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Hie Global 
Edited 

Printed S : mTnt,inwimv 
in Paris, London, Zurich 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 
The Hague and Marseille 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 


Published With Hie New York Times and Tbe W; 


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Israelis 
Agree to 
New Talks 

Lebanese to Hear 
Pullback Plan 
On Thursday 

The Associated Pros 
UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — The Israeli government 
has agreed to a new meeting with 
Lebanese officials to outline a plan 
for a three-phase withdrawal of Is- 
raeli troops from Lebanon, the 
French president of the UN Securi- 
ty Council said Tuesday. 

Claude de Kemonlaria, the 
French represm tarive who is chair- 
ing the 15-nation council for tbe 
month of January, said that the UN 
jecretary-genmJ, Javier Perez de 
Cu£Qar, had informed the Security 
.Council that the meeting would 
take place Thursday in the Leba- 
nese border town of Naqoura. 

The mOitary-levd talks being 
bdd in Naqoura under UN auspic- 
es were broken off by Israel last 
week after negotiators failed to 
make progres. The Israeli cabinet 
thereupon agreed on a unilateral 
•withdrawal plan. 

Mir. Pt&rez de Cndlar met infor- 
mally with the Security Council on 
Tuesday. French sources said he 
told the council that if, in reaction 
to the Israeli plan, the Lebanese 


pioyment erf the United Nations 
peacekeeping force in southern 
Lebanon, he would notify the 
council of the need for action. 

The sources said the secremy- 
genexaTs report was based on a 
telephone conversation he had ear- 
lier Tuesday with Brian E Ur- 
quhart, the UN 



Reagan to Request 
11,7% Reduction 
In Budget for Arts 


general for political affairs. 
Urqnhart 


flew from Jerusalem to 


Yitzhak Shamir 


Beirut on Tuesday in an effort to 
keep lsrodi-Lebanese lines of com- 
munications open on the withdraw- 
al question. 

Mr. Urquhart and his staff have 
worked out contingency plans for 
such things as the movement of UN 
peacekeeping forces into the Sdon 
area to protect Palestinian refugee 
camps there once Israeli troops are 
pulled out. Such a shift would re- 
quire the approval of the Security 
Council. 

A Lebanese diplomatic source, 
speaking privately, said that it 
might be posable for his govern- 
ment to coordinate with Israel on 
the first phase of tbe withdrawal 
without agreeing to the entire plan. 

■ Shamir Criticizes Plan 

Earlier Tuesday, Foreign Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Shamir of Israel 
charged that withdrawal plans did 
not contain minimum security 
guarantees for northern Israel, 
Reuters reported from Tef Aviv. 

Mr. Shamir, who was outvoted 
Monday night when the cabinet 
adopted the plan, told state radio 
that rightists m the government co- 
alition would by to change the 
withdrawal operation. 

Under the plan, Israeli troops in 

(Contmued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


By Robert Pear 

New York Timo Serricr 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan will soon ask Con- 
gress to cut the budget of the Na- 
tional Endowment for the Arts by 
1 1.7 percent, according to adminis- 
tration officials and budget docu- 
ments prepared by tbe arts agency. 

Its programs to support opera, 
music and dance would be cut most 
if Congress approved Mr. Reagan's 
proposal. 

The budget documents show that 
tbe president will request $144.5 
minio n for the arts agency in the 
fiscal year 1986. $500,000 more 
than besought for tbe current fiscal 
year but down from the S163.7 mil- 
lion appropriated by Congress. 

According to die budget docu- 
ments, the program for opera and 
musical theater would be cut by 
I8J percent, to $4.9 million, while 
the music program would be cut 15 
percent, to $13 milli on, and dance 
would be cut 13 2> percent, to $7.7 

mifliri n 

Programs to support the visual 
arts, theater, museums and litera- 
ture would all be cut more than 10 
percent. 

The endowment group is by far 
the largest single source of support 
for the arts in the United States. It 
makes 5,000 grams a year. 

Senator Claiborne Pell, Demo- 
crat of Rhode Island, said when he 
was told of the budget proposal 
that the cuts “would create a finan- 
cial crisis*’ for many cultural insti- 
tutions because “the private sector 
is unable to fill the gap created by 
cuts in federal support.” Mr. PdL 
who helped write the legislation 
creating the endowment in 1965. 
said he would oppose the cuts. 

In the last four years. Congress 
has consistently provided more 


r?r: 


C'Ci.j- 


I Rightist Angeb on U.S. Shoulder 

] Christian Fundamentalism Comes of Political Age 




i LJ 


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j . . By Kathy Sawyer 

j Was hippo* Past Service 

WASHINGTON — In 1980,. 
Ronald Reagan, then a presiden- 
tial candidate, told them, “I en- 
dorse you.” In the years since, 
conservative Christians, com- 
monly called the “religious right” 
or the “new Christian right," have 
settled like an angd of conscience 
on the nation's right shoulder, 
redefining the terms of public de- 
bate. 

of receiving mes- 
tbe Lord as marter-of- 
factiy as those of another Ameri- 
can subculture speak of getting in 
touch with their feelings. 

The spotlight now shines on 
their faith because, unlike tradi- 
tional fundamentalists, who 
shunned politics and concentrat- 
ed rat salvation, the new-style 
conservative Christian activists 
have become involved in the hur- 
ly-burly of secular social and po- 
litical fights. 

With the Reverend Jerry L 
FaJwdTs organization, the Moral 
Majority, in the vanguard, they 
have campaigned for conserva- 
tive candidates and heavily lob- 
bied Congress on a wide range of 
“family issues.” 

They advocate the outlawing of 
abortion, seek stricter laws 
against pornography and oppose 
tbe Equal Rights Amendment 
and bberaliredlaws guaranteeing 
civil rights for homosexuals. They 
are particularly active in educa- 
tion issues, favoring classroom 
prayer, tuition tax credits for pri- 
vate religious schools and oppos- 
ing die busing of children for ra- 
cial balance. 

Conservative Christians readi- 
ly acknowledge that their faith 
makes them suspect in the minds 
of many of their co-workers and 
neighbors, who stereotype their 
kind as bigoted, redneck, often 
illiterate Bible- thumpers out on 
the fringes of American secular 
life. 

In the years following the dyQ 

rights crusades and other social 
upheavals of the 1960s, when it 
haegm» unpopular to speak ill of 
blacks and other minorities, the 
Christia n right remained almost 
the only minority that it was so- 
cially acceptable to ridicule. 

As the nation opens its eyes to 
them in the 1980s, however, it 
finds that they are the family up 
the street, huge in number, di- 
verse and securely entwined in 
" society’s mainstream- 

in the age of hydrogen bombs 
mid computer dating, “born- 
again” Christians who take the 
Bible as God's literal truth ac- 
count for at least one-fifth of the 
US. population, or about 35 mil- 
lion adults, concentrated in the 
'South and rural Midwest actord- 
. mg to polling experts. Most erf 
item, 85 percent by one estimate, 
are while. . 

They subscribe to a rich diver- 
sity of doctrinal interpretations, 
but what unites mart conserva- 
tive Christians is their belief in 
ihe divinity of Jesus Christ and in 
the literal truth of the Bible; their 



President Ronald Reagan, during the 1984 election 
campaign, with a T-shirt that reads: Rim Christian Run. 


“symbol of certitude” from Eden 
to Armageddon. 

In a society groping for an- 
swers in a jungle of moral ambi- 
guity, they seem unambiguously 
certain that they have found “the 
answer.” 

At the core of this movement is 
a “transitional group" of aspiring 
lower- and middle-class families 
oa the move from a traditional 
rural past to the economically 
promising but often terrifying cit- 
ies of the New South, sociologists 
say. 

They look to their new-style 
churches for more than what the 
old Bible Belt churches could 
provide — to serve as a cultural 
bridge; to shelter them and to give 
them voice in a secular BabeL 

Their movement sounds the 
warning that American society, 
founded on tbe revolutionary 
principle of religious freedom, 
has moved beyond the mere sepa- 
ration of church and state to the 
banishment of religion and values 
from public life, a dilemma de- 
scribed starkly by one theologian 
as “the naked public square" 
wbere anything goes. 

“I believe the Judeo-Chnsuan 
ethic is what we’re dealing with 
— not a movement of wild-eyed 
conservatives," said Larry Lea. 
young pastor of the fundamental- 
ist Church on the Rock cast of 
Dallas, one of the fastest growing 
congregations in the country. 


“What has gripped this society is 
a returning to roots.” 

“The coon try is much more 
fundamentalist than I think is 
lerally realized," said George 
3 , the pollster, who took a 
1 interest in religious ques- 
tions. 

According to his polling, 44 
percent “of all tbe people in this 
country believe in creationism — 
that God created man during the 
last 10,000 years. About one- 
third of tbe population can be 
called lileralists who believe the 
Bible is literally true, word for 
word,” he said. “It seems amaz- 
ing, but it’s true." 

Conservative Christians are a 
more complex group than is com- 
monly understood, according to 
those who study them. Defining 
them is not easy because the 
terms are in flux, blurry and over- 
lapping, and are themselves a 
matter of dispute. Many, if you 
ask. simply say they are “good 
Christians.” 

It is impossible to generalize 
without stepping on someone 
rise’s definition, but a sampling 
of religious and political scholars 
outlined several broad types: 

• Fundamentalists: Tend to 
emphasize doctrine and belief, 
read the Bible literally, tradition- 
ally have been uneasy with the 
secular world They include some 
who call themselves “devil sepa- 
(Continned on Page 3, Col 1) 


Belgium 
To Delay 
Missiles 

Reagan Is Told 
Decision Could 
Await Elections 

By John M. Goshko 

Washing: on Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Belgium, in 
a Mow to U.S. hopes of stationing 
medium-range nuclear missiles in 
Europe as quickly as possible, has 
told President Ronald Reagan that 
il wiD not begin deploying its share 
of the missiles in March as planned 
and could delay a decision on de- 
ployment until after the Belgian 
elections in December. 

That, Belgian officials said Tues- 
day. was the upshot of the White 
House meeting Monday at which 
Mr. Reagan failed to convince a 
wavering Pome Minister Wilfried 
Martens to adhere as closely as 
possible to the March deployment 
schedule. 

Instead, Mr. Martens's insis- 
tence that he needs more rimi» to 
make a decision appeared to under- 
cut tbe public assertions of U.S. 
officials that they remained “opti- 
mistic” about Belgium's accep- 
tance of the missiles. 

That left Reagan adminis tration 
officials trying Tuesday to put tbe 
best face on the situation by con- 
tending that there had not been a- 
firm decision to begin Belgian de- 
ployment in March. They also said 
that Mr. Martens had told Mr. 
Reagan that Belgium remained 
committed to NATO’s 1979 deci- 
sion to deploy the missil es by the 
end of 1987 unless the Russians 
agreed to reduce their arsenal 

U.S. officials want fast action by 

and military aid to El Salva- Belgium to show that Washington's 
londuras. Guatemala. Costa partners in the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization are united on 
the missile question, thereby 
strengthening the U.S. hand as it 
prepares for new arms-control ne- 
gotiations with tbe Soviet Union. 

At their Geneva meeting last 
week Secretary of Stale George P. 
Shultz and the Soviet foreign min- 
ister, Andrei A. Gromyko, agreed 
that medium-range ntissfles in Eu- 
rope would be one of the three 
types of weapons covered by the 
talks. The Reagan-Martens meet- 
ing marked the first post-Geneva 
test of NATO’s resolve to press 
ahead with deployment in West era 
Europe of 572 U.S.-made cruise 
and Pershing-2 missiles. 

However, the best that Mr. Rea- 
gan could get was Mr. Manens’s 
promise that his government will 
decide its next move by the end of 
March. Belgian officials said later 
that even if Mr. Martens does set a 
deployment timetable in March, it 
win have to pass debate in the Bel- 
gian parliament. They added (hat 
Mr. Martens might decide to post- 
pone a decision until after the Bel- 
gian national elections scheduled 
for December, 


money than Mr. Reagan requested 
for the arts agency. Members of 
Congress said it was difficult to 
predict what would happen this 
year because there was intense 
pressure to reduce the federal bud- 
get deficit, which is expected to 
exceed $200 billion this year. 

Tbe overall 11.7-percem reduc- 
tion in the arts endowment is com- 
parable to cuts being proposed by 
die administration for other discre- 
tionary spending programs. 

■ Republicans' Wish List 
Margaret Shapiro of The Wash- 
ington Post reported from Washing- 
ton : 

Republicans in the House of 
Representatives, trying to position 
themselves as the party of “new 
ideas,” released cm Monday a 252- 
item wish list for the new Congress 
that endorsed tax simplification, a 
freeze on U.S. contributions to the 
United Nations and a minimum 
length for the school day. 

The Republicans called for a 
constitutional amendment requir- 
ing a balanced budget and substan- 
tial spending cuts, but ruled out 
another two of tbe most commonly 
suggested methods of achieving it 
— tax increases and military 
spending cuts. 

They held out for tax simplifica- 
tion in the form of a modified flat 
tax. But if that fails, the document 
proposes a variety of new tax cred- 
its that would cost the government 
money. These include breaks for 
day care, home care for the elderly, 
and training and hiring of “dis- 
placed homemakers." 

In foreign relations, the Republi- 
can package backed continued fi- 
nancing of rebels fighting tbe leftist 
government of Nicaragua and eco- 
nomic 

dor. Honduras, G uatemal a, Costa 
Rica and “friendly South American 
nations.” 

The Republicans conceded 
Monday that many of the propos- 
als. including dozens pushed un- 
successfully by Mr. Reagan in his 
Iasi four budgets, were likely to go 
nowhere in the House, where Dem- 
ocrats outnumber Republicans 
252-1 SI with an Indiana sea; still 
vacant. 

But the package will show that 
“the Republicans are interested in 
laying claim to new ideas," said 
Representative Jerry Lewis, Re- 
publican of California, chairman of 
the House Republican Research 
Committee, which drafted the 
wide-ranging package. 

In a partisan introduction, the 
Republicans asserted that the “new 
ideas” coming from younger mem- 
bers of the Democratic Party are 
simply “antiques touched up with 
varnish and pit." 

The document, tilled “Ideas for 
Tomorrow; Choices for Today," 
was begun before the November 
elections, when it appeared that the 
Republicans might win enough 
seats to take de facto control of the 
House. 

More moderate than the plat- 
form adopted by the Republican 
Party at its presidential nominating 
convention in August, the docu- 
ment sidesteps the subjects of abor- 
tion and school prayer. At the same 
time, it refers to the United States 
as a “rainbow coalition" — the 
rallying cry used by the Reverend 
Jesse L. Jackson, a Democrat, in his 
presidential p rimar y campaign. 

Mr. Lewis said that some items 
mentioned in the party platform 
were not included in the “Ideas” 
package because, “I didn’t want 
some people' s choice of sensational 
headlines on these controversial is- 
sues to weigh down the effort to 
highlight these new ideas." 

The House minority leader, Rob- 
ert H. Michel erf Illinois, and others 
said that House Republicans were 
unlikely to agree to a freeze this 
year on cost-of-living adjustments 
for the Social Security program of 
retirement benefits and disability 
payments. Senate Republicans are 
considering such a freeze as pan of 
a deficit-reduction package. 

Mr. Reagan, who campaigned 
for re-election on the promise that 
he would not cut Social Security, 
said last week that he would con- 
sider the cost-of-living freeze if it 
were supported by a strong biparti- 
san coalition in Congress. 

Among other proposals in the 
document are: A “pay-as-you-go” 
system that would require that a 
new program have a source of 
funding, such as user fees, or be 
financed by cuts in an existing pro- 
gram; presidential line-item veto 
power over appropriations bills, 
and adoption of the Reagan ad- 
ministration's enterprise zone legis- 
lation. which would provide breaks 
to businesses that locate in de- 
pressed areas. 

On defense, the package pro- 
posed funding for development of 
the Stealth bomber, continued de- 
ployment of the MX nuclear mis- 
sile, upgrading of Minuteman mis- 
siles. research and development of 
the Midgetman missile and acquisi- 
tion of 99 B1 bombers by the 19S8 
fiscal year. 

■ Tax Bills Introduced 
The Senate and House have met 
two days this year, and erf the 528 
bills proposed' in the House and 
(Continued on Page 2. CoL 6) 



T)« Anocnud Press 


Tancredo Neves takes office March 15 as Brazil’s president 

Konak Leader Accuses 
French Envoy in Slaying 


The Associated Pros 

NOUMEA. New Caledonia — 
Tbe leader of the pro-indepen- 
dence movement in this French is- 
land territory accused the authori- 
ties Tuesday of involvement in the 
killing of his security chief. 

Jean-Marie Ijibaou. head of tbe 
Kanak Socialist National Libera- 
tion Front, said that Eloi Machoro 
was “murdered with tbe agree- 
ment” of the French government 
envoy, Edgard Pisani, and the Gen- 
darmerie commander. General 
Jean Deibera 

Mr. Machoro was killed along 
with his aide. Marcel Nonnaro, in 
what police described as a shoot- 
out on Saturday. He was the securi- 
ty chief of the pro visional govern- 
ment declared by the Kanak front 
late last year after it boycotted ter- 
ritorial elections in the' Pacific is- 
land chain. 

The native Kanak. or Melane- 
sian. population is about 40 per- 
cent of New Caledonia's popula- 
tion of 140,000; the rest are 
European, Polynesian and Asian 
immigrants. The settlers generally 
oppose the Kanak demand for in- 
dependence from France. 

Mr. Ijibaou issued a seven-page 
statement demanding a parliamen- 
tary inquiry and judicial proceed- 
ings against “those who gave the 
older to fire, and those who cany 
the responsibility” 

On Monday, the French territo- 
rial authorities charged 37 Melane- 
sians with rebellion. They were ar- 
rested in tbe confrontation in 
which Mr. Machoro was killed. 

Mr. Machoro was buried Tues- 
dav near the town of Thio in a 


ceremony attended by about 600 
people and an armed honor guard. 
The official report on the confron- 
tation, which occurred at a remote 
farmhouse occupied by Mr. Ma- 
choro and about 40 followers, said 
that marksmen of a special Gen- 
darmerie intervention squad had 
been told to aim only to wound 
them in the shoulder. 

Late Monday, four fishing boats 
were dynamited at a port near 
Thio. The boats were owned by 
Thio's European mayor and had 
been “requisitioned" by the inde- 
pendence movement since last No- 
vember. 

Mr. Tjibaou's statement did not 
reject negotiations over the future 
erf the islands, but said that the 
front “will remain inflexible on the 
return of the sovereignly of the 
Kanak people in its land." He said 
that Mr. Priini’i recent p!»n for a 
referendum on independence in as- 
sociation with France was “com- 
promised by the fact its author has 
a smell of blood on his hands.” 

Before Mr. Tjibaou's statement, 
Mr. Pisani's office denied a claim 
by independence supporters that 
the envoy had promised the anti- 
independence party that Mr. Ma- 
choro would be ones ted to com- 
pensate for the murder last week of 
a 17-year-old while. 

Mr. Pisani ordered a curfew and 
state of emergency Saturday in re- 
sponse to the rioting that followed 
the killing of the teen-ager and the 
two Melanesians. On Tuesday, he 
eased the curfew hours in response 
to complaints of hotel and restau- 
rant owners of poor business. 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


Neves 
Elected 
In Brazil 

New President 
Promises Reform 
Of Constitution 

By Jackson Diehl 

Washington Post Service 

BRASILIA — Tan credo Neves, 
the opposition candidate, won elec- 
tion Tuesday as Brazil's first civil- 
ian president after 21 years of mili- 
tary rule. 

The country’s Electoral College, 
in a 34-hour session, gave Mr. Ne- 
ves 480 votes to 180 for the only 

BrazfPs granrifatheriy new pres- 
ident has always steered a 
course of conciliation. Page 3. 

other candidate. Paulo Salim Ma- 
luf, 53. of the military-backed So- 
cial Democratic Party. Twenty 
electors in the 686-seat body were 
absent, and six voided their votes. 

.Mr. Neves, 74, a congressman 
and a prime minister in the Iasi 
democratic government before the 
military’s 1964 coup, was elected 
formally to a six-year term and mil 
retain the exceptional powers held 
by President Joio Bapusta Figudr- 
edo. 

However, Mr. Neves promised 
Tuesday to promote a constituent 
assembly to reform the constitution 
and is expected to convoke direct 
popular elections for a successor in 
1988. “1 call you to a great constitu- 
tional debate,” be said in a speech 
following the vote. “We acted with- 
in the imposed rules exactly so as to 
revoke them and destroy them." 

Mr. Neves, a centrist leader of 
die B razilian Democratic Move- 
ment Party, was supported by an 
alliance of opposition parties as 
well as dozens of defectors from the 
government party. 

In his speech after the vote in the 
central chamber of the Congress. 
Mr. Neves described his victory as 
the product of a national consensus 
and promised a reformist govern- 
ment. 

“I come in the name cf concilia- 
tion," he said. “I came to promote 
change, politic! ci’nc-: 
change, social change — real, effec- 
tive, courageous, irreversible 


fore the Electoral College be- 
gan voting, Mr. Maiuf told the as- 
sembly that he fell “victorious be- 
cause my candidacy guaranteed the 
democratic process.” 

Brazil's 130 million people had 
no direct participation in the elec- 
tion. The outgoing military govern- 
ment. which permitted open con- 
gressional elections in 1982. 
refused to accept a popular vote for 
president- The Electoral College U 
made up of members of Congress 
and delegates from state legisla- 
tures. 

But Mr. Neves’ candidacy ap- 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Supreme Court Expands 
Power to Search Pupils 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Tbe 


U.S. 

use 


Supreme Court, calling drug 
and violent oime in public schools 
“major social problems,” gave 
school officials Tuesday more legal 
power to search students. 

The court ruled, 6-3, that public 
school teachers and administrators 
do not need court warrants nor the 
same justifications that police offi- 
cers need before searching a stu- 
dent. 

Searches of students are justified 
“when there are reasonable 
grounds for suspecting that the 
search wiD turn up evidence that 
the student has violated or is violat- 
either the law or the rules of the 
Justice Byron R. White 
wrote for the court 

One of the dissenters. Justice 
John Paul Stevens, said tbe deci- 
sion allowed searches for “even the 
most trivial school regulation.” 

“For the court," Justice Stevens 
said, “a search for curlers and sun 
glasses in order to enforce the 
school dress code is apparently just 
as important as a search for evi- 
dence of heroin addiction or vio- 
lent gang activity." 

The court unanimously ruled 
thai school officials, like police of- 
ficers, must adhere to the U.S. Con- 
stitution’s ban on unreasonable 
searches and seizures. In other 
words, students have some consti- 
tutionally protected privacy rights. 

But six members, led by Justice 
White, said that teachers do not 
have to meet the “probable cause” 
standard that is applied when a 
court judges whether a police 
search was reasonable. 

“The substantial need of teach- 
ers and administrators for freedom 
to maintain order in ihe schools 
does not require strict adherence to 
the requirement that searches be 
based on probable cause to believe 
that the subject of the search has 
violated or is violating the law," 
Justice White said. 

“Rather, the legality’ ot a search 


of a student should depend simply 
era the reasonableness, under aB the 
circumstances, of the search,” be 
said. 

The court cautioned school offi- 
cials against “excessively intrusive” 
searches. 

Justice White noted that “main- 
taining order in tbe classroom has' 
never been easy.” He added that in 
recent years “school disorder has 
often taken particularly ugly 
forms: Drag use and violent crimes 
in tbe schools have become major 
social problems." 

Prior to Tuesday’s ruling, many 
school officials had expressed the 
hope it would strengthen the posi- 
tion of teachers to maintain disci- 
pline in schools. Nmneroos school 
systems, especially those in big cit- 
ies, have adopted random searches, 
the use of metal detectors, and, in 
some cases, strip searches to seek 
out weapons and drugs. 

The violence appeared to reach a 
peak in the late 1970s, the National 
Education Association reported 
last year. A U.S. government study 
in 1978 showed that 282,000 stu- 
dents and 2J00 teachers were as- 
saulted in school each month. 

Although figures show a decline 
in school violence after that year, 
the problem has continued, espe- 
cially in large cities. 

Tuesday’s ruling reinstated a de- 
linquency finding against a former 
Piscataway, New Jersey, high 
school student who four years ago, 
at the age of 14, admitted to selling 
marijuana to Mow students. 

Ait assistant vice principal found 
the marijuana while searching the 
girl's purse after she was caught 
smoking cigarettes in a school rest 
room. The girl eventually was tried 
as a juvenile, found to be delin- 
quent and sentenced to one year 
probation. 

The New Jersey Supreme Court 
overturned the delinquency find- 
ing, after ruling that the girl's con- 


stitutional rights 
able searches had 


t unreason- 
violated. 


INSIDE 



Tha Anocxned ?rau 

GOOD NEWS FOR THATCHER — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher carried a newspaper Tuesday re- 
porting that the pound rallied. She dismissed charges 
that her government mishandled the crisis. Page 9. 

■ Angola asked the United Nations for refief to saw 627,000 victims of 

drought and war. Page 3. 

■ Senator Helms's cal for a stock takeover of CBS is seen as unlikely 
to bring conservative pressure on the coverage of news. Page S. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ U 5. industrial production increased 0.6 percent last month, the 

largest rise in the last five months, but retailers recorded a 0. 1-percent 
decline in sales, the first in four months. Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

Computer science is becoming such a popular major at U.S. colleges 
that some schools must limit admissions. 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL lTEBAI.n TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1983 


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France Plans Private Television System Similar to Britain’s 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Bowing to increasing public pressure, 
President Francois Mitterrand is expected to an- 
nounce on Wednesday how he plans to establish 
commercial television stations to compete with the 
three state-controlled charm pic 

The aim is to establish a system similar to that in 
Britain, where both public and private television 
operate. 

Mr. Mitterrand disclosed at J an. 4 his intention to 
permit private groups to establish televirion opera- 
tions but provided no details. He was expected to be 
questioned about the issue during a Wednesday televi- 
sion interview devoted to domestic issues. 

According to senior government officials, Mr. Mit- 
tenand’s decision was a response to pressures from 
within his cabinet, from large media interests, munici- 
palities and illegal “pirate 5 * television stations that 
nave proliferated throughout France. 

Establishment of a private sector in television, would 
be the first step in ending die state monopoly over 
French television established after World War IL It 
follows the government's decision in ] 982 that allowed 
about 1,000 private radio stations to operate alongside 
the state-controlled radio network. 

There has been increasing pressure to free French 
radio and television from government controls. On 
Dec. 8, about 100,000 young people demonstrated 
against a temporary ban on operations of some private 
FM radio stations in Paris. **11 showed us how sensi- 
tive the issue is.” said a media adviser to Mr. 
Mitterrand. 


Many private television stations already have trans- 


mitted programs illegally but have been dosed down 
quickly by police. The private groups seek the estab- 
lishment of local, regional or national networks that 


would rdy on advertising revenue. 

Although many details have not been decided, the 
government plans a system under which both private 
and government-controlled television could operate, 
possibly as eady as next year. 

“From the president on down, we are decided on 
deregulating and creating a place for the private sector 
in French TV," said the Mitterrand adviser, adding 
that the model was Britain's system. 

The British Broadcasting Corp. was granted a mo- 
nopoly over radio broadcasting in Britain in 1927 and 
it later was extended to cover television. That monop- 
oly was ended in 1 955 when the government permitted 
the establishment of the Independent Television Au- 
thority, an association of regional independent sta- 
tions. Private radio stations were allowed to begin 
operations in the early 1970s. 

“What we still do not know is how to bring it all 
together,” said an adviser to Prime Minister Lament 
Fab ius. The adviser emphasized that the government . * Canal Phis, the 
wanted to maintain its “historical" role in television, channel, also 

The French government plans to maintain three 
networks under state control and continue support for 
several government-backed projects, such as the build- 
ing of a new television satellite and a 60-biIlion-franc 
($6. 18 billion) plan to provide cable service to at least 
four million homes, hotels, banks and other outlets in 
the 1990s. 


The plan-cable would provide subscribers with ac- 
cess to computerized information services and a dozen 
more television c hann els, which are expected to be 
both public and private. 

An indication that the government plans to proceed 
slowly surfaced on Monday when Mr. Fab ius said be 
was naming a lawyer and consultant, Jean-Denis Bre- 
din, to prepare a study on privatization. Mr. B redin is 
expected to submit his mnwnmpn.ia»irw n within three 
months. 

“We are not rushing into this plan because there are 
certain 'risks and uncertainties we want to examine 
thoroughly first," the Fabius adviser said. 

The official noted that the government still planned 
to launch in July 1986 a satellite that would be able to 
transmit programs over three new television channels, 
two of than government-controlled and one private. 

However, one of the participants, Ge. Television 
Luxembourgoise, a private television company based 
in Luxembourg, has threatened to withdraw from the 
satellite project if the government allows a private 
n ati onal network. CTL then would become a candi- 
date for one of the new private stations. 

t-backed pay television 
become a candidate should the 
government allow a network financed by advertising. 
Canal Plus, established as a fourth station last Novem- 
ber, is financed directly by subscribers. 

This could mean giving up what we have worked so 
hard to obtain,” said one Canal Plus executive, “but 
the fact that new advertising would be involved has 
changed a lot of the thinking " 


Under the current system, the government restricts 
advertising revenues of the three state-controlled net- 
works to about 27 percent of their annual financial 
resources. Last year, that totaled almost 3 billion 
francs. 

Advertising executives estimate that if French tele- 
vision were privatized, that amount would double or 
possibly triple. Government officials said the volume 
would increase so that advertising now going to the 
three government channel would not be affected. 

“There is enormous, unexploited potential, and 
most of our clients, incl uding big mnltinationals, are 
interested in taking advantage of what the government 
may be planning,” said Robot Ap taker, vice president 
ana general manager of Marsieller SA, the French 
subsidiary of Mars teller Inc„ a large U.S. advertising 
agency. “But we would first like to ' 
government is planning specifically.” 

About 50 cities, including Paris, have requested 
government permission to establish local private sta- 
tions. Many of the cities already have established joint 
venture companies with private interests, mainl y pub- 
lishing companies and banks, that want to develop 
programs and advertising for the new stations. 

Several dozen small pirate stations could embarrass 
the government, particularly with the approach of 
parliamentary elections in the spring of 1986, if they 
resume transmission. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Beijing Student Dispute Is Resolved 

BEUING (AFP) — Authorities at a Beijing university have announced 
a compromise with students on a dispute over educational stipends that 
bad led students to defy a ban on putting up wall posters. 

Observers said the university’s response to the protest was consistent 
with a slight loosening of controls on the freedom of expression that has 
followed recent economic reforms. 

The student protest centered on the university’s carrying out of an 
Education Ministry directive rirntmating monthly stipends of 18 yuan 
(slightly more than $6) during winter scud summer breaks. Under the 
compromise, some of the money saved by the etimmation of the stipends 
will go to needy students. 

Taiwan Arrests Own Agents in Killing 

TAIPEI (Reuters) — Taiwan announced Tuesday it had arrested an 



Last of Asylum-Seekers 
Leave Prague Embassy 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

BONN — The last six of as many 
as 160 East Germans who occupied 
West Germany's embassy in 
Prague in an attempt to gain pas- 
sage to the West abandoned men- 
s' t-in Tuesday and returned home 
by train. 

Their departure, which came a 
day before an offer of immunity 
from prosecution by East German 
authorities was to expire, ended a 
fonr-montb ordeal that frustrated 
and embarrassed the governments 
of both Gennanys. 

Heinrich Wradden, Bonn’s min- 
ister for intra-German relations, 
said that he now expected East 
Germany to relax curbs on exit 
visas for hundreds of thousands of 
East Germans reportedly seeking 
to emigrate. 

He added that those who partici- 
pated in the occupation would be 
allowed to go to the West “within a 
reasonable period.'’ 

More than 35,000 East Ger mans 
were permitted to go to the West 
last year, far more than at any time 
since die Beilin Wall was built in 
1961. But the pace of emigration 
slowed drastically in recent months 
as the East Goman government 
emphasized its determination to re- 
solve the embassy siege without 
bowing to the refugees 5 demands 
far guaranteed exit visas. 

Wolfgang Vogel, an East Berlin 
lawyer who acted as a mediator on 
behalf of Erich Honecker, the East 
German leader, said Tuesday that 
the six remaining East Germans 
left the Prague embassy “of their 
own free wfll” and wifl apply to 
emigrate through legal channels. 


He warned against any new oc- 
cupations. 

“I warn very solemnly and em- 
phatically against any kind of an 
attempt at repetition,” said Mr. 
Vogel, who has handled most refu- 
gee transactions for his govern- 
ment “No one shall be able to 
reproach me for not having made 
tins sufficiently dear.” 

West German offi cials have re- 
peatedly urged East Germans not 
to occupy diplomatic missions. 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's govern- 
ment has issued frequent appeals 
on West German tdevisoo, which 
reaches about 70 percent of East 
Germany’s 17 millio n citizens, con- 
tending that such actions jeopar- 
dize orderly emigration and strain 
the delicate ties between the two 
German ys. 

Last year, more than 60 East 
Germans obtained exit visas by oc- 
cupying the UK Embassy and the 
West German diplomatic mission 
in East Berlin. 

In October, the Bonn govern- 
ment declared that it was dosing its 
embassy in Prague because the 
building was fuIL 

West German officials attribut- 
ed the rush into the Prague embas- 

L to fears among East Gomans 
t legal emigration channels were 
about to be dosed. 

West German officials said that 
more than 350 East Germans 
passed through the Prague embassy 
during the four-month occupation, 
with new arrivals replacing those 
who eventually left. 

The West German government 
does not recognize a separate East 
German nationality, offering a 
passport and citizenship to all Ger- 
mans. 



the bead of the agency. General Wang Hsi-fing, in connection with the 
murder of a dissident Taiwanese author in Calif ornia last year. 

The government did not disdose how many agents woe being hebL It 
said a special committee had been set up to investigate the agency, which 
is subordinate to the Defease Ministry. 

Hairy Liu, who frequently criticized Taiwan's president, Quang 
Chiug-kuo, was shot by three persons outside his home in Daly, Calif or- 
nia, OcL 15. The statement sard, “The government is deeply shocked by 
the involvement of our intelligence officials in Liu's murder.'’ 

“What are we going to do in the next few months if 

SflSl 16 Sanctuary Activists Indicted m U.S. 

afford to do that” TUCSON, Arizona (AP) — Sixteen people, including a Protestant 

minister, two Roman Catholic priests and three nuns, were charged 

Monday in a federal indictment with conspiring to transport illegal aftens 
from Centra] America in an effort to provide them sanctuary in the 
United States. 

The church-sponsored sanctuary movement, which began in Tucson 
and has spread across the United States, has worked to bring Central 
American refugees, mainly from El Salvador and Guatemala, into the 
country. 

Members of the movement contend that the 1980 Refugee Act allows 
legal asylum for refugees who are fleeing political oppression and 
violence. The U.S. govermnait contends that most people leaving those 
countries do so for economic reasons and thus are ineligible for special 
status. 

TORUN, Poland — An Interior 

Ministry general implicated in a __ ■ f-irj * _• n i» rj im- 

possible cover- op after the murder Wftfit Iwfi FiflRTlS rilft Ailtl-rP. rsniTIg oflI( 

JSS KARLSRUHE, West Germany (UPI) — Six persons filed suit in West 
has been summoned to testify at Germany’s hi^mst court Tuesday, alleging that the UK-made Pershing-2 

nnrl^ ar missile is a danger to civ ilians 
Prompted by Friday’s accident with a Pershing rocket in which three 
UK soldiers were Hired, they filed a joint suit with the Constitutional 
Court in Karlsruhe saying toe weapon contravenes the constitutional 
provision that every citizen enjoy “inviolability” and “the right to Me.” 
A Bremen law professor. Wolfgang Daub lex, said tire suit, brought by 
four lawyers, a judge and a policeman, was based on the safety record of 
the Pershing-2 He said he would argue that the rocket posed the same 
danger to civilians as an unsafe nuclear power station. A U.S. Army 
spokesman on Monday said the cause of the accident at a training ground 
north of Stuttgart was an unexplained spontaneous ignition of a motor. 


Polish Court 
Calls General 
For Evidence 


Reuse 


a U.S. Army 


_ outside 

Communist Cells' claimed responsibility. 


the trial of four security police ac- 
cused in the killing, court sources 
said Tuesday. 

Evidence is to be heard Thursday 
from General Zenon Platek, who 
has not been charged but has been 
suspended as bead of the depart- 
ment in which the four accused 
men worked. 

Colonel A dam Pietruszka, who 
denies instigating the abduction 
and murder of the Roman Catholic 
priest, told the Tonm court on 

dSriScw&SrKteS CIA Analyst Defends CBS Program 

the investigation. 

The allegations against General 
Platek have not been made report- 
ed by the Polish media. 

Colonel Pietruszka also is ac- 








German and French Guerrilla Groups 
Announce Joint AndrNA TO 'Front 9 


cused of trying to cover up the 
killing, Three security police offi- 
cers under his command. Cap tain 
Gizcgorz Piotzowski, lieutenant 
Leszek Pekala and Lieutenant Wal- 
demar Chmidewslti, are charged 
with premeditated murder. 


Reusers 

PARIS — Two major urban 
guerrilla groups in France and 
west Germany are joining forces 
with the aim of attacking North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization tar- 
gets, according to a document re- 
ceived here Tuesday. 

In a statement sent to Renters in 
Paris, the two groups. West Gtama- 


U.S. Tracking Israelis Agree to New Talks; 
Big Satellite Beirut to Hear Pullback Plan 


From Soviet 

By Wayne Biddle 

Sew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union recently launched one of the 
largest satellites in the history of its 
space program, a device that re- 
quired special tracking efforts by 
the UK Air Force, according to a 
spokeswoman for the North Amer- 
ican Aerospace Defense Com- 
mand. 

The spokeswoman, Kay Cor- 
mier. said Monday that the air 
force “had to bring in extra special- 
ists" to follow the satellite after its 
launching on Sept. 28. She said that 
there was no precedent for the ex- 
tensive maneuvering the satellite 
accomplished once in orbiL 

“We assume it was launched on a 
Proton booster,” said Marcia 
Smith, an expat on Soviet space 
programs at the Congressional Re- 
search Service of the Library of 
Congress. The Proton rocket is the 
largest operational Russian boost- 
er, capable of lifting 50,000- pound 
(22,700-lrilogram) cargoes into low 
orbits around the Earth. 

The U.S. space shuttle can put 
about 32,000 pounds into a posi- 
tion similar to that reached by the 
Proton-launched satellite in Sep- 
tember. The Proton is comparable 
to the Titan-3 boosters used by the 
UK Air Force to launch communi- 
cations and reconnaissance satel- 
lites. 

Mrs. Connia said that the Soviet 
satellite, designated Cosmos-1603, 
is in a roughly circular orbit about 
528 miles (852 kilometers) high. Its 
orbit is inclined 71 degrees from 
the Equator, she said, which would 
enable it to make frequent passes 
ova the United States. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
western Lebanon would pull back 
from (be A wall River to positions 
in the Litani-Nabatiyeh region, 
about 15 kilometers (9 miles) from 
ihe border, within five weeks. They 
would give up the populous Sktan 
area, scene of almost daily hit-and- 
run attacks on the army. 

On Monday, two Israeli soldiers 
were killed in bomb attacks in the 
south, bringing Israel’s total losses 
to 607 dead since it invaded Leba- 
non in June 1982 
■ Gemayd Meets Russian 

President Amm Gemayel of Leb- 
anon invited the Soviet ambassa- 
dor, Alexander Soldatov, for a 
working lunch Tuesday, hours be- 
fore discussing security arrange- 
ments for southern Lebanon with 

Weicker Arrested 
At Protest on Bias 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Senator 
Lowell P. Weicker Jr„ Republican 
of Connecticut, apparently became 
cm Monday Lbe first UK senator 
ever arrested for an act of dvfl 
disobedience. He was one of five 
people arrested at a demonstration 
outside the South African Embassy 
to protest that country’s policies erf 
racial segregation. 

“Apartheid exists not because erf 
a few Sooth African political lead- 
os," raid Mr. Weicker. “It exists 
because a whole world, and that 


United Nations officials, United 
Press International reported from 
Beirut. 

Lebanese government sources 
said the Gemayd-Soldatov meet- 
ing, while planned before Israel an- 
nounced a decision to withdraw 
from southern Lebanon, would 
concentrate on “bilateral relations, 
regional developments and condi- 
tions in the occupied territories." 

■ Moderate Shiite Shun 

A Suite Moslem resident of 
southern Lebanon who advocated 
cooperation with Israeli occupa- 
tion forces was killed Tuesday in 
his Iiwm in Nabatiyeh, according 
Israels state radio. The Assodatea 
Press reported from Td Aviv. 

The man, identifi ed as Is mail 
Zero, was shot at dose range by 
several people who entered his 
home, toe radio said. In an inter- 
view with the radio last week, Mr. 
Zein said that if Israeli troops pull 
out of Nabatiyeh, violence will 
erupt among feuding Lebanese fac- 
tions, the report said. 

■ Egypt Welcomes Withdrawal 

raelPSedsion to withdraw from 
Lebanon as a “step forward on the 
right track,” and hoped it was not 
just cosmetic, UPI reported from 
Cairo. 

Foreign Minister Esmat Abdel 
Meguid said that Egypt hoped the 
decision would “allow the Leba- 
nese government to spread its con- 
trol over all tbe Lebanese territo- 
ries.” 


ay’s Red Army Faction and 
France’s Direct Action, said they 
were forming a joint “political-mil- 
itary front in Western Europe" 
with NATO as its main target 

An officer of the Criminal Bri- 
gade at Paris police headquarters, 
which is responsible for keeping 
track of urban guerrilla activities, 
said he had not heard of tbe state- 
ment but added: “It certainly is of 
great interest to us. We will be 
checking further.” He declined to 
say more. 

The Red Army Faction and Di- 
rect Action have daimed respons- 
bOzcy for several murders and gun 
and bomb attacks in their respec- 
tive countries in the past several 
years, mostly against Western de- 
fense personnel and installations. 
The Red Army Faction also has 
targeted bankers and businessmen; 
Direct Action has attacked rightists 
and Israeli^. 

The German group's activity was 
at its most intense in the 1970s, 
when Harms- Martin Schleyer, a 
West German business leader, was 
kidnapped and killed; Jflrgen 
Panto, head of the Dresdner Rank, 
was shot to death, and a Lufthansa 
Airlines plane was hijacked to 
Mogadishu, Somalia. 

Direct Action came to promi- 
nence in France in 1980 with a 
series of attacks against govern- 
ment buddings, and more recently, 
bomb attacks in Paris. 

Police have defined occasional 
links between various guerrilla 
groups in Western Europe, but 


NEW YORK (LAT) — A former GA analyst, Sam Adams, has told a 
UK jury here that General William G Westmoreland caused a “massive 
falsification” of intelligence during the Vietnam War by imposing a 
ceiling upon the numbers of enemy troops. 

Ending two days of testimony Monday as a witness for CBS in tbe 
retired general’s libel suit, Mr. Adams insirted that tbe network’s disput- 
ed 1982 documentary, “The Uncounted Enemy: A Vietnam Deception,” 
was a careful and “accurate reflection of what went on.” 

The in telligence community, he said, tried to fool the American people 
about the strength of UK adversaries in Vietnam, but “wound upf 
ooradves. It explains in part bow we managed to lose this war." The < 
documentary in 1882 contended that General Westmoreland, as UK 
troop commander in Vietnam, was part of a conspiracy to underestimate 
enemy strength so it would appear that tire war was going better for the” 
United States than was the case. 


Father Popieluszlo, a leading 
. supporter of the banned Solidarity 

al public declaration of an in ten- free trade union, was kidnapped 

turn to join forces. near Tonm on OcL 19. His body - . 

. “Attacks againrt the multina- was found in the Vistula River 11 ito o • j . _ A TUT i* — 

tional structures of NATO, again st days lata. An autopsy showed that LJ ufllu lO ilflll AlQ tO JilOZBlllDKIUC 
its bases and its stratemes. amunxt be h^l strangled _ WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is opening a ‘limited" 

Tl cou £ ” ard f , wtdence military aid relationship with Mozambique, reflecting what nffidah say ; - 

a ??? ta P' OTm >“* k U.S. relations with Ac coontty over the pS 


Tuesday’s statement was an unnso- complices. 


its bases and its strategies, against 
its plans and Its propaganda, con- 
stitute tbe first large rnobilizatioa," 
the statement said. 

In October, a Belgian group call- 
ing itself the Fi ghting C ommunis t 
Cells daimed responsibility for 
several bomb attacks against com- 
panies it said were involved in pro- 
ducing U.S. cruise and Pershmg-2 
nuclear missiles. 

In Bonn, an Interior Ministry 
spokesman said that security ex- 
perts assumed there was coopera- 
tion between international terrorist 
but he said he had no 
of a specific link be- 
tween the French and West Ger- 
man organizations. 

■ U.S. Bmkfing Bombed 

Tbe Fighting Co mmunis t Cells 
daimed responsibility for a car 
bomb explosion Tuesday that 
heavily damaged a UK. Army sup- 
port building less than a mile from 
NATO headquarters. The Associ- 
ated Press reported in Brussels. 

Police said that two UK military 
police guards were slightly injured 
by flying glass. Tbe bombing was 
the eighth in Belgium in four 
months. 

In a statement received by the 
Brussels newspaper Le Soir, the 
group claimed links with the Red 
Army Faction and warned of fur- 
ther actions that could “wound or 
kill Yankee military and their ac- 


Piotrowski that enabled the kid- 
nappers’ cars to escape search 
when stopped by the police. Father 
Popieluszko’s body had been 
placed in the car trunk 

Colonel Pietruszka denies issu- 
ing the pass to the group before 
they set out on their mission. 

Miroslaw Wronsli Colonel Pie- 
tniszka's driver, said he gave the 
pass to Captain Piotrowski on OcL 

son from Colonel Pkuus^ 11 ^ 
informed the colonel lata, while 
driving him in Warsaw, and did not 
see his reaction, Mr. Wronski said. 

“Perhaps he didn't hear me,” he 
told the court. 

Mr. Wronski said tbe colonel 
never uttered approval or disap- 
proval of his action and it was nev- 
er discussed between them before 
Colonel Pietruszka's arrest on Nov. 
2 


two years. 

UK officials, who spoke only on condition they not be identified, said 
that the administration is planning $1 milli on in nonlethal military 
assistance for Mozambique in the 1985 fiscal year and an additional 
$150,000 for training Mozambican military forces. 

“We seek to develop a limite d military relationship with Mozam- • ~ 
bique," said Robert Bruce, a spokesman in the UK Stale Department’s 
bureau of African affairs. Until recently, the forma Portuguese colony 
was considered a loyal ally of Moscow. ' 

For the Record 

Yuri Kolesnikov, an aide to the (stand attach^ at the Soviet Embassy in V •' 
Madrid, has been expelled from Spain, sources at the Foreign Affaire ^ ‘ 
Ministry said Tuesday. They gave no reasons for his expulsion. (AP) 

Tbe world chess champon, Anatoli Karpov, and his challenge, Gary 
Kasparov, agreed Tuesday to a draw in the 41st game of Lheir ma tch. Mr. ... r J 
Karpov, who leads 5-1, needs only one more victory to retain the C. ■■ 
championship. Play is to resume Wednesday. (AP) 

A Senate etiacs panel report Tuesday cleared Senator Mark O. Hal- 
field. Republican of Oregon, of any wrongdoing in his wife’s acceptance .3 

l Tsakos, saying “not one witness" 


fetian 


of $55,000 from a Greek financier, 
testified there was corruption involved. 


(UPI) \ 


Arts Fund Cut Neves Elected in Brazil, Vows 
To Be Sought To Reform the (institution 


includes us, tolerates it by silence. 

He said there was no difference 

between the silence that “eavdops” t/lSL Seeks to Ban Drugs 
the plight of black South Africans 


domerget ®iuber£itp 
Jntepenbrm 

Somerset Unrwustty ts Britain ’s first 
independent urivererty to offer 
Bachelor. Master and Doctoral 
degrees bi most subjects by 
dbtanoe learning. 

For a prospectus send S8 
to the Registrar 



and the sflence “which wasted yes- 
terday’s European Jew ” 

The liberal Republican senator 
was charged with demonstrating 
within 500 feet (152 meters) of an 
ibassy, a misdemeanor. More 
m 650 p< 


em 

than 650 people — including 16 
Democratic members of the House 


To Restore Hair, Libido 

Washington Poet Service 

WASHINGTON — The Food 
and Drug Administration has pro- 
posed a ban on tbe sale of all non- 
prescription drag products sold to 
prevent or reverse baldness. It 


Tourism Grows in Northern Ireland 
Despite IRA Activity, Board Says 

The Assodwed Press 

BELFAST — Tourism has become (me of the few growing indus- 
tries in Northern Ireland despite the violent struggle of the outlawed 
Irish Republican Army against British rule, according to the Tourist 
Board. 

More than one million visitors are expected in 1985, compared with 
940,000 last year, tbe board said Sunday. About 430,000 of all the 
visitors in 1984 were from the Irish Republic, south of the border 
partitioning the island, and 400,000 were from the British mainland. 

A board spokesman said that American tourists to Ireland who 
were previously too frightened to travel north now are crossing the 
border “in coachloads. 

He said that 60,000 Americans and Canadians visited Northern 


□one and once visitors sample what this country has to offer, they 
keep corning bade." . 


called the produas an “area of ccn- 
°f R ^r^tatives — have been sida ^ ble \ xmsimcr fraud,” and 
arrested in Washington and else- 


where since protests against apart- 
heid began at the embassy on Nov. 
21 . 



PorUtokJ 

HbumayouaWyloi 
Bachelors MASTER son doctorate 
Send delated resumd 
for a Tree evaluation. 
PAoncwESTBwuNfvstsrnr 

WNQ*«ntiimSM «•«! Enow QU.9M3BUSA 


said that there is no scientific evi- 
dence that such lotions and creams 
work. 

In a separate action, the FDA is 
seeking to halt the sales of drags 
sold as aphrodisiacs without pre- 
scription, saying that such prodocts 

have not been proven safe and ef- 
fective. It urged those suffering 
from “decreased libido and im- 
paired sexual perfonnanoe” to seek 
professional treatment rather titan 
to “sdf-medlcate." 


Soviet Media Focuses on Chernenko 

MOSCOW (Reuters} — The Soviet press kept President Konstantin U. 
Chernenko before the public Tuesday after tire postponement erf a 
meeting of the leaders of tbe Warsaw Fact renewed diplomatic specula- 
tion about tbe state of his health. 

All the main, dailies gave front-page prominence to the foreword to a 
Polish edition of writings by Mr. Chernenko. The foreword to Mr. 
Chernenko's book, “Questions of the Work of the Parry and State 
Apparatus" was also carried fully by Tass and was tbe lead item in 
Monday’s television news. 

Western diplomats said Mr. Chernenko's health seemed the only likely 
reason for Monday's announcement that the meeting, doe to hftgin 
Tuesday in Sofia, had been put off indefinitely. Tbe Soviet leader, who is 
73. is thought to have emphysema, and doctors said he has been advised 
to avoid severe oold and trips by plane. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

194 in the Senate, at least one- 
quarter are tax measures, Tbe As- 
sociated Press reported from 
Washington. 

Almost all of the bills would add 
or expand tax deductions, exemp- 
tions or credits. Some would allow 
a deduction or credit for buying a 
smoke detector, for donating 
blood, or to offset increases in 
property taxes and utility bills for 
people aged 62 and older. 

Stdl other bills would permit 
people to set aside up to $2000 a 
year in tax-free accounts drat could 
be used wily to -buy homes, would 
exclude tips from taxable income 
and would repeal the highway-use 
tax on heavy trucks. 

U.S. to Appoint Experts 
To Monitor UNESCO 

The Associated Press 

PARIS — The UK secretary of 
state, George P. Shultz, will shortly 
appoint a panel of private citizens 
to assess and report on tire United 
Nations Educational, Scientific 
and Cultural Organization, said 
Gregory J. Newell, assistant secre- 
tary of state for tmernational orga- 
nizations. on Tuesday. 

Mr. Newell said the pawfl, of six 
to right experts, would join with a 
six-member UK observer mission 
to work with memba states and tbe 
secretariat to bring about chang es 
in UNESCO programs and opera- 
tions. The United States withdrew 
from UNESCO cm Dec. 31. 


FBtSONALmES PLUS 

MAAY BUIHKE 

IN THE WEEKS'© SECTION 


(Continued from Page 1) 
peered to have strong public sup- 
port. Noisy street celebrations be- 
gan early Tuesday morning and 
continued throughout the day in 
cities and towns across tbe country 
as citizens gathered to watch televi- 
sion broadcasts abort the ejection. 

General Figueiredo, 67, author 
of a plan to gradually phase out 
military rule in Brazil, followed the 
voting from a hospital bed in Rio 
de Janeiro, where he was recover- 
ing from a back operation. 

Mr. Neves telephoned the presi- 
dent and said, “Thank you for 
making this day possible.” General 
Figueiredo replied, “I congratulate 
you oa your victory.” 

Leaders of the armed forces, wbo 
originally designed the electoral 
college system as a way of preserv- 
ing control ova Brazil’s federal 
government fa another six years, 
said they will accept the opposition 
victory and end their rule when Mr. 
Neves is inaugurated March 15. 

The new government has prom- 
ised not to investigate corruption 
or human rights abuses of the long 
military administration. Armed 
forces leaders are expected to re- 
tain substantial influence ova ar- 
eas of the state administration, 
ranging from anus manufacturing 
to mmimmieatinn^ that are con- 
sidered important to national secu- 
rity. 

Mr. Neves will lake command of 
the world's fifth largest country at a 
time of mexterate economic growth 
after three years of recession. How- 
ever, he will be faced with manag- 
ing the developing world’s largest 
foreign debt, now ovorSlOO bflhoa, 
and inflation that has readied an 
annual rate of 220 percent. 


until now with con- 
structing the broadest possible alli- 
ance and electoral college, Mr. Ne- 
ves has outlined his program of 
government only in general terms. 
However, many politicians and 
diplomats here expect him to con- 
duct a moderate administration 
that w£H attempt few major reforms 
or fundamentally alter the mili - 
taiys policy of stale-directed de- 
velopment 

During his campaign, Mr. Neves 
said he would “discipline" state 
spending while shifting more re- 
sources into soda! programs and 
seeking to increase baric food pro- 
duction for Brazil's milli ons of mal- 
nourished poor. He has pledged to 
negotiate a “soda! pact" with busi- 
ness and labor to fight inflation 
and spur development, but adds 
that such a pact wiD not demand 
any sacrifices by workers.” 

Mr. Neves called inflation “the 
dearest manifestation of the disor- 
der in the national economy” and 
promised Tuesday that “we will 
confront it be ginning the first day." 
However, he added, “We will not 
fall into tbe gross error of using 
recession as a deflationary instru- 
ment.” 


fS-'V 

. 

■ 


■■■■ : . 
- 





& 


V . 1 It' 




“W; 


Knwaili Officiak Find Guns 

Reuters 

KUWAIT — The Kuwaiti cus- 
toms authorities have found 50 ma- 
chine guns, several pistols, porno- 
graphic films and 41 kilograras (90 
pounds) of hashish in unclaimed 
baggage and have begun investiga- 
tions to trade down the owners, 
local newspapers reported Tues- 
day. 




£ 




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.VSel! - 

XVi* mV- 






I' 








rirffiT' — 


:±-** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1985 


Page 3 


i. 

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is. lbJ> 






3ft 


w 

orTflJILJS* 


actuary^ 

0 Dllno r. 


U S»Attifc 

■JPP^skiin 

aole fo?sw 


nngSii 


’•i Census 

nc cosstnajj. 
lii ri^aiag 
- >uit brongt 
e 5^fci> rs* 
:i ?v«i4*s: 
* US.* 
iiraifl2|Ej 
ii-^r.ofas 


ogram 

Adonii hasi 
^2Scjj“=3 
r S 1E3XE 

ss for CBS; 
asiworftc 
^z&sDsc: 


ue 627,000 


Agenee Fnma-Prase 

r v UNTIED ^ NATIONS, New 
r Yesjt ^Angola has' asked the UN 
' disaster relief. agency to hdp save 
^23,000 pecqale - in. its - central and 
' -soathra provinces who are sufler- 
; tmg, bffiffiise of drought and the 
aftennah of figbringwilh merril- 

p>* and raids by Sooth African 
•fcasaa.:' 

'■- -■■ A Tqwrt issued here Monday by 
IteageqCT, the Office of the United 
■■ Nations Disaster Relief Coordina- 
-.ttHv said 500,000 of those people 
: were hi the gateau regions of B& 
andHuambo, and 127,000 in Hm< 
T a, Ctmdne,-: Rwando. Okavango, to 

the south. ” ‘ 

■ - The report said the Angpkmgov^ 
. anmcffltrs coDcemwas fufly shared 
bymtanatioaal relief bodtesoper- 
'ating rathe country. '" 

The situation, the agency said, 
was most difficult in the plateau 
area because precarious security 
•• made it dangerous to send supplies 
by Iand, 7 and that had aggravated 
;food short ag es. 

The Wbdd Food Progr am is 
‘ crating athree-nvtti th pan . Bending 
supplies worth $JJ milli on via 
: South-West Africa to Lotango, 
. Matsda and Kipingp in the south, 
. the report sakL It noted that the 
Angolan government had a pilot 
recoastroctioa plan for the souih- 
- an provinces, where the economy 
has suffered because of fighting, 
but was waiting for the complete 
: evacuation of -South African 
. . troops: . 

■, Loss of Foods Denied 
Robert Lindsey of The New York 
Times reported earlier, front Los An- 
geles: 

. v LjfoeBass, founder of the Intcr- 

■ pwtinwnl flin'«tiai> AM • n rganiwi- 


; . J Ar r; V V , 

- •• %• ' 

«ip 

r 



- -- v 



7 




L, Joe Bass, founder of tbe International Christian Aid organization, denying that his 
gnwp bad mishandled mflfions in donations meant for the victims of the famine in Ethiopia. 


ha d nntoandtedmflnops .of dollars 
m donations meant for victims of 
famine in Ethiopia. He «tid his 


organization had become the target 
of a “witch hunt.” 

“There are no wnnemg xmQioas. 
There is no missing money,” Mr. 

■•Bass said at a news conference. 

Mr. Bass's group in recent 
months has mounted an extensive 
TV appeal for famine victims and is 
the subject of investigations by 
UiL, state and local district attor- 
neys. He said the group had raised 
just $251,487 in the last two 
months of 1984 and 583,000 this 
year. 

Overall, he said hb organization 
bad raised J34 million in tbe 1983 


fiscal year, whkhbesaid was spent 
on various aid programs in the 
Third World, fund-raising, admin- 
istration and unspecified Christian 
religious missionary work. 

An agency of the Better Business 
Bureau, in an analysis of the orga- 
nization's spending in 1983, con- 
cluded that only 41 percent of its 
income was devoted to programs 
cited in hs fund-raising sohdta- 
tions. % 

Last week Neflo PandK, interna- 
tional Christian Aid's director of 

rr wrnnimirarinBis J sard that because 

tbe Fthtnpian gove rnmen t had not 


permitted it to provide aid there 
directly, it was instead flhaimrfrng 
aid through a French organization. 
Doctors Without Borders. Subse- 
quently, the directa of the French 
group said that it had received not 
“one centime” from International 
Christian Aid. 

Monday, Mr. Bass asserted that 
bis group had shipped $ 10,000 in 
medicine to it on Dec. 22. He said 
he could not explain why Doctors 
Without Borders bad denied re- 
ceiving any help, other than to 
speculate that the medicine was 
still in transit. “It's been shipped,” 
be said. 


Official Says 
More May Die 
In Ethiopian 
Derailment 


By Clifford D. May 

New York Tima Sonet 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
Ethiopian rescue officials said 
Tuesday that all those injured in 
the derailment of a train on the 
Addis Ababa-Qpbooti fine were 
now receiving medical treatment 
and that the bodies of die decease d 
had been removed from the scene 
of the accident. 

According to government re- 
ports issued Monday, 392 people 
were tailed and 370 injured when 
the M?i n plug ged from a bridge 
outride the Ethiopian town of 
Awash on Sunday. It was nearly 
seven hours before rescue workers 
learned of the accident and man- 
aged to reach the victims. 

Of those injured, sane were said 
Tuesday to be in critical condition. 
"The'&eaih toll may be higher,” 
i«id Qi pna Kidane, an Ethiopian 
Red Cross spokesman, “but thelat- 
est figures are not known yet." 

An investigation h uo the 
of the derailment was continuing 
Tuesday. Several Ethiopian offi- 
cials said they suspected that the 
train on to the bridge at 

high speed, creating a whiplash ef- 
fect that threw the rear car from the 
track and pulled the three others 
with it 

Mr. Girma said that contrary to 
earlier reports, only four of the five 
cars of the train fdl 35 feet (about 
10 meters) from the bridge into a 
ravine. 

“This is the worst train accident 
in tbe history of our country," said 
Teferra Shiawi, secretary general of 
the Ethiopian Red Cross, after vis- 
iting tbe crash site. 


Helms Call for Stock Takeover of CBS 
Seen as Unlikely to Affect News Policy 


• By Robert Shogan 
and Tom Rcdbum 

La Angela TimtsSenict 

■ WASHINGTON — Senator Jes- 
se A. Helms's aril far a national 
campaign to buy stock in CBS Inc 
and bring conservative pressure to 
bear tm its news coverage is unlike- 
ly to give conservatives control 
over tbe network or even signifi- 
cant influence over its news poli- 
cies, finflrtrifll analysts Ml! mpftia 
leaders say. 

Many analysts and political ex- 
perts suggested, instead, that the 
proposed campaign appears to be 
mined more at gaming publicity 
and fmds fa the causes supported 
by Senata Helms than at taking 
financial control of CBS, which the 
Noth Carolina Republican calls 
Kberally biased and “the most anti- 
Reagan network.” 

Senator Helms, in a fiv&page 
letter to be mailed Jan. 21 to 1 
ntiiimn hnnyjini^ asks conserva- 
tives not only to buy stock in the 
netwok but also to send money to 
an organization called Fairness in 
Media. 

The letter, disclosed last week by 
the News and Observer in Raleigh, 
North Carolina, said the group 
needs $277,000 “to produce TV 
and radio ads and send letters to 
urge other conservatives to pur- 
chase CBS stock.” 

Analysis say it would cost $1 
trillion or more to buy one-half of 
CBS’s nearly 30 rmlhon shares of 
stock, now valued at about S75 a 
share, and such an attempt would 
face a legal obstacle course of gov- 
ernment regulations. 

“Nobody is gong to get control 
of CBS through a cockamamy 
grhftme like tins,” Tory Hoffman, 
directa of corporate finance for 



* 

m y % 

<*£ * . 

V-: 



fives to buy. "If you gca a agnrii- 
cant amount,” Mk Irvine said, u 
wo uld probably reinforce the ten- 
dency that alrauly .exists for son* 
of the media to rootamine their 
status and tbe reasons why they 
have lost public esteem.” 

A spokeswoman for CBS de- 
clined to go beyond ttenwtwork s 
statement of last week in which it 
said it “repots the news accurately; 
•and fairly” and vowed to mamtain 
the and integrity of 

its new organization. 

■ Shaun ,Sfarfr an i senior vice pres- 
ident of the National Association 
of Broadcasters, pointed art that at 
CBS and other networks the news 
operations are jpq«i«rarf from over- 


Senator Jesse Helms 

the investment banking company 
of OnQin and Co. of New York, 
said Monday. “It very definitely 
has no which leads me to 

suspect that it’s just a brilliant 
fund-raising gimmick.” 

Benjamin G Bradlee, executive 
editor of The Washington Post — 
like CBS a frequent target for criti- 
cism by conservatives — dismissed 
the notion that the threat of a take- 
over would affect CBS’s news oper- 
ations. “I thrrik its pretty much of 
an empty gesture/ he said. “It's 
not gong to affect CBS. You know, 
the Mamies announced they were 
buying stock in the Post a while 
back. Well, 1 don’t think Qai put 
the fear of God into' os, do you?” 
Reed Irvine, chairman of tbe 
board of Accuracy in Media, a pri- 
vate press group that monitors the 
press, said the impact of tbe Helms 
plan depended on how much CBS 
stock he could persuade cooserva- 


ly to avoid stockholder influence. 

CBS has about 29.7 million 
shares outstanding, owned by 
about 24,000 shareholders. Accord- 
ing to information compiled by 
Paul Kagan, an investment consul- 
tant in Carmel, California, about 
two- thirds of CBS stock is owned 
by institutional investors such as 
pmrinn f un ds, insmahce compa- 
nies, and large investment firms. 

The single largest owner of CBS 
stock js William S. Paley, the 
founder of the company, who 
owned 6.55 percent, a just un- 
dertwo million shares, as of Febru- 
ary last year. 

Analysts estimated that CBS 
could cost as much as $130 a share 
in a takeover attempt, which means 
that Senata Helms's group might 
have to raise almost $2 billion to 
buy half of the company’s stock 

Although the CBS network is not 
regulated by the government, the 
Federal Communications Commis- 
sion, according to analysts, would 
have to approve any group crying 
to acquire more than 10 percent of 
CBS stock. 


Indian Gun To Replace Colt .45 
AsSidearm. ofU.S. Army Officers 

Lae Angela Tima Senior 

7 : WASHINGTON -r The US Army has decided to supply its 
ntiHtary officers with Italian-made Beretta pistols, replacing the Colt 
: piwni that has been the army officers’ standard 

sidiearm since 1911. ' ' - 

• Tbe choice of tile Berctta 9mm weapon, announced Monday by the 
pentagon, ends an intense c omp etition spurred by a 1978 sovey by 
'the UiL House Appropriations Committee that found a proliferation 

:<rfi mriniK lypfff <* pMffofca" ri ammunition amo ng the aimed services 
despite tbe army’s prefercnce for the Colt. - 

Baetta5^>A^onN<me(rihaQmmany was m the tunning, a. Pentagon 
. iMtemmt said. That co mpany, Mananont of Switzerland and West 
; Germany, produces tire Stg-Sana pistol 

Coli Industries of Hartford, Connecticut took itself out of the 
i rimmuo because, it would be unabte co meet tbe army's delivery 
an" army Bprikesman saiti. 

'• By sfrifting to a 9mm weapon, timU-S.miHtaiywfll adopt pistols 

j f 7 id«™wi»wrinn.cnffiprtfate with thorensed by other North Atlantic 
Treaty Qrgiimzatim counttie&. ... 

The Paragon said that Beretta would be awarded a five-year 
contract to manufacture 315,930 weapons to supply the U5. Army, 
Nay£ AHTbfce; Marine Caps and Coast Guard. The army, which is 
handling tbe ptnehase for the other services, said that the overall price 
wooWbemoftthiai SSObhUkhi. 


Brazil’s Neves: A Grandfather Figure to Steer a Course of Conciliation 


By Akn Riding 

New York Tima Seaite 

BRASILIA — When Tancredo 
Neves became governor of Minas 
Gerais on Mwlf of Brazil’s mam 
opposition party in 1983, he 
seemed content at the age of 73 to 
cKwiax a long political career nm- 
□ing his home state. 

“Tins was always my aspira- 
tion,” he recalled. 

Yet when the opposition began 
looking last year for a presidential 
candidate who could unite their 
own factions and be acceptable to 
the outgoing mihlary regime, Urey 
drafted Mr.'N eves as tlte personifi- 
cation of political conciliation and 

moderation 

Dmxog the months of ™pting< 
and n egot iatio ns that preceded his 
ejection as presidooti Tuesday, Ik 
presented lmnsdf as a symbol of 
national consensus. The endorse- 
ment of his candidacy by almost all 
key interest groups and ideological 


currents in the country h»d turned, 
tire indirect election into a form of 
popular acriamation. 

In this, his age seemed to serve 
him weH He will be 75 when he 
take* office an March 15. He is in 
good health and lodes younger 
than his years, but he nonetheless 
projected the image of a grandfa- 

and fairness and who demands 
hard wnHr and resp onsibility . 

In reality, he is less stem, al- 
though he rarely antes. When 
p res se d, he describes himself as a 
“ieft-of-center reformist”, but his 
instinct is one of cautious pragma- 
tism, tench as B razilians would ex- 
pect of a rmndro, a man from Mir 
nas Gerais. 

“The mineim temper amen t is re- 
flexive,” he once explained, as if 
providing a setf-porwaiL “He ab- 
hors radicalism, he's eminently 
concQiatoty, he’s a man of the 


mm interns and, as SUCh, introspec- 
tive.” 

And like a good mmeuu. Tan- 
credo, as be is generally referred to 
here; talks little. In press confer- 
ences, his answers are invariably 
shorter than the questions and, 
when he speaks, he picks his wads 
carefully. 

“I have never made a friend from 
whom I could not separate,” 1 *, 
once said, “and I have never made 
an enemy char J could not ap- 
proach.” 

The real test erf his negotiating 
skin, though, will come once he is 
in office. He has made few prom- 
ises beyond that of consolidating 
Brazil’s democracy, yet his critics 
char ge that he has become all 
things to all people 

From leftist intellectuals to gaso- 
line station owners, his supporters 
may soon be looking fa rewards. 
In his favor, he cones to power 


Christian Fundamentalism Comes of Political Age in the U.S. 


... tCootiimedfroiii Page 1) - 

ratirts,”wi» do aotwaaltoassd- 
due even with other Christians 
who are nmeh involved with the 

secular world, 

• Evangelicals: May accept fun- 
damentaust doctrine* but tend to 
emphasize to act of amveraon 
aod ils bmxirtance and the rede of 

it. : il 


Carthyisfn,” with strains- of anti- 
Seamtismand rarism. 

The direct impact cf the New 
Right potitkal-re^ous coalition 
and of controve r tiafleadc re such as 
Mr. Falwell is a matter of dd»te. 
But observer on all tides agree that 


ecally, they are considered more 
mofy, mac concerned with so- 
cial poicy. They may be liberal or 

conservative. 

: 7 « Chatisniatics: May accept fun- 
damentalist doctiine,. but tend to 
onplurize ' the immediate^ eano- 
tkmal mamfestation ctf the qparit— 
jumping,; shouting, waving their 
hands in praise, speakinz in 


eotsmdude old-line Peutecostals, 
but also a more modem, younger, 
beocr-cdncated group whose oac- 


The temples of conservative 
Christiam^-range feomaprinritive 
_ Bqrti^ dnmch in rural Sooth Caco^ 
ttn^i which prohibits music, dano- 
■teg or card playing, tohnge effifkxs 
.sock- as the' Crystal Ruace of .a 


wfudh provides almost total fife 
support for its members. 

I For those who share their base 
.befiefe, inrhidmg fl* down-and- 
out, tiie tick and the troubled, ccai- 

5crvativeC2uisti3mtciidtopro^ 

iW icmds of familial warmth, sop- 


tire kinds of famifitf wsimui, sup- 
port mi "“good works” that are 
considered tte essence of Christian 
>love. However; ti* rest of human- 
rtf, (bey ssy T is lamentably bound 
forhdL. v- , 

■; Critics have termed their haish 
1 intbloance cf all wito reject their 
■ mA hat^fified “moral Mo 


LeMon^Nommaies - 

Fraritfliwe tfi ifeFditar 

TkeAstodcoed Pros 
PA^IS— The efitorial staff of 
X^e Monde ncariinated Andr6 Fco- 
tehrefas ifit candidate Tuesdayto 
j)ftp 0 ^ .i^fgrtrir and edka in aiief 
of the The pans daffy. Observers 
said thast; Mr; Fontaine, 63, was 
Safytftl»ct»ifiiiMd Friday by a 

vote of the newspapers gcntTal as- 

4emHy.;:- : ■ . •. 

. . n. . _E,^. A T 411- 


■'-.-■yeoSs resigned after the editorial 
tiaff rpfesed last month to support 
w : ’’ .& jtitais to cut salaries and other. 

coasr teid sefi Le Monde s had- 
v quartos in ceoual Paris. Mr. Fon- 
\ v; 

if lte. would stil the 


right have played a significant role 
in revising public debate and faro- 
. ingAmKicans of every stripe to re- 
examine the most fundamental 
questions of ethics and morality. 

The movement is tiffing a tide of 
infln«nc e that sorafimeshas made 
it tq^ear more um&d and threat- 
ening than it really is, accon&tg to 
both aides and supporters. 

The election and re-dection of 
the most conservative president of 
the modem era — “the most evan- 
grffc al president since the Found- 
ing Fathers,” as he also has been 
- cane d — is apart of this tide. So is 
the ripening a a new gpao&tiani of 
media-sawy jneadrers. And so is a 
widespread pobBc reccffing over a 
spectrum of sodal iUs. 

“T rtiinV Ameri ca « ready to conr 
sidg repentance of its tins,” said 
Pasta Torn Vestal of thepditicaBy 
Olivet 


There is, of coarse, nothing new 
about rdigkxts activism on either 
the right a the left. The aipnal 
cokmies were born in reaction to a 
world in which statecraft was 
chnrcbcraft, and the country has 
had a deticate time refining its ex- 
periment in religioas pluralism 
since. 

There were the abolitionist 
preachers who helped found the 
Republican Party, the religious fer- 
vor that led toMubitiatandthe 
preachers in the forefront of civil 
r ights, the anti-war movement and 
other crusades since the 1950s. 

- the fandameatafists fell off the 
national screen for a time; sane 



BOfy Graham, the evaa- 


President Kennedy at 
the White House in 
1961. At right, Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carta, his 
bead bowed in prayer. 



. :>>* - - -•»- 


>afing. Le Mcmde has lost 80 

'• rmRirtn.. tr+nrs ($$3 mt^Ol) OVCT 

r tte^-fcw yem?. ’ : ' j 


tion of the consetvaove Christian 
movement was fa decades unbod- 
ied primarily in the giant revivals of 

Billy Graham. 

The rise of Jrimny Carter to the 
presidency brought the phrase 
“boro again” bade into the fore- 
front of the political lexicon. Bui 
Mr. Carte's nteod of liberal poli- 
tics and earnest Baptist zeal made 
his liberal constituencies uneasy. 

sft«r raierna ihr rfTtff- 


totions of the increasm^y restive 
rtwwtisn right, he then brought 
their frnsffations to the baling 
point . , .. 

They had watched from the side- 
Bnes while Hbeial causes dominat- 
ed the public agenda: Abortion was 
legaHzwi, the homosexual rights 
sod feminist movements mush- 
roomed, taws woe used to pres- 



witb enormous good will and a life- 
time of political experience. 

Ban in the mountain town of 
Sin JoSo dd Rri in Mmas Gerais 
on March 4. 1910, Tancredo de 
Almeida Neves was one of 12 chil- 
dren in a family of shopkeepers. He 
studied in the state capital of Bdo 
Horizonte, but returned home in 
1932 to practice tew. in 1938. he 
married the former Risoleta Gui- 
marfes, with wbom he had three 
chOdren, all of them adults now. 

He soon became involved in lo- 
cal and stale politics and, in 1951, 
was elected a federal deputy. Only 
in 1953, though, did he become a 
national figure when appointed 
justice minister by President Getfi- 
bo Vargas. He resigned the follow- 
ing year after the president com- 
mitted suicide, but the brief contact 
with the populist figure of Mr. Var- 
gas would benefit him throughout 
his career. 

In tbe late 1950s, he became 
president of the state-owned Banco 
do Brasff under President Juscdino 
Knbitschek. But when the next 
president, I3nh> Quadras, abruptly 
resigned in August 1961, Mr. Ne- 
ves’ political skills were once again 
in evidence as he helped persuade 
the army to allow tbe left-leaning 
rice president, Joao Goulart, to 
takeover. 

Part of the deal involved curbing 
the new president’s poweis through 
appointment of a prime minister. 
Mr. Neves himself assumed that 
post, but he then dedicated himself 
to preparing the referendum under 
which presidential authority was 
subsequently restored. He stepped 
down in 1962, but he was still iden- 
tified with the govmnnent when 
Mr. Goulart was removed by the 
army in March 1964. 

Imfike most opposition politi- 
cians, however, he was not stripped 
of Ms political rights. Over tbe next 
15 years, he served as a federal 
deputy in a Congress that, while 
limited in its powers, was the only 

2 Die in Jamaica 
In Fuel Price Riots 

The Associated Pros 

KINGSTON, Jamaica — Riots 
touched off by sharp price in- 
creases far gasoline and propane | 


police reported two dead. 

Btianesses, schools and govern- 
ment offices were dosed, domestic 
flights grounded and the opening 
session of Partiament was canceled 
The demonstrations started in 
Kingston and quickly spread to tbe 
tourist center of Monlego Bay and 
other dries. 

Tire increases raised the price of 
gasoline from tbe equivalent of 
$U }1 dollars to $2-19 a gallon 
(3.785 liters), and propane gas went 
from $20.16 to $23.38 fa a 100- 
. pound (45-kDogram) tank. 


DIAMONDS 


forum where criticism of a succes- 
sion of nulitary regimes could be 
voiced. 

By 1979, a political abertura, or 
opening, had begun. With Mr. Ne- 
ves elected senator fa Minas Ge- 
rais, differences between “moder- 
ates” and “radicals” within the 
opposition’s broad-based Brazilian 
Democratic Movement surfaced. 

Far two years, Mr. Neves even 
joined a new more conservative 
Popular Party. But by the time he 
ran for governor of Minas Gerais 
this party had coDapsed and he 
once ag?un carried the main oppo- 
sition banner. 

In his home state, he remained a 
popular figure, but he did not dis- 


tinguish btewelf as a dynamic gov- 
ernor. During the recent election 
campaign, his opponent, Paolo Sa- 
lim Maluf of the ruling Democratic 
Social Party, tried to exploit the 
fact that, in both lemslmxve and 
executive positions, Mr. Neves had 
rardy shown himself to be a man of 
daring initiatives. 

Bui Mr : Maluf was never able to 
make these paints directly. He re- 
peatedly challenged Mr. Neves to a 
televised debate which, in true min- 
eiro style, was never rejected and 
never took place. As the strong 
front-runner, Mr. Neves prefared 
to travel the country collecting sup- 
port rather than assume the nsks of 
spelling oat his positions in detail. 





,2 


REMEMBER THE SNOW — A workman dears snow 
from in front of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, after 
a record snowfall in toe city daring toe weekend. 


sure Christian schools to abide by 
civil rights laws and national resis- 
tance to the comnmmst threat 
seemed to wither. 

Aal/nvHn Wnrtvr a iliMtlranan of 


the University af Chicago, put it: 
‘They fdt left out of everybody 
rise’s liberation” Meanwhile, a 
foundation far their uprising had 
been laid by the media revolution, 
which produced religious television 
personalities with new power to 
rranrmmicflte. and raise money. 

In 1979, the sleeping lion of fuiK 


dameatafism seemed suddenly to 
leap to its feel, fed up. 

Mr. Falwell farmed the Moral 
Majority and the p ol itical whir, kids 
of the New Right completed a dr- 


UUt iU ULC OCLUUUlt 

Political hit lists, voter registration 
drives, grass-roots mass meetings, 
lobbying arms and mailing lists 
blossomed on b ehalf of their pro- 
life. pro-moral, pro-family, pro- 
Amenca line. 

Since 1980, the budget far all of 
Mr. FahvdTs operations has grown 
from $58 million to $90 million a 


year. Membership has tripled. In 
the last four years, contributions to 
the group’s educational foundation 
and lobbying arm have increased to 
about $11 million from less then 


But the conservative Christian 
political movement has discovered 
that changing America means, to 
sane extent, being changed. 

‘The first term earned ns the 
right to be heard.” says Cal Thom- 
as, an official of the Moral Major- 
ity. “In the second, we have to earn 
the right to be followed.” 



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Kennedy’s African Trip 


Consider first the simpler questions posed 
by Senator Edward Kennedy’s stormy eight- 
day sojourn in South Africa: Interference in 
another country's affairs? Cadging liberal 
votes at home by posturing abroad? Both of 
these charges were flung at Senator Kennedy 
by Pretoria's all-white regime — and by a 
small faction of black radicals who disrupted a 
final meeting in a black township. 

The charges miss the point Yes, Senator 
Kennedy is not a South African and his pur- 
pose was political. Like President Ronald Rea- 

the permanent rule by a wEhe^nmority that 
welcomes blacks 1 labor but denies than the 
most elementary rights of citizenship. In de- 
crying this system. Senator Kennedy is no 
more a troublemaker than are Americans of all 
races who have been carrying nonviolent pro- 
test to the doors of South Africa’s embassies. 

Knowing his purpose. South Africa issued 
his visa, then had two cabinet ministers lecture 
him for meddling. This from a government 
that funds insurgencies in Angola and Mozam- 
bique and illegally occupies Namibia. 

All that aside. South Africa has little ground 
for complaint. Advocacy cuts both ways. Pre- 
toria yearns for acceptance in the West by 
making the most of few concessions to multi- 
rarialism. Only the other day. President P.W. 
Botha was given an indulgent opportunity in 
the United States on CBS TVs “60 Minutes.” 
If he wants to influence U.S. opinion, how can 
Mr. Kennedy and other Americans be faulted 
for attempting to influence South Africa? 

Whether the attempt does any good is a 
different question. Believing themselves be- 
sieged, white South Africans tend to stop their 


What is one to make of Senator Edward 
Kennedy's visit to South Africa? Certainly it 
was a striking media event, one coinciding 
with and reinforcing the new interest of the 
American public in apartheid. The senator 
drew on the recollection of his late brother 
Robert’s tour 18 years ago. He sought out the 
scenes most expressive of white oppression of 
the black majority and presented himself as a 
new recruit to the struggle of South African 
blacks for dignity and equality. It is a struggle, 
he said, that puts him in opposition to the 
Reagan administration’s policy of “construc- 
tive engagement.” which he finds morally 
and politically wanting. 

Senator Kennedy has something of his 
brother Robert’s quality of being able to sum- 
mon other people's deepest feelings to the 
surface. Thus did he elicit sharp protests from 
a minority of radical black nationalists who, 
far from receiving his extended hand, rebuffed 
him as an agent of the capitalist system they 
blame for their situation. It goes without say- 
ing that the official white establishment fully 
reciprocated his severe judgment of its policies 
and bona fides. More unexpectedly, some 
while liberals who are m opposition, to their 
government also felt the senator was grand- 
standing and butting in. 

We are faced here with a political dilemma 
that Americans have got to resolve if they are 
serious about converting the latest burst of 
anti-apartheid feeling into a helpful contribu- 


tion toward change. It is good to have Ameri- 
cans seeing and understanding the wickedness 
of a system that condemns blacks to serfdom 
on grounds of their race. That some Africans 
are bitterly distrustful of would-be Samaritans 
■ is not surprising. But those who come to help 
should be sure they do not leave having made 
their own personal strivings and purposes the 
center of discussion. They should accept an 
obligation to indicate a strategy that actually 
has a chance to deliver some of the relief and 
benefit their intercession promises. 

“Constructive engagement. 1 ’ with or with- 
out the quotes, has been the policy of succes- 
sive American administrations at least since 
President John F. Kennedy. The constant has 
been to accompany pursuit of routine national 
interests with criticisms of apartheid; the vari- 
able has been the degree of feeling and fre- 
quency of these criti cisms - Recently — belat- 
edly — President Ronald Reagan came into 
line with other presidents, at least for the 
moment, by hims elf making a Strong, public 
attack on apartheid. Still, it might profit the 
American debate if it were accepted that no 
administration, whether Democratic or Re- 
publican, liberal or conservative, has much 
dented events within South Africa in the past 
25 years. Local forces are controlling, and the 
question is what further pressures or blandish- 
ments, mounted from outside, will make 
things better inside. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Rules for Research 


Tension is inevitable between the great 
American research universities and the gov- 
ernment But there is currently a rising con- 
cern among the universities that the govern- 
ment is pressing them harder and is gaming 
ground. The universities always want the lati- 
tude to follow their research where it takes 
them, and to publish the results openly. The 
government, which provides the money for 
much of this work, usually wants a measure of 
control. That has always been the case. But 
increasingly it seems to want more control — 
to see the results of research before they are 
published, for example, and even to have the 
authority to deny publication. 

These issues often do Dot involve U.S. na- 
tional security in any conventional sense, but 
rather an inclination on the pan of the admin- 
istration here and there to push security re- 
strictions beyond their traditional limits. John 
Sbattudc. a vice president of Harvard, has 
written a memorandum that rites some of the 
points that currently raise academic anxieties. 
He cites the presidential order to require all 
government employees with access to certain 
kinds of classified' information to agree to 
censorship of anything that they might write 
for the rest of their lives. The Reagan adminis- 
tration withdrew that rule last year, but only 
temporarily. If it is put into force, it will 
constitute a formidable barrier to government 
service for many academics. That would be a 
disservice both to the government and to the 
quality of scholarship on public affairs. 


The administration is expanding its efforts 
to control the export of many kinds of technol- 
ogy, and those efforts are not confined to 
machinery. In the universities, it raises ques- 
tions regarding which students can take what 
courses. Harvard has had inquiries from the 
State Department about the work being done 
there by Chinese students and, in one case, a 
Polish scholar. Congress probably will renew 
the Export Administration Act this year, and 
some senators want language written into it 
that would strengthen the restraints on the 
flow of academic knowledge to foreigners. 

Congress will have to settle that one. But in 
other cases, the universities themselves are 
going to have to cany the primary responsibil- 
ity to protect their integrity. Mr. Shaftuck rites 
an increasingly long list of federal agencies 
that have been trying to push clauses into 
research contracts requiring universities to 
submit the results of research to government 
review before publication. They include the 
National Institute of Education, the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency and the Food and 
Drug Administration — which suggests that 
national security is not at stake. A university 
can always avoid that kind of degrading re- 
striction by refusing to sign the contract, as 
Harvard has occasionally had to da That is a 
loss to both the university and to the govern- 
ment. But academic freedom is like other kinds 
of freedom. It endures only as long as people 
think that it is worth the price. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR JAN. 16 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: As the North Sprouts Ictdes 
PALM BEACH, Florida — The eyes of society 
in the North, and in New York especially, have 
a g ain turned toward Palm Beach, a resort 
which blooms with flowers when the North is 
sprouting icicles. Visitors were bathing here 
today [Jan. 5] in the surf at a temperature of 74 
degrees Fahrenheit (23 J centigrade). Others, 
dressed in light flannels, strolled under the 
palms complaining of the heat, and these were 
passed by those who had arrived on the first 
through express train from Jersey City — the 
winter service having just begun — loaded 
with furs. Since Christmas, when the Hotel 
Breakers was opened, it has been getting more 
and more lovdy here, and the season will be 
well under way in another week. 


1935: Saarlanders Opt for Germany 

SAARBRUECKEN — Eight hundred thou- 
sand Saarlanders celebrated their national de- 
livery [Ian. 15] in much the same spirit of 
thanksgiving as was manifested by the inhabit- 
ants of Alsace and Lorraine in November, 
1918. This morning this borderland people, 
who for fifteen years have lived without a 
country, were electrified with joy at the radio 
tidings that an amazing 90 percent in the [Jan. 
13] plebiscite had been cast for reunion with 
Germany. Church bells pealed jubilantly 
throughout the 738 square miles of Saar terri- 
tory, youth and maidens danced , citizens afld 
hausfrauen embraced each other and men and 
women in their 80s and 90s wept with joy. “At 
last the Saar’s Ge rman again," they cried. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP ML FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
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LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Execute &tUar RENfiBONDY Deputy PMdur 

Mb* ALAIN LECOUR AbkwMMo 

Deputy E&ar RICH ARD H. MORGAN ABoaattr Pubtaher 

Dqnay EOar STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dfrtaor oj Opamoa 
FRANCOIS DESMAISONS ttnaor cf Qmdaim 
ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Du 

International -Herald Tot 
France. Telephone: 

Director <te iu pvtrtLQB&Qfu Wohor iV, TTwyfr, 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 HennessyM. Hong Kong. Td. 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
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SUL an capital de 1.200-000 F. RCS Ntmum B 7 32021126. Commission Paritaire No. 61337. 

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Associate Editor 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dmeor ef Atbentstng Sola 

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0^74^-1265. Tdoc 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paini 



ears to uncongenial criticism. This was made 
easier in the senator's case when 100 black 
radicals thwarted his attempt to address 4,000 
blacks. There is no dear evidence that the 
government encouraged this disruption, as 
hinted by Bishop Desmond Tutu, the Nobel 
laureate. It could be a worrying portent of 
impatience among younger militants. 

True believers in apartheid insis t that vio- 
lence and communism will enter by the back 
door if South Africa opens its front door to 
political change. So Pretoria minimizes the 
idealism of Bishop Tutu and encourages the 
violence it fears by repressing multiracial 
parties and labor unions. 

The evidence, however, is that both black 
and white South Africans fed a stake in their 
country, not in its destruction. Americans sim- 
ply have to assume that persistent pressure can 
encourage political change. 

A joint statement by six South African busi- 
ness organizations called last wedt for fairer 
employment practices, more political rights 
for blacks, a universal citizenship instead of 
black citizenship in bogus “homelands" and 
an end to the forced removal of nonwfaites 
from certain neighborhoods. 

Business favors these reforms because it 
wants to bead off boycotts and restrictions on 
U.S. investments in South Africa. Whether 
such sanctions would have a good effect is yet 
another question for debate. Nothing is more 
difficult than trying to promote internal 
change in another nation. But there would be 
less hope for reform without the credible 
threat of sanctions and the continued “med- 
dling” of foreign politicians. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 



This is going to be a tough year — Pm sure glad I hare 
my close cirde of trusted senior aides to rdy on , ' 


Has U.S. Pendulum Swung Too Far? 


Bv James Reston 


W ASHINGTON — The weeks between the re- 
election of President Reagan and his inaugura- 


tion have been marked here by a different tune. 

The campaign, as usual, was a noisy riot of strong 
passions and weak reason, but lately there has been a 
revival of common sense. Most leaders of the Demo- 
cratic Party are not underestimating, the defeats they 
have suffered in three of the last four presidential 
elections, and most Republican leaders are not overes- 
timating their victories. 

On the two major problems before the nation, the 
control of deficits at home and the control of nuclear 


preconditions. No promises were made. Probably too 
much is expected or the Shultz-Gromyko smiles, but at 


least they are talking about talking 

There may be less in all this than meets the eye, but 
the president's critics cannot blame him for being rigid 
as a board and then complain when he bends a litue. 

In fact, he has been so flexible since his re-election 
that it is not guile dear where he is going now or who is 
going with him. He has made or permitted almost as 
many changes in his lineup in the last month as the 
Washington Redskins made all season. 


weapons abroad, they are fencing with one another but 
beginning lo adapt their ’ 


wishes to the facts. 

There are exceptions, erf course. Senator Jesse Helms 
of North Carolina is still thinking (if that is the right 
word) that one way to interpret the First Amendment 
is to try to buy out CBS or anything else that opposes 
his fatuous conservatism, but he is fast becoming not 
merely a nuisance but an embarrassment to the presi- 
dent and a majority of his own party. 

Elsewhere, most politicians are not taking the one- 
sided election promises and votes all that seriously. 
They axe making their own judgments about what is 
best for the United States, regardless of the president's 
wishes — and also what is best for themselves, 
sometimes confusing the two. 

Senator Robert Dole of Kansas and other moderates 
in the Senate are coming out with their own budget, not 
satisfied that the president's campaign promises and 
budget proposals will get the budget and trade deficits 
down to manageable size. 

The president is not acting like a man who regards 
his personal popularity and spectacular victory as a 
mandate to insist on every promise or charge or joke he 
made in the heal of the campaign. Though he said he 
would never fiddle with Social Security benefits, he is 
now fudging it and indicating that, well maybe he 
would think about cutting the old folks back if 
an overwhelming majority in both houses of 
Congress shared the blame. 

Same with the nuclear arms talks. No more talk of 
the Soviet “evil empire” or linking arms control talks to 
the Soviet outrage in Afghanistan. The talks went on in 
Geneva, even about weapons in outer space, without 


Maybe there is some logic to these musical chairs, 
though it baffles the reporters and ihe other members 


of the cabinet and White House staff. But after four 
years, an argument can be made for shaking things up. 

There have been more presidential cronies high in 
this government than in any other administration since 
the last war. All of them were among the nicest, but not 
necessarily the smartest, officials available. Some of 
them were tired, and some were bored, and others 
merely homesick or broke. 

‘‘There's something very Japanese about all this.” an 
ambassador said here. “In Tokyo, the prime minister 


allows the various factions to fight among themselves. 

sort of compromise 


and then when they come to some sort i 
or consensus, he approves their deal 1 1 is one way to do 


things and it seems to be Mr. Reagan's way." 
Tnei 


strain point of all this, however, is reassuring in a 
way. There is something in the air here that tells people 
when the swinging pendulum has gone too far. It was 
this instinct that brought Ronald Reagan to the White 
House when the people sensed that the welfare state 
policies of the Democrats needed correction. The 
Democrats hoped the swingi ug pendulum would go the 
other way in the 1984 election after all the economic 
and foreign policy problems of the first two Reagan 
years. But Mr. Reagan changed course abroad and 
was re-elected on his own personal popularity 
and the economic recovery. 

Now Washington is shifting again It will go hellbent 
to the extremes for a while, but there is something in 
the constitutional separation of powers and the old 
fog of independent discussion that makes it pull 
up before going too far. 

The New York Tunes. 


Debate on Detente: 
4 Kremlin Positions 


By Jerry F. Hough 

This is the second of three articles 



W ASHINGTON — The debates 
within the Kremlin about the 
proper Soviet orientation cannot be 
characterized simply as pro-d£tente 
and anti-d£tenie. The major posi- 
tions in the debate are much more 
complex than that, and even the fol- 
lowing attempt to lay out four posi- 
tions misses many differences among 


people within each group. 

The first postion is, in essence, 
anti-detente. It is found in the m ill - 


Why the 'Food Weapon’ Is a Myth 


L ONDON — The Ethiopian fara- 
• ine has raised again the question 
of whether food is oedng used as a 
political weapon. And if it has been 
in Ethiopia, as charged, then could it 
not be used on a worldwide scene, 
since the United States controls 40 
percent of the exports of world grain 
supplies? “If the Arabs have crude” 
said one diplomatic wag recently, 
“we have food.” 

This debate has a long pedigree. 
HoQis Chenery, vice president of the 
World Bank, wrote in an article in 
Foreign Affairs at the time of the 
1974 food crisis “the position of the 
United States and Canada as grain 


By Jonathan Power 


Africa is the only basket case. It 
may be, although it cannot be defi- 
nitely proved, that in the first half of 
14 the Unit* 


1974 the United States was punishing 
Ethiopia by denying it food because 
of its Marxist colorings. But if that 
was the policy it has backfired. The 
severity of the situation has awak- 
ened a great humanitarian urge in the 
West that is pushing their govern- 
ments, not least the United States, to 
deliver large quantities of food aid 
The one serious modem attempt at 
>y Presi- 


a grain embargo — made bv 
dent Jimmy Carter to cut off grain 


The modern world is 
too complex and 
food too plentiful. 


exporters is as dominant” as that of 
the Gulf countries in oiL He wem on 
to argue that compared with the rise 
in oil prices “for the poorest people 
[in the Third World] the impact of 
high food prices and shortages is 
much more serious, since most of 
their income is spent on food.” 

From the vantage point of 1974 
and the world food crisis it looked as 
if talk of a food weapon was realistic. 
The number of major food exporters 
was dangerously few and the number 
of importers was rising sharply. Be- 
fore World War II all the major geo- 
graphic regions, bar Western Europe, 
were net exporters of gram. Eastern 
Europe was exporting as much as 
North America. Butpy 1974 Asia 
had a large grain deficit, and Eastern 
Europe and the Soviet Union were 
increasing imports sharply. During 
the first half of the 1970s North 
American grain exports doubled. 

Lester Brown, the U-S. food ex- 
pert, commented at the time: “North 
America today finds itself with an 
almost monopolistic control of the 
world's exportable grain supplies, a 
situation for which there is no his- 
torical precedent." 

The CIA. in a 1975 report, entitled 
“Potential Implications of Trends in 
World Population, Food Production 
and Climate” argued that the gods 
themselves were on the side of grow- 
ing U.S. power. The CIA detected a 
cooler trend in the Northern hemi- 
sphere. This would work to the disad- 
vantage of those in high latitudes and 
those nearest the equator. Countries 
in mid latitudes would be least dis- 
rupted by frost or drought. The CIA 
report concluded that this “could 
give the United States a measure of 
power it never had before, possibly 
an economic and political dominance 
greater than that of the immediate 
post-World War II years.” 

Only 10 years have gone by and yet 
all these scenarios look dated. 

The Asian and Latin American 
countries are now other sdf-suffi- 
riem or only marginally dependent 
on food imports. The oil-rich Middle 
Eastern countries have become major 
food importers, but who is going to 
refuse to sell them food because of 
some political difference? 


sales to the Soviet Union after the 
invasion of Afghanistan — also came 
lo naught. Argentina stepped into the 
gap and the Soviet Union cut back its 
meat consumption marginally. 

If there was a future showdown of 
major proportions between the Sovi- 
et Union and the United States it is 
likely that the Soviets could buy grain 
and soybeans from Asia as well 
as Latin America. 

The United Stales, moreover, has 
problems of its own. The farm lobby 
is so powerful — and always feels its 
existence is so precarious and thus is 
always on the offensive — that it is 
difficult for any president to interfere 
with its vested interests. As long as 
American fanners k« 


It looks like it will be the same 
story in Ethiopia. The Eritreans are 
finding alternative supplies of food. 
The Ethiopian government has been 
accused of diverting food aid to their 
armed forces. The Western food 
agencies are making some of the same 
mistakes they made in Cambodia. 
They say liu^ are there to help the 
women and children but they over- 
look the reality that much of it ends 
up in the stomachs of the fighting 
forces. Food can come from so many 
possible suppliers it is next to impos- 
sible to control its flow. 

The food weapon may have existed 
in medieval times when the attacking 
armies could surround a town and 
cut off all its avenues of supply. But 
the modern world is too complex and 
food too plentiful for it to be 
the effective and decisive weapon 
that was once thought. 

International Herald Tribune. 


tary newspaper Red Star and (be con- 
servative journal International Af- 
fairs. and treats the West as united 
and threatening in its drive to achieve 
military superiority. As is the case 
with U.S. Defense Secretary Caspar 
Weinberger's views, this position 
does not usually seem associated with 
the advocacy of military action, but 
focuses on the need to increase 
mili tary spending. 

This position tends to be anti-re- 
form, because its proponents tend to 
be xenophobic and isolationist in re- 
gard to the West. It is expressed in 
assertions like those of General Dmi- 
tri Volkogonov, who has said that the 
United States has a “desire to 'replay* 
the lost battles of the 20 th century by 
nuclear war” and that military expen- 
ditures are needed more than in- 
vestment and reform. 

“The defease of socialism.” the 
general wrote, “as never before, de- 
mands not only (he availability of the 
appropriate defense potential (eco- 
nomic. scientific- technical, spiritual 
and military), but also the capability 
to use them immediately.” 

The fact that Marshal Nikolai 
Ogarkov, the ance-demoted chief of 
the general staff, went beyond this 
position to suggest the need for re- 
form indicates that any simple-mind- 
ed conservative position is politically 
weak. The inherent problem with the 
conservative approach is that mili- 
tary spending cannot solve the tech- 
nological problem. Unless the SS-25 
now in development flies, the Soviet 
Union will not have been able to 
develop an operational, solid-fuel in- 
tercontinental ballistic missile 20 
years after the American Minulcman 
(which is such a missile). The Soviet 
lag in computer technology puts the 
country at greater disadvantage with 
other modem weapon technologies. 
Moreover, drastic cuts in consump- 
tion to allow large-scale new military 
expenditures would be politically 
dangerous, especially if there is no 
accompanying reform program that 
holds out the prospect of a better life 
to ordinary citizens. 

.The other three positions in the 
Kremlin leadership are all essentially 
pro-dfetente, but they differ enor- 
mously in their implications. 

The second position might be 
called the traditional detente view, 
like the conservative first position, it 
is based od a two-bloc image of the 
world, but those in this camp believe 
that detente between the two blocs is 
possible. Advocates of traditional de- 
tente emphasize the centrality of the 
Soviet-American relationship. They 
insist on Soviet dominance of its 
bloc, but, to an extent that is not 
appreciated in the United States, they 
generally concede Europe and Japan 
to the United Stales. Despite their 
verbiage, the traditional pro-detente 
faction generally likes the Western 
alliances as a means of keeping West 
Germany and Japan nonnuclear, and 
of justifying the stationing of Soviet 
troops in Eastern Europe. 

The traditional detente position is 
held by Politburo members and their 
allies who are deeply worried by eco- 
nomic reform and frightened by out- 
side ideas. It is based on the hope that 
a relaxation of Soviet-American ten- 
sions would reduce the domestic 
pressure for reform. Originally it was 
based on the belief, now discredited. 


that importing technology would be a 
panacea. In real political terms, the 
traditional detente position, not the 
ami-dttente position, has become the 
basic conservative stance. It is the 
position taken by men such as Leonid 
Brezhnev, Konstantin Chernenko, 
Andrei Gromyko and Dmitri Us- 
tinov, the Hrfmse minister who died 
last month. 

The third position might be called 
activist American-oriented detente. 
Its proponents think that the Soviet- 
American relationship must be cen- 
tral, because only these countries 
have the capability of destroying 
each other. Bur unlike the traditional 
dfcienie advocates, the proponents of 
this position are dedicated to eco- 
nomic reform. Consequently, they of- 
ten speak fervently of international 
cooperation, the integration of the 
world economy and the building of 
trust between the Soviet Union and 
the United States. 

This is not just propaganda for the 
West, but is a plea for a change in 
Soviet attitudes and policy as wdl. 
Supporters of the traditional detente 
approach tend to be reactive, but the 
activists think that U.S. hostility 
might be broken down by far-reach- 
ing Soviet arms control proposals. 


The inherent problem 
with the conservative 
approach is that 
military spending 
cannot solve the 
technological problem. 


tension-reduction in the Third World 
and less Soviet secrecy. This position 
seems to be represented by a number 
of professional Americanologists, in- 


cluding scholars like Geonti Arbatov 
‘ ■ of the ULS 


of the Institute of the U.SA. and 
Canada and Fedor Buriatsky, former 
aide to Yuri Andropov. 

The fourth portion is the anti- 
American, pro-Europe, pro-Japan 
one. In public, it is expressed by ex- 
treme anti-American positions and 
by strong emphasis on division 
within the West 

For example, the director of the 
IMEMO international relations insti- 
tute, Alexander Yakovlev, has writ- 
ten of a “relative leveling in the 
strength of the three centers of powd- 
er: the U.SA^ Western Europe and 
Japan,” and argued that “in the his- 
torically foreseeable future the cen- 
trifugal tendency in the capitalist 
world will grow.” He signaled his 
attitude toward reform by stating 
that Japan leads in many technol- 
ogies, has become “a world economic 
state” and has surplanted the United 
States as “the symbol of youth and 
dynamism in the Western world.” 

In private, many of the proponents 
of anti-American detente can be con- 
temptuous of what they see as Soviet 
government's half-hearted efforts to 
woo Europe and Japan, and they 
have more substantial actions in 
mind. This group, however, consists 
of proponents of economic reform 
who are not merely thinking gpnpnKt- 
ically of a dissolution of the Western 
bloc or of altering the loyalties of 
Western Europe, but are contemplat- 
ing a greater integration of the Soviet 
Union and Eastern Europe into Eu- 
rope and Asia as a whole, with conse- 
quences for both blocs. 


ical 


The writer is a 

science at Duke University ana a mem- 
ber of the staff of the Brookings Insti- 
tution. He contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post. 


Bhopal Raises a Question of Values 


ASHINGTON — The apolo- 


Amencan tanners keep on raising 
their productivity the’ US. govern- 
ment will always be looking for mar- 


! always be looking 
kets, not undermining its reputation 
as a good and reliable seller by using 
food as a political lever. 

While food power at a global level 
has been probably overtaken by 
events, there are many local situa- 
tions where Lhe politicians believe 
food can be used as an effective tool. 

In Ethiopia there is evidence that 
the central government is trying to 
deny food aid too the rebel areas 
in Eritrea and Tigre. 

In Cambodia in 1979 the Vietnatn- 


gjsis of technophilia are al- 
ready at work on the calamity at 
Union Carbide's plant in Bhopal, In- 
dia, gingerly pointing out that, wdl 
after all, the plant was run by Indi- 
ans, and the pesticide it produced 
helped nourish infinitely more 
lives than were Iosl 
T he underlying lesson, they sug- 
gest, is that technology is invariably a 
two-edged sword, but in skilled West- 
ern hands ii is extremdy safe. And, of 
course, it is indispensable. As the 
Monsanto Corp. has mindlessly slo- 
ganized for years, “Without chemi- 
cals. life itself would be impossible.” 
Is that to be the lesson or Bhopal? 


By Daniel S. Greenberg 


name for the pesticide produced at 
Bhopal, rapidly became a worldwide 
bestseller after the United States and 
other countries banned the use of the 
pesticide DDT in the 1960s. Effective 
against a wide array of crop pests. 
Sevin gradually decomposes after 
use. thus avoiding the cumulative 
buildup that made DDT a danger. 

Nonetheless, it is a poison, and 
there is no reason for complacency 
about the consequences of heavy or 
long-term human exposure, in manu- 
facture or use. There are alternatives 


If any line of research warrants a 
crash program, it is the development 
'of safe pesticides. But the resources 
devoted to (his goal remain relatively 
small One reason, at least in the 
United Stales, is that Agriculture 
Secretary John Block is a cheerleader 
for chemical pesticides; be enthusias- 
tically regales audiences with tales of 
the wonders they performed for his 
soybeans back in Illinois. 

Since safer pesticides are them- 
selves examples of high technology, it 
is plain that the issue is not whether 
more or less technology is needed 
Rather, it is the application of sense 
and humane values in choosing 
among the technical possibilities cre- 


ese occupiers conjured up a famine in 
order to get the West to si 


to start dealing 
with them. In fact the food aid that 
did go in via Phnom Penh was only 

ma rginall y useful for the Cambodl- 

ans. It was used mainly for feeding 
the Vietnamese Army. Likewise the 
food that went in via Bangkok was 
used by the Thai and U.S. govern- 
ments as means of feeding the troops 
of Pol Pot hostile to Vietnam that had 
taken refuge in Thailand on the 
Cambodian border. Although orga- 
nizations like UNICEF and the Red 
Cross tried to slop this from happen- 
ing they were unable to do so. The 
destitute mothers and children they 
were hying to help passed on the 
food aid to their menfolk in the 
armed forces. Yet even this did not 
translate into power. All that hap- 
pened was that the Vietnamese and 
the Pol Pot armies were enabled lo 
fight another day. 

The Cambodian stalemate contin- 
ues, Perhaps if the United States and 
Thai governments had had total con- 
trol of the situation they could have 
had a more precise impact But there 
were too many actors in the drama— 

other governments and the charities 

— for this to happen. 


to chemical pesticides — the so 

Afler the Condolences have- bees' ex-- : trailed hiqljjgical controls that seek to a ted by science and industry, 
pressed and the shock., wears off, it mobilize natural opponents of crop- The tragedy of Bhopal can only be 
might wdl be. if ' the public-relations ' ‘dtaroViAg ’bests. Though long ne- 

-.^ccuxj-a^mwwped an, by the chemi- 
cal-producing companies and their 
' allies in-the federal government and 
,i£e agricultural umvenaties* , these 
methods have been 'gaining in scien- 
tific attention and -financial backing. 






m 


, artists, of industry and .government 
have their way. Bui there are other 


lessons to be learned and presdrVbdL 

The first is the fallacy of the,“iai|- 
safe” concept, routinely mv'okeoto 
soothe public fears, of powerful 1 tech- 
nologies. As demonstrated by. 'the 
plant at Bhopal, nothing is fail-side. 

Skill and. attention can minimize' the 
likelihood of failure, but anything 
can fail. To engineer^ Murphy’s Law ! V» 
is only part joke. 

That b&ng so, one can ask why 
Union Carbide an d its Indian partner 


compounded by the grisly contention 1 
that the deaths and sickness there, 
represent the price of progress. 


The writer is editor and publisher of, 
Science & Government Report, an in- 
dependent newsletter. 




' TETTER TO THE EDITOR 

TuridsbResponse - 


Firm on 


answer that has been offered is that 
over the years, the population moved 
in around what was originally an iso- 
lated plant. But that still leaves the 
question of why the danger was toler- 


ated by a company that proudly pro- 
claims its concern for safety. It could 


The report on Prime Minister An- 
dreas Papandr ecu’s declaration on 
“Greece’s sovereign rights in the Ae- 
gean” is so worded as to create the 
impression that the Greek govern- 
ment’s stand on this question is to 
maintain die “legal status of the Ae- 


tute a final settlement between 
Greece and Turkey — and that “the 
delicate balance achieved- at Lau*’ 
sanne between the interests of the 
two countries should not be upset.”' 
In plain words, the Turkish posi- 
tion could be thus summarized; 


have pulled out. Amazingly, the issue - . , , 

of danger to a nearby population is I 630 . defined and safeguarded 
iiisv nnm/ Ivina ahn.it Rhnnai'* by international treaties” against 


just now being asked about Bhopal’s .. _ . 

at in West Virginia. 7™? s claims. The actual postuon 


sister plant 
Beyond the riskiness of this partic- 
ular chemical-processing operation, 
there is the broader issue of toxic 
chemicals and alternatives to their 
use as pesticides. 

Sevin, Union Carbide's brand 


is quite the reverse. 

The Turkish government's de- 
clared view is that nothing should be 
done that would violate the disposi- 
tions of the Treaty of Lausanne 
(1923) — which was meant to coasti- 


accept 

sion to 12 miles cf the territorial 
waters of Greek offshore islands 
only _ a few miles distant of the 
Turkish coast. 

On the other hand, it does not see 
any valid ground to the claim that 
these offshore islands should take all 
the continental shelf of the eastern 
part of the Aegean, so depriving the 
continental coast ( 1 ,{XH) kilometers.) 
of all rights on iL 

H. BATU. 

Istanbul. 




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Ivo OIKUJOVIU | u» ** v 

parti pris et ikse passionnent. 
kconnaissenttouslesr^ 
mes qui nous rfcgissent et ils 
en partem. Ils connaissent 
tons ceux qui nous dirigent 
et ib les font palter. 

Chaque jour des nouvel* 

ksnousparvtennentdeLon- 

dres, Bonn, Frandbrt, New* 


QUOTIDIEN. 

SORTIE 
15 JANVIER. 


couvre les grands sujets: 
macro ^conomie, la vie des 
affaires, commerce, electro* 
nique, innovation, finance 
Internationale, votre 
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50 joumalistesontdfccidfcdefaire un journal qui 
bouge&r image cTaujourcPhui. llsontdesoreilles 
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Paris. Ils sont au coeur de 1’ actuality II est urgent 
de les lire quotidiennement 
dans la Tribune. 











LE MULTINATIONAL 
DE IIECONOMIE. 



Latest Australian Political Scandals 
Enliven Summer Holiday Doldrums 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Tima Service 


S YDNEY - Most of the four raUiion » ^ lizardUkfi 2 

their high-rise offices early on Fridays in search 
of the oerfect beach. Their coolers brim with 

beer. Then bodies, scorched by the sun, are 55^512? ^ 
-i c time he had seen Goanna. 


The newspaper primed the testimony, but to “Drugs, drugs, drugs." was the reply of the 
protect itself did not use Mr. Packer ’s name, mother of two grown children, when asked 
referring to him instead as Goanna, the name of about the increase of malfeasan ce in high 


YDNEY - Most of the four mdiion \*Eh? udiik * creamrc indigeilous to 
people in this harbor city have into Al ~? aiia ‘ „ _ . « . n , 

ESon routines, slipimg may from ™pKd on aty «n^and peran 


In the last decade, urbanized Australia — 85 


“Goanna" graffiti erupted on dty walls, and percent of the populace lives in cities such as 
commuters on ferries were asking each other, Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide along the 


b eginnin g to assume the gloss of dark mahoga- 
ny. 


But this summer 


“Who is Goanna?’ At a press conference. Prime coasts — has witnessed a tremendous increase 
Mi nis ter Bob Hawke was asked about the last in the use of drugs, especially the readily accessi- 


ble heroin from Southeast Asia. 

Besides racking families and society, the 


Finally, Mr. Packer, a large man with a repu- 


season has not been accom- 4^°° f or ^ av “ 1 8 135165 “ ““ flourishing ding traffic has led to more orga- 

nques and cars, ended the suspense. Fust, he nhe ^S e axSdties. according to the amhtJri- 


panied by the usual respite from politics Over nque ? ^ nizec 

hmch tables, in pubs Sd during *ffjed in a public sUlement by his ilawyera ^ 

people gleefutiy discuss each day's disclosures^ that he was Goanna. Having done that, as wefl 

as m ai n t aining his innocence, be promptly filed -r 


a litany Of scandals. m ai nt a ining ms innocence, uc prompuy mr 

Several weeks ago, the city was shocked by 

banner headlines announcing that a justice of 

the High Court, Australia’s top judicial body. Ti mer s, dr ug s., drugs,’ was the 
whose members still wear wigs and silks, had ‘ ° 

been charged with trying to influence the out- rep ly Q f the mother of tWO 
come rtf cases in favor of a lawyer friend. r J 

grown children, when asked 
■»"* ** 01 

agarose after the contents of telephone wiretaps , , 

— themselves a srandai because they were in- ffl3llC383IlCC 111 high ptaCCS. 
stalled illegally by the New South Wales police 

— were disclosed to the press. 

Justice Murphy has said that he is looking a defamation of character suit against the po 
forward to his trial, asserting it provide him with ^ -vealum the damaein 


a defamatioa of character suit against the per- 


nized crime activities, according to the authori- 
ties. 

E VEN Prime Minister Hawke and his 
family have been affected by the drug 
problem. In the recent electoral cam- 
paign, Mr. Hawke broke into tears as he dis- 
closed to the nation that bis daughter and ber 
husband were addicted to heroin. 

And although none of the revelations about 
improprieties involving prominent figures have 
toadied Mr. Hawke, he has faced embarrassing 
financial questions. 

Wide on a visit to Sydney, be reported the 
theft of approximately $5,000 in cash and U S. * _• 
cnneucy from his hotel room. In a televised 
campaign debate; a reporter on the panel asked 
Mr. Hawke why he had been carrying so much 
money in (he first place. 

The prime miniaw declined to answer the ev 



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t j H *’ V Jg jp 

✓ 

-- ■ IF: 


: ^4:-^ 

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■■■ 



an opportunity to establish his innocence. Ies timonj' ^ 

Also due to stand trial soon is the minister for as quickly, the court resolutely dismissed 


• . . _ suv pauuv uuuwtM uiMuiwu uw ouomrf Maw 

son he suspected of revealing the da m agi n g reporters question. 

them , rt . W ^ rdl “y , s .conversations resound with 


corrective services, who is responsible for run- fales of comration in high places, there are some 

ningthe prison system in New South Wales, the immutaWe things about the Australian way of 


most affluent, populous and oldest of Austra- 
lia’s seven states. He has been charged with 
accepting money from prisoners in return for 
their release. 


judicial process improperly. 


life at this time of year. 

Bush fires, which plague ranches along with 


dth XXT7" HAT explains the outbreak of scan- Bu s° ™. wnicti randies along wito 
for \m/dals in this strikingly underpopulated rabbits and kangaroos, are again a threat to the 
▼ ▼ country —only 14 million people in a parched yellow grasslands. Shirks appeared in 
continent the size of the United States — where 


P ERHAPS the most titillating to Sydney cricket, rugby and « fling traditionally have pro- 
residents have been the investigations voked more discussion than politics? 
into the affairs of a television magnate. As the country’s standard of living has im- 


Kerry Packer. 


the waters near a recent surfing carnival at 
Bateman’s Bay on the southern coast of New 


Sod Sann, leader of the Khmer People’s National liberation Front being welcomed by Cambotfian dvffians at an 
evacuation post just inside Thailand. The civilians bad moved from a camp expected to be attacked by Vietnamese troops. 

Non-Communist Cambodia Group 
Gathers Strength Under Son Sann 


evision magnate. As the country’s standard of living has im- *be beach, and the rac 
proved, some people wonder if its moral fiber thousands of bettors. 
Commission ha< ha< disintegra ted 


(continue to attract 


By Elizabeth Becker 

H’ashingion Pan Service 


pushed into the coalition in a politically prag- the United Stales and the Association of South- 
matic move urged on them by foreign powers — east Asian Nations, ASEAN, put irresistible 


charged that Mr. Packer, a self -described heavy Others insist that nothing b a * really phanowt 

gambler, concocted extensive tax-evasion With rakish mii« they note Australia’s cnmi- 


schemes and was involved in an international 
drug ring. 


nal legacy. The country was founded in 1788 as 
a colony for British convicts, many of (hem the 


Mr. Packer’s testimony before the co mmis - more cunning white-collar variety. Then, the 


S EEMINGLY keeping pace with events, 
horse racing has not been left untouched 
by scandal. 

The country’s most prominent bookmakers, 
the Waterhouse famil y, a household mu* in 


China. T hailan d and the United States. 


pressure on Mr. Son Sann to join in a coalition 


sion and some of the co mmission’ s fmriingc officer corps sent to watch over the criminals Australia, has been barred from the tracks. ne ? r 1 1131 pojuer. 

ww In Tht» Nafirtnil Timw mit/'V- himpH 1 a rnmp crvartalninu in cmncolino mm The bail CM1C after M hlQIlifV COPChldcd thflt “ ^ DOl JUS1 &D 


T t tmmss io a P^cuumy navy viemam- ^ Son Sann - has refused to change sides, 
ese attack against a Cambodian encampment Sihanouk , ^ nMSl famous of Cimbodi- 


alliance, but that support never came. 

The United States has ail but abdicated its 


were disclosed to The National Times, a muck- turned to crime, specializing in sm 
raking weekly that has covered the scandals But many Australians say the me 

with as much zeal as Australian libel laws allow, provided a spawning ground for 
The laws would undoubtedly appeal to Ameri- corruption. In the early 1970s, the 


turned to crime, specializing in smuggling mm The ban came after an inquiry concluded that 

But many Australians say the modern raa h»< the Waterhouses had taken part in a scheme 
provided a spaw ning ground for the current whereby a fast horse was surreptitiously substi- 


The laws would undoubtedly appeal to Ameri- corruption. In the early 1970s, the High Court tuted for a 100-1 shot, after large amounts of 
can public officials and corporations, as they limited the powers of the Commonwealth Tax money from all over Australia had been placed 
require a publisher to prove not only that infer- Commissioner. The decision, as one lawyer sees on the long shoL 

m atron is true but also that it was in the public it, sent many lawyers and business officials in The next stop for the Waterhouses is the 
interest to publish it search of illegal tax-evasion schemes. courtroom as they seek to dear their name. 


nor tne lnai ooraer. ans has chan ged sides so many times that he has military interest in the Indochina region to Chi- 

It was not just any Cambodians whom the ^ re p r€senl j^jg than himsdf and a na. The Chinese are responsible not only for 
Vietnamese attnckoL ft was th e camp of a grou p ya ^ e Khmgf nationalism. He fought against most of the armaments sent to the Cambodian 
called tbe Khmer People s National Liberation ^ R 0U ge when he was leader erf Cam- factions fighting the Vietnamese but also the 

Front, a nationalist, non-corrnnumst faction of but he ^ in 1970 he went major guarantor of direct military assistance 

apparently increasing strength and popularity. ovcr to ^ Khmer Rougs side and used his should Thailand be attacked by Vietnam. 

It is one of the two pnncipaJ araua considerable reputation to encourage Cambodi- Moreover, it appears that one lesson the Unit- 

Vietnam s six-year occupation of Cambodia. ^ l0 vrith him. ed States believes it has teamed from the Viet- 

The other army bdemgs to the commumsi Khmer Rouge rewarded Sihanouk by nam War is that Indochina communists are 

Khmer Rouge, widdy bdd responsible for kill- p lin ; n p him under virtual bouse arrest after they better fighters than non-communists. The Fen- 
f 8 W *J‘5 V U m-TQ 1111 ^ 00 111611 ” n ?P atn f“ came to power and formed their own govern- lagon has repeatedly resisted any U.S. military 
from 197. to 1979, when they were driven out mcn « v e , ^ h e ^ far closer to his Khmer assistance to another “third force" in Indo- 


Khmer Rouge, widely held responsible for kill- 

ins well over one million of their compatriots £ f r — ^ 


mg well over one milli on of char compatriots 
from 1975 to 1979, when they were driven out 
by Vietnamese forces. 



APRIL 14 - 23, 1985 


The business 
fever 

MILAN FAIR; 

• an inexhaustible source of contacts 

• a bridge-market for the new requirements of wo rid economy 

• a permanent centre of active business promotion 

• a meeting point where to know and compare cultures, technologies and different 
economic systems. 

MILAN FAIR: 

the most stimulating meeting point for manufacturers and consumers to continuously 
develop a demand and supply market an essential requirement of today's business world. 
Take your next business appointments at the Milan Fair. 

Tbe business fever wiD take also your people 

Rera di M ila n o. Largo Domodossola L 20145 Milano (Italy), 
teL (02) 49971. cable; Reromil. telex 331360 EAFM I 


. . . . . . Rouge associates m the coalition thi 

All last year the Vietnamese said that the Soo S ann _ w^om he openly distrusts. Although that derision went against Mr. Son 

duef obstacle to tlxnr joining in pace talks was Heng Samrin’s goSent is led by and Sann’s w^ tbe results may have been to the 
the con turned presence of the Rouge, with Khmer Rouge who fought under Mr. benefit rather than the detriment of the 

Bu . 1 Po * Pot helped run his regime. They joined KPNLF. If histwy is any judge, the front has 

001 negotiations and Aat its Vietnamese when it was clear that they done far better without U.S. military assistance 

««.»«! 0 3 Mr. Pol Pol’s aecution lists. _ than .those, .resistanoe groups that received 


came to power and formed their own govern- Lagon has repeatedly resisted any U 
menL Yet now he is far closer to his Khmer assistance to another “third force' 
Rouge associates in the coalition than to Mr. china, particularly to the KPNLF. 


chief obstacle to their joining in 
the continued presence of the 


talks was 
r Rouge. 


SPSS'S M Po ‘ “d helped run his.regime : Th^joineti 


Heng Samrin’s government is led by and 
fined with Khmer Rouge who fought under Mr. 


greatest political concern is not the Khmer 
Rouge but this nationalistic alternative to Indo- 
chinese communism. 

The KPNLF. a “third force" that is neither 


were next on Mr. Pol Pot's execution lists. than those n 
It is within this muddy, bloody context that American aid. 


VU T^i^vTc i1 ^ 1 ^ # v l a , _ Mr. Son Sann stands out even further. During Some of the Cambodians in the non-commu- 

the civil war. from 1970 to 1975. Mr. Son Sann nisi resistance are keenly aware of the high price 
refused to support either the corrupt and inept of U.S. military assistance. They are veterans of 
regime of Lon Nol’s Khmer Republic or its the incompetent Lou Nd regime that from 1970 
encrav ' the communist front of the Khmer until its defeat in 1975 was underwritten by the 
Rouge nomina„y headed by Sihanouk. As a UJW Ita- ^Up - ^ | 



bum the military camps and civilian villages of 

the KPNLF. 

Tbe liberation front’s army is bandy two- The KPNLF, a 'third force’ 
thirds the size of tbe Khmer Rouge forces; it is 

*■» k neither commonist nor 

°to^teorS« perhaps because o[ «. Uk corrnpU has become a crucial 

KPNLF fighters have proved themselves in tbe . . p n ■, g 

last two or three years to be the greatest political target for Hanoi S lorces. 

threat to Vietnam’s plans to entrench its client 

state in Phnom Penh. Just as communist guerril- 
las captured tbe. mantle of independence against Mr. Son Sann was threatened with am 


until its defeat in 1975 was underwritten by the 
United Stats. Up until the last weeks, the 
Americans gave uncritical support to Mr. Lon 
No! despite all evidence that he was losing the 
war through corruption and neglect as surely as 
tbe Khmer Rouge were winning it 


foreign occupation in the first and second Indo- 
china wars and won admiration in spite of the 
odds, the KPNLF is be ginning to win a similar 
reputation in this third Indochina war. 


that is neither communist nor I .T or ail of these reasons, American nrili- 

§“ 1 tary assistance to the KPNLF is not the 

corrupt, has become a crucial ,, “f^so^haw put forth, 
r The KPNLF has emerged as the most rndepen- 

tarwt for Hanoi’s forces dent Cambodian force “ what could be 

target ior Hanoi S lorces. seen as a tfan»camered war for Cambodia. The 

Khmer Rouge are discredited not only for tbeir 

gen oa dal policies but for their long-standing 
result, Mr. Son Sann was threatened with arrest allegiance to and dependence on China. The 


by Mr. Lon Nol. snubbed by the U.S. Embassy Vietnamese caQ them a puppet of China and the 
in Phnom Penh and threatened with death by Cambodian people see a germ of truth in the 
Sihanouk in Beijing. charge. Of course tbe Heng Samrin regime is 

A man of the “third force" with no side to regularly called a puppet of Hanoi, a charge that 
support, Mr. Son Sann returned to Paris and the also sticks. 


I F the current war, which is being fought m life of an obscure exile whose mind was fixed on The KPNLF, tbe orphans of the war, cannot 
western Lampodia, was stnctly between events in his homeland. When the Vietnamese be portrayed as any country’s client. True, the 
the RnmcT Rouge and me Vietnamese- were looking around for a candidate to bead a resistance does depend on the expensive good 
imposed regime or Heng Sanmn, the odds p U npet regime should they overthrow Mr. Pol wifl of Thailand for a safe haven and depend- 
would be Tar better lor Hanoi. If then woiud be a p Q ^ ^ey sent an intermediary to Mr. Son Sann able supply route, and without Chinese military 
simple contest between two vying wings of the to ask if be would join them. Mr. Son Sann said supplies it would have languished with little 
same Cambodian Communist .party. The people no> tfcu he was opposed to any plans for a chance to prove its military ability. Moreover, 
o f Ca mbodia would have the narrow choice Vietnamese occupation of Cambodia even if it by joining in the coalition with Sihanouk and 

the Khmer Rouge, the front has tainted its 
reputation. But compared to the other groups 


. _ . . . . Vietnamese occupation of Cambodia even u » ^ *, — ~— 

between Pol Pot s brand of Khmer communism would mean tbe end of the Pol Pot regime. the Khmer Rouge, the front has tainted its 

or tire Vietnamese^ style communism admmis- reputation. But compared to the other groups 

tered through the Heng Samrm regime. TTF HEN tbe Vietnamese took over Cam- fighting in the war, tbe KPNLF can hardly be 

But Son Sann, the leader of the KPNLF, Ym/ bodia, Mr. Son Sann moved from Paris accused as acting as a stand-in for a major 
refused to leave Cambodians such limited v v to a base on the Thai-Cambodian bor- foreign power. 

choices. A prime minister of Cambodia in the der and set about transforming a tired band of Mr. Son Sarin is adamant that he is not 
1960s, Mr. Son Sann organized the liberation refugees, newly arrived overseas Cambodians interested in large-scale military aid, nothing 
front around a platform espousing democratic and young recruits into a military and political that even vaguely resembles the level ofaid 
ideals, a free, independent, nonahgned Cam bo- resistance force. given the Lon Nol regime. He is eouallv uninter- 


Wf HEN the Vietnamese took over Cain- fighting in the war, the KPNLF can hardly be 
■A/ bodia, Mr. Son Sann moved from Paris accused as acting as a stand-in for a maj or 
Y v to a base on the Thai -Cambodian bor- foreign newer. 


dia and a sense of nationalism tied to Buddhism. 
Unable to get support from non-communist 
powers, tbe KPNLF has had to rely oa tbe 
Chinese. Beijing gives the lion’s share of its 


that even vaguely resembles the level of aid 
given the Lon Nol regime. He is equally uninter- 


military assistance to its longtime ally, the Rouge, under Mr. Pol Pot. had nearly 80,000 
Khmer Rouge, and gives the leftovers to the soldiers. The Vietnamese occupation Force num- 


all sides. When Mr. Son Sann’s army started in list of equipment he wants shipped to his trows 
1979. it had about 1.000 members. The Khmer — nothing more or less. 

Rouge, under Mr. Pol Pot, had nearly 80,000 It is questionable whether the United Slates is 


KPNLF. berai 200,000. 

Perhaps because of this virtual abandonment Now, Mr. Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge, despite 
tbe liberation front has surprised all sides and. receiving vastly superior aid, number around 
made deep inroads in occupied Cambodia, be- 35,000 soldiers while Mr. Son Sana’s KPNLF is 


soldi ers. The Vietnamese occupation twee mim- capable of giving even limited supplies, or will- 
bered 200,000. mg to do so, without demanding a price that 

Now, Mr. Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge, despite would HmrinUh the appal of the KPNLF 

SfST 8 As of this week, the question is of utmost 
35,(X)0soldiCTs white Sanas KPNLF is Importance. Tbe Veman^se have destroyed all 

thought to be 15.000 to 20.000 soldiers. of the KPNLFs maior camns. indudfiw its 


among, in many respects, the Cambodian fac- thought to be 15.000 to 20.000 soldiers. of Uk KPNLFs major camps, including its 

bon that the others have to discredit. Although Thor appeal and propaganda reach deep in- headquarters at Ampil Moreover, the Vetmim- 

u is small comfort, tbe Vietnamese attacks side Cambodia and into tbe government. ^ have ' 

against their camps over the past month are a KPNLF operatives have their own intelligence camps, tb 

tribute to the success the KPNLF has had in network. When Cambodians defect from the appear to 


ese have changed tactics. Besides destroying 
camps, they have stationed themselves in what 
appear to be permanent bases against tbe bor- 


HcralbS^ribmtc 




Reaching More T Kan a Third of a Million Readers 
in 164 Countries Around the Work . 


chief political opponents of tbe Vietnamese and 
the Heng S3mnn government. 

Tbe jails of the Heng Samrin regime are filled 
with KPNLF followers, or people suspected of 
supporting the front, not with Khmer Rouge. 
On the contrary, the government has shown 
extraordinary leniency toward the Khmer 
Rouge, to whom they offered a clemency pro- 
gram requiring no more than one month’s re- 
education before they are welcomed back into 
the fold. They are seen as wayward communists 
who need only be shown “tbe true path," as the 
minister of justice said, before becoming citi- 
zens with full rights. 

T HE KPNLF, on the other hand, repre- 
sent an entirely antagonistic poll Lied al- 
ternative. When the Vietnamese or the 
Heng Samrin government are criticizing the 
liberation front, they say that there is nearly no 
difference between the KPNLF and Mr. Pol 
Pot’s people. The Vietnamese are capitalizing 
on the front's entering into a loose coalition for 
more than two years with the Khmer Rouge and 
the tiny array led by Prince Norodom Sihanouk, 
Cambodia’s former ruler. The three groups were 


involved in their country’s war. 


cut off the liberation front from its routes inside 
Cambodia — routes that it has used successfully 


n vDKi7e ■ i j j . . »-amDoaia — routes uai it nas used successfully 

The KPNLF is ovendiadowed. however, by to harass Vietnamese troops, oreanize its fof- 
tfae extraordinary fame of Sihanouk and the lowers around the country, gaihnew recruits 
battlefield reputation of the Khmer Rouge. Mr. and circulate propaganda against tbe Vietnam- 
Son Sann, a former financier who is supremely ^ 

self-confident and patient, is. however, undiar- P . , - 


acieristically modest and shy for tbe leader of a 

guerrilla movement. «"» a * 3 “? 5t *** Vietnamese. Hanoi hopes 

Mr. Son Sann’s imlikdy demeanor and his ^ '^ Cm ' CtXI T U ^ St l sasVlz f e . ^ 

age. 73. undoubtedly contributed to the early ° f 

and consistent U.S. refusal to grant military aid Samrm or the Khmer Rouge, 
to the KPNLF. Mr. Son Sann expected the ^ “xt stage is cnioaL Have the non-com- 
opposite. But the United States would mke no ““msts suffered a milita ry defeat that will leave 
part in his military projects. The Carter admin- them incapable of regrouping and expanding? 


istration decided to give its tacit support to the How should tbe United States mid other sympa- 
Khmer Rouge under Mr. Pol Pol It saw no respond without jeopardizing the 

future for the KPNLF. The Khmer Rouge, on yNU? “ ti» front the last gasp of the dream 
the other hand, wee a proven military force. °* 3 “thiiri force,” or has it enraged as a group 
Both armies benefited from U.S. aid to refugees °f powemilly attractive independence fighters 


along the horde. 


i HE Reagan administration continued 
tbe Carter policy although >1 has given 
greater political support to tbe KPNLF 


who survive foreign occupiers as other Indo- 
chinese guerrillas before them, including those 
who fought with Ho Chi Minh? 

Elisabeth Becker’s book at the Khmer Rouge 


as it has grown in strength and infiuraKe. It was and the devastation of Cambodia, “When the War 
under the Reagan administration that China, Is Over." is to be published this falL 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1985 

ARTS / LEISURE 

Tend Colony’ Starts Promisingly, Ends as Schlock 

•/ i . cnmmr 


Page 7 , 


Computer-Bridge Programs Cheat 

. v.. T TV 


By Alan Truscocc 

Wn> York Tima Service 

XT YORK — If there is an 
1 TNintdlecluaJ activity in which 

L humans can still out-think comput- 

ers, it may be bridge. That was the 
verdict last week after a noisy ses- 
sion at the Midway Oub in New 
j York, in which four bridge-playing 
' computer programs were dealt pre- 
pared hands, then evaluated by hu- 
man experts. 

Although computer chess pro- 
grams can defeat all but the very 
best players, computer bridge is rel- 
atively new — and vastly more dif- 
ficult for programmers. In chess, a 
£ computer must search through an 
admittedly large number of polen- 
oal moves and, with electronic log- 
L'_' ic, select the best. At a middle level 
of difficulty, a chess-playing com- 

K ter makes about 40 moves an 
ur. But bridge involves such hu- 
v man. attributes as deception and 

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style, not to mention cooperating 
with a partner. Often, it is not so 
much logic as psychology. 

Then there’s cheating. Unlike 
humans, who are not supposed to, 
computers are programmed to 
cheat with considerable regularity. 
To compensate for the limited 
mammy available to a microcom- 
puter, the programs peek at the 
other hands, thus taking advantage 
of possibilities not usually avail- 
able to mere mortals. The result is 
that a mach ine will occasionally 
make a highly dramatic opening 
lead or an unlikely but successful 
play. The one computer program in 
last week's competition that re- 
frained from cheating. Dyna- 
eo rap’s Bridge Master, finished 
lasL 

The most sophisticated entry 
and eventual winner of the first 
Computer Bridge-Program Contest 
was a program called Harvey that 


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was devised by Tom Throop of 
Bethesda, Maryland, one of the 
event's organizers. Run on an Ap- 
ple computer, it offered a color 
display of the cards and could bid, 
play or defend a hand. Throop is 
proud of Harvey’s ability to apply 
several bidding conventions em- 
ployed by tournament players. 

The programs were designed to 
permit a bridge fan to sit at home 
and play against a computer. De- 
ciding which was best was no easy 
task, partly because not all the soft- 
ware could do the same thi ngs . Dan 
Lubiu’s Bridge 2J2, run on a Com- 
modore machin e, was actually bet- 
ter at defending a hand than Har- 
vey. which turned out to be a much 
better bidder. A fourth program, 
Artworx 4.0, gave the judges some 
trouble because it would not accept 
the deals that had been selected for 
the test and played only hands it 
had generated itself. 

There would have been a fifth 
entrant, but in typically hu m a n 
fashion someone forgot disk. And 
an attempt to link up with a bridge- 
playing mainf rame computer at 
IBM headquarters in Yorktown 
Heights, New York, did not come 
off because the programmer. Alan 
Cobham, was out of town. 

Another strong program is likely 
to come from William Grieve, an 


By Michael Billington L _ 

International Herald Tribune f 

L ONDON — Kafka attracts j 
/ adaptors like a flame does 
moths. Directors from Orson 
Welles and Jean-Louis Barrault to 
Britain's Steven Berkoff have re- * 
peatedly sought to turn his punitive 
fantasies into expressionist night- 

THE LONDON STAGE 

mares. But although there have 
been some stimulating results fin 
particular a Czech version of the 
“The Trial" in one of London’s 
World Theatre Seasons during the 
late 1 960s). they nearly always miss 
Kafka’s realistic details and rich 
allusiveness. 

The latest example of the stage s 
flair for uunimizing Kafka is a pro- 
duction of his powerful 1916 story, 
“In the Penal Cbtony." which the 
Pip Simmons Theatre Group has 
transported from the Mickery The- 
atre in Amsterdam to the Institute 
of Contemporary Arts in London. 

]□ Kafka’s story, a colonial officer 
seeks to enlist an explorer’s support 
in preserving, a fearsome execution 
machine; fading to gel it, he goes 
into the contraption, which in- 
scribes words on flesh with spikes 
dipped in acid. The story can be 
■ taken as an agonized expression of 
Kafka’s private guilt, a prophetic 
l vision of state cruelty, a religious 
, fable about original sin. But Sun- 
. mons tu ms it into a sensation-seek- 
ing show combining audience ma- 
j nipulation with trite comments 
• about the media. 

I The fust 10 minutes are promis- 
j ing The promenading audience 
. gathers around a mechnical scuip- 
^ ture. La Ballista, designed by Alex 
_ Mavro and looking like a taut, gj- 
_ am crossbow. A television reporter 
I. — Kafica's explorer — moves 
h through the audience asking opin- 
, ions about the machine as a work 
e of art A woman planted in the 
(l audience assails Mavro and sym- 
, r bolicaliy aborts her child as a pro- 
it test against male violence. Then. 

with a good deal of whirring of cogs 
ij and ratchets. La Ballista starts to 
n function and a bomb-shaped rais- 
a sile inside it is released, shattering a 
pane of glass about 20 feel away, 
j, Looking distinctly unsettled, the 
m audience members stumble to their 
1C seats. 

m What follows, however, is a gra- 
tutious attempt to update Kafka 
lv and to bang home a series of mes- 
^ sages. A modern-day officer coolly 


the officer takes his place, the re- t 
porter switches her attention to a v 
slightly campish commandant who c 
tinkles out tunes . on a candle- 
strewn piano, sports dark glasses S 
and clearly represents the arro- s 
gance of power. t 

The trouble is that Simmons ire- * 
sponsible for adaptation and pro- 
duction) has a less interesting mind ’ 
than Kafka. We know that the I 
modem media have an ambiguous : 
relationship with violence, feeding 1 

off it as well as reporting iL We also 1 
know that the modem world is full j 
of brutish dictators who tell silky | 
lies to the camera while sanctioning 
private torture. And if Simmons is 
trying to pin down the obscenity of 
state violence. 1 wonder why he 
plays so much on audience fear by 
turning La Ballista on us until we 
are ready to dive under our seals. 
Kafka's study in guilt is reduced to 
a piece of schlock horror, and not 
even good performances by Trevor 
Smart as the machine-minding of- 
ficer and Mavro, hoist with his own 
petard as the condemned man, rec- 
oncile me to a piece of theater that 
lacks any hint of Kafka's matter- 
of-fact horror. 

□ 

The reality of crime and punish- 
ment is conveyed far better in a 
play performed in Farsi, “A Cry 
With Sernt Lips," at the Royal 
Court's Theatre Upstairs. It is the 
work of an exiled Iranian writer, 
iraj Jannatie Ataie, who was a po- 
litical prisoner under the shah, and 
it is pul on by the Mazdak Theatre 
Group, made up of unpaid, dis- 
persed actors dedicated to keeping 
Iranian culture alive. Watching a 
three-hour play in an alien longue 
with the aid of a synopsis is hard 
work. What is moving is the actors' 
p»ngp of commitment and the feel- 
ing that they and the writer know 
what they are talking about when 
they portray repression, unlike 
many Western theater folk who rail 
against authority but face nothing 


more s hilling than the posable 
withdrawal of a government subsi- 
dy. 

The play is not (like Paraz 
Sayyad's recent film. "The Mis- 
sion”! about modem Iranian poli- 
tics. It is concerned with the perse- 
cution of an Iranian poet, Farokhi 
Yazdi. who from 1908 until 1939 
was victimized by successive re- 
gimes for his commitment to truth, 
and who died in prison. But. al- 
though not about the present, it 
puls Ayatollah's Khomeini's re- 
gime in context and reminds one 


that Free speech in Iran has always 
been a delicate plant. One of the 
best scenes shows Farokhi, in 1923 
during the supposedly democratic 
era of Reza Shah, being elected to 
the parliament; but, when he voices 
his criticisms, his fellow members 
brandish their silver-topped canes 
at him and beat him up. One has to 
take the play's accuracy and quali- 


ty on trust. But Jamshid Ashkam s 
hunted-dog. hollow-eyed look as 
Farokhi transcends the language- 
barrier. and. although the presenta- 
tion is prettv basic, the play has the 
unmistakable air of something that 
had to be written. 

□ 

Elsewhere the literary mince- 
meat-machine goes on processing 

Victorian novels. Hot on the beds 
of Dickens's “Great Expectations 
comes a much livelier adaptation of 
Thackeray’s panoramic study of 
upper- mi ddle-class manners, 
“Vanity Fair,” presented by a 
young company. Cheek by Jowl, at 
the Donmar Warehouse. Later in 
the season the troupe promises 
Shakespeare's “Pericles” and Ra- 
cine’s “.Andromache." There is no 
doubt they have energy, attractive- 
ness and talent. A cast of seven, 
switching easily between narration 


and acted-out scene. niuM up 
Thackeray's world. SageStaj™ 
plays the scheming Becky Sharp 
With the right bright-eyalsdf-cra- 
teredness and Amanda Harris . 
lends her chum Amelia a tear- 
stained. dozy-brained goodness. 

But. though it is well done and 
cleverly directed (by Declan Don- 
nellan). I stiD wonder what it is all 
for. Thackeray took 800 pages to 
explore the workings of a society 
based on snobbery, jockeying for 
position and social status. When * 
the book is filleted for the stage, . 
what vou get is a succession of j 
highlights (such as the Duchess of » 
Richmond's eve-of- Waterloo balll . 
without the gradations of character 
over a passage of time. The play ; 
“Vanity Fair" is fine for those who , 

can't read; but the. aesthetic impact . 

is that of an early 19 th-century ; 
“Dynasty" with slightly belter dia- 
logue. 1 


Edinburgh F< 


77if Associated Press 

E DINBURGH —The 39th Ed- 
inburgh Festival will have a 
strongly French flavor, celebrating 
almost 1.000 years of friendship 
between Scotland and France, fes- 
tival organizers have announced. 

French opera, theater, music and 
dance will be performed by top 
international artists during the fes- ( 
tival Aug. 11-31. organizers said 
Monday. 

The Lyon Opera will perform 
Alexis Emmanuel Cbabrier’s 1877 
opera, “L'Etoile" and Claude De- 
bussy's ‘‘Pfelleas el Melisande." 

Among visiting musicians will be 
the Orchestra National de France 
conducted by Wolfgang Sawal- 
liscta. the Orchestra de Paris under 
Daniel Barenboim, the Pittsburgh 
Symphony Orchestra under Lorin 
Maazet the Amsterdam Baroque 
Orchestra, the Netherlands Cham- 
ber Choir, and the Polish Chamber 


Orchestra conducted by Jerzy 
Maksymiuk. 

The French actor and mime 
Jean-Louis Barrault will also ap- 
pear at the TestivaL 

Works by Johann Sebastian 
Bach, to celebrate the 300th anni- 
versary of his birth, and by Gustav 
Mahler are prominent in the con- 
cert programs. 

Art lovers wil be able 10 see 


works ranging from Matisse to 
Andy WarhoL a festival announce- 
ment said. 

Other events will include new 

books, jazz and films. 

The unofficial Fringe, claimed to 
be the world's largest arts festival 
in itself, has attracted about 450 
performing groups from the United 
States. Canada. Australia and Eu- 
rope. 


Bettotto Work Seized Before Auction 


The Associated Press 

XT EW YORK — An 18th-cen- 
X ’I tury painting by Bernardo Bd- 
lotto that was to be auctioned 
Tuesday has been seized by cus- 
toms agents, who said it was stolen 
from a home in Florence in 1981. 

“A Capricdo with a Domed 
Church and Buildings in Pima" 


was one of three works, all believed 
stolen, that were recovered Fnday 
by the U. S. Customs Service. 

It was listed and reproduced m 
Christie’s catalog for Tuesdays 
auction at Christie’s Park Avenue 
gallery of “Important Paintings by 
Old Masters." It was turned over to 
agents at Christie's. 


IBM executive wuo 

United States in the 1960 world 
team championship. Since simil a r 
efforts are under wav in France, it 
Ukdy that ihe electronic 
competition will soon go interna- 
tional 


rTTWl rTTi i 


tion of the deadly machine. As a 
condemned man is strung up for 
execution, the parasitic TV report- 
er rushes eagerly around (“unbe- 
lievable to have 'this live on film") 
to catch his dying words. And, as 


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NYSE Index 



Own ran 

Low 

Loti am 

Indus 

1337.19 

T343J71 

1228116 12*179 — 

US 

Trans 

59133 

599 

5B6JJ3 

591.78 + 

176 

Util 

14839 

14916 

147.31 

14839 + 

OJB 

Como 

50288 

SUM 

497.96 

501.66 + 

sja 



HKrti Law CIOM Clrta 
Camiusile 98.96 «U7 9839 + OJJ 

S U 'as 'as w ty 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Bn Seles *SMi 

Jan. 14 201415 S4X71S 1.734 

Jan. II ... 192J234 44MI7 ZD64 

Jon. 10 1B7J97 444JB4 ?5S 

Jan. 9 166.107 3BL891 1022 

Jan. B 1S8J7S 407,227 476 

•Include d In It* sates Hmiros 


Tuesday^ 

u 

N 


SI 

i 

A 

41 

( 

Closing: 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


ftdmmcee 
Declined 
Undiansad 
ratal Issues 
New Hlotis 
New Laws 
Volume up 
Volume down 


Com 0051 ft 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

TrcnsD. 


Week 

Ctaw ell's* Aoo 
257 J8 + JJS 246JW 
274.46 +2M 257. 05 
305.90 + 2JW 299.03 
284.29 +1 JO 276J3 
250 JO +1.17 715 HI 
235.93 + 146 23054 
25008 +2.13 239.02 


AMEX Most Actives 


VOL HM Low Last Onto 
wanuB 4ffl » 1» 25* + 4k 

TIE «M » 7» 7* + * 

TexAIr 3689 m I0M I OH + * 

Data Pd 2652 16 »* 16 + * 

CmpCn 2619 12* UK* 12* + Vi 

AM Ittfl 2375 3* 3H 3* + Ml 

Ultmte 3717 12* 10* 11 -1% 

WDIaltl 1546 10* 10* 10* + * 

GrfLkC 1630 33* 33 33* +1* 

GHCdS 1449 12 11* 11* 

Crrsto 1312 3* 3 3* 

AIotCp 1276 71* 30* 21* + * 


39* 25* 
7* 7* 

10 * 10 * 
16 15* 

12* 12* 
3* 3* 

12* 10* 
10 * 10 * 
33* 33 
12 11* 
3* 3 

71* 30* 


V0l.at4PM 

155J604W 

Pre+.t PJML eri. 

mmm 

Prev consolidated dose 

145401,908 


Tattles Include ttie nationwide prices 
up to ttedosiM an wall Street 


Standard & Poor's Index 


High Low Close Ciro* 
Industrials 191.73 19003 19043 +025 

TrShSD. 153J4 150.72 153L50 +1.75 

UIUiUk 7fc2S 75.79 75.99 + 007 

Finance IMS 19J3 I9JS +009 

Composite 17102 17Q40 17081 +030 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


AMEX Stock Index 




Dow Lower in Heavy Trading 




sffli 


United Press International 

NEW YORK. — The stock market finished 
with mixed results on heavy volume Tuesday 
after traders took profits in blue-chip issues. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 3.75, to 
1,230.79. An advance early in the session took 
the index close to the 1.240 area, but selling 
developed at that level as it has many times in 
the past 

Big Board volume totaled 15526 million 
shares, up from the 124.88 million traded Mon- 
day. 

Before the stock market opened. Citibank 
and Chase Manhattan in New York announced 
reductions in their prime interest rate to 1014 
percent from 10% percent. Several other banka 
quickly followed. 

A similar reduction was announced by Man- 
+ii4 ufacturers Hanover Trust late Monday. 

X £ The Commerce Department said retail sales 
X £ fell 0.1 percent in December, the first setback 
since August 

In another report the Federal Reserve said 
industrial production in December increased 
0.6 percent after seasonal adjustment 
"Most traders and institutions decided to 
take profits when the market failed to get 
through 1240," said Peter Fumiss of Shearson 
I .eh man- American Express. He said there were 
organized selling programs by some institutions 
late in the session. 

The individual investor, Mr. Fumiss said, 
appears content to stay in bonds and money 
markets for the moment 
Thomas Ryan of Kidder Peabody said the 


economic figures were a "touch disappointing.'' 
He said the stock market probably is faring a 
period of "churning and some digestion” but a 
push through 1240 might be possible if interest 
rates stay where they are. 

Harry Villec of Sutro & Co., or Palo Alto. 
California, said the heavy volume on advancing 
markets was a sign the stock market was per- 
forming better. 

He said lower short-term interest rates plus 
softening oil prices created a favorable environ- 
ment for a stock market advance. 

AT&T was the most active NYSE-listed is- 
sue, off % to 20%. A block of 504,100 shares 
crossed at 20%. 

Gulf & Western was second, up % to 29%. A 
block of 1.8 milli on shares crossed at 29 and 
another for 1.13 million also crossed at 29. 

Scbhunberger was third, adding % to 37%. 

In the oil group, Mobil advanced % to 26%, 
Exxon % to 45%, Indiana Standard % to 54% 
and Royal Dutch % to 49%. 

General Motors was unchanged at 81 while 
Ford lost % to 47% and Chrysler shed % to 32%. 

U.S. Gypsum advanced 1% to 66% and Na- 
tional Gypsum added 114 to 41%. An analyst 
raised earnings estimates. 

In the technology group, IBM lost % to 124% 
and Digital Equipment % to 1 10%. Burroughs 
added % to 60%, Texas Instruments % to 124% 
and Advanced Micro Devices added % to 32%. 
Motorola lost % to 35%. 

Uni Dynamics jumped 2 to 26%. The compa- 
ny has rejected a takeover bid. Piedmont Avia- 
tion added % to 35%. 


12NU>ntti SIS. Clow 

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Statist® Index 


7| »TEW«TOJi*L M # 4 

licralos^sttnbimc 


AMEX orto P.12 Eomtam reports P.11 
AM EX MgMwsP.12 Fitno rata nates P.13 
NYSE Pfttt P- 8 GoXS fflortufl P. 9 
NYSE hWetow P.10 Interea rata p. 9 
Conation sties P.U Marital summary P. B 
Xarrancv-raa P. V opHana p.12 

CtBonOEDlti P.12 OtC stock P.13 
DMdBOdS ' P.I2 Other mortehj P.14 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1985 

INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


** 


Page 9 


believe they will get 
just what they need* 


Tpining the Supennanager: 
>re Companies Go it Alone 

By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

International Herald Tribune 

EW YORK — Because of the iocreasingJy competitive 
international business climate, big U.S. companies are 
generally devoting more resources to train their “su- 
-j ^ pennanagers" — the executives who can theoretically 
($ii all Executive courses are proliferating, and applications for 
tflJdle- and senior-management courses at top business schools 
g on the rise. 

i Increasing numbers of big companies, however, prefer to train 
feir managers themselves, because they think they can do it 
jitter. According to Bricker's International Directory of uni ver- 
ity executive programs, there 

|as been a substantial increase D , . . «, 

iver the past year in the num- By designing training 
• 3er of in-house training pro- 
grams. Bricker's listed 35 in- 
house business training 
-programs last year, compared 
-’with almost none two years 
agp. 

» There are several reasons 

■ for the newfound popularity of such programs, and first among 
them, some executives say, is the low quality of some of the 
' outside courses. 

“You have 20,000 to 30,000 executive-training consultants out 
there,'’ says James P. Bau ghnan. manag er of the management- 
education program at General Electric to., a company that has 
traditionally favored in-house management training,. “Ninety 
percent you turn down out of hand, you can smell them a mde 
away” 

Another reason is inherent in the tailor-made nature of a 
specific program. By designing their training themselves, some 
companies believe that they will get just what they need. 

“Companies have greater control over the curriculum and can 
focus on the objectives of the company,” says Samuel Pond, 

- publisher of Bricker's International and a former dean at the 
Stanford Business SchooL 

S AYS Mr. Baughnan: “We're trying to get programs more in 
tune with our specific competitive position rather than 
dealing with generalities.” 

Another attraction to the individual company approach is that 
- mode managers can be trained at once. Many business schools 
to limit programs to only two people per company. 

Finally, the actual cost of such a program can be substantially 
lower per participant. 

Most companies now use a mix of business school faculty and 
of iceir own managers to do the training. Some prefer to use only 
then own managers, although manag ers who have the knowledge 
aiyuhe inclination to teach are still the exception. 

4 o such exceptions are General Electric and Distal Equip- 
Carp. “I like teaching, it's the fundamental role of a 
mamger,” says Pier Carlo Fafiotti, who heads Digital’s European 
opeptions. “I believe people in line management should teach 
the lest. Preach and practice is a self-correcting discipline.” 
me analysts believe that the GE and Digital exceptions may 
be the rule, at least for large companies who want the tailor- 
programs from the best schools. For one thing, mixing bl- 
and business-school training requires business- school co- 
don. and some top U.S. business schools are not interested, 
ard, Stanford, the University of California at Berkeley, 
husetts Institute of Technology and the University of 
• r_* Virinia, for example, trill not provide taflormade executive 
i tracing courses for individual companies. 

Tli ere are several reasons. for that, one being a lack of time. 

I (Continued on Page 11, Col 1) 


! 'A-'- 



Dollar 
Weakens 
In U.S. 

Pound Manages 
A Slight Gain 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
turned in a mixed performance on 
world foreign exchanges Tuesday, 
shattering records early in the day 
against the currencies of Italy, 
Spain, South Africa and Sweden, 
bin retreating in later U.S. trading. 
The British pound recovered slight- 
ly from its all-time low. 

Analysts said currency traders 
have become cautious about the 
prospects of coordinated central 
bank intervention against the dol- 
lar. 

Gold prices were mixed in quiet 
trading, rising in Hong Kong and 
Europe but retreating ai day's end 
in the United States. Republic Na- 
tional Bank in New York said gold 
bullion was bid at $301.25 a troy 
ounce. 

The pound, which dipped to n 
record low of $1.10 in Hong Kong 
early Monday, has gained strength 
since the Bank of England raised 
minimum interest rates by 1.5 per- 
centage points lata- that day- 

in London, the pound was 
quoted at $1.1205 in late trading 
Tuesday, up from $1.1137 Mon- 
day. Later in New York sterling 
rose to SI. 1 192 from Monday's late 
rate of $1.1125. 

Tokyo markets were closed for a 
holiday. In London, the dollar was 
quoted at 255-25 Japanese yen. 
compared with Mondays Tokyo 
dosing of 254.55 yen. But by the 
end of the trading day in New 
York, the dollar fell to 254.90 yen 
from 255JJ75 yen late Monday. 

Dollar rales in New York, com- 
pared with late rates Monday, in- 
cluded: 3.1905 West German 
marks, down from 3.1965; 1689 
Swiss francs, up from 1685; and 
9.765 French francs, down from a 
record 9.790. 

■ Ruble Overtakes the Pound 

Britain’s pound sterling was 
fixed by the Soviet Union Tuesday 
at less than one ruble, the first tune 
the Soviet currency has been worth 
more than the pound, according to 
Reuters. The pound sank to 99.38 
kopeks in Tuesday s official list of 
exchange rales. In the last list the 
pound was worth 1.016 rubles. A 
year ago it was listed at 1.1307 
rubles. 


Mazda Chief Gears for a U.S. Test 


By Susan China 

New York Tunes Service 

HIROSHIMA, Japan — A de- 
cade ago, Kenichi Yamamoto’s 
future at Mazda Motor Gorp. 
looked bleak. Mr. Yamamoto 
was the man behind Mazda's ro- 
tary engine, the technological 
wonder but fuel-economy disas- 
ter that helped push the compa- 
ny to the brink of bankruptcy. 

But now Mr. Y amamoto, 61 is 
Mazda's new president, chosen 
Nov. 30, the same day that Maz- 
da announced another funda- 
mental change — its decision to 
build an assembly plant is the 
United States, at Flat Rock, 
Michigan. 

According to Mr. Yamamoto, 
bringing the Flat Rock plant into 
production is “one of the most 
important undertakings'* on 
Mazda’s agenda. The plant is to 
cost $450 million, with construc- 
tion beginning this spring, and a i 
full employment should produce 
240,000 units a year and employ 
3.500 people. 

By all accounts, the plant is 
critically important to Mazda's 
continued success in the U.S. 
market, where the company now 
sells 22 percent of its production. 
A relatively recent success, Maz- 
da has been impeded by the quo- 
tas on Japanese imports. Its 
share was 173,000 vehicles last 
year, and analysis say the quotas 
have stunted Mazda's growth. 

The kind of scrappy leader- 
ship that served Mr. Y amam oto 
well in his long straggle with the 
rotary suggests there will be the 
force behind Mazda's critical ef- 
fort in the United States. 

Mr. Yamamoto, tilting in a 



The Now York Took 

Kenichi Yamamoto, the new president of Mazda 


Mazda reception room under an 
aerial photograph of Mazda 
plants, acknowledged that he 
had also wondered bow he got to 
be president. “1 have given this a 
lot of thought,” he smiled. Mr. 
Yamamoto, a thin man who 
speaks directly and passionately, 
offered his own explanation: “In 
Japanese companies, we often 
take a group decision and the 
individual is buried. But the ro- 
tary engine required leadership. I 


was in charge of ft. And I think 
that if I had not become involved 
in the rotary engine, I would not 
be sitting here now.” 

Mr. Yamamoto’s brand of 
leadership has grown out of a 
lifetime with Mazda. A 1944 en- 
gineering graduate from Tokyo 
Imperial University, he began as 
an assembly-line worker in 1946 
for Toyo Kogyo Corp. 

After a year and a half of as- 
(Con tinned on Page 1L CoL 1) 


Industry Output 
. 6 % in U.S.; 
Retail Sales Dip 


UpO 


By Jane Seaberry 

Washington Post Serrn e 
WASHINGTON — Output at 
the nation's factories, mines and 
utilities rose 0.6 percent in Decem- 
ber — the strongest increase since 
July. The year ended with industri- 
al production growing 6.4 percent 
more in 1984 than in the previous 
year, the Federal Reserve Board 


reported Tuesday. 


a separate report, the Com- 
merce Department reported that 
retail sales declined 0.1 percent in 
December, following a 2 percent 
rise in November, sales last year 
were 10.4 percent above those in 
1983. despite a sharp slump this 
summer. Sales rose at a 123 per- 
cent annual rate following the sum- 
mer slowdown. Commerce said. 

In its report on production, the 
Federal Reserve said that output of 
consumer goods rose 0.6 percent in 
December. Durable goods produc- 
tion increased 0.8 percent and that 
for nondurables rose 03 percent, 
the Fed said. 

Economists said the two reports, 
combined with other statistics 
showing low inflation and slowly 
rising employment, present a pic- 
ture of an economy still in flux, 
between a sleep slowdown in (he 
third quarter and expected re- 
bound later this year. Many econo- 
mists said they expect consumer 
spending to pick up in 1985. 


U.S. Consumers 
Voice Pessimism 

The Associated Press 
NEW YORK — Consumer 
confidence fell sharply in De- 
cember. the Conference Board 
said Tuesday. The “disconcert- 
ing” drop could mean there has 
been “recent weakening in the 
economy which has not yet reg- 
istered in (he standard statisti- 
cal reports.” said a spokesman. 

Of 5,000 households sur- 
veyed for the monthly report, 
the number who described busi- 
ness conditions as “good” in 
December fell to 25.5 percent 
from 29.6 percent in November, 
the board said 
Only 20 percent of respon- 
dents said they expected busi- 
ness conditions to improve six 
months from now. compared 
with 26.1 percent in November. 


U.K. to Sell Remaining British Aerospace Stake 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON - The British govern- 
ment announced plans Tuesday to 
sell its 48.4-percent stake in British 
Aerospace PL C through a public 
offering in the spring or early sum- 
mer. 


eminent probably would offer the 
shares at around 320 to 330 pence, 
barring a major change in the price 
before the offering. 

The government’s timing for the 
sale appeared to reflect the likeli- 
hood that it will be forced to delay 
its plan to sell British Airways PLC 


The company, which makes air- spring. The timing of that sale 


craft, missiles and satellites, said 
that it would raise funds at the time 
of the offering by selling as many as 
50 milli on new shares. At present, 
BAe has 200 milli on shares out- 
standing. 

BAe shares were suspended from 
trading Tuesday at 367 pence 
fS4.ll) apiece, giving the govern- 
ment's share a value of about £350 
million. But analysts said the gpv- 


is in doubt because of the airline's 
failure to reach a settlement in a 
U.S. lawsuit brought by the liqui- 
dator of Laker Airways. 

In addition, the government 
seemed eager to take advantage of 
an upturn in the aerospace market 
and the euphoria created among 
British investors by 1984’s sales of 
shares in British Telecommunica- 
tions PLC and Jaguar PLC Both 


shares have surged from their ini- 
tial offering prices. 

The immediate response to the 
planned BAe sale “has been gener- 
ally quite favorable,” said Nigel 
Roberts, an analyst at James Cape! 
& Co. 

David Butler of Grieveson, 
Grant & Co. said that small inves- 
tors probably would respond favor- 
ably but that some institutional in- 
vestors were wary of pouring more 
money into BAe's unprofitable civ- 
il aircraft business. 

Some analysts were surprised 
that BAe decided to raise funds 
through a sale of new shares. As of 
mid- 1984, the company had about 
£100 million in cash and its debt 


jj Currency Rates _ J Fed As ks Shift in Stock Credit Role 


, Late interbank rates on Jan. 15 . exdudng fees. 

Ofciat fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 

4PJ4 


>(a) 


1 ■ 

161 * m 

6X88 71.245 

Zl*7 1564 
• an runs — 

Mfld 1A9U8 ZWA3 

ueAmta — i.Jiw 

Pori 97883 18926 

T<*1 Closed 
Zur» 2462 MOM 

1 CO a*0*4 06238 

1 sc BJT19T7 B-BTUA 


G Mr. 


BJ=- 

S44*« 


DM. F-F. 1U_ 

11356* 36545* 0-180 

19.9975 65275 3JS95* 17.70 

324S- UJ>* 8853* *»• 

15645 1A9148 2.18550 40203 71.325 

613-05 20BJ2' 542.95 30*79 

11905 *765 1JS65B 350 6350 

10631 4597* 37115 15.326* 

84LI7S* 27-455* 0.137 74JS5* 42048* 

23238 63104 136400 23110 444592 

NjQ. 9J5T3S6 130431 15087 610873 


VF, Yen 
13449*141399 
21795 2530* 
11930*13505* 
1999 28538 
73036 7372 
1689 25490 
1645833315* 

13518* 

1X685 177395 
16101 NjQ. 


A 


Dollar Values 


Currency 


Por 
USLS 

.J ABStraltoaS 13176 
oof Austrian vttHtag 2145 
009 BefeknOLfiranc 6131 
074 CaaoOknS 13141 
aril DaNsbknne IMS 
0.18 FMdstum* 6675 
(Ut Omsk draduna 72885 
Op Hens KMM 6 78005 


I 

0979 Irtsht 

40015 hraeflsMul 
32648 Kvnottt (floor 
(Ml NatoV-rtaWOtt 
0.1082 Norw. krsae 
08527 PM. MM 
03858 Port escodo 
02792 Saadi rival 


MAS Eon I*. Ui* 

13714 03542 Singapore! 17015 

66655 0341 S.A»1« rood 23624 

WF 00012 5. Korea* won mw 

1494 00057 SmLPMeta 17SJ0 

934 0.1092 Sved. krona 9.154 

18971 00254 TUMI 3932 

17100 OS365 TWtteM 27395 

1582 03722 UJLB- tirtiaM 16735 


t^fita:i.l45S Iridic 

liommefttoUraic M Amcunta waded to ouvane pwnd CO Amounts needed to Ouv one dollar 1*1 
lltsaf I00(x) Units oHJOOIv) Units of HLOOB 

AmWW (Brussels); Banco CommorOato Italtam (Mila n); Ba nave 
htianale da Paris (Porta): IMF (SDR): Barque Anita et Internationale d'tnvesttssement 
pnar. rtyaL dirham). Other data from Routers and AP. 


Interest Rates 


] 


Jmocurrency Deposits 


Jan. 15 


Saifu Frnnrtr 

DoBor OMorfc Pmic Storfloo Prone ECU SDR 

V, . 1(4 S*w > sov 5Vi - S* 1216-12* 10 V 10 V. 9* - 9V. 79S.-1C 

WL 8 L - H 5* - 6 5*. - 51S 12*- 1296 109W- 169k 946 . 946 7* • 8te 

M*. Bte-8* 5*6 -6 5* - S* 12V4- 12Vi 10*- 11 *. 9* - 946 8 - 8t6 

iM 0*-8W SU.-6K. 5* -5* 12 - « w- 1140 996-946 8* -M0 

1Y. 9* - 946 6 - 6 VO SW-Sto 1116- 12 1140- 11* 9 96.9* 8W - M6 

Rates aptutatite to mtertanh denaslts of a million minimum (or eaulvalenl). 

Sources: toman Guaranty {dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FPI; Uords Bank (ECU>: attbonk 
ISDttL 


By Robert D. Hershey Jr. 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Reserve Board has recommended 
that the government turn over to 
the stock exchanges its authority to 
set limits on the use of credit in 
stock trading. 

If Congress accepts the recom- 
mendation. it would give up a func- 
tion the government has exercised 
since ibe Depression. 

In a study released Monday, the 
board said U had “serious doubts” 
about the need for a continued fed- 
eral role in setting so-called margin 
requirements, assigned to the 
board bjr Congress in 1934. None-- 
theless, it said that some federal 
body would probably be needed to 
monitor the margin-setting activi- 
ties of the private sector. 

It was disclosed, meanwhile, that 
Treasury Secretary Donald T. Re- 
gan, soon to become White House 
chief of staff, wants Congress to 
consider the total abolition of mar- 
gin controls. 

Margin is the minimum amount 
of money that investors must put 
up when buying securities on cred- 
it The Fed. which administers the 
regulations under the Securities 
Exchange Act of 1934. made Ire- 
quern changes in the required levels 
ai one time, but has not changed 
them since 1974. 

Since then, buyers of stocks, con- 
vertible bonds, and those who sell 
borrowed securities — short sales 
— have had to put up an amount 


Volcker Ties Rates 
To Cuts in Deficit 

The Associated Press 
WASHINGTON — Paul A. 
Volcker. the Federal Reserve chair- 
man. said Tuesday that interest 
rates probably would fail if Con- 
gress passes a deficit-reduction 
plan that starts with a S30-btlliou 
cut in the first year and includes 
“some follow through.” 

Mr. Volcker said after a meeting 
with a group of Republican sena- 
tors that while he prefers spending 
cuts, he would accept consideration 
of tax increases if necessary. 

Senate Republicans are hoping 
to devise a plan in the next several 
weeks to reduce deficits over the 
next three years to 5100 billion 
from more than $200 billion. 

equal to 50 percent of the value of 
the transaction. 

Any change in the government's 
role would require the approval of 
Congress, but Capitol Hill staff 
aides said they bad not yet had a 
chance to read the 189-page Fed 


study and therefore could not as- 
sess the prospects for legislation. 

At the New York Slock Ex- 
change, a spokesman said that it 
would be “premature” to comment 
on the proposals. 

The margin level has been 
changed about 25 times, with the 
low of 40 percent prevailing during 
the late 1930s and the high of 100 
percent set just after World War II. 
One reason the Fed has not felt 
obliged to change the requirements 
in recent years is the growing domi- 
nance of institutional investors, 
who generally avoid buying securi- 
ties on credit 

The central bank’s analysis was 
highly skeptical about the continu- 
ing, validity of any of the three main 
reasons for the government's as- 
sumption or authority over stock 
market credit in the first place. 

These were to restrain the diver- 
sion of credit into the stock market 
from supposedly more important 
uses in commerce and industry, to 
protect unsophisticated investors; 
and to prevent excessive fluctua- 
tions in the market. 

Legislators at the time expressed 

(Coo tinned on Page 13, CoL 7) 


Most Big Banks 
In US. Reduce 
PrimetyPoint 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Most major 
banks cut their prime rate a 
quarter of a percentage point to 
103 percent Tuesday, sending 
the rate to its lowest level in 17 
months. 

Among the banks announc- 
ing the reduction Tuesday were 
the Bank of America, the larg- 
est U.S. bank; Citibank, the 
second-largest; and Chase 
Manhattan, the thini-largesL 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust, 
the fourth biggest U.S. bank, 
announced its quarter-point de- 
crease on Monday. 

The last time a major bank 
bsd a prime rate as low as 10 J 
percent was for about five 
months aiding in early August 
1983. The last time the prime 
rate was below 10.5 percent was 
October 1978. The prime rate is 
the base upon which banks 
compute interest charges on 
short-term business loans. 


totaled slightly less than 30 percent 
of shareholders' equity. 

Sir Austin Pearce, BAe's chair- 
man, said the company did not 
expect to need the funds for a cou- 
ple of years but had been advised 
that the government sale provided 
an opportune lime for a further 
share sale. 

For 1983. BAe reported net prof- 
it of £823 million on sales of £2.3 
trillion, compared with a Joss of 
£23.1 million in 1982. 

In the first half of 1984, the com- 
pany had pretax profit of £563 
million and analysts expect the 
company to report full-year pretax 
profit of £1 15 million to £125 mil- 
lion. For the current year, most 
estimates range between £130 mo- 
tion and £145 million. 

The company was formed in 
April 1977 by the merger of British 
Aircraft Gorp. and Hawker Sidde- 
ley's aviation operations. In early 
1981, the Conservative government 
sold about half of BAe to the public 
for £150 million, or 150 pence a 
share. 


“It's son of a mixed bag,” said 
Steven Wood an economist with 
Chase Econometrics. “It looks tike 
we’ll be sitting here in (he bo-hum 
stage a bit" 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baldrige said that sales in the 
fourth quarter increased at an an- 
nual rate of 10.5 percent. “This 
pickup indicates that spending has 
resumed its upward course,” he 
said “Continued growth in in- 
comes indicates another good year 
ahead for retail business, but pins 
will be slower than in 1984.” 

Retailers had hoped for a large 
increase in sales during the Christ- 
mas season to help their profits. 
However, although volume may 
have picked up in the holiday buy- 
ing season, many retailers had to 
slash prices to reduce inventories, 
resulting in the low value of De- 
cember sales. 

Excluding the automotive sector, 
total sales rose 03 percent in De- 
cember and 8.7 percent above sales 
the previous year, Commerce said. 
Total sales for 1984 were $1.3 tril- 
lion, 10.4 percent higher than the 
1983 total 

Durable goods sales declined 0.9 
percent in December. Automotive 
sales declined for the first lime in 
four months, by 23 percent. Furni- 
ture sales rose 2.8 percent in De- 
cember, the fifth consecutive 
month of increases. Holiday sales 
were strong in electronics. Com- 
merce said 

Nondurable goods sales rose 0.4 
percent in December and were 7.4 
percent above sales in December 
1983. 


AsiariOoIlar Rates 


Jan. 15 


Imo. 

866 -B» 
Source: Rotors. 


2 mas. 
8*6 - 8 * 


3mos. 
BK -84k 


(me. 
■to -9 


9* -»* 


Key Matey Rates 


United Stses 

Discount Ra 
Federal Fur* 

Prime Hate 
Broker Laoriteto 
Comm. Papa 30-T79 days 
3-manttr Tte«v BUlf 
■ 6-mante TrwufV Bills 
CD-sSW* da 
CD* *s 

West Cemny 

Lombard Re 
OvertWsW Be 
One MonMi . tertienk 
Xnonrti initank 
tmanm inrtank 

France , 

inWtrvenJb Rate 
CoUJMoJt 

~a»^tiehlitlertork 

^Interbank 


aou Pre*. 

8 8 
8 B* 

9.1D* 

7.90 8.10 

m 766 
794 7.91 

7J& IM 
J PS 7S0 


£50 530 

560 560 

565 5JB 
5,90 Sto 
535 5.95 


mt tffvj 
10* io* 
10* in* 

10* 10 7/16 
ID* 10* 


Britain 

Bank Bate Rote 
Coil Monev 
91-day Treasury Bill 
>manth interim* 


Close Prev. 


12 

10* 

11 * 

II* 


>2 

11* 

11* 

12 * 


Japan 


Discount Rote 
Coll Money 
6Mov IRfertwik 


5 5 

Clsd 6 5/16 
— 6 S/16 



r Rm/ten, CommonbaiK, Credit Ly- 
BaM, Bank at Tokyo. 


AM. P-M- CUV* 

Itata m.« 30S5S 

Untmooure 30JJS - +1'5 

Ports (126 kllol 30100 30251 +]B7 

roricti MUM 30105 +355 

SSn 30260 30150 +150 

NewTor* - 30160 -160 

omcM flxtoes tor London. Porta ond Luxem- 

S^otanlne-tactetaPr^lor HomXooo 
and zurkft ROW York Corn** cwrwil CHitrsd. 

Ml prices to UAs pw wn«. 

Source .' Reuters. 


Markets Gosed 

inandal markets were dosed Tuesday in Japan for a holiday. 


jfflpTAPMAN 

MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

performance 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTREND If 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF S100.000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded ttw tafowing 
after aU cftaqjes: 

IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: -24% 

3SSl 

JAN. 10. 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $65,130.08 
More than S50.000.000.00 
currency under mcnagemenl. 

Cal! or wne Royall Frazier a; 
TAPMAN. Trend Analyse ana 
Portfolio Management. Inc.. 
Wajl Strea Piaza, New York 
New Vork 10005 2l2-Z69-i0i1 
■feta BM1 667173 UW. 


New issue 


$200,000,000 

I.C.H. CORPORATION 

16%% Senior Subordinated Debentures due 1994 



All ot these securities having been sold, this 
announcementappearsasa matter of record only. 


Prudentiai-Bache 

Securities 


Stephens Inc. 



December 20. 1984 


V'* ♦ 


BANQUE SUDAMERIS 

U.S. $30,000,000 Floating Rate 
Notes due 1987 

For the six month period 
34th January, 1985 to 15th July. 1985 
rhe Nores will bear an 
inreresr rate of 9Ki6% per annum. 
Interest payable on 15th July. 1985. 

Bankers Trust Company, London 


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UCCEL 

UGI 2jM M 
USl Pf 275 121 
UNCRre 

URS A Ob 3.1 

USFOs zoe 7& 
USO 3X0 43 
Unlovn M 22 
UnlFraf 20 1.1 


313 22* 
M 360 1410 

11 321 22* 
HOz 22* 
443 m 
II 25 IT* 
7 2544 27 
I 1341 48 Vi 

13 sno 24* 

14 44 IS* 


47 47* + * 

31* 32* + * 
13* 13*— * 
22 * 22 *— * 
22 22* 4- * 

V **— * 
12 * 12 * + * 
24* 36*— * 
44* 44* +1* 
25* 24* +2* 
17* 17* + Ui 


The Global Newspa 













































































** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1985 


Page 11 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


COMPANY NOTES 





Of Majority Stake in SEAT 






% Wancn Geder 

Iiuemnimal Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Vb&swagpn- 
werk AG is considering the pur- 
chase of 51 percent of Sodedad 
Bspanote de AutorndvOes de Tur- 
iaso SA, die unprofitable Spanish 
automaker, a Volkswagen spokes- 
man said Tuesday. 

“We’re cunwuW examining an 
interest expressed from the Spanish 
side,” the spokesman said. 

The spok esman said that a deci- 
sion would be reached in eaify 
summer, at the earliest, perhaps at 
the company s supervisory board 

meeting m Jane. 

Industry analysts, however, ex- 
pressed doubt about the wisdom of 
such an acquisition. 

“I can't see how it would be in 
the interest of VW, having just 
moved book into profit in 19S4 af- 
ter two yean of losses and stm 
plagued with' problems in Latin 


America, to buy into this S panish 
automaker with huge losses of its 
own," said a market analyst at 
Westdeutscbe Landesbank who 
asked not to be 

SHAT loss figures were not avail- 
able for 1984. In 1983, the compa- 
ny posted record losses of 35.7 btt- 
Son pesetas ($210 mini on) 

VW currently has no finan^ 
stake in SEAT. However, the two 
companies have an agreement 
si g n e d in 1982 that allows SHAT to 
produce VWs Passat and Polo 
models under license, and to act as 
a national importer for VW. 

In die first 11 months of 1984, 
the number of VW and Audi cars 
sold in Spain, inclu ding chose pro- 
duced there under license, shot up 
to 24000 from 4,600 a year earlier, 
the spokesman said. 

VW currently bolds 5 percent to 
6 percent of the market's volume of 
nearly 550.000 cars annually, in- 
dustry sources say. 


Mazda Head Faces U.S. Test 


Standard OH 
ToDropVnit 

The Astodased Pros 

NEW YORK — Standard 
Oil Co. 

it is getting our of the 
business, announcing plans to 
spin off to its shareholders its 
nearly 51.8 billion in assets in 
coal, metals and minerals. 

Richard Morrow, chairman 
of the Chicago-based Indiana 
Standard, said the move reflect- 
ed a decision to concentrate on 
its main businesses of oil, gas 
and petrochemicals. 

Under the plan announced 
Monday, Indiana Standard 
would transfer substantially all 
of its metals, coal and minerals 
assets to a company called Cy- 
prus Minerals Carp, and dis- 
tribute the stock to sharehold- 
ers. The operations involved 
had assets of approximately 
53.78 billion at the end of 1983. 


Dunlop Unveils Plan to Cut 
Debt, Reorganize Finances 


CanpUed try Oar Suff From Dtyadus 

LONDON — Dunlop Holdings 
PLC, parent of the struggling tire* 
maker, unveiled a survival plan 
Tuesday that calls for fresh c«h 
from its shareholders and a debt’ 
far-stock swap with its creditor 
banks. 

The company's chairman. Sir 
Michael Edwardes, said in a letter 
to sharehokJers that the plan was 
essential if Dunlop, which teetered 
on the brink erf collapse in 1983, 
was to have a viable future. 

The letter said Dunlop still owed 
£435 nrilBon ($486 minion) to its 
major lenders, and Sir Mkhad said 
he hoped to make further cuts in 
borrowings after the rescue plan 
bad gone through. 

Under terms of the plan, Dunlop 
would raise some £142 mUlioo by 
issuing £43 mflbcm in new shares to 
existing investors and by convert- 
ing £70 million worth of bank debt 


into ordinary and preferential 
shares. A further £29 million would 
be raised from institutional inves- 
tors by a new share issue. 

Tire creditor banks have also 
agreed to make a new hue of credit 
available to the company, 

Dunlop said the £43 million 
would be raised through a 15-for-7 
share rights issue, at a price of 14 
peace a share. Dunlop shares last 
traded at 25 pence before being 
suspended. 

Dunlap said no dividend trill be 
recommended on the ordinary 
shares for the year ended Dec. 31, 
1984. 

If shareholders apply for their 
full entitlement under the open of- 
fer they will hold around 63 percent 
of the ctanpany. 

A total of £260 million in revised 
British borrowing authority is to be 
marie available, the company said. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


Affied-Lyons PLC said it will ra- 
ter the ULS. commercial paper mar- 
ket with funding of up to $80 mil- 
lion to assist its expanding US. 
activities. The commercial paper, 
to be issued by Albed-Lyons North 
America Carp., will be traded by 
Salomon Brothers Inc. 

Broken H31 Proprietary Co^ the 
Australian muring concern, has de- 
clined comment on a report that 
the New Guinea government is 
considering doting its OK Tedi 
gold and Coppermine. The govern- 
ment is reportedly concerned about 
environmental problems, among 
other issues. 

Chemical Barit said it has re- 
ceived final approval from the U.S. 
and Australian governments to buy 
the r emaining 50percent interest in 
its Australian merchant bank. 
Chemical All-States Ltd. 

Fontwork* AG said it will invest 
over 330 noThon Deutsche marks 
($103 million) over the next two 
yean in its plants at Cologne and 
Dueren to produce a new line of 
al nminnm - h oused gftflf boxes for 
cars and light commercial vehicles. 

Fotomat Corp. said it signed an 
agreement with Konishtroku Photo 


Industry Co. of Japan that wiD help 
refinance its operations. It said 


invest S10 million 
in cash and exchange a $13.5 mil- 
lion debenture feu- common stock. 

T^e New York Times Co. and the 
Public Welfare Foundation an- 
nounced that Times Co. had agreed 
in principle to bay three daily 
newspapers owned by the founda- 
tion. The price and other terms 
were not disclosed. The papers are 
The Spartanburg Herald-Journal 

in South Carolina, and The Tusca- 
loosa News and The Gadsden 
Times, both in Alabama. 

Nip p oarlenso Sales be, Japan’s; 
largest automotive supplier, an-’ 
notmeed it will build a 515-nnlbon 
sales and research center in South- 
field, Michigan 

Parsons Chip, shareholders have 
voted to approve the acquisition of 
the company by an employee stock 
ownership plan. The engineering 
and construction firm, based in 
Pasadena, California, has 7,000 
employees worldwide. 

Tandem Computers Iml, of Cu- 
pertino, California, said it intro- 
duced a high-performance disc 
storage that stores up to 13 billion 


bits of information and speeds ac- 
cess to dau through a new packag- 


Yia pa«i the unprofitable Cana- 
dian passenger railroad, wffl be- 
comes private company, the Cana- 
dian government said, after it 
the board of directors. 
Tbe sew board will be chaired by 
Pierre Franche, the current presi- 
dent 

Writ Disney Productions said its 
new chairman, Michael D. Eisner, 

received a one-time payment of 
5750,000 to join die company and 
will receive a base salary of- 
5750,000 annually for five years. 


Gold Options (prices i» S/a 



Mi 


290 

300 

310 

320 

333 

M3 

1B003U& 
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6(0 75) 

735 4flD 
ISO 703 

050- 135 

34753875 

20253175 

145X1600 

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475-625 


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Vilens White Weld SuA. 

L Qm i dm Mom-Bbnc 
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;j _ . 
: w 


(Continued from Page 9) 
semhfing auto transmissions — a 
task he remembers as not very in- 
teresting but as haring given him 
as understanding of plant workers 
and union goals — he said he 
“jumped at the opportunity” to 
switch to engine design. He rose 
through that division, supervising 
the design of many Mazda cars and 
tracks. 

As deputy manager, be was 
about to start work on an expan- 
sion of the passenger-car line when 


A New Trend 
In Training 

(Con&sed from Page 9) 

“Forty peroral of faculry time is 
spent creating midfectuaf capital,” 
or forming students, says Hugo 
Uyteriweven, an associate dean m 
charge of executive education at 
the Harvard Business School "The 
faculty has to have the time to do 
that/ 

He added: “We also don’t want 
to be in the business of favoring 
some people and not others. If we 
did one executive program for one 
major bank, then another one 
would want one. We’d make some 
people happy but a lot of people 
mad at us/ 

There is also the fear that by 
accepting fees for a company-de* 
"signed educational program, the 
mriversiiy itself might lose a mea- 
sure Of .fw*trww 

There remains, however, one 
main selling point for executive 
programs at universities; Managers 
learn from others operating in dif- 
ferent countries and industries. 


Mazda's president assigned him to 
head a team to produce a commer- 
cial model of tbe rotary engine- The 
rotary, invented by a West German 
engineer but licensed by Mazda, 
produces power with a rotor and 
without the pistons of a conven- 
tional ftn ghn* 

At that juncture, two decades 
ago, the Ministry of International 
Trade and Industry was putting 
pressure on small auto makers Kfrg 
Mazda to merge with larger compa- 
nies to increase their international 
competitiveness. In effect, the rota- 
ry engine was Mazda's rebuttal. 

“We had to show we were differ- 
ent; we had to show our distinctive- 
ness,” he said. 

With the technological prob- 
lems, environmental standards and 
the energy crisis of the 1970s that 
brought about Mazda's own finan- 
cial troubles, tbe rotary engine's 
fate was always uncertain. For their 
loyalty and perseverance, Mr. Ya- 
mamoto's team of 47 engineers be- 
came known as the “47 Renin," 
after the leepufary group of Samu- 
rai whose allegiance to their master 
was so strong that they avenged bis 
death at tbe cost of their own fives. 

As long as pollution was the auto 
world’s lewfaig concern, the rotary 
enjoyed considerable appeal The 
engine designed by the Mazda 
team surpassed even the strictest 
U.S. standards — but got only 10 
mDcs to the gaOon. So when energy 
consumption became a primary 
concern to an to buyers after the 
Arab ofl embargo of 1973, Mazda 
was left without a fuel-efficient car. 

In 1974, Mazda’s sales fell to 
70,000 vehicles from 119,000 in the 
previous year, inventories accumu- 
lated and the company floundered. 
In 1975, Mazda recorded its largest 
loss in history, the equivalent of 
S75 mMon. 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits in millions, ore In IocqI currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


Britain 

Guinea (Arthur) 

Year jm mj 

fhrvmnue *23.7 B7Z4 

Pretax Nat 705 SSJ 

Per Share 0709 0.171 

Canada 

Denison Mines 
Year HM tm 

Revenue 7065 6741 

Profits 0052 10078 

Per Share— 141 254 

United States 

Arthur Danieb 
mow. ms im 

Met Inc 4950 2S59 

Per Shore 051 US 

1 st HaH IMS WM 

Mel Inc 6053 AUD 

Per Share— 084 047 

Per share results adjusted 
far FH stock dtvtdund in Seat. 
Full name at company rs Ar- 
cher Daniels MUtond. 


Europ. Amef. Bk 
4th Quar. 1964 IMS 

Mel lnc 151 <a)A£9 

Veer tm 1963 

Mel Inc (a)13tt 19.23 

a: Urns. MW results Include 
various cnarpoatfs Hr a to- 
tal e! SU7J million. 


fidclcor 

4ttiQuar. tm tm 

Net lnc. 11.17 9 .01 

Per Store 154 155 

Year 1964 no 

Net inc tui 4751 

Per Shore— 1X2 ZJ9 


Fst Atlanta 

4th Qaar. 1*84 1963 

Met lnc. 145 U2 

Per Share OSS Hit 

Year 1964 1983 

Net lnc. MLS S2J 

Per Share— 3.15 256 


4» Qaar. 19M 1963 

Net lnc. 1045 B4J3 

Per Share ZU 213 

Year tm 1MI 

Mel lnc. 3525 337.0 

Per Store 7.13 137 

Per share results after pre- 
ferred afvktenA Full name 
of company bMenutoctvren 


IMS 

2203 

2356 

131 

19*3 

\l1 


McCormick 

4th Qaar. HM 

Revenge 3415 

Net lnc. 1438 

Per Shore— 134 

Yew tm 

Revenue 7BU 

Met lnc. 545 

Per Store — 


122 

... , , of US 

million vs S9J , . 

quarters and o(SM millran vs 
Sifts million m tears from 
property sales. 


nets mauds pome _ 

'J minion In 


NCR 


Fst Chicago 


Bankers Trust N.Y. S*iSS; — 


rib Qaar. im 1*83 

Met lnc. 815 61 X 

Per Share 244 218 

Year im 1983 

Net lnc. 3048 2413 

Per Share— 9S2 US 

Nets Indus* pains of S26J 

million m Quarter and of £57 J 
million vs st million In year 
from sate ot branches. 

Bank of Virginia 

’ 4th Guar. 1984 1983 

Net lnc. ion (L51 

Par Share 079 058 

Yeir - tm 1983 

Net lnc. 37.1 302 

Per Store 293 243 

Control Bancorp 

4th Qear. 1»M im 

Net lnc 735 J5H 

Per Snare 133 156 

Yew tm 19*3 

Net Inc. — 2651 2229 

Per Share — 480 405 

t96t per share results ad- 
justed for 5% slock dividend. 


rib GW. 1984 1983 

Met lnc. 555 47 3 

Per Share 103 lOO 


Yew 19*4 1983 Net ino- — 

etinc. 844 1815 PerShare — 


Net) 

Per Store— Ut 292 
Results Include American 
National Cam. Since May l 
Mi. 


Intel 


Revenue—. 

Net Inc 

Per Shore- 
Year 

Revenue—. 

Net Inc - 

PerShare 


im 1983 
416.1 3325 

232 47.1 

020 050 

1984 1981 

1520. 1 . 12 a 

1TO2 1161 
170 105 


Citicorp 

rib Qaar. 19*4 1983 

Net lnc 2610 2010 

Per Snare — 130 151 

Yew tm mi 

Net lnc B»0 8600 

Per Shore — 636 616 

Per share results after are- 
terrvd dividends. 


Inti 

4th Qaar. 1984 1981 

Revenue 1.1 DO. 1.100. 

Net Inc (at 740 647 

PerShare — — 135 

Year 1984 7983 

Revenue—. 470a Moa 
Nei Inc — mo 3549 
PerShare— 1JM 461 
a; loss. Mt nets include 
write-off of SI S3 million. 

Irving Bank 

4th Quar. 1984 1983 

Mel Inc 21.14 230 

Per Share— UB 131 
Year im 1983 

Net IOC 89-11 9254 

PerShare 5.11 486 


HM 1983 
134a M40. 

Net Inc 12X97 1U44 

PerShare 133 105 

Year HM 1983 

Revenue 4070. 3330. 

Ntl lnc 34254 28757 

Share— 130 254 

Per share results re sta ted 
far Xtor-1 split to AnrtL 

NBiwmf. fin. 

4th Quar. 1984 HO 

Net Inc 684 463 

PerShare 133 0.90 

Yew im 1981 

Net Inc 2502 1750 

PerShare 487 352 

Ntham Trust 

4fh Qaw. 1984 1983 

Net Inc 553 354 

PerShare 083 071 

Yew HM T 

Net lnc _ 225 183 

PerShare 406 176 

Pub. Sve Bee Gas 

Yew I9M 1*83 

Revanue 4.1*6. XM2- 

Ner me rxun 38938 

PerShare — 335 350 


SCM 


2nd Qaw. im 
Revenue— 537 J 

Net inc OTA 

Per Store — 003 

let Hall im 
Revenue— 1040. 

Net die 1153 

PerShare — 1.17 


credit of Si million. 


469. 

MLBS 

1.1 


. >■' !*-- 


"r . - -l 




IF YOU CAN TELL US EXACTLY 
WHAT THESE WILL BE WORTH 
IN SIX MONTHS TIME, 


.r f p . \ 
■ 1 


- t ■ 



YOU MAYN0T NEED 
OUR NEW OPTIONS. 



The Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange, the world's most 
successful foreign currency 
futures and options market, will 
soon launch currency options on 
the British pound and the Swiss 
franco 

Although if s not yet a year 
since the CME opened its options 
on Deutschemark futures, it is 
already the most actively exchange- 
traded currency option in the world. 

Leading banks, institutions 
and government dealers now use 
the CME*s Deutschemark option 
as an essential currency dealing 
and arbitrage tool to lay off risks. 
Options have also enabled them 
to provide their customers with an 
improved and more sophisticated 
service. 

Corporate treasurers use 
them as “insurance policies” 
against future rate fluctuations in 
hedging strategies, tender, or 


takeover situations, and as an 
insulation against translation 
exposures^ 

When British pound and Swiss 
franc options are added to the 
Chicago Mercantile Exchanged 
currency offerings, bankers, 
dealers and corporations will have 
even greater flexibility in managing 
rate uncertainty. 

For a free copy of “Options on 
Currency Futures: An Introduction", 
write or telephone Keith Vfoodbridge 
at Chicago Mercantile Exchange, 

27 Throgmorton Street, London, 
EC2N2AN. (01)920 0722 

CHICAGO 
111 MERCANTILE 
EXCHANGE 

FUTURES AND OPTIONS WORLDWDE 

27 Throgmorton Street, London EC2N 2AN 01-920 0722 
30 South W acker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606 
312/930-1000 

67 Wall Street, New York 1 0005 2 7 2/363-7000 



AU these Notes ha\ e been sold. This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 



DUNLOP OLYMPIC LDVMMTED 

(Incorporated with limited liability in the State of Victoria, Australia) 

N.Z.$30,000,000 
15 3 /4 per cent. Notes 1990 

Issue Price 100 per cent. 

Hambros Bank Limited 

Bank Gutzwiller, Kurz, Bnngener (Overseas) limited Banqne Bruxelles Lambert S. A. 
Banque Nationale de Paris The Nikko Securities Co., (Europe) Ltd. 

Amro International Limited Bank of New Zealand 

Banque Internationale k Luxembourg SA. Commerzbank Aktiengesellschaft 

Lloyds Bank International Limited Soctete Generate de Banque S A. 

January, 1985 


1? Z 

4 ■ 

g S New Issue 


All of these bonds having been placed, this an- 

• January, 1985 


nouncement appears for purposes of record only. 

| INTERNATIONAL BANK 

! FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT 

j Washington, D.C. 


^i°NAt e<v : 


,4^^ 1 



[world bank! 

! DM500,000,000 


i 

5 TA% Deutsche Mark Bonds of 1985, due 1995 1 

• 

• 

• 

• Offering Price: 100% 


• 

• 

9 

• 

• 

• Interest: 7Yt% p.a., payable annually on January 15 

• Repayment: January 15, 1995 at par 

• 

• 

• 

• listing : at all German stock exchanges 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

* 

• 

• 

Deutsche Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

: Dresdner Bank 

l Aktiengesellschaft 

9 

• 

■ 

• 

a 

• 

• 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

Commerzbank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

9 

9 

• 

m 

m 

• 

Westdeutscbe Landesbank • 

Girozerrtraie : 

• 

| ADCA-Bank 

Arab Banking Corporation - 

Bmkhaus H. Aifflifiuser • 

• Aktiengesellschaft 
S Affgemeine Deutsche Credit-Anstatt 

Da us & Co. GmbH 

• 

9 

• 

| Badsn-WOrttembergische Bank 

Bedische Kommunale Landesbank 

Bank fOr Gomelnwirtschatt • 

• Aktiengesellschaft 

- Girozentrala - 

Aktiengesellschaft • 

J Bayerische Hypotfieken- 

Bayerische Landesbank 

Bayerische Ve reins hank * 

• und Wechsel-fiank 

Girozentrala 

AktiengeseHschaft • 

; Aktiengesellschaft 
2 Job. Batenberg, GoaskrACo. 

a 

Berliner Bank 
Aktiengesellschaft 

• 

• 

Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank • 

• 

• 

• Bankheus GebrOder Bathmann 

• 
a 
0 

Bremer Landesbank 
Kradrtanstalt Oldenburg 

- G froze rrtraJe - 

DeKbrOck&Co. ! 

• 

• 

• 

9 

• Deutsche Bank Saar 

Deutsche G fro zent rale 

DG Bank • 

• Aktiengesellschaft 

- Deutsche Koronwnalbank - 

Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank « 

x Deutsche Lfindertank 

Conrad Hfnrich Dormer 

DSL Bank • 

* Aktiengesellschaft 


Deutsche Siedlungs- und Landesrentenbank 2 

* Effedenbenk-Wiituig 

Kaflbaum. Maier ft Co. AG 

Hamburg bche Landesbank Z 

X Aktiengesellschaft 

- Landkreditbank - 

- Girottntrale - J 

• Handels- und Privstbenk 

Georg HauckftSohn Bankiere 

Hessiscbe Landesbank 2 

• Afctiengeselfschaft 

Kommanditgesellschaff auf Aktien 

- Girazentrele - • 

2 von dar Hsydt-Kersten A Sdhne 

Bankheus Hermann Lampe 

Landesbank Rheinland-Pfalr J 

a 

a 

Kommanditgeseltschaft 

- Girozentrala - a 

l Landesbank Saar Girozentrele 

a 

a 

Landesbank Schleswig-Holstein 
Gtrozentrale 

Merck, Ffrick&Co. 2 

• 

• B. Metzier seel. Sohn &Co. 

National-Bank 

Norddeutsche Landesbank * 

a 

Aktengesdlschaft 

Girozentrala « 

2 Oldenburgtsche Landesbank 
• Aktiengesellschaft 

Sal. Oppenhefm jr.&Cie. 

ReuschelACo. * 

* 

2 Karl Schmidt BankgeschSft 

Schwdbtsche Bank 

Slmonbank J 

a 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Aktiengesellschaft J 

• J. H. Stein 

a 

a 

Trinkauf&Bvikhart/t 

Vbrains- und Wsstbank Z 

Aktiengesellschaft J 

J M.IULWarburg-Brinckmann. Wirtz & Co. 

• 

a 

m 

a 

a 

Westfalenbank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

WQrttembergiacha Kommunale Landesbank Z 
Girozerrtraie 2 

• 

• 

* 







Tuesdays 

m 

i 

X 

Qosm| 

or 

5 


VW.of 4 PM.. 
Prev.4PJM.vi 


Tombs Include the nationwide prices 
vp to the dosing on Wall Street 





144 

4H 


4 + H 

USA JOC 



1) 

39ft 

39U> 

391* + ft 







39ft + 1A 








ICP 89(148 


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am ai 
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BAT .vat u 

BOM .15 5 20 

BUT B 

BSN 23 

BTK 

Badger ,40a IB 14 
Bilker 

BalUwS J2a to 
BalyMwt 
BanFd XOBo Si 
Banatrg 

BnkBW 40 UM 
Bar CD 34 

BamEn <8 

BarvRC 

Baruch J4I 3J 14 

Board 

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143 xm 

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63 11 
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43 104* 

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A 4 

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If KT+* 

1M I0U— V4 
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3 3U+ ft 
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MU 10*— U 

4 4 
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4* 4ft 4* 

98 58 M+k 
28H 28 25ft + ft 
13*8 13U 13ft— ft 
21* 2ft 2ft— ft 
A « ft 
7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
14ft 141* 14U + ft 
6*6 Oft 6ft 
4U 4ft «ft 
8ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft 
42ft 40ft 42ft +2ft 
4U 4ft 4U + ft 
7ft 6* 7ft + ft 
4ft 6U £ft+ ft 
1ft 1ft 1ft +u 
26ft 26ft 26ft 
10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 
2348 9 2318+ h. 

** “S **:? 

27ft 27U 27U+ 18 
14ft 14ft 14ft + 18 
lift lift lift— k. 
19ft 19ft 19ft + ft 


Oft FPA 18 

2 RjJnuC 

9ft FlCom ljDOa 94 7 
10U FtFSLn 40)24 1 

11 FWymB n 47 1 

12ft FlschP 15 

■ft FKcCE 140 122 4 
22ft FHGEpf 480 152 
Bft FlanEn 

ZIft FlaRcfc JD V 9 
22ft Fluke 1271 44 12 
448 Foodrm 
28ft Foote of 
4ft FlhlBO 
41ft FdrdOiflTJno 
15 FanKA .15 2331 

15 FordCB 29 3331 

lift ForosfL 31 

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4ft FltfHlY 13 

14 FrsqEJ 17 

7ft Frtedm 20b 32 12 
5 FrtoaEn V 

9ft Frtena 30 32 9 

12 Frisch s 23 12 IS 
Bft FrntHd 

4ft FrtAwt .171 23 
18ft Furvttn 15 


3 9ft 9ft 
15 3ft 3 

1 im m 
10 25ft 251* 
30 lift lift 
137 I4ft 13ft 
33 lift 111* 
14 Mft 251* 
35 9ft 9H 
93 W8 34ft 

117 27ft 27ft 
25 BU Bft 

2 29ft 29ft 

470 Bft B 
27teT09 100 

7 19ft 19ft 
a i9ft wft 

144 14ft 14ft 
285 1ft 1ft 
14 5ft 4ft 
447 IBU !7ft 
1 Bft 8ft 
77 5 5 

SO 15ft 15ft 
7 17ft T7ft 
490 13ft 13ft 
70 7 Mb 

174 !7ft 14ft 


9ft + ft 

3 

10U 

25ft— ft 
lift + ft 
Mft + ft 
llft+ ft 
2448 + ft 
9ft 

37ft + ft 
27ft— ft 
Bft— 18 
SWfc— ft 
Bft+ ft 
100 

19ft + 4b 
Wft + ft 
144* 

148 

4ft— ft 
IBU + ft 
Bft— ft 
5 — ft 
15ft + ft 
1718 

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3ft 1ft DWG JOtlOJ 10 

24 15ft DateEn 22 12 B 
1048 3ft Damson 4 

3ft ft DamwtO 
3248 1318 Damspt 230 11J 
ZIft 2018 Damspf 175 172 


41 248 2ft 2ft 

3 25ft 25ft 25ft— ft 
244 5ft 5ft 5ft 
90 ft 18 +ft 

5 2248 22 22ft + ft 

3 21ft 21ft 21ft + ft 


311* 13ft Data Pd .14 13 10 2452 14 15ft 14 + ft 


5 

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163 

7ft 

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56 

12* 

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332 

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2 

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26ft 26ft 

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lift 

7 

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in* 

10* 

28 

3* 

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54 

15* 

14ft 

60 

3* 

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219 

16 

13ft 

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12ft 

12ft 

10 

9ft 

9 

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2ft 

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12 

9ft 

9* 

91 

27* 

27ft 

22 

9 

8ft 

SB 

26ft 

25 

38 

25* 25ft 

8 

3* 

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265 

17ft 

lift 

39 

» 

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5 

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10 

Mft 

34ft 

1 

25ft 

25V* 

2 

23 

23 

158 

Mft 

26 

10 

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lift 

24 

18 

17ft 

3 

9ft 

9ft 

B 

1ft 

1ft 

A 

12ft 

12ft 


17ft If. ft Joctvn JOS? 14 7 

10ft 5Vn JOOlK 

17 10ft Jensen 7 

7 2ft JelAm 1 

348 ft Jot A Mft 

7U 3ft Jelron XW 7.1 !« 

9ft 2ft John Pd 

12ft 7V. JohnAm 39 34 U 

748 4ft JmpJk n 5 


37ft 2B 1 ft 
5U 1ft 
14ft 9ft 
Bft 3 
IBU 1448 
9ft 548 
20 8 
6ft 2V. 
5ft 3ft 
39ft IB* 
7ft 3 
Sft 1ft 
3ft 2ft 
17ft Bft 

is* 8* a 

24ft 21 


KnGspf *J0 IU 
KaaafcC 

KrarNn X0 10 7 
Kenlm 14 

Kenwlti 80 4.9 7 

KeyCo JO 2.9 
KsvPh JO 13 17 
Klddc wt 

Klnark 9 

KlrsjR JO 3 24 
Kirby 

Kit Mia 17 

KMerVs 82r 3 
Knoeo M 

Knoll 14 

KogerC 2-20 BJ149 


2705 34 
51 24A 

23 IF* 
145 3ft 
4 14ft 
44 4ft 
741 lift 
74 3ft 
6 4ft 
141 3ff* 
02 3ft 
10 4ft 
34 348 

103 lift 
m i3ft 
170 25ft 


33ft 33ft— ft 
sft :ft 
121b 13ft + ft 
3ft 3ft 
Mft 14ft + ft 
4ft 4ft + ft 
TOft 10ft— 4* 
3 Sft 
Aft 4ft— ft 
37V* 38ft + V* 
348 318 
4ft 4ft + ft 
3ft 348 + ft 
lift lift 
13 13 — U 

2518 25ft + ft 


U.S. Futures 


i 


Season season 
High Low 


Open HMrti Low Close Cho. 


town Season 
High Law 


Open Htgh Law Close Ota 


Season 

SaOBan 


High 

Low 

Open High Law CIom Cho. 


ORANGE JUICE (MY CE) 

15800 Ibt- cents per lb. 

18540 109.00 Jan 154.10 157-50 155J0 15750 

18S5B 11850 Mar 14050 169 JO 15&20 159 JO 

18500 151 JO May MOJO MOJO 1 5V JO 14045 

18485 155-00 Jul 14U0 T61J0 159.90 I40J0 

I81SB 157.75 Sep 15BJ5 

1S080 15&J0 Jan 156.90 

T4S40 15430 Mar 157J0 157J0 15495 15495 

. May 15490 

Est. Sales 7M Prev. Sates IJ04 
Prow. Day Open ML 7JB2 off 58 



BRITISH POUND (VMM) 

Sper pound- 1 pond eauotsSaoaoi 
1.1300 1.1300 Jan 1.11BD 

1-5170 1.1038 Mar 1.1090 1.1155 LHM0 1.1120 

1.3350 1 8950 Jun 1.W35 1.1105 UDB5 1.1065 

14450 18950 Sep 1.1028 1.1060 18995 1.1030 

1J710 18950 Dec 1.1000 1.1040 1.1000 1.1010 

Est. Sales >1856 Prev. Sains 11771 
Prev. Day Open UP. 20.139 up 447 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (I MM) 

Sper dir- 1 point equals SOuOOOl 
8050 J444 Mar J531 -7534 J5B8 J51B 

.7835 .7440 Jun 7510 7510 7499 7502 

7585 7503 Sep 7496 

7544 7495 Dec 7500 7900 7500 7492 

Est. Sales 3768 Pnrv.Sates 2.166 

Prev. Day Open lnt 7728 up 543 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Spot franc- l point ewats 5080001 
.11905 .10180 Mar .10200 

.11020 70210 Jun .18100 .10190 .10180 .1 0160 

.10430 .10200 Sap .10120 

Eu. Soles 41 Prev. Sales 2 
Prev. Dav Open ML 348 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

S per mark- 1 point equals 108001 
7118 J137 Mar 7144 7143 7V41 7147 

7731 7M0 Jan 7169 7182 7145 TUB 

7545 7195 Sep 7202 7203 J194 7197 

7610 7237 Dec 7227 

Est. Sales 19794 Prev. Softs 22738 
Prav. Day Open lnt 39763 off 511 
JAPANESE YEHUMMV 
S oar ywv 1 point oquab S0J00001 
084895 803971 Mar J03935 J03943 J03928 J83937 

004450 803955 Jun 80J9B8 803968 JK0M4 80J966 

004150 MmS Sep 803998 

004350 004030 Dec J04P3S 

Est. sales 5839 Prev. Sales 5744 
Prev. Day Open lnt. 13760 up 147 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

8 per franc- 1 point equals SOJOOI 
7035 7741 Mar 7747 7740 7734 7719 

4900 7781 Jun 7789 7797 7775 7773 

4833 7877 Sep 7813 

-4360 7888 Dec 7860 7840 7060 7860 

Est Sales 15789 Prev. Sales 1X492 
Prev. Day Open lnt. 21742 up 745 


3 Ift 
4ft 31* 
7ft 2ft 
41ft 23ft 
141b lift 
17ft 11 
17ft 9V* 
lift BU 

Sft n 

441* 25ft . 
7ft Sft 
9ft 5 - 

5 2ft ; 
ift Ift . 
31 18 I 

35 20 i 

70ft 31ft : 
20ft Bft I 
12ft 4ft I 
Mft 10ft 
13V. 9ft 
24ft 12ft 
10ft BU 


.15e 

74 17 10 
.160 1 J 

41 


70 3 ,8 

’£ ’4S 

-411 37 10 

.10 X 18 
70 Z1 15 


M 1U 
7 TV. 

48 Sft 

14 2Sft 
7 Mft 

29 ,4 
51 I2ft 

24 lift 
55 Zft 

49 45ft 

144 Sft 
22 4 

25 2U 
57 2U 
115 2Kb 
233 31ft 

22 70U 
325 14ft 
40 10ft 

50 13 

7 12V* 
72 25ft 

15 9U 


1ft 1ft 
TU 2ft 
5 S — ft 
2Sft 2SU + ft 
141* 14ft— ft 
15ft M + ft 
lift 12 — U 

11 lift— ft 

2ft 23b + ft 
44 45ft +1H 
Sft Sft 
Sft 6 + ft 

2ft 2U 
2ft 2ft— ft 
28ft 28ft + ft 
31 31 —ft 

70ft 70ft— ft 

13ft 13ft + ft 

10ft IQU + ft 
12ft 12ft— ft 
121C. 12ft 
25ft 2Sft + ft 
9ft 9U 


19ft 10 Quotas 


10ft 5 
Sft 3ft 
UP* 3ft 
20 12ft 
14ft 10ft 
29ft I OH 
7ft 4 
2ft 1ft 
17ft 10ft 
47ft 27ft 
9ft Sft 
4ft 3V. 

13 9ft 
17 10U 

4ft ft 
71 lift 
34ft 20ft 
7 2 

Sft 3ft 
29ft 22U 
4Vb 3ft 
11 lift 
191b 10ft 


RAI 75t . 
RMS El 
RTC 

Ransba J7 
Raven 42 : 
Raym In 1980c 
RtlncT 
Rodtaw 

RrealB 56 . 
Resrt A 
RastAec 
RexNor 
RlbletP 70 
RIOAJg 55 . 
RIoGDr 
Rckwvs 72 
Rogers .12 
RoonPn 
RoyPlm 
Rudckpt 54 : 
RBW 

Russell 70 : 

RyfcOff 50 : 


34 2ft 
443 13ft 


26 1SU 18U 1SU 


6ft 6ft— ft 
4 4 

Sft 3ft + ft 
10ft 10ft 
12ft 12ft 
Tift lift + ft 
7 7 

2ft 2H 
12ft 13U+1M 
39ft 39ft— ft 
Sft Sft 
Sft 3ft 
lift lift— ft 
15ft 15ft + ft 
Ift 1ft 
21ft 21ft + ft 
23ft 23ft + ft 
31* tfb+U 
4 4 

21 24 

4 4 — ft 

13U 14 + ft 

18ft 10ft + ft 


ns 

ITU lift 
lift BU 
Wft 14ft 
Sft IN 
3ft Itt 
14 10ft 
21 Mft 
lift 5U 
10U 6ft- 
19ft Wft 
13ft 7ft 
10ft Sft 
23ft 15 
18 9ft 


10 Oft 
23% 15U 
2SU 15ft 
14ft 4ft 
5ft 2ft 
20 14ft 
10ft 3ft 
1ft ft 
17ft lift 
Bft Sft 
Bft 4ft 
I0U Sft 
8H 2U 
14ft 10ft 
59 44U 

7ft 4ft 
12H 8 
14W 12ft 


UNA 

U Unite 

Unicom 

UntcppT 

UnJmrn 

UAirPd 

UFoodA 

U FoodB 

UtAtad 

USAGwt 

ustck n 

UnilafV 


75. 57 112 

78 

54b 37 9 11 
.10-47 20 136 

28 S& 

AS* 5.1 14 12 

43 

26 43 

JM6 137 12 23 

14 15 

17 44 

29 58 

J0e 45 7 14 

4V 


T^lOU 

,2ft ITU 
9U 9ft 
14U 14ft 
IN IN 
IN 1ft 
13ft 12ft 
211* 20ft 
10ft 10 
Ok 4U 
Wft 19ft 
13ft 13ft 
7ft 7ft 
Mft 14U 
lift 111b 


27k 

n -m- 

12N+N 
Vft— ft 
Mft + H 
Ift 
Mb 

12ft • 
21ft + ft 

mo+ u 
nib + ib 
a* , - 
14»+ ft- 
iift+fk 


VST a 

VollyR 172 97 7 
Voters 44 TJ 11 
vertdtn 

verH 12 

VTAfflC 40b 28 VO 

VtRsti 

Verna 

Vomit JO 17 9 
VertPte .10 IJ 
Via lech 

Vican 10 

Vltttge 38 

Vlrco Mr 2 I 
vntntl 

VhuoHS 78 AI 10 
vamx 74 3J 12 
VufcCo 40e 27 8 


22 Kb 

3 20U 

47 21ft 

829 6U 

4 3 
124 2Mb 

n t 

47 12 
n Sft 
11 7ft 
59 4 

45 3U 
14 Mft 
8 57 
36 7 

10 91 * 

5 UN 


9ft 9ft 

am 2 bu + u 
21 2lft +l ‘ 
m su . * 

7ft 2ft 

am 2n* + ft. 

IS Up- 
lift lift— ft 
5V. Sft 
7ft 7ft + ft 
Sft Sft— ft 
Sft 3ft— Ik' 
14ft Mft 
57 57 +16. 

6* 4ft + ft 
9ft 9ft + ft' 
15ft 15ft 



B LLr 

fffr* 


Mv-I 


1 I 

■ ^ L 1 




1 JBlj U ‘ 




M' Hu 


Livestock 















Financial 


HOGS CC ME1 . 

3&C301IU-- cants par Ri. 

SUB ■ 4757 Feb 5115 5120 

5445 45.10 APT 5075 9075 

5540 4840 Jin 5440 5445 

5X77 4X95 Jul 55- M) 5X10 

5477 4770 Auo S400 5400 

5175 4580 Oct 4970 49J« 

aw 4470 Dec 4970 4970 

49 7V 4675 Feb 4970 4978 

4775 457S Apr 

Est. said 8.738 Prav.Sales 9472 
Prev. Day Doan lnt. 2X424 upI20 

PORK BE LUES (CME1 
3SJOO Ita.- cents per lb. 

0X85 6075 Feb 7480 7420 

HUB 60.10 Mar 7670 7470 

82Jn 61.15 May 78.10 7870 

82X7 6115 Jul 7870 7880 

BOAS 6020 AW 7450 7445 

75.15 6115 Feb 6970 69X0 

7140 4430 Mar 

eat . Sales 4809 Prav.Sales lull 
pm*. Dav Open lnt. 12770 otf234 


5280 5240 —73 

4985 49X7 —75 

5400 54X2 — X0 

5420 5447 —AS 
5X12 5X50 —75 

4970 4985 —-57 

4975 4977 —33 

49 JO 4885 — JO 

4675 


7X80 73X0 —280 

7432 7432 —380 

75X7 75X7 —280 
74X7 7672 —ITS 
7450 7450 — 0J0 
67.10 67.10 —1X0 
6430 — L5D 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI mount- pie of 100 pet. 






9285 

87 89 

Mar 

9,87 

9282 

9187 

9191 

+86 

7189 

87.14 

Jun 

91 J7 

91 JD 

9187 

91X0 

+88 

9181 

86.94 

Sea 

9X97 

9089 

9092 

33 

+89 

9072 

B5l77 

Doc 

9044 

9044 

9055 

+88 

90X1 

8640 

Mar 

9088 

9080 

9081 

33 

+07 

90.12 

8781 

Jun 

9082 

90JI2 

9080 

+J07 

8984 

0080 

Sen 



8983 

+87 



Dec 




89X9 

+87 

Eft. Sales 


Prev. Sate* 10816 


Prev. Day Open inL 48837 oH258 




WYX TREASURY (CBT) 





S1B0800 prtn- Pts & 32ndi anoo pet 




87-27 

70-25 

Mar 

•0-13 

88-18 

80-6 

&!3 

+13 

81-7 

7B4 

Jun 

79-22 

79-26 

79-16 

+12 

00-23 

7S-18 

Sen 

78-31 

79-6 

7849 

79 

+1T 

78-28 

75-13 

Dec 



70-16 

+11 

7B-23 

75-18 

Mar 




762 

+11 

709 

77-22 

Jun 




77-71 

+11 

Est. Salts 


Prav.Satsi SJIt 


Prev. Day Open lnt. 37811 upl.138 




US TREASURY BONDS (CBT1 





(■PCMR«U0D-Mi A 32ndeaf lOOpctl 




77-19 

57-27 

Mar 

71-7 

71-12 

70-25 

70-30 

+14 

77-15 

57-20 

Jun 

70-12 

78-17 

69-30 

70-3 

+14 

76-2 

57-10 

Sep 

4M0 

69-25 

688 

69-13 

66-24 

+14 

76-5 

57-8 

Dec 

68-29 

69-5 

68-19 

+14 

7230 

57-2 

Mar 

68-9 

68-17 

66-5 

66-6 

+14 

70+ 

56-29 

Jun 



67-27 

+14 

69-75 

56-29 

Sep 




S3 

+14 

69-26 

56-25 

Dec 

67-3 

67ft 

66-38 

+M 

69-7 

56-27 

Mar 




66-19 

+14 

68-11 

64-3 

Jun 




66ft 

+14 

67-19 

64-21 

Sep 




66 

+14 

Est. Saiee 


Prav.Satesl09.O39 




Prav. Day Open lnL19S.IB4 up2X87 







10ft 

SV* Nontck 



13 

40 

ift 

6U 

4Vj + H 

W 

10* NtGsO 

X0b XI 

e 

1 

!2Tr 

12* 

17* 

33ft 

T2V* NIPotnl 

.10 

4 

15 

236 

14ft 

IS* 

IS — ■* 

2* 

1 NetaLB 




33 

1ft 


lft+ ft 

SB 

25ft NHamp 

80 

14 

38 

72 

52 

50 ft 

SOW— ft 

19ft 

lift NMxAr 

J9t 4J 

16 

4 

17V, 

1714 

17ft + ft 

14ft 

ID* NPInRi 

JM 

6X 

15 

51 

14ft 

lift 

141*— ft 

19ft 

13 NProc 

1800 B.1 

B 

149 

IS 1 .* 

14?* 

14*— ft 


L>H Press ' 

OdeftcsAn - 

PGE23MJ. 

Ruckawayi 

SaundrSvB 

TexusAlrCp 

Verm id Am . 


BP C066P. INDEX (CMC) 
points and cents 

in25 uajo Mar nus 1700 

1S2S !“- ,D Jon 17780 17775 

l&S I6JB0 Sap 180.10 IBB 38 

WJO 17570 Dec I87J0 11170 

Eel. Soles 7X444 Prav.Sales 7ixi* 
Prev. Day Open ML 4 um up 2JD1 
VALUE LIME (KC8T) 
patats and cents 

T Q(r WOTS 

im<S !S5 i” 1 IS- 10 "S" 

,8US ,^80 19780 
EM Sales Prav.Sales 2736 
Prav.DavOmMitd. 4777 up 47 
NY8E COMP. INPEK (NYFE) 


COFFEE C I NT CSCE) 

37,500 Rn.. coats per Rl _ 

15X50 12X50 Mar 14X52 14580 

15280 12281 May 141 A) 142X0 

14930 13180 Jul 139X0 MOTS 

147 JO 12780 SOP 13X15 130.15 

74180 12933 Dec 13780 137X0 

73580 12850 Mar 

1342S 13180 May 13680 13480 

Est. sales 2.100 Prav.Sales 824 
Prev. Day Open lnt. UTSS off 24 
SUGARWOALD IlfNYCSCK) 

112800 Ibx- c ant s per lb. 

IXIO 2JS7 Jan 429 429 

13X0 481 Mar 4X2 4X9 

10-50 434 May 581 587 

MS 4X3 Jul 5X0 545 

975 4JB Sea 5X2 MS 

9X5 587 Oct 5X3 5X7 

9J3 682 Mar 6X2 6JD 

7.15 650 May 7.10 7.10 

Esf.saMi 10.125 Prev. sem 17806 
Prev. Oar Oesa ML nxas uplJM 

COCOA. (WTC5CE) 

lOfrwtrtc tons- Sper ton 

2570 1988 Mar 2155 2157 

2S70 2020 MOV 2176 2183 

7400 2849 Jul 2188 2163 

2415 TOO Sep 7160 2144 

2337 1999 Dee 2100 2104 

709? 2020 Mgr 

Est- SaMS Prav.Sales 5806 

Prev. Day Oaen lnt. Z2J26 up295 


141X5 14498 
14175 14251 
139 JO 140X1 
UX15 139.10 
13780 137X0 
13605 
13480 13431 


VR 629 

454 467 

«J S8S 

U1 5X3 
tog US 

&n ssj 
473 6X1 

784 784 


7139 3141 

2160 2UI 
2149 2149 

2148 2150 

2090 2090 

2099 
2089 


SS Y ar I 082 * R*X* 

WX0 908a Jun laxg tauo 

Sm J0420 HH5D 

M5J0 WIN Dec W3J95 10670 

Est-5otea T7JT7 Prav.ScrtSlSJW 
Prev. Day Open lnt 8L739 upU44 


172 X 5 17380 
175 X 0 17680 
179 JO 179.10 
18 IJ 0 181 JO 


18 X 90 109 X 0 
19250 WXB 0 
79780 I 96 J 0 


M 0 J 0 MOJO 
101 X 5 WHO 
KH 30 10360 
HJ 5 J 5 109 X 0 


Commodtty indexes 


Close 

"toady's 963.101 

Rfluteri - - . i am td 

dj. Futures. — msn 

Com. Roseoreh Bureau- 24580 

"toady’s : base 100 ; Dec. 31, 1931. 
p ■ preliminary; f - (Inal 
Reuters : base 100 ; Sen. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 ; Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 
96200 f 
1,965.90 
124.39 
245-00 


Market Guide 


NYCSCE; 

HYCE; 


ovcmw Board at Trade 
a*Wq. Me«sontfle Exchange 
fflptdtongt Monetary Market 

K? I2U ^ acoa ‘ S«»r, coflee Exchange 
n ew v ork Cattim Exenanae 
fi9«n»n°dlt y ExchcngA New York 
gn^orkMnrconfno Evchano* 

Qty Board of Trooo 
Nw York Fuferts Exdm 


London Commodities 
Jan. 15 

Figures In sterling per metric Ion. 
Gasoil in U.5. dollars per metric ton. 
Gold in UA, dollars per ounce. 


High Low Close Previous 
SUGAR 

Mar 131X0 12SJ0 131 JO UI 30 129J0 13080 
MOV 13840 13689 13080 138X0 U7A0 13880 
Aug 148X0 146J0 14880 14&60 148X0 14BX0 
Oct 15440 153X0 1SSX0 15&20 15430 15440 
Dec 16380 16380 16280 16320 16280 163.40 
Mar 177X0 175X0 177X0 I7BJU OTjSO 178X0 
MOV N.T. N.T. 184 JO 1B4J0 18480 18520 
2.17S lots oi 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Mor 2865 2834 5836 2837 2866 2867 
May 2862 2040 2845 2846 28°4 2046 

Jlv 2858 2836 2845 2846 2861 2865 
top 2862 2861 2845 2846 2864 10*6 
Dec 2800 1.984 1,986 1.988 2800 2005 
MW 1,985 1,985 1,976 1,990 2800 2JC3 
MOV N.T. N.T. 1,956 28 HI 1,990 2833 
8,174 lots at 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Jan 2322 2J0I txm 2J7i 2800 L30T 
MOT 2854 1338 2847 2849 2J3S TJX 
May 2369 2356 2J63 2J64 TJ53 2354 
JIV 1379 2367 2J72 3J75 2A5 2366 
SOP 2387 2375 2378 2380 2 368 2370 
NOV 2390 2380 2385 2390 2370 2375 

Jan .2315 2375 2383 2390 XU* X38D 

2X22 lots of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

Jan 238-00 235-25 23580 23635 33133 23X50 
Fab 236-75 23X75 23480 Z343S mflO 
MOT ThUM 727 JS 22880 22SJ0 227 30 277.75 
Apt 22450 221 JO 222J0 22X25 3Z13S 23130 

May 231.75 319.25 21980 22080 21SS0 219 JO 
Jun N.T. N.T. 2MJ0 219JS 2nj0 219 JO 
JlV N.T. N.T. 21500 Z19J5 21SJ0 2J9J0 
Aug N.T. N.T. 21280 225-00 21580 7XUW 
Sap N.T. N-T. 21025 229 JO 21580 228 JO 
A93S lots atlOO tons. 

GOLD 

Fab 304J0 30180 30480 30450 299X0 OTO80 
API N.T. N.T. 307 JO 30880 203J0 302JD 
Jun N.T. N.T. 311 JO 31 TJO NX). JLO. 
Auu N-T. N.T. 316J0 3I7JB M-O- N*a 
133 lets at MO travel. 

Sourcmt; Reutmraond LonOon PatntMum Ett- 
cbanpa IsasolM. 


U.S. Business Starts 
Increased In 3d Quarter 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Business starts 
rose 1.9 percent in the third Quar- 
ter, to 3 1. 728 bom 31,133 in 1983's 
third Quarter, a Dun ft Bradstreet 
Corp. economist said Tuesday. 

He said the increase, although 
down from the 93-pcrceot and 6- 
perceai rate of increase in the brat 
and second quarters, still points to 
a record pace for 1984. 


London Metals Jan. 15 

Figures in sterling opr metric ton 
Silver in pence per trov ounce. 


Cash Prices Jan. IS 


Today 

High grade catwr cathodes: 
seal 1.19680 I. I 94 J 0 
3 months 1 - 208-50 IJ 09 JO 
Copper cathodes: 

SPOl 1,19100 1 . 1954 D 
3 months 1 J 07 J 0 1 - 209.00 
Tin; wal 9 J 8580 9 J 90 J 0 1 
3 months 9,79580 980000 1 
Lead: spot 355 X 0 355.50 


1 . 17 X 00 1.17100 
1 , 106 X 0 t, 186.50 


Lead: spot 355 X 0 35550 

3 months 329.50 33000 
ZMc:Spot 725 X 0 72680 

3 months 716 X 0 718-53 

Sllvcr:smt 53 BJ 0 53900 

3 months 55 X 00 55580 

Aluminium: 

spot 981 X 0 910 X 0 

3 months 1 X 10 X 0 1 X 10-50 
Niefcolispal 4 X 4080 4 J 50 J 0 
3 months 4 J 8580 4 J 90 J 0 
Source: routers. 


6 e 9 X 0 97080 

996 X 0 99780 

4 J 4580 4 J 5 DJ 0 
4 JO 0 X 0 4 J 9 SJ 0 


Dividends Jan. 15 


HDNG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UJJ per ounce 

t _poie Pravto u i 

Hloli Lew BM Ask EM Ask 
Jun - NX N-T 30280 304-58 29980 30180 
Feb _ 30409 30400 30180 305 J 0 30080 30 X 00 
Mar - N T. N.T. 30580 30780 30280 30400 
API- N.T. N.T. 237 J 0 30980 30480 30680 
J""— NX N.T. 311 JQ 31100 3 fi«J 0 31180 
Fw - JJX N.T. 3 I 6 .es 31080 31 X 00 3 ?SJSS 
OCf _ 32188 32180 32080 32280 317.80 TIMS 
DOC _ N.T. N.T. 37600 228 X 0 32380 32580 
Volume; 28 lots of 100 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJ per ounce 


Prev. 
Hieb Law 

Ft* 30500 30170 

Mar — N.T. N.T. 

API N.T. N.T. 

Volume: 606 loto of 100 as. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
MetaysftM cents per Mlo 
Close 

Bid Ash 

Feb 19SJ5 195.75 

Me 1WJD 19780 

fpr 19980 30080 

Mav _____ S3XS8 SB&5B 
Jun __ — - 20780 20980 

Vohmte: 31 lots. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
SMeapera aenftaer Mft 
date 

BM am 

RSSIFab-. 17580 175J0 

RS3 I Mor_ 17525 17575 

RS52 Fab— 16U0 16X50 

RS5 3Feb_ 199 JO 16X50 
RSS 4 Feb_ 15X50 154 JO 

R5S5 Fob- 14*50 14650 

yuaLA LU MPUR PALM OIL 
Motayiinn rinwgitsper 25 fans 


Settle Settle 
30 X 90 30 X 60 

305.90 30460 

307 X 0 30630 


Previous 
Bid AM 

W 1WJS 
195-50 1 9685 

19S05 19*80 

20580 207.©} 

207 JD 209 JO 


Pravtoes 
.Bid AM 
17450 17580 

174^ T7580 
16180 16280 
159.00 16080 

15X00 15480 
14480 14680 


Comm odity and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santos. ID 

Prtn®cteHi 6473« 30 V=. yd _ 

Steel billets IPMJ.ton 

Iren 3 Fdnr. Phlla_ ton 

Steel scrap No I ley Pitt. . 

Lead Spot ft 

Copper elect, B» — 

Tin (Straits), R> - - - 

Zinc. E. SI. t- Bash, lb 

Palladium, as _____ 
Silver N.Y.n - 
Source: XT’. 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 15 

Sobot hi French Fnoacs ocr metric ton 
Ottier Ogures In Francs oer IDO ks. 


Hlek Low Close cave 

SUGAR 

Mor 1X50 1X31 1X35 1X39 —34 

Mav U00 1X92 1X82 1XU —43 

Aug 1J95 1J75 1J75 IJEO — X 

Del 1860 1X45 1X50 1X55 — 25 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1.730 1.750 —25 

Mar 18S0 UUS U3D 1843 —40 

Est. voL: Mi2tonof50 tons. Prev. actual 
sates: 2X96 tot*. Open interest; 19874 

2715 2175 2175 2J74 — 

2200 2185 1190 2195 — 

N.T. N.T, 2165 — — 



S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. IS 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. IS 

CNasaMcrtonine Eaton*. 
iMfenaMgrt-tEHImsts ontsocr mat 


Strike Colb'ScMe Putvsettie 

prloe mot Aw Sept Mar jun Sot 

a - 2^ - D.ll 0.40 - 

n MS 1X2 — 0J9 671 _ 

» IUS D.93 us t?l 5.19 1J4 

H 0.17 B JR 0.9) ua 1J3 M 

M 087 035 0x5 2J5 - If 

35 U UI MS 161 ^ _ 

EUknaMWol (9L4J74 
CJb: Mon. iraL 1X03 KM tal.auU7 
Fell : Mon. ni, ins open lr,l 1<JS8 
Source: CMC. 









































































INTEttiiATIOlSAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1985 


Page 13 


** 


BUSINESSPEOPLE 


Den Danake Bank to Open 
First Brandi in W. Germany 


■i ,ft t 


By Brenda Hagerty 

International Herald Tribwte 

LONDON — Den Danske 
Bank, Denmark’s largest commer- 
cial bask, plans to opes a branch 
shortly in Hamburg, making it the 
first major Danish bank to enter 
the West German market The 
move is part of the Copenhagen- 
based bank’s international expan- 
sion plan. 

The new branch, which the bank 
hopes to open officially in March 
or April, will have a sp&cal empha- 
sis on finaocmg trade, said Hubert 
]L Rosmann. Mr. Kosmann and 
Bond Kisc have been appointed 
general managers of the Hamburg 
branch. 

“Some drink we have come to the 
German market too late; I don’t 
think: this is the case,’' said Mr. 
Kosmann, adding that West Ger- 


many has been Denmark's largest 
trading partner for the past four 
years and that Denmark and the 
other Scandinavian countries are 
reporting increased exports to the 
other European countries. 

Mr, Ko smann joins Danske 
Bank from Bayeriscbe Hypothe- 
ken- and Wechsd-Baak AG in Mu- 
nich . Mr, Kiso previously was with 
Bank of American in London as 
deputy area general manager for 
the Middle East and Africa. More 
recently he was with Bank of Amer- 
ica in Frankfurt 

Ernst & Wlmney, the interna- 
tional accountants, have an- 
nounced that the former Irish com- 
nmsioQer at the European 
Oxmnunity, Richard Burke, is to 
join their Brussels-based European 
Community Office as a special ad- 
viser on European affairs. Mr. 


Burke spent seven years as a mem- 
ber ana vice preadeni of the EC 
Commission. He resgned effective 
Jan. 5 

Saatdri & Saatdri Co, the fast- 
growing British advertising agency, 
has lost one of its veteran execu- 
tives, Tim BeEL to Lowe Howard- 
Spmk Campbefl-EwaJd (Holdings) 
PLC, a smaller London-based 
agency. Mr. Bell, formerly chair- 
man of Saatchi's mam agency, has 
been named chief executive of 
Lowe Howard-Spink. Mr. Bell was 
responsible for Saatchi’s promo- 
tion of Britain’s Conservative Party 
in the past two general elections. 

Col^ate-PahDohve Co„ the New 
York-based health-care, cleaning 
sports, food and laundry-products 
concern, has named Barrie M. 
Spelling vice president, new prod- 
ucts and businesses. He previously 
was based in Brussels, where he was 
general manag er of the company’s 
operations in Belgium. The name 
of Mr. Spelling's successor has not 
been announced. 

Nalco Chemical Co. has elected 


Richard N. Brammer and Sergio 
Dd Grande coiporate vice presi- 
dents. Mr. B ramme r will continue 
as president of Nalco Pacific and 
Mr. Del Grande as president of 
Nalco Europe, based in Paris. 
Nalco is based in Oak Brook, Illi- 
nois. 

Chase Manhattan Bank of New 
York has appointed Michael 
Thorpe to head its travelers’ check 
operations in Europe, the Middle 
bast and Africa. Chase said that 
this is a new position aimed at 
strengthening sales of. its Visa trav- 
elers’ checks in these markets. Mr. 
Thorpe, who is based in London, 
previously was with American Ex- 
press Co. as national sales manager 
for its travelers' check business in 
the United Kingdom. - 

Northern Telecom Ltd. has ap- 
pointed BmccTavnermanagiQg di- 
rector of its London-based unit. 
Northern Telecom PLC, effective 
Feb. IS. He will succeed Walter 
Benger, who will become chairman 
of the London unit, filling a vacan- 
cy. Currently, Mr. Tavner is chair- 


man and chief executive of Bell 
Canada International Inc, a unit of 
Bell Canada Enterprises Inc. 
Northern Telecom, the Canada- 
based telecommunications con- 
cern, is 52-percent-owned by Bell 
Canada Enterprises. 

Continental Airlines has named 
Richard Havers to the new post of 
regional vice president — Europe. 
Phil Bakes, president of Continen- 
tal Airlines, a unit of Texas Air 
Corp. of Houston, said, "Hie es- 
tablishment of our new regional 
headquarters in London reflects a 
commitment to fully develop Con- 
tmentaTs potential in Europe." Tbe 
carrier has applied for perurissiem 
to operate a Hoaston- London ser- 
vice. Mr. Havers was European 
genera] manager for British Cale- 
donian Airways. 

Swissair said Hans P. Zollinger 
mil take up the post of general 
manager for the United Kingdom 
and Ireland Feb. 4. Mr. Zollinger, 
who currently is based in Stock- 
holm as Swissair’s manager for 
Sweden, succeeds August Weber. 


President Quits 
People Express 

The Associated Pros 

NEWARK, New Jersey — 
The president and chief operat- 
ing officer erf People Express 
Airlines lnc, Harold J. Paretil 
has resigned, possibly to start 
his own company. 

A company spokesman in 
London said Tuesday that there 
had been “stylistic" differences 
between Mr. Pared, one of five 
co-founders of the discount- 
fare airline, and the carrier's 
chairman, Donald D. Burr. 

Mr. Pared, 36. said be was 
leaving, possibly to start his 
own airline, bemuse ’the bulk 
of the growth at People Express 
has already occurred.” Mr. Burr 
will assume Mr. Pareti’s post as 
president, the company said, 
while Gilbert Roberts would 
become chief operating officer. 


U.S. Stock Credit Shift Urged 


(Continued from Page 9) 
relatively little concern, however, 
far protecting brokers and other 
lenders because experience after 
the 1929 stock market crash 
showed that most had been able to 
avoid serious losses. 

The Fed analysts said that the 
diversion-of-assets argument was 
invalid because stock market trans- 
actions simply facilitate the trans- 
fer of existing assets. 

The money does uot disappear; 
tbe buyer’s money simply moves to 
the bank account of the seller. And, 
in any event, the Fed said, direct 
use of stock market credit has be- 
come much less important relative 
to the size of the economy and the 
securities markets than 50 years 
ago- 

Tbe Fed acknowledged that mar- 
gin requirements, which have been 
set ai fairly high levels, do provide 
some protection for unsophisticat- 
ed investors. But it noted that there 
were alternative ways of speculat- 
ing in stocks, such as by obtaining 


other credit or trading in other fi- 
nancial instruments, such as op- 
tions, for which the margin require- 
ment is lower. 

fit a covering letter to Congress. 
Paul A Volcker. the Fed chairman, 
said that, “in effect, margin re- 
quirements are avoided, to some 
degree, at greater cost and inconve- 
nience.” Heated as an example the 
speculator who might deride to put 
a second mortgage on a house to 
increase buying power. 

As for market volatility, Mr. 
Volcker said that 30 years of work 
by various researchers had found 
that credit-financed trading had lit- 
tle influence on slock prices. 

Since the Fed appears to regard 
margin rates on stocks as now too 
high — at least relative to alterna- 
tive vehicles — it might be assumed 
that the various exchanges, if given 
the authority, would set them at a 
lower level This would tend to in- 
crease trading in stocks, probably 
offset to some extent by a reduction 
in options trading 


Over-the-Counter 


Jan. 15 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


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146 MB 6V* *ft— ft 
94 9ft 9ft 9ft + to 
15822ft 2P* gft + to 
5526V. 25 Vj 25ft + V* 
28628ft 25ft 26ft + W 
150 9) 50 — 1M 

23 13ft Uto 13ft— to 
79523ft 21 23 — « 

69 19V* 18ft 19M+ to 
2680 12to Uft 12 + ft 

«»«)» u JOto + ft 

461 l*ft 14 1416 

79 19ft 18ft 19 + ft 
82 left 19 19ft + Mr 
1018ft 18ft IW? + Mr 

4122ft 22ft 22ft 
5331ft 31 31ft + ft 

S 3W 31ft 31ft + to 
52Vu 51ft Sift + to 
41 26M 26ft Uto 
272*M 23ft Sift + ft 
29 7ft Tto 7ft— to 
10820ft 2 8ft 2IH* + ft 
0B7 2M6 29ft »to 
103736ft 36 34 — to 

448 6to 6 *M> 

180 Mft M M — ft 
137416ft 16» 14to 
93 31 30ft 30ft— ft 
200 16 VSft 15ft + ft 
140 13ft 13 13ft 4 ft 


234 5V8 

5 

5ft + ft 

79M 

Uto 

14 + to 

IJ7T3T8 

Uto 

Wft+ to 

12 37 

26to 27 — to 

1219 

T8to 

189b— to 

8 1598 

lito 

1598 + ft 

413 248 

Sft 

2ft 

I80S 7ft 

r-L 

n* + % 

32C 


6 It + ft 

485 Tift 

12 

»ft + to 

If!- It 

in 

1 T % 



Sale* In 


Hat 1 



180* 

Nigh Lew 3 PJ4. Ch've 

Fudrck 



84312% 

11% 

12 + % 

FulHB* 

JO 

XO 

465 149b 

1498 

1498+ % 

1 



G 


) 

GTS s 



148 7% 

7to 

7ft— ft 

Galileo 



699 1396 

13ft 

13ft— ft 

QamoB 

.10 

1* 

1306 098 

t 

Bto 

Garda 





'ft+* 

Genet Oi 



1173 41 

40 

40%+ % 

GnAut 

GnHme 



62 S% 
149 898 

5% 

7ft 

598 

796— to 

GenetL 




3ft 

3ft+ % 

Genets 



1563 596 

5% 

598 + 98 

Cenex 



417 Sto 

59fe 

598— % 


.lOe 20 

55 5ft 

S 

5to + % 

GaFBK 



1181 1198 

into 

11% + 96 

GerfMds 

J3A 

u 

228 698 

6 

698+ U 

GlbsG 

*1 

J 

1427 2898 

27V6 

28% +1% 

GlaaTr 



52 1896 

n 

18ft + 96 

GteflFd 



172911 

W9fe 

1096 

GidCory 



11 lift 

■K 

11% . 

GUTocd 



78 ft 

to +% 

Gotoas 



742169b ISto 

16 - % 

Gaft 



12 12 

1196 

12 + % 

GouMP 

.76 

43 

47418 

17 

18 +96 


-44 

XA 

4391216 

llto 

12% +1 

Grtmtrv 



229 816 
37 Mto 

0% 

8% + to 

GraatU 



Vto 

10 

GrehSc 



841 *16 

5 

5 

GWFSB 

AM 30 

119 Mto 

16 

16+16 




136 12to 

lift 

12ft— ft 

GreonT 



137 IBto 

1796 

18% + % 

Gtocti 



734 Uto 

13 

13ft + % 

Gullfrd 



2521*16 

14% 

1496+ U, 

GHBdc 



1307 Mto 

U96 

1496 

GItNuc 



2 2 

2 

2 

Gull 

OSe 

5 

18 996 

9ft 

996+ ft 

H I 

HBOs 

.26 

JI 

11381998 

1896 

19% + to 

HCC 

JUe 

.7 

SO Bto 

8% 

8to+ 96 

hcw 

.10 

XI 

45 5 

496 

496— % 

tWO Air 



660 11 

10ft 

10ft— ft 

Haber* 



473 Mto 

lift 

15ft— to 




22 5ft 

S 

S%— % 

Hodson 



86 2ft 

2% 

2% + % 

HateSy 



67 598 

tic 

516— Hr 

Halml 



391 1% 

lft 

HamOIt 

.10 

3 

970 14% 

1398 M 

HaraG 

34 

1.1 

30 30 

30ft + 96 

HrtfNs 

UU 

AO 

157 2648 

2696 

2596 + % 

Hatfiwv 

30 

7.2 

3 9 

y 

9 — to 

HawKB 

X 

2* 

51 9to 

Vft 

9ft + to 

Him** 



8121646 

MU 

1696+ ft 

HHhCSs 



6719 

It 

IB — ft 

Hithln 



24 7ft 

7 

7ft 

le.ifl ’ttlM 



687 398 

3% 

39b+ ft 

nrSri 

.16 

J 

237 24 

2316 

23ft- ft 

HechoB 

.10 

A 

87 25 


2-ft+ ft 

HetenT 



232 7 



Helix 



31 SB 

Bft 

28 + ft 

HenraF 

JMa 

23 

10 35ft 

35% 

35ft- ft 

HeritBn 

140 

37 

90 096 

4396 

4396 

HSbcrC 5 

IJ» 

4* 

1)8 21% 

2096 2096 + to 




5*6 10ft 

Wft 

10(8+98 




2926 6to 

Aft 

698 + % 




1461598 

15% 

1598+ % 

HomaHl 



549318ft 

996 

10 — % 

Hmocft 



IM 796 

7ft 

7to— ft 

Hanlnd 

1% 

X2 

1TB 1796 

17V, 

1796 + ft 

HookBr 

£1 

50 20 

7946 

IPft- % 

Hoover 

1JM 

M 

9172996 

29ft 

2998 + % 

Horzlnd 

56 5% 

5% 

5ft 

HwBNJi 



23819% 

19% 

19% 




347 596 

ft 

598+ ft 

HuntjB 



6521 

2096 

21 + to 


“ 


133 »to 

9 


HuntaB 

148b *2 

26135 

34% 

34% + % 

Horco 



110 516 

* 

ift + ft 

Hybrttc 



543 1896 

1796 

IBto + 98 

HydaAt 



61 5 

4» 

5 

HVMnx 



61 6ft 


6to + ft 

HytekM 



63 Bft 

Bft 

8ft + ft 


ILC 
IMS Inf 
IPLSy 
ISC 
leal 

Imunox 

i mupm 

inacmp 

rnmin 

inflN 

IntoRsc 

InUm 

Infra In 

I nstNtw 

Intocm 

intBDv 

IntsGon 

issco 

Intel 

InMSv 

IntrTol 

intmd 

Infant 

InlrfFlr 

Intrfac 

intarph 


JO B 


lAO 4J 


Intmec 

Inlrmot 

InCapC 

VntCI In 

l Gama 

Innctnp 

IntLse 

lnMobll 

IRIS 

I r Corp 

InTTotol 

Invert 

Iomega 

liomtJx 

ltd 

itelpf 


94 Bto 
23337ft 
153 lft 
BOB 9ft 
241 4 
1372 6to 
138 2V« 
U 4to 
83 23M 
356 33ft 
30 25V* 
79 23ft 
17 7 
IQS 18 
2898 9M 
339 llto 
138 3ft 
25 18 
9333 314* 
1069 9ft 
74 lft 
6914 
119 79i 
2921110 
284 71* 
2228 54ft 
2AS 6 to 
33718ft 
45 4 
9 2?» 
626 Mto 
396 Mft 
175 IBM 
UBlSto 
140 6ft 
140 lft 
61 16ft 
32? 4ft 
lit 4ft 
1819 'to 
■» v.ft 
9 Sc 3ft 
727 


Bft 

3ft 

Bto 

lft 

4to 


7ft 8 ♦ ft 

34M 37V* +■ ft 
1ft lft + ft 
•ft 4 ft 
4+1* 
6ft + V* 
JVfe + to 
4ft*— ft 

5* BS-ft 

25 25 +>fe 

21 23 +2ft 

7 7 

1 7ft 17ft— •- 
9to 9ft 
II II — ft 
3ft 3to+ ft 
17to I7VJ + v- 
31 31to+ to 

9ft 9ft 
ita ift + to 
13ft 14 + ft 

7to 7ft + to 
Wfe u + to . 
6ft 7to + j 
S3to 54ft 4 ft 
6ife 6to— to 

is Uft 

5to Sim— ■ 
2ft 2ft— to 
lift Uft to 
14to 143* + tfe 
18 Uft + <M 

Uto 13ft 4 to 
6 ft tft 
>- '.to ’■to 
loi- + ft 
4.: ,4s - 5 1 


JBRes I 
JtKkpo* 
JCK*'_fB 
Je.r.;..r 
JelSmrt 
jBlMart 
Jorlco 
JHy* 
JonicW 
l A 
Jv^nsn 
Svm 
Judiln s 


-24 IJ7 J 19 Mft 14)* 

t 2 4»fe 3ft 

251 31 jOVi 
10 23ft JOU 
Ma 22 147 18ft 17ft 

143 7 6ft 

1S8 4Vi 3ft 

124 4 Ift 

461 *ft 9ft 

3H.23VZ 221* 
JW 20 101 151* 15 


» 

I 

50 12 


1*5* + ft 

3ft— V. 
31 

2t'i 

ICft 

6ft+ to 
16ft 
ft- to 
4to+ ft 
3ft + to 
9ft + to 
27V. + (fe 
15V* 





K 


_ 1 

1 KL-- 



1554 1796 

16ft 

1718+ to 

KV r.r 



91 S 

tv* 

5 + ft 

Komcn 

*6 

SA 

13723% 

***5. 

„ 

Knrclir 



19214ft 

14% 

Mft 

hosier 

-601 

44 

17613*4 

13ft 

13% 




451 7ft 

7% 


Kelyjn 



1491 2H1 

1% 


Kemp 

1B0 

AI 

26 44% 

44% 

44% 

KvCnLt 

B0 

12 

165 36% 

35% 

36% + ft 

kevwx 



98 5% 



K&yTm 



36910ft 

"to 


Klmoal 

*4 

23 

26 2796 

3ft 

27ft + ft 

Klmbrk. 



41 Aft 

5ft 

6% + to 




2Z 9 



Kinders 

ite 

A 

516 16% 

15ft 

15*8+ ft 

vIKoss 



4 % 

*8 

ft 


06 

A 

316 lift 

1094 

1094 


32 

24 

467 13*% 

13to 

13% 

Kiikke 

.16 

A 

SB2S36 25% 2Sto + % 

l 



L 


f 

LOBrnk 



174 9ft 

9 

9%+ ft 

UN 



144 7% 

Aft 

7ft + 98 

LSI Lea 



1186 ISto 

15 

15 — % 

LTX 



432 19% 

Iflto 

19% + to 

LnPeies 



335 16 

Mft 

15ft + 94 

LaZBv 

i*a 





LadFm 

.12c 

A 

126 15% 

lift 

ISto 

Laidlw 

.16 

1.1 

924 16 

Mto 

13 + to 

LamoT 

B0 

42 

41 13 

1296 

13 + ft 

Lancasi 

*8 

43 

2813ft 

15% 

15ft + ft 

LndBF 

60 

44 

783 13ft 

13% 

13ft + % 

LOmkS 



40 6% 

6h 

698— % 

LaneCs 

BOO 10 

148 4ffto 

399. 

40% + to 


35c 23 

21 6ft 

Aft 

63b- % 

La win s 

X 

1.1 

148 2Ato 

26 

24 — ft 

LMDtD 



134 7% 

7to 

7% 

Letner 



513% 

13% 

1398+ % 

LewisP 

3 8b £7 

45 7% 

7% 

7*8 .. 

Lexicon 



SB5 4 

3ft 


Lextdta 



574 3(8 

3 

3%+ % 

Uebrt 

B7 

2 

183 22 

21% 

21 to— ft 


*4 

A 

142 

42 

12 

UeCam 



230 

6% 

4% + % 

UlyTui 

X 

13 186715 

149b 

14%+ % 

UnBrd 



1962 23 to 

23 

23to + to 

LincTel 

120 

7* 

<6 30 

29V8 

29to— to 


.16 

XO 

43 5% 

598 

5ft— ft 




3QS32B 

27ft 

27% 

Local F 



6615% 

15 

15 

LongF 

1*8 

52 

96 24% 

23% 24% + to 




1387 24ft 25% 

26% +1 




1519% 

19 

19% 

LwMI 



14315% 

15% 

15ft— ft 

-fli 1 


MCI 

MIW 

MTS* 

MTV 

Macara 

MctflTc 

MackTr 

ModGE 

mooch 

Mai ft; 

Mairtio 

MgtSd 

MdMfw 

MfrsN 

Marcu* 

Mergux 

Marqst 

MrldN 

Maeam 

Mcssfor 

MattiBx 

MalrxS 

Maxcre 

Maxwtl 

Mav Pi 

MavnO) 

AteCrm 

McFad 

McFjrt 

MedCra 


JU u 


IX 9A 


Ole 

JO 42 
TOO 42 
J8t 15 

A5e 3 
1*0 IS 


M 27 
S3 A 


17433 9to 
54 Sft 
45 UV* 
271201* 

26 11ft 
1*7 6VS 
4323 161* 
.33 23V* 
US Uto 
E2 Oft 
211ft 
124713 
245 Uto 
23 47ft 
3614ft 
543 7to 

68 7M 
71 451*: 
273 32ft 
2418 5ft 
5610ft 
22 26ft 
84129ft 
119 lift 
55S 4M 
J 3ft 
569 33ft 
202 10ft 
321 Uft 
122 7ft 
223 6ft 


BM 8ft 

S 5to+ to 
17ft 17ft + to 
19% 20 +1 
lift lift— ft 
6to tto + to 
IS 16 +lto 
23ft 23to+ to 
Uft tlto ft 
8 S’* + to 

im u*i * to 

12 to 12 to + ft 
Uft 79 
47to 4 Tto — ft 
14ft 14ft + ft 
6ft 7ft + to 
Tto 7ft— V* 
45 45ft + ft 
31M 32ft +11* 
5 Sto + to 
1DM 10ft + to 
46ft 26ft + ft 
23 27M+ to 

10 ft lift + to 
4ft 4ft t ft 
3ft 3ft 
32ft 32'*- ft 
9ft 10 

lift lift— to 
7ft 7ft -r ft 
6Vg Cft 4- to 


Mcdc u t 

Merfftx 

Megdt s 

Mentor 

MentrG 

MarcBS 

MorcBk 

MrcftCo 

MerSv 

MrBBc 

MrdBuf 

MerrtB 

MervG* 

MotrAtr 

MefSL. 

Ml com 

Micro 

MicrMk 

Mkrdv 

AMcrTc 

Micron 

MkrSm 

MdPcA 

MdSIFd 

MldBkS 

MdwAIr 

Mlirrch 

MUlHr 

Million 

Minipr 

Mhiltcr 

Mirntrs 

Mlschtr 

MGosk 

MOMCA 

MoOIC B 

Mcxtino 

Moiech- 

Motot 

Mon Co 

Manoor 

MaMCI 

ManAnf 

Monolli 

MonuC 

MOTFlO 

Monea 

Morrsn 

Moselov 

Motab 

Muttmd 

Mylan; 


totes in Hof 

Ht» Htah Low 3PJA.arao 


65 151* 151* 15% 
24210ft 17ft 18ft +1 
27 6V> 6% 6M + to 
234 131* 13ft 12ft— ft 
M2 21 to 21 Z1M+ H 

20 33ft XI 33 ft + 1* 
7743ft 43V. 43ft 


IM SO 

U8 3J> 

■88 37 
240 6.1 
2J0 BJ 
1A0 43 


M S3 


m i.i 


M 2-1 
1.12 37 


18 33ft 

23% 

23ft 

r 







LDO 

4A 2988 22ft 

173 3994 

31% 

3948+ % 



mm 


— 


SltUHIc 



1563 2)14 

630 

30 

30 - Vi 

SAY Ind 



22911% 

11 

1198— % 

SMRM 

1.16 

ZS 

17 47ft 

4221% 

31% 

21%+ % 

SCISy 



1332 ISto 


1494 + ft 

Standun 



95 A 




SEI 






Sfanhoi 


S3 


319 M 

Wft 

M +1% 

5FE 

.lOr 





llflliffl 

1B6 

U 

437 47ft 

IIP 11% 

11 

1148 + ft 

SPDruB 

t 





StataG 

33b ZS 

240 6)8 

1249 31% 

29% 

3098+1 

SRI 



3718ft 






84 7 

83 4Vfe 

398 

4V8+ % 

Safecrd 



59 MVfe 

M 


Stern rt. 



22 4% 

55 104b 

10% 

10%+ % 


1*0 

4* 

386 33% 

33ft 

33%+ ft 

StewStv 



981398 

211 5% 

5% 

5ft + to 

SofHIth 



34415*4 

15% 

1594 + to 

Stwlnf 

Ji 

XI 

16 21ft 

1942 25ft 

24% 

24% + % 

St Jude 



269 1 

7ft 


SI Net 



157 6% 

466 5% 

4ft 

S 

StPoul 

300 

60 

755 50 



StaCkSy 



59 ? 

35 5ft 

5% 

5)8— to 

Saicpt 



62 3ft 



Stratus 




2S2 Slfe 

S% 

Mb + to 

San Bar 

BSr 





StravC 1 

« b IB 

245 49 

S 19 

19 


smart 






Stryker 



272 26ft 

186 29ft 

2998 

29ft + % 

Satrico 



B ft 

ft 

ft 

ShiartH 

AS 


“2* 


M U 
M T4 


I A0 37 


350 19 


130 42 

m 

.120 13 

M 22 

X I A 
M 15 
.HH A 


245 4 IM 4 
6 2 m »*— to 
538 36ft 34ft 3Sft+lft 
125 4 Ift 4 
904 34ft 34ft 34ft— 1* 
2712 3ft 3ft 3to— W 
3519ft 191* 19ft— I* 
2 12 12 12 
25315% 15ft Uto + V* 
120 M 7ft 8ft + ft 
957 Bft 8ft oft + to 
59 37to 37 37M+ to 

32 Bto B Bto + to 
576 33ft 32V* 32ft + ft 
55 44ft 44ft 44ft— ft 
98 3% 3to 3to 
64 181* 18ft 18ft— ft 
IM 84* 8ft Bto- <* 
521216 15ft 15%+ ft 
4030% 30ft 30%+ ft 
96 16ft 15ft 16 +1* 

84 12ft lift lift— ft 

1073 17to 16% 17% + 1* 

9B) 5ft 4ft 5 — ft 

85 Mft Uft 14 + to 

76440ft 40 40to+ to 

774 25% 25 35ft + ft 


1 _ _ _ J- _ J 

NCACp 



85 7ft 


7% + ft 

NMS 



533 3% 


394 




50 13 


13 

NBaTex 

.84 

4.1 

42 2098 


2D%— 9b 

NlCtys 

1.90 

4.9 

3*4 39 

B. - p . 

3344+ ft 

NtCptr 

24 

11 

108 23 


22%+ ft 

NData 

44 

<0 

468 m. 

9 

7ft + ft 


OCX 14 

5 21 

2; 

21 — to 

K-LumD 



32 5 

494 

5 + ft 




2220 4ft 

494 

4% 

NTech 

j 


13 39b 

3ft 

3ft 

NtrfrSty 



97 4% 

4ft 

49* 

N auate 



45 5% 

5ft 

5% 

NelsnT 

JO 

XL 

165 B 

794 

794— % 

Nelson 



192 996 

9 

9 - ft 

Nwfc5ec 



264 7ft 

Tto 

748 + 98 

NetwfcS 



3138 27ft 

21% 

22*8+1% 

NtwkEI 



19 4% 

4 

4% + ft 

Neutry 

JO 

A 

104 34% 

rna 

34 + to 

N BrunS 



80 794 

K«j 

794 

NEBUS 

48 

1* 

32 31% 

wm 

31 —1 
2248— % 

NHmpB 

80 

3* 

9123ft 

72ft 

NJNcrts 

1.12 

47 

83 24 

23to 

23to— ft 

NYAlrl 
NY A Wl 



278 Sto 
103 ft 

* 

594+ Vfe 
U+V8 

NwldBk 



517 1198 

uto 

11%— 98 

Newpis 

06 

3 

50834 

23ft 

23% 

NwpPh 



637 6ft 

Aft 

698— % 

NIColB 

NfcckOG 

7 


294 4to 
46 98 

IS 

4% 

98 -% 

Nike B 

AM 43 

1177 Sto 

8to 

Oft— % 


A4 

16 

» left 

l/% 

18ft + ft 

Nordsir 

40 

U 

504 32)8 
207 3996 

31ft 

ai% + te 

Norsk B 

.12e 

J 

39ft 

399* + % 




30 6% 

6 

6% 

NAtllns 



17 TVs 

7ft 

7Vi 

NostSv 



602 B% 

Mto 

B% + % 

NwNG 

14* 

BJ 

238 17ft 

17% 

17% 

NwtFn 

1.16 

3J> 

17 39ft 

39ft 

39ft + Vfe 

MwkLs 

B0 

SA 

1293 31ft 

30ft 

31 +1 

NwstPS 

XI D 

9A 

83 22to 

21% 

2148— Hi 

Novmrx 




4 

4ft 

Noxett 

32 

2D 

4294594 

44 

45% +114 

Nuc'Ph 



377 5ft 

5% 

598 

Numrax 



41 Bto 

Bto 

Bft+ft 

NutrIF 



i60 m 

BVj 

Bto— ft 

HuMCd 



218 10ft 

994 

10ft + % 

\ 



O 


J 

OCGTc 



992 Tto 

2ft 

2*4 + to 

OakHIII 



47 3% 

3ft 

3to + % 




163 2ft 

2» 

2*4 




221 3ft 

3Vb 

3ft 

tv rnf 



10201694 

16 

16ft + ft 




218 2% 

7Vfe 

2ft + ft 

OollMs 

31 

X6 

242 35% 

Mto 

35to 

onieca 

X68 

SB 

357 46V. 

46 


OldKntt 



258 23V. 

XIV* 

2394+ % 

OldRfP 

JB 

19 

JDS »to 

30to 

30%— to 

OWSFfC 

ZAO 1X7 

3E2D% 

2Uft 

20% + Vfe 

OmiECS 

.IX 

J 

3fi2179fe 

isto 

1798+ to 

OnUne 



1W 4 

5% 

594 

Onyx 



452 19* 

198 

lto 

OpflcC 



454 15% 

15 

15ft 

DoilcR 



616 35 

33ft 

3494 +194 

Oeanc 



41 Mto 



Oral! 



356 6% 

Sto 

6 + % 

OrtoCn 



i4' £to 

fft 

5% — ft 

Oshmn 

JO 

1J 

676 :: 

Mft 

Uft— to 

OnrTP 

2-48 

94 

1032!% 

28ft 

2B% 

-vrEia 



-i7 .j 

llto 

13 +1ft 


J6 

27 

‘4! 13% 

13 

1314— ft 

Cc;: 



?i 3ft 

3ft 

5% 

, = -J 

OlJ, 

.12 

11 

: sto 

5ft 

594— ft 

r in ■» 

XJ2 

«,7 

‘iLAuft 

46% 

47% + % 

Pcbi!3 



Hi lift 

ID 

10 

P=rrc.- 

IJOe X4 

*2255 

49% 

5Dto+1to 




lii Sto 

S'4 

e% + % 


JO 


tfl Uft 

uto 

1394— « 




4L0 15 

Uft 

14*8 + lb 

Por.i^'.u, 



*7 7^.,). 

798 

Tto + % 

Pwuon 



3H la . i 

isto 

16 — % 

?cr son 




lbft 

10%— ft 

re . ib 

AO 

JJ 

.* ift 

1- 

M — ft 

Pc:- :?A 




jft 

P* 

PatrKI 



in Lto 

898 

Eft— % 





:3to 

139* + ft 







PayN 

*0 

26 

26 22% 

72ft 

22% + 9* 

Pay cm 



51 109a 

10ft 

10% + ft 

PeaLHC 



*49)7% 

lift 


PecrlH 



73 2294 

22% 

2294 

PeaGW 

Ml 

10 

196 Sto 


Tto 

Pen«3n 

XIU. 

7.7 




P-f icr 

36 

2B 

119 aft 

27 

27% + ft 

ruWEx 



28721194 

Ultft 


PecoRl 





tfe+K. 

Percent 



126 Tto 

7 


Peirlte 

1.12 

«J 

119 27 

26 

26*4 + % 

Ptirmct 



647 a 

7ft 

7% + to 

PSFS 



3358 9to 

Btfe 

9 + ft 

PhllGf 

46r 

30 

1338 M 

1594 

ISto— % 

PsiuAm 






PtcSav 






PlcCate 

M 

3J 





32 

27 





.12 

1* 

78 8 

7% 


PoFalk 



15711% 

11% 

11% + ft 

PtcvMa 



390 28 


Z7to + ft 

Pore* 



175 22ft 23ft 

2298 + to 




M 7% 

TV. 

Tto 

Powell 



216 5ft 

2 


Powrtc 






PwConv 



72 7to 

7% 


PracCst 

.16 

* 

84 33% 

32% 

32% 

PrcCLd 



51 7 

644 

7 + ft 

Prewnv 



34 394 

3*8 

34fe— ft 

Prkiiri 



919 5ft 

598 

S% + % 

PricCma 



4912% 

17% 

12% 

PrtcCot 






Prtronx 






ProdOn 

.16 

X6 

154 4ft 


4%— % 

PraeCP 

.14 

* 

373S% 

35 

35to + ft 

PropITr 

1J0 

87 

81 U 

Uto 

Uto 

ProtcoS 



60 2% 

2ft 

2ft 

Previn 



32 1494 

14% 


PuilTm 



128 498 

4ft 

49fe 

PurtEn 

40 

2* 

5116% 

16 

Uft + ft 

L i 

QMS* 



1275 Mto 

13ft 

1338+ lb 

Ouodnr 



315 fft 

4% 

S% 

BuakrC 

AO 

27 

181 25ft 

25 

25 + ft 

QuolSy 



164 3ft 

3 

3ft 




2976 22 

21 

22+94 

DuestM 



330 4ft 


4% 

Oulnte 



9510% 

it) 

10ft + % 

Quatrn 



1419 9ft 

Bft 

I* 

: -J3_ J 


RPMs 

56 

16 

5751594 

15 

15% 

RodSys 



209 1494 

14% 

1498 + ft 

Ttaotm 



207)094 

10 

7Mb+ to 




170 9% 

9 

9%+ % 

Rodion 



1 10ft 

lllft 

10V4+ % 

Ropen 



433 69b 

6ft 

6ft— to 

Ralnr 

1 34 

7J 

104944% 2394 

24ft 

Rgmtek 



21 5% 

5% 

5%— % 

RavEn 

J4 

U 

49 Mto 

Mft 

1494+ ft 

Reodng 



87 2094 2098 

2098- ft 

Ream 






RedknL 

A* 

12 

10028% 

28 

2B% 

Reeves 



Ml Aft 

6 

A — ft 


RJKVEI 

Regis s 

Rrfwu 

Return 

Renal 

RpAuto 

RpHtm 

Restrsv 

Reoteri 

ReufrH 

Re* cm 

RerRev 

Rhodes j 

RRHIm 

Rltzvs 

Rhmi 

Rooms 

Rotwsn 

RabNug 

RaOVm 

Rockor 

Rot«65( 

ROS05B 

Rouse 


30 U 

J» 4 


M U 


.15e 14 
JO90 J 


U4 U 
20 1-5 


-00 4.1 
140 37 
t 

46 4 


2BO 14 
38D 13 
.92 U 


MS 6ft 6ft 6% + to 
ldfi M Uto 14 + ft 

7124ft 24V* 24%+ % 
199 ID 9ft Bft + to 
96 4to 4 4ft + ft 
390 Bft Bft Bft— to 
387 Uft Uto Uto— to 
7131* 12% 13ft 
1B411 into 10% 

920 I9to 30 
951 4ft r* 3%- V* 
319 37% Mft 37ft +2 
237 13% Uft 73ft + to 
232 9to 9ft 9% 

132 1% 1ft Ito + to 
209 )3ft 13% 131* 
71031ft 31 31ft— V* 

171 6to 6% 6ft— to 
B315to 15 15 — ft 

15011 Uto 10ft 
008 14% 141* Mto + to 
20 20to V» 2fito+lto 
193 22% 32 22ft + ft 
142 36% Mto Mto + to 


IMS Htok LOW 3 PAL Cfefte 

ROYBGfl IS |% 1 9k If* + to 

Raylnt 62 Mto 18% 18%— to 

RnyPlm 35 Bto 81* Bft — ft 

RnytRe 71 6% 6 6% + ft 

RaytAlr 207 9 W 8% + % 

£MPei 288 13% U 13%+% 

RyanFfl 144 20ft 191* 20ft + to 


SaMSy 

SovnF 

SvBkPS 

ScanOP 

ScanTr 

Sam or 

SchlmA 

Sdrtmf 

5dCma 

Sdlnci 

SdMIc 

Scisn 

SdSvsv 

ScHnx 

SeaGad 

Seaaaie 

SecTas 

SEE a 

Solbol 

Semlcn 

Sensor 

SvcMar 

Svmast 

50TVlCD 

SevOak 

ShrMed 


.12 18 
160a 44 
71 24 


XI 

24 


1 6to 41* 6to 

635% 35 35 — ft 

29 28 27% 27% 

241 7% Fft 7% + to 
45 13V, Uft 131* + ft 
" 9ft 9to — 


Shwmls 148 __ 

Shoibv .14 S 

Shetdhl 

Shoney .16 3 

ShonSoi 

Shppnml .too 14 

Silicon 

Silicons 

SlllcVal 

Slliau 

SlltBC 

Simp In J0 S3 

& 

Staler 
Skipper 

SloanTc 
SmiitiL 
SmitttF 
Sodetv 

ISSS 

SaitwA 


2816% Uft 
46 8V* 7ft 
29 5% 5ft 
197 Bto 8 
52 4% 4% 
3121* lift 
239 4 3% 

253171* 16 
IDS 7% 7 
UIB1 7to 7% 
75 2ft 2V* 
844 6% 6 
44 151 3Bto 23 
142 8% Oft 
J 4455 7% 7ft 
3 389 12% 12 
X7 598 3Dft 291* 
t 315 15 

.16 I.t 109 14% Uft 
48 1.7 1204 28% 27ft 


28 53 


40 


45 

48 

1.12 


46 S 


IJD 44 


Hasp 

VFn 


140a 34 

M U 




42 

48 

.10 

148 


448 30ft 30% 
253 77% 77 
235 IB 17 
563)04% 33% 
2 13ft 13% 
19 Sto 4ft 
1949 9ft Bft 
19413ft 13% 
100 1714 16ft 
22716 151* 

160 9ft Bto 
M715 M% 
39715ft 15% 
52 4V* 4 
5016% 16% 
7171% 71% 
548 5ft 4% 
246 3% 3to 
2 7% Tto 
7638ft 38% 
179131* 12% 
86 7ft 71* 
84118ft 17ft 
98 40V* 39to 
56117ft 16ft 
6123% 23% 
114 41* 4 
200 30V* 29% 
20023 22ft 
242 8ft B 
286 39ft 39% 
104 2% 2% 


161* 

Bft +1ft 
51 * 

Bto 

4H4 ft 

uft— to 
m— 1* 

17ft +1 
7 

7ft— ft 
2%— % 
6ft + to 
20ft + ft 
8% + ft 
7ft— to 
12 — 1 * 
30to+lft 
15 —ft 
Mto -t- ft 
28%+ to 
30%+ ft 

in* + to 

17 — % 
34ft +11* 
13ft 4* to 
Sto -f- ft 
9ft + ft 
13% + ft 
17 +% 
15%+ 1* 
9% + ft 
15 + % 
15% + 1* 
4% + % 
16%+ 1* 
17% + to 
5ft+ to 

to 

12%+ to 

.?£+% 

40 

17%+% 

23% 

4 - to 
29ft— to 
23+1* 

39ft + 1* 

2% 


SpOflA 

Sp eeds 

Spctron 

g£ 

Spire 

StarSrfe 


Subaru 

SufarB 

Summa 

SumtHi 

SunCsl 

SunMed 

SunSL 

SupRto 

Supfiky 

Suprtex 

SuprEa 

5yke> 

SymbT 

Svncor 

Synteeh 

Syitfrax 

Symcon 

SrAsoc 

SvsNn 

Snlnto 

SwrtGn 

Svstmt 

SCTCp 


la Net 

iota Hie* Lew 3P.JM.CWee 

M 9 13 M 4H 3ft 4to + % 
28312% 12ft 12ft— ft 
11412ft 12ft 12% 

JS 4 154 6% 5ft 4 + to 
10 3 3 3 — ft 

1 Uft 15ft Uft + ft 

*111% 11% 11% 

5% jft+ u 


5% 5ft 
20 % 20 % 

4ffft 47 + ft 

5ft 4 4 % 
Mfe 6%+ ft 
4% 4 to— ft 
121* 13%-. 
22ft 23 + ft 
6 6 
B% 9 
11 lift 4- % 
47% 49 +1 


3ft 3% + 1* 

148 14 3923 122 122 +2 

144 4.1 65 44ft 44% 44%— % 

128 3% 3% 3ft 
JKe 1.7 460 tto 7% 8 + W 
47 lto 1% 1%+to 

21 7ft 7 7ft— 1* 
I 688 9% 8% 9% + ft 
.16 14 25 161* Uft Uft— to 

I 8% Bto Bto— % 
3% 4% 


44 13 


122 41* 
13313 
2009 1 
281 10% 
37 4 
57210% 
609 4% 
20 M 
233 17 
89 6 
68 9% 
41 7% 
11310 


,2 ft '\t£ 

9ft 10 — to 
3ft 3ft— V* 
9% 10%+ % 
4% 4% 

Uto 14 
16% 16% 

5% Sto 
9 9V. + to 

7% 7% + to 
17ft 17% 


909 14% M 14 — ft 


TBC 

TCACb 

TocVly 

Tandem 

Tendon 

Telco 

TtanA 

TelPlu* 

Totofl 

Telecrtl 

TeleMct 

ToMd 

Tektos 

Telxon 

Temco 

TndrLv 

Te nriPt 

Tesdcda 

Tenon 

Textno 

Therpr 

TUmmc 

Thdftf* 

Thorm 

Tlwrtec 

ThauT s 

3Com 

TkmjE » 

TmeFIb 

Tlprarv 

Tolu s 

TottSvi 


.12 4 


X U 


Bill Uft U%— ft 
18716 14% 15% +1 

371 8ft 8 B% + to 
457422% 21 21to + to 
9090 7% 7% 7%+ to 
1846 10% 18 IB 
1151 25 24% 24% + to 

1321 U% 9ft Oft + ft 
162 6 5% 6 + ft 

18118% 18% I Sto— ft 
52218% 17% 17% 

1796 3% 3% 3% + % 
176416 15 15%+% 


JSel.8 


IAS 33 


756 Uft 

in 

18ft +1 

47 4 

394 

394— ft 

9 4 

4 

4 

146 894 

Bto 

894 

97 2 

194 

194- % 

30 1% 

lft 

1%+ % 

781394 

Uft 

1394+ to 


348 M 13% 13ft + % 
23 lift KM lift 
2933% 33ft 33%+ ft 
13011% 11 11 —% 

28310% 10ft 1Q%— V* 
799 19 18% Mto— to 

306 9 8% 8% 

8411% lift 11% + % 

0813% 

6414% 14 


..j+Ht 
13% 13%+ % 
W% + % 


^HoatiugRate^Note^ 


Ian. 15 


Dollar 


(ssuer/MiBCBo/Mat Coupon next 
Allied Irish 51*45 
Allied lrU)5to^J 
Allied fr«i5 , +87 
UHed Irish -pert 
AndiBke Carp Sto ■% 

ADwdlcFin lnt-9* 


Bid Asfcd 
9% 105 99 JO 99 JO 
ii% 17-4 inunoan 

37 \msunss 

WA 70S 95% 96% 
IT* IB-1 9995 19QBS 
Uto aw iro5iot» 


am Comm. ltaltonJoSto-% Tto 66 99 JH 9996 
Ba> N«n LoyeraSftPl 1D% 264 1083011X40 


Banco Dl Rama-91 
Sana) Sto SpirKD Sft-91 
BOKO PlniottvBS 
Bi Of Greece -91/94 
BkOllreiiniSto# 

Bt CH Ireiand5U42 
81 ManlTMl 5ft40 
B» Ol Mammal 5 -96 
BfeOf Montreal S<+91 
Bk Of New York -96 


74 WAS 9995 
9» 298 99JB 99.15 
10% 5X5 99 JM WXI5 
11% 16-1 90 9845 
9% 58-J 10X10)0030 
13 25-1 99J5 16825 

9*. 204 1007610866 
101* 28-1 108J01DX40 
100* 304 (019010189 
Oto 15-1 1 MCI 0X12 


Bk.CHNavoSwtta5VrBamt»fe M Mli» 
0*0) Novo 5co«c 5)4^4 91* 11-7 10065)0X15 

Bk Of Tokyo S%-93 
Bk Ol Tokyo S1*-89 
Bk Of Tokyo -87 
Bk Of Tokyo Sto-toMXYl 
Bk Ol Tokyo Sto-*c88/91 
Bk America Sto% 

Banners TnsJJto+4 
3ankersTmjl5to-96 
Bj AriAe Invest 51*87/91 
BUS-95 

BU549 .. . 

Bo inanuB ii/2 bo ^.1/1615-7 lOUXbU 
BO lnAmocSUi49 I2iv 7KJ 10X9910069 


II 244 10X7610X93 
10* 29-1 10X4310053 
12% 28-1 1 £U31 0842 
12% 4-1 1613510143 
«% 12-6 10X76 HUB 
233 loaommie 

250 USU7HX47 

13-2 lexnnujo 

290 9X40 9950 
174 10X82 HOW 


a 

Sto 

12 

ft 


11% 114 10X2210X32 


Bo * 'Union Eur Jto-89 
amSto-BJ 
bits 5to-odSt 
BIceSMmffl 
BtC3 5Vi^9 

bra.S«v4oM\ 

BnpjV/JP 

bnoStoOSHS 

Bnp7toB6/t» 

Bno5 1 *-99 
BnoSftO* 
toWI 
8np51*4e 
3o Parltua ven> 

Qa Worms SU-BI/94 
Bsrcterri Overseas 5-95 
B'n^wyfe Oversoos S 48 


ten. im itfLxnm: 

12ft 29-1 10X2910X39 
10% 304 10X8210X92 
12% 22-1 UXU310X41 
u% 113 Muawua 

IZft 4} I0U2IDX82 
12% H-2 10X5410X64 
Uto 2U WJ5 bU 
10% 31-1 1803(10X34 
9% 13e 10050101140 
9% 54 9942 S071 
1X90 9-S 10X3510X45 
12% 4-3 IDM310I-23 

12% 22-1 10XJ01HU0 
9% )J-J JXXaifll*) 
12% +2 10XM1DXM 
12V* 31-1 101.11101.29 
9to 174 10X9710X07 


Barclays Overseas 5-oerp 10% 1-5 1000710X12 
Eardav? Overseas 5 -04 I3h +3 lflXbllfflJS 


mi Bk 6to49 
Bv/gen Bk JW48/91 
KJna Bole She decO9/04 
King Brio Sttood- 99/04 
King BdBtum 5 ian-94/04 
kins Beta 5f in -pern 
ca» Sto-98 
CctE5Vi-CB 
Cnca5’j-9B/97 
Cnco Sto-90/95 
cm SI6-90 

cmsu-ei 

Cibc(Wkltl 5U-M 
a bc r*. ■« 

Carteret 5+L Sto-94 
Chase Mantiattan Ti-93 
Chase 5'+» 

Chemical Bk 5to-M 
Chemical IWUyl 51*94 
Cnrktianla Bk 51+91 

Cnrtstlmki -44 


9% 28-J 11131.07111122 
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9 11-2 9982 9997 

llto 1L4 10X5410X64 
9to 9-7 I JO. 1610X24 

12 % il -2 mmaaxr 

12% U-; 1648210X92 
9% V+3 10X1510839 
12% 540 19X9010)86 
9ft 7^ 1 00 9710X97 

lift 244 10X4010X71) 
W% 05 10X5510X45 

5% 17-1 9X75 9X90 
12ft 18-1 10X3S1M50 
9% 205 10X0410X14 
12% JVI 10X1910X39 
9% 53 99 JB 9900 
9% 27-3 10X3310X43 
81* 71-1 9X83 9893 
Wk 10? 100J71WM 
12ft 4J 100.4010050 


CmCOfP(WklylAo05Vr« Bft 21-1 99 JI ' 


pllcan>Sept5Vi’9* 
OliOa«- 
Cnkon>4-94 
ailcorp -Undated - 
CammcrzUmk 514 JP 
Convnerztxmk nw-Bl 


. . 19J 9935 9935 
18% 30-1 99.73 9983 
9% 12-1 10X9619X96 
lft 104 9950 19X51 
«* 21-2 993* 99.lt 
10% 20-5 1003610X44 


Comm ur« Montreal 5to-91 12% 103 10X1310X27 


Cd5Vr80/W 
Cd S14-90/9S 
C<J- -89/96 
CdSto leBt* 
CeomeFk-v/9! 
Cepme5wa 
Credit Du Hard 9*49/92 
Credli Fonder 5W88/93 
Crwll For Eiporl 5W92 

Cr Lyon5to-9Jri6 
Crani Lvan 51*47 
Credit Lm 5U-M/97 
Credit Lyon Sto-81/94 
Credit Lyon 5Ve91r95 
ci«ui Lvoncre-W 

CibUI Lyon 51*- 10192/96 
Cradit l-von 5to-lon97/96 
Cred Natl Slto Sto 49 
ON Nall St IB Sft-WM 
Creditcnstalt - -94 
CraMtOflslaH5%81/97 
Cruiraratall 5J&M 
Dal Idil Konsrrt 5to-96 
Ddftske Olio Sto-99 
Den Norskc ■fwvvr 

Den Nonke -dadQ 
DwwarirSto-tmja/90 
Denmark Sto-odoS/W 
DewwBiP*-04 

Denmark Sto-pen 

Die Eral Oest5’44l/94 
Dresdnd Ban* 5ft -9J 
Dnsdner Bank 514-99 
Dnsdner Bank 51*42 
Eldorado Noctoar Jto-|9 
EtHSft-99 
Edt5'*-95 
F«j-43 
£t*5to-9fl 
Etci-HM 
Er ter lor lntl-96 
FerroyleSto-W 


12 7*3 10X7210X87 

1740 9-1 10U1UL31 
9% 11-5 10X3)10X40 
17% 5H 1 0X4210X52 
Uft 124 imiW/Ji 
m 4-3 IDQJOKJM 
9% 27-4 10X2910X39 

13 9-4 10X741DXI4 

9% 1-7 loxnioxio 
11% 11-4 19X7210X82 
12ft 31-3 10X2510X75 
12 9-4 20! 08107.19 

9% 9-7 100J71DOJ7 

9% 70S 10107101.17 
m 27-6 16X131 0DJ3 
Uft 101 10X1915X29 
9% 1*4 10X59100*1 
12ft 101 10X44MXS4 
tHfe 11-3 10X4910X79 
9. IW UXltlOXto 
9% IM VDlliSmAS 

12*. 202 muum 

10ft 13-5 10X4910X58 
9. 7-2 uoxmoxio 

9b Jl-8 9905 WXS0 
9ft 19-3 99.95 10X50 
9ft M 10X5519X45 
Uft 154 10X8010X91 
13% 107 100*510X75 

12% 02 lunoxa 

124. 201 99*6 97.9* 
llto IW 101.12101*2 
9% 25-2 99 JO loan 
12to 27-2 10X3410X46 
13ft »? IBX2U0X42 
12% 25-1 HX4410XS4 
I3» 102 1WU510X4S 
9% 174 IBS05ja£LB 
17ft 26-1 laxaUUB 
9ft 03 KXL3210X37 
9ft 214 99JI 10903 
17% 203 1005610X46 


Find Boston Inc Sto-91/94 9% 205 9950 99*5 


Firs Onawo5’*A4 
Flrsl Gly Te*a*Si6M« 
FIrti mterttale 5W4Q 
Full- -Wits 
Genflnensrito-8? 
Gem«nanee5'*49.'93 , 
ConfhanceS-TVM 
G»5%4» 

GtoVvAi 
Ga-oero 
GttSU-H 
Giro 51+01 
Grtmflavs SVi-9? 
GrindtaysStoM 
Greai Western Fh5’+« 
Hill 5omiiri5Wto 


10 21-2 WJ6 10X06 

6ft 23-1 *7% 98% 

7f. +3 W10 9993 
Bto 15-1 10X0310X13 

11 304 UBMUaji 

9ft 206 100*610076 
12% 23-1 1 0X2010X3) 
9% J1-? U8UIU071 
91/1211-3 HX3310U2 
10ft 1+S 9*% 97% 
9% ZM 1UUIHXU1 
9. 27-3 IQX8310BJ2 

13 2W HBJ61D0J6 
13% 1-2 10X66100*4 
10 IM 99JS 99*8 
12ft 35-2 10X3310X53 


tasav/Mla am/MaL Caopoe Next UdAttd 

too Samuel Sto-cefp 9to 205 924)9450 

Htaom Aowrlcono Sft-os 111* 244 99JS 10X15 


Hydro Quetac Sl+W 
ic Indumn-- 91 

■ntaaesla -80/93 
JM5to-85 
lM5l*-nw8l 
Ireland 5WW99 
Rep. Ireland --94 
IW5V.-8S 

Hal* [ Repueac) 5<*-99 
Cltoh 81*47 ‘ 
JtDty-W/M 
LP.Nfe>raon5i*-*7 
Kop-4eW2 
KBP5%Hmoy9} 
KkHmmrt Benson 51491 
KWnwort Benson Sto-96 
Korea Dev Bk 710-89 
Korea Exdunpe 7%8B 
Lincoln 5V. -99 
Ltovdi 5W93 
Uoydilto-92 
Lloyds -04 
Utb 5to-h489 
LtChSto-B 
IMiSH-lutW 
UCbS'i-B* 

LtcbSto-92 
Malvaski 51*-9i/t)9 
Motoinda 5tovwrt9/93 
Matovslo Sto-dec89/92 
Malania 516-88/93 
Alan Man O/Seas 514-04 
Man Han IWUv) 51496 
Marine Midland 51*44 
Marine Midland 5i*>9k 
Marine Midtoed -09 
M*Uon8k5ft-4» 
MWlondSVMl 
M/ 0 MS-B 9 
MWand 51492 
Midiond9-91 
Mtovmsjn 
MlhulFIn 51446 
Maruon Grertell S -44 
Morttiase Deo Sto -90/93 
MOrteape Den 51492 
KatBkDetroU 51496 
Not Com Bk Arab Sft-94 
Nail Wesltnln 5V. -91 
Natl MMtRilnSto-40 
Nan wattnln JV.-44 
nail wostm hi 51492 
Not! WKtoln -perp 
Neste OV5V.-94 
New Zeotond 5V^7 

Mew Zeeland Steel 51492 
Nippon Cradfl Bfc 5to-n 
Nippon Crwfll Bk 516-85 
Nippon Crodll Bk 4to-U 
Nordic int Fin SW91 
Okb 51464 
Dto5i4« 

0«)--95m 

0«flnrettWnoJto9l 

Offshore Mining - -86 
PlrdU 51491/94 
Pkponken 5 -86/11 
Qgmntland5to-96 
Rente 5to-Vl 


12% 201 10X4510X0 
9ft 15-17 99J5 M0JS5 

11 94 1000810X20 

M 54 UBJMbbl 
Mft 2X6 1008210X92 
12% 1+3 108*810X50 
9% t»7 1000510X15 
10% 2M 99J5 10X10 
12% +3 10X2810X38 

13% 21-3 Wife S/S 
9% 05 UBXOMXn 
9% M-7 10X9010100 
12% 1-2 10X3510X35 
Mto 9-5 10X601 OX* 
10ft 19-7 10X3510X58 
12ft 273 10X4710X57 
U V4 IBs 99% 
i; m tftim 
9% 134 9907 99J7 
10% 304 1000810X98 
Pft 04 10X9810100 
11% 104 1011210X22 
12% 22-1 10X28UX35 
10% 1+6 99-95 DM 
m im JXXMioa* 
9% 174 16X6810X38 
9ft 3F5 10X7010080 
9% U4 99*5 9978 

12 94 100*510000 

Ifi 54 10X3510X45 
Ok 201 10X44100-54 
H /8 302 WJ5 1M-M 
Bft 21-1 97JS 97-50 
lft 94 lOOJOUXAO 
•ft IM 9900 9930 
9ft U3 99*7 99J7 
9ft 207 1000719X17 
12% 201 10X7210X82 
99. 344 MELTS MM 8 
9% 14 10084U0J94 
II 304 UIJD1OU0 
13% 43 lOXieiBUB 
131* +1 168*810X51 
9. 11-7 99.95 10XM 

12% 11-3 18X9410104 
Pft JM KKUOWCUS 
8 % 303 W38 99*8 
9ft 214 99*0 99.78 
12% 101 10058100*8 
9ft 274 WX79W009 
11% 141 10106101.16 
10% 254 101.1210122 
law 7 34 10X6818X79 
12% 2M 10X4710X57 
lift 94 MOJ81OO08 
9% 2+6 1005510X65 
13% 11-2 101*110073 
9% 204 99.95 

9ft 144 1002610036 
10ft 95 9975 10X25 
Uft 3)5 10100101.10 
Mft 205 100*410074 
11% 114 lBUPmw 
9% +6 10X6410074 

12% 23-1 1OX28U0JS 
12V: 25-2 979* 58ft 
9ft 19/6 1083219X47 
18ft 94 MLB3101.U 

12% 77-3 10X0310693 


RovolBk Scotland 5to-6&/948% 144 10X3310X0 
5Mame5to-91/99 9* 54 IEKWfl»lS» 

Sanwa Int. Fbi 5ft-B8 11% 203 10X010X60 

5arrM -94/29X4 12% B-l UBJTlflao 

SUM>im.Fln5to*3 1216 192 1000110X11 

Scandinavian Flo SWae>r93 11% 154 9975 10058 
Scandinavian Fin swoeMfft «4 9804 9894 
5coH(ndlfllFlll5V492 lift 3M Massioass 

Snd5V.AB Mto 307 UOMIRIM 

SM 5to -90/93 9ft 2+6 99.99 10U9 

iF£.51+4t 9ft 54 10X0810X15 

5J.E.-91 9% 194 990 99J7S 

Soctele Generde 51490/es +3 101.171 01 71 

SucteteGieneral® 55490 10% 96 10X4410X54 

5ocGenMor514M n% im 100*5100*5 

Sode»Generelr5to-nevW »to 7-3 iwjmms 

50CP-91 10% 2X4 10X5810X61 

Stain (Kingdom) 51492/97 12% 25-2 100J5TOU5 

Klnadam Of Spain 5V*-n 13% 302 MUM 


Spain -W 
Stand Chart 5VM8 
Slani Chart 5%-K 
Stand Chart 5ft-91 
Stand Chart Sft-martO 
Stand Chart -pem 
SroteBkCH India 6ft« 


9ft 305 99.90 10X00 
12% 102 100*510175 
9VW 07 1MJE1BL40 
10% 205 IW+.1XL74 
12% IM 1X1*7101.17 
»% 74 99*2 9W 
9ft 31-5 99*310X00 


Sumitomo Trust 5to-92/96 12ft 11-2 lOXlfllxa 


StBfefcyanDonken 6 -IS 
5«eden9-9l 
Sfteden5ft47/W 
SwcdU 51493/03 
SvHdanSVWUm 

Swwtefl 49/94/99 


Sweden -90/05 
TalyaKebe 51492/04 
TokuBfaW-92W 
Tokai AMb Lid 51494/99 
Taranto Domtolgn jfe-92 
foyo Trust SV492/N 
TvoSto-WW 
Union Bk Norway 5%-09 
United O/Sras fik * -89 
WII0«ra + Glyni5to-91 
World Ban* - -94 
Yokohome 51491/96 

ZertTBlesBOfioi* 5VW1 


Uto 11-4 99.90 trio 
10% 3+1 10X1610X16 
IB* 202 UX47Ulti7 
Mft 305 1815661 
12ft +2 10X0510X20 
1% 99 M 99 JS 

9ft 9/7 10X4010X45 
0% 107 99.14 99*4 
10ft 30-5 WW01DX50 
12% 10J 10X4010058 
9% 134 1007010X80 
13ft 1+3 10X551 BUS 
9% U4 10X4718057 
I 7-7 97 5D 9X50 
12ft 71-2 9X00 99*0 
91* JH PUTS >0US 
13% 103 1DX88J8Q5I 
B96 302 9SJ2 «« 

ims u iDxaiDoa 

9ft 10171007010X40 


Non Dollar 


lKWr/k6Jo asg/Mot. CntPOrHu) BM Add 


PrnvN Brunnrtct 5Vk-89/W1llW 102 


Am -97 
Bk Montreal 5W44 
Bk Tokyo Atm 
Bo Indesva 5V4V1 
DM com 5. 1/4 dHO 
C«>raeV+96 
Crtdll Fonaer 5h-f9 
Cred Mad 5tia5w*i/9$ 
Den mart 93/90M 
IJ.I.5-94 

Kingdom Betoken 5-84 
UovnS*6 
3adJl49BW 
YarksMre Sto-91/94 


10ft 1+7 
11% 77-3 
9% 21-2 
9% Jl-2 
od 142 
10% 31-1 
lift. 94 
9% 103 
od 22-2 
Wto 101 
W% 1X4 

9% 242 
10% 3+1 
10% ZM 


4U09JBS 
99*0 9995 
99J7 99JH 
99*9 

9900 99.92 
99*5 9970 
99*0 99.95 
99*4 9979 
99*7 99*2 
99*0 100*3 
10X0010X10 
99*7 99*7 
9932 99*7 
H&35UO0 
99*2 99*7 


Source : cretfft So/sse-Firsf Boston Ltd. 
London 


TrafcAu 

TrtaaSv 

Trusja 

TBkGa % 

TuckDr 

TwnCty 

TvnsonF 

U&UCO 

UTL 

Ullrsv 

Vnarrm 

Urtlfl 

vlUntoll 

UnPlnlr 

UnTrBc 

LfACoffl 

UBAtek 

UBCol 

UnEdS 

UFnGro 

UFStFd 

UGran 

uPrasd 

US Ant 

U5BCP 

USCta 

USDipi 

us Ml a 

US SMI 

US Stir 

USTrk 

USTr 

ustoina 

UnTaiev 

UVOBS 

IfnvFm 

UnvHII 

UnvHM 

UFSSk 

UraeCr 

Uscafe 

VL1 

VLSI 

VMX 

Valid LB 

ValFSL 

ValNU 

vaiLn 

Von Dus 

Vcpuetl 

VectrG 

Ventren 

Veto 

VtamF 

Vlcorp 

WctroS 

Vie deFr 


36 u 

in xo 


JB 2 
120 *3 
Mm 3 


2*0 48 
.12 A 
-IBo 1.1 
IM 4* 


1J0 X9 


1*0 Ul2 
U0 35 
JO 1* 


J7e 1* 


120 33 
AM 1* 
A0 23 


.12B J 

J2o 1.V 


164 U 
452 10 
23 MV 
411 JSVS 

83 Sto 

113 lto 
120 33% 

4B SBMi 
961816 
658 Bto 
93017 
355 IS 

12 lift 
69 Uto 
47 5016 
6 26to 

123 9V. 

197 zm 

92 2to 
91 Bto 

93 Uto 
497 IS 

11 9to 
174 3 
51 259* 
218 2Vt 
It Sto 
116|3Zto 

62B15V6 
182 Uto 

114 4516 
1904 20V6 

32 1*9* 
841 35% 
45517 
872 llto 
19S 4Vk 
27 Wl 
46S Sto 
42 4 
181 6to 
757 9to 
73S llto 
1000 IJto 
256 9% 
406309b 
234 36 
114 

11 3% 
SB Uto 
17 3 
6 llto 


IW l» + H 
9to 9to + % 
27V, 77*4 — to 
33 33to+ to 

41b 4to 
1 9b 19k— to 
3216 32to+ to 
a 28V* — to 
18 1816 
■to Bto 
Uto 17 + % 

n ar* 

1816 18% 

«9to 4*to— % 
24to 2696 
ffto MW — to 

Bto 896+ fi 
Uto u»— to 
I7U 1798+ to 
9U 9to + to 
3% 3 + to 
25% 25%- to 
2% Sto— 16 
516 5% 

31 Vi 32 + V6 

4 4 + U 

Mto Mto— to 
llto 1196+ to 
4496 4516+ 16 
1916 2096 + 16 
16W 16V6 + to 
35 35% + to 

MVfe 17 +16 

Mlh 1116 
4 416 

9 9 

Sto 516— to 
396 3to— 16 
616 *16— % 
9 916+96 

1096 1096 + to 
13 1396 + 96 

9 P — 16 
3096 30V6 + 16 
25V6 2Sto + 96 
M 14+16 
UJJ^ + to 

496 49V 

% %— ft 

3 316 + to 

15Vj 16V6 + 9b 
296 296— 16 
Uto 1198 


VIkfne 

viratek 

VliTedt 

vodovi 

volfinf 

Volvo 


2)8 13 12 U +1 

S4 18to 18 IBto + % 
68 2% 2to 298 
258 796 74* Tto + % 
186 IS I Tto |7to 
37*4 2798 26% 2798 +1 to 



B8 

43 

118 22 

21ft 

22 + ft 

WWbrC 

M 

3 

28 22% 

2M 

22% + 96 




1281 11 

10ft 

10% + 9fe 


1*8 

02 

32128% 

20*8 

20**— ft 


JOt 

Z* 

72 28% 

20 

20 




392 12 






234 8% 

8 

8ft 

Webbs 

M 

2B 

333 1294 

12% 

1294 

WestFn 



5i) m 

9to 

998 


234 

6.1 

24 46% 

46% 

46%+ 94 




167 798 

7% 

7*8 




93 B94 

8% 

8% + ft 




20 5% 

5% 

Sto— to 




107 Mto 

14% 

14% — to 


40 


102 19ft 

19 

19ft + ft 

WslwriO 



3319% 

19 

19 + ft 

WstwdC 



18914% 

M 

1498 + 9* 

Wnttra 

B& 

X* 

173 25ft 

25 


WlCOt 



50 394 

3ft 

394 




681 10ft 

9% 

9*fe+ to 


1*8 

X9 

449 39 ft 






531 8% 

Bft 





1)3 10% 

10 





66 9% 

9*8 

9to — ft 


20 

1.9 

37 1094 

10% 

10*4+ % 


B7 

1J 

883 59b 

5ft 





147 3% 

3ft 



B8 

4B 

71 1894 

18% 

18% 



X3 

4418 

17ft 



J* 

24 

313 23ft 

23 

2J1* + % 


.15* IB 

2M 8 



Wyman 

Bfl 

XI 

9« 26 

25ft 


Xebec 



1*81 4 

3% 

4 

Wear 



3451194 

lift 

lift- 98 

Xldex 



5714 1398 

Uft 

13% + ft 

f Y _ ^ 

YlowFt 

1J0Q 

ZB 

1162 37% 

35*4 

36 —1% 

[ Z 1 

ZenLbB 



242 20 

19% 

20 + ft 

Zcntec 



265 4ft 

3to 

4 + % 

Zteater 

«5o 4J 

140 1194 

lito 

11% 


1J4 

4J> 

47 31% 

31 

31*8 + to 

2 nd 



80 5 

49* 

s 

Zlyad 



23 7 

7 

7 

Zandvn 

J* 

36 

133 9% 

9ft 



ZymoB 

Zytrax 


129 196 
201 lto 


196 + to 
196— to 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
15 January 1985 

Ttie not asHt vaUw qnotattons shown belowtre (applied by tbe Fond* Dstoa with Ute 
exception ol some fmds whose quotes are based on tosae prices. Tlw tollowlno 
marginal nmibois Indicate baatmicr o I quotethne suPPUed torlhelMT: 

Id) -dally; (wj -weekly; (b) -b+rnoathly; (r) -reoiUarW; (l)-lrraoMartv. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w) A0Mcri Trust 
BANK JULIUS BAER ft CO. Ud. 
—Id) Baerbond 


— (d 1 Conbar^ 


M ) Haver fTetew/lnoen 1 1 534*0 

S142J6 LLOTDS BANK 1NTL.POB43X Geneva 11 

— Hw) Lloyds inti Dollar 5102*0- 

SF 10540 
5F IIBTLOO 


— Id 1 EquBiaer America. 
—Id 1 Equlbaer Europe— 

— (d 1 Eautbaer Pacific 

— Id 1 Grobar ________ 

— Id) Slockbar — — 


— id ) C5F Fund 


—Id ) Crossbow Fund — _ 
— 4d ) ITF Fund N.V 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
—Id 1 Aslan Growth Fund- 

— (w) Ol»eib>Pid._ _ 

— <wj FIF— America 


— Iw) FIF — Europe. 
— Iw) FI F — Podtic- 


ec an ic — Hw> Lloyds Inf I Europe 
le — «W) Uoyds fntt Growth— 2 r 

5 « Sfifi — H«1 Uords Inn Income— SF 311*0- 
~+(wl Lloyds inri Pacific — 5F 142*0 
SF11UO0 PARISBAS— GROUP 
5F 998J00 — Cd ) Cortaxa Intarnatlonol— S BS.92 

SF 161WB" — iw) OBU-DM DM 1J49.1I 

'“ '"I — iwl OBUGE5TION SF«)*0 

- SF24W —(wl OBLI-DOLLAR— S1J097JQ 

- SF 1133 — |w) OBLi-YEN Y M6JKUI0 

— 51X84 — (w) OBLI -GULDEN FL1D51J2 

—Id 1 PAROIL-FUND., — S94J15 

fe in-u — Id) PARINTER FUND 5101*5 

— S F si^ — < d > PAR U5 Treasury Bond— S 99.94 
1_ *17*4 Royal Bank Of Conada.POB 244Guemiev 
. — *9*1 -Hwl RBC Canadian Fund Ltd__ S1X60 
51X01 «+lw) RBCFqrEastXPadflcFd. *1X16 

— 539*2 -+lw) RBC Inf) Coplto) Fd. 518*9 

_ *147*1 -Hw) RBC Inti Income Fd. S 10*0* 

-+ld ) RBC MwCurrency Fd. — S22J1 
-+tw) RBC North Amor. Fd. * M7* 


— Id ) Indosuez Mvltlbands A. 

—Id I Indosuez Multtbonds B. 

BRi TANN l/LPOB 271. St. HeDer. Jersey 

— <W) BrILtlAmmCurr SAW StCANPIFONP INTL FJJMD j 400236270^ 

—Id I Brit. lirtLSMonaojportf S0.96D —Iwl Inc.: Bid *6BOOHer JS.I2 

—Id 1 BrtL l nlU Mn n oo- PorH « 1.153 — IwlAcc.: Bid S480 Offer 15.12 

— (w> Brit .Universal Growth S 0560 SWISS BANK CORP. 


— Iw) BriljGold Fund. _ 

— Iw) BrtLMonae.Currencv-~ 
—Id | Brit, japan O/rPeri. Fd 
— Iw| Brit_iareav Gilt Fund — 
—Id ) Brit, world Lefa. Fund 
—id ) BrtL world Tectin. Fund 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-lw) Capital inn Fund 

— Iw) Capital Holla SA_ — . — 



83X34 “ 
jjjjj —in 


—Id 


Amerlcn Volar. 


CREDIT SUI5SE (ISSUE PRICES) . 

—Id ) ActtenfeSulsMS— SF 350*0- <h | ^ y*. Sh. 

-Id) Band Voter Swt„ SF 10170 =JS { 


p*tarx Bond Selection 
Dollar Band Selecnon— 
Florin Bond Salectm— 

Interval or 

Japan PerHollo- 


Swtss Forelqn Bond Sel_ 


Swiss valor New 5cr._ 
Unlv. Bond Select.. 
Universal Fund — . 



=8} £3 ^SSS KoctuCR- 0 "* K -\i j SSS^S**^— 

^ON Ze^T Fronkh^t 

WlCSFondl — Bonds 5F74J8 — Id ) LltH rente , , . DM 4X24 

—ta ) S — SF 105L2S -« ) UnHonds DM 2X10 

— Idle! Money Merkel Fund— 5V0XUJ0 — <d I Unlrok DM 7X04 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

SFgJM 
EF7135 
SF 13MH 
SF 96X50 
SF472JW 
SF 205*0 


—Id ) CS Money Market Fund 

—id I Entnde— Voter 

—Id ) Uuec. 


—Id > Europo— Valor- 
— Id I matte— Valor. 


Ofp 1 ™ Other Funds 

SF 930*0 (wl AcHBondBlnveshnentsFund. *2X57 
SF 14X25 I w) Actives inti *1X14 


SF 170*0 <w) Aaufla Infemorllonol Fund— * IQ5J5 

lr I Arab Rnonce l.F — *868*0 

(b)Arlane *1*1021 

(wj Tnisloor Inti Fd. IAEIF) S lODfl 

Idl&BLFONDS BF 6047 

Iw) BNP interbona Fund S 105J3 

— Uni DAH Com modi tv Pool- *306.12— |w) Bonds^jnsue Pr SF 14X30 


PIT INVESTMENT FFM 

— Hd ) Conconlra- 

— Ud I intr Bentsnfond _ 

Dunn L Harent 6 Uoyd Gearee. Brussels 


— Iml Currency & Gold Pool — i IB2J0 
— im) Winch. LHe FuL Pool—. *57X64 — 
— Im) Trane World FuL Port- *8»JH — 


im) Canada GW-Mortsaee 
id ) Capital Prmrv. FX inti. 
Iw) Citadel Fund 


fd I C-I.R- Australia Fund . 
Id I C-I.R. Japan Fund. 


ILH 

S1IJI6 

*1.79 

S9J4 

S9B3 


F8£tMGMT.LTD.(NV.AOVISERS _ _ __ 

1- ^pyrenoe Ppuntv Hill, EC4. Xl^23+6M_ _ im) Ctevoiand Oftehare Fd. *1^9649 

— FJC AHaMk: *1X29 iwl Colun^la Securlltes FL 10281 

—tw) FAC European ,* 9M lb ) COMET E * *»J8 


—(w) FAC Oriental *24*8 (d 1 Cons. Bonks Fund- 

FIDELITY POB 67ft Hamilton Bermuda lw) Convert. Fd. Jnl* A 


— Im) American values Common 
— Im) Amer Voioea OmU’rart 

— Id ) Fkteiitv Amer. Arnett 

—Id ) Fkteiitv Australia Fima *7J7* 

— fcf 1 Fidelity Dfr.SvWS.rr SI2X06 

—Id > Fidelity Far East Fund *19.13 

—Id) Fidelity Inn. Fund *51.75 

— Id ) Fidelity Ortenl Fund 5 25.11 

—Id ) Fldelltv Frontier Ftmd *1117 

—Id ) Fidelity Pacific Fund— — S 133.77- 

—Id ) Fidelity SpcL Growth Fd. *145? 

— left FUteiHv World Fund SR*5- 


^ *70*7 jwlOam»rLFd.lnriB Certs S 

« inn M 111,1 nnL - — V 

* Ss ld 1 D - WIt ‘W Wld Wide Ivt TU 

47J7S <*> ) Drakkar inveeLFund N.V. *1 


d ) Drerivs Fund inl'L 


FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Aoent B1-S3MBU 


SIXMXOO 
*9*4 
*25.78 
* 7183 
»83 
97X99 

, *3400 

iw) Dreyfus Inter amt uienf — S 30J1 

iwl The Establishment Trust * 1.04 

id 1 Europe OW loot tons LF 59.97 

wl First Boole Fund S I1J73A4 

b ) Fifty Stars Ltd. S 021.45 

Jw) Rnsburv Group Ud S 111.14 

lw) Foneetex Issue Pr_ - SF 217A5 

iw) Ferextund. 


— Iw) Gold Income. 


(w) Formula Selection Fd. 
Id ) Fondllollo 


—Iwl Geld AaPredotton. 

— tw) Dollar Income 

— Im) shrotepic Trading-. 


* XJ0* id I Gavernm. Sec. Fund* 

1A71 Cd ) Fra nkt-T nisi Interims — 
S 8.08 (w> Hamsmann HldOfe. N.V. 

S U» Iw) HrtMto Fun 


S355JU 


lw) Horizon Fund, 
lb) ILAInU Gold Bond 


riwiu id ) Interfund SA — 
f I » > Iniermarkot Fund 


GBFINOR funds. , 

— tw) East investment Fur 

—iw) Scottish World Fund - - 

^5.’ S m f * ,36 ' 97 Iwlintl Currency Fund Ltd 

CoptuBuldJ-RLLDiiAgcntdMVUza) i r ) inn Securtlles Fund 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMEN T CORP. W .) Imnuta DWS 
PB 119, SI Peter Pori. Guernsey. 0481 -2B715 
(ml FuturGAM SA- — 

InUGAM ArbUroae Inc 

(wl GAMertca lnc. 



Iw) GAM Boxtan Inc. 
iw) GAM Ermlhse- 
lw) GAM Fronc-Vol. 


irl Invest AManti 

*1MJ0 Ir ) naltertime Inti Fund SA. 
* 117A5 (wl Japan Selection Fund 
S 12X08' lw) Japan Pacific Fund 


DM 41*1 
I6M 
* 10.41 
*10229 

. ... . _ *1X1*7 

$81.13 Id) Kletnwort Benson Inn Fit__ *2X26 

. S12JM Iwl Klabnmrt Bens. Jap. Fd *7127 

SF 1DX0O Id 1 LeJeom Fund 5 1 ,060.63 

id i GAM iMernallml lnc—— siofiS ly> L aw nw [Cap how 

Iwl GAM North America lnc. *10X31 { d J rr v — S !J6A0O 

lw) GAM N. America UntiTrusi. IODjDOp Iw) UoWhlnrt. Small Cos. *1268 

(w) GAM Pacific Inc UlUg IwJUmtUd *6X93 

Iw) GAM SterL A Inti Unit Trust. 125*0 D i™' ?«flrwtvnd N.V._ S1S4.17 


Im) GAM Systems .lnc. 

(») gam Worldwide Inc— - 
tml GAM Tycho SA. Clais A. 


5 100.00 Id 1 Mediwanum Sal. Fd. 

*12179- 

S 10X39 lw) NAAT. 


_ *1X10 
Y 111443 
*1X21 


(d I NlMcn Growth Pacfcooe Fd *9*8X17 
■ * WO jwi Ncn^c^nwstrnenl FuklZ. *90735 
—id ) G.T. Asewi H.K. GwthFd — *T2ffl- imi wspVi.t J IlSS 

— (*! Fu nd. — ; ilU‘ im) Qopmiuilty investor* Ltd— 534*7 

—■Id ? &I- At whBl iS Fu r d Iw) PANCURRI Inc *14.12 

, — (d 1 GT. Europe Fund- . ^ “ - 


G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Lid. 

— tw) Berry Foe Fd. Ltd 

— (d ) G.T. Applied Science. 


‘*■15 (r ) Parian Sw. R Esi Geneva SF U97JH 

*1^“ (r ) Psrmal Value Fund N.V *1,14X42 

(h) PWtaes % 949 At 

* 1139 (w) PS CO Fund mv - * 104J6 

^SJG.T.Ho^juP^ndsr 52X78 Id ] Putnam Inti FutwZZ^L 55457 

—fd ) G.T. Investment RtnX — __ SJ482 lb ) Pri— Tecti. 3025*4 


—Id > G.T. Dollar Fund 

— Id > G.T. Bond Fund_ 

—td) G.T. Global TectmtoVFd. 


— <d > G.T. j oey S mall CoJund- «U4* (w) Ouantum Fund N.V. 

—Id i G.T. Technology Fund S2S20 id ) Renta Fund 

-Id )G.T.5outh China Fund *1470* w>Rentlnv*st 

EBC TRUST CO.(JER5EY) LTD. 

1.3 Seale 5t*t. HellBf;D534-36331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 


5X091*1 
LF2304JW 

id) Reserve insured Deposits.. S1Q5MS 
(d) Sole Trust Fund- — ... 5X13 

(w) Samurai Portfolio. 


5F 10X80 

toMijiy weyi W I SCI/TecfL SA UisemOoura— JWI 

2 5 |S&V pgr — Iw) Slate Si. Bonk EouitvHdBsNV 57*7 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND !]?! 1®®?!!!*?.?' Ul1d ^. VIH 

Tfiduo 

59X80 


—111 1 Shari Term 'A* (Aceum)_ *14197 
—40 ) Short Term A' (DlsJri *19961* i?l 


— Id ) Short Term '6‘ (Aocum) — 51.1163 IS! r^5pX*t5w nu? “ 

—Id I Short Term B’ (Wstr) SXfiJlB* 

- (w) Lana Term 52174* iwl Transpeefflc Fimd- 


(d) Turquoise Fund. 


S 13X06* 
- S 6579 
596.99 


JARDINE FLEMING. POB TOGPOHfl Kg <w) Tweedy^rpwn# xv.CJassA 51.95X35 
—lb > J.F Japan Trial,— . . . y 452s iw) Tweedy .Browne xv.CJassB *1424*3 

.*»Jf Id ) UNICO Fund DM7270 

Y 27113 (dl UNI Bond Fund JWX84 

5544 (Bl UNI Coonaf Fund *105476 


— <b if South East Asia- - 

—lb I JJ= Japan Technology 

-lft I J.F Pacific SkSJAccJ — 
-lb 1 if Australia 


NJMARBEN 

— IdICK&sA. 

— (wtClauB-U*. 


— |w J Class C- Japan. 

S RANGE NASSAU GROUP 
BBS57B, The HOqiN {D«l 46967Q 


1 4*2 lw) United Can. Imrt. Fund U(L 5171 

M Wedge Europe N.V 54X54 

Wedd* Japan N.V. 58X54 

12 IW) Wedge Padflc N.V. *5772 

^ (w) Wedge Ui. N.V. *5275 

fm) Winchester Financial Ltd. $ XM 

(nu wmaiester Diveraiiiadee__ *2X87* 
id 1 wont) Fund SA— _______ * 1 x 42 

lw) Wortdyride Securities S/5 3Vs, wuf 
Iwl Worldwide Special S/S 2to . *1*1450 

, DM ~ ° ewt, che Mmji BF — Belgium Frpncs; FL — Dytcn Fienn; LF — 
SF T Swtes Primes: a — asked; + — Offer Prices, -b — bid 
change P/V 510 toil per unit; na - Net Available; N.C.- Notammunlcmed.-o- 
New; S — suspended; sjs - Slack Sent; * - Ek-Divloend; — 

‘"gbt No«-: • — Redernol -Price- Ex-Coupon; re — Formerly 
Worldwide Fund Ud; @ — OHgr Price Incl, W prelim, charge,- ++ — daily stock 
price os an Amsterdam Stock Exchange 
















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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRXBIHYE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY i-j, 1985 



PEANUTS 


| THIS IS THE E55AY THAT 
I WROTE ABOUT MY 
CHRISTMAS VACATION •« 




ftfeU 6 H{ 



BOOKS 


DOUBLE VISION 


By Ze’ev Chafets. 384 pp. $16.95. 
Morrow, 105 , Madison Avenue, 
Sew York, N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed bv Marvin Seid 


BLOND IE 


ACROSS 


1 Rival of Ole 
Miss 

5 After, in Arles 

10 Ghanaian 
seaport 

14 Ancient 
kingdom 

15 Literary 
Becky 

16 First governor 
of “The 49th” 

17 French 
magazine 

18 Short-legged 


lOPresswork 

withpix 

20 Strain 

22 J ayhawker 

24 Pueblo Indian 

25 Joyous 
celebration 

28 Yields as a 
return 

28 Births tone 

33 Grasped 

35 Item often 
having Interest 

38 Sine 

37 Formerly, 
once 

38 Homophone 

for a biblical 
queen 

40 Body . 

41 “Pink Marsh” 
author 

42 Conductor 
Klemperer 

OJV<ki York 


43 Blackjack 
player’s 
opponent 

45 Birthstone 

48Chevet 

49 Am. call-up 

outfit 

50 File 

52 Crow’s kin 

55 Tempestuous 
winds 

59 Vent 

60 Craft 

62 Brainstorm 

63 Anagram of 
noel 

64 Corroded 

65 Wagnerian 
cycle 

88 out 

(barely 

managed) 

87” thou 

these great 
buildings?": 
Mark 13:2 

68 Major ending 


1/lfl/BS 

9 Plant of the 
ginseng family 

10 Core 

11 Selves 

12 So long, In Soho 

13 Shortly 

21 “Second Hand 




A rrs PQCJBABLy a ^ 

( BUPSLAH ! YOU HAWE ) 
*— i TO GET RID OF , — ' 
V— n HIM !! 



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BEETLE BAILEY 


23 Solar disk 
25 Cleaving tool 

28 Lost to view 
27 Goose genus 

29 Choral singers 

30 Fans' favorites 

31 Evangelist 
McPherson 

32 Stingy 

33 In the catbird 


DOWN 


1 Gripe 

2 “lam 
monarch of 
si 

SProme 
4 Birthstone 


5 B.M.I. rival 

6 Caused by light 

7 Choice 

8 Unit of work 


34 Explodes 

39 Sl amm er 

40 Birthstone 
42 Expel 

44 Maugham's 
“ of Suez” 

46 Named a price 

47 Gullies 

51 Common 
contraction 

52 Take out 

53 Berserk 

54 Cattle, to 
Cowper 

55 N.B.A/S 
Archibald 

58 Emulate 
Edward Bok 

57 Cleft 

58 Kind of brush 
61 Charlotte from 

Milwaukee 



ANDY LAPP 


« out* B5S5 RSSiwSi! tuT 

Oil b| Nm An«nci Sindcitv 






WHERE’S HE^ 
v gone -r 
QohoWPJ 








NOT REAUS/, JACK. SHE'S 
NOT SO /VUCH INTERESTED 
IN FINDING W/Af AS -* 
FINDING M-ttT HPS FOUND 



WIZARD of ID 


DENNIS THE MENACE 

f 




PfRE 



STRAITS 

s 

[L 




T HE quality and accuracy of American 
reporting and commentary about the Mid- 
dle East is a subject of enduring controversy. 
The most prevalent Arab view is that the press 
is unabashedly “pro-Zionist," while on the 
other side; some Israelis and some American 
supporters of Israel accuse the media of a 
demonstrable anti-Israel bias. 

Ze'ev Chafets, the American-bora former 
director of Israel's government press office, 
weighs into this argument with an impressively 
detailed claim that much of what the American 
press writes or fails to write about the Middle 
East does in fact distort complex realities. 
Though not without some biases of Ins own, 
Chafets makes a strong case to support this 
contention. 

A major problem in trying to report on the 
Middle East, and probably the one feast under- 
stood by the pubuc, is the news organizations’ 
lack of unfettered access to large parts of the 
region. Israel plays host to more than 200 full- 
time foreign correspondents who are pretty 
much able to report as they choose. 

In addition, reporting by Israel's own free- 
swinging press acts to alert the foreign news 
corps to significant stories. AH of this has 
contributed to focusing a great deal of atten- 
tion — sometimes unwanted attention — on a 
country that is only a tiny part of the Middle 
East. Elsewhere, though, the situation is far 
different 

The number of American correspondents 
assigned to cover the Moslem Middle East is 
quite small, while the number who are dosdy 
in touch with the languages and cultures of the 
countries they report on is smaller stilL Though 
Egypt and Lebanon accredit full-time foreign 
reporters, such key states as Saudi Arabia — 
considered “pro-American" by the U. S. gov- 
ernment —as well as such overtly hostile ones 
as Syria refuse to do so. 

The best that news organizations can do in 
these circumstances is try for occasional brief 
visits by their reporters, meanwhile depending 
on local stringers for routine coverage. In re- 
pressive countries where the local press is fully 
under government thumb, resident nationals 
working for U. S. news organizations can hard- 
ly be counted on to report things that might 
offend the regime. 

Intimidation is DOt limited to the nationals 
of some countries. As Chafeis relates. Western 
correspondents have been harassed and even 
murdered in Lebanon over the years, as p un- 


it is seen as an 
a collection of 
more sii 

Israel confrontation. i 

Chafets is, I think, off-base in claiming that 
the influence of Arab economic power and 
U. S. efforts to appease it are in considerable 
measure to blame^for giving Israel whatever 
bad press it may receive. To suggest this is too 
easily to absolve Israel of any responsibility for 
the criticism that certain of its policies aid 
actions have deservedly invited. His central 
point, however, remains valid and disturbing. 
Much of the Middle East is not reported with 
the depth and accuracy needed Tor a solid 
understanding of what is happening there, be- 
cause that is the way authoritarian govern- 
ments in the area want it American news 
organizations operate under a definite handi- 
cap. Keeping quiet about h doesn't help them 
or the public they save. 


^J‘ ,r 


laf* 


l interrelated whole rather than as 1 U it 

F separate aad exotic countries, or ,n ,{{» in- 
still as the focal point of Arab-.Hlll>‘ 


[ill 1 


Marvin Seid is on the staff of the Los Angeles 
Tones. 


BEST SELLERS 


The New York Tape* 

This list is based on marts tram more dim 2000 bookstores 
throughout the United Stale*. Weeks oo hsiarc not Dectsarity 
consecutive. 

FICTION 

TUt Lax Wafa 

Waft Waft oelix 


THE TALISMAN, by Stephen King and 
Peter Straub 


THE NUTCRAi 


I, bv Mano 
CILER, by 


E T. A Hoff- 


LOVE AND WAR, by John Jakes _ 
THE LIFE AND HARD 


TIMES OF HE1- 

DIABROMOWTTZ. by Joan Rivers 

SO LONG AND THANKS FOR ALL 

THE FISH, by Douglas Adams 

THE FOURTH PROTOCOL, by Freder- 
VckFcCT fth 
JTTTERBUI 
bin* 


JUG PERFUME, by Tam Rob- 


UNCOLN. by Gore Vidal 


AND LADIES OF THE CLUB." 
Helen Hoovcn Sanimyer 


by 


GOD KNOWS, by Joseph Helkr — - — 
ILLUSIONS OF LOVE, by 


, by Cynthia Frec- 


STRONG MEDECINE, by Arthur HaDey 

Dan Jenkins 

BOOK, by Dr. 


LIFE ITS OWN SELF, by 'Dan Jenkins ._ 
THE BUTTER BATTLE 


Sens* . 


NONFICTION 


IACOCCAj An Antobiography. by Lee la- 
IHam Novak 


with William ] 


LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Buscag- 
lia 


PIECES OF MY MIND, by Andrew A. 
Rooney . 


"THE GOOD WAR." bv Studs T«kd 
V.bv 


MOSES THE KITTEN, by James Heniot 
THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Ri rhar rf Bad] 

DR BURN'S PRESCRIPTION FOR 


HAPPINESS, by Geotw Bums . 
HEY. WAIT A MINUTE. I 


ishmenl for what they reported and as warn- 
ings to other journalists. He accuses Syria and 


REX MORGAN 


*WWT ARE 10U WINS 
FOR THAT COD?' 


’HOW MUCH WILL 

TOUflVEMEr 


AFTER CXJ.IN& 

THE FOL/CE.MARTM \ 
& PiCKEP UP 8* A 
SQUAP CAP SEARCH- \ 
FOR BERT' 


ACE *?U SUBB THIS ’ 

is the direction 
MB went; MRS. 0W£? 



the Palestine Liberation Organization of direct 
responsibility for creating a dima te of coercion 
that inhibited full and honest reporting about 
events in Lebanon from the mid-1970s on. 

The charge that reporters sometimes were 
forced to exercise protective self -censorship in 
covering a key Middle East story is a senous 
one. At least two highly respected American 
correspondents who served in Beirut during 
the period Chafets describes confirm that this 
was, in fact, what occurred. 

A lack of ready access to much of the Arab 
world clearly limits what can be reported first- 
hand from the area. In these conditions, some 
distortion becomes inevitable: The Middle 
East, as Chafets says, can only be understood if 


WROTE A 
BOOK! by John Madden with Dave An- 
derson . 


1 

12 

2 

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6 

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18 

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* -? 


THE BRAIN, by Ridiaid M. Restak 


HERITAGE, b^Abba Eban 


12 


AUGHT IN 
stem 


ATTIC by Shel Sftver- 


• K 


13 


SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 
Evan & Connell 


II 112 -- 


THE WEAKER VESSEL, by An Umia Fra- 
ser 


13 5 


14 ELVIS IS DEAD AND I DONT FEEL 


14 13 


IS 


SO GOOD MYSELF, by Lewis Gthzard 
iINNINGS. by Eu- 


ONE WRITER’S BEG 
dora Wdty 


10 


15 42 - “ - 


ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 


WHAT THEY DONT TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 
Made H. McCormack . 


2 WOMEN COMING OF AGE, by Jane 


l 17 -r_ 


Fonda with Mignon McCarthy 2 

CHEF PRUDHOMMES LOUISIANA 


EN.byi 
EAT TO WIN, by Robe 
NOTHING DOWN, bv 


Robert Haas 


Robert G. Allen — 


BRIDGE 


GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri AmoW and Bob Lee 


Unscramble mess tour Jumbtes, 
one latter to each square, to form 
four ottUnary words. 


TUINY 


TIIC 

□ 

□ 


SITOF 1 


□ZD 

Li_ 


PEAQUO 


t ft i 



CLIPSE 


:iu 




SiM’euie 

bUK £KP § 




By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal 
South opened a hand that 
most players would pass. Over 
four spades from West, his. 
partner bid four no-trump, 
which would be ambiguous m 
many more experienced part- 
nerships. 

South had to decide whether 
four no-trump was unusual, 
showing minor-suit length, or 
Blackwood. He guessed the 
latter, wrongly, and bid five 
diamonds to show an ace. 
North passed, assuming that 
his partner preferred dia- 
monds to clubs. 

South suspected that he had 
done the wrong thing when 


East began to think. And when 
East finally doubled. South 
took corrective action by bid- 
ding six dubs. East doubled 
again, consistent but less con- 
fident. 


made, and North-South had a 
great start to their evening. 


By good fortune North- 
South had reached the slam 
from the side that was likely to 
make. West led the spade 
queen, and when East took the 
ace it was all over. East shifted 
to the heart long, and South 
took the are. He drew trumps 
and worked on diamonds. 
Eventually the heart loser in 
dummy was discarded on the 
spade king and the fifth dia- 
mond in the dummy was estab- 
lished The doubled slam was 


NORTH 

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WEST EAST 

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West led tte node oman. 




Now arrange (be circled letters to 
lorni the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


wmnimi 


Yesterday's 


(Answers Tomorrow) 

Jumbles: MAKER FLUID SNUGLY NIMBLE 


Answer The leellng he got when he saw that the baai 
had sprung a laak-A "SINKING" ONE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH 
C F 


Amsterdam 

Albans 


8 46 


LOW 
C F 


Beterade 

Berlin 


-10 14 
10 50 
0 32 
0 32 
-V 16 
-10 14 
-5 23 


.13 10 
■11 13 


Costa Ml Sal 
Dublin 


nice 

(Ms 

Farts 

Prague 

Reykjavik 


Vienna 

worsen* 

Zorich 


-I 30 
S 44 
S 41 
I 34 

4 39 
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■7 19 

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5 41 
1* 44 

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16 61 
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ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 




C 

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XI 

91 

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1 

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AFRICA 






BW 

Algiers 

5 

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Cairo 

28 

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Cepe Tows 

27 

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32 

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LATIN AMERICA 




1 34 
-11 13 


-11 12 


H 21 82 17 

Lima 29 B4 20 

Merits Oty 23 73 5 

Bio do Janeiro 21 82 20 

SaoPaoio — — — 


63 cl 
M o 
47 fr 
68 cl. 
— no 


4 18 


5 41 
5 41 
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-13 5 

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-7 19 
-14 1 

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WORTH AMERICA 


MIDDLE EAST 


Unborn 

Sokrat 


Tel Aviv 


0 32 

23 n 

14 57 
17 43 
25 77 


-4 25 
16 61 


10 50 
14 57 


OCEANIA 


73 17 S3 
90 20 68 


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Altanhi 

3 

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18 

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»U; 

o-oweast; pe-gortiv dandy; 

r-rota; 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Rough. FRANKFURT: Snow. 

Temp. 4 U (18 — 91. LONDON: Snow Temp. 2— -3 (36—361. MADRID: 

Fair, Temo.4 — -5 (39— 23). NEW YORK: Felr.Tanp.-2— f (28- 16). PARIS: 
Overcast. Tome. -4 — 7 125 -191. ROME: Rrfnv. Tamp. 12— S 154—411. TEL 
AVIV: Fair. Temp. 23 — 12 (73 — 541. ZURICH: Snow. T rmo. w — 14 (M— 71. 
■AN6KOK; Foggy, TxM 33 - 33 191 — 731J HONS KONO: FoJr.TemO. 18—12 


S ii — Ui. MANILA: ClburiV. Tomp. 29 — 33JB4— 73). SEOUL: Fair. 

— 12(38 — 101. SINGAPORE: Fair. ~ ' 

Temp. 6 — 1 (41—30). 


'.Toma. 30—23 (B6— 73). TOKYO iCtoudv. 


Canadian Stock Markets jan. is 


Prices In Canadian cents unless marked S 


Toronto 


HUH iMrCkmON 


405 AMI Prce 
TSOOAanfcaE 
2600 Aero IndA 
7823 Alt Energy 
43550 Alta Nat 
1970 Aigoma SI 
350 Andrx WA I 
710 Argcen 
339 Argus C or 
108 Asbestos 
24J0 Also I f 
11200 BP Canada 
15515 Bank BC 
512474 Bonk N S 
5700 Bofrtedc O 
6745 Bonanza A 
300 Braloma 

2400 aramalea 
1300 Brenda M 
139V5BCFP 
37860 BC Ra 
58100 BC Pllane 
4300Brunswk 
50 Budd Con 
124400 38? 
37D0CCLA 
6000 CDtstt! B I 
2300 Cad Frv 
2828 C Nor West 
93D C Pocfcrs 
2700 Can Trust 
36074 Cl Bk Com 
lSBOOCrin NM Rm 
97286 CTIreAf 
418 C Util B 
11300 Cma 
5776 Ceim-x 

410C Dlsttl A 
6000 CDtsIb B I 
2H0CTL Bank 
100 Convent r t 
TOOConvfat A 
12D0CaaekaR 
600 Can ran A 
430 Crawnx 
31130 Czar Re* 
287291 Doan Dev 
7975 Den honA 
3 0830 Denison Bf 
3000 Devlcon 
1400 DlcknanAf 
300 CNeknsn B 
10454 OomanA 
320C Dofosco A 
1050 Du Pont A 
26300 Dv las A 

2012 Elcrtwm X 
400 Ena 


SM 33 33 - Mi 

S12U. 12 1214 + 

U 5ftft 6 + 
JIB?* 181* 18*1 


115 

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S18*k 

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187fe+ 4* 

1231ft 

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SI 72ft 

17V* 

17*6+ Vk 

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25*k 

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M+nc FalcanC 

400 Fed Pten 
1100 F City Fin 
1511 Fraser 

VmZzssr 

3700 Gibraltar 
28700 Galdcorpf 
400 Goodyear 
XM) Grandma 
2000GnMduc 
3200 GL Forest 
TmGrgvhnd 

WHmT 1 

44104 ImOKO 
200indol 
50 Inland Gas 
11500 nifpr Pipe 
lOOIvocoB 
3006 Jannock 

350 Kam Kolia 

miNahnrH 
•07 Karr Add 


sm> 13te 13V: + 
1 55 ISO 150—4 
» 38S 3B -TO 

516W T6'A 16W + 
B • V + U 

Silt* UVk 111*— 4k 
263 256 257 —2 

*32V% 219k 211k 
S13W 13 13 — M 

T5to 15U 1515 
5 151k 19 151k + 4k 

82514 24V, 2514+ 1 
554k $» 5*0- Vk 

81 5 144k 1434 + 

S XPA 211ft 22 + Vi 

“V »» + 

531 30% 301* 

S3»k 30 30 

24 17te 24+7 

._89Hi 9V> 9tk + 

*17 17 17 

*12 Ulft IRk— 
571k 61ft 61b— 
*58h Sift »+ Vk 

VPA Rk 73* 

375 375 375 +25 

tTU 7ft. 714— 

275 Z72 272 +2 

*11*4 111ft Ulft— Vft 
SUta 153k 15W»+ Ik 
133 130 130 -7 

245 236 240 +8 
S16lft 15tk 16 
«14* k 14>4 14Vk— 
814 80k 

440 440 440 —5 

455 455 495 

300 285 285 —5 

5341k 2414 2Ak + 
817 161ft 1M+ Ik 

S28Vk 271ft 284k— 
440 05 440 +18 
816 16 16 — 4k 

S6I* 6V* 64k— Vk 

EVHk IBM ISVk+lk 
5141k UU MVk + Ik 
*831* 82 83Vk+llft 
S19Vk 194k WVj 
8201ft 201k 2014 
812 life T1H— 
5TB V ft 171ft 18 
S23TCk Zl* 1)V- Ik 
Slllk 114k 11(44 


288 

204 

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S3! 

37*m 37*ft+ 

47 

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*2016 sHk am*- ik 
51716 17*4 I7*i 
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81 Ilk 119| lUk+lft 
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S8J6. 34*4 34*4 + *k 
8161ft H'ft 1616 + 
811 11 11 
100 100 100 —3 

834 3SVk 34 + *h 
M5W 151k 1$lk + tk 


38877 Laban 
7640 Lae Minis 
TOOLOnl Cam 
37TXJ Locana 
100 LL Lac 
itaOLoblawCa 
28200 MICC 
219 Mdan HX 
ZSZWkrlanj E 
l22Z0MobanAf 
1100 Matson B 
5900 Nabisco L 
41021 Naranda 
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59250 Nva Alt A I 
WNBMCOW 
35300 NuWri SPA 
2190 Osbawa A f 
4QQPamour 
3300 PanCan P 
4500 Pembina 
500 PtianUOII 
2700 Pine Paint 
4000 Place GO o 
30400 Placer 
200 Proviso 
2TO0QueStlJrao 
900 Rom Pet 

5200 Havnocfc f 

ISllSRedpath 
77697 Rd Starts A 
aUReldlhoM 

600 RetSarv f 
600 Revn Pro A 
IMOHogersA 
36800 Roman 
22900 Sceatra 
300 Scorn t 
1200 Seers Con 
14850 Shell Con 
8211 Siherrltl 
12S Slater Bf 
12500 Sauttim 
300 St Brodcst 
40737 S telco A 
17DQ Su hptru 
1500 Bleep R 
*000 Sydney o 
500 ToIcdtd 
500 Torn 
3400 Tack Cor A 
40040 Teck B I 
1700 Ten Can 
1411D TTMm N A 
IM9UTOT Dm Bk 
4800 Tarstar B f 
3U0 Traders A I 
900TrnsMt 
600 Trinity Res 
095 TrnAlta UA 
!?247 TrQm PL 
27728 Trlmoc 
Trine At 
4500 Turbo t 
62umcorpAf 

200 Un CorbM 

230149 u Enter tse 

100 u Kero 

llOOUSbcoe 
3 34 7S verst! A f 
lOODVatteran 

CTOWMOWOd 

2200weetmbi 
TOOWestnrae 
675 Weston 
18S7WMdWdA 


Mlglt Low Close Chtee 
*22Vk 21te n?k 

*26 Vk 26 26 

510 10 10 

SlOVk 10 lOVk + Vk 
» » 28 + Vk 

8181k 1BU lB'ft — ift 
260 250 250 —25 

S23V» 231ft 23VV+ 1ft 
460, 445 455 +5 

816Jk 1616 16*6— Ift 
S16*k 161ft 161k + Vk 
524?* 241k 241k— Ift 
*1711. 171k 17W- Vk 
S15V7 151b 15**— Ik 

871k 71k 71*— 

819 Vft Ulk 1914 + *k 
50 47 48 —2 

533V, 23*4 231k— * 
**5*50 *46 +15 

Wft 2S*k + 
8171k 171k 171k 
*7Vk TVk 71k 
823 23 23 

105 103 105 +5 

52116 21 Vk 21Vk— 
State Wkjftta 

»?* r* 

83216 32 321ft 

5101k 18te 18Vk — 
89 81ft Blft— Vft 
170 170 170 + 

122 115 122 + . 

88 7*6 776+16 

812*4 12 12 - tk 

ISVk 5 5 — Ik 

517*6 171k 17*6- 
87=1 * _7Vft 7*6+ Ik 
522Vi 2116 211ft— 1ft 

5716 7 7 — 

8914 91* 9 'ft 

557V, 521ft 521ft— Vft 
512V* 12V* I2lk 

21 21 Vft + Vft 

» 3 « 

za) ttii wn 

» 28 30 +2 

76 76 76 +5 

5151ft 1516 15*4 
59*4 916 Aft 

— JJOte 18k. I0V> + 
5346, 34 UVk— *k 
850 491k 50 +Vft 

#1 Kt_ 18 18V, + Ift 

Slflk 161ft 16*6— 
Kite 21 77 Vk 

571ft 716 7V. 

+M 

SDte 23*6 OH 
57116 211ft 211k 
4 28 4H 410 — 5 
KEW4 2214 22*6- 
271k S 25 —TV, 
58 Tfft 8 + 

Slgfc HR* UR6 

«4 W*- 

127 128 120 

5616 6ift 61ft— Ik 
tlOVk WIk 1094 + 
SM 15*4 16 + 1ft 
511*6 llVk 1IW— V* 
552 52 52 

57594. 7JH 75H+ 

sim im ion 


Total sales iu 71491 shares 


Montreal 


Higti 

60677 Bank Moat S26H 

21013 DomTxlA 813 

1310 MMTrsI S12tk 

13SZ34 NOlBk Cda SIS 

2810 Power Corp STSVi 

1200 naUandA S14H 

443N Roval Bank 130*6 

2056 RavTratOO 5171ft 

Total Sale* U9M72 shores. 


Ls» Close Owe 
201* 20*1 
in 121 ft- 1 * 
ra 12 

T4H 14U + Vk 
28W 28V6 + H 
14*6 14*6+ Ik 
* 39H 
17 17te+ M 


Amsterdam 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A'Pom Rub 

Amrabank 

BVG 

Buehrmann T 

Cotend Hkto 

Ehavler-NDl) 

FokJtar 

GbtBracades 

Heteeken 

Haoaavens 

KLM 

Noarden 

NatNedder 

mainyii 

Os» Vander G 

Pakhoed 

PMltas 


STftUI 

735 


Ronnco 
Rartnto 
Roval Dutch 
Uni lever 

Van Ommeren 
VMF Star* 
VNU 


121 119 

93 92 

176 174 
15020 149 JO 
6150 6280 

48.90 47.40 

48JS0 47.90 
278 273 

156 154 

29250 293 

7UD 7170 
57 5640 
7138 7040 

136.90 13678 
6120 64.10 
«W® 43J0 

177 17140 
■mai ihbi 

2840 28 

14SJD T45 
21450 214 


ANPX318 Oeoertri 
Previous : 187 59 
Soane: AFP. 


:19 


Brussels 


Ai-bed 


1450 1450 


Codwrlll 

EBBS 

GBL 

GB innaBm 
Gevaert 
Hoboken 
Krodletbank 


Sec Ou rnk 
Saflna 

Sotvov 

Troctkm Elec 
VNVontagne 


270 274 

2558 1845 
2050 TATS 
3M0 1095 
3A80 1650 
60*0 6080 
7J00 7740 
6790 6518 
1A2S 1A2S 


7A10 7JM 
4.140 


4.10B 

uh xaos 

1000 5J00 


. :U1U3 

Pravteus : 99614 

Brunets 


Frankfurt 


AEG-Tetefimken 10550 18480 
Allianz Vers l.TOS UM9 



Close 

Prev. 

Bast 

18240 

183 . 

Haver 

191.98 

191 

Bayer .Hypo. 

324 33450 , 

Baver.Ver.Bank 

336* J34J0 

BMW 

38541 


Commerzbank 

17040 16? JO | 

Contloumml 

122 11820 

Daimler-Benz 

61858 

613 

Degussa 

331 

339 






Dresdner Eta* 

191-20 19050 

DUB-Scfuittw 

219 

JIB 

GHH 

16250 


HoChtln! 

485 

485 

Hoechst 

18480 

185 

Hoesch 

9840 

9880 



Horten 


182 

Kail U Sail 

27550 26750 

Karstadt 

24150 

240 

Kau^nri 

225 

225 

KHD 

256J0 2S65D I 

Ktoedmar werka 

75.90 

7450 

Krupp Stats! 

7980 

•OLSD 

Linde 

39950 

395 

Luttbanso 





Mannesmana 

15480 15380 

Metallaesalisdiafl 218 

217 

MuencfLRueck 

1870 

1850 

Preussoo 

254 

254 

RMtom-Wnkt 

. 321 317 

Sctoerlrtg 



Sletnera 


Thvssen 



Vtono 


Veba 


VEW 


124 

VotfcswBpenwBrk 

207 

205 


Prevtoos : 143880 
Same: APP. 



II Hong Kong 1 } 


jj 


Oieuna Kona 

12.90 



14.70 

1480 

Crass Harbor 

11J30 

11 JO 

Memo Sena 

47 SO 

47 JO 


T 3Q 

780 


2740 



480 


HK Sbanehal 

9 


HKTol 

57 

43f im 

HKWbarT 


£jbc 

Hutch Wltampoa 

10*90 


Janflne Math 

o jp 



8*00 

9 


5J2D 




1670 

SHK Praps 

880 


Slme Darby 

655 

MJS. 

Status 



Swire PacHtcA 

2380 

to 



Other Markets Jan. 15 


Closing Prices In local currencies 


Wheetack 
Winsor 
World Inti 


1.10 
420 422* 
120 5JP 
1.94 1.96 


Hmtg Seag Iftdez : UN m 
Previous :MS606 

Source: Reuters. 


iJohannesburg 


AECl 

Barlows 

Blwaors 
Buffets 
EJands 
GF5A 
Harmony 
Kloof 


Pst stem 
Rusplat 
5A Brews 
St Helena 


000 735 

1045 1020 
1850 1790 
7450 7275 
1450 1468 
3080 2750 
2900 2B5D 
0075 7S25 

mo me 

6500 6150 
IMS 1630 
655 655 

3600 3600 
555 560 


Source: Nedbank. 


London 


aa com 

Ained4_vons „ 

A nglo Am Caw STVVk S81W 
152 


sunk sink 
163 154 


Barclays 

Ban 

ELAT. 


569 


351 

370 


Bmmter Indus 


39 

273 

185 


147 

569 

482 

348 

368 

251 


481 

248 


13® IIBte 
597 592 


229 

141 

280 

160 

474 

MS 


224 

161 

198 

158 

474 

142 


383 

292 


*2344 S24te 


Conadhan Indexes Jan. 15 I 


Close Previous 
Montreal 1HLS0 11055 

Toronto Z394.10 2J88JM 

Montreal: Stock Exchange industrials index. 
Toronto: TS63PB Index. 


Taiwan Foreign Investment 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwanese invest- 
ment abroad totaled $39.26 million 
last year, almost four times the 
1983 figure of $1036 million, the 
Economic Ministry said Tuesday. 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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E L II O IE HE ID I T IHBH U R 


□BQDnaaaciHa aaa 

□DBEana aaaaa 


CELT 


COR ETTA 


0EmDaa □□□□□ 

□bed aaamn aao 
□Eaaaaaaaaaanaa 
deq naaaa noma 
EHoaa saaoHa 


Aim A N T ABS T Alin 


□C2BHH aEaaaaa 
nna aaananaaaaa 
anann aaana 
□naan aaaaa 


1/16/89 


Close Hr**. 

Dunlop Susa, — 

Fteora 273 273 

Free st God S22V6 S22V% 

GEC 210 208 

GKN 197 1M 

Glaxo. 11 5/32 11 3/64 


Grand Mel 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

irnns 

Ltoyitj Bank 

Lonrho 

Lucas 

Marks and So 
Metal Bax 
MWVand BaHk 
Nat West Bank 
Pllftlnalon 
P lesser 
Ratal Elect 
Randfanleln 
R™ik 

Reed Inti 
R e uters 


293 

232 

707 

329 


758 

194 

519 

161 

257 

119 


33? 

592 
291 
198 
274 
*90V» *91 Vk 

306 302 

548 542 

295 296 


ROVal Dutch C 44 15/6443 37/64 
KTZ 589 592 

Shell 673 653 

SIC 274 272 

SM Chartered 4 71 474 

Tate and Lyle 481 4U 

Tesca ZU 733 

Thorn EMI 429 434 

Ultramar 20 iw 

Unilever 11 19/3211 35/64 
United Biscuits 210 2TO 

VI diets 220 218 

W.Dcn> S33A S34lk 

wXaldlngi S2Mk *26*k 

War Loan 3W CM*ft 04* 

Wool wm III 601 993 

ZCI 13 t2*ft 


F.T.3B index : MUM 
Frevkws : M9J8 
Seurat: AFP. 


Milan 


Banco Comm 
Centrale 
Ooohotets 
CredlRd 
FormJ tone 

Flat 

FlnsMer 

CeneraU 

IFI 

itateementl 

Mediobanca 

Mfiteauan 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascante 

SIP 

Sola 


UUQD 17,810 
2X84 2445 
5J50 3412 
Z151 2130 
9^00 9J01 
2291 2497 
98 90 

36408 36400 
6M9 6490 

764100 76400 
72500 744)80 
1J93 1,374 
AISD AIM 
24MO 2461 
6440003490 
565 564 

2161 24*6 
2442 3MO 
9JB0 9450 


MiBinde x :i JVJO 

^TntomrtJKuo 

BOM 2/1/85 - MM) 
s o u rce: Milam Stock r***^ 


Paris 


AlrUouMe 
AJsthom Alt. 
Av Dassault 
Bancaira 
QIC 

saggy 

Ojrnrtvur 
Outo Med 
Cad mea 
Dumaz 


573 570 
320 2I9JB 
855 869 

591 UO 
939 543 

.725 7W 
2445 2440 
1479 1488 
1.180 1,148 
251 255 

738 719 


Ei+Aounaine 
Europe 1 
Gen Eoux 
Hachetle 
l metal 
Latarge Cep 
Legrand 
rOreal 
Matra 
MIcMIn 
MMPennar 
Meet Hennes s v 
Moulinex 
Nord-Est 
Ocddentaie 
Pernod Ric. 

Pet roles Use) 

Pewpeet 

Padafai 


Radletactm 
Redout* 
Roussel Uctaf 
Skis RasxVgnal 
Sour.Perrler 
Tetemocan 
Thomson CSF 
Videa 


Close Prev 
227 JO 22740 
041 
545 548 

1470 1450 
7840 77.10 
,376 369 JO 
I.9B0 1.976 
2J61 2465 

1-740 1453 

790 790 

65 65 

1.949 1425 
9AM 9140 
8140 8030 
658 645 

704 710 

256 257 

25JJD 255 
4AS0 4A90 
IBSlSO 18740 
225 220 

1416 1410 
1440 1445 
'- 909 

490^56 

2^45 

439 414 

228 225 


Agefl index : NJL 
Pravim : 19144 
CAC Index : 189 Jfl 
Prevtoos : its JO 

Source: AFP. 


I Singapore 


Boustead 
CoM Storage 
DBS 

FraserNeavg 
Haw Par 


1J1 144 

2J2 243 

S.1S 530 


KeooeSSMm 
Mol Banking 
OCHC 
OUB 


Semto SMpvard 
Darby 


Slme 
S Steeenshla 
StTradina 
UOB 


144 145 

245 248 

144 144 

SM 548 
835 875 
174 340 

142 144 

148 149 

1 141 

A28 <30 

A14 4.16 


OUB Index U8SJ0 

Previous : 38732 

Source: Overseas Union Bank. 


Stockholm 


AGA 

AHa Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

Atlas Caaca 

Sadden 

Etecrraknc 


Esserte 

Hendetsbken 

Phminoe k i 


366 

346 

202 

303 

370 

375 

395 

395 

109 

112 

ITS 

175 

261 

265 

273 

273 

31* 

315 

200 

282 

212 

210 


Close Pr*» 
455 450 


Scania 

Sandvlk 385 M 

Skanska 9640 97 

SKF 186 N7 

Swedish Match 246 270 

Volvo 237 335 


A Wers v ark tea Index :<aut 
Pmhxis ; <0740 


SfOFce: UsUomtHbamkem.- 


Sydney 



ACi 

197 

IM 




2d 


ANZ 


518 





Bonn 


no 


Boicsmlnvllle 

167 

to 

'\ 

Brambles 

365 

362 

AJ' 

Cotes 

396 

• 396 

l 

Camalco 

205 

285 


CRA 

495 

491 


CSR 


298 

> 

Dunlop 


195 

Eldars Ixi 


387 

- V 

Hooker 

300 

M 

A ^ 

Mas** tan 

220 

225 


MIM 

238 

MB 

. k ■ 

Mver 

177 

177 


Oafctorkfge 


65 


Pefco 


430 


PaeekJon 


'270 




34 



524 

528 

to 



173 

A 

SautMand 


24 


WoodsMe 

89 

92 

I'v 

WormaU 

318 

318 

AM Ordtoortoi index 
Prevtoos :72i)g 
Source: Reuters. 

:73UB 


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Bonk Leu 
Brown Bawl 
CRm Getgy 
Credit Suisse 
Electr o w ui r 
Georg Fischer 
Jacob Sadxml 
Jet moll 
Landis Gvr 
Nestle 
OerllluxvB 
Roche Batov 
Sandaz 
SeMndler 
Sutzer 
SBC 

Swtasair 
Unlan Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurtcto Ins. 


3400 3460 
1490 1455 
2490 2JB5 
3J34 BIS 
2J60 73*0 

6450 A550 
2 I.9N 
1465 1463 
5490 5470 
U2S U15 
9450 949 






>4, 


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3468 3470 
1*305 WOO 
364 364 

1.108 1495 
3485 3485 
4 4 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 19S5 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


^ Rookie Jordan Brilliant 
As Bulls Down Nuggets 

agS'^jfe - /ampMtotoSo&Fnmi^cha The Bulls extended a 54-48 half - 
:s Po Di ^: , CHICAGO 7- II happened time advantage to 72-63 midway in 
is p^l „ 'again Monday night: Michaef Jot- th*» ihmt mnH*r n>» ai— 


SEft 

oefiniTr.fc 


!h *L' 


of Ha. 


Or. 


ALL 


F;-- 


dan tad his best game of die year. 
,-tfs hard to befieve; but the brifliant 
.. Oricago rookie is improving with 

■each contest 

. ' is Ms first game since acoona- 
- pushin g the National Rarfri^ foai] 

NBA FOCUS 

'Association's most awesome feat 

— seffiag out Richfield Coliseum, 
the Cleveland Cavaliers’ home 
court — Jordan recorded 35 ptrinls, 
14 rebounds and 15 assists in 
-powering the Bulls to a 122-113 
triumph over the Denver Nuggets. 
It was the first triple-doable of Jor- 
dan’s career. ' 

- ha the night’s only other game, 
Washington beat Gevdand, 101- 

91. 

.' Although entering the contest as 
the NBA s No. 7 scorer, Jordan 
showed the superstar's quality of 
dominating without necessarily 
putting points on the board “They 
kind of didn't pay much attention 
tome at first, so I passed off and 
got some boards,” said Jordan, who 
bad only nine pants at halftime. 

Said Denver Coach Doug Moe: 
‘‘We let them score inside too damn 
easy. That really goofed us up. So 
we bad to turn our defense around 
— and Jordan went crazy." 


the third quarter. But Alex En glish 
tallied 12 of his 25 pants in the 
period as Denver took an 87-86 
lead into the final quarter. 

Behind Jordan and Steve John- 
son, who bad 22 points, Chicago 
buflt op a 105-97 tHtlge, but with 
6:02 remaining Denver cut the def- 
irit to 105-102. In the next three 
and a half minutes the Bulls went 
on a 10-4 tear — Jordan hitting for 
six straight points — to put the 
game out of reach. 

Oricago- Coach Kevin Loogfaery 
hardly minced words about Jordan. 
“He has all the ability that made 

ennn the history of 
participated in every phase of the 
offense — when he wasn’t scoring, 
be was giving out assists 01 re- 
bounding to lead the break." 

Kxrughezy praised West, the out- 
standing all-round former Los An- 
gdes Laker, as a great rebounder. 
“But after tonight’s performance,” 
he said, “there is no doabr in my 
□rind that Jordan compares favor- 
ably in every sense of the word. 

“It was really a solid win when 
you consider we had two starters, 
Orlando Wodridge and CaldweD 
Jones, out of the hneup. 

“But Jordan’s play stowed me 
how well one player can control a 
game." (UPI,AP) 



Coping With Super Bowl Hype 


By Dave Anderson 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — It’s almost out 
of its teens, but it remains the 
Spoiled rich kid of sports, obsessed 
by its birthday parties that get 
more extravagant each year. Super 
Bowl XDf win present the Miami 


Colt coach before that be was cm- about Namath’s statement, he 
harassed by the 16-7 loss to the glared. 

Jets in Super Bowl ITL “I don’t know how Namath can 

I think you learn from evtay -rap Bari," he said. “Anyone who 
r von’re there." he said. doesn't give Earl the credit he de- 


year you’re there," he said. 

“Don't ask me to talk about that 
Jet game,” he said with a hard 


give 

serves is wrong.” The veins in Sho- 
ta's neck had thickened. The firm- 
ness of Ms square-jawed face 


mUSK 


49ars Sunday in Palo Alto, Califor- 
nia, almost as an afterthought to 
the hype. But by now, coaches ap- 
pear to have learned how to cope 
with the hoopla of Super Bowl 
week. 

'I want our players to get caught 


years ihar if you rebd or reject it or 
lei it bother you, ilH turn what 
should be an enjoyable time into a 
miserable time.” 


“But I guess," he said with a 
sharp edge in Iris voice, “Namath 
can say whatever the hell he 
wants.” 

When the Jets won, Shuta bad 


BMMrt/Uniud Pran InMmaaoad 

Michael Jordan returns to earth Monday after a slam think. 


To an Outlander Feeling European Winter’s Chill 

inunwakmd Herald Tribune Nice cushion, nasty nuOstcme. figure the odds and still gone Olsen says if be were a defender 

LONDON — Open letter to For the benefit of others who ahead, you are either absolute ge- he’d tackle hard against a player 

Fanrfi Ahmad, a yotmg Singapar- might read this, forgive my explain- reuses (and maybe you are) os seif- like himself. Bui he is learning that, g o 

ean soccer international who is suf- mg more about Olsen; thing s that ish in the extreme. Percentage the- although Manchester's heart is lost reason was given, but some owners^ have PTpny^ ^^ ritfartlnn with 

forma a Epmul harcti Fnrrwvxin vnii M iutnntnt ntaun- thie ram. r»ru has if that vnn hnth ntfmmtftri tn fast attar-tina nlav thf» manawr ^imnp'p ♦a fianAhnla *1 n«n> tiahiiAvlr tJikinnnn ‘ pP 


Shula learned the hard way, es- 

“K w overreact to an op- 

• 11 . ■» k ^ game wnra he let Joe poang opinion. Three years later, 

up m afi that,” Don Shuta says. Namath bother hm. For more than theDdptos lost Super Bowl VI to 
They’ve earned jt and they should a week, the New York Jet quarter- r) a W Gwhovs 24-3 and 
enjoy it But set aride enough time back had b«n saying that\)aryle £££ 
to get their work done.” Lamomca of the Oakland Raiders co** wbo couldn't win the bin 

Stoda ^^knowJMswBbe one. Bui the next year the Dolphin! 

bis sixth SuperBwltro,tto most Mara^wtohad guided die Colts completed their perfect 17-0 sbson 
for a NanonalFootban League to the NFLb lie as the r^accment a 14-7 vict^y over the Wasb- 
c°ach. As the Dolphin roach, his fat ttommred Johnny Unites. And ■ ut&oa Redskins in Super Bowl VIL 
record is 2-2, and as the Baltimore when Simla was asked that day theyarSed fbrLper Bowl 

VJ|I a gains t rhf Wipn /xtn ta VTHng t 

in Houston the following year, 
Shuta had learned to rdax. The 
morning of tris first formal news 
conference, he looked out at the 
assembled members of the news 
media and smil ed, 

“Good morning. Breakfast 
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Two-time Olympic gold medalist Edwin Clobbers,” he said. 

Moses will plead not guilty to misdemeanor charges of soliciting a By having a team in three of the 
prostitute and possessing a small amount of marijuana, his attorney said first eight Super Bowl games, Shula 
Monday. had to learn tow to handle what 

Harold lipton said Moses never intended to engage in sex with a George Allen called “distractions.” 
prostitute and that he was a victim of entrapment when police targeted In his only Super Bowl appearance, 
him early Sunday after they saw his 1985 Mercedes, which carries the Redskin coach complained 
“OLYMPYN" California license plates. Released on bis own recogni- about how the daily news confer- 
Muine, Moses is to be arraigned Jan. 29. ences were disrupting his prepare- 

“My feeling is that someone checked the license plates, found out that lion. 

Edwin owned the car and thought he would be a good catch,” the “For the first rim* in my career 
attorney said. as a coach," Allen announced at 

S . n . TT j pitott the Friday news conference fa the 

immons Resigns as Head of USrL two head coaches, ‘Tin missing 

” practice.” 

NEW YORK (AP ) — Cbsn Sinmons resigned Monday as commission- The more Allen talked about dis- 

er of the United States Football League, the league announced. No tractions, the more to^taySs woe 



SPORTS BRIEFS 

Hurdler Moses Will Head Not Guilty 


facing a second, harsh European 
winter in the Netherlands, where he 
plays, when fit, with FC Groning- 
en. Dear Fandi: 

We may never meet and I have 
only glimpsed your talents through 
the keyhole of television — notably 
your match-winning display 
against Inter Milan in 1983. 

But because your quality was so 
special that day, I felt moved to 
sadness to read in the Straits Stm- 


you, an adopted player on this con- ory has it that you both attempted 
tinent, doubtless know. things of outrageous brilliance 

Come March Olsen will turn 24, while others were better placed to 
although he retains the looks, en- score. 

thusiasms and instincts of a school- Well, the day players like Ahma d 

bey. Those qualities, it seems to and Olsen obey that taw will be my 

last as a soccer spectator. 

Meanwhile, arriving at Man- 
chester with that dub's 50,000 
faithful dreaming that he was die 
second coming of that great enter- 
tainer George Best. Olsen is on pa- 


Rob Hughes 


me, you share, and an almost child- 

, _ . tike wander at scoring Roy of the „ 

day Irens that you, whose pure Rovers goals — yours against Inter flop, 

soccer skBl may never be equaled ««ul nonmet Frwn- Where is Olsen when 




W..' — 




Ui.'« 


: c: !i 


*:« 


ay never be equaled 
by another Singaporean, felt 
ashame d — like a wounded samu- 
rai warrior — to face y our home 
public dtiring the holidays after a 
bad year in the Netherlands. 

Are you fanriHar with Jesper Ol- 
sen’s problems with Manchester 
Unrted? Being Scandinavian, he is 
^ not perturbed by alien coldness. He 
"needs no special potions nibbed 
into his feet and. thighs, andyou 
might think that because he is 
'world-renowned Olsen cannot 
know your doubts, .your fluctua- 
tions in form, confidence and phys- 
ical wdl-bemg. 

Fandi, you would be so wrong. 
Like yon, Oken has flair laced trim 
vrdmerahflhy. 

He is dogged by injuries arising 
in part fromnaving a physique not 
dissimilar to your own. His slight 
frame has been kicked by defenders 
who would prefer that an impudent 
__ little foreigner did not make mon- 
“ keys out a them. 

He is having- to adjust to meth- 


Mfian and (Msec's against Feyen- 
oord that same winter. 

Remember his? Olsen ran 35 
yards to outwit five Feyenoord de- 
fenders (not one of them Iaym£ a 
boot on hhn t much less depriving 
him of the ball), and then scored 
cheekily from what seemed an im- 
possible angle: 

I can still see defenders lunging 


United 

needs him? He has scored twice 
with half the season gone. His left 
ankle, damag ed by a Hungarian 
goalkeeper two years ago, is still 
dodgy after microsurgery and a 
plastic insertion. A thigh muscle 
has gone as well, and fa five games 
now his ahsence has been taken for 
granted. 

Oh. he has thrilled Manchester 


to fast attacking play, the manager 
and coach demand sweat and tod, 
with forwards “tucking back” to 
protect the defense. When the go- 
ing gets tough. Olsen is likely to be 
withdrawn, as has already twice 
happened in Manchester red. 

I am not suggesting Olsen will 
/ad Manchester United, or that Ar- 
senal , which rejected him as a teen- 
ager because he looked too skinny 
and frail, can crow. (Arsenal's own 
$800,000 purchase, Charlie Nicho- 
las, has endured a wretched year 
Lrying to aoriimatbR , and he moved 


Simmons’s failure to negotiate a new network television contract 
The man rumored to be in line fa the job, Los Angeles attorney Harry 
Usher — executive vice president and general manager of the Los Angeles 
Olympic Organizing Committee — arrived in New Yak to “continue a 
dialogue” about the job with the league’s dub owners. 


coach got, die more uptight the 
players goL One day that week, 
Allen dispatched an aide to the Los 
Angeles Coliseum to check the an- 
gle of the sun during the hours the 

Austrians 1-2 in Cup Giant Slalom SJT 

ADELBODEN, Switzerland (AP) — Hans Enn, a nine-season veteran, * e VBrinBS ^ ® fant 10 coin ' 
retained a first-run margin and edged fellow Austrian Hubert Strata by 
seven one-hundredths of a second to wm the Adelbodea World Cup giant 
slalom ski race here Tuesday. 

Enn, 26, had a total docknig of 3:07. 14 seconds fa two runs down the 
Knonisbergii course in scoring the first victory of the season for Austria. 


a mere 400 miles south of a bonier NHL Suspends Messier lor 10 Games 

suDDosedlv between the same Deo- 

W MONTREAL (AP) —Center Mark Messier of the Edmonton Oilers 

has been suspended fa 10 games as a result of a fight in winch 
defenseman Jamie Maooun of the Calgary Flames suffered a fractured 
cheekbone in a National Hockey League game on Dec. 26. 

Brian O'Neill, the NHL executive vice president, announced the 
suspension Monday and said it was to take meet immediately. 


pie, the English and Scots). 

All I'm saying, Fandi, is that you 
are not alone; that even one so 
skilled as Olsen — whose country 
scatters dozens of exports — faces 
chall eng e that only perseverance. 


pgiodkany. oto is incapable of te ' Navralitova Wins lOOth'Toomament 


them dashing tike cymbals as Us 
burst of acceleration, tike a chee- 
tah's, carries Mm dear. But 1 need 
video to remind me that the master- 
piece took precisely eight touches 
on the ball and 63 seconds to exe- 
cute, and would require 21 separate 
frames to pinpoint shifts of balance 
and direction. 

• It was what Fete calls “the beau- 
tiful art” —creating something out 
of nothing. 

And that creativity reveals some- 
thing precious about Olsen and 


playing 90 minutes without leaving 
at least one moment to cherish. But 
among Englishmen who are moe 
long-distance runners »h«n ball art- 
ists, be was always likely to be too 
brittle in the 60-game slog through 
ice and mud and snow. 


tune's favor will conquer. 

Olsen’s ultimate fulfillment may 
come other than with Manchester 
United. Yours may be destined to 
arrive after Gronmgen. But you 
both have the essential thing: tal- 
ent. 


WASHINGTON (UPI) — Martina Navratilova won the 100th tourna- 
ment of her tennis career Monday night, routing Manuda Maleeva, 6-3, 
6-2, in the final of a $150,000 event 
Navratilova, the top woman player in the world, needed oily 65 
minutes to down the 17-year-old Bulgarian, who is ranked sixth in the 
world. 


plain about the locker roan at their 
practice site. 

That year some of the Dolphin 
players also had a complain l The 
dub policy was to take players' 
wives to Houston, but sane of the 
single players were annoyed be- 
cause the offer specified wives only, 
not girlfriends. 

Most teams now offer to pay fa 
the transportation and total of a 
player’s “guest" over the Super 
Bowl weekend. But when the Vi- 
kings lost that game, coaches real- 
ized that most rtf the losing Super 
Bowl teams had been the loudest 
comptainets. As soot as the Pitts- 
burgh Sieders qualified fa Super 
Bowl IX, their first appearance in 
the game, Chuck Nou established 
the outlook for bis team and staff. 

“Look on this game as a re- 
ward." he told them. “Let’s go to 


Dolphin Coach Don Shula, 
deplaning in San Francisco. 


New Orleans and have a good 
time." 

No team has ever had a better 
time at the Super Bowl than (he 
SteeJers — four appearances, a re- 
cord four victories. Instead of re- 
sisting the hype and hoopla, the 
Stadera seemed to relish iL In those 

years, photo day was on Monday, 
followed by mandatary morning 
news conferences on Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday for the 
players at their respective holds. 

Since then, the Super Bowl 
schedule has been revised. The (wo 
teams now put on uniforms fa 
photo day on Tuesday, then submit 
themselves Wednesday and Thurs- 
day to interviews. The two coaches 
also appear Friday at Super Bowl 
headquarters, which this week is at 
the Hyatt Embaicardero in San 
Francisco. While the Dolphins will 
stay and practice in Oakland until 
Saturday, the 49ers will be working 
at their usual Redwood Gty com- 
plex. 

When the 49er players arrived at 
their Michigan hotel fa Super 
Bowl XVI three years ago, they 
were met by a uniformed bellhop 
with alver hair. BQl Walsh had bor- 
rowed a bellboy uniform and creat- 
ed the desired effect — a laugh. 
And his 49ers won. As much as 
anything else, a Super Bowl coach 
must keep his players from taking 
the hype and hoopla too seriously. 

To say the Super Bowl is only a 
football game is an oversimplifica- 
tion. By next Sunday, it will be only 
a football game. But until then, it’s 
a happening of hype that creates an 
unnatural game. 

And fa everybody but the play- 
ers and coaches, the Super Bowl is 
really one big party — one party 
after another, if not several simul- 
taneously. Unlike most NFL dub 
owners, Al Davis, the managing 
general genius of the Los Angeles 
Raiders, doesn’t attend a Super 
Bowl unless his team is competing. 
After the Raiders had lost an 
American Conference champion- 
ship game, be was asked if to was 
going to the Super Bowl, anyway. 

“No,” to said with a shrug, “I 
don’t like parties." 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 


Basketball 


about you. You both come from National Hockey League Leaders 
small nations where robotlike J ° 


National Basketball Association Leaden 


Golden State 

SoatMo 


052 


jwL is 

» i: < 

: a J i " i 
; ( ; 

» k 

, n> r-JS* 

«>* 

: as 

5 ?t» 


ods more physical, to five with the coaching is, thankfully, at a mini- 
kmdiness of a bachelor boy in mum. Ask yourself why you shot 
sumptuous five-star isolation. against Inter from more than 20 
Indeed, in one respect, Olsen's meters. Or why Olsen look on half 
pressure is greater. His a gpnt in of Feynoonfs t eam . 

Copenhagen, a father-figure the “From the beginning in Den- 
way Jaap Reinders was to you marie, I played this way," says 01- 
wfacn you first arrived in Europe, sen. “I always like to have the ball 
negotiated a deal that cost Man-' and pass a man.” One man, yes; 
Chester United more than a mflHan but five? Cfisen sm Acs through 


Notional Hockey League leader* throuah 
Job. tl: 

OFFENSE 

Overall 


d ollars — $700,000 to bis previous 
master. Ajax of Amsterdam, and 
$3JX)0 a week. for two years fa 
Olsen. 


sna g g jgd teeth. He didn't realize 
there had been five, just as you took 
no measurement against Milan. 

If either of you had stopped to 


Gretzky, Edmonton 

Kurrt. Edmonton 
Bossy, N.YJ. 
Howerchuk, Wbmlpee 
B. suffer, N.YJ. 

Kerr. PhOodetoMo 
Dionne, Los Anodes 
NlchoOs. Los Anodes 
Mcrcum WtantoM 
Oorednlck. Detroit 
ToneHl. N.YJ. 

Nilsson, Coloary 


G A P Pin 
44 BO 124 IB 
41 44 Si 12 
J7 39 7*12 
27 40 47 58 

24 41 *5 27 
34 27 *1 23 
» 35 41 2fl 
27 33 60 35 
19 40 59 73 
29 29 SB 12 

25 32 57 4S 
21 3* 57 10 



Capitols Beat 9 Stars , 6-4 


Poiren-ptay Goals 

Ken, Pho 
Bullard. PH 
Andr'ehuk, But 
Crowder. Boi 

Na Hta dW Goats 


GP PP 
41 13 

35 11 
39 10 
43 9 



Compiled bfOttr Ssrff Fbom Dtspaudta 

LANDO VER, Maryland — Al- 
though he’s only scored seven goals 
- all season and just 56 in his Nation- 
al Hockey League career, Craig 
LanghKn has the goal-scorer’s ch- 
Ctos down paL 

“They don’t ask how you score, 
just whether you scare,” said the 
; Washington wing after Monday 
night’s game with Minnesota. A>- 

NHL FOCUS 

though Alan Haworth and Scott 
Stevens each scored two goals, it 
was Laughfin’s disputed second- 


way that one counts if it wasn’t for 
the other one." 

The “other one” was Acton's, 
who had scored Minnesota’s first 
goal of the night at 2:56, after the 
Caps had bunt a 2-0 first-period 


Gretzky, Edm 
Kasper. Bos 
Propp. phi 
D ertooct Tor 


GP 

43 

43 

43 

37 


aampWUMin«i Goal* 


Kerr, Pha 
Kurrl. Edm 
SKtbny, Owe 
Gartner, was 
Bossv. NYI 
Gretzky. Edm 


OOALTENDINO 

(Empty-Met Goal* la ParWM*e*> 


Barrassa 

Souve 

Cloutier 

Buffalo (31 


Undbereh 
pftlkiaetpOia (IJ 




. that provided the mar- 
gin of victory fa the Capitals, who 
took a 6-3 dedsem from the North 

- Stats. 

„ - In Monday’s only other game, 

New Jereey beat the New Yak 

Racers, 2*1. Waddngtofl’s 

, recrad ^ o^ 12-7, and mowaHto 
^Capitals back into a tie with Phfia- 
” ddphia fa first place is the Patrick 


Acton's shot from the right of the 
crease bounced off goato Bob Ma- 
sai and deflected toward the junc- 
tion of the post and crossbar. The 
puck was quickly in and out of the 
net. 

The goal judge turned oi the red 
fight; Morel fiiit waved off the tal- 
ly but then changed his mind. 

Not surprisingly. Mason, who 
picked up his sevenih straight vic- 
tory between trips to the minors, 
didn't feel Acton’s shot was in the iiUL Standings 
net. 

“He jnst got away from every- 
body,” Mason admitted. “But I got 
a piece of his shot with my stick, 
then my glove, then it hit the goal- 
post where it meets the crossbar 
and bounced out,” 

Haworth got the game’s opening 
goal unassisted at 14:46 of the first ^ 
period and scored again at 9:53 of 


GP 

41 

41 

41 

43 

41 

43 


5H 

7 

4 


GW 

6 

6 

6 

6 

S 

5 


MP 

GA 

SO 

Avg 

1^98 

80 

3 

ia 

775 

40 

0 

X10 

65 

4 

0 

X49 

X638 

128 

3 

251 

484 

17 

a 

an 

2.126 

108 

i 

xos 

zeu 

«7 

i 

in 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dhrttlan 


PMLodalaMa 

WasMnaton 

N.Y. islanders 

Pittsburgh 
N.Y. no np ar s 
New Jersey 

Montreal 

Buffalo 


GF GA 
187 127 


the third. 

Stevens had a power play goal at 


■<** 




<v 


In the second period, Langfafia 

tookajwafratiHawathandcat 

toward the Minnesota goal; tews 4;29of the sec^an/closed the 
mtto process of shooting when he scoring at 16:40 of the final period, 
ww dumped by Bo Berchmd. like Hawath to now has 12 goals 

Both Laugttin and the puck Md far the season. 

' . goahe^er CKDesMdo^ ^ G}aaer ^ Washington’s 

^ to other goalhis 26 th of the year, al 

^ ^ tonq>ed tack ig ; 09 of ihe first period. Dmo Cic- 

2 ? ““.tMS by thc shmig Laiffln op a pair of second- 

and losmg control of tto puck. for ^ North Stars, 

-SiisSC; jsaaiysr 


Boston 

H nr ffor B 


bas* . 


^Thcn Mod comes over and says 
to Mew it because to lost right of 
the puck, tol when to saw it again 
to saw ii was-iri. 


od" than Washington. 

The record bears him oof. In 20 
games in which they’ve taken a lead 


“If you tose sigfcd of die puck, into the final period, the Caps are ^ Mimewia 
you can’l allow tto gtaL There's no 17-1-2. (AP, UPI) a; wnwhw" i* mm 


w L 
M 12 
25 12 
25 14 
17 » 

14 21 

15 23 

Adams PWUon 
21 U 9 51 
19 13 II 49 
21 17 t 48 
19 17 7 45 
Ii 1* S 37 
CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norm Division 

Chleart 19 21 3 « 

5L Lduto 17 17 7 J] 

Mlrmecma 14 SJ 7 35 

Detroit 13 2S 5 31 

Toronto 7 30 5 19 

Smyrna Divtnoa 

Edm on ton 3(1 9 * M 

Coloary 21 17 5 47 

Wlnnfeee 21 II < <4 

Los Anoeies 17 >7 9 43 

Vancouver 10 29 5 25 140 23* 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 

Near Jersey B 0 2— 2 

N.Y. Raooers l o B— l 

Drlvw 15J. MocLoon (71 ; Povelifih (3). 
Sbots an pom: New Jersey (on vonbies- 
braudd 12-14-9-35; N.Y. Ronoere ion Resell) 

Mlmssefa 8 ? o— 7 

washioiitan J 5 >-* 

Hauarm 2 <121. Gartner (26). Stevens 2 1 12). 
LMOMIfi (7); Acton (ML Occorelll 2 (8). 

(on Mason] B*IS— 
Maiocne) 11-14-1 0-35. 


180 

201 

145 

153 

14* 

168 

160 

177 

156 

138 


168 

149 

154 

152 

127 

219 

201 

T78 

IN 


135 

166 

176 

171 

171 

141 

128 

160 

149. 

170 


163 

156 

174 

197 

)M 

138 

173 

153 

179 


Mason 

441 

19 

1 ISO 

R log in 

1474 

92 

2 194 

Jensen 

385 

16 

0 2.15 

WasUngtoa (3) 

2403 

122 

3 XD2 

Miioa 

1319 

SB 

1 2JB 

ruhr 

)J82 

78 

7 3139 

(Fuhr and Moag shared o shutout Jot. 8) 

Edmontoa C3J 

XMT 

128 

3 XU 

Penney 

1790 

92 

1 Uffl 

Soetnert 

840 

46 

0 X29 

Montreal t» 

U» 

141 

1 X22 

Peeteni 

1A48 

88 

0 120 

Kean* 

711 

39 

0 129 

Sytvestrl 

102 

6 

0 X53 

Daskatakls 

144 

14 

0 5.12 

Boston (2) 

1AB 

149 

8X41 

Bauchanf 

TJ31 

72 

0 3-25 

Gosvtlln 

WB2 

68 

O X9S 

5evhmy 

319 

19 

0X57 

Quebec HI 

Z6t2 

MB 

0X58 

Heinz 

70 

3 

0 157 

Warns lev 

1.187 

66 

0 358 

LI ut 

1J19 

BS 

0 1B7 

SL Loots fit 

MW 

IJ6 

0 US 

5karodenskl 

628 

31 

1 2» 

Bartnerman 

1.973 

130 

0 X95 

Chicago (2) 

urn 

143 

1 X74 

Mefoche 

1887 

61 

0 117 

Beounre 

965 

M 

1 X98 

Melanson 

424 

32 

0 453 

5onds 

87 

8 

0 552 

Mtanesoto (31 

2J63 

148 

i an 

Hrudey 

I860 

40 

1 140 

Smith 

1AS2 

71 

0 4JB 

Melanson 

425 

35 

0 *94 

N.Y. 1 slanders 

zsa 

164 

1 X93 

Lameiln 

isa 

93 

0 147 

Edwards 

1890 

79 

0 *35 

Cntgory (|) 

X612 

173 

0 197 

Hanlon 

1J07 

87 

0 199 

Vanblesbreucfc 

TJD0 

79 

1 19S 

N.Y. Raegere [» 

xsor 

769 

1 AM 

Janecvk 

1598 

97 

1 164 

Eilat 

1A35 

79 

0 458 

Lai Aagetetli} 

1633 

179 

1 4J8 

Law 

789 

47 

1 357 

Resch 

1A16 

94 

0 398 

Kammouii 

280 

24 

0 557 

New jenny (1) 

MB 

170 

l 4.10 

Mllien 

ZBU 

129 

1 184 

Week* 

420 

40 

0 5J1 

Hartford m 

2A34 

TTO 

1 4.19 

Hoywed 

1MU 

106 

0 197 

Bah rend 

1809 

72 

1 *28 

Winnipeg (4} 

2412 

183 

1 *30 

Romano 

722 

46 

1 182 

Hen-an 

1,151 

85 

0 *43 

Dion 

553 

43 

0 (it 

PUttborgh CO 

TAH. 

176 

1 *35 

Stetan 

1-500 

108 

0 *32 

Mlcalet 

1810 

78 

0 *63 

MlO 

100 

7 

0*20 

Detroit (3) 

X61I 

197 

0 453 

Bester 

*33 

43 

1 *08 

St. Croix 

540 

41 

0 456 

Bernhardt 

482 

32 

0398 

wreaaeft 

893 

75 

OiM 

Toronto (2) 

in 

1M 

1 457 

Brgdeur 

VM 

104 

0 *87 

Caprice 

«o 

BS 

0 SX 

Garrett 

407 

44 

0 449 

Vancouver (1). 

Utt 

234 

0551 


Notional Basketball Association leaders 
nrasm Jan. 13: 

TEAM OFFENSE 


Donvor 

Son Antonio 

Boston 

LA Lofcera 

Detroit 

Port (ana 

Kansas a tv 

PhllodetoMo 

Utah 

Atlanta 

aiicaea 

Dallas 

Indiana 


G 

PL 

Avg 

31 

4515 

11U 

96 

4183 

11*7 

38 

4392 

1154 

38 

4385 

1144 

37 

4267 

1143 

38 

4315 

1134 

37 

4191 

1113 

37 

4191 

11X3 

38 

4192 

11U 

37 

4046 

1094 

37 

4025 

1048 

37 

4005 

1052 

37 

4001 

ur 


Phoenix 

Milwaukee 
Houston 
Nsw Jersey 
LA aipswre 
New York 
Washington 
Cleveland 


39 

4214 

1041 

40 

4313 

1078 

37 

3977 

1975 

38 

4067 

1079 

39 

41T2 

1054 

40 

4194 

1049 

37 

3864 

10*4 

34 

3548 

1044 


TEAM DEFENSE 


mi NBA Standings 

lisa D 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
, Atlantic Dtvfsloo 


College Top-20 Ratingg 

The too-3* teams In the Associated Pres* 
collMa basksttcdl poll (Hrst^riace votes la 
parenttMses; total points nosed mi 19-T9.lt 
efc< records tturoeeti Sunday. Jan. U«Hl last 
week's ranUnesl: 

Record Pts pvs 
l. Georgetown (61) 1541 1239 T 

Tl Duke (1) 12-0 1174 2 

3. So. MeltMdlSI 14-1 1075 4 

4. St. John's 11-1 HM2 3 

5. Memphis 51. 11-1 9S0 6 

A North Carolina 12-2 884 5 

7. Syracuse 10-1 839 7 

1 Indiana 11-3 7W 11 

«. Kansas 12-2 698 10 

10. DePaul 10-3 48S 13 

11. Illinois 13-4 472 15 

TZ Louisiana Tech 13-1 455 14 

13. Oklahoma 11-3 427 B 

14. Oreoon SI. 13-1 425 20 

15. Boston Co* leoe 11-2 386 12 

14. Vo. Commonwealth 10-1 350 18 

17. Geomlo Tech 10-3 344 9 

18. VUtanova M 281 16 

19. MldJlaon St. 12-2 225 17 

20. Tulsa 11-2 94 — 

The united Press International boon of 

caadw*lop-li 11 A. college basketball reft pm 
( flret-alece votes aod records throinli games 
of Jan. 13 In pansthoses.- total points based on 
15 eotats tar first ntaas 14 lar second, etcj : 



W L 

, Pet 

GB 

Boston 

12 6 

842 

— 

PhlkxtelPtoto 

31 4 

839 

te 

Washington 

21 17 

553 

11 

New Jersey 

to as 

474 

14 

New York 

12 27 
Central Division 

■325 

20 

MJhvouJue 

26 14 

450 

— 

Detroit 

21 16 

568 

3Vt 

CMcooo 

19 >9 

500 

A 

Atlanta 

15 22 

405 

tto 

Indiana 

11 26 

797 

13to 

Cleveland 

1> IS 

-286 

I3to 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MWweet DlvteUia 


Houston 

21 16 

568 

— 

Derrver 

22 17 

564 

— 

Daiias 

20 17 

541 

1 

Utah 

17 21 

447 

4to 

San Antonia 

16 20 

444 

4to 

Kansas City 

U 26 

Porfftc Division 

an 

1 

i— A. Lokere 

26 12 

484 

— 

Phoenix 

20 19 

513 

6to 

LA. ampere 

18 21 

4S2 

Sto 

Portland 

17 21 

447 

9 

Seattle 

17 22 

436 

?to 

Go Man State 

10 26 

878 

IS 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 


Wtriitagtee 

25 1C 

a 27— 101 

Cleveland 

35 29 

17 20-91 


Milwaukee 

Seattle 

Washington 

Houston 

Dalfaa 

Boston 

New Jersey 

Philadelphia 

Phoenl* 

New York 

I— A. dippers 

Atlanta 

Chkouo 

LA. Lakers 

Utah 

Portland 

Cleveland 

Golden State 

Detroit 

Indiana 

Son Antonia 

Kansas City 

Denver 


G 

40 

39 

37 

37 

37 

38 

38 
37 

39 

40 
39 
37 

37 

38 
38 
38 
34 

36 

37 
37 

36 

37 

38 


Na 

4073 

4012 

3855 

3924 

3953 

4077 

4092 

3988 

4207 

4347 

4247 

4836 

4038 
4195 
4225 
4231 
3793 

4039 
4164 
4183 
4182 
4314 
4474 


1042 

1«IJ0 

Avg 

1Q1A 

102.9 

1042 

106.1 

10U 

1073 

107J 

1078 

107J 

108J 

10B9 

109.1 

109.1 

110A 

1112 

U1J 

U1A 

1122 

1125 

1111 

1162 

116A 

717J 


SCORING 


RuloncL Wash. 

35 120 

270 

390 11.1 

Thompson, K.C 

37 117 

291 

408 118 

Parish. Bos. 

38 137 

277 

414 109 

Gilmore, S_A_ 

36 105 

2S3 

388 

108 

ASSISTS 






G No. 

Avg. 

Thames, Del. 


37 

452 

1X2 

Jonmon. l_Aj_ 


35 

420 

128 

Moore, 5 A 


36 

354 

99 

Lucas, HOW. 


21 

192 

9.1 

Theus, KX. 


37 

298 

XI 

Nixon. LAX. 


38 

302 

79 

Richardson, n j. 


38 

296 

79 

Valentine. Port. 


38 

291 

7J 

Green. Utah 


34 

260 

74 

Sparrow, N.Y. 


39 

284 

7J 

FREE THROWS 




FTM FT A 

Pet 

Aflaim, Phae. 


93 

99 

.939 

Davis. DoL 


72 

78 

823 

Skctitine, ind. 


57 

63 

MS 

Trlpwcfca. Del. 


141 

156 

904 

Bird, Bos. 


155 

172 

901 

Vendeweghe. Per. 


186 

209 

890 

Brett GA, 


58 

66 

879 

Johnson. K.C. 


174 

198 

879 

Cheeks. PhIL 


85 

97 

876 

Toney. Phil. 


140 

160 

875 


I. Georgetown 140) (1*0) 

2 Duke (1) (12-01 
1 So. Methodist (14-1) 

A. St. John's (it (ll-ll 

5. Memphis SL (11-11 

6. Syracuse no-i) 

7. North Carolina 112-3) 

A Kansas (122) 

9. Indiana (11-3) 

10. Oklahoma (11-3) 

11. Oregon St. (13-1) 

12. Louisiana Tech (13-11 
IX Illinois (13-4) 

14. DoPaul ClM) 

15. Georgia Tech (1M) 

15 Villa nova (H) 

17. Boston College (H-21 

18. Michigan St. (12-21 

19. va. commonweallh (10-11 

20. Tulsa (11-2) 


626 

586 

535 

469 

440 

307 

304 

266 

253 

112 

163 

156 

146 

139 

70 

58 

48 

46 

36 

33 


Ballard 13-17 1-328. Motor* 7-157.721 ; Free 
7-16 3-4 21, Hinson 8-142-218. Rebounds: WOSh- 
bioton 61 ( Ruland 13) ; Cleveland 47 (Poquatte 
8). Assists: Washing to n 28 (Gus Williams 10>; 
Cleveland 23 (Boetov 9). 

Denver M M V 86-113 

Chloago 30 31 32 36—121 

Jordan 11-16 13-15 Jotnson 7-5 5-9 22; 
Englbh 10-71 56 25, Issel 5-14 9-10 19. Re- 
bounds: Denver 35 (Nott9>; CMcano 49 (Jor- 
dan 14). Assists: Denver 34 (Lever 71; Chica- 
go 33 (Jordan 151. 


Selected U.S. College Results 


G 

FG FT 

Pts Avg 

King, N.Y. 

31 371 224 

976 315 

Short. G5. 

34 373 316 

981 28.9 

English, Den. 

38 429 190 1049 278 

Danf toy, Utah 

27 263 817 

743 275 

Bird. Bos. 

38 425 US 1023 2*9 

Wilkins. AIL 

37 383 208 

979 285 

Jordan, CM. 

37 367 229 

966 2*1 

Malone, PML 

37 302 3S2 

956 258 

Johnson. K.C 

37 357 174 

892 2*1 

Matt. Den. 

36 322 522 

066 2*1 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 


FG FGA Pd 

Donaldson. LAG 

152 

219 894 

Gilmore. SA 

238 

379 82B 

Nanas. Plus. 

321 

541 5)2 

Banks, SA 

134 

223 801 

AhduVJabbar, I.A.L- 

348 

590 590 

RufcMd. Wash. 

243 

418 581 

Worthy, LAJ. 

291 

SB 5H 

Cheeks, PhIL 

192 

332 578 

McHole. Bos. 

245 

428 572 

Theme, ICG 

151 

264 573 

REBOUNDING 


< 

> Off DM Tot Avg 

Malone, PML 

37 175 200 

475 128 

Lautitkeer. Dot 

JT m 307 

430 (18 

Olaluwen, hod. 

37 198 228 

426 115 

WllUams. NJ. 

38 141 292 

433 114 

SUuna, Sea. 

39 105 333 

438 115 


THREE-POINT FIELD GOALS 

FGM FGA Pet 


Bird. Bos. 

Ellis. DaL 
Davis. DaL 
Free. cm. 
Bradley, Wash. 
Aguirre. DaL 
Faster, Phea. 
Bus*, ice 
Griffith. Utah 
Moore. SJC 


Richardson, NJ. 

Gs Williams. Wash. 
Moore, sa. 

Lever, Don. 
Thomas. Del. 
Jordan. Chi. 
Cheeks. PnlL 
Conner, GA. 
Orexler, Port. 
Rivers, AIL 


40 A50 
50 A40i 
35 MS 
39 AID 
37 AOS 
30 A00 
71 JU 
55 364 


50 141 
17 49 


355 

347 


G 511 Av« 
38 107 2A2 

34 94 276 

36 98 288 
31 97 155 

37 89 2A1 

37 85 230 

35 78 223 
34 73 2.15 

36 73 2JD3 
36 73 2A3 


World Cup Skiing 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American Leonas 

BOSTON— Signed Bruce KIsafl.Dlraw.io a 
one-roar con tract. Sent Dove Maloeso. cat av- 
er, to Pawtucket of the International League. 

HOCKEY 

Mot loeot Hockey League 

LEAGUE — Suspended Mark Messier, Ed- 
monton center, tar ID games ter actions in a 
Dec. 3* game against Calgary. 

ST. LOU IS— Recalled Perry Gonchar, right 
wing, from Pear loot the fnfernoriana/Hocfccr 
League am sent Alain Lemieus, center, to 
Peoria. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football UHWU4 


HOUSTON— Named joe Foragaiil offen- 
sive coordinator. 

INDIANAPOLIS— ReMrsd Tom Zugandc, 
ttreneih coach. 

Unfled States Football League 

LEAGUE— Announced the redonatlan of 
Chet Simmons, league commissioner. 

COLLEGE 

EAST CAROLINA— Named Mike O'Cain, 
Den Powers and Jeff Farrington assistant 
football coaches. 

OHIO u^-eiamed Boo Wylie Jr. Thomas C 
Hallman, John Skiadaitv, Mm W. Lowe. Bab 
Brawn and Dennis Thome assistant football 
coaches. 

tulane— ncrmo Bill Shaw and Hankie 
McCrary assistant football coaches. 


EAST 

Amherst 66. Framingham Si. 59 
Bloomfield 77. Dominican 46 
Canlshn 7Q, Vermont 48 
CCNY 73, Hunter 55 
Columbia a LeMoft 47, OT 
Hofsta 71. Wagner 67 
Holy Crasc nu, Atsumattan 87 
Maine 55, St. Frauds, N.Y, AS 
Marts! SI, Boston U. 4S 
Monmouth 75. Long Island U. 73 
New Haven 90. Central Com. 74 
Qulnfllpliie 101, S. Connecticut 88 
St. John's 87. Pittsburgh 54 
Siena 86, Tuffs 51 
Upaila 7T> Queens 70 
West Virginia 72. Duquem «2 
SOUTH 

Alcorn SL 73> GramWJnp Sr. 54 
Austin Peav 54. Akron 52 
Citadel 73, Furman 65 
Deaauw M. Frasuin 57 
Hawart 6& s. Carolina SI. 64 
Jwfcnrwllle 61 Cent. Florida 49 
Knoxville 84. ClCrflta 75 
Uberfy Baptist S3. New Engftntd 34 
Livingston 63, MISSISSIPPI ColL 60 
Marshall 76. Apaaiachlan SL 57 
Maryland 72. Duke 7A 07 
Memphis St. 56. Tulane 52 
Middle Tem 4& E. Kentucky 43 
Murray St. 64, Youngstown SL 62. OT 
Navy 94. Bethanv 34 
Tewn^ChQtt u tio ogn 78. VMI 40 


Tennessee Tech 76, M arehtod St. 64 
Va Cammonweatth t& James Madison 52 
Virginia Tech 85, Florida St. 71 
W. Carolina >* E. Tennessee St. 65 
William Carev 77, Dillard 71 
WtaBdte 7a Atlantic Christtgrt 48,201 
MIDWEST 
DePom 64. Okl Dominion 58 
Huron 71 Mount Marty 6» 

IIL-Chlcoga 75, aewlond SL 72 
Indiana St. 7a Brad ley 74 
Oakland City 90. Georgetown. Ky. 73 
Oakland, Mich. 87, Illinois Tech 71 
Ripen 74, Lawrence 47 
SL Lou)* 71, BuNer 54 

SOUTHWEST 

Arkansas St. 62. Tennessee SL 41 
Ariumsee Tech 49, AHt-AtonMceDo 43 
College of the Orarfcs 77, Hendrfx 74 
E. Texas St. 77. Dallas BOPtW 41 
Hartfln-Slmmons 73, Mary Hardin Baylor SB 
Lamar 77. SW Louisiana 44 
Prairie View AAM 91. Jackson SL 79 
Tunas Southern 74. Alabcena SL O 
Tulsa n. oral Roberts 41 

FAR WEST 

BrMnm Young 88, Hawaii 7& OT 
Cal Stj-las Angeles m. Chamlrade 43 
E. Washington 64. Idatn SL 53 
Humboldt st 14. Notre Dane, col SO 
New Mexico SL 91, Caf-lrvine 89 
&- Utah 92. NAB.-Hlah lands 77 
W. Woshlnoton 78. E_ Oregon 75 


MEN'S GIANT SLALOM 

(At AdeHwtfetw SeHtsartand] 

1. Hans Enn. Austria. 1:3356-1 :MJ4-- 
3:97. M 

2. Hubert Stroll. Austria. 1:3X94-1:3127— 
3:0721 

1 RlchanJ Promatton, Italy. );S4.1J- 
1JX49-3A7A1 

*- Ma* Julen, Switzerland. i J454-1 :312V- 
3:08.15 

£ Hans Ptoren, Swffrertond, 1J4S4- 
1:3445—4:0829 

4. Martin Hang), SwHxnriaM, 1:3199- 
1:3445-3:0X44 

7. Jure Fronka, Yugoslavia. 1:3453- 
1:342B— 3:0BJ3 

X Baris strel, Yugoslavia ):3Ul-1 :34JX— 
3:0944 

9. Inaemar S ten mark. Sweden, 1:3526- 
1.317*— 3:0945 

tX Bolan Kritol, Yugoslavia 1:3SJ9- 
1^346-3:0945 

1L Joel Geenat. Switzerland, 3:0920 
12. Guenther Mader, Austria 3:10.19 
ix Oswald Totsctv Italy, 3:ioa< 

14 Bernd FeUrinoer, West Germany. 3: 1045 
ISL Jurgen Grabber, Austria, 3:1097 
MEN? OVERALL STANDINGS 
I. Ptrmln ZOrtartnen. Switzerland, 179 
patois 

1 Marc Gh-ararill. Luxembourg, 141 
X Andreas Wwuyl, Liechtenstein, 152 
4 Thomas Burster, Switzerland, 93 

5. HanoLO 

6. Julen, 02 

7. Krtial. 79 

a Frsnz Hetramr, Switzerland, n 

9. Tobch, 74 

10. Stonmark mi Enn, 71 









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F 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1985 


OBSERVER 


AU the Important Men 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — One day Don- 
ald Regan and James Baker 
went to President Reagan’s house. 

"We have been talking," they 
said. 

The president was happy to hear 
it, for these were important men. 
Donald Regan was secretary of the 
Treasury. James Baker was the 
White House chief of staff. 

“We figured well switch jobs,” 
said Donald Regan, “if if s ail the 
same to you.” 


As the president told his wife at 
dinner that evening, “These are im- 
portant men, so naturally I was 
f ascin at ed and I said, 'When you 
say switch jobs 

Donald Regan had said, “That’s 
right, m take Baker's job at the 
White House." 

And James Baker had said. “And 
HI take Regan’s job at the Trea- 
sury." 

“1 see,” said the president's wife. 
“And what did you say?" 

“What could I say? These are 
important men, Nancy.” 

What he had said was, “Let me 
sleep on it overnight before I ap- 
prove it tomorrow ” 

“Overnight?" said the first lady. 

“Well, actually," the president 
told her, "since these were impor- 
tant men I told them I’d deep on it 
through a cabinet meeting and ap- 
prove it immediately afterward, but 
Baker said there wasn't any cabinet 
meeting today." 

Donald Regan had said, “Of 
course, you could always call an 
emergency cabinet meeting on 
short notice." 

But James Baker had said. “An 
emergency meeting ought cause so 
much excitement, the president 
wouldn't be able to sleep. 


The president's wife asked why 
he had felt obliged to talk about 
sleeping on the matter. Surely he 
knew the press’s propensity for 
dwelling on his fondness for sleep. 
Surely he could have said. “HI 
think about this ridiculous switch- 
eroo in my own good time and until 
then m rhanlr you to get to your 
jobs while they’re still there.” 

“But these are important men," 
the president explained. 

That night he slept on it Next 
day he announced approval of the 


switcheroo, omitting the word “ri- 
diculous." 

After a while Vice President 
Bush and Senator Robert Dole 
went to President Reagan's house. 

“We have been talking," they 
said. 

At dinner that night the presi- 
dent told his wife, “These are im- 
portant men. so naturally I smiled 
when 1 said, “When you talk about 
switching jobs, you mean . . .’ ” 

The president’s wife listened. 
“Let me get this straight," she said. 
“Dole and Bush agree it would be 
best for the country if .you and 
Bush switched jobs and then — 
when you are vice president and 
Bush is president — Dole and Bush 
would switch jobs, making Dole 
the president and Bush the Repub- 
lican senator from Kansas." 

“1 told them I’d sleep on it.” 

“You’d only be vice president." 

“These are important men, Nan- 
cy. And besides . . ." 

Yes, they had been quite persua- 
sive, Dole and Bush. They had 
agreed entirely with his point of 
view. “Yes," they bad said, “it 
would be very confusing for the 
country to be switched from Presi- 
dent Reagan to President Bush, 
then to President Dole, Senator 
Bush and Vke President Reagan in 
the span of a few days. To end that 
confusion as swiftly as possi- 
ble . . 

□ 

In short. Vice President Reagan 
would have to switch jobs with one 
of the cabinet secretaries. Not with 
one of the heavyweights like 
George Shultz at State or Caspar 
Weinberger at Defense. 

“That would be a terrible mis- 
take," the president told his wife. 

“Why?" 

“Shultz and Weinberger are im- 
portant men, Nancy. They could 
never put up with the boredom and 
uselessness of being vice president. 
What Dole and Bush suggest- 
ed ” 

They had phrased it as a ques- 
tion rather than a suggestion: “We 
bet you’ve always wanted to be 
secretary of agriculture, haven’t 
you, Mr. President?” 

The president’s wife then asked 
if there was political si gnificanc e in 
the book he had given her before 
dinner. “Home Canning Without 
Botu lism. " 

“Nancy," he replied, “these are 
important men." 


A Best-Seller Record in the Attic 


By Edwin McDowell 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — A children's 
garden of preposterous poems 
and droll drawings, by an author 
best known to adults for his car- 
toons in Playboy magazine, has 
been on The New York Tunes best- 
seller list longer than any hard- 
cover book in the list's 50-year his- 
tory. 

“A Light in the Attic” by Shel 
Silverstein, a collection of 135 
weird and whimsical poems, has 
appeared on The Tunes nonfiction 
list for 1 12 weeks — one week long- 
er than “Games People Play" by 
Eric Berne, which set the previous 
record in 1967. 

The two books could hardly be 
more different. “Games." by a Cal- 
ifornia psychiatrist, describes neu- 
rotic conflict in terms of games- 
manship and catalogs more than 
100 psychological games played in 
and out of the therapist's office. 

The games in S livers tein's best 
seller are less about coping with 
conflict than about coping with 
childhood, and are concerned more 
with adolescent nonsense than with 
adult neuroses. 


Remember “Rub-a-dub, dub, 
three men in a tub”? In Silversiein's 
antic attic, a somewhat analogous 
version reads: 


There's too many kids in this mb. 
There’s too many elbows to scrub 
/ just washed a behind 
7 hat I'm sure wasn’t mine. 
There’s too mam ■ kids in this tub. 


If some of Silversiein's poems 
would give grammarians fits, that 
does not seem to have bothered 
children, parents or librarians. “At- 
tic” has sold more than a million 
copies since 1981, and it has been 
showered with awards. 


In one poem, for example, a boy 
named Clarence Lee from Tennes- 
see sends away for a mail-order set 
of parents. In “Quick Trip," two 
children are swallowed by a giant 
lizard and deposited safely. Here, 
in the world created by Silversidn, 
is the “Prayer of die Selfish Child”: 

Now I lay me down to sleep, 

I prey the Lord my soul to keep, 
Andif I die before / wake, 

I pray the Lord my toys to break. 
So none of the other kids can use 
’em . . . 

Amen. 


“I like to dunk of 'Light’ as not 
an all-time best seller but as a good 
book," Silverstein said. He made 
that statement through his publish- 
er, Harper & Row, because he has 
tong refused to discuss bis books or 
allow Harptr's to release any pho- 
tographs or biographical informa- 
tion about him. 

What is known is that Shelby 
Silverstein was bom in 1932; lie 
drew cartoons for Pacific Stars and 
Stripes as a GI in Japan in die 
1950s; he is a longtime Playboy 
contributor, a performer of his own 
ribald ballads on records and the 
composer of the song “A Boy 
Named Sue." He is also the author 
or several plays, including “The 
Lady or the Tiger,” which was per- 
formed at Manhattan's Ensemble 
Studio Theater in 1981, and “Wild 
Life,” four one-acts that opened at 
the Vandam Theater in 1983. 

Silverstein has written several 
children's books, including two 
others that have sold more than a 
million copies: “The Giving Tree” 
(1964), the story of a tree that gives 
its fruit, shade, branches and final - 



poems tmd dtouxngs tij 

Shd. Silverstein 


ly its trunk to a boy, and “Where 
the Sidewalk Ends” (19741. another 
collection of poems and drawings. 
Sales of both books started slowly, 
then grew steadily — in much the 
same way. for example, that 
“Games Pwple Play" started with 
an advance printing of 3,000 copies 
buL sold 650,000 copies in hard- 
cover during more than two years 
on the best-seller list. 


G. Allen, fell short by 20 weeks. 
The record holder for fiction. “Ad- 
vise and Consent” by .Allen Drury, 
which won the 1960 Pulitzer Prize, 
was on for 93 weeks. 

For all the impressive sales of “A 
Light in the Attic.” at least 75 other 
hard-cover book have sold more 
copies through the years. The 1984 
edition of The Book Publishing 
Annual, published by R. R. 
Bowkcr Co., notes that’ “Better 
Homes & Gardens New Cook 
Book" has sold more than 20 mil- 
lion hard-cover copies since 1930. 
“Betty Crocker's Cookbook” has 
sold more than 20 million since 
1969 and “The Joy of Cooking” by 
Inna S. Rombauer and Marion 
Rombauer Beck has sold more than 
10 million since 1931. 


By contrast, “A Ti gh t in the At- 
tic" was quick out rathe starting 
blocks, rising to Na 2 on the Ti- 
mes's list soon after publication 
and remaining on the list for 50 
consecutive weeks. It sold more 
than 575,000 copies the first year. 
In 1983, the book was a best seller 
only 14 weeks, but last year it re- 
turned for more than nine months. 
It is in its 15th printing. 


Moreover, the best-selling chil- 
dren's hard-cover book. “The Tale 
of Peter R-.bbit" by Beatrix Potter, 
has sold more than eight million 
copies since 1902. and the best- 
selling hard-cover noveL “Gone 
With the Wind” by Margaret 
Mitchell, has sold more than six 
million since 1936. Many Bibles, 
encyclopedias and reference books 
have also sold in the millions. 


Since Silverstein has opted for 
silence, it may never be known if he 
ever dreamed his record-breaking 
accomplishment possible. But he 
may have provided something of a 
clue in this poem from “Aide": 


No other book in years has come 
close to the Silverstein longevity 
record. The recent runners-up, 
“Jane Fonda's Workout Book.” 
and “Nothing Down" by Robert 


I’ll take the dream I had last night 
And put it in my freezer. 

So someday long and far away 
When I’m an old grey geezer. 

I'll take it out and thaw it out. 

This lovely dream I've frozen. 

And boil it up and sit me down 
And dip my old cold toes in. 


PEOPLE 


'Frozen 9 Boy Doing Well 


Washington 9 s Folger Library Theater to Be Closed 


New York Times Service 


By Greg My re 

The Associated Press 

W ASHINGTON — The Folger Shake- 
speare theater, which has presented highl y 
acclaimed productions of classical dramas for 
15 years, has announced that it will close June 
30 because of financial problems. 

“The losses undergone by the theater simply 
cannot go on if the Folger Library is to contin- 
ue," Werner L. Gundersheuner, director of the 
library, said Monday. “We regret this decision 
very much.” Hie library oversees the theater 
and its resident professional acting company. 


Gimdersheimer said (he (heater had been 
losing an average of $200,000 a year over the 
past decade — as much as $435,000 in one 
recent season. The annual budget for the li- 
brary, including the theater, is about $2 milli on 
The decision to close the theater was made by 
the Amherst (Massachusetts) College trustees, 
who administer the library. 

Gundeisbeimer said future possibilities may 
include scaled-down classical productions, of- 
fering the theater to touring Shakespearean 
companies and expanding the library’s educa- 
tional and high school programs. 


A Folger spokeswoman, Regan Byrne, said 
the announcement came as a shock to the staff. 
She noted that the theater had recently received 
a “substantial private gram" to renovate the 
253-seat Elizabethan (heater, which is on the 
library grounds. Mayor Marion Barry had de- 
clared Dec. 12 “Folger Theater Day." 

The Folger. one of the leading research librar- 
ies in the United States, emphasizes Shake- 
speare, his contempories and materials relating 
to the Renaissance. The library is second only to 
the British Museum in its holdings of books 
printed in Britain between 1475 and 1640. 


Jimmy Tonttewicz, the Chicago 
boy who was considered clinically 
dead after falling through the ice of 
Lake Michigan a year ago. is on the 
road to a full recovery with the 
exception of a minor speech prob- 
lem. On Jan. 15, 19S4. Terrence N. 
Too dewier was pulling his 4-year- 
old son on a sled along the lake- 
front. and both went through the 
ice. Passers-by pulled the father to 
safety and notified authorities. The 
boy was pulled out of the water by 
fire department divers about 20 
minutes after the accident. His 
body temperature was 26.6 degrees 
centigrade (80 degrees Fahrenheit). 
Doctors said he was clinically dead, 
but they kept him in a drug-in- 
duced coma while trying to raise his 
body temperature and monitor for 
brain Harney They said later that 
the extreme cold of the water 
helped save his life by slowing bis 
metabolism. After treatment at the 
Rehabilitation Institute of Chica- 
go, Jimmy returned home in ApriL 
His mother, Kathy, said he was do- 
ing all the things 5-year-olds enjoy, 
“like getting into trouble." When 
be grows up, he says, he wants to 
repair Chicago's elevated trains. 
But Kenneth Ditkonsfci, the lawyer 
for Timmy’s mother, said that, 
though 5200,000 was raised 
through the Chicago Sun-Times 
and Chicago Tribune newspapers 
to pay for the boy’s treatment, Mrs. 
Tontlewicz is now fighting to meet 
daily bills and is on public aid. She 
and Timmy’s father were separated 
at the time of the accident and have 
since divorced. Ditkowslti said Jim- 
my's father refused to pay child 
support. 

D 

The National Book Critics Circle 
named Louise Erdricfa's “Love 
Medicine," a tale of the Chippewa 
Indians, as I984’s best noveL The 
biography award went to Joseph 
Frank's “Dostoyevsld: The Years 
of Ordeal 1850-1859." the second 
volume of a projected four-volume 
work. The general nonfiction 
award went to Freeman Dyson's 
"History and Future of the Nuclear 
Threat* 


once and for all" — referring to 
reports that President Ronald Rea- 
gan is not in charge. Mrs. Reagan 
said she took an interest in the 
people serving the president be- 
cause she had “a feehng for people 
who 1 didn't think were dealing as 
straightforwardly with Ronnie as l L 
they should.” But she added, “I 
don't go around getting people ; 
fired." On other matters, Mrs. Rea- 
gan said that she had fears over her - ' 
husband's security, that she kept a 
diary and might write her memoirs 
someday; and that she was happy 
that the president would not have 
to run for office again. Asked how 
she fdt about Ireasmy Secretary 
Donald Regan and the White 
House chief of staff, James Baker, 
having worked out a job swap and 
then telling the president, she said: 
“Yes, but he was the one who made 
the decision to accept it. He could 
have said no. and would have said 
no. He thought about it overnight." 
She added later: “And maybe once 
and for ail this wiD stop the stories 
that keep saying what is poor Ron- 
ald Reagan going to do now that all - 
these men are gone. Poor Ronald 
Reagan is going to be doing exactly 
what poor Ronald Re agan nas been 
doing for the last four years and 
that's run the government.'' 



f.tl. 


Nancy Reagan says it is “abso- 
lutely untrue" that her husband is 
not running the U. S. government. 
She told United Press International 
that the recent White House staff 
shake-up was “wonderful" because 
“maybe it will stop all these stories 


Princess Michael of Kent long 
regarded by Fleet Street as the out- 
sider of the British royal family, 
said in a 40th birthday interview 
Tuesday that she got along very 
well with her in-laws. The Austrian 
woman who married Prince Mi- 
chad, a cousin of Queen Elizabeth 
D, six years ago entered British 
high society with three social 
handicaps — she was foreign, Ro- 
man Catholic and divorced. “I’ve 
broken through the pain barrier 
and feel. Hello, this is going to be 
all right," the princess told the 
Press Association. Britain’s domes- 
tic news agency. “I get on very well 
with my husband's family. Im os 
very g/ood terms with everybody." 
Prince and Princess Michael are the 
only members of the royal family 
who do not receive money horn 
Parliament- Hie princess said she 
was determined to support herself 
and was writing a popular-history 
book — about 12 princesses who 
married foreigners. “It may gp 
wrong. But even if I get terrible to-* 
reviews, 1 hope I shall be able to cry 


all the way to the bank," she sakL rV 


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contact air load Cbtifcum or: 


tonmliniiit Haraid Tribune 
1005 Trf Song Gommartd Befafag 
24-34 Honiaw Road 
HONGKONG 
Tub HK 5-285726 


Henri sfoTmfaiie lartrar. I an pre- 
paring te cpnen^ondence tor publr- 


anion. Wish to hero tram anyone 
wNlh originate baeaqdiofli of fetters. 
Other writing. Cents reimbursed HD. 
Sdiinwnel. BIS Farit, NYC 10021 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


M ST LOUS 

superb (tiedoJemv 90 iqjn. 

On Sans & Notre Dane, rBoOQOQ. 
SSfGE KAY3R 329 60 60 


MAR AVBM POOL 7 room* 
beoutfful reception, 5 bedrooms, at 
<xn»nvrilh. 360 gyn, wred O 3t oh >i 
Maid's room + panring. P3£00j00ft 
Tefc 727 8B 96 front 3 pm to 6 pm 


VICTOR HUGO, in loMmhquse, Juw 
"S do ptofr fr ge wgMjnifr g bed- 
ixxwkj ^jn u cone! boil r anng pea- 
Ale. RTUOhOOL Immoam 72/BCfi 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 


KHBGNBS CAN BUY: STUM/ 
APARTMENTS, OfALH&VUAS. 
friers tram about SH 00,000. Region: 
Lobe Geneva, Mmtreux & fmai 
Wom e n is reeorfc. We have tor you a 
teg choice ot vary retxonrtdy priced 
Sera hornet but dso lha wry best & 
the nod ariudva. BffORE YOJ MAKE 
A DECISION contact: 

H. fflffXti SA. 

Tour Graa 4, CH-10Q7 Lausamo. 
Trt 21/25 26 IT Taiao 24298 5EBO CH 


LUGANO. Beautiful 2-bedroom apart- 
meni on Sth Hoar with p ro oraa u c 
mm of lake Lugona 3 bdeanes, 
120 sqjn. lotaL Convener# location. 
Seda per netted to non-Swiss res darts. 
Prime contact David Abadan, 580 
Fifth Ara-RM 1206, NT, NY 10036. 
Tat [712)382-2200- 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CHEAT BRITAIN 


MAISONETTE OVERLOOKMG Prim- 
rose fO Regents frxH for rent tap 2 
floors wdh moenremr* south view of 
pair doee to aty & West-End, nevnhr 
modernized to tagh stmdard, double 
living, terraces, drag, rifchen. 4 bed- 
rooms, 2 with bedroom en-asjt 
farrtryroreii indeoenderf centred 
hooting & h*y fitted with ol modern 
convenances. Crd (10| 722 21«7 after 
Jen. 19th. 


LCMJON. Far fa best fimahed flats 
and houses. Conub the Speeded*: 
PtoEn Kay and lewi s. Tat London 
VSW6. Tatar 27846 RESDE G. 


ANSCOMBE A ENGLAND wtf> of- 
fices m St Johns Wood & Knraingwn 
offer the bed service in re* ' 
lattng. Tel: 722 7101 (Dll. UK- 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 


I Am da thadn 

75008 Paris 
Tefax 231696 F 


YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AG84T IN PAMS 


HOLLAND 


Rerrfhouse International 


020-448751 {4 lines) 

Amsterdam, Botestain 43. 


AICOHOUCS ANONYMOUS ei 

Parifc 634 59 65. Geneva 
. Room 394893. 


lONDOH KMGUM). Dine privately 
oboe ret historic sdhg ship to Green- 
wich. Resetvtfians. T* 0T - 480 7295. 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - 
Write Keyset-. FOB 2 B1 


MOVING 


DEMEXFORT 


PARK • LYON • MARSEILLE 
LILLE • MCE 

tot! moving by yea At tram major 
ritiei ei France to aB dries in the world. 
Toll free fften Fr anca 16 (03 24 10 82 

mBBTUHAtS 


CONTROL: Costtoden to 300 dries 
worldwide - Air/Sea Cdf Otario 
281 18 B1 Ram - Can too 


SEAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MQUGBtt - VERY URGENT. Sato 
under value. Residential sumptuous 
600 ma property an Iml *ah the 
ptrfc. 10 moan, large 100 sqm. re- 
ception with firoptooL 5 bedro om, 5 
bane, plajeuom, staff gntel, pntf 


COURCHEVEL 155a CHALET, ftone- 
bdfe, 2 levels, 95 sqm in dL m sqm. 
EvinQ, fireplace, panoremec soWhem 
view. 3 bedrooms wsur ppe d taJwa 
large baswnert- fSOO jaw. Amy, 11 
Awe to Coma 69270 far Awns. Tefc 
(7] 823 31 46 from 7 pm. 


- Onrtaakmq bSafc 

™ £ 2 ? 

room, WRXBf vopka aoB, 

3 gu«> raanoL 2-bednaom staff c^jart- 
ment, pool, n acre ton Hu siw f gar- 
den, urgent. F6jDOO,OOQ. SSk (93) 


GREECE 


YOULA APARTMENT 105 sqm, bto 
cony 50 nn. u rapoflafet a sea wow, 
new —Befa l l construction, s opaiule 
storeroom, garage. Jiemnd mica. 
USMLOtia TE 0la6177B6L 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 


Carder, necr cuseo, ttgfi dost bukhig, 
s ol i n g tovety 2 rooms, 110 sqm. 


BJ*. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO (HEX 
Tefc (93) 50 66 M 
Rm 449477 


PARIS 4 SUBURBS 


55 KM. WEST PARIS 

SuqtMW house; Ifth certay, river. 


impeccable. 


house. 10,000 sqm. bic£ 
rfitTafc »5 S3V4. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO KENT/SHARE 


(SEAT BRITAIN 


LONDON SBWICED APARTMENTS 


Kensington. GoSngtun tart- 
es. Tefc 01-373 630£ Tbu 91®« 


ITALY 


CENTRAL MKAN LUXURY fu tty fur- 
nithed snc4 apartmert. US$700 
monthly. Tefc 27H34 j 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AGENOE DE LTFOHJE 

REAL ESTATE AG84T 

764 03 17 


RAIS FOR RENT 

PHONE 562-7899 

RATS FOR SALE 

IttCNE 562-1640 

OFFICES FOR RENT/ SALE 
PHONE 542-6214 


74 CHAMPS-RYSBS 8th 


5h«5a2 ariroam apvtraent. 

One u until or more. 
t£ OARDGE 359 67 97. 


AVENUE MONTAIGNE 


80 stun, apartmeft, high Hn« 
770 0144 


BEAL FOB SHORT TERM STAY. Peris 

swdtos & 2 mao*, decanted. Conad 


5Hx»oi A 2 roaos, OocrxiSrO. CorVocJ 
Saefefc B0 rue Univervte, Paris 7th. 
Tefc (11 544 39 4tl 


2 WEBCS- 3 MONTHS, tor rent 1-2 
one. eoicrTV, fnai Tefc 


bedtoom^ifana. i 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

SHORT IBM in Lain Quarter. 
No inerts. Tefc 329 38 81 

SB OPBtA. Oriand 3/4 roarer, 
F8750. Tefc 281 10 2) 

161H New thing bedroom fitted brth 
ft letchan terrace No Agmtis 527 6710 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

EXCHANGE APAKTM&4T > Florida 
fer upurtmert Pais, DuiiU a fai- 
era. Sttxtad Bat Reynold's Hane- 
town Jupiter. 20 iriht North Poke 
Beodfc on wafer, aound floa. 6 
yean new. 2 beds 2 oaths ft aD eta's. 
Hatfar raed. Value FFlJoOiXX). CaB 
femor, FraN&st 0 697131-711 a 
rode 6173-7110. Spec* Freni, Ere 
rtrtv Germai Dutch a Spafah. 

IOO»IG FOB a ibedoan house ft 
gatten to rent fa BueB Mdmason/ St. 
fjwnxxn/Vwnet croc for_ staff with 
icernatiorai corporation. Phone Pin 
501-54-12 Ext 3 m. 

EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 



EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


HtANCOOLNADfAN, 30, 


u xr pgHthm , often prawn le ud a T to p 
qudem, nrtxskvfl Sexccic 


« exaalert cannon 
1 in press tre- 

0 Ua4,Wl 

_ r jmmeurive osae- 
tant) rma po fl i r* knrpcigr mcnag- 
er L Gratoc*e B* ae PoTsTWrete Ban 
160, Hereto Tribune. 92S71 Neuiy 
Cedes. Fhmce. 


HBKH LADY 31. quadrSn^al 


p ortion ai Japcoi. n u i to d erpor 
eiance in mil tearing. WS arader c4 
serious offer*. Bax 1634, Hwrrid Tri- 
bune, 92S21 Nadfr Gston, Ftxwb 


SGPHST1CA1ID INIELUGBir LADY 
soaks oeofiactucfiy stonukxinq job vrth 
hovel, b e ned ei USA or lk. Tot: 

tendon (01) 352 2125 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MlBtrUDONAL 
SKSETABAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

h fee BIT Chaaffied Setoon. 


MTBB4ATTONAL COMMITTEE- Per- 
il 1 6 - seeks for 9 months pal lim a 
experienced typist (bfinguta Frendi • 
E n girt mother tonprej. Vtod work 
perert inefapensefeie. Tefc 525 04 98. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


Gt -TWO®* MS LA 0»* terry- 
pprory help peopb «trt yoo a ht^y 
New Year. If you ore a apod seaar- 
tory give m a cal Paris 758 82 30. 


EMPLOYMENT 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MEDED: EXFBKNCED nceive sandi- 
er Tm. hsochers, pari-fime. Void 
vrorfcnq paper*. Sen CV to Bern 
1633. HerSdTribane, 92521 Neuiy 
Codex, Fnmoa 


ARC IANGUES, reaiitopr^Bew hi- 
Sngue native a^o cxnrticorv forma- 
tion assure, Para/fVavmai, CV avec 
photo, 7 rve farfuny. 75P17 Pak. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Governess/ Live-In 

Nor ll mr n New Jasiay farefly with 3 
mart children p monn. 2 yean & 3 
year\ cf boys vtifh good narwri seefa 
atons, uxrwSeneed 8. aduaWed am- 
■nem, PKHXAH.Y GGtMAN SPOJC- 
MG. Green and or ILS. vmriong par- 
nat necesny. P6ce king quariere in 
newly re-bt* houea an nree aae lot 
wirt pond and pool Good pay & bene- 
fits offered. Write tor Sarto Junkers, 
e/o UhC( Corporation, 130 Wertry 
9roef, South lludars o cfe. New Jersey 
07606 USA 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


VALET/ COMPAWON, Frerech genffe- 
man 3 3, Engfcsh , fahon, go od prwen- 
•ntiafv ptesort penonevy, exaefatf 
badnraund seeks post, too part- 
tone. Ttfas cere t* )«i & your home, 
free to travel Write Bax 1603. Hereto 
Trrtune, 92571 Neuily Cedax, firana 


ENGLISH NAPMES & Mother's Helps 
fra* now. Nosh Age ncy, S 3 Owrch 
toad. Hove. IX t3T|02/3| 29044/5 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


INGUSH VAIET/BUTUR oged 38, 
Iramodin top&igSjh hwmhol ch. 
Very refirrtle, profession^ gantiamcn, 
12 yems v^j revitxB a y nyg. free 

AJtoraEt. HcxSu^Tet 02si 
315369 UK Limad 


NANNY AGTO 35, Itod bvrig copp- 
bfe gW. exofad wiifi ehfldrarTw 
yeors with previns etnpfaver free 
now. Fry Staff Coroutine#*, 7 rtto St, 
Aldershot. Hmto, UK. Tefc 1252 
315369.1k Seemed. 


ALWAYS AVABAU - AU PASS, 
dxldren's many, mum's helpers & to 
branches d Id doss fcm-ei do n a rs tk: 
help warfeveda Cdl Sloane Bureau, 
London 730 8122/514204 houto U- 
CEMPAGY.Tbt895067tHOAhi G. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPOST A HIROFEAN 
CAB BHO TK UAJL 
Urt doc u menr explam ftoy whrt one 
must do to bring a cm into the US. 
safety ad leg o*y. 8 rndudel new & 
ned Europeat OJtopricw, buying lips, 
DOT & SPA conver swn cmarasses, ac- 
tons deaanoe & shipping procadns 
as wel as legd points. Because of the 
sti'ong dafar, you am saw up to 
US$1 LOOO vrten buying a Mmcdes, or 
BMW ai Europe ft knportmg it to fa 
5W#v To receive ties nanud, rend 
US$1850 (add USTI50 for postage 
PJ. fimriTWodi 3131 
7000 Stuttgart 1, West Germany 


Mae fare Werfvride Car _. 
ftrndly ei fa reeparts - foot ft 
M documentation 

TRANSSHB* GMBH 

5860 


>2800 Bremen 1 W. Germany 
Tefc 0421/1426^ Tk- 246584 


EATON BUREAU EST. 1969, ovailcbie 


nameeL mothers' helps ft to 
aiandSv»in 


i domestic staff. UK 

Orem. Cal London 730 9566. 

Lie UK- Emptoyroent Agency. 


ALWAYS AVABABU LONDON only 
b a by rn feder s ft 1st doss <Wy madL 
Call Shoe Buntou, iondm 730, 
8122/5142. UCB4P. AGY. 


AUTOMOBILES 


PEUGEOT 504 GR, 1982- Or*, 
20.000 bin. Ex c e l a m oondhon. at 
Stophd - Private owner. DfaOOO or 
egutvqlerd. Cto Spaui 52 - 38CP95 


AUTO SHIPPING 


SHP YOUR CAR TO ft ROM USA 

VIA ANTWERP A ND SAVE. Free ho- 
tel Regular stongs. Airport defcvery. 
AME5CO, Wrtedrart 2, Artvrerp, 
Betgiunv. Tefc 231 42 39. ifc 71469“ 


SHAPING CARS WORUMMDE 




in 1983 

CALI MATWA AT 
ANTWBP30 toes (3) 234 36 68 


FRANKFURT/ MAM-W. Germany. H. 
Jrenmmn GmbH. 7nfc 069-US071, 
nga to treer Europe fro/ituhips. 


WORLDWIDE Cm shipping & ramav- 
ah AIK, NV. Arfaru2Z 2000 Ant- 
Belreum. 03/231 1653 Tx 31535 


TRANSCAR 20 rue be Sueur. 75116 
Paris. Tefc 5000304. hScre 6 95 31 
Antwerp; 233 99 85. Cannes 39 43 44 


AUTO CONVERSION 


DOT/ERA CONVERSIONS to U.S. 
yea- Aaaptcna guaranteed. VIA 
Carp, 6200 Freeport Certre, Bdti- 


wa ^NOj qpAJek 301-6»8611 ( 


'via US 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


HtoM 
ialhmh 

barm, where men dim a Md 
ef a nsBfon readrirx mto- 
wide, awl a f whom me in 
h isisin met etdwriy, wS 
read it Jmt telex ai (Pom 
613393J before lOiutL, en- 
suring mtd we met telex you 
bode, mutineer m e ss ag e w A 
qppocr within 48 boors. The 
mSe m US. f 9.80 or inert 
eo pi' i rt e rt per fan. Yea meet 
b td u dm rxinyW e ft i end vmiS- 


BUSINESS 

Om)RTUNITIES 


nc KEY SWISS COMPANY 
FOR YOUR INIBMATKMAL 
TRANSACTIONS 


of Intemoriond 


* Bade to bade operatio ns (1/C bash). 
” Formation, donitotai and 
adnjrwtrerion of Swiss and 
offshore companies 
Gu Buttle ny on co unt ertrade 


eperctiken, (barter, oouitarpur- 
Axt, detw 


. dearing, otoj 

• faflow-up of counrerfrtxfa ope rari ons 

* Marfcetina countertraded products: 

- -X. - ■- I • ■ 

iw* annMAAiRn, fiww, uoiui^ 

al products. 

AI fiduciary nd tnatoe services. 


Experienced 
boctisig. 


teem. Prime frarii 


us in hi 


DEBBBGSJL 
12 Chemn Beu, 

P.Q Bax 130 

1211 - GB4EVA 17 (Swibmlai4 


Phone> 47 59 80. Telex: 421896 D9 04. 
Coble: DBBBG GB^EVA 


CARLSBBtG 

One of CaHonaa's most succesfd Real 
Estate co m pa n ies has a sdediin of 

LumJ ihh^L rwM^Ale Lu 

nra pwvoa Duomjq iqi iiupiumaui 

The properties, loaned 


thmueheut the stale rang e m priee 
franSl 0,000 to 5600K. S awdaUe 


vrirt terms, far h funwe ton about fa 
company, their node record art the 
properties, contact: 


CABISBBG LAM) CDV. 

PO Bex 412 
London NW3 4PF 
Tefc 936 9119. T«hn 36B048 aH3013 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


LIQUID GOLD 

JOJOBA 


Jojoba. ^ The idrade bean awn m the 
uSaTW a natural He span of 100 - 
200 years. Ueer Lnbrii 
•a, |fa tn — rtds, 

fcRMring. Dr. D. Y e rmanos. 

University, sWed, 'No afar plant 
product n the world is capable of re- 
ptocfeg p et iutew n based lubrieortis". 
tiUhgMhpntoirtresein- 
vitmxnt in fail yem. E ntire omul 
returned by 6lh year. Projectors show 
annual incom e thereafter of 33%. 

ted 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


GOMAN MANUFACTURER OF 
SPORTS EQUIPMENT 
seeks a dynamic. Sporty busmessraai 


for cfcttrrtutian 


body brtdmg 


fa 


The aporopnrte person should be able 
to repesent fa avnaany ft to offer fa 
products to ptfenad cferw. Our axtv 


is one of fa leadw^producen in 


rope. SoU base unites n e xp ec t ed. 
Senous businessmen tired the* often 
to Bax 2108, LH.T, Fnedndelr. IS, 
6000 Fratturt/Main 


MTv 

Far c omplete deeds contact: AUOBA 
K5EAROL Bn 1643, Hereto Trbww, 
92521 Netwy Cedex, France 


I UNHID STATES I 
INTERNATIONAL 


Your PASSPORT TO PRQfTTS in ULSA. 
Ert ibrt your pnx iids 365 d ays / y ear 
at rttnreond efcbtion center in 
New Jersey. RESERVE SPACE NOW. 


Prime opportunity to attain eaxxure ft 
for your products at U5 S22 per 


sates! 


dew in your own 11 sa. i 

Taw niv mt u ge ei fa op p w t w wy 


; contact! 


US. tnte r n iA onrt Connerca Group 
P.O. Box 247. Woodbridw. NJ tPW5 
Tefc P01| 2547006, mT 135056 


UramSAL CONTAthERS LTD. 
High fcd wt In co m e Plan 


I7%% P/A 
in US$ 

UCL provides investors with a high 
tmed Bxijcm with securtiy by eperawg 
a jobti contanr leowo one morose- 
met* service. Inquiries cS 1 9% offer wiS 
oottiinue to be aecti with as rec ei ved 
far dehds of fa My guaranteed and 
insured i i ire sb r w iti plan, uxilu tt 

UNT/BSAL CONTAiNSS LTD. 

PjOJKXC 562 LOMX3N SW5 ODZ 
Tel 350 0 667. Tbr, 896757 


BUST HAT® EXPBMCE 


OF THE US MARKET 


For refiabla rnfcrnxrtor ; ^faring for 
idartiMng new trash & pradudi 
Let us hcnSe yaw madrt reseadk. 
Food/ bu ra oyi o yedtoty. 


A Hedti l 

175 West 93 St reet. 
New York. NY 10025 
TU= 42BW4 


ROUS BOYCE PICKUP TRUCK 
DAYGLO ORANGE, your none 
pointed omt + an 5 HGHLY VEfiL£ 
CARS used daJy (Moyx Euro Oties) dl 


+ pubSaty an/rtfjradc with 


CAR + AWARE TALB^TTO 
MV®. + go od press, + so modi 
more. ENTBrrAJN your guests ornfetf 
tax-dedudftte action 4- reach 90+ 
mdfai people. Own US WEH.MAXE 
YOUR YEAR. Formula 3 race car 
toanu (30 races) U5S250DOO (shtxed 
partKjpabori conadered). Tefc US 
ftfarshcFPuctitiOl 3962m. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Immigration. Residency 
Nohirc£zofion 

AwtifaWe 


through Government 
reran* in Ccnbbeon. Ceferd & 
Sou* America Contact: (MVE5T 
10 Golden Sawe. London W1R 3AF 
Tefc (01) 734XP7 A. 298240 World G 


HOW TO MAKE US$250,000 

through nx rt leml mail order ides. 
The report vnl ajv« yoo much needed 
sthnnatiantafidpraurassplon.lt 
wA show you how you reoay ow 

mefa a quarter miftan daflare in fat 3 

or 4 months. Oder the report Tram 
Gmdre Bwmess Se rvices, PO Bok 
9990. Scotadde. AZ 8^0 USA art 
endow USS10 for fa eqi^dorV in 
any amvertitte airier xy). 


COMPUTH PORTRAITS 


T-SHUTT FOTOS 
NOW IN RILL COLOR 
«m cw- ccuh breiaere fan an eon von 

$8000 > SI O^XXt/momh. New and used 
jntan* from SIOJOO - 530/WL Kemo 
Conpurw G», U*. J16 Beetharenstr 9 
_ m0 Fradrat/W. Genrnny. 

Tefc 069-747808 Tlx: 412713 KEMA 


GOLD WANTS) 

fare. Up mefeic tons art i«s Mat have 


more luumerec tons onoax Mai hove 
*mdad hdhnafc. 9995 meness. 115 
kg bas. Docourted a bwier 
Bonk to bank prorodura. FOO Lti a 


. US. a 

European pdnt Arrfhorized agents only 
reiti ready fern offer only resparrt a 
once with fufl detaw to. 

Telex 230199 Swft UK ATT SRF. 


OFFSHORE TAX ADVANTAGES 

£ZS&?S5S&S£&Si. 

Canprehensve Admmistrefan aid 
D ir edorid Service 
•Stria c— B Jes f i rt fa* 
hfand Resources Ltd SoHocurna House. 
SwnmerML We of Mrav 

Tefal Via UK 628352 Usd a 
Teh (0634) 38020/20340/28933 


AN EXHIBIT OfVOKnMIY is » 

vest m the hm industry. Sorting 
hnmtos fer a mefa Mure fan 
dieady in proprotfcirtfa i Heo re re- 
pty to RTk Prcebdwns, 9903 Sana 
Mcncc Efvd. Suite 349, Beverly fcBs, 
Crt. 90212 or Tefc 213-&57-8W3. 


YOUft OWN COMPANY IN 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURKH - ZUG - UXZBM 


frtxn SF500 per omun - up. 
Confideso. Baarentr. 36, Ot-63® Zug 


Tefc 0041 42 21 32 88. Tbu 86 49 ll 

A Present for Your Son 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


f«I COTE D'AZUR 
HOTEL*** 46 BEDROOMS 

Very can f ort qj rt, high dcSJ, wto brtt 
in 1974^ Sefina hotel business ul 
F4joojpo trajWjy 

RAMS 554 33 22 


UK ORSHOE OOMPAMBI We 
provide nominee Director ft Secre- 
tayl Canjriete dorricictiod London 
brok aorounb opened sfenJtaneoidy 


Shares avafabiet if. Company 
RegistrMon* ltd, New Conrecnes 


Hwae, !7 Widegcta SL, Lo ndai E l 
TWTefcOI J7 I474, Tefau 893911. 


DRECT FACTORY Distrrtutors fer 
high amfity sjwodry rtmn fa i coah- 
rae. Several tines available wrth 3> 
5, at 7-pty consfructan. Conventiond, 
some or wsud cover knob assembly. 
Bar 1646, Herdd Tnbune, 97521 
NeuAy Cedar. Fmtca. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


out 

BEAUTtRR. PEOPLE 


UNUMnSDK. 
UJLA. ft WORLDWIDE 


A oonfaete social ft b u rin — service 
prowdng a wvgue ccieaion of 
tdeitad, versa— ft mdtSngud 
mdvrtuds fcri 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


Property Development 
(N USA & UK 


fasttiahCommerocfcPrinfcftore oti ons 
Corvenhon-Tradt Shovs-Pr— Partms 
Spscrd Evenrj-lmage MdcwvPR's 
Sorid Hasb-Hostesres^fatertcrars 
Sodcd Cmepations-rour guides, etc. 


212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.TJC. 10019 

i Mpr*enlafTv*i 

_ J lftln rlr4 ml 
80 WOtliflWOj, 


RpUOAftY BANKMG on large cd- 
kfae&nd loot*. The rxity axwoer- 
6a bow writ a represennhre offtas 
m Londw ipedafcfeg bi fa service. 
Arab Overseas Barf ft Trust [W.IJ 
ULfflBU: Prince Rd London SE1. 
Td 735 8171 



ms 

WE SEEK pxrtueft to bnpan&detrta- 
uta to fa Europeon marimts. Sand any 
ftjt^yofcwte HT Bax 2105, Frie- 
dnderi 15, D-6000 Ftanfcfuri/tii 

US$ 20000A» «*!■», , 

Another erimesling siTuatior aveflobfa. 
tar further nforectat rortaefc 

StS MBG8 GROUP WC 

140 53rd St. BrudUyn. NY 11232 
Trt (7181 492-7400. Tbe 127570 
% Art for Jay. 





EXCR1NG OPPORTUNITY 
if you ae mferrated in fating ymf 
atm business, lagesi irtl singles Oub 
fans now tooiorej to aspewd m other 
countries, tar uvomunore 
Eurodub, 39 Qn tfAraw, 75D04 ftek. 

Tefc 575 26 88 mornings 





UMTTH) COMPANCS 
BAIOC5 

MSURANCE COMP AMES 


Worldwide 

Narineesdrtnw»strat»n 
Baa Retptrtaioni 
R mrt ymade or Spend 


LONDON RBWSB4TAT1VE 


ASTON eOMftUVr KNMM7FON5 
Dept HI. 

8 Victoria St 

Telex 627691 SPIVA G 


UNGUBlUMCUD 
Atowydi House, 81 Aldwydi 
London WC2, Tefc 01-405 1067 / 
405 1315. Telex: 8811698 VA8MAN G 
* VWthevfahour telex transadians 
“ Profemionat irarefato ni in a8 


riunrontoed defvery data 


CORNHU MBBNAT10NAL Brei- 
■nem Casuhontt. 2817 E. Odtiond 


wp “^Tiwiin» 


Fl 33308, LL&A 
Tries 2(088. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


Imprimi par Offprint, 73 rue de FEvangtle, 75018 Paris. 


GOOD MVE5TMH«r. Nanwgrtn 
m art notes tar iota Una aided 
ivies of 5 NOK-nafes from <3. Port 
of aiurie uuBcdion. Free price fat. 
Write to Atom Mae, Krativo *va 
2A. N8200 Faata. Norway 


SWISS UFE MSUIANCL fad dm 
amnorty, fage bonus. W. SSLHt, 
CatiegcsA, 04-1009 PUUY. 


WALL 5TRST: what * n ext ? GMUat- 
ter has fa m emn . ffiC regtoerod. 
GAS, CP. 54, 04-1000 Laeme 7 


return up to 46% yield PA 
Trustee mrmoged private 'investment 
fwrt miranum unit US$ 10/KKL. 


Midoorp Management Inwestmeie 

ttwiii?' Td: C py%S c ^: 

Tbr 298240 World G 


UTTHtS OF CREDIT fl/O 

fcVABABE 


F®OM TOP BANKS AY 


Cefmerei. or teoru. og dm t security 
can be arrt mgmL 


Write 

401 fiflhAttlfcY, 10016 
Or Telex 236464 SOUL-UR 


■* ‘CAStNO HCrra COMPLEX. Sde 
mure net yields PA gua a ti emfc 40%. 




Box 


DIAMONDS 




Yo w bed buy. 

Rne (faeitandi in aiy price luxse 
a towret whriefae prices 
dreri tram Antwerp 
cente r of fa tfianond world 
Ful g u jo nt ea. 

Pa free price fat write 


ExtafcAshed 1928 

Peliixairtruut 62.M01B Artwerp 
Befcxum - Tefc ffe 31234 t^ 51 
Tlx: 7T779 cyl b. AT fa Diamond Oub. 
Heat of Antwerp Diamond nriraby 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOU* LONDON OHKE 
QfESHAM EXECUTIVE CENTRE 


Comprehensive range of services 
I Street, London Wl. 


150 Regent .. 

Teh (01) 439 AZ88 Tta 261426 


PABS ADOMSS, Otampefintire, 
Seiee 1957 LSF. prawdes mail, phone, 
■fax. meeting rooms. 5 rue riArtcfa. 
730ft Tefc g?4704. lb: 642504. 


eases aookess. Mrt off**, 

atones, felex, sea era x4 Servian. 
Cortoct: Men Birinea Carter. Teh 
517 92 11 (12 fines). The 61344 B 


OFFICE SERVICES 


GENEVA 

SWRZB0AND 
Fufl Service 
b our Busmess 


• Intenwtion d law and taxes 

• Maifaca. tefaphone art telex 


• Tionstafean and saoetond services 
W form aton. d onticiiation art 
admnUraban of Swiss and fbrei^i 


Fid confidenc e and (faaetian cesured 


BUSMESS ADVISORY 
SBIVKB SA. 


7 Rue titan, 1207 G84EVA. 
Tab 36 05 40 Tefasi 23342 


ZURICH-ZURlCH-ZURfCH 


BAHNH0FSI8A55E 52 
TVE FINANCIAL CENTER 

• Yaw oomftieto office a oa foti ser- 
vks oddrate 

• Birinesi decriam by derieon mrten 
e Managwn ert rervicesi unryu n y for. 

mcriara, tax pksnng, business ft 


banring created to met your 
• Domktie yaw address/ affico at 


Zurich's renowned business rireeL 
Barinare Seniete Cawuft Cap. 


BahnhobtaBse 5ZOfc8Q22 Zurich. 
TM 01/711 9207. Ttit 813 062 


LOS ANGELS 
Furnished offices in Bererfy fcfiBs. Gon- 
wniert, prrettoxM address. TJx, mrt, 

secretand ft 


9777 VMvn Btvd. Ste. 609, Beverly 
Hlls, CA 9miZ T^^l^Kg-1678. 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


KARSIISK BUSMESS 


GENEVA 

PuRyequippedrtfioatorea.DocBidfi- 
ation ^nrtTtekx ft phont^. Trade, tries 
cid~) w v fl r ation ft sea eto r x d serecaL 
KB5r 5Rte de Oent 1 2C7 Oe mnra 
Tel. (23 86 17 33. fa <28388 KBS 


OFFICES FOR SALE 


WHY NOT TRAN9B your huBMB 
tefa heart rfMofaG orio-Spogous 
offics fer tdi or 

rwni. Betf *** for your w onpy. For 

more i J^ wtiai atone 1 Mi. Bra 

dmven (93 SL63XI7 a write le More 


(tilSOA 3SS. 


MC 98000 -Made Cafe. Tel 


Th 470D2Z 


AUTOS TAX FREE * 



FRANCO 


i*... ' 


BRITANNIC 

TAX FRS CARS 

ROLLS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

JAGUAR 

ROVS 

RANGE & LAND ROYER 
European & Worldwide 
delivery 

21 Ave Kleber 

75116 PARIS 


r-rir- - 


ti7~ ' • ’ " 


&T': . 

ri-A 


v -, • 

A 1 ' 




i&t . 

•:v'r^‘ ' - 

■T- • 


T!:( 1)757 50 80 
Telex: 620 420 


* . fwv 

* \(2t ■ 

iT’t 


4'^r % 


r.ililiFhin ol Luxury Cai 

OPEL 

XAN CHAME5 AUTOMOBBE 
Special sofa c andMpw i on 
EXPOKT-TT-n-CD 
Core eiwnmfirirty avoderte. 

Sqs|ATOR 

UtiMNISBC, 31 ABS, rir-canriboned 

MONZA 

COUPE GSE. 31 ABS, al options. 

JEAN CHARLES 

OHKUUL DEAlBtSHP 
8, n» O rente Terraese Paris 16th 
Trie* 630091 Tefc 524 43 33 





f» 


* far c 




ter, 


r*":; 

- i;, 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CABS 


r R 


FU 


FROM STOCK 


for MIMfiXAZE defcvery 
aesrsavtCE 


RUTEINC 


Tamunfr. 52. 6000 FraMurt. 

W Germ, tel M <9-232351. fct 4ll559 
Infer m ufan only by phene or trtex. 


\ F \i 


TRANSCO 

TAX FREE CARS 


’4b .:: ■>. . 


We kmp o constant Stock of wore ihcn 

one hundred fr on d new can, 
campetifrwty priced. 

Send for fine g ed ooue ft stock fat 
Transas SA W Itawilaor; 

2030 Artwerp, Belgiuai 
Tefc 03/542 £2 AjuThal 
The 3S2Q7 TUANS B 


. -1c 


^ : -I 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.CT. 


<r., 


A Invntay 

A« fflow, tJI m od**, brand rw 

Thi 35546 PHCMTT B 
Apply for ear colour cri doo u e 
USS5 ash 


DAWAJi TRADE 

1NTLDBJVRY 

We keep a 


Tefc 02/648 55 13 
Tefa 65658 
42 rue tan, 

1050 r 


NEW MOODS QU5 


Dirad DeBuera^Frara Start 


■5oo sa. 500 sec soasiM 
^380 sa. 380 SEC Mpq 
Axirta Carero, Pbndie Turbo 
I Autabats-Sued Grttf 
iBodMnerftr 103, 43SD Seekfartonen 
let 02361/ 7004 Tx 829957 AHSD 


• 

1^:,; 
.Hi- .. 

• •• 

^.0. 
$ kj • it 

iH-. 






S - 


"r ! j. 

3 V 


M,S 


PAGE 7 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


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