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No. 31,697 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Group of 5 Finance Ministers 
Meet to Discuss Dollar Curbs 


Ccmpikdby Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The finance 

minis ters of four leading industrial 
democracies flew to Washington 
on Wednesday in an apparent at- 
tempt to press the United States to 
take measures to curb the dollar’s 
flight against the world's key cur- 
rencies. 

The ministers — from Japan, 
West Germany. Britain and France 
— were scheduled to attend a 
working dinner Wednesday night 
with the U.S. Treasury secretary. 
Donald T. Regan, the fifth member 
of the so-called Group of Five. 

Officials have refused to discuss 
the time, location or agenda of the 
supposedly secret meeting, but 
monetary sources said that the ro- 
bust dollar and its effect on curren- 
cies was to top a list of economic 
issues scheduled for review. 

Foreign exchange markets were 
nervous in advance of the meeting, 
and dealers predicted that the 
Deutsche mark and the British 
pound could take a beating if the 
two-day session fails to yield signif- 
icant results. 

Before leaving for Washington 
on Wednesday, Britain's Chancel- 
lor of the Exchequer, Nigel Law- 
son. said the meeting would focus 
on the UJS. budget deficit and its 
role in propping the dollar. 

Mr. Lawson said (he deficit, now 
in excess of $200 billion, "is a mat- 
ter of considerable concern" and 
would dominate the talks on 
Wednesday and Thursday. 

The European countries and Ja- 
pan believe that the deficit is artifi- 
cially propping U.S. interest rates, 
which in turn buoy the dollar by 


gan to slide on international money 
markets, he said. 

Last week, the pound touched a 
record low of about $1.10 and re- 
r p rp i« covered only after the government 

M&impe Iramng of Prime Minister Margaret 
z ° Thatcher increased Britain's base 

lending rate by 1.5 percentage 
points, to 12 percent 

Similarly, the leaders of West 
Germany's Bundesbank are ex- 
pected to consider raising their key 
lending rates when they meet 
Thursday, economists in Frankfurt 
said. The mark has been trading 
near a 12-year low against the dol- 
lar in recent days. 

Mr. Regan is known to believe 
that concerted currency market in- 
tervention by the five nations to 
deflate the dollar would have no 


Dollar Retreats 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The U.S. dollar 
fell against most other major cur- 
rencies in European trading 
Wednesday, while gold prices 
edged higher. 

The dollar came under pressure 
from fears that European central 
bankers would move to bolster 
their currencies by selling dollars, 
traders said. 


The British pound, which dipped 
to a record low SI. 10 in Fax East 
trading Monday, steadied at 
$1.1205 in late trading in London, 
unchanged from late Tuesday. 

Gold, meanwhile, edged up in 
London to $303 a troy ounce from 
S302.25 late Tuesday. In Zurich, 
gold rose 50 cents to $'303 an ounce. 

Oiher dollar rales in late Europe- 
an trading compared with late 
Tuesday were: 3.1833 Deutsche 
marks, down from 3.1875; 2.6758 
Swiss francs, down from 16837; 
and 9.746 French francs, down 
from 9.7745. 


making the currency more attrac- 
tive to foreign investors. 

“We want to have the discussion 
before the Americans present their 
budget proposals." Mr. Lawson 
said. The meeting had been 
planned well before the pound be- 


tas ting impact. 

U.S. sources said Wednesday 
that Mr. Regan is likely to tell the 
other ministers that the Reagan ad- 
ministration will soon propose to 
Congress its long-awaited plan to 
cut the federal budget deficit. 

The administration's original 
strategy was to set in motion a 
process to cut the deficit in half by 
the 1988 fiscal year, but it failed to 
produce sufficient spending cuts to 
reach that goal. 

Meanwhile. West German 
sources said Wednesday that the 
Bundesbank, in considering an in- 
crease in its benchmark Lombard 
rate, was hoping to avoid the tur- 
moil over exchange-values that has 
occurred in Britain in the past 
week. Mrs. Thatcher has had to 
defend Mr. Lawson's handling of 
the currency crisis in Parliament 

(Reuters. A FP) 



Th» Ancoafad Pros 


KNESSET VOTE — Ezer Weizman, right, a minister without portfolio in the Israeli 
government, congratulated Prime Minister Shimon Peres after a proposal to change 
Israel's criteria for recognizing converts to Judaism was defeated Wednesday. At left is' 
Vice Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir of the Likud bloc, who supported the motion. Page 2. 

A Victory for Israel’s f Shiite School’ 

Lebanon fhdlback Plan Represents a Major Policy Switch 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

New York runes Service 

JERUSALEM — The decision 
by the Israeli cabinet to withdraw 
on its own from Lebanon over the 
next six to nine months appears to 
signal the start of a new Israeli 
approach toward dealin g with its 
northern neighbor. 

Since Israel’s national unity co- 
alition came to power last Septem- 
ber, two basic strategic conceptions 
about the threat to Israel arising in 
Lebanon — and how the Israeli 
Army should be used to deal with it 
— have been competing for su- 
premacy among Israeli decision- 
makers. The two trends might best 
be described as the “Palestinian 
school” and the “Shiite school.” 

The Palestinian school is led by 
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir, 
the ukud bloc leader, it contends 
that the biggest threat to Israel 
from Lebanon is, and will remain, 
josed by Palest 
. . .1 in the Bckaa 
areas north of the 
Awali River. 

The Palestinian threat was the 
orig inal justification for the inva- 
sion of Lebanon in June 1982, 
whoa the Laud government of 
Menacbem Begin was in power. 

Right up to the cabinet vote 
Monday, the PalKtinian school 
contended that Israel should hold 
its present line in Lebanon. 25 
miles (40 kilometers) north of the 
border. The goal would remain: to 
prevent a return to the area of PaL 
estinian guerrillas, who might try to 
infiltrate into northern Israel or fire 
rockets into Israeli settlements. 

Since members of this school 
were responsible for the invasion, 
their strategic perception is rein- 
forced by the. political consider- 
ation of not wanting to leave Leba- 
non until they can point to a lasting 
security gain. 

The Palestinian-centered view of 


Lebanon, however, was defeated 
Monday by a new conception that 
has been gaining strength since 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres and 
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
took office. 

This school is made up of Israeli 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

officials who contend that Leba- 
non is not a Christian country any- 
more — at least not as far as Israel 
should be concerned. Rather, they 
say, the pari of Lebanon closest to 
Israel is well on its way to becom- 
ing a Shii to-dominated region. 

In the view of these officials, it is 
a vital Israeli interest to help deter- 
mine what kind of Shiite region 


INSIDE 

■ American church groups said 
they would continue to give 
sanctuary to Central Americans 
they consider refugees. Plage 3. 

■ SgiMfnr Gary Hart has told 

Europeans that NATO needs to 
change. Pag*! 4- 

SCIENCE 

■ Mysterious, scroB-fflie waves 
may affect many biological pro- 
cesses, a study says. Page 6. 

business/finance 

■ Norway has cot its crude-oil 
price by at least 51 per barrel, 
industry sources say. Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

U.S. homeowners near com- 
mercial centers are increasingly 
banding together and selling 
out to developers in a block, 
often for very high prices. 


southern Lebanon will be — a “hi- 
de Tehran." dedicated io wiping 
out the “Zionist entity," or a pas- 
sive village society where people 
wish to be free of Israelis and of 
Palestinians. 

The proponents of the Shiite 
school believe, and were able to 
persuade a majority of the cabinet, 
that the biggest long-term threat to 
Israel will not be from Palestinian 
guerrillas, but from the transforma- 
tion of southern Lebanon Into a 
permanently hostile zone. 

In explaining the cabinet deci- 
sion Monday night. Mr. Rabin 
made an overture to the Lebanese 
Shiites, saying: “The Shiites and we 
will have to learn to live peacefully 
together. I don't see any conflict of 
interest between them "and us." 

Hie other major change in think- 
ing behind the cabinet's decision 
related to how the Israeli Army 
should be deployed. Here, too, the 
Palestinian and Shiite schools had 
differing strategic concepts. 

The Likud government of Mr. 
Begin, because of its preoccupation 
with the Palestinians, believed the 
army could and should be used to 
fight guerrillas and terrorists in a 
large-scale offensive manner, hence 
the 1982 invasion. 

When the Likud government be- 
gan the invasion, though, it errone- 
ously believed that pro-lsraeli Leb- 
anese groups, particularly the 
Christian Phalangist militia or the 
Lebanese Array, would eventually 
be able to hold the territory taken 
by Israel from the Palestinian guer- 
rillas and provide day-to-day secu- 
rity. 

The result was that in effect. the 
Israeli Array had to be turned into 
a huge police force, manning 
checkpoints and operating out of 
fixed positions all over southern 
Lebanon. Sources say this played 
havoc with the armyViraining, ino- 

(Con tinned on Page 1 CoL 3} 



A fisherman in the Costa Brava port of Arenys, Spain, wipes snow off his boat. 

300 Dead in Europe’s Cold Wave 


Reuters 

PARIS — Freezing temperatures continued to 
disrupt transportation Wednesday in most of Eu- 
rope. with forecasters predicting no immediate end 
to conditions that have cut roads, blocked canals 
and rivers and killed more than 300 people. 

Most European centers, gripped by a cold spdJ 
for the past two weeks, reported continued heavy 
snow. The ice and snow also finally hit Ireland 
overnight, bringing traffic to a halt in Dublin and 
other places. 

Weather officials said that conditions through- 
out most of Europe are unlikely to change before 
the weekend, with further snow expected. 

In Brussels at least two people, including a 3- 
y ear-old child, died when a gas pipe fractured, 
possibly because of the cold, and set off an explo- 
sion that demolished four houses and set fire to 
two others. 

Temperatures plunged overnight to minus 41 
centigrade (minus 41.8 Fahrenheit) in the Vosges 
mountains of France. At least 127 people, many of 
them old or homeless, have died in France as a 
result of the cold. . 

Inland waterways froze in Belgium and France. 


stopping traffic. About SO commercial barges were 
trapped in France by ice cm the Saone River. 

Driving conditions throughout much of Europe 
were at best difficult. The Dutch authorities or- 
dered less salt to be spread on roads to preserve 
dwindling stocks. 

In West Germany the temperature rose a few 
degrees but weather forecasters predicted further 
snowfalls with little overall change. 

In the Camargue region on the southern coast of 
France, wildlife officials trying to save the pink 
flamingo peculation said they have found 700 
dead birds. They fear the death toll could reach 
2,000 birds. 

Fish, their normal diet, are being frozen in the 
lakes. Officials have set up a temporary bird hospi- 
tal. 

Milan was hard-hit by almost 30 hours of con- 
tinuous snow. Both airports were dosed and train 
services were cut by half. 

Snow fell on Madrid overnight and skiers orga- 
nized a race along the promenade at the seaside 
resort of San Sebastian in northern Spain. 

Beaches along the Costa Brava and on the Medi- 
terranean vacation island .of Majorca also .had 
snow. 


Mitterrand Says 
He Is Going to 
New Caledonia 
To Back Envoy 


By Joseph Fitcherr 

International Herald Trtfnme 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand will travel Thursday to 
New Caledonia, the Pacific territo- 
ry where violence has jeopardized 
plans for a referendum on indepen- 
dence in July. 

Announcing the surprise trip in a 
television interview broadcast live 
in France and in New Caledonia. 
Mr. Mitterrand said that he intend- 
ed to support efforts by Edgard 
Pisani. the special French envoy, to 
convince native Melanesians and 
European settlers to accept the 
planned vote as a means of “pro- 
tecting the fundamental interests" 
of both groups. 

Mr. Mitterrand said that it was 
essential to “reconcile the conflict- 
ing, even contradictory interests" 
of the two main communities in 
New Caledonia — Melanesians 
and white settlers, the first of 
whom arrived there a century ago. 

He also stressed, more strongly 
than in previous government state- 
ments, that France intended to 
maintain a strong presence in New 
Caledonia, whatever the ballot out- 
come. to safeguard the interests of 
French citizens and protect the 
strategic position of France in the 
Pacific. 

France, he said, “will retain a 
capacity of decision in defense and 
law and order.” 

Under a plan prepared by Mr. 
Pisani and approved by Mr. Mit- 
terrand, New Caledonians will be 
asked to choose between remaining 
part of France or the slams of inde- 
pendence in association with 
France, in which case French 
troops would remain based on the 
island. 

Settlers and Melanesian leaders 
rqected the Pisani plan this week 
after the killing of a white settler 
and the deaths of two Melanesian 
militant leaders in a clash with gen- 
darmes. 


Asked about guarantees that the 
settlers would abide by a vote in. 
favor or independence, Mr. Mitter- 
rand said there was a “risk of con- 
frontation." His remarks about a 
continued French presence seemed 
to indicate that France seeks legal 
arrangements guaranteeing its con- 
tinued ability to intervene in New 
Caledonia. 

Mr. Mitterrand rejected sugges- 
tions that the government was 
making concessions to the Melane- 
sians and that such an attitude 
could “be contagious," encourag- 
ing separatist sentiment in other 
French possessions. 

New Caledonia is the only 
French territory. Mr. Mitterrand 
said, where there are two rival eth- 
nic groups so closely matched in 
numbers that a special status is 
needed. 

On his trip, Mr. Mitterrand said, 
he intended to call for “reason to 
prevail” or the island. Recent vio- 
lence. he said, “had complicated 
negotiations but not compromised 
them irreparably." 

Violence in New Caledonia, in 
which 20 persons have died, is an 
increasingly serious domestic polit- 
ical problem for Mr. Mitterrand. 

Intensive press coverage of the 
disturbances on the island, which 
journalists call part of the “confetti 
of empire," has fed currents in pub- 
lic opinion in France attacking the 
Socialist government as negligent 
and short-sighted in overseas af- 
fairs. analysts say. 

The Socialist government faces 
accusations, aired even in state- 
controlled French radio and televi- 
sion. that the two separatist mili- 
tants shot Saturday were 
deliberately killed by anti-terrorist 
sharpshooters. Several papers have 
suggested that French leaders were 
glad to be rid of extremists who 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


U.S. Students Prefer Floppy Disks to Fine Arts 


By Gene L Maeroff 

New York Times Semce 

BOSTON — Computer science, 
which was not offered as a major 
field at most American colleges and 
universities before the 1970s, is fast 
becoming such a popular major 
Lhai some schools must limit ad- 
missions. 

The situation is epitomized by 
events in Boston, where Northeast- 
ern University created a College of 
Computer Science in 1 982 with 230 
students and now has an enroll- 
ment of 909. 

At the nearby Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, one-third of 
all undergraduates with declared 
majors have chosen the department 
of electrical engineering and com- 
puter science. 

Computer science, with its lure 
of plentiful jobs and the possibility 
of youthful entrepreneurship, is ac- 
counting for an ever larger portion 
of enrollment ai a lime that overall 
enrollment is no longer growing. 

“These are young people who 
have been brought up on video 
games, and there is a romance in 
computers for them," said Paul M. 
Kalaghan. dean of the College or 
Computer Science at Northeastern. 
“It is a chance to spend your life 
working with devices smarter than 
you are and. yet, have control over 
Lhern. It's like carrying a six-gun on 
the old frontier." 

Computers gradually have made 
inroads on campuses since the 
1960s as aids in research and in- 
struction and as tools for word pro- 
cessing, What is happening now, 
though, is that increasingly more 
students are preparing for careers 
devoted to computer science itself 
and for the various allied techno- 
logical fields. 

The training equips students to 
land lucrative jobs in fields that 

were virtually unknown only a cou- 
ple of decades ago. Graduates can 
go on to become systems analysts, 
who produce an overall design for 
solving problems on a computer, or 
they can become systems program- 
mers, who write the set or instruc- 
tions, called software, that tells the 
computer bow to carry out the 
tasks. Others become systems ap- 



The Now Voik r«i 

Students work in an introductory computer dass at Northeastern University in Boston. 


plicators, who adapt the software 
for specific purposes, such as mak- 
ing out a payroll. 

Those students who also take 
some engineering courses can be- 
come designers of circuits, controls 
and robotic devices. 

“It seems like a field that ir I 
decide not to stay in it all my life 
can be a stepping stone to some- 
thing else." said Raj Jain, a second- 
year student at MIT from HolmdeL 
"New- Jersey. “If you choose, you 
can have a career in computer sci- 
ence without completing your de- 
gree and can even work on your 
own without joining a company. 
Besides, it’s a lot of fun." 

The enrollment surge is taxing 
the resources of institutions as they 
struggle to find money for expen- 
sive equipment and enough nrw 
faculty members to keep up with 
the demand for courses for bolh 
students majoring in the field and 


for conmajors who wont computer 
literacy. 

Moreover, educators are con- 
cerned that as cumculums are 
stretched to include more computer 
courses, the trend away from the 
libera) arts and toward" early spe- 
cialization is being accelerated. 

Nevertheless, undergraduates 
continue to flock to computer sci- 
ence. The number of computer sci- 
ence majors at the University of 
Oregon, for example, has increased 
by 1 19 percent since 1979, to 566. 

Two trailers are parked at the 
University of Pennsylvania, in 
Philadelphia, to accommodate the 
overflow of students from the com- 
puter science department until a 
new wing is added to the computer 
building. 

Computer science accounted for 
the fifth-highesl number of bache- 
lor’s degrees granted at New York 


University io 1 98 1 . and by lost year 
the field was second-highest, ex- 
ceeded only by biology. 

Some students at City College of 
New York, which has 330 under- 
graduates majoring in computer 
science, compared to 20 in history 
and 15 in philosophy, must delay 
graduation because the faculty is 
not large enough to give enough 
sections of all required courses. 

The University of California, 
Berkeley, limits enrollments in 
computer science and is being 
“more selective than we would like 
to be," according to Arthur M. 
Hopkin. a vice chairman of the 
department. 

Faculty members at MIT have 
authorized the department of elec- 
trical engineering and computer 
science to restrict admissions. But 
the plan, which is described as a 

(Continued on Page 2. CoL I) 


Thatcher , Changing Mind, to Permit V-EDay Celebration 


United Press International 

LONDON — Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher has changed her mind and decreed 
that Britain will celebrate the 40ib anniversa- 
ry of the World War il victory over Nazi 
Germany, known as V-E Day. on May 8. 

“1 know that there is a good deal of feeling 
that we should in fact have a national celebra- 
tion of V-E Day.” Mrs. Thatcher told Parlia- 
ment on Tuesday. “It is a feeling which I 
understand, and I fed that we should cele- 


brate not only victory of peace with freedom, 
but the fact that we have had peace with 
freedom for some 40 years." 

It was a reversal of a government decision 
that ruled out official celebrations lo avoid 
upselling West Germany and other nations 
who were Britain's enemies in World War if. 
but are now allies. 

West German reaction to last year's com- 
memoration of the D-Day landings in Nor- 


riiandy. France, illustrated “the difficulty of 
mounting international events which both 
honor sacrifices made in the past and ac- 
knowledge the peaceful evolution of Germa- 
ny and Italy and Japan since tile end of the 
war.” the Foreign Office declared here last 
week. 

Mrs. Thatcher changed her mind after ihe 
“no celebrations" announcement provoked 
widespread criticism in the press and from 
war veterans. 


Poles Assad 
U.S. Program, 
LadangBitier j 
Jaruzekki 


By Roberr Gilicrre 

Las Angeles Times Service 

WARSAW, Poland — The Po- 
lish government has strongly pro- 
lesied a broadcast by Rad io Free 
Europe that drew a parallel be- 
tween the Polish leader. General 
Wqjdech Jaruzelski, and Adolf 
Hitler. 

The Polish government spokes- 
man. Jerzy Urban, opened his 
weekly news conference Tuesday 
by reading a statement that called 
the broadcast “propaganda gang- 
sterism.'' He said Washington’s 
avowed interest in re-establishing 
normal relations could not be taken 
seriously until Radio Free Europe 
was restrained. 

Mr. Urban said Radio Free Eu- 
rope opened a youth program by 
announcing that it was broadcast- 
ing a speech Hitler gave at a Nazi 
party rally in Nurembuis in Sep- 
tember 1939. The broadcast was 
“dedicated to General Jaruzelski" 

“The intention was to suggest 
that in his speeches. General Jaru- 
zelski says the same things Hitler 
did, and that be resembles Hitler as 
a politician." Mr. Urban said. 

Western diplomats familiar with 
broadcast said it probably was in- 
tended as ironic humor but showed 
poor editorial judgment on the part 
of Radio Free Europe. They said 
the radio's often strident program- 
ming has not fallen into line with 
the Reagan administration's new. 
more conciliatory policy toward 
Poland. 

The organization is largely inde- 
pendent of the U.S. Slate Depart- 
ment ft operates under the Board 
for International Broadcasting in 
Washington, whose members are 
appointed by the president with 
congressional approval. 

Radio Free Europe, which 
broadcasts in six languages to audi- 
ences in five East European coun- 
tries, is popular in Poland, where 
more than half the adult popula- 
tion tunes in regularly to the almost 
20 hours a day of programming, 
despite Polish" government jam- 
ming efforts. 

U.S. officials confirmed that the 
U.S. Embassy's deputy chief of 
mission, David H. Swartz, was 
summoned Friday to the Polish 
Foreign Ministry to hear a formal 
protest of the broadcast beamed to 
Poland on Jan. 7 by the U.S.-oper- 
ated station in Munich, West Ger- 
many. 

Taken out of its original context. 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


t 







Pa|;e 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. JANUARY 17. 1985 


Israel Rejects Proposal Beirut Fears 
To Restrict Recognition New Strife 
Of Converts to Judaism 

Rv VA^rA \V/„ 1 ,U » 1/2QVG& SOUtfl 


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By Edward Walsh 

Washington Post Scmce 


ganiza lions that warned that pas- 
sage of die measure would alienate 


fNobotty^g 


rmi jfTwi’c s>age oi me measure wouia anenaie n.. A rj : : „ 

JERUSALEM — The KnesseL the vast majority of U.S. Jews who c J 

rejected Wednesday an attempt to are not Orthodox. 

amend Israel's basic Law of Return Prime Minister Shimon Peres ap- . “■ , iv. Ji* rabl ' 

in a manner that critics contended pealed to the parliament not to take “f 1 Wednesday to d isaiss ways 

would have had a disastrous effect what he said would be a divisive . preventing an outbreak oi na- 
on Israel's relations with American step. gf* «n southern Lebanon 

Jewry. “Let us not destroy. let us not ? fler Israe ^ Army withdraws 

By a vote of 62 to 51. the Israeli divide," Mr. Peres said from the area, state^ontrolled Bei- 

p art lament defeated the so-cajled “The question of ‘Who is a Jew’ A . 

“Who is a Jew" amendment, which was determined many generations 

....... u i I > i- . - i i „ er. General Mrcnei Aoun. ana otb- 


NOUMEA, New Caledonia — 
European settlers and pro-inde- 
! f '' pendence militants in New Caledo- 

/ ool * i» nia traded death threats and insults 

/ HBgKT5 Wednesday as French efforts tore- 
//Israel^ ISSSIS"”*) same discussions on the territory's 
— • — , fate appeared to stall 

ntt The Kanak Socialist National 
Liberation Front said it had re- 
of evacuated territory north of the ceived many letters and telqjhone 
Utani River. calls from extremists praising the 

Prime Minister Rashid Kararai killing Saturday of a prominent 




Kanaka Receive Threat; 
French Envoy Assailed 
As Negotiations Stall 


WORLD BRIEFS 

U.S. Warns of NATO Missfle 'Setback’ 


would o<b- 

recognize only Orthodox conver- charged with providing an answer CT se ,“ lor Sl r?{ nilted re P° rts 

sions to Judaism. as tlhow to preservTthe Jewish » 


sions to Judaism. as to how to preserve the Jewish 

The amendment, backed by the people in the face of changing con- 
religious parties in the Knesset, was di lions and grave dangers." 
opposed by the Labor Parry and a The controversy over the issue 
broad coalition of U.S. Jewish or- has existed for more than a decade 


/"« _ gious community, which is domi- 

COWlpMterS nated by the Orthodox religious 

JT establishment, and secular Israelis, 

/k /T All previous attempts to enact 

IMJTlpUSeS the amendment have failed, but the 
J current push was one of the stron- 

( Continued from Page 1) gest ever and there had been some 
, ... predictions thaube measure would 

last resort, has not been put into pass Wednesday's preUminaiy par- 


as to how to preserve the Jewish j? ^ ■ e r ^P[^ se ? la ” 

people in the face of changing con- {"» nv ? *H d * l( * «? 

di lions and grave dangers.” factions attended part of the delib- 

The controversy over the issue 

has existed for mie than a decade . * ^ “f ^ ** C ^ lD ? 1 de : 
and is a reflection of the continuing aded 10 sel “P * multifactional 
strains between the country's reli- eroeT ^ eoc y cornD J , ^ lee l0 .^ e *P 


has said that the Lebanese Army separatist, Boi Machoro. 38. 


Rruiers governmenL was dumped b\ set- 

NOUMEA, New Caledonia — tiers outside the French High Com- 
European settlers and pro-inde- mission. A paper stuck to the head 
pendence militants in New Caledo- bore the name or Edgard Pisani, 
nia traded death threats and insults the special French envoy sent to the 
Wednesday as French efforts to re- Pacific territory to devise a plan for 
sume discussions on the territory's independence, 
fate appeared to stall One of the slogans read: “Pisani 

The Kanak Socialist National assassin." 

Liberation Front said it had re- The European. .Asian and Per- 
ceived many letters and telephone nesian settlers who make up 57 
calls from extremists praising the percent of the islands 140,000 pop- 
killing Saturday of a prominent • ulation, have argued that Mr. Pi- 


will move into any area lobe evacu- 

ated by Israeli troops. Kanak front leaders that J they front, which wants independence. 

Press reports said that a special would be next on the death list, says it represents most of the indig- 


A letter received Wednesday told 
Kanak front leaders that they 


sani has not been tough enough on 
the Kanak militants. The Kanak 


says it represents most of the indig- 
enous Kanaks. or Melanesians. 


effect 

Princeton University decided 
last month to split its department 
of electrical engineering and com- 


li amentary test 

The religious parties in the Knes- 
set were supported in Wednesday’s 


pater science, making computer J[? te ^ a Majority of the Likud 
science the first department at bloc the other mam partner with 
Princeton to offer degrees in both *« Labor Part > HI national 
engineering and liberal arts unity government The Likud has a 

“Now, the well-educated person ^landing alliance with the ndi- 
doesn’t speak four languages but ©ous parties that it apparently 
only one: Fortran." said A.E. b°ped 10 preserve by backing the 
Barnes, a history professor at Car- measure - 
negie-Mellon University in Pitts- The Law of Return grants Israeli 
burgh, referring to the computer citizenship to any Jew who irami- 


l anguaae 


grates to Israel and asks to become 


Many students seem to be drawn a citizen. It defines a Jew as anyone 


government apply security mea- 
sures in sectors to be evacuated by 
the Israelis, according to private 
radio stations. 

The committee will consist of of- 
ficials from the Lebanese Forces, a 
Maronite Christian militia; Amal, 
the Shiite Moslem movement; and 
the Progressive Socialist Party, a 
Druze organization. 

Israel announced Sunday that it 
will commence a three-stage with- 
drawal from southern Lebanon, 
which it has occupied since invad- 
ing Lebanon in June 1982. in Eve 
weeks. 

{Lebanon and Israel have agreed 
to resume their stalemated negotia- 
tions on security arrangements in 
southern Lebanon next week, The 
Associated Press reported from 
Beirut. Earlier reports bad said 
they would be resumed this week.] 

The cabinet meeting came 24 
hours after the government held 


army contingent will be formed “Your days are numbered," it said cnous Kanaks. or Melanesians, 
and deployed around the port of The letter bore a skull and cross- The settlers have reported ha- 
Sidon from where the Israel Army bones and a drawing of rifle sights rassraeot by young militant Kan- 
is due to withdraw first. and Duroortedlv was signed by the aks. 


The settlers have reported ha- 


Tbe formation of a muhifac- anti-independence National Front 
tional committee is seen as a step movement. 


and purportedly was signed by the aks. 

ami-independence National From ^ Pisani has tried to persuade 


toward beading off bloodshed in 
the south after the Israelis depart. 


There have been no apparent 
moves to resume talks between pro- 


The Lebanese are haunted by and anti -independence factions 
memories of communal massacres since Mr. Machoro and an aide, 
that occurred in the Chuf moon- Marcel Nonnaro, were killed S a. cur- 
tains after the Israeli withdrawal in day in what police described as a 
September 1983. Fighting between shootout. 

Druze and Christian militias took a [Four members of the Kanak 
heavy toll in human lives. In the front have been charged with tnur- 
end, the Syrian-backed Druze der in a death they allegedly tried 
gained the military upper hand, to make appear to be a suicide, 
routed Christian fighters and sent judicial sources said Wednesday, 
170,000 Christians fleeing to safer The Associated Press reported 


grounds. 

■ Islamic Jihad Denial 


from Noumea. 

[The victim was Jean-Marie San- 


boih sides to resume talks on his 
plan for a referendum in July on 
whether the territory' should be- 
come independent next January 
while retaining special links with 
France. 

But since the shootings last 
week, both sides hare pledged to 
take an even tougher stand over the 
French plan to hold a referendum. 

The death toll in violence in the 
territory reached 19 Saturday with 
the death of Mr. Machoro. shot by 
police who said he opened fire on 
them. 

Rioting began last week after a 


Islamic Jihad, a group holding 3, - of Hienghene, which was Rioting began last week after a 
five U.S. hostages, said a claim on b Y other residents European fanner - s teen-age son 

its behalf thatukilled two French - 10 Kan £ „T C T ^ 

cease-fire observers on Monday ^ 5 - P °J»« ‘ honll « 'fP 0 ** 1 a stale ? f . 

wasa lie. United Press Internation- said a nfie was found next to Mr. gency. metudmg an overnight cur- 


io computer sciences by the pros- who is “bom of a Jewish mother, or consultations on a United Nations 


pect of sure employment and high 
salaries. 

“Every time you pick up a paper 
you read of technology and bear of 
someone who has made a million 
dollars out of it like the guy who 
started Apple," said Kenneth J. 
Cohen, of Stamford, Connecticut, 
who is a fourth-year computer sci- 
ence major at Northeastern. 

Often students are encouraged to 
pursue computer science by their 
parents. Philip R. McCabe, the ad- 
missions dean at Northeastern, 
counseled a student last year who 
wanted to be a mathematics teach- 
er but was bang pressured by her 
father to study computer science. 

“I told her she should follow her 
personal interest, even if meant be- 
coming a teacher," Mr. McCabe 
said. “The next day. her father 
called and was very upset. Did I 
realize, he asked me, that I was 
telling his daughter to pass up a 
starting salary of $30,000 for 
$11,000?" 


who has converted and is not a role in the south with Brian E. Ur- 
member of another faith." quharl, the LIN undersecretary- 

The measure before <he Kuessel 8™ cral [or P? 1 j“ cal ^ 
would haw amended ihe law s sec- *1 ™* ^neb mammas . nore 

lion dealing with conventions to ib 3 " _ 30,000 Hoops in eastern and 
recognmTonly those conventions nonhem Lebanon, wants Ubanon 
condSed according to Orthodox •» an faadt request for UN 
rites peacekeeping units to take charge 

According to Rabbi Richard __ a _ 

Hirsch. the executive director of 1/ iW/m/' fnr "Sri 
the World Union for Progressive ' IaAAjm j J C/f k/ll 

Judaism, fewer than 10 percent of 

American Jews are Orthodox. The (Continued from Page 1) 
^^“o'ftStS’Sto rc k ana ba sic strat^fc doctrines. 

in Judaism, he said. Urge number of rSrves, many 

Rabbi Hirsch. who was among military authorities say, it cannot 
those who led the lobbying effort afford to occupy a large, hostile, 
against the amendment, said that densely populated region, 
passage of the measure would have To do so requires too many re- 


al reported from Beirut. sangarne s ooay in ms nouse on 

In a statement telephoned to the ,2 - Suicide l H l ? d 
newspaper An-Nahar and pub- w-fien 311 “topsy showed be had 
lisbed Wednesday, Islamic Jihad beaten.] 
said: “In the name of God we de- In Noumea, graffiti expressing 
clare that the operation . . . was not support for the Kanaks who want 


San game's body in his house on few 1 that Mr. Pisani later relaxed in 
Dec. 12. Suicide was ruled out response to protests from hotel and 


restaurant owners. 

■ Machoro Suit Filed 


clare that the operation . . . was not support for the Kanaks who want A court prosecutor said Wednes- Anatofi Karpov, the world chess champion, and Gary Kasparov, lire 

carried out by our hands. We rciter- independence from France and the day that Mr. Machoro’ s family has challenger, agreed to a draw Wednesday after the 26th move in the 42nd 
ate that whoever claimed responsi- settlers who oppose it has begun to filed a civil suit in a Nouraia court game of their match. Mr. Karpov leads. 5-1, and needs one more victory 
bility on our behalf is lying and has appear on town walls. charging that he was the victim of m r etain his title. (AP) 

no connections with our organiza- A pig’s head with a rose in one willful homicide. United Press In- zimhahram Parfiament nn W«lnesdav extends the countrv’s 

tion." 


ear. symbolic of France’s Socialist 


Victory for ' Shiite School ’ Is Major Switch 

(Continued from Page 1) bfle and offensive doctrines on “Instead of an Israeli Army 


which the Israeli Army was raised, spread out and constituting a target 
A Hebrew University military f or Shiites and other terrorist de- 
expert, Dan Horowitz, said the men is in southern Lebanon," he 
cabinet decision Monday was de- said, “the array will be concen int- 
rigued to restore the Israeli Army cd. capable of taking offensive ac- 
re its traditional posture, in which tion. This will be a mobile aggres- 


been “a disaster," diverting atten- sources, too high a cost in lives and 
tion from Israel's major political too many days of reserve duty for 
and economic problems and under- private citizens. And, as many mili - 
mtning the traditionally strong tary analysts have pointed out, it 
support for Israel by U.S. Jews. also runs counter to the basic mo- 


re ns traditional posture, m which horn This will be a mobile aggres- 
Palestinian threats are seen in their a Ve method of defense, whose job 
more limited military perspective vvill be to insure the security of the 
—to be dealt with through surgical settlements and residents of the 


and selective retaliation. 


north in a different form from the 


HEAR IT DIRECT ON 


. VOICE OF AMERICA .3g 



As Mr. Rabin described it, the current one." 
decision, should “change the char- The pl ann ed new deployment, 
acier of Israeli Army method of senior Israeli military sources said, 

actjon -” should also create a new strategic 

position between Israel and the 
Syrians. 

In the present deployment, the 

- ■ Syrian and Israeli forces are nose to 

nose in the Bekaa region of eastern 
Lebanon. The Syrians are officially 
abiding by a cease-fire with the 
Israelis, while apparently encour- 
aging an underground war by Pal- 
.* <v estinian and Shiite proxies, giving 
Damascus the best of both worlds. 
ZE OF AMERICA . & Because of the ambiguity of the 
/ silualion. it has been difficult for 
■ <f.-y a the Israelis to hold the Syrians re- 

' | sponsible or retaliate against them 
; for attacks on the Israeli Army. 
That should change, some mili- 
tary authorities in Israel say. When 
Israeli troops pub back from the 
eastern front, there will be a large 
□o- man's- land between them and 
the Syrians, and the Syrians will be 


wiiiiu. noimciuc. unucu nos in- Hmbabwean Parfiaroaif on Wednesday extended the 000011/5 

teraational reported from Noumea. sute of m^ency legislation for the 1 0th six-month period. (AFP) 

President Hussain Mohammed Erehad of Bangladesh dissolved his 
cabinet Tuesday in a prelude to parliamentary elections that his govern- 
ment announced would be held April 6. (UPI) 

Japan and the Soviet Union will resume trade consultations next week, 
the Foreign Ministry said Wednesday. The talks will be held in Tokyo 
from T uesday re Thursday. (Reuters) 

President Hosm Mubarak at Egypt arrived Wednesday in Athens fora 
two-day visit to Greece. It is the first visit to Greece by an Egyptian head 
of stale in 25 years. (AP) 

Harrison Williams, a former Democratic senator from New Jersey, was 
denied parole Wednesday. He has served one year of a three-year term at 
Allenwood. Pennsylvania, federal prison for' bribery and conspiracy in 
the Abscam case. (UPI) 

The British pariuBuent voted 159-118 Tuesday night against allowing 
the British Broadcasting Corporation re raise revenue through radio and 
television advertising like Britain's commercial networks. (Reuters) 
The Swiss government has accepted a petition signed by 86,000 citizens 
demanding a referendum on'a law passed overwhelmingly by parliament 
in September that gives women equal rights with men. The vote will be 
Gmnftus held later this year. (Reuters) 



f 7m7‘ 


Frangob Mitterrand 

Mitterrand 


Mitterrand Polish Court Told of Plan 

Leaves Today To Push Priest Of f Train 

(Continued from Page 1) vv 


allegedly were planning a cam- 
paign of violence. 


United Press IntentanonoJ 

TORUN. Poland — A secret po- 


*** ^ w.th k.dnap- 


Rsam. Mr. Tjibaou has accused the hc warned 10 raiimidate the 
Frencb goyenunem o( wacung to clenc by ihrowcg him cm of a 
elunmat e Ihe hkbi oincrne p«v di / train * cour , hurd 
mdepoidence leaders. Wednes^y 

In France, conservative opposi- . _ 
tion to Mr. Mitterrand’s policies Jozef Baczynski, 38, a dqjuty to 


held responsible for anyone who has escalated. 


Lieutenant Colonel Leszek Wolski 


of the police officers present react- 
ed when the captain suggested the 
plan to throw the priest out of a 
train. 

“There were feelings of repug- 
nance toward PopieJuszJco and we 
all thought it was important to re- 
strict his hostile activities, but no- 
body reacted re what Piotrowski 
said," he said. 

A defense lawyer then asked Mr. 
Baczynski: “Why didn’t any of you 


comes across it from their area. The neo-GaulIlst leader. Jacques of Wareaw police headquarters tes- anything about the idea' of 

Israeli military sources say. Chirac, tbe mayor of Paris. ba3 re- ofied that on CKn. 9. 10 days before ^ 

“We were hamstrung in terms of peated warnings from Genera! the murder of Father Popieluszko. think llwi Piotrowski would be in 


' our ability to respond effectively to 
1 attacks from behind Syrian lines.” 
an Israeli military source said. “We 
were forced to play the game by 
Syrian rules.” 

“Now we are going to be leaving 
an area open between us and 
them." be said, “and anything that 
moves into there will be considered 


Jeannou Lacaze. head of the army with the chief defendant, 

general staff, that developments in Cap* 3 *® Grzegorz Piotrowski who 
New Caledonia could threaten tola him of a plan to frighten the 
France's security if they encour- cleric. 

aged separatists in Polynesia and “Piotrowski said that some ac- 
Frcnch Guiana, the French tirrrilo- tion had to be taken to curb the 
ties used for nuclear tests and space activities of Popieluszko." Mr. Bac- 
launches. zynski said. “He wanted to frighten 

Out of New Caledonia’s estimat- him by pushing him out of a speed- 


throwing him oul of a train. Do you 
think that Piotrowski would be in 
the dock now if you had said some- 
thing?" 

Mr. Baczynski did not reply. 

Captain Piotrowski has aamitled 
kidnapping the priest but pleaded 
□01 guilty to charges of murder. 

Colonel Wolski testified that 
there was a long-term plan within 
the police re halt the activities of 
Father Popieluszko, who champi- 


an offensive action. It will put the cd population of 146.000. indige- ing train." Falher Popieluszko. who champi- 

oous of proof on the Syrians to nous Melanesians number about Captain Piotrowski is accused oned the outlawed Solidarity trade 
demonstrate that they were not in- 63,000. a minority that could be with Lieutenants Waldemar union in his sermons. Colonel 
vdved. We hope that the Syrians outvoted by the 53,000 European Chtnielewski and Leszek Pekaiaof Wolsld corroborated Colonel Pie- 


will interpret accurately the silua- 
lion and not miscalculate. We will 
retaliate, and things could escalate 
real fast " 


The finest 
Scotch Whisky 
money can buv 


settlers and 30,000 Asian imeti- abducting, beating and inline Fa- 
grants, most of whom oppose a iher Popieluszko on OcL 19. An- 
Melanesian-run state. other Dolice officer Tnlnwl Adam 


truszka’s earlier testimony that 
there was never any intention to ‘ 


Melanesian aspirations and oppo- guilty. 


- . - “I was never instructed by any- 

sition pobuaans have accused it of Mr. Baczynski, who met Captain body to use force against the 
initially turning a bund eye to sepa- Piotrowski in the company of Colo- priest,” he said. “My task was sira- 

nfisl VifRPTlrt* nA l Li.. II - j _ . 


PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN AND WIFE NANO' 


KARl NCI RJMAl'KHM. Till- Mi II ft IIIIUM 


MORE THAN 110 MILLION LISTENERS 
AROUND THE WORLD WILL FOLLOW THE 
INAUGURATION OF THE PRESIDENT OF 
THE UNITED STATES ON VO A. 

VOA'S FAST PACED NEWS TEAM WILL BROADCAST LIVE JAN 21. 


live coverage 
on the scene reports 
historical commentary 
colorful footnotes 
personalities 


• hear the oath of office 

• inaugural address 

• U.S. and world reaction reports 

• spectacle of parade 

• festivity of the balls 

'BROADCASTING TO THE WORLD " 


VOA BROADCASTS 
IN ENGLISH 
Broadcast hours (GMT) 
and best frequencies 

To AFRICA 

1600-2300 17870 17785 

15600 15S80 

TO EUROPE 

1 700-2200 15205 11760 

9760 6040 

TO MIDDLE EAST 

1700-2200 9760 9700 

6040 * 



ratisi violence. nel Wolski and the captain’s depu- 

The goal the conservative news- ry, Janusz Drozdz, said that none 
paper Le Figaro said, was to intimi- 
date European settlers into leaving . 

so thaube Melanesians could win KrHflfflPDSt A flf 
the July referendum, a choice, the UdUtOSl iAll£ 

paper said, reminiscent of the days , _ „ __ ’ - 

when settlers in Algeria bad to (Continued from Page 1) 

choose "the rifle or the suitcase." Ih . u.iw 


ply to collect evidence to compro- 
mise him in his activities." 


Broadcast Angers Poland 


(Continued from Page 1) 


cnoose me rare or me smuase. the Hitier speech resembles the up- 

Compansoos with the former beat New^ Ws statements of sw- 
French colony may seem far- ^ ^or Polish officials, who 
fetched in the context of New Cal e- predicted a gradual end to hard 
douia but they add etnouonai over- times and a return to 

ton« re the pohucal clamor. normalcy in foreign relations. 

The A^genan praedent is an -comrades." the speech begins, 
emouonal factor with older French according to a text provided bv Mr. 
GaullisLs, many of whom admit Urban’s office. “Conirary to the 
their remorse about granting the daiinS ^ British and American 
cdony md^endence despite de propaganda ... we have managed 


GauUe’s pledge in 1958 to keep lo raise frora 

AJgena Freacn. . just a few years. 

Socialise who are ideologically “Individuals with alien altitudes 
committed lo Melanesian indepen- ^ sy SVem have been iso- 

dena often say pnvatdy that New i ale d in our country." it continues, 
Caledonia is an opportunity for the in wording ^id find 

Fraich left re cany out a small act applicable to the outlawed but still 
of decolonization coraparabk to de ^L ]ar SoUdaritv trade union. 
GauUes divestiture of the French k no place herc for ^ 

empire in Africa. enemies of socialism and those det- 


© UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

Fo»i— . wero— l e a wwfc &Tt— 

tou mov qiuUy lo> 

B«:HtlOR5 MASrnrSOHDOCIORAK 
Send detailed lesumo 
lor a free evaluation 
PACIFIC WESTBM UMVStSTTY 

Wl) Ikm CN.WXUSII ' 


popular Solidarity trade union. 
“There is no place here for the 
enemies of socialism and those det- 
rimental re the national ideals. 

“Gestapo units, devoted to the 
ideals of the party." it says, “stand 
guard over the internal peace. Un- 
der their protection, we will con- 
duct a program of reforms and the 
elimination of the rationing sys- 
tem." 

The speech adds that “friendly 


one of the pillars oT our foreign 
policy." 

Western diplomats said that as 
propaganda, the broadcast proba- 
bly played effectively on the anti- 
government reelings of many Poles. 

Diplomats said the broadcast 
nevertheless was insensitive to Po- 
land's suffering under five vears of 
Nazi occupation, during which six 
million Poles, or one-fifth of the 
pre-war population, perished The 
vast majority were civilians, most 
of them Jews, exterminated in 
death camps. 

Mr. Urban said the government 
had demanded an explanation and 
made dear dial it would not find 
U.S. expressions of interest in bet- 
ter relations credible “until a re- 
straint is put on insults and propa- 
ganda aggression." 

The United Slates announced 
last month that it would no longer 
bar Poland's application to join the 
International Monetary Fund thus 
lifting a major sanction imposed 
three years before when Solidarity 
was crushed under martial law. 

The Reagan administration act- 
ed after Poland released the last of 
more than 630 Solidarity activists 


relations with the Soviet Union are held on political charges. 



1| WASHINGTON (UPI) — The Reagan administration, m ai nt ai n i ng 

rl 11 pressure on Belgium to avoid a crack in the Western alliance, stressed 

Wednesday that a failure to deploy cruise missiles on schedule would be 
inmrvrf hv ca. “a setback" re the United States and NATO. , _ . . 

3??? h'r The warning came after Prime Minister Wilfreid Martens of Belgium 

, , er. said that domestic political pressure may prevent his country from 
installing the first of 48 cruise missiles in March as scheduled. 

Larry Speakes. the White House spokesman, said the administration 
r£ still expected Belgium to keep to the deployment schedule, but added, 
devise a plan for ^E^Vmeans hope in this case." 


Ethiopia Seizes Food Sent to Rebels 

CANBERRA, Australia (AFP) — Australia has sent a protest lo 
Ethiopia over that government’s seizing about 6.000 tons of wheat and 
other commodities, including an oil rig, from an Australian ship bound 
for the rebel-held provinces of Eritrea and Tigre. 

Foreign Minister Bill Hayden said he was “rather g|oomy" about 
prospects for the return of the aid. worth more than 2 million Australian 
dollars (SU million). 

Mr. Hayden said the goods were to have been shipped to Port Sudan 
for transport to Eritrea and Tigre. But, for unknown reasons, the ship, My 
Golden Venture, went first lo the Ethiopian port of Assab. where about 

3.000 tons of wheal consigned by World Vision, a nonprofit relief 
organization in the United States, were to be unloaded. The authorities 
there seized the ship. 

Iraq Claims Its Jets Hit Ship in Gull 

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraqi jet fighters scored “direct and effective hits" 
on an unidentified ship Wednesday near Iran’s Kharg Island oil te rminal 
in the Gulf and “returned safely to base,” a military spokesman an- 
nounced. 

The spokesman, reading a communique over the state radio, said the 
air attack “underlines our determination to maintain and tighten the 
blockade imposed on Kharg Island and other Iranian ports." 

Iranian Exiles Report 400 Executions 

PARIS (AFP) — Iran executed 400 political detainees at Tehran’s Evin 
prison in the first week of January, an exiled Iranian opposition group 
claimed Wednesday. 

The Paris-based Mujahidin, an Islamic-Marxist group dedicated to 
overthrowing the -Tehran government, said that most of those put to 
death were Mujahidin supporters. The Mujahidin said that in six yean 
the Islamic republic of Ayatollah RuhoUah Khomeini has executed 

40.000 people and imprisoned 120,000. 

For the Record 

Awgtn ii Karpor, the world chess champion, and Gary Kasparov, the 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1985 


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Church Activists in U.S. 
Say They Will Continue 
Sanctuary for Refugees 


By Wayne King 

Ntw York Times Service 

TUCSON. Arizona — Despite 
the indictment of some of their 
leaders, American church groups 
here and elsewhere said they will 
continue to give sanctuary to Cen- 
tral Americans they consider to be 
political refugees. 

Supporters of the sanctuary 
movement, reacting to the indict- 
ment of 16 persons on charges of 
conspiring to smuggle illegal aliens 
into the United States, declared 
Tuesday that they would put the 
government “on trial" for its poli- 
cies in Central America and in 
dealing with refugees. 

In addition to the 16 indict- 
ments, returned by a US. grand 
jury in Phoenix last week and an- 
nounced Monday in Washington, 
more than 60 other people, mostly 
Salvadorans and Guatemalans who 
entered the United States with the 
movement's help, were arrested 
over the weekend. 

The nationwide crackdown 
sharply stepped up the conflict be- 
tween liberal church groups and 
the U S. government, which said 
that the aliens are fleeing poverty, 
not persecution, and thus do not 
qualify for political asylum. 

Sanctuary activists argue that the 
United States has a moral responsi- 
bility to admit and care Tor refugees 
from General America because U.S. 
policies in that region contribute to 
dm strife that forces them to flee 
their homes. 

As many as 200 individual 
churches around the country are 
believed to support the movement, 
which has openly defied the U.S. 
authorities. The Reverend John M. 
Fife of the Tucson Southside Unit- 
ed Presbyterian Church, a central 
figure in the movement and one of 
those indicted, vowed to continue 
assis tin g Central Americans who 
seek shelter in the United States. 

“Whenever the church has been 
persecuted through on t history." he 
said Tuesday, “it has strengthened 
the church, not weakened it." 

Mr. Fife was the first to openly 
make his church a haven for Cen- 
tral Americans in March 1982. By 
last spring the movement had 
spread to more than 100 churches, 
chiefly in the Southwest, the Mid- 
dle West, California and the New 
York area. 

The government responded by 
arresting several activists in the 
movement, including Stacey Ann 
Merlct, a church worker who was 
sentenced in June to two years' 
probation for transporting three 
Salvadorans. 

Her case became a symbol of 


religious defiance of the govern- 
ment. and she gained the support 
of many groups and individuals, 
including John J. Fitzpatrick, the 
Roman Catholic bishop of Browns- 
ville, Texas. 

Miss Merkt. 30, has since been 
charged, along with a fellow sanc- 
tuary activist. Jack Oder, with con- 
spiracy to transport illegal aliens 
into the country. She was previous- 
ly convicted for transporting illegal 
aliens who were already in the 
United States. 

After the much larger group or 
indictments and arrests over the 
weekend, the National Council of 
Churches issued a statement calling 
the government action "surprising 
and shocking" 

"The fact that several of those 
detained are mothers and their chil- 
dren is a demonstration of the trag- 
edy which called the sanctuary 
movement into being." said the 
Reverend Arie Brouwer, the gener- 
al secretary of the Council of 
Churches, referring to the arrested 
Central Americans. 

He reiterated the Cornell’s posi- 
tion. adopted in November by its 
governing board, urging a morato- 
rium on deportation of refugees to 
Central America and asking the 
government to "cease its harass- 
ment of, and prosecution of, work- 
ers and participants in the sanctu- 
ary movement." 

A New York group called the 
Center for Constitutional Law, 
formed to assist anti-war protesters 
in the 1960s. said it was preparing a 
lawsuit seeking to enjoin the gov- 
ernment from further arrests of 
sanctuary activists on the legal the- 
ory that they are acting under con- 
stitutional guarantees of religious 
freedom. 

The group said the suit also 
would maintain that it is the U.S. 
government that is acting in viola- 
tion of domestic and international 
law governing asylum for refugees. 

in announcing the indictments 
and arrests Monday, the govern- 
ment said it had used four confi- 
dential informers who had used 
concealed tape recorders to record 
meetings and individual conversa- 
tions in winch plans to help refu- 
gees to come into the country were 
discussed. 

Don Reno, the special U.S. at- 
torney in Phoenix in charge of the 
case, called the use of hidden re- 
corders "absolutely essential," say- 
ing. “ff a crime is being committed, 
whether it's in a church or in a 
restaurant, the covert operation 
cannot restrict itsdf to the venue in 
which the crime is being commit- 
ted." 



IIkMkMKw 

Carolyn Jones and Mattie Sparks, the niece and a sister of Doyle Edward Skillem, 
leaving the Texas Department of ejections unit at Huntsville after visiting him. 

Texas Executes Murder Accomplice 

Man Who Said He Pulled Trigger Eligible for Parole 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Past Service 

AUSTIN, Texas — Tie state 
of Texas executed Doyle Edward 
Skillem, the accomplice in a 
1974 murder, early Wednesday 
despite the fact that the man who 
has admitted pulling the trigger 
is eligible, and being considered, 
for parole. 

“This case shows the capri- 
ciousness of the death penalty " 
said Charles Sullivan, director of 
Citizens United for Rehabilita- 
tion of Errants. “fn effect we’ve 
turned the death penalty upside 
down." 

Mr. Sullivan had delivered a 
petition Tuesday afternoon to 
Governor Mark White, it had 
been signed by 15 state legisla- 
tors seeking a 30-day reprieve for 
the condemned man. Mr. White 
rejected the petition. The U.S. 
Supreme Court also rejected an 
appeal Tuesday. 

Mr. Skillem. 48, was executed 
by lethal injection early Wednes- 
day for the slaying of Patrick 
Randel, an undercover narcotics 
agent in the Texas Department 
of Safety. 

According to court testimony, 
Mr. Skillem did not shoot Mr. 
RandeL He was waiting in a sto- 
len car nearby while Mr. Randel 
was shot six times by Charles 
Sanne, 51- 

Both men were convicted of 
first-degree murder. Mr. Skillem 


was given the death penalty 
when the jury — aware that he 
also had murdered his brother — 
concluded that he posed a con- 
tinuing threat to society. The 
jury did not make the same judg- 
ment about Mr. Sanne. who has 
a record of less serious offenses. 
He was given a life sentence. 

The two convictions were dis- 
missed by the Texas Court of 
Criminal Appeals because jurors 
were not sequestered before they 
deliberated about what sentence 
should be imposed. 

Both men were retried and 
convicted. This time, both were 

? ven the death penalty. But the 
ourt of Criminal Appeals 
changed Mr. Sanne’s sentence to 
life, ruling that it would be dou- 
ble jeopanly to increase the sen- 
tence to death after the second 
triaL 

“We don’t feel that justice is 
being done in this case," said 
Peggy Caniere. Mr. Skillern’s 
sister, who last week asked the 
state Board of Pardons and Pa- 
roles to commute the sentence 
because Mr. Skillem did not pull 
the trigger. The request was de- 
nied. 

The US. Supreme Court al- 
ready had declined to hear an 
appeal of the death sentence 
based on the different punish- 
ments of the two murderers. The 
5th U.S. Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals ruled on that question last 


year, saying Mr. Skill era’s inti- 
mate involvement in plotting the 
murder made the case different 
from a Florida case in which the 
U.S. Supreme Conn ruled the 
death penalty was unfair for an 
accomplice who drove a getaway 
car. 

According to testimony in the 
case, Mr. Randel had arranged 
to make an undercover drag pur- 
chase from the two men on Ocl 
24, 1974. The two learned that be 
was an undercover agent before 
the purchase took place, and, ac- 
cording to the prosecution, plot- 
ted his murder. 

“Sanne is the one who actually 
polled the trigger, but the evi- 
dence is that the gun that in all 
likelihood did the killing was 
Skillern’s gun," said the prosecu- 
tor, John Flinn. said in his sum- 
mation to the jury in the secobd 
trial. 

“Who was the mastermind?" 
Mr. Flinn asked of Mr. Skillem. 
“Who furnished the gun? Who 
got the money? Who got the re- 
placement gun? There he sits. Is 
he connected? Without a doubt." 

In 1971, Mr. Skillem was sen- 
tenced to five years in prison for 
murdering his brother. 

“The critical issue is future 
dangerousness," said Duane 
Crowley, state assistant attorney 

(^commutation. “Tie sentence 
is in conformance with the law." 


Jury Makes 
Partial Ruling 
Against Time 
In Libel Case 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The jury in the 
Arid Sharon libel case decided 
Wednesday that Time magazine 
defamed Mr. Sharon by indicating 
that be “consciously intended" for 
Christian Lebanese militiamen to 
massacre Pales tinian civilians in 
1981 

The decision was the first of 
three that the jury must make in 
order to arrive at a verdict of libel 
against Time. After announcing the 
finding, the panel resumed deliber- 
ations on the remaining issues of 
falsity and malice. 

Mr. Sharon is suing over a Feb. 
21, 1983, Time cover story that said 
be discussed revenge for the assas- 
sination of Lebanon’s Christian 
president-elect, Bashir Geraayd, 
with Phalangisi leaders the day be- 
fore their militiamen massacred 
hundreds of Palestinians in West 
Beirut. 

Mr. Sharon has denied discuss- 
ing revenge "with any Lebanese." 

The jury decided unanimously 
that the Time article, “read in con- 
text,” had defamed Mr. Sharon. 
Based on that finding, the jury then 
decided that a key paragraph of the 
story meant Mr. Sharon “con- 
sciously intended" to allow the 
P halang itis to take revenge, includ- 
ing killing noncotnbatanis. 

The jury, however, did not rule 
that the paragraph meant Mr. 
Sharon “actively encouraged" the 
massacre. 

In addition, the jury said the de- 
famatory effect of the paragraph 
was “aggravated” by Time's state- 
ment that details of the alleged re- 
venge discussion were contained in 
a secret section of a report by an 
Israeli commission. 

Dunne the trial, a former presi- 
dent of the Israeli Supreme Court 
reported to U.S. District Judge 
Abraham D. Sofaer that there was 
no “evidence or suggestion" in the 
report that Mr. Sharon discussed 
revenge with Lebanese Phalangjsts 
or knew in advance they would 
commit a massacre. 

Time’s lawyers had conceded 
that the report did not contain the 
information the article said it did 
but denied that Tune knew this 
when the article was published. 

The jury’s ruling Wednesday was 
the first of three mat Judge Sofaer 
required of them. The jurors must 
now decide whether the article was 
false and then rule if Tune knew the 
story was false 'when it was pub- 
lished and if the magazine did so 
with “actual malice" or “reckless 
disregard” for the truth. 


School Officiate Praise 
Coiirt Rulin g on Searches 


By Paul Houston 

Las Angefn Times Service 

WASHINGTON — American 
school officials have praised the 
Supreme Court's decision this week 
giving administrators more legal 
power to conduct searches of stu- 
dents. 

They say such searches were al- 
ready bong carried out by the vast 
majority of school districts, 

James Koch, principal of New 
Jersey’s Piscataway High School, 
site of the 1980 search of a stu- 
dent’s purse that led to Tuesday's 
Supreme Court decision, said Uie 
decision was “really fantastic for 
education." He said it supported 
what most administrators were al- 
ready doing. 

The court approved school 
searches without warrants or the 
sort of justification required of po- 
lice officers as long as there are 
“reasonable grounds" for believing 
dun the search will yield evidence 
of a violation of the law or of 
school rules. 

“Now we can feel a little freer” 
to search students for drugs, weap- 
ons and other contraband, said 
Ivan B. Gluckman. chief lawyer for 
the National Association of Sec- 
ondary School Principals, which 
filed a brief in the case. 

The decision “sustains what has 
been our practice for years," said 
Ron Apperson, legal adviser for the 
Los Angeles city schools. “We be- 
lieve it will help us maintain safe 
and orderly campuses." 

Representatives of civil liberties 
groups criticized the decision. 

“I think it will probably mean 
that students are going to be sub- 
jected to more intrusive searches in 
deprivation of their constitutional 
rights," said Mary L Hera, an at- 
torney with the American Civil 
Liberties Union of New Jersey. 


Gwendolyn R Gregory, an at- 
torney with the National School 
Boards Association, said Tuesday 
that the ruling would encourage 
administrators who had been hold- 
ing back on searches because they 
feared they would face civil rights 
suits filed by aggrieved students. 

They had been scared, she said, 
by the New Jersey Supreme Court 
ruling in the same case, which went 
against the school administrator 
who found drug paraphernalia dur- 
ing the search of the student's 
purse. 

Robert Chanin. an attorney for 
the National Education Associa- 
tion, said be thought that Tues- 
day’s Supreme Court decision 
struck a good balance between stu- 
dents’ rights and a school's need to 
maintain discipline. 

The court said that students were 
still protected by the Fourth 
Amendment, he noted, even 
though searches could be conduct- 
ed on grounds of “reasonable sus- 
picion" instead of the more de- 
manding “probable cause." 

Mr. Chanin said: “The message 
that should go out to teachers and 
administrators is (hat you have an 
absolute right to investigate suspi- 
cious arcumstances. but you can't 
do it in a capricious, arbitrary man- 
ner." 

Janet Price, an attorney with Ad- 
vocates for Children of New York 
City, a children’s rights group, was 
not reassured. 

“This decision may have a sub- 
tle, insidious effect in dial it will be 
too broadly interpreted." she said. 

She said personal searches could 
“cause a lot more problems than 
they solve." 

“When school officials are too 
quick to start searching kids, it cre- 
ates an armed-camp atmosphere.” 
she said. 


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Reagan Assailed (her Meeting With Black Group 


By Gerald M. Boyd 

Hew York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has met. with about 
20 black business executives, edu- 
cators and other officials in a move 
hailed by some as a new attempt to 
reach blacks but assailed by others 
as an effort to circumvent the lead- 
ership that has historically spoken 
for blacks. 

The meeting Tuesday at the 
White House was requested by the 
group, which presented what it 
called an agenda for black pro- 
gress. 

The session fell on the birthday 
of the Reverend Mama Luther 
King Jr n and around the United 


States remembrances of the civil 
rights leader, who was slain in 
1968, coincided with controversy 
over how his memory should be 
honored. 

The White House meeting also 
one day before the release of 
an annual survey, “The State of 
Black America,'' by the National 
Urban lea gu e, which last year de- 
scribed Mr. Reagan's policies to- 
ward blacks as “callous." 

Like other established black 
leaders, John E. Jacob, president of 
the National Urban League, is not 
a member of the group that met 
with Mr. Reagan. Mr. Jacob was 
among those who assailed the ses- 
sion . 


Anger Greets Decision 
To Cut U.S. Arts Budget 


By Leslie Bennetts 

Nevr York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Leaders of arts 
organizations around the United 
States have reacted with anger and 
dismay to a plan by the Reagan 
administration to cut the budget of 
the National Endowment for the 
Arts by 1 1.7 percetiL 
“I’m just appalled," said Beverly 
Sills, general director of the New 
York City Opera. “I think that to 
take that enormous percentage off 
such a minuscule amount in sup- 
port of the arts is a disgrace.” 
Many officials involved with (he 
arts said they were particularly up- 
set because existing levels of sup- 
port are so small compared with 
other federal budget allocations. 

“To discuss cutting a $2QQ-bil- 
fidn deficit by cutting an appropri- 
ation of SIS million or $16 million 
is preposterous," said Martin E 
Segal, chairman of Lincoln Center. 
“As it is, the support the national 
endowment gets is inadequate for 
the role the arts have in this coun- 
try, and to discuss cutting it further 
as a serious aspect of budget cut- 
ting is ridiculous.” 

. According to administration of* 
fidals and budget documents pre- 
pared by the arts endowment agen- 
cy, President Ronald Reagan will 
request $1445 million for the arts 
in the fiscal year 1986. 

The program for opera and mu- 
sical theater would be cot by 18.3 
percent, to $4.9 million, and the 
musk: program would be cut IS 
percent, to 513 milli on. Dance 
would be cut 135 percent, to $7.7 
million. 

The administration's cuts must 
be approved by Congress, which 
for every year since 1982 has ap- 
propriated more money than re- 
quested for the national endow- 
ment. But this year there is 
considerable pressure to reduce the 
federal budget deficit 
White there is an acknowledged 


need to reduce that deficit, there 
also are some who doubt that cuts 
would be fairly distributed. 

"If the cuts to support of the arts 
are proportional to (he cals being 
paraded out to other parts of the 
budget, then I think this is sad, but 
it is right," said William B. Ma- 
comber, president of the Metropol- 
itan Museum of An. “The key is 
wh ether it’s a fair shore or whether 
it's a disproportionate share.” 

While officials of major cultural 
institutions said they would be bun 
by the cutbacks, many warned that 
the impact would be far worse on 
smaller, newer and less well-known 
groups. 

"It will be very difficult for any 
of us to recoup the amounts we 
lose, but for the smaller companies, 
for whom the percentage of govern- 
ment support is a bigger percent of 
the budget, it may be a disaster." 
raid Anthony A. Bliss, general 
manager of the Metropolitan Op- 
era and chairman of the Joffrey 
Ballet. 

Orville H. Schell Jr_ chairman of 
the New York Giy Ballet, said; 
“We’re going to lose a lot of institu- 
tions.” 

Miss Sills said; “I’m just hoping 
that if enough of us yeD and scream 
and stamp our feet and have tan- 
trums. President Reagan will take 
another look and say. *My God, 
that’s really very tittle money.’ ” 

Vefasacker to Visit Israel 

Jteuiers 

BONN —President Richard von 
Weizsacker will pay the first visit to 
Israel by a West German head of 
state, the government announced 
Wednesday. An invitation to visit 
came from President Chaim Her- 
zog of Israel the announcement 
said, but no date has been fixed. 
Mr. von Weizsacker is to visit Jor- 
dan and Egypt early next month. 


“I don’t think his meeting is tan- 
tamount to meeting with blacks 
who have a constituency and who 
have provided services ova some 
period of time." he said. 

But Bruce Chapman, an assis- 
tant to Edwin Meese 3d, the presi- 
dent’s counselor, said the meeting 
had not been intended as a slap at 
the established black leadership. 

Leaders of the black establish- 
ment say that they have requested 
meetings with Mr. Reagan at vari- 
ous times, most recently in Decem- 
ber to discuss South Africa, but 
that their requests have not been 
granted. The people who met Tues- 
day with the president call their 
group the Council for a Black Eco- 
nomic Agenda. The council sought 
the session last month. Mr. Chap- 
man raid, and was notified about 
three days lata that it had been 
scheduled. 

Earlier in January the council 
offered a plan for black economic 
self-help instead or what it called 
ineffectual government aid. 

Members of the council include 
Arthur Fletcher, a former high- 
ranking official in the Nixon ad- 
ministration; Robert L. Woodson, 
chairman of the National Center 
for Neighborhood Enterprise; Dan 
Smith, president of a Virginia com- 
pany, and Dr. Glenn Loury, a pro- 
fessor at Harvard University. 

Others in the group include high 
school principals, researchers, pro- 
fessors, state officials and forma 
Reagan administration officials. 

Mr. Woodson, chairman of the 
council, said the organization 
stemmed from several meetings 
over the past year among blacks 
who shared a common interest. 
There was no White House involve- 
ment in the group's formation, be 
said. 

Speaking for (be administration 
afterward. Samuel R. Pierce Jr., the 


secretary of housing and urban de- 
velopment. who is the highest- 
ranking black in the executive 
branch, said the meeting was not 
designed to circumvent the estab- 
lished black leadership. 

‘i think that a lot of the estab- 
lished black community has taken 
an attitude that they want to con- 
tinue dealing in a way that this 
administration doesn't want to." 
Mr. Pierce said. “We are trying to 
reduce deficits and get things down 
into manageable shape and others 
just want to have a giant giveaway 
program and we are not going to do 
that." 

Mr. Fletcher, an assistant secre- 
tary of labor in the Nixon adminis- 
tration. said a need for an alliance 
between blacks and the Reagan ad- 
ministration existed because blacks 
were “constantly voting against a 
Republican administration without 
seeking ways to work with that ad- 
ministration once it was in power.’’ 

Mr. Reagan received about 10 
percent of the black vole in the 
1984 election. 


Black Student Stabbed 
By Teacher in S. Africa 

Aeenic France- Presse 

JOHANNESBURG — A teach- 
er in the black township of Sebo- 
keng stabbed and wounded a stu- 
dent leader during a clash between 
school officials and mili tarns trying 
to gel pupils to boycott classes, a 
police spokesman said Wednesday. 

He said the victim. Chaka Ra- 
ti ebe. was leading a group of about 
40 members of the Congress of 
Sooth African Students in an at- 
tempt to prevent pupils from at- 
tending classes on Tuesday. Mr. 
Radebe got into an argument with 
an unidentified teacher, who then 
stabbed him. the spokesman said. 



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— 







Page 4 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1985 


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PnUWifd With The New York Time- and The W—Mnglnn Port 


Sribune 


Democracy Needs Help 


Add Brazil’s Tancredo Neves lo the list of 
democratic presidents in Latin America. His 
choice by an electoral coBege Tuesday ends 20 
years of military rule in a bellwether country. 
This is good news, swelling the tide toward free 
government in the Western hemisphere. Now 
President Reagan needs a strategy lo keep that 
tide moving and to keep these vulnerable de- 
mocracies afloat. 

In the 1970s. when the region’s real econom- 
ic growth averaged 6 percent a year, military 
government was the norm in South America. 
But by decade’s end, everything was going 
wrong. Caught in the worst recession in 50 
years, most countries mortgaged declining ex- 
port earnings to repay staggering foreign debts 
at rising interest rates. By 1983 the net outflow 
of capital from Latin America was nearly $30 
billion and total debt rose by more than $20 
billion to $350 billion. 

So out went the soldiers, tarnished by fail- 
ure. Only two rightist military rulers are still 
entrenched: General Angus lo Pinochet of 
Chile and General Alfredo Siroessaer of Para- 
guay. But it needs to be remembered that this 
shift to democracy was propelled by economic 
distress. The newly accountable regimes will 
need to perform well economically if they are 
to protect their liberty. 

Brazil is the sixth South American country 
to resume civilian rule since 1979. Ecuador led 
the way, followed by Peru. Bolivia, Argentina 
and Uruguay. Venezuela's democracy is solid- 
ly established, and Colombia has managed to 


contain the insurgency that threatened its elec- 
tive system. Poverty and a corrupting narcotics 
trade weaken Bolivia, and Peru must contend 
with Maoist guerriUas- 

AII are weighed down by foreign debts, for 
which military regimes and imprudent lenders 
share the blame. An experienced pragmatist. 
President-elect Neves of Brazil is already un- 
der pressure to repudiate $98 billion in debts. 
He has promised to uy to renegotiate it on 
more liberal terms and deserves a sympathetic 
hearing from his creditors. 

What else can the United States do to pre- 
serve the hemisphere's turn to democracy? 
Policies that strengthened the dollar have 
helped Latin exports: declining interest rates 
have eased Latin debt burdens; oil conserva- 
tion and exploration have reduced the energy 
bill. But the administration should now move 
beyond crisis refinancing of debts to the active 
promotion of trade and investment that can 
spur long-term growth. 

And some important gestures would cost 
little. Lei the White House encourage demo- 
crats by opening American doors, ami minds, 
to truly representative neighbors, starting with 
Mr. Neves of Brazil and President Raft] Alfon- 
sin or Argentina. They deserve a seat at the 
high table, lo be consulted about hemisphere 
policy. Open collaboration is the best expres- 
sion oT solidarity for leaders who strive to 
reconcile legitimacy with accountability at a 
lime of economic stress. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Israeli Withdrawal 


Progress is finally being made in the matter 
of Israel's long overdue withdrawal from Leb- 
anon. The Israelis had demanded security 
guarantees — negotiated ones from Lebanon, 
tadt ones from Syria — to cover the departure 
of the 12,000 or so troops left from its 1982 
invasion. So far. the Lebanese, dominated by 
Damascus, have been unable to offer such 
guarantees, and the Syrians, playing a larger 
game, have been unwilling to. Asa result, 
Israel pained by the continuing casualties and 
economic and diplomatic costs, has now de- 
cided to withdraw on its own. Its plan reflects 
the priorities of Prime Minister Shimon Peres, 
whose Labor Party seeks to extract the country 
from the quagmire his Likud coalition part- 
ners got into in Lebanon while they were 
governing alone. 

The three-stage Israeli plan anticipates a 
unilateral withdrawal from part of the coastal 
region within the next five weeks, then from 
the Bekaa Valley and then, “six to nine 
months" from now, the rest or the way to the 
international bonder. Ready or not, the Israelis 
say, we are leaving. By stating the plan in this 
form, the Israelis intend to jolt the Lebanese 
and others into joining to make cooperative 
arrangements for the control and security of 
the areas being evacuated, lest Israel be left 
free to make its own arrangements with local 


militias or lest chaos follow instead. Along the 
southern strip of Lebanon, the Israelis want in 
the end to maintain control through a client 
militia and their own regular patrols. 

This is a challenge to Lebanese sovereignty. 
Beirut's best response is to demonstrate, 
against the difficult odds, that its army can do 
a serviceable security job. Its antagonists here 
include not only the Druze and Christian units 
supported by Israel but also the Shiite Mos- 
lems who have bedeviled Israel's occupation of 
southern Lebanon. The United Nations forces 
on the scene will be essential although their 
number and deployment are subject to a great- 
power consensus, and Moscow is currently 
using its leverage to work itself into a larger 
U.S.-acknowlcdged Mideast role. 

“After iwo-and-a-half years in Lebanon we 
have learned the hard way that Israel should 
not become the policeman of Lebanon.’' says 
Israel’s defense minister. Yitzhak Rabin. Leb- 
anon, too, has learned the bard way that Israel 
should not become the policeman of Lebanor.. 
The Palestine Liberation Organization as an 
organized and oppressive force in Lebanon 
was ousted by the Israeli invasion, but Leba- 
non paid a very high cost in terms of life, 
property and viability as a state Still it's good 
that Israel is withdrawing What about Syria? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Israel’s Vietnam 

Israel’s decision to execute a phased with- 
drawal of its forces from Lebanon is an admis- 
sion of defeat after the most abortive military 
adventure in the nation’s history. Not a single 
concession was extracted from Syria's Presi- 
dent Hafez al-Assad that might guarantee the 
security of Israelis living near the Lebanese 
border. Instead. Mr. Assad exerts decisive le- 
verage over the very government in Beirut that 
Israel and the United Stales took puns to 
create and has a relatively free hand to harass 
Israel if he considers it in Syria's inleresu 
— Baltimore Sun. 

It says something for [Prime Minister] Shi- 
mon Peres’s integrity as well as his pragmatism 
that he has made good his election pledge to 
begin bringing the boys home even if under the 
slogan the lesser of all evils. 

— Daily Telegraph (London). 

Belghim’s Enromissile Delay 

The government hopes, with fear in its 
heart, that its NATO allies wiH agree to the 
decision to delay the start of installment of the 
missiles. If this does not happen, then the 
ruling coalition will face massive problems. 

— De Standaard ( Brussels). 

The current situation undermines Belgium's 
international credibility. It disappoints our 
Western allies. [Prime Minister Wilfried] Mar- 
lens's dilatory conduct endangers the NATO 
alliance and it indicated to tbe Kremlin that its 
harsh language pays off. 

— La Libre Belgique (Brussebl 


One thing is now a certainly. The install- 
ment of missiles is no longer in question. The 
decision has been taken. That is the essential 
concession Reagan obtained from Prime Min- 
ister Martens. All the rest is subordinate. 

— De Morgen f Brussels ). 

Where Brazil Is Lucky 

The Western world’s eighth biggest econo- 
my Tuesday passed peaceably back to demo- 
cratic hands when Tancredo Neves won a 
sweeping victory, as expected, in the Brazilian 
presidential election. Brazil is lucky — com- 
pared with so many less developed countries 
— that it sits atop some of the richest natural 
resources in tbe world. The long term potential 
must, simply must, be good. What Tancredo 
Neves needs above all is time. 

— The Guardian ( London J. 

Spotlight on the Falaghas 

Two weeks ago the existence of the Falashas 
was unknown to at least 99 percent of their 
fellow men. Now they are news. A small, 
remote, long-isolated community has found 
the world’s spotlights beamed at it, and an old 
controversy has drawn new heat from it. There 
has been more heat than light. 

What cannot be justified is the charge that 
Israel meddled in Ethiopia’s internal affairs. 
Ethiopia has approved the Universal Declara- 
tion of Human Rights and the 1981 African 
Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights. Both 
declare that “everyone has the right to leave 
any country, including his own. 

— The Economist {London). 


FROM OUR JAN. 1 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Roy. Genius Astounds Harvard 

BOSTON — All Harvard is talking about a 
lecture given there recently by William James 
Sidis, an eleven-year-old prodigy who is regis- 
tered at the university as a special student and 
who went far into the realm of mathematical 
theory in his discussion of “Fourth Dimen- 
sional Bodies.” The lecture was given before 
the Harvard Mathematical Society and several 
professors, and although all were fa miliar with 
some of the wonderful features of this boy’s 
mind still they were none the less astounded 
when they listened for an hour and a half to his 
able talk on a subject so complex and difficult. 
Young Sidis still wears knickerbockers and 
outwardly shows no evidence of his master 
mind. He showed mastery of the subject 


1935: Barkers Die in GunbaHle 
OKLAWAHA, Florida — Mrs. Kate Barker. 
65-year-old mother who acted as machine gun- 
ner for her gangster son Fred, was shot dead 
with him by Federal agents here [on Jan. I6J. 
“Ma” Barker was considered the spirit in the 
gang credited with kidnaping Edward Bremer, 
St Paul brewer. Two months ago Fred Barker 
rented the home of Carson Bradford. With his 
mother they had lived there quietly. Display- 
ing photographs to residents in the neighbor- 
hood, agems convinced themselves they had 
located the hideout Surrounding the house, 
they called on the occupants to surrender, only 
lo be met with a burst of machine-gun bullets. 
It was noon before firing from tbe house could 
be silenced. Agents found both Barkers dead. 


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*' 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights resentd 







Going With the Flow 
Inside the Kremlin ^ 


By Jerry F. Hough 

This is the last of three articles. 




Delusions That Undermine Democracy 


W ASHINGTON — Defense of 
democracy depends on pessi- 
mists who are not defeatists. It de- 
pends on spirited realists such as 
Jean-Fran^is Revel. For the first 
time since 1922, when Mussolini 
seized power, all of Western Europe 
is democratic. But Mr. Revel fears 
that democracy could prove to be a 
brief parenthesis in history because 
democracy practices inteUecluaJ self- 
disarmament 

Part of the problem is the notioo 
that nations Inal are merely imper- 
fect have no standing to despise na- 
tions (hat are atrocious. Thus in Hol- 
land in 1981. a substantial portion of 
an opinion sample agreed that the 
Dutcn could not criticize Soviet ac- 
tions in Poland and Afghanistan “as 
long as housing conditions in Am- 
sterdam fail to meet the highest stan- 
dards of modern comfort as long as 
women remain exploited and the le- 
gal rights of heterosexual married 
couples are denied to homosexual 
married couples." 

Part of the problem is a reflex for 
self-delusion. It involves representing 
defeats as victories. For example, the 
State Department hailed the building 
of the Berlin Wall as a victory for the 
West because it revealed the “insecu- 
rity" of the East Actually the wall, 
like another “victory." the Berlin 
Blockade, showed that the Soviet 
Union could abrogate U.S. rights 
without fear of serious reprisal 
Mr. Revel’s new book. "How De- 
mocracies Perish.” is a catalog of fol- 
ly. at once hilarious and hair-curling, 
especially regarding the lingering 
death of detente. Either economic 
links lo the West are unimportant to 
the Soviet Union, in whit* case de- 


By George F. Will 

teme was even dumber in theory than 
in practice, or they are important, in 
which case they should be used for 
leverage. But what happened when 
the Soviet Union, showing toward 
the West's warnings the disdain the 
warnings deserved, imposed martial 
law in Poland? 

France's former prune minister. 
Pierre Mauroy. declared that, were 
the West to retaliate by denying new 
loans to the Eastern bloc, that would 
be equivalent “an act of war." Amaz- 
ing. There is no bankable economy in 
Eastern Europe. Poland especially, is 
hopelessly in hock lo the West and 
without the ability or intention to 
repay. Yet it is “an act of war” to 
refuse to stop the piling of bad loans 
on top of bad loans. 

George Kerman is a tireless auditor 
of the errors, as he sees them, of 
people who regard the Soviet regime 
as radically unlike other regimes. Ten 
weeks after the invasion of Afghani- 
stan, he said: “Their immediate ob- 
jective was purely defensive." 

Now, leave aside the question of 
what the Soviet Union had to fear 
from the communist regime in Kabul 
that the invading Soviet forces re- 
placed. But what if what Mr. Kennan 
says is true? What does it say about 
the possibility of detente with a re- 
gime that says its vital interests are 
incompatible with an imperfectly at- 
tuned communist regime in Afghani- 
stan, an independent trade union in 
Poland and an Anatoli Shdianinsky 
outside prison walls? 

When Cambodian communists 
budded down to tbe drudgery (the 


work of idealists is never done) of 
murdering three million Cambodi- 
ans. the communists almost certainly 
suffered horribly from blisters on 
their palms, a result of using clubs in 
what Mr. Revel calls “an orgy of 
exploding skulls." It was like the kill- 
ing or baby seals, except the killing of 
the seals evokes more protests, and 
does not result in movies deflecting 
the blame from the seal-killers. 

A new movie. ’“The Killing 
Fidds." earns the “Blame America 
First" Oscar by preaching that com- 
munists killed millions but the blame 
falls on America. Why? Because U.S. 
bombing or the communists drove 
them crazy. You thought you had 
seen every wrinkle in the insanity 
defense? this version is: The guilty 
party is the one that deranges the 
killer by resisting him. 

But as Mr. Revel notes, genocide 
can be discreet: “At a time when the 
entire world was anathematizing the 
war in Vietnam, an almost flawless 
program of genocide was being car- 
ried out in total secrecy a few thou- 
sand kilometers away on the same 
continent." The killers of millions of 
Tibetans were Chinese. 

One Tibetan had this experience: 
“Accused of having failed to slack 
the corpses correctly, he was forced 
to go down into tbe pit. where he sank 
into tbe heap of decomposing flesh. 
He was hauled out just in time to 
avoid asphyxiation." 

Amenca’s conservative president 
refers to the regime responsible for 
killing the Tibetans as “so-called 
Communist China." Ponder that 
phrase. It is a symptom of the syn- 
drome by which democracies perish. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


W ashington — or the con- 
tending factions in the Kremlin, 
it seems likely that Yuri Andropov 
was most attracted to the one em- 
bracing the anti-American. pro-Eu- 
rope and pro-Japan detente concep- 
tion. There were men with varying 
views in Mr. Andropov's entourage. 
The careers of those like Georgi Ar- 
batov. of the Institute of the USA 
and Canada, and Fedor Buritasky. 
former Andropov aide, both adher- 
ents or the activist. pro-American de- 
tente view, did not prosper while Mr. 
Andropov was genera! secretary, but 
Lev Tcukunov. former editor of izves- 
tia. and Alexander Yakovlev, the new 
director of the major international 
institute l MEMO, were promoted. 
When, on SepL 28. 1983. Mr. Andro- 
pov made his statement about Lhe 
impossibility of dealing with Ameri- 
ca. he almost surely was not rejecting 
detente in general, but was moving 
towards a pro-Europe position. 

indeed, movement towards an 
anti-American detente remained 
strong after the death of Mr. Andro- 
pov's and into the summer of 1984. 
Thus. May and June featured an anti- 
American’ boycott of the Olympics, 
apparent encouragement of visits to 
West Germany by East German and 
Bulgarian leaders, signs of impending 
agricultural reform. Marshal Nikolai 
Ogarkovs remarkable interview and 
subtle signs of a weakness in the 
position of Mr. Gromyko (a lower 
ranking than Defense Minister Dmi- 
tri F. Ustinov, now dead, in order of 
election speeches and a subnormal 
celebration of his 75th birthday in 
July). These were all part of a consis- 
tent package. 

In August and September, as Mr. 
Chernenko recovered his health after 
a bout of heart trouble, a number of 
these policies were rejected fa an ap- 
parent return to the traditional de- 
tente policy. Mr. Gromyko came to 
Washington, and his speech at the 
United Nations evoked memories of 
the wartime alliance — one of the 
code-words of the Americanists. The 
East German and Bulgarian visits to 
West Germany were canceled, and 
the Central Committee plenum on 
agriculture did nothing. Marshal 
Ogarkov was removed, and Mr. Gro- 
myko's slock soared. In October, 
three months late, his birthday was 
suddenly celebrated wiLh unprece- 
dented fanfare, second only to Mr. 
Brezhnev's himself. 

The immediate future is hard to 
predict. In sociological terms the Po- 
litburo is deeply divided. Six of the 1 1 
voting members are over 70. They 
average 74 years of age. and. if the 


What House Democrats and Republicans Agree On 


W ASHINGTON — Anyone at 
all realistic about the makeup 
and dynamics of Congress has to 
conclude that the prospects for sub- 
stantive legislation passing the House 
of Representatives this year arc poor. 

Whether it is budgetary, economic, 
social or military policy, the House is 
a legislative nightmare. It is sharply 
split on partisan lines, with the open- 
bg-day, party-line vote refusbg to 
seat a contested but certified Repub- 
lican wbner from Indiana just a 
symptom of the deep divisions be- 
tween the majority Democrats and 
the minority Republicans. 

House Republicans, who won 
dose to 50 percent of lhe popular 
vote last November, but gained only 
42 percent of the seals, blame the 
gerrymandering tactics of Deraocrat- 
ic-con trolled legislatures for their mi- 
nority status. They are farther embit- 
tered’ that on key House committees, 
the Democrats have given themselves 
larger majorities than their numbers 
in the House entitle them to claim. 

Beyond the partisan differences, 
there are deep ideological splits. 
Many of the young conservative Re- 
publicans elected b the last five years 
want to carry out what they see as 
“the Reagan Revolution” without 
compromise with the Democrats. 
Many of the old-guard liberal Demo- 
crats are determined to thwart them. 

As if that were not enough, both 
parties are divided internally on gen- 
erational tines. The speaker erf the 
House, Thomas P. O'Neill. Jr.. Dem- 
ocrat of Massachusetts, beginning his 
final term, was repudiated when the 
junior Democrats dumped the chair- 
man of the House Armed Services 
Committee and elected one of their 
own to replace him. 

The House minority leader, Robert 
H. Michel. Republican of Illinois, has 
avoided that kind of embarrassment, 
but must constantly look over his 
shoulder at the young Turks b his 
party, starting with his deputy. Trent 
Loll Republican of Mississippi. Mr. 
Lott and his allies wrote the Republi- 
can platform of 1984 and do not want 
it compromised by Mr. Michel’s usu- 
al half-a-loaf legislative tactics. 

In the face at all those difficulties, 
it may seem almost irrelevant that 
there 'are emerging areas of policy 
agreement between House Demo- 
crats and Republicans. Nonetheless, 
that development is significant, for it 
suggests the direction b which public 
policy may move b the years ahead 
— - even if it turns out that no great 
progress can be made tins year. 

lie clearest and most recent exam- 
ple of this nascent agreement came 
with the publication this week of 
“The First 100 Days.” a legislative 
agenda prepared by the House Re- 
publican Research Commit tec under 
ns chairman. Jerry Lewis, Republi- 
can of California. It is interesting to 
compare “100 Days” with a some- 
what similar booklet, “Renewing 
America's Promise." published ex- 
actly a year ago by a task force of the 
House Democratic Caucus headed hv 
Martin O. Sabo of Minnesota under 
the caucus chairman then. Giilis W. 
Long of Loui.sianj. 

Mr. Lewis and Mr. Sabo. »h» 


By David S. Broder 


came to Congress b 1978. both held 
leadership positions b their state leg- 
islatures and both are thorough parti- 
sans. Mr. Lewis's manifesto claims 
that the Democratic Party “has run 
out of dreams and offers lonlyl recur- 
ring nightmares." Mr. Sabo's pam- 

S hlet bristles with references to “the 
.eagan recession" and “the Reagan 
deficits." 

But if you push past the rhetoric, 
you find fundamental agreement on 
three or Tour essential domestic-po- 
licy propositions: 

First, both these manifestos say 
that the major goal — and the criteri- 
on by which all other policies must be 
measured — is sustained economic 
growth. That is the keynote of the 
GOP document — but no more so 
than the Democrats', which says, 
“We must grow, if we are to preserve 


the American promise of economic 
opportunity. And we must grow 
steadily, without the recurring fits of 
inflation and bouts of recession 
which have plagued our economy for 
the past 15 years." 

Second, they agree that tax simpli- 
fication can be a major component of 
a long-term growth strategy. That 
agreement suggests that (skeptics 
notwithstanding) President Reagan 
may have allies available when he 
moves ahead lo seek bipartisan sup- 
port for a tax-simplification bill. 

Third, both papers recognize that 
the federal deficit is a clear and pre- 
sent danger to sustabed growth. The 
Democrats were predictably harsh in 
their comments on the president’s 
leadership default on this issue. But 
the Republicans' statement explicitly 
recognizes — as Mr. Reagan has re- 


fused to do — the requirement for 
“cost-savbg initiatives" in the Penta- 
gon and the possible need for “new 
revenue” to reduce the deficit. 

Fourth, both parties' House mani- 
festos recognize the need for an ex- 
plicit government strategy for eco- 
nomic growth. The Republicans are 
skeptical of the Democrats' call for 
an “Economic Cooperation Coun- 
cil," but they are also implicitly criti- 
cal of Mr. Reagan for dismantling the 
existing Council of Economic Advis- 
ers. saying it is necessary' to have such 
a body, “unconstrained by the insti- 
tutional perspectives of other agen- 
cies ... to help formulate and pro- 
mote sound policies " 

Perhaps this is reading too much 
into these areas of agreement But 
given the otherwise bleak prospects 
in the House, one may be forgiven for 
finding hope wherever it may lie. 

The Washington Post. 


Kaza khstan party leader. Dinmuk- 
h amoved Kunayev, is excluded, they 
have each worked for an average of 
over 30 years in high posts in Mos- 
cow. The other five members average . 

years of age. and have each 
worked in Moscow for an average of 
three years: Mikhail S. Gorbachov 
with six years work in Moscow- is the 
old-timer. To think that these outsid- 
ers agree with what bus been done for 
30 years stretches credulity. 

Mr. Gorbachov has an enormous 
range of responsibilities — coordina- 
tion of the economy, ideological ~ 
work, foreign communists, agricul- 
ture. the food industry and. by all 
indications, still personnel selection. 
He is given assignments like his trip 
to Britain to test him. to broaden ha 
experience and to build him up on 
Soviet television: and he has been 
passing these tests with ease. If there 
are forces strong enough lo challenge 
him for the succession, it is virtually 
inconceivable that they would not be 
strong enough at least to give Grigori 
V. Romanov, the former Leningrad 
Communist Party chief but now sec- 
retary of the Central Committee in 
Moscow, or someone else these kinds 
of experiences. 

Mr. Gorbachov's policy positions 
cannot be pinned down. He has been 
playing a cautious Gary Han role 
signaling in various ways a commit- 
ment to new ideas, but not being 
specific. He escorts the Hungarian 
leader around, he chairs an unusual 
Supreme Soviet Foreign Affairs 
Commission session on expansion of 
trade with the Third World (which 
everyone knows requires manufac- 
tured goods of world quality), he 
speaks out for the expansion of ex- 
penditures on light industry in his 
election speech (but that passage was 
excised from Pravda). 

Domestically, the logic of his situa- 
tion should certainly push him to 
reform. In foreign policy. Mr. Gorba- 
chov as leader would have to opt for 
d&tente. But after an initial, broad 
“peace" campaign, he could easily 
choose the pro-Japanese. pro-Euro- 
pean (and anti-American) version to 
help him sell his domestic reforms. 

The foreign policy alignments and 
options in the Soviet Union create 
innumerable paradoxes for U.S. po- 
licy and Soviet-American relations. 
American policy has had a devastat- 
ing impact on the political standing 
of the activist. American-oriented d b- 
tente position which is most dedicat- 
ed to a real improvement in Soviet- 
American relations. 

When Soviet leaders have adopted ■ 
die reassuring gestures the activists 
propose — small reductions in troop 
strength in Central Europe or the . 
renunciation of the first use of nude- ^ 
ar weapons, for example — the Unil- 
ed Slates has acted as if they were 
signs of weakness and has become 
more confrontational. Yet, precisely 
the confrontational aspects of Ameri- 
can policy have been Lhe biggest stim- 
ulus in building support lor signifi- 
cant economic reform that tbe 
conservative old guard has resisted. 

In retrospect, it is dear that Ameri- 
can policy of the late 1970s and early 
1980s broke the postwar mold of So- 
viet-Araerican relations and set tbe 
stage for a substantial and benefical 
change in interna tional relations. But 
because the United States seems de- 
termined to force the Soviet Union to 
play to Europe and Japan, any 
change will represent a real challenge 
to which the United States will have 
to react with great sophistication. . 


f'lhuh 


The writer is a professor of political 
science at Duke University and a mem- 
ber of the staff of the Brookings Insti- 
tution. He contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post. 


LETTERS 


or> 




No Easy Money at Mr. Baker’s Treasury Quietly Saving Peopl 

** » Rt-onrAino “ Fthinnirm /n-r 


By Hobart Rowen 


W ASHINGTON — Is James A. 

Baker 3d, tbe Treasun secre- 
tary-designate. an easy- money popu- 
list? “Anyone who suggests’ that is 
talking about a different Jim Baker 
than the one 1 know.” says his men- 
tor. Ben Love, head of Texas Com- 
merce Bancshares. 

“He’d never have changed over 
from the Democratic Party to the 
Republican Party [about 20 years 
ago] if he believed [m easy money]," 
Mr. Love said. 

To be sure, Mr. Baker, as White 
House chief of staff, kept up the pres- 
sure on the chairman of the Federal 
Reserve, Paul A. Volcker, to loosen 
up the monetary strings in 1984. But 
that was at a time that the Fed was 
allowing no growth in the money sup- 
ply. and one did not have to be an 
advocate of easy money to believe 
that the Fed was threatening to over- 
stay its tight policy, and strangle the 
economy to death- 
A significant but little-known clue 
to the Baker altitude on monetary 
policy is that when the question of 
Mr. Volckert reappointment came 
up in 1983, Mr. Baker proposed to 
shift the job to former Ford economic 
adviser Alan Greenspan, whose views 
are no less orthodox than Mr. 
Volcker’s, But no consensus devel- 
oped for Mr. Greenspan or anyone 
eke, and Mr. Volcker was kept. This 
delighted the business community, 
and angered Reaganaut ideologues 
who were anxious to ride Mr. Volcker 
out of town. 

There is every indication that the 
Baker Treasury will fit more into a 
traditional, mainstream Republican 
mold than does Donald T. Regan's 

miscellaneous mix of monetarists and 
supply-siden. Mr. Baker worries 
about' the long-term effect of budget 
deficits, and has less faith than Mr. 
Regan in the abilitv of the economy 
to outgrow the red ink. 

Says Jack Albertine of lhe vscll- 
pljLtd business lobby, the American 


Business Conference: “Baker will 
bring an entrepreneurial business 
perspective to the Treasury. He’s a 
very solid, strong fiscal conservative, 
very much at home in corporate 
board rooms. Remember, he was a 
Gerald Ford Republican before he 
was a Ronald Reagan Republican." 

One erf Donald Regan’s problems 
at Treasury was that the financial 
community began to question his 
commitment to orthodox economics, 
accusing him of flip-flopping be- 
tween the supply-side and monetarist 
advisers on his staff. 

Neither of those ideologies will 
hold sway in the Baker Treasury. 
Moreover, a major change in tone 
and direction is also likely lo result 
from the shift of Baker’s White 
House aide, Richard Dorman, to the 
post of deputy treasury secretary. 

Mr. Darman. who shares Mr. Bak- 
er's conservative views, is expected to 
have a influence on international fi- 
nancial policy, a role now filled by 
Under Secretary Beryl SprinkeL a 
prototypical monetarist. Relation- 
ships between the United Slates and 
the World Bank, which had deterio- 
rated under Mr. Regan and Mr. 
SprinkeL, are likely to improve. 

The international financial com- 
munity will find the views of Mr. 
Baker and Mr. Darman on deficits 
and interest rates more compatible. 
No one on the White House staff was 
charmed by Mr. Regan’s repeated 
insistence that there is no relation- 
ship between huge budget deficits 
ana an overvalued dollar and high 
interest rates. That gave the impres- 
sion (hat the administration did not 
core about the deficit problem. 

In fact, perhaps a sign of the 
changing limes is that Donald Regan, 
after all these months of debunking 
the deficit-interest rate relationship, 
told ihe wire sen ices in jn interview 
last Friday that lhe deficit i» the na- 
tion's No. I ett month, problem, and 





that if we can get it down, “then 
interest rates will come down." 

Although he is opposed to general 
lax increases to reduce the deficit, 
one tax that Mr. Baker may decide to 
push, speculates Sam Nakagama. a 
Wall Street analyst, is an oil import 
tax. “They like that in Texas, because 
oil prices are coming down sharply, 
and that's threatening the banking 
system.” Mr. Nakagama said. 

As chief of staff, Mr. Baker kept a 
low public profile, while exercising 
great power. Those who know him 
expect no surprises. “He’s both 
strong and compassionate, and that's 
an unusual combination.” his execu- 
tive assistant, Margaret Tutwiler. 
said. “He's Mr. Everything in Hous- 
ton — comes from one of the oldest 
families, successful lawyer, tons of 
money. That gives you a type or secu- 
rity that makes you a more powerful 
person because you don't need the 
job to be somebody back in your 
home town " 

The HaJnaptnn IW 


Regarding “ Ethiopian Jews Airlift- 
ed by Thousands to Israel " (Jan. 4): . 

Thomas L Friedman's report of 
the Israelis saving all those thousands 
of people so quietly is one of the most 
beautiful stories I've read in years. 

MILDRED GAREL. 

New York. 

Miles Away From There 

Regarding "U.S. Bases in U.K.: Old 
Bulwark Gets New Weapons" (Jan. 2) 
by Michael Getler: 

The report describes the area of 
Lakenheath. England “jutting" into 
the English Channel. Lakenheath is 
many miles from the Channel. It is 
situated in Easi Anglia and is rela- 
tively close to the North Sea. 

DAVID R.T. MYTTON. 

Manila. 

An Earlier Honor 

The obituary on Sergeant Charles 
E. Kelly (Jan. 14) says that he was the 
first U JS. enlisted nian to receive the 
Congressional Medal of Honor in 
World War II. Since the United 
States had been at war for 21 months 
at the lime Mr. Kelly performed his 
medal-winning exploit, the statement 
seems quite incredible. 

D. EVAN STEVENS. 

Paris. 

Editor's note: Records show I hat the 
general order awarding the Medal of 
Honor to Kelly was the second of the 
war involving an enlisted man, but that 
at least hi other enlisted Medal oj 
Honor winners were later awarded the 
medal for deeds performed before Rel- 
ic's action. 


■ ? ■-. . 






. ' ^ m 

>fe- r ■ 

• ■ 



,:V (0 

- . 

■Stu". M-' " 




Letters intended for publication 
should he addressed "Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be bnef and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 

be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


N - 

4 V . 

' 5 *t 




;,,S 


•fto 


SS'k;:. 








'IT 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1985 


Page 5 


China Says 



r, 

A* 




nai c 


' Wji 


\ 

V, ~i’H 
tdeii. 

^ 5' 

• *■' Dr c^: 
a Dj in'* 

?T'Ci 

'•‘T UnL 
; J .^i 

< she^ 




H:ti, 

' J - ■ J •** 
. ' J: , s "' > 
• l - HuVv 


Vietnamese 

incursion 

• TJto Associated Press 

BEUING — 'Vietnamese troops 
crossed into China's Yunnan prov- 
ince this week but were repulsed 
Mad givea “due punishment," a 
Chinese Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man said Wednesday, 1 

• The spokesman, Ma. Yuzhen, 
also sad at a briefing that China 
would continue to provide assis- 
tance “to the best of its ability” to 
Ganriiodiaa resistance troops re- 
treating in th& face of a dry-season 
-offensive launched by Vietnamese 
oocopation forces. , 

• The official Xinhua press agency 
said Ihat-VietDamese forces crossed 
the border Monday under artillery 
covefbut that by Tuesday evening 
. “all tbe invaders were expelled with 
a number of Vietnamese troops 
Jailed or wounded” 

• The report gave no Chinese casu- 
alty figures, bat Xinhua said six 
Chinese civilians were killed and 
one wounded Jan. 9 when the Viet- 
namese laid a border ambush in 
Guangzi Zhuang autonomous re- 
gion. 

Mr. Ma accused Vietnam of ''in- 
tensified armed provocations 
against China” in the past few 
'months. 

' “Since New Year’s Day 1985. 
Vietnamese troops have furthered 
their provocative activities of in- 
truding into, harassing and bom- 
barding Chinese border areas,” he 
said. 

“Late In the night of Jan. 14 and 
early, in the morning of Jan. 15, 
Vietnamese troops attacked the 
Laoshan area in Yunnan.” Mr. 
Mass said, adding: “Under such 
circumstances, it is only natural 
that Chinese frontier guards were 
compelled to fight back in self- 
defense to give the invaders due 
punishment/* 

China invaded Vietnam in 1979 
but pulled back after a month, say- 
ing it had accomplished its objec- 
tive of teaching the Vietnamese a 
lesson for border provocations and 
Hanoi's invasion of Cambodia. 
Since then, both sides have report- 
,ed periodic damrishes. 

HanoTs pro-Soviet stance and its 
occupation of Cambodia are the 
main issues separating the Commu- 
nist neighbors. China is. a key sup- 
plier of the Cambodian resistance. 

In Thailand, a senior Cambodi- 
an guerrilla official said that Viet- 
namese gunners had shelled a Cam- 
bodian resistance camp along the 
Thai-Cambodian border since last 
Friday to prevent the guerrillas 
from retaking the base, overrun 
earlier by the Vietnamese. 

An aid official said some shells 
landed at a nearby evacuation site, 
where about 3,400 refugees had 
-fled,’ and that they dispersed to 
other areas along the border. 

A Thai nnfitary source said that 
Vietnamese soldiers on Tuesday 
burned the Cambodian half of a 
bridge that once saved as the ma- 
jor Thai -Cambodian- border cross- 
ing point The bridge has been 
dosed since the 1973 Communist 
Khmer Rouge victory in Cambo- 
dia. 



Giuho Andreoiti 


Italy to Push 
To End Crisis 
Iri EC Budget 

The Associated Press 

STRASBOURG, France — For- 
eign Minister Giulio Andreoiti of 
Italy said Wednesday that conven- 
ing a conference to redraft the Eu- 
ropean Community treaties and 
solving its budget crisis would top 
the Italian program during his 
counuy's presidency. 

“No effort will be spared in seek- 
ing agreement by June” on a date 
for convening an intergovernmen- 
tal conference to negotiate the trea- 
ty on European union, he told the 
European Parliament. 

Proposals for revamping the 
ECs institutional framework have 
already been drafted by a commit- 
tee set up at Fontainebleau during 
the French presidency of the EC 
last year. 

To resolve the ECs budget im- 
passe, Mr. Andreoiti said he would 
search for measures to find the nec- 
essary cash. The parliament reject- 
ed the 1985 budget in December 
because it feO I J billion European 
Currency Units (S900 million) 
short of expected expenditures. 

. He said advancing the scheduled 
increases in member nations' con- 
tribution “by a couple of months” 
would be the first “working hy- 
pothesis” on which he would seek a 
solution. He noted, however, that 
this proposal may run into “insur- 
mountable” opposition. 

Mr. Andreoiti said the economic 
strategy of the Italian presidency 
wouldfoHow the program outlined 
this week by the president of the 
new EC Commission, Jacques De- 
lius of France. 

■Removing barriers to trade, 
streng thening the European Mone- 
tary System and convergence of the 
national economies form the back- 
bone of Mr. Delon’s program. 





People’s Doily 
Studies Moo’s 
'Leftist Errors’ 

New York Tunes Service 

BEUING — The People's 
Dapy has marked the 50ih an- 
niversary of Mao’s accession to 
the party leadership with an ar- 
tide asserting that he gpt away 
with his “leftist errors” after 
1949 because “the people were 
not mentally prepared” for the 
possibility of his making mis- 
takes." 

The Communist Party news- 
paper said Tuesday that Mao, 
who died in 1976. had made 
“indelible, magnificent contri- 
butions” during the Commu- 
nists* struggle forpower. In par- 
ticular, it said, tee had “saved 
the Chinese revolution and the 
party” by wresting the leader- 
ship f rom a rival faction at the 
Politburo meeting at Zunyi in 
Guizhou province on Jan. 15, 
1935. 

But^ the paper said,' Mao’s 
role from 1935 to 1949, when 
the Commutzisu defeated the 
nationalists and formed the 
People’s Republic of China, en- 
dowed' him with such prestige 
that neither the party nor the 
Chinese people txala conceive 
that he could do something seri- 
ously .wrong/ 


jence 
Officer Held 
fa Taiwan 

The Associated Press 

TAIPEI —The deputy chief of 
Taiwan's mSimy intelligence has 
been arrested in connection with 
tile lolling of a Chinese-American 
journalist in California last year, 
the government said Wednesday. 

The Govenubem Information 
Office identified' the arrested man 
as Colonel Chen Hu-men. The gov- 
ernment announced Tuesday the 
dismissal of the head of the intelli- 
gence bureau, but no reason was 
given. 

Henry Liu, 52, a political writer 
for the Chinesc-language San Fran- 
cisco Journal, was shot and killed 
Oct 15 by three men of Asian ap- 
pearance at his home in Daly City, 
California. Mr. Liu was reported to 
have been writing an unfavorable 
biography of Taiwan's president 
Chiang Ching-kno. 

Government sources said they 
expected a major shakeup to follow 
in the intelligence bureau. 

The dismissed chief of the De- 
fense Ministry's intelligence bu- 
reau was Vice Admiral Wang Shi- 
lin, 57, a former official at Taiwan's 
Embassy in Washington before the 
United States switched its diplo- 
matic recognition to mainland Chi- 
na in 1979. Tbegovernment said 
General Wong Chin-shu. head of 
the National Security Bureau, had 
taken ova his post. 

Meanwhile, the independent 
Chin ese-language Independence 
Evening Post, quoting unidentified 
Sources, said two other “ranking 
officials” of the agency had been 
arrested. - 

Taiwan has no extradition treaty 
with the United States, and govern- 
ment soorces have declined to say 
whether suspects would be sent to 
the United Slates to face trial 


fb>W' 


Minister Soys India WUlNot Allow 

CfcemM 


.Rotten r ; 

BHOPAL* India — Union Car- 
twfc Cwp. never will be allowed to 
reopen the chemical plant here that 
leaked poison, gas, killing more 
than 2,000 people, the state's chief 

minister and. 

chief minis ter of 
, of which Bhopal 
is the" capital, said at a political 
.meeting .'Tuesday n ight that the 
central government in New Delhi 
bad approved the decision. 

“Union- Carbide .will never be 
allowed io fedpen its factory here.” 
bosaid. - m • 

The chairman of Union Carbide, 
;WaiTea ht -Anderson, has said that 
-the U^-basoi. company might set 
up anew factory cm the Bhopal site 
to pitmdejobs for the 650 people 
laid off Whaa.'the chemical plant 
was das^fbffcrwing the fatal leak 
Dec. 3. 


A government spokesman said 
the state had received no proposal 
from the company to reopen. 
‘TTkw starting a new plant would 
not be welcome to the citizens of 
Bhopal,” he said. 


Pirates’ Raid on Liner 
Foiled in Philippines 

Reuters 

CEBU Philippines — A two- 
member coast guard patrol foiled a 
pintle attack on a liner approach- 
ing Cebu harbor in the central Phil- 
ippines. a coast guard spokesman 
said Wednesday. 

He said the pirates were swarm- 
ing aboard the Coral Princess, car- 
rying 260 passengers on a entise 
from Bali, shortly before da wn 
Tuesday when the patrol spoiled 
them. 


Hart Tells 
Europeans 
NATO Needs 
To Change 

By Stanley Meisier 

Los Angeles Times S«m« 

PARIS — Senator Gary Hart of 
Colorado laughed at the question 
that came up at a cocktail party in a 
fellow Democrat's apartment in 
Paris. 

“No," he replied, “I'm not run- 
ning for anything in Europe, in- 
cluding for an American office, not 
at all. I don’t think an American 
political figure traveling over here 
ought to be suspected all the time 
of doing something political" 

That suspicion, however, was rife 
as the senator, meeting political 
leaders and making speeches on the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion, slopped in Paris as pan oT a 
European lour that was to take him 
to Moscow for four days of discus- 
sions. 

The Paris newspaper Le Monde 
described the trip as part of Mr. 
Han's campaign for the J 988 Dem- 
ocratic presidential nomination. 

During his official visit to the 
United States last March. President 
Franqois Mitterrand of France ar- 
ranged to meet Mr. Han. and the 
two talked for 45 minutes Tuesday 
at ibe EJysee Palace. 

“President Mitterrand is one of 
the most impressive world leaders l 
have ever met,” Mr. Hart said as he 
left the president’s offices. “We gel 
along very well, 1 think.” 

Soon after he arrived Tuesday 
from London, Mr. Hart spoke to a 




Senator Gary Hart talks with students and officials at Edinburgh University. 


seminar of the French Institute of 
Foreign Relations, repeating many 
of the suggestions for change in 
NATO that he had made earlier in 
Britain. 

“If our citizens believe the risk of 
war. especially nuclear war. is 
growing, and that NATO policies 
are contributing to that growth, 
they will begin to look for alterna- 
tives to NATO.” Mr. Hart said. 

Arguing that NATO defense 


cannot be improved simply by 
spending more money, Mr. Hart 
proposed increasing the cohesion 
of units by trying to reduce the 
turnover of personnel developing 
strategy and tactics based on ma- 
neuvers rather than on superior 
firepower, and depending on weap- 
ons that ore small simple and rug- 
ged instead of on technologically 
sophisticated arms that are expen- 
sive and ineffective: 

“Change is not a danger.” he 


Swedish Diplomat’s Disappearance Remembered 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — Ceremonies 
are to be held in many Western 
countries this week to mark the 
40th anniversary of the disappear- 
ance of Raoul Wallenberg, the 
Swedish diplomat who has been 
credited with saving thousands of 
Jews from Nazi gas chambers. 

Mr. Wallenberg was last seen 
Jan. 17, 1945, shortly after Soviet 
troops entered Budapest, traveling 
with a Russian officer and his driv- 
er to report to Soviet headquarters 
at the town of Debrecen. 

The Soviet Union said he was 
taken under the protection of the 
Red Army and died in Moscow's 
Lubianka Prison in 1947. apparent- 
ly of a heart attack. 

Successive Swedish governments 
and Mr. Wallenberg's relatives 
have never accepted this and be- 
lieve be may still be alive in a Soviet 
prison. 

About 25 committees through- 
out the world are organizing cere- 
monies in honor of die man who set 
up safe houses for Jews and even 
dragged them from cattle trucks 
bound for the death camps, assert- 
ing they were citizens of Sweden, a 
neutral country. 

Mr. Wallenberg, then 32. was as- 
signed to Sweden's legation in Bu- 
dapest in 1944 and entrusted with a 
special mission to save as many 
Jewish lives as possible. 

He issued Swedish passports to 
tens or thousands of Jews to save 
them from death at the hands of the 


Nazis and Hungary’s Arrow Cross 
fascist government. 

Sven Julin. the Swedish Foreign 
Ministrv official responsible for his 
case, sard: “Officially. Raoul Wal- 
lenberg is considered to be alive 
until evidence is provided to the 
contrary." 

A Soviet statement in 1957 said a 
medical report showed Mr. Wallen- 
berg had died 10 years earlier, but 
the report was never produced. 
Prisoners released from the Soviet 
Union said he was alive as late as 
the 1970s. 

“We still get several testimonies 
every year,” Mr. Julin said. “We 
are sure Wallenberg was alive after 
1 947. so we cannot accept the Sovi- 
et statement of 1957. The Russians 
are well aware that Wallenberg is 
by no means a dosed case for us.” 

The anniversary of his disap- 
pearance Thursday will be marked 
by the ringing of church bells in 
various places of the United States, 
where he was made an honorary 
citizen. 

A statue will be unveiled in Mel- 
bourne. Public meetings will be 
held in New York. Britain, and 

Spadolini Plans U.S. Visit 

United Press International 

ROME — Defense Minister 
Giovanni Spadolini of Italy will 
make a visit to Washington next 
Tuesday through Friday for talks 
with LIS. leaders, his office an- 
nounced Tuesday. He also plans to 
visit New York. 


IsraeL A memorial service will be 
held in Stockholm cathedral. 

Mr. Walleaberg's family are con- 
vinced be is alive and continue to 
campaign on his behalf. They have 
aarusedthe Swedish government at 
the time of his disappearance of not 
pressing his case so as not to jeop- 
ardize good relations with Moscow. 

His half-aster. Nina Lagergren, 
believes be was arrested by the 


Guerrilla War Slowed 
By South Africa’s Pacts 
With 2 Black Nations 


By Alan Cowell 

New Fork Times Service 

LUSAKA. Zambia — The most 
prominent exile group fighting 
white-minority rule in South Africa 
has had its war against apartheid 
slowed in the last three months by 
actions taken against the guerrillas 
in neighboring, black-governed 
states, the leader of the group said. 

“We have had to be very careful 
over the past three months.” Oliver 
Tam bo, president of the African 
National Congress, said Tuesday in 
discussing South Africa’s nonag- 
gression treaties with Mozambique 
and Swaziland. Ibe ANC, which is 
outlawed in South Africa, formerly 
had its military headquarters in 
Mozambique. 

But the decrease in such activi- 
ties as sabotage and bomb attacks 
is not permanent. Mr. Tambo said 
in an interview, and guerrilla activi- 
ty of an unspecified nature soon 
would resume. The present slow- 
down has coincided with mounting 
unrest and labor activism in South 
Africa. 

Last March 16, South Africa 
signed what was called the Nko- 
raati agreement with Mozambique, 
committing each side to withdraw- 
ing support from the other’s foes. 
Mozambique expelled hundreds of 
ANC members. 

At the same time, it was an- 
nounced that, two years earlier. 
Swaziland had signed a similar 
agreement with South Africa. The 
Swazi police recently have restrict- 
ed the group’s activities. 

“The agreements differ." Mr. 
Tambo sard of tbe two pacts. “The 
Swazi agreement obliges Swaziland 
to assist South Africa in fighting 
(he ANC. So we have had the prob- 
lem that if we are in Swaziland we 
are virtually in South Africa. 

“We have got to be economic 
with our manpower until we have 
overcome the temporary problems 
caused by Nkomati and the Swazi 
agreement They have affected our 
communications system, so we 
have generally advised a lot of cau- 
tion.” 

Mr. Tambo asserted that nation- 
al congress infiltrators had been 


Oliver Tambo 


feuert 


said. “The only danger is freezing 
NATO in a rigid mold as the world 
changes around il” 

Although France does not par- 
ticipate in NATO's military as- 
pects. many French in the audience 
were skeptical of Mr. Hart's pro- 
posals and showed their skepticism 
in close questioning of tbe senator. 
The institute represents France's 
foreign policy establishment which 
tends to be conservative on East- 
West issues. 


Russians because they thought be 
was an American spy. She said that 
Moscow knew that his rescue activ- 
ities were partly financed by the 
United States. 

“Raoul himself has said to other 
prisoners that tbe Russians be- 
lieved him to be an American spy," 
she said. “But Raoul was not a spy. 
He staked his own life to save the 
lives of so many others.” 


3 Die in Jamaica Protests on Prices 


By Joseph B. Treaster 

New York Times Service 

KINGSTON, Jamaica — Three 
persons have been killed and three 
injured, police reported, during na- 
tionwide protests of the govern- 
ment's sharp increases in fuel 
prices. 

The demonstrations Tuesday, 
which consisted mostly of groups 
of 40 to 50 people blocking roads 
with cars and burning tires, forced 
schools and most offices and busi- 
nesses in the capital to dose. Sever- 
al international airline flights to 
Kingston were canceled. 

Government officials said pro- 
tests were less extensive in tbe 
north coast resort towns of Monte- 
go Bay, Ocbo Rios and Ne§riL and 
that the country’s vital tourist busi- 
ness. now in its peak season, was 
not dramatically affected. 

{Security forces, placed on alert. 


patrolled deserted streets in Jamai- 
ca’s major cities early Wednesday, 
United Press International report- 
ed from Kingston. A fourth person 
was killed Tuesday, officials said, 
but they were uncertain if tbe death 
was connected to tbe demonstra- 
tions. 

[Michael Manley, leader of the 
opposition People’s National Par- 
ty, called for more protests 
Wednesday.] 

Prime Minister Edward P.G. 
Seaga said police and soldiers had 
been told to use minimal force “so 
as not to be drawn into confronta- 
tions and to invite escalation." 

Jamaica has a history of political 
violence. Earlier this month, four 
persons were killed and 160 de- 
tained in Kingston during clashes 
between political gangs. 

The police said two deaths and 
three injuries had occurred in 


active in “organizing opposition 
to South African's racial compart- 
mentalization, called apartheid. 

He said he fell encouraged by 
events in South Africa in 1984, 
such as a boycott of elections held 
under a new constitution, protests 
by labor unions and other demon- 
strations of black discontent. 

“One is full of confidence.” he 
said, “and I should believe that the 
next five years will see tremendous 
transformation in South Africa." 

The national congress has re- 
ceived most of its weapons from 
Soviet-bloc countries, and South 
Africa depicts it as a Communist 
front. But. Mr. Tambo asked. 
“Where else would ibe weapons 
come from?" 

Most Western countries, he said, 
bad “not accepted the kind of sto- 
ry" that depicts the ANC as a “So- 
viet surrogate.” But in the United 
States. President Ronald Reagan 
“swallowed it whole." 

“Reagan has been the best ally 
apartheid ever had since it became 
fashionable in 1948,” Mr. Tambo 
said. 

UJk policy toward South Africa 
is based on what Mr. Reagan calls 
“constructive engagement." Its 
premise is that confrontation with 
the white authorities will harden 
their resistance to changing their 
policies on racial separation. 

While U.S. policy has engen- 
dered much hostility among black 
people in South Africa. Mr. Tambo 
said, “It does not damage the image 
of the American people." Recent 
demonstrations outside South Afri- 
can offices in the United States and 
tbe spread of divestment laws in 
U.S. cities, he said, show that 
“Americans are coming out in their 
true character.” 

Mr. Tambo said he supported 
three injured. Tbe spokesman said the withdrawal of U.S. and other 
there were no reports of casualties Western investment in South Afri- 
among tbe police or army troops, ca because, while that might lead to 
and no word about arrests. suffering among blacks who lose 

Opponents of Mr. Seaga, who thnrjobs. “it is aimed at stopping a 
took office in 1980 after campaign- crime against the whole people." 

ing on a promise to restore eco- 

nomic stability, have renewed de- 
mands in the last two weeks that he 
call new elections. 

Mr. Manley, a former prime 
minister who was defeated by Mr. 

Seaga in 1980, described the dem- 
onstrations in a radio statement as 
“a wave of popular protest." 


Kingston. The third death, (hey 
said, occurred in the farm town of 
May Fen. about 30 miles (48 kilo- 
meters) west of the capital. 

A government spokesman said 
two of the dead, including the one 
in May Pen, were demonstrators 
shot by police. The third person 
was killed in an exchange of gunfire 
with a motorist, who was one of the 


Soviet Launches 6 Satellites 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
launched six satellites. Cosmos 
1.617 to 1,622, from one rocket 
Wednesday. Tass reported. 




®£? a ©° 


Here in North Africa, right on the beaches of 
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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. JANUARY 17, 1985 


SCIENCE 


Mysterious, ScroUrLike Wave Linked to Biological Processes 


By Walter Sullivan 

Sew York Times Service 

STRANGE class of waves that 
.unroll as paper does from a 


scroll appears to have a key func- 
tion in many biological processes, 
from heart attacks to the behavior 
of social amoebas and attacks of 
epilepsy, according to a recent 
analysis by researchers at Purdue 
University in West Lafayette, Indi- 
ana. Some physicists suspect that 
the waves may also control the be- 
havior of subatomic particles. 

Because scroll waves produce 
chemical or electrical transforma- 
tions. rather than any physical mo- 
tions, they are difficult to vis ualize. 

Nevertheless, since they can be rep- 
resented mathematically, it is pos- 
able to display them graphically 

through manipulations by a Cray- 1 AT HAS been through computer- 
computer. one of the world’s most generated graphics that the intri- 
powerful, at Los Alamos National cate structure of such waves has 
Laboratory in New Mexico. been displayed, incl uding situa- 

Di splays of the outward-spiral- lions where the scrolls form rings 
ing waves resemble the internal or are twisted, knotted or joined to 
structure of spiral seas hells. Dr. Ar- other scrolls, 
thur T. Winfree of Purdue, who has Dr. Winfree views scroll waves 
specialized in such phenomena, as possible causes of fibrillation in 
said that his office was full of sea- heart attacks, epileptic seizures and 
shells sectioned in various ways other effects. In fibrillation, the 
with a glass cutter. natural pacemaker that electrically 

The waves are related to, and controls the complex sequence of 
may behave in ways similar to, a muscle responses in each heartbeat 
class of waves known as solitons, fails, and the heart flutters useless- 
recently recognized as having wide- ly. Dr. Winfree said that, according 
spread effects in the atmosphere, in to his surgical colleagues at Purdue, 
bodies of water and on a subatomic when held in the hand such a heart 
scale. Solitons occur singly, rather “feels like a wad of writhing 
than in a procession. worms.” 

When solitons meet they can What initiates such an effect re- 
pass through one another without mains uncer tain. Last year, in an 
alteration. That is not true of scroll article on cardiac sudden death in 
waves. Some solitons, such as the Scientific American, Dr. Winfree 
internal waves recently observed in described the fatal efforts of Dr. 
certain ocean regions, involve George Ralph Mines of McGill 
physical movement. They move University in Montreal to find the 
along a boundary between water cause. 


strange that they were not reported 
until further investigated in the 
1960s. 

According to Dr. Winfree, a pro- 
fessor of biology at Purdue, the 
mixture is normally the color of tea. 
But. he said in a telephone inter- 
view recently, if it is stimulated, as 
with a hot pin or a beam of ultravi- 
olet light, the affected spot turns 
electric blue. 

The blue region — a zone of 
transient chemical excitation — 
spirals outward like the spray of 
water from a rotating lawn sprin- 
kler. Behind its advance the mix- 
ture returns to its tea color. In a 
thicker layer of the mixture the 
spiral begins to look like an un- 
winding scroll 

It HAS been through computer- 
generated graphics that the intri- 


tory beach surrounded by twisted in a chain reaction that releases 
electrical equipment-” He never re- cyclic adenosine monophosphate, a 
covered. key substance in cell chemistry. 

The heart, according to Dr. Win- Each amoeba synthesizes the sub- 
free, “is continually bombarded by stance until stimulated to discharge 
electrical impulses from many it by its release from a neighboring 
sources.” Normally, if the pace- amoeba, 
maker is electrically disrupted, the Mathematical analysis of scroll 
heart skips or delays a beat but waves and their three-dimensional 
immediately recovers. But when, display was reported by Dr. Win- 
the impulse occurs at a vulnerable free and Steven H. Strogatz, a grad- 
moment in the electrical cycle, he uate student now at Harvard, m the 
believes, multiple scroll waves journal Nature. 


overcome the heart’s control sys- 
tem. 


The simula tions have helped de- 
fine the extent to which the scrolls 


Dr. Winfree suspects that an epi- can be twisted, knotted or linked. 


Jeptic seizure begins when a sit 
scroll wave propagates through 


The result 
forbidden 


; pattern of allowed or 
ofigurations, Dr. Win- 
. Strogatz said, in di- 


brain. causing major loss of nerve free and Mr. Strogatz said, indi- 
cell potassium and an avalanche of cates the existence of an “exclusion 


nerve impulses. 


principle" reminiscent of that af- 


Such waves also seem to spread fecting the behavior of subatomic 
through a colony of social amoebas particles. 



K T : S. H Stage-. 


Spreading 'Desertification’ Underlies Famine 


masses of differing density, rather 
than along the surface. 


Dr. Mines suspected, from ani- 
mal tests, that fibrillation could be 


A two-dimensional display of initiated by an electric impulse of a 
scroll waves, seen in cross section, critical magnitude at a vulnerable 
occurs in a thin film of mixed moment in the heart’s pulse cycle, 
chemicals known, forits Soviet dis- On Nov. 7, 1914, he tested his hy- 
coverers, as the Belousov-Zabo- po thesis on hims elf. Later in the 
tinsky reagent Its properties, first day. Dr. Winfree wrote. Dr. Mines 
recognized in the 1950s, are so was found “lying under the labora- 


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By Philip M. Boffey 

Sew York Times Service 

W ASHINGTON — The fam- 
ine coursing through Africa 
poses an immediate crisis of vast 
proportions. But underlying the 
tragedy is a more deep-seated prob- 
lem that threatens the future of arid 
lands throughout the world. 

It is “desertification," the insid- 
ious. spreading process that is turn- 
ing many of Die world’s marginal 
fields and pastures into wastelands. 

Seven years ago a United Na- 
tions conference, responding to an 
earlier drought in a wide belt of 
Africa south of the Sahara, adopted 
a sweeping plan to reverse desertifi- 
cation and halt the process com- 
pletely by 2000 . 

Since then, most experts agree, 
very little significant action has 
been taken and the problem has 
worsened. 

"Little progress has been made 
since 1977 in controlling the prob- 
lem,” said Dr. Harold H. Dregne, 
former director of the International 
Center for Arid and Semi-Arid 
Land Studies at Texas Tech Uni- 
versity in Lubbock. Dr. Dregne 
evaluated desertification programs 
for the United Nations last year. 

“The global threat posed by de- 
sertification. far from diminishing, 
has actually increased in severity,” 
Dr. Mostafa K. Tolba, executive 
director of the UN Environment 
Program, said last year. 

Desertification, a process in 
which tiie biological productivity 
of land is sharply degraded by hu- 
man abuse and natural factors, is 
an important underlying cause of 
the famine that has killed hundreds 
of thousands of Africans in recent 
years. It is often overlooked by 


Risk of 

desertification 

EH Desert areas 
| Very high 
0 High 
Moderate 


commentators who focus on the Particularly worrisome, some ex 
immediate cause of the famine, a pens say. are indications that de 


of plant, animal soil and water 
resources can easily become irre- 
. , versible. and permanently reduce 

their capacity to support human 
life." the United Nations warns. 
“Desertification is a self-acceleral- 
ing process, feeding on itself, and 
25 advances, rehabilitation costs 
v.: f. ; .( ':6 z) )4 nse exponentially. 

Desertification describes a wide 
range of ecological changes Io 
some cases, the term refers to deg* 
i radation severe enough to produce 
a desert !o most cases, it simply 
means a sharp loss of productivity. 

I Moderate desertification, ac- 
_ 1 1 cording to UN experts, means the 

AFRIf'A C7y^W(\ I land has lost up to 25 percent of its 

n n jmm \\ * biological production capability. 

(| ' Very severe desertification means it 

| has lost more than 50 percent. 

t\ J Desertification can be caused by 

0 \ S\ natural events, human activities or. 

J sS f most often, a combination of both, 

vfi' /rfll fl j Not much can be done about na- 

enl 1 1 1 H J ture. so international attention has 

\l ft been focused for the past decade or 

J rarf ! more on human activities. 

— J 1 1 IHr "The main cause is not droughL 

Ay as many still believe, but human 

A \ overexploitation of lands through 

overcul tivaiioo. overgrazing, poor 
irrigation practices and deforesta- 
F|t| 1 1 1 1 1 1 tion.” Dr. Tolba said last year. 

n. t*. yoa T.n» Such overexploitation is general- 
ly caused by population growth 
„ . . , * . that exceeds the carrying capacity 

particularly worrisome. some ex- 0 f inn it or by an influx of people 

pens say, are indications that de- Mlo mar yj na i Jands . ^ ^ poA u _ 
senification feeds upon itself and Ialion buiIdjL farmcrs ^ 


The t*w Yo<L Timer 


prolonged drought senification feeds upon itself and ]alion buiIdjL ^^3 have to till 

Drought and desertification are becomes difficult to reverse. Ac- poorer and poorer lands to provide 
intertwined. Progressive desertifi- cording to one respected meteoro- enough food. They reduce the fili- 
ation over the centuries has ren- logical hypothesis, loss of vegeta- low periods needed to regenerate 
dered the whole region more vul- tion in desertified areas increases soil; they cut down trees for 
□erable to drought. And drought the likelihood of future droughts firewood or building materials 
in turn, is accelerating the degrada- through a complex scries of biolog- hereby increasing wind and water 
tion of the land and increasing the ical and atmospheric interactions, erosion; and their cattle eat ground 
rate of desertification. As vegetation is^ removed, the vegetation so that the exposed land 

Earth s surface reflects more sun- hakes hard under the sun and can 
light into iheaunosphere, changing no i on ger absorb and store water, 
the energy balance in such a way , . 


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that dry air sinks toward the sur- 
face and promotes aridity. 

According to another informed 
view, natural forces make it unlike- 
ly that desertified areas south of the 
Sahara will recover on their own 
even after the rains come, as pre- 
vailing wind and water patterns 
flow from north to south, carrying 
seeds farther to the south rather 
than back north into the desertified 
regions. Rejuvenation of these ar- 
eas will thus require an active seed- 
ing program by countries already 
reeling from poverty, hunger, dis- 
ease and internal strife and desper- 
ately short of trained workers. 

“In exceptionally fragile ecosys- 
tems, such as those on the destrt 
margins, the loss of biological pro- 
ductivity through the degradation 


Soil temperatures rise, often kill- 


IN BRIEF 

Eye-Muscle Communication Tested 

EAST LANSING, Michigan ( AP) — People who have lost control of < 
all but their eye muscles could learn to communicate using a computer- 
operated scanner that attaches to eyeglasses, the device s developer says. 

Martin Kin» said he worked about 18 months on to develop the : 
scanning device after reading a work of fiction "about a man who had a 
stroke and could only move his eyes.” Michigan State University s 
artificial-language laboratory is testing the device. Researchers there said 
about a million people worldwide could benefit from such a scanner. 

Mr. Kin® fit a pair of glasses with a transparent qrtinaer wired to a 
desktop computer. Letters, words or symbols are displayed inside the 


desktop computer. Letters, words or symbols are displayed inside the 
cylinder, and infrared sensors tell the computer which symbol the • 
subject’s eyes are viewing. The computer prints the word or letter on a ; 
video screen or speaks it through a voice synthesizer. 

Plant Color Change, Pollinator Linked, 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists say they have evidence that some 
plants change the color of their flowers to attract the bitds and insects 
that spread their pollen. . < 

Ken N. Paige and Thomas G. Whitham, researchers from Northern h 
.Arizona University in Flagstaff, reported in the journal Science that their fk 
detailed fieldwork was the first documentation of this kind of complex 
adaptaion by plants. Plants with color variation probably gained an 
evolutionary advantage, the researchers said. f 

They found, for instance, that scarlet giiia produce deep red flowers i 
when hummingbirds, who like dark shades, are in the area. The plants' ■ 
secondary pollinator, the hawkmoth. favors lighter shades, and scarlet i 
gjlias that flower after the humming birds leave produce shades ranging : 
from pink to white. 

Metal Alloy Called ’Quasi-Crystal’ 

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — An alloy of aluminum and manganese • 
discovered by the National Bureau of Standards, and other metallic 
alloys found since, may represent a new class of solid matter, “quas- 
crvstals." a University of Pennsylvania physics research team says. 

Professor Paul Sleinhardt and a graduate student, Dov Levine, who 
recently presented their findings in Die journal Physical Review Letters, . ' 
have spent two years working on a theory about quasi-crystals, matter f t 
falling between the two recognized classes of solids — amorphous solids ./ 
and crystals. -5 

A university spokesman said the theory was “something no one else has 
ever done before” and could represent a new frontier in scientific 
research. Dr. Sleinhardt said it was too soon to tell how the theory could f 1 
apply to everyday life, just as someone asking 100 years ago about the 
practical application of crystals "wouldn’t anticipate the invention of a • 
transistor." 


Warning Signs of Cancerous Moles 

BOSTON (UPI) — An increasingly common form of skin cancer can 
be arrested if doctors and patients recognize the warning signs, research- 
ers report in the New England Journal of Medicine. 

Melanomas start as moles and eventually spread throughout the body. 
Once the cells spread, the disease is often fatal Certain types of moles arc 
far more likely to develop into melanomas than others, said Dr. Wallacr ; 
H. Clark of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School Dr. Mark H. , 
Green and others at the National Cancer Institute. !. 

Between 1973 and 1980, the number of Americans with melanomas jj 
increased 80 percent. Only the percentage of women with lung cancer has . jn 
grown faster. The disease' is thought to be caused by intense exposure to W 
the sun. % 

Dr. Green described a cancer-prone mole as usually "larger than the j? 
eraser of an ordinary pencil with an irregular outline and complexly 
colored, having a combination of tan, dark brown and occasionally ' 
black.” People with family members who have had melanomas are at J 
particular risk 

Space ’Wind’ May Affect Climat e. ^ 

TUCSON, Arizona (AP) — An exceedingly light “wind" blowing i 
through the solar system could cany material that would produce I 
worldwide rains and sharply alter Earth’s climate, according to Priscilla , 
Frisch, an astronomer from the University of Chicago. ;i 

Such climatic changes would occur 250,000 years from now. Mrs. \ 
Frisch said. J* I have this stored in my file as long-range weather 
forecasting,’ " she said at a symposium on “The Galaxy and the Solar 



■ . # |. _ J - J , . *£ 7 , ■ 4;uipvMiuiu VU IUW VJOJUAI IU1U UJU -JV’JOJ 

mg the mvTiMJr^msms needed io System" sponsored by the University of Arizona, 
spur plant growth. Dust blown up Mis. Frisch said she and a colleague, Donald York, bad compiled 
from the denuded land scours the reseaicb ^ mafl y scientists in the past few years on a very thin doud of 
w?Si n ihf material blowing toward Earth at about 10 miles ( 16 kilonrc- 

JJSy 01 ^ora^' ' Iers) 8 secood - 11 am P° sed mostl - v of Wc&n atoms, she said. 

"People who are not familiar 

Lend to think the problems ^devel- Great Pyramid Solution Offered 

oped quite recently" said Jeffrey WASHINGTON (UP!) —A Naval Observatory astronomer has come 

A. Gmzner. an environmental ge- up with a surprisingly simple explanation for the slope of a passageway in 
ographer at the National Academy the Great Pyramid erf Cheops in Egypt. 

of Sciences who has worked in the In the eariv 19th centurv. the Ffiolich mlmnnmpr Inhn HmcpIipI 


Lend to think the problems ^devel- Great Pyramid Solution Offered 

oped quite recently.” said Jeffrey WASHINGTON (UP!) —A Naval Observatory astronomer has come 

A. Gmzner. an environmental ge- up with a surprisingly simple explanation for the slope of a passageway in 
ographer at the National Academy the Great Pyramid erf Cheops in Egypt. 

of Sciences who has worked in the In the early 19th century, the English astronomer John Herschel 
Sahel. But you can go through the suggested that the 377-foot-long ( 1 14-meter) passageway was built at an 
literature for five centuries and just angle of 26.523 degrees to point at the North Star, allowing the tomb to 
see the vegetation disappearing." serve as an observatory as well 
The curreol famine vras set up. in But Richard Walker, a Naval Observatory astronomer based in Flag- 
a sense, by greater- than-normal staff. Arizona, found that, because of the wobble of Earth’s axis, no 
rainfall in the 1950s. which encour- prominent star could have been seen from the base of the passag eway in 
aged an expansion of humans and 2800 BC, when the pyramid was built. A Naval Observatory report savs 
livestock into marginal lands. the angle was merely the result of the construction technique. 


manage 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANl'ARY 17. 1985 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


;-*N 


■ il 

i£*' 

* -:h. 

-,4> 

‘‘to. 

uS?M 

- *Vk 

“ ' r -iff. 



Mm 


irl-hj King Saud University 

a-Jg- 5 ( Formerly University of Riyadh ) 

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 




f .. K *" g S ? ud University has openings on contract basis for faculty members (Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors) who hold Ph. D. and/or academic titles 

sSm o?j!iJy 27 * 1 ' IsSS S,tW5 ’ and als ° for English language instructors who have at least a bachelor’s degree in English as of commencement of the academic year 1985 - 1986 which 

.. . The fan 8uage of instruction is Arabic throughout the University except in the colleges of engineering, science, medicine (in Riyadh and Abha) . pharmacy, dentistry, allied 

i | 4 T ^ SC i enc t S ' c< ? m P“ t ® r a !?° information sciences, planning and urban designs and the M. S. program in hospital administration in the college of administrative sciences where the 
language of instruction is English. ok 6 

fin I A‘ r candidates are kindly requested to send non-returnable copies of their academic diplomas and specialized experience certificates together with their resumes 

l including lists ot their publications and references) and written applications indicating the position applied for and the subjects the applicant is qualified to teach, to the Dean of the 
inte^few° nCerned C ° ^ *** ® ox num ^ er indicated against the designated college. His/Her address should also be indicated so that he/she could be contacted if selected for 


WA 


Following is a list of the KSU Colleges and departments : 


COLLEGE 


Science 


P. O. BOX 

2456, Riyadh 


2455, Riyadh 


Administrative Sciences 2459, Riyadh 


Pharmacy 


Agriculture 


Engineering 


Medicine 


Education 


2457, Riyadh 


2460, Riyadh 


800, Riyadh 


2925, Riyadh 


2458, Riyadh 


DEPARTMENTS 


Arabic — English - Geography — Mass Communica- 
tions — Social Studies — History— Archaeology & 
Museology. 

Chemistry — Biochemistry - Physics - Astronomy - 
Botany - Zoology - Geology- Mathematics - 
Statistics — Computer Science. 

Law — Business Administration — Public Administra- 
tion — Economics - Accounting — Quantitative 
Methods - Political Science - Hospital Adminis- 
tration. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry - Pharmacology - Phar- 
maceutics - Pharmacognosy - Clinical Pharmacy. 

Animal Production — Soil Sciences — Plant Protec- 
tion — Food Sciences - Agricultural Engineering - 
Plant Production - Agricultural Economics and Rural 
Sociology - Nutrition and Home Economics 
(Females Only). 

Architecture — Civil Engineering - Mechanical 
Engineering - Electrical Engineering - Chemical 
Engineering - Petroleum Engineering - Computer 
Engineering — Nuclear Engineering — Industrial 
Engineering. 

Anatomy - Physiology — Pharmacology — Patho- 
logy— Parasitology — Gynaecology and Obstetrics - 
E. N. T. - Forensic Medicine - Community Medicine 
- Ophthalmology and Eye Surgery — Surgery — 
Medicine — Pediatrics. 

Education — Psychology — Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion — Islamic Studies — Art Education — Physical 
Education - Instructional Media and Educational 
Technology - Special Education (for the handi- 
capped). . 


COLLEGE 

Dentistry 


P.O. BOX 

5967, Riyadh 


Allied Medical Sciences 


10219, Riyadh 


Computer & Information 2454, Riyadh 
Sciences 

Planning & Urban Designs. 800, Riyadh 


Education at Abha 


Medicine & Medical 
Sciences at Abha 


Agriculture & Veterinary 
Medicine in Qasseem 


157, Abha 


641, Abha 


1482, Buraidah 


Business and Economics in 505, Onaizah 
Qasseem 


Noteworthy Benefits : 


DEPARTMENTS 

Operative Dentistry — Oral Diagnosis/Medicine - 
Oral Surgery — Oral Pathology - Oral Radiology — 
Oral Biology - Removable Prosthodontics — Fixed 
Prosthodonrics - Endodontics — Periodontics — 
Pedodontics — Orthodontics — Community Dentistry 

- Dental Public Health. 

Clinical Laboratory Sciences — Radiological Sciences 

- Rehabilitation Sciences — Community Health 
Sciences - Biomedical Technology - Denial Health 

- Nursing — Surgical Technology - Medical Assis- 
ting — Anesthesiology — Emergency Medical 
Technology. 

Computer Engineering - Computer Science - Com- 
puter Technology - Information Science. 

Architecture and Building Sciences — Planning — 
Regional Design - Interior Design. 

Education — Curriculum and Instruction - Psycho- 
logy - Instructional Media and Educational Techno- 
logy - Art Education — Physical Education - Bio- 
logy - Chemistry - Physics - Mathematics - 
Geography - History — English. 

Anatomy — Physiology — Family and Community 
Medicine - Biochemistry - Pathology - Micro- 
biology and Parasitology- Pharmacy - Medicine - 
Pediatrics - Surgery — Medical Education. 

Animal Production and Breeding — Crops and Range 
Management - Crop Protection - Veterinary Medi- 
cine - Horticulture and Forestry — Water and Soil — 
Agricultural Engineering — Agricultural Extension 
and Economics. 

Accounting - General Economics - Applied Econo- 
mics — Economic Analysis — Quantitative Methods - 
Finance - Public Administration - Business Adminis- 
tration - Marketing Management - Behavioral 
Psychology - Sociology - Operations Research. 


» Free return air tickets annually for faculty' member and family. 

■ Furnished accommodation or housing and furnishing allowances. 

■ Monthly transport allowance. 

■ Relocation allowance. 


l End-of-service gratuity. 

■ Free medical and dental care covering family. 

■ Contribution by University to tuition fees of non-Arabic-speaking Children. 


MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SERVICES 

WUfr Disney Productions - Europe 

Wdt Disney Productions - Europe has an immaeScfe opening for a 
Manager Management Information Services. This percar. wfll be 
based in Paris and will be developing systems for our European 
Disney Offices. 

Gfoafified candidates must, at the minimum, be fluent in French end 
English, in both written aid verbal comtnxikxrfibns. Fluency in 
oekfitianol languages, such as German, Italian and Spanish, would 
be helpful. A Degree in Computer Science is preferred, with a 
minimum of five years experience n Systems Development required. 
Applicants mud be cwaksblete travel, highly motiva te d, and familiar 
witit the latest developments in systems hardware. Experience with 
Sperry eqwpment is desired 

QuatiM applicants interested in this challenging opport u nity, p/ease send 
ajrriojkjm vitae with salary history, in confidence tor 

rfxmaHMMM Mcsnng • nm 
Wdt Disney World Ca 
Pott Office Bax 40 
Lake Buena Vida, Ft 32830 
USA 



We seek professional rn^n and women for exciting 
career positions overseas. Opportunities am at the entry 
level. 

A bachelor’s degree is a must, an advanced degree is a 
plus. Preference is given to applicants who demonstrate 
successful business, study, or related experience 
abroad. You must be proficient in ok or more foreign 
languages. U.S. dnzenship or PRA is required. 

Salari es are supplemented by generous overseas allow- 
ances. No fees of any kind. Our clients include both 
business ami non-profit organizations. 

Send your resume, qualifications, home and office 
phone numbers, in absolute confidence. Advise if you 
wfl] be in die United States in the coining months and, 
if so, dotes and phone numbers where you can be 
reached. 

Schrdber- Wells Agency 
P.O- Box 418! 

Grand Central Station 
New York, NY' 10163 
USA 

An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F 


BOB 

Bf, JIIAPCK ATA 

peaakumh 

Ha EM EM CM-JloaaoH n>pcn 
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HAHAJIHATA 3AF1JIATA e ot okojio 11200 
aHmuftCKM jinpn «a roAKHa. 3a noaene 
noxipo6HocTH niniiere Ha aieamiH anpec: ROLS 
(Ref. Bul/85), BBC PO Box 76, Room 906 NE, 
BUSH HOUSE LONDON WC2D 4PH 

We are an equal opportunities employer 


We are looking for an aggressive 

SALE ENGINEER 

whose challenge will be to increase substantially 
our business in Germany by direct selling and 
through distributor. 

.4 Position of 

NATIONAL 
SALES MANAGER 

Is offered to a 

QUALIFIED ENGINEER 

with graduation in Electronics 
and Electrical Engineering. 

Fluency in English. 

Proven success in SELLING 
POWER ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT. 
German nationality. 

Location DOSSELDORF. 

Total compensation very attractive. 

Write: Box D- 2126. International Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neuillv Cedex, France. 


'Director marketing 
Europe 

Media, direct response and P and L responsibi- 
lity - A Urge and most successful, worldwide non-profit orga- 
nization, engaged primarily in relief aid and development in 
areas suffering from natural and man-made disasters, has exten- 
sive fond raising operations in a number of European countries, 
employing over eighty people. Desirous of continuing growth 
and a substantial increase in the scale of its European fundrai- 
sing programs, it seeks an aggressive, effective marketing direc- 
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skills to serve a different set of values from the market place. A 
mature, experienced man with broad undemanding of media, 
direct response, as well as business ma n a g emen t is required. 
This man is possibly now an iniemaikmal media Director with 
extensive experience in new business development at a major 
international agency or in a line marketing position at a multi- 
national company. Pan European experience is essential. Appli- 
cations from North American citizens wfll be looked on with 
special interest. Place of residence is open, with preference for 
Western Europe. Travel wfll be extensive and sometimes out- 
side Europe. The salary wfll be correct for the level of expe- 
rience that is required. Individual will report directly to Presi- 
dent of organization. Initial contact from this advertisement 
will be with an executive search consultant. Ref. A/1622 HT 




PA Personnel Services 

Avenue Louise 386 - 1050 BRUXELLES 
Ttl. (322) 648.65.55 


SINGAPORE AIRLINES 

Invites applications from suitably qualified candidates for 
employment in Singapore as: 

B747 COMMANDERS 

REQUIREMENTS: 

Valid ATPL acceptable to licensing authorities in Singapore with 
endorsement for B747 aircraft and current instrument rating. 
Minimum 1000 firing horns in command including at least SOD 
hours in command on the B747. 

TENURE ET PROSPECTS: 

Minimum 2 yew* with possibility of extension. Applicants should 
be aged 57 years or below. 

GROSS SALARY (S S PER MONTH) 

Include expatriation allowance, annual wage supplement, monthly 
company contribution to Provident Fund. scDool fees & rental 
subsidies. __ 

Single: Approximately 10,000: 

Mamed: Approximately 11.000. 

SERVICE BENEFITS: 

* Monthly company contribution* to Provident Fund: 

* School Jeea and rental subsidies: 

* MeaL nighi-stop and productivity allowances while on flying 
duties; 

* Transport allowance payable on a round trip basis; 

* Free medical and denial treatment for employer: 

* Free medical insurance scheme for eligible dependants and. 

* 6 weeks' annual leave with provision of air travel for employee 


and family . 


I 


SINGAPORE 

AIRLINES 


APPLICATION: 

Please submit your application Itx 

Manager Personnel Services 
Singapore Airlines Limited 

P.O. Box 501, 

Airmail Transit Centre, 
Singapore 9181. 


EXECUTIVE 

AVAILABLE 

-CANADIAN EXECUTIVE 

Maks multinational employment 
worldwide. 18 yean experience with 


THs Indonesian firm is a subsidiary of 0 very important French company sp e rioEzed 
in offshore work 

If requires its fabrication Yard Manager for one of ifs steel structure construction sites 
{offshore pl a tfor ms ), situated to the east of Kcrfmantan (Indonesia). 

This position would suit a Manager perfectly fcmiSar with the construction of shaped 
meld structures, end with difficult working conefitions abroad. He must be perfectly 
familiar with the utsTcation of fabrication schedules, and have significant experience in 
manpgng men on the job-site (he wifi have between 350 and 450 people working for 
him). Interesting remuneration and fringe benefits. 

Please send your application {handwritten letter, curriculum vitae and photo) quoting 
r&f. 10540 to M£c6o-System M&cSterranfee, 29, la Canebifire, 13001 Marseille, France. 


near in g & construction companies, 10 
yews of which has been in project 
management and over A years of this 
has bean in Taiwan and Philippine*. 

P.O. Bax W4, 

—Makati, MmSa, Philippines.-™ 


“INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS* 


appears 
every Thursday 
dk Saturday 


TO PLACE AN ADVSTlS&ABff 
ennted you nearest 
tnleraotiond Herald tribune 
repretentative or Max Ferrero: 
181 Av*. Gmifefrde-Gajlle. 
92521 Neuffly Cede*, hones. 
TeL 747. ) 2.65 - Tele*.- 613595. 




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PPG 

UnJDvn 

ITTCp 

IBM 

Hortrp s 

GaPoe 

Chrvslr 

FordM 

AMR 

GMol 

FlnCnA 

Holhtov 

HlwIPk 

CSX 


VoL 

High 

Law 

Lost 

emu 


20*ft 

209* 




36% 

35 to 

36 V* 

+ % 


28% 

28% 

a% 

+196 


32% 

31% 

32% 

+ % 


125% 

123% 

124 

— % 


S3 

319ft 

X 

+1% 


269* 

25% 

25% 



X 

32 

X 

+ % 

11769 

49 

479* 

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11137 

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10963 

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10754 

46*ft 

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46% 

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101X 

379ft 

31% 

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9963 

25to 

249* 

25 

+ % 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open moh Law Las! Cfeno 


Indus 123023 1M1.I7 1223.74 123068— Oil 

Trans 59133 40075 58046 S902J + 144 

UIM 14013 14052 147.11 M8J9 + 020 

Como 501.76 506.75 49700 S0X54 4- OM 


NYSE index 



High 

Previous 

LOW 

Close 

Today 

3 P .M. 

Com coil 10 

98.96 

9847 

98 S3 

98-70 

InduvIrioH 

11X76 


11X28 

NA. 

Transp. 

96.12 

9528 

9X49 

NA 

ut mites 

M.Q2 

SUP 

SI pa 

NA. 

Finance 

10048 

100.19 

100.78 

NA 


NYSE Diaries 


dan Prw. 


Advanced 
Declined 
U nc hanged 
Total issues 
New Misha 
New Lows 


1093 1025 

SW 577 

423 433 

3055 3035 

US 178 

10 11 


1 Odd-Lot T rading In N.Y. ] 


Jn IS . 
Jan. 14 . 
Mm. II , 
Jan. 10 . 

Jan. 9 , 


’Included tn the sales figures 


Buy Sales •Start 

211,204 541028 UM4 

201415 541715 1.734 

191234 461017 1064 

187397 461784 958 

161107 385091 1022 


Wednesdays 




najnuma 

PreY.3PJM.voL 

138^30088 

Prev amsolMoted dose 

182,627330 


Tattles inctode me nationwide prices 
op to the closiog os Wall Street 


AMEX Diaries 



Close 

Pri*. 


330 

372 


229 






8m 


New Highs 

7 

5 


NASDAQ Index 


Csntcosue 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

utilities 

Banks 

Transp. 


Week Year 
Close Noon Ago 
ISt.Tfl 259.44 24100 
274.46 276.72 25905 
3ttf.90 — 299.03 

2B4J4 — 27133 

2S020 - 33581 

23193 — 23034 

250.08 - m03 


ADO 
28846 
33e Jfi 
287.U 
258.78 
2TV.72 
709 3 3 
2B8JB 


I Standard & Poor's Index 


Industrials 

Transp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


Previous Tudor 

High Lew Close 3 PM. 
191.73 190.03 190.S3 |«054 

15134 150J2 15150 15189 

7136 7SJ9 75.99 7lA6 
19 45 1913 I9JD 19J0 

171 JK 171W0 17081 17079 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages | 


Bonds 

UiUities 

inaustrlals 


Prev. 

Close 

7154 

6192 

76J1 


Today 

Naan 


717S 

5930 

7125 


AMEX Most Actives 


VaL 


WanaB 

IidpGp 

TIE 

TenAIr 

BAT 

DataPd 


WOtaltl 
Astiaie 
Citadel 
DHIrd s 
MaiScn 


16199 

6231 

5650 

4474 

3479 

2525 

1961 

1940 

1863 

1739 

1694 

1567 


High 

Law 

Last 

dm 


23% 

25% 

+ % 

2% 

2to 

2% 

+% 


TV) 

79b 

+ Vft 


10% 

llto 

+ % 


3% 

4D 

+to 



U% 

+ % 


2 

2Vb 

+ Vb 


10% 

10% 

+ Vb 


2% 

29b 

- % 


16% 

17% 

+ 9ft 


42% 

4ZV* 

— % 

11% 

10% 




i 


| AMEX Stock index 1 


High 

208J2 


Prevloas _ Today 

low Close 1 PM 
307.44 20846 20BJ6 


12 Month 
High Low Sloe* 


51a CUW 

Idea High L»W» Cum CHOC 


L A 

23% 

16% AAR 

M 10 

14 

531 

in) 

18% 

18ft* — * Vb 

X% 

9H AGS 


11 

256 

I5V5 

14% 

Uto + % 

21 

13% AMCA 

1-00 73 


2 

13% 

13% 

13ft)— v* 

17% 

13% AMF 

JO 33 

B4 

448 

15% 

14% 

ISV* + % 


49% AMF pf 



10 

SOto 

SOU. 

Mto + to 







37% — ft) 

20% 

IBte AMR Of 

2.18 11.1 


4 

19% 

19% 

19% 

41% 

27% AMR pf 

X12 53 


415 

X 

xn 

37% — V] 

141* 

8% APL 


3 

32 

IM 

10% 

10%+ to 

699* 

44% ASA 



673 

48% 

47% 

48te + % 

2B% 

16 AVX 

32 13 

11 

839 

1B% 

17% 

18 — % 

4S9ft 

36% AbtLab 

IX 23 

14 

402ft 

43% 

42% 

43% +1% 

23% 

16% AccoWd lft U 

19 

199 

27ft) 

22% 

27% 


12% AcmeC 

A0 10 


305 

15% 

14% 

15%+ to 




13 

X 

9% 

9% 

9% 

)B*ft 

15 AdoEx 

2.1let33 


84 

16 

15% 

!5%— % 

1B% 

11% AdmMI 

32 31 

8 

110 

15% 

15 

15ft* + to 


89b AdvSvs 

Bit 73 

17 

352 

10% 

10ft) 

10ft)— % 

41% 

25% AMD 


14 

7257 

33 

32% 

32%+ % 

U 

6% Advent 

.12 13 


B0 

9to 

9V* 

9V* 

14% 

8% Aerflex 


11 

e 

lift) 

11% 

lift* + % 


27to AetnLf 

364 6.9 

32 

2635 

Xto 

37% 

X 


529* AefLPf 






34% 

15% Ahmns 


13 

1991 

2m* 

28% 

28% + ft* 

5% 

2% At been 


29 

35 

3 

7% 

2% 

48% 

X% AlrPrd 

130 37 

10 

2028 

454ft 

44% 

45V) — % 

30% 

13 AlrbFrt 

30 39 

12 

224 

21 to 

Mto 

20ft* + % 

1% 



23 

3189 

1% 

IV* 

1%+ % 

31% 



11 

30% 

30% 

30% + % 

7% 

6 AlaPdpf 37 IU 


X 

7% 

TV) 

7to — % 


61% AlaPpf 



6990* 72V) 

70% 

71 to +1ft) 

65V, 

57 AtaPpf 



ilQz 65 

65 

65 — to 

13% 

189* A lasses 

32 73 

8 

43 

12b) 

12% 

12% 

171* 

9V) AHkAIr 

.14 9 

9 

370 

15% 

15 

15% + *) 

22% 

15% Alberto 

34 23 

M 

41 

21% 

20% 

21% + to 

39% 

22% AlbfSRl 

38 35 

11 

798 

27 

26% 

26% 

40% 

23% Alcan 

130 <1 

10 

4274 

29% 

29 

29%+ % 

36% 

27% AlcoSId 


11 

208 

31% 

31 

311* 

2S*a 

17 AtexAlx 

130 3£ 


3003 

Mto 

25% 

26 + % 








23 + % 

B7V* 

634* AlloCP 

l-OBb 1A 

8 

48 

75 Vft 

73% 

75V) +2% 

26% 

23 AfgCppf 236 113 


Af 

25% 

25% 

25%—% 

33% 

18% Algint 

148 S3 X 

403 

25% 

24% 

25to + % 

22% 

1SU Alain pf 

319 113 


17 

19 

18% 

18% 

93% 

81 AtglpfCltJS 123 


29 

91% 

91% 

91ft) + H 


24% AllaPw 

230 93 

8 

439 

29% 

29% 

29% + to 


1594 AitatG 

40b 23 

10 

264 

18 

17% 

18 + % 

37% 

2Bto AlldCps 

130 5.1 

8 

1874 

35% 

K 

35ft* + % 

63% 

53% AidCppf <74 113 


103 




107% 100% AMCpf 

1239el31 


4cs maw. 103% irate— v* 

23% 

10U AlkfPd 



66 

19% 

19V) 

19% 

56% 

X AlklStr 

300 33 

9 

2057 

53% 

51% 

52% +1% 

169b 

5% AlllsCh 



um 

dftfc 

6to 

6ft) + % 

40 

24 AllsCpf 



29 

27% 

77 

27ft) +1 


X ALLTL 

134 7.1 

9 

119 

25% 

25% 

25ft) + % 


2096 AlphPr 

AOe 13 

18 

22 

71% 

21te 

21%+ % 

48% 

30% Alcoa 

120 11 

9 

5978 

38% 

37% 

38% + 1b 


15% Aimw 



1028 




43% 

32% Amax pf 300 93 


7 

33U 

33 V) 

33% + to 

34% 

22% AmHes 

1.10 44 

9 

2153 

Kto 

24% 

25 +% 


lift AmAer 



467 

2% 

2to 

2ft* 

19 

14% ABakr 


11 

129 

IB 

17% 

18 +1 

69% 

52% A Brand 

175 5.9 

9 

812 

64ft* 

63% 

63ft*— n* 

28% 

249* ABrdpf 



14 

M 


x — to 

66 

53 ABrdpf 

367 <1 


1 

64% 

64% 

64ft)— 1 to 


50to ABdcst 

140 23 

10 

1080 

Mto 

61% 

63% + % 


19% ABUM 

36 16 

11 

43 

23% 23% 

23% — % 

23% 

1796 ABuePr 

36 23 

12 

16 

Tito 

7114 

21V* 

55 

40% AmCan 

390 53 

12 

6923 

SO 

49 

49ft) +1 

Mto 

21V) ACanpf 

230 11.9 


4 

23% 23% 

23% 

48 

30 ACanpf 

330 <9 


IS 

43% 

43% 

43% + % 

33% 

25% ACtaOCv 

Z20 TL2 


‘5 

19% 

28% 

19% 

19%+ 4* 

14% 

6% ACentC 


3 

52 

8% 

8V* 

8to — V* 

53V* 

42% ACron 

1.90 17 

12 

2508 

51% 

si to 

51%+ % 


1896 ADT 

.92 u a 

631 

23Vi 

73% 


21% 

15% AElPw 

Z26al03 

8 

1509 

71% 

71% 

21ft*— Vb 

39 

25 AmExn 

1.2B 14 

211 

5769 

3Rte 

37% 

37% — % 

26% 

t:-XZ 1 

34b 23 

13 

371 

25% 

25% 

25ft* + to 

26% 


30 33 

10 

4004 

77 

76% 






119 

fl% 



72% 



248 

73% 

77% 

73% +1 









53% 

39% AGnpfD 234 63 


567 

54 to 

57% 

54% +2% 

31 

r- "ill 

139 33 

12 

19 

31 Vft 

30% 

31to + % 





103 

8ft* 



55% 

46% AHame 

364 <8 

13 

4X5 

54% 

54 

54%+ % 

42% 

Xto AHOSP 

1.12 19 


3055 

30 

28% 28% — to 

78 

62% Amrtch 
50% AinGre 

630 83 


1573 

75% 75 

75Y|— >4 


44 3 


•69 

6Aftk 

65% 

66%+ % 


18% AMI 

A0 28 

13 

4043 

71% 

71V) 

71ft4 + ft* 

3to Am Mat 
27% ANtRss 



1056 

4% 

41b 

4 V)— tk 

48% 

232 S3 


522 

39% 38% 39V* 

a 

2Zte APresW 

341 31 


670 

35% 3SVb 3514— to 

9 ASLFta 



322 

17% 

12% 

12% + ft* 

■6% 

15 ASLFI pf 2.19 123 


IS 

1814 

Wto 

IBto 

IS 

10 ASMp 
22% Am Sid 
15% AStarfl 

130 <7 12 
15 

SB 

1352 

12 

13V) 

m 

k-* 

271) 

45V* 

26% AmStar 

34 14 

9 

t§ 

46% 

57ft* +1% 

56to 

46% ASIrpfA 438 7 A 


piiUCI 

53to 

51 ASIrpfB <B0 110 



52% 

36% 

14% AT&T 

IX 59 1437675 

20% 

20% 20% 

30% AT&T pf X64 IGA 


10ft 

34% 

1 ■ MB 

371* 

31% AT&T pf X74 10 A 


25 

X 

El 

X 5 % 

41 

27% AWatr 


7 

29 

38% 

Xto 

Xto— to 

51% 

35 A Wat pf 

143 29 


150* 49% 

48 

49% +1% 

12 

10 AWatpf 

135 113 


SOI 10% 

IM 


12% 

io awq sw 

135 103 


iaaz u% 

11% 

27% 

Xto Am Hot! 

248 93 

11 

186 

25% 25V) 


<5% 

53% ATrPr 

us«u 


4 

65 

65 

8% 

74 

49* ATrSc 
5Bto ATrOn 
X% Ameren 

535* 73 


63 

12 

8V* 

73% 

73% 73%-% 

& 


8 

6 

SOto 

X 

Xto 

17 /-WsiesD 1 

M 3 

15 

316 

20 

m 

X +1V) 

83 

60 Amen pf 

332 03 


3 

27% 

□I 

79 +1 

299b 

21% Antetek 

M 23 

14 

365 

76% 7714 + % 

30% 

18% Amfac 


/ 

1434 


23ft) +1% 

19% 

10% Amtesc 


5 

445 

12% 

ITt'l 

120 + % 

r 

26% AMP* 

34 14 

17 51M 

35ftb 34% X + % 

14% Ampca 

X 1.9 

45 

50 

Uto 

[ ■ 

16%— Vb 

21% 

179* Amrws 


6 

1930 

13% 


13ft) + % 

3S 

19 Am5lh 

140 33 

8 

nt 

25% 


25% + % 

25% Aimted 

130 <5 

16 

191 

X 

!■ 

351* — % 

7V* 

19* Anacmp 



718 

2 

i% 

1ft— % 

X 

19te Ant-d uo s 


IB 

294 

25% 

25 

25ft* + V* 

35% 

19% Anchor 

148 03 

18 

697 

22% 

27 

22 

35% 

24% AnCtov 

132 33 

16 

210 

34% 

34% 

34% + ft* 

11% 

9% AndrGr 

X 13 23 

IB 

IM 

IM 

10ft*— to 
17% — % 

23% 

Uto Angelic 

30 12 

10 

58 

17% 

17% 

74% 

S39ft Antesus 

230 23 

10 

1957 



74 -ft* 

54% 

44 AnhoiBrt 330 03 


sra 

54% 

53% 

53ft* — ft* 

25 

139) Alrixtr 

X 13 21 

180 

17% 



17 


34 J 

14 

778 

Mto 

13*. 


16% 

C'lJXlrA 1 ! 

34b 14 

1 

a 

Uto 

13 

13 — to 

14% 

4 

“to Apache 30 2 A 
% ApchPwt 

11 

285 

a 

IM 

1 


Xto 

15% ApdiPtframellJ 


217 

17V) 

17 

17 — % 

29% 

2t APFwpf 
179ft ApfDta 

3-80 112 
1.121 17 


5 

28% 

28% 

28% + Vb 

30*% 

IB 

192 




xu. 

a AppitAi 

1.141103 70 

1MI 

11% 

104* 



159b ArchOn 

.14b J 

17 3197 

2lto 

20% 


22% 

U% ArlxPS 

230 113 

6 

518 

22% 

22 

22ft* + % 

28% 

73 Aripm 

338 723 


27 

28% 

28% 

28% 

26% 

13% Ark Bit 

A0 2.1 

B 

317 

19to 

■mm 


27% 

16 Arkla 

IM <1 

15 

780 

"ft 

17% 

17% — lb 

lift 

to ArtnRt 



692 

% 


99b Armada 


27 

2 

12% 




9 Armca 



771 

HHft 



33% 

is Armcpf 

110 93 


29 

22% 



2296 

15% ArmsRs 

48 23 

a 

114 

21% 

71% 

zi% + % 

Xto 

22to Arm Win 

IX 34 

10 

1295 

35% 

35% 

35ft* + % 

29 

189* AroCp 

IX <4 

V 

19 

21% 

Z7to 

270— V* 

299* 

13% ArawE 

X 13 

8 

231 

16% 16% 

16%— o 

32 

16 Arfre 

33 13 


16 

17% 

17% 

17ft* + V* 

22 

14 Arvtfi % 


B 

269 

21% Zltoi 


50% 

349* Arvlnpf 

2M 33 



51 



34% 

17te Asaroo 



724 

X% 

19V) 

19%+ ft* 


20% AshiOII 

130 35 


543 

27% 

26te 


40% 

339b AihKJpf 

430 113 


IS 

39% 

38% 

39% + ft* 

409* 

31% AztdOpf 

IM 103 


2 75 

37% 

37 

37 — ft* 

61% 

45% AsdDG 

240 <6 

9 

292 

56% 

XV* 


98 

73 AsdDpf 

<75 53 


12 

9M 87% 

tm+ 2ft* 

289* 

18% Altl tone 

140 <9 

19 

24 

23% 

22% 

23%+ Vb 

25 

199* AfCvEI 

248 131 

8 

109 

24% 

24% 

24ft*— V* 


■n* AtiRich 

100 63 

17 7*80 

444* 

Uft) 


38% 

32% AtiRcpf 

333 103 


XOz 35 

X 

25 —1 

ns 

77 AHRcpf 

230 23 


3 105 105 KB 

X 

11% ATIssCP 



44 

12% 

12 

12%+ ft* 

41 

189ft Augat 

32 13 17 

,W6 

Mto 

25% 25% + % 

41% 

29% AtsteOt 

32 13 


926 

41% 

40% 

40%— ft* 

X 

X AvooCp 


10 

48 

SO 

49ftft 

49% 









23% 

15% AVEMC 

40 3JB 

12 

53 

20% 

19% 

28% + % 

33V* 

23 Avery 

40 13 




33% 

33ft* + % 

IS 

10 AvfoJln 



105 

12% 

12% 

12%+ Vb 

46% 


X 14 

15 

V470 

37% 

X% 

37 + ft* 

20 

ITto Aren 

230 93 

9 42Z3 

20% 

2M 

20ft)— n 

42% 

18 Avdin 


10 

80 

34V* 

X 

24%+ % 

— ■ .» 1 


244V 10U 
31% 189k 
23te 15 
26V* 184V 
3 H 
11V) 2 

48U Wfi 
2HV 111V 
1546 746 

41 Xto 
4116 36% 
28 2046 

1146 9 
546 346 
55to 38 
44 29 

5JW 43 
J8W 3616 
25 1916 

2316 14Vt> 
S2% 40 
M 66 
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NYSE Prices Mostly Higher 


77ir Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Prices on ihe New York 
Stock Exchange were mostly higher Wednes- 
day, although blue-chip issues lagged behind. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials was 
down 2.63 at 1,228.14 an hour before the dose. 


But most other, broader measures of market 
trends were on the plus side. Gainers outnum- 
bered losers by nearly 2 to 1 among New York 
Stock Exchange-listed issues. 

A survey of economists by the University of 
Michigan found a majority expecting a reces- 


.4 /though prices in tables on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
P.M. 


sion to set in by the end of the year. However, 
stock-market investors apparently do not agree 
with that assessment. 

Analysts say confidence seems to have grown 
among market participants lately that growth 
will continue for some time lo come. 

That feeling was buttressed by the Federal 
Reserve's report Tuesday that U.S. industrial 
production rose 0.6 percent in December. 

It has also gained support from the remit 
decline of interest rales and comments by Paul 
A. Volcker. the Fed's chairman, suggesting bis 
willingness to pursue a relatively s timula tive 
credit policy. 


After declining on Tuesday, rales edged up- 
ward in the credit markets today. 

American Telephone & Telegraph led the 


active list, unchanged at 204 in trading that 
included several large blocks. 

International Business Machines, also active, 
fell % lo 12J44, Hie company is expected to 
report its fourth-quarter earnings on Thursday. 

Advance estimates on Wall Street generally 
fall in the range of S3.40 to $3.50 a share, 
against $3.06 in the last quarter of 1983. 

The NYSE's composite index gained .11 to 
98.70. On the American Slock Exchange, the 
market value index was up .30 at 208.76. 

Volume on the Big Board came to 113.99 
million shares with an hour to go. 

Earlier, the Los Angeles Times reported from 
New York: 

Wall Street responded warmly, but some in 
Congress reacted skeptically. Tuesday to a Fed 
eral Reserve Board recommendation that the 
U.S. government cease regulating how much 
stock-market investors can borrow on credit, 
and turn such regulation over to the stock 
exchanges and other private groups. 

Industry officials and other observers also 
said that they expected that private regulation 
oT such credit, or "margin.'' requirements would 
probably bring an easing of the rules and stimu 
late the stock market but only slightly. 

They speculated, loo, that such easing of 
credit would draw additional capital to the 
slock markets from the markets for stock-based 
options and futures contracts, which have loos- 
er credit rules. 

The recommendations were hailed by oTTi 
dais of the Securities Industry Association, the 
New York Stock Exchange, and officials of a 
number of brokerages, including Merrill Lynch, 
Shearson Lehman- American Express, and EF. 
Hutton. 


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47 


11 
32 
29 14 
13 


11 ComnSc 
29 Cptvsn 
19% ConAgs 
13% Canalr JMb 1.1 
129* ComEt 142 84 _ 
19% CmiNG 240 94 9 
10% Conroe 4 U I 
22% CotHEd 212 74 7 
35 ConEpf 445 114 
38 ConEpf SM 114 
25 CansFd 144 <5 10 
50% ConF pf <32o B4 
20% CnsFrts 140 34 12 
31 CnsNG 232 53 8 
4% ConaPw 2 

23% CnPpfD 745 185 
25 CflPpfG 7.76 194 
11% CnP prV 448 IBS 
9% CnP prU 340 129 
18% CnPprT 278 127 
25% CnP of H 740 194 
11% CnPprR 440 184 
10% CnPprP 250 19.1 
10% CnPprN 345 184 
7% OiPprM 250 174 
7 CnPprU 243 17J 
11 QnPprS <0Z 125 
7% CnPprK 243 174 
21% CnttCp 240 <9 6 
59 OICpfA 250 24 
81 ChCpfB 250 21 
. 4% ConHil 
2% %Cantllrl 
51% 12 Cnllllpf 
4% % CtllHdn 

24% 18 CaatTof 
48% 24% CIData 
33% 2296 Conwd 
4% 1 vlCaabU 


294 15% 
6953 39% 
3004 29% 
237 22% 
16 18% 
26 25 
420 14% 
1910 30% 
278® 60 
7 43 
914 33 
3 53 
1091 31% 
201 40% 
5621 5% 

1861b 39% 
2650z 40% 
65 2396 
77 19 
17 30% 
670* 39% 
*2 21% 


69 21 
15 20% 


14 

SR 


14 13% 
2083 37% 


1 

2 

346 

1347 


82 

81 

8% 

2% 


15% 15% 

36% 36%— 196 
28% 29% + % 
22% 22*6 
18% 18% + % 
24% 24%— M 
14 14% 

%% 30%— Mi 
39% 40 + % 

43 43 

31% 22*6— % 

31 31%+ % 

40% 40%+ % 
5% 5%+ % 
38 39% 

39% 48% +1 
2294 2396+1 
1896 19 +% 

20% 28% + % 

g&SZi* 


■3 

140 


21 41% 
3325 1% 


82 

81 

796 

2% 

41 


s ^ 


2103 22% 
1876 3596 


iJ 

20 Coapr 

IX 

5.1 

15 

■ Ivj 

X Coopl pi 

7.90 

83 


’ mi 

IM CaapLb 

V* 

3 

3 

TjH 

12% CoprTr 

AO 

23 

B 

■ 

11% Coapvhi 

A0 

20 

15 


11% Cnpwkf 

SO 

<■ 

12 


190 CpwMpf TAB 113 



M% Cardura 

M 

37 

15 


10% Corel n 

3* 

4J 

11 


59% CarnG 

TM 

33 

16 


22% CorBJk 

100 

11 

TO 


39% CaxCm 

A* 

J 

16 

f+j 

40 crala 





Z7 Crane 

130b 48 

21 


X% CrayRs 



18 

aji 

Uto CrackN 

.40 

13 



ISV* CrdcN pf 2.18 117 


*ll( 

19V) CrmpK 

IX 

55 

10 

Tti 

34ft* CrwnCk 



IJ 


27 ft) Crw2m 

100 

2.9 

11 


43 CrZel ps 

433 

93 



X CrZeipfC<50 

19 


a; 

IBto Cufbre 

M 

23 

7 


Mto CuPnef 



X 


Xto Clilimwl 





61to CumEn 

230 

23 

5 


80 Currlnc 

l.lOalU 



300 CurtW 

IX 

37 

9 


27% Cyclops 

1.10 

23 

II 


29 32% 
76 1% 


587 29% 
2S5 33% 


41 

1% !%— % 
mS ot5+ % 

i% 1% 

29% 29%— % 


839 
58 18% 
3037 19% 


33% Xl%— % 


17 14 
17 221* 
130 23% 


51 12 
462 71% 


U4 32% 
521 49 


73 
IM 
465 58% 


214 M% 
12 10% 


36 

436 


21% 

47 


606 35 
58 47% 


14% 14% . _ 

18 18% + % 
19% 19% + % 
13% 14 + % 
22 22 - V6 

22 % 22 % 

11% T1%— % 
78% 71 + % 

32% 32% — % 
48% 48% + % 
7% 8% + % 
33 33% - % 
57% 58% + % 
24% 24% 

18% 18% 

21 % 21 %+ % 
46% 46% 


9 57% 
IB 23% 




429 4896 
2Mb 


61 
662 
12 10 


3296 

45% 


47% __ 

57 57% + % 

23% 23% + % 
48% 4896+ % 
24% 24%+ % 
8496 05% + 9k 
10 10 
32% 32%— 9* 
44% 45% +1 


ir — — 3 



X 20 45 

239 


9% 

9% + to 



IX 43 


USB 


27ft* 

28%— % 


5% Dnrtohr 



58 



r* 


8% Oonfrl 

.Mb IJ 


1091 

■ y w 

13ft* 

14 + % 


64% DortKr 

434 4 9 

10 

HN2 

1 "i 

86% 

87 + % 

60b. 



19 3233 

600 

3? 


X% 

13% Datpnt 


28 

3117 

21% 

21 

21% + % 

120 

8% DtoDso 

X 21 

IB 

341 

9ft) 

9ft* 

9%+ % 

19% 

12% Day ca 

30 13 

r 

1S3 

16 

16% 

15%+ V* 


X% DaytHd 

74 2J 

13 2751 

33% 

EC 

32ft) 


11% DovfPL 

2J0 127 

7 

373 

16 


IPO 

I 

45 DPL pi 

7 JO 133 


5% 58 


58 + ft) 

IF ly 

45 DPLPf 

7J7 137 


lOOz 53% 

I’r'l 

53% 


75% DPLPf 

1250 123 






19% DeanFs 

AB 13 

15 

■ 1 



26%+ % 

1 1 

24% Deere 

IX 3.1 

21 

1634 


31ft* 

32 

1 E* 1( 

17% DetmP 

1.92 83 

8 

958 


21ft* 

21% — fti 


27 DeftaAr 

A0 IJ 

8 

3910 


IC 

4Sto— % 

si 




117 


EZ 

5% 

[ETE 

BilvI’iTl-rX 

IX 33 

15 

511 




1 li 

17ft* DanMIs 

IX 47 

11 

168 

'-it 


25% + to 


Xto Dennys 


15 

473 

■Vr 

/>! 

47% 

X 

26% DeSata 


HI 

32 


3| 


16% 

11% DetEd 


/ 

2495 

JT 


15% + % 

w 

59 DetEpf 

f fM 1 V. 1 


20fc 69 


68%— % 


T A 1 ■ , j J 

, r 1 . H . t 


SOfe 571* 

-ft 


■ 71J 

TrBt il 1 

/ 1 ^ 


41007 56 




' ’2i j • iJ J 

r V 1 J 


124B 

56 

T; 



Ti.E» jfjjl 

him p 


19 

M% 




I ' j . ■ 

334 133 


19 

M% 




1 ^^i'E 

XU 133 


69 

M 




19 DE PfP 

X12 133 


6 




2J% 

19U DEpfB 

275 127 


5 



I T3TI 

20 

19% DepfO 

330 127 


133 

i-y 



25% 

19% OEpfM 

332 133 


IX 

26 



X 

Mto DEPrL 

<00 1X6 


19 

29ftb 




Mto DE Pf K 

<12 1X7 






17% 

Uto DefEpr 

2X 123 






25V, 

17ft* Doiriw 

M 33 

11 

237 


FZ1 


15 

9ft* DIGtor 

34 47 21 

127 

la 

13% 

13% 


21% DKjto Pf 

US X6 


40 

26to 





IX 93 SB 3662 

1B% 

17% 





38 

35ft* 

35% 

35ft*— % 


r ..I-. 

IX 15 

12 

270 

80% 



ETttyj 



14 

7558 

113% 1111*112 +1% 

■rMrj 









X DEI 

238 72 

5 

44J 




69b 

3% Dlvrsln 


3 

49 

4% 



16% 

Aft* Dacca o 

.12 


on 

7% 



aw) 

20% DomRs 

272 93 

8 

790 

29% 

29V) 


24 

U Donald 

00 XS 

9 

33 

18% 

IBto 

lBft* + % 

X 

14ft* Donl—J 

X _■? 

18 

9 

X 

29% 




IX XI 


1011 




38% 

XV* Dorsey 

IX <3 

12 

4M 

27% 

27te 




32 X2 





Emi 


25ft* DOWOl 

IX 63 

18 

4571 

29 


H Mi 11 


XV* DawJn 

70 1.9 

21 

1554 

41% 

40% 

nilTS':!! 

■nj 


30 <3 


191 

11% 


rtrrx?ll 



80 43 15 

684 

18% 

1B% 

rrrftll 

KUJ 


280 103 


19 

18% 

18ft* 

trffrMI 

40% 


30a 13 


239 

40% 




42% duPant 

XX <2 

a 

4496 

4Bft* 

48 



30% duPntpf 130 103 



33% 

33% 







43 


J| 






30% 



76% 

64 Dakepf 

870 113 


31602 

74 


frzxTW 1 

69% 

59% Duke pf 



200Z 

*9 



67 

1 ,■ 1 1 | J ■ 

730 123 


2602 

66 

64% 

r ^w!rll 

25 


239 103 


4 

26 

25 


32% X Duka l- 

335 115 


6 

32to 




511* Dun Bed 

IX 23 21 

1603 

48% 


-i. Bill 


11% DuaLt 

236 1X4 


2196 

15% 

U 

15ft* + % 

lift) 


X10 123 


H0Z 

17% 



15% 

13V* Die- eft 

ZOO 1X9 



14% 

Mto 

:*ft* 

17 

12% Duapf 



100* 

IS 

15 

■ 5 — to 

160 

13 DuqptG 2.10 KS 



IS 

IS 

IS 

16% 

12% DuqprK 2.10 13 A 


1 

15% 

15% 

15% — to 

17ft) 

13% Duqpr 

231 1X4 


1000* 

17% 

17to 

17V* 



275 113 




» 




730 1X3 









7 

20 

9% 



33% 

17% Dntoni 

30 9 


IX 

23V) 

22% 

33% + % 

§ I 

■a 

2*% EGG 

M 13 

s 

ca 





21% ESysf 

X 13 

14 

iKTl 





20% EaaleF 


9 

2 






A* 23 


487 





3% EastAIr 



1B17 

4 




1% EAL wto 


SA 

n* 

■El 







% 

%+% 


6% esMrpI 



29 

11 



■Tjv] 

Aft* EAlrpfB 


97 

n% 

llto 



9ft* EAlrpfC 



7 





191* EastGF 

IX .45 

9 

1388 


7m 


BfTM 


134 113 






70 

600 eased 

3X0 43 

14 





S7 

Jtft* faom 

IX 21 

9 

797 

r-ftri 

t*E1 










■ 

20to Eckerd 

IX X3 

13 

aui 





32% EOlsBr 

IX <6 

8 

13 

3<% 

Mto 


HJTj 

13 EDO 

X 13 

12 

99 

16ft) 




18% Edward 

X XI 

IB 

490 





190 EPGdPf 235 U3 


4 

22to 

y.i'A 


29% 25% EPBe? 

375 133 


M 

Ml 

-H 








PEI 



9 EITonj 


13 

437 

11% 



15** 


JO 33 


20 

10% 




E -‘M 



57 

3ft* 



V 1 



14 

137 

5% 




7ft* EMM pf 

IX 113 


2 




34% 

13 Ektep* 

X 3 

V 

25 

23% 




llto Elgin 

X 53 

13 

6 

14% 

teftb 

Mft* + Va 


5% EIKJM 


X 

388 

■% 





XX X5 

14 

1686 





5% Em Bas 

341 9J 

1* 


trttte 

iH 


S 

llto EmrvA 

X X9 

IB 

1081 

n 



31% 

24% Emfmrt 

13X47 

9 

480 

29VS 

29 

29%+ % 


l ; Morrill 

HipnLan 5<odi 


Dr., via PE 


SIX 

IPOs mpn Lo* 


Caul 

EijM. 


Ciige 


% 

37% 

31% 

23% 

58 

107 

3% 

219b 

20 

21% 

35% 

5% 

18% 

38% 

14% 

14% 

15% 

22% 

34% 

33% 

10% 

10% 

39% 

1696 

46 


1.76 94 
47 104 
SO 104 
.91 124 


149* EmpDs 
39b Emppt 
4 En»pf 
7 Emppt 
% EnExc 
22% EngfCp J2 24 
10% EntsBu 46 14 
17% Enserch 140 74 
51% EludlPf 625*11 J 
91% Ensch pfllSSollA 
1% EnsrCP 
9% Entora 

16% EntxE n IJtSe 74 
16 Entarln 1J0 <3 
23*6 EpulfOJl 1JD <9 
3 EqirMIk 
11% EqmkPt 2J1 107 
28% EqtROS 1J7 <9 
9% Eouftcn 
8% Ertamnt 
12% EssBsn 
15% EssevC 
30% Estrkw 
20 Eltivl 
3 EvonP 
7 Evan Pt 140 194 
30 ExCcto 140 4J 
13% Excrrtsr isioTlJ 
36% Exxon 340 74 


.12 


14 
14 
A9e 4 
40b 39 
.72 24 
45 24 


7 71 19% 

lOOOz 4% 
300z 5 
HMz 7% 
790 

15 396 27% 

12 132 32% 

19 3260 23% 
50550Z 53% 

3S2 989V 

20 1U8 3 

58 10% 
43 17% 
1 106 20% 
14 58 349k 

36 4V 

11 IS 

5 39 35% 

7 71 1W 

16 91 12% 

10 221 15% 

11 «B 20% 

13 115 2796 

11 175 33 

75 396 

35 7% 

11 154 37% 
2 16% 
7 9626 46% 


19% 

4% 

4% 

7% 

% 

27% 

31% 

229* 

S2% 

98 

2 

10>k 

17% 

20% 

34% 

4% 

14% 


19% — 
4% + % 
5 + % 
7% + % 


2796+ % 

31% + 

23 — 
53% + U> 
TO* +196 
2 

10% — 
17%— 
20% + 
349* + % 


10% 

12% 

15 

20% 

27% 

32% 

3% 

7% 

37% 

14 

*596 


1496 — 
35% + % 
10% + % 
12% — 
15% + 
20%+ % 
27% — % 


3% 

7*6 — 
37%+ % 
16 

46% + % 








7ft* 

7ft* 

7 ft)— V* 







SOto 

57 

57ft*— ft« 

76% 

FjtJ-UuJj 

125 

32 


2 

70% 

7IM* 

70%— % 

45% 


330 

83 

9 

1232 

44% 

44% 

44%— V, 


1 1 ft 1 X 



103 

22ft* 

22% 

23% 



JB 

22 

15 

31 

12% 

12% 

12%+ V* 






IX 

12V* 

lift* 

12 + % 



30 

48 

9 

33B 

M% 

16% 

16H— V) 

39 


330 

93 


26 

36% 

36% 

36% + % 

IP 1 1 


.16 

1.2 

9 

123 

Uto 

13 




32 

3 

X 

10W 

2*to 

25% 26%+ % 

I Mil 

ipfrlJrrnn 

AOe 33 

13 

53 

16% 

19% 

16% + to 





5 

6 

29V* 

Wto 

Wto + to 

t*Tnf 


30 

<5 

ft 

357 

20 

19ft* 


iTto 


X 

13 

M 

251 

10% 

10% 

10ft) + Vk 

7% 

4U. Feders 



U 

734 

6% 

5% 

6to + ft. 



1 A4 

<7 

7 

156 

35% 

34% 






23 


37 

35% 

36% + ft* 

IrT'l 


1.52 

46 

10 

336 

33% 

33 

rro + % 

1717! 


.16 

13 


5803 

16ft* 

MV* 

16% 

27 


.70 

33 

7 

377 


j 1 

20% + to 

21% 

16 Fad R II 

1.44 

73 

15 

X 

|:.yj 

l iPj 

20%— to 

191) 


X 

50 

18 

127 


1 1 r-j 

15% + % 

FI 


2 A0 

46 

8 

1532 


till 

51ft* 


F Tt rr* 

1.20 

<9 

9 

75 

264* 26% 


39 

25V* Fldcal 

zx 

63 

n 

3 

31% 

31ft* 

31ft) 

24% 

4 RnCpA 

X 

X2 

10962 

9to 

8% 

9% + to 





347 


33% 


9U> 





368 

4ft) 

4% 

4%+ % 

72 

15ft) Flrestn 

X 

43 

in 

1332 

18% 

IBto 

18% 

25ft) 

19 Ft All in 

X 

33 

7 

233 

25 

24% 24% + V) 

29% 

21 to FBkSys 

IX 

5L4 

7 

i mo 

1 * » ..1 

27%+ % 

33 

24% FBkFU 

IX 

42 

10 

17 


y. \yj 

28% + to 

5Rto 

3«* FBaxf 

30a 13 

10 

151 

| m 

1 t/i 

57V. — t* 

27 

18% FstChfc 

IX 

&4 

20 

379 


FpH 

23% + % 


30 

13% 

47% 

107% 

7% 

27% 

289* 

30 
35% 
52% 
5496 
12% 

31 

47% 

30% 

35% 

30% 

12% 

35 

35% 

37% 

24% 

24% 

to 

17% 

23% 

54% 

51% 

12 

65 

16% 

1296 

39% 

11% 

2596 

34% 

33% 


4 

100 
192 
18 
54 
356 
7 1073 
304 


57 44% FChlOPf 5 l77c12J 

104% 06 Fan pfanTOeizj 
20% 13*6 FtBTex 140 84 14 
51 38% FlBTx Pi 2480 64 

21 1196 FICHv 14 

18% 1096 FFcdAz 

30*6 Flntsto 234 SL2 
31 Flirts! Pf 247 84 
7W FtMfsft 2* 24 ID 
31*6 FN5IB 288 <0 6 
90% FNStBpI 1-70*114 
4% FstPo 108 

20*6 FstPo Pf 242 94 
20 FHJnRI 144 64 13 
1496 FTVaBfc 44 <3 8 
16 F1W1K 140 <4 7 
45% FWfsCPf <25 124 
30% Flschb 140 24 19 182 
8*6 FfcOiFd 450 J 8 

20% FltFnG* 8 423 

42% FttF pf <630125 9 

46 1J 11 1609 
48 24 13 191 
40 27 12 379 
141 124 
40 4 3) 

13 

,16a A 12 

216 27 9 

AO 27 13 


14% FiaetEn 
22% F taring 
2196 FtallV 
10% F Ini pi 
19% FHOtSf 
12% FlaalPt 
2996 FfaEC 
1896 Flo Pro 
11% FlaStl 
3*6 FhnGwi 
11% Flowrs 
14% Fluor 
43% FaoioC 
31 FardM 
10U FIDcar 


A0 

240 

240 


146 114 


23 17 

24550 3672 
<5 9 66 

44 310681 


46% 46% - 
87V. 87 87 . _ 

15% 15 15% + % 

39% 39 39 — % 

18% 18 18 — % 
16% 16 16%— % 
4496 44% 4496 + % 
21% 28% 28% + 9* 
99V 9% 9*6— % 
48% 47% 47% + % 
99 99 99 - % 

6% 6% 6% + % 
26% 28% 2646 + % 
27 26% 26%+ 9k 

19% 19% 19% + tu 
._ 2SV» 25 25% 

1140k 5m* 50% 50% 

3696 33*6 359v +21 h 

urn io% urn— u 

3216 30% 32*6 +1% 
44 44 44 + % 

27% 27% 27*6 + *6 
»% 3396—1% 
SOW 29% 30% + W 
12 % 12 % 12% 

34% 3416 34*6 — % 
23% 23 239k + % 

36% 36% 3694 + U, 
24*6 34% 2696 + Ml 
1SW 15 15 — % 

4% 4 


*46 

144 

19 

350 

166 

411 

233 

92 


16 

164 

463 

ill 

3% 


17% 16% 


45*6 FTHowd 144 24 15 


ss 


10 Fasrwh 
6% FaxSlP 
27 Paxbro 
5% FMOG 
13% FrptMC 
20% Frtgtm 
19 Frvetifs 


... U 11 
48 7J 15 
144 34 40 
141014 
40 34 14 
40 22 15 
40 24 6 


Fruhfpt 240 74 
Fuqua A0 .14 


34 

189 

374 

i2 

iR 

414 

995 

& 


15% 

49% 49 
49 479V 

11% 1196 

29% 29% 


17*6 + W 


47%+ 9b 
1196 
6396 + % 
12%—% 




299b— 9b 


27 26*6 

24% 24 
28% 21% 
31% 3196 


g96+W 

249* — % 
28% — % 
31%+ % 


26% 15 OAF .10a A 
33% 20 GAFpf 120 37 
39% 2596 GAT X 170 34 
44% 33% GATXpf 2S0 54 
51% 49% GATXpf 524O104 
39% 19% GCA 
65% 48% GE ICO 
10% 4 GEO 
13% 5*6 GFCP 

439* 34% GTE 
37% 31% GTE pf 
25 71% GTE Pf 

2296 19% GTEP! 

10 4% GalHou 

53% 33% Ganeft 
23 17% GaoStr 

30% 10% Goarht 
21% 139* Grtca 
65% 53% GflmCa 
39% 301* GnCOrp 140b <1 16 

11 14% GAInv 1430107 

4596 7996 GnBcsh 
28 1696 GCInm 1 

27 1496 GCnafs 

21 12% GnOafs 

72 42 GnDvn 

60 48*6 GenEI 

59% 45% GnFds 
31% 24% GGfti ... ... 

31*6 26% GGttiPf 1.90 62 

22 12*6 GnHoef 40 24 3 

19 8% GnHous 24 24 11 

34% 15% Gainst 40 22 17 
60 419V GdMIlta 224 45 12 


358 

w 

170 
1 
94 

14 1843 
48 14 10 10 

546 

66 

340 7J B 47Z) 
240 64 7 

240 <1 18 

248 11.1 30 

148 34 20 1844 
JO 23 12 115 
40 U 12 68 

46 34 14 
128 


use 

40 

46 


140 

Z30 

2J0 

40 


9 156 

9 813 
5 

23 431 
14 10 1629 


26% 26*4 26W— % 
32% 32% 37% + Vb 
35*6 34% 34% + % 
44*4 441ft 44*6 + 96 
50% SOW 50% + Ift 
26% 25V. 25% + % 
59% 59% 59%+ % 
«% 4*6 496— W 
5% 5% 5% + % 
42% 41% <2 — W 

37% 17 37 + V. 

24% 24% 24% 

22% 22*6 229b— *b 
5% 5*6 5*6— % 
5396 52% 5296— *6 
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109b W % 10% + W 

16% 15% 16% + 96 

65% 65% tf% 

399 3696 36W 36% + ** 

183 15% 15*4 15*6 

44 41% <3% — % 

27% 26 27% +19* 

279b 2696 279b +1% 
18% 18 18% + *A 


380 

1 


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17 17 7070 5994 58% 59 — *6 
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30% 309b 30% 

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«Y% B CMEn TUB 499k 489* 49% +1 

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B294 61 


376 

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633 

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24 22 


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5 

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125 HU 


11% 3% GNC 
11% 7W GPU 
47*6 46*4 GenRc 
9 5 GnRofr 

53*4 39% GnSIgnl 
1196 9% GTFIpf 

12*4 10 GTFIpf 1 JO 104 

68% 61% GTFIpf 8.16 112 

1*4 5V. Gonsco 9 

39 13** GnRod .10 4 18 

24% 15 Ganstg 140 

3394 24 GenPts 142 34 16 1067 

26*6 18 Go Poe JO II 1313051 


5% 5W 5*4— % 
11% ltW UK— % 


619 

137 


42 

240 


5 

22 14 


27% 22% GnPn pf 344 1U 

30% 25% GaPwpf 176 134 

22 17% GaPwpf 156 123 

71 17 GaPw pf 157 173 

34*6 21*4 GaPwpf 275 114 

62% 52 GaPwpf 730 124 

6196 51*4 GaPwpf 772 124 

32 20% GarbPs 1.16 <4 

21 T2 GarbS a .17 J 

1D% 7% GlomP 

111* 59b GUH-Fn 

26*4 1696 GWfHUI 

51% 43% Glllefte 

1796 11% G lOOSC 

99* 4% GlobIM 

26 179b GtabMpf ISO 164 

13% 0% GMNUO 12 5614 

594 19b GldN wf 1256 

25*4 II GMWF 30 4 7 740 

269ft 24% Gdrlch 146 5L9 6 1568 

II BV6 Gdrchpt 37 104 330i 

30% 23 Goodvr 140 64 7 3664 

20% 1396 GortilU 52 33 9 69 

36% 19 GauM 48 34 13 977 

46% 36% Greco 240 64 10 322 

£3% 47 Gralnsr 134 24 14 


34 <5 


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18 11% GtAIPc 

39% 27% GfLhln 
71% 15% GNlrn 
43*4 31 GtNNk 
26% 16% GIWFIn 
199k 9% GWHsp 


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500* 12 12 12 + 96 

I00B 67 67 67 +1% 

385 6*4 6 6% 

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20 % 20 % 20 %+% 
33% 33 33% + % 

2696 259k 25% 

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V 79 29 29 + % 

14 209) 20% 2896 
7 209k 29% 20%— *4 
7 23% 239b Oft + *4 
200* 6196 61% 6196 + *6 
200* 60% 60% 60% +2 
117 26 V. 25% 26*4 + 96 
971 17*. 16 17% + % 

31 K 9% ID + % 
591 10% 10% 10% 

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47 11 2055 SPA 549ft 55 +% 
37 139* 13 13% + *4 

5% 5% 596+ br 

20% 209b 20%+ *4 
1)14 109k 111b + % 
3 2% 2% + *6 

25% 24% 24%+ 9b 
26% 26 269b 

9% 9 9 — % 

27% 2ftk 24% — % 
16% 16'4 16% + *4 
2Z% 229* 2296+ *4 
41% 41 <1*4 

6296 6T 68% +1% 

14*4 14 14 

16% 1596 15% — Vb 

38% 3896 38%+ *4 

_ 169b 16** 16% + 9b 

43 7 1726 35% 34% 15% + % 

13 II 2954 2694 2614 269*+ % 

78 15V) 15 IS** — tv 

15% 15% 15*4 + lb 

25% 25V. 25%+ % 

39V 3% 3% 

19*4 IBM 19% + 9b 

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2287 


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319k 27 GHSU pr <40 135 
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40 


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29% 2946 29%+ *6 

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100K 36% 36*6 36*4 + 94 

55 46 45% 45%+ % 

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9 32% 32% 32% + % 

4® 74 73% 74 *2 

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26% Hamm 
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ft 550B 


46 64 


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21% Handlm 
15% HarUH 
1696 Hanna 
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2296 Horn* 
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19 Harsco 
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33 Hohu 
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18 HrimP 
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37*4 Horarts 
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28*4 Hftnhv 
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31% HowIPk 
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12 HlStaar 
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34 104 

10 49 

11 617 
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27*6 26% 
1*4 itb 
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47*4 4614 
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19% 19% 
45% 44% 
17% 17% 
18% II 
45% 44% 
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18% HR* 
33 22*4 

29% 29*4 
12% *2*4 
34% 34 
29% 29% 
1594 1594 
22*4 21% 
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14 1394 

17% 164* 
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44*4 4296 
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27*4 2614 
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46 4£%— % 

71% 71% — % 
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219V 21%— % 


35% 33% — % 


1296 13 + % 


2894 21 ICInds 1 JO <4 8 636 

84*4 6294 1C In pf 150 <1 7 

994 4% ICN 57 1798 

2596 22% ICNpf 170 105 18 

17V* 14 (NAIn 142 114 72 

199V 1394 IRTPrs Uf! 63 10 4 

47% 20% ITTCP 140 3.1 915586 

76 40 ITT triK 440 <B 42 

70% 44% ITTPiO SM &3 116 

58'4 28 ITTpfN 225 SA 5 

25% 15V6 III Ini 130 7.1 23 1124 


128 U 7 


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123 

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2596 13% IdKdB 
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16% 13% llPowpf 244 128 
1796 14% IIPOWPl 2.13 124 
19% 15% UPawPf 235 124 
34% 27*4 llPowpf <12 127 
30% 25 llPowpf 3JB 124 
50 48% llPowpf 535 113 

58% 45% liPawpf 543 12.1 
31% 2S% llPowpf <00 117 
30% 21% ITW I 44 24 16 _ 
37 27ft) InjpChm 240 54 13 1415 

9% 5% IntalCp 102 

15% 8% IN CO 30 14 

54 45 IntllMpf 746 134 

66 VV 54% IndIMpt 848 134 
17% 14 IrxflMpf 115 124 
179k 14% ImflMpf 235 119 
28% 23% IntOMpf 163 133 
259b 16% indKSsi 148 74 6 
15 5% Inftxco .14 15 15 

24 *u 13U infmtc 
5594 35% InsrerR 
35 279k ingR Pf 

15% 10% IngrTec 
32 19% InidSll 

48% 38% InWSTpf <75 104 
20% 14 Insllco 140 5.1 11 
12% 3% InsoRs 
27% 11% IniaRsc 6 

329k 19 lntgRpf 103 117 
41% 25V. IntflRpf 425 142 
18*6 7*6 inrRFn 


248 

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16% 15% ItcpS* 
AS9b 55 Jnfrrco 
143 120 inter Pf 
18% 9% Intrfst 
51% 41 inhik 
IF*. 8% Intmed 
21% 1496 InfAlU 
128% 99 IBM 
2916 22% IntFkiv 
13% 5% intHarv 
9% 2% IntHrwt 
44% 23% inWPlC 
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49 32% IntMm 

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28% 27% 28%+ % 
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10*6 9% 10*6 + 9* 

2596 25% 259* + % 
16% 16% 16%— % 
18%. 18% 1896— % 
32% 37% 32 + % 
58% 57% 56% +1% 
6096 5B*b 40U +2V) 
41% 41% 41%— 9* 
17W 16% 17 + % 
40 3996 40 + % 

1396 13% 13% + V. 

22*6 22 22% + % 

llQOx 16% 16 16 + % 

50r 17% 1796 1796 + 96 
2700z 18% 18% 18% + 9* 
10X 32% 32% 32% — % 
70te 30% 30 30 — 9* 

309 SO <9% M +1 

6 48 48 48 — % 

1 319b 31% 31%— % 

291 32 30% 31*6 + % 

3496 34% 34%+ 96 
896 8% 8% 

3518 13 12% 129k 

lOz 52 52 52 +1% 

250z AS 64% 64% + % 

7 17% 16% 17% + % 

17% 17% 17% + % 
27% 27 27%+ lb 

24 23% 24 + % 

596 5% 5%— % 

17% 17 17% + % 

<7 46% 46% + % 

33 32% 33 + % 

14% 13% 13% — % 
3396 23% 23% + % 
45 45 45 + % 

38 1 9*k 1996 

4% <Yb 4% + % 
15% 15% 15% + % 
239b 23% ZJ%+ V* 
30% 38 3B — V 6 
9% 6% 9 

_ 18% 18% 189* + Vb 

661 6296 61% 62%+ % 
17 135 13396 135 +3 

973 10*6 W% 1096 + % 
24 <7% 4696 47% + 96 
1137 11% 10% 11% +1% 

34 9 33 18% 1894 18% + Vb 

35 1213588 125%ia%134 - % 



Growing with the 
solid-state 
control market 


Ametek's U.S. Gauge, Controls 
and Microelectronics Divisions 
provide measurement and 
control capability that's inte- 
grated from silicon to systems. 

Write for latest reports to: 


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Dept. H, 

410 Park Avenue, 21st Floor, 
New York. NY 10022. 


IZMonita 
Won Low stock 


511 

lahHlBhLO* 


Close 

Quo). CAW 


15 


19 


14 
54 

7.1 

23 70 

2.1 


2.10BI14 
348 <9 12 
735 53 
40 54 6 
240 55 7 


367 

674 

37 

16 

114 

4 

524 

709 

106 

19 

30 

5 


1296 79b MDC 32 24 9 

40 31% MEI 44 13 15 

13% V% MGMGr 44 34 31 

16% 10 MGMUo 30* 13 24 

5% 7Uh MG Mu wt 
2596 17% MGMHo 40a 24 13 
28% 17% MB Ltg 
<7 25 MoemN 

53% 38% Mo cv 
41% 36 Moon* 

1996 11% Mod R*3 
<3% 24 MaglCI 
29% 30% MgtAsf 
25% 12% Manhln 
19% 13% ManhNI 
19% 10% ManrCs 
41% 22% MfrHan 
59 41 

57 40 


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140 23 15 
144 23 11 3024 
435 11.1 


40 2.1 


MfrHpf <57*111 
MfrHpf 549*123 


42% 3296 IntNHtl 248 <1 _ 

969k 86% IntNtPfHILSO 114 
36 24% IntpGos 140 23 12 

17% 10 InlBabr 
19% 15% InfStPw 130 93 7 
20 1696 inPWPf 23B 114 

18% M% lowaEI 1.90 111 8 
28 21% fowllG 240 9J 7 

19% 17 lowlOpf 231 114 
30% 25 tawaRs 248 *04 7 
33 9) 26 IPOfCO 2.92 84 8 
13% 9ft) IpcdCp 34 3.1 9 
3496 23% IrvftkS 144 54 7 
54 429* I rvBkPf 5.19*113 


6 % 6% 6% 
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38 37% 37% +1% 

31% 30% 3096 + % 
38% 38 38%+ % 

29% 28ft) 2896— % 
5396 S3 539k + % 
12% 119* 12 — % 
41% <0% 40% — % 
2D 95% 95% 95%+ % 
92 34*6 34 34% + % 

7 16*6 16% MOV 
73 19% 19% 19% + % . 
iota 20 20 20 

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I3H 5% vIManvf 
281ft 18% wIMnvtpf 
3096 21 MAPCO 140 
4% 3. Momtz 
2% % Mo rede 

28% 1996 Mar Mid 140 
46% 27*6 Morton 42 
13ft) 9% MarfcC 
199V 14% MOrtl Pf 
50*6 58% Morriof 
59% 35% MrsilM 
46% 30% MartM 


6 126 2 
145 

30b 24 6 121 
32 24 15 61 

.15 4 19 443 

340 83 5 2369 
1164 
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38% 38% 38*6 + Hi 
12% 12% 12% 

12*6 1196 17 + % 

3 29* 2%+ % 

21% 21 21%+ 9b 

20 % 20 % 20 % 

45 44% 45 + % 

45% 44% 45% +1% 
5% 38% 38*6 38% + ft) 
128 12% 12% 12% + % 
38% 37% 37** — % 
26% 26% 266ft 
15 14% 15 + % 

16% 15% 15%—% 
20 19% 10% — % 

38% 38 38% + % 

SO 49 50 + 96 

46% 46% 46% — % 
696 6% 696 + % 

19% 19% 199V + % 
28 27W 77% — % 


32 

130 

44 

240 

134 


74 55 MrtMpf <47 


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36 

.16 

140 


+ % | 


15*6 8% MorvK 
33% 22% Masco 
13 7% MassMr 

19% 15% MasM 
5% 2% MomvF 
269b 209k MasCP 
11% 9% Mas Inc 
80% 519* MatsuE 
13% 6% Mattel 
10% 4% Motel wt 
309* 16% Matt! Pf 
15% 9% Maxam 7 

43% 30% MOVDs 1-72 19 9 
“ 36% Maytg 240a SJ 11 
_ _ 25% McOrpf 220 84 
3% 20% McOrpf 240 122 


56 6 
1.1 34 
24 39 
73 
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<1 43 
34 
<7 

U 12 1607 
1.9 13 1048 
1J 15 75 

93 13 


290 

455 

33 

25 

377 

552 

427 


* * 1U 


28% 28% 2896 + % 
46% 4596 46% +1 
11% 10% 119* + % 
16% 16 % 1696 + 96 
77% 77 7796+1 

59% 58% 59 + % 

4£H 64% 449*+ % 
72% 72 72% +1% 

9% 9% 9%+ % 


248 10l 9 
132 113 
45r J 


279b 20 JWTs 
34% 23% JRI»*r 
19*6 12% Jamswy 
15 10% jopnF 

41% 23*6 JftffPIS 
65% 54% JerCpf 
56 -46% JerCpf 
55 <7 JerCpf 

16% 12% JerCaf 
796 5% Jewlcr 
41% 28 JohrtJn 
499V 371 JohnCn 
309* 31% Junta* 
23 15% Jostens 

32% 2194 JovMfa 


225 

487 

1298 

202 

591 


25% 25% 25%+ % 
32% 31% 31% + % 
1996 18% 1996 + % 
12*6 12 % 12 % + % 
39% 38% 38% —19* i 
100c 6296 47% 62% 

30® S3 52% CT% — 1VV 
20® 53% 53% 53% +11* 
5 16% 16% 16% + % 

5 7% 7% 7%+ V* 

130 33 15 3642 37% 3696 379V— % 
146a <2 9 144 45% 44% 44% + % 

140 34 IS 34 25% 25% 25% + Vi 

48 34 14 255 23 229) 23 + % 

140 57 14 526 24% 24% 24% — % I 


1.12 <3 11 
Jt M f 
.10 J 9 
1.15* 93 
132 34 10 
9J6 14J 
0.12 154 
840 154 
2.18 134 


JB 

142 

240 

134 


73 25 1061 

23 to IT 
14 13 2122 
23 9 1333 
5.1 13 291 


19 


.1% 21% McOei-l 140 
T2 6% McOrl wt 
10% 6% MCDU 30 
56% 4096 MCDnll 
7396 47% McOnO 
40% 319b McGEd 
48*b 34 McGrH 
3396 199ft MclMg 
41% 329ft MCKem 240 
15% 10 McLean 
6% 3% McLeawt 
25% 19% McNeil J9Q 34 9 
41% 27% M*Od 130 11 9 

22 129k Mesnix 34 |j 13 

43% 24% Medtrn Jt 17 B 
489* 33% Met km 240 57 7 
269* 22% Mel km pf 240 10J 


201 

263 

m 

431 

482 

149 

117 

75 

777 

375 

16 

* 


29% 2S*k 29 +% 
129* + % 


12 % 12 % 

19% 19% 19% + % 
2% 29ft 296 
26% 26% 26%+% 
11% 11% 11% 

62% 62% 62H+ % 
11% 11% 11% + % 
8% 8% 8% + V) 

5* «» ?5%ia 

43% 42% 43% +1% 
49% 48% 49% + 9b 
26% 26% 26%- % 
21 % 21 % 21 %+ % 
25 24% 24% 

6% 4% 644— % 
5* 


896 0*+ % 

56, 55% 589ft + % 


73% 71% 73 +H6 

39% 38% 39%— % 


24 16 1275 44% 4396 4396 + % 


63 10 
10 


14 

292 

377 

445 

37 

829 


28% 28% 289* + % 


38% 38% 30% 

11 % 11 % + % 


30 24 


450 124 
134 3 A 


40 

31 

40 


10% 696 KOI 
1496 9% KLM a 

39% 33 KMIPf 
37% 26% Kmart 
36% 24% KN Ena 
22 1294 KabTAI 

25% 14% KafiCe 
16% 8% Ktmeta . __ 

2D9* 14% KCtvPL 2JH 114 
34% 29 KCPL pt <35 124 
36 29% KCPL pf <50 129 

II 14% KCPLpf 730 123 
19% 15% KCPL pf 233 123 
57 36% KCSou 140 1.9 13 

14% 10% KCSDPf IM 7.1 
1894 12% KanGE 236 HI 6 
35% 27% KanPLi 2-74 7.9 7 
22% 18 KaPLPf 232 113 
201V 17% KaPLPf 233 113 
33% 1796 Kafy'n 
86 49 Kate of 

17% 109b KaufBr 
16% 12% Kauf Pf 
8396 68 Kauf pf 
42% 27 KeUaaa 
31% 21% Kelfwd 
496 1 Kancl 
35% 19% Kaunt 
25 20% KrUfO 

18% 11 KerrGI 
26% 18% KerGPf 
36% 26% KerrMc 
23% 16% KevBk 
696 2% KeyCnn 
22% 14 Kevslnt 
35% 26% Khbto 
7896 6196 KldprS ... 

53 42% KJddPPf 144 34 

50% 39% KbnbCs 230 <5 


9 151 
14 2545 
7 

7 2554 
14 93 

41 1442 
71 


158 

241 


146 21 
-40 25 
I JO 9.7 
335 114 
136 
140 


259 

34 

36 


43 13 1157 
24 6 153 
34 

40 33 20 760 
236 94 8 340 
M 34 40 

130 15 21 

1.10 19 13 987 
1.10 44 8 46 

20 

48b 19 18 479 
130 19 20 658 
53 2 

9 1011 


3* 21% KlWhlRd 36 24 15 733 


2696 1796 Kaaer 
34 16% Kolmar 

234* 17% Koaers 
16 12% Korean 

39% 29% Kroger 
31 25% Kubota 

I to* 1096 Kufihni 
67% 44% Kvocers 
19% 13 Kysor 


238 <8 77 
32 13 14 
40 <2 10 1002 
207 

140 5.1 12 913 
J2e 24 » 2 

40 12 Tl 10B 
.141 3 28 44 

40 15 6 146 


89* 8 B%— 9* 

13% 13% 13% 

36% 25% 36V) + % 
369* 36% 369* + % 
31% 31 31% + 9ft | 

15% 15% 15% + % 
11 17% 17%+ % 

996 to* 9*4— M> 
2OT6 20% 20% + % 
lOb 34 34 34 + 9ft 

50z 35 35 35 — % 

IS IB 17% 17%+ % 
12 19% 19 19 — % 

768 57% $1% 51% — % 
MSB 14 W 14 
653 IB 17% 18 + % 

155 35% 34% 34% + % | 
14 2D*ft 3ff*i 2096 
7 20 19% 2B + % 

227 27% 26 26%—!% 

1 60% 66% 68% — 1 
159* 15% 1596 + 9* 
15% 15% 15% + % I 
759ft JS% 73* + Ift 
429b 41% 414*— 9ft 
29% 28 29 + TV j 

1% 1% 1% 

23 22 22%+ 9ft 

249ft 24% 249b + % , 
12% 12% 12% 

20 20 20 
28V) 27% 28% + % 
24% 23% 24% + % 
» 2*6 7*6 — Vi , 

16*6 16% 16*6 
30H 30H 30H— % ; 
70% 70% 70% 

a 48 4i + % 

47% 489* 48% — 1% , 
22 30% 3196 +1% 

49 26% 25% 26% + 9V 
402 17% 19 19% + 9ft 

19% 18% 19% + VV 
14 13% 14 + % 

39*6 30% 39 + % 1 

25% 25% 25V* — % 
17% !0 T9 — % 
SB 54% 55 + % 
17% 17% 17% + % 


144 

1-20 

130 

40 

40 


45% 3096 MelvIU 
599ft 40% Merest 
97% 70% Merck 
56% 39 Merdth 

35 22 MerLm 

3% 2 MmaOf 

22 12% Mesa PI 

35% 24% McroR 
9 5% MePBfa 

6% 214 Mesteft 

3% 2% MexFd 

25% 22% MACn pf 3.19 123 

14% 12 MctlER 130 84 


537 

290 

27 


-06 


6% 4% Mick lbs 
42% 32% AMdcan 
14% 7% MMSUt 
25% 17 MURds 
77% 22 M WE 
17% 11% MlftnR 
85% 69% MMM 
31% 23% MtnPL 
25% Tu Mtonlrts 
20% 15 MoP5v 130b SJ 7 
209ft 1794 MOPS Pf 244 12.1 
229V 18*6 MOPS or 241 124 


12 ... ..._ . . 

496 4% 49) + % 
24% 239ft 24 + % 

38% 37% 38% +1% 
19% 1896 18%— 9b 
»% 279* 28 + 9* 

459ft 45% 45%+ 9b 

2fi yfc 26 

34 II 18Z7x 40 39% 39% + 9b 

24 10 169 57% 59 57% + % 

94% 92% 93%— % 
54% 53% 54 — 9k 
289ft 179* 27%— % 
3 2% 3 

17% 17% 17% — % 
28*6 2896 2896— % 
7% 7% 79* — % 
3% 39ft 396— % 
2% 29* to) 

25% 25 2SW + % 
15% 1596 15*6— % 
5 5 5 

42% 42% 42% + 9* 
13% 13% 13% - % 
189* 18% 189k + % 
279b 27% 27** + H 
14 »9ft 13% 

B2W> 81% Bl*ft— % 
30% X 30%— % 
8% B 8 — % 
2014 20% 20% + *b 
20% 20 20W— 9b 

21% 20% 21% 


34 14 1865 
1J 1] 62 

2.9116 9144 
1619 
5 874 
1 Me <1 6 

410114 9 451 
12 

-13e <7 162 

9 

8 13 


13 18 31 

54 9 172 

1 JB 114 5 4727 
1JU SA 19 IM 
248 9.7 10 5* 

A0 19 U 58 
3-40 <2 12 3850 
256 8J 7 106 


578 

67 

13 

13 


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32% 23% Mobil 
5% % vIMoblH 

9% 5% MOdCrri 

24 16*6 Mflhasc 

169ft 8% MOhfcOt 

24% 14% Monrcft 


30% 26 MpfDU 
30% 16% MonPw 
17% 14% MOnSt 
0% 6% M0NY 

45% 349ft MoorcC 
259b 18% MoreM 


319) io% MmeS 

10% 12 MlgRty 

31% 20 Morton i 44 23 13 1612 

451ft 29'U MOtrla * 44 14 11 59M 

741 6 !5*b Mirnfrd J4to 2J 12 33 

23% 14 Munsng 16 3 

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38% 23Vj AAuraO 140 3J 9 158 

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17 



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17ft) 




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36 349ft 3516 — Ift 

22 2T9S 22 + % 
1B9V 18% 18% + to 
39% 39*6 39% + % 
26 259b 25% + % 

1996 19% 19% 

13% 139* 139V + (b 
4% 4% 4% + 9b 


279b 22% LN HO 244e10J 
15% 7% LFE 
W Oto LFE pf -50 64 

17% 12% LLE Ry 122*10 

... 2 LLCGB 
11% 8 LLCpf 
19% 8% LTV 
40% 43% LTV p* 

31% M% LTV pt 
69 50% LTVpf 

179) 13 LTVpf 

IBM 10% LQufnt 

26% 15% LacGvs 

1296 n Lafarpe 

31% 239ft Lafropf 244 
18% 12% Lamour 34 
3% 19ft LamSta 


573 
15 
2 

1937 

346 134 240 

335 8-5 46 

135 73 277 

14 2778 
1J9) 63 I 158 
30 23 378 

93 30 

14 14 37 

143 


14% 10% Lawllns -56 <7 13 174 

2616 13% LoarPf 30 J 14 3314 

29% 20% LearF Pf 247 107 141 

47M 27% LftarSo 140 44 7 71 

189* 14 LeaRnl9 36 23 13 S3 

39% 24% LswrTr IJD <7 11 209 

30% 20% LeeEnf 40 28 IS 26 

U% 9 LeaMax 30 14 19 158 

31% 15% Leap Ml 44 23 9 32 

4Ws 5% LBhVal 139 

37% 23 LVInpf 2 

19% 13% Lehmn 1JBO103 304 

19% 9% Lennar 30 13 18 255 

339* 16 LeucHI 6 16 

S 20 Levied Pf 240 <0 53 

37% 23 Lev15f 1JS O 27 7974 


3896 25% Levltz 
50 3096 LOF 

„ 62 LOF pf 

» 21 LlOtvCP 

67% 53 Lilly 
30% Uto Limited 
41% 26to uncfftl 


32 13 . 

132 24 8 
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72 24 15 
330 44 U 


34 

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27% 27% 27% — % | 
129b 12% 1214 
8% 8% 8% — % 
15% IS 15% + to 

2% 2 2% + % 

99b 9% 9%— % 
12 11 % 11 % 

50 49% SO - 

229b 22 22M+ % 

61% 61% 61%+ % 
17 1696 169k— U 

Ute il Tlte+ % 

2794 27 27%+ % 

9% 8% 9% + Ift 
26V) 26 26% + % 

14% 14% 14% 

3 2% 3 

12 11% 12 
22*6 21% 22% +1% 
269ft 25% 2696 +1 
4S96 45% 45% — 9b 1 
16 16 16 + % 
319ft 31% 31H— % 
29 28% 29 + % 

119* W% 11% + % 
19% 19 19 

3% 3% 3% 

3296 32 329ft + 96 

15*ft 15% 15% 

15% 149ft 14% + to 

33 329ft 33 + % 

34 33% 33% 

.. 29% 28 29% +1% 

544 379ft 37% 37%— I 
192 46% 459ft 469ft +1 

3 73 729ft 7296 + % 

146 27% 27V. 271ft— % 
151 67V) 66 Vl 6AM + % 


N 


259* 16 NAFCO 
53% 39% NBD 
169* Uto NBl 
20% 16% HCH 
38% 22 NCNB 
32% 20% NCR* 

24% 13 Nf InO 
17 10% NLInd 

33 25V) NUI 

29b % NVF 

49 33% NWA 

54 38% NatneB 248 

32 21 Notes 130 

2996 28 NaStaa 


J0O4J IB 34 
240 <4 7 150 
11 412 
.72 34 13 164 

132 34 9 372 
48 33 8 7352 
9 

30 14 79 1354 
232 73 7 7 

J8 20 10 2690 
<7 11 1125 
44 13 491 
8 65 


19 T8*ft 1896— to 
5511 53% 55 +1% 
1AM 169b 16% + 1% 
20% 19% 20% + lb 
37% 3696 379b— (ft 
2796 27% 27%+ % 
21% 21% 21% + IV 
119* 10% II + to 




37% 3D9k WatCan 140 3.1 _ 

18% 11% NIC* 9 36 23 16 

30 22% NafOlsT 230 <5 13 

19V) 16*ft NOW or 143 104 


148 

176 


35 

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4 22 2199 381ft 294b 299ft— to 

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4846 30% Locfchd ASe 14 9 3501 45% 44% 444) + % 

«lft 30% Lacflte 40 23 14 107 37 JM) + to 

'1S5 I?* IJ0 9 9 2309 1141ft 111 to 1)29* +3% 

32% 19 Lam Fin 1.1* 37 13 356 319ft 31% 319ft 

249V LomMf 146*103 16 TIM 33% 32% 339ft + % 

W* I"* L^Sfar^ ’ * 539 M% W 34% + % 

LoneSpt 537 114 47 49 4S9ft 49 


11 


138 


_19k LILCa 
35 MLpfl 
53% 21% LILPIJ 
IH LILafK 
0% LILpTX 
23% 9 LILpfW 
2J* 9% LILpfV 
11V) ULpfU 
27% 0% LILpfT 
16% 6 UL pfP 
1796 7 LiLpfO 

. 34 LonaOr 
29*» 18% Loral 
15 10% LaGenl 

34% Tpu La Land 

3% 17 LaPOC 

31% 28% LsPLpf 440 157 
« 16% LoPLpf 3.14 1<3 

ttto 22% LOUVGI 244 8« 
LOmti 

259* 16U Lowes 
24% Uto Lubnl 
T 23** LUms 
. 'to 15% LvdtvS 
16% 10% Lukens 


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14 16 
44 <9 9 
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240 43 
.32 IJ 14 1004 
1.16 S4 14 1197 
44 1.9 19 86 

1.16 6J 9 19» 
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1344 a 79) 7% + % 

1 579k 5796 579. 

13% 419, 4896 4096— 9ft 
•S 1 £ 41 42 — % 

46 20 19% 20 + % 

2S' 1996 20 +9b 

20 19% 199b + to 

339) 23% 23% 

10% 18% 10% + % 
15% 15to 15% + to 

17 1696 17 — % 

479ft 4*96 47% +1% 
26% 26 3t% + % 

11% 11 11 
30% 3096 30% — to 
349b 24% 24% 

30*4 30% 30% — % 
Uto 22% 22% 

274k 27% 27% + % 
469* 454* 46% + 9ft 
26% 26 369* + % 

23 'ft 22% Z3U + % 
JWb 289b 28% + % 

18 1796 17% + lb 
13% 13to 134* + % 


63 

in 

no 

■o 

35 

S41 

34 


20% 12% NT Edits 
29% 17% HMFGs 
42% 27 NofGvo 
5% 2% NtMom 
3791 23% Nil 
75 56 Nil of 

2Slft 17% NMedE 
12% 6% N Mines 
2896 209ft NfPrasI 
Mft 9% NlSeml 
2996 21% NfSvlns 140 
174) 11% NStand 40 27 B 
11% IP Nercnn 48e <5 6 
291* 219a NerPw 27* 9.9 • 
u n% tievPpf 140 114 
20% 19 NewPpf 230 114 
16% 14% NevPpf 1.9S 114 
14 9ft •% IOuwSwL JO <5 5 
409* 28% NEMEI 140 94 1 
26V* 21to NErtPpf 276 113 
26% 19 NJRsc 204 74 7 
21% 149k NYSEG 244 189 4 
49 S5% NYSsI 840 121 

26 199) NYSntA 101*127 

17% 13% NYStri 212 125 
29% 24 NY5PIO 175 T18 
17% 13to Newell JO 11 10 
4TU 28% NewflOl 
169ft II NewMI 
12 7to NwtfIRs 
54% 31 Newmt 
6% 1% Nuntark 

T79) 12 MlaMP 
27% 23 NlaMPi 
42 34 NlaMPf 

49% 38% NlaMef 
21% 15% NlaaSb 
17** 10% Nlcatet 
29% MV) HI COR 
19 12% NaalAt . 

639ft 48% NarfkSo 120 
30% 169) NarHfi . 

38V) 29*ft Nerstr . 230b 64 
H 43 Norvtr Pt 4 TSelOJ 
16% 12 Nartetc 40 J 
56 43 NACtxU UM IJ 

40% 38% NAFAIs 140 34 
21% 13% NEurO 1 JAell.l 
1496 10% Naestut 148 107 
15V* 10% Nlrt^S 1-56 127 
44 to m NO&fPw 334 7.7 
25V1 30 KSPWPf <08 124 
36% 316* HSPwpI <10 114 
6696 56% NSPwpf 744 124 
Oto 29% HorTef A0 13 
Z% Nttaafp 


12 

73 6 35 

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- 

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81 2 
11 13 4719 
12 

19 12 25 

. 12 3997 

34 II 51 
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48e 73 
140 16 21 


240 tIJ 6 
340 124 
535 111 
<10 133 
2ZMU 
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54 


M 


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39% 23% Nortrps 130 34 1013180 33 3196 33 

62to 48% NwTlnd 248 53 18 3775 SJto 50. 52 


32 


21% 13% MACOM 
4«V 349* MCA MB 
»% 16% MCorp 140 
34 MCaraf 150 


1.1 22 4671 
11 X 114* 

K 6 "f 


19% 19% 19te— % 
nto «*6 4i% — % 
21 28% 30% + % 

32% 37% 37% 


2196 19% NwfPuf 236 124 
25% 8% NwSfW _ 

~ 309ft Norton 200 57 II 


45 44 44%+ % 

S3 53 52% + % 

254* 34% 25V. 

28 27% 27%+ % 

32% X 22 W— % 

635 159* 15% 15% — % 

37B I6VV 25% 239*— to 

I 17% 179* 17% — to 

561 13% 13U 13% 

269b 26% 26W- % 

429* 41% 42% + 9ft 

2% 29b 29*+ V* 
299k 289* 29% 

62 62 43 —3 

25** 24% 249k— % 
8% 8 S%+ 9* 

259* 25% 25%— V* 
1296 12to 12% + % 

29 »% 29 + 94 

15 149ft 15 + % 

HX* 10% TO*) + V* 

28 27% 279*— % 

TBOQf 14 13% 14 + Vi 

4001 20 Vk » 30V* + % 

11 16% Ikto 16%+ % 

X 11 11 IT — to 

2S1 38% 31ft* 38% + % 
1 24% 24% 24% 

10 26Vft 259* 26 — Vft 
703 22% 22to 22% 

TSDl 67 65% 47 +1 

4 23*6 23% 23D + *ft 
7 17 17 17 — % 

29 to 29*. 29V. + H 

16 15% 16 + to 

40% 40% 40% + % 
13 12% 13 

9% 9% 9% 

38% 30% 38%— to 

1% 1*ft 1% 

. 179* 17% 179*+ to 

00Z 26% 2S 26% 

i box a 40 40 

WOz 46 46 46 +1% 

66 16% 16% 16% 

16% 15% 16 

29 289b 28% + to 
14% 14 •* I4%— V* 

64% 63to 63% + % 
17V* 17 17 — 9b 

37V) Jftto 36% + % 
4S% 44 45%— % 

16% 15% 16% + % 
52% 52% S29» + % 
3Sto 379) X 

1414 13% 14 
14% 14% I4W— % 
13% 13 I3to 
43% 43V) 42V. + % 
WXx 34% 39 34 + % 

3Mt JSto 35to 3SV) +lto 
27TSz 45% 65% 65% + % 
1468 Mto 339* 339)— to 

12 3% 3% JVs— % 

" +1% 

+2% 


2 

513 

19 

48 

17 

IX 

102 

768 


160 
440 
a mi 
6 5324 
22 


113 

613 

23 


125 

1457 

2125 

511 


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647 


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12% 129* I2%— to 
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(Continued on Page 19) 



V 

i 1 . 





is.r 

i'^- ' 

s'*;... 





S 5 S? 









































• t , . , 


fMEJt fftCtt P.12 Eomlnej reports P.1 1 
AMEX rtOto/taPSP.ia Fltn* rate no>« P.15 
*VSE.prtas P. 0 Grid markets P. 9 
nYSE hinhwtops p.io imemt rates P. 9 
Conodtafl starts P.14 Market summary p. 8 
Currency «t*s P. * Options P.1J 

CommodKIvt P.1J OTC stock P.10 
ptvMwig P.H CTlter workers p.u 

THURSDAY, JAN11ARY 17, 1985 


WALL STREET WATCH 

Analysts Look to f Little Guy’ 
To Drive tiie Next Big Rally 

By EDWARD ROHKBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

I NDIVIDUAL investors retreated from the stock market in 
record numbers in 1984. Salomon Brothers estimates ihqt 
individuals, the so-called little guys, sold S124 billion more 
in stocks than they bought i»** year 
Nevertheless, says Robert Farrell! chief market analyst at 
MerriD Lynch & Co., “The source for the bull market of the 
future win come from individual investors.*' 

He reasons that the stage was set five years ago, when the 
public began shifting from hard-asset investments, such as homes 
and real estate, into more financial investments. Typically, he 


licralo^&^enbtmc 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

’ P^P"9 


notes, the first step was to buy . 

money-market funds, which « n , . 

now command more than rtUTell PitnKs the 
$200 biffion in assets. And last u„ri _ 

year, Mr. Farrell notes, indi- neXl bnD market 

were net buyers of will be fueled by 

The public’s funds will next individual investors. 

start flowing into stocks, the 

third alternative, because “to- 
day’s conservative investor becomes tomorrow’s speculator,” be 
said. He explained the phenomenon by describing what happens 
in bull markets.* Early on, he said, investors are nervous and take 
profits quickly, but they get more and more aggressive as prices 
rise. 

“Eventually, many become plungers,” he said. He added that 
the cutoff point where investors typically begin moving out of 
money market funds is when returns fall to about 8 percent — 
“and we’re getting close.” 

Mr. Farrell sees the bull market resuming; in about six months. 
He thinks there is “follow-through strength" in the present rally 
because “everyone’s conditioned to expect it to stop shortly, like 
the others did in 1984." The rally will extend to the old highs of 
the tipper 1.200s as measured by the Dow industrial average, be 
believes, but will then retreat in early Spring to last July's low of 
1080. Stocks will then begin a sustained advance at mid-year, he 
says, and will end 1983 above 1,400. 

Laszlo Birinyi Jr ? director of equity-market analysis at Salo- 
mon Brothers, said individual investors are already moving back 
into Wall Street. ’The major change so far in 1983 is the return of 
the public." he asserted 

A LTHOUGH a record 49 percent of all New York Stock 
Ljk Exchange volume last year was accounted for by block 
-LM. trades (20,000 shares or more), he said, computer analysis 
of the tape indicated that smaller trades are showing all the 
buying in the rally that began early this year. Figures also show 
the public buying across the board, he added, with the rally 
“extending to many more issues than the usual 30 to 40 stocks 
that led rallies in 1984 when upmoves were all dominated by 
institutional trading." 

Banks, pension funds and other institutional investors will be 
forced to come into the stock market if individuals continue 
buying and keep prices up, be said. “Entry by the institutions 
could provide real thnist and take stocks to new highs," he 
predicted. 

However, Philip J. Roth, technical analyst at EF. Hutton, 
believes that heavier buying by individuals so far in 1985 reflects 
seasonal factors. “It's normal reinvestment demand after an 
especially heavy liquidation by the public in December ” he said. 

The individuals coming in are “short-term, aggressive traders, 
not investors,” he said, and they are only buying speculative 
issues, not quality stocks. He said there has been heavy purchases 
on margin in over-the-counter and American Stock Exchange 
issues. 

“It’s a short-term swing, not the start of a sustained rally," he 
predicted. “The ones playing this market for the past year have 
been aggressive individuals and performance-oriented funds do- 
(Continaed on Page 11. CoL 7) 


Currency Rates 


Late interbank rates on Jan. 16 , axduding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 


2 P.M. 

S 

K 

DM. 

F*. 

114- 

GMr. 

AjmtertMm 

3595 

arm 

112.975“ 

36*7* 

0.1843 

— 

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63*875 

71XZB 

20*05 

63315 

23618* 

17.71 

RmtKAni 

3.1833 

357 

__ 

3244* 

1431 x 

RSI* 

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7.1205 

— . 

U7B8 

18.934 

3,18680 

6*313 

Mika 

1*53*0 

2,191 JO 

61337 

20034 

— 

543*5 

HawToriUcI 

— 

1.1175 

119 

9.765 

1.955*0 

3402S 

Purls 

9744 

10*36 

1*627 

— 

4.993 x 

2J11 

Tokyo 

2S4.9ZS 

285X8 

79.98 

26.13 

13-09 * 

7174 

Zurich 

Z4758 

3*041 

84*45* 

27X45* 

0-1371 

7*35 * 

1 ECU 

0*984 

04311 

22234 

6*116 

1J6424 

15133 

1 SDR 

0973415 0*68345 

309867 

9X869 

NjQ. 

3X994 




Dollar Values 



AuriraBaas 
Austria KMDM 
Bririanflo. franc 
Cotodiont 
Dart* krone 
Fteaidt mat* 


si*. Corre " CT 

Uni trHh C 
00015 MrMHsMfcri 
1X58 XmvHf (trior 
1401 Malar, rings)! 
lion Nn-traw 
00527 Pfe&MSfl 
0*058 Port escudo 
02752 Sasdlrirri 


BJ=. SJ=. Yen 

5448" 134J0 *141.15 v 
2X7*35 24.9875 

* 

4:999* 110*4 *12495* 
7144$ 1.997 28544 

30449 72084 7M3 

44*4 16832 255*5 

1X311* 34402XB2S8’ 

399.59 • 9493 

4M2S* 1*503* 

444954 1X711 17001 

61.9044 04083 240123 


s Per 

Ml. CWt * ,CT W* 

04546 sfrwnoanS 21995 

04585 S. Africa rand X181 
08012 S. Karev) woo 83110 
00057 Soon, pools 17X85 

MM Swed. krone 9.123 

00254 Taiwan I 39 31 

0334-5 Thai MU 27 INS 

02729 UA£.dMWn 2473 


I srirtrio : 1.V493 IrWit 

(a) Commercial tronc (b) Amounts nwrid to bur one point (cl Amounts nerted to fcnrowrtttar (*» 
Units at WO <xl Uritsri 1*09 <yl Unltsri 10*00 
HA: net qariad; MJ4J notovoMriXa 

Sources: Banova du Benelux ( Brussels): Banco Commerdale Italtanu (Milan); Chemical 
Bar* (New York); Banana Rationale ae Paris (Parian IMP (SDK); Bonoue Amt» el 
Internationale trinveeUssemenf (dinar, rival. dirham}. Other data tram Renters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Jan. 16 


Dollar D-Mark Franc starting FM ECU SDK 

UUl. m ■ 9W1. 5% - 5% 5W . S4fe 13W-12V. 10*.- low. 9W - 9W 8 - 8-4. 

2 m. 94* - PM 5* - 4 5B. -Sh, 13 - UVh 10M- 101* Hfc ■ Mb 8*1. - SW 

3M. 94* - 5h-ilk 5fc - 5h 12 • 12V* 10* - 11»W W* - ** B«k - 81k 

AM. 94* - tv. SM - M, 5» - 5Vi im- 11V. II*.- 11* « *.-»■*. 8* - 8W 

IV. 9W.-944 SOU- SO. 54* -SMi llth-m BW -9V* 

Rotes to MerhanKMaosttsof Si million minimum (or eautuatenn. 

Sources: Menton Guaranty (dollar. DM SP, Pound. FPf; Lloyds Bank (ECU/: CHttxmk 
(SOM. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Jan. 16 


2 moo 

IM-.IWi 


3 mas. 
bn. -Ih 


Seurat: Motors. 


Key Money Rates 

Unfed States < 


Dbowil Rot* 

Federal Funds 
Prime Role 
Broker Loan Rote 
Comm. Paper, 30-179 days 
9-monffi Treasury Sills 
6-mantti Treasury Bill* 
CD’S 38£? days 
CD1 40*9 days 


Lombard Rate 
OncnteM Rate 
OwUwlh Iriertank 
3-montti interbank 
frnvmtn interbank 


tnterve m to n Rate 
Call Monev 
One-man tti IWerbonfc 
3>mmth interbank 
6 - mo ntt t . interbank 


Ctos* fW. 
B B 

aw. > 

WKp* lOVjJi 
O-IOW f-W» 
005 7.90 

JJI 7.70 
7.94 7.94 

7*0 7J5 

7*5 7*5 


5J0 5*0 

555 MO 
6J» 5*$ 

400 5.90 

0*5 5.95 


ID** 10** 
10>4 TOW 
Iff 7/14 tO** 
103a 10hi 
Utfe 101* 


Britan 

Close 

pm. 

Bonk Bos* Rale 

12 

12 

Call Money 

>2 

NA 

9i4av Treasury Blit 

113* 

114* 

Xfflanm inlarbonk 

11 9/16 

ra* 

Japan 



Discount ROT* 

5 

5 

Coll Money 

6 3/16 

4 5/16 

(Bday interbank 

4 5/14 

4 5/14 

j Gold Prices 


Sources: Reuters. cammanhaak. CndU L>- 
-SBMort Ukmri Son*. Bank of Tokyo. 


Ajtf. PJk Case 
Hong Knw> 302.15 30X45 + 020 

Lincitibeura BOSS - * a. a 

Ports [125 fcllol 30X99 303.97 + 14* 

zurteti 30X20 moo ~aw 

Undo, 30X45 30170 + 290 

New Yort — 3BJ-70 + 2-20 

Ott trial Haines for London. Par# onfl Liuenv 
baura, ootnlng and daslne prices lor Hone Kona 
and Zurich, Pew fart Comer arrtnl ewtrori 
Ail prices >n US* per ounce. 

Source: Reuters. 


ITT Slates 
Huge Sale 
01 Assets 

Cuts Are Valued 
At $1.7 Billion 


Byjamcs F. Peltz 

The Assoaared Pres 

NEW YORK — ITT Corp., one 
of ibe biggest U.S. industrial com- 
panies, stepped up its streamlining 
effort Wednesday by announcing 
plans to divest more than a dozen 
subsidiaries valued at about S1.7 
billion. 

The units to be divested are 
grouped primarily in ITTs natural 
resources and industrial technol- 
ogy sectors. The move will nearly 
eliminate ITTs interest in natural 
resources. 

As a result, ITTs focus will 
largely concentrate on its two other 
ma^or groups: telecommunications 
and diversified sendees. The latter 
sector includes Tbe Hanford In- 
surance Group and Sheraton 
Corp., the hotel chain. 

However, ITT said it is consider- 
ing offering investors “substantial*' 
positions in Sheraton, with ITT re- 
taining management control, and 
minority investment stakes in cer- 
tain overseas telecommunications 
companies. 

ITT. which ranked 20th among 
American industrial companies ac- 
cording to 1983 revenues, also said 
it plans to make selected divesti- 
tures in its overseas insurance oper- 
ations. 

nTs chairman. Rand V. Aras- 
kog. said tbe divestitures would be 
“accomplished as quickly as practi- 
cable." 

In the first nine months of 1983, 
ITTs net income dropped 31 per- 
cent from a year earlier to 5273.2 
million, while revenue edged up 2 
percent to S9.17 billion. 

The conglomerate already has 
sold about 70 subsidiaries — and 
lopped some S2 billion from its 
total sales — in the past five years. 

Last year, ITT sold Continental 
Baking Co. — maker of Wonder 
bread and Hostess baked goods — 
to Ralston Purina Co. for 5475 mil- 
lion. And last month ITT agreed to 
sell major portions of its Eason Oil 
Co. umt for 5240 million. 

Tbe purpose of t he st reamlining 
program is to pare Ill's $4-bilhon 
debt load, bolster its sagging Gain- 
ings and provide money for its ex- 
pansion plans in the hotly competi- 
tive telecommunications industry. 

The latest round of p lanned di- 
vestitures marked ITTs most ag- 
gressive effort yet to shed itself of 
operations not included in its long- 
term strategy. 

“It’s a giant step in the right 
direction," said Laurence C. Baker, 
who follows ITT for the investment 
firm of EP. Hutton & Co. 

“They’re getting rid of assets that 
have very low returns and translat- 
ing that into cash with which they 
can reduce debt or add to working 
capital in the businesses they hope 
to expand," he said. 

Betides telecommunications, in- 
surance and hotel services. ITT 
said it would retain its operations 
in office and defense- space prod- 
ucts: financial and communica- 
tions services; and automotive, 
electronics and Ouid products. 

That means about 12 companies 
in the industrial technology group 
alone will be divested. ITT said, 
although it declined to identify 
them. 

ITT will nearly abandon the nat- 
ural resources area. Tbe company 
said it planned to sell tbe remaining 
portions of Eason Oil and oLher 
“selected operations" within the 
group. 


Angola Bids to Revive Coffee Trade 


Enduring Strife 
Leaves Industry 
In a Shambles 


By James Brooke 

Ne* Vont Times Service 

U1GE, Angola — In 1961, at 
the height of Angola's coffee 
boom, African workers shar- 
pened their machetes, rose op 
from tbe coffee fields around 
here and massacred about 1,800 
Europeans. 

Fourteen years after this first 
blood was spilled. Angola won 
its independence. Today, tbe 
fighting that began here in the 
northwestern part of the country 
has noi stopped and production 
from Angola's cofree fields has 
fallen to 5 percent of colonial 
levels. 

Angola, probably more than 
any other African country, paid 
for its independence with a crip- 
pling white flight and ensuing 
economic collapse. Its coffee sec- 
tor dramatically illustrates bow 
loss of skilled human capital and 
continued civil strife can destroy 
a flourishing economic enter- 
prise. 

In die 1960s. coffee flowing 
from the lush green mountains in 
this region provided half of An- 
gola's foreign exchange. Coffee 
money transformed Luanda — 
about 1 50 miles (240 kilometers) 
southwest of here — from the 
backwater capital of a penal col- 



Norway Reduces 
Crude-Oil Price 
At Least a Dollar 


Die l*w York Tr 


An Angolan Array officer surveys the crop in a planta- 
tion coffee field at the Angolan Coffee Institute in Ufge- 


ony into a booming metropolis 
of high-rise buildings. In grati- 
tude. newly rich immigrants 
from Portugal named a Luanda 
section “Bairro do Cafe," or 
“Coffee Neighborhood." 

In the early 1970s. Angola 
competed with the Ivory Coast 


for tbe title of Africa's largest 
coffee producer. From year to 
year, each ranked third of fourth 
on the worldwide scale of pro- 
duction. 

In 1974, Angola exported 5.2 
million sacks of coffee, each 
l Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


Industrial Utilization Rises in U.S. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —The operat- 
ing rate of American industries 
rose again in December, but was 
still below tbe levels reached last 
summer, the government reported 
Wednesday. 

The Federal Reserve Board said 
O.S. factories, mines and utilities 
operated at 81.9 percent of capaci- 
ty last month, up 0.3 percentage 
point from the November level. 

The 0. 1 -percentage-point gain 
posted in November had been the 
first increase since July. Factory 
operating rates dipped for the first 


time in this recovery for three con- 
secutive months starting in August. 

The declines reflected the overall 
sluggish performance of the U.S. 
economy in the late summer and 
early fall. 

In another sign of the strength of 
the current rebound in activity, the 
government also reported Wednes- 
day that US. merchandise sales 
soared 1.1 percent in November, 
tbe largest increase since May. 

The report on factory use was 
not a surprise given a report Tues- 
day that output at the nation's fac- 


tories was up 0.6 percent in Decem- 
ber, the biggest increase in five 
months. 

The report on capacity utiliza- 
tion measures how much of avail- 
able industrial capacity is being 
used. Economists have said that 
despite the fact the country is in the 
third year of its economic recovery, 
utilization rates are remaining rela- 
tively low and thus there is little 
danger that inflation will be rtig- 
nited by supply shortages. 

The 81.9-percent operating rate 
is still below the peak of 82.7 per- 
cent reached in July. 


Reuters 

OSLO — Norway has cut its 
crude-oil price by at least $1 per 
hanel to a January level just a few 
cents above current free-market 
prices, industry sources said 
Wednesday. 

. Sources in Stated, the state- 
owned oil company, said Monday 
that the company would abandon 
its policy of pricing through pre-set 
contracts and would seek individ- 
ual agreements with customers at 
prices reflecting the market, which 
has been weak because of over- 
supply. 

Industry sources said Statoil 
would charge between S27 and 
527.50 per barrel for crude qfl load- 
ed this month, compared with cur- 
rent spot-market levels hovering 
just above $27. 

Norway, which produces only 
1.1 percent of the world’s oil, cut 
prices in October and sent shock 
waves through the markets and the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries. 

Tbe move triggered similar cuts 
by Britain and by Nigeria, an 
OPEC member. There nave been 
attempts by OPEC to reduce out- 
put, but they have not been effec- 
tive in propping up prices. 

British National OQ Corp. is also 
selling most of its January cal at 
spot-related prices and analysts say 
the pressure is now back on OPEC, 
which has doggedly stuck to an 
official price of 529 a barrel 

OPEC is due to meet at tbe end 
of this month to review arrange- 
ments for monitoring oil produc- 
tion by its members. 

Even the recent cold snap in Eu- 
rope has done little to comfort pro- 
ducers. Spot prices have nsen 
slightly as fuel demand has risen, 
but traders say it is only a tempo- 
rary reprieve in a still-nervous mar- 
ket. 

■ Exxon Joins Price-Cutting 

Exxon Coqx the world's largest 
oil company, has joined the latest 
round of industry price-cutting, an- 


Suez Canal Is Straggling to Stem Threats to Role 


By Olfat Tohamy 

International Herald Tribune 

CAIRO — The Suez Canal’s fu- 
ture as the vital link between the 
Mediterranean and Red Seas may 
be at a crossroads. Traffic in the 
canal is sloggish, and a growing 
network of oil pipelines is creating 
strong alternatives to the canal. 

The canal's revenue ranks third 
among Egypt's sources of foreign 
exchange. Last year it totaled $960 
million — $100 million short of 
projections — according to Ezzat 
Add. president of the Suez Canal 
Authority. The other two major 
sources of foreign exchange are re- 
mittances from Egyptians working 
abroad and oil exports, both of 
which also fefl last year. 

Last year’s canal revenue was 
only a slight increase from the pre- 
vious year’s figure, and indicated a 
continuation of the trend of level- 
ing off of the country's revenue 
from the canaL Tbe revenue has 
ban oscillating around 5900 mil- 
lion a year during the last lew 
years. 

The main reasons for the short- 
fall from the predicted 1984 reve- 
nue were interruptions caused by 
air attacks on Gulf shipping and a 
series of mysterious mine explo- 


sions in the Red Sea. Canal Au- 
thority figures show that the vol- 
ume of traffic during the first nine 
months of 1 984 fdl 25 percent from 
the like period in 1983. 

The authority’s statistics also 
show that only 52 and 54 out of a 
monthly average of 60 vessels went 
through the Canal during May and 
July, respectively. Those months 
were the peak ones for attacks on 
tankers in the Gulf and for mine 
explosions in the Red Sea. 

Shipping sources said that more 
than 60 tankers were damaged in 
Gulf attacks last year because of 
the Iran-Irag conflict That cou- 
pled with the slow economic recov- 
ery in Gulf countries, makes it un- 
likely that the sluggishness in Suez 
shipping, which started in 1980, 
will be reversed anytime soon. The 
Gulf countries are suffering from a 
“soft" oil market that is cutting 
into their exports, which account 
for two-thirds of the canal's north- 
bound traffic. 

Canal officials — ia no mood to 
discourage traffic — have taken a 
conservative approach towards toll 
increases in recent years. The aver- 
age increase for Inis year, which 
Look effect at the beginning of the 


month, is less than 4 percent. Offi- 
cials also said that plans to widen 
the canal to allow larger vessels will 
remain shelved for now. 

The officials are closely monitor- 
ing oil-pipeline projects in tbe area. 
“We are concerned about what 
they mean for tbe canal’s future 
and we are assessing their possible 
impact," said Farouk Abu Taleb, 
head of economic research at the 
authority. 

Mr. Adel noted the high capital 
investment required for the pipe- 
line projects and said that shipping 
crude to Europe via the canal was 
still relatively inexpensive. He 
warned Gulf decision-makers forg- 
ing ahead with pipeline projects 
that they could face the same fate 
as the countries that invested heavi- 
ly in huge tankers during the period 
that tbe canal was closed because 
of the Arab-Israeti war. Using the 
larger tankers became uneconomi- 
cal when the canal reopened — 
because of a worldwide recession 
— and many have been laid up or 
scrapped. 

Ironically, one of the pipelines 
competing with tbe canal was built 
by Egypt when the canal was dosed 
from 1967 to 1975. Tbe line runs 


through Egypt from the Red Sea 
port of Suez to Alexandria on tbe 
Mediterranean coast. 

Canal officials see a major threat 
in a 3.600-kilometer (2,225-mOe) 
project extending from Port Sudan 
on the Red Sea to Douala, the At- 
lantic Ocean port in Cameroon. 

The trans-Africa pipeline is “def- 
initely going to have a negative and 
dangerous impact on us, said Mr. 
Abu Taleb. The project, whose cost 
is estimated at $10 billion to $16 
billion, holds some puzzling as- 
pects for Egyptian officials. 

The officials say they have been 
assured by Sudan that it has not 
approved the project. However, it 
was publicly announced last sum- 
mer that Sudan, along with the 
Central African Republic and 
Cameroon, has granted the pipe- 
line company, Tapco. a franchise to 
operate. 

Mr. Abu Taleb said, “we are pro- 
ceeding with the presupposition 
that the pipdine will be built." 

If the Tapco project gpes ahead 
— and if Iraq establishes its link 
with another pipeline, ending at the 
Saudi Red Sea port of Yanbu — ofl 
shipped north through die canal 
could be cut in half, experts say. 




General Development Corporation, 
Florida’s largest community developer and 
home builder is expanding its Military 
Marketing program in Europe. 

We have immediate openings for both 
part-time and full-time salesmen and 
women who will work with UB. military 
families here.They will represent five 
delightful communities on both Florida 
coasts as well as in Central Florida. 

Those selected will receive excellent 
compensation, big-company benefits, 
dynamic sales aids and incentives plus the 
opportunity to grow into management. 

Interv i e w s will be held in 
various European locations. 

Send resume in Director, Militar y 
confidence to: Marketing Program 

fra General 
%sl Development 

^ 2(jua] 1111 South Bayshore Drive 

Opportunity Employer Miami, Florida 33131 


The. announcement appear; as. a mailer of record only. 


counting Wednesday that it has 
reduced tbe price it will pay for the 
lop grade of oil in the United Stales 
by $1 a barrel to $28, the Associat- 
ed Press reported from New York. 

Exxon, citing “competitive mar- 
ket conditions,” announced the cut 
a day after No. 2 Mobil Corp. un- 
dercut other indusby giants by 
lowering the price it wiflpay for the 
domestic benchmark blend. West 
Texas intermediate, by $1.25, to 
$27.50 a barrel 

Among major oil companies, 

only Atlantic Richfield Co. and 
Shell CHI Co. are still holding at $29 
a barrel, while some smaller com- 
panies have dropped West Texas 
Intermediate as low as $25.90. 

Mobil insisted that it was meet- 
ing competition, not leading the 
way to lower prices. “We're right 
with the pack," said Allen Murray, 
Mobil’s president. 

As recently as October, the oil 
industry was united behind a price 
of $30 a barrel for West Texas 
intermediate. 

Each 51 decline in the price of a 
barrel of oil is equivalent to a drop 
of about 214 cents a gallon on tbe 
price of refined petroleum prod- 
ucts, such as gasoline and beating 
oil, if entirely passed on to custom- 
ers. 

On the New York Mercantile 
Exchange, West Texas intermedi- 
ate for February delivery fell 21 
cents Tuesday to $25.91 a barrel. 
But that still was above the five- 
year low of $25.18 set on Jan. 4. 

Mr. Murray said he did not know 
how far prices might fall and added 
be was looking forward to the day 
when price volatility would end. 

“The world doesn’t need a yo-yo, 
a roller coaster. What it needs is 
stability,'' Mr. Murray said. “Both 
tbe consuming countries and the 

« g countries would all be 
' if there was some stabil- 
ity on prices and some assurance 
on the long-term so that the con- 
sumers could plan, the producer 
could plan." 


Sprinkd likely 
In Advisory Post 

H'oshmgipn Pml Service 

WASHINGTON — Beryl 
Sprinkeh a U.S. Treasury un 
dersecretary, appears io be the 
raly candidate for chairman of 
the Council of Economic Ad- 
visers and may be named to the 
position before tbe end of the 
week, administration sources 
say. 

Mr. Sprinkel is an opponent 
of intervention in international 
exchange markets to affect cur- 
rency fluctuations and has tan- 
gled with Treasury Secretary 
Donald T. Regan on that issue. 

A vacancy at Mr. Sprinkel's 
post — undersecretary for in- 
ternational monetary affairs — 
would make it easier for James 
A. Baker 3d, the White House 
chief of staff who has been 
nominated to replace Mr. Re- 
gan. to fill the position with 
someone of his choice. It also 
would fill the chairmanship 
with an administration loyalist. 
The chairmanship has been va- 
cant since Martin S. Fddstein 
left last summer. 


lanuaiy 1*WS 



International Bank for Economic Co-Operation 

(IBEC) 

U.S.$ 100,000,000 Euro-Loan Facility 

Arranged by 

COMMERZBANK 


WTIENGESEILSCHAFT 


Provided by 


ARAB BANKING CORPORATION (ABC) 
BANCO Dl ROMA (FRANCE) S.A. 


IBJ INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 
OSTERROCHISCHE LANDERBANK 

AM ILNGE SE LI SOH At T 

THE SUMfTOMO BANK, LIMITED 


BANCO CENTRAL SJL 

COMMERZBANK INTERNATIONAL 

scant anonyme 

KREDIETBANK INTERNATIONAL GROUP 
SPAREKASSEN SDS 


UNION BANK OF FINLAND LTD. 


COMMERZBANK INTERNATIONAL 

SOClEIt ANONYM* 


.''J - 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. JANUARY IT. 1985 


WfednescM 


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Closing 


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up to ttte closing on Wall Street 


I] Month 
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PPG 134 40 
PSA 30 18 
PSAdPf 1.90 11.1 
POCAS 130 12.1 
PacGE 172 103 
PocUS 332 44 
PcLum 120 45 
PocPms JHr 3 
PocRa of 230 137 
PaeSd 30 28 
PocTeft 530 78 
Podfa) 232 9.1 
Pacllpf 487 138 
PolnWb 30 20 
Palnwpf 225 8J 
PalmBc 120 32 
PwiABk 36 22 
PanAm 
PanAwt 

Pandekn 20 12 
PanhEC 230 42 
PontPr 

Paprcft 80 S3 


12 352 
817295 


122 

36 
7 3214 
11 586 
14 242 

37 


11 104 

8 1165 

7 SO] 

27 

39 1922 
895 

9 73 

8 2 
2674 

149 
14 261 

10 2837 

13 184 
13 91 

48 581 

11 


2Bft 27ft 28U+ M 
36M Eft Mft + ft 
21ft 21ft 21ft— ft 
1716 17 17M— ft 

12ft 12ft 12ft 
16ft 16ft 1676— ft 
40ft 3916 19ft— lib 
27% 26ft 26ft 
616 6ft 6ft + ft 
1476 14ft lift + ft 
14ft 14 14ft + ft 
70ft 69M 6976— ft 
2576 25 25ft+ ft 

31ft 3176 31ft— ft 
387b 3016 30ft— ft 
27ft 26ft 27 
S7M 37W J7M+ M 
20M 2DVx 20M+ ft 
4M 4Vb 47b 
2ft 2M 2Vb 
16M 16 16ft 
37ft 3616 37ft +1 
416 4 4 — M 

lift 147b 147b + ft 
lift 14M 141»— 7* 
ISft 15ft 15ft— ft 


12% 

6 

PorkDrl 

.16 

75 


451 

6% 

A Hi 

6U 

Xft 

asft 

PorkH 

1 17 

33 

11 

1751 

35% 

34 

34 + M 

20ft 

law 

PurfcPn 

53 

12 

20 

98 



16% 

7M 

1W 

Pot PM 







1W— M 

77W 

14 

PayINW 

•34 

IJ 

18 

3119 

» 

MM 

26%+ lb 

law 

UM 

PavNP 

to 

AS 

12 

218 

13% 

12% 

13% + % 

Xft 

T3W 

PavCsh 

.16 

5 

17 

1877 

19M 

18ft 

19 + H 

u 

1% 

6ft 

Peabdv 

Pengo 

50 

25 


118 

3914 

X 

7 

% 


90ft 

36% 

PenCen 



43 

374 

49% 

4% 

49ft +1% 

55% 

44% 

Penney 

£36 

4.V 

8 

M13 

48% 47% 

4BM— n 

75% 

19M 

Pa PL 

2XB 

9.9 

B 

7ZZ 

2M 

24% 

25M + M 

XM 

SOM 

PaPLpf 

A40 12J 


200Z 34 

34 

34 

37W 

X 

FoPLof 

A50 1Z5 


18&z X 

X 

X + M 


67 5776 Pa PL Pf 830 129 
277k 2316 PoPL.dPr3.42 129 
24ft 30 PaPLdpr290 118 
65M 56M PaPLar 840 123 
26M 22ft PaPLctorUS 127 
297k 29ft PoPLdPfSTS 110 
V7M 8176 PaPLprllX 118 
62 S4M PaPLPT 880 110 

68 5BM PaPLpr 870 110 


SOz 66M 66M 
161 27ft 26Vb 
3 MM Mft 
59tz 63ft 63 
59 267b 25V. 
8 20ft 20ft 
21 Oz 93 91«b 

lOOz 61M 61 VS 
lOOz 67 0 


4ZM 31 M Pemmft 230 28 10 471 38 


26M 

Wlb+ft 

63—76 

25M 

28ft— M 

93 

61M 

a 


34 


24%. 23 Ponwpf 130 40 
457b 3076 PenraxH 120 £2 10 610 
15M 9ft PaooEn 106 70 7 474 


3?» + ft 


23ft 23 23ft 
42M 4316 42M 
ISM Mft 15ft + ft 


12 Marlh 




SIS. 



Close 

Utah Low Stack 

Di«. m PE 

MBs High Lop 

Quoi.avge 

UM 

23ft PepBoy 

36 

i.i 

14 

63 

31% 

31ft 

31%+ M 


34% PepsiCo 

1X8 

A0 

20 

67D9 

43% 

41 

41H— ft 


17% ParkEi 


2.1 

16 

3725 

XM 

16% 


IBM 


I Stolen 

7 

479 

Bft 

8 

8ft 

IBM 

12% P*ry Dr 

JS 

15 

13 

215 


17% 

IBM + % 


26M Pern* 


A1 

15 

635 

34% 

34ft 

XM+ % 


Xft PefRs 

179*135 


39 

27% 

27ft 

Z7M— ft 


M PetRsgl 

157 VOX 


17 

15% 

14% 

14% — V* 

BM 

4% PTrlrrv 

IJ3S22J 


2 

4% 

4% 

4% 

42% 

29% Pfizer 

1-32 

37 

14 

5692 

42% 

41ft 

41 W — Vb 


12% PIMpO 




1824 

15% 

M% 

15ft + % 


34 Phalpor 

£00 



1 

37% 

37% 

37M+ W 


20% PhlbrS 



11 

9613 

35% 


34% + ft 

m 

9 PMtaEl 








29M 

22 PhHEpf 








32M 

24 PMIEpf 

A30 

135 



31 

31 

31 — ft 

33 

25 PhllE Pf 

4X0 



100! 

31% 

31% 

31%+ % 


50ft PhliEPf 

875 



9MAi 

60% 


60% +1M 

10M 

9% PtlilEpt 

1X1 

139 


225 

10ft 

10 

10M+ ft 


6M PhilEpI 




ID 

10 

9% 

9V. — W 


43 PMIEpf 

755 

I4J 


1BDZ 

53 

53 

53 — % 

IS 

6% PtlllE Pf 









87 PMIEpf 1£2S 

145 


loozias 

05 

105 


51 PhllE Pf 

950 



23QZ 

65% 

64% 

65% +lft 


44 PhllE pf 




120? 

54 

53% 

53% — ft 

20 

15ft PtiUSub 

152 

7 A 

11 

40 

17% 

17% 

17% — ft 


62% PhllMr 



10 

7343 

01% 

79% 

79% —1% 

19% 

10% Phi Ip In 



11 

1211 

19ft 

10% 

19ft 

45 

X Phil In pi 

IJD 

23 


1 

4* 

46 

4* +1 


33% PhllPet 



B 

3756 

44 

43% 

43%— % 





9 


25M 



X 

27M PladAvt 

JB 

5 

B 

352 

35ft 

34% 35M+ ft 

32% 

21% PleNG 

232 


B 

19 

33% 

S4b 32%+ % 

21 

M Pier 1 



12 

342 

ISft 

17 

Mft +tft 

45% 

33 Plbbry 

156 

18 

9 

1299 

42% 

41 

41 —1 

33 

21% Pioneer 

1J4 

AO 

7 

415 

31% 

30% 

31ft 

29M 

17 PtonrEi 

.I7r J 

46 

« 

23% 

23*6 

23% + ft 

36% 




11 

1X7 

37% 

36% 

37M+ % 

73W 





IS 

74 

73 

74 +1 

16M 





297 

11% 

10% 

11% + % 

16% 




11 

T73 

14% 

13% 

14 + % 

23% 

12% Piontrn 

.14 

17 

13 

13 

13% 

13% 

13%+ % 

13ft 




3 

58 

11% 


11%— ft 

35U 

21 M Plesev 

X5e 35 

10 

15 

22ft 

21 M 

ZTM 

23 

15% Pago Pd 



17 

145 

16% 

16% 

16% + % 

32% 

24ft Poland 

1J0 

35 

19 

2231 

25W 

34% 

25%+ % 

wn 

11W Pondrs 

40 

J 

8 

2814 


13% 

Mft + % 

Xft 

IS PopTal 

JO 

A3 



19% 

10ft 

18% 

19% 

13ft Partec 

xa 

£1 




18% 

19 + ft 

17M 

13 PartGE 

1J2 

107 

5 

1271 

17% 

16% 

17 + ft 

»M 

90 PoGpf 

150 

12J 


2&z 

95ft 

1-/1 

V» +1% 

21% 

17M PorGaf 

250 

12X 



21 

tjjH 

21 + M 

33 ft 

28ft ParGPf 

4X0 

115 


36 

37M 


32% + % 

32M 

2*ft PorGaf 

A32 

137 


22 

33% 

n% 2i% — % i 

37M 

25ft Potttch 

156 

A9 

12 

59 

32 

31% 

31%— % 

X 

19% PofmEI 

IJ4 

75 




35% 

25%— ft 


X RcdElpf 




SOQz 




X 

31 PatEIPf 

AM 

115 


470z 

35ft 

X 

35 + M 

24% 

16ft PremI s 



IS 


21% 

21ft 

21% — % 

35U 

23 Prlmrk 

250 


t 

IX 

33% 

33 

33 

21 W 

lift PrlmoC 



15 

1670 

16% 

16% 

16% + ft 

36% 

16 PrlmM 

.12 

X 

21 

991 

27 

XM 

27 + % 

59% 

45% PrectG 

2X0 

45 


2284 

57% 

56% 

57% + % 

14 

7ft PrdRsh 

J8 

2X 

n 

167 

11% 

lift 

TIM + % 

47ft 

31 P rotor 

1X0 

13 


59 

42ft 

41% 

42 

19% 

16ft PSvCpt 

1.92 

10J 

8 

1338 

1J% 

MM 

IBM 

m 

51% PSColPf 7.15 

12.2 


400z 

58% 

5BM 

58% 

19% 

16ft PSColPf £10 

117 


21 

19 

10% 

18%— ft 

low 

6% PSind 

um 

12.9 

2 

341 

7% 

7% 

7%— ft 

Oft 

6 PSInpl 

1J4 

132 


500r 

7% 

7% 

7%— % 

8 

6% PSInaf 

158 

144 


380z 

7% 

7M 

7M— ft 

30 

36% PSinpf 

7.15 



SOQz 

43 

43 

43 + W 

66% 

49% PSinpf 

9X4 

165 


400? 

Sf 

57% 

59 +1 

57 

43 PSinpf 




3240k 

5BW 

50 

50M + M 

12% 

3% PSvNH 



1 

630 

4V> 

4% 

4% 

18% 

6 PSNHpf 




700? 

10ft 

10ft 

10ft 

19ft 

6% PNHpfB 




22 

10ft 

10% 

10ft + ft 

TO 

8% PNHPfC 




31 

I4M 

Mft 

14M + M 

ran 

7 PKHpfC 




23 

13% 

11% 

13%+ ft 

24% 





11 

17% 

12% 

12% 

21ft 

Sft PNHptF 




2 

It 

1 I JH 

11 

26M 

19% PSuNM 

758 

115 


775 

21ft 

E ^ ' 1 

25 

27% 

20% PSvEG 

£72 

105 

7 

1240 

26% 


X 

13ft 

10% PSEGPf 1X0 



X 

12% 

trttf 

12%+ ft 

33ft 

28 PSEGptAOB 

127 


TO? 

37ft 


33ft— % 

35 

28M PSEGpf A1B 

12.1 


lOOz 

34% 

XM XM +1M 

X 

29% PSEG pf A30 

127 


1O0Z 

33% 

EH 

33% — % 

41 

33M PSEG pf £05 

12.7 


1207 

39% 

39% 39% + % 

18ft 

15 PSEGpf 2.17 

I2X 


12 

17% 

17% 

17ft— ft 


46M PSEGpf 650 

178 


92Qz 

S 

57 

53 +1 


16% PSEGpf 2X3 

125 


4 

19% 

19% 

19ft + ft 


S3 PSEG Pf 770 

IM 


SOz 

61 

61 

41 + ft 


53 PSEGPf 7 JO 

1£4 


220z 

62% 

67% 

62% 

4M 

2 M PubllCfc 




63 

2% 

7% 

2%— % 

13% 

7% Puebla 

.16 

15 

8 

43 

10% 

IOM 

10% + ft 

12 

6M PRCem 



5 

23 

7 

6% 

7 + ft 

14% 

9ft PuoetP 

176 

13J 

B 

547 

13% 

13% 

13ft 

WM 

10% PidtrHm 

.12 


.12 

■17 

21 

pun 

21 + ft 

62ft 

23% Purotat 

1JS 

47 

16 

IX 

27% 


27ft— ft 


5% Pvra 



8 

1161 

0% 

a 

Sft + ft 

1 Q <1 

38% 

27ft QuafcOi 




5599 

35ft 

XM 

35ft + % 

19% 

15 Quak50 

JO 

A2 

14 

1405 

19% 

10% 

19 + ft 

12% 

6% Quonex 



51 

166 

9% 

9% 

9% 

32% 

23 Qucsiar 

lxa 

SA 

9 

184 

29ft 

39ft 

29%+ % 

20M 

14 Ok Rati 

306 1.1 

15 

33« 

10% 

IBM 

1BW+ % 

1 R 11 

22% 

6ft RBInd 

.16 

15 


39 

8% 

8% 

8% 

40 

28% RCA 

1 JM 

25 

11 

2690 

36% 

Xft 

36%+ Vb 

34 

29 RCA Ff 

350 

113 


3001 31 

31 

31 

91 

67ft RCA pf 


45 


0 

83 

83 

83 + ft 

31% 

24% RCA Of 

7.12 

7.2 


93 

79% 

79 

29ft + % 

34 W 

29ft RCA pf 

165 

105 


2X 

33% 

X 

33%+ % 

1IM 

6U RLC 

70 

Z3 

11 

177 

9% 

BM 

8%— % 

4% 

3 RPC n 




1» 

3% 

3% 

3% 

15% 

12ft RTE 

.56 

15 

7 

374 

15% 

ISM 

15% + ft 

XM 

25 RalsPur 

31 

23 

13 

2449 

34% 

Xft 

34%+ % 

10% 

5% Romod 



34 

XX 

6% 

6% 

4%+ % 

21 

16% Ranco 

54 

45 

8 

HI 

m% 

MM 

IBM 

10M 

ift RangrO 




308 

4M 

4% 

4%— % 

79 


X4 

J 

17 

167 

58% 

58ft 

SBW — ft 

17% 





10 

13% 

13M 

13ft— % 

48% 

34ft Rdvthii 

1X0 

17 

16 

2509 

43% 

47% 

43ft + ft 

13% 

7% ReadBt 

xa 

41 

66 

1WS 

101% 

9% 

9% + M 

23M 

16% RdBatpf2.l3 

105 


35 

19% 

19 

19% + % 

25 

20 RdBat pt 3J4015X 


2 

71% 

71% 

21% * ft 

15% 

9% RltRef 

1 J5e 97 

11 


14% 

14% 

14% 

15% 




14 

19* 

14 

13% 

13ft— ft 

15% 

8 Redmn 

JO 

25 

23 

2850 

17% 

11% 

11% + % 

TOW 




13 

2 

9 

* 

9 + % 

2th 

% Regal 




39 

% 

% 


35% 

23 RefcflC 

m 

24 

9 

47 

33ft 

X) 

33 - % 

5ft 

3ft RepAIr 



6 

2796 

5% 

5% 

S%+ % 

2ft 

1% RepAwt 




171 

Mb 

Tft 

1ft— % 


1? Month 

HhHiLOM Stack 


DW. YkL PE 


Sh. Qbsp 

IDPiHWiLow QwLOfge 


11 230 
» 165 
7 406 
4 
1 

7 570 


43ft 25ft RapCp 30 14 

21ft 9 RapGr J6 V 

4076 3IM RenHY 130 40 

M RNVptC 3.12 133 

SA* 52 BNYofA 6390128 
337b 31ft RopBk 134 60 

39M 20ft ReaBkpf £12 78 

18ft 14 AohCol 82 19 33 119 

3676 22M Bevco 80 13 11 694 

13M 976 VlRever 43 

40ft 287b Revlon 134 £4 11 1552 

24ft 1776 Ftcxhm 70 16 8 11 

Sft 117a Raxnrd 30 £9 11 364 

72ft 52ft Rem In 14fl 47 10 2367 

4876 46 R*V In pf 4.10 83 1 

107ft 100ft Revlnnf 
41 26 Rev Mil 180 16 

S3 58ft RovMpf 430 £3 15 

30M 34ft BchVdk 148 12 9 189 
34ft 1876 R leer IT ISO U 


43M 4276 
21 2076 

40ft 40 
25 25 

5576 5576 
27ft 27Va 
25ft 25M 
17 167b 

2476 34ft 
lift 117b 
3SW 34ft 
19% 19ft 
14 13ft 
73ft 71ft 
48 


42ft 4- ft 
207b— ft 
«U + 76 

is 

5576— ft 
27ft 

25ft + Va 

17 

347b 

11% 4- 7b 
34ft— % 
19% + ft 
14 + % 

717k + ft 


118 


27ft 17ft RlteAld 30 19 16 504 


17 564 


776 5ft RvrOkn 
35% 35 ROtofiw 1.12 15 7 73 

48ft 3676 Rnbtsn 130 43 15 58 

23ft 12 Robfns 

19M 12ft RaebG 120 II J 

33ft 27M RoGhTI 144 73 


J6 3J 16 1435 
5 128 

9 163 


3276 23 Rockwl TOO 11 10 4100 


20 105 104ft 
7 3019 38ft 37ft 
8176 80 
29 28% 

227b 31ft 
267k 26% 
7% 6% 
32 31ft 
3776 37 
2376 22% 
19% 197* 
33ft 32% 
31% 31ft 


6B 

4BW 

RohmH 

wn 

33 

9 

28/ 

60% 




Rohr In 







19% 


RofCmn 

JOB 1A 

30 

209 

19% 


IBft 

6 

K'SiinE s 

.871 

.1 

27 

MOO 

17% 

16% 

13% 

6% 

Rollins 

At 

A6 

16 

1500 

10% 

9% 

6% 

2% 

Ranaan 




69 

2% 

2% 

24% 

12% 

Roper 

M 

18 

B 

111 

17% 

16ft 

XM 

W 

Rarer 

1JB 

AO 

13 

4165 

Xft 

27 

1 r. | ] 

■m 

Rowan 

JB 

.9 


753 

9ft 

9% 


pttj 

RoyiD 

Rubrmd 

£870 5J 

4 

4295 

so 

49% 

f 9 i.A 

f ' i 

04 

IJ 

18 

165 

47ft 

46% 

21% 

13 

RUSSB n 



IS 

360 

21% 

21 


20 1576 RusTog .76 49 8 

34ft 17% RvanH 180 17 14 

50% 38ft Ryders I. 

25M 12ft RWond 

19ft BM RYmeris 


42 

11 9 1670 
40 16 13 90 

4 IV 


16 15% 

26% 26% 
52ft 5176 
23ft 22% 
10ft 10ft 


I0S + % 
3Bft + ft 
917k +176 
38ft— % 
217k— M 
2676+ ft 
7ft + % 
3176 + % 
37% — ft 

22% — ft 
19ft 

33ft + ft 
3176 + ft 
9976— Ift 
4616— ft 
19%+ ft 
17ft— ft 
10 
3% 

17 + % 
2716 — 2ft 
9% 

49% — ft 
47 + ft 
21ft— % 
16 + ft 
26% -f ft 
52—16 
23 — ft 
10ft 


44% 

43M 

13ft 

30 

26 

23 

18ft 

10 

2% 


33% 9 CM 
23% SFN 
7% SLlndb 
19M 5PSTec 
15 Sobliw 


100 44 9 581 
1-20 38 28 283 
am 28 MS 52 
90 12 13 156 
84 2 72 « 


16 SQfanRv 283*164 


73 


45ft 4376 45% +2 
43% 43V6 43U 
10ft 9% 10 
25% 25 2SV.+ ft 

I7M 17 17 + ft 

17% 17ft 17ft— % 


29ft 

35M 

30 

ldM 

12ft 

MM 

2376 

■076 

10% 

51 

24% 

2776 

17% 

19% 

20ft 

lift 

8ft 

23% 

40 

55 

15% 

29 

59ft 

3676 

1616 

43ft 

102 

3476 

lift 

IS 

15 

21 % 

576 

40% 

31M 

3876 

-32M 

65M 


11% SfOdBS 

34 

LA 

15 

489 

Mft 

14% 


5ft SfadSc 



93 

IM 

e% 

8ft 


S starts wt 




20 

i% 

1% 


19M SOfKtnS 



21 

1121 

30 

27% 

Xft+ % 

21ft Sofewv 

1X0 

5X 

9 

5599 

79% 

38% 

29 ft + % 

24% 5000 

44 

IX 

13 

1036 

31ft 

30% 


ISft StJoLP 

1J2 

03 

7 

15 

19% 

19% 

19%+ to 

9 SPaul 

IJD UX 


57 

10% 

10% 

10ft + ft 

6M Salant 




Z7 

7 

7 

7 —ft 

21 salltoM 

.16 

X 

15 

1113 

29 

X 

28ft— 1ft 

17% SDfeGs 

ZW 

90 

7 

722 

Sft 

23ft 

Xft— ft 

6% 5JIHPIB 

JX 9.9 


2V7 

BW 

Oft 

Bft + ft 

BM SJuanR 



16 

40 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft+ ft 


31 Sondrs 
1876 SAnltRI 
2016 SFeSoP 
13ft Soul RE 
1J% snvElP 
1476 SOvEA 
9% SovEpf 
3% Savin 
1716 5 CANA 
33 SdirPki 
34ft Sdibnb 
7ft SdAW 


14 935 
12 104 
11 43M 
43 5 

6 97 

2 
7 
89 

205 87 I 476 
140 44 11 1067 
U0 U t 0962 
.12 18 32 1918 


14 
144 M 
180 3 J 
3D \3 
140 98 
144 7.1 
140 118 


36ft 

35M 

Xft 


% 

21 lb 

21 

21 


ft 

27% 

XM 

27ft 


ft 

16% 

16% 

16% 



17% 

17V. 

17% 

+ 

ft 

19 

19 

19 

— 

ft 

10% 



— — 


5% 

5% 

5% 

+ 

to 


23% 23ft 23% 

3776 37ft 377k 
37% 3676 36% — % 
12% 11% 1176 + V. 


IC 

Scoalnd 

36 

£9 

11 

1131 

27% 

Xft 

36% +1% 


ScatFal 

130 

11 

30 

457 

SBto 

57% 

51ft + % 


SarttP 

1.12 

12 

ID 

2689 

35Vii 

35% 35V. 


rr 

5COftVS 

J2 

£9 

10 

69 

14 

ISM 


- to 


Scovtll 

1J2 

16 

15 

no 

43% 

42% 

42% 


» 

Scavllpf £50 

25 


2 

101 

00 

00 — 1% 

IBIb 

SeaCntn 

X2 

IJ 

6 

544 

34% 

33% 

33%+ ft 


BeaCtpf 

1X6 

130 


X 

11% 

1IM 

lift- 

- ft 


SaaC PfB £10 

142 


IX 

15 

MM 

14% 



2.1 


102 % 

55ft 

22ft 

32ft 

20% 

32% 

61ft 

39ft 

29ft 

30ft 

32% 

9% 

18% 

16% 

34M 

5776 

35% 

3076 

18% 

21 

6016 

5616 

37ft 


12 SaaC PfC 110 144 
14% SeaLd n 48 24 
2% SeaCOn 
30 Moorm 
12ft Saaouf 
18% SeatAlr 
1976 ScalPw 
37ft SOarleG 
29ft Sean 

97 searspf . 

38 SecPoC 244 44 
12ft 5etoU 

20% SvcCp* 40 14 
11% Shakier J7 48 
RPb Shawl n 40 24 
39ft 580110 240 34 

38ft SfwIlT 212 b 69 
17ft SIwIGta 40 24 
18ft SfwKr pf 140 44 
23ft Snrwhi 76 25 
4ft SRaefwn 


70S 
3117 
325 
9 517 
18 732 
40 14 15 40 

180 34 8 43 

42 3 21 2568 

176 £5 8 9297 


14Tb 14ft 14%— ft 
23 31% 21% + % 

3% 376 376 

39 38% 38% — M 

1676 16% 16% + % 
25ft 25 25ft + ft 
28 27ft 37%+ % 
60 58ft 58% + ft 
32% 31% 32ft— ft 
100ftl00ftl00%+ ft 
55 5676 55 + ft 

13% >3% 13% — ft 
2976 29ft 2976 + % 
1516 14% 15ft 
22 21% 2176 + % 

5576 55 55 — 76 

31ft 307k 3076 + ft 
38ft 28ft 2816 

30ft 30ft 30ft + ft 

31 3016 30%+ ft 


T7% 

29ft 

36 

3076 

23% 

2776 

48% 

ft 

34% 

37ft 

b 

36ft 


12 ShowW 
1276 SlerPac 
24ft SMnal 
4876 Shmi pf 
20% Singer 
26ft si nor at 
12% Skyline 
976 SAlIHlin 
50 SmkB 
36 Vb srnuckr 
27 SnapOi 
27 Sonat 
1276 SonvCp 
2276 SOOUn 
27% Source 
IS SrcCppf 
20 SCrEpf 
22 SoJertn 
38% smtan 

22 Soefflk 
5% SdetPS 

17ft SCatEb 
14% SOUthCo 
2SM SOtnGE 
3776 SNET1 
31ft 50NE pf 

nassRg 

23 Soutbnd 


6ft 

Aft 

6ft 

+ 

to 

Mft 

Mft 

Mft 

+ 

ft 

15% 

15% 

15% 



34ft 

33% 

.13% 

+ 

ft 

57% 

57 

57 



33M 

37% 

33ft 


to 

X 

29W 

29% 



164 

16% 

164 

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ft 


IDft 

IBM 



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55M 

55% 



54 

Sift 

X 

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% 

as 

34% 

35 

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34 ft 

33% 

X 

+ 

to 

15ft 

15 

15ft 


u 

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W 

24ft 


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m 

m 

35% 

20% 

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ft 

ft 

22 

23 

27 

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27 

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42ft 

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264 

27ft 

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8ft 8 8% + ft 

21 2376 224b— ft 

18% 18% 1876— ft 
36 34ft 36 +1% 
36ft 3SH 35ft- 7k 
33% 33ft 33% + % 


27% ^ 27ft + ft 


25M 25M— ft 


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Oiv VKI.CE 


SI1 MM I 

130s -‘m* Lw. Cn se — — 


S i 

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14ft 
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29% 
27ft 
1476 
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27% 
22 
20 ft 
27% 
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39ft 
40% 
W% 
26ft 
22h 
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60% 

50ft 

78 

Zl% 


lift So Roy 
A ft SounwK 
1476 5wAlrl 
13 5 «vf Far 

10% SwtGOS 
55 SwBell 
19% SwEnr 
SwtPS 

lift Spartan 
18 SpectP 
33% Sperry 
30ft SorlnoA 
31ft SauarD 
37ft 5avR)b 
17% Staiev 
16ft STBPnf 
13 SIMolr 
48% SlOInd 
39% swoon 
73% SOOhpf 
9% SIPocCo 
II Slandrit 
29ft 19ft ShaiWh 
30% 23% Storrett 
10ft 8% sroMSe 
24% 1576 sraufCh 
4% 2% sreeeo 
17ft 14ft Sterchl 
I2ft 9% StrlBcp 
30 23ft Steel Da 
23ft 1SU. ShrmJ 
3k 25% StwWm 

i: 8ft stkvcpf 

43ft 32ft Stonew 
41% 25% StoneC 
53% 32ft StopShp 
187k 15ft StprEq 
lift 2 vISfarT 
49% 30ft Slarer 
20% 20 StrtMl n 
Mft 14% smdRi 
8% 3% SuavSh 

30% 21% SunBks 
33 24ft SunCh 
20% 7ft SunEI 
59ft 43ft SunCo 
122 90% SunC pf 

50ft 34% Sundstr 


.08 J 
JO 2.9 
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1J0 BJ 
SM 81 


Si 1A 
1.9B 86 


1.92 4i 
1J2 4J 


184 U 
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80 3J 
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280 86 
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.96 15 
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36 4J 


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188 £5 


13X1 9.1 
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1.84 1L2 14 


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1J0 40 
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9 475 11% 

4 2443 6% 

15 1630 25ft 

416 lift 
13 272 Uft 

5 1305 6JL. 

15 46 21ft 

B 224 22 
21 46 15’- 

27 235 2*% 

8 3381 42% 

8 76 36% 

11 077 40% 

13 1547 53% 
IT 833 21% 
II 493 19% 

9 393 14% 
7 3557 54% 
? 2590 42ft 

10Z 74% 

10 526 21% 

10 29 15ft 

11 311 27% 

11 2 30 

Sf 10ft 

36 3291 18% 

56 3ft 
< 15 17ft 

10 24 10% 

12 2335 2Sft 

14 225 17ft 

19 141 33ft 
560Z II 

9 100 43% 

21 381 29% 
226 42% 
103 18ft 
1098 2% 

2208 50ft 
88 20% 

10 7E2 16% 

2 5Vi 
10 1535 X 

20 IS 29 








£20 10.9 


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52% 52% — ft 
21 21% + ft 

19ft 19% + ft 
14% 14% + ft 
54 54% + ft 

41% 42V) + ft 
74% 74% 

20% 2!M * % 
15 15 — ft 

26% 27V)— ft 
X 30 - ft 

10ft 13ft + ft 
18ft IBM 
3 3 

17 17 — % 

10% 10% 

28 20% * ’ i 

17 — % 


6% 5 TriScln 
22% 12% Trlolnd 
28% 23% TrloPe 
35 74 Tritune 

T'lcnlr 


13% 

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left 

lift 

15% 

16% 

23% 

J7-ft 

29ft 


5% 

13ft 

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28% 

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lift 

17ft 

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26% 

34% 

4W 

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lift 

10 

34ft 

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17 

34% 

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20v, — % 
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23 + ft 

10ft + ft 
34% + ft 
31% + ft 
14% + % 
27% + Vb 
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25ft + ft 
23 Vb— ft 
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17 4- ft 

26% — ft 
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£30 4.9 
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16ft— ft 
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29 + ft 

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12 725 47% 46% 47ft + Vb 
7 97 96ft 96ft 
14 262 47% 46% 47 -eft, 
6% 7ft 8 — ft ■ 


29% 

11 

42% 

28ft 

41% 

IB 

2ft 

49ft 

20% 

16ft 

5ft 

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29ft 

8ft 






5 

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68 

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230 

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100 

19 

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77% 

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£16 1QJ 


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714 

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1J0O3J 

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137 


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146 

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£1 

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140 

29to 

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184 

13% TolEdla 

2.S7 

13.9 

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174 

TSU 

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IBM 

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£72 

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12ft— ft 

15ft 

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£25 

153 


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14% 

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wm 

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Xft 

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29U 

20% Transm 

164 

5.9 

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27ft +1 

19ft 

16% T ranine 

£22 

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12% 

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1-OOe 83 


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12 

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£16 

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42M Titcc pf 

367 

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19 

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55% 

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4d ZB 
32% 24 
14ft Te 

23ft lift 
23ft 19ft 
lift 2 
14% 10 
30ft 17% 
68ft 45 
26% 12% 
20% 13ft 
92% 75 
41ft 30ft 
Mft 32% 
7ft 4% 
16% >2 
31 25ft 
35 28ft 
30% 24ft 
60 48ft 
23% 18ft 
17ft 13ft 
56ft 45 
60 49 

51 Mft 
112% 82 
18 9% 

66 53ft 
6'e T- 
21% 10% 
17Tb 9% 
Xft 20ft 
29 22ft 
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26% 19 
16ft 11 
29 20ft 
13ft 10 
22% 14Vb 
41ft Mft 
34% 25ft 
16ft 9% 
3ft 7ft 
361b 22 
12 5V« 

38% 28% 
36% 23 
31ft 22 


UAL 
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UCCEL 

UGI 

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UNCRBS 

URS 

USFGl 

USS 

UnlDvn 

UnIFrsf 

UnINV 


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240 75 156 

34 252 
2J4 B.9 12 215 
2JS 12.1 


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100 45 
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L’CamDj 144 4.4 
UnCcrS 340 9.0 
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UnElec 1.72 10J 
UnElpf 4 JO >11 
UnEIPf 450 110 
UnElpfMiJO 114 
UE1P1L UM 114 
UnEIPf 2JB >11 
UnEIPf —13 125 
UnElof 7.44 118 
UEIpfH BJ0 114 
UflPat 1J0 4j 
UnPcpf 7J5 7J 
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UnEnro 248 9.1 
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8 2693 
6 2544 

14 17115 
14 8 

9 164 
10 1060 
13 2879 

166 
6 1560 


120z 23 
95 9ft 


48% 47% 47% + ft 
37ft 31% 31ft— % 
14% 13% 14ft + % 
22T1I 22% 23?a +• % 
22 % 22 % 

9 9ft 
13ft 12% 17% — ft 

zn> 26ft 26% + % 

67% 66% 6fr%— % 
78% Mft 78ft +1% 
17% 17ft 17% 


* lb 
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— % 
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ft 

400Z 30% 30% X% +1% 
40z Mft MV, Mft 


91% 90% 91% ■ 
37ft 36% 37 
38% 37ft 37% - 
5% 5% 5%- 
16% 16 16ft- 


68 X 29ft 29% 
UOZ 59ft 59ft Xft 
78 23ft 22% 22% 
IS 17ft 16% 16ft 
Xz 54 54 54 

SOz 59ft S9ft 59ft 
16 5487 45 64ft 44% 
242 101 99ft 100ft 
540 14% 13% 14 


400: 66 65ft 65ft 


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— ft 
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— M 

— M 
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— ft 


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UwIrG 
USHom 
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197 ISJ 
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12 1420 
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VS3Tk1\S% USStl or 1175 9J 


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8 109 

1 32 

7 34B0 

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II 36 

3682 

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11% lift lift 
11% 11 11% 
32% 32ft 32% 
27% 26% 27% 
15% 15% 15% 
26ft 26ft 24ft 
3O0Z 14ft Mft Mft 
Z Xft Xft Xft 
91 12% 12% 12% 

I OCX 20ft 19% 20% 
82 37ft 37 37ft 
33% 32% 33ft 


— ft 
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MM 16M 16% 

2% 2% 2%— Vb 

Xft X Xft 
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X 36% 37%+lft 
27% 27ft 27%— ft 
27ft 26% 26% — ft 
51% 51% 51% — Vb 


45 132% 130% 111 —1 




£25 

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1^14 

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431 

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£40 

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1187 

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68ft 

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1.40 

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15% 

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34% 

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197 

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77ft 

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373 

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24 

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1.04 

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£9 

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20% UfaPL 

£32 

9.9 

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685 

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23ft — ft 

2fF.. 

21% utPLPf 

£80 120 


13 

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Xto 

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25ft 

21% UtPLof 

2J0 UJ 


105 

24% 

WM 

Wto + M 

Tito 

17% UtPLPf 

2J6 

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7 

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XU— u 

19 

15% UtPLPf 

£04 IU 


7 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft 


28% 71% VF Com 
xn 5% Valera 
26 14 Vaier pf 

STb 2% Valeyln 
Xft Mft Van Dr s 
7 2% Varco 

56% x% Varlan 
Mft 9ft Vara 
25ft 17% Vecco 
6ft 3% Vendo 


1.12 19 B 
144 21J 


J6 4 15 
40 31 9 
J2 14 15 


527 

1898 

73 

32 

199 

78 

1152 

372 

377 

69 


28% 27% 28% + % 
6 % 6 6 %— % 
I6M Mft Mft— % 
2% 2% 2% + M 
20% 19ft 20% + M 
2M 2% 2Vt + ft 
40% 40 40% 

12% UM 12ft + % 
22ft 22ft 22% + lb 
«% 4Vb 4% + ft 


10ft 

8% VenSe 

IJOallA 


76 

ISM 

10ft 


31% 

23% Viacom 

.42 IJ 

13 

708 

£5to 

34% 

35to + M 

42 

36to VaEPpf 

£00 1Z2 


1(1) 

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41 

41 

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732 126 


200z 

61M 

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78V) 

67% VaEPpf 

8X0 11J 


1 

74 

74 

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X 

MM VaEPpf 

935 12J 


1360? 

X 

76% 

77ft + i* 

62% 

52W VaE Pt J 

732 126 


40Z 

Alto 

AIM 

Alto 

5B% 

49W VaEPpf 

7 JO 125 


580? 

50W 

57% 

57% — 1% 

61 

51% VaEPpf 

7A5 12.1 


90) 

61M 

Alto 

61W + % 

20ft 

lift Vlshay 

!J5t 9J 

12 

14 

X 

19ft 

20 

38% 

25% Vemad 


13 

2 

Xto 

34 lb 

341k 

73% 

58 VufcnM 

£44 35 

10 

25 

69U 

68U 

69 +1 


32ft 

9% 


25% 

29% 

36% 

IBM 

28% 

30ft 

48% 

271-2 

13% 

10 % 

Xft 

37% 

49% 

SO 

Xft 

XM 

48 

53% 

12% 

5V> 

7V. 

18 

13% 

lift 

53M 

109 

38ft 

87% 

98 

9% 

15ft 

48% 

20% 

28% 

40M 

34% 


248 111 
JO 1.7 
J2 14 
JO 2.1 


.IX J 
44 1J 
2.16 12 


22 WQlljB 1 JO 34 
71b WOlU P« 1-00 IM 
29ft waitJ Pf 140 34 
17% Women JB *4 

17 WmCm 

28% WomrL 148 4.1 
14% WaShGS 1-56 U 
15% WahNal 1 JB *3 
16 WlhWf ~ - 
2Tm Waste 

18 WatkJn 

8% Wav Go, 

4 WeanU 
12ft WehbO 
29ft WelsMk 
30ft WelbF . .. 

40 WelF pi £0X11 J 
73ft WflFM 2J0 10.1 
I3ftwenav9 J8 14 
16% wectCa 44 ZJ 
M WPenPpNJO 114 
34% WsfPtR 2J0 54 
9ft WSfcfT 0 MM 
2% WnAlrL 
% wlAIrwt 
8% WAIrpf 2.00 164 
8% WAIrpf 2.14 164 
4 WCNA 

47 WCNA Pf 7J5 1£3 
81 WPoel 
6% W Union 
26% WnUnpf 
29 WnUpIC 
3ft WnUPfS 
5% WnU PfE 

20% wuri pf 
6% wun piA 
19% WlfeE 1 1 J0 17 
31% Wesfvc 1J2 34 
X Weverh 1J0 4.1 
34% Wevr pi 240 64 
43% Wevr pr 4JD 9J 
17ft WhefPI! 

25 WhPII Pf SJ0 167 
36ft Whlripi 2.00 4.1 
MM WhlfC 
17% Whlfehl 
MM Whlttak 
6% wieMdt 
8 Wiffrdn 
22% william 
2 WIlmEI 
6% whshrO 
75% WtnDIx 
7% WlrnBp 
Sft winner 
3% Win ter J 
25% WhcEP 2J0 7.1 
68% WISE Pf 8.90 117 
59M WISE pf 775 11 J 
25% Wise PL 236 BJ 
24% WlSCPS 236 8.1 
27% WITco 148 19 
9M WOtvTW 34 11 
18% Wood PI 72 14 
29ft Wolwth 1 JO £5 
4ZM WoJwpf 2J0 19 
2% WrMAr 
45 Wrlplv 
3M Wurttzr 
10% WyleLb 
16M Wvnns 


1161 33ft 32% X + % 
*102 .» ^8% + 

19% — % 
22%+ M 



3 

44to 

44 

8 

271 

70 

19% 


2576 

72M 

22 


20*0 

36M 

S»U 



I9U 


12 

453 

Xto 




19ft 

Y* 



4R% 

47W 


641 

74ft 

XU 

10 

3 

9to 



5% 



819 

22ft 

22 




.15% 


1835 

51% 

sou 







27% 

£■% 



17% 

16% 

10 

94 

18% 

IBM 


19 


UOz 39ft XM 39ft +1 


471 

6 

229 

42 

41 

67 

29M 


74 
6 

536 
657 
2 
2Z7 
9 6080 
8 239 
17 3797 
60 
19 
52 


IJ0 54 


9 1069 
8 76 

8 696 
13 


lOOz X X X +lft 
48% 47M 48M +1% 
Xft 79% 29ft + % 
22% 21% 22% — ft 
22% 221b 22%+ % 
7% 8 + % 


140 19 


.10 1J 
148 4J 
.IX 4 



297 

11 

10% 

lOTb 



6 

1032 

29U 

W% 

28% 

+ 

to 


358 

3 

9* 

2ft 

— 

to 

16 

X 

6Vi 

6% 

AW 

+ 

to 

12 

199 

34% 

33% 

34U 

+ 

% 

14 

94B 

16 

15% 

15% 



14 

42 

7 

6ft 

7 

+ 

to 


3 

4% 

4M 

4% 

— 

ft 


IX 


140a 10 


-22 12 
40 11 


7 
9 

16 122 
15 X 

10 2964 

M 

21 

11 96 
58 

10 295 
7 49 


159 32% 32 X — ft 
801 76 » 76 +1% 

250Z 67M 66ft 67ft 
434 30% yjVl 30% + % 

31% 31% 31ft + ft 
Xft 37ft Xft 
11% 11% 11%— ft 
21% ZTM 2114 
40ft 29*6 39% + Vb 
56% 56% Mft + ft 
3% 3M 3M + ft 


60 60 68 


50ft Xft Xerox 100 74 12 
50ft 45ft Xerox pf 545 11 J 
36 19 XTRA 44 £5 10 


61 

581 



JW 

JW— lb 


14% 

14% + M 

19ft 

19 

I9U— to 

40% 

39% 

40%+ ft 

49% 

49% 

49% 

26% 

25U 

25% 


1 


31ft X ZafaCP 
24ft 14M Zapata 
49% 2S% Zayro 
38% lift ZantttiE 
26 18 Zara 

29% 71ft Zurnln 


1J2 


U I 73 
54 17 1154 
4Bb J 13 417 
7 1199 
40 17 18 49 

1J7 44 13 175 


25 24% 34M + ft 

Mft 14% 14% + ft 
49% 49M 49%+ ft 
21% 20% 21 - ft 
23% 23% 23% 

79% 79ft 79% + ft 




NEW HIGHS 168 


W 


27% 20ft 
30% 70% 
25ft 16M 
9ft 6ft 
47 30ft 
45% 28% 
22% UM 
32ft 23% 


WICOR 230 
Wochvs .92 
WockM 40 
Wolnoe 
WolMrt J1 
watam JS 
WkHRs a 140 
WcriCSv 45 


84 6 42 

£9 10 365 
23 11 522 

IX 2733 
J X 4405 
17 T6 1004 
94 

14 17 639 


77% 27ft 27% — U 
32% 30% 31%+lft 
11% IB 18% + % 
8% 7% 8ft + ft 


42ft 40% 41ft + ft 
+1% 


46% 45ft 46% 

19ft 19 Mft + ft 
32% 32ft 32% + % 


A»P«*9pf 

AmGenICp 

AmHertfLf 

Arvlnln2pf 

BolfGE pfB 

BbOanOlck 

Burrohs 

CMnneiHi 

ChemNY* 

attCDTP 

CWlAoraS 
Culfnet wl 
DennlaMtas 
DefE 3 42pfM 
Emerson El 
Exxon 
FsfWlsc 
GnDvnam 
HawalElecs 
Hunt Mft 
IntfHarv of D 
KllMhtRld 
Lowes 
MavD5l s 
MopreCp 
Nat Gvvsm 
OhPwBMpf 
PoPL 13RT 
PHnevB 212 
Rabins AH 
Safeway 

SatilndGE 

SunrMkt 

Toll'd 3 75W 

UAL Inc 

Unrref 

VFConi 

WalCMSvc 

WasftMst 

WUUlwVHffl 


AlexAlPx 
AmGenlpfB 
AmSIorvs 
A very I nt 
Bandog Inc 
Sever tv Ent 
CCX Corn pf 
Cant So West 
QrnlNYp) 
Coltlndus 
Cm ten pf A 
CvdapoCn 
DmE17Spf 
OlglfalEa 
EripDE PfB 
FPL Gre 
FlerTFnGrps 
GaPocH 
House Inti 
iCIndspf 
lowaEILTP 
LN Hous 
ManarCres 
MdwstEngv 
MarganJP 5 
NatWtodEn 
OhPw227W 
PlUbroSol 
Prime Mot 
Rubbermaid 
StPe&ri sec 
SfhwttstGas 
Telex Carp 
Trnnsm Inc 
(JALlnc240e 
UnlTeradpf 
VaEP745pf 
Walter Jim s 
WellsFar Co 
Waafwth pf 


ALLTEL Cp 

AmGnCn32SI 

AmSforpfA 

Banco 

Bk Boston 

BosE 1 17prf 

CIGNA Cp 

Can La Elec 

amsCrfi 

CwEJnf 

CantCeefB 

Daniel Ind 

DetESMer 

EGG Inc 

EnniSBF 

FstlntrafBcp 

Gannett 

Handiman 

Hauslnf 2X 

ICN ptwrm 

Jainesvtav 

LoeledoGass 

MartenLab 

MoPubBvc 

MnrKnud 

NaHIkSau 

Ovarhd Dr 

Phi I Ind of 

RTECorw 

SCMCorp 

Sea Land n 

Stone Web 

Thom Beils 

TrlbuneCo 

UnJDvnam 

USLIFECp 

Wachovia s 

wairjiaopi 

Whirlpool 

ZayreCa 


NEW LOWS 18 


Carllnag 

WnUn460pf 

WnUntpf 


Marcade TxPocLd Wsfn Union 
WnUn4 90of WnUndeppf WnUn 14pf 
WnUn 10 25cf 


Over-the-Counter 


Jan. 16 


NASDAQ National Morket Prices 


Sales tai Hal 

108s High Um 3PJM.OTTC 


1 1 * 1 

AELl 



20 23% 

V* 

23 + ft 

AFG 



154 1FH 


ASK 

AamRt 



5618% 
119 I9VS 

IBM 

19 

?r 

A codin 

JOb 2J 

219 9ft 

9% 

nb + to 

AceJrtn 



X 10U 

IOM 

10% 

AeuRav 

JO 

3 

237 71 to 

71 

Xft + ft 

AdacLb 



3113 6ft 

Sft 

fift + to 

Adam 



595 10U 

HI 


AetvCIr 



X 7U 

7 

7 — to 

Aenutrn 
Afl Bah 

JO 

56 

449 «ft 
M9MM 

4to 

4ft— to 

AgcyRf 

AlrflAd 

1 


26 27% 

I’i'J 

27% 

.101 

J 


Bin 

llft+ M 

AirWlac 

f 


Br- pt 

9ft 

9ft + ft 

AtakJtot 

JSr 

13 


I6M 

ifito — to 

AtokPe 

S5r 23 


Wft 

2SM+ U 

AlevBs 

LX 

£4 

529 35to 

*to 

35ft— U 

Aim 



6310 

17M 

18 + to 

Algor ax 



9610U 

9ft 

9ft— to 

AlHWI 



27314% 

MU 

MU 

AltegBv 

AUdBn 

40 

2J 

117 16% 

ini'! 

16M— u 

JJ4 

33 

474 33ft 

23% Xft + U 

AHnaf 



4B2 4 

3ft 

Sft 

AhMMk: 



17 Tft 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

AJfaa 



506 9% 

9M 

FU+ U 

Amcil % 


£3 

4218 

17% 

17%— u, 

AWAIrf 



1113 8% 

• 

fift + u 

AmAdv 



11 11% 

I1M 


ABnkr 

JO 

4J 

100 lift 

IIM 

llto 

AConrs 



2003 12M 

lift 

12ft + ft 

A Con ft 



758 8% 

BM 

HM+ ft 

AFdSL a 

JO 

4.1 

2W14M 



AmFrgf 

1 


357 7M 

lull 

7lb — ft 

A Fl etc 

MB 

£9 

403 37% 

m 

37% + ft 

AGreet 


13 2346 HU 

33% 

34 — to 

AminLf 

A06 33 

734 10% 

Hi 

10U + U 

AMoant 



X 9% 

9ft 


AMS 



6910% 

IB 

IBft— ft 

ANtins 

1JB 

£6 

41129ft 

29M 

29ft 

APfiyGp 



330 6 & 

6ft 

6M 

AQuoar 



fa tft. 

IM 

IM— U 

ASccCs 

IJ2 

6J 

136 17 

16% 

16ft 

AmSoft 



516% 

M 

16% + to 




1307 3% 

X 

w 

ASurg 



447 ft 

Amdtr 

3JH 

£3 

132 99 

[■ /,1 

59 + to 

Amrwgf 



160 19 

If . 1 

18% 

Amgen 



156 5 

lr “ j 

4ft 

AmsfcB 

J4o £4 

37 22V. 

pry J 

2ZM + 1b 

Arnuods 



46I6U 

| i 

16ft + % 

Anodlte 

.10 

IJ 

6 6U 

4U 

6U + U 

Anlogk: 



26811% 

IIM 

11%+ M 

Ana lv L 



2*7 6U 

5% 


Ananan 



9710% 

10ft 

WM+ to 

Andrew 



26737 


37 + % 

Andros 



57 7U 

■ , V J 

fift— ft 


.12 

IJ 

44 9ft 

Ml 

fft 




135323ft 


Xto +1K 

AnotaC 



105420% 29ft 

30% + to 

-ipiBJo 



309 29U 

j 

29H> + ft 

ssss r 



071 30 

m 

13U 

29 + to 

AiddSIr 



30 8% 

8ft 

Bft 

Arch tv* 



a* 4to 

Sft 

4to 




ID ISft 

19ft 

19ft— ft 

ArizB 

JOb £6 

626 22U 

Xft 

22 + ft 

Ariel 



64 8 

Tft 

7% 

AsdHst 

.12 

.9 

48213% 

13ft 

13 —ft 







Atom- 

JO 

£5 

M16 

16 

16 

Alhey 

JOb £5 

2 14M 

I4M 

14to— % 


JOb 23 

46 MU 

10 

IBft 

AflntBc 

AtfnFd 

JO 

£0 

7 Wto 

WM 

Wto + ft 



IM Bft 

Sft 

8%— to 

AtfFfn 



156 10 

9% 

9ft + Vi 





9 


AtSoAro 



53010% 

10% 

w%+ u 











MU 

16M + U 

AlrfTrT 



X 9ft 

9% 

9% 




407 6M 

6U 

fift— U 




141 5% 

5% 

SM+ M 

Amo* 



226 10 to 

9ft 

10 + ft 




26214 


13ft + ft 

Avmfcrfe 



599 Xft Xto 

Xft + ft 




35 UM 

ij 






-JM 


AxtcM 

JO 

4J 

6 4% 

a 

4% 

\ — b. M 


BBDO 
BFI Cm 

siwCb ,10a 1J 
BPISv 
BRCom 
KgjrdC t 


BcpHw 174 44 


BH 

BkNE 

BkMAm 

Bonkvt 


JO 10J 
% % 


BaotoG 44 23 


Barano 

Barton 

BsTnA 

BasAm 

BselF 

BayBtts 

BR^uees 

BeflNt 

BnchCf 

Bcnhan 

Benhn wt 

Berkley 

BesICP 

BetZLB 

BevHS 

Bio B 

BloBaar 

Billings 

Btadfv 

BloRas 

BJOMrt 

BtaflT 

BtatcR 

Bird Inc 

BtahGr 

StlSSAT 

BaatBn 

BabEvn 

BaITTc 

BstnDta 

BsfnFC 

BraeCn 

Branca 

BrwTpRI 

Bnmo 


JHta 2J 
2JB 54 
.13 1.9 


J2 2J 
170 24 


1J0 3J 
JO V 
.16 1.9 


.101 4 

J4 4J 
t 

JB 1J 


163 43% 
179 1% 
1 6M 
47S Sft 
48 11% 
61 B 
94718% 
19 19ft 
531 27ft 
279 7M 
■32 7ft 

50 59 
V47D lift 

IS 11 
1682 20ft 
121 7M 
30 3% 
1 10 

714 BM 
420 35ft 

186 44ft 

12 6M 
211 11 
277 7% 

5 7M 
11613% 
138 7% 
190 14% 
188 M 

1847 34 
75 7 
6813% 
5811 
427 3ft 
2422M 
227 5 
368 7ft 

13 5% 

51 9% 

13 7ft 

6 7ft 
108 % 
149 27ft 
140 18ft 

36 BM 
32 Bft 
134 15M 
161 lift 
M3 6 

t7S0 3ft 

306 21% 


43 43ft 
1M 1H— M 
6M 6M 
2ft 2% + % 
III* lift— ft 
7% 7%— ft 
18 18ft + M 
19% 19ft +% 
MW 27ft + % 
7 7 

7% 7% 

58ft 59 +lft 
9ft IDft— 1 
W% 18% 

26ft 28ft +1% 
7ft 7ft — ft 
2% 7% 

TO 10 + ft 

7% 8%+ % 

35ft 35W + ft 
43% 44W+ % 
6% 6% 

10W 11 + ft 

7 7ft + M 
7M 7M+ Vb 

Mft 13ft— ft 
7M 7%+ ft 
MM lift— ft 
M ft 

Xft 33V. — ft 

6% 7 

13 13 — % 

HIM 10%+ ft 
2% 3ft + % 
73 22ft + ft 
4% <%— M 
7ft 7% 

4% 5ft 
9 9 — ft 

7ft 7ft 

\ 

27 27ft 
17% IB —ft 

8 8ft + ft 
8% 8% 

U 15M 
lift 11% 

5% 5%— lb 
M 3M + ft 
21M 21%+ ft 


Sates In Net 

180* High Low JPALCh’oe 


Buffton 
BulWTr 
BwrrBr 
8MA 1J4 
Buxlnld 


4J 


.87 1% 1% 1%— Ya 
4071% 21ft 21%+ ft 
33 Mft 16 16M + M 

2 48ft Mft 48ft— ft 
1142 4% ift 4%+ ft 


CCOR 

CPRhb 

CBTBc 56 2 A 
CBT 1JS 43 
CML 


.16 17 


CPI 
CPT 
COP 
Cache 
CACI 
CbrySc 
Calibre 
CalAmp 
caiMic 
coisva 

CaUoaP 
CokTy 

canons 
CopPSL 
CapCrb 

Card Dli 

Candles 
Carol hi 
Carter! 

Caseys 
Cencur 
CirtrBc 
Cent cor 
Con Ben 2JSb SJ 
CnBstlS L32 3J 
CPdBfc 1.12 U 

Cent ran 40 1J 


151 9 Bft 8% + ft 
726 8% B 6%+ % 
523 23 23 — ft 

286 38% X Xft + % 
64 Mft 9% 10ft + M 
234 14% 14% 14% + ft 
6S6 6M 6ft 6ft- ft 
9 6ft 6ft 6M 
203 3% 3ft 3% + ft 
884 5M 5% 5% + ft 
435 IBM 17% 18M + % 
12 2 1% 2 — ft 

552 ift 3% 4M + ft 
9M 9%+ ft 
3ft Sft 
3 3ft 
9ft 9ft + ft 
17ft 17%+ ft 
8M Wb+1 
2M 


2ft + ft 
ISft + M 
lift — ft 
2ft +ft 


1J0 64 


.12 U 


.16 VO 


14 


■I2> J 


.18 


76 38 
32 33 
I 

I JO *4 


CortirA 
Cermtk 
Cobra 
Cbotfm 
amcCp 
ChaoEn 
ChrmSs 
CflkPnf 
ChkTdi 
ChLwn 
Chemox 
ChryE 
CWChl 
CM Poe 
Chomer 
Cfinmr 
awDwi 
Chvms 
Ctohar 
QprlcD 
Cjrcon 
CtzSGa 
CfZfMs 
CtzUt A 
CtzUtB 
Clfv Fed 
ayNCe 
OdlrSfa J51 J 
OOrtU JB 34 
ClearCh 

ClevfRt 1J2 74 

athtme 

CoastF 

CobeLb 

coamta 36a 20 

Coour I 

CopenJc 

Conmla 

Cotab R 

Canaan 

Coiiinx 

ColLfAe Si 11 
CotrTl# 

CotaNts 30 4.1 
ColDto 

Cotnolr t 

Contests .12 4 

Comdto .16 1J 
Comdiaf 

Comerc 110 17 
CmciU 32 12 
CmIShr JOa 43 
CwfthF IJ4el54 
CmwTI IJD 48 
CamAm 


Camlnd 

cantSvs 

OneCrd 


JTr 


40 14 


JO 


.12 14 


J5 


ClWMT 

compc 

Cmpcro 
Cocnacp 
Campus 
CCTC 
CntPAs 
CPfAat 
CmpOr 
CpfEnt 
CmpfH 
Cmplf&i 
CmpLR 
CmPtM 
CmpPd 
CmpRs 
On Task 
vieptua 
Cmpufn 
emeft 
Ciwrvs 
Camshr 
Cmpaha 
CunitUi 
Concstl 
ConHr, 

CnCOP 3360134 
CCopR 1480 97 
CCooS 336 119 
ConRtr 

CnPop* U8 17 
ConaPd JBe 14 
Consul 

Cltl I Ben 2JM&64 
ClIHim 
OlHItC 
Cntlnfa i 
Ctuar 
Convot 
Comma 
CaprBla 
Coars B 40 

CoevM 
Carcam 
Cortta _ 

CoreSl £00 


530 Pft 
36 3ft 
296 3ft 
S3 9ft 
1068 18 
1234 9% 

874 2ft _ 

86 15% 15 
10211% lift 
199 2lh 2ft _ 

351 10% 9% 10%+ % 
63 ISM 15 15ft + ft 
20 17% 17ft 17ft— ft 
452 28ft Xft 28ft 
272 II 10ft II + ft 

31 40ft 39M 39% + ft 
tB3 26% Mft 26 W 

5 28% 28% 23ft— ft 
572 35ft 34ft 35ft + % 
10 6ft 6U 6ft 
157 3% 3% 3ft + ft 
323 WM 18 10ft 

7 Mb 1% Wb— % 

103 4% 4% 4% + M 
61 5% 5ft 5% 

11* 18% 17% 17% + % 

IX MM 14 MM + ft 

49 7% 7ft 7ft— % 
61 27ft Z7 27ft— ft 
303 5ft Sft Sft— ft 
9614ft 14 14 — ft 

996413 17ft 12% — ft 

111 79 78ft 79 — ft 

58 18% 18M 18% + ft 

129 9 Sft 8% + % 
184 13% 13 13ft— ft 

30710% 10% 10ft— ft 
1397 24% 24ft 24ft— ft 
4210% 9% 10% + % 

148 6 5ft 6 + ft 

625 20ft TO 20ft 

68 73 21ft 29 + % 

9529 28% 2V 

. .. 2 XU X 38ft + ft 

JOB 17 114511% 11% 11% 

— 3J 523ft 23 23 

' 1X31% 31 31%+ M 

156 26 2Xb 25% + ft 

107 15% 14ft 14% — ft 

1020% TO 20 + M 

58 9ft 9 9ft + ft 
55 lift 13% 13% — ft 
243 12 11 12 +1% 

2 27ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
199 13 13% 13 

118 3ft 2% 2%— % 
520 22% 22ft 22% 

198 5% Sft Sft— ft 

55 12% 12% 12% + ft 

51 Sft S 5 — Vb 

8 29% 29M 29ft 

1699 IBM 17% IBM + % 
200 17 16% 17 + ft 

42 Ift % %— ft 

178 UM 13 13% + ft 

141 71ft 20% 91ft + ft 
331 14 13ft 13%— ft 
170 2% 2% 2%+ ft 
5534% 36% >6%— M 
36S% 2SM 28M+ ft 
1711 10% 10% 

S3 Ift 8% 6ft 

32 31ft 29ft 3IM+1K 

239 3% 3% 3%— ft 
71919% 19 19% — ft 
174 10% 9ft 10% +1 
737 25ft 24% 25ft— ft 

2779 7% 7ft 7%— ft 
5 12% T7% 12%— % 
520 25% 25% 25%+ ft 

6 tt ft 

.361 3ft 3% 3M + M 
3933 15ft 14% 14%— % 
332X XM 71 + ft 

367 4ft 4M ift— ft 

9 11% lift 11% + Vb 
1 9% 5ft Sft 

65 7M 7ft 7ft 
271 8 7% 7% + ft 

104 BM 8M BM 
730 J% 3% 3ft 

31 17ft 16% 16% — ft 
X!U Mb 3ft— ft 
96 ISft 15 15ft + ft 

X 1ft 1 1 — lb 

38 * 5% 6 + ft 

1 5% 5% 5% 

56 3 2% 3 +¥k 

191 7M 7 7% + % 

240 4ft 4 4 — ft 

552 1% 1% 1M 

63 9 8% 9 + ft 

88 21% 21ft 21ft + ft 
311 34% 34ft 34% + ft 
7617ft Mft 17ft— ft 
19424% Xft 24ft— ft 

33 Bft 7% 8 + ft 
7534% 34ft 34% + ft 

7 5 5 5 

SI 5% 5% 5% 
34032M X B 
613 14% I3U 14ft +lft 
899 3% 3ft 3%+ ft 
41 6% 6M 4% + ft 

IN 7ft 6% 7 —ft 
7788 9ft 8ft 9 + ft 
909 17% 17 17M + ft 

371 3% Sft 3M+ ft 
2J 1372 18% 18ft IBM + ft 
25123% 21 M 22M+ % 

7 9ft BM Bft— % 

. 542 9ft 9 9ft 
AS 634 46U. 4* 46 


■36 1.9 


Corvus 

Casino 

CrtBrl 

CrimeC 

Cronus 

CrosTr 

CumBk 

Crump 

CullnFr 

Cuiium 

Cvoara 


.14 .9 


5ates In Net 

188s High Low 3 p jul Ch’oe 
560 4ft 3% 4 
674 6% 6ft 6M+M 
4015 14% 14%—ft 

329 3 2ft 3 +% 

29813% 13ft 13M+ ft 
40326% 26ft 26M+ ft 
134 11M 11 IlM+ft 
26928% 30ft 20%+ % 
7825ft 25ft 35ft+ ft 
181 17% 17ft 17% + ft 
S22 21% 23 + ft 


JO 10 


A4 2.1 
.94 17 
-56 33 


1 D I 

DBA 



271 I3U 



DEP 



87 7to 

Ira 

7V.— % 

DabySy 



B0727W 

rr3 

Z7M+ % 

DaksF 



4223V. 

24M 

WM— % 

DtnnBla 



X 4% 

4% 

4ft + M 

OartGp 

.13 

.1 

113 TO 

68 

89 

Dafcrd 

J4 

IJ 

207 17% 

17 

17U+ U 

DtalO 



271 12U 

12 


DtSwtch 



I47B 7ft 



Ddtpwr 



77 4ft 

4 


Datsc» 



2SI3U 

13 

13 — % 

DtraJh 



23 4% 

4% 

4%+ U 




X 7M 

6% 

6%+ U 

Pfunmi 



32 5% 

5% 

5% + % 

DabSh 

.15* 

J 


17M 

17% + M 

DecbD 



2SX ISM 



DefctaA 

32 

3J 

677 21% 

21 to 

21U + lb 

Defchm 

30 

IJt 

3914ft 

14% 

14% 

Delta Dt 



1 1% 

1% 

1% 

Detlaus 



76 IM 

1% 





IX 6 

5% 

5%— to 




633 7to 

6% 


Detec El 



16 4to 

4U 


DtagOf 



413 3U 

3 

3W— to 

Dina Pr 



47 9W 

9U 





790 3% 

3% 

3% 

■ •Tf- TM 






retail 



30 13 

12M 

TJ 

Dialog 



21 4ft 

4% 

4to— to 

DtofCm 





18 - U 

OtaltSw 



Bpfc 


24% + ft 

Dtonex 



|[itl 


3BM+ to 

DlaiLoa 







34 

£9 

K: KM 


8%— to 

OocuCH 



168 4% 



DlrGnl 

Dome 

30 

3 

2S023 


22% — ft 

1J0 

43 

192 2M* 


26ft 

DrehH 

JO 

IJ 

167 14to 

Itl- ■ 

14M+1M 

DoylDB 

-88 

4J 

133 1BV) 

IB 

IBM— U 

Dranfz 

■15e IJ 

99 IOM 

9% 

10M 

Dtexlr 



71 10% 

Ww 


DravGr 



534161b 

isto 


DwckAi 

33 

IJ 

48719% 



PunkC 

33 

IJ 

154 25 

24% 

Wto + U 

Duiiron 

36 

5.1 

23311 



PurFII 

-16 

IJ 

8512% 

13 to 

12% — to 

Dymcn 

f 


143 4M 

4 

4 

Dynfchs 



494 20U 



Dyson 



356011ft 

11U 

llto 

l B 1 

EIP 

EoalCpI 

.12 

3 

12 M 
474 % 

X 


Eaom 



1100 51b 

s 

5ft+ U 

IM 



6 6 
10 6 

6 

6 

6 — to 

EconLb 

EdCmp 

1J4 

£7 

BOX 

27% 

27% 






Educom 






Elkanx 



3217% 



ElChk: 



149 Bft 



El Pas 
Etai 

ljfi UJ 

567 13V. 

13 

13 U + U 

J7e 

3 

M 7ft 

7ta 

7to 

EOS Itg 



1876 9 

BM 

9 + to 

EMen 

EhfrM 

•Mb 1.1 

3 14to 
3 5% 

I4M 

5% 

I4to 

5% 

EMcBlo 

EtCaths 



4S3 0 

7% 

7ft— U 

EleNucI 



52517% 

12 

12 — ft 

ElcRnt 



1307 NU 

1BU 





317% 

17ft 


ECaisrs 



W 14 

13U 

13U — U 

ElctMla 






ElronEI 

Etaeor 



7 fT& 

X 

W„ + to 
■ft— lb 

EmnAIr 



xi a% 



Emu Lx a 






End to 



6 6Vb 

6 

6to— % 

Endvoi 



X 6ft 

6 

filk + M 

EftdoLs 



1234 7% 



EndowtA 



42 8ft 

Tft 


EnoCnv 



IX X 

28 


EnFoct 



ID 8% 

Bft 


BogOil % 



X 5to 

S 








£ngplii 






EnfPub 






EnzoBl 






Eouof 



565 IBM 

18 

18% — U 

EntOfl 

JB 

13 

IX 6 lb 



Ertcn 

EvnSut 

-94a £1 

204 30ft 

XU 

30U 






ExoolTc 



30 ft 

to 

W— ft 

Cxovfr 



23314% 

13% 

14 

f 


Flurocb 
Fonar 
FUon B 
FUonA 
For Am 
FarestO 
FortnF 
Farms 

Forum 

F oster 

Fuxinvr 

Fremnt 

Fudrck 

FulHBS 


Sates m Net 

nos High Law 3 P.M. cog* 
JO 15 


J7 S 
J» 3 
36 15 
1J0 53 


31 13ft 13% 13% — ft 
376 5ft 5 Sft + ft 


14715 13% Mft +-ft 

340 13% 13% 13% + ft 
4327% 36% 27U+ ft 
1719ft 18% 18% 
42615% 15% 15%+ ft 
248 2% 2ft 2ft— ft 
M J 3443 8 7ft 7ft + ft 

.10 1 J 350 6ft 6% 6ft + ft 
220 24 23% 2A + M 

328 18ft 17ft 181b + ft 
469 12 11% 12 + % 

72 14% 14% 14% + ft 


M £6 


JO 2J 


FDP 

FMI 

FamHIa 

FarmF 

FrmG 

Pea Grp 

Feraflu 

Flbron 

F Idler 

Fifth Th 

FhMfo 

Fllmtec 

Flnamx 

Pi Moan 

FAtaBs 

FIAFta 

FtATn 

FtBnOh 

FfCoIF 

FComr 

FDataR 

FExec 

FFdMle 

F Fa Cal 

FFFfM 

FtFnCp 

FFnMot 

FtFIBk 

FJerNt 

FMdB 

FNHCltl 

FNfSwa 

FRBGa 

FlSvFia 

FSvWls 

FfSecC 

FTenNf 

FfUnCs 

Flakev 

Ftatuff 

FiaFdi 

FINFl* 

FWwSv 


2X8 £8 
230 18 
M 23 


IJD A3 
33 28 
1.10 A2 
2J0 53 


A1 


M 1J 
IJD 56 
1X0 £1 
260b SJ 

JOS .1 
36 U 
A0b 20 


1.10 57 
180 SJ 
1.12 3.1 


X8 3X 
JOB 1J 
32 24 


105 7% 7% 
323 5ft 5% 
42 1% IVk 
LH 51 W 20U> 
11X90% 49% 
3M29VD 34M 
307 7M 6% 
54 M 13ft 
X48ft 48ft 
41 » Xft 
9 23% 23% 
287 14ft 14 
4*3 7 6ft 
191 9% 9V. 
7023 22ft 
2 26 2SM 
29 25% Xft 
29 32ft 50ft 
3 14 13ft 
1723ft 23ft 
113 19ft 18% 
4380 17% 12 
388310% 10 
48014% 14% 
sin 19 
4019% 19 
121 19ft 1BVS 
1122% 22% 
62 32 31ft 
23 31% 31M 
X 51% SIM 
87 M 14 
184 27 Xft 

2420ft XM 

94 Bft 7ft 
iS 21% 30% 
1173 30ft 29M 
840 36% 36 
76 6Ml 6 
8314% 1H 
14X16% 16% 
181 Xft 30ft 
13716% 15% 


7ft— ft 
5M— M 
IV. +% 
Mft— 1% 
50ft + Vb 
25ft +1 
6%— ft 
1 3ft— ft 
48ft— V* 
58ft 
23% 

14M 

44*+ % 
9%+ Vb 
73 + M 

X + ft 
XM 

S2M+2M 
14 + H 

23ft + ft 
19 + ft 

1Tb, + % 
KM 

lift + % 
19ft + ft 
19% 

19M+ % 
22%+% 
32 + W 

3IM— % 
51% 

14 — VS 
27 + ft 

TOW— % 
8%. 

21M + lb 
Xft + M 
36%+ % 
6% + 1* 
Mft + ft 
16ft 

SOW— M 
16 + ft 


1 G 

GTS s 



81 8 

7% 

a + u 

Galileo 



14 13ft 

13 

13ft + to 

GatnaB 

.10 

l.i 

91 9 

Bto 

8% + to 

GandHfi 



3211ft 

lift 

11% . 

Garcia 



711 Sto 

2% 

3 +ft 

Genetdi 



844 40V, 



GnAut 



184 6U 

Mb 


GnHma 



106 8 

7M 

7% .. 

GenctE 

* 


2 3M 

Jto 

3M+ft 

GenetL 



BO 3% 

Sft 

3ft 

Genets 



2468 Sft 

Mb 

5ft+ U 

Genex 



116 541 

5to 


Genova 

.101 

u 

X 5% 

4% 

5U + ft 

GoFBk 



20X12% 

IIU 

12% +1 

GerMds 

JS 

u 

74 6Vk 

6to 


Gib*G 

J1 

J 

75 SHU 

28 

28 — U 

GlgaTr 



SIB 

ia 

1« — W 

GtenFd 



12X 10% 

HIM 

10ft— % 

GldCorr 



44 11U 

II 


GdToco 



165 Vi 

ft 

to 

Gafaas 



159 16% 

15% 

16 — Vb 




4B12U 

11% 


Gould P 

36 

4J 

ZS718U 

17% 


Groco 

A4 

3J 

13 llto 



Gneitre 



IX 0% 



Graph 1 



SflOto 

10 

10% + % 

GrphSc 



2219 5to 

4% 

4%— U 

GWFSB 

J8e JJ 

168 Ifito 

15% 


GBotfCs 



SB 12V. 

11% 


Green T 



IX 1BU 

17% 





121 13V, 

13U 


Gullfrd 



277 15U 

14% 


GHBdc 



2906 15% 



GMNuc 



10 2U 

2U 


Gull 

J5e 

3 

W 9% 

9U 

O'*— lb 

r i 

HBOS 

.16 

J 

1907 mi 



HCC 

JM 

J 




HCW 

.10 

2J 

320 5 

4% 


HMO Am 


276 lift 

10ft 


Habtrs 



IX 15% 

15U 


Hadoo 



10 SM 

SM 


Hadsan 






HateSv 
Ho tan! 



386 Sto 

a 


HomOII 

.10 

3 

300 14% 



HarpG 

34 

1.1 




HrffNs 

160 

5.9 

390 27% 



HolhWV 

JO 

ZJ 

14 9Vl 

«u 


HowfcB 

30 

23 

10710 

9% 


HlttlAS 



189 17 

Ifito 


HHhCSs 



7719 



HHhln 



8 7W 






UK 3% 




.16 

3 

JtW 




.10 

A 

188 34% 






IX 7 



Hklta 






HenrdF 

J40 

23 

6 XU 

36 


HerltOn 

1J0 

17 

10 43% 



Herlev 






HiberCs 

1J0 

4J 

112 21 

20% 


Hickom 






Hogan 



1154 7% 






51 ISM 

15% 





1197 HIM 



Hmecfi 



■.■J 



Hanind 

J6 

£1 

■Peal 

17M 


HaakDr 

1J0 

£1 

mil >■ 

10% 


Homer 

IJO 

JJ 

533 29% 



Hon Ind 



13 5% 






471 19U 



HunoTa 









X 21 



HntgRs 



251 10 



HurrtaB 

IJOb 43 

MS 

Wto 


Hurca 



208 5U 

5 





719 20V, 

ISM 





I .• * . l 






■ a~i 






6 IVk 

0M 

BM + U 

L 

ILC 



16 Bib 



IMS int 

JO 

J 

40 37% 



!£t Sv 



257 2% 

i% 





982 9% 



loaf 



443 4 















WT^jZa 



295 2to 






77 4% 






232 23V, 




IJO 

4J 

XJ3% 

X 


Info Rue 



1«1 WM 









Inf rain 




AU 








Intecm 









737 llto 



Iniscen 



40 3% 






6018 

I7M 


Inlof 



10X32 






673 9% 









Infrnd 













.16 

L4 




Infrfoc 






tntgrpn 


1440859 



litLLijjj 1 



41 6W 



H V 1 ' 



247 18% 

a 


rT7T7T7r r rM 



17 6 









InlCdn 



in mu 

13% 


IGame 



X 14% 

14% 



f 


m saw 



Int Lao 






IRIS 



as ra 

st asp 

it carp 



98 16% 

6U 

ifito 




97 4% 



■overa 

-Ole 

J 

W 4to 

4% 


lomasa 



716 9Vk 



Isomdx 



912M 

JU 




2173 Sft 

5% 





ax a 

27 

a +i 

1- 


■V- 7 


JBRest 
Jackpot 
JackLie 
Jamwfr 

Jetsmrt xoa £2 


108 14% MM 14M + lb 
U«b 3% 4 + M 
343 31ft 30% 31 
1221 Bft 20% + ft 
B4 lift 17% 11% + ft 


JetMart 
Jan co 
Jlfv* 
JonlebJ 
Jonel A 
Joaphan 
Juno 
Justins 


.12 J 


Soles in Nat 

100s High Low 3 PJuLCn'qe 
194 7 fin 6% 

262 16% 14% I6M — lb 
360 % «, 4b +% 

115 4M 4 4 — M 

IX 4% 3% 4 

220 94* 9% 9M— M 

5C23W 23 XM + % 
JW ZJ 515ft 15 ISft 


I 


JO 3J 


CL. 

•CLAs 



89018% 

17M 

11 + ft 

KV Phr 



160 5U 

4ft 

5U + ft 

ICaman 

36 

23 

441 24to 

221* 

24 +1 

Kardir 



1490 I5U 


ISM +1 

Rosier 

M 

4J 

84 13ft 

I3U 

13U — U 

Kavdan 



147 7% 

/% 

a 

KeiyJn 



360 1ft 

Ito 

Romp 

IJO 

40 

270 44 M 

44 

44 V, + % 

KvCnLf 

JO 

£2 

165 36% 

Wto 

36%+ ft 

KevDX 



113 6 

5% 

5M+ ft 

KevTm 



IX 10W 

0to 

10to+ ft 

KeyCm s 


10 6 

6 

6 


34 

£0 

16 77U 

27V. 

27M— ft 

Klmbrk 



100 6U 

5% 

5ft— to 

Klmstd 



5 8% 

0% 

6ft 

Kinders 

06 

J 

74516% 

is** 

16% + % 

vIKoxs 



33 % 

% 

ft 

Kror 

66 

J 

476 11 

9% 

10 — ft 

Knjgra 

32 

£3 3521 13ft 

13M 

13% + to 


.16 

J 

324 25% 

XU 

25ft + U 

1 L 1 

LDBmk 



73710ft 

9ft 

10% + M 

UN 



IX 7W 

6% 

fift— ft 

LSI Log 



315716 V, 

15 

I5M + M 

LTX 



832 Z0U 

I9M 

20 +1 

LoPele! 



8716V. 


16 + ft 

LaZBy 

IX 

£3 

1037 

36% 

36ft+ ft 


■12a J 

38515% 

15ft 

15to 

Laldlw 

.16 

1.1 

118 15 

Mft 

14%— ft 

LamaT 

JO 

6J 

4513 

17% 

12ft 

Lanccst 

JS 

4 A 

X ISM 

14U 

ISM + U 

LndBF 

JO 

4A 

449 13% 

13ft 

13ft 

Ldmk5 



77 6% 

fift 


LaneCs 

JOa £0 

20 41 



Laristy 

JSe JJ 

96 6% 

6% 

6% + U 

Lawsns 

30 

1.1 

1IB26V) 

76 

36U-- % 

LoeOfa 



812 7% 

71b 

7V, — U 

Lelner 



37 13ft 

13% 

13ft 

LewteP 

Lexfcan 

JBb £6 


X 

7ft + % 
j%— to 

LexkHa 



in iu 

3 

3ft + ft 

Llebrf 

J7 

J 

547 ZIM 



LHnws 

34 

J 

1 42% 

42M 

42M+ M 

UbCom 



467 6% 



LliyTui 

30 

O 

u®ns 

14% 

15 + to 

LbiBrd 



17X23M 

XU 

23U 

LtncTrt 

230 

7J 

1*6 X 

29ft 

30 + to 

Undtrrg 

M 

2J 

31 6% 

5% 

6M+ % 




10BOZ7W 

V 

27M + to 

LocalF 



20 15 


14ft— U 

LongF 

IX 

53 

IK WU 

23% 

24V. — U 

Lotus 



1462 WU 

W% 

2SU— ft 




919% 

IVft 

19ft + U 

Lyphos 



81 15% 

ISM 

15ft— ft 

i « : i 

MCI 



6092 9 

8% 

Bft 

MIW 



SO 5% 

Sto 


MPSIs 






MTS t 

34 

IJ 







946 Xto 


X + to 

wiacgra 



50 IIU 

11 

IIU 







MackTr 



55Z716% 

16ft 


MadGE 

2 30 

9J 

45 23V) 

23% 

23% 

MagCfl 






MafRt 



23 BU 

Bib 

Bto— to 

Mcdrlto 

Jh 


111 12 






TJ»13 

12V) 

Mft + to 


30 

4J 

774 19U 

19 

19 — U 

AfilTSN 

200 

4.1 

440 4BW 

47% 


fitarem 

30b 1.9 

4115M 

Mft 


Margin 



43 7% 

7lb 

7ft— ft 

Atorast 

J5< 

3 

Iff? 7V, 

7U 

7M + U 




342 46 



Mscoln 



152 33 



Minsfar 



1092 5U 


5 - lb 




B2 10% 



Mdxcrc 



299W 


W + ft 

Mammas 



» IIU 



WtayPt 



1619 5 

4% 

4ft + to 

MoynOI 



84 3ft 

3% 

3ft 

AAcCrm 

X 

23 

373 32V) 

Xto 


Me Fad 



75 MU 

9% 


McFarl 



154 IIM 

10% 

ii — % 

MmeUnt 



2B BM 



MtaCra 






MedUSI 



227 16 



Madftx 



162 19 



iMagdis 



328 7 

6% 

7 + % 

Afiantor 



222 13 

12% 


MentrG 



1303 22% 

21% 

22U+ ft 

MercBs 


SJ 

105 33% 30 








MrdlCe 






Marsv 

SO 

£7 

1 23% 

S% 








MrdBpf 

£50 

BJ 

6XM 



AAervGs 



243 15U 

14% 

15 — % 

MetrAJr 



491 14% 

13% 

14M+ ft 

AAefSL 

M 

3L3 

5311% 

11% 


Mlcnm 



2634 XU 

31 

3lto+1 





3% 


NUcrfiAM 












MtcrTe 



699 24% 

23M 

23%— ft 

Mleraa 






AAlcrSm 



X 5M 

Sib 

SM + ft 

MtfPcA 



173 Sto 

Sto 

5U— U 

MdSfFd 

A0 

£2 

3 16V, 

IBto 

IBM— M 

AUdBks 

1.12 

17 

67 X 

27% 

X + u 













MiltHr 

44 

IJ 

594 36ft 

15% 

36U + U 





3% 


Millar 

44 

IJ 

91335 

34% 

3rik + ft 

Mlntocr 


2792 3ft 

Sto 

Sft + ft 

MUnetre 



106 19% 

19U 

19U 





12 


HAGask 

Jie 


87 15% 

ISto 


MbUCA 



13 Bft 

8% 

Bft + ft 

MobtC B 



404 Oft 

8% 

BM+ lb 

Mod me 





37% + U 





Bto 



J3 


457 33% 

32% 


MonCa 

IX 

£2 

99 44ft 44% 44% 

Afiisncor 



196 3% 

3M 

3ft 

WanfO 



6 IBM 

IBM 

H5V. 

UanAnt 



198 BM 

8% 

8U — U 

Manaflf 



isv, 


ManuC 

IX 


2238% 30% 

m 


J1 


Slfift 

left 


War Kb 

•12a 

U 

2 11% 

n% 

n% 


JB 

2 3 

199 18 

17% 

17% + to 

MMofav 



686 5ft 

5 

5ft 

Kwcm 

30 

16 

914 

13ft 

J 

Muttmd 

66 

1.7 

9140M 

ID 

10 — M 

My Ion a 

.IM 

J 

846 26 

25ft 

Xft + M 

■- * \ 


127 7% 7ft 7ft— ft 


NM5 

NopcoS 

NBnTex 

NtCtvs 

NICpfT 

NDOtO 

NHIltlC 

NtLumb 

NMlcnv 

NTacit 

NotrBty 

Naugle 

Nougwt 

NelsnT 

Nelson 

NwkSec 

NetwkS 

NlwkEI 

Nautrg 

MB runS 

NE Bus 

NHmpB 

NJNat S 

NYAIrt 

NwldBk 

Newpts 

NwpPh 

NlCalg 

NkfcOG 

Nike B 

Nardsn 

Nardstr 

NorVan 

NAIIIn s 

NestSv 

NwNG 

NwtFn 

NwNLs 

NWStPS 

NaMtl 

NuclPh 

Numrax 

NutrlF 

NuMed 


Sam In Net 

too* High LOW 3 Pjia Ch’oe 
787 3% 3V. 3% + % 
276 13% 12% 13 
17 20W 20V. 20 Va 
386 29M 39 39V! + % 

146 22% 22M 22M 
119 Nk fW 914 


JM 4.1 
.90 4J 
J4 1.1 
X4 4J 
JOB IX 


2 21 

21 

21 

Renal 



14 4ft 


4% + % 

56 5 

4% 

4%— U 

RpAuto 

44 

£0 

111 8% 

Bto 

8%+ to 

Wl 4% 

4to 

4. to— % 

RoHHh 



Ml lift 

lift 

11% 

2 3% 

3U 

3% 

RasirSv 



51 13U 

12to 

I3U 

22 4% 

4% 

4% 

Reuter | 

■15o IJ 

101 11 

10% 

10ft + U 

352 5% 

4% 

4ft— te 

ReutrH 

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55 XU 

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1% + ft 

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6 7ft 

7% 

7% 

ReyRev 

134 

33 

351 38U 

37 

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455 9VS 

9 

9W+ to 

Rhodes! 

30 

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480 B 

7% 

7% + % 

Rlbllm 





9%— V 

1844 23V, 

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23 + ft 

Ritzy* 



141 Ift 

1% 

Ift + lb 


4to 

5 + to 

Rival 

SO 

6.1 

141 13% 

MM 

13to— to 


33% 

33% — % 

RoadSs 

1 JO 

12 

2184 32 

11% 

31% 


22 7% 7M 
163IM 31M 31M + % 
X OM 22% 23V* + ft 
1 23ft 23% 23%— ft 
397 5% 5ft 5W+ % 
34 lift II 11V*— % 
1539 Xft XM Xft + % 
190 64b 6% 6% — ft 


l s x x 


XM 4 3 1351 BM 8Vb 8M + % 


16 

1J 


2 IBM IBM IBM + ft 
6431% 31W 31 W— ft 
1204 6% 6M 6% + % 
26 7% 7M 7% + Vb 
636 8% 8% Bft + ft 
BJ 434 17M 17% 17% 

23 186 40W 39% 40ft +1 
25 1064 31% 30% 31% + % 
9J 161 71% 71M 21% + M 
289 46% 45W 46%+ M 
1190 5% Sft Sft + M 
15 8% Bib 8% + M 
146 BM Ift BM— ft 
502 10ft 10 10ft 


ZJ 


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Reeves 
RgcvEi 
Regis s 
Rehab 
R el lab 


Sam m Net 

ions High Law 3 P.M. Orta 
j64 ZJ 


7328% 28% 28% + % 
1225 6M 6 6M + ft 

202 6M 6M 6M 
257 14 13M 13ft — ft 

101 2SM WM WM— M 
210 10 94b 10 + % 


Rob Vug 

RobVsn 

Rockor 

RosesSi 

RraeSB 

Rouse 

RovBGp 

Roylnt 

RnyPlm 

RovIRs 

RovtAIr 

Rust Pel 

RvonFo 


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55 6U 

6 

6 — to 


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118 15% 

15 

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X W% 

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377 lift 

I4to 

14% 




24 XV. 

If 

19 —ito 


IJB 

£2 

IX Xto 

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1W37M 

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64 18% 

18U 

IBM + ft 

3Com 



43 8V) 

8% 

aw 




7 6to 

6% 

6to+ to 

TmeFlb 




8% 

9U + % 




10313% 

13U 

13ft 




1120% 

19% 

XU 

TollSva 




I 0 1 

OCGTc 






OakHIII 



26 3% 

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OMRec 



3005 2% 



Oceenor 



179 m 

3Mi 

3% + % 

Ocdlai 



295 16Vi 

16 

16M + U 

OftsLog 



114 2% 

2% 

24b + ft 

OgiiM* 

32 

26 

620 35M 

XU 

3SV) 


2JB 

£0 

1246V. 

46 

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230 WU 

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£9 

1930 XU 

29% 


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29 X% 

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20% + W 

OneBcp 

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389 IS 



OnLlne 



584 6 

SM 

6 + u 

Onyx 



1739 2 

1% 

2 + to 

Ounce 



150 lift 



OptEcR 



505 35% 

34% 

35% +1 

Orbcnc 



21 14to 






423 6 to 


filk + ft 




97 Sto 


Sto— to 

Odmn 

JO 

IJ 




OffrTP 

268 

9J 

2128to 

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28% 

OvrE*p 



511 14 

13 

13%+ % 

ObtnM 

■36 

£7 

71 13to 

13% 

llto 

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IX 3% 

» 

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1 P 

PLM 

.12 

£1 

a s% 


5% + lb 


£32 

49 




PabsfB 






Paccar 

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310 50% 


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53 Bft 


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PocTel 

JO 




14 — U 




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141b— M 

■ ‘1 ‘ ^ 






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73 

3X26U 

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26 

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36 

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29 27U 

27 

73 - to 

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<36612% 

11% 

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17 % 

to 














Petri le 

1.12 

4.1 

162 XU 



Phrmo 



489 SM 



PSF5 



3648 TU 



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7297 l<i 

15% 

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fr y- ^ 



JO 

£2 


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£7 





.12 


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47 

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PradOp 

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16 




PraaCo 






PrqptTr 

IX 

£9 




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JO 


96 16% 

16 

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764 n* 

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BM- ft 

L R ^1 

RAX 







56 

16 




RodS vi 



XI 14% 



RadfnT 



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Rad Ice 



1318 IOM 

9 

10 + ft 

Radian 



S 9% 

9% 

9% + to 

Raoen 






Ralnrs 



333 24% 

wu 

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Rswjtek 



133 5% 



RovEn 


IJ 

86 15 



Roadna 



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1 6U 

6U 

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s . _ 1 

SAY Inc 



167 llto 

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5E1_ 



701 14U 



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14 

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J8 

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102 18V 


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14 

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903 33% 

33% 

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SafHIth 



101 15% 

ISM 

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134 7% 


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SchfmA 

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lift 

lift + to 

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96 4 

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833 31% 

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Service 

| 


10915% 

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15 4 





1.1 




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StunSoi 






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SJ 

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2217 




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3 



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SloanTc 



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119 3% 









society 

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3341 23% 21% 2ZM + % 
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7 7% 7% 7% 

127618ft 16M 17ft— % 
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802 10M 9% 10 + M 
32 6 5% 6 

641 18% 18ft IBM + ft 
6X 18ft 17% 17%— ft 
1615 3% 3% 34k + ft 
1357 I7M 16 17ft +1% 
376 UM J7W 17% 

21 4 3% 3%— M 

2 3% 3% 3%— M 
727 9ft 8% 9ft + M 
17 2 1% 1%— M 

95 1M 1% 1%— M 
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211 13% 13ft 13ft— M 
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332 10% 10M I0W — % 
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679 I0M 10W 10W— ft 
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386 14% 13 Mft +1 
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142 5 4M 5 + M 

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97 33ft 33% 32% 


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21 8% 
24 6 
44 14% 
12 19M 
220 
139 15ft 
182 25*k 
1636 3*k 
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120 38% 
388 8% 
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38 38 — M 

BW 8% 
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9W 9M— M 
101k 16% 

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18ft + % 

33ft + ft 

BM + M 
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3% 

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79 1% 
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32ft 31% 32 
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111 

To 


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TIT. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1985 


Page 11 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


■c : t «;• 

s. ' 


i ■ :: • jfS 

■ s' 

: j* .* ■ 


i-n. It, 


■ • •- - ~- 
: . : •>. 


Gticorp Net Rises 30% 
In Quarter, 3% for Year 


The AssocuMed Pros 

NEW YORK — Citicorp, the 
largest U-S- banking company, has 
reported a 30-percent increase in 
fourth-quarter profits while Manu- 
facturers Hanover Corp.. ranked 
No. 4, posted a 2 3- percent gain. 

Crocker National Corp.. which 
had said two weeks ago it expected 
to post a large loss for the fourth 
quarter because of provisions it 
planned to make for potential loan 
losses, reported a quarterly loss of 
5216.1 million and a yearly loss of 
$324.4 million. 

Security Pacific Corp., the eighth 
largest U.S. bank-holding compa- 
ny, reported a 13-percent profit in- 
crease for the final three months of 
1984, and No. 9 Bankers Trust New 
York Corp. had a 19-percent in- 
crease. 

Another large banking company. 
Wells Fargo A Co., said its earn- 
ings in the quarter rose 10 percent. 

The double-digit gains, analysts 
say. stem partly from declining in- 
terest rates, which reduced banks' 
costs of obtaining loanable funds. 

Most banks reported sizeable 
gains from trading in bonds and 
foreign exchange. The bond market 
rallied and the dollar strengthened 
during the quarter. 

Finally, some banks received 
overdue interest payments from 
Argentine creditors, who reached 
an agreement during the period for 
more loans. 

“The results were generally pret- 
ty good," said Stephen Berman, 
who follows bank stocks for the 
investment firm l_F. Rothschild, 
Unterberg, Towbin. 

Citicorp, parent of Citibank, the 
nation’s second largest bank after 
Bank of America, said its fourth- 
quarter profit rose to 5261 million, 
or $1.90 a share, up from $201 
million, or $1.41 a share, a year 
earlier. 

For the full year, Citicorp posted 
earnings of $890 million, up 3 per- 
cent from S860 milli on in 1983. 
Per-share earnings rose to $6.36 
from $6. 16 in 1983. 

The banking company said its 
results reflected particularly strong 
performances in its domestic cor- 
porate and consumer businesses 
and a rebound in revenue from 
securities trading. 

It said these gains were offset 
somewhat by continuing high-lev- 
els of problem loans to foreign 
creditors, mainly in Latin America, 
and expected losses for the year 
from its new savings and loan net- 
works in Florida and Illinois. 

Citicorp made a provision for 
possible loan losses of $141 millimi 
in the fourth quarter, up from $134 


million a year earlier. Its loan loss 
reserve rose to $592 million, or 1.01 
percent of year-end commercial 
loans, from $540 million, or 0.90 
percent of loans, at the end of 1 983. 

Citicorp said its assets rose 12 
percent to SI 50.6 billion from 
$134.7 billion at the end of 1983. 
Figures for deposits at Citibank 
were unavailable. 

Meanwhile, Manufacturers Han- 
over said its fourth-quarter profit 
rose to $106.2 million from $86 3 
million a year earlier. Per-share 
earnings rose only to $2.14 from 
$2.13, reflecting issuance of new 
common stock and higher pre- 
ferred stock dividend requirements 
associated with its acquisition of 
CIT Financial Corp. earlier in the 
year. 

For the year, the company re- 
ported net income of $332.5 mil- 
lion, up 4.6 percent from $337 mil- 
lion a year earlier. Per-share 
income fell to $7.12 from $8.37 a 
year earlier. 

The company is the parent of the 
nation’s fourth largest bank. Man- 
ufacturers Hanover Trust Co. 


LIS. Car Sales 
At 19-Year High 
In Early January 

Los Angela Times Sen-ice 

DETROIT — Domestic U.S. 
automakers have reported that 
sales in the first 10 days of 1985 
rose 12 percent from a year ear- 
lier, to a 19-year high for the 
period. 

Analysts said (he strong per- 
formance indicates that the 
auto sales boom of the past two 
years still is not running out of 
steam. But they cautioned that 
10-day results often show wide 
swings 

The six U.S. auto producers 
said they sold 190,869 cars in 
the Jan. 1-10 period this year, 
compared to 149,136 in the 
same period of 1984. The indus- 
try’s sales of 23,859 cars per day 
were the best for early January' 
since 1966, when a record 
28,922 new cars were sold. 
Them were eight selling days in 
early January (his year and sev- 
en last year. 

On a’ seasonally adjusted ba- 
sis, the early-January sales pace 
equaled an annual rate of 9.1 
million cars. 


Phillips Petroleum Seeking 
To Raise Up to $1.5 Billion 


By David A. Vise 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Phillips Pe- 
troleum Co. is quiedy seeking to 
raise up to $1.5 billion in the pri- 
vate-placement market in what is 
believed to be the second-largest 
offering of its kind ever. 

The company is raising the mon- 
ey in connection with its proposed 
financial restructuring, which 
would increase its debt by several 
billion dollars. Under the terms of 
the restructuring, which has not yet 
been approved by stockholders. 
Phillips would replace about one- 
third of the company's common 
stock with several billion dollars of 
debt. 

Under the plan, about 32 million 
common shares would be sold by 
the company to a new employee 
stock-ownership plan for an esti- 
mated $1.6 turnon. Analysts said 
Tuesday that the “hash-hush” pri- 
vate placement could be used to 
finance the employee stock-owner- 
ship plan. 

The recapitalization plan was de- 
vised late last month in connection 
with Phillips' repurchase of stock 
held by Mesa Partners, an investor 
led by T. Boone Pickens Jr„ 
agreed to end its threatened 


takeover of the company. The Pick- 
ens group earned a profit estimated 
at $89 million by selling its Phillips 
slock back to the company in a 
separate transaction that did not 
require stockholder approval. 

The $!-5-biHion private place- 
ment is bong handled by Morgan 
Stanley & Co. and Fust Boston 
Corp., according to Corporate Fi- 
nancing Week, the Wall Street 
newsletter that reported the unusu- 
al financing earlier this week. Beth 
Selby, managing editor of the 
newsletter, said the offering was 
the second-largest ever. She said 
the largest private placement oc- 
curred about 10 years ago when 
Standard Oil Co. of Ohio raised 
slightly more money. 

There are several reasons that 
Phillips may have chosen to raise 
the money privately. The private 
placement could be cheaper, or 
quicker, or easier, because it re- 
quires less disclosure than a public 
offering. Alternatively, it is possi- 
ble that the private placement was 
the only way to raise the amount at 
comparable rates. Phillips securi- 
ties are expected to be severely 
downgraded because of the in- 
creased level of debt that would be 
on the balance sheet if stockholders 
approve the restructuring. 


Du Pont Offers New Plastic for Cars 


By Warren Brown 

Washington Past Service 

Washington — Du Pont 
Co. introduced Tuesday a new 
family of plastics designed to elimi- 
nate exterior sheet metal on most 
cars produced after 1995. 

Du Pont said the plastics would 

lower the weight and increase tbe 

fuel efficiency of new cars signifi- 
cantly. It also would cut automak- 
ers' tooling costs by reducing the 
need for expensive metal presses — 
many of which cost millions of dol- 
lars but are only capable of stamp- 
ing one kind of metal part in one 
specific way. 

Du Font officials said that their 
new nylon polymer resins, a group 
of seven that will be marketed un- 
der the name Bexloy C, could cut 
20 percent from the current costs of 
producing exterior auto parts such 
as bumpers and door panels. An 
auto company with factories espe- 
cially built to use the new plastics 
could realize even greater produc- 
tion-cost savings. Du Pom officials 
said. 

“Tbe mission of this family of 
engineering plastics simply is to re- 
place steel on the outside of the car 
from front to rear.'' said Lany Gil- 
lespie, director of Du Font's engi- 
neering plastics program. 


“This new material will provide 
the public with a lighter-weight, 
corrosion-proof car: and it will give 
automotive engineers greater free- 
dom of design,” Mr. Gillespie said. 

Plastic car bodies are not new, 
kit car companies have sold them 
for years. General Motors Cotp.’s 
expensive sports machine, the 
Chevrolet Corvette, entered the 
U.S. market in 1953 as the nation’s 
first “all-plastic” car. GM in- 
creased its use of plastics in 1983 
with the introduction of the Ponti- 
ac Fiero, a small two-seater that 
has a high-strength steel frame cov- 
ered with bolted-on plastic panels. 

Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler 
Corp. also are using plastics in ex- 
terior applications, as are Japan's 
auto leaders, Toyota Motor Coip. 
and Honda Motor Co. For exam- 
ple. Honda’s new two-seater, the 
CRX. has plastic bumpers and low- 
er-body panels. 

But the Bexloy C plastics are a 
generation ahead of those now used 
in auto production. Du Pont offi- 
cials said. 

“The technology of the plastics 
found on tbe Fiero. for example, 
was developed in the mid-1970s, 
when the Fiero was still on the 
drawing boards,” said Louis Col- 


lier, a Du Font automotive sales 
business manager. (Du Pont creat- 
ed some of the Kero's plastics.) He 
said the company’s new group of 
Bexloy resins have been under de- 
velopment since 1981 

The new Du Pont resins are ther- 
moplastics , which means they can 
withstand the kind of extremely 
high temperatures found in auto 
paint ovens, according to Du Pont 
and auto industry officials. The car 
parts made with Bexloy resins will 
be injecticm-molded-essentiaUy, a 
process of pumping melted plastic 
into a mold and that quick-freez- 
ing the mold to get the component 
shape. 

According to latest available in- 
dustry figures, plastics accounted 
for 230 pounds of the total material 
weight of a U ^.-produced car in 
1984. Plastics will make up 233 
pounds of the total this year. 

By comparison, steels of various 
strengths accounted for 1.090 
pounds of the material weight of 
the average U.S.-made car built last 
year, ana will make up 1,106 
pounds of tbe average domestic car 
produced in 1985. 

Aluminum also is gainin g use as 
a weight-saving material in auto 
production. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Airbus Industrie has signed a pre- 
liminary agreement with China for 
five A3 10 planes for delivery this 
year and next, according to sources 
in Paris. China originally bad in- 
tended to buy only three. 

BAT Industries PLCs offer of 
£664 million ($744 million) for 
Hambro Life Assurance PLC has 
been cleared by the British govern- 
ment, and the bid will not be re- 
ferred to the monopolies commis- 
sion. the Department of Trade and 
Industry said Wednesday. 

Panarfian Press, the country’s 
largest news wire service, is pur- 
chasing its only competitor. United 
Press Canada, UPCs parent com- 
pany. Toronto Sun Publishing 
Corp.. has announced. No finan- 
cial terms were disclosed in the 
sale, which is effective Jan. 31. 
UPC clients will receive news ser- 
vices through CP. 

Canon Inc plans to expand its 
subsidiary. Canon Bretagne SA, in 
Lissre, France, and make it the 
company's European office-equip- 
ment production center in 1988. 
The expansion is to start this year, 
when the plant begins producing 
electronic typewriters, ahead of the 
previously planned start-up in 
spring 1986. he said. 

Fotomat Corp. has signed an 
agreement with Kooishiroku Photo 
Industry Co. of Japan that will help 
it refinance its operations. Tlie 


company said Konishiroku mil in- 
vest $10 million in cash and ex- 
change its $13.5-milljcm debenture 
outstanding to common stock. 

Frontier Airlines has reached 
agreement with five unions on a 
package of wage cuts and work 
rules changes that will offer savings 
or $2.5 million a mouth for the 
company, meeting the parent com- 
pany’s condition for going ahead 
with a proposed employee stock 
ownership program. The pact stiO 
must be ratified by the unions’ 
members. 

International Paper Co. reported 
a loss in the fourth quarter of $74 
million, in contrast with a profit of 
S68.7 million, or $125 a share, a 
year ago. Sales were level with the 
previous year at $1.1 billion. The 
loss had been expected, because of 
a previously announced charge tak- 
en to cover expected losses. 

jCnutsen O.Ais. Shipping AS has 
won a contract for 1.8 billion Hong 
Kong dollars ($230 million) to 
charter two shuttle tankers to Nor- 
way's state-owned oil company, 
StatoiL The JO-year charter will be- 
gin in mid- 1 986, it said. 

NEC Corp. has won an order for 
four computer systems, worth a to- 
tal of about 4.6 billion yen ($18 
million), from the Indian govern- 
ment's National Informatics Cen- 
ter, an NEC spokesman said 


Factory- Automation Firm 

In U.S. Sought by Siemens 


International Herald Tnbune 

FRANlCFURT —Siemens AG. 
West Germany’s leading electron- 
ics group, is a top contender in a 
takeover bid for a major U.S. mak- 
er of factory-automation equip- 
ment. The U.S. company, Allen- 
Bradiey Co. of Milwaukee, has 
annual sales of nearly 1 billion 
Deutche marks (about S312 mil- 
lion), a Siemens spokesman said 
Wednesday. 

Several major U.S. companies 
were also reportedly interested in 
buying Allen- Bradley. Morgan 
Stanley, the New York investment 
bank, is overseeing the privately 
held company’s plan to sell some or 
all of its shares. Bids for the sale 
closed Tuesday. 

Werner Osd. a Siemens spokes- 
man, declined to comment on de- 
tails of his company's bid. Mr. Osel 
said be expect Allen-Bradiey. a pri- 


vately held company, to reach a 
decision before the end of the 
month. 

Alien-Brad] ey's West Germany 
subsidiary, located in Haan, near 
Diisseldorf. competes with Siemens 
and has estimated sales of 60 mil- 
lion DM. 

A spokesman at Federal Cartel 
Office in Berlin said that it would 
take a “very close look" at the im- 
plications of the takeover because 
of Siemens's domination of the do- 
mestic market for factory-automa- 
tion equipment. 

Siemens is interested in acquir- 
ing Allen-Bradiey to gain ground in 
tbe fast-growing U.S. factory-auto- 
mation market. Siemens is particu- 
larly attracted io AU en-Brad ley's 
electronic-control technology, an 
area in which Siemens is also ac- 
tive. 


Analysts Look to 'Little Guy’ 


Wednesday. Delivery will be com- 
pleted by the end of November 
1985. 

North Sea Sun 03 Co., a subsid- 
iary of Sun Ctx, said Tuesday (hat a 
North Sea weD tested al the rate of 
3.500 bands a day of high-quality 
crude. Tbe well is about a mile 
north of the Glamis structure in the 
British sector of the North Sea. 
Marathon Petroleum Ireland Ltd. 
said it abandoned a well in the 
Celtic Sea off Ireland. 

OBn Corp. said Wednesday that 
it has agreed in principle to sell its 
Ecusta cigarette paper and fine 
printing paper business to a com- 
pany being formed by First Boston 
Corp. for about $130 million. It 
said it will have a 20-percent inter- 
est in the new company and Ecusta 
management will be offered a stock 
interest Olin said in 1984 Ecusta 
had net income from paper opera- 
tions of about $12 million on sales 
of $185 milli on. 

Texas Petroleum Got. a subsid- 
iary of Texaco Inc„ has signed a 
contract with Empress Colom- 
biana de Petroieos. the national oil 
company of Colombia, to explore 
and devdop an area called Rio 
Meta in central Colombia. The 
agreement provides for an explora- 
tion period of six years and a devel- 
opment period of 22 years after 
disco very. 


(Continued from Plage 9) 
ing short-term trading. They get in 
one week and go out the next." 

Geneva-based Henisch & Cie. is 
emphasizing stock picking rather 
than market timing as 1985 un- 
folds, according to Eric Demole, 
partner to charge of research. 

“We want to avoid the stocks 
that go haywire, the ones that can 
severely undercut portfolio perfor- 
mance," he said. This means big 
capitalization issues other than cy- 
clical*. where earnings visibility is 
high. Because of their size and fat 
these companies can cut costs and minds.” 


laifw real advantage of the new dis- 
inflationary environment-" 

As for the overall slock market, 
he warned; “Beware the consen- 


sus. 

“Presently, the consensus again 
appears bullish." he said. “But 
some analysts are beginning to 
back off from this view. Perhaps 
now too many people are becoming 
contrarians to the consensus. This 
year, trying hard to be a contrarian, 
you could be fooled. The exercise is 
becoming very subtle. I think inves- 
tors just nave to make up their own 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, are in local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated 


United States 

Allied Benesh ares 
4th osar. 1984 ms 

Mel Inc. 31-0 £4 

Per Share 0.75 0X3 

Year 1984 IKS 

Net me. 118-8 10X2 

Per Shore 2JS9 153 

19n results restated. 

AMR 

eoevar. im no 

Revenue 1050. 12M, 

Nel Inc — _ ZLSB 11X5) 

Per Shore 137 227 

Tear DM IK) 

Revenue SJ50. 4,7o0. 

Nel Inc 23188 227X7 

Per Share 4X7 4.79 

rear nets Include gain of 
HO million vs provision re- 
versal of SOS million from dis- 
posal of aircraft. 1963 nets in- 
clude oolns or HU million In 
auarter and of SS3 million in 
rear from sale al las tena- 
nts. Per shore results alter 
pre ferred dividends 


Year 1M4 IKS 

net inc. 54.9 4X7 

Per Share — 4X1 *J9 

Per share results odiusied 
tor 5 % slock dividend in Dec 
MKL 

Pst American 

1784 1H3 

9.71 749 

Ijfll AS3 


4th Qaar. 

Net inc 

Per Share-. 
Year 

Net Inc 

Per Share — 


1784 1983 

32.4 2tO 
344 182 


Comerica 


4lhOear. 
Nel inc — — 
Prr Shore — , 


1*84 1*83 

1S2 1U 

no 0-93 


Harris Bankcorp 

emouar. 1784 1783 

Net Inc 1127 6X8 

Per Share IS* IJB 

Year 1784 1783 

Net inc 41.2 31.2 

Per Share — 6.19 4.71 

Insilco 

4ltiQuar. 

Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Shore — 

Year 

Revenue — 

Nef Inc — 

Per Share 


1983 
1814 
4.* 
040 
1983 
674.3 
34j 
147 

7»*J rear per share in- 
eludes gam of 33 cents tram 
sole os securities. 


1104 

18X9 

rji 

042 

1984 

78X9 

3X0 

1.91 


Jay Mfg 

let Boar. 178S 1984 

Revenue 180-0 126./ 

Nel inc 54 5.7 

Per Share — 0JI OJi 

Kaiser Alum. 

4th Boar. 1984 1983 

Revenue B7&3 72115 

Nel Inc . (0)27.8 42 J) 

Per Share — — X97 

Year 1981 1983 

Revenue lisa 24*0- 

Net LOSS — 5X9 74.9 

a: loss. Nets include lav 
credit of MSS million vs pro- 
vision of SftJ million In quar- 
ter and credits ol 888 million 
vs SlOil million in year. Nets 
also Include loss of St million 
m /«7 auarter and tosses at 
81. > million vs S39J million in 
year, oil from discontinued 
operations 

Maryland Natl 

4lh Quar. 1984 1983 

Nel inc 1117 10.2* 

Per Share — 143 134 

Year 1*84 1983 

Nel Inc -11-03 3X83 

Per Shore— 801 489 


Do you make the best possible 

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i 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1985 


Wednesdays 


VoL at 3 PJW. 

.NJL 

Pm.lPH vnl 

.unw 

Prev. cansolMatEd dose 

9/mm 


Tables Include me nationwide prices 
UP to the closing on Wall Street 


LIS 

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53 

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246— ft 




IS 

132 

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14 

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1 

99 

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8 

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10 

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121 

76 Telonfs 

JOe J 

87 

150zll9ft11Bft 119ft 

* 

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53 

33 

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1156 

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12 

3 

4 Vi 

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Wft 

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11 

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5 

4474 

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10ft 

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391 64 

5 

72 

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22V. 

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38 

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8 

324 

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24 

41 

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07 TelEdPf 14-9 


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56 TolEdpf 1000 143 


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104 

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2 

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239 

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36ft 

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316 

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19 

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international herald tribune* Thursday, January it, i985 


Page 13 


13 Vflteh 
Hten lu*. Steel 


Civ tW PE 


&h 

UDsHlUDLan 


Cane 

Oust CW 


23ft IS UnlvRu 
10 9ft unvPnt 


00# 4.7 7 13 17 14ft 16ft + ft 

131 12ft 13 19 + ft 


10 

20ft 

21ft 

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17ft 

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101* 

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59 

7ft 

12ft 

Uft 


9ft VST n 
151* VnltrR 
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lift vermt 
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44ft Vbfnfl 
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1.92 

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19 20ft 
37 4ft 
693 12 
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10 5716 
1 7 


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15ft 


9ft 9ft + ft 
301* tfft + ft 
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20ft 20ft- ft 
41* Aft— ft 
lift lift- 1* 
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7ft + ft 
« +ft 
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7ft 

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NEW HIGHS 47 


bknsinaa 

□opavCarp 

aillartlS 

Greiner 

HovnanEjil 

MavIlwrCp 

Obion 

PGE22SML 

PowwTW 

RvkoH 

Spectra 

Vahtpar $ 


AihnCpwt 

Delated 


Brown For a 

vIContAIr 

FoottilllGP 

Gunrt&Cti 

Ionics 

NYTtmea 

PGE13SP1E 

PGE24flolK 

PoSPLOtC 

5DJe4 40pf 

TexosAlrCp 

WstnHIttin 


atttMHId 
vIContAIr pt 
FordCang 
Gultstr ud 
L ourenCaon 
OdetlcsAn 
PGE lOBOpfY 
Poacppf 
PflSPLpfD 
ScnvloseW 
Unicom PfS 
WlwtiseErrts 


ClhrGas Fla 
CojmoOvn 
FrlsctaRst J 
Hein Worn 
Lett Press 
OdntlcsBs 
PGE1 V4pfM 
Pormnl Pko 
Rockunnavs 
SeabrdCp 
Unity Buy 


NEW LOWS 


Barudi Post Bawvallev Demon Cm 
Sceptre Rsn T moiPcHwt 


The Daily Source for 
lat amatioial Investors. 




Season Saasm 
Hhjti Low 


Open Hiflti Low Case Cho- 


Grains 


WHEAT !CBn 
SjOOObu ml nlrtWm-do( tarsi 


404 

1374* 

Mar 

154 

355ft 

351ft 

153ft —00ft 

405 

302ft 


306ft 

307ft 

305 

306 


3.90 

307ft 

Jul 

US 

305ft 

1*N 

134ft 

—00 ft 

306ft 

3JB*. 


007 

3L07 

135 

305 

—00ft 

303ft 

337ft 

Ok 

306to 

307V. 

306 

306 


304ft 

303 

Mot 




309 



Prev.SoMs UJ84 
Pr*w. Day Open IW. 40473 aft 690 


CORN CCETJ 

sjnatM minimum- dottars per budiH 


305ft 

265 

Mar 

271ft 

273ft 

271 

308 

202ft 


278ft 

207 

UI 

276ft 

Jul 

209 

280ft 

209 

301ft 

270ft 

Sep 

204 

20446 

27346 

355 

245 

Dec 

249 

270 

248ft 

3.10 

- 335ft 

Mar 

20*ft 

280 

209 

121ft 

202 

May 286 

287 

285ft 


271ft +JW16 
277ft +004* 
229ft +0OT* 
£741* +J001* 
£49 +001* 

2791* 4001* 
206 -4ID» 


Est.Sates Prev. Sales U0O3 

Prev.DavOpaaim.l3&6P up 1758 

SOYBEANS ICBTJ 
5A00 bu mini mum- dollars per bushel 
779 537ft Jan 500ft 5091* &03ft $06 401ft 


7.90ft 5j»ft Mar 500 

777 501ft MOV AW 

7.99 . A91» Jul A 19 

7-56 575 Aim *21 

ATT A95 Sen All 

577 Nov 4.12 


£$$ 


579ft 5721* 5.94ft 400ft 
All 604 604ft +001* 

A2H6 iJJft 615ft +0016 
*01 6.16ft 617ft 

612ft 609 609 

-- 614ft 609ft 611 +4MH6 

610 Jan *04ft 634ft 623 (,33V. t-0|H* 

742 474 Mar 639 6® 627ft 637ft 

Est sales Prev. Sales 20006 

Prev. Dov Open inL 68013 uooiJ 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBTI 
wa tons- dollars per tan 

13400 Jan 1000 14300 14170 142.10 
»90O 14610 Mar 14700 14&00 14680 14670 

205.00 14500 May 152.70 IS3J0 15100 15200 

19*50 15070 Jul 157 JD 15070 15*50 15720 

%00 15270 Alia 15900 1S90O 158J0 15B2B 

U950 15400. Sep 16100 16100 1®J8 15970 

18050 M5JD Oct 15970 159-50 159 JO 15” JO 

U40O 142J8 Dec 14400 16600 14500 16650 

Est Sotos Prev. Sales AJ09 

PiYv. Day Open lid. 35082 cH72D 


+.10 

4.10 


+70 

+70 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBTI 

W0OO rta- dottars per TflOite. 


3050 

2205 

Jan 

2434 

2425 

2525 

2407 

+03 

2X95 


9*40 

2540 

2502 

2528 

—.12 

9B.10 

2200 


2420 

£2 

2405 

2400 

—.14 



Jul 

2405 

2455 

2440 

—08 




2405 


2400 

2400 

—05 

2505 

2350 


2405 

2405 

3425 

—OS 

3400 

2X90 

Oct 

2400 

24JM 

2408 

2400 


2405 

2290 

Dec 

2305 

2305 

2170 

2170 

—JOB 


Est Sales Pr»w. Sole* 9007 

Prev. Day Open (nf. 36973 oft 437 


Company Earnings 

Revenue ond proiit& in millions, ore in loco! 
currencies unless otherwise indicated 

(Other Earnings on Page II) 


United Stoles 


Republic N.Y. 

4th Our. IfM 1983 

fiennrnlHedric Kef Inc 2&I3 21.98 

ViHHHiim ciecir^ persnam — 173 174 

•' ethQuar. W l«3 y 

Revenue 7.«fi0- 7031 

Net Inc - — 4530 

Pc ^^” re — Jfj Per share results otlm- pre- 

Nel Inc —— 2JRS. aOW. 

Per Snore 503 445 

Omftan naumd. 


1904 1983 

5790 MBt lnc - *6B 84 *7 

12? Pmr Short — . 649 507 


Marina Midland Neinrt 


AthQuor. 1984 

Net lnc 297 

Per Share 101 

Year 1984 INI 

Net lnc 1865 10U 

Per Share— 501 405 Year 

1VS4 nets IrKtude main of tt* Net lnc 

mmtoit Oinrtor nets fncMe per Share — 
taw provisions at *67 million 
vs S17 million. 


Security Pacific 

4ih Qaar. 1M4 ten 

Net Inc — - 797 700 

Per Shore — 109 076 

19M 1901 

._ »I0 

MM pw Share — 196 301 

Z?3 Per share results odJuKetf 
tj9 for 2-tor- 1 suM. 

South Trust 

1W TJJB 
345 277 

008 800 


Moors fin. 



1984 

1983 

Net Inc. __ 
Per snare 

IS 

BM 

009 

Year 

198* 

1983 

Net lnc. 

PfrShara 

328 

200 

205 

Morton 

Thiokot 


1985 

1984 


6495 

404/ 


W 04 


Qaer Share— 

058 

007 

1st Half . 

1985 

1984 

Revenue 

ms 

8141 


5951 

Hi IS 

Oxer Shore— 

1.16 

aw 


State St Boston 

4fh Qaar. 1984 1» 

Net Inc lira 1170 

Per Share — 179 1-18 

Year 1V84 1981 

Net lnc. — ^-£1 3J9* 

Per Store — Ut 645 

Year nett toctodt gain a t 
at million from drtwwJMop 
of notions w/a» of, *35 mil- 
lion from sale of umls. 

Texas Oil 4 Gas 

1st Ouar. WpS 

55ffr: ^ 


Pacific Lighting 

1M4 1983 

1750. 1700 
457 418 

1.14 7J0 

1984 1W 
4780 4J90. 

1380 105 

156 408 


4fh Qaar. 

Revenue 

Netinc 

Per Share 

Year 

Revenue 

Nei Inc 

Per Share— 


U.S. Trust 

4th Ot»r. HM 

Net Inc 401 JjX 

per Share— 171 007 

Year 19M 1« 

Net lnc 

Per snare— 


1984 year ntl excludes 
•rrile^lfol MO million. 


Paricer H tmn ifin 


2nd Qaar. 

Revenue 

Net Inc 

Per Shore — 
lit Hall 
Revenue — 
Net inc — - 
Per Shore— 


Wang labs 

1985 1WJ 
6100 5154 

563 <ra 
(MO 075 
1985 1984 

1,160 937.4 

1077 • 867 

076 0*3 


2nd Qckt. 

Revenue 

Net lnc 

Per snore— 
1st HoH 
Revenue — 

Net inc 

Per Short— 


1985 

3499 

m 

671 

ms 

lai 

U1 


161 

053 

1984 

« 

009 


AthOuor. 
net Inc — — 
per snore — 
Year 

Net me 

per Shore— 


Welb Fargo 

1984 1983 

46$ 405 

L« 104 

iim im 

1690 1569 

405 *03 


Senean 5nm 
High Low 


Open High Law Close Che. 


OATS (CBTI 

5000 bumbiUnunv- dollars per bushel 
1.96ft 173 Mar 17ST* 175ft 17+U 174ft 

1.91 171 MOV 172ft 173ft 172ft 172ft 

178ft 109 JUt 109ft 109ft 109ft 109ft 

179 105ft SOP 106ft 106ft 106ft 106ft +0Oft 

102ft 108ft DOC 10«ft 108ft 108ft 108ft 

EiL Solas Prev. Sola 793 

Prev. Day Open Hit. 1573 up 60 


Livestock 


CATTLE (OWE) 

40000 Itosrconl* Perth. 

67.5B - 4200 Feb 6575 6575 

6172 6140 Apt 67-25 6700 

4637 6&0O JlOl 67 JO 6770 

6*45 63.15 Aua 6550 0572 

65.10 6109 OcT 6300 CAM 

4500 4300 DOC 6M3 6515 

EM. Boles 1*972 Pmv.Soles 16199 
Prev. Day Oaen int. 5&1D8 off 212 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMS) 

44000 lbs- cents pot ttx. 

7200 4575 Jan 7100 73iB 

7305 4575 Mar TUB 7305 

7200 6703 Aar 7105 7200 

7005 4695 May 7U5S 7U90 

7170 6*60 Aug 7J-W 24“ 

7100 6700 SOP 3405 71.10 

70.10 47.10 Oct 69.90 70.15 

Est. Sales 1755 Prev. Sales 2021 
Prev. Dav Open M. A990 op 307 
HOGS (CMBI 

.m®sa lbs.- cants oer lb. 

58J0 4707 Feb 5200 5230 

5405 4Sl 10 Apr 49.10 4930 

5500 48.4V JUfl 5402 5*38 

55J7 4675 Jul 505 5405 

54-37 47 JO Aug S08 5300 

5175 4500 OCt 49JJS <900 

9005 4430 pec 4935 4905 

4970 4*25 Feb 49MD 4905 

4735 4575 Apr 

Est Sales 9,904 Prev. Sales 9790 
Prev. Day Open im. 26388 up 5*4 

PORK BELLI E5 (CME) 

300001b*- cents per lb. 

BIAS 40.95 Fee 7225 7300 

8130 40.10 Men- 7300 7377 

8200 41.15 MOV 74« 7535 

8207 42.15 Jul 7*30 7*50 

B8.65 6030 Alto 74-00 7405 

75.15 43.15 Feb 6605 6605 

73.40 &oa Mar 4*50 6*50 

Est Sales 9,919 prev. Sale* M» 
Prev. Day Open int. 13397 up 527 


65.10 6532 

6*95 67.17 

67.10 4732 

4*25 4537 

M SI 4157 
4655 4405 


7100 7335 
7270 7207 
7175 7175 
70.40 7007 

70.95 7095 
7070 7060 
4970 69.95 


SI 00 5105 
4060 4807 

5307 5175 
54J0S 54-12 
5205 52.90 
4877 4805 

4905 49.17 

4900 4900 


—.15 

=:?S 

-33 

—35 


—07 


—30 

—30 

+.15 

+.15 


7100 7100 

7232 7232 

7307 7307 

7473 7480 

7115 73.15 
6605 6600 
6*10 6610 


—200 
— 2.00 
—158 
—1.92 
—135 
-00 
—00 


Metals 


PLATINUM 

SO troy eu ddtors per t™ ac ^ 

27*00 27*00 26900 274.70 +100 


27950 28100 77600 MOJO +1J» 
28580 <n 28400 2BA0O +100 


AW 

jul 

JW. 29100 29100 29100 293*0 +100 
Prev. sales 1319. 
prev day's open ini 14JD6 oft 30. 


Season 

High 


Season 

Low 


Open High Low Close Cha. 


PALLADIUM 
UN tray an dollars per oi 


Jan 
Mar 
Jon 
SeP 
Dec 
Mar 

Est sates 587. prev. sales 338. 
Prev day's open Int 6736 up 4* 


11*00 11400 1K00 1140$ 
114.90 11*75 11400 1140$ 
11400 11500 11400 11410 
11375 11435 11300 11135 
11400 11400 11300 11200 
112.10 


-30 

+05 

+00 

+35 

+.10 

+.10 


industrials 


LUMBER (CMC) 

13O0OObd.tt.-speri0Oabd.il. 

22000 13930 Nta t 1(000 16*50 16610 16*40 

747-45 May 17230 17130 171^ 17270 

IS3JH Jul 17630 17700 17530 17700 

15700 SeP 17800 57800 17700 17800 

16700 Nov 17800 17930 17880 17900 

175.00 Jan 15205 

173.03 Mar 38500 


22*00 

231100 

19700 
18*10 
18700 
1 19500 ■ 

Esl. Sales 


—30 

—.90 

-30 

+.10 

+30 


1313 Prrv. Sales 3J94 


Prev. Day Open Hit. 10374 up 372 


Stack Indexes 


(Humes compiled shortly before market ctosel 
5P COMP. INDEX I CME) 
potnl sand cents 

1 BO-25 15330 Mar 17300 17430 17235 1730$ 

18030 15*10 Jun 17*40 17730 17S3S 17605 

183.90 16000 Sep 1 7900 I B0-20 17900 18B2JJ 

101.90 17*70 Dec 18230 18230 18730 M130 

Est- Sales Prev.Snles 730$o 

Prev. Dnv Open int. 46094 up 1330 
VALUE LINE (KCBT1 
paints ond cents 

19600 168.10 Mar 18930 19145 18930 19100 

19740 17300 Jun 193.15 19400 193.15 19400 

19700 18575 Sep 19*60 19*60 19600 19600 

Eat. Sales Prev.Snles 4003 

Prev. Day Oaen int. *949 off J7 


+05 

+05 

+1.10 


+140 

+100 

+30 


Commodity indexes 


Moody's. 
Reuters. 

D_i. Futures. 


Close Previous 

9*100 1 963.101 

1.981.10 1J91.10 

NA. 124.91 

Com. Research Bureau- NA 245.00 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; i - final 
Reuters ; hose 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 

Dow Jones ; base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


CBT: Chicago Board of Trade 

CME: Ciilmoa Mercantile Exchange 

IMM: International Monetary Market 

Of Chicago Mercantile E» change 
NY CSCE; New YorJi Cocoa Sugar. Coffee Exchange 

NYCE: New York Cotton txctiorvgr 

COMEx: Cammcdlhr Exchange, New York 

NYME-. New York Mcrconllle Exchange 

KCBT: Kansas City Board of Trade 

NYFE: New York Futures Exchange 



in the Trib. 


(Thursdays and 
Saturdays, too) 

Start your day 
with a smile with 

Art 

BuehwakL 


World Bank Expansion Is in Doubt 


By Hobart Rowen 

HtuhiHg/wi Post Service 

WASMNGTON - A.W. Ciau> 
sen. president of the World Bank, 
has told the bank's directors that he 
is postponing a plan to expand 
lending potential because of a 
sharp drop in Third World loan 
demand, according to bank 
sources. 

Mr. Clausen, whose efforts to 
expand the bank's lending ability 
have beat opposed by the Reagan 
administration, told the board the 
institution's loan commitments in 
fiscal (985 will fail about $2 billion 
below projections, the sources said 
Tuesday. The projections were 
made last fall at tbie annual joint 
meeting of the bank and the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund. 

The bank's loan commitments 
this year of approximately 511 bil- 
lion will also fall about 51 billion 
under the actual total Tor the year 
before. This is the first time since 
1967 that there has been a reversal 
in the bank's year-to-year growth 
in regular lending activity. 

Bank sources said that in re- 
sponse to a suggestion from board 


members disappointed with Mr. 
Gausen's plan, the staff is prepar- 
ing a paper for a February board 
meeting explaining the reasons for 
the unexpected loan surplus. 

Mr. Gauseti reportedly plans to 
pul off any suggestion for a capital 
increase ai least until the annual 
joint meeting with the IMF in 
Seoul in October. His original plan 
called for launching the project in 
April. 

Sources said the document cites 
several reasons for the sliding loan 
total, notably the inability or some 
countries to meet the bank's tests 
for credit and a retrenchment by 
others who learned a lesson from 
Third World nations that are mired 
in debt after too much borrowing. 

‘'Some of these countries are 
simply cutting back their own plans 
for development and economic ex- 
pansion," a bank official said. 

Bank sources said Mr. Clausen 
would have found it awkward to 
propose a capital increase a I a time 
when loan demand is falling. Origi- 
nally. the rationale for an increase 
was that it was urgently needed to 
sustain an annual S- to- 1 0-percent 
increase in bank lending. 


For the bank management, 
which has steadily battled for more 
resources, the declining loan-com- 
mitment figures are politically em- 
barrassing The UJS. government 
has ail along questioned the need 
for a capital increase. 

In effect. Mr. Gausen has been 
forced to admit that the existing 
560-billion capitalization can sus- 
tain the present level of loans — 
and something more — fora longer 
period. 

Just how long the bank can get 
along without a capital increase is a 
matter of debate within the bank. 
One source said the existing 560 
billion capital base — loans out- 
standing are about 540 billion — 
“can sustain annual commitments 
of £12 billion to £13 billion in per- 
petuity." 

The rule is that outstanding 
loans may not exceed the bank's 
capital. With money earned by 
bank investments — profits are at a 
record — and repayment of old 
loans, a 512 billion to S13 billion 
lending level can be maintained 
without a new infusion of capital, 
this source said. 


Accord Reached 

On Polish Debt. 

Untied Press liitenutivnui 

PARIS - Poland has 
reached agreement with 17 
Western creditor nations on a 
“major rescheduling" of about 
515 billion in public debts, the 
French Finance Ministry satd 
Wednesday. 

A statement said the agree- 
ment. reached after a^ two-day- 
meeting, was "major." but of- 
fered few details of the first 
breakthrough in more than a - 
year of talks on Poland’s debts. 
The meeting involved the group 
of Western nations known as 
the “Paris Club" whose mem- 
bers — in Western Europe. 
North America and Japan — 
hold public loans to the EasL 
bloc and Third World nations. 

Poland owes about 528 bil- 
lion to the West, more than half 
of it in loans issued by or guar- 
anteed by governments. Talks 
on rescheduling the debts were 
suspended for nearly two years 
after the imposition of martial 
law on Poland in 1981. 


Angola Moves to Rebuild Its Vital Coffee Trade 


(Continued from Page 9) 
weighing 60 kilos, or about 132 
pounds. This year exports are ex- 
pected to be 283.000 sacks. On the 
world scale. Angola has tumbled to 
about 26 th place. In contrast, the 
Ivory Coast is still among the top 
five. 

The difference is that the Ivory 
Coast eased smoothly into inde- 
pendence from France in 1960. An- 
gola's independence from Portugal 
in 1975 came amid the chaos' of a 
three-way civil war. A decade later, 
two of Angola's factions are still 
hauling for control and coffee 
trade is suffering. 

“We had 400 large estates, each 


ture for coffee, Augusto Caeiano 
Joao. said in an interview in Luan- 
da, the country’s capital. “The An- 
gola Coffee Institute used to have 
17 agronomists, now it has one. It 
used to have 50 middle-level per- 
sonnel. now it has 10." 

Once the coffee center of Ango- 
la, Uige is now a city of boarded up 
banks, virtually no commerce and 
dogs dozing in the side sLreets. The 
swimming pool formerly used by 
the Portugese is empty and crack- 
ing The Hotel Apollo is marked 
with a broken neon rocket, recall- 
ing the boom era that coincided 
with the ApoDo space program. In 
its restaurant, the coffee machine 


with their own trained agronomist has long been broken and instant, 
— they almost all left for Brazil," freeze-dried coffee is served. 
Angola's vice minister of agricul- Stories from the surrounding 


London Commodities 

Jon. 16 

Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil In US. dollars per metric ton. 
Gold In US. dollars per ounce. 


low Close 


Pro* tout 


High 
SUGAR 

Mar 131 00 12840 12900 12930 13100 13130 
13700 US-60 13500 13600 13830 13840 
14900 14600 14500 14630 14830 1400 
1S5JB8 15300 15300 15340 15500 15630 
N.T, N.T. 15900 16100 16200 16300 
17500 17540 175JBU 17600 17740 17800 
N.T. N.T. 18100 18100 18400 18400 
2038 toft Of SO tons. 

GASOIL 

Jan 21500 23200 23135 23235 21*50 23625 
23200 22900 22935 229.50 23400 23*35 
22*00 22200 22235 22200 22800 23800 
21935 21*00 21*00 31*75 22200 23225 
21700 21200 31200 21335 21900 22000 
31500 21500 211.00 21-lIB 21*00 71935 
N.T. N.T. 21000 21400 71500 21935 
N.T. N.T. 20900 21500 21200 225JM 
N.T. N.T. 20700 21*00 21035 22950 
3.939 lots of 100 Ions. 

GOLD 

Feb 30450 30150 38180 30430 30400 30450 
API 30760 30700 30750 30800 30730 30800 
122 loti of 1001 ray Oi 

Sour cos: Reuters ond London Petroleum Ex- 
change i gasoil l 


May 

Aug 

Oct 

Dec 

Mar 

May 


Feb 

Mar 

API 

Mav 

Jim 

Jlv 

Aua 

S*p 


London Metals Jan. 16 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Silver In pence per troy ounce. 


Today 

High grade copper cathodes : 
spat 1.18000 1.10850 
3 months 1300JD 130150 
Capper cathodes: 

SPOt 1.18600 1.18800 

3 months 1,19800 130800 
9.76000 937000 
939000 9.79500 
2S50O 35*00 


Previous 


1.19*00 1.19*50 
130850 1309 00 


Tin: spot 
J months 
Leafl:spof 
J months 
Zlnc:saol 
1 months 
5ffver:saa( 
3 months 
Aluminium: 
SPOt 

J man ms 


32600 32650 

71100 71400 

70*50 70700 

54200 54300 
5|pann 559 HO 


7.7W0O 

150700 

9.70500 

939500 

35500 

32950 

72500 

71800 

53800 

55100 


1.19500 

130900 

9.79000 

900000 

m« 

33000 

72*00 

71850 

53900 

55500 


9t*S0 96950 

100700 1,00*00 
Nicfc.et.soo1 *31500 *34000 
3 months 4J6500 436900 
Source: Reuters. 


96100 90200 

101000 101050 
434000 435000 
438500 439000 


S&P 100 Index Options 
Jan. 15 
Chicago Board 


Prior Jon 

Feb 

Mar 

Jon 

Feb 

Mar 



__ 

— 

— 

— 

1/16 


_ 


19ft 

1/16 

1/16 

3/16 




16 

1/1* 

to 

to 




11 

lri6 

7/16 

15/16 




/ft 

fell 

Ift 

7to 




4*6 

2 

Jft 

4to 

175 


1 s 

3 Y- 

6ft 

/to 

7ft 

180 

1/16 

7/16 

lft 

— 

— 

— 


Total cad volume 375504 
Total call men tail. 577339 
Total put volume 118277 
Total pat earn inL 39*258 
Inam: 

High 169.94 Low 16820 Clue 16*77 — 004 
Source; CBOE. 


Cash Prices Jan. 16 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Sonias. tt>~ 


PrlntCtattl 64730 30 ft. vd _ 

Steel billers ( Pltt.i. tan 

Iran 2 Fdrv. Phi la. tan 

Steel scrap No I hmr PIM. . 
Lead Spat, lb -■ 

Conner elect. lb 

Tin (straits), lb. 


Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb . 

Palladium, oi 

Silver N.Y- az 

Source; AP. 



Year 

wed 

Age 

108 

158 

0.78 

085 

47100 

45300 

21100 

21300 

79-80 

96+7 

10-23 

24-28 

6306 

6H4+6S 

60974 

42399 

005 

051 

115-117 

156ft 

409 

8075 


Because at technical problems, seme 
commodity prices are not oval table tar 
publication in mis edit Ian. 


Sultan of Brunei Buys 
Loudon*^ Dorchester 

Return 

LONDON — The Dorchester 
Hotel in London has been bought 
by the Sultan of Brunei from Re- 
gent International Hotels of Hong 
Kong for a price reported at more 
than £40 million (about $36 mil- 
lion). a Dorchester spokeswoman 
said Wednesday. 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 16 

Sugar lit French Francs per metric tan. 
Other figures in Francs per 100 kg. 



High 

Low 

Close 

ChUe 

SUGAR 





Mar 

1050 

1030 

1045 

1046 

+ 10 


1501 

1075 

1090 

1093 

+ B 


1585 

1565 

1580 

1585 

+ 18 

Oct 

1058 

1050 

1045 

1055 

— 5 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1025 

1045 

— 5 


1035 

1025 

1030 

1035 

Unch. 

Est. voL: 1021 lots of 50 tom. Prev. actual 


sales: 1446 lots. Open interest: 19320 
COCOA 


Mar 

Xtea 

1180 

2176 

7.183 

+ 4 


N.T. 

N.T. 

X190 

2195 

+ 1 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2180 

— - 


sen 

N.T 

N.T. 

2180 

— 

Unch. 

Dec 

N.T, 

N.T. 

2130 

_ 

+ 5 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2138 



+ 5 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2130 



+ 5 

Evt. voi.; 6 Ian of 10 tans. Prev. 

actual 


sales: 262 lots. Oaen inlerest; 769 
COFFEE 


Jon 

2535 

2515 

2525 

2545 

+ 37 

Mar 

w 

2521 

2530 

2531 

+, 5 

Mav 

N.T. 

2530 

2543 

+ 15 

& 

>/XF, 

2*™ 

2540 

2575 

+ 25 

T4.T. 

N.T. 

2546 

20M 

+ 26 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2555 

2-570 

+ 34 

Jan 

NT. 

N.T. 

2540 

— 

+ 18 


Est. voi.: 13 tots of 5 tans. Prev. actual 
soles: 5 lata Open Interest: 276 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 16 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Matavskm seals Per kilo 
date 

BU Ask 

Feb 19175 194J» 

Mar 19450 ita-SJ 

Apr 19850 IWjM! 

MOV 20150 20250 

Jun 20500 20700 

Volume: 32 lota 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 
Close 

Bid Ask 
R55 1 Feb_ 17435 174.75 

RSSIMar- 17435 17435 

R5S2 Feto- 16135 16235 

RS5 3 Feb- 15935 160.25 

RSS 4 Feb _ 1S23S 15405 

RSS 5 Feb_ 1*435 14*25 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


Previous 
BM AS* 
19535 19575 

19*50 19700 
19900 20000 
303 JO 20550 
20700 20900 


Previous 
BM ASk 
17500 17550 

17535 175.75 
16130 16250 

15950 16050 

15250 15450 

14430 Uo50 



date 


Previous 



Ask 

Bid 



1.130 

U90 

1.165 



1.130 

1.180 

1,160 

1,190 


1.125 

1.155 

1.160 



1.115 

1.155 

1.150 

1.180 



1.150 

1.140 




1.150 

1.130 




1.140 

1.120 



1090 

1040 

1.120 

1.160 

Jem — 

1090 

1030 

New 

~ 


Source : Reuters. 


DM Futures Options 
Jan. 16 

Cftiow Merumtile Eictam 
Vt. German MaVlfiJM motte arts pct mart; 


Cads-SetHe 


Pots- Settle 


Mar 

Joe 

Seal 

Mu- 

Jim 

Swl 


205 


ll 11 

037 

— 

CUD 

138 

— 

f 37 

003 

— 


DJO 

151 

0.91 

130 

U4 

117 

055 

092 

108 

1JU 

LS9 

006 

m3 

005 

255 

— 

— 

0 02 

027 

045 

353 


— 


JO 
31 
37 

33 

34 

35 

Estimated total vM. 3380 
Calls: Tues-voL 2597 open hrt. 29.18# 
Pats: Tues. veL 978 epea HU. 14.950 
Source.- CME. 


Dividends 


Jan. 16 




Company Per Amt Pay Roc 

STOCK SPLIT 

Security Pacific Carp — 2-Ior-l 
USUAL 

Amer Fletcher Ca Q 37 M 1-25 

Baldwin Sec O 08 3-1 7-1 

First Union Carp 0 38 3-15 2-15 

Gencorp Q 37 ft 2-28 2-6 

Honeywell Inc Q .47 ft 3-1B 2-28 

Kmart Corp Q Jl 3-11 2-22 

A-AenuaJ: M- Monthly: Q-Guartorly ; 5- Semi- 
Annual. 

Source: upi. 


Gold Options (pncr< la S/ax.L 


E3 

Us 

May 

** 

290 

1725.1905 

36253825 



300 

1050-1200 

I92S2125 

272M935 

310 

525 4/5 I 

14001550 

21502300 

323 

200 125 

975.1125 

1550-1700 

330 

125 ISO 

/i50 

11501300 

340 

050 125 

450 400 



Gcttxe® Sato 

ValeasWUteWeM&A. 

V Quel du Maal-Bliflc 
121! Genoa 1. Swiucrtanl 
TeL3lB2Sl- Telex 28305 


r i 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 


~ on January 14 , 1985 : U. 5 . $ 132 . 66 . 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pierson, Hefdrtng & Pierson N.V n 

Herengracht 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 


countryside tell of fast-growing ele- 
phant grass spreading through ne- 
glected cofree fields and of jungle 
creepers enveloping the verandas 
of abandoned plantation houses. 

These reports are hard to con- 
firm. When a correspondent asked 
to visit a coffee plantation, officials 
placed him under house arrest and 
then flew him back to Luanda on 
the first available airplane. 

In Luanda. Mr. Caetano Joao. 
the son of a coffee worker, has the 
unenviable job or trying to revive 
Angola's coffee fields. 

After falling steadily since inde- 
pendence. coffee production is at 
the levels of the 1930s and now 
represents only 4 percent of Ango- 
la's exports. 

Since 1976. the Angolans have 
sold 4 million racks of coffee left by 
the Portuguese. But the last of the 
usable colonial slocks were sold 


last year and now ibe Angolans 
must address the problems in the 
countryside. 

When Mr. Caetano Joao as- 
sumed the new post of vice minister 
for coffee in 1982. he started to put 
into effect a recovery plan formu- 
lated by Arthur D. Little Co_ an 
American consulting firm. Part of 
the plan includes providing better 
supplies for the coffee workers, in- 
cluding S20 million worth of food, 
which is being supplied by the 
United Nations. 

'The peasant needs stimulus to 
produce." he said. “We are bring- 
ing him food. doth, salt, gasoline 
and fish." 

However, (here are still vestige 
of 1961s rural violence. 

“Since 1980, there has been an 
increase in acts of sabotage and 
terrorism in the coffee regions." 
Mr. Caeiano Joao said. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
IS January 1985 

The net nut value quotations mown below are supplied by the Funds 1 isted with me 
exception of same funds whose quotes are based an Issue prices. The following 
marginal symbols Indicate frequency of quotations supplied for the (HT: 

(dl - daily; (w) - weekly; (bl - bi-monthly; (r) - regularly; (l) - Irregularly. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w| Al-Mat Trust. S A 


LLOYDS BANK INTL.POB438.CcMva.il 


* 1*2 36 — +(wl Uayds I nr I dollar, 

BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. UtL Zt\w) U^SlSnljSShir 

SP 94805* —+{w) Lloyds Inf'i Income 

iwl Lloyds inri Pacific— 


—10 1 Boer bond 

—id | Conbar 

— (d ) Eauluaor America 


— (d ) Enuibaer Europe- 
— Id ) Eaulbaer Pacific- 
— Id ) & rubor. 


-Id 1 Slockbor 


—Id 1 CSF Fund..- 

—Id 1 Crossbow Fund. 
— <d) iTF Fund N.V_ 


SF 118500 

~SF 114700 PARI5BAS— GROUP 
SF 119600 —W ) CsrtfMia International. 

5F 10170;! — (wi OBLI-DM 
SF 164900- Z{Sj fesfiSiEE: 



SF2SJH — tw»OBLI-YEN 

5F1J29 — |w) DBLI-GULDEN. 
. 5 1400 — (d J PAROIL-FUND. 


58*33 

DM1349.11 
_ SF 9100 
_ S 109703 
Y 10*39200 
Ft 105132 

5 9435 

— <d I PARINTER FUND___ 110109 
51051 —W I PAR U5 Treasury Band— 510823 
SF 8230 Royal Bank Of CanadaPOB 24*Guernsev 
. 1 1115 -+(wl RBC Canadian Fund Ltd— 5 1050 
5 1001 -Hw> RBC For East&PocHic Fd. * 111* 

S1AIJ -HwJ RBC (nttCaaflafFA. *1169 

58937 -+(wj RBC Inti Income Fd- 51050“ 

5 14*97 -+ta 1 RBC MmvCurrencv Fd. 5 2231 

BRITANNIAJ»0B 2>l, 5t. Heller, JefHW 't!* 1 , ni^^rrT^m^tfrinT T r it -imt' 

— (*! ?rlf.0clla r income Stogy 

SUMO — (wiAcc: Bid -5*00 Otter 55.12 


BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
— Id 1 Aslan Growth ' 

— iwi Dlverband— — _ 

—Iwl Fi P— America . 

— lw) FiF— Europe 

—Iwi FiF-PociKc- 

—Id) Indosuez Mullibonds A_ 
—Id 1 1ndosuer MulllDonas B. 


— (w) Brlt.jMOTiog.Curr. _ 

—Id 1 Bril. intLS MonogjfcXil . 
—Id t Brit, intu Monaa-Porti. 
— Iwl Brit. Universal Grawin_ 

— (w) BrlLGofd Fund 

—Iwl Brlt.Monati.Currencv_ 
—Id I Brit Japan Dir Perl. Fd 
—In) Bril Jersey Gill Fund — 
—to > Brit, uvno Leta Fund 


tBffl SWISS BANK CORP. 

• Sqm —Id ) America valor. 

**'■ 'WI ./* I lV8lnrfc Unit#* Ca 


I MS SVEN5KA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 
503iii 17 Devonshire Sa.Lomlon-01 -377-8040 

SOjna* -<b 15HB Bond Fund— 5 2104 

IJUf — (w) SMB inti Growth Fund 1 19.40 

SO, 968 

SF S695Q 
DM 12253 
- 5133.12 
FL 12164 
SF 8535 
SFB4450 
SF 11146 
SF 28*50 
, SF 8125 
SF 11*15 


—ID r Dili, wurip UWi. runu . *v.*wr , n_»d— o— ui CnIaHIah 

-Id . Brit, world Techn. Fund 5 0348 ^ j 


— Id i Florin Band Selecton— 
S 3334 —id 1 Inter valor. 


$1133 — Id ) Japan PDrttatto- 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— Iw) Capital Inl'l Fund . 

—Iw) Capital lialta 5A - , 

r DEniT uiiuc rieciic aoircci —Id i Swiss Foreton Bond Sel. 

,F?iL3i*e?-i!L S0 E PRlCE ci ui K. —id 1 Swiss valor New Ser 

-Id I Actions Suibw SP-UU5* -id lUnlv. Bond Select 

IKrSS — WI Universal Fund 


DM W&32 


—10) Band Valor Swl 
—fa) Bond Valor IVmark— ~ 

— Id) BoMVOMr US-DOLLAL .... iie ,, 

—Id] Bona valor Yen Yen 1043100 —Id } AmcpUJ-Ste— 

—id) Convert Valor Swf SF 10*afl —Id J SarW-InvesI 

-Id) Convert volar U5-OOLLAR. 1 108.44 —Id 1 Fonao Swin Sh. 
— Id) Coimec SF 87400 ~ <d I JOPon-InveW 


-Id 1 CS Ponds— Bonds- 
— Id) CS Funds— I r+ 1 . 


510888 UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 
..lUM* 5F420O 

SF 7735 
SF 1X150 
SF 97550 
SF 46*08 
SF 20600 


SF 7*75 — (d)Soflt South Afr.Sh. 
SF 10535 —id > Slmo (stock price) 


—Id l CS Money Mortet Fund— * 103200 union INVESTMENT Frankfurt 
— id ) C5 Money Market Fund DM 101700 —in i unircotn — . _ DM 4*41 


—Id I Energle— valor. 

—la 1 ussec 


—id 1 Eurupo— Valor _ 
— Id) Pouf ic— Valor. 


cE ST'S — W • Unllgnds 
|F*S'-SS — IdlUnlrok 
ar 1*6^5 
SF 1HL25 


Other Funds 


DM 2024 
DM7232 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

— Hd i Concentre — 

— Md I inti Ren ton fond _ 


Iw) Act I bauds investments Fund. $ 7057 
DM2458 lw> Artlvwft >"tl , , $10.14 

DM 7407 Iwl Aqulta international Fund— $10*35 

Dunn & Haraltr 6 Lloyd George. Brussels in i o5£u> lnBnCB *‘ F ei^~S 

— jmj DAH Cgrnmodity Pool t M*12 Iml Trust cor I nr I FtL |AEIF>I— S WM 

—1ml Currency 8 Gold Pool— .$18250 in i bbi. FONDS _ BF6033 

— iml Wlncn.LHe Fui. Pooi— ICTjUJ*” lw) BNP Interttand Fund $ 10533 

— im) Trans world Ful. Pool. $B 890B‘** |w) Bontheiex-lMu e Pr SF 14405 

FLC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS {JJ 1 , 1 

I, Laurence Pountv Hill EC4 01-623+680 }“ } SSSJ F “ - ,nf ' 

— Iwi F4C Atlantic $1039 — — — 

— Iwl FAC European 5*00 ,d 1 Aullralla Fund 

— lw) FK Oriental 


5 7408 ,d 1 C-t.R. Japan Fund. 


Im) Cleveland Othnore Fd.. 

FIDELITY POB 670, Hamilion Bermuda <wl CotumtMa Securities 

—Im) American Values Common- .5 7057 (b)COMETE. 


5855 
$1107 

— *139 
*906 

— 5 905 
5 139609 
FL 10907 

a 5 93908 

—{ml Amer Values Cum.Prei — 51D035 id ) Cans. Bonks Fund 510*000 

—id 1 Fidelity Amer. Asset* $6306 Iwl Convert. Fd. mri A Certs— $90* 

-40 ) Fidelity AusiroiiD Fima s 736- I w) Convert. Fd. inn B Certs— $ 2*82 

—Id) Fidelity Dir. Svas.Tr 5170.10 Iw) D.G.C $7103 

— id ) Fidelity Far East Fund S 1905 Id l D. Winer Wid wide 1*1 Til 19.91 

—Id ) Fidelity InM. Fund- 1 5131 fb 1 Drakkor Invesi.Fund N.v — 5 974.99 

-la 1 Fidelity Orient Fund 525.11 Id ) Drevtus Fund Infl $3*96 

—10 ) Fidelity Franller Fund 5)230 |w) Dreyfus inter continent $303) 

— Id ) Fidelity Puciflc Fund * 13333’ Iw) The Establishment Trust S 104 


—id) Fidelity SocL Growl n Fd.. 
—id) Fidelity World Fund 


FORBES PC B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01-539- 3013 
—Iwl Gold Income — 5 130; 


11409 Id ) Europe Obligations- 
$28.72* I w) First Eagle Fund 
b 1 Fitly Stars Ltd. 


4w) Gold Appreciation. 

— |w| Dollar Income 

— Iml Strategic Trading- 


( Vi) Flnlbury GrauO Ltd. 
(wl Fansetox issue Pr. 
iw) Forexlund 



GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— iwl East Inuestmenl Fund 

—Iwi Scottlih world Fund . — — - _ . = - 

— iw) Slate St. American i 13*97 lw» Portion Fund--- , 

runll r.nlU LIill Iki A—nUl 4Timil lb ) ILA intr Gold Bond. 


■ 55-21 Iw) Formulo Selection Fd SF 7*68 

Jim Id ) Fondltotla 121.90 

»|J» (d I Govemm. Sec Fund* 5 5506 

fd ) Frankl-Trusi imerzlns DM4104* 

SJSSJH Iwl Maussmonn Hldai N.V $9908 

112005 Iwl Hestlo Funds $98.93 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 

PB 119. Si Peter Port. Guernsey. 0481-28715 

(m) FuturGAM SA_ $11430 (r I I nri Securities Fund 


imIGAM ArMIraae Inc . 

Iwl GAMerlcn lnc 

Iwl GAM Boston Inc — . 

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Page 14- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. JANUARY IT. 1985 



PEANUTS 


THIS MORNING WE WANT 
TO PAY TRIBUTE TO TWO 
OF OUR CLASSMATES... 



PATRICIA AND MARGE 
[MADE AN APPEARANCE 
AT THE TEACHER'S 
CONVENTION YESTERDAY.. 



BOOKS 


THE PRIVATE WORLD OF 
GEORGETTE HEYER 



By Jane Aiken Hodge. 216 pp. 5/V.0-\ 
Bodiey H e uu-. Mernn-.jck. Main Street . 

Salem. S. H. 030~9. 


BLONDIE 


50 

57 

56 


62 




84 




67 





ACROSS 


1 Chronicler of 
the Round 
Table 

7 W.W. II lass 

10 Poet Whitman 

14 Site of Hejaz 
andNejd 

15 Cigar residue 

16 The shivers 

17 Captured again 

18 Pirate 
immortal 

20 Proofer’s 

mark 

21 Menatti opus: 
1950 

22 Ursa, to Juan 

23 Go astray 

25 Fifth spot in 
some theaters 

26 "Roots" co- 
star 

29 Gilmore of the 
N.B.A. 

33 Vitriolic 

35 Paradise for 
King Arthur 

38 A Gardner 

39 Pahlavi's title 

40 Capitol toppers 

41 Biting insect 

42 Caboodle’s 
partner 

43 School 
discipline 

44 Last of the 
Stuarts 

45 Word with case 
or well 

47 Dashing 

Q New York 


49 Actress 
Patricia 

52 Badger 

53 Wheat beard 
56 Britten's 

foretopman 
60 Kind of surgeon 

62 Union 

63 Bane of an off- 
key tenor 

64 Daniels of old 
fUms 

85 One, in Kbln 

66 Countersign, 
e.g. 

67 Bearish initials 

68 Gleam 

69 Paucity 


DOWN 


IPolo 

2 Districts 

3 Verdi's fallen 
woman 

4 Clarinet's 
relative 

5 Disturber of 
the peace 

6 Far East beast 

7 Launder 

8 Autumn 
bloomer 

9 Extensive S. A. 
plain 

10 Creator of 30 
Down 

11 Epochs 

12 Alban Berg’s 
femme fatale 

13 Rossini's 

"William " 

Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


1/17.-8S 

19 Dan of 
"Laugh-In" 

21 Actress Claire 

24 Author of 
"Hard Cash" 

27 Anglo-Saxon 
letter 

28 Belgian city 

30 Visitor at 
Venus berg 

31 Lendl of tennis 

32 Assuage 
completely 

33 Seeks to find 
out 

34 Voucher 

36 Capitalist- 
politician 
Stanford 

37 Honshu port 

41 Freon, e.g. 

43 Norseman’s 

Venus 

46 A mass of 
stratified rock 

48 Set afire 

50 Doubleday or 
Dean 

51 Sutherland 
role 

54 Take by force 

55 She ree from 
L.A. 

56 Hindu 
gentleman 

57 Seine sights 

58 Degrees for 
A.B.A. 
members 

59 Gainsay 

61 C’ -dire 

63 Possessed 


THE PJBST MONTH I HAD 
TO LOSE HO POUNDS 
AND PUT BACK 20 



, THE SECCtJD AAOMTH I M 
| HAD TO LOSE 30 POUNDS I 
AND PUT BACK 15 



| THIRD MONTH p WHO . 
i I LOST 20 VcSAVE YOU l 
AND PUT V THAT C*ET| 
BACK IO 



MV TAJ LOR... HE WAS ' 
MAKING A CORTUNE C»J 



! - 


BEETLE BAILEY 


Reviewed t»y Dorothy Dunnert 

G EORGETTE HEYER. bom in London 
in 1902. was the granddaughierof a Rus- 
sian fur merchant called George Heyer. who 
had come lo England from Kharkhov in ihe 
cj>s of the Russian pogroms. From this 
"bearded patriarch with ihe strong foreign 
accent, a love of strange words and an alarm- 
ing penchant for practical jokes” sprang the 
novelist’s father George, who was to be reared 
as an English gentleman, but whose classical 
studies at'Cambridge led to a checkered career 
and many moves for his two sons George Boris 
and Frank Dmitri and their older sister Geor- 


mor discussed. And while l 
she never 
Addicts as < 

What was happening simultaneously in 
Georgette Heyer’s life is not. I think, indevam 
on either score. Fans who fall in love with 
eligible heroes often recover to become writers 
themselves, or quite respectable students of the 
period. Besides, I ratter like knowing about 



away. 

the piano playing of Prime Minister 
Heath, who occupied rooms below hers in the 
Albany, the most prestigious apartments in 
Loudon. "As for the Gentleman Downstairs, 
you can Have Him — synthetic smile and alLT 
runs one letter. 

Heavy irony — and capital letters — charac- 
terize all her correspondence. Acccording to 


her son, she spoke as she wrote. According to 
Hodge — and I aj 


1 agree with her — stilled dia- 
logue was one of Heyer’s few problems. The 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



* See that building with the bi6 addition sign on 

THE ROOF ^...TrtAfS MY CHURCH 1' 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
■ * by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter lo each square, to toim 
tour ordinary wards. 


THYIC 



n 

^ f 





MOCTE 


L^Ij 

: j 


FACSIO 



cj 


PORTSY 


r 

□ 

LD 

_L 



I WHAT HE 5A1C7 HER 
NEW HEADGEAR //A5. 


Now arrange me circled letters io 
farm the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


*■» * “rixi-crrrxrr 


Yesterdays 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles UNITY FOIST OPAQUE SPLICE 
Answer What e wisecracker does— FLIPS QUIPS 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Amsterdam 

Alhem 


HI OH LOW 

C F C F 

9 48 -1 30 
-9 14 -13 10 

10 50 7 as 

2 36 -7 19 
-2 28 -5 23 

-a is -io 14 

-9 IS -12 10 
■9 M -14 7 

■3 24 -8 IB 


ASIA 


Bangkok 
Beilina 
Hone Kane 
Manila 
new Delhi 


Coda Del Sol 
Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Fr an k fu rt 


-1 30 
9 48 


Helsinki 
Istanbul 
i Pals 


-4 
-2 28 
-1 30 


Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Taliya 


AFRICA 


15 59 



Urton 

6 43 

3 

38 

• i : 

Lentk -i 

-4 25 

-4 

21 


Madrid 





Milan 

1 34 

-2 

28 


Moscow 

-4 21 

-8 

18 


Munich 

4 IB 

-13 

9 


Mice 

i 39 

1 

34 


Oslo 

-10 14 

-13 

9 

u 

Purls 

-12 10 

-16 

3 

h 3 

Progua 

-2 28 

-6 

21 


RayWavik 

6 43 

5 

41 


Rome 

10 SO 

7 



Stockheim 

-9 16 

-14 

7 


StrasbOi.- ; 

-7 19 

-13 

9 


Venice 

3 38 

0 

32 


Vienna 

-2 28 

-4 

25 


Warsaw 

■ 10 14 

-19 

-2 


Zurich 

-10 14 

-15 

5 


MIDDLE EAST 




Attn 

-7 19 

-22 



Beirut 

18 44 

12 


T« 

Damascm 

>3 55 

0 

32 


JsrasaSam 

13 55 

8 

« 

TE?: 

TelAVtV 

IB 44 

13 

55 

116-. 

OCEANIA 





Aecktaml 

21 70 

16 

61 

TOM. 

Sydney 

29 84 

21 

70 


Ala tort 
Cairo 

Caae Town 

Casablanca 

Hanaro 

Lagos 

Nairobi 

Tonis 


HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

c 

F 


31 

88 

22 

72 

fr 

-4 

25 

■11 

12 

fr 

18 

64 

13 

55 

a 

30 

86 

22 

72 

a 

Z1 

70 

8 

46 

fr 

-8 

IS 

-14 

7 

fr 

11 

S3 

-2 

28 

lr 

31 

88 

23 

73 

cl 

19 

66 

14 

57 

o 

12 

54 

a 

44 

fr 

5 

41 

2 

34 

a 

25 

77 

12 

54 

tr 

27 

81 

19 

44 

tr 

11 

52 

3 

38 

tr 

25 

77 

18 

64 

r 

30 

86 

26 

79 

O 

23 

73 

10 

50 

lr 

12 

54 

1 

34 

cl 


2S 77 10 SO 

n 


ft- LATIN AMERICA 

aw 

a Bums Aires 

a Lima 19 M 22 

o Mexico City 20 68 5 41 

fr Rio de Janeiro 30 86 21 70 

fr SaaPaalo 

d NORTH AMERICA 


— — — — no 


sw 

Anchorage 







Atlanta 







Boston 

-S 

23 


12 

fir 


Chicago 

-2 

28 

-12 

10 



Denver 

6 

43 





Detroit 

-3 






HourioiB 

77 

81 





Houston 

10 

50 

7 

4S 



Las Angeles 

22 

72 





Miami 

22 

72 




D 

tetasssaOUs 

-5 

23 

-11 

12 

D 


Montreal 

-1 

X 

■i 

21 



Nassau 

94 

75 

1(1 

ffl 

rl 

0 

Mew York 

-1 

30 

■9 

16 

lr 


Sai Fraadsco 

14 

57 

5 

41 

tr 


Seattle 

7 

45 

3 

38 

Id 

Cl 

Toronto 

-12 

10 

-37 

-17 

(r 

to 

Washington 

-1 

30 

-4 

21 

h- 


d-cioudv; (o-foaav: fr-falr: 

pc - parity cloudy; r-rdn;sJ^ihow^7sw^T^r^^St8rTny. 


mUMDArS FORECAST — CHANNEL; SI Willy Cheney. FRANKFURT: 
OvarasL team. -4 — & ( 25 — 311 . LONDON: Overcast, Town. - 3 — £ (28 — 23 ). 
MAOWD: Rabw. tonus. 7-1 145 - 341 . NEW YORK: Snow. Twim I —it 

!”-^7^-«'®TELAvtv: T 4TraLVMtt« 

seouL^ ^^liu»A«RS* n^o%b?na H0NG K0NC: - “■ 


ONLY MY box has got a \ 

MOTOR, A VI BRATOR ANP 



Nevertheless the same Georgette, after a 
scrambled education, published at 19 her first 
novel. "The Black Moth.” begun as a teenage 
romance invented to cheer the ailing Geoige 
Boris. By the time she died In 1974. she had 
written 57 novels, was the wife of one English 
barrister and the mother or another, and had 
maintained unbroken her iron rule: to make no 
appearances and to give no interviews. “You 
will Find me in my work,” was her dictum. 

It may be true of Christopher Wren and St 
Paul’s Cathedral. It is a litue more testing to 
detect a strong-willed lady of Russian origin in 
a series of brilliant Regency romances: a prob- 
lem American-born Jane Aiken Hodge has set 
out to resolve in assembling this book 

She has not been without help from the 


Heyers. Here are pages of delicate drawings of 

fro 


gigs and bonnets and uniforms taken from 
Heyer’s notebooks, and her surviving brother 
and son are both quoted. To compensate for a 
decided lack of personal letters, there is the 
formidable correspondence Heyer unleashed 
through the years upon her obedient publish- 
ers. But one looks in vain for a sense of the 
author or ter fictitious heroes among the lavish 


range of cartoons and other period pictures. 

in her novels. The 


hand-matched to episodes 
photographs of Heyer in this entire volume 
total just nine, mostly early and all of them 
formal. Of romping family snapshots there are 
none. 

Some of the reasons are obvious. At eight 
Heyer’s son was sent to an expensive prepara- 
tory’ school and later scheduled for Cambridge 
University. Her widowed mother had to be 
looked after, as did ter brother Boris. Her 
husband Ronald Rougier moved as her father 
had done from job to job: first as a mining 
e ng ineer (she wrote Regency romances while 
living with him in Africa and Macedonia); 


middle Regency novels are pure delis 
there were forerunners, such as “Regency 
Buck” and those written in her later years 
which creaked under the weight of period data. 
What began perhaps as a matter of expediency 
seemed to end up as an intellectual exercise, 
depending on bulging files of cant synonyms. 

Heyer was a lady much loved by those who 
knew her well but conditioned more than most 
by her background and the codes of ter time. 
But those rules are not I think, as arbitrary as 
this book sometimes claims. They reflect, in- 
deed, with great faithfulness the manners, the 
prqudices and (he literature of the Edwardian 
age in which Heyer was reared, and to which 
she clung for her own reasons. The oddity is 
that her books have projected these values into 
today. Writers still to be born will spend their 
lives attempting to produce Georgette Heyer 
romances, and readers will remain conditioned 
to accept them. It is a problem which every 
writer of romantic fiction cannot afford to 
ignore. It has also, of course, made it impossi- 
ble for any such writer, young or old, to lay a 
finger on Georgian England. 

For who can match Heyer at the Regency 
game? Worthy though her other novels may be. 
one must agree that her genius lay there in the 
end: with “combining high comedy with strong 
feeling,” as Hodge says of “Sprig Muslin,” 
“and leaving one with the kind of satisfaction 
one gets only from the very best.” 

I am not at all sure that I should have 
enjoyed meeting Heyer. But time and time 
again, on reading this book, I found myselT 
breaking off to lift another dog-eared Heyer 
from the shelf and lose myself in the increased 
pleasure of a re-reading. That is tbe mark of a 
successful biography. 


later as the owner of a failing sports shop. 


Dorothy Dunnert was a Judge last year for the 
Georgette Heyer Award for historical fiction. She 
wrote this review for The Washington Post 


Meanwhile he longed to study for the bar. and 
ihaL he did so successfully in the end was ail 
due to his wife’s novels. 

At the same time, this was not a martyrdom. 
She was a compulsive writer: clever, competi- 
tive, and with a passionate hunger for the 
established, witty, delightful world of the Eu- 
ropean romancers popular in her girlhood. 

An historical novelist herself. Hodge takes 
us through all of her author’s books, and 
proves an excdlenl piloL 
We are reminded of stories, phrases and 
characters. Plots and settings are compared: 
endings are analyzed: pace and style and hu- 


ll. S. Edition of Geo Magazine 
To Fold After February Issue 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Knapp Communications 
Corp. says it will stop publishing the U.S. 
edition of Geo magazine, known for striking 
color photographs, after the February issue. 

A Knapp source said Geo lost $500,000 to SI 
million a month during 1984. Knapp bought 
Geo in 1 98 1 from by Gniner & Jahr. which still 
publishes the French and German editions. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Tru score 


GARFIELD 


( ONE OF MY PET PEEVES IS ) }l PO NOT HAPPEN TO BE \ 
V. PEOPLE WHO NEVER FINISH < ( ONE Of THOSE PEOPLE ) 
X WHAT THEY START /J 

( AW PHILO50PHY IS, J 
\ ''NEVER START f 
Vw. ANYTHING" / 

|°° 

O 

O 




H 7 

«) 1985 Unted Fealute Srnhcaie Inc 


O N the diagramed deal 
from a team game, the 
transfer made North the de- 
clarer in four beans. His part- 
ner had unselfishly chosen that 
route instead of putting him- 
self in charge. 

li had been a bad day for 
finesses, reported North, and 
he demonstrated that the right 
way to bring home the game 
was not to finesse at all. He 


won the opening spade lead. 

tlingamj 


cashed the heart king and lead 
to the ace. East now had a sure 
trump trick and South was in 
considerable danger of losing a 
trick in each suit 
There was no way. as it hap- 


pened. to avoid the loss of a 
diamond trick. But it was im- 
portant to lose it at the right 
momenL North cashed tbe 
king and ace of diamonds, re- 
jecting the Finesse, and surren- 
dered a diamond to West. The 
defense took a spade trick and 
shifted to clubs, out South was 
in control. He took the ace and 
played a fourth diamond, 
throwing the losing club from 
the dummy. The trump queen 
was the third and last trick for 
the defense. 

Notice that a diamond fi- 
nesse would have cost North 
his conlracL West would have 
won. cashed the spade queen 
and shifted lo clubs. East 
would be able to ruff in dia- 


monds before a club discard 
could be arranged from the 
dummy. 


NORTH 
♦ 88 

A J 9 8 4 3 
v K5 3 

• 74 

EAST 
• JS752 

fq io s 

0 98 
• 962 
SOUTH (D) 

« A4 
9K7I 
o A J 742 

• A J 5 

Both sides were vulnerable. Tbe 
bidding: 


WEST 

• K Q 10 3 

«? 2 

O Q 10 6 

• K Q IB 8 3 


2 C 
Pas* 


Canadian Stock Markets j*n. is 


Prices In Conod Ion cents unless merited S 


Toronto 


Htob 


405 AON Prce 
9200 Aon lea E 
2400 Agra indA 
7823 AH Energy 
41550 Aito Nat 
l*70AlggmaS« 
350 Andes WA I 
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339 Argus C or 
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11200 BP Canada 
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sisto 

18 fe 

ISfe + to 

* 23 to 

23 

23 to+ V 

S 17 to 

I 7 fe 

I 7 to+ fe 

Sll 

11 

11 

4 H 

455 

455 

* 7 ta 

7 to 

7 fe+ to 

S 2 Sfe 

2 Sfe 

2 Sfe 

S 6 to 

6 V» 

6 to 


S13*. 13*4 13fe 
155 150 150 — 4 

395 385 385 —10 

55 5 5 

I14Va 16K 1614 + 
*9 9 9 + >4 

*11 to life TUi— 44 
342 254 257 — 2 

*32fe 3Hk ZI^J 
Sira 13 U — to 
ISVi ISto I5to 
*15*4 15 15**+ 4k 

S25V. 24*. 25V. + 1 
SSIfc 5** 5to— to 
*15 149k 143k + 

S22V. 21% 22 + to 
J2SVa 21 »to + 
131 304, 

non so 30 
24 17Vs 24+7 
99W 9% 9to + 

S17 17 17 

S12 life life— 
57** 6fe 6*4— 
S5*k Sfe 5*4+ V* 
IS** Sfe Sfe- 

tn> 9fe to. 

37S 375 375 +25 

STi r U 7U— 
275 272 272+3 

511*4 life life— >•« 
SISto I5fe ISto + to 
133 130 130—7 

245 234 240 + B 

SI6K. 15** 14 
*14fe 14'A life— 

m Sfe n* 

440 440 440 — 5 

455 455 455 

300 285 285 — 5 

S24fe 24to 24** + 

SI 7 16*4 16fe+ to 

92Bto 77*. 281* — 
440 435 440 +15 

II* 14 14 — to 

S4V, 61* 6 to — to 

sis** in* isto + to 
S14W 14to 14to+ to 
S83VJ B2 83 to +Ife 
J19to I9to 19to 
S20fe 20fe 20fe 
S12 11 to life— 

SlSto 17fe 18 
S237* 23 T* 23 to— V* 

Sllto llto I1C.+ 
208 204 304 — I 

SB’A 01* 8W+ fe 

SSto Sto 
*38 37fe . 

47 47 47 —3 

43 43 

S82 81 81—1 

525 - 25 25 

I5S 145 145 

si7to i7w m* + v* 
saofe 20fe 2DH— fe 
117fe 17b 17fe 
548’ . 48 48 + 

Sllb IP* llfe + fe 
*14% 14% Life— to 
USfe 34fe 34b+ to 
SI**. 16V. !6to + 

m u n 

too 100 100 —3 

534 J3Vr 34 + fe 

SI sto ISto 15to+ to 


38877 LobaH 
7440 Lac HAnrts 
7U0 LOnl Cem 
3700 Lacana 
100 LL LOC 
1600 LobkmCo 
28200 UlCC 
n 50 Melon H X 
2352 Mertand E 
12220 Malsan A I 
lloOMotsonB 
5900 Nabisco L 
41021 Morando 
22013 Moreen 
592S0N*aAlfAf 
9469 NowSCD W 
35300 NuWsISO A 

2190OsnawoAf 
eOP Pomour 
3300PanCanP 
4500 Pembina 
500 Phontx Oil 
2700 Pine Point 
4000 Place GOo 
30400 Placer 
200 Provtoa 
2100 Que Sturg o 
500 Rem Pei 
5200 Ravrockf 
15113 Redpalti 


NWi Low Close Cirge 
S22V* 2H* Tito 
52*1* 26 26 

SID 10 10 

SUM 10 10V* 

*28 21 28 


260 250 250 —25 


S7fe 7V* 7to— 


— 3 


4*5 450 4*5 +1! 

S25to 2Sfe 25to + 
S17fe T7V, 17fe 

S7to 7V4 7V: 

S23 23 23 

105 102 105 + 5 

STlfe Tito 21 to— 
S14to 16to 16to 

395 385 315 — 5 

S5H Sfe 5to+ fe 

UBS 
S32H. 32 32'm 


a - 


E 7TI i'ILT'T.* 

Slfffe I8fe 


59 

8to 

m !vviB 

170 

170 1 


122 

115 1 



7fe 


24800 Roman 
22900 Sceptre 
300 Scott* I 
1200 Sears Can 
14850 Shell Can 
821 1 Sherrill 
125 Slater Bt 
12500 Seuthm 
300 SI Brodcsl 
40729 5W CO* 
1700 Sulpfro 
1500 stew R 
BOOOSroaevo 
500 Tal core 
500 Tara 
3400 Teck Cor A 
40040 Tec* B I 
1700 Tex Can 
14110 Thom N A 
19691* Tor Dm Bk 
4880 Tor star B 1 
2630 Traders A f 
900 Tms Ml 
600 Trinity Res 
03*5 TrnAMo UA 
19247 TrCan PL 
27128 Trlmac 
225 Trizec A 1 
4500 Turbo I 
42 Untcarp A I 

200 un CartM 
2301*9 u Entprlsg 
lOOUKeno 
liso u Slscse 
33475 Varsll A I 
1000 Vesfwon 
3700 weidwod 
2200 Westmln 
lODWestnhee 
675 Weston 
1857 Woodwd A 


Bfe— fe 
170 
122 

- _ 7fe + L, 
S12fe 12 12 — to 

S5to 5 S — to 
S17fe 17fe 17**— 
S7fe 7U 7fe + I* 
S22VC. 21fe 21 fe — to 
S7V* 7 7 — 

S9U. 9fe 9fe 
SS2V, 52to S3 m- to 
S12to 12to 17** 
S21to 21 Tito + to 
240 255 260 

220 220 230 

30 = 30 +2 

76 76 74 +5 

S15fe 15fe ISfe 
S»fe 9fe 9fe 
Sioto lOto 10 to + 
S34to 34 34'*— to 

*50 49V* 50 + to 

SIBV: 18 lOto + to 
S14fe 14fe I6fe— 
STlfe 21 21 to 

S7to 7to 7V. 

470 445 445 +10 

*23 to 23fe 23fe 
*219* 21 fe 2114 
4 20_ 410 410—5 

S27fe 22fe Sto- 
271rj 25 25 — flfe 

_ M 7 fe 8 + 
si life ltvto into 
S12fe 12** 12fe+ fe 
S9fe 9fe 9b— 
127 120 129 

SAto 6to 6 to— fe 
SlOto 10 1 * 10V* + 
SI4 15fe 14 + to 

Sllto life life— fe 
*52 57 S3 

575** 7 Sfe 75fe + 
SlOto 10fe I OH 


] | Amsterdam | 


dost 

Prte. 

ABN 

38060 

38060 

ACF Hnldino 

19760 

195 

Aegon 

160 

19960 

AKZO 

10060 

100.70 

Ahold 

203J0 

20Sji 

AMEV 

22760 

22860 

A ‘Dam Hub 

7J0 

765 


7110 

7260 

BVG 

228 

238 

Buehrmgnn T 

85 

8160 

Cokmd Hldo 

2260 

3260 

Elsevler-NDU 

171 

121 

Fokker 

9460 

91 


17660 

774 

Helngken 

15160 

15060 

Hoogovens 

64 

4360 

KLM 

48.90 

43.90 

Maarden 

4860 

4860 

Mat Nedder 

281 

278 

Nedtlovd 

140 

154 

Oce Vender G 

295 

29260 

Pakhoed 

7360 

7560 

Philips 

5460 

52 



7260 

Rodamco 

134.90 

136.90 

Rollneo 

6560 

4560 

Horen io 

4360 

4360 


179.10 

in 

UtM lover 


fc»’ I’ ll 



1 1 

VMF Stork 


r* . l 7, j i 

VNU 



ANPXB5 Genera 

Index 

19860 

Pieriuuii : 1*760 



Source: AFP. 



I i Brussels i ! 





4.410 

g r • . 1 I 


261 

1 

EBES 

2610 

> J . 1 1 

GBL 

2645 



3650 

^~T '1 1 

Gevoen 

3640 

jjl 


4610 

B V'-' 1 f 


7300 

7600 


un 

4.790 

Soc General* 

1600 

1625 

Soh no 

7660 

7410 

Sdvay 

4,100 

4,105 

Trod Ion Elect 

3605 

3600 

Vlelle Montagne 

5650 


Bourse M61L53 








| exchange. 



1 1 Frankfurt 1 1 


10460 10560 1 




Basl 



Barer 
BoverJ-typo. 

Baver.Ver.Bank 
BMW 

Comme r zbank 
Coniigumml 
□clmler-Beru 

Desussa 

Daulscfie Babcock 15BJ0 I57J0 
Daulsche Bank 797^0 3*4 


Close Pres. 
192 l9i.*o 
325 324 

339 336.80 
381 SO Mi® 
171.50 17060 
12140 122 

671-50 41860 
33950 339 


Totnl sales 11.172^*1 shares 


Montreal 


60677 Bank Mont 
31013 DamTxtA 
1310 MfrtTrsl 
13*234 Not BkCda 
2810 Power Corn 
nog Ref long* 
44296 Royal Bonn 
2056 RavTrstca 


Total Sales 22S6J72 shares. 


High LowCWeChge 
576fe 24fe 26H 
SIS 122* 12to- to 
S121* 12 12 

*15 14** 14*+ fe 

CSV* 28fe 28to+ fe 

*14fe Mfe 14 V. + to 

S30fe 30 30fe 
S17V, 17 17fe + fe 


Orwdner Bonk 

DUB-5chott*e 

GHH 

Hochtief 

Hooetist 

Hoesch 

Hotzmom 

Horten 
Kail U Sah 
Karstodl 
Koufhaf 
KHD 

Ktoecfcner Werke 
Krvop Stahl 
Unde 
Lufthansa 
MIAN 

Mannas mann 
Me fo I taeseUichah 
Mucnch-Rueck 
Preuss 

Ruetaers- Werke 


RWE 
Scherfna 
Siemens 
Thyssan 
Varta 
Veba 
VEW 


192 19120 
214 319 

142.10 I62J0 
480 485 

18560 18460 
9860 9860 
79160 391 

184 IBS 
279 27560 
241 241J0 
22450 22S 

25460 25620 
76-50 75.90 
7960 7920 
39760 39950 
194JB 195 

1*450 161 

15450 15450 
216 218 
1290 1270 

254 254 

an 


17250 1 4959 
45460 454 

493 491 

8750 9560 
176 176 

T7150 17160 
12350 124 


volkswogenwerk 20440 207 


Commerzbank led** : 1.14950 
Previous : 1.1 1759 
Source: AFP. 


1 Hong Kong | 

Bk East Asia 

2SJ0 


Cheung Kong 

1360 


China Light 

15 


Cross Horbor 

11.10 

1160 

Hang Seng 







2760 



440 


HK Shanghai 

9.10 


HK Tel 

58 


HK Wharf 

565 

5.70 

Hutch Whampoa 

19.10 


Jardine Math 






New World 



Show Bros 

19 



0.95 

860 

Sims Derby 

460 

465 

Stalux 

NA 

165 

Swire Pacific A 

2460 

7360 

Wheel Mar 



iNhletack 

.460 

420 


Other Markets jan. i6 


Closing Prices In loco! currencies 


Wlnsor 
World Inll 


5.10 

IN 


550 

1.94 


Hong Seng lotfex :U5S6l 
Previous rUJuo 
Source: Reuter*. 


Johannesburg 


Close Prow 


aeci 

755 

755 

Barlows 

1050 

1045 

Blyvoor 

1025 

IB» 

Butte Is 

7425 

7450 

Elan as 

1430 

1450 

GFSA 

2850 

2800 




Kloof 

9000 


Nodbonk 

1090 

mo 

Pst Stavn 

6475 

4500 

Rusokll 

1460 

1685 

SA Brews 

655 

455 

St Helena 

3425 

3450 

5a*ol 

558 

555 

Composite Stock Index :Ulll* 
Previous : 141849 
Source: NetUan*. 


London 


AA Corp 

AiUed-Lvons 
Anoio Am GoM 


Barclay* 


SI I SlOto 

149 I*] 

*»■* 1791* 

150 152 


BAT. 

Baectiam 

BICC 

BL 

BOC Group 
Boots 

Bowafer Indus 
BP 

Brtl Home St 
Bril Telecom 
BTR 
Burmah 
Cadbury Schw 
Charier Cans 
Coats Patans 
Cons Gold 
Caurtaulds 
Dalaety 
De Beers 
Olstlllers 
Drietanteln 
F Isons 
FreuMGetl 


577 

SIM 

253 

378 

263 

40 

287 

187 

230 

483 

248 

12Sfe 

611 

229 

142 

703 

144 

481 

149 

490 

388 

294 


569 

489 

351 

370 

253 

39 

273 

MS 

229 

481 

249 

120 

597 

239 

161 

200 

160 

474 

145 


*239*. *23** 

2B4 273 

*22 S22to 


Canadian Indexes Jon. 16 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


Moon Previous 
Montreal 111^6 110 JO 

Toronto 3A04M Z3V4.10 

Montreal: Stock Exchange Industrials Index. 
Toronto: T5E 309 lnde». 


□ODD a 

□ 

□ 

a 

a 

QDOEO S 

13 

□ 

a 

u 

□DHQ H 

a 

□ 

a 

n 

□i 

QUQDan 

a 


□ 

□ana 

□ 

man asaa 


Manila IVarrows Trade Deficit 


Reuters 

MANILA — The Philippines' 
trade deficit narrowed to 5610 mil- 
lion in 1984 from S2J billion in 
1983, the government said Wednes- 
day. Experts grew to $5.37 billion 
from S5 billion and imports fell to 
55.98 billion from 57.48 billion, the 
report said. 





1 / 17/85 


GEC 
GKN 
GlOkO 
Grand Mat 
Guinness 
GUS 
I Ionian 
Ham* or 
ICI 
I mas 

Uuvds Bank 

Lanrtw 

Lucas 

Marks and Sa 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
r*at West Bank 
Pllklnglon 

PJessev 
Rocal Elect 
Hand font el n 
Rank 
Read kin 
Reuters 


214 21B 

202 197 

1145/64 115/32 
300 293 

235 
707 
332 
425 
776 
200 
519 
142 
241 
123 
382 
344 
597 
793 
199 
278 


232 

703 

329 

423 

769 

1*4 

519 

161 

257 

119 


337 

5*7 

291 

I 9 B 

774 


*901* *901* 

114 304 

550 548 

304 295 


Royal Dutch C 44 21/4444 15/64 
RTZ 


Shell 

STC 

Std Chartered 
Tata and Lyle 
Tesco 
Thorn EMI 
T.I. oroua 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever 


493 *73 

278 274 

484 477 

490 461 

235 234 

434 479 

242 238 

3*4 35* 

154 15* 

303 203 

1145/4411 19/32 


United Biscuits 211 210 

Vickers 223 220 

W-Deap S34to S33fe 

W. Holdings S77fe S26fe 

War Loan 31* C34fe E34to 

Woo (worth 403 401 

ZCI U n 


F T. 30 Index ; 7B1J8 
Previous : 9*1 JO 

Source: AFP. 


Europe 1 

839 


Gen Eouv 



Horteite 

1775 


1 metal 

7740 

7440 

Lo targe Cop 

371 

376 

Leurand 

1998 

1980 




Mot no 

1740 

1740 

Michel In 



mm Pennar 



Moel HermoMy 

1951 

1949 

Moulinex 



Nord-Est 



Ocddentole 

65* 

458 

Pernod RtC 

699 

704 

Petra les Ifse) 

355J0 

254 

Peuoeol 



Poctaln 



Prtntemos 



Rodkdechn 



Redoute 



Roussel Uctat 

I6Q5 


Skis Rossipnoi 



Sour.Perrter 

476 48050 

Telemecan 



Thomson C5F 

438 



23080 

228 

Agefl index ; 1T1J3 


Prevloas: 1 91. 17 



CAC Index : 18961 



Previous : 18960 



Source: AFP. 



( | Singapore 1 1 

Bousteoa 



Cold Sloraae 

249 





FraserMeove 

N.T. 

464 

How Por 

1.90 


Inchcom? 

244 

245 




Mol Bonking 









5emb Shipyard 

142 


S Darby 


148 

S Sfeamstilo 



SI Trading 

462 


UOB 

4.12 

4.14 

OUB Index ; 38268 



Previous : 3*561 



Source: DwrsM! Union Bank. 

1 Stockholm 


II Milan I | 

Banco Comm. 



Centrale 

2605 

2484 

Clgohoteh 

5,100 

5650 


2.147 

2.151 

Farm Italia 

9640 


Flat 


2681 

Flnslder 



Generali 






ItatCOment! 



Mediobanca 



Montedison 








2640 




Blnoscente 



SIP 




262S 


Strtda 

9470 

9650 

| MIB Index ; 169*61 


PravtaB* : 168960 


(Base 2/1/15 » 

1008) 


Sourer; Milan Stoat Exchange. 

1 Paris 1 

Air Llnutde 



Alsihom AH. 

21960 


Av Dassault 

855 

855 

Bancalre 

5*2 

591 

BlC 

S3* 


Beuveues 

732 

ns 

BSN-GO 

3416 

2445 

Cor relour 



Club Med 

1142 

1140 

Ceilmeg 

250 

251 

Dumez 

724 

726 

EH-Amltalne 

225,10 22760 ! 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 


Astra 

Atlas COOCO 
Bonded 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 
Esse lie 

Handel sben ken 

Pharmacia 

Saab Scania 

Sandvik 

SfeansJta 

SKF 

Saedlsh Match 
Volvo 


370 

364 

203 

202 

375 

370 

400 

3*5 

111 

109 

174 

173 

242 

241 

275 

273 

310 

315 

195 

200 

712 

212 

440 

455 

390 

385 

9450 

9*60 

187 

184 

254 

244 

251 

237 


A W or x r ar t d ee index : 
Previous :«SJi 
Source; uwom&baMien. 


Sydney 


ACI 
ANI 
A M2 
BHP 
Borai 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Cotas 

CamsKu 

CRA 

CSfi 

Dunlop 

eiden ixi 


197 

342 

514 

506 

323 

145 

345 

394 

315 


198 

242 

514 

SOB 

322 

1*7 

345 

396 

205 

495 


201 

305 

195 

220 

237 

178 

64 

420 

268 


200 


177 

44 

430 

270 


West North 

£aa. 

r. Pam 2 4 

Pass 

Pass 4 C 


*as» 

Pass 



st led the spade king. 


RGC 

344 

340 

Santas 

521 

524 

Sletoh 

1BI 

178 

Southland 


24 

woodside 

■ 

09 

Wormdd 

31! 

318 


Previous : 73460 



Source: Reuters. 



1 Tokyo S 

Akai 

460 

445 

Asohl Chem 

mm 

715- 

Aaotil Gloss 

*28 

927 

Bonk Of Tokyo 

660 

658 

BrkJoestone 

545 

540 

Canon 

1440 

1408 

□ Nippon Prtnl 




570 


Full Bonk 

1630 

NJL 

Full Photo 

1.770 

1600 

Fulirsu 

1690 

1669 

Hitachi 

877 

870 

Honda 

1620 

1680 

IHl 

151 

NA 

Itoh 



JAL 

5400 

5650 

Ko 11 mo 

280 

281 

Konsol Elec Per 

1470 

1470 

Kao Soap 

858 

NA 

Kaw Sleet 

151 

151 

Kirin 

570 

572 

Kemalsu 


47* 

Kubota 


335 

Matsu Elec tads 

1400 

1670 




Mltsut Bern* 

1690 

16M 


355 

360 

Mltsuta Elec 

489 

407 

Mltsub Heavy 

35/ 

253 


558 


Mitsui 


350 


385 

38* 

Mtvsumi 



MEC 

1650 

1620 




Nippon Steel 

153 

153 


2S4 

259 

Nissan 

615 

682 


955 


□ivmpus 

1610 






1.130 






1670 

1.750 


215 

719 


1S7 

151 

Talsel 

300 



400 






*6< 






1470 









1670 


Yamal chi Sec 

615 








MHckel-DJ Index :1163342 


PfWlaiH :1UBU1 



Source: Reuters. 



Zurich I 


Bonk Leu 
Brawn Boveri 
CJ bo Gelav 
Credit Suisse 

Elect roxrtnt 

Ge or g F tarter 

Jacob Suchard 

Jrlmoll 

LandJi Gvr 

Mesne 

Oerilun-B 

Roche Baby 

Sondoz 

Schindler 

Suiier 

SBC 

Swtxnir 

Union Bank 

Wkitarthur 

Zurich ins 


1800 3^0 
1600 1490 
2415 2690 
1380 1314 
7.750 1760 
435 430 

4490 6650 
1,990 2600 
1665 166$ 
5.920 &»0 
1640 U25 
9425 9450 
7650 7600 
3450 1460 
1420 005 
347 344 

1.105 1.100 
3695 3685 
4400 4400 
19.150 19450 


SK index : 43248 


Source: AFP. 

NA: not mated; mjl: nor 
ovaHnbta: hd: ex-dividend. 



¥ 


,101^ I 01 " 


.. ^ bps 


■0 


iBin* Beal 
ifiorinii V i:a i i 


t 


JJ -i imhi 


l U p Be 


^ .. 

c' 

• •• 

* ylV,’. = : ' 






lYv.. - 


■ ■■■ 
'■ ■- 




^ :■ - 


WsjiV’ • ■■ 


* M.+a- 






**T«' 




■- 

Y. wTl r,f t ’? Vr.. 
w, Ur L 1 L. .... •- ■ 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 19B5 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


: 

lc ^lv* 

■Efj 

■7$ 

S» £*< 

| ja !t 
Her- ■ ** 




Least for the Most: Baseball’s AU-Star Absentees 




"<Hl! 4*; 

’y: rv* 

r ; 


By Murray Chass 

New York Times Sendee 

HEW YORK. — The postseason 
awards have all been bestowed and 
the all-star teams selected (there 
certainly were enough of them), but 
here are an award and an all-star 
team unlike any that have been 
established in the past. This recog- 
nition gpes to the players who. be- 
cause of injuries, played the least 
and earned the most in 1984. 

It is done not to make light of the 
players' bad luck, but to point out 
the fortune injuries cost the clubs. 

The man who played the least 
and earned the most last season 
was Dennis Leonard, the hard-luck 
pitcher of the Kansas City Royals. 
An injured knee that has required 
three operations kept Leonard out 
the entire season and prevented 
him from earning his $900,000 in- 
come cm the field. 

Other injured players, such as 
Bob Homer and Jack Clark, earned 
more than Leonard, but they at 
least played some before injuries 
aided their seasons. They never- 
theless gained spots on the all-in- 
jured, afi-earning all-star team: 

First Base — Paul Molitor, Mil- 
waukee, $960,000 (he played 13 
games). Molitor is not a first base- 
man, but no legitimate first base- 
man had the correct combination 
of a lot of missed time and a lot of 
money earned Anyway, Molitor 
has been a second baseman, short- 
stop, third baseman and outfielder 
in the majors, so why not a first 
baseman? 

Seated Base — Jerry Remy, 
Boston, $465,000 (30 games). 

Shortstop — Rick Burleson, Cal- 
ifornia. $856,667 (7 games). Back- 
up: Dickie Thon, Houston, 
$675,000 (5 games). 

Third Base — Bob Homer, At- 
lanta, $ 1 ,200.000 (32 games). Back- 


up: John Castino, Minnesota, 
$600,000 (8 games). 

Left Field — jack Clark, San 
Francisco, $1,300,000 (57 games). 

Center Field — Gorman Thom- 
as, Seattle, $690,000 (35 games). 

Right Field — Ellis Valentine, 
California, 5300.000 (did not play). 
Backup: Dan Ford. Baltimore, 
$425,000 (25 games). 

Catcher — Bo Diaz, Philadel- 
phia, $525,000(27 games). Backup: 
John Stearns, New York Mels, 
5400,000 (8 games). 

Designated Hitter — Richie 
Zisk, Seattle, $257,143 (dnp). 

Pitchers — Dennis Leonard, 




Hard-Luck Dennis Leonard 


Bruins Beat Devils, 3-2, 
As Goring Again Excels 


Confuted bv Our Staff Front Dispatches 

EAST kUTHERFORD, New 
Jersey — The Boston Bruins have 
recerved an injection of youth from 
a 35-year-old rejecL 

Butch Goring, considered over 
the hill last week when he was 
waived by the New York Islanders, 
scored his second game-winning 

NHLFOCUS 

goal for his new dub here Tuesday 
night to spark Boston's 3-2 Nation- 
al Hockey League victory over the 
New Jersey Devils. 

Elsewhere it was Calgary 5, 
Hartford 2; Montreal 2, Quebec 1, 
and Vancouver 6, the New York 
Islanders 5. 

Rick Middleton, who assisted on 
all three Boston goals, said center- 
man Goring has added another di- 
mension to the Bruins with his hus- 
tling style. 

“He can play in any situation," 
said Middleton. ‘Tonight he 
played like a 21-year-old with the 
smarts of a 35-year-old." 

The Bruins, who had been strug- 
gling, have won three of their last 
four. Goring has been a key factor 
in ouch victory. Last Wednesday he 
scored Lhe winning goal against To- 
ronto and Saturday night he set up 
the game-winner in a 4-3 decision 
over Detroit. 

Goring got the final tally of the 
game with 38 seconds remaining in 
the second period when he flipped 


a shot over goal tender Hannu 
KamppurL 

The goal came eight seconds af- 
ter Joe CireDa was penalized, giving 
Boston a two-man advantage. 

“Getting the winning goal is just 
something that happens,” said 
Goring. “All the ice time puts some 
fun back in the game. It’s nice to 
play well while Islander fans are 
watching" (the game was broadcast 
via cable in the New York Gry 
area). 

Lack of ice time had made Gor- 
ing unhappy with the Islanders, 
and Brain General Manager Harry 
Sinden and Coach Gerry Cbeevers 
both promised the 15-year veteran 
he’d gel plenty of playing time. 

Steve Kasper’s goal with the 


game 21 seconds old gave Boston a 

1- 0 lead that lasted until rookie' 
Greg Adams connected on his first 
NHL goal at 13:08 of the period. 

Paul Gagne finished off a pretty 

2- on-l break with a feed to Adams, 
who fired a 10-footer into an open 
net 

Goring helped set up the Bruins' 
second goal, with 1:21 left in the 
opening period, combining with 
Middleton to set up Tom Fergus’s 
2 1st goal of the season on a 40-foot 
slapshot. The Devils set the stage 
for Go ring’s game- winner by tying 
the game on Tun Higgins’s 10-foot- 
er midway through the second peri- 
od. 

Boston, 4-1-1 in its last six 
games, ended New Jersey's two- 
game winning streak. (AP. UP!) 


USTA Underscores Rules 
On Denis Cup Behavior 


Compiled by Our Staff From Ddpaujta 

NEW YORK — In recent days, 
the top 30 or so U.S. tennis players 
have received anrespondaice from 
the U.S. Tennis Association re- 
garding the Davis Cop. A standard 
application form for those interest- 
ed in being an the team, sc he dules, 
and other pertinent information 
were included. 

There was also a letter from 
Hunter Ddatour, president of the 
USTA, reminding the players that 
they need not apply unless they are 
prepared to observe the rules of 
gentlemanly behavior that have 
been flouted in the past. 

Arthur Ashe, the team captain, 
said last week that the USTA was 
in the process of "lightening the 
rules" after the disturbances creat- 
ed by J imm y Connors and John 
McEnroe last month in Gbteborg, 
Sweden, where the Americans lost 
to Sweden in the cup final. Connors 
was fined $2,000 for his behavior 
and McEnroe was critical of the 
court and the tinting of the event. 

Ddatour' s letter hardly included 
dramatic changes or additions to 
the rules that exist in the mat's 
code of conduct The guideline 
stressed that future U.S. Davis Cup 
teams must agree to "act with cour- 
tesy and civility towards competi- 
tors, officials and spectators. ... 

“We believe the players’ partici- 
pation under these guidelines win 
be a vital factor, not only in the 
success of our Davis Cup endeav- 
ors, but also in the representatiqa 
of themsdves and their country in 
the finest manner possible." 

“It isaremforcement of the rules 
and of our postion," said Ed Fa- 
bririus, a USTA spokesman. “We 
want the players alerted to what’s 
expected of them. We want to re- 
mind them of the specific Davis 
Cup roles." 

After the final in Gdtebotg, Har- 
ry Merio, president or Louisiana- 
Pacific Corp„ which sponsors the 


Kansas City, $900,000 (dnp): Mike 
Norris, Oakland, $729,321 (dnp): 
Rudy May, New York Yankees, 
$638,000 (dnp); Pete Vuckovicb, 
Milwaukee. $575,000 (dnp); Ken 
Forsch, California, $650,000 (2 
games): Rick Langford, Oakland, 
S6GS J34 (3 games); Fred Braining, 
Montreal £360,000 (4 games); 
John Monterusco, Yankees, 
$666,667 fil games); Bob Forsch, 
Sl Louis, $491,667 (16 games). 

In the case of the Forsches, this is 
probably the first time brothers 
have missed so much time and 
earned so much money. 

Burleson has played only 51 
games the past three seasons while 
earning $2257 millio n, and Leonard 
has pitched 10 games the past two 
seasons while earning $1.8 million. 

Three other players of note 
earned enough money but did not 
miss enough playing lime because 
of their injuries to warrant selec- 
tion to the all-injured, ail-earning 
all-star team. George Brett of Kan- 
sas City and Bill Madlock of Pitts- 
burgh each earned Si mBlioo while 
playing 104 and 103 games, respec- 
tively, and Rod Carew of Califor- 
nia earned $875,000 while playing 
93 games. 

Jack Clark's knee injury forced 
the San Francisco Giants to moke a 


move last June that they seemed to 
have been resisting. They sum- 
moned Dan Gladden from Phoe- 
nix, where he was playing his third 
JOO-plus season, put him in center 
field and moved Chili Davis io 
right in Gark’s place. 

“They told me it was numbers 
and options." Gladden said, dis- 
cussing bis plight at Phoenix before 
Clark was injured. T didn't believe 
that. I just felt they wanted a more 
veteran team. That’s why they 
picked up Gene Richards ana 
Dusty Baker. J asked the Giant 
front office what 1 bad (o do to get 
there. They said be patient. I asked 
(ban to trade me if they weren't 
going to use me. They said be pa- 
tient. 

“But I was ready to go to Japan. 
People from Japan bad scouted me 
for days. They were getting ready 
to make me an offer. There was a 
figure floating around that would 
have been tough to turn down.” 

Clark, though, hurt his knee and 
Gladden, who was hitting . 397 with 
32 stolen bases at Phoenix, moved 
into the Giant lineup as the leadoff 
hitter. Playing the last three 
months of the season, the 27-year- 
old had a half-season that most 
players would be happy with for a 
full season. 


His performance, in fact, was re- 
markably similar to — though in 
most categories slightly better than 
— the rookie season Wade Boggs 
had with Boston. 

Batting virtually the same num- 
ber of tunes as Boggs, Gladden 
compiled these figures: a 351 bat- 
ting average (to Boggs's 349), a 
.410 on-base percentage (to .406). a 
.447 slugging percentage (to .441), 
71 runs scored (to 51), 31 runs 
batted in (to 44), 4 home runs (to 
5), and 31 stolen bases (to 1). 

IT lhe Giants were to give Glad- 
den a raise in salary in proportion 
to what the Red Sox gave Boggs for 
his second season — in which he 
batted .361 — the center fielder's 
pay for 1985 would be $165,000. 
Gladden, though, isn't even certain 
he’ll have a regular job this season. 

“1 heard that Clark was going to 
play first base and then 1 read he 
said he didn't know if be could play 
first because of the starts and 
stops," Gladden said. "If he 
doesn’t play first, that would give 
them four starting outfielders. 
They could say, shoot, Danny, you 
have another option: Go down to 
Phoenix, you’ll be weD paid." 

Gladden, though, would prefer 
to be well paid and in San Francis- 
co. 


1 '^tsass,- 


® 'IP - s 


v. „:r. : v ’ • vijv.’.vA. ;•■■■*■ % • •• 









ICED OUT — Snow removal at Parc des Princes in Paris continued Wednesday after 
the French Rugby Federation announced Saturday's Five Nations opener against 
Wales had been postponed until March 30. The federation said that despite efforts to 
thaw the field, the lowest temperatures since 1956 have left it unplayable. Meanwhile, 
the French Soccer Federation said it may cancel the weekend’s 10 first-division 
matches, l ^ngiw leader Bordeaux, in usually mild southwestern France, was left with a 
frozen pitch after temperatures fell to minus 16 centigrade (3 Fahrenheit) Tuesday. 


How to Stop the Super Bowl Quarterbacks? Their Peers Can Only Guess 


By John Ed Bradley 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Lester 
Hayes, ibe veteran Los Angeles 
Raider cornerback, was watching a 
videotape of the American Confer- 
ence playoff game between Miami 
and Seattle. He was enthralled. 

“This guy can do anything," 
Hayes said. “Of the thousands of 
game films I’ve watched in my 
eight years in the league. I've never 
seen a quarterback as good as Dan 
Marino. That doesn’t mean the 
Dolphins can’t be stopped. But the 
question you have lo ask is just how 
are the 49ers going to do it?" 

The flip side of that concern is 
equally perplexing: How will the 
Dolphin defense, also known as the 
Killer Bees, stop the San Francisco 
offense and quarterback Joe Mon- 
tana's slow-sting wizardry when 
the iwitu meet in the Super Bow) 
Sunday in Palo Alto, California? 

“That’s what I’ve been wonder- 
ing." says Los Angeles Ram Coach 
John Robinson. T'd bet they’D 
need a fifth quarter to figure out 
which is the better team." 

Marino finish ed the season as 
the National Football League's 
leading passer and became the first 
quarterback ever to surpass 5,000 
yards. Montana threw for 3.640 
yards in the 16 regular-season 
games; be was second in comple- 
tion percentage (to Atlanta’s Steve 
Bartkowski) with 64 jS percenL 

As effective as both the Miami 
and San Francisco offenses are. 


SCOREBOARD 


their fundamental philosophies are 
polar. While Marino usually relies 
on big pasting strikes to speedy 
receivers Mark Clayton and Mark 
Du per, Montana works the ground 
game around a steady flux of preci- 
sion. middle-range passes. 

“The only way to stop these two 
teams is to' take a gun and shoot 
’em," says Washington safety Cur- 
tis Jordan. “It’s a perfect combi na- 


*; ; ; Tk 




t 1 vm 


Dan Marino 


Basketball 

National Basketball Association Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


San Antonio 

17 

20 

459 

4 


Atlantic Division 



Utah 

17 

23 

434 

5 

, 

W L 

Pd. 

GB 

Kansas City 

13 

35 

-343 

Bto 

Barton 

33 6 

842 

— 


Pacific (Nvlrtoa 



Philadelphia 

33 6 

£42 

— 

LA. Lakors 

36 

13 

467 



Washington 

II 17 

SSI 

11 

Phoenix 

30 

19 

413 

a 

Now Jorsev 

18 30 

474 

14 

Portland 

16 

31 

462 

8 

New Yortc 

13 38 

J17 

M‘V 

LA. Clippers 

Ift 

22 

450 

B4 


Central Division 



Seattle 

18 

22 

450 

av* 

Milwaukee 

27 14 

459 

— 

Golden State 

10 

27 

J70 

15 

Dot roll 

31 16 

■568 

4 

TUESDAY’S RESULTS 


Chicago 

19 19 

500 

i’.1 

Philadelphia 

33 

24 

23 23—93 

Atlanta 

16 23 

.431 

9'J 

New York 

23 

17 

17 25-82 


Cleveland 

Indiana 


11 25 JU in* 
11 37 .389 IO- 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMKd □{vision 

Denver 22 17 JM — 

Dallas 21 17 453 *s 

Houston 21 17 353 


Molorw 13-20 84 31 Cheeks 8-10 1-2 17; Cum- 
mings 9.132-4 20,TuOier 7-122-217. Rebounds: 
Philadelphia 59 (Ervins 12); New York 35 
(Orr, Bailey 7}. Assists; Phi lodetnflia 23 
(Taney at; New York 20 (Walker SI. 
Atlanta hub 33—121 

Indiana M 27 14 22-113 

Wilkins 13-25 6-9 JZ EJotinson 8-14 10-12 27; 


U A team, threatened to withdraw 
support if the Americans continued 
redisplay poor sportsmanship. De- 
latour, speaking at a dinner alter 
the final match, apologized for the 
embarrassment caused by McEn- 
roe and Connors. 

Both players were angered by the 
USTA’s and Merle’s actions- Con- 
nors said that Merio should have 
confronted him and not voiced his 
displeasure in a letter sent re the 
USTA and released to the news 
media. Sources close to the USTA 
said the association was also not 
pleased with Merlo's methods, 
which it felt bordered on grand- 
standing. 

Connors reacted with disdain to 
the USTA guideline. “I have other 
things to think about," he said 
Tuesday. This is No. 650 on my 
]jsl" Connors, 32. also said he “re- 
sented getting a carbon copy in the 
mail- 1 consider myself ana McEn- 
roe big enough boys to come and 
talk to face-to-face." (NYT, AP i 

■ McEnroe Named 1984’s Best 

7he International Tennis Feder- 
ation nnanimously named Ameri- 
can John McEnroe its best player 
/or 1984, United Press Internation- 
al reported Wednesday from Lon- 
don. McEnroe won the 1984 Wim- 
bledon and U.S. Open 
championships and last week’s 
Masters tournament 

Voting were grand-slam winner 
Dim Budge of the United Stales; 
Briton Fred Perry, the 1934-36 
Wimbledon tiilisl; American Tony 
Trabert, a Wimbledon, French and 
US champion in the 1950s; Aus- 
tralian Lew Hoad, who won the 
Australian, French and Wimble- 
don lilies in 1956, and Frank Sedg- 
man, Australia’s first post-war 
Wimbledon champion. 

It is the third time McEnroe has 
won the honor, equaling BjOra 
Borg’s citations for 1978. *79 and 
80. 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pts GF GA 
PhJkxtelPtlto 26 12 5 57 1H7 127 

Washington 25 12 7 57 180 125 

N.Y. I&ian<u>ra 25 17 1 51 206 173 

PfffrtMirgh T7 19 4 38 145 176 

N.Y. Rowers 14 21 7 35 153 171 

New Jersey 15 24 4 34 148 174 


Montreal 

Buffalo 

Quebec 

Boston 

Hartford 


SI. Louis 

Oilcavo 

Mnnasoia 

Detroit 

Toronto 

Edmonton 
Colaorv 
Wind toco 


Adams Division 

il 22 13 9 53 170 142 

19 13 II 49 160 128 

21 18 6 48 17B 162 

20 17 7 47 158 151 

a 16 20 5 37 140 175 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
N arris Division 

s IT 17 7 41 140 156 


19 21 3 41 168 163 

>4 22 7 35 154 174 

13 25 5 31 152 197 

7 30 5 19 127 196 

Smvfhe Dhrtrton 

30 9 4 64 219 13S 

22 T7 S 40 2 06 I7S 

71 18 4 46 178 183 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

CHICAGO — Sloped Mark Gilbert, out 
fielder. 

CLEVELAND— Sinned Tony Bemowru 
and Junior Noboa second baseman; Jell Mar- 
onto. tnird baseman; Jim Wilson and Luis 
Oulnanes. Inflotoers; Dwight Taylor, Raney 
Washington, Miguel Roman and Bernardo 
Brtio, outfielders, and Ramon Ronwra. Jett 
Barkeiv.ana Rich Doyle. Pilchers, lo one-vear 
contracts. 

TEXAS— sinned Jim Anderson and Sieve 
Bucchele, MiKakton. to one-vear contraov 

National League 

LOS ANGELES— Signed Cecil E5PV. Lenv 
mto Milter. Ralph Bryant and Mike Ramsev, 
outfielder*, and Ken Hawaii, oitcner. 

PITTSBURGH— Reached agreemenr on 
1905 con trad 5 wl(h Sieonon Tavtor. outfield- 
er. and Chris Ritter, pitcher. Released Mario 
Mendoza iniielder. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 

CLEVELAND— Announced lhat Howard 
Mudd will be retained as Offensive line coach. 

United Slates Football Leaoue 

JACKSONVILLE— Signed Chip Andrews, 
«P*W, 

NEW JERSEY— Stoned Heyward Golden, 
lrv« safety; John Tauwio and cl stemfeia. 
offensive lacklrs; Derrick HnlOiert one Bill 


tion. Miami is always coming up 
with the long bombs, anti ’Frisco 
goes with tne. short, controlled 
stuff. The Dolphins go for broke, 
the 49ers dink you zo death.” 

Most i aims have lived and died 
with the zone defense against the 
Dolphins, considering man-io-man 
coverage too risky against Duper 
and Clayton. Only the Raiders, 
who beat Miami 45-34. were effec- 
tive against Marino with “man" 
coverage, but that had everything 
to do with the skills of Hayes ana 
Mark Haynes on lhe corners. 

“The most important factor in 
playing Dolphin receivers is re ap- 
ply pressure as soon as they get off 
the ball,” says Hayes. “When you 
give them a seven- or eight-yard 
cushion, as Eric Wright and Ron- 
nie Lott probably wfllfor the 49ers, 
you’re opening yourself up to trou- 
ble. The margin of error by playing 
them tight is minimized." 

Still, Marino managed re drill 
the Raiders silly, throwing for more 
than 400 yards’ 

Haynes, who intercepted two 
passes against the Dolphins, says 
Miami's offensive line is largely re- 
sponsible for Marino’s success, 
having allowed only 14 sacks in 18 
games this season. But the blitz also 
hasn’t worked well “because Mari- 
no gets rid erf the ball so quickly. 
He doesn't have to cock bade re 
throw 50 yards, and there’s usually 
no indication the ball's coming. An 
of a sudden it's on top of you." 

Redskin linebacker Rich Milot 


LOT Aimin 17 17 9 43 190 I7v 

Vancouver II 29 5 XT 146 Ut 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
Montreal 0 5 i— 2 

Quebec 8 0 1—1 

Niton (9>. Tremblay (1BI; P. Stastnv (20j. 
Shots on goal; Montrnal (on 5ovlgnv>9.n-B— 
28; Quebec (on Penney) 9-1-13—21 
Boston 2 1 0—3 

New Jersey 1 1 0—2 

Kasper (13), Fergus (21). Garins (4); Ao- 
ems 11 1, h looms HO). Shots 00 goat: Boston 
(on Karri court] 6-12-12—30: New Jersey Ion 
Peelers) 10-7-6—25. 

Calgary l 1 1— 5 

Hartford 0 2 D—J 

Macinnls (91. Wilson (13). Patlerson (221. 
PeollnsU illi.Laob (17); Lumlev (7),Moiona 
(B>. Shots oa oocri: Colon rv (on Millml 7-11- 
14—32: Mart tort (on Lemelln) 7-14-12— 31 
M-Y. luanOartt a l 4 6—5 

Vancouver 1 3 | 1—6 

NetMv 2 (10). Skrlko (7), Sumfalrom (ID), 
Tanil 114). G I Ills (3); B. Sutter (261. Troltfer 
(171, Bossy (381. Paivln 2 (6). Shots on anal: 
N.Y. (slandsrs (on Brodourl 7-^6- 1 — 10; Van- 
couver (on Smith) 13.14-11-1—39. 


Hill, cnrnerbacxs; Jim Dumont. Ilnooocker, 
and Vauatm Broodnas. fuffback. 

OAKLAND— Announced the restoration of 
joe Penarv. offensive coordinator. Named 
MacArthur Lane rumlno backs coach. Adaed 
Ed Muronskv. offensive lock la; Crois 
Dunowoy, Horn end; Torn UcConnouenev, 
wide receiver; Tom Morris, cornerback. and 
Randy Logon, safety, to Hie roster. 

TAMPA BAY— Named Rich McGoarge of- 
fensive coordinator and attentive line coach 
and Can Franks running backs coach. Signed 
Ron Sauer, ouorterback. 

HOCKEY 

national Mocker Leaoue 

HARTFORD— Sen) Sieve Weeks. goalie, to 
Binohanttonoi the American Hockey League. 
Called up Ed 5lantow*kl, goalie, from Bing- 
hamton. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Coiled UP Chris Konlos, 
toll wlnp, and Marks Prou I n. ooalle. from New 
Haven et tne American Hockey League. 

COLLEGE 

ALABAMA— Named Sfeve Walters assfc- 
tont football coach. 

HAMILTON— Named Sieve Frank Ioann 1 1 
coach. 

NORTHERN ARIZONA— Nomad Don 
Bloc* welder assist ont loatbail coach. 

PR I NC ETON— Named Steve Tosehet. Sab 
OePew, Craig Cason. Mark Harrlmgn. Mike 
Hcaaun. and Steve verbit, assistant football 
coaches. 


says the way to neutralize Marino 
“is not by blitzing on the outside 
but hitting it up the middle. . . .If 
you penetrate the center-guard 
area, you have a belter chance of 
throwing him off than coming from 
the outside." 

Robinson says it is equally diffi- 
cult to blitz Montana, considered 
by many re be the most elusive 
quarterback in the NFL His ability 
re break clear of the pocket, avoid 
the heavy-duty rash and throw on 
the run presents an altogether dif- 
ferent threat from Marino's quick- 
hit capabilities. 

“It’s hard for people to realize," 
says Milot of Montana, “just how 
incredibly quick he is back there." 

Ralph Hawkins. Seattle’s defen- 
sive secondary coach, says Mon- 
tana’s quick-rhythm passes are al- 
most impossible re stop and “their 
methodical, grind-it-out approach 
can wear you down." 

Washington opened the season 
with Miami and took on San Fran- 
cisco eight days later. It lost to 
both. “You play a team like Mi- 
ami,” says Redskin safety Mark 
Murphy, “and you know you're go- 
ing to give up yardage. You have to 
get the interceptions. Yon also have 


to gp with the blitz, no matter how 
strong the Dolphins are against it. 

“I think Miami’s recovers are 
more talented than San Francis- 
co's. but the 49er schemes are so 
well-designed. I think what gives 
them a tremendous edge is the rela- 
tionship that has developed be- 
tween Montana and [wide receiver 
Dwight] Clark. Some people say 
they don’t have the deep threat, but 
they’re not taking into consider- 
ation Renaldo Nehemiah and 
Freddie Solomon. ...” 

In their 45-28 loss lo the Dol- 
phins in the AFC title game, the 
Steelers threw the whole company 
store at Marino — and came up 
with a handful of dusL They used 
schemes designed to boggle the 
young quarterback's mind and 
wreck his spirit, everything from 
dropping eight men and rushing 
only three to alternately blitzing 
everyone and no one. Miami made 
*lhe S teeter effort look goofy. 

Hayes’s summary comment: 
“Everything you take into a game is 
a simple dream. And it’s simpler 
when you’re playing somebody as 
good as Dan Marino. He usually 
does whatever he wants, while you 
do whatever you can.” 





Joe Montana 


Bucks Board Up the Lakers, 115-105 


Fleming 10-13 3-4 21 Kellogg g-ia 4^ 22. Re- 
bound*; Atlanta 59 IWIIIU 10): Indiana 40 
(Kellogg 11). Aufets: Atlanta 30 IE Johnson 
12); Indiana 22 (Thomas. Sletillno 4). 

Utah 26 26 30 19—101 

Son Antonia 26 33 33 29—121 

Robertson 13-15 M 27, Mitchell 8-16 44 20; 
Griffith 9-16 34 2], Danlfev 7-15 7-0 21. Re- 
bauadi : u tah 44 ( Boltov, Eaton 12) ; San Anto- 
nio 53 (Gilmore, Moore 10). Assist*: Utah 25 
(Green III; San Antonio 35 (Moore 131. 
LA. Lakers 28 37 30 20—105 

Milwaukee 25 34 27 29—115 

Cummings 15-37 9-11 39. Moncrtet 9-20 10-12 
ta: E. Jonman 13-16 6-7 33, Scotl 10-14 0-1 20. 
Rebounds: los Angeles 43 (Worfhv III; Mil- 
waukee 54 (Cum minus. Ustor 9). Assists: LOT 
Angeles 27 (E. Johnson 9); Milwaukee 34 
(Prasev 12). 

CftneJaod 37 28 34 27— m 

Kansas. City 32 38 13 15—112 

Hubbard ft- 1 9 6-6 22, Thomason 6-11 3-4 16; E. 
Johnson 13-23 6-6 30. Thesis 10-17 2-2 22. Re- 
bounds: Cleveland 55 (Hinson, Turpin 91; 
Kansas City 47 fL Thomason (31. Assists: 
Cleveland 29 (Bogtov 13): Kansas City 2B 
(Thesis 7». 

Dane* 27 JS 34 51— 149 

Golden state M 21 31 28—184 

Aguirre 6-11 13-1525. Btocfcman 9-13 5-6 21; 
Short U-24 6-7 33. Elovd 5-13 3-4 17. RetMUHlt: 
□alias 59 (Vincent 13); GoKten Stale 401 Shod 
7). Assists: DoIIbsji I Da vis. Harper 6); Gold- 
en Stale 19 I Short, Conner. Johnson. Wilson, 
Bratz 3). 

I— A. CHOPCrs 21 34 28 II— 83 

Seattle 24 33 19 25—101 

Chambers 10-21 4-424, Henderson 8- 14 59 21; 
Smith B-J5 6-8 22. M. Johnson 6-15 0-0 12 Re- 
bounds: Los Anoeles 45 1 Donaldson 111; Seat- 
tle «5 (Slkma 10). Assists; Los Angeles 19 
(Nison 6): Sea tile 31 (Henderson 11). 
Houston 32 22 21 32-117 

Portland 33 23 48 35—131 

Paxson 16-18 7-8 40, M_ Thompson B-17 12-16 
28: Sampson l5-2S2-3 32,Olaluwon 12-16 5-729. 
Rebounds: Houston 57 [Sampson ill: Port- 
land 4] im. Thompson ft). Assists: Houston 34 
(Wtoafrts 91; Po rt land 71 (Vb(enf(ne 7). 


Selected College Results 

EAST 

Albany St. OA Montclair St. 54 
Cornell 79, Hamilton 66 
Elmira 72. Buffalo 64 
Fordham 62. SI. Peter's 55 
La Salto 8S, Manhattan 74 
Nfogara 54. Colgate 44 
Nidioii 78, Coast Guard 65 
Norwich 74. St. Joseph's. Vt. 64 
Rochester Tech 66. Goneseo St. 61 
51. John Fisher 69, Hobart 63 
So tom St. 76, Botes 66 
Salisbury St. 85. Virginia Wesfevan 71 
Trenton 5f 42, Rufgers-Camden SO 
vilionovfl 85. Boston Coll, te 
Virginia ML Penn 50 
WOTOttler Tech 99, Suffolk 83 
Yale 83, Brown 82 

SOUTH 

N. Carolina Wesleyan 69. Chris. Newport 64 
Norfolk st. 69. Hampton Inst. 67 
Virginia union 81. F ovett m/llls St. 63 
Wash, & Lee 58. Morwitl# S2 
MIDWEST 

Bowling Green 66. Cent. Michigan 58 
Dayton 53, W. Kentucky 51 
Dubuque 60, Lutner 59 
Illinois weMevan 81. Whcaion. III. 72 
Nebraska Wesleyan 6a Ma-ttOMOJ City 53 
onto Dominican Ida, Tiffin 92 
Sloun Falls 107. Dakota Wgsiovan 82 
Tabor 67, St. Mary's, Kan. 60 
Wabash 69. Rase-Hulmon 42 
Washburn 85. Benedict tot Kan. 43 
SOUTHWEST 

Ain lent Christian 100. Mary Hantfn-Sartor 72 
Lubbock Christian 61. McMurrv 54 
Stephen F. Austin 73. Tcads weslevan 61 
FAR WEST 

Col Baptist 70, Pomona PitUf til 
Col-Dcvb 81 Concordia, N.Y. 70 
Hawaii Pacific 7 a Fresno Pacific 70 
N. Co loro do 58, Neo.-Omaha 51 JOT 
Point Loma Naiarene 98. 5. California Q1I.B6 
wrtMr St 90, us. fnnmoffonaf 5T 


Compiled by Our Staff Fmm Dispatches 

MILWAUKEE — The Milwau- 
kee Bucks taught the Los Angeles 
Lakers a valuable lesson hen; Tues- 
day night: It isn’t how well you 
shoot, but how much. Los Angeles 
made 60 J percent of its shots, com- 
pared with only 44.9 percent for the 
Bucks, but Milwaukee used a 22-8 
advantage in offensive rebounds to 
take 22 more shots than the Lakers 
en route to a 1 1 5- 105 National Bas- 
ketball Association derision. 

The Bucks, leaden in the Central 
Division, broke a four-game losing 
streak against the Lakers and won 
their fourth straight game re im- 
prove to 27-14, while los Angeles 
fell to 26- 1 3, still good enough Tor a 
six-game lead in tiie Pacific Divi- 
sion. 

Elsewhere it was Philadelphia 
93, New York 82; Atlanta 120, In- 
diana 113; San Antonio 121, Utah 
101; Cleveland 116, Kansas City 

NBA FOCUS 

112; Dallas 149, Golden Slate 104; 
Seattle 101, the Los Angeles Clip- 
pers 83, and Portland 121, Houston 
117. 

“They were shooting only about 
40 percent in the first half,” said 
Magic Johnson, who led the Lakers 
with 32 points. “But they were get- 
ting so many second opportunities. 

! don’t care what you snoot. When 
you get second and third shots, if s 
not going to hurt you.” 

Milwaukee forward Terry Cum- 
mings equaled his career high (also 
against the Lakers, in his rookie 
season two years ago) with 39 
points, while teammate Sidney 
Moncrief added 28. 

“Cummings always played well 
against us when be was with the 
Clippers,” Johnson said. “He’s 
tough to handle when he gpes to the 
offensive boards. He makes so 
many things happen." 

Cummings's 16 prints helped 
Milwaukee outscore the Lakers, 29- 
20, in the final quarter. The Bucks 
led only by 86-85 going into the 
fourth period. He passed Bob Mc- 
Adoo for a 90-87 lead and then 
beat McAdoo again for a three- 
poini play. 

“I started to get real hungry for 
lhe ball in the second half." Cum- 
mings said, “I wanted il - — I think 
we all wanted it.” 

After Johnson scored to bring 
the Lakers to within 109-104, Cum- 
mings put the game away with the 
type of play power forwards don't 
usually come up with: He dribbled 
between his legs and then canned a 
20-foot juniper with 2:02 left. 

“I’ve always been a dominant 
force.” Cummings said. “I just 
played on the Clippers, a team lhat 
didn’t win. If 1‘m an all-star, it's 
been a long time coming. I’m very 
proud of what 1 do. I warn to be 
pan of the elite." 

Cummings and Alton Lister had 
nine rebounds each to lead Mil- 
waukee's 54-43 rebounding mar- 
gin. Los Angeles also conmuited 22* 


turnovers and sent Milwaukee to 
the Tree-throw line 34 times. The 
Bucks converted 27 free throws; 
the Lakers were 12-for-18 from the 
line. 

With a Wednesday night game 
against the Critics in Boston, the 
Lakers were facing the possibility 
of a 1-3 road trip (Detroit pounded 


Los Angeles, 121-98, on Sunday). 
“If somebody told roe a week ago 
that Td have to accept a 2-2 trip I’d 
have said, ‘No way,’ ” said Laker 
Coach Pat Riley. “Right now. I'd 
jump at il” 

Johnson's explanation for the re- 
cent Laker fiat spell: “We ain't 
playing no bad teams.” (AP. LAT) 


U.S. Auto Racing Is Gaining 
In Attendance, Participation 


By Steve Potter 

Ne*i York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — According to 
surveys conducted by the Good- 
year Tire and Rubber Company, 
attendance last year at major U.S. 
auto raring events increased by 52 
percent over the previous year, and 
starting fields were larger and of 
better quality than ever before. 

“Nineteen eighty-four was a veiy 
good year for motor sports,” said 
Burdette Martin Jr., the head of the 
Automobile Competition Commit- 
tee of the United States, the body 
that oversees auto raring in this 
country. “But *85 should be even 
better.” 

With the exception of Formula 
One, all major forms of raring in 
the United States are in robust 
health. Indy car racing, which was 
at an ebb in 1979, has in recent 
years dropped marginal events, de- 
veloped a fruitful mix of oval, road 
and street venues, and has courted 
large corporate sponsors. Now it’s 
challenging big- Lime stock-car rac- 
ing as a premiere form of U.S. mo- 
tor sports. 

Although it hasn't completely 
overcome its reputation as a south- 
ern regional sport — the bulk of the 
Winston Cup events are held with- 
in a few hours' drive of Charlotte, 
North Carolina — Grand National 
stock-car racing teams find pro- 
spective sponsors lining up at their 
doors and the bidding for sponsor- 
ship rights is fierce, even for teams 
lhat haven't won a race yet. 

The traditional start of the rac- 
ing season, Daytona Speed Week, 
is less than a month away. The first 
event, Feb. 2-3, is the Sun bank 24- 
Hours, in connection with the In- 
ternational Motor Sports Associa- 
tion’s successful Camel GT road 
raring series for prototype sports 
cars. Chevrolet is IMSA’s current 
manufacturer champion, but teams 
representing Porsche, Buick, Ford, 
Jaguar and Nissan are looking to 
take the crown. New for 1985 in 
IMSA is a prototype category for 
smaller cars: in that series, Mazda, 
Buick and BMW are the chief con- 
tenders. 

Martin credits the revived econo- 
my for auto racing's growth in at- 
tendance and participation. “The 
economic upturn obviously has had 
a great deal re do with racing's 
current prosperity," he said. “la 
the ’70s it was fashionable to talk 


about how building costs had got- 
ten so high that there wouldn’t be 
any new tracks. 

“Now people are planning new 
facilities again.” 

Prosperity tends to breed stabil- 
ity in team lineups, but there have 
been some significant changes. In 
Level Cross, North Carolina, Petty 
Enterprises had closed its doors af- 
ter supporting the efforts of three 
generations of stock-car racing's 
first family. Richard Petty left ibe 
team at the beginning of last year, 
and now his son. Kyle, has leal re 
drive for the Wood Brothers’ Ford 
team. 

Dale Yarborough hadn't driven 
a Ford since he quit the Wood team 
IS years ago. Now the Ranier team 
be drives for has abandoned its 
long loyalty to Chevrolet to run 
Fords. 

In Indy car raring, Danny Sulli- 
van has replaced A1 Unser Sr„ 
alongside Rich Mears on the 
Penske team. John Paul Jr. is Sulli- 
van’s replacement at Sbierson Rac- 
ing, the team that is sponsored by 
Thomas Monaghan, the owner of 
tiie Detroit Tigers and the Domi- 
no's pizza chain. A1 Unser Jr. has 
joined the new Lotus Indy car 
team. In 1965 — the last time Lotus 
won at Indianapolis — Unser was 3 
years old. and his father, now a 
three-time Indy 500 winner, was a 
rookie. 


Usher Is Named 
ToTopUSFLPost 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Harry Usher, 
executive vice president and gener- 
al manager of the Los Angeles 
Olympic Organizing Committee, 
was named the new commissioner 
of the United States Football 
League late Tuesday. The 45-vear- 
old lawyer was given a three-year 
contract, effective Feb. 1 . 

Usher succeeds Chet Simmons, 
who resigned Monday after serving 
as commissioner since the sprine- 
sunimer league was founded nearly 
three years ago. Simmons had been 
under fire from some club owners 
Tor failing to negotiate a new, larger 
network television contract and for 
the league’s continued financial 
losses. 


i 








«ge 46 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1985 


art buchwald 


Super Bowl Amendment MciTfl Qlfllld 


"“Jf anyone 
mum ** “ UU S U - 

rtsSte^ preadcntoftheU ^- 

W Monday the 21st, 
thri7SL^ aVC u U3 a So bach to 
uSSSay b«g and read about 

Fifty-gy of ^ founding fathers 
^^^^b^inSununer 
mem i W ^ Stalest docu- 

in the jgn. 

oriL t 

dividual states. 

_ One of the 
b‘ggest stum- 

Wmg Mocks was n , 

when u> swear in Bucirwald 

the president The suggested date 
for ms bauguration was Jan. 20. 
nnd there didn't seem to be any 
“gumeot about it untfl John Acf- 
ams of Massachusetts said, “Sup- 
pose Jan. 20 falls on a Sunday the 
same day the Super Bowl is to be 
played? Do we still hold the presi- 
dent’s inauguration on that day?" 

The founding father from Rhode 
Islan d said, “I say verily the inau- 
guratioa of the president of the 
United States must have prece- 
dence over the Super BowL” 

□ 

vania, who owned a piece^Mhe 
Philadelphia Eagles, jumped up 
and cried, “The American people 
will never stand for it. They dran’t 
fight a bloody revolution to see the 
Super Bowl be moved from Sunday 
to Monday. I say verily the Super 
Bowl must be played on its tradi- 
tional Sunday and tbe president 
have his inauguration at a less aus- 
picious time.*' 

The founding father from New 
Jersey, who never dreamed the 
New York Giants and tbe New 
York Jets would one day move to 
his state, took the floor. ^How can 
the United States become the most 
powerful nation in the world, when 
it would put off tire inauguration of 
Us leader to pander to the sports 
tastes of its oountrymenr 

This enraged tbe representative 
from Georgia, who had received 
money from the Atlanta Falcons. 
“Nobody in my state cares when 


Nwetist Portrays Europeans and the Japanese 
As Being Perpetually Pitted Against One Another 


they inaugurate a president but 
everyone knows you only play a 
Super Bowl on Sunday. I cannot go 
back home and ask iny people to 
ratify this Constitution if the day of 
the Super Bowl has to be post- 
poned m the name of political ex- 
pediency." 

The founding father from North 
Carolina hooted. “What difference 
does it make to yon? The Atlanta 
Falcons will never get to the Super 
Bowl anyway.” 

□ 

George Washington, who was 
presiding and had no idea that an 
NFL team would someday be 
named after him said, “I think we 
should table this matter for the 
moment until we can speak to foot- ' 
ball commissioner Pete Rozelle, to 
see if his feet are in cement on the 
Jan. 20tb date." 

John Adams rose and said, “I 
can speak for Commissoner Ro- 
zetle, as I represented the New En- 
gland Patriots at the last league 
meeting. He said be would be 
breaking faith with the millions of 
people in the 13 states if the game 
was not held on a Sunday two 
weeks after the playoffs." 

The founding father from Dela- 
ware roared, “The president comes 
first — first in peace, first in war, 
and first in the hearts of his coun- 
trymen." 

Alexander Hamilton, who had 
season tickets to all the New York 
Giants games, said, “Hie delegate 
can easily say that, since Delaware 
could never support a NFL fran- 
chise even if every person in the 
state came to every game." 

The constitutional convention 
was in a shambles and about to 
disintegrate when James Madison 
offered his famous compromise. 
“Gentlemen, in deference to tbe 
states that do not have NFL fran- 
chises, I propose we do not put it in 
writing that the Super Bowl have 
precedence over the inaugurarinn 
of the president. But let us include 
in the minutes that it was the will of 
this body that if the 20th of January 
fell on a Sunday we wanted the 
Super Bowl to be played firsL” 

The motion was adopted and the 
Constitution was saved. That is 
why this year President Ronald 
Reagan, a stria constitutionalist, 
will be sworn in privately on Sun- 
day, but his inauguration, accord- 
ing to t be wishes of the founding 
fathers, will be held on Monday. 


By Christine Chapman 

fmmaliOrtal Herald Tribune 

T/"OBE, Japan — On the slope of Mount 
-IV Rokko, overlooking this port city, the 


Eurasian novelist Mrira Chand lives among 
art objects from Japan, India, Korea and 
China. Her house is elegant testimony to the 
harmony possible among diverse cultures; 
her novels depict its impossibility. Chand, 
who is completing her fourth novel, writes 
about the clash between East and West, be- 
tween Europeans and Japanese perpetually 
pitted against one another. 

“I write about the foreigner’s position In 
Japan,” said Chand, who was bom and edu- 
cated in London, the daughter of an Indian 
doctor-politician and a Swiss mother. “My 
Japanese characters are on tbe periphery. No 
writer can write about a character in depth 
whose childhood be hasn't shared to some 
extent, ft's a great loss for me as a writer 
writing about Japan. With the Japanese l 
share no blood, no marriage, no childhood 
affinities. 1 am only giving an approximation 
of life.” 

Except for five years in India, Chand. 42, 
has lived in Japan since 1962 with her hus- 
band, Kumar an Indian businessman in gen- 
eral exporting. Their son, Vikiam, 22, and 
daughter, Anjalai, 20, were bom in Kobe. 

In three novels published by John Murray 
of London and sold by Ticknor and Helds in 
tbe United States— "The Gossamer Fly” 
(197% “Last Quadrant” (1981) and “The 
Bonsai Tree” (1983) — Chand has protrayed 
the moral dflemma of Japanese and Western 
characters confronted with the differing val- 
ues of East and West Set in western Japan, in 
the area called Kansai, the books delineate 
individuals in jeopardy. The characters either 
grow stronger or become submerged by their 
response to the conflicts they face in alien 
territory. In “Gossamer Fly” the main char- 
acter is a young mil an outsider because her 
mother is F^ghsh and her father Japanese. 
She endures a summer without her mother in 
her father’s bouse, where be is having an 
affair with the Japanese maid. Still innocent, 
she is disturbed by her father’s secrecy, his 
lover’s cruelty, her brother’s awakening sexu- 
ality. 

In “Last Quadrant" the Western charac- 
ters and “ Haifa, " as Japanese label the chil- 
dren of mixed marriages, are outsiders, 
searching for a place where they can be safe, a 
place to belong. A typhoon hits the Kobe- 
Osaka area and is about to destroy an or- 
phanage where mixed-blood children are 
boused by nuns anxious about their own 
spiritual survival. All begin a treacherous 
journey to safety. 

In ’The Bonsai Tree" an En glish woman, 
Kate, becomes the instrument of moral judg- 
ment for the Japanese family she married 
into. Her husband is torn by loyalty to his 
mother and to his wife. He must make a 


Mrira Chand 

choice that would put him outside his culture, 
until tbe sudden death of Kate restores Mm to 
his fanrily. For the first time, however, he 

realises the meaning of guilt. 


realizes the meaning of guilt. 

A Japanese priest reminds the Kate: “By 
tradition you nave a collective social con- 
science in a different way to us. . .In ran 
society everybody has their place and func- 
tion, it is unthinkable to step out of line. 
People think of us as groupisl and we are, 
society forces os to it Bat if you talk to the 
individual you will find be often cherishes a 
wish to act alone. However, all virtue is in 
conforming here, and we obey." 

Chand's message seems to be that within 
the traditional values that still govern Japan 
there is tittle hope for reconciliation between 
tbe feelings of the individual and the de- 
mands of the group. With this theme the later 
novels veer toward melodrama as Chand is 
almost Dickensian in her vision of oppressed 
innocence in a calculating society. She is 
intent on creating emotion through shocking 
scenes and carefully constructed images, such 
as the bonsai being pruned by Kate's Japa- 
nese mother-in-law, and the destructive 
storm that tests tbe weak- willed. 

“I am a visual writer, perhaps because I 
was trained as a painter." Chand said, sitting 
under a large black-and-white oil she painted 
in 1978. “In the novels I was painting with 
words. I think pictures very much, pictures 
and emotions. Fm not a writer who writes 
about ideas. All I'm doing is to write about 
tbe relationships between people, tbe poverty 
of human existence. I suppose I'm not an 
optimist." 

She writes from compulsion and a feeling 
of emotional isolation from Japan. “1 write to 
prove I'm alive. 1 have to do it every day. 
When I wrote my first novel, I wrote a sen- 
tence, then a paragraph about a-child I didn’t 
know. She was of mixed Mood like myself. 


The pain of not belonging is my own pain, 
but The Gossamer Fly* is not my story.” 

She declared: T have no dislike of Japan or 
the Japanese. But Tin very tired of new 
participating in life as 1 would elsewhere. I’m 
very tired of bang an outsider. It’s exhausting 
io the spirit. The inadequacy of life here is not 
sided by writing. Writing is a sotftaiy act, an 
act of withdrawal” 

Tbe years that sbe and her family spent in 
Bombay, 1971 through 1975, were a revela- 
tion to Chand. “India was a country I didn't 
know and a half of myself I didn't know. It 
was a physical struggle to live there, but after 
the first year I loved iL In India I found 
myself as a writer” 

During those years she wrote short stories 
that bring out her wit and warmth, qualities 
not apparent in the Japan novels. The stories, 
a collection of which is expected to be pub- 
lished eventually, have appeared in maga- 
zines and anthologies. They show affectum 
and respect for the ordinary Indian. In “Tbe 
Gift of Sunday ” a Bombay businessman dis- 
covers that tie can conLrive to escape tbe 
family and cavort with a pretty giri on Sun- 
days. In “Spectrum,” a wife, ignored by her 
husband because she has borne a daughter, 
learns to defy him and win back his interest 
In "Rule Britannia,” an Indian woman takes 
lessons in eating European-styk from an En- 
glish woman. 

Chand's fourth novel, “Upon the Bluff,” 
concerns a 19th-century scandal in the for- 
eign community in Yokohama. She said she 
was reluctant to discuss it in detail since she 
was still working on iL “Even with a plan for 
writing;” she said, “you don't know what 
kind of slant you’ll present to your reader. 
How to get there and how you’ll express h is 
the unconscious at work.” 

When she finishes tbe new novel in the 
spring, Chand will go to London for several 
months to visit friends and family enjoy the 
city. She considers Kobe “provincial,” lack- 
ing the “Tokyo animus.” 

“I don’t know another writer here. We live 
in a far-removed world,” sbe said, referring to 
the international business community in 
Kobe. Tm best known in the cocktail crowd 
for not being seen.” 

Chand's last two novels have been translat- 
ed into Dutch and Italian, but not into Japa- 
nese. “I have no status as a writer here,” she 
said, “first, because Tm a woman, then, as a 
foreigner, and finally, I have no position of 
authority.” 

approval of her critict^ account oF^hTooun- 
try. Tm not flattering Japan," she admitted. 
Tm taking an analy tical and critical Stand, 
which is more difficult to accept in fiction 

than io l wnfirtin n 

T would like a rest from Japan,” she add- 
ed. “I want to write about India." 


people 


Little Tenderness 


J tciot. but I *wM love to haw 

Affection and uuduttjpa °ng ^ ^ dur* ports oppo- 
way - in fact. ilwyteMwr ib an .. 

going all the way. according to Amt ate * □ 

Landers readers. Three weeks. g TaIft pres5 secreuty to 

the American advice column^t __ Reagan for the past four 
asked readers if they is resrgmng to become a sc- 

tent ro forget {JoTvice president at the public 

cuddled and treated tenderty. More jjgj^ fan 'Burson-MurslclIcT. 
than 100.000 people nearly all of House has announced, 

them American women, have an- n 

swered. said Landers. Seventy-two - 

percent declared themselves willing The conductor Sarah Lawnefl 

far affection, AMuvumrrf double paeamomz. 


to forgo intercourse for affection. ^ developed double pneumonia, 
she said “The importance of sex ts will keep her in the hospital 

overrated," Landers said. “Women ^ delav the opening production 
want affection. They want to feel of ^ open Company of Boston, 
valued. Apparently, having sex Caldwell ft « been in Masachu- 
alone doesn't give them the feeling x[ls General Hospital with pneu- 
they’re valued." Too many men. fQQjiia since Jan. 3. Dr. Joseph *V. 
she said, use sex “as a physical ( ^^3 said Caldwell could not be 
release and it has no more emotion^ time for rehearsals of 

al significance than a sneeze. Jauacck’s “The Makropulos Case, 
Landera said 40 percent of the scheduled to open Feb. 3. Instead, 
women wbo said they would swap .Kg season is now expected to open 

r ■ JI_. ...Jm An _ . ... -.1- n. •‘r.irl rtf rhr 


sex for cuddles were under 40. 

□ 

Clayton Moore, who played the 
Lone Ranger on television in the 
1950s, can give up his green-tinted 
glasses and put on his mask again 


Feb. 24 with Puccini's “Girl of the 
Golden West." 

□ 

Glenda Jackson won best-actress 
honors at the third annual London 
theater awards presentation by 

■ iUd Dninh 


striding him from wearing the eye . preseme d die double Oscar 
mask at public appearance had ££ oer lhe award f or Eugene 
been dropped by W rather corp„ O’NeiB's “Strange Interlude, m 
which owns the rights to the char- ^ ch ^ ^ open in New York 
acter. Wrather sought the order nexl monl h. Xian C ox, her 
when its Lone Ranger Television interlude" co-sur, picked 

company was planning to produce best-actor award for “ Rat in 

a Lone Ranger movie, -casting a ^ ^ .. which wiU do with 


a Lone Ranger movie, -castii 
younger actor in the lead role. 


younger actor in the lead role. The Pa _ in New York after 

movie. The Legend of the Une T? tc riude” is finished. 

Ranger, wasa box office flop gol ^ best new play 

when released in 1981. Moore had d for - 0l £ for the Road." 
continued to appear as the Lone 


Ranger, wearing custom-made tint- 
ed glasses in place of the mask. 

□ 

Mym Lay has made 120 movies 
— playing characters ranging from 
a vamp to a sensible, warm-hearted 
wife — without ever getting an 
Academy Award nomination. But 
when the Academy of Motion Pic- 


Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain has sold her 
home in London's Chelsea district 
for £300,000 to £400.000 (now 
about $333,000 to $444.0001 after 
having paid £28,000 for it in ( 969: 
the exact selling price was not re- 
leased. A French banker. Paid- 


wben the Academy Of Motion Ktc- ^ wdner . bought Die residence 

Comte* 

Myrna Loy” at Carnegie Hall in ^ Ro ® er * 

New York, two seven-foot- tall n 

(two- meter) Oscars, seen annually Prince Charies and his wife. Di- 
rt u ring the Academy Awards ana, will attend the 150th anniver- 
broodcast, were up there on the saiy of the Australian state of Vic- 
stage. But RepsoUs, who chose toria in October. Buckingham 

f #.Uii Imp nSAtkw in “TLa Dnlo#«A li«l* nniSmin/HvI TKw IL'lll 


Loy to play his mother in “The 
End" in 1978, told the gathering: 


Palace has announced. They will 
arrive in Melbourne on OcL 25 and 


anan, she add- m a™ w ^ . 

n ^ “Howl wish Td been born earlier. I will tour Victoria before going to 

don't know if I was a good enough Canberra on Nov. 6 and 7. 




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LOOKM5 fata 46e*ooni home & 

gaden ta rent m KubS MoliiKxjon/ St 
Gemiam/Ve anet ana far strff with 
iatemaliand coiporotion. Phone Poe 
501-54-12 Ext 363. 




FOR MORE EXEOmVE POSIIIONS 
LOOK UNOBl 

“INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS" 
PAGE/ 





Geophysical 
Electronics Technician 

USA based geophyacd firm requres 
an Bedrama Tethrad tw /Qperiotar. 
Appkcrt must be capable oi operaleig 
& i i xj inftxi tn q nrnK on yutg b ased iSg 
rtd data ocaucsiMri Htepnert on sur- 
vey aroaft. Mufl have expenenoe with 
nemganoad systnms & pewout experi- 
ence with maowtometers preferred 
Fixegn 6. domesric air mirinents on 
angle status only. QuaMed appAcmA 
lend M resume tor 

Employment Office 
£0 Bax 2469, 

Houston, Texas 
77252 USA. 



EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE | GENERAL POSITIONS 

AVAILABLE 


vuimas, carries sought 

from Some, Strops far new En^h Ion- 
guoge doily. Gpnmrn, CV Hnmedoldy 
hR ED&OiCvb d Ibpotta 22, 
00186 ROME. Italy. 


SKI SWIIZEBANDl Fab. 13 
I. M daw, 2 rworts. ody USSlOd 
Mat be 21 or alder, a good pcnJd 
doer & enjoy ddrfrm. \4bge 


WHICH LAWYER t WIHtPRHHl. 
EngWi/ German/ Spanish, free to 
travel, teeta poatioa Pom 336 33 90 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 




SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/Harpneter S Tourism Gude 

PARS 562 0587 


PA YOUNG LADY 
PARIS 565 03 80 


PARBPJL 

HUNGUAL YOUNG IADY 

PARIS: 520 97 95 


NEW MERCEDESl Y0UNG hhsant lady 

loeai S | MUinUNGUALPAmStSTSBIOl 

FROM STOCK 

far IAM0BMTE deTivnry 

- KSTSaVKE 
Far ddpplnfl, nnraaca, band, 
wm rwi i a u in IL5JA. 

RUTEINC 

Taumedr. 52, 6000 Frankfurt, 

W Germ., tel {0} 69-232351. Hx 4l\559 
WbrmtApn aidy by phone or idex. 


INTI YOUNG LADY GUIDES 
educated, for day, doners & travel 
PAHS A AttPOBtS Tefe 527 90 95. 


PAHS 704 80 27 
VP PA YOUNG LADY 
MuMmgud. 


VVQHD TRAVEUB) FRENCH execu- 
hve, 45, bfingua^ wel educated, spe- 
dditf m tourism A monoae m e nf, 
ready to rekwde, seeh challenging 


land man to busy top executive. Can 
inwest. Bon 1640 Herdd Tribune, 
92521 Neufly Cedex, France. 


odt Foreign & 
on stogie status only, 
axes send fail resume ta 

EnuArymenf Office 
P.O. Baa 2469, 
Houston, Texas 
77252 USA. 


GERMAN . AMQHCAN 

US atasn, oge 62. male bachelor, hoS 
Jewish, ftoanodty mdependert, wfltng 
la raloa^e/travel is pesenrty engaged 
inte adhnties m W4st Germany but wil 
raftie ewfy in 1985. Am mng dxJ- 
ien^ng peshor oi trust os pervond as- 
Wrt . en r e hto or Imeling escort 
with perma re wt residancx outade the 
Fedird fejwbfc. Gx cmiabln. WB 
canyder philonfixoac activities. 

WWte bi avmence to 
Bax 7104, 

LKT, FnedriddV. 15, 

04000 Franfcfart/Mdn. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MlfcmW SffiCS for AMSBCAN 
O’ PICK VC PRMS in PAB& 
English, Belgtxi, Dutch or German 
secretixtaf, Liowledbe ol French re- 
cyxred, English shorthand. Bfagud 
Idexists. mite or phone: 138 Avenue 
Vickr Hiraa, 75114 Paris, Franc*. Tet 


TRANSCO 

- TAX FRS CARS 

We knap a constant stadr of more then 
one hundred bnxnl new cars, 
oompetihwoly priced 
Send far fan cofcdocMe & stock 1st. 
Trtxsco SA, 95 Noordnioon, 


VIP LADY GUDE PARIS 
533 SO 26. Young, educcfcd. elegant, 
tatngud far days, e«erwtgi & travel 


i iM 


SOCETE DIANE PAMS 260 87 43 
Men & women gtxdn, saaxity & rent 
car services. 8 am ■ 12 pm. 


HONG KONG 3-7244209 Sadxsb- 
cated young Eurapecm/Onenlal lady 





HOKHMAN 26, US & FWi But- 

(x» to emort cSveion oT muftnafeand 
oorpartrion Tet 60334-93. 



COOPBl ST JAMES 

OmOAL AGENT 
OF BMW |G8] LTD 

We m offer tax-free BMW’s at tourifi 
prioB, Left or right hond dive, Amen- 
axi sMbficceion. fal factory wtxranty 
end offibd dncixi bodmp. 
Alwfodoryfaun fafapd BMWs& 
spepn™ aweWtoWng. ag. 



PARIS VIP EDUCATB) & taphnhcxited 
young kxly oompamon, for days dn- 
ners, evemngi&weelKmd 277 0169. 


iOFDON. Young German/French dk- 
ana to meet you an your wut la 
London. TeL UK 01-381 6852. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


EXISTING DIAMOND & odd mme 
need nveston or porireri tor farihw 

COMPUTER PORTRAITS S&'SSOO F^fart%tato" 

T-SHIRT FOTOS 1 

HOW IN FULL COLOR 
cm death busmen that can eam you 
S6000 ■ SlO-OOQ/nxxxh. New and toed 
wdemi fain SlO^OO ■ 5WM0. Kema 
Cara^^.Dpt.J17 Beethovenstr 9 
6000 Fiankfari/W. Germany. 

Teh 069747808 TU 412713 K£MA 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


U.S. A. 

EXCITING OPPORTUNITY 

Wirtry iocatBd in Ite Sun Beit, 
eAddamd 3 years, seels apfd to ex- 
pfat trams fccfawlpj m l break- 
through. Equity avmenfan wdi m». 
imwen resinwdrfSSOmSctHtonBd 
captd apfxsriatan can be 
undi ample equey protection. 
Write hi ODnMtnce te 
Box 16% Herdd Titans, 

92521 NeuJy Cede*. Fierce. 



W6 5S( woducK to import & (fahfa* 
Ute la ih* twope® nwteis. Send any 
&aU informaftan to: IHT Sox 2105, Ffte 
dndtsx MOOD Fraritfwl/M