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lobal Newspaper 
Edited in Palis 

railed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zorich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 

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INTERNATIONAL 




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No. 31,698 


** 


PARIS, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


Kyprianou and Denktash Hold 
UN Talks on Rewriting Cyprus 


r , , 




By Andriana Ierodiaconou 

International Herald Tribune 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — President Spyros Ky- 
prianou of Cyprus and the Turkish 
Cypriot leader, Rauf Denktash, be- 
gan summit talks here Thursday 
that are intended to end Turkey’s 
1 0-year occupation of northern Cy- 
prus. ■ 

A settlement reuniting the parti- 
tioned eastern Mediterranean is- 
land under join! Grade Cypriot and 
Turkish Cypriot administration 
could be expected to ease tensions 
between Greece and Turkey, which 
haw meet the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization's southeastern 
Qank for a decade. 

Secretary-General Javier flfcrez 
de Co6flar, the chief architect and 
mediator of the talks, warned the 
two sides in an opening statement: 
“If this moment is lost ... it may 
not readily recur.” 

There were “difficulties to be 
overcome and pitfalls to be avoid- 
ed,” be said, before the two skies 
could agree on a framework for a 
solution to the Cyprus problem 
aimed at establishing^ Federal Re- 
public of Cyprus.” 

Mr. Denktash and Mr. Ky- 
prianou shook hands and snritori 
before beginning to a dosed-door 
session with the UN leader. 

In a statement issued after the 
first session of talks, Mr. P&rcz de 
Cuffiar said he was encouraged 
that the two men had come togeth- 
er in a “relaxed and pleasant atmo- 
sphere." He said it was too early to 
determine how long the talks would 
last 

The negotiations were scheduled 
to resume later Thursday after a 
noon recess requested by the Turk- 
ish Cypriot side for ddiberation on 
the position taken by the Greek 
Cypriots during the morning ses- 
sion. A Greek Cypriot spokesman 
declined to comment on his side’s 
position. 

The two leaders have been nego- 
tiating intensively in indirect talks 
through the mediation of the secre- 
tary-general for three months. This 
is the first face-to-face meeting be- 
tween them since 1979, however. 

Cyprus has been partitioned 
since 1974, when Turkish troops 
invaded and occupied about a third 
of the island in reaction to a coop 
otganized by the Greek militar y 
government against the govern- 
ment of Archbishop Makanos. 

UN-sponsored m ter communal 



Rauf Denktash 



Spyros Kyprianou 

negotiations and two summit meet- 
ings between the Greek Cypriot 
and Turkish Cypriot leaders in 
1977 and 1979 failed to produce an 
agreement on the sharing of territo- 
ry and constitutional power be- 
tween the two communities. 

Greek Cypriots account for 
about 80 percent of the population 
and Turkish Cypriots 18 percent. 
The balance is made up of small 
groups such as Armenians and 
Arab Maronite Christians. 

According to sources dose to the 


.re- ■ --- 
. ■&: : jl: • • 

- -f “ 




UN Official Tells Israel 
Lebanese Doubt Pullout 


- 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Times Service 

■ JERUSALEM — Brian E. Ur- 
quhart, a United Nations undersec- 
retary for special political affairs, 
told senior Israeli officials Thurs- 
day that the Lebanese and Syrian 
governments still bad doubts about 
Israel’s intention to withdraw fully 
from south. Lebanon- 

Senior Israeli officials said they 
responded to Mr. Urquhart that 
the Lebanese and Syrians were out 
of touch with the reality of what 
Israel intends to do. They warned 
that if T Ahiiwin and Syria did not 
take control of the areas Israel 
plans to evacuate by Feb. 18, there 
world be chaos and riffings be- 
tween the Lebanese communities 
— for winch tile Israelis said they 
would not be responsible. 

Mr. Urquhart, who spoke here 
after- visits to Damascus and Bei- 
rut, met separately with Defense 
Minister Rabin, Prime 

Minister Slnmnn Peres and For- 
eign Munster -Yitzhak Shamir to 
brief th«m on bis conversations 
with Syrian and Lebanese leaders. 
He heard essentially the same re- 
sponse from all three, Israeli offi- 
cials raid. 

According to Israeli defense 
sources, Mr/Urquhart said that the 
Lebanese still w * Jf 
“comprehensive 



radi timetable for the withdrawal 
from Lebanon. The Syrians and 
Lebanese apparently were con- 
cerned that tire Israelis would make 
just a token pullback in western 
Lebanon and established a new de- 
fense line. 

« 

The Israelis said the 
pressian they got from 1 
Mr. Urquhart was that the 
nese, and probably the Syrians, 
were surprised by the Israeli deri- 
sion to withdraw from Lebanon in 
three stages over the next six to 
nine months, and were stalling 
while they figured out bow to re- 
spond. 

A senior Israeli official who took 
part in the discussions said: “We 
told Mr. Urquhart to tdl the Leba- 
nese: ‘Look, boys, we have taken a 
unilateral decision. We are out of 
this chunk of Lebanon by the 18th 
of February. After that the ques- 
tion of how you will protect the 
lives of the people there is between 
you and the United Nations.’ This 
is no joke. We are leaving. 

“We asked Mr. Urquhart to 
pleasego ram this home to them," 
the official added. 

The officials said Israeli military 
officers will return to the talks be- 
ing hdri with Lebanese officers at 


-V' 




Lebanese still were de m an ding a Naqoura, Lebanon, on Monday in 
“conmndieosive and detailed” Is- carder to personally inform the Leb- 

their derision in as de* 


wwwe 

tailed and comprehensive manner 
as possible. Afterward, they will 
hold the Lebanese responsible for 
anything that happens after the 
withdrawal 

■ Beirut Barricades Cleared 

The Lebanese Army and rival 
aaHtiimen. ordered by the govern- 
ment to restore law and order to 
Beirut, began clearing the city cen- 
ter of earto barriers amd barricades 
Thursday, United Press Interna- 
tional reported earlier from Bonn. 

Army officers and mtiftia repre- 
sentatives supervised the cleanup 
by buBdczere and tracks, wMch be- 
gan lifting the tons of debris from 
tfac Christian and Moslem sides of 
the Green Line, witnesses said. 

Hw move, part erf Che gpvem- 
mait’s agreement with Beirut’s ri- 
val ^ meant to end 

months of anarchy and outbursts 
of violence in ibe capital 

The witnesses said that while an 
initial early-morning clearing ai- 
tanpt was held up by “arguments 
on bow many feet of barricade 
should be removed first," high-lev- 
d contacts allowed work to get un- 
der way. 



INSIDE 

■Bonn agreed to give 5900 mil- 
lion over the next decade to 
share in a UiL manned space 
station. . . Page 2. 

■A Michigan court must de- 
cide if a prize- winning dog is 
also a tillgr. Page 3, 

Idles “military interdc- 
*” in seeking increased 
J-S. aid. Page5L 

WEEKEND 

■ k the business-class airline 
passenger being taken far a 
ride? Roger Corns looks at the 
problem in the first installment 
of For Fan and Profit, a weekly 
column focusing on the prob- 
lems and pleasures of traveling 
for business. Page 9, 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

B Hiwnniiiifrftfac meeting in 
Washington are not expected to 
agree to joint action on tile dol- 
lar, sources sftf. Pfep 11- 


peace bid. President Ronald Rea- 
gan intervened to press for the Ky- 
prianou-Denktash meeting, urging 
the Turkish side to make territorial 
and constitutional concessions. 
The United States is anxious tc 
reduce Greek-Tkirkish hostility is 
NATO. 

The show of friendship Thurs- 
day between Mr. Kyprianou and 
Mr. Denktash fundamen- 

tal differences in the two sides’ ap- 
proach to the summit 

Mr. Denktash has repealedi) 
called the summit a formality 
where the two sides will be asked tc 
sign a previously prepared draft 
agreement for a Cyprus settlement. 
The Greek Cypriots insist that 
subs tantial ne gotiating re- 
mains to be done before an accept- 
able framework can be reached. 

The substance of the past three 
months* “proximity” talks have 
been kept confidential, but officials 
closely involved in the UN peace 
initiative say the two sides have 
agreed that the basis of a settlement 
should be a bizonal, federal inde- 
pendent Cypriot republic, with one 
citizenship and one currency. 

There would be a Greek Cypriot 
president, a Turkish Cypriot vice 
president and a two-chamber par- 
liament with 50-50 representation 
in the upper house and 70 percent 
Greek Cypriot, 30 percent Turkish 
Cypriot in the lower bouse. The 
balance in the cabinet would be 
seven (o three. The Turkish Cypriot 
minority would have some veto 
powers in govennenL 

Major issues that remain to be 
settled, Greek Cvpriot sources say. 
indude the withdrawal of the Turk- 
ish occupation troops, the guaran- 
tees for a settlement and provisions 
for 170,000 Greek Cypriot refu- 
gees, created by the 1974 Turkish 
invasion, to return to their homes. 

Mr. Denktash has said that hav- 
ing Turkey as guarantor power is 
an essential part of any settlement 
for the Turkish Cypriots. The 
Turkish Cypriot side is also con- 
cerned about the issue of security 
for the minority if Turkish troops 
leave the island. 

■ UJS. Arms Worry Greece 

Henry Kanvn of The New York 
Tones reported from Athens: 

Greece is worried that the price it 
might be asked to pay for a settle- 
ment of the Cyprus problem could 
r flow of U. T 



The toeoaMd Pm 

KREMLIN TALKS — Senator Gary Hart, left, the Colorado Democrat, met with 
Foreign Minister .Andrei A. Gromyko in Moscow on Thursday. Mr. Hart said afterward 
that Mr. Gromyko seemed eager to resume arms talks as quickly as possible. Page 3. 


Weinberger Says 
Space Defense 
Needs Backup 


U.S., Soviet Agree to Mideast Talks 


By Bill Keller 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan’s proposed space 
defense against nuclear missiles, if 
deployed, would have to be backed 
up by anti-aircraft radar installa- 
tions and planes to protect North 
America against bombers, accord- 
ing to Defense Secretary Casper W. 
Weinberger. 

Mr. Weinberger said Wednesday 
in an interview that such a conti- 
nental air defense system, largely 
abandoned 10 years ago as obsolete 
in an era of quick-flying offensive 
missiles, should be restored to as- 
sure that protection against nuclear 
attack was “thoroughly reliable.” 

The defense secretary declined to 
speculate about the ultimate cost of 
reconstructing a system to defend 
against relatively slow-flying 
bombers and cruise missiles that 
might be able to slip under an anti- 
missile shield. 

However, James R. Schleanger, 
a former defense secretary who was 
asked about Mr. Weint 


Mr. Weinberger and Mr. Reagan 
have said that they mil ask Con- 
gress for a budget that adds about 6 
percent after inflation. 

Mr. Weinberger, who is known 
as a tenacious advocate of his mili- 
tary budget, insisted Wednesday 
that growth of 4 percent would 
mean “serious” cuts in weaponry 
and would convince the Soviet 
Union that it did nor have to bar- 
gain seriously at forthcoming arms 
control talks. 

He added that because of the 
long lime needed to negotiate arms 
treaties, it was “doubtful" that any 
agreement would be achieved in 
lime to lead to savings in the mili- 
tary budget for the fiscal year 1986. 
which begins in October. 

Asked whether, in the event of an 
arms treaty with the Soviet Union, 
be would recommend budget re- 
ductions for future years. Mr. 
Weinberger said: “If the present 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 2) 


be a heavier: 


S. arms to 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


By Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
Stales and the Soviet Union have 
agreed to hold a new round of high- 
level talks about the Middle Hast, 
according to the While House. 

Robert Sims, a deputy White 
House press secretary, said 
Wednesday that the discussions 
had been approved in principle by 
the two governments. 

The agreement is an outgrowth 
of President Ronald Reagan's pro- 
posal in September that the two 
countries hold “periodic consulta- 
tions at policy level about regional 
problems." 

Mr. Reagan’s national security 
affairs adviser, Robert C. McFar- 
lane. said in a television interview 
that the renewed discussions about 
the Middle East would be an “ex- 
change of views, a tali, a conversa- 
tion about how each cf us views ihe 
problems of the area" and not *a 
matter of formal negotiation at 
alL” 

Despite reports to the contrary. 


there was only “a passing refer- 
ence" to the Middle East last week 
when U.S. and Soviet delegations 
headed by headed by Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz and Foreign 
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko met 
in Geneva, a State Department of- 
ficial said. 

Other sources said arrangements 
for discussions on the Middle East 
bad been moving in a separate 
channel from the Geneva talks. 

The two countries held an unan- 
nounced round of high-level dis- 
cussions last year concerning the 
war between Iran and Iraq. These 
talks, at a time when military ten- 
sion and the threat of escalation 
between the regional powers was 
high, involved meetings between 
Mr. Shultz and Ambassador Ana- 
toli F. Dobrynin in Washington, 
and Mr. Gromyko and Ambassa- 
dor Arthur A. Han man in Mos- 
cow. . . . 

U.S. officials later described 
these discussions as an exchange of 
information that seemed useful to 
both sides in a high-risk situation. 


Such discussions were held fre- 
quently in the mid-1970s, when the 
United States and the Soviet Union 
were co-chairmen of the Geneva 
conference (hat aimed at a compre- 
hensive Middle Hast solution, but 
they have only rarely been held in 
the past several yean. 

The Soviet Union is expected to 
use the new mllr$ to pud for an 
international conference on the 
Middle East, which the United 
States continues to rqect. 

Among the topics likely to figure 
in new talks, a State Department 
official said, are Arab- Israeli ques- 
tions such as the situation in Leba- 
non and Soviet support for Syria; 
the Iran-Iraq war, Libya; and per- 
haps Afghanistan. 

The most likely UR. participant 
in the discussions is Assistant Sec- 
retary of Stale Richard W. Mur- 


In Congress 
Challenge MX 
Arms Budget 


marks, estimated that rebuilding lXf&tgi T 4X1/1 
and sustaining such a system erf 1 ® 
radar installations and planes 
would cost $50 billion a year. 

The Pentagon spokesman, Mi- 
chael L Burch, said Thursday that 
the Defense Department did not 
plan any “crash program or bolt 
out of the blue” to build up North 
American air defenses immediate- 
ly. But he said the Pentagon would 
continue its gradual efforts to re- 
store U.S. air defenses. 

He disputed Mr. Schksinger’s 
cost estimate for an anti-bomber 
defense as “far too high.” 

Mr. Weinberger also asserted 
Wednesday that the level of mili- 
tary spending now bring endorsed 
by Rqmblican leaden in Congress 
would do “mtgor injury” to the 
national security and “prevent” 
achievement of an arms control 
treaty with the Soviet Union. 

He was responding to a growing 


phy, the State Department’s senior consensus among congressional 

h t VTir* fl-i i it ■ i I'niwafc r-.viL 1 ! 


Middle East expert. 

State Department sources said 
the time, place and other details 
about (he talks had not been estab- 
lished 


Republicans ihai Congress would 
agree to no more than 5 percent or 
4 percent growth in the military 
budget after an increase to com- 
pensate for inflation adjustments. 


Cold Drops 
New Surprise 
On Europe 

Reuters 

PARIS — Europe’s cold spell 
continued to bite hard Thursday 
in the north of the Continent. 

There were blizzards in Brit- 
ain, record low temperatures in 
Paris and a smog alert in ibe 
industrial Ruhr region of West 
Germany. Bui southern Europe 
started to thaw out. 

At least 12 more deaths were 
reported, pushing the number of 
victims of the Arctic spell to well 
over 300. 

In Brussels, three persons died 
after a series of gas explosions 
due to frozen pipes destroyed 
four houses. A 3-year-old child 
and an elderly woman were 
killed Wednesday in Brussels in 
a similar gas explosion. 

In France, a man in his 70s fell 
in his garden and froze to death, 
and an elderly woman died in 
bed from the cold. 

In Britain, thousands of peo- 
ple were stranded by rail stokes, 
called in sympathy with the 10- 
month coalminer/ strike, or they 
were engulfed in blizzards in the 
country’s deepest freeze in more 
than 20 years. 

Italy and Yugoslavia, howev- 
er, reported milder weather. 
Heavy rain since the weekend 



In Brighton, England, swimmers walked down the snow- 
covered beach Thursday for die lunchtime swim that 
members of the group take every day of the year. 


cleared streets in Rome of snow 
and ice while temperatures were 
back to normal in Naples. 

Deep snow continued to ham- 
per flights from airports in 
northern Italy, and several roads 
were blocked by avalanches in 
the Dolomite province of Tren to. 
Eighteen people have died in 
weather-related accidents in Ita- 
ly in recent days. 

Forecasters in Spain, where 
more than 40 people have died, 
said the cold would soon give 
way to wanner, rainy weather. 

In Yugoslavia, where 19 peo- 


ple have died from the cold, tem- 
peratures rose for the third con- 
secutive day. Rescue teams cut 
their way through snowdrifts to 
free scores of towns and villages 
cut off for up to two weeks. 

The temperature in Paris fell 
overnight Wednesday to minus 
14 centigrade (7 Fahrenheit), a 
record for Jan. 17. 

In West Germany, officials 
alerted the five million inhabit- 
ants of the industrial Ruhr when 
a layer of warm air above the 
cold bell trapped noxious fumes 
and caused a build-up of smog. 


Threats, Priest’s Beating 
Are Described by Pole 


Reuters 

TORUN, Poland — The driver 
for Father Jerzy Popiduszko said 
Thursday that the priest's kidnap- 
ping at gunpoint by three security 
policemen seemed like a “gangster 
attack.” 

Waldemar Chrostowski, who 
jumped out of the abductors’ car as 
it spied off with Father Popielnszko 
in toe trank, described the kidnm>- 
ping in detail during the trial of the 
three officers accused of killing the 
priest Their superior is also on 
trial accused of instigating and 
covering up the killin g. 

Mr. Chrostowski said a gun was 
held at Ms head as Father Popie- 
luszko was forced into the trunk. 
The priest shouted, “Why are you 
treating me like this? How can you 
do this to me?” before being put in 
the trunk, Mr. Chrostowski said. 

“I heard a noise,” be said. “There 
was a hollow sound like somebody 
thumping a bag of flour with a 
dab. 

He added: “I knew something 
terrible had happened and Father 
Popiduszko was cither knocked 
senseless or killed.” 

Mr. Chrostowski gave bis evi- 
dence on the 14th day of the trial of 
Captain Grzegoiz notrowski and 
Lieutenants Leszek Pekala and 
Waldemar Gunielewski, who are 
accused of killing Father Popie- 
luszkot, and Colonel Adam He- 


truszka, who was their superior in 
the Interim Ministry. 

All four have been stripped of 
their rank and could face the death 
sentence. The three junior officers 
have claimed in testimony that the 
killing was unintentional and that 
they believed the attack had high- 
leva approval. Father Popiduszko 
was a prominent supporter of the 
banned trade union. Solidarity. 

Mr. Chrostowski gave this ac- 
count of the kidnapping: 

He drove the priest to the north- 
ern town of Bydgoszcz to preach 
Oct 19, tbe day of the kidnapping. 

When they left to drive back to 

Warsaw, after dark, they were .. r ... . 

chased at speeds of up to 100 kilo- rust Publicspeecb sin 
meters (62 miles} an hour by a car ^on^ttrecW^ 
driving with its bright headlights 
oru He told Father Popiduszko: 

“He must be crazy. He is blinding 
me.” 

The priest told him to slow 
down, and the car following 
flashed its lights. Their car was 
overtaken ana stopped in a forest 
near Torun, 120 miles northwest of 
Warsaw. A man in a police uniform 
told Mr. Chrostowski he would be 
given an alcohol test 
He was taken to the second car, 
where he was handcuffed. One of 
the men in the car told its driver 
“Hoe’s a gun. It’s loaded. Don’t let 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


By Hedrick Smith 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — In one of 
the sharpest attacks on the Penta- 
gon budget from the new Republi- 
can leadership of the Senate, Alan 
K_ Simpson, the assistant majority 
leader, has warned that some major 
weapons systems might have to be 
cut to help achieve a 550-faiHion 
reduction in the 1986 federal defi- 
cit. 

Senator Simpson urged freezing 
military spending in the 1986 bud- 
get at the current level. 

At the same time. La Asptti, the 
new chairman of the House Aimed 
Services Committee, questioned 
Wednesday the value of continued 
spending on the MX missile. 

He warned the Reagan adminis- 
tration thai Congress would not 
“just rubber-stamp the administra- 
tion’s arms requests because there 
are arms talks going on.” 

Representative Aspin. a Wiscon- 
sin Democrat, has backed the ad- 
ministration on funding tbe MX 
missile. 

He suggested Wednesday that 
the MX Has less bargaining lever- 
age in arms talks now because of 
Moscow's evidently greater worry 
about strategic defense research. 

“What should we do with tbe 
MX now that it is no longer central 
to tbe negotiations?” he asked. 

However, Representative Aspin 
stopped short of advocating that 
the missile program be canceled. 

Senator Barry Goldwater, a Re- 
publican of Arizona and new chair- 
man of the Senate Armed Services 
Committee, has already urged 
President Ronald Reagan to give 
up on the MX. 

Representative Aspic's com- 
ments at tbe Carnegie Foundation, 
L ;_ « ' since becom- 

was in re- 
sponse to an appeal for MX fund- 
ing made last week by Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz. 

Mr. Shultz urged continued 
spending on MX and the Reagan 
administration's proposed S26-bil- 
lion space-defense research pro- 
gram, to ensure progress in arms 
talks with the Soviet Union. 

Senator Simpson, explaining 
that the Senate leadership was in- 
tent on cutting about S20 billion 
from the administration’s proposed 
Pentagon budget, asserted that re- 
ductions announced by Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Wrinbe 


'Neighborhood for Sale 9 Signs Change U.S l Suburbs 


By William E. Schmidt 

New York Times Semce 

ATLANTA — Already' surrounded on 
three sides by new office buildings, the own- 
ers of 144 homes in a neighborhood north of 
Atlanta gradually concluded that the quiet, 
suburban atmosphere that had drawn them 
there was gone forever. 

So they banded together into a corpora- 
tion and, last month, sold the 85.5-acre (34.5- 
hectare) parcel for S35 million to developers 
who propose to build an office complex. 

The sale amounted to about 5225,000 for 
the owners of each borne, and, pending final 
approval of rezoning for the project, most 
residents will collect nearly twice the ap- 
praised value of their houses. 

As with s imilar transactions in suburbs of 
Houston and Washington. D.C,. the sale of 
the neighborhood in Atlanta is pan of a 
trend that , urban specialists say. is reshaping 
the lan dsca pe of many U.S. metropolitan 
areas. 

As clusters of high-density office, retail 
and ho using developments take root outside 
city centers, they are threatening to overrun 


residential districts and besiege them with 
noise and congestion. 

As the pace of commercial development 
drives up land values, homeowners in some 
of these hoi real estate pockets are recogniz- 
ing the value of banding together to market 
their neighborhoods as one parceL In the 
past year, at least four subdivisions north of 
Atlanta have used this tactic to negotiate 
sales to developers at prices double and 
sometimes triple those on the residential 
sales market. 

“We were in a losing battle trying to stop 
the development and deal with the traffic,” 
said W. William Harness, a lawyer who 
helped organize those who owned the 144 
homes near Atlanta, structures 10 to 30 years 
old and valued at 570,000 to more than 
S 150.000. “The tough pan was finally con- 
vincing everyone that it was in all of our best 
interests to sell out together rather than get 
picked off one by one by some developer.” 

“What seems to be happening is thzi 
homeowners who once fought development 
are now banding together and saying, ‘Since 
we can’t stop it, let's make some hay out of a 


bad situation,’ ” said James P. Gaines, direc- 
tor of real estate research for the Rice Col- 
ter, an urban research institute at Rice Uni- 
versity in Houston. 

in Arlington, Virginia, for example, where 
intense commercial development along the 
route of the Washington Metro rapid-transit 
line has driven up land values, the owners of 
22 homes agreed this month to sell their six 
acres as one pared for about 510 milli on. A 
Maryland developer plans to build a ' 
rise retail and apartment complex on 
land. 

Near Houston, 57 properly owners in 
Meyeriand, a upper-mddle-income neigh- 
borhood southwest of the city, won a state 
court derision last month allowing them to 
proceed with selling their properties as a 
block to an adjoining shopping center. Other 
residents had sought to prevent the sale. 

Some homeowners in Atlanta say they 
resent the trend toward setting, contending 
that it accelerates destabilization of the area. 


has opposed rezoning of residential property 
for commercial development, “whatever 
happens becomes totally dependent on the 
whim of the market and development inter- 
ests.” 

But Christopher B. Lanberger, an official 
with Robert Charles Lesser & Co„ a Califor- 
nia-based real estate research concern, said 
that as developers become more interested in 
converting established, low-density residen- 
tial areas into high-density commercial prop- 
erty, homeowners w01 be more likely to seek 
to consolidate their properties into blocks for 
sale. 

Atlanta developers say they welcome the 
tread because it expedites the purchase of 
land. 


Weinberger 

were not real cutbacks because the 
Pentagon was still getting all the 
major weapons systems and other 
programs it wants. 

Although Mr. Weinberger still 
wantsabout 10 percent real growth 
in military spending, a senior 
White House offiriaf suggested 
that a compromise that held 
growth to 3 or 4 percent but kq>t 
the MX missile program alive 
might be acceptable. 

However, Senator Simpson ar- 
gued Wednesday for sharper cuts 
by freezing military spending in the 
1986 budget at the currentleveL 
"Obviously to do that, there may 
have to Ik votes on elimination of 
various systems," he said. “We’re 
gm&£ to have to be down to the 
elimination of systems and maybe 
even a more dramatic approach 
than that, and that is to say. you 
know, we may have to break thai 
contract." 

The Wyoming Republican, a 
past supporter of major military 
said Gary Ar- !1*5 >OOS criticized the 


“This kind of activity implies a total lack 85. 5-acre property. “I don’t know if we 
of planning," said William F. Tilghman. would have had the ti 


head of a suburban homeowners’ group that 


Tt made our life J . . . 

nold, an official with Albritton Development asserting that 

of Dallas, which, along with C adillac Fair- procurement of weapons systems 
view Urban Development, also of Texas. ^ other multiyear projects could 
plans to develop an office complex on the n01 b® interrupted. 

"It might be better to assess the 
damages under the contract, have 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


ume or patience to 
approach every homeowner individually.” 



Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


Bonn Pledges Funds 
For U.S. Space Station 


By William Drozdiak 

ItitLi/ufigfuii Pust Serritv 

BONN — The West German 
government has agreed to contrib- 
ute 5900 million over the next de- 
cade to participate in a U.S.-led 
program to set up a permanently 
manned space station. 

The decision Wednesday came 
in response to President Ronald 
Reagan's appeaL made a year ago. 
for Europe. Japan and Canada to 
join the United States in funding 
and building the 58 billion Colum- 
bus space-station project. Italy. 
France and Britain are expected id 
announce their intentions by the 
end of the month. 

If all goes according to plan, the 
manned laboratory and observa- 
tion craft would be launched into 
space in 1992. the 500lh anniversa- 
ry of Christopher Columbus' dis- 
covery of America. 

Heinz Riesenbuber. West Ger- 
many's minister for research and 
technology, said that the planned 
cooperation in space between Eu- 
rope and the United States carried 
great political and economic signif- 
icance for transatlantic relations. 

He said that during a review 
phase over the next two years, de- 
tailed contracts must be negotiated 
with the United States to ensure 
that European countries in the pro- 
gram earn a fair return on their 
investments. 

The Bonn government sees its 
participation in the venture as an 
important way of gaining access to 
space-based technology as well as 
experience in developing orbiting 
stations that could reap commer- 
cial benefits. 

U.S. restrictions on the transfer 
of technology, ostensibly to pre- 
vent the Soviet Union from acquir- 
ing sensitive goods or information 
from third countries, have irked the 
European allies. They fear that 
such limits are hindering develop- 
ment of their own high technology 
sectors. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl's gov- 
ernment sees the prospect of close 
cooperation on the space station as 
a way to obligate the United States 
to shore complete access to impor- 
tant space research data. 

West German and Italian com- 
panies are planning to develop a 
special laboratory module that 
would plug into the main body of 
the U.S.-buili spacecraft. It would 
be used by scientists to conduct 
experiments in the zero gravity and 
vacuum conditions of space. Sever- 
al drug and manufacturing compa- 
nies here have expressed interest in 


The venture has evoked some 
controversy. Some scientists are 
skeptical about the need for a 
manned space station and contend 
that robots could conduct more ef- 
ficiently the kind of work envi- 
sioned in the project 

Europe's previous involvement 
in a U A space project was seen as 
less than successful. European 
countries spent 5750 million in 
1973 to underwrite Spacelab yet 
failed to win much in the way or 
research benefits. 


Another argument against Euro- 
pean cooperation with the U.S. 
program is that it exhausts funds 
that some politicians say should be 
earmarked exclusively for projects 
that foster Europe's own capabili- 
ties in space. 

Mr. Riesenhuber said Wednes- 
day that Bonn would contribute 
nearly $500 million to develop mem 
of a more powerful and versatile 
Ariane rocket built mainly by 
France, to make Europe more inde- 
pendent in space travel by the 
1990s. 

But Mr. Riesenhuber said that 
West Germany would not be able 
ro afford a major investment in the 
French space shuttle project known 
as Hermes. 

He said the concept of a Europe- 
an space shuttle was “very interest- 
ing" but that Bonn's involvement 
in the space station and an upgrad- 
ed Ariane rocket precluded partici- 
pation in a third costly space pro- 
gram. 



Melanesians 
Say Visit 
Won’t Affect 
Their Goals 


» WORLD BRIEFS 

U.S. Apologizes to Poles for Program 

*t WARSAW (AP) — The United Stales has formally apologipd to 
Poland for a Radio Free Europe broadcast that implied^ amilarities 
between the Polish leader. General Wqjdech Jarazdsb. and AdcHf Hitler. 

U.S. officials said Thursday. „ , 

The U.S. charge d’affaires in Warsaw, John R. Daws, delivered an 
apology to the Polish Foreign Ministry on Wednesday. Ameriran offi- 
dais said. In Washington, the Slate Department said the United Stales 
ia — aovemment dissociated itself from the broadcast. .... 


, 


. ' *- 

K, - 

V w - • •• 


. . 

~r- • • 


Two Thai soldiers guard a bridge Unking Aranyaprathet, Thailand, and Cambodia. Tbe 
bridge, which had served as a major crossing point, was damaged by brush fire. 

Khmer Rouge Said to Attack Vietnamese 

The Associated Press Fighting has died down in the past few days 

ARANYAPRATHET. Thailand — Khmer after Vietnamese forces, overran several resistance 


The Associated Press 

ARANYAPRATHET, Thailand — Khmer 
Rouge guerrillas have been attacking Vietnamese 
positions in Cambodia along National Highway 5 
opposite this Thai border town in the past week, 
Thai military sources said Thursday. 

About 500 Khmer Rouge troops of the 474th 
Division burned bridges and attacked Vietnamese 
bases in the areas of Ssophon and Mongkol Borey, 
along the national highway in the northwestern 
Cambodian province of Battambang, the sources 
said. 

Two guerrillas were reported killed and nine 
wounded in six days of sporadic fighting, and pan 
of the guerrilla force retreated to bases in the south 
after the Vietnamese responded with heavy weap- 
ons. they said. 


after Vietnamese forces, overran several resistance 
camps along the Thai-Cambodian border in their 
most powerful offensive since invading Cambodia 
in late 1978. 

A Thai military source also said Vietnamese 
troops fired several dozen rounds from light arms 
into a Thai village seven and a half miles (12 
kilometers) north of Aranyaprathet late Wednes- 
day, but no casualties were reported. It was not 
known why the Vietnamese opened fire, the source 
said. 

International aid officials, meanwhile, reponed 
that the Thais will move 62.000 refugees from an 
evacuation site called Red Hill to the Khao-i-Dang 
refugee holding center, deeper inside Thailand, in 
the next few days. 


Settlers who oppose the indepen- Haq derided Thursday to allow more former politicians to take part in 
dence movement planned to fes- next month's general election. He lifted banning orders against 74 people, 
toon Noumea with French flags mainly supporters of Zulfikar Alt Bhutto, the former prime minister who 
and stage "dignified” protests to was executed by the Zia regime. 


show their desire to “stay with The announcement was made after politicians pressed : General Zia for 
France.” more concessions following the removal of long-standing disqualifica- 

Jean-Marie Tjibaou, president of tions that opened the way for most leading officials from Pakistan’s 
the M elanesian group's "provision- banned political parties to contest the poll. 

al government” installed Dec. 1, His decision did not cover a small group of former politicoes who had 
refused comment on the visit. Mr. been barred from political life by tribunals sei up to investigate malprac- 
Tjibaou met Thursday for 75 min- tices during Mr. Bhutto’s term in power. 


utes with Edgard Pisarii, the special . 1T , i r 

Poll Shows Backing for United Europe 

tion with France.” BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Just over half the European Community’s 

Earlier this week. Mr. Tjibaou 270 million inhabitants support European unification and almost six of 
rejected the plan, which proposed a 10 think community membership is a “good thing,” according to a public 
referendum in July to decide opinion poll published by the community's Executive ComnnssiOTL 
whether the territory should be- The polk published Thursday, was carried out by professional inter- 
come independent at the be ginning viewers in October in the homes of almost 10,000 Europeans aged 15 and 
of 1 986. over in all 10 member states. For the first time since the poll was started r 

Hopes for the proposal began to II years ago, a question was asked about “forming a united states of 
wither after the shooting deaths Europe.” 


Urban League Gills Status of Blacks 'Very Grim’ 


By Reginald Stuart 

New York Times Service 


that blacks say are polarizing the 
races and a moratorium on budget 


WASHINGTON — The presi- cats in programs that help the poor, ric with substance. 

r- .1 . 1 « f _i T _ IJT— 


“Such meetings would replace po- sliding back every since,” Mr. Ja- 
larization with dialogue and rheto- cob said in an introduction to the 


- Amn- on drfS^rir prob- KrS? tas caU^d Ste ffi^O^onder.tsmLux 


report. 

dung employment as an exam- 


cans as “very grim" and called on and devising their own sol u- taause ll not t*® 1 reviewed percent almost double the white 
President Ronald Reagan to “take tions o uL v* “Without eov- b V *1“ WWle House- unemployment rate of 7.6 percent, 

a handful of small steps that could cnimenl ^ tlie private sector whether the president would meet But. at the end of 1984. black un- 
begin to heal Lhe breach between ft.iK, involved ihervdenf nainand with Mr. Jacob. Mr. Speak es said employment was at 16 percent. 


begin to heal Lhe breach between fully involved, the evde of pain and Wl11 Mr - jaco °- IW - ■ > P Cil * ra »■« employment was at id percent, 
his administration and black peo- nrnirtv will not be broken. *h* president had not received any more than twice the 6.5 percent 

.1. ** ‘ J fdmuwl frv n mpplllin mto fnr tulttloe 


The president, John E Jacob, on . Jacob said Mr. Reagan 
Wednesday released He organize- 


request for a meeting. 

The report covered seven topics. 


rate for whites. 

Asked what level of un employ- 


ed 1986. over in all 10 member states. For the first lime since the poll was started 

Hopes for the proposal began to II years ago, a question was asked about “forming a united states of 
wither after the shooting deaths Europe." 

Saturday of two Melanesian, or Fifty-two percent replied that it would be a good idea, while 22 percent 
Kanak separatists by French po- replied negatively. But opinions varied greatly from country to country, 
lice. Mr. Tjibaou has called the Up to 7 of 10 respondents in Luxembourg. Italy. France, Greece, Belginm 
deaths assassinations and alleged and West Germany favored the idea. There was a smaller majority in the 
complicity by the bland's senior Netherlands and Italy, but the majority in Britain and Denmark said 
civil and police officials. “no " 

Mr. Mitterrand announced his 

Reagan Seeks Report on Wallenberg 

persuade Melanesians and white WASHINGTON (AF) — Presi- 


nCUllLOUlliy I tlVflJVM UIV> Ul UOUIZai ■ • . IWKIUUUIg ■ mmmmmmwj m ■■■■ UVWV|/IUL'lli ■ V'l 

lion’s annual report on the status of administrators to plications 0 f technology in urban blacks, Mr. Jacob said. “Parity, the 

tbe United States’ 28 million ^regular meetings with leaden school districts now heavily popu- same level or unemployment as 
blacks. The report continued the ot l “ e , , community ana lated with racial minorities, elderly that for whites.” 


including the black family, the im- mem would be acceptable for , : mZL 

niir-iiirxnc n f V „rh a n hwirc Mr -ParJrv ,h, settlers to accept the Pisam referat- dent Ronald Reagan urged Mos- 


tbe United States’ 28 million 

blacks. The report continued the ? 

league's harsh criticism of Mr. Rea- ^° ups ** voiuntcers 
gan. but suggested policies it said “The purpose of such tm 
would change the administration's would not be conventional political 
image as hostile to blacks. stroking, but a true dialogue be- 


me duck community ana Uted with racial minorities, elderly 
oups of volunteers. black Americans, blacks in the me- 

“The purpose of such meetings dia. tite labor movement, the prob- 


The report characterized the 
Reagan administration's attitude 


Among steps recommended in tween those who bold power and 
such experiments. the report were presidential sup- those whose constituents are so 

Besides the potential economic port of a civil rights bill now before deeply affected by that power” 
dividends, the Kohl government Congress, reappraisal of United said Mr. Jacob, who has been presi- 
sees the project as a way to fortify States policy toward South Africa, dent of the 75-year-old public ser- 
honds within the Western alliance, a cooling of political statements vice organization for three years. 


bonds within the Western alliance. 


Heral«*Sribunc 


< Ipr flint* t ||r t)ll» 
I- S-m ill Mit-nn, 


uumit lx*ad*Ts Vow ti> Fu4» 
jr an Economic Recover* 


«►» , 



Ethnic Turks 
Said to Riot 
In Bulgaria 


HWdlr Cm 


S'-S.ws t .S. Iwnn'i Powt 








SOFIA — Diplomatic sources in Greece 
Bulgaria say violent disturbances y S mo 1 
followed official attempts to get w^fd 0 h 
ethnic Turks to assume Bulgarian ^ officii 
names. The authorities deny that 
there have been any incidents. Since tl 

According io accounts from sev- key’s co 
era! diplomatic sources this week, northern ' 
there have been casualties, includ- has maim 
ing deaths, among Turks resisting 10 in mil! 
police demands that they adopt andTurki 
Bulgarian first names. mem bud] 

In Ankara, officials said Presi- effect hm 
dent Kenan Evren had appealed to Turkey’s 
the B ulgarian leader. Todor Zhiv- reduced i 
kov. to help ensure the freedom Congress, 
and legal rights of the Turkish mi- ns ur 


lems of black financial institutions toward blacks as “deplorable.” as- 
and the presidential candidacy in serf ing that it had continually at- 
1 984 of the Reverend Jesse L. Jack- tacked affirmative action, sought to 
son. reverse civil rights gains for minor- 

“In virtually every area of life ities through the Justice Depart- 
that counts, black people made ment and the U.S. Civil Rights 
strong progress in the 1960s. Commission and hud drugged its 
peaked in the 70s. and have been feet on voting rights legislation. 

Kyprianou, Denktash 
Begin Talks on Cyprus 

(Continued from Page 1) cantly increase military assistance 
Turkey, high-level officials said 10 Turkey. 

Thursday. An indication of Greek concern 

Greece has protested earlier j^tim that the first major con- 
U. S. moves in that direction and c ? sslon3 ’ Ankara since the inva- 


dura as a means of protecting the cow on Thursday to provide a 
fundamental interests of both “complete accounting” of the fate 
groups. of Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish 

“The president of tbe republic is diplomat who disappeared in Hun- 
welcome in all pans or the French gaiy 40 years ago, in Soviet custo- 
terrilory.aiKlIdaretohopehewill dy, after having helped to save 
understand the ferocious determi- thousands of Jews from Nazi death 


nation of the ma 
nians to remain Fi 


a of Calcdo- caiuf 
" said Dick “li 


3ths of the horrors of 


Ukeiwe, president of the territorial World War II. Raoul Wallenberg 


government. 


was one shining light of ir 


would object to them in ihe future. w f. re f ' n 9 l ? xce l® 5 

the officials said. I" 1 * 1 “““action than with a proc- 

tarnation of what the government 
Since the 1974 invasion and Tur- of Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
key’s continued occupation of dreou calls a new “national defense 
northern Cyprus, the United States policy.” 
has maintained a proportion of 7 to ti» nniu. ..u,.,— 


But tbe Kanaks said they would tion. upholding the honor of the 
not welcome Mr. Mitterrand. human race ” Mr. Reagan said in a 
“His visit is meaningless," said a written statement. "The world 
spokesman for the pro-indepen- owes a tremendous and eternal 
dence Kanak Socialist National debt to this great man. And the 
Liberation Front. “We want sever- Soviet Union owes the world a full 
eignty.” and complete accounting of his Raoul Wallenberg 

At least 19 people have died fate.” 

since mid-November in a struggle Sweden considers Mr. Wallenberg officially alive “until evidence is 
between native Melanesians seek- provided to lhe contrary.” the Swedish Foreign Office has said. A Soviet 
ing independence and settlers, statement in 1957 said Mr. Wallenberg died 10 years earlier in a Moscow 
most of them of European origin, prison, apparently of a heart attack. Prisoners released from the Soviet 
who want France to continuing Union have said, however, that he was alive as late as the 1970s. 
governing the island, ns it has since 

1853. Melanesians are known lo- r» 1 T 1 J n n ■ 

caiiy as Kanaks. Solomon Islanos elections Overturned 

^ HONIARA. Solomon Islands (Reuters) —The Solomon Islands' high 

described Mr. Mitterrand s deci- mini hi,., nkinu minid.rv .u~ 


The policy, whose text remains le ™- 


^jn -ilitaryaidbetween Greece ^ 

“ d U ' S ’ De W}- Turkey, rather than die Soviet bloc. 

hS 1 ! b hf^i^? t fh thi i 1 T° uU ■" 15 Greece s principal potential ene- 
Sf Sj? ^r 3 £?k?vi h aiS? an, £J? my - Dl P lomals m Athens see in this 

ShtSri !* ,* S" 25- ^ 311 a PP arem inconsistency because 
reduced to the 7-to-IO ratio by of the membership of both Greece 

congress. and T uikey in NATO, which views 

U5. urging is said by informed die Soviet Union as the principal 


1853. Melanesians are known lo- o » ti j n ■ 

cally as Kanaks. oOlOUIOIl ISlaDOS EieCOOIlS UvertUXTied 

HONIARA. Solomon Islands (Reuters) —The Solomon Islands' high 
„ C0UTl has ro,cd lhal two cabinet ministers and an opposition member of 
son to wit New Cakdooia as a Pariiamenl wcre eleaed u fouod inegu ^cs in October's 

throw of (kite that if suo^sfuL voling ^ ^ ^ lhe ^in three district 

iSn^in his seven The 6011,1 01,01 thaI Finance Minister George Kejoa, Health and 
31 * h fJSf fWay P ° ml ^ ^ Medical Services Minister George Ngumi and an opposition member, 
yc J5.;"S - M ^ .. . Aaihr David Kausimae. should lose their seats. The court said that election 


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have been no clashes. There is no 
reason for any clashes. There have 
been no victims. It is all slander.” 

Mr. Gonev estimated there were 
400,000 to 500,000 ethnic Turks 
living in Bulgaria, which was once 
part of the Ottoman empire. Esti- 
mates from Turkey pul the number 
at more than one million, out of a 
population of about nine million. 

The diplomats said Bulgaria be- 
gan the drive to get ethnic Turks to 
change their names about two 
months ago. mainly in southern 
mountain communities. 

The sources said they could not 
put a figure on casualties. One said 
he had heard that as many as 40 
were killed in a clash involving se- 
curity forces near Momchilgrad. 
The report could not be confirmed. 

The diplomats said Bulgarian 
police surrounded small communi- 
ties at night and entered Turkish 
homes, demanding that Turks sign 
forms agreeing to adopt Bulgarian 
first names. 


that the principal argument used den elevation of this situation to a 
by the United States was that a formally proclaimed policy was 
Cyprus settlement would make it meant to be read as a warning to 
possible to pass through Congress Turkey and, indirectly, to the Unit- 
plans by the Pentagon to signifi- ed Stales. 


ralA t(.nl Man, 7'ilivfnnii -mi«i J Ul uiv uuw UWUIWJ pul IldillUl UU UJC tMUUU dJIU l<UICU 

Le Maun, said that New Caledonia cnsur e a secret baHot. 
could turn into a mortal trap for 
Mr. Mitterrand just when he hopes _ m 

to rebuild his popularity. bwiss Deny Asylum to Soviet Detainee 

Serge July, editor of Lhe leftist , n . ' _ r , . . , , , 

daily Liberation, said Mr. Miner- „ ^ <«I U « ; for P° bural 

rand’s journey was the riskiest of “S' 10 ? ■ made a fp' 1 ® soldier detained in Switzerland for two years 
all his foreign trips, including those tang captured by Afghan guerrillas, a Justice Ministry spokesman 

to Beirut and to the French Basque p--- , 

. The soldier, Yun Povartnnsin. was one of 1 1 Soviet fighters captured 

He said that Mr Mitterrand m ^Staiistan who have been held in a Swiss military detention cento 
might face the kind of humiliation H" der ^ agreement by lhe International Committee of the Red Cross, 
that greeted a Socialist prime min- t %P smI “ and ^ Swss. Soviet and Afghan governments, 
ister (Guv MolleL in Algeria in . spokesman said the Federal Office for Police Affairs had rgected 

1956, when European settle pelt- deserdon from f c ™y w ? s ins .'J fi ' 

ed him with tomaioM. 1 reason ‘° P^bng refugee status. However, he added, the soldier 

(AP Reuicrsl 1:311 a PP ea t ^e decision and can live and work in Switzerland with a 
1 * 1 renewable one-year residence permit. 

p For the Record 

1 1*011 greSS An earthquake jolted large areas of soutiteastern Yugoslavia on Thurs- 

. _ day but auibijriiies said no damage or casualties were reported. Seismolo- 

^jpjUg ril l n get Akl'bania^ ^ trerDOr was “ lhe Straight of Otranto or in eastern 

. .. . . Prhne Minister Kaare WiDodb of Norway arrived Thursday in Buda- 

(Coahnued from Page lj Thursday to spare his proposed in- pest, the Hungarian news agency MTI said. Norwegian officials said he 

crease in military spending from would discuss the U.S.-Soviet agreement to resume arms talks as weD as 
their attempts to cut federal defi- trade links between Norway and Hungary. (Reuters/ 

cits. The Associated Press reported A Spanish industrialist was kidnapped Thursday in the northern Span- 
from Washington. ish town of Asteasu. Officials said they believed militant Basque separat- 

But the House minority leader, ists forced Angel Uneaga into a car before fleeing. (Reuters} 

Robert H. Michel of Illinois, said Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of Britain will visit Washington 
Mr. Weinberger underwent “prob- Feb. 20 for talks with President Ronald Reagan, her office said. (AP) 
ing questions” and won no com- Thejray defiberatmg Arid Sharon's 550-million libel suit against Time 


Priest’s Driver New Leaders in Congress 
Teds of Attack Challenge MX, Arms Bu dg et 


(Continued from Page 1) 


him move. And if anything hap- the legal aspects of redsion and crease in military spending firmi 
pens, shoot.” termination, and pay the damages *tar attempts to cut federal oen- 

He was ordered not to tum his , ste P fr ? m svftem in- 
head but saw the driver. Mr. Pe- “f 3 * 1 of , faUin fi r ° r tins old ploy. * rt 2 n Washington. . 
kala. watSing^ ”uirh£ * You ““ 1 slo P «■.' " he said. *«}*£ Hou^ nunonty lead^ 
luszko was seized, and reacting Pressed to ate wapons systems. 

“with disgust and something like said that the B-I 

. •• ° ° hoinho 1 amt my miccii. mg questions and won no com- 

mit intents. 

Mr. Michel said Wednesday that 


tension.” bomber and MX missile were being 

When the kidnappers drove off. *" 

with Mr. Chrosiowski in the front , ^ e ranrH$l h^rw1i^ C | C f C . 

o- or the men brandished a ^ 

rope at him and said: Here you . *5 - , . 


Vhy 




c emptied by Our staff From Drsparcha ^ 3)5 | n Washington, the Slate Department said the United states 

NOUMEA, New Caledonia — government dissociated itself from the broadcast. 

President Francois Mitterrand left The Polish government spokesman. Jerzy Urban, said the Jan. 7 
Thursday for New Caledonia, but program raised questions about the sincerity of U^. efforts to improve 
Melanesian separatists said his visit relations with Poland. He said the U.S.- funded radio station broadcast a 
would have no effect on their at- purported Hiller speech and dedicated it to General Jaruzdski. 
tempt to win total independence 

f ™ F JE£™dw* oepwed U 'Blueprint’ of AIDS Virus Found 

make one undisclosed stop on the WASHINGTON (WP) — U.S. and French scientists, in separate 
12,500-mile (20.250-kifometer) research projects, have uncovered genetic blueprints for the virus that 
journey before landing Saturday causes AIDS, a major finding that is expected to assist basic studies of the 
morning in New Caledonia for a disease as well as help efforts to detect prevent and treat it 
24-hour visit to promote a referen- The U.S. project was a collaborative effort by the National Cancer 
dum for independence. He was ac~ Institute, Harvard Medical School and two commercial laboratories, 
companied by Interior Minister “This is a significant step forward in understanding how the virus 


Pierce Joxe, according to a state- works.” Dr. Robert Gallo, head of the National Cancer Institute labora- 
rnent from the Qysee Palace in Par- iory in Washington that discovered the AIDS virus last spring, said 
is. Wednesday. Dr. William Haseltine of Harvard's Dana Father Cancer 

Officials in New Caledonia said institute said: “Now we see the face of the enemy. We have the complete 
Mr. Mitterrand would make sever- blueprint for the modus ope ran di of the virus.” 
al visits by helicopter to the interior 

KSSlt Zia Opens Vote to More Ex-Politicians 

territorial government. ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) — President Mohammad Zia ni- 

Seulers who oppose the indepen- 
dence movement planned to fes- 



iTiP’i’Si 'i s 
• • -• ' 


A said some ethnic dmenmnin; f aaor . he sn g : 

■rks lSdsone on hunger sirikes s^oor head off on S oor bs. S3™* 


| I...,. 18-1- 85 | | 


Turks had gone on hunger sirikes 
in protest. 

Mr. Ganev, although emphatic 
in his denial that there had been 
dashes, defended Bulgaria's na- 
tionality policies. 

“We’ are justly proud of the 
equality of rights that we extend to 
the Turkish population,” he said. 
“We realize a sort of psychosis is 
created among relatives of this 
community in Turkey, but there are 
no grounds for such anxiety." 

university” 

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most leverage with Moscow in the 


Mr. Michel said Wednesday that meetings the former Israeli defense minister had with Christian 'Phalan- 
he may propose holding increases gists on the eve or a massacre of Palestinian refugees. (UPD 

in defense spending to 4 percent Senator Jesse Helms has started mailing letters in his national cam- 
after inflation in the fiscal 1986 paign aimed at persuading one million conservatives to buv stock in CBS 
budget in exchange for Republican and take control of the television network, aides io the North Carolina 
support for the MX. Republican said Thursday. (UP!} 


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Mr. Chrosiowski jumped from arms talks. “We’re going to have to 
the car as it passed another vehicle look closely at what Shultz is telling 
“I slid, rolled over, and when 1 us. what is it that makes an impres- 


stopped rolling I jumped up. One sj on on them with regard lo our 
of the handcuffs sprang open." systems." 

He went to a nearby building. “If it's the Strategic Defense Ini- 


Bonn Blocks Motion to Stop Missile Exercises 


Reuters 

BONN — The defense commit- 


Three U.S. soldiers were killed 
and 16 injured at a U.S. Army base 


where an ambulance was called. It tiative. then obviously we're going tee of the West German parliament near Heilbronn in southern Gei- 
took him to the home or a Torun lo have that thing, and to do that, ly* narrowly defeated an opposi- many when the first Mage of a sol- 
priesu Josef Nowakowski. to whom we're going to have to unfund some tion motion urging the United id-fuel rocket or a Pershing-2 

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he idd his story. other things.” Senator Simpson 

S " 1 " • > O other senator 

attend ihbe was no waySh 
with .hear 1 1 had to regard aa 
ea-gstertiUaewIroaMoniysave 


Stales to halt exercises involving caught fire as it was being hoisted 
Ptershing-2 nuclear missiles pend- from its shipping container. 


myself hy staying calm." 

He was taken later to an Interior 
Ministry hospital, where he was 
treated for severe bruises and an 
ankle injury. 


that some military bases and train- 
ing facilities be closed. 

■ Weinberger Pleas for Budget 


ing an investigation into an acci- 
dent involving a missile. 

Alfred Biehle. the Christian 
Democrat committee chairman, 
who voted Wednesday against the 
motion from the opposition Social 
Democrats and the Greens, said 
further deployment of themedium- 


Secrettuy Weinberger pleaded range missile would not be affected 
with House Republican leaders by the accident Friday. 


Mr. Biehle said the cause of the 
fire wa* unknown, but that a panel 
of special Isis, including one from 
the Bundeswehr. or federal armed 
forces, was investigating. 

Mr. Biehle said (hat the Per- 
shing-2 system remained fully op- 
erational.' 

The U.S. Pentagon has said stat- 


ic electricity or a problem with lhe 
crane lifting the missile may have 
caused the fire. 

Erwin Horn, a defense commit- 
tee member speaking for the Social 
Democrats, said the Pershing-2 s's- 
tern was not fully developed and 
that deployment had been prema- 
ture. 

Mr. Horn said his party would 
not allow accidents involving Per* 
shing-Is io be “brushed under the 
carpet" and would pursue the mat- 
ter in parliament. He said Friday's 
incident was the fourth involving 3 
Pershing-2 in one vear. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


Page 3 




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Hart Sees Gromyko, 
Says Moscow Wants 
Early Talks on Arms 


By Cdestine Bohlen 

Washington Pott Service* 

MOSCOW — Foreign Minister 
Andrei A Gromyko, in bis first 
mee t in g with a U.S. legislator <inw» 
last week’s arms talks in Geneva, 
told Senator Gary Hart on Thurs- 
day that he hoped U.S. negotiators 
would move directly to “concrete 
proposals" when the two sides re- 
sume arms negotiations. 

In a brief interview outside the 
Kr emlin where he spent two hours 
with Mr. Gromyko, Mr. Hart said 
the Soviet foreign minister empha- 
sized- that the arms talks should 
begin “sooner better than later . . . 
but not if sooner leads to general- 
ities." 

Mr. Hart, a Colorado Democrat 
lost the Democratic presidential 
primaries to Walter F. Mondak in 
1984. His reception by Mr. Gromy- 
ko and other Soviet officials indi- 
cates that the Russians are interest- 
ed tn his future political prospects. 

An aide described the atmo- 
sphere Bt Thursday’s meeting as 
“frank, businesslike and friendly." 
He said the meeting had been ex- 
pected to last 30 to 45 minutes. 

Senator Hart, a member of the 
Senate Armed Services Committee, 
said much of his conversation with 
Mr. Gromyko centered on the com- 
ing arms negotiations agreed upon 
by Mr. Gromyko and Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz in Geneva 
earlier this month. 

Mr. Gromyko reiterated the So- 
viet position “in terms virtually 
identical" to statements made dur- 
ing an interview on Soviet televi- 
sion last Sunday, Mr. Hart said 

“There may have been some nu- 
ances," said Mr. Hart, but he 
would not elaborate. 

The Russians have made it dear 
that their top priority in the pro- 
posed three-part talks is to halt the 
UJS. development of space-based 


tamer the date nor the site for 
the has been set. Mr. Gromy- 
ko (old the senator that he hoped 
the dialogue oyer riming and loca- 


tion did not go on “overly 
and that both sides would be i 
with specific proposals. 

Mr. Han said he and Mr. Gro- 
myko also discussed issues of com- 
pliance in arms control and on hu- 
man rights. Hie senator said he 
stressed U.S. concerns about hu- 
man rights abuses in the Soviet 
Union. 

“I was more concerned with in- 
dividuals than debating general- 
ities,” be said. 

He said that Mr. Gromyko, 
while objecting to outside interfer- 
ence in internal Soviet affairs, said 
his staff would investigate the 
cases. 

Human rights were also stressed 
in a series of meetings between So- 
viet officials and a group of US. 
congressmen, who were in Moscow 
this week on a parliamentary ex- 
change. 

Headed by Representative Tom 
Lantos, a California Democrat, the 
group said they told Soviet officials 
that the United States was not 
ready to accept “detente without a 
human face." 

Mr. Hart, ending a 10-day Euro- 
pean tour, is in the Soviet Union as 
a guest of the Supreme Soviet or 
parliament, and the USA. and 
Canada Institute. 

■ Reagan CaD to Soviet 

President Ronald Reagan chal- 
lenged the Soviet Union on Thurs- 
day to put aside rhetoric and sip- 
port steps to reduce tensions in 
Europe, United Press International 
reported from W ashing ton 

Mr. Reagan, in a written state- 
ment an the Jan. 29 resumption of 

East-West disar mament taflr, in 

Stockholm, said the Russians had 
yet to respond to a “spin t of practi- 
cality, fairness and compromise" 
displayed by the West 

“They have yet to join the major- 
ity of participants who favor a seri- 
ous, practical approach to develop- 
ing meaningful confidence-build- 
ing measures,” he said after 
meeting with James Goodby, the 
chief U _S. delegate to the talks. 



Nicaraguan Leaders Promote Dialogue With US, 


Daniel Ortega Saavedra 


By Richard Harwood 

Washington Amt Service 

MANAGUA — President Dan- 
iel Onega Saavedra of Nicaragua 
says peace negotiations in Central 
America are achieving nothing be- 
cause the only policy the United 
States has is to "liquidate this revo- 
lution." 

Tomhs Beige Martinez, Nicara- 
gua's minister of the interior, said 
in a separate interview Tuesday 
that the United States has legiti- 
mate security interests in the Carib- 
bean region. 

“We could come to an under- 
standing," Mr. Borge said, “that 
there would never be any foreign 
military bases here, there would 
never be strategic weapons here, 
there would never be strategic 


weapons even in a conventional 
sense." 

Mr. Onega, in his fust interview 
since his inauguration Jan. 10, said 
that a "normalization" of relations 
with the United States was vital to 
Nicaragua, that there was no other 
basis for peace and stability in his 

country. 

But normalization is impossible, 
Mr. Ortega said, until three condi- 
tions are met: 

Fust, the “contras,” the rebel 
forces fighting his government with 
U.S. assistance, must be defeated. 

Second, the United States must 
be persuaded “through dialogue" 
that military action against the 
Sandinist government will solve no 
problems. 

And, third, the United States 


must abandon "neo-colonial" poli- 
cies and attitudes toward Nicara- 
gua and all of Central America. 

“Neo-colonialism" as a policy. 
Mr. Ortega said, was inherited by 
the Reagan administration from 
previous U.S. administrations, 
both libera) and conservative. Since 
the 19th century, he said, the Unit- 
ed States has intervened in Central 
American affairs* 

Mr. Ortega and several of his 
colleagues in the Sandinisi-domi- 
nated government proclaim them- 
selves Marxist-Lenuusts. 

But ideology, he said, has noth- 
ing to do with present U.S. policies. 

“Any government of the right or 
of the left," be said, “becomes an 
enemy of the United States if it is 
opposed to neocolonialism." 


The Sandinist definition of neo- 
colonialism is the assertion by the 
United States of a right to inter- 
rene in the affairs of Central Amer- 
ica because of its geographical 
proximity and because of the his- 
torical precedent first enunciated 
in the Monroe Doctrine of 1823. 

Mr. Borge elaborated on the pos- 
sibilities of “normalized” relations 
with the United States. “The North 
American interest is that Nicara- 
gua should not constitute a danger 
to the U.S7* be said. 

“We could make a deal on mili- 
tary advisers," he continued. “We 
could discuss matters related to our 
supposed aid" to guerrillas in El 
Salvador. 

“We could talk about the U.S. 
theory of the export of revolution 


and assure them there is not the 
slightest possibility of exporting 
our revolution” to other Central 
American countries, he said. 

“AH we expect in exchange « 
that they should respect us and not 
meddle in our affairs,” he said. 

“They can have an opinion. Twy 
can criticize. But they nave no right 
to impose their opinions.” 

Mr. Borge said it would bean 
incredible step forward” if Presi- 
dent Reagan would visit Nicaragua 
an d “if we could meet him and look 

him in the eye.” 

“Despite his ideology and histri- 
onic tendencies and nis concrete 
interests as a representative of the 
conservatives, if he just caught a 
glimpse of Nicaragua — that would 
contribute to change:" 


Show Dog Faces New Kind of Trial 

Owner Disputes Charge That Animal Killed Her Mother 


By James Risen 

Los Angela Tima Service 

BIRMINGHAM. Michigan — 
Groomed at least four hours a day, 
pampered by bis owners, King 
Boots has led a glorious life, on the 
international show dog circuit, on 
the covers of dog magazines and in 
the confines of the Charles and 
Kathryn Scbwarb borne. 

But this success cannot obscure 
the brutal questions uow being 
raised: Is King Boots a killer? Did 
the 100-pound (45-kilo) purebred 
Old English sheepdog, which has 
won more prizes than any other of 
its breed in the United States, maul 
and kill Gertrude Monroe, Mrs. 
Scbwarb s 87-year-oJd mother, by 
biting her six to eight times around 
the neck and head, simply because 
she got in his way? 

The city of Birmin gham an af- 
fluent Detroit suburb where the 
Schwarbs live, thinks he did. It has 
impounded King Boots and plans 
to destroy the animal 

But the Schwarbs argue that 
Mrs. Monroe died of a heart attack 
(a Dec. 19. when she tried to get up 
from her chair. They say Boots only 


bit her once on the neck because 
she fell on top of the dog while he 
was sleeping. They have filed suit 
against the city to prevent Boots's 
destruction. 

Birmingham's attorney, Jon 
Kingsepp, charged that “this dog 
attacked this wo man, and when the 
city finds a vicious dog, something 
has to be done. We have to protect 
society." 

But Richard Selik, an attorney 
hired by the Scbwaibs, says “the 
question is whether the dog was 
provoked. The evidence shows that 
this is not a vicious dog." 

What has followed is the King 
Boots trial, scheduled to conclude 
this week in the court of Michigan 
District Judge Edward Sosnik. 

It has taken on all the trappings 
of a major murder trial, with local 
television and newspaper coverage, 
a court packed with spectators and 
friends of the family, and medical 
testimony from pathologists. One 
doctor pretended to be the dog in a 
courtroom re-enactment of the in- 
cident 

Mrs. Scbwarb. whose husband 
owns a foundry, testified that she 


Witness Gives Ground on Westmoreland Figures 


By MA Farbcr 

Nov York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Lawyers for 
General William C. Westmoreland 
have attempted to show that, con- 
trary to a 1982 CBS documentary, 
the general did not suppress higher 
estimates in 1967 forVietcong “ir- 
regular” forces. 

Samuel A. Adams, the former 
CIA analyst whose thesis of mili- 
tary “deception” underlies, the 
broadcast that is the subject 


The CBS documentary, “The 
Uncounted Enemy: A Vietnam 
Deception,” asserted that, to show 
progress m the war, the general's 
command engaged in a “conspira- 
cy” to m inim a the size and nature 
of the enemy, mainly by deleting 
the self-defense forces from the of- 
ficial military listing of enemy 
strength, known as the order of 
battle. It said that “critical" intdli- 
forces 
Itered." 


General Westmoreland's Sl20-iml- 
tion libel suit testified Wednesday 
under cross-examination that vir- 
tually the same figures that were 
said to have alarmed the general 
were, nonetheless, widely distribut- 
ed by his command to U.S. inteffi- 
gence agencies. 

The numbers were “certainly 
similar," Mr. Adams acknowl- 
edged under questioning by David 
Doreen, a lawyer for General West- 
moreland. However, he had testi- 
fied earlier, those numbers were 
not ultimately used. 

Mr. Adams, who served as a paid 
consultant to CBS and is now a 
defendant at the 14-week trial, took 
the stand last Thursday. 

A key witness for CBS, he bad 
testified on direct examination that 
General Westmoreland had im- 
posed an arbitrary ceiling of 
500,000 on reports of enemy 
strength in 1967, partly by masking 
the number of the political cadre 
and of such “irregular" forces as 
guerrillas and village self-defense 
units. 

Mr. Adams, who look part in 
1967 in a quarrel between the mili- 
tary and the CIA over the proper 
estimates for enemy strength, 
seemed uneasy under cross-exami- 
nation. The prodigious memory he 
displayed on direct examination 
failed him a number of times as Mr. 
Dorsen pursued apparent discrep- 
ancies between his testimony and 
other statements he has made. 

For example, Mr. Adams had 
said lastweek that be first rea liz ed 
the CIA hod "sold out" to lower 
estimates advanced by the military 
wbec be returned to Washington is 
September 1967 from a conference 
in Saigon. He said he had left the 
conference after two ex' three days. 

But George Carver, Mr. Adams's 
forms superior, had previously 
testified that Mr. Adams was aware 
in Saigon of the “compromise” be- 
tween the CIA and the military. 

And Wednesday, Mr. Dorsen 
read excapts from a book Mr. Ad- 
ams has been writing in which he 
says that, on the night he learned of 
ibe agreement, he attended a party 
in Saigon and “pounded the table, 
cursed the military and. drank too 
much." 


Donovan Trial Motion 
Denied by U.S. Judge 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — A U.S. judge 
has denied an attempt by Ray- 
mond j. Donovan, the labor secre- 
tary, to have his tool moved from a 
state, court in the Bronx to the fed- 
eral level Mr. Donovan is charged 
with larceny and filing false busi- 
ness reports. 

The ruling was made Wednes- 
day. Mr. Donovan’s lawyers bad 
argued that be should be tried in 
federal court to prevent state inter- 
ference in federal affaire. They said 
that _ Mr. Donovan's indlctmeqt 
Sept. 24 forced him to take an un- 
paid leave from President Ronald 
Reagan’s, cabinet 


wwvmi#, a i JHIU lima wiuwu a. 

gence, on the scopeof enemy ! 
had been “suppressed and alu 


General Westmoreland contends 
that the broadcast defamed him by 
saying that, for political and public 
relations reasons, he had bed to 
President Lyndon B. Johnson and 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He also 
denies that he had ignored reports 
by his intelligence officers of a larg- 
er Vietcong presence in 1967 and of 
a higher rate of North Vietnamese 
infiltration than he made known. 

The general testified that, when 
he ordered the removal of the self- 


defense forces from the order of 
battie in the fall of 1967. it was 
because he had come to believe that 
those units were insignificant mili- 
tarily and that their inclusion at a 
number much higher than used be- 
fore would mislead Washington 
and the press. 

The part-time self-defense 
forces, officially estimated until 
early 1967 at approximately 
70.000, were considered thereafter 
to number around 120,000. 


Malpractice Suits Set Records in U.S. 


New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Americans 
are filing more than three times as 
many medical malpractice claims 
as they did 10 years ago. at the 
height of what was known as the 
“medical malpractice crisis," and 
are winning record settlements, the 
American Medical Association 
says in a report 

A second, internal report pro- 
poses several approaches to deal 
with the problem. A key proposal 
says that organized medicine must 
make a more concerted effort to 
find incompetent doctors and re- 
move them from practice. 

“We’re going to be emphasizing 
this more stringently than has been 
the case before;” an association of- 
ficial said. 

Medical association and insur- 
ance industry statistics show that 
16 malpractice claims woe filed for 


every 100 doctors in 1983. about 20 
percent more than the year before. 
In 1975, fewer than five claims 
were filed for every 100 doctors. 

The awards and settlements in 
malpractice suits “are breaking all 
records." the association said in its 
recent report In each of the last 
few years, several hundred mal- 
practice awards to patients have 
exceeded SI million. 

An official with the St Paul Fire 
and Marine Insurance Co., which 
carries more medical malpractice 
policies than any other company, 
said, “We can see no change in this 
trend" of “dramatic" increase. 

As a result the internal report by 
the American Medical Associa- 
tion^ board of trustees concludes 
that the problem is again “at a 
crisis stage." 

The increasing numbers of mal- 
practice claims are widely believed 


Weinberger Favors Backup 
To Space Defense System 


(Continued from Page 1) 
world conditions that we now see 
were to change drastically, then we 
would be able to change budget 
requests, of course.” 

But he added, “You can't budget 
unfulfilled hopes.” 

Mr. Weinberger's remarks ou re- 
storing an air defense network re- 
flect a growing belief among miH- 
taiy experts that Mr. Reagan’s 
vision of a space-based shield 
against nuclear missiles would not 
be adequate to stop slower, low- 
flying bombers and cruise missiles. 

The United States constructed a 
network of radar installations, in- 
terceptor aircraft and ground-to- 
air mis siles in the 1950s to protea 
against a threat from Soviet nucle- 
ar- armed bombers. 

As of 1960, according to a re- 
searcher at the private Center for 
Defense Information, the network 
included 2,700 interceptor planes 
and 4,400 surface-to-air missdes, as 
well as Airim of radar installations 
across Canada, Alaska and Green- 
land. 

But the network gradually dete- 
riorated, and was reduced to a skel- 
eton under Mr. Schleringer in 1975. 


Mr. Schleringer argued that it 
was pointless to defend against 
bombers when there was no de- 
fense against much quicker inter- 
continental ballistic missiles, or 
ICBMs. 

Instead. U.S. officials said, the 
defense against nuclear war would 
be the threat of devastating retalia- 
tion. 

Mr. Reagan's goal of developing 
a space shield against nuclear mis- 
siles, known formally as the Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative and popular- 
ly termed “star wars." has revived 
interest among military planners in 
ways to stop bombers. 

For example, Gerold Yonas. the 
scientist in charge of the .five-year, 
S26-biHjon Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative research program, recently 
told a symposium that an air de- 
fense network “would certainly be 
necessary” to plug leaks in’ the 
space shield. 

Mr. Weinberger said any talk 
about cost was speculative. “All we 
know is that if we can gel the sys- 
tem, it will be infinitely less than 
the cost of continuing the offensive 
systems,” he added, referring to the 
budduD of nuclear arms. 


to add significantly to the cost of 
health care nationwide. 

Malpractice insurance policies 
can now cost individual physicians 
up to S80.000 a year. 

The value of awards to patients, 
the medical association said, to- 
taled S2 billion in 1983. up 33 per- 
cent in two years. 

At the same time, when the asso- 
ciation surveyed its members last 
year. 40 percent of them said they 
often ordered additional diagnostic 
tests and 27 percent said they pre- 
scribed additional treatments that 
they might not have ordered except 
for fear that they could be sued. 

The total cost of all those addi- 
tional tests and treatments, the as- 
sociation estimated, was SI 5 billion 
to S40 billion last year. 

In the malpractice “crisis” of a 
decade ago, dozens of insurance 
companies simply' stopped writing 
malpractice policies, leaving many 
doctors uninsured. 

In response, government and or- 
ganized medicine instituted a num- 
ber of reforms. 

But the report published by the 
AMA last month concludes that 
the campaign to reform the legal 
system in the 1970s "appears to 
have failed.” 


HARRY’S NEW YORK BAR ® 

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saw her mother /all and hit her 
head on a wall before falling on the 
sleeping dog, which then bit her. 
Dr. Henry A. Kallet. a pathologist 
hired by the Schwarbs. testified 
that the woman suffered a heart 
attack and was bitten by Bools only 
after she was lying face down on 
the floor. 

Dr. Kallet agrees, however, that 
the bile ripped open Lhe carotid 
artery in Mrs. Monroe’s neck, ac- 
counting for the blood on the dog’s 
mouth and around Mrs. Monroe’s 
body found by paramedics called 
Lo the Scbwarb home. 

The city’s case is based on the 
testimony of Dr. William Brooks, 
Oakland County’s medical examin- 
er, who concluded that Mrs. Mon- 
roe died from being bitten at least 
six times on the bead. He said he 
did not discover evidence of a heart 
attack or a stroke in the autopsy. 

Another physician. Dr. David 
Marcus, said he found eight sepa- 
rate biles on Mrs. Monroe’s body 
when it was brought to his hospital. 
He told the court that “the animal 
spent a significant amount of time 
on the back of the head and the 
neck” in maulin g Mrs. Monroe. 

As evidence of King Boots’s pre- 
vious behavior, a former maid in 
the Scbwarb home was called to 
testify. She said that Boots bit her 
on the head in August. 

Mr. Kingsepp promises more ev- 
idence to prove the dog’s guilt, 
while the Schwarbs will make an- 
other attempt to save their pet, 
when King Boots's attorneys will 
call on “character” witnesses to tes- 
tify about the dog’s disposition. 

They said they may appeal the 
case to a higher court if Judge Sos- 
nik rules against the dog. 


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'Page 4 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


Rerali* 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


Pufa&bed Villi 71m New York Tim* and 71m Tastnogun Post 


Escaping the Deficit Bog 


The struggle to reduce America’s budget 
deficit outlasts even the Karpov- Kasparov 
chess spectacular. But unlike that particular 
Moscow circus, Washington’s contest may 
end up with everyone losing. 

The job switch between Donald Regan 
and James Baker — these chessmen now 
move themselves — raises tremors as well as 
hope. Suppose Secretary Regan, even nearer 
to President Reagan than before, urges pri- 
ority for his tax-reform proposals, rather 
than for the deficit reduction on which be 
has not always been so sound? Reform of 
the tangled tax law is less urgent than reduc- 
ing the hole in the budget. If legislative 
action is not taken in the next few months, 
hopes of compressing the deficit wOl fade. In 
Congress, 1986 will usher in the biennial 
surrender of reason to rhetoric. 

Fearing a fresh spate of suggestions that 
the deficit does not matter, let us recapitu- 
late some of the reasons why it does. 

America's economy depends on the level 
of its citizens’ savings and its ability to invest 
them in productive — profitable — under- 
takings. The more these savings are sucked 
out of the private sector by public spending 
that cannot be financed by taxes, the less 
successful the economy will become. The 
public deficit now amounts to about 25 
percent of private savings, a vastly higher 
proportion than in most times. It can only be 
financed by pulling savings from abroad, 
which is why interest rates in America have 
to stay high and the dollar is overvalued. 

In anything but the short run, high inter- 
est rates can only depress the economy and 
reduce its efficiency. They discourage busi- 
ness from borrowing. The cheapest rate at 
which the best company can borrow is now 
around 1 1 percent, and company planners 
can no longer count on inflation wiping out 
this cost. In economic jargon, the real cost of 
borrowing is very high, even when tax 
breaks for some borrowers are considered. 

The process debilitates the U.S. economy 
in another way. The contrived inflow of 
foreign funds and the resulting overvalu- 


ation of the dollar — it has risen about 50 
percent in four years — make it impossible 
for American producers to maintain their 
exports. It also ensures that some foreigners 
make a killing in the U.S. market. 

But what is bad for America is bad, on the 
whole, for the world. As the U.S. boom 
slows down, other countries ought to take up 
the r unnin g. But their freedom to do so, as 
the Federal Reserve Board's Paul Vdcker 
points out, is limited by the weakness of 
their currencies against the dollar, which 
makes for inflation, and by the flight of their 
savings to America, which keeps their inter- 
est rates high. To this must be added the 
debt problem of developing countries. The 
position of these poorer countries is exacer- 
bated because Lheir debts are in dollars and 
because U.S. protectionism Limits their abili- 
ty to repay them out of exports. 

U.S. budget deficits would be less harm- 
ful for a time, if savings rose. But there is no 
good reason why they should. The sopply- 
siders said they would when Mr. Reagan cut 
taxes in 1981. They did noL 

Speed is of the essence. But the process 
may get bogged down in argument between 
the executive and legislative branches, Re- 
publicans and Democrats and — within the 
Republican r anks — the “new right 1 ' and die 
pragmatists. The advance confession that 
Mr. Reagan's budget proposals will fall 
short of the mark is profoundly disappoint- 
ing. His apparent reliance on Republican 
senators to come up with something better 
sounds perilously near neglect of duty, and 
will not boost anyone’s confidence. 

It is dol too late to get out of this bog. But 
we are reduced to the cynical approach. The 
president should not hesitate to break his 
election pledges, because they were mutually 
inconsistent. One cannot, as he pledged, cut 
the budget deficit to a reasonable size with- 
out either cutting spending on defense or 
social security, or raising taxes. Compro- 
mise, probably on all these promises, has to 
be accepted if the worst is not to happen. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Lagging on Deployment 


On the missile issue, it is hard not to show 
some impatience toward the Belgians, whose 
prime minister, WQfried Martens, was in 
Washington this week, and the Dutch, who are 
like the Belgians on the issue but more so. The 
two countries have held back from making 
good on their formal commitment within the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization to take a 
few of the American missiles now being de- 
ployed to counter new Soviet missiles targeted 
on Western Europe. While Soviet-American 
talks were either stalemated or broken off, the 
two countries lagged because the arms control 
scene looked grim. Now that talks have re- 
sumed, some Belgians suggest it is best to hold 
off a bit longer “to give the talks a chance.” 

One has to acknowledge the basic situation 
of Belgium and the Netherlands. As small 
countries located well behind the East-West 
line, they know their military role is slight. 
They were drawn into the missile issue for one 
reason: because West Germany, the front-line 
country that was to take the largest share of the 
American missiles, demanded company so 
* that the response to the Soviet SS-20 missiles 
would be seen as a broad alliance action, not a 
West German-Soviet faceoff . 

As complicated multiparty democracies, 
Belgium and the Netherlands do not find it 
easy to make difficult national security deci- 
sions. Yet each is struggling with deployment 


for the larger cause of alliance solidarity. 

Perhaps the best that can be said is that the 
current Belgian and Dutch governments know 
their special (and very different) political cir- 
cumstances and are working to honor their 
NATO obligations. The immediate interest is 
in Belgium, which is supposed to start its 
agreed deployments this year. The Dutch are 
oaly at the stage of considering construction of 
bases. Not miK±i good will come out of outsid- 
ers’ offering them tactical advice. 

The United States, nevertheless, has a dear 
obligation as the leader of the alliance. It 
cannot dictate to its allies or threaten them. 
Still, it cannot afford to convey the impression 
that whatever they dedde is fine by Washing- 
ton. An alliance that cannot follow through on 
its own decisions is an alliance in trouble. 

The Kremlin failed when it tried to block the 
initial NATO deployments by walking out of 
the old talks on intermediate- range nuclear 
missiles. But it mil surely try to halt or slow the 
later deployments by saying they will endanger 
the new talks. The current tensions in Europe, 
it must be remembered, arose exclusively from 
unprovoked and provocative Soviet missile 
upgradings. The new NATO deployments are 
a belated and, so far, disproportionately small 
response, one meant first to put weight behind 
an effort to negotiate the joint threat down. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Other Opinion 


In Israel, Doubt Remains 

Israel has at long last resolved to pull its 
army out of Lebanon, not because most of the 
major purposes of its invasion 31 months ago 
have been achieved but out of a weary aware- 
ness that they never can be. 

The timing of the three-stage withdrawal 
will be determined unilaterally, and could be 
concluded by the end of summer. With that an 
enormously costly misadventure should end, 
al least for the lime being. 

Perhaps, by some miracle, the Lebanese 
government will find the will and the where- 
withal to establish its authority. More likely 
the predominantly Shiite population of the 
south will uy to assert the political power that 
it has never been allowed to have, precipitating 
a new explosion of regional fighting with 
Christians and others. 

The primary aim of the Lebanon invasion 


was, of course, to remove the PLO as a military 
threat, and the claim has been made that this 
was accomplished. But a sense of nagging 
uncertainty remains. Israel has paid a very 
heavy human, economic and political price for 
its invasion of Lebanon, and in the end even its 
purported gahw are still shadowed in doubt. 

— The Los Angeles Tunes. 

Brazil: Hope, but No Miracle 

The election of Tancredo Neves as president 
of Brazil is good news. Bui his victory hardly 
means that Brazil's problems will vanish mi- 
raculously. Much remains to be redone in this 
Latin American “giant," thrown into deep 
debt through the irresponsibility of its mflilary 
Leaders, and today forced to apply a policy of 
austerity that bears heaviest on the poor. Sri II, 
Brazilians will now have at least some chanr* 
to control their own destiny. 

— Le Monde {Paris). 


FROM OUR JAN. 18 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Russian Moves Worry Chinese 
PARIS — Suspicion is aroused in the minds of 
the Chinese by the report that an official 
announcement has been made in Sl Peters- 
burg that Russia has rejected the American 
proposal for the neutralization of the Manchu- 
rian railways. The rejection is regarded by the 
Chinese press as evidence that Russia and 
Japan are combined in threatening the integri- 
ty of the Chinese empire. Japanese opposition 
was to be expected, but apparently the Chinese 
saw a possibility of Russia entertaining the 
proportion. From the tenor of press opinion, 
the Sl Petersburg report is taken as an indica- 
tion that the Russians will aid the enterpising 
islanders in preventing the “open door" in 
Manchuria from being more than ajar. 


1935: Mexican Labor Grim Gxitiniies 
MEXICO CITY — While settlement of the 
threatened electricians’ strike in Vera Cruz [on 
Jan. 17] averted a general strike in all subsid- 
iaries of the Electric Bond and Share Compa- 
ny, the labor situation in Mexico is still faced 
with a crisis, with more than 100 unions serv- 
ing notice of a general strike in sympathy with 
Aguila oil workers who walked out more than 
a month ago. Ninety-six unions in Tampico, 
the republic’s greatest oQ field, have notified 
the government that unless the Aguila strike is 
settled, all will walk out in two weeks' time. 
This would close the entire oil field, which is 
largely controlled by American companies. 
The Aguila strikers are demanding additional 
pay and improved working conditions. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n I95S-I982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOIS1E 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT FL McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Pubtoktr 

ExteuOrt Editor RENE BONDY Deputy Pubhdur 

Editor ALAIN LECQUR Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate PtibBther 

Deputy Edtiar STEPHAN W. (XJNAWAY Dirtaor of Operation 

AstceiM Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Dirxewr of Cmdadon 

ROLF D. KRANEFUHL Director of Adtenatag Seda 
Imemarirwal Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Qiarles-de-OanPe, 92200 NeuDv-sur-Sdde, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Puis. 

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© 1985, International Herald Tribune AS rights reserved 



The Quiet Survivor: 
Bush Keeps on Jogging 

By James Reston 


W ASHINGTON — During the 
recent shuffle of the Reagan 
cabinet and White House staff, little 
attention was paid to the fact that 
Vice President George Bush is still 
presiding almost invisibly down the 
hall from the Oval Office. 

That is precisely the way be wants 
iL He says not a word even privately 
about the changes. He supports the 
president publicly on whatever his 
skipper does. He praises the old 

Mr. Bush may have a 
chance to demonstrate 


are considerable. 

boys who are going and the new 
boys who are coming, but remains 
the quiet survivor of the original 
Reagan While House team. 

Looking to the future, that is to 
say to the next presidential election 
campaign (which has already start- 
ed), the vice president is not only 
sitting quiet but silting pretty. 

He has established a confidential 
and trusting relationship with the 
president. The other influential 
White House advisers of the first 
term — Messrs. James Baker, Mi- 
chael Deaver and Edwin Meese — 
have moved on or moved out, and 
Mr. Bush gets along with Donald 
Regan, who wUl be chief of staff. 

More important, of all the poten- 
tial presidential candidates in 1988 
in either party — former Senator 
Howard Baker of Tennessee, Sena- 
tor Robert Dole of Kansas and 
Representative Jack Kemp of New 
York on the Republican side, and 
Governor Mario Cuomo of New 
York and Senator Bill Bradley of 
New Jersey on the Democratic side 
— Mr. Bush has more experience in 
the conduct of foreign affairs than 
any of them. 


In addition to his service in the 
House of Representatives and as 
c h il i man of the Republican Na- 
tional Committee, he has headed 
the Central Intelligence Agency, 
served as envoy to China and to the 
United Nations and, as vice presi- 
dent, was a member of all the Na- 
tional Security Council committees 
on foreign and defense policy. 

The chances are that the control 
of nuclear weapons and the control 
of budget and trade deficits will be 
the presiding questions of the sec- 
ond R eagan term. And with the 
secretaries of state and defense fuss- 
ing with one another on these sub- 
jects, the president may have to turn 
increasingly to Mr. Bush, who is 
well liked in Congress, for the expe- 
rience he will need. 

Nevertheless, the vice president 
has two problems. He is too moder- 
ate for the Republican conserva- 
tives, who tend to dominate Repub- 
lican presidential nominating 
conventions, and he has been so 
loyal to his conservative president's 
policies that the Republican moder- 
ates wonder what he really believes. 

He is a Connecticut Yankee from 
Texas, a Yale man with a Dallas 
Cowboys stance who has not won 
enthusiastic support either place. 

He worked tirelessly in the 1984 
camp ai gn and helped the president 
but did not help hims elf. He seemed 
out of character much of the time, a 
cheerleader rather than a candidate, 
whose party loyalty outran his per- 
sonal convictions — a New England 
patrician with a mucker pose. 

In the second Reagan term, how- 
ever, he will be concentrating on 
Mr. Reagan's policies and not on 
the president's re-election, and in 
the process may have a chance to 
demonstrate his strengths, which 
are considerable, rather than his 
weaknesses. 

He sits in on cabinet and Nation- 
al Security Council meetings and 
therefore is as well informed as any 



vice president in recent years. But 
unlike former Vice President Walter 
Mondale, he seldom participates di- 
rectly in these debates but states his 
opinion privately to the president 
when asked to do so or when he 
feels strongly about an issue. 

In the first term, he was asked to 
take on several specific short-term 
problems that could be performed 
without interfering with his presid- 
ing duties in the Senate, and it may- 
be that he wtU be asked to do more 
of this in the second term. 

But like all vice presidents he has 
responsibilities that put severe lim- 
its on his political ambition. He is 
not, for example, as free as Howard 


Baker. Robert Dole or Jack Kemp 
to campaign for the 1988 nomina- 
tion. He is reorganizing his staff and 
will probably play a more public 
role in the next four years than he 
did in the last four, but he will do so 
only if urged by the president. 

Even with increasing influence in 
the White House, Mr. Bush, like 
former Vice President Hubert 
Humphrey under President Lyndon 
Johnson, faces formidable political 
problems that he is not likely to 
resolve unless he is permitted to 
play television politics — which, as 
Mr. Reagan has demonstrated, is 
the way to the top. 

The New York Times. 


In Peru’s Debate on Human Rights, Justice Loses 


N EW YORK — One of the casu- 
alties of the increasingly 
charged political atmosphere in mu 
is the debate about h uman rights. In a 
country threatened by a growing 
Maoist guerrilla movement, Sendero 
Lominoso, the government is dis- 
missing arguments about human 
rights as left-wing conspiracy, while 
many in the democratic opposition 
are using such arguments sensation- 
ally as a way to discredit the authori- 
ties. Meanwhile, justice has been lost 
in the shuffle. 

The eight Peruvian journalists 
murdered two years ago in or near die 
tiny Andean village of Uchuraccay 
are a case in point. As with much 
about the war between the enigmatic 
Sendero Luminoso and the aimed 
forces, it has been difficult to deter- 
mine just how the journalists were 
murdered or who murdered them 
during their investigation of the 
armed conflict. It also seems unlikely 
that the mystery will be resolved 
when a court in the provincial capital 
of Ayaeucho hands down a verdict in 
the coming weeks. 

From the court proceedings, it 
seems clear, however, that the judicial 
verdict will flatly contradict the ver- 
sion of the murder that was published 
in May 1983 by a commission of 
inquiry appointed by President Fer- 
nando Belaunde Terry and headed by 
the renowned Peruvian novelist, 
Mario Vargas Llosa. 

The commission concluded that 
the villagers had mistaken the jour- 
nalists for Senderistas and killed 
them in collective self-defense. It 
blamed the episode on the cultural 
distance between “the two Perns" — 
the Quecbua-speaking Indians of the 
Andes and the Spanish-speaking 
whites of the coastal region — and 
argued that everyone was guilty in 
some measure. Accordingly, the com- 
misdn n said, a general amnesty was 
the only just resolution of the case. 

What led the Ayaeucho court to 
question this judgment? Among the 
critical evidence is a series of photo- 
graphs taken by one of the journal- 
ists, which -suggests that they were 
not killed immediately, in hasty self- 
defense, but survived until at least the 
next morning. What is more, since 
four of (he journalists spoke Que- 
ebua, they would have had time to 
identify themselves, casting doubt on 
the mistaken-identity theory. 


Bj Juan Mendez and Karl Maier 


The judicial verdict may. then, ef- 
fectively refute the commission's re- 
port, but the court's alternative the- 
ory may be equally subject to dispute. 
The judge apparently believes that 
the journalists were looking for. and 
found, a top-secret counterinsur- 
gency installation, and that the 
armed forces killed them, or ordered 
their killing, to prevent disclosure of 
their findings. There is little evidence 
in the court record to support this 
view, although it must be noted that 
several military officers have refused 
the court's request to testify. 

The verdict will, no doubt, set off a 
round of attacks and counterattacks 
on the integrity and political motives 
of everyone who has looked into the 
case — yet another round of sensa- 


tionally charged debate about the ap- 
palling number of human-rights vio- 
lations in Peru in recent years. 

In the last two years, there have 
been more than 4.000 deaths as a 
result of political violence. Many of 
the dead are civilians, killed by Sen- 
dero's selective murderers ana as a 
result of indiscriminate violence by 
the security forces. The military is 
pressing people to form civil defense 
patrols to fight against Sendero. pit- 
ting Indian communities against each 
other. More than 1,000 dozens have 
disappeared following their deten- 
tion by the security forces, and at 
least 10 mass graves have been dis- 
covered in the Ayaeucho region, 
some of them earlier this week. 

What can be done? A number of 


1984: A Bad Year for Press Freedom 


By Sam Zagoria 


W ASHINGTON — “This past year has seen a 
continuing increase in the number of journalists 
expelled, jailed or murdered. There have been more 
cases of newspapers, magazines and broadcasting sta- 
tions forcibly closed." 

These words are from the "World Press Freedom 



editor of the Milwaukee Journal, chairs the group. 

“The institute has collated a frightening array of 
actions against the press, painting a picture of growing 
government interference and intolerance to the me- 
dia," the report says. Its counuy-bv-couniry accounts 
indicate that conditions for press freedom have wors- 
ened in 43 countries; that the picture is mixed in 8; and 
that in 10, there were improvements over 1983. 

Working as a journalist in some of the nations in the 
first category can involve constant, and considerable, 
risk. The report tells of a former LPI chairman, Lateef 
Jakande, who has been held in a Lagos prison since 
Dec. 31, 1983, though he has been “neither tried nor 
charged and has even been cleared of any crime by a 
special investigations panel set up by the government." 

The report notes (hat in Iran “an estimated 100 
journalists and writers remain in prison although none 
has beat formally charged or tried." In Mexico, despite 
“a varied and free media," two leading newsmen were 
killed (luring 1984. In Tanzania, “a number of local 
journalists and photographers were beaten by police or 
the volunteer force while reporting news stones." 

In Uruguay, the government “censored, suspended 


or confiscated 28 of the country’s daily newspapers 
and magazines, and a radio ana TV network. Eight 
publications were shut down.” 

In the Soviet bloc, censorship is still the rule. 

Mr. Leonard, the IPI chairman, called the findings 
of the annual report “discouraging," adding: “It’s not 
getting any better. It's getting worse.” 

IPI intervenes in many cases, with mixed results. 
“We keep up a steady stream of protests, zeroing in on 
the most pressing situations," Mr. Leonard said. A few 
years ago. he said, IPI sent a delegation to Taiwan to 
protest the scheduled hanging of several journalists: it 
achieved their release. An intervention in the Philip- 
pines with a cable signed by 50 well-known journalists 
helped several newsmen leave prison, Mr. Leonard 
said. And in Turkey last year, two papers were closed 
by the government, ana IPL working with other 
groups, helped secure their reopening. 

The reports of improvement in press freedom came 
from Argentina, Brazil, China, EgypL Greece, Hong 
Kong. India, South Korea, Kuwait and New Zealand. 

Mr. Leonard said a new threat on the horizon is the 
perversion of Associated Press and United Press Inter- 
national materials by national news agencies created 
by foreign governments. They purchase (he material of 
the American services, edit and rewrite it to serve 
government purposes, then deliver their versions to 
domestic newspapers. Such practices, he said, have 
arisen in Malaysia, Indonesia, and some nations in 
Africa, Latin America and the Middle East, 


The writer is ombudsman far The Washington Post. 


Israel Still Hopes for Syrian Cooperation on Lebanon 


T EL AVIV — The Israeli cabinet 
has voted to proceed with a uni- 
lateral redeployment of Israeli troops 
in southern Lebanon. We Israelis 
hope this will ultimately restore Leb- 
anese sovereignty over all Lebanon, 
revive the country’s economy and 
promote coexistence between its 
many varied religious communities. 
Our redeployment will be an impor- 
tant step toward this goal, but it will 
be extremely difficult to achieve 
without the cooperation or both Leb- 
anon and Syria. Will they partici- 
pate? We shall soon know. 

We have been forced to take this 
unilateral step by the failure of the 
withdrawal talks at Naqoura. in Leb- 
anon, and by Syria's increasing in- 
transigence on the subject 
Syria has assumed practical custo- 
dianship over the Lebanese govern- 
ment and was responsible Tot the 
abrogation of the Israeli-Lebanese 
withdrawal agreement of last May 17. 
Since then, it has been evident that 
any accord between Lebanon and Is- 
rael would Inevitably have to be ap- 
proved in Damascus. 

It was initially assumed Lhai Syria 
would favor an Israeli withdrawal, 
particularly if Israel made no politi- 
cal gains and senseless bloodshed was 


By Uri Lab rani 

The writer is coordinator of Lebanese affairs for the Israeli government. 


prevented on both sides of the bor- 
der. This, indeed, was Syria's de- 
clared intention. 

We Israelis also took hope from 
our past experience with Syria. Fol- 
lowing the 1973 war, for example, we 
were able to conclude security ar- 
rangements that continue to serve 
both countries well safeguarding 
tranquillity in vulnerable areas in 
Lebanon and along the Syrian-lsraeti 
border. To us. this demonstrated that 
we could reach tacit understandings 
with Damascus to resolve potentially 
dangerous friction — and today, os in 
the past, we were prepared to look for 
unorthodox solutions. 

Yet as time elapsed, it became 
clear at Naqoura that there was little 
prospect of reaching an agreement. 
The absence of flexibility on Syria’s 
part blocked Lebanese attempts to 
reach an understanding, producing a 
virtual deadlock and prompting 
thoughts of unilateral action. The 
Syrians, it seemed, were not im- 
pressed by the prospects of havoc and 
bloodshed that might follow a unilat- 
eral Israeli redeployment. 


It is not, however, too late to reach 
an agreement. Brian E Urquhart. the 
United Nations undersecretary, has 
held talks in Jerusalem, Beirut and 
Damascus. That, together with the 
Israeli cabinet decision, may have a 
catalytic effect in helping all sides to 
reach a last-minute arrangement 

Israel’s concern (o reach such an 
agreement is sharpened by its memo- 
ry of the tragic fighting that occurred 
in the Chut mountains in Lebanon 
following our withdrawal from that 
region in the summer of 1983. Now, 
more than a year later, we deeply 
hope that the Lebanese government 
wifi not repeat its fatal error then — 
its refusal to negotiate an agreement 
to guarantee the security of the area 
after an Israeli withdrawal. If such a 
scenario is repeated in southern Leb- 
anon. neither Syria nor Lebanon can 
be absolved of responsibility. 

Israel, for its part, will not relent in 
its efforts to build bridges to all the 
communities in Lebanon. We have 
already established a friendly rela- 
tionship with the Christians and. 
more recently, have initiated a dia- 


logue with the Druze. We are also 
reaching out to the Shiite community 
across our northern frontier, and we 
hope eventually to develop good 
neighborly relations with them. 

Yet all of this will depend to a large 
extent on Syria. The choice Damas- 
cus faces is clear. It can use farce to 
establish a protectorate in Lebanon 
and prevent an arrangement between 
Jerusalem and Beirut, or it can facili- 
tate such an arrangement as part of a 
farsighted, statesmanlike policy. 

Damascus would hardly serve its 
own interest by adopting a strategy of 
force that ignored both Lebanon's 


Comparing 
Muscle in 
The Atlantic 



concerned Peruvians have tried to 
improve the quality of the human 
rights debate with vigorous fact-find- 
ing and rational analyses. Influential 
voices have called for a broad-based, 
nonpartisan h uman rights organiza- 
tion. Whoever succeeds President Be- 
launde after the election scheduled 
for April must face the challenge of 
Sendero without abdicating demo- 
cratic responsibility for upholding 
fundamental human rights. The hu- 
man rights community must be heard 
and supported before Peru’s human 
rights problems escalate. 

Juan Mendez is director of the 
Washington office of Americas Watch, 
a human rights organization. Karl 
Maier is an editor for the Interlink 
Press Service. They contributed Ms 
comment to The New York Times. 


By John Ausland 

77iu is the first of two articles. 

O SLO — While there is a wide 
assumption that any new armed 
conflict between NATO and Warsaw 
Pact forces would be dramatically 
foreshortened by the use of nuclear 
arms, naval planners on both sides 
cannot afford to be caught unpre- 
pared. A look at the direction their 
planning has taken is informative. 

West European members of the 
North Atlanuc Treaty Organization, 
keeping the two world wars in mind, 
see the Atlantic Ocean as a broad 
highway over which Americans come 
to their assistance. American naval 
planners, with World War II in mind, 
plan for a global struggle over control 
of the world’s oceans. 

Though West Europeans are reluc- 
tant to consider the possibility that 
Warsaw Pact land and air forces 
might overrun them before seaborne 
American and Canadian support 
could arrive in meaningful amounts, 
this is a real prospect should war 
break oat anytime soon. 

Of course, there is no precedent for 
bow the superpowers would actually 
conduct a war with the nuclear threat 
hanging over them. But the naval 
leaders of both sides have gone ahead 
full steam in major efforts to intimi- 
date the other side through naval ex- 
pansion. In Moscow, Admiral Sergei 
Gorshkov convinced Kremlin leaders 
decades ago that they needed a pow- 
erful fleet. In Washington, Navy Sec- 
retary John Lehman is steering the 
United States toward what is said to 
be a 600-ship navy. 

The core of the future U.S. Navy 
will be 15 carrier battle groups. Each 
carrier will be home to about 90 air- 
craft of various types and will be 
accompanied by an assortment of 
surface ships and submarines. Esti- 
mating the cost of a carrier group is 
not easy, but the price mentioned in 
military literature is JJ8 billion. 

The U.S. Navy expects these 15 
carrier groups to be ready in the 
1990s. Bat American taxpayers 
should not think this will end the 
spending. Naval planners are already 
looking to new carriers to replace 
others that are becoming obsolete. 

A controversial innovation of the 
Reagan administration is the battle- 
ship group. Four of these are to be 
organized around World War Il-cra 
battleships that either have been or 
will be taken out of mothballs. 
Aimed with medium-range He 
missiles and longer- range 
cruise missiles, they would be used to 
fight Soviet surface vessels and to 
support amphibious operations. 

In any comparison with the com- 
bined navies of the NATO countries, 
Admiral Gorshkov's navy would 
have a long way to go. Yet be has not 
done badly. NATO military authori- 
ties fed particularly intimidated by 
the large number of attack and cruise 
missile submarines in the Soviet fleet 
A large number of the so-called Back- 
fire bombers have also been assigned 
to the Soviet fleet and have been 
exercising from airfields on the Kola 
Peninsula, between the Barents and 
White seas, in recent years. 

The Soviet Navy’s Kiev- and Mos- 
kva-class carriers are not too worri- 
some, NATO analysts say, but the 
60, 000- ton carrier under construction 
in the Blade Sea will be, when it is 
combat-ready in the 1990s. 

An important but less romantic 
weapon in die Soviet arsenal could 
also play an important role. Accord- 
ing to an official British publication. 
Warsaw Pact countries nave about 
26,000 mines for use in the eastern 
Atlantic, and. just as important, they 
have the capability to lay them. 
NATO, meanwhile, has inadequate 
mine-sweeping capabilities. 

Several of NATO's supreme com- 
manders for the Atlantic have com- 
plained that there is no point in their 
ferrying reinforcements and supplies 
across the Atlantic if they cannot use 
European ports because of the dan- 
ger of mines. 

When wdghing NATO against 
Warsaw Pact navies, however, one 
must also compare the ability to con- 
duct a protracted conflicL According 
to a Pentagon report to Congress, the 
U.S. Navy has only about a quarter 
of the ammunition it would need to 
be able to fight until American war- 
time production got under way. 

Efforts are being made to correct 
this, but the navy will not reach the 
level of two- thirds of its required am- 
munition until the end of tins decade. 

The Soviet Navy, for its part, lades 
bases in the Atlantic. Soviet vessels 
would, therefore, be dependent on 
vulnerable maintenance snips for on- 
the-spot repairs. If Warsaw Pact 
forces did not manage to deny 
NATO the use of the airfields in 
northern Norway, any ship reluming 
to repair facilities on the Kola Penin- 
sula would be vulnerable to air at- 
tack. Nor would repair facilities in 
the Baltic be available to ships in the 
Atlantic before the Warsaw Pact 
gained control of the Danish Straits 
and southern Norway. 

International Herald Tribune. 


t ignore 

need for stability and independence 
and Israel’s right to protect its north- 
ern border area. In the long run, such 
a strategy would only unsettle the 
region and deepen Syria's isolation. 

If, on ihe other hand, the Syrians 
opt for the constructive pragmatism 
of an informal arrangement, they 
would help resolve the problems 
along the Israeli-Lebanese frontier 
and also help Lebanon to enter an era 
of reconciliation, reconstruction and 
peace. Surdy, this would be in Syria's 
interest; it would help Damascus 
play the central role it seeks in the 
tangled politics of this region. 

The New York Times. 


LETTER 
An Asian Yalta? 

Regarding the opinion column 
“1985: Time to Denounce Yalta 
Fraud ” (Jan. 5) by George F. Wilt: 

Since the crimes of Stalin were ex- 
posed long before February I W5L the 
Yalta agreement was an act of mere 
folly. It gave the green light to the 
seizure of Eastern and Central Eu- 
rope: It shattered the whole frame' 
work of historical Europe from the 
Atlantic to the Urals. 

What we are seeing now could pre- 
pare the way to a second Yalta in 
East Asia. The new “useful interlocu- 
tor” is the head of Communist China 
with its 1 billion penile. To believe 
that Deng Xiaopmg has brought a 
lasting change in China is a travesty. 

GICABOBICH. 

Rome. 






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India Orders 
Security Alert 
After Sikh 
Priest Is Shot 


CHANDIGARH* India — Se- 
curity forces in India's northern 
stale of Punjab and in the adjacent 
state of Haryana were put on alert 
Thursday, a day after three men 
shot and wounded the leading 
priest of the highest Sikh religious 
order, officials said. 

Jathedar Giani Kirpal Sin g h . 
head priest of the Am Takht in 
Amritsar’s Golden Temple, was 
said by doctors to be out of danger 
Wednesday night following the 
shooting outside village near the 
Punjab town of Ludhiana. 

Police arrested two men Thurs- 
day who are suspects in the shoot- 
ing, the Press Trust of India new 
agency reported. The agency said 
security forces were looking for a 
third gunman. 

Mr. Singh is widely viewed as a 
moderate among Sikh leaders. The 
Press Trust of India news agency 
said he had spoken out against sec- 
tarian violence and opposed the 
smuggling of arms by extremists 
into the Golden Temple before the 
army moved into the Sikh shrine 
seven months ago in a battle that 
killed at least 800 people. 

Officials in Chandigarh said Mr. 
Singh had attended a religious cere- 
mony shortly before he was at- 
tacked. 

When his car made a roadside 
stop, three men. who had followed 

fire. Mr. Singh’s bodygua/ti^frred 
bade, but the gunmen fled. The 
priest reportedly was hit in the 
thigh ana head with six bullets. 

Police earlier held five persons 
for questioning in connection with 
the attack. Sources here said that 
two of them were Sikhs aged 23 and 
24. 

The press agency said the shoot- 
ing was “the first major act of ter- 
rorism" in Puqab since troops 
stormed the Golden Temple m 
June to quell extremists fighting for 
an independent Sikh nation. 

Extremists led by a hard-line 
Sikh preacher, Jamail Singh Bhin- 
dranwale, fortified the Akal Takht 
as their last stronghold, lranrirrag 
out an armored vehicle before Mr. 
Bhindranwale was killed in the 
fighting 

The other state in which security 
forces were put on alert Thursday, 
Haryana, was formerly the south- 
ern part of Punjab. 


130 Poachers Caught in U& 

Washington Pea Servlet 

WASHINGTON — Federal 
state and local authorities Wednes- 
day arrested about 130 people in 
predawn raids from Norm Caroli- 
na to New York and charged them 
with illegally buying and selling 
birds, anunals and fish. 


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Taiwan Leader Presses 
Murder Inquiry in U.S. 




uty. 
edJy 

As a soldier stands by, Jamaicans try to right a car burned during protests in Kingston. 

nymi 

Jamaica Reopens Roads After 2d Protest ^ 


New York Times Service 

KINGSTON, Jamaica — Protesters blocking 
roads with debris and bunting tires brought Kings- 
ton to a standstill for a second day and caused 
disruptions in many other parts of Jamaica. 

The protests, Tuesday and Wednesday, were tbe 
most serious in the more than four years since 
Prime Minister Edward P. G. Seaga took office. 

[Early Thursday, security forces using armored 
personnel carriers and heavy road equipment con- 
tinued to patrol the streets of Kingston, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported], 

[Most major streets in the capital had been 
swept dean of roadblocks, and the government 
news agency, Jampress, said that most roads in the 
north coast resort areas also woe dear.] 

Police said Wednesday that four demonstrators 
had been killed since tbe protests started Tuesday 
and that 1 1 had been injured. Earlier, three deaths 
had been reported. Some Jamaican journalists put 


the number of injured as high as 23. A government 
official said about a dozen protesters had been 
arrested. 

The demonstrations began Tuesday morning 
after the government sharply increased the price of 
fuel. 

Diplomats and government officials said they 
believed tbe demonstrations were being organized 
by political opponents of Mr. Seaga who have been 
calling for his resignation and new elections. 

He has been trying to revitalize the economy and 
restore stability after nearly a decade of economic 
decline and increasing violence. 

Tension has been high for more than a year as 
austerity measures have begun to be widely feiL 
Before the latest, 21 -percent increase in tbe cost of 
gasoline and other fuels, gasoline and electricity 
prices had already doubled over the past year as 
Mr. Seaga eliminated government subsidies and 
devalued the Jamaican dollar. 


Drug Abuse Increases Worldwide 

UN Report Calls Heroin Use a Major Problem in Europe 


The Associates I Press 

VIENNA — Worldwide drug 
abuse and related crimes reached 
unprecedented proportions last 
year, even posing a threat to the 
security of some countries, accord- 
ing to a United Nations report re- 
leased Wednesday. 

“Illicit production, trafficking 
and abuse has become even more 
serious" in 1984, tbe annual report 
of tbe International Narcotics Con- 
trol Board said. “An unprecedent- 
ed n umb er of countries mid human 
beings are affected." 

The report said that tbe problem 
has become so pervasive that “even 
the very security of some states are 
threatened." 

The report did not elaborate on 
the national security issue but it 
may have alhided to developments 
in Colombia, where the justice min- 
ister was assassinated April 30 after 
declaring war on drug-traffickers. 
A national state of siege was im- 
posed after the killing. 

The 13-member panel of non- 
governmental experts cooperates 

Study Faults 
U.S. Teaching 
Of Hispanics 

By Kdth B. Richburg 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Almost half 
the Hispanic high school students 
in tbe United States drop out be- 
fore graduating and 40 percent of 
tbe Hispanic dropouts never reach 
10th grade, according to a new re- 
port 

The rate is more than double that 
for blacks and three times that of 
whiles. 

The report, by tire National 
Commissioa on Secondary School- 
ing for Hispanics, found that 76 
percent of tbe Hispanics who look 
the “High School and Beyond” 
achievement test scored in the bot- 
tom half of ail students nationwide. 

One-quarter of the Hispanics 
who enter high school are overage, 
two-thirds attend inner-city high 
schools with a predominantly mi- 
nority student body, and the His- 
panic student is more likely to hold 
a full-lime job while in school, the 
report found. 

Hispanic leaders and educators 
called these statistics alarming for 
both the native Spanish-speaking 
comnmmey and the United States 
as a whole. They noted that, by tbe 
year 2000, Hispanics wffl pass 
blacks ^nd Asians as the United 
States's largest minority group and 
will be in the majority in some 
areas of the country. 

The commission concluded that, 
imril now, these education prob- 
lems have been “overshadowed" by 
the politically explosive issue of bi- 
lingual education. For many His- 
panics, that issue has been the sym- 
bolic equivalent of voting rights for 
Maries. Deep divisions over the hi- 
llngn.il education question have 
“evolved - into intransigence which 
now inhibits any movement for- 
ward,” the commission said. 

Sidestepping the bilingual edu- 
cation issue, the 16- member com- 
mission concluded that Hispanics, 
perhaps even more than other im- 
arigranls before them, want to 
learn English and should be taught 
it more effectively. 

“The surprise was going about 
the country and getting this re- 
sponse from both parents and stu- 
dents,’' said Rafael Valdiviesco, 
vice president far program and re- 
search of the New Y ork-based His- 
panic Policy Development Project, 
which sponsored the commission. 

The overall theme of the two- 
volume report is that the high drop- 
out rate is a failure of the education 
system, which has not met the aspi- 
rations and special needs of the 
growing Hispanic population. 


closely with the World Health Or- 
ganization and other UN organiza- 
tions in the prevention of drug 
abuse. 

The 45-page report said that U .S. 
high school students were turning 
away from marijuana, one of the 
few positive findings in the over- 
view of (be world situation. 

“The abusive consumption of 
drugs remains a serious public 
health problem" in tbe United 


States, the study said. But it added 
that “overall percentages of new 
and current abusers” of some drugs 
are believed to be leveling off with- 
in some age groups. 

In contrast, it described the drug 
abuse and trafficking situation in 
Western Europe as “grim and dete- 
riorating." 

“The number of abusers, involv- 
ing even the very young is grow- 
ing.” it said. “The number of drug- 
related H paths is increasing in many 
countries." 

Heroin use is “a major public 
health problem" in Western Eu- 
rope, according to the report. It 
said that the amount reported 


seized had grown steadily in the 
past decade and jumped 40 percent 
to 1.6 tons ( 1.7 metric tons) in 1983 
from 1981 

Italy, West Germany and Britain 
reported the highest amounts 
seized. and “other countries most 
gravely affected by heroin abuse 
are France, the Netherlands and 
Belgium.” tbe report said. 

Cocaine “has become a major 
drug of abuse” with the largest re- 
cent amounts seized in West Ger- 
many. Belgium. France and Spain, 
the report said. In Western Europe, 
amphetamine misuse is greatest in 
Scandinavia, it said. 

In the United States, heroin 
abuse last year remained “relative- 
ly stable" while cocaine usage 
“continues to escalate," the report 
said. Most widely misused is mari- 
juana, “and the number of persons 
who use this drug once or more 
monthly is estimated at more than 
20 million." 

But the report said hashish and 
marijuana use among U.S. high 
school seniors declined in 1984 for 
the fifth successive year. 


The Associated Press 

TAIPEI — President Chiang 
Ching-kuo, who reportedly is furi- 
ous over the alleged involvement of 
Taiwanese military intelligence of- 
ficers in the slaying of a Chinese- 
American journalist, has declared 
that he wants tbe killers punished 
“no matter what their rank. " 

Officials of the Foreign and De- 
fense ministries met Thursday to 
discuss the incident, which has 
linked a top official of the Defense 
Ministry’s Intelligence Bureau to 
the assassination of a political writ- 
er. Henry Liu, 52. Mr. Liu was shot 
in the garage of his borne in Daly 
City. California, on Ocl 15. alleg- 
edly by two Asians. 

Taiwan government sources, 
who spoke on condition of ano- 
nymity , said Mr. Chiang ordered a 
special committee investigating the 
slaying to “Spare no effort to find 
oui the truth and punish those re- 
sponsible. no matter what their 
rank." The makeup of the commit- 
tee is not known. 

“The big boss was vct> mad,” 
said a government official after a 
meeting of the ruling Kuo min - 
tang’s standing committee. 

Authorities have arrested the In- 
telligence Bureau’s deputy chief. 
Colonel Chen Hu- men, in connec- 
tion with the killin g, and “several 
others” are bring questioned. The 
chief of the bureau. Vice Admiral 
Wang Shi-lin. has been dismissed. 
He is a former consul at the Na- 
tionalist Chinese Embassy in 
Washington. 

[Colonel Chen has told interro- 
gators that higher-ranking officers 
than he knew of the murder plot, 
official sources told Reuters Thurs- 
day. They said the investigators 
had interviewed Admiral Wang but 
concluded that he did not know of 
the involvement of his subordi- 
nates.] 

Colonel Chen was said to have 
been implicated by two gangsters 
from Taiwan wanted by California 
authorities in the assassination. 
The two were arrested in Taiwan in 
an anti-crime sweep in November. 

San Mateo County prosecutors 
have issued a warrant charging 
Chen Cbi-li with Mr. Liu’s murder. 
He is the reputed leader of the 
Taiwanese underworld group 
known as tbe Bamboo Gang, which 
has brandies in the United Stares. 

Among those attending Thurs- 
day’s meeting was John Chang, di- 
rector of the Foreign Ministry’s 
North American Affairs Office. 
There was concern here that any 
involvement of Taiwanese officials 
in the incident might damage exist- 
ing U.S. relations with Taiwan. 

The United States and Taiwan 
do not have formal diplomatic ties. 
Washington, however, maintains 
an unofficial mission in Taipei. 

Lane Bonner, a U.S. Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation spokesman, 
said the FBI was sending agents to 
Taiwan to seek information about 
Mr. Liu’s death. 



V*; 



Chiang Ching-kuo 

Taiwan newspapers reported 
that two other ranking officials of 
the Intelligence Bureau, who were 
not identified, had already been 
arrested. Like Colonel Chen, the 
newspapers said, they were not di- 
rectly involved in planning the as- 
sassination but knew of the plot. 

Government officials declined to 
comment on the reports. 

Mr. Liu. who worked in Taiwan 
before emigrating to the United 
States in tbe 1970s, had written 
several articles critical of the Na- 
tionalist Chinese government and 
was reported to have finished revis- 
ing a biography of the Taiwan pres- 
ident shortly before his death. 


A News Service 
To Shut in Canada 

United Press International 

TORONTO — United Press 
Canada, the last surviving part of a 
news organization that has operat- 
ed in Canada for more than 60 
years, will be merged with The Ca- 
nadian Press on Jan. 31. according 
to the company’s president Doug- 
las Creighton. 

Mr. Creighton said Tuesday that 
all 54 employees at UPC would be 
offered jobs by The Canadian Press 
or by the Toronto Sun. Tbe Cana- 
dian Press will honor UPC’s con- 
tracts with its 90 newspaper, radio 
and television clients. 

The executive blamed poor eco- 
nomic prospects for the closure of 
UPC, which has operated at a loss 
since 1979. The service was estab- 
lished in Canada in November 
1922 as British United Press and , 
later became United Press Interna- 1 
tional Canada Lid. UPC began op- 
erations in 1979 after the Toronto 
Son purchased 80 percent of the 
Canadian division of the U.S.- 
based United Press International. 


Egypt Stresses Ties to U.S . in Seeking Aid Increase 


By Leslie H. Gelb 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Egypt, in a 
document seeking a Sl-biliion in- 
crease in U.S. aid, has portrayed 
itself as a critical “strategic asset” 
to the United Slates. 

Reagan administration officials 
said the document's emphasis on 
“military interdependence” and 
crisis cooperation with Washington 
went beyond Cairo's usual public 
statements of its “special relation- 
ship" with the United States and its 
declarations of nonalignment and 
place in the Arab world. 

Adminisiration officials said ibis 
was the first time Egypt had sub- 
mitted a written brief in support of 
its aid program, something Israel 
has done as a matter of course for 
years. 

“It represents the first shot at 
doing what the Israelis do all of the 
time to show how important thev 
are to us,” a State Department offi- 
cial said. 


Philippines Drops 
Charges Against 
Returning Exile 

United Press International 

MANILA — The Philippine 
government dropped subversion 
charges Thursday against an oppo- 
sition leader, Jovito Salonga. who is 
due to return next week after more 
than three years of self-imposed 
exile in the United Slates. 

The move came as Labor Minis- 
ter Bias F. Ople warned that recent 
moves by the United States, includ- 
ing intensified contacts with the 
opposition, bordered on interfer- 
ence in the country's internal af- 
fairs. 

Mr. Ople said some dements in 
Washington were “anxious to help 
the opposition" in order to achieve 
a “semblance of matching political 
forces” between the rating part) 
beaded by President Ferdinand E. 
Marcos and its rivals. 

The state-run press agency said 
prosecutors, acting on orders of 
Justice Minister Estelito Mendoza, 
filed a motion to dismiss the sub- 
version charges against Mr. Sa- 
longa. 62. a tamer senator and 
presidential aspirant. Mr. Marcos 
ordered Mr. Mendoza on Tuesday 
to review the charges to penrnt Mr. 
Salonga to “pursue his political as- 
pirations to the fullest." 

Mr. Salonga had been accused of 
masterminding a senes of bomb- 
ings in 1979 and 1980. He arrived 
Wednesday in Honolulu with his 
famil y. He is expected to reach the 
Philippines on Monday. 


For the fiscal year 1986. which 
will begin Ocl 1. Egypi is asking 
S3. 15 billion in military and eco- 
nomic aid. The total aid this fiscal 
year was S2J billion. 

IsraeL by contrast, is requesting 
$4.05 billion, plus $800 million in 
emergency economic aid. Ii is re- 
ceiving $2.6 billion this year. 

Administration officials said the 
White House would recommend 
increases for both nations for the 
next fiscal year in about the same 
proponioni as this year, and all as 
outright grants. 

The document Egypt recently 
sent to the State Department is 
tilled “The Need for Mutual Inter- 
dependence Between Egypt and tbe 
United States, F.Y. 1986." Admin- 
istration officials said it was writ- 
ten by .Americans under contract to 
Egypt and was approved in Cairo. 

It says the two countries “are 
already well on the way to achiev- 
ing military interdependence" and 
cites a long list of cases in which 
Cairo has allowed Lhe United 
States to use Egyptian facilities. 

Also cited are Egypt’s “support 
for U.S. transshipment of ammuni- 
tion io Lebanon in September 
1983.” in dealing with Libyan 
threats to Sudan and in granting 
overflight and landing privileges in 
special U.S. military exercises with 
Oman. 

But it notes that “while Egypt 
maintains exceptionally close stra- 
tegic relations with the U.S., Egypt 
remains a nonaligned nation." 

Thus, the document argues. Cai- 
ro must “continue to support Pales- 
tinian rights," retain “full control 
over its military bases and facili- 
ties" and maintain “regional priori- 
ties.” It concludes that “none of 
these problems will prevent steadi- 
ly closer cooperation between 
Egypt and the O.S.” 

“They want io distance them- 
selves from the United States be- 
cause of the mood in the Arab 
world,” said W illiam B. Quandt of 
the Brookings Institution, “and 


they want to insist they are critical 
to our security to keep our aid go- 
ing-” 

Mr. Quandt was a Middle East 
expert on the National Security 
Council staff in the Carter adminis- 
tration. 

Several State Department and 
Pentagon officials said that Egypt, 
while important to U.S. military 
concerns in the Middle East, had 
exaggerated its value and support. 
These officials pointed out that ini- 
tial plans for aU5. base, to be built 
in Ras Ban as on the Red Sea and 
costing several hundred million 
dollars, dissolved because of Egyp- 
tian sensitivities. 

The backup plan for each side to 
put up $50 million for a smaller 
facility fell apart recently because 


of Cairo's reluctance to have a fa- | 
dhty that might appear to be a U.S. j 
base. 

Israel's supporters in the U.S. 
Congress have raised concerns 
about Cairo’s retreat from high- 
level diplomatic contacts with Isra- 
el. and from negotiations with Isra- 
el on the West Bank, as provided by 
the Camp David accords of 1978. 
Cairo withdrew its ambassador in I 
response to Israel’s invasion of 
Lebanon in 1982 and has not re- 
placed him. 

Tbe Egyptian document ac- 
knowledges the benefits of peace 
with Israel as a “hitter degree of 
military security.” and said peace 
allowed a “shift of resources from 
the military to the civil sector.” 


Japanese Gang Leaves New Warnings 
Of Poisoned Candy in Extortion Plot 


OSAKA, Japan — Lethal doses 
of sodium cyanide were found in 
two package of candy left in an 
envelope outside the Osaka head- 
quarters of the Yomiuri Shimbun. a 
daily newspaper, police said Thurs- 
day. 

Attached to the envelope, which 
was left Wednesday night, was a 
note saying: “Poison. Dangerous. 
You wdl die if you eat what is in 
here.” It was signed, “The Man 
With 21 Faces," the signature of 
the group that planted cyanide in 
candy nude by Morinaga & Co. 
last year. 

The envelope also contained let- 
ters from the gang addressed to the 
Yomiuri Shimbun and Lhree other 
newspapers. The letters taunted tbe 
police with their failure to catch the 
extortionists despite large man- 
hunts since the gang first surfaced 
in March. 

Police said the poisoned candy 
was found m special tightly sealed 


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The gang, which ended a New 
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ON FLORIBA PROPERTIES 

One of the largest developers in Florida seeks qualified 
brokers to sell homes & homesites from V4 to 1V6 acres at 
subdivisions in northwest Florida near "the world’s 
most beautiful beaches”. 

HANK FISCHER, Marketing Consultant 

Overseas 

Call collecl (305) 971-9100 
U.S. toll free 1-800-327-9100 
Telex # 441564 FIorida tol1 1 *«> 0 * 4 324891 


Global Vision 

As the largest full service 
real estate firm In Texas 
and the southwestern U.S.. 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
management. 


Please note specific interest 
in request to 


SAN ANTONIO, 
TEXAS 

Commercial property in 
the S unbelt. Situated 
within the path of rapid 
growth. Land now priced 
by the acre soon to be 
sold by the square foot 
is appreciating at an 
unprecedented rate. 

R>r information on 
specific properties 
contact: 


HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS'* 

David Dooosky. CEO 
Corporate Headquarters: 
2001 Bryan Tower 
Dallas, Texas 75201 
214/748-9171 Telex 732459 
Tho Driving Form m tons Root estate 
Par were in Service with Grubb 6 EDte 


Investment 

Opportunities 

Commercial real estate mvestments and 
nwe s tm en t management. Undeveloped 
land to be held for appreciation. Turn- 
key prejed* with subirtantid apprecia- 
tive potential -des i g n , coat fraction, 
leaw up and management Completed 
project* fufly leased financing ova8- 
abie to odiiew leverage. Far informa- 
tion an eivo t bnen! Opporhmifia* in 
loufe w ee i United Sta te* conta ct : 

TARBC, Inc 
4742 Norfb Oracle Rood 
Suite 113 

r«wi, Arisons 857Q5 
Telex: 165541 EXIUC 



HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS* 

Kit Corbin 
89i8Tesoro Drive 
Suite 400 

San Antonio. TX 78217 
(512) 826-3251 


CANNES 

Wonderful villa bwh in 1977 
8 double bedrooms - 7 bathrooms 
big swimming pool 
FOR RENT: 

FF. 60,000. — per month 
{15-5/15*) 

FF. 30,000 other months 
FOR SALE: 

FF .3, 800, 000. — 
further informations from: 
IMMOBIU&tt DEVJLLARSS. A. 
Box 62 - CH - 1884 YBars 
Td.: 41-25-35.35.31 
Me* 456 213 GSE 


INTERNATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 

appears every 

FRIDAY 

m 

J® P*«* an advertisement 
contact our office in your country 
(listed in Gauified Section) or: 

Max Ferrero, 

181 Ave. Chariewie-Ganlle, 
92321 NeaHIy Cedes, Fraare. 
TeL: 747.12.65. Telex: 613593. 







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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


** 



1 Dow Jones Averages 1 


Om Htflti law tan OM 


Indus 1229.57 123445 121974 122849— 1.9* 
Tran* 5B01B 592.12 57540 38470— IAS 
UtU 148.18 14885 14786 MU4- 035 

SRU2 50247 4*457 400X8 — All 


NYSE index 


Composite 
i nduBtr lah 
Tranm 
‘ Utilities 
Finance 


Hleh ten CMC Cfi'OO 
9844 9848 987S — 0.15 


11129 'RSrHI 


9478 9181 
5147 5174 5147 — 805 
101 JM 10047 101 JH —043 


r 


NYSE Diaries 



Clam 

an 

Prev. 

M92 


7A 

541 


460 

423 


2016 

2056 

New Htafa 

113 

140 

New Lowa 

7 

M 

Votumeup 
Volume down 

4Q36AS0 



Odd-Lof Trading in N.Y. I 


Jon. 16 . 
Jan. 15. 
Jan. 14 . 
Jan. 11 . 
Jon. 10 . 


Bay Sales 
200485 484021 
211.204 54&02B 
2D1X1S 50715 
19X234 465417 
1B7797 466784 


‘Included In the soles figures 


•SSYt 

1444 

1444 

1-734 

2464 

958 


Thursda y 

MSE 

Closing 


VoL at4 PJA 1I155MM 

PTBV.4PJW.VOL 1R524W 

Pray coosoMoted dose lSMWXio 


Tofiks fodade me nohow Me prices 
op to me desks on wrt street 


L 


AMEX Diories 



dew 

Prev. 

Adrancad 

319 

S 

Declined 

250 

S 8 

Unchanged 

330 

255 

Total Issues 

799 

8)4 

New h tofts 

36 

47 

New Laws 

1 

7 

Volume us 

o.wrvsn 


Volume down 

3JQ1X75 



NASDAQ Index 



Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utinties 

Banks 

TnsnSp. 


Close 
261.16 
27843 
30940 
28673 
251 48 


24870 


Oft* 
+ 042 
+ 145 
+ 148 
+ 142 
+ 816 
+ 029 
— 275 


Week Year 
Ago Aso 
25065 28649 
26478 33232 
30141 287.17 
28046 26141 
24670 27643 
23243 20*71 
2047 28840 


industrials 

Transa. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


Htflh Lew Close arm 
19141 18*46 19044—847 
15347 149.98 15129 —212 
75JB 7540 7S40— 114 
1948 1937 1941 — 004 
17134 17023 17023—046 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages] 


Baids 

Utilities 


OlHttk. 
industrials 


7204 

6/942 

7646 


+ 816 
+ 825 
+ 804 


[ AMEX Most Actives 


VoL mg* Low Uat dm 


MtanpB 

impCP 

BAT 

DQfoPd 
TexAIr 
TIE 
OzgrkH 
. AtzoCp 
MatScn 
FmtHd 
CnwCn 
WOEsltl 


8090 3SU i 
5031 2ft 
4654 «. 

3153 17V. 
209 llto 
2095 7* 

2831 ion 

1468 *4ft 
im ran 
1357 14 

1297 ran 
inn nn 


2410 

w. 

4 

W% 

ion 

7% 

10 

2in 

im 

ran 

vpk 


St +46 
Mb +ft 
4Mi 

TO +H 

n% — n 

7ft — % 
UH — ft 

« 
ran — n 
ran +k 
nn +n 




j AMEX Stock Index 


HM 

21005 


Low 
209 m 


Clan 

21805 


am 

+M8 



aMonn 
H left Low Stock 


Div. Y18 PE 


Sis. 

TCesHWlLO* 


OH 
fluptai'n 


23V, 

16% AAR 






18% 

18ft + % 
15%+ to 

30% 

Vft AGS 



12 


15ft 

15*6 

17ft 

13% AMF 

XD 

33 05 

346 

151b 

15 

15*6 + M 


24% AMR 



5307M 

35ft 34 

as**— n 

20ft 

18to AMR pf 

2.18- 113 


15 

19% 

10ft 

10ft— V 

41% 

27% AMR Pf 

2.12 

68 


<70 

35% 

34 

35to— m 

14*6 

8% APL 





10% 

10% 

10% — ** 

60ft 

44ft ASA 

380 

68 


848 

50 

48 to 

50 +1ft 

28% 

16 AVX 

32 

IX 10 

472 

1796 

17*6 

17ft— 91 


36ft AMUB 

130 

27 

M 

3370 

44% 


44V. + 9I 

23ft 

16% AccnWds .44 

28 

IB 

1859 

22ft 22 

22 — V. 

27 


XO 

25 


270 

16ft 

15% 

Mto +U) 

12V* 

Sto AcmoE 

J2b 33 

U 

216 

9% 

0ft 

9%+ % 

TBft 

15 Ada Ex 

2.1IB13J 


107 

15% 

15ft 

15% 

1S% 

11% AdmMI 

32 

21 

1 

7 

15% 

15% 

15%+ H 

20 ft 

Sft AdvSys 

311 

AX 

20 

1267 

12*6 



A% 

25% AMD 



13 4821 

33% 

31% 

31%— % 

U 

Aft Advert 

.12 

13 


64 

9*h 


»to + % 





11 





30 

37*6 AetnLf 

2X4 

73 

21 

1200 

30 

37% 

37ft— to 

34% 

1596 Attains 

130 

42 

13 2060 

289k 

28% 

2096 + *6 

5% 

2ft Alt urn 



30 

5 

3 

3 

3 + W 

48ft 

36% AJrPrd 

130 

26 

10 

433 

45ft 45% 

Ok + to 

30V, 

13 AlrUFrt 

XO 

29 

11 

00 

21 

20*6 

20% — *6 

1ft 




23 

1251 

1ft 

1% 

1ft 

27V» 

21 AidPrt 

2S7ellX 


220 

25to 

25% 

2S%+ to 

7ft 

5 AloPdpj 

JD 12 2 


21 

7*4 

7% 

7% — *4 

101 

83to AlaPpf 1180 1)3 


48Qz 

9796 



74% 

63% AlaPpf 

9X4 12X 


6100s 74% 72ft 

74% +29) 

65*6 

57 AlaPpf 

B-1A 123 


3SOz 65% 

64 

64 -1 


51 75 | U 
.14 3 0 1992 

34 23 18 17 

48 23 12 876 
130 4-1 10 1932 
130 15 II 519 


13% ion Aiaasca 

17% 916 AtekAIr 

2246 15* Alberto 

29V; 22VV AlbHm 

40V* ffl* Atom 

369k 27V* AlcoSM __ 

26* 17 AlaxAlx lJOO 34 

23V* 1706 AJexdr 25 

87tk 629k AltoCP l.Mf 13 8 

2694 23 AloCPPf 246 11.1 

33ft 18V. Alolnl 140 53 24 

2296 15V. Alain pt 819 113 

03% 01 AJfll PfC 1145 123 

30 249k AlloP™ 2J0 9.1 8 

2516 IfW AllenG Mb 23 II 188 

371k 28V. AlMCps 140 81 8 2336 


129k 12V. 1216— n 
isn 1416 u — v* 

21V* 2116 21 V* + ft 

279. 26* 279k + 96 

20ft 29% 2914— n 
3196 31ft 3116+ (6 
206 2616 25to 26 

34 23 23 23 

31 TSto 75 75 — 14 

3 2596 2514 2594 + % 

107 2516 2S16 2514 

II 19 19 » + 16 

48 99 Vito *196 

231 2996 79V* 29*4— to 

IM 18 lMt + to 

3516 3SVk 1596 


i+l 


6396 53*6 AMCp pt 634 114 15 59*6 5996 5996 + to 

11296 99 AklCi>pn2iM 113 4 104*6104*610496— V. 

10716100*4 AldCpf 1249elZl 100 103161031610316— to 

2316 10V. A IldPd 22 1946 7W* 19**+ 16 

5616 30 AlktStr 240 34 0 1689 52*6 5196 9 — 16 

1696 516 AIHsOi 285 79* 6* _7to + % 

40 26 AlbCPl 31 “ 

2516 2D ALLTL 144 7.1 9 9* 

27 2096 AlPtiPr 40e 13 to 1 

4896 30*6 Alcoa 170 11 9 2994 

Z796 1516 Amax 40 14 373 

4316 3216 Amaxpf 380 9.1 10 

3416 2296 AmHes L10 45 9 7194 

144 9816 AHesrt ISO 34 1 

3 iv. AmAgr 390 

19 1496 ABakr II 346 

659* SZft ABrund 175 59 9 958 

28V. 2416 ABrdpf 275 186 1 

66 S3 ABrdpf 247 44 2 

77%. 50*6 ABftest 140 23 ID 37*2 

25% 1916 ABbJM 46 33 11 <0 

23*6 1796 ABusPr 46 14 13 29 


25ft 25% 2S% 

2116 2116 2116—16 
39 3016 3896 

1716 17 1716— to 

32*6 32*6 32«—96 
25V. 24 2416— V* 

MB 100 108 +216 
216 216 216— 16 


1896 1816 1BV6 + to 
6216— to 


__ _ . _ 2196 + 

59 40V* AmCan 230 54 12 H6S 4996 4916 4996 


6316 62*6 . _ 

25*6 2516 2596— 16 
6316 6396 6316—496 
6SV* 64 64*6 + 96 

2*16 23to 34V. + H 
2196 ZI96 2196 + 96 


2414 2114 A Can of 240 113 
48 36 ACaipf 340 63 

109 103 ACanpf 1375 123 
1996 1696 ACapBd 220 113 
3396 2516 ACopCV 6360227 
U9h 6W ACentC 
53 Vk 42V6 ACven 
27% 1896 ADT 
2196 15V6 AEIPW 
39 25 Am Exp 

26* 13*6 AFcmll 
27 1996 AGnCP 

9V. 596 AGnlwl 
57 51*6 AGnlrtA 6410117 

7316 5716 AGnt pfB 5XSo 04 


57 4316 AGn |pf 325 57 

54% 39% AGnpfD X64 44 
3114 25*6 AHerlt 148 25 12 
1496 7V. AHaW 
5596 4696 A Home 
4216 2614 AHflSP ... _ 

70 6296 AmrfCtl 640 84 8 1606 

73 50*6 AlnGm 44 7 15 

125 112V6 AIGppf 545 ^ 

2016 nn AMI 40 
716 314 jlinMol 
4096 2796 ANtRss 222 57 8 
3716 2296 APmH 74t 21 4 

ASIerU . 15 

AmStar M 14 9 


3 2396 23V* 23n— to 
21 43to 4396 4396— to 
3 107 107 107 

si 19*6 ran ran— to 

28*6 2896 24*6 
896 8 896+ 16 

5196 51 5116— 16 

2496 23V. 2496+196 
2196 2116 2196 
3816 37V* 3796— Hi 
2Sft 2316 2596 + 16 
2716 27 2716+ to 

8*6 8*6 896 

54 5396 54 + to 

74Vi 74 7416 + 96 

5796 57to 5716+ to 

55 54V6 5496+ to 
3116 3116 31 Vb — to 

189 896 896 8*6 + 96 
244 43 13 3574 54to 5416 5416 — 96 
1.12 17 10 1401 2R6 29 29% +1 

7516 7496 75 — to 
4616 — 


37 

. m 

130 37 Tl HOT 
32 17 2, 909 
X2601QX I 1415 
14B 34 20 6357 
44b 25 13 95 

30 13 10 2649 
411 
XII 
87 


48 2 1229612296122*6 +196 

28 12 4512 2196 2196 2196— 96 
' 416 416 416—16 


2S4 SVto 3896 3Vto 
980 35% 15 3516— 16 


1*6 AT&T 170 53 1417827 



73 

16 

57 

974 

12 

552 

104 


ran 12to 1296— to 
U16 Uto 1816 

47 S£2S+% 

5816 5796 5816 + 96 


1 AT&Tpf 344 184 
AT&T pf 374 105 
27Vx AWatr IB 41 7 

10 AWatpf 135 113 

10 AWaSM ITS 11.1 

20to ArnHutl 241 93 M 

5896 ATrPr 5JHe 83 
49k ATrSc 

58to ATrUn 535o 73 
3416 2616 Ameren 140 S3 8 

30V. 17 AmesOs 30 7 15 

83 60 Amesrt 532 64 

2916 2lto Ametek 30 29 14 

3096 Uto Amfoc 

1996 HM6 Amfasc 

3896 26to AMPS 

24 14to Ampco 

2116 1216 Amrecs 

25to 19 AmSItl 

37to 25*6 Amsted 

716 196 Anacmp 
lVto Analogs 


52% 5016 sm+ to 


299k 2016—16 


341b 3M 349h 
3596 35to 3516— to 
3Bto 38 3816— to 



11 Uto Wto— to 
11U llto llto— to 
~ 2496 2S — to 

<446 6496—96 
*to 8J6 
7316 7116— K 
X 3016 
2796 28*6 + 96 
77% 81 +2 

2716 2796 + to 
— _ ^ 


M 13 1* 3102 

JO 13 45 1 

6 66 
140 54 7 7 

140 45 16 25 


|2to J216 Wft+ % 


10 


3596 

I0to Anchor 

1X8 

47 ]■ 

32 

3596 34% AnCtaV 

132 

38 U 

250 

lift 


30 

IS 23 

* 

23% 

16*6 Anodic 

X6 

38 11 

326 

74 ft 


280 

27 10 

1786 

54ft 44 Artieupf 3X6 

6X 

22 

25 

13ft Anbrtr 

38 

IX 21 

■7 

17 


84 

J 14 

301 

16ft 

10ft Antteiy 

X4b 3X 7 

N8 


- .. . -Ito 

1616 161* l«to 
1416 1396 U16 + 96 
2516 2516 »%— 96 
35*6 35*6 3596— to 

an 2 an + *6 

2596 2516 2516— to 

22 22 a 


lDto 1096 . 

Uto 1796 1816 + 96 
7416 74 Wto + to 
54% 5394 54V6 + to 
1716 T7V» 1796+ 96 


149h 9V. Apoctie 3 U 11 ZB 
4 to ApctlPwt 86 

2D W. 1516 ApcnP unXOOellX 
31*6 2716 APPwrt 4.18 133 
30to 1796 AMDta 1.121 38 18 
28* 8 APPtMs 1.14M07 78 


MVb 1396 1396— 96 


23to 159k ArchOn 
22 to Uto ArfzPS 
28% 23 AriPrt 

9596 79 ArlPpI 

2696 1316 Art Bat 
27*6 16 ArklO 

lto to ArtnRJ 
1396 9*6 Armada 
23 9 Armco 

33V. IB Armcrt 110 

2296 1599. Arms R 3 48 
36 V. 2216 Arm Win 138 
29 TSto AtdCp 130 
2996 13to ArowE 70 
22 16 Arfra 32 

22 14 Arvtits 

3416 17to Asarca 
2916 2Dto AShlOil 140 


1 

310 

165 


-Mb 7 14 2719 
240 117 4 763 
338 MS 11 
1070 123 
40 2.1 8 ... 
138 6.1 15 1577 
210 
27 1 


1316 1296 ... 

T ,B fc '%-« 

171* 17 T7M+to 
37*4 7796 31% 

11 2996 2996— to 

llto 10*6 llto 
2096 2016 2014 — to 
22*6 22*6 2216— 16 
.. 2896 2896 3896+46 
Mb 8696 86*6 B696 + to 
343 1996 W 19 
~ 1796 17£ 1J£ + 

12to 12to 1216— to 


93 11 

22 B 10 
34 10 1799 
44 9 1 

13 8 188 
13 16 

8 336 
718 

58 343 


10*6 10*6 Wtojk to 


40tt 3396 AshlOpf 430 113 
4096 31V* AshlOpf 296 W4 
61 V. 4516 AsdDG 248 44 9 
2B96 1096 Altdone 140 73 IS 
25 19*6 AlCyEt 243 103 8 


33 

43 


S2to 4096 AH Rich 330 
125 97 AlIRcpf 230 

20 11*6 AtlasCp 

43 1896 AUDOt 

41 Va 29Vx AuVoDt 
58 24 AVCOCP 

9916 52 Avaert 
2Jto 1596 AVEMC 
34 23 Averv 

15 10 AvWI n 

46to 27 Avnet 
26 19V. Avan 

4296 18 AvdJn 


2216 2196 . 

2196 21to 2196— to 
3596 3516 35*6—16 
2716 2716 2716 
1696 14*k 1696+16 
18 1796 18 + 96 

2196 21 2196 

2096 19*6 2016 + 96 
27*6 27to 27to+ to 
3916 3996 3996+ 96 
<77 37to 37 37to + to 
250 569* 5416 5416 
5 221k 2296 221k— Vfc 
IM 24*k 2496 24*6 + to 


63 17 4251 44to 6416 4416— 16 


24 


13 16 
13 18 
10 


4 10596 10» 10596 + 96 
192 12*6 1296 1296— to 

228 2596 25 25V.— to 

41to 4016 4016 — 96 

58 4996 50 + to 

99 99 99 

2096 2016 2096+ 16 
34U 3396 3416 + 96 
_ .. 12to 1296 12to— to 

30 14 U 2665 3616 34to 306—216 
230 93 f 3015 3096 3096 2Bto— to 
10 111 27*6 239k 23*1— to 


40 23 12 
B 111! 
6 


21 

I 

U 

302 

» 


40 33 17 131 

30 13 11 212 

31 S3 16 1076 

36 13 15 61 


95 

27 12 U2 
13167 2602 
13 313 
230 73 7 


138 

30 


3496 lOto BMC 
31*6 1W Ba Uncs 
23to 15 Bkrlntt 
2tto 1B*6 Batdar 
3 96 ylBaldU 

llto 3 BldUrt 

489k 2Bto BatlCp 

2316 1116 Baity Mf 

1596 796 BollyPk 

4116 3016 BattGE ... 

44 36V) Balt PfB 450 107 

28 30*6 BncOne 1J» 33 9 179 

596 39k BanTex 30 O 24 375 

55*6 38 BOndOS 1.10 13 12 66 

449* 39 HtBPS 240 54 7 400 

5316 0 BkBaert 335e 83 B 

3816 26U BkNY 244 57 6 180 

25 159k onkVaa 140 42 ■ 105 

23to Uto BnkAm 132 83 10 4750 

52to 40 BtAmpf 531*113 109 

BA 66 BfcAmpf 843*113 378 

2116 llto BKAmrt 238 MB 

31 W. 22*6 BkARIV 240 74 * 1077 

AOto 3796 BOOkTr 270 .45 6 T2DA 

2396 1916 BkTrrt 230 103 U 

1296 7to Homer JO* J It 13 

3696 >9 Bend 44 13 19 4M 

23V* TB BcrnGP 38 17 7 4 

4796 32to Bomel 136 23 9 431 

4816 35 BomtPf 237B 5J> 9* 

3396 19to BoryWr M 25 14 439 

12 8*6 BASIX .12b 13 10 68 

2796 1796 Bomch 3 M U Ml 

1196 BOXlTr 33 25 W 2736 


13*6 13*6 1316 
- — 2896+ 16 


2894 2m ... 
1516 1596 1596— to 


Xfto 21« 2196+ to 
lto 1*6— to 


296 

9 

4896 47*6 

13*6 12*6 

1016 1816 Wto + to 
4116 40*6 40*6— to 


•WW+ 96 
1396+ to 


240Z 42to 4216 4216— 196 


2596 3616 2SH— to 
«U 4*6 4*6— to 
56to B*6 S*to + 96 

4494 44V. 4494 — to 


47*6 4796 ^-to 


3496 35to ... ._ 

24 2394 24 + 16 

1896 1816 1816— to 
44 44 44 

73 7116 71 Vl — to 

1596 1516 Uto + to 
3116 3096 3196 + *6 
A0 5996 5096— 16 
23 2296 23 + to 

lllto W16 Wto 
23U 21*6 . 

21to 2196 21 to 


Dow Of! 1.99 in N.Y. Trading 


The AjsodateJ Press 


NEW YORK — Airlin e issues were off 


sharply in an otherwise mixed and drifting 
stock-m 


market session Thursday. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, 
down about 7 points at its midday low, closed 
with a loss of 1.99 at 1,228.69. 

Volume on the New York Stock Exchange 
came to 1 13-55 million shares, against 13552 
milli on Wednesday. 

Advancing issues slightly outnumbered de- 
clines. The exchange’s composite index of all its 
listed common stocks dropped .15 to 98.75. 

Hie airline stocks slid after American Air- 
lines announced a broad discount-fare plan, 
raising the prospect of a new fare war in the 
industry. Many of American's competitors said 
they would match its new fares. 

Shares of American’s parent company, 
AMR, tumbled 17k to 35U after a delayed 
opening, and led the active list on turnover of 
nearly 4 milli on shares. 

UAL fell 2 W to 45tt; Delta Air Lines 2 V4 to 
43; USAir Group 1V4 to 35; Piedmont Aviation 
1% to 33%; NWA 1% to 43, and Trans World 
Airlines 5i to 11%. 

Among aircraft manufacturers, Boeing 
dropped to 57% and McDonnell Douglas fc 
to 7216 amid some conjecture that new prob- 
lems for the carriers might slow orders for new 
planes. 

The weakness in the airline issues sent the 
Dow Jones average of 20 transportation stocks 
down 1052 points to 584.70. 

Before the market opened, the government 
reported that housing starts rose 2.1 percent in 
December to a seasonally adjusted annual rate 
of nearly 1.6 mflli oo. 


M-l Grmcs $2.1 Billion 


The AssoaaeJ Press 


NEW YORK — The nation's basic money 
supply expanded by $2.1 billion in early Janu- 
ary. the Federal Reserve said Thursday. 

The basic supply, called M-I, rose to a sea- 
sonally adjusted $559.4 billion in the week end- 
ed Jan. 7 from a revised $5573 billion the 
previous week, the central bank said. The previ- 
ous week's figure originally was estimated as 
$5573 billion. 

M-l represents funds readily available for 
spending, and includes red* in circulation, 
checking deposits and nonbank travelers 
rhaotrs- 


Lower interest rates “are beginning to revive 
homebuilding activity," said Malcolm Baldrige. 
the secretary of Commerce. 

A few minutes after trading got under way. 
International Business Machines reported 
fourth-quarter earnings of $355 a share, up 
from $3.06 in the last three months of 1983. 

The company's enminoc which are closely 
watched on Wall Street because of the preemi- 
nent position of IBM stock in the market, came 
in above most advance estimates on Wall Street, 
which generally were in the $3.40-S350 range. 

StiH IBM stock slipped Vt to 123% after 
opening at 124%. 

Rockwell International dropped IM to 30M. 
The company said it agreed to bay Allen- Brad- 
ley, a privately held, major manufacturer of 
factory automation equipment 


H! Month 
Htafa Low Snek 


Div. YU PC HOi High Lew QuotOrte 


7ft 

2ft 

Brack 




102 

3ft 

3% 

3% — % 

Bto 

18% 

14ft 

Brckvry 

132 

IA 


28 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft + to 

Mto 

36 

28 

BkVUG 

3L12 

&5 

8 

78 

36ft 

35* 

36ft + ft 

29 

2Z% 

10% 

BfcUGpf 2X7 

10S 


530 

27* 

22% 

279k + to 

X 

33% 

20 

BkUGrt 3X5 

12X 


B 

31% 

31% 

Uft 

50 

2Bft 

13 

BwnSh 

30 

13 

5 

0 

17 

17 

17 — % 

51 

32% 

22* 

BrwnGp 

136 

4X 

11 

244 

28*6 

27* 

2BVb+ to 

51 

42*6 

26% 

BrvmF 

188 

27 

15 

T247 

48*6 

30ft 

30ft— % 


36to 

2396 

Bntswk 

180 

22 

B 

2240 

35% 

35 

35to+ % 


30* 

2% 

BrstiWs 

X8 

IX 

16 

210 

35 

3m 

3m 


10)6 

n 

BucyEr 

X4 

XI 


73 

14* 

MM 

Uto— to 


23V6 

13ft 

Brady 

80 

4X 

B 

30 

18ft 

Uto 

Uft + % 


17* 

15% 

BunfcrH 

2.16 

123 


Zl 

17ft 

17ft 

17%— % 

26 

24 

Mto 

Burma 



12 

3) 

17 

Uft 

17 

25*6 

36*6 

21 

Burl Ind 

1X4 

67 

12 

■63 

Z7*6 

26% 

26ft— % 

im 

51ft 

35 

BrlNths 

1X0 

22 

8 

2088 

51ft 

51ft 

51*6 

15% 

79b 

69b 

BrtKapf 

J5i 

8.1 


2 

6ft 

6ft 

6ft— to 

26% 

58* 

44% 

BrtNpf 

5X39118 


334 

<m 

40% 

r+w 

16% 

20*6 

12ft 

Burndv 

34 

48 

14 

148 

17% 

17 

3Bto 

41% 

44% 

Burrgh 

2X0 

O 

12 

6222 

61ft 

AOft 

61 to— to 

flft 

20 

12% 

Bwtfrtn 

X2 

2S 

80 

181b 

17% 

17% — % 

58? 

12% 

3% 

suites 




84 

4% 

4ft 

490 — to 

15 

10% 

Butts pf 

2.10 2BX 


22 

10*6 

1096 

1016 + to 

4% 


2416 CBI In 

ni « cLc* 

3696 21 CNAFo 


41 


S3 


1300 53 Tl 
330 33 10 

260 53 20 2613 
275 *J m 
31 

15 377 

40 


£ 74to 


* + to 


8% 

CNAI 

lTOallX 


34% 

CPClnt 

270 

5X 

U 

Uft 

CPNtl 

1X0 

73 

0 

18ft 

181 

43 

0 

22 

CTS 

180 

28 

14 


796 C3IIK 



38 

91 21 10 

14 2249 

^ ^ 32 13 6 560 

4296 3296 CoiFd Pf 475 113 8 

2416 13to Cafllxi 3Sr 13 IT 


?SS?S5+ 


.12 3 


19*6 11*6 Canml 
3096 1596 CRUt® 

9*6 3*6 CmpRe .16t 
Wto rato CpRrt® 258 
72V6 54to CvnSp 250 27 11 
4196 28*6 CdPoc® 130 
20 Wto CanPE 0 30 
59to 14*6 CanIRMc 
174toT22to CapCtts 3D 
46to 30to CapHH 134 
18*6 UB6 Cartas a M 
36to 24V6 Carlisle 130 
83*6 5096 Carnal 
29 13*6 CaroFl 


299b 

MW* 10*6 1816+ 96 
1696 16*6 K96+ 96 
43 429k 43 +96 

1396 MV. + 96 
Uto 1416 
1716 18*6+1 
— 4to+ to 


.1 15 
24 11 


3 

7 _ 

530 15* 


Wto 

4V6 316 
12*6 1296 

6796 6Ato 

3Bto 3796 3BM + to 
1896 1896 1896+16 
15to 15to 15% + to 


sa: iX 


156 


23 11 
29 M 
17 Q 


146 

162 


*** ^ W?+ to 


into 10*6 
37 35)6 

83to 81 


26% 

19*6 CarPw 

2X8 

103 

7 

1315 

25ft 25*6 

25%+to 

23* 

10ft CarPpf 

2X7 

117 


12 

Z) 

22% 

22%— 14 

i/to 

36ft CarTec 

X10 

4S 

11 

2M 

42ft 

41ft 

4296 +lto 

189b 

7to Carrol 

87 

X 

13 

86 

0ft 

9V. 

9to— V* 

Nto 

30ft CarsPIr 

130 

XI 

17 

U7 

38% 

38ft 

35*+ Vi 

32*6 

lflto CarfHw 

132 

S3 44 

Bbl 

23 

229b 

22ft— Vt 

27% 

199* CorlWl 

XS 

IS 10 

21 

25% 

25% 

2S% 

ISto 

9*6 CascNG 

130 

XI 

9 

31 

14* 

Mto 

14% 

IBM 

.0% CQstfCK 



losaz 

M* 

14% 

15ft— to 

33 

15* CsftCpf 


108 


457 

26% 

24 

25 — % 

52ft 

28ft CatrpT 

SO 

IX 


2246 

30ft 30 

38%+ % 

24* 

U Coco 

36 

17 

0 

20 

20ft 

20% 20ft + to 

87*6 

Of Cetera* 

4X0 

XI 

7 

T79 

86% 

86*6 

Mto— ft 


□ Month 
HWlLO* Stack 


Div. YM. PE 


5b. 

nosHiaiiLae 


§5 


LOlH 


31 CneNG 
4*6 CoiWPw 
13 CnPpfA 4.16 173 
13U. Cap pfB 450 174 
23% CnP pfD 745 18.9 
2 » OlPrtE 772 193 
25 CnP PfG 776 183 


232 37 8 208 


9*6 CnPprU 260 W3 


25)6 OiPafH 748 194 


1096 CnPprP 336 185 


7to CnPprM 250 173 
7 DlPpTL 223 17 J 

11 OlPprS 432 184 
716 CnPprK 243 173 
Z3to CntlCp 240 63 
4*6 Conti II 

96 Cantll rt 

12 Cnflllrt 

96 CfilHdn 

. 18 Coni Tel 172 . 

4Bto 2696 CtData 72 23 11 1896 25*6 3516 35to— 16 

37V. 33 CnOtrt 450 121 200z 37to 37to 3714 + to 

33*6 229k C«rt 130 11 13 371 33V. 329k 3296— to 

I vICookU 36 196 lto 196+ to 

26 Coopt 1-52 S3 15 400 

Coopt pf 230 83 28 


74 


4096 40to 4096+ to 

2 3369 6 596 6 + V> 

1DRE 24 26 24 + 16 

TQz TSto 2«to 25to +116 
bXb 37to 38*6 39Vi 
4302 Wto 39 39 — 96 

2002 41 41 41 + to 

34 24to 24 34 + 14 

61 TO If W*6 + to 
31 20*6 199k 20 — to 

330r 39to 3914 39to 
37 22 21 21 — to 

62 21V. 2096 21to + *6 
14 20% 2096 20*4 

24 14 13*6 W 

6 12*6 1296 1196 
54 2116 2116 2196+ to 
16 13*6 12*6 1346— to 
6 928 3796 37 37*6— 96 

333 7*6 7*6 7*6 

BBS 2*6 2*6 2to+ to 
20 41fe 41 4TI6+ to 

1192 196 196 m— to 

9 1319 2D6 23 23*6 


4*6 

3696 


s* 

£ 


JJ3e 3 J 


40 23 8 63 

40 23 15 71 B0 


10)6 CooPlJb 
1296 CnprTr 
11*6 COBpVb 
1196 Cepertd 
_ 16*4 ConJurn 

14*6 1096 Core In 
7*% 5914 CamG 
33to 2296 CarSIk 

5474 37*6 CtJXCm 

8)6 4*4 Cralo 
*R4 27 Cranv 
38to CrnvRa 
29*6 16U CrecfcN 
23*6 15V. CrctiN Pf 2.18 113 
23*4 Wto CrmpK 130 S3 10 


■ 34 
36 
256 
1JX1 
34 


4.1 12 
37 15 
47 11 
33 1* 
11 26 
7 16 


130b 45 21 
18 

13 


3496 CrwnCfc 


299k 2916 299k— % 
33*6 33*6 33*6— to 
1496 14*6 14to + to 
ISto lflto 1896+ *6 
20to 1996 W96— *6 
1416 1396 Wto + to 
23 2Z96 2296— to 

12 11*6 11*6 
7116 78)6 71 
3296 0)6 2296 + to 
4896 43*4 4816 
8Vb Sto 8to+ to 
SSVk 32to 3296—96 
59 5896 SBto+ *6 

2496 2414 2414+ 16 
1814 18*4 11*4— to 
2196 2116 2196— *6 


3896 279k CrwZel 130 
Slto 43 CrZalrt 463 
43*4 50 CrZal PK450 
25*6 18*6 ClXbro 60 
4896 MV4 Cul Inet 
2496 22*6 Collnt wl 
18*6 61*6 CumEn 230 26 5 
18*4 Sto Currlnc 1.100113 
*B% 30% CurlW 138 37 9 
4Sto 2714 CVdaps 1.10 25 11 


29 II 

97 

73 

25 7 
36 


13 1264 4716 4696 45*6 


153 86 
27 10 
2 329. 
29 45 


34to 34*4 3496— 9k 
4796 47*6 4794 + to 
87 57 57 — to 

2396 ZP6 2396 
49 4814 4096 

24*6 2496 2496 + to 


8596 8Sto 
70 HJ 


4414 44)6— to 


15 714 Cenavft 31* -l 21 

3*9k 309k Cartel 238 6.1 9 
26V» T7 Centex n 45 

23*4 1696 CenSOW 202 85 7 4773 

25*6 16)6 CanHud 234 1L5 5 134 

2396 18*6 Ceoliu 214 96 B 44 

1796 W CTlIPS 760 23 7 545 

23 1794 OlLaEI UK 85 6 718 

339k 29*6 CLaEI pf ATS 125 4 

14*6 796 CeMPw 160 U5 4 167 
IBM 14 Cn5aya 

189% 10th CVtPS 

179% 796 Control 
996 796 CntrvTl 
249% 189% Cenvfll 

23*4 ISto CrMsed 

27 17 CesiAlr 

289k 14*6 dtntpln , 

38V. 19 Oanl pf 130 . 

55*6 43V. axtil pf 460 93 


778 9*4 896 


34*6 23*4 2314- 
23 2296 229k- 

2494 24*4 2*fe 


45 12 
158 M3 6 


194 

13 


ChamSo 60 45 11 


1716 17 >716 

23 22*6 23 + to 

33Vz 33*4 i 
996 946 946 — to 
17*4 17*4 1716 + to 

1896 TBto 1W6 

ftt <M K 

9to 996 9Vt 

21*6 21to 2116 + 9% 

2296 229% 2291 + to 

60 13445 2150 229k 21 V4 22*6 +1 

60 13 10 5920 22V4 2716 23% + 46 

- -- — 23*4 249k 749k— to 

5196 51 51*4 


38 83 9 
268 115 9 
M 16 12 


156 
524 
104 
109 
6 1537 
1 

21 




896 

196 


•— *6 


246 29% 
51 fiDto 
A3 A3 
4296 42V. 
589% 54*% 


1U 

3?*+9% 

gk+\k 


— to 
96 
to 


1196 

12*4 1 vIChrtC 

616 to vICUwt 
llto lto vtChrlrt 
S296 359k CTnse 380 75 
7D9h <0*4 Chose pf 760 12.1 
3%9k Chcoe Pf 525 113 
48 Chase pf AJTelll s 

37to 51 ChOMrt AJOelU 53 

79 Uto Otefsea 66 17 8 MS 

369% 244% Cheated 168 5J 12 342 

3796 23*4 CUNY 8 236 63 6 1294 

37*4 234% ChMVrt 137 5.1 5 

58*6 48 ChMVrt 6576128 1 

569% 4A ChNYPf 559ell3 250 

Ito Slto Chunk 124 08 IS 77 

3«6 32*6 ChesPn 2J» 56 11 511 

40V, 29V. Chevm 260 7 3 7 2765 319% 31 3116— to 

419* 199k CNWSt 10 2936 254% 2496 2J — to 

W596 Mto CMMIw 82 18 18794 Wto 187*% — to 

7416 47 ChlMI pf 2 67 57 67 + (6 

25W IA ChlPnT f IB O 22V6 SV4 

15 79% ChkFull 3» 4.113S 19 8*6 8*6 (to 

36)6 34% airtsCr 68t 13 SI 3A9k 35*6 34 + *6 

104k 5 ChrWn 35 10 10 10 — to 

1 39% 99% Chroma 1 St 11 109% ’ 


M 1796 
28*6 279% 28)6 
3796 36% 37*6 + to 
37 3616 37 — to 

5446 54*6 5496— to 
53 53 53 +* 

22*4 32 22*4 + % 

3Ato 3546 


11 

43 11 
.. 26 18 
3.12 7.1 8 
2.16 153 6 
435 143 
MS 1A7 
32 3.1 36 
34 23 IS 
58 3 15 


4646 <5*4 4446+ to 
479* + to 


25*4 1646 BOV Fin JOe 3 23 

30 1AA BayStO 240 93 8 

3916 28*k Bernina 130 23 11 

36 2496 BeatCa 130 S3 9 

45*4 46*4 Beef Pf 3J0 63 
42 3096 HaetnD 130 23 U 

12 496 Better 

10*4 9to Baker Pf 130 1A3 
20 12*4 BeWnH 48 U 12 

38*4 19*6 BefHwl M 73 12 

38 IVto BeIHlfPf 67 26 

83 66 BORAH <40 83 8 

27*4 229% BCE® 238 

349% 194% Beuind 32 14 10 

™ \i ,5 

68 15 IT 

Benfcp 2X0 53 9 

17 Benefrt 250 125 

816 3*6 Berate ,15e 16 9 

1616 716 BeroEn 10 

796 39% Berhev . II 

1716 Wto Beet Pd 34 20 12 
2916 Uto BethStl 60 11 
5996 3716 BethStpfUO 113 
299k 18% Bemstrt260 106 


479k 47*4 

24*4 24 2416+ to 

109k *0 10% + to 

ar* 


13 


249% 2fl6 2flk 

' 28%+ to 


'5 28% 28*6 . 

2 34*4 Mto 34*4 

4898 289% 2B9% M%— *6 

5 53*6 53*6 5316— *% 

151 4196 41)4 41% 

71 6% 6)6 4*6 

9 10)4 W» 10*4 

* 16% M 16*4— to 

120 25)6 254k 25% 

44 25*4 25*4 

1381 79*6 78to 

310 26)6 26 

111 22% 22*6 



3516 Wto Beverly 
2446 10*6 BtaThr 6B 

28 1716 BhxfeO 64 
2916 20 BfcfcHP 168 


9 21 


1546 1516 15% + to 
4)6 416 4*6 
12 llto 11%— to 
19*6 1896 Wto + *6 
45*6 4496 4SU + to 
2316 22% 22*6 + 9% 


. 759 35 34% 34% + % 

17 18 1752 219% 2114 21% + *6 


40 

1416 BlabMn 

M 

XX 

0 

654 

50 

37 BktaHR 

2X0 

XI 

12 

617 

60% 

3m BeelM 

1X8 

2X 

IS 20178 

4m 

32% Boisec 

1.00 

44 

12 

rare 

57% 

46 BataeCe 

5JD0 

08 


270 

26 

IS* Banov 

.IB 

X 

28 

250 

65% 


222 

43 

9 

377 

2496 

16% Barawd 

.02 

AO 

IS 

400 

B9k 

4*4 Bormns 




22 

35% 

24% KcsEd 

334 

9X 

8 

456 

73 

63 BOSE Pi 

888 123 


■JBZ 

M9b 

0 BatEPr 

1.17 21.1 


30 

12% 

10% BbsEpt 

1X6 113 


4 

35% 

14% Bawtrn 

72 

38 


13Q4 

31% 

25% BrtflSt 

1X0 

53 

w 

41 

52ft 

41 BrWM 

1X0 

12 15 

2540 

3B 

21ft BrttPt 

176eX0 

6 

41 

Uto 

0% BrtTTpp 




3638 








2J U 1543 25% 259* *%— 46 
6.1 B 40 38*6 Z7to 27to— 9* 
1696 159k 1616— 96 
4696 4596 


i +196 
i— 19% 


2414 BH 


649% 63*% 64 — to 
ZM 229% 22%+ to 


Sto 546 54% 

34*4 341% 3(14 + to 


73 

Mto 1816 






24*4 2D4 

289% 2896 289%— to 
5116 309% 5096— 16 
3196 2146 Zl%+ to 
1496 1416 149% + 9k 


33% 20% Chrvelr 1X0 
53 349% Chubb s 230 

21 to Church 30 
44*6 35*4 Cln Bell 
15% 8% dnGE 
33*4 Mto OnOpf 
64% 48 OnOpf 
33*% 20 ChtMlI 
3SVk 2096 drcJK 
29*4 1496 ClrOty 
99k 1314 Circus 
<1 27% athrp 286 A1 

68*4 atteppf 833*114 
9996 75)4 OfcprtA9X5elU 
44*4 32 Ctrylov 2X0 il 

61 4VW cry In of ua S3 
26 2196 crylnpf 2X7 118 
11% 6*4 Clobir 32 *0.1 
39 234% CJOrttE LW A> 14 

14 6)4 CktyHoi 15 

»k 17 ewat 1X0 5 l1 

255% 1396 Ctove 252 130 5 

59% 46*4 CtvEI pf 740 UX 
60 47 CIvEIPf 756 130 


4 4661 32* 32% 32%— 9b 


779 51*% 5091 5096— to 
33*6 32*4 33*4 + 9% 


_ 77% CtvEI pf 12X6*144 
169k M Clevpk 40 H 


17% 15*6 Clvpkpf 233 143 
2DVk 14*4 Ctvpkpf 134 123 
31 22*4 Ciorex 130 43 

T796 14% CtabMIt 
21 22)4 ChieffP 1X0 32 

19*4 14% Chief rt 1X0 S3 
2996 rato Coaehm 40 33 


Coastal 40a 14 * 


539 

» 44*6 44 44*6 

376 14*6 1414 Mto— *6 
300z Uto 33*6 33to 
aaar 63 63 + % 

228 24 23to 23%— % 
455 3414 34 34to— *6 

449 25U 3446 Mto— 9% 
12 608 1996 »*% 19*6+ to 
6 26W 40% 40% 409%— Ml 
10 7316 73*6 73*6 
46 87*4 87 8714 + % 

9 1393 29*4 3896 3W%— 16 
3 61 61 61 — to 

445 24*4 Mto 249k 
17 7% 716 7*6— *6 

3B6 27*4 27 27 —14 

138 vm 13% 13%+ Ml 
13 19% 1946 Wto + *6 
946 Wto 19*6 1996 
5DBZ 57 57 57 

17% a 57 58 +04 

84 84 84 

27 llto 11 llto + % 
8 M 1596 1596— to 
25 15% 15 U — to 
9 1686 28% ZTto 3 — % 
60 17to 17 77 + *6 

9 497 20% 29)4 30*6+ to 
6 18% 10% J 

17)4 17*4 1716— Ml 


39 24*4 CStl Pf 1.83 4X 1 30% 30% 30% + to 

66 49 Cocoa 276 45 U 5181 63*6 61% 61%— 116 

20% 9% Col BCD 1817 Uto 12% 1296— to 

27to 25to Cotemn 130 45 9 272 27 UVs 244k— % 

26*4 20)4 Colo Pat 138b 53 M 1625 249% 24% 34% 

49% 39 CofoP rt 435 1U AOQr 42*4 42*4 42V, 

38% 27*4 CotlAfc 130 3.1 7 497 39 38% 39 + % 

17)4 9% Cal Fibs .16 9 13 237 17*6 17 17*4— to 

21% 20% Cotton VXD 53 9 662 25% Mto 2696 + to 

57% 39% caftlnd 250 43 to IOC 58*6 56*4 SB +1 

37*4 27 .COiGai 118 93 7 688 33)4 33 33*4— to 


26*4 ZTto CSO pt 3X5 1 25)4 25% 2S*4 + *4 

107% 97 CSOrthlS35 143 SDl 105% M5%»Sto — *6 
41*4 2796 cembfn 2X8 53 10 1045 40 39)4 39(4— % 


3496 25% CmbEn 
15% 8 Comdis 
25*4 15M ComMft 
46to Mto Comoro 
28% Z1V2 CmwE 
28% 21% avert 
MM M OvErt 
1614 T3V. CwEPf 
24% 30% avert 
66 5414 CwE pf 

57 46 CWE Pi 

25*4 Mto CemES 
3414 2096 Comsat 
M 169% CPsrca 
39% M Comoor 
21% ll Comae 
46)6 29 Cptvan 
29% 19% ConABB 
22% 13% Conrtr . 
Wb 1216 ConnES 152 83 
25 19)4 CimNG 240 9X 

18*4 10% conroc m 3X 
31*6 22% coraEd 2.12 7.1 
46% 38 ConEpf 5X0 113 
34% 25 ConsFd 134 43 
31*4 20% CnePrta 1X0 33 


366 

326 


33*6 32*4 
13*4 13*6 


1X4 Sl6 12 

jg M q 

36 22 12 97 16*% 16% Wtta— to 

3 M35 15% 14% U% + % 
6 4912 27% 279b 279%— to 
1 27% 27% 27%— % 
« 15% 15% IS)*— % 

n i*% 16% m% + *% 

I 21% 239% 23% — *6 
MU 66 <6 66 

1701 Hto 56 56% 

S 56 23*4 23*6 S)4 
1179 20 279b 2794— to 

1031 28*6 27% 2Mb + % 
3 29% 29% 29to— to 
. . 220 15% 15% IBb + % 
31 2703 37% 35% 36V.— to 
3X 14 461 29% 28% 29)6— % 
3S0 22% 2216 22% 

20 18% 18% 18% 

M 25% 35 25*6+16 

809 MM 13*6 Uto— 1 
1469 30% 30 30 — % 

14 43% 42% 4S6+ to 
463 32% 31% 32 — to 
2028 31% 30% 30% — % 


300 MX 
132 5.1 
139 12 A 
200 122 
2X7 12.1 
848 117 
731 US 
2J2 93 6 
13# 4J 11 
3* 3 75 

SSe 13 11 
11 


37 ... .. 

34b 1.1 13 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


Div. YU PE 


Sic. 

lBBsHtgULOn 


Close 

Quo?. Ofce 


14*4 8% Ertxnnt 
15*4 129% EssSsn 
2296 ISto EssexC 
34% 2896 Estrfne 
33% 20 Ethyl 
10*4 3 EvanP 
10% 7 Evanrt l JO T9X 
399% X ExGeta 1X0 43 n 
16% 139% Exeats- LSI el 1,1 
469% 36V% Exxon Iff 74 1 


JOe lx 14 
M 5 11 
30b 4X 10 
-72 16 13 
30 26 11 


is* ra% ran— % 

17 15% 16% +196 

20to 20% 2Q%— % 
27% 279* 27% 

3Zto 32% 3Zto— 16 
396 39% 39% 

796 79* 79% + to 
37*4 37to 37% 

16*6 16 16*6 + *6 
46*6 45to 46 — to 


15% 

6*6 FH Ind 



6 

19 

8 

7ft 

a + to 

62 

41% FMC 

UO 

3X 

8 

11V 

59 

57% 

58 + to 

76% 

51* FMC pf 

225 

XI 


1 

71ft 

71* 

71* + ft 

45ft 

35to PPL Go 

376 

BX 

9 

425 

44ft 

44ft 44%+ % 

25* 

22% FPLGpwJ 



42 

57ft 

25ft 22ft— ft 


0ft FabCIr 

36 

23 

IS 

79 

15ft 

12% 

13% — % 

14% 

0% Facet 




57 

17% 

Uto 

15% + % 

19* 

15 Folrchd 
33% Falrcrt 

JD 

50 

9 

1533 

169b 

15ft 

16 — ft 


3X0 1X0 


316 

34% 

as% 



0ft Folrtd 

16 

13 

B 

88 

13ft 

13 

UVl— to 

29*6 

16to FamDtr 

32 

X 

71 

253 

26% 

26*4 

26ft + * 

19ft 

Uft Frastln 

XOe 17 

13 

2 

16*6 

Uto 

Mto + % 

28* 

Uft Farcti 

Ji 

48 

B 

30 

19ft 

IPft 

19ft— to 

12ft 

8ft FavOrg 

30 

18 

16 

754 

18* 

u 

lDto— ft 

7% 

4*6 Feders 



11 

ISO 

6ft 

6to 


3Sto 

29ft Fed ICO 

1X4 

47 

7 

54 

35% 

34ft 

34ft 

45% 

ZTto Fed Exp 



23 

1535 

37 

36% 

36% — % 

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29ft FdMOP 

1X2 

47 

10 

M3 

33% 

32% 

37ft— ft 

24% 

lBft FedNM 

.16 

IX 


3206 

16% 

Mto 

Mto— to 

27 

im FedPB s 

70 

16 

7 

130 

20% 

Uto 

19% — ft 


16 FedRtt 

1X4 

7.1 

15 

at 

20% 

50 

20ft— to 

ITto 

13% FdSanl 

80 

SX 

IB 

M 

16 

IS* 

15ft 

SSft 

42ft FedDSt 

2X0 

46 

B 

601 

Sl% 51ft 

51* 

38% 

Sto Ferro 

130 

45 



26ft 

26% 


30 

25*6 FMcst 

280 

» 

11 

4 

3196 

31* 

31* 

24ft 

4 FltlCpA 

30 


3675 

09* 

aft 

9ft + to 


Sto 3*4 FlnCPPf M 12X 

48 14% FlnCPPf 634aO0J5 87 

9% 2*4 FnSBor 73 

2 15% Flrestn 30 43 10 1907 

2596 19 FlAtfln 38 33 7 68 

299k 21% FBkSy * 138 53 7 540 
34% FMFlO 132 4 J 10 IS 


5 5 5 

34 33% 33% 

49% «to 4*4— % 
189% 18% ISto + % 
24% 24% 24% 

2794 27% 27to + 9k 
2894 269k a4k + % 


5BV. 

3+to FBust 

X0a IX 

10 

150 

57to 

56ft 57 to 

27 

IBft FsfCMc 

132 

56 

X 

ISO 

23% 

23% 

27ft 

TOto 

13to FtBTex 

130 

87 

14 

235 

15ft 

IS 

15 —ft 

21 

n* Fiatv 



M 70S 

IBto 

17’* 

18 

IRft 

10* FFedAz 




332 

16% 

Uto 

Mto— % 

44* 

30% Fintsie 

234 

53 

0 

484 

45to 

4m 

45 + % 

30 

21 Flntstpf 237 

Ll 


167 

28ft 

78% 

23ft 

13* 

7% FtMlfa 


U 

*0 

206 

9% 

Sto 

0%+ to 

48* 

31 to FNStS 

2X8 

60 

6 

65 

48 

479b 48 + to 

W7ft 

00% FNStB ptlTOellT 


55 

, 


90* + * 

7ft 



106 

444 

Cl 



27ft 

TOto FstPnpf 2X2 10X 


19S 


r 

26 to — Mi 

at* 

20 FttlnR! 

1 64 

4X 

14 

243 


Uft 27*+ ft 

» 

14* FtVoBtC 

X4 

43 

B 

Ml 


li.'l 

19% 

25% 

U Ftwbc 

130 

48 

7 

18 

rZ 


25% 


52% 4Sto FWteCPf ATS 113 
5496 30% FlBchO 1X0 19 19 
12% 816 Fish Fa XSB 3 

32% 20% FftFnG 8 B 

47*4 42% RTF Pf 
30% 14*4 Fleet Ed 
S to 22% Plenum 
3094 2396 FlexlV 
T2to 10% Flex] pf 
as 19% Fiieffii 
3596 12*4 FlOOtPt 
37to 2996 FklEC 
2494 ISto FtaPr® 

3496 Uto FtaStf 
10 3*6 FhvGen 

17)4 11)4 Flewrs 
239k 14*4 Fluor 
54% 439b FoeteC 
Slto 33 FardM 
T2 MM FfDear 
65 45*6 FtHowd 1X4 

M96 10 FastWh 


4X3elU 
36 13 11 
38 2X U 
30 17 12 
1X1 124 
30 4 a 

13 

,16a A 12 
116 87 9 
AO 24 >4 


in. «to Foxstp 
399b 27 Foxbrc 


24 17 
24638 259 
45 9 AS 
r 42 3 5544 
136 114 AO 
14 15 B2 
34 13 153 


40 

M 

130 

2X0 


n 


179% 5% FMOO 


25% 13*4 FrPtMc 


3296 20 


Frtptm __ 

Fruehfs 40 24 
FruWrt 2X8 63 
Fuaue -40 L2 


48 74 14 
134 35 <1 a 
IJlAfflX 151 
M 34 14 1167 
40 22 15 83 

“ ' 6 


32Qz SOto 50% 50to + to 
40 25*b 349% 3496— 4% 
39 Wto 10% W%— to 
AOS 32 3196 3196— % 

92 45 44*6 45 +1 

63 279% 2696 261%— 9% 
45 3396 339% 33% — to 
7A 30*4 30 » — % 

50 179k 129% 1296 + *6 
80 3(to 34to 24%—% 
341 34*6 23% 23*4 + % 
10 369k 36% 36%— to 
888 2fl% 21% 2196 
47 1516 U 75% + % 
531 4% 4*4 49% + % 

an 179% 17 17 — to 

t£9k 15% 169% + 9% 
49 48% 48)4— % 

47% 47% 47% — % 
1196 I19k ll)k 
63% 6296 63*6— *4 
13to lZto 13 + % 

7% 9*4 9*6— % 
20 29% 30 + 96 

0% 8% 8H 
1796 1796 1796— % 

2S96 2AH 2696 — - to 

975 25% 24% 25%+ % 
589 29*6 28% Wto + 96 
75 32% 3196 32V6 + *6 


HOW CONTRARIANS REALIZED 800% PROFITS 


In 1982, viti ife the DOWwas drooping under 800, wrten^m^orrtyolseerswgmbaarian.^ 
rebuked the consensus, predicting THE EM WILL TOUCH 1,000 BfcFORE HTITWG TSCrJt biateo 
riveting to recall that at, or near, the nadir of despair, a prestigious publication featured a story 
headlined: "The Death of EctuBies’. Their orthodoxy boomefanged; the BuU rampaged to 1290, 
our optimism was vindicated. After the market soared, the same magazine released an article 
entitled: “The Re-Birth of Equities’. Once again, they were myopic; the market sagged .A month 
ago. Business VVeekp ubiishedalengthydiscourse with the scalding title: The Death of Mining" , 
an obftuary tor the North American minJng industry. . 

Our cerebral juices stir we challenge their prosaic thinking. "Power •Elitists are pre- 
conditioned to buy into weakness, to sell Into strength, as we recognized when our researchers 
recommended BOEING atS 16. FORDaroundS 17, G JuLat$39. SEARS under $ 19 (bt^e spirts), 
and other seasoned shares that the “Street’ once scorned, misguided by hero l ffeuncL What 

gurusfail to divine is that "misery* has already been factored Into the price of AMAX, asarco. 

INCO. NEWMONT. NORANDA and PHELPS DODGE, that to sell after the "Group has been 
decimated is to defy logic. Wien Elitists are ready to peddle their inventories, the Group 
will under go a metamorphosis; fiscal events are rarely spontaneous combustion, movements 
are orchestrated. . . 

Our forthcoming latter discusses why the DJi will gaflop over 1500, why mining shares will 
recover in addition, CGR focuses upon a low-priced equity with the dynamics to vault to 
prominence, emulating the success of a recently recommended ’special situation that 
escalated 800% in a brief time-span. For your complimentary copy, please write to. or 
telephone... 



CAPITAL 

GAINS 


n 


FPS. Financial Planning Services bv 

Kafvers*raat112, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) -275181 
Tetex 18536 


Name: 


Address: 


t 


I Phone: tnria/i j 


Past performance does not guarantee future results 



12 Month 
KWiLaw Stock 


Div. Yla. PE 


5b 

lOQs High Low 


OantOrtw 


1516 9% Hutlv 


219b 12*4 HuotiTI 
i7to Hn 


45 


25 ^ 

33 21% Human 

2 S% 17% HuntMf 
389% 239% HuttEP 
2396 1816 Hydra) 


JO 

1X2 


XI 

37 

IX 9 9 

27 13 3647 
IX 14 26 

BV"! 


13% 13 13 

139k 13 13% — to 

18% 18*6 Mto— to 
25to 25 25*6— 9b 

24% 24% 2496— % 
309% 309k 30% — *6 
23*6 23*6 23*6 


26% 15 GAP 
13to 20 GAFpf 
35% 2396 OAT X 
39% 19% GCA 
6596 489k GEICO 
10% 4 GEO 
13% StoGFCp 
4396 3416 GTE 
37% 31)6 GTE Pt 
25 21% GTEpf 

2296 1996 GTEpf 
10 4% GalHou 

5396 339b Gomtt 
23 17% GapStr 

30% 10% Okortrt 
21% 139b Grtco 
53% GomCa 
30*6 GflCorp 
_ 14% CAInv 

459. 2994 GftBesh 
28 169k Gditm* 

2796 u« GCnrta 

21 12% GoOcfl 

7294 42 GoOyn 
60 48*6 GbnEI 

58% 45% GaFcfs 
31% 24% GGttl 

22 12*6 GnHort 

19 8% GnHoua 

34% 15% Cnl rot 


.10b A 2155 
120 37 1 

120 X5 203 
W 2110 
X8 15 10 2286 
333 


1X8 


26% 26*6 36% + to 
32% 329k 32*6— % 
35 34*4 34% — % 

25% 239k 2496— 9% 
5996 599% 599*— % 
4% 4% 496 
6% 5% 6 +% 
429b 4196 42to + to 
37*6 37*6 37*6 + )6 
2496 24% 249% 

2296 22*% 22% — *6 
4 5*% 59k 5*6+ % 

2X 20 1510 52*4 51% 52*6— % 


73 


A 


79 
8 5428 
5 
20 
12 


-SO 23 12 
M 37 13 
-56 84 14 
10 

IJOB 4X114 
1436115 
ran 23 9 
X M I 
X6 17 

34 
1X0 
220 
250 


21 

215 

77 

6 


348 
152 
10W 
33 
723 

14 M 1784 
37 1210049 4016 59 
43 V 2115 55% 55 


22 *!%,.. 

10% 10% 10% + to 
16% Uto 16% + % 
659k 6S% <5% + % 
3796 3696 37% + % 
15% 15*6 15%+ to 
44 43% *3%— % 

27% 27% 2796 * 9% 
27to 27*6 27V.— % 
19)6 W% 18% + % 

” ? ”^+% 
55*%—% 


t 


2896 21 IClnda IX 44 I 615 

84% 6296 1C la rt 250 42 5 

10% 4% ICN 58 1443 

25*6 22% ICNOf 270 104 14 

17% 14 iNAIn 1X2 11A 21 

199% 13to 1RT Pt s 140 8X 10 23 

479% 209% ITT Co 1X0 33 9 6767 


130 


7 A 23 
82 7 


144 120 
L10 11.1 


a 

50% 4591 


37 

9% 

15% 

54 


II D II 

IK 

9ft Danone 70 18 48 

651 

MM 

10 

10%+ ft 1 

flEZ 


17B 4X 

9 

184/ 

28% 

27* 27ft— to 

7M 

Bfx. 1 



1« 

7M 

7 

7% 

MM 

11 

.IBb 17 


45/ 

14 

139) 

14 

IHLaI 


474 4S 

1C 

301 

86J* 

Bflto 

86%— % 

60V 

39 DataGn 


« 

1669 

60 

STO 

59 — to 

30M 

13% Dafpnt 


20 

3<5U 

22 

21*1 

22 + % 

12*4 

«b OfaOse 

70 28 10 

IU 

f* 


0ft + to 

10% 


34 13 

7 

89 

Mto 

15* 16% + ft 

37% 


74 22 

13 

1692 

33% 

32* 

33*+ % 


■ 1 i. 1 * ■ 4 Irt A 

280 128 

7 

221 

15A 

Uft 

15ft— % 

55% 

45 DPLpf 

737 136 


6610* 54 

S3* 

54 + to 

97% 

75% DPLrt 

1230 128 


W8* 97M 

9/M 

97Vk 

20* 

I0H DeanFi 

XS IS 

U 

700 

27 

25* 

25?h— 1 

4D9t 

2m Deere 

180 XI 

21 

BS4 

32)4 


a* + * 

22* 

17% DefmP 

1S2 BJ 

B 

146 

22 

21*1 

2i%+ to 

45ft 

27 DeltaAr 

Xfl IX 

814405 

43to 

41* 

<3 —a* 

8ft 




40 

5ft 

Sto 

5% 

58* 


1.76 38 

15 

460 

58ft 

5Bto 

5S% 


l^lr ' 1 in 

130 AB 

11 

05 

25% 

25% 

25to— to 

42% 

SSft Dennys 


15 

3U 

<2% 

42* 

«%+ to 


26% DeSoto 


10 

73 




Uto 

11% Del Ed 

1X0 lOS 

7 

006 

ISft 

15% 

15ft— to 

49 


933 136 


30* 68% 

68% 

68% 

58 

47% OefErt 

7X8 UX 


258* 57* 

sim 

57% 

57% 

46 DefEpf 

7X5 132 


700* 57 

56ft 56)b+ % 

56 


736 1X1 


190z 56 

56 

56 

24% 

Ctol-lriJ 

275 IU 


6 

24* 

24% 

24% 

24ft 

20 DEprR 

33* 1X2 


7 

24% 

2*% 

24% 

25ft 

19ft DEpfG 

X13 1X0 


25 

24 

23* 

5* + * 

24% 

19 DEpfP 

XU 1X1 


8 

24% 


26* 

■ji. 1 •; n.,’1 

3X0 1X1 


51 

26 

25ft 

26 - * 

26 

tX4i-l r.i J 

3X2 1X2 


224 

2Aft 

25% 

25% 

30 

t - . -j- -« I ft 

480 1X6 


21 

20% 

209k 

20%+ % 


A.I2 1X7 


13 

30ft 

30% 

38% 

101 

86 DE Pfl 

1280 127 


1 

100% 100% 

O0%— to 

Oft 

72% DefEPf 

972 117 

19500* 02 

82 

82 

17ft 

13*4 DetE pr 

235 128 


19 

T7ft 

17ft 

17ft 

25% 


80 X9 


58 

2096 20% 


15 

9ft OIGtor 

64 A7 


367 

13* 

13% 


27ft 

21* DKMopf 275 68 


6 

26 

»% 

25%—* 

■ ■ . 


176 08 Sf U» 

IS 

>7% 

IS 

1 38ft 34ft DtaShpf 4X0 113 


17 

35* 35% 35* 1 

83% 


130 13 12 

102 

70* 79* 

70* l 

50 

f- "l* i b + 


2 

5196 52* 52* + to 1 

113% 77ft Dtattal 


14 5689 112% 110% UM—' 1% 


45*4 Diaper 

130 18 24 2577 

66% 

LJ 

65ft +lto 






36% 

36 


6ft 

3ft Dtvrsla 


3 

17 

4% 

4* 

4% 

16ft 


.12 


in 

/% 

7% 

7%+ ft 

I ■ ’ 


272 93 


726 

29ft 

20 

20ft 

u 

U Donald 

X6 X5 

8 

13 

18% 

IBft 

18*-% 

40*4 


180 XI 

15 

>11 

49 

48% 

48ft+ to 

3B% 

23<4 Dorsey 

130 43 

13 

M9 

a 

27% 

2B +95 

40 


82 23 

n 

225 

37% 

37* 


34% 

25* Dowd* 

180 63 


2574 

29 

28* 


51ft 

35% DowJn 

76 18 

21 

484 

41ft 

40% 


14ft 


JO 43 


128 

11* 

11% 

lift 

23% 

15*4 Drear 

X0 43 15 105A 

18ft 

18% 


18* 

ir^i-,771 ■ 

280 107 


4) 

18* 

18% 

im + % r 

1 K _ 1 

F j .yl 

30a 13 

11 

151 

40% 

30% 

40 + to *- 

51ft 


X00 A3 

0 2279 

48% 

47% 

40 —ft 


30ft cuPnlrt 



5 

am 

32 to 

33% — Mi 



430 10LS 


3 

43 

42% 


30ft 

27*4 DubeP 

2X8 03 

8 

1341 

30% 

20% 



64 Dukeef 




74 


69% 

50% Dube of 

OX 1X1 


300* <9% 

68 

68—1 

67 


780 1X0 


5010* 66 

64ft 

55% + to 1 

35 

21ft Dufcert 

2X9 107 


18 

25% 

25% 

25%+to 1 

32ft 

28 Dube pf 

3X5 128 


7 

32 

32 

32 — to < 

1009k 

TO Dufcert 1180 11.1 


UttzlOO 

90% 


66% 

51% DunBfd 

180 2X 20 

825 

66ft 

65* 


Uft 

11% DraLt 

206 1X5 

7 

344 

Uto 



















17* 

TJft Duapr 

231 1X3 


200* 17ft 

17ft 

T7ft+ to ; 


43% Overt 






18% 

8% DvmPt 

38 38 

6 

73 

9ft 

0* 

0to— % 1 

Uft 

17% DynAn 

30 3 

12 

20 

22% 

22ft 

23 -to * 

d 






3 1 


17*6 GaPwrrt 256 123 
17 GaPwpf 252 123 


52 GaPwpf 7X0 I2X 


30% G«rbf»* 1.16 
12 GortM S .12 
I OH 7% GksttP 
11% 594 OtbrFn 

1494 GHfHIII 32 
429% GfHoffO 240 


43 11 
J 15 


5 

21 14 
*7 Tl 


35*6 26*6 EGG 
32% 2196 E Syst 
26% 209% EaataP 
23% 12 Eaico 
796 3% EastAir 


X8 IX 20 SO 369k 34*6 35*6 4- to 
x IX 14 2603 28% 27% 27%— to 
1X4 42 9 546 25% 2**% 25 + to 
X4 25 1U 17% 179k 17% 

2377 4 3% 39k— % 


92 

19 

45 

IU 


1% 

% 


1%— to 
%— % 


lto 
% 

Wto ... ... .. 

11% Mto W%— % 


416 1% EAL wto 
Ito %£XLW(A 
13% 6% EsAJrsf 
15% M EAtrpfB 
19% «6 EAirpfC 6B 

2M 19*6 EostGF 130 49 9 568 
18 12% EartUfl 1X4 113 6 206 

78 60V, EnKod 330a 45 14 2143 

57 TO Eaton 130 11 9 1451 56% 55% 56 

» 20% Eeftfln 36 24 13 573 29V, 2896 29 +« 

5% EcMrd 1X0 3X 13 2154 SB 299* J99k— % 

4296 32% EdbBr 140 47 8 25 34*4 14*4 Mto— to 

IV?» *3 EDO 34 IX 12 944 M% U% Uto + to 

29to M% EtfMTd XB XI 17 208 W 35% Sto— *4 

2to 19% EPGdPf 235 104 * 22*6 22*6 23*6 

29% g% EPGrt 375 122 3 28% 28)6 28% + % 

28 23% EPGPT 211 27*6 Z79k 77% + to 

14% 9 EFT OTO 13 202 12V. 12 Wto + % 

15% 8% Etcor 36 25 5 Mto 18% 10% 

8% 2% ElacAa 54 39% 3*6 3%+ to 

8)6 4% EMM 14 72 Sto 4to 5 

Mto 7% EMM rt 1X0 UX 8 9*6 9 9% 

24% 13 Eleraia Xi J 27 21 23% 23% 23% 

W llto Elsln 40 S3 13 24 Mto 14% 14%— 16 

Wto » El 5dm 39 353 9*6 B% 9*4 + « 

73to 58*6 EmrsEI 240 3LSMI840 7M% 73*6 739% + % 

10% S% Em Rifs JttUW iJO 19*4 7% TOM + to 

25 llto EmrvA 30 3X 18 287 17 1M6 Uto— to 

31% 24% EmflWt lXObU 9 106 29% 27% 29*6— to 

llto 1496 EnuOs 176 93 7 X TO TO TO 

16 % EnExe 235 % 

37> 22% EnrtCp 32 24 15 381 28 27% 27%— to 

32% 18*6 EfltaSU X6 IX 12 149 32*6 31% tt% 

23% 17% Ensercb 140 4 3 1? 2298 23*% 2Z?% 23*6 + to 

a 51% Emrtlrt 4258114 370001 53% 53% 5394 + to 

KJ7 919% Enaction IJ3»1U 50 WV. 97% 97%— to 
3*6 lto Ensroo 20 724 

Zlto 9*6 Ertara 136 

20 15% ErtxE n 1358 73 30 

21% U Entaxln UO 62 7 447 

35V, 23VS. Equfta. 131 49 14 4 

5% 3 BtolMtk 29 

18*6 llto earn* pf 231 157 4 

am am E«tR» ijz 43 6. <i 

Uto 9to Eduncn .n 1.1 7 12 


t : t 

wto wto Wto— to 
If 17% 17% „ 

20% 20*4 28%+ to 
34% 3496 3496 
4% 4*4 4*k— to 
14% 14% 1496 
3 5% 35*6 3596 + 46 
10% M16 M7%+ % 


2X114 292 30% 30*6 309.— to 
2X 3 3S2 19% 19% 19% 

24 11 2 M 9*6 996— to 

27 18 4716 19W 10% 10% + % 

rt 41% GnMIlb 234 45 12 688 50*% 49% 50 

ezto 61 GMal 433r 53 6 6838 B09* 799i BO%— % 

47% 33 GMEn 1419 49% 47% 48 — T% 

39 33% GMolpt 175 99 9 » 3716 a 

5216 44% GMotPl 5X0 KLO 6 50% 50*% SD%— to 

11% 39% GNC .16 U U 46 Sto 5*6 59%+ to 
71% 7% GPU 4 1564 T!% TIM 1116 

67*6 46*6 GorRo 1X4 24 22 531 47to 62 62% + to 

9 J GflRvfr 5 148 8% 8% 8% + to 

53*6 39% GnStonl 1X0 37 13 425 487% 489% 48% — to 

12*6 It GTFlrt 130 I1X 1004 11% 11% 1196— % 
8*6 Sto GertkCO 9 124 M 6 ito 

39 139% GnRnd .10 4 18 185 17% 17 17*%— % 

24% 15 GorertO 1X0 144 21 20% 21 +9% 

22 16% Gat Pt 148 84 4 S 20 20 

24 Gen PI a 1X2 3JU 812 33%33%33%+to 
26% 18 GaPoc JO 33 12 3060 25% 2SV. 2S9k— % 

GoPptB 234 A4 4 35 35 05 

GaPwpf 344 12X 76 26% 26% 26% 

32 2? 29 29 

1 20% 20% 2096 
8 20to 20% 2m 

319 14*6 23% Mto + % 
K»J 61 61 61 — % 

24ta A! 60 61 + % 

420 27V, 269% Z7V% + to 
834 18 16% 18 

338 10 9% » 

2S6 W% W% 10% — 16 
69 246. 23% 2416 4 % 
520 55 54% 54% — % 

54 13% 13 a — % 

470 5% Sto 59k 

110 21% 20% 21% + % 
>1 2B94 11% 11% 11« + % 
1823 3(6 3to 3*4+9% 

38 X 7 639 259% 24% 2Sto + *6 

1X6 5X 6 213 26*6 26 26*6— to 

1X0 6X 7 2021 27 36% 2S9v— to 

X2 32 9 *43 16V, 16*6 16% 

48 2X 13 1909 Zlto 2296 23% + to 

2X0 64 10 17*1 419k <096 41%+ M 

134 20 14 81 62% 61% 6I%— % 

40 Z9 8 BM 14 13% Uto— % 

9 491 16 1596 75% 

JOaUlO 65 39% 3B96 39% + to 
IXSellX 6 3 MH Uto Uto— to 

1-52 4X 7 2462 35% 34to 14%— 1 

— •’ 10 30 a SO 

JM 26% 26% — % 
531 Uto ISto ISto + % 
17 Uto 15% Uto 
SB 2SW 25*6 259* — to 
64 3% 2% 3%— to 

63 19*6 Mto }«%— to 
108 Sto 9% 9*1 + to 

269 30% 27% MVk + 9k 
as . sto 6 + to 

X J3to 2TA ZJto 

146 23% 23% 39k 

9 3560 Mto 299fc x + to 

. 3X 5 148 12% 12*6 Wto— % 

M GlfSIUt 144 123 6 SS4 13*% 13 13% 

30% GtfSU rt 4X0 133 300Z SOto 32% 32*6 +1 

24 GtfSU or 3X5 137 2A 28% 28% 2Bto— to 

27 GtfSU ar 4X8 133 22 31% ZZ% 33% + % 

Wto GABTU 35# 33 B 364 15% M 14 —lto 

U Gutter xe 4.1 12 36 149% *494 Mto— to 


9% 4% Glow* 34 AS 
1796 Gto&MPf 3X0 U3 
_ 8to GJdNuo 
5% 1% GMNwt 
11 dtfWF 


23 Goodyr 


GoukJ 


47 Gralnaf 
■to GfAFkf 
11% GIAtPc 
27% GHJUn 


GtNNk 


19% .9% GWH8P 


a 33 11 3230 


2to Grctter 
12% GrowG 
696 GnAEt 


172 113 
130 47 


■to 4)6 Grurtrt .16 


20 Gutttrt 
25% GttWst 


9 
12 

2.1 15 
3 1J 
34 7 
27 27 

Z n r 


30 30 


H 


1% 


1X0 

1X0 


to 


187 

33 

B0 


4*6 HRTn 
Mto HaOFB 
26*6 Hatata . . 

*4 MM 30 7.1 

Sto Hatwdrt XA 67 

3B*6 HamrP 2X6 43 • 

11% Koras 1X7rtlX 
15% HanJI 144a OX 
21% Horcffm 72 2X 16 338 
15% HandH XA 3J 17 IS 
Uto Hanna X0 23 13 37 

23* HarBrJ 1X0 22 13 138 
37% Harm] 32 IX 17 147 

7% Horn! ah B 2070 

14% HrpRw JO 1! II 4 
2296 HatTH M 33 U 927 
10% KorGr n 150 

M Horaco 13 U Tl 29 
OVl M OTT m an raa 43 9 64 

uto Hefts* ran nx h 3 

ISto Hew El > 144 73 9 1U 

1196 8 HpyaaA .Mb S I 137 
Mto ISto HazJvtn 36 IX 43 T71 

13 9 HazLrtl 32 37 » 26 

1594 99% Heda 78 24 39 79 

23% 13*6 HadoM 30a IX 31 1871 
29% Mto H attain Am 33 0 V» 
7194 l» Memo 36 17 12 57 

45 32 Heinz 148 17 12 826 

30 ISto HatnaC _ . 25 52 

2Sto *8 H a l m P 34 14 22 595 

5% .39% HanCa _ 14 

5296 llto Hem Inc JOe 77 20 

30 27% Harcub 140 47 9 438 

19 13to Harttc X5a J 33 81 

23)6 Wto HerttCrtlJO 64 137 

4116 2896 Harctry 1X0 37 ll 513 
3J96 516 I le m on 252 

25 9 Il —ft irt ■ 

45% 3Tto Hmm 


.15 IX 10 37 

XI 2X 11 51 

1J0 13 IS 333 
38e J O IBS 
.90 IS 14 1949 

ixo ix ia a 

23 157 
7 


17% Hexeel 
17% 12 HISbear 
12% B*k HtVett 
2696 17% HUnbrs 
589% 45% Hilton 
44% 31 Hitachi 
51% 3Stt HoUdov 
25 45*6 HrttvS 

27% 12 HomeO 

20% llto HmFBO. . _ 

9% ■ HoieG rt U0 MX 22 
3596 20% HlTlktfts 70 S 28 IBJ9 
25% Bto HtratPn X 10 < 18 
60*6 61% Hondo XOe _J 18 OU 
Mto 44% Hon— H 1X0 32 

279% Wto HoovrU 1X4 43 

25)% 18 MnmBn 1.12 44 8 12 

to X HrxBnrt 2JSBI25 Z 
w 39% H or to n _ ?i 

«to 35*6 HOtpCP JO 13 13 7151 

25 21% Hotel in 240 f 7 13 35 

36 3R6 HOuOflM XI 27 13 M 

Mto 13% HOUR* 40 2.1 12 84 

3596 a Housmt ITS 5.1 I 991 

Slto 36 Holrtrt 2X8 43 I 

72 61 HOlntrt ATS U . II 

m m% Hbdlnd 248 MS 6 2921 
63*6 399% HaoNG ZM 47 10 351 
X TOk HOoOR 77*42119 22 

22*6 12 HawfCp 40 27 20 1 

26 am Huttrt 238 99 II K 


5% 5% 5to— to 
3446 24*6 24%— to 
64 9 2117 Z7to 2696 27*6 

ito >to no 

8% 89b 89b — to 
<7*6 4696 47 —% 
13% 139k 139% + to 
19% 19% M%— % 
46% 45*6 46*6+1% 
17*6 16% 17*6 
18 1796 U — % 

46 45% 46 4 ‘ 

48 479% 40 +9% 

109k 10 189% 

2296 379k 329k— % 
29% 29*6 2996+ lb 
12%. 129% 13% 

a% Mto a%+ to 

30 2996 29%+ to 

15% 1596 15% + lb 
22 % 22to 22 %+ % 
11% llto 11% 

2596 2*96 259b— % 
*0% M 10*6 + V6 
1191 11% 11%— to 
14% 13* Wto + % 
17*6 16% 1696—% 
XH% 28% 3040+ *6 
<3% 43*6 43% — to 
15 14% IS +96 

19*6 19 . W — *6 
5)6 5% 5%— Hi 
11% 1196 1T«— *6 
34% 34% 34%— to 
19*6 18% 19*6 + to 
23% 23*6 239b + 9% 
38 37% 38 

9*6 Bto ■% + % 

B 12 11% 12 +1 

A 14M5» 3SH 35% 3590—196 
27 18 S 279k 264k 279k + 9b 
2J 24 SB T79i 17*6 1716— to 
" 11 18% II 

20% 20*6 28*6— % 
56% 56% 55% — to 
34% 3M6 84%— to 
46% 46% 459b— % 
71% 71 71*6— *6 

M 17% 17% — % 
20*6 19% 20% 

9 8% 9 +16 

23 21% 21% + % 

U% 13*6 13% + % 
52% 52% 53% — to 
9 2197 rt 579* 58% + to 
9 80 24*k 24*6 24to— to 

2Sto 25*6 25*6 
23% 23% 23% 

.5*6 S Sto + % 
41% 4196 41% + to 

am am 2SM+ to 

35% 3S*6 25% + to 
IVto 19% 19% 

34% 34% Mto— % 
Slto Slto Slto 
70% 78% 

22% B*6 2296 
43 % 42 % 42%— *6 
10% M% 10*6 
IS IS IS 

2<% am am— % 


76 4Q ITTrtK 4X0 AX 
70*6 44% ITT pfO 5X0 SX 
Sto 28 JTTpfN 275 53 
B0 42% ITT pfl 450 7.1 
2596 ISto IU lilt ' " 

40% 3896 IdohoP 
259k 13*6 Idea IB 
23% 17% IllPowr 

19% 14% lIPowpl 

1796 15 IIFowrt 231 115 
34% 27*6 llpoarpf 4.12 12.1 
30% 25 IIPowpl 378 123 
~ 48% 1 1 Pomp* 575 1TX 

llPawpt 4440113 
__ 45% llPowrt SX3 12.1 

X 28T6 UPowrt 4X7 110 
31% 25% llPowrPf 4X0 12S 
32 2Ito ITWS 44 23 17 
2796 ImpCnm 2X0 57 13 
59b Imaicp 
8% INCO 70 IX 
45 IrvfiMpf 7X8 137 
54% IndIMrt 8X8 134 
91% irnflMpmXO 123 
. 14 IndIMrt 2.15 12X 

1796 14% IndIMrt 275 12J 
2596 1&% IndIGdS 1X8 7X 6 
15 5*6 Inezes 34 24 15 

Mto 13U Intmtc 15 

5596 23% IraerR 240 44 
35 2796 IraRrt 235 73 

15% 1856 InorTec 54 3J 20 
32 10% IrfdStt JO 2.1 

48*6 38% InkJSlrt 475 1CJ 
20% 14 InsJIco 1X0 S3 10 
12Vi 2% InsoRa 
27% ri% intoRx _ 6 

3296 19 irtoRrt 3JO 123 
54% «2 inteRPt AX3el4X 
41to 2Sto IrtoRrt 475 14X 
1816 7% IrtRFn 
18% 15% ItcpGe 
659* 55 interco 
18% 0*6 lrtrfst 
51% 41 Intrlk 
*99« B% Irttmed 
21% 14% irtAto 
128% 99 IBM 
Wto 22% intFlov 
13% 5% IntHarv 
996 2% IrtHrwt 
44% 23% IntHpfC 
50% 20% IntHpfA 
21*6 1716 IrtHpfD 
49 32% IrtMln 


122 

s 

S13 


28*6 Mto 28% 

M (4 84 — *6 

70% HJto 1096—% 

26*6 a a + to 

*696 16% 16*6— to 
Mto 18% 10% + to 
32*6 31% 31%— % 


58V6 58*6 58*6 
A0V6 58*6 58*6— T9* 


62% 63 


342 


17to IM 17%+ % 


40 79% 40 

14% im 1416 + % 
22% 21 to 22 -to 

Uta 1796 1796 17% + % 

f 

100z 34*6 34*6 
U 31 31 

289 Sto 31% 

3224 35*4 34% 

275 896 8% 

1848 1216 12% 

5002 51% 51% 

^8% 8% 


,7 *j£ 


17% 

a 

Sto 


s% 



868 

Z7 

78 

817 

234 

19 

14 


32% 23 IntMutt 176 

S9 46 inlPoer 2X0 

17% 9 hitRc 3 
42to 3294 Inmrtlt 2X8 6X 

87% 82*6 IntNtpf 848 9.9 

01% W% InmtpfHASB 11X 
36 24% IrtpGps 1X0 2S 12 

T7to 10 InTBukr 

19*6 15% intslPw ISO 97 7 

1896 Uto lowaEI 1.98 iox a 

M 21% towllG 2X0 93 7 

10*6 17 lowlllrt 231 11X 

30% 25 HMQR6 3X6 103 7 

3396 24 I oaten 2*2 U I 

13% 7% IpcoCO 34 37 W 

3496 23% IrvBki Ml U 7 


157 
Z3 

731 .. . 

3M 18% 17% Wto +1 
<94 46% 46 
19 3296 3296 3296— to 

15 Uto 14 14*6 + to 

■ am 2396 23»+ to 

46*6 45*6 46% +1*6 
1996 19*6 10%—% 
4% 4*4 «%+% 
16% 1594 16)6 + to 
2*% 34 24% + to 

45to 4516 45*6 
30*6 30 30*6+ V. 

9% 896 9%+ % 
18V6 1896 18%+ to 
63 6246 62% + 96 

10% 10% 1096 
47% 4696 4*96— 96 
12*6 Uto 11% 

19 TSto 19 + % 

4X8 24 1710491 134*6 mtt Km— to 
1.12 4X 15 m 2716 27% 2716 

18943 llto Wto Wto + to 
1162 696 6% 6% +% 

16 43 47% <2% 

78 39 3796 38% +1 

220 37% 31 32% +1% 

2X8 47 11 93039% 31% 39 +% 


ZlOallX 
106 47 12 
30 U 6 
2X0 56 7 


34 

31 

198 

392 

M 


72 33 9 


63 9 300 2896 28*6 2896— % 
AS 28 1803 5394 53% 5396— % 
14 377 1216 12 12*4 + to 

8 2f9 47 40to 41 + to 

1001 86 W 86 +1% 

221 Wto 93% 95% 

119 34% 34V6 34% + to 

22 16% 16% 1696+ to 

57 19% 10*6 19% 

84 19 18% 19 + to 

HH 28 27% 27% 

21 Oz 19to Wto 17% 

43 38*6 2996 JO +16 

190 33 3296 33 

126 1110% TOto— % 
69 33% 33*4 3396 


353 

360 


451 


36*6 25% 2S%— % 
319k 1096 31 —% 
20to 1996 20 + *6 

12 % 12 % 12 % 

30% 38*6 38% — 9k 
54 +1% 

53*4— to 


Z7% 20 JWT 3 
34to J River 
199“ 12% Jomswy 
15 10% JapnF 

41to 2394 JotfPla 
56 46% jerCrt 

55 47 JerCrt _ .. 

54% 45% JerCrt 7X8 132 lOta 52 52 52 

08to 88 JerCrt I3JC 147 20z 95 95 95 +lto 

Uto 1296 JtaCpf 2.18 135 2 Uto 16*6 16*6 + % 

796 59k Jertcr 19 44 7% 7% 7%— to 

41% 28 JetaUfl 138 37 15 1894 37to 36% 27V.— % 

4W6 37% JahnCn IXiO 47 to 23 44% MVi 44% + to 

3096 21% Jereon 1X0 4X 15 103 2546 25*6 2S%— 16 

23 15% Jatfena X0 3X 14 210 2396 22% 23V. + *6 

32% 21% Joy Mto 1X0 57 14 180 24% 2416 249k— to 


1.12 4X II 
56 13 9 
.10 X 9 

1.15b 93 

172 3J 10 ... 

8.12 15X 200a 54 54 

8X0 15X 180Tb 53*6 53 

738 1 32 


10% 696 KDI 
149k 99k KLM8 
29% 33 KMIpf 
57% 2696 Kmart 
36to 34% KN Era 
22 1296 KalsrAI 

2 Sto 14% KateCe 
21% ISto KoiCpf 
Uto 8% Kaneh 
2996 Uto KCtrPL 236 UX 
24% 29 KCPLpf 435 12X 

n 1416 KCPLrt 27s no 

*9*6 15% KCPLrt 233 127 
57 36% KC5ou 1X0 IS 13 

1846 12*6 KanGE 236 IU 4 
35*6 27% KanPU 276 7S 7 
22*6 U KOPUPf 232 113 
28% 17*6 KaPLpf 23) UX 
Mto T796 Katvln 
17*6 M96 KaufBr 
1696 12% Kart pt 
tato A* Kart pf 
42% 27 Keiloee 

21)6 21 % Kjaftwa 

49k 1 Keno) 

3Sto 19% Kenntf 
25 . 20% KVUHi 
18*6 11 KerrGI 


.8*6 8 8*6 + lb 

1296 13% rato— *6 
34*6 26 36 — 16 

37 30% 37 + % 

33*6 31% 22*6 + 96 
lAto 15% 16 + % 

1796 17*6 17%— to 
im Uto 16% + to 
9% 9*6 996 


38 2X 9 240 

14 Wtt 

4X0 12X 11 

174 3X 9 <437 

15 76 

X0 38 11B3 

30 1.1 40 

ur u r 

' A1 421 

2 18 17% 17% 

25 19% 19 19 

309 51% 5* to 51*6 

SM 18% 1796 1796— to 

1A2 25% 24% 35 + % 

34 209k 20% 20%— to 

11 28 19% M%— % 

Iff! 249k 2596 26 — to 

U JB6 15% 4- *6 
25 »MlM+« 
« TO TO 769k + % 
41% «% 41 — % 
20H 29 29*6+ U 


72 Marti. 
HtakLow Stack 


. ON. YU. PE 


SB. 

HBtHtahUrt 


(ML Cllta 


s? 


LOFrt 475 A 5 
_ UbtvCp 72 27 IS 

67% 3) Littv 330 48 IB 

30% Uto Limned 34 J 21 


11 

29 

871 

869 


73 
27 
67 
38% 20 


7796 73 


+ *6 
— to 

<m 

20ft— % 


ta 

26* UntSIH 

1X4 

47 

0 

1154 

89ft 

39 

39 to— ft 

HFl 

1B% LtacPI 

274al07 


3 

21 

21 

21 

no 

56* Litton 
3M LrtMd 

280 


0 

1306 

69* 

68* 

10*—* 

4S* 

X5l 

9 

2286 

45* 

44)5 44*— to 

47% 

am LDcHte 

70% Loews s 

80 

23 M 

17 

37 

am am- % 

114* 

LOO 

V 

9 

1120 

IM% 113*1 Mto +1% 

37* 

19 LamFbi 
2m LomMt 

1.J4 

37 

U 

58 

31ft 

3T96 

31 to— * 

35 

3X6B183 

18 

61 

23ft 

31% 

3Sft— to 

29* 

17ft LnSfur 

180 

77 

9 

MS 

24ft 

24ft 

24*+ * 

53 

44 LoneSPl 537 IBS 


5 

49% 

49* 

49% + % 

n 

3* LtLCo 



3 

1566 

■ 

7% 

7ft 

23 

8% ULpfX 




128 

20% 

2D 

20* + * 


23% 9 ULPfW 
23*6 9)6 LlLpfV 
2796 11*6 LILpfll 
22% 8ft LtLpTT 
Uft 6 ULpfP 
1796 7 LILptO 
48% 24 LoraDr 
299k 18*6 Loral 
15 10ft LoGenl 
34ft 23% LoLimd 
28ft 17 LoPoe 

31 to 28ft LoPLpf 4X0 U7 
W 16% LnPLpf XU 143 
28*6 22% LouvGs 2X4 0X I 
40% 36 LOMta 2X0 43 4 
36% Uto Lowes 32 17 U 
24V. Mto Lutarzl I.U AS 14 

32 22% Lufins X4 IS 10 
Mto 1596 Luckvs 1.14 AS 0 
16% Mto LUkana X0 38146 


Slto 10 


130 27 13 
XB 13 16 
X4 AS 0 
1X0 37 10 
XOb 3X 20 


21 

37 

100 

H54 

15 

201 

401 

24 

24 

176 

6 

274 

516 

21 

701 

35 


20*6+96 
_ 20% + to 

33ft 2196 33%+% 
10% 18% Wto + to 
15*4 159b 15)6 
17% 16ft M%— to 
48 47*6 47% + to 

26 % am 26 % + % 
11% 11 11 
30% 20% 30to— *6 
24% 2396 2396— % 


22*6 22 22ft 
27*6 27 27 —to 

4696 4696 4696 + 96 
27 im 26ft + *6 
2396 21*6 23% + 96 
29 28% 20 +M 

Uto 17% 17% 

13% 13*6 13*6—% 


2196 Uto MACOM 32 1J 22 1577 

4fib 34ft MCA J8 XI 20 826 

27*4 U% MCorP 1X0 67 6 126 

1296 79k MDC 32 XB 9 50 

40 31% MEI XI 13 IS 172 

13)6 9*6 MGMGr X4 33 31 174 

12 9 MGMGr pfX4 33 24 

Uto M MGMUO 30b 17 34 601 
5*6 2% MGMuwt 169 

25% 17*4 MGMHO XOQ XS 14 
47 25 Mocmll 


XI 6 


100 


W96 11% ModRei 
43% 24 MoofCr 
29*4 20ft MptAaf 
2596 Uto Marti In JOb 28 6 15 

TO 13% Marti Nt 32 28 15 42 

20 10*4 Mart) .*5 X 20 309 

*1*4 22% MfrHan 370 BX 5 2160 
50 4] MhHrt 65701X2 935 

57 40 MfrHpf 5X9B125 396 

13)6 5to vlMOttvi S 315 

71*6 Uto vIMnvIrt 35 

3094 21 MAPCO 1X0 3X 11 
4% 3 Monrtz 
2ft ft Morcdl 
23ft 19% Mar MM 1X0 55 6 
4m 27*6 Marlon 32 Ll 34 _ _ 
I» 9% MarkC 32 23 30 S3 

WH M Marti Pf 130 7J 2 

»to 5Bta MaTlot 34 J 14 111 

59% 359k MntiM 2X0 48 44 380 
46% 30V. MartM 134 38 
74 55 MrtMpf 4X7 ' 

J596 m MarvK .12 

33*4 fito Masco 30 

*3 7*6 MassMr .14 

T996 IS) 6 MOIM 1X0 

Sto Zto MasayF 

26ft 20% MoaCp 2X8 1)8 

lift 0ft Mtslnc 132 113 

Nto 5196 MOtME X5r 7 M 

13% Cto MatM 

101b 4% Matrtwl 

14U Mattipf 

*SV4 9*6 Moram 7 

£% 30*6 MarOB 172 19 9 1645 

STO 36*6 Mavtb X60a 5J 11 ISA 

UV4 »b McDrrt 230 BX 32 

31% 23% McDerl 1X0 73 25 1565 

12 6V> MCDTlwt 25 

H>ft 6*4 McOM 38 20 18 31 

s«b *96 uanll X2 IX T3 1544 

7396 47% McOnD 1X2 23 9 1334 

40*4 319b McGEtf 280 S3 13 138 

<896 34 McGrH 134 

3196 19)6 Mclnt 9 


10*6 W% 19%—% 
41to 41 41% 

Zlto 20% 2891— to 
11% IHb 11% 

38% 379“ 37%-% 
12% 12% rato + % 
11% 11% 11% + % 
12 11% 1196—16 

3% 2% 3 + ft 
21 % 21 % 21 %+% 
180 23 15 874 46% 45 45% + to 

144 23 11 1038 45% 44% 45 — to 


.IP 


me nixm 


Hn 




AS 7 
13 n 1590 
IS U 701 
10 15 
♦x 13 


13% 12*6 12*6 
37ft 37% 37%+ % 

am am am 

15% U9S 15 

u is% u +% 

109k 10% 10)6 + % 
38% 38 38%— to 

50 40% 49ft — to 

47 46% 47 + % 

m 6% m— to 

10 % 10 % 19% + to 

... 27% 27% 27ft + % 

\ + % 
539 29% 28% 28% + to 
389 47 4m 46%+ to 
1116 11 llto— *6 
Uto 16% Uto— to 
77% 76% 7696— 1 
59% 99 50%+% 

45% 44% 4496— to 
72 71% 7I%— % 

10% 10 10%+ to 

20% 20 20%+ % 

13 12% 13 + *6 

19% 18ft 19*6— to 
2ft 206 2ft + ft 
26% 26 26ft— ft 

11% 11% 11*6 
63% 62*4, 62% 

n% im u %— m 

Bto 8% lto- to 
28% 28 28*6+16 
13% 11*6 13% + to 
44% 43% 44 +% 



378 

173 

608 

89 

60 

870 

728 

51 

199 

43 


i. 


48% 48%—% 
6*6 369b + *6 


41ft 339b Me Kata 2X0 A* 10 270 


269* 2#V 

am Mto 24% — to 
m 6% m 

0% 8% 8ft— ft 
5S% 5flk 5496—1 
73*4 7116 72% — ft 

... 39 38ft 38)6— ft 

28 U 1835 44*6 43ft 44*6 + % 
20to 29 29% + 96 


I; f. 


u% io McLean 
ito 3ft McLeawt 
21% 19ft McNefl SO 
<1*6 27% Mood 130 
22 17% Masnn 34 

43to 24% Malta » 76 


11 


33% Mellon 2X0 5X 
22% MkUqn efXaa 108 


1X4 

170 


XB 25 
130 9X 
■73 11X 
176 47 13 1037 
181 34 4 25 


JO USD 
236 9X 8 
X4 SX 


. . 18% KerGPf 178 85 
569b am KerrMc 1.W 3S 13 1402 
24*6 16% KerM LIO A5 ■ 04 

69k a% KevCnn 1 

2m 1* Kevslnt XBbXS 18 35 

35V. am KMde 130 3S 38 301 
a 42% Kidds rt 1X4 3X 1 

5016 39% KtatOCS 2X0 4X 9 1341 
31 Zlto KnHtIRd 76 2X 15 
1696 1796 Kooer U0 88 77 


Mto KellM 
}7ft Kaeera 
16 Ukb Korean 
8*% 39% temper 


33 


2 i* + * 

33 23% 27ft am + to 
WB 24ft 24% 26ft 
19 Uto Uto 12% 

20 20 X 

TO » 38%+ to 

» 396 2 f)» + * 
U% 14% 1696 
31 30ft 31 + % 

« 48 <8 

49 47 to 47% —1% 
343 31ft 31ft 311b— % 
- 26ft 2«k 2*ft 


1996 10% KuMml 
67Vi 440k 


2X0 


Kyocera 

Kyaar 


5.1 n 

XO 37 11 
.14 3 20 
X0 2J 6 


19% TSft 19% + 9b 
19ft 18)6 IPft + ft 
14 14 14 

TO to to 


ZTft 229k LN Ho 
15ft 79k LFE 


2J4k10X 9 13 


17ft UK, LLE Ry 222k US 

11% 8 LLCrt 

TSft 8% LTV 

31% Uto LTVnf U6 133 

69 50% LTV pf 575 OX 

1796 D LTV Pi I3S 7X 

10% 10% LQvM *4 

2796 Uft LOCG49 178 AX 8 

0)6 8% Lotcrae 70 U 
31ft 23% LOtrurt 2X4 9X 
U% OH Lomawr 34 IX 14 
3% 1% Lams*) 

14% Wft Luwtlns X6 AX U 
26% 13% LMrFt X 9 U 
Wft am LaorPpf 2X7 hit 
49% 37% UorSB IN G I 
120 95 LaorSBl US U 

TB9k 14 LeaRfl) a 36 U 12 
79% 34% LswyTr IJO 47 11 
13ft 0 LasMaa 30 IX 18 
21% U% LraPtat X4 U 9 
4% 2% LeflVU 
19% 13% LelWin LtatWT 

I .0% Lennar 30 M it 

> u LeucMt A 

» Levcdpf ZJS0 XX 

n% -a Lovtai ixs A 2 aa 
am ‘m> Lmtti ji is t 
— 38)6 LOP IB 21 I 


27V. Z7 27% 

» Uto 12 n — % 
<83 16 15% U + % 

1 996 9ft 9% 

1537 11% 11% lift— to 
126 22ft 21ft 22*6 + ft 

36 61% Cl 41 — % 
3ta 1696 15% 16%— to 

13* U% 11% 11% + % 

92 3796 27V. 279fc 

774 0% 9 9% 

IP 36 X 26 — % 
10 Mto 14ft 1496— to 

MM3 M+to 

93 T2V. 1196 TZft + ft 
837 2>*6 2396 23% + to 
591 27*6 26% 26ft + to 

66 06 45 AS — % 

2 111 111 111 +|96 

45 U% UK ifft + ft 

32 21% 3116 + % 

im im im- % 

3% 3ft 3ft 
im 15% isn 

is is* * 

33% 31% 33% + % 
04*6 34to 3<ft + 96 
2% m 3994 + to 
57% 37% 37% 

47 <6*6 46ft- % 


94 

30 

127 


150 

18 

530 

25 


am 

«% 3096 MbtVfff 
S» 4Jft MeraSI 
07% 7VA Merck 
56*6 X Merdta 

33 22 MarLyn 

3to 2 MesoOf 

22 12ft MesaPt 
0 3* MtaolJ 

6% 2*6 Mam k 
n Mto MtE pfO 7X8 IA8 
3% 2ft MoxFd .U» 47 
35% 32*6 MhCnnf 110 127 

lWt 12 MctiER 138 8X 


249 

w 

674 

395 

«0 

74 

6 

977 

92 


38% 3794 38ft— to 
I7to 12 1296+ to 

5 4% 5 + to 

24% 73% 2396— ft 
389k 37ft 37ft— to 
1096 10 |0%+ 96 

20 5% 2796— to 

46% <5% <<% + % 
2* 35ft 25ft— % 
39% 30% 30% 

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(Cootinaed on Page 10) 


















y 




Jan. 18, 1985 


DmKjmONALgi # | 

lieralg^^ertbune 

WEEKEND 


Page 7 


Laurie Lee and a Child’s View of a Vanished World 


I ONDON — The Queen’s Hm pub is 
one of Laurie Lee's two locals and 
is so named because Queen Eliza- 
beth J took shelter there undo 1 a 
uee in a storm. Henceforth, she decreed, this 
should be called the Queen’s Elm. 

“1 don’t believe a word of it," says Laurie 
Lee. He is no fool, and mistrusts tales rhnr 
include the word henceforth. 

Laurie Lee's other pub is in a small Cots- 
wold valley in the village of Slad, where he 


Mary Blume 


was raised and still spends weekends. Slad is 
the center of “Cider With Rosie,” his mem- 
oir of cirikibood which has sold three milli on 
copies since it was published in 1959, has 
never been out of print and has gone into 20 
Penguin paperback editions. Slad is still the 
center of his heart: 

“Z love coming away on Sunday nights, 
but the coming away is only a prelude to 
returning.” 

His weekday London life is reclusive and 
based on unchanging routine. “In London 1 
can write undisturbed One is much more 
exposed in the country. I'm gregarious with a 
pronounced defensive attachment I thought 
I could write away in the most romantic way, 
in a tweed suit looking out at the buttercups 
and pastures. But people would come in. The 
country people do come without warning; 
they come to tea and stay until midnight. I 
like to be able to say without hurting anyone. 
"WeH, I’ve got to be going now.’ You can’t do 
that when people are in your cave." 

His Chelsea flat is his prison cell; many 
writers, he observes, write best from prison. 
He finds London gross, top-heavy, out of 
focus and out of scale. London leaves him 
with a Inner taste. “I have just been biting 
the hand that feeds me, ” he once wrote of 
London, “and it tastes of sool" 

L ATER, over dinner at the Chelsea Arts 
Club, a noisy, companionable place 
J with members who look like minor 
figures in literary memoirs and a fine snook- 
er table where Laurie Lee used to play with 
Sir Alexander Fleming, he says rather sud- 
denly; 

“There is a trend, if 1 may suggest it, that 
at my carter is the village which I’ve never 
really left. The point 1 wish to make is I’ve 
been everywhere, all around the world I've 
lived in London for 25 years. But I never 
dream of London. I slip back into those vivid 
dreams of cottages, slightly rearranged my 
mother always there. I've been on these long 
elastic pulleys, but it is always to that village 
I go back. Most people change wives, houses, 
countries. I have a kind of fixture from 


which I can't escape and from which I sup- 
pose I don’t want to escape. I come away m 
order to return.” 

On its 25lh anniversary, “Oder With Ro- 
sie" is an established minor classic, min or 
not in quality but because Lee chose deliber- 
ately to keep it on a small scale: a child’s 
view of a vanished world that was green and 
loving and harsh. No other book of his has 
been as successful because, he says, you have 
only one childhood. 

‘i was lucky to have such a concentrated 
childhood, not to be dragged from one place 
to another. It's not like being trapped but we 
lived in a capsule from which there was no 
escape. Not that we wished for one. And not 
only were there no distractions, there was 
continuity. .As a child I could see on that one 



small green stage the beginnings and ends of 
things." 

like many boys his age. he was named 
Laurence, after the church in nearby Stroud 
and like them, was always called Laurie, 
though his sisters called him LolL He still 
gets tbe occasional letter to Miss Laurie Lee. 
to which he politely replies Dear Mr. Bill or 
Dear Mr. Fred. 

Born in 1914, be likes at moments to plav 
the old codger. “Most of mv life has been 
spent living and celebrating bang alive. Now 
it is spent tidying up and enduring and 
trying not to be knocked down by cars,” he 
says. 

In his own words, be is often shy and 


extremely devious. He has spurts of self- 
advertisement, rearranging displays in book- 
stores to show his own works to advantage 
and he says, when tipsy, signing not onlyrns 
own books but those by D„H_ Lawrence, 
Dostoyevsky or whatever is at hand 

T HE devious side is the natural heri- 
tage of one who has grown up in a tiny 
village, where, he has said life was as 
open as a cucumber frame, and who must 
resort to stealth to keep his privacy. 

“He's a tricky customer," says one of his 
publishers. He only allows one photograph 
to be released a gray anonymous image. In 
fact he more resembles a sepia print from 
childhood with its wide, observing eyes and 
the secret contented smile of a man who all 
his life has been cossetied and adored by 
women. 

“I was cushioned by lovely women. They 
were my guardians, they gave me confi- 
dence." he says. He grew up with three 
beautiful, billowy older sisters who tickled 
and teased and admired him, an affectionate 
and often distracted mother, and two broth- 
ers. His father left his wife and children (tbe 
daughters were from his first marriage) when 
Laurie was three. 

“I remember saying I'm glad there’s not a 
man in the house, " he says. “1 wouldn't have 
been as free or as loved" 

“Cider With Rosie" has been translated 
into many languages and was a Book of the 
Month selection in the United Slates where 
it was unfortunately called “Edge of Day: 
Boyhood in the West of England." The 
Americans, Lee was told do not drink cider. 
(Nor does he. preferring whisky and beer.) It 
is taught in American and British schools, a 
sure way, Lee says, to make young people 
detest it. Recently, to celebrate its 25th year. 
Century in London and Crown in New York 
published a fancy illustrated edition, which 
might tempt the unknowing into thinking it 
just another exercise in nostalgia. 

Not only does “Oder With Rosie" pre- 
cede the present nostalgia boom, but it is 
funny, never sentimental sunlit and some- 
times cruel a book with no model or succes- 
sor. Before he wrote it, Lee was a poet who 
□ever quite measured up to his early success 
— Cynl Connolly published him in “Hori- 
zon" and his first collection of poems was 
published by Leonard Woolf at the Hogarth 
Press in 1944. The precision and compres- 
sion of poetry are found more often in “Ro- 
sie" than in his verse. 

“It’s the reduction." he says. “The writing 
that I really tried to do is poetry, which is 
reduction, simplification, rather than a rhe- 
torical expression of experience. ‘Cider With 
Rosie’ is not so far off from the poems — an 


essay in condensing, so everything can say 
what it can and some words can say more 
than rhev can." 

The book begins with Laurie, aged three, 
being set down m the summer grass, which is 
taller than he. 

"I began my tale where this light sparkled 
brightest, close up. at the age of three, when I 
was no utiler than the grass and was an 
intimate of insects and knew the details of 
stones and chair legs, " he wrote later. 

“It was not meant to be nostalgic," he 
says. “I was committed to my family, my 
neighbors and our childhood — a magic and 
tormenting time. I wanted to celebrate and 
also record the time I saw, to praise the life 
I'd had to preserve it and to live again both 
the good and the bad. 

“There were dark sides to it Children 
dying in a couple of days of simple diseases. 
There was also the drudgery that wore the 
women out young." 

Lee's mother, born Nance Light, was a 
handsome country girl, “disordered, hysteri- 
cal, loving.” he wrote. “She was muddled 
and mischievous as a chimney jackdaw, she 
made her nest of rags and jewels, was happy 
in ihe sunlight, squawked loudly at danger, 
pried and was insatiably curious, forgot 
when to eat or ate all day, and sang when the 
sunsets were red" Lee watched the tasks of 
daily life wear her down. 

“It was a deep stab for me to notice such a 
thing happening so quickly,” he says. After 
his mother had waited 35 years for her hus- 
band to return, news came of his death and 
she, too, gave up. “She never mentioned him 
a g ain, but spoke to shades, saw virions, and 
then she died," Lee wrote. 

“I found a wonderful thing last weekend," 
be added at dinner. “A hand-embroidered 
card which my father made once when he 
was in hospital And on the back was writ- 
ten, 'To Nance from Reg. With his love.’ But 
it’s in her handwriting. Tve kepi that." 

E VENTUALLY, the time came for 
Laurie to set off from his village. And 
in 1934. at 19 and still soft at the 
edges, he left, carrying his fiddle. As “Cider 
With Rosie" begins with Laurie in the grass, 
his second memoir, “As 1 Walked Out One 
Midsummer Morning," opens with “the 
stooping figure of my mother waist deep in 
the grass and caught there like a piece of 
sheep’s wooL" 

He walks to London in a month and then, 
because his only foreign phrase is, “Will you 
give me a glass of water?" in Spanish, he 
walks across Spain, playing his violin. “Tbe 
better class of Spaniard would send a servant 
and ask me to play Schubert’s ‘Serenade.’ 
Then they’d shower me with biscuits.” he 
recalls. 


“Another night." he writes, “a young 
smuggler invited me to serenade his invalid 
mistress, after which I was awarded with a 
wrisiwaich which ticked madly for an hour 
and then exploded in a shower of wheels." 

It is a young man's book, wide-eyed and 
innocent, recording the end of a world in 
which wide-eyed innocence was possible. At 
its end Laurie, having been repatriated by 
the British government, sets off on Toot 
across the Pyrenees to the cold winter of tbe 
Spanish Civil War. 

Lee’s publishers have waited for years for 
his third volume of memoirs, which he some- 
times states is in the battered plastic brief- 
case he always carries. “Anyway.” he says 
rather airily in a phrase that mil give his 
publishers no comfort, “all the books I’ve 
written were autobiographical." 

During World War II. he worked at the 



The official portrait. 


Ministry of Information, shared a flat with 
Cecil Day Lewis and says he was served 
lunch every day by John Betjeman's adored 
heroine, “Joan Hunter Dunn" (“very stem, 
good-looking, a Home Counties girl”). At 
night while firewatching he played chamber 
music with a blind cellist and a deaf viola 
player. “This doesn't happen now. Everyone 
has hi-fi. They listen, they don't play." 

If he were capable of playing anything at 
all on his violin, he would choose Paganini's 
“Devil’s Trill" because “it's real flash and 1 
like to show off." and Bach's unaccompa- 
nied sonatas. He listens mostly to chamber 
music these days. 


“ I don’t want lots of hullaballoo. Opera 
— those voices give me a sense of anxiety, 
they suggest domestic discord. I don t like 
raised voices and I don’t like great gusts of 
roast-beef music — Elgar — blaring me out 
of the room." 

Lee’s last salaried job was in 1951, when 
be wrote captions for the Festival erf Britain. 
He helped devise an eccentrics' comer that 
include a statue of Lewis Carroll’s White 
Knight with a velvet-gloved hand that kept 
patting him on the back while a voice pro- 
claims. “You’re wonderful, you’re simply 
wonderful." 

“The king couldn't quite make it ouL He 
expected statues to be a bit more formal 1 
think," Lee says. Still, his festival work won 
him an MBE (Member of the Order of tbe 
British Empire) in 1952. 

“Cider With Rosie." which has supported 
Lee since it came out, was written three times 
over two years on the back of discarded BBC 
scripts. Lee and his wife, Cathy, lived in deep 
poverty tbe whole time and Lee was strange- 
ly happy. 

“I'd find myself with a special expression 
on my face, pleasure or grief, sometimes 
chuckling out loud because the memory was 
so intense.” The book was an immediate 
best-seller. 


H E met his wife when she was five and 
he was 22. She lives in Slad and their 
daughter. Jessy, who was born after 
they had been married 12 years, works for 
the BBC. Lee sees them when he goes home 
weekends. In 1983. without warning them, 
he published “Two Women," a collection of 
his photographs of Cathy and Jessy, and a 
declaration of his love for them. 

He thinks it may have been a mistake. 
“I've r ealized you should never show family 
snapshots." He adds, “In this book, although 
I’ve tried to keep it light, 1 think I’ve declared 
myself. I think that's a mistake." He quotes 
Blake’s lines about losing one's love by tell- 
ing iL 

“All love lives by slowly moving towards 
its end." he writes, “and is sharpened by the 
snake-bite of farewell in iL” At 70, he sees 
his much younger wife and daughter moving 
away. 

“1 see them receding, naturally, they're 
pushing from me." he says. He does not say 
it plaintively: It is part of the nature of 
things. And' anyway, it is often the most 
loving people who are finally the most alone. 

“1 left home when I walked out to see the 
world.” Laurie Lee says. “When I go back 
for my very important nourishments, I am 
still a solitary on my journey.” ■ 



A Wine Maker Grows in Brooklyn, 
Or Improving the Kosher Product 


by Frank J. Prial 

N EW YORK — Don’t look back, 
Robert Mondavi, Joe Zakon may 
be gaining on you. Joe Zakon? 
Yes, Joe Zakon, Crown Heights’s 
pre-eminent commercial wine maker. He is 
also Crown Heights’s only commercial wine 
maker, but pre-eminent sounds better. 

Crown Heights is a working-class Brook- 
lyn neighborhood not known for its vine- 
yards. But it is populated heavily by Ortho- 
dox Jews who. while they are not known as 
connoisseurs of the grape, are drinkers of 
wine. 

Wine and Jewish tradition are inextrica- 
ble. Jews have always consumed wine as part 
of their religious cites, both at borne and in 
the temple. Since Orthodox Jews observe 
their religious rituals more often than others, 
it stands to reason that they consume more 
of what has come to be known as sacramen- 
tal or kosher wine. 

Zakon hopes one day to supply a lot of iu 
“Do you realize,” he says with a note of awe 
in his voice, “that my synagogue alone goes 
through five cases of wine on a Saturday for 
kiddush, just with people coming in and out? 
And that the same thing is going on all over 
Brooklyn?" Kiddush is a prayer said over 
wine on ceremonial occasions. 

Zakon worships at the United Luba- 
vitcher Yeshivoth on Eastern Parkway, a few 
blocks from his home on Montgomery 
Street Growing up in an Orthodox Jewish 
famil y, he was exposed to wine at an early 
age. “We had wine at our own family kid- 
dush every Saturday,” he said. “You can’t 
believe how awful that stuff is. Every week I 
got sick. 

“1 decided when I was just a lad — hets 

27 now — “that there had to be something 


better than that sweet concord wine. I 
could’t find iL So I went to the public library 
in Manhattan and read everything they had 
oh wine. I was going to make my own. I did, 
and it was a total disaster." But not for long. 

Thai was in 1977. At 19, he was discour- 
aged but not defeated. In 1978 he bought 
California grapes — zmfandeL ruby cater- 


The dry concord is Za- 
kon’s vision of the fu- 
ture, or at least the fu- 
ture for fans of kosher 
concord wine. 


net and barbera — enough for 150 gallons ot 
wine. “It was better," he said. “I was begin- 
ning to get the hang of iL" 

In those days. Zakon made his wine in the 
basement of the house on Montgomery 
Street where he still lives with his parents. He 
keeps a small makeshift laboratory at borne, 
as well as a tiny, cluttered office. His winery 
is considerably expanded and known as 
Crown Regal Cellars. 

T HE turning point came in 1979. He 
drove up to the Finger Lakes and 
came back with seyval blanc and con- 
cord grapes. “The concord is my bread and 
butter, my cash flow',*' he said, “but my 
concord is good stuff, not junk." Tbe seyval 
blanc is a while hybrid. "One expert told me 
he thought I’d given him a California char- 
donnay,” Zakon said proudly. 

That year, be said. “I treat to work for tbe 


navy in Brooklyn as a statistical clerk, but 
when they moved to Staten Island two years 
later I saw it as a message — I decided to 
make wine full time.” 

After a mildly disastrous vintage in 1980 
— he said his supplier sent him a load of not- 
so-fresh Marecna) Foch, a red hybrid grape 
— Zakon hit his stride in 1981. He made 700 
cases: De Chauoac, another red hybrid 
grape From the Finger Lakes; concord, and 
something he called Mellow Red, a blend of 
cabernet sauvignon from Long Island and a 
dash of concord. 

“The concord was gone in no time — 400 
cases of iL” he said. In 1982, he made some 
700 cases of concord and in 1983, almost 
1.000. “It’s incredible," he said, “there is 
actually a black market here in Crown 
Heights for my concord wine. At $3 or 53.50 
it sells right ouu But some guys who still 
have it sell it for twice that.” 

With sweet concord kosher wine paying 
the bills. Zakon has been able to branch ouL 
His biggest hit last year was his chardonnay. 
made from New York grapes. “It's on the 
wine list at the River Cafe;" he said, “and I 
may get the Water Club and, who knows, 
Elaine’s." 

C ROWN Regal Cellars is a grandiose 
nam e for the drab warehouse where 
the wine is made, and perhaps for the 
wines themselves, which have a considerable 
way to go before they offer significant com- 
petition for the great wines of Europe and 
California. Bui Zakon's ideas are in keeping 
with the name. He is negotiating to acquire 
space under the Manhattan supports for the 
Brooklyn Bridge. “It would be more than a 
winery." he said. “It would be a showcase for 
New York state wines. It would be a major 
tourist attraction. It could also be a retail 
outlet." 

This year, there will be no chardonnay. 
Zakon was unable to buy any in New York 
at a reasonable price. He will make some 
Johannisberg nesting from New York 
grapes. “Someday I will have my own vine- 
yard out there," he said, “and I’ll have my 
own source of supply.” 

The dry concord is Zakon's vision of the 
future, or at least the future for fans of 
kosher concord wine. He hopes that congre- 
gations all over the borough will turn their 
backs on the sticky. sweeL grapy wine of 
their forebears and lake into their midst 
Crown Regal dry concord, a practically su- 
garless variation of his regular concord. The 
grapy taste is there, but the wine is dry and 
better balanced, ‘it’ll take some getting used 
too." he acknowledges. “buL well you never 
know — ti may se!L" 

Zakon is planning a label that shows the 
Brooklyn Bridge, and he would like to do a 
label honoring his Lubavitcher congrega- 
tion. at 770 Eastern Parkway. “I don’t know 
which wine it win be.” he said, "maybe the 
dry concord. I will call it just ‘770.’ " 

He also is thinking of jettisoning the name 
Crown Regal Cellars. “1 named it after the 
neighborhood," he said, “but people say it 
sounds too much like a whisky.” 

If he gets rid of Crown Regal he may have 
io change his car. His bcensc plate is 
KESSER. a transliteration of the Hebrew for 
“crown." ■ 

- WSf The .\V“- York Times 



Joe "Zakon appraises his product. 


Booksellers: An Independent Lot 


by Deborah Hofmann 


N EW YORK — Dan Balaban, a ' 
New Jersey writer, dreamed of a 
Byron esque life. He opened Bala- 
ban’s Books in Teaneck. New Jer- 
sey, “to be around my dear books." Lewis 
Meyer, “a failure as a lawyer,” now owns a 
bookstore in Tulsa. Oklahoma. 

Pal Shad of. owner of the Sierra Bookshop 
in South Lake Tahoe, California, was di- 
vorced. “so I looked for a respectable busi- 
ness.” A “bored housewife." Martha 
McLeod, was “tired of scrubbing floors and 
washing clothes," so she opened tbe Caroli- 
na Bookrack in Gteenville, South Carolina. 

Three-fourths of all bookstores around the 
United States are independent , and these 
people are typical of those who own and 
manage them. Two-fifths of them earned less 
than 5100,000 in retail sales of books in 
1983, but the independent operators ac- 
counted for nearly half the market share of 
all retail book sales in 1983. 

These are among the findings of a survey 
by The New York Times in 1984 of 2J06 
general- interest booksellers acro-js the coun- 
try representing 5,477 sales locations. 

'Publishers say the 50-50 balance between 
the independent bookstores and tbe three 
national bookselling chains, Waldenbooks, 
B. Dalton Booksellers and Crown Books, is a 
key to the continued health of the publishing 
industry. 

“These booksellers cherish individual 
books as they do their customers," said Jean 
RawitL publicity director of the E.P. Dutton 
Publishing Co. “They keep books alive. We 
rely on the chains more for blockbuster 
books, but we depend on independents to go 
after sales for older titles, steady sellers and 
the unusual book; and just couldn’t go with- 
out their sales." 

Booksellers tend to be highly educated, 
proud and fiercely independent. Two out of 
three are in small towns, and they feel they 
attend to their customers much as a rector 
attends to a small- town parish. 

Many were poets, teachers or librarians. 
Some were once milk deliverers, lawyers, 
philosophers, psychologists or retailers. 
They lend to te 30 to 44 years old, and two- 
Lhirds have been in ihe business less than 10 
years. 


ANOTHER quarter of those sampled 
said they had been in the business 1 1 
to 20 years, having taken advantage 
of low interest rates and easy bank financing 
when they bought their stores. Sixty percent 
said they had a college degree or an ad- 
vanced degree in a professional field and 24 
percent said they had "some college educa- 
tion." 

William Schuetze opened Hawley Cook 
Booksellers in Louisville, Kentucky, six 
years ago. “Another lawyer and I decided we 
wanted to be surrounded by something we 
enjoy.” he said. “Books " 

With a Ph.D. in English, David Carter, 
owner of the Spencer Bookshop in Spencer, 
Indiana, “felt a destiny to bring literacy to 
the masses ” 

Thirty-eight percent said they considered 
their stores among the two or three major 
bookstores in their area, and 28 percent said 
they were the major retailers. 

Abby Curlew, who owns Curlew Books on 
Unalaska Island in the Aleutians. 900 miles 
(1.460 kilometers) from Anchorage, said she 
gave that remote island community of 1.300 



Dan Balaban at work in his bookstore. 


people "an alternative to bars, cannery 
drudgery and lousy weather — 1 consider 
myself a mental health consultant," 

Nearly one in four dealers said the main 
reason for entering the business was the need 
for a bookstore in the community, often 
meshed with a desire “to be my own boss" 
Ira Campbell, owner of Campbell’s Book- 
shop in Terre Haute, Indiana, wanted a copy 
of "Moby Dick” but could not find one. 
“There was no bookstore in the area in J 945, 
so 1 opened one," he said. 

But one-third of the respondents said they 
were in the business for sheer love of books. 

A like-minded 10 percent said they had 
got into the business to be involved’ with 
other people or fulfill a dream. Fred Austin, 
co-owner of Marketplace Books in Eugene. 
Oregon, said, “h sounded like a kindly life, 
of helping people satisfy their needs for 
books." 

Rupert LeCraw. owner of Oxford Book- 
store in Atlanta, said, “I’ve always admired 
people who tried to improve themselves and 
opened my bookstore to serve those people." 

Aim Johnson , one of five women who own 
the Lake Country Bookseller in White Bear. 
Minnesota, said: “It was a romantic idea. 


and 1 always wanted a bookstore. It was a 
community effort.” 

Among independent book dealers, women 
tend to take on the management of the 
business as well as ail the bookkeeping, ad- 
vertising, carpentry and janitorial tasks. 

About 6 out of 10 of the stores earning less 
than $100,000 in retail sales in 1983 were 
owned by women. The percentages owned 
by men and women are evenly split until the 
5500.000 income level where 6 in 10 stores 
are owned by men. 

Patricia Raneri of Lake Park. Florida, 
who opened the Second Chapter Bookstore 
10 years ago, said: “Most women after a 
divorce drown their sorrows reading books. I 
bought the whole dam store.’ 

Keeping in the black, owners of stores of 
ali sizes say. takes more than books. 

Forty-two percent cany computer man- 
uals and 14 percent carry' computer software 
packages. Eighty-four percent cany other 
sideline offerings, and more than a third say 
that these items are “essential to our overall 
business.” An additional one-quarter say 
sidelines are “somewhat importanL” ■ 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 



TRAVEL 




INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 

•Wigmore HalJ (tel: 935.21.41 ). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 20: Beaux 


Jan. 20: Radio Light Orchestra, 
Nicholas Braitb waite conductor 
(Haydn). 


VIENNA. Konzerthaus (tel: 
72 . 12.1 n. 

CONCERTS — Jan. 21: Alban 
Berg Quartet (Schubert). 

Jan. 23: Vienna Symphoniker. 
Hans Graf conductor (Bartok. Mo- 
zart). 

Jan: 24: Ernd Sebestyen Ensemble 
(Janacek. Dussek). 

•Museum Modemer Kunst (tei: 
78.2550). 

EXHIBITION — To March 3: 
“Maria Lass nig Retrospective.” 
OPERA — Jan. 19, 22, 25: "La 
Traviata” (Verdi ). 

Jan. 21 and 24: La Boheme" (Puc- 
cini). 

Jan. 23: "H Barhiere di Siviglia” 
(Rossini). 

•Theater an der Wien (tel: 
57.96.32). 

THEATER — Jan. 19-20. 22-25: 
“Cats” (Lloyd Webber). 


ENGLAND 


BELGIUM 


ANTWERP. Royal Flemish Opera 
(lei: 233.66.85). 

BALLET — Jan. 20: “Coppelia” 
(Saint- Leon, Delibes). 

OPERA — Jan. 19, 23, 25: “La 
Boheme'* (Puccini). 

BRUSSELS. Opera National (lei; 
217.22.11) 

OPERA — Jan. 22 and 24: “Ludo 
Silla” (Mozart). 

•Palais des Beaux Arts (tel: 
511.29.95). 

CONCERTS— Jan. 23: European 
Philhar monic Orchestra, Jean Ja- 
kus conductor (Handel). 

Jan. 25: Belgian National Orches- 
tra, Mendi Rod an conductor (Bee- 
thoven, Tchaikovsky). 

GHENT, Roval Opera (lei: 
2524.25). 

OPERA — Jan. 25: “Eugene One- 
gin’' (Tchaikovsky). 

LIEGE, Theatre Royal de Lifege 
(tel: 23.59.10). 

OPERA — Jan. 20 and 24: “The 
Devils of Loudon” (Penderecki). 


DENMARK 


COPENHAGEN, Nikola) Gallery 
(tel: 13.1626). 

EXHIBITIONS — To March 3: 
“Soviet Revolution Posters,” “Ab- 
original Art” 

•Radio House Concert Hall (tel: 
35.06.47). 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 

628.87.95). 

Barbican Art Gallery — To March 
2: “Prin [makers at the Royal Col- 
lege of Art,” 

Barbican Hall — Jan. 19: London 
Symphony Orchestra, Yan Pascal 
Tortelier conductor, Ju Hee Siih 
piano (Beethoven, Fauri). 

Jan. 20: Royal Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. Martin Fischer-Dieskau 
conductor. Vovka Ashkenazy pi- 
ano ( Mozart, Handel). 

Jan. 21: London Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Maurice Kaplow conduc- 
tor, Enrique Perez de Guzman pi- 
ano ( Berlioz. Beethoven). 

Jan. 22: Orchestra of Su John's 
Smith Square, John Lubbock con- 
ductor, Rosemary Fumiss violin 
(Mozart). 

Jan. 23: Beaux Arts Trio (Beetho- 
ven). 

Jan. 24: London Symphony Or- 
chestra, Rudolf Barshai conductor, 

Ju Hee Suh piano (Brahms, Mus- 
sorgsky). 

Jan. 25: London Symphony Cham- 
ber Orchestra, Howard Shelley 
piano/conductor, Michael Davis 
violin (Bach. Mozart). 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Company — Jan. 19: “Peter 
Pan” (Barrie). 

Jan. 23-26: "The Comedy of Er- 
rors” (Shakespeare). 

•British Museum (tel: 636.1525). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan 31: 

“Japanese Paintings from the Har- 
ari Collection,” “Prints in Germa- 
ny 1880-1933.” 

To March 10: “The Golden Age of 
Anglo-Saxon Art: 966-1066.” 

•Hayward Gallery (tel: 92857.08). 
EXHIBITIONS — To April 30: 

“Renoir,” “John Walker: Paintings 
from the Alba and Oceania Series.” hlandrm - 
•Roya! Opera (tel: 240.10.66). 

BALLET — Jan. 22-25: “Cinderel- 
la” (Ashton, Prokofiev). 

OPERA — Jan. 19 and 21: “Die 
Zauberflote” (Mozart). 

•Tale Gallery (tel: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 20: 

“Susan Rothenberg.” 

To Mar. 31 ; “Wflliam James Mull- 
er," “John Walker Prints 1976- 
1984." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 

589.63.71). 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 28: 

“British Biscuit TinS” 


Arts Trio (Schubert, Smetana). 
Jan. 23: Rondel Ensemble (Mozart. 
Schubert). 

RECITALS — Jan. 20: Sergiu 
Luca violin (Bach). 

Jan. 21: Mark Hooper piano (Mo- 
zart, Chopin). 

Jan. 22: Dang Thai Son piano (De- 
bussy, Prokofiev). 

Jan. 24: Kenneth Gilbert harpsi- 
chord (Bach, Scarlatti). 

Jan. 25: Leslie Howard piano (Mo- 
zart, Schubert). 




PARIS, Centre Culture! Wallonie- 
Bruxelles (tel: 271 26. 16). 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. 10: 
“Magritte." 

•Centre Cultural du Marais (tel: 
272.73.52). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 27: “De- 
gas.” 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
277.1233). 

CONCERTS — Jan 31: Ensemble 
Vocal de Grande Bretagne (Hanis- 
son. Cage). 

EXHBITIONS — To Jan. 28: 
“Kandinsky.” “Homage to Kahn- 
wefler." 

•Galerie Horizon (tel: 5555827). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 26: 
“Fred PeterdL” 

•Grand Palais (tel: 26154.10). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 28: 
“Watteau (1684-1721).” 

To Feb. 4: “Zhongshan: Tombs of 
Forgotten Kings.” 

•Musee du Louvre (tel: 260.3926). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 28: 
“French Drawings of the 17th Cen- 
tury ” 

To April 15: “Holbein.” 

•Mus&e du Luxembourg (tel: 
23425.95). 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 10: 
Hippolyte, Auguste and Paul 


CONCER’ 


Plevel(tel: 
ERTS — 


WEEKEND 


[ 


CONCERTS 


SUTTON PLACE 

GUIDFORD, SURREY, 

WINTER PROGRAMME 1985 


Spadd Concert Series - GALA EVBHNGS 
Paul Tortelier - cello 


^Scrtvrday. March 9th - 7:30 ^jn. 


Sam martini, Bach, Tortelier, 

Tickets £90, inclusive of Champagne reception, 
formal dinner, fireworks 

Goncarf Series 

Kenneth Van Barthold - piano 


The 


Haydn, Beethoven, Debussy, Chopin 
feky String Quartet 
Wednesday, February 27th - 7:30 p.m. 
Mozart, Shostakovich, Brahms 
Wednesday, April 1 7th - 7:30 pjn. 

With Jonathan Williams - horn 
Shostakovich, Mozart, Mendelssohn 
Tickets £50, inclusive of wine reception, dinner 

YOUNG PERFORMERS SBUES 

Stephen keserfis - cello with Paul Coker - piano 
Sunday, January 20th - 3:00 p.m. 

Bach, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms 
Mui fin Hughes - piano 

Sunday, February 17th - 3.-00 p.m. 
Beethoven, Schumann, Liszt 
JudMi HaH - flute 

Sunday, March 17th - 3:00 p.m. 
Beethoven, Chopin, Messiaen, Donizetti, 
Bartok, Mendelssohn, Poulenc 


The Comberi/ Clarkson Trio - strings 

.. April 14th -3:00 1 
Schubert, Mozart, Cirri, Hummel 


i p.m. 


Sunday, 

Schubert, 

Tickets £10, inclusive of full tea 

For i n form a t i on end tickets: 


Sutloa Place, Guildford. Surrey GU4 IQ} 


GERMANY 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.4449). 

OPERA — Jan. 19: “Die Zauber- 
flote” (Mozart). 

Jan. 20: “La Boh&me” (Puccini). 
Jan. 21 and 23: “The Marriage of 
Figaro” (Mozart). 

Jan. 22: “Ophelia" (Kd ter bom). 
COLOGNE, ROmisch-Gennan- 
isches Museum (tel: 22123.04). 
EXHIBITION— To Jan 11: “Tbe 
Treasures of San Marco." 
FRANKFURT, Alte Oper (tel: 
134.04.00) 


TRAVEL 


WEEKEND 


HOTELS 



HOTEL LUTET1A PARIS **** 

I? 315 miBSON 

pouiu aaOMNCr . ROM M3V. 2) lo MWOI 31) 
ATIADIIiONAL 1925’STYIE 
RBKWATH) HOTEL 
*KHT M THE KUT Of MBS 
3DO ZOOMS, MB GOMmONMO AM) 


COOCTA& LOUNOI AND 
TmCAl nUOTAN KKT AWANT 


«S.Bd 


-730M-Tafa(1|S44J*.ID 



First Class passages are available on an around 
Britain stopping Pullman train partly hauled by 
■ steam traction on 


SCOTSMAN 


. . . “wtiHe the railway traveller in Britain may not be 
•panning great cont inente to arrive at some d 1 st ant 
* destination, the railways of Britain have a charm 
and sense of history all of their own. Nor oan we 
forget that Britain was a pioneer in the age of steam 
• locomotion" . . . 

A private Pullman train limited to 80 passengers wiH 
call and stay at some of Britain’s most scenic spots 
and historic centres commencing at: 

Kings Cross — York Minster (1) — Edinburgh (3) — 
Inverness (31— Kyieof Lochalsh — the Isle ofSkye(3) 

— Mallalg — Gleneagles (3) — Perth — the Lake 
District (2) — Windermere— Chester (1) — Cotswold 

— Oxford — London (Paddington). 

Ibrlff: £1395.00 Fully Inclusive and escorted throughout 
Duration: 18 days. 

. Oepartwe dates from London: May IS, Sept 5 1885. 
' lWa »«wrttaqttBtMpl»n«tofMBtagtrat>d c at»logMiita:- 

VOW3ES JULES VERNE 

10 Glentworth St London NW1 Tet 486 8751/2/3 



4L 




RECITALS — Jan 23: Raymond 
Havenith piano (Liszt. Brahms). 
Jan. 24: Daniel Barenboim piano 
(Beethoven). 

•Cafe Theater (tel: 77.74.66). 
THEATER — Jan. 20, 22-25: “The 
Roar of tbe Greasepaint — Tbe 
Smell of the Crowd” (Newley). 
HAMBURG. Staatsoper (tel: 
35.1555). 

BALLET — Jan. 22: “Mahler’s 
Fourth Symphony” (Neumeier. 
Mahler). 

OPERA — Jan 20: “Don Carlos” 
(Verdi). 

Jan. 24 and 26: “La T raviata” (Ver- 
di). 

MUNICH. National Theater (tel: 
2113.16). 

BALLET — Jan. 24: “PapDJon” 
(Hynd, Offenbach). 

OPERA — Jan. 23 and 25: “Joan 
of Arc at the Stake” (Honegger). 
Jan. 22: “The Barber of Bagdad” 
(Cornelius). 


Denmark’s Regal Porcelain 


By Ruth Robinson 


C 


BOOKS 


SALES! 


A fine selection of English end American art books 

an at CUT PRICES! 


NOUVEAU QU ARTIER LATIN 

The International Bookshop 
78 Boulevard Strint-Michel, 75006 Paris. 

: Telephone 326.42J0. Open doSy from Warn, to 7 p.m . : 


ATHENS. Dada ■ Gallery 
(Id: 72423.77). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 25: 
“Elena Zantrdko.” 

•Medusa Gallery (tel: 724.4552). 
EXHIBITION —To Feb. 9: “Bull- 
fight,” drawings by Yiannis Dirni - 
trakis. 

•Nees Morphes Gallery (tel: 
.361.61.65). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 26: 
"Vassilis Sperantzas .” 

•Skoufa Gallery (tel: 36035.41). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 31: 
“Mina.” 


OPEN HAGEN — The Royal Co- 
penhagen Porcelain Manufactory 
in Copenhagen believes in doing 
things the old-fashioned way — by- 
hand. Blue Ruled, a pattern introduced in 
the company's first year of operation in 
1775, remains one of its most popular de- 
signs and is still made with each delicate 
floral motif painted by individual artists. 

Such devotion to tradition and craftsman- 
ship has not gone unnoticed. Royal Copen- 
hagen Porc elain dinner services, figurines 
and decorative pieces are owned by the royal 
houses of Europe, by heads of state, by the 
nobility, by the rich, and by ordinary citizens 
with an appreciation for good design. 

Royal Copenhagen emerged as a name to 
be reckoned with for ceramic achievement in 
1889 when it won the Grand Prix at the 
Universal Exposition in Paris for the natu- 
ralistic undeiglaze p ainting style developed 
by Arnold Krog. This underglaze technique 
uses a limited palette — only blue, chrome 
green and red gold — but the special glaze 


and very intense firing give the colors the 
soft, misty, cool tone that 


HONGKONG 


Jan. 18: Nouvel 


Orchestra Phnharmonique, Chris- 
tian Badea conductor, Victor Tre- 


liakov violin (Brahms, Liszt). 

Jan. 24 and 25: Orchestra de Paris, 
Zubin Mehta conductor (Haydn). 
•TheStre de la Ville (tel: 
27422.77). 

CONCERT — Jan. 21: Ensemble 
Inleroontemporain, Ronald Zoll- 
man conductor (Boulez, Ravel). 
•Thefitre Musical de Paris (tel: 

233 44 44). 

CONCERT — Jan. 21: Orchestra 
du Conservatoire de Paris, Jean- 
Sebastien Bereau conductor (Mo- 
zart, Puccini). 

OPERETTA— Jan. 19, 23. 25:“La 
F3Je de Madame Angpt” (Lecocq). 
Jan. 20, 22, 24: “Die Fledermans” 
(J. Strauss). 

•Thfeiitre 3 sur 4 (tel: 327.09.16). 
RECITAL— Jan. 21 : Elena lakou- 
bovitch guitar, Russian ballads, 
gypsy songs and poetry ( Pushkin, 
Pasternak). 


HONG KONG. City Hall Concert 
Hall (tel: 790.7521). 

BALLET — Jan. 22-25: “Giselle" 
(Sardli/Perrot, Adam). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 19 and 20: 
Hong Kong Philharmonic Orches- 
tra, Kenneth Schermerhom con- 
ductor, Birgit Finnil ae mezzo-so- 
prano (Wagner, Mahler). 


ITALY 


MILAN, Teatro alia Scala (tel: 


80.9126). 

BALLET — Jan. 19 and 20: “Swan 


Lake” (High tower, Tchaikovsky). 
OPERA — Jan. 22 and 24: “ 
Barbiere di Siviglia" (Rossini), 
ROME, Accademia Nazionale di 
Santa Cecilia (id: 679.03.89). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 20-22: Or- 
chestic deO ’Accademia Nazionale 
de Santa Cecilia, Franco Manning 
conductor (Rossini, Mannino). 
TURIN, Teatro Regio (tel: 
54.80.00), 

BALLET — Jan. 20: Ballet Tb6fitre 
Fran^ais, Rudolf Nureyev. 


NETHERLANDS 


AMSTERDAM, Concert gebouw 


(^gn .83.45). 


HOLIDAYS 


ROME 


RESIDENTIAL AREA 

Lowly qportnenb by day, by week or 
by month. Orttf phone, autonomous 
hoofing, bar, raitovranl, garage, 
24 hour larvice. 

8E5H3B4CE 

CORTMA D'AMPEZZO 
L (39-6) 333701 2 - 33870)5. -I 


CERTS — Jan. 19: Radio 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Sergiu 
Comissiona conductor, (Masse- 
net). 

Jan. 20: Concertgcbouworkest, Lu- 
cas Vis conductor. Else Krieg violin 
(I^euris, Lutoslawski). 

Jari.25: Brabants Orchestra, Andrfc 
Vandernoot conductor (Wagner, 
Elgar). 

RECITALS — Jan. 19: Jaap van 
Zweden violin, Ronald Brautigam 
piano (Beethoven, Brahms). 

Jan. 21: Little Consort, Lucia 
Meeuwsen mezzo-soprano (Fresco- 
baldi, Monteverdi). 

Jan. 24: Theo Olof violin, Gfcrard 
van Blerk piano (Debussy, Fame). 
Jan. 25: Rachel Ann Morgan mez- 
zo-soprano, Tan Crone piano (Gra- 
nados. Flotbuis). 


SCOTLAND 


31: 


EDINBURGH, National Gallery 
(tel: 556.8921). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan 
“Turner Watercolors." 

•Usher Hall (id: 228. 1155). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 25: Scottish 
National Orchestra Neeme Jarvi 
conductor, Ralph Kirshbaum cello 
(Barber. Bartbk). 

GLASGOW, Theatre Royal (td: 
331.1234). 

OPERA — Jan. 19, 22, 24: “Ca- 

priedo" (R. Strauss). 

Jan. 23: “The Bartered Bride” 
(Smetana). 


SPAIN 


MADRID.Teatro Real (tel: 
24838.75). 

CONCERTS — Jan. 19 and 20: 
Spanish National Orchestra and 
Chorus, Marimian n Valdes con- 
ductor, Eulalia Sole piano (Ravel, 
Stravinsky). 

Jan. 22: Gclo de Muaca de C&- 
mara y Polifonia. Jos6 Luis Temes 
conductor (Stravinsky, Bartdk). 
Jan. 24 and 25: Spanish Radio- 
Television Orchestra and Chorus, 
Antonio Ros-Marba conductor 
(Mozart). 

Jan. 25: Spanish National Orches- 
tra and Chorus, Jesus Ldpez Cobos 
conductor (Bach). 


UNITED STATES 


NEW YORK, Lincoln Center (td: 
87059.60). 

New York Qty Ballet — Jan. 19: 
“Jewels" (Balanchine, Faur&, Stra- 
vinsky). 

Jan. 25: “The Four Tempera- 
ments” (Balanchine, Hindemith). 
•Guggenheim Museum (tel: 
360.35.00). 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 3: 
“Robert MotherwelL" 


•Metropolitan Museum of Art (td: 
535.77.10). 


EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 24: 
“Chinese Painting and Calligra- 
phy" 


riistingmshps the 

porcelain from the work of other factories. 
Indeed, connoisseurs can recognize it with- 
out looking underneath for the company 
trademark of three wavy blue tines repre- 
senting the three principal Danish water- 
ways. 

Although the company exports to about 
SO countries, its shop at 6 Amagertorv on 
Stroget (the midtown pedestrian street in 
Copenhagen) offers the widest selection any- 
where, with many items not available 
abroad. This is the only place, for example, 
where a collector can purchase seconds at a 
saving of 25 percent and small sacrifice to 
aesthetics. Sometimes you have to look hard 
to find the flaw. 

Elsewhere in the store the flawless porce- 
lain is displayed more elegantly. The setting 
is entirely appropriate, consisting of adjoin- 
ing houses in the Renaissance style, one built 
in 1616 for an alderman of the city, its.twin 
added in 1898. The celebrated Blue Fluted, 
along with Blue flower, which dates to 1780, 
as well as more modern services like Domi- 
no, in plain white with brown rim and design 
of three dots, and the newest. Noblesse, 
ornamented with a blue Dowering vine, are 
displayed at set tables, just as they would 
appear in a private home before a dinner 
party. 


The service is today at Copenhagen's Rosen- 
borg Palace and is used on state occasions by 
the Danish royal family. The second service, 
made for Princess Alexandra's wedding in 
1863 to the Prince of Wales, later King 
Edward VH is now’ at Windsor Castle. 

Visitors to the Royal Copenhagen Porce- 
lain factory at 45 Sraailegade on the out- 
skirts of town see services such as this under 
production. The gold, before firing, looks a 
drab brown. Each floral motif is painstak- 
ingly copied from lSih -century copper- 
prints. each raised flower modeled by hand, 
the serrated edges and ornamental holes cut 
out by hand. 

A dinn er plate sells for around $193, a 
perforated dinner plate for around $275. Yet 
it is not unusual for a customer to spend 
$15,000 ou Flora Danica. Recently, says 
Jora Due. manager of the shop, the store 
received a $90,000 order for a service for 26. 

Casting figurines is a time-consuming pro- 
cess also, since each consists of many pieces 
cast separately and then put together. Take 
the charming children in Danish national 
costumes, holding bouquets or garlands of 
flowers, each petal of which is made sepa- 
rately. This series, in many bright colors, is 
decorated by hand over the glaze. The most 
popular figures are the Greenland boy with 
his blue anorak (the equivalent of $298) and 
the Greenland girl in her orange anorak 
($483). 


iece in production, ] 
on the Hans ■ 


The most expensive 
at around $22,727, is 
Christian Andersen fairy utle “7 he Princess ' 
and the Pea." Mark Palgas. project director ! 
at the factory, says that it takes nine months ■ 
to paint the princess. She reposes on a pfle of ; 
cushions, her powdered hair piled high, and < 
was designed in 1911 by Gerhard Homing ■ 
as a cookie jar. a mundane use hardly suited i 
to her rank. 


ihK • 1 . 

flU - 


Tradition notwithstanding. Royal Copen- ■ 
hagen has all along shown a determination ' 
to keep up with the times and not become a 
museum factory. Thus faience and stone- ■ 
ware have been added to the line and there 
are commissions to contemporary artists like . 
Lin Utzon, daughter of Jom Utzon, the< 
Danish architect responsible for the Sydney ' 
Opera House in Australia. Her porcelain 
bowls and vases in the Platina senes are; 
decorated with a deep cobalt-blue in-glaze 
decoration, contrasting with an application ■ 
of matt platinum over the glaze. 
Stereit-Giuings Kelsey is the only Ameri- 


can on the company's roster. Her jolly little 
figures, such as a boy on a sled ($98), a girl 


clutching a snowball, a snowman and a boy 
on a rocking horse are in the company's 
typical underglaze with blue predominating. 

The shop's prices are generally about half 
those asked in the Unite] States. ■ 


£> /<W The Sew York Times 


HE tables are changed every 10 days 
and there are always fresh Dowers. (A 
sampling of prices for the Blue Fluted 
service, half-lace version: the covered bouil- 
lon cup with saucer is around $64; dinner 
plate of just under 10 indies. $23; covered 
vegetable dish, $76.) 

Flora Danica, possibly the most exclusive 
dinner service in the world, has a room all to 
itself. The first set of this gold-encrusted 
porcelain ornamented with botanical illus- 
trations representing some 700 Danish wild 
plants was ordered in 1789 by Crown Prince 
Frederick as a gift for Empress Catherine of 
Russia, who died before it was completed. 





A Flora Danica setting. 


An Island Off Yucatan 


by Richard Halloran 


N 


EW YORK — It takes a sense of 
adventure to spend a holiday on 
the island of Cozumel, off the 
coast of the Yucat&n Peninsula in 

Mexico. 

Tbe island is covered with tangled brown 
jungle and surrounded by green water, rough 
and surf — white on the eastern, Caribbean 
shore, dear and tranquil on the western 
shore facing the Yura tin. Along that west- 
ern edge, a thin slice of habitation has been 
carved out of the thick growth, with the 
whitewashed town of San Miguel in the 
center and strips of beaches stretching to the 
north and south. Tbe weather is sunny most 
of the year and hot by May. In midsummer, 
the temperature climbs to at least 100 de- 
grees Fahrenheit (37 degrees centigrade), but 
summer is a lively season, with a particular 
Mexican flavor, because that is when Mexi- 
cans from the mainland come for their holi- 
days. 

With Cozumel's relaxed ambience, visi- 
tors can simply laze on the beach, soaking up 
sun and imagining the shapes of the occa- 
sional billowing clouds. As a collector of 
beaches, Td rate those on Cozumel as good. 
You can swim out from 300 yards to half a 
mile in dear water, but the beaches are a 



roving the Spanish Main, but not until 1 848 
did permanent residents come back, in the 
form of Mexican refugees fleeing a civil war; 
on the mainland. By the early 20th century. 
Cozumel bad become a resort. A photograph 
of Charles Lindbergh, taken m the late 
1920s. hangs in the El Portal restaurant in 
San MigueL ] 

Halfway across the nine-mile- wide (14- 
kflometer) island, to the left of the only road 
traversing it. are the stone ruins of San 
Gervasio, most of which are still covered 
with brush. But one can wander among tbe 
s, altars and a crypt. 


main 


the Nbw York runs) 


with 

pink. 


ir fading frescos of ocher, blue and 


ter of the Caribbean. "If you don’t try 
snorkeling.” said Paul Ball entitle, one of the 
young men, “you will never forgive your- 


self.” 


little rocky and not up to the best in the 
ific. Visit 


Pacific. Visitors can also snorkel and scuba 
dive in some of tbe great lagoons and reefs of 
the Western Hemisphere as well as explore 
splendid Mayan ruins, with a dash of nighL 
life in open-air restaurants and some shop- 
ping thrown in. Cozumel is a nature lover’s 
ddight, with all manner of fish, porpoises, 
tropical birds and sea birds. Day trips to the 
Yucatan are easy to arrange. 

My own recommendation: a strong dose 
of the island’s natural a l tractions laced with 
a sampling of historical detours. 

Cozumel should not be confused with 
Cancun, the relatively new and posh Yuca- 
tan resort just across the water, nor with 
Acapulco, the established and posh resort on 
Mexico's Pacific coast. With Caaimd, the 
adventure began cm the Air Mexicans flight 
from Miami The stewardess, in a standard 
announcement about flying tune, food and 
safety, informed passengers that their life 
preservers were the cushions on which they 
were sitting. That was the first time in my 
!mory that a plane making an internation- 
al flight completely over water was not 
equipped with life preservers. 

Cozumel is rustic, even primitive in some 
respects. There is a pervasive nuotana spirit, 
which can be infectious when a visitor wants 
to relax but frustrating at other times. Hold 
service can be haphazard. Making a tele- 
phone call, either on the island or abroad, is 
a gamble. Although in a half-century of 
wandering, I have ignored most cautions 
about drinking the local water, these cau- 
tions definitely should be observed on Cozu- 
mel. A modicum of Spanish, even from a 
phrase book, is needed, as little English is 
spokai, even in hotels catering to tourists. A 


There was plenty of opportunity to do so. 
A handy booklet, the “Blue Guide to Cozu- 
mel," which promises to explain "everything 
yon wanted to know about Cozumel but 
didn't have the Spanish to ask." lists nc 
fewer than 13 dive shops. At these shops, 
beginners can rent snorkeling or diving gear, 
take classes and arrange trips to the best 
reefs, such as the Paradise Reef. Rates range 
from the peso equivalent of $5 a day for a 
mask, snorkel and swimming fins to 5275 for 
a full course that culminates in a certificate 
from an international association of divers. 


Though I wasn't up to the full course, I did 
try snorkeling, swallowing half a lagoon be- 


fore I got tbe hang of it, then marveling at 
the fish, plain and striped, white and blue 
and black and multicolored, Jong and flat 
and round. An easy way to see Cozumel's 
underwater life was to float with the currem 
that runs from south to north off the western 
shore over the sandy white sea bed. Snorkel- 
ers do that for a mile or more, then swim to 
shore and walk back to their starting point to 

Even 
boat, 

with a guide who knew where the best 
schools of fish collected. Easiest of all was 
sitting on the bold balcony and watching 


It is a great mystery as to why the Mayas 
settled in this inhospitable place, which has 
no streams, uncertain rainfall and water 
available only by tapping the water table. 

How they survived is a puzzle. 

One day we joined a tour that began with a 
90-minute voyage on an ancient packet boat 
with wheezing diesel engines from San Mi- 
guel to Play a del Carmen on the YucatAa 
coast The journey continued with a bus ride 
through morejungle, from which a few farm- 
ers had cleared enough land to eke out a 
harsh life, to the ruins aiTulum. These ruins 
alone were worth the trip. Here, the ancient 
Mayas built a city waDed with gray stone 
whose centerpiece was a high temple that 
stands majestically atop a cliff, set against 
the green and blue sea. Here, the high priests ; 

of Tulum may have sacrificed human bongs r ' r 
— usually the chiefs of vanquished tribes -r • , 1 

to the sun gods. 

While we consider such customs barbaric 
today, the people of Tulum evidently had a 
strong sense of justice, for the penalty for 
murder in their culture was slavery for as 
many years as the victim might have been 
expected to have lived. 






A, 


•C*:; 


half a dozen porpoises undulate against the 

r, feeding 


current through the clear water, feeding as 
they proceeded in stately dignity. 

For the bird watcher, Cozumel is a trea- 
sure. The island, whose name is derived from 
a Mayan name meaning “the island of the 
swallows,” is home to hundreds of those 
seemingly tireless birds that spend the day 
darting through the air catching insects. 
Great-tailed grackles perched on the palm 
trees, clucking and w histling Every evening 
just before sunset, several magnificent frig- 
ate birds circled slowly over the water a mOe 
away, riding the wind. Occasionally a peli- 
can lumbered by. Out over the jungle a 
dozen hawks circled looking for prey. 


Sr-; 




. 1 : 


’A.-tP. V . •- • | . 


i OR a history buff, exploring on Cozu- 
mel and the Yucarim is particularly 
intriguing. The Mayans, whose ances- 
tors are bdieved to have come from Asia 


Volkswagen we hired for a day of exploring through Alaska and California and thence 
the windshield across Mexico to the 


was so battered that when 


was turned on, the horn honked. 

my wife and I n 
pair of recent graduates of the University of 




route to Cozumel, my wife and I met a 


the YucatAn, reached Co- 
zumel by about AJD. 300. There they built a 


Central Florida in Orlando, who were head- 
ed to the island for a week of snorkeling and 
scuba diving. Tbe young men, both accom- 
plished divers, said that Cozumel was chal- 
lenging the Virgin Islands as the diving cen- 


shrine to IxcheL god of fertility and healing, 
one remains can still be found deep 


whose stone i 
in the jungle. Spanish conquistadors landed 


on the island in 1518, brinj 

guage and religion and 

wiped out the population 
Cozumel later became a 


a new lan- 

which 
1600. 
for pirates 


FAVORITE restaurant was Costa 
Brava, a small concrete-block estab- 
lishment on the sou them edge of San 
Miguel built around a tree that sticks 
through the roof. A 16-year-old boy pa- 
trolled the sidewalk outside, hawking the 
restaurant’s merits with a line of patter wor- 
thy of Madison Avenue. The decor was sim- 
ple. with fishing nets strong around the tree 
and colorful Mexican blankets on the walls. 

But the service was friendly and the vegeta- 
ble soup, with great chunks of fresh vegeta- 
bles piled in a slightly spicy broth, was the 
best I’ve ever had. "Also tasty were the 
shrimps in butter and the grouper fihet in 
garlic sauce. 

Dinner was often followed or preceded by 
an evening stroll through tbe town for shop- 
ping. Along with the usual trinkets, one 
could buy Mexican blouses, blankets and 
tablecloths, and, at Casa Blanca, elegant 
silver jewelry made by Mexican artisans. 

Since almost everyone observes the siesta f "‘flj t 

between about 1 and 5 P.M., shops stay open A*, -Hif.-c * lf j- 
untii 9 or later. 

During one of those strolls, we learned 
that the island is not as far off the beaten 
track as we had thought My wife, who is 
Japanese, had doubted that her compatriots, 
well traveled though they may be, had made 
it to Cozumel. But as we passed an open stall 
filled with bracelets and clay models of Ma- 
yan gods, a young Cozuxneieno said in the 
flawless accents of Osaka, a center of Japa; 
nese commerce, “I can get it for you whole- 
sale." ■ 




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•s 19 as The New York Tuna 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 



TRAVEL 


A Question of Class 
On Flights in Europe 


Finding a First-Rate Steak in Scotland 


in ucceva receuuy ncara XI/ 1 • 

by several consumer bodies, I npL nt CPT* 71 i 
le International Chamber of jjai ^ jv vJL Ovi 
, at the confusion and lack of ■. . ■ 

landards in the business-class nritpH nPCTIl p 

re Airline Users Committee, a UULCU UCopl C 

ised study group set up by the -> | 

il Aviation Autnority,is exam- PlllniW IftnP d 
, it suspects may be ddiberate LILUJUJ mOC £5 


by Roger Collis 

I S tire business traveler being ripped 
off on short-haul flights in Europe? 
“Yes, I wouldn’t disagree with 
that,*’ said Lance Coleman, general 
manager of Kuoni Trawl Ltd. in London. 

This sentiment is being voiced more and 
more vehemently by a growing n umb er erf 
executives who feel that they are being 
short-changed by some airlines on their 
soH^&lkdbusmess-class services. T resent 
paying a surcharge just to at in a cur- 
tained-off section of an economy cabin 
with a free drink,** is a typical reaction. 

The International Air Travel Associa- 
tion (IATA) in Geneva recently heard 
complaints by several consumer bodies, 
notably the International Chamber of 
Commerce, at the confusion and lack of 
common standards in the business-class 
market The Airline Users Committee, a 
London- based study group set up by the 
British Civil Aviation Authority, is exam- 
ining what it suspects may be ddiberate 
attempts by some airlines to force business 
travelers wire want a flexible, fun-fare 
economy ticket to “trade up" to business 
class. In many cases the service offered is 
inferior to that of the old economy class. 

Business class began to be introduced 
ri gh t years ago with the concomitant de- 
mise of first class on many short-haul 
routes and the burgeoning of discount 
-fares. (Today, only Iberia, Lufthansa and 
Swissair offer first class within Europe.) 

. The idea was to reward the executive who 
paid the full economy fare with a separate 
dabm, away from sandaled back-packers 
and. other hoi pofloi, and a more distinc- 
tive service such as more cabin attendants, 
bee champagne, priority check-in, execu- 
tive lounge and soon. 

Alan Deller, now mnrirgring director of 
British Caledonian, said: “ I used to be No. 
2 in British Airways’s sales organization. 
When dub class was introduced in Europe 
the attitude was that what we'd actually 
done was to downgrade the back end of 
the plane, left the front as it was, put a 
curtain in the middle, take the economy 
fare away, and force the guy who wan ts an 
e conomy ticket to pay a surcharge. That 
was a mictaVe and one that we don’t in- 
tend to make." 

Interestingly, British Caledonian claims 
to have been the first airline to introduce 
business class, in 1977 on its London- 
Houston route. But it has not yet d cme so 
in Europe and is reluctant to discuss its 
plans. 

The amount of surcharge for business 
daw can depend on the route traveled as 
well as the airline. It’s what the traffic will 
bear. According to one investigator for a 
consumer group, flights out of London are 
especially susceptible to this land of thing 
“London to Australia is a good example," 
be said. “You pay a premium unless you 
go over to Amsterdam and fly from there.” 
Swissair and SAS are at least two honor- 
able exceptions to this practice. Both air- 
lines allow full economy-fare passengers 
to fly business class without extra charge. 
The old economy class cabin in the back oE 
the plane is reserved for people flying on 
discount fares, but drey enjoy standards of 
service at least equal to that of the old 
economy class. 

IATA is sympathetic to consumer com- 
plaints about business class, but can do 
little except cajole its member airlines to 
adapt a common standard. 

“We can't get involved in their commer- 
cial affairs, although this class question, 
what we call product definition, is a seri- 
ous difficulty with us,” a spokesman said. 
“Our hope has been that where there’s no 
difference in the seating the business-class 
fare would be at the same price as full 


economy. Bui it hasn't worked out like 
this. There are cases of a sure! uge being 
paid for a product that really is *t worth a 
surcharge. ’ 

To be fair to the airlines, it's tot easy to 
offer a distinctive service on bn aess class 

within Europe. You can hard! expect a 
gourmet meal on a 40-minute light, and 
who cares about one free drink 
“At the end of the day, whn the busi- 
nessman is buying on die shor iaul is a 
flexible ticket and what I call tssle-free 
hustle,” said British Caledonia: s Deller. 

S Sm, business services oordina- 
ilish Airways, said thei ns a time 


fs Deller. 


atf of comfort 
Sal routes, but 
Jxecuiive dol- 
1 smorgasbord 
[ flier. Among 
l fought in the 
wars are seal 
in vary by as 
me plane from 


ngflf can sometimes 
tesfBritish Airways, 
veie “widest seat in 
h/in business class, 
ip in first class. The 
4s can be confusing. 
Pacific, Super Execu- 
rpper. Gold, Galaxy 


when service in the air can be ss impor- 
tant than service on the gratae like prior- 
ity check-in and the use of a executive 
dub lounge. 

But comfort also counts fc the short- 
haul business flier, especially first class 
has virtually disap pe red. Sompiriines do 
provide more legroom, calledpt pitch in 
industry jargon, than the stanArd 32 inch- 
es (82 centimeters) in econonr class. But 
they still squeeze passengers fto the same 
cramped economy seat. I 

There are higher stands# of comfort 
and service on inter continepl routes, but 
intense competition for thtfxecutive dd- 
lar has led to a bewilderia smorgasbord 
of options for the busing flier. Among 
the hot issues that are bdg fought in the 
trans-Atlantic advertisiijwars are seat 
pitch and width, whichpan vary by as 
much as six inches on thpame plane from 
one airline to another. I 

First-class passengs can sometimes 
come off second-bes British Airways, 
which claims to haveM “widest seat in 
the sky” at 24 inch/ in business class, 
offers a measly 21 hi/ss in first class. The 
very term business ch can be confusing. 
Take your pick frmrfacific. Super Execu- 
tive. Marco Polo7 Jrpper, Gold, Galaxy 
and Preference QJ- 

Some light has fin cast into this con- 
sumer jungle by Hgg Robinson, London- 
based specialists /business travel, who 
have maria a sub of the business and 
firat-dass servidbf 28 airlines operating 
out of Britain ofOth short and long haul 
flights. Their 7(pge report compares air- 
port facilities, splaoe seating, such as the 
availability of cepers uid angles of re- 
cline, and the pportion allocated to non- 
pokere as w<p details of in-flight caier- 

IJUsinespfcs buffs will be overjoyed to 
learn that of half the airlines offer free 
rhampR£Ti pj business class and that Sin- 
gapore AirfSi whidi scores high in ca- 
tering, prqpes only one executive toilet 
on hs 747 |)oinpared with five on SAS. 

The smly does not get into the com- 
plex issup fares, nor does it compare 
ecoaomyass services. But it is useful and 
timely, id amply demonstrates that the 
wa jchwb for the business flier must be 
Great jrptor. 

“A nestion of Gass” is available free 
cAchafi from Hogg Robinson Travel, 71 
Kngsay, London WC2B 6SU.) ■ 

Forun and Profit is a new column that 
dU bear weekly to help businessmen cape 
dime complexities of travel worldwide. 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

I INUTHGOW, Scotland — “A dish 
that 1 do love to feed upon,” re- 
marks Kate to Petruchio’s manser- 
vant, Gmmro, in “The Tamin g of 
the Shrew ” when he offers her a piece of 
beef and mustard. 

The British adored steak in Elizabethan 
times — the nickname Beefeaters for the 
Yeomen of the Guard dates from that era — 
and they continued to adore it in Victorian 
times. Nathaniel Hawthorne, reaching for a 
simile, wrote, “Dr. Johnson's morality was 
as English an article as a beefsteak.” Not for 
nothing is the British equivalent of Uncle 
Sam called John Bull. 

But like so many things gastronomic in 
Britain, the steak has fallen on hard times in 
the 20th century. It is still possible to find a 
good roast rib of beef in London or in the 
countryside, but good steaks are even scarcer 
ihan Johnsonian morality. 

The typical English restaurant beefsteak is 
underweight, underage and overcooked, not 
a patch on its counterpart in New York or 
Florence or Tokyo; I have been told for at 
least a d ecade by Englishmen land even by 
Frenchmen) that the best beef in Europe 
comes from Scotland, but 1 had never been 
able until recently to find the evidence to 
support their argument on my dinner plate. 


N OW 1 have. The man who made a 
believer of me is Give Davidson, a 
South African who was so disap- 
pointed with the beef offered him by whole- 
salers that he closed his Edinburgh restau- 
rant and set out to learn butchering. Once he 
had mastered his new trade, he and his 
Dundee-born wife. Anne, opened a place 
called the Champany Inn near Linlithgow, 
about 30 minutes' drive west of Edinburgh. 
They serve an array of steaks: rib loin. 
Pope's eye. sirloin and filet (but only reluc- 
tantly, because he considers filet “expensive 
and inferior'*). 

The steaks bear comparison with those of 
Christ Celia in Manhattan or Peter Luger in 
Brooklyn or Morton's in Chicago or Sos- 
tan?a in Florence, which is to say that they 
are thick, seared black on the outside and 
dark red in the center, the juices sealed in, 
the flavor rich and smoky, the texture tender 
but still chewy. Best of all. they f£D the 
nostrils, indeed the whole restaurant, with 
their hearty aroma. 

Last year. Drew Smith, the new editor of 
the Good Food Guide, a campaigner for 
honest and unpretentious cooking, put 
Champany on tire map. In the 198S edition 
of the guide: just out be says that these are 
“the best steaks in Britain." He is absolutely 
right. 

Davidson cooks his steaks on a massive 
charcoal grill that generates enough beat to 
carbonize a rhinoceros, cooks them rare but 
not quite blue, if his customers allow him to 
have his way. and serves them on big oval 
plates. A trolley holds 10 mustards, includ- 
ing a particularly good English one made 
with honey; Kate would surely smile if she 
were ever to find her way to Linlithgow. 

Clive Davidson, a big, jolly man who is 
jusi as serious and just as knowledgeable 
about his beef as a three-star chef in France 
is about his sauces, says that there are six 
main factors that affect the way a steak 
tastes. 


tenflg, pro 
on hs 747 f 
Tbesufi 
plex isscP 
ecouomd^ 
timely, id 


H ERE they are. together with hi s com- 
ments and a description of the meth- 
ods used: 

1. The breed of steer. “I don’t like Aber- 
deen Angus purebred, so I try to use Scots 
blue-gray — the ugliest beast you ever saw. 
Never get near Charolais or a Charobis 
cross, because it's too fibrous, far too fi- 
brous. Hereford has too much marbling. 
What you want is a piece of beef that glis- 
tens. with creamy-colored fat that flakes off 


Taking It Easy on the Purse 


by Craig Claiborne 
• and Pierre Franey 

N EW YORK — It has long been 
our contention, where food is con- 
cerned, that taste has little to dc 
with cost. Although we have am 
pie admiration, for truffles, foie gras an j 
caviar, we can content ourselves with chic) / 
en in tire pot or a simple platter of bo fit l 
beef and stuffed cabbage. . J 

We are, with fair frequency, asked to of7 
dishes that do not put too much strain ony 
purse string s, and that is what we havw 
mind here. . I 

First, we would propose ground me a* 
it beef, poo* or lamb — as lean as pos^ 
Then, there are foods that are some«s 
called “stretchers” — macaroni, 
jinfi so on — that should be used in 
■q uantities although sometimes the 0 ^ 
serve as the focal point of a platter. 
one should consider such underrat* . 
therefore low-cost, cats of meat as V® 51 01 
lamb, one of our favorites- . - 

• Our specific offerings include a “.“"r 
given a special flavor with chop~, ircsn 
basfi, a little Parmesan cheese, cW™ . 
■lie and pine nuts. These ingredi^ are; “ 
course, the baas for the excel 11 
sauce known as petto, which is w 
•a pesto meat loaf. We also inch- * .252? 
base of ground beef topped 
amount of weD-seasoned rna&fP™*? 
This is our most recent vetsk^^™ 1 - 
ftonal FngHsh dish, shepherd* 16 ’ 
our recipe is very much at ‘“J 

origSaZAnd, finally, we . 

lamb stuffed Italian-siyle, * f 
pored of ricotta cheese, sp^ Parmesan 
cbeese and mushrooms. 

Gii irouiru nriz* 

6 potatoes, about lYt pob 
Salt to taste, ff desire ' - 

4 tablespoon peamd, corn 


I. Put the potatoes into a kettle and add 
niter to cover and sail to taste. Bring to the 
mil and cook 20 to 30 minutes or until the 
jbtatoes are tender to the core when pierced 
yith a fork. 

J 2. As the potatoes cook, heat the oil in a 
fekDlet and add the onions and garlic. Cook, 
f stirring occasionally, until they are wilted. 
Add the cuny powder, cumin and coriander 
and cook briefly, stirring. 

3. Add tire meat and cook, stirring down 
with the side of a heavy kitchen spoon to 
break up the lumps. Add salt, pepper, the 
tomatoes, broth and sugar- Cook, stirring 
occasionally, about 20 to 30 minutes. 

4. Meanwhile, preheat the broiler. 

3. Drain the potatoes and put them 
through a food mill or a potato ricer back 
into the hot kettle. Stir in the peas and cook 
briefly. 

6. Add the hot milk, two tablespoons of 
the butter and pepper, preferably white, 
beating with a wooden spoon. 

7. Heat an eight-cup baking dish (a souffii 
dish works well) and spoon the piping-hot 
curried meal into it. Top with the hot 
mashe d potatoes. Smooth over the top. Dot 
with the remaining tablespoon of butler. 

8. Rim the mixture under the broiler until 
the top is golden brown. Serve immediately. 

Yield: See to eight servings. 

PESfTO MEAT LOAF 

2 pounds lean ground pork 
Salt to taste, if desired 
Freshly jptnnd pepper to taste 

1 tablespoon ofive oil 

2 tablespoons finely chopped garfic 
1 cup fine bread crumbs 

16 cop toasted pine nuts 

1 ciq> finely chopped, loosely packed fresh 


1 or 2 tablespoons of powder 
1 teaspoon ground cr[* 

1 teaspoon ground 

2 {Moulds &rotmd 


«■ to taste 
imported tomatoes 
chicken broth 


^oj^f^orfiptreen green peas 
hot milk 
spoons br^ - 


% cap fresh or 
1 fassooon sns 


% cap finely chopped, loosely packed 
paisley 

Vt am freshly grated Parmesan cheese 
1 egg, Bgrtfy beaten 
Fresh tomato sauce (see reape). 

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 

2_ Put the pork in a mixing bowl. Add salt 

^3. Heafthe oil in a small skillet. Add the 
garlic and cook, stirring, until it is wiited 
Add to the pork. , 

4. Add the bread crumbs, pine nuts, basiL 
paisley, Parmesan cheese and egg. Blend 

wdL , , . . . 

5. Put the mixture mto a standard six-cup 
loaf pan. Pack it down and smooth over the 
top. Place in the oven and bake abom one 


hour or until the internal temperature regis- 
ters 165 degrees. Remove from the oven and 
lei the meat loaf stand about IS minutes 
before slicing and serving with the tomato 
sauce. 

Yield: Six to eight servings. 

STUFFED BREAST OF LAMB 

2 breasts of lamb with pockets for stuffing 

Salt to taste, if desired 

Freddy ground pepper to taste 
1 pound fresh spinach in bulk or 1 10-ounce 
package in plastic 
1 tablespoon butter 

1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic 

2 cups thinly s&ced mushrooms, about *4 
pound 

16 cup ricotta cheese 

!4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 

1 egg, lightly beaten 

l-i teaspoon finely jp-aled nutmeg 

1 tablespoon peanut, com or vegetable oil 

1 teaspoon crumbled rosemary leaves 

& cup chicken broth. 

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. 

2. Sprinkle the breasts of lamb inside and 
oui with salt and pepper. 

3. Pick over the spinach and pull off and 
discard any lough stems or blemished leaves. 
Drop the spinach into boiling water to cover 
and cook one minute. Dram. When cool 
enough to handle, press the spinach to ex- 
tract as much excess liquid as possible. Chop 
finely. 

4. Heat the butter in a saucepan and add 
the garlic, mushrooms, salt and pepper. 
Cook, stirring, until the mushrooms give up 
their liquid and it evaporates. Add the 
chopped spinach and stir to blend. Let cool 
slightly. Spoon the mixture mto a mixing 
bowL Add the ricotta. Parmesan, egg ana 
nutmeg. Blend thoroughly. 

5. Stuff each lamb pocket with equal 
amounts of the filling, packing it down to 
almost completely fill the pockets. Sew up 
the openings of each pocket with string. 

6. Rub the meat all over with oil. Sprinkle 
both sides with rosemary and place the 
breasts bone side up on a bakin| dish. 

7. Place in the oven and bake 20 minutes. 

8. Reduce the oven heat to 400 degrees. 
Turn the breasts bone side down. Bake 23 
minutes. Pour off the (at Pour the broth into 
the pan and stir to dissolve the brown parti- 
cles that cling to the bottom and sides of the 
pan. Place in trie oven and bake 15 minutes 
longer. 

Yield: Four to six servings. ■ 

- .'Of'? The Sen York Times 


when you scrape it with your nail It must 
never be at all rubbery.'’ 

2. How the steer is fed- “If possible you 
warn a steer that has had to work for his 
meals, so the meat is best when they have 
been battling to find the short grass in June 
and July. When the grass is too young and 
lender, they gorge themselves and swell up. 
Very bad." 

3. Aging. "We hang the meat for at least 
four weeks, and we have had some very good 
results in hanging it for eight. It goes into a 
chilled room — 39 degrees (4 d eg r ees centi- 
grade), 1 degree above the European Com- 
munity limit — where ionizers help to retard 
the fungus growth and weight loss. StiH, by 
the time we finish, we have lost about a 
quarter of the original weight — 10 percent 
from aging, 13 from trimming. An ordinary 
supermarket steak in Britain hadn ’t been 
aged at alL" 

4. The cul “My absolute favorite is a 
Pope’s eye, which is cut against the grain 
from the point where the hind leg connects 
with the body. It is never flabby and always 
full of flavor.” (There is no direct American 
comparison, since both the pattern of butch- 
ering and the terminology is different Da- 
vidson said he liked American Porterhouses 
and T-bones best-) 

5. Thickness. “You can't cook a thin steak 
well. Ours are a minimum Of one and a 
quarter inches, and they should be thicker." 

6. Cooking. “I paint the steaks with olive 
oil, which has a low flas h point; that means 
that the meat cannot born before it cooks. I 
use a lava-rock grill, heated with gas, that 
must be lighted an hour before cooking. I 
turn the steak as few times as possible, sel- 
dom more than three, because that toughens 
iL And I never salt the meat before cooking, 
because if you do that you let the juices 
escape." 

Steak isn't everything at Champany. 
There are several first courses, including 
frogs' legs cooked over the same grill and 
served in a tiny copper pan with foamy 
butter (my wife’s favorite) and fine gravlax 
with mustard sauce ( mine ). There are deep- 
fried onion rings, real ones, and baked pota- 
toes that have never seen a piece of foiL 

There is an ample salad bar. a rarity in 


Champany 


>• 

' Linlithgow 








LOTHIAN 



Collntor 


MID-LOTHIAN 


PEEBLES n 

Tha New York Tm 


Clive Davidson inspecting the beef. 

Europe, and creditable chocolate mousse 
and pecan pie for those hardy few who can 
cope with desert after an orgy of protein. 
And there is a first class wine list offering the 
full line of Beaujoiais from Georges Du- 
boeuf, lots of 1971 and 1972 Burgundies and 
a selection of South African reds, well served 
by the amiab le and aptly named wine waiter. 
Andrew Backus. 

Not easily satisfied, Davidson has in- 
stalled a pool, imported from La Rochelle in 
western France and the only one of its kind 
in Britain, to hold live lobsters, oysters and 
scallops, as well as langpustes, which the 
Scots call crayfish. The water contains the 
same salts and trace dements as the Atlantic 
Ocean. The cocktail lounge, which he dis- 
likes because it tends to decani too many 
customers into the dining room in no condi- 
tion to appreciate the cooking, is soon to be 
replaced by a raw bar. 

One eats in a round room with stone walls 


under a six-sided peaked wood roof, served 
by young waitresses in gingham pinafores. 
Hunting prints, green velveteen chairs and 
mahogany tables without cloths give the 
place something of the air of a London club. 
But the food in Loudon clubs doesn’t taste 
tike this, and London dubs aren’t surround- 
ed, as is Champany, by a garden populated 
by peacocks. 

The Champany Inn is two miles northeast 
of Linlithg ow at the junction of routes A 904 
and A 803; telephone 683 4532 ; closed Sun- 
day dinner and two weeks at Christmas; 
American Express, Diners' Gub, Visa and 
MasterCard accepted; about $33 for two 
including service and a modest wine. A 
branch has been opened in suburban Edin- 
burgh (Giampany Inn Town, 2 Bridge 
Road, Colin ton; 441 2587). It serves the 
same meat but has not yet completely hit its 
stride. ■ 

e 1935 The New York Times 


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Ihursda^ 

WSE 

Closing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing an Wall Slreel 


JKJt 54 12 
Jt IS 232 


w 




jS? 


6% 3 Ooklnd VI 

20% mt OakHeP 152 SJ 11 19 

3m 23% OtxtPot M t 4561 

17 9% OcdPwt 2 

23% 20 OcdPpf 2-50 11.4 2 

20U 17W OcelP of 2.12 120 5 

51% 4814 OcdPpf A-2S 126 16 

113 WS<% OcdP pflS50 142 35 

S«S% 10114 Occf pf 1462 119 6 


NYSE Highs-Lows 


H M K 
2 8% 3ms »%+ % 

27% 26% 27 +16 

1 » 10 % in + % 
21% 31% 2T%— % 
17% 17% 17% + % 
49% 49% 49%+ % 
10916 IOBVjIW + Vi 
105% 105 105V6 + % 


Jan. 17 


2. 






1840 35% 34% 35 — % 
JO 4.1 M 449 19% W* 19% + % 
51 215 9% 9% 9% + Vfc 

140 55 9 210 29% 29% 29%— % 
30m 1.1 15 92 18% 1016 ISM 




m 


pi3 

■ i 



44 % 

79 

20 +1 
42% 

49% 

3516+ 16 
28%+% 
U — % 
26% 29%— % 
26% 26%—% 
24% 24%+ % 
30% 30% — % 
16% 17 
16% 16% 1616— % 
45% 43% 45% + M 
29% B% 26% — 16 
33% 33% 33% 

M 13% 14 + % 


l 31% VFCOTP 
i 5% Volant 
14 Voter Pf 

i 2% vdovln 

14% VonOra 
2% VOrco 
5% VOrcopf 
30% Vorian 
9% vara 
17% Vmkd 
3% Vantia 
9% vestSa 
23% Viacom 
60M voEPpr i 
60% VoEPpf 1 
52% vae pm ; 
49% VoEPPf 1 
51% VoEPpf < 
14% VbhOY 1 
25% Vomad 
50 VUlCnM S 


at 3 is 
40 52 9 
92 14 15 

U0all4 
42 19 13 
644 IZJ 
995 13L5 
792 126 
720 122 
745 11J 
IJSt 94 12 
13 

244 39 M 


28% 28 
6% 6% 
16% 15% 
2 % 2 % 
am 2ou 
2% 2% 
7% 7% 
4«*fe m 
12 % 12 
22% 21% 
«% 4% 
10 % 10 % 
39% 35% 
TIM TDM 
79 78 

62 61 % 
50% 58% 


28% — % 
6 % + % / 
- % 
JH— % 
30%— % 
2%+% k 
TV.— V. \ 

™%+ U 
70 + % 

8=5 

69%+ a. . 


it 


41% 33% 8CM 2JOO 49 12 002 46% 45% 46%+ % 

43% 2391 SFffl IJ8 a S 3SJ 43% 43M 431A .. 

12% 7%SLIn«l8 90b U 9 20 10 9% 9%—% 2? 

30 19% SPSTac JO 3.1 M 73 25% 25% 25% + % Jj, 

26 15 Sabina JM 2 22 123 17% 17 17 J5 

23 16 SabnRv 2J3el4J 130 17% 17% 17% + M iz 


62 35% TDK 99a 9 20 50 42% 42% 42% 

31 24 TECO 220 79 0 132 50% 30% 30%— % 

15% 7% TGIF 16 100 9% 9% 9% + % 

14% 11% TNP 1.19 85 7 44 M% 13% 14 — % 

34% 17 TRE IJO 44 16 71 22% 22% 22% 


3E 








50% 33% Xanra 3 jOO 75 12 7333 60% 40 40 

50% 45% XaraNOf 545 1U 63 49% 49% 49% 

36 19 XTRA 44 2J 10 219 25% 25% 25% 


31% 34 ZotaO 192 54 ■ B 24% 24% 2M- k“ 
M% 14% Zapata M SJ U <64 14% 14% 14%—.% 

49% 30% zovra 40b J 13 an 49% 40% 4ff»— % 

38% 10% ZraHtlE 7 1232 21% 21 71% + % 

26 U Zara 40 19 10 V 23% 23% 22% + .% 

29% 21% Xurnln 192 44 11 M» 29% 29% 29%— % 


r.' : T -V: 


Vi> ' 

Meetthe 

NewErexich 

Cabinet 

February 26, 1985, Paris 

Following the success of our 1982 conference, we are pleased to announce a one day briefing session 
focusing on “Modernization: Priority for the French Economy 7 
With the cooperation of the French Government, we have gathered together the key ministers most 
directly involved with policies affecting business activities in France. 

The program will include presentations by: 

Pierre Beregovoy, Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget 
Etfitfa Cresson, Minister of Industrial Redeployment and Foreign Trade. 

Hubert Cprien, Minister of Research and Technology. 

Michel Ddetatre, Minister of Labour, Employment and Vocational Trading. 

Roland Dumas,* Minister of External Relations. 

V* DumhaiiKrwtelinpwople. 

Additional insights wifi be provided business executives actively doing busi- For advertising in f or m a t io n and 

by a panel of international business- ness with France. editorial synopsis, please contact 

men and bankers. To register for this exertional Her- Mandy Lawther, Advertising Manager 

Each presentation wfll be followed national conference, please complete Special Reports, in Paris on 747 1265, 
by a queshon-ard -answer period, and and return the registration form below ext 4504 
simultaneous Frendr-English transla- without delay. tj jvwnsg^ssf * L 

tion will be provided at all times. hMay 1985, the IHTwffl publish an flCII ^ OrfaaSfe.^tT.UllllC 


I? i 


INTERNATIONAL HE 
SPECIAL RE 
1985 


TRIBUNE 


TS 


One sure way of getting your message Imenrati-nanHerald Tribune Special Re- 
across to a third of a million decision-makers ports. Th fdowing Reports are scheduled 
in government, business and finance in 164 for 1985, jvitl topics and dates, of course, 
countries around the world is to advertise in subject to notification. 


8k 


m 

to 


m 


KrV. I 

I ^ * I 


tion will be provided at all times. In May 1985,thelHTwffl publish ai 

An important aspect of the confe- in-depth Special Report on the latest 
rence wtO be the extensive opportuni- economic developments and 
ties to engage in informal discussion policies in F rance^ ~ 

with the current policy makers 
and with other 


9craliQ&fe@ribttnc 


FEBRUAR 


Qatar Economy 
International 
Education 
Nigeria 
Cyprus 

MARCH 

Bermuda Economy 
Countertrade 
Japan Economy 
Japan Fashion 

APRIL 

Korea 

Bahrain Economy 
Office Automation 
Germany 
Kuwait Economy 
Banking & Finance 
in Italy 

Travel in France 
Commercial Real 
Estate in Britain 


Arts & Antiques 
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in Britain 

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Telecommunicarions 

Turkey 

Portugal 

JUNE 

Banking & Finance 
in Luxembourg 
Electronic Banking 
Egypt 
Spain 

Cayman Island s 
Economy 
West Africa 






Goman Fashonl 
Commodities \ 
Auto Industry l 
Japan l 

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Banking & Final cd 
in Nordic Couatfc 
Banking & Finance i 
in Arab Countries 

North Yemen 
Hong Kong 
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Small Computers 

OCTOBER 

Greece 

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in Asia 

Italian Fashion 
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in France 
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Energy 

Jinking & Finance 
in Austria 


NOVEMBER 

Saudi Economy 
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Real Estate 
Netherlands Economy 
Construction in 
Arab Countries 
Travel in West Africa 
Euromarkets 
Gulf States 

Latin American Trade 

DECEMBER 

iLondon 

Caribbean/ Central 
\ American 
\ Development 



J *1 ■ i-f via 


Each Report will be earned in all editions 
of the International Herald Tribune, and a 
reprinted version will be available on request, 
at a nominal cost 

For information on placing advertising 
in these Special Reports, or to 
receive preliminary 




editorial synopses of the topic 
contact: Mrs. Mandy Lawth 
Manager, Special Reports, InteiV 
aid Tribune. 181 Avenue Char* 
92521 Neuilly C 
TeL: 747 1265. Tlx.: 613 
to. local IHT 


France, 
or your 




feed on or before February 15. CarietiS^ 




THS’KONE 


TELEX 


18-1-85 


















































ArtEXP 

MYSE PilW* * * 
KWEhlBtd^P.W 
fMMHMl stack* . P.W 

S?ww"ta P,J1 
CMnawJW". 
ntattn» P - M 


Eomtnos resorts P.13 
Fttng rate nolos P.1S 
CaM mortals P.11 
Interest rotes P.11 
Market summary p. 4 
Options P.H 

OTC stock P.14 
Other markets P.T6 


licralbS&ribunc 


FRIDAY. JANUARY 18, 1985 . 

TECHNOLOGY 

Researchers Try to Revive 
Computer Bubble Memory 


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Researchers hope 
to marry the 
durability of bubbles 
to the speed of chips. 


. . » ?.-. : 
-• r- • :• 


By DAVID E. SANGER 

Nev York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Four years ago, the bubble burst for 
bubble memory. Once viewed as one of the most 
promising ways to store and retrieve computer infor- 
mation — a method that preserved it even when the 
plus was pulled and the display screen went dark — magnetic 
bubbles turned out to be too slow and too expensive to be 
competitive, company after company concluded. 

In 1981, after investing millions of dollars, Texas Instruments 
7 Inc. National Semiconductor Corp. and Rockwell International 
Coro; dosed their bubble operations and turned back to the 
traditional means of storing information: chips and magnetic 
Hides. 

Now, however, there are indications that magnetic bubbles 
may make a comeback. At Cara egi e-Mellon University, where a 
new Magnetics Technology 

Researchers hope 

JSSVWifi to marry the 

time put semiconductor de- dur abili ty of bubbles 

' vices on bubble-memory ma- J 

teriaL The development prom- tO the Speed Of Chips. 

ises to make bubble memories 

much and much fast- 

er, combining the durability of bubbles with the speed of semi- 
conductor chaps. 

- ‘It’s a very promising step,” said Lane Mason, a senior 
.industry analyst for Da toques t, which follows die memory mar- 
ket “With bubble prices so high, a big enough market just hasn't 
developed to give you that warm and fuzzy feeling that bubbles 
are hoe to stay.” The worldwide market last year was about $140 
million, or “about equal to about two weeks of 64K RAM 
.production,” Mr. Mason said. The 64K RAM. the most common 
of memory chips, is a random-access-memory chip which can 
store 65,536 bits of information. 

Bubble memories differ greatly from semiconductors, however. 
They are best envisioned as tiny, permanent magnets on the 
surface of a chip made of garnet, the same material used in 
gemstones. The position of the bubbles, each of which represents 
a single bit of information, is changed by two sets of coils wound 
around the garnet. 

* “AH these bubbles are marching around like a band an a 
football field, and each one has to march out to be read,” said 
Mark Kiyder, a former researcher at International Business 
Machines Corp.'s T J. Watson Research Laboratory who worked 
with David Greve and Paul Rasky on the Camegie-MeDon effort. 
The. from each member of the band are then translated 
through a handful of “support” chips surrounding each bubble 
device, and sent to the computer’s processor. 

T HE benefits are tremendous. In a desktop computer, data 
might be stored — at least temporarily — in RAM chips, 
but in the industry such chips are known as “volatile” 
That means that when flic power disappears, so do the data, 
. instantly and irrevocably. More often, data, are written onto a 
. -magnetic disk, where thing s are more p erm a n e n t- But disk drives 
- are heavy and cannot take much bouncing around. 

Because they arc solid-state devices, bubble memories can take 
" all sorts of abuse. And because the data are stored magnetically, a 
r^onstant stream of power is not necessary. Thus, they are particu- 
larly attractive in portable computers, and companies like the 
Teleram Corp. have used them in their models for some years. 

■ However, forreasons of economy .other portables, like Tandy’s 
- popular Model 100 portable, use RAM’s supplied with power by 
: battery packs. . • 

“Bubbles wade for years and years, which make them particu- 
larly attractive to the military, and anyone who needs memory in 

a miserable environment,” Mr. Kiyder said. As a result, bubble 
memories have been incorporated in robotics equipment on the 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 3) 


Currency Rates 


s 

Ai m U nlOH 3396 
Bnmds(o) 07109 
Frankfurt 3.1816 
London tW 1.1 18S 
Mika . . UK&58 

NewYork(c) — 
Porto MS 

Tokyo 254.W 

Zurfc* 16738 

1 ECU ' 84876 

i sdk aseuw 


sir. eu ™ r 

04175 JtodMonS 
flJOMJ JUNtrtascMMn 
,08116 BoJgfcnfefraM 
0JM7 Cannons 
0J87S OotUtm 
'D.wm FUaWs mark 
04678 Oraricdractaa 
Q-ian Hang Knot 


DJL F.F. «i- 

11157 ■ 36495 • MM 
2042 6433 32625* 

3164* 1426* 

34578 105068 118640 

61440 260J7 

3.174 9J7 155240 

34631 — 4581 * 

8025 2650 T3L10* 

8406* 27465 * 0.1368 
13262 64064 1J6S.11 

349767 949279 HXt. 


Dollar Vahies 


_ *■ Cu rrmcr 

0.9766 IriHlC 
84015 lunoH sbekni 
3J» KUaUdtoar 
0481 MOtoy-rtoaoB 
MOBS Norw.knM 
ojh» PUL nan 
04051 Part-Mcnda 
83791 Saadi rival 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


IBM Net 
Rose 20% 
In 1984 

Apple Higher; 
Tandy Off 24% 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — International 
Business Machines Corp. said 
Thursday that its fourth-quarter 
profit climbed 16.6 percent from a 
year earlier, while full-year 1984 
earnings jumped 20 percent 

Other computer makers posted 
mixed results. Tandy Corp. said its 
fiscal second-quarter profit 
slumped 24 percent, and Hon- 
eywell Inc. said fourth-quarter 
profit tumbled 65 percent because 
of a charge related to the previously 
ann ounced plans to sdl i is Syner- 
tek semiconductor uniL 

Apple Computer, meanwhile, 
said its fiscal fust-quarter profit 
soared nearly eightfold from a year 
earlier. But its president warned of 
an “extremely challenging’' quarter 
ahead because of rising dealer in- 
ventories of personal computers. 

That troubled Wall Street, and 
Apple's stock fell $1,875 a share, to 
$28,375 bid. in over-the-counter 
trading. 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
change, IBM slipped 25 cents, to 
$123,625 a share. Tandy lost 12% 
cents, to $25, and Honeywell edged 
up 25 cents, to $58.75. 

IBM said its fourth-quarter prof- 
it rose to $2.17 billion, or $3.55 a 
share, from $1.86 billion, or $3.06 a 
share, a year earlier. Revenue rose 
12.4 percent to $14.5 billion from 
$12.9 billion. 

The results were in line or slight- 
ly ahead of many analysts' fore- 
casts, some of whom praised the 
company’s showing given the 
strong dollar's adverse effects on 
IBM's revenue overseas. 

The dollar climbed 15 percent 
last year. If it had held steady, 1984 
profit would have been up 32.4 


BerUnrBased Schering’s Big Role 
Abroad Helped Profit Jump in ’84 


By Warren Gerler 

International Herald Tribune 

BERLIN — Sobering AG is a 
loner in this divided city, the last 
of West Germany’s major com- 
panies to main lain headquarters 


last year. If it had held steady, 1 984 
profit would have been up 32.4 
percent, IBM’s c hairman, John R. 
Opel said in a statement. 

IBM said that if the dollar re- 
mains at current levels, the compa- 
ny's revenue growth will be held 
down as reported in dollars, “par- 
ticularly in the first six months." 

IBM’s 1984 earnings rose to 
$6.58 billion, or $10.77 a share, 
against $5.49 billion, or S9.04 a 
f Continued on Page 15, CoL 6) 


maceutical and chemical group 
might appear cut off from the 
main currents of world trade. 
Sobering is more closdy tied to 
international markets than any 
major West German company. 
Eighty-two percent of the 
group's 1984 revenue of just un- 
der 5 billion Deutsche marks 
(about $1.57 billion) came from 
foreign sales. 

Thai international connection 
paid off big last year with sunn- 
ing profits. And this year, stock- 
holders are expected to receive a 
dividend boost 

Klaus Pohle, one of the com- 
pany's six directors, pointed to 
the helpful effects of the strong 
dollar on his company’s foreign 
operations. He especially singled 
out operations in the United 
States, where 1984 revenue 
topped 1 billion DM and where 
the market surpassed that of 
West Germany as the largest for 
Schering products for the first 
lime. 

Mr. Pohle said 1984 group re- 
sults would show record net 
profits exceeding by “at least 50 
percent” 1983*s 80.1 million 
DM. 

“If anyone is going to profit 
from an export boom, then 
Schering is going to been the top 
of that list as far as German 
companies are concerned,” said 
Mr. Pohle, who oversees compa- 
ny finances from his office on the 
16th Door of the modem Sober- 
ing Building, which overlooks 
the Berlin wall 200 meters (660 
feet) away. 

Mr. Pohle joined Schering’s 
board in 1981 after being finance 
director at the West German 
chemical giant, BASF AG, a 
Schering competitor. 

Final profit figures. Mr. Pohle 
said, would depend on exchange- 
rate conversions as well as spe- 
cial value-added tax rebates and 
special depreciation allowances 
for companies incorporated in 
West Berlin. 

Beyond those significant fi- 
nancial incentives, Schering feds 


American Airlines Cuts 
Domestic Ticket Prices 


Lota interbank rates on Jan. 17 , mdudins few. 

. Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Fnwkfurt, Milan, Pais. New York rates at 
4 PM. 


if. Yen 
13438 >141 JOT 
21*18 2946 • 
11852* 1J52* 
25945 2B475S 
73145 749 

2472 2S415 
344318295* 

9127 

14907 * 

14667 177433 
24051 247397 


per i ri _*_ P * T 
U 4 J Stoat*. UJJ 

1434 04543 Stamm 5 2301 

66155 044 S.AfrtOB> road 22727 

83059 84012 S.KOWW0C 822.10 

2493S 04057 5«m.PKKta 17640 

92175 &10M Samd. krona 9.135 

105695 04335 TOtwmt 3929 

17200 88366 TM boM 27 J2S 

ISO 02723 UJLE. atrtaai 16725 


i Stomas: U475 irfshx 

•to) CMweretal Iraae tb> Anwinte Modedtotw orw pound tel AmauateMolM tobuv oiw acton 

' unltt of UO (>d tfnlto of U 80 Iv) IMtt of U 400 

Bank l Hew York!; Bantu* Uatkmete d* '(^u^lfdAP * 

.tntenattonafa crinvesttssement (amor, rival OrtmO. Other data from Reuters ana Ar. 


Interest Rates 


^Eurocurrency Deposits 


Jan. 17 


The Associated Press 

DALLAS — American Airlines 
announced Thursday that it will 
offer discounts of up to 70 percent 
on flights in the United Slates. 

The new fares range from $39 for 
short trips to $129 for one-way, 
cross-oounliy traveL 

Trans Worid Airlines said it 
would match the fares “across the 
board.” A United Airlines spokes- 

AMR Corp. promotes its presi- 
dent. Business People. Page 15. 

ynan said his company would also 
match the fares, “reluctantly.” Oth- 
er airlines were expected to follow. 

American's restrictions — in- 
cluding a 30-day advance purchase 
and a provision that 25 percent of 
the ticket price is non-refundable 
— will protect the airline's balance 
sheet, according to Lowell Duncan, 
a spokesman. 

American posted record earn- 
ings for 1 984 despite a fourth-quar- 
ter slump and reportedly has a Sl- 
billion fund of cash and short-term 
investments available. It said it did 
not believe that it was touching off 
a fare war — something for which 
the airline has criticized competi- 
tors in the pasL 

Following disclosure of the fare 
cuts, stocks of airlines and aircraft 
manufacturers were battered on 
Wall Street. (Slocks report, Page 6). 

Charles Hanneman. an airline 


« .rr. s rr„ H. .rs 

i 12 . 12M 109W1B* 949 -9* ^ 

VMMW. _ 


Canada Considers Accord 
With U.S. on Free-Trade Area 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Jul 17 


-Sara: 


ftsaunr Rota 
Fodanfl Funds 
Primal^ 

Bnkar Loon fete 
Casa. Paw. I0-179 davs 
XbmUTi Treasury Bins 
6-re0nMi Treasury Bills 
CDS win 
CDtttWWm 


Lombam Rata 
OrendaM feta 
SnaMfiKDi interbank 
Interbank ' 
4*wnth Interbank 


i"terv«Bon' Rate 
CfdT looney 

Interbank 

►moots iqtarbdak 
VreortR Interbank 


8 5/14 m 
1WHA 

9-HW. 9-WA 
UB. US 
7JT 7J1 
7.95 7.95 

744 7M 
IX 755 


i5B S3D 
545 5JS 
555 650 

' 558 '458 

555 60S 


IOWi iwn 

Wfc «>« ■ 

1«fe to 7/14 
Hfik IMi 
RM lOVb 


6 nm. 
BOk-B'h 


Britain 

Bank Base Rata 
Call Momv 
flndav Treasurv Blit 
Vnontti Intotbonk 


DHeaunt Rate 
Call Momv 
6iHiay Interbank 


One Pfw. 

12 12 

UK 12 

lltoi lHk 
IZte It 9/16 


5 5 

&Vi 6 3/16 
6 5/16 6 5/16 


Gold Prices 


—■ f SS ” ;= 

STST™ s jjg 

S2, SS 5SS 

Mwrork - 30730 

OMtekfl ftalnos for London. Paris end un«n- 
^a,oMnlna end cicslw Prica* fw 
ml Xurtdv «• rant Comet currenl oontren. 
AH prfcw to UiS oor ounce. 

Source: Routers. 


PM. oi-w 
30455 + 1-40 


30555 +175 
HKto + 280 


Smtom.- Reuters, Comment***. Credit Lr- 
T^notSr iJards &tak. Bdttk «f Tetm 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — Canada is mull- 
ing the possibility of entering into a 
free- trade-area agreement with the 
United States as one way of im- 
proving trade between the two na- 
tions, Canada’s counsel general in 
New York said Thursday. 

A free-trade area is an agreement 
between two or more countries to 
abolish tariffs and other mutual 
trade barriers between the signato- 
ries. Such an agreement is allowed 
under the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade as long as it elim- 
inates practically all barriers be- 
tween the signatories, the official, 
Robert Johnstone, said. 

-There’s serious discussion going 
on and the government wants to 
Ati^aa the people of Canada in a 
wide-ranging discussion on this." 
Mr. Johnstone said. 

He said the Canadian govern- 
ment will release a study on pulling 
into efFect a free-trade-area agree- 
ment winch will then become the 
basis of a discussion on the issue. 

Also under discussion are so- 
called sectoral agreements which 
elimina te barriers on an industry- 



industry analyst at Thomson 
McKinnon Securities in New York, 
said he did not expect the fare cuts 
to have a major impact. He noted 
that People Express already 
charges SI 19 for transcontinental 
flights and asked, “Where's the 
damage?” Some other airlines offer 
discount one-way, cross-country 
fares as low as $99. 

Mr. Hanneman said the restric- 
tions on the American fares “are if 
anything tighter Than anything now 
in effect” and that the penalty pro- i 
vision is new for the industry. 

American's new fares take effect 
Feb. 18 and arc good for any or the 
92 rides the airline serves within 
the United States, excluding Ha- 
waii and Alaska. 

■ Airline Faces FAA Fine 

The Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration has proposed a S375.000 
fine against American Airlines for 
using a plastic wing slat rather than 
a required metal part in DC- 10 jets 
even after the plastic slat failed 
nice. United Press International 
reported Thursday from Washing- 
ton. 

The airline has IS days to appeal 
the proposed fine. The FAA found 
that a plastic pulley instead of a 
metal one was used to cany the 
cable that retracts the slats. The 
slats are curved metal plates that 
are extended with a pufley system 
from the front of the wing. 


A Schering scientist works on steroid research. 


at home in Berlin because of the 
company's unique access to the 
city’s two major universities and 
its 180 research institutes. Ber- 
lin's first gpne-technology re- 
search center, a 80-miilion-DM 
joint-venture between Schering 
and the city government, will 
open this year. 

Schering’s own research-and- 
developmenl outlays last year 
rose 15 percent to 500 million 
DM from 433 million DM and 
will grow by at least another 30 
million DM in 1985, Mr. Pohle 
said. 

“The key question for Scher- 
ing is how fast it can translate its 
commendable research efforts 
into marketable products." said 
an analyst at Deutsche Bank. 
“They know the international 
pharmaceutical market doesn't 
wait long for stragglers.” 

About 400 million DM of last 
year’s research funds went to 
biomedical research, including 
developing new drugs for cardio- 
vascular and central-nervous- 
system problems as well as for 
final testing of the fourth genera- 
tion of oral contraceptives devel- 
oped by Schering. called Gesto- 
den. 


Mr. Pohle said much of 1984’s 
proGts would be put back into 
retained earnings to finance ex- 
panding operations in the Unit- 
ed States, a Schering priority 
since the late 1970s. 

In 1979. the company ac- 
quired the internal-medicine di- 
vision of Copper Laboratories. 
This division was renamed Ber- 
lex Laboratories Inc. Ashland 
Oil Co.'s chemical-products divi- 
sion, now known as Sherex 
Chemical Co, was also acquired 
that year. 

Part of the expansion will in- 
clude launching Gesioden on the 
U.S. market, where Schering ex- 
pects to get approval from the 
Food and Drug Administration 
without mud) delay. 

This would mark the first time 
that Schering would market the 
piB in the United States after a 
long history of troubled relations 
with the United States. 

“Our recent focus on the U.S., 
where our sales have grown from 


30 million (DM) in 1974 to over 
one billion (DM) today, is a clear 
change of direction at Schering.” 
Mr. Pohle said. “Our operations 
in America were expropriated 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


fiCOK'V 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 6 


Page 11 


Finance Chiefs 
Put Off Action 

On Currencies 


United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Top finance 
officials of five leading industrial 
countries said Thursday that they 
would be willing to undertake coor- 
dinated intervention in foreign- 
currency markets when necessary, 
but stopped short of saying they 
would do so now. 

The statement came as fin a n ce 
ministers and central bank chiefs of 
the United Stales, Britain, West 
Germany, France and Japan 
wound up a two-day me e t ing here. 

Although the meeting had been 
scheduled before the dollar began 
its most recent climb against other 
major currencies, there had been 
speculation before the meeting be- 
gan Wednesday that the group 
might take joint action to weaken 
the dollar. 

“We are wining to undertake co- 
ordinated intervention in instances 
where coordinated intervention 
would be helpful" said Treasury 
Secretary Donald T. Regan, speak- 
ing for the group, known as the 
“Group of Five." 

The agreement reaffirmed a 
commitment that these nations 
made at the summit of major indus- 
trial nations in Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia, in May 1983. 

They agreed at that time to resort 
to coordinated intervention when 
necessary. 

The Group of Five is an informal 
body representing the five nations. 
It was formed in the late 1970s and 
meets two or three times a year. 

The announcement at the end of 
an all-day meeting Thursday said 
the ministers, “in light of recent 
developments in foreign exchange 
markets, reaffirmed their commit- 
ments made at the Williamsburg 
S ummi t to undertake coordinated 
intervention in the markets as nec- 
essary.” 

The meeting took place while the 
dollar has been strong and many 
European currencies, particularly 
the British pound, have been at or 
near record lows. 

■ B undesbank Stands Finn 

The Bundesbank, West Germa- 
ny's central bank, ruled Thursday 
in favor of preserving economic 
growth rather than price stability in 


Dollar Finishes 
Lower in N. Y. in 
SkittishTrading 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
turned lower against most curren- 
cies in skittish late trading Thurs- 
day amid speculation that finance 
□musters meeting in Washington 
might act to hall its record-shatter- 
ing climb. 

“It's a little bit of a waiting 
game." said Elaine Lloyd, a curren- 
cy trader at Irving Trust Co. in 
New York. _ . . . 

In New York, the pound finished 
at $1.1235. up from $1.1187. Id 
L ondon, the pound fell to $1.1 185. 
compared with $1.1205. The dollar 
finished at 254.10 Japanese yen. 
down from 254.925 yen in Tokyo. 
It finished at 254.15 yen in New 
York, down from 254.85. 

Other late dollar rates in Europe 
compared with late Wednesday in- 
cluded 3.1816 Deutsche marks, 
down from 3.1833; 2.6738 Swiss 
francs, down from 2L6758, and 9.75 
French francs, up from 9.746. 

In New York, the dollar finished 
at 3.174 DM, down from 3.187; at 
1672 Swiss francs, down from 2.68, 
and at 9.72 French francs, down 
from 9.7675. 


deriding to maintain its key lend- 
ing rate at current levels. Reuters 
reported from Frankfurt 

In response to the strength of the 
dollar, several members of the 
bank's central committee were re- 
ported to have favored a hike of 0.5 
percent in the 53 percent interest 
rate charged for short-term loans to 
the banking system. The dollar has 
climbed to near 3.2 Deutsche 
marks. 

They argued that the surge in the 
dollar' threatens price stability in 
West Germany by making import- 
ed goods more expensive. Oppo- 
nents had argued that making the 
cost of borrowing more expensive 
could threaten & country’s eco- 
nomic growth. 


m 






For the man with exceptional goals, 
anew dimension in banking service 


by-industry basis. Two such agree- 
ments, one governing the auto in- 
dustry and another for military 
production, already exist between 
the two countries. 

But sectoral-trade agreements 
could run into roadblocks if waiv- 
ers could not be obtained from 
GATT members, he said. 

The most-favored nations clause 
of GATT requires a nation to ex- 
tend conditions of any bilateral 
agreements on lowering trade bar- 
riers to all members of the organi- 
zation. Mr. Johnstone said. 

Canada and the United States 
are each other's largest trading 
partners. In 1983, the latest year for 
which data are available, U.S. ex- 
ports to Canada totaled S43 billion. 
In contrast its exports to the much 
larger European Community in the 
same year totaled $43 billion while 
Japan purchased only 522 billion in 
U.S. goods. 

Since Lhe Progressive Conserva- 
tive party came to power in Sep- 
tember. Ottawa has increased its 
efforts to improve relations with 
the United States, which had 
soured over such issues as trade 
and U3. investment in Canaria. 


TTTThat makes Trade Develop- 
Wment Bank exceptional? To 
start with, there is our policy of 
concentrating on things we do 
unusually well. For example, 
trade and export financing, 
foreign exchange and banknotes, 
money market transactions and 
precious metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to serve 
your needs, wherever you do 
business. Reason : We have 
recently joined American Express 
International Banking Corpora- 


tion, with its 80 offices in 39 
countries, to bring you a whole 
new dimension in banking ser- 
vices. 

While we move fast in serv- 
ing our clients, we’re distinctly 
traditionalist in our basic poli- 
cies. At the heart of our business 
is the maintenance ot a strong 
and diversified deposit base. Our 
portfolio of assets is also well- 
diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a con- 
servative ratio of capital to 
deposits and a high degree of 


liquidity -sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of hank you would entrust 
with your business, get in touch 
with us soon. 

TDB banks in Geneva, London, Paris, 
Luxembourg, Chiasso, Motile Carlo, 
Nassau. Zurich. 

TDB is a member of the American 
Express Company, which has assets of 
US$ 6 2.8 billion and shareholders' 
equity of USS 4 A billion. 



Trade Development Bank 


Shown at left, the head office 
of Trade Development Bank. Geneva. 


An American Express Company 









INTEKNATIONAL 



Tables include tbe nationwide prices 
up to (tie dosing on Wall Street 


12 Month 
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Oxford on America 


(A Confidential Document.) 


America is changing; that is agreed. 

Why, and from what, and to what, 
are not agreed 

Yet these questions touch us alL 
For two years, 15 senior scholars 
from Oxford University studied these 
questions in depth.Their findings are now 
presented in America in Perspective. 

America in Perspective is a detached comprehensive look at 
the state of America today and the potential of America tomorrow. 
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In 269 pages, America in Perspective casts a penetrating light 
on American politics, economics, markets and society. And a 
controversial light on the future of the American dream. 

Above all, America in Perspective provides an objective 
account of America now and where it will be in ten years time. 
It may be the most comprehensive study of America in existence 
today. 

Commissioned privately as a major $200,000 Oxford Analytics 
study, America in Perspective had such a profound effect on its 
sponsors that they now urge that it be given a wider audience. 

Accordingly, a limited number are being released for public sale. 
Ybu can obtain a copy by means of the coupon below. 

America in Perspective: the more important America is to 
your company or you, the more you will profit from it 


IF YOU THINK 

THE FIREBRANDS OF THE 1960’S 
CHANGED THE SYSTEM, 
WAIT UNTIL YOU SEE THE LATEST 
BATCH OF REVOLUTIONARIES. 


, • > T 


They are the new corporate elite. Entrepre- 
neurs, not managers. Building new companies 
and rejuvenating old ones. 

And their views of business and the world 
often bring them into sharp conflict with the 
leaders of the “old" economy. 

This week in Business Week read who they 
are, how they’re reshaping the economy, in what 
way they’re influencing policies in Washington, 
and how they may affect vour life 


It’s the kind of significant story you'll find 
every week in Business Week. And the dynamic, 
authoritative style of reporting is another reason 
Business Week is the number one business 


magazine. 


. ?*** 


BusinessWeekri 


. a : • ■ 


* 







<■? i 


I 




I 


I > 





OXFORD 

ANALYTICA 


1 '-J 

ts £ ' - ffeiitW-C 


TO- OXFORD ANALYTIC A LTD.. 9] A HIGH STREET. OXFORD OXI IBJ. ENGLAND. PLEASE SEND ME 

OF AMERICA IN PERSPECTIVE □ I F.NC1XJSK MY CHEQUE FOR S2S5 PER COPY. □ PLEASE BILL ME MY COMPANY. 


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T 8-1-85 



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Expects Lower Net 
For Last Quarter of ’84 


■ Return 

* TORONTO — General Motors 
Oxp. vUl probably report lower 
-earnings foe the 1984 fourth quar- 
ter because of strikes in the United 
-States aid Canada, the company 
' thannan, Roger B. Smith, said 
vlbariday- 

“I don't see how (higher earn- 
ings) would be possible with the 
vflforv- we Hast in the two strikes" 
last September and October in 
North America, he said. 

• GM reported net income of $1 J 
hjlKn n, or $4J 1 per share, in the 
J983 fourth quarter. 

The United Auto Workers struck 

for six days in (he United States 
last year. In Canada, about 56400 
workers were oat for almost two 
weeks in a strike that also affected 
about 50,000 U.S. workers. 

- The strike Jed the Canadian sec- 
tion of the UAW to seek, a break 
with theUS. onion because of con- 
flicts between the two organiza- 
tions. 

■ Mr. Smith said be was not con- 
cerned about dealing with a sepa- 
rate Canadian union and stills sees 
Canada as an attractive place to 
invest 


On another subject, he said 
GM’s Canadian branch would 
have a “substantia]” advantage on 
bidding to supply parts to the com- 
pany’s new Saturn Corp. subsid- 
iary because of the lower Canadian 
dollar 

GM earlier this month an- 
nounced a SS-biUion plan to begin 
building a new line of small cars 
later this decade from a plant that 
will likely be located in the United 
Slates. 

General Motors of Canada Ltd. 
is also considering building a new 
small-car plant with Suzuki Motor 
Co. of Japan but that plan remains 
“in the paper stage,’* Mr. Smith 
said. 

He said he believes that while the 
existing partial free-trade agree- 
ment covering automobiles be- 
tween the United States and Cana- 
da has been a success, the accord 
should be reexamined from time to 
time. 

Mr. Smith later told an industry 
group that he was not suggesting a 
“wholesale" revamping of die pact 
but said “effective trade policies 
must always be flexible and respon- 
sive to change.” 



TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


6.3% Profit Rise 
Expected for '84 
By Matsushita 

Reuters 

OSAKA, Japan — Matsu- 
shita Elec trie Industrial Co. 
said Thursday that profits in 
the fiscal year that ended Nov. 
20 would rise to about 250 bil- 
lion yen ($981 million), up 63 
percent from a year earlier. 

Sales in the fiscal year are 
expected to rise 5.8 percent, to 
3,450 billion yen from a year 
earlier, it said. The company 


Rockwell to Pay $1.6 Billion 
In Cash to Buy Aflen-Bradley 


said it plans to pay a 10-yen 
dividend for the year. 

The expected poor growth 
rate for the year is attributable 
to die uncertainty of worldwide 
economic conditions, it said. 

Video-equipment sales rose 
21.9 percent to 1,026 Union 
yen, from 84238 biffion a year 
earlier, it said. Communication 
and industrial equipment sales 
rose 29.4 percent to 61345 bil- 
lion yen from 474.08 billion a 
year earlier. 

Electronic components sales 
rose 31.6 percent to 471.76 bil- 
lion yea from 358.45 billion a 
year earlier. 


The Astedaud Frets 

PITTSBURGH - Rockwell In- 
ternational Corp. announced 

Sl.&fwhon in cash tcfacquire 
len-Bradley Co„ a leading maker of 
automation equipment. 

The purchase of Ahen-Bradley’s 
common stock outstanding has 
been approved by Rockwell’s di- 
rectors and the shareholders of Al- 
len-Bradley, said Rockwell, an 
aerospace and electronics compa- 
ny. 

Rockwell, riding a business crest 


last nine years, will be gaining an 
important foothold in the growing 
field of factory automation. ABen- 
Bradk/s principle products are 
automated controls, the electronic 
devices that control nmrhim* 

Allen-Bradley reported sales of 
$942 million and earnings of $90 
million, both records, in the fiscal 
year ended Nov. 30. Analysts be- 
lieve it bolds the leading share, esti- 
mated at 30 percent, of the US. 
market for aptnmat#*i controls. 

The management of Allen-Brad- 
ley put the company up for sale in 
Oaober. 


A group led by company manag- 
ers said in December that it 
planned to buy the company with 
money borrowed against Afien- 
Bradky’s assets. The West German 
electronics manufacturer, Siemens 
AG, also hid for the company. 

Rockwell the builder of the 
space shuttle and the B-1B nuclear 
bomber, set company records with 
sales of $93 billion and net income 
of $496 million for the fiscal year 
ended Sept. 30. 

Rockwell’s common shares 
dosed at $30,625 Thursday, down 


Exchange. 

“Allen- Bradley will be a sub- 
stantial new core business for 
Rockwell” said Robert Anderson, 
the Rockwell chairman. 

C.R. Whitney, chairman and 
chief executive officer of Allen- 
Bradley, and Tracy O’Rourke, 
president and chief operating offi- 
cer, said in a joint statement, “Al- 
though we were hopeful the man- 
agement buyout would succeed, we 
believe our association with Rock- 
well win support and enhance the 
continued success of Allen- Brad- 
ley-” 


Berisford S&W 
Reports Higher 
Sales, Earnings 

Roam 

LONDON — Berisford, S&W, 
PLC reported Thursday pretax 
profit of £8033 million ($71.6 mil- 
lion) for the year ended Sept. 30 on 
revenues of £5.7 billion. 

The comparative figures for the 
previous year were £55.64 million 
in profits and £4-25 billion in reve- 
nues. 

Berisford is a bolding company 
for a diversified group that includes 
sugar refiners, commodity and in- 
surance brokers, and various food 


companies. 

Berisford said steps to expand its 
financial -service operations pro- 
vided the year's mam strategic 
achievement. Monthly oil revenues 
are running at about £336.000. The 
group is participating in 21 produc- 
ing wells in the United Stales and 
further development drilling is ex- 
pected in coming months. 

A lower contribution from a sub- 
sidiary, British Sugar Corp PLG 
was attributed to a depressed sug- 
ar-beet crop, higher European 
Community levies and lower EC 
profit-margin increases. 


U.S, $175,000,000 

National Westminster 
Finance B.V, & 

(Incorporated in The Netherlands with limited liability) 

Guaranteed Floating Rate Capital 
Notes 1991 

In accordance with the provisions of the 
notice Is hereby given that for the six months 
interest period from 18 January, 1 985 to 18 July, 
1985 the Notes will carry an Interest Rate oi 
9Vte% per annum. The Interest payable on the 
relevant interest payment date, 18 July, i98o 
against Coupon No. 8 will be U.S. $227.82. 

By The Chase Manhattan Bank, N A, London 
Agent Bank 


8%% CONVERTIBLE DEBENTURES 1080 
due 1991/1995 


ELSEVIER-NDUnv 


The undersigned hereby announces that Elsevler- 
NDU N.V. will redeem by prepayment all of the out- 
standing 8%% Convertible Debentures 1980 due 
1991/1995 (the "Debentures”). The redemption date 
has been fixed at 1st March 1985. 


Its Berlin Base Doesn’t Isolate Schering From Big Role Abroad 


(Coataned from Page II) financing costs fmm a major over- shares are a sense that tire company Oral contraceptives. 


/ 'Schering for any of our products 
V.sold there. 

■>*« “Well that loss came as such a 
;* ? \ shock to Scbointfs management 
i: 2?tbat far years the Berlin board 
rl is- : didn’t want to gp back to the states. 


rhemirflls, Lechler-Chemie GmbH and agro-chemicals, 
and Isar-RakoQ Chemie GmbH, to tv t»ir*vw»*r nf 


“Acquiring FB 
Schering’s growth 
broader basis,” 


ano isar-Kaxou i_nenue union, re takeover ^ FBC, which broader basis,” said Margot 

hdp finance the acquisition of ^ highly successful cereal SchSnen, an analyst at Wesx- 

FTC- . . r fungicide, ^ortak, and has a deutsche Landesbai noting that 

P™* 51 strong marketing network in Eu- there are substantial risks in con- 
and a possible dividend increase at ™ and the United States, en- centrating too heavily in the fierce- 


where tries, but especially so for Schering 
et leader given its overseas exposure," she 
) million said. 

r, or 12 Schering employs 23,000 world- 
wide, with 7,000 in Wes! Berlin at 
- ciMj.lv the company’s headquarters and 
iron mis m a 7300118 factories there. 

Maron, Several thousand workers arc in- 
3,0 iWe« vo/ved in research and production 
\ 0 ihot 31 Bergkamen, West Germany. 


I Kingdom of Sweden 

U.S. tlSajBBbjm Floating Rate 
Notes Due January 1995 
FOr the six months 16th January, 
1985 to 16th July, 1985 the Notes 
will cany an interest rate of9V4ft 
per annum with a Coupon Amount 
of U.S.S1 162a74. 
Bankers Trust Company, 


Fiscal Agent 


[Gold Options (frinhS/a). 


= ;_*r, managers here who recognize the 
■y] -:'j heed to return to that huge tnar- 

"■ i s.:l Expansion will not preclude 
i ^shareholders from sharing in I984’s 


fcheririg W fuded a smjge in ihe Schering ^beco^e one of ly c^rtitive int^ationalTh^- 

many's share pnee smee last ^ ^ lo^yers * world maceutical market that includes “25_SS JSJSS 


company’s share price since last 
summer. 

Sobering's shares, traditional fa- 


gro-cbemical business overnigbL 
As tire food requirements of the 


£ 'sharply improved results, Mr. a*?d associate 


HPofalesaNL 


f ■ no IOC IUUU lcuuucufcuu vi uic — j 

and associate the Mmpany’s labd grow d^d for hCTbiadcs Mrs 
MU, ,ts p-htaSTKlto * 


B^kt AG. both based in West Oer- 

said. 

Mrs. SchOnen said that although “1 ihinlr having a backup hea ti- 
the dollar helped Schering’s 19 


IWcb 

fcfc. 

Mel 

Aag. 

250 

1825-1973 

V3XBJ30 



300 

1125-1275 

21202250 

28502023 

3H1 

575 725 

nrrvvA«n 

23003650 

320 

250- 60S 

10254175 

IA75TB25 

SO 1 

101.200 1 

675 S3 

T275-1525 

30 1 

050- 125 1 

*25 575 

900-1050 


GJUglP-Ma 



quarters is a thing of the past, bat 


ment of oral^traceotivaintE re® 3 * 0 brisk, according to Sdrer- results, the company should be that’s up to shareholders to de- 

. . wvuuuw^iu.w 111 11 H. I_ 0 ’_ rin)«aictc MM* m inn fort I ; J 


id “*{ Without being specific, he said ing’s strategists. 

£ . S' - ^ barch0l fS^i C ?§fS^^nI over the past six months by Agnvchemicals, including herbi- 

advancing from alow of 316 DM in cides and pesticides, had accounted 
I'; '■ • ^ a My to^nuiisday’s 4554 DM on for only 15-18 percent of volume at 

fi.-'^viriend on somewhat disappc^- ^ p raakfurt Exchange, up Schering before the FBC acquisi- 
- “g earnmgs (hiring the part sevoal ^ g Wednesday. ^ bon but today account for 32 per- 
:: 1 v ^Uicn the company has be en ^ addiliai to investor aware- cent, compared with 42 percent for 
f* m 8 n^ OT r^fructnnng. pluirrmSnicals. 


■* '» ' Net profit dropped 22 percent to tion to benefit from the strong dd- Industrial chemicals, fine cfaemi- “A sharp drop in the dollar's 
q- rj:.80.1 rmllioa DM m 1983 from 103 lar, analysts say, other factors cals and electro-plating take up the value this year is a big risk for all 
f' TdlhoB in 1982 as result Of . high er behind the demand for Sobering's rest. export oriented German compa- 

rt .% •. I 


wary of trying to expand too fart ride," be gain 

overseas. She said Schering also 

must watch developments in IjHti 

America closely, wnere the compa- r— 
try’s subsidiaries are being battered 
by hyperinflation and radical ex- 
change-rate fluctuation but are un- 
able to raise prices. 

“A sharp drop in the dollar’s 0 , 


Vilem WMte Wdi &A. 

i. Q1 am Mnw IQmr 
1211 Gcam 1. Swttifrim 
Td. 318251 -Tda 28 30S 


Pursuant to Article 3 paragraph 2 of the Trust Deed, 
the Debentures, with the coupon as at 1st March 1986 
and subsequent coupons attached, will be redeemed 
at 102.50 per cent, or U.S. $1,025.— per Debenture of 
U.S. $1,000.—, upon presentation at any of the head 
offices of Pierson, Haldring & Pierson N.V., AJgemene 
Bank Nederland N.V. and Amsterdam-RoUerdam 
Bank N.V. in Amsterdam, Swiss Bank Corporation in 
Basie, S. G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. In London, West- 
deutsche Landesbank Girozentrale in DQsseldori and 
Banque Generate du Luxembourg SJL in Luxembourg. 

Pursuant lo Article 4 of the Trust Deed, the Deben- 
tures may be converted, up to and including 28th 
February 1985, into Bearer Depositary Receipts 
("BDRs”) representing Ordinary Shares of Elsevler- 
NDU N.V. at the Conversion Price of Dfl. 39.60 per 
BDR representing one Ordinary Share of Dfl. 4.— 
nominal. 

B.V. Algemeen Adroinistratie- 
enTrustkantoor 

Rotterdam, 17th January 1985 


Company Earnings Bubble Memory May Return 

hum and profits. In millions, are In local currencies «/ 


Revenue and profits In millions, are In local currencies 
-unless otherwise Indicated 


B*** 1 o^Lf_ WtajSS ■ 

TnirthPU-Fbrte ig Jg 

Vear tm rm terandafssj mllUai In yaar. 15 g$ 

Revenue- — l.lSOt IW. natnarnetaedadaaaabua rw * nnrB — 

ES’SL'* - - 1,0 BWV exchange. Ter 1*§* tm 

Per snare— 80M3 MWS nr snare twuMs eWtr we- **?«"«* 

temtl dMdmntb. M«t (nc. 7XLAZ 49QJH 


iA — 


MM wn 
148 (0)1X7 


Year 

Revenue. 


nw 

7.U8 

l_ K&2 


Berisford (S&W) gj 

_ y»or nee im _ 

1 Revooue UDL «50 l _ empoa 

PtWaxNel- 8023 SS £2*5*- 
Per Share— 03279 02213 M WfeC- - 
p®r snarv, 


G f b r ul tnr Rn. 


United Stoles 
Abbot Labs 


Nef Inc. 

Per Share 


ji*n Slouffar Chem. 

7M, HI Qear. ms I9U 
041 Revenue __ B7 j) USA 

„ Mel Inc. (0)321 U24 

Pershan — — 036 

hh a: mss. itte rwsufts rmstat- 


4lh dear. 
Revenue — 

Jet Inc 

’■r Shore — 

Year 

Hvanue— . 

HI Inc 

Hr Shore— 


wet 1983 u „ 

95B3 aczfl Hot 

12107 106.12 mow 

1M m» OperMel — 
320ft. 223ft Over Shore. 


HonaywoU 

■or. wu 1983 


HR Neflnc.— L. 

OperKot — lift* 1025 Per Shore 


Suburbcai Bancorp 
«hO«or. n*4 nn 


40ZSB 30ja 
134 IM 


“ 's£k~ ss s - 

. oner Share — 7.14 5 M 

■" Nets sxtuda tOoroes of SS 
lftl mliaan msn mHUenfit aoar- T 

3162 ton and of I3SJ million vs 

3JD si9J million m rears from HI Qear. 
ft 10 discontinued ooerntkm. I9B4 R«y«mie — 
nsfa aba exdutfe eftaroe of N®* Inc. 


1® Mat Inc 

Per Share— 


Apple Computer 
IHODor. ms lie 

(emu— 0U 3M. 

*« Inc 46.10 is 

’er Share— 075 ftl 


AuL Data hoc 

, — J Qear. Ift5 M 

Revenue 2SL6 m 

*atlnc 21.1 p, 

*er Share — 057 05 

1st Halt IMS 191 

Hvenaa 4902 <20. 

4et Inc 305 31. 

~ "hare 1JJT U 


S70A mlfUan front disaoeal of PerShare — 


Tandy 

19*5 

_ W5J 
_ 705 


Net inc 

Per Share 


1985 T9M 
WftS 9098 
7ft5 1012 
086 0.98 

MSS 198* 
ijin. isoo. 

1132 1609 

126 13* 


Revenue.. 
Net Inc — 
PerShare. 


Fufl noma at company la 
OMmatlcDataPmcasuna. 


Iff* 19S3 
VM90. 12,890. 
Z17Q. 1M0- 

1S5 106 

IM 1*8* 
4523ft *0.180. 


Met Inc *580- 

Por Share— tflJ7 


DL 61 r.i Iilrinrl 

ok new engma 

hOoor. DM 1)03 

me 1446 8LB2 


me 

Hr Share— 
Yew 

Hr Inc 

Hr Share 


™ Johnson Controb 
1st awl MW «* 

rS Revenue JIM 3J*. 

Metlnc 2178 232 

IM PerShare l-*8 

36AS 


Tiger tort 

4M Qear. 19M mi 

Revenue ska 309.6 

Oaer Net 3S36 466 

Oper Share— 122 023 

Yew 19M 1983 

OserNef— . 4U1 {o)85u0 

Oner Share— 105 — 

a: lass. Hals axduOe losses 
of SIS) million ya SOU million 
hi QvarTars ami of SI 311 mll- 


Burfingtoa Ind. 

MQaar. MS WM 

Hvenue 653JJ 7714 

«t lac. 459 -3167 

3 er Share — 0.16 . 150 

tnSnmf tncHxIta gain afSSJ 
nUBon tram s aNlaawnl oHIt- 
00 film 

Cessna Aircraft 


Outboard Marino 

WOW. MB DM 

Revenue M12 1475 

Net Inc (0)358 U4 

PerShare — — 008 


Reynolds Mafcds 

4ft, Qear. 1984 19*3 

Revenue M95 8465 

Net Inc 3ft* 1Z3 

Par Share— W? «s* 


321 hi auarfars ami of S133-I mll- 
154 fihn vs SIS7A million tn years 
from discontinued opera- 
dona. 


Utd Jersey Bla 

MOW. 19*4 1983 

Net Inc ft22 6.W 

PerShare — 1.13 153 

Yew MM 1983 

Mel Inc 30.1 232 

PerShare— *22 355 


lac *J* (aUTI Revenue xnft im 

S’” ~ SSSfcc: S' 1 - 

Frt Pennsylvania *££* 


*»h Qear. 
SaerdM 


19M - IW and tor boneft I at S1U 
358 (aM4 Ban. 


Utah Pwr Light 
OhOew. MM 1« 

Revenue 2562 «12 

Net Inc *158 3328 

Per Share 058 054 

Year mm Mn 

£53 Jg 

PerShare — 252 229 


BANQUE NATIONALS DE PARIS 

John ■ Sue* Company wjtb i capital oi FRF L63Z580 JM0 

Registered office; 16 Boulevard des Italiens, PARIS (^J 
Tkade Register PARIS B 662 042 449 

Floating rate bonds 1979 - 1991 of US$1,000 


early redemption 


Holders of feature rate bonds 1979-1991 are hereby informed that all aid 
bonds »riU he redeemable at their 

Febnsrv 22. 1985 at the office of FRENCH AMERICAN BANKING 
OWPOftAHON in NEW YORK and at (be offices of the following Banks: 


- Bxaqne Rationale de Pdria (Puri*) 

- AJgemene Nederiaad NV (Amsieidun) 

■- Banea Nasonala del Lavoro (Rome) 

- Bmpe Bnuelks laabot S A . 


Nktkmalede Paris Ltd. (London) 
i-Bank AC (Frankfurt/ Main) 


(Continued from Page 11) more densely and eliminate those 

factory floor and in weapons sys- 1)C ~i 

tems. In addition, some aircraft lt f^ u R ue 

manufacturers are using them in Mellon has involved bombardmg 
flight reewders, the “black boxes" ^ garnet with hydrogen^ helium 

thlr record flight-deck convex- “JW P™*? 

tion and irmrSnentation on jet- amflar to that used to put unpun- 
tinen; ues with special characteristics for 

_ . , , conducting electricity in semicon- 

The problems have been cost and duciors. “Thar forms a pattern in 
speed. As the price of semiconduc- ^ v ,^f cr< n0l on ^ 
tors has plummeted 90 percent in su rf ace> " maVmg ii possible to Gil 
the last five years, bubble mOTories ^ jg tiny* more bub- 

simply could not keep up: silicon is bles I f ian m a conventional device, 
a lot cheaper than garnet. More- Mr. Kiyder explained. 


over, the babbles themselves take a 
while to get sorted and “detected" 


trolling those bubbles, however. 


by a probe on the surface of the x±Lal was more complicated. By 
chip that sends the signals to the lasers< ^ Carnegie-Mdlon 
support chi^. Thus, the process is uam was able, for the fust time, to 
too slow and cumbersome for ma- pm a silicon wafer on the 
nipukting large amounts of data. t hin £ ihai rhe most 

The effort by researchers, both ai space on the bubble chip is the 
Camecie-Meilor and Intel Corp„ detector," Mr. Kiyder said. The 
the sole U.S. manufacturer with a hybrid drip, however, uses far 
very active bubble-memory pro- smaller silicon detectors, and those 
gram, has been to pack bubbles problems are solved. 


I IF 


To the Holders of 

International Income 
Fund 

Short Term 'A! Units 

Distribution Units — in Bearer Form 
Short Term *B' Units 

Distribution Units — in Bearer Form 
Long Term Units — All Holders 

Midland Bank Trust Corporation (Jersey) Limited as Trustee of 
the above mentioned Fund has declared the following dividends 
per Unit for the financial period ended 31st December. 1984, 
payable on the 31 st January. 1985. in respect of Units in issue 
on 3 1 st December. 1 984 : — 

Short Term ’A’ Units — Distribution Units 
USS0.0446 per Unit — payable against Coupon No. 7. 
Short Term *B' Units — Distribution Units 
USS0.0302 per Unit — payable against Coupon No. 7. 
Long Term Units 

US$2.00 per Unit — payable against Coupon No. 24. 

Unit holders should send their Coupons to either the Trustee 
at 28/34 Hill Street. St Heiier, jersey, Channel Islands or to 
one of the following Paying Agents:— 

EBC Trust Company (Jersey) Limited. EBC House, 1-3 Seale 
Street St. Heiier. Jersey. C.l. 

Bankers Trust Company. One Bankers Trust Plaza. New 
York. N.Y. 10005. 

Banque Generate du Luxembourg SA. 14 Rue Aldringen. 
Luxembourg. 

Arrangements have been made whereby holders Of all Long 
Term Units in issue at 31st January. 1985 may reinvest the 
dividend paid at that date in additional units at a purchase 
price equal to the Net Asset Value per Unit at 27th January. 
1985 (as an indication, the Net Asset Value per Unit was 
US$21 .40 on 13th January. 1985). This right will be terminated 
at the doss of business on 28th February. 19B5. Long Term 
Unit holders who desire to reinvest their dividend should 
advise the Trustee or Paying Agent accordingly when presenting 
their coupons for payment. 

Midland Bank Trust Corporation 
(jersey) Limited 

Trustee 

Dated 14th January. 1985 


S. G. Warburg & Co. Ltd 

are pleased to announce the opening of the securities branch in Tokyo of 

S- G- WARBURG, ROWE & PITMAN, AKROYD (JAPAN) INC. 

Hibiya Kokusai Building, 2-2-3 Uchisaiwaicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100 
Telephone: 593 0555 Telefax: 593 0550 Telex: 2222535 


Masaharu Ono 
General Manager 

MarkTaketomi 
Deputy General Manager 
(equities) 


Christopher T. B. Purvis 
Branch Manager 


Susumu Yamada 
General Manager 


Nicholas J. Hanbury-Williams 
Manager (bonds) 

TadashiJitoku 
Manager (settlements) 


Tatsuya Yasukawa 
Manager (new issues) 


Martin L. Gordon, Resident Senior Director, Far East 


This ameumtmml appears as a mourr retard only 


(gre) 

Hellenic Telecommunications Organisation S.A. 

(Orgamsmos TeleptMnomon tis EDados) 

U.S.S 300,000,000 

Medium Term Credit Facility 

Lead- Managed by 

Arab Banking Corporation (ABC) Chemical Bank International Group 

Citicorp Capital Markets Group Commerzbank Aktiengesellschaft 

Tiie Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank, Limited The Fuji Bank, United Gulf International Bank B£.C. 

Kansaffs -Osake-Paakld The Mitsubishi Bank, limited Samuel Montagu & Co. limited 

National Westminster Bank Group Orion Royal Bank limited Standard Chartered Bank 

The Sennit omo Rank, limited The Sramtomo Trust & Banking Co., Ltd. 


Banco de Bilbao, SLA. 


Bargan Bank SAK. - Kuwait 


Co-Lead Managed by 

The Daiwa Bank, Limited 


The Saitama Bank Ltd. 


Managed by 


Dresdner Bank Aktieiigeseflscliaft, London Branch 


Co-Managed 

Associated Japanese Bank (lntermtioaBl) limited Banco cti Roma SpA 

Irriog Thtst Company ktitiito Banauio Sao Paolo & Tomo, Loodoa Braodl 

Mitsubishi Trust ft Bankrag Corporation (Eiaope) &A. 


IMEL (IM1 Group) 
Libyan Arab ForeigD Back 
The Tafyo Kobe Bank, TA»itwl 


Funds provided by 


Arab BmUbr Cwporatioa (ABO CbeakrtBa* 

Cumin i ihmit iraenntjomd Sodfag Anocyinc Tbe M-Hi Kugyo Bank, Limited 

Gdf bUerutioaal Bank BSX. lotereotioa*] Westminster BmA PLC 

TTn ntlmidriilrf ITonlr. I Imiliil The Sojai of Canada GrtN 9 

Tbe SmhoMo Bank. Luted Tbe Sradtoao Trust & Braking Ccl, Ltd. 

Tbe Driffft Bank, United TbeSoitaMBHkLrt. 

Pi cj db w Barit AlOi enpifllMfiaft , Loodno Branch Aa wulfi J 1 —ae Bofc (haa m a thwiil ) Ljanted 

IMUflMl Groap) IirwgThist CewP^v btital 

LAtss Arab Foreign Bank MteuMsbi Thai ft Baking Corporaboa (Europe) SA. 

Tbe Tiiyo Kobe Book, LdaBol CIC - Unon Ew ty eane, I nte MtiaBal et Ge (Londoa Braacfa) 

Buk cf Brltidi Cokratiia MoegHi GreafeO ft Co. ioM 

QKOBANK Osaaqanfckim KealtagmoUp Oy UBAF Arab America &ak 

Anstrafia-Japra InterBzbooal Finance Lioited Banco ifl Santo Sp8r&o,Lowh» Branch 

HFC Tnst ft Sara^ Limited Zentrabpwtasw rad KommerzoBank, Wiea 

CERA-Ceatrale Ramsoftas CV.-Beigim Fanctafagsbaafcei) AS. 

Kunlo-Freoch Book 


OrihoiA (Omari Month) 1 AntwA 

Tbe Fqji Bank, LUted 
KaalMabMdd 
Standud Chartetd Baft 
BaarodeBbaa.SJL 
Bntgu Bank S^K. - Emit 

Banco <S Roma (LaodoeBnmdO 

btitMo Bnaris Sn F»ok> ft Tbftixt, Lendan Bmcli 

L SaamdMoBtaga&GiLUiidted 

randi) Americaa ScamfiBK-riaa Bankiay Carpo rt , 
National Biak of Aba DUi 


Bnra Totta ft Azores - Ladoa Brndt 
Basque NorfewopeSJL 

littaaatioaate Gc anwnwl.. l *> t l j ) , n ^ ^ 
bmeraalnart (LmanbonB) SJL 


Agents 


Chemical Bank 


Standard Chartered Bank 






r 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


( 


Over-the-Counter 


Jan. 17 


NASDAQ Notional /Market Prices 


Mt* HUI Low 1P.M. arte 


, 1 


r : — i 

AELa 



57216 


AFG 



32 1916 

Wto 

1916 + 16 

ASK 



57119 

18W 

1BW— to 

ATE 



2 4 

4 


AarnRt 



5 19 

17 

19 

Acadln 

JOb 21 

163 9ft 

9H 


Acalrtn 



3051016 

IBM 

ISto 

AcuRav 

JD 

s 

97 211* 

211ft 

71 to— ft 

AflocU) 



479 6ft 

416 

ito 

Adage 



72 10W 

10 

Wft+ 1* 






7 

Aeqtitra 



349 4ft 

4to 

jfe + to 


XO 

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JIB Mfe 

Mfe 

14ft— to 

AocvRt 






Air me 

.lft 

.9 

223 nu 

11 

nw— to 

AlrWIsc 

< 


H7 9ft 

9to 

9ft— to 

AtekMi 

JSr 1.5 

2616ft 

16 

lift 

AlakPc 

55r 

22 

3 24ft 


24ft- 16 

AluxBS 

L20 

34 

120 36 


35to 

Alfln 




Nj7| 

18 




155 10U 

9ft 

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340 15 

14 

14ft + W 

AlMoBv 

M 

24 

3716ft 

lift 

Mfe— to 

AlMBn 

04 

34 

179 23ft 

ZJH 23fe— lb 

Allnet 



Bid 4ft 

3ft 


AloMIc 





7ft + *1 

Altos 



448 Ffe 

9fe 

9ft 

Amcsts 

A0 

22 229517ft 

16ft 

17VJ— to 

AWAln 




8ft 

BP, + fe 

AmAOv 



5211ft 

lift 

lift 


30 

43 3394 llto 

lift 

life— to 

ACorrs 



197 12ft 

mb 

12ft 

A Conti 



493 9 

SW 

Bft + W 

AFdSLi 

AO 

41 


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Mto 

Am Fret 

X 


147 7to 

7 

7W+ fe 

AFIefc 

IM 

3X 

65B38W 

37ft 

Mto + ft 

AGrggt 

JB 

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1722 34ft 

33ft 

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44 9ft 

9W 

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AMS 



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1X8 

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981291* 

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2m — to 

APhVGp 



170 6ft 

<ft 

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AQuasr 



4922 1ft 

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ASecCs 

1X2 

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5217 

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AmSoft 



716 

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ASafar 



132 Sfe 


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ASurg 




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Amrltr 

3X8 

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8859 


57 

Amrwst 



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Analvl 



469 6ft 

rjM 

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38 Mb 


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116 3716 

37 

37 




7 7 

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ife 


.12 

IJ 

151 18 

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■^TTFsTl 


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AtmteC 



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1563016 

p. JJ 

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31 13to 

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120 9 

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APIS wt 



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ArtzB 

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108 22U 

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Artel 



48 SW 

8 

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AscHsf 

.12 

3 

47913ft 

13W 

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Aatrosy 



12 6ft 

AW 

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Afcor 

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I Sfe 

AHArn 

AOb 

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S18W 

1SW 

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AtlntBc 

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16626W 3616 

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2 8ft 

8ft 

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AtIFTn 



2810to 

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All Res 



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AtSeArs 



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IBft 

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f J 1 ■ | 



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257 6W 

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63 5ft 

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AvntGr 



90 MW 

14ft 

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Avntek 



7222 

21ft 2lft 

Avatar 



B216W 

1616 

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AvfatGP 



698 Uto 

17ft 

17ft + to 







Altcfl 



30 216 

216 

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» B \ 


BantaG 

BoronO 

Barton 

BsTnA 

BasAm 

BHtF 

BayBks 

BavlY 

81 Fuses 

BHINt 

BndiCf 

Benftan 

Benhn wt 

B erkley 

BeMCp 


Ma U 
230 5X 


32 12 


BetzLb 130 16 


BevHS 
BMB 
B hi Bile 


BltTTngs 

Blndtv 

BfoRes 


BlolcR 

Bird Inc 

BtehGr 

B1IUAT 

BootBn 

BofaEvn 

BoHTc 

BstnDta 

BotnFC 

BroeCp 

Bronco 

BrwTom 

Bruno 

BufHon 

BuHKTr 

Bmhm 

BvrrBr 

BMA 

BMtaM 


fn Net 

mt High Lew 3P-M.O>*t* 
U 167028W 27ft 28 — VS, 
95 7 7 7 — to 

788 3 2fe 2*4 + ft 

in io io 

135 Sfe Bft Sfe + ft 
3935V, 35V 35ft— ft 
5744ft 44ft 44to 
4 4W 4W 4W + k 

125 11 W 11 lie + It 
IDS 7Vi 71b 7V. + lb 
78 7W 7ft 71b— ft 
202131* 12fe T2fe — Mt 

ia m m 7w— ft 
Bis. 14W 1« „ 

136 1b lb b+h 
70S«3to sm 33 — ft 

11 Mt ife 6V.— V. 
57 izfe mb IZVb + lb 
2 lit It lift — Vb 
I0W lOto— ft 
3 Sft — lb 
22 Ml 221b 
4ft 41b 
716 7Vj — It 
41b 41b— It 
Bfe Bib— 1b 
71t 7ft + ft 
7 7 — lb 

fe lb 

50 271ft 27 27 — It 

34181ft 17fe 18 
25 Hto Bft 8ft 

9 9 + «t 

15 15lb 
11 Hr lilt + It 
nt a + v. 
3ft 3W 
21 lb 2Zlb+ 4b 
lib lib 

_ 21 V. 21V, 

318181b I Bib 18ft 
151 16V, lilb MH 
2481b 4BV2 481b— lb 
497 51ft 41t 41b 


31 11 
7221 31b 

1233 
19* 5 
109 TV. 
43 51ft 

32 91ft 
24 74b 
19 7 
34 


JX 


S 9 
335 14 
35912 
41 4 
431 an 

»*» 

172 22 


CCOR 

CP Rhb 

CBTBc 

CBT 

CML 

CPI 

CPT 

CSP 

Cache 

CACI 

CbnrSc 

Canton 

GoMmp 

calMic 

CalSIvo 

CatfanP 

Calny 

GononG 

CopFSl 

CortOte 

Cordlai 

Caronn 

Carter! 

Caseyn 


£6 13 
150 4 X 


■10a IX 


t 


BBDO 
BFICm 
BlWCb 
BPISY 
BRCam 
BaJrdC 
BaltBcp 
Bancokl JO 47 
BcpHw 1J24 U 
Baictec 

. BanaH JO 105 
BkNE 254 47 
BkMAm 150 9.1 
Bonkvl 


250 45 22W4SU 44 -MM+fe 
42 14b lib 14b 

5 7 7 7 + lb 

212 2* 24b 24t— lb 

1612 111b lllb 

58 71ft 7W 7ft + V* 
547 194b 184b 194b + 1b 
91191b 19Ui mb- Ml 
573 274ft 271ft 274ft + *4 
35 71ft 7 71ft 

115 74t 74b 74b— lb 

81 61 59 <0W +11b 

247 11 101b 11 + Vi 

31111ft 104ft 104ft 


CntrBC 

Cent cor 

Can Ben 

Cn BaliS 

C FdPK 

Central 

CertirA 

Canntfc 

Cetua 

OmcCo 

CbooEn 

ChrmS* 

CtikPnt 

CWsTch 

OiLwn 


150 4 X 


255b 5.1 
1-32 43 
1.12 U 
M 1-7 
.12 1J 




M 15 


78 9tb 841 ?li + Ml 
209 9Vb 84ft 846+ !* 

1 2416 24V. 2416 + It 
291 391ft 38W JPft +1 

17101b 94t 944— Vb 
9401416 MW 14W 
1505 7ft 446 718+14* 

34 64ft £W 6Vb— lb 
207 346 3W 34b 

724 51ft 51ft 5W+ 1ft 
1054 IBM 18 18ft 

2 2V. 216 21fc + V, 
250 44b 4V, «Vft 

718 946 9 94b — W 

112 34ft 3M 31b + 4ft 
Ml 3th 3W 31ft 

Ul 91ft 9 9W— W 

525 18U 171k 181* + W 
444 94ft 9 9V.— W 

1809 2Vft 216 216 

181516 1514 1514— Vb 
3441214 MVb T3I4+1 
271 216 21b 214 + Vb 

508111ft 104ft 11W + 4b 
12115ft ISto I5W 
161714 171ft 1714 
163 2SW 28W 28to 
34111W11 1114+ 1ft 

3SS 4044 40 4014 + 1ft 

44 2714 2444 2£4ft— Vk 

113 2914 28W 29 +14 

427 351ft 34* 35 — 1ft 

71 Ml » 414 — 1ft 
14 344l 34b 34b- 16 
127101ft W 1014 + 1ft 

35 446 44b 44ft 

273 54ft 5V, Sto— 1ft 
319 184ft 171ft 1BW + 14 
793 15W I4W 15W+1 
19 TVft 7W 7W 
98 374b 27W 2746+ lb 


ChIChl 

ChlPoc 

awmer 

Chranr 

ChrDrrj 

Qiym* 

Cinfas 

C3pher 

anrfco 

Circcn 

CtxSGo 

CfeFMj 

Ozlit A 

azuts 

atvFod 

CSyNCp 

CiofrSf s 

OarkJ 

OearCh 

ClevtRf 


.138 J 


« 5ft Sto 5ft 
MW M 14 


.10 


2J 

.9 

J 


13541 124b 124b 124b 
44 79 784b 7846— It 

67 184ft W4 184ft + 16 

IMS 9 846 9 

111 13V. 124ft 13W — Vb 
67 KMb 1044 104b 

134 20 24 

561 244ft 2414 2414— 1ft 
2711 10W 11 + W 

44 544 6 

154 2Mb BIW 20V. 

22 2916 29 29 — M 

81 29 2046 2846— 16 

_ 36 284b 2816 28W + 4b 

J0e 17 118312 I1W 1146 + 1ft 
5Rb SJ 26 23W 23 33W 

m .1 338 3* 3116 33to+[ft 

58 a A 45 3546 2SW 2546 

3715 MW 15 + Vb 

152 7 3 7 196b 196b 196b— 4b 


76 35 
J2 3J 
t 

158 6 3 


athtmo 

Coast F 

CebeLb 

CocoBt ■ 

Coeur 

Cooenlc 

CohmT* 

CatabR 

Colasen 

Collins 

Co ILIAC 

CelrTle 

CotaNts 

ColDta 

ComaJr 

Contest s 

Comdta 

Corndkil 

Cwnre 

Cmaall 

CmlShr 

CHdtnF 

CmwTI 

ComAm 

Camlnd 

ComS vs 

CmpCrd 


36a 25 
I 


Air 


XO 15 


CmpoT 
CenwC 
Cm per* 

Campcp 
Comoos 
CCTC 
CrapAs 
CptAut 
CmpOt 
CptEnT 
CmptH 
Cmpldn 
CmnLR 
CmntM 
CmnPd 
CmnRs 
Cm Task 
vlCptUs 
Cmautn 
Cptdt 
Cmsrve 
Camstir 
C mashp 
Comlch 
Cancntl 
Conttrs 
CnCap 
CCapR 
CCaoS 
ConFbr 
CnPaps 
ComPd 
Consul 
CntiBcp 254b 64 


Safes fa 
lets (Hah urn 3PJ«-ChfK> 

223 944 9 91A- lb 

S MW MW MW + Vi 
243 13 12W 12W 

376 2816 271b 27W 
99 13 12W 1246 

285 3 24b 3 

612224b 22W 224ft + W 
W a Aft JMr + W 
182 124b 1246 124b + W 
8 5Vb S 5 — lb 

3294ft 2*46 2*46 + V, 
1194 19 16W 18Vb + W 

923 17W 17 171+ + W 

SB 1W 4b 4b— W 
3171346 134b 13M 
501 2216 ZUt 22W+ 6b 
SS& M 13W 1346 
415 34b 26ft 2W 

137 374b 371+ 374ft + 6b 
193 29W 384ft 284ft— M> 
5911 10th MHb 
66 BW lift Bit — It 
33 31 30W 30W— 1 

83 34b an 36ft 
162a 1916 1946 + 46 

77111ft 104ft 104ft— Vb 
494251b MW 2446— W 
4015 74* 7V, 74ft 
53 HW 1316 13W + It 
196 254b 2S4b 254ft 
5 7 7 7. + 4ft 

154 ^ 14ft lK+tk 
270 Mb 34b Jib + Vb 
552 MW 134b MW— W 
888 21 W 21 21 — M 


3 
1 3 


2.10 S3 
J2 3-3 
30a 47 
U4el4J 
1JB 43 


56 15 


xa 


593 4% 

4ft 

4ft + lb 

j 

6 11ft 

lift 

iift+ to 



49 5ft 

£ 

Sfe 



151 7ft 

7W+ ft 



57B 8 

7ft 

7ft 

.n 

1 A 

04 8ft 

8ft 

aw— to 



483 Sfe 

& 

3ft 



653 T7 

17 + to 



1 3M 

Sto 

3to 

X5 

3 

3 ISto 

14ft 

ISto + ft 



9 1 

1 

i 


95 £W 
42 6 

4 74ft 
10 9 


+ 4ft 


13(0104 
158B102 
136 135 


128 37 
58e 15 


CtfHHti 

CtlHltC 

CnfinfO 


CtLoar 
Convgt 
Comma 
CoprBlo 
Caere B 

A0 

Coaytal 
Corcam 
Cordis 
Core 5t 

2X8 

Corvus 

Coomo 

CrkBrt 

.M 

CrtmaC 


Cronus 

CrasTr 

xa 

CvrnBk 

Crump 

44 

CulInFr 

.94 


if 

Cvoore 



Vh 6 

f 3 

716 7V,— W 

in *V» 

. . an sn— w 

6521W 2116 21W 
250 25W 2446 25 + W 

341716 164b 16W 
369 2516 2416 2446+ W 
27 > A I 

594344. 341b 34W— It 
It 51b S 5W 

292 54b 546 546— Vb 

532 a 32 
618 15W 14W MW + W 
1668 5 36b 5 +14h 

63 646 6W 64ft— Vfe 



Sates In 


Net 



1005 HW LOW 3 P-M.cn 'gc 

DecuOi 



14 4fe 

ito 

Jfe 

DlrGcH 

JO 

.9 

45231* 2 Sto 

22ft— to 





24W 


OrclIH 

JO 

XA 

4515 

MW 

14ft + U. 

DovIDB 

X8 

40 

103 1BVS 

I8to 

lBto + to 


.151 

13 

71 101* 

10 


Draxlr 



7H 11 

low 

ii + ft 

DrcrGr 



94)4 

Uft 



32 

1 3 

361 19W 

I9to 


DuhkD 

J2 


<225 

Mto 








DurFII 

.16 

IJ 

355 13 



Oy risen 

| 


172 4to 

4b. 

4b, + to 

Dvntchs 



52 m. 

19W 

l<ft + to 

Dyson 



64511ft 

llto 

llto + to 

It E 1 

EH mt 



50 Sfe 


2b. — fe 

EIP 

.12 

X 

33 MW 


MV, + fe 

EoglCpt 



496 fe 

ft 

EoglTI 



1378 5to 

516 

5to 


1X4 

3J 

54 28 

27ft 

27ft + to 

EfJCmP 

.12 

U 

186 Sto 

Bft 

9 + V. 

Eoucam 

XN 


20 lft 

Sfe 

3ft + to 

Elkonx 



37 llto 

llto 

Mto +1 




100 Bfe 



ElPes 

1.46 

'Ll 

405 UU 

U 



X7o 

S 

6 7fe 

7ft 

7ft + to 

EKrtlg 



129 9fe 

9 

9ft + to 

EMon 

.16b 1.1 

16 MW 

MW 

MW 

EklrM 



Ilf Sfe 

SW 

5ft— to 

EteeBlo 



1134 7ft 

Tto 

7ft+ to 

ElCaths 



71319ft 

18ft 

19ft + ft 

EleNud 



246 1?lb 

12 

Mfe— to 

EicRnt 



406 18ft 

17V, 

17to — 1 

ECpfsr s 



18 13ft 

Mto 

13ft + to 

ElctMIs 



16 SHr 

5 

J — 't 

ElranEI 



128 lOto 

9ft 

10V. 4- ft 

Emcor 



5 ft 

ft 

ft+ti. 

EmnAlr 



664 Bft 

8W 

Bft— to 

Eimilx s 



253611 

10 

10ft 

Endta 



15 6ft 

6 

6 — to 

Endveo 



32 6to 






543 BW 

Tto 


EngCnv 



37 2BW 


28V. — to 

EnFoct 



65 8ft 

■ iTi 

HW 

EngOflS 



41 Jfe 

til 

J 

EngRsv 



219 1 

% 

1 + to 


J2 

1 3 

212ft 

12ft 

12ft + to 

Em pub 









353 19 


Uft— to 




149 18W 

17ft 

17ft— fe 

EffiR 






.440 3J 

539 30ft 

29ft 

29ft— fe 

EvnSut 



257 14W 

Mto 

14W 

ExcolTc 



230 ft 

w 

w 

Exevlr 



14214 

1316 

M 

1 — F H 


89 7 «W 646 

4270 9tb 86b BW— It 


izm Mlt I7W 1816 + 46 

n m M m 
22 1411 18th 184b 181b 

234 2346 22W 23W + W 
6 9 846 846+ It 

5B6 9W 846 S46— W 

45 767 464b 4ft 464b + W 
141 4Vb 4 4 

137 £Vb 64b 64b 

J 57 15 Mft 15 + W 

438 3 an 24t— W 
22 1316 1316 13 Vi— It 
10 IMS 2746 MW 266b— n 

11811W 11 llVb— 4b 

25 190 21 Mi 21 lft 21W+ W 

35 625V. 25 25 

35 143919 1746 1B4* +1 

4 214b 214b 214b— Vb 


DBA 

DEP 

DtosvSv 

Dalai F 

DmnBkj 

DartGo 

Datcrd 

DtalO 

DfSwtch 

Dafpwr 

Datscp 

Dtaslti 

Datum 

DebSh 

DedsD 

DeklbA 

Defchm 

DettaDf 

Dettaus 

Danefcr 

□entMd 

□etecEl 

DfooOt 

DtooPr 

Dlasanc 

Dtcaan 

Dialled 

Dfolag 

DhrtCm 

OiallSw 

Dienex 

DfadLoa 

Dvtaed 


1933* 

73 25 
323 4tft 

an 


.Ue 5 


67 1316 124b 13V. + W 
104 7W IW 7Vb + 4ft 
27Vb 38 + 1b 
24W 24W 
44ft 41b— W 
8ft 18 —2 

4am 1716 17Vb 
34212V. 12 12 — W 

1560 an 7n ait + n 

89 416 416 446 
2813W n 13 
4 4W 44t 44b 
63 64ft <46 646— W 

61 TSU 1746 1814 
1265 MW Mtb 1446 + W 
143 214* 2116 2116— W 
85 141b Kth 144ft + Vb 
18 IV. lit lit— W 

in in m 14* 

191 54ft 5W 54ft- n 


52r A 


240 

220 


M 

30 


17 


FOP 
FMI 
FomHis 
r c irni F 

FrmG 
FMGrp 
Forufiu 
FH) ran 
Fldlcr 
Fifth Th 
Flinle 
Flhmec 
Flftrlk 
Final co 
Ftnomx 
Fin loan 
FAJaBe 
FIAFln 
FIATn 
FIBnOh 
FICOIF 
FComr 120 
FDotaR 
FExec 
FFtowUc 
FPdCal 
FlFnCp 50 
FFnMot 
FIFIBk A0 1J 
FJerNt 150 55 
FUdB 150 5.1 
FMftOn 250b 55 
FN18UB 520 .1 
FRBGa M 35 
FJSvFla AOb 20 
FSvWlS 

FtSecC 1.10 &1 
FTenNt 150 52 
FlUnCs 1.12 
Flakav 


158 

72 

1.10 

250 


55 


35 7tft 74ft 74ft— W 
311 5W 516 54ft 
340 14b 1V6 Hi. 
t 3M30H 20H 20W 

152 10 14685046 50 SOtft + W 

366 3546 2316 24 W— 'U 

216 7 646 64ft 

2714 13tb M + 4ft 
M48W 48W 48W 

34 59W 58*. 59W+ W 

188 2*16 234k 24 + <A 

23M46 14W 14W 
64 IS 1446 1646— lb 
*5 7 4W 4W 4W + 4b 

279 7 4%. 7 + lft 

333 1016 9n ion + Vb 
43 12 a 22W a + W 

22 1 2614 261b 26*6 + W 

41 1311 27 26W 26W + W 

52 1152W 51W 52W 

86 1446 M MW + V, 
3SS 234b MW 234ft + 4ft 
1181996 » 19 — W 

1841 1316 12W 13 
237 1016 1DW 10W— W 

35 1446 MW 1446 + M 

92 20 19W 19W— V, 

44194ft 1916 19t* + tfc 

7a 279b a + Vb 
32 32*6 32 3216 

49 3146 31 W 31 W 
15 5216 5146 514b 
105 1496 M 14 
237 274b 27 27W+ Vb 

is 27 aon 20W— « 

1 7W 7W 7W— 46 
107214b 204h 214ft + 16 
543 3046 30 3046 + 46 

11 1381 36W 36W 36W + 4b 
366 6M 54b 5W— U 
35 1416 14 1416— 4b 

<96 I6W Mlt Mlt— 66 

5431 SOW SOW 
7016W 154b 16 
31 1316 U 139b— W 


4.1 


AO 3j4 
300 1J 
32 14 


30 13 


246 7 

4ft 

6ft 

Fbnar 



493 5ft 

4ft 

4ft— fe 

18 416 

41* 

4V. — to 

FUonB 

X7 

A 


MW 

15ft + ft 

56 316 

31* 

3ft + lb 

FLJon A 

.07 

3 

566 M 

raw 

M + 16 

5 9ft 

Tto 

9to 


.96 

35 


27ft 


820 3ft 

39b 

3ft + to 

Ji£_rTLi3 

1X0 

SJ 

■iJT'lj 

Fi5J 

18ft 

5913ft 

13ft 

1316— ft 





It--*! 

15W 

1481316 

17ft 

13 




80 2ft 

jfe 

2to— fe 

25 516 

4ft 

4ft 


M 

X 3843 Bft 

7ft 

8+16 

291 18 

17W 

17W— W 

1 

.10 

IX 

241 ife 

ife 

Sft 

306525ft 

34ft 

24ft— ft 




X4624 

23ft 

24 + W 

7629 

28W 

2BW 

Fremnt 

M 

77 

784 TUft 18 

18—16 

9 ito 

6 

ito + to 

Fudrck 



3581216 

I7M 


2247 91* 

Bft 

9 

FviHBs 

xa 

10 

249 15 

lift 

15+16 


cs 


G 

UeSe Futures Jan. 17 

Season 

High 

Simon 

Low Open Htah Low Clew Cha. 

1 Grains | 


WHEAT (CUT} 

5500 bu mini mum- doi lore per biMlwl 

454 35746 Mar 3J246 35346 15016 

455 1321b May 144 XttMt 14316 

190 127W Jul 13416 3544b 132 

176W 12816 Sep 135W USW 13346 

163W 137W Doc 146 1464b 14446 

2J4W 343 Mar 

Eaf.Salea Prev. Sotos U8I0 
Prar. Day Open int. 40506 eflMS 


15244 —584ft 
1444b —5116 


334W — 50W 
345W -50W 
149W +50W 


CORN (CBT) 

5500 bu mMiTwn- dal tan per bushel 


3J5W 

2X5 

Mar 2J71W 

272 

271 

271ft 

330 

272V. 

May Z76to 

278 

276W 

277ft 

3X1 

Z76ft 

Jul 17916 

2X0W 

279 

2X016 

3JTW 

2JOft 

Sap 274 

27416 

272W 

273W 

Z9S 

2X5 

Dec 2X816 

26916 

2X6W 

2X8 

HO 

225W 

Mar 27916 

27916 

277ft 

27816 

321ft 

2X2 

May 2X4 

285 

2X4 

2X5 


-^1 


nw 

HM 


Est. Safes Prev.Salea 23369 

Prevr. Day Open lnt.133469 UP 52 


SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5500 bo mini mum- dollars per bushel 


. 7V 
30 
154i 
1414 
30 
7341 
W 
lfll 

: ?v 
3W 
25M 
MVS 


779 

557ft 

Jan 

5X7 

290 

255W 

570 

+X4 


5X9W 

Mar 

5M 

4X0W 

5X4 

579ft 

+X5 

737 

551ft 

May 4X7 

218 

6X5 

209ft 

+jnw 

739 

&91W 

Jul 

6.16ft 

2WW 

2MW 

2M 

+X216 

736 

535 

Aug 

6.18W 

219 

2MW 

219 

+X1W 

£71 

535 

SOP 

6.12 

212 

6X7 

210 

,+jn 

6XB 

577 

Nov 

6l12 

212W 

207ft 

21116 

+X0TA 

£79 

4.10 

Jan 

675 

425 

4J1W 

234 

+X816 

7X7 

624 

Mar 

428 

230 

*36 

237W 


Em. Safes 


Prav. Sates 34X11 





Prev. Day Open ini. 89521 up MB 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 
loo lane- dollan par tan ■ 


iiS 

Il4 


r* 


200X0 

134X0 

Jan 

14308 

14258 

14270 

14350 

+1X8 

209X0 

M2 10 

Mar 

14720 

M7JD 

14250 

M7X8 

+78 

305X0 

143X0 

May 

15250 

15250 

15210 

15350 

+-«) 

196J0 

15B50 

jm 


158X0 

157X0 

157X0 

+X0 

180X0 

15220 

Aug 

w? 

140X0 

15250 

159X0 

+1.10 

179J0 

154X0 


r nTr 

i" *l I -T1 

16000 

160X0 

+50 

MOJO 

U5J0 



fkki-t 1 ] 

160X0 

148X0 

+J0 

18200 

16240 

In * ,3 



145X0 

165X0 

+.10 


Est. Safes Prav. Safes 9JT2 

Prar. Day Opor Int 35531 oti35i 


i sm 

m 

now 




r71b 

'1216 


ion 

3 

1016 

6446 

BW 

lit* 

BW 

<n. 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60500 Rn-dol Ian par HO lbs. 

3050 2255 

3040 2195 

30.10 2250 

3030 22J0 

2370 2150 

2555 2150 

2650 2290 

2475 3230 _ 

Eat. Soles Prev. Safes 10983 

Prey. Day Open Int 36445 an 328 


Jan 

3420 

3639 

26X0 

2639 

+22 

Mar 

25X0 

2S0S 

2523 

2500 

+-S2 





2118 

+20 

jm 

E2z I 

2420 

24X0 

+28 



3*45 

24X5 

24X5 

+XS 

Sera 

3425 

305 

34X0 

24X5 

+.18 

Oct 

3*00 

24X0 

2375 

21X0 

—20 

Doc 

2275 

2375 

2345 


— 20 


OAT 


icw 






1.96W 

173 

Mot- 

125 

175ft 

174ft 

174ft 

1.91 

171 

MOV 

172W 

173 

172W 

172fe 

1J8W 

1X9 

Jul 

170 

178 

1X9W 

IXOto 


lXSft 


1X6 

1X6 

1X6 

1X6 

unto 

IXBto 

DOC 

1X816 

lXBW 

1X816 

IXBto 


ts 


EeLSaiea Prev. Sotos 

Prow. Day Open int 3JB3 affSO 


:S 

•916 

7V. 

IS 

nw 

124ft 

» 

■746 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMC) 

90530 Ibs^ cents per to. 
67 JD <250 Fab 

4872 6143 Apr 

6137 4550 Jun 

6645 £3.15 Alia 

6110 6140 Oct 

6540 6140 


6515 

030 

6755 

6540 

6140 

6455 


6555 

6740 

6375 

64JO 


A 

W 

A. 


Ell. Sales 18576 Prar.Satos 17.155 
Prar. Oav Open Int 58570 up 2*2 


6555 

6755 

6772 

6572 

6342 

6455 


<857 

6757 

<777 

6877 

6345 

6452 


—.18 

—.12 


FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 


416 

5 

5! 

S 

% 

Ai 

P 

a 


6575 


7260 

7375 

7227 

72X7 


6575 


7230 

7X10 

7220 

72X5 

— xa 

67X0 


7170 

72A2 

71X0 

7175 


6475 


7UD 


7020 

7020 

—27 

66X0 


71X0 

7075 

70X0 

—.15 

67X0 

ss 

70X5 

7875 

78-45 

70X7 

—.13 

67,10 

4*75 

6975 

4978 

4970 

— wH 


*6 

H : 

it i 


7355 
7160 
7050 
7158 
71.18 

70l15 ..... 

Ext. Soles _ 823 Prar.SOtas .1789 
Paw. Dav Open inL 9,142 up 152 
HOGS (CME) 


301000 Rml- oante p«r lb. 
5820 47J7 Feb 

51 JO 

5170 

5127 

5128 

54X5 

45.10 


4875 

4BM 

4U0 


55X0 

48X0 

Jun 

53XB 

5857 

53-55 

53X5 















5175 

45X0 

Oct 

48X0 

4897 

«75 

4875 

50X5 

4620 

Dec 

49.15 

<922 

49.M 


4978 

4*23 

Feb 

4920 

4920 

49X0 

49X0 

4725 

EstSatas 

4SJS Apt 

jM» Prw.Sa** 1W 


46X0 


Pmr.DayOpanim.at5H up 123 



4095 


71 JO 

7320 

7075 

71X7 

—21 

8120 

60.10 


7175 

7130 

71X8 


—M 

8200 

6L» 

MOV 

7215 

7420 

7X05 


—27 

83X7 

6215 

Jul 

7450 

75.10 

74X5 


— v45 


6020 


7225 

7240 

72X2 

7278 

—A5 


6215 


46X0 

44X0 

6405 

66.15 

** 


6420 





4SJ5 

35 

Bst.Sefea 

8X53 Prev. Sates 11271 





Piw.Dov Open int 135a n>5M 


Food 


COFFEE C (KYCSCE) 

37400 too^ cents Perth. 

mm V23.FO nrinr M5JD Mild u««i 14&M 

WOO 12251 MOV ion V43JB 14259 UZfO 

14970 12150 Jul 14050 MUO 14050 141.18 

14740 12750 SeP 13975 13955 13975 13*43 

14150 12975 Dec 13870 US-50 13875 13B7S 

13640 12840 Ma- 1367S 13770 13675 13750 

13650 13150 May 13549 135L75 13S69 13SJS 

Est Sales 2700 Prev. Sotos 1403 
Prev. Day Open Ini. U427 up 11 


+143 

+71 

+in 

+48 

+74 

+48 

-US 


SA 

Te< 

Ra, 


PA, 

TE. 

[16- 

Ten 

Fall 

TO* 


SUOARWORLO 1 1 (NY CSC*) 
1125M Romania par lb. _ 

aia 247 Jan 679 

1340 451 MOT 446 

MJ0 434 May 459 

9J5 443 Jvl 5^ 

975 450 Sap 451 

955 557 Oct 549 

- 628 677 Jan 420 

. "i9J3 652 MOT 665 

- J.15 640 MOV . 655 


459 

527 

570 

*57 


EstSales 1*302 Prar.Satos 115IS 
SSnXyOPMfitf. Wni UF4SI 


479 

422 

445 

493 

&17 

574 

410 

432 

457 


544 

423 

457 

494 

1)7 

538 

554 

433 

457 


1 .§ %S 5T 

as 


May 

2 -um 4595. Prav.Safes 2747 
ggjopen Int. 23,149 l»® 



+18 


Season 

HlOtl 


Season 

Law 


Omm Hleh Law Claw Cha. 


ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15500 Urn- cams oar to. 

MS40 10950 Jan 16040 16*00 14050 16350 

18540 11850 mar M550 16580 1*375 16580 

18580 15180 MOV 16550 16480 16580 16680 

1848S 15588 Jul 16400 16785 16558 16755 

18140 15775 Sep 16348 16558 16348 16440 

18150 15750 Nov 16040 16350 16040 16240 

muse 15680 Jan mzts 

USAO 15430 Mar MZTS 

May 16850 14050 16080 18340 
Eat Safes 1500 Prev- Sale* l.w? 

Prar. Day Open Int 7709 oftiv* 


+540 

4580 

4550 

4550 

+580 

4640 

4685 

4685 

4640 


1 Metals 1 

COPPER (COM EX) 




&a»KML cents Per lb. 




92X0 


Jan 6120 61X0 

61X0 

59X5 

+1.10 



Fab 


5975 

+1.18 

9320 

5520 

Mor 99J5 60X5 

5950 

£0.15 

+1.10 

9X50 

5620 

May 60.15 60X0 

9930 

6X40 

+50 

8825 

57X8 

Jul 6050 6050 

6000 

6020 

+70 

BIN 

57 JD 

Sep «a mss 

6050 

£0X0 

+50 

8425 


Dec 61X0 61X0 

60X5 

£1X5 

+J5 

8438 

59X0 



61-50 

+.15 

00X0 

59X0 

Mar 6275 6X75 

ii.® 

41XS 


74X0 

61.10 

May 62X0 6X80 

61X0 

4X15 

— w 

74X0 

61J0 

Jul 6X10 6X10 

62.10 

6X45 

—JO 

7878 

6X30 

Sep 


4X75 

—45 

EstSatas 16X80 Prev.Sates 13256 




Prey. Day Open Hit 86701 off 86 




SILVER (COMEX) 








15752 

58X0 

Jan 6175 4175 

6175 

6295 

+18J 

723J 

6165 

Fab 



+17J 

16202 

SB53 

Mar 6332 £372 

mo 

6345 

+182 

151 32 

9950 

May £312 £442 

9033 

6432 

+181 

14412 

tmo 

Jul 64X0 6542 

6382 

*5X4 

+18J 

11832 

6140 

Sas 6492 6612 

6492 

662 J 

+183 

17302 

630X 

Dec 4652 48X0 

6652 

<786 

+184 

QUO 




4842 

+185 

imx 

6492 

Mur 6745 <97 X 

6845 

6953 

+186 

10480 

4602 



707A 

+187 

9452 

<732 

Jul 70BX 7082 

7082 

7195 

+18X 

*402 

6812 

Sea 7200 7342 

7202 

7324 

+189 

Est Sates 21X00 Prev. Sates 19257 




Prav. Day Open Int. 8X333 up 263 








■ JTTT . . 







271X0 

27850 

+*» 



Apr 277X0 280X0 

27410 

279 JO 

4450 

449 JO 

27X00 

Jul 381X0 04X0 

280X0 

284X0 

+410 

39300 

281X0 

Oct 2B&20 390X0 

2S7X0 

290X0 

+3X0 

37150 

29150 

Jon 29550 29550 295-50 

297.10 

+350 

Esf.Satat 

■f . * a JTTTt ■ * ■ f 1 












1 'In ii 




129X0 

1M20 

Jon 


116X5 


16150 

10758 

Mar 11*20 117X0 

11550 

116X3 

+1X0 

159 JO 

10650 

Jun 11&50 11550 

115X0 

115-90 

+1X0 

149X0 

10650 

5en 11520 115X0 

115X0 

mis 

+1XO 

141 JO 

10475 

Dec II5X0 115X0 

11350 

11440 

+1X0 

174X0 

11420 

Mar 


7I3JO 

+1X0 

Esl. John 





Prev. Day Open im. 6740 up 7 




GOLD (COM EX) 





100 tray <Oj- dollars per trav ax 




33350 

29800 




+410 

moo 

29470 

* » ' ' -jj.-' i* 

rttTi 

fVi - i'I 

+4X0 

306X0 

299 JO 



Pi! B 

+100 

51450 

30078 


i - j 


+410 

510X0 

30S20 

J | ; >■'' 

TtX: 

>1*70 


48SJH 

r-w-B 

i r T ' B - . \ 

■itj- ■ 

321 JO 


49200 

tit 1 M 

1 1 l B - .4 i> 1 



+430 

wja 

318JQ 


f rf- . < 

pvjkT' ■ 

+448 

48550 

32SXD 

. w ~* » v 



+440 

494X0 

330JB 


33830 

341X0 

+150 

43570 

33*70 



347X0 

4430 

428X0 

34X00 

Aug 350X0 350X0 

3JBX0 

r-h-i 

+4X0 

39570 


Oct 35720 357X0 

35720 


+470 

est. Sates 3X000 Prev.Sates 32-447 
Prav. Day Open Intl63.121 affU32 




1 Financial 1 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

Si mUJJon- ms of 100 pet 
9288 87.39 Mar 

9149 87.14 Jun 

9171 8494 SOP 

9073 8577 Dec 

9041 8640 Mar 

90.12 8751 Jun 

■984 8850 Sep 

Dec 

Esl. Sates 103*1 Prev.Salea 9489 
Prar. Day Open ML 40499 off 18*2 


91 J2 
9183 

*057 

9073 


9187 

914* 

9086 

9057 

9075 


9182 

9140 

9081 

9040 

9020 


9182 

9140 

9081 


9011 

0981 

8946 

8944 


18 TTL TREASURY (CBT) 

SI 00000 Min- Ms 8. Bnds of 100 pcf 



81-37 

7075 

Mar 

80-18 

90-2* 

80-14 

80-16 

« 


81-7 

7M 

Jan 

79-28 

79-31 

79-23 

79-23 

+2 

+.18 

+.M 

-A 

80-23 

78-28 

70-23 

7M 

75-18 

75-13 

75-18 

77-33 

SOP 

Dec 

Mar 

JM 

79-8 

79-3 

7+3 

78-19 

7K 

« 

+2 

+2 

— ilO 
— JB 

EstSatas Prev.Sates 6248 

Prav. Day Open InL 38480 up 342 





US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(■ Oet-Sioaooopts ASRide on 00 net) 


77i« 

57-27 

Mor 

70-34 

7X-5 

7+23 

7+27 

77-15 

57-20 

Jun 

70-1 

70-9 

49-28 

6*31 

76-2 

57-W 

Sea 

6*6 

49-18 

69-6 

6*7 



Dee 

6+17 

6+78 





Mar 

4+3 

6+7 



WH, 




67-24 

67-1* 


69-25 


S«P 

£7-8 

67-11 

67-3 

£73 

69-26 

5+25 

Dec 

<4-35 

4+25 

6+23 

6633 

69-7 

56-27 

Mar 




6+12 

68-11 

64-3 

Jun 

664 

6+10 

6+3 

6+2 

57-19 

6+31 

Sea 

6+31 

6+) 

65-25 

4*35 



Prav.SateeiiOTH 






Prev. Day Open lnl.191827 otTSTM 
GNMA (CBT) 

tmoooartiv pfs ASBids oMOOpct 
4+20 57-5 MW 6+3 69-12 

69-5 57-17 Jun 68-16 68-W 

<8-20 59-13 Sap 

60-13 59-4 DOC 

<7-15 50-20 Mar 

<7-* SB- 25 Jun 

66-13. 4*31 See „ 

Eat Sates Prev. So Wa 31* 

Prar. Dav Open Inf. 7423 off *1 


690 

68-13 


6043 

67-25 

67-7 

4633 


+1 

+7 

+a 

+2 

+2 


61-28 


9153 

9044 

9012 

8958 


91 36 
9043 
9012 
8952 


91 39 
9041 
9054 
8942 
8981 


CERT. DEPQ51T [IMM) 

SI mniton-pfeaf IWpcI 
91 J* 8543 MOT 9187 

9073 8530 Jun <043 

9052 8500 SOP 9013 

8977 8534 Dee 8952 

8M5 865* MOT 

0888 8643 Jun 

8786 8786 Sep 

Est Safas 568 Prar. Sates 903 

prev. Day Onen Inf. 14765 up 229 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

Si mllllotoptsaf TOOdcL 
9BJ3 801* Mar <008 9059 

9088 8249 Jun 9026 9081 

■985 8443 Sop 8971 -1975 

8942 8480 Dec 8977 B9J0 

BUR 86.10 Mar 8&4B 8851 

8877 8672 Jun 8848 8858 

8840 8748 Sep H2B 8878 

8977 8779 Dec 

EstSatas Prev. Sales 17722 

Prar. Day Open inL <0566 off9M 
BRITISH POUND UMM) 

SOW pound- 1 point cguabtPOflCl 
IJIJB I.IOI0 Mar 1.1130 T.TM0 l.nflD 1.1 159 

MB L095D Jun 1.1880 U100 1.1035 L1090 

14450 17958 Sop L1S6S L1990 1.1020 1,1065 


+JU 

+JB2 

tfl 


0970 0971 


+07 

+05 

+53 

+4B 

+51 


8775 -Jtt 


*SS 

■HO 

HO 


Hlufi 


Season 

Law 


Open Htuti Lew Ctow Clia 


17710 15950 DM 1.1015 1.1015 1.1015 1.1050 

EiL Sales 7547 Prev. Sales 0366 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 19506 UP 110 


HD 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 
5 Per dir- 1 potit equate 504 001 
JO® 7*46 Mar 7530 

7835 JVM Jun 7518 


7533 

7518 


3366 J4K Dec 7474 748 

EstSatas Un Prev. Sales 1,133 
Prar. Day Open inf. 8773 up 181 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

»per f ra n c- 1 palm equate WJHM H 
.11905 .10180 Mar .10180 .10201 

-1T0QB .10100 Jun 

.1043C .10135 Sep 

Eto. Sales 2 Prev. Safes 4) 

Prev. Dav Open InL 415 UP 33 


J3U4 

J5M 

—14 

.7490 

JM 

—IS 


J491 

—15 

J74W 

JM 

— M | 


Safes fn N** 

109ft HWl LOW JP-M.CITBC 


GTS* 

Galileo 

GamaB 

Gondii a 

Garcia 

Gancfcn 

GflAut 

GnHme 

GenetE 

GenctL 

GenefS 

Gene* 

Genova 

GaFBk 

GerMda 

CftnG 

GIpaT r 

GlenFd 

GWCorr 

GdTaca 

Gotaas 

Gall 

Goa Id P 

Graco 

Greaitre 

GrOPftl 

GrphSc 

GW FSB 

GBavCs 

GrronT 

Glech 

Gullfrd 

GIIBdc 

GifNue 

Gull 


276 aw a SW + *e 
131X6. 13 13 s * + to 

69 9 04, * 

16 fife life life . 
4» 3W 3 3W+W 




97240to 

40 

40 

__ 

to 



44 

ife 

6ft 

efe 

+ 

fe 



26 

8 

7ft 

Tft 





36 

3to 

Ife 

3fe 

— 

to 



66 

Oft 

Sfe 

Jfe 

4- 

to 



1733 

ife 

5ft 

6 

+ 

Is 



475 

Sfe 

5to 

Sfe 

T 

to 

.lOe 

20 

32 

Sfe 

Sto 

51b 

— ■ 

fa 



1505 

12ft 

llto 

121b 

— 

to 

X8 

IJ 

94 

6ft 

6 

ito 

— 

to 

XI 

J 

SI 

tt’u 

as 

29ft 




9 law 10 1BW + W 




an ioft 

lOto 



16 lllb 

10ft 



286 % 




245 Kto 

15fe 



144 12ft 

lift 

36 

43 

4Z7 13 

17' ■; 

44 

17 

14 12 

life 







44 lOfe 

70 to 



1687 5 

4ft 

48e 

28 

175 17 

16 


, W 


T) 

. 17 +1 

5917+ life life 

21 18W 18 IB — 

71*1* 13W 1* + W 

4 15fe 15 IS — ’t 

4831 15W 15 15 

34 2fe 7 2fe 
356 96* 9fe <fe 


H 


HBOs 
HCC 
HCW 
HMO Am 
Haber 1 
Hadca 

Hudson 

HateSv 

Hcrlml 

HnmOfl .10 
HorpG 34 
HrtfNs 140 
Hafhwy 30 
HawkB 30 
HlttlAs 
HlthCSs 
Hlthln 
HJfhdrn 
HochgA 
HactieB 
HefenT 
HHIv 
HenrdF 
HerltBn 
Hertev 
H merC 3 | jo 
H icham 


.16 J 
-«J4e 4 
.10 ZJ 


523 19?b 19W 19 W— W 
13 9fe 9W 9U + lb 

2 S 5 5 

31<11W 11 lllb 

224 75fe IS’-. 1SW + '« 
6 SW SW S'e— W 

159 2W r- r-b + 14 

4 5fe 5»t + ■- 

115 It 1W l v * 

46 141*i 14fe 14',— W 
17 31V. 31 31 

459 27V. 267b 2T« + W 
23 9Vy <fe <W + fe 
2*210 9fe 9fe— V« 
1426 17 MW 17 + 

51 18W 10 IB — W 

3 71) 7b 7fe— fe 
“ 7W Jfe + W 

23fe + 1- 
25 + fe 

oW — lft 
2flfe + to 
36W + W 




7791 Jtt 

Jto 

.16 

3 

67 24 

23to 



46 25 




103 7 

tto 



3628ft 

27W 

X40 23 

373 36W 

3A 

1X0 

33 

943ft 

43ft 


HmFAJ 

HomeHl 

Hmacft 

Hanind 

HackDr 

Hoover 

Horzlnd 

HwBNJ 

HunaTo 

HunrJB 

HntuRs 

HunreB 

Hurco 

Hvbrlfc 

Hyde At 

Hvoonx 

HvtekM 


56 

1J0 

1J0 


4 4Vb 4W 4W— W 
264 21W 20fe 2IW + to 
12 low 10W 10W+ W 
1209 76* 7 7% + W 

70 15to 15W ISto 
761 101b <W 10W 
139 7to 7V, 71+ 


12 

38 IB 

lT'to 

17ft 

5.1 

72 20 

19W 

Wft 


■W 29V, 


29W 


9 Sft 

5to 

5ft 


281 Wft 

I9to 

Wft 


S3 Sto 

Sfe 

Sto 


221 21 21 
B3 1B 9to 10 + to 

*5 353. 35 3544+1 

101 Sto 5 5 — fe 

30220W T9fe 20 + Vb 
40 5 4W 49h — W 

77 6fe *to *to 

S 16 1 8 


Leilcor, 

LoxIO.'C 

Uebrl 

Lfmvs 

LfsCsm 

LlivTuI 

UnBrs 

LlncTct 

LincbrB 

LISOas 

LeccIF 

LongF 

Lotos 

L-nden 

Lvchos 


Seles la Nti 

IBOs High low 3PM.C.V0C 
2S6 3-. 3-, 3fe 
23 3to Sto Sfe 
j jk Sto Sto 23'v + to 
A : *2 C 42 — -.1 

4t+ 6W *fe 4 to + '• 
13 2*915 1«=» IS 

3C5 2* Sto S'. + to 
2*30 33 33 

7 Sto Sto Sto— to 
IM 27. Mfe S'- _ 

20 14W 1<to 14-r — to 
111 2*’, 2* i^—v. 

76* 25to 25 25 — fe 

26 20 l»fe 2C + fe 
41 IS 1 , 1SW 15 , + W 


ZJ 


M 


MCI 
MRS! 1 
MTS S 


MT*/ 


jie 


£0 *2 
ZOO LI 
J5e * 
160 23 


.10 


J5 


ILC 

IMS Int 
lPLSy 
ISC 
lent 

Imunex 

iimma 

lmuaen 

ineanp 

IndaHtt 

l IKON 

InfaRsc 


30 J 


148 Bit 7W 8fe + W 
83746 37W 37fe 
192 3 2W 2W + Ik 

m «*— w 

4 4W+ W 

£W Sto + to 
III 1 -ft 
2fe I + W 
4W 446+ V. 
23W 23W+ W 


530 9W 
754 4V6 
86 6W 
02 3V. 
68 3 
132 5 
115834 


Infra In 
InetNIw 


IntaDv 

intuGen 

ISSCO 

Intel 

InffSy 

InfrTef 

Infmd 

Intdvn 

InfriFIr 

Infrfac 

Infurph 


25 33W 33W 33W+ W 
4826W 2SW 26W+ V. 
145 2236 22V. 22W— W 
S Afe 6to 4W + to 
16 1716 17V. 1716 + W 
4313 9to 9 946 

609 11 W 11V. 11V6 
8 3to 3to Sto 


1086 9to 
B47 2 W 


.1* 1J 


78 8Vb 
1261116 II 
83 7to 


77 6W - 
303 WH IS 
5 StO 


17W 

781* + fe 

29ft 

38ft— ft 

9W 

9ft 

Ito 

2ft + to 

17ft 

17ft — ft 

a 

8 

ti 

7! — ft 

6fe 

Tto + ft 

56W 

S7to— fe 

6 

6 — fe 

M 

IfJft— fe 

Sto 

sto— to 


IrCopE 

170 2ft 

2ft 

2ft 

intCIbi 

8814 

13Vi 

14 

IGorrw 

451 ISto 

15 

15fe+ fe 

Int Kino 

t TO 18ft 

18ft 

18to+ ft 


18 13ft 

13 

13 — fe 

InMoWI 

1374 8fe 

R 

Bft + fe 

IRIS 

228 1ft 

nil 

lft 

IT Coro 

21 1£W 

16ft 

16W+ ft 

intTotal 

29 4fe 

ito 

4fe 

Invert 

Xle X 286 ito 

4W 

4to 

lumrua 

424 9fe 

9ft 

9ft 


isoaidx 
1 tel 
Itelpf 


a 121b 12 12 — Vb 

345 Sto 5to SW+W 

2 a a a 


.10188 .10210 
.10170 

.101a 


GERMAN MARK I IMM) 
sper mark- 1 point eauabSUNOl 


X110 

J137 

Mar 

J15D 

X141 

XI 49 

5159 

+li 


JM0 

Jun 

J174 

J1B3 

5173 

51 BO 

-+1J 

5195 

Sop 

J205 

SR 

5203 

5208 

+12 

J610. 

3734 

Dec 

X241 

52*1 

5341 

+14 


EstSatas I4J31 Prev.Salea 1L231 
Prav. Dav Open Int 39J83 off 189 


JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S per van- 1 potaf equals 90X00001 
004695 000921 Mar J083939 J03946 JB39M JQ3944 
004450 J03935 Jun J03967 J03970 JO039S7 J03972 
0041 SJ J0S99B Sep J0be»3 

004390 JW4034 DOC J04034 J04036 J040M J04040 
Est.Solee 1097 Prev. Sale* 2J61 
Prev. Dev Open Int 14,141 up 299 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

5 per franc- IPDfnfrwafsRUOOl 
JOS J734 Mn- J752 -37*1 5739 5754 

UJ900 J775 Jun 5786 J792 J775 5789 

4830 -3824 Sep 3825 J82S JOS 5823 

ASUS J8A0 Dec -3864 

EstSatas 11J99 Prev. Safe* M519 
Prev. Day Open int 21 376 off 711 


+11 

+9 


+9 

+12 


Industrials 


LUMBER l CME) 

130J00 bd. It- * per 1 J00 b(L If. 
22150 13050 

22IL40 13953 

22SJD0 14750 
23050 153X0 

19750 15750 

186.10 1 67 JO 

187X0 175X0 

1*5X0 178X0 


Est. Solas 1JM Prev. Safa 2549 
Prev. Day Open Int. 10525 aH4f 


Jan 161 AO MUO 16140 16140 
Mar MT40 162*0 16140 16140 —500 
MOV 16BJ0 16850 1 6750 167J0 —5X8 
Jul 174X0 174X0 172X0 172X0 -5X0 
SOP 17440 17550 17350 173X0 —5X8 
NOV 177X0 177X0 174X0 175X0 — 4J0 
Jan 1 81 TO U1J0 179.10 17820 —450 
Mar 183X0 lB3xo 18250 183.10 —340 


COTTON 3 (NYCE) 


7930 

7935 

7750 

78X0 

7675 


tents perlb. 
45.12 Mar 

66X5 

6438 

6535 

6S. 70 

—3* 

6370 

MOV 

67.10 

6750 

66JS 

6479 

—36 

47-40 

Jul 

6JJS 

67.95 

67X0 

6752 

—.70 

67X0 

Oct 

47 JS 

67 JS 

67J5 

<7 -57 

— xa 

6751 

Dec 

67 JO 

<751 

67X0 

67X3 

— 4te 

69X0 

Mar 

6595 

66.75 

68X5 

68X0 

-05 


May 




49 JO 

—JO 


Jul 




69 JO 



Est. Sales 3500 Prev. Sales 3X70 
Prev. Dav Onen Int 18X12 up 187 


HEATING OIL MY ME) 
42X09 oaf- cenfft pw cal 


86J3 

69X5 

Feb 

7650 

7BX0 




B3X0 

48X0 

Mar 

7204 

72X0 

7150 

72XS 

+136 

8275 



48.10 

<850 

67X0 

68X0 

+X1 

82X0 

£5X0 

May 

6470 

57JB 

4630 

6655 

+X5 

78X0 

6650 

Jun 

<650 

6*30 

6550 

66X0 

+50 

Est. Safes 


Prev.Sates 15336 





Prev. Dav Open ini. 24566 up 488 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 
lJOObM.-dolloreMr bd. 


3750 

25.15 

Feb 

3580 

25X0 

2S59 


+X7 



Mar 

2538 

25X0 



+.12 

31X5 

2110 

Apr 

25X8 

25X8 




3028 

25-10 

MOV 

25J4 

2533 

2551 


+X8 

2955 


Jun 

2SX2 

2550 

2535 


+.10 

2954 


Jul 




25X0 


2957 



3535 

2SJS 

25.15 

25X0 

+.10 









2950 

2630 

Oct 






3950 

25X1 

Nov 




25X0 


2950 


Doc 






29X6 

29X6 

Feb 






29X5 

29X5 

Mar 






29X5 

25.10 







2750 

2750 

May 






2*70 

26-70 

Jun 




25X0 








25X0 

+.W 

ESL Sales 


Prev.Salea T7385 



Prev. Dav Open Inf. 60X83 off 1484 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMC) 
pafnte and cents 

1MJS 15350 M or 173X0 T7Z50 172.15 17240 

780-70 156.10 Jun 17650 176-80 175X0 175X0 

183.90 MOJO Sep 180X0 1B0X0 17850 T7U0 

18230 17530 Dec 18250 1B2J0 181X0 101X0 

EN.Saiei 56442 Prev. Sales 74304 
Prev. Day Open Int 48510 until* 

VALUE LMBKCBT) 
points and orn 

JS42 155-12 w* - I* 1 -22 mm inxs 
1252 J Mn m» iolis 

197 J0 US35 Ses 19650 19650 19650 197X5 

Eat. Soles _ Prev. Soles <3*4 
Prev. Day Open law. SAB W48< 


— X5 
—35 


+30 

+45 

+53 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 
potato on aoe o H 

I03XO B630 Mae 10045 10055 9935 9930 

&& Jvn 10Z30 1EB 18lS 10145 
1MJO 91^ Sep 10390 103X5 1BZ» 10X35 
M6J0 101 JO Dec 1BSXS 

Est- Soles 12X12 Prar.SOtas 16X98 
Prar. Day Open Int 7X99 imlOf 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 


Reuters. 


DJ. Futures. 


Close 
960X0 f 
1,999.70 
12536 
245X0 


Com. Reseorcti Bureau- 
Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary ; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 
961X0 f 
1,983.10 
124.94 
244.90 


Market Guide 


CBT: 

CME: 


NYCSCE: 

NYce: 

COMCX; 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


OMoubd Board of Trade 
CWbobo M a mm tHe Exctsonoe 
intwn uf tonal M anetafy Market 
Of emcooa MeramHto E x chonoe 
New York. Cocoa. Soger, coffee EaChanue 
Nto York Cotton Endnei 
Commodity Exctmae, New York 
New V ark MercanUte EfMBaiu* 

Kansas CRv Board of Trade 
New York Futuna Eschenae 


JBRast 

Jackpot 

Jack Lit, 

JamWtr 

JriSmrf 

JetMart 

Jurfco 

Jitve 

JanlcM 

Jonel A 

Mmomt 

Juno 

Justfne 


34 14 


i 2J 


.12 J 


X 

X 

30 53 


225149m Mto 14to— W 
42 4W 3to 4 
433 K 31 32 +1 

35 21 20V. 20W— Vb 

17 l8Vb 1796 1796— Vi 
81 Tift 59b 7 
1016 16W 14 
115 to tft 

77 41* 4 

■ 4 4 

747 J2* 9»k 
94 2396 73 


w 

4Vb + Vft 
4 

«•+ to 
2396+ to 


701 20 179159b T5W 15V6 


KLAS 

KVPhr 

Komon 

Korehr 


1456 18Vb 18 18 — fe 


Kay den 

Kdyjn 

Kemp 

KvOiLf 

Kevw 

KeyTm 

KovCms 

KJmbal 

KJmtrtc 

KlncoM 

Kinders 

vIKoss 

Kray 

Knurs 

Kulcke 




12 Sft 

4ft 

56 

13 

279 25 Vr 

24ft 



414 15ft 

life 

xot 

45 

351 13W 

13ft 




a 

1X0 

4.1 

192 44to 

44to 

50 

23 

163 36ft 

3£ft 



4 6 

Sto 



198 10 

9ft 



13 Sft 

5ft 

54 

TO 

16 27 

36ft 



23 4 

Sft 



8 8ft 

BW 

X6 

A 

1B71 16ft 

life 



319 fe 

ft 

06 

X 

108 10ft 

9W 

32 

23 

931 Mfe 

13ft 

.16 

X 

490 2SW 

2Sfe 


6 

10 + W 

5Vi — fe 


BW— 14 


96+ to 
996— Vi 


LDBmk 
UN 
LSI Loo 
LTX 

LoPetos 
LaZBv I JO 
LadFm .IB 
Lafdlw .16 
LomaT X0 
Limoast 48 
LndBF 40 
LdmkS 
LonaCi XOa IX 
Lanolv 35a 17 
Lcnrwn s 20 1.1 
UraDla 
Loinar 

LawHP 3KD 15 


42 


382101* 7014 7096 — W 
277 7V, 696 7V6 + 9ft 

2206 14*6 1496 75 — 96 
474 2016 1996 20 
506 Mto 15fe 16 V. 
»37fe 349* 3796 + H 
134 16 154b 15fe 

52 15V. 14W I4W— 9ft 
0213 1294 13 + V. 

35 ISto 1516 151* 

674 14 IJto 14 + U 

36 Mb 6to 6W + W 
1T3 42W 4196 42W+1 

M 694 696 696+ 9b 
143 76V. 2596 2596— W 
224 796 6to 7 — fe 
531396 13fe 7314— fe 
43 8 796 8 


Moeprg 

MccnTc 
MacfcTr 
MOdGE 
MOCCM 
MclRI 
Moi rite 
Me i Sc I 
Manitw 
MfrsN 
Mornst 
MrldN 
Mscaln 
Massfor 
MattiBx 
Mans 
Max era 
Maxvret 
.ltevPt 
MovnOi 
McCrm 
Me Fad 
McFarl 
Ar«dn 
MedCre 
Medctft 
flr*jttx 
Mescts 
Menler 
MentrG 
McreS s 1.92 
MarcBk 148 
IVL-cftCa 
AAerSv X8 
MreBc 240 
MrdBcrt 250 
MerrGs 
MelrAIr 
MetSL 40 
Mlcem 
MlcrD 
MIcrMk 
Micrdv X6 
WicrTc 
Micron 
MtcrSm 
MdPcA 
MdSIFd A0 
MldBka 1.12 
MdmAIr 
Ml II Hr 44 
Million 
Mllllpr 44 
Minlscr 
Mlnstr s 
AWscfwr 
MGask Xle 
MoblCA 
MoblC B 
Modi no 140 
Motedr 
Mohw X3 
Mon Co 140 


<113 9to 
11M S', 
.5 H', 
14! 2£ 

11 life 
624 r. 


IT 9 

4fe S'-, *ie» 
18 lBfe + fe 
Wfe l»'a + W 
11 11'- 
6ib 7 
2*65 Hfe 16fe 16fe— W 
73 23fe 73fe ZT ; 

2C9 IT-i life 12fe 
& Bfe aw Bib 
3512 12 12 

341 13 12fe IW- fe 
131 19'e 1< life 
63 48fe 48 «fe + fe 
15C a Tfe Tfe + fe 
50 46fe 45W 46 C. + fe 
11732 Slfe 31W— fe 
4101 S’., 5 S — W 
20* lOfe 13W lCfe + fe 
;a 27 27 + fe 

804 2*'i afe 24 
4c life 10fe 11 
29+7 5fe «fe 5W + fe 
ir» *\, 3fe jw + fe 
202 3296 32W 22'* 

2 <fe <fe 9fe 
35 11 109, TOfe— fe 

165 3fe Bfe Bfe + to 
5C7 6W *fe 6W + to 
273 16'b IfW 16-, 

15< l*o lBfe 19 
102 71: J 7W + W 
171 13 12fe 12W— W 
724 SW 21W 219b— fe 
7! 33W 33 33fe 
13 *3fe <3'4 Ufe 


1 

12‘b 

12to 

13to 



Vz 

17 

23ft 

23 

23 

■— 

to 


40’t 

40 

40 

+ 

to 

54 

31 

30 

31 

+ 

to 

.54 

15 

life 

Kft 

— 

ft 

557 

life 

13ft 

13fe 


ft 

25 

life 

lift 

lllb 

+ 


1234 

32 

31W 

31to 

— 

to 

1S4 

4ft 


4ft 

+ 



3J 


Monta 

MatAill 

Monant 

MonuC 

MorFfo 

MorKa 

Marrsn 

Meaeiey 

MatCRf 

Muftmd 

Mytene 


U0 

XI 

.12e 

48 


JO 14 
4* 1J 
.101 A 


a 1QW -HIW 109b 
197 SW 5W SW— fe 
538 ato 2)lft 23V. — to 
565 Sfe 5fe 5W + fe 
707 Sto Sfe Sfe + fe 
136 Sfe 5 5 — W 

8 lBfe 189* 1896 + V, 
145 X 29fe 2994— Vi 
200 4W Sfe 4W + Vb 
221 aw 36 u. aw 
32 3fe 396 396— to 

205 35fe 34fe a 
1221 396 39b 37b 
192 Mto M 19 — to 

3 72 12 12 

243 16W life 16V6 + W 

52 896 BW BW 

475 Sfe BW BW— V# 
2D\ 40V. 389ft 40 +19* 

65 89* Sto Sto 

101 3394 33to 33V. 
104469b 44W 44W— fe 

82 39* Sfe 396 + lft 
18 lBto Uto I8W + to 
207 Sfe 8 fftft+ to 
15*8 15to 15W 15H— fe 
56 30to 30W 30W— W 

53 T6fe 1696 16fe + W 
481194 life life— Vb 

250 18 17fe 18 + to 

102 5fe 5 Sfe 

1 14 14 14 + W 

im m « 

USB 2794 a 2716 +116 


i Pavchx 
; PeakHC 
I PecriH 
FcvGW 
I PcrioEn 
I Peninr 
! PeopEx 
Peppet 
Percent 
PersCpt 
Potrite 
Piuxnct 
ajes 
PtniGi 
PhruAm 
Picsov 
PicCcite 
PICnHI 
PlenSI s 
PoFatfc 
P.'CVMO 
Psrex 
Pesl5l 
Powell 
Potn-tc 
P*Conv 
PreeCst 
Prod lu 
P rewav 
Pnom 
PrleCm I 
PrlcCoi 
Prtranx 
ProaOP 
ProaCo 
ProptTr 
Prsvln 
PullTrn 
PurtBn 


Sola in Net 

1009 HHh Lew IPJA-Ctrae 
<3 H W II 1IW+ V, 
457 Uto uto Ufe + fe 
219 Bfe 2296 23 
331 6 S*. 6 + to 

17 76 25to »•— «6 
40 77’-, 27 27fe + W 


Ml IX 
2X0 74 
-76 20 


69B6 life 10W 10W— 1 
fe+lb 


+ to 


406 fe W 
27 8 Tfe 
M 6W Sfe BW 
36 MV, » 2BV6+1 

325 < 8 Sfe— 16 





9 

9ft 



3X 


ISto 

16 + 

M 



IB 3ft 

3to 

3ft 




125 21ft 

20fe 

21 — 

U 


3.1 


19ft 

TOW + 

Vt 

.92 

23 

194 33ft 

33K 

33W 


.12 

13 

17 8 

7ft 




24 12 life life— W 
2C2 28W 27to 2794— W 
117 239* 22W 23W + fe 
47 8 7*i 7ft 

2«0 2to 2 lb 296+ Vb 
1717V6 Mto 1714 
27 8 79, 794— Vi 

79 33U. 3294 32to 
M 69 m 6fe 6to 
6f 376 39b Jto— lb 

1385 Sto Sfe Sfe + to 
121 1414 13 Mto +lfe 
334650 4094 4994 + 9* 

*< Mto 15fe Mto + to 
W *fe 4W 49b + W 
291 359, 35 3594+ 94 

40 14 13W 14 + W 

<0 Mto Mto 1414— fe 
182 4 W 4fe *to + lb 
121 17 Kfe I6fe + 16 


QMS 5 

Quarfrx 

DucftrC 

QoctlSv 

Quantm 

QuestM 

Quixote 

Qualm 


454 IS 149b MW 
305 Sfe 49b 5W + fe 
I 25 V. 2Sfe 2Sfe — to 
204 3W 31b 3'A 

694 22W 22 2214 

1011 4fe 496 49b— to 

2D10W Wfe 101b — fe 
1322 Sfe SW Bfe + to 


NCACs 

NM8 

NaacoS 

N Bn Tex 

NtCtV S 

NtCutr 

NData 

NHHttC 

NfLutnIJ 

NMIcm 

NTedi 

NatrBtv 

Nauuta 

Nauawrt 

NdmT 

Nelean 

NwkSec 

NetwkS 

NlwkEI 

NBrtmS 

NHmpB 

NJNats 

NYAIrl 

NYAwt 

NvrfdBk 

Newt a 

NwpPh 

NlCalu 

NkkOG 

Nike B 

Nardsn 

Nardstr 

Norsk B 

Marxian 

NAtlln * 
NastSv 
NwNG 
NwtFn 

NwNL S 

NWEtPS 

Navmtx 

Novell 

NuUPtt 

Numrax 

NuIrtF 

NuMed 


230 7Vb 7to 7to 


34 <7 
SO 47 
34 1.1 
A4 4.9 
JOe U 


215 39* 3H 39b— to 
UV6 13to 


X6 J 


1013V. 

1532094 »fe 20W 
396 40fe 39fe 40W + fe 
234 2296 22to 2ZW + to 
494 9fe 9 9 

A223W B 23W +2 
50 5V. 496 *9* 

4W <96 + to 

Sto 316 

4W 4W+ to 

4ft 5 

!W 1W— W 
796 7ft + to 

916 9W 

... a* W.+ to 

365 2316 22fe 21 
490 6 Sto 596 

19 7ft 7ft 794+ to 

lB23Mi 22ft Z3W 
24 24 Zt94 24 
302 59b Sfe SW— fe 

1 to to to 
*31) ISA 11 —to 
77B25 24 25 + 96 

6SD 694 6ft 696+ to 


280 494 
15 314 
I *W 
330 Sfe 
ID 1W 
M 7ft 
310 994 
469 BW 


8 * * tfr & 


XOb 

48 

839 

Mb 

8ft 

Bfe 

X6 

37 

1 

a 

M 

18 — 

XO 

IJ 

2219 32 

3IW 

31 to — 

.120 

J 

9 

!9tt 

39ft 

39ft— 



54 

6ft 

AW 

ife 



34 

7ft 

7W 

7W— 



744 

9ft 

Bto 

9W + 


zfo 


396 17VS 17fe 17W 
2X 90411b 40ft 48* + ft 
25 1356 32fe 3tW 22ft + fe 
9X 12 2194 Bft Bft 

118 496 4 4 — to 

.92 20 3346W 469* 46W+ to 

333 6 SW 6 + to 
33 Bfe Sto Bib— to 
25 896 8W 894 + to 
8310ft 10ft 10ft + to 


OCGTc 

OokHIII 

DOIRec 

Oceoner 

Odiias 

OffsLog 

OaltMs 

OhlaCa 

OldKnts 

Old Rep 


32 

268 


1054 3ft 3 
56 3ft 3ft 
478 3V, 296 
63S 4ft 3fe 
500 MW 14 
142 3ft 296 


3ft + fe 

316 

3to + W 
<to+ 9b 
M — ft 
1 + Vi 


-88 23 


OktSPtC 7M 128 

OneBo -13e .7 

On U no 

Onyx 

OpttcC 

OpttcR 

Orbonc 

Orolt 

OrloCp 

OStHTH) JO IJ 
OttrTP 288 <J 
OvrExp 

OwenM 26 2* 
Oxoco 


28 I2KJSSW 3554 3596— ft 
SO 383 46V. 46 46 — to 

133 24 23ft 23ft — ft 
69 30ft 30W 30to 
27 2094 209* 209b— ft 
244 ISto 179* 179*— to 
67 ito 4 6V. • W 

500 2 Ife 2 + ft 

235 IS Mto MW— to 
419 36ft 3596 36 + W 
55 14ft 14YS 149b + ft 
155 6ft 6 6 — ft 

2*2 59b 5 Sto— ft 
51696 169* 16fe+ ft 
31 22ft ato 2Bto— to 
384 Mb 13fe 14U. + to 
35 1394 13ft 13fe + to 
196 396 3to 39b 


PLM 

PNC 

PatatS 

Paccar 

PacFet 

PocTei 

PocoPh 

PancMx 


.17 

2J2 


Parlsan 
Part. Oft 
PatntM 
Pair* I 
PaulHr 
PaulPt 

PayN 


62 596 Sfe 5b 
561 *0ft 47ft 48 + fe 
3?®* 994 * 9ft— fe 
1201 24 975DV. 50 SO — fe 

272 Oft Bto Bfe 
OO 53 a 14 13fe 74 

3215 Mto 14fe— ft 
.13 1J 34 7ft 7fe 7fe 

azisfe im is* 

4211 lOfe lOfe— to 
36 14 14 M 

127 4 596 Sfe— fe 

1)0 BW Bfe Bto— to 
793 1*94 13ft 1*9* +19* 
a 7ft 7 7ft— to 
* 22ft 229* 229 m— to 


RAX 

RPMl 

RodSys 

RodtnT 

Rodlce 

Rodion 

Rouen 

Rolnre 

Romtek 

RovEfl 

Reodna 

Recoin 

RedknL 

Reeves 

RpcvEI 

Rewsa 

Rehab 

Rellab 

Renal 

RpAulo 

RoHItti 

RestrSv 

Reuter I 

RetrtrH 

RftWi 

RovRey 

Rhodes* 

Plbllm 

RlchEI 

RXtove 

Rival 

RoadS* 

Robasi 

RabNug 

RobVen 

Rockar 

RostaSl 

RaseSB 

Rouse 

Reyfnt 

RovPIm 

RovtRs 

RoytAlr 

RustPul 

RvonFa 


34 22 


3L1 

3 


.156 1 A 
X 9e A 


00 

1X0 


280 9 Bfe SW— to 
3-5 1035 Mfe 15b 16 + 9b 

41 Mfe Mb Mfe 
204 II 10W 10ft— ft 
9810ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

15 9V » n 

112 Aft Sfe 6ft + ft 
30324ft »fe 24ft + ft 

113 S96 5 5 — fe 

1) mu 15 15 + ft 

16 20ft 20ft 20ft + b 
73 Aft 6 6Vb- ft 
57 289* 2BW 2894 

276 696 69b 6ft— to 
300 bfe 616 4» 
11951394 T2to 129*— 1 
76 34ft 24ft 24ft— fe 
43 tOVb 9ft 9ft 
10 4b 4to * li — ft 
204 9 Bfe V + b 
991 119* life 1196+ lb 
4013b 12W 12ft— 96 
33 W* 10ft 10* 

87 21 2094 a +96 

44* 4 3* 4 

... 183 3816 3716 30 + to 

IX 143614ft M 14b 

73 Vfe 9 9b- ft 

10 aft aft 21ft + to 
12 lft 196 1H 
S3 940 IJft 1296 13ft + ft 
12 324 31ft a 31 W — to 
37 6W 616 6ft + ft 
A 5016 ISto 1594 

la llto 109* 11 + Vi 

556 15 1496 14* + ft 

IX 11 19ft 19ft 191*1—1 
IJ 522ft 22V, 22W 
2 A 332 3896 35 3394 + 96 

66 1096 lBto 1896 + ft 

10 8b Bto Bto— to 

59 6ft 6b 6ft + to 

100 996 9V6 9 to 

160613ft 11 1146—196 

8330b 1994 20b 


3J 


S 


-10r 1.1 


M 16 


ISO 43 


OSr .7 


.12 1 3 
IXOa 45 
.72 13 


SO fox 

SeaGal 

Sftogo** 

Us 

Sensor 

SvcfWer 

Svtnaet 

Servlca 

SvcFrc* 

SevOafc 

ShrMod 


3J 


61 lib II II — b 
361 Mfe Mlb 149*— b 
1072 14fe 14 1416 + to 

96 9 894 Sfe— 16 

190 Mto 14 14 

207 18 18 18 — ft 

354149* Mto 149*+ Vi 
426 33ft 33ft 33ft 
ISM 1596 15b 

7ft 816+ ft 
49ft 4996— W 
316 39* 

716 7ft 
8 8ft 
fe fe 
7 7 

43514 35to 3516 + to 
1527ft 27ft 27ft 
645 9ft Oft 99*+ ft 
28 13ft T3b I3W 
16 994 9ft 9X6 
B 7ft 7ft 7ft— b 
4K ft 896+ ft 

32 494 4ft 496+ to 

312 12 lift lift— W 
134 4 3* 4 

33 17W 1696 1696— 96 
147 7W 7 7ft 

BOSS 8 7to 79*+ 9b 
76 2ft 2fe 2ft + fe 
629 6W 4 6ft + ft 


1545 Bto 
LO 139350 
a 39b 
72 7ft 
23 Bto 
44 fe 
ID 7 


sales In Net 

lHe HH* Law JP-M-CS.** 


Stratus 

SlrwCe 

Sinker 

StuartH 

Subaru 

Sutx-B 

5umma 

SumTHI 

5unCsf 

SurUMcd 

SunSL 

SuoRte 

SuaSkv 

Sunrtex 

SuprEa 

Syk« 

SvmDT 

Svncor 

5rnfecft 

Syntrex 

Svscon 

SvAuc 

S vatin 

Srs Into 

SvstGn 

Systmt 

5CTCP 


4668 119* 11 life + v 
16748ft 48V. 4896+V 
18 36 2596 2594 

15 3* Sfe Jfe— V - . • 
a22w laftiaiv lSt-j- *• . . 

68«fe 45W *5K t- VU-^ v> • « 



56 Mto 1596 MU 
II9NN 
M * 3fe 4 
194141* 13ft Uft + 
5861 1 ft 1 
353 109, Wft 10ft + 
152 4ft 3* Jfe 
500 lift II 179* + 

ae 4ft 49* 4ft— 
2 13ft 13ft 13ft— 
0417b 17-17 
458 6ft Sfe Sfe— 
B 9ft 9 9ft 
42 8 796 8 . 

264 18b 1796 18 + 
150114 1394 life ■ 


.12 


TBC 
TCACO 
TocWv 
Tandem 
Tanden 
TcCem 
Telco 
TIcmA 
TolPtos 
Tolcrfl 
Ttaecrd 
TetePld 
ToWld 
Tefata 
Tetean 
Temce 
TndrLv 
TermDf 
Teadota 
Tewm 
Textne 
TherPr 
Thrmd e 
ThetM 
TMN a 
Thor In 

Thorite 
ThouTe 
3Com 
TimeEa 
TmeFtb 
Tlprarv I 
Tofu s 
Tansy a 
TrakAu 
TrtodSy 
TrlbCm 
TrueJe J6 
TBfcGaa 1X0 
Tuck Dr 
TwnCty 
TvaonF X8 


JSe 1.9 


1X0 3J 


226 llto 1096 1096— 

26 Mb M M — 

inn n oft— _ 

2679 229* a94 22 —to 
7299 Bib 796 8. + lb 
16 Bto 8b Bto + ft, 
71517ft 17 17ft + b 
712 24ft 24ft 2496 + W 
058 JOTS 10 WM + ft ' 
48 6 Sfe 5t0 + lb- 
94 19 toft lift— l* 
*91 10ft 1714 177b— ft.. 
1291 3ft 39b 3fe+ftJ. 
101918 17b 1716— b" 

S5317fe 1716 17ft— b' 
*5 4 4- 4 + !*•>. 

64 3fe 3 3b— W - 

178 996 916 Ife + 96 ’ 

90 Ife 19* Ife j- 

202 19b 19b 19*+ ftr' 

369 1396 13W 13ft- to -' 
6813ft 13b 13ft + ft— 
14 9ft 996 9ft 
30 994 9ft Vft + 9*: -; 
2234 33W 34 + ft; - 

I2210W lOto 109b + ft 
33910ft Wft 1016+ Ib.- 
1069 ISto 17ft Wft— Vi.. 
777 39b 8ft 0ft— 1*. 

ia i2to life i2to + to • 

40 10ft w 18 —ft 
312 Ife Ife lft • 

51 14ft Uto Mfe + V6 - 
26 ISto 149 m 15M + 96 ' 
5814V, 14 14fe+ ft 

438 1016 9ft 10b + to ; 
155 2to 21* Zb— 16 
1929b 23 29to + tb.- 
9 9 Bfe 33ft lift + 16 
209 5ft 4fe 5 
3 Ife H* Ife— lb . 
lisa 32V. 2996 



USLICO 

1J0 

42 

2) 28ft 3BW 

28ft 

UTL 



7 77ft 

17ft 

17ft- W 

UHrav 

X6e 

X 

1393 7ft 

7W 

7ft 

Unumn 



239518ft 

17to 

inft + Vi 

UnM 

vlUnloll 



iSTKl n 

% 

UnPlntr 



3518ft 

18ft 

18ft .* 

UnTrBc 

3X0 

47 

9 51ft 

50ft 

Slft+1 .111 

UACom 

.12 

X 

55 27ft 

26ft 

Z7 'U 

TlTUul 

,10e 1.1 

2 Bfe 

Sfe 

Bto— to' 


1X8 

46 

199 23ft 

23fe 

23ft + to 

UnEdS 



10 2ft 

2 

2 - lb. 

UFnGrp 



24 SW 

Sfe 

■fe— to 

UFstFd 



3813ft 

u 

13ft + 1* . 

UGron 

f 


134 771* 

17ft 

i7ft— to 

UPread 



61 9ft 

9W 

9ft + to ' 

US Ant 



2T6 3ft 

3 

3ft + H ■- 

US Bet, 

1X0 

35 

877 3Sft 

2Sfe 

25ft + ft 

US era 



27 Jib 

Ito 

ife- H" 

USDscn 



20 Sft 

Sft 

5ft 

US HI l 



1047 33ft 

32ft 

33ft +1 

us Shit 

X66 15 

48 4te 

4 

4 + to 

U55wr 



717 Win 

life 

Uffe + W 

USTrb 

1J0 

93 

418 12fb 

life 

12W+ to-MMI 

USTr 

1X0 

15 

222 45to 

45ft 

<5to+ 

UStatns 

JO 

IX 

310 life 

20ft 

21 +1 

UnTetev 



436 17fe 

17 

17W + ft "* 

UVaBa 

1X4 

40 

746361b 

35ft 

36to + 14' 

UnvFrn 



302 1BW 

IB 

18 

UnvHlt 



70012ft 

lift 

12 

UnvHId 



65 4W 

4ft 

4K + to 

UFSBfc 



19 9V, 

9 

9ft + ii. 

tracer 



4S Sto 

5M 

Sfe + to 

U scale 

X7e 

1.9 

79 Sfe 

Sfe 

Sft + lb- ‘ 




Hu 



X5 

l.W 15 
t 


53 2DW 20b 20W+ W 
12 896 


. 1 * 

AO 


Snwnrts US 


.16 


.14 3 


.100 1.9 


JO SJ 


X6 3 


1JD 44 


■60 43 


30 23 


awidhl 

gSo 

Shpwnt 
Silicon 
StltconS 
Stitcvol 
Sllicnx 
SHtee 
SJmptn 
Stpoln 
StoCp 
5Uzi«r 
Skipper 
SloonTc 
SmlthL 
SmlthF 
Socfetv 
SOCtvSv 
SoH ech 
SdftwA 
SonocP 
SonrFd 
SoBost 
SoHosp 
S lhflFn 
Soulrst 
Sovran 
Sovran 
SpaiA 
Speeds 
Ssctron 
SoecCfl 
spire 
StarSr s 
SfafBId JO 
Standys 1X0 
StdMlc 
SMReg 1.16 
Stondun 
Stanhos 1JD S3 
SraStB IM 23 
StoleG .15b 13 
Sleloor 
Stern rL 
SteYrSfv 

Stwlnf 32 3J 

stitei 
Stack Sv 


Bto 09b + lb 

3 a*2 796 7to 7ft 
3 672 T2W 1216 12W+ 9* 
440 32ft 3194 32 + 16 
121594 15b 15b— fe 
70 Sfe Sfe Sfe 
B214fe 1496 Uto 
41129ft 299* 29ft— 16 
9531* Jl HUI* 
1201BW 17ft Wft + to 
33T7W 1696 17 
1313516 3496 35 
86 14ft 14 MW + ft 
10 516 Sto 516 + to 
143 9W 916 9W 
472 149* 13W MW + fe 
6617 16W 17 — to 

12S T7V. MW 1696 + ft 
46 Vfe Fb Vfe— to 
24 15 1496 15 

1816 15ft 15ft 
48 496 49b 49b— ft 
» 17 149* 1696— to 

82 1216 life 12 + to 
536 7 596 69* + ft 

166 Ife 39* 3W 
77 7ft 7ft 79b + V6 
48 K 38W 39 + w 
*9 13fe 13b 13ft + to 


1X8 4J 
X5e X 


XS X 


2j4 


64340b 39% 40 + fe 

2C8 ito Sto 4to +lto 
82 1296 12V, 12W 
0) 1294 lift Uto— ft 
48 69* 6ft ife 
a 15V6 MW 149b — to 
74 lift nw llto— to 
193 696 6V. 6W 
556 22b 21 V4 2196— to 

247 aw aw wft— ib 

S7 4BV. *7to 43 
177 4 5ft 5ft 

324 aw aw aw 

20347 4694 4JW— U 

167 6ft 69b 6W 
45 6ft 69* ife— to 
9 496 4ft 4fe— to 
329 14W 13ft 1*1 « 

11 aw S96 2296 + to 
to £ * 6 —to 

109 9 8ft 8W~ W 


vu 

VLSI 

VMX 

VatkiLg 

VolFSL 

VoINtl 

VoJLfl 

VanDua 

Vonsetf 

VectrO 

Ventrex 

Veto 

VtcoilF 

VI cent 

VJefraS 

videoCP 

vie oe Fr 

vtkmu 

Vktrtok 
VlsTecti 
Vosfmrl 
Volt Inf 
Volvo 


437 ife 

•rft 

6 —to 

43810ft 

Hto 

lBfe— Vi 

195 10ft 

184b 

10ft— to . 

138213ft 

raw 

13ft + to 

20 9 

9 

9 

439 31 to 

X.ft 

31 W - T 

499259* 

75 

25 -to 

21213ft 

13W 

13ft— fe - 

5 life 

lift 

life _ ■ 


•77 9* 


Xtm 3 


toe fe "to ft+h 

22 29b 2ft 2ft— 16 • 

26317ft 16W 17 +ft 
65 3 Jfe 3ft— to’ - 

9 Wfe 19ft lfeb 
32a U 69811ft life I1ft+I6' ~ 
9813U 13 13 • ’ : 

209 a to 1916 1916—16 
3B4 Ife Ito 1W 

S2 79* 79* 7ft— K 

146 18 179* 17ft— ft — . 

2043 KV6 29V, 29ft + W - 


fv 


+.U. 


W 


WD 40 
walbrC 
WlkrTet 
WaftE 
WFSL* 
WMsa 
woven. 

Webb a 36 
WoslFn 
WnGoeS 2X4 
WstFSL 
WMleTc 
WMlcr 
WITlAl 
WmorC A0 
WsiwdO 
WstwdC 
Wrttrv os 
meat 
WKfcom 
Wlllmt lxo 
WIIIAL 
WmaSn 
WlhnF 


1X8 84 
JXH 23 


6.X 


2.1 


4 aw aw aw 

2223W 23 » 

1473 12 11W 12 +ft- 

Z1720W 19ft a TS*. 
10528ft aw 2BW^“ . 
34812b nft 12W+16. 

724 8ft Bto 8ft + lb f 
3X9 1296 T2W XVjk- ftLMI 
153 10 9ft 9Tb Wt 
246b 4ito 46to— ft 
06 Bto 7ft 0 . „ ■ 

92 91* Bfe Bfe + ft 
18 616 4 ito + ft 
34Mft MW 1496 
»19W 1916 19to 
!l#vi a 30W+ V: 
M15to 14fe 15b 
456 ato 349* asv— ft 
107 396 3ft 3b 
22* 10 9ft 996- ft _ 
169 33b 37W 37W — ft • • 
8312 9ft Bto 8W+ft 
1431116 1094 llto+l 
379 99* 9b 9V,- * 




'ra'^rf ■■ 

ew o . v v,.£: 


•U 




19 7W 

7ft 

7ft 

WllsnH 

JO 

1.9 

29 10ft 





2S4 lBfe 

IB 

18 -fe 





7 +* 

1J0O 3X 

16140ft 

41)ft 

40to 









68 17W 

I/to 

17W 

WlserO 

XB 

48 

188 18W 

«tft 

lBto— * 

XO 

17 

61 23ft 

23ft 

23ft — ft 

WoodD 

XO 

12 

152 79ft 

18ft 

lUfe + ft 



225 4lb 

4 


Wortha 

56 

2X 

257 23ft 

73 

23 -ft 

52 


15 30V, 

29ft 

30W + ft 

Writer 





06 

JX 

119 23ft 

22ft 

23 — ft 

Wyman 

X0 

3X 

54 26ft 

26 

24fe 



443 Sfe 

8 










Xebec 



6124 Sfe 

5 

Sfe + to 

W 

Xicor 



272 774. 

lift 

life 

to 

Xktex 



1824 lJfe 

13W 

Mfe 

ft 

1 V j 

W 

lb 

YrowFf 

1X0 

27 

B43 36W 

36fe 3Sfe— * 


i z LJ 

to 








ZenLbB 



803 211* 

3) 

20fe + to 

U 

Zmfdc 



300 4ft 

Jfe 

4 +!« 


Ziegler 

X8o 43 

150111b 

lift 

lift- to 

ft 

ZfanUt 

IJ4 

40 

5 31 ft 

31ft 

31ft 

ft 

Zltei 



IS SW 

Sto 

5W 


Zlvod 



76 7ft 


7ft 

to 

Zendvn 

54 

3X 

130 »W 

fto 

9W+ [J 

fe 

Zymas 



22 Ife 

IW 

lfe+* 

W 

Zvfrex 



72 l’.g 

Ife 

Ife 


London Commodities 

Jan. 17 


Figures In stertlno Per metric Ion. 
Gasoil In US. dollars tier metric ten. 
Gold In UA dollars per ounce. 


LOW 


Close 


previous 


Htah 
SUGAR 

Mar 129X0 120-20 120X0 120X0 129X0 127.a 
U5XO 127.00 127 JO 127.40 135X0 1J6X0 
1*6X0 137 JO 137X0 7J7.80 745X0 1463) 
153X0 144X0 144X0 M5X0 1&3X0 153X0 
199X0 159X0 151X0 15300 159X0 161X0 
175X0 16720 166X0 167X0 175X0 176X0 
180X0 180X0 173X0 175X0 181X0 163X0 


May 

AuO 

Ocl 

Dec 

Mar 

MOV 


2X15 lots of a lens. 


COCOA 

Mar £095 2X35 2J067 2X69 
2.107 2X48 2X83 2X84 
M<W SaW 1376 SMJ 
2,105 2X45 2X76 2X78 
2X10 1.98S 1.995 1,996 
1.996 1.982 1,987 1JV3 
N.T. N.T. 1X75 2X00 


May 

Jfy 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

MOV 


7X22 lata of W Ions. 


COFFEE 


Jan 


Mm 

Jiv 

Sep 

NOV 

Jan 


2J60 2-331 2X55 2X56 
1382 2X53 2X70 2X72 
2X82 2J60 2J70 2X73 
2J<0 1375 13B0 2382 
2X90 2X77 2X03 2X86 
2XM 2X89 2X85 2X89 
2X70 2X87 2X85 2X92 


NA NA 


2X55 fata of Slons. 


Feb 

Mar 


GASOIL 

Jan 236X0 23*75 234X0 236X0 231 .75 7M« 
232X5 229X0 2a JO 231.75 229J5 227 JO 
22535 23X50 224X5 224JD 222.25 722-50 
219X0 2MX5 21750 317X5 2MX0 216X5 
3 5X0 21425 21450 215X0 21200 27275 
a&xo 214X0 312X0 a+so aia 2Mx5 
214.25 a*J5 212X0 2MX0 2I0JM 214J» 
N.T. N.T. 2IU0 220.00 209X0 275-00 
N.T. N.T. a 5X0 225X0 207X0 31*00 


Paris Commodities 

Jaa. 17 


Subot In French Francs oer metric tan. 
Other flares In Francs oer 180 1* 



Htah 

LOW 

Close 

Cnve 


SUGAR 






High 

Mar 

1X35 

1X18 

7X20 

1X27 

— 25 

Jan _ N.T. 

MOV 

1X80 

1X60 

1X41 

1X63 

— 29 

Feb _ N.T. 

Aua 

1565 

1555 

1541 

J-553 

-39 

Mar _ N.T. 

Oct 

1X35 

1X20 

1x15 

1X25 

— 30 

API _ 310X0 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1 700 

715 

— 25 

Jun — N.T. 

Mor 

1X15 

1X10 

1X00 

■XI 5 

— 30 

Aug _ N.T. 

Esl. val.: 1X05 tola of 

50 ions. Prev. octuai 

Oct _ N.T. 


sales: 2X73 lots. Open In ter esl: 79^78 


COCOA 


Mar 

2JS0 

2,190 

23U 

2236 

+ 55 


2X55 

2225 

2241 

2251 

+ 53 


N.T. 

N.T. 

2245 


+ 40 





— - 



N.T. 

N.T. 

2-175 

— 

+ 50 


N.T. 

N.T. 

Z1B0 

rnrnm 

+ 55 


N.T. 

N.T. 

2.180 



+ 55 

Est. vaL: 100 lota of 10 tons. Prev. 

actual 


sales: 15 Mt. Open Interest: 773 


COFFEE 


Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2540 

Mar 

2558 

2540 

2554 

MOV 

2542 

2541 

2557 

Jiv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2555 

Sop 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2560 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2540 

Jon 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2550 



Eat. vof.: a lota at 5 Ians. Prev. actual 
sates: 13 lots. Open fn lereet: 272 
Source: Bourse au Commerce 


May 

Jun 

JIV 

So? 


2-717 lots Of 100 tons. 


GOLD 

Feb 307.10 30540 30*30 30*50 310X0 XMJO 

Apt N.T. N.T. 309X0 310 JO X7J0 30800 

Jun N.T. N.T. 314X0 315X0 NA N O. 

*0 N.T. N.T. 318J0 319a NA NA. 

<7 lota of 100 Im ox. 

Sovran: /teuton and London Petroleum Em. 
( gasotu . 


London Metals Jan. 17 

Figures In starling per metric ton. 
Silver In pence per Iroveimoe. 


previous 


Today 

High eraae cooper cathodes: 
snot IJ34X0 1J34JD 1,188X0 7.1SSJQ 

3 maim* 037 JO 1 J38X0 1X0050 1X01 JO 
Cooper en mooes: 

SPOT 1J23X0 1J24X0 I.IB&OO 1,188X0 

3 man His U33X0 1J34JM 1,198X0 1 JOOXQ 

9.780X0 9J90X0 9,7*000 9.770.00 

91790X0 9 J95X0 9J90X0 9J95X0 

)*■? HP 363X0 <55 «1 356X0 

329 JD 330X0 324X0 326 JO 

715X0 716X0 77J00 714X0 

712X0 713X0 70LS0 707X0 

559X0 551X0 S4U0 543X0 

5a£J0 567X0 S5BX0 559X0 


Tin: poof 
3 months 
Lead:saal 
3 months 
Zlnc:soof 
3 months 
SHvariapoi 
3 months 
Aluminium, 
apol 

3 months 


980X0 981X0 968J0 94A50 

1X09 J0 1X10X0 1X07X0 1X08X0 
MICkeOSpOt OOlOO 4J4SX0 4J35X0 4J40XQ 
3 months 4J70X0 4J7105 4J65X0 4-369X0 
Source: Reuters. 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. 17 
I W. Gomrei Mwb.12SX00 laorfd. CMSi pw mart 


CaU+SeHe 


Price 

Mtr 

Joe 

Sepf 

MOT 

36 

— 



aio 

31 

DM 

LC 

034 

33 

041 

*94 

US 

an 

33 

0.18 

057 

an 

1J6 

31 

0X7 

0J4 

— 

2X4 

35 

U2 

02) 

0X7 

3X1 


PutVSettfe 
Jen Sref 


Eafhnated total voL 1737 
CcdU: weds. voLUUenmM. 3030* 
Puts : weds *eL48t nw let. 15.177 
Source: CME 


j S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. 17 


Qifcaon Board 


CaUs-Lat 
Jan Feo Mar 
iSft-is — 
tsw *ato~ is 

BU 916 11 

3W SW 7fe 
3/16 2 fe 4W 
1/14 lb Mb 


PotHJtat 
Jan Feb Mar 
— i/i* to 
1/16 1/16 5/16 
]/10 5/16 13/16 


1/1* 

lft 

ito 


in - s/u iw - - 


2b 

416 

7ft 

Uto 


Total eon veiome 215J82 


bated 

MOB 169.17 Low 157JI Oose 161X1 —05* 
Source: CBOE. 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 17 


HONG*KONO GOLD FUTURE5 
UJJ per ounce 

Clew Previous 
Law aid Ask bm Ask 
N.T. 304X0 C34JXJ 303X0 305X0 
N.T. KMO 307X0 303X0 305X0 
N.T. 306X0 308X0 305X0 307X0 


N.T. 313X0 715-DO 311X0 313X0 
N.T. 31 /XU JJVJ» 314X0 JTBX0 

_ _ N T. J22X0 04 00 320X0 321X0 

Dec _. J28JN 328X0 327X0 329X0 325X0 327X0 
VoiuiTie: 25 lots of IDOol 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 


„ Htah Low 

Fffh 3*60 J0520 

Mar N.T. N.T. 

API 310.10 310.10 

Volume: 760 lots of 100 oz. 


Settle 
305.70 
307 JO 
309 JO 


Settle 
304 JO 
306-30 
308X0 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents ear kilo 


Feh . 
Mar . 
Apr . 
MOV . 
Jun. 


BM 

191X0 

192-50 

196J0 

200X0 

203X0 


Volume: a tats. 


Ask 
191J5 
79X00 
197 JO 
201 JO 
205X0 


Previous 
BM Al 

lfe.75 194J0 
1V4J0 195J0 

19150 1WJ0 
20150 mss 
205X0 20700 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Slagapore cents per klM 
Clow 


RSSl Fefi_ 
R&S I Mor_ 
RSS 2 Feta _ 
RS53Feb_ 
RSS 4 Feb _ 
RSS 5 Feb_ 


BW 

17150 
17200 
159J5 
157 J5 
150-25 
14225 


Ask 

172X0 

17225 

160-25 

158-25 

15125 

14425 


Previous 
BM Afk 
I74J5 174.75 

17425 1747S 
161 JS 162JS 
1S9JS 160J5 
I52JS 154 AS 
14425 146J3 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


ringpih 


25 tens 


Feb . 


BM 

1.130 
1.130 
1.120 
1,110 
1.110 
1.100 
1,100 
1X90 

_ 1X90 

Volume: 0 loti of 25 tans. 
Source.- Reuters. 


MOV 
Jun. 
Jiv. 
Sen . 
Nov 
Jan 


Ask 

1,190 

1,190 

1.170 

1,160 

1.150 

1.150 
1,140 
1,140 
1-1X 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


1.130 

1.130 
1,125 
1.115 
1,110 
1-MO 
i-iao 

1X90 

1X<0 


1.190 

1.IBD 

1,155 

1,155 

1.150 

1.150 
1.140 
1X40 
1X30 




NEW HIGHS 34 


AlzaCar* 
Greiner 
MotScf n 

ISS3& 

SeattedCP 

TeehOPS 

WwhRIEst 


Olsten 

POEINpIM 


Broun Far A 

GwardsCh 

Momxi 


SCE orgpfA 
uMcoraitfS 
wedteenn 
OtaMHId 

LthPrew 

MayflwrCp 


“■in 


PGE23 


WEtlW 

UrdvCamn 

WMnHItnn 

FrtedteRMe 

LvMfcCSri 

OdetfceAa 

FGE13MD 

PsrmntPkg 
SonJowW 
9CE 75tpf 
Vaboari 

wiierasetNffs 


NEW LOWS 



Commodity aad Unit 

Coffee 4 Sonias. Ib 

Ponlclolti 44/30 38 *b. >0 

Steel billets [ PUL). Ion 

Iran 2 Fdrv. Phi la. Ton 

Steel scrap No 1 Iwv Pitt. _ 
Lead Spat. tt> 


Copper elect, Ib . 
Tin (Straits), ib . 


Zinc. E. St L. Basle, lb . 

Palladium, ax 

Silver N.y_ or 

Source: AP. 


Thu 
>JB 
0-7B 

47100 SW 
213X0 7UK 
7M0 
18-21 

6346 66fe^ : 
6JV74 b»._ 

043-45 ,*£; 

11+119 IN; 
4773 W- 


Dividends Jan. 17 


Family Dollar Sirs 
PPG Industries 


Per Amt Pov BT 
INCREASED x. 


4-1 S 
3-12 


SPECIAL 


FetO Savings 


X5 2-8 


STOCK SPLIT 


Family Donor Stares — 3-tar r 
First Eastern Caro— Wort 
ToWteim Coro — 3-tar-2 


Ahflone Industries 
Avnet inc 

Fedl 5vna« Madison 
First Eastern Coro 
Geroan Brunswig 
Lons Star Inc 
Norittwest Nail Gas 
Ogdon Core 
Reynolds Rj inds 
Tea) Energy Inc 
Third Natl Carp 
Vermont Aimt Coro 
Source: UPI. 


O -40 

a .12 n 

u JO 

a J 3 fe 
a .08 

a -47 w 
a Jt 
a 45 
Q X5 
Q 
G 
Q 


i*-. 


2-IS J. 

+i X 
7-8 t 
+1 1^1 
3-1 ft 
Ml X 
MJ t 

+» y.-, 

35 :*? j>;- 

fo 5% Vv;s 


•s.-: _ ' 


Cedel, Euro-Qeai^ 
Will Giver CDs : 




Reuters 

LUXEMBOURG ■— Cede! S.%,j. ; ■ 

and Euro-Oear. the two leadint^H.,^ ; . v 
Eurobond dealing bouses, sai 

Thursday that certificates of dqw. i . 

it will be added to tbe list of secur i^W : 
ties that can be uansferred thrott 
their computerized tie-up. 1 

The dearine houses said CL ^ 



Bor- Valley 


1 


lions is Eurobonds, New York 

livery bonds, Samurai issues ; 

other securities. ^ 

They said ibe extension w 
tie-up was a majw improvOTfflU‘ ^ l ,: = . t 
ihe system, first established iD ■' : *- 

caliber 1980 for bond cfcarau^ 
between banks that participate *•, - 

one of the clearing systems. ^V, • \ ' • 

j C 

■ W ,*<a . :... • 

















• \ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


Page 15 


^ L'V 


international classified 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
GREAT BRITAIN 


(Continued From Back Page) 



SSOCATTON WITHOUT Ag^w 
non. if you wish to rani or acquire a 
house Or qparlnjenj m the bea r«*- 
dBrtSa efatneb of Lxidon and its envi- 
rons, now first pat-el-ed should be 
& Partners - Tha Lot 
Heath Sheet. London 
S&S* Dl-794-n25, The 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

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13* smreraat 82^,^ 

17*. NEAK PARC MONCEAU, 3 

SU 70 1040, fireplace, und June, 
F5WC + efacfrKitv. Yefc la 42 44, 

TERM in Lcdm Quarter. 
No agents- Tnfe 329 38 33. 

SHORT ISM, owner's Wt, 60 scun, 
“Ashe surroumftigs. Tet B24 0712 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AY AILABLE 


WANTS 

FARM MANAGEMENT 
or ogribuweH opportunity. American, 
34, mceien business odnw plm Oon and 
a^mAure degree, successful experi- 
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owner, seeks diatoflfling position Cur- 
rartty production mapper on 2, <00 
hectare wJt&Qf form. DevelopmerOfi 
and troubled utuabera w elc ome. Gone 
Truni»,P.O. Box 2165, 8uraycMv5eu- 
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AUTO SHIPPING 

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Antwerp 233 99 B5. Cams 3? 43 44 

AUTOS TAX FREE 

BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRS AND USE OUR 
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AND SAVE 


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380 sa. 380 SEC, 38051 
Porsche Correra Porsche Turbo 
Autohoiiflaed GmbH 
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Td 03361 77004 Tx 829957 AHJD 


Kuwaiti Bank Set to Open Office in London 




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Ba*4659, Herald Tribune. 92521 
Neu3y Cette*. France. 




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SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


MIMT P VT SSKS for AMERICAN 

MIN6KY6 firms in Paris 


English, Belgian, 
secretaries, knew! 
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tetexbb- write or 


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edge of French re- 
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France. Teh 


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777 61 69. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 



EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


QSARWATER BEACH, R. Beach 
house for rent. Avertable aordhhr or 
weddy. Feh. Apr3 or May. 3 bed- 
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furnished, special fartur-es. S2700 
monthly. >01-253-3441. 


DOMESTIC 

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NEW MERCEDES 

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Information eafy by phone or tele*. 


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We keep a constant stock of more thoi 
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SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/Irferp reter A Tourism Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 


PARS P-A. 

BILINGUAL YOUNG LADY 

PARIS: 520 97 95 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 

MUtlftMGUAL PARK: 525 81 01 


MTL YOUNG LADY GUOE5 , 
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PARS 1 ABPOBT5 Tab 527 9095. 


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VIP LADY GUIDE PARK 
533 SO 26. Young, eduaW elegcmt. 
trifaigud for days, evenings & katmi. 


By Brenda Hagerty 

huemtaional Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Commercial Bant 
of Kuwait SAK plans to open a 
European representative office in 
London on Feb. 4. 

The office, the bank's first in 
Europe, will be headed by William 
Major. He joins the Khwait-based 
bank from County Bank LhL, the 
merchant-banking, arm of National 
Wes tmins ter Bank PLC, where he 
served as senior international exec- 
utive responsible for the Middle 
EasL Before j oining County Bank 
in 1983, Mr. Major was chief gener- 
al manager of European Arab 
Bank. 

Richard Carey, the bank's gener- 
al manager in Kuwait, said, “The 
European representative office is a 
first step towards eventually estab- 
lishing a broader banking presence 
in London." 

The office will give Conunerdal 
Bank a link to developments in the 
international capital markets, the 
bank said. In addition, it will focus 
on trade finance opportunities, 
principally between Europe and 
the Middle East. 

The London office is the second 
one overseas for the bank, which is 
one of Kuwait's largest. Last year it 
opened a branch in New York. 

Swissair has appointed Markus 
Hanseler manager for Sweden. He 
moves to Stockholm from Frank- 
furt. where he served as the Zurich- 
based carrier's sales and marketing 
manager for West Germany. In his 
new post, Mr. Hanseler succeeds 
Hans P. Zollinger who, as previous- 


Air France Net 
Rose in 1984 

Reuters 

PARIS — Air France, the stale- 
owned airline, boosted profits six- 
fold last year despite rising fuel 
costs, the airline's president, Mar- 
ceau Long, said Thursday. 

The airline posted a net profit of 
530 million francs (554.4 million} 
last year, compared with 87 2 mil- 
lion francs in 1983, he said. Reve- 
nue in 1984 rose 13 potent to 27.6 
billion francs. The increase came 
despite a 15-percent rise in the dol- 
lar against the franc during the 
year, which sharply pushed up the 
cost of aviation fuel, he said. 

Mr. Long said die airline is plan- 
ning to expand service an routes 
between Paris and Washington; 
Salzburg; Seoul; Aden, Southern 
Yemen, and Birmingham, England. 
He said that all Air France subsid- 
iaries made profits in 1984, indud- 


jv reported, was named Swissair's 
London-based general manager for 
the United Kingdom and Ireland. 

Standard Chartered Bank PLC 
of London has named Peter Bur- 
foot 10 the new post of regional 
coordinator for the group's Asia- 
Pacific region. A spokesman said 
Mr. Burfoot will initially be based 
in London. He is succeeded as chief 
manager for the bank's U JC. opera- 
tions by Don Gillespie. 

Nederlandsche Middens tands- 
hank NV of Amsterdam said Jos 
Osten has been appointed general 
manager of its new Tokyo office, 
which the bank hopes to open this 
spring. Mr. Osten was succeeded as 
general manager of NMB Bank in 
London by Hans Ymema. previ- 
ously deputy general manager of 
the branch. 

AWT, a Vienna-based trading 
company that specializes in 
counter-trade and special trade so- 
lutions, has opened counter-trade 
operations in London. The busi- 
ness will be handled by David Mo- 
ses. who previously worked as a 
consultant to Laporte Chemicals 
Ltd. AWT is owned by Austria's 
largest bank, Creditanstalt-Bank- 
vensa. 

Caftex (UK) Ud. has named Ed- 
ward A. Lee managing director. He 
takes over that post Feb. 1. follow- 
ing the retirement of Stanley Hol- 
lin. Cal lex (UK) is based in Lon- 
don and is pan of theCaltex group. 
The parent company, CaJtex Petro- 
leum Corp*. has its headquarters in 
Dallas and is equally owned by 
Texaco Inc. and Chevron Corp. 


Mobil North Sea Ud aud Carl J. 
Burnett Jr. has become its presi- 
dent and general ma n ag e r, suc- 
ceeding Doyle G. Mans, who has 
taken over as president and general 
manager ©f Mobil Oil Canada Ltd. 
Mr. Burnett moved to Loudon 

from Lagos, where be was general 
manager of Mobil Producing Nige- 
ria, in his new post. Mr. Burnett is 
responsible for Mobil's exploration 
and production activities in the 
UJC North Sea; 

Sears Holdings PLC, Britain's 
largest rewBer, said Roland J. Den- 
ning will join its ranks Feb. I as sn 
executive director. Mr. Denning 
has been with the Hong Knag- 
bas ed trading group of Jardinc, 
Matheson&Co. s i nce 1977, princi- 
pally as a director of marketing 
services and latterly as internation- 
al coordinator. The appointment is 
pan of Sears’s effort to improve its 

marketing strength. 

Nabisco Group Ltd-, London, 
said Alistair G Mitchell-Inncs is to 
join the company March 1 as chief 
executive. Mr. Mitchefl-lnnes cur- 
rently is a director of Brooke Bond 
Group PLC which was acquired 
by Unilever PLC late last year. He 
mil succeed John Greeniaus, who 
is returning to the U.S. parent. Na- 
bisco Brands Inc^ to head up the 
cookie division. In addition, 
Charles Tidbury joined the Na- 
bisco Group as a non-cxecutivc di- 
rector. He was chairman, of Whit- 
bread Co. and remains cm its 
board. He is also a director of Bar- 
clays Bank PLC. 






Robert L CramS ft |W»dent and 
chief operating 

Cook, the pares! of American Air- 
ffir^^ttoesday was elect- 
ed chairman and ri n rf executive of 
both companies. He aicceeds Al- 
bert vTCjsct, who tad Mnounced 
at die 

last May that be twn** r f &re "h™ 
be reaches!! age at ' “d °f 
February. Mj^CrawW *31 re- 
rnain president of both companies. 


Trafalgar House PLC the Brit- 
ish shipping, construction, proper- 
ty ana oil group, said that John 
McCracken has oeen appointed a 
director of its Scott Limgow Lid 
unit. Mr. McCracken is resident 
director, Scotland and Northern 
England, for IBM United King- 
dom Ltd, Scott Lithgpw builds ex- 
ploration rigs, floating production 
platforms and naval vessels. 


Tandy, Honeywell Post Lower Nets 


(Continued from Page 11) 
share, a year earlier. Revenue rose 
143 percent to $45.9 billion from 
$40.2 billion in 1983. 

Apple, riding the success of its 
Macintosh personal computer, said 
net income for the quarter ended 
Dec. 31 surged to $46.! million, or 
75 cents a share, from $5.82 mil- 
lion, or 10 cents a share, in a de- 
pressed period in 1983 Maori tosh 
was just coming to market 

Sales more than doubled to 
S6983 million from $3163 million. 

But John Sculley, Apple’s presi- 
dent, said in a statement that sales 
trailed retailers' expectations in 
December, thus boosting dealer in- 
ventories. 

“This factor, along with the con- 
tintmte industry transition through 
a fragile and very competitive mar- 
ketplace, will make the next quarter 


$76-5 million, or 86 cents a share. 
from $1013 million, or 98 cents a 
share, a year earlier. Sales slipped 
to $8933 million from $8983 mil- 
lion. 

Honeywell said fourth-quarter 
earnings from continuing opera- 
tions rose to SI 10.4 nnQion from 
$1019 million, but that a loss from 
discontinued operations lowered 


net income to $31.8 million, or 68 
cents a share. It earned $91.9 mil- 
lion, or $1 .98 a share, a year earlier. 

Fourth-quarter revenue rose to 
$1.75 billion from $1.62 talKon. 

Honeywell said full-year 1984 
profit rose to $239 million, or $5. 10 
a share, $2313 million, or $5.03 a 
share. Revenue rose to $6.07 trillion 
from $5.67 billion in 1983. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
17 January 1985 

YSe net asset unto# u dotations shown below are sappUeO bribe Funds IMed uritti fte 
e x cep ti on of tome funds whose Quotes art toted on Issue arias. Tfte faUowbn 
mare tool symbols kxficati rmnenev of wntatiam waned ler ttw IHT: 

Id) -daily; l w> -weekly; (tq-M-menltily; trt -regularly; Cl) - irrwetaly. 



























































































.Wd. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


4 

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PEANUTS 

AH. ANOTHER LETTER 
PROW MY BROTHER SPIKE 


1 PEAR SNOOPY, I UHSH 
YOU C0UU7 5S MY 
NEW HOME ..THE VIEW 
FROM THE UPSTAIRS LHNPOW 
IS SPECTACULAR! " 


UPSTAIRS UWOtO? 



5**^8 iWt+l 




3 j p* 



BOOKS 


BLONDIE 


WHAT DIO 
>“ IX MV < 
PEBFUWE 
*? - 


5 (yes.- AND THE TASTE OP 
| 7 CHICKEN FQJCASSeET^ 
■ =V-+ ON YOUR UPS 7 


SEJvjw j- ■ - 

hJEROSS 

&&L ^LBofler product 
— ■” 

^>.Jtayby 

P - ■**. -Aristophanes 
■. *H6 mn ando 
B Moves 
* r stealthily 
b ismry 
j? 21 Eightfold 
y. - - 17 Freer display 
fe i AtD.C. 
f 18 Co mm ents 
k? A source of 
$. . libber 
l , U Tailless 
f" ..amphibian 
M ' .21 Certain palms 
‘ Uhige 
■ 8 Cafin output 

f -27 All. City 

marker 
28 Hon 

2* Seamstress ‘s 

utensil 
.32 Former 
republic of NE 
Africa 

- ‘ 33 They, in Paris 
34 Useless but 
. awtiy object 
41 Gleamed 
.42 Actor Chaney 
■ . AS Worktrans- 
■ J ; lated by Pope 
'45 Sagacious 
48 Chart again 

48 In 

(wholly) 


49 Triple this for 
a wine 

50 Cuddly 

52 Heat unit, for 
short 

53 Abstract 

55 British motor 
trucks 

57 Figure cm 
Louisiana’s 
seal 

58 Gourmet’s 
cousin 

59 Amber is one 

60 Coal beds 


DOWN 

1 Saddle 
appendage 

2 Richly 

embellished 

icecream 

, 3 Sounds of 
hesitation 

4 River between 
Manchuria and 
theU.S.S.R. 

5 Allots 

6 Candle fibers 

7 Some are 
co-ops 

8 Alphabetic trio 

9 Demotic 

10 Late British 
movie star 


1/1B/BG 

11 Part of an 
arrow 

12 Stay 

13 Muscular 

14 Unkempt 

19 Highly excited 
22 Authentic 
24 Seasoning 
obtained by 
evaporation 
26 Ray 

28 Territory in 
N India 

30 Spleen 

31 Roof angle 

34 Susurrus 

35 Antagonistic 

36 Ace, as pan of 
a blackjack 

37 Hill in the 
Southwest 

38 Make possible 

39 Element used 
in alloy steels 

40 Shreds 

41 Long oar 
44 Drench 

46 Kind of 
numeral 

47 Drops heavily 
50 Genes' 

positions 

51 0’Nefll’s 

Smith 

54 Las’ followers 
56 Bldg, in 
Rockefeller 
Center 


BEETLE BAILEY 


LISTEN/ THE PITTER-PATTER 
OF LITTLE FEET RUNNING 
ON THE ROOF/ MUST BE 
v A SQUIRREL/ 


ISN'T Y 
eSETLEw^ 
IN IM% 
EITHER?/ % 


WHERE Y. 

IS HE?/ 


ANDY CAPP 


’r/SUOSTR3R WORDS- T THAT*S 

k - A OKAV-. 


."'Ll -“- rl 



JJL 


© New York Times, by Eugaie Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


WIZARD of ID 

1 1 w&?a yfttt&sop- to 5m ue 

A l^CTURP OH STRESS 


$5000 A R?P 
RFTtttg 
OPGG 


rjjoBan\ 
TWtTTeARVfcJUR 
v onscmri 



BEX MORGAN 


|* mwa iw o nip ac 


NM l i m l u li mu i, 

CHmO^oOMW."*. IMS 




&) 





GARFIELD 


*1 LIKE TOAST, BUT I DOnY LIKE THE BARK." 




Unscrambtelhaae tour Jumbles, 
one taller to each square, to term 
tour onfinary words. 


COASH 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bab Lee 


MYLAN 


V1LEWE 


GURFEE 


Answer here: 



NEMESIS: Ti nman and Johnson in 
the Coils of War in Asia 

By Robert J. Donovan. 216 pp. $14.95. 

St. Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 10010. 

Reviewed by Archimedes L_ A Patti 

A T a time when there is a tendency lo revert 
.to simp listic thmlrmg about non-nuclear 
wars, unconcernedly rfi<nw«ing all mention of 
Vietnam or even South Korea, where about 
40,000 Ameri cans are still stationed, this book 
is a timely r emin der of the illusions and futility 
that brought the United States into those two 
catastrophic conflicts. 

From the vantage point of a White House 
reporter. National Book Award winner Robert 
Donovan captures the complexities of dea- 
con- making with their concomitant implica- 
tions. intrigues, undercurrents and .pressures. 
He incisively examines the origins and conduct 
of both wars and finds striking parallels in 
their anatomy, concluding that they were “cut 
from the same doth of the policy of contain- 
ment of communism in Asia." 

“Nemesis” is an excellent study in tandem of 
both wars and of the devastating effect they 
had on the lives of Presidents Harry S. Tinman 
and Lyndon B. Johnson. It skillfuHy and un- 
ambiguously compares the causes and effects, 
the pressures and commitments, the traps and 
pitfalls that led to tragic and inconclusive re- 
sults. 

Donovan introduces Truman and Johnson 
as “two gamecocks who had come to (he White 
House originally upon the death of two famous 
presidents” and who later “had been elected in 
their own right to show what they could do.” 
Their elections, 16 years apart, were bailed as 
harbingers of progress in ri vO rights and reded- 
icarion to thepohey of using federal money to 
improve the lives erf die American people. But 
the Truman Fair Deal and the Johnson Great 
Society became mired in conflicting interests 
that had roots in their predecessors* legacy — 
the containment of Communism. 

This legacy-, Donovan suggests, governed the 
role and conduct of both presidents, casting a 
pall over th e i r ariBifriis tT atinns, shaft wri ng thar 
dreams for a better society, and compdling 
them to leave Washington with a deep sense erf 
unfulfiQment. Neither president was able to 
end the war in which be had committed Ameri- 
can troops to combat. 

Donovan credits President Truman with 
having “established the framework in which all 


was. President Roosevelt had advocated a sys- 
tem of postwar trusteeships for dependencies- 
suefa as Korea and Indochina (Vietnam). Tru- 
man subscribed to that concept and his imme- 
diate concern was control of Korea, brin g in g 
the United Slates into competition with the 
Soviet Union. In Ghina the Nationalists woe 
losing ground to Mao Zedong and in Vietnam 
the French were faring no better against Ho 
Chi Minh in Southeast Asia leftist elements 
dammed for independence. In the Middle East 
and in Europe co mmunis t parties maneuvered 
for political control. The anti-communist hys- 
teria was cm 'and in 1948 the Soviet Union 
became the enemy. 


“Nemesis” is rich with anecdotes about tire 
two presidents and the men around them. 
“Have to mtk to God’s right band man,” Tru- 
man wrote to his cousin on the way to meet 
with MacArthur on Wake Island. When the 
president’s plane arrived, die general was sit- 
ting in a jeep surrounded by a small crowd, 
seemingly trying to upstage Truman, and did 
not go out to the ramp. The president “refused 
to budge from his seat until MacArthur finally 
rami* to tire ramp. Only then did be descend.” 
Johnson’s last years in office were difficult 
ones. Reverses in Vietnam, public dissent, a 
party split, and Bobby Kennedy’s malting a 
run for the presidency disheartened Johnson. 
“Sometimes in those months Johnson, who 
was not a regular communicant in any church, 
became so consumed with anxiety that late at 
nigjhi he would order his hmoosme and a Secret 
Service d etail and drive to St. Dominic’s Cath- 
olic Church for private prayers with a few 
priests and Christian brothers. Beginning in 
1966, he returned for consolation from time to 
rime, including a night when he had ordered 
the bombing near lunoi and Haiphong.” 
Donovans account raises many questions. 

^^^^onfh^Sdligence^^K^ policy and 
decisio n -making level prior to committmg the 
United States. Days before the North Koreans 
invaded South Korea none of Truman’s advis- 
ers had fold him of massive preparations north 
of the 38thparallel for a drive south. General 
Omar Bradley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, later said, “I don’t think you can say that 
any of us knew when we went into this thing , 
what would be involved.” And Donovan 
points up that during the MacArthur offensive 
in Korea, “The crowning mischief was that no 
American official had the slightest valid idea 
how many Chinese might be m Korea.” Fur- 
ther on, he notes “The lack of intelligence itself 
became an incentive for advancing?* 

The same conditions prevailed in the Viet- 
nam conflict. “Neither Johnson nor Eisenhow- 
er nor Truman nor Achesou nor Dulles,” says 
Donovan, “had ever really understood Viet- 
nam, hs people, its culture, its history, its 
institutions, its politics, its aspirations.” 
“Nemcsis”makes good reading. It is terse, 
factual, well-documented, devoid of over-bur- 
densome details and thorough in essentials. 

Archimedes L A. Patti, author of “Why Viet 
Nam f Prehide to America’s Albatross,” wrote 
this review for The Washingto n Post 

Erotic Lennon Drawings 
On Exhibit in Liverpool 

The Associated Press 

L IVERPOOL— A collection of the late John 
j Lennon’s erotic drawings went on display 
in Britain Wednesday for me first time since 
police seized them at a London gallery in 1970. 

The 14 drawings were produced by ex-Beade 
Lennon while on honeymoon with Yoke Ono 
in 1969. They show the couple in various acts 
of love and caused a storm erf controversy 
among church leaders and politicians in 1970. 
“Times have changed and we are delighted to 
have the display here,” said Roger White, gen- 
eral manager of BealleGty, the museum where 
the drawings are on display until Easter. 


By Alan Truscott 

G REAT deceptive plays 
have To be made quickly 
and nonchalantly, and even for 
great players that is difficult. 
But if they have thought about 
the position, the right play may 
pop up, years later, when the 
opportunity arises. 

A magnificent example is 
the d i agramed deal East found 
himself defending six hearts 
reached after an artificial 
opening of the no-trump by 
West This was a pre-emptive 
action based by partnership 
agreement, on a seven-card mi- 
nor with a four-card major. 

It might seem that North- 
South should have no trouble 
at all in bringing home a $l flm 
in no-trump or either red suit' 
The contract reached was six 
hearts, and it seems that a nor- 


BRIDGE 


maj 3-2 tramp split is all that 
ti« declarer needs. 

South woo the club lead and 
lead a low tramp to dummy’s 
king. To his astonishment be 
collected the ten from West 
and the queen from East 


Something funny was happen- 
ing, and he could only see one 
plausible explanation: West 
had begun with J- 10-8-2 and 
had made a foolish play of the 
ten. In that case he would re- 
gret it, for he would score only 
rare trump trick instead of two. 

The declarer led a dub from 
the dummy, and was not sur- ' 
prised to see East discard a 
diamond. He won, led a low 
trump and was mystified when 
West produced the jack and 
East the two. And he was hor- 
rified by the sequel: West led a 
dub, and ruffing with the heart 
nine in dummy did no good. 


East threw his diamond queen 
and there was no way bade to 
the dosed hand to lead the 
heart ace; the heart eight 
ruffed a diamond to defeat the 
lay-down dam. 

WORTH 
*AK 
9K9S 
O A JS 804 
• 73 


WEST (D) 

4> J 
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♦ 1073 

• J 1098 802 


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410878543 
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Pen 


Weet lad the dob Jack. 


Now arrange the circtod toners to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Prices (n Canadian. cents unless marked S 


Toronto 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow 

Jumbles: ITCHY COMET FIASCO SPORTY 
Answer What he said her new headgear was— 

A "HAT-ROOTY” 


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DVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


Mark Clayton stretches during a practice session for Sunday's Super BowL 

Dionne Ties Hull in Goals Scored 


The Associated Press 

INGLEWOOD. California — 
Marcel Dionne got the night off to 
an auspicious start But the Los 
Angeles Kings didn’t respond and 
the Toronto Maple Leafs sneaked 

NHL FOCUS 

- away with something rare — a vic- 
tory. 

. Dionne scored the 610th goal of 
his 14-year career just 2:37 into the 
game Wednesday night, tying him 
with Bobby Hall in third place on 
the all-time National Hockey 
League scoring list. Dionne also 
’assisted on Dave Taylor's pair of 
third-period markers, but it wasn't 
enough as the Leafs won, 4-3. 

1 “I was just thinking about the 
fact that Winnipeg lost and we had 
a chance to gain ground on them 
'again, and we didn't." said Dionne. 

Asked whether his milestone 
meant anything to his teammates, 
he said, “Sometimes I think it's a 
detriment." 

Coach Pat Quinn agreed. 

"Marcel's magnificent feat of 



Marcel Dionne 

610 goals to become third on the 
all-time didn't get to the team's 
imagination," Quinn said. "Maybe 
i his team has no imagina tion.** 
Elsewhere in the NHL. it was 
Washington 5, Pittsburgh 4; Chica- 


go 6, Winnipeg 3: Edmonton 3. the 
New York Islanders 3; Buffalo 2, 
the New York Rangers 2; Minne- 
sota 4, St Louis 4, and Philadel- 
phia 1, Detroit I. 

Dionne and Rick Vaive traded 
first-period goals, then Toronto 
took charge on goals by Bill Kitch- 
en and Ken Strong, both with their 
first NHL goals. Vaive made it 4-1 
with his second of the night early in 
the third period, and Taylor’s two 
goals late in the session were not 
enough. 

The triumph followed a victory 
on Sunday in Vancouver, marking 
the first time since the fust two 
games of the season that the Leafs 
have won two in a row. 

"It feds great winning two in a 
row," said Vaive. "We had 20 guys 
playing toni gh t. The last time we 
were in this building we didn’t” 

The Leafs lost 7-0 that time in 
the Forum. 

*Tve always been saying to the 
team. ‘As bad as it’s been, if we can 
get this turned around, it can be 
very good too,' " Coach Dan Ma- 
loney said. 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 

i _ * 



NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



AthmfiC (MWtkU 
W L 

Pet 

GB 

Boston 

33 6 

J44 

— 

- PMhxMpMa 

33 4 

M6 

— 

Washington 

22 17 

-564 

11 

New Jersey 

19 20 

JB7 

14 

. New York 

13 2B 

J17 

21 

Milwaukee 

Central Dtvlslan 
27 14 

459 

__ 

-Detroit 

21 74 

.568 

4. 

Chicago 

19 20 

487 

7 

Atlanta 

U 23 

^1# 

10 

, Cleveland 

11 25 

J04 

13VS 

Indiana 

IT 27 

289 

14to 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest DMstaa 


• Denver 

23 

17 

.575 

~ 

Gallos 

21 

18 

.538 

Ito 

^Houston 

21 

18 

S38 

IV* 

Sai Antonio 

17 

20 

JO* 

4to 

• um 

T7 

23 

JOS 

6 

. . Kansas City 

13 

25 

sa 

9 


poclfle Dtvlsiai 



LA. Lakers 

2ft 

T4 

ASH 

— 

Phoenix . 

2). 

. 19 

.525 

5 


Hockey 




^NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pis GF GA 


Washington 

26 

12 

7 

59 

185 

139 

Philadelphia 

26 

12 

6 

58 

188 

128 

N.Y. islanders 

25 

17 

2 

52 

209 

175 

pHtaburgn 

17 

20 

4 

38 

149 

181 

N-Y. Rangers 

14 

21 

8 . 

36 

155 

173 

New Jenny 

IS 

su 

4 

34 

14 

174 

Adams Division 




Montreal 

22 

13 

9 

S3 

170 

142 

JJutfata 

19 

13 

12 

SO 

162 

f 30 

fluebec: 

21 

18 

ft 

48 

I7B 

162 

Bo«Wn 

20 

17 

7 

47 

158 

1ST 

i Hartford 

16 

20 

5 

37 

140 

175 




CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 


Chicago 

2D 

21 

3 

43 

T74 

lift 

Si. Louts 

rr 

17 

5 

42 

>57 

160 

noiamou 

14 

22 

B 

36 

158 

178 

Detroit 

u 

25 

ft 

32 

153 

190 

.Toronto 

8 

30 

5 

21 

131 

199 


smvtto Dtvlstoa 




Edmonton 

30 

9 

5 

65 

222 

141 

Calgary 

22 . 

. 17 

5 

49‘ 

206 

175 

JMnntpeg 

7} 

If 

4 

46 

J#» 

189 

Las Angeles 

17 

18 

9 

43 

193 

183 

Vancouver 

11 

29 

5 

27 

14ft 

241 

.. WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 


WUMnotoa 




1 

2 

3— S 

■PtttstJargh 




1 

3 

1—4 


■dri- 


r.y 


' - Christian (itj, Haworth <U>. Gartner 1271 

• Gould (0), Carpenter (32/; Shedara f?l)>Bus- 

*ds (21, Lomleax 2 £151. Shots on wait WOSh- 
. Jneton (an Herron) B- 11-13 — 32; Pittsburgh 
(an Riwlfll U-44-21 
tlaflfllo 1 0 1 0—2 

• N.Y. RtHHMn 2 0# #— 2 

- Porraault ITS). Hamel (111; SondEtram 

X "Hli. Robots (151. Chats oa Boat: Buffalo (on 
Horton J T7-U-124— 47; U.Y. Rowers (on Bar- 
twaaj win— ». 

-.yPMMhMta #3 10-1 

OttroB 0 l 0 9-1 

Zeart (75; StfHer (6). Shots on #Ort: Phne- 
I Ofkhki (an Mto) KM-18-1— 33; Detroit tan 
Llnd&org) 10-714^-29. 
htortoe# 0 8 1—3 

CMCOgg 5 t 0-4 

MncMiUcn 151. S. Lormer (241. Ota* HO), 
P We r kBB 2 (4). YareracinA 101; Mac Lean 
UM. Beschman (14), Steen (17). Shan on 
Sort: Mflnrtwa ton Skorodenskl) MA4-34; 
CMcbob [or, Bchrand Holden) 17-15-5-40. 
EL Louis 12 0 0-4 

Nmaesuta -#13 8-4 

■ Wlckenhstser (131. Federka (16). HKkev 

' rsi.GBuuwr (12); Velladwk (2). MciUfinev 
.H«,Re(U4(2J,AtaCarttiv' (74). Shots on oca); 

• 5t„ Lovb too Metonson) 8-11-KJ-V-O0: MUnw- 

(on Uut) O-U- 8 - 2 — U 
M-Y.tuauen 1 1 1 #-3 

EdnaMon 2 10 0—3 

"P-Sutter (M. Trtttler (IB), B. Suitor 127); 
Srrtlkv US). Carroll W. KnrtWtnyskl (23). 
hohnwal; N.Y. Islanders (on Fuhr) M-f 1- 
‘■0—35; Edmo nto n fan Hrudey 1 7- IS- 12- 1 — 35, 
'amt# 1 1 W 

M Ansotes l 0 2 — 3 

' Volroif 18), KUthen (1 LStrang (1); Dtawn 
. 27i. Taylor 2 Qgl.Sbotiim sort: Toronto (on 
-onecyft) 7-17-9—57; Leo Mttld I" 1 Ber*- 
- erflt) 12-4-9 — 55. 


LA. Cuppers 19 22 .463 TVs 

Portland * W-21 M3 7Vi 

Seattle 18 ■ 22 450 8 

Golden State r 10,28 .263 15 
WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 
Ortcngo 32-2# 25 17— *4 

New Jener 2t » 22 23 — U» 

Birdsong 7-12 *4 20. WUDams #-» 2-4 1«; 
Jordan 8-17 11-1227. Matthew 7-W 0-2 14. Re- 
bounds: Chicago 41 (Jordan 7); New Jersey 
47 1 williams 13). Assists:- Chlcaao 20 (Jordan 
71; New Jersey 23 (Richardson 9). 

Altaitn M U 33 »- 9* 

PhOodetPhla 24 » 30 29—72) 

Malone 13-20 5-n 34. Ervirio KM3 34 23; 
Wilkins 6-13 10-13 22, Willis 7-17 0-1 14. Re. 
boarnds: Atlanta 47 (Willis 11); Philadelphia 
48 (Barkley 8). Artiste Atlanta 30 (E. Johnson 
7); Philadelphia 35 (Barkley 8). 

LA. Lakers 32 23 20 18-Ktt 

Boston >1 V 29 17— W4 

Johnson 10-22 frO 20. Bird 9-161-1 W.Porlsh 8- 
IS 3-3 19; AbduV-Jabbor 1» 19 9-11 33. Scott 8-15 
0-1 16. Rebounds: Los Anodes JB (Abdul-Jab- 
bar.E. Johnson. Rombls7>: Boston 54 (Parish 
U). Assists: Las Angeles 28 ( E. Johnson 13): 
Boston 25 (Bird a Johnson. Alnoe 7). 
Wosbtootan 24 25 31 21— Ml 

Utah 21 29 13 37— Ml 

Gus Williams 11-24 7-11 31. McMIUen 9-182-2 
20: Dantlev S-U 12-13 22, Griffith 8-17 3-5 21. 
Reboands: «kWMnoton47 (Mahoml2); Ulah 
£< (Eaton ill. Assists: Washington 27 (Gus 
Williams 12); Utah 23 (Green 6). 

Dallas 25 38 22 IMS 

pnoeoix 25 17 3» 22-98 

Lucas lZ-18'44.28. Adorns S-12 54 U. Humph- 
rles 44 7-9 is.- Aauirra 10-257-8 27, Vlncent4-13 
6-7 18. Davis ■7-9 4-4 18. Rebounds: Dallas 47 
(Vincent lei; Phoenix 53 (Nona ll). Assists: 
Dallas 22 (Davis 9); Phoenix 24 (Nance 5). 
Ookkwi Stato 22 22 83 38- W7 

Denver ' 38 29 25 31 — 11 S 

Natl 10-21 79 Z7, English 9-19 45 22; Short 12- 
222-227. Johnson 7-104-4 18. R e boa nrti- GoMon 
Stole 55 (Smith U); Denver 64 (Nott IS). As- 
sists: Golden State 24 (Conner 8); Denver 20 
(Turner 5). 

Houston >4 21 28 17-81 

LA. Cllppen IS 29 24 28-98 

Donaldson e-10 5-8 23. Johnson 9-15 2-2 20; 
Sampson 10-24 1-2 21. /McCray 4-12 6-8 18. Re- 
baeads: Houston S3 (Sampson 151; Las Ange- 
las 52 (Donaldson 131. Assists: Houston 19 
(McCray. Hollins 5); Los Angeles 22 (Nixon 
12 ). 

College Results 

EAST 

Bucfcnell 82, Delaware 76 
Clarion 64, Lock Haven 65 
Coooln Sf. 71. Md.-Balthmn Ctr. ft* 

CW. Past 59, Dowling 50 
Delaware Valley 84. Catholic U. 78 
Dickinson 46, Franklin 8. Marshall 42 
Drew 71 Moravian 71 OT 
Elmira 77, Cortland 51- « 

Fairmont SL 54. Shepherd 48 

Georgetown 05, providence 44 

Hunter 77, Lehman 68 

Indiana, Pa. 4ft, California, Pc. 39 

Kean 79. Rufaers-Newartc 58 

Klna^ Pa. 61. Susquehanna ML TOT 

COHO'! Point 71 Trlrjltv, Cam. 72. OT 

Lebanon Valiev 71 Juniata 71 

LftMoyne 64. Scranton 61 

Larala Md. 65. Wasnar 64 

Lycoming 71, Eltzabeltrtawn 61 

Maine 54. New Hampshire 51 

Morfst 64. FalrlMh Dickinson 5ft 

Mercy hurst 7B. Mansfield 77 

ML SL Mary, N-Y. 86, Shhwensburg 80 

Navy 74, Lnfoyette 71. 20T 

New Hmnpdhire CofL 91 S. Connecticut 88 

New Haven SO, Lowftll 59 

N.Y. Tedi 121 Pratt 63 

pace 81, Mercv 70 

PM la. Textile 56. Btoomshwg 55 

PIH-Bratfford 87. Pwm St.-Behrend 65 

Pltt.-Johmtown 91. Froslboro SI. 74 

Potsdam 5t. 73, Casfldton SI- 63 

Rider 74, Drexel 74. 0T 

Sacred Heart 77. Cant. Connecticut 63 

Slaton Island BL Baruch 44 

Stockton St. 84, Gtassboro St. 77 

Syracuse 90, Set on Hall » 

Towsmi St. 72. Lehigh 69 
Tittts 106. Currv 77 

SOUTH 

Alabama 60. Auburn 55 
Afa-BirrmncDcm «9. Jacksonville U 
Augusta Coil 35. Georgia SL « 

Berea SL Transyrvcnlo 82 
Columbia CM1. 8L LaGrange 51 
E. Kentucky 77. Clinch Volley 57 
Florida Sauthen*i79, St. Thomas. Fla. 75 
Georgia 71. Hot Ida M 
Greensboro B& ML St. Mary's. M. 45 


James Madison 64, American to 
Johnson C. Smith 66. N.C. Central 51 
Kentucky 58. Mlsslssloal St. 57 
Kins 36, Emory A Henry 7ft 
Maryland 94. Clenean 84 
Maryville 81 Roanoke 61 
Morehouse 79, Morris Brown 75 
N. Carolina 8L N. Carolina St. 7ft 
H. Kentucky 70. imL SLEvonsullle 65 
N-C-Greensboro 71. Mefhodlst 70 
RandDlph-Macon 36. Longwood 34 
Richmond 76. Georoe Mason 75. OT 
Rollins 77. Sew a n ee S9 
S. Mississippi 71 Louisville A3 
Souftiom Teen 71 Berry S3 
SI. Leo 61 E chord ftl 
Tampa 9L Florida Inll. 76 
Tennessee 87, Vanderbilt 79 
W. Carolina 84. Campbell 43 
MIDWEST 

Benedictrne. III. 41 Aurora 41 
Bethany. Kan. 76, McPherson 49 
Black Hnu St. 97. National 93 
Btuffton 66. Denonce 61 OT 
Butter 4L W. Illinois 55 
Com Western 78. Kenyon 71 
Cent. Missouri BL NW Missouri 58 
Cincinnati 71 5. Carolina 51 
Cleveland SI. 51 Akron 50 
imL-SE BL Oakland CiW 78 
John CorraU 46. Carneoia Mellon 57 
Kansas Wtostoyon 81 Ottawa 76 
Kent Sr, 89. W. Michigan >1 
MaraueNe 51 Utica 51 OT 
Mory crest 99, Grand View Bft 
Midland 7L Bellevue 72 
MO.-SL Louis 9L Mo.- Ratio 65 
Muskingum 71 Ml. Union 49 
N. Illinois 36, Balt SI. 71 
N. Iowa 69, Winona SI. 52 
N. Park 80. Auaustona III. 79 
Nobmsko 75. Kansas SL 43 
Notre Dame 96. Holy Cross 41 
Ohio Northern 71 Bafttwln-Waltace 62 
Ohio U. 71 EL Mlehioan 46 
OMo Wesleyan SL Wooster 7# 

Purdue 50. Northwestern 49 
Quincy 91. SE Missouri 77 
Rockhurct 89, Kansas Newman 81 20T 
St. Francis, ind. 80. Marlon, ina. 62 
Toledo 71. Mioml, Ohio 65 

SOUTHWEST 
Houston 77. Rice 73 
Langston 9ft. NE Oklahoma 84 
Oklahoma 91 Missouri 65 
Oklahoma Si. 9L Catoroao 7ft 
SE Okiahamo 70. Cent. SL Ofcia. 53 
Stetson fth Pan American sv 
SW Oklahoma 65. Phillies 63 
Texas 68. Baylor 65 
Texas ALM 65, Texas Oirislran &Q, OT 
Texas Tech 4L Arkansas 48 
FAR WEST 
Denver S7. Reals 49 
Idaho 09. E. wasntnaten 66 
Lewts-Clark 5t. 69, Whhman to 
Metro St. 7L Colorado Coll. «5 
Montana Tech 70. W. Montana 43 
Ndv.-Las Vegas 91 Cal-Santa Borbara 74 
Pod lie Al. N. Mexico SL 59 
Seattle 68. St. IKgrtln-S 59 
Simon Fraser 67. w. Washington 61 
Wyoming 77. Air Farce 75. OT 



BASEBALL 
American League 

DETROIT— Named Voda Pinson batting 
bts hucT or. 

National League 

ATLANTA— Readied a five-year contract 
.ooreemenl with Rafael Ramirez, shortstop. 
Named Raich Gorr minor league baserun- 
ning Instructor and scout and Jim Grant mi- 
nor league Mtchino coocn. 

CHICAGO— I nv l led Larry RomsctUld. 5am 
Holman, and Jen Perlman. Ditchers; Tito 
Nsnnl and Chico Walker, outfielders, and An- 
mony Castillo and Bin Hayes, catchers, to 
spring training. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
CLEVELAND— Named Tom Bettis defen- 
sive coordinator. 

NEW YORK— Announced the resignation ot 

Jim Rings, assistant coach. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 
MONTREAL— Recalled Rle Nattress. » 
fanseman. from Sherbrooke Of thft American 
Hockey League. 

Winnipeg— R ecalled Mark Holden, goal- 
lender, from novo Scotia of the American 
Hockey Lftaotie. 

COLLEGE 

UTAH— Named Jack Relilv offensive Coor 

dmaur. 


In Defense of the Receivers: Shula Gives a Warning 


By Gary Pommnrz 

Washington Post Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Because 
Miami’s mighty mite receivers, 
Marie Duper and Marie. Clayton, 
have beat the victims of numerous 
vicious hits in recent games. Coach 
Don Shula of the Dolphins has sent 
out a pre-Super Bowl wanting. 

"As long as it is within the rules, 
it's part of the game," Shula said of 
any hand hits San Francisco’s de- 
fensive players might have planned 
for Duper and Clayton in Super 
Bowl XIX Sunday. "But if it is 
deliberate and not within the rules 
of the game, something should be 
done The guy should be thrown 
out of the game.” 

Simply put, Shula fears that the 
Marks Brothers have become 
Mariced Men. Such is the price they 
must pay for being 5-foot-S darters 
who helped Miami become the first 
team in league history to possess 
two 1,300-yard receivers in the 
same season. 

"There have been some good bits 
and some cheap shots against them 
this year," said Nat Moore, Mi- 
ami’s veteran receiver. Defensive 
hades "have gone after their heads, 
dubbing than when they tackle 
them. In general, they are doing all 
of the dirty tactics that, if you’re 


not mentally strong, can affect 
you." 

"But as you can see by the statis- 
tics and the records," Moore said, 
“no one has succeeded. One thing 
has been found out — both of these 
guys can’t be intimidated. Both can 
play with pain. I don’t see them 
knocking Duper or Gayion out of 
the ball game Sunday." 

The 49ers’ defense fancies itself 
for its hard-hitting fury. Three 
years ago, the 4$ers won the Super 
Bowl and the secondary became 
known as "Dwight Hicks and the 
Hot Licks." 

Comerbacks Ronnie Lott and 
Eric Wright and safeties Hides and 
Carlton Williamson all were nnnipH 
to the Pro Bowl this season. These 
guys can ring some bells. Ask any 
receiver. Cross the middle and bold 
your breath. 

And Shula knows all of this. 
That is why he issued Wednesday’s 
warning. 

"My game plan Sunday is just 
coming up and making some tack- 
les and not worrying about rough- 
ing up," said Wright, a fourth-year 
comerback. “If 1 have the opportu- 
nity to get in some good licks. I’ll 
do it. But 1 won't do any devastat- 
ing, slugging hit that will get the 
officials’ attention." 

"I don't think that we'll do any- 



The Arooatod Pre» 

Julius Ening: StiD hitting heights in his 14th season. 

No Retirement Plans Yet 
For the 76ers’ Good Doctor 


Compiled by Qur Staff From Dispatches 

PHILADELPHIA — There 
have been a few people around 
the National Basketball Associ- 
ation who have been hmting 
that the good Doctor, Julius Er- 
ring. should be thinking about 
retirement. 

Erring and the Philadelphia 
76ers don’t concur. Erring, a 
little more than a month away 
from his 35th birthday, signed a 
contract Wednesday to play an- 
other season. 

By way of celebration, Dr. J 
went out a few hours later at the 
Spectrum and led the Sixers to 
their 13th consecutive victory, 
an easy 122-99 derision over the 
Atlanta Hawks. 

Erring scored 21 points in the 
first half to lead the 76ers to a 
63-47 lead, then turned the 
game over to the younger play- 
ers, including Moses Malone. 
Malone finished with 34 points, 
although be sat out almost all of 
the last quarter. 

Ezying, who began his career 
in 1971 with Virginia of the old 
American Basketball Associa- 
tion, will soon pass the 27.000- 
point mark in an illustrious ca- 
reer. 

Erring has scored 15,243 
points in the NBA and 1 1.662 
m the ABA. a total of 26.905, 


and is Hiaflengin^ the Denver 
Nuggets’ Dan Issel for fourth 
place on the combined NBA- 
ABA scoring list. 

“!’m really not thinking 
about next season.” Erring 
said. "Right now, all I'm think- 
ing about is doing everything I 
can to help us win another 
championship. I fed we are im- 
proving all the time." 

The Sixers' general manager, 
Pat Williams, in announcing 
the signing, said Erring’s new 
contract would take effect when 
his old one expires after the 
season. Financial terms were 
not disclosed, but it is believed 
the contract calls for a hefty 
raise. Erring currently makes 
more than $1 million a season. 

Erring, who will be 35 next 
month, said earlier this month 
he would return for the 1985-86 
season. Erring has shown no 
signs of slowing down this sea- 
son, averaging 20.7 points a 
game. 

“This is a great day for the 
76ers." Williams said. “Julius 
continues to play at a All-Star 
level this year and it appears be 
will continue operating at that 
plateau for next year also." 

Erring is in the middle of his 
14th pro season, his ninth with 
the NBA. (LAT.UP1) 


Celtics Edge Lakers 


United Press International 

BOSTON — With the game on 
the line, Boston Coach K.&. Jones 
went with the cold hand. 

Kevin McHale had hit just three 
of his first 12 shots in Wednesday 
night's game at the Boston Garden, 

NB A FOCUS 

a rematch of last year's National 
Basketball Association champion- 
ship series between the Los Angeles 
Lakers and Boston Celtics. But 
with the heat on, McHale hit a 6- 
fooi turnaround bankshot to lift 
the Celtics to a 104-102 victory. 

-We have a saying on the Ceh- 
ics."' McHale said. “Sometimes 
you get the bear, sometimes the 
"bear gets you.*" 

Once again, it was the Lakers 
who wound up in the bear's jaws. 

The victory was the Critics' sev- 
enth straight. The Lakers have 
dropped three in a row. 

Elsewhere in the NBA. it was 
Philadelphia 122, Atlanta 99: New 
Jersey 100. Chicago 94; Denver 


115, Golden State 107; Wi 
ton 103, Utah 101; Phoenix 
Dallas 95, and the Los Angeles 
Clippers 98, Houston 88. 

Los Angeles, which lost the 1984 
championship game at the Garden, 
led 102-99 with 1:37 left before 
Robert Parish’s threo-pdm play 
tied the game. After me Lakers' 
Kareem Abdul- Jab bar and James 
Worthy missed, Boston rebounded 
and called time. 

"K.C. called my number and I 
thought, ‘Oh boy, OJKL, now con- 
centrate.'" McHale said. "And I 
did. Afterwards. 1 told K.C., 
’Thanks for helping out a strug- 
gling man.’ " 

It was the first meeting between 
the two teams since last spring's 
championship series. 

Abdul-Jaboar led Los .Angeles 
with 33 points as the Lakers fell to 
26-14. Dennis Johnson paced Bos- 
ton with 20 points, while Bird and 
Parish each had 19 for the Celtics, 
who improved their league-leading 
record to 33-6. McHale finished 
with 10 points. 



Ronnie Lott 


it,” said Lou, also in 
his fourth year. "No, I don't think 
those two receivers have been in- 
timidated by anybody this year. 
They’ve won games and that’s what 
counts, rightf’ 

"I don’t worry about that stuff,” 
Clayton said. “My job is to catch 
the balL Their job is to make hits. 
Well crash beads and see who sur- 
vives.” 


In Miami's 31-10 playoff victory 
over Seattle three mats' ago. Duper 
was knocked woozy and required 
three stitches on his mouth after a 
forearm hit by safety Kenny Eas- 
ley. Shula was angry about the hit 
and said he would file a report to 
the league office. 

Then, in the Dolphins' 45-28 vic- 
tory over Pittsburgh in the confer- 
ence title game 10 days ago. Duper 
was knocked woozy again and 
missed several series after a 
thwacking from comerback Sam 
Washington. Clayton missed toe 
entire second half after jamming 
his shoulder on the ground, diving 

for an incomplete pass. 

Duper caught 7 1 passes for I J06 
yards and eight touchdowns this 
season. Gayton caught 73 passes 
for 1 .389 yards and a league- record 
18 touchdowns. Together, they are 
match and fuse. 

Duper, toe milder personality of 
the pair. said. "Teams have been 
trying to stop us any way they can. 
But when you're being aggressive in 
football, I don’t think you can say 
it's a cheap shot. They may uy to 
hit you across toe head, but I don’t 
think that it is anything intention- 
# iL" 

Clayton has shown a tough-talk 
cool this week. It's the kind of bra- 


vado seen in Super Bowls gone by 
from Dallas linebacker Thomas 
Henderson and Raiders defensive 
lineman Howie Long, Wednesday 
Clayton said. “Some of the corner- 
backs, they uy to jam you at toe 
line, try to punch you through the 
face ra«dr or in your throat. Or 
when you're on toe ground, they try 
to punch you. You know, different 
tactics.” 

“Trying to play Gayton and 
Duper physical can be a big mis- 
take." said Jimmy Cefalo. another 
of Miami’s veteran receivers. 
“That’s why Gayion has had so 
many touchdown catches this year, 
he gets by the comerbacks . Against 
the Steders on our first touchdown 
of the game. Clayton stutter- 
stepped and toe comerback came 
up for him. he went by and we got 
six." 

And what of toe fact that both 
Duper and Gayton have spent time 
on toe bench recently waiting for 
circling stars to clear from their 
vision? 

"What that means to me." Loti 
said, "is that both of those receivers 
can come bad: and play strong. I'm 
looking at what they have done 
after they have been nil hard. They 
do things to prove something to 
you," 


Mr. Oh, a Master From the Sandlot, 
Teaches Zen and the Art of Baseball 

By George Vecsey 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The first robin 
of spring has been righted in these 
parts, and his namf is Sadaharu 
Oh. He was spotted in Manhattan a 
few days ago. ostensibly to pro- 
mote his glorious autobiography. 

“A Zen Way of Baseball,'’ but do- 
ing more to leach a few writer types 
how to turn their hips on an inside 
pitch. 

There is something cosmically 
revitalizing on the coldest day of 
toe winter to be ushered into a 
small reception and receive a bat- 
ting tip from a man who hit 868 
borne runs. It seemed restorative to 
him, too, as he raised his right leg in 
toe famili ar flamingo style and 
pointed to the spot on his right hip 
where all his left-handed power had 
come from. 

He reassured us all that his team, 
the Tokyo Giants, would soon be 
heading for spring training on the 
island of Guam, in a seaside camp. 

He became manager last season, 
having retired as a player after the 
1980 season, but he did not teach 
his oneTegged baiting stance to 
any of his players. 

Most American baseball fans are 
aware, at best, that Mr. Oh (he 
refers to his teammates and oppo- 
nents as “mister" ; it seems impolite 
to do less for him) surpassed the 
home-run totals of Babe Ruth and 
Henry Aaron. But no American 
can blow Sadaharu Oh until he or 
she reads “A Zen Way erf Base- 
balL” published by Tunes Books 
and written by David Falkner, a 
writer and actor from New York 
who was mystically matched with 
Oh in Zen-like dreu instances. 

If Oh had not been occasionally 
photographed for toe Western 
press, with his grim competitor’s 
mask and his thick athlete’s legs 
and trunk, one would think his life 
story were fiction. 

Consider this: a half-Chinese, 
half-Japanese lad, whose twin sis- 
ter died young just before a sudden 
improvement zn his health, whose 
parents run a noodle shop in a poor 
district of Tokyo, ts playing a sand- 
lot game. 

Suddenly, the boys notice a tiny, 
marginal major-league outfielder 
named Hiroshi Arakawa walking a 
dog, Arakawa stops to watch the 
game, and offers advice to only one 
boy: "How come you pitch left- 
handed and bat right-handed?" 

Arakawa asks. "You know, you’re 
probably wasting your talent that 
way. You look left-handed. Why 
don't you try to bat left-handed 
next time you come up?” 

The 13-year-old follows the ad- 
vice and swats a clean double to 
right-center field: “I looked toward 
toe bleacher beach behind toe 
plate. Arakawa-san was still there. 

He gave me a big nod of approval. 

My body filled with gooseflesh." 

In toe context of Japanese re- 
spect for elders, Japanese loyally to 
community, Japanese attention to 
detail and technique, this encoun- 
ter becomes toe opening of a life- 
time. 

Arakawa-san becomes the men- 
tor of Oh, stepping in when toe 
young major-league player nearly 
loses himself in the pleasures of toe 
Ginza District, ordering him to fol- 
low directions for the next three 
years. Arakawa-san is a disciple of 
Ueshiba Sensei, a Zen-like master 
of Aikido, a form of martial art In 
season and out of season, the two 
make nearly drily pilgrimages to 
his salon, his dqjo, for exercise and 
wisdom. 

The Sen sa has no interest in 
baseball, yet when Arakawa tries to 
incorporate the an of bitting with 
the concept of ma. the balance be- 
tween two contrasting forces, the 
master roars: 

"I will tell you something, you’re 
a lousy teacher. You see, you’re no 
good when you’re thinking of ma. 

Ma is there because toe opponent is 
ib ere. If you don't like the situa- 
tion, all you have to do is eliminate 
the ma between you and your op- 
ponent.” 

The advice from toe master 
teacher is incorporated into daily 
drills straight from the 1 5 to centu- 
ry. Ordered by Arakawa-san to lift 
his leg to eliminate a hitch in his 
swing. Oh practices first with spe- 



Sadaharu Oh in flamingo stance: A lesson to be learned? 


dal hand-crafted bats taken from 
male wood found only on a remote 
island in northern Japan. 

Later he practices the samurai 
sword swing, using a cheap sword 
be purchased for function only, not 
for show. He practices until he can 
cut a straw doll in half with one 
swing. And he becomes Japan’s 
leading baseball slugger, overcom- 
ing bad habits, the prejudice be- 
cause of his Taiwanese citizenship, 
and toe greater popularity of his 
teammate. Shi geo Nagashi ma- 
la person. Oh is not of toe mist 
and shadows of legend but a dy- 
namic man of 44 looking to im- 
prove upon his third-place finish 
(“I am satisfied"! as a rookie man- 


ager. He hears English well enough 
to smile when asked if it is difficult 
for a superstar to become a manag- 
er. "This is something I don’t like 
io think about," he says in Japa- 
nese with a polite laugh. 

He speaks with respect of some 
Americans who have played in Ja- 
pan: Larry Doby and Don New- 
combe years ago, Reggie Smith and 
Roy White in recent years. He talks 
of the need for concentration, par- 
ticularly for Japanese players, who 
are smaller than the American 
players. And he constantly insists 
be would never have reached a total 
of 868 home runs playing in the 
States. But toe Tom Seavers and 
Pete Roses insist he would have 
been a star in any league. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

NCAA Approves Preseason Tourney 

NASHVILLE, Tennessee (AP) — NCAA convention have delegates 
approved a 16-team preseason National Invitation Tournament in bas- 
ketball. 

The preseason NIT tournament, approved overwhelmingly, would be 
played starting next season during toe last two weekends in Novem- 
ber.The postseason NIT would be unchanged. 

In other action, delegates adopted a proposal setting strict limits on toe 
number of games that can be played in many college sports. 

Roof of Milan Stadium Collapses 

MILAN. Italy (DPI) — A large section erf toe grandstand roofing at 
Milan's SB-year-old Vigorelli cycling stadium collapsed under the weight 
of tons of snow Wednesday. 

The Vigorelli stadium, which had fallen from its days of glory and had 
been used in recent years for dog racing, among other events, was 
refurbished and pm back mto good shape for cycling competition last 
year. But under the heaviest snowfall in Milan in 29 years Wednesday, 
more than 200 meters of toe roofing collapsed. 

Weekend Soccer Postponed in France 

PARIS (UPI) — The French Soccer Federation on Thursday post- 
poned all First Division matches scheduled for the weekend because of 
the record cold snap that has frozen fields around toe country. 

The French First Division had been scheduled to return to play 
Saturday after its annual three-week winter break. The federation did not 
give a new date for toe 10 games. 


i 






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4- 


Ts: 

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(It 

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p «ge 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1985 


OBSERVER 

Unclean-Cuts of Yore 


_ By Russel] Baker 

-- A news story 
the Presidential lnaueu- 
™Cbnunmee*s search foTnSn- 
™k» actors takes me back in sweet 
nHano 7 to a time long ago when 
“yambitkm was to be clean-cut 
. Attractive, clean-cut ali-Amer- 
— these were the qualities-the 
committee said it wanted in non- 
Qn *° n actors, and though the onion 
angle was what made the story 
newsworthy (President Reagan was 
once head of the movie actors’ 
union), it was the term “dean-cut” 
that made the story for me. 

In my youth, cleanliness of cut 
was commonly associated, just as 
the inaugural committee apparent- 
ly still associates it, with attractive- 
ness and aD-Amencanhood. The 
three terms were so linked in the 
national consciousness that in 
speech they were often run together 
as one word, pronounced “atirac- 
tivedeancnt 


their haystacks combined with an 
odd smile to make many people 
who saw the combination scowL 


What they were scowling at, I 
always thought, was the sudden re- 
alization that another human bang 
could be both utterly unattractive 
and Ameri can 

Which left the “dean-cut” tesL 
Anybody who could meet one 
out of three of the requirements of 
excellence wouldn't have to be 
ashamed, would he? Gean-cut 
seemed to be a goal I could reach. 
□ 


Yes, It Was a Starry Night for Van Gogh 


By Lee Dye 

Lea Angela Tima Service 

T UCSON, Arizona — The swirling, bril- 
liant sky in Vincent van Gogh's painting, 
“Starry Night,” reflected the deep thoughts 
of a serious amateur astronomer rather than 
the hallucinations of a mad genius, an art 
historian has told the American Astronomi- 
cal Society meeting here. 

Albert Boime said that van Gogh was ob- 
sessed with “celestial phenomena" when he 


I have since learned how compli- 
in be, 


lean. 


m, pronoi 
itaSameric 
□ 

The values embodied in this term 
were complicated and vague at 
best, but to a literal-minded adoles- 
cent they spoke of unattainable 
standards of excellence. The “all- 
American” requirement was the 
most discouraging, for I associated 
it with football and especially with 
Yale football 

There was little likelihood that 1 
would get to Yale. Even if I should, 
the notion that anybody who was 
6-foot-2 and weighed 119 pounds 
might play football for Yale well 
enough to become all-American 
seemed most unlikely. 

If ab-Americanhood was abso- 
lutely impo&able, measuring up to 
the second adjective — “attractive” 
— seemed merely out of the ques- 
tion. Adolescents were more realis- 
tic then than now. I knew that the 
possessor of a Egnre conforming to 
the above-died statistics, a fellow 
nicknamed Ichabod the Crane, 
would have problems passing the 
“attractive” test 

□ 

Even if I sent away for the 
Charles Atlas muscle-buuding pro- 
gram, worked out with York bar- 
bells and got my weight up to 130 
pounds, I would face difficult hair 
and teeth problems. 

An irresistible Depress on bar- 
gain in baby-teeth dentistry had led 
to curious gaps, rotations and tilts 
in my second-growth teeth. Hair 
that rustic relatives compared to 


cated and nasty clean-cut can 
but at the time my grasp of the 
concept was rudixnectaiy. To me 
the idea of “dean-cut” was pretty 
much what it sounded like. 

Cleanliness and cutting were 
deeply involved. The cutting was of 
two varieties: haircutting and the 
cut of the jib, as a popular clicbfc 
had it “I liked the cut of his jib,” 
was a line found in many books 
dealing in heroes with strong jaw- 
lines. 

Of course, the hair had to be cut 
cleanly, too. No rat-tails around 
the ears, no fur trading off the edge 
of the skull's overhang. 

Pursuing clean-cuttedness, I 


spent much time thrusting my jaw 
litsjiblil 


forward to em phariae its jib like cut, 
and tried to keep my haystack 
cropped dose to the bone. 

Soapy cleanliness was also vital 
however, and here I was doomed to 
fail the third test. Cut I might be, 
but clean-cut? Never. It was my 
adolescent destiny to be perpetual- 
ly dirty-cut, marked with ink 
smears on fingers and chin, news- 
print smudges from elbows to 
wrists, and blackheads and acne 
pimples — always attributed to 
evilly “oily skin" — that were in- 
vulnerable to the most ravaging ap- 
plications of hot water and soap. 

The result: an adolescence spent 
adapting to failure, followed — as 
prolonged failure often is — by 
seething contempt for the stan- 
dards that had defp jH ed me. These 
fires have been long banked, but 1 
still feel the lip's urge to curl for a 
sneer when I hear of some pitiably 
inadequate devil whose only rec- 
ommendation is that he is attrac- 
tive, clean-cut and all-American. 

Thus is the soul of the man 
warped by a misspent youth. 

New York Times Sendee 


created one of his best-known paintings while 
confined to an upper-story cell of the menial 


asylum in the French monastery, Saint-Paul- 
de-Mausote. 

Boime. a professor of an history at the 
University erf California, Los Angeles, said 
that van Gogh was suffering with epilepsy, 
not insanity, and he believes that the painting 
was based on the artist’s observations. 

Borne, who presented a paper before the 
astronomical society’s annual convention 
here Tuesday, said that several astronomers 
at UCLA and elsewhere had looked at his 
evidence and reached the same conclusion. 

Charles Whitney, an astrophysicist with 
the Harvaid-Smithsonian Center for Astro- 
physics, was pursuing the same conise and 
reached s imilar conclusions. In a telephone 
interview, Whitney said that both his findings 
and Boime's are of interest to art historians 
because they show that van Gogh based his 
paintings on “his actual impressions of the 
sky.” 

“We have to get away from this idea that 
van Gogh was insane,'' Boime said in an 
interview. “He suffered from epilepsy and he 
recognized that he needed help. He had put 
himself in the asylum. But he was perfectly 
rational and sane between seizures, as his 
letters show.” 

Whitney, who has presented his findings to 
various arts symposiums, said that the think- 
ing today is that van Gogh's “illness was 
episodic. Between the episodes, he knew what 
was going on." 

Charles Moffett, curator of European 
painting s at the San Francisco Fine Aits 
Museum and a leading authority on van 
Gogh, said: “I have often taken the stand that 
he wasn't the lunatic everybody assumed him 
to be. He’s had a bum rap. All you have to do 
is look at his works. They are from a cogent 
intelligent rational individual Everything is 



Astronomers verified the starry sky of Vincent van Gogh’s “Starry Night" 


that at last he had executed his ’Starry 
Night” 

Boime showed a slide from the planetar- 
ium alongside a reproduction of the painting. 
The moon in the painting is where it should 
have been if van Gogh painted the scene at 
around 4 AM., as Boime believes, and the 
bright object just above the church steeple is 
where Venus would have been. 

The constellation Aries is shown across the 
top of the painting , and Boime believes (he 
swirling mass in (he center of the work was a 
comet drawn from the artist’s imagination 
rather than the scene as it appeared that 
morning. Boime presented a reproduction of 
a page showing various comets published in a 
1881 issue of Harper's Weekly, “a magazine 
regularly read by van Gogh daring that peri- 
od.” The comets bear a striking similarity to 
the swirl in “Starry Night.” 


very carefully worked out” 
Boime said 


But Whitney says that the swirling pattern, 
which first interested him in studying van 


that van Gogh painted with 
great concern for accuracy, and with a pas- 
sion for the heavens. “Van Gogh had more 
than a perfunctory interest in celestial phe- 
nomena,” Boime said. 

Boime said that be concluded that the 
French Impress onist had his astronomical 
facts after Ed Krupp of the Griffith Observa- 
tory used the Los Angeles planetarium to re- 
create the sky over the monastery as it would 
have appeared on June 19, 1889, the day 
Vincent wrote excitedly to Theo, his brother. 


lying 


Gogh's works, resembles a spiral galaxy, the 
i discovered 40 years before 


first of which was i 
van Gogh painted “Starry Night. ” Whitney 
said that he set out to determine whether van 
Gogh knew of the phenomena. He said he 
never found the evidence he was seeking, but 
be is inclined to believe that the artist was, in 


fact, depicting a spiral galaxy. 

Boime conceded that the artist took oon- 


be said that the scene as a whole “tallies with 
astronomical facts at the time the painting 
was executed.” 

In his letters, van Gogh frequently de- 
scribed the view from his window, and often 
included references to celestial phenomena, 
including this quote: 

‘This morning I saw the country from my 
window a long time before sunrise, with noth- 
ing but the morning star [Venus], which 
looked veiy big.” In other letters he described 
the stars in great detail concluding at one 
point in a note to his sister that “it will be 
clear that putting little white dots on a blue- 
black surface is not enough." 

“Naturally, the circumstances of the pic- 
ture's execution were fraught with the deepest 
personal meaning for the painter.” Boime 
said. “Incarcerated in both mind and spirit, 
urged on by the longing for both the security 
of Life after death and the desire to escape his 
physical limitations, van Gogh painted a mo- 
tif chat put him in couch with (he cosmos in a 
way «h«t marig this connection immediate 
and real." 

The stars, Boime concluded, represented 
immortality to the artist. As the artist wrote: 

“Looking at the stars always makes me 
dream, as simply as 1 dream over the black 
dots representing towns and villages on a 


siderable liberty with dimensions, and even 
inserted a church that would not have been in 
the area as viewed from van Gogh’s celL But 


map. Why, I ask myself, shouldn't the shining 
dots of the sky be as ao 


accessible as the black 
dots on the map of France? Just as we take 
the train to get to Tarascon or Rouen, we take 
death to reach a star ” 


PEOPLE 


A 'Dallas ’ Doublecross? 

Lionel Richie, Michael Jackson m. 

Stevie Wonder have agreed rewrite _ 

the song, and a stellar list of pop „ >/ // f C- 4 

rock, country and R&B artists an 1 L rtf p' 
committed to singing on the record 1, J - % f » 

■h) l 


In a move that would have made 
J. R. Ewing Proud, a British com- 
mercial TV company has poached 
rights for the long-running “Dal- 
las” soap opera from the British 
Broadcasting Corp. “A piece or 
hooliganism, a very underhand and 
shabby deaL” said Michael Grade, 
controller of the BBCs Channel I, 
confronting Mmr Sutherland, who 
engineered the deal for Thames 
Television, on a news program 
Wednesday. Grade threatened to 
screen the” 17 episodes he stiU has 
on hand at the same time as 


Thames. “Thames could look^ven/ 


stupid playing the end of a 
hanger before we’ve shown the be- 
ginning of iL” Grade angrily told 
Sutherland. But Sutherland said, 
“We can do all sorts of things to 
bring the story up to date and will 
do so if we have to.” The BBC 
charged that Thames secretly 
etinebd a deal with the series' dis- 


Tbe participants are believed to in i* 
dude Bruce Springsteen, Xetuq * 
Rogers, Linda Ronstedt, W'ffie Net i 
son, Tina Turner and Quincy] I 
Jones. The charity effort is the oui-l* * 
growth of the highly successfii 
“Do They Know It’s Christmas?" 
single, recorded in London by Brit- 
ish rode stars. Proceeds from the. =. 
“Christmas" record — which has ’ 
already sold millions of copies — 
will aid famine-stricken Ethiopi- ' ; . 
in s. 

□ '■ 


tributore. Wortdvision Enterprise, 

1BC i 



in Hollywood, while the BBC was 
preparing to negotiate for the same 
package. 

□ 

Kicked off (heir stage at Radio 
City Music Hall by Walt Disney 
movies, the Rockeries rejected an 
offer to perform at Disney’s Epcot 
Center in Florida in return for end- 
ing their Radio Cit 
place 

plans to 

from late May through August for 
the premiere of two movies, “Re- 
turn to Oz” and “Cauldron.” The 
Disney offer, made Wednesday, 
was meant to resolve the dispute 
that sent the dancers to the streets 
last week, picketing and gathering 
petitions that urged they appear at 
the Music Hall with the Disney 
players this summe r. “We're not 
turning down work," Rockette Ei- 
leen Coffins said Wednesday. “The 
statement we’re making is what a 
vital part of New York the Rock- 
eries are.” Hie dancers, a fixture at 
the Music Hall for more than SO 
years, have said a Rockette-less 
Disney show could set a precedent 
for the theater’s dispensing with 
them completely when their cur- 
rent contract expires in May 1986. 

□ 

More than a dozen American 
pop stars wQl record a angle this 
month in Los Angeles as part of a 
rampaign to raise milli ons of dol- 
lars for African famine victims. A 
source close to the project said that 


Singer Brenda Arnan, who re- 
cently won a long battle against *" - 
cancer, made her comeback in Lon- 
don in the 5,500-seat Albert Hall * , 
which was virtually empty — but ~ • 

she said she had ao regrets. “I ' 
promised you an extravagant eve- V • 
ning — what's more extravagant: •’%’ . 
than having the Albert Hall to '■ ' 
yonrselves?” shejoked with the 100 . - 

people who showed up for the;- 
Tuesday night concert. Her has- - J. 
band, drummer Robert Ttrft, look '- \ 
out a second mortgage on his apart- - 
meat to pay £3,500 (about S3, 920)' 
for renting the hall as a wedding, 
present Arnau, who has undergone 
two major operations for cancer/., 
added: “It's the first time I have 1 • • • 
sung with cut pain.” Lynda Mods,; . 

a reporter for The Standard news* 1 

paper who attended the concert, - " 

wrote Wednesday that at first the 01' ■ 
small audience looked embarrassed %=Y 
and a handful walked out But by - 
the time Arnau belted out her final <i : 
number, “Live and Let Die," which : \ 
she had performed in the James i " Z 
Bond film, Murdin said the halK/ 
was "reveberating to cheers and % 
galls for more.” 


•f' 

.jS 




The British movie “The Bosto- gjUl 
mans '" and the Soviet film “A 
Ruthless Romance” shared (he 


uoiaen reacoot awaro tor uk oest j • ft yj~W 

feature film at the 10th Interna* j \ \_liiC i 1 I i**- v? 
Ti rwwl Film Festival of India in u " v. 

New Delhi Thursday. Carios Va> „ 


eza won the Silver Peacock as bat in l ;7T*ff i’*I* ■ 

actor for his performance in Bn- II' i * t **■“ 
zfl's “Memories of Prison," while ' 


Prison,' 

Vanessa Redgrave and Madefctae 
Potter shared the best actress ' .’-" 
award for their roles in “The Bosli> - 
Qians.” . . ” 


Place Your Classified Ad CMddy and Easfiy 

In um 

INTBUHATIOIIAL HERAID TRIBUNE 

By nseoNK Cdl yaw local IHT representative with your text. You 
wR be infarmad af the cost iuxieciutely, and once prepaymert is 
made yaw ad wiB appear within 48 hour*. 

Gael; The bade rate is $930 per ine per day + loeri taxes. There cne 
25 fallen, signs wxi spaces in the fttf Bne and 36 in the falawmg fates. 
Mmwn space is 2 Bnes. No abfarevirtiare accepted 
CirmAt Garde: American Express. Diner's Out, Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access and Visa. 

HEAD OFFICE 

LATIN AMBUCA 

Porta: (For classified only): 
747-4500. 

BIROPE 

Amsterehew.- 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421. 

Bogota: 2129608 
Buenos Airec 41 40 31 
(D^x.312 
Cerexasc 331454 
Guayaqul: 431 943/431 
(fam 417852 
Pmcsna: 64-4372 
Scat Jese: 22-1055 
SontiugoL 69 61 555 
Saa Pouke 852 1893 

Broseels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen. (01) 329440. 
Frxnifcfart; (069) 72-67-55. 
Uxinxmi 29-5894. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
London: (01] 8364802. 
MaWfcfc 4553891 /455J306. 

MDDIEEAST 

Bcdweav 246303. 
Jardn 25214. 

Kawah 5614485. 
Ortmt 416535 
SawSAirtia: 

Jeddah: 667-1500. 
UAL Dubai 224161. 

Mfan (02) 7531445. 

FAR EAST 

Norway: (03] 845545. 
Ranee 679-3437. 

Sweden: 08 104632. 

Tef Avhn 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

Bangkok: 390-96-57. 
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Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

UNITED STATES 

AUSTRALIA 

New Yarfu (212) 752-3890. 

Sydney. 929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 690 8233. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 


INIHBGB DESIGN 
M THE SOUTH OF FUANCE 
2 crertivo Cotfomiu designers 
avofabJe far o 3 nrnodd & residertid 
project KSNV/1HOBOS DESIGN. 
Tefc (94) 59 71 40. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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to the 

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AND SAVE. 


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faternri fanri HenaW Tribune. 


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riw n e wssta nd price . rhperetng 
an your country of resdena. 


For detail 

an this special introductory offer, 
write tat 


WT Sufasafafaiie Department 
181 t Avenue Oi erfesde G r eitt i. 
93200 Meofiy-eui Seine, France. 


Or tat Profs 747-07-29 
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contact our load cbfrijetar an 


Tefal HK 5-2*6734 


H-B - faToK: 

peeing he canenuti m enij tor 
Q 3 tion_ Wish to hear from anyone 
wilh aright*, JMeriptoe of Mn 
altar wnhno. Cods iwmbuned. Hit. 

SSwifo Fa* NTC 10021 

WtaUodan. Boe Ifflo#. Herjdd in- 
Iim. 92521 Nwily Ceoex. Fran 


ANONYMOUS in 

^SStfSm 6MSP6S. Geneva 

T^fjnQfL ENGIAND. Kfwpriyotoly 




SOU NY‘ ™*SL i |S 


personals 




MOVING 


ALLIED 


VANUNES INTL 

OVHl 1,000 AGENTS 
fa U5JL - CANADA 
350 WORLD- WVE 
flffiF ESTIMATES 

PARS Pe tfa ord ei InfemeHonat 
(01) 343 U 64 

hwnkhjkt JSLira? 

(069) 250066 

MUNICH imls. 

(OS9) 142244 

LONDON , 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSELS: zfagfarSJk. 

(02) 425 66 14 

GENEVA GnaMW^A. 

(022) 32 64 40 

CAIRO Alted Vai Um* fatfl 
(20-2) 712901 

USA ABed Van time fan C«p 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


CONTNEXi Godfaurien to 300 dries 
woridwde - Air/Sea. Cc4 Oiarte 
281 1851 Pari* -Cte* loo 


REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 


PALM BEACH 
FLORIDA 


RESDBrfnAL 
COMMERCIAL 
RAW LAM) SALES 


WUn E Huitan HI 
hd Estate 
177 Seaview Ave. 


Tefc 005} 659-6C00 
»51ltt5W721 


Tlx. 

wmUTTON 


FORMORE REAL ESTATE 

omxnMTES sa 

PAGES 


BAHAMAS 


PARADISE POUIB 
Deaovar your own tropical panto at 
the luxurious VISTA BB1A condone 


um loGCfed right on beautiful CABLE 
BEACH NASSAU. BAHAMAS. AI 28 


up gtwenU have oyedooJar view of 
the oce a n, 24 how security, large re- 
croahon room, private beach « pool 




room, priv ate 
Triced from US$200,000 


Tei (SOS) 443 9346 fa Miami 
or write; PO Box 145159, 
Coni Gbbtat, Ha. 33114 
PARTICIPATION INVITED 


CANADA 


CANADA 
OUESFB, R.C 
5 ooe lots vrith view, ntfurd trees, 12 
rmnuMi west of city an pavement. 
Priced to tel at Ccmocficm $12,000. 


Write: A.F. Mey. 462 Bm St, Quesnd, 
6.C V2I 3W9 Canada or phone 


604-747-1834. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


FOR SALEM 
SOUTHERN MITT ANY 


(7 km. from Loriant Airport with daily 
connections toand from rarij] an exdu- 


. .. . . funwihed v*Aed-in Fort, 

started on dnr 9,000 sqjiL jriond. 


400 m. from the coast, ocasabie rt 
low- 6 de by foot & by cor. CSmate fo- 
vardbly mnuenced by the Gulf Stream. 
The Fart wrib various ouriaddna was 
built in the 17lh century & n 19/0 was 
renovated mta a oamrortable manorial 


damiale widi s epqr rt e Gued Porters 
Sheltered moor 


rage. Pnee SH11 750 
eampony exst be triton _ . 
DOMUS UUMOOUe* 


. Go- 
r arergn 


Lodge. 

fr __ 
cat be 
36RJS I 

OHtBWMMaU 


COIR D'AZUR 


A DeBgMfui Smdi Traowre 
AI on one tevw) an the best 
reridennri center of CAN&S 
Lwirg-cfirang roam co mb i ned, 3 bed- 
rooms. 2 brtfvocmj, bea u tiful fafchen. 
AI fi tefc up to die highest standad. 
Smrii fkd- < gorden af riaoui 16 acre, 
- ri, mw v«w on Bayof Cannei. Hgh- 
recorvnended rt F3,150^XX). 

Ft 1962. Aparin 

JCHNTAYLOR 5JL 
55 La Croiirtte 
06400 Came* 

Teh (93) 38 00 66 . Tetoe 47D921F 


»>OD«OOfll I IllWIlf Ute tm«u Of 

wrfufrishad nw w i cordtkwv ncFtb- 

laulh view af tea & mauntriro, pool. 


_ j fiabron roea af Nee. 

Please crilhfce (93) 81 -97-01 ,p3) 86 - 
3582, or contoe t awnero A grt aws a t 


Properiefc 9465 WfeHre Bfvd. 57724, 
BewfiTR^CA. 90212 USA. Tote* 
194795 AS1BIN BVHL 


COTE D'AZUR 

SAMT PAUL 

viloge house 


inside 




... SJL. 

Le CoHe Sur Loup. (9^ 32 83 40 


FRBKH CASTLE FOR SALE, with 
Iroge properly, abort 2 M hour* by 
from Pari, arson a taw melts 


dS ? 011 very dose. 

mril plane indbded in 

the price. For further eifomriim, 




please uu rd u rt ED. Case Postate 92, 
laiGteteva, Tetoe 421216 LBLCH 


COUROCVB. 1550. OtAtET mw 
buft, 2 Jeveh.95 sp/n-inol. A upn. 
taring, fi re plo r e, panoraric wudteni 
view, 3 berkooms, tqwpped btahea 
kege basement. P&XJXQ. Aipy, 11 
A«s du Cats, d927D Forirones. Teh 
3146 wm 


(7) BZ3 13146 from 7 pm. 


TOUR CONTA CT 84 P B OTBUCE. 

ft duedv. Ormsna 
Estates. Errite 

-i 1 

VWCE 


55 13532 STJtEMVWfllO. 
MCE tode*. Tefc WS 9Z01 58 +. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

GREAT BRITAIN 

GREAT BRITAIN 

SpfllS 

VMS OWB BVB 1HAIRES 

MoreificerTt 5tfi floor flat in one of lon- 
don s finest bloda off V/riitehaL 
Gampietley renoroted to a superb 



eh. II is ready far immedkrfn ocD 4 X> 
tioa 2 double bedrooms, duwtaq room 
30ft x 19ft New oric ttehen/efiner, 2 
bathrooms (1 erawte], utilty room. M 
hour portwogE. cantrai hirfna sns, 
telex aid restuuraTi fotftbei tec. 

44 yeas S195J00 

POSTMANS 

01 681 1477 UK (24 hours) 
Tefaa 8953355 

GERMANY 


MUNICH 

Enepfiend. 1 8 1 Beebe am 


in most prestigious control locdion. 
NVfcCO GMBH 

AMSAPLATZ 1^08000 MUNCH Z 
TeL ($9-22 13 21. 

PAM LAIC. mSTlGKXJS flris over- 
loridng Hyde Pari. 2/3 bedrooms, 
2/3 brinaoms. From CITOjOQO. 
HYDE PARK, Magnificert hotee. 8 
bedrooms, iwinwwia pod, joru 77 a, 
souna PurNTY BRJDGE, atlrective 
flat, lounge, 2 double berioam. 
£56.000. BtfeW, kefcroL Terro«d 
Victorian house, 2 bedroone, 2tage 
Ivina rooms, torts fuffy restored. 
mjxti GaAs. Red Estate Co, 114 
New Sand St, London. Tefc 01493 
5399. Tbt 27646 

llliii 

GREAT BRITAIN 

KNKSHTSBRIDGE 
OPPOSITE HARRODS 

Recently renovated flat comcririns 
3 bedrooms, double reception, feehen 
bathroom, separate WC efc Lease 1 13 
years- E16W00. 

For ivfxxntmert end axxJKons of srie, 
ptease contact: 

esr i 

7 OLD PARK LANE 
LONDON W1 

Tel: 01-499 9986 
Telex 2A1 692 (No Agarts Please) 

HOTH IN CBIIB OF A1W6. 

C eotemy. bu* 1972, 96 beds, 
USUSOM Mr. Pofasj7 tooris- 
triou St, 10677 Athens. Tot 3616969, 
63Q-9J0 pm 

TTALV 

I 

ip 




MONACO 

Mpaa 

PASSING THROUGH Monte Carlo 
reajVsrtyl Why not invert in o modern 
hi»y equipped Slutfia in fan heart of 
city. Make the best of your money 
rodjy. Le Montaigne - located just 2 
MMfa owoy froin rtn costoo ofrttn 
flood rxjportuntes. Le Martrirtie, 
fiLC 9*0 0 - Monte Crtta TeT^ 
904007. Tbc 470 022. 


LONDON ST. JOHN'S WOOD & lil- 
Ke Vericft 2 becuriiH 1-bedroom 
qportmerts. Tefc 01-328 51 10. 

| International Business Message Center | 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


— rzz: 


m 

i 1 .R( 

EXOTMG OPPORnMTY 
if you are mterested in dating your 
own faamea. Lagesr int'l stegtes dris 
run* tov kxjfcing Id saepemd m 
CEMntries. For nuoiiiutiom 
hndvb, 39 Qud tf Anjou. 75004 Porfr. 

Tet 575 26 88 morrwgs 




n 


||l§|ij 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

OFFICE SERVICES 

Soft in a duty-free Eurqpeai eourtry 

US$5000 9i»» wafaSTnowl Mn- 

mum net yields PA gwucitteedi 40 %. 
Rare opportunity. TopuchaM^write: 
Bbx Vfy. Twero M3. OOSO Ma- 
drid, Span 


DIAMONDS 

COMPUTS PORTRAITS 

T-5HRT FOTOS 
NOW tel full COLOR 
at aB-oash bminec thetf can eont you 
S8000 . SlOOOO/moiTfh. New ard uwd 
spam trom S10J3Q0 - OMOG. Kema 

your LONDON OFFICE 

chesham EucunvE catna 

Gwroeriensvo range of semces 
150 Regent 5trMt. Londmi Wl. 
Tei; (01)439 6288 Tbu 261426 



6000 Frantnrf/W. Gtsrmaty. 
TeL 069-747800 Ike 412713 KcMA 

99 Keaersgtotto, 10)5 CM Ansterdott 
Tefc 312055 57 49 Telex 16183. 

Wortd-Wkk Badness Gum - 

roe tree pnee bst «nwe 

Jaadhta Gotdenrtoin 
— . . . 

eawmaen 
fatobWtedira 

PeBnaretreat 62. B-2018 Antwerp 
SeWt - Tefc P2 3) 234 <7 51 
Hn 71779 syl fa fi the^ Diamond Ouh. 
Heart of Antwerp Dkxnand Industry 

BQ5TWG DIAMOPC & arid rone 
needs tftvedm or portnefs Tor further 
aiMsiw Write IHT Box 21(7, Frie- 
Sdrtr. 15. D-6000 Frafcfurt/Mrin. 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 


Center, near enmo, hij^i doe biding, 
sefing bv«fy 2 roorn, 1 10 iqjiL. 


If. 54 
MC 98001 MONACO CH1EX 


Tefc|jW^50 66 84 


469477 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


BBL 

G80UP WIBtNA TlONAl 

Rndi For you (|uc£ty aportmonb & 

fapdencM & hopes fo ramify ol your 

, BEST WISHES 
FOR 1985. 

IBEX 61 29 06 F. 

TH. 727 34 65. 



OWBCR SBiS PASS 1 6th. Off Foch. 
2200 sqir. (over 200 iqjnJ, 4lh flow, 
elevOor, in high class (690 buUrn. 
Surety apartment, large entrance pi 
lery.fcvin^ iiniixirooni | study, 7 bici. 
roams, 2 auths, large btrimn, ixttty 
room. Mricfs room & cedar. (2-cor 
oarage on premises for rent onfyL 
PcnH) 6227294, USA 313-922 2141 

VEWWBRBTOWa 

From an apatment af 100 sftm., very 
high dots <n the 7th. 

SANTAMNSA 561 90 91 



brths, parkin. F^OO.OOa Tefc 563- 
03-10 ext. 31K 

VBJNET AREA, riong Seim, beautiful 
view, house S (Jordan, 620 SOUL. 8 
rooms, 3 beths, 2 -car goroge. 4 rare 
by car RSL Tefc (3) wQSSu. 



PORTUGAL 



SPAIN 





REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


OWM9ANA, MALAGA QUIET. 6 
■ooms. 3 brtta, sorvtnS quarters, 
gaage + nvgrowid pool loertodon 
acres an Spain's beautifri Cceta 
dd Sri. Corweraent access to hrinvay 
& carport Telephone Mr tfdtoel 
WANNA QD1)5»4420 USA or An- 
tonia de Forrimy 772-139 Marbela, 
Sprin. USS165h00. 


MAJOBCA^ BEAUTIFIULY positioned 
tafly tautened Art on booth. 3 roesm, 
Mcnan, balfi, Iw^i terroa?, porting 


REAL ESTATE 
FORSAUE 


USA GENERAL 


INVESTMENT OPPOBTUMTY - ISO 


uq b in Ne w Jersey. Ide ri for exdu- 
y SWCra Bitote, 


wve fiomer, tmtm aaams. «nritatonaL 
1 00 mles bom New York & Washing 
tan 45 ndei from FMadelplaa - conv 
ideri when new mpresswa 
. Potertid return over 1 
i SLOOO^Wl Price *400.000. Bax 
328 HHSl. North Troy, V 
05B5P USA Tele* 05*22747 


Ph7m3tonar 
cy. Teh UK 0702 


196 


any cun en- 


SW1TZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 


FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


DO YOU WISH - 

• TO BUY AN APA2TMENT 
08 A HOUSE? 

• TO RETUE IN S WI7ZBH AM» 

• TO INVEST M SWITZEOAND? 


CONTACT US: 25 YEARS OF EXPERI- 
ENCE IN BUILDING AND SELUNG 
fWE SWISS REAL ESTATE 


SOD M SA 
P.O. Box 62. 


1884 Vfflars, SwitzerW 
i 456213 GES Of 


The 


SWITZERLAND 


FORBGfSB CAN BUY: STUDIO/ 
APARTMENTS, CNALET5, VR1A5. 
Prices from about SFlOOtiX). Region 
Lrice Geneva. Manfreux & famous 
MourAsn resorts. Wa ham far you a 
big choice of very reasanabty 
5*ro* homes, twtctao the very best & 
the mart wdim. BffORE YOU MAKE 
A DECISION aontatt 
H. SBOLD SA 


Tour Grin 6, 04-1007 Lausanne. 
TeL 21 72526 if Telex: 24298 SQOCH 


A vn» A 7Ki4 DE LAUSANNE 
pufar^ en bordure des bail, dons un 




MAJSON 

co t npren u nt 15 dtombrei, 5 sates de 


bain, garag e pour p our 2 yritarwL Par- 
frit etar aentretan Terrain 


14411 

Trta beaux arfaret. Frire offres sow 
tfxffre 22-2571, FUtfirim, 1002 
Lausanne. 


UlOANOL Beautiful 2-bedroom t^art- 
mer» on 5ch floor vwth panevomic 


on the xa, 
double ' 



vwwi af Ldm Lugana. 3 bricories, 
total Convenient bention. 


120 K|4n. (. 

Srie permitted to no»v5wi» readerto. 
PWeoa corfotf David Abrahm jSBO 


PAIM BEACH RORB1A Investment 
New aceorfrant luxury aondomnwm. 
QuoEty conduction vwtri 24 ulogjyt 3 
betfroom, 3H bath reskfanaB. Fnt 
dan tvnerisles. Wanda ShrieU, Reri- 
tar, The Keyte Co. Reariofs, 98 5 
Federri Hwj, Baca Raton. FIA 3343Z 
005)391-9503. 


AMBUCAN SEAL ESTATE: New 
Hampshire's beautiful lofas area 
Maurice Cottas. Century 21/Gamer 
HowaMererith, MIL 03251 Tefc 
(603)279-7971 or 253411a 


SUNBELT FARMS. Gorton, soybeans, 
rice, catfish & other snril 90 m farms. 


H.C. JJJl Cl^ STEVBMS REALTOR. 


■ 3874a 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NYC SUBURB/ WESTCHSTa 


Bromtvile Wloge, MY. • 28 nia ta ! 

cortemparwy, 
prrotiripw loertiar. watt to OR. Iving 
room/Rreploce, formri dining room, 
design er lat che s od joiring fanxfy 
roam, smeshmg mater bedroom suite 1 
with brihplus 4 adcMond bedrooms, 2 
eecelent sdnok. 


LEY 

914/337-1410 
85 PondSeM Rood 
Bronn v Ce, New York 10708 


PEBBLE BEACH, CALIFORNIA. Be- 


gBw3jro^ftltgnte on world fan- 


— Oreon view and 10 

rooms area front dunes and beach. 


CA 93923. 


30 MMUTE5 FROM MR7TOWN 
Manhattan. Nut conrition adoriri 
house for sola h exdusive Westches- 
ter an 114 acres. 5 bedrooms, 3 M & 
2 htf brths. Oriet. ShartvwA to Oo- 
don 6 school*. TefcAdnende Merode 


Bneseh, Beigum 322/517 
USA 9U?mS6 72 


16 46 arm 


BRONXVl^ W - sjucrtvftoge one 
sa mile. 28 mm. tram NYC fenous 
satort K-1Z Gracious homes & coop 


woi Essrte . 120 KraftAre- Bronxv 6 e, 

NY 10708. |9!4) 337-09»rw: S 

tpeoaisfs. 


Mi MBBA CH STATE, 4 berioomi, 
Sn baftu, mot rb hMwrii mas. 
65 ft. pod 2 (ors, beach. SI SrrAan. 

trade ptas as h. Trii 
1 202) 333-9WI 


OARKN, CONWCnCUT. Exerota*- 


REAL STATE. TeL 303 6557724. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


EXOUISITE MANHATTAN pw4xxss — 
cpretment (Sutton Place area). Ap 


» . 


praxiiwrtefy 2500 sq. fr. & temn V- . 
Unbelievable ' " ' 


views. Mopxficwflt ~ 
deuxrted & ready for ocrupdtHL^ 
Iflnsss farces sale, ninapris criy. S - 
mCon. Florence 516-561^S I 4. . ". 


PARK AVBIUE, NEW YORK, Bon* 

M penthouse dose Carfyste Had. ; 
Entire floor. Huge recaption, Ire- 
place. Speciocuiar vi ews. Ca mtAta:"" ■ 
pnvanr far enlei luitwnu. Stf - 1 - 
5S2Stu0. Prinripris only. Rereram »S.'-- 
Cofl (212) 772 6934. 


SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE < ^ 

rooms, 3 baths, texury home an IB . 7— 
aoes m the heart af South Jtms 
Bnoh country. faceBent huntMoS 
faring. $275Jj(10. 512/449-M^lM 


USA ^ - 

COMMERCIAL 
A INDUSTRIAL 


CORAL QAB1E5, HORRM V 

Best location. 100,000 sqA parcel, srt \r. ^ 
ride far 300.000 sqit. office or a*- - 
merriri buidfag. Located ei the bsafc 
fri dty of 4401 Ponce de Lean BM • /• . : 
Right next to Meirorril Station. .— 
PRfCED TO SBL By awrwr. 


Tefc (305) 443 9346 
t PO Bax 145159 


Wide 


CcndGafctaL.no. 33114 
■IPACnWADO^H 


ARON WVTTHI. 


ST. LOUIS, MiSSOURL Unque dm* 
town red estate oaoes from Si£ 
nflmn Union Strtion redsvriofxad 
project. 593/300 tq.ft. butang spo» i 
an 3A acres far a miwd-use prapd 1 
( axporotehoadquot 1 et\cflndttaM> 


Chesfrwf 5f. Loon, Mo. Td 
314-34g-24jtp, UAA- 


1 ' *" 


PALM BEACH - One of ltw fargO 


hctaric ol co mmendri btddngs 0,1 
mer45W 


.■ ‘T ■ 


■ rs. _■ t- 


■Wdlh Avenue & ons ownv 45ymfL 

Steui'.: 

Int. Anthony Hafts. 217 fcnniw 
Aye,, Pehn Beech. FI 33480 USA TA 
TO 6555710. 


& 


SHOPPING CBttB. Queens. NT 

~ ■vsurtjn 

l 6 AthofwsBouDiritwSte 
15342 Apfria PcrrokM/Atart 
Greece. 6598935 from Sum local tag 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SHABE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


London sannes apajumbrs 

in Ktefangton. Gsftngham Apart’ 
otenh. Tefcul-373 630C 7bn 9IB« 


PAGE 15 
FOR MORE : 
CLASSIFIEDS: 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 



LOW COST FLIGHTS I HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


USA 


EAST COAST HWM 

MX) WEST FROM 
WEST COAST FROM 
SOUTH EAST FROM I 


£119 

£160 

£2121 

£195 


Anywfsrte to onvwher o 
fa USA on BRAMFF £95 

NATC London 734 8100 


NT ore WAV 5150. Everyday MY. - 
Wen Coast 514T. Paris 2BW 90. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


ROUND THE WOR1D 


ROM £769 
AitdraSa return From ES T9 New Zea- 
land return from £&9. Dterih from 


THE LAST GREAT LUXURY: rriri 
vocy, wrturf io nl in lush ircwrori pi 
tcoon horees, fame staff beta after 
your every need. A Cornel UriiterNy 
Hriri Stfwri (ronwg atu m Jamooon 
seuthesari faring wbjL Groups 
ham 2 to 12 dtare S200 to S600/day. 


Rob & Mature, RossMey. Ataorv 
, VA. 2231 A Tefc 70554^-3276 


dria ’ 


01-3700349. 


HEUAS YAQfTMG. Yafa Ovtere. 
Aoodemxs 28, Athens 10671. Greece. 


OM87SI A YACHT M GRSCE. Of- 
rest from owner of largest Beet 
Airwricon manogtelienL ' 

: bonded. Vo 


Greece. Tefc 4529571, 4S9486. Tbc 
LKA offiras: Fif Bogd Am- 


21-2000. LKA< .... . 

bier. PA Wfe T 6 215641 1 


Far mare HOUDAY A TRAVB. ADS 
PlEASE TURN TO 
PAPE B W 

M THE WBBOMD SECTION 


HOTELS 


MY.C HOia BARG AW 

THBAD + 571.00 per neon, double 
occupancy, e melei you fa real ' 

New Tori. Nui tun 


_ vatoein 

a CSVTURT- 

Sreer. mvx. 10036. conv ei w J Ihe- 
atret. everything. 650 raotm wBh balh, 
TV. eir cannoning. Sfagiei $38. Re- 
serve now. 7ns a a deep* r 

sense. TeT@f 7i 

Telex. 42591 


FRANCE 


PAJOS-Wjm. DUMINY-VB«OOME 
•*«NK 79 roan* vwh both, ettere- 

ry rea ov rte d. In hwwt of Potb, dou 
daocardc / Tdbries. Crim & comfort 
Fran F360.2 rue Mart Thabar, Para 
tit Tefc 260 32 8a Thu 21349? F. 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 


PARS - Plaza MMbecui ***Mj!? 

Ave. £ Zota, 1-2-3 wt to, h* 
fcjtdwn, fridge. T* 577 72 00. 


GREAT BRITAIN 




WBi PIAZA HOTH, IO£ON- 

■Kwamgtan; best 


farbute** 


and plecsure. AI rearm bata / jfcf 
er /Tv / tetafatme / re* / 1*5 
xkymr. tec. Rroiaurort / bar / semi 


tedusve 


fax. 

Tefc 


68 Queen's Goto. Undo 
0)*DD6))1. Tfcu 916228. 




London SW7. 


T* 01 TO 4175. 


HOLLAND 

SAVE HOTa expenses. RertadAr* 

flat SI 30/ week, fame 




USA. 


BEDFORD HOIB New Y«ri Gty^ 
fatf40 St. MT, 10016 

abfa. Tefc 212-697- 


Imprime par Offprint, 73ruede FEvangile, 7 5018 Paris.