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The Global Newspape 

£<lued in Paris 
Printed SimuJtaaeouslv 
in Petris, London, 

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Kremlin 
Doubtful 
^On Talks 

Says £/.S. Team 
Is Hawkish on 
Space Defense 

By SetK Sdunemann 

Nem yirk Tunes Serrke 

MOSCOW — The Soviet press 
has described the disannamem ne- 
gotialois qipoinied by ftesidenl 
Ronald as ha^linm on 

Soviet-American relations who 
woold treat the new negotiations 
‘•skepticaHy.” 

Initia] commentaries carried 

Hk new U.S. anns n^tiator, 
^JVfax M. Kanqielniaii, is a sfc^ 
^Ideal optimist Page 2. 


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Sunday Tass, the official press 
ageoQf, rtierred to an artide whose 
co-aotiior was Max M. Ktuspel- 
man, the new chief American n^p- 
tiator. The article wiU appear in 
The New York Tunes htogazine 
next Sunday. 

The article. Tass said, “e xpi esse d 
serious doubt about the po^tdity 
of much progress at the t«)V< on 
anns control in the near future.** 
“ gumdiiian is a rta^ i fieh snp- 
poTierof the president’s known iiu- 
native in the Bdd of stintegic de- 
feme»”itsaid. 

Thri initiative, known by the ad* 
mbutratioa as the Strat^ic De- 
fense Initiative, is a researdi plan 
on space-tdated (Senses against 
mi&sdes. Slopping it has been Mos- 
cow’s mqm' interest in the new ne- 
Lgodations, announced eaiiier this 
vionth by Secreta^ of State 
George P. Shultz and iWeign Mi^ 
ister Andrd A. Gtomyiio. 

A week Mr. Grc»ay1a> said 
in a tdeviskm interview that Mos- 
cow would rgect any U.S. effort to 
sq>arale talks cm space weapons 
fr^ talks OD nud^ missDes, the 
dement d the jiew negotiations 
that is of aeater interest to Wash- 
ingtozL An Soviet cranmentades 
since then luive centered on the 
Soviet view that q»oe wct^KBis are 
a central component of the calks. 

. Tass said t^t Mr. Kampdnian. 
'inbisnxBgazineaibcfe,'ise3^^ 
iog ifae news Gppceed the 
Unioii, vriiich bdkves that Mr. 
Rttgan's initiative to create a 
large-scale system with onter- 
spaoe-based dements win be the 
canse of further instal^ty.” 

Tass described another member 
d the U.S. negotiating team, for- 
mer Senator Jdm G. Tower, as a 
cmiservative “stnngly advo- 
cates a buildap of U.S. military 

migtll ** 



Reagan Presses Plan 
For Space Defenses 
In Inaugural Address 


By Fred Farris 

latemauenel Herald Trdnaie 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan dedared in his in- 
anguial address Mond^ tiiat ttis 
research pn^ran to build a «hirid 
in space against nuclear n»«iie at- 
ladt **wo^ not militarize qwcff, 
but help itwiiiii Tariy^ ihe arsen^ 
of Earth.** 

With the coldest Inaoeuration 
Day on record forcing wmday*s 
ceremonies indoors and the trad- 
tiooal parade to be canceied, Mr. 
Reagan terfd about 1,000 invited 
guests and membets Cemgress 
under the great nnunda of the 


first term, among which be called 
the S(>viet UnUm *’tbe evfl emigre.’* 

On Monday be said of Soviet 

Union. **71iere are those who scenn 
our virion of human dignity and 
freedom.** 

The prerident noted that, smoe 
the b^mmng d the centuiy, “the 
numbff of draocrades m the 
world has grown fourfold. Today, 
human freedom is on the niarc^ 
and no more so than in our own 
bemisphereL** Freedom, he added, 
is “the world’s only hope to con- 
quer poverty and preserve peace.** 

Moitday’s inaugural address 
dealt mainly with 


UM hw hawMoMS 

President Ronald Reagan defiveriog his inaugural address at the Capitol Rotunda in Washington. 

America’s Mood Is Bright for 2d Term 


wounded in an assasrination at- 
tempt March 30. 1 98 1 . The poll h^ 
a margia d wmpWng error d plus 
or minus 3 percentage points. 

Richard R Wh thhn and Robert 
M. Teeter, tte poll takers for the 
president’s re-election i:ainipaig n 
said Mr. Reagan’s popularity was 
tied to his pmonnance in office, 


is going in the li^t direction out- 
number those holding the opposite 
opinion by 2-to-l. “If you go bad: 
to the laie 19^ tht^ numbers 
were reversed.** he said. 

Increased optintisin was appar- 
ent in the nespOTSCs to questions 
about the prospects for economic 
profperity and for the control of 


By Howdl Raines 

New Yoric Times Sernee 

WASHINGTON — The saiis- 
factimi of Americans with their 
country’s cooditioa and their <q)ti- 
ntisin about its totnre have dimbed 
m the hiebest levels in several ye^ 
as Presid^t Ronald Reagan begins 
his second leroL 
There attitudes are closely tied to 
Mr.Reag3n*spapulariQfacm(othe — ^ . _ _ . ... 

public’s strong ovaaHaijpioval of Evftn amnilff gmnpa that: h«vs» gsvan 
his perfonnance as presideiri, ao- cr r t9* . 

™^»NcwYo*Tm»=M 3 s Reagan liinited sopport, OTch as bkcks and the 

poor, there is a widespread feeling that the 

in the past, SD^ as blades and the # , «ii i_ * ^ .* j 

poor, is a wide^read fedittg lUtuTC Will D6 D6tteT tllflil tll6 pF6S6D.t> 

that the future wffl be better than 


the present, and these groups also 
rate the present mnch.moire pos^ 
ttvdy th^ they did early in bfr. 
Read’s fiist term. 

In a po& by tdqtiume of 1,534 
adnlts conducted fnmi Jan. 14 to 
17, 62 perceut approved d Mr. 
Reagan's handling of his job, wlnlc 
29 perrat dis^rovefL After four 
years in office and de^te a re- 
dection campaign in tdiidi his pol- 
icies were hardily critidzed, the 
pierident was very dose totlKti?- 
peicent aiprova] rating he attaizied 
in the period of hdghteaed pul^ 
support after he was seriouriy 


tbe rdbounding ecraomy and the 
fact that the United States is at 
peace. 

But they and other polling eat- 
pesrts also said the picsideni’s polit- 
ical standing was dosdy inter- 
twined with general trends toward 
optintism, increased trust in gov- 
ernment and growing nariftnal 
pride. 

“Americans are very optiimstic 
about the dit^on tte country is 
gpUlg," Mr. Wff thKn said, adfBng 
that people ate thinlf the country 


audear 'weapons, with about 4 cf 
10 Americans expecting inqirove ' 
meat in these areas. 

The pdl also found that with a 
magori^ of the public Mr. Reagan 
stin enjoyed a remarkable im mun i- 
9 from political blame. It made 
little difference whetiier the ce- 
spoodmts agreed with his policies, 
^ve him errat or blame for condi- 
tions, or hzA an accunte memoiy 
of his snccesses and failnres. 

In particular, when people were 
askenif Mr. Reagan “has cut feder- 


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EvsroE 


■ iofito Sdonea, a Philippines 
oppoaitiott leader, retnrned to 
lu commy vowing to unify (be 
anti-Marcos forces. 2. 


\Wi 


the Upitmi States 
withbolding tax. 


m 

ace a new 
Page3w 


■ Iba benfiu expeeb a limit- 
,ed agre eine n t to be reached ^ 
tire Buopean seenrify talks in 
Siockhdfan. PtigeS. 

■dtiiOMI Vrebumew refugees 
are tr a pp ed in Arian canqis 
with no relief in right Fi^ 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

B Oomtaental Ulrnois Corp.. 
a 1984 net loss of S1.09 
Page 9. 

SPORIS 

■Ibe San Fhuiciseo quarter- 
back, Joe Montana, was voted 

tire most valuable player Stt- 

perBowlXIX. Page 15. 


TOMORROW 

Tjrhny mrinns have loSt mUCh Of 

the vi g pf that mily a decade ago 
a dominant ele- 
ments in many Westeni Eiuo* 
pean countries. 



[had It— hiwmrfniMl ftiuMii 


TOUCHiK)WN! — Quarteiteck Joe Motttoim scoring a touebdown in leadmgtiie San 
p^andsco 49 eis to a 38-16 victoiT over die Miami Dolpluis in Super Bofri Xl£l^ 15 , 


al income taxes to any real extent*’ 
as he promised in 19%, c^y 28 
pocent said $es, wi^ 60 percent 
said na In lai^ Mr. Reagan s^ 
cured oongrebional approval for 
deep inomne tax cuts in 1981, 1982 
and 1983. 

In the 1984 carnprign, Mr. Rea- 
gan {Nomised that in his second 
term tax increases would be al- 
lowed only “ewer my dead body.** 
But the found that 75 peroent 
of those sorveyed expect Mr. Rea- 
gan to aric Cemgress U> ruse taxes 
in the next four years. 

The pc^'s inqor fmHiTig ; on 
puUic optimism came in a set of 
questiems in which people were 
asked to rate past, present and fu- 
ture conditkms (m a scale of 1 to 10, 
with I beiog die worst and 10 the 

' iLe.« w:.ie .ariations 

among groups, with Republicans 
tire most satisfied and optiimstic. 
and blacks registering the most 
mgative mood about present and 
fuflire conditioiis. 

Republicaas rated the present at 
an average of 6.71, while hlacks put 
it at 4.82. In assessing thdr expec- 
tatioitt for tire future, Rqiubticans 
put it at a very high 7.64, blacks al 
5.01. 

Democrats tend to have rosier 
riew of the past than Rqniblicaiis 
and to be lere optimistic about the 
future. One finding was that every 
group measured expected the fu- 
ture to be dearly better than the 
present, litis maots a return to an 
American attitude that had faded 
in poQs takai in the 1970s. 

The most iizqxirtant difTerences 
amoig giDiq» are that whites are 
hq)|na- abom the present and 
more hopeful about the future than 
are bla^: men are h^qner about 
present future than women, 
^though the differences are not as 
wide as they were in 1983; married 
people are happier than singles. 


a tiring nation once agam vibrant, 
robust, and alive.** he said. 

He said that his agenda fm* (he 
next four years indiute a freeze on 
federal spending next year, siinpli- 
fying the tax ^stem and diminat- 
ing economic barriers to tquri op- 
. portunity. 

On tire matter of arms n^(ia- 
tions, the preti^t said, “For the 
sake of eata dtild in eveiy comer of 
the gk^ we sedc, one day, the 
total einninatioD of nudear weap- 
ons from the face of the Earth.** 
He said the Soviet Unu» “Ires 
conducted the greatest mflitaiy 
buildi^ in tire history of man,” and 
the United States, in leqxmse, has 
*frnade pnre;^ m nstoring our de- 
fense ctqrebilify.” 

But, be said, he would seek in his 
second term to make huge defense 
efforts less necessary and is pursu- 
ing litis goal in ntgotiarionx with 
the Soviet Umcm. 

“We are not jim discu^g lim- 
its on any farther incFease of nude- 
ar weapons,” Mr. RiTO^ said. 
“We se^ inriead, to reduce them." 

“Is there any or moiatify m 

bdieriiig tiret, if one skle thrcatois 
(oldD tens of miDioiis (ti’ our peo- 
ple; oux mtiy lecQurse is to threaten 
tens d* nuBicns of tiu9r^ the pres^ 
idem asked. 

In a reference to his proposed 
Strati Defense Initiative, the 
president said his administration 
seeks “a far better way." 

“1 have apjjffoved a research pro- 
gram (o see if a seemify sfaidd can 
be devdoped that will dcstn^ nu- 
clear missiles before they reach 
(heir targeL Such a shield would 
not IdO people, but destroy weap- 
ons; -it would not ntilitarize q>aoe^ 
but help deimliiarize tire arseu^ 
of Earth,” he said. 

“Such a shield could render nu- 
dear weapens obsol^ So, we will 
meet with tire Soviets heming that 
we can agree on a fonmiia for rid- 
ding the worid of tire threat (ti nu- 
dear destruction.” 

Foreign kfinister Andrd A Gro- 
myko d the Soviet Union, after 
nreedng in Geireva early this nxreth 
with Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz, called the UR qnc^e- 
fense research “a plan of aggres- 
rion” and declared that Moscow 
was “resolutely against iL” 

Mr. Reuan’s references Mon- 
day (o tire Soviet Unioa were nuld 
in contrast to those be his 


- . — — r ^tic prob- . f-u 

iiol dome, “Our nation is pdsed for lems, and cmimmi«H few concrelft cl^ce to achieve the area 
greamea." pr(^>osals.Theq>edfK$(tihislra^ thisgs~t&beheToeswhoheal 

“We are creating a new Aiperica, lative program are in Mr. 

Rto^’s Stale of the Union mes- 
sage to Congress on Feb. 6. 

The president said be would send 
CoBgreis next month a budget 


“aimed at freezing government 
program spewfing for the next 
year.” 

“Beyond that, we must take fur- 
ther stqis to permanently contrd 
government’s power to tax and 
spend," he said. And he renewed 
lus call for a constitutioirel amend- 
ment requiriitg a balanced budget. 

“We must amplify our tax os- 
tein. make it more fair and bring 
tax rates down for aH who woric 
and earn, he said 
He said Ure nation must “move 
with new botdiiess, so every Ameri- 
can uho se^ work can find wmt; 
so the least aiDODg 0$ have an equal 
test 
our 

sick, feed the hungry, protect peaire 
among natioos, and leave t^ 
world a better place. 

“The time has come for a new 
iCoutiiuKd oo Page 2, CoL 5) 


Reagcai to Reduce Funds 
For Biomedical Research 


By Robert Pear 

New York Times 5erncr 

WASHINGTON — As part of 
tire s effort to leduce the 

Arfirit, Reagan admimstratioD offi- 
cials haw decided to reduce U.S. 
support for {timnedical reseaidi 
th^ year below the leinds intended 
by Congress, officials said 
Urey said that they had found a 
l^al way to firmt lesrarch speodbig 
to the amount pre^xosed by Pteri- 
dent Rrmald Reagan last Jfmuaiy, 
rather than the larger amount ap- 
proved by Cragress. The move, 
th^ said, apparently does not re- 
quire ^iproval lay Os^ress, ri- 
thoogh kgriatois could write a 
new, more ralidt law. 

lire official srid the adntiiustra- 
tion would reduce the r>‘rr^ d 
cooqxditive grants awarded 


bfliziDg effect” on bi omedical re- 
search and would “violate the 
intent (ti Congr^” 

Dr. Thomas J. Kennedy Ji., a' 
former official at the National b- 
stitutes d Health who now works 
at tire A^ocaatioa ^ American 
Medicri Colleges, s^ ‘Tire Office 
of Man^ement and Budget has 
outsmarted the Congress.” 

Dr. Sherman said the lactic was 
“utgiemQas” and “appears to be in- 
vulnerable to legal chaUengE;" al- 
thou^ res^chen are looking fix’ 
ways to chaUmge iL 
The adminis tratinn p lans tp (ate 
money intend for eme-year 
grants and use some (ti it fb ihi^ 
year grants. As a result, the money 
would cover cmly 5,000 awards. AU 
tire mQoey would be “(ti)ligated" in 
the current fiscal vea.% so, accord 


age d $140^ to $150,000 a year. 

Some researchers, told fonr 
weeks ago that they would proba- 
bly receive U.S. fimds, have been 
advised that such awards were un- 
likely or uncertain. The cutbacks 
would affect the full range of re- 
seard) siqqioiled by the nratfa in- 
stitutes, mdudbg the studies of 
cancer, heart disrase, arthiilis, im- 
munology, cell moiecolat 

genetics, neurolo^cal disorders 
and stroke. 

Dr. John F. Sherman, rice preri- 
dent of the Assodation of Ainai- 
can Medical Cdl^ge^ sak) tire cut- 
badcs ocenned al a time vriren “the 
promise of biomedical sdCDoes has 
never been greater, both for tire 
health of onr countiy and the rigor 
d our economy.” 

Di. David H. Gctiren, chaornren 
of the doartment of nemxtinology 
at the State University of New 
Yoik at Sumy &ook, said tire cait- 
baefcs would have “an acute desta- 


Nimeiri Says Jews Gm Leave Sudan 

But Elhiopkm Refugees Musi Not TmvdIHiecify to brad 

By Judith 

NewTOfk Tin 




s^- 




KyprUmou Wants U.S. to Help Revive Cyprus Talks 

• fQ de CuHIai’s contact and those prianou hopes that it will agam use thied of the island since 1974 and 

By Andriana loodbconou ^ gwemmaus to bring its h^uoice m efforts to resume the Turkish Cypriot insistence that 

Inumamoi Herald Tribune about a new meetiiig with Mr. the d i al o gue. Turk^belheguannta'tkafutuie 

UNITED NATIONS, New p^iKaah " the Cvpriot prerident The negotiations, under the aus- federal state. The Greek Qpriots 
Ytrt — neridoU Spyns Ky* [ticesctiMr.PTOdeCudlar.were rgeetTu^ as a guarantor, giving 

prisitoii of Cyprus said Monday pg^deOtellar said that he the first direct cratact between the the 1974 mvaskm as a reason. 

iW he hasL ariced IQ meet wim tp arraafte new talks ’Sf Greek and TUridsh rides siooe Mr. Kypiia^ said tim he ha^ 

Prerident Ronald Reagv b tte nosrible*^ by the end of February, and bad opened amid optimism set oo conditions for sgrBeing to 

hrMthatlTS mtffventiOD COtud ,r tha* ha hae that an aereement romM Hr niftfr Mr p wilrtach agam 

ed that “given the experience of the 
past few da^ the projects for 

suoMss would be better a we met 

^^^^whenbrurae^Tuf- the Greek and Turkish poritioos with an agreed list of items for 
Mr Kvnriaaou's discussions wedesnge^ rmally deadlock^ oo argu- disciisricm. 

Mtii ibni^Jenkiasb the wriioriai an^ ““«? *>wr the purpose of the Mr Drakiash on S^y rq^^ 

Cypriot leader, ended Sunday Peni^ ,nwari meeting. ed tire Febniaiy meeting suggested 

vtiSoul ameioent on unific^^ federal solutkm for Cy^ Before the procedural dispute by Pferez de Gito. 7I am not 

of the divM island or on a date a tnzooai iw*** cme^ imponam differences be- agaiirt meeting Mr. Kypnanouun- 

fornewtalks. . *”l&iain also asri«cd in arranging came apparent on the withdrawal der all or any dremnstanoes, but I 

“We are counting on Umtedl^ .uffiaw York talks, and Mr. Tty- of Turkish troops that have held a (Contimied on 2. 61L 4) 
lion s Secrelaiy-General Javier rc- me 


Miller 

Times Service 

KKARTOUH Sudan — Presi- 
dent Gaafar Nimeiii has declared 
that Fthifyian Jews and aO other 
refugees firing in Sudanese camps 
ate free to leave tire conntiy, pro- 
vided they do not go dire^ to 
Israel 

“If th^ come and tell me t^*re 
girii^ to Israel, I will not h^ them, 
bmose land kne^ that I am its 
eaeiOT,” Mrior General Nimeiri 
said ^day. 

T won’t hdp Israel by sending 
them more pecrele,” he said. “But if 
they go away from here — to Eu- 
rope, to tte United States, U> any- 
place else — 1 don’t care.” 

According to United Nations es- 
timates, there are more than a ndl- 
Uem rcfi^am in Sudan, nrest of 
them from Ethiopia, and 300,000 to 
400,000 are exptot^ to arrive in 
the next few months. 

Geseral Nimeiri said his gqveni- 
ment would not be involved in ar- 
rangements for the refugees’ dqsar- 
ture. If the United Stales or 
Eon^rean countries wished to help 
evacuate refugees from Sudan, he 



PKsideiit GaMar ^Gltle^ri 

Euk^ Boomding to idief wodt- 
ers. . 

General Nhneiii made his re- 
marks during a , two-and-a-h^- 
bour interview. It was the first time 


miniafn in bnd and tire Utiiied 
States. The Israeli authorities con- 
finned the existence of the flight* 
[In Jerusalan, a ^xtoman for 
Mme Kffnider Shimem Peres said 
Sunday that be would not comment 
on the aibsumce of General Ni- 
meufs remarks. Sinoe tire stitit of 
tbeairiiftafEllikqtiaaJewstoIsra- 
d, laadi officials have rrfiised to 
Higffiiee the iqxuted cooperation 
between bead and Sudan over the 
transfer of Ethiopian Jews to Israr 

Ibh^i wkiI U,S . off iwsiT* 
t hat IflOOfl kiniman Jetw have 
bem~takai to larad in rec^ 
in the last 


nMwii|igj _mdigine 3^ 

two mratbs, thrmi^ the'evacua- 
tioit ^ort known as Opetatioa 
Moses,. ■ " 

— Ask^ whether the United Stales 
would asrist Ethiopian refugees in 
tearing Swlan, Imm A. Ho^ 
the UR ambasadff in Kharttnin. 


priated Congress. 

An oWgatioo is a binding com- 
mitment to spend the UKHiey at 
some lata* time. 

In 1974, after several fights with 
Prerident Richard M. Nixon, Cni- 
mvss passed the Congresrional 
Budget and Impoundment Control 
Act This law restricts tire presi- 
dent’s abilify to dday or cancel the 
^rending of money ^rcnrbted 
Confess. To cut qread^ the 
president may ask Congress to re- 
sdttd, or caned, part of a prerious 
a p p r o pti atian, but the mon^ must 
be obfigated uriess Coupess votes 
to approve the request 
Adnnnistiation estimat- 
ed that the cuts would save $280 
m2lK» in the current fiscal year 
and at least ihai amount in eats of 
the noA two years. Omgress has 
uip^riated $5.1 InOion fev the 
National Institutes of H^th in the 
current fiscal year. 

■ Rdlonn of Tax System 

Bernard WeinnaA cf The New 
York Times r^ort^frm Wa^m$- 
fen: 

James A. Baker 3<^ the White 
House dtief of staff vmo is sched- 
uled to t^ over tire lYeasmy De- 
partment, said Sunday that be ex- 
pected President Reagan to - 
“embrace” the Treasmy’s plan to 
ovahaol the tax system after some 
revirions in the measure. 

At the same lime, Mr. Baker and 
Treasu^ Secretaiy Dcnald T. Re- 
gan said that a reduction of tire 
U.R bne^ defidi and a restiuo- 
turing of tire natioD’s tax syston 
were the centra] dMnestic priorities 
of the second Reagan administra- 
tion. 

Mr. Bakff and Mr. R^an, who 
win swap iobs in the next few 
wedts, made tireir comments in a 
televirioD interview show. 

Mr. Regan said ihm tte way to 
reduce the budget deficit was to 
“cut federal speuding — poiod.” 
Nothing dst^ to said, not even a tax 
inauase. Ure adznnustratian has 


Mr. 

would 


made it dear that be 
It any con^esrionri ef- 


III jlir 1 iimniMUlri ftn the neuks,] 


the possibilities. ”We 
r see what more can be done fw 
these peofid^” be said. . 

[In washhigton. tire State De^ 
partment HaH no inrmwrfi'ata com- 
meol 00 Gmeral Nimeiri's re- 


hope that U.S. inteivention conw Kvorianou said that he has that an agreement could be 

hdp persuade Ttaikidi to ^ masrine with Prerident reached. 

'^me reunification talo dot Bm discusrioos made no pro- 

.tiufoDowing the breakdown 01 hdped arrange last gross after imtial presenialioas of 


Hi^ CommissioDer for Rdugees. 
a Coieva-based agency. 

“If they want to do this, tbOT will 
have to £1 it alone,” be said. *%t I 
am not interested in kequi^ any 
refugees in my country. If all two 
million left, it would be good for 


Jews who have bea 
in Sudanese cao^ after 
Israel sumended its misrion to 
evacuate them £mn Etbit^ by 
bringii^ them to Sudan and tha to 

Iwad. 

An airlift of Etbic^ian Jews from 


Sudan. Fra* while they are here, we SudaDese_caiPPS that began Nov. 


must feed and protect them. 

. Fthiopian Jews have been bick- 
ling into Sudan for months and 
were taken 10 Israd on boats from 
Port Sudan and by plane through 


21 from Kharto um was saspended 
Ian. 0 alter me Bd^ charter 
oouqiany that was fl^g out the 
refD^ pulled out of the opeiatktt 
because d news reports about tire 


^ Washmgto n wy ld ceria^ fort to rednoe Ddtase 

Department botnet beytxid tire 
neaify $9 tHSkm in cuts iroroved 
by President Reagan because 
“that’s w^t the protideat wants 
me to do” 

Cutbacks, he indicated, will be 
proposed in Medicare, veteran 
beotots, state revBUie sharing and 
farm programs. These reductions, 
coupled with the Defense Depart- 
ment cut pnmosed the adnmns- 
tration, would result in a $50-bD- 
lion budget cut for fiscal 1986, 
which Starts next Oct 1. 

Mr. Baker’s comments Snnday 
woe tire first fxiNic acknowledg- 
menl that tire prerident was far 
. . ^ . mme enthusiastic about the Trea- 

miose food production airy*s plan than he initially 
(0»fiiiiiedQDPase2.CoL7) ed. ^ 


Nictiolas Monis, (he Khartoum 
representative of UN High 
Cmnnusskoer for Refugees, said 
his agency bdieved that re^e- 
ment was the least si^actory of 
the various solutions to the refugee 
problem. But tire agency *iias al- 
ways facilitated resettiauait,” he 
sai^ “and will continue to do so in 

cases where it u proven to be neces- 


I 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1985 


An And-Maroos Leader 


Returns to Philippines 
To Organize Opposition 


By Steve Lohr 

Nev York Tima Saviee 

MANILA — Jovito Sainny an 
oppositioa leader, returned Mon- 
day to tbe Ffailippioes after n^y 
four years of seU-esak in Unii- 
ed States. He vowed to woit to 
unify and strengthen the polidoi] 
rivals of PresideDt Ferdinand E 
Marcos. 

Cheered by supporters at Manila 
Airport Mr. Salonga said, *‘I wiO 
piua in and.do whatever I can to 
achieve that doished goal which 
the whole nation has bem yearaing 
to see a united, ind^endent 
vigMous opposition.” 

Mr. Salonga is the first mtyor 
oppodiion Hgure to return to the 
Philippines since Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr. came back Aug. 21. 
1^3, and was assassinated on tbe 
airport tarmac. A citizen’s pand 
oo^uded in October that Mr. 
Aquino was killed in a milit^ 
conspiracy involving senior offi- 
cers. 

Mr. Salonga's arrival was with- 
out inddeni, although he was jos- 
tled at the airport by well-wishers 
and journalists. 

“Tbe Uggest problem was to 
make sure u wasn't traiupled by 
tbe press,” said Aigandro Roces, a 
former cainnei secretary and ^ 
longa supporter. 

Lato'. about 400 demonstrators 
marched toward the presidential 
palace, protesting alh^ed human 
rights abuses by tbe militaiy. They 
were blocked by riot police and 
^spened peac^dly. 

Mr. Sal^p, 64, left tbe niilip- 
pines in 1981 to seek mescal treat- 
ment for iquries be had suffered in 
a political bombing a decade earii- 
er. However, the opposition leader 
himself had been cmarged by tbe 
government with sabverstoa for d- 
legedly organizing a series of 
bombii^ in 1979 and 1980. 

Tbe long-standing case against 
Mr. Salonga was dropped last 
week, after Mr. Marcos ordered a 
review. The mposition leader, who 
had consistentfy his in- 

nocenoe, said be fdt vindicated by 
tbe goyemmeot decision. He called 
tbe ruling ”the most authentic ad- 
mission that we were unjustly 
smeared and perseoited for four 
long years.” 

Salonga was prai^ Mon- 
day by opposition politicians as an 
elder statesman wbo might be able 
to tighten the ranks of the frag- 
ment^ (^positioiL Tbe former 
senator was one of tbe most out- 
spoken critics of the Marcos gov- 
eramenl during the martial law 
years from 1972 to 1981, vdien ^ 
sent was severdy curbed. 

“Saloi^ has the prestige, talent 
and credibilify to command the fol- 
lowing of many in trying to 
unify tbe oppositioa,” said Dios- 
dado Mac^ragaL a former piea- 
dent of the Fli&pptnes. 

Agapto Aquino, brother of tbe 
slain opposition leader, hailed Mr. 
Saloon’s return as a “boon for tbe 
opposttioo.” t ike Several others, he 
said Mr. Salonga would be anwog 
the opposition figures most quah- 
fied to run for the presidency m the 
next election, which is scheduled 
for 1987. 

Mr. Salonga did not indicate 


whether he was planning a presi- 
candidacy or just how he 
might woric to bring together the 
opposition, explaining chat he 
needed some time to “get the feel of 
tUn^ here again.” 

In Washington last week, Mr. 
Italone a told a gatlwiiiig of Univer- 
sity oTtbe Fhilqipines al umni that 
be did not cona^ hfmsdf to be 
“in the class” with Benigno 
Aquino, who, be added, “was a 
much more pnrfound threat to the 
Marcos regjixne.” 

That assessment is shared by 
politicians and foreigD diplomatSL 
Mr. Mtaxos's accommodating atii- 


nide is partly eiqilained by the fact 
that Mr. 


Salon^ is not widely 
viewed as a potential presideaL But 
gfyea siandizigwittaai the oppo- 
sition, be auy weQ play a medi- 

ating role, forming coaliiions 
among the various factions. 

In gener^ Mr. Salonga is a left- 
leaning nationalist- He has Called 
for the removal of two large U-S. 
military bases in the PUlip^nes, a 
review of tte role of multinational 
corporations in the country and a 
reoegotiatioD of the nation’s S2S.6 
billion in foreign debts. 



India Says an Agent 
Involved in Spy Case 
Has Left the Country 


WORI^rRS^IEFS 




5 Dropped From Syrian Directorate 

^ — Five hieh-ranking Syrians have been d 


% 


Sanjoy Hazadka 

few Yiirtt Tima Savice 

NEW DELHI — The Indian 
government said Monday that an 
“a^t of a foreign power” in- 
volved in a major spy scandal had 
left India. 

The home affairs minister, S.B. 
Chavan, who made the announce- 
ment to both houses of Parliament 
did not identify the diplomat or the 
foreign power involved. On Sunday 
night however, the Fieocb deputy 
militaty auadk was recalled to 
Paris. 

The French diplomat. Colonel 
Alain Bcrfley, has denied auc- 
tions that he was a spy or was 
connected to tbe U.S. Central In- 
teUigence Agioicy, as a local news- 


Mr. Chavan said he would not 
name the country involved, saving 
it could hurt nugning investigations 
and reiatiods with that nation. 

India is in tbe process of mod- 
ernizing its armed tottxs and is 
seeking to purchase billions of dol- 
lars in arms from a number of 
countries, including the Soviet 
Unioo, France, West Germany and 
Britain. 

The aU^ed spies, Mr. Chavan 
said, were “pasang on classified 
documents a^ reports to an Indi- 
an «^o, m turn, was transmitting 
them to an agent of a foreign power 
in New DdbL" 


nAHifAcrtN I Reuters! Five high-ranking Syrians luve beendisr 

Nasir ad-Din Nosir. the inienor mmister. and Ahmed Diab, the natund 

regional directorate is often *1 ‘?S“ 

polSrfi No reason was oven to tte The 

fij^tained their individual posts, at leart for 
The announcement was made at ^ 

Ba'alh party, the first m five years. Presidenl Halez ai Assao vias n- 

elected secreiary-gcoeial of the central committee. 


Bomb Hurts Lebanon Political Figure 


pqier bad rnented. French Em- 
aau have refused to 


General Hurt in Ambush 


Unidentified giinirwn ambushed 
and wounded Brigadier General 
Pediito de Gnzmin and five of his 
escorts Sunday ni^t near a r^on- 
al militaiy fae^uartexs on Minda- 
nao Island, the military said Mon- 
day 


Prime NRnister Bob Hawke of Australia, widi Jean- 
Marie Ijibaou, leado* of the Kanait oidqumdeiice move- 
moit in New Caledonia, at Aar meetb^ on Monday. 


Associated Press reported 
staouJary 


that the Phnippine Coostabuiaiy 
headquarters said General de Guz- 
man, 69. was hit in the 1^ and an 
arm. A PfaQqmine News Agency 
dispatch from Cagayan de Oro said 
he was out of danger after surgery. 

General de Guzmdn was tte 
highest military officer to be am- 
bu^ed once Mostem smaiatists 
luDed Brigadier General Teodulfo 
Natividao and 34 other officers 
and men on Jdo Island in October 
1977. Sundays attackers were be- 
lieved to be Communist guerrillas. 

■ OppoAioD Papa Remed 

An oppostiem newspaper that 
was shut down by the army two 
years ago returned to the news- 
stands Monday with an editorial 
referring to the country’s “ruthless 
and power-crazed dictatorship," 
accoidinR to The Associated Press. 

The ^preme Court ruled last 
month that the closure of the En- 
glisb-language tabloid. We Fonun, 
was ill^d and ordered the militaiy 


Government in Noumea 
AssaUs Mitterrand Visit 


WaMigtem Post Service 
NOUMEA, New Caledonia — 
The local government of this 
French overseas territory harshly 
denounced on Monday the 12-bour 
virit of Present Fraogt^ Mitter- 


rand as an attempt to “abure public 
r^inioo” on the issue indepen- 


dence for the islands. 


Independence-seeking Kanak 


natives gave tbe trm Saturday their 
waL 


to return the newspaper’s property. 

iher. Jos6 


But the eihior-publisE 
Burgos Jr„ said the paper's press 
had not yet been returned arid its 
offices were boarded up, so he is 
pubGshing the eight-page daily pa- 
per <m a ccMnmeFcial press. 

Mr. Burgos and nine members of 
his staff were jafled for eight days 
after the paper was dosed. Thw 
trial on subversion charges contin- 
ues. 

The editor has said he believes 
Mr. Marcos ordered We Forum 
shot down because of articles ques- 
tiooing the president’s war m«lals. 
Mr. Marcos, a guerrilla fighto' 
against the Japanese, was the most 
derated FQipino soldier in Worid 
WarIL 


hikew’ann approvi 

Tbe Feacti(»s. contained in com- 
munique issued by tbe recently 
elected territorial govemment of 
New Caledonia and the rival provi- 
sooal “government Kanaky,” 
proclaiined by Kanak militants, 
came in response to statements by 
Mr. Mitterrand upim bis return 
Sunday night to Fans. 

Mr. Mitterrand said he had suc- 
ceeded in avmding a rupture in 
talks on New Caledonia’s future, 
would call a parliamentary session 
to extend a state of anagency in 
tbe territoiy and would reinforce a 
French militafy base here. 

He ^)pealed to the territory’s 
rival groups to continue a “dia- 
logue” with the central goveni- 
ment, but did not discuss a plan for 
indqpendeQcem“assodation” vrith 
France, drawn 'up by his envoy in 


New Caiedooia, Edgard Pisani. 
of tnecc 


The president of the cmservative 
local govenunent, Dkk Ukeiwe, 
said Monday that “we are now con- 
vinced” that Mr. Mitterrand's 
is a new blow aimed at abusixig 


realities, Mr. Ukeiwe said, was a 
peaceful demonstration Saturday 
in the streets of Noumea by more 
than 30,000 pet^Ie, about <me-fifth 
of the pc^^nmi, “to proclaim 
their anacbment to France.” 

Scattered acts of violence contin- 
ued. The authorities reported Mon- 
day that vandals had burned seven 
trucks and caused other damage 
Sunday ni gh t at a nickel-mining 
CMiqilex near the eastern coastm 
vQla^trfThio. 

WhQe both supporters and op- 
ponents of indqiendence agreed 
that Mitterrand's trip was con- 
nected mainl y u,ith ttis domestic 
political proUems and contributed 
no inqxirtant new deanents to tbe 
search for a solution in New Cale- 
donia, the visit seemed to trigger a 
fresh round of travels by rival lead- 
ers and politidans 

Tbe he^ of the Kanak Socialist 
National Uberatioo Front, Jean- 
Marie IjibaGM, conferred Monday 
in Canberra mth Prime Mmister 
Bob Hawke and Forei^ Mmister 
Bill Hayden of Australia during a 
stopover on ins way to Franw to 
prennote the independence cause.' 

Mr. Ukeiwe announced he 
would Irave Tuesday for Fran^ 
vrith two ministers of his territorial 
govenunent to argue against inde- 
pendence. 


officii 

confirm or deny the rqiorts. 

Investigations have yidded a 
large number of clasafied and 
hi^y senative documents. Mr. 
Chavan said. 

“At the ingitfimrw of (he govern- 
ment of India, tbe agency of a for- 
dgo po^ involved in tms case has 
been withdrawn from our ooun- 
Liy," he said. 

The Indian govenuneni an- 
nounced that it was reviewing secu- 
rity procedures for handling of 
infmnation. Sixteen per- 
sons, including 1 2 government offi- 
cials, ^ve 0 ^ arrested in the 
passing of secret documents. 

Indian newspapers reported that 
tbe documents dedt wiui many of 
India's defense plans and internal 
security arrangements and that 
they included ^fidal position pa- 
pers on issues relating to Punjab. 
Pakistan and Sri i -•mifa 

Mr. Chavan not identify the 
government officials wbo have 
been ebar;^ in the case. 

Opposition members, dissatis- 
fied with Mr. Chavan's stalemenL 
pressed him for more details about 
the foreign agent But be declined 
to go further. Madbu Dandavate; 
tbe leader of the Janata Patty, told 
Mr. Chavan: “You are letting this 
diplomat off scot free.” 


Tbe Indian is believed u) be Coo- 
mai Nantin, a Delhi businessman 
who is among the 16 suspects and 
wbo, a neighbor said, frequently 
entertained government officials. 

Intelligence sources have said 
that tbe suspects, many of whom 
were persond ddes to senior oFTi- 
dals, met regularly at Mr. Narain's 
office trith secret documents. They 
said tbe p^)ers included India's 
prelected pl^ for armament pur- 
c hases and weapoiis s^lems and 
minules of cabinet meetings. 

These were then copied and the 
origjnals returned to the offices, tbe 
sources sdd. 

Sources said that Mr. Naraio ^ 
parently made the payoffs, which 
in some cases were meager sums 
supplemented by bottles of liquor. 
Tbe Times of India speculated that 
the suspects may teve even had 
access to “nuclear secrets.'* al- 
thou^ it did not substantiate its 
report 

At least four of the arrested per- 
sons are members of the prime 
minis ter's secretariat. The>' include 
an dde to a former senior adviser, 
two clerks and a messenger. 

A huddle Eastern diplomat who 
asked not to be named described 
Colonel BoUey, as "very quiet un- 

mmfniTnieariw and alfflOSL FUde.” 

He added: “He was often r^arded 
as the odd man out in diplomatic 
circles." 


BEIRUT(AP) Israel dismantled its Cnxit line at the Awah Ri^ 

on Monday, radio reports said that a car bomb in the occupW port 
of Sidon at least one person and wounded more than 30, mdnm iy 
a political leader who was the ^parent tara^ ' „ j j i 
%e blast went off in front of the home of Mustafa Sa^ le^ of the 
Popular Nasseriie Organization, fleirul radio repom said. grocq) is 
one of those expected to cont^ for control of Sidon after the Isradis 
complete the withdrawal of tbeif troops. 

The radio said that Mr. Saad, in his 30s. was in critical conditiaa and 
that his wife and a daughter also were iiyuted. The a ss a s sm at io a o£Mr. 
Saad's father. Maaronf, in 1975 was one of the events that led to the 
outbreak of dvfl war in Lebanon. 


U.S. Court Upholds Juror’s ExdusioB 


WASHINGTON (A^ — The U.S. Supreme Court made it easier 
Monday forjudges to exclude from capital punis hm ent cases pio^ioctive 
jun»s nto have reservations about toe death penalty 

By a vote of 7-2. the court rdnstated the death sentence in Florida d 
Johnny Paul Win. who was convicted of having killed a child. The conn 
overturned a U.S. a(^ieals court dedrion that inrahdaled Mr. Watt 
a potential juror had been disqualified from his trial ' 
Writing for the'eourt. Justice William H. Rdmqi^t said it was ne^ 
necessary to show with “unmistakable clanty” that a juror has “automat 
ic” oppositioa to the Heath penalty in order to exclude tbe pro^pecthe 
juror. 


British Millers, Coal Board Hold Talks 


LONDON (UPI) — Representatives of Britain's strfldng coal minecs 
and of the Nation^ Coal Board met for infonnal talks Monday, four 
months after their last negotiations broke down. 

Board officials would give no details on tiie talks. Labor analysts said 
tiiey believed they were “talks about talks.” and could lead to a resuiup- 
tioD of full nidations within a few days. 


The board said that 1.774 miners returned to work Mondaii^ It said 
more than 40 percem cS the country's mners — 76,000 out 1 sfjQOO — 


were at work, though the nnners’ union disputed the figu^ 

The meeting between Ned Smith, industrial relations dnef of the stale- 
owned National Co^ Board, and the miaers union general 
Peter Heaihfidd. was informal and resulted from an 
union, a coal board spokesman. 


Slain J oumalist Said to W ork for FBI 


■ Gtscard Opposes Plan 
Val6iy Gis^d d’Eslaing, the 
former French president, said 


public qpinkm." He added that it 
utterty f^ed to address “Caledo- 


Monday that hej^iposed indqiea- 
for ‘ 


nian realities.” 

Chief among New Caledonia’s 


deuce for New Caledonia, Reuters 
reported from Paris. 

“I shall support tbe ‘French solu- 
tion* for New Caledonia." he said. 


U.S. Arms Aide Is Skeptical Optimist 


By Francis X. Qines 

New York Tima Sertiee 

WASHINGTON — In turning 
to Max M. Kampehnu to head tbe 
arms negotiations with tbe Soviet 
Uoion. President Ronald Reagan 
has dioseo a Democrat with a 
utation for skepticism in bargain- 
ing with adversaries and for an ap- 
thai keeps Him bargaining. 

The 64-year-old lawyer, whose 
ideals and negotiating skills are 
rooted in eariy service with Hubert 
H. Hunqihrey, was a holdover from 
tbe Carter administration when he 
worked out a difficult agreemeni 
vtith the Rsisrians at the E^l-Wesi 
conference in Madrid in 1983, im- 
pressing tbe Reagan govemmenL 

His style as a negotiator was ex- 
emplified in (hat mission, in which 
he first managed a compromise on 




continuing violations of human 
rights. 

“Signannes on a docum ent d o 
not necessarily produce oonmli- 
apee with its provisions,” said Mr. 
Kampdman, characteristically 
ch Qfiiang a tone of realism. 

Tbe Russians rqpHed with a blis- 
tering on Mr. Kampelman. 
His respcMise took a longer view of 


Max M. Kampefanan 


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Singles $80-90 
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Suites $110-150 
Group rates and attractive 
monthly races available. 
Call Gen. Mgr. Tom O’Brien 
(212)475-4320 
Telex 668-755 
Cable GRAl^ARK 
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New Tbrk, NY. USA 10010 


optimisni. as he eiqilained why the 
United Stales signed tbe accord at 
a time of what be said were the 
worst Soviet human rights abuses 
in years. 

“It is because tbe pursuit of 
peace is too vital tbe need to un- 
derstanding too indiqiensable.” be 
said, to “penxut us to be discour- 
aged Ity the task or the obstacles we 
face.” 


dent's campaig n for president last 
year. 

“Max is a aum very careful with 
his words ond very sensitive to the 
people he is demin^ with,” said 
Arthur Lazarus Jr„ his law partner, 
whose ties go back to Mr. Kampd- 
man's roots in New York City. 
“He’s a very skilled negotiator who 
does his homework and rhinks 
about what be is doing and what he 
is saying.” 

Mr. Kampelman first came to 
Washington uiih Senator Hum- 
phrey, whom he served as legisla- 
tive counsel from 1949 to 1^5. 
Through subsequent decades in 
corporate law. banking, education, 
dvic activities, public broadcasting 
and occasional government senicr. 
he has become one of the capital’s 
respected elders. 

He has been a senior adviser to 
the U.S. delation to tbe United 
Nations and sen*es as chairmaTi of 
Freedom House, vice c^inirmnn of 
the Coalition for a Democratic Ma- 
jority. hoDoraiy vice chairman of 
tbe Anti-Defamation League and 
chairman of the national advisory 
committee of tbe American Jewish 
Cmunittee. 


Kyprumou 
Asks U.S. Aid 


His years of diCficuli private oe- 
goliations and blunt {wlic stat^ 
meats at Madrid made him a favor- 
ite erf the cmseivative R^ubiieans 
of the Reagan admimsiration. 
Tbw also noted that be had sac- 
cesaulfy assisted Edwin Meese 3d, 
the piendent’s oounsdor and aitor- 
ney general-desgnate. in a spedal 
prosecutor’s inquiiy last year into 
Mr. Meese's and official 

conduct 


Mr. Kampelman was bom in 
New Ywk in 1920. He was gradu- 
ated from NeA' York University' 
vrithaBAm I940andalawdegm 
in 194S. He was a consdeoU^ 
otgecuN' during World War II and 
spent most of the war as a volun- 
teer to a human experiment on the 
conditions of semi-starvation con- 
ducted at the Uaiversity' of Minne- 
sota. 


At the same time, Mr. Rampel- 
man has remained an active Demo- 
crat most recently serving as a for- 
eign policy adviser to another 


Humphrey prot6g6. Waller F. 
Mondale; m the former vice presi- 


IMVBtSITY 



SWMhEmMtenet 

flu may (juaMy 101 

DArHiiORS MASlERSORJlOClOeuE 

Send detailed resume 
tor a fme eveluMon 

maHc WESTERN uMVERsrry 

iihii E"«-ia mimmusa 


After the war, he earned a mas- 
ter’s degree and doctorate in politi- 
cal science at the University of 
Minnesota and became acti\*e to 
Mr. Humphrey at the municipsl 
level. In 1956, after serving in 
Wadiinmon with Soiator Hum- 
phrey. ne became partner and 
Washington director to the New 
Yorit-based bw firm of Fried, 
Frank, Harris, Shiiver & Kampel- 

man 


’The fatheihood of God presup- 
poses the brotherhood of man.” 
Mr. Kampelman has observed. 
“However defined, tins is a good 
guide for life's conduct,” 


Of the diffleuities of dealmg with 
the Russians, he has said, “We have 
to patiently, persisicntly. confi- 
dently keep lalking Mth ihcm.” 


iC o a tin ued from Page 1) 
am not committiiig myself to any 
date at this time,” Mr. Denktash 
said. 

After tbe talks broke off, Mr. 
Denktash and Mr. Kyprianou said 
that they had reedved contradic- 
toiy infonnation from the secre- 
tary-general on the purpose of the 
New York meeting. 

Mr. Denktash insisted that Mr. 
Pdez de Cuellar had told him that 
the suounil meeting had been ar- 
ranged to sign a document drafted 
in NovembCT. The document was 
the result of three months of indi- 
reci negotiations with the Greek 
Cypriots, listini 14 main points re- 
lating to establishing a federal re- 
public in Cyprus that would com- 
prise two zones. 

Tbe document, titled by the 
United Nations as both an “agen- 
da” and a “p weliminar y draft agr ee - 
ment” did not provi^ details on 
issues such as the guarantee for a 
settlement and the withdrawal of 
the Turkish occupation troops. 

”We have the assurances the 
secretary-general that we would 
not diange one comma, that the 
paper was there to be signed,” Mr. 
Denktash said. 

Mr. Kyprianou, however, mW 
that be had been “assured ^ tbe 
secretary-general and by many 
governments that we would have 
real . negotiations. There was no 
lake-it-or-leave-it documenL” 

He said he expected to have no 
trouble explaining the faOuie ^ the 
summit meeting at home. **I 
couldn’t sign a docuirat left 
blanks on issues such as guaran- 
tees,” Mr. Kyprianou said. “I 
would be asked vriiat I had rignivt 
and I wouldn't know.” 

According to well-informed 
sources close to tbe laikc. informal 
conversations among 
the two ddegations revealed »hRt 
the main differ enoes between the 
Gredc Cypriot and the TiirUsh 
Cypriot positions lie with tbe issues 
of tbe guarantee to a future C> 
pros state, and the ri^t of free 
movement, settlement, and proper- 
ty owneiship. 

Uw sources said that tbe issue (tf 

utx^ withdrawal upeated to be 

less of a problem anauiai (here had 
been mdications that Mr. Denk- 
lash wu prepared to compromise 
on a withdrawal 



NEW YORK (UPp — Henry Liu. a journalist who was slain outsid^. 
his home in Daly City, California, three nxxiihs ago after he wrotegF- 
criticial biography of President Chiang Qting-kuo of Taiwan, was an 
informant of the Federal Buieao of Investigation, according to a maga- 
zine rqrarL 

Quoting unnamed sources, Newswedc reptxted in its Jan. 28 edition, 
released Smday, that Mr. Liu gave tbe Federal Bureau of Investigation 
infonnaticH]i about Cbinese-Ameacans. 

Newswedc said the Nationalist |overamem of Taiwan has agreed to 
investi^te U.S. su^dons that T^anese ^ents were involved in Mr. 
Liu’s death after being told that the FBI possesses a tape implicating 
several of Taiwan’s intdligenoe officials. 


Bomb Viedm linked to Terror Groiq> 


STUTTGART (Reuters) ^ A man who was killed in a bomb explo^ 
at tbe West Gennan aeroqiace computer research center near Stuttgart 
and a woman who was injured had coonections with terrorist groups, the 
federal prosecuto's office in Karlsruhe said Monday. 

Secunty sources linked Johannes Thinune, 28, and Claudia Wanneis- 
dorfer, 23, to the far-left Red Army Faction. More than 20 bombing and 
arson attacks have swept West Germany since Dec. 4, when 30 jmled Red 


Aimy Faction suroects b^;an a hunger strike to press thdr ddnand that 
they all be kept in the same prison. Nfr.Tbimme was the first person todie 


in the attacks. 


Chinese Revolutionary Is Executed 




BEUING (NYT) — More than 17 years after it occurred, a brutal 
political murder prompted by the early excesses of the Cultural Retail- 
tion has resulted in the execution of a former official in the soulbern 
province of Kwangtung. 

The PeopIe^s iSuly, the Communist Party new^iaper, announced 


Monday ib^ Hmig Gtiiwea, 51, was put to death on Sunday in Kwsn^ 
chow. He was convicted in August of ifiiMng Peng nephew of one of 


the eaity heroes (rf the party, by cutting off his bead with a bamboo knife. 

, 1 ,- contended that tens of tbousands 


TTh AnaagiEdWen 

The president kissed his wife, Nancty, afta* tbe swearing-in. 


- — — - — ^ — ■■ ■ ■■! w a iTf U 

of people were persecuted during the leftist politicai turmoil from 1966 to 
19?6, there have been relativdy few announced exec 


related crimes. 


I executions for pcditicaliy 


Reagan’s Inaugnral Speech 
Stresses Space Defense Plan 


For the Record 


(Cominued frmn Page 1} 
American Emancipation — a great 
naiifmfli drive to tear down eco- 
nomic boniets and liberate the 
spirit of enterprise in (1 m most dis- 
tressed areas of our country." he 
said. 

In inspirational phrases sound- 
ing the themes of conservative 
philosophy, Mr. Reagan said ti^t 
“from new freedom will s[»ing new 
<^>portiinjties for growth, a more 
prMUCtive, fulfill^ and united 
pet^e, and a stroa^ America — 
an America that wiU lead tbe teeb- 
nolo^cai revohitkm, and also open 
its mind, heart, arid soul to the 
treasures of literature, ouiac and 
poetry, and the values of faith, 
and loVC.” 

In an answer to critics of his 
efforts to trim welfare spending, 
Mr. Reagan said that there is a 
plaro for the governnrat in “mat- 
ters of soi^ compassion.” 

“But our fundamental goals 
must be to reduce dependency and 
upgi^ tbe d^ty of those Mio 
are infirm or disadvantaged.” he 
smd. “And here, a growing econo- 
my and support £im fa^y and 
Gommututy offer our best chance 


rate stand on the West From of the 
U.S. Capitol before I40.()00 pet^Ie. 
But the temperatures at noon Mon- 
day, the of the swearing-in, 
was 7 degr^ Fahrenheii (minus 14 
d»ees centigrade). 

The cold prompted Mr. Rea- 
gan's dedrion Sunday night to 
move the ceremony into tbe Ctun- 
tol rotunda and cancel outdoor m- 
au^ual activities for the first time 
since Andrew Jadcson’s inaugura- 
tion in 1833. The ceremonies were 
televised nationally and carried 
abroad by satellite. 

Mr. Reagan, who at 73 is (he 


Four alleged leaders of the Spanish inrtran guerrilla group GRAPO were 
among 18 peo^ arrested in a seven-dtyptwee sweep over the we^nnd, 
an IntOTw Ministiy communique said Monday. The minisuy iHwuifigd 
Antonio Pedrero Donoso, who was arrested in Barcelona, as the groop'li 
leader and said he would be held responsible for several altadcs ctaarooM 
by GRAPO since May. fjfeuun) 

The oountdown be^ Monday at the Kennedy &ace Center at Cape 
Canaveral Honda, for the scheduled launch Wednesday of the space 
shuttle Discovery, which is to cany a U.S. Air Force spy satdiite tnio 
orbiL fupjf 


NimeiriSays Jews Can Leave 


oldest persra to serve as president, 
was sworn in the dtieijiistice of 


for a sod^ ndiere compasaon is 
the way of Ufe. where tiiie old and 


infirm are cared for, the young and. 

yes, the unborn protect^ and the 
rniffiminatft kxdtra after and made 
sdf-niffidedt.” 

The president called for an 
America “in which all of us — 
white and Mack, rich and poor, 
young r"H dd — wiD go forward 
toge£er, arm in am.” 

THe U.S. Cknstitution stqiulates 
that the term of the newly dected 
fffesid pit beans at noon on Jan. 
20 ^ and Mr. Reagan took the oadt 
office at that time in a White House 
ceremony attended by about 95 of- 
ficials and famUy members. 

Monday's inaugn^ ceremony 
was to have been hdd on an elabo- 


tbe United States, Warren £. Bur- 
ger. Moments earlier. Vice Presi- 
denl George Bush had been given 
the oath by Potter Siewarl a retir^ 
Supreme Court assodaie justice. 

Mr. Reagan rode to the Capitol 
in a motorcade al^ a nearly de- 
serted Pennsylvania Avenue, past 
empty bleacbers that would have 
held hundreds of thmitanrfs of 
spectators on a warmer day. 

Tbe largest group was a smaD 
band of anti-war demonstrators in 
front of tbe East Wing of the Na- 
tional Gallery of An. 

Flanked by Thomas P. O’Neill 
Jr., a Democrat of Massachusetts 
wbo is speaker of the House, and 
Senator Charles McC. Mathias, a 
Rqjublican of Maryland wbo is 
chairman of tbe coneressionai in- 
augural committee, Afr. Reagan 
walked through the of (he 
Capitol to the rotunda. 

No other presideat has been 
sworn in at tne Rotunda. In the 
early 19th century, before tbe oath- 
taking was moved outdoors, the 
House or Senate chamber was used 
for the ceremony. 

On Monday evening, the Rea* 
ns were to visit all nine of the 
vish inaugural balls being held in 
their honor. 


(CoBtiniied fnm Page 1) 
has been severely depressed by the 
drought in northern Africa, has ap- 
pealed for emogency aid to hdp 
house and feed the refugees. But 
experts say food aid has been insof- 
Gcieni and slow in reaching refugee 
camps in the eastern Sudan, as wdl 
as hungry Sudanese in the north- 
west and the Red Sea hills. 

General Nimeiri reiterated his 
government’s ailegation that Ethio- 
pia bad long permitted Jews to go 
to fsrael in exchange to weapons 
to fight insurgents in Eritrea and 
ngre provinces. Ethiopia has de- 
nied the all^ations. 

The presidail who spdte in En- 
giisb, also accused Erhiopia and 
labya of s h el t ering and arming Su- 
danese insurgents m the south, who 

have recentiy made successful noli- 

(ary strikes against Sudanese Army 

positicms. He acknowledged that 
the atuation in tbe smith was “very 
b^” but be vowed to fi^t on in 
what be termed an “active ddense” 


“cruel and unusual punishmeaL” 
But General Nimeiri said that the 
harsh punishment woiked as a de- 
terrent to crime. He urged the Unit- 
ed States and other Western coun- 
tries to atto>t similar punisbmenty. 

He defended the execution rf 
Mahinoud Mobfijsined T&hft, 3 76* 
year-<Hd moderate leader who was 
hanged Friday after being convict- 
^ of herety and provoking opposi* 
tira to the govemmenL Geoetrij^ 
Nud^ said the Koran prescriWr 
death as pimishmeat to herety. 

“Even presidents, kings arm snl- 
lans cannot change thal” he wiM- 

Genera] Ntmeiii was 
during the Interview and said he 
was in good health. He quoted fre- 
quently from a Koran th** be kept 
on his desk. He said he would go to 
the Unit^ States on March 1 for a 
private visit anrf a medical check- 
ijP< a nd be said be hoped to see 
Pr cadent Ronald Reaaan in Wadi- 
mgton. 


posture. 

He denied that his im po sition 
more than a year ago of Islamic law 
was uimqpular in the south, where 

inost of tbe peqrle are Christian or 

animisL 

'n>erehavBbeen50io55 ampu- 
tations of hands of convicted 
thieves since Islamic law was intn> 

duoed, he said. But there have been 

nmie since October because “there 
haven’t been any serious thefts 
since then." He said that “Khar- 
toum is the safest dtv in .^rica ” 
Ust June, the State Depanmeru 
denounced the amputations as 


■ ^ Airests Reported 
The authorities in Sudan arrest- 
lew 400 people as a securhyi 
pracauoOT before the hang in g M 
Mr. Taha, according to rroorts 
«^g Cairo on Monday. The 

Associated Press rqxirted 

repom quoted sources at 
UnK'ersity as saying 
thore arrested inninHi^ many 
student leaders linlft*^ to a aoap 
known as the Republican Brothers. 
Jhe group advocates a modem in- 
lerpreiaiion of Islam and opposes 
the way General Nimeiri bas unple- 
memed Islamic law. 




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Page 3 


< V 


A. Hickey, the archbishop of Washiiigtoii. kft, and ao aide, 
winds as th^ walked toward the Washington National CatbeM m 
S imday for a prayer service marking the second of President Rea^u. 

Arctic Storm Brings Record Lotvs to U.S. 


The ^ssoaated Preu 

^^JSiWGTON ~ areiie storni brought 
reooni cold lo dozens of diies in ihe easiem Mfor 
the United Slates on Monday, in the nation's 
opi|^ the parade celebraiing the inauguration of 
President Ronald Reagan was canceled, and lem- 
I j peratures below freezing in Florida ihrcaiened the 
' state’s citrus and vegetable crops. 

John Hendrickson, a forecaster in Indianapolis 
sauL “It would probably rank as one of the malor 
edd snaps (d the centuiy.'' 

Recora l<m temperatures for the date w*ere bro> 
ken or tied in at least 76 dues from Texas to New 
York state, with more than a dozen cities reporting 
their coldest day ever. 

Record lows were rootled on Monday in 
Gengia, Ahiiaina, Tennessee, West Virginia, 
PRmqdvania, Mississippi, Kentucky. \^fgjziia, 
Ltezisiaiia, Floida, the Carolinas and Maryland. 

IniernationaJ FaDs, Minnesota, reported witmt; 
34 dffirees Fahrenbdt (minus 36J ceodgradel 
Orleans, where it was 14 degrees Fahrenheit 
(mniiis 10 centigrade) overnight, was just tme 
gree warmer than Faiibmiks, Aladta. In Atlanta, 
temperatures fdl to 3 d^rees Fahrenheit 
(i^us 19 centigrade). 

In many places, the cold was accompanied be 


strong winds. The wind chill at )(£||. 

lucky, was pul at minus 60 degrees Fahrenheit 
(minus 5 1 cenugrade) and in Queago at miaus 80 
degrees Fahrenbdt (mnus 62 ceoiigr^]. The 
cold was accompanied by snow as far south as 
New Orleans and Jackson, Misassippi. 

Monday’s inaugural parade was at 

Preadem Reagan's reouest on Sunday because of 
the cold, snowy weainer. His inaugural address 
and a repetition of tus oath- taking were moved 
inside to the Capitd Rouioda. 

Temperatures as low as 9 degrees Fahrenheit 
(mious 12 centigrade) in Mflion, Fk^da, and 12 
degrees Fahrenheit (minus 1 1 centig’ade) in Talla- 
hassee <» Monday posed a miyor threat to the 
slate's citrus todusuy. 

Earl Wdls, an official of a citrus growers' orga- 
nizaiioD in central Florida, said the odd wave was 
much like the freeze in December 1983 in which 
120,000 acres of fniii-produdog trees were killed 
in Florida and growers lost an estimated $840 

millinn 

With about 75 perMt of tins year's dtnis crop 
still on the trees, he said, only groum in southeast- 
ern Florida have a chance of esof^g crap damage 
if temperatures do not rise before Wednesday. 


U.S. Subjects Foreigners to Withholding 


By Ruth Ryon 

Lot Aegria Ttma Semce 

LOS ANGELES — Under a 
change m UR tax law, people buy- 
ing property in the United Stater 
from nonre^ent fereigners are 
now required to aside 10 per- 
cent d the purchase ^ce for the 
Internal Rrnienue Service. 

An ameadmem to the Focago 
Invesunem in Real Propert y Tax 
Act that rook effect Jon. 1 says that 
if the 10 percent is not riihh^ the 
buyers a^ bit4cers are persoEudly 
liable to the IRS. An a^t's liabQ- 
iiy is limited to bis or her commis- 
ston. The buyer would be required 
10 pay the tax owed and interest OS 
the tax. 

The new amendment “puts the 
fmrigd investor on a pamy with 
the domestic investor, “ said Rich- 
ard F. Davis, an attorney who is a 
partner in tte estate depart- 
ment of Mernel. JaoriK. Piemo Jt- 
Gersh. He said thm “if you and I 
went 10 the same forago countries 
and were able to buy and sell real 
property there, they wendd tax us. 
Thm is DO redproaty.** 

Mr. Davis did not foresee any 


The Msoa f« iht aamdromi 
rea property being sold. was to “amplify the proecdufe.’’ 

t^ iheutle through ^ublees- IRS's public affaiis^w in Los 

crows, straw men or other . _ . . . . - - 

as a way to conceal owae^p hy 
forei^ penoQs, will be consinied 
as tax evasion by the Internal Reve- 
nue Service. 

If the C3^ portion of the pur- 
chase price to be pa^ before the 
escrow accoont is ctosed is not 
large enough to cove- the 10 per- 
cent. the buyer must stiU wiihbild 
the full 10 percent unless the sdln 
(Status from the LRS a “qualif\'ing 
statemeat'' pennhiing some other 
withholding arrang emMit 

The only type of real ptopetty 
that is exonpt from the withhold- 
ing tax is residential propeny baiN 
ing a price not greater than 
$300,000 and purchased by the 
buyer for use as the buyer’s resi- 
dence. 


Angela Previously, she said, there 
were “invoh'ed reporting reqnire- 
meats.” 

Mr. Davis said. ‘"Tlie require- 
m e ot s were confusutg and tb^ 
were difficult to enforce. It was 
difncnlt 10 convince owners to 
make aD of the mdaiions re- 
quired.'' 

In an aitide in a trade rablica- 
don, Mr. Davis said that the For- 
eign Investment in Riml Property 
Tax .Act was origmaljy conceived to 
“ranove the preexistiog exemption 
from UR taxation of any gain on 


there were ways to “gei around 
these requiranents.” 

“These are very conqilicated and 

would only be ^ilicahle in certain 
cases,” be added. 

Essentially, the difference befoK 
the aniendoient and now, he said, is 
that “people were structuring deals 
toavoid tax. Now th^arestrnctur- 
ing to iwlnittwT^ tax.” 

Besides the withholdiDg provi- 
aon, the amendment also overrides 
treaties with foreign governments 
aBowittg fmeagneis to avdd 
c^tal g^« taxes on real proper^ 
in the IJnit^ States when the pn^ 
erty is sold. 

“So there is no advantage in 


irom yjt. laxanon of any gam on boidin- g propeny ihrongfi the 

Neiheriands Antite or tmoiher 
foreign enti^ exc^t with income- 


wax previously available to foreign 
invesUvs bnt rat to domestic inves- 
tors.” 

However, he said in an interview, treaty bendQts,' 


producing {ntmerties, because the 
income ma^stifl be sulgect to some 
Mr. Daris said. 


Temions Raised Anew in El Salvador 

MnrdeTs, Tnfighring Overshadow Assembly flampaign 

menl tn die Umted States as a Tt- ^ o 


suit of the amerKlffleoL 

“We are one of the few countria 
where a ftmigaer can walk in and 
buy real estate, and there is a tow 
political risk here and a stable 
ecoD<xny.“ he said. “The benefits 
outweigh the deirimmt irf paying 
the same tax that the dlizens here 
have to pay.” 

The amendment provides that 
eve^ buyer of real estate in the 
United States must wiihhold 10 
percat of the sale price, except in 
two instances. These are if an ex- 
emplion is obtained from the Inter- 
nal Revenue Service in advance, or 
the buyer obtains an affidavit exe- 
cuted by the seller under penalty of 
perjury stating that the seller is not 
a foreigner. If a properly is co- 
owned, ev^ co-owzrer must sign 
an affidavit to exempt his or her 
interest from the witlmolding tax. 

The amendment also requires 
that buyers and agents iovol\^ in 
a sale should conduct an investiga- 
tioi lo deiermine that selling par- 
ties who sign affidavits as noofor- 


frozen Piccolos, Protesters Fail to Stop the Show 


Ctm^Hlad Iff 0» Suff Fnm Dispmeiia 

WASHINGTON How cold 
was it? 

U was so ookl that when the <Mm 
A. WOsem Sdiod March 
Band from Hadenda Hd^its, CaS- 
fomia, assembled Saturday lo 

{NAUGURAL NOTEBOOK 


doubly 


practice the “Purple Carnival 
March” then’ instrument valves 
&COS shut The band was to have 
led the inangoial parade, whiefa 
wascaneded. 

President Ronald Reagan and 
bis wife, Nancy, agr^ to meet 
with all parade partidpanu at the 
C^tid Centre coliseum just out- 
side Washington Mond^ after- 
noon, where the Reagans would 
thanV diwn for thcxT effOTta 
The csncdlatioo may bve been 
for the day 
/eepingWa- 
Sdiod in Ndvadta. For 
the past two wedcs, (he band's 38 
meoubers had maidied d^ in 
sahfieezing weather to prepare for 
their appearance. (lAI) 

n 

A warmer atmoqAere prevailed 
Saturday aftenuxm at Blmr House, 
where the Reagans awwidiyi g pri- 
vate hmeh with dose ffiends bom 
California, and at the preadeot’s 
inaugoral gaht at die D.C. Conven- 
tk» Center Saturday rtight, where 
12,000 guests atteoded a tdevised 
salnte to the piesitoL 

Frank Snmra was the host of a 
two-hoor show featnring Chad ion 
flestod, Jhnmy Stewart, Mikhail 
Baryshnikov, the Beach Boys. 
Oystal Gale, Lou Rawls and Don 
^Jtiddes, a comedian. 

^ Mr. Reagan waited imtO after a 
Ray. Charies Rsdition of “America 
the Beantifor to express bis 8{^>re- 


datioL He closed the evening by 
redting the words lo “America.” 
(lAT, UFI) 

□ 

Saturday’s presidential galii had 
something dsc, coo — pickets. 

A handful of demonstrators 
fnm an animal rights group mgr 
early arrivals with placards protest- 
ing the fiir coots that many of the 
wranen gu^ wore. 

Susan Ridi. a member of Peqple 
for the Ethkad lYealment of Ani- 
mals, said the group dedded to 
denaonstrate u the preddeatioi 
party after heaiug that Mrs. Rea- 
gan planned to wear a fur coat to 
the maugural ceRsnonies. 


A security official at the cooven- 
tioD center qdddy moved the pro- 
testers away from' the oomptEx’s 
nuun entrance. Pdioe did osA re- 
port any arrests. 

Also on Saonday, the Reverend 
Jesse L Jackson led about 700 
marchers past the White Hoose to 
the Washington Mmiument to pro- 
test imetqilqymeat and pover^- 
amid the s^etidor and gaiety of the 
festivities, which are cqiected to 
cost $123 miHion. 

'’We ate here to ranind the ad- 
norustratkni that all is not wdl in 
this land of ours,” Mr. Jackson 
said, pointing out that six millioa 
more people have faOea below the 


poverty line since 1980. **It*t not aQ 
private airplanes and limouanes,” 
he said. (WP. UTf 

O 

As smooth as the festivities have 
sooned, tte 5G^ presidential ioau- 
gniation has had a few snafus, the 
most notable cooce n u 'n g llie distri- 
bution of ddmts to eveots. 

Apparently the cornputer han- 
dling the distributioo of tickets for 
the galas and the swearing-in shut 
down for a few days, bm orders for 
tickets were still tal^. So. when 
some of the Reagans’ closest 
(deads went to pick up their ti^- 
ets, they woe given envelopes that 
.did not conUin anything. (N^ 



The cerfd kept Presideiit Reagan and bis audienoe inside ratfaer than outside the Capitol. 


Sources of Cosmic Rays Identified 

B,W,Ic=rSuIli«n 

New Yeris Times Serriee ing it to he a sQUTce crf extremely tbus, never reach Earth. 

NEW YORK — Asironomen eSreetic eanmia rays. Cosmic ray particles, on the oib- 

a dnaxm Md the ongm of ampenion star. 


ongm 

has one of the most 

protbimd mysteries of tk universe. 

One soof ce^ Cygmis X-3, a two- 
Btar qrstem to lie on the 

ads fringes the M£Uty Way, has 
been found to produce so much of 
a^bese hig)i-awiw particles that it 
tthild acoMmt m the galaxy's en- 
^imrinctioo of aich 
A anmiwr o[ sdentists who at- 
taided a meeting of the American 
As tBMftwtifftti Sode^ last week in 
Tqcsqq, AiizoBa, say the discover- 
ies are a landmark in astrophysics. 

Cosmic rays iwtwde the most 
.powetful ftrin oi radialioi) knoM 
to sejeaea In toooe, th^ consst 
prinu^ of hi gh -eiysgy protons, 
oodd of hydrogen atoms. When 
thqr stfflrff the atmo^here they 
^Boaate dicniers of secondary par* 
bdes that reach Earth. 

The hdirf that alary portion of 
^an nrigimiu* jn Cygpus X-3 is 

AUTHORS WANTEO 
BY M Y PUBLISHER 

^*wSrtg abidv beeii puhUwr we*® '«’*■ 
fieiioi*. PS 

vlww i ed Send w 

•fe?Ue’P«U,516W 34lhSl..NBwYefI.NY 

IQ0C» USA 


InteracticHis between the two ap- 
parentiy ad as a particle ^ 

celerator of rimost unbelievable tf- 

ficaeDcy. 

This great slcllai aj^erator geo- 
erates g*"«Tiia rays with energies as 
great as 10 tiuQioo bilHon electron 
^is. This is 10 million tiroes tlte 
cDsssf nchievad by the world's 
most powerful atcan smasher, at 
Fennilab near Chicago. 

q a pnnui rays are the most ener- 
getic form of electromagnetic 
waves and exist at the top of the 
xaam that includes lieu waves, 
^en rays hit the Earth's 


Although the nature and oi^ 

crf cosnne rays are of great sdenmc 
interest, no one has figured out a 
way to convert tbar exiergy into 
us^le fcMm. And sdentists at the 
Asiroaomical Society meeting 
ppintfci out that much remained to 
be learned about how the partides 
are acceierauxL 

Other andidatfff (or cosmic ray 
productKHi indude a perplexing 
object, Gemtoga, whidi been 
recoil in X-rays and gamma rays 
but not in radio waves, as well as 
the pulsar systems known as Ifo- 
ciiles .Y-I and Vela X-1. AH are far 
out in the Milky Way. 


By Edward Cody 

(4 tnXifigton Pan Smicr 

SAN SALV.aDOR — An out- 
break of poHtieally rdaied murders 
and biller partisan in fighting has 
raised lenaons at ihe opening of El 
Salvador's two-month legislative 
election gampaigw 
The aimoqrfiere has sharpened 
basic pditical dividoos between 
Presidat Jote Napqleto Duarte 
and his rightist opposition, i^tiiwg 
to predictions last week from bds 
aida and mediators from the Ro- 
mra Catholic Church that the nexi 
round of talks with leftist gueniUa 
leaders may have to be delayed 
pending the legislative assembly 
vote. 

One fear among political obseiv- 
^ and some of Mr. Dnaite's aides 
is that ihe recent assas&nations in 
provincial towns and the dimate of 
political ct^coniaiiosi m the Con- 
stituent Assembly could oystallize 
doubts in the aitned forces about 
the president's efforts for Hialnpy. 
with the reheis. 

Publidy, the mflita^, under De- 
fense Mister Ctflos Eugenio 
Vides C^asanova. has Mr. 

Duarte's attenqjt on the condition 
that he adboc to the constitution 
drawn up over t^ last two yean by 
an asBonbly dontinated by the 
rigbL But some (rffkos have voiced 
reservations about the wisdom of 
talking with the rebels at a time 
when the ar^ gnemg to have the 
initiative militarify. 

Monjognor Gn^om Rosa Qii 
vez. the aiudhaiy bisbap of San 
Salvador, who is involved in media- 
tion effots, tropeared to be refer- 
ring to this whm he said Sunday 
that^rintenuJ conflicts within the 
goyernment" have dimmed 
chmees for an early third round of 
talks with the rebm. 

As a resuU, dialogue with the 
rebels appeaitd to hm faded as a 
political seliing point for Mr. 
Duarte's Christian Democntic 
Pa^ by the time tbe dection cam- 
paign for mayors and assembly 
members opeo^ Tborsday. In ad- 
dition, ri^tist critidsm of theooo^ 
tacts ^peared to gain nKnDcntnin. 

Agamst backnound. three 
municipal officials 01 tbe two main 
rightist partis tbe Nationalist Re- 
'pubOcao Alliance and the National 
Condliation ftri^, were killed in 
tbe two weeks Imiding op to tbe 
start of the campajgn. A fourth was 
killed Friday. 

Altboi^ the authorities have 
not founo the killas. the assasana- 
boos have coniribui^ to thepoUti- 
caJ acrimony. In additioa, the sec^ 
relajy-graerri of an a^iculturai 
association linked with the Oiris- 
tian Democrats was wounded in an 
apparent assassination attempt 
Jan. 14. One of Mr. Duartes aid^ 
P«iro Rene Yanes. was lolled Jan. 

6 by a Natioiujisi Rmbticaa Mli- 
ance member with wtiom be had a 
long political rivalry. 

“This is a produa of tbe coltme 
of tenor,” Duarte said then. 
"There is in people's ntinds a per- 
maneui halr^ a qurit of terror- 
ism, of death. TIj^ beheve ibey can 

Chartered Aircraft Dating and Ifitlin^ " 

Meanwbil^ Kfr. Duarte has be- 
come embroiled in a coDstitutional 
dispute m the assen^ hu led 
some rightist political leaders to 
dwnand postpcmcment of tbe de^ 
tions, DOW set for March 17. Tbe 
cmfroniatiOD has gone before tbe 
Supreme Coi^ and it is not known 
when a dedsion wiD be made. 

Tbe clash involves Mr. Duarte's 
veto of two sections of an dectoral 
code passed over his olyections ^ 
the assembly. One section woi^ 
have prevented his s(s. Al^andro, 
from running for le-decumt as 
mayor of San Salvador. Hie other 
would allow the Nationalist Re- 
publican Alliance and the Natimal 
CoodliationPartyionmasacoali- 
DOD but with ibeif candidates listed 
s^»rately on the balloL 
This, the Christian Democrats 
cos tended, trotild give them an un- 
fair advantage with the often illiter- 
ate voters who vote by chraxing 
party symbols, not Daine&. 


Crashes in Nevada 

The AsnxufeJ Frets 

RENO. Nevada — A chartered 
Lockheed Eiectn (urb^rop re- 
turning to Minneapolis after a 
gambling junket to Reno crashed 
and burned shortly after tokeofl 
here early Mrmday, killing all but 
three persons aboard, (he authori- 
ties s»d. 

An airpert qrokesmao sa/d the 
plane was chartered to carry 68 
passengers and six crew members, 
but it was not known if evoyooe 
bad actually boarded The aircraft 
crashed m a field about two mles 
(3.2 kilometers) from the airpoa 

Tbe pilot of Galaxy Aslhus 
Flight had reported plane vi- 
bration during ixkeotT and wam^ 
to return to tu atipcKi, said a Fed- 
eral Aviation Adminislrsiioo 
spoltesmas is Washington. A sber- 
ifr$ dauty said the plane was on 
fire before the crash. 


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No Fonnal VS. Dedston 
Presadtatt Ronald Reagan's na- 
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that the administration had not 
formally decided to seek aririirirmal 
military and economic aid for El 


Salvador this year. The New York 
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Page 4 


TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1985 


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P^UmI Widi Hir l\nr YoA HmeN and Hir Vadnug^toa PkM 


Reagan and the Experts 


The »nan wbo raised his hand Sunday to be 
sworn in again as president has defied many 
odds. He has defied age, an assassin's bullets 
and the vicissitudes of office (o win a second 
ienn by an unprecedented margin, drawn from 
'almost ail sUca of the electorate. And be has 
prepared for t^ new term the same way he 
conducted the one just completed: by confi> 
dently defying the experts. 

Ronald Reagan does not have a detailed 
grasp of the nuyor issues of his presidency, 
inriiirfin^ «wmnfnir theory and nuclear strate- 
gy. But instead of firmly rel^g on authorities, 
be firmly ignores them. Hewing to his cm 
path for four years, he has bro^t into view 
two great goais; sie^y economic growth with- 
out inflation and a broadly based ^reement 
wi^ the Soviet Union to restrain aucliur aims. 
Siould he achieve both in the term be now 
h^ns. his president^ wiU be a triumpL 

Mr. Rsa^ h^ peiststemly reyecied the 
warnings of mainstream economists that he 
must reduce the deficit, alietber by raising 
taxes or cutting spending. Instead, he has cut 
tnr«»!e and furthcT enlarged the deficit by 
spending nmre on the miutaiy. So far he has 
avoided being proved wrong. The Anwiican 
economy is domg fine because Mr. Reagan's 
tax cuts and defense spending have stimulated 
growth in traditional Keyneaan fashion. 

The dangers t^t the economists warned of 
are but their arrival has been unexpected- 
ly d^y^ Foreign captal has poured in to 
finance the defidi and the persisting strength 
of the doDar and demand from Europe 
have kq>t imported raw materials cheap, hdp- 
ing the Federal Reserve Board bold down 
ir^tiOD. These are short-term palliadves: 
Eventually, the United States must pay for the 
accumulated deficit and huge foro^ borrow^ 


ing with infladon or a reduced standard of 
living. But t^ could conceivably last long 
enough to spread the pain of the eventual 
payment to tolerable lewis. 

Mr. Reagan has been just as bold in defense 
by fiouting prevaiUng msdom. He announced 
a missile defense program of the kind conven- 
tionally jud^ as destabilizing, and has re- 
mained unmoved by ^ broad consensus 
among strat^c experts that his “star wars" 
notion cannot guaiutee protection. 

Yet concern about a space-based defense 
^tem appears to have contributed to the 
Soviet de^on to resume arms talks. Whatev- 
er its practicability, perhaps the Russians see 
the program as a race tb^ must enter, on 
unfavoc^ie terms. Mr. Reagan failed to inake 
process in resuainu^ nucU^ arms duriiig his 
first term. If in the second be obtains an 
agreement, "star wars" may turn out to have 
been an important card in his hand. 

economic experts whom Mr. Reagan 
imores are ri^t in ibe Irxig run. and the 
wense expots ate li^t in detaiL The world 
economy could crash, and the U.S. economy 
slide baa into stagnation. Unless be achieves 
a bender arms agreement than any of his prede- 
cessors, Mr. Reagan wili have committ^ the 
superpowers to a new phase of the arms race, 
more costly and uncontainable than ever. 

By igoanng his exp^ Mr. Reagan has 
created wider posribilities. Does he trust his 
vision over tbor narrower teduiical insights? 
Or is he merely following the vaities of a 
strong defense and a free market with a minl- 
mum of government manipulation? Wheito 
his presidency is now beaded for triumph or 
disaster, the pilots have been cast ai^t, and 
Mr. Reagan rione has set his course. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 



Someihii^ excit^ is t^rpeoii^ at the 
Peace Corps. A m^or recniitmeot effort was 
launched receotiy in response to food riiort- 
ages in Africa, and tin response has been 
dramatic. The agency usually receives about 
160,000 inquiries a year from proq)ective vol- 
unteers; now. more than a thou^d calls a day 
are coming in. This is an especi^y inqyressive 
response because only those with agricultural 
and relaled slrills are bong sought 

Peace Corps volunteers are now woriung in 
24 African countries, but not in Echio[na, 
whose Marxist government asked them to 
leave in 1977. Famine is a pittblem in many of 
these natitms, and about half of (he 2 J 00 
volunteers on the continent are already worir- 
ing directly in a^culiure. But that is not 
enough, and Wastungton has received quests 
for 600 additional volunteeis to begin work 
this spring and summer. Loret Ruppe, the 
Peace Corps director, launched an appeal for 
volunteers of all ages with work expoience or 
degrees in ^culture, forestry, biology, health 
nuiritioo, mechanics and water systems. 

Many of those who have called Peace Oxps 


headquartos are older than the avoage votim- 
teer. One n»an , a 5S-year-old fanner, is willmg 
to leave his farm in the care of his sons for two 
yean. Another caller ofleed a different skilL 
**I'm not a farmer." he said. **but Pm a diesel 
meehanic; and I can rqtair tractors.*’ These are 
just the kind at people the Peace Corps needs 
in Africa, not only in the inuneefiate future, but 
for a long-range prtgect undertaken with the 
U.S. Agency for Iniernatioiial Devdopment to 
improve agricultural production. 

The American response to the human trage- 
dy of famine has remarkable. Not only 
h^ the U.S. government taken a lead in pro- 
vidiag a«i«ranfi», but individual Americans ul 
every part of the countiy have acted as weR In 
a two-month period at the end of last year, 
privaie volunt^ orgamutions received mote 
than $60 ni»n?nn in individual coniributkns 
for Ethi(^)ia. The thousands who called the 
Peace Corps last week are wQling to ^ve even 
more ~ their time, ifadr ene^. themselves. 
They want to make a difference in the lives ol 
people all over Africa, and th^ ml). 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


No Love Lost on 'Star Wara’ 

The Americans have to reckon mth (he fact 
that Europeans, governments as well as peo- 
ple, are much less enamored of the Star Wars 
project For if, for the sake of argument the 
Strat^ Defense Initiative can be made to 
woik. it both seriously prgudices the plausibil- 
ity a British Trident system and leaves 
Europe ejposed to low-flying cruise missiles. 

And if it doesn't work, the costly attempt to 
build h leads to an arms race in a new dmwn - 
dOD wUeb finds Europe in the middle, vulner- 
able at a time of insecurity between the super- 
powers. In theory, the SDl is still an infant that 
can be strayed at birth. In practice, there is 
enou^ divirion of expert opinion about its 
prospects to encourage Mr. Reagan to nurture 
it. It be a year or more before ibe U.S. 
feasibility reports are in. Perhaps that is when 
the talks wilJ begin in earnest 

— The Guardian (London). 

1945: A Du^ Id Remember 

Ihere is a strong case for recallmg. periodi- 
cally, soberly and somberly, the war that end- 
ed in 194S. That case does not rest on pride or 
lusstalgia; nor on the obligation to honor the 
victims of war. Primarily, it tests on the duty to 
prevent obhterauon of tte past This is a doty 
Ibai the present owes to the future —as will be 
qjpredated by those who, last year, read or re- 
ce^ George Orwell's 

Today many West Germans and Japanese 


are able and widing to acknowledge that 194S 
brought their countries not only defeat but 
also a liberation from tyrannical masters who 
had marched them into caiaslropfae: a libera- 
tion that gave them their present freedoms. If 
some of them still seek to deny this, so much 
stronger is the case for poiodic rcimnders of 
the events that climaxed 40 years ago. 

Today most Russians are allow^ to hear 
only (he version of those events given by their 
country’s official information monopoly, in 
that Iqirided version some afreets of the 1939- 
4S war are dishonestly belittled — for exam- 
ple. the struggles in the .Atlantic, in Africa and 
in Italy. These distortions shoidd not be ulu- 
lated in Britain or in other Western ooumries. 
Tlie whole truth needs telling. 

— The Economist (London). 

flTie idea of] celebrating the Uberatioo from 
Hitler’s yoke once again as if there were noth- 
ing more urgent to do is questionable. But let 
the Americans celebrate together with the 
Russians. We can look on, as we did in Nor- 
mandy. without getting emotional 

— Rudolf .4 ugsrern 
in Der Spiegel (Hamburgl 

A few months remain to ensure that May S. 
1985, will not later be remembered as a day of 
embarrassment and bad taste. If a wonhy 
ceremony cannot be built out of ibe g^ins of 40 
years of cross-border cooperation, we had bet- 
ter refrain from [holding any ceremony]. A 
Day of Humility might not be unbecoming. 

— NRC Handelddad f Rotterdam). 


FROM OUR JAN. 22 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: SomaUans Attack ItaHanVessd 
ROME — A despatch from Mogadiscia m 
Italian Somahland. states that one of the 
**sambudu" — sail^ vessels manned by rix- 
if ion men and carrying a small gun — winch 
the Italian Government keeps along the coast 
to prevent gun-nuining into Abyssinia by way 
of SoinalUand, was attacked by Migiunans the 
other day off Ras Hafun, not far from Cape 
Guardaful llie natives were shelled and made 
off. What casualties tbqr sustained is not 
known. Nine were wounded on the ItaHan 
vessel The cruiser Elba has left Massowa for 
Ras Hafiin, in case of further trouble, and to 
bring the natives to order. This affair will 
doubtless force the Italian Government to take 
some decision regarding the building of a 
iighthn» 8 g and fort on Cape Ctiardafta. 


1935: Tibetan Wise Men Seek a King 
LONDON — Tibet, which bos been kin^^ 
since the death last year of the Dalai Lama, its 
supreme ruler, is about to choose a new sover- 
eign. Acewding to Tibetan tradition, the spirit 
of the Dalai Lama is immortal: When the ruder 
dies it enters the body of an unknown baby 
bom at precisely the same moment, ^lecially 
cbosoi "wise men"' are now about to set out on 
the quest ftH* this successor. They visit 
more than 300 homes. Half a dozen babies wili 
be taken to Lhasa, the capital where gjani 
prayer-wheels will be set in motion and the 
Grud Lamas will begin (he eliminating pro- 
cess. The ebem is ratified with reference to the 
stars, and the baby is then proclaimed hmire 
ruler of Tibet and is bathed m waters brought 
from the seven holy rivers of India. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, CMrmsn l>>SS-t»a2 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-^kairmai 


•HILIP M. FOlStE 
VALTER WELL5 
lOBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT_ 

:arlg£wirtz 


LEE W. HUEBNER. />H&teA 0 ’ 

Exeaairf Edacr RENE BONDY 

fitor ALAIN LEOOUR 

Dmu B£ur RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Kdmi 
AisoaiSe Edaor 


O^m PiOtaher 
Assaeuie PMiktr 
Asuaate PMsIter 


W. CONAWAY Dimer et Optn&m 
OifKiinr <ff CmdawM 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dmew tf Adit m mg Seks 
iimuiiooal Hoald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chartrit-dc GiiiUe. 92200 NeulIy-sur-Sdne. 

Td«: 6t27l8 (HenM). Cables Henikl P^ 

^ M- e ftV rmm_ „ 


When Government Forgets the Governed 


W ASHINGTON -- When the 
student of American society 
contemplates the impact of 
years or Ronald Read's policies^ 
may be fr^teoed by something po- 
tentially more dangerous than E^i- 
West brinkniansbip or taniished cab- 
inet appointments. 

The first Reagan term has ended 
serenely, thanks to the presi^t's at- 
tractive persona, the inqnoving econ- 
omy, and the residual social baefiis 
of earlier administraiions. But be- 
neath the surface are noisy rum- 
biings: the voices of the marginal 
fanner, of wooiea. of organized la- 
bor. of blacks and other nunorities. 
Will four more years of shrinking 
social programs deregulation, and 
ideological individualiim compress 
these pressures until they erupt? If 
this happens, should we be surprised? 

For 200 years America has been 
moving tovrard a more effective par- 
ticipatory democracy. The purpose of 
this more responsive ^svernmenL 
many felt, was to be the attack on 
extremes of wealth and poverty, the 
regulation of special interests, and 
the removal of conditions that put 
certain groups at a disadvantage. 

This movement was under way be- 
fore the nation was born and contrib- 
uted to the revolt against England. It 
showed itself in the state and federal 
constitutitMial conventioiis, in 
party battles of the republic, in 
the advocacy of the worl^ginan’s 
interests, and in tfae first stinugs of 
public responribility for tte dm^L 
the delincpieat and tiu destitute. The 
movement has not bM universally 
successful: yet. in two centuries, jt 
has acquired a cumulative force that 
would be difficult to reverse. 

An early indication of tbe young 
republic's senae of direction was the 
eroritm of the famous Jeffersonian 
antipathy toward strong central gov- 
enunent This antipathy was built on 
two main ingredioits. One was the 
tradition of political skepticism iden- 
tified «nth the Piigtigb Whigs who 
onstnisted trffices and p^es, greet- 
ed any governmental edict noth dis- 
belief , and were ever ready to turn the 
rascals <miL This attitude survives. 

The other ingiediem grew out of 
the tustoric abuse of power auto- 
cratic rule. But with the realization of 
America's unprecedentedly represen- 
laiive political system, the rear cH 
govemmeni-as-oppressor has gradu- 
ally receded. 

in revolutionary days, govenunoit 
meant king and ParliameoL Govern- 
ment was something that would force 
citizens to house soldim. suppress 
(^jposiag voices, confiscate arms, and 
would taxes aititrarily. 

Yet within two geoeraUoos. gov- 
ernments in the United States were 
betog ask^ to subsidize turnpikes 


By Robert H. Walker 

This is the first of run articles. 


and ganatg- regulate cuneecy and 
hanking , prevent lim laws and in>- 
prisonment for debi and provide 
asylum for individuals not fully capa- 
ble of carii^ for ihemselveai: quite a 
s^i fnmi the first lOamendmems to 
the Constitution, which assume that 
the greatest threat to (he individual is 
qspression by government. 

As restricticxis on voting began 
gradually to be lifud. as responsible 

WtUfour more yean of 
mdividiuilismand 
shimking social 
programs cause society's 
disfavored to enqit? 

individuals were elected to office, and 
as courts and legislatures showed a 
decent seoritivi^ u> the common- 
weal. the image oj government began 
a steady shift from ogn to rrferee. 
from arbitrator to advocate. The con- 
cept of ctvil liberties was moving lo- 
mitl the concept of dvil rights. Gov- 
ernments, increasingly tbe federal 
govemmenL were ari^ to restrain 
those who threatened the public in- 
terest and to rescue the victims of 
neglect or discrimmatioa. 

The slavery question contains 


some lessons that are not always re- 
membered. Most Americans in pub- 
lic life agreed that slavery was wrong. 
What to do about it? Some ihougbi 
slaveholders could be persuaded to 
abandon their "peculiar iostiimion." 
Wrong. Some thought the non-slave- 
hoiders of the South (a distinct ma- 
jority) would sec slavery as a regional 
[iabiiiiy and vote it away. Wrong. 

The vaunted power of voluniarism 
product^ one of its most memorable 
manifestations, the .American .Anti- 
Slavery Society, which labored bril- 
liantly' and dihgeoily — to no avail. 

Tbe problem escaped solution 
through individual initiative, associa- 
tional efions. state and local pro- 
grams. Although the Civil War was 
not a response to slaverv alone, it is 
fair to recognize thai the abolition 
movement would have failed without 
federal intervention. And it must be 
noted that this crusade produced not 
only emancipation but tbe 1 3lh. 14th. 
and 15th amendments: the founda- 
tion for civil rights. 

Tbe direction of social eban^ pre- 
cipitated by this first great crisis was 
echoed in ibe response to the Great 
Egression. To the student of histo- 
ry. it appears fortunate that the man 
in tbe White House as this sionn 
gathered was a man who believed in 
the supreme power of the indivndual 
and or private enterprise. .Action by 
the federal government, he felt. 


should be considered as a last resort. 

So President Herben Hoover ap- 
pealed mightily to citizens, to busi- 
ness. and to the subordinate levels of 
government before reluctantly. lardi- 
fy. sigiung in July 1932 the E^rgen- 
cv Relief and Construction Act that 
not onlv made the government a wel- 
fare agency but which pul Washing- 
ton into business more profoundly 
than it had ever been in peacetime. 

In times of crisis, as well as in less 
dramatic moments, the federal gov- 
ernment hu accfflted. if rductantiy, 
an augmented role in the promotion 
of political and economic democracy. 
TTie cases in point are numerous. Suf- 
frage has been drastically expanded 
and voting rights protect^ pnimerty 
q iialif icatii-ms remov'ed and direct 
elections advanced. The government 
prosecutes monopoUes. monitors tbe 
sale of drugs, and attempts to assure 
equal access to public accommoda- 
tions. bousing and employmnt. It 
levies graduated income and inheri- 
tance taxes. 

The central government of the 
Ltnit^ States come to provide 
the fundamental national equilibri- 
um. To weaken this force substantial- 
ly is to risk the delicate balance that 
has defined American society. 

The writer, professor of U.S. dvUi- 
cation at Geo^ tVashingjon Univer- 
sity and author of the forduwning book 
“Reform in .America: The Continuing 
Refo/ution," contributed this to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 



After Geneva: U.S. Must Speak in a Single Voice 


W ASHINGTON — Ttie weeks 
since Secretary of State Geoi^ 
P. Shultz and Soviet Fmeign Minister 
Andret A. Gromy^to completed their 
discussioiis in C^eva have brought 
oonfinniog evideoce ihaL as both 
men noted, tbe road ahead is a long 
and difficult one. And it has also 
fanned fears that differences wittw 
the Reagan admiiiistration may 
prove to be as troublesome as differ- 
ences between the two countries. 

Self-congratulatory comments 
about (be teamwork in Geneva al- 
ready have given way u> ibe cusukh- 
aiy cacophony of cabinet voices. Mr. 
Shultz told a televirion interviewer 
that both sides in the talks recognized 
a "relationship" among tte thro sets 
of arms negotiations (on inieiconti- 
nental-range nuclear weapems, me^ 
urn-range nuclear weapons and ^lace 
weapons) to be set up in accordance 
with the Geneva formula. 

Before his own more deferential 
press, Mr. Gromyko emphatically 
shared Mr. Shultz's understanding 
that ^lace, strai^c and medium- 
range weapons are to be approached 
"in their intenelationship.^ 

But Defense Secretary Caspar 
Wctnbeiger contended that Mr. Gro- 
myko was inirodudng "a new de- 


By Paul C. Warnke 


rnenr and that testing o( U.S. anti- 
satellite weapons wrmld proceed, as 
would the exploration of defensive 
weapons SYsu^ 

It may be that the differences be- 
tween these three men are more rhe- 
torical than real but it should be 
recognized (bat Mr. Gromyko's as- 
sertion of an ioteTTdation^'p is nei- 
ther a Stmd uwentioo nev "a new 
element" Bef<N«, during and after 
tbe SALT-! negotiations it was the 
United Stales that inaisied on dealing 
ooncunrentiy with tlu oontroi rtf of- 
fensive and defenave weapons. 

inde^ in the late 1960s a m^or 
stumbtiiig block to the imtiatlon of 
talks on lindtuig strategic auctear 
amu was Soviet in^enoe that de- 
fensive missiles were good because 
they destrojvd weapons and not peo- 
ple. and that only olTensive systems 
should be coostrmned. Tlte U.S. side 
aigued (hat any baflistic-missile de- 
fense could reat^ be overwhelmed 
by an uxaease in the number and 
sophisticatmn of offensive warheads, 
and that tfae deployment ot such de- 
fenses would stimulate arms races. 

Tbe Soviet side finally accepted 
this logic, and the result was the 1972 


signing of both a treaty tightly limit- 
ing ami-ballistic missiles and an 
agreement setting ceilings on strate- 
gic misstle launchers. 

Curiously, the arguments that the 
American side rgecied when they 
were advanced by Soviet neptiaiors 
are now being made by U.^ propo- 
nents of baJUstic-missife defenses. 

While Preudeni Reagan voices his 
vision of a world in which deterrence 
by the threat of ratilua] annihibtiOE] 
can be replaced by a ma^c curtain to 
render nuclear weapons obsolete, 
some of his advisers argue that the 
deploymem of existing lecfanolories 
can improve deterrence by proiec^g 
mi^Ie& They characterize their bal- 
listic-niissile defense plans as steps to 
an impenetrable population defense. 

The argument for an admittedly 
leaky defense of missiles is as flawed 
today as it was when it was advanc^ 
by the Russians a decade and a 
ago. Today, as (hen. the testing and 
deployroeni of such systems would be 
fatal to prospecis of controlling and 
reduciDg strategic nuclear warheads. 

NeitliCT the Soviet Union nor tbe 
United Slates will cooperate in giving 
the other a plausible fim-sirike capa- 


New CaJedordou Lessons of the Past 


P ARIS — Tbe grip of the past 
has seized the present in New 
Caledonia. It will not be sh^en. 
French and Melanesian popula- 
tions are acting out a coofuct with 
roots a oeotu^ and a half ol<L Pr^ 
idem Fran^ Minemad and the 
government in Paris apply, or mis- 
apply. lessons from a more recent 
history, that of France's colonial 
wars of the 1950s. 

The Melanesians want back tbetr 
land. This attachment to tfae land 
has nothing to do with property 
rights as those are omedvra in the 
West The land, to theoL is the 
souitt of their existence. Ibey bad 
to yield it to tbe powerful French, 
who brought with them the fantas- 
tic machines and comforts of tbe 
industrial age. A factor in (he inde- 
pendence mov'ement now is a magi- 
cal notion that if the whiles are 
forced to lea\‘e, the Mdanesians 
will automatically become ridi and 
powerful in thdr place. The Cargo 
Cult of the Pacific exists here. 

Tbe white and .Asian populations 
of the island are, togetb^, a major- 
ity. Melanesians make up 43 per- 
cent tbe total Europeans 37 per- 
cent. The rest are Asian im- 
migrants. The Europeans say their 
stake in New Caledc^ is as unpor- 
tani as the Mdanesians*. Tb^ de- 
vel(^ iL They think Mdaneaan 
control will ruin it 
Tbe government in Paris listens 
to a different warning. Socialists 
took part in the Fourth Republic 
governments that wt^ a futile 
war in Indochina in the early 1950s. 
They settled that war. bravely and 
dranuuicatly. in 1954 under Pierre 
Menddi-France. but plua^ im- 
mediately into u new w^r to put 
down, in^rrection in .Al^x 
Frjn«;ois .Mitterrand was the 
minister in charge of .Algeria in Ni«- 
vemher i*554 when ihe insurrection 


By William PfaH 

began. "Algeria is French," be said. 
"No government will ever yield on 
that fundameatd principle." The 
result was a war that contributed 
beavily to the coQapse of the Fourth 
Repumk and to the return to power 
of General De GauUe — yield- 
ed that principle. The Socialists still 
have not |o( over the shock. 

The uprisug in New Caledonia, a 
surviving outpost of the old colo- 
nial emigre, round the Mitterrand 
gpveninwm eager to make conces- 
sons to tfae independence mov^ 
meot, takisg with great seriousness 
its ddffls to speak fw all the Mela- 
neaans. This encouraged the most 
radical to take the lead. A Niter and 
increasingly violent backlash has 
developed m the white population. 
When the ^vemmeni briatedly ai- 
temptsd to restore order, after 
deaths in clashes between whiles 
and Mdanesians. the pdice shot 
dead tfae most radiem indepen- 
dnee activist and one of his aides, 
in circumstances that raise doubt 
about dauns it w’os an acddeni. 

The resulting shock to both sides, 
and to government and public in 
Paris, has been considerule. Will 
these events end. or acederate, 
compromise? Tlie plan put forward 
Jan. 7 1^ tbe government's special 
repremtauve to the island, Edg^ 
Pisanl calls for a vote on a beavily 
qualt^ independence. The land 
outvie the predomi&antiy white- 
populated capital. Noum^ would 
be handed to the tribal com- 
rouoiues, with guarameesof securi- 
ty for white farmers. Noumea 
would govern itself. France would 
be reqxwiaWe lor external and in- 
ternal security, justice and police. 

This was flii inielligeni uitcmpl to 
’•iilvjge a rapidly deierioraiins >iiu- 


ation — like most such attempts, 
probably loo late. The violence of 
the weekend of Jan. 12-13 and the 
ensuing visit by President Mtter- 
rand to the island iniervened before 
people bad fully reacted to the Pi- 
saoj proposals, though one Kanak 
leader on Monday gave the plan his 
qualified support 

Tbe undHying question, cur- 
rently unanswerable, is whether 
most Melanesians support the 
young independence activists who 
nave provoked tbe present crisis. 

Jf tn^ da a very unpleasant out- 
come is implied: for the Melane- 
sians ibemselves, whose outlook as 
an independent nation is preiiy 
bleak, for the island's French, and 
for the French Sodalisls. ffi on tbe 
other hand, tbe activists prove sig- 
oificamly unrepresentative, and vi- 
olence has sooered people rather 
than intoxicating them, the Pisani 
plan has a chance. A second vital 
question is whether (he Mitterrand 
government can coDtain (he reac- 
tion of Ihe white settlers, even with 
a plan that preserves the essentials 
of French authority on the idan d. 

Tbe affair has about it a terrible 
graluiiousness. the air of bid news- 
reels being run at (be wrong speed. 
Melanesia is not Indocfaina or Alge- 
ria. The Melanesian indq>eadence 
activists seem innocent parodies of 
the cruel and tragic men of earlier 
iodqiendence sirug^es, although 
they are ibemselves no less tragic 
for that — and no less vulnerable to 
what ihQ have b^n. 

They claim lo be modern men. 
radical Uberaiionisis. Marxists — 
some of them — but they reclaim 
the land for their people because it 
is where their spinis lie. The strug- 
gle in New Caledonia is political, 
social, raciul. but the irreconcilable 
factor is spiriiu.il. 

■ fW. it/Wii;»»j Piitn 


biliiy. But the reduction of missiJe 
warheads while defensive mtems are 
being set in place would be seen as 
doingjust ibai The retaliatory strike 
that could be mounted after a pre- 
emptive attack cotdd then be 
quaie to penetrate a ballistic-inissilc 
defense. This fear would particularly 
concern the Soviet Union, with matt 
than thre^uarters of its straioic 
warheads in fixed silos that can 
targeted by accurate U.S. missiles. 

At Geneva both sides made major 
concessions. The Russians swalJov^ 
more than a year's worth of state- 
ments that it would never return to 
(be baigaining table until U.S. Per- 
shiDg-25 and cruise missiles were re- 
move from Europe. And Mr. Shultz 
described the president’s Strategic 
Defense Initiative, or "star wars" 
strategy, as being "fully consistent 
with iSe ABM treaty," and said that 
"no decisions to go beyond research 
have been made, nor could they be 
made for several years." 

If tbe president continues to back 
Mr. Sbuliz, tbe two countries can 
impiemeni their joint coramuniquk 
ano "wrat out effective agreements 
aimed at preventing an arms race in 
space and terminating it on Earth." 
No defensive system against obsolete 
nuclear missiles will be available for 
vesting or d^loymeni in the next 
severe years, or several decades. Ad- 
vanced research can be justified to 
explore the frontiers trf technology 
and ensure that the United States u 
not presented with a rude Soviet sur- 
prise in the future. Moreover, a ban 
on such research could never be pan 
of a verifiable agreement. 

So long 35 tbe preridem dreams for 
the future and avoids shortsighted 
action now, constructive negotiations 
can proceed on limiting both strate- 
gic offenses and defenses. 

The agrada developed at Geneva, 
as since interpreted by Mr. Shultz 
and Mr. Gromyko, is a pro mising 
start. It is better than could reason- 


Reagan’s 

Imperial*^ 

Presidency 

By Anthony Lewis 

B oston — Ronald Reagan’s 
greatest political accom^^ 
ment is impiimt in the fact of Im 
second inaugural. He hu resitted 
popular trust in the presidenqr, 
versing a deep ^eptiosm abom the 
office that had set in with tbe 
pointments and abuses of the Joha- 
soD and Nixon years. 

But we have paid a price for^ 
acbievemenL With trust has cmi^ 
renewal of the old instinctual dove 
for more power in the White House. 
It is disguised the geniali^ Mr] 

Re^an. but it is tiiere: the push for 
an imperial presideacy. 

What I mean by that phrase i$ 
power that can be exerdsed widtbot 
tbe traditional restraints the U.S. 
governmental system; without hav- 
ing to go to Congress for authority, 
witiioui having to explain to die 
American public, without having iq 
justify itsdf in law. In short, it h 
power without accountability. 

prudent Reagan's Nicaraguan 
policy is an acute example. He dead. 
ed to wage a terrenist war on hGcara- 
gua-Tocairyit out tbe Central Imd- 
tigeoce Agoicy organized and paid 
the "contras" in secieL Acting in k- 
crecy is tbe neatest way to etei|M 
power without accountability. ^ 
When the secret leaked and Cra- 
g^ became concerned, Mr. Reagan 
did all he could to Congiess 
from playing its constitutional role. 
He asked Cmigres to approve fu^ 
for the contras without makmg clear 
the objective of the carnpaign, wfa^ 
er to pressure the Sandinists to stop 
exporting revolution, as he sonw- 
times said, or to overthrow their gow 
enuneoL There can be do account- 
ability in obscuri^. 

The latest turn in the story was the 
president's decision to boycott the 
World Court proceedings on Nicara- 
gua's suit against the United ^tes. 
This tiioe iSt forum was a leg^ cne, 
but once again tbe purpose was to 
avoid accountability. 

The Slate Dcpknme&u in an- 
nouncing that the United Slats 
would mtbdraw from all partidpa- 
ti<» in the case, offered various 1 ^ 
arguments — arguments that hodj^ 
before the judges. But the real ret^ 
was evident. Tne Reagan admioiriia- 
tion feared that the court proceeding 
would bring out tbe tacts tt its ^ to 
tmorist acuvities and focus attention 
on its violation of treaties. 

Of course, international law is not 
a solid edifice, and the World Court 
has no ready way to enforce its dot- - 
rions. But respect for the court and 
for international taw gives a cenain 
legitimacy to a counltv ~ or so ll£ 
governnieats used to ^nk- 
Just four ye^ ago the Amoicio 
hostages in Iran were at last relcamL 
Imernaiionai law was one of the l^ 
vers used the United States in tk 
efiort 10 bring that terrible epu^ to 
an end. U.S. officials sued in the 
Worfd Court, and deplored baa's 
failure to participate and its deflaacg 
of the court's dmsion. 

Even in the emergm^ ciiciUD- 
stance o( the Cuban missile crisis of 
1962, President John F. Kennedy 
made a point of complying with a.|l 
the legal niceties of treaty oblig^ 
(ions. He thought respect for lav 
would increase American influencir 
in the world community. 

Mr. Reagan and his legal advisers 
have made oonsisienlly clear bow lil- 
lie regard they have for the law —in 
domestic affairs as in internationaL 
When federal appeals courts un- 

lawful the stripping of Social Security 
benefits from hundreds of thoniunris 
of disabled Americans, the adimniS' 
iraiion made the astoundiim daini 
that it was not bound to follow the 
decisions in those judicial dreuits 
where they were the law. 

Law has been the balance wheel of 
the U^. ^tem. a prime reason for 
Americans' living under one Consti- 
tution for nearly 200 years. Law has 
been able to play that role oofy b^ 
cause presidents, most of them, ha||l 
in the end respected courts. After 
as Alexander Hamilton wrote ip The 
Federalist, courts have "ndtber force 
nor will, but merely JudgmeoL" 

When Mr, Reagan decided to pull 
out of the World Court proceedings 
on Nicarama because he had lost in 
the first phase. I thou^t of another 
presid^t who lost a Te^l dedsioo 
and oiinded greatly; Harry Trumaa. 

In 1952, during the Kor^ War, 
pF^dem Truman sdzed the oono- 
iry's steel mills to prevent a making 
strike. The &preme Court held, 6-3, 
that he had acted without necessary 
congressional authority. 

Mr. Truman was funous. He wrde 


ably have been expe^ The presi- in his nSSdrs ttoT Ac Sup^ 
dent now must make it dear that Mr. Court h.iH ioru^ni^ th« p...fe 
Shultz speaks for him in this vital 


area of foreign poUcy, and that others 
in his administration are to go along 
or get out of the way. 

The writer served as director of the 
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament 
Agencyin J977-7& He contributed diis 
comment to the Los An^es Times. 


Court had ignored tbe facts and ig- 
nored history. But tfae relevant pas- 
sage in tbe memdrs goes on to say: 
"Word of the court’s decision 
reached me in my office in the early 
afternoon of June 2, and before 4 
o cIo(^ 1 had issued an order to com^ 
ply mih tbe decision and reuun tbe 
plants to the sted iiidustry." ' 

The New York Tones. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 
ReaganandlhePiibUc U.S. Double Standards 

Regarding the opinion column 
“Reagan raid che Petrie Mpy Be Part- 
ing” (Jan, 9} by Barry Sussman: 

Mr. Sussman maintains that "Mr. 

Reagan's success until now tnav Irave 
come about because his ibeioiic and 
gos^ were almost a perfect fit for the 
natiood mood at tbe time of his fini 
election." Of course his goals fit the 
notional mood. This is why he was 
elected. Mr. Sussnum states that "the 
defen« buildup was the pubuc sidffl. If 


not Mr. Rian's." A policy should 
be the public’s idea first. The people 
decitk the policy they want, then 
nominate and elect the man propos- 
ing ig carry it out. This is a basic 
demtvraiic tenet: policy originate.*, in 
[he public. The article &j\s noihinc. 

KllLl LtKi.AN' 
London. 


Re^rdine “Churdi Activists in V.S. 
They Witt Contiruie Satauaryfor 

Refugees” (JoTL 17): 

U.S. double standards will never 
CNM to amaze. It is almost beyond 
b^f that the government that wants 
10 be so closely associated unih Qnifr 
arrest and sentenra 
church members who are trying to cr 
the most Christian thine posable io 
the current situation in Central 


'h Europe, one may be sure 

the Reagan admirustraiion would be 
uie firai IO scTuatn about the "viola- 
tion of religious freedom." 

I he pages of hisiorv contain manv 
samples of VS', hvpocrisy and 
d'»uhlestjndardv , 

RUBY UNDER- 

Paris. . 



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Diplomats Expect 
A Unuted Agreement 
At Security Conference 

Rmene c 

STOCKHOLM —■!%.«.. w devise ways of pre- 

Umon otpecis a c?rll2 


1NTERNATION.4L HERALD TRIBLNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 22. 1985 


Page 5 


a 1- ^ 

. yt/S 


^ i- 
5 I fi 

jf 

■y 


t . 11 ' . fc .‘ 7* 

!Hlil 


ii-U 


■■ f-H ' .' 

I ? if 


or terSS?- 

spmc isaes ahead of schSJu^II *" Stockholm ihis 


some issues ahead of seh^f.iu c •*^eepwni in Mockholm ihis 
viei diplomats said Moodav ^ ^ oot in the next ses- 

Tbc firsi siao^- rtf Ik perhaps in the one after “ 

is to last *“ 

NATO diplomats Si?ihe Unl^M ■ fifth session be- 

Slates had offered lo cr.n.-i Th gins Jan. *9. The sixth session will 
«cord M =1" May 14 to July 5. 

|rae for the lOih aniuvcrs^J o?ihS diplomats said the U.&- 

Helsmki agreement on human meeung m Geneva this 

nghts Aug. J, 1985 . ” month clearly had a positive influ- 

Washinojrtn t,^A :-j- . On the Siockbolm al- 

endof 1984ihaiiiwowi?h^^ir^'^ [hough the US. offer was made 
to conclude an agrSicm'' ™ 11! r'" «iperpowHs agreed 

aotification and®obser."auSl ne^SnL” 

delegation 

there had not bi^n Tnnff^'i Stockholm conference, 

ef fSpSos? ^ «pm«cd opU- 

A - interview with a Finn- 

faiic JJ? / 35-nation ish newspaper last week that the 

w 2^ ™ proews set in next session would lav the ground 
^ Helsinki Final for a possible outline agreemem by 

Am on Secunty and Cooperation in ihe spring. 

Earlier. President Ronald Rea> 
cun bad said that the United States 
and its allies wanted a fair compro- 
mise at the Siockht^ lalki:, but 
complained that Moscow had 
failed to meet them way. 

Last Thursday. Mr. Reagan ac- 
cused the Soviet Union of indulg- 
ing in pn^agonda at the Stock- 
holm conferenue, which began in 
January 19M. 

NATO diplomats said that rath- 


SoDief to Give 
Western Group 
Computer Data 

The Auoaaud Press 

LAXENBURG. Austria — 
The Soviet Union has agreed, 
for the first time, to give an 
oiganization in the West direct 
acc es s to some of its computer 
data, a spokesman for the Imcr- 
oational Institute of Applied 
Systems Analysis announced 
Monday. 

Jean-Pierre Ayrault, a 
spokesman for the research or- 
ganization, said the agreement { 
would give the institute 
to bibliographical information 
from Soviet data Hanlrc on so- 
cial and politicai science and 
ecoDooucs. 

There has been U.S. oitidsni 
I about the a^iilal^iy of West- 
ern conopuier technology and 
informauon to Soviet atizeos 
working at the research center, 
south of \^aina, w4uch also em- 
ploys sdemisis from the United 
Slates and 23 other nations. 

The agreement, sigi^ last 
wMk between the Institute of 
SdenUHc Infcnmatioo on So- 
cial Sciences of the Soviet 
Academy of Sciences and the 
center, is a “kind of an infonna- 
uon breakthrough.'’ 


tu «IWfMiUPiW» 

LIFT NEEDED — Two GemmiK ski by a U.S. Anny tank dtat stalled in tbesnow after 
its fuel pumps froze. The incideof occuned near Marburg, north of Frankfurt, while the 
tank was route to take part in the Central Guardian exercises, which be^ui Monday. 

Bonn and Moscow Begin Trade Talks; 
West Germans Look to Political Thaw 


BONN — The Soviet Union and 
its biggttt Western trading partner. 
West Germany, opened trade talks 
Monday in Bonn that Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's govemmeni expects 
will lead 10 improved political and 
economic ties. 

The two-day session of the Sevi- 


er thim amply c«Ugaii^ Moscow. a-West Genian Joint Economic 

•*"” Commission folio,* n frosiy peri- 
iheKremlm Ihnl a pielmiio^ ^ 

^reanenl WM 10 be reached by coimlries. Il is the firsi ministerial- 

AueusL the two sides must sian ■ a i *, __j I am OUiu 


ccnier-righi coalttiun is hopeful 
that the dtscussiofis will produce a 
political thaw after months cS Jit- 
ter Sewiet critirisni of Bonn’s poli- 
cies toward Eastern Eun^. 

Economics Minister Martin 
Bongemann, who heads Bonn’s del- 
egation, was quoioi Monday by 
Neue Osnabruckcr Zeiuing as say- 
ing that Soviet bloc alieptions that 
Bonn wanted to turn back the clock 
in Eastern &irope were not in Mi^ 


AugittL the two side must Stan ,^^^1 contact between Bonn and 
working on it senously immediate- Moscow since the agreement earli- 

^'c r m L- . vwiw er Ihis month between the United 
W of Washmgions NATO Slates and Ihe Soviet Union to re- ^ ^ OsnabnitL 

allies, however, appeared wotned am,, contml talks new^i^er. 

by the U.S. negotiating strategy. Mr. Bangemann said that paral- 

Apan from an accoid on ex- While West German industrial le] talks involving the Soviet dele- 
changes of military informaiian, I^ders see the talks leading to bil- gallon chief, Dqwly Prime Miois- 
die North Atlantic Treaty Organi- of dollars in business during ter Alexei K. Antonov. Mr. KoU 
zaiion is vdlliog to n^tiate on a the rest of the 1980s, Mr. Kohl's and Foreign Minister Hans-Die- 

key Soviet propel for a declara- 

lion renouncing the use force. ^ _ __ 

Sir Robert Fraser, U.K. TV E 

use of nuclear weapons, as unao- 

ce^Ue. Uiui^ Press iruemanontd sioa in Britain to cookie with the 

beheads of the 16 NATO dele- LONDON — Sir Robert Fraser, stai^rhartered British Broadcast- 
gaiions to the Siodtholio confer- 80, an important fi^ire in the de- mg Cmp. 
enoe are due u> discuss their ocgoti- vdopmenc of commercial lelevi- An Australian. SSr Robert came 
aiing strategy for the notl session jjj Britain, died Sunday. to England in his early 20s and 

® »es 49 when he was "““““I .« l^mdop School of 

day®ndrnday. annmni«i Hinwirtr Econonucs beforc deciding totniCT 

Tbc Stockholm conference bo- ^tor-general rf the journalism. 

gan at a low point in lelatioos be- In 1930. he became an editorial 

tween the two superpowers and sion Autnoniy in 1934. From then ^inriter at the E)aily Herald, which 
was stalled until alnxist the end of until his neurement in 1970, he di- no loader ezisbs. and remainol 


**1 am quite sure that the gcod 
results 1 expect in the economic 
field will help solve c^er disputed 


issues," he told the Osnabruck 
new^iaper. 

Mr. Bangetn^ said that paral- 
lel talks involving the Soviet dele- 


irich Genseber were "part of the 
political dialogue:" 

The Soviei-Wesi German talks 
follow- senior-lev-el trade negotia- 
tions between the United States 
and the Soviet Union, the first in 
six years, that took place in Mos- 
cow two weeks ago. 

Mr. Kohl’s coalition, like previ- 
ous West German governments, 
considers trade a stabiioing ele- 
ment in East-West relations and 
hag pursued a business-as-usual 
policy with Moscow irrespective o( 
fluctuations in the pohticu climate. 

Western trade aoalvsts have pre- 
dicted tbattheSovietTlnionwmbe 
placing about 20 billion marks 
(S6.3 billion) of m^or orders 
with Western companies in the 
near future, after a marked slow- 
down in major contracts last year. 


Sir Robert Fraser, U.K. TV Executiye, Dies 


Umai Press Ituermaiwnat 

LONDON — Sir Robert Fraser. 
80, an important fi^ire in the de- 
vdopmenc of commercial televi- 


sioo in Britain to cookie with the 
staieNcfaanered British Broadcast- 
ing Cmp. 

An Australian. Sir Robert came 
to England in his early 20s and 


Sir Robert was 49 when he was 

appointed director-general of the .Economics before deeding to enter 

i^ly for^lndep^l he became an editorial 

Sion Auihoniy in 1954 frorn dia ,^ter at the Daily Herald, which 


last year over begoiiating proce- 
dures. 


reeled the shaping, planning and 
development oI iodependem televi- 


no longer exists, and remained 
there for nine years. He then began 
a long association with the govem- 


meut in the Ministry of Informa- 
tion. 

GilfisW.LoDg,61, 

Louisians Demoenr 
WASHINGTON fA?) — Rep- 
rcseniative GilJis W. Long, a Loui- 
siana Democrat who heacM the 
House DenxKraiic Cbucus during 
the early years of the Reagan ad- 
mimstraiion, died Sunday, appar- 
ently of a heart attack. 


A Secretary 
Says She lied 
ToAidKiUers 
In Polish Case 


I'vteJ Frets /nimaiionJ 

TORUN, Pedand — Breaking 
mto tears, a witness in the trial of 
four secret polke officers accused 
in the murder of a pro-SoIidarity 
priest adnuited Monday giving 
false evidence and withholding in- 
formation that implicated the kill- 
eis. 

Mrs. Barbara Storv. 36. a secre- 
Lsiy in the Interior Ministry, which 
controls the secret police, wept as 
she said in a court in Tonui that she 
made an anonymous lelrahone call 
to Warsaw police after the kidnap- 
ping and murder of Father Jerzy 
POpieliiszko in an attempt to cover 
up the Clime. 

She said she called the police and 
pretended to have seen the car used 
by three secret police officers to 
abduct the priest, near the town of 
Torun. when the vehicle in fact 
been driven back to Warsaw- — 
about 1 26 miles (204 kilometers) to 
ibe south. 

"I called Warsaw police head- 
quarters and said 1 bad seen a car 
near Torun that carried the same 
registration numbers as those is- 
sued in a television announce- 
meot." she said. “I said there were 
three men in h who answ'ered the 
descriptions announced oo televi- 
gon." 

Mrs. Story said she made the 
phone call on the orders of her 
boss: Go^rz Pioiron^. a for- 
mer secret police captain who is 
one of four men ebar^ with mur- 
der. She admitted that she w-as a 
friend of the Piotrowski family. 

A prosecutor then asked her. 
"Can't you admit that you w-amed 
to conc^ his pari in the crime?" 
and she rq>Iied, "I didn’t want to 
hide the truth, I knew Kolrowski 
and his wife and 1 could not imag- 
ine that he did such a thing." 

Mrs. Story also said she had been 
shown a travel permit signed by a 
secret police colonel. Adam Pie- 
truszk^ who denies charges of ' 
complicity in the murder, that au- 
thorized Captain Piotrowski and 
the other accused officials. Walde- 
mar Ounielewski and Leszek Pc- 
kala. to take a car iourney OcL 19; 
the priest was abducted beaten 
and lulled during the trip. 

Mrs. Story said that she was pre- 
sent when the permit was later 
handed u> bar superior, a police 
gcneraL Zenon Platek. while inves- 
ti^iions into the murder were un- 
dCT way. 

"When Platek saw the pennii 
with Pieiruszka's signature on it, he 
went pale." she said. 


Albania Opening Links 
To Yugoslavia, Greece 


By E>jvid Binder 

•Vni- York Turn Senne 

WASHINGTON — Albania, 
one of the most isolated countries 
in the world, is taking steps to open 
new transportation links w-itb Yu- 
goslavia and Greece, with which its 
relations have long been cool. 

On Jan. ILaZZ-roilei^Skilome- 
ut) seaion of railreud wa.s com- 
pleted from the northern Albanian 
city of Shkoder to Hani i Hotii, a 
point on the ^’ugoslav border. 

A day later, a road crossing the 
frontier at the Greek town of fCika- 
vija was reopened. 

The Albanian authorities consid- 
er the rail link the more important 
of the two trans(|onation projects 
because it is designed to connect 
their country’s small and relatively 
new rail network with the railroads 
of the nest of Europe. 

.Albooia, a country trjJitionuily 
lacking the infrasiructure pns>eni 
in most European countries, had 
oo railroads before World War (1 
and has built only about 250 miles 
of irack in the lo.si four decades. 

Yugoslavia ho.s pledged lo com- 
plete a section of track later this 
year from Hani i Hoiii loTiiograd. 
die capital of the ^'ugostavian re- 
public of Montenegro. esiabli.shing 
the connection lo other European 
lines. 

Until then. .Albania's vM-erlund 
imports and exports will continue 
to move by truck, largely across ihe 
border at Hani i Hotii.' 

Meanwhile. .Albania plans to 
complete a new railroad soon be- 
tween Fier and the port of More 
and is considering the construction 
of lines to Kios. Shengjin and 
Korce. The plans w-ere disclosed by 
Besnik BekteshL d^uiy chairman 
of the Council of Ministers in Tira- 
na. the Albanian capital, who 
spoke at a ceremonv at Hani i Ho- 
tiL 

The reopening of the road at Ka- 
kavija, for the first time since 
Worid War II. makes it the second 
crossing oo the frontier with 
Greece, along with one at Kapsh- 
tica. 


The Greek govemmem of Prime 
Minister .Andreas Papandreou 
nude a large affair of the Kokavija 
reopening ceremony, sending out 
ioviiaiions to 2.000 people from 
northern Greece and .Athens. 

.According io Greek sources, 
however, when the ceremony had 
ended. Albanian border guards 
closed the crossing on their side 
and indicated that it would be 
opened again mainly for official 
traffic, including diplomats or oth- 
er govemmeatal travelers. 

For many years, the Comimu^i 
government In Tirana has forbid- 
den travel abroad by Albanians ev- 
crot on official missuvns. and it has 
severely limited visits by foreigners. 
.About 100 .Albanian vbung people 
ore believed to be studying in West 
European countries, and the uver- 
agenumberof tourists allowed into 
Albania is about 3.000 a year. 

Greek Comt Jails 
2 on Libel Counts 

ITsi- IwiK'.'iSii'J Pri'\> 

ATHENS — .An .Alheas court 
has sentenced the puhlLsher and the 
editor of a Greek newspaper to 
four years i.n pri.son on libel 
charges, a court spokesman said. 
The new spaper had reported that a 
senior cabinet minister inien-ened 
lo assist a SwedLsh communica- 
tions company bidding fi'r a multi- 
million dollar contract to modern- 
ize Greece's telephone system. 

The spokesman said' Saiurday 
that .Aris Voudouris and George 
Katsonis. publisher and editor of 
Elefiberos Typi>s, an .Athens daily, 
appealed ibnr sentences and were 
freed pending an appeals cvvun 
hearing. 

The afieraoi'‘n new-spaper was 
sued by the altemaic minister of 
national economy. Coniioniinos 
Vaitsos. after publi.shing an article 
on July 9. 1984, stating ihai the 
L.M. Ericsson company of Sn-eden 
was given special irraimenl by 
evaluation commjnees w-orking un- 
der Mr Vajisos. 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBliNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1983 


Asian Refugees Ask What’s After Camps 

40^000 Who Fled Jl^nam Are Trcpped in Seidemenfy WWiNoRdi^inS^ 


By lain Guesc 

Iniernatimial HemU Tnbme 

FANG ZHEN CAMP, Guanw 
province. China — Yuan 
Shun. 17. sat on the h^ wooden 
bunk and explained through an 
interpreter, how the fishing boat 
bad sunk under him in die South 
China Sea after be fled Vietnam in 
August 1983. 

Mr. Y uan is one of approximate- 
ly 40.000 Vietnamese refugees who 
have been trapped for more than 
three years in camps throughout 
South^t Asia, and for v^om 
there no obvious relief. 

He told bis story impassively. 
Chinese fishermen, he said, had 
rescued him from the sea. Chinese 
authorities brou^t him to this 
holding center for refugees. 

At this point. Mr. Yuan’s story 
lost its thrkd. He was prompted. 

What comes next he was asked? 
Mr. 'I'uan frowned and sho^ his 
head. “Any Western country. Fve 
had my late of socialism.” 

Then he stopped. He had spoken 
without convictioiL He had been a 
refugee for more rhan a year and it 
was beginning to dawn on him that 
his bid for freedom had been 
brought to a halt in this isolated 
comer of China — just SO miles (80 
kilometers) away from the country 
be had fled. 

He lapsed into a brooding si- 
lence. One offidal from the office 
of the United Nations High Com- 
missioner for Refugees, who had 
accompanied reporters to Fang 
Zhen. conceded that Mr. Yuan's 
chances of moving from the camp 
were slim; 



Yuan Wen Shun 

Mr. Yuan is not likely to be re- 
settled because be has no relatives 
living in the West. This will count 
against him under U.S. refugee po- 
ll^. which stresses reuniting fam- 
ilies. So, too. could the fact that he 
had lived in Hanoi under a Com- 
munist re^me: 

Rq>atriation is unlikely, too. Mr. 
Yuan insistwi he would never re- 
turn to Vietnam, but even if he 
wished to, it is doubtful that the 
Vietnamese government would 
lake him bacU Since 19^, Hanoi 
has agreed to repatriate only 141 of 
the 1.4 millioa people have 



H’ ^ I ■ ^8 



fi# 


A Metnainese fisherraan in Beihai, rhina. 


fled Vieinam, but few have applied 
to go home. Almost aS those repa- 
triated were Fishermen became 
lost at sea. 

Officials of the UN agency 
warned that throughout the &)utb- 
east Asia the refum problem is 
causing tension with local people, 
and acute depresstoo among the 
refugees. Last summer. 2.500 refu- 
ge in the camp of HeQing Chau, 
in Hong Kong, went on a hunger 
strike tnat was eventually broken 
up by police. 

But the strike achieved its princi- 
pal aim, publidty. The fact that the 
C3imese have |iven asylum to laru 
numbers of Vietnamese is laigdy 
unknown outside the region. 

Since 1978, China has accepted 
276,427 refugees from Vietnam. 
That is second only to the United 
States, wtucb has taken in 700,000 
Vietnamese since 1 975. China is the 
only country of Fust asylum in 
Southeast Asia to offer Vietnamese 
lefug^ a permanent home. With- 
in Asia as a whole, Japan has set- 
tled 6,500 up to the end of 1984. 

llte Chinese welcome cootcasts 
sharply with the rou^ treatment 
afford^ Vietnamese rehigiees else- 
wbere in Southeast Asia, ^ it has 
brought praise senior ofTidals 
at the agency and ofFicials of 
Western govemments. 

After visiting Cid^ last year, H. 
Eugene Dougl^ the U.& coordi- 
nator for refugee affairs, told the 
UJS. House Judiciary Committee 
he had come away “encouraged'* 
by the Chinasa policy. 

Almost aO tbe Vietnamese refu- 
gees who have arrived in China 
since 1978 have been et^c Chi- 
nese. In 1978, as relations between 
tbe countries deteiioratet^ the gpy^ 
emmem in Hanoi gave its ethnic 
Ounese the option of talc^ Vict- 
namese dtizeiisbip OT leaving. 

Chinese government ofOdals 
said repeatedly that thqr acted out 
of a “sense of duty” in taking in the 
refugees. But th^ also made it 
clear that the refugees* int^ration 
into Chinese sodety had been diffi- 
cult and expensive. 

The Oist problem, in 1978, was 
iriiere to pot tbe refugees, in a 
coun^ when only 9 pocfflt (tf tbe 
land is cultivable. The Chinese de- 
cided to send them to 2S6 state 
farms where tbe refugees could be 
subsidized, instead m communes 
meant to be sdf-suflkiem. 

On the Quing Yuan state farm, 
near Guangzhou, the refugees are 
living in the houses that had 
formed the villa^ before the revo- 
lutUm in 1949. iWng a viat, oat 
house appeared spacious and cool 
with a tall ceiling, wdtewashed 
walls and declridly. 

But apart from a calendar from 
Hong Kong, advertising quartz 
wato^ thae were few si^ of 


personal possessions. The occu- 
pants said authorities in V^etoam 
had confiscated all their personal 
belon^gs, including furniture and 
electric fans, when they Idt in 1978. 

Chinese ofRdals accompanying 
ihe visitors pointed out t&t sira 
accommodation was considerably 
better than that Inmost peasants in 
China. Ti^ also said there were no 
formal tesuicliODs on the refugees 
leavi^ the farm, and no ^stem of 
identity cards. This was confirmed 
refugees, who said it was “quite 
simple” to take a bus or train to 
Hoag Kong. 

The sec^ problem for China 
was money. According to Ji Hua, 
deputy dilator of the cent^ gov- 
ernment office for resettlement, die 
refugees ^ve cost the eqmi^ent of 
S600 minion since 1978. The office 
of the UN Hi^ Commissioner for 
Refugees has contributed MS i^- 
lioo. 

Mrs. Ji said it was originally 
hoped that the refugees wmdd be- 
come self-sufiicieat in three years. 
But. she said, this had not hap- 
pened, and half the refuge still 
requir^ substantial subsimes. 

Refugees and Chinese officials 
agreed that the newcomers had 
found it hard to a^ust to life on the 
state farms. But they differed over 
tbe reasons why. 

Tang Shang (^g operated a 
crane in Haiphong before be left 
for Qnna. Now he beads a tea- 
-picking production team on the 
Qingyuan state farm, in Guang- 
dong. “Fm used to city life, not 
farms,” he said through an inter- 
preter. “This b hard. I don't like 
iL” 

“The problem is more simple,” 
responded Mrs. Ji. “They're 1^.” 

[n an e^ort to ease thw im^ra- 
tion. and rmnnnwg the disruption 
to Qiinese agriculture, the refugees 
are allowed to grow tea and pro- 
duce sUk instead of rice, whi<± is 
more labor-intensive. Tt^ also are 
exempted from production quotas. 

Several rehig^ added that they 
had not been forced to take Chi- 
nese dtizeastiip and that ea^ fam- 
ily is allowed two children instead 
of the (»e child per family de- 
roaoded by China*^g strict family 
p lanning law. 

These privileges are seen by the 
Chinese as excqitiooally generc^ 
but they have been treated with 
indifference by the newcomers, 
who haveproduced 30,000 children 
since 197K according to Mrs. JL 

This rqiresents a birth rate far in 
excess of the national target, and 
Chinese officials conceded tl^t it 
had proved almost impossible to 
enforce family planning r^ula- 
tions among the refuge*^ 

In one refugee fishiiig seille- 
menu near the southern port of 
Beihai in Guangxi Zbuang region. 



^ 


A Vietnamese boy refugee in Beihai, China. 


L'ly Stai Mul 51, proudlv dis- 
played eight of her 14 children to 
visitors. Six of the children slept on 
two mattresses in one small room 
of the five-roo.rn apanmeriL Anoth- 
er six had married, and themselves 
had produced 13 children. They 
lived elsewhere in the seiUemeoL 

The husband. Loo Chong Kfaol 
57. said he paid 10 yuan tSS) a 
month in rent He earned IJOO 
yuan in 1983 as a member of a 
refugee fishing cooperative. Any 
repairs in the apanmenL he said, 
were paid for by the local commu- 
nity. 

According to Xu Lthua. director 
of refugee resettlement for Guang- 
dong. several hundred refugees 
have slipmed away from tbe farms 
and left for Hong Kong and Ma- 
cao, often simply in order to bare 
children. Some refugee women, she 
added, reijortedly had sold 
girls — «4iich are less highly prized 
than boys — in Macao for more 
than 2,000 Hong Kong dollars 
(S250). 

After Yuan Wen Shun was res- 
cued at sea he was offered the 
chance to remain on a Chinese 
state farm. It is an <^tion he would 
not have had in Thailand. Malaysia 
or Indonesia, but he quickly turned 
it down. Now he is preparaing to 
apply for reseiilemem in the W»l 


Chinese officials indicated that 
be would not be encouraged to 
change his mind. For the Iasi two 
years. China has done what it can 
to discourage oeiv airiv'als. short of 
pushing them back out to sea. 

lo 1983,337 boats carrying 6.392 
Vietnamese refugees pul into Chi- 
nese ports on their way to Hong 
Kong. One official in the port of 
Beihai said “virtually none” of the 
refug^ had expressed the wish to 
remain in China. The rest, he said, 
were given water and 15 kilograms 
(33 pounds) of food for each refu- 
then sent on their way. 
Diplomats in Beijing say’s there 
is “a certain resentment” in China 
at having received only one-Fifth of 
the funds ailoied to Thailand by 
tbe office of the UN High Commis- 
sioaer for Refugees since 1978. 

Diplomats and l^N officials held 
out little prospea of increased 
funds for China, given the pressing 
demands from rnugee crises else- 
where. They expressed coocern 
thai the Chinese might lose pa- 
tience and follow the example of 
other Southeast Asian countries by 
toughening their attitude toward 
those seeking asylum. 

Such a developmem. an official 
said, would be “understandable 
but demoralizing" for refugee work 
in the r^oo. 


Border Tension Grows 
Between Thailand, Laos-^ 

Bangkok Fears Influence of VieMon; 
Vientiane AU^esIncurnonhyTluas 


By William Branigin 

Hin/iinghvi A(Sf Sen'iiv 

B.^NGKOK — A border dis- 
pute between Thailand and Laos 
has resulted in each country releas- 
ing a while papec denouncing the 
other as a securiiv ihreaL 

The Thai Foreign Ministry is- 
sued a 33-page document last week 
saving that Laos had become a 
“willing servam" of Vietnam by 
accepting increasing numbers of 
Vietnamese seiilere. In the Thai 
view, pervasive Vietnamese inTlu- 
ence in Laos is a major factor be- 
hind a steady flow of Laotian refu- 
gees into Thailand. 

The Thai allegations followed a 
Laotian white paper issued in 
lember concerning a conflict over 
three border villages. Laos declared 
that tbe villages — Ban Mai Ban 
KJang and Ban Sawang ^ were 
illegoJIv occupied by Thai troops 
last year, and the white paper ac- 
cused Thailand of barboring “ex- 
pansionist -md hegemooist ambi- 
lions” against Laos for centuries. 

In a recent statement, the Lao- 
tian Foreign Minisuy said that 
Thai troops launched a series of 
attacks this monlb across the bor- 
der near tbe triages “to extend 
their occupation of Lao territory.” 
but were repulsed by local militia. 
The siatemem said that “Thai 
troops heavily pounded the area 
with all cab'ber aitiliery Fire, includ- 
ing 155-milUmeterhowitzers.” 

A Thai Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man, Sawanit Kongsiri, denira that 
such actions occurred. Thailand 
withdrew its troops from the ril- 
ta gat in October, and Mr. Sawanit 
said that tbe Laotian reports were 
bring manufactured by Hanoi to 
distract attention from the Viet- 
namese dry-season offensive 
against Cambodian resistance set- 
tlements on the Thai-Cambodian 
border. 

Tbe Thai paper said Hanoi's aim 
was “to place Laos under the total 
control of Viemani” and to realize 
Ho Chi Minh's dream of an Indo- 
chinese federation that would unite 
Vietnam. Cambodia and Laos. 

It said that from tbe Commuoisi 
takeover of Laos in 1975 to No- 
vember 1984 more than 286,000 
refugees have crossed into ITiai- 
land from Laos, which has a popu- 
lation of 3.8 miUioQ. according to a 
1981 United Nations estimate. 

The Thai document said that the 
Vietnamese “have infiltrated into 
every aspect of Laos* social fabric” 
and that advisers from Hanoi were 
effectively in charge of the govem- 
menL It said that Vietnamese set- 
tlers were causing hardships and 


resentment among Laotian rea- 
dents, who were powerless to resist 
the influx. 

The Thai paper did not indicate 
the number of Vietnamese settlers 
in Laos, but Mr. Sawanit said there 
were about 60,000 new settlers in 
addition to those who had lived in 
Laos before the Communist take- 
over. The document did say that 
the settlers included former s(^ 
diers from the estimated 4SJXX) 
Vietnamese troops in Laos. 

Some Western observos of Lao- 
tian affairs expressed skqptidsm 
about the Thai aUegaiions. 

MacAlister Brown, an American 
pnrfessor from Williams CoU^ in 
Massachusetts, visited Laos in Oc- 
tober. He said be saw no eridenoe 
of a large Vietnamese influx. 

“I don't know where they'd set- 
tle,” he said. “Laos doesn’t have the 
available land.” 

He said that Vietnamese settle- 
ment was no more effective as a 
means of controlling Laos than the 
stationing there of Vietnamese 
troops. 

Mr. Brown also said that the 
Vietnamese idea of an Indochinese 
federation was a “nonstarter” and ; 
unneoessaiy to Vietnam’s control 

Laos and Cambodia. 


Bomb Damages 
Buddhist Temple 
In Indonesia 

77 u Ajseciare^ Press 

JAKARTA — A berob exploded 
Monday at one of die woridS larg- 
est Buddhist temples, cauang ex- 
tensive damage at the recently ren- 
ovated 8tb-century shrine, 
Indonesia’s education minister 
said. 

The tninix ier, Nugroho NotOSU- 
santo. did not say if there were any 
casualties from the explosion at the 
Borobudur temple. But he said nine 
of the temple's bell-shaped towers, ^ 
known as stup^ were damaged in ^ 
tbe early morning explosion. 

“The explosion was the work (rf 
terrorists who wanted to create in- 
stability in tbe nation,” Mr. Noto- 
susanlo said. He said security 
guards at Borobudur, 374 miles 
(604 kilometers) from Jakarta in 
the centralJava town of Jogjakarta, 
are bring questioned. 

The temple was reopened in 1983 
after 10 years of Festoration wwk, 
to which 27 countries contributed 
S6J million. 



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FdHroaiy 26 , 1985 , Paris 

fb/hwing the sucx'ess of our 1982 conference, we are pleased to announce a one day bribing session 

focusing on “Modemtation: Priority for the French Economy". ' 

With the cooperation of the French Government, we have gathered together the key ministere most 
directly involved with polici^ a/Ti^ting business activities in France. 

The program will include presentations by: 

PSeiTC Beregovoy, Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget 
Edhh Cressoo, Minister of Industrial Redeployment and Foreign Trade 
Hubert Cunen, Minister of Research and Technology. 

Midiel Delebane, Minister of Labour, Employment and Vocational Trading. 

Robmd Dumasf Minister of External Relations. 

-M Di«»iQthon A i t<al « p nnapla 


AddHionol insights wil be pTowded by o 
ptmdof in temcrtondbuanessrnenQnd 
bonkere, inducing: Erk Bourdoos de 0»r- 
bornere, S.V.P. end Genercd Mcnoger, 
Morgen Guorenty Trust Compcviy oF 
York,ond Ldik Le Hodvft i ge nt , Owirmcn 
oFRhSne-Poulenc 

Eoch presoitoticn w3 be foSciw^ 
queslkarvcn(i<nswerperiod.andsniuitQ- 
neous FnendvEngiish translation w9 be pro- 
vided c4dl times. 


An inipoitonf taped of the conference 
ynl be the extensive opporfuraties to engage 

in kiformcJ ciscuseon the current poEc/ 

mckers and with other business executives 
actively efoing business vvHh Fnnce. 

On Pebnxry 27, the Mirwhy of 
ol Red^skiymerti ord Foreign Trade is orgcl- 
rvzingfuadclyvisit5,exdu5^vdyfvcx)^fe^- 

enoe attendees, to industrial ^ 

picnis indueSng 


the Aerospatiale ptaa in TouiousaFuMde- 


^foeconference.ToregisierforthisexGep- 
honol conference, please axnptete and 
return the regetrotjonforrn lociciy. 


CONIB®gCE RfiOSTRAnON 



55 

S Mi-r 
!?• fS's 

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r- 

£ ii: 

^ a 

' . s 4 Uji®* 

'5 

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.I** 


INTERNATIONAL HERAtD TRIBUNE, TL^SDaY, JASVARY 22, 1985 


Page 7 


ABTS /LEISURE 



Sex-Appealing Hii 


Herald Tntnme . 

pboLORra- 

^^pher Bruce Weber 
^vc Norman Parkinson's aristo- 
^uc stance or Hoist P. HorS 

suave savoirfaire. With a blue b™- 

Hebe Dorsey 

Junta l^y tied around his hair 
s« ample bulk wrapped in flannci 
£art ^ tired corduroys, and his ' 

scuffrf boots he looks more ijjtc a . ‘r,* •**'-“ 

Ipo^boreman on his way to the worn by a aihletie nun, imay wnf esi ^l y 

^ way to ine ^boi 3^t a whitewashed back- 

Weber, who was among the 12 by anoi^ get hung up. I like doing a differeoi 

® *■ ipr KJem s men s underwear, this Siiloot^ 


^®***^t winners of awards given by 
the Council of Fashion Deserters 
« America, is one of the hottest 
pboiogniphers in the world. 

A sensitive and strittfd artist, 
Weber is perceived by fashion de- 
signers as as by Madison Ave- 
nue as a highly successful image 
utaker. With Calvin ^on, be start- 
ed a type of advertising that sug- 
gests as much as it shows. 

Weber. 37, first entered the pub- 

uc consciousriess with ads for KteQ 


want lo open another magmnf 
and see another dress? This reaOy 
tells more about your doibes than 
if she was wearing your dothes.' ** 
Weber says the sex app^ that 
his pklures for Klein eruioe stems 
from the fact that KJeiii *‘iikes to 
sec his men and women sexy." 

All (Us oould M out of hand 
were it nM for Wdtei's UCL “Cal' 
vin is also a very good editor." he 
said. "He knows exaedy where to 

^ith Lauren, Wdier said, 


t . • . , 

i- in-*.,;...- 


MamlaCoiut 
Petitioned for 
Ptiml^un/ping 

By Alex Gaw 

The Asiodaied Pros 

M anila — a FiUpino nim 
producer has petitioned the 
Supreme Coun to order the show- 
mg of an award-winning Lino 
Broclm film that has been held up 
' by a board of censors for contain- 
ing scenes and music that the cen- 
sors found subversive. 

The film, ‘‘Bayan Ko" (My 
Country), uses foot^ from anti- 
govenunent street detnansiratioas. 
It takes its title from a song that has 
b^me increasingly identified 
mtb the political opposition that 
intensified after the opposition 
leader. Benigno Aquino, was assas- 
sinated in August 1983. 

The producer. Jose Antonio 
Gonzalez, said in the petition fiM 
last week that the Board of Review 




tune worn 1^ prls. The same ap> 
proach prevail^ for Uein's per- 
fume ads, which showed a young 
couple in bed under a sheet 

Then came Weber's campaigns 
for Ralph Lauren, which were to- 
tally different. Lauren, wbo made a 
foruioe with sportswear, had a rad- 
ically opposiie image from Klein's. 
Bas^ on the rural dtarm of the 
United Slates, this image evolved 
through the yeai^ into the borae- 
and-bound grandeur of English 
suiely brnnes. Weber captured it 
arid ideniiTied Lauren's customer 
with the epitome of aristocracy. 

Weber CMoes from a small min- 
ing town in Penn^lvania. "My 
grandfather, my mother, my father, 
all loved f^os," he said in a re- 
cent interview. "I grew up aware of 
photography. In the early 70s, 1 
deddM that 1 wanted tobea phen 
lographer. But then somebody told 
me t^ if I wanted to become a 
pbolograpber. I bad to ernne to 
Paris. In the *iOs and the *60$. all 
the great photographers, like Penn 
and Avedon, were m Par^. Avedoo 
sent me to study under Usette 
wbo trained Diane Arbus. 
She was terriUc." 


Claiming he is not a fasbioi] pho- 
tographer, Weber said be was more 
intoesied in allure than dothes. 
"Why has fashion ^ to be so liter- 
al?" he said. "I w^ ( h^ awonsan 
like Anna Mago^. 1 would have 
loved to do fashioo oa Elsa Max- 
weU," 

He does not like to hang aroiuid 
with fashioa people, he sm fed 
my life doesn't b^ and end as a 
ptetographer. There's so much 
more out (here to do" — fev exam- 
ple, a book on prison athletes that 
is expected lo be published next 
year. 



Urqmh, Un^amorous hut Elite Oub 
Provides ^AUbVtoSO Washingtonians 


By Marjorie Hurtter 

Stw Yertr runes Senice 


rwov«r b). Wfebe': Mot* Mate n dim moi rtntn 

One of Bruce Weber's advenisiiig photos for C^Mn Kfeiii. 


N.Y.C. Fines Fancy French Eatery 


By Rick Hampson 

The Aaaeiaied Prea 


ja« weex loai me tsoara oi Review , ^ ^ ^ La Cole Basaue. where Manhattih'c nv*i »rt 

was in last year's Cannes Fam Fes- 7 ^n<w™“De>»»k. She.gaveine 
tivd and was named best picture 
by the Britidi Film Institute. 


In the preface to a I9S2 collection of her restanrani 
.reviews, which includes the review ttf La C6te Basque, 
Sheraton wrote, "Cleanliness |is) also importanL If a 
restaurant does not look i rhw)t on its latest 
iospecuon" by the Health DepartmenL 
"She reviewed the food," said Marvin the 

department mokesman. ‘'WeinqMcted the premises." 

On Nov. 9 the first inspector, Sydney 
reported the foUow’ing: "f^b and old mouse drofy 
pings;" a "gr^ and slippery" kitchen floor, “sup- 
plies stored dirt^ on the floor, triudi did not aSeW 
cleaning and invites infeslaiion." 

f r-A. B • ,Wey^-~\’rc When Bdvederc went Dec. 19. die reported that the 
^ Basque 1%5. m which Nov. problems remained and new ones had devel- 

dum exchange Scan^OtiS gossip about th^ aped: mad« nf inacWnw; " 

I luncheon is $25. the dumbwaiter was “encrusted with food," qImw 


N ew YORK — When Mimi Sheratim. llwn The 
New York Times', food critic, went to La C&e 
Basque in 1982 she died the "satiny" vinaigrette 
dres^g and “bradag" golden cotuommi, and gave 
the expensive French restaurant a three-star rating. 

But when the dty Health Deparunent's Jacqueline 
Mvedere in^iectd the resLauranl lad iminth she 
cited the "sliin^iadefl" ice machines and "peasy" 
floor, and gave a wanting to clean up. toui de nd/e. 

La Cote Basque, where Manhattan's elite meet to 

1 1M« «K« t<V>C B......' 


The film, co-produced by the 
French filmmaker Pierre Riessent, 
. has been shown in private screoa- 
ings in the Phili^ines but is 
banned from tfaeaiefs. 

The board said that the film's 
protest scenes “tend to undennme 
the faith and confidence of the peo- 
ple in their govemmeiit" and t^t 
the song "iu^ oppressed people 
to rise against the autboiities." 

“Bayan Ko" duonicks the trou- 
bles of a labmcr trying to raise 
money for his pr^nant ^e^s med- 
ical The prolagaoist rentes 
00 a promise not to jda a striking 
union, robs bs enqripyers and dies 
in a s^tout with poSce. 


Wdier gives a lot credit to a 
very siqiportive Kleitt. "Calvin al- 
ways letsme do the land of jticture 
I ue to do. His enthusiasm and 
courage help you a lot He never 
wants to knw wfiai the picture is 


jobs. I wasn't working for dSgners ® ^ 

then. Calvin, whom I knew 

ally, one day said- ‘Let’s do some “““ ^ wolairons 

piiLfes.' Wejust went and did it" 

involve rodenis. 

Sheraton’s review said La Cdte 8asq^ was "excel' 
lent . . . and festive, too, with fanofiil murals 
Basque scenes glimpsed tluxiu^ st^e-set windows." 

The decor she ^ed “as exhilarating as Qiristjnas." 

gaiog to he Kkt He likm to be .Among the dishes she praised were the boned qoaiJ 
surprised and rh»i,i^ whoe 8™* and Pengourdine sauce, the paupieties 

nobody else dors, ftople usually of s^c with fish inousse, the runsctles of venison, and 
ask you, *Whai exactly arc you do- all ibe pates and lenines. 

ingT’Andtiu^wfllevenhandyoua 

drawing. Not Calvin." ^ „ i* , * , 

His next cai^gn for Kleiii, LJneziiatlieqiienaiiiiratarLosAiigel^ 
diot in Mcocob is even tnore indie- New York Timer Semee 

ative of ^ essence than (he pro^ LOS ANGELES —Tta American Cinematheque; a 

wrtipe of a gid cultur^ center for ftim and xndeo arts, wiD be pmi of 
wiih a jnm aothdraped ovct the restoration of the 1935 Pan Pad& Auditorium, 
her. I told Calvin, T)o we really organizers have anmyiTvyd . 


glasses 

“were stored on dirty mats" and “uncovered pots and 
trays of cooked food were stored on the floor." 

The restaurant was fined S180 for the first set of 
victiations and S67D for the seco^ Bogner -mid The 
inspectors' findings were u pheld at a hearing request- 
ed by La Cote Basque. 

Jc^b Reyers. the lesiaurant’s maiuiger, did not 
dispute the findings. He said the conditions had hem 
corrected. 

*^ou just don't arm with the Health Depart- 
menL" he said. “One does not have a choice." 

Bogner said Ivt week that the lesourant would be 
in^oected ag^ in about two weeks and dosed if any 
of the coodiuoos dtod were foi^ 

La C5ie Basque was one of 14 restaurants on the 
lisL Anolber was ibe Blimpie's restaurant on West 
44th Street, where the most expensive item is the SZ^ 
roast-beef and cheese sandwich. 

Asked how hfelt to be in the company of La Cdle 
Basque. Blimpie’s manager, lUtti Janpasa. rroUed. 
•'What? I never heard of il" 


W ASHINGTON — For 
over a century the Ahlti Club 
has offered some m titis ci^-'s most 
fHixninent men just what its nam.* 
uiqilies, an excuse to escape into a 
fraternal world of their own. 

The club is little known outside 
its own membership. Its headquar- 
ters buOding does not have the land 
of imposing facade that the Metro- 
politan and Cosmos dubs have. It 
ies a small house, buili before 
!ivil War, it is dwarfed by a 
seven-sU^ hotel on one side and a 
nondescript building bousing ap- 
ical offices on ibe other. 

Yet it could be called the club of 
dubs, the dty's most elite. Its mem- 
bership is limited to 50 men, each 
voted in unammously, most from 
the top ranks of government and 
the ntilita^- and from the city's 
ddest fantiliei 

Yiee President Bush is amember. 
So are Quef Justice Warren E. Bur- 
ger, Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. and 
retired Justice Potter Stewart; and 
General Maxwell D. Taylor, re- 
tired, the former chairman trf the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

George C. Marshall liked to 
q>esd quiet moments amid the 
^b's incredible clutter when he 
was secret^ of state in the 1940s. 
Llewdyn Toompson, ambassador 
to the Soviet Union, was a mmber, 
along with Jttim Foster Dulles, an- 
other secretary of state; Allen W. 
Dulles, the former director of Cen- 
tra) Intelligence: and Alfred 
Gnienther, cnce stnyane mOitaiy 
commander of NA'TO. 

"We leaQy don't pitaend to be 
anything spedaL" said W. John 
Kamey, the proctor (the club's 
‘name for president), and a loog- 
liote memur who was an undersec- 
retary of the Na\y in the Truman 
admmistralion. "We're just a group 
people who like each other." 

It began in 1884, when seven 
members of the Metropolitan Club 
deetded they wanted a more sedud- 
ed spot in which to itiay poker. uH 
jokes and try tbear hand at a tittle 

ennlfin^ 

They acquired a two-room 
house, former slave quaiten, on I 


Mahler Festival in liMukHi 

!Ih» AsMxsrck/ Pnsr 

LONDON — A sevcD-moDth 
festival cddirating .the Austrian 
con^Mser Gustav Mahler and the 
in fl ue n ce of tum-of-the-ceatuty 
Ytenna on the 20th ceotuiy is 
planned for London, starting in 
March, orrami^ say. AD of Mah- 
ler's iQriniMiooies and song igrcles 
win bepofonned- 


I8th and l9Ui 
er the years it has been 
) include a modern Idtdi- 


Street between 
streets. Over i1k 
enlarg^toi 
en, a dining room, game rooms and 
various other quarters, fot even 
with the additions, the narrow red 
brick buDdiog, with its gr e en sbui- 
lets and brawn window triin, looks 
tike a 19tb-ceQ(ury retie on a bus>’ 
modem street 

At first it was known as "Thai 
Little Club." Membm still fondly 
refer to it as "The Joint" It finally 
acquired a pennanent name when 3 
member dtowed up at the door one 
night and said be was in dire need 
of ari alibi — obviously, one tt yu 
his wife mi^t believe. The name 
stuck. 

The dub has never pennitied 
women as members. Old-timers in 
the ranks say the idea has ne\*er 
come up and womeD have never 
apphed for membeisfaip. Members 
may invite their wives and othff 
women to private functions, :d- 
though not to the r^ular Friday 
luncheons. 

It was at tfae Alibi Gub that 
Nicholas Longwonh, later speaker 
of ifae House, entertaiiied his future 
wife. .Alice Roosevelt, and set'eral 
of her friends at a private din^ he 
had prepared. 


The fact that women are 
occasionaUy seen entering the cinl 
once proved somewhat embarrass- 
ing some years ago. A police offico' 
newly stationed on the street saw a 
parade of well-dressed men enter- 
ing the small bouse and became 
suqnctous enot^ to report it to 
beadquarteis. 

"So we got raided,” Kenney said 
with ^)od humor. “They thought 
we had girls in there. We didn't, of 
course, and we got h ^ strait- 
ened out” 

While mosutf the city’s exeluave 
clubs are degantly furnished, the 
Alibi Gub isduttmd with acentu- 
ry of memorabilia, a flea market of 
objects boitgbt bkk from all over 
the vraild by weB-tiavded mem- 
bers. 

There are disitiays of boomer- 
angs, a British nun cask mounted 
oa an dephant’s foot, a statue of a 
monkey devil malring a pass at a 
mermaid, an old-fashioned dgar 
lighter, a somewhat battered planet 
waO lockers in which members kept 
tiquttf during ProhibitioQ. Almost 
every ineb m wall qrace displays 
cartoons and portraits of past and 
present members. 

Kenney said: “These are the 
things thm our waves won't let ns 
keep at bone." 


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UniwI Press liuemumitJ 

NEW YORK — The siodt market soared in 
heavy tradiite late Monday with advandug is- 
sues ouinumSiniiig decUaes for the 1 1 tb consec- 
utive sesaou. 

The Dow Jones bidusuial average was up 
26.62 10 1,253.97 about an hour before doring. 

Advances led declines a 3-1 ratio among 
the 1,969 issues crosriog the New York Slock 
Exchai^iape. 

The dve-bour Big Board volume amounted to 
about 113.059 muUon shares, compared with 
86 miltion in the like period Friday. 


Afthou^ prices in laNes on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. dose in New York, Jor time 
reasons this article is based oa the ma^-ei at S 
P.M. 


Prices were Ingher in heavy trading of Ameri- 
can Stodt Exchange issues. 

Analysts said tuvcsiofs were responding to 
signs that the U.S. economy would be able to 
grow at a moderate pace in 1985 amid lowered 
inflation su^ lower mierest rates. 

Hu^ JtdmsoQ of First Albany Coip.. Alba- 
ny. New York, said the advance reflected a 
“percqrtion that the economy is picking im in 
response to the tonic iigectM by the Federal 
Reserve.” 

Mr. Johnson said in addition to recent cuts in 
the rate "reserve data released last 

week suggested the Fed has become very aggres- 
sive in iqectiflg liquidiQr both into the ecraomy 
and the ftnant^ system.” 

He said undervahiatioo of secondary siocka 


that have been beaieo down in the past two 
years, combined with the Fed moves, helped 
fuel the advan«. 

Last week secondary issues Qiitperformed the 
big-capitatization issues of the indusiriaU. 
Although the Dow gained 9.27 overall last 
week, the index clos^ loirer in evesy sesaoa 
fnxn Tuesday through Friday after a l^poini 
gain Monday. Whtie that was ba^^Tenbig. ad- 
vances were topping declines in every session, 
the same as the previous week. 

“You're seeing a revival of individual interest 
in the market,'' said Michael Metz, of Oppohd- 
mer & Co. He said individuals were re^od^ 
to declines in shon-term interest rates and in- 
creased confidence abmit the economy. 

He said blue-chip slocks in the Dow index 
were under pressure last week as a result of 
positions takes by professioaal traders who 
nave offsetting poshioos in stock index options 
and futures. January options nqrired Satur^y. 

Jeny HmUeof Sanford C Benistein Co. said 
the stock market was respon din g to a combina- 
tion of fundamental dr^eiopmests, meitvAmg 
lepOTis of a slower economy with steady 
growth, low inflatitm and lower intoest rates. 

He said an analysis of trading urads showed 
the Slock market was "overboughr going inu> 
tfae Mtxiday session, and thus the market was 
"defying gravity" as sU)cks pushed higher. 

On the trading flom*, Intentational fiusmess 
Machines Cotp. was near the top of the actiie 
list and sl^y higher at midday. IBM's Roim 
Corp. unit announced new products in its 
“ntooemail'' tine. 


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514b 5146 514b + 1b 
341* BM 344% +1M 
6M 44V* 44M+V% 

m I4M 144% + re 

334% a 334%+ re 

are ore sore— i 

*4 U 64 +3M 
344% 234% 36M+ re 
35M 334% 34M+ re 
a 3sre 2Sbb ‘ 

an rare aov*+ m 

42U 40H 431* +14% 

00 B7M as + re 
30* an 0 re + v* 

60M 6DM 60M + M 

24M 964% 2ire+ re 
74% 7M 74% 

27M an 27M + 4% 
1SH 141% MM + M 
194b T9M 174b + U 

174% lore rare— re 
0 0 0 
ure lire ure + 4h 
16 m 16 + re 

iSM 15 ISM + M 
304b 27M asu, + re 


Sfc. 


Ctact 


174b 14M OubMn 
0 32M ClMttP 

1719 144% Ouorpf 
BV9 ISM Ceochm 
3*M 23M Coawof 
30 S4V% Csnpf 
66 V Cocoa 
BM 74* cetaa 
371* aSM CaJmm 
are 201% ceioPDi 
37M 37Va CaliAik 
174* 94% CoJFdS* 

314b sn CoIPmi 
SOM 37M Shlnd 
37V% 0 SiGa . . 

S5 40 c5g%R| XOM1.1 

sore are coopi 3*s 

H17 0* CSOpfelSB 1X5 

WTVb 0 esOpfnISaSMS 
401* 27M Combln 130 63 
144b 2S4b CmbEn 1J4 X6 
isre t Cemoib 

MM ISM CotnMfl 
46M Wife Conm 
an are cmwE 
I6M 13 CwEpf 
MM 13re OmE of 
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are in cwbpi 
34%b sn CwEpf 
66 S4M CwEpf 
0 46 ewEpf 

asre ISM CpmES 


17 ure IT 
Tore 274b 30 

17 in m + M 

174* 171* 17H + M 
37 BM V + M 


UM 7n CvnESpBJO 113 
321% an conuol IB X2 18 120 
30 ISM CPms J4 J 3b 1571 


36M 36 Gpmppr 
are II Cpmpse 
46M 27 OpIVHI 

30M W4b com* 

234b UM Conolr 


... .. + 1 * 

UD U 7 4V ■ 

IJO X4 IS4 

V 33 6 333 

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1J3 6J 3 . 

276 4* 14 2700 63M 63M 63M + M 

1302 194% 124% I2M— re 
IB 4J 10 TK an 27H sn+iM 
IBb S3 TO 139 344% MM HI* + re 
130 33 7 TB 40* 3B4% 40M +11* 
.M J 14 3B in ITM in+H 
1*0 S3 7 342 0 314% 3IM + 1* 

2B43I0 3nvre57t%S74b+M 
lit 111 6 997 2Wb av% ai*+4% 

■ ■■ 1 0 a a 

5 25M an an— 4% 
loocH* losrerasre— ire 
asKWirewsreiesre— re 

W was 37M 0 0M + M 
13 SV 334% 374% 30* + M 

IJ 13 771 134% rare m+ m 

XI 12 M m 164% M4b+ M 
3 349 154% I4M 144b— I* 
6 839 274b 27M 271%— M 

13 isre m m— 1% 
44 ure 1*M U4b+ re 

3*n 64M 64 64M+ M 

1 are 214% ai%— m 
3 334% sn sn 

IMOz 4S 64M 64M— 14b 

MOs sre ssre ssre— m 
5 50 33M are 3M + re 

100% 04 M M +e 

~ an 374%an+iM 

274% an 27M+ 46 
274b 371% 20%— re 
ure ISM ISM— re 
an 0 an+iH 
304% M B + re 
334% 331* 32M— I* 

lire m iire+ 1% 

359% 3SM 3SM + M 
14 13M UM 

lore 27M B — M 
401* ITM 40*+ 1* 
BM SIM are + 4% 
a 304* 3BM— re 
VM 414* flre+ M 
59% Mh 59%+ M 
ran 231% 33V* 2B%— ire 
3BZ3SM 2SM BM— M 
310% 40*0 4DM SOM— M 
350% 401% 4ire 40M+ re 
aoc 42 4ire 40 +3M 
1% Mre BM M 

17 rare in 179 % + re 
a aore 30M aoM 
V ai% a%% sire + m 
B 32 214% aib + re 
a aoM an* an+ M 
II IA 14M H9I + 4% 
13 139% in— M 


3J0 1X7 
IJO 1X4 
230 122 
031 133 
237 11.1 
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0*0 13.1 
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133 fj 


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774 


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174% m COnrac *0 23 
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401% as CpnE Pf X6S 11* Vto 
14M 3S CemPO 1*4 A4 10 A 
are 3DM CnaFris IJB U 12 STSS 
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in 41% ComPw • 208 

98 13 CnPpU XI6 WS 

38 131* CnPpn XSi 1» 

471b 9M CnPpfD 7AS 1X5 

a an enPprs 7JS ra.i 

sn 39 CnPpfG 7J» IXS 
rare lire cnPi*v 4*o ixs 
are 9u cnPpru 160 iC 

3SM IBM CnPprT 330 1X7 
an 1IM CnPprR XOD 1X6 
36 m OiPprP X98 113 
25M TOM CnPprN |J5 H* 
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IS 7 enppru la 17J 

are 11 copprs SB 1X7 

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29% a CofMIri 
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41* 4%CmHdll 

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m 364% CfOato 33 23 12 3433 361% 384% Sn+IM 

S& S.. S*X"Pl xa IXI WM 57M 371* 37M 
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49% 1 viCeBkU 
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0 inCOOPU Bo J 3 
19 134% CopiTr *0 U 8 _ 

3A UM tePvW *8 XI U IA 

2SM TIM COPwM JB 4J 13 0 

BM ITM CowWpl 148 1LI 

234% ISM Corrim J4 3J is 

“ ■ " J6 X4 II 866 

2J6 X5 U @ 

1J8 23 9 laa 
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110 

11^ 

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37M 37M 3746+ M 
7M 7V% 7M + 9% 

34% are n 
414* are 414b + 9b 

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are 2 ire sn+re 


144% IBM CMIn 
731% 571% CornG 
3sre 229% Corn 
8400 am cexCffl 

n 4M cteiB 
409b 0 Craw 
sn asreCrarplM 
271% I6M CroMi ... 
are 15M CrBN PI XIB IU 
an I7M CrmpK 1J8 15 10 
474% 3A CnHiCk 
384b 2796 CrwZol 
are 0 cr2oia 
are SB orzMs' 

56M IBM Culbra *0 
sn MM CMIlWt 
a BMCulhilwi 
m 4VA CmaEa UB 2* 4 
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01* 271% Cvelon 1.10 3* 11 


112 SSM BM are— re 
10 19% IM IM— re 
729 are a sn + re 

101 33M are 3nb + 9b 
177 IA MM |4M 
a IBM 18 in+ 9b 
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36 3m ^ re 
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2^ 134% 12 1396 + re 
'7896 mb 7m+1M 

a asre a«re+9re 
are 0M are+n 




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W 230 *1M 574% $1 +0M 

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a are abb 2 T 96 + re 
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0 isa sn sn in +19% 
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3 IBM lore HM + M 
111 am a 3ire + 9% 
36 4n 0 sn + re 


in 9M pomqnC B IJ a Sls 1196 UM UM 

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07U 644* DortKr 


^Continued on Page 8) 









iVlondai’s 

Mia; 

Qosii^ 


Tobtes include ttie notionwtde prices 
up to the doting on Wall Street 






1 ^ 




itManth 
HWILOW SlOdk 


ah. ClOB 

Dtv. mPE mwghLw Qual.Oi^ 


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a law 


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tm 
27 
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41 

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US 
18 
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law 7v» 

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27W ISW 
a 24W 
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24W 

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m 




the Mujisny of Foreign Ecomaac 
and Trade told the Beijing R^tfw. 


^ I ff : 1 1 rg * ;A 'i 1 :>J I Vfc*A J t ^ 1 


nies to remit abroad profits from approved 
to the dometic China market, aoeordiiuto^^ . 
expert, Liu Yimin, ^dio was quoted in the mcst 
f Xnt edition of the weekly publication. 

Frtrwt ga t^rnhang e can be ca med e ither diwct 
from the consumer or by converting local cur- 
rency received through the Bank of Ouna. - 

Mr. Liu said the companies will pay taxes of- 
20 percent to 40 percent based <m progresave ' 
rat^ and a local lO-pcrcent surtax on assessed ^ 
totals. Investors remittii^ profits will be 
empt^ from usual tax. 

Onjant ventures, Mr. Liu said conuaitiesin 
cp«wna 1 eocnonuc zones, Hainan island and the 
14 open coastal cities win pay a straigSt 15 . 
percent lax and none on repatriated profii' 
dsewfaeie will pay 30 percent, a local 
yj irtax of 10 percent and another 10 perceni on . ' 
remitted pro^ 

The 30 -year time limit for contracts may be 
extended for those with high investment, long 
lead linws and low returns. 

Export products can be freely priced bat 
d o me s tic prices will dqiend on local prices arid - 
costs. At contract expiry, dqnedaied assets wiD - 
be divided between partners by a liquidation 
cftimnitiee oD the basis oC shares bdd. 


42 asw TDK 

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ISW IIW TndvcR II 13 13W I3W imi- W 

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s— stock SPIR. Dividend begins wim dote « wilt. 

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' —dividend eeld b, ftloek Ri erecedlng 13 nionili& ecfimt ,,— 1 
cosn value on ei>.divldend or o» 4 lMrlWlwiaalii **""*“Md 
w— newvearivWoh. 

V — irodhie hotied. 

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der ite Bonkrupln Aci. or seeurilics osMSedbvSlKni^^^ 

wd — wfien dlshioutod. 

— when Issued. 

«m— wHn Monontc, 

A — ex.dlvldenda ox-rleiitk. 

«cHc — ekMftfrWutiOfi, 
x«» — wilheul Mmrranls. 

V — e«.dividendend sola In full, 
vid— vido. 

A— sales In lull 


News hot from the 
trading floor in 

Eduard 

Rchihachs 

V\&fch. 



'=R- 





































































































-?.i 


Stadstics Index 






AMEX prlCBS P.I3 
AAAEX MOlH/lawvP.ia 
NVSE prlcAf P. 7 
NVSE M«ta/l9W» P. 8 
COrtO0l«ii SiVCia P.14 
Cwnncr rnt«s P. 9 
CMIKKKSnH P.10 
CMvHsidt p.10 


Banunn reowis p.n 
Pitno rei» riMM p.ij 
GoM markets p 9 
imeresi ram p! 9 
si»mmar» p 7 
OPHOBS pjo 

OTC stock P.13 
Other markets P.14 


licralbSSribunc 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S.Stod£ 
Report, Page 7. 


• . < 


.. '»i' 




Page 9 




:/.y 


V7 




futures and OPTlfMiK 

Treasury Accommodates 
Growing Long-Term Marl 

By HJJMAIDENBERG 

^•ttmanonal HenU Tnbane 

N A# ^ elemeat of uncertainty entered 

™ last Tuesday, when be 

bonds to be auctioned as pan 
to «demptim afte i«) longer be suigS 

art^Tzf^ .SeTiS^^otS!^ * “* ““ 

The move wm taken to accommodate the erowins mar^t in 

ooupt^ twice a year. For ^ 

these investors, the Treasury’s IT T7, 
caD provision meant that they i 06 deuverv 

might not enjoy the aniidpat- t ^ i. r 

ed price rise in the final Hw IBCtOr has become 

important to the 

»>«»°Jfatnres market 

traders there calculate prices ~ 

ba^ to a large extent on coupon value and time to maturity. " 
said Nor^ E. Mams, first vice president and financial futures 
resttren director at Drexel Buninam Lambert Inc. in Chicago. 

Many traders t hink that the 30-year bonds now outstanding 
nwy prove the che^est to deliver against maturin g futures, h4r. 
Mains said. 

The defavery factor has become important to the bond futures 
mantel bec a u M it has become an integral pan of the government 
s®®***^®business, not merely a hedging or speculaow vehicle. 

In December, for exan^le, a record 26,383 bond futures, each 
wim a face value of $100,000, were canri^if d through the actual 
deuyeiyofsecunties. ThiswasZ.! percent the face value of all 
such bonds outstanding. 

“Actually, each quarteiiy bond futures maturity in the past 
year hu rented in record deliveries,” Mr. Mains '’Treasuiy 
securities dealers find the futures delivery mapAanis m a conve- 
nient way to sell or acquire inventory.” 

At the same time, however, the record deliveries have put 
l\ many bond futures speculators and short sellers (who sell 
M. bonds th^ do not own) in a precarious situation at each 
quarteriy contract ejqpiration. 

“These Soaked’ shc^ often bad to pay dearly for higb-coupon 
and high-price deliverable bonds,” Mr. Mains noted. “In Dec^ 
b^, for example, half the bonds delivered were the rdatively 
high-prioe lOlte of 2012, with the rest divided between the 12s m 
2013 and the 12Js of 2014. 

"*We think this helps omlain why bond cash and futures prices 
have tended to jump at delivery tunes during the past year,” be 
said. 

But this situation could also bendit qieculators itiio ^read the 
Treasury bond and bfll fiitures, said AJmi C. L^enten, presideat 
of the financial futures unit o( the Twenty-First Securities Corp. 
inNewYwk. 

“For various reasons, the yield curve between the short and 
l(mg end of the Treasury securities maricet has been very positive 
the past year, which means yidds on notes and bonds h^ been 
modi higl^ than those on bills,”' Mr. Leventen said. 

Last Friday, for exanqxle, March bond futures closed at 71 14- 
32s, which translates into an annual yidd of 11.73 percent, while 
the same 90-day UH contract finished at 92.04^ equivaleat to' a 
coupon yidd of 8.24 percent 

Suppose, Mr. leventen said, that 1^ ddhroy time in March the 
yidd curve remains more or less the same and the yidds on both 
have risen, say, 100 basis points, or hundredths of a full percent- 
age perint This would mean a bfll futures price of 9.24 and a rate 
of 91 .09. For the bonds, this would mean a fatnies price (tf 6S 31- 
32s and a yield (rf 12.73 percent 
Because each basis point move in bills is worth $25 per contract 
with a face value of SI niilltnti, the decline of lOQ basb perats 
(GoDthmed on 13) 


Currency Rates 


] 


Late tnterfaonk rotas on Joa 21 , exdudng fees. 

Official ffadngs for Amsterdorn. 8russeb,Fradhirt. Milan, Ptvis. New York fo^ 
2 PM 


AMsteteen 

■rotsstotol 

R uu fcl v rt 

iCb) 


NewYorttCe) 

Pvto 

Tekye 

Znrieli 

I ecu 

ISMt 


$ 

3S81 

049 

USB 

1.125 

1,9474W 

Clend 

9714 

2S3S7S 

07608 

B574S1B 


C 

AMI 
71 .44^ 
US9 

&19100 

lAfS 

2BSM 

26013 

B4SSS 


IMS. P.F. lU. OMr. B.P. S.P. YW 

110M* asBAS* 0.114 ^ &A42* 13430*141359 

20JB 6339 33S0B* 177355 ^ 23J305 2SM* 

_ 3Z.A4* 139X 0031* 4312* 1IB.92* 1349* 

15M 1292 2.19333 4327S 7132 23905 2M.10 

51475 200lM S4330 303H 73030 73BI 


3JM31 — 4.915 V 

80.19 3A.1B 1337* 

BAM * 27345 * AI3S7 

22229 A31 135530 

3JD90II 937HA MA. 


Z7112 15393* 33425 3M7* 

70.97 40035 * 9S32 ^ 

7AM* 4.190* IJm2* 

253 443101 13692 I77J53 

339B4 51.9005 2404* 2473SI 


Dollar Values 




I 

BWI*. 033 

08157 AHbetaS 13354 

20547 AH5rtaliteBnB 2235 
BS1SS ■9l0llM5to.5ree6 4330 
27S17 CwdlMO 13867 
OMBI HMltetinill 113SU 
2UD1 FtoBtokMork 5361 
00010 erMitteocOinn 13215 
21203 HSOBKBOet 779K 


* Carrwey 
E«hr. 

297B5 IrMiS 
88II5 mMsktoUl 

2209 KOkidHBtoar 
240M Mtoknr.rtoBBn 
2W 5iw«.towo 
2050 PMLMM 
OMSB PortsteteB 
03792 Swdirtvel 


U33 

13219 

55175 

23059 

241 

9.1975 

12457 

17201 

33ni 


e«l«. U33 

24SS fOlPOiOlS 2190 
0430 OAfncoomd 23811 
03012 OKmoaMOO 83205 
20057 SPHLMHIB lUM 
210M SwoOkfOM 9.12 
00254 IWmS 3933 
03357 TMboM 2737S 
•3733 UJLB.ilrfea» 25735 


8$Ih«ob: 1.1«I IrUS 

iBt Ci«iim«w hwe <b) Anvwnos oetded to bwone PBond tc» Araowils needte loouv ont drttar CM 
1Mb o5 NIB to) Units of 1300 (y) UfBtS oftOaOD 

Bmhnt iBrumMi Banco Commerdala llollana < Mlanl : Omnle al 
Balk f«kw yert); Banoun n^fenale eb Pwb m 

/rttonwTtomb d'/BiwMswiierir tettwr, r7yot wrMin). ewier aaw »wi WOTw* «w 


Interest Rates 


] 


EnrocDTrenc^ Deposits 

BwlM 


Jan. 21 




Frandi 

Starone Fixne ECU SDR 

121k- 1215 1M> lim 91b - 99k 79b - 0 Ml 

13 . 12)b 10H- lOto 91b - 9 9b 7«b -a«k 

113h.12 IMh. 10«b 9lb • 99b B - BW 

Tito - llto llto ■ 11% 9 lb ■ V 9b aw - Bto 

T,« — -- II to- 

M d^aisi • CMkonk 

Soureas: Atom Gutwanty tOoHar, DM, Sft »««* FFh LMi Bank «CW. Citibank 

(SORi. 


1M. 

M. 

m. 

UK 

IV. 


DMor 
Bto - M 
Bib • Bto 
Bto - Bto 
B9b-B9h 
Bto - Bto 


Sib - S9b Stb • 57b 
S9b - 5to 5to - 5to 
Sto - 5M 5to - 5to 
59h .5 5to -5% 
5to -5 5tt -Sto 



Asian Dollar Rates 


JML 21 


Bib -Btb 
Sounof; Rmriars, 


2nHS. 
Bib - 84 b 


imss. 
Bto -Bto 


smec. 

89b -Bib 


Key Money Bates 

thdteii States 


dose Prt*. 


nioeewit RdlB 
Patera) Funds 
Prime Role 
Braker Loon (koto 
Comm. Poiwr, 30-179 doys 
teianHi Troesurv BHU 
Bfltontti Tfcosury BUis 




.4 

J . . 



CD's days 

, CD^«M*days 

§ 

Ceraain 

u 

'h^ 

I !•*' 

i-Mitbord Roto 
OviraIgM Rote 
One iWoDlli intertMBtk 
tenonin tfteraonk 
teimm Intertetok 

France . 



Britain 

Bonk Bess Rob 
Ooll Money 
9I4)av Treasury BUI 
>inanlli inlertiank 

Japan 

Discount Rate 
Coll Money 
424kiv intertank 


CloH Pm. 

13 13 

lEto ITto 
1 1 toll 15/15 
1211 15/33 


-tv 


intonemlon Role 
Con kitomv 

iiifirOartk 
Pnwrttt IMbtoonk 
*<>"ntli IntoffeoM 


lOto IBM 
IBto to 7/15 
Iffto 10 7/15 
TOto lOto 
TOto lOto 


*"*te*.- Aeuierx CemimroBoMb CnBit Ly- 
"toiate ueros Bank. Bank o( 7Mm 


ajm. PJ5k ctitoe 

30735 3B7J5 - 9-70 

W.15 - - Bfl 

306JJ7 305.77 — 105 

J0775 307JS + IL2S 

30730 M735 — 0.75 

^ _ 307.90 >J0 

Jnpneki in UA5 per «nee 
Soufcni Rfvtcfi, 


HMW ItoPB 
LuunMure 
PM-IS 1125 kllDl 
Zuriefl 
London 
New York 


OPEC’s 

Output 

Drops 

jpnoducfim Seen 
Bdow C^big 

CatHplled by Om St^ From Di^dus 

LONDON — OPECs oU output 
in early Januaiy fell below the car- 
id’s sdf-in^iosed ceiUng of 16 mil- 
lion barrels per day for the first 
time, the Peuoleum Inielligence 
Weekly said Monday. 

The authoiilative newsletter esti- 
mated the carters daily output at 
I5.S million to IS.9 mmioo barrels 
per day in early Januaiy. In the face 
of slaw demand, the cartel agr^ 
OcL 31 to reduce its production 
cdling from 17.5 raillion barrels 
per day. 

The early Januaiy production es- 
timate represent a drop of about I 
miliiou barrels per day from (he 
fourth quarter of 19S4. Adoption 
of strict auditing procedures ibe 
Organization of Petroleum Ex^n- 
ing Countries at its year-end meet- 
ing in Geneva, as as prevailmg 
soft markets, helped the trend, the 
newsletter said. 

Petroleum Intelligence Weekly 
DOW puts OPECs November out- 
put at around 16.7 million barrels 
per day, about level with October. 
Saudi Arabia's output was around 
3.8 million barrels per day and 
Iran’s rose sharply to 2.4 million 
barrels per day from 400.000. 
There were cutbacks from Indone- 
sia, Kuwait, (^lar and Venezuda, 
the newsletter said 
In another report, the Middle 
East Economic Survey, quotmg a 
reliable OPEC source, said Mon- 
day that OPECs production in 
January had drqjped to 14 million 
barrels per day or less. The newslet- 
ter said January output in Iran was 
I.l millicm banrels pw day and in 
Saudi Aral^ 3 J million. 

In Riyadh, OPEC experts Mon- 
day ended two days of talks on 
price difiereniials and a number of 
del^aies rqx>rted a satisfactory 

nub-img 

Two oil ministers attended, 
Sbeikfa Ahmed Zald Yamani of 
Saudi Aral^ and Tam David- West 
Nigeria. 

Mr. David-West said the experts 
considered a Kuwaiti plan to re- 
place OPECs bcDcbmaric price for 
Arab lighL currently S29 a barrel, 
orith an aveiage price for all of 
OPECs various g^cs. Hk Nige- 
rian wrinirter said Other prcq)0^ 
were conridered, but he refured to 
daborale. 

(Reuters, AP) 


New York’s Boom in Arab Banking 


New Arrivals 
Lodc-foraNidie 
In U.S. Market 

By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Times Servue 

NEW YORK — Only four 
years ago. New York’s financial 
potpourri had only one Arab 
ingredient; tbe UBAF Arab 
American BanL Today there 
are more than 20 Arab banks in 
New York, beneficiaries of lib- 
eralized banking laws and of 
their own vision of titis city as 
their new frontier. 

No one is entirdy sure what 
ib^ are all doiim or if they 

all will survive, m fact, some are 
finding it exceedingly dilYicult 
to gel much business in the 
higuy competitive New York 
markcL 

”I actually tried to get an 
account from tbe PLO mission 
here,” said one Arab banker 
who aeiffld not to be identified 
by nan^ referring to the Pales- 
tine Liberation Orgaiuzation. 
“But Ui^ said tb^ were very 
happy at Chemical,” the oi^ 
b^‘ with an office at the Unit- 
ed Nations. 

But if Arab banks in New 
York sometimes find it difficnlt 
to win even Arab clients, Arab 
bankers still believe it riiould be 
possible to compete successful- 
ly by ^ding a nicbe. 

“Why would an American 
company leave 15,000 banks 
and deal with an Ar^ bank? Or 
any fenriga bank?” arited Fakh- 
ruddiii Khalil, senior executive 
vice prerident of tbe UBAF 
Arab American Bank, which 
was ebanered in New York in 
1976, long before any otho' 
Arab baiiks arrived. “You have 
to have a specialty. And that 
special^ is knowledge of the 
Middle EasL” 

Mr. Khalil’s bank, whb assets 
in late 1984 of $1J2 billion, 
works with U-S. eiqxirters seek- 
ing Arab markets. It finances 


Will H 

TteimaMArtbbMtahNwrVbtfcriiiMWemMttoRaBwMMdoM h 
mnteno30,l884 temto 1 

Snk 

nnWoH) 

WMlBB 

UBAF Arab Amorlem Bonk 

si.afi7.4 

UA.-ehwtored uMduyel 
AmbeonMrSunbMk 

SaudlntemallafialBank . 

S41.2 

Btseftel Afrit conioniiin 
bMricbMMilnLetMan 

Arab African bitomotlQnal 
Bwtk 

331 .4 

Branch ot Arab eeniQiltoni 
bsnkbsNdbiCdre 

Arab Benkine Coiparatlen 

320.1 

Branch of Knaritt-EsyptlBn 
bankbiiadtaBriiraln 

Tbe Gulf Barrie 

305.6 

Wmeh of taordr ewrad by Kih 
vnB Rwetawit tafflly 

ThaNaBonMCoramarolal 

Biirir 

280.1 

Branch of higra! Soadf Ar» 

DVI CMBIfQB Dm 

Bank Audi (U.SJD 

133.0 

U.8.-ehwBrad aMdsry Ota 
SwtoafauadLabanatebaiik 

DubWBank 

132.8 

Bfwich of tank owntd by 
profnlmnl EUal tartly 

Quit MamstlonM Bank 

11B.3 

BnnebafAnbcontemijm 
bank braid In Bahr^ 

Tba Unitad Bank of Kuwait 

60.7 

Bra.’ich el Kuoritt eenaGrihn 
cnc otiiD ri Lonoon 


80 W 8 I 

>wwara»radawnwifi»aewd 


trade, arranges jewt ventures, 
and seeks d^osits from corpo- 
rations and institutions. That 
strategy produced a pn^i for 
the bank of S4J million for the 
first nine months of 19M. 

The local boom in Arab 
banking was made pos^Ie by 
the iDteniatiooal Banking Act 
of 1978, ahich suspended the 
redprodQr requiremenl to get a 
federal bank dianer. Before 
then, a Saudi baiik, fix' exam- 
ple. could not get a federal li- 
cense unless U.S. banks were 
allowed to operate in ^i«4i 
Arabia. 

Even after the 1978 act, red- 
prod^ remained a requirement 
to get a bank charter in New 
Yolk state, until New Yoik re- 
pealed that restriction last fall. 

New Yok has attracted vir- 
tually all of the Arab banks that 
have come to the United States, 
although one chose Washington 
D.C another established a 
branch in Texas. Analysts ex- 
pect a few more branches to be 
established. 

The Arab hanks in New York 


nte New Yont' Times 

run the gamut from those that 
technically are New Y(^ msti- 
tutiofls, owned by Arab inves- 
tors, to branches of bank chains 
that have offices across the 
Middle EasL 

Few seek dqxuiis from indi- 
viduals, altboi^h Bank Audi of 
Lebanon has aggressively pur- 
sued wealthy Ld»nese-Ameri- 
cans for tiidr business. It gener- 
ated a profit of S35jX)0 in it 
first seven months of deration, 
through December 1983. And 
thepreadent of the U S. sobad- 
' iary, Joseph G. Audi said it is 
now Biqianding rapidly and will 
rqxnl net earning for 1984 of 
OKHe than $300,000. 

Smne institutions from Gulf 
countries l&e Kuwait and Bah- 
rain came to New York because 
they were flush with ddlars and 
wanted luentive mvestmeots. 
Others, sudi as the Ai^ Bank, 
have branch networks and 
wanted to add the United 
States to the list so (hat tho^ 
could transfer funds more easi- 
(GnUiniierlwi Page 13) 


Continental Says 
1984 Loss Was 
$1.09 Billion 


Hanon, Renault’s Oiainiiaii, Beskns 


By Axel Krause 

iniemaiional Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Bowing to govern- 
ment pressure. Bernard Hancn re- 
signed as chairman of Renault, 
France's ailing state-owned auto- 
maker. (he company said Monday. 

The board, at a meeting Tues- 
day, is expected to accept the rcsig- 


natitm. Senior govenunent officials 
said that Mr. Hancm would be sao- 
ceeded 1^ Georgy Besse. curnadly 
cfaairnum (rf P6dimey Ugjne KuU- 
'mann SA, a natit^Iized metals 
conmany. 

hfr. is expected to be efea- 

ed to the 18-member Renault 
board Ttiesday, and then be nomi- 
nated as ghalTOan 


He is expected to be confim^ 
as RenanlrS rfiairmHn and cfaitf 
ocecutive effioer at a calnnet meet- 
ing Wednesday. 

Some ct^any officials said 
tb(^ were bitter over tbe manna' in 
whidi Mr. Hanon was removed. 
Neither the company nor Mr. 
Hanon has commented publically 
(Cotttinofd on nqge 1^ 


Remers 

CHICAC^ — Continental 11^ 

National Bank A Trust, reported 
Monday a net loss in 1984of 51.09 
bOlion conqiared with a profit ai 
$108 mUhon the year before. 

The loss amnuntgd to $26.99 per 
share omnpared to a per-share 
pn^i of $2.46 in 1983. The corpo- 
TBiioD rqiorted a 44-percent in- 
crease in fouith-quarter profit to 
$36.0 minion, or 12 cents pa share, 
from S2S.0 n^'on for (he like peri- 
od in 1983. 

Continental said that it had net 
loan losses of $48 mUlion in the 
fourth quarto, including a $23-inil- 
lion chatgectff of sovoeign risk 
loans, compared with $103 mOlioa 
in the fourth quarter last year. 
Gross cha^ieoffs for (he las( 1984 
quarter totaled nullion. vrith 
S12 million in recoveries. 

The fouitlKiuaiter chaiwoffs do 
not include lo^ scrid to the Feder- 
al Deposit Insurance Co. as pan of 
a S4.^biIlioD bailout plan in ndiich 
Continental shareholders surren- 
dered 80 percent of their control to 
tbe federal govenunoit. 

The bank nearly ccdltqised last 
spring when big deposilois wit^ 
ilrew tbeir fun^ because of worries 
about Continental’s Urge number 
of proUem loans. 

Under the restructuring, Conti- 
oental transfened $53 mOlion in 
inans to the FDIC in the fourth 
onarter and can transfa aimther 
SL^ billion through SepL 26, 
1987. About 70 percent of remain- 
ing proUem lo^ are digiUe for 
truker to tbe FDIC. 

Continental said non-p^orm- 
ing loans were $1J)18 bulion on 
Dec. 31, or 4.1 pocent of total 
loans, conqmed with $949 miDioo 
or 3.6 per^t at 30. Omti- 
nental held S1.9M mllion in non- 
peifonning loans, or €2 percent of 
the total at year-end 1983. 

The 1984 provision for loan 
losses totaled $801 nnUioii plus a 
$42S-millioD, second-quarter pro- 
vision For the loss <m sale of loaiu 
to tbe FDIC Tbe prior year’s pro- 
visicM was $395 mulion. 

Tbe conmany said total net ebar^ 
geoffs in 1984 were Sl% million 
compared with $387 miDioo in 
1983. It said the increase was due to 
revised guidefines £nxn the U.S. 


Comptrdler of the CUiteacy re- 
miired as part (rf the restructuring 
pla& 

At Dec. 31. 1984, the reserve for 
loan lo ss es st^ at $366 mni««n or 
1.5 percent of total loans. That 
conq»res with $356 millioD or 1 J 
periCTt d loans on SepL 30, 1984 
and $382 milliQn or 12 perdat of 
onts tonding loans at ycar-eod 
1983. 

Giatniental’s bank borrowings 
at tte Federal Reserve Bank of 
Chicago stood at ^9 ItiHion on 
Dec. 31 and averaged $3B Ullioa 
in tk fourth quarter and $6.1 bil- 
liOD in tbe third quarter. 


DaUarSUdes 
AmidConcem 
For baervention 

Tie Assedaied press 

. LONDON — The doUar 
drifted brouDy lower in light 
trading Monday in J^ian and 
Eurtqie amid conoeni over cen- 
tral-bank intervention agmnst 
the U.S. cunoKy. 

Thae was little impact ap- 
parent in currency marke(s to 
the aan of tbe seomd term of 
Preadent Ronald Reuan. Dur- 
ing his first teim, the dc^ rose 
more than ^ pocenL 

Tkadets remained wary about 
the proqiect of action against 
itiie d(^ by central banks 
should the dolUr resnine its re- 
owt ^awarhig dimb this week. 
UosnbstMUiaied lepiy i a swqrt 
catrency maAets Friday that 
the Federal Reserve had sdd 
deflars. On Mmuh^, West Ga- 
fmm hatiiring soDices said thoe 
was no basis for the remits. 

The dollar began dm trading 
. day 1^ dipping to 253.875 yen 
in Twyo 2S3.92S yen Fri- 
day. In London, the pound rose 
to$1.12S from $1.1^ Ute Fri- 
day. 

Other late ddlar rates in Eu- 
rope indnded 3.168 Deuisdoe 
marics, down frmn 3.1711 Fri- 
day; 2.6633 Swiss francs, down 
frem 2.675, and 9.714 French 
fiancs. doira from 9.725. New 
York banks were dosed for a 
state holiday. 


bi U,S,, FaUing Gasoline Prices Lead Drop in Crude 


By Nicholas D: Kristof 

New YoHc Times Semee 

NEW YORK — CooqTany by 
company, ddlar 1^ d<^, the 
price of U.S. crude oil has fallen by 
as much as $4 a barrel at the pro- 
ducer level in the past t^ee 
months, in the past week atone, 
most big companies trimmed $1 ofi 
the price they will pay for a barrel 
of crude ofl. 

Because tbe prices eroded gradu- 
ally. rather than faDing in one 
burst, the decreases have not at- 
tract^ much attentioiL But as two- 
thirds of the crude oil ooosumed in 
.the United States is produced do- 
mestically, the declines are actoaDy 
much more important for U.S. con- 
sumers than aqiistmeats iu official 
prices of the Organizatioi of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries. 

“From tile point of view of the 
consumer, they are certainly much 
more important” than OPEC 
prices, according to Phi^ K. Ver- 
leger Jr., a petroleum ecraomist in 
Washington for Charles River As- 
sociates, a consulting group. “But 
tbe consnmBr doesn’t necessarily 
see aU the benefiL They may not tie 
reflected at the pump,” 

Many experts, in Tact, said that 
gasdioe^ces fdl before crude oil 
prices. Declining gasn linn prices 
are uiggii^ down crude dl prices 
by squeezing refinery margins until 
the refineries reduce the price th^ 
pay for tbe crude. The le^t is (hat 
gasoline prices lead cnide-oil prices 
more ihu (be other way around 


Tbe erosioD in oude-ofl prices 
has occiured in the 


wbai a conmany wiD pay For oil 
detivered t^ — at U.& r^eries. 
Last October, cooqiBnies uniform- 
ly were wflllng to ^y $30 a barrel 
for West Texas intennediate. which 
is used as a benchmafk ^ade. 
Tbea, after Norway. Britain and 
Nigeria slariied thor prices, and 
OPrc ma in eme;rgai^ session in 
Goieva, most refineries in Novem- 
ber started cutting thor posted 
prices. 

“It shows that the U.S. crude 
market is very sensitive to produd 
margins in the short-term,” said 
Phfl^L. Dodge, an dl analyst with 
Don^dson, Lu^ & Jenrette Inc. 
in New Yodc. “The reason they’re 
cutting crude postings is that 
they’re loshig mon^ on f^^tdine.” 

Althou^ (be ^led pikes were 
uniform in OcU^. now they are 
scattoed across a range of several 
dollars. SheD Co., whiro had been 
the last refiner willing to pay $29 a 
barrel for West Texas intermediate, 
on Friday trimmed its posted price 
to $28. Most of tbe other major 
conm^es are also posting $28, but 
smaU indne^ent refineis are sub- 
siaatiaUy lower. Qtgp Petroleum 
Co. posts tbe lowest price, $25.90. 

Why would anyoM seD oil to 
Ci^ for $25.90 uto it can get 
from Shefl? Tbe answa is tnar the 
prospeciw who rolls a barrel of 
crude to the SheD reCnefy wfl] be 
spumed. 

The higher prices are mainiained 


mostly ^ companies that not only 
refine oil, but ^so p^uce it Up to 
half of the crude they buy is, in 
fact tbdr own, purcha^ by the 
refining arm from the produdng 
araLl^arerductanttoculpost- 
becMise that devalues tbe base 
ml on ^lidi they are buflt, 
and could obUge them to write 
down the value m their ofl lands. 

De^nte tins drawback, there arc 
substantial tax advanta^ in cut- 
ting their postings and paying less 
for their own ofl. The so-aDed 
whidfall profits tax — a misnomer 
because it is actuaUy an excase tax 
on sales rather than a tax (Ml profits 
— is 70 percent on most crude (xL 
Thai coupled with (he corporate 
income tax. means that of every 
extra dcrilar earned throuA pfo- 
4iiftiii?p| 85 cents is taxed, mt tbe 


extra dollar in tax, or less if it has 
tax credits. The re^t is that laige 
ocmqianies benefit if they diarge 
thoDselves less fex their own crooe 
dl, passing the income on lo 
refinery. 

Even thon^ OPECs lack of dis- 
Capline in maintaining hi^ prices 
has helped drive dora prices of 
U.S. cnide, OPECs own prices 
now are not venr detnemed. Arabi- 
an Heavy is semng at a slighi 
mium on tbe mt maika over ils 
offidalprke of $^ JO. And AraU- 
an Li^L the OPEC benchmaric 
crude, at »nn« traded last wedt at 
only SO cents a barrel bdow tbe 
official price (tf $29. 


This is about $1 more a bartd 
than North Sca cnide — oriiidi is 
normaUy more valuaUe. So why do 
customers choose Aralnan L^t 
when they could take the more 
vahiable North Sea oil for less? 

“Everybocly talks about these 
things," said John H. LichtUau, 
preadent of the Petroleum Indus- 
tn Research Foundation in New 
York, adsdlting that he had no 
ready answer. “It’s terribly omfus- 
ing, ftices are really out of line 
with tiaditk»al value differentials, 
not only in the dfidal maikeL but 
also in (he spot market” 

Mr. Liditbtan and other experts 
noted tint few trades were acoi^y 
maide in Arabian Light at the hi^ 
prices and said that contract oUt-i 
gations, tbe deare to maintain' 
business relationsh^ or teduncal' 
factors might keqp some buyers in 
tire matkei regardless of tbe extra 
eiqiense. 


Itay B Output FaDs 0^% 

Reuters 

ROME — Italy’s industiial pro- 
duction feO OJ percent in Novem- 
ber after a 10.9-petcent increase in 
Octoba, die government said. 


CREDIT NADONAL 

U^75 minion floating rate 1978/88 

Tbe rate <rf interest 


banning on Januaiy 1 


I annually. 


licable for the six months period 
.965 and set ly the reference agent is 



We are pleased to announce that as of January J, 1985 

Dieter SPAETHE 
and 

BiN^iCT HENTSCH 

became partners of our Bank. 

The arrival of Bdnddict Hentsch marks the entry of 
the seventh generation of the family which, since 1796, 
has given its name and fourteen partners to the Bank. 

Hentsoi &. 

IS, RUE DE LA CCMtRATERlE, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND 



2,500 Laid Off 
By Norsk Hydro 

Reuters 

(%LO — Norsk Hydro A/S 
has laid off 2,500 enmk^rees be- 
cause of a strike by f,0(W work- 
ers, a company ^kes^ said 
Monday. 

Ptoduction of petrochemi- 
cals, fertflizeis and magnesium 
is coming lo a halt as plants are 
dosed and almost half of the 
company’s 11,000 work force 
willbelMdcrfToroD strike soon 
unless tbe strike ends. 

Tbe dispute over wages start- 
ed a wedt ago aud involves four 
unions. The ^xikesman said 
there is no rign the dilute 
euding. 


uuo MvmiBai M 

HOUCTOH,TBm»WJJL 
EXCB&Bir OPPOBTimmES 

For informalion anlaa: 

Uojd J. WiliiuBs Bcohora 
S 629 FM i 960 WmL 8 niie 210 
Booitoa. 77069 . 

T«Li < 713 ) S 86 - 9399 . Tbe 387356 


Notice To Commodity investor& 

PROFESSIONAL 

MONEY 

MANAGEMENT 

Rudolf Wblff has developed ccmsiderabfe 
expertise In money management, and is 
able to offer proven programs for qualified 
investors who do not have the time 
expertise to manage their own investments. 

' Miniinum initial fn vos tin e n t SIOtMWO. 

Rudolf Vltolfl, estabishad in 1686, s a marnbar ol the Norenda group el 
Gompanias, a mining and resource group wMi a net worth of S2.7 bllltei. 



Please send 
a detailed 
Rudolf Wblff 
Inlormation Kll. 


RudoU VfoW Piituns kia H H M as « H H ■ 
295 Madison Avenir, New Ybrk, NY 10017 U.SA 
Phone (212) 5730440 Telex HT 423840 
Attn; William Rafter 

Mama . . . 

Address 


Phene 


1hte« 


1/22/B5 


HOW CONTHARIANSigAUZED 800% PROFITS 

In 1982, while the DOWwas drooping underSOO, when the mulorfty of seerswere bearish, we rebuksdthe 
consensus, predicting THE DJ WLL TOUCH 1,000 BEFORE HniING 750”. tt is Mao riveting to recaH that at, or 
near.the nadH-ofdespalr.apiestiglous publication featuredastoiyheadnned;*The Death of Equities”. Their 
orthodoxy boomefariged; (he Bull rampaged to 1290. our rmtirnismures vindicated. Afterthe market sowed 
the same magazine re l eas ed an articteentttled;TheRe-BlrthofEquitle8*.Onoeaaain.theywereniyopic; the 
market sagged. A month ago. Business week published a lengthy discourse with the scalding title: *The 
Death of Mining”, an obituary (or the North American mining induMry. 

Our cerebral Jidces stir we challenge their prosaic thinking. ‘Power Elitists” are pre-conditioned to buy 
into weakness, lostil into strength, as we recognized when our researchers racoininended BKMG at S 16 
FORD arDund$17,GLM.at$39, SEARS underS 19 (before split^,widotherseasonedsh8resthat the ”Stre^' 
once scorned, misguided by herd Inriinct What gurus laillodivineisthal ‘misery" hasakaady been factored 
Into the price QlAMAX, ASARCO,INCX},NEWMCX4T.NORANDAandPHELPSDOOGE,thaitodellafterthe 
*Group” has been decimated is to defy iogio- When Elitists are ready to peddle thek inverrtwfes, the (3roup 
will undergo a metamoo^osls; fiscal events are raely spontaneous combustion, movemente ae 
orchestrated. 

Our forthcoming letter discussea why the DJ will gallop over 1500, why mining shares wiU recover in 
addition, COR focuses upon a low-priced equity with ttie dynamics lo vault to prominence, emultfrn the 
success of a recently recommended "special situBtion” that escalated B00% in a brief time-span. Rx your 
complimentary copy, please write lo. ^telephone... 



CAPITAL 

GAINS 


FPS. Rnandal P lann ing Services bv 
K a tvef s li aa tllE, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, Tlw Nethertertcb 
Phone: (020) -27 51 81 
Telex 18536 


Name: 


Address: 




Phone: 





n 


I 


J 


Past performance does not guarantee future results 











U.S. Futures 


Season Season 
HloA Low 


Opwi Hlon Lew Close Ow. 


SeoHR Season 
HWi LOW 


Open HiBh Low Close Os. 


Grafns 


IWtrfWShHwffcwYoAnwwMJHwWan IP tW 


ORDHUNG BY AAAIL 
FROM OUR BOOK DIVISION 
IS AS EASY AS 1-2-3-4. 


WHEAT <CBT> 

SMObumlnlmanKdellanperbinliel 
tM SS^ IMor S51 151 XWo 3M —51% 

45S uavi MOV ijoh 14m uiu ism 

m 127W Jul 133 U3U U1H 133 +50% 

17SVS 15Mk Sep 133% 354VS » 134W +50% 

103M 357VS Dec lASVl ISSVO 143 144% 

174% 153 Mor 1«% 

Est. Sales Pm. Sales 453« 

Pm.OevOpenint, 414S4 oHl72 


21U 2105 MOV ^ 

Sst. Sales Pm. Sales Z904 

Pm. Day open ml. 33583 ua34 
ORANGE JUICE (NVCE) 

11000 lbs.- cents Perlb. 

1BSJD 11150 Mar WJ5 10755 

1BS50 1SI50 May 17055 I7ILSS 

IS45S U&B JUl _ _ 

IBI50 1S7JS Sep 16050 16050 

10150 15750 NOV 

1*140 15*30 Mor 

16150 14050 May 

Est. Soles SO Pm.Sales 3500 

Prev.OoyOnen InL 7533 up 190 


10959 16959 +950 
17055 170^ ^ 
I7D5S +550 
16050 16050 +5M 

16650 +550 
16650 +550 
16*50 +450 



COPPER (COIMEX} 



SOTBEAlfO CCBT7 
5.000 bu mmimini+doiian per bushel 
7.79 557% Jan A96% 559 

7.90% 559% Mor 657 *09 

7.97 051% Moy A17% *301 

759 191% Jill *27% *30 

756 555 Auo 627 6J0 


2500 lb*- cents Per lb. 
920 5*U Jon 

6*0 

M.0 

600 

61,25 


keen 


600 

4270 

4145 

410 




610 

4Z10 



BUS 


Jul 

61.18 






Sap 

610 

4155 





Dec 

610 

42A5 



8450 

590 

Jan 



«7M 

4115 





410 






430 

630 



7*0 

6Z0 

See 

430 

*10 




FREIVCH 

COMPfllUY 

HnniDBdOK 


*60 S.07 NOW *17% 6 

*79 *10 Jon 650 6 

752 654 Mar *45 6 

Est.Soies Pm.Saiae 39.1 

Prey. Ooy Open Int, 70.523 up387 


Jon 

*94% 

199 

*0 



Mar 

*07 

tot 

*M 


+52% 

MOV *17% 

*511% 

*14 

*20% 


Jul 

427% 

LSI 

*25% 

429% 

Aue 

*27 

60% 

40 

+0 

Sep 

*IB 

*32% 

*M 

422% 

+51% 

NOW 

*17% 

*34 




Jon 

6J2 

457% 

40 



Mor 

*45 

451 

*45 

*51 

+57% 

Pm.Saiae 39.144 




Est. Solas 11500 Pm.Sales 17522 
Pm. Day Open int. 80565 up653 
SILVER (COJWEX7 

S5B0fmaz.-eentseerlroyai. 

15755 sn5 Jan 62&0 6275 62S5 6U 

7335 6165 Feb *095 

16305 aS5 Mor 6335 6355 6205 *nJ 

15115 S9S5 MOV 6415 6445 6M 6ffJ 

14615 6035 Jul 6515 6945 6475 6S15 

11035 6145 Sep 6585 6M 6SU M5 

13305 6305 Dec 6715 6775 6715 tnj 

12115 6335 Jon 68U 

11935 6495 Mar 6035 6935 6085 6045 

10415 6605 MOV 7065 

OM5 035 Jul 7115 7115 7115 7^ 

9405 6015 Sep 7315 

Est Soles 17500 Pm. Soles 34531 
Prow. Boy Op en lot 11.929 up3Sfl 


jViiji'i'M. n.f ii.i 


® THE FRONT PAGE 
1887-1980 

Reproductions of 129 front pages from 
the Trib's own archives: the sinking of 
the Titanic, the Dreyfus trial, Jock the 
Ripper, Lindbergh, the Windsors, Stalin, 
— the news headliners and the 
mojor events of the past oentury. 
Hardcover, 28 x 38 cms. A distinctive 
personal or business gift. 



ICmlh^Stnbune 


^ FRENCH COMPANY 
HANDBOOK 1984 

Now in the 1984 up-dated edition, 200 pages 
of indispensable information in English on 81 of 
the most important French companies. Bask 
fads on other major firms, information on the 
FrerKh economy and major sectors of activity. 
Profiles indude detailed information on: 
management, major activities, sales 
breakdown, shorehoklers, subsidiaries, 
inlematiorxsl odivifies, 1978-1982 firKsndal 
performance, 1983-1984 devebpments, 
highlights and trends. 

Indispensable for corporate, government and 
banking executives, industrial purchasers, 
institutional i.-ivesfors. 


Ita minimum- dallors per bmhal 

»% 153 Mar 1.77% 157% 1J6U 156% —58% 

I 151 MOV 158 1^ 154% 154% — JXMi 

1% 158 Jul 1511* 151% 1.71 151% +50% 

9 L65% Sep 157 157 157 157 

Z% 156% Dec 159% 159% 159% 159% 

.Soles Pm.Salea SOB 

v.DoyOpanInL U43 up9 


CAl-n.6rcME) 



670 

620 

Fob 

6U3 

634D 

Apr 

6157 

490 


6645 

63.15 


6*10 

610 

Oct 

650 

630 

Dee 


UvestBck 




Esi.Saies 11517 Pm.Soiss 8553 
Pm. Doy Open Int. 58.197 off 329 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44500 Ibir cents per lb. 

7355 6555 Mor 7120 7150 

7250 050 Apr 7355 7250 

7050 4455 MOV 7055 7050 

7150 5*60 Aup 71.10 7150 

71.10 6750 Sap 7055 7150 

70.15 67.W Oct 6950 7110 

Est. Sales 1543 Pm.Sales 838 
Prey. Day open Int. 9539 up 113 
NOCS(C66B) 




SIX 

470 

Feb 

5445 

4*10 

Apr 

550 

480 

Jun 

SS77 

4195 

.iiii 

5457 

470 

Auo 

5155 

450 

on 

5055 

440 

l>r 

49JD 

440 

Feb 

470 

4&7S 

Apr 


Est. Sates 5530 Pm.Sales 3546 
Pm. Doy Open Int. 2*501 up2Z3 

PORK BELLIES (CME> 

31500 lbs., cents par lb. 


6127 —.15 

050 — ^ 

055 +.11 

4552 +.10 

6177 +.13 

6SJI7 +55 


7160 +59 

7250 +53 

70JD +25 
7125 +.15 

TOM +.19 
7150 +20 


51.10 

4853 — .N 

5355 —JO 
5197 —50 

5250 —55 

4175 —57 

0.13 —55 

4950 

4*45 +53 


33050 Apt 34350 34250 34250 
33*70 Jun 
34250 AuB 
36220 Oct 
Est.Sules 19500 Pm.Sales 3170 
Pm.DavOpsnliH.158523 oH2.lB1 


Financial 


us T. BILLS (IMM) 


II mlUton-PtoellMpct. 

920 


Mor 

910 

0.14 

Jun 

9151 

094 

Sep 

9*73 

8SJ7 

Dec 

9*61 

860 

Mor 

0.12 

051 

Jun 

00 

— rpi 

Sep 

Dec 


ti0 

00 

Pab 

rmi 

7150 

7*T7 

7*17 

810 

010 

Mor 

■not 

7245 

700 

700 

820 

61.13 

MOV 

740 

740 

710 

71.92 


015 

Jul 

7*ID 

75.10 

72BS 

run 

0*4S 

600 

Auo 

730 

730 

710 

710 

75.15 

0tS 

Feb 

670 

SIM 

6S0 

6*0 

7140 

440 

Mo* 




660 


^ I.H.T. GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS 

TRAVEL &ENTERTAINMENT: 
EUROPE 

Turn an ordinary business trip info a 
pleasant, more efBdent journey. Covers 
Amsterdam, Brusseb, Copenhc^n, 
DOssekJorf, Frankfurt, Geneva, London, 
Lyon, M'hn, Munkh, Paris, Stockholm, 
Zurich. Written fr>r the Trib by joumdist 
Peti^ Graham. Hardcover ecfition, with 
orientation maps. 




ACTOR - ASKSSPAIMf ■ AR FRANCE - 
ALSmOMAIlANnOUE - AUMIAIIE 
DB>4ng«ISES • AVIQbS MMCB. CMS- 
SAULTBSEGUe- AVMION - BANCauE 
EC09JEZ • BANQUE NATIQNMLE DE 
PMOS - BEGW6SAY - BDeiMAFt4 ■ 
BONGRAN - BSN - aUU. - CAMFB40N 
BBB4ABD - GGS AtSIHOM - OWL 
BOr«>4AGe5 DE R(M^IC£ • OtARCaiRS 
. OMBsirS HlANC^AB - OT /«ATa 
QUB MEDfTBOArCE - CCXXMA - 
CCA«>AGI'tt DO MO GCMTAChC 
RANgASE 06 FETSCXE5 CQMFA^ 
GNIE GENBCALE D'OEOnaTE ■ 
QOMPAGNE G9CRALE D6 EAUK 
OOMPACNE lA HENM - OBXr AGRI- 
COLE . OBOHr COMMEK3AL OE 
FRANCE - OEXT NATTONAL - CKXI- 
ZET - DARTY - IXMEZ - aBCmONOUE 
SaiGE DASSAULT - OF AQUHAIIC - 

bcdasqitrand fauc - essuxi - 


nVESUlE ■ FOUGOOUE ■ FRAMA- 
TOME - RANCA29 - GeCRAlE B5- 
ajn--GROU7EvicnaRE-GTMe4nEr 
POSE - METAL - IfGRATCI - L'ORBM. - 
LYObNABE 0E5 EAUX ■ MATSA - AO- 
UN GSM - IWCHBiN - MOET-W4. 
NESSY - MUIUBIES UhCUaiOUPE 

nnuoT - iai«)i>«iCAiio - mjGEor 

- FOl£r ■ fY3TAM - PRCM600E5 ■ QUU 
LERT . lA 2EDOUTE ■ R84AULT - 
GOCTOUB< - ROUSSa UC3AF - 
SACR.OR - SAB4T-GOBAM - SANOR 
SOEG - SB - SSTA - 9«CMA ■ SOCX- 
TE GBseiA tE - SOOETE Ga4BMi£ 
DB^nEnOSESSAIMMPT & BBQ - SO 
OB(HO - SOMAe AUSarr - SHEnBA- 
TIGNOUES • TaEMECANKXJE ■ 
IHCMSC^I GIKXJP • THCM50NCSF ■ 
UNON OES ASSURANCES DE PABS ■ 
USMGR - UFA - VAUaUBEC 


Est.Soies 4.417 Pm.Sales MTS 
Pm.ooyOpanlnl. 1*113 offSO 



^ FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE 
TO PARIS 

By the Trib’s restaurant critic Patrida 
VVetts, a new and unique guide to the 
dty famous for its food A persoiKil 
tour of hundreds of restaurants, cof^, 
bistros, pdtisseries, etc and Paris' 
glorious outdoor markets. 

(rrcludes lively critical commentary, 
anecdotes, history and local lore. 

A great gHt idea. Paperback, over 
300 pages with 140 evocative . 
photographs. 


IntemaliQiid HercM Tribune^ Book Divbion, 
181 Avenue diori ca d o GouBeb 
92521 NeuayGedex,taKe. 

Please send me: 


.copies of THE FRONT PAGE 
at $37 each, plus postage: 

odd $2.50 each in Europe, 

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(2j copies of I.H.T. GUIDE TO BUSINESS 

TRAVEL &B4TB1TAINMENT: EUROPE 
crt$16eoch, plus postage: 

add $1 .50 eodi in Europe, 

$4 each outside Europe. 

copies of FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE 

TO PARIS 

at $1 1.95 each, phis postage: 

odd $1 .50 eoch in Europe, 

$4 each outside Europe. 

copies of FRENCH COMPANY 

HANDBOOK 1984 

of $38 each, mducEng postage 

in Europe. 

Add $4 each for toddle East, 

$7 e(xh for Asia, 

North and South America. 


Please check method of payment: 

n Enclosed is my payment. (Payment eon be made in any 
eonvertible European currency at current exdiange rotes] 

Please charge to my: 

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□ Diners Club International 
Q American Express 


n 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE) 
000 lbs.- cents per lb. 






1530 

12350 

Mor 

1480 

1400 

1470 

14836 

+.11 

ISZOO 

I2ZD1 

66ov 

I44A0 

1447D 

1430 

M*SB 

+39 

' U90 

1210 

Jul 

1420 

I4Z0 

M10 

142.18 

+0 

1470 

1270 

Sep 

1400 

14*15 

1X0 

14*13 

+.13 

U10 

129 J5 

Dec 

13125 

I3UQ 

13*25 

1380 

—0 

1370 

12UD 

Mar 

1370 

1370 

1370 

1370 

—51 

13*0 

1310 

May 

1360 

13*70 

1360 


—0 

Est. Sotos 

1.1M Pm.Soles 16M 




Pm.DoyOpanliU. 11717 up 303 




SUOARWORLD 11 {MYCSCE) 





1 1250 lbs.- cents ntr Rl 






1140 

401 

Mor 

414 

435 

*13 

*36 

+0 

1050 

*34 

May 

449 

475 

469 

*74 

+0 

90 

453 

Jul 

40 

*18 

*07 

*10 

+56 

955 

40 

SOP 

*)2 

*19 

*12 

*99 

+0 

MS 

557 

oa 

*37 

554 

50 

554 

+54 

70 

*55 

Jcei 

10 

SJ7 

S0 

40 

+0 

90 

452 

Mar 

629 

*46 

*25 

*46 

+0 

7.15 

4l39 

MOV 

6lU 

*64 

*51 

453 

+.U 

esLSolas TOMS Prev. Sates 14562 
Prev.Doy Open int 98509 up 10 




C»COA(9IVCSCE) 

1 0 metric taw 5 par tan 






3570 

1980 

Mor 

2322 

2229 

230 

2n9 

•w 

2370 

3030 

Atoy 

2225 

2244 

Z22S 

2234 

+26 

340 

2069 

Jul 

2212 

3&4 

3710 

2221 

•IG6 

2415 

3053 

Sop 

2195 

2205 

2193 

3199 

+0 

2337 

1999 

Dae 

2129 

219 

2115 

2127 

+19 

»I8 

200 

Atar 

2T33 

210 

2110 

2127 

+19 


EsLSales 2522 Pm.Salea 11579 
Pm.DoyOpwilnl. 0558 off 331 
H VR. TREASURY (CBT> 

008500 Pr In- pte A 3Ms 0 in PCI 
81-27 7*25 Mar 80-30 81 

81-7 7V4 Jun 80-5 BB6 

80-23 ^18 Sop 

795 7S-I3 Dee 

78-23 7S-1B Mar 

78+ 77-22 Jim 78-1 7B3 

Set. Soles Pm. Solas 7J32 

Prsw. Day open InL 3*01 up 3S7 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBTl 
(8 pct-S10050*«ts 1 32nds 0 ISOPCI) 
77-15 057 Mor 71-11 71-14 

77-1S 049 Jim 70-1S 70-11 

76-3 0-10 Sap 68-31 6955 

7*5 05 Dec 69 69-S 

73-30 0-3 Mar 

70* 56-0 Jim 68-1 60-1 

59.25 S6-0 SOP 

69-36 S6-3S Dec 

69-7 St-27 Mar 6656 66-36 

48-11 64-3 Jun 6*16 66-16 

0-19 64-31 Sep 66-7 665 

Est- Soles Pm. Sotni0*865 

Prw.OervOp«ll0.I9Uim 00689 
ONMAtCBT) 

080580 M-tn- Pts 5.32nds0 in PCI 


9151 9254 

9152 9156 
91JM 9152 
9052 9059 
9028 9025 

8958 
89 Jl 
8926 


8057 8028 
8*1 805 

79-15 
7*30 
7*U 
7*1 7*2 


715 71.11 

7*13 7*1S 
6951 69-9 
a 695 
6*15 
051 0-H 
0-17 
0-5 

6*26 6*36 
6*16 6*16 
6*7 6*7 


Stock Indexes 


(Indexea conwlM sherllv before merliBl claae) 

SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

PoMs and cants 

18025 15128 Mor 17168 17720 17160 17720 +320 

18020 15*10 Jun 17*60 18025 17*60 1802S +155 

18320 16050 Sap 1795S 10158 17955 1050 4140 

1B20 17S20 Dec 1H40 18S40 18548 I8S40 +228 W- 

E0. Salas Pm.Sales S256S ^ 

Pm.DeyOpsn1nt, 0551 oH30 

VALUE LINEtKCBT) 
paints end amts 

19656 mis Map mss 19*50 1915S 1964S +655 

10^ 17350 Jim 1K40 19950 19540 19928 +4.15 

mM 10S2S SOP 2D1JD 30120 3BI2I 30120 +35S 

E0. Soles Pm.Sales 5572 

Pm.OavOpeniM. 5297upll6 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 
points end cents 

tom Buo Mnr 10150 lom 10*45 louo +320 

10S50 9050 Jun M330 10440 1039 K460 4140 

1 QU 0 9125 sen 10400 I 0 *I 0 IIMSO 10*10 +3.15 

Est. Sates Prev.Sales 1040 

Prow. Day Open 10 . 8231 up334 


69-20 

57-5 

Mar 69-U 

69-16 

69-13 

69-15 

69-5 

57-17 

Jun 68-0 

68-22 

68-21 

68-0 

68-9 


Sap 




68-13 

99-4 






5B-X 

Mqr 




67-4 

58-25 

Jun 



66-17 

**I3 

65-21 





Est. Sotos 


Pm.Sales 

6sa 




Pm. Day Open liM. 7.168(030 
CERT. DEPOSIT (U6M1 
0 mllHon-pls0inpcl 


9146 

fK6V» 

Atar 

910 


8*30 

Jun 

9051 

9032 

850 



037 

8*34 



00 

8*54 



auo 

8643 



00 

00 



Est. Sotos 

10 Prev. Solas 


9144 9146 
9051 9*10 
«23 
0927 
8924 
8953 
8171 


PrsvIouE 
96750 f 
1.991 JO 
12551 
24S50 


Pm.DevOpsnlnt. 14499 oH0 

EURODOLLARS (IMM) 


SI milltor+etsol mpoL 
9L14 0.14 Mer 

91.13 

91.15 

9L1I 

91.13 

— 0 

9*4* 

8249 

Jun 

9045 

9047 

9*41 

9045 

00 

8*53 

See 

00 

00 

00 

890 


00 

140 

Dec 

041 

00 

00 

04) 

+0 

00 

010 

Mor 

00 

00 

00 

00 

+5) 

8*77 

8*33 


auo 

0*48 

aue 

8*68 

8*40 

00 

Sep 

0*38 

B0 

880 

BU8 

+0 

Sst.Sataa 

00 

Dec 

Pm.Soles 2Z97D 


0TB 



Pm.DeyOpenirn, 92221 up 992 


Commodflty Indexes 


Close 

Moody's 968401 

Pw«1«r« 1.992.70 

D-J. Futures mX 

Com. Research Bureou . N4V. 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931, 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters ; base 100 ; Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


CMeeee Board 0 TrMt 
Chteoee Mercantile EsOionM 
irdamotionn Monetary Murtet 
Of ailGOM •Aercontlle EMhme 
New Vert Ceceg Sueor, C0tee Exmanpe 
Mew York Cotton Excttonoa 
Commodity Exdnns* New York 
New York Mercantile EjNSwnM 
KonKB cnv Beard of Trade 
Haw York Ritures EMdMnee 


9IYCSCE: 

NVCE: 

COHIEX: 

9IYME: 

KCBT; 

tlYPE: 


London G>nunodities ■ 

Jan. 21 

Pigiires in sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil in U5.dolion per metric tun. 
Gold In LI5. tMlors per dine* 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 21 


Paris Commodities 

Jtui. 21 

Sugar to Frendi Fmics P0 melrie iM. 
Oltar llBiires In Fnncs PIT W kg. 


Cash Prices Jan. 21 


Higb Lav CIOM Pmieus 
SUGAR 

Mor 12450 11940 I245D 13450 1)950 11940 
May 13140 12620 13150 13120 12650 12620 
AIM 14150 13650 14140 14150 13628 I36J0 
O0 14940 14440 1050 1028 14450 14440 
Dec H.T. N.T. 15450 1S648 1040 15850. 

Mor 14840 16*60 17050 17120 16640 16U0r 
MOV 17440 17140 17458 17450 17150 17260 
1553 tots 00 ten* 

COCOA 

Mor no 2568 2586 250 2573 2574 

May Z112 2,04 not 2.10 2583 2.006 

Jly no SSO 8590 2,095 2579 250 

Sep 2.100 350 3586 ZOM 1077 2579 

Dee 2508 2500 2501 1003 1.998 1599 

Mar 2505 15K 1,993 1515 1506 150 

May N.T. N.T. 1.971 3500 1571 150 

1251tots00nn* 

COFFEE 

Jon 2580 U60 350 3560 3560 2565 

Mor 2400 3578 2578 2579 2577 2579 

May 2598 2573 2575 3577 2572 3573 

jrv 25M 250 2582 2583 2578 2580 

See 2594 250 250 350 2575 250 

Nov 2596 350 350 250 250 ISB 

Jan zm 2589 250 3591 2579 zS6 

154110105101* 

GASOIL 

Jan 23*58 23655 KOO 33*0 2335$ 065S 
Fab 2340 33*25 Xn5S 23*0 2295S 0MO 
Mor 2217S 22248 22Z7S B&0 2210 22155 
A0 2175S 21558 21555 3150 2140 2M0 
May 3150 31L75 211.» 31355 21*25 31*75 
Jun 2140 21350 21155 211553810 21048 
Jly 2110 21255 31)0 21248 200 2110 
Aiig N.T. N.T. 000 ZT70 20*0 200 
Sep N.T. N.T. 2100 2190 300 2320 
250 Ms 010 ton* 

OOLO 

Feb 30850 30030858 0803080 3890 Ftb 
A0 3110 3110 nno — 3110 3110 HW 
10 tats 010 troy o* Apt, 

Beurese: RmOanand Leaden A elraleMii Ex- Mov 
efiome toosellL Jun 



Mob 

Low 

Ctase 

area 

SUGAR 




Mar 

150 

1563 

101 

150 

+ 31 

MOV 

1 .M 

1410 

1428 

1432 

+M 

Auo 

100 

150 

100 

1515 

+ 26 

Oct 

100 

1565 

108 

105 

+ 26 

Dee 


1465 

1460 

1470 

+ » 

Mor 

1340 

1375 

130 

+ 0 



PgJM 








E 0 . woL: 535 lets 0 0 ten* Prev. actual 
soles: 350 tot* OpsntntereV: 19558 

COCOA 

Mor 35S1 3533 +«« 2536 +9 

May 2575 3555 250 ZX9 +8 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2540 ~ +10 

Ssp N.T. N.T, L2S5 — +22 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2 .IM — 

Mer N.T. N.T. Z 10 — 

May N.T. N.T. 110 — _ e 

Est. v 0 ,: 170 lots 0 10 ten* Prev. actual 

ntos:« lot* Open Interen: 793 

COFFEE 

I ds? ZM 247S 301 +a 

Mur 10S ZS71 2.S4S + 7 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2465* 2473 +e 

Jly N.T. N.T. 240 240 +3 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2M UnA 

Now n.T. N.T. ZW — ” +i 

Jon N.T. N.T. 2455 — +e 

ESI. VOL: 0 lota 0 5 ton* Pm. actual 
Mtos: IOtoto.Openlntemt :03 
Saurea: BaufStdaComnera. 


CemmodltvandUiril 
Ceftoe 4 Santo* i n 
Primctotli 44/0 0 %, vd _ 

I Steel bHlots iPm.). ton 

Iron 2 Pdrv. Phlia. tan _ 
Sto 0 aerae No I hw pitt. . 
LendSBat.lh 
Cupper 0 e 0 . lb — 

Tin (Streltol. lb 

Zlnc.E.St.l-Baal*ib 
P0lodlum.oi - 

Silver N.Y. 01 

Sauna: AP. 


Dividends Jan. 21 




Per Ami Pay Rec 
USUAL 

Q 43 M 

- Q 45 3-15 3-1 

Q 0 M5 1-31 

Q 0 % 3-1 MS 

a at 2-14 1-31 

Q 0 M 3-15 

Q0% 3-7 10 

G 0 3-15 3-1 

Q 0 34 3-6 

Q .14 2-0 Z-B 

Q 0 *1 3-15 

Q .10 2-0 Ml 

Q 0 2-14 M 

Q 0 3-1 M 


London Metals Jan. 21 
FioiiiRS in sIsrHnB per metilc tm. 
Silver in pence per Irev ounce. 


Voluma: 0 lots 0 0 Ion* 
Seuroe; Reuton* 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and Praflts. Iii millions, ore in local currencies 

unless otherwise Indicated pncies 



cxD. dote 


Signature 


Address 


Cty/Cbde 


Today 

High undo copper eathodas: 
SP0 154*0 15470 

smentlis 15690 15490 
Gepper caiiNdas: 

Hot 15240 ^ 

Smennis 15350 15350 
Tin: SP0 *47S0 9.4800 
-amanita 9010 94610 
Laad:sp0 36*0 3610 

3 IHWlMiB 3390 3390 
Zlne:ap0 no0 7310 
amanita 73*0 7270 
SUwerm0 BS0 55*50 
3 monlta 57240 5710 
AlomMiim; 

spot 9970 9980 

Smsnlta 1070 1070 
Nld(al:aPei 44310 444*0 
amonms 44380 44400 
Sauna; Reuter* 


1.3600 1010 
1500 15410 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. 21 

OHoae MacaelBt ExdBRs* 
W.GEnnMaMyBiBEki CBM per Dark 



9910 9930 

10*0 1080 
45850 45950 
44050 44180 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. 21 

Ctiicaso Board 


strike miti-Lert Pati-L0i 
price Joe Feb Mar Joe Feb Mar 


Agency Finds 9 Nations 
Own Mh^ri^ of Phones 

Uniied Pm Im en a Jiou ai 

GENEVA —Just nine advanced 
ccxmtries accouol tor three-quw- 
tors (tf (Ik 600 nnllioa tdepbooes in 
Uie werid. the IntematioDal Tele- 
comiDiiiiication Union rqxmed 
Monday. 

More than half the world popu- 
lation lives in counuies with less 
than one telephooe for every 100 


UMBoihsCoto. (4 

41* Otar. 1984 190 

Net Inc. — 154 *g 

Per Shere.^ *0 843 

■■ Yeor nw 190 

Net In* __ XU 3*6 

Pv^Siiara™. 10 240 

WBkBnatta Ind. 










































4 









W. * ’• . ^ 


iiJ 


; i 




1 




■ '■* ' .- .«% "C- 


^- ■ ■ . . T '- 






INTERJNATIONAL HER.\LP TRIBITNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1983 


Page 11 r 


.Midlaiid Agrees to Lift 

Crocker Stake to 100% 


Reuien 

LONDON — Midland Hanif 
PLC ^ Crocker NatkMnd Corp. 

have signed a definitive agreament 

on the previously announced pl»^ will also be callable'^ $27 if Mid- 
for ligand lo increase its bolding « required to provide more 

than SlSO million to Crodcer dur- 
ing any 12 conseoitive months un- 


Jhen 103 percent for the foUowng 
nve years and at $27 a share th^ 
after. 

The new Crocker preferred stodt 


. „ — Jioing 

in Oodeer to 100 perceai, a KGf 
land statemeut said Monday. 

SharehtddHS of fa^ companies 
must qiprove before the agree mem 
$224-mmion transaction 
final. Midlaad currently hdds 57 
percent di Crocker. 

Conqdetion of the transaction is 
‘'^bject to certaun conditions, in- 
' dudh^ settlement of shareholder 
litigation pending in Odaware iind 
CaDfomia. 

Under terms announced eaitier, 

each Crocto coininoQ ^aie will be 
exchanged for $27 in face value of a 
new Crocker at^ustaUe^te pre- 
ferred stoct 

The divtikad rate will be dc- 
signed to create a maricet race level 
for the new stock of S27. ^ sioc^ 
will be callable at 105 percent of 
face value for the first five years. 


der die support agreonenL 

As announced. Midland has 
agr^ to suppon Crocker rwth 
funds that may be needed to meet 
U.S. regulatory capital require 
ments, and also the dividend on the 
new Crodter prefe n ed stock as 
long as it remains outstanding. 

Earlier this year. Midland said 
that Crocker, hurtl^ aslump in the 
Caiifomia agriculture and real es- 
tate maiketsi, expected to rqport 
losses $215 motion for the fourth 
qtiarter and cX $324 nnllion for all 
of 1984. For all of 1983, Crocker 
posted a loss of $10.4 miUjon. 

In trading Monday on the Lon- 
don Stock Exchange, Midland 
shares were uochang^ at 347 
pence apiece. 


NipponKokan 

^gnsOunaPat^ 

The Asudaied Pnrss 

TOKYO ^ Nippon Kokan 
K.K. said Monday that Ji had 
readied agreemem in principle 
with Qiina’s TUnjin Shipbuild- 
ing Industjy Corp. to establish 
'a joint venture to produce ma- 
chineiy for offshore oil and and 
gas w^ in China. 

A spokesman for the Japa- 
nese steel company said the 
agreement Jan. 1 1 calls 

for the establishment in April in 
Tianjin of Qiina-NKK Off- 
shore Engineering and Services 
Co., penmng approval from the 
C3uo^ loveromeni. 

He said the joint venture 
would manufacture ttffsbore 
well equipment including jack- 
ets or sted frames, pTunfS and 
cranes. The company, capital- 
ized at SO milnon yen 
($197,628), win be owned 60 
percent by the Chinese compa- 
ny. 28 peiCQit by Nif^ Ko- 
kan and 12 percent by Maru- 
beni Corp. of Japan. 


Harvester W orkers Return, Reoreanis€Uion Set for Kronebanhen 
Ending Their 2-Day Strike 


Jiaaers 

COPENHAGEN —The Danish 
The Assohated Pros The walkout, over the union’s bank and Mimsuy of In- 

CHICAGO—Morethan 11,000 effort to restore beneTits it cmiced- dustiy are to undertake a reor^- 
International Harvester workers ed to Harvester in IWl. marked the zation of the troubled KFOoeoao- 
will hold ratification meetings later company's first work stoppage A/S, the central bank and 
this wedt after the company and since a SV^-mmiA strike in tie win- i^Bistry said Mon^y in a joiui 
the liniied Auto Workers rodied ter of 1979^ that sent it into a siatemenL 

a tentative agreement ending a tw(^ The move fdlows the ndthdraw^ 

day stril^ crfficials hare sauL Mr. Laannan said the union *in- ulofJyskeBankA/Sfrmnnegotia- 

ThestrikebeganatraidnighiFri- that signifiami progress Jons on a takeover of Kroneban- 

day after msou^ons hrcAe down . “ be« m agni^cant areas *®5: . , . i i 

3„i; arrec"S in ei^i ^ 

not to discuss details of the tenta- vatbanken A/S and Den Danske 

tire seitlemeoi until it was ratifi^ — 

and added, ”We believe this will be 
well-accepted, well-received and 
implemenietT by the rank-and-nie. 

Mr. ^ainuui said the UAW*s 
bargaining council would meet in 


Bank A/S will 
reofganizatioo of 
the statement said. 


'states. They were to return to work 
Monday, according to a Harvester 
spokesman. Bill GreenhilL and a 
U.AW spokesman. Peter Liarman. 

Mr. GreenhiU said Sunday that 
no further details were available on 
the proposed three-year ^reement, 
which ended the siiUe in less than 


The governor of the central 
bank, ^k HttfFmeyer, said in a 
ra^ interview that Kronebanken 
would continue to operate in one 
form or another, but under a new 
board of directors and manage- 
ment. 

The reconstruction process will 
lake at least one year, ne said. 

Last week, Kronebanken an- 
nounced an tolerating deficit of U 


jte in the billion kroner (SI I4J miltion) for 
□ebanken, 1984. compared with pre-tax prof- 
its of 433 million kroner in 1983. 

A takeover bid for Kronebanken 
by Den Danske Provinsbanken 
A/S failed last week. 


Since Kronebanken encoumered 
financial dilTiculties last month, 
four leading Danish banks, includ- 
iflg the central bank, have underta- 
ken to guarantee its pa3mient5. 

These guarantees are to remain 
in force pending the recoasiructioa 
of tlw tvank, Mr. Hoffmcyer said. 


Nordieni Telecom’s Net Grows 47% 


48 bouts. Most planu were not CtiicsgP on Wednesday to rotnew 
k ovi 


scheduled to worl 
end. 

‘’Normal scheduled operations 
are expected lo resume immedia te- 
ly at aU U.AW-represemed IH fac^ 
iiies. including manufaciunng 
plants and paru-disiribution cen- 
ters.'* he said. 


over the week- ^ proposed agreement and t^ 
would pass it along to the rank and 

file. 


Ouna Plans 


1/niteJPrea intemammal 

TORONTO — Nonbers Tde- 
com Ltd. reported Monday that its 
1984 ofperatuu net was 47 percent 
higher than the year before, a re- 
am 333.9 miltiOD ramidtaii ()oi- 
lars ($251.81 inillkMi) or 2.76 dol- 
lars per commoa share. 

The company earned 227.1 mil- 


COMPANY NOTES 


Amoco (UJL) Ltd. has a 
published rmrt (hat it plans to seD 
Its Milford Haven reTin^ complex 
and gasoline statitxts in Britain. 
The Sunday limes had quo^ 

' industry sources as saying they ex- 
pected announcement m such as 
sale in the near future: An Amoco 
spokesman said Monday Uiat the 
article was purely speculative. 


Bund PLC a British of 

paper, paclca^ and fillers, said ^ 

Monda)( (bat h planned to raise New York Gty. 
£SA6 mUlion (S6I million) throogh 
a rights offer on the of one 
new share for every four held. The 
company said that it may use die 
pnxxeds for further ac g iiigi t ions 

Australia and New Zealand 
Bank^ Group lid. says it is ex- 
pects a modest profit increase for 
the fiscal year ending Sqn. 30. In 
1984, the group’s net profit in- 
oeased to 269.04 millioo dollars. 


(S330 millioa) from 197.90 iwitwyn 
dollars (he year before. 

CStisoace Inc. erf New Y(^ 
says ii has begpn pteliounary nego- 
tiations with Corp. on 

the jtwt marketing (rf a pomUe, 
hand-held emnputer device that is- 
sues court summonses. Lockhe^’s 
Dataomn Systems Corp. unit pro- 
vides amDar ^steins to 75 odes 
and Ciiisource said its device 
should go into operation soon in 


Hanson IVnst PLC of Umdon 
said Monday that it would ext^ 
its £151.5 m01i<m ($169 mtUion) fm* 
Powell Duffiyn PLC an additional 
,11 days, but would not diange the 
offer. Hanson Trust now owns 
23.98 percent of Powdl Duffiyn, 
an industrial holding company 
based in London. 

Honda Mtrtor Co. of Jq>an said 
it expects 1985 vdiicle sales, ex- 


duding motorcades, to increase to 
IJS imltion from 1.24 mUlioo in 
1984 and exports to rise to 900,000 
from 847,469. Honda also project- 
ed 1985 motorcycle sales of 3.10 
million, an increase from 2.67 mil- 
lion. 

C. Itoh & Go. of Tokyo says it 
has stened an agreement to tracer 
its full lOJS-percem equity share 
in TOA Oil Co. to Showa Shell 
Sdtiyu KK, TOA's largest share- 
holder. Under the agreement, C. 
Itofa win pay Shown Shell 1 1 biUion 
yen ($43 million) for halting a 10- 
year contract sig^ in 1979 for the 
refinemieat of oude oiL 

Uons PUrofetm Corp. of Jtqrau 
has abandoned plans to in^on 
gasoline from Singapore, a spokes- 
man for Japan's Mmistiy of Trade 


galloiui of gasoline from a Sing> 
pore refiner and planned to sell it 
below the regular price in Jap^. 

Petroleas Mexicanos, Mexico’s 
slate-owned oil company, says it 
has found a on offslmre deposii of 
crude oil m the Bay of Campeche, 
14 kilonteters (8.62 miles) west of 
the Abkatun Held. Pemex said it 
was the first time that commerdal- 
1} viable amounts of offshore crude 
had been found in the Jurassic geo- 
logical siratum. 

Tarmac PLC of Britain beads a 
consortium which has been award- 
eda£] milJioa(51.12niUlion)pro- 
ject ro insiall new sewers in Cairo. 
Other members of the Anglo- Egyp- 
tian C^r> Wastewater consortium 
are Balfour Beatty Ltd., Cementa- 
uon Civil StruciuraJ & Iniema- 


-p- • -wf tioQ doUais, or 2.05 doUais per 

Joint Veatnre ■*^‘"i9S3. 

Li Biotech 


Revenues were also a record 32J 
perceni higber for the year, at 4 J79 


Fourth quarter results for 1984 
woe also a record. 

(Consolidated revenues were 1.4 
biUion dollars, a 44.2^)aceDt in- 
crease over 974.2 mrllioD dollars to 
(belike period (rf 1983. 

Profits rose 69 p ercent to 1 14.6 
minion doUars or w cents per com- 
mon share, compared with 67.8 
milliod ddlars, or 60 cents per 
share, in the 1^ three months at 
1983. 


supplier of fully digital telecom- 
uumicatioDS ^rsteius. 

Northern Tdecom **significant]y 
increased its investments, in Cana- 
da, the U.S. and selected intema- 
timial maritets," said Fitzgerald. 

He attribute the performance, 
both for the year and m the fourth 
quarter, to central office switching 
revenues, wUdi rose 55.8 percent 
in 1984. 

The growth in central ofiice 
switcbuig came because of the 


The Assoaaud Prea 
TOKYO — A U.S. manufactur- 
er of biochemical products and a 
Canadian company have reached 
agreement with two Chinese com- 
panies to establish the first biotedi- 
nology jmm venture in China, it 
was announced here Monday. 

Cocoma oa 

PfamtoDissobe 

molecular biolo^cal research, the 
statement said. 


..... Northern Telecom is the secondr 

biDion dollars, coiiqwed with 3.3 largest designer and manufacturer strong demand for Nor^em Tele- 
bOlioa doUaxs in 1983. of equipment corn’s DMS digiud switches and 

in North America and the sixth in tte SL family of distal PBXs (pri- 
the world. It is the world’s largest vate brandt exchanges). 


Edmund Fitzgerald, presidem 
and chief executive offica (rf the 
idecommunicatioas giant, said or- 
ders were also at record lev^ In 
1984. 


Philippines Co-op 


and Industry said Monday. The in- tional Construction Holdings Ltd, =veek. Prnm^ Com of UfaHimn »*»»»» wu|iuuig»^ 
dependent gasotine retailer had Edmund Nutial Holdings Ltd. and u/ 5c/>n,{n^ ^ tran5w wtinnimw of the comply, said. 


The new company, &u>-Ameri- 
can Biotechnology (^., will have 
starting capital of $1 n^oo (about 
254 mfflion yen), it said 
Under an agreement reached last 


Jieuterr 

MANILA — The United Coco- 
nut Oil Mills Inc, the Philtppiaes' 
laig^ coconut-oil company, will 
be (fissoWed because of the govern- 
ment’s decisiem to lift curbs on co- 
conut-oil exports, president 
Eduardo Cqjumigco, the president 


bought 3,000 kfloliters (792,000 Arab Contractors. 


• ADVERI^EMENT • 


irfflERNATlONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
21 Jonuoiy 1985 

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worldwide Fond Ltd; 

price as on Amsierdoiii Stock BicntTO* 


Company Earstlsigs 

Revenue and profits, tn millions, ore In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicoled 


Canada 

Alcan Alununum 


eteonar. 

Revenue— 
ProllfS. 


Per Share— 
Year 


PtaOl 

PorStm — 


ifW 

1.32a 

200 

0.20 

19M 

ygin 

Z59 


Tfn 

UIO 

5S0 

057 

»83 

5J10 

7U 

on 


Bank of Boston 

OMGuar. 1TM 14C3 
Nei me. — 7(57 3U3 

per Shore . 133 15S 

Ymw 19H 19E2 

Nat Inc- lUOS I35T4 

PerSnure 035 7(0 


Eostam Gas & Fuel 


4111 Gtnu-. 
Revenue t — 
Oner n«i .... 
Ooor Shar^. 

Yeor 
Revenue , 


IIB4 quarter net toefvdft Oiw Net ._ 
ppAiiM5t77iH/fItoir>friBr>SCW Cuer Shore— 


e/nnmrm. 


19M 

3703 

070 

003 

1*04 

1510 

SU 

258 


no 

287.2 

175 

BJ7 

1*S1 

1.I9D. 

»U 

157 


l«SU nets Include write. 


Northern Tdecom 


Olh Quor- 
Revenue— 
Oev Nat— 
Oser Shore- 
Year 

Revenue 

Oner Net...— 
Oner Share— 


1*84 

lAOO 

i2ii 

IW 

1*M 

4JK. 

333.? 

2J6 


1*83 

9UJ 

STM 

194.7 

in3 

im 

Z27.1 

3RS 


Bur&ngton Ntfiero 


4MiQuor. 
Revenue — 
Met Inc 
Per Shore—. 
Veor 

Revenue — . 

NelliK. 

Per Shore— 


)?S4 

zieo 

13254 

155 

I?S4 

9.I6S. 

4C3.I 

MS 


l?B3 

45(11 

SAC 


nets I 
eotm at S354 mHHan. 

Ethyl 

4tti Quer. IJM 
Revenue .— 3B7.2 

Net Inc — . aSAS 
Per SXere— 15S 
Year l*M 

Rdh-enur lAfU 

■Irt tn4 13Z1S 

PerSirare— 3.M 


1983 

4S25 

3142 

031 

1*83 

IJSO. 

10L34 

341 


worth $250,000 lo ti» jorat venture. 

The venture’s other participants 
are the Luoyang Prefecture Bio- 
chemical Factor of Henan, China 
iatemationa] Trust and Invest- 
ment Corn, of Beqing and Sinogeo- 
etik, of Vancouver, Canada, the 
stateoient said. 

ProoM^ also will bain nine Chi- 
nese sdentists at the company’s 
U.S. facilities mthin a year, the 
siatemem said. 

Promega's president WilUam 
Linton, said that the operations 
will expand in the next three years 
to include insinmiems for human 


President Ferdinand E Marcos 
lifted the restrictions earlier this 
month, opei^ oocomit-oil ex- 
ports to all miil^ Previously only 
four t»g Gonmanita were alkwre^ 
export aud UNICOM accounted 
for nx>re than half the npcala. 

Mr. Ccguaogco said in a state- 
ment there was no incentive now 
for oil millers to export through his 
conqiany, which was set up in 1979 
as a cooperative to help revive the 
coconut mdusiry. 

Exports of coccHUii products last 
year earned $801.9 miOioiL 
Industry sources said the govem- 
inenl had been under pressure from 


and animal diagnostics researdi Uie Internationa] Monetary Fund 
and agricuitural applications to dismantle sugar and coconut 
bmtechnology. rooncfiolies. 


NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 
Can.S25,000,000 

16V^% (imtal March 1, 1985 and 17% thereafter) 
Gnaranteed Notes due March 1, 1988 
of 

TD MORTGAGE CORPORATION 
formerly 

TORDOM CORPORATION 

PUiBUBiu lo pinraph 5 of the above Notes, and in ocroidance with ihe 
itberis» 


I and Paying Agency Aawmnit dated March 1. 1962. 

all of Uto above Noies on March 1. 19K al 


provioioDs of . _ . 

the CosporalioD intends to rede^ all* 
a ndemptioD price of 100% of the principal amouni |Can.SlJ)00 per 
certificale) phis interest lo that doi^ as lepresenled by Coupon F3. 

PSymeni of the redemption price H-ill only be made upon pnsenlation and 
sunender of the Note, logeiberwith ihe unmanned coupons nuinbriwl F4^ 
and F6 (due March 1, 1W6, March 1. 1967 and March 1, respeclivdy). 
at one of the ^ying Agencies listed belOH*, if any of the inunaiumi coupons is 
miasing, the amouni ^ ihe missii^ ci>upoR(s)'(CaiL$170 for each coupon) 
shall be deducted from Ihe redemption price. The amount so deducted shall be 
paid against surrender of the rel^'am missing coupon(s). 

All iniecesl on the Notes sEaU cease fmm and after March 1. 1985. and any 
Notes presented after such date shall have no other right ncept to receive 
paymetil of die. redemptioa price of such Note. 

January 21. 1965 TD MORTGAGE CORPORATION 

PAYING ACEMOES 

TBETMC>IVT(MX)liaN10NBA^ THE TOKO)VnM)OH[N10N BANK 
SS King Street Vest and B 117 Street ^ Cornliill 

Toraatu, Ontario LAndoa, PmImmI 

MSK IAS EC3V3PL 

THE TORONTD-DOHINION BANK TRU^ COMPANY 
42 Wall Stieei 
New York, N.V,, U.SjL 
IDOOS 

MORGAN GUARA.’m TRUST BANOl'E CENSRALE Dt 
COMPANY OP NEW YORK UmiBOURC SA. 

Avenne des Arts 35 14 me AMriagea 

B-LOM Bmwrlii Luscinli«iir|i 


United States 
Amor. Not. Res. 


Caterpillar Troc. 

4tt Guar. 1934 1983 

Revenue 1.7^0 

4ih Guar. 
Fewemie _ .. 
rrei inc. 

1*84 

617.4 

4410 

19S3 

W4.1 

S054 

Year 

Revenue — - 

1984 

6580. 

I«33 

£.420. 

Year 

Revenue 

1984 

2570 

1981 

2530 




Fer srisre_ 

354 

3.17 


ttbOuar. 1*84 1983 

Revwwe ....^ M9.9 9S7.9 

Nsf Inc. __ a> 515 

Per Shore 156 IJi 

Year l«M im 

RovorNie— 3.4*0 3J41 

Not me. 196.) )71 j 

PerShare_ U6 458 

1934 rear net Includes 
Choree at S39 atOHen. Per 
share results aU)u*fod for j. 
tor.i split In Mar. 


Cent’f illbiois 


Inland Steel 


4Rl Guar. 

i*»; 

1923 

ethOuar. 

I9S4 

1913 

Net Inc __ 

isB 

25.C 

Revenue __ 

7750 

B31.9 

Per Share _ 

0.12 

057 

Oser Net 

2S.9 

174 

Year 

KK 

1983 

Oner Stiar^..' 

IJR 

070 

Net Inc. _ 



Veer 

I9M 

1*83 

Per Siiera 

— 


Revenue - - 

3520. 

2.920 

a; lass. 1983 rosu'ls include 

Oaer Net __ 

31 5 

(QI5S4 

sair ofSf.l millien (ram earl • 

Oper snare... 

156 

— 


retiremenf ef debt. 


(Other Eamtnss on Plage 10) 


For Investors with slollars 

seeking ABSOLUTE mFETY! 



We are 1 0 U.S savings banks grouped together !o offer investors a safe 
and most convenient way to deport from S20.000 to SiOO.000 with each 
of us and have the entire amouni up to S1.000.OOC automatically insured 
(without cost! against any conceivable risk or loss. Your deposit with each 
bank IS insured up to S100.000 by the Federal Savings and Loan 
Insurance Corporation, a permanent insuring and regulatory authority of 
the U.S Government In more than SO years, noi a single dollar has been 
lost in an INSURED deposit account A perfect record of safety. 
Moreover, as local consumer banks virtually all our assets are invested in 
the U.SA. obviously the safest place m which lo invest U.S. dollsrs. 

Alpim-ltansMnRSsryRnBaoitlauRuS-aBts Hstf-TcimCaftNiBatRSf Oapstfl: 


Tarm 

Interest Rate 
Raid duarterly 

Annualized Yield 
Produced from 
Quarterly 
Compounding 

3 months 

B.34ihi 

9.21 %■ 

6 months 

8.54% 

S.43%* 

1 year 

8.74%b 

9.65% 

3 years 

9.14% 

10.09% 

S years 

9.44% 

10.42% 

7 years 

9.64% 

10.64% 


These were the prevailing rates paid on deposits made during the week 
ended Monday, Jaa 2tst. The rate is guaranteed for the entire 
term you sign up for. Rates on offer change weekly in accordance with 
the rise or fall in the 13-week U.S. Treasury Sill rate foing fixed-term 
deposits, should an early withdrawal be necessary, a substantial interest 
penally would apply. 

* For 3-month arid 6-month CDs, re-investment ol interest is assumed to 
have been made at the same rates for additional 3-month and 6-month 
periods. 

S There Is no U.S. withholding tax. No fees or commis- 
sions to pay. No deductions whatsoever. 

(•I Through our Joint depositary, one of America’s largest 
clearing banks, you may, in one transaction, by che- 
que or bank-wire, purchase up to $1 ,000.000 in CDs, 
fully insured, with eur 1 0 savings banks. 

THE 10 SPOISfliilllO SOINNOS BARKS 

ftauftu UmdBsS Ssrtsgt al CsMata • AnosksN ftoitii Saaqa d CdHsidi 

Bsl-Alr Srtt|i If Cilinta • M-Asano Sangs of CsSlnb 
CcMs^SamgselCalitfirM DSii^SBEiiEsdSalilBrdi 
Msicdi; Sate d Toss • Sib Saitags ef CsB}beb 
Q oRlSnligiiilCiRBm R WcthiBFwssKbl&arisssdGittlsiBiB 

For complete details, including our most ciir.'enr raies and an Application 
Forrn. fUHn the coupon and .iraii today: Minimum deposirr 520,000. 


■ saw M M M M S?C\00tt 

AMittiirtaiafliUBosiSf: 10 US SavBip Baifcs. ?2 Jonn Sir&si. Lordon WCfN 2BL 
EngiaKl 

Ma ma- _ 

tovease 


I 
I 

j^Noi onersB lo Unied K:pgovti resdmts 




Success IS the ai1 ol choosinc (lie best. 


C, . - 


'4 £ X { > 


// 


t 1 




C V- ./ 

/ 






THE XO COGNAC 

Exclusively Fine Champagne Cognac 






IVIonda^i 

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.7.340888 

Pm. CDBSOridBM C30S8 

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INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE 
SPECIAL REPORTS 
1985 

One sure way of gptting your message Iniemational Herald Tribune Special Re- 
across lo a third of a n^on deci^on-makers pons. The following Reports are scheduled 
in gQvemmenL business and finance in 164 for 1985, with topics and dates, of ccAirse. 
countries around the world is to adviertise in subject to modificatioii. 


IIA 8A PGEptB IJ7 1Z0 
ISA 8A PGExfD lES 11.9 
IM< 8'6 PCEpfE 1JS 118 
10A I PGEdIG 130 132 
» 28A PCEbIP 4J4 111 

33>m 24A PGEsfZ 4J4 111 
34A 3IA PGServ 330 117 


3 IIA IIA IIA+ A 
3 IDA IDA lO'k + A 
48 IDA 10'6 IDA + W 
IS IDIk 9A 9A 
9 33’6 33 33A + 16 

45 31 3DA 31 + A 

84 25A 3T6 25A 


14A SA VankCs 5 33 4A 4 4A 

5A 4 Vordnv JH U 11 39 4A 4A 4A 


I2A SA ZhriM- .10 U 20 201 7A 4A 7 — 


Floating Rate Notes 


Jan. 21 


Dollar 


FEBRUARY 

Qatar Economy 
Internadonal 
Education 
Nigeria 
Cyprus 

MARCH 

Bermuda Econom>’ 
Countertrade 
Japan Economy 
Japan Fashion 

APRIL 

Korea 

Bahrain Economy 
Office Automation 
Germany 
Kuwait Eccxiomy 
Banking & Finance 
in It^ 

Travd in France 
Commercial Real 
Estate in Britain 


MAY 


Arts& Antiques 
Banking & Finance 
in Britain 

United .Arab Emirates 
Econom)' 

France Economy 
Jordan 
Scotland 
Aviation 

Telecommunicatioas 

Turk^ 

Portu^ 

JUNE 

Banking & Finance 
in Luxemboiug 
Electronic Banking 
Egypt 
Spa^ 

Cayman Islands 
Economy 
West Africa 


NOVEMBER 

Saudi Economy 
North American 
Real Estate 
Netheriands Economy 
Construction in 
Arab Countries 
Travel in West .Africa 
Euromarkets 
Gulf States 
Latin American Trade 

DECEMBER 

Lond(» 

Caribbean/Centra] 

.American 

Development 


Each Report will be carried in all editions 
of the International Herald Tribune, and a 
reprinted version be available on request, 
at a nmninal cost. 

For information on placing advertising 
in these Special Reports, or to 
receive pieliminao' 


ISnbuuc 


SEPTEMBEl 


German Fashion 
Commodities 
Auto Industry 
Japan 
Singapore 
Banking & Fmance 
in Nordic Countries 
Banking & Finance 
in Ar^ Countries 
North Yemen 
Hong Kong 
Italy 

Small Computers 
OCTOBER 


Greece 

French Fashion 
Banking & Finance 
in Aria 

Italian Fashion 
Banking & Finance 
in France 
American Fashion 
Energy 

/Banking & Finance 
in Austria 


editorial ^opses of the topics lo be covered, 
contact: Mrs. Mandy Lawther. Advertising 
Manager. Special Reports, International Her- 
ald Tribune. 181 Avenue Chaiies-de-GauUe, 
92521 Neuilly Cedex. France. 

Tel.: 747 12 65. Tlx.: 613595. or your 
local !HT representative. 




154 
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9A 253 
12*6 213 
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I2A E3 
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9 a 43 
9A 314 
12A 28-2 

1? SI 

lA 224 973S 
9A 43 99.A 


1 L*>1 



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rrii 

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LU 


Non Dollar 


iGwer/Mln on/Mpt. Cwm Nut BU AM 


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StSSBISS"’^ nvi 2M 

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aticm&l/4ckt-10 pcf 1S4 

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UOTA5-96 tw. 

Sad5k.40/9] loL £? 

Vgrksblresu4l,« M 


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A.K mis 

AJI9947 
AJBAjl 
I0US1BUD 
AJ5 A8D 




^Srtbuuc 


„ .-. .S?S%*vSkTi^ MTV « vhlaciii* 




Comcast International Finance N.V. 

S22,S00^ 

8% Convertible Bonds due 1997 
Guaranteed by 

Comcast Corporation 

Pursuant to Section 5.7 of the Indenture dated as of December I, 
1982 in respect of the above issue, notice is hereby given as follows: 

1. On August 27. 1984 the Board of Directors of Comcast Corpor- 
ation voted a three for two stock split in the form of a SO^t dividend. 

2. Accordingly, the conversion price at which the Bonds may be 
converted into share.s of Class A Common Stock of Comcast 
Corporation has been adjusted with elTect from September 7. 1984. 
The conversion price in effect before such adjustment was S 19.33. 
and (he adjusted conT-ersion price is SI 2.89. 

Bankers Trust Company 

/Vm» fpti/ i«h/ t'umrrtjiiii -lijt'fii 

Jiinujii 1". i‘^5 


Boston Ltd. 


foreign & COLONIAL 

reserve ASSCT FUND 

A. US OCUAR CASH ’JiS 

B. matiqibojcyowh r2i' 

C. douarboi^ 1,22 

E. string ASSETS^^ 

. Pa®GN&COLONAl 

mat 4193043 

OT HBg F BC nMx* 


GoW Options 



Cc6i3®a>ar;D 

w-.iTjnv.'t5raa 












































Renault Cha 


lINTERftATlOWAL HERALD TRIBUNE, Tl^SDAY. JA.\L aRY 22, 1985 




^ Said in CompeOhe VS. Mmiet 


13 




Move Alters 
Bond Market 


lOrnKn.—! I „ ecessor (lonlinuMl fran Pa|>t 9) pricesr Assud & Assaai presi- myslm- — but a ouand-irv uh,, „ 

nn ™ ^ Thr nr! ^ s«^ cliciits With dealings uj d“»of»heAbuDbabiInteniation- ih«>Wgoingiodo°h NcwYiS Sj^ to the “There's noihine that exotic 

^ems leading lo his resigna- bacLoK the Amena. al ^ in Washington, asked rtie- said a senwrWer at a N^- York ^ ™rtoan de^^ about iu" he Xftf “Mavtefe 

^ 8“fPr«idcni Fraru;oisMil. Asmtu typically ran^^ of Arab bankers. He bank. -They're opened v^ in the a Se^^ 

b^ue. Baucally, Um? bank ho5 
tried to avoid pc^iics and relxgioa." 

Avoiding politics and religion is ^1-9^ is .9? which is ffluliiplied by 
. . a particularly sensitive question be- 

^»u.bi«b.vebui.,„pbu9P 


(Commued from P^e 9) 
would equal S2.37S (92.04 less 


' rtrii* MrA I —SMI l\^i|slUJl 5 rc- UUl IIUI 

Mr. Hanotj T^i recaved word of wiih iraH- •f*“Sbn»-*s6 in dealing dial sime of the iosiiiuiions thai 


financial reserves. 





the job. 

.A senior Frach official conced- 
the manner^ 
which Mr. Hanon was remnv.»H 

w^-nouglL-BuihesaidihTtK 
f«ssary to act quickly and aai^ 


lion francs (S925.9*** miujonh ^he “pera^ and ihe vigor of the Arab banks thrived for a wWIe, 


Peter J. Tanous, executive vice 


arisen mudi because most Arab spreaders believe in this see- 


largest loss evw bv j French^^^ t‘4>mpeuuqn. Moreovw.^ banks rmanciaJ insdtutkms are no longer Bank Audi in New- batiks aim only to serve Ar^ and “ttrio, they- could in round numbm 

*” •‘■•IMI vom- exDandwl HIM at Ih-!r K«-* .u- r«n.4i«a MCU M..!.:...... ^ T Ofk Said that cnm.. n.k.~ A_u *^*'*6«* W/UnOTCaaS WlK> lUtOW * ‘ . 

It we 

beauMofineffidCTt.diff^^^ ’ - - — «to the reve« with some chM 


Pany. The compahv has not con- “ their bases in the finding easy pickings, 

firmed the figure. Middle cast were experiendng a 


« - V'i‘«'-»jy ana name bead diJi-'lining trade with the United 

a successor who has displayed and he was Slates, 

chansxna.” ^ f®*" ^ indefiniie term -wii 

lost Mav. 


York said dui some other Arab not a word of Arabic 

-It’s an «.bon3.siM.t bu. 

dihrlinino irud^ ..niu ik> i r®**dt may bc 3 kind of fuianaal because nf ininrr!.-!^*., .iifr..^ n t have one person on our s 


American corporations ddng bust- u “®ti ^ March bill futures and 
ness in Arab countries. "tiy 10 March bond futures." Mr. 

Is there any reluctance to hire ^T®t^ “If not, ih^ ctnild 








n-hn M.w,L « V. M — . , iT^ jcw»: “w M*v levEiac miui SUniC cnaDEeS U 

A ViuESoS^S: is a very strong and the ratio of biU to bond futures." 

of the SjSSS BaSk (?iS5 anybody "Hk iniiid cash margins on bill 


and manager <rf its New York of- 
fice. 


w|bo applies and qualifies will be and bond futures vary with each 
hired, irrespective of religion," said brokerage house but have recently 
Mr. K halil of the UB.AF BanL been about $2,500 per contract. 


»••* Hlob LM SPJH.Ch'ge 


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95 4 m 4 -MS 
4 16W WUi 14M + W 
19111 low lew 4- 4b 
?S 1 666+ W 

W SW |W JW 

16016 u im+w 
604 32Vb aw A 
41 164b WW 164b 
SI18W II llVb 
13 4Vb 4U 4W 


aaoo 

■PI Cm 
Biwea 
BPISy 
BRCam 
Bailee 
BolIBcP 
■oncDkl 

BCPHW 

B flnrtac 
BanoH 

BkHE 

BKMAm 1M 
Bankvt 
BontoC A4 
BeroiiD 
Burton 
BsTnA 
BasAin 

BoetP ma 22 
BovSks 210 AS 
Bnylv .12 1J 
BIFusts 
BoHNt 
BonAen 


£01 A4 
.Mo II 


I 


JO 101 
214 42 
92 


22 




Borklov 

Basl^ 

bmS 

|S^ 

Btown 

Bbare 

BfetcR 

BIrdInc 

BbhGr 

BIIhAT 

BoaiBn 

BobBvn 

BottTe 

BtfnPC 

BraoOp 

Bronco 

BrWTom 

Bruno 

Buffton 

BiilUTr 

Brntam 

BurrBr 

BMA 

BMrrid 


3D74SU 44 4SU +1W 
1H 14b m 1H 

3 6W 6W 6W— M 

975 3 2«b 29b+ W 

1612 lUb 12 + W 
65 7W 7W 7W 
430 194b 19 ]94b+ W 

4 19W ms 19Vb + W 
Dsow at a 
3a 7H 7 7W+ W 

205 7W 7<b 74b 

111 611b 604b 41 
1SI1W 104b low 
521IW II II + W 
151 a 27V, a 
n 7W 7 TVb 
a 5W 3 3 — W 

mo 94b 94b— W 
SI Sib Mb Mb— Vb 
445 N 3S4b 3Mb+ W 
77454b 4Stb 454b + W 
221 TVb 44b 71b + 4b 
81 im 104b II — W 
ID 74b 7 74b + W 

IS 13H 134b 134b— W 
I 7 04b 7W 74b 

12 U S144b I4W 144b— W 

190 4b 4b 4b +K» 

110 31 3153Mb 33W 334b + Vb 

73 7W TW 7lb+ W 

33129, 12Vb 12W+Jb 
I IW lU IW— A 
I21IW 104b I1W+ W 
374 34b 3W. 3bb + 4h 

10 aw aw 234b 

739 51b S4b SVb + W 

2M 74b 7W 7U— W 

MS 41h 5 + Vb 
17 94b 9 94b+ W 

106 TVb 74b TVb 
3 7 7. 7^ + W 

I 01 « 4b 4b 

ID 91 99274b a a — W 
D 11 270 1B4b T7W IIW + lb 
.16 11 30 9Vb 14b S4b— 1A 

.lOl 1 33616 154b 16 

330 1214 114b I3W + Vb 
14 31 270 6W 51b 6W + 4b 

I 119 34b 3Vb 31b— W 

2t 11 239 22W 219b 221b 

in m lib ivb— Ml 
M23W a 3IW + 1b 
.lOt .9 6 19W 19W I9W * W 

66 184b 17 IIW+1 
IM 41 349 4Mb 49 + H 

1590 5W 44b S4b + 4b 


Comdin 

CORIdlol 

Comere 
Cmceu 
CmlStir 
CwithF 
CmavTI 
ComAin 
Comma 
ComSvt 
CmpCrd 
Compaq 
CmpoT 
Campc 
CniDcro 
Compcp 
Cqmpus 
CCTC 
CmpAs 
CpIAtfl 
CmoDl 
CptEnI 
CmntH 

Cmpite 
CmpkR 
CmptM 
CmpPd 
CmpRs 
CmTosk 
vieptUs 
Cmpubi 
teen 

Cmarvo 
Comatir 
Cmpkhp 
Comteft 
Cencpil 
Conttrs 
CnCop 
CCapR 
CCopS 
ConPbr 
CftPops ID 35 
CensPd Do ii 
Consui 

teIBcp 2M 51 

ctiHisr 

CHHNC 

« ’ 
Convpi 
Convrao 
CoprBle 
CcwrsB 
Goovtel 
C o^ m 

CoroSt 
CervM 

^ .» n 

Sriino c I 
CranM 
CmTr 
CwnBk 

giliiNn D 31 
Cyaoro 


D 


3160131 
IDoWS 
316 134 


D U 


2D 41 


21 


61* 134b nib 134. ♦ W 
6WJW 2W 2W— V, 
213 a 371b 37W— 4b 
6 21-b aw 20'b- W 
Mil low 11 + w 
in «w sib 9W + H 
7J0W »w aw— 1 
74 3W 1W 3W 
2D aw I4W 20W + w 
n iivb 104. n + u 
49 2SW as aw 
2507 7W »w 7W + W 
69154b 13^ 13 _n 
6SI 2*W avb 36Vb + W 
44b 6Vb 6W— 4b 
3« if. IW IH 
109 3W 3W 3W 
S226Vb ^ I3W— W 

iia2ivb aw 2IW+ w 

*2.5W 4W S-A+lb 
32I1W 1IW 1IW 
56 fb Mb SW 
2g 0 7W 0 + W 
» 7W 7W 7W— W 
, » *y4 6'* SVb + Vb 
'S2S ,1^ • 6W + 4» 

708 ITVii I4W 174b + W 

5 3 3 3 ^ W 

D16W I5W 16W + 4i 
41 IW I I 

47o 7W 64. 7 + W 
a 4Vb 64b 6W— Vb 
IDS 3W 3W 3W + Vb 

6 71b 6«h 7W 

a 4 4 4 + lb 

SS9 ns, l^ JW 
IM 9W 8W 94h + W 
K21W 214b aw— Vb 
^25lba 3SV,+ W 
a I7W 1644 16W— Vb 

Ml aw a a — w 

20 OW OW 04b + 4b 
206 SAW 3SSb 35W + W 
4 5 5 S - lb 

a 59k 54k 5W 
31 324k aw 324b— W 
1S61SW 1444 I4W— H 
2a 4Vb 4Vb 44b— lb 
415 T4b 44k 7W + W 
a 6W 4tt 51b 

4» aw I Stb— 4h 

a IB I7W 10 
384 31b 31b 3W + Vk 
Ml 1IW low 104b 
54 24Sb 2ilb 24W— W 
17 9W OW 9W4-1 
IS 04b BW SW 
7SA « 464h 479b +14b 

IID 444 4W 4W9- Vb 

SM.Ub 6W 61b 


ComoB 

Concfira 

Corcln 

GoMtcfi 

GnAut 

GnHme 

CeMiE 

OonoiL 

Coneis 

Cone. 

Genowo 

CoFBk 

CerMds 

CIDG 

CloiiTr 

GlonFO 

CldCwr 

BOToco 

Gploob 

Gon 

CouUP 

Gmeo 

Granlm 

Grnphl 

GrpfiSe 

CWPSB 

GBovCs 

CreonT 

Gtooi 

Cvlirrd 

GIIBdC 

GIINuc 


SOlKiB ,1^ 

lOOo Hipn t«w JPAlOiVe 
10 l.l ID 9W fw 9U— W 

a » iiw 12 + w 

in 3H 34b 3W— Vb 
^41 4DW 401b 
197 7 6W 7 

2 S'* 7W aw + w 

a » 3lb 3W— w 
21 4 3W 4 + lb 

1305 4W 6W 6W— W 
*?J 6*7 6W Sb 
.IM 21 a SW 5 SW 
469 12W 12 12W 

D IJ 47 6W 6W 6W 

■SI .7 415 a aw a -f- Vb 

83% Swiss** 

3|3"« 

94 14 ISA I5W 

« ^ . J! I3J7 12lb 4k 

H ™ <7Vb I7W 

S’2... t*** *6 

29 OVk • 8W 

n IM low lovb + w 

^ 3763 SW 4W 4W— W 

Do 2J 44 17W 15W Itfk— W 

a m, i»w I 2 W ■«■ w 

IS19W low 1Mk-W 
ion 154b 141b ISW + 9b 
a ISVk I4W ISW + w 
3009 ISW « ISW 
4 3 2 3 


MSB HWI Low 3P15.CBV0 


D U 


D 

1.12 


H 


iSn4« im im 
lam 32W 22W 

n ^ asw 2SW + w 

11219 1146 1BW— w 

ID3245 aw 22W-9 W 


O 


DBA 

DEP 

DoloySv 

DolenF 

DnmBlo 

DortGp 

Dalord 

DIalO 

msortcb 

DatPtwr 

Ootbcp 

Dhjiiii 

Datum 

Dow n 

DohSi. 

Dtew) 

OefcJbA 

Mctm 

PbHoOl 

DoVtous 

Denolcr 

DbOtMd 

DatocBI 

OtaoDI 

DkioPr 

Dlodonc 

DICKM 

Olcmod 

DlPlOO 

DWtCm 

DloltSw 

Olonox 

DbtLoo 

Dvfood 

OocuOl 

DIrGni 

Dome 

DrDH 

DovIDB 

Droniz 

Droxlr 

OrovGr 

DiKfcAs 

OunkD 

DiHlron 

DurFII 

Dvnooi 

Dvnitf S 

Dvton 


.1 

II 


.ID 1 




D 

ID 

D 


14311446 I3W I4W+I 
. 26 7W 7W 7W'+ W 
31973m 2m 294h— 
aw a«k awA 
«*b 4W 4W 
190 90 90 

M» T7W 17W 
342 12W 114b 12W 4- 
459 aw BW BW- 
5 4fa 4W 4W — 

31 14 I3W 14 -f W 
*6 4W 4W 4W+ W 
45 7W 7W 7W— 
,13 SH SW SH 
ID I9W UW 19’A -t- 
S5415W I4W I4W 
34 160n4b aw 3IW+ W 
11 iai5 I4W I4W— 

10 IW IW IW 

W IW IW iw-t- w 
259 SH SW SW 
110 7 6W 7 -F W 

40 Mb 3W 34b + W 
4 10 N 10 + W 
1040 39b 3H 34b •>■ W 
5821346 UU ISW 
1371346 I3W 13WA W 

11 4W 4W 4W 
jNtttaw 174k 10 
S2a 25W 24W 25W + W 

D as aw a + w 

24 6W 6 6W— W 

16 2724 9W * 9W + W 
a 49h 44b 446 
1 271 2346 SW 2346 + W 
»27W 27W 27W * W 
13 1646 1646 164k— W 
1131046 ISW low 
164 1M6 low 1046 -I- w 
2M11W W46 1IW+ W 
91546 1516 15W— W 
173 19W 19W 19V, ■!■ W 
303SW a a 
193 I2W 1146 12W + 46 
416 14 13 14 -H 

39 44k 4W 44k + W 
4603DV 19W 204h-Fn6 

ISIS IIW 11 nw+w 


HBOs 
HCC 
HCW 
HMOAm 
Hobors 
Hodoo 
Hodson 
HaleSv 
Halml 
Homoil 
HorpG 
HrtfMt 
Hdlilwv 
HdWkB 
HlthAB 
HHhCSo 
Htthovn 
HKboA 
HoetioB 
MoienT 
Hellb 
HenrtlF 
HerltBn 
Horlev 
HIborCa ID 
Hickdm 
Hopon 
HmPAz 
HomeHi 
Hmocil 
Nonind 
HflokOr 
Hpovor 
Horzlnd 
HwBNJ 
HunoTo 
HuniJB 
HnloRa 
HuntsB 
Hu mo 
Hvbrftc 
HydeAt 
Hypom 
HytofcM 


J 

11 

51 

10 

19 


J4d £J 
ID 37 


D 

ID 

ID 


IDb A1 


»6 im I9W 194b- W 
19 9W 9W 9V. 

I 49b 49b 49b 
6361146 11 IIW— Vk 
27 1546 ISW ISW 
II 5 5 5 

71 S* awi 8w 

« IW ^ S&-K, 
W1«b I4W 144h+W 
.S31. sy> 33W- W 
inm 27W STH + bb 
57 10 9W 10 + W 
6l 946 9W 94h 
tSt 17 16W 1646 

9 IB IB IB 
3BO 4W 4W Mb -F W 
19 34 23W 3Mb— 4b 

157^9 2SW-FW 
16 74b 7W 716 
6730W 394b 3946 ■FW 

*7 38 2f5 21^*ft*“ 

1511 low II 
571 746 7W 74b 
n 16 154b 16 F U 

37810 946 fW 

.. 104 7W 7W 7W— W 
ai 21 la 1746 18 F W 
&l 13 9 »W 19W— W 
31 II119W 29W 9 

67 6W 546 64b F W 
199 194b im— W 

M SW SW SWFW 
539 22 2046 a F 46 

48 10 9W 9Vb 
93SW 3SW 3S4kFW 
130 SW 5 5U— W 

165 9W 1946 1«W— W 
393 SW SW 546F 4b 
30 7 kW 5W— W 
MB 7W 0 F W 


MrdBpf 2D 
•DrlBs 
MtrvGs 
MolrAIr 
MiSL 
BBtoMI 
AMcrD 
AUerMk 
MIerdy « 
MerTe 
Mlcrop 
MlcrSm 
MdPcA 
MdSIFd 
MMBks 
AWwAIr 
MUIIHr 
Mlllem 
BBIIIIpr 
Mlnlicr 
MlRsIrB 
MGon 
A40MCA 
6DOICB 
Modine 
MeWelr 
Moln JO 
MonCd ID 
Moncer 
Mon lCI ID 11 
BtenAitf 
Monoin 

iWonuC ID 41 
MorFio 11 
MorKe .ID II 
ADmn D 21 
MMBIOV 

Morcib D 11 

Multmd M 11 
Dylans ,im l 


M II 
M 11 


lie 


ID 31 


16 3IW n 31 F 4b 

17 UW UW UW 
660 ISW MW ISW 

inuw 13W u 
33 IIW IIW nWF w 
am 314. BOW 3l4hFIW 
2S3 4H 41b 4W •«■ ta 
7711 MW II F 4b 
466 S4b SW 5W F W 
7D2346 aw 234b FD 
39 6 546 6 F W 

140 SW SW S4b— W 
40 SW 4W 5 
9 1BW IIW low F W 
249 2fW 29W 
7m 4 3W 34b— W 
3U37W 364k 37W F W 

10 3W 3W 3W— W 
2733446 34W 36W— W 

IB9 3W 3W 3W— W 
DI9 1146 1546— W 
395 16W I6W MU— 16 
1 04b aw OH 
NO 84k SW aw 
234 046 414h 43HFW 
D 04. aw 5W 
.. 193346 aw 33W 
31 1305 44W 44 44U F W 

52 3H 346 Mb F W 

11 1BU IIW law— W 
n 146 • aw— w 

1600UW ISW 16 F H 
101 29W 20W 29W— U 
62 17W 16W 17W F W 
34 I2W IIW 12 F H 
29 law 17W II 
60S 5H 5W SWFW 
MU 14 14 F W 

S4S43 39W4IWFIW 
I4932n6 27W 9WF W 


Sotosta 

lOD Mloh Lm 3PJA.CMWO 


SEI 
&PE 
SP DniB 
SRI 

Sotoerd 

SofOCD 

SolHim 

SUuoe 

SVFdUl 

soite 

SnnBor 

SondCM 

SotelD 

SotolSv 

SomP 

DBkPS 

SconOp 

SemTr 

Soierw 

SCMmA 

Dlnwd 

DKmp 

Selincs 

seiMie 

SdSH 

DiSySv 

seitoK 

SeoGnl 

SOQMte 

SocTm 

SBEQ 

Selbol 

Semicn 


.ID 1.1 
I 

D 37 


.12 17 
I40d 41 
J2 21 


D £9 


D 

D 

1.13 


I 


N 


NCA Cp 
NM5 
Nopoos 
NBdTm M4 
metys ID 
Niter 2t 
NDoto M 
NHHIlC Dl 
NtLimB 
NOaicm 
NToch I 
NdlrBlv 
NqubW 
HdllBwl 
NetaiT 


D 21 


11 


.13 






CCOR 
CPRM 
CBT 
CAM. 

CPI 
CPT 

esp 

a?r 

SiST 

CBiSIvg 

iST 

teCrt 
CaniDls 
Cordlos 
CoroBn 
Coriorl 

CntrB« 
Contcor 
CmBcp 
CnBaM 
CFdBk 
Contron 
CeitrA 
Cdnntk 
Mib 
Q wern 

ChkTdi 
OiLMn 
Qwinn 
Owe 

9!S!L 

OirPac 
Qwiiwr 
Qiranr 
OirDwa 
Chyma 
QMm 

OplMT 

^ ' 

%UtA t 
^tltB ID 


ID 41 


Do .1 


ID 61 

IDb U 
ID 4B 
1.U 3J 
D 17 
.12 17 


.18 1 


.19 1 


D 21 
.10 1 
Do J 


4^' 9Iypm 






&/JKP 

Q^s 

tericJ 

CworCh 

OevtRt 

EfMrao 

COOSIF 

CobeLb 

CmMa 

Cohmts 
CoiabR 
C ol Bo on 
CoUkiB 
ColUAC 

terTIa 

CohtHts 

CbIDIb 

Conwir 

Com^g 


61 
Do 11 
DB 37 
M 1 
D 3.6 

ID 71 


StQ II 
V 


TO fW 9 9W 

186 916 9 9 — W 

90 39W 3046 39W 
77 tow 9W lOH F H 
408 ISW UW ISW F H 
614 8 7W 7H— W 
60 6H 6W AW— W 
62 3W aw 3W F W 
1448 6 SH SW 
39 18H WH I8H— W 
13 3 IW IW— W 
233 4W 4W 4W F W 
227 low ID low 
18 3W 3H 3H 
19 3H 3W Mb F W 
SH 9W 9W 9HF W 
an 19 10W 18H F H 

D2 9W 9 OVb— H 
339 2H 3W 2U— 4b 
215W ISW 15W 
1MT2H 1»i.W 
3n 2M 3W mFhi 
224 114b 10H WH 
9 15W I5H ISW F ta 
3 19 19 19 

DSSVb 2746 at 
1HI1W IIW 11WFU 
544046 9 40WF U 
D87Vb 27 37V3F W 

U39U 29W 9W F W 
5S735W .35 ^ 

52 6W 6 6U 
88 3H 3H 3H 
34210H NW lOHFVb 
17 IH IH 1H ^ ^ 
IS 5W 5 SW F W 
36 SH 5H SHF Vb 
664 19H »U 17H+1H 
6H16W 15W 15Vb-,H 
71 TVb 7H 7UF W 
927H 27W 27W— U 
73 4H 5H 
6UU UW MU 
1048 12H 12H 12H 
97794S 7«6 
245 19W 19 !«+ JJ 

a 9 8H M—U 
78 13U 13 13W F H 

79 low l«b WH + S 
34 9 asw 26 F W 
662 9 24H 8SU F 46 

. jJnU II 1IU + » 

9 6 6 6 

631 9W 9W DW 

M S9U D St 

K§Xk 946 29UFU 

138U 9U au— w 
m 12W igt 
IZ722H 3346 3M6— 4k 
DtM 31H 
laau 3P6 36UFU 
9 ISW 1SU ISW F W 
2 I9H I9H I9H 
71 9H 9W 9U 
15 M M M T S 
62T3H I2U I2WFH 

SrV »W 29 FH 
49 1346 I2W 12W— U 

m32W 22 22W 

129 I8W IBW 
111 I7W 17^ ITU 
222 IW HI 
IH n 43W 13.. . 

119 2246 22U 22W F W 


EH Ini 
EIP 
EoBlCpt 
EosITI 
EmTwIA 
EanLb ID 37 
EdCmp .13 II 
Educom jm 20 
ElkoiM 
EKMC 

EIPh id 111 
Elan Do .9 
ElMlo 

Eldon .Mb 1.1 
EWrM 
EIkBIo 
E lCdltlS 
EloNuel 
ElcRnt 
ECPlM-9 
EldWUs 
ElronEI 
Emeor 
EmpAIr 
EmulKB 
Endld 
Endveo 
EndoLs 
BnoCnv 
EnFoci 
EnoCMIa 
EnoRsv 
Enspbs 
EntPub 
EnzoBi 
Equal 
EqtOil 
ErlcTI 
EvnSut 
Ex^Te 
EMivIr 


D 31 

74r 31 


13 3H 3H 2H— Vb 
63 14W 14 UW— W 
289 W H W t-lb 
107 SH S SW— W 
6 6 6 6 — W 

U9 27W 9 + W 

D9 low *W lOH F H 
252 4W 3W 4 F W 
1B12W I3W 12W 
29 10 «W «W + W 
436 13U I3W 13U 
49 7W 7H 7W— W 
19 9H 94b 9W 

2 14W MW MW F H 
62 SW SH SWF W 
179 7H 7W 7W 

663 28W IBW I9W— 1 
360 13W 13W I9W— lb 
lU IBW I7«b I7H 
I 13W 13W 13U— W 
46 SW S SW 
31 low 10 10—16 

2S W H H— lb 
ID BW BW aw F W 

loanw low nw 

11 64A 6 6 — W 

3 «W 6W SH— W 
1090 9W aw 9H -HW 

74 9W TTVy 9W F W 
IS aw BW IW 
9 5 4W 49h 
91 1 H 1 Fib 
3 13 1346 13 F bi 

D 15 UW IS 
367 19 law 14 F W 
140 ITU 17W 174. F W 
9 6W 6W 6Vb 
509 aw 9 9 — W 

303 ISW UW IP6 + W 
40 Vb W W 
156 UW UVb I4H 


F W 


FOP 

FMI 

FamHIs 

ForntP 

FimG 

PodGrp 

Perothi 

Plbron 

Fkner 

PirniTli 

FiBRiO 

FlInHec 

Flltnh 

Flnaln 

FMprnx 

Flnlaon 

PAldBS 

RAFbl 

RATn 

PICbIP 

FDODE 

FEmc 

FPdMIc 

PPdCal 

FFRM 

FtPnCP 

FFnMSt 

FIFIBk 

FDrNt 

FAMB 

FNItCM 

FNISUP 

PRBGo 

FtSvFId 

FSvWtS 

fisnC 

FTenMt 

FtUnCs 

Ftaluv 

FIdMtl 

FioFtU 

PINPIs 

FldoMV 

Flurod) 

Popar 

FUonB 

FLionA 

For Air 

ForostO 

ForfnF 

Forms 

Forvm 

Pdslor 

Foxmvr 

Fremni 

Fvdrck 

FlriHBS 


210 

UO 

D 

D 

D 


47 

17 

20 

27 

41 


41 

21 

AI 


170 B m 8 + H 
Dr 1 H SW SH SH— W 
170 IH IW 1H+ M 
I 319 31W SOW 311b •!■ H 
ID 14 I7MS3W 51W DU 4-1 
383 27W 2k 2T. + W 

40 7 64k 7 

44 UU I3H I4U + W 

184 4S4b 48H 4B4k + H 
I3tf 59U 60 + W 
93«W » 24W •*■ w 

81 UU M 14H— W 
33 IS UW UH * H 

41 4W 4 4W -V W 
112 7W 7H 7H -k W 

97 low 10H low 
U214 23W 34 + H 

9»W 3SW 2SW 
S9 37W 86W 3716 + Vb 

45 I6U ISW >616 +IW 
119 19H 19W UW * 4b 

1193 13Vb 13W I2W— W 
17S10U low low 
6 ISW 1546 UW + H 
3 IBW low lOW— W 
64 DU 19W 30U 4 46 
4614H I9W I9U 
41 23H 27W 23W— W 
14 32U D 32V, 
19314. 3IW 31W 
6D>6 S2 ‘DW 4 4k 
3914 13W 13W- W 

ID aw 9 aw- W 
9 20W 9 9 — U 

ID TVb a 9Vb41W 
1.10 A9 l»22W 2Vk OW- h 
ID 5.1 49 31H 30W 3IH 4 W 
1.12 31 326 3646 36W 36U 4 W 
ID 4W SH 6H 4 H 
atS U4u 14W UV9 4 W 
333 16H 16H T6W 4 W 
15131 30W 30H4 W 

7B6 I7W I4H 16U 4 U 
77 12H ISH I2W 4 W 
108 5 4W S 4 W 
D A 315 16W 1M6 16 4 16 
D 1 277 14 ISW U 
.M 31 173 27U 21 37 

ID 51 26 UW 19W I9W 

167 ISH ISH 15W 4 Vb 
2277 3H 3W 3H 
D 7 179 BW 8H 5H- W 
.10 11 383 6H AH 6H— W 
967 34W 334. Mb— H 
D L7 49 ISW I7H 18 

625 124i I3H 12W 4 H 
D 21 inuu UW 14H— W 


ILC 

IMS Ini 

I^Sy 

ISC 

Icor 

ImunoB 

Imuno 

■muoen 

Inoemp 

IMpHIt 

indiN 

intoRoc 

Inifm 

lidtaln 

InstNIw 

I n M ui i 

iniBDw 

IntoGop 

ISSCO 

Intel 

intlSv 

Inh-Tol 

Inimd 

Inidim 

InIrlFir 

Inhiac 

IntorpTi 

Inirmen 

intmee 

IpCopE 

IntClin 

IGame 

IrilKIne 

InlLSB 

inMobll 

IRIS 

iTCoro 

iniTolal 

invere 

lomesd 

llel 

llelpf 


ID 41 


34 9 BW 9 4 W 


3W 2H4 H 
9H I04b4 W 
4W 4U 
AH 7H4 H 
3W 3H 
2H 2H— W 
5W 5H+ W 
2Mb 33W— W 


.11 II 


t9 4U 
IIS 7H 
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(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


COOPB ST JAMES 

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Page 14 


internahonal herald tribute, Tuesday, January 22, 1935 



PEANUTS 


flAKEAiTVANTAeEOF 
I THIS OFFER NOW! > 


5ENP \)S '(OUR 

.NAMETOCAYi. 


BUT YOU MUST BE 
. 18 OR OLPER ^ 


UAlT FOR me; 


BOOKS 




PASSAGE TO PESHAWAR; 
Pakutan Between the Hindn Kush 
and the Arabian Sea 


/-2S an^awftRic 


BLONDIE 


I NEED A WORD CP TeN 
^ LETTEPS... ^ ^ 


I THAT ALLaVIATES E^N 
AND AAlS&Ry ^ j 


scHoc-Asemp ) / tmat I |rr qoes when vou'vb \ 
^ ^ l^po^NTj |Gcrr Tvwo TBBNAeeas^j^ 


^ Richard Reeves. 233 pp. $15.95. 

Simon & Skusier, 1230 Avenue of the 
Americas, 

fliew York, N. Y. 10020. 

Reviewed by Richard M. Weintraub 


T tS Uoiied States anlcs several hundred 
miOion dollars a \iear into Pakistan, and 


X miOion dollars a year into Pakistan, and 
several score millions more funnel ihrou^ 


Pakistani tenitoiy to support the guerrillas 
fighting in A fghanisian The U. S. even has a 


A critic might point out how little be gives 
on the history of the region, both the 
formation of the Pakistani state m 1947 and 
especially before. There is little about the re- 
guxial strains that threaten the country’s pcild- 
cal cohesion. And there are ocpa<^ fiiecs, 
such os Reeves’ soggestion, during ^re discus- 
sion of Pakistani economic devoofEnenl, or 
the lack thereof, that maybe the oountiy could 
use a dose ^ sodalism. 

Reeves, a mdicated colmnmsl and free- 
lance writer, mcs offer a series of interwovai 
essays that give us a feel for the dynamics (tf 
the place and espedally for the r^ioo that is 
currently the focal point of U. S.p(riicy in the 
area — the wild Afghan border tenitt^. In the 










ACROSS 


1R(^ Norse 

naTtia 

5 Plucky 
9 Noggin 
UBetetpelm 

14 “A Able" 

15 dela 

Soci4t4 

16 Mater 

limapatdted 

ISCrobks* 

ziemeses 
16 Hayseed 

21 Cypress 
feature 

22 Wldy. arrival 
28 "My 

Sister " 

25 Rabbit fur 
28 Tlie first Mrs, 
Soames 
Forsyte 

SB Crbcte figures 
81 Ablatlve«e.g. 
SSHoratiaii 
creatiOD 
37 Slipped away 
39 Washington's 
German baron 
41 Poorest 
42CQDcmniiig 
44"Ofniee 

I ” 

45 Eight gills 
47SQuander 
49 Philatelists’ 
bocds 


52 Kiln 
54Uquori 
specialty 
55 Killjoy 

61 Iris part 

62 Syllogism 
word 

63 Broader 

64 Submerge 

65 Carol 
68CrSmedela 

crSme 

e7K2nofPh.D.'s 


68 U.S.S.R. 

agency 
66 Quebec’s 
livesque 
DOWN 
IBuccal 
2 Maiqidsette's 
weave 

satiic 

4Queen 

Esther’s 


13C.P.A.’S 

record 

29 Sixteen drams 
24 Arrow ptrison 
25“LeRold’Ys’' 
composer 
28 Culture 
medium 
27 Squirts 

29Symbolft)r 
Andid Watts 
20 Garfield's 
sound 
S2Shebafs 
(bllouw 
24 R.1.P, notice 
35 Basso 

S6M.I.T.grad. 

38 Anagram of 
must 
40 Crying 

45 Comical trio 

46 Agreement 

48 Retort 

49 Titillate 


BEETLE BAILEY 


. treaty that could bring it to the direct siq^pon 
of Pakistan in case a( Soviet invasion — and 
Moscow’s troi^ now are just across the Pald- 
stan-Afghanisiaa border. 

For all this, we know precious little about 
this country that is an anchor of U. S. foreign 
policy in the Middle East and South Asia. 

We know, ever so vaguely, that Pakistanis 


process, he sets very basic ptMts in sharp 
relief, cutting through some or the miseonoep- 
dons that fog our understanding. 

He makes clear first and foremost diat it is 
not some mystic^ "Islam” that establishes the . 
norms ofgovanment in Pakistan, but a group 
of men. ^ssl among these is the militaiy and . . 
forem os t amo ng the military. General Mmiam- 
mad Za ul-Haq, president and chief martiri ' 
law administrator. Importantly, Reeves goes.- - 
the next necessary step to make dear that eva ' 
if it is men who press the movement toward a- - ' 
system based upon more rigocoos f ulfiTTnwnt .r 
of Islamic values, this should by no means " 
suggest that the process is somehow dishoaert- -■ 
or that the ’’Western" way is the only one \ 
toward a more modem sodeQr, althoi^ he 
certainly has some doubts ^xxit how farl^^ ‘ 
Stan can go under Za’s harsh cmnbiiiatkin . of 
martial law and conservative Islamic tends. ' 

Writii^ as he stresses, as an American ' 
abroad in the country next door to Iraa,r.' 
Reeves focuses not Just oaPaldstan butalsoon a 
the U. S. rde in Pakistan. His conciorion is*- 
that Foggy BotUxn’s men in Islamabad are 
knowledgeable, competent and skating on the 
edge of disaster because the United States is so . 

totally identified with Za's rule. 

It is serious stuff with «4iicih be deals — . . 
Islam, the desper^ desire for ennnn«rB ft 
growth, the interaction of a great power and '• - 
developing stale in a tuibuleot part the . . . 
woiid. But Reeves’ writing and outloak are 
anything but dull and pedantic, and the result ' 
is a book both highly readable and cautious^ 
provocative. 


WE'RE PEAP 
TIRERCAMYWE 
TAKE THE TRUCK 
BACK TO CAMP? . 


WELU 

OKAV 




KEEP^IHd. 
nb ONLY A 
FEWMlLE^v^ 


and Indians have a lot of trouble getting along 
with each other. We know that the Islamic 
currents that have ripplol across much of the 
r^on have bad their effect in this overwfaelm- 
in^y Moslem nation. And we know, some- 
times to our elucidation and most often to our 
everlasting mispeiceptiaQ, the lessons that Ru- 
dyard Kipling left from the last great encoun- 
ter of a western nation in land that stretch- 
es east and south from the Khyber Pass. 

By his own admission, Ridiard Reeves 
brought little more by way of knowledge to his 
encounter iritb Palostan in the q«mmw of 
1983. But be brought a lot more by way of 
r^iortorial skill and instinct, and that, coupled 
mth his considerable talents as a writer, com- 
bine to give us a book thai is both eminently 
readable and a woihy intr^uction to a region 
that people would do w^ to learn a lot more 
about 

The word introduction ^x)uld be underiined 
— twice perhaps. “Passage to Peshawar” is 
iwt. and does not pietad to be, a compreben- 
sire treatment of the history and contempo ra ry 
rdi^ous and pohticai undercurrents oS Paki- 
stan. Reeves says at the outset that this is a 90- 
day wcmder. from the arnimw of 1983. bur- 
niffied by a twoweek foDow-up trip in the 
summer of 1984. 




a 



ANDY CAPP 


pally Mi«to» NiMipiptn Ltd. 
Out dr Na« Anwrca B«fi4eMa 


peninsula 
6 Bacteria-free 
state 

7Mesabihole 
8 Veal 
Parmesan, 
perhaps 
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19 Solitary 

11 Caddoan abode 

12 Ruhr € 6010 * 


50 Lead-adored 

51 Mingle 

53 Early stringed 
Instruments 


1 1RBCM3N j 
^ IT'S JUST < 

exhaustion. 

— , FLO.' - 


THERE'S TEN A 

OTHERS INTHE J 
»■ TBAMaWHY-N 
DOESHEHAV5 J 
, TOTP5VANO "d 
^takeonthejI 
OPROSmON 
SIN6LE-HAN0&?] 


^ HE HAS 
SPOKEN 


BECAUSE 

rXCANffx^ 


56 Malay 
outrigger 

57 Heap 
SSFri^smate 

59 Network of 
nerves 

60 Sel halved 


WIZARD of ID 



ste'-c-: 


R /: 






i^v-. 

■ VWiM -• 


Richard M. Weintraub ismithe staff of The 
Washirt^on Post 


Quantirb-ii:" " 


O Nan York Taaes, oiHted by Tiijj iH MaUn. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



romr 



I 

(SeWPNeWSFBW 




REX MORGAN 




, P^MHrr 



CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


G ary KA^AROV came world CDampioasnip canoa- 
from bdiind to draw the dates match in Vdden, Austria, 
^st game of the wodd title b 1983, but Black’s position 
m^ 1^ tne^y in gamWl drew the game effort- 
Moscow.l^ 21-year-old chal- lessly. 


IS ^B2, 0-0 against Vasily 

Smyslov in their quarterfinal 




. Tliealtemativativc 9B-K2, 


fenSc in a look kjoumment has 

sessioo, the onc^wn advan- ' 


I’M APRATD THAT KENNy*^ 

builoino an imaoe of 
ME -nt/rr lu never be 

ABLE -no LIVE UP TO , A 


Z' you 
ALREApy 
V HAVBf 


rvwv PONT you SIT DOWN 
I HERE AT THE KITCHEN TABLE 
WHILE X prepare DINNER j 
FOR US? - 


LATER. THERE'S SOMETHING 
I NEED TO DISCUSS WITH 
Umr VOU. BERT.' 


Karpov leads the match S-1 


After 1 1 N-B3, numerous ex- 







• , 4 wRfcw, 4 1 lIUillGdUUd CV* 

and needs one vicioiy to amples of siimlar positions 
retam to wwld chess supr- have made it clear that 


iwa w iy/wim 

FMpMMae 


macy. Draws do not count in 
this series, which has set rv- 


ll...NxN?I; 12 PxN 
strengthens the uhite centa. 

_.T J ^ wr . m 


rards for the most dipvs, 35 ; Hiat is why Karoarov retreated 
the most consecutive draws, 17. with II . . . N-Q3. 


and the most games in the mod- « .u- . 1 . . . 

cm era. Rather than retreat with 

IS . . . NB3, Kasparov took t^ 
When play in the 41th game risky course (rf active counter- 
b^an last vkek, it was surprise play with IS . . . NQ6!? After 


bausted. all winning anenqits. 
He offered, and Kasparov im- 
mediatebr accepted, a draw. 


nrawf OBroaB 


*SORRV^UESS I GOT IHE Wi^ NUMBER .. . 
BUUET^lALKANrHOW.^ 


GARFIELD 


ing to see Ka;q)arov turn to the the tortuous complications this 
solid, drawisfa Petrov wfacsn the move made necessary were le- 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


6 UM 0 CAT HAS STUFICP 
I SUMO WRESTLIN& , 
FOR VEAR 6 


Unscramble ihaaa four Jumbles, 
oneleBytoeachaquaie.to(oim 
fou' ordinary wmla. 


OCKAL 


TADUN 



Skiii^ Defense had b^un to solved by23RxRP, thecha^i- 
work very well for him, as 00 was a pawn ahiaH but be 


shown Games 35 and 37. still had to overcome the resis- 
Probably it was part of the tance that the black Nshi^ 


“whatever you can do, I can do pair ofi&rd. 


better” r^imea of this mai^ 

Karpov has so far in this match 


After 41 K-N3, when the 


narpovnassoiarmiQismatcli »„«. uiw 

relied exdusiv^ 00 the Petrov 5?^ 

when he has bl^ against I P- a pa^ ahead, but the 

K4. Sa Kasparov tow show ^ 

he can playiL toa tro against one— and the fact 


1 % 

3 lUCBa 
1 MU' 

« lUdB 

7 00 
t MH 

I Bja 

» w 

U K«S 
B B4q 

n MOO 

M Ml 
li MB 
II WM 
17 Ptf 
U B-a 
U 


« MOP a«i 
» ILJCt U 
Ji MPdh MO 
m mren m 
o na 


« lUQ 


two against one — and the fact 
tl^ they were all on the same 


After 8. . , N-N5, Robert Save Kasparov drawing 
Hudmer played the das^ 9 c h a n ces. 




Neverless. the champion ran 


13QxN, B-K31; 14QxP, B^3; fore deriding tiiai he had ex-. 


B bap M 
M »C7 Si 
s Ml aof 
B lue mS 

V M« Ml 

3S£ SS 


* ..... 

a e^ MB 
B l4l MB 

a B.m* MB 
H P.B4 wai ' 
a ui ' u»i 
« MU MM- 
(7 Ul MH 
S MOM U2 
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Canadian Stock Markets 

Prices in Conodlon cents unless moriced S 


Jan. 18 


Amsterdam 


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Toronto 


Printans^KThen; ( I X t ] 


(Answers tamcRoin) 

Jumbiss: GUILD ARRAY INJURY PARDON 


Answer Whet he called those people who acquitted 
him— A "GRAND" JURY 


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Oeuiidie Bow 405 4asjo 


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Closing Prices itviocal currencies 


CetandHMe 

Bl9evl*r.HDU 

Fokker 

Old Brooms 

Hdiieken 

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M efeUpo edlschoir 217J0 215 
Miendi.RiiBde 14 a ua 
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NORTH AMERICA 


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Frankfurt 


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AinenzVere IW4 1070 

Boh W450 10450 


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HK Heieb 

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HKSbanetiol 

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IKFU 
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Montreal 112A9 112A0 

Teranie 2A3&30 2A1950 

Montreel: Sfodc Exelmoa Industrials index. 
Toronle:TSE 38 Index. 


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15a 1570 
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4.140 +18 
19550 1959 


155 !"*•» : *37.10 
Fre»loui • 489 
Scufte. AFP 
























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 198 5 

SPORTS 


"Page 15 




‘ -^lAil. 




-'7 




- -..-.Tf 'ii-Vir. 




■ *• •s:i^ 






: rjj0 

i i *• 


U9ers Rout Dolphins, 38-16, in Super Bowl 

^^ PMy es.tQ break tbe Super Shula. So did Roger Craig, who McLemore had fumbled aw» a when wide receiver Freddie SoJo- 

^ . Owl record oi 318 yards set by scored three loudidowDS. puntatlheSanFraitfiscoll, Kuzi* zdod caught a Mooiana pass Imu 

STANTORp, C^oroia — And /l*i- Bradshaw **A1] we heard aU week long was no was flushed /rom tbe pocket and was hit and ftmbled at the Miami 

yw wonder why they caD faun Joe |~^*^Da^mSt^wBciwlXin. hOasni’s oflense," said Mofutana, heav^ a sh^y toss into the end 20. Dolphins tecoveied. OfS> 

Cool? Qnarterbadc Joe Montana nimed five times for 59 who was also voted most valud>Ie zone. Safety Oulioo Williamson cials ruled the pass iacon^Iete, 

opened ms bode o[ resouicefiilness a^tho' recntl for quarteiv player in the 49ers* 2^21 Soper intercepted. By iate in tbe game, a however, and tbe 49er s drove for 

here Sunday, passing for a record Dolphins totaled 25 Bowl vicioiy over Cindnnati tlm fog swept over Stanford Stadium the toudtdown that niade it 28-10. 

Januaiys ago. “De^ inside we ^ Ma^ was barely visible on *^ou can’t complain about one 

call in the game." said Miami Une- 
badca- Bob BrudzinskL **1 don’t 


the San Frandsoo 49ers to a *^omana was named the game’s knew ie l^ a 


t offense, ton 
! about howto 


(hesi^ine. 

‘'Montana bad an awful lot to do 


« Notoolyaid Mo«u.acon.p,«, ™ 


. ^ - 



ave playets on bis trophy. It «« . Dolphins 72 yards on II mSsi^ 

seemed that Miami quarterback h« 3S/ P**^* to set up Uwe von^^ia- 
Dao Marino, the record-bresddng mann’s 31-yard fidd god that 

second-year pro who av^ ymlSh brought to witS^28?3 
three scofing passes a game this ^ s«mds kft m tlm hS^ ll 

season, bai$ had a chance. hr«te the s« ^ ^ would end that 

The 49ers broke from their nor- *»y- 

S drfeiSSbSs^'^^ 3 ^ SSers.Herusbed»^kidsf(KM ' 

score and caudit Montana’s pass« bekoff. San Francasco guard Guy 
from eighl^dld yards to McIntyre picked up the ball and sal 

^ fn^Sdi^Ti^^ts^ on .tfiep»und.^dy. trying to 
ir, *“ by the 49ers matched the Super * fumMc. Bui for some rea- 
‘rS^oS^STb^ Swl record set by to Los Aii^ Mlrn^im— andwasMlimme- 

i«tn^«£3 ^SS«SJ? SS Raiden in their 38-9 thraahmg of ^ MamTs Joe Canet. Me- 

team playd us ddostvely ibs washinaton last Jarnuu?^* Buyre fumbled, and Dolphin Tun 

Rafter to i«oSd at thTl3 with 

/S? JSi game, winmna coach BUI Walsh four seconds lefL Von Schamarm 

S!±"lwSTu^baruri-^ kt^edaJ^yaidfiddgoaltopuU 
Added alli^2^“^i)er within 28-16 as to Ealf 

Stnnfie.toalhatanettf^toDQl- But to second half broneht 


wiih ihU." Shida said. “Every time know if it would have been a turn- 
we seemed to have good pressure ing point in to game." 


on tdm, he scrambled and maite big 


Tbe 49eis were, in truth, angry at 


{ 7 toSSSS 5 itos^ 

^KCoidsctbytoLosAii^ Mlrn^im— andwasMlimme- 
i«*n^«£3 ^SS«SJ? SS Raidere in their 38-9 thraahmg of ^ MamTs Joe Canet. Me- 

team playd us d^ostvely tbs washinaton last Jamuu?^* Buyre fumbled, and Dolphin Tim 

Rafter to i«oSd at thTl3 with 

/S? JSi game, winmna coach BUI Walsh four seconds lefL Von Schamarm 

S!±“lwSTu^haruri-^ ki^ed a 3^yaid field goal to pull 
Added alli^2^“^i)er within 28-16 as to Ealf 

oSn^rerainerf Strange, loo, that one trf to Dol- But to second half bior^t 

Maybe soTButsurdyiVwas to E*^’ slieogths, punter ootJ^ nure than ajeexmd w^ 

seatest mommt for ^ Frands- becaix a genuine of49ermonicanuin. “They dictated 

CD’s defense, to fitsi unit to bold Roby »* *1» aU-pw |p us when il^ went to a fi^-man 

Miami under 21 poims this season, a^osesoiuc-^l^lsflctt^ to hni^ said Manno. He fuusbed 
Sunday’s equaticu^Moalana and best aver^ in to league ihis sea- with Suoff Bow] records for al- 
to 49a defense eatialcd San Fran- son. But hjs performance m Sun- tanpts (50) and completions (2?X 



Strange, too, that one to Dol- 
phins’ greates! strengths, punto' 
R^e Roby, became a 
weakness. Roby is tbe all-pro 


vw 0 uav ausa W4uk av uviu • i_ ■— ■ 

Miami under 21 poims this season. J^osesoiuc-boomi^lsflctt^ 
Sunday’s equation of Monlana and “S* 

to 49a defense equaled San Fran- ^ “s performance m Sun- 
dsco 537 total yards. Miami 314. qu^ w ho^. 

Completing 29 of 50 passes (or 
318 yarSlSaiino. 23, a^red 

inore rattled ihair rc|aL Wiffl was rredy to br^ every passing 


a J^p goal H> pim FM MnoMnd 

^tou^to withm 28-16 as to half Dmjne Bouvi made the initial bit and Jeff Stova (72) sewed up dds sack <d Dan Maiino. 
But to second half brooght ^ M-m-r -m -m •. ^ 

SSS.S5 Defense: Nobody Knew but Us 

line,*’ said Marino. He fiwtciiwi » ... .. . _ . 

with Super Bowl rec^ for at- Dwight Hicks. "WdL nobaty knew but us." 

tanpts (50) and o-wnpl^ons ( 29 ), . ^^WFORD, Califonua — The 49a defense would Inde^ toy did know. Marino’s statistics were good 
but most came lone afta to foe "boldmg meetings during to last two weeks when a enough for a monal quarterback — 29 of 50 for 318 


tried to revive his dying Dotohins ®5 ^ "T “ ““ 

tl6.3)afiCTa28-l6failf£ncd5icji, cO“Plfed^of lOforlOSyards 


he found he couldn't "We knew all 
week, among us in the secondary." 
said San Frandsoo safety £nc 


and a touchdown in to first quar- 
ta. But Rotv and to Miazai punt 
coverage twaTn ih«i failed three 


and to 49ers hadrdled in. Imeman wgJd jump up. It might be Fred Dean or yards. But when he passes for only one toudidown, as 

"Baacally. we broke down thar Lawrence Rners cj Dwame Beard or MieJ^ happened here, to Ddj^iiiis are in tnwble. 
pass protection," said Walsh, “and ^GwJ^isc^Nomatiawboitfl^saidarna- “We executed our defense;" said Jttoson, “just to 
third guana way it was drawn up on to board"^^ ^ 

was rattled." said Board, another 

GOi'in aEOMcawihnrmiOftmniH* tlw> D«ca Mm eveiyiDing W\u OC aii ngQL Amfi^ri^rA mn/i “U. »• ,k> ‘U- 


Quarteiliack Joe Montana, on die praid ngaingr Miami. 

Figini Continues Streak 
^By Taking Giant Slalom 

CmpilulifOirSt^FnmDi^eKka 

ST. GERVAIS. France — Mi- 


chda Fi^ of Switzerland pro- 
duced a brilliani second run here 
Monday to win a slalom, ha 
sixib World Cop victory in three 
weeks. 

Meanwhile, in Wcopai, Switza- 
land, Man: Giiarddb ot Laxem- 
borng won his fourth cup slalom of 

WORLD qjPSK^ 

to season \r^ setting to fastest 
tiriies in both runsand boldiag off a 
dialfenge from Inggnar ^amrark. 

GirarddU clocked an aggregiSte 1 
nunute. 3623 seconds <m the icy 
Jungfrau course to rmaio tbe lead 
in to overaD men^ standings. 

Stoimaik, second afta a moroing 
run of 49,^ thriKigh 58 gates, set- 
,V tied for to nmna-up spot with a 
V 1^7.61 total 

Frfflni. who won Sunday’s down- 
hill atneaifay M^pre, rooed down 
a 45-gate, 305-meta (1,000-foot) 
course in 1 ;2320 on ba second run 
for an asregate of 2:47.61. 

Aostim FKcah eth Kircfala was 

second in 2:47.85 and Arme-Flore -'’njufir^ri • * 
of France thiid in 2:47.93. 

American Tamara McKinney 

(2:4SM) was fourth and Austrian ap 

Ingtid S^venmosa, who had neva Mkbda Figiiii 

before wtm cup points, finished >> Jt is so beautifuL ’ 

fifth in 2:48.08. 

Fiemi has won three consecutive . ^ 

doS races and three giant sla- ccm h« captured a e^um 25 
lomssinceJaiL4,andin^pfo- pomw from a cqm^ ev«L 

->au. au “lus SO beanufuL” she said afta 

(be race. *i took a lot of chances on 



said San Frandsco safety Eric ™ 

Wti^t, “that we would be to straight times. 

. to luting those guys." O 

Marino was sacked three times First, Roby dragged a punt 37 
on to first two drives of to second ya^ that n&ed at to San 
half. He was nailed four times on Francisco 47. Four plays lata, 
to day afta being sacked only 14 Montana threw a tooendown pass 
times in the season’s previous 18 to Craig for a 14-10 lad. 
g^cs. Next, lotqied a 40-yarda 

And remember those two mar- that McLemore returned 28 yards 
vdons Miami receivers called to to the &n Frandsco 45 (only a 13- 
Marks Brothers? On Sunday you'd yard net). Six plays lata, Montana 
have had trouble finding Mark scrambled ax yards fora score and 
Duper and Mark Clayton iritii a a 21-10 edge, 
seaidi party. Dupa cau^t one FiiiaUy. Roby slapped a punt 39 
pass and Clayton sue, most of them yards and McLemore made a 
late in to ganie. yard return to to San Frandsco 48 


m Sima XK. Th. ddosiv. K “5',^, S' *“ 


in to thin) guana our pRssure way it was drawn up on to board" 

was rattled." said Board, another 

so^aswesawibeycouldinpveto defensh« end “He wm screaming at to offidals. ‘He 

m on us. w ci^ m «ih to rouSd KoS^iT&S^^ B^ ^ ^*he back!’ He was 

being hi. when he still bad ti.e 

“There was no turning point — San1ISrino!*?S!S‘aM?^^ ^ Marino was hit so much was that the 

49^fc^a.waytoha^Dwighi,Steph^^^ 

Ir” A Mitoy.TtolinenimMdlmebacko^^ bli^a that Im kI^ neS ^ 

to way he *d i&img to regula totacks — who said the elwy t^e.Bidthe4^press^ 

season.... Our offaise had a tough linemctn aiui thar mu nich ^ ^ raragm help, which bft to defensive ends one-on-one against 

tirntwebedn-ibeena^dl ^?SdSSti^‘SbeXbest comer in tile wnrid." offpsh*. tscldes. ^ s ™iU 

uS^‘ **S!?*^ *aidRMmicLodoiicoftohestcornasmtoworii “^Mar^ four limes — three of the^ 

-Ston you gttaiass rush from defensive ends, 

running game 125 yaitis on nme .n ..... "Defmjavehf " uiri r\vw-h ami Waict, <ti/f 


late m to ganie. yard return to to San Frandsco 48 

When Marino tried to find Clay- (a 29-yard net). Nine plays laia, 
ton vqth a 34-yard scoring pass late Cralgranovo'leftguardanditwas 
u tbe third gipta. already trailmg 2^ 10: the 49ers looked to be going, 
by 38-16, wiri^t intercepted, with gn i n g , gone. Ah, fidd positioiL 
arms outstretched at the 4^ 1- “He’s to best punta in to 
yard line. league," Simla said. “But be didn't 

Tbe beU toDed one final rime for punt like the best punta." 


running game | 2 S yaitis on nine 
carries}, but to runs we tried ifidnT 
work ^ we got behind. Thar de- 
fens^ bads were playing so far 
off, h was tough to think about 
going deep." 


defensive end: “Ibe defensive backs gave us aH we 
needed." 


“Defensively." said Coach Bill Walsh, “we did 
nothing dindrent, though we did change up a lot. We 


Not quite. San Frandsco started with a g*«wA ni«n had excellent pass coverage early, and we started to 
that gave the major respimsibilj^ to to defensive W: penetrate. And I tiiink th^ realized at srane prant that 


The 49ers play a 3-4 daense most of the time on first 
down; this time, idia the game’s second sales, ihi^ 


penetrate. And I tiiink th^ realized at srane point that 
they had to score every rime they had to b^." 

The Dolphins obviously felt that way, because ih^ 


There was keen symbolism in mostly used a four-man rush, always with five or ax bad SO pa^g plays and oiily ntpe runniag So to 
Walsh's final commeais. which ap- defensive badcs. 49ers te^ rtff on Marino, and as Kecna Tursa, to 

plied to Montana the glorious The idea was to get maximum pressure on Marino, team’s best Itobatto. said. "(>ur defensive line made 
things that football observe had to best qiiarterback in tins Natu^ Football Loigue iteasy." 

been saying about Marino all year. The 49os bad been hearing and rrading how Remarked Walsh, to winning Supa Bowl coach 
along. Walsh; “MoDiana is good Marino was. but, as defensive end nUers said, for the second time in four years: "This has to be our 

flii* wL Ksa ^ tfW^ - - aLZ^ — — 9a i i - - .■ ja nw_ . 


Marioo. Eartv' in the fourth period, 
one play afia the 49ers' Dana 


nr like to best punta." to greatest quarterback in this 

Botii teams ser^hed daring to league, nn^be oFaU tiin& This was 
first half. Mianti's ire was raised hisyear."Ilcertaioly washisgame. 


'He hadn't pbyed the 49ers this season. 


best game since Pve been with the 49ers. We are 


"Everyoor kqn asking, 'How are you going to slop clearly to best rooiball team, including some of to 
him? How are you going to step himf" said free major univeisities." (NYT. fVPj 




71 


SCOREBOARD 


Super Bowl XIX: Summaries 


Foolljall 


Basketball 


MiOTi 

Soi F ran cMCT 


i« c « 0 -M 
7 ai re o-n 


Soi FrwNUcs 7 ai re e-^ Hsmon 

WoirM 

Fim PirtBd; Ml^FG ««n scfteinam 97. Mclnryr« 
7:3*. SP— Atairae 9 atm rrom w m m awu Tolsi 
(mnoilng kickl. Tl:«. AUo— ajonnson 2 
OOB li’om Atarina <vsn SehRirann kiad. 

14; ]& 

S « ca wa pm ga:SP CrglaSBv w IrwiiMm. 
fm IWanetiing kidil, 9:M. s r - Mcniono i mcnmi 
run IWmdilns kiao. 8:01 SF— Craig 3 rwi Kectowskl 
ONcnertng tOA), laiSS. Nkie— FG ven SO«- UBiadnwod 
mi¥i 91. 14;48. Mto— FG von Sdnmain 90, sowgll 
14:90. caiodiweao 

TIM PerM: SP— FGWmciUng27.4:4S. jiidm 
SF Craig 14 PCM tram JW a mgwoWwadiliig snigo 
kich). 0:42. W.Bra«n 

Bragfiv 


f 7 G 8 
» 7 GO 


^Pird Excels 
AsCdtsBeat 
76 ers, 113-97 

. . -TkeAstodaederess 
BOSTON —On Sima Sunday, 
siqieistar Lany Bird bad a supa 
game, scoriim 38 pdnis (12 in tbe 

I JI> •ZT. \ »;_« Atmtrrt 0 


win again ** 

Fl ^ ni was sevoith afta the 
ffiornini run and needed the day’s 
fastest tune to edge Kircfala. one of 
her main rivals for the giant slalom 
and overall cup crowns. 

Figini, the Olympic downhill 
champion and the overall cup lead- 
a, increased ha point total to 205, 
a figure based on ha top four Qn- 



MM 

SP 

Bowser 

FIRST DOWNS 

19 

31 

Bebrnnoer 

Rutflbig 

2 

14 

BrudrinskI 

Pomhie 

17 

IS 

Otariee 

PWtiCltV 

Q 

8 


THIRD DOWN EFF 

Gil 

G)1 

Barters 

FOURTH DOWN EFF 

M 

G1 

Jensui 

TITTAL NET YAR17S 

3U 

SD 

HelUn 

Telal Ptavs 

03 

74 

Carter 

Avg Cam 

SJl 

7J 


NET YARDS RUSHING 

a 

ai 


Rushes 

9 

40 


Avg nor rush 

u 

U 

WrWit 

NET YARDS PASSING 

3V 

3a 

Hicks 

Comoletad-Att. 

2 FS 8 

3Ga 

WIlllmrHon 

Yortts per Pass 

&4 

94 

Hdmge 

Socked- Yds tast 

*a 

l-S 

Ring 

Hod IntertfPied 

3 

0 

Lon 

PUNTGAyo. 

GW 

341 

McLemore 

Hod Bleekad 

0 

g 

Puller 

TOTAL RETURN YARDS 

IS 

91 

Elllsen 

Punts Relunts 

G15 

GSI 

duns 

Kldcotfs Return 

7-ia 

G40 

TiHwer 

intarcapttans 

0 

34 

ReynoMi 

PEtlALTIES-VM 

i-ie 

GIB 

PUtere 

PUMBLSGLOSt 

14 

14 

Deon 

TIME OF POSSESSION 

a:49 

a :11 

Board 


RUSNINO 

N 8 Yds Avg Lg TO 


TutososaM 

Shgli 


. t. •” Z L ■■•__*, iMQex m UK wwumu Kuu 4 rautin.n 1 

blocking 3 shots and legistauig 2 ^^^jpoidts. 

MtA raATTTC “She's really on a roll" said Mc- 

NHA rvAfUO Kinney, tbe 1983 o\'eralI diampion 

annu as Boston roUed to a U3-97 and to defending cup slalom tii- 
National BasketbaU Association list. “Once you figure out what 11 
victory that broke to Phfladelphia takes to win, then ymi know^ 
76ers^winning streak at 13 games, you aecapable of. I did my best to 
WitotaSvmaitshoniereeotd give ha a nm to to money, but 
to 18-1, to CaSs regamal the she’s just so fast (UPI..AP) 
^^best Qttdc in to NBA Boston is 

Bird hi. peete’s 68 Wins 

twofrothiowsanfla l5-footim- 

around. An exdiange of basket QqIj Ky 2 

left Boston ahead, 101-92. wth mtHSIUX WUUJ ^ 

2.-5S (o go, and Bird thoi hit three The Associated Pms 

more fidd goals Cmdufing w 3- pHOENDC — CalwnPeeie.giv- 
pointeis)astiieCdtsbe3tI%ilBw- aQijf^athing room by a triple bogey 
pltia for the second time in ifaw that befell Doug TewdL shot a > 
- thfa MMsnn and thwarted mjdcr-par 68 Sunday to win the 

to 76er^ bid to equal to longest p^ p^niT Open golf tournament by 
wianmg streak in franchise histoiy. strokes. In scoring the ninth 

victory of his PGA tour cai^. 


Goacb Bxof^ 270 "on to 6,726-yard Phoenix 

By Bangers of NEDL was two strokes behmd 

^ . j n tm^ApT TeweH p run e mio to final Total 

^ York ISS^builedbyooeS^ywhen ^ 

^T^EW Nw Y^ g j^Ig bc^.7 on 

pdg Patrick^ to NaiiondH fourth-round 72 gave Mpute 

Leaffie team s vice president ana jjijn for woikar 

general manager. . ,o«. ™nd“wiih Moms Haialsky (a 

Brooks, who coached the 19M JffJno 70) Bunched at 275 in 
UA Olyiiipic team, wok “ “^Srolace were John Mahaff^r Dmawns 
Joi«198i^conipMal31-U3. ^f^N£TFX( 66 ). Dan Fof^ 

4! record with tbe Ran^ iSfi( 66 l, Don Poolsj’ « 68 l. Loren mmi^ 

curremly are 15-22-8 and m fifth ® .^j Corey Pavin (69». toioi 

place in the Patrick Division, 


The Associated Press 


DDIFHIU 

Robv 


Nathan 

5 18 34 14 

0 

Bennett 

9 7 X9 7 

0 

Marino 

I 8 OB 0 

8 

TOIOJ 

9 a XI 14 

8 

49ers 

NO Yds Avg Ls 

TD 

Tyler 

19 AS 58 9 

0 

Montana 

S SO IIJ to 

1 

&oig 

IS 9 SF IB 

1 

Harman 

S a AO 7 

0 

Sotamon 

1 5 58 5 

8 

Cocper 

1 4 48 4 

0 

Total 

40 311 S3 19 
PASSING 

3 

oeipblns 

Art Cmp Yds TD Long 

Ut 

Marine 

so a as 1 a 

3 

4Wrs 

All Cmp Yds TD Lang 

)M 

Montana 

a » 331 3 48 

RECEIVING 

0 

DetPhlns 

NO Ya Lo 

TD 

Neman 

10 a a 

0 

Clortan 

6 R a 

0 

Rom 

A n a 

0 

DJohnson 

3 a 21 

1 

Ntoore 

3 17 9 

0 

Cetoto 

1 14 14 

0 

DuMr 

1 11 11 

0 

Tetoi 

79 318 a 

1 

esora 

No va Lo 

TD 

Crulo 

Baa 

2 

DCtark 

5 73 a 

0 

Fronds 

5 40 19 

0 

Trier 

S 70 40 

0 

Monrae 

1 a a 

1 

Solomon 

1 14 14 

0 

Totol 

a 331 a 

9 


Cdofu 

AlUndBOCB — 8MW 


N« Y«f Lg TD 
2 M S 0 
1 W M 0 
• 8 8 0 

4 « 9 8 

OCFSRSE 

DolMbn 

PgfQPlcg 
T A VT«t Rk FC0 
9 7 G 8 « 8 

2 8 GS 8 0 

« 4 Gft 8 8 

1 1 G8 8 8 

2 8 GS 9 8 

2 0 G 8 8 0 

1 8 G6 0 0 

f 7 G8 0 9 

» 7 G8 0 8 

2 9 G 8 9 9 

2 1 G 8 e 8 

S 2 G 9 B P 

2 8 G 8 9 8 

2 \ G« 8 B 
9 4 1-5 8 9 

8 8 G 8 1 8 

1 B GB 1 B 

B 8 G 8 0 1 


T A GVOi RK Fed 
2 1 GO 8 0 

5 0 G 8 8 8 

2 9 G 8 8 8 

4 1 G 8 S B 

1 1 G 0 8 » 

1 B G • B B 

2 0 G 6 B 8 

2 2 G 8 B 8 

I 1 GB 0 8 

7- 1 G a B B 

4 2 GB 8 8 

0 I G 8 8 0 

B 1 GB B B 

1 1 G 9 e 8 

4 B GI2 B 8 

2 a 1-5 B B 

B 2 G B 8 8 

4 • VQ 8 B 

1 • GB • 0 

I B GB B 8 

I 0 G 8 0 8 

T 8 GB B B 


Selected U.S, College Conference S tanding s 

atui«t,c»^ 

( 12 } Super Bowl VII}}. CenfgrancgAll Gomes Confarancti 

MgW VM T*Vs CoInML Roib thim ~ Bl W w Fd. w k Pet. w k Pel. w 

[Sa»FrvidgcgS97.MiDml3M;gMreeera7a2 P ’ ***’*,. * 1 JOB 19 9 JI9 MWHgon 4 2 J<7 I! 

OgktM(49}vs.Minnegg(a(90}SuggrBgwl I \ ^ W t S 5 1 IS ! 

XII. Mow Fgferti. Ong q iwi l u. Team — 21, yV *"*** ’ 1 Za» 19 5 J72 OHe St. 9 2 i «0 1 

Sen FroncfKg (gM record: 1A Ookiond n. ^ ® *' 

MmMtikSwerBgwiXD.MeWPgwc.igdl' “S’""" * 9 .W 8 IB 5 .457 Indlono 3 2 JBO I 

*Maot-iaRogar(>elAS^rBnd»M »■ > 2 JB 8 18 5 J57 MMoerata 2 2 J08 li 

rKonl; Tgdi 1 2 J9 12 3 J08 Mtehloen St. 3 2 SOD T 

lend.sJ^Be,^7lMMM 8 5 JOD 8 8 J08 Fvrduo 9 9 JBD 1 ! 

rldi»l-G(tog.r Craig. Son F««IK»^ SST"" I t ^ " 

record: a b7 wvgrW}. Mast p» AHwBOtB ConferwiKAIIOamgs Northweileni 0 5 JBO < 

WWgwiAn«ere»IMn,WM»«dm«t^ | 2 |, ,S '“JSSeSne.i 

* » iz » ? 'S 

FTTfi'ni rnnnirinunriinni rwKi n vingnow 4 2 JS7 ll s Zis Oreoansi. 4 o lJUO 1 < 

Don SiiidK Boirirrwre.Mlami (Old roesrd; & ^ZSSL, | | « 'I » IS sISilS??M 4 i joll il 

Tom Landrvr DoiidA m Shula). cwoieoiait 2 3 .W 8 • 7 M2 SouHmm cat 4 i joo il 



CentorancoAll Gomes 


CenfbronceAJl Gomes 


W k 

Pd. 

w 

k 

Pd. 


w 

k Pd. 

w 

k 

Pd. 

N. CorWine 

4 

1 

JOB 

13 

3 

as 

Mldiloan 

4 

1 

J47 

13 

3 

JOO 

Ntata Pored 

3 

1 

ja 

I) 

4 

.73 

Illinois 

4 

X 

487 

IS 

4 

989 

WmyliifBl 

3 

1 

3S0 

13 

5 

Z 22 

onto SI. 

3 

3 

JOO 

11 

3 

9U 

Duko 

3 

2 

400 

13 

2 

J47 

lOltiS 

3 

3 

JM 

14 

4 

J7I 

Ctantson 

2 

3 

400 

TD 

5 

JS7 

Imfiona 

3 

8 

JM 

11 

4 

.la 

toCorellna St. 

3 

3 

MO 

18 

5 

J47 

MlnWBseto 

3 

2 

MO 

10 

5 

J<7 

Georote Tedi 

1 

2 

ja 

13 

3 

JOB 

Mkhtoon St. 

3 

2 

500 

n 

4 

.79 

viroMo 

8 

$ 

480 

8 

8 

508 

Purdue 

3 

3 

580 

13 

4 

.79 


BIG EAST 




Wiseonsin 

1 

4 

900 

w 

5 

547 


Corrference All Gamas 

Nerthwasteni 

0 

5 

JBO 

4 

11 

SB 


World Cap Skilni 


Connecticut 
BMten Ggllg 
PNIKurgli 
ProvidgnGg 
Sglen HoH 


L 

Pd. 

w 

L 

Pel. 


PACIFIC 18 





IJB 8 

17 

0 

IJW 



Conference All Gmnes 


1 JM 0 

13 

1 

.99 


W L 

Pd. 

W 

L 

Pd. 


5S7 

11 

3 

314 

Oregon SL 

4 

8 

1JU 

14 

1 

M3 


J 88 

11 

3 

J44 

Wtashlnotan 

4 

1 

MO 

13 

4 

J9 


MO 

< 

7 

J42 

Soultiera col 

4 

1 

MO 

10 

4 

714 


3X3 

11 

4 

JB 

Artaono 

3 

3 

jeo 

n 

4 

547 


J» 

9 

5 

MS 

UCLA 

3 

2 

59 

4 

7 

40 


J9 

1 

9 

J71 

Aiinna Sl. 

3 

3 

JW 

7 

8 

40 


JEO 

9 

8 

J39 

weehinptn S*. 

3 

4 

J33 

M 

4 

535 


METRO ATHLETIC 

Conference All Gomes 
w L Pd. w L Pet. 

irtrginia Tedi 

3 

0 

1 M 0 

13 

3 

J9 

Momphta a 

9 

1 

79 

13 

1 

.979 

CindimoM 

9 

1 

79 

9 

4 

59 

Louisville 

3 

3 

500 

9 

6 

59 

X Carolina 

I 

3 

.333 

a 

4 

54? 

X MIssHeiepl 

1 

3 

JB 

5 

11 

713 

Tutane 

1 

3 

79 

8 

7 

5B 

FtarUo «. 

0 

3 

MO 

7 

1 

59 

WESTERN ATHLETIC 

Conforanca All Games 
w L Pd. W L Pet. 

TeMs-a Pa 

5 

1 

too 

13 

S 

7a 

New MOKloo 

5 

1 

JB 

12 

5 

7M 

Colarode St. 

9 

1 

79 

II 

5 

59 

Son Dleoe SI. 

4 

9 

547 

13 

4 

79 

Brigham Yno 

4 

3 

547 

10 

7 

59 

Wvemino 

3 

3 

59 

10 

7 

59 

Utah 

2 

4 

733 

7 

11 

79 

Air Force 

0 

4 

MB 

4 

11 

3B 

Howpll 

0 

4 

MO 

4 

13 

79 


IVY LEAOUe 

Conference All Gonwa 


SOUTHEASTERN 


WOMEirS GIANT SLALOM Plorfdo 

(AI St. (MrvoG Prme) i-m 

1. WUWiglq Flginl, SwUxartaMk V.IMV . .— 

t:2M»-2:47JI ...-.--Jl 

X EtiMbgm Klrctiigr, Aunrhv i:2ll7- . 

1A4G-SrCJS Motam 

X A i mo- n gre Rer. FnoKG l.’MJG 

1:2287-2:4753 


1:7U9-B;4XM 

S. Ingrid Solvenmawr, AuatriOr 1:2BS- 
1;23M-2:4BJI 

4. Erlko HBB, SwUnrlonG 1;3MG 
1:2272-2:48121 

7. Merlo EpplA Wed Cermonv. 1:314A 



CdiioraneeAJI Coma 

Orooen 

1 

4 

79 

1 

10 

544 


W L Pd. 

W 

L 

PCL 

1 

1 

0 

4 

79 

8 

S 

571 

PlertdB 

4 

2 

547 

11 

3 

M4 


SOUTHWEST 




Tonnesoeo 

4 

2 

547 

13 

S 

7a 



Conlorenco All Comes 

Kantudiy 

4 

2 

507 

9 

4 

59 


Mr 

L 

Pd. 

W 

L 

Pd. 

MimiseiPPi ft. 

4 

2 

J47 

8 

7 

58 

So. Methodisi 

5 

8 

IJI9 

IS 

1 

.99 

Lmaiene $t. 

5 

3 

535 

11 

4 

JB 

Hotiictan 

4 

1 

79 

13 

4 

79 

Atabome 

4 

I 

571 

12 

4 

79 

Texoo Tedi 

J 

T 

JOO 

11 

4 

78 

(Seervte 

3 

3 

59 

11 

4 

JS 

Tna AXM 

3 

3 

59 

11 

5 

5B 

Auburn 

2 

4 

Ja 

10 

S 

5S7 

TOXOB 

3 

9 

59 

to 

4 

525 

vonderblK 

1 

5 

.147 

1 

7 

533 

ArlMRSes 

3 

3 

500 

13 

4 

547 

MISSiSPippI 

t 

4 

.M 

7 

• 

40 

Rice 

1 

4 

79 

• 

7 

58 








Toms amshi 

1 

S 

.ia 

9 

a 

529 








Bovler 

0 

5 

79 

7 

9 

59 


Vole 

CohHnbto 

Harvard 

Princeton 

Erown 

P w BVIv un l o 

Doninoutb 

Cornell 


W L Pel. W 
7 0 laxi B 

1 B 1J0B 4 
9 1 J9 10 

1 I J80 S 
1 1 JfiB 4 

1 1 1 JOB 2 

I S .U7 2 

a 1 JOB 6 
INDEPENDENTS 


College Results 


ETraudlHDeUter.WKlGern0n'.l:2&9G Alfred 7A Clorfcaoa SS 


l:BJS-2:4241 


Botes $4. Oort az 


». Mttfioelo Gera, West Germoar. 1 :»UX La Solle 12 Halford 88 


t;243i-2:4MS 

IB Helene BarWer. Frone, 1 : 2 <JGI :24.I7— 
3:4BJe 

ll.EWncarerecwdK-Od— .5gofck2;4iJ2 
IX Catherine QuIHei, Fronre. 2:4848. 


Sacml Heart. Conn. 84. Lewtll 72 OT 
SOUTH 

2 AicMma 82 KC Chaiiette a 
MUDWHSr 
Bailevve SB Oudrni SL 48 


AL- 8 rmnahm 
Old OomMan 
Vg CmmimlH) 
& AWmma 
W. Kerrtuckv 
G Florida 
joekBonvlllo 
ILC. Chortan 


ContoraneeMi Gomes 

I L 

PeL 

W 

L 

Pd. 

0 

179 

IS 

4 

79 

1 

80 

a 

5 

547 

1 

79 

12 

3 

557 

1 

3S3 

11 

5 

59 

4 

78 

9 

7 

58 

3 

79 

IB 

5 

547 

4 

79 

0 

7 

58 

4 

79 

4 

8 

78 


Meuemore 5 B 51 28 B 

KICKOFF RETURNS 
DolelUM No Yds to TD 

Wolker 4 83 2B D 

Hordv 2 21 16 D 

Mill 1 Ie lA 0 

Total 7 T«0 21 0 


IS a 35 18 f SUPER BOWL RE07RDS SET 

s a 45 7 0 Wort Terdi pemhra indMdJol —331. Jne 

] ^ ^ ^ ^ maRfBna.SanFranc1«eoWdrocard'.3lBTor- 

1 4 45 4 0 rv BrodHMra. PltUBurgh vo. DalM Suoer 

40 211 S3 If 3 BOwIXIID.MoelNitYardATOMi— 597,Son 

ING FranetaeoloMraoord: 0.OeWandvs.lwn- 

Yds TD Long lot i i o tu , super Boert XII. Mow Pbk Aftemofi, 
IP 318 1 a 2 indivMegi— 9GOaiMartne.Mtaml (eWfo- 

Yds TD Lang )M eord:a,RanJaa>erekkPni)adolplijov».Dok- 
M 331 2 40 0 tand. Stiieor Bowl XV}. Meet Pn CemWo- 

VINO lleoA tidMdoaf — 2f, Ooi Mortne. Mtonl 

No Yte Lo TD (oWrtard: akKcnAiidoraeit Onelmottvs. 
10 a a 0 Sol PrancHee, Suom- Bowl XVI2 

6 R 27 0 MowYadmiwtilaA OiTtorEoK— Sfutee 

4 n a 0 Man(aw,SenFiairtaa(o1dreard;97,Rog- 

9 a 21 1 or Stoiiooch. pQHae vs. Pinbvren. Stiptr 

2 17 p 0 Bo«»txlii).MoftFeints,Tigni, 0 )KHarr-El 

I 14 14 0 Son FninctKe (old record: 2 L bv levernl). 

1 II II 0 Me«tPeMi,BofaTeam,OBeHaN-.-44lBld 

a 318 a I reeard: 38. Pfllsouroli vs. Dalles Soper Bowl 

No Yds La TD xlll>.FeweetRii«aieeAitBfnFfi.Toaei— G 

0 n a 3 AAHinl low record: 12 KaaasarvvGGreon 

5 72 33 0 Bav.Swerao<i*ll:M(nnoMavs.Ran*uDtVr 

9 40 IP 0 Stiver Bowl IV). FewBCi Retlriog Arteogts, 

4 a 40 0 BetliTeam— 49(eidreaTd:S2.KaniaQtv. 

1 as 1 10. vs. Green Bov. 92 Super Bowl I2 

I 14 14 0 MeeTPe»Aftecnets,S«thTeams— a (Sen 

a 331 a 9 Prondsce 2 S,Mflinm;eMrKerd; 7 a,Boltl- 

INTERCEPTIOMS ntare 4L vs. N««r YorX JetL 9. S*mr Bowl 

Na Yds LO TO iit).MoetPoeiCaieileiienfcBoHiTe 8 mr— O 

1 0 0 0 IMioml 2B San FrencUcs M; Old record 39. 

loop Oneinnall (a> vs. Son FnmclKO lUl Suoer 

3 0 0 0 BawixvD.MesiNefYardsFBSSlaGTwm- 

PUNTIHC 324, Son Frondaco (old retard: 3DP. Pilti- 

Me Avo LO Bn OtiFon V 2 Lbs Anoetes Rams. Supei' Bowl 

6 3MS1 a XIVi.MoMNetYcrdCpBSSlOGBtmTMim- 
Ne AV 8 LB BIk 6l5(Son Franclsce33LMi«mJ289j old record 

3 31735 0 SI. PhllodeiBhiafai} ws.Ce4.lorw (340) 5u> 

turns porBowlXVj.MestFkif OowiLTwin— 91. 

No FC Yds LB TD Son FroneiMo (aWfecoca-. 24.anonnati vs. 

2 0 18 9 0 Son FronciSca. 8 «ioer Bowl XVI.' WosMnotsn 
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FOOTBALL ”*! ” 

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Page 16 


1NTER1SAT10N.4L HER\LD TRIBl \E, TI ESDAY, JAMiARY 22, 1983 


ART BUCHWALD 

Presideiidal Franchises 

ASHINGTON — Now that **What did you have in maid? 
. die seUing of the preadeotial **We want to produce oue ’ 


Arlene Violet 





niaiiguratioa has mtiiTO so su& 
cess^ can the sdifflg of theprea- 
dency be far b^ind? 

The inauguration committee 
copyrighted the inaugural logo 
licensed all rights to souvenir com- 
paiues as wdl as co^xiratimis, 
which could 
then advertise 
that thqr were 
the “official 
company^ of the 
presidential in- 
auguratioo. 

Obviously the 
committee got 
the idea from 
the Los 

Olymirics. Inau- ^ , 

gurations do BoenwM 

cost money, bat my fear is that the 
people who organized the presiden- 
tial festivities won’t stop there. 
They nuy so<m start seOing the 
rights to the president. 

‘'While Hwse licensing Com- 
mittee.’' 

*niis is the Fruitcake Cereal 
Company. We'd like to become the 
offioa] cereal company to the pres- 
ident.^ 

“We're sorry, those i^ts have 
already been spoken for. Do you 
make any other products?” 

''We're the lai^t cupcake mao- 
ufacturer in America.” 

“Well, cupcakes haven't been 
spoken for y^ We can let you have 
the presidentiai seal of approval for 
a miliioQ dollars.” 

“Will the president do our com- 
mercials?” 

“He can't do thaL But well give 
you pennission to hang a tasi^ 

CUpt^e banner behind him in the 
East Room when he's holding his 
press conferences.'' 

“Well take iL Send the contracts 
to us right away." 

“Thank you. . . . White House 
Licensing Committee.” 

“This is the president the Real 
Instant Coffee Company. We «osh 
to sign on as the official coffee 
supplier to ite White Mouse.” 

ARare'nfEazijSale 

7%r Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Tiffany, one of 
Fifth Avenue's elite shops, l^ed 
off its fust storewide sale in 30 
years Monday. On sale are discon- 
tuuied items of every sort except 
^iamnnH rings. 


“Whal did you have in maid?” 
“We want to produce one TV 
commercial showing Margaret 
Thatcher drinking our atffee at a 
state dinner and oqiressing her suT' 
prise that it was an instant brand 
and <fid not come out of a c^ee 
pou” 

*T don’t see any prcMem with 
that, but let me cbeu it out with 
the White House chef and get back 
to you. . . . White House Licens- 
ing Committee.” 

“This is the Cartilage Sneaker 
Company. Has anyone put in a bid 
yet for tbe official presideat's run- 
ning shoes?” 

“No, it's sdll up for grabs.” 
“Good. AU we ask in exdtange is 
that the preadent and his wife wear 
our soakers when they're running 
for tbe hdicemter to take them to 
CampDavid.^ 

“I don’t think we could promise 
you thaL The Cist lady h^ never 
publicly worn sneakers in her life. 
But we crald get >Cce President 
George Bush to wear them as he's 
flying off to attend a state funeral” 
“We don't want BusIl we want 
the president and bis wife. If you 
can't deliver, then forget iL” 

“Sony about that . . . White 
House UcensiQg Commiitee.” 
“This is the Yakamura Film 
Con^iaiw. We want to become the 
official mm conq»ny to the White 
House.” 

“It will cost you.” 

“We don't care what it costs. But 
we have to be assured t^i tte 
White House photographers will 
only use Yakamura fimi when tfa^ 
take picmies of the preadenL” 
“We can't do that because we 
have no control over the White 
House pbotogr^ihers. But what we 
can do for you is make sure Uiat 
those photographers using Yaka- 
mura mm wiD ^ the best places 
up front to shoot frtHD while they’re 
snamring away at the pr^denL” 
“rat us do\TO fm- the license." 
“Wni da ■ . . White Houm Li- 
censing Committee.” 

“I’m a lawyer representing the 
Fourth of July Souvenir Com^y. 
The Secret Sovioe visited nw (^ent 
yesterday and informed mm be 
cooldn’t put the American flag on 
his beer mugs any mne." 

“That’s correct We now hold the 
oc^yri^t on tbe Stars and Stripes. 
But for a small royalty your client 
can have exdusive beer mug ri^is 
to the American flag fm* the next 
four years.” 


By Carol Lawson 

New York Times Sernee 

P tROVIDENCE, Rhode Is- 
land — When people in Rhode 
Island can th^ state's attorney 
general simply “the general.” tlw 
term seems twor-made for Ar- 
lene Violet A former nun who in 
November became tbe first wom- 
an to be elected an attomqr gen- 
eral in the Umted States, she has 
taken on tbe job with the zeal of a 
Geld manJial. 

Since she ux^ office Jan. l,sbe 
has made headlines with her deci- 
sion to retry Claus von Bulow on 
c^fgra that be tried to murder 
his wife, a wealthy Manhattan 
socialite. In addition, NTiolet has 
taken steps to bring to trial Umg- 
peading cases invmving accusa- 
tions of political corrtqiUon. and 
she has been meeting with feder- 
al, state and local law enforce- 
ment officials to develop a coor- 
dinated strata for dealiim with 
the heavy coDcentration of or^ 
nized crune and drug traffic in 
the state. 

“1 think it is important to set 
tbe tone when you are in office, 
and that is w^ I am attenqiting 
to da” said Violet 41. During the 
years she spent as apubiic-inter- 
est lawyer, she said, she was 
known as “Attila the Nun.” Vio- 
let bad to resign from her order, 
the Sisters of Mercy, to run for 
attorney general. 

Her experience representing 
tbe disabled, environmenialists 
and consumers, she sud, has 
shaped her altitude toward the 
job of attorn^ general. ‘T basi- 
cally see tte job as a public-inter- 
est job,” she said. “My overarch- 
ing perspet^ve is that it's about 
time the ciinnnal justice system 
was responsive to the needs of 
vic tims crime. My priority is 
street crime.” 

Violet said she had “more than 
a theoretical understanding of 
life on the street and crime” after 
rf liviog “in every high- 
crime section of Rhode laand.” 

“1 wanted to understand w^i 
was being operienced by people, 
parti cularly poor people. Liv^ 
m those bign-ciime areas, u4uch 
were high-inctim areas as weU, 
develops in me a commitment 
to do soawthiag about tbe crimi- 
nal justice system.” 

Violet said one of her poals was 
to obtain qieedy trials in “high- 


trauma Climes." particuhriy as- 
saults on the elderly and r^ies. 
“If you don't try them right away, 
you can kiss tbiCT goodbye. Two 
years later, a woman is not inter- 
ested in testifying in a rape trial.” 
Close behmd her interest in 
street crime, she said, is organized 
crime. Providence has long been a 
prindpal center for organized 
crime m New England 
“Organized crime is coupled 
mth pcrfitica] corruption. You 
can't have organized crime with- 
out payoffs to officials.” 
Aitl^gh she intends to be ag- 
gressive in the area of organi^ 
crime, ^fiolet says she is operating 
under no delusMMis: “You never 
get rid of organized crime, but 
you make them so uncomfOTtable 
that tl^ movcL I teli people 1 am 
Machiavdlian euou^ to want 
smne other attorney general to 
have the headache for a while.” 
Violet's decision to retiy voo 
BQlow was announced on her 
fifth day in office. *i believe there 
is probative evidence whict if 
believed by a jury, would result in 
convictioa,'’ she said “This is go- 
ing to be a credibility t^” 


Former Nun Who Is Now a State Attorney’ General 
h (yf to a Fast Start in Her Attack on Crime 

Violet who was defeated in her 
first campaign for attorney gener- 
al in 1982, won only narrowly in 
November. Her margin was 6.000 
votes out of nearly 400.000 cast. 

She r-ampnigned as a RepubU'- 
can, but suppon^ passage of tbe 
equal rights amendment creation 
of individual retirement accounts 
for homemakers and the concept 
that men and women should be 
paid the same wages for compa- 
rable worL She also said she 
would enforce a woman's right (o 
have an abortion as long as it was 

Violet was bom in Providence, 
the daughter of a Republican al- 
dennan. “1 grew up with that 
sense that you are here to serve 
people.” she said. “1 consider that 
the best tradition of politics.” 
After high school she joined 
the Sisters of Mercy, an order 
known for social activisirt For 
several years she lived in a con- 
vent and wore a traditional habit 
In 1966 she graduated from Salve 
R^tna CoD^ in Newport and 
beranse a teacher in an inner-city 
Catholic junior high school. 
faiMrt-UMdPrMinwiuatf Later she did inner-city work 
AtttHvey General Viirfet; **A traumatic dedsion.** on behalf of the elderly, an expe- 
rience that led to her dedsioo to 
ly as- VonBolow. wboisfreeonSl- go to law school at Boston Col- 
■flpas million bail and living in his l^tf- She financed her legal edu- 

away, wife's Hfth Avenue apartment, is cation by scholarships and mon- 

Two to go on trial April 2. In March ^ earned in summer internships, 

inter- 1982 a jury in Newport, found Violet gra d uat ed in 1974. b^m- 

rial.” Mm guilty of twice injecting his tog one of the first nuns in tbe 

5t in wife, Martha, with irtsuiin in nj. nation to earn a law degree, 

nized tempts to kill her. Mrs. von B6- Violet resigned from the Sisters 
lera a low. who is ba a New Yorit hospi- of Mercy in January 1 984. after 

nized tal has been in a coma since the bisb<^ of Pitn’idence, Louis 

December 1980. E. Gellineau. said he agreed with 

ipl^ Last April the Rhode Island Pope John Paul II that priests 

You Supreme Court overturned the and nuns should not hold public 

conviction. sa;rii^ that some of office, 
tbe drugs found in von Bulow’s ‘‘it was a traumadc decision 
closet in the couple's Newj^ for me.” she said. “I knew that LM 
mansion had been analyzed mth- chose to run for political office, 
sting g search warrant and should tjie bishop would mm’e to have 
not have been admitted as evi- jgg excluded. It rsirne down to 

' dence. The court remanded the being a Sister of Merev in name 

wble case to the Superior Court only or of bemg one in reality." 

Alan M. Dershowiiz, the Har- she said, 
al to Seb^ pKrfessor who §he is very conscious of being 

le” Bujows appeal, in the spotlight as the first woman 

von s deosiOT a pofiiical an attorney general “I don't 

jjgj. OD& She dismissed the statement want to do a poor job because 1 
ihere “showmanship.” jjoa*! foreclose other lal- 

h. if “People who know me. Arlene emed women from ha\iog this 
iltin Violet know that I do not make posiiioa,”shesaid.”iju5iwamio 
s go- politick dedsions. 1 ^ to call a make sure 1 keep ^ poriiion 

riiot exactly tbe way it is." open for them.” 


Ejs 0 Rock Festival Endsi^ 



Von Bolow. who is free on $1- 
million bail and Hving in his 
wife's Fifth Avenue apartment is 
to go on trial April 2. In Ma^ 
1982 a jury in Newport, found 
him guilty of twice mjecting his 
wife, Martha, with inmiin in aj. 
tempts to kill her. Mrs. von Be- 
low. who is ba a New Yorit hospi- 
tal has been in a coma since 
December 1980. 

Last April the Rhode Island 
Supreme Court overturned the 
conviction, that some of 
tbe drugs found in von Bulow’s 
closet in the couple's New{^ 
mansioa had been analyzed mth- 
out a search warrant and should 
□01 have been admitted as evi- 
dence. The court remanded the 
case to the Superior Court 
Alan M. Dershowic, the Har- 
vard Law Sch^ professor who 
argued von Bulow's appeal, 
called Violet's deciaon a political 
one. She dismissed the statement 
as “showmanship.” 

“People who know me. Arlene 
Violet know that I do not make 
politick dedsions. 1 ^ to call a 
riiot exactly tbe way it is." 


St warn to 
poriiion 


The Brirish progressive rock 
eroup Yes and the German punk 
rock singer Nina Hagen attracted 
hundreds of thousands of fans for 
the closing day of Rock in Wo, 
billed as the biggest rock festival 
e'^er. More than 1 .3 million specta- 
tors were estimated to have turned 
out for the lO-day event in Rio de 
Janeiro, according to the organiz- 
ers. “1 can quite honestly say we 
have manage to create the largest 
event of peace in history.” one or- 
ganizer. Roberto MeiBna. said in a 
radio imerriew. 

a 

A leading figure in the “French 
Connection” ring, which smuggled 
an eslunaied S250 miOioD worth of 
heroin into tbe United Slates from 
1968 to 1971, has been released 
from fed^ prison at Leaven- 
worth, Kansas. Christian Jacques 
David, S3, a Froich citizen, wu 
sentenced in 1972 to 20 yem in 
prison on cbaiges of smithing 66 
pounds (30 Idlograms) m h^in 
into the United States. Brazilian 
police arrested David in 1972 at tbe 
request of die United States. He 
was flown to New York, and bond 
was set at S2.S million. Auiborilies 
said he headed tbe smuggling ring. 
David pleaded guilty to the drug 
charge to avoid extradition to 
France, where be had been convict- 
ed in absentia for the 1966 slaying 
ctf a police official 

□ 

The J. Paul Geiiy Trust named 
ling Moareai as dirntor of the new 
Getty Conservation Institute. Har- 
old w miams, president of the trust 
has coaTiiTiied. Monreal secretary- 
general of tiie International Coun- 
cil of Museums in Paris, will head 
an insiinite that is expected to be- 
come ibe world's leading center in 
[he scientific preservation and res- 
toration of artworks. He will as- 
sume his new post in California, in 
May. Monreal 42. has served 1 1 
years as chief executive officer of 
the museum council an affiliate of 
the United Nations Educational 
Scientific and Cultural Organiza- 
tion whose merabeis are museum 
specialists from 121 countries. 

□ 

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, 
who owns a $344, (XX) estate in Ber- 
oanlsville. New Jersey, will recrive 
a refund from the lo^ tax collec- 
tor She overpaid her 1984 taxes by 
52.79. ^id^ said Onassis's tax 


Dill was 56.859. The ia.x coljector- - 
cni.t Onassis. a part-time resident 
was one of about 20 property own. ' 
ers who would receive rebaietr 
Onassis bought the 1 0-acre (4-bect- 
are) estate 10 years ago, after rent- 
ing in tte area for years. Sie uses ' 
the pK^ierty as a weekend retreaL' 

O 

Mayor Diamie Feinsten of Sag 
Francisco is planning a visit to the 

Middle East in Maim her press 
secretary says. The trip would ^ 
the mayxir’s third abroad in five 
raootbs. Tte itinerary indute I^' 
rael, Egypt Jordan and Sauifi Ai^ 
bia. said tbe press secretary. To# 
Eastham. Feinsteia led a delation • 
to China, South Korea and Hong 
Kong in November and wait. to-. 
TaiwaninDecembotorignarii^ - 
ping contract 

O 

WSam Shawn, editor in chief of 
The New Yoiker aia^aane, and 
ei^t other people pnaninent in ^ - 
arts have bear nmned winnets a 
the 29th annual Brandos Univeiii.. 
ty Creative Arts Awards. Twoj. 
types of awards — medals xeebg; 
nizing lifetimes of aduevemeoti . 
and diatioos recognizing artists of .■ 
great distinction — are being giyea . 
in painting pociiy, music and plim' ' 
tography. R^pients of tbe nudd ' 
and dtation in each fidd will dure 
a $2,500 prize, financed by tbe Jad_ 
1. and f ilKan Poses Creative AiB' 
Awards endowment 9iawn wHlt^-. 
cove the Notable AdtievemeBt' 
Award, given periodically fra* cdi^'. 
tributions of importance to the ae> 
alive arts and oilture. Medals «3;: 
go to Cy TwonAfy for p««ntf«g. 
James MerriB for poetn, Ge^' 
Rochberg for iimric and Heny Cfr 
laha for photogra^y. GtationT 
will ^ to Dorotea Rocfcbiraefer 
painting, Thom Gunn for podiy, 
Robert rjummiiig for lAou^r^qr. 
and Ornette Coknan for music; 

□ 

A Briddi gynecologist threw s.' 
party, complete mth birtbdaycakq ' 
at Cromwell Hospital in Ltadon 
for more than 30 “test-tnbeT ba- 
bies. including two sets of tiiplels.- 
Ian Graft, the bosphaJ’s director rf 
gynecology, said he otganiz^ 
party to demonstrate how moth; 
happiness the in-vibo method of, 
fertilization had brought Ci^h^ 
supervised 58 births of bdiies Ekr ( 
tilized in vitro to mothos win' 
would otherwise have been dild-. 


Meed Your Oossified Ad Quickly nnd Easily 

Inllw 

INTERNATIONAL HERAIO TMBUI« 

By PlmM: CoB your locol IKT represerioiivB wnlh your toid. You 
win be infbmied gf the cost inmndialeiy. and once prepayment a 
■node your od Mil oppe9 mMihi 48hoii^ 

CoGb Ttw basic rote a$9a0 par Km per day ^ locditaees.'Tbaiecse 
2S loners, and spoces Uf the first Ene Olid 36 in Km fblowme Gnm 

Mnimum space o 2 Inns. No obbrevulions octepied. 

CrodU Ccsdi: American Bepress, Diner's Oub. Birocnd. Master 
Card. Access and Visa. 


HEAD OFFICE 


nsis; (For domfiad only); 
7474fr00. 

aiROPs 

Arostondaei: 26^6-15. 
AimnK 3614097/360^1. 
Bnnwb: 343-)899. 
Coiw e ha a wi: (01) 339440. 
WtsMirt: (069) 7247-55. 
Leufonn: 29-SB^. 

UAoR ff-27-93/66-2544. 
toadem (01) 8344601 
IMoM: 4552891 74553306. 
NUen: |02) 7531445. 
Norway: EQ) 845545. 
Romo: ^0437. 

Swodoi: 08 104632. 

Tol Aviv: 03455 559. 
VhmKt: Gmoet Fronkfurr. 


Now Yerio pi3} 7S2-3890. 


LATIN AMBUCA 


■ ripilui 212^9408 
Buom«Am*: 4I 4031 
(Dept. 312) 

CoMcoa 331454 
Owyaqoli 431 943/431 
Uno: 417 m3 
PWNmm 644372 
Son JoMe 23-1055 
SMHage.6961 555 
$ao Route: 852 1893 

IHBDUEAST 

Bdnin: 346303. 
Jordan: 25214. 

KuwA S6I448S. 
CMw:4l6S3S. 
SaoAAitAlB 
JoAMe 667-1500. 
UJtE.: Dofad 234161. 

FAR EAST 

Bn^cnlu 39096-57. 
Kong Kona 54309D6. 
Mona* 817 07 49. 
SmoI: 73S8773. 
Stngeeera; 222-2725. 
Tciwan:75244 2S/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 


Syibwy:939 56 39. 
Molbo u m o. 6908233. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIE 


EMPLOYMENT 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


READY TO MOVEM 

rcAE Bois DEBomomc 

mam perfed con d i ti oii, newly re- 


done. 120 sq.nL, 3 bedroons. 3 bc4|;& 
WC Evin^ entry, dreo laxess 10 120 
sqjiL terrace. nNads rooin, qmooe. oet> 
kv. AH dneonUed, h maihed jrd urfje 

Oiomps Byseos, 75006 Pom. 


AVBtIUEFOCH 

B»9nCNAL ■ NEW 
HdL ivvabiAocaiL equipped Uidwi, 
naUe Ink. About /6 sqjn. Sun, 

34 hour aideo securny systm 
OME-ssBeaM 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




NEAB AVt FOOL 7 rooim beautful 
remphm -I- 5 berfioonii. 2M sqjiL. 
o> comforts, -I- rawfsroBm + pm- 
mq. F4JX)0m Tet 704 49 36. 


PORTUGAL 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




UIGANO. Beouaful 2- b e d t uun i apart- 
ment On Sth Hoot with panevame 
views of Lake Unam. 3 bdeonia. 
120 sqm. toidL Convement location. 
Sole pematled to non-Sww resKfens. 
Please cordod Dovid Abredasn, SEE) 
nith A«e.. RM 1206, NY, NY 10^ 
ret (212) msm 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SUARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


P.AftlS AREA FURNISHED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


74 CHAMP»YSSS 8lh AVBHJE GEORGE V 

Sfudib 2 or 5room apt^tment. Neor OuanpvSysees 

One ntonth or more. ' pratniaus axrtoient. ISOOM 1 
If OAlilDIS 359 67 97. 


FOCH SUMPTUOUS 

Recepiioa 3 bedraone. 

2 bade, porfcing, F2IJXIQ: 5636838. 


Near OvnipvSysees 
protiqiaus qxrftnent. iSOOM 190 
sqjiL, 5ih floor. &fi. FZ2J00 + F2j£00 
Teb 2i£ 0276 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVA1L.4BLE 


IKiaNATlONAL EMPtOTMBUr 
fto f eggo rd t. iwmQnn emd sbOed 
werkan. ore dwen'i neecM a world 
wide protects. We con contact 
)36,000 fim in 133 counlm and 
4000 Amencor. Muihrarimob. Wme 
for ■nkamuhen. bitemoticnal Career 
OvnuttcpieL 2730 Sen Pedro N.E, 
Sucre H. AlbuqwerqM. New Muato, 
871 10 USA 




AGB4CE DE LTTOIIE 

BEAL ESTATE AGENT 

380 26 08 


RUEVISCONn 

3 BOONS: about 90 iq.>t dt 
OD mb ft^ 3nd Boor, no HI h XMI 
buUng, dwriiinU tunny. 563 30 23 


LAKE GENEVA «d 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Apartmerts in Meniran on Uw 
Geneva. Abo ovoloble ■■ fonoM 
meurdoin reeartn VMerL Verber, La 
Oiabicrcis. Qwlaou D'Oa mar 
Gstaod, LeyiiL CWals owdeUe. Ex- 
adert opportunities far forninrs. 

Moeimsnasipoa 
lAerd matigw w di 6mb iiMred. 
GicirnANsA 

Av Mon Repos 24, 1005 Lausanne, 
S wit ie rland. TeL- mi 32 35 1Z 
Tebx: 25 185 Oi 
The Tonaeas of Genova G^ aid 
Ceuatiy Cfab - Le«ely townhouses 
ovoilafale at ottraaive prieee. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCRIBE 
!lo the 

INTERNATIONAL 


masuNE 

ASOSAVL 

As e new sAsoiber to dw 
Memaiond Hsrdd Tribm 
you ean sere up le hde 
die n ewsstand price, depen^ig 
on yeur eeicHry of readenaiL 

For delads 

on dxs spend inhothOory offer, 
write iR 

tff ffuAjiassKwis Depateiwil 
181, Avbom anirlg de OmBA 
93300 NeuUhr wr Setae, haico. 
Or Mb Pait 747-07-39 

04 ASIA AND PAORC 

contad our bod dsiribuear or; 

■ - e no- 

1005 Ta Seta Cwanerdd PuOdhig 
a4-34Roaaay Red 
KONGKmO 
Td: HK 5-386736 


MOVING 




i6ih mioBmu. 

LiMmous 300 kijii. duplex, -fqordn 
moefs rooni, porldno. F4,7D(1009 
INU60CCM TS* 84 76 




»BDO US OR eNGUSH 
HKtruciors ip ol disapEnes 
busmess. Fid a port tune. Plcae M 
resume to Europeai Amemm fider- 
’ Conserbum, IS Rue Gou- 
ReoiB, France. 


ALWAYS AVABABLEIGNOONai* 
babymfldersA litdasiUyenK. 
Col Sfam Eknou, faxidDa 730' 
B122/514Z UCEMP. AGl . ... - 




SMART, CAPABLE GIBt ford of wn- 
ter sports, needed uraenriy for dulet 
n GerraevHoeddng SMiMrIaKt d^ 
scad fife. Reply with cholo fa Box 
1^8, Heidd Tnfaiim, Neidly 
Cede*, Frace 


EBUCATIONAL 

POsmemswAffm) 



Td 1029 34 1 1 55 Th: Moka 36629 Ol 


Embassy Service 

8 Avd. da Maiwe 
75008 Pan 
Idex 231696 T 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AG5^ IN PARIS 

FLATS FOR SB«IT 

mONi 563-7899 

FLATS FOR SAIE 

PHONE 562-1640 

OFFICES FOR R54T/SALE 

mOie 562-6214 


FO0GN BANK m PARIS SHI sods 
young QBK/TYnST. Sod CV to Box 
iaaa. Herdd Trfame. 92521 NeuiBy 
Cedex. Frona 


GENERAL 

POSmONS WANTED 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


BIG B ACCOUNTING TBUA seeks 
slaff/senar lor U.S. ladepatment. 
ftw eimerieia & fluent r^ 

owed Seid CV tor Box 1661, Her^ 
ubune, 92521 Neuily Cedex Fracioe 



PAHS - BJGUSH SPEAKING dayhnw 

naviy reqwed far new baby end 
Mads NoMiMher. Send CV. A ref- 
wenoes to Bov 1674, Herod Tnbime, 

92531 NMly Cedex, Frane 


TRANSCAR'i 

THE CAR SHIPPING 
_ SPGCUUS1S 
PAtBS Q| SOD 0901 

CANhES/MCE {^39 43 44 

FRANKFIRT (defCT) BOit • 

BQrt4 / COLOGNE TaaBZiOT .; 
STUrTGART I^J 880B1 ' 

MUMO) (om n 10 G 

BREMeiHAVB<l 101711 4300 > 

NEW YORK DfF^7D6>.. 

HOUSTON ma 931 TBS 

LOSANGBES 03 215 310 

MONTREAL Biq 866 6681 

, AGB4TS VTORtD ^ ' 

Uowe it to w to taring a to ya- 


PAGE 13 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Business Message Center 


PAIUS AREA UNFURNISHED 


17lk 3-rooni 8a, sunny, fivmSL^xng, 
bedroom, bldin, both, FSjOO t 
fhages, hitniure far ide F32HO0. 
No ogent. Teh 22M60B. 





Secretarial Positions m 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


PARIS Deefaenfae hiNnaffainil 
|OI] 343 23 64 

fSANKFURT JSJEJH 

(069] 250066 

MUFfiCH IJA-S. 

(0891 142244 



REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 




REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 



DSMEXPORT 

PARIS • LYON 6 MUUtSBUE 
lUE • NICE 

Ml mewng fay spga^.frg" "■ 
ddain Frana to Jcjbcinthawg 
Mnm fraoi Frona 16 M 34 10 
ftsesnMAm 


PARIS* SUBURBS 


U. S. A. 

EXCITING OPPORTUNITY 

hdiary loeoled in the Sun Seb, 
erteb feh ed 3 ynax, seefa coaMto ex- 
^ amiu terhnnlfxiiLd break- 
mrough. Eqw^ ownerthm with mm- 
nnim eMnpRNfU d SStUXu Sutaand 
cepeaj Mp r edhtia i i con be aaeded. 
wim anple equity proledion. 
write 10 u vdidw m to; 

Bat 1630 Herdd Ttfaune. 

92521 Nealy Cedei^ ^ace. 


WCSIOWBE OPERATING 
PubfalMig heiM tadgrtisii xj fidd) 

Priea%>6mboa 

Kaamfc ufAMed ponAibies far w 
cr e mii v j thalun ie y e i.BuaneMoaMawi 
<Bi be ndanried to ether fields. Con M 
opera e d (ran u iyidnr e n the world. 
No eimeneice reqwred. 

FleoM write to: 

B« 2109. LH.T„ F r i e d i dfci i. )S|, 
D4O00 Fraihfuri/A4OT 


IMMICRAnON TO USA 
MADE EASY 

Attorrny & ReoBa obtain vba & pa- 
meneid rendwee. Helps to aa up USA 
buuiesB & bean caixwidd, eskn- 
tnd & nedoniid lad eta*. Fa five 
brochure writn David Hn«i. 1201 
Dove St . Sie 600. Newoort Beodi. CA 
93660 USA |7iq 752 


BUSINESS BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES OPPORTUNmES 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 
t-shutfotos 
NOWMRALCOIGR 
gn ^ e aji bameg tha eon earn you 

S8000 - SlOiOOO/aanih. New ad loed 
nara from SIO/XS - S30A!D. Kenn 
Can gAer Co, OtA. J22 BeeHwvei st r 9 
eODO Frenkfiirt/W. Germaiy. 

Teh 069-747EOB Th; 412713 KEma 


COLLATB2AL 

VYe cai provide prime balk naificaian 
ofedlara farafadrege Irensoctians. 
Baaonolde (on. Prooipi sennee. 
landai based. Telex 89516^ 

Teh 01-385 5492 / 01.930 8926 


TAX SERVICES 




FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


UK ONSHORE OOMPAMESI Wb 
prow^ •"me Direeta & Seeo- 
tad Cuuipleie rfnnxLBuiuiil lerdai 
oeeanto opened suniltorieoidr 




5E(.:ret.arial 

PtISmONS AVAILABLE 


GIRL RHDAY WANHD «i fUA Lodb- 
nq mduded. Te); 813482-1247. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE I fiEmg r ABigg |s ven ARin 




*andstad Harass 


FlWCH WOMA N, famer toadiei. 'tr^’hdbyiciB.'2660i w 

ff*tdd Tnbone, tafa; 753 12 40 *'**plso«d 
eaFren^EngUnSw^ieetod- 92521 NeuHir C>dex. Fran ce ^ rtrawm 

fin wat some typrn telex. stHieh- "7 — ~ . 

board expmm wil ca^ aiy OR - THE OIBME DE lA CREME tan- TROINOUAl, Gatm am seee- 



NeuiVy Cedex. Fiance. taa7S8B33Q. | paiinn Fab. Tdi 3331 U 


6AMdED(#B SffiS (a AACBO^N 
mnmxNK pme m mris 
Engfiih, Bdgfaa Diildt a Gennai 
santaies, taiowle» of Frendi re- 
quired, Endoh sI i i xiI hj i xL Bbviud 
Idada. mito a phene: 138 Avatue 
Vida Hum 75116 Pars, Raiee. Teh 
727 61 A 



RBUESB4TAT1VE 

ASTON COWANY FORMAnONS 


Tdex 627691 SFIVA G 




ZURKH-ZURKH-ZUUCH 

BAfGHOFSRASSE 52 _ 
YOUR Oiwa AWAY FROM HOME 

• Offiee/Maagamenl Services 

• Company raa Mkaw 

o How to de Budness m /a/ ^ 
FBCM SWITZBRAND 
R y ffa e w S ad w awed* OaqA 
Bamhofineae ^OtBQS ZwA 
Td 01/211 92 07. Tbu 813 062 


YOUR ICimON OFTKC 

ot Rt e 

a HS HAMEXEamYECBYnB 

Tefc |0ir439 62^ Tbe 261426 


impetus * ZURICH • 3S2 76 21 

' Ptono / tda / iRidtoX. 



SEOErARCR Wb have demy of poB- 
inm la biiinud ad englan mother 
tenam seownr i es. fivry Cofl Oa^ 
idoTSB 8230 a beanm 225 5925 
PonhGRINTBBM 


American Radio Station located in Munich 
has openings for 


experienced, 

billngiial Secrelaries 


with romplete nuency in English and good 
knowledge of the Hungarian or the 
Romanian language. 

Please submit your application to; 

RFE/RL Inc., Personaiabteilune 
Oettingenstr. 67, 8000 MQnchen 22 


lioiis 9'^*' 


sajciar.CiC 


a.'cdiEb'- •/ 


mmicir sii'X 

vilhiiliBIbll 


oak. 


Jl, 

up cfliCTi C. L 
Ik 


comniitiM