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V -'Si- 


The Global Newspaper 
£ted in Paris 
Simultaneously 
* uL fi^s, London, Zurich, 

WEAIHK DATA AFPEAt ON PAGE 14 


Hcralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



(Tribune 


: '^S No. 31,702 

- « — — 

r ii-j. 


Published With The New York Hines and The Washington Post 

V* PARIS, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


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Panel Advocates 
Changing Structure 
Of U.S. Military 


By Bill Keller 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A diverse 


at the US. Mature barracks in Bd- 
rot bombed by terrorists in 1983. 
Many of the chaoses to be pro- 


group of experts, inducting some erf P 05 * 1 by the Geoigetown group 
the members of Congress who are have beat recommended by prcvi- 
tn» s» T«finenfifli on miiitsiy m«r- ous official commissions and in 


Anuf? 


■»**«[ *■ 
- t; > Addsif 


im, has agreed to push this year congressional reports, only to face 
r SlCD '»\ for a sweeping restructuring of the opposition.' 

'■‘toasi'j U.S. military operation. Defense Secretary Caspar W. 

He group, condnd iM an 18- Weinberger said in an interview 
’^di j. month study, contends in a draft ^ wo weeks agp that he would not 
^ssi report that the current nrititary or- support major changes in the oper- 
mnizaiio a, which it says is para- aticax of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 
15 Jy zed by rivalries between rite Navy Secretary John F. l^hman 

army, navy, air force, and Marine Jr-, in an interview, called the 
Corps, is the underlying cause of Geoigetown proposals “a very 
bloated budgets, poor combat foolish way to organize a democra- 


■££?*? 
• V.v.,3 

■ar; 


who conduct 
st reamline the 
niugoperatira 
to?iaa:V->r partment,and 


. *ifl& readiness, ana a lack of coordina- 
--^■ahy^ dan in operations, 

V To resolve these problems, the 

r - ' - 2 * 1 ,*, group will propose to rive the 
_ ■' Achie lC ^ chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
“••.--U.JK f, T£f Staff new powers as a presidential 
adviser in an effort to override 
■f- Mrjy. squabbling among the services. 

The recommendations, which 
^ are to be published next month, 
■- ac Hamt woold 8150 strengthen the powers 
~-r-; of regional military commanders 
; w bo conduct combat operations, 
Curji ■; - streamline the budgeting and plan- 
•r ning operations of theSrfense Dc- 

:> ^ parmant, and alter the role of Con- 
: " gress in handling the military 

budget 

r ‘: ^ : M adapted, the reootmnendft- 
' tints would represent the most 
' L.c;- d ras tic <*any « in miUfnty nmniigff- 
: meat since the administration of 
- r - t“>. President Dwight D. JSsenbower, 

' - when a number of measures were 
r,: enacted to strengthen thepowersaf 

• ^ tile Joint Chiefs of Staff and the 
' rzi± secretary of defense. 

■ But some of the latest proposals 

• are likdy to meet reastance from 
■ : the Reagan administration, accord- 

r ing to recent interviews with ad- 
ministration officials concerned 
widi the military. 

The study was financed by the 
■ u ‘ Ford and Rodtefellcr Foundations. 

•>\:’rjtp A ' " It was coadocted by a panel of 
'v former Defense Dep art ment offi~ 

\ jiw • k. ^ rials, members of Congress, and 

- > academics that was assembled by 
: : 7 ,T the Georgetown Uniwrsity Center 
•i.V.v for Strategic and Intematiana] 

■ ~ m "^tnifies. 

: -ij .i'cv xjje joint Chiefs of Staff, now 
\ ~ ' beaded by General John W. Vessey 

:iv: Jr^ is made up of thechajmrtm and 

) MOBILE.' top officers of the army, nayy. air 
c= gf == force and Marine Corps. It advises 
• : Jr ■■ ^ the president and oversees opera- 
■ tions of the four services. ■" - 

. . 1 X \ The draft rqwrt sud a ^stagiat- 

ed” military structure was “the sin- 

'^vTpa-yf ^e most important cause of the 

- * - -- — grave problems that now oonfirou 

... the United States in managing its 
^ 5 L " ' national defense efforts." 

^£rT f “Unless die procedural and or- 
ganizatioml deficiencies undedy- 
ing these problems are identified 
\ ana corrected, no realistic level of 
' defense spending wili be sufficieat 
S to meet me needs of the nation's 
: - security," the draft said. 

Philip A Odeen, a partner in the 
,.;\V accounting firm of Coopers & Ly- 
a ~“* * . - brand and chairman of the steering 

committee that directed the 
; Georgetown study, said in an intw- 
^•5 < j ' view that the strength of individual 
. ! service Se£s has rearited in an ero- 


ct*s dcrisiai-inabng,” aigtting that 
they would centmtize too much 
power and dimmish civilian con- 
trol. 

But partidpaats in the study said 
they were convinced that the politi- 
cal balance has shifted, in favor of 
the changes. The reorganization 
package, they said, wifl be off aed 
to a public that has become disen- 
chanted with the coat of the nriE- 
tary and to a Congress in which 

(Conthmed on Page 2, CoL 3) 



U.S. Says GNP 
In 1984 Made 
st Gain 
■ades 


ifHy'of 


Post Service 

WASHINGTON — New figures 
on the US. gross national product 
show that the economy grew 6.8 
percent in 1984, the sharpest rise in 
mere than three decades, and that 


The department also reported 
that from October through Decem- 
ber consumer spending increased 
and the UJS. trade Katanne im- 
proved for the first time is three 
years. 

The GNP repot was called “re- 


more man inree qocaacs, ana mat The GNP report was “re- 
inflation was the lowest it has been matkablc" by tne White House. “If 
in 17 years, the_Commcrce Depart- this were almost any other country 


ment Resorted Tuesday. 

The OS. economy also a 
to be rebouztding dining 


in the world, the economic perfer- 
mance of the United States would 
be tensed a mirade,” said Larry 


three months of the year fr om its Speakes, the chief White House 


summer dump 


GNP measures the total value of * impressive. 


spokesman. “Indeed, it has been 


a nation's output erf goods and ser- 
vices, including income from for- 
eign investments. 

A price index tied to the GNP 


GNP increased 3.9 percent in the 
fourth quarter after a rise from July 
to September of 1.6 percent. At 
that time some economists ex- 


ANTI-ABORHON MARCH — More than 70,000 
people demonstrated against abortion in Washington on 
Tuesday, the 12th anofrersaiy of the U.S. Supreme 


Court decision legalizing abortion. President Reagan 
told die marchers he supports their cause but warned 
against the use of violence to achieve their goals. Page 3. 


showed that inflation totaled 3.7 pressed the fear that the slump 


percent last year, down from 3.8 would cany over iwtn the first half 
percent in lv83 and 6 percent in of 1985 and that there was & remote 
1982, the department said. 


Reagan’s Address: A Subdued Look Back on Familiar Goals 


By Hedrick Smith 

New York Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — In an echo of the 
patriotic op timism that marked his re-deo* 


tion campaign, President Ronald Reagan Baker3d, promised that it would be “a new 
made Ins second inaugural address on call to arms." Afterward, the former Kea- 
Monday a celebration of the “American gan White House communications dfreo- 
renewar of his first term, rather than a tor, David A Gergen, commented that it 
driving caff to action for his second. was. “at best, a muted cafl." 


messages, this was an address that other vices that normally help him to a polished pose and that some of his subor dinate s erate private business and reduce 
politiaam found low-key and undramatic, delivery. believe should eventually be sacrificed for dependence on welfare programs, 

lacking in his usual rhetorical flair. The sense of nigency that he conveyed in the sake of an arms agreement Indeed, Mr. “Osr fundamental goals must be to re- 

in advance, his chief of staff, James A 198lwasredac^by ase^rfvmdMtion Reagan put more stress on the space de- duce dependency and upgrade the dignity 
Baker 3d, promised that it would be “anew at what he had achieved. Over the past fense than on an aims agreement of those who are infirm erdisadvantaged” 


at what he had 


driving caff to action for bis «enruirf 
The occasion brought die preadeurback 
to center stage after several weeks of his 


week, some presidential aides had been 

NEWS ANALYSIS 


Over the past fense than on an arms agreement 


Tooonj 
offer any 


onal Democrats, he did not ^r, Reagan said. “And here, a 
of moderation on his cam- economy and support from far 

• rWiwfrr nm omr rm ami to ... _«.” r « ... ■ 


fearful that Monday's speech, which was ^8 l&xes - Answering congressional 


paign to shrink domestic programs and to commumty offer our best chance for a 
combat huge federal deficits without rais- society where compassion is a way of He." 


y? ”■» ™ “M” 1 th= vJZ and SSr of teta ganar^iuxl ttatt thm i. 


it\ MEM 

i : .•-■v* ^ 
** 

' r ' ».r. 


with an incantation of his fanriHar ccaiser- Iran's idease of 
vativB manifesto, promising “a new Amen- ta grs Bitter cold 


cOTser- inn's idease erf the U.S. Embassy hos- gestures toward senior Democratic 


vamuniiuuautmunnung ancw/tmca- ages, uitter cow dronvea it of the pag- favori ^ poels- a posh for a constitu- ^ <««n8 “ cooperate m ettorts tor 

cm Emancipation to “Kberale the spint eantry of an outdoor ceremony and ers found his rowch less combanye and ^ 0 ^ amendment to balance the budnet peace and ha ffi ng his evocation of patriotic 
of enterprise* from government intrusion, throngs cheering the president parading psrtisan than ms first inaugural address. ^ a11licjon to ^ n ^ n _ abortion, a pledge themes. But few found his address as pow~ 

Briefly, Mr. Raigan sketched ane^iect- from the Capitol to the White House. But Mr. Reagan betrayed no lessening of i© try again for a program to revitalize erful as they had expected, 

ed agenda of trying to freeze the overall i„ Mr seemed sober and con servativ e fervor, set out no over- dnesand a promise to build an One Republican, asking not tobe quoted 

size of the federal budget, simplify the subdued rather than ebullient, and he was ^ching impel stives that demanded bipar- “opportunity society’ by freeing private by name, recalled that at the Republican 

nafinrt’e t err nmAfn ntwM qKau^ wtth _ *« i. _ia! • j _v r» nc*m AAonfiMhnn nnn GUTiflJwl no vioinl^ • j it. -*-• «■ — — . 


ition” to "liberate the spirit eantry of an outdoor ceremony and 05 { . ouad U* 9 >eech ?« combative and 
from government intrusion, thro ngs cheering the president parading partisan than his first in a ug ural address. 


politicians. Indeed some Democratic lead- . ,^v 


arms controL rormc most part, nowwer, 

To his rightist partisans, he reaffirmed crai* let Mr. Reag an hav e his 
thrir favorite bc»1s: a oush for a constitu- mi * offering to cooperate in 


In this, some Democrats saw a rationale 
for what they expect to be harsh new cuts 
m social programs when Mr. Reagan sends 
his budget to Congress in two weeks. 

For the most part, however, the Demo- 
crats let Mr. Reagan have his day in the 
sun, offering to cooperate in efforts for 


size of toe iedcraJ budget, smpny the subdued rather than ebullient, and be was artaun ^ imperatives mat demanded tnpar- “opportunity society” by freeing private by names, recalled that at the Republican 
nation’s tax system, press ahead with re- occasionally halting in delivery. Several ns ? n cooperation and signaled no visible enterprise and welfare recipients from a Convention in Dallas, Mr. Reagan's accep- 

ran nrli «w« fa arum L - • awil ^ J % 4 vnn Frw OA in w rA ftMCW raff lusrM «w oKnvid « a . i r .«. « ■ « T 7 - r 


to build an 


search cm a space-based defense and pur- 


TO MOBILE; 
f atbps 

- - • : --r ■- 


sue arms negotiations with the Sovirt^ fromhis prepared text, ioduding his e\ oca 
.Umon. tion of more “years of American renewal/ 

But for a leader known far firing the possibly because he was depending on : 
public imagination with short, symbolic written text rather than the prompting de 


times, he dropped sentences or paragraphs drive for conqjronrise at hotne or abroad, 
from his prepared text, including his evoca- To the Russians, he sent the strong mes- 


onveror compromise at come OTaoroac. bloated government. 

To the Russians, he sent the strong mes- His most tanlaKzm; 

sage that one of his top priorities was evocation of Abraham 


the possibly because he was depending on a pursuing research on the space-based de- erence to a “new American Emanapa- Reagan c 
oHc written text rather than the prompting de- fense program that they so adamantly op- tion.” Briefly, he suggested wanting to fib- the gate.' 


tance speech had been rambling, diffuse, 
allusion was his and notup to his usual par. But this occa- 
incoln with a ref- sion, he said, was more important: “And 
dean Emanapa- Reagan did not exactly oome roaring out of 


U.S. Asks New Zealand 
To Permit Warship Visit 


By Bernard Gwenzroan 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States has formally asked New 
Zealand for pcrnrissioo to send a 
navy ^ warship there despite the anti- 
uudear policy of that government’s 
ruling party, State Department of- 


The officials acknowledged that 
in asking fra a port caff for the 
warship, the United States could 

« • aI _ <11 


savKxnasiiKicfluiwmanci^ pro ^ ase vaes(raminthe34- 
phasKOT costly new wrapons and JJJr&oth Padfic affiance of the 

Urdied Stales, Australia and New 
Zealand, known as the ANZUS al- 


and other essentials of combat 
readiness that are nm by the weak- 
er joint commands. 


fiance. 

Prime Minister David Lange, 


to bar all ships in the fleet, Ameri- 
can officials said. 

State Department officials said 
the request fra a port call by a navy 
ship was made in recent days in 
connection with a planned ANZUS 
exercise called Sea Eagle. The exer- 
cise will be in Australian waters, 
the officials said, bat American 
stops traditionally pay caffs on 
New Zealand ports m connection 
with such maneuvers. 

In July, the Labor Party decisive- 
ly defeated the conservative Na- 
tional Party, which had allowed nu- 
clear-armed ships to visit. Labor's 
election platform called for the bar- 
ring of all such ships. Mr. T-angp. 



Peru Military Gted in Civilian Deaths 

420 Are Reported Killed, 1,005 Missing in Security Zone 


By Don Podesca 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — More than 
1,000 Penmans have disappeared 
after being detained by police and 
the military, and another 400 have 
been reported killed since nine 
mountain provinces in southern 
Peru were placed under military 
administration two years agp. Am- 
nesty International reported Tues- 
day. 


they were victims of extrajudicial report 
execution. " when they look fra the bodies at 

“Many victims are unidentifi- known damping grounds, “which 
able; ibet dotting has been de- arc always near main roads regular- 
siroycd, features mutilated and ly patrolled by troops or police.” 
bodies dumped far from the scene The organization said. 
of detention, in areas where rda- Amnesty International said that 


soldiers 


s or ponce." 


of detention, in areas where rela- Amnesty International saic 
lives are unlikely to travei,” the documents and testimony 
group said in its report come directly from families 

“Human rights violations on this community representatives, 
scale are unprecedented in modem The group credited the ofE 


of 1985 and that there was a remote 

chance pf another rwwcimi 

However, in the fourth quarter 
consumer spending rose smartly 
and fewer dollars were spent on 
imported goods, the Commerce 
Dqurtmenlsaid. 

Inflation, as measured by the 
price index, was 24 percent in the 
fourth quarter, down from a 3.9- 
paoeat rate in the third quarter. 
The index is called the implicit 
price deflator, and measures 
changes in prices and the composi- 
tion of output, not only price 

changpc 

“The economy comes into 1985 
with definitely strong upward mo- 
mentum and -we continue to look 
for growth between 3 percent and 
4i percent for the year/ said Allen 

Siniti, rfifaf atvwtnni iq far ShegfSOn 

Lehman/ American Express. “The 
prospects fra inflation remain quite 
bright.” 

The 6.8-percem increase in GNP 
last year was the sharpest increase 
since an 83-peroent rise in 1951, 
the Commerce Department said. 
GNP rose 3.7 percent in 1983 and 
contracted fay 2.1 percent in 1981 

The Reagan adminis t ration is 
counting on growth of at least 4 
percent this year to help reduce the 
federal budget deficit through re- 
duction is spending and increases 
in tax revenues resulting from an 
improved economy. 

Some economists doubt that the 
administration will get its wish and 
are predicting growth of slightly 
above 3 percent fra 1985. 

“With lower interest rates and 
inflation under control, the econo- 
my is in a good position to achieve 
the 4-percent growth expected by 
the adminitfi atinn over the course 
of 2985," said Commerce Secretary 
Malcolm Baldrigc. “To reinforce 
the staying power of tins expansion 
in the years ahead, our first priority 


documents and testimony had must be a reduction in the federa l 
come directly from families and deficit to hdp hold down inflation 


scale are unprecedented in modem The group credited the office erf 
Peru,” Amnesty International said. Pern’s attorney general and the ju- 


and bring down interest rates fur- 
ther.” 

The trade picture also improved 


Comma Pr«a 

David Lange 


A report by the London-based part,peasants,localleadcra,teach- 
human rights group said that it bad era and students, 
documented 1.005 “disappear- Anmestv International acknowl- 


The victims have been, fra the most diriaiy for making efforts to pro- in the fourth quarter, marking the 


tect the rights of local residents and firat 
far uncovering some abases, but it Mr. 


meat in three years, 
said. Net exports ad- 


Anmesty International acknowl- said they have been unable to hall justed fra inflation increased SI 1.8 


ffeSSTSS was a Defense sh£*hk dectira lart j 2 J, hasS ^«affi^thatpdicy,butit 

SSed committed to to Labor l«s not yet been put into law. 
Party’s policy of forbidding port To an early crisis, the 
WitaStarf United States has pot gdted pg- 

5-8LhLlL'!!!*L*2- 

the lack erf central authority also ^^S"^ sd ^ for,,ny 
hfl« hatnwtnl • mflifaTV activities. ^ ^STSillp to Visit. 


Bob Hawke, strongly opposes Mr. 
Lange's policy. Mir. Hawke is to 
visit Washington in early February 
for talks with President Ronald 


apee^ m^ th e are a by the end of edged that it has received reports of them. tnlhon m thelounti quarter, in coa- 

ly opposes Mr. A disappearMce is consm- “scores 0 f kiffings” by leftist Shin- Zcgarra Dongo, former Ayacu- trust to a decline of $15.6 Union in 
. Hawke is to ^ P® 5 ? 0 “ ing Path guerrillas and empbimed dm chief prosecutor, reported last the third quarter. Although total 
early February l£ * en mt? curiody by the authon- ^t it condemns torture and km- year that his office had received exports decreased SI .2 billion, total 

sident Ronald ti& wen comnvaiM. ano mgs by them as welL 1,500 formal complaints of prison- imports declined S 13 bflfkrn incan- 

lUltz, with AN- . •uwonties jmer deny mat tee ^ emeinency zone, which has ers’ disappearances in 1983 and the trast to an increase of $18.2 billion 
sue. State Do- vicum 15 detained. been extended to 13 provinces in first two months of 1984. in the third quarter, 

aid. In addition, the report said, the Hoancavdica, Ayacucho and A spokesman at the Peruvian For the year, mflatun-adjtisted 


To avoid an early crisis, the Reagan and Mr. Shulc 
United States has not asked per- ZUSthe primary issue 
mission fra any warship to visit panment officials said. 


New Zealand until now. Buta Stale 


in 'early February alten into curiody by the anthori- 


rfks with President Ronald ti« or wiih thor corauvano, and 
an and Mr. Shultz, with AN- ** ^ ^ thal thc 

the primary issue. State De- vicum « defamed. 
lent officials said. In addition, the report said, 

: ANZUS foreign ministers “Amnesty International has re- 


been extended to 13 provinces in 
the Hoancavdica, Ayacucho and 


in the third quarter. 

For the year, inflation-adjusted 

r»\m j n iftt; j . 


has hampered mflitaiy activities, 
including the unsuccessful 1980 
mission to rescue American hos- 
tages in Iran and security planning 


INSIDE 



TALKS OVER — Alex- 
a K. Antonov, a Kremlin 
official, says that there 
may be ‘‘new impulses” 
in Soviet trade with 
West Germany. Page 2. 

■Rant Denktash, the Turkish 
Cypriot leader, agreed to new 
talks with Prcadent Spyros Ky- 
prianou. ft®e2. 

■ Die Westmoreland case has 
revealed, the distrust between 
the American generals in Viet- 
nam and the press. Page ?. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Several central banks in Eu- 
rope intervened in the currency 
markets, dewing the rise of the 
dollar in Europe. Page?. 


The Reagan 1 administration 
would not disclose details about 
the ship, which it would like to send 
to New Zealand in March. In Wel- 
lington on Monday, the New Zea- 
land go ver nmen t md it would sot 
deride on the American port caff 

request for several weeks. 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz, who has urged Mr. Lange to 
be more flexible, has said that fra 
an alliance to have any meaning the 
military forces erf the members 
should be allowed “to interact” by 
port caffs and other joint actions. 

Moreover, die last ANZUS alli- 
ance communkjufc, signed by the 
three allies on the eye of Mr. 
Lange's taking office, said that they 
“agreed that defease cooperation, 
iprinriing combined exercises, vis- 
its and logistics support arrange- 
ments, played an essential part in 
promotmg mutual security." 

For the last six months, the Unit- 
ed States and Australia have been 
quietly urging Mr. Lange, to no 
avail, to drop the anti-nuclear 


. The ANZUS foreign ministers “Amnesty International has re- Apurimac departments, was put Embassy in Washington said that GNP increased SI 043 billion to 

Department official said that the are to bold their annual meeting in ceived information on 420 individ- under military command in De- reports such as Amnesty Interna- 51.639 trillion, compared with 

is sue h ad to be faced, and that this Canberra, Australia, in July, at »ai< named as having been de- canbex 1982 in an effort to curb the tionaTs are received by the authon- $1334 trillion in 1983. Unadjusted 

seemed the best time. which time the issue of port calls by mined and subsequently found guerrillas, who subscribe to the ties in lima and the disappear- fra inflation, GNP in 1984 was 

The Australian Labor Party gov- nudear-armed ships is to be taken dead, whae these and other rir- teachings of Mao. 1 fauces investigated on a 53.661 trillion, compared with 

eminent, headed by Prime Mmiker up. cumstances suggest strongly that Relatives of the rfassmg people case-by-case basis S3 304 trillion in 1983. 


uals named as having been de- cember 1982 in an effort to curb the tionaTs are received by the authon- 51334 trillion in 1983. Unadjusted 
rained and subsequently found guerrillas, who subscribe to the ties in lima and tire disappear- fra inflation, GNP in 1984 was 

< i 1 .1 _ _ I 3.1 T. « * - MG. ■ * - 1* - J •*!_ 


cumstances suggest strongly that Relatives of the rfiissmg people case-by-case basis. 


a 53.661 trillion, compared with 
S3304 trillion in 1983. 


V- • ■ 

Labor Groups Struggle to Overcome Loss of Influence in Decade of Decline 

By R.W. Apple Jr. to country. The West German “CUTSET * ff". -Someuaions on the Continent have small hirij-tecimology compj 

New York Tima Service unions have managed to retain sentjritaiey to hdp strikes’ fam- and in other new bus in esses te 

LONDON — West European la- much of their strength, while those ThfltrllPr Nf»W Cnal Talfefl^ 1 ffieUmttbey have done so in ways beless amenable to organizai 

bor unions have lost SSrf the in Spain and FraL have ueiw ^IkttUier JXCjeCIA iMJW KAMI to tire money 

nnlitinal and mmnmic viww that had as much dout as those in Reuters " ‘- ' out of Mr. Scamll s hands. Dui some peopic m tne ] 


po litical and econrank rigor that had as m uch clout as those in 
only a decade ago made them one northern Europe. 


of the dominant dements in many But the general picture is a bleak 
countries, and their leaders are un- one, from the Netherlands, where 


Europe’s Unions: 

A Time of Trial 

First of three articles. 

sore how and when they will be 
able to re-establish their position. 


northern Europe. LONDON — Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher ruled oik as^Fuesday 

But the gmeral picture is a bleak new talks to eod Britain's 10-month coal strike. "n: 

one, from the Netherlands, where She told Parliament that new negotiations between the National Goal 
strikes by state employees 15 Board and the National Union of Mineworfcers were pointless as long as 
months ago utterly faffed to stop the miners refused to accept closures of uneconomic pits, 
cuts in ' -- - ■«- «- j ■■ J ' * “ t ' 


7T-\ -Some unions on the Continent have 
sdtt jikatey to hdp strikers’ fam- 
*• '-.flies.' but tfegr have done so in ways 
<>*'V that they hope wiff keep the money 
• : '' 6ut erf Mr. ScargUl’s hands. 


“Somehow,” said Giusqipe Fa- 
jertag of the European Trade 
Union Institute in Brussels, “gov- 


small high- technology companies, 
and in other new businesses tend to 
be less amenable to organization. 

Bui some people in the labor 
movement, including Mr. Fajertag 
of the ‘Dade Union Institute, say 
they think the unions themselves 
are at least partly to blame. He said 


nation members 
the eighth in the 


cuts in salaries and welfare bate- Mrs. Thatcher was responding to demands by opposition members 
fits, to Sweden, where the once- thm she promote a new round erf talks, which wouM be the eighth in the 
monolithic unity of the unions has strike, to take place without preconditions, 
broken down, to Britain, where the The leadership of the NUM boasts it hasn’t budged an inch,” she told 

government of Prime Minister the House of Commons. Thus, she raid, “There is no point gang into a 
Margaret Thatcher has passed re- new ra^d of talks only to fail" 

arictive new laws and all but sev- Mrs. Thatcher said the miners should accept the terms of an iadepen- 


eroments “Western Emope of recnntmentm service industries 
whatever pohtical colraation fee! was dow “because the unions are 
^th«t^ oi^ to be tougher, like elephants, slow to change, and 
Manyofthe problems vraold exist they continue to reflect blScollar 


even if ^ there were sodaKstgovero- attitudes in an increasingly white- 
mems m every capital, because the collar world." 
economic crisis cannot be es- 


AmrwvrfSSkS’a ered the traditional close communi- dent arbitration settlement that averted a proposed strike by mine 


The last high-level visit by an 
American to New Zealand was by 
Lieutenant General John T. Gham 
Jr. of the US. Air Forces director of 
the State Department s bureau erf 
politico-military affairs, who 
briefed Mr. Lange 11 days ago on 
the recent U-S.-Sovkt arms contrd 
in ike hi Geneva and discussed the 
nudear issue. 

As a matter of long-standing po- 
licy, the United States wiff not dis- 
close whether a ship carries nuclear 
weapons. Thus for agpvernrnent to 
ban any U.S. warship with such 
weapons, it would, in effect, have 


cations between the union foremai last autumn. 

sals in mioo power, oof only in leadership and 10 Downing Street. 

their ability to win wage increases Some politicians and civil ser- 

and other benefits for their mem- vants, like Jean-Cyrff Spinetta of General Workers’ Union into one 
bers but also in their capacity to the French Labor Ministry, worry of the most powerful unions in the 
influence governmental policies, that weak unions will provide an West and ended up as the foreign 
Their decline has reached a point inadequa t e ch ann el fra the expres- secretary in Clement Attlee’s post- 
where “they’re desperate for a sion of workers’ aspirations and war cabinet. 


Board to keep coal mines open 


caped.” Unemployment has had a psy- 

Mass unemployment has cur- c^opcal torn as wdL Fearful 
tailed the unions' membership in losing their own jobs, union 
most countries — workers who lose have been reluctant to 

ibeirjobs seldom stay active — and sa t*e. 
so has the rapid shrinkage of the “Trade-nnion power rerides in 
aarfrestac* industries in sadi areas thc minds of men,” said JOrg Baro- 


wfaere ‘they’re desperate 


nrfe,” in the words of Lord Lever, a frustrations. They say they fear a 
frames' minister in Labor govern- recurrence of the sort of social ex- 
men is in Britain. plosions that happened is Fiance 

Austerity programs imposed by and West Germany in 1968 and 
many governments, including some that briefly flared in major British 


work, and it is widely expected that 

That sort of story would be ah the board will prevail inenl - needs the protection of his union, 

most inconceivable today, with few Nowhere in Western Europe has Last year, the proportion of the that is when he is most anxious 

unions able to resist the tides of the miners’ strike found a strong British work force that was union- aboutinsjob, and therefore there is 

change that are battering them. echo. In general, thc dosing of un- ized dropped to less than half fra a danger of solidarity breaking 

The most defiant gesture of resis- economic plants, such as steel the first time since 1973, and in dawn, 

tance has been that of the mines in mills, has baa grudgingly accept- France, only one wraker in five is a The unions' orestiee h w. 


that heavy battalions of the labor move- are" worst, when the worker most 
local- needs die protection of his union. 

Last year, the proportion of the that is when he is most anxious 

« - .t ... j i 


that are at least nominally socialist 
have forced European labor offi- 
cials to accept cutbacks in jobs and 
benefits, however grudgingly. 


dries four years ago before rapidly 
dying away. 

In Britain, Ernest Bevin began as 
an orphan with a horse-drawn de- 


Britain, who have been on strike for ed. Most unionists, includi 
10 months, under the mdodrsmat- in Britain, have kept their 
ie leadership of Arthur ScareilL in from Mr. ScamlL whose 


The pattern varies from country livery cart, built the Transport and an effort to force the National Goal leanings they appear to suspect, employed in service industries, in 


from Mr. ScargiD, whose Marxist Unhappily for the onions. 


J uujj vuc wuiici m live is a -tl- . , 

;many union member now, compared with be ? 1 

- one in four five ye^sS^ by 

Unhappily for the unions, those ^“™B ma ^ty to exert aiqr 


tar seemmg rnabmty to exert any 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 2) 


v 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


lrg< 


Turkish Cypriot Says 
He Would Participate 
In New Talks on Unity 


By Andriana Icrodiaconou 

International HeraUl Tribune 

UNITED NATIONS, New 


standing issues should be relegated 
to joint working groups. 

The Turkish Cypriot leader’s 


York — Rauf Denklash, the Turk- statement on the possibility of a 
ish Cypriot leader, has reversed future meeting appeared to con- 


himseff and said that he would firm hopes that b 
meet with President Spyros Ky- ing doors open, 
prianou in a second attempt to In November, 


sides are keep- 


In November, President Ronald 


agree on the reunification of the Reagan personally urged Turkish 


divided Mediterranean island. Cypriot concessions on territory 


Four days of negotiations at the and constitutional power to bring 
United Nations ended Sunday in about talks. 


failure. At a press conference after- 
ward, Mr. Denklash rejected a pro- 


Washi 
iling the 


hington is i 
le Cyprus is 


interested in set- 
issue to minimize 


posal by the UN secretary-general congressional opposition to In- 
Javier Pfcrcz de Cuellar, for a new creased military aid for Turkey, as 


the end of February. well as to reduce tensions with 


Mr. Kyprianou accepted and lat- Greece within the North Atlantic 
er added' that he had no precondi- Treaty Organization. 


lions for new talks with Mr. Denk- 
lash 


Mr. Kyprianou said Monday 
that he has asked to meet with Mr. 


In an interview Monday, Mr. Reagan to discuss Tesumption of 
D cnlciash said that the secretary- the talks. 


general “sprang the February “We are very disappointed," one 



After Talks, 
Bonn Hoping 
For Better 
Ties to Soviet 


WORLD BRIEFS ■ 


Polish General Accuses Subordinates 


ill 


By James Markham 

,Vfw York Times Service 

BONN — A two-day session of a 
Soviet- West German ’trade com- 
mission has raised expectations in 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's govern- 
ment that Moscow may be easing 
its policy of attempting to isolate 
Bonn. 

The commission meetings, which 


TORUN. Poland (UPI) — A suspended secret police general Mamed 
his subordinates Tuesday for the kidnapping and murder of a pro-; 
Solidarity priest and said that a colonel accused in the c rime had withheld 
m criminating evidence 

General Zenon Flatek, 58, an Interior Ministry department head 
suspended but not charged in the October murder of the Reverend Jozy 
Popieluszko, denied the assertions of the four defendants that he was 
involved. 

Testifying for a second day. General Platek directly implicated his 
subordinate. Colonel Adam Pietruszka, and said that on several occa- 
sions the colonel withheld evidence that would have unma s ked thekiOers 
of the Roman Catholic priest 


!en< r 


44 More Deaths Reported in Bhopal 


ended Tuesday-, also raised hopes 
among West German businessmen 


meeting all of a sudden without UJ5. official said after the talks 
saying what it is for." But in re- broke off. “But as the secrctaiy- 


sponse to a question, he backed general said, efforts will continue, 
away from bis rejection of the pro- The alternative would be very unat- 


posal 

“Of course there is going to be a 
meeting with Mr. Kyprianou,** Mr. 
Denklash «id. “But I don't know 
under what conditions and for 
what purpose — all this has to be 
talked about." 

He added that he plans to remain 
in contact with Mr. Perez de Cud- 


2 Frenchmen Linked to Spy Ring Said to Flee India 


taucfia about. The Associated Press 

He added tha C he jrians to remain ^ DELHI — Two French- 

mcontact with MrPercz de Cud- men alleged to have trafficked in 
lar’s special repnsenianye m Cy- SIale jeft ^ Mac ±c 


dia before the crackdown began 
last Thursday. 

News reports said that at least 15 
persons bad been arrested and that 


for st riving new contracts tied to 
the 1986-90 five-year plan. West 
Germany is the Soviet Union's 
largest Western trading partner. 

The leader of the Soviet delega- 
tion, Deputy Prime Minister Alexei 
KL Antonov, declared that the com- 
mission could give “new impulses” 
to the relations between Bonn and 
TheAimc*dP»m Moscow. He also alluded to the 
CHURCH LOSES TO STATE — East Germany demolished all but the tower of a resumption of U.S.-Soviei arms ne- 

landmark Lutheran church at the Berfin Wall on Tuesday, apparently to give bonier gouanons, urging that the militari- 
guards a field of fire. A crowd on the West Berlin side watched as the neo-Gothic “J 011 sp®* ** prevented. 
Church of the RecondEatioa collapsed in rubble. The tower is to be razed next month. w« GraSoTs SmpUmce with 

the North Atlantic Treaty Orgam- 
n a _ __ zation's ban on exporting certain 

'Ring Said to Flee India 

C7 al trade. Tins prompted his host. 

The Hindustan Tunes, an inde- investigators also were investigat- Economics Minister Martin Bange- 
ardenL newspaper, reported that ing a possible Soviet connection in mann . to interject: “It was clear 
e government fW suspected spy- reported leaks from the prime min- from our talks that in this area, for 


BHOPAL. India (Reuters) —More titan 40 more people have died in 
Bhopal in the last month as a result of the industrial disaster at the Union 
Carbide pesticides plant, officials said Tuesday. 

The officials said that a local government survey showed that 44 died 

from the effects of poison gas in a 33-day period between Dec. 18 to Jan. 
20. Poisonous methyl isocyanate gas leaked from an underground storage 
tank at the plant Dec. 3, killing 2^00 people and injuring 4,000. 

Meanwhile, the minis ter for chemicals and fertilizers, Veerendra Patti, 
tdd Parliament on Monday there had been ax accidents at the factory 
before the Dec. 3 leak. He said a man died after liquid phosgene spilled 
from a pipe in December 1981. In February the followiM year 25 were 
tafren ill after another phosgene leak In October 1982, 15 workers were 
treated in a hospital after a leak of chloroform, hydrochloric arid and 
methyl isocyanate gas, he added. 


Managua Official to Leave Priesthood 

MANAGUA (UPI) — The Reverend Edgard Parralc s, one of four 
Roman Catholic clergymen in the Nicaraguan gove rnm e n t, has an- 
nounced that be is giving up the priesthood rather than obey Vatican 


pendent newsp 
the government 


. - .. - — uuuu, tuw i — ing in the prime minister’s office isier’s office. The KGB may have understandable reasons, some 

pros to continue atscusstons on a french government recalled a dip- 60 were bring questioned or were after stories appeared in twoAmer- used a European diplomat to gath- goods and services are excluded." 

second meetmp i I I j _ » , i J 11 ,i i_i : .I **rw . . . , :_r ^ II . . I 


second meeting. 


lomat who was also accused of hav- 


Sources dose to the UN initia- bg a role in India’s spy scandal the 
live on Cyprus said that the special United News of Ind£ news agency 

HtnracantohinaV r/wilo/»tc With KAth . _ u J 


representative's contacts with both reported Tuesday. 


under surveillance in the scandal ican newspapers about a CIA brief- er highly classified information, 
the first to confront Mr. Gandhi’s ing to the Senate intelligence com- said the source, 
administration since he succeeded mutee on a secret Indian plan to The Times of India newspaper 


sides in Nicosia could lead to a 
mutually acceptable draft agree- 
ment for a bizonal federal solution 


Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
told Parliament that the espionage 


his mother, Indira, who was assas- attack a Pakistani nuclear reactor. 


smated Oct. 31. 


The Tones of India newspt 
said Tuesday that investigators 


Mr. Antonov met Tuesday after- 
noon with Mr. Kohl and Foreign 
Minister Hans- Dietrich Genscher. 
For some weeks, the Kohl gov- 


orders to resign his government post 

Father Parra! es, Nicaragua's chief d e legate to the Organization of 
American States, said Monday that he had first told the Vatican in 
October 1983 that he would rather return to the laity than resign Ins 
position in the government. He said the Vatican had failed to issue a 
derision on his case, which was formally submitted last May. 

He said his decision to lave the priesthood was firm and that it had not 
affected his Roman Catholic beliefs. Like the other priests in the 
Nicaraguan government. Father Parralcs has refused to obey Vatican 
orders to leave his post and devote himself entirely to the church. 


It said that the story was leaked to asked the Indian External Affairs eminent has been uneasy about an 


Two Defense Ministry officials The Washington Post and The New 


case was “one of the most serious" were arrested Monday on charges York Times. 


1 0 , I i . . T VU*. UL UIW UlVdl OUIUUO uiimiwv VII MUUUMI 

before the next high-level meeting, airi vowed to go “to of passing secrets to the French 

Last wed* talks collapsed be- g^t depths to find out what has diplomat, a high- ranking govern- 

happened, why it has happened mem source said 


Minis try to declare five French, apparem Soviet policy of trying to 
U.S. and West German diplomats exclude Bonn from revived East- 


5 Bolivian Generals Retired in Dispute 


It was then that Indian counter- persona non grata, obliging them to Wesl discussions. Some govem- 


Da^diMgr^overw tahera how it ^ cSSSys 

preliminary draft was a final docu- J 


preliminary draft was a final docu 
mem ready for signature. 

The Greek Cypriots want to in- 


security. 


mem source said. 

The news agency reported that 


intelligence started a surveillance leave. 


meat analysts see this as a contrnu- 


of the prime minister’s aides, the According to press reports, the ’ alion of Moscow's attempt to 


Indian intelligence teams Wad been ultimately rejected by Indira Gan- 


paper said. It said that the plan was secrets allegedly leaked included a punish Mr. Kohl for accepting the 


TTie Greek Cypriots wuttoin- firmed thatrae Frenchman, not a 
dude more detafls in a final draft diplomat, left India after authori- 


key ^ such as the ^ crack 
withdrawal of Turkish occupation aDegedspv ring, 
troops from the island, guarantees eveT^dfaedic 


ultimately rejected by Indira Gan- proposal to develop laser technol- oepioymmt of U.S medium-range ^ Paz'kstW 

dh^ thmthe pmre mmist^ SgyTdrfense plans in case of an 1983.and to impose a „ cra^^ 

, “* Fore ® 1 attack by Pakistan; India’s capabil- fora } ,°( W ? 1111116 on . Bonn f ^ A Defense Ministry stsoemrat saidfi Generals Hugo Gironda, ch 

has refused comment on theaUega- ity to respond to a nuclear strike w °^ a wanning of ties ^ ^ of Lhe a^oiminand, Mario Oxa and Hermes Fefiman, met 
tions of French involvement since with atomic weapons; aid given w 1 * bers of the an^oommaiid, Lorcio Justinian, a member rfSemfliia 

it made a bnef ^ statement on Sun- Tamil separatists m Sri Lanka, and L^tyear, Moscow vetoed \nmts tribunaland Harddo Pbrio, commander of the 5tfa Division, h 

Colonel details of New Delhi’s multibillion- “ iBmm i by tbc tetden of Btst ^ been placed in the resen« at the disposititm of newi^dn 
Alain Bdley, the deputy military dollar arms deals and negotiations Germany and Bulgaria. And. when d-ai ri— r-vton 

attachfc m New Delhi, was being with Moscow. 11 t0 reopen a dialogue with 

recalled to Paris “for consulta- The high-ranking source said Western Europe, it dispatched 

lions." that 16 persons had been arrested ^khail S. Gorbachov, reputedly Ufopop OllltB NATO Dcf 6 DS 6 Coll 6 ffG 

rolnnrf Rniim u/ac m since thTcrackdown b«Mn. Thev the second-ranking figure m the VfCCUC ylttlb 11 A £ LTC1C1I8C VjUUC S C 


A senior goverament source con- sent to Paris and London “to estab- dU* then the prime minister. ogy; defense plans in case of an nussQes in 1983 and to impose a 

med that one Frenchman, not a lisb the foreign linlcs in the spy ring l In ftuis, the Foreign Ministry attadc by Pakistan; India’s capabil- fom^af quarantine ot Bonn that 
' *' ‘ through which highly sensitive and *" *"~ J ’ ” ,J -1 '" L ‘ *‘“ 


alleged spy ring. The source, how- 
ever, said he did not know about 


down on the top secret documents concerning 
: source, how- the country’s security, defense and 


of a settlement and the right to 

tra '£i re ^ y ’ s f^ tsniown P* 10 ^- fled by the news agency only as a 
ty throughout Cyprus. busin^unan. 

Mr. Dcnktashs position last ^ fira Frenchman, who was 


week was that these and other out- not identified, fiedlndia on Satur- 
day, the news agency said. The in- 


40,000 Protest in Athena 

The Associated Press 


dependent Indian Express also re- 
ported that a French national who 
it called the “ringleader," left the 


economy and the prime minister's 
office were smuggled out" 

Home Affairs Minister SJ3. Cha- 
van tdd Parliament that investiga- 
tors had not determined whether 
the U.S. Central Intelligence Agen- 
cy, the Soviet KGB or some other 
foreign intelligence agency was in- 


Last year, Moscow vetoed visits 
to Bonn by the leaders of East 


LA PAZ (AP) — General Josd 01 vis Arias, Bolivia’s army commander, 
and four generals who backed him in a dispute with President HemAn 
Sfles Zoazo were retired from active duty Monday, the military high 

command announced 

Before accepting his dismissal General Olvis Arias held out for 24 
hours with a cavalry regiment at his headquarters in La Paz last month. 
He had been accused of plotting a coup. 

A Defense Ministry statement said that Generals Hogo Gironda, chief 
of staff of the army command, Mario Oxa and Hermes FeOman, mem- 
bers of tite army command, Loigio Justinian, a member of the militar y 
justice tribunal and Harddo Pinto, commander of the 5th Division, had 
been been placed in the reserve at the disposition of new army thief, 
General Raul Lopez Leyton. 


recalled to Paris “for consulta- The high- rankin g source said Western Europe, 
tions." that 16 persons haxf been arrested Mikhail S. Gorbacl 

Colonel Bolley was accused in since the crackdown began. They **. second-ranking 
press reports of working for the include 14 government employees. Pohiburo, to Londt 
.TA. He described the a 


volved in the leak of national se- as “ridiculous.' 


for the 
ga tions 


Politburo, to London last month. BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Greece has withdrawn abruptly from die 


The Tunes placed the total number No comparable envoy has been NATO Defense College in Rome in a dispute over a classroom exercise 
of arrests at 17, while United News sent to Bonn. simulating a coup in Athens, diplomats said Tuesday. 

■’ Three Greek students and a lecturer at the coOege, which trains officers 


ATHENS — Striking bakers, country hy m nwiCT rial nirlini* r Sat- 
bank derks and construction work- unlay. 


The government source said that of India said 15 had been detained. 


The unease in the gov erament 
has been compounded by nervous- and civil servants in strategic studies, were instructed by the Socialist : • . 
ness over the impen ding ceremo- government in Athens last week to leave within 24 horns, the diplomats : ~ cr 
nics in the West and within the said. .itti: 

Warsaw pact marking the 40th an- A spokesman for NATO’s military committee, which runs the college, 'i_-‘ 
niversary of the defeat of Nazi Ger- said, “We are aware that the Greek studmts have left the caDege and we 
many and the end of World War IL are discussing the problem with the Greek authorities," Informed sources ~ 

As the May anniversary nears, the said the withdrawal followed a dispute over a classroom scenario invdv-v. — ;j ' 
Kohl government expects a stiffen- ing political upheaval in Greece, a leftist government and a tmhtaiy coup. J7 


ere led a march through the center Quoting “highly placed intelli- 


of Athens on Tuesday by more gence sources,” the news agency 
than 40,000 people protesting the said the second Fre nchman was 


Socialist gove rnmen t’s min i m um- tipped off that he was under sur- 


wage policy. 


veillance and “slipped our of In- 


Envoy to Noumea Sees 
Whites as Shifting Views 


BE THE FIRST TO KNOW ! 


A 


Ssgg ffi l 


uwmjsa / Dnunait ties mu. fouoi us presuBm/i EUEaiot. 


BagluSad - Tin Iraqi So m in n lui Melded la PMlora dlplamtlc lln wldi Um 
U altad SUtH In l*c «wi itur We US Pmldatlal alactlan. utitcb fills or 
nj w tw r (. It MU Iraq rfiltb severed dlptdMtlc Iti*i In 1M7 In nrntnt nl Un w e ll 
bMktnq ftw Israel tn l*e Smr Mar df tint j Mr nqilnst *ril Sum. 


Reuters 

NOUMEA, New Caledonia — 
Edgard Pisanl the French envoy 
mediating between white settlers 
and indigenous Melanesians in 
New Caledonia, said Tuesday he 
believed the whites had begun to 
realize that independence for the 
Pacific territory was inevitable. 

“You now have the question 
starting among the New Caledonia 
people of the how and the what 
ana no longer the question of if," 
Mr. Pisani said. 

His remarks followed an an- 
nouncement Tuesday by a French 
High Commission official that 
France planned to build a major 


military base on New Caledonia 
once the Pacific territory became 


HfflSIA / SIGN FI GOT EEL 1 E IB OWE OIL DUTPUT KX HBJICra. 

cowu-f -1 ervd. •>' » LlTti wJ” U BkwbrT ■«*■ ,«> l hr B ow* . 

MU,p "' r "“ "* M,mT ' l-i -" 1 " 1 to IQ MMU.iraj, 


SMH AMBIA/ SHDBCG6I GROFS 0GH-FUM PR&B6 COFIRB. 


Change Asked 
bi U.S. Forces 


H pod - ttw Mdih-lwMd Uoboggl group officially asked Its bankers to agroa to a 
■onttrlM ob Its flNoclal affairs 1> lat* higvst. canftraiag oirller TV ports that 
JM group had casb-naa problaos (Mf . Canftd. q*. r 85 of W> M.0 4.1M«I. Um 


MX /WAT M-frY.i I II HUH iil rlltY. 


Dini . dw nets hive cow to light about the dutlvatlan of die funds oblch 
the Ueit African Ecoratc rpiinttr entrusted to Moaai d Dlauara. According to 
soorces close la tho UA£C. PlaMra began at an barly stage In Wo affair tu seme 


NOtf COST / ffiSICBATI® OF TIES RlIH ISRAEL WEOED HIM. 

Puri* - Foreign 


aipect mat T»dt> toast ul" soon restore diplomatic rail t loot 


sum / NUEner mill hnc subjul tisatpekt rext rtm 


tharMM - according U Ueslara aodlcal sources In tbo Sudanoao capital, 
FnsIdM Jaafar [l-WBlrj Is iirlouslp III aod ulll hive to undergo surgical trait- 


(Comamed from Page I) 
some senior positkms have been 
taken over by sett-described re- 
formers. 

Among those who participated 
in the Georgetown study ana have 
endorsed its recommendations are 
Representative Les Aspin, Demo- 
crat of Wisconsin, who is the new 
chairman of the House Aimed Ser- 
vices Committee; Senator Sam 
Nunn of Georgia, the highest-rank- 
ing Democrat on the Senate Aimed 
Services Committee, and Senator 


once the Pacific territory became 
independent. 

The official said that President 
Francois Mitterrand of France, 
during his 12-houx visit here Satur- 
day, approved budding the base. 

Mr. Pisani said he thought that 
enough settlers now realized inde- 
pendence must come and this 
would swing the balance in a refer- 
endum. He has proposed holding a 
referendum in July on whether the 
territory should become indepen- 
dent in special association with 
France next January. 

Nineteen persons have died in 
racial violence in the past two 
months as the Melanesians, known 
as Kanaks, have pressed for inde- 
pendence from France. 

The 55,000 Kanaka, are outnum- 
bered by 90,000 European sealers 
and Asian immigrants, most of 
whom are opposed to indepen- 
dence. 

Meanwhile, the territory re- 
mained under dawn-to-dnsk cur- 
few imposed cm Jan. 12 after set- 
tlers held violent protests in 
reaction to the shooting of a French 
youth. 



Warsaw Pact marking the 40th an- 
niversary of the defeat erf Nazi Ger- 
many and the end of World War IL 


ing blast of hostile propaganda 
from Moscow accusing it of har- 
boring Nazi-like “revanchist” ten- 
dencies. 

In this environment, the An- 
tonov visit was taken here as a faint 
sign that Moscow may be introduc- 
ing some strains of moderation into 
its posture toward Bonn. “We are 
grateful" said one senior official 
“for opportunities to show that we 
are not completely excluded from 
the dialogue the Soviet Union is 
conducting with the West" 

“1 think,” added the official 
“that we’re so important that they 
cannot conduct their policies with- 
out talking to ns." 

Mr. Kohl has furnished Soviet 
propagandists with ample material 
in the past few days by his dealings 


Lebanon Insists on Israeli Timetable 


NAQOURA, Lebanon (AP) — Lebanon refused Tuesday to bad 
down on its demand for a detailed timetable for Israel’s troop withdrawal 
from southern Lebanon but agreed to continue negotiations with Israel 
later this week. 

Hie 13th session of the United Nations-sponsored talks, like 
meetings held since Nov. 8 in this southern Lebanese viQage, focused on 
how to maintain peace in southern Lebanon after Israel withdraws its 
20 , 000 -member occupation force. 

The talks coincided with a general strike and demonstrations in 
Moslem areas of Lebanon to protest a car bomb attack Monday night in 
Israeli-occupied Sidon.The explosion seriously injured Mustapha Saad, a 
Sunni Moslem leader and an opponent of IsraeL 


Graxi Galls Confidence Vote on Decree 


Andr6 Fontaine 


propagandists with ample material ROME (UPI) — Prime Minister Bettino Crari’s 17-montihdd gorem- 
m the past few days by his dealings ment called a confidence vote in the Senate ot Tuesday to cut short 
with an organization of former ref- opposition obstruction tactics on a decree to curb tax evasion, 
ugees from Silesia, an erstwhile The vote was expected to be held late Wednesday and a defeat would 
Goman temioiy that now lies force Italy’s first Socialist-led government to resign. However, the gov- 
witmn Poland- eminent was confident that Mr. Crari’s five-party coalition would bold 

Th« nL fl Ol tTT rill Aa . .1. J .1 * “ 


The cha n ce l lor is scheduled to together and survive the vote. 


speak to the Silesian organization In November, Mr. Craxi used a series of confidence votes to push the 
m Hannover on June 16, but he tax decree, then a biR through the Senate. Then, in mid-December, when 
balked at appearing when it un- obstruction tactics were bolding up the bill Mr. Craxi converted it into a 
vdled its motto: “Forty years of decree, which now must be approved by both houses of jp arHam eni. The 
banishment — Silesia remains bin would give tax officials power to assess tax on private companies 
oms.” The slogan was perceived as suspected of filing false returns. 


On Tuesday, the Kanak Socialist Reuters duous isf m ucaiy WHO Warsaw 

National Liberation Front de- DADT „ tk- that effectively recognizes Poland's 

manded the release of 87 detained ~ “** <te jw newspaper boundaries, 

militants as a condition for allow- ““JJg On Monday. Mr. Kohl met with 
mg a nickel mme to reopen after it - , ^ ^ £- Herbert Hnpka, a parliamentary 

was sabotaged Sunday. independence is not paUnjcopar- < j eputy the Silesian or- 

Tbe Kanaks denied that thay 4®; !? mana P n 8 director. An- ganjmjjon, and rejected a mnArfieA 


f ]/ j jr m nannover on ju 

Le Monde to Vote balked at appearing 

_ . _ veiled its motto: “f 

On Acceptance of banishment - Sil 

* J ours. The slogan wi 

Outside Funding ^STS^i 


manded the release of 87 detained 


being provocative and even re- 
vanchist, calling into qnestion 
Bonn's 1970 treaty with Warsaw 
that effectively recognizes Poland's 
postwar boundaries. 

On Monday, Mr. Kohl met with 


For die Record 


W illiam ^ rnjv-rT ^R i^n hfi ra n* had sabotaged the equipment, and ^Iwfeht nf aTvmt Rfi 1110110 f° r the gathering. Mr. apparent robbery attempt in Chicago last Thursday acted jnsrifiaMyand 

Sr<^of R 2=“ b ^ “SSilSLlSLETJI 


independeoeg is not ppt in jeopar- 

^ration, and rgected a modffied 


of cocaine and heroin, arrived Tuesday in Los Angeles to be arraigned on 
criminal charges in the case. Miss Smith, 37, of Toronto, gave up her 22- 

mAnlK ftoVit a oatnel _ . _ «.l 


v 

; - 

ni!. - 

W; 

■Lj , ' 1 - 


» Angeles County district attorney’s office. (AP) 

A 68 -year-old man who shot and killed a tcen-aged gunman during an 


i- .•••' ■ 




More than 

30 intemationaJ journalists, 
businessmen and officials 
ghre the benefit of their 
inside ^formation to 


miltee that oversees naval forces. 

The proposals agreed to by the 
participants, as outlined in a draft 
and in interviews, include these: 

• The chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff would become the 
principal military adviser to the 
secretary of defense and the presi- 
dent. 

Under the current procedure ot 
the committee, any service has an 
effective veto on formal positions 
conveyed to the president 

• Commanders-in-chief of the 


blamed the raid at the mine on ih, Hnpka proudly , 

anti-mdependeiice groups they said version Way, 




«** wmid ament the fnnds * u«»u«jr, nuui ok muw R. Foster W»aiis, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, went on trial 

are trying to discredit them. Six thaTrontributions aocc P tablc to the chancellor “For- in New York on Monday, charged with defraudStte newspaper by 

tracks were destroyed, three dam- ^ ^ nnr itv ty years of b anishmen t — SOesia secretly investing in securities whose price woSdbe aSctixS^ t£ 

aged and a control panel m the . ^ avoid remains our future in a Europe of columns be wrote. Mr. Winans’s roommate, David Carpenter, and a 

mme was Mown up. The mine is in freepeooles." fonner stockbroker. Kenneth P ™ ’ 7a pj 


the east coast town at Thio. 

The front said in a statement rhm 
it would block resumption of pro- 


any takeover," Mr. Fontaine said 
Monday. 

Under the paper’s system of 
ownership, journalists brad 40 per- 
cent of the shares. Combined with 


Luie. 


ees were not released and if security °eni or tne snares. Lommnea wim 
forces did not withdraw from the fbe 11 permit hdd by the manag- 
area. ing director, who is always a jour- 


Reagan Says He Wants Arms Accord 


The from the saboteurs arrived SIarf reta * M a WASHINGTON — President wml . twatjSIasizc that we are^£ ^MSraiS^uiSradvS^^ 




ter around dawn. 
Jcdonia, w hich is 1^00 


m Sfr It Fontflme. bv the R°“ld Reagan said Tuesday he termined to' achieve a good agree- ert G McFariane; the chainnan of 

»h* viewed new aims control talks with tnenl, an agreement which meets the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General 


nnifiqqrf regional commands would ? 1 ^!3 journalists last week to hem the viewed arms control talks with ment, “agreOTtent which meets the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General 

h-»». »« mwT.'ii, kilometers (about 900 miles) east of \ . , . the “utmost serbusness" and was mtercsts of both countries, John W. Vessev Jr.: and Kennrth 


•3^.. - 

$**3 V": 


PuUshod twice a week in EngM and French 
by the “Group© Jem Afrique” In Paris, 
the most authoritative press group feafing 
with Middle East and African bosinass 
and pomes. 


havemore authority to override 

? U?r ^^i?l^ CeSaild nickel producer. Deposits of 
to infl u ence military budgets. metal and inurigm ■n th*> ha 


o, tourism are the badt- 

lh ^ Se ^f tar 5 i-^ bone <rf the economy. r- , 

defense would be realigned and ns gi , structure to allow outside c^ntaL 

staff reduced to emphasize broad ■ atron g O O Ms KaK * ed He said salaries would be cut 

strat^y, long-range plans, and so- French forces raided strongholds considerably starting next month 

perviaon, while leaving daily man- of pro-indepen dence Mdanesians and he suggested changes in print- 
agen^nterf the details to individual and arrested four unidentified mm ing arrangements. He added that 
services. near the west c oast t own of Kone the layout of Le Monde would be 

• Procedures for buying weap- ot suspicion of burning the homes revised and news presentation 
OQ5 would be changed in a variety of European immigrants, The As- marie ampler. 

of ways designed to prevent cost sociated Press reported from Noo- 

overruns and increase competition. m&L Six homes and three business- 


newspaper, said the shareholders 
would be asked to decide within 
three months on a plan to change 
the company’s legal and finand«l 


structure to allow outside capitaL 
He said salaries would be cat 


To obtain a complimentary copy and details of our 
si*scf1]irtZoii rate*, please apply to: 


French forces raided strongholds considerably starting next month 
of pro-indepen dence Mdanesians and he suggested changes in print- 
and arrested four unidentified mm ine arranaements. He added that 


and arrested four unidentified mm ing arrangements. He added that 
near the west coast town of Kone the layout of Le Monde would be 


the “utmost seriousness" and was the interests of both countries, J ohn W. Vessey Jr.; and Kenneth 
determined to reach a “good agree- which increases the security of our L. Addman, director of the Arms 
ment” with the Soviet Union ot a ^* C3 &°d which enhance s interna- Control and Disarmament Agency. 

and'finanad cu« mnnclear w eap ons. . Also attending were Paul H. 

Mr. Reagan smessed his commit- Nitze and Edvraft L. Rowny, the 

ment to arms reductions m a state- Scm« ne^ agency Tass mucEed negotiatoraaitwosetsofannscoB- 
roent issued after conferring with a Mr. Keaaan for &aym« m his tnm> [rd talks with the Russians that 
new team of negotiators and Ms broke down and who are now spe- 

c n ninr imlrtarv anil Hmlnmatir a/ 1 - WaflECQ lO Qfi&DuBlC 3 TTTK COIltlTH _ m ■ 


ment issued after conferring with a 
new team of negotiators and his 


■k. " ' • ■ 


senior military and diplomatic ad- waot£ d to negotiate arms control ^ a j advisers. 


visers at the White House. 


agreements with Moscow but in- 




The Soviet Union, which walked tended to press ahead with research 


of ways designed to prevent cost 
overruns and increase competition. 


• Congress would review the es there have been burned recently, 
military budget every two years. The police said they recovered 
instead of every year. some stolen vehicles and goods. 


CONFIDENTIAL TELEX 
O ROUPS JEUNE AFRIQUE 
3, RUE ROQUEMME 
70006 PARIS 

FRANCE 

T«fc (1) 265 69 30 
Trim EDUIA641 654 F 


UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


Fof m».< UJJ q ra* e*W<nfc r»y 1 «i r a 

mu may (luaMy 

BoiMfiORS MASIE R SOnpOCIOflAlE 

Seod detailed resume 
tor e trpe evatualiOn. 
PACIFIC WESTERN UMVERSTY 

MaaOVonlMBM IIMT) Eaoao CM.OM36US* 


The police said they recovered 
some stolen vehicles and goods. 

■ Kanak Leader in Paris 
The leader of the independence 
movement in New Caledonia, 
Jean-Marie Tjibaou, arrived Tues- 
day in Parte, Reuters reported. He 
was escorted by police to an undis- 
closed destination, airport sources 


out of arms talks 14 months ago, 
agreed on Jan. 8 to resume the 
negotiations at a time and ate to be 
announced soon. 


Mr. Reagan said before the 
meeting that Hie negotiators were 


The commentary said the mau- " a R 1 ® 31 team > Sup 0, Bowl-type. 
Lral address provided more evi- ^b® Super Bowl is professional 


The Associated Press ment 

BIRMINGHAM, Michigan — mitre 
Ajudge ruled Tuesday that a diam- agov 
pionship English sheepdog alleged the c 
to have killed its owner’s elderly more 
mother Dec. 19 must be neutered ing, a 
and defanged within 21 days or be dear 
destroyed. The dog. King Boots, is He 
rated top of its breed by the Ameri- pot I 
can Kennel Club. The owner dis- the t 


Mr. Reagan did in his state- devdoped a realistic attitude about 
ment: “I view the negotiating com- the new arms negotiations. 


nee that Mr. Reagan had not football’s championship game, 
wdoped a realistic attitude about The president, in an apparent 
e new arms negotiations. move to win bipartisan support. 

M eetin g Mr. R eagan on Tuesday said he had charged his negotiators 


nhtmenls we undertook two weeks Meetin g Mr. Reagan on Tuesday said he had charged his negotiators 

ago with the Soviets in Geneva with were Max M. Kampdman, head dr with keeping ap pr o pri ate members 
the utmost seriousness. I have no the three-man team and negotiator of Congress informed, 
more important goal than, reduo- “^£^ a P^ f( ^ ncr The White House spokesman, 

ing, and ultimately el imin ati ng , nu- negotiator on inter- Larry Speakes, said that the presi- 

dear weapons.” rantmental strategic arms, and who has denied widespread 

He said the United States would Maynard GhtmaiL negotiator on ^ between modo*es 

put forward concrete ideas when nwhum-range nuclear missiles. ^ hanHiners among his arms 
the negotiations resumed and he Others at the meeting were Vice omtmi suMsets wanted officials 




. . .. . . nnum-rangc nuciear missues. and hanHiners among his arms 

said. On Wednesday, he is to meet can Kennel Club. The owner dis- the negotiations resumed and he Others at tile meeting were Vice control advises, wanted officials 

the Socialist party leader, Liond ptued the city’s charge that the dog hoped the Soviet Umoa would fol- Prcsidem George Bush; Secretary and Congress to be united behind 

Jospin. killed ber 87-ycar-oid mother. low the same approach. of State George P. Shultz; Defense the U^. team at the talks. 


SSStesS a? 


-•'n-.i . ' 













INTERNATIONAL GERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


PageS 


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Reagan Urges 
Rally Against 
Abortion to 
Bar Violence 

By Ruth Marcus 

Washington Post Service 

• WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, speaking from his 
Oval Office, told a 'cheering crowd 
of more than 70,000 anti -abortion 
protesters bn Tuesday that “these 
days, as never before, the momen- 
tum is with os” to end legalised 

abortion. 

Bui the presuteat, addressing a 
“March far Life” rally an the 12th 
anniversary -of the Supreme Court 
decision dial women have a consti- 
tutional right to abortion, also re- 
peated his condemnation of the re- 
cent rash of a tt a c ks on abortion 
ffinks across the United States. 

“We cannot condone the threat- 
ening or -caking of human life to 
protest the taking of life by way of 
abortion,” Mr. Reagan told the 
protesters who gathered on the El- 
lipse before matching to the U.S. 
Capitol and the Supreme Court. 

It was the first time that Mr. 
Reagan harqwken directly to the 
marchers. In previous years, he has 
.met privately with leadas of the 
anti-abortion movement 

A White House spokesman said 
Che president decided to speak to 
the protesters because “he is very 
supportive of legislation and other 
efforts to overturn" the Supreme 
Court decision. 

Despite temperatures below 
freezing and sharp winds, the 
crowd was the largest ever at the 
annual rally. It was doable last 
year’s total of 33,000, according to 
U.S. Park Police estimates. 




A 'Freeze’ "wSSyspenS^™ Farmers in U.S. Midwest 

Takes Many Protest Financial Flight 





CeofavUMad Ami tnMmuioerf 

ENGINE FAILURE SUSPECTED — Officials kreestigating the crash of a chartered 
plane in Reno, Nevada, said that engine f adore was a possible cause. A lawyer for the 
airlines. Galaxy, said 3 of die 67 aboard survived, but 2 were in critical condition. The 
Lockheed Electro L-188 crashed into a recreational vehicle sales lot Monday. 

U.S. Space Shuttle Begins Countdown 
For Launch Today on Secret Mission 


! • fv U.S. Park rouce estimates 
u .. Mr. Reagan, speaking 

• •- .* _.tr. aJL telephone-loudspeaker h 




;-£• 

' ---si* 


1 - • 


telephone-loudspeaker hookup, 
told the demonstrators, “I am 
proud to stand with you in the long 
march for the right to fife.” 

“I am convinced that our re- 
sponse to the 12th anniversary” of 
the 1973 Supreme Court ruling 
“mnst be to rededicate ourselves to 
ending the terrib le national tragedy 
of abortion.” he said- 
”1 am convinced that spirit of 


nse Collet 


ii Timeta 


-L.^- 
Op ■*. 


...i ■ ■ — 


nitioa of the reality of fife before 
birth and a recognition of the reali- 
ty of death by abortion.” 

“But that spirit of understanding 
also includes, as all of you know, a 
- complete rejection of violence as a 
means of settling this issuer” Mr. 
Reagan said. 

Abortion clinics in the United 
■States tightened security on Tues- 
day in response to warnings from 
tile Federal Bureau of Investigation 
that the anniversary erf the abortion 
rating could prompt attacks 
against the facilities.- 

Since 1982, there have been 30 
bombings or arson attacks against 
family planning and abortion efih- 
icsinthelMtal States. 

• Security at the Supreme Court 
also was extraordinarily heavy. 

The organizers of the march are 
pressing for passage of a “para- 
mount human life amendm ent” to 
the constitution that would barirfi 
abortions, even where the fife of the 
mother was in danger. 


By Jfbhn Noble Wtiford 

New York Times Service 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida 
— Although the countdown has 
begun for the planned launching on 
Wednesday of the space shuttle 
Discovery, the digital countdown 
docks at the press site remain dark. 
It was another reminder that this is 
to be the fiist secret military mis- 
sion in American manned space 
flight 

The two lose status reports is- 
sued on Monday by the National 
Aeronautics and Space Adminis- 
tration were scarcely more infor- 
mative. They said little more than 
that the countdown “was in pro- 
gress” and “continuing essentially 
on schedule.” 

The countdown was understood 
to have begun on schedule at 4 
AM. Recent shuttle countdowns, 
induHing the one for the Discov- 
ery’s last flight in November, ran 
about 54 hours, which would lead 
to a liftoff oo Wednesday moating, 

Preparations this time are either 
more time-consmmng, perhaps be- 
cause of the secret payload, or are 
being stretched out over a longer 
period. The air force has an- 
nounced that the Discovery is to be 
launched between 1:15 FM and 
4:15 PM on Wednesday. 

[Temperatures that fell .to 19 de-~ 
grees Fahrenheit (minus 7 degrees 
centigrade) Monday night caused 


water pipes to freeze and put the 
shuttle's countdown three hours 
behind schedule on Tuesday, The 
Associated Press reported. Offi- 
cials said that Wednesday’s weath- 
er forecast called for high tempera- 
tures in the mid- 50s Fahrenheit 
(about 12 degrees centigrade).] 

The darkened countdown clocks 
and the inexactness of the an- 
nounced liftoff time are part of the 
Defense Department's efforts to 
make it difficult for Soviet tracking 
facilities to follow the mission, at 
least in its early phases. In addi- 
tion. the Pentagon is believed to be 
establishing a precedent for secrecy 
for all its future shuttle flights. 

The Discovery's crew arrived at 
the Kennedy Space Center on Sun- 
day afternoon for final preflight 
briefings and training. Tne com- 
mander is Captain Thomas K. 
Mattingly of the navy, who flew 
one of the early shuttle missions. 
The other crew members, who will 
be making their first journeys into 
space, are Lieutenant Colonel 
Loren J. Shriver, Major EUison S. 
Onizuka and Major Gary E. Pay- 
ton of the air force, and Lieu tenant 
Colonel James F. BucM of the Ma- 
rine Corps. 

The status reports did not give 
anydetails of the astronauis’ activi- 
tiesJUnlike all previous crews, the 
astronauts were not permitted to 
hold preflight news conferences. 


According to widely published 
accounts, tire reason for all the se- 
crecy is that tire Discovery will be 
hauling an electronic intelligence- 
gathering satellite to be placed in 
orbit within eavesdropping range 
of the Soviet Union. The satellite is 
reported to be a more advanced 
version of the type of Sigint (for 
signal intelligence) craft that lave 
been used for years in monitoring 
missile tests and listening in on 
radio communications. 

Since it is known that a powerful 
upper-stage rocket is attached to 
the payload, the assumption is that 
a satellite win be released from the 
shuttle’s cargo bay and then boost- 
ed to an orbit 22300 miles (36300 
kilometers) above the Equator. 
This is an mbit well within lire new 
rocket's boosting capability and a 
position preferred for many intelli- 
gence-gathering satellites. 

The mission also represents a 
crucial test of the air force rocket, 
which is needed to keep the shuttle 
program on schedule for the rest of 
the year. Plans far at least four of 
the 12 shuttle missions scheduled 
for tins year depend on the success- 
ful operation of the satellite-boost- 
ing rocket, according to NASA. 

The duration of the flight has not 
been, announced. The time of. the 
shuttle’s return to Cape Canaveral 
is to be announced about 16 hours 
before tire landing. 


Takes Many 
Forms on 
Capitol HRl 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — In the 
White House and on Capitol HHL 
“freeze” is a popular teem for a 
budget plan to bring the federal 
deficit down. But the term is bang 
used in different ways by President 
Ronald Reagan and Congress. 

In his inaugur al address on Mom- 
day, Mr. Reagan said that he would 
submit a budget “aimed at freezing 
government program spending for 
the next year.” What he is propos- 
ing, administration officials said, is 
not freezing individual programs 
but holding overall government 
spending next year, excluding pay- 
ment on the national debt, to this 
year's level of about S820 billion. 

Under Mr. Reagan's concept, his 
mifitaiy budget would be allowed 
to increase by about 6 percent after 
an increase to make up for infla- 
tion. To hold overall spending at a 
stable level, nonmflitaiy programs 
would have to be frozen, reduced or 

flKminaiyH 

In the House of Representatives, 
the approach to a froze has come 
to mean treating all programs alike, 
including the military budget 

But tire Republican leadership in 
tire Senate is retreating from an 
across-the-board freeze. Robert J. 
Dole of Kansas, the Senate major- 
ity leader, said last week that Re- 
publicans would not back a freeze 
on military appropriations, al- 
though he added that Mr. Reagan’s 
military spending request would 
still be trimmed. 

Other appropriations in the 1986 
fiscal year would be held to 1985 
levels, except for benefit programs 
for the poor. Cost-of-living pro- 
grams fra other pension and bene- 
fit programs, perhaps excluding the 
Social Security program of retire- 
ment benefits and disability pay- 
ments, would be eliminated far one 
year. 

None of these approaches in i 
1 986 would save enough in project- ’ 
ed spending through 1988 toget tire ^ 

Cold Damages Citruses; j 
Florida Calls Emei^eiicy 

The Associated Press 

ORLANDO, Florida — Gover- 
nor Bob Graham declared a state 
of emergency in Florida on Tues- 
day after two nights of icy weather I 
that severely damaged citrus fruit j 
and vegetable crops in the state, j 

“Florida's agricultural industry ; 
is being deeply affected by this lat- 
est freeze,” the governor said in j 
Tallahassee after signing an execu- ' 
five order dedaring the state of i 
emergency. I 


MO ML DBDt 
nun wum* rawer , 



Domestic Spending 

For fiscal years, al nonnVBwy 
spending except interest on the 
Federal debt, in unons of dollars. 



Source: Othcm M Mmgmnl and Budgw 


federal budget deficit, now project- 
ed at more than $200 billion in 
1985, down to $100 bfllion. 

Tire Reagan administration has 
abandoned tire goal it set fra itself 
in December of reducing the deficit 
to $100 billion by 1988. 

The Senate Republican leader- 
ship still dings to 5100 billion as its 
target- But to reach that target. Re- 
publicans would have to go beyond 
an across-the-board freeze on 
spending and ehmmate some pro- 


By Andrew H. Malcolm 

New York Tima Service 

CHICAGO — Thousands of 
fanners, their families and owners 
of small businesses have demon- 
strated in St. Paul, Minnesota, and 
in Chicago to protest the financial 
plight of Middle Western family 
farms. 

The demonstxarions, in bitter 
cold weather Monday on tire steps 
of the slate capital in Sr Paul and 
at the Board of Trade in the Chica- 
go financial district, were generally 
peaceful, although a dozen people 
were arrested here for crimma] tres- 
pass and disorderly conduct. 

[Another 20 farmers were arrest- 
ed Tuesday as they tried to enter 
the Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
in a second day of protests, The 

Associated Press reported.] 

“‘Fair prices fra tire farmer is no 
more than a fair wage fra the 
American worker.” said Carlos 
Welty, an organizer of the Chicago 
demonstration, winch drew 300 
farmers from 16 states. 

In Minnesota, scores of busi- 
nesses and more than three dozen | 
school districts closed to support a 
march on the capital by ltyOOO ru- 
ral people and their supporters. I 

The demands included an ex- 
tended moratorium on farm fore- 1 
closures, guaranteed operating . 
loans to financ e each year’s plant- 
ing and cultivating, and a fair price I 
for agricultural commodities. 

"These are just plain old Amec- 
can people going to Si. Paul to I 
reclaim social and economic jus- 
tice,” said Bobbi Fobane, one of the 
organizers fra Groundswell, a co- 
alition of groups trying to counter 
tire effect of low prices and high- 
interest rates in tire counbyride. 

Vario us s tudies have in dialed 
the worst economic impact is on 
middle-size farms, those of a few 
hundred acres. One Minnesota sur- 
vey predicted that 13,000 farmers 
there faced foreclosure in the next 
18 months. In Iowa, land values 
have fallen 37 percent since 1981, 


mining farmers have lost $35 bil- 
lion, nearly $1 bfllion a month, in 
equity and coDatend- 
“We must find the solution that 
wil] save the family farm,” said 
Glen Anderson, a Minnesota state 
representative who offered a pack- 


turn. They $?? 5 million in 

property tax relief and e l iminati on 
of salt* tax chi A gri cultural parts 
and machinery. 

The fanners maintain that spec- 
ulative trading in quantities far 
larger than what is actually pro- 
duced artificially depresses crop 
prices below the cost of production. 

Thomas P. Cunningham, the 
board president, stud his organiza- 
tion was merely a marketplace fra 
tire laws of supply and demand. 
"We are not the cause of the prob- 
lem,” Mr. Cunningham said. He 

blamed instead crop surpluses, 
high-interest rates and the strength 
of the dollar, which makes US. 
agricultural exports more expen- 
sive abroad. 


l£Ror 

by Bauhe 


| » f„ uSffjft 

Beverly Wilshine Hotel 

IN THE HEART OF LOS ANGELES 
Wilshire Boulevard at Rodeo Drive 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 90212 
(213) 275-4282 Tilex 698-220 

^Sif^adu^Holekoratf9Md 9 

London (01) 583-3050 
Frankfurt (069) 290471 
Hong Kong (5)22 J I 42 


- Ganfiwndi, 
uHr«-ihri. 

quartz, watar-raiiuiu. 
Mat blaek mad oral 
ml gold piano. 

T ax-fran for export 


vnqdMpta 


London (01) 409-0814 
Frankfurt (069) 28 75 24 
Hong Kong <3)68 23 35 


WMTI wax: M Man. 3 W OB H 


r PiageL> i 

LMonit-Cado SSL 

3, avenue des Beaux-Arts 
MONTE-CARLO / 


k» -ail wno a 

mm un> {tan) 


“We waul tire ‘paramount hu- events. 


Decade of Decline for Labor Groups 

(Continued from Page 1) Among prominent European British work force by “re-creating 

great impact on the course of politicians, only Tony Benn, the political trade unionism” of a mih- 

. ' ' I.lu. 1 at* mVlKH- fuw tha llmmu . • l ll.a *..V. -.11 J-U— 


SiSs: THE NEW YORK HERALD 

”-7 " -T EuaoFEAW gPITfbw OF THE NEty. VOBK TWtBUWe irc. S. 

•»***■*■ h-iurr. m wmJTSTetSSS'Cr^SS^^mm remm, anpw, milt n:un. ■ — MraJTtf.B r*'. 

LINDBERGH ARRIVES ON RECORD-BREAKING FLIGHT 


man fife amoKhirent’ with no txnn- In UreNethcriaads, for gamble, 
" promise, Mr. FreridetU,” a leading . the unions tried everything they 
march m gjm iaier told Mr. Reagan knew — strikes, working to rule 
over the two-way telephone hock- ami nrass demonstrations — topic- 
.up. vema3-p*n»itpaycmfmgoveni- 

“Good fra you, and I support meat workers and a 5-percent cut 
- you,” Mr. Reagan replied. In the in general welfare benefits. Hie 
. past, he has supported a constitu- government of Prime Minister 
tiooal amendment, but with an ex- Rnnd Lubbers refused to budge 
‘ception to allow abortion where the and after six weeks was victorious, 
mother’s Kfe was in jeopardy. In Britain, the picket -line vio- 

The White House later said that leoce that has marred the miners' 
tire president did not mean to gp strike has hurt not only the miners’ 

. r ... - U Ul .l. n .U na«n fJt 


Labor left-' 
gaining stre 
the coal st 


knew — strikes, working to rule mental changes in the views of the 

and mass demonstrations — to pro- 

vent a 3-percent pay cut for govern- 
ment workers and a 5-percent cut rr o U7 , ;f| I)™* 
in general wd/are benefits. The trUIMJCpOTl 

government of Prime Minister . > /i •j«_ 


rer, sees the unions tant sort that ultimately will drive 
a. He contends that the moderates to tire wall, 
is working funds- “No social change ever begins at 
i in the views of the the lop,” Mr. Benn said. **Ilus just 

war rathe miners is radicalizing tire 

labor movement from underneath, 
rv rv _ . through a level of political educa- 


FARMERS FI S. TiJm 


inMlihMliliaMnLn.taj.MMJ 


WMHn rum AT la 



meat workers and a 5-percent cut TJ C Tf7;Ti tnrougn a level Ot political educa- 

in general welfare benefits. Hie *t lU lAtzIMJ/l tion we haven’t seen in this country 

government of Prime Minister « » » ,* in a couple of generations. People 

Rnnd Lubbers refused to budge JjUtCnJtUHl wUttY wffl go to their graves 50 years from 

and after six weeks was victorious. _ J now with political perspectives 

In Britain, the picket-line vio- Qf LftJlQ, VjXOJUL shaped in 1984." 

leoce that has maned the miners' J Many others involved with 


SQgOOO Roar Welcome at Field 
As Lone American Lands After 
Ocean Dash of 33hr. 30min 


nriafWfl am t.i toM vtf>» «* 1041 aUsck. <M h> 

JM Urn Rjm maan/Um tmm M b WBurgm-TM* ]m* agtyArM lm Ml 

•bur ilMlu abr b rami off Am |iuo l.O n — mH IfcM. <* lUm 


country I — 
.People I 


Urrited Press International 


shaped in 1984." 

Many others involved with 
onions, however, say they think the 


beyond his j previoos position. 


The 1973 Supreme Court rail 
in the case of Roe vs. Wade cm 
turned a Teams law frabiddi 
--abortions except to save the life 


ae Court ruling anions in general and that o! their izen who has admitted bilki 
vs. Wade over* pcAitical ann, the Labor Party. thousands of European investors 

# r e m mm f. < » 


'-^boitkms except to ^avc toe Die or wim pues oi garoage m me sura 
tire mother. Under the dedrion, and difficulties in roe hospitals — 
women legally may have abortions tire so-called winter of discontent 
fra any reason until tire fetus be- — that helped Mrs. Thatcher get 
comesviaWe— able to live outside elected in 1979. Four years later, 
the womb; After that time, usually she wan a second term in an dec- 
' considered to be six months into a tion that saw a majority of union 
pregnancy, an abortion is allowed members voting fra tire Conserva- 
to protect the woman’s health, but lives or the Social Democrati c-Iib - 
states may take steps to protect the eral alliance rather than supporting 


own cause 1ml also the cause of LOS ANGELES — A Dutch rit- weakness of unions] 


izea who has admitted bilking for society as a whole. That view is 
thousands of European investors of particularly prevalent in Latin 
about $500 auDion in what prose- countries, 
catore say is me of the biggest land “There is a very grave danger, 

frauds in histoty is to be deported, and it is a danger not just for 


frauds in histety is to be deported, and it is a danger not just for 
Judge Richard Gadbois Jr. of tire unions but fra governments and| 
US. District Court in Los Anades tnutmn mdoum. Tor every - , 
sentenced Rienk Kamer, 41, to 16 said Mr. Spinetta, a topervi] 


It was a 
with piles i 


he workers’ strike, 
irbace in the street 


months in prison Monday, but 
gave him credit fra 15 months 


servant in France's Labor Ministry. 
“Part of the role of a union is to 


fife of the fetus as well 


tire Labor Party. 


served. Mr. Kamer also was or- Jannd and giv e coherent fonn to 
dered held until he is deported Feb. the needs and wrnts ofworkere and 
11 to the NetherimdsTwhere he emp^ros. If these dungs arc not 
faces additional criminal charges- cnnahzed, there can be senous ex- 


Youssef K. Lille, President 
Of Uganda After Amin, Dies 

The Associated Press ^ 

Ugandan rebels backed by troops ffi; 

- stn^gte, Mr. ^letm ^^^edM 

Mr. Lule arrived in Lcmdon suf- 

feting from- a serious blood disor- A 

. dec. He had been treated in 1971 

while in. London when, he was in 7rn% 

.extteoRxBiflgtbeAjifflr regime. Youssef K. Luie 

Hewasanacadtantcasjnnc&asa, 

■ pohtiaan. He was edacat^ at Fort Japan Sodahst Party, Tuesday of 
! Hare Univeratty m. South Africa c^einTokw. 
and tire University of Edmbnrgh- Lord Tboraas Bdo^ 79, a Hui 

He was a lecturer at MAerere Uni- ecrmraoSt who was 


An associate, Bernard Whitney, 
66, was sentenced to six months in 
a community care facility. Mr. 
Whitney suffers from numerous 
debilitating Alnesses, and Judge 
Gadbois said he believed that send- 


ploaons." 

Such fears, according to Daniel 
Singer, a journalist who writes of- 1 
ten about French unions, stem 
from 1968. At that time, he said, 
“evoyone was saying that trade 
unions were useless, and then the 




ing him to prison would amount to fcds exploded in spontaneous 
a death sentence. strikes and showed that something ; 

A 57-count grand jury indict- could be done.” 


ment charg ed Mr. Kaiser and Mr, 
Whitney with persuading investors h 
in the Netheriands, Belgium and a 
Germany to buy land in desolate tl 
areas of the Antelope Valley in la 
Southern California, in Utah, Tex- u 
as and New York as tax shelters, h 


M I personally don't think it will 
happen again.” he said, "not under I 
a left-wing govamment But had , 
tire right stiD been in power and i 
laid off as many workers and cut ! 
unemployment pay as Mitterrand : 
has done, there would have been a 


The land was supposed tobcdevul- social upheaval, of that 1 am abso- 
oped as expensive housing tracts or lutely sure.” I 


plush recreation resorts. But the 
developments sever occurred, 
prosecutors said. 


aum nci fkp m 'ssrmzrszrsi — 

e^^ alV u 0 VpeoP^ e * 1,1 " ■ 

Rei d 1 


NEXT: Uniats in West Germany, 
the exception to the general decline. 


BROADCASTING TO CAB1£ COMMNIES 
IN &THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


CHANNEL 

PROGRAM, WEDNESDAY 23rd JANUARY 


Youssef K. Luie 


stroke in Tokyo. 

Lord Thomas Bstogh, 79, a Hun- 
garian-horn econo m ist who was a 


«isity before becoming a minister to former Prime 

-•kBritMtfs colonial artamistrafion Harold Wflson in the 


* rrf his native country. 

* Other Deaths: 

Itsuro Saitiaaka, 87, one of ht 
pan’s feaHjng Marxist economists 


1960s and then minister of state for 
energy, Sunday in London. 

Lots Spots, 60, a novelist and 
television jourftelist, Sunday of 


UK TIMES 13-35 UONA BOYD: A FESTIVAL OF GUITAR 
14.40 THE NATURE OF THINGS 
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CONTACT SKY CHANNEL SATELUTE TcLEVTStQK PLC POR FLOTTHER H^ORNVOtON 

TELEPHONE LONDON (01) 6364077 TELEX 256943 


THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1980 

ImcmiLioraJ Herald Tribune, Book Division, 

181. avenue Churies-de-Gaulle. 92521 Neuilly Cedcx. France. 

Please send me .copies of The Frew Pascal U.S. S 37 each. 

plus posuce: $ 2.50 each in Europe - $ 8 each outside Europe. 

D Enclosed is my payment. (Payment may be rrude in (he convertible 
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and an mflnftniifll theorist of the cancer m Mexico Qty. 




Page 4- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 'WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23. 1983 



Shortages Again Push Mozambique Toward Famine 


By Glenn Frankel 

Washington Past Service 


, INHAMBANE, Mozambique— distribution center near the 
One year after about 100,000 of its P 01 * Vilanculos. 
people died of ^ five 4taie . njI1 warehouses in 

Bique is again on the bnnk of fam- dty of Inhambane. capital of 

Hie- TnliamluAanrAinqM — -1 ■ 


province. are empty” he said dur- moved from food sacks because 
ing a recent tour of the Pambara rats were eating them. 

Sa 2 v£SL m near fc h ™r 

pw uiui.iuua. that it needs 339,000 tons of food to 

The five state-run warehouses in see the country through April, 
the dty of Inhambane, capital of w hen the local harvest begins. It 


reports of isolated deaths are trick- mcl 


the sou' 


Inhambane and Gaza m 
and Teie in the north- 






*“7, . . . . . Inhambane province, where several reported supplies and cotnmil- 

; only a birne international rehef thousand Mozambicans died of nients from international donors of 
effort so far has prevented a rqpeb- hanger last year, are supposed to be 225,000 tons. 

^~ mon ?;^ c H noonc 

World Food 


workers are warning that ddays in bv the World Food FWramevprv ^ d,c> , Amos M *banjaiie 
food shipments from abroad and ^ weeks. "ogra™ cver > director of Mozambique’s Depart 

the difficulties in transporting food ment for the Prevention and Con 

to remote rural areas almost cer- Officials in Inhambane say the trol of Natural Calamities. **Bu 

tainly will m«m hundreds and pos- ^ not niade a delivery since after this will come a veiy danger 
sibly thousands of H^h s in the “id- December. They estimate that ous time and many could die.” 
next few months. ' hess now are no more than 150 facL araa . nf , n 

“tr th- Mr, rinKn'i eh;, tons of food in the warehouses to J! 


The government said this week The food crisis has resulted from west, either have not received ade- 

that it needs 339,000 ions of food to a combination of harsh drought, quate rain or face a potennal crisis 
see the country through April which in some parts of the country while waiting for crops to mature, 
when the local WvStbegmT It * recurring for the fifth consecu- In the tot^n^^official 
reported supplies and commit- Qve JW, and agncultural pohcies «umate of people affected m In- 
mans from international donors of Uw goveramrat now conges wwe 

225 000 tons. misguided. They have been wors- from 362,000 to 400,000, according 

ened by a widespread campaign of to Antonio Matsemane. a senior 
This month we believe no one economic sabotage and terror con- provincial official of Frelimo, the 
will die.” said Amos Mahanjane, ducted by anti-government insur- country’s sole legal political party, 
director of Mozambique’s Depart- gents. In many areas, the insur- “If the boat does not arrive soon. 


next few months. 

“If the ship doesn't arrive this 
month, then we are in terrible 


In fact, in remote areas of In- l ^ ose w ith shortages. 


fc^p^ofmo^on, 

on people. people already have died, although fected by the drought at 2J5 million wo ^ f ldn 

Most of the warehouses have no statistics have been compiled, and noted that rainfall in some re- Morc 1113,1 Pc°P le 


uiurnu, m wu nv ui LUUWlV ■■)■ - I 

shape," said Mozambique’s home 1111111011 P 60 ? 1 * 
trade minister, Manuel Jorge Most of the warehouses have 
Aranda da SQva, the official in leaky roofs and offer easy targets 
charge of the national relief pro- for rodents and vermin. In one, 
gram. “Our warehouses in this paper inventory lists have been re- 


gents have cut off virtually all people will die," he said, 
means of ground transportation. Gregory Alex, an American 
making it nearly impossible to ship CARE worker, said the conditions 
food from productive areas to already have reached a critical 
those with shor tages stage. “Even if the boat started ar- 

The government report placed riving every day.” he said, “therms 
the total population ofpeople af- suc ^, . a , Sf „ need diat 11 


UV ■■■■■ ■* -- uan, 1 /vt, 41 LUIUUUvU- II IWI » ■ nu uwu iu mruiv iw- *■ # , 

Officials have reported at least gions has returned to normal, rais- *t fctneFgenqr . “ “ tab ‘ 

eight deaths in rural Inhambane in ing hopes for an adequate harvest las* year m northern Inh a m - 
the past three months and say olher ate April. Bui several provii.es. 


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HUSSEEN'S RAIN — King Hussein of Jordan, second from right in the front row, 
leading a prayer for rain near Amman. Hours later, some rain fefl on the city Monday. 

Israel Seeks New Wage-Price Accord 


all-in-one (with guidance). Bumua- tor at the Pambara relief center. _ . _ 

Distortions of Earlier Pact Are Seen Threatening Chaos 

Wnto YET ABO DOMAINS, Paly, anrip Ion Inno with milnntn inn” n . ... l ire* _ 


ting to lot by it* wwk or month. Drain aamage oecause tney nave 
b^Jo iw^YoSSTm^. ?d * i ' S 01 ^ 100 l° n 8 with malnutrition." 

LONDON CHARMING HOUDAY Rot ***** ° f , S0 ^ 

near Begenb Perk, 24 pen<»L $48 plies is prevented by overwhelming 
par maht for flat, hifly eewped lakh- iranSDortation nroblems. Mozam- 


T§ h> ..i r transportation problems. Mozam- 
Gdro.LadonSW.te] in770?S9 bique winds along 1,500 miles 
u/vrm o (2,424 kilometers) of Indian Ocean 


By Dan Fisher 

Las Angela Tima Service 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli 


lion at the end of the current eco- 
nomic package deal. 

The government is clearly afraid 


HOTELS 

FRANCE 


Horn 

FF315par 
No* 73-1 


(2,424 kilometers) of Indian Ocean 
coasL Only one paved road con- 
nects much of the country's re- 
gions, and it is under almost con- 
stant attack by rebels. Roads 


JERUSALEM — The Israeli t j iat a full-fledged consumer panic plemented have been virtually 
government is scrambling to nego- h -ju occur unless it can quickly an- wiped out by increased government 
date a new wage and price control a0 imce a replacement wage and subsidies under the package deal 
agreement with the country’s man- p-^ control agreement — “pack- for fuel electricity, bread, pnbtic 
ufacturers and trade unions amid a g C deal 2." as it has been called, transportation, water and other 
growing evidence that distortions \ ncw wage and price agreement items. 

introduced into the economy by a a [ so would be important to Israel's The subsidy bill went up by an 
similar pact three months ago request for a big increase in U.S. “alarming” £200 mini on in [he 
threaten chaos in the marketplace, ^d. three months of the freeze, accord- 


tkt* 23- Mach 3i t a nadrtood i to leading inland generally are single 
lane, pothole-covered curt tracks, 
proof wkidows onTteXmi. GoddoS As a result, food and other sup- 


i & typed Ptman rcsfcunuL 
RmpaC7KX)&. Td [1) 544 38 10 

COLLECTORS 


MARLENE DETRICH - 1 

p arting 4 fL by 3 ft. 


dttoa As a result, food and other sup- 
plies in surplus in some parts of 

Mozambique cannot be moved to 

others. There are 5,000 to 6.000 
Too tons of potentially life-saving salt 
moo. crammed into warehouses in Nova 


threaten chaos in the marketplace. 

A so-called “package deal" 
signed by government, industry 
and labor in November is sched- 


Last month, Washington de- ing to Eitan Sheshinsky, an econo- 
ferred consideration of a request mist at Hebrew University, 
for $800 million in emergency aid That, in turn, required the gov- 



porting 4 fL by 3 ft. bv Dtrnmgo. crammed into warehouses m Nova 
Mamh nna hi northern Inhama- 
Frondsto. ca‘ 94109 or ' erf bane, according to Jossias Joaquin 
415-4736023. Nhate, provincial director of inter- 

WINES & SPIRITS txxnmnaL But it cannot be 
■ ■ — — — shipped elsewhere m the province 
cognac fra- lack of ships and trucks. 

uouhs “The warehouse is full but peo- 

Brai pie are dying for lack of salt, 1, he 

said. 

Similarly, thousands of tons of 


and labor in Nov-ember is sched- for $800 million in emergency aid That, in turn, required the gov- 
uled to expire Feb. 4, and as the until the national unity govern- eminent to prim more shekels to 
deadline nears, there has been a run ment of Prime Minister Shimon cover its bills, building up infla- 
on items ranging from coffee to air Peres takes tougher measures to tionary pressure that mil explode 


on items ranging from coffee to air Peres takes tougher measures to tionary pressure that will explode 
conditioners by consumers an tier- straighten up its own economic next month, barring some new 

paring steep price increases. household. Israel also has asked for agreement 

Other items have disappeared an aid increase of nearly 60 percent The government also must stem 

from store shelves because manu- in the 1986 fiscal year, which be- a continuing erosion of its foreign 

facturers pulled their products off gins in October. currency reserves, which dropped 



oumuuiy, uiuu^muo ui iuuo ui ^ ± government re- 

harvestol mangoes he rotting m the ^ ^ demand fw an immediate 
sun in Gaza for lack of transport, wT: . uxmw * UJU - 

accnrdino to Arne DLsch. nmeram “P® 1 CCn ^ price 


facturers pulled their products off gins in October. currency reserves, which dropped 

the market rather than continue to When the first package deal was by $220 mil I i on in December alone 
sell at frozen prices. Israel's only signed early in November, it was According to the Finance Minishy, 
cigarette maker, Dubek, baited billed as the symbolic cornerstone if this pace continues, the SI 2 bu- 
production at all five of its plants of the government's economic pro- lion in aid that Washington provid- 
Sunday after the government re- gram. ed Israel last fall will disappear this 


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according to Arne Disch. program 
officer for the UN development 
program in Maputo. 

Where transportation is avail- 
able, it is often of the wrong type to 
meet the particular needs of Mo- 
zambique's interior. The 31 trucks 
registered with the government in 
Inhambane aR weigh ai least IS 
tons, far too big to haul food along 
the winding dirt roads there. 


gram. ed Israel last fall will disappear this 

The agreement, which included a spring, threatening a credit crisis 
90-day price and basic wage freeze and a possible economic collapse. 


Responding to such pressure, a and a sharp, one-time cutback in While the first package deal 
tripartite committee set up to moo- cost of living protection for work- slashed inflation from an annnal 
itor the freeze approved 10-percent ers, was intended to break the back rate of nearly 1,300 percent, which 
increases Monday for instant cof- of the country’s runaway inflation, existed just before it was signed, 
fee, tea, beer and cigarettes. The Israeli' cabinet has been un- the situation remains so bad that 

In another sign of trouble, the able to fully implement $1 trillion the proposed 1983 budget submh- 
black market rate for the U.S. dol- in budget cuts voted at its first ted Sunday stated: “Israel’s eco- 
lar has jumped sharply this month meeting in September, mnch less noraic situation today r eprese n ts a 
in anticipation of a large devalua- make the even deeper cuts that Is- severe threat to its security." 


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N. Yemen Seeks to Save Ancient San’a 

By Judith Miller economic aid to free emerprise-ori- done in the tradition Yemen 

New York Tima Service enied North Yemen. style. But the government has rio 

SAN’A, North Yemen — Inside 


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By Judith Miller economic aid to free emerprise-ori- done in the traditional Yemesri 

New York Tima Service enied North Yemen. style. But Lhe government has mot/ 

SAN’A, North Yemen — Inside The origins and age of San’a are enacted a total ban on demolition 
the mudbrick walls of this ancient obscure, but fable has it that the in old San’a. Yemeni and Western : 
capital, a narrow passageway leads city was founded by Shem, the son residents said the inaction reflected 
lo an inauspicious dwelling. Inside of Noah. Its structures are unique the government's lack of basic poo- . 
the lantern-lighted cave of a house, in the Middle East: buildings of trol over the dty and its celdbwidd- 
a 400-year-old oil press slowly re- five and six stories made of hand- souks. " ; - ' 

votves, turned bv a cameL chipped stone and dried mud, dec- But dvic pride still abounds. A- 


volves, turned bv a cameL chipped stone and dried mud, dec- 

Once there were 80 such presses orated with delicate white alabaster 
in San’a. Today, there are four. and . gypsum arabesques and 


at all unless our campaign suc- 
ceeds,” said Aii Oshish, the direc- 


But dvic pride still abounds. A- 
wealthy merchant said: “1 wealth. 
London to look at (rid building? 


“Tomorrow, there may be none stained-glass windows in porthole there. But I could not understand! 


and half-moon shapes. 

Viewed from the new part of the 


tor of the Technical Office for the dty, old San’a resembles a large 
Preservation of the Historic City of gingerbread cake, encircled by a 


le get so exdled about It; 
compared to Old Sana.” 


, Old San'a. 


ring of chocolate-colored motm- 


Nkomo Suspends 


With considerable fanfare, the tains. j. vjb.RJiAi.1# ijlisjiciius 

government has begun a drive to Bui the dty is literally washing ^ » pw 

raise $300 million to save the old away, as heavy seasonal rains \44Ulipaigll LHl6 tO 
paiurfthedty.lt intends to spend weaken the dirt coots and pour A 

$500,000 on Lhe campaign, accord- mud and gravel over the walls of Violent iFOtCStS 
ing to Prime Minister Abdul Aziz the 6.500 houses, 100 mosques, 

AbduJ-GhanL Officials hope to schools and public bathhouses. Reuters 

raise money from Arab and West- Despite its campaign, the gov- HARARE, Zimbabwe — Joshu 


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raise money from Arab and West- 
ern donors. 

To get more public exposure. 
North Yemen began its campaign, 
which is being run jointly with the 
United Nations Educational, Sci- 
entific and Cultural Organization, 
during a recent meeting of foreign 
ministers from 45 Islamic coun- 
tries. an event that brought 200 
Arab and Western journalists to 
North Yemen. 

“Since your government has 
withdrawn from UNESCO,” Mr. 
Oshish said, “perhaps Washington 
might consider some bilateral aid 


schools and public bathhouses. Reuters 

Despite its campaign, the gov- HARARE, Zimbabwe— Joshua 

eminent has not been able to do Nkomo, the Zimbabwean opposi- 
much to preserve the historic area, lion leader, has suspended cam- 
It has not, for example, banned paigning after demonstrations 
cars from the old quarters. As a against him by supporters of the 


result, gardens and trees, a hall- ruling 
mark of Islamic cities, struggle Zimba 
along with residents for air. said Ti 

The famed guardhouse at the He s 


ruling party, a spokesman for his 
Zimbabwe African People's Union 
said Tuesday. 

He said the tour would be sus- 


Bab el -Yemen, the only one of six pended until the government gave 
city gates that remained, was razed assurances that there would be no 
in the early 1980s. An ugly gray further violent protests against 
cement monument, to what or ZAPU and its leader in the cam- 
whotn is not clear, stands in its paign before general elections ex- 


Marxist 

Yemen, 


peeled in March. 

“The government has to live up 
to its undertaking (hat the elections 
will be held freely and fairly,” be 


Oshish said, “perhaps Washington place. peeled in March, 

might consider some bilateral aid Rocks and garbage litter every “The government has to live op 
for the project." block; children play in the crash to its undertaking that the elections 

North Yemen has managed to heaps. will be held freely and fairly,” be 

raise more than S400 million a year “Before the revolution in 1962, said, “and that no political party 

in aid from anyone and everyone, the ruler, the imam, as he was will be hindered from campaign- 
The Soviet Union, which backs the known, required shop and house ing.” 

Marxist government of Southern owners to keep the area in from of Mr. Nkomo earlier abandoned a 
Yemen, also provides military and their dwellings dean,” said a West- tour of southeastern Masvingo 

— .... era resident. “The filth you see to- Province after an estimated 30,000 

what WOULD UFE be LIKE a publican.’’ supporters erf the ruling Zimbabwe 

W ITHO UT it? In 1980. the government ap- African National Union-Popular 

WEEKEND proved a resolution requiring that Front demonstrated against ms vis- 

EACH FRIDAY IN THE IHT repairs or new construction be it there. 


IT , A 

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raeli economists and U.S. officials 
agree are necessary. 

Those budget cuts that were im- 


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I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


DO0NESBURY 




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ARTS /LEISURE 

Amado and His Friends MarkNew Novel 


By Marlisc Simons 

New York Times Service 

SALVADOR, Brazil — Jotge 
O Amado sai in his unkempt 
tropical garden on a recent day. 


having 158 friends to lunch — such 
notables as the town ma 


mm 


spiritism, a well-known virtuoso of 
a one-string instr ument . They were 
celebrating their host’s latest novel, 
“Tocaia Grande" (Big Ambush), 


Kip Hanrahan: A Portrait of the Record Producer as Auteur 


Bp ^Mtcfaad. Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


«* ns; 

6 Oh 




'“ L -I. :,;cn 'Tilt 
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icicatod sound treatment ma- 
chinery ahd multitrack mixing 
techsupies tamed the recording 
studio into a musical instrument in 
the mid- 1960s. (The 1967 Beatles 
album “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely 
Hearts Gob Band" is generally 
considered the benchmark; Tech- 
nicians, managers and business 
people began to make aesthetic 
contributions. The credit “Produc- 
er" was added Producers were 
leaders, singers, soloists, compos- 
ers, arrangers, or somebody they or 

the recant company hired. 


Producers left increasingly no- 
ticeable imprints; strong personal- 
ities such as JciTy Wexler, Phil 
Specter and Qtrincy Jones were 
sought after for commercial as well 
as musical reasons. They assumed 
responsibility for elements from 
choice of material, concept and 
ca sting through texture, mixing , 
presang, jacket design and market- 
ing.^ The producer of a record began 
to resemble a film director in rela- 
tion to the final product. 

With Kip Hanrahan the resem- 
blance is total. Within the next two 
weeks, two albums — “Vertical’s 
Currency” and “Conjure,” fi- 
nanced by his company — wfll be 


released under his name. Producing 
was his sole function. Describing 
this representative of a new breed 
of auteur, the French newspaper JLe 
Monde recently called Hanrahan 
“the Jean-Luc Godard of contem- 
porary music.” Hanrahan describes 
Godard as “my father.” 

“It’s like bade in De Witt din- 
ton High School the blades mostly 
listened to Motown artists and the 
Latins to Joe Cuba,” be said. 

“Those of us who wanted to be 
above the fra y listened to Miles 
Davis. Maybe 1 liked Miles more 
for what he represented — he was 
so cool — than for his music. May- 


be that’s the way I fed about Go- 
dard. 

“How do I describe myself? I try 
very bard to come up with enigmat- 
ic answers to that question, ^hey 
change every week. ‘Musician’ in- 
volves a cruel seductiveness. You 
try to justify yourself somehow. A 
certain amount of romance is in- 
volved. People excuse your eccen- 
tricities when you’re a musician. 
The ladies like musicians. Anyway, 
Td rather not describe myself by 
how I sdl my labor, It’s a constant 
struggle not to be seduced. If s just 
me. This is what I do.” 

With his fast tics and intense 
verbal flow, it's easy enough to 


'Waste’: A Well-Acted Play on Righteousness 


By Michael Btilington 

IruentazUmal Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Barley Granville Barker (1877- 
* 1946) is one of the neglected figures of 
British thealec. He was the leading young actor 
of the pro-1914 generation. He established die 
importance of the director through hij produc- 
tions of Shaw at the Royal Court and of Shake- 

THE BRITISH STAGE 

speare at die Savoy. He campaigned ceaselessly 
for a nartmifll theater. And, as a dramatist, he 
left behind a clutch erf plays that give a lacerat- 
ing portrait of the hypocritical smugness of 
Edwardian society. 

One of the best of them, “Waste,” has been 
revived by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 
its small Barbican theater, the Pit John Bar- 
ton’s elegant, beautifully acted production 
proves Barker had a sharper eye feu the reality 
of politics than any British dramatist of this 
century. The play dais with a radical politician, 
Hcniy Trebefl, whose career is ruined when bis 
mistress dies in the course of an Btaal abortion. 
When the play was written in 1907 it was re- 
fused a Hcmse by the Lartf Chamberiam, osten- 
sibly because of its references to a “criminal 
operation. 

Since then, the play has rarely been seen fit 
did not get a West End production until 1936). 
What emerges now is Barker’s tare ability to 
combine public theme and private issues — in 
particular, his obsessive concern with the emo- 


tional sterility of pioneering visionaries. His 
hero, Trebefl, is the architect of a bid to dissolve 
the Church of England and divert its surplus 
funds to education — a popular measure, which 
the Conservatives use as an election winner. 

Conservativrrattn el gradually ditches Trebefl 
because of his involvement in sexual scandal It 
is a wonderful piece of writing that captors the 
step-by-step move from wily pragmatism (with 
tbe ConserWives persuading the dead woman’s 
husband to keep his mouth shut) to moralizing 
smugness as the politicians contrive to keep the 
lull while sacrificing the man. 

What lifts Barker’s play onto another level is 
his perception of the Hi zk between emotional 
emptiness and visionary reform. Trebefl is an 
ambitious workaholic ruined by momentary 
hist He finally realizes that the conception of a 
child is more important thm the creation of a 
bill, but then in the ul timate irony, he loses 
both. 

Theatrical attacks on politicians are now two- 
a-penny. Barker’s achievement was to create 
real people rather than vulgar cartoons, and a 
star-packed RSC cast brings his characters to 
abundant Hfe. Daniel Massey as Trebefl has a 
feverish, nervous excitement what at work, but 
when in (Meat he faces an empty desk you feel 
that all meaning has drained from his life: Jodi 
Dench plays iris mistress, Amy O’Connell, with 
a light brogue and a mature fltrtineas, even 
down to tbe lightly arched instep prescribed by 
the text There is stating support from Tony 


Church as a Conservative prime' minister who 
views the collapse of his schemes with a laid- 
back unflappability; from Maria Aitken as Tto- 
bdTs spinster aster, who symboGres the chronic 
waste of female potential; and from Charles 
Kay as a fishlike puritan who exudes the odor of 
moral righteousness. 

□ 

The British theater’s obsession with turning 
novels into plays continues, with Shared Experi- 
ence's production of Samnri Richardson's 18th- 
century classic, “Pamela," on view this week in 
Winchester and returning to T/mAyi in April. 
The book is a four-votomc epic consisting large- 
ly of a servant’s letters home about her master’s 
attempts to exercise his drotidusagmu. But the 
adaptors, Giles Ha vagal and Fldehs Morgan, 
have solved the inherent problems by presenting 
“ Pamela " as a rehearsal-room Jim-through. 

It works superbly simply because it sets Rich- 
ardson’s story in a modem context Half the 
time we are reminded of the author’s implicit 
feminism and Iris realization that a woman is 
more than a piece of disposable property; for 
the other half we recognize how far we have 
travdedfnm] the chauvinism of tbe 1740s. when 
it was thought improper for a mother to nurse 
her own child. 

Sian Thomas is excellent as a mutinous ac- 
tress angry at having to play fill-in roles, and 
Robin Hooper as the show’s director executes a 
number of female parts with suspiciously hectic 
enthusiasm. 


That same week, the author at- 
tended the unveiling of a bust of 
him, was made an honorary dozen 
in his hometown, monopolized 
magazine covers and signed about 
2,000 books. 

Amado, 72, has long been Bis- 


was exiled for a time and his books 
banned because of leftist activities 
in the 1930s aDd 1940s. Today he is 
something of an institution, mak- 


gness he is from New York. Other 
New Yorkers might spot a Bronx 
accent. He wanted to he “the best 
American outside-left pro soccer 
player" until he met the bandleader 
and composer Carla Bley when he 
was IS — he is 30 now — and 
started sealing envelopes and work- 
ing as a gofer for her organization 
after school (“1 learned a lot about 
record distribution”). Saturday 
nights be would play percussion in 
Latin bands. He spent his money 
on “vices like lis tening to jazz in 
Slugs and taking oris to Coney 
Island.” 

After graduating from Cooper 
Union film school at 19, be re- 
searched a “critique of Jean-Pan] 
Sartre's Marxism as limited by his 
unders tanding of self and Other* at 
New York University while trying 
to raise money to nuifce a film that 
would “take Sartre apart." 

Realizing that records were a lot 
cheaper to malt* than films, he set 
out to objectify an elusive sound in 
hit head — Latin percussion with 
rock and jazz dements — with a 
childhood friend. Jerry Gonzalez. 
Although he learned baric record- 
ing tecnniqp cs , the project failed 
because “I thought his taste was 
miserable and he thought mine was 
unrequested.” 

Hanrahan’s background was 
I .mm music and jazz, and he had 
met some rock players through 
Bley. He wanted to “put together a 
bunch of musicians who would by 
their mere presence force the next 
person to shift out of their ghetto, 
out of their mannerisms, to be 
forced to re-invent themselves. The 
New York music scene is one of the 
most ghettoized communities in the 
world, outside of South Africa. Ev- 
erybody knows the cats who play 
their own type of music and that’s 
it” 

In 1 979 he Found an investor 
who “works in a muffler shop,” and 
began to break down ghetto walls 
by putting together an eclectic 
“cast” including Jack Bruce, once 
singer and bassist with the legend- 
ary 1960s rock group Cream, the 
blues rings Taj Mahal, tbe new 



OmttonReie 

Kip Hanrahan 

wave bassist Bill Laswell (producer 
of Mick Jaggeris soon-to-be-re- 
leased solo album), some of the 
best salsa, reggae, soca (soul and 
calypso) and Haitian players in 
New York, and jazzmen of con- 
flicting stales such as David Mur- 
ray, Kenny Kirkland, Teo Macero, 
Lester Bowie, Steve Swallow, Billy 
Hart and Jamaaladeen Tacuma. 

He tried “everything Td beard, 
heard of, or never heard or heard 
of.” He found people wbo were 
willing to come out of their ghetto, 
open to turning the beat backward 
on purpose just to see what would 
happen. He turned tapes upside 
down and ran them backward: “I 
tried to be as comfortable with the 
engineers as a film director would 
be with his camera person. At Gist, 
none of us knew what we were 
doing but we'd stumble ou amazing 
things.” 

W ithin tbe past year he has been 
featured in Vogue magazine (“Peo- 
ple Are Talking About . . 
Musician ma ^mne described him 
as the “highest common denomina- 
tor”; Down Beat gave his album 
“Desire Develops An Edge" five 
stars, its highest rating, and pro- 
filed him (“fresh sounds in settings 
of his own design”): and mqor 
features appeared in tbe French 
publications Actud, Le Matin and 
Le Monde. 

Last week he passed through 
Paris looking for the “Yeh-Yeh" 
singer Fraoqoise Hardy (he did not 
find her). He asked Actud to tdl 
her “that I would love to make a 
record with her. She has a beautiful 
voice, really French. It would add 
another fine color to my melange.” 



Year End Report 
From The International 
Herald Tribune 
T o Its Readers And 
Advertisers 


ing the publication of his new novel 
lantflnvM i pi to a national event 
More than any other writer, this 
re&er of earthy, tropical tales has 
taken Brazilian literature to the 
world. His books have been pub- 
lished in 46 languages and sold 


But it is here, in northeastern 
Brazil — the setting for his affec- 
tionate satires about prostitutes, 
politicians, scoundrels, street phi- 
losophers— that the myth of Jorge 
Amado is strongest, ana perpetuat- 
ed by the world be re-creates. 

At his rambling home, surround- 
ed by hundreds of pieces of fofle an, 
he condacts his life with the benev- 
olence and paternalism expected 
here of someone with wealth, pow- 
er or fame. He receives constant 
requests to donate money, serve as 
witness at a marriage, be godfather 
to a child. Journalists solicit politi- 
cal comments from him. A con- 
stant procession of visitors passes 
through his house. 

Amado, a round, white-haired 
man with eyes that go from melan- 
choly to droll, said these visitor* 
and Ins participation in provincial 
town life were essential to his work. 

“I nourish myself with this," he 
said. u ! need contact with people — 
1 have to touch earth.” 

His wife, Zdia Gattai, recalled 
t hat tha t day’s visitors had includ- 
ed the elders of a candomble com- 
munity, practitioners of an African 
spiritist cult widely popular in Bra- 
zil. They had come to tdl him that 
the spirits had chosen him as a 
patron for an initiation ceremony. 
(This meant he had to pay for the 
ceremonial clothes and festivities,, 
said Gattai.) 

Later, carrying a ctqjy of “Tocaia 
Grande,” a priest came to ask for 
an autograph, then knelt in front of 
the author and kissed his hand. By 
lunchtime, the neighborhood tin- 
ker had brought a large lizard, the 
kind Amado likes to eat 

“As a writer, I am a product of 
my links with the people of Bahia," 
said Amado, referring to the state 
where his writing is set “1 need to 
see how they think and feel With- 
out this I could have no intimacy 
with my characters” 

But Amado and Gattai — who 
types her husband’s manuscripts 
and has just published her third 
bode of anecdotes about their hfe 
— have also become Hr^tag es to the 
world (bey created, and have to flee 
it when they want to work. 

“We live like gypsies,” she said. 
“Jorge has to travel to be able to 

think." 

Amado novels such as “Ga- 
briela. Dove and Cinnamon," 
“Tent of Miracles” and “Dona Flor 
and Her Two Husbands” have 
been written in hideaways, hotel 
rooms, friends’ homes. Amado said 




O* Nh York Torn 

Jorge Amado 

tbe latest book — his 22d novel, 
tracing the birth of a town, starting 
when henchmen of a cacao planta- 
tion ambush a group of settlers — 
took three years to write in four 
different residences. 

Friends said that, above all, the 
author wanted with this book 
defy critics who have claimed that 
he has become repetitive in hi$ 
erotic themes and has commercial- 
ized his art. “This book was diffi- 
cult for Jorge,” said one friend, his 
publisher, Alfredo Machado. “He 
becomes more anxious every time 
because he has to outdo himself. 
He took this book as a challenge to 
show that, after.SO years of writing, 
at age 72, he is at the top of his 
form." 

The first printing of 150,000 
copies of “Tocaia Grande," which 
came out last month, was sold out 
within two weeks. 

Amado cited several difficulties 
with the book. “I bad already done 
four novels about the cacao re? 
gjoo," he said, “so everything had 
to be seen from a different perspex, 
five. And there is no central charac- 
ter but dozens of stories, individual 
stories, which. little by little, be= 
come a collective story and turn 
into a community. I had a lot of 
trouble conceptualizing it” 

He confirmed that be rarely pre- 
pares outlines for his works. “Pm 
incapable of making a plan," he 
said. “I know people who construct 
books beforehand, but 1 never 
know what will happen. My stories 
are constructed by the characters 
that lake me along. 

“For me a book is done when the 
characters walk and live on their 
own feet. That’s why the beginning 
of a book is always so hard for me.” 


u> Nisp 
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* ^ :<y 


1984 was a year of exceptional growth 
and development for the International Herald 
Tribune. This report is written to share some 
highlights of that year with our readers and 
advertisers, in a spirit of deep appreciation for 
your interest and support 

The most important fact about the IHT 
in 1984 was that circulation continued to 
grow at a remarkable rate — the most encour- 
aging growth, in fact, in our history. In the 
course of the year, daily circulation surged 
past 170,000 copies per day (distributed in 164 
countries) and me average daily sale surpassed 
160,000 copies. Circulation in Asia — where 
we' began printing just four years ago — now 
exceeds 25,000 copies daily. 

Overall, thepaperis circulation has 
grown by 6 percent in the past year and by 
more than 20 percent since 1980. Seme 60 air- 
lines now buy more than 35,000 copies every 
day, evidence of the paper’s continuing im- 
portance to the global business traveler. 

Meanwhile, our regular subscribers con- 
tinued to renew their subscriptions at a rate 
exceeding 80 percent, a vote of confidence for 
which we are most grateful. 

' New research conceniing our readers 
shows them to be affluent ($79,400 average 
family income), educated (88 percent hdd at 
least one university degree) and influential (72 
percent hdd managanmt positions). This re- 
search was based on a reader questionnaire 
printed in the newspaper and tabu la t e d by an 
independent research company. We were en- 




couraged when nearly 12,000 readers returned 
their questionnaires, providing an unusually 
broad sample of our daily audience: 

Advertising aimed at this important au- 
dience has also been dimbing, with 1984 sales 
increasing by 23 percent over 1983. Once 
again, this was the best growth in many years. 

As readers have undoubtedly noticed, 
there was a mariced increase in the use of 
four-color and spot-color advertising in the 
IHT in 1984 — by more than 75 percent over 
1983. Classified advertising, where advertisers 
depend on fast results, also increased signif- 
icantly. 

We believe this growth in readership and 
in advertising support dtimatdy reflects our 
progress in two other areas: our editors’ 
efforts to produce an increasingly valuable 
newspaper, and the efforts of our circulation 
and production team to make that paper 
available to reader in more places on a more 
timely basis. 

Concerning the newspaper itself, an ex- 
panded team of editors and writers has helped 
us not only to increase the scope of our cover- 
age but also to preserve and advance the 
IHTs reputation for accurate and balanced 
reporting 

One of the biggest editorial expansions 
in 1984 was the new “Personal Investing” sec- 


tion, now appearing on the second Monday 
of each month and designed to help our read- 
ers look beyond national boundaries as they 
make their savings and investment decisions. 

Other editorial advances ranged from 
regular new columns cm “International Man- 
agement” and “The European Economic 
Community” to a substantial increase in our 
listin gs of international sports results. A new 
“American Topics” column, appearing on 
Mondays and Saturdays, provides a fuller 
sense erf American society. The winter and 
summer Olympics and the American political 
campaign wee topics for expanded news cov- 
erage, and once again this year our editors 
produced more than 60 special repeats on a 
wide range of countries and industries. 

On the delivery front, the IHTs techno- 
logical expansion continued with the start-up 
erf our seventh facsimile printing rite in May, 
this one in Marseille. International Herald 
Tribune copies now reach the South of 
France and Spain earlier than ever as a result 
To mention one example, the IHTs arrival 
time in Madrid is now 8:30 AM. (coming 
from Marseille by truck and then plane) com- 
pared to 12:30 P.M. whenth e paper was 

> Wmpcy grttiref — — ~ -1 

! PERSONAL INVESTING A 


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flown from Paris. Further new printing rites 
are under consideration. 

Other IHT activities in 1984 included 
five well-attended conferences, with speakers 
ranging from U.S. Vice President George 
Bush to Portuguese Prime Minister Mario 
Soares. And new guides to European travel 
and Paris food joined the growing IHT book 

list. 

On all these fronts and others, we hope 
to make further advances in the year ahead. 
But that will require your continued help. 
Your derisions — to read this newspaper and 
to place your advertising in its pages — ulti- 
mately detamine the pace erf our advance. 
That is why it is so important for us to fed in 
touch with you, sharing information about the 
newspaper with you, mid learning from you 
about your reactions and interests. So keep in 
touch — you can be sure that your letters to 
us are carefully read and noted. 

With thanks again and very best wishes, 
Lee W. Huebner 
Publisher 


129827 









Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


Heral 



{tribune 


Poblbb«a Wld. The ?iw York Turn* and The WwMnpoa Port 


And Now Back to Work 


A genera] atmosphere of peace, prosperity 
and pride applies mainly to affluent America. 
There is little feeling of well-being, for in- 
stance, among the 20,000 homeless crowded 
into New York shelters. Yet the national spirit 
represents a substantial achievement. Presi- 
dent Reagan was right on Monday to recall the 
“economic stress" when he took office, and be 
is entitled to his oratory about golden years 
and America reaching for hear best Restoring a 
spirit of national pride is an achievement that 
was rewarded with overwh elming re-election. 

That re-election itself further explains the 
national mood. Not in 23 years has a president 
finished two terms. The promise of continuity 
means that the public can rock along comfort- 
ably without having to rhmlc much about 
Washington; familiarity can breed content- 
ment. But now the election has finally ended, 
Mr. Reagan’s victory has been certified in 
ceremony and it is time to get back to work. 
What does the president want to do? He says 
he wants to do something about two goals, 
deficit and defense. Or does he? What he says 
about those goals clanks with contradictions. 

After 50 years or deficit spending, it is time 
somebody did something, the president asserts 
manfully. “If not us, who?” 

If not us, who WHAT? Ronald Reagan is 
borrowing three times as much a year as Jim- 
my Carter ever did By the end of his term he 
will have borrowed more than all previous 
presidents combined On his record the only 
thing Mr. Reagan appears to mean is: “If 1 
don’t stop borrowing at this rate, well, that will 
be the next president's problem." 

Then he proclaims with a straight, even 
stem face: “Let us make it unconsti tutional for 
the federal government to spend more than it 
takes in." Mr. Reagan says that knowing that 
be is having trouble cutting S50 billion out of 
his new budget, and that even if he succeeds he 


Another Colonial Puzzle 


New Caledonia never mattered much except 
to its 140,000 or so inhabitants, but now it also 
matters, considerably, to the French. They 
face parliamentary elections next year in 
which President Francois Mitterrand's han- 
dling of New Caledonia, which he visited Sat- 
urday, seems likely to be an important issue. 

The issue bears a strong family resemblance, 
as almost all colonial issues do, to Algeria, for 
whose affairs Mr. Mitterrand was the respon- 
sible minis ter in the 1930s. There is a group of 
French settlers, and some others, who wish to 
stay with France; and there is a group of native 
Me lanesians, known as Kanaks, and some 
others, who wish independence. Things started 
to get violent on a small but disturbing scale 
late last year. In response, the French offered a 
plan for limited independence — indepen- 
dence “in association” with France. A referen- 
dum on the plan is scheduled for July. If it is 
approved, France will remain in charge of 
defense and internal security, and the settlers 
will keep their French citizenship but also will 
vote in local elections. Nonetheless, the settlers 
fear being sold out, and the Kanaks find the 


plan a denial of their claim to sovereignty. 

In the seemingly endless series of colonial 
end games, the Western nations not immedi- 
ately involved almost always have a dear idea 
of what the Western nation that is involved 
should do: Let go as gracefully as possible, 
sooner rather than later, before the costs in the 
Lerri Lory and the political costs at home get out 
of hand. For all the West's experience in such 
political activity, however, it u never easy for 
the involved country to take such advice: That 
country tends to resent receiving it, even from 
friends. One nation’s embarrassment often be- 
comes a matter of alliance-wide concern. Inev- 
itably, apprehensions come to be voiced that 
the Russians, if they are not actually manipu- 
lating the scene, stand to gain from it. 

Perhaps it will be different in New Caledo- 
nia. Perhaps Mr. Mitterrand will manage to 
find a dever, peaceful way to preserve the 
rights and privileges of Europeans in a place 
whose native population becomes increasingly 
determined to have independence. If he does 
succeed, however, it will be a first 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Concerns for the Second Term 

President Ronald Reagan, as leader of the 
Western nations, carries with him into his 
second term a very great responsibility for the 
peace and stability of the world. 

At the outset of his first term, Mr. Reagan 
promised a major tax cut, a major increase in 
defense spending and elimination of the bud- 
get deficit. These promises then seemed to 
conflict with each other, and tins proved true. 
His failure to fulfill his third promise was the 
most disappointing. The deficit, instead of 
being reduced, is expected to reach a record 
$200 billion this fiscal year. We wonder if Mr. 
Reagan will be able to adhere to his policy of 
reducing the deficit through reducing expendi- 
tures without increasing taxes. We are very 
concerned by the huge U.S. budget deficit, 
which drives up interest rates which in turn are 
pne cause of the Japanese-U.S. trade deficit 
— The Daily Yamhai (Tokyo). 

Despite bis militant tone at the start, Mr. 
Reagan proved a very cautious and moderate 
president after aJL He wants to use his second 
term to gam a place in the history books as a 
man who was able to turn around the nuclear 
threat to the world. It remains to be seen if the 
Soviets will render him that honor. 

, — Gazet Van Antwerpen (Antwerp). 

A security shield that does not militarize 
outer space but demilitarizes around arsenals, 
makes nuclear weapons obsolete and rids the 


world from the threat of mid car destruction 
is an aim considered by most experts to be 
unattainable. These experts say that the [“star 
wars”} program aims at destabilization and in 
fact militarizes outer space. That would make 
downright impossible an agreement on the 
reduction of offensive weapons. In the light of 
his inauguration speech, Mr. Reagan contin- 
ues to stress ongoing military devdopmenL 
— Magyar Nemzet (Budapest). 

Failure Again at Cyprus Talks 

In the approach to the meeting between 
Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders which 
broke up in acrimony in New York on Sunday, 
the UN Secretariat took Lhe risk of allowing, if 
not encouraging, a crucial ambiguity about the 
nature of the “documentation” on which the 
meeting was based. The Turks described it as a 
“draft agreement,” while the Greeks saw ii 
oaly as “a basis for negotiations.” Mr. Deuk- 
tash has now gone home claiming to have 
withdrawn all his concessions, apparently in 
the hope that international opinion will no 
longer blame him or his Turkish protectors for 
the lack of a solution. But, whatever the in- 
felicities of Mr. Kyprianou’s negotiating style, 
that is hoping too much. The crucial issue 
remains whether Turkey is willing to withdraw 
her troops. Had there been a real negotiation, 
the Greek Cypriots were willing to concede 
almost everything in return for that one assur- 
ance. It seems that it was not forthcoming. 

— The Times (London). 


FROM OUR JAN. 23 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Turks Want Towerfnl Navy 5 
PARIS — Hilmy Pasha, recently Grand Vizia 
of Turkey, who is in Paris, received a Herald 
Correspondent [on Jan. 22]. Questioned as to 
the programme of the [Young Turk] Commit- 
tee of Union and Progress, Hilmy Pasha said 
that his successor, Hakki Bey, intends to fol- 
low the lines laid down by himsdf and thaL 
they are both working for the advancement of 
the empire. He said: “Turkey at the present 
moment is in a better position, both financially 
and commercially, than ever she was before. It 
is important that we should now build a pow- 
erful navy, not only in the interests of Turkey, 
but also for Greece, for on the unity of Turkey 
and Greece depends the maintenance of the 
Ottoman Empire. They must stand together; 
there mus t be no friction of any kind." 


1935: Nomads Blamed for Massacre 
PARIS — Following the news that a French 
official, sixteen native militiamen who were 
accompanying him and eighty Isms tribesmen 
had been massacred in French Somaliland by 
Abyssinian raiders, it was learned that the 
attackers were members of the Assai-Maras 
tribe, a clan of nomads who often attack both 
French and Abyssinians and who are beyond 
the control of Emperor Haile Selassie L As a 
consequence, there is no likelihood of the af- 
fair developing into an international incident 
The massacre took place at Marbeiio, where 
Albert Bernard. French deputy colonial ad- 
ministrator, was surprised by 800 Assai-Maras 
tribesmen on Jan. 17 while hurrying to DitlriT, 
where the raiders were reported to be burning 
villages and killing French citizens. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chairma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARLOEWXRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

Executive Editor REN£ BONDY Drputy PuMsker 

Editor ALAIN LEGOUR, Associate PMsktr 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate Piddbher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director 4 Open mun 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS D ir ector of Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertbatg Sates 


International Herald Tribune: 181 Avenue Charies-de-GauDe, 92200 Nenffly-sur-Sane, 
France. Tdepho^747-1265. Tdoc 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

Dirtaeur de la publiaBion: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Hemessy RdL, Hong Kong. TeL 5-28561 & Telex 61170. 
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U.S sdncriptlon; S284 yearly. Seart-tdasspssmw paid a Lang Island City, N.Y. 11101. \ 
0 1985, International Herald Tribune. A0 rights tests vaL i 



I 

rn: 


will still be spending S i 70 billion more than he 
takes in. Further, although be has for years 
been calling for a balanced-budget amend- 
ment, he has yet to propose one to Congress. 

He is just as full of contradiction about 
defease. He complains of bloated government, 
yet the essence of his muscular diplomacy is a 
bloated Pentagon. He thinks America's de- 
fenses are sufficiently repaired to warrant a 
new start in arms control, yet he continues to 
discredit mutual assured destruction, the only 
effective deterrence in sight as ineffective, 
even immoral. He spent paragraphs of his 
second inaugural address promoting a science- 
fiction notion of nuclear defense. Pushing that 
idea now, 30 or more years ahead of its time, is 
the surest way to aggravate the arms race in 
offensive weapons. Perhaps Mr. Reagan does 
not understand this paradox and is merely 
driven by those around him who oppose all 
arms restraints. Perhaps he understands it very 
well and thinks of diplomacy only as a sop to 
doves while the arms race continues. In any 
case, by failing to use such occasions to pro- 
claim realizable objectives, he r emains strate- 
gically uninspiring and, worse, unclear. 

If Mr. Reagan is serious about hating to 
spend borrowed money, then be has to stop 
spending so much of it for the Pentagon. If he 
is serious about not wanting to spend more 
than he takes in and cannot cut spending 
enough, then he has to take in more, in taxes. If 
he is serious about arms control, then be has to 
give the White House or the Stale Department 
the authority to squelch its opponents at the 
Pentagon and the Arms Control Agency. 

The president has earned his second term. 
He can now ride his mandate. The question is, 
in which direction? As Matthew Arnold once 
said about freedom, it is a good horse — but it 
is a horse to ride somewhere. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


NQ..HERE,BOB,... 
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Individual Freedoms and the Common Weal, Too 


W ASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration, now passing 
its midpoint, is notable for its anti- 
pathy to broad federal authority in all 
matters but national defense. Tbe 
prospect of eight years of continuing 
attack on Washington's regulatory 
and welfare functions raises some se- 
rious potential problems. 

But what has been the good of all 
the federal programs? Can one say 
that economic democracy has been 
advanced when wealth distribution, 
measured in quintiles, is nearly the 
name now as it was in 1800? Are the 
poor not still with us? Are not the 
descendants of slaves still dispropor- 
tionately represented among them? Is 
not a woman's wage, for equivalent 
work, still a fraction of a man's? 

These are not easy questions, but a 
number of political scientists and 
economists nave been actively fur- 
nishing answers. As regards political 
democracy, the rise in raw numbers 
of voters offsets the lagging percent- 
ages to some degree. And as ways are 
developed to measure participation 
outside the voting booth it becomes 
apparent that tbe American citizen is 
relatively and increasingly active. 
Compared with his foreign counter- 
parts he feels himsdf a part of the 


By Robert H. Walker 

This is the second of two articles. 


help those special groups was by pro- 
viding a separate setting: an asylum, 
a reservation, a technical school. For 
a century social progress was mea- 
sured by tbe quality of those facili- 
ties. Then the goal shifted from sepa- 
ratc-but-equal to “mainstreaming.” 
The quest for integrated equality 
is relatively recent 

No, the government has not 
brought social justice for alL Much 
progress has been made, astonishing 
progress in some cases, as in the earn- 
ing power of black women. One 
could argue about how much of the 
progress is due to federal initiative, 
but there is no doubt that most of 
these advances have rested on actions 
by the executive, tbe Supreme Court 
and Congress. Were this activity dis- 
continued it would be sorely mused. 

Implicitly a whole spectrum of is- 
sues is dismissed by ascription to a 
lunatic fringe of “reformers” who are 
presumed to have no connection with 
the “real world.” This image is un- 
deserved. Reformers are not extrem- 
ists. They are middle-class and well 
educated. The professions have been 


They will absolutely leap to second 
the notion that only a program of 
serial justice can underwrite an ag- 
gressive and inventive economy. 

If President Reagan and his policy- 
makers have underestimated this 
group, it is surely not entirely their 
fault A master of Lhe anecdote, the 
president touches a universal fond- 
ness for the act of individual heroism. 
We respond. We let him forget that 
the freedom that makes individual 
achievement possible is based on a 
profound ana continuing concern for 
tbe weD-being of the entire citizenry. 

But if we lionize the self-made 
man, we also exert an incredible 
amount of collective energy to end 
slavery and mitigate poverty. If we 
are quicker to make heroes of An- 
drew Carnegie and Lee Iacocca than 
of such social reformers as Jane Ad- 
dams and Edward Bellamy, at least 
we show an active conscience regard- 


process; compared with his ancestors well represented among them; they 
be is developing more effective ways have included business leaders and 


to bring political attention to neglect- 
ed groups and problems. 

As far as economic payoff is con- 


government employees. 

Such people have neither de- 
creased in number over the years nor 


Issues in 1985: It Will Become 
Harder to Beat About the Bush 


ceroed, several important conditions moved from the center. Nowadays 
lie just beneath the troubling surface, they are probably more apt to express 


Inequality of wealth has been far 
from static. And since the nation has 
absorbed millions of new citizens — 
most of them poor — some argue that 
it is a positive achievement simply to 
have kept inequality from rising. Fur- 
ther, inequality of income is far less 
than inequality of wealth. 

A more profound question has to 
do with the proper economic respon- 
sibilities of political democracy. Only 
a very few ever believed that univer- 
sal suffrage would lead to equality of 
wealth. So long as there is no prevent- 
able malnutrition or widespread pov- 
erty, who cares how many museums 
J. Paul Getty has? From this point or 
view the system has come closer to 
success. Poverty has not been elimi- 
nated but, recent studies indicate, 
there are fewer pockets of “hard 
core” poor than had been expected. 
Aid in land has reduced the more 
pathetic consequences of bring poor. 

Having coded slavery and extend- 
ed suffrage to women, has the federal 
government been able to advance so- 
da] justice for blacks, women and 
other groups perceived as disadvan- 
taged? Tbe answer begins with (he 
recognition of an enormous shift in 
attitude. Early in their history Ameri- 
cans assumed that the only way to 


their concerns through cash gifts than 
through joining a protest march, but 
they are committed and persisienL 
They have been described as tbe “ex- 
treme middle,” which means fiscally 
conservative and socially liberal. 
Compared to the population at large 
they are better educated and more 
urban, coastal, female and Jewish. 
Their agenda for the '80s stresses civil 
rights fix blacks; civil liberties for 
minorities; improved female stand- 
ing in the labor force; abortion; nu- 
clear nonproliferation; conservation; 
population control; government ac- 
countability and effectiveness. 

There are more than 4 milli on of 
these reformers and they donate, an- 
nually, nearly $ 100 million in support 
of these causes. These people are not 
victims; they are not epical; they are 
Qot living in an unreal world. They 
are not anti-business; they come 
largely from management. They be- 
lieve in social change as a process in 
which the federal government must 
play an essential part. The causes 
they espouse eventually win. 

This segment of the population 
is delighted with the studies, now 
emerging, that show the success of 
many of the Johnson administration 
social programs — while they lasted. 


W ASHINGTON 
no great deba 


VV no great debate in 1984 be- 
tween a conservative president and 
his liberal challenger. By November 
Mr. Reagan was pledging to fight for 
arms control and against cuts in So- 
cial Security, and Waller Mondale 
was arguing for more defense and 
prudent budgeting. That consensus 
has set the stage for critical disagree* 
ment in 1985. Questions include: 

1) Who pays? The size of govern- 
ment — which means the amount of 
federal taxes — seems to have been 
determined for a time. Mr. Reagan 
has given up claims of reducing its 
size and is trying only to reduce its 
rate of growth. So who pays the 20 to 
25 percent of GNP that will be going 
to Washington each year? 

The key to any tax reform will be 
the method and total of taxation of 
the great middle class, liberals will 
iry lo push as much of the tax burden 
as possible on the rich and corpora- 
tions without taking so much that 
insufficient capital remains to under- 
write future economic expansion. 
Conservatives will uy to push as 
much as possible the other way, onto 
the middle class, but will have to be 
careful that the squeeze is not so light 
that the middle millions do not have 
enough expendable income to pay for 


Brazil’s Neves Should Have Support 

J ASHINGTON — The elec- By Rlordan Roett inflation to pass 250 percen 

r firm nn Inn 1 S nf Tannwin - IQH 1 ! tir Mnw mnfmnic a xli 


W ASHINGTON — The elec- 
tion on Jan. 15 of Tancredo 
Neves as the next president of Bra- 
zil was an ironic compromise 
choice, the product rtf a year of 
political confusion. It was less than 
many Brazilians wanted but per- 
haps a good deal better than most 
had expected. It is above all a sub- 
stantial victory for the democratic 
process in the world's fifth- largest 
country, and Mr. Neves should get 
whatever support he needs abroad. 

The confusion was created by the 
miliiary regime as it relinquished 
the power it had seized in 1964. In 
an effort to control the succession, 
it created an electoral college to 
ratify a candidate to be selected by 
incumbent President Jo5o Baptista 
Fi g uriredo. Tbe problem was that 
the government was unable to out- 
maneuver Panlo Salim Maluf, the 
former governor of Sao Paulo, 
when be emerged as front-runner 
among the electors from the ruling 
party. In the end the regime reluc- 
tantly embraced him, creating a se- 
rious split in government ranks. 

Meanwhile the opposition 
launched a nationwide campaign to 
force the government to abandon 
the electoral college and reestab- 
lish direct elections. When this ef- 
fort failed, the opposition and dissi- 
dents from within the rating party 
sought common cause. Governor 
Neves of Minas Gerais emerged as 
tbe consensus candidate. 

Suddenly one of Brazil's most 
cautious politicians, a 74-year-old 
warhorse who had avoided seeking: 
the presidency, became the man to 


bear. Drawing his running mate 
from the dissident wing of the gov- 
ernment party, Mr. Neves orga- 


nized a broad political coalition 
and easily defeated Mr. Maluf. 

in fact his victory may turn out 
to be just what the country needs. 
The president-elect is profoundly 
donocratic, a born conciliator, giv- 
en to caution and pragmatism. As a 
compromise candidate he also has a 
good chance of getting along with 
the military, which has wisely rec- 
ognized his popularity and guaran- 
teed his inauguration on March 15. 

His government will oversee the 
rewriting of the constitution and a 
reorganization of the party system. 
It will prepare for direct presiden- 
tial elections. It will seek. then, to 
consolidate democratic procedures, 
after more than two decades of au- 
thoritarian military rule. 

That is easier said than done. Mr. 
Neves takes office after three years 
of austerity and recession. Real 
wages have plummeted. Unemploy- 
ment is at an all-time high. Malnu- 
trition is widespread and infant 
mortality is rising. The distribution 
at income is becoming increasingly 
uneven, and the sodai agenda, long 
overlooked, is a first priority. 

Meeting the expectations of Bra- 
zil’s 130 mini on people will not be 
easy. Resources are scarce. In addi- 
tion to the SlOQ-billion foreign debt 
owed to private commercial banks, 
Brazil has a heavy burden of inter- 
nal debt. Many businessmen expect 


inflation to pass 250 percent in 
1985. Mr. Neves confronts a classic 
challenge — how to meet social 
expectations with limited resources, 
while consolidating democracy. 

The United States has an impor- 
tant role to play. Last year it ac- 
counted fa- nearly a third of Bra- 
zil's total exports of 527 billion. 
Brazil's overall trade surplus of 513 
billion helped enormously in its ef- 
fort to restore its creditworthiness 
with the international financial 
community, and the country will 
need to repeat that performance in 
1985. The United States and its 
industrial allies can best help by 
buying Brazilian exports and resist- 
ing protectionism at home. 

At the same lime, tbe private 
commerical banks, in rescheduling 
the external debt, should rive Brazil 
terms at least as reasonable as those 
granted to Mexico and Venezuela 
last year. Only in that way can they 
begin to depoliticize the debt issue 
in a country where many politicians 
champion a radical refusal to pay. 

The industrial countries must be 
aware that it is in their interests to 
see democratic government work in 
Brazil. Mr. Neves's visit to Wash- 
ington, scheduled for early Febru- 
ary, will provide an excellent op- 
portunity for the United States to 
publicly recognize the challenge be 
faces and offer its strong support. 

The writer is director of the Center 
of Brazilian Andies at The Johns 
Hopkins School of Advanced Inter- 
national Studies. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Tunes. 


By Richard Reeves 

- There was- • the products and services of -inulti- 
in 1984 be- national corporate America, 
resident and 2) Should America prepare for a 
ly November world war? After World War II it 
ig to fight for adopted a “2£ war" (conventional 
>t cuts in So- weapons) defense strategy, trying to 
ter Mondale maintain the ability to fight major 
defense and wars in Europe and Asia and a small 
at consensus war elsewhere. After Vietnam came a 
ical disagree- “IVi war” strategy, under the as- 
i include: sumption that if the United States 

x of govern- and the Soviet Union were fighting 
te amount of on two continents, the conflict would 

10 have been inevitably become nudear — and 

Mr. Reagan men and tanks and ships would be- 
redudng its come irrelevant Then the Reagan ad- 
to reduce its ministration began trying to fund a 
iays the 20 to “3 Vi war” strategy. Defense Secretary 
will be going Caspar Weinberger has testified: 
r? . “Our long-term goal is to be able to 

form will be meet the demands of worldwide war, 
f taxation of including concurrent reinforcement 
Liberals will of Europe, deployment to Southwest 
le tax burden Aria ana the Pacific and support for 
rnd corpora- other areas ..." 

» much that 3) Can a Pax Americana be tra- 
ins to under- posed? The next step in Reagan- 
expansiOQ. Weinberger thinking is to try to 
to push as change the strategic balance back to 
er way, onto its post- World War 11 state when 

11 have to be America dominated tbe world- 
snot so light The trillion -dollar dream is for a 
do not have breakthrough in space weapons and 
ne to pay for defense: “star wars." Will it work? 

Can America afford it? Could the 
Soviets match it? What would they do 
if they realized they could not? The 
answers must begin coming in 1985. 

rt 4) Are we really our brothers’ keep- 
ers? The debate over welfare pro- 
grams for the poor — not Social Se- 
lercent in curity and middle-class programs — 
s a classic will get down to basics this year. 


ing extremes of injustice. And yet, 
under the present leadership the 
American people have a chance to 
make some big mistakes. 

They must realize that the great 
importance of social change is in its 
continuity and not in its success or 
failure in reaching fixed objectives. 
And they must realize that the gov- 
ernment has come to play an increas- 
ingly indispensable role. 

To stifle this process is to court the 
violence of impoverished minorities 
as demonstrated in the city streets of 
the ’60s. To stifle it is to risk the 
disaffection of a committed minority 
of social actors whose role has been 
crucial in maintaining that balance 
between a historic commitment to 
individual freedom and the equally 
vital concent for the common weaL 

The writer, professor of U.S. civili- 
zation at George Washington Univer- 
sity and author of the forthauning book 
“Reform in America : The Continuing 
Revolution, ” contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


Developing 
Has to Do | 

With Skills | 

By Flora Lewis j 

P ARIS — In the middJcfof | 
a speech on the frustrations of ) 
development, an African official 
paused to ask: “Who started tins. . 

Third World' rating anyway — first, ? 
second, third? Why?" 

Tbe occasion was a recent confer- j 
ence of the African-American Insti- L 
tute in Gabon. The remark reflected. M 
bow much perceptions have changed M 
in little over a generation. ; Wh 

The idea of a “Third World": did EJ 

not start out as meaning a lower place 
on the totem pole. It was generated at Igjj 
the 1 955 Bandung conference, which 
President Sukarno of Indosesia.de-. |i|| 
scribed as “tbe first intercontinental Hp 
conference of the so-called colored Ip 
peoples in tbe history of mankind.'’ 

The purpose was io reject tht po, p? 
larization of the world into blocs led 
by the United States and the Soviet 
Union, to map a third way and to 
spur decolonization. That purpose A 
was reinforced at the 1961 non-; ,|i j 
aligned summit conference in Bel- [}| 
grade, a gathering of 25 legendary 
leaders that included 1 Yugoslavia's 
Tito, Indonesia's Sukarno. India's _ .. 

Nehru, Egypt's Nasser, Ghana's : il 

Nkrumah, Ethiopia's Haile Selassie 
and Cyprus’s Archbishop Makarios. 

Now the nonaligned movement in- 
dudes well over 100 countries. Some, ' . 
such as Vietnam, Cambodia and \\ 

Cuba, are quite dearly aligned. 

Classical imperialism the coloni-' 
ration of territories subjecting indigo 
nous peoples to foreign rule, has al- -• 
most disappeared. But the vocab- - ■; 
ulary remains, still passionate 
although fuzzy. With the exception of' ' ' ; 
tbe once-proud Third World label, it ~ - 
could be said that whatever has been ' 
achieved or has failed up. the oft- 
demanded transfer of technology and , 
resources, the one transfer that has : 
taken hold is that of vocabulary. 

Most of it, even the Marxist catch- *- - 
words of class, exploitation and neo- -- *• 
colonialism, originated in the indus- : _ 
trialized WesL So did tbe catchwords 
of sovereignty, independence, de-; - . 
mocracy, individual rights and na- ra- 
tional drgmty. AU have meaning, but 
not the same meaning for everybody. 

So there is something skewed in a 
debate that uses big words to describe ^ _ 
the grievances of societies grappling' ~ 
with tbe terrible problems of entering V~ 
the modern world against societies' 
that have defined — and not only for . . 
themselves — what “modem” means. " 1. 

It leads to a debilitating hypocrisy, 
on both sides. Hypocrisy is not all. ~ 
bad. It is a taril acceptance of stan- 
daids. even if they are only goals,- L77. 
very far from achievement. But it is 
an irritant and an obstacle to practi- 
cal pursuit of what is possible. 1 
One aspect to which 1 am con tin- 
ually exposed by profession is tbe “ 
complaint about the deforming, anti- — - 
social impact of the media. “Haven't’ *” 
you distorted the image of Africa?!! 
asks- a Gabonese offioaf who spent' 
years working in European tdeviaim. C:; 

A minister proclaims, “Tbe media ' 
should be at the service of develop-' 
menL” An earnest ambassador from 
Chad says, “Why don’t you consider ■■ ■ 

tbe consequences? Your reports are --■? 
drying up foreign investments.” ; : 

Tlie onslaught makes me defen- -.i*- 
sive. 1 cannot help reminding tbeoffi- - 
dal from Chad that flattering reports- 
that would mislead investors would 
make Western information services '* — 

useless, even for his country's pur- 
poses. Tbe real reason for the donri-' If” ? 
nance of Western media is that, for - H nw/.t djt 
all their faults, they are more credi- $£ k JF% £ J ] 

ble. People do not believe their own. - 

palaver, let alone that of their leaders,! jr 

their neighbors or rivals' leaders. llffn 
The best way for African and other ■ill i fj'f) ~fi*£ 
developing countries to induce a to s 

more accurate, balanced flow of in- n 
formation to the West would be to *? Uvd e u r- 
devdop their own press so that it. ' r 

provides a reasonably reliable base: 

The arguments offered for why, j tr. 
that is not possible stress mexperi- II/;. 
ence: lack of technology, cultural If..' - 
habits and especially the weakness of 
new nations trying to mold coherence - 
out of deep ethnic hostilities. This, {*'%■ 

I was told, is why one-party states 
and dictatorships cannot be avoided. . 3 ? 

The alternative would not be political ..^r 
pluralism but tribal war. 

All that is probably true. But it 
amounts to a plea for a double stan- 5 ^ 
dard, a hidden self -disdain wrapped 
in an alien vocabulary that is di- di- 
vorced from local reality. 

The antidote came from an Ameri-. • s'jT 
can engineer, a man who has spent '<; ! ' 




/ 





lie Pre 


will get down to basics this year, can engineer, a man who has spent 
Basically, conservatives are arguin g his life b uilding big, solid thing s in 
that nothing can be done about most improbable places. He is working on 
poverty, especially multjgenerational a Gabonese railroad and pretends be 
black poverty. The logical cause- is a mercenary, not concerned with 
quenceofthflt argument is that all tbe big ideas and big words. But be is, 


country can do is to try to maintain a 
growing economy for most of the 
nation — some of the poor have to 
benefit — and then combine enough 
soda! welfare and police power to 
maintain tolerable public safety from 
angry or criminal people of poverty. 

Universal Press Syndicate. 


making something real, in a real for- 
est, with real people, to create real 
wealth. “Third World" began as an. 
assertive political slogan. Now it is a 
sense of having been left behind.; 
Catching up is not about vocabulary.- 
it is about work and skills. 

The New York Times. 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

Achievements in Europe Despite the heavy influ 

„ ... , r „ grant, labor and refugees 

Regarding the Minion column “Eu- cultures and religions, E 
rape s Decline; What Illness. What not eirwrimml ran 


ropes Decline: What Illness. What 
Cure?” ( Jan. 4) by Giles Merritt: 

Tales of woe about Europe contin- 
ue to fill your pages. Tbe theme re- 
mains constant: Europe has high nn . 
employment and a lagging economy 
when compared with the vigorously 
growing Pacific Basin countries and 
with the United States. This is the 
view of someone who sees a glass as 
half empty. But those of us who like 
to regard it as half full and who are 
familiar with the situation on both 
sides of the ocean have an entirely 
different view about Europe. 

Europe has been rebuili since 1945. 

Thriving tourism, delightful central 

dries, a vigorous and dianging edu- 
cational system and an excellent in- 
frastructure have arisen from the nib- 
ble and misery of World War fi. 


Despite the heavy influx of immi- ■ 
grant labor and refugees from alien ; 
cultures and religions, Europe has, 
not experienced the race riots of ■ 
Waits, tbe civil war of Korea or tbe 
terrorism of the Middle East. 

Despite language differences, cen- 
turies of hate and strife and clash in g [ 
nationalistic interests, Europe knows 
friendship, social commitment to un- 
derdeveloped countries, excellent so- . 
dal care rot its sick and aged and a . 
high level of tolerance. 

At what social cost have tbe Pacific ; 
Basin countries -forged ahead? Who 
takes care of the environment, the 
aged, the ill, tbe hungry and tbe job* ; 
less in Brazil? How many homeless 
wander the streets of New York? 

Let's take a balanced look at the 1 
glass: It is half filled in Europe, and 
we will fill it even further. 

HANS WYNBERG. 

Groningen, The Netherlands. ; 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


Page? 


INSIGHTS 


7 a v 


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f? oftag 

:-*aSs 

•ajSs 

- 

•" * fnird Jr* 
z . 3!! °n. TV? *t 

r na g or 'll’, 

nciuaed y, 



Creighton W. Abrams 


Ellsworth Bunker 


Lyndon B. Johnson 


Walt W. Rostow 


Earle G. Wheeler 


WiBiara C Westmoreland 



The Press and the U.S. Army: A Story of Distrust in an Uncensored War; 


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ast 


By Eleanor Randolph 

fKaUngfoii fan Service 

N EW YORK — For journalists, the case 
cf Westmoreland vs. CBS Inc. has pro- 
vided a documentary windfall, a ram of 
i that give a glimpse of something many erf 
’17 years ago, but never saw 

firsthand. 

Within the thousands of cables and memos 
and letters that have been — their 

“secret” or “eyes only” den gnarimn scratched 
out lo bring than into the light erf public scruti- 
ny for the first time — reside the details of how 
US. nriHtary and government officials tried in 
1967 to foot the American press, to bide dam 
about the size of the enemy forces in Vietnam. 
It is a story about how the military distrusted 


SS 

rr.T ,‘-;v „ - 








the madia, an uncensored duster of more than 
300 accredited journalists. 

But it also is a story that hdps explain why 
many in the madia distrusted the military. The 
paper trail documents how much time, effort 
and concern was used by the men running the 
war and the government to make that 
the press did not get the idea that enemy forces 
in South Vietnam were growing at & time when 
the official fine was that they were shrinking. 

And the reason that (he story is so easily 
available in the U.S. District Court in lower 
Manhattan is (hat h is not technically apart of 
the CBS trial Almost three years ago, when CBS 
Reports aired the broadcast that is at issue in 
General William C Westmoreland's 5120-mil- 
lion libel action, the network accused the gener- 
al and his assistants of trying to deceive the 
American public, Congress and the president. 

But when the case came to trial almost three 
months ago. General Westmoreland’s lawyer, 
Dan M. Burt, made it clear that he would 
concentrate on disproving one issue — the 
allegation that the general tried to dec rive die 
president. 

T HE judge-in das. case, Hqoe-N. Leval 
warned^. Burt at the time that it nn^it 
lookafitdeoddwimheduugcdthejuiy 
at the end of the trial with their duty in this 
matter. 

“Let us say," Judge Leval told the lawyers in a 
pretrial hearing, “that the plaintiff -in an imagi- 
DBjy libel suit is somebody who has been ac- 
cused in a newspaper article of being a mobster 
who has con t ra c ted for the ktQmg of 32 people 


■ ^ and the names of the 32 people are given. And 


the last name on the list of the murder victims is 
Joe Jones. 

“The plaintiff brings a Gbd action, says the 
Denver Chronicle, or whatever it is, libeled me 
in staling that 1 arranged for the killing of Joe 
Jones. ... It seems to me the judge would have 
to say to the jury something along the lines . . . 
[that] you could not find for the plaintiff «nte*s 
you found that, riven the complete propriety of 
their stating that he killed 32 prople, that he was 
injured in ms reputation by tbe further state- 
ment that not only did he km 32, but he killed 
33.” 

As a result, some of the most fascinating 

Hnmiments put into the public record by this 
trial are about an uncontested issue — the 
military leaden* sensitivity about the pres and 
their fear that the media would distort their view 
of the war. 

The concern about the press is not 
that a warrior wants to worry about, as 
Westmoreland made clear both then and now. 
His concerns are with troop deployments and 
strategy. 

I N his book, “A Soldier Reports," published 
in 1976, he reminds readers of what other 
soldiers have said or done about the press. 
Napoleon said, “Three hostile newspapers are 
more to be feared than 1,000 bayonets.” Wil- 
liam Tecunueh Sherman, die CSvQ War general 
who tried to hang a reporter for espionage, 
com plaine d about journalists who “nave the 
im pudence of Satan” when they “poke about 
among the lazy and pick up rumors and publish 
them « facta. 

But what if, as it turned out frequently during 
die Vietnam War, the military laden thoug ht 
we were winning and a lot of their mm thought 
we werenot? Who gets to tell their version of the 
troth, or more precisely, whose truth goes to tbe 
public? 

It is always a reporter’s problem to try to 
determine who is telling the story straight, who 
is telling a narrow slice of the story or who is 
, om the big picture. Thus, what began to 
n in Vietnam was that reporters did not 
the generals at their word and the generals 
did not trust what the reporters were writing 
about the war. 

Many reporters sensed at the time that the 
facts were bang massaged, at best, sometimes 
hidden in bureaucratic garble. What follows is 
sane of die cable traffic that began when mili- 
tazy intelligence found evidence that enemy 
troops were doing better than thought 




•_i: V.;,: 

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■x'.- 



World Bank School Trains 
Managers of Third World 


. By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Times Sertfce 

TFT ASHINGTON —A term at one of 

11/ Washington’s more unusual schools 

T T has just ended. 

Souhni El Abed Aland, a senior Moroccan 
avE servant; was among tbe latest “fellows” 
m the emchusve school. El refuses to call its 
students stndoits, gives no examinations, 
identifies professors as “seminar directors” 
and provides “fellow” with an efficiency 

apa rtmen t. . 

Mr. Aland never the words to die 

school song (bis languages are French and 
Arabic), wears no school tie (because there is 
none), plays no football (his game is soccer) 
bnt says he is re turning to Rabat better 
trained in die arts of development 

This unconventional school is the World 
Bank’s Beqinmic Development Institute. Its 
alumni include Liberia’s minister of health 
and social welfare, Sudan’s state minister for 
energy, and m ’ n i~ r| g i Zimbabwe’s permanent 
secretary m the ministry of finance and eco- 
nnmwmmrning and halt the Cabinet of South 
Korea. 

The courses run through the Christmas 
week because most of the fellows come from 
non-Christian countries: the 100 Third 
Warid countries that borrow money regularly 
from the International Bank for Reconstruc- 
tion. and Development. 

The Economic Development Institute is 
wm of several Washington bodies that are 
barely noticed in the pan heal dynamics of the 
rity but are of great consequence to the out- 
side world. Eugene R. Blade, a former presi- 
dent of the Wodd Bank, recalled an expen- 
rhee at Seoul's airport some years ago that 


With 18 other Moroccan bureaucrats who 
wore bis fellow “fellows,” he also visited 
Clyde’s restaurant in Georgetown, the White 
House, the Capitol and other attractions of 
Washington, spent weekends in the Virginia 
countryside. fie also took a side trip to New 
York, where he met co m me r cial bankers in- 


pten 
started. 
1977. 


f, back in 1955, that the school was 
* came in a speech in 


on 


him the importance of tbe institute to their 
cotmtiy. 

“As I got out of the plane there was a great 
h» banner with EDI on it and a band,” M r- 
B lork gfliri “T was told that every Kratan who 
bad ever beat to EDI was there.. I had no idea 
there were so many of Own. They seemed to 
be aO over thegovemmenL’’ 

N CTgtnwr and agronomist, Mr. Alarm 
k . BO®eafthediISCtoreofahBgeiIriga- 
.*. -A. turn project in northwestern Moroc- 
co. After the five-week course that ended last 
month, he says he knows “mud* more about 
finan««l management* and is able to inte- 
grate it withtStedmical skills. 



Citibank' s retired chief executive, Walter 
Wriston. 

“New York Gty is very dynamic,” ob- 
served another of the Morocco participants, 
Abddaziz Chagou, a senior official m the 
Ministry of Finance. “It’s America’s Casa- 
blanca. Washington is wry nice, but duller, 
more like Rabat." 

Mr. Alai and Me. Chagou are among the 
20,000 Third Wodd functionaries who have 
patted through the portals of the institute in 
its nearly 30 years of operations. 

Christopher R. Willoughby, an Oxford- 
educated British economist who is director of 
the school, says that last year it “graduated” 
2J00 fellows. They took 87 courses ranging 
from general economic management to social 
forestry and primary health care. The 
courses, which varied from nip weeks to 
sevenweeks depending on tbe objective, were 
given in Pnghsh r Spanish, French. Arabic 
and Chinese. 

“Expansion of countries' human capacity 
to manage their own development is a crucial 
tacV — many would say, the heart of the 
development problem/ Mr. Willoughby 
stressed in explaining the school's mission of 
hel ping countries improve themselves eco- 
nomically. 

The classes are run tike graduate school 
seminars. “Although there are no exams, we 
them an awfullot of reading to do," said 
de I nwgrum. the school’s associate di- 
rector. 

The seminar directors are drawn from the 
Wodd Bank hself, winch has a caps of well- 
paid sp ecialis ts in just about every field of 
development- The institute started with three 
fuB-thne instructors; now there are 40. 

When it first got under way, the institute 
encountered seme hesitancy and skepticism. 
Is fact, the World Bank was so uncertain 
about the wisdom of the enterprise that it was 

willing to pay oily half the costs. The other 
half came from grants by the Rockefeller and 
Ford Foundations. 

“There are a lot of countries that would be 
poorer than they are if we hadn’t fi- 
nanced dams and roads and ports and power 
25 years ago,” Mr. Black said in 1976. “But I 
think that the gamble we took in 
^ Wishing EDI was one of the best things 
we did to help our member countries over the 
long run." 


On March 9, 1967, General Earle G. Wbeder, 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, cabled 
General Westmoreland about tbe new enemy 
data that had come from U.S. intelligence in 
Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam. At that 
point, the numbas were internal, but as General 
Wbeder put h: “If these figures should teach 
tbe public domain, they woild, literally, blow 
the fid off of Washington. Please do whatever is 
necessary to insure these figures are not. repeat 
not, released to news media or otherwise ex- 
posed to public knowledge.” 

T WO days later, a cable followed, express- 
ing concern about how the new figures, 
showing increases in Iaxger-scale attacks 
by tbe enemy, would go against what General 
Wheeler »nA ocher government nfRriak had 
been telling President Lyndon B. Johnson about 
the enemy troop levels. He concluded that “the 
tfTert of surfacing this major and significant 
discrepancy would be dynamite." 

In the following m onths^ a amilar discrepan- 
cy arose, one between the Central Intelligence 
Agency and General Westmoreland’s command 
over whether enemy strength levels were higher 
than they had Once thought It hrraunft Clear 

both to the military men and to the intelligence 
contingent in Vietnam and Washington that 
they were going to have to work out a compro- 
mise between General Westmoreland’s com- 
mand view that the enemy troops were leveling 
off at 300,000 and the CIA’s view that the 
number ranged from 420,000 to 600,000. 

The CIA wanted to count the home mifitia, 
described as children, women and old men, who 
fought with punji sticks and homemade bombs. 
The U.S. Army began saying that these people 
were civilians, that it had been a mistake to 
lump than in with the enemy troop count 
The argument between the CIA and the army 
had increased by August 1967. Bnt throughout 
the debate over the numbers runsa fairly consis- 
tent thread of concern about what would hap- 
pen if the press beard about the higher figures. 

AS a former official in charge of “pacifica- 
non,” Robert W. Komer cabled a CIA 
IX official, George A. Carver Jr., on Aug. 
19: “You can well imagine tbe ruckus which 
would be created if it came out as everything 
tends to on Vietnam that agency and MACV 
figures were so widely different. Any explana- 
tion as to why would simply lead press to 
conclude that MACV was ddiberatdy omitting 
[the home guard] category in order to down- 


grade enemy strength. Thus, credibility gap 
would be further widened at very rime when, in 
fact, we are moving toward much more valid 
estimates.” MACV stands for Military Assis- 
tance Command, Vietnam. 

The same day, Genera] Westmoreland’s intel- 
tigence chief in Saigon cabled the head of a 
militar y delegation in Langley, Virginia, where 
the CIA has its headquarters, trying to work oat 
differences with the agency. Major General 
Philip B. Davidson told Gmeral George God- 
ding that tbe enemy troop figure of 420,000. 
inclu ding the local militia, had iff Tfaccd and 
“has resulted in a scream of protest and deni- 
als." 

“I am sure that this headquarters will not 
accept a figure in excess of tbe current strength 
figure earned by the press,” he said. 

A day later, General Westmoreland’s deputy. 
General Creighton W. Abrams, expressed the 
concern to ms superiors of tbe possible press 
reaction on the issue of the military-OA debate 
on figures. He said : “The press reaction to these 
inflated figures is of much greater concern. We 
have bees projecting an image of success over 
tbe recent months, and propoty so. 

“Now, when we release tbe figure of 420- 

431,000, the newsmen will immediately seize on 
the paint that the enemy force has increased 
about 120-130,000. All available caveats and 
explanations will not prevent the press from 
drawing an erroneous and gkxany conclusion as 
to tbe meaning of the increase. All those who 
have an incorrect view of tbe war will be rein- 
forced and the task will become more difficult." 

O “eyes only" message to President John- 
sons assistant, Walt W. 


L N Aug. 29, 1967, the late Ambassador 
Ellsworth Bunker in Saigon cabled an 


Rostow: “I need hardly 
mention the devastating impact if it should leak 
out (as these things so often do) that despite all 
our success in grinding down VCNVA here, 
CIA figures are used to show that they are really 
much stronger than ever. Despite all caveats, 
this is inevitable conclusion which most of i 
would reach.” VCNVA stands for the Viet ( 
and the North Vietnamese Army. 

Over the next few weeks, various brandies erf 
the government agreed on a plan they hoped 
would trick the press, or at least send the jour- 
nalists covering Vietnam off in another direc- 
tion. The plan, believed to be instigated by the 
CIA, was that they would describe the home 
nnhtia members but not count them. The idea 
was that if you gave the press numbers erf tbe 


civilian enemy, they would add them to the 
military enemy. 

Then tbe press would compare that total with 
previous totals, resulting in stories that would be 
at odds with what a Washington Post writer, 
Don Oberdorfer, called the “success offensive” 
by President Johnson in 1967. That was a con- 
stant public drumbeat about the progress of the 
war that backfired when the Viet Cong struck 
virtually everywhere at once in South Vietnam 
during the Tet offensive in January 1968. 

D URING the pre-Tet period documented 
in the CBS case, the fear of the press 
reaction is stated in almost every declas- 
sified cable that is in evidence from tbe Vietnam 
years. At one point, Mr. Carver of the CIA 
cabled his superior, Richard M. Helms, explain- 
ing how Mr. Komer had given an “hour-plus 
monologue reviewing his and General West- 
moreland’s problems with the press.” 

Mr. Carver, whose telegrams are among the 
most florid of those from this period, said that 
Mr. Komer was adamant “in insisting that there 
must not be any quantification of the irregular 
forces on the ground that the press would add 
all figures together and, hence, quantifying tbe 
irregulars would produce a politically unaccept- 
able total over 420,000.” 

On Sept 1 6, 1967, Ambassador Bunker sent a 
confidential “eyes only" cable to Mr. Rostow. 
announcing an agreement among the various 
intelligence officers. He added: “We also agree 
with yon absolutely that no backgrounder 
would be appropriate until you. Bob McNa- 
mara, Dick Helms and others there have had an 
opportunity to go over tbe figures and to make 
sure that we are all on the same wavelength. It is 
my opinion that we should take extreme care in 
the preparation of background material and 
(hat we should both agreed as to content and 
timing before any public presentation of figures 
is matte." Robert £ McNamara was secretary of 
defense at the time. 

T HE following month, an Ocl 28, Mr. 
Bunker cabled Mr. Rostow again on the 
draft of a Defense Department press 
release being prepared on this issue: “One as- 
pect of it stm bothers General Westmorland, 
Bob Komer and myself. Given the overriding 
need to demonstrate our progress in grinding 
down the enemy, it is essential that we do not 
drag too many red herrings across the trail 
Thus, referring to old estimates of the shadowy 
self-defense and secret self-defense forces [the 


M 


home militia] and then saying we have dropped* 
them from tbe order of battle, it seems to me is- 
simply to invite trouble. We may end up wii&j 
stones that enemy strength is greater, rather, 
than less. Far better in our view to deal with thi^ 
matter orally if it arises.” - 

In a little more than a week, officials began 
briefing the press in Washington and in Saigon, 
on the new and better intelligence figures. The. 
releases stressed that the new order of battle, or 
listing of military strength, had harder data onj, 
the “tighten” and had dropped the political- 
workers, the women, old men and boys from thtf 1 
list of tbe enemy because they were “non- 
fighters." They said in essence that tbe number 
of fighters bad declined from 285,000 to 

242.000, not including political operatives. 

ANY reporters who used the figures 
stuck to the line. In fact, among the, 
few who appeared to go beyond it were 
The New Republic and The New York Times,'! 
both of which finally made a stab at tallying up!. 
(be totals in December 1967. The New Republic 
suggested the enemy probably numbered! 

400.000. The New York Times, in a Dec. 20 

article by Hedrick Smith, used the figure of 
418.000 to 433,000. ” 

But most reporters either shrugged off the" 
numbers, deciding that the latest quantification 
of a victory by the military brass was nothing 1 
new, orDetieved them. Al The New York Times,' 
for example. Mr. Smith’s article was followed 4' 
week later by a piece by Hanson W. Baldwin,’ 
who said that “military indicators in Vietnam-' 
present tbe most dramatic and clear-cut evi- 1 
deuce of progress in the war since the dark daysj 
of 1965. Mr. Baldwin cited tbe figures thaf 
were used in the press release. 

Perhaps what is most astonishing about all* 
this effort is that these same generals and gov- 
ernment officials were wagjng a war at the time, 
concerning themselves with many other issues*’ 
As General Westmoreland said during the trial.' 
he believed they would have been “dumb oxes" 
not to be concerned about what the press said in 
the nation's first uncensored war and the first 
war televised on the nightly news. 

However, as Lhe cable traffic has unfolded in 
the trial it might be araued that the press alsq 
would have been “dumb oxes” to accept what 


was given as the unvarnished truth. As < 
Westmoreland himself said in his amobiograj 
phy, “It may well be that between the news 
media and public officials there is an inherent, 
built-in conflict of interest.” 


'Underground’ U.S. Press Often Conservative 


By David Kupferschmid 

Lea Angela Times Sark* 


Ws 


ASHINGTON — The Harvard Sa- 
’ lient, a self-prodanned “alternative" 
student newspaper, is literally pro- 
duced undoground. “we’re stuck in a 12-py-5 


basement room with a one-foot hot-water 

miming 

Lais Waldorf. 


Review at the University of California, Berke- 
ley, says freedom of expression is limited at the 
student newspaper the Daily Californian, which 
his papa calls “Pravda by the Bay." 

Freedom of expression also famed the battle 
ay of many of the alternative papers of the 
1960s, same of which seemed less interested in 


relief o rganiza t ion , the Review staged a lobster 
buffet on Oxfam’s designated day of fasting. 

HE Review calls feminists “ugly ” It re- 
serves “prof essoretie" fra women faculty 
members it considers to be feminists. An 
article ridiculing affirmative action 


through it,” said the editor in 


‘ -E V° politics than in shocking their readers. One of aiding members of minority groups, 
r P 1 ^ the longest-surviving erf the formerly radical Sho Ain’t No Jive, Bro,” was wntti 

chidwii rniH worrni ntlnaivw tKn RMvlm Rarh demo 


Why do Waldof and his staff put up with 

i ffirj i conditions? “Missionary zeal" bn said 
“We want to convert what is the dominant 
ideology on campus.” 

The Salient is one of about 70 alternative 
campus newspapers launched recently around 
the United States. Their editors have much of 
the moral fervor of their anti-establishment, 
counterculture predecessors of the 1960s. 

But there is one important difference: They 
are conservatives. 

These weekly, monthly, or sometimes irregu- 
larly published papers — inspired by the pro- 
vocative and widely publicized Dartmouth Re- 
view and helped by aid from a New York 
foundation — reflect the conservative mood of 
many of today’s American students. That these 
publications are blossoming Tndientwt dmi con- 
servatism, bartered by the Vietnam War and the 
Watergate scandal is regaining its intellectual 
and idwiKaip. appeal on wwtip m 

This band of idealism, said Mr. Waldorf, is 
“about America and about what democracy can 
be.” Unlike the radical campus press of the 
1960s, the new papas cheerlead for “the sys- 
tem” — fa capitalism at home; anti-commu- 
nism abroad. Instead of denigrating big busi- 
ness, they take shots at big labor and 
government social programs. 

Today’s students, wrote George DeAn gdn in 
The Observer, an alternative papa at Boston 
College, “don’t scream about the supposed in- 
equities of the profits of corporate America, 
because they want to share in those profits.” 

O N campus issues, tbe conservative pa- 
pers praise the Reserve Officers’ Train- 
ing Corps, fraternities and sororities, 
and traditional curriculums. They press for the 
elimination of “special interest” pr og rams, in- 
cluding women’s studies, Afro-Amcncan stud- 
ies, affirmative action and college support for 
homosexual student groups, which they regard 
as products of a radicalism being advanced by 
facility members and administrators who at- 
tended college in the 1960s. 

“What remains of real radicalism,” Mr. 
DeAngelo wrote, “is a rather moribund collec- 
tion of drippy, nostalgic sentiments clustered 
among younger faculty who long to reignite the 
foolishness erf (he 1960s." 

Representatives of the new campus press say 
it provides an alternative to the liberal bias that 
pervades many student newspapers. Don Mc- 
Namara, publisher of tbe alternative Berkeley 


longest-surviving erf the formerly 
student underground papas, the Berkeley Barb, 
recently folded after spending most of its exis- 
tence as an above-ground venture. 

A paper that still survives is the conservative 
American Spectator, then a counter-countercul- 
ture student paper at Indiana University, now a 
national monthly. 


written in black 


a ™iill group of students demonstrat- 
ed against the renegade tabloid. Review staff 
members expressed their studied unconcern by 
playing croquet nearby, dressed in blazers and 
peony loafers and sipping gin and tonics. 

Offended faculty members and admmistra- 


When a small group oi students demonstrated against one 
conservative publication, staff members expressed their 
studied unconcern by playing croquet nearby, dressed in 
blazers and penny loafers and sipping gin and tonics. 


T 


The Spectator, 


with the National Re- 
surprisingly, the tradi- 


view, Commentary 
tionaBy liberal New Republic, are mentioned 
most often by the student editors as their politi- 
cal models. Thus, it is no coincidence that the 
campus papers have such names as the Wash- 
ington Spec tator the Indian* Commentary. 
Wesleyan University’s alternative paper 
changed its name from the Wesleyan Adversary, 
winch publisher Andrew Goldman said was 
mistaken for “a neo-Marxist study group," to 
the Wesleyan Review. 

Confrontation, however, was what launched 
the Dartmouth Review into the national lime- 
light after its inception in 1980. And the Dart- 
mouth Review “has been the catalyst of this 


ton have brought civil suits against five Review 
staff members in four years, so far without 
success. One black administrator took matters 
into his own' hands — and teeth ' — when he 
assaulted a Review editor, leaving him with a 
bite wound cm tbe chest. 

The faculty voted, 113-5, to censure tbe pa- 
pa, a symbolic gesture because tbe-Review is 
entirely independent of the university. 

Tbe Review’s editors have done a remarkable 
job of promoting their paper and have become 
(he shock troops for the new generation of 
alternative papas. Some of them nave gone cm 
in professional life to became leaders of a vocal 
new generation of conservatives. 



Hawkeye Review. 

The Dartmouth Review’s Latin motto, which 
t ranslates into “No one assails me with impuni- 
ty” is instructive. The original members of the 
Review staff seemed to be inspired both by Jerry 
Rubin, a radical activist, and William F. Buck- 
ley Jr., a conservative writer and publisher. They 
provoked outrage with tactics borrowed from 
Mr. Rubin’s Yippies, but at the same time 
exalted tradition, revered a free-msrkct econo- 
my and set the Review’s aristocratic tone. 

To protest college support of a homosexual 
student organization, souk Review editors pro- 
posed the “Bestiality Society” and, with stuffed 
animals in hand, went before college officials to 
demand similar organizational recognition and 
assistance. To protest what they called the 
Marxist leanings of Oxfam, tbe British famine- 


D’Souza, class of *83, recently completed a biog- 
raphy of Jerry Falwdl the Moral Majority lead- 
er, and is the editor of a conservative alternative 
alumni at Princeton University. Steve 

Kelley, dass of '81. is a nationally syndicated 
cartoonist for Tbe San Diego Union. Other 


forma editors of the Review have worked as 
speech writers in the Reagan administration. | 
Although most editors of the alternative canh 
pus papers agree that the Dartmouth Review, 
was instrumental in starting the movement, they 
give it mixed reviews. 

Michael Johns, editor in chief erf the Miami 
Tribune at the University of Miami in Florida, 
said be likes tiie Review. But be said his papa 
has a larger circulation, makes more money and 
is “more intellectual.” ’ 

Perry ffibner, editor of tbe Badger Herald at 
tiie University of Wisconan and a critic of th^ 
Review, said: “We put ourselves above politics. 
Some of these other newspapers arejust conser; 
vative sheets." 

The Badger Herald, the Miami Tribune and 
the Dartmouth Review, each with annual bud- 
gets of around $100,000, are financially sound. 
Most of their kin are not 

| HE struggling ones, said the Tribune’s 
Mr. Johns, are making the mistake o£ 
“relying on the welfare state." He was 
alluding to the Institute for Educational Affairs 
in New Yak Gty, which has given an average of 
$6,000 in start-up funds to 61 of the papers. 

The institute, which describes itself as a “con-; 
trarian" nonprofit foundation, said in its annual 
report that “our grant programs have addressed 
an underlying antagonism toward traditional 
American me, institutions and values" in “mudi 
of the elite thinking that dominates classrooms, 
chnrchct and mwtia rharni ds,” ( 

Bui Mr. Johns said that among the institute’s 
beneficiaries, only the Dartmouth Review has 
become self-arffiaenL And he said that mosto( 
the Review's money comes not from advertising 
but from alumni who are perhaps the paper’s 
biggest fans. “We’re the only conservative papa 
that has become self-sufficient by advertising," 
Mr. Johns said. ' 

The institute estimates that about 20 of the 
conservative papers it helped have folded. Oth- y 
ere are on he brink of insolvency, bill new one^ 
are springing up; the foundation expects ei gh t 
more papers to apply for grants soon. 1 
ent of the institute, sakj 
the failures. He plans to 
reduce by more than 25 percent the size of thd 
average grant, while advising students to seel 
money from a variety of sources, including stu* 
dent activity funds. But he said Ik re main^ 
“surprised and amazed" by the vibrancy of the 
conservative journalistic movement. « 


PERSONALITIES PLUS 

MARYBLUME 

IN THE WEEKEND SECTION 
OF FRIDAYS IHT 


. ’ vf- 


l 





Page 8 



Dow Jones Averages 


Own man Low Lad Coon 

Inchn 126976 (27737 125277 1255 JO — 137 

Trans 59775 M2JD 5TOJ7 594.11 + 009 

urn 14737 Mf.Itf MUD 14731 + CUM 

Com) 51173 SI 145 50175 KJA64 — 021 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Dad load 
Uncfr an aad 
Total issuos 
New Hlohs 
New Lows 
Volume ua 
Volume down 


950 1331 

m 383 

<26 322 

2075 2836 

284 230 

2 3 


INTERNATIONAL 


NYSE Index 


Htoh Low Close Orta 
Composite 10) 38 1DIJ6 10IJ8 +0.16 

IndUStrtotS 11745 116,88 11688 +623 

Transp, 9tJB 9TM 9786 +0.19 

UtlllthU 5281 52.14 £2.18—004 

Finance 10489 1D3J0 10380 +086 




90.152800 

65.119430 



Bay Sales 

•Slrtl 

Jan. 21 

234064 549712 

3312 

Jan. 18 

181788 445764 

1043 

Jan. 17 

185,183 43X332 

1717 

Jan. 16 

206785 488371 

1744 

Jan. 15 

211304 548028 

1744 

"Included In Hw, sales daures 



Tuesday s 

MSE 

OoSHlg 


VoLoUPJM 17V7M0# 

Prev.4PjM.voL 1M73M08 

Prtv coasoRdated dose MMNJM 


Tables tadode the natfomMe prices 
w to ttM dosl no oa Wall Street 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 

Declined 

Uncnonoed 

Total issues 
New Hlohs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume dawn 


date prer. 

336 663 

268 U6 

a s 


Standard & Poor's index_ 


Hloh Lew Close CtfVe 

¥S » 

SSSSne 17482 175.15 17546 +023 


NASDAQ Index 


WMK 

Close arte AM 
24842 +281 25778 
28786 +228 27444 
3 1589 + 182 
2943B +166 2B434 
25620 +140 250.20 
242.15 + 189 23693 
2S4J9 +083 23088 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Bonks 

Transp. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bends 

Utilities 

industrials 



AMEX Stock Index 


HloO Law dace arts 

21780 21569 2T7J2 +143 


6.1 
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United Press International 

NEW YORK — The slock market finished 
mixed Tuesday, with blue chips backtracking 
after spectacular gains and the broader list of 
issues advancing for the 12th day. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which 
gained 34.01 Monday, lost 1.87 to 1,259.50. 

The New York Stock Exchange index ad- 
vanced 0.16 to 101.28. lopping the record high 
reached in the previous session. The pace of an 
average share increased 5 cents. 

Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index rose 025 
to 175.48, also topping a record reached in the 
previous session. 

Advances topped declines by a 9-7 ratio 
among the 2.067 issues traded. 

Big Board volume the fourth-heaviest on re- 
cord, totaling 174.77 milli on shares. On Mon- 
day, 146.83 milli on shares changed hands. 

Robert Stovall of Dean Witter Reynolds said 
the results were better than might have been 
expected after Mondays huge gain. “There 
were signs of profit-taking with big stocks clos- 
ing well bdow the highs of the day,” be said. 

But with stocks such as AT&T. IBM, General 
Motors, and Exxon in the forefront of die 
recent advance, Mr. Stovall said, it's likely that 
there will be further gains. 

Tbe Commerce Department reported the 
gross national product grew at a strong 3.9- 
percent annnal rate in tbe fourth quarter of 
1984. An earlier estimate for fourth-quarter 
GNP had the growth rate at 18 percent. 

For all of 1984, GNP increased 6.8 percent, 
the best showing slice 1951. 

The report's measure of overall inflation 
showed a rate for 1984 of 3.7 percent, the best 
since 1967. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige pre- 
dicted the growth rate in early 1985 would be 


dose to that seen in the fourth quarter of 1984. 
He said a stronger economy could bring higher 
interest rates but only if Congress does not take 
strong action in balancing the budget. For the 
very near future, he predicted interest rates will 
decline. 

The stock market has been responding to 
Tower intern rates, improved gross national 
product, optimism about the future and lower 
inflation,” said Harry Villec of Sitro & Co.. Palo 
Alto, California. He said compared to other 
investments, stocks have been undervalued for 
several years. 

On the trading floor, AT&T was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, unchanged at 21. 

IBM was second, up 1% to 12m 

Merrill Lynch was third, unchanged at 30. 
Two blocks of 481,000 shares crossed the tape at 
30%. 

General Motors added Vt to 82%, Ford was 
unchanged at 4916 and Chrysler fell Vi at 33 Vi. 

Exxon gained % to 48V&, Chevron % to 3314 
and Sun Co. Vi to 4644. Indiana Standard, which 
raised its quarterly dividend from 75 cents to 
82J5 cents, gained V* to 56K. Mcibl lost % to 28 
and Atlantic Richfield fell % to 45%. 

Rockwell International, wind] reported first- 
quarter net of 94 cents per share vs. 59 cents, 
added V4 to 32%. 

Data General Corp., which reported first- 
quarter net of 87 cents per share vs. 40 cents, 
advanced 1 to 624k 

Digital Equipment, which reported second- 
quarter net of SI. 81 vs. $1.41, jumped 2 to 113%. 

Texas Instruments spurted 2% to 129%. Mo- 
torola added % to 57% and National Semicon- 
ductor shed % to 13. 

Control Data fell % to 35% and Burroughs 
lost 1% to 61%. 


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' SOCIETE GENERALE 
ALSAOENNE DE 
BANQUE 

$ US 20 MILLION FL.R. 
DUE 1989/1991 


For six months, from January 18, 
1985, to July 17, 1985 the notes will 
carry an interest rate of 9,0625 56 
per annum. 

The interest due on July 18, 1985 
against coupon number 12 will be 
$ US 45.56 and has been computed on 
the actual number of days elapsed 
(181) devtded by 360 

THE PRINCIPAL PAYING AGENT 
SOCIETE GENERALE 
ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
LUXEMBOURG BRANCH 


SOCIETE GENERALE 
$ US 50 MILLION FL.R. 
DUE 1991 

For three months, from January 
18, 1985, to April 17, 1985 the notes 
will carry an interest rote of 8 5 /s% 
per annum. . 

The interest due on April 18. 1985 
against coupon number 23 will be 
$ US 21,56 and has been 
computed on the actual number of 
days elapsed (90) devided 
by 360 

THE PRINCIPAL PAYING 
AGENT 

SOCIETE GENERALE 
ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
LUXEMBOURG BRANCH 


32 23* 17*996 74 17 80 75 29* 29* 29*+* 

19* 15* Lucky* 1.16 67 10 2539 18* n 18* 

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29 29 — * 

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such as MoSi i 
Perrier group, 


£osmair, the U.S. licensee of L’Orfcal, have fashioned 


themselves a i 
“ Someof ttw 

style and. «SF 
Departing fn 
groups are a 
with a senior, 
executive alt 


portable spot in the U.S. market, 
pore successful companies share a management 
ption that have helped them in the U.S. markeL 
[the stereotype of French management, i hffsr 
decentralized 


many F rench, 

[top who acts 


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as mediator, m ns lator, corn* 

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French headoarters and the understands both 

U. S. oompancs. Usually the tl , 

U-S. compaitts in the group mentalities. 

are manager by American 

managers. [ 

It would k an exaggeration to say that there is a direct 
correlation ntween management style and success or failure in 
.the U.S. maset In a y ear-old study done in the United States by 
r^rthnr Youg International and toe French-American Chamber 
of Comxne^, 61 percent of the French subsidiaries surveyed 
.attributed tmculties to the competitive U.S. market, 26 percent 
to high finace costs and only 13 percent to poor management 
>Managempt problems have not been the main problem faced 
rfiy French feopanies in the U.S-,” said Sage Beflanger, president 
of the F rem- American Chamber of Co mmer ce and executive 
Vice presidat of Crtxht Industrie! et Commercial in New York. 

V, Most owe companies surveyed attributed their success to a 
'superior dodoct line — but they also referred to two manage- 
’.peat faesra as critical: marketing expertise and superior cus- 
[.tcanersenoe. Among the growing companies, these functions are 
? usually uder U.S. management. 


”Hie best solution is 
to get a person who 
understands both 
mentalities ” 


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ami. Qtttarduta from Omrtors ondAP. 


Interest Bates 

icy Deposits 


1M. Stk 
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3M. 89k 

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k> laferbank de«*»ffs of SI million minimum for rwfwtertf/. 
mi Gcwmftr (donor. DM. SF. Found. FF); Uayds Bank ( ECU! ; atlbonk 


dollar Rates 


2HNW. 

Ik -• Hr 


Key lousy Rates 


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son Rote 
oner, J6- 17V days 
treasury Blits 

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ntti Interbank 
lafttrUank . 
interbank 


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(Srtritb interbank 


KM 1IHW6 

9-lOkk MOVi 

7X7 no 
7X6 7J0 

7J0 7X0 

7X6 7X4 

7JB 7X3 


SJO SJO 
150 &5D 
-5X5 SJS 
5X0 170 
5X5 SX5 


lOtt KM 
1«1» 
iim km 

10M KM 
un* KM 


Bank Bom MM 
CoH Momv 
91-dav Traonirv Bill 
3-fnarM In ter ba nk 


Discount Rate 
CoH Monev 
6Moy IntertWMt 


12 12 

12 1216 
11M lUb 
12 1/15 H 


5 5, 

616 ■ 6 Vi 

6 5/16 6 5/14 


Gold Prices 


f C> . '■ 

K ; - rjf 


Avao; Rmdori, Commoatoonk. Credit Ly- 
pats. ijord* Bank,. Ba/Ut at Takm ._ ... 


Aft PJW. Qfoc 

Hm Kan 30745 304.7S -040 

Lunmbaum 30A50 — “BiS 

Fam IQS tool - 36623 30L27 +045 

Turki. 307X0 »S0 -US 

London 304X5 306.90 — 0^ 

- MUO -440 
official (brings lor LoAdM. Porfc and Linein- , 

Beg^ooantngandctolnapricssfcir Haig Kong . 

and ZuriA New York Come* onreni eontroa 
Afl priCM In UXX per ounce. j 

Sovrtx: Routcrx [ 


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HcralbS^&ribunc 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


rrr: 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 

\ - 

* - - . 

IHTEHWAnOHAt MANAGER 

French Touch or U.S. Style? 
Some Sai 'BiculturaF Best 

• fly SHERRY BUCHANAN 
? ' ■ f riuenmiondt Herald 7hbute 

| ■'t RENCH 4pmpanies with operations in the United States 
. Li have ha< their share of problems. Among these are 
' f I * Cacbarea Moulinex, Rossi gnol Slri*, Motob6cane «nrf 
-R- AgachfrpiUoL But sckdc of the larger French groups, 
such as Mofit HOTessy, Qub MMiterranfe, Mcridien Hotels, &e 
Perrier group, tlr scatware company Cap Gemini DA5D, and 


Page 9 


Profits Up 
At Indiana 
Standard 

17% Rise Came 
On Lower Sales 

Compiled by Ow Scoff From Dispaicka 

CHICAGO —Standard Oil Co. 
Of Indiana has repated that ccc- 
soHdated net income tor 1984 rose 
17 percent from a year earlier to a 
record $1183 When, or $7.70 a 
share, from $1,868 billion, or $639 

a share. 

TberisecarociksphcadccKneio 
revenue, to $29 bnhon from $293 
billion a year earlier, the company 
said. 

Fourth-quarter net income rose 
only slightly from the 1983 period, 
to $465 wiuHnn, or $1.72 a share, 
from $459 uuffion, or $137 a share, 


A U.S. Trader’s Silken Ties to China Central Banks 

In Europe Act 
Against Dollar 


Shamash&Co. Develops 
Key Role in 2 Countries 

By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York, Timer Serrice 

WASHINGTON — Jack Shamash, a New 
Y cut-based trader, recently signed an agreement 
in the northern Chinese city of Dafien, then cele- 
brated with his partners at a imilti-course banquet 
highligh t ed by frequent toasts and servings of 
crunchy fried silkworms. 

The peanut-sized silkworms, a not unco mmo n 
food in China, were singularly appropriate because 
Mr. Shamash had just signed ajoirn venture with 
China Silk Carp., one of the biwest of the state- 
owned enterprises. It produces s3k in nearly ad of 
China’s provinces and employs 50 million waters. 


l. ^vantage of keeping a F renchman at the top is the 
? 1 1 yng ties to headq uarters that moat manager s heKew. are 

ijv-Tr nedol, especially during the start-up period. Yet many 
^renchMiiagm expect to be rqjlaced by an American socmer or 
’later, ley note that U.S. subsidiaries is Europe started with 
senior j-S. managers and gradually switched to Europeans. 

- 4 | fWp planning for an American to take oyer,” said Michel 
iBertyjresidcQt of Cap G emini DASD, which specializes in 
raHungngGn software matters. “It’s my job to train him and find 
him.’fap Gemini has been in the United States for four years. 
“We 6ent six months hesitating about whether to have an 
attsMT or somebody who would know everything about the 
gcomr said Mr. Berty. “I was the first to suggest the latter and 
.uznongly got the job. The next thing I knewTwas moving with - 
my My to Milwaukee.” 

— Sal Bernard Kcot, president of the Moftt Hennessy group in 
'the piled States: “In some ways I am just a prolongation of the 
Fresh bolding company. It’s important that the communication 
linepe good between the subsidiaries and the parent, especially 
in tf beginning.’’ Mr.- Kcot has bees in the United States since 
'199 Same French companies that have been in the United 
Suss for more than 10 years, such as Cosmair, still have a Paris 

^ - what’s important is to teach the L*Or6al way” said Jean 
*t4r, president of Cosmair. Other French operathms in the 
Ufed States waot, to keBp a-Ercachmarrat the top as part of 
3ft image. “We try to have French managers,” raid Robert J. 
jjfee, general manager of the Hotel Patker-Meridieo in New 
Atk. Despite his own Anglo-Saxon habits at breakfast — he eats 
T (Continued on Page 11, CoL 4) 

• i 

* _• ■ 

2 . Late interbank rotes on Jan. 22 , exdudmg fees. 

fbanaffor Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, MSan, Paris. New York rates at 


Revenue dipped to $7 raUion in 
the period from S7.41 billion a year 
earlier. 

The earnings gains reflected im- 
provements in all of -Indiana Stan- 
dard's principal lines of business, 
Richard M. Morrow, chairman and 
chief executive officer, said. 

Exploration and production op- 
erations benefited primarily from 
higher volumes in worldwide crude 
oil and natural gas production, the 
company said. 

Chemical earning s reached a re- 
cord high as sales volumes and 
m a r grim improved for all major 
product lines. 

Refining, marketing and trans- 
portation operations also reported 
improved results over 1983. 

However, the company said the 

imp m w iwncnt in those fljeaS WHS 

due primarily to more favorable 
non-operating factors. 

The Chicago-based company 
also said it raised its quarterly divi- 
dend on common siodc by 7Vi cents 
a share, to 82tt cents, payable 
March 10 to hdders of record Feb. 
6 . 

The company’s shares rose 75 
cents Tuesday on the New York 
Stock Exchange, to close at 
$5630. (UP I, Reuters) 

■ Canada Proposes Price Cttis 

Canada’s National Energy 
Board has proposed cutting the 
price of the «1 it exports to the 
United States between SI. 13 and 
$1.89 a band, effective Feb. 1, the 
Associated Press reported Tuesday. 

If the reduction is approved by 
the cabinet, the price of light ofl 
shipped to the United States would 
fall to $2536 a band and heavy oil 
to $2338 a band. 


Mr. Shamash and his Western partner in the 
Dalian venture, Courtxulds Ltd. of London, each 
agreed to invest $13 mflfif m to setup adying-and- 
fimshing plant in China lor tussah silk, a ropgh- 
textured fabric used for blazers and other sports- 
wear. His famfly-owned trading company, S. 
■Shamash & Sons of New York, wQ2 market the 
fabric to apparel makers worldwide. Courtanlds, 
an old-line British textile producer, is supplying 
the manufacturing expertise. 

The United Stales imparts $100 million worth of 
silk annually. $20 mflfcac of which comes from 
China — and 80 percent of the Chinese imports are 
handled by the sh«ni«-di company. The roots of 
this relationship go hark a century. Mr. Shamash, 
(SO, was bom in Baghdad but came to New York 
G«y as a teenager. He is descended from a family 
of Iraqi merchants which has traded with China 
for more than 100 years. 

Mr. Shamash is cate of the few China traders to 
survive in America after the years of China's isola- 
tion from the West With the doors wide opes 
again, S. Shamash A Sons is booming, not only U a 
textile merchant, but also as a broker for other 
American companies «v4rir^ > business with the 
Chinese. 

As the leading silk importer into the United 
States, Mr. Sh*ma«h has a network of contacts 
both in Bering and the provinces. Now that the 
provinces have been riven mare economic autono- 
my, he is bong asked increasingly to advise them 
both on investment and export peukaes. He recent- 
ly helped Szechuan province, far example, on the 
rale of glassware to the United States. 

At the same rime, through new relationships 
with Jardme-Matheson, the giant Hong Kong 
trading company, Minnesota Mining and Manu- 
facturing Co. and Coortaulds, he is emerging as a 
broker engaged in helping American and other 
foreign companies either sell or invest in China 
through joint ventures with the Chinese. 

When not in Dafien. Mr. Shamash may be in 
Begint Shanghai or Guangzhou, or in the prov- 
inces. He makes several trips annually, spending 
two to three months a year in China. He travels 
with a aide, but rarely uses an interpreter, relying 
instead on what he describes as passable Manda- 
rin. 

Typically, after a nig ht to a provincial dty, a 
shaky, vintage Toyota will take him from the 
airport to hotels like the Dafien, a faded and 
cradced structure in Dafien town, or the New Swan 
Hotel in Harbin, a city in Heilongjiang province. 
Sometimes be stops at the Shanghai Peace Hotel, 
which used to be owned by a trading company that 
his grandfather and father had been connected 
with. 



Compiled tf Oar Staff Frvn IXsptXcha “Rather than Wait fOT the GNP 

LONDON — Coordinated in- figure, the banks probably decided 
tervenfion by several European to show the market dearly they 
central banks succeeded m b raking were prepared to defend their cor- 
the dollar's rise in European trad- rendes,” said David Sawyer, depu- 


ing Tuesday. But the U3. currency 
remained weS bid and ended at 
Monday’s dosing levels, dealers 
and analysts said. 


ty economic adviser at Barclays 
Bank PLC in London. 

The UJ5. Commerce Depart- 
ment reported after the incerven- 


The central banks of West Ger- tion was already underway in En- 
many and Austria confirmed that rope that the U.S. economy 
they had sold an unspecified expanded by 63 percent in 1984, 
amount of dollars, with dealers es- the best expansion for any year 


timaring that the Bundesbank since 1951, and by 3.9 percent in 
alone may have sold about $100 die final quarter. At the same time, 
minion the agency reported, inflation 

Dealers said that the BaiiV of slowed to a rate of 3.7 percent for 
England, which two weeks ago was the year, 
still staunchly refuting to defend . However, Tuesday’s intervea- 
the pound, took part in Tuesday’s tion appeared to promise more 
attempt to sap the denar’s strength, than it delivered, analysts noted. 

Dealers also said that the Although the dollar sank to as low 
French, Dutch and Scandinavian as 3.16 DM aftCT the concerted scB- 


centrai banks were also active, al- 
though there were no signs of inter- 


an, it recovered to finish in 
nrt at 3.165 DM, little 


tore were no signs or inter- rraniaun at j.ioj wm, im. 
by the U3. Federal Re- changed from its finish Monday. 


ito Now Yoti Tints 

Jack Shamash: A 100-year family fcra- 

efition that started with teas and opnnn. 

“Our family has been associated with China for 
100 years, starting with my grandfather Saleh Sha- 
mash, who represented ED. Sassoon, a Baghdad- 
based company with branches in India and Chi- 
na,” Mr. Shamash sgid. “Xbey traded in teas, silks 
and opi um ” 

Saleh Shamash not only represented the Sassoon 
trading company bat was related to the Sassoon 
family by marriage, arid named his son for them. 
Sassoon Shamash <»gtahiichi-d his own trading 
company, first in Baghdad and latex in. New York. 

His son — who early on simplified his riven 
name from Jacques to Jack — was sent from 
Baghdad to school in England, but cauqrieted his 
education at Horace Mann High School in the 
Bronx, New York, and the University erf Virginia; 
then he joined the family business in New York. 
He has never lived in China. 

In 1949, after the Communists came to power, 
Sassoon Shamash moved his Far East operations 
out of China to Japan, and concentrated on devel- 
oping trade with Korea. But in April 1972, two 
months after President Richard M. Nixon’s trip to 
Beijing, S. Shamash ft Sons was invited by the 
government to return to the China aDc business. 

“China trade runs in the Hood,” Mr. Shamash 


serve Board. 

The orchestrated sales, which 
dealers called moderate at about a 
total of $250 million, appeared to 
confirm the banks’ resolve to honor 
the agreement readied by five fi- 
nance minister in Washington last 
week to enter the markets as neces- 
sary to check any excessive dollar 
rise. 

Before the intervention, market 
anticipation that the United States 


Later in the United States, the 
dollar rebounded to 3.1770 DM. 

Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with late Monday: 
2.6683 Swiss francs, up from 
2.6663; 9.70 French francs, down 
from 9.71; 335785 guilders, down 
from 33805; 1^47.80 Italian lire, 
down from 1,948.75, and 13240 
Canadian dollars, up from 1 3212. 

In London, the pound fell 


e the intervention, market cn London, the pound fell 
ttion that the United States against the dollar, to $1.1245 from 
release data showing a $1-1255 late Monday, 
strong rise in the U3L gross nation- Other late dollar rates in New 

al product last year had pushed the York included: 2.6790 Swiss 
pound under $1.12 and the Dent- francs; 9.71 French francs and 
sebe mark to a record low of 132445 Canadian doOars, up from 
3.1845. 132335. (Reuters, AP) 


Allianz Chief Forecasts 
Higher Profit for 1984 

O 


By Warren Geder 

Inuenationnt Herald Tribune 

MUNICH — Allianz Verscher- 
ungs-AG, West Germany’s largest 
insurer, wiD apply 1984 earnings to 
company reserves and toward a 
dividend payment at least equal to 
the cunent lO-Deutsche-mark’ 
($3.15) payout, according to the 


15.4 billion DM a year earlier, be 
said. 

Mr. Schkren said that 1984 con- 
solidated earnings, benefiting pri- 
marily from markedly higher earn- 
ings from capital investments as 
well as gains of more than 200 
million DM from the sale of seemir 


“China trade runs in the Wood,” Mr. Shamash ($3.15) payout, according to the nes > would Ucdy top 1983 group 
said. “Thai’s probably why they invited us back company’s chief executive. Wolf- BaL > 

They’re believers in tradition.” ' gang Schkren. from nominee acanbes wouldmrt 

Headded: “Personal relationships are extremely But Mr. Schieren, who predicted re 5? 1 year-eartier result of isz 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 1) higher earnings for the year with- 


But Mr. Schieren, who predicted year-earher result of 182 

higher earning* for the year with- m ”W> n .D M. 

ZLTSv- cnmAttodiwd Earnmgs from Allianz insurance 


People Express 

RaisesMost 

OfhsFares 

The Associated Press 

NEWARK, New Jersey — Peo- 
ple Express Airlines Inc, a leader 
among discount airlines, is raising 
fares an average 10 percent on afi 
bm one of its nights. 

The fare boosts, announced by 
the company Monday, range from 
$1 to $26 on rate- way travel and 
take effect March 1. 

Theincreases result from “gener- 
al cost increases.” said Russell 
Marchetta, a spokesman for People 
Express. 

“Everything we’re buying in the 
operation of the aircraft is going up 
except for fad prices, which remain 
stable,” Mr. Marchetta said. 

Some of the fare increases: 

• From Newark International 
Airport, where the 4-year-old air- 
line is based, to Washington’s Dul- 
les International Airport air fares 
will rise to $30 for ail flights. The 
current fares are $19 during off- 
peak hours and S29 doling peak 


Hong Kong Land Sells Utility Stake 


United Press iroemaaonoi the September 1 982 start of I 

HONG KONG — A leading aborts between Britain and 
Hang Kong property developer, on Hong Kong's future, 
crippled by the slump in the coto- “1 have been watching thi 
nys property market, said Tuesday parry for two years now,” s 
that it will sell its controffinginter- Ka-shing, the chairman of 1 
est in a local utility in an effort to son and a prominent Hong 
reduce its massive debt. businessman. “This is a go 

Hong Kong Land Co. an- vestment for Hutchison.” 
nounped tto it has agwd to sdl its Hong Kong Dad once ex 

34-pensnt .slake m Hong Kong ^ fnrtr 


J mg a major restructuring, is Huso 

But prices for such prime locations ^h cash that could be used to 
have now dropped to $2.70. finance a takeover or diversifica- 

The company sold its 34-percenl uon program. 

fi. ..k-i.-h. l.u:.. «« F..n 


at Allianz's U3L subsidiaries and 

elsewhere outside West Germany, 
mg a major restructuring, is huso - 


Died by the stamp in the coto- “1 have been watching this com- interest m its other utility holding, ‘‘Establishing our own fnll-ser- Schieren said, 

property market, said Tuesday pany for two years now,” said Li Telephone Co., two vice ban*: would not be particularly Allianz posted 

it will sell its controlling inter- ka-shing, the chairman (k Hutchi- yearsago. sensible for Allianz, Mr. Schieren of 320.4 million Dm m IV8 J. up . 

n a local utility in an effort to son and a n mminen i Hone Kona Simon Murray, chief executive said Monday. But he did not rule percent from 2548 nriffion DM 


in addition to a 300-mQIion-DM 
setback in claims resulting from a 
destructive hailstorm that hit 
southern Germany in July, Mr. 


d net group profit 
DM in 1983, up 26 


businessman. “This is a good in- of Hutchison, said 


market has 


tong’s out some future engagement with 
got a banks in an effort to stake out an 


year earlier. 


way to go," bat declined to unspecified role in consumer cred- 




SSdSKoS .fed fort— e» in ‘ ^.Scitaen^AUi^Uin- 

p^cocSinHSnB&M&to » ** “ « tere^mKqm^.lli® ipur- 

the conglomerate Hutchison according to company estimates, anceconmanym the Umted States. 

Whampoa Ltd. for $371 nriffion DUSU ^ lllsn,CL Mr. Murray said Hong Kong He said, however, that “you need a 

(2.9 biffioa Hong Kong dollan). In 1982 Hon S Ko ng L and Land probably made no profit good offer, and currently we don’t 

Hong Kong Land currently bias bought a downrown waterfront ate from the sak. see any.” 

$1.9 billion in debt, acquired for more than 5800 nnmon to de- Stock-market trading in Hong Last May, Affianz dropped plans 

through heavy borrowing during v ^°p a twin- towered office com- Kong ixnd, Hntddson and Hong to acquire the insurance divisious 
the colony's property boom m plot called Exchange Square. Kong Electrics shares was suspend- of Annco Incx, the diversified U3. 
1981. The company had hoped to rent ed Tuesday morning after rumors ■ steel and energy group. 

The market property dumped office space at $5.10 per square swept the colony of the impending Mr. Sdricren also said that Al- 
amiri the uncertainly that followed foot (about $55 per square meter), announcement hanz intends to lift its stake in 


for more than $800 nriffion to de- Stock-market trading in Hong Last May, Allianz dropped plans 
velop a twin- towered office com- Kong ixnd, Hntddson and Hong to acquire the insurance divisions 
pkx called Exchange Square. Kong Electrics shares was suspend- of Annco Inu, the diversified U.S. 

The company had hoped to rent ed Tuesday morning after rumors ■ steel and energy group, 
office space at $5.10 per square swept the colony of the impending Mr. Sdricren also said that Al- 


In Besse, Renault Gets Deft * Surgeon 9 


• Fares from Newark to London 
will rise to $169 from S159 for 
coach class and to $450 from $439 
for premium class. 

• The fare from Newark to Na- 
tional Airport in Washington wiD 
rise to $30 from $29 for off-peak 
flights, and to $50 from $45 during 
peak hours. 

• Fares from Newark to Boston, 
Baltimore, Hartford, Connecticut, 
and Ncrifolk, Virginia, will increase 
to 530 from $19 for off-peak 
flights, and to $50 from $29 for 
peak-hour flights. 

• Coach fares from Newark to 
San Francisco and Los Angeles wiD 
rise to $129 from SJJ9 during off- 
peak hours, and to 5169 from $149 
during peak hours. 

The only flight on which fares 
were left unchanged is service be- 
tween Baltimore and West Palm 
Beach, Florida, which is $89 off 
peak and S99 peak. 


amid the uncertainty that followed foot (about $55 per square meter), announcement h a nz intends to lift its stake in 

Italy’s second-largest insurer, 

Riunione Adriatica di Simula 

In Besse, Renault Gets Deft 'Surgeon 9 

New York Tunes Sendee After a speD al Elf Aquitaine, the peared, but with little political an- nance its growing stake in RAS bat 

NEW YORK — Georges Besse, stauwxjntroDed ofl company, Mr. banrassment for the government ^ Jrft ^tcuc&d a 550-nriHion- 
who was named Tuesday as the Besse was tapped by France’s So- Mr. Fabius, seeking to mate the DM ^ through 

next chief executive officer of Re- cialist administration in 1982 to nationalized sector mere efficient ^ year of a 30- 

naalt, France’s stale-owned anto- take charge of Pfechiney Ugine while faring parliamentary eko- p ercect stake in Eapt* Star Hold- 
maker, has the reputation of being Kuhlman SA, a straggling ahum- dons next year, hopes that Mr. p £q 


New York Times Service 


aam and ehamcwl enterprise that Besse can do this again, 
had just been nationalized. As head of Renault, 1 


a deft corporate surgeon, skilled at 
restructuring troubled nationalized 
companies without making politi- 
cal waves. 

The appointment of Mr. Besse, 
58, follows ihe resignation Monday 
of Bernard Hanon, who was forced 


out by Prime Minister Lanreat Fa- of 550 million francs for 1984. 
bins in a dispute over Renault's The way Mr. Besse turned P6- 


mgs mx. 

The RAS takeover would xignifi- 


bad just been nationalized. As head of Renault, Mr. Besse expand Allianz’s premium 

His mission was to narrow its will also be responsible for its income from abroad, as more than 
losses, and they shrank dramatical- North American operations, Amer- half of RAS*s premium funds are 
ly —from 43 oflUon francs in 1982 ican Motors Corp. and Mack foreign-based. The foreign share of 


iIptapman 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDU 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded hie tobondng 
after as charges: 

IN I960: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: —24% 
as of 

JAN. 17, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
US. $65,18936 

Mors than $50,000,000.00 
curronhy under management 


jukks, sou uic> auiiuu. uiouMuwu- in otui / uuci itsui upcrauuus nun* jjajf oj rass premium rands are 
ly— from 43 billion francs in 1982 ican Motors Corp. and Mack foreign-based. The foreign share of 
to 294 million francs in 1983. K- Trucks. Renault owns 46.4 percent 1984 pnammn income at Affianz 
chmey is ejected to report a profit ofAMC and 40.6 percent of Mack, grew to 19 percent from 173 per- 
rf 550 nriUiM i francs for 1984. But AMC and Mack seen Kkdy con in 1985, Mr. Schieren said. 
The way Mr. Besse turned re- ^ CSCSDC ^ worst of the Besse Wodd group premiums rose 5.7 

iffion DM, from 



cuspate over Kenamt s me way mt. oessc wm«i rc- to escape the worst of the Besse 
mounting deficits. The company’s chiney around was to sdl off its ctbaiis- both are nrofiluble. 

loss for aD erf 1984 is estimated at 9 nnprofitabie heavy-chemical oper- ^ ’ 

billion francs ($925.9 nriQirm). ations to other nationalized compa- 1 
Mr. Besse’s appointment Tries- tries, prime uneconomical ahum- 


percent, to 1 


■fetex BMJ 667173 UW 


day in Paris by Rojauli directors is num production and negotiate a 
expected to be confirmed Wednes- lower price for the electricity used 
day by the French ca bi net. in making aluminum. 

Mr. Besse, who cranes from a In ihe process, 4,000 jobs disap- 

modest family, is a graduate of 

France’s elite Ecofe PoMechnique. 

He began his career in the national- 
ized nuclear industry, where he rjZj “ 

hripedbufld up Cogema, a nuclear- L -M 

services company. ‘ 




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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1983 


Tuesday?? 


Nisi; 


.1.', 1 1 


Tcfcta rsdtxfe the raftamtfde prices 
bp tottie dosing on wall Street 


W4 




5 A 

nA4 

8 

IIUJ 

5 

7 

U 

7 

24 

9 

183 

18 

102 

S 

129 

7 

74 

7 

115 


114 


1M 


1M 


724 



m- w 

15% 

70* 
17*1—1 
13*— * 
17* — * 
70*— * 
MW 

10*— * 
s m— * 

24* 

26* + * 
21* — W 

a 

24+1* 

29*1 

17*+ * 
4IW— W 
12*— * 
BH+ V* 
40*— W 
1W + V* 
I7W— * 
2BM + * 
3D + * 
M*+ * 
V5W+ Vi 
20 *— * 
14*1 

MW+ * 
1 ** + * 
37*+ Vk 
4514 — - * 
UW+ * 
SI — w 
40*— * 
15* + W 
14*+ * 
12 *— * 
43*+ W 
31*— * 
34*— * 
35 — * 
75 +2* 
56*—* 
25* + * 
3* 

am—* 

52* 

at*— * 

21 + W 

34*+ * 
24*— * 
25* — W 
15*+ * 
4* 

75 + * 


26* 25* 25* 
27* 27H 27* 
14* 13* 13*' 
50* 40* 60* 
05 55 05 

04 55 54 

75* 


41 37* 
774 0* 

72 17 
Sir 32* 
100 34* 
mi »* 
725 22 
005 9* 
7* 
27* 
28* 


PHH JH 
i PPC . MO 
. M* 58 
nAM 1J0 
I PocAS MO 
i POCGE M2 
I POCUfl U3 
i PeLum 13B 


2M 20* 20*— 

JSsrae: 

raw n*tn* 

15* 14 ,-W» 
37* 37*. 37* 
27* 244V 27* + 
5* 4* 6* — 
15* 15* 15* 

9* «* 7* 
25* 25* 25*— 
32 31* 31* + 


PocRspf 2J0 
PocSd AO 
PocTrta 540 

paoroi m 
Podfcu 232 
Poetfpf Ajp 


M fl 477 
44 M 704 
' J 75 

. .59 

4.1 W 1 
92 7 1071 
124 43 




is- 




32* 21 QuMfor 140 54 9 255 2*4 29* 27*— * 
20* 14 QkRell 3K11U 851 »* 19* 19*- * 






10* 27* QuakOi 
19* 15 QuokSO 
12* fi* Quw 


3237 35* 33 34*— 1* 

4.1 M SZ7 19* 19* 19* + * 
53 325 70* 10* 10*— * 





m 


i 


34* 

m* 02 

17* 9* 
55 53* 

5* 3* 


59a 1.1 

240 

74 

244 

94 

4R 

111 

208 

75 

340 

43 

1J0 

34 

48 

11 

J8 

13 

4J0e 

45 

144 

43 

348 

84 


The Krugerrand is 
an easy wav to invest 
in gold. 

Why? 

Krugerrands re genuine legal 
tender gold coins No other gold 
coin offers you as many good 
investment asset » : exactly one 
ounce, 1/2 ounce, 1/4 ounce and 
1/10 ounce of 999? fine gold plus a 
touch of hardening alloy. 

Since they areminted in 
volume they are slid at an 
advantageously lov premium over 
the daily gold price at banks, 
bullion coin dealers and precious 
metal brokers. 

International GoldCorporation 
1, rue de la Rdtisseie 
1204 Geneva - Switzerland 






4*- 


mt 




14 

27* 

20* WICOR 

230 

04 

5 

27 

27* 

27* 

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fc 

49 

34* WAR pf 440 105 


601 45 

45 

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% 

32* 

28* Wocftvs 

92 

23 

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533 

32* 31* 

31*—* 


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19* 

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130 

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34* 

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44 

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48 

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49* 33* Xarex 340 7 j0 T315830 43* 41*) +1* 

98* 45* XOTOXBf 545 11.1 344 49* 49 t*— * 

14* 19 XTHA 44 24 W 764 25* 25**+ 11 


I 




l ia±u 


Opening lor Talks 
1 b Seen in Moscow 













Leaders Vow to Push 




Agneamt 




P=3= 


WoteniUadadloiibt 

UABw w er y’ iIWr 


*3* hop,v 


Subscribe to the IHT today and save up to half the newsstand price. For new subscribers only. 

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* BUSINESS ROUNDUP 




** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


Page 11 


’N ! 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 


r 


American 


Express Co. 

‘allov dllL 


Prime Unveils Powerful Computer 



ssif 


The Associated Press 

‘ NEW YORK. — American Ex- 
was Ca said Tuesday that ii 
earned 5 169.5 milli on in the fourth 


[ Pl%n *ito. huarter, duupty reversing a year- 
: ai bant ^ earikf toss of 521^ rmllioa. 

i r .- ' But another financial services 
jnd investment company, Paine 
Webber Croup, said. its fiscal first- 
Boarter profit tumbled 35 percent 
from a year earlier despite a 21 
percent revenue gain. 

• American Express, whose in vest- 
1 , i r»«i unit is Sheaison Ldunan/A* 
surican Express Inc, said fourth- 
quarter profit equaled 76 cents a 
ws, share. Revenue jumped 38 percent 
to S3i billion from S2J3 bufion. 

:.j; For all of 1984, American Ex- 
t press said earnings rose 18 percent 
to. $609.6 million, or $2.79 & share, 
from SS1A7 nrifftnn, or S253 a 
share, in 1983. Annual revenue in- 
qn trugj. creased to $12.9 biHion 

^ paine Webber said its net income 
: wJ^^Tdl to S6.03 million, or 36 cents a 
: from $9-21 motion, or 55 




— reported 

»?!} S- quartets because low interest in 
i 5j v securities and-' commodities m_ 

< fcas lowered commission revenue. 

,« ft American Express shares dosed at 
’•» I ?■ ja $38.5000 the New York Stock Ex- 
J\ ]r % change Tuesday, down 62% cents, 
s \i$% while Paine Webber closed at 
^ ^ $3130, up 37% cents a share. 

.j .‘Many of the big investment 

ii? 5 £ «-firms made major investments and 
■ " (! 41 '' padded to tbeir costs to accomodate 
* ^ * i s' the stock mariret rally that began in 
:J * m s Ai^ust 1982. But now the firms are 
^ J; s-it having to retrench as demand from 
l; * -^individual investors has slackened 
i "-V r ^ ^ in stitu tio nal mvcMari are pres- 
-sunne the firms to cut their com- 


21.1 i 


. , i>i,i musioni. ' • 

. ‘ u\ ‘Paine Webber, whose securities 
' =2 S L^unit is Pairo Webber Inc, said that 
, 'i | ; T i while investment banking revenue 
.£ a ;v rose in its fiscal first quarter ended 

•* * % T^-Det 31, “market conditions coo- 

■ £ 4' j* tamed to. negatively impact the 
- \f" ^Stfirin’scomimasionbnaness.” 

■ - American Express said its travd- 

i U ' [ ^related services and international 

f ' ■^■banking groups contributed to the 
% S q fourth-quarter rebound. Travd ser- 
• sb ; \ invites’ derating income rose to 
•: £ ^$933 unhk m from $75.6 million a 

*> '4wr ember, while international 
;’s earnings climbed to 
i from $33 millinn. 


jx a <=, 546.4 1 

» M<l 

- t* a. 


2 w I*. Tt 
•: m-. -a 
■4 i S 
■ ii n r-( rn 

’ ■: . sw 
: r: 


AVw York Times S&vife 

NEW YORK — The race to pro- 
duce increasingly powerful mini- 
computers at ever lower costs rot 
its latest entrant Tuesday, when the 
Prime Computer Corp. mtrodneed 
its fastest computer. 

The company said its new model 
9955, priced at $321,000, wiH be 
available immediately. 

The market for minicomputers 
has rapidly grown as many corpo- 
rations have found that mm em- 
ployees need faster computers that 

can hamfl* mnn» flat ? 1 th ro nm jw- 

sonal computers. 

As the needs have grown further, 
companies have chosen to buy si- 
per-mimeonrouters rather than 
mainframes because with super- 
minis they can transfer thdr old 
progr a ms and data. Mainframes re- 
quire users to buy new software 
rod eater new data and can cost as 
much as SI million. 

“We’re seeing tremendous de- 

Toshiba Joins 
U.S. Company in 
Fuel-Cell Venture 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Toshiba Corp^ the 
large Japanese electrical company, 
said Tuesday that it has agreed to 
establish a joint venture with Unit- 
ed Technology Corp. of the United 
States to develop and produce fud- 
cefl power plants. 

Fuel-cell power generation is a 
relatively new method of power 
generation ideally sailed to small- 
scale needs. Electricity is generated 
in the cells m an electrochemical 
reaction between hydrogen, which 
is extracted from natural gas and 
other sources, and oxygen. 

The company, to be called Inter- 
national Fuel Cells Corp 7 is to be 
established next month in South 
Windsor, Connecticut, with an ini- 
tial work force of 560, including 
researchers, a Toshiba spokesman 
said. The vaiturc, to be owned 
equally by the partners, will be cap- 
italized at $8 million, he said. 

He said the new company plans 
to develop by 1989 a fud-ceD pow- 
er plant capable of generating 
11,000 kilowatts of electricity. He 
added that by 1992, the new com- 
pany hopes to produce 20 such 
plants for sale. 

The two companies have jointly 
built an experimental 4,8tiv-ki]o- 
watt fuel-cell power plant outside 
Tokyo, which has been in operation 
since 1982. 


maud Tor these superminis,” said 
Stephen K. Smith, a technology ao- 
alyk at Paine Webber Inc. “De- 
mand is dearly outstripping sup- 

pJy-” 

Prime’s new 9955 will perform at 
a rate of about 4 nnTKtm instruc- 
tions per second, compared to the 
25 million per second capacity of 
its predecessor, the 9950. 

Analysts say the Prime 9955 will 
compete with a new, powerful 
minicomputer called Venus intro- 
duced last fan by the Digital 
Equipment Corp. the Venus and 
the Prime 9955 are both expected 
to be produced m volume this 
s p ri n g. 

The Prime model should also 
face competition from other new 
higb-speed minicomputers such as 
Data General Corp.’s MV 10,000, 
Wang Laboratories Inc-’s VS 300 
and the International Business Ma- 
chines Coro.'s 4381 Model 3. 

“Even the manufacturers them- 


selves didn’t realize how big the 
market would be," said Frederic G. 
Withington, an analyst at Arthur 
D. little & Co, the Boston re- 
search firm. “Now they are all 
scrambling to produce a product” 

The new Prime product beats a 
number of similarities to its prede- 
cessors, and will be able to run the 
existing library of Prime software. 

That software runs tbe gamut 
from commer cial ap plications aprfi 
as those used by banks and insur- 
ance companies, to tgriimral and 
scientific programs used by engi- 
neers. 

The model 9955 should be 

snapped up by Prime's existing cus- 
tomers, many of whom have out- 
grown their current Prime ma- 
chines, analysts say. But to be 
financially successful with the 
model 9955, the analysts say, Prime 
most sell it to new accounts, a 
much harder task. 


Afcroyd A Scatters PLC said 
Newco has acquired more thro 96 
percent of its shares and proposes 
to acquire the balance. Terms were 
not disclosed. 

Computer Techniques 
said it will announce joint- 


major U3. software publishers — 
Microsoft, Software Publishing 
and AshtonTate — to back its 
Apricot mkrocomputer in the U3. 
market 

Chevron Corp. said its Gulf OH 
Corp. subsidiary has put its Pitts- 
burgh headquarters building up for 
s?Ic. Golf headquarters will be 
transferred to San Francisco, 
where Chevron is based, over the 
next year. Price was not disclosed. 

China Cement Co. (Hong Kong) 
Ltd. said it had been acquired by 
Bmmmen Ltd. and Supreme Door 
Ltd. for an undisclosed price. It 
Bruxnmen, a company owned 
by Chinese interests, acquired a 95- 
percent stake is the company and 
Supreme Door, a subsidiary of 
Cheung Kong Holdings, took the 
remaining 5 percent. 

Cbri h atii Airlines said it has 
filed for authority to offer interim 
service to Calgary, Alberta, from 
Houston and Dallas starting 
March I. American Airlines 
dropped the route. 

hrforaaft, a $97-mUlkm trade 
center devoted to the'high-technQl- 


ogy industry, was opened in Dallas. 
The h«ti « i mt to assemble all as- 
pects of the high-technology indus- 
try under one roof. 

MGM-UA Entertainment Co. 
said it will split its movie-making 
activities into two independent and 
competing production units, Unit- 
ed Artists Corp. and MGM Films 
Inc. Tbe company said it will con- 
tinue to distribute movies made by 
both divisions, but each will have 
its own marketing operation. 

Nu-Med Inc. said it agreed to 
acquire substantially all of the as- 
sets of privately-held US Health 
Corp., mending seven acute-care 
hospitals in the southeastern Unit- 
ed States, for cash and stock. 

Sel trust Holdings minority 
shareholders rejected a reorganiza- 
tion plan proposed by its majority 
shareholder, BP Australia Ltd. The 
BP unit, winch bolds 75J percent 
of Sd trust, had proposed to spin 
off the company’s goldfield inter- 
ests into a new company, while 
retaining control of other mineral 
nnilfi for itself. 

Sonat Inc. annrwtnrad that its 
subsidiary, Sonat Exploration Co. 
of Houston, had acquired the gas 
and oil properties of Eason Oil Co., 
a subsidiary of ITT Corp, for $178 
mtlli on. Sonat said the acquired re- 
serves total some 4 million barrels 
of oil and 64 billion cubic feet of 
natural g n s 


A U.S. Trader’s Silken Ties to China French Touch 

Or U.S. Style? 


(Continued from Page 9) 
rtant in China. Once (hey 
„.j yon and you gain their trust 
^l’re a friend of thaisfor life» and 
i doors are unlocked for you wiih- 
ut lengthy red tape.” 

His company was the first buyer 
!of Chinese silk in 1972, and today H 
trades with 12 provinces, Mr. Soar 
mash notes with pride. However, 
imports of Chinese s3k into the 
United States did not become com- 
mercially important until 1979, 
when Beijing was accorded xriost- 
favoted-nation trading status. The 
action lowered U.S. silk import du- 
des from 40 percent to 5 percent. 

Mr. Shamash’s business was not 
much affected by last year’s dilute 
between China and the United 
States aver UB. textile quotas; 
both sOk and Knm, the main fab- 
rics be imports, are free of quotas. 

From the base of his personal 
contacts and bis assets in the silk 
trade, Mr. Shamash has moved into 
new tradine fields- He acts much 
like a merchant banker, shepberd- 




re C.5- 


tries and provincial power bases, 
arranging introductions and invita- 
tions to trade fairs. He wQl also 
work out financing, sometimes 
from bis company's own resources, 


meats in which imparts are fi- 
nanced not by cash but by goods 
that the setting company eitiier oses 
or sells in tbe warn market Coun- 
tertrade is an essential aspect of 
Chinese trade. 

• .“The major advantage,” ex- 
plained Thaddeus C Kopmski, a 
. trade specialist at Business Interna- 
tional, a busness information and 
consulting group, “is that it dmri- 
nales having to obtain Chinese gov- 
ernment approval for foreign ex- 
change to leave the country, which 
can be a complicated ana tedious 
process." 

Besides arranging ventures for 
others, Mr. Shamash is rapkBy ex- 
panding his own operations. His 
venture with Mmnestoa Mining 
has been profitable from tbe day it 
started last September, he 
First 3M-Shamash, which is based 
in Shanghai, sold local glassware to 
a buyer in the Ame ri can Midwest; 
now it is negotiating to sell cotton 
fabrics and yam to Bangjadrsh, It- 
aly and several East-bloc countries. 

Mr. Shamash recently arranged 
some introductions for Ken Hjetm, 
bead of global operations for Min- 
nesota Mining. Mr. Hjefan met with 
Wang Mmgpm, managing director 
of OrinaSak Corp. and Huang 
Tsienmo, tbe company’s vice man- 


In addition, he is-an expert in 
-- '“countertrade,” the baiter arrange- 


“Fve known them both for at 
least ID years,” said Mr. Sham a sh, 


recalling that Mr. Huang was one 
of the first Chinese to come to tbe 
United States as first secretary at 
Bering's embassy and iaier as the 
New York-based head of CHIN- 
ATE, a government body that over- 
sees all the Chinese textile negotiat- 
ing missions. 

Mr. Shamash is also a friend of 
He Shoulun, the vice governor of 
the northeastern province of Hei- 
longjiang, who under Bering’s de- 
centralization policies controls 10 
provincial corporations in such sec- 
tors as linen weaving, agriculture, 
light industry rod chemicals. “We 
buy a lot of Kncn from the prov- 
ince," Mr. Shamash said, explain- 
ing the baas of the friendship. 

At yet another of the banquets 
that China traders must suffer 
gladly — this one at Harbin’s New 
Swan Hotel — Mr. He gave his 
guest a shopping list of equipment 
the province needs to modernize its 
industry. Tbe newest textile plants, 
for example, were built by the Rus- 
sians in the mid-1950s. 

Mr. Shamash said he’s working 
with Courtanlds and his other part- 
ners to help supply the equipment. 

“One of the things the Chinese 
want is an ice-cream plant," be 
said, noting that the Chinese ac- 
quired a taste for ice cream from 
the Russians. Characteristically. 
Mr. Shamash rod his partners are 
arranging the fin»nring. 


•:/: i 


Tbe International 
Herald Tribune 

invites you to 

Meet the 
New French 
Cabinet 

cmFebruaiy26 t 1985 atthehter<^tinentaIHoldinPaik 


. 

_ ,_-7 ... ■■ Vv' : , : v .. ■■’is '-Y?? 

- 1 5? . -v ■;./.■> ■, tjpz. ■■ 










(Continued from Page 9) 
porridge — he says, “We want a 
French touch.” 

One solution is to get the best of 
both worlds. “It’s not that easy to 
find bicultural people, but they ex- 
ist,” said Mr. Hcot of Mo£t Hen- 
nessy, who is one himself. “The 
best solution is to get a person who 
understands both mentalities.*’ 

Most of the French operations in 
the United Stales have American 
fifjH managers who divisions 
and profit-and-loss centers. Some 
companies hire French technical 
expats when they cannot find peo- 
ple with tbe proper expertise in the 
United States. In its California 
nursery operation, Mott Hennessy 
has a French expert in plant tech- 
nology. Cosmair, in its effort to 
decentralize its manufacturing op- 
erations into smaller plants, has 
hired a Frenchman. 

Relations between senior French 
managers and American managers 
are not always smooth. But this 
often has more to do with the fact 
that the Frenchman, is the new 
owner of an existing U.S. company 
than with tbe fact that the new 
owner is French. “We’ve had our 
share of problems,” said Mr. Picot. 
“If U-S. manager s are not interna- 
tional they don't stay with us.” 

Mr. Berty of Cap Gemini com- 
mented: “American managers un- 
derstood perfectly that a French 
guy was president. I think I avoided 
the mistake of saying do that be- 
cause in France we do it that way.” 


Sony, NEC Set 
Agreementon 
Computer Port 

The Asudoied Pros 

TOKYO — Two Japanese 
electronics companies, Sony 
Corp. and NEC. Corp., said 
Tuesday that they had reached 
so agreement that allows Sony 
to manufacture and sell NBCTs 
V-series micr op roce s sors. 

The five-year agreemau calls 
far NEC to provide Sony with 
circuit schematics and other 
w-hnic 8 ! infor mati on n g ymu r y 
to make parts for two V-series 
microprocessors, NEC officials 
said. Sony will offer products 
compatible with the v-20 and 
V-30 by year-end, they said. 

The officials said NEC has 
been trying to develop a net- 
work erf suppliers — often re- 
fened to as second sources — to 
enable companies to secure a 
reliable product supply. 

This was tbe first time Japa- 
nese munirf ypi r e rs reached 8 

second-source agreement to 
market microprocessors, said 
Nihon Kdzai Sxunbun. a Japa- 
nese econontic daily. 


Drexel Picks 
Burifor 
London Post 

ImvmuUmoi Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Dreed Burnham 
Lambert Ixkx, tbe New York-based 
securities firm, has appointed Jean- 
Pkxre Bun to the new position of 
deputy chairman of DBL Securities 
Ltd, a London Eurobond-trading 
unit fonnerty known as Ross & 
Partners. 

Drexel said Mr. Bari, a senior 


AT&T Moves 
To Safeguard 
UNIX System 

New York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — American Tele- 
phone ft Telegraph Corp. has 
moved to regain some control ova 
its popular UNIX operating system 
for a>mpmeis. 

UNIX, rierignwt by Bed Labora- 
tories, is a basic set of computer 
instr uctions tha t has engendere d a 
Dumber of spin-off versions. AT&T 
is stcppmgup its effort to establish 
a single UNIX standard that will 
run on a wide variety of personal 
computers. 

Its primary competition is MS- 
DOS, tbe operating system used by 
International TtnqnwM Machines 
Corp.'s line of personal computers 
and used widely in IBM-compati- 
Me machines. 

AT&T on Monday published a 
unif orm system of commands 
writers of “applications programs” 
fa word processing, financial anal- 
ysis, communications functions 
and the like can use to assure that 
thdr programs run on the standard 
AT&T system. 

Without tbe right applications 
programs, of the conman 
emqging computer line would nev- 
er take off, company officials have 
said privately. The company's first 
UNIX-based persona] computer, 
developed by Comyrgent Technol- 
ogies, is expected in the next few 
months. 

Operating systems act as the 
“traffic cop” of computers, and 
UNIX is particularly useful in sys- 
tems that permit several individ- 
uals to simultaneously use a single 
computer. 

“Clearly, we are looking fra a 
more orderly world,” said William 
T. O’Shea, executive director of 
AT&T’s computer systems soft- 
ware division. 

AT&T also announced Monday 
that it had entered into an agree- 
ment with Microsoft Corp. that 
will make two UNIX versions — 
AT&T’s own UNIX System V and 
Microsoft’s Xenix — compatible at 
some time in the future. 

The company also announced 
agreements with the nation's three 
largest maker s of commercial mi- 
croprocessors — National Semi- 
conductor Corp- Intel Corn, and 
Motorola Inc. — to put the LINK 
system on their products. 


ny, will take a leading roieinDBL’s 
efforts to build up its sales and 
, desks and develop a market 
-yield” Eurobonds, 
yield bonds, more com- 
_ known as “junk” bonds, are 
those by companies that do 
not qualify fra top ratings rod thi»s 
offer higher yield. Drexd domi- 
nates tbe junk-bond market in the 
United States and is trying to pro- 
mote «■»* business in the Euro- 
market. 

The firm also smd that it will 
seek to become a p r imary deala in 
gilts, or British government securi- 
ties. 

Mr. Buri remains in charge of 
DrexeTs Swiss operations and is to 
shuttle between. London and Swit- 
zerland. 

PtdSp Monis Bdgjom SA has 
named David de Cotxrcy-Ireland, 
previously marketing director, to 

th^pnsf rS managing dirantwr Phil- 

ip Morris Belgium, with headquar- 
ters in Brussels, is part of Rnhp 
Moms/EEC Region. Tbe New 
York-based parent, Philip Maris 
Ina, produces tobacco products, 
beec, soft drinks, specialty papa 

and pM/*frqg«ng malwinlc i mrf is en- 
gaged in community development 

BeafairaCas^ the Chicago-based 
food and coosmaa-products con- 
cern, has appointed Richard S. 
WDKamson sen i or vice president 
for corporate «vl wtamivmiii re- 
lations. He previously was the U.S. 


permanent representative to the 
United Nations in Vienna and the 
UE. resident representative to the 
International Atomic Agency. 
From January 1981 to May 1983,' 
he served on the White House se- 
nior staff as assistant to President 
Ronald Reagan fra intergovern- 
mental affairs. 

The State of Michigan, Office of 
International Development, has 
appointed James T. Roily as direc- 
tor of its European office, which is 
located in Brussels. He succeeds 
Hugh Fmmnger, who has returned 
to Michigan to pursue 
busness interests. Mr. Rally 
ously was based in New 
where be served as director of plan- 
ning and operations for the inter- 
national division of Spring? Indus- 
tries bin, a U.S. textile concern. 

Wostnmduid Coal Go. of Phila- 
delphia said it has appointed Ul- 
rich Hartmann to its board. Mr. 
Hpi-tmann jj ehitf financial officer 
of Nardwestdeutsche Kraftwerke 
AG, a subsidiary of Preussische 
EkktrizitiUs AG, itself a unit of 
Veba AG. Veto, tbe Dussddoif- 
based enexgy-and-trading group. 



/owns about 20 percent, of West- 
'mordand CoaL 

v ’ Outboard Marine Bdgginn SA, 
'Bruges, has named Owe 3L Jansson 
president-director general, suc- 
ceeding C- Labeur. who retired. 

Mr. Jansson previously was deputy 

managing director -ana vice pres- 
ident of feariteting fra Outboard 
^ Marin e Bflg&im, which is a unit Of 
Outboard Marine Crap, the U.S.- 
- based maker of outboard motors, 

stern drives rod garden equipment 

Coigate-Prioofre Co, the New 
York-based maker of consumer, 
healtb-care and industrial prod- 
ucts, has named Qay S. Union to 
the new post of vice president ami 
director of woddwide advertising. 
He was senior vice president, inter- 
national, and regional director- 
chief operating officer for the 
. Americas/ Asia-Pacific region of 
the advertising agency Doyle Dane 
Bembach Inc, 

First Wisconsin National Bank of 
MDwattee has promoted Terry 
Thornton and Phmp Dickinson to 
vice presidents. They are based in 
the bank’s branch. 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, are In local currencies, 
unless otherwise indicated 


United Stales 

Amer. Express 

HiQwr. KM Wl 

ToT— =85110=83 

per Share — ft» — 
rear tfM ms 
Revenue 12JW. 9J». 

Nef,nt -— I *0$ IS 


BankAmerica 
atiQaar. tw ms 

Net Inc 73D 53J 

Per Share OK 022 

Year MM IMS 

net Inc I75JD 3WD 

per Share L» 2.W 

Cons. Edison 
emoear. itM wss 

Revenue 1379. U49. 

Net Inc U5J9 

Per Shore 097 090 

Year I9M ms 

,nc=: ^ ££ 


4.M 

Net More preferred c&W- 


Dkxnond Shan. 

iSS iSK 

MM Inc. sutaiuao 

Per Store C42 — 

Year ItM M 

Revenue mu um. 

Over Net 203 (a >602 

Oror Share— 1J» — 

a: lass. MSS nets include 
writeoff of S194J mnUcn and 
mtlidinwi of S91A million, 
out y ea r n ot e xc l u des seen of 
S4 million from early re- 
tirement. 

Digital Equipment 

SndQuar. IMS ISM 

Revenue 1/20 lXta 

Net inc m3 8(L5 

Per Star* 1J1 ui 

MHNf INS HM 

Revenue 3.M0. ZOO. 

Net Inc 2515 943 

Per Store CH MS 

Merck & Co. 

4ai gw. mt wu 

Revenue Mlj essa 

Net Inc liM iota 

Per Shore MV 1X2 


Year 

Revenue — 
Net Inc — 
Per Store — 


IMS 

XML 


071 S.10 


RCA 


Revenue — Z790 l«o 
OperMet — imj fiW 
Over Shore— UO 0X7 
Year KM IMS 

Revenue I0.n0. RS®, 

DperNel MM 

Oner Share— 2.15 0JV7 
not nets exclude cfexveof 
SMS mllUen from restructure 
km of operation* tmdoaln of 
SJ5J mutton from ettonoe In 
accounting. 

StaMiOillnd. 

t3R 


7SS 

Net Inc — i 46&D W0 
Per Shore — U2 1S7 


Revenue. 


2Mm 


Met Inc. Zi^ 

Per Shore— 7 JO U9 
Futt name at com p any Is 
Standard OH of Indiana. 


Gold Options dri»ns/<sj. 


Ihoef 

fab. 

May 

A* 

290 

300 

310 

320 

330 

340 

202S9135 
1230-1400 
475- *25 
30X425 
125 225 
OSX 1-25 

29253)25 

30003125 

24253575 

1800-1930 

X3754S25 

1025-1175 

16251735 
1 100-1250 
735 9X0 
525 675 


0*4 30535-30755 

iVUeonWUteWeMSA. 

1l.Q-U.ma RW 
1211 Grocve I. Se ta e fa-d 
TeL 31*251 - Tdex 2*3*5 


DnupfATio m 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


^ * 


• Rental of promotional 
robots, accompanied 
by well trained mufti 
lingual operators 

• Selling promotion-, 
home- and company 
robots 

• Production of robots, 

designed by yourself. 



For more Information: 

Nassau Dillenburgstr.21 
2596 AB The Hague 
The Netherlands 
phone {070} 24.53.30 
telex 34498 VTKHF 


MTERNATaONAL 


mS T I TUTT E 

CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED AND 
RECOGNIZED ALL OVER THE WORLD 



ANTWERP NEW YORK 

DO 

ONE WEEK INTENSIVE 
DIAMOND AND COLORED 
STONES COURSES. 

Fo» nue iniomuuon 

Sdwpekmd 1/7 - 20(8 Antwerp 
Tel.: tansrers 8 Belgfam 


TRADE BANK 
PARTNER 

International private U.S. Trade 
Bank seeks actiw fuO or part time 
partner fentfar with trade financ- 
ing. Excsflent growth opportunity 
to join a successful and dynamic 
firm with a unique niche in the 
market place. Minimum invest- 
ment $150,000. Please contact 
ArieSldraPiesdeiit, 
STBUMHUKUWESTUBinS 
SFffiMEHIGmL 
1295 Mafeon A&, 

New M.MY, 10028 
(212) 860-0131 


FITCH 


We are pleased to announce that 

Hans van den Houten 


has joined our firm as 


Vice President — Manager 
International Division 


FITCH INVESTORS SERVICE, INC. 

5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004 • (212) 668-8300 
NEW YORK DENVER 


This appears as a matter of record only. 


$ 75 , 000,000 


Structuring and financing 
arranged for the acquisition of 
the assets of 


SKELGAS, EMC. 

a subsidiary of 

TEXACO INC. 

by 

SKELGAS GROUP, INCORPORATED 

an affiliate of 

SYNERGY GROU? INCORPORATED 


financing 

arranged and provided by 

// 

CenTrust 

CeriEnst Savings and Loan Association 
101 E. Flagler Street, Miami, Fla. 33131 


December 7, 1984 












INTERNATIONAL 


luesdays 

AMEX 


IJMonltl 

HUiLm Slock 


72 17% 

20% im 


9% & Dir Art n 
flji 5% Dlxko 
3% IM DonwP 
27% 22% Oomfro 
11% S9b Downey 
JUto UK OrtvHr 
<3 Vi 2 5* Ducnm 
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28% 22% Duplex 
zm U DurTSt 
13% 9% Dynkt 
JIM 17% Dyiwvr 


Dlv.V1d.PE UftHU L 


A 23 71b 

,17s U 10 189 7ft 
191* 1% 

1X0 US 27 

4 92 11% 

26 20 23% 

AO LA 30 30|b 

M U 11 1*30*1 

40a LA IS 9A 15% 
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3316 231* 

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114 4H 4% 4to+* 

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30 lOVl 10% 10%+ % 


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Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 


6to 4 
19% 13% 

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305 

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34% 25% I 
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21 % 21 % 
2% 2% 
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8 % 8 % 
B% 0% 
13V 13% 
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17V 11% Jadyn J0b 3.1 10 30 16% 16 16 — M 


10% 5% Jacobi 

16 10% Jensen 

4% 2% JetAm 

3% % JefAwt 


4 5% SV 5% 

4 15% 15V. 15% 
54 3% 2% 3% 

23 Til V V 


7% 3% Jetton X9f 44 15 123 7M 7% 7% 


7M 2% John Pd 

11% 7% JatmAm JO 13 14 

7% 4M JfnpJk n 5 

29% 21% JlHHtar 5 


64 4% 4M 4% + M 

49 9% 8% 9M+ % 

25 4% 4% 4%— M 

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4% 2M 
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22M 13M 
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t.-r- 




U.S. Futures Jaa - 22 


147 M 
12 25% 
12 5% 

’S *16 

W 27% 
U 22% 
2B67 19% 
195 AM 
62 7% 

18 20 
17 13% 

in 2% 

93 5 

A 7V 
31 15% 
44 7M 
2 CV 
35 10 

S St 

.043 45 
29 5% 


open High Low 


10 %+ % 
26% + H 
11% — % 
9H + % 
A%+ % 
13M + M 
1%— % 
3% 


2% 2V 
2SM 2SM+ M 
5% 5% 

* %+* 
22M 22M 
22 22 — 1 * 
18% X8M— % 
5V 5% 

7% 7V+ 1A 
29V X + M 
1390 13V— % 
2% 2% — % 
4V 5 + % 

7% 7%— % 
15% 15% + % 
7% 7%+ % 
5% AV— % 
9% » + % 

■s w 

43% 45 +116 

SM 3% + M 


Kacok C 
Koycp jo 

BS" * 

KeVCa" jo* 

KevPIi JB 

Kidds wt 

Kifem 

KMark 

KlngR an 

Kirby 

Ktt Mfg 

KhwrV a SOr 

Knoeo 

Knoll 

Koeorc 220 : 


AO 2% 
■ 12 
31 14V* 

Ml 4ta 
» 15% 
15 7% 

713 11 
A3 3% 
1 3% 

X 4% 
X 30% 
326 3M 


2M— % 
12 

14% + % 
4M+ % 
14% —IM 

7% 

I0M— % 
3M— % 
3% — % 
4M 
35% 

3M + M 
5M— % 
J%+ % 
13% + % 
14 + M 
25% + % 



16% 

14% 

17% 

9% 

X 19% 19% 

24 34 36 

37V 3AV 37V 

X 37% 37% 
7% 4V AV 
H M N 
XM 19V 19V 
11% 11% 11V 
0% 3% 3% 
12% IIV I2M 
30% 30% 30% 
17V 17% 17% 


XM 33% 
9% 9% 
13% 12V 
12% 12% 
10V M% 
4% 4M 
% M 
7% 7% 
9% 9% 
141* 14% 
2% 2 . 


5% 

12 % 

69% 

9M 
10% 

12% 12% 12% 
2% 2% 2% 
2% 216 2% 
23% 23 231* 


20 

6% 

8% 

VI*- % 

97 

9% 


*%+ Vk 

■8 

816 

7% 


40 

10% 

10 

10 — L 

D1 

IM* 

13% 


30 

B% 

H% 

n»— % 

9 

11% 

11% 

11%-.% 

IS 

Tit 

M 

»— % 

60 

2% 

3% 

2%— I* 

» 

IM 

in 

11% + % 

7 

341* 

33% 

534* — v 

60 

5% 

3% 

5% + % 

ra 

16% 

16% 

16% + 1*' 

V 

2% 

2% 

2% J 

SOr US 

130 

133% +1%: 





13 

29% 

26% 

2*% + %- 

15 

1(1 

9% 

*%— !*• 

28 

6% 

8% 

8H+ %, 

91 

4 

3% 

3%— % 

S 

4% 

4% 

4%+ to 

» 

5% 

SV. 

51* — to 

16 

27% 

26% 

27% +1% 

D 

10% 

10% 

10%+ to 

7 

6% 

5% 


76 

16 

17% 

1794 

D 

3% 

SU 

5% 

5 

3% 

2% 

2to 

0 

5% 

5% 

Sto— % 

« 

51* 

5% 

5% . . 

11 

4V* 

4 

4% 

9z 

30% 

30 

30 

az 

39% 

39% 

39% +1 .. 

Oz 

36 

16% 

34 +31* - 

8 

9% 

9% 

9% 

3 

M 

BV. 

W*- to . 

8 

9% 

916 

*% + %•- 

6 

16% 

16% 

16% + to. 

S 

H% 

14% 

149b + to 

3 

9% 

9V. 

TO.+ to'. 

7 

7% 

7% 

7% 

S 

3% 

1 

5 — 

7 

6% 

3% 

Mb— 4b 

0 

7% 

2% 

2to , ■ ■ 

7 

13 

12% 

12% — % 

0 

M% 

26 

26 - to' 

7 

5% 

5% 

3% 



21 % to Queues an 


10% 4% HAL 
17% 12 HMG 
34% 24V Hanfrd 
2V 1% Harv*y 


7 

J0 40 
JO 2J 11 


36 Mb 8% 0V— % 
3 12 % 12 % 12 %—% 
44 34V 34 3*V + % 

21 1% IV 1% 


Season Season 
Htaft Low 


open Hioh Low Close Cho. 


Grains 


WHEAT CCBTl 

54100 bu minimum- dollars per buWwl 
4J4 137V Mar 344’* 151% 

4jQS 132% MOV 147V 145V 

190 327% Jul 332% 136 

174% 120V Sen 333% 337 

361% 137% Dee 345 347 

174% 143 Mar 

Est. Sales Prow. Sales 6312 

P rev. Dov Open Int 40332 oft 72 
CORN (CUT) 

MOO Mi minimum- dal Ian par bushel 
125% 165 Mar 173% 173% 

IX 272% MOV 279% 279% 

131 Z7AV Jul 232 202% 

121% 2-3BV SOP 276% 276% 

195 26S Dec in 170V 

110 275% Mar 2Jov 200% 

121V 102 MOV 2JMV 104% 

ESI. Sales Prev. Sales 16334 

Prev.Dav Open ini.l 34529 off 478 
SOYBEANS (CRT) 

5J00bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
779 557V Jan 59* 5J0 

7.941% 5J9% Mar 606% «s 

731 SJ1V May *19% 631 


1471* 349% +30% 
141 143V +31 

131V 333V +J0V 
133V 33S +J0V 
345 345 +J0OM 

349 +JOOV 


271 —32V 

277V —32V 
27W* —JO 
274 -32V 

260% — J» 

278% —JO 
2JB4V -32% 


7.99 191% Jul 629 629 

756 195 A US 629 629 

477 575 5«P 421% 427% 

468 197 Nov 422% 622% 

679 4.10 Jan 4J6 634 

762 424 MOT 650 650 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 20336 

Prev. Day Open lift. 70.928 up 405 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CUT} 

MO tore- dal Ian per ton 
20&00 13400 Jan 14ZJ0 14200 

209 M 140.10 Mar 14570 14400 

205JM 14560 May 15150 15150 

19650 15050 Jul 15650 15650 

18000 15270 Aua 13450 15050 

17950 15*00 SOP 15450 15950 

18050 15550 Ocl 16000 1*010 

18480 16240 Dec 16680 16680 

Eat Sales Prev. 5a le-, 5719 

Prev. Day Open lid. 3SJ23 up IX 
SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

40000 Bn- dollars par 100 lbs. 

3050 2265 Jan 2776 27J0 

3040 2295 Mar 2650 2455 

XM 2280 MOV 2651 2435 

3050 2270 Jul 2585 25 M 

2720 2250 Aua 2550 2555 

2550 2250 Sep 2530 2555 

2680 22.90 Oct 2460 2*75 

2+75 22.90 Dec 2450 200 

Lit. Solos Prev. Safes 11895 

Prev. Day Open lot. 35812 aft 160 
OATSICBT] 

5000 bu minimum- OH km per bushel 
1.94% 1.73 Mar 176% 174% 

1.91 171 May 1.7S 175 

170% Ij 9 Jul 171V 171% 

1.79 1 X 5 U. Sop 166% 166% 

187% lJfl'6 DOC 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 233 

Prev. Day Open inL 3575 up 32 


551% 5.92V — J* 

554% 556% —.12V 
685V 687% —.12V 
4 IS 6.16V — .13 

6.17 417 —.13 

411 411 -71% 

412% 413V —.10% 
426 6J6 —-11% 

640 640 —.11 


14050 14070 
14340 14370 
14860 14980 
15350 153.90 
iw g 154X 
15750 15750 
15850 1X10 
16480 16480 


27X 2735 —70 

XM 2419 —37 

2553 2570 —M 

2525 2543 — 50 

25.15 2SX —75 
2+95 2580 —JO 

2425 2+25 —JO 

2+00 2+02 —21 


174V 1.74% —32 

173V 173V —31% 
170% 170% —81 

166 166 —31 

T6tV -30V 


Season Season 
High Law 


2125 2U0 MOT 2105 2MS 2095 

2110 2105 May 

Est. Sates 2830 Prev. Safes 1064 
Prev. Day Own Int. 2MV up 74 
ORANGE JUICE (NYC E) 

15300 lbs.- cents per lb 
1B5JB 11850 Mar 174JS 17+55 17+2 

10530 15180 May T7S2S 17573 17575 

18465 15580 Jut 17575 17S7S 17575 

181.50 15775 SOP 

101 80 15780 Nov 

16540 15430 MOT 

16250 16030 May 

Jan 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 41 

Prev.DayOwnlnt. 7.9Z3 up 190 


| Metals 

COPPER (COMEX) 

25800 lbs.- cents per Hx 
9280 5565 Jan 6165 616S 

Feb 

9120 SJD Mar 6165 61.90 

9230 5420 MOV 4L95 6110 

M25 5760 Jul 62J0 62J0 

8110 5760 Sep *140 6265 

B4J5 5450 Dec 6275 6275 

8420 5960 Jan 

«MHi 5960 Mar 6535 6S3S 

7 4C0 61.10 May 6360 6360 

7+40 61J0 Jul 6360 6360 

M98 62J0 Sep 6+10 64J0 

Est. Sales Pray. Met 12712 

Prev. Day Open InL 89817 im6S2 
SILVER (COMEX! 

5800 travaz^- cents par tray oz. 

15758 5*18 Jai 6103 6103 

7236 6145 Feb 

16208 5855 Mar 6323 6348 

15138 WiD May 6398 6428 

1*61-0 4408 Jul 6508 4515 

11837! 4148 Ss© M18 6618 

12X0 6308 DOC 6768 fiT&ffl 

12158 6333 Jan 6828 6828 

11938 6498 Mar *935 6935 

10488 6403 May 69+1 70+1 

9458 6738 Jul 7188 7183 

9408 Ul\a Sap 

Eat Salas Prev. Sales 0.116 

Prev. Dcrv Open Int. 81786 off 143 


2300 —27 

7100 — 27 


17455 +580 
17525 +530 
17575 +400 
17350 +580 
17150 +580 
17150 +400 
17150 +530 
17150 +480 


6065 —60 

MU® — XS 
*185 —65 

CU0 —70 
6150 —70 

6170 — TO 

6280 —75 

62.10 —75 
6240 —75 

A26S —75 
5250 —75 

63.15 —75 


6103 —176 
61 1J -173 
6155 —183 
6219 —184 
6323 —187 

6426 —198 

6583 —195 
6636 —197 
6743 —XI 
6068 —205 
6977 —209 
7103 — 21J 





n 

9% VST n 




60 

10 

9% 

10 + %- 

71 

15% VcdlvR 

1*2 

93 

7 

2 

20% 

28% 

2B%— to 

24 

15% Waisprs 

X4 

13 

13 

365 

25% 

24% 

2SU+IU 

15% 

4% VerMtn 




643 

6% 

6% 

6% 

5% 

2% Vertt 



12 

19 

2% 

29b 

23b 

20% 

149b VIAmC 

XOb 28 

9 

15 

20% 

199b 

20% 

MV* 

3% VfRsh 




26 

4% 

4% 

4% 

m 

% Verna 




9 

% 

E 

%+H 

16% 

11% Ventff 

JO 

13 

9 

147 

11% 

n% 

11% + to 

8% 

39b Verfpie 

.10 

L7 


47 

6% 

6 

6 -%■ 

8% 

44b«vlufadi 




17 

t% 

•% 

Mb— %' 

99* 

3% VIGOR 



11 

46 

7 

6% 

691+1* 

7% 

7% vrntaa 




66 

39b 

3% 

39b + to 

16% 

10% Vlrco 

Mr 

J 

■ 

33 

16% 

16% 

16% 

59 

44% Valntt 




1 

37% 57% 57%+ to. 

7% 

6% vfawaiG 

JO 

39 

H 

11 

7% 

Tto 

7% + 1b. 

12% 

■ Vortex 

J6 

3X 

13 


1Mb 

99b 

nto + to 

16% 

12% VuIcCp 

XOa IS 

9 

7 

16% 

16% 

16W+ to' 


IE 

WA* 



l 


□ 




1 ■ ‘ . 1 1 *■• 

9 

K 

P 




FRENCH FRANC CIMMI 
Spot franc- 1 eahnenuatsouoon 
.11905 .T01IC Mar .10215 .10270 .18260 

.1W20 .10103 Jun 

.1043! .MIX Sap 

Eat. Sales 417 Prev. Sales 
Prev. Dav Open mi. 711 

GERMAN MAR* (IMMJ 
Spar mark- 1 paint aauals SMOOT 
.4110 -3137 Mar -3166 JT73 J1S7 

J733 JU0 Jun JIN -3198 JMD 

JS45 J195 Sep 7220 3332 J22D 

J610 7234 Dec J255 7255 J2SS 

Est.Sata 16310 Prev. Saha 6.147 
Prev. Dav Open in+ 4+343 up 582 


J05e 5 8 
138 16 13 
70 17 17 
1.16 +3 II 
J7t +9 7 
.15 1J U 
28 12 
X 
24 

64 43 12 
40 23 A 
530 116 
7JA 113 
090 127 
34e 27 14 
34 15 n 
lJOQ 2J 10 
54 SJ 9 
70b 14 1A 
70b 28 16 
l44e 88 A 
12 



883964 383947 
303970803972 
304004304005 


SWISS FRANC (IMMJ 
Spertrnwc- ipatnt equals Z03001 

7734 Mar J763 7770 7741 7746 

6900 -£75 Jun 7799 JBOO 7776 7779 

-5£4 SOP JS36 7836 JIT2 JB09 

ll»2 P»?IfsaJei 9791 JM9 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 22700 


174 
55 
117 
M 

17 

44 
26 
12 
214 

78 II 

3 20% 
Hi® 44 
MOX 64 
20W 73 

18 9% 
286 16V 

1 43 
52 10V 
04 13V 
446 14% 
95 MV 

79 4V 
I SV 

•I 3% 
105 5V 
3 V 
14 10% 


2V 

10 

60 + V 

16V + % 


MV 5% 
31V 12% 

m t 
5* 25% 

19V 11% 
14% 10% 
19V 13 
XV 21% . 
BV 4V 
16 10V 

3% V 
9% 5% , 


Nanfcfc 
NtPatnt .10 
NelaLB 
NHump 60 
NMxAr 79f . 
NPfnRt 86 i 
NPrnc IJOe 
NYThne J2 


11 6V 
592 17V 
176 1% 

35 S0% 
2 17% 
46 14% 

72 15% 
524 39% 

73 5% 
228 16 

75 1% 

173 0% 



.94 1.1 15 
160 65 17 
X 26 5 


6V 6% + V 
16% 17 + W 
IV 1% + V 
X 50%+ % 
17V 17V— I* 
MV 14V 
15% 15% 

X XV — V 
5V 5% + V 
14% 15V + V 
IV IV 

m f% 


56 27 II 

60 +2 l 

.11 17 

M 

36 13 M 

50 13 6 
16 

-14e 13 I 


621 68 7 

.12 7 12 

1309 83 5 

.16b IJ 60 
60 33 M 
X 17 12 


60 33 7 
6 U I 
280 lifl 11 
16 






150 e U 15 
133a 43 7 
19 


51 14 II 
2340103 

60 47 9 

52 38 6 

19 

IX 128 
-as 16 n 
-02 .1 
asm If 


16% 5% YonkCo 6 

5% 4 Yurdny 38 13 11 


69 AV 6 A%+ b 
IS 4% 4V 4% 


12% 8% Timer .10 16 X 79 7V 7 7 



12X80 13030 
12250 11835 
12280 11875 
12280 11875 
12050 12050 


267 JO —960 
27180 —960 
27530 —1030 


12065 —385 
11885 —330 
1T785 —3-55 
11730 — 355 
11670 — 355 


Industrials 



I Livestock 

CATTLE (CMEJ 
«M*10 ibs^ cents per to. 

6750 6280 Feb 6585 64,10 

*872 6X40 Apr 67,15 67.15 

6U7 6580 Jun 6760 SMO 

6645 6115 AIM 6560 6S60 

65.10 61A0 Ocl &U0 6180 

ASM AIM Dec 6+97 6530 

*4 24 *5-25 Fob 6450 6550 

EsI.Sate 15647 Prev. Sales 10.100 

Prev. Dov Open inf. 58610 up61S 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMEJ 
44300ibx- cants per lb. 

7365 6575 Mar 7340 7360 

7190 6760 Apt 7140 7140 

70.90 6+95 May 7060 7040 

7150 6660 Aug 7182 71 JE 

71.10 4780 SOP 7070 TOJB 

70.15 67.10 Oct 6960 6935 

Nov 7060 7075 
EN. Sales 1561 Prev. Sates 1629 
Prev. Day Own int. 9545 up 206 

KOGS(CME) 

3030D lbs.- cents per lb. 

5860 4757 Fob 6035 5165 

5+45 45.10 Apr 4775 4867 

55.40 4860 Jun 5X10 5X75 

5X77 48.95 Jul S 3J3 S+6S 

S+37 47 JO AUO 9230 53.12 

517* 4X80 Ocf 49JK 49.15 

5035 46J0 Dec 49.10 +9 JO 

4970 4625 Feb 4890 4X90 

47J5 4415 Apr 

Eat. Sales 8170 Prev. Sales 6J54 
Prev. D6rV Open Int. 26774 up 773 

PORK BELLIES (CMEJ 

38000 Ibx-cenrs per Ib. 

8135 6495 Feb 6970 7830 

0130 6810 Mar 7030 7880 

0280 6US MOV 7175 7265 

0267 6215 Jul 7170 7337 

■LAS AOJO Aug 7132 71J5 

7X15 6X15 Feb 6680 6680 

7X40 6+30 Mar 

CK.SahtS 11,090 Prev. Sales 7805 
Prev. Day Daen int. 1+137 i»2S 


COFFEE C(NTCSCe) 

37J00 Ibx- cents per lb. _ ____ 

1S3J0 12330 Mar 1473S 1SLX 

15280 12281 MOV M+10 1+4J0 

147JD 12180 Jul WIN 14360 

147JB 1Z780 Sep T3785 l«a 

14180 1X35 Dec 13150 13030 

13735 17850 Mar 1 37 JO 13850 

13670 13180 May 13730 13730 

est. Sales Prev. Sales L230 

prey. Day Open urt. US67 upIX 
SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCBI 
112800 Ibx-centx per lb. 

1X60 481 Mar +» 430 

1030 4J4 May +73 +76 

985 +63 Jdl 5.12 214 

975 650 Sea 5JA 536 

985 SJJ7 Oet 536 SA 

775 SJ5 Jan 6X 400 

M3 682 Mot *30 651 

7.1S 639 Mav 645 648 

Est. Sale* 1X013 Prev. Sales 11.110 
prev. Dev Onen int. 90634 UP 413 

cocoa (NYcsee) 

lOmelfktow-Seerwn 

2570 1988 Mar 2217 ag 

2S70 §829 May 32= 22= 

2400 2049 Jul 220j CTO 

2415 S0S3 SOP 2185 2188 

2337 1999 DOC 210* 210* 


COLD (COMEXJ 
100 troy ox- dollars per Itovol 
33330 29880 Jan 30780 

52280 29670 Feb 30770 

31 LOO »9_5D Mar 31000 

51+50 30870 APT 31130 

51080 30580 Jun 31680 

48580 mao AUB 31980 

49X00 31480 OCT 32+83 

48950 31+50 Dec 33050 

435.S0 32X00 Feb 33140 

4%80 33050 APT 34080 

43570 33+7D Jun 34650 

42+40 34280 Aua 

39570 34+30 OCT 

Es>. Sates _ Prev. Sales I7.1X 

Prev. Day Open mt.i57.9A3 at! 961 


j Financial 

US T. BILLS (IMMJ 
SI million- ptsaf 100 pet. 

9286 B7J9 MOT 9281 92.14 

9139 87.14 Jan 9167 9145 

9131 5684 5ep 9084 9L13 

9073 05.77 Dec 90J4 904(9 

9061 1640 Mar 1035 9035 

90.12 5781 Jun 

8984 0680 Sep 

Dec 

EH. Sales _ Prev. Seles 1868 

Prev. Day Open InL 47820 ua41 
M YR. TREASURY (CRT) 

5100000 pritvpts&3fe*teoMM pd 
81-27 7045 Mar BOX 01-X 

■1-7 706 Jun 806 80-29 

BOO 75-18 Sea 79-3S 106 

79-3 75-13 Dae 79-14 7V-23 

78-23 75- IS MOT 79 796 

7S6 77-22 Jim 78-19 7141 

Eit.Satei Prav.Satai 486 

Prev, DovOpan Int. 37,970 oft 458 
US TREASURY BONDS ICBT) 

(8 Pd610080G«ti 6 32ndseflNpct> 
77-15 57-27 Mar 71-17 73.7 

77-15 57-X Jun 7B-T7 7VT7 

74- 2 57-10 Sep 69-25 7D-19 

7+5 576 DOC 69-4 6+31 

75- 30 57-2 Mar 61-11 *9-13 

70-6 56-39 Jun 6S-2 66-29 

69-25 56-29 SCO 67-20 66-14 

69-2* 5+25 Dec AMI 66+ 

69-7 56-27 Mar 67-U 67-25 

66- 11 64-3 Jun 

67- 19 6+21 Sep 67-4 67-5 

Ext. Sales Prsv, Seles 13452 

Prev. Day Open IM.19U71 o#f779 
GNMA ICBT] 

U O0800 prill- at* & finds of 100 pet 
69-70 57-5 MOT 69-15 6929 

49-5 57-17 Jun 6621 69-4 

66X 89-13 Sep 

60-13 59-4 Dec 6720 6720 

67-15 AX MOT 

*7-4 58-25 Ju«l 

66-13 *5-71 SOP 66-15 66-19 

Est.Satas Prev. Sales 40 

Pf«v. Dav Open InL 7.156 off n 

CERT. DE POSIT (IMM) 

SI million- ptsal 100 PCI 
9149 <063 Mar 9145 9137 

9082 1X30 Jim 9082 »1 

9022 BS80 SOP 9079 9079 

8977 BSJ4 OK 0072 M72 

89JI5 *4-54 Mar 

1581 8+43 Jim 

5786 1786 Sop 

EsLSale* Prev. Saha X 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1+681 off IS 
RU RODOLLARS (IMMJ 
Slmliiion-pnoflOOpef. 

91.15 BS.14 MOT 91.12 9184 

90X7 8249 Jun 9843 9044 

8986 B433 Sep 0983 9084 

99X2 B4J0 DM 89X0 9935 

89JJ7 86.10 MCT 89JJ1 89.15 

8+77 5+73 Jen 0849 6633 

86X0 87JM SOP 8645 86X1 

8977 07 J* Dec 

Est Sales Prwv.Sales +769 

Prev. Day Open int. 92.92* uneoe 


*2.12 +JB 
9144 +.n 

91.11 +39 

9069 +.W 

9034 +89 

9006 +36 

8979 +36 

6934 +36 


H-23 +26 

8X29 +26 

80-9 426 

79-23 +25 

794 424 

71-26 +B 


72-7 +2B 

71-11 421 

70-19 +21 

69-31 +29 

69-13 +30 

66-29 420 

66- 16 +31 

68 4 +21 

67- 25 +31 

67.15 +21 

67-7 +31 


49-3S +13 

SM +14 

61-16 +14 

67-30 +14 

67-14 +14 

6631 +14 

66-19 +14 


9134 +.H) 

90JW +.14 
9031 +.15 

B981 +.14 

89X8 +.14 

89.15 +.13 

085 +.14 


■n +.10 
9041 +.16 

9083 +.15 

8935 +.U 
•9.15 +J3 
081 +.U 

8831 +.13 

8X23 +.13 


1300bd.fi. 

Mar 15730 157X0 15530 15548 

MOV 16630 14630 U4J0 1+4X0 

Jul 17230 17X10 17130 17130 

SOP 17330 177X0 17570 17670 

Nov 17830 179.90 178X0 179X0 

Jbl 18330 16330 183X0 16330 

Mar 18730 

J rev. Soles 1710 
I. 10273 aft ITS 

COTTON KNYCE} 

5S300IB*.- cents per lb. 

79J5 *5.12 Mar 6X13 6X15 6535 *535 

7970 6630 May 6737 6737 6485 6687 

7935 67X0 Jel 6735 6735 6775 6730 

S3 *r-E 061 *7X1 

7X00 67J7 Dec 67X2 6730 67X2 6730 

7673 68.95 MOT 6670 

6930 W.90 MOV 6930 

7X00 7UH Jui moo 

Est-Sotes Prev. Sales 1366 
Prev. Day Open Int 15X72 off 1,994 


KEATING OIL INTAKE J 
42300 pal- cents per pal 
0X75 4*35 Feb 7930 7930 

SUO 41130 Mar 7230 7X40 

8275 6X75 Apr 67X0 6775 

3240 4S30 May 4430 44X5 

70X0 6530 Jun 4570 6585 

Feb 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales IXW1 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 24314 off 564 

CRUDE OIL (NYMEJ 
1300 bbL- dollars Par bbL 
31J0 M.16 Mar 2534 2536 

31X5 25.10 Aar 2535 2535 

3076 25.10 Mav 25X5 25X7 

VM 25* Jun 2570 

2934 2LN Jul 95 10 2SJ0 

12-91 ' iAn t+w 

2930 25.15 Dec 2530 

Est. Sales Prev. Seim 11720 

Prev. Day Open int 527*0 off 7734 


London Commodities III I fJ ldo " Jif** 1 ® J.™’ 22 ■ Commodities I Cash Prices Jaa. 22 


75J0 75.95 

7139 7139 

6630 6735 
4525 4035 
MW 6575 
635 


25X2 2534 

2572 &n 
2535 sm 
2X97 25.15 
2435 2X95 

2X93 2X93 


Stock indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CJMB1 
points ondonv* 

Mm- 17880 179.13 
J5KS Jun 16130 1 0233 
’•{■IS »SSS Sep 185.10 185.10 

'®30 17570 Dec 1*775 18730 

EG. Sales 77,911 Prey, sales 7X903 
Prev. Dov Open Int. 5X325 up 5774 
VALUE UNE (JCCBTJ 
aolnnaM cents 

IS-IS *f or !**» ,WJD 

Z0BJ0 17630 Jun 20230 mi» 

20130 185.73 Sea 202X0 

Est. Sales Cltta V81 
Prev. Day Oatn int. WoSaS* 

^SS&A****'™*' 

™ SS SSTiSSiSS 

IE™ hf HU WO 

10X70 10170 Dec 109 JO 09 JO 

ElL Sales 1X079 Prev.Sata 11M3 
Prev. Day Open int. KUJ96 ualJtd 


177.10 177.15 ^30 
U&M hub —as 
1*5-10 18325 —JO 
1S6J0 18630 —JS 


19570 1*535 — 1X0 
19985 19980 —180 
202X0 202X0 —170 


10X55 102X5 —30 

10X39 M4X5 —35 

10X10 10*20 — XO 

10988 10775 — X5 


Previous 

96Lttf 

1.W2JD 

12iW 

344.70 


1 Commodity Indexes 

Clow 

Moody's 96X00 f 

Reuters ZOKUO 

□J. Futures 12SJJ0 

Com. Reaztorch Bureau _ 26X40 

Moodys : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f . final 

Reuters : bo»e 100 : Sea Tfc 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 197X 


Market Guide 

Gniteee Bean! of Trade 
Cnkoao Meramfile E w tianpe 
immnjTtonol Monetonr Market 
Of emcooo Mweomitt Endow 

X“ I £*"• EMhanos 

New York Cation Exchange 
Commodity Exchanw, Now York 
New York Marccntlh EmhanM 
KaftMM ary Beard of Trade 
New York Futures Exchonae 


Jazz. 22 

Fioures hi skrUng per metric Ion. 
Gcooil in ui dollars per metric ton. 
GoW in U8. doHars per ounce. 


HIM Lew dose Preview 
SUGAR 

Mar 13730 11980 11980 12000 13X00 13X40 
Mav 13530 126X0 12770 127XD 1J1JJ0 IJ170 
Aim 145X0 13660 137X0 13730 141X0 14180 
Ocf 15270 14530 J45JO 14580 14900 M970 
DM 15670 15470 15130 15230 15X60 15X40 
MOT }J2M 17030 16630 16730 17030 17170 
Mov 17*30 17780 173X0 17X00 17430 17630 
2X40 lots el 50 tens. 

COCOA 

Mur 2.105 2371 2373 3375 3306 3387 
May 2.115 237* 2379 2880 1101 2.1KJ 
Jhr 28*2 2872 23*7 2871 2890 3395 
San 2390 2048 2346 2348 2304 2308 
OK 2300 .TO 1.961 1.965 2301 2303 
Mar 1.983 1,983 1,975 1XS0 1.993 1.995 
MOV 1880 1880 L96S 1.980 1878 2300 
5X70 lots olio lent. 

COFFEE 

Jan U66 2750 UE 3365 2357 3360 
Mar 2394 2377 7M1 7393 2378 2379 
MOV 2389 2371 73ft UP 3375 2377 
3y 2395 2J7J 2377 7390 2382 ZJBJ 
San 2X0O 2J77 2X00 2X02 2JB0 2J82 
Nov 2X00 2JSS 2 X00 2X05 2382 23K 
Jon 23*7 2385 2397 23*6 2300 23*1 
2X52 rots Of 5 tens. 

GASOIL 

Jon 23X50 22280 2JCUB 23X00 23580 21600 
Fab 22930 22X00 22X00 22X25 23 0.25 23CJ0 
Mpr 22180 217,75 217,75 71130 22275 srun 
API 21X00 21135 211 JO 21175 21575 21SJ0 
Moy 210X0 208X0 CT7A 29930 21175 21235 
Jen 21086 20880 2W80 20875 71135 21175 
Jly 21050 20800 207 JO 20X50 71130 212J0 
AUO N.T. N.T. 2D6JU 214.00 21030 21730 
5ea NT 9LT. 20630 220410 21030 21930 
1505 lets of 100 lens. 

GOLD 

Fab 30930 30780 3B7XS 30780 300.70 30X90 
APf 31250 31130 310L90 31230 3T2.I0 — 

791 leli of 100 Irev ox 

Sources: Reuters and LonOon Petroleum ex- 
change t email). 


U.S. Drops Trade Cases 
Against 3 Steelmakers 
Return 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
International Trade Commission 
voted unanimously Tuesday (o 
drop unfair-trade cases brought 
against carbon-steel producers in 
Australia, Finland and Spain. 

The cases, alleging illegal dump- 
ing of foreign sled, were ended 
when U.S. Sled Coro, withdrew 
petitions against the tnree nations 
after they agreed in recent weeks to 
voluntarily reduce sted exports to 


Fioures in sterling per metric ton. 
Sliver hi pence per troy ounce. 


High grade copper cotftuoes: 
.mot 134630 134730 
3 months 134930 135039 
Coaoor *alt mde* ? 
mot 133030 133130 
3 months 131930 134030 
Tin: mot *73530 974530 
3 months 9X9530 970030 
LndlsPOl 37100 37580 


3 mo nth s 

Z Inc: mol 

3 months 
Sllv«r:spal 
3 months 
Aluminium: 
snol 


34680 14*30 

73630 73830 
73X00 73X50 

55330 55X00 
56930 57030 

90*30 9*000 


1 months 131800 181930 
Nicfcelispel 4X9530 XSDOJ30 
3 months 4X6330 4X6530 
Source: Reuters. 


134630 134730 
134930 1349 JQ 

132430 132*30 
133530 133630 
9X7X30 9X6030 
9X41.00 9X6530 
3*630 36630 

33930 339 JO 

73030 73130 
77430 73730 

wm 55XJ0 
57250 57100 

997 JO *9650 
132730 1327.90 
4X79 .90 jj -j p Q Q 


Malaysia Weighs 
Firm Acquisitions 

Reuters 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia 
— Malaysia may acquire some 
multinational tire companies to 
achieve its objective of becoming a 
leading tire exporter, a government , 
minister said Tuesday. J 

Paul Leong. the minister of pri- 
mary industries, said that in an 
effort to increase growth in rubber- 
based industries, Malaysia plans to 
manufacture tires. He said the ac- 
quisition of some companies could 


NY CSCE: 

NYCE: 
COMEX; 
NT MS: 
KCBT: 
NYFB: 


the United States. 

Prices Rise 0.1% in Canada - 

Renton 

OTTAWA — The consumer 
price index rose 0.1 percent in De- 
cember . compared with a 0.6-per- 
ceot increase in November and a 
0.3-percent rise in December 1983, 
Statistics Canada said Tuesday. 


wide tire-marketing networks 
needed to become a top exporter. 

Mr. Leong did not say whether 
Malaysian government agencies or 
the private sector would undertake 
such acquisitions, but said the cabi- 
net has agreed in principle on the 
strategy. 

Taiwan Foreign Orders Rise 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Foreign orders re- ( 
ceivcd by Taiwan's manufacturers i 
and exporters totaled 531.6 billion 
in 1984, up from 525.7 billion in 
1983, the Economic Ministry said 
Tuesday. In December 1984 orders 
totaled 52.44 billion, down 3.56 
percent from November but up 
0.41 percent from the year-earlier 
period, it said. 


Jan. 22 

Sugar hi Ffwdi Francs per metric too. 
Ottrr flams in Francs per TOO kg. 


SUGAR 

Mar 1x30 1371 1371 U75 

May 1X60 1X15 1X17 1X2P 

AUB 1533 1501 1X93 1305 

Ort 1X30 1868 1369 1570 

D*C 1JW 1.710 1X50 1X65 

Mar 1820 1365 1.7*5 1,775 

Est, vbI.: 2300 lots of 50 nns. Prev. 
him: 900 (ats. Op«i kihrMt: 193*5 
COCOA 

Mar 2350 2320 2322 smt, 

MOV 2367 2350 2351 2360 

JIV N.T. N.T. 2340 — 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2350 — 

Dec N.T. N.T. — 2.170 

Mar N.T. N.T. XIX — 

May N.T. N.T. 2. IX — 

Ett. VOL: *0 tort ol ID tans. Prav. i 
sales: CTIofA Opmi inMnesl: 826 
COFFEE 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2550 2J90 

»tor 2500 LfflQ 2573 2500 

May N.T. N.T. 2567 2590 

JIV 1570 2570 _ 2560 

SOB M.T. N.T. 25*0 — 

NOV N.T. N.T. 1355 — 

Jan N.T. N.Y. 2552 — 

EH. to.: 10 toll of 5 Ians. Prev. « 
saiai: 34iaU.Oawi mtsresi: 343 
Source: Bourse dv Commerce. 


Dividends Jan. 22 


Company Per Amt Pay Rsc 

DECREASED 

Prmn Bin Rvlty Tr .. .133 2-1* i-ji 
DISTRIBUTION 

Q 0.12 2-26 1-21 
INCREASED 

CllvfwfFin O .10 2-19 2-4 

Fnteprt-MCMm O .19* +10 1J1 

STOCK 

5aftwaraSvc .25 PC 2-28 3-1 

STOCK SPLIT 
Mvlan Lab* — 2-for-l 

USUAL 

Crass A Tratotor O 30 3-3 2-15 

Effrn UNIv Am O X 8 % 2-15 

Fax-SfiHy Pnatu Q 17 j-i 2.15 

San Juan Ban Rvlty . 376 2-14 |.ji 

Southern Co O XO M 2-4 

**»j*tj MMoalUv; CWhiortsn* ; S-Stmi- 


S&P 100 -Index Options 
Jam. 22 


WrWe Cetu-UH PaM-txot 
Price P«b Mar AM MB Mar am 

ISO 251* 24% ‘ — 1/16 int in* 

1SS im 20 22 1/16 % ‘A 

MB 14% M II ITU $n» % 

165 9H 11% m 5/16 % IV* 

170 5% 7% f% 1% 2% 2% 

175 2 

11/16 4% 6% Mb 4% S 

IK 1% 2% 4% 7 » n. 

Total cau vakims 3S3H 
Total call ea*n Ini. 292.161 
Total oat vatadto 1*021* 

ToMmrt OMn InL 364314 

Man 17542 Law 17174 CUM 17433 + 032 
Source: cmoB. 


Commodify nod Unit Toe , 

Orttae 4 Sonias. tt> 1 49 

Prlnfcloth 64/M JB^y.va _ 035 

J. , on 47X80 4! 

iron 2 Fdnr. PhllB. ion 71100 71 

^SSS p ih° n,v P,M - - * 

Lead Spot, lb 10.22 2 

vOOIHl ttoefa lb _ 6 Ufl Aud 

SJKStan: 5 1S r 

SStonTiS— "VI! 

Source- AP. 

■ Asian Commodities 

I Jan. 22 


HONG-KONGOOLO FUTURES 
UJApor ownev 

. Close PirrlW 

Mtab Lew BM Ask BM AM. 
N.T. N T. 306JJ0 MB 08 30680 mW 

ESP - S-I S- T - 30700 aw-K a*- 00 “S 

Mar ~ N.T. N.T. 30BJ30 310.00 J08 00 31006 
AM - 31180 31130 31080 312.00 110.00 
Am _ N.T. N.T. 31580 21780 31580 3I78J 
ft? “ N-T 31*80 32U» 319J» 321 S0 

Oct _ N.T. N.T. 32380 32580 12AN) 32*06. 
Otc r 331 JR 33130 32TJ6J 33180 32*30 JJIOO 
ValufTw: 21 letaeflKOL 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U5LS per nance 


Htak Law 

Fab 308J0 307.10 

Mar N.T. N.T. 

AM ..... 312.00 31286 
Vrtume : 367 lots of IM oz. 
*™*LA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malayuan esmts per KIM 
Ctose 

614 Ask 

SP 19230 19352 

Mar 1*450 1*550 

ffr ItaXO IW8B 

May 20000 30200 

Jun 20350 20550 

Volume: 23 ia+L 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
SHwopors nnbper kUa 
One 

HSSIFeb- 17155 1H8S 
RS5 1 Mor_ 17J25 172.75 

RSS2Feb_ IS* JO 16050 

g»3P«- 157J0 I58J0 
RSS4Feb_ 15050 15250 
R$S3Faa_ 14250 14*50 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malpyvlas nmgDiMfB (DPI 

aase 

, M Ml 

1.1*0 1500 

Mar 1,1*0 1,190 

AM 1.130 1,180 

MO* — — 1,120 1.170 

JUh — 1.110 1,160 

Jly I.M0 1,198 

Sea mod MM 

Nov .. 1390 1.140 

JM1 1390 1.140 

volume: 4 lals « 25 taw. 
Source: Reuters. 


Settle settto. 
307 JO M7-M 
309 JO 30973 
311 JO 311 JO 


Previous 

,9% 

iSS 

20000 7020° 
201.00 sosja 


Prevtow 
■M Mis 
7113° ma 
17130 I71M 
1 6050 MIK 
15BJB I99K 
15100 151M 

14330 |4$39 


Prsvkss* 
AM Aik 

1.1 EC 1-2S 
MS) l-S 

1,140 1.100 

1,130 1.1*0 

1120 U« 

i-»o J-Hfi 

1.110 1.JK 

1.100 f,*g- 
1.100 1-U0 


, c- : 


1. ; ; I; 

; s’ iV; 
I * ! « ' L -i 


•'I iv* 

vfs-::; 

S 

^ I’ 

*■ 'Sir. v-. ; . . 


iHu : : 
: 

iSf » ■ 

'»h ^ HZ ‘ 

J >C J “ 

3N \ T : ' • 

: u 

: ri- - 

3 u § % 1-5 V- - - 

. V'R i? _ • 

0 il! 1 *, ;■* = ~ ■ 
■ £**’’> A 1? 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. 22 

W.l^rTOiMiyli-IZS.WO'Wta.cwfir-' . 


! H fe CoDs+rtn* PMvSHtt* _ 

mot mot jen im m am SB" 

» — 20* — CD7 0-70 “ 

31 082 ID l.» 0^ 0*2 - 

n 037 852 I J8 5 /: 1 56 'Ji 

U 0U 057 097 151 1*9 >9* 

34 016 §55 0X7 2XS — - . 

3 5 001 ui 030 ye - — 

MmM MM v«L IBM 

Mb: MofcvsLUtf optBipt. HR » 

PM* : 660B. VBL3S1 «PM HI. 1*497 
Source: CMC. 


*» ?) *1, 

"‘ft 

!,;4S! 

•lit 

'|:F 

■4t\ 

SsS' 1 ! 


































































r.:: 


INTERNATIONAL. HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 23, 1985 


Page IS 


U.S. Program in Caribbean Basin Is Starting to Lure Investment, Spark Competition 

By Frances Maclean Over the Iasi year, many govern- eluding Cota* Industries Inn, the labor, tax breaks, streamlined pa- haw -35 percent of its value added compared with 52 million 10 years statement of some product 

Washington rati Service rtiAni u— _ . ■ • ■ « j ir «■■ JlmkL aa..h«h. nip fmm ih» nfnmm - 

Washington — • president 


tnes and individual businessmen :/up operations in Haiti. ship. The latter are aimed primarily blouse might be cut in the United “Most of this is due to the end of 

nave promoted the Caribbean Ba- ' The CBI information center now at Hong Kong businessmen wof- States or the Far bast, shipped to the world recession,'’ said Claude 
sin Initiative with almost mission- . receives ISO inquiries a day, and ried about the country's reversion the Caribbean .for stitching and Levy, director of Association des 
Vy zeal. The CBI information cen- ' the Haitian commercial attache, to Chinese control in 1997; and to then sent bade to the United States Industries if Haiti “But the CBI 
ter of the Department of Harold Joseph, says his telephone Palestinian entrepreneurs in the to be sold. has attracted positive attention to 

Commerce has hdd seminars in 35 rings constantly. OPIC, which in- Gulf who have difficulty obtaining IftitereisajewdinCBTscrown, m y country.” 

U.S. nues and 9 foreign countries, sures against the risk of revolution, visas. . it is Haiti, the region’s ooorest The neighboring Dominican Re- 

The Department of Commerce wrote 32 new policies in 10 Carib- “Our ideal investor is usually a country. public established 21 free-zone fac- 

and the U.S. Overseas Private In- bean countries Iasi year. middle-rized finn looking for a nrmgrw 4 lories is the past year and has a 

vestment Corp„ or OPIC, took The Reagan administration long-term arrangement to have a . arivanram- Sr mV waiting list for space under con- 
businessmen cm visits of many Ca- hopes the resion’s economy will product manufactured for a U.S. J s traction, according to Wilson 


for the program s auty-iree status and toe U.S. Overseas Private In - 1 bean countries last year. middle-sized firm looking for a lories is the past year and has a under OSr. Ine GaP, orvienerai- 

& * od desisted product were up 17 vestment Coip„ or OPIC, took The Reagan administration long-term arrangement to have a . arivantaw nr™*^Sffc!r w^ting list for space under con- iz«rf Sch^ of Pirferaices, is an 

percent as of six months after the businessmen on visits of many Ca- hopes the region’s economy will product manufactured for a U.S. s traction, according to Wilson accord within, the General Agree- 

A*: program’s mcepuon. Btrt imports nbbean countries, and the nations improve as trade picks up, bruising company that already has a need P***™ Rood, director of the American nwnt on Tariffs and Trade that 

V*. A 2 . 1 oevdpping coun- themselves hosted several missions, improved soda! conditions and for that product,” said Larry Ther- Chamber of Commerce there. provides for preferential tariff re- 
ft 1 tries with similar tariff stems were Fred Brooke, chainnan’ of a directly helping to stabilize there- iot, director of the CBI infonnaton SJSKS ° f CB1 ’ S critics, U.S. labor ductions on exports from devdop- 

Mup 28 percent. sporting-goods company in East gion politically. The U.S. govern- center. TO5, unions remain its most MnsfettnL mg countries- 

Tl . nsaThr trtrt mpIv roll VT-__ . I “ i . ~ . < m u_ tl j * _ _ i.V U/iln a lwini i m wi nnM Ipcc AliUnttnli nrAvimihi kur Uaaa 


statement of some products ex- 
empted from the program — in- 
ducting textiles, leather apparel 
and canned tmia, aQ subject to 
strong lobbying efforts before the 
CBI legislation was passed. 

“OnlylO percent of imports 
from the area qualify" said one 
critic, “and two-thirds of those 
were coming in duty-free already 
under GSP.” The GSP, or General- 
ized Scheme of Preferences, is an 
accord within, the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade that 
provides for preferential tariff re 


r* “It’s redly too early to tell just Rutherford. New Jersey’ personal- ment has spent an estimated $2 Mr. Theriot attempts to match With a m i nimum wage of less “When we have unprecedented 
O/C bow effective CBI is going to be.” ly invited 22 businessmen to Haiti, billion since the Caribbean Basin potential investors with in-country thsn S3 a day, more than 250 for- trade deficits and 7_2-percent nn- 


v’ raid Jou R osenba um, the assistant w here he has been established since initiative was conoatptLThe U.S. companies that provide the plant, 
N? 05. trade representative. “It was 1®7G- “The Caribbean had an im- Agency for International Develop- labor and lower-level management 

. i .i. a n.uanr nnumiii !• 4A* mmL1a_ ** li . n. . . i ■ _ J . . e . aam ■§_ _ — I _L* J 


in Haiti- Almost all baseballs 


x, v made a 12 -year program because it 
can take 2 years, and even 4. for a 
M- business to get going. CBI is not a 
i J quick fix. It .was meant for the long 
iSrun.” 

a 


said Mr. Brooke, meat spent almost $800 mtUion last to oversee packing, shipping and and a large number of brassieres create 


employment, it’s ironic we are en- 
couraging a program which will 
create higher deficits and fewer 


Although proximity has been 
one of the Caribbean Basin Initia- 
tive’s s elling points, shipping rates 
remain staggeringly hi gh. 

"They’ll come down when we 


“People thought there was a revo- year on CBI-idated projects. paperwork. The investor needs are assembled there, along with jobs at borne,” said Mark Ander- have more to put in the holds.” said 
lotion a week.” . Countries involved in the pro- only to supply raw materials, ma- electronic goods, textiles and toys, son, an official of the AFL-CIO Peter Johnson, director of Caribbe- 


Three of the companies rep re- gram have become healthily com- chinery arid top management. For Assembled 
seated on Mr. Brooke’s visit, in- petitive, luring investors wi Lh cheap duty-free status, the product must valued at 


for export were trade federation. 


an-Central American Action, a pri- 


mfllion last year. Other critics would like the rein- vaidy funded organization - 


Japan, Soviet 
In Trade Talks 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Japan an- 
nounced Tuesday that it had 
resumed trade talks with the 
Soviet Union, the first such dis- 
cussions between the two na- 
tions since Japan imposed sanc- 
tions on the Soviet Union after 
the 1981 crackdown on Poland. 

A Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man said the two countries 
opened (he 25th round of talks 
in the Japan- USSR Annual 
Consultations on Trade. 

Trade between the two coun- 
tries has been declining in re- 
cent years. Japanese figures 
show that Japan exported $13 
billion in goads to the Soviet 
Union in the first half of 1984, 
down 18 percent from the year 
before. During the same period, 
the Soviet Union exported $730 
million to Japan- 


Ovei>the-Counter 


Jan. 22 


NASDAQ Notional. Market Prices 


4£+» 

23Vj 

21V* +11* 

Wft-M 

26V. + ft 
9ft+ ft 
IB 

23ft 4-H 
«k— ft 
1014 

7ft V4 
M> +m 
4ft— ft 
1 4ft — - ft 
28ft + ft 
12ft 
9ft 
lift 
25ft 

IB —ft 
1516 

18 —ft 
23ft -f ft 
21ft +1 
4ft — ft 
Mb— ft 


17ft + ft 
3ft + ft 
12V* + ft 
12ft + ft 
13ft + ft 
Mb— ft 
15ft + ft 
7ft + ft 
4Bft + ft 
35ft 
lift 
7ft + ft 
9ft— ft 
2Bft +1 
14U + ft 
30ft + ft 

lft— ft 
17ft + ft 
17 + ft 

V* 

* ft 

+ ft 



Mb 
2092 4ft 
117 13ft 
1137 1ft 
419 12ft 
103 4ft 
TUT Tift 
205 4ft 
70 
205 
IN 



m 9ft 9 9ft + ** 
Ml Vft B% 9ft 
2 4 B25ft 23 » -2ft 

45 25640 39 40+1 

5010ft Mft 10ft + ft 
33314ft » 

. 1199 7ft 7 7 

779 Mb -Sft . Mb 
7 4ft 3ft 3ft 

S-S IS a=£ 

r 

■ 552 5 4ft 4ft— ft 
. 93510ft 10 W „ 

222 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
247 3H 3ft 3ft— ft 
1.7 501119ft fft 9ft + ft 
2W 191b 19 If + ft 

M 770 M 1S1* 1J» + 1* . 

s am 9ft »•;’«•+ ft- 

■j 

a-* 

■ It 19ft WU.TWb+ J* 
55 372 aft 27ft 27ft— Yl 

m lift lift tift + S 

M .91 411A 40ft 41ft + % 
« 95 27ft’ 27 V — ft 

34 . 302914 29» SH ^ 

1 J 451 Sift 3Mb 3g* + W 
151 13ft 12 12Vi— «■ 

1J 47 Oft A 6ft ^ 

95 3ft '3ft 3ft— 

mv» ioft ’“ft+ft 

14 78 6ft .8 gb+.ft 

■ 51 5ft S Jft + ft 

■ 185 5ft Sft 5ft— ft 

& "sr £r* 

U >3BZ7ft 2W 33ft' ' 
12P 5ft Mb + » 

4 38 14V. IM 14ft 

149413 l«W +»• 

- 2979ft 7BW 
4M25 7445 25 + ft 

• 10120 19 * 

]}M Mb 8ft— J* 
14 34 Ubb 131b 13ft + ft 
4 791 70ft JM* M*- L* 
It 24 80ft 79ft 79ft +’ 

A ‘ * TSft 25ft 25ft —.ft 

1Q5Z7 '25ft 25ft 

■ 118 lift lift lift + '* 


. 84814ft 
1U 7ft 
t 3 10 

5855 31ft 
■ <4 25 

Si 

.12 .1 sm 

K IJ « 8 fc 
75912ft 
737 0ft 
11 4ft 
11 141b 
. 87 4ft 
BS 7ft 
25 Sft 
...15« 4 32920ft 
1774 151b 
72 34 902 21ft 
JS 17 -35 U 
58 1U 

343. Mb 

6» 5ft 

955'7W 

149 I 
. 40 4ft 
41 7 5ft 
•471.3ft Sft 
215 10 9ft 
1354 3ft 3ft 
35414 13ft 
134 U 13ft 
9.5ft 4ft 
18518ft 17ft 
11178 21ft 2Sft 
21129ft 29 
13 5ft 

* 

70 4 50725 

170 4.4 11527ft 
70 17 114 17ft 
88 46 28219ft 
.159 U M 1*U 
5511ft 
4515ft 15ft 
72 1J 17BWft T9ft 
72 U 21525ft 25ft 
45 «4 149 2ft 

.14 UT 1139 14ft 
t 199 5 
l 57021ft 

2713 124b 

10 2tW 2* 

.12 S~ 814ft U 

411ft Hli 
705 ft ft 

w n i 

35 4 Sft 

28 9ft 9ft 

144 17 14O20 27ft 

.12 T7 348 10ft 10ft 

Ml 17 144 4M . 4Hi 

20513 12 

44 9ft Oft 
175 198 911 13%b Oft. 
j 070 7 127 7ft 7ft 

74 9 9 

32 SW Sft 

• 328 8 7ft 

53419ft 17ft 
37213ft lift 
63818ft 17* 

• - 5015ft 18 ' 

3813ft 131b 

11 Sft 4ft 

12716ft 50„ 
73 ft lb 
130 8ft 8ft 
231511ft 11 
41 416-6 
1308 9ft 9 
16029 28ft 
as sft Sft 
31 5 '47k 

24 1 1 

72 U 512* 13ft 
28315* 14* 
13 3ft 3 
16517ft 16* 
352 Wb 18* 
1933 IB* 18 
.70 U 118 6ft Mb 
Me 33 1073 29 28ft 

... jnty 

r 12514ft 1414 

6 8 t 

jar A 157 Sft Mb 

.16 tr 111 8 w 

7 1ft 1ft 
t 23821ft 38ft 
t 133 4ft 4ft 

JJ2 27 2040 54ft 52ft 
62328ft 27* 
226 TV! 4ft 

rnis M 

2j40 4.9 4849* 48% 

2J0 3 2260ft 40 

M 27 4024ft 24ft 

11915 14 

&U iS’fft T 

■ - 

’jl 27 “al«£ Sft 

U0 47 50 27ft 27ft 

230 S3 24 52ft S2 
92 16* Ig* 
170 5.1 *£? 

23820* 19% 
3323 13ft 13 
91910* 10% 
44616 15* 

JO 37 2*4 21 20 

11019* Wft 
AD 1.7 731 21 g* 
1JB 56 14 32* 32 

170 5-1 218 31* 31* 
170 6J 6318 17* 

U0&S7 4852* S'* 

.1 * 13* H'V 

JJ3 1 20ft 20ft 


Floating Rate Notes 


Jan. 22 


Dollar 





bipoa He» 
9%. IOS 
11* 174 
9* 8-7 

UUi ZM 
174 JM 
lift Vrl 
9* M 
Wh 254 
9t+ 74 
n. 295 
Wft 20-5 
1114 18-1 1 
9ft 28-7 
□ 25-1 

*4 W4 
IP» »1 
10% 3M 
8ft 1W 

no* im 
*14 IM 

11 254 
10% 29-1 
12H 251 
17V» +7 
99. 124 
89, 28-3 
1* 1H 
9* 13-3 

12 2W 
** 174 
11* 114 
157 10U 
12h 2Y3 
9fb aw 
17* »1 
10* 304 
12* 21-1 
19b 133 
12* +2 
11* 2S-3 
Wft JH 
*9L 134 
9* 54 
1888 9* 
12ft 43 
9ft 22-7 
9* 1W 

m *■? 

12ft 31-1 
9* 174 
Wft l-S 
17* 43 
9ft 35? 
Oft 104 
* 11-2 
n* iw 

9* 9-7 
lift IM 
12ft 11-3 
12* 259 
9ft 74 
11* 244 
10* 84 
8* 31-1 
12* 18-1 
«ft 204 
12* 31-1 
9* 52 
■ft 27-3 
8* 28-1 
9* 11-2 
n* 53 
0* 28-1 
7b 19-3 

Wft an 

9ft 124 
ft 154 
9ft 2K2 
IS* 204 
12ft 184 
12 253 

134194 
lift 22-2 
n* im 
9ft 54 
9ft 274 
12 94 

9ft 1-7 
lift 114 
n* 214 

12 94 

9ft W 
9ft 2«4 
9ft 274 
9 IE-7 
9* 744 
9 16-7 

12ft 1KJ 
9. IW 
9ft It3 
(2* 257 
Wft U4 
9L 7-2 
m 11-7 

9ft 19-3 
9ft 9-7 







; »I /J 



1 \b 

Mil 






VrrJ 


Non Dollor 


ftuer/Mincff/Mai Com* Next BM AlU 


Arti-97 

Bb Mammal 5*u 
85. Tab ro -81/90 
Ba indosuez 5ft-f 1 
OHmrpil/iol-lO 
C4«MSVr9S 
Credll Fonder 5VM9 

C«0 Bofl Slto5ft-91/9S 
Oanmarit 93/98-18 
(.U.S -91 

KlnoOMn Bcftbim 5 -94 
UorfiS-94 
SndSb-n/9] 
VwiiNn5Vr9)/N 


Wft U-2 49J0 99JS 
lift 27-1 99 JO 994$ 
9ft 7H «9J0 „ 
9ft 71-2 99J0 99JS 
Kt 152 99.18 99J3 
Wft 214 9942 9M3 
Wft 94 Wi 9*JI 
A 184 99JK3 99J7 
Bd V I 99J2 99.97 
12ft 158 9932 TOtdl 
Mb 184 99J8 Wtf 
9ft »2 99JS 9940 
10ft 251 flXUOlMJS 
10ft 274 99JB 99JB • 



ttt 

18% 1 % 1 M*+ * 
3 » 3 

It* Wft Wft 
12ft lift 12(5 + ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft 4- ft 




INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
22 January 1985 

Umi oof ssiat volM aaotatians mm HUaworeoaiwlM b» nw Funds llstM »mi tbo 
exception of tome funds whoso auatos ore based on Issue price*. Tift followiflo 
maruliKU symbols indfeato frequency of mmtattons supMM for the IHT: 
(d)-daDv; Cw) - weekly; (b) -bl-monttily; (r) -reootortr; (D-hTeeukrlv. 

BANK JULIUS BAEA & CO. Ltd . -Id 1 Bcvar EWkwftnOMH-t — 53X40 


-Id > aaectwnd 5FW0J 

—Id ) Conbar_ SF 1185 

— (d ) Equibaer America — 1 11*7 

— <d i Eaulbaer Europe— — 5F1152 
—Id 1 Eaulbaer Pacific— — SF 11M 

— Id) Grator SF 1027 

— IdTStockbar 5FI549I 

— (d | C5F Food SF25 

— Id ) Crossbow Fund SF 11 

—Id ) JTF Fund N.V 514 

BANOUE INDOSUEZ 

—tdl Aslan Growth Fund — — — 518 

■-HW1 Ptvtfropd SF 82 

*— <w) FiF— America- S 18 

— Iwl FIF— Europe $ 18 

—In | FIF — Pacific — — S 16 

—Id ) indosuez MultlbOndsA- 509 

—fd> Indosuez MuttlbondsB S146 

BRITANN1AJOB271.SI. Heller, Jersey 
— (wj BritJTollar income—. SHOW 
— iwi BrlUManaaCurr 
— Id I Bril. Inti J Moneejwrtt 
—Id ) Brtl. iniLt ManaaPoril 
— Iw) Brit.Unlverxal Growth 
— (w) Bril.Goid Fund 
— lw> Brit JManoo Currency 
— (d 1 Brti. Japan Dir Pert. Fd 
—Iw) Brit-Utter Gilt Fund: 

—Id) Brit. World Let*. Fund 
—Id j Brtl. World Techn. Fund 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 


PARISBAS— GROUP 

5F 1|oJ8 — (j ) corlexo Inlernotlmiat— — 58540 

-.IJ S-2S -IwlOBLI-DM DMU44J2 

— (wlOBUGESTKJN S F Ji-*S 

SF liraoo _< W ) OBLFDOLLAR I w» 

eif.lBH? — (W7QBU-VEM— . . Y1«LZMJ» 

SF 1549JB — (w OBU -GULDEN PL 105L34 

5F2583 — Id, PAHOIL-FUND S93J0 

SF HJO —Id 1 PARINTER FUND 5101.93 

I ikg — Id 1 PAR US Troosunr Bowl 5 10069 

Rorol Bortc Ol ConodoPOB MLGuenaay 
S1041 “H*l RBCOxwdtan Fiftd Lid — — _ 510J1 

-Hwl RBC For EcstLPqdflC Fd 51047 

— siHs -Hwl RBC Inti Capitol FA 51931 

i inm -+|W) ROC HWI income Fd~ * VIA*’ 


«as foot: 


*1041 KBVUXIOOUXI f-imo Lm — » IUJI 

-Hwl RBC Far EcstLPqdtlC Fd 510A7 

5 V&S -Hw| RBC I«n Caoltol Fd. *1931 

- S lam '+('*» RBCiitri income FdL 9 IBM’ 

" sitii -tld 1 RBC MaaCummcv Fd. \ZU2 

- S8937 -l-lw) RBC North Amur. Fd., IW 

‘ SI45J7 SKANDI FOND INTL FUND M5M3IZ78> . 

. — (w)inc: Bid 5480 Oiler sin 

— IwJAcc: Bid 5488 Offer 55.12 

SW SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

S0.V70 17 Devonshire 5Qj-nndoo-01-377-8M0 

' CUM -IblSHB BWdFund— I214M 

tiisSa -Iwl SHB Infl Growth Fund 51948 

50-721* SWISS HANK CORP. 

C15J7 -idlAmerkavBlor SF5U25 

- SO**! —Id 1 D-Mark Bend Selection DM12243 

cam — (dloo/far Bond Selection ST3254 

52-S5 -Id 1 Florin Bond SUidon FL12BJ9 

80J73 -(d) intervotor— 5FS5J5 

— Id 1 JOT1 PurtfaUo SF 85025 

turn — Id ) Swlw Foreton Bond 5el SF 11040 

■ sTvw — (diswtovolorNewSer SF2UZJ8 

- — Id t Unlv. Bond Schid^ 5F832S 

— <d ) Universal Fuad 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) -<d ) Universal Food SF T19JT 

— SF3SW UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

—Id Bend Valor Swf .. SFiniBO iMiimnim o ... SFJ3M 

—Id Band VOIar D-marb— — DM 1DL12 —15 . SF TITS 

=13 122 X 22 I £: DOLLAR vs, .Uffis 3* FS£s5Sa= sf isiSS 

— Id Band VWor Yen Yen 10500.00 _ia i japan- irwest SF 95880 

— <5 S^v^Swr—rTr- sFig^ -idjsamswmAtr.sh. SF471J0 

dS r^ Vrt ^ UW0UA VmM -fdlsumlftdiptol SF 20X30 

=}2 csSS£=5SS== 5F H7S UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

-Id C5 Funds— I nil SF ISfr 00 ijn ! u5l»S2£ niiftSI 

—Id CS Money MOrtM Fund— *103380 HjIUJuS? 1 * 

—Id CS Money Market Fund DM rorSAO — IdjUnlrok— — — DM 7U8 

— id Ene rate— vo tor sf iw js Other Funds 

—Id UM«C 

—Id Eurojuj— Volor 

—Id Pacific— Valor 


sFiga Otfae- Funds 

SF147J5 (W) Adlbotm* inve st menl* Fund. S 21X53 


SF 171 js (w) Adi vast mil 

_,T .— 1C . T „C„ T ecu <«1 AauUo intamatlDnal Fund 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM Ir ) Arab Finance I F 

— -Hd ) Concantro DM TLBS |b | 

— Hd I inn Rentenfond DM *4.13 (w ] TruUcor Inn Fd. (AEIF) 

Dunn & Horulrt 6 Lloyd Georpfc Brussrts W 1 BBL FOWPS -- — 

— (ml D&H Commodllv Pool- 5308.12 
—4m) Currency 8. Gold Pool —S 182JO 
-fm) Winch. Life Fut. Pool— 557244 
—(in) Timm World Put. Peal— 588988 


iwl BNP imeruond Fund 
lw> Boncbdex' Issue Pr- 
im) Canada GM-Marteoae F 
d I Caplfai Preserv. Fd. InM, 

w) CKodn) Fund 

F&CMGMT. LTD. IN V. ADVISERS Id I CJ.R. Austro 

1, Laurence Pouxlv Hill, EC*. 01-523-4580 (d 1 C-I.R. Japan Fund 

— (w) FAC Atwiilc— — slaw (m> cieveiond Offshore Fd— 51A7IL92 

“l*! EK 1“™**" * 9J7 (w) Columbia Securities FL 1*67 

— iw) FAC Oriental— — — 525-51 in » rnuPTF S938M 

FIDELITY FOB 670, Hamilton Bermuda {!* J SSertFA SntSrt=" * 

=J2! « S JSS (w cSS$ ftL !5ri B cSfcr s &S 


STDJ5 
S 105.97 
*83873 
S1JOX55 
*1882 
BFW7* 
S 10533 
SF 14<55 
*855 

S11JJ8 
*182 
*9.93 
* 1880 


— Iw) FBC Euraceon. 
— iw> FAC Oriental— 


- i l SSj^ASrataF!^ Itjht W/D.Wlflm-WWWWelvtTsf, 

=}«.» PiSiK OlfaSliTr lb ) Drakkar nwosl.Fund N.V. 

Zrt Id ) Dreyfus Fund Inf L— 

=!rt ftt Jon? I w) Drevfus Intercontmenf 

=/» (wl The Eshjbnshment Trust 

ZlSl SSmZ i£2Z3L?££d IM (d) Europe Obligations 

ZrS » HSml pSSSifprJSt Mill? Cw) Find Eagle Fund 

=13 1 * ’slew <» > Flf *v Stars Ltd. . 

—Id ! Fidelity wSid Fundi * 29 J9- [* j SS!f Pr 

FORBES POB8S7 GRAND CAYMAN Iwl Formdund— __ 

London Agent 01-839-1013 twl Forrmilo iSotecMon F. 

-<w) Gold Income 5823* d Fondltalki — — _. 

— Iw) Gold Aopredatian *442 Id Governm. Sec-^und* 

— Iw) DoMor income 5834 Id ) Frankf-Trusf Injnb* 

— Iml Shratealc Tradtno S 1JH Iwl Hauswnann Hldos. N.V. 

GEFINOH FUNDS. (Si KSironR^ 

— <wl East Inveetnwnl Fund *351.34 b ILA lnM GoW 

4 w) Scottish World Fund 112044 id J JnWrfundSA— — 

«) State SI. American 5 140.90 !«) i^tnarUt F^S 

LODtl.GuldLW-LDd Aorfrtjl 49 1 <230 [ w | iml OmmCT Rmd Ltd 

GLOBA L ASSET MAN AG EME NT CORP. l?!l*£SS!22!P* Ftald 

PB 119, St Peter Port, Guernsey. 04S1-2S715 W > jnv^ D W S.— — DM *tS 

SU6JM (r/ fnvwf Al/anfwufti — — - S4M 

PfSiMitme Inc — *11954 <r i i^^.nh»«SA I mj4 

(w) GAMerlco lnc_ — 5 123.15- g{ 

!"i ISilKUr ' — StS’S d ) Am B«nson inn Fa S3U1 

Iwi GAM MSS' = SFm# S-SS?? J ? Jap - 

Id ) GAM International Inc— SUB J, 

(W) GAM North America inc. 510041 lw) l8v«goe Cap Hold 

|w) GAM N, America Unit Trial. JttOOP u {-wuffxwr 

Iw) GAM Pechlc Inc 5 1 1485 iwt uowtointL small coo. 

IW) GAM HerL&HUl Unit Trued. £BjSDp iff. VJSSSS L ft mi 7 
Im) gam Systems inc — .. — *10140 {J.J 

Iw) gam Warldedde Inc — — smj)*- jg \ W 

(m) GAM Tvctie SA. Class A 5110.96 {S. jfKr ™ S 1 U 9 

G.T. MANAGEMENT l UK) Ud. _ ' Id j NlkJu Growth PacfeOBO Fd S9M82 

—Iwl Berrv Pac Fd. Ltd. 5 9J1 Iw) Nlopon Fund — S 2974- 

d ) G.T. Applied Sdence— _ — 51530* Iw) Novotee Invest m ent Fund S9B9S 

d ) G.T. Asean H.K. Gwth.Fd — 51232* (w) KAM.P.. 


w) G.T. Asia Fimt— 

—Id ) G-T. Australia Fund 
— Id I G.T. Europe Fund- 
— Iw) G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund 
d ) G.T. Dollar Fund 
— (d I G.T. Said Fund. 

—tit ) G.T. Global Technlov Fd 
—Id ) G.T, Honshu Pathfinder 
—Id ) G.T, Investment Fund, 
—la ) GT. japan Small Co-Fund 

—Id ) G.T. Tcchnoioov Fund 

—Id ) G.T. South Chino Fund. 


*1»* In) MSP F.I.T 

SSJ0* im) opportunity investors Ltd^ 53487 

S93A Iw) PANCURRI Inc - 514.12 

.*180 (r ) Parfofl Sw. R Est Geneve SF 139780 


* 13.74 (r ) Permat Value Fund N.V. 

J 9Jj* (o t piefodes 

*13.10 Iw) P5CO Fund N.V, 

52199 [d | Putnam Infl F 

*1724 (b ) prl— Tech 

5CJ], iw) Quatilvm Fund N.V 

_ ... 12741 (d ) Rento Fund 

—Id ) G.T. South China Fund *1444* (d 1 Rent Invest, LF 145072 

EBC TRUST CaiJERSEY) LTD. '2 1 5 

1-356010 Sl_St. Heller ;0534-3i331 if Te »**]« 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. _ d 5 

0(d) Ine.: Bid 5948* Offer -»J9l 2, |em 

»IdlCao.: Bid 31029 Offer—— *10419 iff. 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND ' ‘ Sfroll,ft¥ Funa — s 1? - 58 


©EdlCao.: Bid 

INTERNATlOl 


.72 
IJ9 
LF 241240 
LF14S0J5 


iw) Strategy Investment Fund— S 1958 


I** I CKItn I lUflMn runu ri 1 qvnttn I M Vrirm 

—id ? Short Term 'A' lAccum) — S_l44?t 
—IB ) Short Term 'A' (QHstrl ID. 9978* 

-<dl Short Term ■§' 51.1159 {*} ™V* Pat HOW. IM 

tDlrfr> — *imc iwi NV - 

— <w) Lono Term S3) AT {d ] Turquoise Fund 


_ S4JB 
SF 10192 

*WJ 2 

S134J16* 

SB7J7 


Source : Credit Su hie- First Boston LUL 
London 


jardine Fleming, POE n GPO Hb Kb (W) Tweedv.Bnwww n.v.Cla&sA 52JU.93 

— lb } J.F japeA Trust— Y 4855 Iw) Tweedy.Browno nv^lassB 5 145243 

— IB) J.F South East Asia- 53041 (d 1 UNICO Fund dm Tina 

— ») J.F Japan Teehmrfpgy — Y 22181 id ) uni Bona Fund^ 

—4blJ.FPdclfleSetS.iAec) - 5552 <d> uni Capital Fund 

— iblJJC Australia.— S4J3 (w) United Cap. mvt. Fund Ua 

LLOYDS BANK 1NTL~P0B43B, Geneva U (wl Wedge Europe N.V. 

— Hw) Lloyd* Int'l DfiI)or_— s 10190 iw) Wedge Japan N.V.. 

— MW) Uovds inn Europe— SF 10540 Iw) Wedoc Padflc N.V 
— Hwl Lloyds inn Growths SF iw) Wedoe US. N.V — _ 

— Hwi UoVds Inn income SF 31150 Im) winchester Flnaneki! Ud. 

— Hwl Uovds infl Pocttlc- SF 14248 iml Winchester Diversified** 

NiMARBEN Id I World Fond SA s 1059 

— trfiruw. a _ tnn iw) WorWurlde Secwmes S/S 3Vj. U155 

— (w I Class B - UX 5 1004a Iw) Worldwide Special S/S TVs. S 143195 

Sti* — C ^it»che I M{)rit; Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 

Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs: a — asked; + — Offer Frlcestb — bid 
chow P/v S10 loSl per unn ; N A. — Not Available, N.C — NotCommuniebted.-o— 
Now; S — suspended: S/S — Slock Split; * — Eu-OI«ldend; — — En-Rts; — 
Gross Performance Indw Dee.; ■ — Redempl-Prlce- Ex-Couwm; Formerly 
Worldwide Fund Lid; 9 ~ Offer Price Incl. 3ft pretlm. charge; ++ — dal tv stock 
Price at On Amsterdam Stack Exchange 
















































Page 14 



BaiMHiHiniaai 


iiiiimaBiiiii 



amiHimiHiii 
am ami am 


ACROSS 
1 Hazard at sea 

5 Comprehen- 
siveness 
10 Noah’s first 
son 

14 Summit 

15 Kind of bear 
*16 German’s 


great hall 
17 "Till 


47 River of Devon 

48 Truth twister 
48 Fiber for nets 
58 Tribunal 

54 Spirit of St. 
Louis 

57 Weather 
forecast 

60 City; town 

61 Russian co-op 


23 Cavil 

24 Sbool 

25 Football's Noll 
or Knox 

26 Shaping 
machine 

27 Japan's 


1946 film 

20 Garden tool 

21 City of SE 
France 

22 Low-lying 
tracts 

23 vide 

(which see) 

24 Houston or 
Snead 

.25 "Of and 

starry skies”: 
Byron 

33 Refuge ana 
desert 

34 Meadows 

SS" Yankee 

Doodle 
Dandy” 
36Nipapalm 
37 Short trip 

39 Chinese weight 

40 Old. to pay 

money 

41 Buffs 

42 Call 

43 Have erne’s 


63 Allot 

64 Elklike 

mammal 

65 Visibility 
reducer 


28 Melting snow 
28 E.M.K. is one 

36 Tabby’s plaint 

31 Correa 

32 Certain 
transactions 

37 Austen or Eyre 

38 Formicid 

39 Norse god of 
thunder 


2 Chinese tree 

3 Pintail duck 

4 Gumshoe 

5 Relating to 
certain seeds 

6 Grand 

Dam 

7 Word with 
shoppe 

8 Football tactic 

9 Stray 

10 Deli item 

11 Pea pod 

12 Magdeburg's 
river 

13 Hall of Famer 

Willie 

18 Praises 

19 S tadiums , 
often 


41 Repaired 

42 "Republic” 
author 

44 Big flood 

45 Escapes 

48 Ring 

49 Mod. weapon 

50 Veer; twist 

51 Civil wrong 

52“ mane," 

Verdi aria 

53 Not fooled by 

54 Inter 

(among other 
things) 

55 City of NE 
France 

56 Scotch Gaelic 

58 Sweet potato 

59 Monogram of 
the Great 
Dissenter 


(daydream) often Dfssentt 

© New York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



XW/WmmAlETHE 
DIFFERENCE 80WKNAFISH 
AND A 5U6WARINE?' 


'A SUBMARINE HAS 
liTTUCEAN'TDMAID l* 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
9 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to totm 
four ordinary words. 


YASOP 


ALL FLIGHTS 
TEMPORARILY 
DELAYED 


HECAF 



tm 


GURDIT 


PLITOE 


WHAT WERE THE 
PROSPECTS C” 
DEPARTURE DURING- 
THE 31© BUZZARD? 


Now arrange the orcled letters to 
form I he surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by rtie above cartoon. 


Answer here: ^ ^ ^ 1 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow^ 

Jumbles CLOAK DAUNT HIATUS BLOODY 
Answer How you sometimes end up if you go ad 
out— ALL IN 


WEATHER 


Att ar re 
Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

BadODBOt 


15 5* 14 57 
4 3V 2 36 


15 St 7 45 

15 5« S 46 


4 29 -3 24 
3 38 -1 31) 


7 45 5 41 

■3 2fl -12 10 


COSto Del SM 

Dual In 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

I stan but 

Lot Palana 

Listen 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Mm left 

Nten 

Oslo 

Paris 

Profile 

Revkievlk 

Rune 

Stocktetm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


J 3o -5 23 (o 

1 34 -4 25 r 

14 57 H S3 O 

7 36 0 32 tr 

3 38 0 32 r 

17 73 8 46 a 

7 45 3 38 o 

4 9> I 11 r 

.13 0 -16 3 SW 


Banatuk 

Beilina 

Hana Koaa 

Manila 

New Delhi 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

S inga pore 

Taiael 

Tokyo 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
31 H 22 72 
3 33 -3 26 
25 73 18 64 
28 SI 24 74 
19 66 ID 50 
3 38 -2 28 
12 54 9 48 

31 88 22 72 

2S 77 14 57 
8 46 3 38 


10 50 4 99 

16 61 16 61 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Caae Town 
CasBManca 
Harare 


14 57 10 50 
3 41 4 39 


23 73 8 46 fr 

20 68 12 54 d 

24 75 14 57 Ir 

IB 64 14 57 0 

24 75 17 63 f 

29 B4 25 77 cl 

25 77 14 57 fr 

20 68 7 45 el 


12 54 9 4fi 


34 0 32 

I -77 -17 g Bueno* Aires 29 84 12 54 fr 

30 -2 28 O Lima 27 81 IB 64 to 

46 7 4S r Mexico CUT 31 70 7 36 pc 

25 -7 19 sw Rio dt Janeiro 31 88 21 70 Ir 

48 7 45 a 5ao Paulo — — — — no 


LATIN AMERICA 


9 48 7 45 

■2 TH -6 21 


•1 30 -3 36 
16 61 17 54 


NORTH AMERICA 


-3 26 -3 36 sw 

8 46 4 39 D 

5 41 2 36 «0 

0 32 -5 33 fa 

0 32 *8 18 0 

5 41 0 37 o 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 

Beirut 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 

TM Avlo 


1 34 -9 16 
17 63 IS 54 
IS 59 5 41 

17 54 8 46 

IS 59 12 $4 


A nch ora ge 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Houston 

Las Angeles 

Miami 

Minneapolis 


2 36 0 32 d 

-2 28 -16 1 Ir 

-7 19 -15 5 fr 

-3 26 -U 7 oc 

-5 3 -11 13 s« 

-2 28 -14 7 pc 


29 83 16 61 


4 39 -5 23 PC 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Sydney 


22 72 12 S4 5*i 
74 7S 19 66 a 


New York 
San Francisco 
Seattle 
Toronto 
Wash looted 


T5 59 H 52 d 

13 SS -l 30 fr 

S 73 -14 7 pc 

-18 0 -27 -8 el 

23 73 IS 59 d 

-5 23 -IS 5 cl 

12 54 4 39 pc 

7 45 1 34 Id 

-18 14 -22 -8 sw 

-1 30 -7 19 fr 


el-CleudY; lofocsrv . Ir-falr. h-hall; o-ovcrcasl: pc-oarthr cloudy; r-raJn, 
sh-showers; se-sor*; st-utor /nv. 

WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Rough. FRANKFURT; OvCTCSSt 
Temu.7 — 5145 — 4IJ. LONDON: Rain. Temp. S — 4 (41 — 39). MADRID: Over- 
COJI. Toma. 11-8 ( 52 - 461. NEW YORK: Cloudy. Temp. D--8 132-IBl. 
PARIS: Cloudy with showers, Temp. 6 — 4 (43 —39). ROME: Fair. Temp, 
n - 13 163- S5J.TEL AVIV: Fair. Temp. 1 7 - 12 (63 - 54) ZURICH: Overcast. 
Temp. 6 — 4 143-39). BANGKOK; Foggy. Temp. 34 - 23 193 — 73). HONG 
KONG: Cloudv. Temp. 23— 18 173 — 641. MANILA; Fair. Temp. 29 — 31 
184 — 70). SEOUL: Fair. Temp. 7 — -2 iU — 28). SINGAPORE: Fair Temp. 
31 — 25 (88 — 771- TOKYO; Foggv. Toma. 9 — I 148 — 34). 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


PEANUTS 


P065 ARE LUCKY... 


D0G5 NEVER HAVE 
TO DO HOMEWORK. 


DOES NEVER REALLY 
HAVE TO DO ANYTHING 


JU5T U5TEN TO f 
CRITICISM ... J f 


BOOKS 


THE KNIGHT IN HISTORY 



By Frances Gies. 192 pp $16.95. 
Harper & Row, 10 East 53d Street, 
New York, N. Y. 10022. 


donderry, carried on bravely under a iarae J N S ” 
green umbrella. Two days later, in sunlight the /-> ] 

pageant was restaged, but it was the memory of * If fJ§S§ 

“the knight-with-the-umbrella" that endured, a fr " 

Nevertheless, Gies points out, much of the \\ipj u 
idealism survived. Sbe writes, apparently quite Y/'“ 
without irony: “Above all the heroes of the 1 . 

Round Table were offered as examples to boys - — ■ 

in school in sport, and finally (1908) in the -^v'- .... - - 

founding of the Boy Scoots.” Well. yes, I sup- ■ V -r-'-' ! ' - - - 

pose; but remembering some of my Scoutmas- ■y.Jl-;:.- -. 

tor’s oddities, I wouldn’t care to press the issue, vj V 

Apart from aD that, “The Knight in History," 

with more than 50 illustrations drawn from y j- 

manuscript illuminations and other sources, is - v - 

a carefully researched, condse, readable and - 

entertaining account of an institution that re- ^r v ,y • 7 . : ’* ■■■ 

mains a part of the Western imagination. v-'.-f- - ' :r* 


pOfNl 


Reviewed by John Espey 


BLONDIE 


I F George Frederic Waus's painting of Sir 
Galahad represents your nation of a true 


WHAT OO 
VOU WANT, 
HONEY ? i 


| NOTHING, I JJST ENJOY 
~t LOCKING KT YOU > — . 



| VOUVE STILL. GOT fT, 



BEETLE BAILEY 


Here 

comes 

the 

PARADE 


WHY ARE 2 
THEY RUNNING | 

% . I 


THE (SEN ERA L 
IS DOUBLE 
. PARKEP ^ 


if . 




□ □D 

nr 


{$& 



ANDY CAPP 


K it&DMdr V*tl» Hr-wp**** I 
D«lt Hmmi% JUmNI Sfi»diC*l* 



r SORRY \ 
ABOUT THAT, 
V AHOY. V 
f BUT YOU v 
L KNOW ME - / 


HPSVtOt-ENTLY 
y OPPOSED -ST' 
f TO VIOLENCE i 



SURE, 

VICAR , 


WIZARD of ID 


mam h&a mm aw m wrf 




Vfcovcz <zmv 

flN< 2 C*OM! 




f wo X 

M5 V 

Awsete 
ewmiro 
I PWJ^UP J; 
A PI ¥*?J 


.B— IObmIk, wani— ivm. 


REX MORGAN 


J. Galahad represents your nation of a true 
knight, the dedicated youth whose ‘‘strength 
was as the strength of 10 because his heart was 
pure." and you rave no wish to alter vour view, 
this alluring history of knighthood from its 
beginnings in the Middle Ages to its nostalgic 
revival in the reign of Victoria is not for you. 

If, on the other hand, Galahad’s being the 
bastard son of Lancelot has ever made you 
curious about the whole matter, Frances Gies 
mil give vou not only answers but will also 
provide ah account of the varied roles played 
by knights in Europe and the Holy Land, the 
significance of the stirrup's invention, the real 
and imagined sexual feats of courtly lovers and 
much more. 

As Gies observes, our popular image of the 
knight is largely English; the Arthurian cycle, 
even in Sidney Lanier’s watered-down version 
of Malory, still casts a powerful spelL The true 
origin was French, and the knight's advance in 
status covered centuries: "Origin ally a person- 
ality of mediocre status raised above the peas- 
ant by his possession of expensive horse and 
armor, the knight slowly improved his position 
in society until he became part of the nobility." 

As the population grew, and oldest sons 
became sole heirs to family property, knight- 
hood (like the church) provided a safety valve 
as a career for younger sons. Originally op- 
posed to knighthood, the church found ways to 
incorporate and mak e use of iL founding the 
orders of the Templars and the Hospitalers 
(often in conflict between themselves) to hold 
the territories seized by successive Crusaders. 

The Troubadours, centered in son than 
France and composing in Proven§al, created 
the chief literature of knighthood. Gies pro- 
vides a useful introduction to this complex 
poetry, concentrating on Arnaut Daniel and 
the theme of love. In view of the fact that 
knights were, above all else, waniors, she may 
unduly neglect the work of Bertrand de Bom, 
the onegreat edebrator of the actual clash of 
battle. She mentions his lament over the death 
of Henry ITs rebellious son, but does not give 
the melodramatic circumstances under which 
it was delivered. According to the often ficti- 
tious biographies of the poets. Bertrand risked 
death by presenting hims elf before the king 
and delivering his song. 

So much of chivalry's lore is sheer romance 
that the three chapters given to actual persons, 
Wi lliam Marshal (“Knighthood at Its Ze- 
nith”), Bertrand du Guesclin (“A Knight of the 
Fourteenth Century") and Sir John Fastolf 
(“English Knight of the Fifteenth Century"), 
stand out in their precise, human detail and 
their recording of genuine personalities. 

Knighthood slowly turned into ritual Dur- 
ing the reign of the first Elizabeth, tourna- 
ments were staged, but it was left to the Vic- 
torians to revive knighthood in the pages of 
Scott’s novels. Tennyson’s idylls, the craze for 
“Gothic” architectural restorations and the 


John Espey, professor emeritus of literature at 
the University of California at Los Angeles, 
wrote this review for the Los Angeles Times. 


BEST SELLERS 


Thr Now York Times 

This tsi is based on reporu )rom more than 2^)00 bookstores 
throughout (he U ailed States. Wtda on fisiarc not necessarily 
ooasecntfvt. 

FICTION 

T Vs Lm Weds 

Wm* Wfch «oIia 


1 THE SICILIAN, by Mario Puzo 

2 THE TALISMAN, by Stephen King and 

Peter Straub 

3 SO LONG, AND THANKS FOR ALL 


THE FISH, bv Doughs Adams — 

LOVE AND tVAR/b 7 John Jakes 

THE FOURTH PROTOCOL, by Freder- 


ick Frasytfa 

“ . . . AND LADLES OF THE CLUB," by- 

Heten Hooves Saounyff 

JITTERBUG PERFUME, by Tom Rob- 


bins — 

8 ILLUSIONS OF LOVE, by Cynthia Free- 
man — 

9 THEUFEAND HARD TIMES OF HEI- 


DI ABROMOWITZ. bv Joan Rivers 5 

10 LIFE ITS OWNSELF.'bv Dan Jenkins __ 14 

11 LINCOLN, by Gore Vidal 9 

12 STRONG MEDICINE; by Arthur Hailey 13 




13 GOD KNOWS, by Joseph Heller 

M NUTCRACKER, by E.T. A. Hoffmann „ 
15 STILL WATCH, by Mary Higgins Clark _ 

NONFICTION 


IACOCCA; An Autobiography, by Lee la- 
cocca with William Novak 


oocca with William Novak 

LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Buscag- 

lia 

PIECES OF MY MIND, by Andrew A. 


4 MOSS THE KITTEN, by James Herrick 

5 “THE GOOD WAIL" by Studs Terkd 

6 THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Hi . -har d Itarti 

7 DR BURN'S PRESCRIPTION FOR 

HAPPINESS, by George Burns 

8 THE BRAIN, by Richard M. Rcstak 

9 HERITAGE, by Abba Ebon 

10 HEY, WAIT A MINUTE. 1 WROTE A 

BOOK. 1 by John Madden with Dave An- 
derson 

It SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 
Evan & Connell 

12 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC by Shd SDver- 

stein - 

13 ONE WRITER’S BEGINNINGS, by Eu- 

dora Wehy 

14 THE WEAKER VESSEL, by AnumiaFrar 







IS ELVIS IS DEAD AND I DON'T FEEL 
SO WELL MYSELF, by Lewis Gnzzaid 14 

ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 


Rex had to Run bv the hospital' 
Tune < he’ll meet us at the 



IT’S BELIEVED THAT THE MAN 
AND WOMAN ATTEMPTING TO 
ABDUCT THE DANE BoY ARE 
RESPONSIBLE FOR AT LEAST 
. TWO OTHER KIDNAPPINGS/ 


pre-Ra-phaelites’ narrative paintings. In 1839, 
the wealthy young Earl of Eglinton put on a 



tournament with all the trappings at his castle 
in Ayrshire. A torrential downpour soaked the 
opening procession, but its leader. Lord Lon- 


what they dont teach you at 

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 

Mark H. McCormack 

WOMEN COMING OF AGE. by Jane 

Fonda with Mignan McCarthy 

THE ONE MINUTE SALESPERSON, by 

Spencer Johnson and Larry Wilson 

WEIGHT WATCHERS QUICK START 

PROGRAM Jean Nidetch 

NOTHING DOWN, by Robert G. Alien 


i 

v.m 




BRIDGE 




By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagramed deal 
South opened in third 


GARFIELD 


5 UMO CATAS 50 ME 5 
THE CLA 6 SIC 6 U/W 0 
wrestling POSITION 


THERE 16 ONLY ONE 
TINY DRAWBACK TO 
"V THIS POSITION... . 


1 SEVERE ^ 
CRAM PIN Gr/i 


V-/ South opened in third 
seat with one diamond and 
West overcalled with one 
spade, perhaps the least evil 
with an awkward band. North 
contributed a double that 
looked positive but was nega- 
tive. 


M-J/. . . 


•?. JjV : ; v 

fv <£•«»:' 

X\- '/ 


mm 

I Ht'HjtivC' 




If East had raised spades to 
the two- or ihree-leveL North- 
South would probably have 
lost their heart fit and the re- 
sult in the other room might 
have been duplicated. 

But East's cue-bid in dia- 
monds, an attempt to show 




■S 1965 uwrt fgjn e% Srnd44t.lnc 


that he had passed with a hand 
just short of opening strength. 


allowed South to bid hearts at 
the two-leveL North naturally 
raised to game. 

When West led the club king 
and shifted to the spade queen. 
South ruffed in his hand and 
raffed out the club ace. He 
then returned to bis hand with 
a spade raff and discarded 
dummy's singleton diamond 
on his winning club. The 
trumps were cleared, by play- 
ing ace and another, and the 
spade ace eventually scored 
the third and final trick for the 
defense. 

There does not seem any 
way to defeat the game. If 
West leads the spade queen. 
South can niff and lead a dub 
honor. If West wins and plays 
another spade. South can ma- 


neuver to ruff a thud spade, , . ... . 

losing one trump trick, a dia- r ‘ w ” w " 
mond and a dub. 


west 
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Vi 4 
i 

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NORTH (D) 
6K9I1U 
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3 * 

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PM 



Canadian Stock Markets }za 22 


Amsterdam 


Prices in Ccnodlon cenls unless marked S 


Toronto 


1950 AbH Pfco 
12)60 Aanleo E 
«n Agra indA 

50444 All Energy 

1600 Alla Ngt 
100 Alga Cent 
57MAIgomo5t 
295 Araotn 
25A^bcsios 
.'EDO AlCO I I 
?0M7 BP Ccnoda 
64079 sank BC 
274949 Bank K s 
77400 Barrlch o 
75 Baton A I 
1M25 Bonanza* 
21517 Bralarne 
3345a Bramalea 
■ 500 Brrnaa M 
1BK0 9CFP 
40815 BC RM 
91854 BC Phone 
20845 BrunsMk 
11375 Budd Can 
170410 CAE 
410 CtX A 
32600 CDIstoBI 
■6938 CcdFrv 
31350 C Nor Wesl 
2UC Packns 
17250 Can Trust 
500 c Tuna 
100 CCE 

156334 Cl Bk Com 
35860 CdnNol Rn 
118794 CTIreAi 
55B0 C Util B 
600 Cora 
2100 Crlnra 
lOlOBCDIsWA 
32600 COIsIb B I 
S7D70CTL Bank 
130 Canutes! A 
2700 Coseka R 
650 Conran A 
7X10 Crown 
14650 caar Res 
989322 Daon Dev 
lSOOOaen A 
28740 Denison A 
817SS Denison B I 
2100 CMvelcen 
3600 Dlcknsp a I 
1000 Dick ran B 
5506 Daman A 
63997 DafcrKa A 
9280 Du Pont A 
SS3S Dries A 
SODEKtham X 
lOOErtKD 
7400 Eaultv Svr 
TSTSFCAIfttt 
1510 C Falcon C 
35493 Flcnbrtgc 
400 Fed Ind A 
«*MFpd Pkm 
2420 F CUv Fin 
TOGO eraser 
11992 GendlsA 

SCO CeoC Camp 
1CS3Q Gcocrudo 
7J0M Qlbrgtigr 
3973S GeMcore f 
1 00 Graft G 
1200 Grandma 
yx Grarriuc 
450GL Faresl 
100GI Padlk 
771 Grovhnd 
2 H Group A 
red Hr ding A I 
2900 Hawker 
120K9 Moves D 
1881 M BavCo 
7625lmosco 

SWDlnOat 

4M0 mens 
1577 Inland Gas 

1795! fnlpr Ploo 


High La* Ctose Ctigs 
534 34 34 


10710 Jorawck 
1000 Korn Kalla 
7600 Kelicv H 
17102 Kerr AM 


.I3-— 36539 LOtortf 


high low Close Ch'ge 
Sll~l 11*D Il'v+ta 
105 105 105 +3 

5351: 34\« J5«* +J^ 
516 16 16 + lg 

S22*s r-- 77*1 


SITS* 17*1 17**— I0C0 Mice 

4M 465 465 -H 20131 Melon H X 

8 fi a . , 1«0SI Mertond E 

25. - + ’■» 29554 Mohan A f 

.*? ? 4 •- * 9704 Matson B 

S iSi* lie ™' + V * 2900 Ngpl SCO L 

,\S S 277EW Norareto 

'f 54 i* 6075 Noreen 

a *S 1 t ? 283807 Nva AHA ( 

’lit r ,2 s * + ■* 41188 NawseoW 

5’ 7 '« * 125490 NiiWd SB A 

* J 2500 Qck "OOd 

Sii** . 15150Oslw»v«Al 

3J 41 ! 12500 Pamaur 

10134 PanConP 
fi’it JS?* JT**'- 4500 Pembino 

I?-'* li -'T V* 1,00 PM" 1 * Oil 

lif* if-’ ”'■*'* 300 Pino Polni 

^ 361. 2E9 Place GO a 

54 + '-V 178510 placer 

SOOpISriio 

S5-. ut 2^, aooOueSiurao 

S? 1 lT’ + '* SfMRavrockl 

5, l!.. a ,., S1570 Reaootti 

SU'u 14., 14U4- 54I3SRO strata A 

SS,- 3000 Prtcfinold 

°) i 31 ft + y. 5100 Ra Serv 1 

32 J2 — 5 3442 Ruun Pro A 

SlOft 10' ! 1^+ r» 2700 ROBOTS A 

J' 19D0 Roman 

*11^ — •* 5DO Rofftman 

E 1 E 1 ? 29300 Sccatro 

Jo? S 200 Scorn t 

“Sr * 4840 Soars Can 

*<“■* 10 4* 47050 Shell Con 

‘L- **~z “22 . 


240 240 240 *40 

174*. 23'* 24V, * ft 
475 465 475 +10 

YlfA. 16*T le'-t + 
Sl6'u 16 16 — ft 

525 24*. 24V— '•« 

52017 !7v. 20 + 


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is,. S*;. 2*1, — ■ 3400 Slater B( 

ll? }F,' : tSOOO Souttim 

lii >« 1 + H St Brodcst 

wa 'S, ... *48515 Stolen A 

■we 9 S? .tS 6 <600 SulOtra 

lie- ^ ^ t 3 ? iWSteouR 

§ «T J at nsssssr* 

46c *60 +iq sDOTctetfvne 


34S ,. T ZS3 ,,r j HI « Tex Con 

? 4 T* 13685 Thom N 


i?.* ifhlT MSMiTorDmM 

<4 3, ^n 3, in 3, '\t W05 Torstor B I 

*£,, « . -» *7SB Tractors A I 

*■*.2 14 r *6-3 63STmsM! 


V*., ,*- *7S8TrwtorsAt 

5,4 2 ,4 : 9 14 ? 630Trns Ml 

4 *•>-;. 20608 Trinity Res 

9 MiSSTrnAltoUA 

•'fig ,S il ,4 S + J. 62527 TrCcto PL 
102222 Trtmac 

S 55* lev, I9H 19650 Trtiec A I 

?! ;!- ■* urooTurMi 

UV* IL 1 JUi+'i 28V7UnicoraAI 

*'8 1A*— 'i 300 Un CsrtoW 

Sa'+ ^ JS'-* <32601 u Entartao 
Sii’* ”■'» *)■•»— 3000 U Keno 

■* } 9500 usiseoe 

St” s>* V*~ * 1000 Von Dor 

SJ 5 " J* 5* . 13310 Ventl At 

4, .. +| 2733VestBron 

.1* J? .f 3 ** -tsw wettSsme 

, . , M»We*ttorto 

SgJk 82-3 E"3+ 1 17403 Westmin 

5EL 1?-. . 3174 Weston 

524rt ]4 J4'-— -* 5098 DMMwS A 

6-- 6V- jam Yk Bear 

Sills 19 ^ “ S ^ 

S2l*< 2IH 5IVj— 

SWlli II 1 . Ifil* ♦ * peserv 

UFx 4FL 48*-j+ rCJOU 

Sir, 73 I3~*+ /UAj 

Sill* II II - I ... "“J* 

*I4\- 14V 14V— i. IN THE W1 

535'+ 347s 3fp- OFF 


.^JPrmKino 517 76-» 7? + 

1900 Pnom* on S7V 7i» n»— 

300 Pine Pataii S23ft 2x7 23 

' J Place GO a 106 106 106 

”3 Placer s2Sft 24V : 24ft + 

IProvfoo «6Vj 16ft toft 

lOueSturaa 385 385 385 

i Ravreckl ss 7ft 7ft- ft 

IPeOMirn S32ft 32 32 — ft 

: Rd Strata A SI 7ft lVft 19 V 
) Reiciinoid S9 bv re + v 

IRaSarvI 17S 170 ITS + 5 

IRevnPraA 136 124 124 —16 

IRaoersA sav 8V Bft+ ft 

I Romm V12ft 131H 72ft— ft 

IROtTimon 144 44 44 

I Sccotre 15ft 5V 5ft 

I Scorn t 518V 18V 18V + 

I Sears Con S7' j Pi 7ft + ft 

I Stall am S2Jft 21V 221%+ V 

iSberrin in; 7ft 7ft— ft. 

I Slater B I SPV 9'.% 9ft + V 

rsaurnm sr- st + i i 

I St Brodcs) S12V I2ft 12V* 

i Stolen A SZ3V 22ft 23 V + 

iSulotro 245 2*0 230 — 5 I 

I steed R 225 225 225 +10 

'Sirdnevo 30 26 29 +1 

[Tara SI7 17 17+1 

Teck Cor A HI II 11 + ft 

i Tech Bf Slift lift lift* ft 

iTrieCvne siOft 1X.% 10ft 

TejrCffi S36 35 36 +1 

ThamNA 552 5PA 52 + ft 

Tor Dm M siBft 18V 18ft + ft 

T orsto r B I Jiy.^ t7 7» 

Tnxtors A t S21 21 21 

TrresMf S7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 

I Trinity Res Sjft 5V SU— V 

TrnAlto UA 524 23V 23’« 

TrCanPL JSIft 21ft 21ft 

Trlmac 470 <40 460 +20 

iTrtiecAl 523V 23 23 

TurMI 44 34ft 41ft +7 

UnicoroAf sav | 8ft+ ft 

UnCnrbW 511*. 11V Jiv+ Is 

UEntortM 513 12V 12V 

UKeno 510 9ft *Ti+V 

U Stowe 129 Hi its -jo 

VanOer 223 220 220 +10 

VwrilA I V.V Oft 6ft 

yestq ron jtiv mi |jv + 

wewaae sit 16 it 

Wnttorto 15 15 15 

Westmin «2 lift lift— ft 

Weston S78 77 78 +1 

WaedweiA snv li lift* 

YkBeor si i 10ft io"% 

Total soft* 2*347,389 shares 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

AICZO 

AHold 

AMEV 

A’Oam die 

Amrotaank 

BVG 

SMlirniaM T 
Colons Hido 
, Ehcwier-NDU 
Rsfckor 
GW Brocades 
Hetoekra 
Hoogovens 
KLM 
Naorden 
< Hal Nedder 
Nediktyd 
Ooe Voider G 
Pakhoed 
Philips 
RcSSJGS 

Rodgmca 
RollncO 
Rorenta 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Otnmeren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


AMP. CBS General Index M9SJ8 
Preview :1V8J8 

Sauna?; AFP. 


Brussels 


Allianz Vers 

Bast 

Bayer 

Bayer, Hypo. 

Bavor.Ver.Bank 

BMW 

COmmerxbank 

Contlaummi 

Daimler-Benz 

Ocgussa 

Deutsche Babcock 

Deulsctie Bank 

Dresdner Bank 

OUSSchuffw 

CHH 

HocMM 

Hoechs* 

Honch 

Holimann 

Horton 

Kail* Salt 

Karaiodt 

Kauflwt 

KHD 

Kloochner Werta 

KruPPStoW 

Unde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Monnesmarai 
Metal toe sellscha tt 
MuenctcRueck 
Preussao 
Ruergers-werke 

RWE 

Scherlng 

B lenw me 

Ttryssen 

VOrla 

vote 

VEW 

VoHcswagefmerfc 


Close Prev. 
1077 1074 


Other Markets Jan- 22 


Closing Prices In local currencies 


Close Prvv. 
Wheel Mar Na — 

Who* lock 4JJ 4J0 

Whtoor SJS 5.15 

Work! mn 1.99 i.fo 

•Jong Sana Index : 1ST3M 
Previous :USUS 
Source: Router *. 


Johannesburg 


GKN 

Gla»a 

Grand Mel 

Gulmioss 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Imps 

Lloyds Bank 


AECI 

Barlows 

Blyvaor 

Button 

Elands 

GFSA 

Harmony 

Kloof 


Psl 5tovn 
Rusal at 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasat 


745 745 
1065 1085 
1850 1875 
7785 7700 
1390 1430 
2900 2925 
2915 2958 
B02S B075 
1000 1040 
6550 6650 
1730 1410 
4S0 659 
3600 3675 
585 565 


Lucas 

Marksand So 

Metal Bov 
Midland Bank 
Nat Wesl Bank 
Pithing ton 
Plessor 
Rocal Elect 
Romttonwln 
Rank 
(toed Inti 
Reuters 


I Ureal 

Matra 

AMctMiin 

MM Pennar 

Moel Hennesay 

Moulinex 

Nord-Est 

Ocd dm talc 
Pernod Rlc. 
Pelrotos Use) 
Peugeot 
Packi In 
Prtntomos 

Radtotechn 

Redoule 

Roussel U (HI 
Skis RassKmoi 
Saur.Perrtor 
Teiemecan 
Thomson CSF 
Valeo 

Agefl index : na 
P ravtous : njl 
CAC Index : mjo 
Previous : 198J0 
Sourer- AFP. 


Close Prev Ckne 

2414 2184 Woodslde 87 ® 

1823 1850 WormakJ 322 323 

tuo AIM AH Ordinaries lades :7S4J» ?°> 

1978 lt» gtog yjl*” 

9B M Source. Reuter*. 

7VJ& 7*M , = 

J5 4 Tokyo _ ^ 


322 377 -i,, 


699 693 1 — 

256J0 254.50 

255 2S350 Akal 
saia 488a Asahl Ctiem 


1 77 JO 177.WJ Asahl Gloss 
XII 244LS0 Bank Of Tokyo 
1215 nil BrUoestonr 
1619 1608 Canon 
1949 194V D Nippon Print 

459 463 Dolwa House 

2300 2275 Full Bank 

44* 44$ Full Photo 

23630 23780 Fulltsu 
HI facto 
Honda 


483 453 

488 I: 

RIO TO V 

ms OB 

543 « ^ 

1X30 1 JH Bu, 

«4 tB ™ 


964 9JR 
565 NA 
I3P0 toA 
1JS0 L8» 
1 JN l^J 
NO. 

IJM 1 JB 
MV MA 
251 375 

5JSC SJffl 
380 m 




*05 


ROVdl Dutch 4517/32 


Composite Stock index ; UOOM 
Prayfon .-182428 
Sourer: NoODonk. 


London 


AltMd 

Bekoert, 

Cockerll) 

EBES 

GBL 

GB innoGLM 

Gtnmen 

Hoboken 

Kredtotbank 

Petrorino 

Soc Generate 

Safina 

sotoav 

Traction Etoc 

V Montaane 


Commorzbaak index : 1.171J8 
Prev lout : 1.14*48 
Sourer: AFP. 



Hong Kong 


Benrse : 143144 

Prerlota ;U)1U7 

So urce: Brassefs Stock 

ETicfmae. 


Frankfurt 


AE&-TeMunken 10&3D TBUM 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
Chino Light 
Crass Harter 
Hang Sena 

HK Elec 

hk Harris 
HK Land 
HK Shanahal 
HK Tel 
HKWhart 
Hutch Whampoa 

JaiVIne MMtl 
Jardlne Sec 

New world 
snow Bros 
SHK Props 
SHtie Dotty 
SlehH 

Strire PodftcA 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


Page 15 


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VANTAGE POINT/Tony Komheiser 

49 er$’ Waklu A Coach Apart 


SAN Francisco — in .the last four 
the San Francisco 49en have made it to the Na- 
tional Conference championship gamp three tira^s 
Both times they won that game they went cm to win 
tbe Super BowL Discounting the strike-shortmed 
season as an aboxatioo, the overall record of those 
three San Randsco teams is 45-11. 

This year's team won 18 erf 19 gmyy allowed 
die least number erf points in the lan gm*, wut in 
Sunday’s Soper Bowl not only scored 38 perints but 
also shut down the most prolific passing offense 
the NFL had ever seen. 

. AD that might not make Bifl Walsh a genius, bat 
it does give turn the right to saysametning other 
dun, “Aw shucks, it was nothing.” Given the 
duice erf listening to false modesty or immodesty, 
FH tafcfrimmodesty every time. 

So will Walsh. Which is, apparently, why he is 
not (he most popular fellow m the league. 

It’s one thing to be a coach and have to watch 
Walsh pluck you dean and leave year feathers 
blowing fa the wind, Ift quite another to have to 
watch him pick iris teeth with your bones. 

Far erampte, immediately after the Stiper Bowl, 
Walsh called his 49ers “dearly tbe best team com- 
peting today — including some of tbe major uni- 
versities.” (Gracious? Not particularly. Accurate? 
Absolutely^) 

He did it again Monday, summing up a variety 
of reasons why San Francisco won by saying, “It 
just came id pass that Miami played a better team 
and was beaten.” Thank you. Nat 

Walsh stands there, a cultured pearl of a man 
with sflverhair and steel rims, delivering body shot 
afterbody shot to a corpse. No, he wasn’t surprised 
at anything Miami did. No, he wasn’t surprised at 
die relative ease with which his defease handled 
Dan Marino. “We woe simply a superior de- 
fense.” 

Nor was he surprised at the way his offense 
twirrhad methodically — and at the «nw». rtiw 
almost casually ~up and down the field. “We saw 
rtmt we could move the ball on immediately.” 



hotaAA 

Watte Not afraid to cutaway from the hod 


Nothing about the scope of the victory 
him. Few football coaches on this level would even 
dare think such things, let alone say them. Walsh 
not only says them, he says them wjth authority. 

And then there are the tiling s he doesn’t say, the 
things he leaves implicit, for the rest <rf the world to 
say for him. By now almost everyone knows that 
the 49m — exclusively on offense and generally 
on defense — are an extension of Walsh personally 
and of his philosophies that defensive football 
should be stunning and decisive while offensive 
football should be controlled and acquisitive. 

So if the 49ers are “great” and “dominating,” 
who bat Walsh should get the credit? And wbeane 
says of Marino, as he did Monday. “ . . . This 
awesome passer, going into the game it appeared 
he couldn’t even be slowed down, let alone 
stopped,” and you know that Marino was in fact 
throttled, who but Walsh should get tbe credit? 
And when be calls Joe Montana “without question 
the greatest quarterback football has seen in 
years,” and you know — because Montana’s said it 
— that all be does is drive the car he's given, who 
but Walsh should get the credit? 

Walsh is a professional football coach, but he is' 
not an the same page as the rest of them in the 
NFL. Sometimes, I suspect, by design as well as 
good fortune. He often seems too delicate, too 
urbane, too dean and polished to be wasting his 
time around fat men in cleats. 

It took him so long — until he was SO — to 
become ahead coach in tbe NFL And every other 
year or so, it seems, be threatens to quit, saying the 
game is whuiKtin^ him until once he be- 
comes convinced it’s in everyone's best interests 
for him to stay on. On tbe one hand, he is like 
Hamlet brooding how “the time is out of j oint. Oh 
cursed spite, that ever I was bran to set it right” 
And on the other, he’s a little bice Diana Ross 
tdling a stagehand, “Trim up the house lights, 
baby, so I can see all the people who kjve me.” 
Yet for all his transparencies, I find Walsh 
refreshing. Not so much because he can talk about 
things other than football: there’s merit in that, but 
there’s no shame in devoting yourself to one disci- 
pline. I Hke trim because bos not afraid to cut 
himself away from die herd. When yon ask him if 
winning this Super Bowl gives him a feeling of 
p erawml aaran ril lamen t hf doesn't hide behind a 
team, or a set ofcoaches and players or a library of 
game films. He says, “It’s a great personal satisfac- 
tion. You have to be so dam guarded in my 
business, because even week you play someone 
else who’s ready to take you ouL But there’s no 
game next week, so I can talk now. 

. “At this point I lake a lot of pride in our offense; 
the dimensions of it, tbe fact that we use all our 
receivers. I dnntr absolutely that we are the most 
prolific offense in football.” 

And I Hke hiyn because he’s not ashamed of his 
ambition. A couple of yean ago, after his first 
Super Bowl,-Walsii conceded that becoming a head 
coach so late — he was 47 when he was hired at 
Stanford — would surriy limit his contribution to 
the game he had loved since Iris California child- 
hood. “m never dominate the game like a Bear 
Bryant did,” Walsh said. “TU never own it. But Td 
Ske to have pushed it a little” 

There’s an old stray about great coaches gath- 
ered together around a blackboard. The offensive 
gminflgq diagram something unstoppable only to 
see the defensive geniuses thwart than with some- 
th i n g impenetrable. 

_ It goes an that way for hours until only 'one ' 
coach is left awake. Says he: “Last guy with the 
chalk wins.” Td give my chalk to Walsh. 


=s=al 


Weather or Not, It’s Still Profit Before Propriety 


Internebeoal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Something in ex- 
cess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit sep- 
arate a Mexican beat wave from the 
Siberian shiver so recently down 

Europe’s spine. 

No imposters, those two ex- 
tremes, and soccer treais them just 
the same. 

Indeed, if it were asked to play a 
major final on the moon, soccer 
would do so to please the big pay- 
master in our satellite sides. Televi- 
siou possesses the sport's soul, and 
^nrti rfy hwarf^ 

Certainly where the TY cash is 
up front there is no place on earth 
that the best interests of playets or 
of performance are not for sale. 
Eurovision wants the 1986 World 

Rob Hughes 

finals for prime-time “live” 
viewing — so what the hefl if its 
own players who qualify this winter 
with a running game will be re- 
duced to shuffling beneath dehy- 
draring noon scorchers in Mexico, 
where the pr eferr e d languid style of 
t jtins is to be granted even more 
advantage by kickoffs at 11 Aid. 
local rime? 

The winners in Mexico will be 
those who writ last — those best 
prepared by doctors, masseurs and 
respiratory experts; those either 
bom to sun and high altitude or 
able to gpend weeks acclimatizing: 

Were it not too obscene an irrele- 
vance to the struggle for fife, Ethio- 
pia might have anticipated spring- 
ing a surprise in Mexico. Alas, that 
is «nnther thing that comes too late 
for Ethiopians: Their team lost 
narrowly m tbe qualifying round 
against Kenya. 

But what of Europe, which can 
supply 13 of the 24 cup's finalists? 
Its protest against unnecessary, un- 
fair early kickoffs is muted. 

Players are complaining about 
having to compete in “sauna condi- 
tions/ but iUs officials who lodge 
protests. Or rather, in Jofio Have- 
lange’s FIFA do nor protest 

It probably matters less to them 
whether they sip gratis drinks un- 
der the midday am or in the rela- 
tive cool of evening. They never 
played at this level, or have long 
forgotten the tax on wind and limb. 
Or perhaps they are all true disci-, 
pies of the FIFA president’s profit- 
before-propriety leadership. 

That would explain the apparent 
disregard to players' welfare or 
supporters' comfort that allowed 
Juventus and Liverpool to go ahead 
with the so-called “super cup” 
match in Turin last Wednesday. 

Italian determination to mount 
this glorified exhibition — for 
which no status and no cup (only 
an undignified plaque) exist — was 
cither an extraordinary act of faith 
by Juventus fans or greed for e asy 

The “super cup” is gold-plated 
hype. Ostensibly it decides the bet- 
ter of last year's European Cup 


(Liverpool} and Cup Winners’ Cup 
(Juventus) champions, but at best it 
represents a nontide bout Other- 
wise the European Cup, tbe su- 
preme award to the continent’s 
champion of champions, is deval- 
ued. And Juventus, having waited a 
lifetime to capture that trophy, 
might as well not bother since it 
now calls itself the super team. 

The ring is hollow everywhere 
but at the banks, where Liverpool 
and Juventus each deposit 


£100,000 (J11Z500) from the at- 
tendance before TV and advertis- 
ing rights come in. 

Juventus had presold tickets to 
60,000 fans, and the club moved 
what fell from heaven to earth to 
play the match even if the outcome 
was farcical 

Liverpool had abundant reason 
to believe the match a nonstarter. 
The previous weekend both its own 
league game at Sunderland and Ju- 
ventus’s home Tnat<*h against fa7in 



WpodDritMariGdo 

Graeme Somess, then of Liveipool, and tbe 1984 European Chp. 


were abandoned because of frosted 
pitches dangerous to players’ 
health. 

Turin was subsequently hit by its 
heaviest 'snowfall in 20 years, the 
Siadio Comunafe surface buried by 
almost a foot, the airport closed. 

Game on, the Italians 

Liverpool's plane was told to go 
instead to Genoa. Game on, re- 
peated Jtive. whose benefactor. 
Giovanni Agnelli, ordered bulldoz- 
ers so that Liverpool — and Liver- 
pool alone — could land in Turin. 

Snowplows and many hands 
cleared the pitch. Gas heaters and 
chemical sprays took some of the 
bone out of the torf — and. as Juve 
said, game on. 

Commented Europe's “golden 
boot,” Ian Rush; “The pitch was 
very tricky. It was soft in places, 
hard in others.” Rush never got in a 
worthwhile shot 

Michel Platini European player 
of the year, agreed about the pitch 
but was one of three players — all 
foreigners — to transcend it. 

Bruce Grobbdaar. Liverpool's 
Zim babwian goalie; reacted like a 
wildcat to catch a 22-yard Platini 
special that bent as if by radar. 
While all around him lost their feet. 
Zbigniew Boniek, the Vatican's Po- 
lish gift to Juventus, kept his to 
score, in the 39th and 75th minutes, 
the rally goals of the night. If it’s 
true that Juventus does not intend 
to retain Boniek this summer, he 
could make a threesome with Tor- 
vill and Dean. 

Liveipool retreated happy with 
its takings, relieved that its only 
casualty was Mark Lawrenson 
(wbojaried a hamming), ready to 
nod and wink that if the teams 
meet in serious European action its 


puipose will be somewhat more 
red-blooded than Wednesday's 
tenderfoot show. 

Strangely, one Liveipool expatri- 
ate became so heated he completely 
lost his bead. Graeme Souness gave 
up playing for Liveipool to add his 
mixture of guile and spite to Samp- 
doria of Genoa; hired by the BBC 
to add insight to its radio broad- 
cast, he saw nothing but red. 

He considered Boniek’s first goal 
offside, and minutes later when the 
lineman ignored what Souness 
would swear on the Bible was the 
most blatant offside he'd ever seen, 
he yelled: “It’s nothing but chea- 
ting. . . . Nothing but cheating!” 
His professional commentating 
partners suggested in hushed tones 
char was going a bit far. “It’s an 
absolute joke.” retorted Souness. 
“You just wonder if some of the 
thin gs yoo hear are true — you 
wooder watching this if the offi- 
cials here are not taking bribes.” 
He would not be queued: “I may 
get into trouble, but it’s criminal 
down there.” be continued. 

Souness seldom sees “live” 
games as a spectator and might be 
well advised to continue the habit 
of abstention. Otherwise, if he is 
going to repeat all he hears in Italy, 
the snakepil erf bruited soccer cor- 
ruption, be will wind up ostracized 
and barred from tbe land of lire: 
If, on the other hand, he can 
justify comments taken by millions 
of listeners as gospel I offer this 
space for chapter and verse. 

He won't make a fortune, but he 
would do the game a service if he 
could dear the air about bribery 
allegations that dissolve like the 
snow once people inside the game 
are required to testily. 


Oilers 9 5- Goal Barrage in 3d Period Nips Kings , 8 - 7 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

EDMONTON, Alberta —It was 
an old-fashion Western shootout, 
but the Los Angeles Kings were up 
against the National Hockey 
League’s fastest guns when they 
took rat the Edmonton Oilers here 
Monday night. It started with a 

NHL FOCUS 

four-goal Los Angeles strafing in 
the opening period, but when it was 
over the Often had pumped in five 
third-period goals and came away 
with an S-7 victory. 

Elsewhere it was Sl Louis 6, De- 
troit 3; Boston 3, Montreal I; Chi- 
cago 7, Minnesota 2; Winnipeg 7, 
Pittsburgh 6, and Calgary tied Van- 
couver, 3-3. 

“We knew, even when it was 7-3, 
what their game plan was — to line 
up four guys on the blue line,” said 
Edmonton's Wayne Gretzky, who 
spirited the third-period come6ack 
with a short-handed goal in (be 
opening minute. “So we just 
dumped the puck in and kept going 


after it . . . We exploded and just 
kept going -” Paul Coffey’s unas- 
sisted goal at 17:12 broke the 7-7 
tie and lifted tbe Oilers to victory. 

“I could have hired a peewee 
tram out there in the third period.” 
said a frustrated Pat Quinn, the 
losing coach. “At least they might 
not have been scared to play. We 
have 20 guys that play like they’re 
afraid to do anything — so they do 
nothing. We were mentally frozen 
out there.” 

Following Gretzky's goal Don 
Jackson, Jari Kurri, and Kevin 
Lowe had final-period tallies to tie 
tbe score at 7-7 before Paul Cof- 
fey’s wrist shot at 17:12 capped the 
rally and spoiled a milestone per- 
formance for King center Marcel 
Dionne, who contributed three as- 
sists and scored his 611th career 
NHL goal. 

Dionne moved ahead erf Bobby 
Hull into third place oh 'the NHLV 
all-time goat-scoring list. Notching 
his total in 1,049 games (compared 
with Hull’s 1,063), Dionne now 


trails only Gordie Howe (801) and 
Phil Esposito (717). 

“I feel like dying,” said Dionne. 
“It's just a shame because we need 
every break we can geL But the 
OOets have the confidence, and it 
looks like well be meeting them in 
the first round of the playoffs.” 

His goal came on a low slapshot 
at 13: 17 of tbe first period, mudng 
the score 3-0. The Kings led 4-0 
after 20 minutes (and after blasting 
Andy Moog out of tbe Oiler net) 
and 7-3 after the second period, 
when the two teams combined for 
five goals in less than six minutes. 

Brian MacLellan opened the 


scoring at 10:04 of the first period 
before Bob Miller scored on a slap- 
shot 37 seconds later. The Oilers 
yanked Moog following Dionne’s 
goal but Grant Fuhr fared no bet- 
ter as Carl Mokosak made it 4-0 at 
14:35. 

Edmonton's Willie Linds troro 
tallied at 10:47 of the second peri- 
od, but Craig Redmond and Dave 
Taylor replied for the Kings at 
14:58 and 17:21. Jackson scored 
just 12 seconds later but Jay Wells 
scored for the Kings on a fluttering 
shot from the point at 18:17. Lind- 
strom tallied 15 seconds later to 
make it 7-3. (AP. UPI) 


SCOREBOARD 



• National Hockey League Leaders 


A K 


*ta 


B.3M 
OVERALL Of¥WSE 


ETS 

* - Gretaky, Edmonton 
7 Alt* Karri, Edmonton 
: Boot, NY (skaters 

a;.*: H ur dut wmmwB 
. a Suttar, NY Wonders 
i : ca«® Karr. PhUodelpbta 
Dionne. Los Augofes 
Ipc 9& JWocLoan, Winnipeg 
Pale 


FtB 


Oerodnidc. QOTolt 
: : Nldians. IM ABBOT* 
?B Torofll, NY IlfcKKter* 


„-B Cartnr. W WW i 
■tC~-~ Savant OUeoso 


V.MKam. Ccfaorv 
.TAtmag, Detroit 
Factor** SL touts 
ac Proop, PMtatfOTNa 



> -i Pr»* 
-T 

III . 

J J*j ’ 

3 ”- 


P. Stariny, fejsbsc 
Fax, Lb Annates 


G A P Ptol 
47 B4 Ul 22 
44 44 Bl . 12 
IS 42 B 12 
28 44 72 O 
79 41 70 2f 
39 27 M 23 
37 39 M 28 
22 41 43 75 
31 31 42 U 
28 34 £2 35 
24 34 42 54 
79 32 <1 39 
24 37 51 28 
17 44 51 57 
35 25 40 53 

21 » Nil 

20 40 4023 
IB 42 40 15 
27 30 57 21 

22 35 57 5) 

21 35 54 6 


Gnfccky, Edm 
Karri, Edm 
Karr, pm 

Boot, NYI 


Op 0 
44 47 

43 44 

44 3* 
43 38 


ASSISTS 


Op A 
44 84 
44 44 
44 44 
43 44 


:MLSton&ig8 


16? y® 1 


i - 


^ . v WALES CONFERENCE 

*■ - • Patrick Mvfaioo 

ra** 7 • W t T Pt8 6F GA 

:nrr WaNUnattm 20 12 7 O Ml W 
iPMMMWpWa - 28 12 4 42 W 134 

^ ^ -N.Y. fatlanCtofB 25 18 2 SJ 214 181 

'PtmtaKBh 18 22 4 40 142 1W 

..N.Y. Ramrs 15 22 I 38 US 184 

NOT JO tot - 15 25 5 . 33 1S8 187 

Adam* DMSiQO 

Moafraaf 23 14 .10 .-54 780. )53 

Buffalo - - *1 13 -12 54 148 133 

if-- -Quebec 22 18 4 50 182 145 

.Boston 21 I* 7 49 147 W 

. t- .-Hartford • H 22 5 37 144 181 

CAMPBELL- CONFERENCE 
Norris THvMoa 
-If 18 8 44 144 171 

21 .23 3 . 45 185 177 
- 14 24 3 34 1«T 1W 

' U X i . a M4 21* 

* 38 5 23 137 200 

SOTttw D W OTa 

32 t 4 70 241 157 
23 17 - 4 a 213 181 
23 20 4 • SO 1*8 205 
7* T*. ,'t 4 S SOS J» 
U 30 7 . 29 158 255 
MONDAY’S RESULTS 

14 7-4 


Gretzky. Edm 
Coffey. Ed 
HowerOTik. Win 
Kurri, Edm 

POWER-PLAY GOALS 

Gp PPO 

Kerr, Ptw 44 14 

Bullard, Pit 35 11 

Gartner. Wo* 47 11 

SHORT-HANDED GOALS 

Gp She 

Gretzky, Edm 44 7 

Kasper, Baa 45 4 

Propp, Pnl 44 4 

GAME-WINKING GOALS 

Gp Gwb 

Kurri, Edm 43 7 

Slot any. CM 43 7 

Gcrtnar. Was 47 4 

Gretzky. Edm 44 4 

SHOTS 

GP S 

Bouraue, Boo 4* 231 

Gretzky. Edm 44 198 

Moelanto, Cal 45 187 

Gartner, Wbt 47 184 

Dianne, LA 45 185 

SHOOTING PERCENTAGE 

Gp G S Pet 

Youna, Pit 43 24 73 354 

Karri. Edm 43 44 142 31A 

'Simmer. LArBoe 45 24 H 389 

Salter. CM 21 14 51 27S 

Fraeer, Chi 43 18 49 24.1 


ten 


- ^iL-f.SL Louts 


« 5JT* 

. ^ - 9r 

: A 

\ r " — 

1 U *9- 


tCNcapo 

•wmaeseJa 

kTdroma 


^ ? 




rCataary 
.Wtmdpoa 
.Co* AltBOTS 
{Vancouver 


- ( 
ry ■ 

* 4 - 

A 

t: 


St Lads . 

jMmdt . II W 

V Motion cm, Sutter 013, Ramaaa 13>, Po- 
■wwto C2>, Petter w on 2 (143; Gore (13», KWo 
.ilU,B0Mlr«y (U).5M»«nBoai: 0. LMlstan 
^MIcal^v-l»10-^:Datratt(ofllMms- 
itov) 1I-6-HV-Z?. 

Jtoea t reM 18 8-1 

Mh 1 1-1-3 

> O’Coanett 2 01). Crowdof (17); Mendou 
TO. ttotsea seal: Manttwd (otiPeArs) 10- 
4G-G4; Settan (an Pen ne y ) WM— 3t ■ 
PKHbOffB 2 18-4 

, WHIM—: .'21 W 

-- Ho«n*uk 30 I}, MocLABn 123 L Turnbull 

( 1 QL Ptord (S),AmJel ( 12 ); lam < 7 ),St»d- 
-.I OTffn.rhiikuin' inyio n iiiMi n ? ns . Vnuno 


■ ZS 
■zi' 3 


• 

, .O- 

-:.9f 


GOALTENDING 
■OToooto to 

MP GA 
1,923 82 

Sauve S35 43 

Cloutier 45 4 

(4) 2423 133 

484 17 

2311 115 
(23 2395 134 

Mam Mi » 

Rteeln 14S4 97 

jeneen 305 74 

(5) 2343 M2 

1350 93 

So44aert W0 50 

Montreal CO W* 

Mono 1384 42 

FUhr 1387 84 

Fair and Moos etarad dwtaut 
Edmonton CD 2«7*l 158 

POT** 1« « 

711 39 

Sylvastrl 102 4 

DOTcoMt* tM U 

O J 2485 159 


SO Avfl 
4254 

0 239 
0339 
4243 

B 2.11 

1 299 
1 241 
1 257 
2292 

0 as 

3 298 

1 232 

0 333 
IMf 

1 290 
1 342 

Jen. I 
3 222 
0 322 
0329 
0353 

0 5.12 

3240 


Bouehord 

1431 

72 

0 L2S 

Gowolin 

Urn 

71 

0 190 

Sevtany 

379 

21 

1 112 

Qorttac aa 

2482 

U5 

1 343 

Heinz 

70 

3 

0 257 

wnraley 

1.157 

48 

0 350 

Lhit 

1444 

95 

e 195 

SL LOOT U) 

2401 

151 

0 174 

SkorodBflSkl 

748 

38 

1 105 

Bomerman 

vim 

t3S 

0 198 

Chicago CO 

1781 

ITS 

1 171 

Lame fin 

1442 

W 

0 158 

Edwards 

1490 

79 

0415 

Ctogary <l» 

1733 

171 

0 191 

Moloch* 

L2B7 

71 

0 153 

Bccupty 

955 

54 

1 399 

Mlomui 

489 

35 

D 442 

Sands 

to 

8 

0552 

Mtanuata t» 

2J48 

182 

1 197 

Hmdry 

1.188 

59 

I 248 

Smith 

1,114 

77 

0 415 

Wkiteison 

425 

35 

0 AM 

NY Ntandarx 

1727 

181 

1 Ul 

VantotattroocX 

1320 

87 

1 195 

Hanlon 

1422 

to 

0 482 

NY Smart m 

1752 

1U 

1 496 

Jonacvfc 

1458 

107 

1 344 

Eliot 

1498 

84 

0 459 

cox An a* tar (M 

Z755 

ia 

1 449 

Low 

799 

<7 

1 157 

Reach 

1484 101 

0 403 

Komppurt 

272 

32 

0 5.16 

Not Jersey (41 

2455 

U3 

1 412 

NUUon 

2.194 

Ml 

1 345 

weaks 

420 

40 

0 S71 

Hartford O) 

2414 

183 

1 438 

KaWm 

157 

9 

0357 

Hayward 

1411 

109 

0 406 

Bahreod 

1429 

77 

1 449 

Winnipeg 151 

2493 

200 

1 438 


■22 

52 

1 180 

Harran 

1431 

94 

a 450 

Man 

553 

42 

0 447 

Pmrtiargti CD 

2406 

191 

1 440 

Bernhardt 

582 

35 

0159 

Beater 

533 

43 

1 408 

St. Croix 

540 

41 

0 455 

wioooaff 

993 

75 

0 5JU 

Taraat* CO 

2471 

191 

1 445 

Mia 

211 

14 

0 198 

Stefan 

1400 

100 

0 432 

Mica let 

1464 

87 

0 482 

Datrofi (4) 

3495 

m 

0457 

Bradeur 

1458 

120 

D 490 

Caprice 

990 

85 

0 530 

Garrott 

407 

44 

0 649 

Vancouver (31 

UBS 

252 

0 538 


National Basketball Association Leaders 


SCORING 



G 1 

Fg 

Ft 

Pts 

Avg 

King, N.Y. 

31 

371 

234 

974 

313 

Short 6i 

37 

413 

229 

1077 

29.1 

Donttav. Utah 

31 

294 

i 2S 

! 84427.2 

Bird, Boa. 

41 

458 

159 

nos 

27J 

English, Den. 

« 

454 

301 

ilia 

259 

Jordan. CM. 

41 

409 

258 

1090 

354 

Wilkins, AtL 

41 

419 

338 

ion 

354 

Motonc. PML 

40 

335 

372 

1042 

26.1 

Johnson. KX. 

40 

392 

184 

972 

243 

Natl, Dan. 

40 

358 

an 

957 

239 

Cummings. MIL 

41 

397 

184 

978 

239 

Woolrtdge. Oil 

38 

350 

303 

903 

2U 

Aguirre, DalL 

40 

363 

192 

930 

ZU 

Thomas, Dot 

39 

336 

210 

•97 

2M 

Moncrfrt, MIL 

37 

304 

239 

850 

280 

Griffith. Utah 

42 

387 

116 

945 

225 

Vandmuaoha. Prt. 

40 

341 

200 

887 

32J 

Abdui-fctobr. LAL 

43 

J84 

149 

917 

7IJ 

Chombora, Sea. 

43 

331 

217 

900 

ZM 

Garvin, LA. 

39 

319 

180 

818 

21 jO 

GAwllOams, Wsh. 

38 

330 

111 

795 

309 

Ervtag. PML 

40 

319 

185 

825 

20J 

Otaluwan. Hou. 

41 

341 

153 

844 

204 

Sampson. Hou. 

41 

353 

128 

834 

30 3 

Nonce, Pfwa. 

41 

152 

113 

817 

199 

Gilmore, SJL 

39 

257 

an 

774 

T9J 

MttchalLSJL 

39 

334 

102 

773 

19J 

Smith. LAC 

41 

314 

173 

805 

194 

MJhompson, Port 

38 

285 

156 

738 

194 

Rutand. Wash. 

35 

245 

199 

509 

19.1 


Otoeks. PIUL 
'Joftneon LAL 
Thorpe. KX. 
Rulond, Wash. 
MGwle, Ban 
Wool ridge, Oil 
Johnson, Chi 
Parts*. Baa. 
Naff. Den. 


Malone, PML 
Ota tu won, Hou. 
Lokntseer, Del. 
WlHIam. N J. 
SHuna Sea. 
Rutand, Wash. 
Tkomaeon. KC 
Eaton, uton 
GRmare, sa. 
Partsh. Bos. 
Smith. OS. 
Bint Bos. 

Sam peon, hou. 
Vincent. DalL 
Walton. LAC 


Thomas. Dot 
Johnson, LAL 





LA Utters 

42 

4841 

1153 




Dofroh 

39 

4481 

1149 




Boston 

41 

5495 

1145 

210 

353 

£71 

Portland 

41 

4578 

1141 

255 

453 

472 

Kansas Cltv 

40 

5534 

1134 

153 

2H 

456 

ntsllf.il> Inti In 
rul WufWHU 

40 

5503 

1124 

245 

433 

455 

Utah 

43 

4516 

109.9 

259 

450 

455 

Aflmta 

41 

4455 

1037 

IS 8 

523 

452 

CMcoeo 

41 

5*54 

1084 

171 

308 

455 

Dallas 

41 

4442 

10U 

290 

S27 

450 

Indiana 

40 

4315 

107.9 

358 

551 

450 

MlhMsukee 

42 

4530 

1073 

G 



Houston 

41 

5414 

1037 

Dof 

Tot 

Avg 

Phoenix 

42 

4513 

M7J 

315 

500 125 

Not Jersey 

41 

<357 

WAS 

an 

479 1L7 

l_A a topers 

42 

<393 

10*6 

323 

434 1L5 

Golden State 

39 

4073 

1044 

31* 

459 IM 

Washington 

41 

4Z72 

1842 

360 

473 1U 

Cleveland 

31 

3953 

1040 

276 

483 TU 

NOT York 

43 

4453 

1036 

309 

438 tIJI 

Seams 

47 

4196 

99.9 


FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

Fu Faa Pet 
Donaktonn, LAC 147 239 399 

Gilmore. SA. 257 410 A27 

Banks, SA. 154 250 314 

Nonce, Phoe. 39 581 AOs 

AJxiut-Jabboc, LAL » iff JN 

worthy, LAL 330 558 SB 


College Top-20 Ratings 

The lap ao teams to the Am 
cottone badtethoH pod (Hr-stH 
p are n theses, total paints bn 


Them. KX. 
Nixon. LAC 
RktMnttoa Nj. 
Green. Utah 
Valentine. Port. 
Lever, Den. 
Soarrow, N.Y. 
Pressey, NUL 
Henderson, Sea. 
Boo toy. CJev. 


Gus Williams, Was. 


39 

41 

42 
34 
4S 

42 1H 250 458 189 

39 117 305 423 1Q1 

41 144 395 439 107 

39 193 222 415 104 

41 73 355 428 134 

41 119 301 420 102 

39 92 303 395 131 

40 120 270 390 94 

ASSISTS 

G NO. A VO. 

39 479 12J 
39 473 T2.1 

39 392 121 

40 325 BJ 

41 324 BA 

41 323 74 

38 294 7J 

41 314 7J 

42 301 74 

42 298 7.1 

41 » U 
40 276 59 

38 251 44 

40 278 54 

38 253 5J 


TEAM DEFENSE 


Washington 

Houston 

Dellas 


Philadelphia 
Not Jersey 
Phoenix 
New York 
LA. die 
Atlanta 


LA. Lokers 
Cleveland 
Utah 
Detroit 
Portland 
Indiana 
Golden Stole 
San Antonio 
City 


G 

Pts. 

Awn 

43 

<271 

10IJ 

42 

4304 

10L5 

41 

4258 

1KL9 

41 

4139 

1056 

41 

4354 

1066 

41 

41*7 

1066 

50 

<182 

107.1 

41 

4397 

1073 

42 

4520 

1076 

43 

4531 

1077 

42 

4532 

1986 

41 

4449 

1086 

41 

4454 

1006 

42 

4515 

1096 

30 

4210 

1108 

42 

4591 

1113 

39 

OKI 

1113 

41 

4598 

112.1 

40 

4496 

1126 

39 

4452 

113.9 

39 

4513 

1152 

40 

4559 

1153 

42 

4929 

1176 



ReOTn/Uided Prea he emOT nrf 


PhD Sykes (1 eft) and Beraie NichoUs balled tbe puck away 
after Los Angeles goafie Bob Janecyk had lost his bearings 
on a first-period shot by Edmonton's Jaroslav Pouzar (10). 

Pacers Down Warriors 


etc. record threw 8 Joe. It oed 


Ofl 28-19-11, 

hnt 


Transition 


BASEBALL 


MINNESOTA— Signed Randy Bush and 
Stan Hotme& designated hitters: Steve Lom- 
hontezblnfleWor; Rlcfc Lnander end Cwl 
Wardle. pHeherx and Daw Meier, outfielder. 


Tennis 


<h»m>,aw6atil}^an«sntrinen3Cy,Yo«W 

Wtan^^'fan Ranantl lS-liW-87-'. D.S.PtoMoot 



ClPf—Zl; ypkmtoes (on RMantl 15-13-KL-37- 
18 1-4 

8 3 V-7 

S<ljBltOT2(Xl,oicm(l2).FniwteY(n, 
os, GartJjtoT (m a WRsan (13): 
-Paroei mi. SMs an MU Minnesota too 
rian n e nri a a i 14-9^12-35: CUcaae I On 3to- 
‘Jpche.M»ke ieuiu 12*8-28. ^ - 

Jjh AeaOTc_ 4 3 8-7 

; LtodNrom 2 (5J, JadOTn 2(3). Gretzky (4W. 
'.Kbnt (45), Unre 14)rOrffev (W); MottMm 
420), Mifler m, Dionne (20: MakaHK .ri), 
Redmond O), Taylor OS), Welh (2). Shots « 
•dcd". Lai Angata* Ion Moog. Fuhr) 14-TO-4— 
38; -Edmonton (or Jonecvk) w*-15-e . 
Cotewy ■ 0.1 2 8-8 

V o n coo wj a i.i B-a. 

. Reinhart fi5L Beers (1 7), SheehyOJ.-Tarti 

- « 2 (iBL'siMketiSLSiafunaaal: Cafsacy (on 

Brodeur) n-U-UG^t; Vancouver (on Le- 

s-* -y ■ ; *" “ . - : * 


■■J . , - 


v-r 

M 


■ MEN’S SINGLES 
PM* Rw"d 

Scott Davh, U&dai Ricky Brown. Ui. 5-7, 

5 J,M(M);ioyLap(d»UJ.*tTomCut- 

naan, 05. 24, M, M; Po*el Stadl. Czodta- 
3 tewrida,daf.Todd Nelson, UA.74.to2.- Greg 
Hatows. US* deLTOrik BwheMtoe. Frtetw. 
74. M: WoJtefc Fttrtk. Poland, det Shlomo 
GUdalekt, (snot, to& ** Sammr Oam- 

maiva U A. del. ajolior Perlite*. Israel, 5-4 5- 

1; Stoidv Mover. UJ-det Marti OkJaon, U5. 

88. tot: Bates Tarocry, Hungary, del. Robert 
Green, UJL « W). »*)- -* 300 

Soarefc Bnnllcfct Tim iWMesn, UA,5-4to* 
tol;NtolPi»rcetLUA.dotMa«oOOTte.Yii- 
gaMaviaM-M C7-0,tol; Boris B*<ker, West 
Gannanv.def.Zenan Ku(wnky,5wflartaii& 

5-7 ( 57 L 5 -Lto 2 ; Matt MMehen.Ui.drt. Hdnr 

Scnlhanlb Swlbertand, toL 3* toJ; Tbn 

Mayotte, U4» dot Stova Denton, UJ-toitol 


LOS ANGELES— Signed Mike Mental, 
outfielder, to a one-year contract. 

NEW YORK— 5fenedDawiy H*ep,outfleW- 
er-ffrst baseman; Terry Blocker, outfitter, 
imd Kevin MUcfiefl, htflefder. 

BASKETBALL 

Nadeeel Beskelbetl Amdafioe 
CLEVELAND— Signed Earl (Butai) 
Graves, auord, to a second Itodav eontrart. 

FOOTBALL 

National Poottnlt League 
LEAGUE— Amaunaed that Bob Baum- 
hawar, Miami non tackle, nos withdrawn 
from ttia Pro Bowl because of on Injury to Ms 
red knee and aiUe. Maned Joe Kfecfca. N.Y. 
Jets defensive tackle, to replace Mm. 

MINNESOTA— Retained Jerry Bums os 
asOThail head «aocn and affenshig coartBna- 
tor. 

K.Y. JETS— Named Bud Garaon defensive 
coordinator aid defensive bocWfeW coach. 

HOCKEY 

NaHaaai Hockey Le o o ue 
N.Y. ISLANDS RS— Called UP Scott How 
son, center, mm Km Letter and Vera Smith, 
detw n em m . from Springfield of the Ameri- 
can Hockev League. 

COLLEGE 

MICHIGAN TECH-nAimouocsd the reslO- 
nafian of Ran mototL head football enoch. 


rtmtOaf): 

1. Georgetown 150) 

2. So. Methodist 

3. st Jotor* 

A. Memphis SL 
£ Duke 
£ llllneti 
7. DePaul 
&. North Carolina 
9. Oklahoma 
78. Orgaon St. 
tl. Syracuse 

12. Louisiana Tech 
11 Indiana 

U. VUIanova 
IS Kansas 

16. Georgia Tech 

17. Tuba 

13. Michigan 

19. Vo. Commonwealth 
2d Nav^Loe Vegas 


Record 

17-0 

15-1 

13-1 

13-1 

IM 

Ur* 

IM 

163 

134 

Itot 

11-4 

15-1 

11- 4 

12- 3 
1*0 

13- 3 

14- 2 
IM 

1» 

13-2 


Pts Pvs 
ISO 1 
1108 3 
ion 4 
ion s 

958 2 

739 11 
5a W 
580 6 
551 13 
405 14 
502 7 
918 12 
455 I 
423 II 
415 9 

316 17 
239 2D 
157 - 
108 16 
96 — 


TEAM DEFENSE 

G PtS. Avg 
Denver 42 4974 HM 

son Antonio 39 4551 1T6.7 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Attaotic Division 

W L Pet GB 


Selected College Scores 

EAST 

Assumption 82. Cent. Connecticut 70 

BudoneU 55, York, Po. 51 

Coterie 70. LeMovne 48 

EaOTrn Cat 74 . Uoaolo 73 

Navy 87, Delaware S3 

New Hampshire CaL 103, Keene SL 84 

pmstoirgh 61, Boston College 55 


The United Press Internottota board of 
coaches top-20 colle ge bos m tbcfl rattngs 
(with fhnt-piacg votes, records Ibroagb Jan 
20rOad total polslx based M II petots (or first 
place, M far seenwd, del: 

1. Georgetown 1391 (17-D) 589 

2. Southern Methodist (15-11 544 

X St. Johni (1) (13-1) 498 

4. Memphis » (12-1J 463 

5. Duke (13-21 409 

A llltnota (134) 255 

7. Oklahoma (134) 237 

8. Oregon St. (14-1) 219 

9. North Care Una 11M) 277 

10L CtoPeul (12-3) 215 

11. Louisiana Todi (15-1) 174 

12. Syracuse (11-2) 154 

11 Indiana (IM) 146 

14. Kansas 113-3) 129 

15. viuanava (11-3) 87 

16 . Tulsa ( 14 - 2 ) 79 

17. Georgia Ted) (12-3) 44 

18. Washington (124) 50 

19. (tte) Nevada- Los Vegas (13-2) 33 

19. {tie) Ata.-fltrmlnohoin (134) 23 


Boston 

34 

7 

629 

— 

Richmond 74 Amorim U. 58 

Phnodatpnta 

33 

7 

625 

ft 

Stem 83. Maine 55 

Wosiilnoton 

23 

19 

648 

lift 

SL Fronds, Pa 84. Loyola AM. 81 

Not Jersey 

19 

22 

653 

15 

SL Pater'S 63. Dataware SI. 61, OT 

N«w York 

14 

29 

325 

21 

VUtanovo A Dreed a 


Central DMsioo 



SOUTH 

Milwaukee 

28 

14 

657 

— 

Alcorn st. 79, Alabama St 77 

Dtarait 

23 

16 

690 

3ft 

Ondnnott 99, S. AfltaisNppI 58 

Chicago 

20 

21 

688 

7ft 

Delta Si. 73. W. Georgia 67 

Atlanta 

17 

24 

615 

10ft 

E. Kentucky 67, Austin Penv 47 

Indiana 

14 

27 

341 

13ft 

George fown. Kv. 80. Union. Ky. 73 

Cleveland 

11 

28 

382 

15ft 

Gears la Tech 49, Virginia 45 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Grambllng 72, Prairie View a 


Midwest Division 



Jacksonville SI. 72. Mlntappl CoL 62 

Denver 

25 

17 

-5W 

— 

Maryland 99. Holy Cross 75 

Houston 

23 

18 

651 

Ift 

N. CaraOnO 74 Jacksonville 68 

Miras 

22 

19 

637 

2ft 

$. Carolina 54 Louisville 59 

Sen Antonio 

19 

20 

687 

4ft 

Tanwo 75- Florida mterantlonol 59 

Utah 

18 

24 

629 

7 

Turn. -Chattanooga Sl E. Tennessee St. 74 

Kansas Qty 

14 

35 

350 

10 

Taxos-Ariinatan 63. Samford 59 


PortftC Division 



VMI 57. DavMsen 51 

la. Lokers 

28 

14 

667 

— 

w. Kentucky 84 Tennessee st. 55 

Pheento 

21 

21 

600 

7 

MIDWEST 

LA aieoers 

19 

23 

652 

9 

Ball St. 74 E. Illinois 73, OT 

Seattle 

19 

23 

652 

9 

Do Paul 72, E. Washington 50 

Portland 

18 

23 

639 

7ft 

Detroit 74 EvmvIllB 65 

Golden state 

10 

30 

350 

17 

Loyola, UL 85. St. Louis 73 


Ctonland 


MONDAY’S RESULTS 

29 26 21 32-115 

37 27 36 34-138 

Ballard 11-15M31, Dave 9.1224 20; Freei2- 
1874 31, Hlneon 7-13 1-1 15. Roboumts: Clevg- 
kM 46 (Hinson 0). Washington 26 (Mahom 
101. Assists: demand 26 (Bosley. K.WU- 
nams 9). Washington 36 (Gus William IB). 
Gol den State 38 25 38 22 M 12-127 

Indiana 23 26 33 23 18 14-09 

William 14-25 S? 33, Kellogg 7-16 44 18; 
Short 1M1 7438. Floyd d-30 1-1 22. Rebounds: 
Golden State 65 (Smlttk 17). Indiana 70 (iCei- 
tooeU). Assists: Golden State 20 (Connor TO), 
Indiana 23 (Fleming, wiHalms 6). 


Marquette 10. W. Mlctitosn $9 
N. Iowa 65 Valparaiso 53 
Oral Roberts 78. Butter 56 
Xavier. Ohio 7Z Oktahoma CTly 65 
SOUTHWEST 

Abilene Christian 77. Texts A&i 69 
E. Texas St. 101, 6. New Mexico 93 
5E Oklahoma 66, Dallas Baptist 59 
PAR WEST 

Nev.-Las Vegas S3. FuHertan SL 69 
Pacific 101. Utah st. 89 
Reals 71. Colorada Mines 7ft, 30 t 
S an Jaie SL 7X Lang Bead) Sl 67 
UCLA 6X Washington 51 
Wyoming 69. Utah 50 


Compiled by Our Stag From Dt^aeha 

INDIANAPOLIS — You know 
things have been tough when a 
double-overtime loss looks good. 
“We have to play games Hire to- 
night's,” said Golden State’s John 
Bach after tbe Warriors battled val- 
iantly before dropping a 129-127 
decision to the Indiana Pacers here 
Monday night. 

“We just have to have an iron 
will and not give in to bad breaks," 
added the coach of the National 

NBA FOCUS 

Basketball Association’s worst 
tram Golden State (10-30) has lost 
II straight 

In Monday’s only other game, 
Washington downed Cleveland 
128-115. 

A three-pointer by Tim Thomas 
and free throws by Tony Brown 
and Steve Stipanovich in the sec- 
ond overtime set up Indiana's tri- 
umph. Golden State led, 124-123, 
when Thomas —who at one point 
in tbe p«ne missed nine straight 
shots — made a lay-up and con-' 
verted after being fooled on the 
play; Brown made 2 free throws 
with 8 seconds left to give the Pac- 
ers a 4-point lead. 

Mickey Johnson, a framer Facer, 
canned a 3-pointer for the Warriors 
with 3 seconds left to cut the differ- 
ence to 128-127. Stipanovich was 
fouled with one second left; he 


made the first free throw and pur- 
posely missed the other. Tune ex- 
pired before Golden Slate could 
call a time-out. 

Golden State’s Purvis Short, who 
scored 38 points, made a basket 
with one second left is regulation 
to tie tbe game at 105. Johnson sent 
the game into its second overtime 
at 115-115 with a basket with four 
seconds lefL 

Herb Williams had 33 points and 
Clark Kellogg 18 for Indiana, 
which has won three in a row. 

“Both teams were faced with sit- 
uations where they could have quit. 
They didn’t, we didn't,” said Indi- 
ana Coach George Irvine, who was 


cals in the Jim 

Irvine spent the rest of the game 
watching the action on a television 
set in the locker room. “I’ve got so 
used to watching us on tape, I kept 
wanting to rewind itio run through 
the play and see what we were do- 
ing wrong” 

“An assistant coach doesn’t have 
the same fed fra the players,” said 
Donnie Walsh, who look over. 
“Basically, I left it up to the players 
out on the floor, and all I did was 
call timeouts when I thought we 
needed them. 

“I fed this is a game that (he 
players won,” Walsh said. “Jerry 
Sichting. Jim Thomas and Hob 
Wiliams were showing a lot of 
leadership out there.” (UPI, AP) 


i 





• • r 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1985 


OBSERVER 


people 


The One-Minute MWion Jean-Michel Folon’s Transparent Fogs’ Cheap at $750 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — The kid is in 
television, which is big, Larry, 
very big, as you know, and I am 
proud of him. My kid. *10 televi- 
sion,” I tdl people, and they say. 
“Ah, TV, huh? Very big. You must 
beproud.” 

Sore, Pm proud. ListenljLarry, 
Hke you, I have always beeCimall 
potatoes. My whole fanaiyTHke 
yours. And what did we talk about? 

Small taUfj right? 

And now, thanks to this kid, I 
can finally have some big talk. 
“Come on over,** I say to him on 
the phone. “Come on over so I can 
have big talk.” 

Naturally he's embarrassed. 1 
like that. It shows I raised him 
eight. He reads, even if he is in 
television. He has read Fred Allen's 
line about New York being a place 
where " small men at around enjoy- 
ing big talk," and maybe be thinks I 
am trying to make a monkey of 

him 

“Why don’t we just get in some 
beer arid watch ‘Gunga Din' "gam 
on the VCR?" he says. 

□ 

But I am not teasing the kid, 
Larry, because, honest to God, I 
really hearing the big uJk It 
gives me such a sense of the scope 

nf history anil chang e in the uu nrld 

For example, he got me thinking 
about how sad it is, what’s hap- 
pened to A Million Dollars in my 
lifetime: 

A Million Dollars — 1 still say it 
with awe myself. You too, probar 
bly. Remember when we were kids 
what it meant? A Million Dollars. 

Remember who had A Million 
Dollars, Larry? 

Daddy Warbucks had A Million 
Dollars. John D. Rockefeller had A 
Million Dollars. That Saturday af- 
ternoon we went to the movies — 
remember the newsreel shot of 
John D. Rockefeller in which he 
was celebrating his 93th birthday, 
or something dose, by giving out 
riimnt to all nis servants: 


It sounds cheap now, but it 
looked pretty good at the time, eh, 
Larry? I remember you saying, 
“Wow, if we worked for John D. 
Rockefeller, with our happy-birth- 
day dimes we’d be .able to go to 
another movie." 

Nowadays, though, the old fel- 
low would have to give each servant 


510,000 or so, or we'd denounce 
him for stiffing the bdp. Please 
notice, Larry, that l am engaging in 
big think It remits from big talk I 
heard from the kid. 

“Did you know that TV com- 
mercial time during the Super Bowl 

cost A Million Dollars a minute?" 
be said. 

“You wouldn’t funj(MLOlddad=- 
dy, would you?” I said. 

Even when the idea — maybe 

they call it a “concept” nowadays 
— even when the concept sank in, I 
didn't really cry. Just sat tfteregel- 
ting quieter and quieter and filling 
up with lugubrium, or lugubrious- 
ness, or whatever you call it when 
the melancholy for glories that are 
past is seeping into your marrow. 

That A Million Dollars had 
come to this. And in my lifetime. A 
sum once possessed only by the 
earth’s titans — Warbucks, Rocke- 
feller, the Sultan of Hyderabad — 
my childhood's monetary symbol 
of magnificence was now so trifling 
that it could buy only a 60-second 
opportunity to hawk snake oQ be- 
tween touchdowns. 

Larry, Larry, what has the world 
come to? And in our lifetime? 
While the kid was destroying the 
sense of values on which I’d built 
my life, 1 started remembering oth- 
er proof of the galloping decay, and 
I don’t Just mean Weinberger and 
those Pentagon airheads talking 
about SS0 billion like it was money 
for Jujubes. 

□ 

Something came back to me, 
something so monstrous I’d forgot- 
ten it until the kid activated my 
brain. It was a row house I saw in 
Manhattan last month. It was 
smaller, more decrepit and located 
in a dumpier neighborhood than 
that similar row house you bought 
in 19S6 in Baltimore for $24,000. 

The Manhattan row house was 
priced at A Million Dollars, plus a 
little change; to wit, $200,000. I 
remember saying to the real-estate 
agent, “You mean for A Million 
Dollars, plus 5200,000, you cannot 
buy Calumet Farm and half the 
rest of Kentucky, but only a 
$20,000 Baltimore row house?’' 

I guess the shock was so bad I 
immediately blacked it out until 
the kid came over and started talk- 
ing football commercials. What I'm 
saying, Larry, is, what's the point 
of being a millionair e anymore? 

New York Tima Serrice 


By John G. H. Oakes 

International Herald Tribune 

B URCY, Fiance — There are 
two sorts of artists, Jean-Mi- 
diei Folon says: ‘Those who stay 
in their ateliers like monks, and 
those who live, who work from 
their memories." 

To what he calls “the house at 
the end of the world” (only an 
-hour from Paris) the 30-year-old 
artist returns from his wide-rang- 
ing travels to mine his memories. 
His trademarks — gentle pastel 
colors, sweeping horizons, spare 
stick figures — have apparently 
touched a popular chord. 

Primarily watered ors and pas- 
tels, Folons art is in constant and 
growing demand for posters, 
ma garin #*, advertisments, galler- 
ies and exhibitions. 

It was a long journey: After he 
left his native Belgium for France 
in 1960, Fdon “died of hunger 
for six years," living in a garden- 
er's shack and “drawing, draw- 
ing, drawing." But one day re- 
cently, after having rushed in 
from an interview in Paris, he can 
speak for barely 13 minutes with- 
out being interrupted by the ring- 
ing of the telephone. 

Exhausted, he sinks onto a 
couch and toys with his bright 
yellow sneakers. His already soft 
voice sinks to a near whisper. 
“You shouldn't get (he idea I'm 
stuck in this house all the time," 
Folonsays — as if there were any 

dang er of that 

In the tiny farming community 
of Burcy he found the peace he 
needed as well as a reminder of 
the (men countryside of Belgium. 

“I like spacel It’s quiet. Its the 
flat country of Jacques Brel," he 
said. He fled it he readied 21, 
ahamdnrm^ Brussels and archi- 
tecture studies far the bohemian 
life across the border. “I had no 
money, but the problem rhwi 
wasn't bow to pay the rent or buy 
bread. It was now to buy paper 
and ink." 

Now. he sees nothing so excit- 
ing about France, and spends 
fewer than three months a year at 
his studio in the countryside. 
“France often bores me,” he said. 

“I have understood the light 
and space here," he said, gestur- 
ing at the e»p»niie of fields out- 
side the window. "I am sick of the 
heavy gray sky. I move around a 
k>L The Red Sea. Venice. New 
York. California." 


S '*%.*** A**— .t*—- - •: 

mhmm 

[A* 


“La Mfctaroorpfaose” (detail, 1973) by Fdon (right). 


He added: “1 like America and 
it likes me. My first success was 
there:” His favorite city is “mag- 
ic" New York, and it was there he 
found a market for his work in 
Time magazine. The New Yorker 
and other publications. It was 
there, too, that he had his first 
exhibition, at the LeFehre Gal- 
lery in 1969. 

He does not speak En glish, and 
understands very little. “I think 
it’s one of the reasons I idealize 
New York," he said, referring to 
his necessary dependence on 
“purely visual experience" while 
in the United States. “It’s a coun- 
try I look aL If I understand it, 
it's with my eyes alone. 

“Paris is always Paris. Venice is 
always Venice. But New York, as 
such, doesn’t exist It’s a collage 
of dozens of communities and 
cultures, of extremes of wealth 
and poverty." 

like J.M.W, Tomer, one of 
Folon's favorite artists and an- 
other master of watercolor, Folon 
feels an attraction for Venice. 
“Venice is the town of water. 
That’s the watercolor town, a lot 
of water, a little color. You have 
to do watercolors for 10 years 
before you understand how much 
water and how little colo^'you 


“Watercolors flow into each 
other, imKVe oils. It’s marvelous, 
the changes between red and 
bine, far example. IPs like a man 
and a woman, making a child. 
Never the same, always a differ- 
ent shade of violet-" 

What attracts him in Turner is 
what Folon calls “the intensity, 
the depth of the wok.” Folon 
strives to achieve this mme depth, 
and it is far this reason that he 
uses watercolors, he said. 


“I need their transparent fogs 
of color. I hate walls. I like win- 
dows. I want the viewer to be 
drawn deep into the work. 1 don't 
like that which is on a plane, 
which has no depth. Most paint- 
ings are Kke that. 

“The viewer should be lost in 
the image. For example, HI paint 
a person, and b ehind the person 
is a hill, behind the hill the rising 
sun, behind the sun a galaxy. It 
goes on forever.” 

The figures in Folon’s work are 
stripped bare. “The person I con- 
sistently portray is as simple as 
possible. He is not recognizable 
to anybody and he is recognizable 
to everybody. I put a hat on his 
head to add to his anonymity. He 
has two holes for eyes. A line for 
the nose, a line for the mouth. He 
never langhs and never cries. He 
has no expression. 

“1 use the fewest dements pos- 
sible, SO what r emains is the es- 
sentiaL" 

This is the universal man, for 
Fdon — a creation that reflects 
the general alignttrinri of Humana 
from society. Folon develops his 
themes out of a profound human- 
ism. as evidenced by his frequent 
charity works. 

Over the past 20 yean, about a 
third of his illustrations have ^ 
as their subject matter some sort 
of humanistic u ppwi. fueH as 
calls for amnesty for political 
prisoners, protests against capital 
punishment. The last poster he 
mmpig ttid was for a fund-raising 
appeal for the victims of the 19S0 
railroad-station bombing in Bo- 
logna. 

“It goes beyond politics," he 
said. “It’s respect far the human 
person that interests me.” 

“Art for art’s sake doesn’t at- 





tract me," Fdon said “Of course, 
I like certain abstract artists, such 
as Mondrian, Klee and Kan- 
dinsky. But it’s more in the pho- 
tographs of Henri Cartier-Bres- 
son than in works of abstract an 
that you’re gang to find witness- 
es of the 20th century." 

Treading the thin fine between 
realism and abstraction. Fdon 
mils himself an observer and in- 
terpreter of reality. For him. the 
great abstract painters, despite 
their genius, were “stay-at-homes 
for whom art was a religion.” 

“My nature leads me to tell 
about what’s going on today. My 
images speak about reality." be 
said 


The telephone company called it 
“a cheap thrill.” Maxine Bitten, 
after receiving a 48-page, 5750 
phone bill is calling it a few other 
things. Pacific Bell officials in San- 
ta .Ana, California, say they will 
help resolve the problem of the bill 
run up by Biuers's son on their new 
TalkLine service. Bitters com- 
plained to Pacific Bell about the 


charges made by her son, Darrin, 
18, after the telephone company 
sent an advertisement to 32,000 


California residents between the 
ages of 12 and 19. With TalkLine, 
teen-agers can talk with as many as 
13 other youths simultaneously, for 
reduced charges. The company ad- 
vertised the experimental service as 
“a chrep thrill,'' the utility’s answer 
to “the neighborhood pub." Bit- 
ters, while conceding that Darrin 
overdid it with Talk One, criticized 
the phone company for advertising 
the service to people who are not 
legally responsible for the bills they 
run up. A phone company spokes- 
man, Mike Ronzler, said about a 
dozen complaints had been re- 
ceived He called the Bitters situa- 
tion “out of the ordinary." and said 
the company was trying to work 
out a solution acceptable to both 
parties. Runzler said the company 
would “reconsider” its advertising 
if it received a significant number 
of complaints. 

□ 

Kathryn D. Scffivan. 33, was the 
first American woman to walk in 
space. Now she has added a per- 
sonal first to her r&uini: a solo 
flight by glider. Sullivan, who in 
October circled Earth in the open 
cargo bay of the space shuttle Chal- 
lenger for more than three hours, 
made her maiden solo sailplane 
flight at Estrella Saiiport, south of 
Phoenix, Arizona. “Sne was able to 
solo on her eighth flight, after only 
four hours of instruction," said Les 
Horvath, who operates the saiiport. 
“When you’re good, you’re good” 

□ 

A group of leading African musi- 
cians has produced a record called 
“Tam Tam pour I’Ethiopic" to. 
raise money tor famine relief hr 
Ethiopia. The money -mil be chan- 
neled through the French organiza- 
tion Mededns Sans Frontiires 
(Doctors Without Frontiers). The 
record, inspired by the British 
group effort, “Do They Know It’s 
Christmas?" brought together mu- 
sicians inHitrimg Mwo DQttflgO, 


MHamma, King Soapy Ade, Salif 
Kelts, Tom? Kunde, Mory 
Ghetto Blasts; Souzy Kasseya and 
Ray K ffp a- The record was orga- 
nized by French media. All taking ^ fl -r •£? 
part donated their services. The re- - 

cord will be sold in France for 48 
francs (about 55). ■ u N 

The French team of Patrick Zao- 1 ^ 

iroii and Jean da Sffra in a Mitsubi- t * " ^ ^ 

shiPajero won the auto category of ^ ^ j 

the 7th Paris- Dakar rally and Gas- ■, * L fj>. 

toaRaUerof Belgium won the mo- i||! J. 
torcyde category on his BMW. It i ]I> 
was Rainer's second consecutive 
victory in the three-week comped- - y • 
lion. An&ew Cowan of Britain, also -.ivi,'” ' s 
driving a Mitusbishi Pajero, fin- yy 

ished second in the auto category. 

° '■ 

Chtefc Corea wants to set the re- ^ . 

cord straight on his views about '-j.-' - 

South Africa. The jazz pianist be- -X 
came the object of anti-apartheid A 

protesters after he played m South 
Africa a few years ago. He now says V- r - - 

he opposes apartheid, however. “I ^ y - 
am a musician and have been to 
South Africa some time ago and - fc ‘ 

Tm very concerned to see that the '-" t 
sordid conditions and human 
rights violations are abolished ’’tg^ 
down there, and will continue to '• • -■ 
speak out against them." he said. ' 

“My church, the Chun* of Sciea- 
tology, and its newspaper have do- y’ ; 
contented these atrocities and it apr y,‘.'. 
pears these conditions continue." 

Corea recently finished a stand at yy'-- \ 
the Blue Note in New York that 
included a benefit with the guitarist - 
George Benson for Ethiopia. Now 
he is headed to Japan for a series of &*':]-■* j;.- 
concerts, some of them with the /.. - ■ 

pianist Keith Jarrett 

□ . ' :5s" - ■ 

Donald Nibiett’s estranged wife, 

Lyn, was seeking a share in their 
joint property. Now there's little 
left to share. Borrowing a five-ton : ' :: 
mechanical digger from his work, ' v, -‘ 

Nibleit, 31, set about demolishing dr.-'-- 
much of the four-bedroom brick y'-: 
house in Middlewich, England, . 

which he finished building only last * ' 

year. Neighbors said Niblett's wife vr: \ : -* 
left him earlier this month with 
their two children, aged 7 and 4, 
and was said to be seeking a di- 
voice and a share in the property. - - • 

Niblett was questioned by police, — 

then released after _paying a bond y^y : - • . . .- 
that he will forfeit if he “breaks the 
peace" in the next two years. ‘zvzz.: • 


ikEi* 


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Conven ti o n -Trade ShowvPrwi Patm 
Scwoc* Ewievbnaoe MdarvfVs I 
Sodoi I Hosa-Hostenes-Entortan e rs 
Soad Campanans-rour gudes, etc. ! 

212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. S6th St, N.YjC 10019 
Service Eepretertfcarves 
Needed Woridunde. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


UTTERS OF CREDIT (L/C) 
ROM TOP BAMS AVARAUE 

Cohort* oi, or toms, agarai secunty 
can be arranged. 


Wnto: 

Joann Cap. 

401 Fifth Aw. New Yak, N.T. 10016 
» Totox 236464 SOUL A* 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Your Office in Germany 

we aw “At Your Service" 

• Campbte office services at Iwp 
addresses. 

■ My equnped offi ces for the short 
term or the long term. 



Immigration. Residency 
Nafvrdization 

Avafabto through G ovem neie 
program m Cenbbean, Central & 
SoJn America. Contact- 1MVBT 
10 Golden Squar e. London W1R 3AF 
Tel: (DI) 734 2077 tie 298240 WerB G 


COUATERAL 

W e coipr ftvrie pmneba dt notification 
arbitroQo tnxvoukn. 
Keascsnofe fees. Ffrwnrt i«rvica. 
London baeed. ' TJ«fe>51622. 

Tel: 014J85 5492 / 01-930 8926 


UK OFF5HORE COMPAteSf We 
provide no mn ee Oc actor & Seo«- 
myl Complete derwfofionl tendon 




• totamemnafly tranarf office and 
professional staff at your dspend. 

• Can be togrfly med as your corpo- 
rate domoie for Germwiy .'Europe. 

• Your buftness ccercfton con ttert 
i mmetfiotefy. 

teiraft Bwfaeee Servfa — GmbH 
tetreoMmn an Hokchauwiipork 
JWuuansrrcBM 22 
6000 Frankfort ten Mom 1 
_ Germonv 
T*t 0611-590061 
Telex: 414561 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


Worldwide 

N o m inee s Admin u tutfion 
Boat Regatratiora 
Readymade or Speaal 


SWISS UHE INSURANCE, first class 
company, large bom*. W, S6LBL 
Coleges 26. CH1009 PUU.Y. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


MAH YOUR MONO KONG IBP «*ymwe or bpecxX 

U3 »* 0N ««5»TATTVE 

SK 'SS KS C Zft L ASTON COW^ FORMATIOW 
51624 W EMBE HX Your ftref. We wnl SvStoo’St 



10676 Athens. 


DOMESTIC 

POSmoPS AVAILABLE 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


Dowlas, hta of Mem. 

Tefcfl624 J6591 
Wex 627697 SUVA G 


YOUt OWN COMPANY W 

SWITZERLAND 

ZUBCH - ZUG - IUZHN 
From 9=500 per anum ■ up. 
Cofihdmatoarwjr.36, CH6300 Zug 
Teh 0041 4} 21 32 68. Tht 86 49 15 

A P t iiBi i t for Your Son 




TOUR tOFOON OflfKE 

OC5HAM EHCUnVE CENTRE 
0>5V>mhanyve range of terwoH 
150 Regent Street, tendon WI. 
T«k (01 1 439 6288 Tbc 261426 





ite^Cu 




f 1 II 

53 BE 





WE SEEK produOt to MOI A defnb- 
ute to the Eixopecn markets, Send any 
&dl mfexmehon to HT Bn 2105, Fne- 
dndofr 15. 1M00Q Rnkfuri/M 


MtttfEOMCAl/ COMMBtOAL 
wtotpeliB Q /ltaetewg. 306 06 64 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 





UfuVBBAl CONTAVStS 1ID. 
HVi hind faKMiN Plan 

17%% P/A 





GENEVA KMSI S t ^ B5 

Fufty equipped ofhem to ienl. Dontci- 
mtnt [nwfl. tel ex & phone). Trade, ides 
Bdmmstroean & teOfttand services, 
«S- SJAe.de Chene, 1207 Geneva 
Yd (22) 86 17 33. Hu 428388 KBS 


AUTOMOBILES 


be;::*?.- 




olf Expqrtab tfttoogi aiter for ir4era> 
ton dt Faiien ei Groftroum Pore 
Unobhangig und wer spradu. Zi*h 
rih at Mr. Bertaod, 210 n» di ftg. 9 
Denis. 75010 Paris. 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

Don’t am 
NTBMATKMAL 
SECRETARIAT POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in Hra IHT Oaafflftd Sedan. 


i iH prr' -; 

t a. C -•>. _ 


fevTake 1 


PARIS ISGPT1VE TRAVEL Agency re 
quires expenenced shorthand typed- 
teaetary. ImmedkM avalabAy. fe- 
dy to Btw 1671 Hen*i Tribrt. 
92iJ7 Ncwfly Oed ax. Frame. 

SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 

GB - THE CRB6E DE 1A CREME tere 
parary help people recnat bingwJ or 
EngWi mother tongue seoetones 
Print 75B 82 30. 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SttJa - 
J? ■- 

’jiCffi.-',- .... ‘ 
.tKcZLj" - • 
Jao-.:;,- 
.. ...' 

i- 

> .^Air ■(,- 


_ MACHWE, gold deer 
pniAi FereUe profit between £1000 
hi £2500. No bid per month with 
exdunft eenbod Or your atriepen - 
dence at vnr chg^. fij or nt 
w* *4adwie » m (detafo £1$S0. 
Wra* Sfflr 275 IHT. Me Tm we6 
6D. 28020 Madrid 20. 


AN EXEUBfT OPFOnUNTY to in- 
mf xi the new edntry. St e te^ 
m inst e rs for a nanr feature f8m 


Development 
MUSA AUK 

Potential return up ta 46S yield PA 
Truttoe managed pnvafo anredmwt 
fond retrwnxn unit U5J lOjOOD. 

Midcwp Mgrtege re a ft tomfenart 
Tbn 29S540 World G 



OFFICES FOR SALE 


PAGE 4 
FOR MOPE 
CLASSIFIEDS 




the