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ZURICH, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


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Reagan Says U.S. 
Awaits Soviet Reply 
On Talks in March 


The Associated Press 


been seat at public since Dec. 27, 


WASHINGTON — President said that Moscow would conduct 
Ronald Reagan said Wednesday the new negotiations in “a busi- 
that the United States has asked nesslike and constructive manner.* 
the Soviet Union for a meeting in The diplomats said the message 


Geneva early in. March to begin a served to keep the 73-year-old lead- 
new round of arms control talks, el's name prominent during his ab- 
But, so far, be said, “we just have sense. Soviet officials have coo- 


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not heard back.” 

In an interview with Tbe Assori 


finned that his health prompted Ihe 
Warsaw Pact to caned a summit 


W ated Press, Mr. Reagan said he had meeting set for Jan. 14 in Bulgaria, 

tin** no reason to thsnk that there was “L«t us hope the United States 

io fetji . any problem in setting a time and will also adopt an nprighi and re~ 

aod T placefor the talks, which the two sponsible approach,” Mr. Cher- 

k jl countries agreed to earlier this aeako said It was bis first refer- 


manth. 

Mr. Reagan said, in disdosi 
the UR proposal: “Obviously, 


ence to the accord to resume talks. 

Mr. Reagan said Tuesday that 
Washington approached the talks 


there is some reason that's not sal- the “utmost seriousness'’ and 
isfactory to than, well continue was deter min ed to reach “a good 


trying to find a date.” agreement. 

Puffier this month, Secretary of Speaking after he met with his 
State George P. Shultz and Foreign new team of arms negotiators, Mr. 
Minis ter Andrei A. Gromyko met Reagan said the United Stales 
in Geneva and agreed to resume W0U M put forward concrete ideas 



Manila Charges 
General, 25 in 
Aquino Slaying 


By Steve Lohr cover it up afterward, he said. The 

New York runes Semce maximum sentence for two counts 

MANILA - The Philippine 38 811 accesso[ ? is 40 years in pris- 


govemment Wednesday charged 
tbe chief of staff of the armed 


Brigadier General Luther Custo- 


dio, former head of the aviation 
25 other persons with bang in- se “ ult * and 16 other 

voh-ed in arompiracy tTmurder nuhuuy personnel were indicted as 

S^^ticml^BenignoI P™*** “*gW *9 

^ * redly involved. They face the death 

Warrants for the arrest of all 26, u. . 


IHW4M Puns Marnctiwd 


disc ussions cm reducing intermedi- when talks resumed, 
ate art d lon g- ran g e nuclear weap- Mr. Chernenko, in his message, 
ons and to begin talks on prevent- said the “mass anti-war move- 
ing an wmn race in space. But the s® 1 )" bad grown in recent years. 


FROZEN SHUTTLE — A technician checks an ice- 
covered switchbox on the launchpad of the space shuttle 


Discovery at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Freezing weather 
postponed Wednesday's scheduled liftoff. Page 2. 


three of Item gpnerals, were to be the only nonmiliuo' person. 

issued Thursday morning. 

The case now goes before a spe- South Korea says it wffl arrest a 
dal three- judge court, which typi- ifissident, Kim Dae Jung, if he 
cafiy tries jgoverainenr officials, returns to the conotiy. Page 2 

and could linger there for years, 

legal experts said. Hermilo Gosuico, a businessman. 

The defendants wfll be tried for was indicted as an accomplice. An 
their alleged part in the murder of accomplice, in Philippine legal 


Hate and for th e t»nm bbw in 1 lus msclls confidence m th 

be determined later, preferably calls for even more 1 _ 

within a month. . ous, purposeful and cohesive ac- By Seth S. Kins competitive in world markets. This 

“We’re still in that single nous against the' war danger." York rimes Sente would bring greater competition to 

month,” Mr. Reagan said. “So I No independent anti-nuclear W ASHTNfvmN — Aorinilhtre foreign exponas, 
don’t think that this is much fool- campaign exists in ihe Soviet ^ n Thirdly, the plan would also de- 

dragging. “We have only recently Union and official groups protest £^2 p^siomoftteLafiM cnasc «hc size of U^. $ovem- 
scttled on a date that we thought only against Western arms. ment-hdd surpluses of gran and 


U.S. Farm Bill Calls for f , Revolutionary 9 Chaoses 

pie and calls for even more vigor- « «/ C7 


Mr. Aquino and on a second count terms, is a “person who cooperated 
or Wiling Rolando Galman, whom in the offense by previous acts." It 
the military claimed was Mr. carries a maximum sentence of life 
Aquino's kuler. Both men were imprisonment, 
shot to death ax Manila's interna- jn issuing their indic tmen ts, gov- 
tional airport on Aug. 21, 1983, as eminent prosecutors agreed with 


settled on a Hate tha t we thoug ht _ _ 

would be satisfactory to us." A tap Pravda commentator, Va- ^ cotton. The federal goveraroent, by 

_ ^ dim Nekrasov, said that there were keeping U.S. grainln storagp and 

■ Chernenko Statement signs of discord between Washing- m natJOna ^ a S r ’ Cu ^ mre P°" off the market, helps shore up for- 

President Konstantin U. Cher- ton and European manbas of t&B “Ki nrnnna ji __ olcn agn grain prices. A reduction in 

nenkosaid Wednesday that the So- North Atlantic Treaty Orgamza- £bese stockpiles would mean more 

viet Union would take a construe- tkm over the role they shodd play U5. grain and cotton on world 


competitive in world markets. This visions have cost the taxpayers S10 best, the coming battle mil end 
would bring greater competition to .bitlioa to J1 9 billion a year over the with the same basic mechanisms in 
foreign exporters. past three years. place but with gradual reductions 

Thirdly, the plan would also dc- Nearly all the administration's in the subsidy and loan rates, 
crease the size of VS. govern- .proposals would reduce or eUrni- -r^ omnosal 


f \~AawM Mr. Aquino was returning home the majority report issued in Octo- 

^ from three years of self-exile in the ber by a five-member independent 

best, the coming battle will end United States. board of inquiry. That report con- 

Mth the same : basic : mechanisms in [After learning of the charges, duded that the same 26 persons 
pla« but with gradual reductions General Ver raid he “was prepared had been involved in a high-level 

in the suhsidy and loan rates. for this. like a gpod soldier/ The plot to kill Mr. Aquina 

Tire adminis tration's proposal Associated Press repotted. Those Findings were viewed both 


administration’s farm bill, says 


crease the size of UJS. govern- 
ment-held surpluses of gram and 
cotton. The federal government, by 


.propolis wouiu reuuec or omu- ^ administration's proposal 
nate farm aid programs that Con- ^ bdude m 'SaSTf 

gress has chemhed and protected mo non m the amount of mkirfv 


(“No, I am not worried, 1 have domestically and internationally as 
^ 520,000 on the amount of subsidy faith in the judicial processes," a blow to the government of Ferdi- 

since .the lv.JUs^m the past three pgymems per farm banning next General said in a telephone inter- nand E. Marcos, maiiily because 
years many of these proporais have year reduce this to 510,000 by view from his quarters in the presi- GenaalVer.65 w isalifdongfriend 
been tried an Congress, with little j^gg The limi t now is $50,000. dexttial palace. He soonded at ease of the president But while influen- 

su °° ess * .. „„ . . .. ^s he answered questions without tial, that panel's report had no legal 

These wide differences in post- The agriculture secroary said hesitation, occasionally laughing, standing, unlike the indictments is- 

lions, with a farm recession con- ihe administration would not seek 7^ Associated Press saicLJ sued Wednesday by a three-mem- 


ich at new arms talks m tbe negotiating process. 

for more international Attempts to conceal the split 


tnral products more competitive in 
world markets. 

Almost everyone involved in 


aun paig ns against nndear weap- showed that contradictions woe “ 

STSM 5 - * - -a 5 STS 1 

C0 S: ^ SHhe Food and Agriculture Act 

T^CommunistParty newspa- se»J on a space ddenxspton. ^ I9 gi wMch mrirSkOctobex. 
txr Pravda. meanwhile, said there Diplomats said the article and „„ ’ 


eign grain prices. A reduction in 
these stockpiles would mean more 
U^. grain and cotton on world 
markets, fracing lower prices for 
foreign-prodoced grain and cotton. 


sar and reduce this to $10,000 by view from his quarters in the presi- General Ver, 65, is a lifelong friend 
988. Tbe limi t now is $50,000. den tial palace. He soonded at ease of Ihe president But while influen- 

__ . . . , _as he answered questions without tial, that panel’s report had no legal 

The agriculture secretary said hesitation ocrasinnallv Inuphim* standing, unlike the indictments is- 


per Pravda. meanwhile, said there Die 
was a tifl between Washington and Mr. C. 
Western Europe over the talks on paren 
Hudcar and space weapons. w the 


TIT- is an expensive anachronism that 

. s renmxs were ap- does not work and should be redc- 

anned at raising emotions ^ ^ 

°*y Much of the current four-year 


foreign-prodoced grain and cotton, tinnin g and a midterm election additional authority to subsidize 
The suggested changes in com- -ahead next year, presage an emo- American farm exports. But its new foufld 
modity aid could, according to the tional struggle in Congress that bill will authorize retaliation varied 
Office of Management and Bod- coukl last all year. against countries that subsidize j^Gt: 

get’s latest analysis, save taxpayers • Congress faces adivirive straggle their own crop exports, he added, chief C 


overnment prosecutors her panel of the government’s om~ 

at the level of culpability bodsman’s office. 

aong the 26 charged. Ma- For months, public concern had 


get’s latest analysis, save taxpayers ■ Congress faces adiviave straggle 
more than $6 billion in the next in writing the new act because few 


Din will auuionzc rciauauon uofmg ^ ^ charged. Ma- For months, pubbe concern had 

against countnes that sntoitae jor General nrospero A. Olhas, the been expressed about the indepen- 
tbeff own crop exports, he added, chief of the crmstabulary for Met- denceof the government’s prosecu- 


three fiscal years. 


of the people concerned, from farm modity associations, which are 


ureter and roaaweapons. Much of the current four-year 

Western diplomats saw the and driving a wjxlge betweenWest- kw ^ ^basically the same aslhe 
Pravda arttde and Mr. Cheram- em Europe and Ihe United Stales. N rv^iv Aencnltnre Adfost- 
to’s ronaris, contained in a mes- They noted that the Kxemlm mcni Act of its intent is 

SSSm the same; Itobilizing farmers’ 
was addressed .te a Moscow peace NATO’s deployment of erase ^ ^ ^ t0 

conference; asrart of * renewed and Tii^^imdeariinsales in ^pdanenting their m- 

WWthloSiaitaidfeaBdgpf- 

pobfi: trantoi., ; •• went ahead,. prompting Moscow to cnimenl purchases of their com- 

Mri CJicnienio, who has not . walk oot of nndear arms talks. ^ 


Many of the powerful (arm com- ropolilan Manila, Goieral Ver and tors, givai the politically sanative 
aditv assoc iations, which are six others were names as acoesso- nature of the case. But, said Mr. 


too expensive and no longer effec- 
tive for ihe problems of today’s 
export-dependent farming, espe- 
cially the law’s provisions to sup- 


Much of the law is criticized as lobbyiks to tbe Reagan arinrinis- among the most generous contribu- ties in the plot. Ferdnandez. the ombudsman, “We 

■ » — . — r effee- tratian, can agree on which parts tors to congressional election cam- As accessories, explained the tried to doright and call the case as 

today’s ought to be changed or on who paigns, say they may have to accept chief prosecutor, Bernardo Fernan- we saw it" 

, espe- should make sacrinoes. some compromises in a new farm dez, they did not participate in the The military had claimed that 


should make sacrifices. 

Longtime observers of the farm 


The military had claimed that 


port prices and income. Those pro- wars in Congress expect that, at attack 


ill if they are to head off another conspiracy. But they had knowl- Mr. Galman was a lone gu nm an , 
track by urban congressmen. edge of the plot and attempted to (Continued on Page 2, Col 4) 


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West Fears That M’Bow 
May Take U.S. to Court 


- By Paul Lewis 31. But Mr. M’Bow has said Wash- . u we seep uymg io iowct pro- 

P/ew York Times Serwice ington still aright be liable far its ^ actIon ^^better pnees for our 

PARIS — Western members of share of to^sUNESCO bud- 
UNESCO have ex press ed concern get and has warned that he might “ 5ntmi *f 10 “q^d ihar agncul- 
mt toSS^TAmadou go to the World Court if the UniSd 

UNES 

pShh flielMied Sum. ____ co;, B*“JT St&Smmi 


modiues. 

“We’ve had 50 years of govern- 
ment intervention that hasn't 
solved the old problems and won't 
solve the new ones," Mr. Block said 
in an interview, “it’s obvious that 
we can no longer regulate supply, 
control surpluses and hold up 
fanners' prices with the law we've 
got now. 

“If we keep trying to lower pro- 


Ingredients Seem Present for an Upbeaval in South Lebanon 


been UNES- 1 T * 1 ? 

putemtblbe United SaET 

Representauves of these own- Sof supports that would 

SoiSbl^ffol^^S rince UNESOD^budget for 

1984 and 1985 is voted asa lump te i *^ °f yiiwnm^ 011 - 
sum, the United States remains!©- mate of a fanner’s cost to produce a 

al Court rt would Ante to ^ ^ for adndllistraUoa . s 

and copaderably dtnage UNES- ’^^^b^ngh, ^ »n K, «fnce federal tonne 

»ss Msasm ea=ss?fi 5 Sit 

positions and adnrinistrative proce- 
dures, withdrew from the united 


Nations Educational Scientific vekiproenu 


SiciS^£5t 

— 

- - $$*$ 

! *«• -je« s .v 


ami Culttnal'Oiganizatirai on Dec. Officials at the meeting said they 


pan, that make up the Orgamza tion ment-set “support" leveL This 
forEcon^^ 

. petitive m world markets. Mr. 

"*2™!*, . Block said in the interview, hdd 

Sv ft would also discourage 

behevedthi^ ltf^ a^ overproduction of these crops, 
gal^ was htqmig topOT^detbe ^ ^ j^ dem 

^ n ¥ ,n ’ I ^ s ^^ s . an ^ Third r rap an propose gradually re- 

Worid natians, v^i have a ma- dnd ^ subsidy^iSB over the 

IS T ^ C °lTw SSfive fSaf ySsiSil they are. 
boarel to vote at a meerag hoe b effeci eliminaiedL He wiU advo- 
nCXt month to take the united «nHini» nnvmmts In fsmnpix 


sfccing subsidy payments over tbe 
next five fiscal years until they are. 
in effect, eliminated. He will advo- 


next montii ro cure me um wu ^ payments to farmers 

^WoretiK^h^bTBow ^ reS & pitted acreage 


'- . r ■■rt? ; fi 
- 

££*b£f 

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-3 • L- 



has sent four aides to governments . 
around. the world to seek their pon^f^ 


Arecentl' 
for Mr. M* 


"r“JPr and will propose setting the sup- 
** Uiar port level for loans bdow the aver- 
. age free-m&rkel price, Mr. Block 

said, thus dealing the market 
tfoiia ra tt k. 


By Edward Walsh 

Washington Past Senate 

SIDON, Lebanon — Four hours 
before the walls around him ex- 
ploded in a shower of concrete, 
plaster and glass, Mustafa Saad sal 
at his desk, a smiling, confident 
man of 33 planning for the day 
when tbe military occupation of his 
city will end. 

That day is expected to be Feb. 
18, the date Israel has set to com- 
plete the first stage in its planned 
three-stage withdrawal from south- 
ern Lebanon. For the first time in 
more than two and a half years, 
Sidon and the surrounding area 
then will be free of the Israeli 
Army, the de facto government 
here during that time. 

But in a reminder of tbe violence 
that has seemed to follow the Israe- 
lis into Lebanon and on their way 
out. a car-bomb explosion Monday 
tore away the front of the five-stray 
apartment building wheie Mi. 
Saad lived, killing two men and 
injuring more than 30 people. Mr. 
Saad. critically injured and report- 
edly in danger of losing his sight, 
was flown to Baris on Tuesday and 
then to Boston on Wednesday for 
emergency treatment. 

His wife, who was also injured, is 
with Him Their i 1-year-old daugh- 
ter is in Beirut, reportedly in a 
coma. 

Mr. Saad, the son of a slain Leb- 
anese politician, is a Sunni Moslem 
and one of tbe most important men 
in Sidon. He was deeply involved in 
planning for the transition from the 


Fhalangist militiamen and, near 
them, the Phalangists’ bitter ene- 
mies, armed Lebanese Druze mili- 
tiamen. Soon these two forces will 
have access to the south. 

East of Sidon, hi the Ain d Hd- 
weh refugee camp, there are an esti- 
mated 30,000 Palestinian refugees, 
including about 1,200 forma in- 
mates of the Israeli prison camp at 
Ansar. They are the Israelis’ ene- 
mies bat what they fear mast is a 
repeat of the 1982 massacre of hun- 
dreds of Palestinians by Christian 
Phalangist forces at the Sabra and 
Chatila refugee camps in West Bei- 
rut. They also fear an outbreak of 
fighting between rival factions oT 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion in the camp. 

Sidon is a predominantly Sunni 
Moslem city. But tbe surrounding 
countryside that the Israelis also 
will evacuate is a sea of Shiite Mos- 
lems who have grown increasingly 
militant during Israel’s militaiy oc- 
cupation. 

Tbe Israelis are leaving, and no 
one knows who, or what, will fol- 
low them. While life proceeds nor- 

. . . . , . „ , . . . . . ""T 1 mally here, there is a clear sense of 

Young Sidon residents holding a Lebanese flag demonstrate against the assassination uncare ova what will happen when 
attempt on Monday against the Sunni Moslem leader Mustafa Saad. On (he car’s IsraeTs militaiy might is gone and 
windshield is a picture of Mr. SaaiTs fattier, Maronf Saad, who was assassinated in 1975. ihe Lebanese and the Palestinians 

are left to themselves. 

la there be a chance forbad things There was a general strike in Si- others here said they hoped to ^ ^ Hdweh, relief agencies 

to happen,” he said. “But we don’t don, and strikes elsewhere in south- avoid. When the Israelis end the stockpiling extra medical sup- 
know what the Israelis are plan- on Lebanon on Tuesday to protest first stage of their pullout next and planningto open a system 



lords Telecast 
Is Interrupted 
By Protesters 


IN PARIS — Dick 
Ukeiwe, tbe New Cale- 
donian leader, arrived in 
.Paris on. Wednesday to 
Join the debate on the 
future ^of the French Par 
cffic territory. Page 2. 


tor ror widow, vrerara « if Mr. Block’s plan should be 
Switzerland, amfi rn i e d ^t the adop^ panjeukriy the export d- 
quesfion would be disowned emems, it would constitute another 

executive board next month- But be attempt by the Reagan administra- 
declmed to comment on Mr. ^ w ^ European Economic 
M’Bow’s views. Community subsidies of agrical- 

■ tnral exports by its members. This 

is the key so far as direct action by 
T T rwi J . the U.S. government is concerned. 

Jboms telecast Another instance in which this 

could affect European and other 

T T - «. - .1 grain-exporting farmers would 00 

.. JIB ■ TIltfCIVTIlFlTeflj cur if the administration succeeded 
I- in lowering the support-loan rates 

T>- . on grains Mid conon to free-market 

JOY M^IXfieSterS levds. This would Iowa the sup- 

J port floor now under American 

Ream grain and cotton and make it more 

LONDON — About 20 support- ~ u 1 j 

ere of Britain’s striking coal nunas 4* JOUrnalBlfi Iveieasea 

SSSTuS^taS From Kampala Prison 

Lords, hot the protest was frustrat- The Associated Press 

ed by a ban on coverage of demon- KAMPALA, Uganda — Four 
Strattons. Ugandan journalists hdd in prison 

Television cameras remained for months without trial were re- 
fixed on the floor of the house as leased Wednesday by the authori- 
donoostraiors, wearing ‘‘coal not 

drie” badges, were hustled from Freed front Kampala s maxi- 
ihe miblic caikrv by parliamentary mum security prison at Luzira were 
offijgjs. Drake Ssekeba and Sam Katwere. 

, - editors of the Star dailv newspaper 

The ban on covering demons itnnfigmai 

•once Nnvemher_ and 


anese pouuaan, is a annm Moslem rnng. 

and one of the most important men Many Lebanese, including the 

in Sidon. He was deeply involved in government in Beirut, were quick 
planning for the transition from the to blame tbe Israelis, rather than 
Israeli occupation and efforts to one of Lebanon’s own rival sectari- 
prevent the violence that has oc- anmililias, for Monday's bombing. 


the bomb attack on Mr. Saad. month, they do not want to see a 9 s small sateflite dimes in the gimp 
Many Lebanese, including tbe Shops were closed, few people were repetition of the bitter sectarian ui case there is an outbreak of fight- 
governmem in Beirut, were quick on tbe streets of the city, and the fighting that followed land’s pull- “*8 ai “J, a f®f scattered but 
to blame the Israelis, rather than normally congested coastal high- out in J9S3 from the Chuf tnoun- accessible mediaufadhties. 
one of Lebanon's own rival sectari- way was relatively free of traffic, tains, east of Beirut. People identified as collabora- 

an militias, for Mcmday’s bombing. The bombing could be just an- Certainly all the dements far an tors with the Israelis haw been tar- 
An Israeli Foreign Ministry other violent episode in Lebanon's explosion are present in the area EPt“L and several have been killed 
spokesman called the Lebanese tortured history, or it could mark the Israelis are to evacuate next, m the last few months. Known ool- 
gcrvernment’s charge “irresponsi- the beginning of the ordeal of Si- North of the present Israeli Kne on ‘ a “ orators 110 monger enter Ain d 

Ul.n ..J -■ I!, " Tk.t 1/. C..J fkaAnnliDuin. .M »— ■■ « - — - — /*■_! tl 


curred as Israeli forces have with- 
drawn from other parts of Leba- 
non. 

“We are being very careful not to 


ble" and “a lie.' 


at is what Mr. Saad and theAwali River, there arc Christian (Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


West German Labor Federation Proves an Exception 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Times Service 


DUISBURG, West Germany — Karlheinz expect to mfllr the next morning.’ Our members 
Wdhs is a manual worka at the big Thyssen understand why they have had to take token pay 
steel combine here, just north of DQraddorf in 

the Ruhr. . ■■ ■ ■ ■ — 

But be also is the mast important union TInLmc* 


INSIDE 


■ Knowledge of geografdfy in 
the United States among col- 
lege students has plummeted, a 
survey indicates. Page 3. 


The Associated Press 


nut dc aiso is me mast important union 
member there, and under theWest Ge rman 
system of codeter minati on, he sits on the com- 
pany’s supervisory board. 

His principle; he said as he sat in Thyssen’s 
crisply modem office tower just across the street 


Europe’s Unions: 

A Time of Trial 

Second oj three articles. 


Because the country had to be rebuilt after tbe 

war, and had to be rebuili jointly by workers 
and management, a spirit of cooperation devel- 
oped, entirely free from the polemics of class 
warfare Ihe unions, starting afresh, managed 
to stay mtified, rather than splintering into po- 
litically or religiously oriented units. 

Tbe national passion for security, for risk 
limitation, led to the creation of (^determina- 


te Janws Beard, the culinaiy ex- 
pert, is dead at 81. Page 3. 

■ Salvadoran peace talks may 
not be resumed fra months, 
both sides' leaders say. Page 3. 

■ Speaker OWeffl pledged he 
would not tiy to bloat a vote on 
the Reagan programs. Page 3. 

SCIENCE 


KAMPALA, Uganda — Four fromlhe blast furnaces and rolling mills, is that increases, less than the rale of inflation, to hdp boo and to an extensive welfare network. And SCIENCE 

Ugandan journalists hdd in prison “if you warn to lake part in decisions, then you ihe company recover " the national passion for hard work made it 

for months without trial were re- also have to accept some of the responsibility." JT, . ' possible to pay for it aL ■ Flashes of X-rays lasting bil- 

teed Wednesday by lit amhoti- 

WestGcrmmy's 'MM**'* ftgei 


lions was among the few groui 
rules governing the start of a si 
month experiment in teievisii 

(Coothmed on Page 2, CoL 1) 


* unprisooed since November, and 

Sa£ Kiwanuka and Francis Kan- 
yohamba, both of the weekly Pilot, 
m televising hpi j Tnfv Si» nthws mmam 


held since July. Six others remain 

in prison. 


'rta-fSfcanv iuouiid a menial nic ^ « «"» itself thj largesi single te labor !m t sa ** ™“ n ™ for ' Don ™ tos - 
tore of manafiement as the enetDV " he Jid. union in the world, and unlike otha unions in That it has managed it up untfl now, he said, 
"And wtTdM’free our strateffTi bkickma Western Europe, it has lost relativdy few of its is a tribute to the fact that the Goman worker 

members about 200,000 and tittle of its 

orda to keep mdividualplams open." ^ economic and political douL he works very, very hard”— and to the attitude 

“Nor," he added, “do we see our role as The West German labor-union movement is, (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


To Our Readers 

Because of technical reasons, 
dosing U.S. stock prices were 
not available for this edition. 
Earlier prices are being pub- 
lished instead. 


1 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


Saboteurs in New Caledonia 
Attack Another Nickel Mine 


MninurcA xj— « , - . The island has been under a slate Mr. Tjibaou, who set up a rival 
Cal “ oni f — of emergency since Jan. 12, after 19 provisional government on Dec. 1, 
people mod in violence between the hoped to meet with French opposi- 
tv tJbSJxSuiAA t ? nt0- w * ute and the Kanaks, who tion leaders but they refused to see 
ednesday lt was launched a campaign for indepen- him, reportedly at Mr. Ukeiwe's 
l 2S nt r5 e t“ 1 dence is November request ' 

tains N,dcd °P 90 P* 5 ™ 1 of Late in the day, Mr. Tjibaou was 

^soM-third of the world snrckel the temWs eroom and brin^in forced to leave the National As- 

about $300 million, a year. The sexnbly when the conservative op* 


forced to leave the National As- 


„ ... apout wwj miiiioa a year. The sexnbly when the conservative op- 

Police said the raids did not ap* rackcl boom of the 1960s brought position objected to his presence 
pear to be the work of militant thousands of settlers to New Cale- during the debate on extending a 
Melanesians who want an immedi- donia from France and other Padf- state of emergency in the territory. 
ate end to 131 years of French rule. »c slates, leaving the Kanaks a mi- in a dramatic start to what was 
The Kanak Socialist National Lib- oority in the tori lory’s 145,000 clearly going to be a stormy debate 
erahon Front, which represents the population. Claude Lathi, floor Wn of the 

Mela n e si a n s, denied responsibility The mine at Thio is expected to Rally for die Republic party, said 
for the first raid. be shni down for up to four weeks, that the presence m the assembly of 


Police believe the attacks, which Kouaoua mine “a man who has put himself outside 

have caused an estimamd $5 mil- “ working again soon, they the law” was intolerable, 
lion in damage, may have been car- *fr\r ul , P rcx r uan 8 3 re- Mr. Larbi contended that Mr. 
ried out by a rightist group con- du f ed „ ar ^ ount °* Tjibaou had violated Article 86 of 

cerned ova French moves to make 7 1 Pans> mea “*™ e ' supporters ^ French penal code, which car- 
the tenritoiy independent. ana opponents of independence lor — < 


cerned over French moves to make 7 1 rans ' ntejmwnue, ampoiters 

the territory independem. “f P®K«a« for 

„ Tt „ .. . New Caledonia hardened their po- 

1 ‘hc.mmes, Soaete sitions Wednesday as the French 

kNickel said tiie raids appeared to government moved toward extend- 
be earned out by a ^eU-organized £g the state of emergency until 
commando group with knowledge rung in 

,v- - 1 . 1 l: " J _ . 


of the place and machinery. 


Dick Ukeiwe, head of the territo- 


Ln the latest raid, (lie attackers rial government in Noumea, said 
got past security guards at a com- be would urge a relaxation of the 
plex at Kouaoua, on the east coast, emergency because it was interfer- 
They smashed equipment, drained ing with die terri lory’s economy, 
oil from engines and damaged 21 Mr. Ukeiwe arrived in Paris on 
trucks and three loaders that carry Wednesday to take part in the de- 
ore, the company said. bate, which Prime Minister Lau- 

in a similar raid Sunday at Thio, rent Fabius was scheduled to open 
six trucks were destroyed and a later in the day. 
control panel in a mine was blown His political rival, Jean-Marie 
up. Tjibaou, who heads the Kanak in- 

Edgard Pisani, the French envoy dependence movement, flew to 
handling mediations between white Paris on Tuesday but Mr. Ukeiwe 
settlers and the Melanesians, called said he had no plans to meet him 
the raid “part of a spiral of violence He described Mr. Ijibaou as “an 


in the territory." 


outlaw." 


Mr. Larb6 contended that Mr. 
Tjibaou had violated Article 86 of 
the French penal code, which car- 
ries a sentence of life imprisonment 
for sedition and undermining the 
integrity of French territory. 

At that point, Mr. Tjibaou rose 
and left the building. As he was 
leaving, he told reporters: “I didn't 
know we were so important,” 

Earlier, Mr. Ijibaou said his 
movement would demand changes 
in the draft of an independence 
statute proposed by Mr. Pisani. 
The draft provides for continued 
French control over an indepen- 
dent New Caledonia’s foreign rela- 
tions and defense. 

“One cannot say one is indepen- 
dent if, a priori, certain powers are 
withheld from us,” Mr. Tjibaou 
said, “if the French government 
will not give us foreign affairs, if 
the government insists on keeping 
military defense forever." 



BASQUE CASUALTY — Pedro Garda was aided by friends in Vitoria, Spain, after 
being bit in the eye Wednesday by a robber bullet He was hurt as unemployed workers 
dashed with police outside the Basque parliament Inside, speaking just before elections 
for tbe post of premier, Jose Antonio Ardanza, nominee of the governing Basque 
Nationalist Party, called for an end to political violence. He was tbe only candidate. 


South Korea Threatens to Imprison 
Kim Dae Jung on Return From U.S. 

By Clyde Haberman Edward F. Feighan, Democra 

New York Times Service Ohio, and Robert E. White, a 

SEOUL — A senior adviser to mer us - ambassador to 0 Sj 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Pole Telfa of Pope Hot; Denial taued 

TORUN, Poland (UPI) — A police general testified Wednesday at the 
trial of four security policemen accused of murdering a pro-Sohdanty 
Roman Catholic priest that his agents thwarted an attempt to tail the 
pope during his visit in June 1983. The Polish government denied that the 
testimony of General Zenon Platek. 58, was true. 

General Platek, who was the superior of the men on tnal and who has 
been suspended, said that police officers made several arrests and 
confiscated weapons and explosives during the pope s visL “There was a 
real chance of an assassination attempt on the pope,” the general said. 
“We took special steps and arrested several people in possession of 

explosives and automatic weapons." ...... 

The Polish government spokesman, Jerzy Urban, denied the allegation. 
“There were no arrests or investigations carried out on armed groups or 
individuals before or during the pope’s visit,” he said. “The only modern 
concerned an Austrian who was turned back at the Polish border when he 
was found to be in possession of a hi gh -precision rifle.” 

21 on U.S. Plane Killed in Honduras 

TEGUCIGALPA Honduras (Combined Dispatches) — A US. Air 
Force C-130 Hercules transport plane carrying 21 Americans crashed 
Tuesday off the northern coast of Honduras, U.S. officials said, and 
searches continued Wednesday for traces of the craft. 

Rescue teams searched the waters Wednesday off the Caribbean coast 
at Puerto Trujillo, about 150 miles (240 kflometera) northeast of Teguci- 
galpa, but efforts were hampered by bad weather and rough seas, officials 
said. The fate of the 21 aboard the plane, 16 soldiers and five crew 
members, was not known, a Honduran civil avian on official said. 

The soldiers were en route from Howard Air Force base i n Pan ama to 
Trujillo, on the northern Honduran coast, a Pentagon spokesman said. 
Although their mission was not disclosed, he said it was likely they were 
going to prepare for U.S.-Honduran military exercises, code-named Big 
Pine 3. scheduled for March or ApriL 

Meanwhile, a U.S. Navy A-3 reconnaissance plane with nine persons 
aboard disappeared off radar screens while approaching Guam on 
Wednesday and was believed to have gone down in tbe Pacific, navy 
sources said. ( UPI.NYT) 


lain powers are South Korea's president says that 
Mr. Ijibaou Kim Dae Jung, the exiled opposi- 


Cold in U.S. Kills 145, Delays Shuttle 


tion leader, will be imprisoned as a 
“revolutionary” if he returns from 
the United Stales as planned in 
early February. 

“We cannot treat him as a politi- 
cian: he is a revolutionary.” said 
Choi Chang Yoon, secretary for 
political affairs to President Chun 
Doo Hwan. 




FrighaaDemocrai ot *4 (UPI.m 

Ohio, and Robert E. Whne, a for- 
mer U.S. ambassador to El Salva- 

“°Tbe sedition charge, against Mr. Polish Diplomat Expelled by France 

Kim, considered highly exaggerat- PARIS ( UP!) — A Polish diplomat arrested for gathering informati 


Mm, considered highly exaggerat- PARIS (UP!) — A Polish diplomat arrested for gathering information 
ed even by people friendly to tbe 0 n French financing of Lhe banned Solidarity union has been declared 
government, were brought after persona nop grata by the French government, an In Leri or Ministry 
Mr. Chun seized power in a mill- spokesman said Wednesday. 

lary takeover that followed the Stanislav Janczak, 33. a Polish Embassy employee in Paris, was 
1979 assassination of President questioned by the French police Jan. 7 when he was found in possession 


ES ,e T i * ■ t ^ ni f ed ., S f at<a 00 ^ dKUh attributed to the pr^ ££T wSEdav dm 

NEW YORK — A cold wave Wednesday, with record low tern- weather since Friday included 2 1 in Kim's return would be "trouble- 
enveloping the eastern United peratures for the date posted in North Carolina: 16 in Tennessee; free," The Associated Press report- 
S tales has killed 145 people, post- South Carolina and Florida, and 14 in Florida; 10 in Michigan, 9 in ed from Was hing ton The State De- 
poned the Gm classified flight of records tied in Georgia and North Pennsylvania; 8 each in Texas, partment spokesman Bernard 
the U.S. space shuttle and damaged Carolina, ranging from 13 degrees Georgia and minois; 7 in South Kalb, said the United States has 
up to nine-tenths of Florida's or- Fahrenheit (minus 10.5 centigrade) Carolina; 6 each in Ohio and Inrti- discussed Mr Kim’s case with all 
ange and grapefruit crop. at Columbia and Greenville. South ana; 5 each in Oklahoma and New concerned parties.1 

On Wednesday, the third day of Carolina, to40Fahienheit(4.4cen- York; 3 each in Louisiana, Vir gin - . . _ T 
snow and sub-freezing weather, tigrade) at Miami Beach, Florida, ia, Kentucky, Minnesota and West ■ Mr tJl01 s comments in an mter- 


_ _ , _ (The State Department ex- 

The death toll attributed to the pressed hope Wednesday that Mr. 
ather since F nday included 2 1 in Kim’s return would be "trouble- 
Tennessee; free," The Associated Press report- 


Mr. Chun seized power In a mili- 
tary takeover that followed the 
1979 assassination of President 

Park Chung Hee. df documents from groups that support Solidarity, the spokesman said. 

Mr. Kim was sentenced to death. He said the French Foreign Ministry declared Mr. Janczak persona 
.Intervention by the Carter and non grata in France. He could not confirm whether he had already left 
Reagan administrations helped get France. The spokesman said Mr. Janczak was gathering information 
that reduced to a life term, then to from French onions and the Committee for Co-ordination with Soli dan- 
20 years. ty. a group of Polish exiles that raise funds in foreign countries for 

Mr. Kim had served nearly three Solidarity and other Polish dissident organizations, 
years of his sentence when the gov- 
ernment. at Washington’s urging. 

Commonwealth Armed Force Urged 

has been living in a Virginia suburb LONDON ( Reu ters) — Commonwealth legislators called Wednesday 

of Washington. for the creation of the group’s first defense force, composed of regional 


Kalb, said the United States has 
discussed Mr. Kim's caw with all 
con cemed parties.] 

Mr. Choi's comments in an inter- 


™ To the nonh. stow comum, 

fell from cmttil New E^iand 


J? *he nonh, otow continued to ^ S 

iSSausisaaifB 


New York, although temperatures 
warmed somewhat in the north. 




Kan Dae Jung 

end to Mr. Chun’s rule, describing 
it as a “military dictatorship." 


Commonwealth Armed Force Urged 

LONDON (Reuters) —Commonwealth legislators called Wednesday 
for the creation of the group's first defense force, composed of regional 


He has told interviewers of fed- rapid deployment units, to help small countries defend ihemselves. 


Mr. Kim back to prison to serve the 


-u u ““8 frustrated by his inability to ... v — 

w \* e ^eaus. Mr. cooi saia, influx eg South Korean politics should contribute troops to a small, well-armed “ready reaction unit’ 
and so when he comes back, and f ro[n abroad, and has said he par- that could be deployed at short notice to meet an external threat to an; 
since be still hasievoluuonary on- wauls to work with stu- member. Creating a defense force would be a major change for thi 

entauons. we will imprison hun. dents and laborers in "the straggle Commonwealth, a 49-nation group of former British colonies mat serve 


recommended that Commonwealth countries in each region 




Mississippi. 


more than 19,000 people, the most 
since the Depression, were crowd- 
ing city shelters at nigh t 
Mayor Edward I. Koch an- 


Mayor Edward I. Koch an- ™ to tnree mo 

% nounced Tuesday that New York ““ mcter ) snow- First military mission. house arresL s f rvc »w ana me aumoniy oi days 5^^ country's first na- Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and intended for discussion 

police would tie people, even Governor Mario M. Cuomo de- Florida stale officials said that Mr. Kim, 61. came close to being tonal legislative elections since at a Commonwealth summit meeting expected to be held in the Bahamas 

against their will, from me streets dared a stale of emergency Tues- two days of record-breaking cold elected president in 1971. He has . • , . .J.,' ® th _ 1981. Officials said that Mr. Kim next October, 

to shelters or hospitals on nights day in Buffalo and five western had damaged nine-tenths of Flori- been South Korea's most com- . . .. ^r; had been told he could avoid prison 

when the temperature fell to 5 de- New York counties, allowing for da’s orange and grapefruit crop, manding opposition figure for the * T by delaying his arrival until after c . tt» _ .t • • r 

grees Fahrenheit (minus 15 degrees sate assistance in snow emergen c y They called it one of the most wide- last 15 years, most of which he has , 0 n-auLi&wth Korean tmaran- Feb. 12 balloting, hui that he jUSDCCtS rIC6 uPV IllCniiry IH IHulfl 

ura^Mr.Kim-SMTay, NEW DELHI (Reuters) — Indian investigators have started a search 

The cold wave reached the was called to help dig out . history. (AP.NYT.WP) D v ._ Parallels have been drawn be- ■ Reaction by Kim for several missing government officials identified as suspects in a major 

: ; * jaurng Mr. turn the govern- lween me Korean politician and Mr. Kim said Tuesday he doubt- spy scandal, the Press Trust of India news agency reported Wednesday. 

menl would nsfc tteatJng distur- Benigno S. Aquino Jr., tbe Philip- ed any attempt would be made on The agency quoted intelligence sources as saying detectives found the 

iffQ L 'Jf iy>||* . _ . TI _ I*_ • p.I • • Dances oy uissdents woo nope lus pine opposition leader who was his life when he returned u South suspects had fled. It quoted the sources as saying the missing officials, all 

Uti/ return will galvamze opposiUon to ^ 1933 his return to Ma- Korea. United Press Internationai lower-level bureaucrats, appeared to have been forewarned bv arrests in 

J the authomanan Chun regmie. Re- mia from exile in the United Suies. reooned from Ca m hndc P the sov scandal last ThurSavT 


police would take people, even Governor Mario M. Cuomo de- 
against their will from the streets dared a state of emeraeocy Tues- 
to shelters <x hospitals on nights day in Buffalo and five western 


In Buffalo, New York, many At Cape Canaveral, Florida, the 
trackers have been stranded since cold fared a 24-hour delay in 
the weekend. A new storm Monday Wednesday’s scheduled liftoff of 
left up to three more feet (almost the space shuttle Discovery on its 
one meter) of snow. first military mission. 

Governor Mario M. Cuomo de- Florida state officials said that 
dared a stale of emergency Tues- two days of record-breaking cold 
day in Buffalo and five western had damaged nine-tenths of Flori- 


remaining 17 years of a sentence be 
received in 1980 for sedition. 

Until now, officials have said 
pubtidy that Mr. Kim would be 
dealt with “according 10 law,” leav- 
ing open various options, including 
house arresL 


This may create domestic disor- for democracy.” 
dees, but we are ready to tolerate The timing of his return - Feb. 

Ih^i i ? iiurllL wi S.K 8 ~ k toportant because it is four 
serve the law and the authority of n-, 


Mr. Kim, 61. erne close to bang 
circled president in 1971. He hS 


as a forum far political and economic talks, but has no mihtary role and is 
not an alliance. 

The proposal was made in a report issued by a study group of tbe 
Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and intended for discussion 
at a Commonwealth summit meeting expected to be held in the Bahamas 
next October. 


centigrade) or lower. operations. A National Gu 

The cold wave reached the was called to help dig out. 


Cholera Killing Refugees in Ethiopia 


United Press Internationai would 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — rarily.' 
An outbreak of cholera is killing up Arc 


turning him to jail would likely be 

would have to halt at least tempo- jumped from 14 people aday to 52, denounced by human rights activ- 
rarily." The Times said. ists overseas. A Western diplomat 


An outbreak of cholera is killing up A relief worker said that as many j- fll- p.l; 

lo 60 people a day in a camp (Sr ai 60 people per day were dying 
famine refugees and might spread from cholera at the Harbo famine 
to southern million tamps where camp near Kambokba in Wollo 

hundreds of thousands^ people proSnce, about 150 miles (240 ki- ^ cause ,l! woal , d ^ folml 
would be threatened, relief officials lometersi northeast of Addis Aba- program, which is 


said Wednesday. 


ba. Cholera is spread rapidly by 


The officials said the disease contaminated water. 


ie Tunes said. Lsts overseas. A Western diplomat 

j: j .j,. also said that it could “complicate 

SSSffC relations” between the Onited 
veranoCTi has ban rductant to Stales south Korea, 
knowledge the cholera outbreak . 

cause it would be forced to halt Mr. Choi said that Mr. Kim had 
tbe resettlement program, which is "betrayed his promise to avoid 
now in full swing. politics while living in the United 

-i. L,. ..i. ,l * .j Suites. Instead, he has called for an 
“It has taken them a long time to 


nila from exile in the United States, reported from Cambridge, Massa- the spy scandal last Thursday. 

South Korean officials reject the chusetts. Investigators had a list of about 30 key suspects and added that more 

Aquino analogy, and even the gov- “I don’t see much possibility of arrests were likely, the agency said. The Tunes of India newspaper said 
crament’s most bitter critics say another Aquino case," Mr. Kim Wednesday more than I >500 people have been questioned by the authori- 


they do not think that Mr. Kim is in said at a press conference at Har- ties, 
danger of assassination. vard University, where he has lec- 

But he is expected to be accora- Hired since coming to the United q 
panied on his flight home by a large States two years ago. He said that oT 
group of supporters who have ex- he did not believe that the South 
pressed concern for his well-being Korean government “is so siupid” . j 
Among them are Representative as to commit the same crime. 


could hamper Ethiopia's goal of In London, The Times cewspa- get the program off tjie ground.” 
relocating almost two million peo- per reported that 529 of the 5,200 the diplomat said, “and they would 
pie from the northern areas refugees at Harbo are afflicted by prefer to con tin u eleven with a po- 
plagued by famine to more fertile the intestinal disease, which is tential health risk.” 
areas in the south. characterized by severe diarrhea The disease also is reported in 10 


areas in the south. characterized by severe diarrhea 

“If cholera shows up in the and vomiting. Without treatment it 
southern relocation camps as we can be fata] within seven days, ac- 
fear it might," one aid official said, cording to doctors. 

“the entire resettlement program In recent days the death rate 


tential health risk.” 

The disease also is reported in 10 
other camps in the Wollo region, as 
well as in Sidamo province, far to 
Lbe south of Addis Ababa, The 
Tunes said. 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Throughout the 1 1-month inves- 


hired by Communists, who shot the tigation by the independent panel 
opposition leader. Bui Mr. Galman and the subsequent review by the ^ 
apparently was brought to the air- government prosecutors, no cri- . r £jr 
port by the military and shot to dence was submitted [inking either p--|pg 


tuicu aiuiA; tuuiuig iu LUt vjuik-u ^ v w^ c . | V/'# i •% 

states two years ago He said that springer Kin Apparently Kidnapped 

he did not believe that the South &■, i J# n ,L. e . J , 

Korean government “is so sLupid” . C , H c UR ’ Switzeriand (Reuters) - Sven Axel Springer grandson of 
as to commit the same crime. ^ German publisher, apparently has been tad- 

napped. Swiss ponce said Wednesday. 

The 19-year-old youth, a student at a private school in Zuoz. Switzer- 
9 land. 25 miles (40 kilometers) southeast of Chur, was last seen Sunday 

10 Police said his mother, who lives in Munich, received eight telephone 

__ calls Tuesday in which her son said in a recording that he had been 

’ '’iu kidnapped and was being held for a large ransom. Police did not disclose 

' "■ v‘ r - the amounL 


Ingredients Present for Lebanese Upheaval 

(Continued from Page 1) control of the government and they camps, they will be resisted by local 


death by soldiers. 


President Marcos or Imelda 


(Continued from Page 1) control of the go' 
Hdweh, and many are planning to , I on 1 have arms, 
leave the area before the Israeli Mr. Saad had 


U i ^ Members of opposiuon parties Marcos, his wife, to the plot. 

IAC9 I nhPDVfl! welcomed the indictments, but reit- The greatest significance to the 

VjJUWttOl era led their long-held belief that indictments will be on the Philip- 
Mr. Marcos was behind the plot, pine military, according to foreign 
camps, they will be resisted by local “We're on third base now." said diplomats. Since he was named in 
Sidon forces so there will be no Agapito Aquino, brother of the October’s report. General Ver has 
repetition of the Beirut massacre, slain man. “But what is missing is been on j “temporary" leave of 
he said. the mastermind." absence. 




i'tWi 5 . 


leave the area before the Israeli Mr. Saad had been optimistic, rep^^on oi me Beirut massacre, slain man. "But what is missing i: 
Army does. One of the most notori- Sitting behind his small desk, he ' .... ihemasiemtind." 

ous collaborators, Mr. Saad said said Monday that he and other Mr Saad said ihere was one pos- 

Monday before the explosion, was leaders representing virtually all erf sjbiuty that be did f ear. I t was that 

at tbni moment “selling his furai- the communities in the area were “* , s f ae * is would attempt to stir up Reagan to See -Neves of Brazil 

- jj- i ... l, «l_ i i.. j r .i ircwjhieas Ihrv Irfi ihf -iron “ 


He laughed as he related the mating regularly to plan far the 


information. 

“There is a real Carch-22 far the 


approaching changeover. 

He said they did not expect an 


trouble as they left the area. 

“We expect'it is in Israel’s inter- 
est to make the situation here ex- 


T7ic .4 iWlu’.'eJ PrcH 

WASHINGTON - President 


plode after they withdraw." he R ? nald Reagan will meet Feb. I 


absence. 

“This is it for Ver; his military 
career is over." a diplomat said. 

The acting chief of staff is Gen- 
era] Fidel V. Ramos. 56, a West 
Point graduate with a reputation 
for professionalism and integrity. 


For the Record 

j/V ' \ Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel will mat Tuesday with 

’-'’l President Ronald Reagan of the United Stales in Washington, state radio 

\ .v . 1 y-vJ reported Wednesday in Tel Aviv. f AFP} 

\ - i -J Anti-Sflch riots after Prime Minister Indira Gandhi's assassination 

'^"2 c ^ me ^ ^ vcs °f al l«^t 2-717 people, the Indian government said 
> 'r Wednesday. The figure was more than double that previously released by 

•y 1 _ the governmeaL (Reuters} 

•ij- ...J Preskteut Li Xiannian of China will pay an official visit to Thailand 

|HhP‘ from March 11 to March 15. confirming closer ties between the two 

countries, the Chinese foreign minister. Wu Xueqian. announced Tues- 
_ day while in transit in Bangkok. (AFP) 

General Fabian C. Ver Guerrillas sabotaged power Hues in Mozambique near the border with 

South Africa on Tuesday, partially blacking out the capital Maputo. 
General Ver's lawyer. Antonio P. according to a dispatch from the stale-run press agency. AIM. monitored 




General Fabian C. Ver 


Palestinians,” said Bruce Camp- outbreak .fighting among PLO said, “but we are taking all possible President-elect Tancredo Ne- 
belL the administrator of a hospital wbere be mcasure s to prevent tilt. Smuf is ves of Sraafl. Lany Speakes. the 

at Am el Helweh run by the U.S.- said there are only small arms hid- « v whit. u nn » 


based International Rescue Com- den among the refugees. If the Pha- — w , 

mi tree. “They have been pushing langist militia attempts to move ■ Lebanon Welcomes Ptmout 
for the Israelis to leave, but they are against the Palestinians, as they did Lebanon has welcomed Israel's 
fearful: tbe Palestinians don't hare against the Sabra and Chatila decision to end its 51 -month occu- 

pa tion of southern Lebanon, but 

said it wanted assurances that the 

Lords Telecast Interrupted 

i Wednesday from Naqoura. Leba- 

(Contimied from Page 1} come full circle in the 60 years since n0 ?‘ , . _ , 


White House spokesman, an- 
nounced Wednesday. 


Since October, he has made some Coronet, is hoping for a swift ac- in Lisbon. (UPIl 

reforms in the military, such as quittal for his client. Earlier this Anatoli Karpov, the world chess champion, agreed Wednesday to a 
cradting down hard on the abuse of month. Mr. Coronel decided dra w offered by Gary K as par ov. the challenger, after the 36ibmore'in the 
civilians and shuffling entrenched against filing for a dismissal from 45th game of their tournament in Moscow. Mr. Karpov leads 5-1 and 
officers to new posts. the government ombudsman. °ne more victory to retain the title. (AP) 


needs one more victory to retain the title. 


Lords Telecast Interrupted be^comjjl 


(Continued from Page 1} come full circle inti 
proceedings of the upper house of he entered politics. 
Parliament. These telecasts t 

Tbe protesters briefly shouted ewe the decision i 


JT Wednesday from Naqoura. Leba- {Continued from Page 1» 

de in the 60 years since n0 ? - of the unions, which he calls “most 

Cities. Israel presented Lebanon with a sensible, even if we do grumble." 

rasts likely Will influ- three-stage withdrawal plan during To a visitor from Britain, where 
ism on whether the ^ nitcd Nations sponsored talks al rite wildcat strike and the slow- 


West German Labor Federation Proves to Be an Exception 

(Continued from Page 1) printing works and a travel agenev. produce the goods that people of inflation and increased produc- ers even to negotiate on a 35-bour 

if the unions, which he calls “most But it has not yet been able to do want, so the working must be tiwty. IG Metall gave up only part week, and it shows up in some kev 
enable, even if we do erumble P 100 ® a R° u f unemployment, which spread around. of its raise, and hence the West people in fioveramenL You can sec 


slogans during a debale on govern- House of Commons opens its doors *** Lebanese border village. The down are a key part of union tac- 
numteconomic policy. Opposition to television. Parliamentary pro- presumed Tuesday after a two- tics, the absence of such activity in 
L - in the de- ceedings are regularly brradcasi in ^^si^ension. Wmi Omumi k ennhno Rv i««. 


has reached record levels, and that The government proj 
rankled, especially with IG Me tall, shorten workers’ working 
The big union ultimately decided er than their workin 
that the only way to put a real dent through a system of ear 


spread around. oi us raise, and hence the West people in government. You can sec 

Tbe government proposed to German industries shared the cost it in all the Western countries to 
shorten workers’ working life rath- of the shorter week. one extent or another an unwiil- 


ine snorter week. one extent or another, an unwiil- 

tt is too i early to tell what the ingness to take joint responsibility 


West Germany is startling. By law. 


bate criticized the handling of the some other countries. . ' ^ if iirsi ume mere talks me west uerman unions are 

10-month coal strike. fa the United Stales, all sessions “ave had a positive point." the bound to ensure that their mern- 

Tbe upper house, unusually of the House of Representatives spokesman for the Lebanese dde- bers fulfill their contractual obliaa- 
crowded for the televised session, have been televised live since S^said- lions. A complex system of worker 


■This is the first time these talks the West German unions are 


fa the United Stales, all sessions have had a positive point." the bound to ensure that their mern- 


that the only way to put a real dent through a system of early retire- effect on efficiency in West Genna- for unemployment, an ragerness to 
in unemployment was to shorten meni that could have been repealed ny will be. but many Dutch busi- cut the net of social support just 
the workweek, in the hope that that after four years. Bui the union per- nessmen complain that the change when we need it. 
would compel companies to take sisied and eventually cracked ihe has only driven more people into ... . . 

on more employees. Last vear it 40-hour barrier. It gained for its moonlighting to bolster their in- ^ *" 

efrurlf (ARV imivM,n< nVmlifi i. 4 tSIt-knnr wwlr with (in eAmra nnrl ihm if (,,, OOL hoping lOf. 3 HCW 


crowded far the televised session, — - — — — . , 

also heard the former Conservative March 1979 and carried over a ca* coun cils, which exist a t every level 

grime minis ter, Harold Mac millan ble network to abool 20 million Bulgaria T emDO^arilY , fro® fae individual plant to huge 

So, criticize bis pair’s moneiaiist hooseholds. o t • l t » »ed » iron out 

policies. The broadcast in the House of Bars Turkish Tourists disputes before they burst into 

Mr. Macmillan, now the Earl of Lords began with the regular daily Agmcc Fmnce . Pra . 0 

Stockton, said monetarists had procession into the chamber, led by ANKARA— Bulgaria has" tem- ,, cosls , I W!} c >'* of course. Mr. 


March 1979 and carried over i 


s conflict here. We 
But that sort of thing 


The broadcast in the House of Bars Turkish Tourists 
Lords began with the regular -daily A Fnnce . Praie 

prtxxssion into tiwchamber. led by ANKARA — Bulearia h a «“ta 


disputes before they burst into 
flame. 

“It costs monev. of course.” Mr. 


uuiuuacu oy pnuu HUI jiuul uiuit uuu’ l-uu*JlCCUC 1 ICSOUUilDlC 1OT rqn ttf imiwiiJ f 1 -r 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl as being days, others may start later or fin- Issuing cash advances is now ab- c V,1ul - ro , n ; abo y=* u P 00- 
both “silly and dumb." ish earlier, and some may adopt yet sen t half a day a week, so advances L ■« ““ ™ , “ er rar ' 


done infinite harm and that the 
whed of mass unemployment had 


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wvgBii mm mv < vpvuu utiuj Atmcc France- Prer:* 

procession into the chamber, led by ANKARA — RiiiMm e “u*m- “ il money, of course.” Mr. 

Jbc tad High Cta«Uor. Lord p«SS^taS5S,»S Wote ^d. “femebodv- r™, 
Haiisham. The former Conserva- ^ touriiU ‘ m respoa}£ Turldsh 5laff mKts wth representauves of 


J6rg Barczynski. the spokesman another system. 

at the union’s national headquar* Professor Bemd von Maydell of Erwin Kristoffersen. bead of the 5un * 11131 01 development 

ters in Frankfurt, put IG Metall's the University of Bonn, an expert international department of the seer3s a * on B at Tnyssen 

case this way: on labor unions, says be sees IG DGB. or Dcutscher Gewerks- headquarters ip Duisburg. Mr. 

“More investment will not create Metall's achievement as u historic chaf tsbund. says he thinks the IG ™[eih.s says the tinie will soon come 
more work. In the 1970s, the Social breakthrough, hut warns that most Metall strike has left a residue of woric ere wffl want to recoup 
Democrats used to say, 'The profit companies will try to get more bitterness that could poison the so ™ of ,he sacrifices they hare 
of today is the investment of to- wm* out of the same work force to previously healthy relationships now , * ul **» company has 


are simply not issued then. 

Erwin Kristoffersen. bead of the 


Still, that kind of develc 


meets with representatives of 


five minister, 77. leaned on his cane nress renorts thairthnie Turks in one of our councils almost eveiy 
as, dressed in black alk robes and K day. Bui the system is so successful 

wemisg a full-bottomed wig, he afi^Ssting orf^uf“BdgariAn- tfitdjdn l exist, Iwouldbeoul 
made the short walk from his resi. • «- t :i.. . -T°T , cainpaiEnmE for the establishment 


made the short walk from his resi- 
dence in the parliament building. 
Tbe session opened with ques- 


oih. 1 iwisiuiguiusis lu Duigoiiiui- aicnino fm- lh* raihliEkmMf “ uk uivcaimeni ui W uk nuib *in» unit lu ueaiuiy reiailODSOipS “*'**'» 

ize" family names. Turkish xrax’d nfSr^^inl iot mc_esiaousnment j obs t j, c ^ compensate for the change, many between labor and management in re,um ®d to profitability. 


agencies said Wednesday. 
Diplomatic sources in Sofia have 


of something like in” 

In this climate, the West German 


after tomorrow.’ But we found, as by making even larger investments West Germany 


lime went bv. that most of the in- 


l*"* ^ government spokesmen said about 40 members of the Turk- union which is known vestment wat into technological 

fotlowed py debate on an opposi- ^ minority, which at 800,000 peo- « *e DGB, has grown steadily improvement, and the profit of to* 


Asked how he will react. Mr. 
Wolke answers. “Our attitude will 
be positive, boause we have to lake 


uon n»uon enuemng ^yerament pj e accounts for nearly 10 percent 
economic policy . A record number 0 f Bulgaria's population, were 


. debate. 


killed by security forces late Iasi 
year. 


richer and more powerful while day became the investment of to- reached, the unions in effect fi- always in the back of the employ- 
union groups abroad have suffered, morrow and the unemployed of the nanced the change by forgoing pay ers’ minds, and now ihev think the 1 , 
.it owns a bank, an insurance com- day after tomorrow. This world increases that ihe\ would .otherwise can assert it. Il was visible in the 
pany, a big building company, a needs less and lev- working time to have been expected to gain because initial unwillingness of the empln>- 


py maxing even larger investments west uermany. Asked how he will react. Mr. 

in work-saving machinery. “We have had very little class Wolke answers. “Our attitude will 

Id the Netherlands, where a warfare here” he said, “but per- be positive, because we have to lake 
somewhat similar agreement was haps- the idea of class straggle was into account the way in which the 
reached, the unions in effect fi- always in the back of tile employ- work farce has helped ” 
nanced the change by forgoing pay ers’ minds, and now ihev think the 1 , 

increases that thes would otherwise can assert it. It was visible in the SEXT- L t ’f!'iriy.p,irii, uurh 
have been expected to u.iin because initial unwillingness of theemplnv- tn finram. to rei'ii.'n pn*rr 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


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O’Neill Pledges Vote on Reagan Prograi 


By Gerald M. Boyd ■ 

New York Times Service 
WASHINGTON — The speaker 
of the House, Thomas P. O’Neill 
Jr„ says be will not attempt to 
Hod a vote on President Ronald 



pub! 

president in his re-eJection. 

The assurances Tuesday by die 
Massachusetts Democrat occurred 
as Senate Republican leaders indi- 
cated that their attempt to assem- 
ble a defidt-redudng package for 
p» t yeas had run into snags and 
would not be finished by the origi- 
nal iarget date of Feb: L 
The waders were trying to find a 
way to cut the deficit, now running 
at more than S200 bflHon a year, to 
$100 billion by 1988, a goal Mr. 
Reagan had abandoned. 

One stumbling block, the Re- 
publicans said, was resistance to 
making deep cuts in the mfiiiaiy 
spending levels Mr. Reagan is ex- 
pected to propose. 

Senate Republicans have also re- 
ported resstance within their ranks 
to an across-the-board freeze at 


1985 levels that would indude the 
rafitaty and Social Security. Sena- 
tor Bany Gold water of Arizona, 

the new chai rman of the Smatp 
Armed Services Committee, met 
Tuesday with Defease Secretaiy 
Caspar W. Weinberger to urge him 
to agree to some further savings in 
the military budget. 

Mr. G’NtiFs comments Tues- 
day indicated that, whether or not 
the White House and the Senate 
reach a comp romi se, Mr. Reagan’s 
budget would at least be voted on 
in the House, where Democrats are 
in the majority. 

Representative O'Neill said be 
had given the assurance io Mr. 
Reagan at a bipartisan meeting the 
president called at the White 
House on the first day or his new 
term. 

“I said to him, we can read.’' Mr. 
O'Neill said afterward. “You got 
59 percent of the votes and and 
there’s no question in my 50 years 
of public liTe, I’ve never seen a man 
more popular than you are with the 
American people, and in view of 
that 1 want you to know that every- 
thing is on the table. 


“When I say everything, I mean 


Asked later, what be meant 
“everything," Mr. O'Neill added: 
“We wiO give him a vote on the 
economic and domestic policies 
that be is interested in. There’s a 
mandate oat there demanding 
these things." 

The speaker said be would not 
block Mr. Reagan's proposals 
through hearing s and scheduling 
devices. 

Although be appeared concilia- 
tory, Mr. O’Neill said he was not 
endorang Mr. Reagan's economic 
proposals, which are to be submit- 
ted to Congress on Feb. 4. 

The Whi te House and House 
Democrats are expected to be at 
odds on several issues, including 
reductions for domestic and nuU- 
taiy spending. Mr. O'Neil] said 
that those questions would be on 
the table for discussion and for a 
vote. 

On reductions in Social Security, 
Mr. O’Neil] echoed Mr. Reagan by 
saying. “You can be sure that Dem- 
ocrats are not going to cut Social 
Security as a whim of their own." 


Q: How Many U.S. Students Know 
Location of Amazon River? A: 27% 


By Theodore Shabad 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Name the country drained by 
the Amazon River, U.S. college students were 
asked ia 1 950 survey, and 77 5 percent of them 

last fati*' in a statewide arilejfexam in North 
Carolina, and only 27 percent erf the students got it 
righL 

The apparent deterioration of geographic 
knowledge evident in the North Cardona survey 
and in urmflar tests around the United Stats has 
prompted two professional organizations of U.S. 
geographers and educators to devise a set of guide- 
lines for (he teaching of geography in elementary 
and secondary schools. 

The guidelines, just published by the National 
Council for Geographic Education at Western 
Illinois IMvershy in Macomb and by the Associa- 
tion of American Geographers in Washington, 
explain the nature of geographic inquiry aoa rec- 
ommend a systematic learning sequence for use in 
a geography curriculum from kindergarten 
through the 12th grade. 

In contrast to countries with national education- 
al systems, geography does not fare wdl in the 
United States with its varying state standards and 
local school board control. Few schools offer separ 
rate courses in geography, the subject is fragment- 
ed in the e du c atio nal process and what little teach- 
ing of map dolls ‘and geography occurs is often 
submerged in overall sodal studies. 

Apart from an awareness of location on the 
earth's surface, the new guidelines emphasize the 
need for four other central themes in the class- 
room. They are the physical and human character- 
istics of areas and plans, the relationship between 
man and the environment, the movement of people 
and goods on die earth and the ways in winch 
regions are framed and change 

What made the North Carolina tesnmusual was 
its use of questions posed more than three decades 
earlier to allow comparison. It was possible now 
to decerarine whether students today were more or 
less geographically sophisticated than their coun- 
— jartsm 1950,” the report said. 

ror comparison, the North Carolina educators 


used a nationwide survey conducted in December 
1950 by The New York Times among 4,752 college 
students in 42 colleges and universities. The results 
were reported on June 11, 1951, under the front- 
page headline, “U.S. College Students ‘Flunk' in 
Knowledge of Geography." 

The North Carolina exam, which involved 2JOO 
students in eight schools of the state's university 
system, used about 25 percent of the questions 
given in 1950. Others were no longer applicable 
because erf changes in world geography. 

When asked the approximate 1980 census popu- 
lation of the United Slates within a margin of error 
of five milHon, only 8.4 percent of North Carolina 
coDege students came dose to the correct figure — 
226 million, the report said. Answers ranged from 

100.000 to 236 birnon. 

A sampling of questionnaires provided insight 
into students’ confusion and disorder, the report 
said. When asked which stales a person would 
drive through to get from Duluth to Seattle, one 
respondent recorded the plaintive admission. “I 
have never honestly heard of Duluth." The answer: 
Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana, Idaho and 
Washington. 

The North Carolina geography professors 
hoped to learn whether students understood the 
concept of time on the earth's surface, and asked 
what time it might be in such places as Chicago, 
Denver, San Francisco and London when it was 
noon in Raleigh, North Carolina. Answers ranged 
around the clock and included an exasperated 
“Who cares!" 

When told to say where selected cities and rivers 
were to be found, replies placed Vladivostok in 
Germany, lima in Italy, the Gangs in Brazil and 
the Amazon in Egypt, the e xamin ers reported. 

Closer to home, they found that one set of 
answers Ikied die .“State of Atlanta” among North 
Carolina’s neighbors and that students gave the 
population of their home state at anywhere from 

25.000 to 250 million; it is about 6 million. 

Seventy-one percent of the respondents said 

they never had reference to geography in elemen- 
tary school; 65 percent never had a course in junior 
hi^i school relating specifically to geography, and 
73 percent had no geography in senior high school 


James Beard, Culinary Expert, Dies 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — James Beard, 
81, one of America’s best-known 
cnimary experts and author of nu- 
merous cookbooks, died Wednes- 
day in New York. 

Among, his two dozen books 
were “The James Beard Cook- 
book,” “American Cookery” and 
“Beard on Bread.” 

“Cook It Outdoors," which came 
out in 1941, is bettered to hare 
been the first book ever published 
about outdoor cooking. 

An Oregon-born bachelor- Mr. 
Beard lived in NewYoric’s Green- 
wich Village in a bouse that served 
as residence, office and cooking 
school 

As a youth in Portland, Oregon, 
he was first influenced by the cook- 
ing of his British-bom mother, who 
made skilled use of local produce. 

At 19, be traveled to the West 
Indies and discove r ed the tropical 
marketplaces. The following year, 
1923, he sampled the restaurants of 
Paris and London. 

Mr. Beard returned to the Unit- 
ed States to follow an acting career, 
appearing in some New York reviv- 



James Beard 

als and in early radio dramas 
broadcast from San Francisco. 

He went into cooking as a liveli- 
hood in the early 1930s by giving 
private lessons on culinary arts to 


Tale, Qerical Workers End Dispute 


New York Times Same 

NEW HAVEN, Connecticut — 

Clerical workers have overwhelm- 
ingly approved a labor contract 
with Yale University, ending a la- 
bor-management struggle that led 
to a 10-week strike last faR 

The agreement, approved Tues- 
day night by a vote of 890-2, covers 
2,tE»00 employees and - gives the la- 
bor movement a presence among 
office workers at a major American 
mnvaaiy. Yale still must reach a 
contract with 1,000 dining hall and 
maintenance workers. 

Negotiators era -both rides said 


Tuesday that they w ere confident a 
contract could be reached for those 
workers by Saturday’s strike dead- 
line. The the Federation of 

University Employees, said the av- 
erage salary of the clerical workers 
wiU increase during the contract 
hom 513,318 to 118,000. 

Organizing clerical workers at 
universities and in the private 
workplace has been discussed in 
the labor movement for years, but 
unions have accomplished little. In 
recent years, however, some unions 
have begun vigorous efforts to or- 
ganize office workers, of whom 15 
percent or less belong to unions. 


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Meanwhile, several Senate Re- 
publican leaders offered differing 
interpretations about the outlook 
for a deficit-reduction package. 

Some senators said the confusion 
reflected the fact that the majority 
leader. Senator Bob Dole of Kan; 
sas, and other Republicans were 
keeping their options open. They 
also said that Republicans have yet 
to sit down to decide where to re- 
duce the budget 

Senator Bob Packwood of Ore- 
gon, chair man of the Senate Fi- 
nance Committee, said there were 
not enough voles yet for major re- 


ductions in the mili tary budget be- 
cause Republicans were naoctant 
to tangle with Mr. Reagan. 

“In the few meetings I've been in 
with the president, be has aD but 
indicated that if we send him a 
defense budget too low he will veto 
it and take it to the country,” Sena- 
tor Packwood said before a lun- 
ch eon meeting of Senate Republi- 
cans. “At the moment. 
Republicans have no fort in the 
Senate for a knockdown, drag-out 
with the president over defense.” 



SANCTUARY IN SANTIAGO — Protesters take ref- 
uge in Santiago's Roman Catholic cathedral as Chilean 
police used water cannons. A memorial Mass for former 


President Eduardo Frei, who died three years ago, 
turned into a demonstration against the military govern- 
ment of General Augnsto Pinochet by 3,000 people. 


Taipei Warns 
U.S. on Naval 

Sales to China U.S. May Have Held Nazi Doctor, Papers Show 


customers of a kitchen designer in 
Portland. 

In 1938 be opened a catering 
business. Hois d’Oeuvre Inc, in 
New York in partnership with Wil- 
liam Rhode, who later became edi- 
tor of Gourmet magazine. Mr. 
Beard’s first book, “Hors 
d’Oenvres and Canapes,” appeared 
in 1940. 

After a brief hitch in the army 
during World War H, Mr. Beard 
ran a dairy and vegetable farm in 
Pennsylvania and then joined the 
United Seamen’s Service, opening 
chibs for merchant seamen in vari- 
ous countries until 1946. 

After the war he was featured for 
two yean on the first commercial 
food program televised in the Unit- 
ed States, called “Elsie Presents," 
to identify it with the cow that was 
the symbol of its sponsor, Borden 
Co., makers of rannnri millt- 

A bald and portly man, Mr. 
Beard had a deep, throaty chuckle 
and easy manner that convinced 
listeners that his food was fun to 
prepare and irresistible. 

In his 1964 autobiography, “De- 
lights and Prejudices,” he wrote 
that the meals he prepared when he 
ate alone “would shod: people with 
an Edwardian background, the sev- 

en-course-dinner set — and the nu- 
trition experts as weH" 

Sir Arthur Bryant, 85, 
British Historian 

LONDON (AP) — Sir Arthur 
Bryant, 85, the British historian, 
died Tuesday in Salisbury of can- 
cer. 

Sir Arthur is credited with bring- 
ing history to a wider audience than 
any historian since Thomas Ma- 
caulay 100 years earlier. His first 
book, on King Charles n. became a 
best-seller in 1931. He wrote 37 

books in aE, the most recent a his- 
tory of Brilain, “Set in a Silver 
Sea.” 


% Jim Mann 

Los Angeles Times Service 

TAIPEI — Taiwan has saved 
notice that it is worried about the 
possibility that the United States 
will agree to sell naval equipment 
to China, and said its supporters 
wiD seek to Nock any such deal in 
the US. Congress. 

Raymond S.H. Hoo, chairman 
of Taiwan’s Coordination Council 
for North American Affairs, said 
Tuesday that recent reports that 
the United States will help modern- 
ize the Chinese Navy are “very seri- 
ous.” If such.modentizatioii is car- 
ried out, he said, “the military 
balance we have now" between 
China and Taiwan “wiD be disrupt- 
ed." 

Mr. Hoo pointed cut that under 
US. law, any major weapons sales 
negotiated by the executive branch 
must still be approved by Congress. 
Asked whether a sale of naval 
equipment to China could be 
stopped in Congress, he replied, 
“Yes, I think so." 

“I can say frankly, we have many 
friends in the Congress, both in the 
Democratic and Republican par- 
ties,” said Mr. Hoo, whose council 
has been in charge of all dealings 
with the United States since 1979, 
when Washington broke diplomat- 
ic relations with Taiwan . 

Earlier this month, on the eve of 
a visit to China by General John W. 
Vessey Jr., chairman of the U.S. 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, newspaper 
reports from Washington said the 
United States and China had 
agreed upon a plan for sales of 
sonar equipment, gas turbines and 
other new technology to the Chi- 
nese Navy. 

US. officials have said that no 
such deal on naval equipment has 
been completed, but acknowledged 
that discussions were taking place. 

The proposed modernization of 
the Chinese Navy apparently is 
pan of a broader arrangement on 
naval cooperation between the 
United States and C h ina, which 
have both expressed concern about 
the build-up of the Soviet Union’s 
naval forces in tbe Pacific. 

Final details are being worked 
out on an agreement in principle to 
allow US. Navy ships to make port 
calls along the Chinese coast for the 
first lime since 1949. 


By Ralph Blumendbal 

New raft Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Newly declassi- 
fied U.S. intelligence documents 
indicate that Dr. Josef Mengde, 
widely regarded as the most notori- 
ous German war criminal still at 
large, may have been arrested and 
possibly released in the American 
occupation zone of Vienna after 
World War IL 

Other records indicate that Dr. 
Mengde applied to the Canadian 
Embassy in Buenos Aires for a Ca- 
nadian visa in 1962 under a pseud- 
onym and that the Canadians in- 
formed American intelligence 
officials of the attempt. 

The last si ghting s of Dr. Mengde 
were in Paraguay in the 1970s, cut 
tbe government of Paraguay main- 
tains he has left the country. How- 
ever, Serge and Beale Kiarsfeld, 
French Nari-huntm who exposed 
Klaus Barbie in Bolivia, believe Dr. 
Mengde is still hiding in Paraguay. 

The American intelligence docu- 
ments were obtained through the 
Freedom of Information Act by the 
Simon Wiesenthal Center, a Los 
Angeles-based institute for the doc- 
umentation of Nazi crimes that is 
named for a Nazi-hunter. 

Other declassified government 
documents indicate that the Justice 
Department was alerted to Dr. 
Mengele’s passible presence an a 


flight to Miami from Paraguay in 
1979. Federal agents staked out the 
flight but Dr. Mengde, possibly 
alerted, never arrived. 

There is no indication from tbe 
records disclosed that American 
authorities sought to use the infor- 
mation from the Canadian* to 
track down tbe elusive fugitive or 
to advise tbe West German govern- 
ment, which has bad a warrant out- 
standing for Dr. Mengde's arrest 
on murder charges since 1959. 

However, four pages of docu- 
ments bearing on the case have 
been withhdd because they “rea- 
sonably could be expected to cause 
damage to the national security” or 
involve foreign government infor- 
mation, according to the U.S. 
Army Inteffigence and Security 
Command in Fort Meade, Mary- 
land, which released the other re- 
cords. 

Survivors of Auschwitz in the 
United States, Europe and Israel 
including several sets of twins upon 
whom Dr. Mengele conducted 
pseudo-medical experiments, are to 
gather this weekend at the framer 
death camp ate in Poland to com- 
memorate their liberation 40 years 
ago. 

Tbe newly disclosed documents 
include a letter dated April 26, 
1947, from Ben J.M. Goxby, a spe- 
cial agent of the US. Counter-In- 



UH/19U 

Dr. Josef Mengele 

tdligence Corps in Germany, to the 
commanding officer at the 430th 
C3C detachment in Vienna. 

Mr. Gorby wrote that his office 
had received information that Dr. 
Mengele “has been arrested in Vi- 
enna." An informant, he went on, 
“stated that to the best of bis 
knowledge Dr. Mengele was arrest- 
ed in rite US. Zone of Germany,” 
an apparently erroneous reference 
to Vienna, where the 430th unit was 
located. If the report were true, Mr. 
Gorby continual. Dr. Mengde 


Duarte , Rebels Say a Long Impasse 
Is Likely in Salvadoran Peace Talks 


Coke WiUTry 
To Help Quench 
Russian Thirst 

United Press International 

MOSCOW (UPI) — Things 
are going better for Coca-Cola. 
Tbe American soft drink soon 
will be competing with its rival 
Pepsi Cola for sales in the Sovi- 
et Union, officials said Wednes- 
day. 

Coke initially will be sold 
only in special stores for for- 
eigners and will be limited to 
Moscow, raid a spokeswoman 
for the Soviet import agency, 
Soyuz Plodimport. 

Tbe company’s president, 
Donald R. Keough, in an- 
nouncing the breakthrough into 
rite Soviet market after a week 
of meetings with Soviet offi- 

io have Coca-Cola in additional 
Soviet cities for the peak sum- 
mer season. 

Pepa-Cola, which has 10 fac- 
tories in tbe Soviet Union, has 
been produced and sold widely 
throughout the nation since 
1973. 

Pepsi sells on the barter sys- 
tem, taking Russian vodka in 
payment for Pepsi concentrate. 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Past Service 

SAN SALVADOR — President 
JoshNapoleta Duarte’s peace talks 
with El Salvador's rebel movement 

withmonths of delay likefybd^ 
new discussions begin, according to 
comments here by Mr. Duarte and 
by rebel officials in Mexico City. 

Mr. Duarte, who began talks 
with the guerrillas in October, said 
in an interview Monday that be is 
seeking a sign of good faith from 
rebel leaders before agreeing to the 
next round of negotiations. He said 
that talks could not proceed on the 
basis of rebel demands presented in 
the last session of the talks. 

“1 don't want to fool around with 
the hopes of the people,” Mr. 
Duarte said. “The answer is simple. 
They only have to come out and 
say, ‘We don't believe that violence 
is the way to seize power.’ ” 

Rebel leaders, at a briefing Tues- 
day for foreign correspondents in 
Mexico City, called on Mr. Duarte 


to respond to their request for a 
third session of talks before the end 
of this month. Tbe said the request 
was forwarded to the government 
on Jan. 11. 

Rubto Zamora, of the Demo- 
cratic Revolutionary Front, the in- 
surgents’ political wing, said the 

sure from El Salvador’s rightist 
parties, Mr. Duarte is unable to 
hold more talks until after the 
March 17 legislative elections. If 
Mr. Duarte’s Christian Democratic 
Party does poorly then, Mr. Zamo- 
ra said, the peace talks could be 
delayed “six or eight months or 
even a year." 

The conciliatory atmosphere 
that surrounded Mr. Duarte's Oct 
15 meeting with rebel leaders in the 
Salvadoran tilQ town erf La Palma 
gave the appearance of a break- 
through. But since the second ses- 
sion, era Nov. 30, at which the in- 
surgents presented demands for a 
new constitution and a reorganized 
army, tbe differences again have 
become very apparent. 


Managua Seems to Off er 
Amnesty to Rebel Chiefs 


The Associated Press 

MANAGUA — Nicaragua’s 
National Assembly has approve d a 
broad amnesty law that “does not 
exdude” leaders of US. -backed re- 
bels battling the San dims! govern- 
ment, according to the assembly's 
pres dent, Carlos NiiSez Tellez. 

The law was approved Tuesday. 
President Daniel Ortega Saavedra, 
who was the bead of the ruling 
three-man junta until the Nov. 4 
election, proposed amnesty for the 
rebels in his inaugural address on 
Jan, 10. 

Responding to the amnesty pro- 
posal the Nicaraguan Democratic 
Farce; the major rebel group, said 


that amnesty would be possible 
rally if the government agreed to 
remove foreign military advisers, 
end a state of emergency and stop 
the “persecution” of Nicaraguans. 

Mr. Ninez said that Tuesday’s 
enactment of tbe law was “within 
the responsibility that we have to 

end the war and it is a fair measure 
so there will not be more Nicara- 
guan deaths.” 

He was asked if the law included 
amnesty fra the rebel leaders, and 
replied that “it does not exclude" 
t hwn- He s«id the measure applies 
“to all tite Nicaraguans who actual- 
ly are involved m counterrevolu- 
tionary activities, including those 
of an armed nature." 


Mr. Duarte said those demands 
are the main reason fra delay in 
agreeing to a third round of talks. 

“They want this government to 
eliminate itself, to depart from the 
constitution, to destroy the efforts 
at democracy and to polarize" Sal- 
vadoran political forces, he said. 
“And you see, what they’re asking 
me is fra me to eliminate myself, 
and if I eliminate myself, with 
whom are they gong to negotiate?” 

The main mtermediaiy, Arch- 
bishop Arturo Rivera y Damas, 
had said a third session was likely 
before the end of January. But, for 
the last several weeks, Mr. Duarte’s 
aides have been wanting that this 
was unlikely because of increasing 
rightist opposition to Mr. Duarte’s 
government as the elections ap- 
proach. 

Mr. Duarte said opposition to 
the talks included attempts by 
rightist leaders to enlist the aimy in 
a coup. But the officer corps, after 
expressing some reservations, en- 
dorsed the talks on the understand- 
ing they were to remain within liiu- 
its defined by the constitution 
adopted last year, Mr. Duarte said. 

By insisting an a new constitu- 
tion, a reorganized army and a co- 
alition government before new 
elections, Mr. Duarte said, rite re- 
bels woe reverting to hard-line po- 
sitions held since 1979. Instead, the 
dialogue must focus on his docu- 
ment presented at La Palma, he 
said. 

That framework tor discussions 
centered on ways to bring insur- 
gents into the political system es- 
tablished by rite new constitution, 
including a proposed amnesty for 
guerrilla combatants. The guerril- 
las have rejected this, equating it 
with organized surrender. 


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MY THANKS. ITSSHOUh 



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I'lcjiC w.'ill' 

I'hniw u3i'f,\?r»| U-lox'ff.W. 1 


should be interrogated about the 
fate of approximately 20 Jewish 
children evacuated by him from 
Auschwitz in November 1944. 

No response, if there was any, to 
the leuer was released and the wie- 
senthal Center said that all at- 
tempts to locate Mr. Gorby 
through tbe army had failed. 

Another document suggesting 
American involvement in the Men- 
gde case is one dated June 26, 
1962, from Major Buford F. 
McCharen Jr, of the 513th Intelli- 
gence Corps of the U.S. Army in 
Europe; to G.M. Bailey, a visa con- 
trol officer at tbe Canadian Embas- 
sy in Cologne. 

The letter is a response to Mr. 
Bailey’s query concerning a “Jo- 
seph Meoke” who evidently had 
applied for a visa to Canada from 
Buenos Aires. Mr. McCharen at- 
tached an army intelligence report 
identifying “Joseph Menke” as Dr. 
Josef Mengde of Auschwitz. 

No further correspondence was 
disclosed to indicate if the Ameri- 
cans and Canadians followed up 
this lead. 

Dr. Mengde was a major in the 
Nazi SS and, from May 1943 to 
January 1945, a physician at the 
A useb witz- Birken au camp where 
up to four ntiOion Jews and other 
prisoners were gassed and cremat- 
ed. 


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A touch of elegance ana style \ 
Cosmopolitan c:n:ng flair 
And a fling with Lady Luck. 

What more exciting way to 

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To make your evening out an. 


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First ciass Gs'.s Restaurant 
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Warm, inviting club atmosphere ' 
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Choice dishes in the Flett 
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Messieurs, Mesdames - 
Raitesvosjeux. 


fcv-i-y 




Page 4 


RmlbS»ribirae 

PuhUahcd With The Mew YoATuna, indTV Waafalng lon 

Let the Youngsters In 


The United Nations calls this the Year of 
Youth. Celebrations will reflect not pride in 
youth's achievements but sham* for vvhat it 
lades: jobs and a place in organized society. 

The crying need is to restore a sense of 
participation to the young. Currently they 
see themselves as victims of circ umstances 
they did not create. Instead of feeling com- 
mitted to society, they scarcely feel involved. 

In the next couple of years or so the 
economic process will not create enough 
jobs to start solving the problem: at best it 
will stop youth unemployment from getting 
worse in some countries. Most governments 
have still to concentrate on rooting out infla- 
tion, but within this limit there are useful 
things they can do to alleviate the worst 
aspects of enforced idleness and alienation. 

The solution favored by many govern- 
ments is to provide more technical t raining 
This takes youth off the streets for a time, 
and people in training schemes do not enter 
dole queues. More positively, it can fit some 
of the jobless for vacandes that already exist 
but cannot be filled because the expertise, 
often quite elementary, is lacking . Bat for 
many this solution may be short-tom only. 
Itishard to identify the sorts erf training that 
mil correspond to employers’ needs a few 
years hence. There is a risk that the young 
will be chanted successively from unem- 
ployment to t raining and back to the dole. 

More fundamentally, there is vast need to 
increase and upgrade the resources devoted 
to general education, so that youth can bet- 
ter apply itsdf to the chances and changes of 
technical life. Encouraging the teen-ager to 
stay longer in general education does more 
than simply take him off the streets. It in- 
creases his ability subsequently to acquire 


skills in whatever the labor market may 
offer. But this takes time — and a great deal 
of money that governments currently lade. 

Wage snbsdies to encourage employers to 
take on more young workers can help. Em- 
ploying an apparently useless young person 
may produce a valuable addition to die work 
force when experience has been gained. But 
again, it costs public money, and there is the 
danger that employers will amply use subsi- 
dized youth to replace older workers. 

The latest fashion is called local employ- 
ment initiatives. Local governments, firms 
and do-gooders identify and organize activi- 
ties that can be run on something like a self- 
financing — perhaps profitable — basis. 
Local people know best the needs and possi- 
bilities of their areas. Local business can be 
quick to recognize the importance of soda! 
as well as private benefit, since the one helps 
the other. Local needs for cleaning up the 
environment and helping the sick and aged 
— or simply repairing lawn mowers —can 
be catered for. This may be a real instance in 
which supply creates effective demand. 

Should help be automatic and uncondi- 
tional, or only, as in Sweden, for those who 
join particular schemes? There may be a case 
against unconditional benefit; paying the 
young to do nothing can sap morale. But 
does the concept of conditional help risk 
leading to new versions of Hitler Youth? 

Whether help is conditional or uncondi- 
tional. governments should press on with a 
wide variety of experiments. Nobody knows 
how any of them will turn out. Economic 
engineering is like pushing an ox cart — it 
swings right or left unpredictably. This is the 
Year of the Ox, as well as of Youth. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Sakharov’s Term Is Over 


By September, according to information 
reaching Andrei Sakharov’s relatives abroad, 
the Soviet scientist and dissident had endured 
a hunger strike of at least six or seven weeks, 
plus bouts of forced feeding and drugging, and 
was either threatening or conducting a new 
hunger strike. On Sept. 7, however, the family 
believes, he was returned to his apartment in 
Gorki and reunited with his wife, Yelena Bon- 
ner. He began to emerge from a condition of 
depression, and by November he was able and 
was allowed to discuss scientific work with 
visitors from the Academy of Sciences. He is 
now “probably in reasonable physical and 
mental condition, considering Ins recent or- 
deal and chrome medical problems,” accord- 
ing to the fanigTC Khrooika Press in New York. 

Why the change in the Kr emlin 's handling 
of tins brave and prickly symbol of con- 
science? The change coincides with the period 
when, we now know, the Kre mlin was deciding 
to strike out for improved relations with the 
United States. It could not easily turn anew 
face westward while it was pushing (me of its 
roost distinguished citizens toward the grave. 

it is fcosable, of course, that the whole 
recent picture of improvement in the Sakhar- 
ovs' circumstances is a KGB concoction. The 
link to Soviet foreign policy, however, seems 
plain. Hidden-camera photos of the Sakharovs 
were released in the West just as Mikhail 


Gorbachov arrived in Britain in December. 
The Sakharovs have been permitted to ex- 
change telegrams and mail with friends in 
Moscow and relatives abroad. 

But the basic fact of the Sakharovs’ isolation 
and vulnerability remains unchanged. They 
are still pawns of the regime, pinned in Gorki 
and removed from all of those whose indepen- 
dent word alone could establish their condi- 
tion credibly- The Kremlin cannot expect peo- 
ple who care for the Sakharovs to be reassured 
as long as it continues to monopolize all infor- 
mation available about them. 

Their status as pawns is cruelly underlined 
by the way they are being treated under Soviet 
law. Yelena Bonner, a side woman, was tried 
and sentenced to five years of internal exile 
last August for “anti-Soviet activity” — her 
human rights work. Andrei Sakharov complet- 
ed five years of exile — under Soviet law, the 
maximum term — in Gorki on Tuesday. But 
he was never sentenced, nor charged nor tried 
If his detention now continues past this grim 
anniversary, he will be paying a harsher penal- 
ty outride the law than he would have paid if 
he had been tried and exiled under the law. 
Such is Soviet “justice." 

Does not the Kremlin have the sense, even if 
it lades the mercy, to let these much abused 
souls live out their lives where they please? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Nimeiri Plays With Fire 


What can one make of the erratic ways of 
Sudan’s President Gaafar Nimeiri? Having 
done the decent thing in sheltering Jews fleeing 
Ethiopia, he insists that they cannot go directly 
to Israel, the one country that wants than. 
Having earned a reputation for moderation, he 
soils it by hanging a 76-year-old opponent and 
by chopping off the hands of thieves under a 
supposedly Islamic law he decreed in 1983. 

Major General Nimeiri, it is plain, wants to 
be seen as a fierce, devout Moslem, at the risk 
of alienating Sudan’s Christians or secular- 
minded Moslems. He has reasons. His good 
friend Anwar Sadat was struck down in Cairo 
by Islamic zealots, and a tide of fundamental- 
ism surges around him. abetted by Libya's 
Colonel Moamer QadhafL Bui understanding 
President Nimeiri's jitters does not require 
condoning his ruthless and risky moves. 

Coming to power after a military coop in 
1 969, General Nimeiri initially gave bis huge 
country a rare interlude of social peace by 
ending a 17-year civil war. With some courage, 
he supported the Camp David agreement. But 
in the 1980s, as Sudan's economy crumbled 
and its debts soared, the country was further 
strained by a million refugees, most of them 


from starring Ethiopia. Thus beset. President 
Nimeiri tightened military rule, divided the 
rebellious Christian south into three provinces 
and rediscovered fu n d amen talism 

He boasts that Khartoum is the safest city in 
Africa because bis Islamic “trials," without 
right of appeal or counsel, order amputations. 
And when an aging Moslem moderate was 
executed on a red steel scaffold last week, 
mobs shouted “Death to die enemy of God!" 

Tins shout awakens grisly ghosts. A century 
ago this week a holy warrior known as the 
Mahdi conquered Khartoum and murdered 
the British governor general General Gordon, 
three days before a relief expedition arrived to 
save him. Sudan was bled by a religious war 
that opened it to foreign invasion. By playing 
to the same passions. President Nimeiri runs 
the risk of being consumed by them. 

There are good reasons for the United States 
to open iis purses to help Sudan feed and 
resettle a million refugees. But the arguments 
for security assistance to Khartoum grow pro- 
gressively weaker as General Nimeiri plunges 
into bis own holy wars, it is lime to say that in 
trying to lead the mob he has joined it. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR JAN. 24 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Parisians Are Evicted by Flood 
PARIS — With the Seine rising more rapidly 
than forecasted, and the waters spreading over 
several sections of Paris, the situation {cm Jan. 
24] is much more serious than was expected. 
The police have been compelled to drive sever- 
al hundreds of persons from their homes, espe- 
cially in the Auteuil district, and the Govern- 
ment has been appealed to for aid. With the 
continuation of the rain three bridges are re- 
ported to be in danger, the prats des Arts, de 
FAlma and de la Concorde. It is feared that 
any great accumulation of driftwood might 
weaken these spans. From (he provinces, news 
of a most alarming character is being received. 
Bridges are being swept away and whole val- 
leys bong transformed into vast lakes. Many 
villages are cut off from communication. 


1935: Japan Invades Inner Mongolia 
PEIPING — For the first time since June 
1933, when an armistice brought the Japanese 
invasion of China proper to an end, Japanese 
and Chinese troops were fighting in Northern 
China [on Jan. 24]. Part of Japan's modernized 
and motorized army on the Asiatic Continent 
is driving through the Inner Mongolian prov- 
ince of Chahar on a twenty-five mile front, and 
despite sharp Chinese resistance is crushing oQ 
before iL The objective apparently is to grasp 
complete control of the vast area of Inner 
Mongolia, gateway to Outer Mongolia, which 
penetrates almost to the bean of Asia. The 
drive is being carried out according to the most 
modem conception of warfare, with mecha- 
nized units leading the surface attack and 
airplanes co-operating with armored cars. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISJE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL AST 
CARLGEW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, WWff 

Execute* Editor REN£ BONDY Depun PuNukrr 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Assocme Publisher 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Pu b h s h er 

Dean- Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of 

Assort Editor FRANCOIS DESWAISONS Director of 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Ddetar of Adte 


Director of Adtcrtumg Sda 

International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Oariefr^-Gau^ 92200 N«dly^ur-Seiiit 
France. Telephone: 747-1265. Telex; 612728 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

Direeteur debt pMktdum: Waiter N. Thayer, 

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US subscription; $284 veartv. Second -das postage paid a Long Island City. N.Y. II 101. 

0 1985. International Herald Tribune. Au rights reserved. 




Underrating 
The Gipper 
Is a Mistake 


w 


By Lon Cannon 

ASHINGTON — Underestimation of 
Ronald Reagan is an old sioiy. In 1966. in 
his first campaign, he was compared unfavorably 
to Bonzo, a chimpanzee who had upstaged him in 
the movie “Bedtime for Bonzo." 

The man who did the underestimating then 
was California's Governor Edmund G. Brown, 
who had the excuse of never having seen Mr. 
Reagan campaign. Subsequently Mr. Reagan 
was underestimated by California's dominant 
Democratic politician of the day. State Assembly 
Speaker Jesse Unruh. who proved a forerunner 
of House Speaker Tip O'Nall. 

The underestimating has been bipartisan. Re- 
publican legislators in Sacramento were more 
contemptuous of Mr. Reagan than Mr. Unruh. 

Gerald Ford refused to take Mr. Reagan seri- 
ously until it was almost too late. Late in 1975, 
several months after Mr. Reagan had formed a 
committee to defeat Mr. Ford that was “explor- 
atory" in name only, an otherwise brainy Ford 
aide asked me whether Mr. Reagan really nad the 
nerve to challenge a Republican president. 

During the 1980 Iowa caucuses, one of Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter's ablest operatives expressed 
dismay that George Bush was on his way to 
victory there. The Carter aide feared that Mr. 





LEMNS- 



Bush would be the nominee and not Mr. Reagan. 

Those of us in the media have underestimated 
Mr. Reagan even more than the politicians. Gov- 
ernor Brown's 1 966 view of Mr. Reagan's vulner- 
ability was widely shared in the press corps. Four 
years ago many of us confidently predicted that 
Mr. Reagan's tax-reduction plan was doomed in 
the Democratic House. Three years ago I wrote 
that the impact of the Reagan recession would 
cause him not to seek a second term. 

Now here we go again. We have examined Mr. 
Reagan's deficit-reduction plan and found it 
insufficient. We wonder how the White House 
will function with a new chief 1 of staff. 

In Congress, even the strongest hawks have 
taken aim at Mr. Reagan's bloated defense bud- 
get, The orphan MX nuclear missile, abandoned 
by its friends, faces a March buriaL .And it is 
doubtful if even the powers of the Great Com- 
municator can resurrect U.S. aid for the anti- 
SandinisL rebels in Nicaragua. As many now see 
iL unless there is a major arms control agreement 
with the Soviets Lhe best that Mr. Reagan can 
hope for is a draw with Congress if the economy 
holds in 1985, followed by Democratic capture of 
the Senate in 1986 and two years of semi-retire- 
ment featuring frequent trips to his ranch. 



BAKER. REGAN. «D 
MSSEAfESWHOfii&- 


JWmMHKAN 
PEOPLE RKLKIB) 

ME_ 




Maybe that is the way it will turn out- But just 
in case it doesn’L here are a few thoughts on why 
we so persistently underestimate a man who 
surely ranks as one of Lhe century’s most accom- 
plished American political leaders. 

The first thought is that we do not take Ronald 
Reagan seriously because he is not a politician in 
the accepted sense; he had a successful career 
before he entered political life and is totally 
uninterested in the details of politics. This is an 
asset that politicians (end to represent as a liabil- 
ity. Yet it enables Mr. Reagan to think in popular 
terms and be taken seriously by the many Ameri- 
cans who distrust political solutions. He is never 
dragged down by details because he is never 
involved in them. He is not held accountable for 
his personnel disasters because he is disengaged 
from the people who work for him. 

Usually, Mr. Reagan keeps his eye on the balL 
He has a sense of what he wants to achieve and 
where he wants to come ouu both in negotiating 
and in historical terms. And he is willing to put 
aside his ideology in order to save iL 

This security in terms of governance makes it 
possible for him to ignore the conventional wis- 
dom of his advisers and economists. It was Mr. 
Reagan, not his inner circle, who refused to 
compromise on income tax reduction or defense 
in the first term and won because of what was 
then perceived as stubbornness. 

The underestimation of Mr. Reagan feeds on 
itself. U is so easy to compile “Reaginisms" that 
leave one gasping, so easy to demonstrate gaps in 
his knowledge that expectations for Mr. Reagan 
are set extremely low. This makes a moderate 
success seem an extraordinary triumph. 

Mr. Reagan understands this, just as he under- 
stood four years ago that there was plenty of 
power left in a presidency supposedly under- 
mined by Watergate and Vietnam. Isn't it time 
we stopped underestimating him? 

The Washington Past. 


A U.S. Senator Proposes 
Anti-Apartheid Sanctions 

By Alan Cranston 

The writer is a U.S. senator from California, the Democratic whip and 
a member of the Senate's committees on foreign relations and banking 

W ASHINGTON — Americans 
of conscience have long been 
opposed to the white South African 
regime's repugnant system of institu- 
tionalized racial oppression of its na- 
tive black papulation. So why the 
renewed activism of apartheid oppo- 
nents in the United States? It is fair to 
ask why this new sense of urgency, 
and to question whether the mount- 
ing concern will lead to effective ac- 
tion by the U.S. goveramenL 
Americans are stfll struggling to 
overcome our own legacy of racial 
discrimination. We have therefore 
been remarkably tolerant of the Pre- 
toria government's snail’s-pace effort 
to change. But after four years of the 
Reagan administration's policy of 
“constructive engagement, 1 ' it is clear 
to most that U.S. engagement has 
proved less than constructive. 

Efforts to achieve greater justice 
for all South Africans and to induce 
South African withdrawal from its 
illegal occupation of Namibia have 
failed. South African authorities have 
clearly misunderstood the Reagan 
administration's silence, punctuated 
only by President Reagan's statement 
last month against apartheid. 

The meager •‘reforms" advanced 
by the 4 million whiles who govern 
South Africa’s 23 million black* have 
been pathetic. Black citizens are up- 
rooted and banished to become citi- 
zens of puppet regimes in alien bUck 
“homelands." Many black workers 
are forced to live separated from their 
families to avoid starvation, because 
black residents are confined to cer- 
tain areas while jobs are often avail- 
able only in others. Recent constitu- 
tional changes have led merely to 


fraudulent “reforms” that continue 
to deny all South African blacks the 
right to vote in the land of their birth. 

The latest wave of domestic repres- 
sion unleashed by the Pretoria gov- 
ernment has led to the death of more 
than- 160 black opponents of apart- 
heid, the injury of more than 1,000 
and the arrest of more than 3.000. 

The failure of the Reagan adminis- 
tration's “constructive engagement" 
policy has led me and other congres- 
sional opponents. including Repre- 
semative Howard L Berman, a Cali- 
fornia Democrat, to press since 1983 
for legislation that would distance the 
American people from the apartheid 
regime. Our efforts have been moti- 
vated by a deep sense of moral obli- 
gation io combat the gross injustice 
of apartheid. But they have also been 
mounted as a strategic imperative 
both for the sake of future U.S. rela- 
tions with the emerging nations of 
black Africa and the black majority 
of South Africa, and as a means of 
reducing targets of opportunity for 
Soviet adventurism in the region. 

Despite extensive efforts to forge a 
compromise measure invoking limit- 
ed sanctions against South Africa, 
the last Congress failed to adopt any 
legislation whatsoever against U.S. 
commerce with the apartheid regime. 

As a proponent of such sanctions. 
1 am heartened by the new public 
outcry in America' against the Pre- 
toria regime. The task ahead is clear: 
We must channel the strong rhetoric 
of both Democrat* and Republicans 
into effective legislative action. 

This task is made more difficult by 
the fact that there are strongly diver- 
gent views among opponents of 


IT 

FEEL* /mi LIKE 
A MARRIAGE, ItfTEAP 
HFjuiutWrwcm 

ELEMENT 0 



- 


Bv Barry In The Swr (JohannMburai. Distributed by Cartoonists 8. Writers Syndicate. 


regarding what type of 
nal actioi 


apartheid 
congressional action promises to be 
both achievable and effective. Sanc- 
tions that are too strong, such os a 
complete U.S. trade embargo, might 
cause excessive new hardships for 
those whose rights and security we 
are trying to improve. Sanctions that 
are too weak, such as largely symbol- 
ic measures barring new U.S. soles 
of South African gold coins, run the 


Here Comes Four- Generation Society 


L OS ANGELES — Not to bear 
/ around the bush, my father is a 
phenomenon. He celebrated his 
90th birthday here last week, with 
about a dozen family members and 
friends joining him and my mother 
in a salute to his longevity. 

Born in Poland and brought to 
America as a boy. he is. so far as he 
knows, the first member of his fam- 
ily io reach the 10th decade. He has 
outlived his father by 25 years — a 
goal I will certainly not achieve. 

In that sense he is pan of a larger 
phenomenon, which is changing the 
face of America and redefining tra- 
ditional ways erf i hinting. The num- 
ber of very old people is increasing 
rapidly, and fellow Americans' 
view of them — and of themselves 
— is changing just a* fasL 
The fastest-growing age group in 
the country is my father's gang, the 
over-8Gs. As the Population Refer- 
ence Bureau said in a report last 
fall. “Since the late 1960s. life ex- 
pectancy among the dderly in the 
United 'States has increased at his- 
torically unprecedented rates" 

In the seven years between 1974 
and 1981, the Social Security Ad- 
ministration's statisticians added 
about four years to the life expec- 
tancy of both men and women. 
Many experts project that by the 
year "2000. average American's can 
expect to live to 80 — almost 35 
years longer than their grandpar- 
ents who were around in 1900. ' 

Another dramatic measure of die 
change is found in Census Bureau 
projections of the number or cente- 
narians. fn 1982 there were about 
32,000 U.S. centenarians. By 2000 
we can expect more than three 
times a* many — 1U8.000. And by 
20-W they may number 2 million. 
The secret behind thi> exiunrdi- 


Bv David S. Broder 


□ary development is medical pro- 
gress in treating heart and vascular 
diseases and, to a lesser extent, can- 
cer. My father has minor strokes, 
but the doctors and hospitals have 
learned so much about managing 
stroke patients that he and my 
mother are able to live indepen- 
dently. in their own apartment, 
with only pan-time assistance. 

They are among the lucky elder- 
ly, for they are sharing life together 
after almost 60 years of marriage, 
rather than experiencing the wid- 
owhood that is the condition of 
most of their contemporaries. They 
are more typical of the pattern, 
however, in their decision to retire 
in the southern half of the country, 
having moved from Illinois when 
my father took down his dentist's 
shingle some 15 years ago. Half of 
America's elderly migrants have 
moved to the 12 Sun Belt states. 

For the rest of us, including the 
millions of retirees with living re- 
tired parents of their own. the phe- 
nomenon of which my father is a 
pan has consequences that are as 
clear as its blessmgs. The extension 
of human life brings added costs for 
tire family and for the nation. 

As the Population Reference Bu- 
reau reported. “Today the federal 
government is spending 27 percent 
of its yearly budget on people 65 
rod older. The proportion could 
grow to an estimated 50 percent of 
the federal budget by 2025." 

Twice in the last five years Con- 
gress and the president Have had to 
devise "emergency" measure* to 
save the largest single source of 
income for the elderlv. the Social 
Secants svswm. Medicare, which 


pays many of the health cosu for 
my parents and their peers, is in 
serious financial difficulty this year. 

It is clear that younger Ameri- 
cans are not going to turn iheir 
backs on the elderly or deny them 
lhe medical or financial assistance 
that protects their dignitv. 

The latest issue of The Wilson 
Quarterly pointed out in a special 
section on “The Elderly in Ameri- 
ca" (hat one of the great success 
stories of the past two decades of 
federal policy has been dramatic 
reduction in poverty and disease 
among the elderly. Economise Les- 
ter G. Thurow showed that, thanks 
mainly to government programs, 
per capita income for the aged 
reached a par with the rest of the 
population in the 1970s. With 
Medicare and food stamps figured 
in. they have "a higher per capita 
income than the non-clderly." 

The growing numbers and the 

political influence of lhe elderly al- 
most guarantee that those gains will 
not be wiped oul But it is equally 
dear that America is just at the 
beginning of the national debate 
over the best and most efficient way 
to finance the programs for the el- 
derly, along with America's other 
national responsibilities. 

There are major controversies 
about retirement ages, options lor 
employment after “normal" retire- 
ment and financing and tax treat- 
ment of private retirement plans. 
AH these ore part of a vast transi- 
tion from a two-generation to a 
Tour-generation society. 

No one can pretend that these 
problems arc anything but tough. 
Bui after last week's celebration 
with mv father. 1 cannot think of a 
more welcome mti of challenge*. 

Thi II I'.-st 


risk of trivializing the apartheid issue. 

In recent days, discussions that 
1 have pushed among apartheid op- 
ponents of all ideological stripes m 
Congress have borne fruit There ap- 
pears to be a consensus that Congress 
needs to take action this year on 
limited economic sanctions. 

These sanctions would include s 
ban on new U.S. investments in 
South Africa, a ban on new loans to 
South Africa and criminal penalties 
for U.S. firms in South Africa that do 
not adhere to the fair-employment 
practices of the Sullivan code. ~ 

These measures would not force 
(he loss of any existing jobs in South 
Africa, but they would make clear 
that Americans will not allow further 
U.S. investment in an abhorrent sys- 
tem. Already, many U.S. banks and 
corporations doing business in South 
Africa have adopted similar positions 
for reasons of economic security and 
basic morality. Congress should not 
undercut such progressive business 
leadership by doing less. 

Most important, such sanctions 
would apply pressure where pressure 

is most needed — on the white offi- Meantime, there is excitement in 
cials who bold all economic and po- the day-to-day working together of 
litical power in South Africa. These once mortal enemies. “If you doubt 


The Family 
Of Europe 
Will Adapt 

By Philip Geyelizi 

B RUSSELS— It is easy enough to 
make fun of the performance 
and pretentious of the European 
Community. The reality falls far 
short of the great postwar vision of an 
economic united Slates of Europe. 

The Community is still not much 
more than a customs union, earing, 
but by no means freeing, trade 
among the 10 members. The remain- 
ing red tape and other encumbrances 
are formidable and costly. The lack 
of a common currency would be rea- 
son enough why Europe is faffing 
seriously behind its American and 
Japanese competitors in the hi gh 
technology race that is rcvriutiomz- 
Leg the industrialized world. 

The nationalistic impulses that ac- 
count for the Community’s weak- 
nesses are also a potential source of 
strength. Its members are all practic- 
ing democracies, responsive to profit 
motives, economic stagnation and 
crushing unemployment Not only 
are they capable of decision-making, 
collectively, when their interests co- 
incide, but all the instrumentalities 
are at hand: an “executive" Europe- 
an Commission, a "legislative” Euro- 
pean Council and the authorization 
in the 1957 Treaty of Rome. 

AU that has been lacking is a readi- 
ness to surrender sovereignty to some 
degree of supranational authority, 
and an awareness of the price the 
member states are paying and will 
increasingly pay for their failure to 
make good on the original promise. 

What are the odds now? At EC 
headquarters you gel two answers. 
The first is: Don't hold your breath; 
this organization moves oh, so slowly. 
The second, firmly grounded on the 
Community’s often torpid and some- 
times turbulent history of painful 
progress, is more positive. 

Opinion polls dwell on “Euro-pes- 
simism. " Economic experts say this 
has to do with “Euro-sclerosis/' But 
the latest effort to capture the mood 
in a thoroughly mixed bag of EC 
member nations is called “Euro-real- 
ism" — a developing willingness, as 
one old hand puts it, to “race real 
issues and look for answers." 

Now that does not race pulses, 
even in Europe. In the United States 
the mere mention of the EC is a 
room-emptier. Brief bulletins from 
the front report that the Europeans 
are at it again over the price of fish or 
turkeys or milk or who pays or 
doesn't pay a fair share of the bills. 
One hears of doors angrily slammed 
and resentfully reopened. 

But observe that these are things 
families fight about — and that is the 
point. Over time, the EC capitals 
have acquired not only the worn but 
the best habits of family life. 

The Community has discovered, as 
well, the value or putting into prac- 
tice, however imperfectly. Dean Acfa- 
eson’s principle, as he expressed it in 
1952: “Peace is more than the ab- 
sence of war." In this sense the Com- 
munity’s institutions can be consid- 
ered to be what Henry Kissinger used 
to call “structures for peace. 

Far from splitting asunder or tak- 
ing up arms as many of these 10 
nations used to do by way of resolv- 
ing differences, they recently agreed 
to broaden EC membership to in- 
dude Spain and Portugal. 

France so reseated the Communi- 
ty’s supranational tendencies that it 
withdrew from participation in 1965 
for some months. Bui recently the 
French made available one of their 
most respected dvfl servants for the 
presidency of the Commission. 

The British created the recent crisis 
over cost-sharing. But it was not Brit- 
ain’s case so much as the way Marga- 
ret Thatcher put it that made the 
battle so long and so embittering. 

Farm subsidies have always ban a 
problem, but a common agriculture 
policy may be now within reach. 

The big challenge ahead is a com- 
mon currency, for reasons that a 
Commission official summed up this 
way: “Don't tell me America would 
be better off if the dollar fluctuated 
between New York and Chicago. 
Like hdl it would." He and others 
dream of the day when European 
entrepreneurs — and not just the big 
ones — can contemplate new ven- 
tures with unrestricted access to a 
market embracing a population of 
270 million people These experts be- 
lieve that pressure from business, la- 
bor and fanners will make it happen. 

Skeptics disagree. But my hunch is 
that when enough Europeans fully 
recognize the technological threat 
from abroad and are reminded that 
they have the means to do something 
about it in the Treaty of Rome, they 
will slowly do something about iL 


are the individuals on whom Ameri- 
cans must press the urgency of mean- 
ingful change, in the interest of all 
South Africans as well as erf America. 

Las Angeles Times. 


you 

the value of this organization." a 
longtime observer says, "think back 
over the last 40 years in Europe, and 
the previous 40,” 

Washington Pan Writers Group. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 
Why India Wanted Rajiv 


Helping a 
the Bor- 


The opinion column 
Hindu Revolution to Sira at 
der” by Harish Khare (Jan. 7) is apt 
to mislead your readers grievously 
about the nature and significance of 
the electoral verdict in India. 

Extensive pre-election polls, which 
predicted the landslide in favor of 
Rajiv Gandhi, indicated quite a dif- 
ferent combination of motivations. 

These were a desire to strengthen 
(he hands of the young prime minis- 
ter and give him a chance to prove 
himself; a desire for a strong govern- 
ment to negotiate lasting solutions to 
immediate communal disturbances; 
a vote for stability to fill the vacuum 
in the wake of the national emergen- 
cy and shock created by the mindless 
assassination nf a great and estab- 
lished leader; the bad experience of 
handing over the reins of government 
tii .in ill-jvMiricd vt Minion of political 


parties; the impact of women's vote, 
and generally the appeal of youth, 
modernism and a fresh start 
Mr. Khare does not do justice to 
the shrewdness, sagacity ana sense of 
responsibility of the average Indian 
voter and Ids and her growing in- 
volvement in the democratic process. 
His interpretation that the vote is 
explained by the Hindu majority en- 
dorsing “the horrible anti-Sikh car- 
nage" is, frankly, perverse. 

KAMALE5H SHARAIA. 

Cambridge Massachusetts. 

Family Name Fiddled? 

Your Jan. 9 obituary of jazz pianiM 
and composer Johnny Qua mien said 
he descended from the Cremona fam- 
ily of violin makers. Perhaps. Bui 
(hey were called Guaracri — or 
Guarr.cnu> — and not Guarmen. 

BARBARA GUARSERI 
Parts. 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


Page 5 




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Fight Against Tropical Parasite Called Successful 


By ftella Tones Comer quences of the disease. It decimal- where population is rapidly ex- and metrifonate, whidi cores uri- 
Jnttntati&dl Ilerokt Tribune ed Chinese villages at the beginning pending. But WHO now believes nary schistosomiasis, are used in 

G ENEYA pr0 . of the ceatnry and became more the disease can be controlled and areas where only one form of the 

nounce and even harder to prevalent during the social upheav- effectively treated. parasite crisis, 

eradicate, schistosomiasis is never- als of the Cultural Revofation. Previously, schistosomiasis con- The parasites life begins when 
thriwre » ramm/Mi nr"”™ 1 ,n Schistosomiasis causes rash, trol focused on mass campaigns eggs exacted from an infected per- 

2oo milliofl Deooie. cough and chest pains, cramps, di- aimed at diminating water snails son’s body break upon reaching 

Also knownas bilbamasis, after arraea, fever, blood in the urine and treating the disease with a toric water. The parasite must find a 


the German 


Theodor 2 nd 


compound requiring multiple in- freshwater mail as host within 8 to 
jections. The realization that spray* 12 hours, or it dies. Once it has 


timgs yds process causes itching, 
but most people never notice ll 

Within weeks, Che parasite trans- 
forms itself into a white worm. If 
female, it seeks a male io which it 
joins itself for life(wbich lasts from 
S io 40 years). Once eggs are pro- 
duced, the cyde starts again. 

Children under 14 usually con- 
tract schistosomiasis through 


rimes. But not until IS5I did Dr. 
Bilharz discover the parasitic 


worm, or schistosome, that causes 

the disease, which is sometimes ^WHO said that n 


cancer is also linked with rnent coincided with the discovery 


uantd, a non toxic dreg Cfc 
1 be taken orally in a sin- most 


A d et a i l e d image of a living human blood platelet, obtained with X-ray microscopy. 

Split-Second Flashes of X-Rays Yield 
Finely Detailed Images of Living Cells 


By Harold M. Schmeck Jr. 

New York Times Service 

XT EW YORK — Hashes of X- 
lN rays lasting billionths of a sec- 
ond are giving scientists their first 
highly detailed lodes at individual 
living human cells. 

The images, obtained with a new 
technique called contact X-ray mi- 
croscopy, can stow surface charac- 
teristics and internal structures. 
The details are far finer than can be 
obtained with the best light mkxo- 
scopes. 

Although electron microscopes 


can reveal finer detail than is possi- 
ble with X-ray microscopes, they 
cannot malo» images th at capture 
an instant of life. For viewing un- 
der the dec iron microscope, sub- 
jects must be boused in a vacuum 
chamber and therefore cannot or- 
dinarily be pictured while alive. 

The new technique makes use of 
long wavelength, or “soft," X-rays. 
The rays kill the cell, but the image 
is formed before the destructive ef- 
fects occur. 

“We report here what may be the 
first soft X-ray image of this type. 


IN BRIEF 

Tiny Tacks Used to Repair Retinas 

DURHAM, North Carolina (API — Surgeons at Duke University Eye 
Center have used tiny stainless-steel tacks to repair badly tom and folded 
retinas, offering hope to patients whose cases had been considered 
hopeless, officials said. 

“The amount of sight I have has doubled at least,” an Alabama man 
whose retina was repaired vrith the tacks said in a statement issued by the 
center; be asked not to be identified. The center said two case studies 
would be described in an artide in the March issue of the American 
Journal of Ophthalmology. 

“The retina . . . was totally detached and balled up like a fist,” Dr. 
Robert Machemet, director of the center, said of the Alabaman’s case. 
‘Tn the operating room, we were able to unfold the membrane and flatten 
it, but each time it refolded.” So in December, Dr. Machemer and Dr. 
Eugene de Jaun attached the retina to the wall of the eye using five 2.7- 
miffimeter tacks developed at the eye center. They are left in the eye until 
the retina heals. 

Banned Giemicals Found in Dolphins 

LOS ANGELES (NYT) — Tissue samples from 27 dead bottle-nosed 
dolphins that washed ; ashore in California contained extremely high 
levels- of the pesticide DDT and of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). 
mice used far electrical insulation, exammatioes have- revealed. 

Since DDT was banned in the United States in 1972 and PCBs were 
banned in 1977, it was undear how the dolphins accumulated such high 
levels of the toxins. The source of the DDT might be countries such as the 
Philippines. Japan and South Korea. Sewage runoff from U. S. West 
Coast cities might contain PCBs that are leaching out of soil where they 
were deposited several years a go. 

The study by the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project 
raised concern that the pollutants might affect the reproduction rate of 
the 240 or so dolphins that live between La Jolla and Palos Verdes 
Peninsula near Los Angdes, where the dead dolphins were found. DDT 
and PCBs have been known to damage the immune and reproductive 
systems Of smaller, n onmar ine mammals. 

Vitamin Use Against Cancer Disputed 

BOSTON (LAT) — For the second time in five years, a study by Mayo 
Clinic researchers has failed to confirm claims by the Nobel laureate Dr. 
Linus C. Pauling that large daily doses of vitamin C increase the survival 
time of patients with advanced terminal cancer. 

Dr. Pauling, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistiy in 1954 and the 
Nobd Peace Prize in 1962, challenged the results of a 1979 Mayo study, - 
eoniendmg that it found no benefit from vitamin C because the patients 
had undergone chemotherapy, which he claimed interfered with- the 
action of vitamin C 

The latest study, reported on in the New England Journal of Medicine, 
compared patients who had not had chemotherapy. It too, feund I vitamin 
C ineffective in extending the lives of cancer patients. Dr. Pauling said, 
however, that the vitamin does no barm to cancer patients and that he 
believes it might do sane good. He criticized the Mayo researchers for 
not sending him a copy of the report 

Cobalt Extracted From Coal Waste 

LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico (NYT) — Two chemists from the Los 
Alamos National Laboratory have discovered a way to scour coal waste 
Tor cobalt, a rare mineral essential for hardening steel and making 
computers. Dr. Paul Wagner and Dr. Richard Heaton said the method 
might increase the U.S. cobalt supply as much as 10 percent. 

The two experimented with releasing certain kinds of adds into coal 
slim piles. Ram and groundwater wash the adds through the mine 
utilmgc. leaching out cobalt and other minerals. The researchers said this 
runoff could be diverted to holding ponds and the minerals reclaimed. 

Speeding Delivery From South Pole 

GREENBELT, Maryland (NYT) — A new satellite Hnk has reduced 
from months to horns the time it takes to obtain scientific data from the 
South Pole. An expedition from the Goddard Space Flight Center here 
recently completed the project 

Michael Comb*""**, a Goddard engineer, developed the idea- His 
brother Anthony, a communications specialist, accompanied him on the 
six-week expedition. Previously, Anthony said, scientific data coflecled in 
winter had to be Stored cm magnetic tape until the weather became warm 
enough to ship it by aircraft. Now it will take three hours to relay data. 

Benign Breast Lumps: Little Bisk 

BOSTON (AJP) — About 70 percent of women who undergo biopsy 
operations to remove benign breast lumps face no unusual riot of later 
developing breast cancer, and the additional danger is slight for nearly ' ®u 
of the remaining 30 percent, according to the latest tn a senes of simil ar 


I J f 1 1 1 1 ICUCUUJ lUCLUJ hAVMU - . * - 

surgery faced up to four times the ordinary nsk^ cancer. Sometimes 
“preventive" mastectomies were performed an them. 

Dr. David L Page of Vanderbilt Umvwsty Medical School, who with 
Dr. Wilh'am D. Dnponl reported on the stwfy m the New England 
Journal of Medians, said 10 years of research, based on the biopsies of 
10366 women, showed that about 3.6 percent of those with benign 
growths — specifically, women with a condition known as atypical 
hyperplasia —faced a “medically significant" increase in ask. 

New Painkiller Patented in France 

PARIS (Reuters) — A French n^biologiajh^^ J»n Ubori L 
has annfutnfwf the patenting of a substance called AGR-529 that he raid 
had revolutionary painkilling properties, A spokeswoman for Dr. Labont 
said the substance could be the strongest analgesc yet known. 

The patent also describes the substance as anti-inflammatory. tranquU- 
izing anSrfpfleplfc and said it was believed to protect the brain from 

USSSV one or the first ^uve 
substances, the tranquilizer known as chlqropromaane. told the newspa- 
per Le Figaro that AGR-529 is his most important diswvny. He said a 
iaiwratoiyrat treated with AGR-529 did not react when placed on a very 
hoi mend plate. • 


that of a living human blood plate- 
let, produced with a flash X-ray 
source that emits a 100-nsec pulse 
of soft X-rays,” said the first public 
report of this research, in the jour- 
nal Science. “Nsec” means nano- 
second, or billionth of a second. 

Blood platelets, crucial to the 
healing of wounds, were the first 

, Skxn cells are under studjM&ntf^ 
wide variety of other living cells 
and components will be examined 
sooo. 

The technique is considered ap- 
plicable to the study of many im- 
portant functions of life, such as 
cells' actions as scavengers and in 
secreting vital hormones and other 
substances. 

“The image reveal details not 
previously seen in images of fixed 
or dried platelets," said the report- 
The research was done at Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corp-’s 
T. J. Watson Research Center in 
Yorktown Heights, New York; the 
National Institutes of Health in Be- 
thesda, Maryland; and New En- 
gland Deaconess Hospital and 
Harvard Metrical School m Boston. 

Platelets are pancake-shaped 
structures, about Half the size of red 
blood cells, Lhat serve a vital 
thomb-in-the-dike function in the 
human circulatory system. They 
are inactive until they encounter a 
break or damage in a blood vessel 
Then they dump together quickly 
to stop Mood flow through the 
breaks, said Dr. Mario Baldini of 
Deaconess Hospital and Harvard, 
an expert on platelets and one of 
the authors of the report. Platelet 
action happens before the actual 
formation of a durable blood doL 
It is an early st a ge of wound heal- 
ing. 

Platelets were chosen for the 
studies because they are of such 
great importance in understanding 
beating and, probably, conditions 
such as atherosclerosis. 

The new method of making pic- 
tures of platelets stems partly from 
techniques used to produce ex- 
traordinarily small printed circuits 
for the computer industry, said the 
primary author of the report, Dr. 
Ralph Feder of IBM, a pioneer of 
contact X-ray microscopy. 

Living platelets are exposed to a 
flash of X-rays from a MaxweQ 
Laboratories Low Energy X-ray Il- 
lumination Source. A bas-relief, 
virtually three-dimensional image 
is fixed on a sheet of synthetic ma- 
terial sensitive to X-rays. This im- 
age is then observed under ibe elec- 
tron microscope, showing details of 
platelet structure never obtained 
before. 

in the research, platelets have 
been observed under the two kinds 
of electron microscope — transmis- 
sion and scanning — and reveal 
somewhat different structural fea- 
tures under each. The functions of 
same of the features shown in the 
pictures are totally unknown, but 
the pictures are already offering 
pew insights nun the mechanisms 
by which platelets work. 

As a key part of halting bleeding, 
platelets send out projections 
called pseudopods, and evidently 
tangle with each other and adhere 
to the blood vessel to block blood 
flow. Just how the pseudopods 
form is unknown, but X-ray mi- 
croscopy shows dearly that they 
are not just exterior projections. 
Dr. Baldini said, but have roots 
deep inside the celL 
■ Powerful Microscope Sought 

A physics professor in Chicago is 
trying to develop the world’s mosL 
powerful electron microscope, one 
that would magnify a specimen up 
to 20 million times. The Associated 
Press reported. 

Dr. Albert Crewe of Lhe Univer- 
sity of Chicago’s Enrico Fermi In- 
stitute is working on a device that 
would be three times more power- 
ful than the strongest microscope 
now in existence. That device, at 
the University of California at 
Berkeley, was developed in Japan. 

Dr. Crewe, who has done pio- 
neering research in electron mi- 
croscopy, said he hoped to com- 
plete construction of the new 
microscope by 1986. The $2.5-miI- 
tion microscope would be about 8 
feet (2.4 meters) tall and weigh 
about a ton. It would be run by a 
computer. 


Aaa 


faiiwt ctm.1 fww Kiyy nw. qiap»r of 5*dtistosogri«sis is impossible. It gle dose and is effective ag a i n st all horns. It penetrates the skin with 
snail is host to the parasite. The is endemic, propagated by the in- three types of schistosomes that in- the help of special secretions, and 
disease affects one outof 20 people creasing number of irrigation pro- feet humans. Oxanmiquine, which within two days has wriggled its 
in 74 developing countries bm is jects needed for agriculture in areas cures intestinal schistosomiasis, way into the bloodstream. Some- 

laigdy unknown in northern, icm- ■ ; 

□crate climates. “ ‘ 

Organization announced that pOoi " 1 INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 

programs begun in the early 1980s * ■ " “ “ 

had checked the ninnmng increase 

in schistosomiasis and cured a ag- ] } 

mficant number of cases. The pro- — ~ ~ 

grams in clud e new methods of de- 
tection based on rapid and 
inexpensive urine and fecal analy- 
sis, the discovery of three new 
drugs called praaquantd, oxamni- 
quinc and metrifonate that treat 

andf^ ^5^3^ requires II I MANAGEME 

disease or likdy to be affected by it 2 FUTURE SUBSIDIARY 

In Malawi where 66 percent of MANAtiFRS 

the population was affected before mnianviv-i iw Boeing Services 

the pilot programs began, the rate. AFRICA - ASIA wholly-owned subs 

was reduced to 12 percent afro one . . CnmrMnv is oilmen 

year, WHO said. In Sudan, the 50- responsible for the development management and operation ^ i , u j 

percent infection rate was reduced hotel and catering units, construction sites and site villages. 10 penorra a proaa 

m 14 percmttfter^ nKmihs. The Minimum age 30. business school or hotel school graduates, 

Phihppmes reduced its rate ate ^ us ^ experience in the field, particularly expatriate work. 

one year from 43 permit to 17 Perf^tEnglteh required. .A™ we Deed ke ? 

percent, and new cases were down Salary according to profile and experience. this five-year contTi 

66 percent plicable Array fadlil 

China, where a mil 'km cases Detailed applications should be sent under Ref. C 140 to aeement exn#»rienn 

needed treatment in 1983, com- S.H.R.M., Direction du Personnel. a^raeni expenenci 

pared with eight and a half million 113, rue de rEvtoto, 13006 MARSEILLE, France. J 'i oduction Lontr 

in 1960, has been a forerunner in ^ • Work Center Supi 

encouraging community paniopa- • Facilities Mainter 

tkm in programs against schistoso- • Shop Supervision 

miasm. Plamed with Schistosoma • Procurement Mai 

n= INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER AUDri =1 IsWCOMFaS 

small snail bearing a cover that IS leader in lhe Geld of aervieearnt^riru) Data Frocmotag Security • Hospital Maintenj 

mvulneraWe to pesticides), China “ k>okins tor ■ I • Intrusion Detectii 

has long been aware of the conse- TECHNIC AL DIRECTOR Tf vnn have re™, 


Oiuside the mail, the parasite, in countries where the disease u 
mi gnd a host within 48 endemic have been known to catch 
nrc. It penetrates the skin with schistosomiasis, but the more so- 
e help of secretions, and phisticaied hygiene of the industn- 

thiti two days has wriggled its alized world usually keeps the par- 
ty into the bloodstream. Some- asite’s life cyde from continuing. 


SHRM 


Holding Company - Catering. 
Institutions, Hotel Project Studies, 
Food Trade and Services 


requires 

2 FUTURE SUBSIDIARY 
MANAGERS 

AFRICA -ASIA 

responsible for the development management and operation 
of hotel and catering units, construction sites and site villages. 

Minimum age 30, business school or hotel school graduates, 
plus good experience in the field, particularly expatriate work. 
Perfect English required. 

Salary according to profile and experience. 

Detailed applications should be sent under Ref. C 140 to 
S.H.R.M., Direction du Personnel, 

113, rue de I'Evbchd, 13006 MARSEILLE, France. 


INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER AUDIT - 

leader In the field of acrviccB rthtiM to Pu« ProcMthg Security 


BOEING 

IS LOOKING FOR 
EX-ARMY PERSONNEL WITH 
FACILITIES ENGINEERING 
MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE. 


la looking lor ■ 

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR 


Tropieal Plants in Antarctica 

Reuters 

WELLINGTON, New Zealand 
— Scientists have found a tiny cor- 
ner of the tropics flourishing in 
Antarctica. A New Zealand-Aus- 
tralian team said tropical mosses 
and liverworts, healed by steam 
from Mount Melbourne, a volcano 
in Victoria Land, grow at an alti- 
tude of 3,000 meters (9,800 Feet). 


to take fall iwnoostkifity for ou tuuiai i y anting oernoair A UDYT/CONSUV 
TANCY /TRAINING; tor defining and drvdojptng now aexricea; for expanding 
training and I tmUi>g a —mil team of ap™!!— 

Graduate of a Vmvenitj ora Grande Ecale Technique ptini a l hut Kchnieal 
competence and practical experience of Data PhKcasng and Tdecotmmuaca- 
lioaa are more important, especially if combined with ex p erie n ce of udidu 
Ape: 30 to 40. DM he abjective, analytical and nataiaDy oriented unqnu 
problem miring and giving service. Bilingual FiendfEngbah. Hie petition ia 
baaed in Paris. 

Rennmefation will correspond tn the importance of the pott. A partnership wiJ 
be made available tn the mcceasftil candidate 

Full # — i ifiy ffnn pi$fgg and photograph Joe 
Blw04130, Inl armWimxd Hattdd Trgmno, 92521 Nao Jy Cebu France, ss 


Boeing Services International, Inc., a 
wholly-owned subsidiary of The Boeing 
Company, is currently preparing a proposal 
to perform a broad range of facilities engi- 
neering services for the U. S. Army in Kai- 
serslautern, Federal Republic of Germany. 

• And we need key project personnel for 
this five-year contract who have recent ap- 
plicable Array facilities engineering man- 
agement experiences in these areas; 

• Production Control 

• Work Center Supervision 

• Facilities Maintenance 

• Shop Supervision 

• Procurement Management 

• Architect-Engineering Services 

• SATCOM Facilities Maintenance 

• Hospital Maintenance 

• Intrusion Detection System Maintenance 
If you have recent Army experience in 

these fields, we’d like to hear from you. Just 
forward your detailed resume with salary 
requirements to: 

BOEING SERVICES INTERNATIONAL, INC. 
P.O. Box 220 -m. Cocoa Beach. FL 32931 


BO 

SERVH 



iriNAL. INC 


V.S. CilkcHship Rri/uiml .4h Equal l IppurtuHilt Etuplnp-r 


BOB 

BT> JIT APCKATA 
PE^AKUMH 

Ha EM EM CH-JIohaoh TbpcM 

ClTpy/lHHUH. 

Pa6oTaTa ce cbctom b npesewnaHe or anniHflcxH 
Ha 6i>JirapCKH h HeTeHe no MmtpotboHa Ha 
HOBHHH, KOMeHTapH, XIOnHCKH M Up., K3KT0 H 
ynacTHe b cneiuiajui3iipaHif nporpaMH icaTo 
KanefixiocKon Ha H3KycTBOTO, HayqeH h 
HH nycTpuajieH npernen, hobh mum h up. 
KBajmifrHKaiiHH: KaHnunaTHTe TpafiBa na ihsmt 
6uirapcioi neptbeKTHO. Te Tpn6Ba na HMaT 
cojihjiho o6pa30BaHHe, npnareH mac h na MoraT 
na ce H3pa3HBaT no aceH h HHTejiHreHTCH uanuH. 
HAHAJIHATA 3AI1JIATA e ot okojio 11200 
aHmuftckii Jim pii Ha roAHHa. 3a noBene 
nonpo6HocTH nHiuerre Ha cnenHHa anpec: ROLS 
(Ref. Bul/85), BBC PO Box 76, Room 906 NE, 
BUSH HOUSE LONDON WC2D 4PH 


benson 


Pan of the Schlumberg&r group and the European leader in computer graphics. 

The European Field Service Department located near Paris seeks 

Technical 
support engineers 

COMPUTER GRAPHICS HARDWARE + SOFTWARE 

You will be responsible tor: 

■ high level worldwide technical support and (raining of the lield personnel, 

■ definition of the product maintenance policy along with the design and development teams in 
Paris and California 

You should have an Engineering Degree or a good technical education and a strong firsl ■ 
expenence in the computer peripherals industry, either on the field or in the lab. 

We have good opportunities to otter to specialists of IBM Connections or Fortran and 68000 
graphic software or graphic plotters and systems. 

Through the wide span of international contacts and situations which you will have to deal with, 
you win be required to make lull use of your analytic capacities and of your good communica Hon 
skills. 

In order to apply, please wnte to us with a CVand an idea of what you Ihink you're worth to 
BENSON -zone induslrielle des Petites Hates, 1 rue Jean Lemoine - 9401 5 Crfeteii. 

WhmmU benson 


LEADING INTERNATIONAL 
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 

are looking for 

HIGHLY QUALIFIED STAFF 

preferably with experience. 

WRITE-. BOX D 2131 , 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
92521 NEU1LLY CEDEX, FRANCE. 




Internal Auditor 
International Merchant Bank 

PARIS BASED 

Internal Auditor, required by Paris-based International Merchant Bank specializing 
in corporate financial services, treasury and foreign exchange, loan management 
and bond trading. j 

Applicants should possess experience of auditing similar operations, probably 0 
obtained from working in another bank, or by employment with an international | 
accounting firm, be French and English speaking (pref. French or EEC National), c 

a 

Remuneration in accordance with experience and qualifications. ^ 

Applications with detailed curriculum vitae will be treated in the strictest confidence | 
and should be sent (reference 78208) to HAVAS CONTACT, L place du Palais-Royal I 
- F - 75001 PARIS who will transmit 


A&ENCE SP&3A1IS&E DES MG&NEURS ET CADRES 
12 Rua MmhB. 7JS436 Ftra CB3EX 09 
Tti. s 280.61.44. Ext. 71. - 285-44.40. EkL 42. 


Herpes Test Approved in US. 

United Pnsx International 

PALO ALTO. California — • 
Syntex Corp. has received Food 
and Drug Ad minis tra lion approval 
to market a speedy lest for diagnos- 
ing herpes infections. The lest, dis- 
tinguishes between facia) herpes 
and sexually transmuted genital 
herpes. 


• DBOAL JMNMBt M MIBWA- 
TIONJU. MMHSIMB BUSMESS, 45, 
Spanish national Graduate from bviinni 
School, fifteen years experience lap negoti- 
ations cni d r oc ti any mtga piedudi, W- 
vkte* importMwpart nl suv ttw world 
Frunch, EngUi, Goman, Arabic. SEEKS 

challenging po s i ti on to travel or relocate 
I onywher*. Free rfnmodiaiofy. Ref.; 
3P3-PA9SS CADRES I/JOL 
*SAUS MANAQEB, 35, Frandi, gradu- 
ate ocanci mla end man o gimant, fluent En- 
glish, Spanish, German. 13 yanrs e*peri- 
enee sale* Marketing food products 
wor l dwide. Lost ex p erience In rtn atop m e nt 
of exparl company as deputy to genera! 
manage r. Man 9f chatienge wtK study all 
proportions flom open minded company 
France or abraad m otivated by individual 
and experience any product or sendee. Ref . i 
394PARIS CADRES l/JOL 

• IfimtNXnQNAL EXECUTIVE, experi- 
ence multinational c o mpan i es U.S-A. & Eu- 
rope is looking to develop & manage 


intemotksnd busnass activities A growing 
company. Matter U.S. unwenky. Fluent En- 
gfidi, F r en c h, hoAon. Base Europe or U&A. 
Mi 3PSPAOS QUXES I/JOL 

• FRENCH HOm MANMB, 41, Under 
USA immigrant vba proems seeks executive 
position m USA or CANADA. Lang experi- 
ence of management in international & no* 
tionat ho te ls chain. Strang k n ewdedge in 
F&B, Mori ta ting & admMstration. Good 
knoiriedgeofwdf. SyA ef accounts, fluent 
English, Spanish & French no geographical 
preference. Ret . , 396AARJS CADRES 
I/JOL 

• MINCH PHAIMAOSr, 32, busteem 
school graduate. Fluent English- Five years j 
ex p erience in France and EEC countries. 1 
Tim years Hospital supplies ides. Three 
years sales manager for a French ethical I 
company In Belgium and Luxembourg avaih 
abia for sales monger positron In Ethical. > 
Disposable or cosmetic. Ret.-. 397-PAIRS ' 
CADRES h'GR. 


Futur direefeur dans 
notre filiale canadienne. 

No 1 du Nettoyage Industrial en France, notre force reside dans le professton- 
nahsme de nos equtpes et un excellent rapport quality du service rendu/pnx. 
Notre implantation tfxenle au Oudbec corma if une exparenon repute (actueUe- 
ment 2.500 personnesdans 8 agences). et nous souhaitons encore devekapper 
et creer de no uveites agences au Canada et aux USA Cette mission, news la 
confi crons & un candid at jeune, de narionalfte canadienne ou amiricaine. 
parfaitemem biHngue franpais-anglais. 

Son bon niveau de culture generate, sa connaissance de ces pays fit doii y 
avoir vecuj. la formation Ires complete ■ technique, commercials, gestion 
managemeni - que nous lui donnerons en France, et sa votonte d’enfreprendre 
et de reussir, lui permetifom de prendre a moyen terme ia responsatwiie 
complete dune agence au Canada 

Merei d'adresse: aossiei oe canaidature C v et 

11 11 pfiolc- sous re»erence 2376 CA a QV 

4 i-.» Oi.-"! " H.lur r, ar* • 








Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives ] 


Kq< available at press time 


| Dow Jones Averages 1 


Hal available at press time 


NYSE Index 




Prevtous 


Today 


Hlgb 

Law 

oom 

3PJUL 

Composite 

101.78 

10IJ6 

101J8 

101J5 

industrial 1 

117 J5 

116J8 

116X 

1 1731 

T remap. 

9X68 

97 J6 

97 J6 

97 66 

u 1111 nos 

5231 

S£!4 

5213 

52J1 

Finance 

104J9 

103JD 

VB50 

10435 


NYSE Diaries 


Nat pvalleCfe at prase lima 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Jan. 22 
Jan. 31 
Jan. IB 
Jan. 17 
Jan. IB 


Bur Salas 'Sim 
Z4UW1 661679 1,648 


549,613 


* Included In the sates figure. 


1212 

181 JOB 441864 1JH3 

181183 C7J32 1J17 

20AJ8S 488X1 1J44 


Wfedn^dajs 



Pitv.3PiA.trol 

Prmr consolidated dose umS5B 


TaUa todude TM aottunride prftes 
op to am doting on wall street 


AMEX Diaries 


Nal available at press i«"f 


NASDAQ Index 


Commit* 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Trartso. 


week Year 
Cl«« woon Aoo 
-*84? 2oU5 257.78 
787-Si 28120 £4J6 
litov — 305.90 

294.78 - 

wrn — 2S0X 

Saw - 

25459 — 25106 




Hteh 

previous 

Low 

Close 

Today 
3 PJA- 


197 JB 

196.13 

19+55 

t»7 26 


155J5 

I5£9S 




76.16 

7SA2 

;wl' 

JSJi 


mn 

19.9] 

19.93 


Camposlie 

V76J2 

175.15 

17SJ6 

XM 

E3— 


Dow Jones Bond Averages] 


| AMEX Most Actives 


Not available at press time 



Err- T sS 

Close N#« 

7130 7147 

70J2 7156 

7638 7638 


I AMEX Stock index 


Mali 

217.80 


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217 J2 


21 169 


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Rally on NYSE Seen Resuming 


Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange pushed higher (ate Wednesday 
as the boom m secondary stocks continued for 
the 13th consecutive session and blue-chip is- 
sues rgcaned the parade. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which fell 
1.87 Tuesday, was up 6.62 1266.12 an hour 


Although prices in tables on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
P.M. 


before the dose. The Dow had gained 34 points 
Monday. 

Advances led declines by a ratio of 5 to 3. 
Volume was about 107.6 million shares, down 
from ISS milli on in the like period Tuesday. 

Prices were higher in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

Analysts said recent trading patterns provid- 
ed evidence that the basic thrust of the stock 
market was toward higher ground. 

Before the stock market opened, the Labor 
Department reported consumer prices in- 
creased 02 percent in December. For all of 
1984. the inflation rate was 4 percent 

The inflation rale for 1984 was only slightly 
higher than the 3.8 percent in 1983 and 3.9 
percent in 1982. As recently as 1980 the infla- 
tion rate was 12.9 percent. 

OPEC sources denied a Kuwaiti report that a 
cartel committee has derided to recommend 
lowering the group’s benchmark crude oil price- 
A meeting of OPEC ministers is scheduled for 
Geneva next week. 


Prospects for moderate economic growth 
against a background of moderate inflation and 
lower energy prices have helped push the stock 
market higher since the first of the year. Broad 
stock market averages hit all-time highs in the 
Tuesday session. 

•‘We’ve got ourselves a strong market here, 
the fact that it slowed down in the last couple of 
days is noting to be concerned about,’ said 
Keith Pinsoneault of Underwood Neuhaus & 
Co_ Houston. 

Pointing to the string of consecutive sessions 
with advances lopping declines and the move of 
the Dow industrials above the 1,240-1.250 area 
Monday. Mr. Pinsoneault said it “suggests a 
very strong underpinning to the market.” 

Among basic problems, be sees a lack of cash 
by institutional. Also, investors are worried 
about the federal budget deficit and tax propos- 
als. Some disappointments in corporate earn- 
ings repents are likely too, he said 

Hewlett Packard near the top of the active list 
and lower at midday. 

Phillips Petroleum advanced in active trad- 
ing. The stock rose on heavy volume Tues- 
*day, touching off speculation someone was try- 
ing to accumulate a position. T. Boone Pickens 
Jr. recently called off an attempt to gain con troi 
of Phillips. 

Other ofl issues were lower at midday includ- 
ing Exxon. Indiana Standard, Texaco, Chevron 
and Atlantic Richfield 

Southern Co. was off a fraction on heavy 
volume. A block of 600,000 shares crossed at 
18W. 

American Express was higher at midday. 

AT&T was up a fraction on heavy volume. 


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Statistics Index 


AMEX prim 

P.11 

Eantfngs mvrts F. 9 

AMEX hWWkalP^- 

Fling ran mm 

P.11 

NVSE ariees 

P.ft 

Gold marten 

P.7 

NYSE MshvfaMi 

Intend rates 

P.7 

amdon stocks 

P.12 

Market summary P.4 

Currency rates 

P.7 

Options 

P.S 

comneamsc 

P. B 

OTC start 

Pj— 

DtvtMKb 

P. ■ 

Other markets 

P.I3 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


RmlbSfribunr 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 6 

PageT 


WALL STREET WATCH 

Wall Street Slow to Match 
A Global Rise in Equities 

By EDWABD UOHBBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

W -ITH Wall Street ldckiog up its heels now, has it 
finally decided to join the party? Major stock markets 
worldwide have been rising to new highs lately, and 
Geneva-based Capital Int ernational 's world index, 
which combines the performances of all the principal exchanges, 
established a record this week. 

Wall Street, in fact, has also touched a new high in its current 
surge, as measured by Capital IntemadonaTs USA. index, 
which trades the stock prices of 320 larger American companies. 

"January is always a strong month for equities, especially in 
Europe,” noted NHly Sikorsky, a director of Capital Internation- 
al, which makes statistical surveys of world stock markets and 
manages funds for institutional investors. 

She pointed out that exchanges in the Britain, West Germany, 
France and the Netherlands are aS higher than they have ever 
been, while Hong Kong - 

Analysts note that 
Wall Street is 
lagging a worldwide 
rise in stock prices. 


stocks, up 1 3 percent, nave en- 
joyed the biggest gain of all so 
far in 19B5. Sweden is second, 

8.6 percent higher already this 
year. Japanese stocks are also 
at their best levels ever. 

But while other equity mar- 
kets have been generally 

strong, Wall Street has lagged 

for the last 18 months, trading sideways as measured by prices of 
larger issues, and frustraiingly lower for secondary stocks. More- 
over, leadership has been capricious, whipsawing investors who 
have tried to pick winners or make up for losers. 

Mrs. Sikorsky commented that Capital International’s studies 


of 1,600 companies worldwide show U.S. stocks are "fairly close" 
in valuation now compared with non-US. companies. Both are 
selling at a price/ earnings ratio of approximately 10 times 1984 
profits, she said. . 

How well European stock markets perform in 1985, she be- 
lieves, depends largely on whether government policies will "be 
geared to pick up economic steam” in the individual countries. 

"In view of the uncertainty there, plus where interest rates and 
the US. dollar are heading, they arc Likely to be analysts’ markets 
in the year ahead, with good companies and good stocks more 
important than markets,” she said. 

O N the subject of the dollar, a crucial factor for foreigners 
investing on Wall Street, U.S. economist A. Gary Shilling 
observes, is that Europeans have all but given up attempt- 
ing to predict its value versus other currencies. 

“They’ve been so badly burned in the past by getting into the 
yen or Deutsche mark, particularly — or even snorting the dollar 
— that now they’re not even trying to guess,” he said. “The 
feeding is that it’s high, but nobody wants to be a hero.”' 

Mr. Shilling who visited nine European countries in five days 
last week talking to leading money managers in conjunction with 
Alexander Brown & Sons, has been predicting a resurgent dollar 
since the summer of 1982. "And a whole host of factors remain 
for it to stay strong,” he asserted. 

Stan Weinstein, editor of the Professional Tape Reader, cites 
the c o ntin u in g strength of other exchanges as a principal reason 
for Wall Street remaining both poised to advance higher now and 
looking good long texm. ' , 

“What’s more, major stock exchanges never did get into 
trouble Hke the Dow Jones,” he said. '"That’s . more than partly 
why t never hdsaine too bearish onU.& ^ this past year.” * 
He maintains dial there has always, been a strong correlation 
among vrorid markets, with non-American exchanges "giving a 
good warning when they top . oat to be cautious about Wall 
Street” He mid he first noticed the phenomenon in 1973 and 
“you can find it in every major market move since.” 

Mr. Weinstein expects Wall Street to top 1,300 on the Dow 
after correcting slightly from its current level "the nan-believers 
will then become the believers,” he declared. 

Dana Stewart, technical analyst at Bear Steams, adds: “It has 
(Continued on Page 9 , Col I) 



Late i nter bank rates an Jan. 23 , excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Pori*. Nbw York rates at 


2 PM. 











S 

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BLF. 

S>. 

Yen 

Amsterdam 

15855 

4J01 

112.77 *34.935 










81* 

837 

— — 

5447* 

1U04 *14142 V 

Bnmeiua) 

naK 7O.MS20 

DOTS 

45378 

3451* 

17415 

— 

234558 

2501 * 

Frankfurt 

11739 

MSI 

■ 

32485* 

142ft x 

8153* 

4778* 

11840* 

145* 

Lenta DU 

1.1105 


xsn 

104118 2.167081 

ms 

70485 

2.7748 282415 

Milan 

1JS5M2. 

.18090 

41577 

201.13 

— — 

SUM 

30463 

72948 

7486 

NewYarMc] 


.1.112 

117 

7X25 

195800 

3985 

tlTS 

U72 

254.14 

parte 

7.7105 

10533 

ZQW 

— — 

4971 * 

znai 

1X375 • 

3437 4411 • 

TOfcYO 

254.125 

285L77 

am 

3425 

1347* 

7090 

37744* 

7447 

— 

Zurich 

XftftTftB 

19642 

U37S* 

2747* 

0.1372 

7441* 

441 • 

— 

1453 • 

1 ECU 

UO 

8427 

27339 

47766 

144437 

2JC7B 44447*1 

7721 177478 

1 SDR 

0.774395 

8971231 

39724 

744177 

NA 349366 








61 

4754 

240551 20437 


Dollar Values 


184* Austrian kMBm 
UU7 hMtehMC 
U5M Omenta S 


Per 

ILL* 

_ * Censer 

Seel*. 

F*r 

U34 

_ * Cvrancr 

Per 

UJU 

14315 

urns trite * 

19118 

04S42 StaMreS 

24*18 

BJU 

09015 Iran state 

*6945 

04435 LMricaerand 2498 

6343 

347 nmaM Moor 

flHW| 

00012 S. Keren wm 

13145 

1425* 

0402 . Motor, rtoeoft' 

24875 

00057 5aen.MHetD 

12545 

114115 

0.1007 Morw. krone 

7.18 

1.1103 Sued, knee 

94*5 

64315 

0554 PWLMSO 

18051 

04055 Taiwan 1 

3741 


04(68 Port.Mdo 

i7i.ee 

041*2 TkalboM 

27425 

ID 

747* 

U2M Stalttnl 

30*15 

84723 UJLH. (Brtjam 

14725 


LUOS FlnatafaeMrt 

uan 

is. Qroskdrocftma 
1.1383 HmKomS . 
t Stamp: U 375 irtatii 

lol ComnaffM fr« IM Amountsnertrt to toff one pound (el Amount* mM lo tow one dotfor (’I 
units in we no units of i 400 ivi umi* o* nos 

MjQ.: net quota; MA: not crraOoOte. . _ , . 

Sources: amur du Bene fax {Brussels)/ Banco Commerdole ttohana t Milan <>; Chemical 
tNew Yarn).- Ban** NaMonafm On Parts (Paris); IMF (SOR is Banova Anode at 


fiUH wta t iniMstaaml Ulnar. rhraL tttmoaU. Other data from Routers and AP. 



Eurocurrency Deposits 


Jan. 23 


Swtaa 

■ Donor EFMort Franc 
BH.-8H. SV» - s*k 5fe -Sfti 
toh - K 5»W - 5*1. 5* - SVi 
Btb-Sh 5V.- 59k m -9fs 
8*. -a«i S*fc-. 591. 5ft i -5Hi 


Starting Frame ECU SDR 

tttfa- llfc 1M< tOflt 9lh - 7Y.-B* 
im-lK. 70*. U» Wfc -7* 7 V. - 8 ft. 
12H.- 12ft. lOftt- IBM m -ftta 8 -BN 
■ n- cit ™ - 11*- lift. 11 -lift.**-** VA -Wi 

-TO 5* -SVi. «fc -** «» -*» 

i applicable lo MmHeetk deposits of SI million minimum (arena! volenti. 

Guaranty (dollar. D* SF. Pound. FF); UoyOs Bant (ECU): Ctoor* 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Jan. 23 


be. -a* 

Source: Reuters. 


a rim. 


limn. 

mu -m 


8* -•* 


9 ft. -»* 


Discount Me 
Federal Fond* 

Prime Rate 
Broker Loan Rote 
Comm. Pater, 3MW days 
3-month TreawTV Bills 
6-manth Treasury Bills 
CD's 36-59 days 
CD's 60-87 days 

West Cam«w 

Lombard Rate 

. Overni gh t Rate 
One Month interbank 
3-month t n tertwn t t 
fr-month Interbank 

Prance . 

intervention Rate 
Calf Money 
OnB-monJh Interbank 
imanm In ter ba nk 
(month hrtw t wi te 


Owe Free. 

B B 

BW B 

10ft) 1«4 

MOW t-IW 
■ TBS 747 
7J8 74ft 
74* M0 
745 74ft 
7JV 7J8 


558 540 
550 530 
BBS 545 
550 550 
555 5.05 


UVSi WVb 

w» to* 
im ibw 

MRS 

JM W 


Britain 

Bank Base Rato 
Call Mann 
91 -day Treasury Bill 
Mwntti Interbank 


Discount Rate 
CoH Money 
d&dav Interbank 


CMC* Prw. 

13 12 

12th Utt 
12* J1» 

12V. 12 I/M 


5 3 

ft* tv, 

ft 5/M ft 5/16 


L 


Gold Prices 


] 


Sources: Romans ammonhonk. OridltLV- 
on note Herd* Ban*. Bank at Tokyo. 


Ail PAL 

304.15 30285 - 1» 

30X15 - — US 

30X97 30239 — X53 

30X95 30X50 — 680 

30X15 30085 - 6*5 

— 30140 — 2.10 

OJflclot Hetew lor London. Paris and Luxem- 

txiuro, oeentna and ctoslno prices lor Hora Kons 

and Lurk*. New Yort COmw arrant oontraa. 
AH Him In U£* per ae»ce. 

Source: Reuters. 


Hon Kano 
Luxembourg 
Ports 11X5 Mlo) 
zurkA 
Lenta 
New York 


Prices 
Rise 4% 
In U.S. 

*84 Was 3d Year 
Of Moderation 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Consumer 
prices rose 4 percent in 1984, giving 
the United States its best three-year 
inflation rate since the late 1960s, 
the government reported Wednes- 
day. 

Last year's increase was only a 
slight deterioration from the 3.8- 
pfcrcent inflation rale of 1983. 
Prices had risea 3.9 parent in 1 982. 

A White. House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, said the repot 
showed that “we have frozen infla- 
tion in place for three straight 
years.” 

At the beginning of 1984, most 
analysts were predicting that prices 
would rise around 5 percent as the 
economy waged its second year of 
recovery from the recession. •’ 

Despite the strongest economic 
growth in three decades, however, 
inflation came in one percentage 
point under expectations. 

Analysts are now predicting 
more price moderation in 1985. 

“We don’t really see any signifi- 
cant price increases in any of the 
categories,” said Donald Ratajc- 
zak, bead of the economic forecast- 
ing unit at Georgia State Universi- 
ty. “The world trend in inflation is 
downward and our trend is even 
stronger because of the dollar." 

Wednesday’s report was the sec- 
ond round of good inflation news 
in 24 bouis. 

On Tuesday, using a different 
method of calculation, the Com- 
merce Department put last year’s 
inflation rate at 3.7 percent 

l 


report said prices rose 0J2. percent 
in December, a gain that matched 
the increase in November and in 
three other months as the best of 
theyear. 

The Consumer Prire Index stood 
at 315_5 in December, meaning that 
goods cooing S10 in 1967 would 
have cost $3155 last month. 

For the three years ending in 
1984, consumer prices were up 12.1 
percent, the best showing since 
prices rose 115 percent in 1966-68. 

As recently as 1980 prices soared 
12.4 percent in one year, following 
a l 33-percent jump in 1979 as the 
Iranian revolution sent oil markets 
into turmoil, creating gasoline 
shortages around the world. 

Since then, the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries has 
fallen on hard times as importing 
nations adopted conservation mea- 
sures and OPEC began to face in- 
creasedl competition from countries 
such as Britain that don't belong to 
the cartel 


Fiat Profit 
Widened by 
22.9% in ’84 

Ratten 

TURIN — Fiat SpA reported 
Wednesday a group operating 
profit of about 1.6 trillion lire 
(£821.8 million) for 1984, a 22.9- 
percent increase over the 1 .302-bil- 
lion Kre in profit reported in 1983. 

Consolidated revenue in 1984 
amounted lo 23306 billion lire, a 
5.6-percent increase over the 
21.985 billion in 1983. 

Fiat Auto SpA, the company’s 
automobile unit, recorded a 05- 
percent increase in revenue, to 125 
trillion lire from 1 1.888 trillion lire. 
It showed a 3 .^percent increase in 
vehicle production, to 137 million 
units. 

In a letter to shareholders. Fiat’s 
chairman, Giovanni Agnelli, said 
the results were “widely satisfying” 
given the weakness of the automo- 
bile market in Europe. 

In the European market. Fiat in- 
creased its share to 133 percent 
from 12.8 percent in 1983, fie said. 

Mr. Agnelli said that the group’s 
relatively modest increase in reve- 
nue resulted from lackluster mar- 
ket conditions and decisions by 
Fiat subsidiaries to restrict their 
price increases. 

Mr. Agnelli said the Thema 
model, launched by Lancia, a Fiat 
subsidiary, had done well since it 
was introduced in November. 

Mr. Agnelli voiced fears, howev- 
er, that Italian inflation, having 
fallen steadily in 1984, might begin 
to rise again this year. He said that 
his greatest specific concern was 
labor costs, which he described as 
the major generator of domestic 
inflation. 

He said scone wage increases had 
already been agreed upon, and that 
others resulted from automatic in- 
crements that had exceeded the 
government's target of 7 percent 
for 1985. 

In the results that were released 
Wednesday, Fiat also reported that 
group investments amounted to 
2.158 trillion lire, against 1009 tril- 
lion in 1983. 

This included expenditures of 
661 billion lire for research and 
development in 1984, compared 
with 556 billion in 1983. 

Fiat showed consolidated debts 
of about 4.4 trillion lire, a decline 
from the 5.401 trillion at the end of 
1983. 


Debating Cost of Being Canadian 


Fearfully, Ottawa 
Studies Closer 

Ties With U.S. 

By Douglas Martin 

New York Times Service 

TORONTO — If there were 
no border' between the United 
States and Canada, economists 
point out, the consequent tariff 
reductions could cut the cost of 
living in Canada by as much as 
10 percent and the price of some 
shoes and clothing by a fifth. 

But to many Canadians, the 
savings would not be worth it 
“We always paid a higher 
price for being Canadian,” said 
Jack Granaistein, a historian at 
York University in Toronto. 
“People woe willing to pay that 
price because we didn't want to 
be Americans.” 

This attitude was buttressed 
by the fear that, without tariff 
protection, Pnnadian producers 
would be unable to compete with 
much larger U5. companies. 

Now, the Progressive Conser- 
vative government of Prime 
Minister Brian Mulroney, which 
took office late last year, is 
studying a large-scale liberaliza- 
tion of trade between Cana da 
and the United States. Even 
though the thinking slops well 
short of any customs union or 
“common market,” the topic is 
so sensitive in Ottawa’s bureau- 
cracy that one official calls it “a 
political blade hole.” 

The thought is that to survive 
in the increasingly competitive 
world of in terra tional trade, Ca- 
nadian enterprises need to be as 
big and as efficient as their 
American competitors. 

As a result, a spirited debate is 
beginning here over the nature of 
the world's largest economic 
partnership, with two-way trade 
estimated at 51 20 billion (905 
million Canadian dollars) last 
year. At issue is whether Canada 





Pierre Elliott Trudeau 


win emphasize nationalist con- 
cerns or move to a broader, more 
continental virion. It is a debate 
that finds echoes through thehis- 
toiy of this nation. 

Canada's first prime minister 
won election in the 1 9th century 
by backing tariffs. His imposi- 
tion of them is still called “the 
National Policy.” and the Liber- 
al Party sank to defeat in 1911 by 
advocating free trade. That ef- 
fectively removed the topic from 
political discussion for two gen- 
erations. 

But the increasingly competi- 
tive nature of world trade, exac- 
erbated by protectionist moves 
in many countries, may have 
changed the political equation, 
altering the nature of the genera- 
tions-old discussion. 

"Any of the major industrial 
countries have a substantial do- 
mestic market and we don't,” 
said Rowland C.. Frazee, chair- 
man of the Royal Bank of Cana- 
da. “If this country is going to 
continue to prosper, it's going to 
have to be more involved with 
trade, especially with the United 
States.” 

The “cmly option," Mr. Frazee 
warns, is free trade. Otherwise, 


Brian Mulroney 


be predicts that Canada will be 
“left in the hinterland.” 

But opposition remains exten- 
sive. Walter L Gordon, a former 
finance minister and a leader of 
Panmiian economic nationalists 
for years, worries that Mr. Mul- 
roney’s government "could come 
dose to selling out the country.” 

Similarly, Leonard Neal, pres- 
ident of Tamco LuL, a Windsor, 
Ontario, gearshift maker, pre- 
dicts that the natural behavior of 
American companies would be 
to convert Canadian manufac- 
turing plants to “warehousing 
and distribution operations." 

From the nationalist perspec- 
tive, the chief problem with free 
trade is the fact that fanwdian 
manufacturing is nearly half- 
owned by foreigners, with Amer- 
icans making up four-fifths of 
that. 

Nonetheless, Ottawa is pro- 
ceeding with its goal of develop- 
ing a specific negotiating] 
al to present to Wa 
Ottawa's various economic min- 
istries are dying to prepare a 
preferred option or range of op- 
tions on free trade, to be made 

(CoBtfcmed on Page 9, CoL 2) 


Volvo Reports 
Higher Profits, 
Clark Venture 


Reports About OPEC 
Push Down Oil Prices 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — CHJ prices fdl in 
the open market Wednesday as re- 
ports surfaced that an OPEC com- 
mittee had recommended a reduc- 
tion of $1 to $250 a barrel in the 
cartel's benchmark price for crude 
oil. 

OPECs deputy secretary general 
denied the reports, however, and 
was quoted as saying that the com- 
mittee did not discuss the price of 
the reference grade at its recent 
meeting in Saudi Arabia. 

As the conflicting reports circu- 
lated, oil industry analysts said the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries no longer appeared 
strongly committed to defending 
its S29-a-barrd standard for Arabi- 
an tight oiL 

“J think some cut is coming,” 
said Stephen Smith, an ofl analyst 
for Data Resources Inc., a private 
consulting service in Lexington. 
Massachusetts. “1 think they’ve 
tossed in the towel on $29 ” 

On the spot or non-contract mar- 
ket, Arabian light oil for Februaiy 
delivery was quoted Wednesday at 
$27.75 a band, off $135 from its 
official price and down 15 cents 
from Tuesday, according to Teler- 
ate Energy Service, a private mar- 
ket information business. 

Meanwhile, West Texas interme- 
diate, the major US. grade of 
crude, was quoted at $25.10 on the 
spot market, off 30 cents from 
Tuesday as it hovered at levels last 
seen five years ago. 

Pressure on OPEC continued to 
come from outside the cartel. 

Oil industry sources in Europe, 
who spoke on condition (hat they 
not be identified, said Wednesday 


that the government-run British 
National Gal Corp. was continuing 
to sdi most of its crude oil at spot- 
market prices, which are aboulfca 
hand wlow Britain’s official price 
of $28.65 a barreL 

Company officials would not 
comment 

Britain, which is still buying oil 
from North Sea producers at the 
official price, has been studying a 
change to a pricing formula more 
dosdy tied to spot markets but has 
so far put off a decision. 

Earlier Wednesday, knowledge- 
able oil industry sources in Saudi 
Arabia, who spoke on condition 
that they not be identified, said 
that a recommendation prepared 
for Monday’s OPEC meeting in 
Geneva proposes cutting the price 
of Arabian tight to $28 a barreL 

Kuwait’s news agency later 
quoted an unidentified OPEC offi- 
cial as confirming the proposed $1 
cut 

in 
com- 
mittee had proposed reducing (he 
price gap between Arabian light 
and Arabian heavy oils to under $2 
from the current differential of 
$250. 

That led to same reports of a cut 
in the benchmark price to $2650, 
the current price of Arabian heavy 
oiL 

But Fadhi) al-Chaiabi, the depu- 
ty secrciary general of OPEC and a 
participant at the committee meet- 
ings Sunday and Monday, was 
quoted by OPECs official news 
agency as decribing reports erf a 
$250 reduction in Arabian Light as 
“totally untrue.” 


Reports in two newspapers ix 
Saudi Arabia said the OPEC com 


Apple Unveils 
2 Products in 
OfficeSystem 

The Associated Press 

■ SAN JOSE, California — Apple 
Computer Inc, stepping up its ef- 
fort to challenge International 
Business Machines Corp. in the 
business market, introduced 
Wednesday a networking system 
that allows up to 32 of Apple’s 
Macintosh personal computers to 
share information. 

Bui Apple, conceiting that it 
must coexist “with the IBM 
world, ” said its network eventually 
will accomodate personal comput- 
ers matte by IBM. 

The network was one of two 
"Macintosh Office” products that 
Apple planned to introduce for- 
mally at its annual shareholders 


The other is a $7,000 laser print- 
er that can print drawings and 
charts as well as text in a variety of 
type styles and sizes. 

Since 1981, much of Apple's 
strength has been in the home and 
educatio nal markets, but the com- 
pany has struggled to gamer atten- 
tion among business users of com- 
puters. 

Conversely, IBM has quickly ris- 
en to dominance iu the office mar- 
ket, where its personal computer is 
considered the industry standard 
by most analysts. 

A year ago, Apple introduced 
Macintosh as its new mainline 
product, and the machine received 
high marks for its speed, ease of use 


By Juris Kaza 

InrematUmat Herald Tribune 

GOTHENBURG. Sweden — 
AB Volvo, the big Swedish auto- 
motive group, announced Wednes- 
day that its 1984 earnings would 
more than double year- earlier re- 
sults and that it had agreed to 

merge its construction -equipment 
operations into a joint-venture to 
be set up with dark Equipment 
Co. of the United States. 

The resulting company, which 
would have annual sales of around 
$800 million based on 1984 com- 
bined results, would be the world's 
third-largest maker of heavy-con- 
struction equipment after Caterpil- 
lar Tractor Co. of the United States 
and Komatsu Ltd. of Japan. 

Under terms of the proposal, 
which requires U.S. and Swedish 
regulatory approval, Clark's Clark 
Michigan Co. would combine with 
Volvo BM AB into a new company 
to be set up in the Netherlands. 

Meanwhile, Volvo said prelimi- 
nary results for 1984 show that its 
pretax earnings rose 101 percent 
over 1983, to 7.63 billion kronor 
($674.6 million), from 3.78 trillion 
kronor. The automaker said, how- 
ever, that the strong increase re- 
flected an extraordinary gain of 
138 bfition kronor from the dives- 
titure of share holdings in other 
companies. 

Operating earnings, excluding 
extraordinary items, rose 47 per- 
cent, to 6.65 btlhon kronor, from 
45 billion kronor in 1983, the com- 
pany said. 

Volvo said that its higher operat- 
ing earnings reflected improved 
profits from both cars and trucks 
and lower losses from its energy 
division. Volvo did not give a 
breakdown of earnings by division 
in the preiuzdnaiy report 

The company said group sales 
fdl 8 percent for the year, to 872 
billion kronor, from 99.64 billion 
kronor in 1983. Volvo said the drop 
reflected a deliberate decrease in 
energy-trading activities as well as 
the removal from consolidated ac- 
counts of subsidiaries in which Vol- 
vo's holding have been reduced. 

Car sales, sparred by strong de- 
mand in North America, rose 20 
percent, to 302 billion kronor, and 
exceeded production capacity, the 
company said. Truck sales rose 36 
percent, to 153 lriSion kronor. 

Volvo said fourth-quarter earn- 
ings rose 13 percent from a year 
earlier, to 643 million kronor from 
569 million, but were down sharply 


from 921 million kronor in the 
third quarter. 

Pehr GyUeshammar, Volvo's 
chairman and chief executive, said 
the apparently low fourth-quarter 
earnings reflected special circum- 
stances and the uneven division of 
costs and revenues during theyear. 

Gdsta ReneUL Volvo's chief fi- 
nancial officer, said the down trend 
in quarterly earnings, wen when 
special factors are removed. **wm 
affected by tbe decline in Swedish 
competitiveness” as well as the 
strooggenerai economic upturn be- 
hind first and second quarter re- 
sults. 

Volvo posted earnings of 2.6 bil- 
lion kronor in the first quarter of 
1984 while second quarter earn- 
ings, reflecting extraordinary in- 
come, totaled 3.466 billion kronor. 

Shortly after releasing the pre- 
liminary results, Volvo's managing 
director, Hakan Frisinger. an- 
nounced the plan to combine Volvo 
construction-equipment business 
with Clark’s. 

The new company would retain 
its current nameplates — Volvo 
BM. Michigan, and Euclid — and 
would be managed by a holding 
company in the Netherlands. 

Terms of the proposal call for 
both parents to take 50-50 stakes in 
the new company and to contribute 
$100 million in assets to it. 


Pound Fatts 
To Record Low 

Reuters 

LONDON — The pound feU 
sharply in active trading 
Wednesday to dose at a record 
low in London as oil prices 
slipped and the threat of central 
bank intervention receded, 
dealers said. 

The pound dosed at $1.1 105, 
down from Tuesday’s 1.1240 
close. Against the Deutsche 
mark, the dollar closed at 
3. 1739, up more than a pfennig 
from its previous finish. 
Against the Swiss franc, the 
dollar slipped to 2.6768, a little 
below Tuesday’s close of 
26790. 

“After all the rhetoric from 
finance ministers about inter- 
vention, it would be very foolish 
for the Bank of England to let it 
go through $1.11," one U.S. 
bank dealer said. 


Pratt Wins Engine Contract 


EC Unemployment Is Record 11.3% 

The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — Unemployment in the European Community rase 
to a record 113 percent of the work Trace in December; with about 
100,000 more people out of work than at the start of 1984, the EC 
statistics office said Wednesday. 

Tbe December rate was up from 11.1 percent in November and 103 
percent a year ear tier. 

An estimated 13.1 minio n people were reported on unemploymail 
rolls at the end of the year, compared with 13 million in January. 

The unemployment trend in ibe 10-nation EC is running counter to 
a downward pattern in the United Stales, where the jobless rate in . 
December was 72 percent of the civilian work force and the number 
of people working rose to a record high. 

The EC statistics office said the unemployment rates in nine of the 
10 member countries rose last year. Denmark was the exception, with 
its^unemployment rale falling to 102 percent from 10.4 percent in 

Ireland recorded the highest rale fra 1984. al 36.7 percent, up from 
15 percent in 1983. Luxembourg’s was the lowest, at 1.7 percent, up 
from 15 percent. 

The unemployment rates reported fay the EC for individual coun- 
tries usually do not match those reported by the national governments 
because the community adjusts the figures for comparison 


said h sold more than 250,000 
dntoshes last year, exceeding its 

gpwl- 

Now, Apple is hoping to increase 
the appeal of the Macintosh to 
small businesses and dusters of 
workers in large companies by 
making it possible to connect its 
machines with each other and with 
products from IBM. 

Some industry analysts said that 
the network is being introduced 
just in time because Macintosh 
sates have begun to slow and that 
Apple will have to further pene- 
trate the market for office equip- 
ment to retain its momentum. 

“With Macintosh sales flatten- 
ing, they have to do something to 
reposition and enhance the Macin- 
tosh line and I do think they have 
some attractive offerings,” said Jan 
Lewis of InfoCorp, a research firm 
in Cupertino, California, where 
Apple is headquartered. 

The network, called “Apple- 
Talk,” can link up to 32 Macintosh 
personal computers or peripheral 
products — such as printers — j 
within an area of 1,000 feet (about 
300 meters), Apple said. 


The Associated Press 

EAST HARTFORD, Connecti- 
cut — Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
announced Wednesday that it had 
won a contract to supply a new 
PAW engine to Pan American 
World Airways for its recent order 
of 12 Airbus Industrie jetliners. 

The contract for the engines and 
spare parts is valued at $500 mil- 
lion, a company spokesman said. 

In addition. Pan Am selected a 
second engine developed by Pratt 
& Whitney and four non-American 
companies to power 16 smaller Air- 
bus jets. 

Pratt & Whitney, a subsidiary of 
United Technologies Corp„ had 
been in fierce competition with 
General Electric Co., which had 
offered updated versions of older 
engines for the Pan Am contract. 

Arthur Wegner, president of 
Pratt & Whitney, caned the order 
"a significant milestone" in the re- 
vival of the company's 
pressed commercial-engine 
ness. 

The company said the Pan Am 
decision means it can move toward 
large-scale production of its big 
new PW4000 engine, which is still 
under development. Development 
of the PW4000 was viewed as a 
gamble by Pratt & Whitney and its 
parent corporation. 

In September, Pan Am an- 
nounced that it would acquire 12 
twin-engine A3 1 0-300 airliners and 
16 smaller, twin-engine A320s, 


with options to acquire 13 more 
A3 1 0s and 34 more A320s. 

Pratt & Whitney offered its 
PW4000 powerplani for Lhe wide- 
body A310, against a derivative 
Genoa! Electric engine called the 
CF6-80C2. 

Engine orders for the smaller 
A320 were sought by the five-com- 
pany combine, International Aero 
Engines, headquartered in East 
Hartford, which is developing the 
V2500 engine. The competition for 
that order was another derivative 
engine called the CFM56-5, offered 
by a GE partnership with the 
French firm Snecma. 

Jeff KrieodJer, Pan Ain’s vice 
president for corporate communi- 
cations, said Wednesday that the 
airline's decision represented a 
“double victoiy” for Pratt & Whit- 
ney, which has a 30-percent interest 
in the International Aero consor- 
tium. 

Rolls-Royce of Britain also has a 
30-percent interest, and three com- 
panies in West Germany, Japan 
and Italy have smaller shares. 

Mr. Kriendter said the firm en- 
gine orders announced by Pan Am 
were worth $269 million, but the 
need for spare engines and options 
put the contract’s potential total 
value at more than $500 million. 

lhe Airbus jets, manufactured 
by a consortium of European man- 
ufacturers, will be delivered be- 
tween 1987 and 1989. 



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and executive charter with a fleet of. 

5 Ciurion n - 1 Levin 35 - 1 BA 125- 1 Falcon 10-1 Falcon 20 *6 Falcon 50 
6 Gulfstrean D/ni - 1 OC9-I Boeing 737- 5 Boeing 727 - 1 Boeing 707-1 DC4W) 


B**l, Cacra. Miaicfc. Zwricfa Had office Europe: Jes Avnbon 

jaUiRifadb Head office Middle E«t: JteAvuoaa 

Boston, Waliinpoui D.C Had office Noah America: Jet Amnon 


Zuridi Phone (D1)S1420Q2 Tk. »«20 
JtijttUi Phone (1)2201888 Tk 205 551 
BchUM Ptwiw(M7)Znil«) Tlx. 951 195 


E.F. HUTTON 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT 

ROMNI A. M ATTAT1A 

VICE PRESIDENT 
E.F. HUTTON & COMPANY INC. 
AND 

JAMES V. KIDD 

VICE PRESIDENT 
E.F. HUTTON & COMPANY INC. 

HAVE JOINED OUR GENEVA OFFICE 


HPHutton 

INTERNATIONAL 

13, ROUTE DE FLORISSANT 
TELEPHONE: 46 99 44 






Page8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


Wednesdays 


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37% 29% WalsMk M 
51% 30* WellsF 116 
50 40 WetF pf5J3e 

28% 22% Wei FM 280 
2D* 13* Wendy sJ8 
27% I6ta WestCo 84 
40 34 WPenP p4650 

50 34% WstPtP 280 

17% 9% wstcJT 0184 
S* 2% WnAIrl. 


1$2 334 9% B% 9% + * 

J2424B4 45% 44% 45* + 14 
1817 449 u47% 47% <7%+ % 
7® 30 19% 20 + * 

1J IB 47 u36 35* 35*+ * 

35 7 38*U34% 34* 34% + « 
45 B 344 19* 19% T9* 

2905 34% S3* 24W.+ * 

48131894 37% 36% 37V. 

12 B 240 19* 18% 19 
6513 64 74 ta 34 34* 

55 JU45W 45* 45*+ lft 
11 7 247 19* W* W%+ % 
18 183400 u50* 49% 90*+% 
U15 67 25% 24ft 2£ + * 
XI 10 1 9% 9% 9% — * 

26 4% AM A%+ * 

.9162033 u23 22* 23 + lft 

1514 39 36 35% 35%+% 

62 7 133 51% 51 SI* 

11. 34 45* 45% 45*+ % 

10.13 44 37% 27% 27*+* 

15 U 2540 10* 18% U%+ * 
X210 29 19* 19% 19%+% 
II. 213039* 38* 39*+l 
SJ 6 48 39% 38% 38% + % 
19 11% 11% 11%+ ta 
2*20 4 3* 4 + * 


2% 

% Wt Air wt 


2*1 

nti 

Ilk 

llk+ ta 


flta WAJr pf2 

16 

209 

17% 

12 

12%+ ta 

13% 

SVW/ 

1 r pfll4 

16 

473ul3% 

13 

13% +1 

11 Ik 

4 WC 

VA 


lift 

4% 

4% 

*% — % 

53% 

47 WC 

NA PT735 

16 

17 

48 

47% 

48 + Vi 


U. cSCfl u31ta 30* 31 +3* 


MO 34* 34* 34* 


11 2990 48% 47* 48 ta — ta 


21 30* JO 30 
10 u23ta 23% 23% — * 
S 23 27% 22%+ * 


11 z2SQ 56% 56 SAM— ta 
19141574 45% 44% 4S%+% IS* 

73 i: in2ta mi ta loita— m ■tl*' 

3 6 412 14% It* 16*— ta 5* Si. 


109 81 

37* 5% 
■7% 24% 
69 26* 

9% 2ta 
15* 4% 

48% 20 
30% 5* 


4 IDS* 105% ICS*— ta 


50 34 3% 3* 3* 

9 362 11* 11* 11* 

25 11 11 11 

859 40 33% 33ta 33 ta— * 

&J 13 514 28% 27% 28M + % 


11 3 85 15% ISta 15% 

15. 50 26* Wi 26* 

16 Z1X» 15% 14% I5%+ * 


15. 11 IT* 12% 12* 

1513 21 21 2D% 20%—% 

82* 1 38* 31* 38*— ta 


40* 31% 

34 25 

44% 34% 
51 43% 

92 74* 

35 13* 

43 31* 

38 25 

49* 34* 
45 24* 

49 47* 

45* 34% 



5%— 1ft 
71 + * 


35 —1 
30 

49 ta— % 


65 8 43 34% 34 
8 19 16* 16 


34*+ * 
16 - * 


I 10 2% 2% 2% 

J 79459 36% 35* 36%+* 


3306 7* 4% 7%+ % 

ID 9 M 38% 38* 38%— * 


1011 41 28% TBta 28* 

17 1815 27% 27* 27M— * 


TZ 78 53% S3 52%+ % 

03 47 132 \3» 132 - % 

79 443 3% 28 28% — ta 


4.1 13 900 34ta 35* 35*— I* 
78 81230 *9* A9ta A9*_ ta 


16 15026 3«- 39 39*— % 

71 452 35% 34* 35*— * 


13 91977 23% 23* 23*— M 
7810 S3 16% 16% 16% 


39% 17% 
23% 14* 
9 4% 

17% B 
31% 22% 
8* 7 
10% «* 
34% 2S% 
16* 7% 

14% 5* 
33% TSta 
79 68% 

(8 99* 

31 25% 

37% 24* 
39* 27% 



1527 7* 7 7 — * 

34 28% 27 23% +3* 

5 26 d26 26 —4 

147 3f* 3* 3* 

21 6 5% 51b— 1ft 

4 21 21 21 +* 

39 8 7% 8 + * 

12106209 U30% 3D 30% +1 

14 8 2740 38% 38 38%+ % 

48 IS 1715 32% 27* 32M— * 
65 32 43* 43* 43* 

09 A 50% 50* 50%+ % 

69 zlO 83 63 83 —1 

29 17 Iff* 17 +% 
17. z250 35 35 35 —1 

17. >100 30 X 30 

61 10 712 49* 49 49W— ta 

48 9 343 31* 30% 31*+ ta 
63 1 47% 47% 47%+ * 

7A 5 39* 39* 39*+ * 
9 42 24% MM 74%+% 
25 I 225 23% 23% 23*+ M 
56 5 7% 7% 7* 

220 12% 11* 12ta 
684 273 29% 29% M 

49 3* 3 3 — * 

1614 114 A% 6* 6% 

48 12 78 U3S 34* 34% 

61552261)16% 15* 16%+ * 
15 75 7M 4* 7% + * 

717 798 3W» 31* 31 %— * 
12 >10 76* 76* 76*+ * 

11. 120 47% 67* m 4+ ta 

>7 1 C 30* 30% 30% — * 
EL2 7 32 31% 31 31 M + * 

LB 9 1B7 39* 3»% f * 
1014 384 11% 11% M%+ % 


meet to provideJegal penalties forOTjiooatao. j .> - ^ 

tor-chip plamarism, officials said Weanesagjr. . - - 

Mmictry officials said the l egria tiofu to be ■ > >..•>' 
drafted on recommendatioiis from a sohcom- • ■ ■ . . 
nrittee off the Industrial Structure Cooncfl, an ^ •- - “ 
advisory body to the ministry, will resemble a ■ 
law enarted in die United States last October. > 

They said the measure, in litre with Marnfr 

meat reached at a meeting on high te^iology ...... ...... 

between U5. and Japanese officials m Novem- . 

ber 1983, wfll pant the developer of drip toy- .■ 
outs rights g ^ r> i^ ar to patent ri^its for a period ■ " * . 

of 10 years. , , • •' 

The draft legislatkm will also empower toe - 
designer to daim damages and seek court m* .. - - ' ' 

junctions against anyone who infringes on those .r^‘ - 

rights, the officials said. •• 

The bill will probably be submitted to the r ! 

irrel ative hndy in the current parliamentary . 
session, which ends in April, they said. 

The advisory board also xgco inniend e d that ,* -■■■, .... - - 

japan and the United States, which together > ; - 
account for 90 percent of the worid's produo- 
tion of integrated droiits, cooperate in a bid to j 
urge the Wcaid Intellectual Property Organize- l>**- 
tion of the Uruted Nations to establish interna- * 
tiooal guidelines for the protection of IC de- 4 rtP|" 
signs. jK 


12 Month 
hwlm aoc* 


Sh IPJ6 

Wv. YM. PE 10K Htgi Loo guot.CDftt 


Forecast 


77* lfftaWoodPt J7 
41V, 29* Wolvrtti 1JD 
58* 42*Wotw pfX20 
5* 2% WrtdAT 

51 44 Wrtcly 1-BOo 

7% 3* Wurltzr _ 


72* 10% WyloLb 33 
28* 14* Wynns 60 


49% 33* Xenix 3 
50* 451ft Xorox pf&45 
M* 19 XTRA 64 
29% 34 ZOteCp 132 
24% 14* Zapata 64 

S 2B% 2ayr» .«*> 

* lBWZmltftE 
25* 18 Zoro .40 
29% 2I*Zumlfl IJ2 


3615 324 21* 20% 21*+ M 
621«331BuO% «% 42W+1*. 
17 2U59* 59* 59* +1* 

20 4 3% 4 + lft 

3.1 10 42 5B% 58 58ta 

1 3% 3% 3%+* 

XI IB 45 15* 15 174+* 

XI 7 34 19% 19* 19*— * 
X— Y— Z — 

76138572 43 42* 43 

11. M 49% 49% 49% +98 

Z41D 234 24% 24* 24*+* 
SO B 108 2AM 25% 26<ft 
56123373 15% 15* 15*+ M 
614 4A4U51U 5D* 50%—* 
B 2999 22* 21% 22* + % 
U 18 115 24% 24 24 

46)1 73 29ta 28% Z9M+ * 


23% 14% untvar 68b 


4 26* ta* a* + % ! :*% ia* umvFd i ju 
2 J1 TVn * ) 23 151ft UL*o» V9I 


370 75 29% 29* 29*- % 
1? 13 14 18% 18* IS* 


25 262 21 70*3 * 

3216 194 33% 33* 35* + M 


3910 3 17% 17* 17%-* 
X3B U» 17* 16% IPft+ta 


2615 339 21 70% 20* 

69 6001 B% 18* ISta— * 


Ota 30 Unocal I 
77* 45 UPlahn XSA 

33 23*USLIFE 1.04 

34 25 USLF p(Z25 
9% B% UilttFd 1.04a 


64 IS 469 24 23% T3%— * 

« P 58 20* 20% 20*+ % 
26 97191 38ta 37% S* + * 
15 13 35D l)7T* 72 72*+* 

X71I 641 38 J7M 37*+ % 
6A 43 35* 34% 3SM— ta 
11. ID 9% 9% 9* 



1390 

7% 

6% 

7%- % 

55% 

20% UlaPL 232 

1X10 

.141 

33% 

23% 

23 ta— V, 

1014 

*44 

45% 

L*% 

<5 — % 

75U 

7i%urPL pfxea 

11. 

18 

74V, 

24ta 

3+ta+ ta 

20 

A 

79V* 

9% 

7956+1 

25% 

21% UtPL pra.90 

11. 

94 

25% 

3Sta 

25**+ 15 

20 

594 

21% 


20% — % 

19 

15% UtPL pIXIM 

11. 

12 

18 

IB 

IB +% 

30131002 


0 

*5V> — V> 




v— V— v 





17V) 

47%— % 

29% 

71% VF Carpi. 12 

30 8 

939 u29% 

28V] 

29%+ % 

3.9 7 

93 


kta 

J* ta— % 

73% 


2430 

TV, 

4% 

7 - % 

2410 

71 

29V. 

29% 

29% 




98 

17% 


17%+ % 

If. 5 

392 

17’, 

7% 

I7%— % 

S% 

2tavaleyln 


37 

3% 

2% 

2% 


14. 150 26* 24 ta 26%+* 


46 27 76* 27 + * 

15 25* 24* 2SM + M 
14 01 30% 30* 

11 IT* 15* 17 +V< 


24* 14* VpnOr 5.92 
7 2* Vans 

X* 5* vorco pf 
54% 30 ta Vartan 36 
■4* 9* vara .40 


2 lb% 16% 16% — * 25% 17% Vpeco 32 

2 44% 44* 44*- * 10% StaVmtSe 120a 


9 12 44% 44* 44 % * 

1.7 10 18 29* 28% 28*— % 

3612 233 33% 33 33%+ * 

MID 515u141» 14% 14% 

363 IM 1* )ta+* 

T9 15* ISta 15*— M 
74 46% X 29 T9* + * 

1.214 412 29* 29M 29%+ '.ft 
93C36 12 11% 11%+% 

IX 34 14% 14* 14*— ta 


37* 23% Viacom 62 


46 6 241 23 ta 31* 33 +) 
59 2% 2* 2% 

13 7% 7* 7% 

3 14 785 39* X* 38*— 1 

X2 9 ES 12* 12% 12% + * 

1 J 16 187 34 23% ZPS— * 

11. 6 10* 10% 10% 

1.1)4 226 u37% 37* 37%+* 


42% 

54 VOEP 0*772 

11 

Zl0uA3 

43 

43 

+1 

72ta 

60V! VoEP PN04 

11 

z300 72W 

75 

77 

+ to 


6OV3 VoEP Pf9.75 

12 

ZlOOuBO 

BO 

80 

+7 


U.S. Futures 


Soaaan Season 
Hlsfi Low 


Odwi Htah Low Claw Ota. 


Season Soason 
HHh Low 


Opot High Low ClOK Chfl. 


Ha. 23 


Boasan Season 
High Law 


Goon High Low CIom Che. py»v' dairt opm tat 7641 oK 39. 


180J5 18035 18835 18035 +560 FRENCH FRANC 
17860 17860 17830 17850 +5JH) t per none; 1 point oguals XjBOCOI 
17A60 17460 17660 T766D +i00 Mar .10265 .1IC70 .10260 .10270 +5 

17A6B -KAO Jun .18215 1C21S .182i5 .10220 45 

174JO +iOQ Sep .10170 *6 

17460 +560 . Prov. stfes 417. 

Prav day*t open tot 1,126k up 415. 


GERMAN MARK 
I pordPmart; I paint 


WHEAT 

SM0 bo mtatautm; 6oltai per bHbol 

Mar 368M 149% X47% 369* 

May 163* 164M 362* 344 

Jul 363* 1341ft 362% 134 

SOP 134* 165% 164* 135% 

Dae 365 366 364% 365% 

Mor 169* 

PICT. OTtoS 10632. 

Prav «tav*i open M 41641, up l». 

CORN 

MOD ha mlaCmam; dollars par bubal 

Mar 230% 231 269* 230* ■ 


COPPER 

2M80 Bn-’ cents per lb. 

J fS 


X74* 236% 235% 236% 
X79 239* 238* 239* 

X73ta 233% 233 233 

268 26IM 267* 247% 
238 238* 237* 277% 

284 264* 283% 284 


S930 —.95 
5935 —95 

6860 4065 59J0 40.10 —.95 

60.70 4070 MLI5 4060 —.90 

4060 40.90 4030 4066 —65 

41X0 4165 4030 4065 —25 

6UD 4165 41X 4135 —35 

6135 —35 

4165 4135 4165 6160 —60 

6200 6X10 6160 41.90 —35 

4225 47 7S 42 20 47 70 _7U 

4250 6250 A2S0 4265 —30 


Jun 11B4 J1 

Sop 

Dec 3239 3. 

Pro*. Ida 17647. 

Prey day's open Ini 4X751, off 591 


9 3C36 il 11% n%+* Salas nawras aro unofflciaL Yaorly higtu and lows reflect 
16. 34 14% 14* 14*— ta the previous 53 weeks plus the airrenl woe* but not itielafeg 

ID. 179 22* 32'ft 22%+* troWno day. Whore o spill or stock dividend amounting to 25 

60141454 27vj 27* 27* + * percent or more has bean paM, me veto's hlDh4ow ranee ond 

11 17 19* 19% 19* aiwhJond are shown lor the now stock only. Unless otherwise 

83*8 5 12* 12 12 noted, rates of dividends are annual disbursement* mod an 

4 J 9 9+1 53 ta +9* 49*— * latest decjaroMon. 

a — dividend oha •rtraCSI. 

■ ^ t — annual rate of dividend plus Stock dividend. 

c— Maul dating dividend. 

aen High Low cioae Chg. d — new ysiortv low. 

e — dividend declared ar paid In preendi no 12 months. 

; joixtsi b— dividend la Canodtantand&eubloctta 15% nofvmldenca 

'imis 'inis 'inis 'ion +1 i^dlvlderta declared offer spIII-up or Neck d lvtaond. 

.18215 1C215 .182.5 ,|0» +5 , _ d , ^end paid this veor. omlttva deterrea or no action 

.iuin-»o rcicen at latest dividend maetfaa. 

._ k— dlvldand dedored or paid this veor, an occumulatlva 

in. Issue with dividends In arrears. 

n — new l9sue In the past 53 weeks. TNe high-low nsige begins 
nkUflcni with the Start Of trad I no. 

i’U i{£ 5& i‘« +J pJr^^H^mtle. 

ilB4 +4 r^divibond declared or paid In pmcedlno 12 months, plus 

3239 3?40 3239 3W> +4 Otvktond begins with date of spilt. 

51, off 591 t— dividend paid In stock In preceding 72 months, estimated 

anti value on ex-diuidend or ox-dUtrtbuttea dare. 

u— newvworW htah. 

* v » huClr>o 

SPuii fSEBS. vl — In bOTkruotcy or reaHvershlp or bolnc rcoroontatd un- 

SSEZ? iSSSf . der Ifte BOTkroptcv Act. or securities assumed bv such enm- 


IlS S80CO1 

3141 3144 . 3154 3144 +4 

31 B 4 JUS 3175 3186 +4 

3213 +4 

3239 31*0 3239 32+4 -M 


The Daily 
Source for 
International 
Investors, 


**«..> * 


JAPANESE YEN g — n ew yeo rl v htah. 

S per yen; 1 point equals SD6C8091 v — l^dllw halted. 

Mar XXrrrjj .003749 0D»ll 003947 vl — irbonk roofer or ri 

Jun 0C3971 T33972 .«G9i6 003977 dcr the Bankruptcy Act 

Sea .003999 X02999 0SO999 JMMQQQ -5 BOTKTUPTCY act. 

am, ,n!.r un 1 ^ 914D40 — 5 wd— when distributed, 

rrw. tout iSJl. — whan tnued. 

Prey day's OM bit 1X853. off 211. 


Prav dart open lot 09.144, bp M7. 
SILVER 


Prav. SOlOS 2X149 

Prav ddirs open In! 136692 m 1342 
OATS' 

5633 bu minimum; dollars per bushel 


132 133* 132 133* 

May 1.71 133* 131 132* 

Jul 169 % 138 169% 1.70 

Sep 164 164* 164 164* 

„ EXK 168* 168* 168* 168* 

Prav. sales 231. 

Prov dent's open bit 3652 off 23. 

SOYBEANS 

5660 te mlMmem; dollars per battel 

Mar 5.W* 601% £92 461 

May 60S 6-13* 603* 6.13 

Jul 4.15 431 6.12% 430% 

AUfl 614* 622 614* 622 

See 6)0 615* 6HJ 615* 

Nov 611* 617* 611* 6T7 

Mor 439 643 639 643 


SWISS FRANC 

S par franc; 1 paint equals S90CQ1 

After 0731 3764 3738 07 fO +*,< 

JOT 3734 3792 3760 3772 +» 

5ep 0314 3317 08,3 0820 +11 

_ 06C 3S4B 3348 3843 Ja 60 +11 

Prav. soles 1X939. 

“rav Say's eaoa lot 22376 op 76 


5990 —119 Dec JSd 

5995 —113 Prav. sales 1X939. 

ms 4100 5965 6015 —120 “rev Say's apea lot 22376 bp 

6170 6190 6050 6115 —1X1 

A2SJ 4280 4l3Jf*205 —133 I — — 

6360 6360 6380 6100 —1X6 j tfldl'qtrinfq 

6510 isu uu 6453 —1X9 1 mBltSmOI S 

65£L5 —111 

4553 4650 4553 6610 —133 LUMBER 
6720 6720 67X0 47X5 —135 WW bd. It.; S per 1096 K. r. 


wl— when Isc iNd. . 
ww — with womxrfs. 
x — Bx-atviitend or e.-rlflhts. 
«dli — ox-til si r Ibutlon. 
xw— without warrants. 

y— ax-dtvideadand salts In full, 
yld — yield, 
z — sates In luH- 



31. , 


~ v . • 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 23 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 23 


Cash Prices Jan. 23 H Dividends Jan. 23 


Jut 4985 4985 4870 6861 -1X6 
Sap 6964 —1X8 

Prav. tees 25371 
Prev dam open lot 8X48X up 497. 


Prov. sales 28414. 

Prav dart apea tot 7B4723W 256 
SOYBEAN OIL 
40000 tos; do Ho r s per IM lbs. 

ftftar 2600 2435 25.92 2646 

Mav 2550 2625 2545 26.18 

Jul 25.18 25.90 25.10 2552 

Aue 2400 2545 24J0 2532 

Sep 2451 2530 2451 2530 

Oct 3435 2435 2435 24-75 

Dec 2400 2430 2X90 26.13 

Prav. »atei' 13300. 

Prav flairs opto lot 3X814, OP A 
SOYBEAN MEAL 


PLATINUM 

SB fray a tj dolors per tray ax. i/n r 

Jan 26750 26750 26650 271.10 +300 Eat. soles 2572. Prav. 

+F° Prav dorses, ta! It 
Jul 77450 27750 27 +00 27B50 +330 

Oct 27950 28300 27950 28330 +X80 COTTON 2 

Prav. worn 2486°" mi ° +i9 ° StenS.’coo«scrni. 

Prav dovb open tot 15321. bp 272 


Jul 17100 in 

Soo 17600 176 

Nov 17950 179. 

Jon 13350 161 

I Aar 

Est. soles 2572 Prav. sales 2646. 
Prav dtnrs apea ta! 1X076 off 197. 


15550 15633 15440 15430 +30 

1AS20 16550 16150 16SJ0 +.90 

17100 17X20 17040 17130 +.10 

17400 17650 174.90 17600 
17950 17950 177*0 17X60 —40 

19350 18159 18150 iSXM —50 
18653 —100 


Sugor bi French Francs per metric ton. 
Other figures In Francs oer HO kx 


J75 1340 1J71 1J74 UnctL 

1430 1376 1415 1430 — 1 

1500 1470 1490 1500 —4 


HONG-tCONO GOLD FUTURES 
nr—-! U5J per dobcb 
“ Cioa a 

Htah ura Bid Ask 
ctroa Jon __ n.T. n.t. iqxoO moo 
llH - Fab - 30400 30400 30200 X400 
Unc *V Mor _ N.T. N.T. 30100 30600 
— J APJ _ N.T, N.T. 30600 30800 
Jun — 31100 31100 31000 31X00 


1569 1530 15*0 1570 — 5 AUfl"!^ NT NT 31400 31*00 

1450 1/35 1460 1465 +4 Sc? ~ NT NT 31900 32100 

1075 1040 1J7D 1730 •' - - " - 


PALLADIUM 

MO trey «; dollars per ex 

ftftar 11950 12X00 11935 12145 +100 

Jun 11125 12000 11750 11905 +100 

SeP 1T735 11735 11455 11X95 +100 

Dec 11450 11908 11400 11833 +100 

ftftar 117 JO +100 

Prav. sates 738. 

Prev dav% open tot 4399, up 34. 


SOYBEAN MEAL 
MO tons; dollars par tap 


Mor 4530 & 

May i4_7E 4 

Jltl *7 75 * 

Oct *752 6 

gee 1750 i 

Mcr 6X90 6 

MOV 

„ Jut 

Prav. sales 1339. 

Prev dey'j open tel IB45-L off IX 


+ S Dae „ N.T. NX 31*00 37*00 


SgSSSSgg :■]{ ^•^'•tLOPOTlntarref: 19311 

*5+5 ff’30 Urn VSIM "let "si, ,*ia 


«*wa» Volume: M le* ollMM. 



Comraotnttmi Unit 

Coffee 4 Sontos. lb 147 150 

Prtntc»om*4/3B3B*.vd_ ' 0J5 005 ACCO World 

Steel htllefs tPItt.J, ton 47300 45100 AMIBkcpWy 

Iran 2 Fdry. PWta. ton 21X00 31300 Armted Industries 

Steel scrap No 1 hW Pitt. _ 7W0 96-97 Beet on Dickinson 

Lead Spat, lb— 20-21 34-28 Caki mot Industries 

Capper etoct. lb 65+8 66*48 Carlins CTKeofe 

rm (Straltsl.R) 54626 63392 Cctoc Carp 

Zinc, E. st. I_ Basts, lb — _ 0.43 051 Crumpton Kns 

Pat ted lunvez IIff-319 1S4ta Dominion Bkshrs 

Silver N.Y.oz 5045 809 EOO Corn 

Source: AP. El Pooo Etoctr* 

Great Western Find 

Hathaway Con* 

nces Rise 1 . 5 % in Greece 

ts. *_ • . . „ Market Facts 

The Associated Press Merchants svnos 

ATHENS — Greece's consumer pocmeTinconsoi 

i«. mrfwr fn r fV— ta. K.. Parker Drill Ino 


Yore Company 


6753 47. ID +39 


6800 69X6 6C.9C 4005 -.15 

6953 
7000 


ftftar 

2900 

2195 

2316 

9 99* 

ftftov 

2040 

7025 

2233 

2250 

Jly 

N.T, 

N.T. 

2330 


Sea 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2230 

— 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2.170 

MOT 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2125 


ftftav 

N.7. 

N.T. 

2)25 

— 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U5LS per ounce 


Prav. 

Fra 30*40 3ax5) xSm ^otSi ai iitiNb — UTeeces consumer Pocwtetihconw 

Am _ 306 io 306.90 ^0o 3 ?i!m P ncc index for December rose by portecine ,,llnB 

vohmte: 4i5 tots of too ox 1.5 poTCCDt from November and 

kuala lumpur rubber 18.1 percent from December 1983. ^ 0, " ra ,r * 

Motevston the government reported Wednes- SSSSSiAJSS? 

Bid ASH Bid Ask Hsu TV- ; nnM r. . V " ,Qno L ® ta Cl B 


Par Amt Pov Rec 
USUAL 


Prices Rise 1 . 5 % in Greece 


77ip Associated Press 


MOV 14750 14 

Jut 15330 15 

Alta 15500 15 

Sea 13600 15 

Oct 15900 15 

Doe 14400 14 

Prev. safes 6308. 

Prav dam open tot 35387, bp 64. 


14X40 14180 14X00 14 
14750 14940 14750 14 
15330 15430 15X40 IS 


115500 15600 15500 15600 
1900 13000 15650 15000 
15900 13950 15830 159501 
14400 16400 14350 14450 


Livestock 


COLO 

100 troy eu dorters par troy ox. 

Jan 30000 30130 30000 301.4C -XW 

Feb 30X20 30140 29950 301.70 —200 

ftftar 30400 30400 30100 30250 —230 

Apr 30500 30400 30250 30533 —7M 

Jun 30900 31008 30750 3B9M —ZSO 

AuQ 31450 31450 311.90 31X70 —250 

Oct 318.19 — XSJ 

Dec 32150 32300 32100 JTX10 —300 

Feb 32700 12700 32700 X630 —113 

Apr 33X50 33X50 332JW J33JE —353 


HEATING oil 
42030 sol; cents per oaf 
Feb 
Mor 
Aw 
Mcv 


Esl. voL\ 75 W» ci W taw Prev. actual 
rain: 48 lets, open Interest: 80 
COFFEE 

7575 7453 i,o Jan X590 2590 X5W 2320 +35 

TSM -100 i£f? ~ ? ftftar 2592 XS8S 2585 2500 +13 

21? ?9-S --9? Mav N.T. N.T. X680 2500 +U 


SIe £2 ^ j™ 


CATTLE 

40080 fcu cants per lb. 

Feb 4405 4503 

Apr 6630 6730 

Jun 6730 6750 

AU* 6505 6555 

Oct 4167 6185 

Dec 6497 6502 

Foti 4550 4550 

ESI. Bales IA448. Prav. sales mats. 
Pro v daV* apea tot S85M. *H 120. 


6457 4500 
46J0 67.17 
6732 8757 
6500 4537 
6300 6332 
*490 6507 
4550 4450 


Oct 

Dtc 32350 32308 

Feb 32700 12700 

Apr 33X50 33X50 

Jun 336*3 33900 

AUQ 
Oct 

Prav. teles 49316 

prav doV* opm IM 15X157, Off 1805. 


Jul 

Prev. setes 17525. 

Prav fieri oven Ini 2455*. up 710. 


2090 

2090 

25W 

2*20 

+ 35 

2592 

2085 

2085 

2400 

+ 13 

N.T. 

N.T. 

zzeo 

2AM 

+ O 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2590 

2010 

+ X 

N.T. 

N.7. 

2065 

2000 

+ 12 

N.T. 

N.T. 

25« 


+ 5 

N.T. 

N.T. 

25*0 

— 

+ 1 


KUALA LUAtPUR RUBBER 


Clow Prwtees ujs guynmiiBU icponca W races- snumteline Bock 

iraSo iqxoO i55i i^M d?y- The increase was attributed to vCl^cic 

19*50 19535 19*50 19S50 Hiphn- nrir+c fnr fnnri anH in rtKKo_ WICOR Inc 


I -* 4X.ID — }L 

7490 Z535 7465 2507 —01 

7475 IS 5J T^aC 1494 — .18 

7*53 2455 7*50 24X8 —IB 

:*<! :*5£ 2441 2454 -ja 


US T. BILLS 
n nfflbn; ott of 100 act. 

ftftar 


FEEDER CATTLE __ 

44040 lbs.; amts ere 1b. 

/War 7X10 7350 

Apr 7X05 7X60 

Aua mS ^10 

IS #JS 

Nov 

Prev. sates 1553. 

Prev fieri a pea tot 9572 up 27. 


7X90 7357 
7105 7257 
7025 70-55 
7005 71.15 
70*0 7000 
4900 6808 
7X70 


33X50 33250 ram rn y — i— CRUDE GIL 
33X43 33900 33400 33MO —303 I-" 0 OOflcrs iter bM. 

34475 —ItO I W*r ii*s 25a J 7507 7S0S _ 

15000 — 253 , ear 25.15 Y.il 7*05 SlB — 

I Var :4.90 2535 7445 2507 — 

157. Off 1805. I Jun rx.rj 26 55 TiaC 2494 — 

1 Jul J*S3 3 455 7*53 2408 — 

f Au» :<5T 2441 24 «4 _ 

Finonchrl ) ) ^ Z 

I g 35 $£ 23 \i% z 

9X15 9X17 9X10 9X11 —01 \ Apr iJH “ 

9108 9)03 9103 9104 t May “ 

91.17 91.18 9U1 91.11 Jim I4S 

W-7S 9O0B 9009 WJ59 Jon “ 

90*0 90*5 9035 9035 +07 Feb ;S|? “ 

9D.13 9013 90.13 9008 -riK Prrv sates 14319. " 

8904 8936 8934 BE +04 Prav fiovs own ini 5X95L us 1091. 


2?^ ~-3 NX NT: 2560 — +B 

• — rfi Esf. voi.: 14 tots of 5 tons. Prev. actual I 

rules: 10 lets. Open Into rest : 236 
Source: Sours? do Commerce. 


2686 —is 
2406 — 14 

i*-3* — ja 

•*.,^ 7473 2X73 7406 — ,'B 


London Metals Jan. 23 

FIbutk In sterling oer metric ton. 
Silver In pence per trov ounce. 


Mor 19*00 |9iH 1900 17500 higher prices for food and an obbg- w,CDRInc a 

tSStZZZZ JZuo JSS W0§ »20O atwy Christmas lip for services. B M^ontwy; <w»- 

Jun — i . . 203XQ 306X0 20300 305.50 
volume: 25 lute. i - - — — 

SINGAPORE RUBBER I • 

siOTNteivMp^ ^ I Company Earnings 


Q 

.11 

+12 

3-29 

a 

35 

2-22 

2-5 

Q 

.40 

3-15 

2-20 

0 

00 

3-29 

3-8 

a 

07 

+1 

2-28 

0 

.12 

+1 

38 

a 

05 

2-15 

2-1 

Q 

JO 

3-1 

H 

Q 

30 

M 

24 

Q 

04 

3-29 

34 

Q -36 to 

3 -tS 

3-25 

a 

32 

2 - 2 B 

2-4 

s 

.10 

M 

2-15 

a 

09 

3-29 

M 

a 

.15 

+1 

3-13 

Q 

.15 

+ 25 ' 

+10 

Q 

02 

2-22 

2-8 

Q 

-*5 

3-1 

2-1 

O 

.10 

3-15 

2 -U 

a 

JM 

7-19 

2-5 

Q 

.10 

3-1 

2 -U 

O 

77 

2 22 

2-1 

Q 

.13 

3-1 

2 -U 

0 .11 to 

3-11 

2 - 1 ? 

0 

ja 

3-28 

1-7 

0 

JO 

3-18 

24 

0 

04 

+29 

+1 

O JC% 

+29 

+1 

Q 07 to 

2-28 

Ml 


i 'urr? i 


M-Mootnjy. Q-Ooorterty; 5-Soml- 


U- , - 
L - . * . 


SUi* 'T : - " 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 




Ctese Prav l OTi 

DM ASM BM AM 

RSSIFeb- 17100 ITUS 17135 17135 

HSS 1 Mor_ 17X50 17300 17X25 17X75 

RSSJFeb- 15900 1*050 15950 1*050 

RS5 3 Feb— 15750 15850 1 57 50 15850 

RS5 4Fob^ 1S0SO 15550 T50JD 15250 

RSSSFeb- 14250 14450 1425Q 14*50 


Revenue and profits. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


ftftar 9X15 9X17 9X10 9X11 —01 

JOT ta 9108 9)33 9102 9104 

sea 91.17 91.18 9U1 91.11 

Dec 9038 90JB 9009 9009 

ftftar 9X48 9005 9035 9035 +01 

JOT 90.13 9X13 9X13 9008 x-K 

Sea 8904 8904 8934 B903 +04 

Dec 8958 +04 


£A£S -.78 
243* -.IB 


— ;-'a I High erode coocer calhodn: 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


(Other Earnings on Page 9) 


24 36 -IS 
:««6 -j* 

2406 —10 


spot 1331 JD 133200 734600 134700 ftftotortfon rtepflfri per 25 tOM> 

3 monthft 133650 131700 13«J» 135000 - — 

Coseor cn modes: fa 

Spot 131300 131700 I3ni» 133100 iJSr ~ Z 1.1*0 U«8 

J months I32S0O 132600 133908 134800 ApJ 1.130 1.180 

Tin: SCOl 935000 936000 933X00 934500 MOV 1.120 1.170 


Burroughs „ rear 

Hu ibm Revenue __ 

r- im Net Inc. 

I — — 1390. I31X Par Share 

9*4 B14 — 

re — 208 101 


Prav. rate* X97L 

Prevjfipy’S open tel 4687X off 92X 


HOGS 

30080 toej anti per IX 
Fab 


H YR. TREASURY 

*18X008 Brin; Pis a 22Mf of 180 PCt 


Commodify indexes 


5140 5107 5130 
^iw *hik 4830 
mm S40O «« 
5430 5450 5615 
53.10 S34S 5X10 
4950 4930 4X90 
4935 4930 49.15 


Mar 

81-27 

820 

81-25 

81-27 

Jot 

81-3 

81-8 

B0J 

8+1 

Sep 

80-18 

(0-18 

Off-12 

80-13 

Dw: 

80-1 

80-1 

79-27 

79-27 

Mcr 

Jot 

79-19 

79-19 

79-12 

79-13 

78-31 


Prav. igtei X77X 

Prav dor* epee 1st 26332 w 199. 


PORK BELLIES 
38080 bL' Mb POT lb. 

F8tl WJ5 7X83 4945 7043 

Mor 7035 71 3D 7800 7102 

Mov 7135 7200 7135 7X60 

AUS 7135 7100 7X95 7142 

FM 6505 *6*0 4695 4507 

ftftar *625 

Prev. faMa 13433. 

Prav dart open Inf 14474, «p 337. 


COFPEE C 

37300 Oil; ceatt par lb. 

Mar 

May 

Jul 

Sep 

Dec 


1*9.90 15X10 1*931 15X24 +53 

1*5.95 147.90 14S40 146.17 +.10 


Prev day* open lot 39088, up L916. < o - prel 

GNMA j Pf* Liter 

818X880 rate; P*f A and* M t« per Ogw J, 

Mar 67-79 70-S **.» t+n +a 

Jun 47-7 49-8 69+ 60+ +55 

SdP »17 68-18 48-17 48-18 tC j 

Dec 67-31 68 *7-» 68 +« ! j 

:g 

Prev. rate, 446 s ” SK: 

Prev am eoea tot 738B> op 144. 

US TREASURY BONDS NYC5CE : 

(> PchnaxaMrata a X 2efie ef tee pen ' M I CE ' 

ftftar 77- U 72.23 72-11 72-14 +C7 ' c °**=*- 

JOT 7MB 71-28 71-15 71-13 +C7 \ 

Sea 70-25 71-3 70-24 70-24 +07 KC9T. 

Dec JO-5 70-15 7M 7M +y 

Mar 49-19 «-a 49-19 69-28 +S7 

Jun 69-5 49-7 49-5 49-4 +G7 

Se» *8-27 48-27 68-73 68-23 +C? 

Dec 68-17 *817 4811 4811 +C7 

mot __ *s +e? I 

Jot 47-29 47-29 67-22 47-22 +C7 

Sw 47*19 67-19 47-14 67-14 + 07 ! 


ClG« 

Wocdv's 9*300 1 

vp. . 4 e , U, S t l 1.9740C 

+ 34 ] 5-t- futures NJV. 

Mm. Rcseorch Bureau _ N JL 

Moatfrt : hess TOO : Dec 31. l?3l. 
o - prellmirwv ; f - fine! 

Reuters : base 100 : Sea. IB. |f- 3I, 
Dow Jaies ; txise ICO : Dec. 31. 3?74. 


L8ad:tPCl 37X00 37200 37X00 37500 

3 ircnlra 3*400 34500 34X50 34900 

2Jnc:spat 72800 72850 73600 73800 

3 months 72SJ0 72600 73300 73356 



BM 

Art 

BM 

Art 


1.150 

1000 

1.140 

uoo 



1,190 




1.130 

1,180 

1.130 

1,180 


1.120 

1.170 


1.170 


1,110 

1.140 




1,100 

1.150 




l,H0 

1.H0 


I.1S0 


1090 

1,140 

1090 


-hi IF ■ 

1090 

1.140 

1090 

1,140 


1984 1981 

X71X 2020. 
461 J 431J 
198 277 


Gt West. fin. 

«th Goar. 1984 1 


•StL'r- c-v,;.. -r :e 

'-to,*'- : ‘' f - -■=». 


IM* 1W 
*080. L39X 
2440 I960 

£40 400 


IBU 1M3 

Par Share — 198 177 Not Inc. 1_ 2SJ9 214 i'* 

Per snare — 009 800 JR. 

Fnrtarn Airlinre uTk. 9iv* '* Aft 

4Bi Osar. 198* 1981 Per Share 160 208 ^ v, 

Netinc. 1X7 (0)5*0 

Per Share— 009 — 

jam •£ ^ 

Net loss 37.9 1817 - r- ljg» «•* 

H^ZZ ^ ^ 

r J , Per Shore XS4 046 4^. 

*« Quar.^S ,« r^S H __ ,3K Jlffi ‘Pj 

Rey+flue 4410 4450 N+t Inc. <70 34J 

l"t _ 260 280 PerShare L17 092 

Per Share — 092 10* ^ 1 

Revenue lJ5f iSStL FfiHon HOIttU 

igta 700 840 401 Ooar. 1(84 190 ‘i+? 

Per Share — 327 30* Revenue 1810 1BX2 1 

Per snare results ailusted JJe> ine. 4601 2SL14 'w 


Vahima: 0 tote of 25 tens. 


9&C03C f 53600 55309 55400 Source: ReOTrra. 


Cabot 

i»es 


1984 1983 

37.9 1817 


3 months 55100 55X00 56900 57000 

Aluminium: 

ywR 97700 97X50 98*00 99000 

3monftn 1097.00 T0O7JO 101100 101900 
Nlcfcehspal 400500 401000 409S.OO 400000 
3 monltre 440900 *49000 444300 L44S0O 
Source: (toilers. 


Revenue __ 559 J 

Netinc. 9*53 


London Commodities 


Control Data 


Jta. 23 

Ftaires In sterling per metric Ion. 


Market Guide 


CMcsflo Board a: T'cde 
Chtcaga Mor tanlite Etefanse 
international Mone:=rv Markrl 
Cl Cilcopo Merccnlfte fichor-jr 


S&P 100 Index Options 
Jm 22 


Gasoil In U0. daHars per metric toa 
Gold in U0. dollors Per ounce. 


New York Cnccc. Sueer. teller E.ctvjrw 
New York Collen Evcftonae 
.onunotlly Caetioepe. Mew Vcrk 


Chicago Beard 


«b Gear. 1184 1*83 

Revenue 10*0. i^SL 

Nef Inc. 310 «!y 

Per Share 000 IX* 

Tear T9M 1983 

Revenue — SJDX uhl 

Net tec. 310 Mu 

Per Shore 801 428 

t9Sd year nef includes 

charge of STOJ million from 
AWNRrf Of business and 
aetnatSll.9 million ffam sale 


hijilt ..■• .'.Zs 


m-sr S 


179 X94 

1984 1983 


•low Vcrk Mercanllie E'CteW 
varw* d(v Bears cf T-sfie 
New York futures E»chsnsc 


14150 1*475 14X10 MXO +30 
14150 14201 141.10 141JS5 +.14 


Jim (7-29 67-29 
, _ Sep 67.19 67-19 

Prav. sates HX29X 
Prav dart apea bit I9UM, op £239. 


Dec 14000 14X70 139.90 129.9a +03- 

ftftar 1X30 139 JO 139 JO 12X53 +.13 

ftftav 138J0 13X38 13X30 137.13 +.10 


5 g 58S2£rS reaper. 


ftftar 138J0 13X38 13X30 137. 
Prav. sales 200. 
prav dors op aa tot I3J1I, off 56 


SUGAR-WORLD II 


ftftar 

408 

630 

605 

629 

+.17 

MCV 

645 

*49 

60 

* ID 

+.19 

Jul 

401 

508 

680 

IS 

+.19 

Sea 

5.12 

538 

5.12 

+.15 

Od 

508 

500 

9L2T 

10 

+.14 

JOT 

5.74 

S91 

574 

5.94 

+.17 

Mar 

6J3 

6*5 

618 

i* 

+.14 

Mav 

6*8 

670 

66* 

+.1S 


MOT 

njB 

■M-30 

9132 

91.22 


JOT 

9X70 

S07I 

(044 

90+4 

-J3 

Sop 

9X12 

9X1S 

nos 

9007 

+04 

Dec 

8904 

8907 

8538 

8939 

+04 

Mar 

8974 

8930 

89.19 

B9.5( 

+34 

Jun 

weiw 

88.97 

MIC 

EXf3 

-Jft 

Sop 

8259 

8803 

8839 

8855 

+01 

Dec 

8X32 

8832 

8632 

8827 

+04 


Prev. sates 2X44X _ 

Prav tori open tat 9*052, up 1JSJ. 




Shtta Catl+Lail PsteLast 

Price Feb Mar AM Fab Mgr Apt 

ISO 25 ta 24ta — 1/14 1/16 3/16 

im rr-L. to 22 1 rt* w 

MO 14% 1* ■( I/I* 5,16 % 

145 9% IMrs 12% 5/16 % Ita 

178 8% 7% 9% 1<& 2to 2% 

175 3 

11/14 4% 613 3% ita 5 

ISO ilk 2% 4Ws 7 7ta 7ta 


H*ob Low Close Pravtaas AiWs+mf 0/ business and 
SUGAR ou trun S i 1.9 million tent sale 

Mar 13X40 11740 12208 12300 11900 12X00 “»ta»rfR 
MOV 131-40 12409 13040 13000 177 JO 12740 _ . 

AUfl 14X60 13S.*0 14X20 14840 13740 11700 COTTHno Gian Wkff 

Oct 14800 14X40 14700 1*808 1*520 14500 4 ” 

Dec 15040 150X0 15160 1S5J0 15100 1S2JH Rl 5^ or - «« 

MW 14X40 165X0 16800 168* 14400 14700 

M a* 62 !. a 2 . , 2 Si , ““ 17480 ,71 " 17U0 SSJSUr & 


I TeM coll vetainw 333034 
; Total con opm In!. 39X161 
j Tarot pul vwim 149316 
ToW Mil eaon tot. 36,7)4 


ksteot SO tons. OP*TShora_ 049 078 bpMt. 

Year 1(84 iff) 

Revenue ijsl i.aa 

ISISliSw^S SSJSS™- « S "J?" 

bb 32 & » k m jssrssast 

.... SSSwSS SS.“iS?«WiJS w 

1- WO. U* tiR* 1 '’® of SZ9 minion In auerter ond — 

UM Wft of re im of SSSi mimon m rear from P«r Share — 

sole of securities. 


0M\ 4JJ far ssoc* dividend. PerShare 179 XM 

rl includes _ _ Year 1984 1983 

nltlfon from Fft fiorida Bio R * vo "«* .6068 6 &3 

te££ "3 

°P«- Shore- 048 X57 

faftWh . Tear »M 1933 of securities. 

”* "" Oper Nel 383 3*0 

2JH 0^ Shares 245 219 n . M _ 

•Si ^ wy y fa ^ wca wtopoto of a Horizon Bkqp 

™ 5 S SaX*™ *™*>»*< ** 7 ?*°^ 'SS 'IS 

1PM TO Per Share _ 870 0LB7 

mb ^ M Intawi.j.. Dl .. Year I9M 198) 


,'v an 1 - V-"- . 

■£. - ,a! «r!ir.2 

’ scr.5.3 ■ ■ 




Mtflh 175.42 Lew 17174 CLao 17622+001 
Sourer : CBOE. 




CERT. DEPOSIT 
SI arofoaj Pti of 188 PCt 


in :be Trio. 


COFFEE 

Jan 2393 2374 1393 

Mor 2425 2397 2415 

Mar 2AX 1395 ICO 

Jty 2415 X4D8 2430 

Sep 2A40 2408 2*38 


394 2383 2345 
•iff 2393 2J93 
(22 2387 2309 


Crown Zolorbadt 

mover. 1914 7983 


Prev. tale* I6*ai. 

Prev dOY*9 «*» llrt 90016. off 3ML 


COCOA 

Id metric fans; * per Me 

Mar 2165 3188 3158 3144 -0 

Mcv 21B0 3199 7178 3184 —10 

Jul 2170 2185 2145 2177—3 

Sea 2158 2144 2)54 3140 —7 

Doc 2007 2094 2085 2090-8 

Mar 2980 30*2 2065 20B7 —13 

May 2087—13 

prav. sales 6232 
prav day's open Int SUM. up 199. 

ORANGE JUICE 

15AM IB*.; cents ear IB. _ 

ftftar 17905 1790S 17905 17905 +400 
Mav 18005 100JS 18005 10025 +400 


Mar 

91-61 

9103 

9134 

9134 


Jun 

9X94 

9104 

9X94 

9X98 

+04 

tap 

9031 

9X51 

9X40 

9042 

+02 

Dec 

9000 

9X32 

89.91 

87.94 

+03 

ftftar 

Jun 

Sep 

8932 

8900 

8932 

»3S 

89.19 

tUF 

+07 

♦J4 

+3* 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. 23 


2397 2398 j Revenue 8050 7224 Net Inc. 


2ii Per Shore 

Tww 


Start off your 
invcKment ’.veck 
v.-iiK 


Oikrajflfcrcxilil! Ejdaase. 

W. Gam MarU£ 0 E mnfe rail per nm 


Jty 2*35 2408 2430 204 2397 2098 *055 7224 Wet Int. - — 807 703 a: lass IS 

Sep 2*40 3008 2*38 TAB 3008 2403 ****"*■- — 1^ 2X1 PerShare — 009 049 wnteoHofn. 

NOV 2040 2410 2034 2*C 2*00 2405 Par Shore — 023 B77 Tmr m* i«j 

^ ^ ^ "xli hB" 1 

c*soa ft! S3 JT5fWSaSiW3 

Mar 217.00 21125 21650 216H 21705 21800 mUtts after preferred dirt- ies * rear net metudnoom of Year 


GASOIL 

JOT 22X75 mOO 22600 22X75 2X33 23*00 


Year IN* Ita Net Inc. __ 

Revenue. — 3090. J69X Per Shore — 
Net int 64.9 870 1984 marl, 


ran ertr. Net Inc. 647 707 

Per Shore— BJ0 0LB7 

Fit Intsretate Bfccp Ntifnc. aS 'un 

41b quer. lfM 1983 p w Shore— 2«7 272 

01 EE — *n mm ski 

HuehsiTrid 

wsharTz ”ss *ss Krrr— ^2 lo s3 $ 

FVVirgmtaEto ,'JS ,® ^ 

tnQwr. 1184 1983 Net Low in a* egjj; .Hi 

*1 7 — JJB ai lass ISO nets Include 1 . 

ir Shore _ 059 049 **iteotfoi S174J million. ’ft 

Totw I9H 1983 V 

S &S= *gs "xli InawwdWtend ^ 

1984 merler net Imurf.* _ *U> Odor. 198* INI ■_ 


"Pared " Gc-.en 


'h. 


Fst Virginia Bk$ 


«»!(> 


Prav dey^l open fnf 16477, off 6 




CANADIAN DOLLAR 
8 per fllr: 1 petal broth 500601 

MOT JS36 -7538 952* 9533 -7 

Jun J51S JS19 .7515 -7519 —4 

Se p 7313 -4 

Dec JSU .7510 JSBt -7509 -7 

Prev. rata. 1041^ 

prav der open M fjm. off 272 


Prtai 

Mar 

Jbb 

seal 

Mar 

Jcrt 

'lee) 

32 

— 

208 

— . 

004 

023 


IJ 

007 

\M 

ITS 

125 

850 


32 

0J7 

0.93 

160 

073 

107 

ITS 

23 

Xlft 

036 

331 

109 

104 

10J 

2* 

C06 

OB 

005 

242 



3S 

302 

021 

04& 

US 

— 

— 


Art 21100 20700 31)00 HITS 31100 711.75 
May 20900 20600 20X00 20X25 20X75 20900 
JOT 307.73 29600 20700 20X75 70700 30X73 
JIV 20700 38600 38658 20808 20708 20800 
Aua N.T. N.T. 20500 21700 20*00 21600 


31 million from tUKoeoam. Revenue 2480. 227X 

Her int SX9la)li23 

Per Share _ 7.7a — 

6*n*iri Foods JtLJZ ”■ Ne,i - ,nc,wir 

M A|_ 11fll CnOtOtK Of 98 MQ ffl WOf* 

y ” li r r - -!*“ ™ fers ana of UJ8tn wars tram 


DdaGwatd 

IsIObot. 1985 1184 


ff.t! MX 30400 222JB 20&H 23000 ® WJ 


40)1 Ms of 100 fans. 


G*n*rol Foods 




on Eurobond?. 


UtaMedtaM rat 4095 
cax»; Tua.eoL3fflearatet.B4W 
Psfs : 7m Tri.1029 oon taf . ta5Q 
Seuroe: CMC. 


GOLD 

Feb 30500 30X20 30X30 30X50 38700 30700 
Art 30*00 20600 38300 38400 31090 31208 
Jun 

213 Ms of tQO trav as. 


lEfcz S? & Kr Hft ^^raS^ 

IW results restated. P*r Share — 10ft J0O tr ■ »— 


Source*: Reuter s an d London Petroleum Ee- I Net Int 


eftanoe ibosoD). 


mopoww tSS. fSS. NB fTn? 00 '- 

MTL 5 S s «3 S^SSriz 13 ‘535 

•1 Int — 970 09J £2??** "Ff maudes „ Tear 

(r Snare QJ] otj onto of 2203 million tram sale 2 CT — — — 

of business. Per Snare_ 


Mvenue 60 U 973.1 


Per Snore 


Ksy Banks 

or. 1984 TW 

144 X91 

d X»1 070 

1984 1 »«* 

— . SOS 33 . 

e_ 330 201 








‘■istS®: 






\ 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


Page 9 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


■cr^ 


a r " 


•/««& Korea’s Hyundai Preparing to Enter U.S. Market 

S»r. * Jia a juij? 1 -fciR.v/u — nyunoai motor 
^is-- r ? ^3* aiming to become the first 
Korean antomaker to enter the 

S' 


Jc 

J£ fcgh 


"S or. “■* 




lS3l nihufi?Plk 


*1“ £ ^. 0 iffipiw 

et* ana 




'. aY'HA', 7*% 

£&sbs 

- P-t-bsuac 



U.S. market, reportedly is planning 
to open a UiL sales and marketing 
headquarters in time to introduce 
its first models h ere neat f alL 

Hyundai, which began selling its 
small cars in Canada last year, has 
already hired several top executives 
from Toyota Motor Ca’s UJS. sales 
arm to staff its own new U.S. oper- 
ations, a Toyota spokesman con' 
firmed Tuesday. 

Although Hyundai refused to 
comment. Automotive News, an 
industry trade publication, said in 
its Jan. 2 1 edition that tbe company 
plans to Announce the formation of 
its U.S. unit nett weekend at the 
National Automobile Dealers As- 

Racal Shares 

Lose After 


soaation convention in San Fran- Hyundai’s move into the United 
risco. States could signal the beginning of 

Hie magazine also said that a Korean invasion of the U.S. car 
Hyundai expects to sdl 100,000 market 
™ “ its first year in the Uniitd General Motors hss j. 

j ■ w >4 i ready formed a joint venture with 
Hyundai has hired Max James- South Korea’s Daewoo Group to 


son, a former Toyota executive in 
the United States, to run Its new 
U.S. arm out of offices in Garden 
Grove in Southern California, a 
Toyota spokesman said. Mr. Ja- 
miesson could not be reached for 
comment. 

At least two other top Toyota 
executives have also been lured 
away from Toyota’s U.S. head- 
quarters in Torrance, California, to 
join Hyundai, tbe Toyota spokes- 
man said. 

It was not dear, however, how 
soon the Garden Grove offices will 
be opened. 


build cars in South Korea for ex- 
port to the United States beginning 
in the 1987 model year. Chrysler 
Coip. has been negotiating with the 
Samsung Group, another big South 
Korean company, in an effort to 
form a joint venture of its own. 

Although South Korea’s auto in- 
dustry is still tiny by U.S. or Japa- 
nese standards, the nation’s cheap 
labor force makes it an attractive 
source of inexpensive cars and 
trucks for U.S. car companies dy- 
ing to compete with the Japanese. 

At the same time, independent 


Korean automakers such as Hyun- 
dai now have an opportunity to 
penetrate the U.S. market while 
their huger Japanese rivals remain 
hindered by restrictions on tbeir 
exports to the United States. 

In Canada, in fact. Hyundai's 
low-priced Pony subcompact has 
already become an instant success, 
with sales of more than 25,000 in its 
first year in the country. Last week, 
Hyundai introduced its second 
model in Canada, a four-door com- 
pact called the Stellar. 

Tbe United States and Canada 
are wide-open markets for Korean 
auto imports. But if Hyundai and 
other Korean companies begin to 
make a dent in tbe U.S. market, 
pressure could build in Washington 
and Detroit to place -South Korea 
under the kind of limits that now 
cover the Japanese. 


COMPANY NOTES 


quarter earnings, giving it a loss of 
an estimated 510 million for the 


Advanced Micro Devices Inc. has 
announced plans to build a plant 
n -w-i near Dublin for malting wafers, or quarter. Convergent thus would re- 

l oor P disks containing a large number of port a loss of about $11.9 million 

w^v**o* computer chips. Tbe bidding, in for all of 1984, on sales or about 

Ireland, 






By Bob Hagexty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Stares of Racal 
Electronics PLC plunged Wednes- 
day, after the company warned that 
results for the year ending March 
31 would be "‘substantially below” 
expectations. 

The warning came as Racal re- 
ported that pretax profit for the 
first half, which ended Oct 12, 
slipped 32 percent from a year ear- 
lier to £47.2 million ($53 milli on) 
at sales of £449.5 million, up 17 
percent The first-half figures were 
about in line with expectations, but 
the dismal forecast sent Racal 
shares down 48 pence to dose at 
240 pence apiece. 

Analysts began slashing their 
forecasts for full-year pretax profit. 
At Grieveson, Grant & Co., John 
Tysoe reduced his by £20 million, 
to £135 million, compared with 
£1 19.2 million last year. 

Mr. Tysoe said that about 60 
percent of this year's expected 
profit improvement would stem 
from Chubb. & Soo, a maker of 
locks and other security devices ac- 
quired by Racal last October. Thus, 
be said. Ratal's underlying perfor- 
mance is “not that impressive, ” 

Racal Mamed the setback mainly 
on problems at its California-based 
Racal- Vadic unit, a maker of low- 
speed moderns, which are used to 
help transmit data between com- 
puters. 

Sir Ernest Harrison, Racal's 
chairman, said Racal-Vadic intro- 
duced a modem for use with zmero- 
ters late in 1984, just as the 
for such computers “went 
through the floor." 

In addition, nncrodup-design 
problems have delayed the intro- 
duction of other new modems fay 
more than a year. Tbe result. Sir 
Ernest said, is a reduction of £15 
million in expected- profit for the 
year. 

But he reported that improve- 
ment in such areas as nriKtaiy radio 
equipment, radar and avionics. 
Spending on RacaFs new mobile- 
tdephone business reduced profit 
by £3.4 million in the half, but Sir 
Ernest predicted that the opera- 
tions would be highly profitable by 
the late 1980s. 


Greystokes, Ireland, will cost an 
estimated $186 million (189.7 Irish 
pounds). 

CIT-Akatd of France and Chi- 
nese authorities have signed a con- 
tract worth about 500 million 
francs ($51.5 million) calling for 
CIT-Alcatel to supply 14 of its 
E10B telephone exchanges Tor Beij- 
ing, a company spokesman said. 
The capacity of the exchanges will 
be 100,000 'lines. CIT-Alcatel wfll 
also supply 180 kilometers (111-5 
miles) of fiber-optic cables to con- 
nect the exchanges. 

Gabo 1 Corp~, a group involved in 
food and military antes, said it has 
ended mlks on the possible sale of 
its 76-perceni interest in Isaly Co„ 
a food company, because it had not 
obtained acceptable offers. It also 
said that Isaly will acquire Clabir’s 
interests in British oil and real-es- 
tate development companies. 

Convergent Technologies Inc, 
the troubled Silicon Vafiey com- 
puter maker, said it will take a 
series of charges against fourth- 


UPI Results Show 
First Quarterly 
Profit Since 1963 

United Press / numaiional 

WASHINGTON - United 
Press International recorded a 
Sl.l-million profit in the fourth 
quarter of 1984, according to pre- 
liminary results. It was the news 
service!® first quarterly profit smee 
1963.' . 

Luis G. Nogale&jpresident and 
chief operating officer, reported 
that fourth-quarter revenues to- 
taled $25.4 mud on, against operat- 
ing expenses of $243 million. In 
the fourth quarter of 1983, UPI lost 
$63 miDion. 

UPI, a privately-held company, 
bad been projected to have an oper- 
ating deficit of $7.7 million for 
1984. In 1983, it recorded losses of 
nearly $23 milli on before taxes. 

In September, UPI employees 
approved a 25-percent pay reduc- 
tion for all employees for three 
months, with a gradual restoration 
to previous levels by the end of this 
year. 


5350 million. 

Dee Corp.’s bid for Booker 
McConnell PLC, an engineering 
and food-distribution group, is not 
against the public interest, the Brit- 
ish Monopolies Commission said. 
Dee’s plans, however, were not 
known, as the food retailer's bid. 
valued at about £233 million (5262 
million), lapsed automatically 
when it was referred to the commis- 
sion. 

Dome Petroleum Ltd. has an- 
nounced the - filing of an amended 
tus in the united States and 
for its proposed issue of 
527.1 million of common shares. 
The share price will be based on a 
formula to be agreed on between 
Deane and its lenders. 

First Gfy Financial Cor a unit 
of Vancouver’s First City Capital 
Corp., and an affiliate, First Gty 
Securities Inc^, and AH. Robins 
Co. have bought Brillion Iron 
Works from Beatrice Cos. for 
$32.48 million. First City said 

Lockheed Cotp. said it has tenta- 
tively agreed to buy Metier Man- 


agement Systems, a privately-held 
computer group of five companies, 
for $100 million to $130 million in 
cash. Metier, whose revenues this 
fiscal year are expected to be about 
580 million, developed and market- 
ed Artemis, a computer-aided pro- 
ject management system. 

Meflon Bank Corp. said that tbe 
U3. Comptroller of the Currency 
has approved its application to es- 
tablish a consumer bank in Dallas. 
Mellon still needs Federal Reserve 
Board approval for the bank, which 
would be authorized to provide de- 
posit taking, trust services and con- 
sumer and mortgage lending. 

Monsanto Cd, u a reaction to 
the gas leak that killed more than 
2,000 people last month in Bhopal, 
India, said it will disclose more 
information to the public on poten- 
tial chemical plant hazards. It said 
it will make the information, which 
it now shares with its employees, 
available to officials, the media and 
citizens’ groups. 

Peninsular & Oriental Steam 
Navigation Co. said it is offering 
holders of Sterling Guarantee 
Trust warrants the right to sub- 
scribe to P&O warrants foil 


UT Corp. Posts 
Higher Earnings 
In Quarter, Year 

Reuters 

HARTFORD, Connecticut 
— United Technologies Corp. 
said Wednesday that a major 
cost-reduction program, in- 
creased productivity and higher 
volume m most of its units con- 
tributed to higher net income 
for the fourth quarter and year. 

The company, a diversified 
high-technology concern, said 
fourth-quarter net income rose 
to $1492! million, or 51.10 a 
share fully diluted, from 5138.1 
million, or S1.01 a share in 
1983. Revenues rose 5438 bfi- 
lion from $3.89 billion, the 
company said. 

United Technologies said 
earnings for the year rose to 
5645 million, or S4.7Q a share 
fully diluted, from $5093 mil- 
lion, or 53.74 a share in 1983. 
Revenues rose to 5163 billion 
from 514.7 billion. 

The company said improved 
demand from the automotive 
and budding-construction in- 
dustries helped sales at its Car- 
rier air-conditioning, Otis ele- 
vator, Essex wire and cable, 
lament automotive paint and 
Hamilton Standard electronic- 
controls twits. 


Trade Specialists Draw 
New Interest on NYSE 


f erred stock. 


owing a ril 
igs de- Jf- Ul 


CSR to Make 
A l-for-3 
Rights Issue 

Reuters 

SYDNEY— CSR Ltd. the Aus- 
tralian energy group, said Wednes- 
day that it will make a one-for- 
lhree rights issue at 2 Australian 
dollars (51.63) per share to raise 
about 247.6 million dollars. 

The issue price compared with 
Wednesday’s dosing share asking 

rice of 2.71 dollars, up a cent from 


recent increase in Sterlings ae- Tuesday. The theoretical rights val- 


Company Earnings 

Revmue and profit*, in millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated 


United States 


Amor. Home Pdfs 

4ttaQaar. WM TO3 

Revtmua l.m 

Net Inc 17X87 

Per Share, — , 1.14 

Year ISM 

Revenue 

Net Inc MOM 

Per Shore — 443 


UNO. 

1*3-12 

UM 

1M> 

<2701 

027.23 


Amfac 

«J, On. 

Revenue. — 

Oper Loss — 

Year 

Revenue _ 

Oper Loss — 


ISM 

5984 

304 

ISM 

*© 


smi 

V9 

1SU 

£250. 

J93 


Amstcr 

2nd Chtar. ISM ISM 

Revenue 3U0 ra 

Net Inc — — 7*7 11-* 

1st HaH 1W ISM 
Revenue _ joda ssa* 
Net Inc -- l&O 3J.9 
nee d-manth net includes 
provH loa of SSJ million for 
plant closin g . 

Airated Ind. 

1st Oner. ms TO* 

Revenue ISM 1MJ 

Net inc _ 7JM (aioj 
Per Shan — <U2 — 

a; toss. 


M»ts exclude gain oi SI mil- 
lion vs lass of SIS. 1 million to 
auarton and gain of SI mll- 
Uan trs tats of S33 million to 
years from discontinued op- 
erations. 


MtQaar. 
Revenue __ 

Net Inc 

Per Share— 
Year 


Net Inc 

Per Share — 


AMP 

ISM 

«U 

3S.9 

037 

ISM 

uni 

JffU 
1*7 


Arlda 

eihOear. lm 

Revenue J564 

Oper Lam — 3*2 

Year ISM 

Revenue 1 . 180 . 

Oeer Net — 4131 

Over Share— 120 


1983 

2 * 0.1 

93 

ISO 

1 . 120 . 

SB2* 

1 . 1 * 


ISO 

417* 

4*3 

0*3 

ISO 

1310. 

1*3.1 

1*2 


AMs exclude losses of SIS 
million 090000 In ovarian 
ana of SI J million vs profit of 
S87VM0 to rears from discon- 
tinued operations. 


Baxter Travenol 
4fh Qunr. ISM ISO 

Revenue wsa 477* 

Net Inc — lain* 503 
Per Share—. — 041 

Year ISM ISO 

Revenue — Uml h*«- 
Net inc — 2S.1 219.1 

Per Share— . 021 1*4 

a: lass. 

Becton, Didrinson 

1 st ouar. nes wm 

Revenue 35X1 25*2 

Net inc U* 12-1 

Per Share — 020 0*1 

me not includes sofa of • 
cents a shore from sale of 
business. 

Bohn f f mn p f n 
iso 

SOU) 
U2 
044 

TO* ISO 
vm. 3*00 
494 


SO* 

(a|245 


Ashland 03 


Per shore results odlustea 
far 3-for-t split to Mar. 


lei Ouar. 
Revenue — 

Net inc 

Per Share — 


A 

S3 


2 . 100 . 

Z72 

a** 


manor. 

Revenue 

Net inc. 

Per Share — 

Revenue 

Net Inc 

Per Share — 233 1.91 

Bristol-Myers 
«m Ouar. TO* ISO 

Revenue 1*10. WSJ 

Net inc 11749 HUB* 

Per Share 04* 0J* 

Year TO* ISO 

Revenue *190 l*2a 

Net Inc 47237 407.96 

Per Share — 145 3*0 


ue, based on the latest market 
price, is 54 cents. 

In its announcement Wednes- 
day, CSR also said that net profit 
for the year ending March 31 is 
unlikely to exceed the 1983-84 level 
of 91.7 million dollars. 

Bui, it said, earnings in 1985-86 
are expected to show some im- 
provement because of increased 
coal sales, cost efficiencies and con- 
tinued good results from opera- 
tions in building materials and iron 
ore. 

For the rights issue, the 123.8 
million shares will be offered to 
shareholders and convertible note 
holders who are registered by Feb. 
15. 

The money raised will be used to 
aid in carrying out a restructuring 
and refinancing of CSR's invest- 
ment in Delhi Petroleum Propri- 
etary LuL, a substantial partner in 
the Cooper Basin gas and oil fields, 
the company said. 

CSR said that, afler it acquired 
Delhi in late 1981, it arranged fi- 
nancing to help in its purchase and 
development through a trust, the 
Delhi Australia Fund. 


By Fred R. Bleakley 

iVeir Font Times Semcc ’ 

NEW YORK — The winds of 
change are whipping the flags of 
the New York Stock Exchange 
faster and faster these days. 

Tbe Big Board has been explor- 
ing 24-hour trading in stocks of 
companies listed on the exchange 
and is studying a possible merger 
with the Pacific Coast Exchange. 
Now. it is readying a controversial 
proposal that coukl have even more 
far-reaching implications. 

That proposal which the ex- 
change staff is expected to recom- 
mend to its board of directors in 
February, would pave the way for 
giant, well-capitalized firms such as 
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & 
Smith Inc. to own arid operate spe- 
cialist units on the floor of the 
exchange. 

“The specialist business has be- 
come much more risk oriented." 
said John Phelan, chairman of the 
stock exchange and formerly a spe- 
cialist. “It needs more capital to 
grow." 

Specialists are members of a na- 
tional securities exchange whose 
job it is to maintain an orderly 
market in selected stocks traded on 
that exchange. 

They stabilize the market by 
buying when there are no other 
buyers and seOing when there are 
no other sellers. They also act as 
agents for brokers who give them 
orders to execute. 

There ore 58 specialist firms 
serving as the market makers in 
1,550 slocks. Making it more at- 
tractive for larger firms to buy 
them would bring more capital to 
the exchange floor and allow spe- 
cialists to better handle the large 
orders of institutional investors 
that are increasingly dominating 
trading. 

It also would help the Big Board 
Tend off competition from regional 
stock exchanges, which have been 
siphoning off volume in NYSE 
slocks they trade. 

Most Big Board specialists back 
the plan. 

“Would we jell? Absolutely," 
said Peter Haas, 57, principal own- 
er of AB. Tom pane & Co., which 
specializes in 25 stocks, including 
UJS. Steel Corp. 

He said be and other older part- 
ners would want to lock in profits 
from the sale of the firm ana put it 
to work in tbe business until they 
retire. 

Critics of the idea contend that it 
could significantly change the bal- 
ance of power m the brokerage 
community and make it more diffi- 
cult to police insider-trading 
abuses and the manipulation of 
slock prices. 

They also expect that the 
NYSFs auction market, where one 
specialist serves as the focal point 
for trading in a particular stock, 
would be transformed into a dealer 
market of competing market mak- 
ers similar to that which exists in 
over-the-counter trading. 

Brokerages might be compelled 
to set up rival specialist-trading 
units because money managers are 
likely to view firms linked to spe- 
cialists as having the best price in- 
formation. There is also the fear 
that corporate investment-banking 
relationships could be swayed by a 
specialist linkup as well. 


(Other Earnings oo Page 8) 


are 
which 
drawn. 


I 


Wall Street 
Lags Upturn 


Debating the fast of Being Canadian 


(Continued from Page 7) 
always been reinforcing to have 
stock markets around tbe world 
traveling in the same direction." 

If some exchanges are doiqg sub- 
stantially better than others, they 
lend to siphon off investment 
funds, be explained, “but with so 
• j much unanimity as now exists, the 
arnuKr effect is to create general confi- 
ji deuce.'* 

Mr. Stewart is very bullish to- 
wards Wall Street, too, asserting 
that “it’s just a matter of timer 
■ t before new highs are achieved on 
y W* the Dow. 

> “Tbe path of least resistance now 
j/j-C ^ for Wau Street is up rather than 
' \ «• __ v down,** he said. “All setbacks will 
^ ** be brief and well-controlled.” 

‘ r " ^ However, Mayri Voute, manag- 

J, -‘ * ing director of Capital Manage- 

r ~z. T-- r mem, a Paris-based investment 


3*1 r 


... 


(Continued from Page 7) 
public around the time the Tones 
submit titer first full-scale budget 
this spring. Business and other sec- 
tors are being extensively consult- 
ed. 

For the United States, whose tar- 
iffs are already lower than Cana- 
da’s, the move could mean not rally 
significantly lower tariffs for ex- 
ports to Canada, but also a shift 
toward freer trade in an increasing- 
ly protectionist world. 

U.S. manufacturers of items car- 
iying high tariffs, such as furniture 
and textiles, would particularly 
stand to benefit from a Ca n adia n 
riiang jB. Computer and information 
services would also gain. 

Washington’s official stance is to 
wait for a specific Canadian initia- 
tive. But separate hearings on freer 
trade between Canada and the 
United States were held in Wash- 
ington last week by the lntmia- 


ifiimwhkhspe^tei ni^ividnal ^^Comtes^ and 
.^accounts, said Wall Street is cur- Special Trade Repre- 


•fc* 9 " 


ado ®* s . 








■'■ready giving her “an awful Feeling 
of dfeji vu.” 

* Ms. Voule, who was right a year 
'ago in predicting that Wall Street 
-would be “unexciting” in 1984 
J. j “compared with European mar- 

fir ^ •ikets,” attributes the entreat surge 
r - < . 'in New York to investors overre- 
‘. Tcting to each other and ^ustwant- 
* ng to do something after a boring 

’/ear” 

rtf*** She compared it with the 
; : cky upswing earty hi January] 

4i surge led by big intetutionai in- 
. '.'■estors, which collapsed after a few 
precis of high-volume trading. 

. Just as for last year, the main- 

fu.ii ur-.ll CfM-t m 1QSK 




sentative, both American agencies. 

The purpose is to identify the 
sectors of U.S. industry that might 
benefit from Uberaliz&l trade. 
Moreover, the U.S. Chamber of 
Commerce and other U.S. business 
interests are lobbying for bilateral 
trade liberalization. 

Government officials in both na- 
tions suggest that President Ronald 
Reagan and Mir. Muironey will 
likely endorse the idea of an agree- 
ment on freer trade wfa&i Mr. Rea- 
gan visits Quebec City on March 
17. 

For Canada, what is at stake is 
challenge on Wall Street in 1985 the degree of access it will have to 
-riU be to avoid making costly mis- the world’s biggest market at a time 
' items in picking stocks, she said. 

JJSL issues comprise only 15 per- 
;-_ v '--ent of her equity portfolio, with 
VjVnly “special UJs.-type" qualify- 
as potential purchase. She 


-*C !/ 


when the U.S. Congress is turning 
increasingly protectionist toward 
Canadian exports, which range 
from rolled steel to raspberries. 
About 78 percent of Canadian ex- 
ports go to the United Slates. 

Without a trade agreement, a 
Canadian official said, “It would 
be difficult to overstate the risks to 
Canada.” 

Figures released last week indi- 
cate the importance of Canada's 
U.S. connection. In the first 11 
months of 1984, Canada exported 
560.1 billion worth of goods to the 
United States, while importing 546 
billion. Exports have been in- 
creased by continuing weakness in 
the Canadian dollar compared with 
tbe U.S. currency; the Canadian 
dollar is currently trading at 
around 75 cents in United Stales 

currency. 

Still, the issue strikes at a basic 
insecurity inherent in the Canadian 
psyche — the fear of being over- 
whelmed by a neighbor 10 times as 
large. Critics qnestion whether 
smaller Canadian companies 
would survive and whether closer 
economic ties could lead to a loss of 
sovereignty. 

But Mr. Muironey and Canada's 
major business organizations say 
that freer trade and doser econom- 
ic integration with the United 
States is the best answer lo bringing 
the country’s 10.8-perceat unem- 
ployment rate down. Policies of the 
former Liberal government of 
Pierre Elliott Trudeau, perceived as 
antibusiness and excessively na- 
tionalistic by the new team, are 
being rapidly reversed. 

Enhancing bilateral trade now 
seems to be the chief priority, part- 


ly because more trade might lead to 
more investment Tbe new finance 
minister, Michael Wilson, said in 
his November economic statemem 
that a key goal for Ottawa is to take 
advantage of the dose — and huge 
— U.S. market 

But the farm the final Canadian 
will take is far from dear, 
idals say it could be anything 
from a reiteration of a Trudeau 
proposal fra - free trade in specific 
industrial sectors, such as informa- 
tion technology and agricultural 
equipment, to full free trade. 

As the debate accelerates, a par- 
ticularly damaging argument to 
Canadian free-trade proponents v 
may turn out to be that free trade is 
irrelevant to Canada’s true needs. 
Such opponents say that by 1987 
less than 10 percent of Canadian- 
American trade will be subject to 
dudes anyway, as cats already 
agreed to are absorbed. 


, “It will change the rules of the 
Total borrowings of $950 million game competitively." said Thomas 
e available through DAF, of p_ Rygj, j r-f a vie e president at 
$875 million has been Kidder, Peabody & Co„ one of the 
firms opposed to the proposal. 
“The issue is much bigger than at- 
tracting capital to the NYSE 
floor,'' he added. 

Many major brokerage firms 
_ , * /T* f view the acquisition of a specialist 

JNCW Renault Liniei post as a smart move, considering 

the relatively high return on capi 

Agcrue Fronee-Presse 

PARIS — Tbe French cabinet 
Wednesday confirmed the appoint- 
ment of Georges Besse as president 


Cabinet Confirms 


of the stale-owned automaker, Re- 
nault, succeeding Bernard Hanon, 
who was dismissed. Renault direc- 
tors approved Mr. Besse’ s appoint- 
ment Tuesday. 

Edith Cresson. minister of indus- 
try, said Mr. Besse's job will be “to 
gjve a new start" to the group, 
which lost an estimated 51 bfiHon 
(about 9.7 billion francs) in 1984. 

Tbe state provided about 5120 mil- 
lion in subsidies for the group last 
year and is expected to inject an- 

other $400 million this yrar. Cream & Cram aod chairman 

Mr. Besse, 57, who played a ma- of Lhe exchange, explained the Big 
jor role in establishing France^ Board's rationale for recomroend- 
massive nuclear power program, b ing a new rule, 
credited with reviving. state-owned “We shouldn't place any resuic- 

Pftchincy Ugine Kuhlman SA_ tions on who can be in the game,” 


!y earned. 

stock exchange said special- 
ists earned a 19.4-pervenl return on 
about $600 million in capital in 
1983. In contrast, firms doing busi- 
ness with the public averaged a 
163-percent return on capital. . 

Even so, the large firms say they 
are not likely to throw money at the 
stock exchange specialists. 

“They have an inflated view of 
what their franchises are worth," 
said Howard Brenner, executive 
vice president of Drexel Burnham 
Lambert Inc., which has become 
one of the most active specialists on 
several regional stock exchanges. 

Michael Cream, a specialist with 


•fi 


* anted Jostens, American Family 
‘nd Bolt Beranek & Newman. 


p* 




\ss t . •mfo» to Export MoreJnte 

c .v. NEW DELHI — India expects 
export 275,000 metric tons of 
■r ■"*?•■■■ -/sip p/yvk during lhe season end- 
r y^tgin June 1985, up from 233,500 
■ :»s in the year-earlier period. 


7 !\f' 


n 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on January 21, 1985: U.S. $134.06. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Infoimation: Pierson, Hetoring & Pierson 

Herengracht 214,101 6 BS Amsterdam. 


We are pleased to announce 
the election of 

BRUCE W. SCHNITZER 

as a member of our 

Boards of Directors 




DISCOUNT CORPORATION 

OF NEW YORK 

58 Pine Street, New York. N.Y. 10005 


he said. “This is pan of the whole 
deregulation and competition 
trend. In the end, it will make Tor a 
more efficient marketplace.” 

Firms that deal directly with 
public investors now can buy spe- 
cialist units only if they do not act 
as an investment banker or dissem- 
inate research on the stocks in 
which the*: specialize. 

As a result, there have been only 
a few firms doing business with the 
public that are affiliated with spe- 
cialists on either the Big Board or 
the American Stock Exchange, 
where a aaiilar rule is in effect. 

The new rule would allow a firm 
that deals with the public to contin- 
ue research and investment bank- 
ing while specializing in those com- 
panies' stocks as long as its 
specialist unit is organized as a sep- 
arate subsidiary. 

In effect, this would create what 
the Big Board refers to as a “Chi- 
nese Wall” to totally isolate sensi- 
tive market information. 

The Amex board agreed to a sim- 
ilar plan last week and has forward- 
ed it to the Securities and Exchange 
Commission for approval 

Finns such as Paine Webber and 
Prudential Bache Securities already 
have talked to Big Board-specialist 
firms about possible ownership. 
They say they are likely to pursue 
the idea if the rule goes through 
and wins SEC approval. 

Merrill Lynch, on the other 
hand, says it has some reservations. 

As Sam Hunter, director of secu- 
rities trading, said. “Becoming a 
specialist on the New York is a lot 


Leading Specialist Firms 

N'-'S - s:ec a:'Srf:rTi»ran>.od ty 
n_" r 05r -I S’CC<& .i»nC SC 


$p6Sr, Leeds & KeHoM 
Common stocks: 114 
Including: AMR Carp-. Baxter- 
Travpnoi, Boeing, Mobil, Unocal 
R.P.M. Specialist Corporation 
Common stocks: 70 
including: BankAmerlca, Cigna 
Corp-. du Pont, Eastman Kodak, 
Eastern Airlines 
Henderson Brother* Inc. 
Common stocks: 70 
Including: American Express, 
Bally Manutacturinn, Ford 
Motor, Honeywell. Schering- 
Plough 

Murphy, MareetRee ft Smith 
Common stocks: 64 ' 
Including: Alcan Aluminium, 

. A max, .Global-Marine. 
Homoetafca Mining, Ptittflp* 
Petroleum 

Adler, Cotaman ft Co. 

Common stocks: 60 

Including: Avon Products, 
Consolidated Edison, Motorola, 
J. C. Penney, Squibb Corp- 


The N9T 

more complicated. 1 have no idea, 
for instance, what my institutional 
competition would do.” 

The controversy has healed up to 
where it is been suggested that rath- 
er than take orders to lhe specialist 
post of a competitor, big institu- 
tional firms might boycott them by 
turning to the regional stock ex- 
changes. That, of course, would 
further undermine the strength of 
the Big Board. 

The reason for the boycott would 
be suspicion that, despite the so- 
called Chinese Wall of security, a 
specialist unit might tip off its par- 
ent firm's trading desk to a compet- 
itor's moves. 


B anquede Ri ve s.a. 


CONSEILS ET PLACEMENTS 


Nouveile adresse 
desle 17 decembre 1984 


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I 


Over-the-Coimter 


Jan. 23 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


CmTask jb 
vlCptUs 


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TVs 7% 9Vy— Vi 


Krov 46 
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y . -y: : - They cross the worid in hours rather than days. ; 

' - ' ■ . . Their village is global, and so is their marketplace. They 

• : ' ; . ' . are today's ^international executives. ' 

'... V^T,:.-" 7 .' : ;T: 1 • v'vi^^d it takes- mere than an ordinary business magazine to 
f.y i ^-y„^.e|p'.them keep pace with iheir complex, fast-changing world. 

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.; :r ”hb4 y : -'.w ; f--x • yy .b- iTxecLitives-wGrJdwidereiy on it for the informed outlook 
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y-f *y .fi^rthe experienced insight as well- as the verified iact^ 

c, y ,c . y c y o w ; fo -On sale at all international 







I NTEttNATlON AL 




mm VOICE OF AUTHORITY 




BANQUE DE LA 

SOCIETE FINANQERE EUROPEENNE 

is pleased to announce that 

Mr. Volkmar von ALTEN 
Mr. Bernard GUEliN 
Mr. Candido JOARISTI 

have been appointed 

MEMBERS OF ITS 
EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Banque de la Societe Finandere Eurnpccnne 
20, rue de la Paix - 75002 Paris 
Telephone: 26L57.47 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
23 January 1985 

YIm nctisMt valae iniefaHora shorn betaware siwptkKl by llw Funds wmi me 

■k cupHob m iame foods mttotm quotes cm based on Issue prices. The tui^rkis 
morainal symbols Indicate ftaqvency of quataflaas BBPPlIed for Iba IHT: 

(dl -daily; («) - weakly ; (b) -M-tnaaHily; <rj -nwutarly; fl) -Irrasidariv. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
<wl ANVkd Trust. SA 


Hum ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

PB B557B. Tht Hague (Dn> 46761 B 
—US I Bever Bcrt60o8M«H+™ 


BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. Ltd. —US I Bever Bartogimwm 

~1h I SSSSy* PARISBAS— GROUP 

=<d i ^AimtaZL I lisioo zfj} CgT em^ideneiflonal 

Kiwfctz vfiJHaF 


— td I Grabar___— — SFinsoja 
—id l Stoekbar _____ SF 167780* 

—Id 1 C5F Fund SF25 

— (d 1 Crossbow Fund SF 11 

— <d J ITF Fund H.V 1 14 

BANQUE 1NDOSUEZ 

— (d ) Aslan Growth Fund — III 

— twl Olwfband SF S3 

— fwl FI F— America S17 

— Iwl FIF — Europe $ 1C 

— Iwl FIF— PocJflc__ SIS 

— IdllndEMiMzIMumbaiidsA— — . SB 7 

— <d) Inctettar Multitouch B 1 146 

BRITANN1 AJ>OB 271. SL Heller. Jersey 
— Iwl BrttJJoiior Income 
—Iwl aritSManagXurr. 

—Id l Bril. intUManagjwrtf 
-Id J Bril. intU ManoQ-Portt 
—Iwl Brit.Untveriol Growth 

— Iwl'Brtt.Gald Fund 

—Iwl BrltJiAanaaXumMcy 
-Id 1 Brit. Japan Dir Peri. Fd 
—Iwl BriUenwv Gin Fund- 
—id 1 Brit. World Ulo. Fund 
—Id ) Bril. WorM Techn. Fund 


$8640 

OM1JUA72 
— SF 71 AS 

BinSttS — <wi OBUGOLLAR— — S1JP8.00 

ViS5S — IW) OBLI-YEN— — Y IQL73433 

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SF 2508 —id I PAROIL-FUND JTirO 

SF 11.40 — «l PARINT6R FUND J 1W.13 

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Rural aonkOI ConodoPOB 246/Juomsov 

Kin/* -H»l RBC Cmxntel Fund LW 510.71 

SFoS -Hwl RBC For Ea5»P0CHlt Fd— 51047 

S19J3 -Hwl RBC Inti Ccdtol FdL 519.21 

| in j* -+Iw1 RBC Int’l Income Fd S 1044* 

S1S86 -Tld ) RBC MorvCummcv Fd S22J2 

S8U7 -«w» »BC North Amer.Fd. J8JT 

1146.77 5KANDIFOND INTL FUND I46*2J6270) 


— Inline: Bid- 
— IwjAk.: Bid. 


-5405 ONw _ 
. W8S Otter _ 


S0DI63* »— "" Mu. 

S843* SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

. 5097V 17 Devoralrtre SoJ-ondon-01 -377-0X8 

1 1.175 —lb I SHB Bond Fund S2UK 

S0960 — lw)5HBInHGrowttFund S 194C 

SWISS BANK CORP. 

-<d lAmeritn Valor =s. SF 58450 

-Id 1 D-Mark Bond Selection — DM 1225B 

«!»?« — wi Dollar Bend SriOCHon 513345 

5J5J2 “tdlTWrtnBmdSeloOwi FL 13882 

* 0788 — [d | Intorvokir Sr 86J0 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL — Id 1 Jcaoc Pcrltallc — — .. SFB4600 

-(n) S3343 ~Jd J Swiss Forntan Bond Sel SF T104T 

_45« capital itrlks " s IL» -<d 1 Swtaevdar New Ser. SF 3S72S 

, * M-3U — Id ) Unlv. Band Soled SF 3375 

CREDIT 5UISSE I ISSUE PRICES! -Id 1 Universal Fund SF11789 

Trti£5D? > t7,w t’t? UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

~w Bond DM K =JS l SE £2 

-Id) Band Vcdar U 5- DOLLAR — s 109.17 T2 } viti'S 

-Id) Band Valor Yen Yen 105000) 3“ SSS-SS.* 1 lc 

— la) Convert Valor Swf SF 10735 Z 3 1 

^9^My||K»UM. IMP 

SF 74.75 UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

sf 106m — fdlUirirmia OM4198 

— , 51 D 33 JU — IdlUnMBnds DM 2130 

— Id I CS Money Marhel Fund DM I018JW — W 1 Unlrok DM7640 

-Id) Enwow— valor sf™^ Other Funds 


— Id ) Ctmas&c 
—Id ICS Fond 
—Id i CS Funds— Inn 
—id ) CS Money Market Fund 


— Iwj FAC European. 
— Iw) FAC Oriental-, 


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JS'.SlS!S o “ V0 '. Dr — SF147.7S iw) Actlbondk Investments Fund. 5 2058 

Id I Pacific— voter SF 171JS iw) Actlvest imi 5 103$ 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM i?,’ Fu,1<, — * J“-S 

— f Id ) Cancartra DIM 7452 |q J A?2?n^ taOnC0 F iiiartv! 

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Dunn A HarpHt 6 Uoyd Coarse, Brussels Id > BBL FONDS BF $V30 

—(ml DAH Commodity Pool- S 308.12 Iw) BNP InterOond Fund 5 I05JE 

— Im| Currency A Gold Pool __l I8Z50*** BomSeiek.lSsue Pr SF 14475 

— (ml Winch. Life Ful. Pool— 157244— lm) Canada GM-Morlaotto Fd 5 OSS 

—<m) Traeu Worid Ful. Peal- IB074S— fd 1 CoplKd Proserv. Fa Inll 51148 

FAC MGMT. LTD. IN V. ADVISERS !?! r‘ o JllSSii^S 

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— I w) FAC Oriental S2551 mtcon/iFT F 573054 

FIDELITY POB 670. HamUtcn Bermuda fg., 1 £gS-5 Pgf fjgfi r7r-= — 

— Iml American vakm Common- S 7057 {JJJ J Fd. jnTI A Certi .* 

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—Id ) f idol IN Orient Fund, 52S2S 1^1 pw EslWHKh mewt Trust S1JE 

— Id I Fidelity Frontier Fund SI2JJ JO ) Eurooe Obliealtora LF 6043 

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GEFINOR FUNDS. Iwl Hestla F un d i 5 MAC 

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-lw» Scottun Work) Fund r 170.44 }5 B ana * ’•” 

— IWlSMull.A— rimn Minn Id I IntWlUnd SA $ I2JS 

C^^auaLoSfl^jMfiSn Iwimtormarket Fund 53726 

^Luuw^uqtiAocmAJ wni4Zffl [M(I mri Cummer Fund Ud 5 2227 

GLOBAL .ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. Ir MnTI Seairtlles Fund 5 JJ52 

PB IW. SI Polar Port, Guormev. W8I-70715 IS I invom PWS ■ DM4T.94 

_ S 11648 lr I Invest ANontlouM 5 664 

511944 Ir 1 Itnirortufia imi Fund SA 5 IC44 

5123.15* Iwl J anon Sotoeilen Fund 1 t&uw 

IB8J7 iwl Japan Porille Fund _____ 5 10095 
. S 12.10 M! KWmwrl Banwn Infl Fd 531.11 


FORBE S POB887 GRAND CAYMAN Iwl Forecfttnd” 

London ASM 01-837-3013 (wl Formula Sola 

-JwlGoJdlbcotn.. 5823* Id ) FandtaMa— . 

=JSS2f A f proeWk>n 4J42 Id 1 Govern m. Su 

~Jw j . KJg’gg'W - 5824 Id I FranW-Tnrrf 

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(wl Inn Curran ev Fund Ud- 
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(w) GAM Boston inc 
(w) GAM Ermitoge 

(wl GAM Franc-val 

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(»»> GAM Pooflc Inc 5 HAAS (wl Ugydi Inti. Small Cm i 1327 

(w) GAM SlerL 8. Intf Unit Trust. 12SJ0P ( wI Llurtund 567.46 

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- .55..* !'• ~" T j : .. •' '• -• • '■■■ • 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 



Page 11 


Japan Says It Would Curb Auto Output to U.S. 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —Members of 
Japfij 




inauguration, have toJd Reagan ad- 
ministration trade officials that the 
Japanese would limit their auto- 
production capacity to prevent dra- 
matic increases in U.S. sales even if 
existing import quotas were re- 
moved. 

The production limit would be 
around X5 million cars a year, 
which is (SSO, 000 more cam than are 
currently allowed into the country 
tinder a four-year agreement that 
ends March 31, the Japanese visi- 
tors said. 

They also said that Japanese 
automakers want the quotas re- 
moved, despite reports here that 
some of them preferred continuing 


the restrictions beca u se of the large 
profits they have been making. 

The U.S. automakers are split on 
quotas. General Motors Corp. 

tiMrtta rf-i ii ■ ■ i ■ 


ler Corp. and Ford Morn Co. fa 
vor extending them. 

Adminisiration officials and pri- 
vate trade specialists reacted skep- 
tically to the idea that Japan’s auto 
exports would remain limited by 
production capacity. They fdt that 
Japanese automakers could not re- 
sist increasing their capacity if they 

could sell more cars in the Ameri- 
can market. 

Nonetheless. U5. trade officials 
took the comments by. leaders of 
Japan's Liberal Democratic Party 
as a signal to the Reagan adminis- 
tration that letting the quotas die 
would not mean a flood of Japa- 


that would him U.S. 


The party officials included Su- 
sunm NDtaido. vice chairman of 
and Yoshiro Hayashi, a 


raw ....nis ier oi neann ana neaa 
of the committee oi the Diet, the 
Japanese parliament, that handles 
trade frictions. They met with the 
UJS. trade representative, William 
E. Brock, and the commerce secre- 
tary, Malcolm Baldrige. 

The question of whether to re- 
new the restraint agreement is one 
of a number of trade issues con- 
fronting Tokyo and Washington 
following the meeting three weeks 
ago in Los Angeles between Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone. 
Trade problems dominated the 
meeting, as Japan holds a S34- bil- 
lion trade surplus with the United 
States. 


five administration offi- 

cials wffl leave tor Tokyo next 
Monday for extensive follow-up 
talks on ways to open Japan's mar- 
kets in telecommunications, com- 


puters. wow* in- 

scription drugs and sophisticated 
medical equipment These talks, 
wfcich will focus fust on telecom- 
munications,- wfll be held at the 
undersecretary level 

In Japan, meanwhile, the Tokyo 
Shimbun reported Tuesday that 
Japanese officials oppose most of 
the U.SL proposals, including a re- 
quest to buy American satdu t es.. 

But the newspaper said the offi- 
cials had taken a “positive” posi- 
tion on buying U.S. telecommuni- 
cations equipment and accepting 
data from foreign laboratories for 
licensing new kinds of medical 
equipment 


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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


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PEANUTS 


ACROSS 

1 Narrated 
5 Sheepfolds 
10 Squint . 

14 Le6n’s love 

15 City near Kobe 

16 Longfellow's 
bell town 

17 Gnomish, in a 
way 

18 Oscar winner: 
M B 

19 Havoc 

20 Battologizes 
22 Dorm topic 

24 Beyond 

25 Frat topic 

26 Cudgels 

29 British orderly 

33 Azimuth 

34 Strikebreaker 

36 Cinched 

37 Snail's motto 

41 Bristles 

42 Parrot 

43 Diminutive 
suffix 

44 Imply 

46 Gone, at Logan 

49 Tommy of the 
theater 

50 Deliver a 
haymaker 

51 Gust 

54 Game fish 
58 Be bested 


59“... face 

the world 

with": 

Browning 

61 Gallimaufry 

62 Actuaries' 
concerns 

63 Silk voile 

64 Rod’s partner 

65Siliques 

66 Anthony and 
Clarissa 

67 Nixed item 

DOWN 

1 Actor Jacques 

2 Skip 

3 Like an 
eremite 

4 Decay in a 
forest 

5 Italian 
noblewoman 

6 Wicker 

7 Hebrew letters 

8 Duke 
Ellington's 
monogram 

9 Huarache 

10Fala,e.g. 

U Case for trivia 

12 Banshee's 
bailiwick 

IS “Lair” of two 
Baers 

21 Har rinum 
nickname 

23 Let 


25 Butler in 1939 

28 Chaliapin and 
Moscona 

27 "Over the 
Rainbow” 
composer 

28 Apollo 15 
astronaut 

29 Scenic 
peninsula 

30 Devout 

31 St.-Cyr-I* 

32 Fortification 

35 Shipper’s need 

38 Carte carrier 

39 Longest 
human bone 

40 Ciceronian 
collection 

45“ for 

tennis?” 

47 Kennel adjunct 

48 Hereditary 

50 Squelched 

51 Tab 

52 Trademark 

53 Canceled, as a 
stamp 

54 Tenor Maison 

55 Dairyman's 
anat 

56 Vienna, to a 
Viennese 

57 "Star Wars” 
hero 

60 nod 

(show 

drowsiness) 



BEETLE BAILEY 


you Ire right, you 
can't talk to 
SB T. SNORKEL \*4 
THE MORNING 



Unscramble thua four Jumbles, 
one letter to each equara to torm 
tour onflnary words. 


ELZAH 


1 

nr 



1 UBOAT 



nn 

bn 


LESLIE STEPHEN: 

The Godless Victorian 
By Noel Annan. 432 pp. $25. 

Random House. 201 East 50lh Sired. 

New York N. Y. 10021 

Reviewed by D. J. R. Bruckner 

ESLIE STEPHEN is most remembered 
now for his literary criticism, but Noel 
.Annan is right in saying Stephen regarded Ins 
relentless assaults on theology, and his insis- 
tence that man can be moral without religion, 
as his life's great work. 

Stephen taught at Cambridge University un- 
til he was 30.' became ihe editor of CornhiU 
magazine at 40 and the editor of the great 
Dictionary of National Biography at SO. and 
he wrote hundreds ot articles and more than 20 
books. He had been a clergyman but found a 
few years after his ordination that be was no 
longer a believer and set out to knock down the 
intellectual foundations of belief. 

When be thought he had cleared the field of 
theologians he searched for the moral impulse 
among novelists and used his wit and critical 
penetration to make writers a moral force. But 
at last he said. “Literature is. in all cases, a 
demoralizing occupation, though some people 
can resist its evil influences.'' 

His daughter. Virginia Woolf, has left a 
distressing picture of him as Ramsay in the 
novel “To ine Lighthouse," but that is really a 
portrait of warts, not of Stephen. There is not 
much in .Annan's book to suggest Stephen was 
less unpleasant than Ramsay or that Virginia 
and her sister. Vanessa, had no reason to resent 
him. but Annan did not intend to write a 
biography: he says someone else ought to. 

His first four chapters sketch the life, but 
they are only an introduction to nine chapters 
of discussion of Victorian social and intellectu- 
al history. He wrote this book more than 30 
years ago and it has been long out of print The 
new version is not simply a revision, but a 
rewriting, especially of those last nine chapters. 

His point is that Stephen was a great Victori- 
an, not more. He was at the. center of the 
Victorian intellectual world, and within its 
confines: unlike some — Matthew Arnold, for 
instance — he did not soar out of it. And in 
discussing Stephen's works. Annan surveys the 
German philosophers. Darwin. Huxley. Cardi- 
nal Newman, Auguste Comte, Saint-Simon. 
Gladstone. Disraeli and hundreds more, even 
Pope Pius XI. 

At their best the chapters on history and 
ideas are like an exciting conversation with a 
good-humored man who has read everything 
and understood it all. You cannot quite call 
Annan’s excursions digressions, but his refer- 
ences touch on everything, ff he wants to 
conjure up Stephen overcoming depression he 
will draw on characters from “War and Peace" 
as well as on the novels of Benjamin Constant 
and the paintings of Eugene Fromentin. In his 
vigorous accounts of the contests among think- 
ers he sometimes enters into the fray. Recount- 
ing the argument that elicited Acton's famous 
remark about power, he says. “Acton’s dictum 
makes history incomprehensible." And to 


point up the failings of British empiricism he 
whips its brightest child: “Benrand Russell 
was the most original British philosopher since 
Hume and the greatest British logician since 
Occam, but when he considered social and 
moral problems he still wrote as if they could 
be solved bv the simple application of reason 
without a thought for ihe structure of society 
and its institutions even though his prose re- 
sounded with imprecations against men for 
behaving irrationally. He wrote as if Max We- 
ber had never Uved." 

It is a wonder Stephen does not get lost in 
this Annaoite ferment. In fact, he enrages 

more comprehensible. And, by placing Ste- 
phen’s thinking among his contemporaries and 
successors. Annan gives a clear understanding 
of the movement of ideas in politics, philoso- 
phy. literature and religion. His argument that 
there is an unbroken line between the evangeli- 
cal fervor of the Clapbam sect from which 
Stephen sprung to the ‘exclusive intellectual 
rigor of Bloomsbury that was established by 
the next generation of Stephens U compelling. 
And when he illustrates Stephen's failure to 
defeat religion, demonstrating that just when 
rationalism pulverized standard Anglican the- 
ology the interest of most thinkers had turned 
elsewhere — to textual studies and the anthro- 
pology and sociology of religion — he makes 
an eloquent plea for an understanding of what 
intellectuals do. and how perilous the enter- 
prise is. Stephen did combat with some of the 
most formidable intellects of the age. and while 
he could chop up an illogical opponent re- 
morselessly , his own thinking was guided by an 
old-fashioned, indeed profoundly religious, re- 
gard for ordinary' human values. In hindsight it 
is dear he lost many of his battles, but be had 
great courage. 

And there were triumphs. Annan says Ste- 
phen's “History of Thought in the Eighteenth 
Century" is a great wort: that still must be 
consulted by anyone interested in the history 
of ideas. And he makes a strong case, for 
Stephen as a very important literary critic on 
two grounds: he was the first En glishman u> 
take the novel seriously and to devise critical 
standards for it. and he was the rust to insist 
that social and historical forces shape taste and 
thus literature. In (he end, even if one would 
□ot want to have lived Stephen's mental life, it 
is a wonderful one to be led through by a man 
of such bubbling curiosity as Annan. 


D. J. R. Bruckner is on the staff of The New 
York Times. 


Israel Returns to Book Fair 
In Cairo, Prompting Protests 

The Assodtned Pros 

CAIRO — Both the Palestine Liberation 
Organization and Israel are participating in 
Egypt’s 17th international Book Fair, which 
began here this week. 

Israel's participation after a two-year ab- 
sence triggered a boycotL by some Arab pub- 
lishers. A small rival fair was organized by the 
Egyptian lawyers' and journalists' unions. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Tmscott 

O N the diagramed deal 
East demonstrated that 
3D apparently impregnable 
contract was pregnable after 
all. His opponents had done 
well to reach three no-trump, 
avoiding four spades in which 
there would have been four top 
losers. 

In three no-trump it appears 

NORTH 
* i 10 6 S 2 
? A5 
« 3 

• A Q 10 7 S 


WEST (D> 

• 8 

7 J 1032 
< 10 87 58 
*984 


EAST 

* A KQ 7 

* 984 
A 9 2 

* J 83 


SOUTH 

* 943 

? KQ 76 
V K Q J 6 

♦ K 2 


Neither side was 

vnlnerable. The 

bidding: 

West 

North 

East 

South 

Pass 

1 A 

DW. 


1 V 

I * 

Pass 

3 N.T. 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 



West led the heart Jack. 


that there are the same four 
top losers and no more, but the 
bad spade break offered a 
chance for the defense. 

West led the bean jack. This 
was a good Stan for the de- 
fense not so much because it 
aimed to establish a heart trick 
— West was entry less — but 
because it attacked the South's 
communications. 

■ If the declarer had chosen to 
reply on a favorable division of 
clubs he could have made his 
contract easily by winning 
with the heart ace and leading 
a diamond. But he could not be 
sure about clubs, and hoped to 
develop spades. 

The declarer chose to win in 
his hand with the heart queen 
and lead a spade. The jack lost 
10 the king, and a low diamond 
was . returned. Notice that a 
heart return to the see in dum- 
my would have enabled the de- 
clarer to lead a spade from the 
dummy advantageously. 

As it was. the diamond king 
won in the closed hand and the 


spade nine was led. West's dis- 
card revealed that the spades 
could not be used, and for the 
purposes of making nine tricks 
in the other suits South's com- 
munications were in ruins. 

The position was (his after 
East won with the spade 
queen: 

NORTH 

♦ JOS 

iilr 

*984 * J 6 3 

SOUTH 

* 4 

*7 K76 

*QJ6 

*K2 

East shifted to a club, and 
South could not disentangle 
his tricks. He resigned himself 
to defeat by winning in dum- 
my, crossing to the club king, 
and returning to the heart ace. 
In this way he lost two spade 
tricks as well as the diam ond 
ace for down one. 


BONGIB 


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SEEBID ! 


ZD 

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THE WHEEL WAS 
CON5II7EKEC7 MAN'S 
GREATEST INVENTION 
UNTIL HE ©OT THIS. 


Now arrange Ihe circled letters to 
torm the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer here: [111 X IT X ^1 


Yesterday’s 


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the big blizzard?— UP IN THE AIR 


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64 

Ir 

0 

Martin 

26 

79 

24 

75 

a 

D 

New Delhi 

19 

66 

10 

50 

Ir 

fr 

Seoul 

-2 

28 

■7 

19 

0 

d 

Shanghai 

11 

52 

5 

41 

r 

0 

Staoaaore 

32 

n 

25 

77 

a 

cl 

Talpai 

21 

70 

16 

61 

a 

0 

Tokyo 

II 

a 

5 

41 

cf 

r 

fr 

AFRICA 






fr 

AMIen 

24 

75 

10 

50 

a 

cl 

Cairo 

19 

M 

9 

48 

cl 

0 

Cape Town 

26 

79 

U 

55 

tr 

to 

CasaMaaca 

18 

64 

12 

54 

ef 

V" 

Hann 

22 

72 

18 

64 

r 

el 

Loom 

27 

81 

» 

75 

O 

ci 

Nairobi 

26 

79 

14 

S7 

fr 

cl 

cf 

TuMi 

19 

66 

10 

50 

d 


LATIN AMERICA 

BoenoiAlre* 2# 79 20 68 fr 

Uma — — — — no 

Mexico atr 2T n 5 41 d 

Rio Oe Janeiro 28 B2 24 75 0 

Soo Paata — — — — no 


-5 
13 
-2 
2 
3 

6 33 
2 36 
2 36 


NORTH AMERICA 
A n rt ioreg n 


36 sw 
38 to 
fa 
o 


BMfoa 

CMcow 


IDDLE EAST 


nancus 

■Satan 

Atrtv 

IEANIA 

SWtf 


4 39 -3 26 
18 44 10 SO 
13 55 4 39 
12 54 4 39 

W 66 B 46 


DvtoJI 

kmoMd 

Houston 

Las Anodes 

Miami 

MhmaepaRt 

Montreal 


22 72 17 63 d 

23 73 2D 68 Ir 
dwdv; Mmr; tr-falr; h-holl; 
i shawm; sw-emm; 0-storm v. 


34 ■ 6 

41 4 

96 * 

25 -13 

26 -15 

30 -9 
81 16 
48 2 

64 IB 
57 1 

23 -10 
21 -13 
64 II 


16 Cl 
61 fr 
36 a 

50 PC 
34 fr 
10 pc 
9 pc 
52 PC 
19 fr 


New York 
InFrascto 
Seattle 
Toronto 
WOSWMIoa 
oarer co st; pc - partly cloudy; r-roin; 


26 -11 
39 -7 


43 PC 
34 to 
12 Sw 
19 fr 


THURSDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Smooth. FRANKFURT: Cloudy. 
Temp. 3—1 (38 - 301- LONDON: Partly dandy. Temp. 4-2 <39 - 361. 
MADRID: Partly cloudy. Temp. 11—5 (52—411. HEW YORK: Pair. Toma. 
2— -3 136— 261. PARIS: Portfv Cloudy. Tcmo. 5— -2 <41— 381. ROME: Cloudy 
wtffl ram. Tamo, u — li (57-521. TEL AVIV: Fair. Temp. 19 — 9 (66—451 
ZURICH: Cloudy. T*fm». 5—1 <41—341. BANGKOK: Foosv. Temp. 34 — 74 
(93—75). HONG KONG! Fair. Tama. 26— n 179 — 631. MANILA: Cloudy. 
Temo.30— 23186— 73). SEOUL: Folr. Terns. -1 — -7 130— 191. SINGAPORE: 
Fotr.Tomp.32 - 34 <90— 7S). TOKYO: Fair. Temc 11 — 1 ($2-38). 


Mleti LraCWH Ohm 


1950 AMI Pres 
T7T00 ASflfCO E 
400 Aora |nd A 
50444 All Enerov 
1600 ANa Nat 
ISO Also Cenl 
SJMAIeomaSr 
295 ATOCen 
25 Asbestos 
7BOD Alsn I I 
70717 BP Canada 
64079 Bonk BC 
274949 Bank NS 
27400 Barrlck a 
25 Baton A I 
15025 Bonanza R 
2351 7 Bra tome 
33450 Bromalec 
1500 Brenda M 
IB930BCFP 
40015 BC Res 
61854 BC Phone 
20045 Brunswfc 
11375 Budd can 
170410 CAE 
410CCLA 
XUODCDtStbBI 
S693B Cod Fry 
31350 C Nor West 
MOCPockrs 
17250 Can Trust 
500 C Tuns 
100 CGE 

156334 Cl Bk Com 
35B00 Cdn Nat Res 
llBTMCnra A f 
5580 C Util fl 
60S Cara 
2IOOCaianese 
lOTHCDMbA 
32600 CDfelbBf 
57070 CTL Bank 
lOOCanwett A 
3730 Csoefta R 
650 Conron A 
7330 Crown* 
14650 Car Res 
989323 Ooon Dev 
1900 Doan A 

2B24D Denison A 
SI 755 Denison B I 
2100 Develcon 
3600 DkJmsn A I 
1000 Oldman B 
SSHDomoftA 
63997 Dafoace A 
9280 Du Pont A 
5535 Dyfek A 
SRIEKinomX 
lOOEmca 
7400 Equity Sw 
2825 FCA Inti 
S510C Falcon C 
3S493 Flcnbrdoe 
400 Fed Ind A 
B0DD Fed Plan 
262D F ary Fkl 
2000 Fraser 
■1992GOMIS A 
800 Gone Comp 
HOT Geocmde 
22030 Gibraltar 
39200 GaMcorpf 
100 Graft G 
12DS Grandma 
HJO Grand uc 
4SDGL Fares! 

100 Gt Pacific 
771 Gnrvtmd 
7 H Group A 
3240 Hrdins A 1 
2900 Hawker 
1 2089 Haves D 
1681 H Bov Co 
7625 lirasco 
MOOmdal 
tan mails 
1577 Inland Gas 
I9C81 inf or PIcm 


10710 Jo 

1000 Karri Kollo 

2500 Kelsey H 
17532 Kerr Add 
26539 Lcbott 


sans m* 2ou+ a. 

SIS". 15>A 15"- + Mi 
819 19 19 + 

S19I* I9U 19*% 


1550 LOnl Cm 
sauLocona 
660 LL LOG 
12444 ldUow Co 

si7ss ins 17W— Vs I J.?«25iS, H v 
465 465 465 —35 I 20131 nscion H A 

m'a a ev« i 

S2S*» 25V. 2SV: + '« i 

S6’A 6 6W— IS ! 

S14U. 14 14a 4- % ' 

ISO 145 150 

5151k 15** 155*r— l, 

395 335 395 +5 

S5Hi 5th " 

SI7 17 
*9 9 9 

lino H ir-fc 

259 253 253 ■*■ 7 

*22 2114 21 rS — '.% | 

*14 134% IT«+ '4 1 

Sin. IB'- IB'-— >1 f 

SI 5*1 14*% 15V. + - I 

*27 264. UV, 

* Mi 52% 

S15V. 14* 

*24 231* 221. 

*299% 293* .’WJ + -i 1 
SHU SI’S 32 

*14*. 14 C. 14>, + 

*53 58 58 

or* 3UT* 31»% + ’A 


41 32 

*1176% 1095 
S17K 17 
Sll’a 1IV» 
tn. rs% 
S5?% 5%. 

ISA. S3* 

crate n 


16051 Mertand E 
29554 MaJ son A I 
VHMMobcn 0 
2900 N col sen L 
2778E9 Norunda 
6C2SNorcen 

„ _ , 28083/ Nva AHA 1 

61188 NOWSCOW 
17 + il2S490Nl»WS»SSA 
- 2500 CafcMrood 
15150 Oshawc A I 
12500 Pomour 

10134 PanCan P 
4500 Pembina 
1900 Phonl* oil 
330 Pine Potal 
! 200 Place GOo 

5%. + ■_ ; 178510 placer 
IS + 2 | w Proviso 

’ 203 Que Stars o 

830 Roy rock f 
51570 Re t ta olh 
54135 Rd 5 lenns A 
2300 Rdcfthokf 
SlOO ResSery f 
3442 Rsvn Pro A 
2700 RoaersA 

1906 Roman 

500 Rothman 
29200 Scesfre 

200 scarfs f 

4040 Sears Can 
47050 sncii Can 
66700 Sherri ft 
3400 Sister B f 
15000 Southm 


32 -5 
im% + i* 
ir-% + 1 * 

nib— 1% 

7*% 

544 

PA+ l* 
10V« + 


SBMi B*% 8*61 — , 

270 267 267 —7 

S12la 12^1 I3VS+ ! 

817 14% 16% +19 i 

1900 steep R 
4700 Sranev a 
230 Tore 
557 Tcck Cor A 
51316 TKfcBf 
300 TeiedyRo 
15115 Tee Con 
T3685 Thom N A 
3DS581 Ter Dm Bk 
9SBTorotarBI 

4758 Traders A I 

<00 TrmMi 
296Q0 Trinity Res 
46155 TrnAlta UA 
62527 TrCon PL 
182227 Tri mac 
19*50 Tr&oe At 
165100 Turoof 
7«99 urucar* A I 
330UnCarMd 
437KH U Entnrho 
3000 U Kena 
9500 U Shear 
1000 Von Dor 
13310 Verstl A I 
7733 vc-noren 
4300 W« Id-ad 
oconustfarro 
19flOWortmln 
3174 Weston 
5B?i WoodwdA 
3300 Yk Bear 


164 13 133 , 

299 297 297 +36 

295 290 2»0 +33 

lir% 155% 1544+ 
S1413 13^4 141% +6%! 
59 B*% 9 + ft 

455 4(0 443—10 

460 <60 460 +10 

260 3*5 250 -5 

*25 34>% 24*4 + 

SU« 16’- I6U— 
*314* 31V. 31<^ + 
430 433 <33 — -10 

*161% Ml* 16'.% 

567% sv: 6 ‘>j— 

jisa isib laid— u 
II6V1 I5H I6V2+I 
*87 S5V4 87 +1 
*194% 19%% 194% 

*21 21 21 + 

5114. Il» M'«+U 
XM 1746 17%«— A 
*3514 34S% 2S7- + 

SI I lk m% llVk- 
225 220 230+8 

59*. 94. 919— U 

SSHi Si% 55% 

*27 27 27 +1 

<3 48 43 +4 

43 43 43 

*834% 829S Cl’S + I 
B9 29 39 

*24' *a 24'i, 74'A— 14 
S 644 614 au- 
las IB 135-5 

SIVA 19 19 

*219% 7)5% 7T*- 
SlfrVi 18’4 18=% + - 
W9 4814 4a>:% + 
*131% U 13'% + 
*114. n 11—1 

5141. 144. 164— '4 I 
WA 34!% 34'»- ’■ 


him Low cum Ciree 
8118% 11*% 111% + V« 
IBS 105 105+3 

sar; 34V. 35":+ ns 
*16 16 \% + ;% 
*a*B 72'm 224% 
*28*% 77*% 27*%— 4. 
*10 7 » 10VS 10*%+*% 
*I0"j I0X-J 

ix 7> - vr.z— v. 
*19 19 |9 + -4 

240 340 249 +40 

*2(44 ZFb 24*% + *b 
475 445 <75 +10 

*1644 I6*S 161%+ V. 
SHU 16 16—1% 

*25 34V. 344— <4 

*201% 19%4 ^ + 

*1514 15Va 15'% + '/% 
*716 7U 7 Vb 
S irA 19 19V. + <u 

65 55 56 — 4 

*5 5 5 

*24 23U 23'4— >% 

475 470 <70—5 

*36 26 26 

*17 16*1 17 + 

S7U 7V« 7Ve— 
S23V% 23Va 23>% 

106 106 106 
S2»* 341% 24=» + 
Slavs iai% >6’-% 

385 385 385 

58 7*6 7*»- 3% 

1221% r 32—1% 
sm i«*% i9u 
>9 64. 8t%+ U 

17S 170 175 + S 
136 124 124 —16 

*844 8U B*%+ *% 
*123% 174 17.%- >% 
*44 44 44 

*5Vl 5U 5*4 
*1814 1B<4 10*6 + 

S7V% 7K, 74% + ■* 

SZ2V% 7144 221%+ U 
S7V% 73% 73% — 'A 

*9*4 91% »*%+ % 

*5 61% SU 56 +1 
Slav. 121% i3u 

ZZS A 223% 2314 + 
345 a 230 —5 
225 225 325 +10 

30 26 29 +1 

*17 17 17+1 

sii n 11 + u 
sin% m% 11 H+ *% 
slow 101% 101% 

*36 35 36 +1 

*52 51 Ui 52 +4. 

*181* 18V. 1B44+ *% 


ABN 

ACF Holdlno 
Aeoon 
AKZO 
ATOM 
AMEV 
A Do m R ub 
Ann utonk 
BVG 

Buchrmorm T 
Coland HMD 
Ehavtar-NDU 
Fekker 
Ghl Brocades 
Helneken 
Haagavons 
KLM 
Noodgn 
Not N odder 
Nednovd 
Oco Vender G 
Pokhood 
PWllps 
Rot+co 


Roiinco 
Rorento 
Rovol Dulcb 
Unilever 
VonOmmeren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 

ANP.CBSI 
:1I 

Source: AFP. 


Brussels 


Arbed 

Bekoert 

Cocker (II 

EBES 

GBL 

GB-inno-BM 

Gevoert 

Hoboken 

Krediononk 

Petrol Ina 
*oc Generoie 
Safina 
Sokov 

Trod ton Elec 
vr 



Close Prcr 

Bovcr 


Bmrer_Hyp& 

323 331 

Bayer. Ver.Ba nk 

345 351 

BMW 


Commerzbank 


Conti Bumml 

121 JO 123 

Dolmlci-Bmz 

633 JO 638 

Deeuiso 


1 Deutsche Babcock 160 16150 

Deutsche Bonk 

400 405. HJ 

Oresdner Bank 


DUB-Schuth* 

216 715 

GHH 

17180 171 

Hocnita 


Hoechsi 

183J0 188.70 

HOMdl 


Ho+zmarm 

397 '396 

Morion 


Kail + Sou 

263 268 

Korsladl 


Kaufhaf 

213 717.80 

KHO 

2*9 254 

KJoockner Werke 

75 77 JO 

KrupoS/ohl 

80 81 JO 



Lufthansa 


MAN 




Metaiifioseltschaft 222J0 222 

Muench-Rueck 

1400 1420 

Proussoa 

247 252 

RueToers-Werke 

325 230 


165.70 165 




495 541 JO 

Thwsen 


Varra 


Vrtw 


VEW 

123J0 12179 

Volks wooenwerk 

201.90 205 

Commerzbank Index : 1,15958 1 

PrevhNH : 1,1718 231432 85 ! 

Source: AFP. 



Hong Kong 


*174% 17 
*21 21 
*76% 7*% 

ss* SW 
*24 23*4 

*313(1 713% 
470 440 


17 
21 

7*0 + 3* 
5U— U 
2T» 

211 % 

460 +21 


*2X4 23 23 

U 341% 4Vi%+7 
,*0i% 8 BV%+*k 

*1134 1U. 114. + ir, 

*13 i7i% m 

*10 99% 9%+ U 

129 115 1311 —10 

220 220 320 +10 

S6U 6Vi 6>. 

*114i HU 114i + 
*16 16 16 

IS 15 IS 
*12 ll!% lift— «%, 
sm 77 78 +1 

SHU 11 114% + 

*11 W% IK. 


Total satos 20J67J89 shares 


Source: AFP. 


AEG-Totofunkon 10650 10850 

Allianz Von 1010 1077 

eosf 17950 10350 


3700 3400 East Asia 7450 2450 

SOM 583J Cheuno Kang 11*0 1140 

7640 ItM CWno Lkim 1(50 14.40 

4720 on CroBlWtnr 11 11 

Tno 17n HanaSeno 4A75 47.75 

7200 6990 I HK Elec 7.45 KQ. 

W40 3?50 29.70 79 JD 

3895 3850 t®’* 1 450 *«»■ 

5310 5150 ttS§*® nBhal *-J® ’-'O 

UK Td 58 59 

MK Whorf 5.70 5.90 

HufcSi Whampoa 19.70 N.Q. 

Jardlne MaHi 9Q5 15 JO 

Jaralne Sec 9 5.50 

— 1 Ne-Wftrld 555 SJB 

Snow Bras 17/0 20 

— 1 SMK PfTOS 940 9.70 

KJOHUD SS***” ^ 


Other Markets ja». 23 

Closlno Prices in local currencies 


CIOM Frev. 

Wheelock (775 (35 

Wlnw 5 JO 5JS 

World Inti 1.97 1.99 

Hmw Sene Index :L3S75< 
Previous : 1,37343 
Source: Reuters. 


| Johannesburg l 

AECI 



Barlows 


1065 

Blyvoor 

1825 


Bui lets 

7300 


Elands 

1360 

1390 




Harmony 

2H» 



7825 





Pst 5 torn 

6300 


Rtnotal 



SA Brews 



5t Helena 

3500 


Sasoi 

585 


Rl ■» NW1 .‘IrXZfiJfl 
S<x*ce: NtdbanK 

L London 

□ 


AACorp 
AIII«W_yoci9 
Anglo Am Gold 
Babcock 
Bsrcttn 
Bass 
BJLT. 
D eccbam 
BICC 
BL 

BOC Group 
Bools 

Bowotar Indus 

am Home SI 
Brtt Tetocom 
BTR 

9.10 Burmah 
55 CodBury Sdiwr 
5.50 Cbarler Cons 
N.Q. Coats Palana 
1050 Cons GoM 
5.90 | CourtouMa 
- ' Dotoefy 
Dc Boors 
Dbtiilen 
Drlefonteln 
Dun loo 
Fisom 
Free SIGed 


GEC 

SKK 

C+IIQI 

Grand Mol 

Gulnnou 

GUS 

Honson 

Hawker 

ICI 

imp* 

Lloyds Bank 

Lpnrho 

mats 

Marks and Sp 

Mrlol Box 

Midland Bank 

Nat West Bank 

PllklnoTun 

Plessav 

rocdi Elec: 

Randfonteln 

Rank 

Reed Inf! 

Reuters 

Royal Dutch C 

RTZ 

Shall 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Tale and Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMJ 
T.I. oreuP 
TrofaloorHse 
THF 

Vllrempr 
Unilever t 


Ciate P/r- 

20« :u 

209 317 

13 13/3717 37/64 
798 303 

740 
731 
337 
447 
■16 
203 
617 
179 
775 
126 
418 
349 
477 
300 
190 
340 
*87’/, 

330 
583 
335 
45PL4S 17/r 
649 657 

705 713 

3M 774 

514 507 

«5 500 

236 237 

4S2 457 

340 348 

370 386 

156 159 

198 708 

1161/641161/64 


Untied Biscuits 70S 2M 
Vickers 33 334 

Wlleep NJX. US 1/4 

WXoldlnDS *277% 5284i 

war Loan 3V, Ml* 34%% 
wool worm 618 675 

ZC1 S14V. SMI. 

Financial Times Index : I0U79 
Previous ; 103(50 
Source: AFP. 


La/aroccoo 
Leurand 
I'OrecI 
Malra 
Micnel In 

MM Prrcnoc 

Aloe! Hcnr.esy 
Moullnc. 

Nord-Esl 
Occldenlole 
Pcrnoc Rlc. 
Peiraics (tie l 

PCUBCCl 

Pocialn 
Prinlemps 
Rodtorecnn 
Radouio 
Roussel Udm 
5%is Rossionol 
Sowr.Perrtar 
Telcmeccn 
Thomson CSF 
Valeo 
AOOB Index : 19455 
Previous : 19U3 
CAC InCex : BUD 
Previous : 197 JO 
Source: AFP. 


Close 
3*1 
7IS0 
7431 
1500 
79« 
6X10 
1+75 
1 0030 


677 

700 

25633 

25530 

52 

182 

729 

1215 

1601 

1935 

<55 

2775 

4*5 

73X58 


Pr*to 

338.90 
2970 
24 U 

779 

6370 

1C7E 

•e 

7*35 

676 

6*9 

25650 

255 

said 

17730 

73! 

1715 

lil« 

1949 

459 

2308 

449 

73630 


Soutniond 
Woods! dr 
Warmald 


Close Prey 
23 » 

H7 87 
370 327 


All Ordinaries Index :75850 
. Previous :75630 
! Source: Petrters. 


Tokyo 


t Singapore I 

Born toad 

1.47 

1J0 

CoM Storooe 

142 

248 




Frinerweavr 

(B3 

(88 

Maw Par 

1.90 

1.90 

Inched c+ 

747 

747 

KcopelShle 

)A0 

Ul 

Mai Banking 

SJ 5 

SJ5 

OCBC 

(60 

8J5 

OUB 


130 


1.41 

144 

S Darby 

1J>7 

147 

SSieamsnip 

1JH 

145 

SI Trcdina 

4J4 

436 

UOB 

436 

(22 

OUB index :JtU6 



Previous :28SJ0 



Sour cm. Overseas Union Bank, j 


Canadian Indexes Jan. 23 


Nooa Pmton 
Montreal 115.74 1153V 

Toronto ZA97JO 2^91.90 

Montreal; Stock Exchange Industrials I ride l 
T oronto; T5EX0 Index. 


Montreal 


PERSONALITIES PLUS 
MART BLUME 

IN THE WEEKEND SECTION 
OF FRIDAY S IHT 


155B0S BmAManl 
574 6 ConBaDi 
577* DomTktA 
4975MntTr*t 
115911 NatBkCda 
B42S Power Carp 
3800 RollondA 
10* RallandB 
lossa Rovai Bonk 
7700 ReyTrstao 
300 Stan Draft 


HIM 

saw 

*1716 

*124% 

*1716 

*154% 

577?% 

S1517 

*16 

sm 

*171% 

*77 


Total aaies X73934S sham. 


Low doseCQua 

77V. 2T*% + 4% 
16% 17*A + W 
121% 124%+ V. 
17»% 1346+ A 
15V% ISV% 

77V, 7rt%+ 1% 
1S5« 15V+- Ve 
16 16 
J8'7 301% ♦ *% 
IPi 17V. + 

77 77 


Solution to Previous Pirezle 


□ubd aaaao □□□□ 
DBnia Qaann anna 
□QQQaaaaaEDaaaaa 
□ED □EDaaE3 
Eana saa 
EDHmaaaaaBaoaQa 
Enana v naaa man 
□ddq naaan anna 
bkjjq anaa □□aaai 
□BaEnaaaQsaHaQai 
Baa Hoaa 
Bana aamDQ □□□ 
BsmaaaaaHasaan 
gbqb naaaa eziaaa 
□bob cjaaBB aaaa 


l,3< B5 


Milan 

Banco Comm 



Central a 

2479 





Cred Ital 

2150 


Formitolla 

9650 

9690 

Flat 

2309 

2340 

FlraWer 

S575 

56 

Heneroll 

37690 Mat 

IFI 



Itaksmentl 

70000 77809 

Medtabeneo 

75000 

7J99C 

itaniodlaan 



OUvertl 

6399 

AS1B 

Pirelli 

2128 

2139 

has 

67450 68900 

OfnsKenle 

US 

567 

SIP 

2138 

2160 

SnM 

2511 

2445 

Stands 

9210 

9330 

M1B Mutat Mill 



Provtau :1IZJ 



Soiree; nwen Slock Exchange 

Paris 


Stockholm 


AtrltauMe 

S27 

574 

Alsmam AIL 

319.90 

31980 

Av DonauH 

69S 

903 

Banco! re 

597 

597 

OIC 

568 

542 

Bauvoues 

741 

749 

B5N-GD 

2378 

2280 

COrrefour 

MK 

IBM 

Club Med 

1198 

1180 

Catimea 

253J0 

753 

□WTWZ 

733 

705 

EU-Aaultalne 

734 

716 

Europe 1 

930 

9*4 

(Sen Eau« 

566 

569 

Hachtlto 

1B4S 

1829 

imeiai 

74 

71 W 


AGA 

Alio Lord 
Asm 
A stra 

Atlas Cobcd 

Balloon 
EleCfrofUX 

Eriessen 
Essetlr 
HandelsMien 
Pharma c ia 
soeb-sennia 
Sandwik 
Skonsfca 
SitF 

SnfdlsnMiTtch 

Volvo 

Aftanvaridea Index ; 399*8 
Prey tod* .Ml M 
Source: UMMsbonkiA. 


340 

368 

2C3 

325 

J40 

345 

470 

CC 

u: 

lio 

ITS 

175 

265 

265 

250 

263 

335 

370 

190 

185 

199 

200 

445 

445 

380 

339 

94 JO 

97 JO 

186 

188 

251 

252 

2S4 

2M 


Sydney 


ACI 

195 

196 

ANI 

350 

?48 

ANZ 

477 

*n 

BHP 

516 

510 

Barai 

318 

JIB 

Bougainville 

19| 

187 

□fumble* 

370 

36S 

Coles 

an 

m 

Comalco 

250 

230 

CRA 

540 

5J6 

C5R 

771 

270 

Dun tec 

214 

210 

tutors ixi 

305 

336 

Hooker 

M2 

230 

Magellan 

220 

310 

MIM 

255 

280 

Mver 

182 

176 

Oaftbrtdor 

65 

65 

PakO 

ex 

<29 

PmoMan 

rrs 

283 

nor 

J7J 

370 

Sonic', 

574 

530 

Sletoh 

190 

ia; 


i Akai 

J Asahl Chem 
I AMni Glass 
| Bonk 01 Tokvo 
Brlaomlane 
Conan 

D Niopon Print 

Oalwa House 

Full Bank 

Full Photo 

Futilsu 

HI loch J 

Honda 

IHI 

lion 

JAL 

Kolbna 

Kcnsai Elec Pr 
Kao Soao 
kav» Steel 
Kirin 
Komatsu 
Kt-Cota 

Moeu Elec Inds 

Matsu Elec Works 

MltsuD Bank 

MitsuDOiem 

MJIsuO Heavy 

Mitsubishi 

MilSUi 

MUsukoshf 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NlkkoSoc 
Nippon Ste«H 
Nhman Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Otympus 
Ricoh 


Sony 

Sum l Bank 
Sum I Cham 
5um( AAeTOl 

Talsol 
Taisho 
Tckeda 
Tallin 
Tk Marine 
Tk Power 
Torov 
Toshiba 
Tovota 
Ysmaieni Sec 
New mam -.ras 1 
pravtow* :*3I47 „ 

Ntkke+OJ Index :I1AS9JH 
Pr«vtoes:l 1468.17 
Source: Reuters. 


465 483 

687 6B0- 

910 910 

630 635 

5*5 543 

1,400 M30 
9JB 9« 

545 5 S 

1J58 1J70 
1.780 1,780 
1J80 1380 
985 N.Q. 
US0 1J50 
U0 149 
357 3» 

A40B &3M 
777 280 

NA 1J70 
822 837 

149 147 

SS5 556 
459 462 

328 338 

1 J 80 1 J 90 
MV 650 
1390 1JW 
349 346 

246 249 

539 544 

337 340 

3*9 388 

1.150 N.O. 
IJ10 U30 
637 670 

150 151 

344 747 

615 6«» 

930 930 

1.310 1.1*0 
950 960 

1430 1.130 
3.930 1 » 
io9o 1 Jta 

309 212 

148 147 

200 W 
383 390 

793 793 

439 435 

741 7 SV 

1J50 1.540 
446 450 

420 (24 

1270 1270 
630 630 


Zurich 


Bank Lev 
Brown Dover! 

CR>c Gatov 
Credit Sutsie 
Etectrowott 
Georo Fischer 
Jacob Sucfiard 
Jelmoll 
Landis Gvr 
Nestle 
Qerilkat-B 
Roche 3cbv 
Sortdoz 
Schindler 
Sutler 
SBC 
Swissair 
Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurkn ins 
SBC maex : e»ja 
Pre«taM : m * 

Source: AFP. 

NQ noi auoied NA 1 

o-Qiiooi,. «<j ee^ivtoena 


XMO 1780 
1J3D U15 
1750 2J60 
2J9S 2J95 

2710 va> 

678 65S 

6+90 6499 
2JQ10 2000 
1470 1465 
5J!90 5.9J3 
usa ij»5 
9.925 8.950 
7450 7400 
3SS 

>jm ijbo 

367 W 
1.102 1.100 
3495 3490 
(170 (175 
IP JOS 


I 17450 





















r—rc* 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


Page 13 


-.iT-jUa« 


' ’ " 


SPORTS 

Three Stars of the 1970s — Namath, Staubach, 
Simpson — Are Voted Into NFL Hall of Fame 


CtopUed by Ow Staff From Dispatches 

CANTON, Ohio — Quarter- 
backs Joe Namath and Roger Stau- 
bach, running back 0 J. Simpson, 
old- timer Frank Gatski and Na- 
tional Football League Commis- 
sioner Pete Rozefle, have been 
named to the Pro Football Hall of 
Fame. 

Pete Elliott, the shrine's execu- 
tive director, announced Tuesday 
that the five will be inducted into 
the Hafi of Fame Aug. 3, before the 
NFL’s first 1985 exhibition gune 
between the Houston (Xlers and 
New York Giants. Their selections 
increase the Hall’s membership to 
128. 

The five were chosen from an 
original list of 15 finalists which, 
bad been cut to seven last week. 
Failing to make it were running 
back Paul Horaung and quarter- 
back Fran Tarkenton from the fi- 
nal seven . 

Simpson and Staubach were 


back Namath, who ended his 13- official stamp; now I have left my who have more to be grateful form 
year career in 1977, when he played legacy in the game." their pro-football experience than I 

Rams. Simpson, still involved with pro have.’ 

rd like to congratulate the oth- football as a television announcer, Gatski, 62, was a center and t 
ere, too. I'm just sorry Fran didn’t said of his fellow f 0 r the linebacker. He played three sea- 

niakejt again. He certainly had the Hall, “I’d like to offer toy congratu- sons at Marshall and one at An- 

la lions to a0 of them. Watching ibe burn before joining the Browns, 
Tarkenton holds several league Hall of Fame ceremonies in the then part of the All-America Foot- 
passtng records, inc l u d ing most at- past, I don’t think there’s ever been ball Conference, in 1946. He an- 
con, pl e tions a doss that I’d rather be with. chared the Gevdand line that 
(3,686), yards (47,003) and touch- “J feel more than honored bo- deared the way for pro football's 
downs (342). cause of the company. It mav be most powerful offense in the 1940s 


“rd like to congratulate the oth- football as a television announcer, Gatski, 62, was a center a 
ere, too. I'm just sorry Fran didn’t said erf his fellow for the linebacker. He played three 

makejt again. He certainly had the Hall, “I’d HV* to offer my congratu- sons at Marshall and one at 

la lions to a0 of them. Wa tching the bum before joining the Bro 
Tarkenton bolds several league Hall of Fame ceremonies in the then part of the All-America F 
passing records, in cl u d ing most at- past, I don't think there's ever been ball Conference, in 1946. He 




1 • 


downs (34^). cause of the company. It may be most powerful offense in the 1940s 

Namath, 41, once described by the all-lime class5 and 1950s. 

his Alabama coach. Bear Bryant, as H e said he was particularly Gatski played on eight champi- 

JK. eatest at r ete 1 pleased that Namath, who previ- onship teams, including the Detroit 
cobbed, may not have matched ously had eligible ror selection Lio® 5 m 1957, his last season, when 
Taraenton s statistics, but his flam- to the Hafl, was amonn this zrouo 1x5 earne d his last championship 
boyant style was regarded as a key .... ■ ^ad , ring by helping the Dons rout his 

; t J" W^s^d. old team, the Browns, by 59-14 in 


O J. Simpson 


Roger Staubach 


— V1%. MIUKU null] OU lut, uiu IUJBJWU ■ <• ■ uii. DUJ leaHL UK DruWUS, QV in 

original list of 15 finalists which FootbaD League to win a mager his firuU game, 

bad^ceo cut io seven lim wedc. ^L rn 1966. d* fire. NFL 

Failing to make it were running A celebrity from the moment he JJJ2“ L Me s desemn E 45 television contract in 1962, presid- 
back Paul Horaung and quarter- signed a then-startling $400,000 ed over the merger with the AFL 

hack Fran Tarkenton from the fi- contract with the Jets in 1965. . Simpson said he grew up watch- developed the Super Bowl. He 
nal seven. Broadway Joe, as Namath was ,flg .8 r “ t players from the 49ers is the third commissioner named to 

Simpson and Staubach were &oa ^. kn ? wn ’ became the AFL’s l f^ ts P^? in hw the hall of raroe. following Joe 

etecteam their first year of eftgibil-- !*** ot ** year. Two seasons ^ Frana^o«iDd Carr> ^ serJed frora |921 w 

ity, five seasons after their retire- ^ ater - be became the first quarter- ^ eanun %, o* makmg the Hall of 1939^ and RcacDe’s predecessor, 

meats in 1979. Old-timers must ^ to for mart 4,000 fan | e - Bert Bell, who served from 19 46 to 

have left ihe sport before I960 yards in a season. ft would have been nice to have 1959. 


rds in a season. “ft would have been Hire to have 

He elevated himself to a football won" a championship, he said. 


Bert Bell, who served from 19 46 to 
1959. 

"My 25 years has been an inter- 



Lang to Propose Reforms 

Of Siding Cup Schedules 

The Associated Press asked to stage World Cup events 

TODTNAU, West Germany — every two years instead of mmual- 
Serge Lang, founder and president ly. “If we cut the number of races, 
of Alpine skiing’s World Cup tour, then we could have same countries 
said late Tuesday he wB propos. staging them one year and other 
«hq)n|inr reforms to overcome countnes holding them the next 
the dmiirs often chaotic nature, season," he said. 

Lang, a 71-year-old French jour- “But national ski federations are 

nalisi who 20 years ago brought opposed to this. They want to have 
various men’s and women’s races as many races as possible, and each 
under the umbrella of the World federation wants to have a race in 
Cup, made his remarks after rain its country every year. Many skiers 
here Tuesday forced a 24-hour m ^ against this and some 
postponement of a men's giant sla- rrarhe* don't film the idea either, 
iom race. Ibe event was finally First we must gef the national fed- 
canceled Wednesday because of eratioos to agree." 


continuing heavy rain and fog. 


The tour has been dubbed the 



J 


the year’s best college player in 
1963 at Navy while Simpson won at 
Southern California in 1968. 

“I’m very proud and thrilled.” 
said former New York Jet quarter- 

Moses Pleads 
NotGuiltyin 
LA. Sex Case 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Edwin 
Moses, the two-time Olympic 
champion in the men’s 400-mc- 
ter intermediate hurdles, plead- 
ed not guilty Tuesday to 
charges of solid ting sex for 
money from an undercover fe- 
male police officer. 

Moses was not present at- the 
Municipal Court arrai gnmen t 
The trial was scheduled for Feb. 

S. 

Moses, 29, was charged only 
with sohdtafion of an act of 
prostitution. Mike Wilkinson, 
deputy dty attorney said. He 
sard a second count of posses- 
sion of less than an ounce of 
marijuana was dropped be- 
cause the amount was so small 

Spokesmen for Moses said 
that the world record holder; 
who is unbeaten in 109 consec- 
utive races since August 1977, 
does not use drugs, and said the 
marijuana — found in a small 
film cannister — could have 
been left by others who bad 
been in the car recently. 


Pete Rozefle 


Joe N amath 


Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl 111. players who won four Super Bowls, (AP, NYT) Pete RozeUe Joe Namath 

With his prediction having pro- ’ ___ 

duced ridicule around the country. 

be proceeded lo lead the Jets lo’a # ~ p • __ 

Namath, who was plagued by Congress to Shift From Deficit to Defecting Team 

knee problems throughout his ca- C7 O 

Lawmakers Considering at Least 5 Bills to Prevent Clubs FwmQuitting Cities 

He is the first New York Jet By Howard Kurtz °f Washington, and several col- delphia for the $30 million the dty responsibility for that action," 


Congress to Shift From Deficit to Defecting Teams 


A men’s slalom had already been -white circus” because of its often 
canceled to make way for the run- unwieldy schedule. Racers compete 
sing of the giant slalom Wednes- annually in Europe. North Ameri- 
day. There was no immediate ded- ca and Japan, and the 1986 sched- 
skm when and where the two races three downhill races in 

would be made up. August in South America. 

The slalom had been relocated Lan g said he also would contin- 
twice already. It was originally ^ t0 push f or what he feels is a 
scheduled for Jan. 7 in Baqueira, more crowd-pleasing finish to sla- 
Spain, but lack of snow forced or- fom and giant slalom rues. Under 
gangers to shift it to La Mongie. his plan, the field for those events 
France— where it again became a would be pared to the 30 fastest 
victim of bad weather. after the fust nm, with the suivi- 

“We just have too many races,” V ore starting in inverse order of 
Lang said. “This creates btg sched- ihdr first-leg times. The outcome 
tiling problems, especially when we would be in doubt until the first- 
have such bad weather as this run leader, the last skier oftbe day, 
year.” More than 20 men’s and completed’ his final descent, 
womm’s races have been post- Cuneat pracUce reverses ^ 

the top five Fiist-run finishers, and 


player named to the hall. His Jet _ - , . . . „ 

coach, Weeb Ewbank, was elected WASHINGTON — The iborai- 11 ^ P ro t ^ scba f i 10 

in 1978. est issue facing Congress this year expand by two hams and pro foot- 

Staubach. who completed 1.685 won't ocossarily be what to do baB^ ftmr.tTOrfwhKhwoiddbe 
t 048 nat»c r«r n inn »iu» armc mnmii manoated tor Uatiimore and Oak- 


By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Post Service 


of Washington, and several col- 
leagues, the bill has an added twist. 


delphia for the $30 million the dty responsibility for that action," he 


had to spend to keep the Eagles. 

Senator Dennis DeConcini, 
. D emo crat of Arizona, plans anotb- 


said. 

James Fitzpatrick, an attorney 
for major league baseball said there 


of 2.958 passes for 22,700 yards about the deficit, arms control or manoaieu tor Baltimore ana uax- 
and 153 touchdowns, cal led his se- the Nicaraguan “contras." It may Lalrforma- 
feclion “the greatest honor of my be what to do about the Raiders, , E y“^ 00 f •noiqraeni* 
career.” IlK^mer TSe 1%3 ihe Colts arri Ihe E^bl *« *“ a. Irmchrse fa»on ihs.” 

Heisman as a junior at Navy, he did With a growing number of pro- G o rton sa,cL i ^ evcr y 

not begin his pro career until after fessional sports teams abandoning n 5 rBB ® rhoenvt or Louis- 
he had served four years on active their home dues or threatening to ^ “ d w *?? s t °S ct a frmichise is 
duty, induding a stint in Vietnam, seek greener pastures. Congress hurt by sudjibg^because tiieresno 
In a nine-year period. Staubach wfl] consider at least five major ' 0I J6 er a city they can raid, 
played in six National Football bills on the problem. ^ ^ pressure may 


er bill that would give the NFL an is do reasonfar any hill to mdiidf 
antitrust exemption to stop its baseball which has enjoyed total 


teams from moving. 


antitrust immunity for 


womens races have been post- praclicc reverses only 

m the top five first-nm finisbera. and 
many times the awards ceremony is 
TIC maketheWorldCupmoremtojst- hdd while slower racers still are 
-tic? mg, mid ideally the competition ■ eonmletmg ihdr second heats. 

Sf iid ^ TtelSg formula was inlro- 

UiS ifS duced at ^ Worid Senes at Sana- 

cario. Italy, in November, and it 

wThi, proposals is sdUug '™ sa 

ittorney aside one week of the four-month Lang said he also would ask that, 
id there schedule so that all postponed starting next season, no races be 
include races can be held at a single venue, held on Mondays. “We just cannot 
d total Lang suggests the site of the next get enough television interest on 
des. He world championships as the reserve Mondays. It appears to be a dead 


While Phoenix failed to snare the that hare been no franchise site; were the rule adopted for next day for sports on television," he 
Eagles, DeConcini said, “If you’re shifts in the last 10 years and that season, the ate would be Crans said. 


qmi in 1979. 

“Fm thrilled to be included with 
players like Joe and Roger," said 


Football bills on the problem. 


But skeptics say pressure may 


trying to get a team, you'd like every dty that mice had baseball 
some protection that they won’t now has a team, with the exception 
move off to Salt Lake City or AIbu- of Washington. 

_ »« a-? *“ 


Conference title games, leading the They range from giving the Na- budd to award franchises to all 435 

Cowboys to four victories and tri- tional Football League more au- con & ressIonaI dlsLncts - 
umphs in Super Bowls V] and XII. thority to control franchise shifts to The major sports leagues have 

His career pass rating of 83.4 was blocking all major-league learns mounted a strong defense against 
the highest m NFL history when be from moving without government some of the legislation, although 
qmi in 1979. approval. the NFL favors legislation lo allow 

“Fm thrilled to be indiidrd with The most far-reaching measure, the league to make the decisions, 
players like Joe and Roger.” said the Professional Sports Team Com- “These are essentially business 

Simpson, who had a spectacular mtmity Protection Ad. would have judgments," said attorney Paul 
NFL career that included four the Commerce Department set up Tagiiabue of Covington & Burling, 
rushing titles, five consecutive an arbitration panel to regulate one of several Washington lawyers 
1.000-yard seasons and five Pro franchise shifts in baseball, fool- who represent the NFL. “We just 
Bowl selections. ball, basketball and hockey. A don’t want Congress telling us" 

. “Now there’s nothing missing in mam would have to demonstrate where t eam s can play, 
my career,” said the 37-year -old that it had an inadequate stadium Congress also is under pressure 


Co™a> jug 


Montana, Switzerland, home of the “These are all proposals which 

1987 championships. we want to put to national ski fed- 

In order to accommodate a eratioos. We must do something to 
smaller schedule, Lang said that avoid such scheduling problems 
national ski federations should be that we are having this year." 


ngresstonai districts. ^ f oUowcd eveiy major bUl ^ 

Ibe major sports leagues ha ve pa^byCor^SrlheNFL- 

ounted a i strong defense Mains^ . a 1961 antitrust exemption for prompted ^ bflIs on ±t 
. roe of the legislation, although teams to pool television revenue; 
the NFL favors legislation lo allow the 1966 approval of a merger with _ . ‘ 

the league to make the decisions. ihe American Football League, and The Nation^ Basketball Assoo- 
“These are essentially business the 1973 lifting of television black- •**« “ ^Ppbng with the ame 
dgments," said attorney Paul outs on borne games. problem, having sued Ihe San Die- 

l. . _#/• . • R ^ v n . - „ on Fnr mmnno tn I nt An. 


urns and angry fans. That has 
prompted several bills on the 
House side as well. 

The National Basketball Associ- 
ation is grappling with the same 
problem, having sued Ihe San Die- 


zny career,” said the 37-year-old that it had an inadequate stadium 
Simpson, who accounted for 1 1.236 and had been losing money for sev- 
yards on the mound in his 1 1 sea- «al years. 
sons with the Buffalo Bills and San To be introduced next week by 
Francisco 49ers. “I fed like it’s mv Senator Slade Gorton, Republican 


NFL Commissioner Pete RozeUe 6® Clippers for moving to Los An- 
made the connection in Senate tes- B^es last year without the league’s 
timony last year. “I personally and a PP rovaL 
. the other owners in the league feel a Nevertheless, said NBA attorney 

-responsibility, when Congress Philip Hochber^ “I’m not sure that 
passes something for you, to give a legislation is necessarily the best 
quid pro quo to show a sense of answer." 




SCOREBOARD 

Hockey ~| [ 

NHL Standings SeL 


Basketball 


Selected College Results NBA Standings 


WALES COKFEREMCE 
Patrick DWIsloa 




W L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 


WmhlnBlon 

28 12 

7 

63 

in 

142 

£ -r • 

PMlotkttuMa 

38 U 

6 

a 

199 

134 


NY Islanders 

25 19 

2 

52 

218 

186 

_ ■ -- ’ 

pmsburah 

18 22 

4 

ta 

162 

1*8 


NY Ranoars 

15 22 

B 

38 

165 

186 


New Jersey 

15 25 

5 

35 

*58 

187 



Adams Mvtsioa 



„ '~JL : - ~ 

Montreal 

24 14 

10 

St 

188 

158 

. j z 

Buffalo 

21 13 

12 

54 

168 

133 


Quebec 

22 18 

7 

51 

184 

167 


Boston 

21 19 

7 ■ 

49 

167 

IS* 


Hartford 

16 23 

5 

37 

149 

200 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Narri* Dtvbtea 


EAST 

Army 4 *. Monhatfan 48 


Coast Guard 7Z Botoson 65 

Framiriohom Si. 40, Tutts 85 

Itnaca 73. Hobart &B 

Johns Hopkins 801 Messiah 48 

Lehman 78. Monhottcmvllla 85 

Massachusetts M. Dartmouth 78 

N. C-Graensboro ML St. Andrews AS. OT 


« IW M.Y. Maritime 57. Kina's Col si 
37 I4f MO pmla Pharmocv 4& Swarthmore 51 
BNCE Ptottshunh St. U. Johnson St. 45 

Rhode Island 48. Brawn U 


e ASTERN CONFERENCE 
Attaottc Division 

W L PCt. GB 


St. Louis 

19 

18 

8 

46 

166 

171 

Cntcaeo 

21 

23 

3 

45 

188 

177 

Minnesota 

M 

24 

8 

36 

T61 

189 

Del roll 

14 

28 

6 

34 

171 

223 

Toronto 

9 

30 

6 

34 

139 

202 


Smyth* Division 



Edmonton 

32 

9 

4 

TO 

20 

157 

Caloarv 

73 

17 

6 

S2 

213 

181 

Wtantoee 

23 

20 


50 

198 

206 

Los Anaeles 

18 

19 

9 

45 

206 

196 

Vancouver 

11 

30 

1 

29 

I5B 

255 


Ala-Birminaham 45. N.C-Charlotie 62 
Longwood 59. Liberty Baptist 54 


MIDWEST 

Afiiterson. Ind. 65, SE tndiona 64 


TUESDAY’S RESULTS ^ ^ OnST 


0 1 1 ola Dakoro W«W«T«" 7 4- Huron 74 

Andorson (ill, Terr Ion C71: A.Stostnv C271. ^ SSSta 

QU *^ *“ M. 75. S. Dakota 74 36 , Wtal 

Sr *** - a u_a tt-WctilQanTi.WhL-OshkeshiS 9-12 3< 

, rt SJouk Fairs 82. Dakota SI. 66 Golden 

waiter (Ml. RoMraon (7). Kunm |9). Mas- WeafmlnsfBr 46 

lundi 129), Hunter 8 (15), Svaboda 131; John. SOW™"**! f" ” l 

son list. NeuWd 02). Malone (101. Lumitv ^^ ,on *?• 

(8). QiMMMvnw (4). Shots on 0«d; Montreal ^ahomaBopIKt d^Okiohomo 01^11^46 Rattle 
(onMfMn) 16A-10-32J Hartford (on Ponnevl UjYlnUv. Twos 36 New r 

~ ’ Sante Fe 66. Lubbock Christian 62. OT Walk 

Dtinri, % i j 5 Stephen F. Austin 62. Twos Wesleyan 51 Chamb 

N.Y. istanaen 1 1 1—4 FAR WEST 

Gallant (T>. Yzerman (211. Lambert (11), Com, Washington 71. Whitworth 68 


Boston 

34 

7 

J29 

_ 

PfMJadetoMa 

34 

7 

JD9 

— 

Washlnatan 

24 

19 

S5B 

n 

New Jersey 

19 

23 

-432 

ISVj 

Mew York 

15 

79 

J41 

20ta 


Central DJWstoa 



Milwaukee 

28 

14 

A67 

— 

Del roll 

24 

16 

-600 

3 

Chicago 

21 

21 

500 

7 

Atlanta 

17 

IS 

M 

IT 

Indiana 

14 

27 

-341 

13V9 

Cleveland 

11 

2* 

575 

16 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Midwest Division 



Denver 

25 

17 

SK 

— 

Houston 

24 

18 

JS71 

I 

Deltas 

22 

19 

SD 

2V» 

San Antonio 

20 

20 

-500 

4 

Utah 

19 

24 

-442 

6ta 

Kansas City 

14 

•B 

341 

IOM 


Pacific DlvUn 



LA. Lakers 

29 

14 

674 

— 

Phoenix 

21 

22 

-488 

B 

LA. Clippers 

19 

24 

AO 

10 

Seattle 

19 

24 

AO 

10 

Portland 

18 

24 

xn 

KJV5 

Golden State 

10 

31 

244 

18 


from have-not communities look- quid pro quo to show a sense of answer. 

ing for major-league sports to spur — — 

economic development. Cities ’ _ _ _ _ . 

76 ers Nip Cars, 101-100 

baL stadiums in hopes that a new J- ' 

team wfll boost tourism and in> Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches tipped the ball in above Hubbard 
prove their images. RICHFIELD, Ohio — Four to give the 76erstbdr game-winner. 

The latest franchise shifts began things contributed to the Phil add- “That’s what tappens when you 

when A1 Davis defied ihe NFL and phia 76 ers* 101-100 National Bas~ double- team." said Cleveland Coa- 
moved his Oakland Raiders to Los keiball Assodation vicioiy over ibe c* George Karl “Somebody gets 
Angeles in 1982. The NFL sued, Clevdand Cavaliers here Tuesday left alone, and it burned us. Then 
but a federal appeals court hit the night: we just goofed up our inbounds 

league with a 550-million judg- • PhiJ Hubbard did what he was pl*y> Bagley wasn’t supposed to 
mem, saying it had violated anti- supposed to da drive for the hoop." Hubbard in- 
trust law’s by requiring that three- • Moses Malone didn’t do what 




B es' •». " ■ * 

rrw „ . 


but a federal appeals court hit the 
league with a 550-million judg- 
ment, saying it had violated anti- 
trust laws by requiring that threc- 


we just goofed up our inbounds 
play. Bagley wasn’t supposed to 




flSSSftMC 


quarters of the club owners he was supposed to do. 


approve any relocation. 

The ruling turned the league into 
an idle spectator while Robert Ir- 
say moved the Baltimore Colts to 
Indianapolis. Dty officials, not the 
NFL, pWsuaded the Philadelphia 
Eagles not to leave for Phoenix. 

It wasn’t long before Senators 
Pete Wilson, Republican of Cali- 
fornia, Charles McC. Mathias, Re- 
publican of Maryland, and Aden 
Specter, Republican of Philadel- 
phia, became increasingly interest- 
ed in (he issue. 


• Maurice Cheeks did what he’s 
not supposed to do. 

• John Bagley didn’t do any- 
thing. 

Actually, the scenario was sim- 
ple. The Cavs led, 100-99, with 19 


drive for the hoop.” Hubbard in- 

mrocus 

bounded to Bagley. who drove to 
the baseline before putting up a * 
weak jumper that was partially 
blocked bv Malone at the buzzer. 

“I guess I blew it,” said Bagley. j 
“I should've shot and hoped for a 




J .ii 




seconds left following a three-point * 5001 no P ea “ 8 

play by rookie center Mel Turpin, t^et If not, mayte we ^uld ve 
“I was pretty sure they wbuld 8^ a « a quit* reboimd. 
double-team Moses and leave » l was Washington 


somebody alone." said Philadd- I2 9, 
phia Coach Billy Cunningham. 


phia, became increasingly interesi- “Fortunately, that was the case.” Houston 101, Pboonx 

ed in the issue. Hubbard helped double- team Ma- ??’ Sa ^^^Ji I7 V^ anSaS S? 

Specter has introduced a bill that kme, forcing him lo miss a 10-foot )? 3 j i j* A mji ’ 

would force the NFL to restrict jumper, Cbwiks, who only averages Utah 10 a New J»^ 99 and Los 

franchise shifts and to repay Pfnia- 3.02 rebounds a game, snuck in and ^8®“ ^ An ^ es 

° Oippers 114. 

Philadelphia, paced by Julias Er- 
ving’s 22 points and Andrew Ton- 
ey's 21, improved to 34-7 and is tied 
with Boston for first place in the 
NBA Atlantic Division. 

Cleveland (11-29) has lost four 
straighL Turpin, who did not start 
for the first time this year, and 
World B. Free each led the Cavs 
with 21 points. 

Led by Free’s 17 first-half 
points, Cleveland took a 32-24 ad- 


6 11 B T-| aorau- re no. Luma uwisiian oa ui 

• ! 1_5 Slowten F. Austin 42. Texas WestoTOR 
N.Y. istanaen 1 1 1—4 FAR WEST 

Gallant (T>. Yrsnman (III. Lambert (ID. Com. wastilnaton 71. wwtwortu 68 
Larson IT}. OemcMck (22); Homan 2 (21, Pocttle Luttwnn M. W. Washinafan 50 
Ken- (3>,PeMfl m.saetaonooal: Detroit (an Rocky Mountain 81. N. Montana 66 
Smith) 10-12-8— 30; New York (on MIcalen 5- San Dleoo St. 112. U.5. International 74 
n-8—24. Seams 4& Simon Fraser 67 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American Leosne 

Milwaukee— S tewa Bill Scftroeder. 

catcher; Bob Gibson, oMcfter; Brian Giles. 
tafleWer; and Bobby Clark and Paul House- 
holder, cuffitidera. 

TORONTO— Invited Rlek Leach, InfleMen- 


FOOTBALL 

Ncmoaal FoMboli Lewie 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
GoMen Stale M 29 27 34—104 

W wA ta u tan S M 28 25—10* 

Gus Williams 12-23 2-226. McMUIen 11-1*4-5 
2A Malone 11-190-1 22; FlOVd 8-16 3-S 19. Smith 
a- 11 *3 19. Johnson 6-71 4-1 76. ReOomdi: 
GoUen State 48 (Whltenead. MJohnson 10), 
Washlnatan 37 (Ballard 101. Assists: Golden 
State 19 (Brotz S), Waehhwtan 23 (Gas Wil- 
liams 131. 

Seattle 31 21 18 18-98 

New York 26 22 21 23-92 

Walker 10-16 3-4 23. Cummlnos 7-16 6-7 20; 
Chombers 8-18 1M4 23. SHtma 8-16 3419. Re- 
tKMOds; Seattle 44 (Slkma 111. New York 37 
tCummlnos ill. Assists: Seattle 30 (Hender- 
son 51. New York 26 (Walker, Sparrow 6). 
Phltade lp h ta 24 25 29 23-101 

Oevelo n d 32 26 19 23—100 

Ervlns9-144-722.Tonev 9-1*3-421: Free*-22 
34 21, Turotn 9-13 3-3 21. Shelton 7-13 1-2 IX 
Rebounds: Philadelphia 4t (Barkley 9), 
Cleveland 49 (Shelton 8). Assists: Philadel- 
phia 20 (Cheeks 8), Cleveland 30 (Baatev ID). 
Portland 28 27 35 25-115 

Chicoea 25 40 25 33-123 

Waalrldae *-19 UM3 2*. Jonkui 11-20 7-7 2*. 
Corrlne 4-10 4-4 11 HiealnS 5-4 3-2 12: Thomp- 
son JD-l *5-9 25-Dmfer 10-203-421 RftBoanOs; 



.. 'v ^ m- 

'■ ■ *< *■* . i 


i&J 5 


- ■ i W.. _ ■ 

V-'ii ' - 


vantage after one quarter and 
stretched it to 58-49 at halftime. 

The76ers led, 78-77, entering the 
final period, which couldn't have 
been close- — neither team led by 
more than two points throughout, 
and the score was tied 1 1 times. 


outfielder ; Jorry Kelter. WteWer; DovuSton- eft. Wontad EdtBe 
house, Je« Dew tills and JaK Hear ran, catch- DENVER— OitkWyl n J °T 

ers. Rich Crnluaa and Tom Filar, ptlchero, ta « TiwnwB. ■j*?”’ 

wrine -traJnlng as nanrader otavors. Henry Vwao n and M 

. . nnm[r Mike Calltai.CDmcrtwck. and Larry Bamet 

PITTSBURGH— 5fflnadSJxto Lscedfla »f* namin g b^L C f^ e11, wU 

newer, m a tarns antracL 


• CLEVELAND— Named Tam Olivodottl « IB0W „ I0J , oNeooa S3 (Jonta^ 

linebacker cooA. 121. Assists: Portland 25 (Valentine IS). Ctil- 

(Jnttod State* Football Lima ^ q (wtiotlev 10). 

A HI ZONA— Named Ban Hawkins receiver crr - 31 29 31 23-113 

cooehgndSklp5trc3sottenslyebocklieidu»- ^ 28 37 Z7 25 117 

eft. waived EdtBe Brawn, defenslva tacK jwbertswi 11-15 4-S 36. Gilmore 10-13 34 33; 

DENVER— Cut KNvI n AHdn s. JOY W ilson, Thet „ a IS 66 35. Johnson *-20 1-1 2 a Rh- 
Ed Thomas, janune Brtn»n. lumaaers. Q(y 55 (Johnson II), San 

Henrv Vereen and Ed Seoftwlde Antonio SO (Gilmore 14). Assists: Kansas City 

MiXe ColUns. comertjock. and ILorry Bamatt. M (Drew /j, Antonio 29 (Moore 14). 
naming boek. Released JO0 Cockerell, wide 35 16 31 23— 97 

receiver, and Steve EnrtohL tackle. Hoo*tai 34 21 21 23—101 

JACKSONVILLE Signed Arthte GrlHIn sompson 11-25 4-7 28. Otaivwan 3-7 13-MI*: 




more than two points throughout, against the lame, 
and the score was tied 11 times. “Two points off the Islanders in 
“There were positive things, but Nassau Coliseum — wow " John 
I wish we would’ve lost another Ogrodnick said Tuesday night after 
way.” said Karl “I don’t think we breaking a 4-4 tie with 2:53 left to 
can play any better than we did. At give Detroit a 5-4 victory over the 
least the Sixers didn’t blow us ouL crippled New York Islanders. “We 


OOF — Canadian Ron Richards came acropper in tlie 90- 
meter team ski jumping at the Nordic world champion- 
daps. Finland won Tuesday's final in Seefeld, Austria; 
the host country finished second and East Germany third. 


Red Wings Catch Islanders 
In Final Period to Win, 5-4 

When, mn as seldom as the score, 44. Howson’s second goal, a 
Detroit Red Wings do, any victory high 20-footer from the slot that 
feds good. Even when it comes beat goalie Corrado Micalef, bad 


agjunst ine lame. . put the Islanders ahead at 5:04 of 

“Two points off the Islanders in {he period. 

NasMu ColisKim — wow" John H ow*m had the first period’s 
Ogrodnick said Tue^iay mgbi after onjy ^ a short-side 10-foot 
breaking a 4-4 tie with 2:53 left to 


MMCOlUnAConwitodLOkl UriV M {DfW San Antonio 29 (Moore 14). 

naming bock. Released JO0 Cockerell, wide 35 16 31 23 — TJ 

reootucr, ond Steve EnrlohL tackle. HooMw 3t 21 3* 23—181 

JACKSONVlLLE-^OaodA/c^ GrlHln ,,.j 5 4-728. Ola iuwan 3-7 13-14 10: 

and Cedric Jones, runatn a bockA ta^two. ond Nma ia ., f ^ ESworts 8-16 6-7 22. Ro- 
HircO-VW contracts, respectively. An- toiwda . pn^i^ 33 (Nonca 14). Houston 4* 


m . fftreo-vwr camroCT*, boumis: PiwmiIk 33 (Nonca 14). Houston 4* 

I emiiS nouncod iW Ken Hobart, worlertart. has (Sompun 121 . Phoenix 25 (Aaans. 

ctearod wolvers (Md is a free ooeni. Nance.HumptirlesS).Houstan23IMcCrav7). 

LOS ANGELES— Signed J 09 Lawson ana 38 26 35 31 130 

IT 6 P n. L T_ JAM Wanrwi. dolensive bocks; Cftuek Paoe. Anoata 32 24 21 33—113 

rTu indoor tackle; JBtl coner. ounirr; Kevin ->ud'«'- looo 14-18 0-0 2 H. Trloucko 1H7 33 23; Wll- 

nmmn llnebaekor. a«« Hl * ert Ale «nider. Named k|(B IW 1 33 . carr m M 17. Rebaaods: 

Jita-w. II «_ 6. 2. Joha Fa * defensive bockneW coocft OelroH <3 (Latmbeer. Cureion 121. Atlanta 46 

NEWJERSEY-StaMitJerrv Holmes, enr- luvflwstol |3).Aiai8te: 0etre»42 (Tftomos 

U^.64,63. MilMlov MBdr, Cnjchoelavukta nBrtact HOCKEY 34 1 E - Jotw5<,n ‘ £rr «■ 

«t riuofiy TvtaNw,' France, M, M ff-tfc Not tonal Hacker Letmue iarie9 “ “ " 

SECOND ROUND LEAGUE-5usPewW Jim Boo |lBV . ^ „ Grl) „ TT™ 

YanmckMtalt, Franco. dtf. Sandy Mover. „; G | IIW ta julfBntacAercdTorerrtotemrw M n. 

UA,6<S-7.7^ (B6). T|m MovOtte. VS-doL ^ ponieipatliio In a benrtwkwrina 

John SadrLUJL 6.3. 6 < Eliot ToHsefter.UA. SSHtan. Wa^insl 5t. Louis. Suspended Bn- JSTk l*RlS 

del joy Lanldus, OS. 64. 6-1 Tomas Smld. pmt # Philadelphia laur oames lor a g Edan I 6 L A^. New Jeraov 25 iRlcn- 
C»«taNovaiaa.dtLMa«MltcheiLUJ^ inctaenl Jan. U oboimi Calgarv. * tGma ”- M 

6 . 6 - 2 . Brad GJfeert, UJ5- dot Sammy Ctanv college fT w S n ^in 

KANSAS WESLEYAN-Named Jock Abdul-JaCbm- B-1-1 7-e -n. Wenfcv 4-U 4 7 l!L 
n weld, football coach. Scott 7-161-2 16; Sm.fc7-UM2aworfiek8.il 

Woilek OREGON STATE— Named Srlulo Moore MKMMrt-LACU^filllWonM. 


nounced tttat Ken Hobart, wortertack. has (Sompun 121 . Phoenix 25 (Aaans. 

doored waivers and is a free ooeni. Nance.HumptirtesS).Houstan23IMcCrav71. 

LOS ANGELES— Stoned Lawson and 38 26 35 31 J30 

JAM Wanrwi. dolensive becks; Chuck Paae. AnoBta 32 24 21 33—113 

tackle; Jdt Carter, ounier; Kevin Lons I4-1B0-Q2B. Trlnucko 10-17 3-3 23; WII- 

Unebocker. and Rnhert Alexander. Named k|RS , W1 3 j, corr « W 17. Reboaads: 

John Fax defensive bockneW n»d>. Oelrott <3 (Lolmbeer. Cureion II). Atlanta 46 

NEW JERSEY— 5i*wdJenrv Holmes. enr- (Lev(rin tan13).AtaiSlT; Detroit 42 (Thomas 
nwfftack. unrifFY 201, Atlanta 34 (EJohiHon, Carr B). 


u ^"»v >«< « ^ oraSi BtS 


COLLEGE 

KANSAS WESLEYAN— Named 
Welch tootftali conch. 


L-A. dinm 27 23 26 38-1 M 

LA. LOtWn 27 26 37 33— ID 

AbduF JaObar B -14 74 23, Worthy 6-13 4-7 lk 
Scott 7-161-216; Smith 7-156-9 2a Warrick B- 1 1 




MHSIS 



can play any better than we did. At give Detroit a 5-4 victory over the ™ ^ 

least the Sixers didn’t blow us ouL crippled New York Islanders. “We WnL rDliUS 

We gave ttem a game.” (UP/, AP) needed iL 1>) you know this is our Wkka . . , ~ 7 

■ Denre^s Usel to Retire tawminisssrhitlasttimctlK 

Dm !cd tbs fourth leading « S tatata 

scorer in pro basketball history, an- ^®P«- 28. They had gone 0-10- Nf £“ goiJ Buu ^ ^ K '“ 

nounced Tuesday that he will retire “ Elsewhere TjKsd.iv Toronto twi scorin S 21 ^ 00 a P«sout and 

SAfSattiS a^-Nitaitatad 

sSkttiar ** 1118 


scorer m pro basketball history, an- 
nounced Tuesday that he will retire 
from the Denver Nuggets at the 
end of ibe season to devote his 
energies to his Kentucky horse- 
breeding farm. United Press Inter- 
national reported from Denver. 

Neva- one to dazzle crowds with 
fancy moves or dramatic slam 
dunks, Issel, 36, played through Al- 
ness, injury and fatigue. He has 
missed only 23 of 1,202 games in 
his professional career. 


Elsewhere Tuesday. Toronto tied 
Quebec, 2-2, and Montreal downed 
Hartford, 8-5. 

^Wejusf went out there and kept 
working,” said Ogrodnick. 


from newcomers. Eariier Tuesday „ j. Trjj 
to Red Wmgs bad celled 1 


A 6-foot-9, 240-pound cenier, Is- 
sel played ai the University of Ken- 
tucky and was a first-round draft 


f lb«L M, *«. « B« Toienrafl. *Mltn cjn^ic ' 


OREGON STATE— Named Stlvlo Moore M ». Rettoends - LA. Cllaoers 52 1 KaVgn 1>?. 


U5.0«f. Pou^i SloiiLCx*cftMlauak«X 24.6-4. 
H 17-4). . 


Pittsburgh— N amed Chuck StaWri as 
siSianl inolbali coacn 


LA-Lakers55(RambK13I.Aulsit:LA Clip- 
pers P iUi-on lOi. L* Lakers 25 Ua-wiwn 
•3 1. 


Colraids of the old American Bas- 

Ita Ancoaad hem ke! ^ Assodation. 

Jdte Em-ng, here lorfng control of the bdl in a colliaon A &£.m 

with Oeve and-s Worid B. Free tad a game-high 22 points ChLherlain and Elvin Haves on 
us Philadelphia nipped the Cavaliers lOi-lOO, on Tuesday, baskeiball’s all-time list. ' 


dunks, Issel, 36, played through 21- r^isrered his first god kTS 

ness, injury and fatigue. He has i games when Ron DiSay set^m 

missed only 23 of 1^02 games in feom Adirondack of J eA mer- a two-man iSawav at 

his professional areer. ^^■ Ua ^ and P 3 ?? 1 2137, and 

A 6-foot-9, 240-pound center. Is- scored Lhe Wm 8 s first goal of the a ^ through SmitifH^ai 
sel played ai the University of Ken- 8“*- . . 2:58. ^ Jtmui Ic gs at 

lucky and was a first-round draft The Islanders, missing half their “This is getting hard lo take" 
choice in 1970 of ihe Kentucky rosier because of injuries, brought said Islander Coach AI Arbour 
Colonels of the old American Bas- up three men from their AHL team “Four one-Eoal aames in a 
keiball Assodation. in Springfield: Ken Leiter, Vera we get one?? ™ 

With 27,002 paints, Issel trails Smith and Scon Howson. Howson In its Iasi three outinas New 
only Kareem Ahdul-Jabbar. Wilt had iwt> goals Tuesday nigbL York had tied Edmonton mid kw 
Chamberlain and Elvin Haves on Reed Larson’s seventh goal or in overtime to Vancouver and Inc 
basketball’s all-time list. ' ihe year, a 40-foot shot over goalie Angeles. 










Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


World’s Greatest Hugger J llllC OuTStlC 


Tre Been Trying to Live in Ways That Would Try . 
To Break Through the Barriers Imposed by Society 9 


? A Plucked Cockatoo ’ 


W ASHINGTON - As if we 
didn't have enough to worry 
about, there is trouble in America's 
bedrooms. The information comes 
from the syndicated columnist Ann 
Landers, who. in conducting a 
reader survey, discovered that 72 
percent of her woman readers 
would rather be hugged and treated 
tenderly by men than have sexual 
intercourse with them. 

Although the figure came as a 

not *come as a |jjjv 
surprise to me. 

Ihavetem de^-- 

who woulcf rath- .|||j 

erbe bugged. 

In my high 

school years, the figure was more 
like 99 percent, and even those girts 
who only agreed to be hugged and 
treated tenderly thought that was a 
very big deal 

When I went from high school to 
the U. S. Marine Corps. I was hop- 
ing the odds would change in my 
favor. After all, I did have a uni- 
form and was going off lo fight for 
my country. Either I attended the 
wrong USO dubs, or the wrong 
Salvation Army canteens, but I 
could never meet the women who 
preferred “the act" to the hug. This 
was very frustrating, because while 
my buddies came off leave with 
happy smiles on their faces. I 
dragged myself in at4 in the morn- 
ing, my arms dead from bugging 
my dates all night long. 

□ 

You would expea in a wartime 
situation that you could End some 
women who enjoyed both being 
hugged and the ultimate experience 
as well. I never did. 

I would hug and hold than ten- 
derly till the sun came up, but every 
tune 1 suggested we go one more 
step they would reply, “I'm not that 
kind of girl” 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — The state record 
company, Melodiya, plans to pro- 
duce SO records this year commem- 
orating the 40 th anniversary of vic- 
tory over Nazi Germany in World 
War H, Tass said Wednesday. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


“What kind of girl are you?” 1 
would ask. 

Tm the kind of girl who just 
likes to be held in someone's arms." 

If I got angry enough I would 
reply, “You don't need a boyfriend 
— you need a nanny.” 

OK, the conflict was over, and 
according to mv U. S. Marine dis- 
charge papers I was now a man 
entitled to an veterans' benefits as 
well as the adulation of a grateful 
populace that had been spared the 
horrors of war. 

Surely the University of South- 
ern California coeds would under- 
stand that man cannot live by hugs 
alone. But once again the odds 
were stacked against me. A survey 
on campus revealed that 85 percent 
of the women said they would rath- 
er be hugged and held tenderly, 
while only 15 percent admitted that 
they would “go further," providing 
the person was on the first-siring 
football team or his father owned 
the Bank of America. 

In no time I developed a reputa- 
tion at USC. The word was out on 
sorority row that if you wanted to 
have a tender evening, gp out with 
Buchwald. But if you wanted the 
earth to move date somebody else. 
□ 

After three years of hu gg in g and 
frustrating tenderness I decided to 
go to Paris, where women were not- 
ed for pleasing themselves by pleas- 
ing their men. They considered 
hugging just the soup course lo a 
wonderful night 

As with most legends of love this 
one turned out to be slightly exag- 
gerated. 

I hugged under the bridges of 
Notre Dame, I hugged under the 
Eiffel Tower, I hugged in the streets 
of Montmartre, and T treated 
French women as tenderly as the 
filet migncxi they had ordered in a 
restaurant I couldn't afford. And 
all they ever did when I took them 
home was thank me at the door and 
say, “You're not like other Ameri- 
cans who only want French girls to 
make love." 

Well, that was some time ago, 
and I forgot all about such thin gs 
until the Ann Landers survey was 
splashed over the front pages. I 
showed the article to my wife, and 
thought she would laugh. But all 
she said when she finished reading 
was, “Why don’t you ever hug me?" 

“Because," I screamed, Tve 
been doing it all my life and it never 
got me anywhere!" 


By Barbara Gamarekian 

New York Timet Service 

W ASHINGTON — “Acting isn’t 
enough,” Julie Christie said. “I guess it 
should be, but for me it isn't You are doing 
other people's work, saying other people's 
words. I want my own voice to be heard, and 
the only way you can do that is to choose 
those areas in which you want to work for 
change." 

The actress had flown in from Britain for 
the Washington premiere of the British Em 
“The Return of the Soldier,” starring Glenda 
Jackson, Alan Bales, Ann-Margret and 
Christie. The opening will benefit Women 
Make Movies IV, an international women's 
film festival to be hdd in Washington in 
March. 

Christie, settling down on a sofa piled with 
pillows in her hotel suite, said she did not 
relish being interviewed: “There is no real 
dialogue, just somebody asking you what you 
feel what you think — it uses up an awful lot 
of energy, and I find it quite nervous-mak- 
ing,” 

Christie, 44, said film premieres, were also 
high on her list of unfavorite tilings. 

“I rarely, rarely, rarely go to them — I can't 
even remember the last time I did something 
like this. Bat this is a benefit for something I 
care about. And the producer, Ann Skinner, 
is an old friend. She was continuity girl to 
John Schleanger when [ filmed ‘Darling.’ 
Utile did I know then that inside this person 
taking notes was an iron-willed creature who 
would mm into a producer one day.” 
Women behind the camera — as directors, 
producers and technicians —are rare, Chris- 
tie said. “Look," she exclaimed, handing over 
a sheaf of papa. “Read that — of the 7,332 
movies made by major studios in the 30-year 
period ending in 1 979, only 14 were directed 
by women.” 

In Britain she lives amply, on a farm, she 
said. Her deliberately unkempt dress, and 
activities that include “fact-finding” trips to 
Nicaragua and such causes as nuclear disar- 
mament. feminism and protection of the en- 
vironment, are for her a way of sorting out 
life's priorities. 

As a feminist, Tve been trying for quite a 





PM Houfea/Ths Nm Yoik Turn 

Julie Christie 

long time now to live my ordinary, everyday 
life in ways that would try to break through 
the barriers imposed upon me by society.” 

These barriers, she explained, include 
“those relating to men." 

Tve tried to overcome my fear and awe of 
men, an attitude to which I was conditioned 
by both school and society — and it's been 
quite a struggle." 

And how is it going? 

“So-so, so-so,” she replied, breaking into a 
grin. Tm not always successful Sometimes 
you say. This is just too tiring.’ and you give 
up." 

Her most publicized romance was with the 
actor and director Warren Beatty, with whom 
she made several films in the 1970s. These 
days, she said, her “long-standing fella” is a 
journalist who writes for City Limits, an 
English publication. Td rather not tell you 
his name — no one in America would know 
who the h*U he is anyway." 

As for marriage, the very mention causes 


Christie to giggle. “What a funny idea." she 
said. “I can’t think of any reason I should. 
Tm not conventionally religious, and I don't 
see it as a sacrament "it is just a question of 
needing the slate to condone a relationship." 

Even the prospect of children, she said, 
would not necessarily lead to marriage. “1 
don’t know what it's like in the United States 
these days, but in England a lot of children 
are born to unmarried people — just masses 
and masses. It's become normal” 

Although she keeps a room in London, 
home for 10 years has been a stone farmhouse 
in Wales, winch she shares with a couple and 
their two children. 

“It isn't a commune." she said. Ti’s a 

S of friends, a family. I really have no 
I of my own. as my parents are both 
dead.” 

Christie was born in Assam. India, where 
her father managed a tea plantation. She was 
sent to Britain for her schooling. 

Much of her early acting was on the stage, 
touring with the Royal Shakespeare Compa- 
ny. Her performance as (he swinging society 
girl in the film “Darting” won her interna- 
tional attention and an Academy Award for 
best actress in 1965. That was followed by 
such films as “Dr. Zhivago." “Far from the 
Madding Crowd." "Petulia," “McCabe and 
Mrs. Miller. " “Shampoo" and “Heaven Can 
Wait." 

Christie lived in California for three years 
before returning to Britain in 1 977, when she 
took a respite from movies. In 1980 she re- 
sumed her film career and she is now working 
on a television series and is scheduled to work 
on a movie in New York next spring. 

“I can't remember what it is called," she 
said, “but it is with Sidney Lumet for sure — 
he’s such a wonderful director." 

However, she still wrestles with how to deal 
with stardom — the autographs, the inter- 
views. the demands for photographs. 

“I understand the need for icons," she said. 
“I have had idols and there are still people 
whom I am in awe of because of their talent, 
so 1 try to be understanding. But 1 so hate 
being a public person rather than a private 
person — I’m just not as nice as I should be." 


Magazine Aims to Help Find Long-Lost Special Someones 


United Press International 

C HICAGO — Reuniting miss- 
ing children with parents, 
placing names with faces, rekin- 
dling memories with old friends — 
these will be the continuing cover 
stoty in People Finders magazine, 
which makes its debut this month 
in the United States and Canada 
T think there's a warm spot in 
everyone who hears stories, the suc- 


cess stories, of people getting back 
together after a long period. It's 
something that makes you fed 
good inside,” said Blair Hail ea- 
stern, the magazine's publisher. 

Hallenstein. 31, described the 
publication as the first U. S. na- 
tional magazine to prim listings by 
people in search of missing chil- 
dren, runaways, adoptees, old mili- 
tary buddies, long-lost friends. 


On first glance, the 50-page pub- 
lication looks like a collection of 
classified ads, but the four or more 
lines of copy become individual- 
ized short stories of hope. 

In the runaway section is an ad 
seeking Kathryn Witcome or some- 
one who may know her. “Katie. 
Please call us right away to let us 
know you are OK_ Your dad and I 
will come and get you wherever you 


are. We promise not to ask any 
questions. We love you.'* 

Hallenstein declined to discuss 
the start-up costs of the monthly 
magazine, which be said was his 
first business venture. The maga- 
zine costs $1 and ads are S4 a line. 
People Finders will be available by 
subscription and at newsstands. 

The magazine is published in Ba- 
tavia, a suburb of Chicago. 


The singer and actress Cher, do- 
scribed as “a plucked cockatoo sa- 
ting femininity back 20 years," and 
the rock stare Cymfi Lmper and 
Prince lend a musical touch to Mr. 
Blackwell's 25th annual “Woret- 
Drcssed Women" list. Cher topped 
the lisL followed by the reigning 
Miss America. Shari ene Wefls; 
Patti Davis, daughter of President 
Ronald Reagan; Lauper: the ac- 
tresses Diahann Carroll and Joan 
Collins in a tie for fifth: a “Dallas” 
star, Victoria Principal: the singer 
and actress Barbra Streisand; two 
more actresses, Sally FieW and 
Pamela BeUwood; and, in an other 
tie. Prince and the rock band Twist- 
ed Sister. A special “worst-un- 
dressed of the year" mention went 
to last year's Miss America, 
Vanessa W illiams , dethroned after 
a Penthouse magazine feature. 
“This is the first time we've had this 
category, but it's gening eas ier all 
the time," said Richard Blackwell 
the fashion designer who releases 
the lists under his professional 
name. Mr. Blackwell. He said Mr. 
Reagan’s daughter, an aspiring ac- 
tress, “packs all the glam our of an 
old. worn-out sneaker.” Asked 
which woman he felt most epito- 
mized bad dressing over the last 25 
years. Blackwell unhesitatingly re- 
plied, “Efizabefh Taylor.” She no 
longer appears on his lists, he ex- 
plained, because she was made a 
member of his WorsL-Dressed Hall 
of Fame. 


Mother Teresa of Calcutta, who 
arrived in Hong Kong from Beijing 
Wednesday, said China’s needy are 
apparently well taken care of by the 
government Asked whether her or- 
der. the Missionaries of Charity, 
could play a role in China, the 
Nobel Peace Prize winner said: 
“Our sisters are able to give certain 
loving care that is always much 
needed." Speaking to reporters 
upon her arrival the 74-year-old 
nun said she had made no requests 
to the Chinese authorities during 
her three-day visit to set up a mis- 
sion in C hina. Mother Teresa is 
□ext scheduled to visit Seoul, then 
go to Papua New Guinea. 

□ 

Cathy Evelyn Smith may plead 
guilty to a reduced charge of invol- 
untary manslaughter in the drug 
overdose death of John Behsiri, 
but tire deal is Off if prosecutors 


SUBSCRIBE 

to the 

INTERNATIONAL 

HERALD 

TRIBUNE 

AND SAVE. 

As o new nbscritwr to the 
Horoationd Herdd Triburw. 
you axi saw up to half 
the nB wi tf on d price, depending 
an your courtly of resjctonoa. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


CSEAT BRITAIN 

LONDON WZ MEWS COTTAGE - 
Peacefully saauded with e m ti u Siiq 
roof gtrdcn overlooking wmbassy 
gonfam. 2 aim Hyde Pork, 2 beck, 
tape reception, garage. 01-229 1991. 


; reception, parage- 0 

MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 

Frindpatity of Monaco 
sung veer exceptional 

AWWTWWT. RATIO 
700 eqj». private radon 

Sstickwthd craa. Center of town. crim, 
300 iqjn. feting space, tape entance. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 
HARVARD BUSBESS SCHOOL far lAWYBt, Britah notional, American 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 


Embassy Service qr 


8 Ave. <k M e n l ire 
750C8 Pam 
Tates 231496 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 


URGENT 

Far Iranians of 3 weeks out of every 2 
months, we era leaking far; 

HIGHLY QUAUHED 


181, A vwom Choriei rte-Gmrite. 
92200 Ne o B y b it S ei n e. Franca. 
Or toL Paris 747-07-29 


m fiats for rot 

on this sperid introductory offer, WOfff 562-7899 

** snxi^aFfa. farge^2«ssmg room. FLATS FOR SALE 

WT SsksaMan Dapcrtaient, grage. Jjgh dass , . PHONE 562-1640 

■SMSStSJtSS 'SSSri£ff£6*i OIHCES FOR RENT/SA1E 

a tthn. 74HM9 « ,*01 &3Ja> CEDEX W °" 


HATS FOR RENT 

PHONE 562-7899 

FLATS FOR SALE 


PHONE 562-4214 


or Frnch spealang Europncm seanft A KtigJion For rrassians of 3 weeks out of every 2 

co u ntrie s next E xp e ri ence indudes 3 Jifrytta^ rath c mcef.pgjo nfra ip/ yr months, we era looking fart 

CSffiKSKn HIGHLY QUAUHED 

spSWiK 'aRSUSEULln TK ™5"! LL 1 r "*® 

FOOD TRAVH1ED FKB4CH emu- feUS* 5 SwSf 

ifa 45, bfingud, wall educated, spe- Tribune. 92521 Neu4y Cedes. France lhWFrrm*»e^, ^o ai o«*L 


SWITZB&ANDL Feb. 13 ■ Mach FASHION pBWfO A«ner- 
16 days, 2 resorts, only USJIOQ. d wanaryW. IwmdoJtweriMvv 
of bo VI or older, a good pmdU "fl *i Zurich, wriefa travelled, Ger- 


~ ~ ■ ■ icumiwnn / imi .hr 

lion. 5eeks legal or mav^mrntaxp ” *1. ***£ 

Son UL. Europe a oversets, fluent mfl l*rt ■" A«l Parana gmen to 


WORLD TRAVELLED FRENCH moo- 


new vfAMM tu nrf . Consuftcm, inter- 
national sdes. pufafac relations, nghl- 
hand man to busy tap executive. Can 
invest. Bar 1640, Herdd Tribune, 
92521 Neinfty Cede*, Franca. 


HBSNCH lAWTEB A WIHPREIR, 
Endfeh/German/Spamh, free to 
travel, seeks positron. Para 326 33 90 

GENERAL POSITIONS - 
AVAILABLE 


Write affw to: 
S-18-II5D1& PU8UOTAS, 
0+1211 GENEVA 1 


Sta SWITZBOANDL Feb. 13 - March 
1. 16 days, 2 resorts, only USJIOQ. 

• Must be 21 or older, a good pmcJel 
skier & enjoy cMdcerv Vala^i Car** 
Chalet Senecq CH-1854 Liiyiin. 

a® 1 *! THAI CURB* required far 
an esSaUshed Thai restaur ont m Lon- 
don. Salary negafcabfc. To arrange 
interview teleph one London (01) 564 
8529 

GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 

YOUNG AMERICAN WOMAN 24, 


«h, good 
Hafcan. s eeks 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easfy 

Inltso 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phones GaU your loed WT repres en t a t i ve with your tend. You 
win be informed of the cost immediately, and anoe prepay me nt is 
made your od wS appear withm 46 hours. 

Caeh The base rate is S9J0 per ire per day + load taxes. There are 
25 letters, signs end spaces in the first kne and 36 m the fallowing Knes. 
Mirnnum space a 2 bias. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Cards; American Express, Oner's Club, Euroaed, Master 
Card. Access and Visa 


fashion trade or industry. Plane aav 

I tad Box 1669, Herald Tribune, 92521 
NeuJy Cede*. France 

TO THE RUSSIAN COMMUNITY! 
Yrfe student wavs work in Pan tor 
HS-TIA. Experience tutoring English, 
specks Cusson & French. Writ? Afeon 
Gordv, Bax 3163 Yale Station, New 
Haven, 006520 USA. 


rekabla, efficient, 2-yecr callage bus>- RE5ENTABLE DANISH LADY mjD- 
nsn dopee & romance docutnemo- I kngual (English. German, Spanish, I 


IN ASIA AND PACnC 

contact our bod rfetrlxitor or: 

httamafianed Herald Tribune 
1005 Tef Sag CmmimkM Bofcfing 
24-34 Tl —ieex y Road 
HONGKONG 
Teh HK 5-286726 


IDEOLOGIES TODAY: 
TEW RIGHT, FEW 1ST 


Teh 1931 SO 66 84 
Ttx: 469477 

PARIS & SUBURBS 


MONTMARTRE 


AGENCE DS L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

764 03 17 


DUPLEX, fering. bedroom + dressing, 

k°A kIuTgem * 30 '- aiarm 74 CHAMPS-aYSES 8th 


WORLD TRAVHiH) LAWYER. 35. 
bBngud women with suc cessful inti 
executive, managerial, marimwig, 
PJL, l eg J . Etet qry. T.V, film proebc- 
ron badtgroimd socks interesting 
vwxt. Prefer Pans, Zundi. In Europe 
until Feb. 6th & after April 1. Bax 
1667. Herdd Triune, 92521 Neufly 
Codex, From 



OVERSEAS P OSITION S. Hundre ds of 
top paying i* f » t **o avafoWe. Tax 
free names. Attractive benefits. Op- 
patutmiw far aN occupations. Free 
detab. Overseas Employment Ser- 
viem. Dept- HT. P.O. Bra 460. Town 
of Moan Royd, Quebec. Canada 
H3P3C7. 

BG 8 ACCOUNTING HRM seek 
staff /senior for U5. tondeparfment. 


lion axparamai, seeks ai employment 
transition from USA to London area 
SJafe indude proof-rearing, atony, 
word procanng & bfapd (Tkmga- 
ianj. Please forward retries to Eva | 
Rob, Ml Durban Avenue, Hapaitsng, 
New Jersey 97843, USA. 

FASHION DE5KRCR + aonfador 
& worldwide sdes/buyer fabrics & 
feather selection accessories ek. 


FrericN sales experience, seeks stimu- 
kkrna mb veth travel. Base Europe / 
US. TefcUK 09326 5571 Bon 40255. 
I-H-T., 63 Lor^ Age, London, WC2E 
YOUNG LADY. 28. CaMoma U raver. 
Hfy law doc to rate. TrBngua! Enqksh, 
French 5paush [written & spoken}, 
xeks fail or part-tune job. Write Bax 
A94, Hordd Tnbaw. 92521 Neufiy 
Cedex, France 


Jon. 25 - 26. 85 

Grand Airmhrt&Stre Of Iho Sorbome, e 
47 rue Ses Ernies, 75005 Park 

Fri. Jan. 25> 3-6 pm. 

kfeobgres in Tr a rsfor m a ho n 
8.30/11 pm. Pokticd Idealo^ns 
Sat. Jan. 26: 70 cxn/1 pm 

Stiody jir fe Economics u 
3/6 pm. Cufhra&uJedogicd Change 

Presentations & drsarssions pi n 

French/Engfith 

Among portioponfis: 
fhnE HJ7GERALD. - 

Ambcraada- Even GALBRAITH, 1 

John Kenmrh GALBRAITH, 

Wady LEONTEFF, ' 

Joshua MURAVOffK, WIEam PrAFF. J 


ORPI - M.GJL 387 71 55 
38 Bd Bofi g naBes, 75017 Paris 


T6TH ETOHE. High doss apartment, 
perfect canririan, triple re o ep t fan, 


«=!««■ 3 bedraans, 2 balhroane, equmpedj 
anl - kitchen, parfeng in courtyad, 

rid sftiles. 283 sqm. 

SALE BY NOT AIRE. 247 12 17 
xmafron 

3TH AVE HOCHE 

55°™“ targe e lega nt aptm e n f with perking. 
FWOOJMO. Paris: 766 33 00 


Sturio. 2 or 3*oam apartment. 

One month or more. 

IE CLARDGE 3S9 67 97. 

IDEAL FOR SHORT TKM STAY. Pans 
stixfias & 2 rooms, decorated. Contact 
Soreira- SJ rue Uraverate, Paris 7th. 
Tek (11 544 39 <0. 

LAMARCK, in townhowe. artist's ole- 
tier + 2 bedraotnj kxmdry room, 
bdhroam, 2 WCs. FB000. Stort term. 
Td: 387 47 29 , 

2NO - STtXXO; AI comforts, 6fh Root, 
F70/day. Vail toctoy from rraddeyon. | 
47 roe a Aboular Metro Sentwr. 


nxparienoe & fluent bigfah re- 
xL Send CV ia Box 1o617HeraM 
me, 92521 NeuSy Cedex, France 


hafian BigSsh. French. 37 yem old & ENGLISHMAN. 25, ex-Arts graduate 
20 yean experience. Avertable xrarae- seeks poshon as office cterk, wdl 


Serious arty. Td: 0771- 
Tele«68Q574 - Mr hfitn 


International Business Message Center 


ATI&fnCJN EXECUTIVES 


CHAMP BYSSS UDa Perfect pied- IfiJh POMPE New bufafe^, hgh 
otorne. Reaepbon + bedroom, dess, reception + 2 bear owns, 

litohen. biuh. needs no work. Price: ffJWL Tel 50tL 36-00. 

FI .100,000. Sant Pferro: 563 11 B8 SHORT TERM m Latin Quarter. 
16A OFF HSMB MARHN new bob. No onetns. TeL 329 38 KL 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

garooe, 7 mas rooms. 5D4 8620. 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNmES 

In tho fa mefend Harold ft- 
bona, >6mnim6aie«M WOSLOWIDE OPIATING 

of a mehen rmodtn s world- Publohmg home (edvertans 
wide, most of Mchoni era in FOR SALE 

burners end industry, wi Prict SFl^OOOlX) 

•» (Paris PraeJicaBy unferated posri>&« for m- 
6IMY& Omtore IOojtu en- aecnmg the rumowr. Buutubs actrvrnes 
am be axtvmtod to oHw 5ddt Gxi be 




Claude BT1BL MonoPrax* GA8AUD 
Edgar MORM, Guy SOCMAN- 


mines 741 3S28 
SWITZERLAND 



LAKE GB4EVA and 
MOUNTAIN RBORTS 

grr*£JSSTi.”faS: 

1 mooatain raewta VBars, Verbier, Los 

PERSONALS Dtottoatj, Chateau B'Oe* mr 

■■■ — I. G tfmdj LpyvL QioSeTs ov^kibfe. Ex- 

NMA - Comtoq lo ttortt Feb. 1 2. Crri cAel aeperturilei fa fardaen. 
us m«ed East Hompton. Im pBSb from 5R 23,000. 
Norrai & Criy, Liberal nxx looaes ri 6VH6 interest. 

Mrtvnur 1 G!oSn*ANSJA. 

MOVING Av Mon Bepas 24, 1005 Lausome, 

Switoeiimd Tot Pll 22 35 12. 

Trine 25 185M&IS CH 
The Torracoi of Geneva Golf aid 

ALSL3SD - c TaaS»‘J53fcSSt" 


AILED 

VAN UNES IMPL 

over toco Acanre 

tN UJLA. - CANADA 

350 WORLMUDE 
fXS ESTIMATES 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
CSEAT BRITAIN 


UJXUHOUSCHaSEA HOUSE, nowfy 
rAKCj Dodbonkfi Int om oliond d ocBr o ted far ootporata rent. 3 dou- 
(OT) 343 23 6A . 

FRANKFURT , JgfiSgi 

|069| 25C066 LONDON. For fa besi fambhed Hols 

ULS. 

(089) 142244 . . 8»El5. Ttfat 27846 BBPE G. _ 

LONDON tanStaSS lONDONVia 2 bedroom luaxyftat 

ion *3 M3* 

CAIRO /UKod Van Lino* Infl month. TaLiOl-402 0679 e *erency only 


(30-2) 712901 

USA ABiod Vat iiiMl httl Cap 

(0101) 312-681-8100 


Tefevtaoa, stereo, washmg madim 
etc. Avdtabfe fartB months. £800 par 

month Tafc 01-40? 0679 o v ere ngsonh 1 1 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

ANQB47 H OUSE or Palazzo wanted 
prefacrisfy in South of Span bur 
would oa ra d er PortugcL South 
France, Graeco vrih I (LOOD son. gar- 
den mint have vast atoma-toom, 3 
beds, will buy/rent. Cavendish. Apor- 
pfa Wofaffh Span. 

TeL [34-521 7B1508 

EMPLOYMENT 

FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSTIICKS 
LOOK UNOBl 

‘INIGINATIONAL POSmONS" 
PAGE S EUROPE 
PAGG7 ASIA 

EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

ATTORNEY needed to sene as spe- 
atilriMfl nbfe Mevipon ana a rep- 
resenlolive of Amu icon fBcn nduriry. 
To be based m London veth rsautar 
travel la the Ewapean continent. Mu9 
reaf & wrue both Engfch & ftendi 
fluertty. Bod^TOund m mtefiedud 
property field reoommendsd rbcue 
send resume & sriory req ui remerts to 
Bax 1650, Herald Tribune. 92521 
Neuriy Cedex. Fiance 

AMERICAN PUBLICATION 5H3C5 
raprosentolMi n Pin, qarium t s 
should be perfectly bdtrguriDi^h- 
Freneh wrih expmna in advertran 
sries/pro m et ia i Trt Pare 551-47 OS. 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


creating me turnover, flusmas actrvmes 
can be eortendsd to othw fads. Can be 
operated from BnytvHe-e m the world. 
No experience 'eoured. 

Please wnie to i 

Box 2109, IKT, FnednchstT. 15. I 
06000 htrldunitfan 


BUSINE SS COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

an ofl-cash business that con earn you 
______ . S8000 • 510,000/ month. New and usad 

INVEST IN gSJSKLSffiJS! 

«___ «XJ0 FVorirfurt/W. Germany. 

FUTURES Td: 0W7J7808 412713 K£MA 

TAFIA VI fSHH WATB PEARL sben± and 

I vUA T I ksoxe pearls on safe m Hpng Kang. 

Good qarity aid best erwp. Fa- 

ifei m n-nmr frrrfnn rmto. C0NVBmM B**® TRADING & 
arttoroge-VJ*. of wefl known WaD SI. 
Oh 30% average yearly .emmsma OTjnrrafap frequently vismng FEG 8 

, ' WKto fa, FREE brodrura 

lease indudeyaor phone nraba SES^dto Box 1685, Heirid tn- 
tMrrmsm Invesmert US510j000| buna 92571 Cedex. Frane 

W [ i i .... ■ WTBWTIONAUY KNOWN pracL 

irons World Conm^es bekfed s«nplasiieGs.UK.raeoaIia^corra. 

, . W*™ 1 _ _ eon melon motenab/aoducis, 

6 2 MOD. eortrads, cose taS 

Cetuwg owner dredor «a triri 

sSmrMhf'a iw y«m pmo A 

S^mfaSn 8 .C^tot^feroUIL 

SAEDWI^ Rats m exduswe resderx* 

wo for remesfmem neadiy 

u. S. A. 

XCmNG OPPOmJWTY West Germcmy tI731/24OTf ir S 

IndusSry locOtad w the Sun Beb. 712520 DfGOSD 


xpftn g mat wa an tel ex you 
back, and your m ese ag m and 
appear wrtSen 48 hour*. The 
rale is U.S. j 9.80 or beat 
aq u hnJ e n l per One. You mat 
indude compfete end veriG- 
abte baSng addms*. 


w*h 30% cveiace yearly >eium once 
1979. 

Writs far FREE brodrura 
Phase indedo year phone numbae 

tMxxmom fnvesnaent US510j000| 

Trans World Cermnodries berried 
Dept AW504 

T«t= (02} 640 32® 

Telex 22981 TRANS 8 
EesHded r firigun 


U.S. A. 

EXCmNG OPPOmJWTY 


BUSINESS SERVICES 

MTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UMLIMUBl INC 
USA. 8 WORLDWIDE 

A oanpfetu «d & buDnes sennee 
provickng a axque reflection of 
•dented, versatile & mutoinoud 
■xfivxJuafc far: 

FasframCannereirifVint-Ffeoiiiotioro 
Con v en tkxvT rode Shows-Pres Patios 
Spedd Everts-fmoge Mdvsfls 
Soaal HostvHoHesses-E rt eri an en 
Scxxri Conip a nio w t-Tour gwdes, etc. 

212-765-7793 
212-765-77V4 
330 W.56l h SL, N.Y.C 10019 
Service Representatives 
Needed Worldwide. 


UMITHJ COMPAME5 1 
INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Worldwide 

Noneitees-AdriMMtoetson 
Boat Registrations 
R e odymode at Spedd 

LONDON RBtESENTATIWE 

ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 

Depi HI, 

8 Victoria 51 
DouriaL Us of Mon. 

Tet 0624 26971 
Telex 627691 SPTVA G 

MAKE YOUR HONG KONG W 
produetive. Buriram Advisory Service' 
wfl set up ]mur meeting & aeeanpo- 
ny you l a prewbdriie rwowi o ftons + 

fl am & orfHndB. 

TAX SERVICES 
FRENCH P8ESCNAL TAX GUIIX with 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Yoa best buy. 

Fira domonds m ary price large 
ot fewest wholesale prices 
direct fian Antwerp 
canter of the efianond world 
Fril guarantee. 

For free pnes list write 


learn/ receive trailing. Any post con- 
vdered. Bar 1672. Horrid Tribune, 
9252! Nealy Cedex, Fiara, 

TECHNICAL TRANSLATOR/ wrier 

Engfah/french/German, extensive 
ovariaastronifetion/iiujnagemanl ex- 
perience. seeks position. Tel: UK 

0245/468552. 

MTHHOR OeSIGNBC Parians grain- 
□lo, Swiss notional, triaigud. work 
penrit. seeks potman with arjjimx 
design firm w Porn. Pais 5554973. 
BRITISH INVESTIGATIVE Jouraofel 
rasidert m France seeks rorxrawons. 

Tri (50) 04 83 X 

31, MANAG8L 6 lonaiogei Seeks 
tab US Tel (3) 973 30 ^France 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABIJ: 


HEAPOmCI 

Fariw (For deesfied ortyL 
747-4*00. 

EUROPE 

Amxterdcxn: 26-36-15 
Aaiew 36 1 -83*7/368-242? 
Braewto 343-1099 
Cnptsliogtei- (01) 329440 
Fran kfu rt : (069) 7247-55 
Lmnanne: 29-58-94. 

Lfebaa: 67-27 93/ 6A-2S44. 
London: (01| 836-4802. 
Madrid: 455-2891 /455-3306 
Mflcm-. (02) 7531445. 
Norway; (03) 845545. 
Rome; 679-3437 
Sweden: 08 104632. 

Tel Aviv; 03455 559 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

UNDBI STATES 

Now YoA: (212) 7S2-3890 


EMPLO^TVIENT 


«S — itex porl 

fctabWied 192B MINERVE 

Wkoawroat 62 B -2018 Antwerp Tt! , 

Btto w - Tut 02 3) 234 07 51 . Brian 

Tkt 71779 sy( b. At the Oianaraf Oub. 

Heart of Antwerp Diamond mdunry 

OFFICE SERVICES 7! 


DOMESTIC 

itismois wanted 

MINERVE ENGUSH SPEAKING WOMANS, 6 


mnwcsrE F«MS m RAJBS: 
fcngfah, Befean. Dutch a German 
soaeleries. knowfed ge of F ra ndr re- 
cm rad, Enrihh shorthand. BJuiguri 
tefexBts. Wnte or phone 138 Avenue 
'few Hugo. 75H6 Pans. France. Tek 
727 61 W 


Your Office in Germany | 

w» are **Af Yoar S ervice " 

• Complete office services at two 
pruligo 

• hAy equipped offices far the short 
term or the tang term. _ 

• treeniatianaly nmd office end 

S 'esnanai staff at your (fisposri. 

be fegaDy used as your corpo- 
rate donvate tor Gerraany/EaupB. 
e Your business operation con start 


Don't mica 
INTERNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

ia fie WT Ossified Section. 


yeor rid seeks l«nn domestic posi- 
tion m France. Experience & refer- 
ences Write: Martin 5069 Nash Rd.. 
Comandtwsuo. NY 14424. 


AMBUCAN WOMAN, 23, seeks nan- PORSOC tEtSARl, BJM.W. eh 
try portion abroad With Aircnccn or aba 

British Family. tef«encw. Box 1)11, Wo Are Spedafinrd in DOT 8 EM 
IWT. 63 Long Age, London WQ Convewtan. Shipping A Imp ort tag 


LATIN AMERICA 

Bogota: 212-9608 
Beenoi Aim 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312} 

Caecoti 331454 
Guayaquil 431 943/431 
Lima: 417 852 
fanaiuM4372 
5t» J ora: 22-1055 
Sanfia0o:6961 555 
Sod Paula: B52 1B93 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahrain: 246303. 

Jordrat 25214. 

Kowaif: 5614485. 

Oahte: 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 

Jeddah: 667-1500. 
UJLE: Dobai 224161. 

EAR EAST 

Bangkok 390-96-57. 

Hang Kona 5-420906. 
Maifla: 817 07 49. 

Seoul: 725 87 73. 
Stogqpare: 222-2735. 
Tahvrni: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925 

AUSTRALIA 

Sydney: 929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 690 8233. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

INTERCOM* EUROPE 
PRESOTS 

FOR IMMEDIATE DGUVBff 
THE BST CARS FROM EUROPE 

TAX FREE MERCEDES BBC, 
PORSCHE, FE3RARI, ELM.W. eh 



Utitco Bedn en Sendee * GmbH 
Lara>Han ax I WJuiwimjik 
J utfmittlmM 22 
6000 Fronkfut am Mon 1 
Germany 

Tek 0611-390061 
Teleii 414561 


ADVERTISING PJL. raqurrad far 
Groton Direclar, London agency. 
CVs to Fereith Shard. SSCmtatos. 


IWT. 63 Long Acre, London WQ Conversion. Shipping 8 Imp orting 

JUST GIVE US A CALL, 

5523 30 78 Frarce. nnro^i^n'euTnr 

YOUNG MAN hotfng dnwig Eoenie, INTERCORP HJROPE 

reeks chauffeur portion, 5 years ex- High Performance A trto m obfl M 
pawnee. Prepared to do any tand of 54 Booten d aan. Mo ral 

work. GJ OT 5343 Pans. Ho&rtd 

ALWAYS AVAHASIE LONDON arty Xtk *°> <a4500S5 - T,to * 99331 

babymurctan & 1st ctass doriy mmdt 

Cdl Sfearte Bureau. Lmlan: 730 

I 8122/5142. UCEA4P. AGY. ..me# ssnrr^m « 


AUTOMOBILES 


„ — rraror cm. e n erested ut popular 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


brcerdi, new modeb, Reese "nfe Ban 
17042, Mr. £ Kdsoros. 54210 Thena- 
taniki. Greece 


ny you fax pr^duclive nrow ic txjnt + 

foflow-ap worV after voo1bov«l Telex: W 1OND0N 

51624 WEMBE HX Yow Bnaf. We wfl •7«fay24houroreBS*&oniworphanij 

men 8. erirmriB. • Ful support tannoK irtfadng: 

TAX SERVICES • 

BNCH PBBOPtAL TAj T c£ia3E vui tfi * wM«S KISScSSL 
Iffl raws. To adet lfa boorirtatid HOTbe Stand faSSSS&A 


AU RAM OR HOUSBCSm to core 

far 2 year aid A 5 yea rid ur NYC: CADRJAC DC VBJ£ i98G WD Very 


own funny room; convenfent Upper dean, chcxjfW driven since new, 
fast Side Morirdton locriron. Rcriy rasoroaofferlB £4jXX). . bari ngs riser 
to Box 4 0242, IHT. 63 Long Acre, 7pm: Tel: Laxton 5S 0 7399 | 

lotrion WC2E 9JH. MB10B500SEC 

RAMS SPEAKING doyiuw hen, Tel 772 3< 72. 

SZ7S£J;.SS8\Zt Airro SHI 

ewe to Box 1674, Herrid Tribune. 

92521 Newfly Cedex. Franca t B A kl e 

DOMESTIC THE CAR 5F 

POSITIONS WANTED 5PEOAL! 

AREYOUIOpnWSFORhctedwork- 
mgjwnes*, Engtah reupfe. ewMOi. 

bSSwGCIOGNE 

NANNY/GOVB9CSS AGS} 39 
very capable in crettove educrirgn. 

porting, slory wnting etc ktims sh3- MONT ^~: 

ttien. Free now. Fry Srff CcvrwParti, WOR 

7 Moh ». Aldershot. Haiti U*L Tel: UtB * ta 05 10 b 

022315369 UK licenced 


den, C700 per math, 01-985 1068. 
HOLLAND 


GON19l9t (netv Opera): Cbstbus- 
ten to 300 aties worldiwdo - Air/Sca DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE S.V. 
Gd OrarSe 281 1881 Pars- Can too Deluxe rentals. Vrieriosstr. 174 

Amsterdarr. 020421234 w 623252. 

REAL ESTATE =r- 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES Wtan in Ron* 

CANNB ■farte Crorsatte'. In hgh RALACO ' At VHAflR O 

esra teattraiss? 

mom opening onto 2 targe bate- Wrtr. ju, 4 
ml FI 6I0J3KL SSI. 47 La ucaette. HJiB* WetiL 

06400 Cannes. Td- P31 3819.19. - 


h ave T Q ga n rf profeggi dbflemp- 

men! experienre^wf^'S^ , ^w- 
eomod m motk e ting to _ Foreign 
Goverwnert egtnc ks. fa/ e utan d b 
end Driiiufors. EuropNnAiwicon 


taduiry toasted re the Sun Brit. 712520 DfGOSD 
atoM shed 3 yea rs, saris capita l I to to - RDUCtARY BANKING on lerse eoL 
mrraJT'liirtY tafe icfac d toons. The only con tun- 

”° u g h - gf S ?!^5g "f; od bank wdh e repneentairve affia 

mum wratiwuil of 550.000. Substortrol m lordon moaka v m the service. 


F55 died; to Cotmi Soxcfa 102 Bd 
Bofeprofies, 75017 fata. 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


Tab 01 8364918 Tic 24973 


■tnniov pit sikjip TmweoaS iw« WTl MARKETING MANAGB. 1 Jpeoafew in ft 

haveTO^ripraW^Interrto 


with empta equity pt oteet p n. 

Write in earfsfence la 
Bex 1633, Herdd Tribune. 
92521 Merrily Cedex, Franca 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 


m London jpeadsTW m the service. 
Arab Oversea Barf & Trad [WIJ 
Ud. 28 Sack Pnnce Ed. London SET* 
Tri 735 6171 


YOUR LONDON OFFICE 
□f fhtf 

RB3UKE HNANOAU.Y STRONG °^A M DCEOftTVE CBORE 
European- Amencar- or Midde Got. toritametHiw row of sarvicn 
emfendmorfem&rgbonkorlendkta W. 

s ymfcnt ei who ore rtwested n 6- (01f 439 6288 Tbc 261426 


r»« 1 ogS ,J pw , Snfd 1 pri2 3 52 n ai - 

■nxaance or anme n ro mtaarv noun ™e«te / ln« / raflux. 


|»» *«rf expniwnce OTconus- t w 
renr record of /esubs.cati be effective- | rrwuttewiai raa Wft w m 


BUSINESS SERVICES 
YOUR OPKE W NEW YORK, fifth 

An. oldroB and / or dtortei cb wur 
USA office. Mai, pto™ cafe reamed 
& rorwaded. New Tori: Utd Service, 
210 fifth Ave, NYC 1001C. 


■nuance or pnme promi Muty note* ' • m™ r manox. 

esgucroieeei mother cosh noguar- 

3wS^*;3S , < SSSSS offices for rent 

partdppton jul Currenae* re- MM^ OWE SPACE cnofabie n 


V us^ far farther enqur- ol P®*£ LUTT1 trcrafctm your enmnef. 

rm Para 293.1278. “I «!.* jdertafe tart faora. French- 1 


nev Porta 293.1278. 

ITALIAN/ B4QSL Itftrprria J 
tap secret cta or qpc e . Setting en 
mert writ o ILSA cwnppnv pr 


mertwtfho USA «xnp™ or oftt- TO SSL croducts to import A (faint 

ria.Rgwne on request. Write to Jte to the Eurooeen market*, Send aw . F ° tl * 

GOSCCWSK!. V<a imwnafe S?. £ oG irioimatidn to- Mi Ba* 2105, Fne- PAWS 1EODOCAL ' COMHHEK3AL 


Englidi 8 vieewenalcmdon 6364441 
EXPBBB40S TRANSLATOR. Sated. 

prot ki ent senrxz, French & Germcn 

to Enririr. TeL Pwe 341-35 !6. 


qurred: USS - 5ww Fima or German 
Mata. All repkm vril be treated m 
strict confidence. Box 40253, 1 H.T„ 63 
Lonp Acrn, tendon. WOE 9JK 

AUS1RAUAN KEGUTBSD Compary 
reqrarei USS25 nsBon far raeknbpn 
of very vnbta buMng props an the 
grid coast of Autnfia beach land 


My furnahed roomi wHh te 
rawphon, dorugu. Canto 
M*w474J71 1 a 475-9060. 


rpm: lab Lcrdon auu / jw WGerm tri 

MBK3B 500 SEC 1983. new rend- Womrelton ( 
Non, Tri 772 34 72. 


NBW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE. BMW. EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

for MU4GDM7F drirvery 

best ssnncE 

Fa ririppina i ne u rarce. bond, 
rfmraScn to UJLA. 

RUTE INC. 

Taunuerr. 52. 6000 Frarikfart. 

W Germ, tri ffl 6M32351. Itx 411559 


by phene or Htax. 


AUTO SHIPPING 

TRANSCAR 

THECAKSHPNNG 

SKOMBT5 

as Q)sao3 04 


Ptacse contact: «Q21 7, LH.T 
Aere, London, WOE 9JH. 


AGENT'S WORLD WHJE 
[earn if to US to fating it so you 


2w5S? cits’ t h£ "WAYS AVABABU * AU PJURS, AUTOS TAX FREE 

n 1 »475.5Q60 eradron S aonry, mum i nripers A ait ■ — 


TAX TWEE CARS 
P.CT. 

Largeri Showroom 8 Inventory 
Afl mrices, al models, brand new 

Tlv 35546 fHCART 8 
Apply fw on colour asabgoe 
USS5 catfi 


(6i7H 43063 MEKB9GS500SL 

!lFirf5 706t Sard Red 568 ■ Lerihw Btot* 271 My 
13) 931 7605 tooded ■ UjSM km. from 5/83, 

13215 3183 USS27JOO. . , _ 

l3 866 6681 LWnirirt Bfae 904 - Leotner Getne 275, 
VTOE Ufa noried - 27.000 km., from 5/83. 
) it so you USi2Jfl» . 

A eto hou* Sue d CtehH 
- — BochumwSfr 103. 4350 Ee riJ mflb M *" 
FREE Tel 023*1/7004 T* 829957 AKSD 


OFHCES FOR SALE 


broncho ri 1st etan hvo-m domett TRANSMUNCI SBG8JM. 21 Senai- 
Ufa, ’’roridwrde. Cod Sbaie Smau, reboon. B-224) Zsxnet Antwerp. Tek 
Lortaon^TM 81^2^SU2 p4 hours) U-| 03-384.10^4 Tb 3230^ Trotsm 8 fn 
CfeW\AG«. Tbt J9504T 


03-3841054 Tlx 32303 Tratsm 8 fn 
ritodfc Mercedes. BMW. A5Q. { 


36100 VwnK.lh.fa. 


rindrsti 15. 0-6CCU Frcnkfurt-'M. 


mtei prating.' bandanrig. 306 06 64 


burhferg 8 rfcvrioprwBnt p e m r rt t go 
on hafl. rmoart requrea far 5 yrai 
onl r, nn to rtcn very poBafata. Bax 
40252, LH.'C 63 Long Acre. Laxton 
WCE9JK 


buMteB based m MorteCariaL IBIGUSH BUflB VALET, vary pro- 1 M B'? MBOT B 


Maxaigne affen you 
Be* oreanmsiSswi. te 

M.C 98000 • Monte Cato. Tri 
R63JJ7- Tti< 47D 022 


ML TAX HR 

favlja Tet 9M 
iMHSTut 


7^9"^igsfm Tri?ga j 

hnt&Sr B ^ m ' 5 -rnfatarioy ^ 


PAGE 11 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


- 1 - 

-Till - 


insist (xi a prison tens, the former 
singer’s attorney said. Smith, 37, 
who ended her 22-month fight 
agains t extradition from Canaria 
and returned to Los Angdes to 
stand trial, was indicted in 1983 on 
charges including murder. She re- 
turned to California after agreeing 
to plead guilty to involuntary man- 
slaughter, instead of murder, in the 
1982 death of the comedian from 
an overdose of cocaine and heroin. 
Her arraignment was postponed 
until Jan. 28 to give her lawyer time 
to study the indictment. Smith re- 
mained in custody while attempt- 
ing to raise the money to posture 
150,000 bail. 

□ 

Kelly Aim Hu, 16, of Honolulu, 
didn't stop crying for an hoar after 
she was crowned Miss Teen USA 
1985 in Miami. She told photogra- 
phers: “rm going to keep crying 
Tor a whole year. Tm just so hap- 
py."Hu won a 1985 spoils car as 
part of $100,000 in cash and prizes. 


The actress Carrie Nye, wife of 
television personality Dick Cared, 
chased down a mugger who 
snatched her purse in New York, 
but the man punched her in the 
face and fled by car, police said. 
The purse contained $15, she told 
police. Nye refused medical treat- 
ment after tire incident She had 
arrived at her Manhattan apart- 
ment building and was in the lobby 
trying to find her keys when a man 
approached from behind, police 
said The man knocked her to tire 
ground, grabbed her pocketbook 
and ran. Nye chased the mugger for 
a block, but he turned andstnick 
her in the face before jumping into 
a waiting car. a police spokesman 
said. 

□ 

Prime Minister Dsnid Lange of 
New Zealan d will confront the 
U. S. religious leader Jerry Fahrel 
in a debate March 1 at Oxford 
University on the morality of nu- 
clear weapons, it was announced 
Wednesday. The 160-year-old Ox- 
fond Union, one of the world’s fore- 
most debating societies, said the 
two men would debate a motion 
“that the Western nuclear alliance 
is morally indefensible." The 60- 
minute debate will end with a vote 
on the motion by the audience of 
a boat 800 students, said an Oxford 
Union spokesman, Gareth Penny. 



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