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No. 31.704 


The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 

Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 

The Hague and Marseille 



INTERNATIONAL 



WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 16 


Published With The New York Times and Tbe Washington Post 



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Thatcher Rules 
No Concession 
On Coal Dispute 

By Michael Getler 

Washington Petr Serna 

LONDON — Amid signs that 
Britain’s 10-month coalminers’ 
strike is crumbling Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher said Thursday 
that she would not yield on the 
crucial point of the dispute, despite 
pledges by the miners' union that it 
would now negotiate without pre- 
conditions. 

Mrs. Thatcher’s defense of her 
Conservative government’s posi- 
tion came at a time when the strike 
appeared to be moving into a cli- 
mactic phase, and when the fate of 
possible new negotiations to end 
the bitter and frequently violent 
strike hung in the balance. 

In a stormy debate in Parlia- 
ment, Mrs. Thatcher said the final 
decision on whether to shut down 
coal pits that were “uneconomic," 
meaning that they could only pro- 
duce coal at a big loss, ‘‘must rest 
with the management of tbe Na- 
tional Coal Board," the organiza- 
tion that nms Britain’s national- 
ized coal mines. 

The leader of the National 
Union of Mmeworkers, Arthur 
Scargdl has demanded from the 
outset of the stoppage that none of 
Britain’s I7S coal pits should be 
closed unless they are exhausted of 
coal or are unsafe. 

Mr. ScargiH said Thursday that 
his union was ready to start negoti- 
ations without preconditions as 
agreed to late last week in informal 
talks with coal board members. 

Uneolf a would-be peace plan was 
discussed. 

But later, the coal board, in a 
move that stunned the union, de- 
manded that the onion put in writ- 
ing whether it was prepared “to 

with uneconomic capacity in the 
coal industry.’* 

Union cfficijls claimed they- 
were ready to negotiate “every- 
thing" and viewed the demand as 
an effort to sabotage the chances 
for new negotiations. 

In the House of Commons. Ned 
Kinnock, the leader of the opposi- 
tion Labor Party, said he sensed 
that the new demand bore the 
“dirty fingerprints" of Mrs. 
Thatcher. The coal board, which 
tends to be more cantiliaiory than 
the government, is supposed to be 
independent of direct government 
control in tbe dispute, but it is clear 
that the government plays a role. 

Although both sides appeared to 

(Continued on Plage 2, CoL 5) 



EPA Gtes 

Chemical 

Leaks 

Gas That Caused 


Ariel Sharon 


Sharon Loses 
UbelCaseas 
Jurors Find 
No Malice 


By John Doyle 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Arid Sharon 
lost his $50-million libel suit 
against Time Inc. on Thursday 
when a federal jury ruled that Time 
magazine did not knowingly or 

A former official testified die 
CIA ‘sold out' to General West- 
moreland in Vietnam. Page 3. 

recklessly publish a false story link- 
ing the former Israeli defens e min- 
ister to the 1982 Beirut massacre of 
P alestinians. 

. The jury issued its finding after 
11 days of deliberations. Earlier, 
the jurors ruled (hat the Time arti- 
cle was defamatory and that it was 


Escaped in US. 

By Philip Shabecoff 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Methyl iso- 
cyanate, tbe chemical that killed 
more (Han 2,000 people in India, 
was accidentally leaked 28 times in 
tbe last five years at a Union Car- 
bide plant in West Virginia, (he 
Enviro nmen tal Protection Agency 
has reported. 

The report Wednesday, based on 
an inspection last month of the 
plant and its records, attributed the 
releases to “equipment failure" and 
“human errors." 

The report said more informa- 
tion was being sought to determine 
if any of tbe methyl isocyanate es- 
caped into the surrounding envi- 
ronment Tbe plant, in Institute, 
West Virginia, is near Charleston, 
tbe state capital. 

The report did not indicate 
whether the leaks affected the 
health of plant workers or others 
living in the vicinity. But the inves- 
tigation found no evidence of inju- 
ry from the leaks, according to the 
deputy director of the agency’s re- 
gional office in Philadelphia, which 
prepared the report. 

The official, Stanley L Las- 
kowski, said Wednesday that the 
amounts released were very small 
compared with those that poured 
into the air Dec. 3 from a sister 
plant in Bhopal. India. There is no 
official estimate yet of how much 
methyl isocyanate gas leaked from 
a storage tank in tbe Indian plant. 



The N«w York To 


Union Carbide's chemical plant at Institute, West Virginia, employs 1,400 workers. 


but Mr. Laskowski said it was be- 
lieved to have been thousands of 
pounds. 

The report on the West Virginia 
plant said the leaks, which occurred 
from 1980 through 1984, ranged in 
size from less than a pound to 840 
pounds (380 kilograms). Some of 
the releases were in the form of 
liquids and others in gases, the re- 
port said. 

An agency spokesman said that 
if further investigation found the 
chemical escaped from the confines 
of the plant, the agency would con- 
sider asking for a criminal investi- 
gation of the company on the 
ground that it apparently failed to 
report tbe releases. 

Under the Comprehensive Envi- 
ronmental Response, Compensa- 
tion and Liability Act, governing 
hazardous substances, companies 
are required to report leaks of a 


pound or more of specified chemi- 
cals. including methyl isocyanate, 
if they are released into the “envi- 
ronment." 

Thomas Sprick. a Union Carbide 
spokesman at the company's head- 
quarters in Danbury, Connecticut, 
said company officials had not yet 
seen the report on the Institute 
plant and could not comment on it 

The environmental agency's re- 
gional office said it was also re- 
viewing spills of toluene, a solvent 
that can cause neurological disor- 
ders, from tbe Union Carbide plant 
into the Kanawha River last month 
and this month. It said tbe compa- 
ny failed to notify the agency 
promptly of the toluene spill 

■ Wanting of Danger 

Union Carbide knew of the pos- 
sibility of a “runaway reaction’ of 
methyl isocyanate at its Institute 



sSaSs S Filipino Judge Orders Arrest of Yer Israeli Talks 

^ nday >» 0^2^ U1 AOUUM) C^SC ^ 1^)0000 

On Pullout 
Break Down 


While the jury did not find actual 
malice by Time, tbe foreman, Rich- 
ard Peter Zug, read a statement 
that be said the jurors bad unani- 
motisly..'" : !Jrtpd. upon. It said the 
jurors believed that certain Time 
employees, -especially a Jerusalem 
correspondent, David Halevy, had 
acted .“negligently and even care- 
lessly.’’ 

Mr. Halevy was not in the court- 
room. Mr. Sharon and his wife 
were expressionless when the ver- 
dict was read. 

Later, cm the steps of the court- 
house, Mr. Sharon said: “I fed we 
have achieved what brought us 
here; and I accept iL It was a very 
long and hard struggle and it was 
worth iL I came here to prove that 
Time magazine lied. We were able 

(Contiimed oa Page 2, CoL 5) 


By Steve Lohr 

Sew fork 7 imes Service 


MANILA — A judge ordered 
the arrest Thursday of the chief of 
the Philippines armed forces and 
25 other persons on charges of con- 
spiring to murder Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr., a leading opposition 
figure. 

ThemDiiaiy chief of staff is Gen- 
eral Fabian C Ver. a lifelong friend 
and former chauffeur of President 
Ferdinand E Marcos. This has fu- 
eled public concern about tbe inde- 
pendence of tbe government judi- 
cial system in the politically 
sensitive case, for which formal 
charges were made Wednesday. 


In announcing tbe arrest war- 
rants, Judge Manuel Pimaran, 
head of the three-judge special 
court that will try the case, pledged 
impartiality. 

“The law has no sex, no relatives, 
no political color." he said. “I am 
very confident that we can dispense 
justice." 

Judge Pamaran, who is known 
for his stiff sentencing in lower 
courts, said that the case would be 
tried continuously, with daily ses- 
sions planned.’ Such rigorous 
scheduling is unusual in the Philip- 
pines, where cases often drag on for 
years. The judged declined to pre- 
dict how long it would take to try 




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Britain’s Union Barons Have Lost Their Empire 


i. 

9 y 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Tima Serna 

LONDON — There used to be 
something almost imperial about 
the British labor unions. The 
union barons sal confidently at 
prime ministers’ elbows, regular- 


Enrope’s Unions: 

A Time of Trial 

Third o f three articles. 

ly darting from their limousines 
into lODowmng Street for late- 
night meetings to discuss some 
national cogs os* other, dispens- 
ing advice and not infrequently 
issuing orders. 

But the days of the extraparlia- 
mentary labor power brokers, 
and of those “beer and sand- 
wiches" conferences, as the Brit- 
ish call them, may well be gone 
forever. 

“The facts, though 
able, are undeniable,’ 1 sate 
Hattersley, the Labor Part) 
deputy leader, as he reviewed 

situation of unions in Britain and 
elsewhere in Western Europe. 
“The world has changed, and 
with it tbe economic culture, 
based on mass-production fac- 
tories, in which the unions 
thrived." 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher no longer seeks the 
union leaden* counsel, 
she saw to it that two leaders ■ 
tried to work with her, Frank 
Chappie and Leu Murray, were 
given peerages in the New Year's 
Honors List 

Mrs. Thatcher has won a series 
of changes that make it harder tO 
maintain a dosed shop, harder to 
win authority for a strike, easier 
to remove union-officials and eas- 
ier to move through the courts to 
slop unlawful acts such as sec- 
ondary boycotts. 

"There has never been a tune 
when the views of trade unions 
have been less noticed, let alone 
heeded," Mr. Hattersley said. 
“And seldom have track unions 



"The world has 
changed, and with it 
the economic culture 
... in which the 
unions thrived.” 


Comoro Proa 

Roy Hattersley 



had less clout on the shop floor. 
Tea years ago, a union official 
told management, The union 
won’t have that,* and the manage- 
ment backed off. Now tbe man- 
agement says, ‘So whaiT ” 

Asked whether the Thatcher 
government was hostile to 
iminnfi, Thomas King, the em- 
ployment minister, said: “Cer- 
tainly to the political ambitions 
of trade unions. Most anion 
members don’t want their unions 
to mess about in politics, anyway; 
they want better wages and con- 
ditions at work/ 


public conviction that big wage 
increases and huge social spend- 
ing programs need to be reined in 
abiL 

Two conflicting strategic op- 
tions are under discussion among 
British union leaders. On the left, 
there is constant talk about 
“workers with their hands on the 
levers of society" especially the 
handful of workers in power-gen- 
eration stations, who could pre- 
sumably bring the country to a 
halt if they walked out 

But the moderates respond, 
first, that it is foolish to tie every 



where, 

the European Ti 
tnle in Brussels said, “Unions ev- 
erywhere are suffering, and in my 
view, this is not a short-term 
problem that we’re facing” 
What, then, can tbe unions do 
to regain power? The short-term 
answer, some officials say, is to 
put leftist governments back into 
power. But opinion polls suggest 
rhai governments of both left and 
right, ns different as those of Olof 
Palme in Sweden and Ruud Lub- 
bers in the Netherlands, will be 
obliged, if they want to stay in 
office, to continue to respond to a 


trial muscle would only alienate 
the mass of ihe electorate. It is far 
more important, a leading mod- 
erate said, to “win the war of 
ideas" than to win a few key 
strikes. 

“You establish an intellectual 
climate of sympathy," Mr. Hat- 
tersley said. “That is how you win 
big battles in this country- We 
have to convince people ail over 
again that unbridled individual- 
ism is not the same as freedom." 

Jack Jones, who retired several 
years ago as the head of Britain s 


biggest union, the Transport and 
General Workers, blames the 
unions themselves, as well as Mrs. 
Thatcher and mass unemploy- 
ment. for (he fix they find them- 
selves in. 

The unions “overreached 
themselves in 1979," he said, 
causing the downfall of the last 
Labor government, and since 
then have given their members 
“no sense of a policy being devel- 
oped that could win the support 
erf a majority of the public. 

He said be would advocate a 
limited set of goals and campaign 
hard for them: greater public ex- 
penditure to create jobs, sane 
program to respond to Mrs. 
Thatcher’s popular policy of sell- 
ing public housing to occupants 
and a revitalization of the Na- 
tional Health Service. 

He added that uniats would 
have to work much harder to or- 
ganize public-sector workers and 
do a much better job of keeping 
in touch with the political and 
economic views of their rank- 
and-file members. By implica- 
tion, he was urging unions to 
avoid involving themselves too 
dearly with noneconomic issues 
such as nuclear disarmament. 

“The whole thing has gone 
wrong," be said. “You can’t tell 
people what to think, and you 
can’t expect people to join trade 
unions out of habit. They have no 
reason to join and stay active un- 
less it is to their own advantage." 

Unions have hired poD -takers 
to find out what their members 
want, have cut bade their over- 
head costs in an effort to demon- 
strate efficiency and concern for 
their members’ money and have 
begun to contemplate no-strike 
agreements in return for better 
wages and benefits. 

Among tbe most innovative of 
the new breed of British unionists 
is Eric Hammond, head of the 
Electrical Electronic, Telecom- 
munication and Plumbing 
Union. Controversial among his 
peers —he was jeered as a “fas- 
cist" at more than one conference 
last year — he says he is con- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


the case, but he said it should take 

IcSs chan Lye*. 

The duration of the trial could be 
of significance in determining the 
effect of the Aquino case on the 
Philippine military. Since he was 
named in October by a citizens 
board as being involved in a plot to 
kill Mr. Aquino, General ver has 
been on a leave of absence. In tbe 
indictments handed down Wednes- 
day, government prosecutors con- 
firmed the findings of the citizens 
panel. 

The acting chief of staff is Gen- 
eral Fidd V. Ramos, a 56-year-old 
West Point graduate. Since taking 
over. General Ramos has instituted 
some reforms, such as dealing 
harshly with soldiers found guilty 
of mistreating civilians. 

General Ver. 65. seems to face a 
lengthy trial which would make it 
unlikely that he would return to 
head the mdiary. Yet Judge Pa - 
maran confirmed Thursday that 
any of the accused men could ask 
for a separate trial. 

It is possible that General Ver 
and a few of the other senior offi- 
cers charged could be tried sepa- 
rately and before the others in seek- 
ing a speedy acquittal, lawyers say. 
“If they are allowed to go that 
route, then there is a chance that 
Ver could be brought back," a for- 
eign diplomat said. 

Such a move would almost cer- 
tainly be met by large public pro- 
tests. opposition politicians say. On 
Thursday, opposition groups de- 
manded the dismissal from the mil- 
itary of General Ver and Major 
General Prosper o A. Olivas, chief 
of the Philippine constabulary for 
metropolitan Manila, tbe two most 
senior officers accused. 

Rene Espina. secretary general 
of the United Nationalist Demo- 
cratic Organization, the largest 
grouping of opposition parties, said 
that the dismissal of the pair would 
be the appropriate action under the 
circumstances and would not be 
“in any way prejudging ihe guilt or 
innocence of the accused.” 

Mr. Marcos set up the special 
three-judge court in June 1978, 
during martial law. Tbe court was 
established to try government offi- 
cials accused of misdeeds. 

Mr. Aquino was assassinated on 
Aug. 21, 1983. at the Manila inter- 
national airporu when he returned 
after spending three years in the 
United States. The military assert- 
ed that he was killed by a lone 
gunman. Rolando G a l m a n , who 
was then shot to death by soldiers 
beside Mr. Aquino. 

The government prosecutors 
charged 25 military men and one 
ci vilian with two counts of murder, 
one being Mr . Aquino and the oth- 
er Mr. Galman. 

General Ver. General Olivas and 
six others were charged as accesso- 
ries, the least of three levels erf cul- 
pability. The civilian w as accused 
as an accomplice. Brigadier Gener- 
al Luther Custodio, former head of 
the Aviation Security Command, 
and 16 other military personnel 
were indicted as principals, mean- 
ing those directly involved in the 
conspiracy. 


Reuters 

NAQOURA, Lebanon — Leba- 
non and Israel broke off their talks 
Thursday on coordinating tbe first 
stage of the Israeli withdrawal from 
southern Lebanon without setting 
a dale for a new meeting. 

The announcement was made in 
a joint communique after Israel 
had accused Lebanon of taking a 
“totally unrealistic" attitude at the 
14th round erf the negotiations. The 
statement said: “The delegations 
maintained their earlier positions 
and agreed to leave open the date 
of the next meeting.” 

“It means they agreed, in polite 
terms, not to meet again," a confer- 
ence source said. He said the dele- 
gations would keep in touch with 
United Nations mediators and 
would set a date fa further lafr* 
only if there were new develop- 
ments. 

The talks at the southern Leba- 
nese border village of Naqouia, 
which began Nov. 8, were to deter- 
mine measures to police the south 
after Israel ends its occupation. Ne- 
gotiations repeatedly have been 
deadlocked over disputes about the 
possible roles of die Lebanese 
Army, tbe UN peacekeeping troops 
and a pro-Israeli militia 

An Israeli spokesman. Colonel 
Yooa Gazit, said after Thursday 
morning’s session that Lebanon 
had refused to discuss an Israeli 
hand-over of the Sidon area to tbe 
Lebanese Army or the UN Interim 
Force in Lebanon, known as UNI- 
F1L. 

Tbe head of the Lebanese dele- 
gation, Brigadier General Moham- 
med Hay, said Lebanon would be 
ready to ask the UN fa a wider 
deployment of UN1FIL, from its 
positions further south, only if Isra- 
el submitted a full timetable fa a 
total withdrawal from Lebanon. 
He called Israel's plans fa a three- 
stage pullout “a unilateral decision 
erf redeployment, not withdrawaL” 

His Israeli counterpart, Briga- 
dier General Amos GOboa, said 
Israel would issue no timetable be- 
yond its Feb. 18 deadline fa leav- 
ing the Sidon area, but that Israel 
was sincere in its intention to pull 
back to the border. 

Referring to Sidon, Colonel Ga- 
zit said: “We i nvited the Lebanese 
Army and UNIFIL to eater the 
territory in an orderly fashion and 
to take responsibility for the area 
we are about to evacuate the min- 
ute we leave iL 

“They simply and totally ignored 
the issue and reiterated the hard- 
line positions they expressed in the 
past. It is just unbelievable, just 
totally unrealistic.” 

Lebanese security sources in Si- 
don said Thursday that Israeli 
troops fought a gun battle with 
masked Palestinians near the Ain el 
Heltveh refugee camp outside the 
city, killing a man. 

Masked gunmen have been pa- 
trolling the camp at night since 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 


Reagan Claims 
Nicaragua Poses 
A ’New Danger’ 


plant less than three months before 
the Bhopal disaster, according to 
an internal memo released Thurs- 
day. 

Tbe mono, prepared by a Union 
Carbide safety team and received 
by the manag er of the Institute 
plant SepL 19. warned of two “ma- 
jor" concerns about toxic chemi- 

(Continned on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, increasing pres- 
sure at Congress to renew U.S. aid 
to Nicaraguan rebels, charged 
Thursday that Iran had joined Lib- 
ya, ihe Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization and the Soviet bloc in sup- 
porting Nicaragua's leftist 
government in a campaign of 
armed subversion in Central Amer- 
ica. 

In an address to about 60 legisla- 
tors from other nations of the 
Western Hemisphere, mostly Latin 
American. Mr. Reagan sud the 
“subversion we’re talking about vi- 
olates international law." 

He called U.S. support for Nica- 
raguan guerrillas “self-defense." 

“Sandinistas have been attack- 
ing their neighbors since August 
1979,’’ Mr. Reagan said. 

He also condemned what he 
called ' a “concerted and well-fi- 
nanced effort" by the Soviet bloc 
and Cuba to seize power in Central 
America. 

It was the first time President 
Reagan has claimed that Iran was 
supporting the Sondinist govern- 
ment in Nicaragua. 

Hie comments came a day after 
Senator Richard G. Lugar, the new 
chairman of the Senate Foreign Re- 
lations Committee, said that Con- 
gress would probably deny further 
aid to the guerrillas fighting Nica- 
ragua’s govemmenL 

Mr. Lugar, a Republican of Indi- 
ana who had supported the aid, 
said Wednesday that the program 
was no longer “a viable proposi- 
tion." 

Senator Lugar’s comments was 
the latest signal to tbe Reagan ad- 
ministration from Republican and 
Democratic lawmakers (hat the ex- 
pected request fa new aid for the 
N icaraguan rebels faced difficult, if 
not insurmountable, obstacles in 
the 99th Congress. 

President Reagan, in his speech, 
said: “A new danger we see in Cen- 
tral America is the support being 
given to the Sandinistas by Colond 
Qadhafi’s Libya, ihe PLO. and 
most recently, the Ayatollah Kho- 
meini’s Iran.” 

Wanting of subversion in Cen- 
tral America, he said the Organiza- 
tion of American States “in tbe 
past has enacted sanctions against 
Cuba fa such aggression." 

“Countering this by supporting 
Nicaraguan freedom fighters is es- 
sentially acting in self-defense and 
is certainly consistent with the 
United Nations and OAS charter 
provisions for individual and col- 
lective security." he said. 

Radio Havana said Thursday 
that Prime Minister Mir Hussein 
Moussavi of Iran held talks 
Wednesday in Cuba with President 
Fidd Castro before traveling to 
Nicaragua. 

In Managua, the Nicaraguan 
government said Thursday that the 
Iranian official had met with Vice 
President Sergio Ramirez Mer- 
cado, who has visited Iran. 

Wednesday’s issue of the pro- 
Sandinist newspaper, Nuevo 
Diario, said the purpose of the visit 
was “to strengthen the bonds of 
friendship between the two peo- 
ples.” 

The official Iranian press agency 
said Iran maintained ties with Nic- 
aragua “due to their common anti- 
imperialist position.” 

On Wednesday, President Rea- 
gan said the United States must 
continue supporting anti-govern- 
ment rebels in Nicaragua, but that 
it would be very difficult to provide 
money openly because that could 
be “considered acts of war." 

Tbe White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes. was asked Thurs- 
day about Mr. Lugar’s comment 
that Congress would turn down ad- 
ditional seem aid for the rebels. 

“We intend to ask for full fund- 


EYSIDE 


■Tbe White House resolved 
objections to increasing mili- 
tary aid for Israel Page 2. 

■ James A Baker 3d said he 
viewed the proposal fa a U-S. 
tax overhaul as only a si 

point. 


taiting 

’fee 3. 


WEEKEND 

■ David Putinam ponders the 

role of tbe film producer. Mary 
Bhime reports. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Exxon Corjx, the world's big- 
gest industrial company, says 
fourth-quarter profits fdl 113 
percent. 


TOMORROW 

U.S. nonprofit organizations 
are fighting cutbacks in govern- 
ment grants and federal tax 
proposals with a nationwide 
lobbying campaign. 


ing for the entire Central American 
program,” Mr. Speakes replied. 
“We will just have to see bow the 
legislative ball game goes.” 

Congress imposed a ban on addi- 
tional secret aid to Nicaragua last 
October, until Feb. 28. Several law- 
maker, including Senator David 
Durenbetger, a Minnesota Repub- 
lican who is chairman of the Senate 
intelligence committee, have said 
the United States should fund tbe 
rebels openly. 

The administration has never of-. 
EknaHy acknowledged that it is fi- 
pancmg arebel face trying to over- 
throw a government with which 
Washington maintains diplomatic 
relations. The administration has 
argued that its efforts have been 
directed not at overthrowing tbe 
Sandinis ts but at preventing Nica- 
ragua from exporting revolution to 
El Salvador and other Central 
American nations. 

In The Hague, the International 
Court of Justice said Thursday it 
would ignore the U.S. withdrawal 
from a suit filed by Nicaragua and 
will continue hearing Managua’s 
complaints that the United States 
covertly supported the rebels. 

Taslim Elias, the presiding judge, 
said the court would give Nicara- 
gua until April 30 to present its 
case. The United Stales has until 
May 31 to present its defense. 

The United States, citing nation- 
al security concerns, has an- 
nounced it will boycott court pro- 
ceedings on the case. It has accused 

the Ranrimistg of “ misusing (he 

court fa political purposes.” 

(UP I, AP. NYT % WP) 



Walter Reder 


Italy Releases 
ExrSS Major 
To Austria 


Reuters 

VIENNA — Walter Reder. a 
former SS major and the last Nazi 
war criminal held in Italy, flew to 
Austria on Thursday after being 
released from prison in the town of 
Gaeta. His sentence fa war crimes, 
imposed by an I talian military tri- 
bunal, was due to end in July. 

An Austrian Defense Ministry 
spokesman said that Defense Min- 
ister Friedhdm Frischenschlager 
met Mr. Reder, 69, an Austrian 
citizen, on arrival at a military air- 
field near Graz. The Austrian news 
icy, APA, said that Mr. Fris- 
• had accompanied Mr. 
Reder to Baden, a small spa town 
south of Vienna. 

[The news that Mr. Frischensch- 
lager had met Mr. Reder became 
known as 200 Jewish leaders from 
40 countries converged in Vienna 
to attend a three-day meeting of the 
Governing Board of the World 
Jewish Congress, United Press In- 
ternational repented. 

[At a press conference, Mr. Fris- 
chenschlager said his presence in 
Graz was a matter of logistics and 
was not to be confused with an 
official reception. He said Foreign 
Minister Leopold Gratz informed 
him Wednesday of the expected 
arrival and requested that he take 
care of the transportation.] 

Mr. Reder was convicted of re- 
sponsibility fa the killing by Nazi 
troops under his command of 
abort 600 civilians in Marzabouo, 
northern Italy, in September 1944. 
He had been imprisoned in Italy 
since 1931. 

Italian authorities gave no expla- 
nation of why Mr. Reder, who is in 
poor health, was released early. A 
statement Thursday from the office 
of Prime Minister Bet lino Craxi in 
Rome said the Austrian govern- 
ment had pledged to continue to 
treat Mr. Reder as a condemned 
man who had been granted provi- 
sional liberty, but did not elabo- 
rate. 

The Marzabotto town council 
condemned the release, saying that 
it “did not take account of the 
wishes of the relatives of the vic- 

(Centimed on Page 2, CoL 1) 






t 


) 

I 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1985 



[r 

[• 







U.S. to Raise Request 
For Israeli Military Aid 
To $1.9 Billion lor ’86 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON —Hie Reagan 
administration has resolved objec- 
tions by the Office of Management 
and Budget to an increase in mili- 
tary aid fra- Israel and will ask Con- 
gress to provide about SI-9 billion 
in such aid next year. U.S. officials 
said Thursday. 

The officials said that figure was 
approved by the White House after 
Secretary of State George P- Shultz 
reached agreement with David A. 
Stoc kman . director of the budget 
office, on a formula circumventing 
the office's desire to freeze Israeli 
military aid at the present level of 
S1.4 billion. 

Israeli officials said Thursday 
that, in the aid negotiations in 
Washington last month, Israel sub- 
mitted a document outlining possi- 
ble economic and militaiy aid re- 
nts totaling SI2 billion in 


qmrements tot 
the next three years. 

The officials stressed, however, 
that the portions of the document 
dealing with the years after 1986 
did not constitute a formal request 
but were “preliminary long-range 
projections of anticipated future 
□eras" and “almost surely will be 
subject to revision" depending on 
bow well the Israeli government 
deals with its economic trouble. 

U.S. and Israeli negotiators 
reached tentative agreement in late 
December on SI. 9 billion for the 
1986 fiscal year. The budget office 
ihpn argued that giving such a siz- 
able increase to Israel, already the 
largest recipient of UJL foreign aid, 
would run counter to the office’s 
efforts to cut the U.S. deficit by 
freezing most of the budget for fis- 
cal 1986. 

t The U.S. officials said the dis- 
pute was resolved when Mr. Shultz 
and Mr. Stockman agreed on a for- 
mula that would involve reshuf- 
fling certain components of the ad- 
ministration's overall foreign aid 
request and diverting some funds 
originally intended for Export-Im- 
port Bank credits to the Israeli aid 
package. 

The officials said that these mea- 
sures, coupled with the normal ad- 
justments that Congress makes in 
transposing its “base line" budget- 
ary figures from one fiscal year to 
the next, will provide enough mon- 
ey to cover the increase. 

At the same rime, die officials 
said, the budget office win be able 


Italy Releases 
Ex-SS Major 
ToAusbia 


to argue that the adjusted total for 
foreign aid in the administration’s 
budget request for 1986 will not 
represent any substantial real 
growth from this year’s figure. 

Israel had originally sought 
about S4 billion — HI billion in 
military assistance and SI. 9 billion 
in economic aid — as well as imme- 
diate emergency aid or $800 mil- 
lion. 

The U.S. response to the imme- 
diate formal request for economic 
aid was to promise a fiscal 1986 
request to Congress of $12 billion, 
the amount Israel is getting this 
year. The administration deferred a 
decision on the request for $800 
million because Mr. Shultz was dis- 
satisfied with the pace of IsraeFs 
moves toward an economic stabili- 
zation program. 

US. officials say Mr. Sfcultz be- 
lieves bis strategy of “holding the 
Israelis' feet to the fire" mil gradu- 
ally force them to take the austerity 
measures the administration seeks. 
If they do, the officials added, the 
United States is prepared to ask 
Congress for all or most of the 
$800- million emergency request 
■ Inflation Controls Sought 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres 
sought agreement Thursday with 
trade unions and industrialists on 
an eight-month ex tensi on of wage 
and price controls that would limit 
Israel's inflation to S percent a 
month. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Tel Aviv. 

Mr. Peres and four member of 
his cabinet met with leaders of the 
Histadmt trade union federation 
and representatives of the private 
sector to work out details after the 
broad outlines of agreement were 
reportedly reached during a 15- 
hour session Wednesday. 



Sharon Loses Libel Suit 
As Jurors Rule Time 
Did Not Intend Malice 


WORLD BRIEFS 


(Continued from Page 1) 
to prove that Tune magazine did lie 
. . . and they were careless." 

His lawyer, Milton Gould, told 
Judge Ab raham D. Sofaer of the 
U.S. District Court that he might 
submit motions later. Mr. Gould 
said afterward that Mr. Sharon 
“didn’t come here for any money. 
He came here for vindication and 
he’s been vindicated." 

Time’s managing editor, Ray 
Cave, said, “Needless to say, we're 
immensely pleased with the ver- 
dict." 

The magazine said, “Tune feds 


determine if Mr. Sharon's reputa- 
tion had been injured by the article. 

Mr. Sharon would have bad to 
win on all three questions, and then 
show damage to his reputation, to 
win his case. 

Mr. Sharon, who was forced to 
resign as defense minister after an 
Israeli inquiry found that he bore 

“indirect responsibility’' for the 
massacre, called the Tune story a 
“blood libel" against him, Israel 
and Jews everywhere. He is now 
mini ster of industry and com- 
merce. 

His lawyers argued that the Time 


U.S. Shuttle Launched in Secrecy 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) — H* U.S. space shuttle Discov- 
ery rocketed away from Earth after a secret countdown Thursday, 
carrying a crew of five military officers who will laundi a reconnaissance 
satellite to eavesdrop on the Soviet Union, according to government 
sources. 

The shuttle, bound on the first completely classified mission in the 
history of U.S. manned space flight lifted off its Iatmchpad Thursday 
afternoon and flew over the Atlantic Ocean. The laundi was delayed a 
day by freezing weather in Florida. 

The satellite, sources report is capable of tracking Soviet missile tests 



■ fi(i‘ 


Sow!"'* 

'I, . L 7 , nctird 


V 


and eavesdropping on mili tary and diplomatic communications in much 
ica. The exact launch tape was kept secret until 


of Europe; Asia and Africa, 
minutes before the liftoff. That was intended to 
monitor the satellite after the astronauts have 
shuttle's cargo bay. 


Soviet efforts to 
leased It from the 


Yugoslav Court Releases Dissident 


strongly that the case should never story wouW ,ead thcavoage reader 


General Amos Gilboa, the Israeli representative, at the 
Naqoura talks Thursday on Israel's pullout from Lebanon. 


Naqoura Talks Break Down 


(Contained tram Page 1) 
Israel's withdrawal became immi- 
nent. They have attended rallies 
backing the Palestine liberation 
Organization, and collaborators 
with the Israelis have been lolled. 

Security sources said Moham- 
med al-Gharamti, leader of the big- 
gest local pro-Israeli militia, had 
left Sidon by sea with 25 of his 200 
men for an unknown destination. 
■ Sunni Leader Has Surgery 

A Lebanese S unni Moslem lead- 
er, Mustafa Saad, who was serious- 
ly wounded in a car bomb explo- 
sion Monday in Sidon, was 
reported in stable condition Thurs- 


day after surgery on his eyes and 
face at a Boston hospital. United 
Press International reported. 

But doctors said it might be a- 
wcek before they know whether 
Wednesday’s surgery was success- 
ful. A hospital spokesman declined 
to say bow severely Mr. Saad’s eye- 
right was affected by the explosion. 

Mr. Saad's wife, Lobove, was 
also stable after surgery Wednes- 
day for wounds suffered in the 
blast outside the couple's apart- 
ment house. Two persons were 
killed and 37 were injured in the 
blast- The Saads were flown Tues- 
day to Boston. 


have readied an American court- 
room. It was brought by a foreign 
politician attempting to recoup his 
political fortunes.” 

“The article we published was 
substantially true," the magazine 
added. 

Henry Gnmwald, Time’s editor 
in chief, said: “I'm not totally hap- 
py with the jury’s earlier findings 
on defamation and on falsity." He 
said he thought the jury's verdict 
was wrong on those points. 

Mr. Sharon claimed that, in its 
Feb. 21, 1983, cover story. Time 
libeled him in reporting that he had 
“discussed" revenge for the assassi- 
nation of Lebanon's president- 
elect, Bashir Gemayel one day be- 
fore Christian Phalangists 
massacred hundreds of Palestin- 
ians at two refugee camps in Israe- 
li -occupied BdruL 

The jury ruled that Mr. Sharon's 
lawyers had proved a key para- 
graph of the story defamatory and 
false. If Lhe panel had found that 
Time published the story knowing 
it was false or with “reckless disre- 
gard" of whether it was true, a 
hearing would have been held to 


to conclude that he “instigated, en- 
couraged and condoned" the mas- 
sacre. Time denied that that inter- 
pretation was possible. 

The magazine had originally 
maintained that information about 
the discussion it reported was con- 
tained in Appendix B of an Israeli 
inquiry commission’s report on the 
September 1982 massacre. 

Mr. Sharon testified that he did 
not discuss revenge “with any Leb- 


BELGRADE (Reuters) — A Yugoslav court has freed a dissident 
intellectual and reduced conspiracy charges against three others in an 
unexpected move from the prosecution. 

The public prosecutor. Danllo Nano vie, announced Wednesday that 


the state was withdrawing all charges against a translator, Pavtuska 
Imrirovic, 36, one of six defendants, for lack of > 


evidence. He said the 

conspiracy charges against Miodrag Milic, 55, a scriptwriter; Dragonnr 
Olujic, 36, a technician; and MDan Nrkoiic, 37, a sociologist, would be 
reduced to that of a lesser charge of spreading propaganda hostile to 
Yugoslavia. This carries a one-year minimum sentence on conviction 
instead of the five-year minimum for conspiracy. 

Mr. Nanovic said the state was also ready to amend charges against 
Vladimir Mijanovic, 38, a sociologist, and Gordan Jovanovic, 24, a 
philosophy student, who were absent from court Wednesday. The trial 
was adjourned until Monday. 


contained information about such Result of Popieluszko Autopsy Given 


a discussion. 

For months, the Israeli govern- 
ment refused to release Appendix B 
and other secret documents from 
the investigation, citing national 
security. 

After an exchange of letters be- 
tween Judge Sofaer and Israel's 
Justice Ministry, the Israeli govern- 
ment agreed to let former Supreme 
Court President Yitzhak Kalian re- 
view Appendix B and other docu- 
ments. 

In answer to three written 


mes- 


qu 

lions submitted by Judge Sofaer, 


TO RUN, Poland (AP) — The pro- Solidarity priest whom three Polish 
secret police officers are charged with killing was beaten repeatedly on 
the head and arms by fists and a club and apparently died by choking at 
his blood, medical experts told a court Thursday. 

The experts said they could not determine for certain whether the 
Reverend Jerzy Popieluszko was dead or “on the verge of dying” on Oct. 
19 when he was thrown into a reservoir bound, gagged and with a noose 
tied around his neck 

But they said that the beatings administered to the priest were so severe 
that his death was “already irrevocable" before he was dumped into the 
water. The head of the autopsy team. Professor Maria Byrdy said the 
cause of death was a combination of factors, such as the blows, 
and the noose but that the primary cause was choking on his bl 


(Continued from Page 1) 
rims and of those who escaped the 
horrendous massacre." On Dec. 30, 
the town's inhabitants voted in a 
referendum for the third time to 
tuge that Mr. Reder not be shown 
demency and that be remain in jail 
• Mr. Frischcnschlager, 41, is a 
member of the small rightist Free- 
dom Party, which went into coali- 
tion with the Socialist Party after 
the April 1983 elections in Austria. 

■ Arrival Was ‘Confidential’ 

Mr. FiMchenscMager said at his 

press conference that he was under 
instructions to keep Mr. Reder’s 
arrival confidential, and decided it 
was best to handle the logistics 
himself, United Press International 
reported from Vienna. 

“I was in Graz, and accompa- 
nied him to the barracks," he said. 
“I only had a few hours, and I was 
of the opinion that the most re- 
sponsible thing would be to do it 
myself.” 

■ Bartne Death Plot Described 

Serge Klarafeld, a French lawyer 
who tracked down Klaus Barbie 
and other accused German war 
criminals, says he joined an assassi- 
nation plot against Barbie in 1982 
and would support other such plots 
against important Nazi fugitives if 
all legal recourse to their seizure 
were blocked. The New York 
Times reported 

In a telephone interview Tuesday 
from Pans, Mr. Klarsfdd con- 
firmed an account in Life magazine 
that reported he and his wife, 
Beale, paid a Bolivian code-named 
Juan -Carl os about $5,000 for his 
travel expenses to Bolivia to loll 
Barbie, the former Gestapo chief in 
Lyon. 

The plan was canceled Mr. 
Klarsfdd said after a new Bolivian 
government agreed to Barbie's ex- 
tradition to France. Barbie arrived 
in France in 1983 and is now await- 
ing trial in Lyon. 


Madrid Fights ’ 80s Crimes 
Bf Bringing Back 'Serenas’ 


Reuters . 

MADRID — Rising crime 
and a scholarly mayor’s love for 
the past are combining to bring 
back the serenos, night watch- 
men who unlocked doors for 
late-night revelers for more 
than a century until they were 
phased out in 1976: 

Gty officials have said they 
are working with business and 
civic groups on the legal' and 
financial arrangements for 
about 2^00 serenos to start 
work, possibly before the sum- 
mer. 

The familiar figure in an old- 
fashioned coat and peaked cap, 
a heavy stick in his hand and a 
keys dangling from his belt, be- 
came increasingly rare as old 
apartment blocks with iron 
gates gave way to modem 
buddings with automatic doors. 

But many residents of Ma- 
drid including the Socialist 
mayor, Enrique Tierao Galvan, 
felt that intercoms were a poor 
substitute for the vigorous dap- 
ping that traditionally sum- 
moned the sereno. 

Mr. TLerno, who composes 
edicts in 16lh-cealuiy Spanish, 
has found support from civic 


groups that are alarmed at the 
rise in mugging* and armed 
robberies. 

One of the main issues being 
discussed is how the serenos 
will be paid without increasing 
the city’s payroll officials said 
Some form of subsidy from 
business organizations is being 
considered 

The old serenos earned only 
tips and had no social security. 
Most held a daytime job. 

The new serenos probably 
will still cany a stick, although 
it likdy will be a rubber version. 


They will use a two-way radio 
but not 


to contact city police, 
carry a gun. Armed serenos, of- 
ficials said, could become the 
targets of criminals who want 
guns. 

The new serenos will join 750 
of their former colleagues who 
were formed into a vigilante 
corps assimilated by the munic- 
ipal police force. 

A doily newspaper, Ya. said 
this would mean the return to a 
tradition of "unconditional 
help for dozens in exchange for 
just good wiH which has in- 
spired comedy, drama and hu- 
mor.” 



Mr. Kahan. who dkl&S Paraguay to Destroy Drug Chemicals .. 

WASHINGTON (NYT) - The president of Paraguay and other 
fn , m . a -,u Paraguayan officials promised two visiting members of Congress last 
Shiran disused revenge with ^ ^ d deslroy 49^00 gallons 

(185,760 liters) of chemicals believed to have been intended for the 
manufacture of cocaine, according to U.S. officials. 

Before the visit by the congressmen, the president of Paraguay, General 
Alfredo Siroessner, had refused requests from the U.S. ambassador for a 
meeting to discuss the chemicals, which were seized in October by 


Phalangists or knew they would 
commit a massacre. 

In final arguments. Tune’s law- 
yers conceded that Appendix B did 
not contain the information the ar- 
ticle said it did. but they denied 
that Time knew this when it pub- 
lished the story. 

After calling 13 witnesses, in- 
cluding eight Time employees, Mr. 
Sharon's lawyers rested their case 
Dec. 20. 

Time's lawyers stunned the 
courtroom what they rested their 
case just two hours later without 
calling any witnesses, though they 
had spent thousands of dollars 
traveling to Israel to obtain deposi- 
tions from at least five witnesses. 

Tune said it had made its case in 
cross examination of Mr. Sharon's 
witnesses. 

in Tel Aviv on Thursday, Mena- 
chetn Begin, who was prime minis- 
ter at the time of the massacre, said 
the jury’s decision was a “moral 
victory" even though Time was not 
found guilty. 

“The jury decided there was no 
malice but they reprimanded Time. 
The question of malice is only a 
technicality." Mr. Begin said in a 
telephone interview. "There is an 
absolute moral victory of Minister 
General Sharon in this case.” 


-f».* 


Paraguayan customs officers. The congressmen are Peter H. Kostmajer. 


Democrat of Pennsylvania, and Robert G. Torricelli Democrat of i 
Jersey, the U.S. officials said Tuesday. 

That refusal and an investigation by American officials had caused the 
State Department to say it believed senior Paraguayan military officers 
might be involved in drug trafficking. The chemicals that were seized — 
ether, acetone and hydrochloric acid — are used to convert coca leaves to 
cocaine. U.S. officials said that with 49.000 gallons, traffickers could 
make about eight tons of cocaine, or 10 percent of the US. supply for a 
year. 


L\and Europea 
[Grciins Bark It 


Gandhi Puts Conditions on Sikh T alks 


NEW DELHI (AP) — Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi declared Thun-, 
day that he will not open talks with Sikh leaders on a resolution of the 
crisis in Punjab state unless they renounce terrorism and withdraw 
autonomy demands. 

Hie autonomy demands are contained in a 1973 resolution passed by 
the militant Akaii Dal party, which Mr. Gandhi and other government 
leaders have called “secessionist." Mr. Gandhi said that there was no 
point in discussing demands for a larger share of interstate river waters 
and merger of Chandigarh city with Punjab if the Sikb leaders insisted ori 
a settlement on the basis of the 1973 resolution. 

“There can be no complete agreement as long as Akaii Dal is not 
willing to compromise on this issue," Mr. Gandhi said in Parliament 
“The leaders should also state that they stood by the constitution." 


s';: 


Mozambique Rebels Blow Up Bridge 


i 




A sereno, keeper of the keys. 


Critics List Risks at U.S. Work Places U.K. Miners 

Offer Talks 


Union Barons 
Lose Empire 
In Britain 


JOHANNESBURG (NYT) — Anti-government rebels in Mozam- 
bique were reported Thursday to have blown up a bridge in the south of 
ihe country, severing rail links between the capital Maputo, and South' 
Africa, its main trading partner and nominally a major ally against the 
insurgents. 

The attack, reported by the South African radio, followed sabotage 
earlier this week of a power line running from South Africa to Maputo 
and an ambush in which two Johannesburg-based Britons were killed on 
the highway in the same area Last week. 


2f* 








South African radio said thousands of tons of goods for Maputo that 

South Africa.; 




By Peter Perl 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The Public 
Citizen Health Research Group 
has disclosed the names of 249 
work places in 42 US. states where 
the federal government has identi- 
fied, but never notified, approxi- 
mately 250.000 workers who face 
an increased risk of cancer, heart 
disease and other illnesses. 

The consumer group obtained 
the list through a Freedom of In- 
formation Act request and made it 
public Wednesday. 

The list included major corpora- 
tions in the oil chemical metal 
asbestos and pharmaceutical in- 
dustries that produce hazardous 
substances. 

U.S. health officials have been 
debating whether the government 
is obligated to notify workers who 
may be in danger of contracting 
diseases from substances in work 
places studied by the National In- 
stitute for Occupational Safety and 
Health over the past 15 years. 

“We have more than 200,000 
workers at severely increased risk, 
and the government does not want 
to notify them,” said Dr. Sidney M. 


Wolfe, director of the group, which 
was founded by Ralph Nader. 
“And so the chemical companies 
win out over the people they em- 
ploy." 

He added: “The government is 
nodding to the industry, and ignor- 
ing the public." 

The Health and Human Services 
Department rejected a $4- million 
budget request from the occupa- 
tional safety agency to begin a 
“worker notification" program, cit- 
ing the cost, the confusion in some 
industries about whether the medi- 
cal evidence justified a government 


warning, and the fear that notifica- 
tion would unduly alarm commu- 
nities. < 

“There has been a lot of discus- 
sion and a lot of agonizing over 
how to do it, and how lo do it 
right." said Shirley Barth, a depart- 
ment spokesman. 

The Centers for Disease Control, 
which includes the institute, asked 
its own ethics advisory panel to 
review the issue in 1 9S3. fi conclud- 
ed that although the govern mem 
did not have a legal obligation lo 
inform workers, it “does have an 
ethical obligation" to do so. 


were to be exported through its port were now hdd up in 
All the recent attacks took place close to the South African border. 

(Continued Iron Page 1) 

vinced the future of his of|niuza- Reagan to Offer Post to Kirkpatrick 


- iHjJrt. - . 


v^- « . 


lion lies in “cooperating wi 


EPA Cites Chemical Leaks 


§U&tCL 


SHIRTMAKER - TAILOR 


SALE 


2 Rue de Castiglione, Paris l er (260.38.08) 
10 Old Bond St., London (493.44.68). 


(Coathmed from P age 1) 

cals at the facility. The Associated 
Press reported from Washington. 

The team cited “the possibility of 
a runaway reaction in the MIC unit 
storage tanks" and said corporate 
rules required a corrective plan to 
be developed within 60 days. MIC 
is the acronym for methyl isocya- 
nate. 

The safety team concluded that 
“a real potential for a serious inn- 
dent exists" at the methyl isocya- 
nate unit and questioned whether 
response to one would be “timely 
or effective enough to prevent cata- 
strophic failure of the tank" 
which the chemical was stored. 

But the team added (hat it did 
not consider the problems “immi- 
nent hazards requiring immediate 
correction.” 

The internal document was re- 
leased by Representative Henry A. 
Waxman. Democrat of California, 
who said he did know if the team's 
findings had been made available 
to officials in BhopaL 

In trading on the New York 
Stock Exchange. Union Carbide 


to 


slock fell S 1.375 a share, 
$38,125, on news of the report 

■ EPA Seeks $6.8 MQBoq Fine 
The Environmental Protection 
Agency announced Thursday that 


(Continued from Page 1) 
be expressing a greater willingness 
to end the dispute, which has cost 
Britain billions of dollars and cre- 
ated hardships for about 110,000 
striking miners, the precise way it 
ends is viewed as crucial 
The government, which clearly 
feds it is going to win, is deter- 
mined that a strike called for what 
it believes are unreasonable eco- 
nomic demands and pursued by 
violence on the picket lines ana 
intimidation shall not succeed, or 
be allowed to set an example for 
other militant unions. 

The union leadership, faced with 
weakening support, is trying to sal- 
vage what it can and to win some 
concessions on who determines pit 
closures now that its members have 
gone without pay for 47 weeks. 

Mr. Kinnock asked Mrs. Thatch- 


WA5HINGTQN (NYT) — President Ronald Reagan said Wednesday 
that he intended to offer Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, the U.S. representative to 
the United Nations, a high-level job in the foreign policy field, but he did 
not specify the post. 

Mrs. Kirkpatrick, who has expressed a desire to leave the UN post and 
return ro Washington, is scheduled to meet with Mr. Reagan next 

Wednesday at the White House to discuss her future in the administra- 

dioiigb un employ- A House official said the leading candidate to replace Mis. 
to 3 percent, even Kiricpatrick at the UN was Vernon A. Walters, an ambassador at large 


ponies and contributing to their 
prosperity." 

He has signed no-suike con- 
tracts. containing provisions for 
flexible work rules, with a dozen 
companies. 

In Sweden, unions are on the 
defensive even 
ment is only 2 lo 3 percent. 


*>3^ j.* - . 

■ ^ ~ : 
.*® to 

1 file 

• ' *.*■ • 

: - 


though a Socialist government is in 
power, and even though they repre- 
sent 90 percent of workers. They 
have recently been limited to rela- 
tively small wage increases, al- 


though they are gaining a share of 
Swedish 


erstup 

through the newly created workers' 
funds. 

“We have been restrained in our 
wage demands." said Klas Pelt era- 
son of the Labor Organization, 


and former deputy director of Central Intelligence. 

Administration officials speculated that Mrs. Kirkpatrick would be 
offered the directorship erf the Agency for International Development, 
and close friends of Mrs. Kirkpatrick raised the possibility that she might 
be offered the top post at the United States Information Agency. White 
House officials said a job in the arms control or national security field 
was also possible. 



>ft 




Hunt for Springer Kidnappers Opens 


ZURICH (AP) — Police said Thursday they have opened a worldwide 
manhunt for the kidnappers of the teenage grandson of Axd S 


r Axd Springer, the 


Sweden's big but no longer pro WesI German newspaper publisher. They' said the youth was released 
[roup, “and Wednesday after being hdd hostage for three days. 


it is seeking the largest toxic waste CT: “O' 0 V 00 realty want to encour- 
pcaalty in its history, S6.8 million, age negotiations or are you still 
~ ’ ~~* L ““ humi ba- 


rn 


against Chemical Waste Manage- 
ment Inc. of Oak Brook, a Chicago 
suburb. 

The Associated Press said the 
agency filed a civil complaint 
Thursday alleging that the compa- 
ny violated federal regulations gov- 
erning the “use, record-keeping 
and marking of PCBs between 1980 
and 1983" iu storing the toxic waste 
material 

Company officials could not be 
reached immediately for comment. 

Studies have shown that PCBs, 
or polychlorinated biphenyls. 


with securing 
lion, no matter what the cost or 
how long it lakes?" 

At issue is an unspoken govern- 
ment tactic. For the past few 
months, it has become clear that 
many miners have gone back to 
work, and that How is continuing. 

About 50.000 of Britain's 
188,000 miners defied the strike 
call from the start. Since Novem- 
ber, another 25,000 or so have gone 
back to work, according to the coal 
board. 

Mrs. Thatcher said (hat there 


eminent labor-union group, _. - . . . , „ 

in return we expect the government *“d Axd Sven Springer. 19. disappeared Sunday from a 

to maintain the present level of boarding school at Zuoz, near Zurich, and was freed Wednesday night at 
welfare spending. There is no Tor- Zurich airport. Police said one of the kidnappers was described as 
- speaking English with a foreign accenL Few details of the case, including 

the number of kidnappers involved, were available. 


aj - : 

— ... 


‘i: d 
P:rj 


.-VJ 


I “C A.1 


cause liver damage in humans and had been seven rounds of negotia- 
cancer in laboratory animals. They tions already, that all were fruitless 


were used for hah a century as 
insulators and coolants in a variety 
of industrial products, primarily 
electric transformers. The EPA 
banned their production in 1976. 


because Mr. Scargill never 
from his “impossible demand” 1 
there be no pit closures, and that 
having a written pledge was essen- 
tial for new talks. 



HARRY’S NEW YORK BAR ® 

Est. 1911 

Just tell the taxi driver "sank roe doe nee" 

• 5 Roe Daunou, PARIS 

• Fallcenturm Sir. 9, MUNICH 

• M/S ASTOR at sea 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


For Uf . wlc * WP*» g j ty rtm r u 

*«•!•-* I CHS M*s»( PSOnpOCTOHAH 

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mal agreement; we have simply 
talked and come to understand 
each other." 

No such conversation is possible 
at the moment in Britain, a coun- 
try, in the view of Peter Wallen- 
berg, a leading Swedish banker 
who knows both places well that 
could not be less like Sweden. 

“Our trade unions have been one 
of the driving forces in the creation 
of modem Sweden," he said “His- 
torically, they are certainly a be- 
nign force, and they are still seen as 
stub by most people. They ore not 
revolutionaries, and they are very 
Swedish in (hat they never shout. 
They want to keep what they have 
— jobs and benefits — and they are 
willing to yield on wages to do 
thaL" 

Not everyone agrees with (hat 
view. Assar Lind beck, an econo- 
mist. says Ik sees the penetration of 
almost every Swedish institution by 
the unions, and now their enuy 
into the ranks of industrial owner- 
ship, as a threat to the pluralism he 
thinks essential to liberty. 

But one does not hear even from 
Mr. Lindbeck and his allies in Swe- 
den. or for that matter anywhere 
else in Western Europe, the kind of 


Police said Mr. Springer would remain “in the care of police" for the 
time being because he was needed 


lime being because he was needed as a source of information. Bernard 
Servatius, an official with the Springer company, said no ransom had 
been paid. 



Greece Affirms NATO College Fallout . 

ATHENS (Reuters) — Greece is withdrawing indefinitely from the 
NATO Defense College in Rome aver a dispute about a classroom 
scenario involving a coup in Athens. Prime Minister Andreas Papon - 
drcou said Thursday. 

In a brief statement, the Socialist leader said: “The inrident is dosed, 
but no further partidMtion by Greek officers and diplomats is envi- 
sioned at the NATO Defense College." A government spokesman sail 
“There is no time limit on the decision." 

Last week. Greece withdrew' three students and a professor from d* 
college after they were given a classroom exercise envisaging a foreign*, 
backed coup by the Greek armed forces on the day after a leftist election 
victory. 




•TfcCV. 

Sp-- 1 * 




For the Record 


■' '■ : 

■ ,e Uer , - . 





Senator Warren B. Rodman, Republican of New Hampshire, was 
appointed Thursday to head the Senate Ethics Committee. The firswern* 
senator was appointed by ihe majority leader. Robert J. Dole, io succeed 
Senator Ted Stevens, Republican of Alaska. The pond reviews com- 
plaints about the conduct of senators. The chairmanship is roiaicc 
periodically. iAN 




i5C| 5^ ^ 


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H c 


I — -^ 538 3 g 




di- 


Bernhard H. Goetz, charged with attempted murder in a Manhaltm Otiu 


outright hostility to unions that one subway shooting, will not testify before a grand jury in the c 
regularly bears in Britain. no11 P 1 * 3 bargain if he is indicloi, his lawyer said Thursday. 


in the case and wjjl 
(AP) 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY^ JANUARY 25, 1985 


Page. 3 




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Baker Calls Tax Plan 
'Simply a Starting Point’ 

Treasury Nominee Fields Questions 
As He Heads Toward Senate Approval 


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By Peter T. Kilbom 

New York Times Service 

" WASHINGTON — The unani- 
mous vote of support by the Senate 
finance Committee for James A. 
Baker 3d, President Ronald Rea- 
gan's nominee as secretary of the 
Treasury, aH but assures hu confir- 
mation by the full Senate next 

week. 

But Mr. Baker, who is leaving the 
While House after four years as tire 
president's chief of staff, encoun- 
tered bipartisan misgivings over 
the most important legislative issue 
da the Treasury’s agenda this year: 
the overhaul of the tax system pro- 
posed by the man with whom he is 
Switching jobs, Donald T. Regan. 

- ' Mr. Baker, testifying Wednesday 
a 1 his confirmation bearing, mid 
the president considered both the 
spending “freeze” he will recom- 
mend next month and tax “simpli- 
fication” equal in importance and 
wants both to become law this year. 

“These are equal priorities for 
him on the domestic agenda," Mr. 
Mr. Baker mid. 

At tire same time, however, Mr. 
Baker showed a greater willingness 
than has Mr. Regan to reconsider 
many of the proposaTs most con- 
troversial provisions. As senators 
raised objections to one provision 
after another, Mr. Baker said re- 
peatedly that the tax plan was 
“simply a starting point” and 
“nothing but a starting point.” 

- Mr. Baker disputed a senator's 
contention that the doCar was over- 
valued. “1 think the dollar is very, 
very strong,” he said. “It’s not a 
question of too high or too low." 

He confirmed that the United 
States might do “a little bit more” 
intervention in the foreign ex- 
change markets to control sharp 
changes in currency values, but 
said it had not intervened after the 
meeting last week of Mr. Regan 
atid the finance minist ers of Brit- 
ain, France; West Germany and 
Japan. 

•" He said the administration was 


also “dead set against returning to 
a policy of protectionism.” a state- 
ment questioned by Senator KB 
Bradley, Democrat of New Jersey. 

Mr. Baker said he supported 
trade restraints on such imports as 
steel, textiles, motarcycks and Jap- 
anese automobiles. 

“You don’t want to r eturn to 
protectionism," Mr. Bradley said, 
“but that's a pretty good package 
there.” Mr. Baker replied that the 
areas mentioned represented ad- 
ministration responses to unfair 
trade practices. 

The tax amplification plan’s 
proposals to remove tax breaks tied 
to capital gains, state and local tax- 
es, business investment and em- 
ployee health benefits, he said, 
were something “we have to take a 
dose lode at.” 

Most of the 20 senators who 
questioned Mr. Baker, including 
Republicans, saw deficit reduction 
as the first priority and tax reform 
as something that could wait. 

“The most important problem 
facing tins country” is the deficits, 
said Senator John H. Chafer. Re- 
publican of Rhode island. “We've 
only got so much energy and I'm 
not so sure that getting tangled up 
in the tax reform might divert our 
attention from the principal objec- 
tive." 

Senator Bob Packwood, Repub- 
lican of Oregon and the committee 
chairman, said after Mr. Baker’s 
appearance: “We’re not even 
thinking about a tax reform bill ." 

Beyond tax reform, Mr. Baker 
shed little new tight on how the 
administration’s economic policies 
might evolve during Ms tenure at 
Treasury. He said he expected a 
continuation of the “tensions” be- 
tween the Federal Reserve Board 
and tire Reagan administration, 
and confirmed previous statements 
by Mr. Regan that the Treasmy is 
conducting “low-levd" studies to 
curb the Fed’s independence. 

Mr. Baker said the president 
would retain his Council of Eco- 



Ex-Official Testifies CIA 'Sold Out’ 
To Westmoreland on Troop Strength 


Tha Anoboud P™*» 


James A. Baker 3d testifies before the Senate Finance Committee. 


nomic Advisers, now down to only 
one of its three members, but gave 
no indication who the president 
might name to succeed the last 
chairman, Martin S. Felds ton. 

Mr. Baker expressed doubts 
about Commerce Secretary Mal- 
colm Baldrige’s campaign to merge 
the Commerce Department with 
the office of the Special Trade Rep- 
resentative under a new Depart- 
ment of Trade. 

■ Budget Tangle in Senate 

Sara Fritz of the Los Angeles 
Times reported from Washington: 

The chairman of the Aimed Ser- 
vices Committee, Senator Barry M. 
Goldwater of Arizona, said 
Wednesday that he would accept 
whatever increase President Rea- 
gan wanted in the Pentagon bud- 
get 

“He’s the commander-m-chief,” 


Mr. Goldwater said. “1 listen to 

him ” 

Mr. Goldwater s attitude pre- 
sented a major obstacle for Senator 
Robert J. Dole, Republican of 
Kansas, who Had asked committee 
chairmen to give him their esti- 
mates by Friday for reducing 
spending. 

Using these figures, the majority 
leader hopes to draft a budget that 
would be $50 billion less than the 
one for fiscal 1986 that the presi- 
dent is scheduled to present to 
Congress on Feb. 4. 

Not only did Mr. Goldwater in- 
dicate that he did not intend to 
submit a lower defense spending 
proposal to Mr. Dole by Friday, 
but be also suggested that he would 
not mind if the military budget 
were allowed to rise higher than the 
5.7 percent increase requested by 
the Pentagon- 


“I would like to see a higher 
figure, but 5.7 percent, 5. 8 percent 
or even 6 percent is a figure we can 
meet without doing any damage to 
the economy,” Mr. Goldwater said. 

Opposition from Mr. Goldwater 
and others is forcing Mr. Dole to 
back away from one of his original 
objectives: a freeze in defease 
spending at current levels. In addi- 
tion. Mr. Dole has discovered that 
he cannot meet his self-imposed 
deadline to complete work on the 
Senate Republican budget plan by 
Feb. 1. 

Senator Pete V. Domenici, Re- 
publican of New Mexico, chairman 
of the Senate Budget Committee, 
alsom acknowledged that the Feb. 
1 deadline could not be meL 

“If you think we're going to have 
a detailed budget plan by Feb. 1 
with all tbe specifics, you’re mis- 
taken.” he said. 


By M.A. Farber 

flew York Tuna Semce 

NEW YORK — George W. Al- 
len, a former deputy chief of Viet- 
namese affairs for the ILSl Central 
Intelligence Agency, has testified 
that the CIA “sold out" to themOi- 
taiy in 1967 on tire issue of enemy 
strength in South Vietnam and that 
President Lyndon Johnson was giv- 
en a “dishonest and misleading” 
estimate fall 

Mr. Allen said Wednesday in 
U.S. District Court in Manhattan 
that General William C. West- 
moreland was “ultimately respon- 
sible” for “this prostitution” and 
that the CIA, by “going along with 
it,” had “sacrificed its integrity on 
the altar of public relations and 
political expediency.” 

As a result, Mr. Allen testified. 
Washington was left “essentially 
with an inadequate understanding 
of what we were up against.” 

Mr. Allen, who retired from (he 
CIA in 1979 but still works under 
contract there, appeared as the sec- 
ond witness for CBS in tbe trial of 
General Westmoreland's S120-m3- 
lion libel suit against tbe network. 

During the Tet offensive, which 
began in late January 1968, Mr. 
Alien said, “the chickens came 
borne to roost." He estimated that 
at least 400,000 armed troops took 
part in that attack. That was about 
100,000 more than tbe total enemy 
troop strength then acknowledged 
by the military and the CIA. Mr. 
Men said that, during 1967, be and 
some CIA colleagues had argued 


For an 


force estimate of 


enemy 
about 500,000. 

The suit steins from a CBS docu- 
mentary in 1982, “Tbe Uncounted 
Enemy: A Vietnam Deception,” 
that charged Genoa! Westmore- 
land’s command with engaging in a 
“conspiracy” in 1967 to show pro- 
gress in the war by minhnmng the 
size and nature of North Vietnam- 
ese and Vretcong forces. 

As part of this “conscious ef- 
fort.” the broadcast said. General 
Westmoreland removed the Viet- 
cong’s part-time, hamlet-based 
self-defense forces from tire listing 
of enemy strength, known as the 
order of battle, and refused to al- 
low a current count for them to 
appear in the 25-page special esti- 
mate for the president m Novem- 
ber 1967. 

Mr. Allen, who testified Tuesday 
afternoon that the self-defense 
forces might have accounted for as 
much as 40 percent of U.S. casual- 
ties in Vietnam, said Wednesday it 
was a “lie” that those units amid 
not be counted accurately. 

“We existed.” he said, “to make 
estimates." 

Mr. Allen seemed on the verge of 
laying part of the blame for the 
CIA’s “sellout” on Richard Helms, 
then director of tbe CIA and the 
official who signed the estimate for 
the president 

Mr. Helms, Mr. Allen said at one 
stage, “made it clear to our staff 
that be was not prepared ...” 
Judge Pierre N. Leva! cut off the 


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U.S. and European Freeze 
Is Ording Back to Siberia 


By Lee Dye 

Lot Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES —The cold 
wave that earlier this month 
struck Europe and has now par- 
alyzed the East Coast of tire 
United States has given scien- 
tists an insight into global 
wea ther patterns. , t 

Jerome N amiaS. asrientistat 
the Scripps Institution of 
Oceanography in La Jolla, Cali- 
fornia, believes the storm began 
to gain speed over northern Eu- 
rope several weeks ago before it 
began its assault on the Atlantic 
states. He thinks it will move 
slowly across tire UmtedStates 
and over tire Pacific, then end 
op in the Far East, not far from 
where it began, in the northern 
reaches of Siberia. 

He said high ionospheric 
pressures in the northern Euro- 
pean countries and Siberia 
poshed cold weather south, 
“encouraging storms triform in 
tbe Mediterranean and south- 
ern Europe.” 

That resulted in something 
called “blocking,” Mr. Naxmas 
said. The torn, he added, means 
the normal atmospheric flow 
from west to east is “blocked, 
for reasons not yet fully under- 
stood," and tire westerly winds 
that normally would confine 
the cold to Europe do not form. 


“When that happens, the 
cold moves westward very slow- 
ly ” he said. When it reached 
tire Atlantic coast of the United 
Stales a couple of weeks ago, it 
created high pressure areas over 
the Arctic and forced cold 
weather south. 

. Additional storms' form 
along the forward ridge of tire 
cold front, and “each storm 
drags more cold air down with 
it as it moves sooth." Thus, the 
weather system, while really 
moving east to west, has been 
dubbed tire “Alberta Clipper” 
or tire “Siberian Express" be- 
cause of the cold air it has 
brought from the north. 

Dr. Roger Wakhnoto, of the 
atmospheric sciences depart- 
ment at the University of Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles, described 
tbe phenomena as “a chain re- 
action type of thing.” 

Mr. Wakimoto said the 
“blocking” effect has a pro- 
found effect on weather pat- 
terns, both when it forms and 
when it fails. 

“I would be more interested 
in what causes it to break 
down,” allowing storms to 
move into unexpected areas, he 
said. “If we could do that, the 
accuracy of our predictions 
would go much 


V. > 


V.r- v:^r V! ; 


Moscow’s Latest Words 
On Chernenko: A letter 


napp^ 


By Dusko Doder 

Washington Pest Service 

MOSCOW — President Kon- 
stantin U. Chernenko, who has 
been out of public view for four 
weeks because of Alness, called 
Thursday for a halt in the arms race 
and said that only “concrete steps” 
would make it possible to “do away 
with the fear of tire future.” 

Mr. Chernenko, 73, made the re- 


PapalBoard 
Urges Ban on 
Space Arms 

By EJ. Dionne Jr. 

New York Tima Service 

ROME— A scientific group that 
advises Pope John Paul II has rec- 
ommended “banning the place- 
ment and testing of all weapons in 
outer space.” 

The group of 33 scientists and 
four clergymen said in a statement 
Wednesday that "it is essential to 
prevent a spiral of competitive de- 
ployment of weapons in space.” 

The report was based on a meet- 
ing held in October under the aus- 
pices of the Pontifical Academy of 
Sciences on “the impact of space 
exploration on mankind.” It came 
as another scientific meeting spon- 
sored by the Pontifical Academy 
was being held here specifically on 
weapons m space. 

It was not immediately clear if 
the report would lead the Vatican 
or the pope to take a firm position 
against all space weapons. 

Diplomats and scientists in- 
volved in the meetings said that 
they doubted that either the scien- 
tists or tbe Vatican would take a 
dearly political stand on a question 
(hat sharply divides the United 
States and the Soviet Union. Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan has proposed 
a research project on space-related 
defenses against missiles, and Mos- 
cow is seeking negotiation of a ban 
on weapons in space. 

The report praised “the spectac- 
ular achievements” of space explo- 
ration but said these had “not as 
yet fully contributed their potential 
to the reduction of poverty, of illit- 
eracy, or to the improvement of 
, . . public health of the poorer nations 

roumty was capabtetf “J^ting ^world.” 

tbe war danacr. Tbe The report urged that developing 

countries take part in space explo- 


Italy Reaffirms Support 
For Missile Deployment 


tire war danger. 

Miss Pinna's letter, Mr. Cher- 
nenko said, was to ask what could 
be done to secure peace. 


Return 

WASHINGTON — Italy's de- 
fense minister. Giovanni Spadotini. 
reaffirmed Thursday his country’s 
commitment to tbe deployment of 
U.S. missiles in Europe and said it 
was essential to the success of U.S.- 
Soviet arms talks. 

Mr.' Spadolini said he told Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan in a White 
House meeting that he was greatly 
encouraged by the talks Jan. 7 and 
8 between the secretary of state, 
George P. Shultz, and the Soviet 
foreign minister, Andrei A Gro- 
myko. in Geneva. The talks result- 
ed in an agreement to resume arms 
negotiations, which had been bro- 
ken off 13 months earlier. 

“I confirmed the strong and co- 
herent line Italy follows in the im- 
plementation of its commitment to 
Euromissiles,” Mr. Spadolini said. 
“Their acceptance is an essential 
condition to the talks.” 

Mr. Spadolini expressed opti- 
mism for the success of the talks on 
medium-range missiles, strategic 
weapons and space arms. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speak es, said the Reagan ad- 
ministration had not bad a re- 
sponse from Moscow on its sugges- 
tion that the new talks begin in 
Geneva in March. 

But Mr. Spadolini said that Mr. 
Shultz and Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger had expressed 
the hope that negotiations would 
begin by mid-March. 

U.S-- Soviet negotiations were 
broken off in November 19S3 when 
Moscow walked out after NATO 
began deploying new U.S. Per- 
shing-2 and cruise missiles in Eu- 
rope. The missiles are capable of 
reaching European Russia. 

Britain, West Germany, the 


Netherlands, Italy and Belgium 
agreed to take the weapons, but 
Prime Minister Wilfried Martens 
of- Belgium has indicated that be 
would delay deployment in view of 
the renewed arms talks. Tbe mis- 
siles have been deployed in Britain, 
West Germany and Italy. 


U.S Advisory Council Seeks 
Toted Ban on Cigarette Ads 


New York Tima Service 


Advisory 
jit all adw 


Drug Abuse has called for l egisla tion to prohibit an advertising and 
promotion of cigarettes in tbe United States. 

The council said Wednesday in a letter to Margaret M. Heckler, the 
secretary of Health and Human Services, that smoking was “(me of 
tbe most widely practiced and destructive forms of substance abuse in 
America today.” 

Cigarette makers spend $1.5 billion a year on advertising and 
promotion, tire council estimated. That, it said, “attests to the virtual 
flood of cigarette advertising which now exists in our print media." 

A law harming cigarette commercials cm radio and television took 
effect Jan. 2, 1971. The council called for a ban on advertising in 
ma gazines and newspapers, on tailboards and at concerts and sports 
events. It urged that cigarette companies be prohibited from sponsor- 
ing concerts and sports events. 

Lloyd Johnston, a council member, said, “Most smokers establish 
Ibeir addiction before the age of 18” and are “not of an age” to make a 
mature choice. Cigarette advertisers may say they do not aim at tire 
adolescent market, he said, but “they are reaching that market” 

William D. Toobey Jr., a spokesman for the Tobacco Institute, a 
trade association for cigarette manufacturers, said he had not heard of 
(be recommendation, but he described it as “extremely iH-ad vised." 


witness and called the 
the bench for a private cooferena^ 
Later, Mr. Allen said only that he 
beard Mr. Helms “«q>rcss hnnsdf 

on more than one occaarai about 

the conflict with the military over 
the figmes. - ■ 

Mr. Helms is not expected to 
testify at this trial ...... 

In a pretrial affidavit solicited by. 
General Westmoreland’s lawyere* 
Mr. Helms said the “disagreement” 
over enemy strength was not t®- 
/tnmftnfai to the conduct of tire 
war” that he was under no pKSr 

sure from “tbe nrifitaty or any otiH 

ex source” to accept low numbers 
and that the . estimate he signed 
“represented the highest qgaby«- 

ness' of much of the data." 

Mr. Allen said that, in 1975, 
when a congressional inquiry was 
conducted into the dispute, be was 
told by WiBiam E Corny, who had 
succeeded Mr. Helms as director of 
tbe CIA, to be “guarded” in. his 
testimony in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. 

Mr. Allen recalled driving to 
Capitol Hill with Mx. Colby and 
others on tbe day of their appear- 
ance. Mr. Colby, he said, looked at 
him and said he “didn’t want to put 
ourselves in the position of attack- 
ing die military. 

“I now see very clearly it was a 
whitewash,” Mr. Allen told the 
jury, “and I regret I conformed.” 

General Westmoreland, who 
commanded U.S. forces in Viet- 
nam from January 1964 to June 
1968, contends that CBS defamed 
him by saying he had lied to the 
presided and the joint chiefs of 
staff about tbe true strength of the 
enemy. 



Ski weeks 


SF 1500.- (all inclusive) 
from January 6 to February 3 
and March 3 to 17. 


PALACE HOTEL 
GSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 

Please rail: 

Phone; (130/KJl 31 Telex *>’2 222 
bids of thcWoridJ 






school student; Laurie Piraux, 18, 
of Calgary, Alberta. The text of the 
tetter was distributed by the official 
Soviet press agency, Tass, along 
with a letter from Miss Piraux to 
Mr. Chernenko. 

The reply follows a series of re- 
cent messages by Mr. Chernenko 
that apparently are designed to 
provide public reassurances on his 
health. ... 

Mr. Chernenko was last seat in 
public ion Dec. 27, when he.awaid- 
ed nrafak to several prominent, lit- 
erary figures. The next day it was 
announced that he would attend a 
Warsaw Pact summit meeting in 
mid-January in Bulgaria. 

Mr. Chernenko's letter to Miss 
Piranx recalled. tbe use of a similar 
device by ^ predecessor, Yuri V. 
Andropov, woo publicized l)is -re- 
ply to an American giri. Samantha 
Smith, 1 1, of Manchester, Maine. 

Mr. Andropov’s , letter was sent 
in April 19 Sj, a month after he 
became seriously ilL He died last 
February. .. 

. ’* Mr. Chernenko’s letter, like Mr. 
Andropovs, cast Moscow's policy 
in the amplest terms possible. 

- He .said that young generations 
in the- Soviet Union are “con- 
vinced” ihm the intentional com- 


“The answer is simple," he con- 
tinned. “It is necessary to observe 
norms of intercourse between 
states and peoples, to develop rela- 
tions between them cat the basis of 
equality and noninterference in in- 
ternal affairs. It is necessary to re- agreement to ban weapons in outer 
nounce for ever the use of trace or -space even in the absence of a wider 
the threat to use it." international agreement. 


ration and said new global commu- 
nications systems should be accom- 
panied by efforts to assist groups 
“to maintain cultural diversity and 
to retain and enhance a sense of 
communi ty.” 

The scientists said that the “two 
is" should reach 



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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1985 


r- ;• 

r 

r* I 






China Steps Up Attacks 
Against Vietnamese, 
Gtes 'Provocations’ 


By John F. Bums 

New York Tima Service 


BELTING — China has an- 
nounced that its forces counterat- 
tacked against Vietnam in recent 
days after weeks of “provocations” 
along the border. 


assault on their strongholds along 
the Thai border in northwestern 
Cambodia, attacked Vietnamese 
troops on two fronts Thursday. 
United Press International report- 
ed from Thailand 


The Foreign Ministry statement 
Wednesday gave no indication of 
the scope of the military actions, 
nor any other details. 


The Khmer Rouge attacked 
Vietnamese troops around Kfaao 
Din, about 35 miles (57 kilometers) 


i-fiii, auuui iiuiu 

south of Aranyaprathet, early 
Wednesday and righting continued 

tk, orM ThiircHiv Thai miliiarv 


But officials said the mili tary ac- 
tions were continuing and were on 
a scale greater than usual in the 
sporadic fighting that has gone on 
since 1979. 


in the area Thursday, Thai military 
sources said. 


io- 


For the moment. Western 
mats said, a new war seems 
ly. They noted that Chinese mili- 
tary leaders told a visiting 
American military delegation last 
week that Beijing did not intend to 
prejudice its domestic economic 
growth with military “adventures.’* 


The Communist guerrillas also 
attacked a Vietnamese base little 
more than two miles from the Thai 
border along Highway 5, which 
leads to Phnom Penh, the Cambo- 
dian capital The Vietnamese hit 
back with artillery Fire, the Thai 
sources said, protecting supply 
lines senring Hanoi’s forces near 
the Thai border. 


Struggle Busts New Caledonia NickelrMining Town 


The Associated Pros 


THIO. New Caledonia — A 
sign at the edge of this virtual 
ghost (own shows a skull and 
cross bones. Another warns 
French security forces they will be 
fired on if they come too dose to a 
sandbagged encampment de- 
fended by pro-independence mili- 
tants. 

The red-blue-and-green flag of 
the Kanak Socialist National Lib- 
eration Front flutters in a gentle 
sea breeze. Across (he river, m the 
center of town, the red-white- 
and-blue French flag flies over 
machine gun emplacements. Gen- 
darmes in battle dress patrol the 
streets and refuse to talk to 
strangers. 

The flag of the Kanak front, 
which is fighting to win indepen- 
dence from France for this Pacific 
island territory, flew over town 
ball for 18 days after the guerrillas 
seized Thio on Nov. 22. 

The siege ended after the 
French authorities on the island 
agreed to release all front mem- 
bers taken prisoner. The guerril- 


las moved out of town to posi- 
tions across the river. 

The takeover of the town 
stunned European settlers who 
favor continued territorial status, 
and Thio has become a symbol of 
the struggle over independence 
for New Caledonia, which has 
claimed 20 lives since late No- 
vember and left the island in cha- 


os. 


Nearly all the European resi- 
dents have fled Thio, where 3,000 
people once lived. One of the few 
who stayed shrugs when asked if 
he will remain in Thio. "Where 
can we go?** he said. 

Most of the pretty little beach- 
front homes have been aban- 
doned. Many homes have been 
wrecked and looted. 


French troopers hunch behind 
a machine gim on town hall's 
from porch. Scores of troopers 
hold the town, far outnumbering 
the Europeans who have stayed 
Independence-seeking mili- 
tants have barricaded themselves 
inside tribal reservations outside 


the town. The Kanaka, as Melane- 
sian militants call themselves, car- 
ry knives, axes and clubs. They 
say their guns are just out of sight. 

Thio became a flashpoint over 
independence after the Kanak 
front boycotted territorial elec- 
tions Nov. 18 and demanded im- 
mediate independence. 

But independence is apparently 
strongly opposed by most of the 
Europeans, Polynesians and 
Asians who make up 57 percent of 
New Caledonia's 145,000 people. 
The Kanak front claims it repre- 
sents nearly all of the native Kan- 
aks. who make up (he rest of the 
population. 

Thio, the main town on the east 
coast, is the site of (be country’s 
largest nickel mine. Nickel min- 
ing is New Caledonia's main in- 
dustry, but the Thio mine bas not 
operated since the siege. 

The mine was worked mainly 
by non-Kanaks. The state-owned 
nickel company says much mine 
equipment has been sabotaged, 
and anti-independence groups 


sav the Thio mine was sabotaged 
by the front 

The independence fighters say 
(he damage was done by rightist 
Europeans trying to discredit 
them. The front says it will not 
allow the mine to reopen until the 
nickel company recognizes the 
natives* sovereignty and the 
French release political prisoners 
seized after the siege ended. 

Jacque Loquet one of the few 
European members of the Kanak 
front says the French forces have 
been going after Kanaks since the 
siege ended. More than 50 people 
have been arrested and the 
French are trying to break the 
front be said. 

Mr. Loquet who says be favors 
a peaceful political path to inde- 
pendence, says many European 
residents could not accept the hu- 
miliation of seeing their town 
seized so easily by the Kanaks. 
Many are unlikely to return, he 
said. 

“The Europeans did not want 
to admit that after 130 years they 
were no longer the masters and 



NTT 


the situation was reversed,” he 
said. 


■ France Extends Emergency 

A law extending the state of 
emergency in the French Pacific 
territory of New Caledonia was 
adopted Thursday in the National 
Assembly and was to go before 
the Senate later in the day. The 
Associated Press reported from 
Paris. The measure passed the 
lower bouse by a vote of 288-144, 
with only the Socialist Party vot- 
ing in favor. 

The Communists and the neo- 
Gaullist Rally for the Republic 
party voted against the law and 
the centrist Union for French De- 
mocracy abstained. 


Moreover, the diplomats said, it 
was far from clear that Chinese 
prospects in a new war would be 
any better than in 1979, when Beij- 
ing incurred heavy losses against 
stiff Vietnamese defenses. 


South Korea Begins Election Drive 


Nonetheless, there were signs 
that tensions in the region had in- 


Opposition Hopes to Turn Vote Into Referendum on Chun 


creased to a dangerous degree be- 
nt Vietn 


cause of recent Vietnamese attacks 
on Chinese-supported guerrillas in 
Cambodia, which has been occu- 
pied by Vietnam since 1978. 
Among other things, the attacks 
have sharpened longstanding ani- 
mosities between China and the 
Soviet Union, Vietnam's ally. 

As the fighting between China 
and Vietnam has developed, B ey- 
ing and Moscow have sent high- 
ranking envoys to reaffirm their 
stands. 

71m Chinese foreign minister, 
Wu Xueqian, was in Bangkok on 
Wednesday, where he reportedly 
told his TTiai counterpart, Siddhi 
SavetsQa, that China would "teach 
Vietnam a lesson” if Vietnamese 
troops carried their attacks on 
Cambodian guerrillas into Thai- 
land. The phrase was the same as 
that used by China’s leader, 
Xiaoping, to justify the 1979 atl 
on Vietnam. 

Meanwhile, a Soviet deputy 
prime minister, Nikolai V. Talyzin, 
is visiting Vietnam on a mission 
that was officially described in Ha- 
noi as one of support for Vietnam’s 
"defense” and “economic recon- 
struction.” 


■ Khmer Rouge Attack 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas, trying 
to bead off a major Vietnamese 


By Gyde Haberman 

New York Tima Service 

SEOUL — Campaigning has be- 
gun for legislative elections that op- 
position forces hope to turn into a 
referendum on President Chun 
Doo Hwan. 

The ejections for the 276-mem- 
ber National Assembly are the sec- 
ond to be held since Mr. Chun 
seized power five years ago in a 
military takeover. But they are the 
first to include a militant opposi- 
tion, the New Korea Democratic 
Party, whose leaders had long beat 
banned. 

Their chief sponsor is Kim 
Young Sam, who cannot run for 
office because he is still on a black- 
list 

In the last two weeks, policemen 
have aimmintlwl hi< Seoul home 
four times to prevent him from at- 
tending political meetings. On Jan. 
14, he was detained for five hours 
at the airport when he tried to visit 
Masan for a rally. 

Anti-government activists have 
dismissed the Feb. 12 election as 
"meaningless." They say it will 
have no direct effect on Mr. Chun’s 
grasp on the presidency. Moreover, 
the electoral system is designed to 
all but guarantee that his ruling 
Democratic Justice Party captures 
a solid majority. 

However, opposition politicians 
say that if they can reduce the gov- 
erning party’s share of the popular 


vote, compared with the last elec- 
tion, in 1981, they will have demon- 
strated a loss of public confidence 
in the president 

In addition, should the new po- 
litical party win 20 to 25 seats, as 
many analysts believe it will, anti- 
Chun forces would have an effec- 
tive voting bloc. 

Complicating matters is the fact 
that four days before the balloting, 
a wdl-known opposition figure, 
Kim Dae Jung, is scheduled to re- 
turn from exile in the United 
States. An aide to Mr. Gum said 
Tuesday that Mr. Kim was a “revo- 
lutionary” and would be sent to 
prison. 

His imprisonment could cost the 
government support in big cities. 

The election mil be the last to be 
held before 1988, when Mr. Chun 
promises to step down. Members of 
his party reject suggestions that the 
results will amount to a test of his 
popularity. 

“This is not an election that will 
determine who holds power.” said 
Lee Jong RyooL a senior tactician 
for the Democratic Justice Party. 

But Mr. Lee acknowledged that 
the party would probably get sever- 
al points less than the 35.6 percent 
of the popular vote it gained four 
years ago. 

Under the South Korean system, 
voters choose two national assem- 
blymen from each of 92 districts, or 
184 altogether. The party that wins 
the most seats in this direct ballot- 


ing is automatically awarded 61 of 
the remaining 92 slots, with the rest 
divided proportionately among the 
other parties. 

Since the Democratic Justice 
Party is expected (o elect one per- 
son in nearly every district, it 
would be difficult, to the point of 
impossible, to keep it from w inning 
150 or more. 

A key test for the government 
may be public perception of how 
faidy the election is run. Past cam- 
paigns were maned by payoffs, in- 
timidations and vote-rigging. 

■ Overflight of North Alleged 

North Korea claimed Thursday 
that two South Korean fighter 
planes infiltrated air space above 
the North’s side of the Demilita- 
rized Zone dividing the two nations 
on Wednesday, according to The 
Associated Press in Tokyo. 

The official North Korean news 




By U.S. Into Murder 


By Jim Mann 

Lee Angeles Times Service 

TAIPEI — An official of the 
Taiwan government said Wednes- 
day that U.S. investigators looking 
into the slaving in California of a 
dissident Chinese-American au- 
thor, Henry Liu. win not be al- 
lowed to talk with the Taiwanese 
military intelligence officials ar- 
rested here in connection with the 


Kim Young Sam 


case. 


agency said the “deliberate military 
provocation” took place around 
7:50 PM. It did not say how long 
the alleged air space violation con- 
tinued. 

The North Korean report also 
repeated allegations that South Ko- 
rean vessels fired on North Korean 
fishing boats Jan. 22. 


The official said the U.S. investi- 
gators, who arrived Tuesday, were 
allowed to question two alleged fig- 
ures from the Taiwanese under- 
world who have been arrested in 
connection with the killing. 

The official discussed the Liu in- 
vestigation on condition that he not 
be identified by name, title or agen- 
cy. He said that his viewpoint re- 


Reporter Barred From Pope’s Plane 

By E.J. Dionne Jr. 

New York Tunes Service 


Dionne 

fork Tunes 

ROME — An Italian newspaper 
reporter who wrote an article ques- 
tioning Pope John Paul ITs fre- 
quent trips abroad has been barred 
from traveling with the pope to 
South America. 

The action was criticized by a 



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large group of Vatican reporters, as 
wdl as a significant segment of the 
Italian press, who say the move 
represents an attack on press free- 
dom. 

The reporter, Domenico Del 
Rio, was informed by the Vatican 
that he could not join the papal 
flight hours after his article was 
published last week in the Rome 
daily newspaper La Repubblica. 
The article sharply and at times 
sarcastically questioned the pope’s 
frequent tnps abroad. Mr. Del Rio 
had originally been assigned a seat 


on the pa^al plane. 


After the article appeared, the 
Vatican newspaper. L’Osservalorc 
Romano, called it “a virulent, in- 
sinuating and insidious attack” on 
the pope’s travel. 

The Vatican press office issued a 
statement saying it rejected “the 
distortion of the sense of the pon- 
tifical pilgrimages” and said it had 
asked Mr. Del Rio to withdraw 
Trom the flight 

“Under these conditions,” the 
statement went on. “the press of- 
fice has asked the journalist Do- 
menico Del Rio to withdraw his 


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participation in the ‘papal flight' 
for the forthcoming apostolic pil- 
grimage to Latin America.” 

Mr. Del Rio is one of 61 journal- 
ists assigned seats on the flight, 
which leaves Saturday for a 12-day 
trip to Venezuela. Ecuador, Peru 
and Trinidad and Tobago. A Vati- 
can spokesman. Joaquin Navarro 
Vails, said the Vatican was not 
seeking to censor the reporter and 
had only dropped him from a single 
papal ftighL 

“The derision was only to ask the 
journalist to fly on commercial 
flights instead of the papal flight 
for this trip, and only this trip ” the 
spokesman said. 

Mr. Del Rio’s article quoted 
theologians and others who criti- 
cized the pope's trips abroad. John 
Paul has made travel a major as- 
pect of his pontificate, taking more 
than two dozen trips outside Italy 
since becoming pope in 1978. 

“What’s the difference between 
God and Wojtyla?” the article be- 
gan. using the pope's family name 
in telling a joke Mr. Del Rio said 
was circulating in the Roman Cu- 
ria. “That God is everywhere and 
Wojtyla has already been there.” 

At another point. Mr. Del Rio 
quoted a Spanish theologian, Jose 
Maria GonzAlez Ruiz, as saying: 
“Oh, he does it sincerely, because 
he thinks this is the evangelical 
apostolic way. On the other hand, 
this is a temptation of the devil. 
Christ has been persecuted by the 
powerful. The pope is received by 
the powerful." 

A group of 42 journalists accred- 
ited to the Vatican wrote a letter of 
protest to the Vatican's secretary of 
state. Cardinal Agostino Casaroli. 
expressing their “perplexity" at the 
exclusion. The Italian press gave 
the incident substantial coverage, 
most of it critical of the Vatican. 

But some members of the Vati- 
can press corps said the article was 
offensive and noted that the Vati- 
can had taken punitive action 
against reporters in the past. 

The pope chose his Angel us 
prayer Sunday to explain the rea- 
son behind his travel, saying," I fed 
it as a burden upon me. as one of 
Peter’s successors, the responsibil- 
ity of not leaving anything untried 
to serve the cause of justice and 
solidarity.” 


■ The Pope's Voyage 
During his Latin American tour, 
the pope is expected to criticize 
human rights abuses, strife in Cen- 
tral America, oppression of the 
poor and the creeping infiltration 
of Marxist ideas into his own 
church, the Los Angeles Times re- 
ported Thursday from Vatican 
City. 


fleeted that of the Taiwan govern- 
meoL 

“l don’t think they can speak to 
any others besides these two sus- 
pects he said of the U.S. investi- 
gators. “I don't think they have the 
right to make any further investiga- 
tion beyond that line. What is be- 
yond that tine should be handled 
by ourselves and is already being 
handled by ourselves.” 

He said permitting interviews 
with the two underworld figures in 
custody was pan of a compromise 
under which the U.S. investigators 
were being allowed to work in Tai- 
wan. 

He said there was “almost zero 
chance” that the two would ever be 
turned over to U.S. authorities for 
trial. Asked if the words “almost 
zero” meant that Taiwan was leav- 
ing open this possibility, the offi- 
cial replied, “almost zero means 
zero.” 

The official said that the two 
could not be turned over to the 
United Stales for trial because Tai- 
wan has no formal diplomatic ties 
with the United States, because 
there is no extradition treaty be- 
tween the two governments and be- 
cause such extradition is forbidden 
under Taiwan law. The Taiwan 
press has suggested that it would 
violate Taiwan’s sovereignty if its 
citizens were sent abroad for trial. 

About the Taiwan intelligence 
officials now in custody, the Tai- 
wan official said. “We are trying to 
find out whether they had prior 
knowledge, whether they learned 
about it later on. or whether they 
masterminded the case. It will take 
more time” 

Meanwhile, it was learned from 
other sources that Taiwan authori- 
ties were planning to disclose evi- 
dence purportedly showing that 
Mr. Liu had a relationship with 
Taiwan intelligence officials. 

The official said it had been 
found that Mr. Liu had “some 
working relationship” with Tai- 
wan's intelligence bureau. Bui he 
said it was uncertain whether Mr. 
Liu had ever actually agreed to co- 
operate with intelligence officials 
or had ever been paid by them. 

Asked about a possible motive 
for the Liu slaying, the official said 
that “maybe some of' the intelli- 
gence officials “thought it was a 
patriotic act to take action against 
the guy who wrote books against 
the government.” 

“I don’t think the government 
would ever instruct them to take 
such a stupid action.” he said. 

Mr. Liu, the author of a book 
critical of Taiwan's president. 
Chiang Ching-kuo. was shot to 
death Oct. 15 at his home in Daly 
City, a suburb of San Francisco. 
The U.S. authorities have issued 
warrants for the arrest of Cben 
Chi-ti. the reputed head of the 
United Bamboo Gang Taiwan's 
largest underworld gang. 

Mr. Chen and two other alleged 
gang members are believed to have 
traveled to the United Slates to 
carry out the killing. In November, 
as part of what was called a crack- 
down ou organized crime, Taiwan 
officials arrested Mr. Chen and a 
man named Wu Tung, one of the 
other two alleged gang members. 

Last week, Taiwan officials dis- 
closed that the intelligence bureau 
of the Minisuy of National De- 
fense had been implicated in the 
case. It was first announced that 
Colonel Chen Hu-men. a middle- 
level intelligence official, had been 
arrested an connection with the Liu 
killing, and later (hat Vice Admiral 
Wang Shi-lia. director of the minis- 
try’s intelligence bureau from 1983 
until this month, had also been tak- 
en into military custody. 

The team of three ILS. officials 
began its investigative work here 
Wednesday, 


SC/ 


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Rebels Gaim 


Ethiopi 


nans 

Killed 27 
Prisoners 



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New York Tunes Service 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — 

Ethio pian rebel group has accused 
the government of trifling 27 pris- 
oners of war and wounding 7 in 
Asmara, the chief city of Eritrea 
province. 

The charge, made in a commnm- . 
que issued this week in Paris by the [| 

Eritrean People’s Liberation From, 
was repeated Wednesday by 
spokesmen for the secessionist 
group in Khartoum. 

Semere Russom, one of the 
spokesmen, said the killings ocj 
curred Jan. 9 and 20. According to 
reports from Eritrea, Mr. Russom 
said, Ethiopian soldiers opened fire 
Jan. 9 in a room full of Eritrean 
prisoners, killing four and wound- 
ing seven. * ' 

The following day, be said. Gen- 
eral Mend Negusse, a member iff 
the Ethiopian Army’s general coir* 
maud of the northern front, or- 
dered 23 prisoners taken to the out- 
skirts of Asmara and shot by 'a 
firing squad. Mr. Russom did not 
suggest a motive for either action. 

He said reports indicated dial 12 
other prisoners were taken to the 
Ethiopian government’s special 
prison in Asmara for extensive ini 
terrogation. Their fate is unknown, 
he said. 

Mr. Russom attributed reports 
of the deaths to "excellent Eritrean 
sources” but would not identify 
them. 

The rebel group has previously 
accused Ethiopian authorities of 
murdering Eritrean fighters and of 
forcing the starvation of ci vilians 
affected by famine. 

The group protested Ethiopia’^ 
seizure ana confiscation of the 
Golden Venture, an Australia^ 
ship bound for Sudan with wheal 
for drought and famine victims in 
Eritrea. The food was to havt 
readied Eritrea by the end of Janu- 
ary for distribution among the 
most severely affected victims, Mr. 

Russom said The ship was seized 
Jan. 13 at the Ethiopian port ct 
Assab. 

Ethiopia rejected the rebels’ re- 
cent call for a cease-fire so that 
food and aid could be distributed 
in remote sections of Eritrea. 

■ 3 Rival Groups Unite 

Three of the four rival Eritrean 

guerrilla groups announced Thurs- 
day that they had joined forces, 

The Associate! Press reported The 
announcement, in a statement re- 
leased in Rome, said the formal 
agreement to unite was made 
Wednesday in Khartoum. 

Several guerrilla leaders said in 
December that unification, after. - 
nearly a decade of rebel feuding, . 

•would give them more influence 
internationally and allow laager 
and more effective military opera- 
tions in Eritrea. 

Abdulwahab M. Jame, a guerril- 
la spokesman based in Rome, said 
the new organization was called the 
Eritrean Liberation- Front-Unified 
Organization and would be led by 
Osman Saleh Sabbt 

Mr. Sabbe beaded a splinter 
group known as the ELF- Peopled 
Liberation Forces. He will lead a 
15-member executive committee, 
comprising five members from 
each of the three guerrilla bands. * 

The three largely Moslem groups 
claim that, united, they equal in 
military strength the largest rebel 
organization, the Christian -domi- 
nated Eritrean People's Liberation 
From, which has refused to take 
pan in the unity efforts. 

■ Cholera Report Questioned 

Ethiopian Red Cross officials 

said Thursday that field workers 
had reported no incidents of chol- 
era in northern Ethiopia despite 
reports that the disease was epi- 
demic in at least 12 relief campi 
Agence France-Press reported 
from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 

Tafara Shawul, the newly anf 
pointed secretary-general of the 
Ethiopian Red Cross, said the orga; 
nization's teams in Bali and Mine 
camps, in northeastern Wollo prov 
ince. had reported no incidents 
the disease to headquarters. The 
Red Cross did send a medical rea^i. 

group to the region to investigate ■j?' « does ' ” 
the reports, he added. ’ 


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Angolan Rebels _ 
Claim They Cut ; 
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LISBON — The Angolan rebd V'b^.’pN' -'^d: 1 

ganiza tion. the Union for the To- 35. I 


organization, the Union for the To- 
tal Independence of Angola, said 
Thursday that its forces cut power 
to Luanda, the capital and trilled 
136 government and Cuban troops 
in an attack in eastern Mcrticc 
province in the past week. 

The UNITA statement, distrib 1 
oted here by supporters of the 
movement in Portugal said (hat 

rebel guerrillas knocked down 10 
pylons carrying dearidty to Luoa* 
da from the Mabubas dam power 
station on Friday. It sad two tran* 
former 
strayed. 

The action 
town of Caxifo 
miles} 
note said. 

The rebel group also said its 
fighters surprised government 
troops and Cuban regulars at tho* 
barracks in the Moxico capital & 
Lucna on Monday, killing 109 sd* 
diers in the Angolan units and V 
Cubans. The claims could not be 
confirmed independently. 

Both UNITA and the 
mem of President Josk 
dos Santos restrict access to 
observers in most of the former 
Portuguese colony. 





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Prokofiev 'Romeo’ 
Reaches the U. S. 

In Two Versions 

by Anna Kissdgoff 

EW YORK — In case you don’t know the story of 
“Romeo ant. Joliet,” the Jeffrey Ballet and American 
Ballet Theater have now crane to the rescue. Within a 
month of each other, at Kennedy Center in Washington, 
the two troupes presented U. S. company premieres of two &i r yip««» 
ballets based on Sergei Prokofiev’s celebrated score. 

As odd as this overlap of two major, expensive productions may 
seem, the same coincidence offers a revealing commentary upon the 
state of both European and American ballet. The Jeffrey is present- 
ing John Cranko’s version created fra his Stuttgart Ballet, ori ginall y 
danced in the United States by the West German company in 1969. 
ABT is presenting Sir Kenneth MacMillan’s 1965 version, which had 
its U. S. premiere in the same year with Britain’s Royal BalleL 
What does this double staging mean? Some would reply that it 
suggests a bankruptcy of imagination: Neither American company 
can think of anything else — nor can either rare provide a new 



A '^ r ifo; Qn l? choreographer to create as good a treatment of Shakespeare's play as 
' Thiij ^ two British choreographers did within three years of one another. 







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ned by 

another company in New York. The MacMillan “Romeo” showed 
the Royal’s ensemble playing at its finest and served as a consistent 
vehicle for established stars — Margot Fonteyn and RudoffNureyev 
— and new ones, including the young dancers fra whom h was 
Created, Lynn Seymour and Chnsiopher Gable. Cranko’s version 
contributed greatly to the Stuttgart's initial reputation. 

Nowadays, the Royal doesn’t visit New York and the Stuttgart not 
at alL Cranko died in 1973 and MacMillan will divide his time 
between the Royal and Ballet Theater, for which he has recently 
become “artistic associate. Moreover, the two European companies 
have moved into different phases, even different styles. To say the 
Royal was identified with “Romeo and Juliet” at one time would not 
be wrong. Yet even good ballets can die if they are not performed 
often, and these are not * 

And so we now have a relatively new concept at work: Better a 
reproduction than no production. Unlike the 19th-century classics, 
these two ballets are not open to major changes (there would be no 
point m doing them otherwise) and are restaged with their produc- 
tion values and choreographic text intact. MacMillan personally 
supervised his ballet's staging for ABT and Georgette Tsingtrirides 
did the same for Jeffrey’s “Romeo and Juliet” The result in each 
case is a copy of the original not a new look at it 

There is a certain validity to this ap proa ch. If successful the 
Jeffrey and Ballet Theater wiQ restore to American audiences two 
popular fun-evening narrative ballets, and each has chosen the 
version most natural to it The Joffrey has previously staged other 
Cranko ballets, and MacMillan, whose earliest ballets in the 1950s 
were created under the aegis of Ballet Theater, has had several works 
in its repert or y. 

Each company faces a dilemma. A mere copy is a fossilized work 

of art To change too much is to meddle with a familiar h^Qet Each 
company now needs to mate the “Romeo” it has chosen distinctly its 
own. The dancers need to give it their own interpretation, a Joffrey or 
Ballet Theater stamp upon the set spectacular vataes and theatncal- 
ity that moved the companies to stage the ballet in the first place. 

B OTH yecarais owe a a great deal to Lfiaiid Lavrovsky's 1946 
Bolshoi Ballet production, which was based cm Lavrovsky’s 
collaboration with Prokofiev in' 1940 for the original version 
at the Kirov BalleL Prokofiev’s programmatic score dictated a 
similarity of stractnreih the later two versons. In a few in s t a nc es, 
MacMUan has been inspired by Cranko, whose three gypsies, for 
instance; become three hardworking harlots in MacMillan’s staging. 

And yet each choreographer has also created different images, 
some in minor scenes, fiat make fra significant differences in die 
dramatic action. MacMillan has Paris attempt to force himself upon 
Juliet in the last act. She dances obediently. Then, as the choreogra- 
phy makes dear if rightly danced, die resists him as if he were 
assaulting her. 

Cranko has no such detafiedopisode-and he does not concentrate 
on intimate closeups as MacMillan does. On the other h an d, he has 
general atmospheric ideas. His second act indudes a harvest canti- 



Glenn Edgerton, Dawn Caccamo in Joffrey version. 


val with obvious folk rituals. And this communal revelry contrasts 
wifi the private tragedy about to take place. MacMillan, instead, has 
a wedding party, to associate with Romeo’s dream of marrying 
JntieL Romeo stabs himself in Cranko’s version, but swallows a 
potion in MacMillan’s. 

The major difference is one of overall emphasis. Cranko’s ballet 
depends upon an ensemble picture while MacMillan’s offers a 
dramatic focus on the principals. Cranko’ s stage values are highly 
pictorial. There is a «««(«»> play upon formal groupings and design 
to ra rnmnniratp rmn rtftn The sy mme try behind Shakespeare’s play 
is repeatedly shattered by Cranko’s asymmetry when a crisis comes 
to a oHma». A strong Romeo and Juliet are of great help here, but 
they are less crucial tfat n in the M*gM»n«n staging. 

In line with the interest in psychological themes he has shown 
elsewhere, MacMillan focuses on the lovers. There are four duets for 
them, esch beginnmg with a “B" — ballroom, balcony, bedroom, 
bier. There is also more dancing in the MacMillan version, 

and it might seem more difficult Yet Cranko's Soviet-style duets are 
also very technical and, because the Joffrey dances better than the 
Stuttgart, the virtuosity of the choreography is now more apparent. 

Cranko’s is the better ballet — faster paced, balancing the tension 
between individuals and the feuding clans. Cranko’s designer. Jflrgen 
Rose, offers a more colorful Verona than Nicholas Georgeadis’s 
heavy Renaissance grandeur for MacMillan. - 

MacMillan’s version is more real and it needs the reality of 
dancers who stand out from the ensemble. In recent years. Ballet 
Theater has pursued a no-star policy, presenting more of an ensem- 
ble image. Such leveling should not preclude star-quality perfor- 
mance, but it has not trained dancers, inexperienced in dramatic 
roles, to stand out in rehef. 

FinaDy, it is the company sphh that makes the difference For 
MacMillan’s “Romeo,” the ensemble was a frame. Fra Cranko's, it 
was a tapestry into which the lovers’ story was interwoven. The 
distinctions between the two versions can serve to justify two 
American productions of “Romeo and Juliet” — to offer not a choice 
but double pleasure. ■ 

. © 1985 The New York Times 


l« H r . 

We Didn’t Hear the Same Concert 




by Dona! Henaban 


N 


EW YORK. — The most com- 
mon line that occurs in letters of 
objection received by music crit- 
. . ics,accordmgtoasn^privatdy 

' "T.. financed poll, is tins one: “I really can t 

- believe we heard the same concert.” 

. • r .\ : It is such a stock response that it tends to 

i 1 : . dull whatever sharp points the complainant 

- ~ < may have tried to make. That is because the 

; j trouble with most chcWsis not that they are 

false but that they amply are too old and 
tired to sing anymore — too true to be good. 
~ Nevertheless, the critic who gives the mat- 

- . ter any thought will readily admit, chdte or 

no dich^ that he. does not hear the same 
.. “-"‘f . : concert as his readers. It should be obvious 
' ' that no two members of any audience hear 

. . "■ exactly fie same musical performance. No 

two of us possess exactly the same degree of 
aural acuity or pitch perception. Our musical 
— — "* , background and! training vary. No two hs- 

» . fLp teners have exactly the same temperament, 
i^ll^ * . life experiences^ social standing and cultural 

~ advaattges- 

lilll * "■ You are, let us suppose, an only child; I 
<Vhapp«aitohcthel7fhmabioodof 35.1am 
. _*» tjt v**{" tan, handsome arid impossibly rich; you are 
T+t 1 rather plain, Yaa area sensitive flower; Jam 

'....a dodhoppiDg boor. I came to the concert 
s V hungry, while you. dined downtown on Tex- 
' „ ... •. Mex, <rf which yoii begin to be reminded in 
- - \ the middle d the slow movement. Or, in 

■ .. ■ <5 leacti case, fie- other way around. In sum, 

-'.j ..r-:! though the sounds transmitted by the instru- 
ments, tinman or mechanical go col on 
specific and identifiaWc wavdengths, each 
; _• \ rans pkks them up witii a shortly diffweol 
antenna, that adds its own interesting static, 
thft fcge gtabg litany of truisms were 
: '-C,-not mnagh, consider fie unavoidable prob- 
-v" :■ \:. v ' iem rf acooflicsl Music as an art does not 
. ' ; v'.came to- fife until someone or something 

,) - ■ ' disturbs the air in odd ways that we reoog- 
■ V . "' nize as pleasurable or otherwise interesting 
*!.- v sound. lost how interesting that sound ttuns 
. ' <mn to- be depends largely on acoastics, 

-whoso rffects may change in -ngnifijearae 
1 . frran peflfonnance to performance and frooi 

• pafonner to perfooner. Although the basic 
character of any hall does not change much 
^ - '"from' performance to performance, the 
.. : acoustical equarion varies drastically for an 

.. ■' . ^''.orcficstraplayxng a Mahler symphony, fra a 
r . . - ' ■.-• soprano ringing Schubert bettor or for a 
' • string quartet playing Webern's Opus 5. 

- ■'>*!, That is why critics regnlariy find it neecs- 
■ ■ -. sarytotatefieacraistical.cliana^ 

Cv .into ctffladaaticm when reviewing prafra- 
• ^ j ' V^Daances. It can never be a dead issue, dis- 
V 'mssed once and buried forever. Whatever 


the venue, it remains one of the factors — 
sometimes the overriding factor — that any 
musician must d eal with, night in M night 
out. In fairness to the artist, then, it is often 
not only proper but necessary to point out 
bow the ambience of a hall may have affect- 
ed the performance, fra good or evil 

Let us say, fra instance, that I go to 
Bayreuth and hear a baritone whom I know 
from other experience to have a voice of 
middling size. I am thrilled to discover that 
the tonelias become not only heroically large 
bat remarkably rich and expressive. He has 
blossomed from a timid mambler into Wo- 
uld. I am forced to suspect that the smallness 
of the Bayreuth theater and its famonsly 
resonant acoustics have had something to do 
with this apparent miracle. The artist himself 
may even smg better and more confidently, 
knowing he need not shout to be heard. 

Or, say, I bear the same pianist play a 
Brahms concerto in New York’s Carnegie 
Hall and a Mozart concerto in Avery Fisher 
Hafl- The Brahms should sound better in 
Carnegie, a hall that is more attuned to the 
romantic repertory, while the Mozart may 
come off very well in the drier ambiance of 
Avery Fisher. But nothing in art is that 
ample. What also must come into play are 
innumerable factors such as the size of tbe 
audience (more bodies soak up more sound), 
the piano chosen by the soloist (different 
pieces demand different keyboard actions, 
different voicing adjustments and so on) and 
his tone-produdng methods. Nor can we 

overlook fie volatile i 

conceptions 
nist and conductor. 

Rather often,' to be sure, the quality of a 
performance overshadows acoustical ques- 
tions and every other question as wdL I may 
prefer certain nmrir m an intimate place 
j« a ifn g a couple of hundred devotees, but if a 
Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau derides to ring 
“Winterrrise" in Carnegie HaD, I probably 
will be there, making whatever allowances 
are necessary. In the same way, I might 
prefer to hear tbe Tokyo String Quartet in 

my parira rather than in Avery Fisher Hall’s 

expanses, but sometimes we have to take 

what we can get where we can get it A critic 

must reserve the rij*ht and duty, however, to 
mention the acoustical problems inherent in 
pi/-h mismatches of hall and artist where 
they seriously affect file musical outcome. 

People with particularly keen ears would 
like ns to believe that they sometimes can 
detect acoustical differences simply by mov- 
ing jntQ an adjoining seat. It is not necessar- 
ily to believe them to recognize that signifi- 
cant nh»ng»s do occur from area to area, hi 
both Avery Fisher Hafl and Carnegie Hafl, 


v nicmg meinoas. in or can we 

* volatile question of the stylistic 
, and n mariinship of both pia- 


fra instance, I have often been impressed by 
bearing orchestral tone increase in round- 
ness and musical fidelity when I moved to a 
rear location from my usual seat in the center 
of the hafl. The move brings a shgbi loss in 
brightness and presence but a compensatory 
gain in focus, perhaps because of the prox- 
imity of back and side walls. Similarly, the 
standing-room on Carnegie’s main floor of- 
fers strikingly rich sound, although it is un- 
der an overhang that might logically be sup- 
posed to dull the tone. 


D O not take from this that the best 
seats in any house are always at the 
rear or under a balcony. 1 remember 
what a shock 1 had one night in the old Met 
When 1 moved after intermission from a side 
se&L.under a balcony, to a higher-rent dis- 
trict in the center. Tbe voices blossomed and 
the orchestra sounded like an orchestra, not 
like an ensemble trapped in a sewer. The old 
Met, in fact, was famously eccentric in its 
acoustics, with more variety of tone and 
volume from place to place than in any hall I 
have known. There was even an acoustically 
charmed spot on tbe stage from where, ac- 
cording to legend, voices projected with spe- 
cial power, amplified by some structural 
accident or other. Artists were said to jostle 
each other fra the favored spot, like race- 
horses fighting for position in the home 
stretch, but I must confess 1 never witnessed 
that scene and find it hard to conceive of 
such unseemly behavior by opera singers. 

So, I am sorry to belabor tbe point, sir or 
madam, but you are right: you and I do not, 
cannot, hear the same concert or opera or 
reritaL Not ever. If nothing else, it is impor- 
tant to remember that each of us occupies a 
different space in the hafl, one body to a seat. 
And even your seat selection can make a 
significant difference. For some reason that 
probably could be explained by a soda! 
theoretician such as Theodor Adorno or 
Walter Benjamin, the less you are able to 
spend fra a seat in most halls, the better you 
wifi bear the music. As a rale, sound im- 
proves as you go up into the balcony, any 
balcony. Generations of poor but discerning 
students have known that As music listeners 
grow older, more conscious of status and less 
keen of ear. their need to sit doser to the 
performers becomes greater. So, demograph- 
icaily speaking, does their ability to pay fra 
the supposedly choice front seats. It’s almost 
algebraically neat, isn’t it? Unfortunately, at 
fie moment I can't think of anything else 
that is uncomplicated about the question of 
why people hear different conceits in the 
same hall on the same nighL Sony. ■ 

© 1W The New York Times 


The Pul Inara Enig ma 


P ARIS — “Chariots of Fire” won 
four Academy Awards in 1982 and 
so far has returned $100 million an 
its $6-miIlion cosl From a wise guy, 
its producer, David Putmam, has become a 
sage with a CBE from tbe queen and an 
honorary degree from Bristol University, 
where be is giving a course this year cm the 
role of the film producer. This month he is in 
Los Angeles, presenting detailed case studies 
of four of his films. 

Put mam followed “Chariots of Fire" with 
an impeccable sm all film, “Local Hero,” and 
this winter released “Tbe Killing Fields,” a 
courageous epic about Cambodia under the 
heel of the Khmer Rouge. It has been said 
that Puttnam inspired the renaissance of the 

Mary Blume 

British film industry, but aside from the 
emergence of one maj or production compa- 
ny, Goldcrest (of which he is a board mem- 
ber), he is not at all certain that any rebirth 
has occurred. 

Puttnam should be in the catbird seat but 
sees himself cm a helter-skelter instead. He is 
restless, dKcaricfigd , and says that if the 
financial situation has improved, the state of 
British filmmaVing — despite such huge suc- 
cesses as “Chariots” and Richard Attenbor- 
ough’s “Gandhi” — has not 
“The jury’s out and the jury’s liable to 
remain out for another two years. I just think 
that we don’t have tbe entrepreneurial zeal 
and ability that the Americans have, to learn 
by our mistakes quickly. We’re slow to capi- 
talize on our successes and we’re slow to 
learn from our mistakes in films.” 

Putmam — who has worked in advertis- 
ing documentaries and television — was in 
Paris to meet with the French minister of 
culture and a group of directors and produc- 
ers to discuss the future of European cinema. 
At the last moment, tbe directors refused to 
tit down with the producers and the meeting 
fell apart. 

“The Director’s Guild in Great Britain 
had a meeting the other day about organiza- 
tional things and apparently it was a sham- 
bles,” Puttnam says equably. “One of the 
people said ‘How can we straighten this out?* 
and someone else said ‘We need a producer.* 
Thai might either be a prologue or an epi- 
taph for today’s meeting. What they need is a 
producer." 

The producer, says Puttnam, is responsi- 
ble for all the things the camera cannot 
One of the few who can be referred to by the 
apparently contradictory words creative 
producer, he has little panmee with schisms 
between art and money. Such divisive think- 
ing he says, is holding back tbe entire British 
film industry. He wants film to be consid- 
ered in its broadest context, as part of what 
he calls the entire media spectrum. 

“One thing that irritates me is tbe poverty 
of the debate within which film gets dis- 
cussed. Him is only one dement in tbe 
media mix but you get no sense of people 
backing off and seeing bow film and televi- 
sion, for example, are interlinked. And yon 
cannot discuss television without disensang 
the other media and technologies.” 

Without serious debate and study, Pott- 
nam claims that vested interests (me old 
mm in gray suits”) and amateurs C*the eter- 
nal undagraduates”) will retain the status 
quo. To dramatize his view, be has let it be 
known that he is thinking of abandoning 
film and returning to adver tising taking a 
job with Saatchi and Saatdri, Britain’s most 
visible agency. He says he will make his 
decision by the end of February. 

“When you consider the long-term role of 
film and television, one of the big players in 
all this, it seems to me, wQl be advertising. It 
would seem to me a good idea to iqect a bit 
of philosophy and long-term thinking into 
that equation. 

“Advertising is one of the major levers of 
the economy. And it’s been a totally quies- 
cent non-lever, if you like. It would be good 
to know that there is same thinking were 
that wasn't just costed-out thinking. There’s 
a fantastic quality of research available with- 
in the agencies, they could really be key 
players in all of this. They could be malign 
and they could be benign.” 

P UTTNAM is voluble and thoughtful 
ambitious and visionary, good at 
reading the bottom line and ai imag- 
ining the whole. When he left school abrupt- 
ly at 1 6, his teacher scrawled at the bottom of 
his report, “This boy is a total enigma.” His 
company is called Enigma Productions. He 
is a money man given to moral distinctions 
between what he calls tbe malign and the 
benign and he uses the word expiation quite 
a lot He is a hard-nosed entrepreneur and he 
also has a rousingly romantic view of rinena 
that goes bade to tbe films that he saw in 
north London, where he was bom in 1941. 





v : ’w-*- 

David Puttnam. 

“I fell in love with cinema watching ‘Pin- 
oochio.’ If you cut out all tbe ‘Pmocchios.’ 
where do you develop an affection fra the 
cinema? We don’t build audie n ce any morel 
When kids go to the rinemn in America 
today, they’re seeing a concrete product fiat 
has no growth in it If you love Eddie Mur- 
phy films you’re not going to move into 
Martin Scorsese, you're going to remain an 
Eddie Murphy fan. while before you could 
move from Disney to musicals to Kazan, and 
it was a very gentle slope. 

“My whole ethical basis of my life and 
certainly my mental awakening was not at 
school it was the American film of the 1950s 
— Kazan and T>n the Waterfront,’ Zinne- 
mann. and to a degree Stanley Kramer. 1 was 
sitting there like blotting paper. My vision, 
rightly or wrongly, was of a society that was 
fair-minded, where winners emerged, and 
evfl was overcome." 

Put tnam has a Norman Rockwell print in 
his office at home. Whether the image it 
gives of the United States is true or false is 
irrelevant to him: It is the image he grew up 
with. 

He deplores the violence of Brian de Pal- 
ma’s films and thinks there is a direct rela- 
tion between violence in film and violence in 
life. “Every time I open my mouth on the 
subject, I fed as if I’m tacitly advocating 
censorship and tacitly advocating a kind of 
propaganda cinema rm not, I'm suggesting 
that there be responsible filmmaking. I do 
think filmmaking is incredibly important.” 

Yes, but Puttnam did produce “Bugsy 
Malone,” a gangster comedy played by chil- 
dren, and “Midnight Express,” one of the 
most violent films ever made. “Bugsy Ma- 
lone," be says, was simply the only way he 
and his best Friend, Alan Parker, who was 
then a director of TV commercials, could 
break into films. 

“We thought we’d use the same expertise 
we’d developed in advertising and come up 
with a product,” he says. 

“Bugsy Malone” was a product that sold 
well enough to enable Puttnam to launch 
another TV director, Ridley Scott, with “The 
Duellists,” a classy adaptation of a Conrad 
story. 

B Y then Put tnam was ready to move 
into the big time, and he and Parker 
made “Midnight Express,” with a 
budget three times that of “Bugsy Malone.” 

“ ‘Midnight Express* was not an example 
of responsibilily,” Puttnam admits. “It is a 
malign film. But you must understand, and I 
fed strongly about this, we were nowhere in 
Britain. I mean, to say you were a filmmaker 
in Britain in 1975 was a joke. Ten years later, 
people forget that. You either got a small 
grant from the British Film Institute to make 
an experimental film or you didn’t exist 
outside of the television and commercial 
business.” 

“So tbe first thing was ‘Bugsy,’ just to get a 
film made. Then we did r The Duellists,’ 
which was terribly well received but seen as 
an art film. Our next determination was to 
show we’re just as good filmmakers as tbe ■ 
Americans. We wanted materia] that from 
American standards was commercial We 
wanted to dazzle them commercially. 

“ ‘Midnight Express’ is certainly a malign 
film, but it's a mm that turned me into a 
mainstream film producer. And it gave me a 
negotiating position. Without it I would nev- 


er have had tbe chance to make ‘Chariots of 
Fire.’” 

“Chariots,” with its boyish idealism, was, 
says Puttnam. a sort of expiation for “Mid- 
night Express.” “I wanted to give the audi- 
ence the sort of feeling 1 had at my best when- 
I walked' out of the cinema.” 

“The Killing Fields” had a $12J-nrilfian 
budget and is Puttnam’s homage to the semi- 
documentary film, “The Battle of Algiers.” 
It was also an attempt to expiate his mis- 
placed enthusiasm when the Khmer Rouge 
took over Cambodia. 


A° 


GAIN he used an untried director, Ro- 
land Joffh, who came through with 



Sydney H. Schanberg, 
interpreter, Dith Pran, who is cruelly impris- 
oned by the Khmer Rouge. At the end, the 
two men are reunited to tbe strains of John 
Lennon’s “Imagine:” 

The use of “ Imag ine" caused some sur- 
prise and a lot of heavy explanation. The 
reason was benign manipulation. 

“If ‘Killing Fields* breaks even or makes a 
profit, I know there are 20 pieces of material 
lying around so far collecting dust that will 
become makable for other people. You know 
this is a fashion business,” Puttnam says. “1 
knew what Roland and I were doing when 
we put ‘Imagine’ at die end of the film and I 
knew without doubt that people would come 
out of the woodwork and slam us fra it. 

“I had in mind an audience commensurate 
with the cost of the film. And I knew we had 
to broaden that audience out to an audience 
where the tears had to be won a little more 
cheaply than if it had been a smaller picture. 
We couldn't afford to be austere, we’ve got 
to get an audience in to see that picture: It 
cannot afford to appeal to a high-minded 
audience in- New York, San Francisco, Chi- 
cago and Boston. Not only does the film fail 
but by definition the type of film fails." 

Puttnam’s next film starts shooting in Co- 
lombia and Argentina in April and with a 
$ 19-million budget is his costliest so far. It 
may also be his most controversiaL Called 
“The Mission,” it is set in 1750 and deals 
with Jesuits who, having converted some 
Guarani Indians, are ordered by Rome to 
desert them, Rome having sanctioned Portu- 
guese slaving claims to the territory. The 
Jesuits refuse to abandon their charges and 
they and the Indians are wiped oul Roland 
Joff & will direct and Robert Bolt, a scenarist 
of epics, has written the script. 

Just now, as Puttnam prepares the new 
film and makes his decision about returning 
to advertising — a decision that seems more 
a metaphor than a likelihood — he is also 
deeply engaged in the government-spon- 
sored British Film Year, which starts in 
April 

There will be lots of activities, there are 
lots of ideas. Puttnam is in the thick of it all 
“It’s aimed at this incredible untapped depth 
of affection fra the cinema, untapped be- 
cause we haven’t really done the job which 
was done for us, audience buflding,” he says. 

When be was a kid there were five movie 
houses within walking distance of his house. 
When one of them was tom down recently, a 
workman on the site gave him two signs that 
might sum up his ambivalence to British film 
right now. One says “Exit"; the other, 
“Opening Monday and All Next Week.” ■ 


History in a Pull-Top Can 


by Michael Kenmn 


W - ASHINGTON —I have a press 
release here that says Jan. 24 was 
tbe 50th anniversary of the beer 

T hanks a lot 

My father was bora before airplanes or 
TV or even radio, and I used to think. My 
'God, that is old. Ihat is an old guy. 

Now I see I was born before the beer can. 

, I thought beer cans went back to when 
guys in howler hats brought their suds home 
from the saloon in little tin buckets. In fact, 
that was bow it got the name suds: It looked 
|just like a bucket of extremely soapy water. I 
thought they just welded a top on me backet 
so they could take it in to watch John L 
Sullivan fight Gentleman Jim Corbett, and 
that was the first beer can. 

Not at all according to the Can Manufac- 
turers Institute. 

On Jan. 24, 1935, the Krcuger Brewing Ca 
sold the first canned beer to the patched 
people of Richmond, Virginia. 

Smce that historic day, 610 billion beer 
cam have been produced, though through 
the years the changes, the institute avers. 


have been enormous. Quart cans started in 
1927, 16-ouncers in 1954. Ring-pulls came in 
1962 (Iron City Beer, Pittsburgh), and the 
sleek, modern, conservation-wise, non-de- 
tachable (except when it breaks off in your 
hand) poll-top was introduced in 1975. 

Those are the institute's miles tones. They 
are not mine. 

The first beer can I personally handled 
was painted dive drab because it was made 
for the troops in World War II. From Pearl 
Harbor on, all two billion cans produced 
daring the war went to servicemen abroad, 
and people were worried that The Enemy 
might sight a gun on the glint off a can of 
Bud. 

A friend of mine’s big brother brought one 
lack from Tarawa. We could touchit but not 
open it The theory was it would be valuable 
someday. 

A ROUND 1945 my cousin, John Rudd, 
began carrying a church key on his 
XJLbelL You didn’t want to brash past 
him too closely because he wore the sharp 
end sticking out like a tom car fender. 

The first time 2 managed U> crash a beer 
can with one hand was at s party on T-ate 
Moraine in August 1947. Cans were a lot 


stronger then. Aluminum didn’t come in 
until ’58. 

On Christinas Eve 19S9, assembling a toy 
garage; 1 looked at the nnpamted underside 
and discovered it was made from Miller 
High life cans. All the way from Japan. 

For tbe institute, the big news of 1970 was 
the founding of the Beer Can Collectors of 
America. For me it was the stray that divers 
on an ocean-bed archaeological dig off Mex- 
ico came up with several rusty ring-pulls, 
causing a wave of editorials about how we 
were tittering the planet with the things. 
Li tttejjp ris made them into necklaces, too, as 

Today the beer can is part of the base 
costume of country-and-western macho. 
Right up there with the dangling cigar ette A 
cowboy can get as much emotion out of a 
.beer can in the fist as John Garfield ever got 
out of a cigarette. You can cany one in toe 
breast pocket of your denim jacket if you 
don’t mind toe cold. 

In every sense of the word, the beer can is 

pan of toe landscape: And after only 50 
years. 

You expect me to cheer? An old pr nrr 
like me? 

® 1985 The Washington Pan 















Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25. 1985 


TRAVEL 


The Ultimate Traveler’s Checklist 


by Paul Hofmann 


sonaJized countdown catalogs in their brief- 
cases. (“Cancel lunch and dinner dates,” 


A COUPLE driving with the kids to 
Disney World without having 
packed a few of their best-loved 
toys may be in worse trouble than 
Challenger or Discovery with a malfunction- 
ing antenna. The astronauts, after all. have 


ground support from supercomputers and 
Mtecl ' 


battalions oi technicians. Bui pareats on the 
throughway have no one to turn to when 
their offspring whine “It’s boring!” and start 
righting with each other. 

List-making is a way to deal with forget- 
ting anything before going on a trip, whether 
in a starship or in the family sedan. The 
National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- 
tration has developed intricate countdown 
procedures before launchings, and cancels 
the entire project if something goes wrong. 
Methodical people, too, draw up their own 
checklists if they plan to spend a weekend in 
Niagara Falls or set out to scale a Himalayan 
peak. 

Some executives of multinational corpora- 
tions and other frequent travelers carry per- 


“Have secretary make hotel reservations, 
“Get new batteries for portable computer”) 
Guidebooks, almanacs and packets for air- 
line tickets have long offered hints for 
would-be travelers on how to get ready. 

But the most elaborate litany of sugges- 
tions I have ever seen was detailed on a 
yellow folder that I found recently in a bag 
from the Motzko Bookstore in Salzburg, 
where 1 had bought some Mozart literature. 
The four-page folder, published by the book- 
store. enumerated 194 steps that the com- 
pleat journey er should take before actually 
leaving. NASA couldn’t do better. 

The folder is entitled “Vacation Checklist 
for Unencumbered Holidays." A drawing 
shows a mao with a potato nose and a chin 
Like a cleaver, surely a landlubber despite his 
sailor's cap, in repose under an umbrella in a 
rowboat, the oars drawn in. smoking a pipe 
and reading a book. He will need plenty of 
rest after completing the 194 countdown 
steps, and should try not to t hink of what is 
to be done on returning home. 

The checklist doesn't even mention the 


earliest stage, when the man now lazing in 
the boat said at some point. “Let's go to 
Lake Garda!” He must nave asked the boss 
to set vacation dates and visited a travel 
bureau to arrange for bookings. Could he 
have done that without a preliminary list of 
his own making? 

The yellow timetable starts with the head- 
ing “Four to Six Weeks Earlier." Step No. 1 
asks: “Is your passport or ID still valid?" 
Some people who want to go abroad will 
realize they don't even have an expired pass- 
port. They ought to lose not a minute Ac- 
cording to Step No. 4, the period four to six 
weeks prior to departure is also a good time 
to visit the family physician and the dentist. 
Perhaps in Salz6urg.’ In other pans of the 
world, would-be travelers may be told that 
the doctor and dentist are themselves on 
vacation, and they will be fonunate if they 1 
get an appointment for some day after their 
return. 

Meanwhile, the holiday candidates can get 
shots to immunize them against diseases 
lurking in foreign ports. Cholera? Bubonic 
plague? Sleeping sickness? Painstaking re- 
search will be necessary; inquiries at ihe 


DOONESBURY 


mis 


HARD TO 
?- TELL. I 

.mem, cants# 

| PEAN HONS/? MUCH. 


FOUR.HOURS 

wW 50 far., rr 

COULD WE 
rrsmi? 7 £«.\ 


HEY.. YES./WfM , 
ime AFRAID 
PUKES NOT BEING 
INTHgtS! WCO HELP. 



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"MM! 




WEEKEND 




CONCERTS 


SUTTON PLACE 

GUILDFORD, SURREY 

WINTER PROGRAMME 1985 


Spaded Concert Senes - GALA EVENINGS 
Paul Tortelier - cd(o 


Saturday, March 9th - 7:30 p.m. 
Sammartini, Bach, Tortelier, Grieg 
Tickets £90, inclusive of Champagne reception, 
formal dinner, fireworks 


The 


Concert Series 

Kenneth Van Barthold - piano 

Wednesday, January 30th - 7:30 pan. 
Haydn, Beethoven, Schumann, Chopin 
Wednesday, March 27th - 7:30 p.m. 
Haydn, Beethoven, Debussy, Chopin 

String Quartet 

jy, February 27th - 7:30 p.m. 
Mozart, Shostakovich, Brahms 
Wednesday, April 17th - 7:30 pan. 

With Jonathan Williams - horn 
Shostakovich, Mozart, Mendelssohn 
Tickets £50, inclusive of wine reception, dinner 

YOUNG PERFORMERS SERIES 
Stephen kser&s - cello with Paul Coker - piano 


Sunday, January 20th - 3.-00 p.m. 
Bach, Schubert, Schi 


Martin Huqhes - piano 


iuma nr, Brahms 


iunday, February 17th - 3:00 p.m. 
Beethoven, Schumann, Liszt 
Judith Hdl - flute 

Sunday, March 17th - 3:00 p.m. 
Beethoven, Chopin, Messiaen, Donizetti, 
Bartok, Mendelssohn, Poulenc 
The Comberti/ Clarkson Trio - strings 

Sunday, April 14th - 3 :00 p.m. 
Schubert, Mozart, Cirri, Hummel 
Tickets £10, inclusive of full tea 

For info rmation and tickets: 

BOOKINGS 

Saturn Place, Guildford, 
Telephone: GUILDFORD 


1 1 


HOLIDAYS | 


PRIVATE FRENCH CHATEAUS 

in Normandy. Brittany, Anjou. Poiloa, 

Charenies, Auvergne, Languedoc. Burgundy, 
Ile-de-France, etc... 

Weekends, short or long stays 
Paying guests welcomed by owners. 

Including board, meals and entertainment 
Catalog on request (US 85) from 



B.P. 4 - 78220 VEROFLAY - FRANCE 
Tel: 33 (3) 024.18.16 


BOOKS 


SALES! 


A fine selection of English and American art books 
all at CUT PRICES! 


NOUVEAU QUARTIER LATIN 

The International Bookshop 

78 Boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris. 

: Telephone: 326.4270. Open daily from 10 am. to 7 p.m. : 


The Global 
Newspaper. 





turn 



HOTELS 


•ick'k'k* 


The Grand Hold in the mountains 

The hotel surrounded by snow-covered 
forests. SkischooL Chairlift and skilifts to 
the sunny slopes. Downhill runs to the 
doorstep. Cross country skiing. 

Curling- and skating rinks. 

Elegant indoor swimming-pool. 

Sauna and massage. Solarium. Bars. 
Dancing. Restaurant fran^ais «Le Miroim. 

SUVRETTA HOUSE ST. MORITZ 

. Phone 082-2 1121 Telex 74491 R. F. Muller, Mgr. . 



TRAVEL 


The 

International 
Herald Tribune 

invitesyouto 

Meet the 
New French 
Cabinet 

on February 26, 1985 at the 


Inter-Continental Hold 
in Pahs. 



. Fbrfmtf&rafafm&ka; 

oati&aoedaycoateim 

pi^CcmfereoceMm^a:. .. 



Ffrst Class passages are available on an around 
Britain stopping Pullman train partly hauled by The} 

steam traction on 




The Flying 

SCOTSMAN 


. , . "while the railway traveller In Britain may not be 
* spanning great continents to arrive at some distant 
destination, the railways of Britain have a charm 
and sense of history all of their own. Nor can we 
forget that Britain was a ploneerlntha age of steam 
. locomotion"... 

A private Pud man train limited to B0 passengers will 
call and stay al some of Britain's most scenic spots 
and historic centres commencing at 
Kings Cross — York Minster (1) — Edinburgh (3) — 
Inverness (3) — Kyle of Lochalsh — thelsleof Skye® 

— Mallaig — Glen eagles (3) ■ — Perth — the Lake 
District 0 — Windermere — Chester (I)— Gotswokf 
— Oxford — London (Paddington). . 

Tariff: £1395.00 Fully InduefYo and escorted throughout 
Duration: 16 dam. 

Departure dates from London: May IB, Sept 51986. 
'Ftoara write or Maptone for an mn&ratedetiMagtM ta 





VOYAGES JULES VERNE 




• *r. 


10 Gtentworth St London NW 1 Tel: 486 8751/2/3 


HOTELS 



HOTEL LUTET 1 A PARIS «*** 

FF 319 PER PERSON 

fXMtfOaCUWNCr- PiOwMCr'.a I0MM0111I 

A TRADITIONAL 1OT SITUS, 
KH0VATH) HCRB, 

RMHf M1HE HEART OF MRS 
WO ROOMS, ARCONHTWNBMAW 
SOUNDPROOF WUOOW5 ON KUUMMB 
COCKTAIL lOUNWAtfl} 

TYPICAL HUBSMM RESTAURANT 


43. Ml 


I- 75006 -TA (1) S4US-10 
TMCTMU ■■ 


HOLIDAYS 


ROME 


UStDENTlALAREA 


txmaly aporjriMnta by day, by week or 
' phono, wtgnomous 


by month. Direct 

hooting, bar, rnitaurant, garago, 

24 hour wrvkn. 

KE5IDENCE 

CORTINA D'AMPEZZO 
L (39-6) 3387012 - 3387015. J 


WEEKEND 


appears every 

Friday 


For information 
call Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris 
on 747.12.65 
or your local 1HT 
representative 


Geneva headquarters of the World Health 
Organization may be in order. 

Those four to" six weeks will be quite a 
busy time in other respects. Step No. 10 
warns: “Take Security Measures." Would-be 
travelers are ordered to make sure all locks in 
their home are st31 working as they should 
and that windows and grates won't budge. 
Then, an inventory of all valuables and ap- 
pliances must be drawn up, “wherever possi- 
ble with serial numbers.” It may be a good 
idea to take pictures of all those possessions 
because photos wQl be helpful “to identify 
them ana press insurance claims” if. despite 
all precautions, they are stolen. 


, HRF.F u> one weeks before departure 
life is getting really hectic. The house- 


holders who have just snapped pic- 
lachinc 


lures of their jewelry, washing machine and 
television set are busy assembling their travel 
pharmacy. It seems they shouldn't by any 
means leave without remedies for circulatory 
disturbances and the vagaries of the diges- 
tive system together with an arsenal of other 
pills, creams and sprays, including a “light 
sleeping drug and tranquilizer." 

Then there are bills to settle: Rent, insur- 
ance, installment payments, utilities, taxes. 
Foreign currency has to be bought. Adapter 


plugs for hair driers and irons are needed 
because those foreigners perversely use volt- 
ages and connections different from those at 
home. 

To travel by car. you have to go through 36 
extra steps. Among other things, you ought 
to put rough gloves, a blanket and an old 
coat into the luggage compartment in case of 
a flat. You might also find yourself in an 
accident: Take a chalk crayon to mark the 
pavement and a tape measure to determine 
distances. 

If you obey all the injunctions on the 
yellow list, you won’t have much time to do 
vour regular job: You must also familiarize 
yourself with customs and currency regula- 
tions in the countries you plan to visiL find 
out whether gasoline or foodstuffs are scarce 
and bone up on their traffic codes. You will 
feed vour frank account and make sure you 
can request money transfers by telephone or 
telegram (ever heard of credit cards?). 

You will also have to call on relatives and 
neighbors, providing them with your vaca- 
tion address and phone number, ihe coordi- 
nates of foreseeable intermediate stops and 
the make and license plate number of your 
car “in case you are urgently needed at 
home." Such faintly ominous visits will offer 
chances to place your pets and plants in 


temporarv foster homes. You might also askhl 
neighbors' or relatives to empty your mailbox'! 1 
daily and adopt other rases “to create the 
impression your home is inhabited." 

You won’t have a moment to spare iheksi 
iwo days before departure, what with alKthe 
chores that the checklist suggests. Bov -- t . 
snacks for the trip; eat up all the items in*' 
vour refrigerator so that it can be defrosted 
ind the door left open; make an “ultimate' 
inspection of the car, including the spare 
wheel"; get around to packing. Don't forget ’ 
cuff links, an alarm clock, a robe, shoeshmcl 
equipment, hangers, matches, binoculars^ an) J- 
infia table mattress, a bellows to inflate lhe\.. 
mattress and other paraphernalia. — ■ 

With a second set of car keys and extra 
cash in a secret bag strapped to the cbe§t 
under the shin, the traveler is finally ready, . .. 

All appliances and master switches turned ,-j 
off. windows hermetically closed. >. 

Swallow a pill to protect against travel . v 
sickness and make a couple of quick phot* •' _ 
calls (Step No. 194) to inquire about ttifb ; • 
traffic and the weather. Off you gp. Unl^s. 
perchance, you are so exhausted by all the 
preparations and so drowsy thanks to the fjg] : 
that you decide you ought to have a nap right V • 
away, and check into the nearest motel. ■ ■>' ' 




Trave 


£ /W The Vw I 'ark Times 


AUSTRIA 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 

I 

To Apr. IS: “Lea Nike! — The Sponta- 
neous Disciplinarian. 1980-1934.'' “ 


FINLAND 


VIENNA. Konzerthamt id: 71 12.1 1 ). 
CONCERTS — Jaa 28: Alban Berg 
Quartet ( Schubert). 

Jan. 30: Vienna String Sextet (Bach. 
Brahms). 

RECITAL — Jan. 29: Andras Schiff 
piano (Bach). 

• Museum Moderner Kunst (tel: 


78.25.50) 

irhON— ToMarch3: “Maria 


EX FOB] 

Lassnig Retrospective." 
•Staauoper(td: 53240). 

BALLET — Jan. 26 and 27: “ Ray- 
monds" (Petipa. Glazunov). 

OPERA — Jan. 28: “The Flying 
Dutchman" (Wagner). 

Jan. 29 and Feb. 1: “L'Hisire d’Amo- 
re” (Donizetti). 

Jan. 30: “Manon" i Massenet). 
•Volksoper (tel: 53240). 

OPERA — Jan. 3 1 : “Die ZauberflOte" 
(Moza rt). 

OPERETTA — Jaa 29: “The Beggar 
Student" (Mllldcker). 


Lorenzo Alpert flnte (I 6 lh century 
Spanish music). 

HELSINKI. Finlandia Hall (tel: 
40241). 

CONCERTS — Jaa 30 and 31: Hel- 
sinki Philharmonic Orchestra. Janos 
Frsi conductor. Reijo Hursti trumpet. 
Magjt Rahkonen piano (Beethoven. 
Janacek). 


RENNES. Maison de la Culture (tel: 
31.55.33>. 

DANCE — Jan. 26: Groupe Fabnce 
Dugied. 

Jaa 27: Foltz and Company. 


ITALY 


GEBMANY 


FRANCE 


BERLIN. Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

BALLET — Jaa31:“SymphooyinC' 
(Balanchine. Bizet). 

Feb. 1: “Swan Lake" (Petipa. Tchai- 
kovsky). 

OPERA —Jaa 27: “The Merry Wives 
of Windsor" (Nicolai). 


NICE. Music International d'ArlNaif 
(tel; 71.78-33). 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 15: “Rous- 
seau, Bon bios, Baucham. Seraphine, 
Vi via" 


Jaa 28: “Don Giovanni" 

Jaa 30: “Madame Butterfly" (Pucci 


m). 


BELGIUM 


ANTWERP, Royal Flemish Opera 
(td: 233.66.85). 

OPERA — Jaa 27: “La Bohime" 
(Puccini). 

BRUSSELS. Optra National (tel: 
2l7J2.ll) 

OPERA —Jaa 27 and 29: “LurioS il- 
ia” (Mozart). 

GHENT, Royal Opera (ud: 25.24.25). 
OPERA — Jaa 25 and 27: “Eugene 
Onegin” (Tchaikovsky). 

Feb. 1 : “La Bobeme" (Puccini). 
LIEGE, This ire Royal de Lifcge (td: 
23.59.10). 

OPERA — Jaa 26: ‘The Devils of 
Loudon" (Penderecki ). 


PARlS.Centre Georges Pompidou 
(tel: 277.12J3). 

CONCERT —Jan 31 : Ensemble Vo- 
cal de Grande Bretagne (Harrisson, 
Cage). 

•Galerie Horizon (id: 555J5S-27). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 26: “Fred 
FetereiL” 


•Grand Palais (id: 261.S4.l0j. 
EXHIBITIONS —To Jaa 28: “Wat- 
teau [ 1684- 172 1)." 

To Feb. 4: “Zhongshan: Tombs of 
Forgotten Kings." 


•Nationalgalerie(td: 266-6). 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. 27: 
“Adolph Menzel: Drawings and 
Graphics.” 

•Philharmonic (tel: 25.48.80). 
CONCERTS— Jan 26 and 27: Berlin 
Philharmonic Orchestra Herbert von 
Karajan conductor ( Berg, Brahms). 
Feb. I : Berlin Symphony Orchestra, 
Thomas Mayer conductor (Beetho- 
ven). 

COLOGNE. Romisch- German! sebes 
Museum ( td : 22 1J23.04). 
EXHIBITION — To Jaa 27: “The 
Treasures of San Marco.” 
FRANKFURT. Cafe Theater (tel: 
77.74.66). 


BOLOGNA, Galleria (fArte Mo- 
deraa del: 50-28.59). , 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 28: “Mano 
Nanni." ,l , 

MILAN. Teatro alia Seal a (cel: 
80.91-26). <•!? 

BALLET — Jan. 30 and 31: “Soon 
Lake" (Highlower.Tchaikovsky).'! r 
OPERA — Jaa 29: “II Bartneie di S- 
vigtia” (Rossini). 

ROME. Accademia Nazi onalediSon- 
" (Mozart). ta Cecilia (tel: 679.03.89). ", , 

erfly" ( Pucci- CONCERTS — Jan. 27-29: Orcfosoie 
ddT Accademia Nazionale de Sank 
Cecilia. Krzysztof Penderecki condlR- 
tor( Penderecki). •>. 1 




JAPAN 


TOKYO, Idemitsu Art Gallery (td: 
213-31.28). : - 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 3: “Tbcjfi- ; r 
lerinfiiience of Ceramic Art in East r; -.; 
and West.” >•_ 

•Korakuen Stadium (td: 81 1_21.1 IT 
CIRCUS — To Feb. 17: Korakdi 
Great AnimranCimit. 




NETHERLANDS 




DENMARK 


COPENHAGEN. Nikolaj Gallery 
(Id: 13.1626). 

EXHIBITIONS— To March 3: “Sovi- 
et Revolution Posters.” "Aboriginal 
Art." 

•Radio House Concert Hall (td: 
35.06.47). 

CONCERT — Jaa 20: Radio Light 
Orchestra, Nicholas Braith wait* con- 
ductor (Havdn). 

•Tivoli Hall (td: 14.17.65). 

BALLET — Jaa 29: “Petrushka” (Fo- 
kine. Stravinsky). 

OPERA— Jaa 26and28:“Wozzedc" 
l Berg). 

Jaa 30: “The Barber of Seville" (Ros- 
sini). 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 

Barbican An Galleiy — To March 2: 
“Primmakera at the Royal College of 
Art." 

Barbican Hall — Jaa 26: London 
Concert Orchestra, Jonathan Dd Mar 
conductor, John Ogdon piano (Rossi- 
ni. Ravel). 

Jaa 27: London Symphony Orchestra. 
Norman Dd Mar conductor. Jack 
Btymer clarinet (R. Strauss, Mozart). 
Jaa 28: Polish National Radio Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Antoni Wit conduc- 
tor, Nigd Kennedy violin (Glinka, 
Mussorgsky) 

Jaa 29: Royal Philharmonic Orches- 
tra YimTemutanov conductor, Peter 
Donohue piano (Prokofiev, Rimsky- 

Korsakov). 

Jan. 30: Northern Sinfonia, Richard 



w 




Claudio Abbado 

PF SPECIAL INTEREST 


MOZART WE£X 


Choir, Anton Dawidowicz con- 
ductor, Gerhard Zukriegel or- 


SALZBURG — This musical 
festival runs from Jan. 26-30 
and features the following 
events: 

CONCERTS — Jan. 26: Ca- 
merata Academica du Mozar- 
teum, Sandor Vegh conductor, 
Adelina Oprean/Marieke Blan- 
kestijn violin. Panisna Blum 
flute (Mozart). 

Jan. 27: Salzburg Cathedral 


gan (Mozan)/Stuilgart Sud- 
funk Choir and Heilt 


leilbronn 
Chamber Orchestra. Klaus- 
Martin Ziegler conductor, Kris- 
tina Laki soprano (Bach, Mo- 
zart). 

Jaa 29: Vienna Philharmonic 
Orchestra, Claudio Abbado 
conductor, Alfred Brendel pi- 
ano (Mozart). 

For further information tel: 
42541. 


AMSTERDAM, Ruksmuseum Vto- 
cent Van Gogh (tel: 76.48.81}. ... 7 :: : 

EXHIBITION -To April 15: “Dutch - 
Identity - 


•Stadsscbouwburg(tei: 24JL3.lt L 
BALLET — Jaa 26-27, 29-31: 
trushka"{Fokine, Stravinsky). -T 


■ *r 4 


PORTUGAL 


LISBON, Sl Carlos National Theater r - 

(id: 36.84.08). > 

OPERA — Jaa 26: “Tristan unidlsi^- 

de” (Wagner). „ . .7“' "" ■ 


SCOTLAND 


rr- 


EDINBURGH, Natioaal Gallery (r9: 
556.89-21). .t L 

EXHIBITION —To Jan 31 : “Turner 
Waiereokws.’’ ^ 

•Queen's Hall (teL 66821.17). 
CONCERT — Jan. 31: Scottish 
Chamber Orebestra. Ian McCrork 
conductor (Elgar, Brahms). ■ 

•Usher Hall < id: 228.11.55). 
CONCERT — Jaa 25: Scottish Nfc 
tioual Orchestra. Neeme J4rvi conduc- 
tor, Ralph Kirshbaum cello (Barhet 
Bartekk 

GLASGOW. Theatre Roval (iS: 
331.1234). J/ 

OPERA — Jaa 26. 29, 3 1 : The Bar- 
tered Bride" (Smetana). 




SPAIN 



•Mus£e d’Arf Moderne (rel: 
723.6 1227k 

EXHIBITION — To Mar. 3 1 : “Gus- 
Hickox conductor, Janet Bakermczzo- -Ttav Mahler.” 
soprano (Mozart, Beethoven). S •Museedu Louvre (teh 260.39.26). 
Jaa 31: London Synqjbony Orchestra. EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 2B: 


Andre Bernard conductor. Olivier 

REOTiSf^^hm^Sk BBC^gera 
(Poulenc, Williams). 

Barbican Theatre — RnyaJ Shake- 
speare Company — Jaa 26: “The 
Comedy of Errors” (Shakespeare). 
Jan. 28-31: “Mother Courage” 
l Brecht). 

•British Museum (id: 636. 15.55). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Jan 31: “Japa- 
nese Paintings from the Harari Col fae- 
ti on.”“Prm isin Germany 1 880- 1933." 
To March 10: “The Golden Age of An- 
glo-Saxon Art: 966-1066.” 

•Hayward Gallery (tel: 92837 .08). 
EJOUBITIONS —To April 30: "Re- 
noir," “John Walker; Pointings from 
the Alba and Oceania Series." 

• Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
7343032). 

EXHIBITION —To Mar. 31: “Cha- 
gall.” 

■Royal Opera fid: 240. 10.66). 
BALLET — Jaa 26 and 30: “Nut- 


'French Drawings of the 17th Ceniu- 

7o April 15: “Holbein." 

•Musee do Luxembourg (tel: 


234.25.951 

BITION — ■ 


EXH1B 
lyte. A 
•New 


To Feb. 10: “Hippo- 
He and Paul Flandria 
td: S23.56J9). 


•New Morning (td: 523.5639*. 

JAZZ — Feb. 1 : Brian Mdvin's Night 
Food. 

University (lel: 


•New York 
288-52.84). 

COLLOQUIUMS — Jaa 26: “Poli ti- 
ed Ideologies." “Culture and Ideolo- 
gics,” 

•Op^a (tel: 7423730). 

OPERA— Jaa 28: “Tristan und Isol- 
de" (Wagner). 


THEATER — Jan. 27. 29-31: “The 
Roar of the Greasepaint —The Smell 
of the Crowd" (Ncwley). 
HAMBURG. Staaisoper (tel: 
35.1535). 

BALLET — Jan. 30 and 3 1 : “Onegin" 
(Cranko, Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — Jaa 26: “La Traviata” 
(Verdi). 

Jaa 29: “Madame Butterfly” (Pucci- 
ni). 

MUNICH, National Theater (id: 
22.13.16). 

BALLET — Jaa 27 and 29: “Papil- 
loo" (Hynd, Offenbach). 

OPERA — Jaa 26: "La Bohime" 
(Puccini). 

Jan. 31: “Eugene Onegin" (Tchaikov- 
sky). 


MADRID. Biblioteca National (fp£ 
435.40.03). f 

EXHIBITION —To Jaa 31 : “Frails 
Picabia Anihology " t 1 

•Circulo de Bellas Arles (telj 
231-33371. 

EXH [BITION — To Jaa 31: “Pard J 
disc Lost. Paradise Recovered." 

• Fundaci 6 n Juan March (tdb 
435.4140). .*1 

EXHIBITION —To Jaa 27: “Julius 
Bissier." Jt . 

•Museo dd Prado (teL- 468.0930 ).'. , 
EXHIBITION — Through January, 
“Leonardo da Vind, manuscripts.'' ,u 
•Teatro Real (tel: 24838.75). 
CONCERTS — Jaa 25-27: Spaoisa 
National Orchestra and Chorus, Jestg 
LOpez Cobos conductor (Bach). 


Hiajrj C 

■a-.--. 



J..-V 

■O; . . • - - " 

- j. 




'Va 5 -:'r. - 


Jan. 29: Ciclo de Musica de Chnaray 
conducts 


Polifonia, Luis Izquierdo conduc — 
(Handel Bach). 

Jaa 3 1 : Spanish Radio-Tdeviskm 
chestra and Chorus, Ali Rahabaricrai 
ductor (Beethoven). 


aX-." 




UNITED STATES 


GREECE 


•Salle Pleyd (teL- 563.88.73). 
/CERTS — J - ' 


CONCERTS — Jaa 30 and 31: Or- 
chestra de Puis, Myung-Whun Chung 
cmductor (Beethoven, Dussek). 
RECITAL — Jaa 29: Danid Baren- 
boim piano ( Beethoven). 

•Theatre de Paris (td: 280.0930). 
Jan.31. Cinderella (Ashton, Prokof- DANCE— Jaa 26: Conrnamie^ 
tev). 

OPERA — Jaa 29: “La Traviata" 

(VenJi). 


■Toie Gallery (tel: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Mar. 31: “Wil- 
liam James Muller," “John Walker 
Prints 19761984." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 28: “British 
Biscuit Tins." 


•Wiemore Hall (teL 935-21.41). 
CONCERTS— Jaa 26: Nash Ensem- 


ble (Mozart. Mendelssohn). 

Jaa 29: Rasumovsky String Quartet 
(Mozart, Beethoven). 

RECITALS — Jaa 27: Julian Bream 
euiutr (Albfeiiz, Weiss), 

Jaa 28: Angela Hewitt piano (Bach, 
Ravel). 


DANCE — Jaa 26: Compagniedela 
Place Blanche, Josette BaZz (“Pru- 
dence ou Emotions Subfiles”). 
•ThdUre des Champs Elystes (tel; 
7233637). 

CONCERTS — Orcbestrc National 
de France — Jaa 30: Emmadud Kri- 
vinc conductor (Gershwin). 
•Tb£&tre du Rond-Point (tel: 
256.70.80). 

RECITAL — Jaa 27: Talicb Quartet 
(Mozart, Beethoven). 

•Theatre Musical de Paris (tel: 

233.44.44). 

OPERETTA — Jan. 26: “Die Fleder- 
maus” (J. Strauss). 

Jaa 27, 29, 31:“ La FOlede Madame 


ATHENS, Gallery 3: (id: 362.8230). 
EXHIBITION — To Jaa 31: “Vana 
Xenou." 

•Medusa Gallery (td; 724.4532). 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. 9: “Bull- 
fight," drawings by Yiannis Dimitra- 
tas. 

•Moraitis School (id: 68237.90). 
THEATER — Jaa 30-Feb.2: “Temp- 
tations Sordid, Virtue Rewarded" 
(Rose). 

•Skoufa Gallery (td: 36035.41). 
EXHIBITION— To Jaa 31: -Mina." 


NEW YORK. Lincoln Center (wli 
87039.60). 

New York City Ballet — Jaa 27: “The 
Four Temperaments" (Balanchine. 
Hindemith). 

•Guggenheim Museum -{left 
360.35.00). #.•' 

EXHIBITION —to Feb. 3: "Robeq 
MolbcrwelL" 




' -iii ic , ' 




a ^tHow DER 


•Mdra^rolitan Museum of Art ( 6 k 


535 


HONGKONG 


EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 24: “Ch£ 
nese Painting and CiQigrwhy.” /. - 
To Sept ] : “Man and the Horse." 

■ Museum of ■ Modern M. 
(lei: 708.94.00). * .t 

EXHIBITIONS —To Feb. 12: yx 
Krasncn A Retrospective.” " * 
•Whitnev Museum of American 'Art 
(tel: 5 703633). ' 

EXHIBITION — To March 3: "The 
Third Dimension: Sculpture of •fit 
New York SchooL" ,ui 




ss 
ft 


nm-o, 




"red 


HONG KONG, City Hall Concert 
Hall (tel: 790.7531). 

OPERA — Feb. 1: "The Barber of Se- 
ville” (Rossini). 


WALES 


^4 cin i 


ISRAEL 


Angot"(Lcooca). 
trB3sur4(t 


Jaa 30; Peter Katin mano (Chopin). 

: Montserrat Figueras soprano. 


Jaa 31: 


•ThMtre 3 sur4(iel: 327.09.16' 
RECITAL— Jaa 28: Bans 
viich guiur. Russian ballads, 

songs and poetry ( Pushkin, 
nak). 



JERUSALEM. Israel Museum (td: 
69.82.11). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 28: 
“Eli aim Gat-Women and Nature,” **A 
Vanished World - Roman Vishniac," 
photographs. 


CARDIFF, New Theatre (ret! 

THEATER — To Feb. 9: “Re® 
Hood” (Lea, Hidcs-Joaidns). 1 1l ! 
•St. David's Hall (id: 37.I2J6) -all 
CONCERT— Jaa 31 : Royal Phi®* 1 ' 
rnonic Orchestra, Yuri TcnrirkflOfN 
conductor, John Lill piano (Tcfaaiko<] 
sky.abdius): 

RECITAL— Jaa 30: Aliaade lane 1 
cha piano (Grieg, Espial. 


i r»f. 


■St, ' 


J -IJU 





'Aid,.. 




. V. 

.. \ . 

: \ 




Page 7 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 




fe *CS l 
“!' J p JK 

-fci 
^fchev 

..**<« i&t 

-^cfiV 
^ ^-.f’ hii Wk t " 


On Getting the Most 



by Roger CoDls 




•xiphpjn^ 



LFRED SLOAN of General Motors 
once said: “I know that at least 
half of toy advertising money is 
being wasted. My problem is —I 
do sot know winch half.” 

A sumlar<fictnm might apply to the mon- 
ey that British comp a nies spend on business 
travel. 

According to an extensive recent survey 
by American Express, the 2.6 million execu- 
tives who travel on behalf of British-based 
companies spend a total rtf £13 billion (S14 l 6 
billion) a year, or 4 percent of turnover, on 
navel ana entertainment. This is twice the 
.amount paid in corporation tax and four 
(irqes that for advertising and promotion, 

. ‘ Yet few companies have effective policies 
to this expenditure, and in some 

cannot even identify how the 
money is being spent 

For example, Jess than a third of the com- 
panies interviewed use their c o rporate dout 
to negotiate the best deals with travel suppli- 
ers. Only 60 percent say tbey check all claims 
for expenses and only 28 percent itemize this 
expendititre nito air travel, hotels, meals and 
"so an. Moreover, cash advances to executives 
on the move' amount to £780 rnOHon at any 
one time. This ties up vital cash resources 
and could be costing around £94 minim a 


lot less price-conscious,” saw Brian Donnel- 
ly, commercial director of Bickfords Travel 
Ltd. “Even companies that shop around for 
the lowest air Cares fail to take advantage of 
the readDy available corporate hold rates.” 

A survey made a year ago in B ri t**" by 
Chief Executive magazine showed that half 
thecxmipaiuesitintemewedwercnotreodv- 
ing concessionary rates for hold accommo- 
dation. In another sample of 300 business 
travelers, 73 percent reported that their com- 
=-i had no policy on the use of specified 
while 54 percent claimed they could 


Many companies 
get poor value, 
fail to use dout 


V Z'r '-■&> 


..I - ’ 





Although four out of five companies say 
that their top priority is to reduce the abso- 
lute level of owsran business exprases, nearly 
half of than think that this wifl increase as a 
percentage of turnover in the next two to 
three years. This seems to indicate that most 
companies behave they are presently getting 
value for money. 

: Travel policy is laid down at boardroom 
level in 84 percent of the companies inter- 
viewed and expense budgets in 58 p er cent. 
However, once the budgets have been set, 
:most of the companies leave individuals to 
□take their own travel arrangemen t s. The 
secretary, American Express notes with dis- 
approval, is the single most important ded- 
son-makerin organizing business traveL (In 
only 6 percent of companies interviewed is a 
travel manager responsible for booking 
flights and hotels.) 

But there is nothing wrong with this. Pre- 
sumably, executives and their secretaries 
know best what they want, and they need to 
have flexibility , to make at the last 

pahmic. Trida Dina, marketing manager, 
business travel, for the London-based travel 
agents Limn Poly LtiL, says that Shell, one of 
her accounts, mis recently dismantled its 
travd diviskffl. 

What is important is that executives 
iTUn’l should work with designated suppliers with 
whom the best corporate terms nave been 
negotiated. But reaativdy .few companies 
concen t rate their travel budgets in this way. 
Only 42 percent have standmg accounts with 
travel agents, according to .the American 
. Express survey, hr fad, standing accounts- 
"with all travd suppliers maker up only 14 
percent of alL business -expenses. However^ 

• th e £ 1 85 WTHft" that thin rqwiMantu ft ymnal- 

ty shows that even a Spcxpeut saving wouliL 
give a£90-minion clawback ayear far corpo- 
rate tteasuros. And tins is just the tip of the 
iceberg. - 

■ American E xp r e ss sots that air tickets 
account for 43 percent artravd budgets and 
hotels and meals for another 31 percent But 
only 3 percent, of companies nave direct 
accounts with aidines and only 14 percent 
with hotd and restaurant chums; winch are 
daunting to offer corporate discounts of 20 
percent rad more. 

.“Business travelers are getting poor value 
Tor money. They often buy less efficiently 
■than the British holidaymaker and they are a 


NETKERUU8 


'■ 

POBTUtW 


5COTLAH 


\b: F.dK. 


spend more or less what they Eked on a 
room. It is rare for accounts to be settled by 
corporate charge card. Most executives in 
Britain pay by personal check or credit card 
and claim the money bade cm an expense 
account. 

This practice has led to a proliferation of 
card-based incentive schemes by the major 
hotd groups, aimed at the individual rather 
than the company. Hilton has its Executive 
Business Service, Sheraton its Executive 
Travelers Gub arid Hyatt its Gold Passport 
Typically, these offer the executive free ac- 
commodation (“a bargain weekend break 
for two”) after the required number of “busi- 
ness nights” have been docked up. Trust- 
house Forte even offered a sports car to the 
executive who had the most stamps in his or 
her Premier Gub “passport.” 

Although some incentive schemes offer 
discounts, many companies are losing out 
Tea percent off the published tariff doesn't 
begin to compare with the saving a compa- 
ny can make by malting a direct deal with a 
hotd duti-n or travel agent 

Several travel agents have formed consor- 
tia for obtaining bulk discounts for hotd 
rooms. For example, Woodside, a Boston- 
based consortium of 65 travd agents, offers 
corporate clients up to 50 percent off regular 
room rates in 8,000 holds throughout the 
world. The Woodside rate for the Interconti- 
nental in New York is $105 for a single 
room. This compares with the corporate 
business rate of $140 and the n ormal pub- 
lished rate of $165. 

A good travd agent can save a client 
money by hunting through the jungle of 
airline fare structures for the best deal One 
way is to exploit promotional fare offers on 
some routes. Another is to include a more 
distant paint cm a ticket (to which yon do not 
actually travel) to take advantage of varia- 
tions in governme nt-adjusted fares or soft 
cmrepciesL Planning an east-west trip a year 
ahead can save up to 40 percent without any 
loss of flexibility, according to one travd 
tap®ent.-^We^havc a team^aL.i&» mr -brokers • 
WOO. do Heaift with and manipulate 

‘rules on complex itineraries,” he says. 

Travd agents can hdp negotiate special 
discounts with airlines, especially on fre- 
quently traveled routes. They should also be 
mile to demonstrate to corporate clients the 
savings they have made through monthly. 



i*8 no prize for guessing that the solu- 
tion bemg urged by American Express is for 
companies to centralize their travel spending 

with its Travd Management Services divi- 
rion and to make more use of corporate 
plastic in the form of the green Amex card, 
which, it claims, can cover 80 percent of 
business expenses away from the office. ■ 


TRAVEL 


What’s Doing in Honolulu 


by Robert Trumbull 


H onolulu — whai's the best 

time to visit Honolulu? Anytime. 
The Hawaiian clima te is so consis- 
tently balmy that the native Poly- 
nesian language has uo word for weather. 
Normal daytime highs range from 80 degrees 
Fahrenheit (27 degrees centigrade) between 
December and March to 87 degrees — on 
rare occasions a little higher — between July 
and September. The annual rainfall of only 
about 23 inches (59 centimeters) is also even- 
ly distributed, though winter is a little wetter. 

Could this climatic bliss, along with other 
attractions, make Hawaii too popular? Even- 
tually yes. says a demographer from the 
East- West Center, an international research 
and educational institution in Honolulu. The 
influx of tourists — more than 4.7 million 
last year — could, if it continues, discourage 
discriminating travelers, he predicted, and 
an effort is under way to improve Hawaii’s 
image in what the tourism industry calls the 
upscale market 

For 60 cents (exact fare needed) the city 
buses take viators to or near most points of 
interest in Honolulu and even clear around 
Oabu, the island on which the capital city is 
situated. Call 531-161 1 for bus information. 
(The area code for the state is 808.) 

All national car rental agencies are repre- 
sented at the Honolulu International Airport 
and in Waikiki, the city's resort center. Driv- 
ers sometimes find Honolulu confusing be- 
cause of the many one-way streets and inad- 
equate street signs, so it is advisable to plan 
routes in advance. When flying to another 
island, check the three competitive inter- 
island carriers — Hawaiian Airlines (td: 
537-5100). Aloha Airlines (tel: 836-1111) 
and Mid Pacific Airlines (tel: 836-3313). 

Virtually all first-time visitors to Honolu- 
lu go to Pearl Harbor to see the Arizona 
Memorial, the national ahrin#! built over the 
sunken battleship of that name in which 
more than 1,100 navy men died during the 
Japanese air attack on Dec. 7, 1941. Only the 
free tour offered by the U. S. Navy, which 
includes a documentary film, puts visitors on 
board the shrine itself. The boat for the navy 
tour leaves the Visitor Center, just west of 
the city, every 15 minutes between 8 AM. 
and 3 P:M, except Mondays; it lasts about 
an hour and a quarter. Call 422-0561. 

A visit to Paradise Park in Manoa Valley 
is a scenic tropical experience, with jungles 
to walk through, and performances by 
trained buds. A restaurant offers a view of 
rain forests and gardens. The valley is raze of 
the raini est roots on the islan d, so telephone 
(td: 988-2141) to inquire about the weather. 
Open daily from 9:30 AM. to 5 P.M. Admis- 
sion $7 JO; $3.75 for children between 4 and 
12 . 

Another popular attraction is the Polyne- 
sian Cultural Center in the town of Laie on 
the island's north shore: In a setting of re- 
created villages representing half a Amm 
Polynesian cultures, students from the near- 
by branch campus of Brigham Young Uni- 
versity demonstrate traditional dances and 
arts and crafts. Admission is $14 for adults, 
;J-$ML50 for children, with an extra charge for 
lunch or dinner and an elaborate evening 
performance of island dances. For more in- 
formation, call 923-1861. The center does 
not serve alcohol and is dosed on Sunday. 

The Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, 
is one of the world’s leading repositories of 
Polynesian artifacts. Call 847-1443 for a 
tape-recorded message on the museum and 
the attached planetarium. Admission is 
$4.75; $2.75 for children 6 through 17. The 
museum is (yea daily from 9 AM. to 5 PjML 


Outstanding collections of vivid tropical 
fish, sharks and other marine creatures in 
simulations of their natural habitat am he 
seen at the Waikiki Aquarium, a short walk 
from the heart of W aikiki The aquarium is 


v ~. — -r 


:• r 





er 


SPA® 


by Craig Qaiborne 
and Pierre Franey 


! ’Si-' 



EW YORK— Over the 
have often been asked about 
origin of the word chowder, which 
has a distinctly American ling, 
v -f: .Surprisingly enough* the word is said to 
n ~ derive from the French word far cauldron, 
- : chaueB£r^ the vessel. in which the French 
~ -' ,s :V rwho migrated to America from their coastal 
- -r r regions cooked fish soups and stews. 

To tell the truth, we have rarely experi- 
. _T - mented with or created a dam chowder that 
.was completely to our liking- The dam bits 


' _ 


i:.: _;"m both soups funless ' 


were too rub- 


- : .-buy or chewy. The solution is not only in the 
1 t 'reasonings but in the preparation of the 


___ tough “muscles” of the dams 

?._ r _T -Ivwere chopped m the container of a food 
'■ .^./..'-processor rad the. bits simmered with the 
‘ . v - rern «r n nig ingredients .until tender. The soft 
• - ^ bodyportions were then chopped and added 

. /-toward the end. 

- r V%..- ■'--.'i Some years ago, we discovered a recipe in 
„'r ' a regional French cookbook for a chtnuBire 

: - •’ poisson, fish chowder, and ada p te d it We 
have elaborated on the original _ ingredients, 
put basica&y, it is a chowder with a French 
Javor. - .. 


unlit# 




; MANHATTAN CLAM CHOWDER 

i'J 24 dwfHkr dans x -~ 

A pomid lean sdt pork (see note) 

1 1% caps find|y chopped onions ' 

. y \ *up fineb dwpped greet pepper 
• I aq> finely chopped carrots 
* . j.-lkcup finely chopped celery 

\ eras orusted. canned, imported tomatoes 


■\ j • 

.vi- 1 

?■ : ; 

' 

i '4 i ■ 


_ -J cops dam brotii 
water 
. bay leaf . 


Salt te taste, if desired 
Ftdfafy gnDnd pepper to taste 


; ;t*es, about 1V4 asps 
s , y i'opfciel 3 N%sfed parsley. 




i m **' 


1 J- ■ .■ v‘ 
1 


L'Rcona and set aside the tough musde 
f each; dam* Reserve both the musde and 
after body portions. Chop the masdes as 
mefy as posable or purfc them in a food 
roce&sor. lea ving the meat, a bit coarse but 
me. Ttere should be about IV4 cups. 

*1 ; ^Git thesritporkmto very time dice. Put 
,.ie rfioe into a kettle and cook, stiriing often, 
: ntil they are zendered of fat and are slightly 
risp. •/ / 

3. Add the onions and cook, stirring, until 


they are wilted. Add the green pepper, car- 
rots and celery, and cook, stirring, about one 
minute: 

4. Add the chopped dam muscles, toma- 
toes, broth, water, bay leaf, thyme, salt and 
pepper. Bring to the bod and add the pota- 
toes. Simmer, skrmmtng the surface to re- 
move all trace of foam and scum, 20 to 30 
minutes or until the potatoes are trader. 

5. Finely chop the soft body portions of 
the dams or chap them using a food proces- 
sor. Add this to the chowder and continue 
cooking five minutes, skimming the surface 
as necessary. Remove the bay leaf . Stir in the 
parsley and serve. 

Yield: Ten to 12 servings. 

BOSTON CLAM CHOWDER 

24 chowder dams 
% pound lean salt pock (see note) 

2 tablespoons butter 

1 exp finely deed oraons 

2 ta^esnoom flour 
4 cops dam broth 

2 cops water 

Vh pounds potatoes, peeled and cut into V4- 
inch dice, about 3 cups . 

3 cqa mile 

1 cup heavy cream 

Salt to taste, if desired 

Freshly grand pepper to taste. 

1. Remove and set aside the tough musde 
of each elam. Reserve both the musde and 
the softs 1 body portions. Gum the muscles 
as finely as posable or puree than in a food 
processor, leaving the meal a bit coarse but 
fine . There should be about one and one- 
quarter cups. 

2. Cut the salt pork into very fine dice. Put 
the dice into a kettle and cook, stirring often, 
until they are rendered of fat rad are slightly 
crisp. Add half of the batter. 

3. Add the onions and cook, stirring, until 
they axe wilted. Sprinkle with flour and stir. 
Add the dam broth and water, stirring vigor- 
ously with a wire whisk. Add the chopped 
ffam muscles and cubed potatoes. Bring to 
the bofl and simm er 20 to 30 minutes until 
the potatoes are tender. 

4. Finely chop the soft body portions of 
the dams or chop them^ using a food proces- 
sor. Add this to the chowder and continue 
cooking five minutes. Stir in the milk, cream, 
salt and pepper. Bring to the simmer and 
swirl in the remaining one tablespoon of 
butter. Serve immediately. Serve, if desired, 
with common crackers or pilot crackers. 

Yield: Ten to 12 servings. 

Note; These traditional American dishes. 
In our opinion, must be made with salt pork 
or they will not be worth producing. 


CHAUDfERE DE POISSON 
(French fish chowder) 


re- 


5 pounds fish bones with head and 
moved 

2 cups dry white wine 

6 cups water 

2 cups coarsely chopped onions 

1 bay leaf 

2 cloves garlic, impeded but spBt in half 

2 sprigs fresh thyme or Vi teaspoon dried 

3 sprigs freshpardey 

2 ribs celery, broken hi half 
Salt to taste, if desired 
15 peppercorns 

VA pounds potatoes, peeled rad cut into 14- 
inch dice, about 2Vt caps 


1 dove garlic, finely minced 

2 cups finely chopped onions 

Vt cup finely chopped green pepper 
y* oqi finely chopped leeks 
Vi cup flour 

2 pounds white, nonofly fillets of fish su ch as 
flounder, sole or coil, or a combination of 
owh fkh 

Vi cop heavy cream 

Freshly ground pepper to taste 

3 tablespoons Rkard or Pernod, optional 

Finely chopped parsley for gantish. 

1. In a kettle or deep saucepan, combine 
the fish bones, wine, water, coarsely 
onions, bay leaf, sjriit cloves of gadxc, 
sprigs, parsley sprigs, celery, salt and pep- 
percorns. Simmer, uncovered, about 20 min- 
utes. Strain, discarding the solids. 

1 Meanwhile, prepare the potatoes and lei 
them stand in cold water. 

3. Heat the butter in a saucepan and add 
the minced garlic, finely chopped onions, 
green pepper and leeks. Cook, stirring, about 
5 to 10 minutes until the mixture is wilted. 

4 Sprinkle with flour and stir to distribute 
it evenly. Drain the potatoes and add them 
to the saucepan. Add six 
broth made in the first step, 
minutes or until the potatoes are trader. 

5 Meanwhile, prepare the fish. If flounder 
or sole is used, you win note that there is a 
line of tiny fish bones running down the 
center of each fillet. Run a knife on each side 
of this line and discard it Cut the fish fillets 
into one-and-one-half-inch cubes. Add the 
cubed fish to the chowder. Simmer about 
five to 10 minutes. Add the heavy cream, 
salt pepper and Ricard or Pernod. Serve 
piping hot sprinkled with chopped parsley. 

Yield: Six to eight servings. ■ 

CI9S5 The Sew York Time* 


X of the fish 
simmer 10 



Because of the large populatiOT^thiwts 
in various Asian countries, Honolulu is 
Lwnforthe^and«ccn^^ 

ethnic restaurants. Personal kvontes 
the years include the Maple Garden (9W 
lsenberg Street; tel: 
nese specialties include 

Thai Se (625 Kapahulu Avenu^jd. 



Statue of Kamehameha / in front of I olani Palace. 


open from 9 AML to 5 P.M- Admission 
$150; children under 16 free. 

A trip to Waimea Falls Park on the north 
shore two hours by the No. 52 bus from Ala 
Moana Center, can be a memorable all-day 
excursion through some of the island's most 
beautiful natural surroundings. 

For a real understanding of the city, past 
and present, spend a couple of hours walking 
around its compact downtown — morning is 
the best time, being cooler. A good starting 
point is Iolani Palace, the former residence 
of the last Hawaiian monarchy about 20 
minutes from Waikiki by the No.2 bus. To 
arp>n y a guided tour of this building, the 
only royal palace in the United States, tele- 
phone 536-6185. Nearby is the hikoric 
Kawaiahao Church, known as the Westmin- 
ster Abbey of Hawaii, where sermons are 

still delivered in the Hawaiian lan g ua g e. 

Most of Oahu’s 157 hotels and condomin- 
iums — nearly 38,000 rooms, cottages rad 
its — are crammed into Waikiki 
is seven-tenths of a mile (about one- 
kilometer) square. 

The newest addition to the Waikiki sky- 
line is the rebuilt Halekulani Hotel (2199 
Kalis Road, Honolulu 96815; 923-2311). 
Under the new owners, Mitsui of Japan, the 
informal cottage atmosphere of the old Ha- 
lekulani has been replaced by an emphas is 
cm elegance. The new construction consists 
of four interconnected buildings in a stepped 
design rising to 17 stories, but ret aining the 
old main budding. Nearly all the 456 rooms 
have sea views. Prices range from $145 a day 
to $2,000 for the deluxe suites. 

Still a favorite is die venerable Royal Ha- 
waiian Hotel, the “Pink Palace,” right on the 
beach (2259 Kalakaua Avenue, Honolulu 


96815; tel: 923-7311). Rooms start at $95 a 
day for a garden view to $250 for a sweeping 
vista of the beach and Diamond Head, an 
extinct volcano. Suites are $295 to $2,000. 


for Japanese fare. AD are reasonaniy 
For an authentic Polynesian PT J- 

$9.75 Hawaiian dinner at the Tamtiatt_u- 
nai, the poolside restaurant, of tiw 
Hotd (1811 Ala Moana Boulevard;, td: w- 

6541). The menu includes kafua pigCjJJ 611 ' 
roasted pork) and pipikaitla (jerked beet). 

A dependable old favorite with exceflrat 
food and service at moderate prices is the 
f-aniis, sometimes called the Crabs Brouer 
(2100 Kalakaua Avenue; tel: 923 - 2324 ). it 
abruptly dropped its stria jacket-ana-tie 
rule after King Hussein of Jordan rad his 
entourage, unaware of the regulation, 
showed up one night in aloba shirts. 

Oahu »nd other islands contain many in- 
viting wilderness trails for hikers. However, 
before choosing one. check with the outdoor 
recreation section of the State Department 
of Land and Natural Resources (td: 548- 
7455) to be sure that your choice is notone of 
those the agency has listed as dangerous 
because of a history of holdups rad unpleas- 
ant encounters with marijuana growers. Of 
25 popular trails on Oahu, 13 are so listed. 

The Hawaii Visitors Bureau has an office 
in the Waikiki Business Plaza (2270 Kala- 
kaua Avenue; td: 923-1811), where tourists 
can pick a listing of fairs, festivals and other 
special events on all the islands. ■ 

01985 The New York Times 



ThtNawYoATinM 


Twice As Much 
Art for Yout Money 



Buchwald 


W ASHINGTON — Flounder 
rushed into Bass’ office at 
the Stole Department and cried, 
“The secretary wants a slide pres- 
entation on the electio n s in Enchi- 
lada to show to the American peo- 
ple.” 

“I anticipated that,” said Bass. 
“I’ve been putting one together. Sit 
down. 

“This is the 
Garcia family, 
which lives in Mi- 
ami and which fi- 
nanced the Liber- 
al Peasant Assas- 
sination Pam of 
Mirad Tortilla.” 

“Who is Tortil- ■ 
la?” 

“He is known 
as ’The Hammer' 
because his people like to beat on 
opposition ooliticians with 
hammers. In 1971 we called him 
Enchilada’s ‘Criminal of the Year.’ 
But he got 25 percent of the vote.” 

“Wow, it’s going to be hard for 
us to support him.” 

“Not necessarily. We found a 

If you purchased this Trib at a newsstand, you’re > 
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W 




WASHINGTON — Every time 
Secretary of Defense 
Weinberger goes abroad, I 
get the willies. The success of every 
mission seems to be based on how 
much UJS. military equipment be 
can give or sell to the country he 
visits, as well as his ability to per- 
suade the bead of the state he is 
drinking tea with 
to build up his 
armed forces. 

I don't mind 
when Weinberger 
does a selling job 
on a Third world 
power, but 1 start 
shaking when he 
puts pressure on 
a country Uke Ja- 
Buchwald pan to get its mil- 
itary act together. 

This is what Secretary Wein- 
berger has just done on a trip to 
Tokyo. He wants the Japanese to 
re ar m and become a military pow- 
er to be reckoned with. 

To those of us who served in 
World War II, memories die hard 
when it comes to allowing a power- 

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Page 8 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1985 


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Heralh 


Wlh Tie New York Timex and Hm Wuhingun Pm 


Sri b un e 


Losers Win in Quebec 


Quebec's separatist movement, as a crucial 
force in Canadian politics, has now ended Its 
great advocate for the past 17 years, the Parti 
Quebecois, voted at its convention in Montreal 
last weekend to loosen fatally its commitment 
to the cause. The party continues to favor an 
independent Quebec in principle, but it no 
longer intends to make independence the issue 
in the next provincial election. 

The vote was an acknowledgment that, 
among French Canadians, the impulse toward 
national independence has been fading fast 
The party’s membership is f allin g, and the 
surge of enthusiasm for sovereignty that car- 
ried it to power in Quebec nine years ago win 
no longer keep it there. The leadership of the 
Parti Quebecois decided that, if it wants to 
stay in office, it is going to bave to set aside 
indefinitely any serious talk of separation. 

This outcome of the separatist challen ge is a 
triumph for Canadian democracy. There was a 
time, in the middle 1970s. when it seemed that 
Canada was not far from splitting into two or 
perhaps more fragments. It was not easy to see 
the terms on which French-speaking and En- 
glish-speaking Canadians might be reconciled. 
But the federal structure held. 

One reason was the language law that the 
Parti Quhbecois enacted, requiring much wid- 
er use of French in the province. That met the 
sharpest grievance of the French-speaking 


population — that they frequently could not 
use their own language to earn their livings and 
carry out their business in a province in which 
they were the majority by nearly four to one. 
One consequence of that law was a shift by 
some b usiness es to Toronto, an unwelcome 
reminder of the economic costs that national 
independence might impose. 

But there is more to it than that. 

In Quebec 25 years ago the English-speak- 
ing minority was urban and educated — the 
manag erial and professional middle class. 
Quebec's working class, and the countryside, 
mostly spoke French, and among them the 
average level of education was well short of a 
high school diploma. But in the 1960s, after 
years of political passivity. French Canada 
began to press aggressively its claims to equali- 
ty. That generated the separatist movement. 

Nearly a generation later. French is far more 
widely used in business in Quebec. More im- 
portant. the tremendous expansion of higher 
education has greatly increased opportunities 
for young French Canadians and expanded 
the numbers of them in technical and manage- 
rial jobs. Language lines no longer follow so 
dosely the boundaries of social and economic 
dass. The separatists’ failure as a party of 
political revolution owes much to their historic 
success as a party of social reform. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Zeal in New Zealand 


The latest episode in the trials and tribula- 
tions of die United States as an allian ce leader 
is unfolding in New Zealand. The new Labor 
government there said it would not let midear- 
powered or nudear- armed ships enter its ports 
or waters. The United States responded, en- 
tirely properly, that such a prohibition was 
inconsistent with New Zealand's obligations 
under the ANZUS treaty binding the two 
countries and Australia. This is the time of 
year when these things are ordinarily arranged, 
and the United States is now testing the New 
Zealanders by requesting permission for U.S. 
Navy warships to make a routine port call in 
March. A countdown of sorts has begun. 

What most strikes the American eye is New 
Zealand's evident zeal for this gathering fric- 
tion. The impetus does not lie simply in the 
familiar European-style combination of anti- 
nudear and leftist elements. The cause appears 
to be genuindy popular and nationalistic: a 
small country making its special contribution 
to the harnessing of the world's nuclear furies. 
New Zealand may not be trembled by threats 
to its security, but large parts of its electorate 
are agitated by the perceived challenge to its 
integrity as a sovereign state. 

Jnited States has been trying to talk the 


new prime minister, David Lange, a Methodist 
preacher's son, into finding a way to continue 
the defense cooperation required for a working 
alliance. Mr. Lange's response is perhaps best 
indicated by his scheduled participation in a 
coming Oxford Union debate with the Rever- 
end Jerry Falwell on the motion “that the 
Western nudear alliance is morally indefensi- 
ble." Mr. Lange is arguing the affirmative. 

It was always possible for Washington to 
avert its gaze, pretend that Labor’s election 
was a bad dream and wait for a fresh turn of 
New Zealand's political wheel Far there can 
be no pleasure or profit in entering into what is 
bound to be a tense encounter with an ally — 
an encounter, moreover, that can easily be 
painted in David vs. Goliath colors. 

But an alliance that is an alliance only in the 
even-numbered years is not an alliance. And 
the leader of several alliances does nor have the 

luxury of sitting it out. Its leadership responsi- 
bilities require it to make its best fair effort to 
engage its fellow democracies' partitipation in 
the agreed modes of cooperation. 

New Zealand retains its sovereign right to 
decide whether alliance with the United States 
still serves its national needs. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Better the Perez Way 


Die Reagan administration has pulled out 
of World Court proceedings in the Nicaraguan 
case, saying that the forum is being used Tor 
political and propaganda purposes." But of 
course. What other purposes did Nicaragua 
ever have? That is insufficient reason for the 
United Stales to engage in unilateral political 
disarmament. Better to stay at The Hague and 
argue that whatever it is doing with respect to 
Nicaragua it is doing with its friends in collec- 
tive self-defense against Nicaragua’s depreda- 
tions against them. That is its case, isn't it? 

Regrettably, the World Court is not the only 
or the most important forum on Central 
America from which the Reagan administra- 
tion is currently departing. It has just suspend- 
ed the bilateral talks with Nicaragua that it 
had been conducting since mid- 1984 in Mexi- 
co. The reason given for hailing the talks is the 
same as the reason cited for entering them: to 
induce Managua to be more cooperative in the 
Contadora discussions of a regional solution. 

The impression conveyed is that the admin- 
istration is toughening its line. To what pur- 
pose? It is four years since Mr. Reagan entered 
the White House, and the basic ambiguity of 


his policy is intact Acceptance of a Sandinist 
regime moving toward peace with its citizens 
and neighbors is stated as the Reagan adminis- 
tration’s goaL But its support of the contras 
and the longings plainly mible in its heart of 
hearts suggest to the Sandinists, and to many 
others, an intent to overthrow the regime. 

A dear sign of the possibilities of coexis- 
tence is needed. The form it should take is for 
the administration to let the contra operation 
end. That is the Carlos Andris Perez solution. 
The former president of Venezuela declined to 
attend Daniel Ortega Saavedra's inauguration 
as president of Nicaragua on grounds that the 
Sandinists had discouraged a role for the op- 
position and thereby “cheated" friends of their 
revolution. Yet he opposes the U.S.-sponsored 
insurgency and is pressing for withdrawal of 
both the U.S. and the Cuban-Soviet presence 
in the region and for consolidation of the 
Nicaraguan revolution on the bans of plural- 
ism, a mixed economy and nonalignment 

That worldrclass democrats ukc Carlos 
Andres Pfcrez still see a way is powerful reason 
for the United States to help him find it 
— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Other Opinion 


A Murky Spy Scandal in India 


The wild conjectures from New Delhi about 
Indian “Quislings" betraying vital defense se- 
crets to foreign agents for as Utile as a bottle of 
scotch appear to fit all too familiar a pattern. 
True, (he deputy military attache of the French 
Embassy has left under a cloud, and the gov- 
ernment has detained 16 people, including 
some aides dose to the offices of the prime 
minister and the president. The mystery still is: 
Who was spying for whom? 


What may be safely conceded is that lately 
there has been an alarming drop in the effi- 
ciency and morale of India's intelligence and 
security services. How alarming was brought 
home by two incidents- One was the lack of 
adequate intelligence about the arms buildup 
inside the Golden Temple in Amritsar when 
the Indian army stormed it in June, suffering 
needlessly high casualties. The other was the 
unexplained lapses in the security detail as- 
signed to guard Prime Minister Indira Gandhi 
— South China Morning Post (Hong Kong % 


FROM OUR JAN. 25 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Airplane 'Bombing’ Is Tried 
LOS ANGELES — The Uni led States Gov- 
ernment entered the recent aviation meeL here 
in a spectacular manner. Lieutenant Paul W. 
Beck, of the army, detailed as Government 
observer at the meet, was taken up in a Curtiss 
biplane and attempted to drop bombs on a 
given spot from a height of 250 feet. The 
bombs were represented by bags of sand. Lieu- 
tenant Bed: dropped several bombs but failed 
to hit the mark by from fifteen to twenty-five 
feeL Mr. Curtiss was compelled to bring down 
the biplane before the experiments could be 
completed, because of engine trouble. In a 
subsequent test. Lieutenant Beck came nearer 
the mark, but missed striking it by four or five 
feet. These latter tests were reported to be most 
important from a military viewpoint. 


1935: Britain Publishes India BID 

LONDON — The government of India bill 
which if adopted will grant Home Rule to 
India, was published [on Jan. 24], The text 
follows the project for federal government for 
India approved last November by committees 
appointed by the House of Commons and the 
House of Leras. In view of the agitation which 
has raged around the earlier draft, it may be 
stated (hat tbe bill will satisfy neither the 
Conservatives, led by Winston Churchill nor 
the Pan-Indian Congress, which demands 
complete independence. Mahatma Gandhi 
who formerly opposed the federation scheme 
as head of the Congress, modified his attitude 
recently, but his new policy will not be known 
until he makes his statement when the contents 
of the bill are published in New Delhi. 


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CAP WEINBERGER, 

StHooioF 


\ I 9 TH CENTURY 

Tm 


'Far too intonate and suggestive a stance, Mr. Shultz — farther apart, ifyoupleaseT 


The Case Against Belief in Arms Control 


N EW YORK — Even some enthusiasts of 
arms control admitted that there was some- 
thing almost dementedly disproportionate in the 
press and television coverage of the Shultz-Gro- 
myko meeting in Geneva, what troubled these 
enthusiasts was the danger that excessive expec- 
tations might be aroused, leading to disappoint- 
ments that would bring discredit upon the entire 
process of arms control negotiations. 

But what if the journalistic treatment inadver- 
tently exposed a truth about the illusions sur- 
rounding arms control that have taken root in 
our political culture in general? 

These illusions rest on the idea that by negoti- 
ating with the Soviets we can not only cut down 
the size of the arsenals on both sides but can also 
render them less threatening, thus increasing 
stability and reducing the risk of nuclear war. 

This idea is so widely taken as intellectually 
and morally self-evident that anyone who ques- 
tions it is treated with incredulity and outrage. 
Yet there is virtually no evidence to support the 
faith in arms control and a great deal of evidence 
that makes it seem altogether irrationaL 
Consider the record. In the 1920s and '30s, 
belief in disarmament produced a series of agree- 
ments between the western democracies and 
their totalitarian enemies of that period. Japan 
and Germany. The best that can be said for those 
agreements is that if their purpose was to prevent 
the outbreak of war, they obviously fallal 
Die worst that can be said — and it has been 
said by Eugene Rostow, a former director of tbe 
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency — 
is that those agreements helped to bring on 
World War II “by inhibiting the possibility of 


By Norman Podhoretz 


military preparedness" through which Britain 
and France could have deterred the war. 

Most students of the period accept this assess- 
ment Some argue that nuclear weapons have 
created a greater incentive to disarmament than 
existed in the p re- nuclear age. Yet the arms 
control agreements of the nuclear age have never 
made good on their promise of reductions in the 
quantity or quality of nudear arsenals. 

The Test Ban "Treaty of 1963, one of the 
proudest achievements of the arms control pro- 
cess, may have driven the testing of new nuclear 


vaunted achievement of arms control) — to in- 
crease the quantity and improve the quality of its 
weapons. The United States, following the prece- 
dent of the democracies in the 1930s, slashed its 
military budgets in the years between the two 
strategic arms limitations agreements. 

There is nothing accidental about this pattern. 
In the nudear age, no less than in the pre-nuclear 
age, the democracies, for economic and other 
reasons, have been eager to spend as little as 
posable on defense. Their totalitarian 


Hi wniK, 


in a relentless pursuit of imperialist expansion 

er for mili- 


weapons underground, but it has diminished 
re number of 


neither the number of tests nor the number of 
new weapons developed in such tests. 

Nor have the limitations established by negoti- 
ation realized their promise of greater stability. 
Thus the placing of more than one warhead an a 
single missile, now regarded by almost all arms 
control enthusiasts as destabilizing, was itself a 
product of the first strategic arms limitation 
treaty, which restricted the number erf missiles 
rather than the number of warheads. 

Arms control in the nuclear age also resembles 
the disarmament treaties of the 1920s and '30s in 
another way: It has led to cutbacks by the demo- 
cratic side and increases on the totalitarian side. 

As Japan and Germany did with the disarma- 
ment agreements of the 1930s, the Soviet Union 
took full advantage of what was legally permitted 
under the first strategic arms limitation treaty — 


and hegemony, have been just as eager 
tary superiority. Given these asymmetrical aims, 
arms control talks have inevitably served as a 
screen for unilateral cuts by the democratic side. 

In short neither the historical record nor the 
nature of the superpower conflict provides ratio- 
nal justification for the faith in aims control. We 
are far more justified in characterizing this faith 
as the great superstition of our time. 

Like all superstitions, this one is rooted in fear, 
and like all fears it can easily prompt action 
whose unintende d consequence will be to bring 
about the very thing it is meant to avoid. This 


could happen — indeed it is already happening 
- efe 


—through erosion of^sujypoiifor defense spend- 


ing and a w eakening of the U.S. military capabil- 
ity that has been the only reliable guarantor of 
peace in the nuclear age. Worse yet, it could 
bring abandonment of the Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative, which does hold out rational hope for 
eventual escape from the threat of nuclear war. 


while also cheating on its sister agreement, the 
Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of 1972 (another 


The writer is editor of Commentary magazine. 
He contributed this to The New York Tunes. 


An Occasion to Restrain 


Police Powers in Poland 


By Leopold Unger 


B RUSSELS — Two Polish trials 
are being held simultaneously in 
a provincial courtroom in Torun. 
One is of the four men indicted for 
the murder of Father Jerzy Popie- 
luszko — the since-demoted security 
officers who did the killing, a captain 
and two lieutenants, and their imme- 
diate superior, a colonel accused of 
“instigating and abetting" the crime. 

After the testimony of defendants 
and witnesses, it is clear that the 
government is not seeking the whole 
truth. Tbe killing was the dimax of “a 
series of unexpected events," said tbe 
main defendant. Captain Grzegprz 
Piotrowski. The government has de- 
cided not to go to the source. Four 
scapegoats will have to do. 

But the other trial in progress in 
Torun reaches much further. There 
are 30 million judges and one defen- 
dant: the system that rules Poland. 

Anyone familiar with tbe Commu- 
nist system knows that officers who 
are party members and graduates of 


the system's political schools would 
not assassinate a figure like Father 
Popieluszko without asking ques- 
tions, even under orders from an im- 
mediate superior. That is not the way 
the Interior Ministry operates any- 
where in the Eastern bloc. 

Nor are these ordinary officers. All 
were attached to Department IV of 
the Interior Ministry, which handles 
religious affairs — surveillance of 
and contacts with the clergy. 

Colonel Adam Pietruszka repre- 
sented the Interior Ministry several 
times in its contacts with the church 



THE EVENING NEWS. 
By Kobyltashi In PoUtvko (Warsaw). 
Cartoonists A Writer* Syndicate. 


hierarchy. Captain Piotrowski was 
i of the i 


lieve that one of their group could 
and kill 


one ot tne officers who protected the 
during his June 1983 trip to 
1; and he accompanied Arch- 
bishop Bronislaw Dabrowski on a 
visit to Lech Walesa when the Soli- 
darity leader was interned. These 
were security officers who had the 
confidence of Poland's rulers for sen- 
sitive and wide-ranging assignments. 

They evidently felt entitled to be- 


grve an order to torture ana kill an 
innocent man and that they could 
cany out the order, go unpunished 
and even be rewarded. 

How could that be? The answer is 
that under this system the police is 
not at the service of the state, but the 
state is a hostage of the police. And 


party apparatus, the police and the 
t KGB. which protects its own 
stand. 


Soviet KGB. which 
men operating in Pol 
Tbe group that took over the re- 
gime on Dec. 13, 1981, owes its sur- 
vival mainly to the police, which has 
obeyed orders even when it meant 
firing into crowds made up of broth- 
ers, fathers and friends. 


the guilty cannot be punished by a 
Lem that is 


system that is too weak to resist the 
pressures of its own structure — (he 


Yes, I Do Remember the Kdrean War 


L OS ANGELES — I dug into a 
/ cardboard box in a dark i 


corner 

of my doset the other afternoon to 
find the only souvenir I had kept 
from the Korean War. It is a photo- 
graph of me and my best friend at 
the time, a kid from Green point, 
Brooklyn, named Joe Gtera. We 
were two 20-year-olds decked out 
in combat gear, trying to look the 
pan of mean marines. I had an M-l 
rifle and Joe held a .45 he had 
borrowed for the picture. 

Despite oar efforts to appear the 
very epitome of what the corps used 
to call “perfect killing machines," 
the fear and uncertainty of what lay 
ahead was in our eyes. As well it 
should have been. In less than a 
week, Joe Citera would be dead. 

I sat looking at tbe photograph 


By AJ Martinez 


some of them last week after receiv- 
ing a call from a man named Larry. 

He had guessed from references 
in earlier stories I had written that 
I might have been in Korea during 
what everyone in the 1950s was 
calling the “conflict" or the “police 
action.” He was trying to form a 


Tribute, if required 
at all, is due those who 
died on both sides. 


for a long time, until the light had 
ined from 


drained from the sky and the room 
was in almost total darkness. I was 
trying to recall the names of others 
I had known who died in what 
Winston Churchill once referred to 
as “the war that can't be won, can't 
be lost and can't be ended." 

But now we are three decades 
removed from those days of drums 
and bugles, and the names have 
vanished from my memory as 
quickly as Joe Citera vanished from 
my life on a bloody piece of land 
known only by its numerical desig- 
nation. Hifl 749. 

I put the photograph away and 
said nothing for a long time. 

I had not consciously thought 
about the Korean War for years. 

I say “consciously" because there 
are still nightmares occasionally, 
and 1 know that every terrifying 
moment of tbe 15 months spent in 
combat will be replayed for the rest 
of my life in a shadowy corner of 
ray mind. In fact I began to see 


group to lobby for a Washington 
memorial honoring the 54,000 
Americans who diet! back then for 
a cause none of us fully understood. 


I left him dangling because the 
thought of a memorial had not oc- 
curred to me before. That after- 
noon I dug out the picture of Joe, 
and in subsequent days tried to 

E iece together the images of what 
ad transpired in Korea and how I 
had felt about it, like a child trying 
to recall the terror of old thunder. 

There was the sound of Joe's an- 
guished voice on his dying night; 
and the napalm-charred bodies of 
enemy soldiers frozen bv sudden 
death in the posture of flight; and 
the explosive disappearance of a 
mari ne not 20 feet away who had 
stepped on a mine: and the brittle 
winter roar of a thousand mortar 
shells as they struck like bolts of 
ligh tnin g from an iron gray sky. 

I saw a young corporal (was that 
me?), M-l ready, at the point of his 
squad, rounding the bluff of a cliff 
on a narrow pathway high above an 


unnamed valley, coming face to 
face with a North Korean soldier, 
his automatic weapon at the ready. 

There was a split second of 
stunned hnmobility, a heartbeat of 
indecision, and as I studied his face 
in the still-life of that isolated en- 
counter — a smooth, round face 
with eyes that shone like polished 
coal — I remember thinking, my 
God. he’s only a kid! 

We were trained well the two of 
us, and our instincts were honed to 
survival We reacted almost simul- 
taneously in a conditioned reflex of 
two weapons pointed, but only one 
trigger pulled. I fired first. Tbe ene- 
my soldier (a boy!) disappeared 
from the ctiffside as though he had 
been jerked from the ledge by a 
cable. His body continues to fall 
through my dreams. 

Joe Citera and an unknown 
Ndrth Korean — oddly compan- 
ionable in the mutual context of 
their terrible destinies. 

It was not my intention to bur- 
den anyone with my memories of a 
war best forgotten, bnt I did want 
to explain to a man named Larry, 
whose last name I didn't even write 
down, why 1 will not participate in 
a campaign that would honor only 
the Americans who died in Korea. 

Tribute, if required at all is due 
those on both sides far having died 
so young and so bravely in such a 
brutal exercise of governmental 
power over our lives. 

But, by honoring the dead, we 
would be honoring their killers, and 
I don't think I will ever be able to 
forgive myself for blasting another 
human being into tbe long, slow 
turns of humanity’s sad history. 


expected. They will be condemned 
will i 


But others will continue. 

Unless ... Unless General Wqj- 
dech JaruzelskL the — ‘ ' 



aL If certain limits were now imposed 
on arbitrary police powers in Poland, 
history would have been made in a 
Communist regime, and the sacrifice 
of Father Popieluszko would not 
have been in v ain. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Forecasting 
Slow Death 
For Britain 


.7* - 


I- \ 



By Anthony Lewis 


B oston — Not so 
would have been 


...Si* 

Htifi 



the pound worth little more 
dollar. But when it happened las 
week, when tbe pound sank to 51.12 
there was no great fuss. 

The reaction, or lack of it. was ever 
more telling than the figures. The' 
world has grown used to the 
of Britain — that is what the 
told us. What once would have 
humiliation was now 
What Americans an 
rich countries mostly do about Brit-!. 
ain is cluck at. its economic misfor- >. 
tune — and take advantage. Britain is >■ - 
already thick with tourists and kwill ' -. -■ ‘ 
be more so. More foreigners will fly .: 
over for the Harrods said or buy;..- - 
property in London. For such it wflF: 
be forever England, coxy and quaint. ; ;r 
But much that the world valued in'. - . 
England and Scotland and Wales is J. 
being eaten away by the economic- " - 
decline. For example, when J.K. Gal--- J 
braith wrote of “private affluence- -j..- 
and public squalor in the United:-' 
States, we saw a contrasting picture: ' 
in Britain. We saw its parks and pub- : ‘ 

lie transportation, its government: ■ - : . 
support for the am. Now those pnb-r 
lie investments are being squeezed. 

Peter Jenkins of The Guardian, the : ' 
leading British political columnist. - 
tn al 


-loug^i t W - 11 

unthmkable']] HtH 1 * 4 

ion: than thill 1 y ... r > t-. T* 


h J> 

■J* 




wrote last month about the conse--. 
quences “of a decade and a half - 
accelerated decline." He quoted an _• 
observer of 17th-century Spain as' .::: 
saying that its decline had become so 7 -.: ' 
apid that “one can actually see it" 7 


rapt 


occurring from one year to the next" ^-.1 - 
Mr. Jenkins said: “We see it our- ' ’ 
selves. We see urban delapidation'; 
and squalor, a rotting housing stock '" - ' 



broken or not working. One of Mrs. ~ - - . 
Thatcher’s former cabinet ministers. 

David Howell has noticed this ‘even 
in the weeds and broken pavements ' ' - 

at Hyde Park Corner .. . h r: ' 

Even more depressing than physi- w 
cal decay is tbe sense of decline in 
things of the min d. A country whose ; ; 
laboratories once Alumina led the sd- 7. . 
entific world has cut way back on'_.\. 
scientific' research- The money avafl-".'~ . .’ 
able for universities is down, and in . .'-1 _ . 
ah likelihood it is going down fortha. . . . 

“Here we have a case study in the 
politics of decline," Mr. Jenkins said vr; 
trf that “Our basic researdi, our tech- ' 
nological innovativeness — surely - ’ ■’ 
among tbe keys to future corapeti- - ' ‘ 
tiveness and prosperity — cannot be 
kept up because we are already too - - 

poor, too uncompetitive." 

More than 3 million Britons are - r 


unemployed, a rate approaching 13 . 

percent A depressing part of thai_- 
picture is the tmemployment among 
- j university graduates.. Many of the - : J.. 
brightest young women and men _ 

have been in pan-time work fa -LVl" 
years; or on the dole, because there ". 
are no jobs in their fields. ~ _ V 

Economists and historians have 
traced the decline back to Victorian .'.'r* r * 
times. The rot set in, they suggest " 
even as tbe empire reached its apo- 
gee. The country emphasized glory 
abroad over enterprise al home. It 
rewarded philosophers and sneered 
at businessmen. The roots of the Brit- 
ish disease, it is often said, are 
But the politicians of the last 
years or so have cer tainl y accelerated 'f-.-. 
the trend. First place in the parade of r * 
fools must go to Sir Harold Wilson, 
the Labor prime minister who came ^ 
to power in 1964 talking about what ^ 
the white beat of technology would ^ 
do for Britain, and then proceeded to J' - 
drift in a dream world of bis own Va 


* rrmn 1 


accomplishments invisible to others. 


But prime ministers of both parties ^ 


have done their bit since then. - Q 
Margaret Thatcher is distinguished a 


among tire postwar prime minis ters 
rid belief in one economic 


In exchange for such loyalty, these 
forces took the state hostage. They 
have had the privileges (hat the state 
can offer, particularly immunity 
from prosecution. Kidnappings and 
killings have been the work of “un- 
knowns." Solidarity activists have 
died during police interrogation, but 
□ever has a policeman been found 
guilty of such a murder. 

That kind of impunity breeds vigi- 
lantes. Four of than went too far and 
are thus guilty of professional negli- 
gence — their plan did not work as 


by her rigi 
faith; monetarism. She has pursued it t. 






long past rationality, greeting tbe un- ^ 


decay with 
has shed its 


and the physical 
about how lnanstty 
us fat and is now in 




fighting trim. Yet that same industry, 
with all the advantaees of a low 






-.11 
. 'r 


St* 


the advantages of a 
pound, is losing out in exports. 

The worst of it is the lack of 3 
credible political alternative now. La- 
bor has moved so far to the left, and 
is so riven by the continuing coal 
strike, that it hardly seems a potential ' - 

govemingparty. The Alliance of Lib- > 

erals and Soda! Democrats is looking 
up but has not reached the point of 
credibility for many voters. 

Peter Jenkins has chronicled the 
decline for years now. Sometimes he 
has seen the chance for a miraculous 
regeneration. But last fall he took 
“the gloomy view that the adaptation 
that would be required of us, after all 
that has gone before, will prove too 
great — and that, like Venice, success 
will consist in manag in g a long, civi- 
lized and dignified demise." 

The New York Tones. . 


Mr. Martinez is a staff writer for 
the Los Angeles Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Sovereignty in Lebanon 


in g “Israel Blames Lebanon 
for Halt in Talks'' (Jan. 8): 

A clarification of Lebanon’s posi- 
tion may help to correct any misun- 
derstanding among your readers. 

Lebanon has always advocated an 
expanded role for United Nations 
forces, and believes that the United 
Nations can make a significant con- 
tribution to establishing peace and 
security in the frontier region. 

Lebanon has also undertaken to 
guarantee security arrangements on 
her southern border. 

Clearly no breach of sovereignty is 
acceptable within her territory, and 
therefore Lebanon cannot permit any 
force other than her own army to 
provide security and maintain the 

rule of law in southern Lebanon. Is- 
rael's attempts to make use — in 
some areas of tbe national territory 
— of the so-called South Lebanon 
Army (or Southern Lebanon militia) , 
which is sponsored and armed by 


Israel am consequently rejected by 
the government of Lebanon as at- 
tempts to partition the country. 
General AHMED EL-HAJJ. 
Ambassador of Lebanon. 

London. 


An Immigrant Worker 


Regarding the feature “Yes, It Was 
a Starry Night for Van Gogh" M®*- 
18): Vincent Van Gogh was Dutch, 
not French. You might say he was 

a travaHleur immigri. 

NELLY F. OTTENS. 

Paris. 


Letters intended for puUicatioa 
should be addressed "Letters tolti 
Editor” and must contain the writ- 
er’s sipiature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief &d 
are subject to editing. We cannot. 

be responsible far the return ® 
unsolicited manuscripts * 









Hcralbca^Sribune 


Statistics Index 


"CP*w *2 



ffi 


AMEX friew P.M Brans rwons P.VI 
■uQC Nftp/laMP.U . Fttns rote notes p.u 
hYSE mi&s R-10 Goto mortals P. 9 
Mgfe/bws P.M Intern* rotts P. 9 
stocks P.14 Marta* swwnory P.1D 
P.9 QnHons P.12 

Wnodnks p.u OTCstw* p.u 

Btoktonta 


PJH Ottter mode** P.U 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 




IpRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1985 


** 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 

Page 9 




G 


TECHNOLOGY 


.jChips With 'Intelligence’ 




u . 

w nea ■„ 



erts 




'■haiSljipitr 

■ hat ti£ Ct * l '*4^i«ni! 

*'**?+*»*- 
Hr/jw 


S 


By ANDREW POLLACK 

New Tor* 7 Tmo Sente 

AN FRANCISCO — It has leas been s omething of a 
paradox that the simplest tasks tor the human mxnd — 
'Siencan " '"•Hmt/j" l W sufi as rccognizing an object, ubdexstanding. speech and 
;n; . language, and reasoning with common sense — 'nave been 

cl. it - ip^Ti'among the most baffling and taxing t&ks for computers. 
ij iak e ^, ec %-’ u:fi - Now, however, a vanety of compiler chips specifically de- 
ucl niikV 38 ^ i -iGkrignad for artificial intelligence are bdag developed. They prom- 
r . Lise to lead to computers that are fasteipnd cheaper in perfarming 
•iij such ««ks as understanding la 

m LttiS*Ak fl ‘experts in such tasks as diag- 
r EnElanrt nosing diseases and offering 

«h ihai L c ’^«f <r,v Hwestmaat advice, 
ani Soi j Such developments are in 

sen i-j, t 10 *it ,{ ij the early stages. ‘There are all 
euirif,,; ‘"sots of things going on, in 
rots of - J^Ttidimentaiy form,” said Fred 


in emulating human 


intelligence 


•lie ^cuaL-^^^^^Seber, a semiconductor m- 
s , 11 1? 0 ": 'dustry analyst at Dataquest, a 
r. Wj ‘f^^’Snaiket research com 
spwaiior. a ^RSan Jose, California. 



tax general- 
computers. 


so dose to reality that this 
be devoted to the topic at the 
inference, the annual srienrif- 
that will be hdd in New York 

, such as the microprocessors 
leant to be jacks-of -all-trades, 
that more narrowly 
[particular tasks. Already, such 
devdoped for such tasks as 
sen and analyzing complex 
: seismic tests. 

I requirements that tax gener- 
i in artificial intelligence 
ess the computer language 
are expensive, ranging m 
5100,000. 

sells a LISP machine, is working 
contract to shrink virtually the 
ip by 1986. 

& i r \ C*^ 15 ? 09 ’ 1 P YMBOLICS Inc. of dmbridge, Massachusetts, another 
vendor of such nadmk says it also is working on shrink- 
' e t n ing its machine ontoapip over the next several years. 

The development of sndtlSP processing chips would do for 
.c. artificial intelligence what tf development of the microprocessor 

• - "?.lTzzv!? *1 did for general computir" * t ™ KnB ,Tw ' Kro * nt ’ al ■**»«««»« ^ ° 
computer onto a single 

, T? ,‘; it would allow for a hu / reduction in costs and size. It also 

to be “embedded" in other 
•: * : v.j'i ~£~f“ r products, just as mkxoprdssors now are embedded in automo- 
~ It i bfo.cngpne*, refrigpratou 


- ,- ( j, ^ J,^ ( iwct month. 

- ' ^ *• “ General-purpose computer 

Hind in personal computers, 
[^Computer scientists long hav 
,y-. £ ^'focused chips can be masters 
- si- £13 Sc -1‘^ccjaBy designed circuits ha' 
from > ’ “ i-f-^controffing the video image 
signals, such as those from : 

Artificial intelligence has 
.\'^^itiaH>uiposeconq>uters. Today, 
z rir^-v^^oorfuse machines specially tafia 
„-£ ? p. '^‘iiiJmown as LISP. But these 
r .3 ^ '.iift ’-v- *'!»■: 'price from $20,000 to more 
:: Texas Instruments Inc, ~ 

'ct,- under a Department of 3 
K - -7. entire machin e onto a single! 


* -r-ac;, 
-iizxi: 


'nwDqartmentrf 

i processes in weapaos 

•r.t f^ujr maneuver by ‘ 

T:‘'Trs ; -i ii pick out thdr own 
. Last November, 
signed for processing 
: • - -~t . be in allowing robots to 

.r.::rr:g Marietta Corp^ can 

\ tional drcintstio one 

.• :■< by the huge number rf 

•:* ti Puttherpt<^r q> s cm 

: -rzn* Developing a 

■r. ■ :i' = 3 putting at least 10 

. !»«•* piece of silicon, 

. Institute ar Camerie-Klon 

“By the year 2 
dxq>,” Mr. Redd 
would have trou 


as 


for motanre, wants to place LISP 
lanlf t, winch would be able to 
missiles, which would be able to 


-.-V 


i. introduced a chip specaally de- 
iyzmg images. One appKcation will 
The chip, devdoped with Martin 
ly jataihftnng in par allel. Conven- 
a time and are rapidly overwhelmed 
ons needed to analyze images, 
ed as chip technology improves, 
artificial inteffigence chip wifi require 
-logic dements, or gates, onto a single 
Ra Reddy, director of the Robotics 
a University. 

le to have one billion gates on a 
it even such a “super drip,” he added, 
like a person. 



•ency Rates 


] 


• . :::= ‘ ' totoi 

-■.vr.w-- - Official Rxin&forJ 

FM. 


: rotes on Jon. 24 , endudng fees. 

, Bturaeb, Frankfurt, AWcn, Paris. New York rates ai 


Aaatmkna 15BS j; 

BrandKal U 45 ■ 

Fmkfnt SM» : 

lodom a» miss 5 

MUM 1*5140 p7 


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Porto 

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27723 283X15 
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95.11 

1X48- 

1X577 HA 
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Dollar Valnea 



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0XBB4 Matov-rtoeoH 
0109 Narw.'kroM 
OOBI PMLMM 
in pwLMtmto 
02792 Saadi rival 


Per 

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44*25 0X11 OAMcnruO 13281 

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9.174 01104 tMibW 9X42 

18X42 OBBTahMS 39.17 
171X0 0X344 TftaibM 27X24 

35*13 02722 UJLB.«rtato X47B 


”■ — :*-£i *. 


C5torRMCl.139 IrtS* 

(a) Commercial fc* D 8 ) Amto nw<toa^ to^ tonri one^ pound <d Amaonh^ iwded to 1 tui m dWor^ (*J 
unite ol to* (x) ub»«i iXprtUjlto o* W* 

Saura-TamM* AktrWvnWl Banco Commercto* Havana (Milan}; Banaue 
Wirfltanote da Par (Pail IMF (SDR); Bamwa Arena at Warnrttanalatrtmmstfssament 
(dinar, rival, dfepnl.ifrdata (ram RaaMnaadAF. 


Interest Rates 


] 


JEurocmrei^ Deposits 


Jan. 24 


.Ji 


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''' 3M. • ■«. -> 
aw. 5 Vh -> 

- 4M. - 

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StarOM . BMC ecu SDR 
[ 5 V. 5Mi - 5N T»- 12to 10W- MM. 9to -9* 7Hi - 81% 

IS* no I2W- IZHi MW- 1« 9S%-94% 7M.-8H. 

■ S*i 5A -9A Wto- 1»% W9V- »» 99% -PM. 8 -816 

:S% 51% - 5* 1210- T2W. 17 - II W, 99% ■ 9*. 816 - B» 

5* 5*-5Ki 119% • 12 THfc-Tllk 99%-Plh »% - *9% 

deraifiMOfSI million minimum rerKwAntonM. 
nfy (Hollar, DM. SF, Pound, FF); Lloyds Ben* (ECU); CHBxmk 


AsWour Rates 


Jan. 24 


n. 


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8th -8* 


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816 - ante 


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tills 7 X 4 7 X 5 

7 X 3 7 X 4 

775 777 


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Close 

Pm. 

Bonk Bam Roto 

12 

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12 

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1146 

114 k 

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Porto 1125 MW 302 X 1 30 Zjr — 0JB 

Zurich 302 X 0 30175 + 075 

louden 301-90 300 X 5 + 0 X 0 

New York - 299 X 0 - 1.90 

Official Rxlngs ft r London. Paris and Lunm- 
Hm «*** and rioilno Brices fcr Hang Kano 
and Zurich, Now York Comm currant amiroa. 
Ml rrka ht VSS pm ounce. 

Sourer; Rautan. 


EC lists 

Projects 
In Esprit 

104 Research 
Efforts Picked 

The Associated Press 
BRUSSELS — The European 
Community selected 104 projects 
last year to start the first five-year 
phase of a 10-year research pro- 
gram aimed at doting the technol- 
ogy gap with the United States, the 
community said Thursday. 

The projects' total cost is 360 
milli on European curr en cy units 
(5252 million). Half of each project 
is bong financed by the EC Com- 
mistion and hatf by the partici- 
pants — predominantly compa- 
nies, universities and research 
centers. 

The program's only non-Europe- 
an links are to the European sub- 
sidiaries of four U^.-based multi- 
national corporations: TIT Corp^ 
International Business Machines 
Corp., American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. and Digital Equip- 
ment Coip. No Japanese compa- 
nies are involved. 

Additional projects to be chosen 
later will bring die five-year cost of 
theprogram to 1J billion ECU. 

The program, approved by EC 
governments last February, is 
known as the European Strategic 
Program for Research and Devel- 
opment in Information Technol- 
ogy, or Esprit 

The EC Commission said its ini- 
tial selections, from 441 proposals 
submitted, were GnaL 
Esprit is designed to promote co- 
operation betwxn European busi- 
nesses and academic institutions in 
developing advanced microelec- 
tronics, software technology, ad- 
vanced information processing, of- 
fice systems and computer-aided 
manufacturing. 

Mach co ntr oversy was stirred 
over how many non-European 
companies should be allowed to 
participate. The link to IBM is par- 
ticnlany sensitive. A senior EC of- 
ficial said Thursday that a more 
visible IBM presence in Esprit 
would have been politically unpop- 
ular with member governments. 

The official said IBM's only in- 
volvement would be the participa- 
tion of its West German subsidiary, 
IBM Deutschland, in two projects. 


Oil Dealer Loses to Japanese System 

Tokyo Resists 
Free-Market Bid 
To Bring in Gas 


By Susan China 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — Taiji Sato had a 
modest proposal: He wanted to 
buy inexpensive gasoline from 
Singapore and sdl it to Japanese 
consumers for less than they now 
pay. 

Before tie dropped the idea re- 
cently in a glare of publicity 
ill will, the 31 -year-old oil im- 
porter had dashed with the pow- 
erful Ministry of Inte rnational 

Trade and Industry, lost his fi- 
nancial backing and helped to 
rekindle a debate about Japan's 
ml policy. 

There are few issues as sensi- 
tive here as ofi supplies, which 
the Japanese talk about with the 
emotion other nations reserve for 
defense. 

Japan imports all of the oil it 
uses. In 1983, the last fuQ year 
for which statistics are available, 
Japan imported 4.1 million bar- 
rels of oil a day and refined 3 2 
millioo bands a day. 

Mr. Sato’s business plan 



Taiji Sato 


seemed reasonable enough oa 
the surface. But it contradicted 
lon gstanding government policy 
of refining crude ml into gasoline 
at home, and it ran counter to a 
Japanese belief that an individ- 
ual's interests should give way 
when national interests arc in- 
volved. 

The idea of importing gasoline 
originated more than a year ago 
with a group of g?«ilin* station 
owners. One oil company, 
Sawarabi Oil, imported a small 
amount of gasoline from Singa- 


pore, bul dropped the plan at the 

trade mimstiy’s request 

Mr. Sato, president of Lions 
Oil, a small distributor with 1 10 
employees, then decided to go it 
akme. He arranged to import 
3,000 kilbliters (780,000 gallons) 
of gasoline a month from Singa- 
pore and to distribute it through 
local gas stations, including sev- 
eral he owns. 

The price was to be about 10 
cents a liter (38 cents a gallon) 
cheaper than the standard price 

of high-octane gas here, about 60 
cents a liter. 

Japan's refineries and large ofl 
distributors opposed the idea. So 
did thg trade ministry. 

Hiroshi Matsu mura of the 
trade ministry's petroleum plan- 
ning division said that Mr. Sato's 
proposal would have disrupted 
the government plan for assuring 
a stable supply of ofi. 

The trade ministry forecasts 
demand for oil and sets recom- 
mended levels of imports and 
reserves. For more than 30 yeais, 
Japan has maintained a policy (tf 
importing crude cal and that re- 
fining it in Japan to create other 
products, such as kerosene and 

g r 1«AW 

The trade ministry requires re- 
fineries, winch are licensed by 
(Contimied on Page II, CoL 1) 


Declining Prices 
Batter Profits of 
U.S. Oil Firms 


World Bank Cuts Interest Rate, Fee 


By Hobart Rowen 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The World Bank has cut the 
lending rate and a fee that it charges Third World loan 
customers, siting a gain of $588 million in the first Half 
of its 1985 fiscal year. The bank earned $600 million in 
aU of 1984. 

The lending rate was reduced from 9.89 percent to 
9.29 percent, effective Jan. 1. 

Moreover, the bank’s senior vice president for fi- 
nance, Moeen A. Qureshi. said Wednesday that the so- 
called front-end fee introduced three years ago at 1J 
percent and now at a rate of 025 percent, would be 
“reduced" to zero. Mr. Qureshi said be preferred not 
to describe the fee as abolished, since it might some- 
time be reactivated. 

Details of the World Bank's investment strategy 
showed that the hank bad been keeping its assets in 
high-yielding dollar obligations and its liabilities in 
currencies that have been depr edating . The result has 
been a gain that the bank is now being pressed to use 
for the benefit of its poorest members. 

Treasurer Engene Rotberg said that, since most of 
the World Banlrs regular loans were denominated in 
Japanese yen, Swiss francs and Deutsche marks, all of 
which have depredated sharply against the dollar, 


borrower nations could save as much as $6 billion “if 
all of the $31 billion in in»n& disbursed by the bank- 
over the past seven years were to be repaid now.” 

Part of the World Bank's investment gain — expect- 
ed to reach $900 millin n for all of this fiscal year — 
Mil be allocated to World Bank reserves, Mr. Qureshi 
said. Another part of the money, said Mr. Rotberg, 
“can be used as a dividend where it will do some 
good." Last year, $200 millin n of the bank’s 5600- 
million gftm was passed on to the International Devel- 
opment Association, the bank’s low-interest aid arm. 

Mr. Qureshi confirmed reports that World Bank 
loan commitments this fiscal year were expected to fall 
by about $2 billion from an earlier-projected $12 
billion to $13 billion. 

The return on short-term dollar investments in the 
first half of fiscal 1985 was 14.16 percent, against 
11.19 for short-term nondollar investments. On a 
book-value basis (interest rales phis realized gains) the 
average yield was 13.55 percent, compared with 9.81 
percent for the first half of fiscal 1984. 

The financial rate of return on short-term dollar 
investments — which indmtes unrealized as well as 
realized gains — comes to an even more spectacular 
17.62 percent, Mr. Rotberg said. 


Conytlal by Our Siojf From Oispacha 

NEW YORK —TWo oil giants, 
Exxon Crap, and Mobil Coip., re- 
ported Thursday that their profit 
fell in the fourth quarter as tum- 
bting prices for petroleum products 
cut into earnings. 

Exxon, the world’s biggest indus- 
trial company, said its profit slid 
123 percent in the final three 
months of 1984 from a yea i earlier. 
Mobil, the second-largest U3. oil 
company, said its fourth-quarter 
eanungs dropped 36 percent 

Meanwhile. Standard (XI Co. 
(Ohio), said its profit fell 10 per- 
cent in the fourth quarter and 
13 percent for the year, 
rfming setbacks and 
widening losses from its mining 
business. 

Analysts had predicted the ma- 
jor oil c ompanies would Show low- 
er eamings d uring the fourth quar- 
ter because of dropping enure ofl 
prices amid the steady erosion in 
prices for gasoline, home hearing 
oil and other petroleum-based 
products. 

Both Exxon and Mobil had large 
writedowns for refinery shutdowns 
in the fourth quarter and both re- 
ported steep drops in results from 
refining petroleum products Kke 
gasoline and beating ofl. 

As an example cf the problems 
faringj oil companies, the securities 
firm First Boston Corp. estimated 
in a report last week that a Gulf 
Coast refiner paying the official 
price of $29 a barm for Arabian 
fight oil was getting rally $24.84 a 
barrel on the open market fra* the 
products produced from the ofl. 

■ Exxon 

Despite the fourth-quarter re- 
treat, Exxon said gains from earlier 
in lire year lifted profit for all of 
1984 by 11 percent to $532 trillion 
from $4.98 billion. Revenue 
jumped to $97.28 billion from 
594.73 bflfioo a year earner — be- 
low the record 5108.1 billion of 
1981. 

Fammg i: in tiie fourth quarter 
fell to $1.42 trillion from $1.62 bil- 
lion a year earlier. Revenue dipped 
1.1 percent to 5243 billion from 
$24.81 billion. 

Clifton C Garvin Jr n Exxon’s 


rtrairrnan, said the wfining_ and 

marketing of petroleum products, 

as gasoline, suffered signifi- 
cantly from downward pressure on 
product prices in most markets. 

Exxon said its profits from refia- 
. i Ml *K A. rwrenf 


in the fourth quarter and were 
down 68.8 percent for the entire 
year, sl iding to $353 rnilHon from 
$1.1 bflfioo. 

“It's obvious that refining and mar- 
keting still does not do weD," said 
Rosario Haccma, an analyst at I-F. 
Rothschild, Unterbera, Tcwbm. “I 

think that's the real ldller. 

■ Mobfl 

Mobil said its 1984 earnings fell 

• > I m 


153 percent and __ 
fourth quarter fell to 


in the 

h quarter leu to nriDion 
from $447 million. 

Mobil said it had a $77 million 
r efining and marketing loss in the 
fourth quarter, compared with a 
$174 mini on profit a year earlier. 
For the full year, refinery profits 
(Continued on Page IS, CoL 5) 


Exxon Is To Sdl 
Unit in Europe 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Exxon 
Corp. said Thmsday that it had 
agreed to sell its electronic of- 
fice business systems division 
outside the United States to 
Olivetti SpA of Italy. 

No details of the sale agree- 
ment were available. Exxon Of- 
fice Systems Co. has marketing 
and direct sales operations in 
Europe. 

Exxon said negotiations were 
continuing for the sale of the 
business system in the United 
States. The division, based in 
Stamford, Connecticut, makes 
Vydec word processors, Qyx 
electric typewriters and Qwip 
facsimile printers. Exxon en- 
tered the office-systems bitti- 
ness in the 1970s, but has been 
unable to compete with Inter- 
national Business Machines 
Carp, and Xerox. 


Dollar Drops Amid Fears 
(tf Renewed Intervention 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
sharply Thursday amid reports that 
the Federal Reserve bad joined Eu- 
ropean central banks in Tuesday’s 
sell off of the currency. 

Although there were no reports 
of intervention during the day, cur- 
rency dealers said the dollar was 
restrained by fears of a repeat of 
Tuesday’s dollar sales by central 
banks m West Germany, Britain, 
Austria and the United States. 

Senior officials of the Finance 
Ministry in France said Thursday 
that the Fed sold $46 million dur- 
ing the concerted market interven- 
tion by central banks on Tuesday 
to ion is the dollar. 

The French statement was the 
first official word that the United 
States has intervened in world 
money markets in line with last 
week’s declaration by the five ma- 
jor Western industrial countries 
that they would try to check any 
excessive surge by the dollar. 

UK officials declined comment 
cm the report, noting that it was 
official poBcy to not comment on 
currency-market interventions. 

The dollar fell sharply in 
New York trading, droppii 
ly below 3.15 Deutsche marks right 
after one $350 million commercial 
sdl order from Europe. It bounced 
bade to finish only slightly lower 
but dealers said they do not see a 


sharp recovery in the immediate 
future. 

“It’s not surprising that the dol- 
lar fell, the market is so nervous 
about centra] bank action,” said 
Earl Johnson, vice president at Chi- 
cago's Harris Bank. 

In London, the British pound 
recovered to $ 1 . 1 175 after falling to 
a record European low of $1.1125 
Wednesday. The pound dipped as 
low as SI. 10 in Hong Kong on Jan. 
14. 

As the trading day ended in New 
York, sterling was quoted at 
$1.1188, against $1.1128 late 
Wednesday. 

Dollar nues in New York follow- 
ing the 4:30 P.M1 EST release of the 
money supply figures, compared 
with late rales Wednesday, includ- 
ed: 3.1630 Deutsche marks, down 
from 3.17025; 2.6590 Swiss francs, 
down from Z67075, and 9.6725 
French francs, down from 9.6700. 

Earlier in Europe, compared 
with late rates Wednesday, includ- 
ed: 3329 DM, down from 3331, 
and 9.702 French francs, down 
from 9.710. 

Gold finished the day at S301 an 
ounce in both major European bul- 
lion centers, nudging up 25 cons in 
London and $1 in Zurich. On the 
New York Commodity Exchange, 
gold bullion fra- current delivery 
fdl $1.90 to close at $29930 a troy 
ounce. (AP, Reuters. UPI). 


Airlines Gte Sliding Pound 
In Requests for Fare Hikes 


Compiled by Ota Stiff From Dispauka 

LONDON — Six airlines have 
asked Britain's Civil Aviation Au- 
thority to approve increases in air 
fares between London and the 
United Stales because of the de- 


A CAA spokesman said 
Wednesday that People Express 
and Virgin Atlantic Airways had 
asked for approval for price in- 
creases on their North Atlantic 
routes. He said a decision was like- 
ly in 10 days. 

The spokesman also said that 
four major carriers, British Air- 
ways. British Caledonia, Pan 
American and Trans World Air- 
ways, had asked for fare chants 
ran ging from a 3-parent cut to a 
30-percent increase. 

virgin said it wants to increase 
its one-way fare to New York by 
£10 ($11), to £139, on weekdays 
and by £20, to £149, on weekends 
in March. The fares then would be 
raised in June to £149 for weekdays 
and £159 for weekends. 

If the request is approved. Virgin 
said fares from New York to Lon- 
don would increase in March to 


$219 from $175. There would be no 
weekend surcharge. 

People Express, whose costs are 
mainly doUar-based, has asked to 
change the rate at which it oon wens 
dollar prices from $130 to the 
pound to $1.10, bringing the single 
economy fare from Britain to £154 
from £122. The premium class fare 
would rise to £409 from £338. 

The People Express request in- 
dudes an increase in the basic dol- 
lar fare from New York to London 
starting March I to $169 from $159 
for economy dnss and to $450 from 
$439 for premium class. 

Until their summer fares Stan in 
April, the major carriers offer a 
$290 round-trip ticket to New 
York. 

A British Airways spokesman 
said the raily increases would be 10 
percent at most and the majority 
would be only 2 paeon to 3 per- 
cent. 

The potmd-dollar relationship 
has a limited effect on us," the 
spokesman said. “Our business in 
dollars from the United States 
helps offset the change in rates." 

(UPI, Reuters) 



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Hade Development Bank 


Shown at felt, the head office 
of Trade Development Bank Geneva. 


An American Express Company 



j/ 

V 


*■ , fV* V -■ 

./- y 







NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


opm Htvn Lew Last cim 


NYSE Index 


Indus 1279.15 1357.99 135458 1270.53 — 430 

Trans 405*3 613*0 599.98 404*2 * 047 

Util 14080 149J7 14776 147.93 — 077 

Comp 51043 52086 51092 51349— 174 


Composite 

Industrials 

Transp. 

Util likes 
Finance 


High Low Close ChOe 
10274 102(0 10203— U4 
11841 11776 11776 — JJS 

wa* nz> 2J77 — oio 

5253 4? SB SUB — 107 

10541 10207 10107 +0.15 


Thursdays 

1MSE 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


HE* 


NYSE Diaries 


Closing: 


Advanced 

Decflrwcf 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Hietn 
New Lows 
Volume up 
V olume dawn 


CUM Prey- 

398 378 

233 21> 

342 334 

323 823 

66 M 

4 9 

471 WO 

4490400 


Comoositu 

Industrials 

=inci:c 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Transs 


Week Veer 
Close Ch’gc Ago Aao 
ZTUJ * 1 42 St7.1t 225*1 
■9171 1.99 77143 314.97 

31725 -1.13 30940 28159 

4i- « I li -1* 71 -U <11 


Lad am 


79745 + 131 3473 25441 
74XJ1 +282 29148 766.58 
744 60 +146 22842 21141 
75541 + 849 748.70 24040 


Heirer 

♦VarroB 

MlwRtwt 

Amdahl 

TIE 

wokrin 
CtimpH 
BeraBr 
Comae 
Ultra to 
TexAlr 
FrntHd 


77k 2b 
2716 27 
396 3% 

1596 ISto 
796 TVS 
1396 12 
4 3)6 

25 296 

0 7 

Mto 99k 
1196 11)6 
1290 11 


296 + to | 

i 


396 — to 1 

159k + M 1 
796 — 16 I 
12% + to 

4 + V, J 

Zb — 96 * 
7% —16 | 
996 — 16 | 

1116 — 1* I 

nv — 4* 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 



Advanced 
Declined 
Undiangod 
Total Issues 
New Hiatts 
New Lews 
Volume up 
V olume dawn 


2077 2071 

2SB 220 

2 6 

78*91.340 
65074*30 


Bar Scries 
225*41 567440 
241401 665679 
234464 549413 
1 31488 445464 
1 85.183 02332 


VoLat 4 P.M 1(0740*08 

Prev.4PALvoL 144*34J09 

Pre* eonsoliikitei dose 169*64*30 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


•Included In Itw wles figures 


Tables hcMe ftw wtipawMe prices 
up to (be dosing on WaD Street 


industrials 

Transp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


High Low Close CtTue 
199.73 19743 19E01 — 047 
15753 155.97 156.15 +0.1 E 
76.11 7540 7547—0*0 

20*2 3123 2225— C43 
178.16 17656 176.71 —059 


[ nnw Jones Bond Averages 


Bonos 

Utilities 

industrials 



Dow Off 4.30 in 



23% 16V6 AAR *8 23 

20 to 9*6 AGS 

21 12b AMCA 140 75 

17% 13'* AMF 50 35 

3896 24to AMR 

209k IBto AMR pt 218 11.1 

39 Z7% AMR pf 2120 SJ 

2Sto 23b ANRDt 247 114 
T4W 81* APL 
699. 4496 ASA 240 62 

2696 IA AVX 52 12 


*8 23 16 665 3094 3D 3096+116 
13 342 I6V 1596 TSb — 1(6 

140 75 9 139k 139k 139k— % 

50 12 86 184 16 156k 151k— 96 

. . 9 7922 3016 3716 3796+ Ik 

2.18 11.1 30 199k 1996 1996 

2120 SJ 799 38)6 37 37!* + Ik 

247 114 11 24 V. 2416 24k. + 16 

3 9 IIAk 1046 1896— 16 

240 62 586 4096 4816 4896 

42 1-7 11 1145 19 18)6 18% — to 


«6 3696 AMLOh 120 27 U 4121 45V. 4494 4496 + «6 

296 I6Vk Accowds *4 1 4 20 442 24 2396 24 + )k 

27 121k AcmeC *0 23 SU 179k 1796 17% + 96 

12J6 816 AerneE 52b 22 12 55 10 996 10 + Ve 

179fe 15 AddEx 211el34 ?16 16V. 16)6 1616 

1896 1196 AdmMI 52 15 8 32 17 1*96 1696 


121* 816 AcmeE 

179k 15 Ada Ex 
189k 1196 AdmMI 
20b B96 AdvSvs 
41Vk 3SVk AMD 
1296 6*6 Ad vest 

1416 8b Aarflex 
39 27*5 AetnLf 


52b 12 12 55 10 9*. 10 + % 

Lt)®134 116 16Vk 16)6 16)6 

52 15 B 32 17 1696 1696 

41t 65 20 242 1296 12)6 121k + V. 

14 W 3596 3496 349k— 96 

.12 14 571 TOta 10 10U. + to 

12 76 13V6 13 13H+16 

L64 49 32 2727 389k 38 3816—16 


39 27% AetnLf 244 69 32 2727 389k 38 3816—16 

589c. 5296 ActLof 5*7.1 04 3D4 55% 55% 55% 

33b 1596 Ahmns 150 19 14 433 KBh 3m 30)6— 9k 

5V6 296 Alleen 30 37 3 39k 3 + % 


United Pros International 

NEW YORK — Profit-taking hit blue-chips 
and other stocks Thursday, stalling the broad 
advance that has been building for more than 
two weeks. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 4.30 to 
1.270.43. The Dow had climbed to within 6 
points of its record high of 1 .287.20 at midday, 
before heading lower. 

The New York Stock Exchange index fell 
0.24 to 102.03 and the price of an average sham 
decreased 8 cents. Standard & Poor's 500-stock 
index lost 0.59 to 176.71. 


M-l Falls $ 2.8 Billion 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — The U.S. basic money sup- 
ply. known as M-l, fell $2.8 billion in the week 
ended Jan. 14, declining to a seasonally adjust- 
ed $556.8 billion from a revised $559.6 billion 
the previous week, the Federal Reserve Bank of 
New York said Thursday. 

The previous week's figure had originally 
been reported at 5559.4 billion. 


489k 36lk AlrPid 140 25 10 413 48 


296 3 + % 
4796 4796 — 96 


.92 7.1 8 
.14 5 9 

54 25 19 


2896 13 AlrtFrf 40 24 13 278 239k 23)6 23)6— Ik 

2 96 AlMoas 25 673 196 196 196— «6 

311* 2*9. AJoP Of A 152 124 18 8A 30*6 309k + to 

71k 6 AtaPdPl 47 114 13 796 796 796 

7214 411k AlaPpf. 9.00 124 146% 7396 71*6 TIM- «k 

101 B5b AlaPpf 1140 114 300z 97 

7+16 631k AlaP Pf 9*4 124 200z 75 

66 57 AlaP pi 8.16 125 1002 65% 65% 45% — to 

65 56 AlaPpf 851 125 200z 65 65 65 + Vk 

1396 109k AkOKI .92 7.1 8 389 1316 12*6 1256— to 

1696 916 AlsKAJr .14 4 9 710 1696 16b MVS + to 

22b 15b Alberts 54 24 19 37 2396 23 

29% 22 '/J Alhtsns 48 2* 12 490 29 28 

3796 23to Alton 140 4* 12 5267 3096 30 30V6+ 16 

3696 27)6 AlcaStd 140 34 12 91 33% 33 to 33to 

26b 17 AisxAJx 140 19 980 Z6U 2596 2556 + 96 

28)6 18b AlMdr 23 115 23 2296 23 

87% 6296 AlloCP 1.141 I* 8 46 78*6 78 

2696 23 AleCp ef 246 1 14 25 26 26 

MVS 18b A faint 1*0 54 27 79 »% 26 

22*6 15V, Alain pf 2.19 115 7 19 18 

93% 81 Algl pfC 1145 124 51 92*6 92 92 

30 2496 AHaPw 240 94 8 BIS 29% 28% 29 

2496 15b AllenG 40b 3.1 11 84 1996 19 1996 

379k 28 to AlldCp s 1 40 44 t 2095 37b 37 37to + IA 

63)6 53b AldCp pf 474 114 54 59b 59to 5946 + % 

112% 99 AMCp pfl 100 114 1 106b 106to 106 to + to 

lank 10096 AfdC pf 1249H10 433 103*6 10346 103(6 + to 


673 1*6 lb lb— to 

18 30b 3096 309k + to 

13 796 79« 796 

146% 72b 71*6 TIM- M 

3002 97 97 97 

2O0z 75 75 75 +1 

10% 65to 65VS 65)k— to 
20Qz 65 65 65 + to 

389 1316 12*6 12*6— to 

710 1696 16to MVS + to 

37 23b 23 2396 + 96 

490 29 2896 2896- M 

5267 3096 M 30V6 + to 
91 33to 33% 33 Vo 
900 ZAto 2596 25% + M 
IB 23 22b 23 

46 78*6 78 7896 +1)6 

25 26 26 26 + to 

79 2Ato 26 2696 + M 

7 19 18b 19 

58 9296 92 92 

B15 29V6 28% 29 
84 19M 19 1996 


48 2* 12 490 29 
140 40 12 5267 30b 30 


23to IDto AlkfPd 

56to 38 AltdStr 240 34 

1696 5to AlllsCh 

39b 24 AiksCpf 

26)6 20 ALLTL 144 7.1 

27 2096 AlPtlPr *0o 1.9 

AH* 30b Alcoa 140 3.1 

27b isto Amox 40 1.1 


49 20)6 T9to I TVS — to 
1453 52b 52 5296 — 96 

200 7to 7VS 7to — !k 


56 2696 25b 25*6— Ml 
2 21to 21)6 21)6+ to 


140 3.1 12 4771 3Bb 37b 38M + 46 


27b 15VS Amox 40 1.1 886 17*6 17to 17M— to 

4396 32VS A max pt 300 9.1 34 33b 3796 3316 + to 

34to 22b AmHes 1.10 A3 9 1505 25 24b 24b— 96 

144 98)6 AHrapf 150 34 5 106 » 106 — Ito 

948 2b 2 2V6 

11 105 199* 19 19b— to 

6596 52M A Brand 175 54 9 654 64*6 63b 64b + to 

28 VS 24)6 ABrdpf 2.75 105 12 26to 26b 26)6— 16 

66 53 ABrdpf 2*7 4.1 4 65b 65b 65b— b 


3 lb AmAsr 

19VS 14b ABakr 11 105 199* 19 

65H 52M A Brand 175 5* 9 654 64b 63 

28 )k 24)6 ABrfl of 273 105 12 

66 53 ABrdpf 2*7 4.1 4 65b 65 

77b SOb ABdcst 1*0 2J 10 5422 699* 68 

2596 19VS ABMM *6 3* 12 66 25b 25 

2396 17b ABusPr St 25 13 45 22b 22 


65b— b 

122 69b 68 6B%— to 

66 25V, 23 23 — b 

45 22b 22b 22b— to 


55 40to Amcan 240 5* 12 2122 52)6 51b 5296 +1 

24b 21b AConpf 2*0 11.9 23 23to Z3to 23)k + b 

48 36 AConpl UO 15 B2 46 45 46 +lto 

109 103 A Can pf 1175 117 2 106 J07to HM + to 

19*6 16b A COP BO 120 11.1 123 l«b 19to 19b+ to 

33b 25)6 ACopCv 6*ta22* 37 29b 29 29b + 9k 

Mb Ato ACetifC 3 25 8b 8 8b 

53b 43V6 ACVtm 1.90 3J 12 2544 54% 53 53b + M 


29b 18b AOT SI 3* 24 408 24b 24 24 - 

21b 15)6 AElPw 226al0* 7 2472 21VS 21)6 21b 
40 25 AmExp 178 “ 


SI 3* 24 408 24to 24 


28 13b AFomll 

28to 199* AGfiCP 40 32 
9b SbAGnlwt 
57 51M AGnlpfA 621611 3 

77b 57VS AOnlpfB&45* 77 
57b 39to AGnpfD 2*4 43 


57b 39to AGnpfD 
21b 25b AHertt 


14M 7 to A Ho 1st 
55b 46b AHanw 2*4 5.1 11 
42b 36b AHOSP 1.12 16 10 


43% Amrtch 600 30 1 3215 75b 74b 75)6 + to 


28V6 llto AMI 
7M 3b AmM 


.72 33 13 491 


411k 27b ANIR6S 222 5* 8 1774 43 41 

37)6 22*6 APrwtd J4t 20 4 1520 38b 36 

13b 9 ASLFlo a 89 ~ 

lib IS ASLFI pf 2.19 120 308 

16 10 ASH IP 40 57 29 790 

34M 22b Amstd 1*0 4J 12 665 

23b 15b AStaril 15 12 27b 22 

48*6 26to AmStor *4 12 10 1319 49 

40% 46V6 AStrpfA 428 72 291 61 

53b 51 AStrofB 640 124 132 53b 53 


SP 


21b 16b ATE.T 120 52 1531643 22b 21b 21b + to 
34to 30to AT8.TPf 3*4 10* 85 35)6 34b 3596+ 9k 

_ : AT&T pf 374 10* 


36to 30to AT&T Pf 3*4 10* 85 35 

37b 31)6 AT&T pf 374 10* 1286 36' 

41)6 27)6 AWOtf U0 47 7 86 40b 4' 

12 10 AWdtpf 125 114 1700 

2796 20b AmHotl 2*8 9* II 381 

45b 5396 ATrPr 525* 82 7 

8b 4b ATrSc 17B 

74 58b ATrUn 525* 72 15 

34b 261k A moron 1*0 52 ■ 19 

30b 17 AmuD s 20 * 17 326 

83 60 Antes pf 522 62 1 

28b 21 VS Ainefek 40 24 15 690 

30b into Amfac Ml 

18b 10V6 Amfasc 6 224 

3816 2616 AMPS 72 24 17 2657 

24 14to Amoco 20 17 41 53 

21)6 12b Amreps 7 279 

26b 19 AmSH) 1*0 52 8 106 


— — _ 2»V6 2616— to 

25*82 7 65b 65 65b + b 

17B 9 8b 8fk + to 

u35* 72 15 74 73)6 73*h + 9* 

*0 52 ■ 19 31b 30b 30b— to 

20 * 17 326 31 to 29b 30M +1 

22 62 1 85 85 85 +2 

40 24 15 490 29b2Bto2BM+b 
141 24% 24)6 24b + to 
6 224 13to 13b 13b— b 

72 24 17 2657 37)6 36)6 36b— to 

20 17 41 53 17M 17b 17b + to 


1b Arwcmp 
199k Analogs 


19b Anchor 
36 24)6 AnCIOV 

lib 9to AndrGr 

23to lib Amwllc 


78b 53b Anhm UDD 27 10 1423 75to 74b B + b 


Anhau pf 3*0 6* 


249k 13b Afilxtr 28 15 
15b 8b Anthem 44 J 16 
16b 1 0b Aflthnv *40 14 7 

14b 9b Apache 28 24 
4 to ApchPwi 

20b isto AoehPutaooeil.? 

66 55)6 ApPwot 8.12 12* 

34b 21 AoPwpf 2*5 107 
31b 27b ApPwpf *18 13* 
29to 26 ABPwpf 340 13.1 


100 55b 55b 55b + to 


2a 14 22 409 19b 18b 18b + b 


2 Id 380 15b 15b 151k + Ml 

3* 7 4 13b 13)6 13b— to 

24 10 519 10jj£ 38j£ 10£- b 

14 362 17V. 16b 16b— b 

It 10% MV6 6416 64)6 + % 
07 156 24b W* 24b + to 

3* 5 311* 3Tb 31b— b 

3.1 5 29 29 29 


33 17b ApfDtn 1.121 34 20 506 3316 32 32b— to 

2SVS 8 AppIMB 1.14(104163 195 11M lib 11b 

23)6 15b ArchDn .145 7 14 3674 21)6 20M 20b— 96 
23b 1416 ArtzPS 160 I1J 6 1751 2216 21b 21b— b 

38b 23 AriPpf 348 124 63 29 28b 28b 


28b 23 AriPpf 348 115 63 29 28b 28b 

26V* 13)6 ArkBst *0 24 8 490 20b I9b 19b— 16 

27M 1* Ark la 148 64 14 1459 IBM 17b 17b— . b 

lb b ArHiRf 70 H to hi— to 

22b 9 Armco 521 10b 10)6 I Ob— to 

32b 18 Anne pf 110 94 24 H)6 21b 22 + b 

22b 15b ArmsR 1 4 12 > 36 22b 22 22V6 + V* 

36b 22b ArmWIn 140 34 10 474 3616 35b 35to + to 

34 29)6 ArmW Pf 175 1T4 10% 34 34 34 + to 


521 10b 10)6 10b— to 


22)6 21 b 22 + b 


29 15V* AroCP 140 4* 9 

2Sb 13b ArowE 70 1.1 0 

22 16 Artra 42 14 

22)6 14 Arvtns 9 

34V6 17b Asorca 
29 VS 20b AshlOII 1*0 58 

40b 33b ArttOpf 440 11 J 

40b 31 vs AsfilO pf 3.96 10* 

61 Vk 4SV6 AsdDG 2*0 4* 9 

98 73 AadDRf 475 54 

26)6 18b AiflkXM 1*0 74 18 

25 19b AtCvEI 2*8 10.1 0 


10% 34 34 34 + 16 

40 27b 27b 27b— to 

295 17H 17 1716 

23x 18b 18 18 — to 

691 22)6 22Vk 22b + to 

735 20b 19to 19)6— 1)6 
457 3B 27)6 27b— to 

5 40 39b 40 + )6 

33 37b 37V6 37to + Ik 

498 56M 56 5*b + to 

28 90b 90b 90b +2 
17 23 22b 23 + )6 

210 Mb Mb 24to 


52)6 JOto AM Rich 100 47 17 *388 XSb 4416 44b— b 


347b 204 AttRcpf 340 14 
36)6 32)6 AHRepf 375 10* 

125 97 All Re Pf 240 2* 

20 llto A fiasco 

41b 18b A uocl 32 14 16 

43M 29)6 AutoDf *2 14 19 

30to M AvcoCp 10 

99to 52 A vend 

23)6 15b AVEMC *0 2.9 12 

35 23 Avery *0 17 15 

15 10 Avion n 7 

*4 27 Avnet 40 1* 14 

26 19b Avon 240 94 10 

42b 18 Avdln 11 


3J» 14 1 3Mb 304b 3Mb— 6b 

375 10* 5% 36 36 36 +1 

240 2* 1 lOHh 106*6106*6+ to 

23 14b 14b 14b— M 
21 13 11 06 25)6 24)6 24b— * 

*2 14 19 491 43b 42b 42)6— K 

10 9 SO 49b 49b— M 

9 99b mu 99b + to 

*0 29 12 J 2M 20b 20b + to 

*0 17 IS 418 35b 34b 35b + b 

7 101 12b 12)6 12M 

40 1* 14 1907 37b 35b 35b— 2b 

240 94 10 3386 22 21 to 27b— b 

11 517 27b 26 26b + b 


Z3to 10b 
31b 18b 
23)6 15 
2frb 18b 
3 b 
IBto 2 


23V* llto 
15b 7b 
41b 30b 
3616 


BMC *8 35 16 638 

Balmcs 40 1* 12 364 : 

Bkrlntf .92 54 17 1031 

Bolder 46 1* 15 1D0 : 

vIBaldU 1565 

BMUpf 34 

BdICB 148 2* 11 1M 

Bally Ml 40 14170 2844 
BallyPk 12 100 

BoItGE 340 &2 7 2014 

BoltpfB 44D 104 6% 

BncOne 1.10 4.1 « 277 


44b 29 
38)6 26b 
25 15H 

23% Mto 
52»6 40 
86 66 
20)6 11b 
31to 22b 
63 37b 

23b 19b 
39 35 

12b Tto 
34b 19 
23to 18 
48)6 32)6 
50 35 

33M 19)6 
lib 8b 
28)k 17)6 
22b llto 
35)6 16b 

30 l*to 
38b 28b 
36 24b 

6Sto 46b 


I 70 

482 

1.10 14 12 M0 
2*0 5* 5 902 
ZM 5* 6 2680 


4b 

IDto 9to 
19 72b 

30b 19b 
“ 19VS 
_ 66 
27b 22b 
33b 19b 
33b 27b 
SBb Mto 
27b 20b 
BSto 73 
37b 23 
35)6 30b 
Bb 3b 
16b 7b 
Tto 3b 
17b 10b 
38)6 14b 
58b 37b 
26b IBM 
35b ms 

Mb 18b 

2716 17b 

29b 20 
40 14b 

SO 37 
60)6 35b 
44b 33b 
SftVS 46 
26 15b 

65b 49M 


BUNY 

EMC Vo ■ 1*0 44 8 143 

BnkAm 1*2 8.1 10 7388 
BfcAmpf Ulell* 728 
BkAmpf B*3ell* 488 
BkAmpf 2*8 383 

BfcARtV 2*0 7* 8 63 

BonkTr 270 4* 7 1711 
BkTrpf 240 10LA 57 
BkTrpf 442 11* 5 

Banner JOn 3 20 53 

Bare *4 1* 10 292 

BarnGp *0 3* 7 12 

Bornel 176 24 9 387 
Domf pt 277e 4* 10 

BaryWr *0 23 IS 148 

BASIX .1211 14 10 TDD 

BOUSCh 48 2.9 16 1212 

BaxtTr 43 24 1112301 
BavPIn 40e * 23 14 

BavSIG 2*0 94 8 20 

Bearing 1J» 25 12 1U 
BaatCfl 170 5.9 9 5498 
MSI Pf 340 64 9 

Pectn D 140 U 14 250 
EM*W SSI 

Bekerpl 1.70 14* 26 

BekSdH *0 2* 12 27 

BelHwi 56 U 11 1144 

BelHwpf *7 2* 238 

BellAti 6*0 84 I 5075 
BCE p 248 1585 

Bet lind 42 1* II ISO 

Bell5o* 2*8 76 8 5492 

BetoAH 72 U 17 16 

Bern It 3 *8 34 11 126 

Bndx Pf 444 44 9 

BenfCp 240 5* 9 5789 
BetWfpf 440 125 1 

BengtB .15e 16 10 OT 

BereEn 10 432 

Berk sy 13 62 

BestPd 44 24 12 UN6 

BethStl *0 34 4733 

BethSlol540 104 125 

BefnSlPf 2^0 10* 120 

Beuerty 42 .9 20 931 

Btgmr *0 3* 19 306 

BtockD M 2* 13 2281 

Bit* HP 1*8 6.1 8 m 

BkjlrJn 61 12 f A 

BkfcHR 2*0 54 12 216 

Burring 1*0 24 16 4534 

BOlieC I.W 4J 19 714 

BOISeCpf540 94 545 

BoltBer .10 * S9 331 


Borden 2.73 44 


I2to + b 
31 to + b 
16*6— )6 
2116+ Ik 
Ito + to 
4to 

49 — b 
13b— to 
Hb 

3fb— b 

41) 6 

27 + to 
9)6 
4)6 

58 —1 

44b + b 

37b + b 
34* + b 
18*6 + M 
45)6+ to 
72b + to 

15) 6— to 
30*6— to 
63b + to 
Mb + to 
37 

I0U 

23b + )6 
22b 

47)6— K 
49b + to 
26b— to 
10to— b 
27)6— b 
I4M + M 
Mto— to 
29 + b 

36b + *6 
28b— to 
53b + to 
43b— to 
7)6 + b 
10b + to 

16) 6— b 

26 + to 

27b + b 
78 — b 
27b + M 
33b— to 

32) 6— to 
47to + to 
36)6 +1b 
86b +lb 
37 

34ft — to 
416— Ml 
15*6+ to 
4b 
12)6 

19b + to 
46to + Vi 

33) 6 + to 
34b— to 
2316 + 66 
26)6— to 
27b — to 
17M + to 
47*6 + to 
S9b— to 

42) 6— to 
SSto 


2,074 issues traded. It was the 14th consecutive 
session in which mote slocks gained than lost. 

Big Board volume was the seventh heaviest 
on record, amounting to 160.7 million shares. A 
total of 144.4 million shares traded Wednesday. 

“It's a pause well within the category of 
profit-taking." said Monte Gordon of Dreyfus 
Corp. The Dow industrials had a net gain of 
more than 47 points in the Monday- Wednesday 
period, and broader averages hit all-time highs. 

He said the recent gams resulted from a 
“growing conviction that the Federal Reserve 
would not alter its policy of accomodation even 
though the economy has strengthened." 


sue. gaining VS to 21%. Federal National Mort- 
gage Assn, was second, up Vi to 16^. Phillips 
Petroleum was third, rising V: to 48. Phillips has 
been heavily traded this week amid speculation 
someone has been trying to accumulate a stake 
in the company. 


Exxon, which reported fourth-quarter earn- 
zs of $1.81 per share vs. $1.90 in the same 


The analyst said the market would probably 
: trace a little bit than try a move to the upside 


retrace a little bit than try a move to the upside 

a gain 

“We see a strong market, this is not like the 
one-day rallies we saw before," said Dudley 
Eppel of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. 

He said institutional investors may have 
raised funds by selling utility stocks, which did 
well in 1984. and taking profits in bonds. The 
institutions were said to be low on cash recently. 
AT&T was the most active NYSE-listed is- 


13 Month 
High Lo» Stock 


Dlv.Yld.PE MCI WflhLaw 


-28 U 1411610 40to 39 39to— to 

*4b 27 14 288 28Vk 27)6 27)6— to 

70 82 10 2536 2Mj ^ 3JJ6- to 

wi 8* ?*£ T 

L64 43 __ 491 56*6 58)6 56)6— W 


OH SS 5$ 5Tb— 1*6 


31b 30b 31 + b 


70)6 71*6 +1*6 
134 135 +lto 
21b 22b + *6 
4)6 4 4 

41b— b 
36*4— to 
1316 + b 

665 35tf iT iT Ito 
12 22to 22*6 22to 

Si’ssm *i* 

132 53b S3 53)6 + to 


324 93 8 
&8S 122 
1.17 112 
1*6 11* 

72 XI 11 
1*0 55 10 
1*0 10 16 
43 

176*77 6 


122 73 
3.12 15 8 
2*7 10* 
3.95 125 
20 1.1 6 
126 47 11 
1*8 25 14 
1*0 3* 9 
*8 12 19 
*4 10 
20 42 8 
3116 122 

II 

1*4 SS 21 
1*0 25 8 
35 8.1 
5*0*112 

£ SK 

52 U 


41)6— to 
18to+ to 
4)6 
1IW 


35b+ to 
34*6 + to 
86 42V. 41)6 42M + to 
110% DM 11b 1lto+ to 
381 27b 2(16 Mto— to 


279 14*6 1416 14)6— to 
a io6 26 * 36to asto + to 


37)6 2Sto AmM 1*0 4* 12 105 37 36H 3646— 16 

7)6 Ito Anocmp 3665 3b 3*6 3)6+46 


„ 3645 3b 2*6 3)6 + to 
19 5A1 26*6 261k 26*6— to 
1*8 64 19 45723 22V. 23 + to 

122 3* 17 281 36b 35b 34to + to 


1-32 3* 17 281 36b 35b 36to + to 

20 17 23 90 10b 10b 10to + to 

56 18 12 475 20 1916 19*6 + to 


33b Mb 
87W 41)6 
SSto 44)6 
10 4)6 

48 27 

29 23b 

8b 4b 
40b 21 
10b Bb 
4Tb 34b 
19V6 1446 
26b IBto 
38)6 22 
12b 7b 
30to 22b 
13b 8b 
22b llto 
44b 32b 
24b 13)6 
19b llto 
30b 15b 
9b 346 


72b 54b 
42 28M 

19b Ub 
174)612316 
48b 3Db 
108b 100*6 
17b 10b 
38)6 Mto 
28 13b 

26b 19b 
23b 19b 
S (to 36b 
lob 7to 
40to 30b 
32b 18b 
27b 19to 
1516 9to 
1846 9b 
33 15b 

52W 28b 
234A 16 
BSb 67b 
15 7V6 

40)6 3046 
26b 17 
2346 16b 
25b 16)6 
23b 18*6 
42 36 

17*6 14 
23to 1?b 
I 34 29Vk 
14)6 7b 
18)6 14 
18b 10b 
17b 7b 
ID 746 

am isto 

23b 151k 

am 17 

2646 16b 
2646 19 
5546 43V. 
llto ■ 
1ZM 1 
616 b 
11)6 lb 
53M 3546 
70b 60Vi 
44 3646 

57b 51 
20 1346 

36b 24b 
•Mb 23)6 
38 23M 

SBb 48 
S6to 46 
38b 31 to 
39b 3ZV6 
4016 29b 
3946 llto 
1«£b 96b. 
74b 47 
25b 16 
15 7M 
38b 24b 
mi 5 
13b 94k 

54 42 

3Stk 20b 
S3 34b 
3446 21to 
44b 3SM 
15to 8b 
31 24 

66 50 

67 SO 

31b 20 
35b 20b 
29% 16b 
3D*k 13% 
43b 27b 
86 681k 

44% 32 

68 49% 
25b 21b 
lib 6b 


CdPoca 1*0 
ConPEa 80 


CanllLt 272 97 
CnILtpf 450 117 
CnllPS 1*0 97 
CnLoEl 1.W 15 
CLoElpf 4.10 1U 
CoMPw 1*0 140 


10 % 9b io + to 


CnSera J4 47 12 347 1746 17b 1714— to 
CVtPS 1.90 10* 6 45 IBM 1816 1816+16 
CHitrOt 336 9% 9U PM 


Cwitrot 336 

CirirvTl 78 7.9 9 106 

Canvfll 2*0 II* 9 61 

Cr+tmd JO 25 11 327 


CfcSBAlr A0 1J 38 1981 22b 21b 22 + U 

aimpln *0 17 11 IKS 24b M M — to 

Oiml pt 170 4* 30 27b 26b 27 + to 

Chmlpf 4*0 8* 93 S3b 52% 52% — to 

Cham So *0 47 12 254 9% 9V. 9b— to 

vIChrtC 109 2 Ifl + to 

vlCht wt 103 46 b + 

viairfpf 39 2M 2b 2b 

Chora 3*0 77 6 795 53 52to 52b— b 

Chora pf 7*0 II 3 1 66 64 66 +1 

Chase Pf STS 120 247 43b 43 4Tb + % 

Chase pf 620*11* 499 54% 56 54% — % 

Chetoea *6 37 9 77 30% 1946 19b— to 

Owned 1*8 52 12 930 29 27 28% +Tto 

CUNY* 274 47 4 3444 39 37b 37b— M 

ChNYpf 1*7 45 38 38% 38 38 

CUNY pi 6-S7e11.9 100 55b 55b 55b 

ChNYpf 5P9B11T 100 53to 53to 53to+to 

Cheep* 174 34 17 175 36)6 35b 36 + to 

aiesPn 200 1* 11 1420 36to 35b 35b— to 

Okvm 2*0 7* 7 3668 33% 32% 32% — b 

CNWst II 1860 28 27 37% + b 

ChlMlw 84 4 193b 193% 199% + % 

CNMIer 20 70 47b 49to— to 

CMPnT > 7M 22b 21% 21%— b 

OricFuH 73t 37148 107 Bb 8% Bb + b 

ChrtsCr *81 IT 38 3Sto 38% 38b + M 

ChrUtn 165 Tito 10b 10b + to 

Oinxne . 155 11% 11% llto + to 

Chrmpt 13 51 49 50 +1 

CBrwtr 1*0 2* 519080 36% 35to 33% + % 

ChutXis UO 42 11 124 52% 62% 52b + % 

Church *0 2* 19 940 34 33b 33% — to 

ClnBeJI 3.12 7* B 9 44% Mto 44% + to 


CfaiGpf 932 162 
CftlttUI — — 
ClrctK 


15% 4% 

34b 17 
2016 13b 
47 
16b 10 
I Tto 1514 
20)6 14b 
31 22% 

17b 14b 
22 % 
19% 14to 
28% 12% 
39to 23% 
39 24% 

49 

30b 9b 
37% 25b 
26% 20% 
41b 27% 
18b 9b 
31b 20b 
SBb 39b 

37% r 

26% 21to 
19 15b 

96 
107% 97 
40% 27)6 
34b 23U 
15% 8 
24% 15% 
44b 13% 

Kb 21% 
28b 21b 
16b 13 
16b llto 
95% 80 
21b IBto 
Mto 20b 
Mto 54% 


CtxnMti 76 21 13 


CwE Pt 1*3 5.1 
CwE pf 1.90 11 2 


CwE Pf 2*0 12* 
CwE pf 11-70 11* 
CwE pf My 11.1 
CwE pf 2*7 121 
CwE Pt 8*0 12* 


ings of $1.81 per snare vs. ai.w in me same 
period a year earlier, lost 1 io 47. The compa- 
ny also said it was selling its foreign office 
systems business to Olivetti 


Mobil, which reported fourth-quarter net of 
70 cents per share vs. $1.10, lost li to 28tt. 
Atlantic Richfield fell % 1044% and Chevron Vt 
to 32^. Indiana Standard gained V« to 56ft and 
Unocal l to 40. 


Ohio Standard, which reported fourth-quar- 
ter net of $1.15 per share vs. Sl.32. added ft to 
43ft. 


Merrill Lynch gained ft to 32 on heavy vol- 
ume. The brokerage concern is likely to benefit 
from the recent heavy volume in the stock 
market. 


Quof-OlV* i 


13 Month 
HWiLOkf Stack 


SIS. QOM 

lOb Won Low SuoLOfra 


24 + to 
5M 

3416 + U 
73 + to 

1046 + to 
1246+ % 
23%+ to 
29 — to 
53b— to 
4to 
22b 

mm— to 

1% 

17b— to 
36b + to 
23b + % 
31% + to 
18b— to 
2Bb + to 
42% 

52+,B 

14b 

19)6 

17b + to 
15b— Ito 
27b + to 
SS — to 
6b 

50 + to 


16to+ to 
(Ito— to 


1 5?i22?S 3 SbSSilS 

1* I 53 53 51 -to 


CBI 111 1*0p 4.9 II n 

CBS 100 29 10 2274 

CBS pf 1*0 1* 1 „ „ _ 

CCX 12 50 6to 6 6)6— to 

CIGNA 260 5* 20 2046 46b 46M 46b + to 

CIGpf 27S 97 37 2SH 2Bto 28b + to 

CLC 9 616 6to 6U 

CNAFn 10 96 SBb 38% 38b 

CNAI ITOall* 55 10b 10b 10b 

CPC lot 220 5* 14 430 39% 39)6 39to— to 

CP Ntl 1*0 7* I 29 18b IBto llto— M 

CSX JM 4JJ 818060 26)6 25% 26 + M 

CT5 1*0 27 15 223 37b 37b 37b— to 

C 3 Inc 39 80 10b ID 10% 

Cabot .92 29 11 289 32 


39 80 10% ID 10% 

.92 29 11 289 32 31 32 +1U 

14 3139 11% 10b 11 + to 

CalFM J2 1* 6 865 17b 17b 17H 

CalFdPt 475 107 15 44)6 44to 44M 

Calttm TSr 17 83 49 14b Mto 14b + b 

Comral .12 J £? 13to 13to 1316 

CRLka *0 658 1 Tto Mb Mb— % 

CmpRB -16t 97 4b 4b 4b +16 

CpRpfo 2 M 8 13 1ZH I2b 


CamSP 150 4* 11 662 64% 62% 62%— lb 


133 41b 4Tto 4116— to 

10 2 ® 20 go + to 


3 22b 22% 22b— % 
28 46% 45 45 

10 10 9b 9b 

25 40 39b 39b— to 


Capa l» TO .1 M 219 171 166% 168 —2 

CQPHId 1*4 32 11 967 47b 47b 47% + % 

COVHPI 10*9al0T 51 103% 103% 103% + to 

Cor fnoo *8 74 11 10b 10b 

Cmftata 1JQ 27 12 97 JBto 38 38 

CaniFf *0 1* 13 980 25% 24% 25% + b 

CorPw 2*0 10* 7 M90 25 24% 25 + % 

COTPPf 2*7 11.7 3 22b 22b 22b— % 

CarToe ISO 47 11 220 46% 45 45 

Carrol *7 J M sio 10 9b 9b 

CaraFfr 120 3* 18 25 40 39b 39b— to 

CortHW 132 4* 49 977 2S% 24b 2Sto— to 

CortWT *0 17 W 381 27b 27(6 27b + b 

CoacNG 1T0 LI » 48 Mb 14% 14b— to 

CasttCk 20(1 14b Mto M%— to 

CltlCpf 10* 215 24b 24 24 + to 

CotrpT 30 1 J 3373 34% 33% 33% + to 

Cmo 76 35 10 111 21b 21% 21b + % 

Colons* 4*0 4.9 8 990 89b 81% 89% +1b 

Cenavn *18 .1 21 1071 9b 9b 9b 
CanMf 278 6.1 9 284 40% 39 39)6—1 

Canfaxn m 26 % 25b 25b— b 

CanSaW 2*2 8* 7 1222 23M 23b 23% 

CtalHud 2*4 117 S 94 24M 34% 24 to— b 

CanllLt 2T2 97 I 172 23 22b 22% + % 

CnILtpf 450 TIT TIDE 40% 40U 40)6— to 
CnllPS 1*0 9J 7 389 17)6 17% 17% 

CnLoEl 1*6 83 6 372 23b 22b 23 + % 

CLoElpf 4.10 1U 3 34% 34U 34M + to 


46 CwE pf 774 127 
16)6 ComES 2-32 9* 
2Db Cannot 1T0 47 
16b CP*VCS -24 * 

26 Compgr 35o 1* 
11 CampSc 

29 Cptvan 

19b ConAss *7 25 
13)6 Concur 74 ta LI 
12b ConnE* 1 31 8* 
19% CmiNG 2*0 95 
10b Conroe JO 2.9 
22M ComEd 2*0 8* 
MS ConEpf 6*0 31 
35 ConE pf 4*5 11* 
38 ConEpf 5*0 11* 

25 ConsFd 1*4 4* 
20b CnsFrtB 1*0 3-1 
31 ClMNG 132 S* 

4% ComPw 
1316 CnPpfB 450 167 
2316 CnPpfD 7*5 18* 
25b CnPpfE 7.72 1&2 
11% CnP prV 4*0 1&1 
9)6 CnPorU 340 18* 
1016 CnPprT 378 185 
25b CnPpfH 7*8 17.9 
llto CnPprR 4*0 1&2 
10M CnP dtp 3-98 18.1 

18) 6 CnPprN 3*5 17J 

7) 6 CnPprM250 177 
7 CnP prt. 273 17* 

11 CnPprS 4*2 18* 
716 CnP prK 2*3 17* 

23% CnNCp 2*0 75 
4b Cantlll 
b Cantll rf 

12 Olllllpt 
b cniHdn 

18 ContTgi 172 77 
24b CTData 72 20 
23b Camnf 1JOO 3* 
1 vicooku 

26 Caoar 152 47 

30 CooPlPf 2*0 87 
10b CoapLtJ JO* 3 
12b COPfTr *0 2.1 
11b Caapvta *0 11 
Ub CopwM 58 37 
1916 CpwMpf 1*8 10* 
16% Contain 54 38 
10b Carta n 56 45 
59% CornG 156 16 
29b CornG wi 

22b Carfllk 150 IV 
39% CoxCm 74 * 

4V6 Cra la 

27 Cram l*0b 45 
38% CrarRs 

Mto CrockN *0 U 
1516 crckN of 118 11* 

19) 6 CimpK 1-20 U 
34b CrwnCk 

27b CrwZ«l 1*0 19 
43 CTZrfpf 463 94 
50 CrZ*fPfC450 7* 
IBto CuHjra *0 2* 
22M Cunnats 
6116 CumEn 2T0 2* 

8) 6 Cunrine LlOalO* 
3016 Curtw 170 3* 
27% Cyclops 1.10 2* 


<0z 57 

5 68 23b 

11 2244 29b 
26 992 30b 

11 13 29b 

10 1577 ISM 
36 3793 42 
M 323 27b 

12 156 22% 

8 22 17b 

9 36 25b 

6 80 13b 

7 79M iffit 

I 193% 
T730X 41 
9 43b 
9 1378 3216 
12 2370 32b 

8 164 42% 


56% 57 +1% 
23% 23b + to 
28b 28b— b 
39b 29b— b 
29b 29b 
Mb 14b— b 
41b 41b +1% 
29b 29% — to 
22 22 
1716 17b— % 
25% 25)6— to 
13b 13b 
30 SS — to 




2 Sb 


93% 192% 45 
40 40)6+ b 

43b 43b + b 
31b 31b— b 
32 32 + % 

41b 41% — M 
6)6 616— to 
25 27 +2 

40b 41%+ % 


| 

Ito7 5 

p=# 

37)6+ to 
Bb— % 
2b ■ 
39b— b 

227* 

29to— b 
1b 

32% + to 
34b + to 
1416— 16 

18b 


*587 a 

§ % + to 
%— b 
12% — to 
71b- b 
36b + to 
34b +216 
53% +1 
Bto 
33% 

Mto+lb 

IBto 

2lb + % 
49W + % 
34%+ % 
48b + to 
57% — to 
25% + to 
28% + b 
«3%— 216 

io% + to 

3316— to 
45b + b 


40 Mb 14% Mto— to 

206B 14b Mto 1*%— to 

215 24)6 24 24 + to 

3373 34% 33% 33% + to 


336 9% 9to 9b 

106 10 9b 9b— to 
61 22% 2216 22b— M 
327 24 23% 21b 


70 15 
24 1J 
74 ZB 
2*0 12* 
pt 770 13.1 
pf 777 125 
Pf 1250 12* 
Fs *8 15 
1*0 XI 
152 9* 
*0 1* 





1*8 19 
1*8 11* 
7*8 135 
776 13.1 
275 117 
374 125 
XU 1X0 
X12 1X1 
275 12* 
3*0 111 
3*2 1X0 
4*0 113 
4.12 13* 
12*0 127 
270 1X8 
*0 35 
*4 4J 
2JS 87 
176 97 
4*0 11.1 
170 15 



Churtai JO 2* 19 940 34 33b 33% — b 

anBBil 112 7* 8 9 44% 44 Vi 44% + Vi 

CInGE X16 15* 6 37U7 14b 13b 13b— b 

CtaG Pf 4*0 137 190K X 30 30 + to 

ClnGPf 970 145 210z 65 64 64 — % 

CfaiGpf 952 147 100z 67 67 67 +1 

72 25 39 340 25b 25V. 2516— % 

.74 2.1 15 160 35b 35% 35% — to 

*8 7 17 1685 28b 27% 28 + % 

IS 371 »% 19b 20% — M 

CltkTP 2*6 47 7 6792 44% 43)6 43 %— % 

Cftlcnpf STtoll.l WT 75% 75 75% + to 

Ctfylnv 2*0 XI 9 1695 39% 39% 39)6 

Ctylnpf 2*0 37 9 (I 60% 61 +b 

ctylnpt 2*7 11* 437 24% 24% 24% 

aobir 72 95 25 716 7% 7to— % 

ClarfcE 1.10 17 15 1279 29% 29 29b + b 

CtavHm 16 151 15% 14% 14b 

ClvCII 1*0 5* 300 20)6 19b 20 

CtavEI 2*9 137 5 1744 19 Mb 19+16 

OvEI pf 756 137 100* 57 57 57 

ClOVPk *0 ST 36 11b 11b 11b— % 

Clvplcpf 273 135 49 Mto 16 Mto 

Clvpkpf 1*4 115 75 15% 15)6 15% 

Ctanu 1-20 4.1 10 3053 29% 2Bb » + % 

ClubM n 100 17b 17% T7% + % 

Ciuettp 1*0 X4 * 919 30 29% 29to — to 

ChMtPf LOO 5* 6 18b 18% IBM— to 

Caodim J 11 < NS IBto 18% 18% + to 

Coastal *0a U 7 754 29b 28b 29b +1% 

CsHpf 1*3 57 4 32 31% 32 +116 

Cocoa 276 44 13 3526 63% 69% 63b— % 

Cotaco 2758 11% 10% Mb— b 

Catafim 1T0 4* It 121 30% 29M 30% 

CalgPol lTBb 5* 11 1761 26% 25% 35%— % 

ColiABc 1T0 19 7 464 41% 41% 41% 


41% 41% 41% . 

18% 17% 18% + b 
am 26b 26% + to 


Cofflnd 250 47 10 570 SBb 38b 5B%— to 

ColCas X18 10.1 6 524 22% »% 31b- % 

CSOpf 3*5 36 25% 25% 25%+ % 

CSOpf 2*1 11* 2 19 IBM 18% —to 

CSOpfOlSTS 147 10zT0(% 18(% 106% +1)6 

CSOpf nISTS 14* nozmtoiw 106 + % 
Combln 2*0 57 10 1895 3946 38% 39 

CmoEn 1*4 IS 13 455 34% 33to 3116— to 

Comdb 70 1* M 1196 Mto M Mb- to 


196 Mto 14 Mb- to 
81 17b 17% 17b + to 
60S Mb T3b Mto+Ito 


3*0 10* 6 8211 28to 27% 27b- to 


2 28 27b 27b— to 

35 15b 15b 15b + % 

10 16b Mto Mb 
2143 99b 97b 9916+4% 

11 21b 21b 21% _ 

6 23b 23to 23% + to 

195fa 66% 44 M% + % 


37 26% 

30% 71b 
26b 20% 
22 % 12 
7b 3% 
4b 1% 
lb % 
13% 6b 
15% 6b 
18b 9b 
28% 1914 
10 12 % 
78 60)6 

57M 37b 
30b 20)6 
30% 20% 
4234 32% 
18b 13 
29% U% 
23% 19% 
29% 25% 
28b 23b 
Mb 9 
Mto Bto 
8% 2b 
8% 4b 
10)6 7b 
Mto 13 
1? 11)6 
18b 5b 
77% SB% 
10b Sb 


CastAJrB 

EALwtO 

EALwtA 

E&Alr pt 

EAtrpfB 

EAlrpfC 

EaatGF 

EasKJH 

EaKod 

Eaton m 

EchllnH 

Eckerd 
EdbBr 
EDO 
Edward 
EPGdof 
EPGpf 
EPGpfB 
ElTorol 
eicorB 
EIkm 
EMM ■ 
EMM pf 
ETCtapi 
BMn ■ 
Etaefntra 
EmrsEl 
EmRd s 


*8 17 21 
*0 17 IS 
1*4 35 10 
*4 2* 


170 XI IS 
154 II* 6 
370a 4* M 
ITO XI 9 
74 U 13 
1*0 37 13 
1*0 4* 8 
-24 17 13 
*0 2* 19 
275 10* 
STS 1X1 


U 

1*0 187 
*8 7 27 

*0 SJ 14 
35 

2*0 3* IS 
.wt li n 


HL * 

12% 11b 
13b 13 
U IS 
2SH 25% 
77b 17% 
72% 72% 
57b 57to 
TOW 29b 
SOb 30 
36% 34 
IBM IB 
28b 28% 
22 % 22 % 
29 2S% 

38% 28 
13)6 12b 
9b 9b 
3b 3b 


9% 916 
241* 23b 
15% Mb 
8b Bto 
77% 75b 
llto 10b 


Ub EmryA 70 23 
24% ErMhart 1.40b 44 
14b BnwOs 176 97 
7 Emppf 51 12* 
to EnExc 

22% EngICp 72 24 
18% EnlsBu Si L7 
17% Enrarai 1*0 6* 
97 EnKftpf1072 102 
51% Ertsdi pf 67S9I17 
91b EnxtiPfll 73611* 
lb Entree 
9% Entera 

16% EntxE n ITSe 6* 
16 Enftatln 170 67 
2TjU Equifax 1J0 4.9 
3 Equlmk 
llto Eamkpf 271 15* 
28% Eat R« 172 48 
9% E aultc n .12 1.1 
Bb Erfemnt TOe L5 
12% EtraBsn -09o 5 
15% EssexC JWh 3.9 
20% Estrina -72 3* 
20 EltlVl *5 27 
3 EvanP 
6b Evan pi 1*0 20* 
10% E van pf 2.10 19.1 
30 ExCcfa 1*0 35 
13% Excafer IJIall.l 
bto Exxon 3*0 72 


it 1809 ian 
9 403 30b 
7 40 19U 

706 7% 

16 3J7 29b 
U 32 34% 
20 4379 23% 

9560zl00b 
311002 53b 
1083 99% 
20 66 2% 
119 9% 

64 IBto 

7 242 207* 
14 118 35M 

71 4b 
SO 15 
6 656 36K 

8 Ml lib 

17 118 13% 

11 1224 17% 
11 46 20% 

II 2812 26% 
II IDS! 37% 

295 3b 
90 6b 
6 11 
11 288 41 

28 16% 
711980 47b 


IBto lBb + b 
30b 30b + % 
19 ivn— % 
7b 7b 
% + 
29to 29% + to 
33% 33%—% 
23% S3%+ % 
100V. 100b + U, 
53% 53%— to 
SBb 98b— to 
2 2 

9b 9%— to 
17b IBto + b 
20% ZW-'e 
34b 35 + % 

4b 4b 
14% 15 

35b 35b- b 
u n%— b 
13 13 — to 

17 17 — % 

20% 20%+to 
23% 22b— 2% 
35% 36%+lb 
3b 3b— % 
6b 6b 
II II + % 
40b 4H + % 
Mto 16 to 
44 to 47 —1% 


HOW CONTRARIANS R 


800% PROFITS 



6 M2 
270 XS 9 537 
X25 25 9 

X76 0* 9 608 
irt 30 

78 22 15 15 

20 

*0 47 9 792 
3*0 9.9 999 

.16 1.1 9 651 
72 7 23 1721 

*0e 3* M MM 
5 32 

*B 4J 8 Its 
TO 17 II 321 
11 353 

1*4 4* 7 24 

21 7668 
10*0 20.9 2382 

1*2 47 II 588 
.16 1* 29629 

70 3* 7 6M 
1*4 65 IS 237 
Jffl 48 IB 43 
2*0 4* 9 462 
TTO 4* 9 67 

2*0 63 II 56 
TO 2* 2566 

*0 11* 4 

674819* 167 



674819* 167 

*0 47 10 853 
*8 3* 8 339 
1*8 47 B 320 
TTO 4* 10 T10 

*0a 1* IS 523 
172 5* 20 1307 
ft*Sall* 115 

1*0 87 8 517 
2*8b SS 18 
13 54 

1405 

274 50 I 764 
277 75 134 

*4 25 9 347 
2*8 6.1 7 141 
7 517 
2*3 95 410 

1*4 65 14 151 
*4 47 8 161 

1T0 4* 8 180 
675 12* SOOz 

1*0 2* 19 TOO 
05c 5 203 

172 4* 8 160 
*6 1* 11 2070 
*8 2* 14 327 
*0 25 13 199 
1*1 13* 23 

TO * 21 120 
15 773 
.16a * 12 V 
Zl« 17 « 396 
*0 25 13 92 

277 

*0 27 18 996 
*0 27 850 4691 
270 4* 9 65 

200 40 319155X 


S%— % 
62b + b 
77% +1% 
44b 

22b + to 
12M — % 
12 % — % 
17 

36b— to 
14b 

29b + to 
T7b + % 
29 — to 

20to 

Ub + % 
4%+ to 
37%+ to 
33 — 2b 
47% +5b 
36U +lto 
16b + to 

20b % 

21 

16b 

55b-1% 

26b 

31% — to 
IDto + % 
5V, 

35% + to 


17* 11J 42 

1*4 Z6 15 231 
*4 23 14 716 

*8 7* M 2S4 
1*4 3* 62 129 
ZI3S2X1 191 
*0 37 14 5240 
*0 37 IS 233 
*0 2J 6 582 
2*0 65 m 


AO IT 9 272 


Fuqa pf ITS 24 


.109 * 

170 IS 

,J ° U 15 
*8 I* 11 


1*8 27 21 
.50 20 13 
*0 37 13 
56 3* M 
133 

150 19117 
l*3o 9* 

1*0 13 9 
I JO 13 10 
1 *6 1* 

34 

1*0 17 10 
270 35 13 
250 45 9 
*0 10114 
150 67 
*0 10 3 
74 13 12 
50 16 19 
124 4* 12 
4J9r 5* 6 


21b + b 
uto + b 
29to + to 
7b + to 
13% — 1 
BSb— 1 
66to+1b 
20% — b 
10% — b 
Mto + to 
Uto + b 
15%+ to 
59 — b 
57% + % 
99 +1% 

25b + % 
32% — to 

21%— b 
44to + % 
5b— % 
61b— to 
27 —1 
42b 

36 + b 

15)6— to 
59 — % 
56 + M 
24b 

25U + « 
24 — to 
23b— to 


26 — to 
26b — to 
30 

20b + % 
«n%+ to 

17b 


27%+ % 
18% + to 
36 + to 

79b— to 
53%+ to 
115% + b 
49b— Ito 
36b+ to 
« + % 
7to 

29% — to 
T9b+ to 
4916— % 
28% 

39b +1% 
29to — to 
43% — to 
11% 

19% 


43b + to 
49b— % 
33%+ % 
43%+ % 
29 — % 
74%+ U 
48% + % 
25%+ to 
32b 

74% — % 
71% — % 
T4%— to 
14%— % 
15% + % 
16% + % 
16% — % 
53b + b 
9% + to 
24%+ % 


G«nRa 1*4 12 
GnRetr 

GnStanf 1*0 35 
GTF1 pf ITS 10* 
GTFIPf B.U 113 
Gcmsco 

GnRod .10 * 

Garatg 1*0 
Gatpf 1*8 7* 
GonPtI 1JO 25 
GaPac *0 11 
GaPcpf 124 60 
GaPpfB 274 67 
GaPwpf 3*4 118 
GaPwpf 378 13* 
GaPwpf 156 113 
GaPwpf 252 723 
GaPwpf 27S 11.1 
GaPwpf 7*0 1Z5 
GarbP* 1.M 4* 

cores* .12 * 

damp 

GrtjrFn 

GlffHlII 52 11 
GlUatta 160 43 
GiaatC 

GtoUM 74 45 
GtobMpf 150 175 
GMNUO 
GMNwt 

GldWF TO * 
Gdrtch 156 55 
Gaodvr 1*0 57 
GornftU 52 13 
Gould *8 16 
Groce 160 6* 
Gretngr U 4 15 
GtAFst *0 2* 
GtAtPc 

GtLkln JOo 11 
GNlrn l*5ellT 
GtNNk 152 47 
GfNNk pf475 8* 
GIWFbl *8 12 
GWH*p 

GMP 172 117 
Gravh 170 44 
Grevfi pf 475 117 
Grafter 

GrowG *0 27 
GrowGwf 
GrubEI *0 5 

Gremn 1*0 15 

Gnim pf 2*0 10* 
Grunlai .16 2* 
Guardi -33 IT 
GuHtre *8 3* 
GffWtt 50 19 
GffWpf 575 9.1 
GuffRt 2* 

Gulf R pf ITO 7* 
GltS tUt 1*4 12-1 
GtfSUof 5*9elll 
GHSlIpr 3*5 US 
GHSUPT 4*0 IS* 
GffSU Pf UO 115 
GAaro 5Se 3* 
Gultan *0 3* 


24 + to 

6)6— % 
23b— to 
22b— to 
31% + to 
63 +1% 

Mto— % 
18b— to 
13% 

47 +1U 

V + % 
32b + % 
74 —I 
Uto— to 
15% + to 


37 

30 + % 
26b— to 
18% — to 
4% + b 
2„ + to 

12% + to 
13%+ % 
15%+ to 
25b— Mi 
17% 

72% + to 
57b + % 
29b— to 
30% + Mi 
34 

Uto— to 
2Bb+ to 
22 % 

28b— to 
2B%+ % 
12b— to 
9% — to 
3%- to 
5% + to 
9b + to 
m* + % 

15to + % 
Bto— 16 
74% -1% 
11 + to 


416 
19)6 
Mto 
ito b 
8% Sb 
55% 38b 
13% llto 
19% 15b 
4616 21% 
20 15% 

34to 16b 
47% 23% 
51b 32% 
12% 7b 
33% 14% 
41% 22b 
IS ID* 
36 19 

32% 23% 
Uto 13% 
23b 15% 
12 % 8 
34% 15% 
12% 9 
15% 9% 
23% T3to 
29% Mb 
22 15b 

45 32 

99 77% 

30 12* 

25% 18 
5b 3b 
12% llto 
37to 2716 
19% 13b 


MRT n 

MaUFB 

HaOrtn 

Hattwd 

Hahvdpf 

HamrP 

HanJS 

HanJi 

Hond lm 

HandN 


1*0 4* 
1*0 4* 10 
*0 5*130 
56 4.1 
2*4 47 8 
1*701X9 
LMa f* 

52 20 16 
*6 20 17 
*D 2S 13 
1*0 11 14 
52 17 18 


*0 27 17 
*1 25 14 


41 to Mto 
24% 5U 
25 9 


HatfSe 
HawEI* 
HorrtkA 
Haztein 
HnzLab 
Hecki 
HedaM 
Hettmn 
HeJUa 

Heinz 
Hffmpf 
HefncC 
HofmP 
HentCa 
Ham l nc 
Hrrcuts 
Horne 
HorltCpf 
Horshy 


ITS 49 13 
1* 41 I 
1*0 1L5 10 
1*4 73 9 
.We * 9 
76 17 49 
72 12 18 
78 13 38 
TSe 15 29 
JUb 20 9 
J6 17 12 
1*0 30 11 
170 I* 

26 

*4 17 23 


50a 73 
1*0 45 ID 
*59 * 34 
150 45 
1*0 4* It 


SBb SOU 
lb 1U 
9% Sb 
49 47% 

13% 13b 
19% 19% 

47 4Sb 
17% 17 
18% Uto 

48 47)6 

53% 53b 
10% 1016 
30 29% 

Tib SO 
14b Uto 
36% 25 
30% 29% 
15b 15% 
23% 22b 
12% 12% 
28b fflli 
10b Hto 
12b 12 
M 13% 
17% 16% 
21b ZI 
42b 41 
93 93 

15% 15% 
20 1949 

5% Sb 
lib Ub 

35b 35)6 
19b 19)6 


37 SS 
9b 7% 
13 11% 


25%— to 
2016— % 
ib + % 
916+ b 
48% +1 
13% 

I9to— to 
46 — % 
1716 

18% + % 
48 + V* 

52b— b 
10b + to 
SB + to 

so —ito 

14 + % 

24 + % 

29b— b 
15b— Mi 
22b— % 
12b— % 

2Ab + 44 
KM 

12 — b 
13% — to 
17 — b 
21 — to 
4ib + b 
93 —5% 
15% 

mg— to 
5%+ to 
lib + % 

3S%+ % 
i9b + b 
23% 

js%— ib 

8 —lb 
11 %— ib 



in ioa 2 while the DOWwas drooping under SQO.Vhen ihe majority ot s eers were bearish, me 
rebu^d^^nL Tpredicling -TOE DJI W1LLTCXCH 1.000 BEK^rt^75^tte also 
SSto recall that at. or near, the nadir of despair, .presltgious puW^tori le^urala^ory 
headlined "Tti- 3 Death of Equities'. Theirorthodoxy biomeranged; the Bull rampaged to 1290,’ 
ouroptimism was vindicated. After the market soarec the same magazine released an article 
entitled - The Re-Birth of Eauities". Once again, they wire myopic: the market ^^ed-Amonttr 
ago BusinessYi/eekpublished alengthy discourse wttlthe scalding utieiTheDeathdfMlning^ r 
an obituary for the North American mining industry. . _ 

Our rerebral juices stir we challenge their proaic thinking. ‘Power Errtfets' are pre- 
conditioned to buy into weakness, to sell into strength, is we re«>gneed when i ourresearchere 
recommended BOEING at S 16 . FORD aroundSl 7 .G M < t S39. SEARS underS19 (before spllte^ 
and other seasoned shares that the "Street" once sconed, misguided by herd instinct What 
™il t rs?,e IS thal “misery' has already been faerred intothe price otAMA^ASAROT. 
INCO NEWMOrfT NOHANDA and PHELPS DODGE, ttat to sell after the -Group 1 * has been 
decimated is to defy logic. When Elitists are ready k peddle their inventories, the Group 
will undergo a metamorphosis; fiscal events are rarely spontaneous combustion, movements 

are orchestrated. . _ 

Our forthcoming tetter discusses why the DJI will gaop over 1500. why mining shares will 
recover: m addition. CGR focuses upon a low-priced quity with the dynamics to vault to 
prominence, emulating the success of a recently ream mended "special situation" that 
escalated 800% in a brief time-span. For your comp merit ary copy, please write to, or 
telephone... 


CAPITAL 

GAINS 


FP5. Rrancial Planning Services bv 

if ahiATRtmt 112. 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (GO) -27 51 81 
Telex 18S6 


Name: 


Address: 


I Phone: 


19)6 — % 
26 — b 
31%+ to 
2916+ % 
99to + b 
24% 

76 +4to 
15 
42 

17)6— to 
16%+ to 
46b— to 
29% + % 
•to— to 
47 47Vk — % 
4to 4to + to 
26% 26to 
28W 2Bto+ to 
20 20to — to 
26b 26)6—1 
52 52 +1 

35 35%+ to 

10% 10)6— to 
30b 31 + % 

27% 27b + to 
35% SS%— % 
31b 31b 
12b 12b— % 
3Jto 35%+ to 
24 27 + to 

37 37 — % 

24% 14% — to 
16)6 Mto— % 
S% 5)6— to 
Mto 15b +b 
18% 18%— % 
47b 48 +b 
49b 49% —1 
11% 12 
67to 62b— % 
1314 13b + to 
Vto 9)6— Ik 
30to 30to— to 
9% 9b 
18% 19 + 1* 
26b 27to+ % 
26 26 — % 
31 31 

33b 33% + % 
51 to 51U— b 


Past performance does not guarantee future results 


KMontti 
Utah Law Sax* 


Sta. Ctaw 

Wv. via. PE UBS HWl Low Quot C3l 08 


12 Month 
Won Low Start 


Ply. YkL PE MhHlgtiLow Ouor.CvW’ 


Uto 31 to 
30 17% 

18% 12 
12 % 8 % 
24 17% 

58b 45% 
Uto 31 
sob 35to 
75 48% 

27% 12 
20% 11% 
9b a 

36b 20% 
20% 8b 
60to 41% 
66% 46b 
27% 19% 
26b 18 
10 3% 

48b 35b 
29 21% 

36% 20b 
19b 13b 
35to 24 
51% 36 
72b 61 
23% 17b 
43to 39b 
20 9b 
23 to 12 
26 20% 
14b 9% 

21b 12% 
2 3 1716 
33 21% 

2Sto 17% 
36b ZJ% 
24b IBto 


25b 34to 
2916 28% 
18b 18% 
Ub llto 
Zl% 21% 

50 to 57b 
35% 34b 
47b 47H 
7BU 70 
17b 17 
20b 20b 

9% 9 
21b 21to 
Uto 15 
54% 53% 
61to 59b 
27 26 

25 24b 

Sb 51k 
44b Uto 
28% 2Sto 
36 35U, 

19% IBto 
34b Mto 

51 U 51 

73)6 72 
23 22b 

44b 44% 
10b 10% 
15b 15 
25 24b 

13 12b 

14*6 13b 
21 19b 

27b 27 
24b 24% 
Xlb 32% 
24b 24% 


34% + % 

sab— b 
18% 

11)4— to 
21b + b 
57b— to 
35 — % 
47b + % 
7DI6 + to 
17V. + to 
30% + to 
9 

21)6— b 

is + to 

54% + to 
60 — to 
26b + to 
Mto + to 
Sto— % 
44)6 + to 


29%— % 
35)6- b 
18b— to 

m%— b 
51 

72 -to 
22 ) 6 — % 
Uto— to 
10%— to 

sr* 

llto 

14 

2016 +lto 
27% — to 
24)6 + % 
-3216 + %. 
24b + to 


22b LN Hi 2*tal0* 
7b LFE 

12)6 LLEj. 2728143 
2 LLCC 
8b LTV l . 

45% LTV P 

18)6 LTV p- 3*6 135 

50% LTV 01575 8* 

13 LTV P1 1*5 73 
10% LQuM 

15b UKOa 170 68 
Bto LofonP-TO 12 
23b LofrpP2*4 93 
12b LamCRA74 1* 
Ib LamSa 
10% Lawlln *6 43 
13% LoorPt jo * 
20% LaarPp*7 107 
37% LuarSa so 33 

14 LaaRnl 148 23 
2«% LawvTr 50 45 
20% LMEnf 80 23 

9 lmMos io l* : 
15% Lna Plat u 13 
2% LefiVal 
13b Lahrim Saio* 


26 26b — % 

12b 12b 
ISb 15%— bl 

IS .SS“^ 

49 49 — 1%. 

22% 22b 
62 62 + % 
16% 1(%- It, 
12b 12% + 16 1 
75 25 —2b. 


9 9 — toj 

23b M — Ik, 
Uto 15b +14' 

,2 3» + W 


Sb-*- 


3b 2b— b 
14b U + H 

14,4 ssta 


ICInds 170 47 I MM 31% 30b 31 


27b 

34b— % 
26%+ b 
26% — to 
63b +1% 
5% 

7 

42b— 1 
25to+ % 
22%— to 
5V.— % 

55 +1% 
31b +1 
10b 
16b 

68 + % 
38to— U 
16b + to 
43b— to 
29b — % 
39% + to 

19% — 

76 —216 
63b— b 
5516 + % 
30b + to 
30b + % 
19b + to 
10b— to 
19b + to 
48to— % 
84b + to 
5Ub+l% 
38 + b 
50 + % 

6b+ b 
11 

66 + % 
low + b 
51b 
lib 

66% +1H 
5b+ % 
Mto— b 
22b + to 
21% +1 
35% 

2Sb— to 
37% +1 
36 +1 
27%+ % 
29 + to 
as* + % 

20% + to 
24b + 16 
62to— b 
26% — % 
1 9)6 + to 
10b + b 
10% + to 
24)6 + to 

56 —1 
13b— to 

4b + to 
19%— lb 
lib— % 
Sto + to 
26% +1 
28)6 + b 
27% — % 
15b— to 
24% + to 
42b + to 
63b +116 

Mto + 16 
15b— to 
42b + to 

Hb— % 
36%— % 
59b + to 
2716 + % 
isto + b 
15b— to 
27%+ % 

a 

3% 

IBto— % 
12)6 

9 — to 


42b 1C In pt 730 3* 

4to ICN 40 

22% ICN pf 370 10* 

14 INAIn 172 11.1 
13b IRTPrs 1*0 8* 11 


730 3* 8 93 92% 9216—7 

60 1329 10% 10% 10b + % 

370 10* 21 27 26b 27 + to 

172 11.1 14 Mb T7V. 17b 

1*0 8* 11 39 19% 18b 19 + VI 


20b ITT CP 100 XI 9 4015 32% 31b 31% 


46 ITTpfH 4*0 67 
40 ITTDfK 4*0 40 
U% ITT pfO 5*0 8* 
28 ITT pfN 275 SJ 
42% ITT pfl 450 7* 
15% lUinf 170 6* 
30b IdcftoP 128 14 
13% IdnlB 


4.00 bJ 2 *0 60 60 +1% 

4*0 68 35 59 58% 58b— % 

5*0 85 M 59 58 ®%— % 

275 SJ 3 43% 42b 42b 

450 7M 29 65 63)6 64 +1% 

170 6* 25 991 18b 18b 18b + 16 

3L28 16 7 280 38% 38 38 — to 

50 15V. 15% 15% — % 


17b IHPowr 2*4 115 6 1362 23% 22b 23 + 


13% HPowpf 2*4 120 
14% HPowpf 113 11* 
15 HPowpf 121 113 
15b HPowpf 135 125 
37 HPowpf 4*40117 
25% HPowpf 4*0 125 


MSb 17 17 17 — % 

77701 1816 18 IS +1 
40lk 18 18 18 

me 18% 18% 18% + % 

75 39b 39b 39b— V, 
14 3Z% 32 32 + to 


21 to ITWl 34 1.9 18 138 34% 33% 34b +b 
27b impawn 100 5* M 1604 37 36% 36b— to 


Uto Infmtc 
25% irtgarR 2*0 55 
27b InsRpi 135 7.1 
10% InorToe 54 37 30 

19% i moan 50 11 

38b must Pf 4.75 107 
M Inalha 1*0* 5* 

3b Inralte 
llto IiMbRsc 
19 intoRpf 3*3 113 
42 infgR pf 6-63*146 
25to IntoRpf 475 13* 

7)6 InfRPn 

15% iicpSo HOollT 


5b ImofCP 236 9 Bto Bb 

BH INCO TO 15 2968 13b 13% 13b— to 

45 IndIMPf 7*0 112 lftc 53% S3% 53% +1 

49 IndIM Pf 771 137 140z 56% 56 56 —2 

54% HWIMpf 8*8 133 I00z 65% 65% 65%— b 

91% IndIM Pfl 200 12J lOOz 97b 97b 97% 

M IndIMpf 115 116 51 17% 16b 17% + % 

14b IndIMpf 123 116 11 17b 17b 17b + % 

23% IndIMpf 3*3 127 200 23% 27to 20% + b 

16b IndKMl 1*8 70 6 64 24b 23b 24V. + to 

5% inox co .14 13 16 390 6to 6 6 — % 

Uto Infmfc 15 S3 19b 18b 18b + to 

2*055 322 47b 47 47 — % 

135 7.1 6 33b 33 33 

54 37 30 10 14% 14% 14% 

50 11 353 25% 24b 24b— to 

4.75 102 32 47 46% 46b— to 

1*0* 5* II 603 20% 19to 20% + % 

396 4% 4% 4b + to 

7 1163 19% 19 19 

3*3 113 124 24b 24% 24b 

6*3*14* : 45% 45% 45% 

4TS 13* 123 31b 31% 31b— to 

154 10b TOM 10%— % 
HOoITT 47 18b 18b 18b + to 


ras+b 

37b 37%+ W 
50 SOto+l 
7Bb 79 +1% 
28b 29 + 14 

SESEr’S 
S5 5? b7S 

7016 70b- to 
46b 46% — W 

J 4 JX 

120b 12014 +116 
40% 40%+ to 
31% 3Tb— 1 
3414 30* 

25% 25% 

50b SOb— to 
7b 7b + to 
22% 23%+) 
41% 4T%— % 
41 42 

19b 19% 

19 19M + to 

19b 19b , 

21 22b +114 

18 18% + to 

54% 54% + to 
MU MU— to 
M% 16b + to 
47b 40% + 14 
29 29to + b 
II llb+b 
31% 31%— % 
24b 25 + to 

30% 30% 

22 22to + » 

Mb 26% — W 
16% 46% — Vi 
28b 28b- b 
2314 23% + % 
29% 30 + b 

ibu iau— to 
Mto Mb + to 


13% MACOM 72 124 2 

34b MCA *8 230 1 

16% MCorp 1*0 6 S 1 

7b MDC 72 2 jo 

31% ME I J4 V 15 


23b 21b 22 — % 
43% 42 4214— % 

2ZU 22)4 22b+ to 
13b 12% Ub + b 
39 38% 38b— U 


9)4 MGMGr J4 3aj 2151 73 % ifta 13b— M 
■ MGMGr Pt*4 IT 


Intarco 308 40 12 3 17 65)4 64b 64b— % 


9% inlrfsl 
41 IntrHc 
Bb infmod 
14b inlAlu 
9V ibm 


921 12 11% 11b— to 

123 50% 49% 49%— b 

265 10% 10% 10%— to 

32 20b 20% 20*4 


4*0 13 1218227 134% 133b 133% + % 


9 MGMGr pt*4 H 12 ha n J 

™ SSSyL - 20 * ’■« 4 » 1 m 12 % ub- to 

2% MGMuwt 5813 b 3)6 316 — to 

E* 21 21 b- to 
l ?* 1 .-S' 12 21 ^ 21 b + » 

25 Mocmll 1*0 12; 405 in* 44 b 4514 

«■» U 3757 K 44b 46% +1b 
11% ModRra 206 C% 12b 12b— to 

50 2* 565 Vb 39% 3914— to 

1 B 2 1 % 26% 24% 


22% InfFtov 1.12 4* IS 393 2B% 27% 20%— b 


5% InfHarv 1T33S 10b 9% 10%— % 

2% InfHr wt 63V 6% 6H 6b 

23% inIHpfC 56 45 43b 44% +1 

20b InfHPfA 35 38b 38% Wife 

17b IlllHpfD 33 32 31 U 31U— U 

32% InfMhl 2*0 6J 12 2332 41% 41% 41ta— U 

30U IntMnpf 4*0 11.9 1 33% 33% 33% 

23 Inf Muff 176 6* 9 54 29b 29% 29% — » 

46 lntPaPT 140 4* 29 3326 54% 54 54% + % 

9 Inf Res 15 251 Mto Ub I2%— b 

5% IntNrlh 148 6* 8 303 42% 41% 41%— 14 


25 Mocmll 1*0 27 
38% Macv 1*4 27 
11% MadRra 
24 MaalCf 
20b MetAst 
12 % Manfim JOO it 
13% AAtalflNf 72 1* 
10% ManrCs .15 3 


■X? 1 1257 Ito 15* 15b 


17% 17%+ to 

lS K 38% Sto- b 

m ££££ !£ f 51b 51b— to 

- StoWSa““ Tz% 

w* vWtoVlPf 33 l5 19b 19b 

^ 1J0 “ 1 « 2% 27b 27b— to 

Mom hr A7 4 «i& 4 f i| 

W* Marcda 154 1 % %+% 

T9b MorMkf 1*0 49 048 j3 JT% 32% +IU 

*5* MorMpf STZoll* 1 *3 «Uk 46%— % 

27U Morten S2 1.1 31560 47) 46 U Sto— IH 

.5- MtrtC 72 2 a 40 a 111 11 % 11% 

14b Morkpl 1T0 6.9 5 M 7U 17% + to 

58% Morrlof *4 3 17(30 aiiBO 81+1 

35b MTtfiM 140 4* 44^7 60H»U S9b+ b 

30% AAortM 174 19 -82 471 ( 46 % *T 

55 MrfMpf 407 6 lS *0 75)04% Z4b to 

Bb MaryK .12 1.1 U nn iVs j. 2 


*/■» Bk- W 

"a 


83V, InlNtpf 8*8 99 
■ 6 U InfNf pftTOJO II* 


90* 86 86 86 

2 95% 95% 95% 


24b InfpGPl 1*0 29 11 384 34to 34’A 34U— % 


10 intBofcr 
15to IntafPw 1.90 97 
16b inPwpf 278 117 
MU Iowa ei 1.90 mi 
21% lawllG 160 9* 
17 lawlll pf HI 119 

25 lowalto 10B mi 

26 Ipolco 192 9* 
9b IpcoCp 74 XI 


23% IrvBki 1*4 5J 
42b Irvflfc p( 5.19nlll* 


*77 15% 14b 14b— I 
1.90 93 7 39 19b 19% 19% + % 
278 117 100* 19% 17% 19% + % 

1.90 mi 8 199 18b 18% 18b 

2*0 9* 7 142 29 3% 28% + b 

271 119 1790* 19% 1916 19b + % 

108 10.1 7 34 30% 30% 30% 

2.92 9* 8 1303 32b 32% 32% + % 

74 XI 10 2(4 11 10% 11 + VS, 


31% 32% +IU 
46% 46% — % 
46to 46M— IW 


I9U 59% + b 
16b 47 „ 

r4% 74b— to 


22 % Mom u u n 

7V. MaraMr .16 1 J M 53 


418 34% 3416 34% 

91 49 49 49 +1% 


20 JWTl 
23% J River 

12 % Jtanswv 
less jowsf 
23b JeffPIs 
47 JorCpf 
12 b JorCpf 
5% JewtcT 
31 JofmJn 
37% JahnCn 
21% J organ 

15% Jostens 
21b JovMfg 


25b 2SU 
3ib 32 % + % 
21% 21% — u 
12b 12b + % 
38b 39% 

55 55% + b 

16 16% + % 

SU 8b— to 
37% 37b— % 
45b 45b— U 
25 21 — % 

23 23 — U 

25b 26% + b 


'S M J? ® ,1!< 1 llto + % 

34 1* M 99 32) IU 3Hh — b 

.■» « S !S »* * 

1O0 9* 12 14 18*10% Iff* 

-I*. n 3 m 2 b— u 

1*8 10* )0 26b u 24% 

'■» "4 R 11b u im + to 

JSr 3 W * 62b b 62% — to 

15 12 % % ia%+ to 

0 9 K Bto 


15% MooM 1*0 94 12 14 18*3 

2U MoravF n a " 

20% MosCp 2*8 10* 10 26b 

9b Moolnc 172 11* u 11b 

Sib MOfSuE AST 7 10 J 62b 

6 U Mattel is uS 

«to Motel wf a e 

16V. Maftlpf 

9V. Maxam , . 

30U MavDS 172 37 10 i 46% 

36 V, Marta 2*0 q 5 * 11 ; 49 

25% McOr pf 270 79 .28 

2 Mk MCDrpf 2*0 11* 4 22 

23% McOerl 1*0 7* 24 13 2(M 
6 U McDrl wf 17 % 

4% McOM 70 27 19 9b 


40b MCDnlS 


14 M 45 S8b 


13% 

46b — % 
48% — % 
a +i% 
22 + to 
2 » + b 
7%+ % 

57» + % 


47% memo 1*2 11 10 27) 76% 71 n* + % 
31b McGEd 2*0 <9 13 Z «% A «%— to 


McGTH 174 17 16 22C 46b 


1 6b KDI 
> 9% KLMa 

1 33 KMIPf 4*0 
26b Kmart 174 
1 24% KN Ena 
1 12b KatarAl *0 
I 14% KataCe - 
0% Kaneb — 

1 MU KCtvPL 236 
25 KCPLPf 180 
29U KCPLpf 4*0 
l«to KCPLpf 120 
15% KCPLpf 111 
36% KCSau 1*0 
1DU KCSOPf 1*0 
12% KanGE 276 
27b KanPLf 296 
18 KaPLpf 2J2 
17U KaPLpf 273 
T7b Katvln 
49 KOty pf 1*6 
10K Knufflr AO 
12% Koufpf 1*0 
68 KOUfpf 8 35 
77 Kellogg 176 
31% Keflw* 1*0 
I Kenal 
W Kenmf __ 
20b KVUTII 276 
11 Kerrd *4 
lff% KerGpf I JO 
26U KerrMc 1.10 

16% KoyBfe T.1B 

2% KovCnn 

14 Kminf *80 
26U KMMe 170 
61b KhfnrB 4*0 
62 KklPfC 4*0 
39b KbnBCs 270 
21 U KnohffW 96 
17b Kooer 130 
Mto Kalmar 72 
17% Kopara *0 
30% Kaprpf 4*0 1 
96b KopprpfHMN 
12 % Korean 
29% Kraaer 2*0 
10 b KuMme *0 
44b Knars .141 
U Kvser *0 


249 8% 8 8 — to 

I960 13b 13% »%— % 
I 26U 36to S6to 
7155 30b 37% 37b— % 
94 35% 34b 35% + b 


3?b Me Kara 2*0 67 II 19 38b 


4D%— to 
4S%— % 
29b- to 


16% ISb 16 — to 
29 IBto 18b IBto— U 
3438 Uto Mb 11 +U 
681 20H 2DU 20 to— V. 
2004 29% 29% 29%+ % 
IDOz 34 34 34 —1 

58 18% 18 18% + % 

7 19% 19% 19% — to 
472 53b 52b 53 — 1 
soar M 14 M 
887 17b 17% 17% 

194 SSto 34b 35 — U 
9 21 21 31 

II 20 20 20 + to 

694 27b 28% 28b — to 
1 74% 74% 74%— I 
298 Mb I6U 16% 

16 16% 16% 14 to + % 

5 7Bb 70)4 78b +1 
2231 41% 41to 41% + % 

10* 31b 30% 31U + % 
124 Ito Ito Ufa + to 
284 25 24% 24% — % 

112 24b ?«to 24b + % 
47 Ub 119k 1Tb 

6 19b 19b 19b + to 
795 29to 28b 29 — % 
250 24% 25% 26% + b 


10 McLean 
3% McLaawt 
19b McNeil 
27% Mead 
12 b Wtasnn 
24% Medtrn 


2*0 67 I 1938b * 88% „ 

11 » isb 1 : uy. + to 

1 _ ,, . “7 3% I 5%+to 

■55 3j 9 8124% 34 94U— to 

170 37 9 26*3846 38 M — % 
74 LI IS l-Bfe* 21 n% 

M 16 8 28 » + 16 


33% MMlon 230 53 8 3072jb% 47 

2gt MeUonpfiao 10 * 14^% 26 

Mb Me Mil LU 14 12 2074 2* 4] 

40to Merest 170 17 10 40 in 61 ! 

* 370 3* 14 OT3 SM 92 

JO 1* 13 72 j% 57 

70 2*13322543 <g 31 
1342 1 j 

S 2602 D 17 
TSelU 7 183X1* 7 
..... 5 % 31 


Wi Morale 
39 64eram 
23 Mon. 


12% MeuPt 
5% Merab 
Tto Mestek 

21b MfE pfC X90 1X9 

46 MfEpfP XI2 148 „ ... 

47% MfE PfJ 872 14* 30 b to 57% % +1 

«% MIEpfH 872 157 70B i* 54% S— » 

2 % MexPd .T7e 4* Ml 4 2% fa 
Sto MhCn pt 119 114 « 1 jSk fa + to 

IS MCKER ITS &9 7 33 ? «% i— b 

4% Mick lbs *6 17 10 7:5%—% 

^ 876 15 9 356 41 a — » 

9to MMSUf ITS 1X1 5 4069 IS |3% 1 

17 MMRos 1*0 55 19 273 M Jj 

® “W* 2*8 97 M IB 28 28% 

AO X9 U 71 74 Sb + U 

. , 140 4.1 13 2034 8* 83 —I 

*32? 55t P . L 8*6 B* 7 150 30*30% , — % 

Tto M trains 321 ffl 7 % 1+ % 


686 19% 18 IV +1% 
3B9 81% 31% Jlte + to 

4 74 74 74 + % 

3 74 74 74 

1192 48% 47% 47b +% 
850 81b 81% 31% 

46 27 26% 27 

180 21% 21 21% + % 
1953 21% 20% 21U + % 
12702 Bto 35to 35U + U 

5 101 U 101 to 101)4+1 

399 14 13% 13% 

353 39 30% 38b— % 

84 19% 19% 19b— % 
26 55 54b S<%— % 

378 19% 161k 19V. +1 


22 MWt 

llto MlltnR 

Mto MMM „„ „ _. 

^ 5 * Kt P . L 8*6 14 7 ISO 30 * 30 % 3 - 
Tto Mlrains 327 B 7 % 1 

J* MoPSv iTflb 5.9 7 45 2 «R*to ± 

Mb MoPSpr 2*1 IZ 4 5 21 2 ? a. 

Mb MOPS Pf 4.12 12 * 30 33 13 1 

4 MHd 0663 7 pt t 

»» “SKL, U Z 2 D 77 8 556 ] 20 b«fa tA 

«k vIMofalH 858 % % 1 

Sb ModCpt 342 Bto raj J 

M 1 * Mohase *0 17 10 344 26 M 34 

8 % Motto Df 225 Uto |b 13 

]3& 552r ch ,5 t 7 * 1 rnirito w 

4 % Moms UO 11 . 8 4148 45 U lb 44 

26 MnfOU 2*6 U I Iff 30 % . 31 

16 % ManPw 2*0 102 8 643 30 U % 19 

14 % MaaSt ITOalB* 1(2 18 % b M 

6 % MONY J U 8 If! 9 to 9 


(Coatmaed on Plage 12) 


















** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25,1985 




BUSINESS ROUNPup 


2 Firms Develop 
FisecJrDefense 
'•{Gene for Crops 


gnUDEUPHIA-Rolm 
■ & Haas Co. and Plant Genetic 
, Systems NY of Brussels have 
“Hwnnccd an advance in ge- 
netic engineering that they said 
-could lead to. the development 
* of crops resistant to insects. 

, However, the companies sai d 
the commercial potential of tt*» 
research was not yet known. 

. For the first time, “an agn- 
ajltnraBy important gene of 
bacterial origin was tncorporat- 
Ited successfully into tobacco 
.plants, providing the potential 
i for plants to defend themselves 
‘ against destructive insects," tbc 
companies said Wednesday. 
Scientists altered the tobacco 
"V genetic, structure to 
a protein which has 
used for many yes 
' Sprays to fight in- 
ompanks said. 
Rohm A Haas is a chemical 
Uicer based in Philadelphia, 
it Genetic Systems was cs- 
Jahbshfd in March 1983 to ap- 
genetks to crop plants. 


fcduce 

iwiddy 

Sets, 


m 


Distillers Co. Mothballs 10 Plants 

By Bob Hagecty 


j LO NDON — Distillers Co 
drenAed with huge inventories of 
Sootdi whisky, said Thursday that 
n b motfaballiug abom a third of its 
disnmiig capacity. 

■ ’Dte oompany, whose labels in- 
clude Johnnie Walker, Dewar’s and 
white _ Horae* announced th at it 
planned to ceaseprodndion March 
31 at 10 of its 34 malt distiUfties 


and dose part of two others, toying 
off about 180 waters. The move 
comes about 18 mouths after Dis- 
tillers announced the permanent 
closure of 11 distilleries. 

Along with those of other whis- 
kies, sales of scotch have dropped 
sharply in recent years amid reces- 
aon, a shift to wine, gn and vodka, 
and a growing preference for 
drinks with less alcohol The 
Scotch Whisky Association esti- 


2 Ex-Bell Units Report Profit 


The Astneiated Press 

NEW YORK — Nynex 
and American Infamation 
oologies Inc, two offspring of the 
American Telephone & Telegraph 
Co, on Thursday reported profits 
of more than $900 million each in 
their first year of oper ation 

Both companies raid the fnH- 
year earnings exceeded their expec- 
tations. 

Nynex said it earned $2623 nril- 
tion in (he fourth quarter and 
American Information Technol- 
ogies, known as Ameritech, said it 
earned $2029 mfllion in the final 
quarter of 1984. 

The results produced an ammqi 


profit for Nynex of 598 6.4 minion, 
or $10.10 & riiare, and 1984 earn- 
ings of $990.9 million, or $10.17 a 
share, for Ameritech. 

Nynex said fourth-quarter reve- 
nue was $144’ billion and animal 
revenue totaled $9.51 billion. 
Ameritech said fourth-quarter rev- 
enue was 52.13 biffion and the an- 
nual revenue was $835 btfiton. 

Nynex, based in New York, and 
Ameriteau based in Chicago, are 
among the Seven holding compa- 
nies formed to operate the 22 Bdl 
System telephone companies that 
woe divested from AT&T on Jan. 
1, 1984. For that reason, year-eadi- 
er comparisons are not available. 


mates 1984 sales at 900 million bat- 
tles, down 15 percent from the 1978 
peak but about even with 1983. 

Though Distillers said it had to 
reduce its inventories, the company 
added that the decline in sales ap- 
parently had halted. 

Analysts remained cautious. “I 
. think it's bottoming out, but ifs 
going to be a very, very slow pro- 
cess of recovery, said Peter Large 
of the Edinburgh-based stockbro- 
kers# of Wood, Mackenzie & Co. 

Distillers, by far the biggest 
scotch producer, has a bigger in- 
ventory problem than its major ri- 
vals and has lost market share in 
recent yean, analysts say. 

Scotch accounts for about 85 
it of the company’s profit 
Jysto say Distillers is over- 
due for a major diversification. 



move, 

Scrimgeocr, 

London brokerage. 

Last May, Distillers bought 
Somerset Importers Ltd, of New 
York from Fsmarfr far, for about 
$250 mfflka. Somerset is the exclu- 
sive U.S. importer of Johnnie 
Walker Scotch and Tanqueray gin. 

The entire Scotch whisky indus- 
try, scattered among hundreds of 
towns, is severely depressed. 


Trans-Padfic 
Cable Plamw 
By 22 Firms 

Untied Pm Intern ati on a l 

KAUAL Hawaii — A draft pro- 
posal to lay an undersea Eber-op- 
tics cable front California to Japan 
and Guam has been approved by 
American Tehshone & Telegraph 
Co. and 21 other tdecommnnitt- 
turns companies. 

The cable will cost about 5593 
null ion and be able to cany die 
equivalent of 37,800 telephone calls 
simultaneously. AT&T said it will 
also t ransmi t tdevison and 
other services. 

Work on the 7300-nantical mile 
( 1 3,320-kiloroeter) system is sched- 
uled for completion by the end of 
1988. The project still requires ap- 
nd Japai 


'okyo Resists Gasoline Plan 


(Continued from Page 9) 
government, to keep on hand 
adequate supply of .kerosene. 
12 urge refining and distribu- 
inies rhat dominate the 
_ ve chosen to price kero- 
ilow and makeup the costs of 
! by charging relatively high 
; prices. 

If other oQ importers were to 
’ Mr. Sato’s lead and import 
Mr. Matsnmura said, a 
price war would probably 
hot ting «naTl, financially 
weak gasolme stations. To make op 
for lower gasofine prices, refineries 
and distributors would probably 
charge more for kerosene, raising 
home heating bills. And if pcriKtw- 
were imported directly, Mr. Matsu- 
rnnra said, the imports of crude oil 
would probably fall, causing short- 
ages in other products. 

While the gasoline was en route 
last month from Singapore to Ja- 
pan, Mr. Sato received a letter from 
the trade ministry requestin g that 
he send die gasoline back. 

The trade ministry had no legal 
authority to farce Mr. Sato to drop 


bis plan. But all oil importers must 
report their plans tome ministry, 
which' may tnen offer “administra- 
tive guidance.” 

The economic cri sis that fol- 
lowed the worldwide energy short- 
age of the early 1970s cast a lone 
shadow in Japan. “During the oil 
crisis we could see that shortages' 
and price ftuctnations must be kept 
at a minimum," Mr. Matsumnra 
said. “So the overall ral policy must 
be an exception from the free-mar- 
ket mechanism.” 

Mr. Sato injected that argument 
He said he threatened what he la- 
beled a “carteT of large distribu- 
tors and refineries that have bene- 
fited from gov ernmen t policies. 

After the trade ministry’s oppo- 
sition, Mr. Sato raid, the bank 
lending him the money to buy die 
gasoline withdrew its support 

Mr. Saio srid he had spent about 
$1J2 nriffion on the deal, but would 
make up mast of his loss by selling 
the gwnKn* to another (til compa- 
ny. With the trade ministry's per- 
mission, die gasoline will be classi- 
fied as na phtha to dear msltvne 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits. In millions, are In iocot currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


United States 

Amman Brands 
aiQear. i*M tfo 

ftnMN U*. 1.790. 

Nat Inc. 10423 10404 

Per Shan IAS l SI 

Yew MM MU 

Revenue 7»a 7.090. 

Nat Inc 4t4.ll 39030 

Per Short 7 JO 6J6 

Dot & Kraft 

OtWe. MM lfS) 

Revenue Z4KL zao 

Net Inc UU US4 

Per Shore 159 2.1* 

Year T9M ifH 

Revenue rota. »jia 

Net Inc &S . a 435.1 

Per Share 9 j02 1S3 

Mela Indorse tanas of M 
ceift e share vs 11 cents In 
ouartars and at SJ cents vs SB 
ants In rear from foreign 


Yen- MM »U 

M?= ^ 

Per Share — 4JU 4.19 

Megan Bank 

«»cj*or. me na 

get »«. — . a* su 

Per Shore 153 201 

Year MM MU 

Net Inc — Mi ISIS 

Per Share — 544 744 

Nats Mode ban loss pro- 

fJMJmltUoo vet02 motion 
toy 


Mot inc. 

Par Short 

DM 

uuoa. 

« 

Moasaita 


tttiQoar. 

Rmru 

IfM 

UUL 

1K3 
W l 

Mat inc. 

Par Star* 

ass 

ua 

Year 

Rawanue__ 

Nat inc. 

Par Share — 

MM 

*£!> 

5*2 

INS 

5300 

me 

an 


Exxon 

4tfe<Hv. MM MU 

Revenue 1454a 24410. 

Net inc. 142a 143a 

Per Shore — 141 1.90 

Yen- 1904 19U 

Revenue 972M. 

Net Inc SS3S. 

Per Share 477 

!W* kcW pah of S1K 
mfttion vs choree of m mil- 
lion from toroton exchange 


inwiuuic oann 
ethQuar. MM MU 

Net Inc 100 1445 

Per Share 144 093 

Yeer T9M MU 

Net Inc *£D4 4014 

PerShare 401 145 

3 M 

4th Qon-. * 19M MU 

Revenue 1480 1740 

Net Inc 147X 1610 

( 143 1J9 


IGmbaffy-Gark 

IQeer. MM 790 

R ev en ue 91AO B3S* 

Net Inc— 537 457 

~ 1.15 ua 


MM MO 

7700 7,040. 

Net inc. 7XLD 447 a 

PerShare 427 547 

Foil name of compear Is 
Minnesota Mining * Manu- 
facturing 

MoW . 

4th Qunr. MM 190 

Revenue 15400 14,100 

Net inc 2S6J) 447 n 

PerShare 070 1.10 


Per share results restated 
tarlSor-1 sptttlnjona. 


— - — — - 
ivuiiuik jiiiw u 

«<lwr. MM MO 

Revenue SM7 1157 

Net Inc . 1002 ioi J 

PerShare—. 172 141 

Yea* MM MU 

Revenue isia 3.150 

Met inc 4827 3545 

PerShare— 744 547 

Stand. Oa Ohio 


- 1200 3. HO 

Net Inc 2900 124 a 

Per Shore 175 172 

Yeer MM no 

Revenue 12730 11700 

Net Inc 1405. 1400 

Per Shore — 4.14 4J4 

Han. I9S3 nets ktcMe data of 
SSt million from HauSattoa 
of Inventories, loot of 57J7 
mtTBon In year from dtvesh- 
turt of operation s, and ocfn 
OttSS tnmkm In mns 


proval by the US. and 
governments. 

The system would reach from 
•Pont Arena, California, to Ma- 
kaha, Hawaii, then split into two 
legs, one to Ajpiaa, Guam, and the 
other to Boso, Japan. 

Companies with interests in the 
system include ITT World Com- 
munications. RCA Global Com- 
munications, MCI Internati onal 
and Western Union Corp- 

MeetrordcData^ 
AT&TSignPact 
On Computers 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. and Elec- 
tronic Data Systems Corp. said 
Thursday they had readied agree- 
ment on a joint plan to develop and 
market customized computet and 
communications systems. 

The systems, which analysts said 
would compete with International 
Business Machines Corp. products, 
would be aimed primarily at busi- 
ness and government customers. 

Teems 'were not disclosed. The 
companies s^H the agreement did 
not call for either company to make 
an equity investment m the other. 

AT&T makes computers and 
other info rmati on and communica- 
tions products, while Electronic 
Data, a Dallas-based unit of Gen- 
eral Motors Corp., provides com- 
puter services and software. 

The accord is aimed at mntrliing 
AT&T's product line and large 
sales force with Electronic Data’s 
experience in putting together inte- 
grated systems and software. 


FINAL NOTICE TO HOLDERS OF SECURITIES LISTED BELOW 

Persons holding the securities listed below must surrender them to .the Exchange Agent, Raymond F. Glenn. Director, 
Reorganization Accounting and Claims. The Penn Central Corporation, 1700 Market Street IVB Building - 29th Floor, Philadelphia. 
Pennsylvania 19103, not. later than April 30, 1985 in order to be certain they will receive payment for such securities. Seajritjes.may 
also be surrendered between May 1, 1985 and December 31, 1986; however, payment will only be made with respect to the~first $3' 
million in face amount of bonds and distribution value of securities surrendered in that period. The date of actual receipt of securities 
by the Exchange Agent shall determine the timeliness of the surrender. 

BONDS 

Boston & Albany RR Co. 456% Improvement Mortgage Bonds due 1978 
Carthage & Adirondack Ry. Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due 1981 

Cleveland. Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis Ry. Co. 4% Series A and 5% Series B General Mortgage Bonds due 1993 

Cleveland, Cincinnati. Chicago & St Louis Ry. Co. 4fc% Series E Refunding and Improvement Mortgage Bonds due 1977 

Cleveland, Cincinnati. Chicago & St. Louis Ry. Co. 4% St Louis Division First Collateral Trust Bonds due 1990 

Cleveland. Cincinnati. Chicago & St Louis Ry. Co. 4% Cincinnati. Wabash & Michigan Division Mortgage Bonds due 1991 

Connecting Ry. Co. 3ft% Series A First Mortgage Bonds due 1976 

Elmira & Williamsport RR Co. 5% Income Bonds due 2862 

Kanawha & Michigan Ry. Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due 1990 

Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Ry. Co. 356% Gold Mortgage Bonds due 1997 

Michigan Central RR Co. 456% Series C Refunding and Improvement Mortgage Bonds due 1979 

Mohawk & Malone Ry. Co. 356% Consolidated Mortgage Bonds due 2002 

Mohawk & Malone Ry. Co. First Mortgage 4% Bonds due 1991 

New Jersey Junction RR Co. 4% First Mortgage 8onds due 1986 

New York & Putnam RR Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due 1993 

New York Central & Hudson River RR Co. 356% Gold Mortgage Bonds due 1997 

New York Central & Hudson River RR Co. (NYC RR Co.) Ref. & Impr. Mortgage 456% Series A and 5% Series C Bonds due 2013 

New York Central & Hudson River RR Consolidation Mortgage 4% Series A Bonds due 1998 

New York Central & Hudson River RR Lake Shore Collateral 356% Bonds due 1998 

New York Central & Hudson River RR Michigan Central Collateral 356% Bonds due 1998 

New York Central RR Co. 556% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1980 

New York Central RR Co. 5X% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1980 

New York Central RR Co. 6% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1980 

New York Central RR Co. 6% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1990 

New York Connecting RR Co. 256% Series B Bonds due 1975 

New York, New Haven & Hartford RR Co. 456% Harlem River Division First Mortgage Bonds due 1973 

Northern Central Ry. Co. 456% and 5% Series A General and Refunding Mortgage Bonds due 1974 

Penn Central Co. 656% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1993 

Pennsylvania RR Co. 456% Series D General Mortgage Bonds due 1981 

Pennsylvania RR Co. 456% Series E General Mortgage Bonds due 1984 

Pennsylvania RR Co. 356% Series F General Mortgage Bonds due 1985 

Peoria & Eastern Ry. Co. 4% Income Bonds due 1990 

Philadelphia, Baltimore A Washington RR Co. 5% Series B General Mortgage Bonds due 1974 
Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington RR Co. 456% Series C General Mortgage Bonds due 1977 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & SL Louis RR Co. 5% Series A General Mortgage Bonds due 1970 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis RR Co. 5% Series B General Mortgage Bonds due 1975 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & SL Louis RR Co. 356% Series E General Mortgage Bonds due 1975 
West Shore RR Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due # 2361 

STOCK CERTIFICATES 


Beech Creek RR Co. common capital 
Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago ,& SL Louis 
Ry. Co. common and preferred 
Cleveland & Pittsburgh RR Co. guaranteed 
7% and special guaranteed betterment 4% 

Delaware RR Co. capital 

Erie & Pittsburgh RR Co. capital 

Ft Wayne & Jackson RR Co. common and preferred 

Holyoke & Westfield RR Co. capital 

Kalamazoo, Allegan & Grand Rapids RR Co. capital 

Little Miami RR Co. capital and special gtd. betterment 


Mahoning Coal RR Co. common and preferred 
Michigan Central RR Co. capital 
Northern Central Ry. Co. capita) 

Norwich and Worcester RR Co. preferred stock 
Peoria and Eastern Ry. Co. capital 
Philadelphia & Trenton RR Co. capital 
Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Ry. Co," common, preferred, 
original guaranteed 7% and guaranteed special 7% 
Pittsburgh, Youngstown & Ashtabula Ry. Co. preferred 
United New Jersey -RR & Canal Co. capita) 

West Jersey & Seashore RR Co. capital 


BY ORDER OF THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA, NO DISTRIBU- 
TION WILL BE MADE UNDER THE TERMS OF THE AMENDED PLAN OF REORGANIZATION OF PENN CENTRAL TRANSPORTATION. 
COMPANY AND CERTAIN OF ITS SUBSIDIARIES, DATED MARCH 17. 1978, TO ANY PERSON WHOSE SECURITIES ARE RECEIVED BY 
THE EXCHANGE AGENT AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1986, AND DISTRIBUTION IS CERTAIN ONLY FOR SECURITIES RECEIVED BY THE 
EXCHANGE AGENT BY APRIL 30, 1985. NO EXTENSIONS OF TIME OR OTHER EXTRAORDINARY RELIEF BEYOND THE DECEMBER 
31. 1986 DEADLINE WILL BE GRANTED. 

If you are uncertain about your rights as a security holder or you need forms to apply for the distribution payable in respect of 
your security, it is suggested you write the Exchange Agent or call (215) 972*3065. 

THE PENN CENTRAL CORPORATION 
By: Francis A. Kareken. 

Secretary 


- v 





l 






U 1 


NOTICE OF MEETING 

of the holders of 12%% Partially Convert 
Debentures due 199° of 

TURBO RESOURCES LIMITED 

NOTICE is hereby given that a meeting of "MaMunln 

Convertible Debentures due 1990 (hereinafter referred to a -any”) issued untfor 
of Turbo Resources Limited (hereinafter referred dated as of the 

a trust indenture (hereinafter referred to as the Trust lnde ^^iL Canada Trust 
13th day of November, 1980 made between the Com ff2L a ^cmjstee by Montreal 
Company, as trustee (which trust company was later replaced as be held at 

Trust Company of Canada, hereinafter referred to as the Trustee Tu0S£ - 

Hyde Park Hotel, 66 Knightsbridge, in the City of London, gHJ^nd. w 
28th day of February, 1985, at the hour of 1050 o’clock In the forenoo reenwk* 
Mean Time), for the purposes of: 

1 

resolutions for the following purposes, namely. 

A. To establish a committee to consist of three persons (or 

as may be prescribed in the resolution), who need not be Deoe 
with power and authority (subject to such limitations, if any< ' 
prescribed in the resolution) to exercise, on behalf of the Detentu der^ 

such of the powers of the Detoentureholders as are exerasab uy «ora* 
ordinary or other resolution, as shall be included in the resolution, fg 

without limitation the powers referred to in the next following tparaurapn b, 
such resolution further to provide (i) for the employment of amnsersan uxner 
assistants and for the payment by the Company of the expen aw 
disbursements of the committee and its reasonable compensation, tnjmat 
such committee shall continue in office during the pleasure of . 
tureholders, the members thereof, however, being entitled to resignany 
time, and that vacancies occurring in the committee may be filled by pereons 
selected by tire remaining members; (lil) that neither the committee nor me 
members thereof shall be liable for any loss arising from any action taxen 
or omitted to be taken by them in good faith relating to or in connection with 
the powers and authorities conferred by such resolution; and (iv) that an acts 
and things done by the committee within the authority delegated to 'toy such 
resolution shall be binding upon all Debentureholders and couponnolaers, 
as contemplated by the Trust Indenture. 

B. Without limiting the generality of the powers to be conferred upon the com- 
mittee pursuant to paragraph A above, to authorize the committee to 0) sanc- 
tion any scheme for the reconstruction or reorganization of the Company, 
(10 assent to any compromise or arrangement with any creditor or creditors 
of the Company or any class or classes of creditorsof the Company, whether 
secured or otherwise, and with holders of any shares or other securities of 
the Company; and (iii) sanction the exchange of Debentures or coupons for, 
or the conversion of Debentures or coupons into, shares, bonds, debentures, 
notes or any other securities or obligations of the Company or any other com- 
pany; whether In the context of a proposal for the restructuring of the in- 
debtedness of the Company presented to the committee or otherwise, and 
to instruct the Trustee accordingly. 

C. To authorize the Trustee from time to time to concur In and execute all deeds 
and documents, in form approved by the committee, supplemental to the Trust 
Indenture and embodying any modification, abrogation, alteration, com- 
promise or arrangement of the rights of the Debentureholders and 
couponholdere against the Company or against its property and any modifica- 
tion of or change in or omission from the provisions contained in the Trust 
Indenture which shall have been sanctioned by the committee. 

II. Electing persons (who need not be Debentureholders) who so consent to serve 
on the committee contemplated by labove. and for such purpose proposed can- 
didates for membership on the said committee may be nominated by another 
Debentureholder or themselves. Nominations may be made either at the meeting 
or by written notice delivered to the Trustee c/o Orion Floyal Bank Limited as 
set forth below on or prior to the business day immediately preceding the day 
of the meeting. 

Th8 said meeting is being convened at the request of the Company in order 
to afford to the Debentureholders an opportunity to establish a committee to 
negotiatawith the Company with respect to -the. Debentureholders’ participation 
in the restructuring of the Company’s indebtedness. Senior management represen- 
tatives of the Company will be available at the meeting for discussion purposes. 

This notice is given pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture with the 
intent that any extraordinary resolution or extraordinary resolutions passed at the 
said meeting or any adjournment thereof shall, if passed in accordance with the 
provisions contained in the Trust Indenture in that behalf, be binding upon all the 
Debentureholders, whether present or absent, and couponholders and each and 
every Debentureholder and the Trustee (subject to the provisions for its indemnity 
contained in the Trust Indenture) shall be bound to give effect thereto accordingly, 
with the further intent that in considering and/or passing any resolution, extraor- 
dinary or otherwise, such meeting may modify, amend, change, amplify, add to or 
omit any of the matters and things hereinbefore specified, it being stipulated that 
the foregoing does not purport to specify the terms of any resolution or resolutions 
to be proposed at the meeting, but only to indicate the general nature of the business 
to be transacted thereat and In general terms the subject matter of any extraordinary 
resolution or extraordinary resolutions to be submitted thereat. 

Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture and regulations made 
thereunder, Debentureholders desiring to be present and vote at the meeting without 
producing thelrDebentures may deposit same with any of the depositaries named 
below and will receive in exchange voting certificates which will entitle the holder 
named therein to be present and vote at the meeting and at any adjournment thereof 
and to appoint a proxy (who need not be a Debentureholder) to represent and vote 
for the holder at such meeting and at any adjournment thereol in the same way 
as if the holder so named in the voting certificate were the actual bearer of the Deben- 
tures specified In such voting certificate; Debentures so deposited will be held on 
deposit until after the meeting and any adjournment thereof and will then be returned 
to the depositor. 

Copies of recently-published financial reports concerning the Company and 
other publlcly-avallable information relevant to Its restructuring, together with 
instructions and forms for depositing Debentures, forms of voting certificates, 
specimens of Instruments of proxy, forms to nominate candidates for the commit- 
tee and other information may be obtained on application to any of the depositaries 
at the addresses set forth below. 

Save as aforesaid, the only persons who shall be recognized at the meeting 
or any adjournment thereof as the holders of any Debentures or as entitled to vote 
or be present at the meeting or any adjournment thereof shall be the persons who 
produce Debentures and/or voting certificates at the meeting or any adjournment 
thereof. 

In the event that the said meeting shall be adjourned by reason of failure to 
attain a quorum, those Debentureholders present in person or by proxy at the 
adjourned meeting may transact the business contemplated by this notice. 

For the convenience of Debentureholders unable to attend the meeting 
proxies, voting certificates and forms to nominate candidates for the committee 
sent to Montreal Trust Company of Canada, c/o Orion Royal Bank Limited, 
? L o 'rt°p W»l | . London. England EC2Y5JX, Attention: Colin 
Tibbies, and, In order to be relied upon, must be received at such address on or orior 
to the business day immediately preceding the date of the mSing. 

M perrons Intending to attend at the meeting are asked to arrive at least one 
SS|!! !‘ commencement for registration and other similar ad- 

Dated the 18th day of January, 1985 

MONTREAL TRUST COMPANY OF CANA DA , 

Trustee 

411 8th Avenue S.W. 

Calgary, Alberta 
Canada T2P 1E7 

The depositaries contemplated by theabove mentioned notice are as follows: 


Montreal Trust Company of Canada 
Attention: Corporate Trust Department 

• 411 - 8th Avenue S. W. 

Calgary, Alberta T2P 1E7 

• 1 Place Vine Marie ■ 

Montreal, Quebec H3B 3L6 

• 15 King Street West 
Toronto, Ontario M5H 1B4 

• 466 Howe Street 

Vancouver; British Columbia V6C 2A8 


1 0ri <>n Royal Bank Limited, 

1 London Wall. 

London, England EG2Y 5 JX 

• Credit Sulese, Paradeplatz 8. 

CH 8001, Zurich, Switzerland 

• Banque Generate du Luxembourg SA, 
14 RueAldrlngen, Luxembourg 

• a J Jarance System Limited, 
^53® Guaranty This* Company of 

^ori'i 35 Avenue des Arts, 

1040 Brussels, Belgium 
•CedeiSA 

JTBoulevard Grandedu Chesse 

Charlotte POBTOOBIOIO Luxembourg 


p 

% 


* 


Ni 

* 

£ 


■ 








394% 

27V. QuokOn 



6213 

351% 

34 

34 — K 

14 

98 

90V* QuoOpt 

954 111 


lOQz 95 

9(V* 

941% — II* 

43 

199% 

15 QuokSO 

80 42 

14 

416 

1946 

ISA 

1916— V* 

102 

129% 

64* Quanex 


30 

299 

10 

91* 

9t%— W 

37 

3Hh 

23 Ouestar 

1X0 55 

9 

414 

201* 

2916 

2916— 9h 

11 

2(H% 

14 QfcRtll 

JOB 18 

14 

1292 

21 

201* 

201* + 16 

15 


«ua 65ja 
MSS MS* 
47X4 67X7 

a as ass 
ass asa 


7155 7*33 

69.55 7071 

MJ0 66*2 
6580 6SM 
MM 45-10 

5SS 

6935 


75-13 25-31 

MM 2113 
3478 1*79 
3443 1490 
3470 MM 
3482 
2412 
3482 
3440 2479 




2978+*% 

Ik — U 
17V. — I* 
2*8 + ■* 
23*8+91 
Jta + W 
TTl + 3* 
38 -1W. 
12VS— v% 
227- — I 
41* * 14 
10*8 + 18 
37*-— 1V8 
43 +J 
AM + 74 
73 +1 

77—» 
63W +1 
40 + V8 

71+4* 
3448 + Vi 
7118 +148 


4944 3314 Xorax MO 78 13 4418 44 47>% 431%— K 

HU «UX4fWl4S4I1U 583 501* 494- 50 + 16 

341% 19 XTRA 44 14 II XB 2444 2418 3846— <6 


241* + l* 
154%+ Vh 
5318+ 1* 
2246+16 

at +m 

29—1% 







-jgaamg 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMS) 
notate and cents 

10025 15130 Mar 17945 18015 17010 17X55 

18275 154.10 Jim 18X70 1CU0 1B1J0 18185 

IKS U080 Mn 18170 1 1*435 18480 18SJK 

187 JO 17570 Dec 18970 189 JD 18000 18875 

Got, Soles 82793 Prev.Sate* 74847 
Prev. Oav Open inL 51535 up 1X92 

VALUE UHS ( KCBT) 

notate and ante ^ Wfc<8 

moo iTino jum 20170 mno 2111.10 awx© 

20Z4Q 18575 SOP 20155 28355 20159 20340 

EsI. Sates Prev.Sates 4X5S 

prev. Oav Ooenint 483B aHSOS 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 
nolnis and ante _ 

104.10 8020 Mar 10195 104X0 100.10 10140 

10480 9000 Jun 105,90 10475 104J5 10580 

10770 9L35 Step 10770 1077a 10770 10475 

109 JO 10170 Doc 10950 10950 T09JOO 10870 

ert.sate* 17, ns prev. so** mm 

Prev.Dev Open lot 10731 un 444 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody'S 949X0 f 

Reuters 2JXMJ0 

OJ. Futures 124.94 

Com. Research Bureau- 244.70 

Moody's : base 100 ; Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. It 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100: Dec 31, 1974. 


London Commodities 
Jan. 24 

Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil in U.5. dollars per metric ton. 
Goldin U 5. dollars per ounce. 


HMh Lew cm* Previous 
SUGAR 

Mar 12480 1 1980 11980 120X0 12280 12380 
May 131X0 I2&J0 127X0 12780 130X0 13080 
Aun 14180 13780 137X0 137X0 14020 140X0 
Oct 148X0 14600 144X0 M480 14770 14*80 
Dec 154X0 154X0 15280 IfflXO 153X0 155JM 
Mar 14780 14780 145X0 147X0 16880 14080 
May 17180 17280 173X0 174X0 17480 17480 
6824 lots of 50 tans. 

COCOA 

Mar 28W 2849 2878 2879 2882 2803 
May 2.105 2801 2X92 2893 2895 2896 
JIV 2890 2870 2879 28B0 2805 2804 
Sm> 2886 2871 2877 2879 2802 2803 
□K 2802 1.990 1.990 1891 2800 2802 
Mar 1.994 1,906 1.90* 18*7 1896 2800 
May N.T. N.T. 1,970 1,983 1894 2800 
3X54 lots of n tans. 

COFFEE 

Jan 2J78 2J40 1341 2J« 2J93 2894 
Mur 2X00 3877 2877 2JW 2X15 2X16 
May 2X10 2807 2J8B 2890 2X20 1422 
JtV 2X20 1407 1407 2X09 2X30 1434 
Sop 2X25 1415 2X16 1410 2X30 2X37 
NOV 1430 2X20 1420 1424 2X36 1442 
Jan 1420 2X19 2X20 2X24 1435 2X40 
2X45 late of 5 has. 

GASOIL 

Jon £180 S?80 23150 23580 22480 22325 
Fee 22580 22175 22485 22580 TT??* 22150 
Mar 21125 21SJ5 21785 21750 21630 216J5 
AM ZI17S 20985 71 US 21 150 2! I d 21 115 
Mav M98S 20950 2088S 20S50 20080 20025 
Jun 20980 20780 20750 2U9 20780 20SJ3 
Jly 20980 20980 20780 30*50 2D65D 20*80 
AU0 N.T. N.T. 30780 21580 3OS0O 21789) 
SOP N.T. N.T. 20780 22080 20480 ZOJM 
2X2* lob of 100 tons. 

GOLD 

Feb 30280 31080 30180 30280 30030 3005B 
AM 30580 30600 30580 30550 30380 30480 
94 lots of 100 troy oar. 

Sources; Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
change faasoui. 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 24 

Sugar In Frendi Francs wr motile km. 
Ottwr ttoures In Francs oer WO ks. 


HU Law a an Ctrtte 

SUGAR 

Mar 1.390 185 1877 1JS0 +5 

Mav 1X40 1 J15 1X24 1X25 + 7 

Alio 1515 1508 1X97 1505 +* 

Oct 1585 1570 1560 1570 Undl. 

Doe N.T. NJ\ 1X40 1X70 +3 

Mar U85 U80 1 JB0 U85 +7 

EM. voL: 1800 tote Of 50 tans. Prov. actual 
sales: 2804 toteOoon Merest; 19521 


Cash Prices Jan. 24 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. 24 


Commodity and UnH 
Coffee 4 Santos, to— __ 
PrintdaRi 64/M 30 «*. yd _ 

Steel billets (Pitt ), ton 

Iren 2 Fdrv. PhltoL ton _ 
Stow scran No 1 hvy Pitt. . 

Load Saol. lb 

Cooper Meet, lb 

Tin (Sfralls). lb - 

Zinc. E. st. L. Basis, lb 

Palladium, oz _____ 
Siver N.Y. az _____ 
Source; AP. 


COCOA 

Mar 2JM 2.190 2.193 2.194 —29 

May 2J23 1321 Z225 2830 —17 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1210 — —20 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2810 — —20 

Dec N.T. N-T. — 2.140 —30 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 1140 —10 

May N.T. N.T. — 1140 — TO 

Est. voL: 35 tote, at 10 tons. Prev. actual 
sates: 86 toll. Open interest: 030 

COFFEE 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2539 25*0 — 35 

MOT 2571 15*5 1552 1553 — 42 

Mav N.T. N.T. 28Sffl 2565 —34 

Jht 9LT. N.T. 2545 — —50 

S4P N.T. N-T. 2550 — —33 

Nov K.T. N.T. 2550 — — IS 

Jan N.T. N.T. 1545 — — 20 

Est. vuL; 17 tote of S tons. Prev. actual 
sates: 14 lots. Open interest; 233 
Source: Bourse <ft> Commerce. 


DM Futures Options 
Jan. 24 

W. German Morfc-125800 marts, cmH per made 


Strike auts-scttie PuteSetfle 

Price Mar ten Sent Mar Jen sent 

30 — 220 — 083 OJi — 

31 084 153 185 0.19 053 — 

32 0X1 085 1X2 045 095 1.20 

33 117 041 089 1X0 143 — 

34 U> U7 lit 227 - - 

35 082 032 144 125 — — 

EsHooted MM vri.5892 

CoUK wed. veL 28*1 snen let 317» 

Fills : wed. v«L MM open InL IM37 
Source: C*1E 


»*» .Comm 

MM Jet 

Wo FBMhU Wi 

Nk Mar Ml 

150 B* 3BV — - 

l/M I/M i% 

IB 2116 2196 - - 

l/M Ih la 

M0 W* ITU 19 - 

1/14 16 b 

M5 11%. 1216 M* m 

3/M )t 11% 

pi t% n m in* 

V 1M 21% 

ITS » 546 7H Bft 

M 31* 416 . 

m ni n% 4E 4 

S) M Mt 

ng 9/M IV, 3 » 

n» — ii96 

n* 3/M 11/1611* !S 

13V*-- 

Trial cMI HtNM BO 


TWnl crilontg lri.C2.IU 


Triripri vrivew 179871 


Trial not own M.35SXM 


Mr 


Htebmjl Lon 175X7 □ 

n» 17571-058 

Source: CBOE. 



Asian Commodities 

Jan. 24 



gr^sHam 

avsk, 33 ass sa 

yff*WREGOU FUTURES 


s* — a & 

22 — N-T. 

VMume: 40 tote of 100 St 

LU MPUR RUBBE R 
MWOVMn cents per kite 
Owe 

J*}* lS lte 

«" r 19690 1M8B 

■ wbbj mso 

Jwi_ — 2BU0 MM 

Volume: 73 tots. 
SINGAPO RE RUBBER 
SwWPor* cents per KUe 

MC , _. BNI AMI 
glSlE?**- t71 -l» 17150 
RSStMor_ 17380 17350 

RfS2Feb_ 159J75 laus 

Fife _ jays isa.,5 

g#f«E*b- ,S0JS 'S3.7S 
RSSSFeb- 14275 144J5 

SUSA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

rinooH* nor as tans 


rtml c5S K 

F« 1JM (an 

jjy j.ig i!m 

ia» uto 

r — ifl UB 

— — Ull l,ia 

1,140 

Volume: 0 toteonsiarn. 40 

Sowet: Reuters. 


ffl, 

M W80 


192BS 19380 

19450 i gS 

SB a 


ilafo jnro 

j|| SB 
IS S3 

Previeut 
Bid 4a 
1.1S0 uSl 

Vis m 

jaw i.iao 
jaw i,i7o 
jajo i.i«o 
•ago i.iso 

1'TOO 1,150 

jaw 1.M 

i-WO M40 



































































Over-the-Couiiter 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 




TVi 
K H4 
20 
14to 
30to 

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17*4 
im+ vx 

to 
to 
14 
4b 
to 
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4b 





Jan. 24 


4ft 
KHk 
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t? mb 
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w. 9to 
2to 
ISft 

KRh 
15ft 
mi 
37 


.16 J 17*3 
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315 
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2179 


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5V*i 54b 
3244 34 
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4to 4H 
744 714 
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na *^l 
Wft 1044 
64032V4 2044 
30 2644 Otto 
153 54b 514 
16193 OS 
5971914 1*44 
2941314 1244 
452 ■ 7W 
2T7 444 444 
31151b 1414 
7b 414 444 
■9 71b Alb 
544 544 
2H4 20 
1744 1444 
2144 
1544 

IK 

lib 


2741 2744- 14 
Wt 2«b- to 
544 M— lb 
9Wi m- *4 
41b 444— to 
2A 26*4 + Ml 
2744 2744— 14 
I7Vb 174b 
W4 W1b + lb 
Wife 10» 
m mb— m 

ISto 15Yi — lb 
m. i W.+ to 
29ft SSto 
111b 111b— 44 
14V4 W44+ lb 
4ft 5 —14 
211b 214b + 14 
EM 1214 + lb 


lOVi 13 
im i4<u 
314 244 
17V4 1444 
191b 174b 

ttn mt 

Alb 644 
zvv. 3M 

13ft 131b 


044 + 4* 
914+14 
b 

lib + lb 
204b— lb 
41b + 14 
5414+ lb 
2744— 44 
«b- 4b 
1514 

«Bb— Ml 
ACM + 14 

am 

15 

144b 

414+ lb 
714 + lb 
11 +44 
24M+ lb 
2Alb + 44 
2714 + lb 
54 +1 

17 + V4 

231b- lb 
IMh— 14 
1314 

1044+ 14 
lb + to 

m»— 1* 
21 

191b— Ml 

» +14 

32 

3A!b 

3144 

10 

524b + lb 

14 — 4b 
2DU 

2044+44 
2044+ lb 
10 
221b 

3244+ 14 

37 

25 

A — 14 

15 —14 
174b— 14 
3114 — Mi 
1714- 1A 
1214- 14 

5+14 
17 — to 
1414 

28+14 

19*4 

1714 + 4b 

S 5 +1 * 

saia 

1244+ lb 
1394—44 
014— lb 
1414 

94*— to 
1244+ to 
M— to 
43to + to 
6*4 

*44+ to 
314— to 
314+ to 
7 — *4 
614— 14 
5*4+ M 
1214+ to 
614— to 
204b— 14 
1044— 14 
1044 
1144 „ 
to+Kl 
lb 

1214 + to 
17*4 + to 
13 +14 
>lb 

1014 + to 
414 

914— Mi 
17 

l»b— 4b 
7*4 + to 
1914+14 
5to 

14V4— 44 
1414 

144b— to 
2to— lb 
9*2+14 

2044 + *4 
9*4— to 
+14 + to 
12*4 + 44 
1SM+ to 
51b 
314 

Rk „ 
ito +14 
1414— *4 
3314 

2914 + 44 
lBto— to 
914— 14 
19+14 
10 
7*4 

31* — to 


Floating Rate Notes 


Jan. 24 


Dollar-. 


m to* 
im 304 
M n-7 
11 ■ 2*4 

#32 
1 » +2 
9ft 126 
■ft M 
Oft 253 
914 XVI 
Xt ZW 
914 174 
lVft 1M 
.157 ML 
ttfe SW 
oft 2sa 
Oft 59-7 
MSS 304 

flb 2 vr 

1394 1W 
Dta +3 
lilt >53 
WO 3+1 
914 13+ 
914 5+ 
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Yfh 4+ 
91* 227- 
W4-1M 
EM +2 
Hto 3+1 
9ik n+ 
1014 w 
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9 , 1H 

nvn+. 
w. w 
nw iw 
m im 

» U3 
12ft 2M 
9Sfa 7+ 
1114 214 

mu 

0)4 1+1 
Uft 18-T 
tft H 
TR4 3+1 
914 H 
Oft- 2H 
Oft W 

II 

TOtt.304 

S-K 

M 

IS 

9% M 
9ft 17+ 

& +7 

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Non Dollar 


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+W*1 




rS 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


Votre appartement 
a Paris 8 tmc 

22, rue Jean Goujon, 
entre fAlma et les Champs-Elysees. 




V 1 


Eiiaiiiiii 

iirirnr - 







"jrf 



Du studio au 4 pieces 
habitables imm6diatement. 


Visite sur plax Je samedi et le lundi 

del4b^lSb. 

A utres joins sur R.V. (l) 745.6622 


0 


Commenialismoo 

Patrice Mosy 

36. n» Th *7 - 90200 Nauflly 


Investment 

Opportunities 

Commncia l raol Mtato few M lmonl* end 
inra ifcn o nl imwQomod. Undmmlopod 
lend to bo hold far u ppradafion. Turn- 
kay prafactf wtti wb*tanllai nprado- 
«*• polo n lla l d oo lg n. eonrtwdkn, 
hou up and Baonagamont. Cbmptofad 
prajod* fatty Uatod. Ffemang aw* 
dto> to ochfevo favarofl *. Far ahnao- 
don an hra ftrt epporfenBn* In 
•outhwott Unifod States conlad! 

TARBC, Inc. 

4743 Norik Oradn Road 
Soft* 213 

Tuaaiv Arizona 85706 
Trine 165541 EXIUC 



Wonderful vila bidt m 1977 

8 double bedrooms - 7 b a lhrooms 
big cwHiumng pod 


FF.60,000. — pw monlh 
(15J/1W) 

FF30^XX7 othar months 


FFJ,800,000. — 

Further infor mati ons from; 

IMMOBUGE DE V11ABS 5A 
Bax 62 - CH - 1 884 YUars 
Tdj 41-25-35^5.31 
Tdeac 456 213 GESE 


\HZ7 HjDSODQ 


TORONTO. CANADA 

C$10500 - A SMALL DOWNPAYMENT 
FOR A BIG INVESTMENT IN 
PRIME LOCATION CONDOMINIUMS 

• only 15% cash downpayment 

• 3 years rental and management guarantee 

• prices: CS62^0frCSSB, 000 

• 2, 3,4 bedrooms, multHevel 

• Apartment sizes: 1198 9q.fl. ( 111 m z )-2010 sq. ft 

• Modem conveniences and recreation facilities 

• Constant appreciation, fully rented, professionally managed 

WIN ZEN CORPORATION LIMITED 

Alt: Marketing Manager, 87 Yonge Straot, Suite 700 
Torontfe, Ontario, Canada. M5E 1 J8 
Tut (416)00+0071 - Telex: 06S243O1 

• IN ADDITION WINZEN OFFERS: 

— quality commercial properties & rental apartment buildings 

— comprehensive services to potential immigrating entrepreneurs 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


My address 
in Nice 

Domaine de Clairefontaine \ J 

Bd. Imperatrice Eugenie \ ^ 

i am actu<e. and I need calm as well as the \ 
amenities of a town-center nearby. \ 

Rather private. I wanted to live in a human- \ 
sized residence surrounded by a private park to \ 
enjav the charm and freshness of lawns , flowers \ 
and trees... _ \ 

Sporting. I needed a residence with a swimming \ 
pool, case to the beaches. \ ■ • . • 

Romantic. I needed a comfortable, cosy apartment \ 

in which to share my happiness. V’vc" " 

.4 dreamer. I wanted the sea for horizon... \ 

The Domaine of Clairefoittatne seduced me. I have 
discovered die ou-eeX life. I found myself. Do like me... \ 

Information and visit on the premises *S 

Bd. Imperalrlce-Eujjenie - NICE - Ready to live in 1 

silks n Km 'K . 1 

timmobilitovt 


1U. a* Mjro.hal-Fft.h- UMW0 MCE. Fiance 




FIRST CLASS HIGH-INCOME INVESTMENTS USA 
THE FEDERAL EXPRESS PROPERTY 
ST. LOUIS -MISSOURI 

Brand new office and distribution center. Total surface including land 
118.800sq.fi. located in the 14ih largest meuopoliian area of the 
United States. 

Tenant: Federal Express, the world biggest company in counter 

services, listed at the New YonT Stock Exchange 
(Turnover 1984: SI. 4 billion). 

Lease term: 10 years Triple Net lease. All operational costs, including 


Price U.S. S2.0d0.000.—. Mortgage available. 

Average Net return to the investor: 9.45% 

The Orion Group (Miami, Geneva, Frankfurt, Essen, London and 
Montreal) has been operating for more than 15 yean, offering high 
quality real estate investments within a large price range, together with 
a broad display of services such as legal, fiscal and financing consultan- 


Please contact our Geneva and/or Miami office: 

ORION INVESTMENTS ORION LEASING It 

4 TRUST LTD. MANAGEMENT CORR. Heritors 

15, Rue du Cendrier. Suite 210. Southeast Bank Building. 

1201 GENEVE 7100 North Kendall Drive. 

MIAML Florida 33156. U SA 

Telephone: 32.4S.05. Phcflf: (305) 665-5889. 

Telex : 23676 Orion Ch Tries: 264 830 Orion. 





/»v 


-■-SS** 






HT2S/1/S5 


TEXAS 

Commercial property in 
the Sunbelt Situated 
within the path of rapid 
growth. Land now priced 
by the acre soon to be 
sold by the square foot 
is appreciating at an 
unprecedented rate. 

For information on 
specific properties 
contact: 


HENRY S. MILLER Ca, 
REALTORS* 

Kit Corbin 
8918 Tesoro Drive 
Suite 400 

San Antonio, TX 78217 
(512) 826-3251 


+ SWITZERLAND 

FOREIGNERS CAN BU ' 
3 stud:q. APARTMENT 
or chalet on 
LAKE GENEVA-MONTREUX 
:h&se wor.d iirno-js reiyv; 
CRANS-M0NTANA. 

LES DIABLERETS. VERBIER. 
VILLARS. JURA. etc. 
from SFr. liO'CCC- - 

REVAC S.A. 

*‘ch • Tth GENEVA 


Knteniadeiuil 
Real Estate 

Appears on Friday 

Fo r Information i eoris of 
odrarl hin g, oontod the tatamafiend 
HSrfd rrihu« 

In )®w country. 




























































f-y 




*«eH 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25. 1985 


** 


. Th ursdays 

MX 

Closing 


VoJ . OH PJW. 


Pw.BPjh.vqI 

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79 

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96 

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7 

4% 

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31 

47% 

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38 

15% 

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4% 

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BAT 

.128 35 


711 

4% 



21% 

BDM 




143 



3% 

1% 

BRT 







5% 

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X 

J% 

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BTK 




30 

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11% 

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15 

64 


111% 

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11 



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2 


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50 

52 

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19 

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3% 

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38 

198 



5% 

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68 

21 

3% 

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13 

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50 

25 


6 

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BnrvRG 




58 

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241 

52 

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Beard 




Ml 


6% 

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BertOl 




38 


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BetdBln 

150 W 


12 

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5 

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S 


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13 

39% 

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24 

8* 

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12 

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36 

39% 

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591126 


3 

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BICCO 

J2 

24 

9 

95 


77% 

12% 

9% 


50 

35 

27 

8 



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150 

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11 

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73 

22% 

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14 

BloR B 




6 


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15% 

15 

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50b 22 

7 

7 

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BIOCkE 




347 


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BkxmtA 


2.7 

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70 



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7 

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16% 

16 

J? 

17% 

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JOS 

2 

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90 

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77 

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54 

44 

9 

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9% 

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Bowmr 



24 

268 


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19 

12 

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5M 

25 

15 

307 

15% 

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269 

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7% 

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150 



35 

25% 

25% 

16% 

11% 

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7 

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12% 

12% 

31% 

22% 

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50 

25 

ID 

659 

33 

31 


4 

34% +2% 

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w 

11 % 

HHh + % 
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2%— % 
34%+ % 
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3%+* 
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39 — th 
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27% + W 
13%+ % 
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31%+ % 


MMniti 



Sit 


Close 

Htoti Low Stock 

(Nv. YkL PE 

HO* High Low 

tooLOlV 

33% 

23% BrnFB 

58 23 

10 

57 

33% 

32% 

32% — % 

3% 

3% BmFpf 

JO 105 


36 

4 

3% 

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4 

2% Bucklm 





9% 

2% 

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18% Buell 

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6 

8 

X 

X 

X 

l c J 

17% 

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16% 

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M 

9 CHB 

20b 1 J 

12 

198 

13% 

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13% + % 







If ; | ~*W 



13% CR5 

24 22 





15% — % 


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14 


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13% 

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124 106 

13 

115 

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25 


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77 



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501 9J 

3 

74 

8% 

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22 25 

11 

13 

13 

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5 

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22% 


28 


378 

15% 


15% + % 


18% COnOcc 



20 

18% 

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2S% CWIne 





h ’ 


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7% Cores 


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7 

10% 

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.10# J 

15 

55 




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19 

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9% 

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36 CarePnf 550 115 


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41% 

42%+ % 



561142 


43 

4% 

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9 


17% 

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25% CasFd 




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8% 




33 

5% 

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1 



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14% 

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143 

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s 

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19 

2196 

4 

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19% ChrlMA 

20 5 

19 

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X 

34% 

34%+ % 


19% ChrtMB 

20 A 

19 

29 


34% 

34% 

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25 115 


6 

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6% 

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10 





15 




Em 

TO 

10 — % 

46 



100* 38% 

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19 

88 

19% 


IF»— » 


H L 1 n 1 1 - • 1 


7 

236 

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72 — % 



120 52 

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6 

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22% 


28% Ctarmt 

1.45o 36 


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8 

3 

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71% Claras! 


11 





19% 

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.16 5 

11 

15 

19% 

19% 

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33 

5% 

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9 

91 

9% 

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76 

5 

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3 

163 

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68 

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68 

629 

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13 

380 

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76 

97 

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22 

11% Cnctun 

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10 

15 

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5 

2 

9 

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9% 



7 

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7% 

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31 

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38 

545 

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4 

101 

408 

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428 

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6V 

11 % 

11% 

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34% 

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8 

74 

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21% + % 

14% 

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J0e 15 283 

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3% 

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14% 

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3% CasCrn 



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39 

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34 

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7 

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Mm 35 


107 

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1% 

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3 

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10 

4 

10% 

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23% Crass 

122 4.9 

14 

80 

7m 

27 

27% 


■ . t-, -im 





10% 

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27% 

16 CwCPpf 

123 102 



18% 

18% 

18% — % 

9% 



10 

6% 

6% 

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14% 

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21 12 

9 

266 

15% 

M% 

15 + % 

4% 

1. CrulcR 


3 

77 

1% 

1% 

1% 

17 

2% CrystO 



8SS 

3% 

3% 

3% 

25% 

13% Cubic 

29 22 

10 

409 

18% 

18% 

18% — % 

78 

21% Curtice 

50 11 

9 

146 

77% 

316 

76 —1 

9% 

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52 

1% 

1% 

1% 

| 



D 




f 

3% 

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JOfTOJ 

10 

167 

7% 

2% 

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26 

15% DaleEn 

22 12 

0 

11 

75% 

25% 

25% 

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n Dam wtO 


3 

IX 

so 

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4% 

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VTf 


18% Damspf 

250 114 


2 

37% 

72 

72 

l-n'i 


325 162 


6 

27% 

23% 

22% 

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13% Data Pd 

.16 2 

ID 

1714 

18% 

17% 

17%— % 

10 % 

3% Datarm 



70 

5% 

5% 

5%— % 

8% 

6% 

3% DeRosa 
4% Decrals 


12 

10 

60 

5 

8% 

5% 

7% 

5% 

7M> — % 
5% — % 

31% 

20% Del Lob 

52 U 

10 

16 

37% 

31* 

32%+ % 

14% 

11% DriVol 

160 111 

8 

79 

U 

13% 

13%+ % 

11% 

2% Denned 



438 

2% 

2% 

2% — % 

7% 


23t 47 

11 

5 

5 

4* 

4%— % 

11% 

7% Dasani 

221121 

17 

6 

7% 

7% 

7% 

16 

9% Device 


9 

42 

15% 

15 

15% + % 

10% 

5% Dtoo A 


16 

77 

7% 

7% 

7%- % 

10 

5% Dkn B 


16 

5 

7% 

7% 

7% 

11% 

9% 

0 DicBtti 

2 Dio Icon 

20 25 

10 

98 

56 

10% 

7% 

K 

2% 

10% 

3% 

2% 

% DlBlCwt 



X 

% 

% 

% 

45% 

71% Dlllrds 

20 J 

U 

586 

47% 

4S% 

46%+ % 

7% 




X 

5% 

5 

JM.— % 

9% 



6 

56 

7% 

7 

7 — % 

% 

5% Dtxlco 

.17# 22 

11 

59 

7% 

(ft 

7%— % 

1% DomeP 



1435 

1% 

1% 

K - . 

22% Damtra 

140 


42 

37% 

7/% 

Z7% + % 

BTi" 



4 

61 

11% 

10%. 

11 

■ P' 

1% Driller 



» 

7 

1% 

1% 


13% DrtvHr 


» 

5 

73Vi 

27% 

23% 

V * 1 1 

25% Ddcom 

50 25 

30 

168 


31% 

31%— % 

% 

% Dontae 



405 

% 

h 



54 29 

11 

3 

78% 

28% 

28%— % 


13 DurTst 

40a 26 

H 

63 

15% 

15% 

15% 


9% Dvnlct 

25e 11 

17 

268 

12% 

11% 

12 + % 


17% Dyneer 

50 32 

10 

3 

20% 

20% 

20% 

1 

n% 

6% EAC 

40 52 


178 

7% 

7% 

7%+ % 

16% 

11% EECO 

22 21 

26 

25 

15% 

15% 

15% + % 

8% 

2% EoolCI 


15 

IX 

7% 

2% 

2% 

40 

31% EsJoo 

6260221 

3 

5 

31% 

31% 

31%+ % 

11% 

6% EchoBa 

.12 


956 

R% 

8% 

0%— % 

4% 

1% ElAudD 



47 

7% 

2% 

2% 

22% 

15% ElcAm 

140 75 


29 

20% 

70 

20%+ % 

5% 

3% ElecSd 


13 

29 

4 

4 

4 

10% 

5% Eislnor 


22 

3VU 

7% 

TH* 

7% 

12% 

10% EmMdn 



61 

12% 

17% 

12% 

6% 

2% EmCor 


5 

72 

4% 

4% 

4%—.% 

2% 

% EnaMat 



IU 

% 

Vat 

%+* 

4% 




2 

% 

% 

% 

12% 

12 E3Dn 

20e 15 


147 

13 

12 

13 +1 

6 

3% En strut 

50el54 


/ 

3% 

3% 

3% 

11% 

5% Era Ins 


IB 

19 

10% 

1(1% 

10%—% 

35% 

19% Es(my 

40 12 

7 

66 

22% 

21% 

21%—1% 

8% 

1% Esorlt 



39 

2 

1% 

1% — M. 


awpitn 
HMILW Stock 


Dir, m PE 


SIS. 

KBs High low 


Cwe 

Quot Qi'ge 


34% 27% EnM 
36% 22th C lx Lav 
9% 3% EvaiRs 
12th 7 EvrJ A 
9% 7 Excel n 

4% 2% ExptSv 


J2e 21 

9 

19 

34% 


18 

3 

32% 


16 

SO 

6% 

20 22 


55 

9 

JOB 4.1 

4 

TO 

7% 

SO 

18 

3% 


6% 


7% 

3% 


4% + th 
9 — v. 
7% 

3th— % 







If 

17 

10% 

10% 

10%— % 







8 

3% 

3% 






8 

1 

11 

11 






6 


23% 






50 


8 

117 

11% 

11% 






16 

19 

15% 

15% 

15%+ % 



FIRGE 

150 125 

4 

71 

11% 

11% 

11% 

28% 


FhGE el 450 145 


5 

27 

27 

27 + % 








9% 







1.9 

9 






1271 

42 

12 


29% 



9% 







9% 










8% 


8% + % 

34% 






1 

31% 

31% 

31% + tt 



FttilllG 




05 

8% 

8% 







lozias 

05 

05 





2128 

1S7 

20% 

20% 





59 

.412* 

2 

20% 

20% 

20% + V. 


11% 



X 

232 

19% 

1B% 

18% + % 







136 

1% 

1 


37 



1J» 

35 

14 

| 

33 (u 

33V 







37 

21 

5% 

5 

5% 

32% 


FreaEI 



20 

377 

22% 

21% 

22% + % 

9% 

7% 


28b 12 

12 

3 

8% 

8% 

8%— % 







IS 

6% 

6% 

6*+ % 

16% 



50 

3.1 

10 

7 

16% 

16% 

16U + % 

18% 




12 

16 

12 

18% 

18% 















.171 



154 

5% 

4% 


1716 

10% 

FurVltn 


15 

106 

17% 

17V* 

17% + % 

c 






2 

4% 

4% 

4%— % 

11 




5 

397 

10% 

9% 

9*— % 





11 

» 

5% 









3% 



20% 




6 

217 

13% 

17% 

13%+ % 

3% 





in 

2% 

2 


33 


120 

42 

8 

1317 


27* 

28% + % 

18% 

10 

GotUI 

55c 

A 

16 

74 

IFh 

11% 


10% 

7 




16 

21 


8% 

B%+ % 

15% 




17 

21 

11% 

11% 






94 

24 

3% 

3% 






9 

357 


14% 





12 

33 

4 

3% 


17% 



J 

12 

S 

13% 

13% 


10 





IX 

5% 

4% 

4%— 1% 

16% 


20 

15 

14 

19 

I4U. 

14 

14% — % 

s 

VI fi.'rrrl 



5 

3S 

9% 

9» 

9% + % 

n 

0% GoaRspf 150 105 


30 

9% 

9% 

9% + % 

30 

19% GkmtFd 


19 

10 

S3 

Y rr 



21% 





40 

m Tr 1 


9% — % 

27 

rrT : rw 


32 

6 

in 

Y'L? 

27 

27*+ % 

31% 

1 T ' M 


9 

35 

, ' 

74% 

24%— % 

6% 

2% GtjNRn 



19 

w 

3% 

3% 

3% 

17% 

10% Glaser 

M 

26 

11 

74 

17 

16% 

17 

11% 

1% 

% 

GtodW 

GMFId 




105 

IX 

5% 

1 

S ft 

5V.+ V4 

1 




79 

34 Ut 

34% 


l-n 




42 

10 

5 

» 

25% 


14% 



26 


11 

13% 

13% 

13% — % 





II 

99 

19% 

1IFK 

19* +1% 

11 




9 

200 

10% 

10% 

10%+ % 

2% 

1 





43 

1% 

1% 

1% 

17% 




15 

m 

13% 

12% 

13% + % 

» 

24% GIAml 

M 

15 

73 

79 

31% 

X 

31%+ % 



GrtUtC 

M 

1.1 

16 

81 

36% 

35% 

36%+% 



Granms 



9 

438 

18% 

17% 

17%— % 

^F _ 1 Wr r , - , ' 



104 

69 

9% 

IF* 






3 

30V. 

30 Vk 



8% GrdCJl 

JOO 42 

10 

14 

17% 

II* 

12 — % 


10% OKCda 

52 



499 

12% 


12% — % 


19% GHsfr 

20 

15 

15 

30 

X* 

m 

29%— % 

L H l 


10% 


HAL 



7 

16 


flu. 

816 

17% 

12 

HMG 

50 

48 


1 

12% 

13% 

12%+ % 

ftt 




10 

m 

13 

1.1 

U + % 



S3t 92 

7 

70 

10 

9* 

10 + * 


24% 


JO 

26 

11 

27 

34% 

34% 

34% 







1 

1% 

1U. 

1% 

23* 

Hasbro 

20 

J 

10 

181 

9% 

50 

50% + % 


9% 

Hasbwt 




6(1 

74 

74 

» + % 


27% 





97 

29V. 

79 

29% + % 

K • '1 


H tttlCr n 


8 

45 

21 

X* 

70% + % 

9% 

5% 

HlttiCh 



11 

121 

8 

7% 

8 

19* 

11% 

HI til Ex 



39 

44 

15% 

15% 

15%— % 

9% 

6% 

HetnlWr 

20e 24 

12 

6 

8% 

8% 

a % 

T 

7* 

Heimck 

.10 

J 

12 

766 

13% 

13% 

12%— % 

7% 


375c 



9639 

7* 

2% 

2*+ % 

s% 

2% 

Heldor 


7 

8 

3% 

.1% 

3% — % 

1 

3* 

Heflant 



40 

1283 

93 

8 

'ft 

, % +% 

4% 

Henna 



22 

63 

5% 

5 

5 — Vk 

14 

9% 

KHntran 



74 

9 

13% 

13% 

13% 

7% 

7% 

Hof man 



8 

12 

3V* 

3% 

3% 

13% 

6% 

HollyCP 

.lie 15 

16 

1 

7% 

7% 

7% 

-V 

75% 


150 

13 

11 

51 

37% 

31% 

32%+ % 


8% 

HraHar 

Jit 

62 

14 

I2M 

11* 

11% 

11%— % 


3% 

HmH wt 

571 

77 


578 

3% 

3% 

3% + % 

tr- 

11% 

HOtlPtY 

1 J2 115 

9 

42 

15% 

15 

15% + % 


1% 

HotIP wl 




14 

3% 

3% 

3% 

i. 

4% 

HktuOT 

12Se305 


436 

4% 

4% 

4%— % 


■ 

HovnE 



11 

114 

1714. 

17% 

17% — % 

G ; 

6% 

Howl In 

50e 15 

9 

95 

13 

17% 

I2%+ * 

■ 

SB* 

HutoriA 

156 

IS 

17 

73 

311* 

37% 

38* +1% 


7K* 

Mabel H 

US 

15 

72 

59 

30% 

37% 

38% +7% 


X 

HubMpf 

7M 

40 


9 

51% 

50% 

51% +2 

id 

16% 

HudGn 

AO 

25 

13 

3 

19% 

19% 

19% 

tm 

7V4 

Husky a 

.15 



165 

8% 

7* 

a 


82% 

24% 

ICH 

55 

J 

13 

750 

78* 

75% 

78% +3% 

10% 

5* 





7% 


9 

4% 

ICO 



11 


* 


4 

14 

10% 


.40b 10 



m 

13* 

5% 

7* 

IPM 

JKr 

1J 



3 



31% 

17* 







71% 

6% 

IRTCpn 



34 





2% 

1 







6% 

4% 

IS5 

.17 

25 

16 

12 

4Vk 








214 



2% 

1% 

InvGo 

.12e 

52 

• 

ISO 

2% 

2 % 


19% 

IT* 







3% 

1* 

unputd 








14* 

Ml* 







34% 

25% 

Inwoiia 

160 



594 

33 



19% 

13 







10% 

6% 

Inftotit 





a* 


8*+ % 

39% 

21* 

NYTlme 

31 U 



39* 

39* 

21* 

14% 

1 natron 

58 

12 

X 

2 

21% 



8% 

4% 


25# 47 

5 

ID 

5% 


3% 

I* 

InstSy 



M 

396 

2% 

2% 


16% 

10% 


22 15 



16* 

15* 

3% 

2% 

insSypf 

5H 

95 


15 

2% 

2% 


14% 

11* 

NwnEi 

150 11.1 

8 

6 

13* 

1.1% 

9% 

6* 

IntCtV a 

M 




e% 



9% 

5* 







9% 

5 

mtrrt# 

Jit 

05 

10 

79 

8% 

S% 


4* 

2% 

Nod Ind 



3 

2* 

2% 

16 

11 

Intirtfc 

.12 

5 

25 

76 

14* 

14 

MVW— % 

3Va 

2% 

Not ex 


13 

X 

2% 

2% 


2* 





417 

3% 

3% 

3% 

13* 

10 

NanlRn 


8 

86 

12% 

17* 

7* 

1 

IntBkwt 




121 

1% 

1% 

1% 

18 

13% 

NoCdOa 



■ 

w * 

14% 

18* 

13% 

IntCtrl 

JO 

16 

11 

289 

19% 

18% 

19 + V. 

35 

29% 

NIPS pf 

425 13.1 


MZ 

33 

32% 


8% 

InlHyd 



m 

81 

9% 

9% 

9to 

5% 

2* 

NuHrzn 


7 

90 

4% 

4% 

11* 


IIP 


8.1 

70 

1 

10% 

10% 

10% 

1% 

% 

NuHrwt 



10 

1 

1 


3* 




44 

2 

4% 

4% 

4% 

10% 

5* 

NudDt 


9 

625 

10% 

10 











14* 

9* 

Numac 



26 

10% 

10% 


L.. 



rt Wn t.d wiyv.i«t iw»««4 iv ft* 

Conference 

Schedule 


1985 


MEET THE NEW FRENCH CABINET 

February 26, Paris 


THE INVESTMENT CLIMATE AND INCENTIVES IN EUROPE 
Cosponsored with Plant Location International 

April 25-26, Brussels 


TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN HUNGARY 

June 13-14 , Budapest 


THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OUTLOOK 

Cosponsored with Oxford Analytica 

September 19-21, Oxford 


OIL AND MONEY IN THE EIGHTIES 
Cosponsored with The Oil Daily 

October 24-25, London 


>lete the form below and mail itto Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune Conference Office, 181 Avenue Charles-de-Gaulle, 9252l Neuilly Cedex, 
France, or call Susan Lubomirski, our Conference Manager, in Paris on 747 1265. 


1 


Please tick appropriate bOTfes) 
□ French Administration 


Surname 


FirstName 


L 


□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 


Investment 
Incentives in Europe 


Position 


Company 


Trade and 

Investment in Hungary 


Address 


International 
Business Outlook 


City/oounhy 


Telephone 


Tdex 


Oil and Money 


Company activity 


25-1*85 


IJ Month 

HMD LOW Slock 


5H 3sse 

Dlv. VIS. PE IMS Higti Low Cutf.tJse 


11 6% IntSeow 

J* ltt Into la 
26% 16% ionics 

35U» 17% IrooBrd 
5th 3 Isalvn 51 




34 i% l’i 1% + % 
13 25 24% K'+— % 
J1 32% 31« 31% — % 
39 3'-. 3v* 3W — % 


IflWI 

H-n La™ Stack 


Sts. dan 

Dm. tit PE 10% high Low QuW.Ch’Bt 


IV- 

19% 

2% 

11% 


17% 11% Jadvn 
10% 5Vh Jacobs 
ink Jensen 
3% JriAm 
% JetAwt 
3% JHron 

2% JahnPd 
7V. joftnAm 
4th JmpJkrt 


16 

6% 

3V. 

7% 

7* 

11 % 

7% 


691 65 16 


JO 11 15 
4 


SB 15% 15% 15%— ■= 

173 »% 6% 6% to 

3 15% 15V. 15U 

49 3% 3 li 3% 

« % % % 

243 BW 7-b B% + % 

J9 4% 4I*? 4‘h — % 

171 18% ** 9% + '1 

185 5% 5 5% + =- 


23'-. 
I iT% 


it 


37* 

XU. 

KnGapf 

450 

126 


300: 

35% 

35% 

35% 


5% 

1* 

KopakC 




33 

2* 

2% 

Z% 


14* 

10 

KovCs 

20 

12 

17 

X 

11% 

11% 

in- 

% 

16% 

9% 

KcorN n 

JO 

25 

8 

S3 

14 

13% 

to -■ 

■■B 

7% 

3 

Kanti 11 



19 

234 

4% 

4% 

4% — 


21 

10% 

Ketdim 

J8t 

32 

TO 

1 

15% 

IS* 

15% — 

% 

8* 

5% 

KeyCo 

2D 

25 

20 

8 

r» 

8 + 


19 

8 

KevPb 

20 

15 

17 

1054 

10% 

10% 

10% — 


15 

S 

KevCa 



X 

1 

5% 

5% 

5% 


5* 

TA 

KJddewt 



44 

3% 

3% 

3% 


4* 

3* 

KUern 



70 

49 

4V. 

3% 

4% •*- 

% 

5% 

3% 

Ktnorfc 



10 

17 

4% 

4% 

4% 


39% 

18% 

KbraR 

2D 

5 

73 

100 

JBVo 

38% 

38% 


7% 

3 

Kirby 




48 

3% 

3% 

3% + 

’»* 

5% 

3% 

KltflMa 



20 

10 

5% 

5% 

5% 


3% 

2* 

KkerVe 

SOT 

6 

107 

3% 

3% 

JVj— 

u. 

16% 

8* 

Kitopo 



16 

72 

13% 

13% 

13% — 

% 

15% 

8* 

KneH 



15 

54 

14% 

14 

14 — 

'6 

26% 

21 

KooerC 

730 

86154 

272 

26% 

357* 

26 V. + 

% 


3 

1* 

lsb 




47 

1% 

1* 

1%— % 

4% 

2* 

La Bara 

JM 

15 


5 

3% 

3% 

3* + % 

7% 

2% 

LoPnt 



B 

6 

5% 

S% 

5%+ % 

41% 

23% 

LafceSa 

■15e 



17 

27 

26% 

I*%+ % 

u* 

11* 

LndBnn 

54 

36 

10 

9 

14% 

14% 

14%— % 

17% 

11 

Ldmfcs 

.16e 

16 

10 

15 

16% 

16% 

16% — % 

17% 

9* 

Laaer 



41 

43 

15% 

12 

12 — 'A 

12% 

8% 

Laura n 




14 

12% 

12* 

12% — V. 

3% 

2* 

LeePti 



14 

31 

3'c 

3% 

3V. + % 

7% 

3% 

LMsurT 



24 

25 

5* 

5% 

5%— % 

9% 

5 

Levitin 



7 

61 

7% 

7% 

7%— % 

5 

2* 

LHfM 




13 

3 

2* 

TV + 

4* 

1% 

Loom 




36 

2% 

2% 

2% 

30% 

18 

l_ou Icon 

20 

2 

19 

64 

29% 

28Tb 

28*— % 

X 

20 

Lartmr 



16 

473 

31% 

30% 

31%+ % 

71 

31% 

LoulsCe 

150 

16 

X 

15 

71 

71 

71 

19% 

B% 

Lumex 

JB 

6 

17 

«6 

13% 

13% 

13% — V. 

11% 

6* 

LundyE 



18 

X 

11* 

11% 

11* 

16* 

10% 

Lurkl 

611 

32 

10 

IX 

12* 

12% 

12% — % 

13* 

9* 

Lvdats 



4 

168 

MU. 

14 

MW + % 

X 

12% 

LynCSy 

.10 

6 

19 

X 

28% 

27% 

27% — m 

10% 

8% 

LyrmtiC 

20 

26 

15 

5 

10 

10 

10 + W 


14% 

3% 

9% 

2% 

20 % 

5% 

17% 

2 % 

25% 

15% 

35 

PH 

5V. 

22th 

30% 

15% 

13 

5% 

24% 

14% 

26% 

>7% 

29% 

11 % 

3% 

5% 

13% 

69 

17 

29% 

11 % 

11% 

15% 

23% 

8 % 

11 % 

21 % 

74% 

9% 

25% 

43% 

10 % 

16% 

16% 

3% 

10 % 

3% 

12 % 

21 

8 % 

5% 

15 

2% 

11 


Mm 55 
M 35 
.14 1.1 


11% MCO Hd 
1% MCO Rs 
7% MSA n 
1 MSA Wt 
9% MSI Dt 
3 HASH 
8% MocScn 
% Mocrod 
12 Mbps 
9% Motarto 
14% Monad 
4% MrthOi 
3% MorttPd 
21% Morm Pf 2J5 105 
18% Mrsiiln 

6% MartPr 
8% Mosknd 
5 Matec 


7 26 

M 449 


150 107 
JOe 


8 
13 

20a 15 8 
18 


52 

38 

91 

124 

40 

35 

SO 

10 

79 

23 

78 

10 


13 13 

3 % 3 % 


8% 8» 

1 % 1 W 


13 + V. 

3% 

0% 

. 1%+ % 
10% 10% 10% — % 
3% 3 3 

13 13% 13% 

1% 1% 1%— % 
13% 13% 13% — % 
9U. 9% 9'*— 

23 23 23 

3U % ID 
5 5 5 

21% 31% 21% 

24% 24% 24% + % 
14% 14'£ 14% + % 
13% 13% 13%+ % 
7% + t* 


70'. 
13% 
29 . 
14-h 
Th 
3 

13% 

17'. 

r". 


24% 


V. 


6 

OfT-h 
25% 
13 - 
33 
19'. t 
10 


9% 

Perlni pf 

1.1Q 

iai 


153 

11* 

10* 

W* — * 

\ 

PeiLw 

Pe-.Lwt 




585 

5 

45* 

n. 




PetLe p* 

155 226 


70 

7* 

7L. 

7* 


PefLcPt 

25 

246 


X 

9% 

a* 

9* — * 

17=* 

PetLe pf 

323 242 


71 

14* 

13% 

13% — * 

1^4 

PnilLD 

22ellX 

2 

41 

2 

1* 

2 + * 

J: 

PlcaPC 




X 

4* 

4* 

4* 

T'z 

Pier 1 wl 



2 

95 

4* 

4 

4* 

s 

ptanrS* 



47 

173 

6* 

6* 

4%+ * 

i"t 

pttwva 

56 106 

10 

6 

5% 

5* 

5*— V. 

5T 

Pltrwnv 

160 

26 

11 

5 

70 

70 

TO 

4% 

p.zzcin 

JM 

6 

9 

9 

9% 

9% 

9%— Vh 

13"'T 

PIcrD 9 

X 



31 

18% 

18% 

18*— * 


PtvGms 


II 

X 

13 

17* 

12* + * 

7’i 

PIvRB 




5 

2% 

2* 

2* 


PoptEv 



21 

412 

5* 

6% 

5* + % 

V* 

Port5w 



68 

226 

9% 

916 

9*— Mi 

12 

PcsTIPr 



16 

1 

16* 

16* 

16* 


PowmrT 

.lib A 

50 

41 

27* 

2646 

*%— * 


PralrOs 




65 

6% 

6% 

6% 

lS’a 

Pratt 1. 

.92 

42 

8 

14 

22 

21* 

21* + » 


Pratt Rd 

20 

26119 

22 

7* 

7 

7% 


PremRs 




4 

% 

% 

% — * 

6‘2 

PresR B 

20 

9.1 

6 

19 

8* 

8% 

8%— U 

j+3 

Presto 



17 

5 

3% 

3* 

3* 

15^1 

PrsCTs 



11 

20 

19% 

19* 

19*+ * 

IB’ : 

PrpwEn 

224 

75 

7 

3 

25% 

25% 

25% + 16 

Id^eo 

Pat pfe 

224 13.1 


12 

18% 

17* 

17*— * 

zr-3 

Pat 3fE 

4J7 146 


34 

31W 

71 

31 U. + 16 

15^ 

pat diD 

224 

126 


SO 

18% 

18* 

18* + * 


PuntaG 




32 

5* 

5* 

5% 


10% 

5 

RAI 

251 

46 

13 

87 

7* 

6* 

5% 

3% 

RMS El 




29 

4 

3% 

10% 

3 6 

RTC 




13 

4 

3% 

16% 

13*6 

Rascn 

.12 

6 

23 

99 

15* 

U 

20 

12% 

Ransbs 

72 

38 


67 

If* 

18% 

4% 


Ratliff 




1 

1 

1 

14% 

10% 

Raven 

42 

32 

8 

12 

13* 

1316 

29% 

10% 

Ravmlr 19JMc 



2 

11* 

11* 

2% 

1% 

Red law 




» 

2* 

2* 

1T% 

10% 

aesroiB 

56 

19 

10 

34 

14% 

14* 


77% 

Resrl A 



19 

451 

41* 

40* 

r.~ 

5% 

RaslAsa 



8 

47 

6 

6 

4* 

3W 

FexNor 



ID 

57 

4% 

4 

18 

9% 

RlbletP 

20 

13 

14 

09 

11% 

IT* 

& 


RrtiTC v 



1 

6 

216 

1* 

17* 

law 

RlaAJa 

55 

11 


49 

18 

17* 

24% 

11* 

RCKWV S 

52 

72 

X 

Ml 

24* 

24 

34 

2D* 

R os era 

.12 

J 

14 

48 

20 

26* 


2 

RoonPn 




273 

416 

4 

5% 

3% 

RovPIm 




X 

4* 

4% 

X* 

20 

Rudlek 

56a 

12 

13 

4 

25% 

25% 

6W 

3% 

RBW 



7 

468 

6% 

6* 

16% 

11 'A 

Russell 

20 

11 

10 

472 

14* 

14* 

TOW 

10% 

RykoH 

so 

15 

12 

514 

20* 

19* 


+ % 
+ % 


n Month 
HMiLaw Swct 


Dtv. Y«.PE 


Sts. 

WhHWiLOw 




137% 

8% 

31% 

12 % 

18% 

5% 

4% 

10% 

11% 

10% 

22% 

18% 

3% 


11 % 

9% 

13% 

m 

27 

12% 

18% 

18% 

15% 

8% 

14% 

4% 

14% 

26% 

6 % 


76 TetanR 
2 Ttfecon 
21% Tel Hex 
8% Tel Dio 
7% Tetsd 
2% Teiaph 
3% Termer s 
5% Tensor 
5% TaxAIr 
5% TexAE 
16% TexAE of 
3% Tuscan 
2 TharEn 
3% ThrOA 
2% TMwetl 
4% Tnrfei 
TofIPta 


Jfle A 99 33Mzl39% 134% 134% +Ith 
62 3% 3% 3% 

54 15 14 25 SO 29% 29%— % 
J6a U 10 07 10% 10 10% 

52 153 W 8% 8% — % _ 

267 3% 3% 3%— t& 

13 45 4% 4%-4%— % 

9 5% 5% 5% 

5 1592 11% 11% 11%— % 
JVt 65 5 33 5% 5% 5%— % 

32 17% 17% T7%+% 

8 338 9% 5% 5%— th 

20 2 % 2 2 % 

72 5th 5 5 — M 

68 4% 4 4%—% 

35 9% 9 9 — % 

118 9% 8% 9% + % 



.10 


24 
25 13 


54 


12 





B 

* 

% 

%+ * 


268 112 


1 

25* 

as* 

25* — * 


.10 16 

9 


W4 



11* T ms Tec 

56 35 

9 

in 


16 

16 — * 


M 23 

8 

* 

15 

15 

IS + * 


Mm 42 

22 



9* 

f* 


Aft 95143 

5 


7* 

7* 




35 

5% 

5* 

5*-* 



11 

50 

2* 

2* 

Th— M 


M 3A 

12 

IX 

13* 

13* 

12*+ to 


1.10 42 

9 

9 

25* 

X* 

26* 

3* Tyler wt 



ITS 


5* 

5*— * 


6 + % 
4% + % 


24% 


4 — % 


6% 
4' 4 
6% 
14% 
11 % 
«% 
7% 
7% 
63 


SFM 

SMD 

SPWCP 

Saoe 

Salem 

SCaHo 

SDsopf 

SDaopf 


JOr 14 


7% 

% 

•% 

6% 

- SZ% 

21% !7>i _ . 

36"« 31% SDoapf 453 114 


11J 
50 HO 


10 


4% 

4f% + 

U 

19 

3* 

3% 

3* 


44 

416 

4* 

4* — 

to 

13 

7% 

7* 

7%— 

* 

1 

8* 

8* 

8*— 

* 

51 


1* 

1* 


1 


7* 

7VS— 

* 

300 

7* 

7* 

7*— 

* 


SDpOOf 759 114 
SOaapt 147 111 


12* Mat Rati 

.12 

4 

20 

163 

19* 

18* 

IB%— * 

X 

X 

8% MrrtScn 




335 

14 

IZj 

13% — % 



18 Matrix S 



29 

218 

X* 


25% — % 



12* MarEno 

260 134 



15 

14% 


IP# 


13* Mayflw 

80b 24 

10 

USD 

30% 

30 

30%+ % 

9% 

% 

8 McCOn 

2600214 


110 

9% 

9* 

9Vi — W 



2* McRae A 




2 

?% 

?% 

2% 

4* 

3% 

■ I 




2 

2% 

2% 

2%— % 

i% 


■ J# 

JWn 

5 

8 

57 

10* 

9% 

9T!,— * 

15% 

iito 

52 Medio 

1.16 

17 

13 

44 

M i’rl 


69 W + % 


7% 

12% Media 

50 

15 






9% 


20% MEM CD 

1.16 

43 

11 

1 



27%+ * 

1B% 



271 

50 


47 

7% 

7* 

7% 

14% 

0% 


.15 

14 

16 

104 

12 

11% 

r? + % 

3% 

IU 

liTx'TTtTB 


20 

12 

49 

15* 

15 

15% + w 

14% 

9% 

14* MetraC 



X 

14 

23% 

23 

23 

15% 

in* 

4* MctiGn 



74 

179 

7% 

7* 

7*— to 

I2W 

B 

8* MklAm 

44 

48 

12 

13 

II 

ID* 

11 — to 

8% 

4 to 

13* Mid Ind 

40 

15 

8 

17 

71 

20% 

21 + % 



65* MlnPpf 

850 

115 


!0tr 75 

75 

75 +1 

20to 



54e 27 



8% 

0% 



9% 


-24 

15 

12 

39? 

16 

15% 

15*0 — to 

16 

12% 

33 MlteCP 

un 

22 

10 

5 

44 

43% 

44 + % 

8% 

5% 

■ si 1 

56 

52 

7 

19 

10% 

10% 

1D%— * 

11 

8% 

r !rt . . § 

50b 12 

18 

13 

15% 

1.5% 

15W 

9% 

7% 


58b 16 

18 

271 

15% 

15 

15U.+ * 

9% 

7% 

3* MtaRt wi 




4097 

3% 


J%— to 

llto 

8% 

Eel'll' Mill 

1.44* 7.9 


149 

18% 

13U. 

1B16— to 

13% 

10% 

IhjJ 1 i iiiil^l 




IX 

1* 



Xw 

10% 





150 

4% 

4% 

4*— U 

19% 

16 


40 

36 

10 

15 

70 

19% 

» + % 

72Va 

61 

4* Movie L 




11 

5* 

.5* 

5W 

li% 

6% 

3 Murpln 




32 

3* 

3* 

3* + % 

10% 

6% 

3% Muse At 




8V 

5* 

.5* 

5*— to 

78% 

15* 











7* Myerln 

20 

24 

10 

21 

11 

10% 

10% 

IS 

10W 









4 

2% 


7 — % 
13% — % 
16%— % 
1% 

54% +3% 
17% + % 
14% 

M + % 
39% 

5%— th 
16% 4- % 
13% 

9 — % 
3% 

2%+ V, 
12 %+ % 
14% 

32%- % 
4% 


10 %+ % 
10 %+ % 


27* 

16* OEA 



12 

15 

19* 

l»Vi 

19% 

22<h 

14* Ookwd 

68b 

A 

15 

164 

27% 

22 W 

22% + to 

7* 

4 OdetAn 



57 

25 

7% 

7% 

7% — * 

7% 

4* oderBs 



54 

16 

7% 

7 

7 - % 

21% 

16% Ol la ind 

M 

10 

15 

5 

X 

X 

28 — to 

23* 

13% Olsten 

30 

12 

15 

65 

22% 

!2% 

22% 

5% 

3* OOkhtp 




16 

5% 

5U» 

5%— to 

4(6 

3% Oaentin 



a 

10 

5% 

SW 

5% 

B* 

S'. A OrfalHA 

50 

76 

ti 

6 

6% 

6% 

6% 

7* 

5* OrMHB 

60 

96 

10 

1 

6<6 

6W 

6U. — to 

4 

1 Orrnmd 



T3 

19 

1% 

1% 

1% 

5* 

2* Orrox 




12 

2* 

2% 

2% 

X 

21* OSuItvn 

60b 16 

14 

6 

34 W 

34 

34* + % 

10% 

6* OxfrdF 

62t 

56 

10 

23 

7% 

7% 

7% 

11* 

7% OzarkH 

30 

15 

B 

425 

10% 

10* 

10% 


10 % 

24 


10* PGEpfA 

150 

126 

X 

13 

12 * 

12 %— 

W 

8* PGEpJB 

1 27 

112 

9 


n% 

12* + 

% 

8% PGEpfO 

125 

11.9 

76 

llUl 

10 % 

10%— 

w 

8* PGEpfE 

125 

116 

39 

10% 

10 * 

10% + 

* 

8 PGEpfG 

120 

120 

* 

tow 

9 % 

10 — 

u. 

28* PGEPtF 

424 

125 

19 

E *i.7i 

i. 

33 % + 

w 

26% PGEpfZ 

466 

125 

101 


l£t 

31% 


21% PGEPfY 

ax 

122 

222 

t 1 


X* 


77to PG EM 

257 

124 

54 


r<'». . 

2046— 

to 

15* PGEPIV 

2 22 

125 

IX 

18* 

ft 

18% + 

* 

17 PGEPfT 

254 

122 

19 

20% 


20% + 

* 

17* PGEpfS 

262 

125 

U 

21 


21 + 


7* PGEptH 

1.12 

115 

17 

9% 

rr 

9% + 

% 

15* PGEPfR 

23/ 

121 

10 

19% 

TTT 

19% — 

to 

13% PGEnfP 

265 

121 

J4 

17% 

Ttv 

17 


rTv , j 

260 

115 

VI 

17 

f £7 

16* + 

% 

1 k j tj f.y 

1.96 

122 

27 

16* 

15% 

16* — 

to 

1 r * 

229 

122 

16 

18% 

law 

18% + 

M 

Ip L ■ 

104 

121 

U3 

17 

ITTj 

16ft + 

to 

7* PGEpfl 

169 

121 

n 

9 

Mam 

9 


U% PGTrn 

1.12 

55 6 

94 

| i;7b 


20* + 

* 




275 

Hj 

■tj 

to- 

■ 

27* PaiiCii 

60 

1.1 21 

466 

W, 1/ 1 

EJI 

37% — 

* 


2% 

39 

10% 5% Pontast 
9% 3% PornPk 
23% 15% PartC* 
17% 10% parref] 
4% 2U PavFon 
8% 5% PUMG 
u% 8% PeerTu 
42V. 32V. Pan EM 
24% 15% PenTr 
2% 1% PE CP 

34 26 PenRE 




Penlmv 
33% 23 PerlrdC 
Wt 10% PorJnl n 


12 
19 

50O10 8 
22 
37 

.130 15 19 
50b <5 14 
150a 11 9 
150 7 S> 9 
-2ST16J 9 
250 74) ID 
50 15 10 


6% 

8% 

20% 

11% 

5% 

7% 

8% 

38% 


17 17% 
21 1 % 


2 34% 
168 13% 


6% 6% 

8% 8% 

20 % 20 % 

11% ll%— % 
4% 5% + % 
7% 7% 

b% ra— % 

38% 3BH— % 
17% 17% 

1 % 1 % + % 
34% 34% + % 


50 25 12 


1 

27% 

13% 


I2j£ 13.. + % 


F 


% 

27%— to 
13% 


4* 32% SanJW 

36 3% Sondgfe 

6% 3Vs Sonmrk 
6% 4% Sound B 

6Vh 4% Sound A 
S’- 3% 5ceolrn 

21% 14 Schelb 

13% 10% Schwab 
13% 3% SciMul 
25 TTU 5dL» 


255 55 


.15 U 
20 35 


36 

M 

.10 


sndC» 

Seaport 

SocCop 

SelsDII 

Setas 

SellaAs 

Semico 

Srvlsca 

Serve 

Servctr 

Setans 

ShoorS 

Sharon 

Shoawt 

Slercn 

SlkasAs 

Sllvrcst 

SimcoS 

5mthA 

SmlhB 

Snvdcr 

SoKIron 

SoeiCoo 


J6 

50 


,16c 1.1 


sa 72 
.12 J 
1500 82 


M 35 
M 11 
250 148 11 


25c 13 


SCEdPf 152 105 
SCEdol 156 115 
SCEdpf I.T 9 11.1 
seed Pf 155 105 
SCEdPf 2 J 0 115 
SCEdpf 251 115 
SCEd Pf BJO 110 
Sprit mn 


Sort pi 
Spectra 
spwjop 
S pencer 
_ _ SarDwt 
10% 4% SIHavn 

3% 1% Stt4avwf 

25% 13% Sid Prd 
71% 53 STdShr 
11% 

17% 

12 % 

25 


150 125 
.14 5 


M 


50 19 
2791 45 II 


6'A 

3% 

19H 

11 % 

4% 

_r» 


10 % 

n% 

13% 


4 

14% 


6% 

9% 

2th 


8% 

14% 


8 W SlOTwd 



U 

2 

Ml 

ipn 

9 

1 r% SlorrtH 



IP 

4 

Fn 


15% — * 

6% States 
SOW State pf 




24 

tri 

■ ] 

9*—* 

255 112 


3 


y \ l,~i 

22% + W 

M% Slenan 

60 

4.1 

11 

1 

16% 

14* 

16* 

4W SlrtCap 




13 

4* 

4% 

4* + * 

1% Start El 



16 

28 

2% 

2% 

2*— * 
19* + * 

4* StrlExI 



11 

34 

19% 19% 

5% StertSM 

20 

28 

» 

187 

7% 

7* 

7*—* 

1% Straw 




13 

2* 

2* 


5U. SumltE 




21 

12* 

5* 

llto SumiE of 150 M6 


1 

fea 

12%+ * 

6% SunCiy 



• 

13 

10% 

10*— u. 




9 

10 

7% 

7* 

7W 

5% Sunalr 

24 

36 

15 

19 

4* 

4% 

«%— * 

11* SunJr 

61 

32 

14 

S 

14* 

14* 

14* 

16W SuprFd 

64b 16 

12 

11 

26% 

X* 






73 

1W 

1* 

lto+ * 

6% SuPind 

65a 

5 

HI 

M 

9* 

9% 

9% + to 


22 

23 

10 

BJ 

14% 

14 

m — to 

3% Susaueh 



W 

63 

4* 

6to 

«*— * 

3 Swantn 




n 

4* 

3* 

4* + * 
I*+ * 

1% SwftEn 




55 

1% 

1% 

19% SwIRIn 

120 

46 

11 

151 


25*+ * 

4% Synaloy 

281 

76 


33 

1 .1 

turn 

5*+ * 

9* SvslEn 

.14 

1.1 

17 

9 



14*— * 


llto 

6* T Bar 

511 

55 

27 

48 

8* 

12 

7% TEC 

JUe 

6 

19 

25 

9to 

25* 

5* TIE 



II 

3057 

7* 

17W 

6* Til 



45 

S3 

HP* 

18% 

13 TabPdS 

20 

12 

10 

7B 

15* 

15W 

6% TandBr 




19 

S* 

13 

9% Tasty 

60 

32 

13 

43 

12* 

7to 

2 % room 




7 

3% 

5% 

!* TctiAm 




31 

2* 

18% 

13* TrtiSvrn 



14 

ins 

19 

55* 

33* TocMP 



IS 

Z4 

54% 

9to 

3% TecftTn 



8 

44 

5* 

18* 

7% Tectmi 

20 

16 

10 

154 

14* 

4% 

1* Tchndn 




18 

2* 


8% 

9Vk 

7% 


8% 


3% 

2% 

18% 


B%— % 
9Vfc+ % 
7%— U 
10 —th 
15% — % 
I%+ % 
12 %+ % 


5% 


2% 


2%+ % 
18% + % 
54% +114 
5%— Vh 
W%+ % 
2th— % 


AMEX Highs-Lows 


Jan. 24 


3 


NEW HIOHS 46 


AMCEntn 
Baker MIcW 

OareniDiTl 

De Rase Ind 

PrlesEntern 

Greenmans 

Hubei IA 

Lvdalls 

Mel Pro 

Mfaemvwt 

OakwtfHm 

PGE3 25PH. 

RBWCP 

SlkasCpAs 

Telon Rndi 

Wesn Hemes 

WstnHItbn 


ATTFdn 
Brown Far A 
Clarralnl 
OmlUdn 
FrtschsRsis 
Healthcare n 
Hubbel 2 06 p 

AtashidSon 

MMrocon 
NY Times 
PGE I 37pf8 
PnyFone 
SD|e 4 65pl 
Start Exfrdr 
UMcorppfB 
WascoFtn 
WherhsoEnt a 


AflUPuU 

Brown F Pf 

CoInFds wts 

Dillards 

FmVauHn 

HelrUcke 

IntCoatrul 

MavfhvrCp 

MlnPLpfC 

Newcor 

PGE 1 12pfH 

PenoaRE 

SaundrSY A 

SUpSwMf 

usalrGp87wf 

WMBrdaC 


AmExprwt 

CaeffeAMs 

Crawnlnd 

BSD n 
Glalfltr s 
Howell Ind 
JatraMeind 

Media Gam 

NUteCarp 
NuctaarDIa 
PGE 2PK> 
RtaAIgama 

ScfieibEart 

TartiSvm 

voUevRns 

WtfDtuMul 


New LOWS 4 

BaklanBln Conwaind FrantA wt RlchmdTCv 


7 

2 USR Ind 




3 

2* 

"ft 

9* U llmte 



7 

1668 

541 

* 

14% 

11* Unlccpt 

25 

45 


*8 

15* 









14* UAlrPd 

54b 32 

10 

3 

17* 


1* UPoodA 

M 

53 

23 




lw U FoadB 



20 





651 SO 

16 

06 


71* 

10* USAGwt 




to 

21* 

11* 

5V. USMcn 



31 

119 




541132 

14 

62 

fiTfa 


16* UnltvB 



M 

5 

w* 





17 







29 





60e 

L6 

7 



T7V. 

9* UnvPttf 




48 

Uto 


It 


W% 


2% 

9%— % 
%+ th 

15%+ % 
9V. — % 
T7th 
1% 

Mb 

13 — th 
21% + % 
11 

6*+ 14 
Wlh- % 

’?%-" 

I»— % 


10 


9% 

.. 7 5V. 

25% 15V. 
15% 4% 
SVh 2% 
20% M% 
10% 3% 
1% % 
16% 11% 
Bth 3% 
9% 5th 
7% 2% 
59 44% 

7% 6th 
12% 8 


VST n 

VallvR 1-92 95 7 
VDttprs 54 1J 13 
Verbtm 

Vertt 13 

VtAmC Mb 20 9 
VtR3h 
Verna 

varnir 3D u f 
Vartnie .10 12 
Vtcon 11 

Vtnfae 
vainfl 

VbuaIG JB 37 11 
Vaptex 26 35 13 


45 10 
S 2114 
45 25th 
619 4% 

2 1 
. 2 
139 
4 

415 12% 
1 4 

73 7th 
103 4% 

1 57% 
12 7% 

19 10% 




9% «%— th 
21 2lt4 + « 
34% 2St4 + th 
5% 5»— %- 
2 % 3 
20 20 

^ w. 

12% 12%— 14 
6 6 — th , 

6% flh— % 
4% 4%+% 
5714 5714—% 
7% 7% + % 
10 10% + % 



















20* 

8* 

6to WTC 



70 

X 

■M 

■r ^ . j 



X) 


37* + * 


17* Water 

60 

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HEW LOWS 
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THE FRONTPAGE 


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The International Herald Tribune 
1887-1980 


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PEOPLE 


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•1*^1 14 


IQ Appoints 
Toshiba Chief 
To Its Board 

By Brenda Hagerty 

Intentademtd Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Imperial Chemi- 
cal Industries PLC, which has been 
rapidly expanding its business oat- 
side of Europe, has appointed a 
Japanese executive 10 iis board. 

I Cl, Britain's largest chemical 
company, said Sbdchi Saba, 65, 
would become a non -executive di- 
rector on Feb. 1. Since June 1980, 
Mr. Saba has served as president 
and chief executive officer of To- 
shiba Corp., a maker of electrical 
and electronic equipment. 

Mr. Saba will become ICTs sev- 
enth nonexecutive director. The 
only other non-Briton is Walther 

Profits Down 
At Oil Finns 

(Con tinned from Plage 9J 
plunged to $26 million from $404 
million. 

Mobil reported a one-time 
charge of SI 10 miHion for the dos- 
ing of its Wilhemshaven refinery in 
West Germany. 

■ Sohio 

In Oevdand, Sohio said fourth- 
quarter profit fell to S290 million, 
or $135 a share, from S324 million, 
or $1.32 a share. Revenue edged up 
to S3 .2 billion from $3.1 billion. 

For the year, profit drifted down 
to $1.4 billion from $13 billion. 
Earnings per share held steady at 
$6.14. Revenue rose 14 percent to 
$112 billion from $11.9 billion. 

■ Elf Acqmtaine 

Sodfetfe Nadonalc Elf Aquitaine. 
France's state-owned oil company, 
said Thursday its 1984 profit rose 
76 percent to 6.5 bOhon francs 
($66.94 million} from 3.7 billion 
francs in 1983. 

Elfs chairman, Michel Pec- 
queur, said that the group's con- 
solidated turnover rose to about 
175 billion francs from 143.6 bil- 
lion in 1983. 

(AP. UPI, Reuters) 


Kiep, managing partner of Grad- 
mann & Holler, a West German 
insurance company. Mr. Kiep has 
been an IG director since 1981 

A spokesman for IG said Mr. 
Saba’s appointment was “part of 
the internauonalizmg of IQ.” 

ELF. Hutton International Inc. 
said Ronni A. Matiatia and James 
V. Kidd have joined its Geneva 
office from Merrill Lynch in Gene- 
va. where they served for 18 years 
and 24 yean, respectively- ELF. 
Hutton is a New York-based secu- 
rities firm. 

National We stmi n s t e r Bank PLC 
said Geoff Abell has been appoint- 
ed senior vice president, with re- 
sponsibility for its New York min- 
ing and metals office. He succeeds 
Alistair Bees ton, who returns to 
Britain at the end of his tour of 
duty. Mr. Abell had been a manag- 
er in NatWest’s mining and metals 
section in the London head office. 

Perrier SA, the French minera l 
water, soda and fruit juice compa- 
ny, has named Jacques Bombal di- 
rector-general adjoint. He had been 
a senior official in the French Agri- 
cultural Ministry. 

Lloyds Bank PLC said Sir John 
Hedley Greenbotough will become 
a deputy chairman of the bank and 
of Lloyds Bank UK Management 
Ltd, and a director of Lloyds Bank 
International Ltd. He will take up 
those posts following the London- 
based bank’s annual general meet- 
ing May i and the retirement of Sir 
Bernard ScotL Sir John is chairman 
of Newarthill Ltd. and deputy 
chair man of BowatCT Corp- Also, 
Sir Robin Ibbs will become a direc- 
tor of Lloyds Bank and of Llovds 
Bank UK Management on April 1. 
He is an executive director of Impe- 
rial Chemical Industries PLC and 
serves as an adviser to Prime Minis- 
ter Margaret Thatcher on efficien- 
cy in the British government. In 
aAtilirtn, Jnhn Katsman will be- 
come a director of Lloyds Bank 
and of Lloyds Bank International 
chi April 1. He will be retiring as 
c hairman and chief executive of 


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Floating/ Fixed Rate Bonds Due 1991 

In accordance with the provisions of the Bonds, notice is 
hereby given that for the three months interest period from 
24th January. 1985 to 24th April, 1985 the Bonds will carry 


24th January. 1985 to 24th April, 1985 the Bonds will carry 
an Interest Rate of 8‘W«% per annum. The relevant Interest 
Payment Date will be 24th April, 1985. The Coupon amount 
per U.S. S5JXX) will be U.S. S108.59. 

On 14th January, 1985 the Ten Year Weekly Treasury Rate was 
1 1.50 per cent, per annum. 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York. 

Agent Bank 


Shell UK-Ltd. at the end of March. 

Barclays Bank UK. said Robin 
Hoyer Millar has been appointed a 
director. He is deputy chairman of 
Barclays Bank Trust Co. 

Noniic Bank PLC said that Stein 
WessekAas will become managing 
director and chief executive officer 
and John R. Sdater non-executive 


Pagel5 


chair man as of Feb. 1. Mr. Sdater 
is the bank’s managing director; 
Mr. Wessd-Aas is one of three dep- 
uty managing directors. Borger A 
Lenth. deputy chief executive of 
Nordic Bank’s Oslo-based parent 
Den Norsks Creditbank, wll be- 
come Nordic's non-executive depu- 
ty chairman on the same date. 


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UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

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UNION INVESTMENT Frank lur) 

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Other Funds 


STOCK 

BED 

ASK 

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U5» 

US* 

International bv 
Gly-Qock 

5 

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International nv 

2% 

avi 

| ‘Quotes as oL Jan. 24, 195 

5 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

—fid ) Concentra DM 2AS0 

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FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
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FIDELITY POB *7& Hamilton Bermuda 
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^AWETODRTSBMCE.Tefc 























































































































i 




! 


p *gel6 


Bi 

H 

a 

a 

H 

■ 

■ 

■ 

y 

■ 

■ 

■ 

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■ 

■ 

■ 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JANUARY 25, 1985 


PEANUTS 


I 5TILLSAY 
P065 ARE LUCKY 



YOU DON'T HAVE TO 60 
TO SCHOOL OK SET A 
JOS OR ANYTHING ! 


'THOSE "ANYTHIN65' 
L CAN 6ET TO YOU 


t-O 



BOOKS 


TALES OF A LONG NIGHT 


BLONDIE 


ACROSS ‘ 
10W 
5 Muffles 
iOPahoehoe 

14 Toast covwriTi p 

15 LOce argon 
1* Desiccated 

17 Mosel tributary 

18 This may be 
posted 

18 Violet 
container 
20 Rosalind’s 
lover 

22Prospero's 

servant 

24 Little corn 
Brower 

25 Tree or resort 
28 Pierre and 

Helena 

38 Ruffe' cousins 

34 Waody'ssaa 

35 JeuneflDe 

37 Intimidate 

38 Spanish estuary 

39 Concurs 
41Mapabbr. 

42 Transcript 

44 Ombuor poan 

45 Proper 
48 Vezsants 
48 Dandle 

D inmonti 
m Acclaims 

52 Baltique, e.g. 

53 Desdemona’s 

husband 

56 PosQmmus's 
servant 


60 Hat-trick 
component 
81 Prevent 
.83 Tide type 
84 Jennifer of 
WXftp 
65 Legendary 
being 

86 Former 
Genovese 
magistrate 

87 Joy’s lioness 

88 Utopias 

89 Soon 

DOWN 


1/25/88 

23 Gives 
temporarily 

25 Avers 

26 Two-wheeled 
vehicles 

27Prospero’s 

aide 

28 Flat: Comb, 
form 

29 Least likely 

31 Vichyssoise. 
e.g. 

32 Journalize 

33 Instructions to 
a printer 

36 Dirk of yore 

39 Of a radon 


WE2_i.. WHAT'S EVHW/BCOV) 
LOOKIN' AT ? 



By Alfred Doeblin. Translated from the 
German bv Robert and Rita Kimber. 486 
pp. Cloih S 18.95. Paper S12.95. 

Fromm. 560 Lexington Avenue, 

New York. N. 10022. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

>ast vear or two the Goman 


Montmartre, now in Germany, and daborat ej 
on the already elaborate legend of her patro; 
saint, Theodora. 

We would have a firmer sense of our bearlf/ * 
ings if tbe stories were set in a more consistent 
ly realistic framework. Bui the Allisons live in: 
dreamlike atmosphere, where events tend tt 





obey [heir own looking-glass logic and symbol 
oroliferate like tropical vegetation. Edward’. 


-\W '+ ? 


BEETLE BAILEY 


40 


1 Just fair 

2 Winged 

3 Close securely 

4 Hamlet’s 
friend 

5 Distribution 
problems 

8 P. Wylie's 

"Nirfit 

Nlgfit M 

7 Cachar, e.g. 

8 Ambler and 

Knight 

9 Renders 
penniless 

lfl “Titus 
Andronicus" 
heroine 
31 Bedouin 

12 Passport 
stamp 

13 Yemeni 
capital 

21 Common 
negative 

'<£> New York Tana, edited by Eugene Malabo. 


They can bring 
the house down 


43 PQlooius's 

daughter 
45 Prospero’s 
daughter 
47 Some fodder 
49 Dos’ followers 

51 “1 a lass 

. . Wither 

53 Leer's kin 

54 Dibble or burin 

55 Painter 
Holbein 

56 Sch. authority 


AS FAR AS PO&S GO, YOU 
CAM WAVE YOUR COLLIES, 
POOPLES AMP TERRIERS... 






□□□ 

□PO 


□ 





ANDY CAPP 


58 Desdemana's 
detractor 

59 Type of 
tournament 

62 Dir. from 
Madrid to 

Barcelona 



WIZARD of W 


DENNIS THE MENACE 

B 



O VER the past vear or two the Gt 

novelist .Alfred Doeblin has aroused more 
interest in this country than he ever did during 
his lifetime, thanks partly to Rainer Werner 
Fassbinder’s film version” of “Berlin Alexan- 
derplauf and partly to the appearance of an 
English translation of “November 1918." 
Doeblm’s trilogy about the abortive German 
revolution led bv Rosa Luxemburg and Karl 
LiebfcnechL Neither work, however, will do 
much to prepare readers for Doeblin's last 
novel, which he began in 1945 toward the end 
of his exile in Hollywood and finished in Ba- 
den-Baden the following year, and which has 
now been translated as “Tales of a Long 
Night” (A literal rendering of the original title 
would be "Hamlet or the Long Night Comes 
to an End. - which spells out one of tbe book's 
major themes more clearly.) 

“Tales of a Long Night" is the stoiy of a 
young Englishman called Edward Allison who 
loses a leg during World War II and returns 
home a nervous as well as a physical wreck, 
tormented by doubt and anger, and obsessed 
with what seems to him the mystery of where 
the blame for the war really lies. He is released 
from a clinic in the hope that living among his 
family will hasten his cure, but he simply 
transfers his fixation with hidden girill to the 
domestic fronL 

In an effort to exorcise his demons, the 
Allisons and their friends start telling a series 
of stories, man y of them variations on ancient 
myths and legends. Some of these tales serve to 
reveal the character of the storyteller, others as 
a riposte or as a comment on what has gone 
before. .Ail of them are meant to advance the 
psychological and spiritual action. 

Edward's father, for example, confirms his 
reputation for stripping away romance by re- 
counting a version of the story of the trouba- 
dour Rudel and his quest for the Princess of 
Tripoli, in which the princess — the original 
Princess Loimaine — turns out to be a hideous 
old crone. Edward's unde, a sagacious scholar 
equally at home with Celtic myth and Eastern 
wisdom, declines his nephew’s request to tell 
tbe story of Hamlet (it would come too close to 
borne) but offers instead to tell the true story of 
Lear, in which the king emerges as a ravenous 
middle-aged brute laying waste his own king- 
dom. a very different proposition from Shake- 
speare's Lear — and one in whom Edward 
thinks he can see the moral lineaments of the 
father he detests. 

Many of tbe tales of Doeblin ‘s long night 
have an undoubted lurid power. But there are 
too many of them, and they ramify too rapidly. 


lather, in particular", is as much of a gargoyle a 
half the char acters in the tales he ana hi- 
companions exchange — indeed, for much a 
the tunc be is rather disconcertingly referred it 
by the name of one such character, a mysteri 
ous figure called Lord Crenshaw. 

The unreality is heightened by an English -- 
setting that is m some respects quite werirfly 
un-English. Perhaps this is a deli berate effect . 
on Doeblin’ s part, a parody of England as il 
used to be portrayed in country-house detec- : . 
live stories. 

In tbe final stages of the book the distinction ' 
between framewmk. and fantasy starts to break ' 






- "-«* r 

Vt3 




*- , 

: -t 5. 


down completely. Edward’s mother embarks - 
i surreal journe 




on a surreal journey in the course of which she - 
changes her name, enters a beauty rfmic that is- - 
described in terms of a witches’ kitchen, en- •• 
gages in philosophical dialogues with a wealthy 
lover, and goes on the stage as part of a mind- . - 
reading act We move from England to France, ;■ 
but it all remains deeply Teutonic. : 

Yet through the haze it is possible to discern - 
a continuous story unfolding. Edward learns . 
something about his parentage that seems to 
mak e sense of hi s emotional predicament, and . 
then has to unlearn it Love and hate are not so' 
easily located as he supposes, deceptions are , 
not so easily unmasked. And in the end he is 
cured of his neurosis, or at any rate set on the . 
road to recovery, through a combination of 
faith and self-awareness. 

A family reunion shadowed by guilt, the 
borderland between therapy and salvation — . 
there are some curious parallels between ' 
“Tales of a Long Night" and the plays of T. S. . 
Eliot. At its deepest levels it is heavily colored' ' . ■ 
by Doeblin's religious convictions — anagnos 
tic Jew. he converted to Roman Catholicism in 
1940 — and there can be no doubting the 
seriousness with which he devotes himself to 
major themes. But as a novel the bode is too- 
cluttered and too melodramatic to achieve' 
more than a limited and fitful success.; 




-fi} 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York * 
Times. 


-- 


Missouri’s Hannibal Inrites 
Worid to Mark Twain Fete ; 


- i.mh 


We move through an expressionist phantasma- 
goria from a wayward b 


jus in Los Angeles to 
Pluto and Proserpina, by way of Michelangelo 
and Salome and a mock -medieval tale about 
tbe Virgin. Edwards mother. Alice AUisou {a 
significant name, we can be sure), spins vari- 
ants of a story about a mother who waits for 
her son to come bad: from the war, now in 


United Press International . ~* 

NEW YORK — John Lyng, the mayor of; 
Hannibal Missouri, extended an invitation to' 
“the nation and worid” to the 150th birthday,; 
celebration of Mark Twain. "Hannibal' pos- 
sesses to this day the neighborly, hometown} 
flavor which is so dearly portrayed by! Mark' 
Twain in bis tales of Tom Sawyer and Huckle- 
berry Finn,” Lyng said. '■I 

Twain, born in Hannibal on Nov. 30.11835,.;-, 
died April 21. 1910.. The May to Nov^ntirerijjj 
celebration will indude fence p ainring cazh-j 
tests, a Becky Thatcher look-alike competition,"^ 
exhibits, films, concerts and the largest flotilla ^ 
of slemwheeler steamboats assembled in mod- J 
era times. Ns! 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


N the diagramed deal 
d South em- 


Unscrambie mesa tour Jumbles, 
one letter to eacti square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


NORCO 

nn 


£ SABSY 


( 



o North an 

ployed a "Lebensold" se- 
quence en route to four spades. 
North's two no-trump forced 
three dubs, and the three-dia- 
mond cue-bid was a Stayman 
action that denied a diamond 
stopper. 

West got the defense off to a 
good start by leading the dia- 
mond ace and continuing with 
tbe queen. This forced dummy 
to niff, and Son lb led a spade 
to the king, losing to the ace. 
The diamond jack forced an- 
other ruff in dummy, and the 
play of the spade jade revealed 
the bad break. South cashed 
three heart winners and 
reached this position: 


NORTH 

♦ — 

vj 
c- — 

* A 10 B 3 


WEST 

* — 

9 — 

* 64 
*Q53 


EAST 
♦ 10 3 
9 — 

« — 

*K»4 


to niff so a club was discarded... 
One dub trick was lost and • 
East's attempt to preserve a"N 
trick failed. 


trump 


SOUTH 

♦ Q9 

9_ 

O 

♦ J 76 


NORTH 

♦ J 676 

♦ J 6 6 5 
O K 

♦ A 10 8 3 


If South had been wining to 
guess the location of the dub 
nine; he could have made the 
contract, leading to the ten in 
the actual position of leading 
to the eight if West had that 
card. 

Instead be played for an er- 
ror by East by leading to the 
club ace and playing the bran 
jack. As he hoped East refused 




SOUTH (D) 

♦ K Q 9 3 
P AKQ 
O 10 9 8 

* J76 

Both aides were vulnerable. The 


J 


a;-# 


balding : 



1 ; . ‘ 


Sooth 

WeM 

North 

Eest 


1 N.T. 

2 0 

2 N.T. 

Pen 

• T 

3* 

Pan 

3 0 

Peso .'. 


3* 

Pan 

4 * 

PlSS -i ■ 

* - 

Pass 

Pan 





Wan led tbe dhwnnnd ace. 


DIMFOY 


_u_ 

J 


lODONELi 


□ 

ID 



Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


— •■‘Txnm-m’ 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles HAZEL ABOUT GIBBON BESIOE 
Answer The wheel was considered man's greatest 


Invention until he got this— BEHIND IT 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

BarcetoM 

Belgrade 

Rerun 

Brunets 

HcMmt 

B u dapest 

Co pen h a g e n 

Casta on) Sol 

DabOn 

Edinburgh 


Frankfurt 


HatsJMd 

Istanbul 


HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 





F 



c 



F 




7 

45 

tr 


31 

88 

22 

72 

d 


38 

1 

34 

0 

BM|I no 

2 

36 

-9 

16 

Ir 


64 

8 

44 

a 

Hone Koog 

20 

« 

16 

61 

r 

10 

58 

£ 

43 

d 

Manila 

31 

18 

25 

77 

d 


57 

7 

45 

d 

New Delhi 

21 

fll 

8 

46 

tr 


39 

0 

32 

Ir 

Seoul 

-2 

28 

■7 

19 

tr 

4 

39 

0 

32 

d 

5hc«0lxH 

6 

43 

2 

36 

a 




SB 

a 



<8 

25 

77 

o 

3 

38 

2 

36 

a 

Taipei 

19 

66 

15 

59 

o 

2 

36 

-1 

30 

e 

Tokyo 

* 

43 

3 

38 

o 

16 

7 

61 

45 

9 

-3 

48 

34 

tr 

a 

AFRICA 






1 

34 

-3 

26 

o 


IB 

44 

9 

48 

Cl 







a 

48 

8 

44 

d 







34 

75 


41 

tr 



1 




1* 










Harare 

25 

77 

12 

54 

r 


Lisbon 


Nice 
Oslo 
Paris 
Prasue 

RavtUavtk 


0 
IS 
-It IS 


14 41 
7 45 


Stockholm 


_ 28 

0 32 fr 

1 34 fr 
a 18 r 
-I 30 SM 
S 46 h 

-12 18 sw 
24 


LUH 

Nairobi 

Trail 


82 24 75 
61 15 5V 
64 II 52 


LATIN AMERICA 


WS 23 73 SO M O 

Utna 23 73 IV 66 a 

Mexico City 22 72 8 46 fr 

Rlode Janeiro — — — — no 

Sao Paata — — — — na 


-I 30 


Venice 
Vienna 2 36 

Warsaw 1 34 

Zurich 1 34 

MIDDLE EAST 

-2 2S 

IV 6* 

14 57 

15 59 

22 n 


S NORTH AMERICA 


mkt . 

Bninrf 


Jerusalem 
Tri Aviv 

OCEANIA 


-5 23 fo 

10 50 tr 

-1 30 Ir 

7 45 (r 

7 45 fr 


Lai Amities 
Miami 


Auckland 23 73 18 *4 Hi 

Sydney 23 73 20 « cl 

cLckwdv; ta-toogv: ir-fair: h-hoii: 
sIkJ uMi'i. mmow; st-starmr. 


19 

New York 1 

San Francisco II 

Snaffle 6 

Toronto 4 

WnlMP 5 

Mwerast; nc-ocrtlv 


32 O 
46 0 

36 -5 
28 -7 
48 -IS 
2t -6 
81 16 
57 S 
48 10 
70 8 

14 -12 

23 -10 

46 10 
34 -5 
52 5 

43 I 

24 - 6 
41 -1 
aoudy; 


26 d 
32 d 
23 d 
19 sw 
14 fr 
21 sw 
41 fr 
41 d 
50 PC 
44 tr 


21 sw 
30 fr 
r-raln; 


FRIDAY'S FORECAST -—CHANNEL; Rouetv FRANKFURT: Rain and snow. 


Temp. 4—0 139 — 32). LONDON: Clotidv with ratn. Tama, to— 4 (50 — 39). 
MADRID: Fair. Temp. 7 - 0 145— 32). NEW YORK: Cloudy. 0- -4 (32—21). 
Ram. Temp. 6 — 2 (43 — 34). ROMS: Ctaudv. Tema 14 — 8 (57 — 46). 


PARIS 

TEL AVIV 


am. Tv 

: Fair. 


Tema. 21 — 9 (70 — 48). ZURICH! Rain. Tema. 2—o (36 —321. 


BANGKOK: Fensv.Tefnp.32 — 24 (10 — 75). HONG KONG: Fair. Temp. 14 — 22 
(57 — 721. MANILA: ~ “ 


(57 — 721. MANILA: Ciouav. Tema 31—23 (88—73). SEOUL: Fair. Tema 
■1 — 8 (30—1*1. SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Tema 31—25 (88 - 77). 
TOKYO: Snow. Temp. 6— 3(43— 38). 


46) Atoll Free 

1000 Acfc lands 

7950 AonlcoE 
MOOAarulridA 
48V95 Aif Energy 
iimo Ana Nat 
49*0 AtaomaSi 
520 AfKbrg WA I 
125 Arocen 
_ 2*0 Arouse or 
24700 Atco I f 
18990 BP Canada 
33816 Bonk BC 
2647*5 Bank N S 
14*15 Berrlck a 
1650 Baton A I 
40975 Bonanza R 
11484 Brotome 
37HW Bra ma lea 
1550 BrendoM 
113855 BCFP 
66135 BC Res 
31538 BC Phone 
11253 BrVRSWfc 

20339 Sudd Can 
*4150 CAE 
300CCLA 
99800 CDiltb B f 

47749 Cod Fry 
15140 C Nor Was! 
1700 C Pockrs 
WS3* Can Trust 
. 458 C Tuna 
1012S CGE 
**7«9 Cl Bk Com 
1470 0 Cttn Not Res 
322075 CTlraAf 
UM1* C (Jill B 
500 Cara 
«932 Cetan es * 

25 CHUM 

59900 C Dtelb A 
59S00 CDIlib B I 
52*78 CTL Bank 
BOOConventrs 
ITOOConwesI A 
iTSQocaseka R 
1000 Cwsi A 
1200 Craw m 
37000 Ciar RaS 
443090 Dean Dev 
900 Daon A 
30250 Denison A 
4*70 Denison B f 
MODevelcan 
8050 Dlduisn A I 
280 Didcnsn B 

moo Demon A 
239090 PotoCD A 
7900 Du Pont A 
1BS00 DVlexA 



34 — Vl 
17 17 

12W 12^— 
M 6U 

21 Vi 
15V j 141* + 3b 


*21Vj 20% 

524 24 24'* -f 

*174* 17M 174k 
SUV, 1t(* llta+Vk 
583* BV* 87*4- Vs 


*26 25M 24 + 1* 

*6J* 6 6Vb 

flflk U 14 — to 
145 140 140 —5 

*16 15*6 16 + 1* 

430 410 425 —5 

32* Ok SVa— Ms 

S17V. 171 * 171* + % 
S9V» 91* 91*+ 1 * 

sum 111 * iita+to 
2*0,. 355 260 +2 

S22V, 22V* 22M+ V. 
S]5Vj 14V» ISta+IM 
S19M — — 


19 


m* 18% 

*UVi 16V. 16V. 
*27% 27 vs 273* + Ik 
*6 5M 6 + 4* 
*151* IS 15 
*2* 733b 23*.+ V, 

W* 29M 29M+ Vb 
S32VS 32 32M+V6 

S14'(. 14 14V. + ■* 

543 6 U* 43 +3 

*31V* 31M 31V* — V* 
35V* 33 Vs 35 — 1 
*11 10M 11 + H 

517M 17 17V* + 

*1U* llto U9S 
JS7V, 7VS 7M+ V* 
538V* 381* 38 VS — 1*4 
M 5to 6 + V* 

*4,. 5M 6 + V* 
SUM 10M I1M + 
450 44$ 450 +20 

SBM IVs 8 M + M 
270 260 260 —6 

112V!, 12V* 17V* 
5I7M 17 17V. + Vk 

154 148 154 +4 

298 297 397 — 1 

330 325 330 +35 

51 SM 15M ISM— 
*MM 14V* 14M 
WV. BM 9M + to 
445 435 *35 —15 

4*0 4*0 4*0 

295 280 307 +2 

126M 25V, 26 + 

*17 16M 17 * Vk 

S32V. 32 33 ♦ tt 


3300 EtattMm X 
1450 Equity Swr 
5535 FCA Inti 
15300 C Falcon C 
30350 Fienbrdue 
20 Forty Rt. 
4*oo Fed Ind A 
33000 Fed P ten 
13500 F City Fin 
3500 Fraser 
_300 Fruehauf 
23400 GendisA 
30600 Geoc Comp 
14299 Ceecrvde 
12900 CHbraftor 
74550 GokJcoru r 
OOOGaadvear 
500 Grandma 
1BS0GL Forest 
3260Grevnnd 
10389 H Group A 
3100 Hawker 

lUBSHsmO 

_ II H Bar Co 
45S0S fmasco 
22 S 0 I ratal 


430 410 415 —15 

S 6 M 4M 6 M + 

SI9M 18V, 19V* + V* 
*l7Vr I4M 17V- + Vi 
589 88 V. 89 + V* 

55 24S 2S0 

M9M 19V* 19**— M 
*31 31 71 — Vi 

SUM. UK life— U 
*18 173* 1726— i* 

518V. 18V. 18V* 

*24 2Sfe 25M+M 

*11 10*s II 

236. 220 221 + 1 


S9M 

9U 

9to— to 

ss:x 

480 

495 —17 

*38 

38 

38 

45 

45 

45 — 4 

sasi* 

85 

as 

S2H* 

25 

2SV.+ 36 

S7to 

7to 

709+ to 


*19% )PM I9M — Vs 

*34 2Tu 733b + Vs 

JIM* 18fe 1 SVa 
54PM 48M 49tu + 
514 I3M 13M- 


500 Inal to 
243 inland Go* 
4435 Intpr Pipe 
11200 IvacoB 
120* Jannack 
3700 Kam Katlo 
400 Kebey H 
1000 Ken- Add 
3*312 Lotoatf 
2»8 Lac Mnrto 
2900 LOrrf Cem 
350 LOCOOO 
300 1_L Lac 
4200 LeMawCa 
946MDSHA 
39491 MctonH X 
305*1 iwertand E 
451S3MoUonAf 
3900 MoJ son B 
TOOMurpbv 
JtfSO Notofsco L 
57293 Noronda 
MB? Moreen 
243576 Nva AHA I 
1049 MawscoW 
HUNUWllwA 
2500 Oak wood 
15400O*haw«AI 
3050 PariKtur 
4760 PanCan P 
9100 Pembina 
1400 Phonlx 0(1 
2040 Pine Point 
aoqpioceGOo 
36007 Placer 
514* Proviso 

1700 Due Stura a 
50400 Ram Pet 
530 0 Rayrodt I 
5082s Redoatfi 
207197 RdStgnflS A 
25100 Reidthold 
3500 Res Servf 
1105 RevnPrp A 
45*8 RoaereA 
5500 Rama) 

1450 Rothman 
19W0 Sceptre 
soascumt 
56173 Sear* Can 
aoeisMHCa) 

62*7q Bwerrin 
5WJ Slarer B I 
148*4 Souttim 
2550 SI Bredcst 
85359 SletaoA 
ZBBSuiPtro 
5 Sleep R 
laOSuncorpr 
694* Svdnev e 
7800 Talc orn 
7nao Tara 
910 Tack Cor A 
165061 Teck B I 
75 Teledme 
lioa Top Can 

1524 Thom N A 
80710 Tar Dm Bk 
67084 TarWar B f 
10*550 Traders A I 
saoTrraMt 
11300 Trinity Res 
58723 TmAlfO UA 
13240* TrCan PL 
3Z2Trimac 470 

40 Trl»c A I 

43D900 Turaef 
*B49unlcerp Al 
OtO* U Entnrtoe 
IOOQU Kene 
3QSQU Stocee 
330Q Von Per 
32200 Verstt A I 
595Q vestg ran 
4954 Wekhmd 
79587 Weelmin 
6300 Weeton 

■7793 Wapdwd A 
UK rt Bear 


*12 12 12+1 
SUM 14M 148k— to 
SUM 34M 34M+ to 
*181* 18to 18M 
S12V. 12 12 — 

100 100 100—2 
S34fe 36M 36fe + 
S14to 14 14 

*23 72V, 73 

Site* 26M 2*M— M 
510*-. Wto HWs— to 
rtOH IBM IOM + 
*29 2Bfe IT' 
S19V* 19V» 19fe 
STSto u IS — to 
SHfe 25V. 25M— V* 
475 4*0 470 

*T7Vl 17 17V. + M 

S14M I486 14M + M 
*20 19M 19M + to 

S24M 248i 24M+ to 
S20M 20 20V. + to 

*15M UM ISto + U 
*7fe 7V, 7V»+ M 

S19to 19'A 19to 
60 58 t0 


485 485 485 -15 

*24 238* 24 + 

470 455 455 —IS 

S27M 27 27 

*17 168* 17 

S7V. 7M 7W 
SOU, 23 Vj 23M 
I« 105 105 

S24M 24 V, 24M— 
SlTVi 16M 17 + M 
390 375 390 +10 

Kfe Sto 5fe+ fe 
*7M 7 7 — to 

S37V) 3181 32 — fe 
S19M 198k I9to+to 

178 175 175 — 3 

115 IIS 115 —5 

» 8M Bto+to 
*12to 12to 12M + to 
*431* 431* 43M— '* 
SSfe SM 5M 

*18to 18to 18V, + v* 

*78 * Tto 7M+ to 
* 228* 1 32to 22Vl + to 
STto Tto 78k + to 
*10 9to 9to 
*568* S5Ml 54 V, + 1 
SUM 128* 1286+ V* 
5238k 3V. 23to+ M 
2A5 730 230 

215 215 215 —3 

*24 V. 341k 24V* + U 



27 — I 
82 +3 
17 to — to 
llto+ to 
llto + M 
iim life + to 
358 ft 35 to+ to 
~ 53 V. + 1 

in* 


*17*4 

17Vj 

17to+ to 

*21 Vi 71 to 21to + 

*7to 

716 

7to— % 

S5V* 

5to 

SV9 

sa% 

122 

Z3Vi 

21(6 

23 Vt+ fe 
22 + to 

450 


—15 

SO 

23 

23 — V. 


*1 SI 59 +9 
Wto 8 Sto + M 
S13 12*. 13 

Wto 9to 9to 
134 HD 124+4 
225 220 225 + 5 

68k + 

*12 llto llto 
517 _ 17 17 

*12to III* 12 + 
wo, 7a 80 +4to 
*118* llto llto 
siOM to*, wto 


Total sole* I8.949J54 shores 


ABN 

ACFttataina 

Aeoan 

AKZjO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A-Dam Rub 

Amrotxmk 

BVO 

B u ahrma nn T 
Cakmd Hldo 
Eisevler-toDU 
Fofcker 
GWBre„ 

H e in e ken 


KLM 



Claw Prev. 
I Bayer Xypo. 320 323 

Be ver.Ver .Bank 340 345 

373 377 

I Commerzbank 177 173J0 

1 ConHoumml 122.10 171 JO 

Daimler Benz 628 633.50 

34* 347 

| Deutsche Babcock 156 160 

I Deutsche Bank 397 400 


Or .. 
OUBSdtalhe 

Ighh 

iHoditlef 


Nat Redder 

Naditovd 
Oce VandarG 
Pakhoed 
Phi dps 


Roilnco 
RorentQ 
Royal Dutch 
UnJ lever 
Van Ommeren 
VMF Stark 
VNU 


49 BO 5030 
293 293 

15090 159 

304 303 

72 73JC 

60.10 5970 
74J0 7190 

U5AO 135B0 
67.90 £740 
.nun a en 
I83J0 182JD 
338J0 33590 

29.10 38.90 
14* 14*50 

22050 220 


ANP.Ctvs General 
Prevfowi :194B* 

Source.- AFP. 


Brussels 


Arbad 


Cocker! 1 1 

EBES 

GBL 

GB-lnno^M 

Gevaert 

Hoboken 

KretHelb onk 

Putiuftna 

Soc General* 

Satina 

Sotvay 

T radian Elec 

vr 


1430 1410 
4603 4500 

243 263 

3*30 2830 

1995 NA 

2000 2965 
3758 3700 
5900 59*0 
7650 7640 
6660 6730 
1790 3250 

7290 7200 

3915 7940 

3930 3895 

5340 5310 


Baaree index : LM6X4 
Prevtoas : UJ3SJ3 

Source; AFP. 


Frankfurt 


AEG Tetefunken 10450 10650 
Allkmz Vers 1064 1070 

Bast 177 JO 17950 

Borer 1S7J0 18950 


KOU USod 

Kanrtod! 

Kauthal 

KHO 

Ktacduier Werka 
Krupp Stahl 
Unde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesmann 

Mata H eeeeil i c h afl 

MuendvRuedv 


Ruefaers Werlw 

RWE 

S chertno 

Siemens 

Thvssen 

Varta 


VEW 


Vbtoewap ew wer k 19*40 201.90 


MnmarzbSN* index : 1.MT40 
Prev ta in : 1.15050 

Source: AFP. 



Bk East Asia 

2450 

3440 1 

Che-unp Kona 

1180 

CTJI 

China LtaM 

1A80 


Cross Harbor 

11 

il 

Hone Sena 

4750 

dcl\ 




HK Hotels 

3T.2S 





HK Shanghai 

9.15 

9.18 

HK Tel 

6050 

51 

HK Wharf 

VS 

£70 


72JO 

tun 

FTA' wa 

■7. 1 

II 


9JB 



555 



18 

It/. I 

SHK Props 

950 

940 1 


620 


Shrtux 

157 

145 

Swire Podflc A 

2550 

25 

Wheel Mor 

1 

NjQ. 

WheeloeX 

. 450 



Other Markets jan. 24 

Closing Prices in local currencies 


Ctove taav, 

5L40 530 

1.94 1.97 


*ta— Sen g ladex :1JS457 

Prevtaas : 1,357+4 

Source: Renter* 


Johannesburg 


AECl 

740 

745 

Barlows 

1045 

HJ7S 

Blwoor 

1825 

ms 

Bufds 

7200 

7300 

Elands 

1368 

1370 

GFSA 

2150 

2050 

Harmony 

2800 

2825 

Kloof 

7X25 

7800 

Neobank 

1008 

975 

Pst Stare 

*150 

6250 

Rustotaf 

1740 

1740 

SA Brews 

*30 

440 

St Helena 

3325 

3500 

Scaol 

575 

515 

Composite Stadtlodax: 148278 


Ptw Weag :lA 0 yje 


London 


AACora 

SlOto 

S10»* 

rrn am 

175 



SB ft. 

S«» 








512 

514 

OJkJT. 

358 

358 

Beechcm 

378 

380 

BICC 

255 

211 


38 

38 

BOC Group 

295 

295 

Boats 

183 








Bril Home SI 

254 


Bril Telecom 

127to 


BTR 

454 


Burmah 

220 



167 


N, i ir jm 

205 


Coats Pa Ions 




49* 



141 

145 


488 



391 


Dbtmrrrs 

308 

3IB 

Drietontetn 

SXP* 

S3to 


3Sto 

Bto. 

FI sons 

joe 



Canadian Indexes Jan. 24 1 


aese Prevtaas 
Montreal 117 jh 

Toronto 7.57590 1509,90 

Montreol: Stadc Exchange Industrials Index. 
Toronto: TSE 300 Index. 


Montreal 


lisoo Bank Menl 
15*80 Can Bath 
20520 DomTxtA 
3200MntTrst 
19 3993 NOTBUCdO 
7250 Power Corn 
4900 RaiiandA 

83180 Royal Bor* 
*50 RnvTrsJeo 
Total Sales 3.1B0J49 


HWi Law Clesa Cbge 


S28Vb 

S17to 

8I2V3 
*13 
I15to 
SBto 
*1586 
*31 to 
117to 
shorea. 


_ „ 27to— to 
17V. iTu 

12 U - to 

12*1 I Tto 
IB* 158*+ to 
17\ 27Tb— to 
]5ta 15M+ M 
3086 30M— to 
17M 1786+ to 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


oehb aaaao □□□□ 
DEED H3QI3Q 
nnno □□□□□ 



□□nnnHaa 
nE0Q 0[a[iaH anna 
□B 00 niiaan aaaa 
qehb Bagno maaa 


1/23/88 


CMte Prtr 
*20to S21M 
700 2 04 

2tt6 3Q9 
1211/321213/32 
M 298 
238 240 


734 

333 

441 

SM 

19S 

542 

177 

283 

125 

412 

349 

634 

soa 

US 

218 


5S7to S87to 
324 330 


Free 51 Ged 
QEC 
GKN 
Gkntoc 
Grand Met 
Gulm>e*5 
GU5 
Hanson 

Hawker 
ICI 
imps 

VlATCb Bank 
Lonmo 
Lucas 

Mark sand So 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
Pllklnpton 
Ptassev 
Rocal Elect 
Rpnd l ontain 
Raik - 
Raedlntl 
Routers 

Royal Dutch c 4553/64 
RTZ 
Shell 
STC 

std Chartered 
Tata and Lvie 
Tesce 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. group 
T rota I oar Hse 
THF 

Uhramar 
Unilever c 123/6411 61/i 
united Biscuit* 205 fee 

Vickers 225 22 s 

W.Deep S33M NA 

WJtaldhtas S27to *27M 

War Loan 3to 34to 34M 

Wool worth 614 610 

ZCI 16 141* 

F.t.m index : erut 

Previous : 109X7* 

Source: AFP. 


574 

334 


70S 

264 

514 


232 


373 

ISS 

196 


582 

335 

45*. 

649 

70S 

3* 

514 

«« 

236 

4S2 

3/B 

154 

1W 


Milan 


Banco Cun an 

Centrale 

Ctaahatels 

Cred Ital 

FarmHaila 

Flat 

Flnsklar 

Generali 

1 F 1 

italcemwiTl 

Mediobanca 

Man led Ison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rtaascenie 

SIP 

Snlo 

stoma 

MIB ladex: 1110 
I to Vl lftB I it is 


17550 17500 
2450 2479 
5*35 5770 
MA 2150 
9600 9650 
2321 2309 

55 5175 
37610 3769Q 
6740 6730 
76500 76000 
76430 75000 
1470 1453 
6350 6399 
2136 212S 
67000 67450 
55150 545 

2070 2138 
2501 2511 
9080 9210 


Paris 


r metal 
LafaroeCop 
L e erond 
rOreol 
Matra 
Mlchelln 
MM Pennar 
Moet Hsmessy 
Moulinex 
Nora-Eir 
Occldentate 
Pernod Rtc. 
Patra t ii Use I 
Peugeot 
PoOata 
Prlntemp* 
PtxUolecAn 
Redoule 
Rauseei Uckrt 
Skis RouMnoi 
SourJ B errler 
Teiemecan 
Thomson CSF 
Valeo 
Agefl ladex : I9A49 
Prevtaas: 19*54 
CAC index : 19&5B 
Previous : ltut 
Source: AFP. 


Close Prev 

77J50 74 

400 M>1 


2480 201 

1B55 iaoo 
802 709 

66X0 63.10 
1975 T975 

101J0 100 JO 
81 79 

700 672 

705 700 

757 25*50 
274 25530 
5250 S3 

18530 1B2 

234 225 

1219 1215 

1*15 1*01 

1935 1935 

464 455 

2Z75 2275 

4*9 4*5 

2J5J0 23X50 


1 Singapore I 

Bauttead 

148 

147 

Cold Storage 

142 

243 



ifi 




Haw Par 

148 

141 


243 

247 

Keppel Ship 

141 

141 

Mai Banking 

£40 

US 

OCBC 

440 

BAD 

OUB 

344 

UO 

Senib Shipyard 

142 

141 




S Steamship 

145 

1JM 




uos 

A32 

426 

OUB Index .-38448 



Previous J1B2M 



Source: Overseas Union Bonk. 

| Stockholm 1 

AGA 



Alfa Laval 



A*ea 

340 

340 

Astro 

420 

420 

Attas Copco 


111 

Boikfen 



Electrolux 



Ericsson 



Essehe 



htandelsbhen 



Pharmacia 

200 


Saob-Scanto 


445 

Sondvlk 

380 

380 

5konska 



SKF 


184 

Swedisn Maich 



VOtvo 

250 

2*4 

Prevtaas :39f 40 



Source. AFP. 



Sydney I 


579 

228 


Bovygim 

BSNJGO 

Carre tour 

Club Med 

Caflmea 

Dunn 

EK-Atwilalne 

Europe 1 

GcnEwx 

Hoefte t te 


601 

585 

7«S 

2301 

1801 

1194 

255 

732 

239X0 


579 

1925 


71 Me 

ft 

568 

741 

227S 

1819 

two 

253 SO 
733 
22* 
too 
544 
1165 


ACI 

192 

195 

ANI 

250 

250 

ANZ 

474 

477 

BMP 

512 

516 

Bora! 

325 

318 

Bougainville 

in 

19) 

Brambles 

370 

370 

Coles 

400 

400 

Comalco 

235 

230 

CRA 

524 

540 

CSR 

Z72 

271 

Dunlop 

212 

214 

Eider* ixl 

306 

305 

Hooker 

201 

202 

Magellan 

220 

220 

MIM 

238 

255 

Mnr 

1B3 

IBS 

Ookbrldge 

45 

4a 

Pefco 

412 

420 

PoscMen 

273 

275 

RGC 

J7B 

373 

Santos 

510 

524 

swteh 

180 

180 


Close Frw 

Southland 20 O ; 

woodslde M » ■’ ; 

Warmald 300 778, 

All OreUaarfes index :7SXJ» 

Previous :7S*40 

Source; Reuters. 


Tokyo 




Akol 

Asahl Clwm 
ASMlI Glass 
Bank Of Tokyo 
Brldaestorte 
Canon 

DNtooonPrtnl 

Dotwo House 

Full Bank 

Full Phaio 

FulHsu 

Hitachi 

Honda 

IHI 

non 

JAL 

Kallma 

Kama l Elec Pwr 
Kao Soap 
Kaw steel 
Kirin 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Matsu Elec ind) 


4,55 Ug ' , ■■ 

& S ■■} ■ 

to %"9r.: 

STD ,5*S ■ 

1J7B 1®. 

LXM 1 : 

on » 






361 .S' 
u» iA 

272 n m., 
1AOB L*3f,.:. 

443 

328 

uw H 



Matsu Elec Works W 
Mltmb Bank ijMO 1 Jg..-V 


MltsubChem 
Mitsub Elec 
MKsub Heavy 

MHSUM5M 

Mitsui 
Mltsakastil 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NikkoSec 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yinen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Sony 

Suml Bank 
Suml Cheat 
Suml Metal 
Toliel 
Ttrisho 
Tofcoda 
Tallin 
Tk Marine 
Tk Pwar 
Torav 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
YamalcM See 
Now ladex -.TBL5S 
previses .-nyjn ... „ 
Nikkei- DJ ladex -.ILSM J* 
prev io us :llj»Jl 
Source: Atvbn. 




345 VP 

eat 4B 

5S 

534 »•'? 

wta 

mid ijm 

28 

917 

IJO i 

’ 

is 

% f 

4115 439- ... 

7J4 741 -+- 

1A10 L» 

441 

48« m 
ijno i-S 
6 15 


"*‘S V.-v 

- u 

1 i 1 fctfcPi 

’ “ “ S' S+- 


: 4 iJ-, 




Zurich 


Bank Leu 
Brawn Bavarl 
atnGeta* 

CntdH Suisse 
Electr e we m 
Gears Fischer 
Jacob Suchard 
Jelmoll 

LamNsGrr 
Nestle 
Ocrllkcn-B 
Roche Baby 
Sandaz 
Schindler 
Su»r*r 
SBC 
Switsalr 
Union Bank 
WHiierttwr 
Zurich Ins 
SBC Index; 43588 
Pieviaa* : 43UI 
Source: AFP. 



3J30 
Z*ao 

ill 

- 


urn 


31 

1490 3 • -v. -a . 


JAM 


•k 

4.179 








J 4..-^ 


- >:? 


Source: Arp. ■ V, L^_ 

HA: «wt * 

■ ■■ MIlNNIb ' NMUI 8 | h" w -L ■ 

V. 


.Z-- 

" *‘ s -* rr* A 






AS <5 












BNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


VANTAGE POINTlm Berkow 

l^oces a 


;' iA>-' 

*x 


/ilftf Tart Times Service 
* NEW YORK — Edwin Moses, 
-OS"-* 2 one-time honor student ana holder 

_.h cS^iJrf -a bachelor's degree in physics 
i Morehead College, two-time 


words. Moses, a lean 6-foot*2-inch- 
es, stood ramrod straight. The look 
in his eyes was — calm? worried? It 
was hard to say. Then he gathered 

r . himself, clutched the rest of the 

e Sht-« m u. Olympic gold medal winner, world- oath as he had been clutching the 

VreS ^ utraxad holder and a man who has white Olympic flag, and finished .world of Moses "coll 
- . ■ ^ am. VpQt been defeated in a 400-meter faultlessly. to. At 3: 17 

To many, this was as indication 

of the inner man, a prideful man 
who had taken the trouble to mem- 


of the year. Last year, among other 
awards, he was named Sports EQus~ 
traied’s Sportsman of the Year and 
ABCs “Wide World of Sports*’ 
Athlete of the Year. 

Then, suddenly, die incredible 
' — or 


P-scd\ 


hurdks race since Aug. 26, 1977 

Pn_i i/V% hof K o^ti cnmtm ia Ka 


ip. uinJ 6fc(IW Twoesi has been shown to be 
“^■Cidnerable. 

'■ mtbo,* Moses, 29, is one of the most 
nd '.m-J^^respeeted athletes in the worid. The 
i* i'i ; ^^wwd “dignity” is mentioned as of- 
ir Men in diseuwons about him as is 

;:rr-:'jC!^<f«kdie word “gifted." He is a man 
j ^chosen to represent his country and 


Jan. 13, he 

was arrested in Los Angeles. Ac- 
cording u> a charge filed later, he 

had so&ated an undercover pohee- 

orize the oath — however short — woman who was posing as a prosti- 
and bad the confidence to recite it rate. The charge is a misdemeanor, 
More this h» g p au d i ence without sod those found guSty are often 
benefit of notes. It seemed to speak fined around $50. Moses was re- 
also of his meticulous training hab- leased and given a trial date for 
its, and of the enduring qualities D-l ~ ° 


- f :or ; r^Paiofjihe U.S. Olympic Committee, as 
T^'r’dioMrdl as. being a spokes m a n , for the 
ii-.Vi United Way and the American 

r?}.’ •; .S^hjCanOBr Society and numerous com- 
< n .V.,,* Eds^jneraal enterprises. Bur Moses has 
r. ^ jpa i%beea shown to be vulnerable. 

. For one tiring — at least once — 

j... * 7 g js ^Moses fell down at the job erf tying 
cl shoelace. This was in the 1983 

1 ^e^rack and field worid champioo- 


Fcb.8. 

Moses had been retaining from a 
mfrtin g of the USOC that .ended 
around 1:30 a.m. He and a few 
others went to a discotheque, and 
after awhile be left. On his way 
hone, Moses, in his gray Mercedes, 
Sunset and 


-1 aav 


^ a^hjps hdd in Helsinki. He won his 
“ CJn4 ae : ace despite a flopping shoelace 
r'r-.--;,- hat had come untied as he bound- 
- ; 7£ t » h over the hurdles. 

- 7 . r Bui the worid wasn’t looking on 

iv‘ jr [ t*ii that. or at least the audience was 

l “Clothing like the second time Mo- 

l i.Tv’.'i^fes’s vulnerablility became appar- 
. : • ? . r7 T- 7 E at. This occmied during the open- 
-IT ^ng ceremonies of the 1984 
J „ It? iJlympics. Moses had been given 
.. - distinct honor of redting the 

- " ..." Competitors’ oath before acrowd of 

iaore than 100,000 at the Los Ange- 
— “ ■ sas s Coliseum and for an ini ema - 

.. . ioual television awfience of nearly 

*■ ■ - V hiffioo. 

__ Part way through the 43-word 

alh that he had memorized, he 
;pr :t j i . tumbled. Suddenly it was painful- 
obvious that he had forgotten the 

rriTwaiafijj 


that have him an exemplary 
athlete. 

Only be and Paavo Nurmi, the 

Flying Finn of mote than half a 
century ago, have won individual 
Olympic gold medals in the same 
running event eight years apart, stopped at the corner 
Moses’ current winning streak is Genessee. 
believed to be a record for any 
runner in any event 

Quietly, patiently, gently, Moses 
had continued to go about Iris busi- 
ness. Advertisers had flocked to 
him, wanting to associate their 
products with his nann* and impec- 
cable reputation. He earned an esti- 
mated SI milli on last year — legal 
under current amateur guidelines 


He said he stopped for a red 
light. He says that the woman came 
over and he turned down the win- 
dow “eight inches” and ‘tjoked” 
with her. The police contend that 
he solicited her. He contends that 
there was' no such intent. 

The undisputed fact is that be 
never got out erf the car. He never 
unlocked his door. He drove away. 



Johnson, Bird to Lead 
Teams in All-Star Game 


— arid it was expected he would The woman was wired and the con- 


top that this year. 

He also made lime to visit 
schools and speak to youngsters 
about the necessity not to drop out 

and to tdl than that nlhlnries 

should play a secondary role to 
academics. 

He was a family man, married, 
and the sou of educators from Day- 
ton, Ohio. 


venation was heard by two police' 
men in a car nearby. They followed 
Moses and two blocks later picked 
him up. 

Now. Moses was hardly incogni- 
to. His license plate reads OLYM- 
FYN. During the Olympics, he was 
on billboards throughout the Los 
Angeles area, hurdling at passersby 
in his red trade suit. When be was 


Gerald Henderson of Seattle passes around former Celtic teammate Larry Bird enroute to 
the StqierSomcs’ 107-97 come-from-behind upset in Boston Garden Wednesday night 

Henderson Gets Revenge on Celtics 


highest order. 

In 1983, he won the prestigious 
Sullivan Award for amateur athlete 



• *<:r- ~~V - J e . .. V 

(•tfv-Uitad Plea Manafanoi 

^^fwin Moses kisses his wife MyreBa before a Los Anodes 
• ■ * ' views conference where lie denied sofiating a prostitute. 


Moses "was a role model of the picked up, one of the officers recog- 
nized him 

“Hie officer was dismayed that it 
was Moses,” said Lt Dan Cook, a 
spokesman for tbe Los Angeles Po- 
lice Department. 

“When they saw it was Edwin,” 
said Gordon Baskin. Moses’ busi- 
ness manager, “I think they felt. 
This is a nice fish to fry.’ " 

Whatever, word of the arrest gpt 
out — Cook says he has no idea 
how — to a local television station. 
It was soon a big story, and grow- 
ing. Tt became,” said Code, “inter- 
national” 

Moses called his wife; Myrefla, 
who came to his side. And almost 
immediately Moses began receiv- 
ing numerous calls and telegrams 
of support, said B askin. 

One caller was Peter Ueberroth, 
former head of the Los Angeles 
Olympic Organizing Committee 
and now the baseball commission- 
er. “Edwin,” said Ueberroth, in 
New York, “is a giving, decent hit. 
man being. If he says he’s innocent, 
I believe him. I told him that if 
there is anything I can do to help — 
if I haw lo go back to Los Angeles 
— HI do it* 


The Associated Press 

BOSTON — Gerald Henderson, 
a starting guard on Boston's Na- 
tional Basketball Association 
champ ionship team last year, could 
think of nothing better than beat- 
ing his former teammates at home 
as a member of the Seattle Super- 
Sonics. 

“1 hoped, thought, wished, 
prayed we could come out of here 
with a win and that’s what we did,” 
said Henderson, who had 16 points 
and 15 assists to help the Sonics 
upset the Critics 107-97 Wednes- 
day night. “Our defense and execu- 
tion held up down the stretch.” 

The loss knocked Boston out of 


first place in the Atlantic Division, 
leaving the idle Philadelphia 76ers 
in sole possession of the top spot. 

The SuperSonics, four games un- 
der 300, handed the Critics only 
their second loss in 20 home games 

NBA FOCUS 

and eighth defeat in 42 outings 
overall despite trailing by as many 
as 14 points in the second quarter. 
“It was a sweet win. I wanted to 


Celtics and you really don’t expect 
to win.” said Jack Sima, who nad 
34 points and 16 rebounds and 
dominated Boston center Robert 
Parish. “So 1 guess you have a ten- 
dency to play loose and free 
— Even when we were down by 
14 points we weren’t frustrated.” 

In other NBA games, Atlanta 
edged Phoenix 101-100, Dallas 
bombed San Antonio 122-110 and 
Portland crushed In dian a 136-104. 

Seattle trailed 49-35 midway 


United Pro* International 

NEW YORK — Indiana favor- 
ites Lany Bird and Isiah Thomas 
will return to Indianapolis as start- 
ers for the 35th annual NBA All- 
Star Game, joining Magic Johnson, 
who received a record number of 
votes in final balloting announced 
Wednesday. 

Johnson, the flashy point guard 
of the Los Angeles Lakers, collect- 
ed 957,447 votes from the record 
2,852^96 cast by fans selecting the 
starters f or the Feb. 10 game at the 
Hoosier Dome. 

Joining the NBA’s assist leader 
as Western Conference starters will 
be teammate Korean AbdnJ-Jab- 
bar. It will be a record 14lh appear- 
ance for the NBA’s all-time leading 
scorer, breaking the mark he shares 
with Wilt Chamberlain, Bob Cousy 
and John Havlioek. 

Completing the starting West 
squad will be forwards Ralph 
Sampson of Houston and Adrian 
Dan dry of Utah and guard George 
Gervin of San Antonia The West 
will be coached by Pat RQey of the 
Lakers. 

Bird, Boston’s brilliant forward 
who was selected the NBA’s Most 
Valuable Player last season, and 
Detroit’s Thomas, last year's All- 
Star MVP. each have a strong fol- 
lowing in Indiana. A native of 
French Lick. In diana, Bird played 
at In diana Slate while Thomas led 
In diana University to the 1981 
NCAA Champ ionship 

Other East starters are forward 
Julius- Erving and center Moses 
Malone of Philadelphia and rookie 
guard Michael Jordan of Chicago. 
Jordan is the first Freshman named 
a starter in the All-Star Game since 
Thomas in 198X 


vote of NBA coaches is each con- 
ference and will be announced next 
week. 

Seven of this years starters were 
also starters in last year’s game, 
won by the East 154-145 in over- 
time. Sampson was a reserve and 
Malone did not play because of 
injury. 

This year's vote surpasses the 
mark of 2469,336 set last year. 
Johnson’s total breaks Malone's 
1984 standard of 927,779. Malone, 
tbe NBA’s top rebonnder, was the 
leading East vote-getter this year. 

The closest race was for the sec- 
ond West forward position, where 
Dantley edged Denver’s Alex En- 
glish by less than 12,000 votes. 
Abdul-Jabbar pulled away in tbe 
final week to beat out Houston 
rookie center Akeem Olajuwon. 


Capitals 
Have Look 
Of Champs 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 
CHICAGO — The Washington 
Capitals, formerly the doormat of 
the National Hockey L e a g u e, are 
beginning to riiow all the elements 
Of a rfiatnpinnslrip team. 

The Caps used their versatility to 
stymie the Chicago Black Hawks 3- 
2 Wednesday nig ht in an NHL 
gamp, in C hi ca g o- Washington had 

NHL FOCUS 


Either K.G Jones of the Critics . 

or Billy Cunning ham of the 76os Ae , 5 h® 1 

Sll pride the EttLlfe team thatS andumihenn^forfhathonOT 

leadfngthe Eastern Conference on 

Jaa27 will send its coach to India- ^*^(21 saves) and Bob Ma- 


come in ‘and play weR” said Hen- ^ lUc midway Jan. 27 will send its coach to India- _ 

derson, traded in the preseason af- riuwgb ti*e seara^ quarter, but the napolis. After Wednesday night’s the 

2LMSST 4 d ** 


with Boston. 

“You come in here against the 


Budd, Decker Likely to dash 

Agencc France-Presse 

BIRMINGHAM, England — 

Barefoot teen-ager Zola Budd 
could face at least two showdowns 
with arch-rival Mary Decker on the 
European grand prix track and 
field circuit this summer. 

Tbe pair have not met since their 
controversial collision in the Olym- 
pic 3,000-meter race at Los Ange- 
les. which left Decker sprawled in- 
jured on the trackside while Budd 


between the American and the 
South African-born teen-ager. 

Budd announced her plans here ^ __ u 

Wednesday saying: T wffl run the Western Conference teams, outre- 
grand prix circuit m Europe — bounded the Sonics in the first half 
probably over 3,000 meters. Tm but was beaten on the boards 26-21 


fourth to overcome the deficit. 

“We had no intensity.” said 
Larry Bird, who led the Critics with 
30 points, “Maybe we became 
overconfident and looked at tbe 
team’s record and not their person- 
nel” 

Boston, which went into the 
game with an 1 1-0 record against 


lead on Boston. 

Reserves will be selected by a 


looking forward lo running in a big 
race and if Mary Decker is there FU 
be bappy to meet her, but she will 
be just another runner * 
Commenting on her Olympic or- 
deal Budd said: Tt was taken out 


sta ggere d .on am id boos JoJiaO. iii-Qf all proportion The incident with 


seventh. 

Decker, the 1,500-meter and 
3.000- meter worid champion, plans 
to compete in Europe, and that 
could mean at least two meetings 


Decker is in tbe past and now it is 
best to look to the future. But I can 
understand people’s reaction at the 
Olympic Games because it is such a 
big event.” 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 

Basketball 


HL Standings 


NBA Standings 


NBA All-Star Teams U.S. College Basketball Leaders 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick. DtvttkM 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DMNMi 


‘ ahhiaton 
ikxMpMa 
f. IMohair* 
* _ .^tumnSt 
> ~ f. Ransars 


■<*: *7 ntr»ol 

• UNO 

• RtXK 

'* tfon 




W L 

1 

MS 

Of 



ft 

1 L 

Pet 

GB 

29 

13 

7 

65 

201 

144 

Philadelphia 

34 

7 

529 


28 

13 

6 

62 

302 

140 

Boston 

34 

8 

510 

Vt 

! 25 

19 

2 

52 

218 

186 

WOrtlngton 

24 

19 

-558 

11 

18 

23 


4ft 

165 

282 

Now Jersey 

19 

23 

532 

ISIS 

15 

22 

8 

38 

165 

186 

N«w York 

15 

29 

541 

20 Vi 

15 

21 

5 

35 

161 

191 


Central DMxtoe 



Adams Dtetataa 



Milwaukee 

28 

14 

567 



24 

14 

10 

58 

188 

158 

Detroit 

24 

16 

500 

3 

21 

13 

12 

54 

168 

133 

Odoaoa 

21 

21 

J00 

7 

-a 

18 

7 

51 

164 

167 

Atlanta 

IS 

25 

519 

lOta 

21 

19 

7 

49 

1457 

159 

Indiana 

14 

2B 

533 

14 

M 

23 

S 

37 

149 

200 

Cleveland 

11 

39 

573 

16 



CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norm DtvWun 

Louis II U I 4# M6 171 

n w 3 45 in in 

15 34 I 38 145 193 

ran U 21 4 34 171 223 

onto 9 30 6 M 139 302 

SmrUM DtvUoa 

32 9 < 79 241 157 

24 17 t 54 219 184 

24 3D 4 52 294 210 

» 19 9 47 212 199 

icouvtr 11 31 7 » 1<2 Ml 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULT'S 
ftfwrva ■ 0 1 2—3 

wealthy ns), Lawton (5). Maruk (10), 
Know 120); Rtasllmi (2), Mantha (ID. 
jkton (23). Shota oa ooal: PtltsbunA (an 
araan) 124-10-28; Minnesota (on Romo- 
15-21-13-49. 

Rtowtao .12 0-1 

EDM ■ 2 ® — 2 

aroe n l to * 2 (J7>. Erickson (151; Gardner 
^ Yoramchwk (7). Shotaoa ooaO: Wdsrihw- 
(an Shmdmkl) 13-11-3-27; ChJcaBO (on 
■ oln) 6-12-5 — 23. 

» Jersey I 1 1 — 1 

wnr 3 2 1-4 

Uaoa(14LHuntor(4),Macoun (5).N09Gsn 
. . Locto (2D), Mod mis U0); Driver (7), 
aim ni>. Son (lM.Shote on ooal: Now 
toy (on LmoM 11-12-12-35; CaJuary 
natOO 10-1*5-37. 

2 2 3-6 

1 1 2-4 

Ntan (19), MocLean 2 (25). Tvrntwil (li ). 
dhoKn rni.Oatyto (8>;Sund*tromin2), 
tab (14), Lupol (8). Starts « OQd: Wlml- 
(onBradoar) 15-14.11 — O; Vancouver (on 
MM) 15-13-74 — «L - 

0 3 0-3 
2*0-6 

onto (29), Pm (22). Redmond (4), Nl- 
ta (29)»GaOoy 2 (7); Zozel 2 (V), Sinimlo 
. s*m on mol: PMtadeMto (on Eltott 2- 
— 32 ;lm Anootox (on Undborah) 1244- 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Mktamt Division 

Dmnr 2S 17 595 — 

Houston 34 18 Sn 1 

Dallas 23 19 348 2 

San Antonio 21 21 .488 4Vi 

Utah i» 24 AC 6Y> 

Kansas City 14 27 J41 10M 

Padflc Dlvtatoo 

LA. (JOAera 29 14 ^74 — 

Phoenix 31 O 477 M 

Saattle 20 24 455 9W 

LA. CIlPfMrs 19 24 M2 70 

Portland 19 24 .442 W 

Golden Start » 31 244 18 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 

38 29 37 40—136 
21 31 29 30—104 
Paxson M-16 0-11 2fc Vandneeahe 10-15 44 
24; Stchtlng 7-12 2-2 U. WlUiann 7-16 1-1 1& 
nonn m ita; Portland 30 (M-Thamnsan 12); In- 
diana 57 (gflmnovicfi (4). Assists: Portland 
39 (Valentine 12); Indiana 23 (Skrtina. Dur- 
rani 6). 

Seattle 25 21 21 22-W7 

Boston 2* 32 74 21-97 

SHcma 14-19 64 3L Chambers s-19 H 24; 
Blrd 12-204430, McHOlO 6-11 2315. Raboands; 
Seattle 46 (SHmw 16); Boston 42 (Parish. 
MeHaio 3). Assists: Seattle 27 (Handorsn 
15); Boston 21 IBM 6). 

PtoWDlx 28 24 27 21-MO 

Atlanta as U 24 2»— wi 

Johnson 12-19 44 28. WIHdOS 11-27 03 22; 
Monee 2-1534 21. Adams 9-16 1-2 19. Rebooads: 
Phoenix 57 (Lucas 19); Attanta 51 (WHUns 
11). Assists: Phoenix 19 (Humphries 5); At- 
lanta 30 (Rivers W. 

Sad Antonio 31 20 26 St-110 

DaNas *» 26 26 »— 122 

Btachmon 11-17 5-7 27, Aauttn 8-13 2>2 18; 
Gervin U-3fi 44 3& Moore 10-19 00 21. Rt- 
boMdts; San Antonia 43 (Gilmore 9} ;Daiios36 
(Vincent 9). Assists: San Antonio 29 (Moore, 
Robertson 9)7 Dallas 28 (Davis 9). 


Flmd totals to tan vattap tor A»Skr Game 
(to bo played Fefau 10 In lixflanapaUs) 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

Cantors; Moses Malone. PhfladetoWa. 
662445; Robert Parfeh. Boston, 269410; Bill 
Labnboar, Detroit, 2MLS3D; Tree Rollins. At- 
lanta, 217,950; Alton Lister. Milwaukee. 
172JIL 

Forwards; Julius Ervin*. Philadelphia, 
591 403: Lory Bird. Boston, 564A1; Keilv Trl- 
puefca. Detroit. 46B455; Barnard Kina New 
York. 381460; Don Roundfleld. Detroit. 
23427. 

Guardi: Isitfi Thema& Detroit. 66001 7; Ml- 
catoel Jordan. Chlcaga, 608.193: SUftiev Mon- 
crlef, Milwaukee, 40U33; Dennis Japnsan, 
Boston, 282448; Paul Prossev. Milwaukee. 


NCAA’S Cortot Basketacmeodorsthrauea 

Silvrtns. Cole 

SR 14 17V 125 

JOM.21; 



NeaL Fulrtn 

SR 14 177 125 

TEAM OFFENSE 


Towns. MONMTH 

lr 13 154 115 


G (W-U 

Pis. Avg. 

PatomUzkhBallSt 

JR 15 177 115 

Oklahoma 

17 13 

41586 9X3 

Catledoe, SoAJa 

SR 16 111 1L3 

Alcorn SL 

IS 11 

41333 885 

Harper. Mia O 

lr 14 158 115 

Ukte Si. 

IS 9 

4131* 875 

Johnson, IMIehSI 

SR 15 169 115 

Baylor 

16 7 

91383 865 

Grant. UtahSt 

JR 15 10 11.1 

Southern 

IS 9 

61289 819 

Koopman. NawHom 

JR 16 176 115 

Tulsa 

16 14 

21365 85J 

Koneak, SMU 

Sr 16 176 115 

Northeastern 

13 9 

41QB8 KL7 

Kryxtkowtakjftntnd 

JR 18 195 108 

Virginia Tech 

15 12 

31255 8X7 

Brown, GWosh 

SR 12 130 105 

South Alabama 

16 11 

51336 8X5 

Tisdale, Ok la 

JR 17 183 MU 

Indiana SL 

IS 10 

51239 825 

vonas. SCtara 

BR 18 192 107 

LOYOto. IIL 

16 11 

51308 815 

Lee, Mem St 

SR 14 149 106 

Ohio St. 

14 11 

31144 BU 

Crisp. TennSt 

SR 18 189 105 

Nev^Lai Vegas 

15 13 

71222 815 



Cleveland St. 

IS 10 

51717 81.1 

FIELD GOAL PCT. 

The Citadel 

15 9 

61215 818 


Cl G PG FGA Pet 


thereafter. The Celtics also fell 
from 62 percent shooting in tbe 
first half to 54 in the second half, 
while the Sonics improved from 49 
percent to 53. 

“Against tbe Sonics. you've got 
to run,' rebound' and "be physical to ~ 
win," Bird said. “We didn’t do 
thaL” 

“Our defense in the third period 
was the key to the game,” said 
Sikma, who hit 14 of !9 shots from 
the fidd while Parish was 3-for-13 
for six points. “We didn’t give them 
second shots.” 

Boston’s 6 1-51 halftime lead fad- 
ed into a 75-75 lie after three quar- 
ters. Henderson's long f alia way 
shot gave tbe Sonics an 83-82 lead 
with 8:22 left in the game and they 
never trailed again. 


All-Star Money 
To Be Donated 
ToFamineAid 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — National 
Basketball Association players 
kicked off a drive Thursday to 
raise money for famine victims 
in Ethiopia. 

“Like all Americans, we have 
been touched very deeply by the 
situation in Ethopia,”^aid New 
York Knicks star Bernard 
King. 

The players are donating' 
prize money they will receive in 
the NBA AITS tar Game next 
month — 550,000 — to the re- 
lief effort. The league is match- 
ing the donation for a total con- 
tribution of 5100,000. 

Tbe money is lo go lo tbe 
Interaction Ethiopian Fund. 
King said the idea for the drive 
originated with Alex. English of 
the Denver Nuggets. 


center Bob Carpenter. 

Carpenter scored two goals, in- 
cluding his sixth game-winner of 
the season, for Washington, which 
has lost only four times in the last 
29 games. He now has a career-high 
37 goals in only 48 games and is 
within four of the record for an 
American-bora player, set last year 
by Joey Mullen of SL Louis. 

The Black Hawks, who have lost 
seven of their last 11 contests, were 
impressed with the Capitals. 

“There is no doubt about it 
Washington is a very disciplined 
team,” said Chicago center Denis 
Savard. “They come at you all 
night They don’t lay baric and let 
you become an offensive team. 

-“I have lo give them credit be- 
cause they do everything well and 
when you have great goal tending 
and excellent defense and great for- 
ecbecfcing, it’s an unbeatable com- 
bination.” 

Washington has won five consec- 
utive games and 13 of 16 away from 
home for a three-point lead over 
the Flyers in the Patrick Division. 

Elsewhere Wednesday night, j{ 
was Los Angdes 6, Philadelphia 3; 
Minnesota 4. Pittsburgh 3; Calgar/ 
6. New Jersey 3, and Winnipeg 6. 
Vancouver 4. (AP, UPI) 


From No. 1 in China to an Also-Ran in U.S. 


The Associated Press 

SAN DIEGO —Some two and a 
half years after defecting to tbe 
United States, tennis player Hu Na 
says she has found happiness in her 


routed by Claudia Hernandez. 
Badly overmatched in subsequent 
outings, she finished the year with 
four wins in 13 matches on (he 
Women’s Tennis Association tour. 

Hampered by injuries and her 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Cotom: Koreom Abdul-Jabbar. LA. Lak- 
ers. 55L402; Akoern Otatuwon. Houston. 
449 JUS; Dan IsseL Donvor, 259.727; Artis GU- 
tnoro. Son Arrtan to. 252J1 7; Sam Perkl ns. Dai- 
Um.23MS4. 

Forwards: Ralph Summon . Houston. 
62QA24; Adrian Dantrtr. Utah, 361327; Alex 
Ersllsti. Denver. 351,433; Marauos Johnson, 
LA. diapers, 31&S83; lorry Nance. Phoenix. 
2B7A6S. 

Oenrrti: Earvin Johnson. LA. token, 
957447; Georoe Gervin, San Antonia 452.133: 
Norm Nixon. LA. CJIoperv 386421; Dorreir 
Griffith, Utah, 361911; Jim Paxson. PorttaxL 


Fresno SL 
Princeton 
Oroaen 5L 


Transition 


-v 


BASEBALL 


• - ^,1 


4 .»TON— sgwd. Dove sox. catcher, la a 
•x feoMw contract. 


ncinkati— S toned Dana BUanfaUo Bid 
o y McGritt, catchers; Tam Brown Infl, 
./ w.and Sha ertr Barms. toBeWer.toona- 
" contracts. 

y 7USTOW— Stoned MHo Hanirton. brood- 

BT. . 

.COUl5~SonedMftaLovo01err,CBt£ft- 
i omiiwieaBue contract thouoti he erfH 
: ntaspriimiiuiidn0asononrss(ere>BV> 
okl tTolpt, CHorella. pitcher, h> Porttond 
* PbtiSc Cooet League. 

-BASKETBALL' 
ftafio mit Aaocfatton 

* evELAKD-pioasi Pout Thompson. 

■’ * « «e toiundJM. .. 

FOOTBALL 

-NsBaoa) Foottatl Leone 
:EEN Bay— N amed Chuck Hutditson 
rvlsor of oiayar' procurement. 

‘ ‘ *8PA bay— N amed Leefnsn Bennett 




tTW Odta n Peetool LHW 

l *0**TB— Trad ed Jo*' Burpee, quarnr- 


bodbtoCototaV tar Walter Bottom, defensive 
■to, ant future cornkterertons. 

Uolted Starts FootoaB LedBoe 
ARIZONA— Stoned mb Zcndehs rtoee- 
kicker, *n a gua rant eed onmeor contract. 

LOS ANGELES— Stoned Tony Boddle and 
Jason Jocobb running bocks. Aimowiced the 
retirement of Aaron Mitchell, safety. 

MEMPHIS— Cut John Pmreod* ouarter- 
agek. Added Gary Mutt auartertodt. to the 
rosier. 

HOCKEY 

Wafkwai Hockey Leagoe 

QUEBEC— Bocal lod Wo yne Grout*, center. 

from sauft Ste. Marie rflhe Ontario HoeMV 

League. Sent Won Vautour, left wfng. to Fred- 
ericton of the American Hockey League. 

MINNESOTA— Traded Mark Napier, for- 
ward, lo Edmonton In exchange tor Gord 
Shencn and Terry MarllA, fonwnls. Called 
up Dirk Orotiom. rtoW wing; Tim Trfmper. 
loft wing, and Brian Lawton, center, from 
Springfield of toe AHL 

COLLEGE 

ARIZONA— Declared Luchn MUler oar 
rtartcaliv taeltolWe for toe 1985 hw* season. 

- NORTHERN COLORADO-Nomed Ron 

Hood taottxdl coach. 


College Results 

EAST 

Boston U. 78. Maine 59 
Cantatas 75, Colgate 51 
Colby 61. Bamfoln 53 
Mawara 72. Tewson St. 71 
Pordham 77, Holy Cross 66 
Georgetown 79, Connecticut 6* 

Iona 93. La Salle 77 
Lafayette 80. BucknoU 77 
Lono Island U. 75, Wbsner 73 
Penn 86. American 71 
& Florida £A SL Peter's 61 
Slippery Rock 74. Lode Haven 64 
Si. Francis. N.Y. 62, Falrfeieh Dickinson 49 
St John's 82, Syracuse 30. OT 
St Joseph's. N.Y. 81. N.Y. Teen 68 
Vermont a, St. Michael's 61 
Vlllonova 65. Providence 57 
Wash. & Jett. 88. Bethany. W. Va. 82 
SOUTH 

Alabamo 79, VanderhlH 77 
Georgia 81, Kentucky 73 
Loublono SI. 86. Florida 66 
Mary Washington 91 Catholic 89. OT 
Memntita St. 74 Hedsta St. 69 
Mtastastad SI. B2. Tennessee 66 
H. Carolina 9t. 89, Duke 71 
W. Carodno 95, Augusta 59 
Wake Forest 81. Rider 59 
WlUtam & Mary 63. George Mason 62 
MIDWEST 
Ball St. 187, W. MfefttoQfl 87 
Case western 8Z Ohh Wesleyan 77 
DePauw 71. Ind.-Pur.-Indpi. 60 
Illinois 84 OMo 5L 66 
Kansas St. 88. OMahama SL S3 
Kent St. 80. Miami, Ohio 69 
Nebraska 85, Colorado 67 
Notre Dame 64 Davion 61 
OMo U. 50. N. Illinois 42 
OUahomo 81. hjwo St. 74 
Wichita SL 82, CreigMon 81 
SOUTHWEST 
Angelo St 68. Me Murry 67 
Arkansas 67, Rice 56 
Arfe.-Plne Bluff 9a LeMovnfrOwcn 78 
Prairie View 51. SW Texas 50 
SE OUofwma 64 NE Oklahoma S9 
Sol McthodW 54 Texas 46 
SW Oklahoma 63, E. Cent. OUahomo 9 
Texas A&M SB. Texas Tech 4? 

FAR WEST 

Azusa Pacific 64 Occfdenlal Coll. 63 
Fresno 51. 74 Utah SI. 75 
W. Oregon 59. Willamette 42 
Rocky Mountain 71 N. Montana » 

W. Montana 7ft, Montana Tech 69. OT 


Marquette 

Iowa 
Carnage 
Houston Bapttal 
Va. Military 
SL John's 
Illinois 

James Modisen 
San Diego 
SI. Peter's 


Potamb tel oJo liSI 
Catledoe. SaAla 
Williams. Ind St 
Mitchell, Mercer 
McDcbiM. WchSl 
Smith, tent-Ca 
Tisdale. Ohio 
Hoppon, Neb 
Gervtn Tex SA 
Dumars. McKees 
Huehes. Luy-il 
Harper, Mia O 
Beard. Samtrd 
Kieine. Ark 
Harris. Tuba 
Bradley, USF 
Lowts. Neactn 
Cozzens. Army 
Battle. Ruters 
Ben lam bv Crghl 
Robinson. Now 
Yates. GMason 
Battle. No III 
Rogers, uc-lrv 
Walker, Ky 
Stevens. lowoSt 
woshlngtonJJlhsi 
Moore, cram 
Cor r alling. Hrvrd 
Grier, KentSt 
Truesdale. Cllodl 
Harris. NOrin 
Grant ufahSt 
Saortitwn. BVU 
KmfkwkrthMntn 
Krarentrinkjllw 
whnars. Brodfv 
lm. Mem St 
Potties, w Mich 
Person. Auburn 
Tucker. Butler 
Stokes, (ana 
Burden. 51 L 
Hinson. Bant 
Vincent, MlrilSt 
McIntosh, forth 
Scurrv, LIU 
George, Firtri 
Taylor, BurtGm 
Hail Cants 


TRAM DEFENSE 

G (W-U Pts. Ava 
15 IB 5 818 545 
12 5 1 710 546 

15 14 1USU 
14 12 2 TBS 541 
17 17 0 957 543 

16 11 5 908 542 

11 14 41027 57.1 
76 M 5 913 57.1 
16 12 4 914 57.1 

12 1 4 690 57J 

14 13 1 889 57J 
19 15 41102 584 

15 7 8 872 6B.1 

16 II 5 932 SU 
14 9 5 821 546 

SCORING 

Cl G FG FT Pt* Ava. 
JR 15 168 56 <23 2B.1 
SR 16 169 86 434 245 
JR IS 162 67 391 241 
SR 16 156 102 415 249 
SR 16 167 77 411 247 
JR 14 164 72 400 2SJ) 
JR 17 163 98 424 249 
JR 75 14? 98 J74 249 
lr 14 126 93 345 246 
SR 14 113 117 343 145 
SR IS 156 53 365 243 
lr 14 UQ 55 335 23.9 
SR 18 IBS 60 4 30 219 
SR 18 165 96 426 217 
SR 16 142 91 377 216 
sr 15 130 86 346 211 
50 13 113 73 299 210 
SR 13 IQS 88 298 219 
SR 13 117 64 29B 219 
JR 19 162 110 434 22J 
50 14 134 71 319 228 
SR 14 109 100 318 217 
FR 15 122 92 336 224 
JR 18 153 97 403 22^ 
JR 15 114 106 334 22J 
SR 18 162 76 400 222 
SR 15 118 96 332 211 
SR 19 167 BS 419 211 
SR 11 87 68 20 225 
SR 14 119 66 304 21 J 
SR M 133 58 324 21A 
SR 16 134 97 345 21.6 
JR 15 127 68 323 215 
IT 17 133 99 365 21 S 
JR 18 132 121 385 214 
JR 14 119 61 299 21,4 
SR 16 143 57 341 2U 
SR 14 113 73 298 21 J 
JR 15 128 63 319 213 
JR 15 139 40 318 213 
SO 15 132 53 317 21.1 
SR 15 157 55 379 21.1 
sr 15 134 45 313 203 
SO U 130 72 332 208 
SR 16 120 92 322 208 
SR 17 W 79 J51 2*6 
V 16 124 81 329 205 
JR 15 119 70 308 205 
SR 15 125 56 306 204 
SR IS 18? 100 384 2U 


Harkins. Soothn 
Oedmoa Souther 
Walker. Utica 
Moore, Crghl 
Ewing, Gtown 
Slaves. Souttui 
Sol lev. GaTecti 
Scarf, NewMex 
Happen. Neb 
Thomas, Cenrty 
Hurt Afatana 
Johnson. MlchSI 
Robinson. Now 

Aiarle, Duke 
Koneak. swu 
PMCknev. Villa 
Collier, Alcorn 
wrecker, Texas 
Kleine. Ark 
Ferry. Harwnl 
Stonge, SW Ms 
Bullock, Purdue 
KrvstkowtataMnlno 
Berry. St jns 
Beniamin, Crghl 


SR 15 7B 99 785 
SR 14 (7 138 725 
SR 17 104 141 7U 
SR 19 161 232 72J3 
SR 16 104 149 <95 
JR U S3 130 695 
JR 16 106 155 ISA 
SR 17 108 163 66J 
JR IS 142 215 665 
JR 16 134 III 464 
SR 16 80 122 6S5 
SR IS 83 129 64J 
SO 14 124 193 64J 
JR 15 1M 162 642 
■T 16 112 176 635 
SR 15 78 123 635 
SR 15 K IX 63.1 
SR 16 109 173 634 
SR 18 166 262 635 
SR 11 6S 105 61.9 
SR 13 II 131 615 
SR 16 95 154 6L7 
JR II 112 214 61J 
SO 14 89 145 615 
JR 19 162 264 415 


girls who can beat you, it can be 
very unsettling,” said Vic Braden, a 
noted tennis pro and one-time in- 
structor for Hu Na. 

“I think I am just starting,” she 

adopted country despite failing to said in halting English during a ... 

achieve the lofty ranking she en- telephone interview from Key Bis- confidence shaken by losses to 
joyed in her native China. cayne, Florida, where she played in m a rgi n al players, Hu Na played 

Tennis experts give the one-time a U.S. Tennis Association touma- * ' ‘ ,n * J 

top-ranked women's tennis player meat “I played in some touma- 
in China little chance of bang a meets before I was over my inju- 
agmficant force on tbe pro dreuit, ties. After that 1 took a rest I bad 
largely because the United States injuries to my ankle, my shoulder 
and China are worlds apart in — my whole body wasn’t great but 
terms of the quality of tennis com- now 'it’s fine. I’m ready” 
petition. Hu Na’s debut after her defec- 

“When you’ve been No. 1 in a tion was disastrous. In her first 
country with 990 million and come American tournament at Erie, Pa^ 
to a place where there are 1,000 in the summer of 1983, she was 


only 18 matches in 1984, earning 
51,830 on a 7-1 1 record. 

Her outlook on the game has 
improved with passage of time and 
with the dentine in publicity about 
her July 1982 defection, which set 
off a diplomatic brouhaha between 
the United Stales and China 

She has pat down roots in San 



Cl 

G FT FT A 

Pet 

Hagan. Weber 

SR 

U 

52 

54 

96J 

Brown. TexAAM 

lr 

16 

58 

61 

95.1 

Timka Youngs 

lr 

IB 

51 

54 

WJ 

Collins. PennSt 

SR 

13 

44 

47 

9X6 

Alford. Ind 

SO 

15 

SO 

54 

924 

Elmore. VMI 

so 

11 

54 

59 

915 

Sudor. Duane 

JR 

14 

64 

7D 

914 

Les. Brad tv 

JR 

U 

42 

46 

91.3 

Buttons. So III 

SR 

16 

49 

54 

907 

Teague, RastnU 

sr 

13 

45 

50 

900 

Elliott. TenTeti 

SR 

15 

45 

50 

900 

Johnson. RJcnmd 

SR 

13 

34 

38 

895 

Harris. Tutso 

SR 

16 

91 

IK 

8U 

Cox, venal! 

SR 

15 

74 

83 

sva 

Cozzens, AriTTV 

SR 

13 

88 

99 

809 

Hale, NoCara 

JR 

17 

43 

54 

389 

Hurd, NdArtz 

JR 

17 

48 

51 

809 

Redden. LSU 

lr 

15 

40 

45 

809 

Kelley. Conn 

JR 

13 

47 

53 

807 

Petotte. Lehigh 

SO 

16 

78 

88 

886 

Thorpe, Cllodl 

JR 

15 

39 

44 

806 

Wash Intw. UtahSt 

SR 

15 

100 

113 

B05 

CermMna Harvrd 

SR 

11 

68 

77 

8U 

Burden. St L 

sr 

15 

45 

51 

802 

Oteon, Wis 

JR 

15 

45 

51 

102 


Tennis 


REBOUNDING 


Ben iambi, Crghl 
McDanlcL WfchSl 
Scurry, LIU 
Saxton. MbVai 


Cl G No. avo. 
JR 19 282 148 
SR 16 3N 145 
sr 16 224 145 
SR 13 168 129 


U.S. Pro Indoor 

ME ITS SINGLES 
Seated Bond 

John McEnroe (1), UJL deL Maty Doris, 
US- 6-2, 4-3. 

Greg Holmes. US. del. Mata W) tender (3), 
Sw ed en . 65. 6-1 

Jimmy Connors (2). UX, rtf. Lett Shlras. 
U.S.6-2.4-4. 

Mltaslav Medr. Czerixntevokte, def. Joo- 
Um Nystram (61. Sweden. 6-1 6-7 (5-7). 6-1. 

Mel PurcalLU5.itof. Jbnmv Arias (7I.U5. 
6-7 (4-71. 6-4. 6-4. 

nanart Kristuwn (13). India del Balau 
Taroay, Hingarv. 6-1 6-3. 

Scott Doris. UJL dri- Michel schapere 
Netherlands. 6-3. 66. 6-1. 



“■» Aaoaohd Ansq 

The pressure shows on Hu Na in her fir^ tennis tourna- 
ment in the United Stales after defecting from China. 


adviser. Frank Wu, 
house last month. 

Hu Na doesn’t like to talk about 
her defection, citing concerns to 
her family. She hasat seen her par- -. 
ents or her older sister and younger 
brother since she slipped away 
from the Chinese team hotel the 
day before she was to play in the ; 
Federation Cup in Santa Clara, * 
California. % 

Her goal in tennis, she says, is to * 
be ranked in the top 20. <. 

■ Wflander, Nystrotn Upset ; 

PHILADELPHIA (AP)— Mats l 
Wflander and Joalrim Nystrom, - 
members of Sweden’s victorious f 
Davis Dip Team, were upset in the 2 
second round <rf the $300,000 U& =i 
Pro lndow T ennis Champi onship “ 
Wednesday, along with American ’ 
Jimmy Anas j 

But top U.S. stars John McEnroe ^ 
and Jimmy Connors made success- *> 
ful starts, polishing off their Ameri- 
can opponents in straight sets. ^ 
Top-seeded McEnroe, in pursuit 9 
of his fourth straight U.S. Pro In- * 
door championship, defeated ^ 
Marty Davis 6-2, 6-3. Connors, - 
winnner of this title four times, ^ 
ousted fanner Princeton star Leif l 
Shiras 6-2 64. 

Third-seeded Wflander, the re- * 
cent winner of the West Australian -« 
Open, was beaten by Greg Holmes, * 
an American, 64. 6-3. ’{■ 

Earlier, the sixth-seeded Nys- 1 
trom was beaten by Mfloslav Me- ' 
dr. the 1983 national champion of ' 
Chechoslovakia, 6-3, 6-7(53), 6-1. 

Seventh-seeded Arias, who ad^ • 
vanced to the final 16 at Wimble- * 
don last year and is ranked 14th in s 
the world, lell to former University 1 
of Tennessee star Md Purcell 6-7 V 
64 64. 




1 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JANUARY 25, 1985 


*. . 


OBSERVER 


Reaching for the Stars 


N; 


By Russell Baker 

i — My fears about 

‘America s stars began three 
weks ago with a yawn in the mid- 

.°f People magazine. I couldn't 
“ueve that yawn! Surely I had 
newer yawned in People before, had 
l- Or had I? Maybe 1 had been 
yawning foe months and had been 
too sleepy to notice. 

Bat no — it couldn't have been. 
My weekly People was toopredous 
to me. It comforted me. That fan- 
tastic weekly catalog of the United 
States’s stars — it was my confi- 
dence builder. 

Turning the pages to review that 
inexhaustible procession of stars 
passing under my gp re always 
made me fed better about the 
world. The Russians will never 
catch us in the star race, at least not 
in my lifetime — that was the way I 
felt, and it was a good feeling, carat 
though there was no evidence that 
the Russians were secretly wigagnri 
in a crash star -development pro- 
gram to close the star gap. 

And what if they were? Did they 
have the know-how to up 
with a Russian star of the magni- 
tude of Cary Grant, Elizabeth Tay- 
lor, Frank Sinatra? 

□ 

I am describing here the secure 
feeling of the past, of the time that 
preceded my yawn three weeks ago 
in People. Inal yawn was a shocker 
because — wdf, if American stars 
have such tremendous power, why 
would anybody be yawning at 
then? 

Alarmed and now alert, I exam- 
ined People closely with a growing 
suspicion that a crisis was in the 
making. Yes, yes — good heavens! 

The magazine was crammed with 
pictures of people who looked like 
stars; that is, they had stars’ teeth, 
stars’ dimples, stars’ hair stylings. 
Among them were a few of the old 
familiar stars, the stars every maga- 
zine editor and TV panel host has 
in mind when irening thCC OmiDfilld 

to ‘‘round up the usual stars.” 

There was John Travolta with 
pectorals exposed. Raquel Welch 
with pectorals concealed. Jane 
Fonda, Sophia Loren, Bette 
Midler, the great Liz were all there 
as usual, but it was the presence of 
the great Liz that deepened my 
alarm. 

Except for the great Liz, could 
anyone else in this thick catalog be 


accurately described as great? So- 
phia passably. Jane Fonda? Well 
sure, but let’s be honest; When 
somebody speaks of “the great 
Fonda,” it’s Henry you think of, 
isn’t it? 

As for Travolta and Raquel, they 
are surely nice people, probably 
just as nice as their pectorals, but if 
we are talking sex-object stars — 
and why else would we be so con- 
cerned with pectorals? — Raquel is 
no Mae West and Travolta is a 
feeble replacement for the great Er- 
rol Flynn. 

□ 

Scanning the rest of this alarm- 
ing issue of People, what else do we 
find? 

Jimmy Carter. AD right, a decent 
man. But a star? In Qadc Gable's 
day we had Franklin Roosevelt 
That’s a star, folks. In Clark Ga- 
ble's day we also had Clark Gable. 
Now in this issue of People we have 
Sylvester Stallone, Larry Hagman, 
Barry Manflow, Jack Wagner, Ja- 
mie Lee Curtis, Julian Lennon and 
Kyle MacLachlan. In terms of star 
mega tonnage, if Gable was the H- 
bomb, these fellows in People, tal- 
ented though they may be, are a 
box of Fourth of July sparklers. 

People in star business say this 
dangerous dilution of the product 
has been necessitated by tbe tre- 
mendous demand for stars to fQl 
TV stows about the stars, break- 
fast-time dnd late-night televised 
interviews with the stars, maga- 
zines and newspaper columns that 
traffic in the stars as well as scandal 
sheets that humiliate the stars. A 
single weekly magazine like People, 
which requires stars for its readers 
to envy, uses up approximately 
2,000 stars a year. 

The result is pleasant for Ameri- 
cans who yearn for stardom. The 
need for stars is so desperate that 
almost anyone can get into star 
work. I myself have starred briefly 
not only in People, but also on the 
Merv G riffin shew, and might have 
gone on to notoriety in The Nation- 
al Enquirer if I had wanted star- 
dom enough to have my teeth re- 
placed, my hair dyed and the 
wattles under my chin surgically 
removed. 

I declined — though if the Rus- 
sians surprise us with a Caiy 
Grantslri, a Tayloronovna and & 
Sinatravich, I mil make the sacri- 
fice for my country. 

New York Times Service 


Invitation to the Dance, That^s Gene Kelly 


By Anna Kisselgoff 

New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — Gene Kelly 
came to town the other day 
to talk about dance — not exactly 
a foreign subject to him, and 
hardly irrelevant to “That’s 
Dancing,” the new film for which 
he is the chief narrator and execu- 
tive producer. Like the movie — 
an anthology of dance-on-film ex- 
cerpts — Kelly himself represents 
a wide range of dance over the 
decades. 

If the entire world seemingly 
knows erf Kelly's contribution to 
film musicals, few of his Tans may 
be aware of bow far-reaching the 
dance background was that got 
him to the top and kepi him there 
as dancer, choreographer and di- 
rector. 

Like Martha Graham, Kelly 
bails from Pittsburgh, and like her 
he first attracted attention on 
Broadway under the sponsorship 
of the noted producer John Mur- 
ray Andersoa. Few balletomanes 
may know that his most influen- 
tial ballet teacher, Berenice 
Holmes, was the original Poly- 
hymnia in the commissioned pre- 
miere of Stravinsky’s “Apollo,” 
choreographed by Adolph Bolm 
in 1 927. One year later. Stage Dia- 
ghilev assigned the same score to 
George Balanchine. 

A Diaghilev dancer and Bol- 
shoi alumnus. Alexander Kotche- 
tovsky, helped round out Kelly’s 
ballet education in the 1930s, 
when he was also learning to do a 
mean Romanian chain dance and 
Polish mazurka at dance teachers’ 
conventions. Tbe tap and acro- 
batics instilled in Kelly as a child 
were, as he put it, “a piece of 
cake” by the rime he found a 
mentor in the Broadway choreog- 
rapher Robert Alton — an un- 
sung innovator of the Broadway 
musical. 

After Kelly had done a great 
deal to change tbe Hollywood 
musical, he created — using ballet 
dancers — the first American all- 
dance movie feature, “Invitation 
to tbe Dance.” He was also the 
first American-born choreogra- 

? her to create a ballet for the 
aris Opfera Ballet, “Pas de 
Dieux." 

Asked if he would he like to 
choreograph a work for a U. S. 
ballet company today, the 72- 
year-old Kelly replied, “Yes." At 


the same time, he sought to distin- 
guish his approach to dance as 
seen in films from those of stage 
choreographers in ballet. 

“The thing that I do,” he said, 
“is not the same as my friend 
Peter Martins or Jerry Robbins 
because they're with dance com- 
panies and they use dance with 
music to express a certain idea in 
the context of a complete dance 
that includes music. 

“The dancer in film for years 
has not done that. He takes a role. 
He gets a group of songs some- 
times and interprets the role. If be 
is a truck driver, he cannot come 
out and dance in fifth posidon. 
Everybody would laugh. If he is a 
prince consort be would have to 
dance a certain way. If I played a 
pirate in the early 19th century, I 
certainly couldn’t tap dance. 

“So tbe role of the dancer is 
subject to the role he’s playing 
and often very subject to me song 
that’s composed. This doesn't 
happen in a dance company. The 
question is, who has the greater 
freedom?” 

implicit behind his remarks is a 
dance philosophy that Kelly and 
a few other key figures did much 
to promote in the 1940s and '50s. 
The idea of the integrated musical 
— in which the dancing advances 
the plot — is now taken for grant- 
ed on Broadway and on film 
(“Singin' in the Rain” is a prime 

exampleV 

But in “Pal Joey,” the Rodgers 
and Han musical based on John 
O’Hara’s stories that catapulted 
Kelly to stardom on Broadway in 
1940 and then to Hollywood, his 
approach to dance was definitely 
novel. 

Directed by George Abbott 
and choreographed by Roben Al- 
ton. “Pal Joey” charted a rake’s 
progress. Kelly played the heel as 
anti-hero and in Alton’s choreog- 
raphy he found the means to ef- 
fect characterization with danc- 
ing. 

As the great popuiarizer of 
dance in nearly every form, Kelly 
promoted an image as a dancer 
and choreographer that was al- 
ways more ecumenical than eclec- 
tic. It is true that he could occa- 
sionally be spotted in a top hat 
and tails on the screen. But he 
chose to forgo that overt elegance 
early on. Americans saw him as a 
low-ranking gpb — a sailor in 





jack Mrewng The fte» Yorfc Taws 

Kelly on film, ballet: “Who has the greater freedom?* 


“Anchors Awdgh” or “On the 
Town." His trademark was spe- 
cifically democratic: casual street 
dress, from roHed-up sleeves to 
slacks and loafers. 

The deliberately masculine bra- 
vura style he cultivated for a 
dance-shy public in his early ca- 
reer could be traced to tbe ecume- 
nism of his tr aining . Berenice 
Holmes, with whom he studied 
ballet for several summers in Chi- 
cago in the 1930s, had danced 
with Adolph Bolm's companies in 
the United States. Bolin epito- 
mized tbe kind of virile Russian 
male ballet dancer Diaghilev had 


unleashed upon Paris in 1909. .As 
the ferocious warrior in the “ Po- 
lo veisi an Dances.” Bolm re- 
mained unmatched in bravura. 

“Berenice Holmes was really 
remarkable.” Kelly recalled. “Be- 
cause she had been with Bohn, she 
knew how a man could dance. She 
could do double tours en fair bet- 
ter than a man.” 

Ballet was not the first type of 
dance that Kelly, his two sisters 
and two brothers learned when 
their mother sent them to “a very 
polite dancing academy” in Pitts- 
burgh in tbe early 1920s. when 
thev were children. "As second- 


generation Irish, we should tub 
prove ourselves, she thought.” 
Kelly said. The idea was so good 
that before he graduated from the 
University of Pittsburgh in 1933 
he had opened the Gene Keily 
School of Dance and started a 
second branch in Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania. One of Kelly’s sis- 
ters taught beginning ballet, while 
his younger brother, Fred, per- 
formed with him in nightclubs 
and local shows. 

When Alton, who saw Kelly’s 
stagings in Pittsburgh, encour- 
aged hi m to go to New York in 
1937. Kelly already saw himself 
as a choreographer rather than as 
a dancer. Certainly his experi- 
ments with film technology, in- 
cluding animated-cartoon figures 
as partners, gave viewers a cre- 
ative view of dance on film. Yet as 
a choreographer be was remark- 
ably attuned to the dominant 
dance aesthetics of his day. 

When he recruited ballet danc- 
ers for “Invitation to the Dance,” 
his first choices for male stars 
were Igor Youskevitcfa of the Bal- 
lets Russes de Monte Carlo and 
Ballet Theater and Jean BabQ6 
from Roland Petit's company in 
France. “They were gymnasts, 
that's how we all started,” be said. 

The French ballerina Janine 
Charrat led him to Claire Som- 
bert, a young unknown at the Par- 
is Opera Ballet, and Kelly enlisted 
the ballerina Tamara Toumanova 
and a leading Balanchine balleri- 
na. Diana Adams. The novelty of 
an all-dance film was so strong in 
1956 that life magazine referred 
to the movie at its release as “a 
nonialkie entirely done in dance.” 

The film died, but Kelly went 
on to accept Lhe Paris Optra Bal- 
let's invitation in I960 to choreo- 
graph “Pas de Dieux.” Claude 
Bessy, the rising French ballet 
star he had used in “Invitation to 
the Dance,” portrayed “Zeus’s 
lady who is bored and comes 
down to the south of France for a 
fling.” It was good dean naughty 
fun and Kelly could use ail the 
flying machines for clouds and 
chariots that a 19th-century opera 
house can provide. By his own 
account, “the ensemble choreog- 
raphy was weak but the individ- 
ual parts in the pas de deux were 
we(j done. Now I fed I could doit 
better.” 


,1 - 







PEOPLE 

Princess Anne to Resume ; 

Interrupted Tourofbutit 
Britain's Princess Anne will nr’ 1 
sume her tour of India imerrupte . 
last October by the assassination c’ 

Prime Minister Indira Ganrfh. 

Buckingham Palace announcer 
The princess was visiting relief cen 
ters in northern India in her capac .1 [ 

ty as president of The Save th||, “ 

Children Fund when Gandhi wa 
■fatally shot. The princess stayed o.. 
for Gandhi's funeraL but the re.rit a ? L - 
raainder of the tour was canceled]!*^” 

The princess is to arrive in Indi. , 

Feb. 18 and stay for 10 days. Sh 
will make slops in New Delhi. Cal.". A. * 
cutta and Madras. . . .Garn ik 
biers will have an unusual opportu . - 

nity when the horse-racing seasoi ’ 

begins at Epsom. They can hei oi '.l L 1 *" 

Princess Anne, who will competeir v . . : V . 

her first competitive horse ract.^'lj ' 
when she takes part in tbe Farrier? *' ■ » i ; . • ■ 
invitation Private Sweepstakes thif.; ■ * -* 

spring for the benefit of charity.' 

The princess, who rode on the Brit- 
ish showjumping team at the 1976 „ 

Montreal Olympics, will compete 
in a 16-horse field of top amateur ~ 
jockeys in the Pi-mile event. 

A course on French actress Brv. 
gitte Bardot, featuring eight of kr 

films, is packing them in at Middle- -- 
bury College in Montpelier, Ver- .. 
room. About 175 students of the ; 
small, private college are viewing 
the movies, writing a short anaJyas - 
of each and discussing “popular* 
culture, eroticism, aesthetics, voy- ’ ~ 
eurism and misogyny.” according 
to Lhe course description. Claire 
Sdmb. the 29-year-old professor of . . - 
French who is teaching the dass,;; 
said she thinks most of the students j 
signed up for Lhe four-week course "■ • : 
out of. curiosity. “Most of them 
have heard of Brigitte Bardot, but 
hardly any have seen her movies." . .. 
she said. “She was a sex symbol for ' 
their parents." - 

□ . 

Film director Frank Capra was.: - 
honored on the 50ih anniversary of ^ 
his most famous film, “It Hap- 
pened One Nighr.” The Clark Gt- . 
Me-Qaudctie Colbert comedy won - 
five Oscars in 1935 for Columbia .j - 
Pictures, which sponsored Wednesr j 
day's luncheon in Beverly Hills, ~ 

California, for Capra, a sprightly!..... . . 

87. Capra listened to affectionate 
tributes from actors James S te w a rt, 7,' . 

Hope Lange, Alexis Smith and a ‘ 1 
message sent from the White . 

House by former actor Roodd Rea- - ' 
gan. : 


i 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


THE MTBMAHQNAL AMBBCAN- 
Mordhly newsletter far Amerenc Gv 
ina / working ovtneos. Request sren- 
en. Irtemohond American 201, E. 36 
STnY. NY 100)6. USA. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
Pans; 634 99 65. Geneva: 
Rome 39 48 93. 


LONDON, ENGLAND. Dine privately] 
aboard histone xrirna jhip to Green 
wick Heservaltonj. Tel: 01 -4807295 


PAHS ON THE MIN. Par logging nun 
of Pare. 0*567 12 57. 


PERSONALS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOB MORE REAL ESTATE 
OFPORTUMTIB SS 
PACE 13 


BAHAMAS 


NU4A -Commote Parte Feb. 12. Cafi 
ib colled best Hampton. Love 
Norman & Gary. 


MOVING 


ALLIED 


VAN LINES INFL 

OVER 1,000 AGENTS 
in UAA. - CANADA 
350 WORID-WDE 
PUS ESTIMATE) 

PARIS Dnbonb bitamaSana) 

(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

(069) 250066 

MUNICH uu. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON IB * 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSELS; Ziegler SJV. 

(02) 425 66 14 

GB*VA eJtsA 

(022) 32 64 40 

CAIRO Affiad Van Linai bifl 
(20-2) 712901 
USA ARM Vn Lews (nfl Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


INTERDEAN 

WHO ELSE TOR YOUR _ 
NEXT MIERNATH3NAL MOVE 

FOR A EM ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHENS; 

BARCELONA: 

BONN: 

BREMEN: 

BRUSSELS; 

CADIZ: 

HIANKFURT: 

GDEVA.- 

IOMX3N: 

MAPU TO: 

MANCraiBb 

MUMCH: 

NAPLES: 

PARK: 

HOME: 


ZURICH: 


01)061.12.12 
03 6523111. 
UNI 166062 
0421)170891] 


9561863TB 
0619012001 


iif 




01J961.41 .41 1 
01)671.2450 
061)70720161 
089)1415036 

» 
HH269342 
^K) 95 5520 
01 (343.20.00 


CONHNEX (new Opm): CoribjB- 
Mrs to 300 cities worldwide - Air /Sea 
CalOiarSe2B1 18 B1 Paris -Cans too 


REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 


PALM BEACH 

FLORIDA 

RESIDBMTIAL 
COMMERCIAL 
RAW LAND SALES 


WKam £ Hutton 111 
Real Estate 
177 Seaview Ave. 
Tel: (305) 459-6400 
Tib 51(952-7721 
W&IUTTON 


USA 


IFESSKTNAL real ESTATE lain 
— German & French specking. 

*40. USA area CdTSotoca- 
Diredor-Gwiritier Roaitora / 
iwc Homes & Graders, TeM 
00-325-1978 or 314-372-8832- 


mer 


BAHAMAS BTATE 
Engfeh Colored house raortoolang 
OCKeL 14 rooms, + 5-room goden 
gueP rnoe, MtMried on onaanraaely 
6 acres. 8000 sq.fi. morn noose com- 
prises 2 large master bedrooms with 
adjoining sun roams + 3 oddtiand 
bedrooms & mnery. MreMe-ftwred 
ertioxx fed leads la kege main sdon, 
formal cfciing room. Man floor dso vv 
dudes office, studio apartment, bn wA - 
fasJ room, p twiiy brr, large kitchen & 
nodi room, 4 bathro oms + powder 
room. House d fully ar-anitianed 
with security windows and ele dri cd 
dorm systems. Basemet* indudei wifc 
shop, wine ceBar, and two ful bath 
shower roams. New decordion aid 
carpeting with French furniture en- 
hanae tha sumptuous residence. House 
overlooks a formal 52 ft. X 24 ft. swim- 
ming pool dm n a m ing 3 terraces 
(rxed by superb Mart marbfe stat- 
ue*. Price MSI ,500,000. Color bro- 
chure on request. 

Hnaida Management Corp, 
atm. Mr Arthony Thompson, 

tefc 809 32? 85 49 or taken: 
P.O. Bax N, 4826 Nassau, Bahama. 


PARADISE FOUND 
Dbcow jyour owntr oged paroefse ct 


the luxurious VISTA 
urns located right on beautiful CAGLE 

beach, Nassau, Bahamas, ai 28 

eportmenh hove a spetJoaAa view of 
the ocean. 24 hour security, large re- 
creation roam, private beach 6 pad 
area Priced from US$200,000 
By owner. 

Td (SCO) 443 9346 in Mani 
or write PO Bax 145159, 
Carol GaMea Ra. 33114 
PARnGPATiON BWITHJ 


CANADA 


CANADA 
QUESN3, B.C 

5 acre fan with view, natural trees, 12 
u inu res west of city an pavemirt. 
Priced la eel at Canarian SI2/XXL 


Write: AJ, Wot, 4® Bn St.. 

BC V2J 3W9 Canada or phone 
6047471834. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNES 

COTE D’AZUR 

Town center Jantns de la CrabettE 
Ouse to the Carbon Hotel m a bright 
new buiUng, outsfcmrfrg one-bed- 
raom aport ment with large terrace, fa- 

'"price FI^rSoS^Opwi to offers. 
JOWrfWITlOR S Jk. 

55 la Groisdle 
Q640Q Comics 

Teh (93) 38 00 66. Telex: 470921F 


NEAR GENEVA 
20 Msaatee From 


Large luxurious recent house an 19,000 
eqjn. gromfa with wnpaidh'fi wew 
stretdung from Geneva to the Atant- 
Blanc. Lobby with meEuxine, kege Ev- 
ing/ifinrngHroom (85 sqjnJ, fuBy laid 
out kitche n, A bedaotre, 2 + 1 
bathrooms, dike, games room, soma, 
2 <or oarage, large terrace nitaUe tar 
nan pad. CorUact Mr. Lubke, Ge- 
^36 28 office hours. 


COTE D'AZUR, FOR SALE by owner. 
3-bedroom n a srt nent, furrohod or 
unfurnished, nxwe-mcorxition, north- 
south view of sea & mauntdre, pod, 
private nan, norage, tennis cowls, 
oi high Ooncwig Ferrari area or Pace. 
Hem cal (93] 81 -97-01, {93)86- 
3S8Z or contact owners Assatourian 
Properties 9465 WBdwe Blvd. S/724, 
Beveriy Kh.CA 90212 USA. Telex 
194795 ASTERN BVH_ 


ST. JEAN CAP TBHAT, between Mce 
& Mrkol MumiTicent view over- 
kxjidng harbor of 3 trapsed acres. 8 
bedrooms, 4 baths. Bdn> large Bvinft 
dmeig room, modem Idtehen. terroce 
t swxnming pooL Mdd ovoilobte. 
Monthly rentaUSSlZnOO. August 
USSISJMGrtadJacquHFTOOTbj 
250 vTsTst. NYC 10019USA. ( 212 ) 
586-2607. 


EXCEPTIONAL! CANNES Crobette. 
Top floor, axguisile 550 sqjrv dipinx. 
Fabdous 150 jqjn. Ewng room, Rro- 
ploce, 8 bedrooms, 7 bathrooms , 4 
ireff qucrtnrt. 3 dosed g ora gea. Deep 
terraae. MarveBoui M irmnn 
sea view. SSL 47 La Oobstte. 06400 
Games. Tefc 38.19.19. 


MOST KAUTffUlPROmtIY lip Cap 
Marti), 3 Ian. Mode Cab), an me 
wter's edge. 26JM0 sqm, exotic 
garden, Rft, vary large secwaler 
twinuwng pad. Mmiod price 
S5 jZ)0mX). No ageds. Contach Box 
1689, Herald TrSn*. 92521 NKjOy 
Cedex, Franca 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MQUGMS, homely villa, large tfnng 
& drawing-room. 4 bedrooms each 
wth private bathrooms, unenraam & 
kitchen- Nice flat garden 2^00 sqjiL 
4-room guest hoiie. Garare itar 3 
axv Swmnvng pooL RCZOOn®. 
Agenoe Latour, 20 rue Maubourg. 
OqSd Garner Yet 193) 94 40 51 


CANNES. Luxury apmtnmr. too floor 
omrioaUng private parfc aatKwm, 
ksga Eving, fitted kJchw. Wt 
erasing room, large terroce, base- 

7B65 


dea 5 me& Croiseite. FI ,1 
( 93 ) 48 53 62 or Paris (1 


oom oof uiuf kne iwuiy name, voo- 
versed Sbedroam txwn ful of ehojm 
in beoutifd surrouxfings. PerfeO tor 
p emuwnl or hofiday use. F540JDOO. 
Mr. Kentish. Redoncke, Satnac, 
24400 - Musuday France. 


TOURAI1*. 500 bre {125 idles) south 
of Pare Grodo usca«e s 12 room s. < J 
eonvenienca, large dependenaes, 
sepmate axwdiier s home, 24 na (60 
gored of endased grounds and 
woods. Write Jean Berger, 4)400 
Ponl-Lcvoy, ftance. 


FOR SALE/ RBfT, OOM 8 LOUX. near 
MegAve & da dopes, very amfort- 
afaledider, 400tqj>u 1 txg flat + 1 
shic&as, exoeptiand view over Mont 
BkxscTzOOO stun. land. Tet Paris 354 
2542 or (21) 06 09 19. 

ST. TROCEZ Beaatflul 2-room, mezza- 
nine, terrace. 100 m. from seo, tatnis. 
pad. F525.000. Td Paris 264 05 71. 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

GREAT BRITAIN 

YOUR CONTACT M PROVBKE 

Houses with character. Qxrmmg 
propertied. Estates. EmSe GARQN. 

55, 13532 ST-UEMY-DE-PBO- 
VENCE Cednx. TeL 190) 923)138 +. 

PARK LANE. PRESTIGIOUS Rats over- 
taofcrag Hyde Fork. 2/2 bedrooms, 
2/3 bathrooms. From £170,000. 
HYDE PARK. Magnrfxwit house. 8 
bedrooms, swvnmna pool, iccuzus. 
sauna PUTFfiEY BRSJGE, anraaLm 
Hat. lounge. 2 double bedrooms. 
£56,000. SOajN Ireland Terraced 
Victorian house, 2 bedrooms, 2 Irege 
firing rooms, tastefully restored 
£7BjX». GAAS. Bert Estate Co, 114 
New Band Si.. London. Tet 01-493 
5299. Tbe 27646 

5T. PAUL DE VB4CE. Pwaraic sea- 
riew. vflage house, 200 sqm. hwng 
space, luxurious serwaa, nrehad-type 
color, terrace. srtreiunLFl 800/1)0. 
Promotion Masart, (93) 87 08 20. 

GERMANY 

REAL ESTATE MVE5TMENT 

MEXT TO COLOGNE/ BONN 

Wel done oonstroetirev apartment 
house wtfh 24 units - 1 to 3 bnriooms - 
excellent location, sales price DM5.96 
mi Lon. FuBy rented, ratal nan* qa. 
DM320.000. For fwiher details, please 
OMtod: 

UBDII DU WE KG 
Dortenhudenar Sir. 30 
D-2000 Hamburg 55 

Trt: Wert Germany 
(0) 40-86 36 27 

Telex 2173509 LUP D 

LOOKMG FOR A MEWS HOUSE IN 
London? Cfoe erf to recente our com- 
prehenave list containing over 150 
Mews hmises for sale from £55.000 to 
aver £H mJfion. Trt Lurot Brrnxl 01- 
584 6221 UK 

GRD5VB40R SQUARE BY. bmaeu- 
lt*e flat, £50000 spent ra renovation 

2 double bedrooms, 2 en suite betas, 2 
intercom receptions. 96 yere lease. 
£235^00. Tel: weekends London 580 
4941, weekdays 499 2910. 

BRIGHTON, SUSSEX. SEA VIEW bd- 

cony flat. 1 bedroom, bath er suite. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

LONDON KENSINGTON BY Afcert 
Hal, outstreiding weftmodonised Are 
with wide private entr reice. 4 bed- 
rooms, 3 en suite baths, 2 fine inter- 
com receptions, My equipped kitch- 
en. 80 rear too*. D45.000. Tat 
waekmrt 01- 870 4703, weekdays 
493 2091. 

Afri. ^ 9 , 22 holy Croft Avenue, 
London NWl Tek 01-794 6644 

LONDON W2, NEWS COTTAGE - 
PhaoeftJy seauded with enchcxrfrig 
roof garden overlooking embassy 
gredens. 2 mms Hydo Park, 2 beds, 
large reoephon, garage. 01-229 1991. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CHEAT BRITAIN 


LONDON KENSINGTON, Superb 
large ground floor fkd in prime area. 
3 fertooms, double reception, study. 
2 baths, Utchen/dner. CIBODOD. 
Midtod Kabnar SCo (01)581 2661 


LONDON HAMPSTEAD exceptwilly 
pretty IB* century cottage in private 
enclave, 3 bedrooms. 2 oaths, vew. 
E150Jtt) Freehold. Tel London J01J 
435 6310. 


GREECE 


AEGEAN IStAfD OF UBBOS. 3SDOO 
sqjn. seafront property m estadnhed 
Petra - Mythimna tourist center, re- 
gon of haghest stale incentive for 
tourist promotion. Ina. 52 MichaUo- 
poukxi St. 41528 Athene Greece. TeL 
724 9983/4. Tlx; 221535. 


IRELAND 


SOUTHEAST IRHAND, 3 bedroom 
cottage an 1 aae. neor town + 
beach. Insh £35.000- TeL Ireland 
053/58819. 


MONACO 


PASSING THROUGH Monte Carlo 
regularly? Why not invest in a modem 
fuly equipped sturto in the heart of 
oty. Make lhe best of your money 
today. Le Montagna . loaded juP 2 
nuns, away from the casino rffen 
goad oppartunkev le Montaigne, 
MC 98000 - Mode Corio. Td |93l 
50-63D7. Tbe 470 022. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBOTON EXECUTIVES 

Publish your b uaVv e rr m mta qgo 
inAmMmaxAxxdHanUTH- 
buna, wd wn e more Aon a third 
ef a reflEan emotion wa rU- 
wrde, meat of whom one n 

ba in i e s « mad industry, wR 
rood it Just Ad ok m (Paris 
6135951 bs fae I Oom, ma- 
turing that turn con Min yw 
book, amt your menage wS 
appear w it hin 48 hours. 16# 
na to fs US. $9.80 at food 
oarhxriont par Bna. You must 
itduda com p le te aid ver#- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


INVBTM»IT PARTNOS 

tmxD 

• Select land strategkxdy kxosed near 

Dawyworld/ OrCndo 

• Option re purchase at wel beta* 
current maker value 

AAdJ t ionalficKxxaj p ainersreqMred 
to complete purchase and tabs Ale 
to higHy vt*jobie land 

• Short ImUng period before very 
profitable raise (prafeded at 100% 
ptod to devetop a rs mlerated in ' 
builclng imernolional tayria 
atiroefren, hoteb, sh^pnomiter. 

• bw mim ue mge USSZSjOOO to 

USS2^00U» 


rtiRO AMnrtrAN 
HVE5TMB4T CORPORATION 
100 M. Bacoyne Bhid 
Suite 1209, Miami, R 33132 
TeL CBS 35M097 
Teiex: K®7 EURO MIA. 


SAVE 50% ON ART 

Ois. | W oter ootory Tapestries, Uiho- 
graphs and Odeu. nry cfirect from 
me Publisher at below regular 
prices. AdcStianai disoouni to profe- 
sanab. Tea raicAty. 

DALI, CHAGALL, MKO, 
PICASSO, VASAIELY 
& 100 ednons of lesser resists. 
Showroom: 

DIN. Deere taforNatoal 

. 2* roe Godot de Mouroy, 
75009 PADS - Opera dstrio. 

Phone 265.09.07. Mqre oredt cords. 
Caire photos sent upon request. 




EXCITING OWXTWffY 
if you are interested in starting your 
own business, taped mfl stogies dub 
Pa ris now loo king to expa nd m other 
QMUVnfii. Far viiuiwiliafc 
Eurodubj 39 Qua cf Anjou, 75004 hvb 
Tot 575 26 88 mornings 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


WOB0WTOE OPERATMG 
PufaEdmng h ous e jodrotiung field) 

Price: sn/Bonoo. 

IVodtooKunfiaited pos diil lies for in- 
creaang ra 


s turnover. Busan 


dnAies 


are be e x tended to other fields. Cm be 
operated from anywhere in the world. 
No e»p«tonce required. 

IVase write to: 

Bob 2109, LHJ, Fnedrichstr. 15, 
[>6000 frOTkfiirt/Mam 


GB4UIE DBH HFC POITH L Y 

United Gfifion, with cert if i uia of ou- 
thentidty. 1 lot cormnsno cbout 8000 
plotes & mugs at only USjl2 per piece. 
SaSng price to W. Geramy about 
US$45 each. Srenple ooSedion (12 
ptolre & 12 nun) ovaflobte. Phase con- 
tort far sremE M5EGMBH. 

PO Bax 40lSTl>8000 Muendnt 40. 
W. Germany Tab 0B9/398060 
Telex 5212469 


NATURAL GAS LAND fir lease or 
sate. LocabonReeues County near fle- 
ore Texas. Producing wefls bvlween 
52 irifion cubic feet & 182 mifian 
cube feet between 3 & 4 ndes from 
existing land WS lease or sell be- 
tweai 640-960 acres for $227 per 
acre with antamexy pereertape. Will 

J.O.GrSri 46 IOWlcS?E£nd?SoSfr 


ton, TX 77035 or phone 713 
or 713-463-1600 tU5A) Hon 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-SHIRT . 

NOW M FULL 

rei afl-anh bustoes fact can earn you 
$8000 - SlOnOO/month. New and ueed 
from $ 10,000 ■ $30^00. Kerna 
Co, Dpt. J25 Beethovensb 9 


6000 Frqrikhirt/W. Germany. 

TeL 069747B0B Thu- 412713 KEMA 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADEEASY 
Attorney & Realtor obtains visas & per- 
manent residenca. Helps to set up USA 
businesses & locates commercid, indus- 
trial & residenlHt red estate. Far Free 
brochure write: David Hrton, 1201 
Dove St- Sle 600. Newport Beach, CA 
92660 USA. (714] 752 0966. 


FRESH WATS PEARL Brands ml 
loose pearis on sale in Hong Kong. 
Good quafity and besr pnas. Far 
mate details. Tbu 57719 POXAB HX. 
Td: (3 <832767. Address: 9/F, Wing 
Ldt MsBfoa. No. 14, Ming Eoad. 
Tit, HONG KONG. 


RDUOAEY BANKMG on hvge cot 

laterdsxd loreu. The ody ccmer- 
6d bank with a tepesentdh* office 
m London spesafiaire m itvs wees 
Arab Overseas Bank & Trust (WJJ 
Ud, 28 Bfod Pnnce Rd, London SB. 
Tel 735 8171 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SETTUNG IN CANADA 

Investment ad nmredwi 
Cortoct: DART INVBT 
1916 MoGil 
Mcxmeol H3A 2W9 - 
TeL B14) 281 1981 
Trims 5561023 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


OWL 

BEAUTWR PEOPLE 

IINUMTBIMC 
U-SJL < WORLDWIDE 

A complete sacral & bus ies se rvice 

9 C OfotM l ol 

& mgiiitngud 
axfividuob for: 

fashran-Conimw( « |.ft^^ 

Convertion-Trade 5hows-Pres Parties 

Spead tverfrlmagB MakervFR's 
Saad Horis^tostesses-Entertanera 
Soctd Goraponons-Tour gwdes. etc. 

212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.YJC 10019 
Service P 
Needed 


PANAMANIAN corporatkre provide 
the advantages of complete confiden- 
hrity, zero fax iabi ty & US doflor 
currency envemnert. We offer oom- 
prety formation services on a fast, 
i*fc±le and pomaeMiw bads. We 
are paitiajtcwty irearaued in bdeing 
MB with anthree busmens creeutton a 
to other erantrreContad H. L Dar- 
lington. P08 1 327, Parana 9 A, Pare 
mcL Tbu 3121 KBriXA PG. TeL 23- 
0834 or 23-4819 (eres 236779), 


YOUR BU5ME5S ADDRESS in Amder- 

dara or Rotterdam. Mail receiving & 
forwvdna Service. NZ KoOr 33, 1012 
PV Amsteraam NL/Txtoni mniiuu i 66- 
3022 $M Baftardom 


TAX SERVICES 


RW4CH PS 8 SONAL TAX GUIDE. 

Speoaly deagmd fix foreignere in 
France. To areter rhn booldet send F5S 
chart to Cabinet Saxrt, 102 Bd Batig- 
noles, 75017 Pare TeL 293 65 01 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


AUSTRAUANgBRSTmCony^ 
requires US$25 mwan for recfc ot ion 
of vary vnUe buttng protect an lhe 
gold axri of Au strdra, bead) bid 
bike ng & d e v el opment penrits are 
hard, mount required for 5 years 
uiKjpuliuu wry possbie. Bex 
LH.T, 63 Lang London 
9JK 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


REQUIRE RNANOAUY STRONG 

European - American ■ re Midde Ensl- 
em lenders or tearing bar* or bring 
synrtcntes who are interested in tv 
nondng very viabto projects to some 
ernes agoirat print bank of prune 
insuranoe or prime promiBory notes 
i gu mu nteer, in other cotes no aw 
ntees ovoMia. to be financed by 


either the supply of a guarantee or 
jn bare Currencies re- 
i - Swiss Frms « German 
Maria. All repies vefl be trerted ra 
strict confidence. Bax 40253, LKT. 63 
Long Acre, London, WC2E 9JH. 


HMtOUHt MNMUM US$ 
tovestar(s)oppcxturityinlepUS 
operation. Expect 1-year 
pus lucratM profit. Call: 



DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Fine danonds in any price range 
at lowest wholesale prices 
direct from Atewerp 
center of the rtomon d world. 
Ful guarantee. 

For free trice Sst write 
Joartan Qd de mtel n 


Es s uUnh ed 1728 

PaBcaonsIroai 62. B-20I8 Antwerp 
Briajnp - Tet P2 3) 234 07 51 
Tbt 71779 syi h. At the Diamond Cbb. 
Herat of Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR LONDON Offla 
<* lhe 

OE5HAM EXECUTIVE CBfTRE 
Compiehengve rrerae of Servian 
150 Roper* Sheet Tendon W1. 
Tel: 101 ) 439 628S Tbe 261426 


EUntUSMBS rrurrv 
99 Keaenaracbt, 1015 CH Amsterdam 
Tri: 31 JOS 57 49 Telex 16183. 
HWMkb B usin es s Centers 


PRESTIGE ADOSSS in Paris for pi- 
vote or canuny aurposes. Phone, 
telex, ma^bax. Monthty rale US$200. 
ConKxh Safari, 12 Ave de la 
Bourdanrais 7907 Rons. TeL- (1) 
555 IQ 22. Telex: 205322 F. 


PARIS ADDRESS, . 

SmcB 1957 I&P. prowdesmof. 

neetow rooms. S rum a Mae, 
TeL 3» 47 04. TT» 642504. 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


ROME, Offla SPACE awriobie to 

unniry buBdna off via Veneto. 4 kxga 
fiAy twrtished rooms with teL, trier, 
rowhon. storage. Goreoa Miss 
Mler 47J-4711 or 475-9060. 


fmprime par Offprint, 73 rue de I'Esangle, 75018 Paris. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 

5BUNG VHTf EXCcPHONAL 
APARTMENT, PATIO 
700 s q.m, private garden 
Residential area. Center of towr,. cnim, 
300 sq.m. kving space, large entrance. 
Irege reospfior.. lib: cry, dirang. JV 
room, 4 b eqrocna. 3 baths, 1 room for 
daff with bath. Large modem My 
adjatohea, ' large spree room, 
office, targe crossing room. 
:. rtgh dsss service: 

■dtxraed, electric blinds, etc. 
EXCLUSIVE AG84CE INTBiMEDtA 
BJ*. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO CBXX 
Tel: (93) 50 66 84 
Tlsi: 469477 


MOROCCO 


MOROCCO 

Tangien 

Beautiful Vila on 3000 sqm 
Spectacular vwws. Landsayeci gar- 
dens Great value at $185,000. Write- 
RAP. 59 Plain Ave, New RecWte 
NY 10601 or phone (914) 5764011. 

PARIS & SUBURBS 

ST. OLCMJD 5 mnut« by ere from 
PARIS, very resdentirt. 10 mnutes by 
tram to center of Pans. 11 On 1E3 
sqm., rila, high dass. can be a town- 
house, built by redirect who was 
awarded 'Pnx de Rome 1955'. 400 
sqm firing space, ground floor, inde- 
pendent 1st floor, Jaxaqraqe, many 
other rooms, garden, Fj.5OG.M0. To 
which can be added or separated : 2 
plots of lend 700 sqjn. & 452 sqm- 
Crei be bought with viBa 
with dneount or separated. Wnte W. 
LAVTGNE. 79 Bd. deb fopublfoue. 
92210 SAINT aOUD. FRANCE. 

7TH NEAR CHAMP MARS 

Hian dass aparfment. exceptional 
ou building, 315 sqjn.FW00.000 

16TH NEAR TROCADSO 

500 sqjn. tawnbauera 

whh large garden + uxewAms house. 
Excrieie conrifton. FI 5.000/500. 

CABINET MARCEAU 

720 01 44 

INVAUDB 

Modem, high dass, upper floor, duplex 
with terraces, about 260 sqm. 
sumptuous reception + 4 bedrooms, 3 
bams, mod's roam, prefcxig, (unified 

l^vffioroupe SEEH: 723 72 58 
Ext 422 

CENTER VESINET 

NEAR R8L Modern villa. 

Up a unity eonstnxbxra. Lrexhcaped 
greaan, Irving, office, 4 bertooms. 

3 baths, basemei^areqct 
AG840E MARNE 976 52 SZ 

PARIS 6th, EXCSTtONAL fixation 

on lhe Sene between Louvre & No- 
tre-Oama. duplex, 6 wndows an 
Sane, 120 sqjn., tugh cering 4 m. 
FS/iOOJDOO. Space to ae arrowed + 
pcasbnty to aid extra Bear. 
F4.O00O00. &VJ. 326 98 66. 

16TH - AVHMUE FOCH 

1D0 sqjn. + 80 sqm. ore dsn 
Price: FI ,900.000 

Tel: 526 T6 13 / 526 17 22 

15TH PLACE DTALL9AY, attractive 
modern 4-roam fortravate sate, top 
floor, 88 sqm. + 22 sqm. bakones 
taring won. + greaoe. Sony, quiet, 
futy aqtxpped, childrens garden. 
nJooJScTiT- 530 08 7? 

EXCELlfNT MODBM STlTOIOopret- 
menrs as wel as 2 or 3 room ojxrt- 
meris cMxfofcto immeriatetj for sste 
ei a new ttoartitient complex located 
in Parts Makot. Apply for further 
enquiries at |3) 094.23. M. 

VESENET AREA, afonq Sw*, beautiful 
view, house & garden, 620 tqm., 3 
rooms, 3 baths, 2-oar aoroge. 4 nns 
by ere RER. Tek (31 

nere PLACE DS VOSGES, presa^ous 
townhouse. luxunous re«Aon + 
bertoam^Drfcng. FI 700.000; 723 72 

AV RAFHAR kwely 220wm, garage, 
3 bedrooms, reasprint 5D3 v 52 

NEU1LLY, -Maurice Baras, luxurious 
5/6 roans, 330 sqm. let 503 4752. 


16th HOW MARTIN. 210 rem. 
sumptuous, paring, am 503 4752. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PORTUGAL 


PRIME PROPHmB THROUGHOUT 

Portugal ree promoted m lhe United 
Kingdom exdusvriy through George 
taxght - Ovanace, 155-157 Knights- 
bndge, London SWl. Telephone: 01 
5d9 2123. Telex 25480 EQU€S G 


SPAIN 


COSTA BLANCA 

Beautiful vilas, aparPrerti and dxdats, 
si luaied to desxable arol famous resort 
of Denia and Javea tA&cante) with vww 
of sea & mountains, ror instance 06 of 
a rmle from sea, a luTurymla complete- 
ly furnished. large btchira, 5 bedrooms, 
2 bathrooms. 2 twig rooms, 1 drawing 
roam. 2 terraces, svmunmg port, dou- 
ble 9 oroge [for 3 cars) with 1 bedroom 
8 bathroom. Exceptional 3000 sgjm. 
garden. Told surface 6000 sqjn. Price: 
UjSIOO.OCO. 

We am offer you: Apartments from 
USS22jJ0. Chalets from US$31 ,500 in- 
Vilas Froni 
_ 1000 sqm 

grounds. Brochures available. For any 
raformahar write to; 

Engtand: MIGHTCREST LIDl, 
Epwarth Hcwe. 25-35 Gty Soad, 
LONDON EC1Y 1AA 
Gemtreir- T8 RKT, 
Ba&enhainerflniSSe 23. 4280 BORKB4 
Spain: SOUXNA, Patricia Farrandb 
59. DOHA (Akante) & fix Benelux: 


during 500 sqm. 
USS50.000 


7101 


DLEASE, B. Strop nunJ roai 44 
AT WWTEKWJK - HOLLAED} 


THINKING ABOUT REI1RENG in 
Spain* Splenrid idea, if you ree head- 
ing for MrebeBa - Costa del Srtl 
Contact us: We buy, sell, rent, oon- 
stroct, rtlas and apretments, beach- 
ridi, m the mountains and on the golf. 
We are rteher we la have gal what 
you ree looking for a nd jf not well 
produce it for voul PKOMOTUR - 
Apartada 118, Marfaefla, Sptxa Hx: 
77610 OTUR L The BKrProperty 
People 


THE Off FROM YOUR FRONT - or 
ki»chen docri m Guaddman Golf 
MrebeUa, we have fix rent or sale, 
vilo, incomparably rice fires, town - & 
penthouses with ocean vww, race an- 
rounrings & totemahanal readetts 
oround. napply fcwig the easy Guo- 
ddmma-way-orkfe. Irfonnation: 
PROmOTU# - Apartada 11B - Mor- 
beAr ■ Spain. Tlx. 77610 OTUR £ "The 
BEST Prccery Pecpte". 


COSTA BLANCA, hnoostog execute 
Ixbde home. 1 km brorire Superb 
oreem views. TotaRy furnished to USA 
stondcxds inrtxfing Ca. Privacy as- 
sured on 3,188 sqtoL a i land. 4 bed- 
rooms, many extra USS984XXL Write 
or cable: Jermer, Apcnado lit. Gar- 

rucha. Aimer ig. Span. 


BIZA. STA. EULALIA. Beautiful vib 
an the sea, 2 bring rooms, 2 dintogs, 5 
double bnkopms, 3 baths, 2 btchwa. 
separate staff quarters, large garden 
(coring to private beach, telephone, 
ftivate sale SF9S0.000. Trt: London 
01-370 0349. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


Pts7 iraEonorequivalenianyairren- 
cy. TeL UK 0702^4196. 


SAN AGUSTW. MAJORCA ON THE 
Sea. 2 bed Art ready now, port, 
restounral. $65^)00. Furnished. Lon- 
don 722 7919 or KSf 8461. 


SWITZERLAND 


G5TA AD 
VALLEY 

YOUR INVESTMENT IN 
SWITZERLAND 

We are saSng very exclusive & com- 
fortable homes with 2 to 5 targe rooms. 

The complex of 3 chalets is located 
data to the heart of the wBage with a 
brerfh-tafanq view aver the ifa slopes S 
the wide wfley. 

A canqxeheRBve rings of servicn "A 
la Carte', »xh as mamtancnce, servic- 
rag, leasing & management is avatabie. 

For Further i nformation or 
era oppomtawn!, please contact: 
On Site i (029) 4 52 49 

PLAZA CONSTRUCTIONS 
Riff DU RHOL : 100 
CH-J204GMVA 
Tab (022) 21 60 44. Tlx: 421121 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RBORT AREA 

DO YOU WISH - 

* TO BUY AN APARTMENT 
OS A HOUSE? 

* TO SETHS: IN SWTTZStLAND? 

* TO INVEST IN SWTTZBLAMJ? 

CONTACT US: 25 YEARS OF EXPSB- 
ENCE IN BULDtNG AND SB1ING 
FINE SWISS REAL ESTATE 

SODIMSA. 

P.O. Bax 62, 

18B4 Wires, Switzerland. 

Tbu 456213 GEE CH 


SWITZERLAND 

FOUSGUras CAN BUY 8 EALmFUL 
APARTMOI1S. CHALETS, VILLAS, 
in me whole region of Lake Geneva. 
Morlreux 6 cs famous mounhin re- 
sortL We have fix you O very txg 
mows of reasonably priced ana map 
mgke'veSwBg homes. Price from about 
OT00 000. BEFORE YOU MAKE A 
WOSON, pleasa cantaa-. 

T ^ KSEBOIDSA. 
i_ Tajff Gnje & 0+1007 Lausanne. 

I Tet 21/25 26 IT Telex: 24298 SEBO CH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND • - 

Ew a ^ rttand Op^ac ha iiy __ • 

ST. MORITZ And DAVCYv '. 

IK, 2K & 3frroora lovely, wany. . ~ 

^KrSraXs _ ;- 

For sale near firatuflic sking area \m 
gnat from SF175J30 
mortgage up to flOX. 

Permit for forrt(pMn to buy. 

KB CONSULTANTS LID. ' 1 i 7 
P.O. Bret 460, 8034 Zurab V-] > { , 
Tab Zurich 69 38 96 or * ‘ si hi S', f 
London 368 3460. 


7 * 


b II 


VALAIS / SWTIZERLAND 

CRAMS MONTANA 
THYON, IB OCRLONS 
ST. UJC VAL D'AMWYBB 

Hats and chdeb 25 to 150 sqm, I B 5 _ 

rooms. Gertt 60*. bderest fttet 6751 . 
Duration 15 yam Owners hides - 
Direct tde. 

VAL PROMOTION SA -. 

10 Ave. du Wri. CH-1950 Sws. '-_V 
Tet 41-27-23 34 95 


A VENDRE A 7XM DE LAUSAMG : . 
ISutote) en banfare dm bo b, riaete 

wSsis^rsatessr - 

ootoprenont 15 ehambres, 5 srtta i* ■_ - 

baiv 0 arage pour pouf 2 yonerjf.™- • 

fiatetatdentrefien. Terrom iq*- 
Tr*s beaux prfaras. Fair* ofW JP* : 2 
chfffre 21^71, Pufcfiatas. 10B - 
Lausanne. 


LAKE 


5 r Orem, gardm, dock. 
Td: Switzerland 


1 XMASCONA 
BeaafiM 

VILLA : -V 


091/66 63 


USA CEVERAL ^ ^ 

OWBTMBir OPTOETUMTY C*-'-. . 

acres in New Jersey. Hert fix 
mm homes, smal BMq 
100 m3es from Nmv York & Wid"9-. ^ 
ton. 45 mte from PUodelpliei^ ■ ‘fe. . 

muting ided when new a p'- ; -• 
mmpteted. Prtwitirt rritxri ® ,. J crv-.":' 
yron $l,OOOLOOa Price S400ffl.te %.y - - 
328 RFd 1, North Tray, V 7'- ' . 

05859 USA. Telex: t&8ZP<7 __ V- •- . : • 


WAIERHtONT PROPHtW, -V . 
655ft.onif*wii8rmexokrew/** , '5i5. '• 

Late Ave. SL Jam*. NY 11780. LBA -.f.^ , : ... 


PAGE 15 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIES 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


USA 


EAST COAST FROM £119 

MID WEST FROM £160 

WEST COAST FROM £212 

SOUTH EAST ROM £195 

Anywhere to nan» where 
in USA an BOAMFF £95 

NATC London 734 8100 


$2269 FBST CLASS round lhe wreU 

mdudas USA. HAWAB, N Zetland, 

AinircAa. Sngnpree. Hong Kona Fun 
detaib DumaTlravd, TeL London (01) 
488 9011 


NY ONE WAY $150. Everyday N.Y. • 
West Coast 5139. Paris Z& 9290. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE LA5T GREAT LUXURY: tatri 
vacy, waterfront in hah 
lotion homes, forge staff 
your every mnd. A Camel Univenzty 
Hotel School troamg site m Jamaoan 
sauthcactf fahtag vilago. Groups 
from 2 to 12 Aore SaoSZSMtdSy. 
Ras & Moneure, Rass Alley, Alexan- 
dria, VA. 22314. Tel: 703-549-5276 


Far mare HOLTOAY £ TRAVR ADS 
PLEASE TURN TO 
PAGE 6 W 

IN THE WEEKEND SECTION 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


CHAKira A YACHT IN GR EECE. 0»- 
rjwFroni Owner of largest fleet 
Amroean management. Ea»lom 
oww-^govt. bonded. Vdef Yochts, 

rP t n ^P^°y 22 !£. 2 *L Ptowus. 

I^«7?571, 4559486. 71* 
JWflSceB fir Road, Am- 
Mer. PA 190Q2. Tet 215 641 1624 


LONDON CHARMING HOUDAY Bat 

"■* g P95 na - n ° t K-^4 persons, $48 

fw Rat. fufly equiiraedkilth- 
TV era. Erica PtaraJJB Evelyn 
Gdns, London SW7. Tel: 01-3707429 

OV01NK3HT ACCOMMODATION, 
gremmfl gw na house, mnutes from 
Gatwidc fit* fogteh fcwrtrfret. reo- 

soiteble rates. TrtHartey 2738 MC 


HS1AS YAOfTING. Yacht Oxxters. 
Acodermas 28, Athens 10671 . Greece. 


HOTELS 


U.SrtL 


N.Y.C. HOTR BARGAIN 

T>« AD 4- $21 JB per person, double 
oceupretey, mtolte you to real vafoe « 
New York. Next teae fry CBMtySY. 
PARAMOUNT HOTEL T3S W« 46th 
Street, N.Y.C 10036, c on v en ien t The- 
atres, everythrag. 650 rooms with bath. 
TV, air conrittoi M ig. Singles $38. R» 

serve now. This is a ~sf -- ~— " 

sense. TeL 

Telex: 425-91 





BBJFORD HOTEL New YortW-jjjj " ' ' - 

EmteOSuN.Y.lMfoDfw^JSW. -■ 

BevS&A ffi . 


FRANCE 


PARS - Plaza Mrrtteaa 


HJB* PLAZA HOTH, 

Kensngton: best atuano 

andpSSraftAlrocxMl 
er / TV / tetapHone 
riryte.BfC-tedourr^i 

W^SvSfc*fflB{V v ’ . 

tax. 68 fliewi Qgn>jg& , - : 

Tek 01 -37061 1 1®!®---; & h 4 \.- r 

\ SSuBZiSf- 1 *.