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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris ; 
Printed Sunnltaneouslv 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hoik Kong, Singapore, 

The Hague and Marseille 

. vVEAfreK DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 

'No. 31,705 


Austrian 

Minister 

Criticized 

Sinowatz Calls 
Greeting of Nad 
'Serious Mistake’ 

The Associated Press 

VIENNA — Chancellor Fred 


ncralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


Published 'With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

77 - : PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


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ESTABUSHED 1887 




; -I- Sinowatz censored Defease Minis- Friedhehn Frischenschlager 


ter Friedhdm Frischenschlagcr on 

bl--;, f« ,***?* a ™ eryihine that coc 

n - - ; nr'v. criminal released by -Italy. The l rr i . 

■•'-'i Jia»V; chancellor described the action as ^ a2i 

JtfSSw 

;/& Bui Mr. Frisctomschlager de- newspaper Kuril 

. _ fended his airport. mee tin g Thnrs- 

day with Walter Reder, former SS who has a serio 
- . major, am j his decision 10 accom- Jer, to ensure t 
* •* ir.' ; pany him (o nearby Baden. Mr. release and retu 

Reder, 69, taken lo Baden army confidential 
: J e - r barracks by a military helicopter, «j sureJy ^ n 

‘ ‘ ‘ V remained in seclusion there Friday. take& ^ ( do no 

J; ':. The affair dearly strained the was serious enc 
.; • . 4 government of Mr. Sinowatz's So- resignation," he 
7 : : d&Hsts and their junior coalition Mr. Frischi 
partner, the Freedom Party, to quoted as saying 
-V-; which Mr. Frischenschlager be- ister Leopold C-r 
: ~ ; longs. the strictest seer 

Several Socialist politicians justwnted to ei 
ra\inA for Mr. FrischenschlageFs Officials said i 
- resigns tk®, arid mwnlvan nf Lw. Austria dec id i 

■ tria’s Jewish co mmuni ty said his R®d®r , s early re 

>' meeting showed the strength of far- ^ concern I 
. right elements in the Freedom Par- wAeprotesism 

Offiaals of t 

An Italian court saotcoced Mr. • 

Redo to life in prison in 1954, for 
the 1 944 IdBing by troops under his 
: command cf wool eOOrivilians in “l 1111 ™ 

1-: Muubono, nonh Iuly 
. A mOteymb !™ 1 rdedm 1980 preadent of 
tole cooldbe rteascd tlm July }mj ^ p^, 

• • • '.-X. 15. Last month, citizens of Marza- AnstT : an r_, 

•• ' T-bodolte a request by Mr. Reder SSSSSa 
' ■ for an early release be rejected. crivedbyameml 

The Austrian govezmnent had government in d 
asked for Mr. Rider’s release for Mr. Wiesentlu 
■*"" ' years, officially On humanitarian “ a ^ 

— -^.b' grounds. Bui Mr. Sinowatz’s prede- voters ofthe F 
50?.!‘,cessor, Bnmo Krcisky, said the former Nazis.'* 

~ . T . government also wanted Mr. Reder The Freedom 1 

— ——to be freed out of conceni that his jy conservative \ 

death in prison could make him a bets consistently 
•’ +• *]■ [legend for Austrian ri gh t is ts. refuge of ext re mi 
_» k.-k :■£ Mr. Sinowatz, in a television in- Mr. Frisdienst 
. . ^ " ■'’terview, critirired "the personal - sidered to belong 

ST 4 C?!ii ; "presenceand the greetmg of Wahec era! dement, whi 
Reder hy tlmdrfmsemraster^ asd -jng headway 
— : :»dissoctaled v filrasdf ' from 7it He"'"conservarivei str 


Israelis 
Agree on 
Economy 

Accord Extends 
Controls Cher 
Wages, Prices 

By Edward Walsh 

Friedhehn Frischenschlager jERimS ^R^esenta- 

tives of tbc three m ai n power cen- 
eryihing that ccmld him" ai aciivity ters in the Israeli economy have 



3 ..^ 



reacted agreement on an extension 


Mr. Frischenschlager. in an in- of economic controls that Prime 
terview with the mass-circulation Minister Shimon Pares described 
newspaper Kurier, said he derided as “one of the most important and 
to meet and accompany Mr. Ruler, far-reaching agreements” in the 
who has a serious stomach disor- country’s history, 
der, to ensure that bis premature The agreement is seen by govem- 
rriease and return would be kept meat officials as ai least a partial 

confidemiaL : 

“I sureJy did not act without mis- 1 ( «^«>op S are Le^ 

takes but I do not think my mistake non w ™ a siens ® ®* renef but 

was serkms enough to force my a ^ s ® AsflhJCBwmieiiL Page 2. 
resignation,” he said. " 77T~ ~T~ 

Mr. Frischenschlager was response lo U^. demands for more 





DoleAtlacks 


Weinberger on 
Arms Spending 


quoted as saying that Foreign Min- 
ister Leopold Cratz had demanded 


lent austerity measures as a 
tion for large increases in aid 


the strictest secrecy. He added: “I to Israd * 
just wanted to mforce this.” The accord was signed late 

Officials said that both Italy and Thursday night by offiaals of the 
Austria decided to keep 'Mr. national unity government; the 
Reder’s early release confidential Histadrut, the trade union federa- 
out of concern that it would pro- tion; and (^Manufacturers’ Asso- 
voke protests in both countries. ria tion. It provides for deep cuts in 

Officials of the World Jewish government subsidies of basic con- 
Congress. preparing to open a sumer products and a series of con- 


Together after signing the Israeli economic agreement Thursday night were, from left, 
Deputy Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, Prime Minister Shimon Peres, Finance Minister 
Yitzhak Modai and Israel Kessar, a union representative. The accord lasts eight months. 

Sharon Suits A Solomonic End 

Ruling on Malice liaises More Issues Than It Resolved 


three-day meeting here Saturday, trolled wage and price increases . .. - „ , .-. 

joined Austrian Jews in condemn- aimed at preventing Israel’s ram- NEW YORK — When Judge dudin°, in effect, that the magazine 
ing Mr. Frischenschlager’s role. pant inflation from re-igniting, Abraham D. Sofaer asked the ju- jj ® 5 careless, coiud wen prove 
Simon WieMthaThcad of the The agreement will replace a «» “ A ™ 1 Sharon's suit against PVJ™ 1 ? m the public forum. 

Jewish Documentation Center here threc-mouth^S; and price freeze. Tune magazine to consider the case With<wt proving actual mahee, 

and president of the Union of the which expired mStth. It was “ w “ »*^S “ 

, . Yul. .1 - j— nmnlifv the difTimlt task ihev on cannot W 1 D libel SUltS. HlS m- 


By David Mar£ 

New York Times Si 


not a higher court of law. Tune’s 
victory in court, with the jury con- 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Robert J. 
Dole, the Republican majority 
leader in the Senate, sharply criti- 
cized Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger on Friday and warned 
that the Reagan administration's 
efforts to reduce federal deficits 
could falter if it does not yield more 
on military spending. 

Senator Dole accused Mr. Wein- 
berger of trying to block efforts to 
reduce the budget deficit, saying: 
"Don’t count on me if Weinberger 
continues to sit it out.” 

In an unusually sharp attack on a 
Republican administration official, 
the Kansas Republican also ac- 
cused Mr. Weinberger of using in- 
flated economic figures to exagger- 
ate Pentagon cost-cutting. 

“They’ve been able to survive 

msday right were, from left, there without much difficul- 
p«« mnanM Mtnictar ty, Mr. Dole said in a speech to 
jwblic relations officials.^! think 
tie accord lasts egfrt months. rest of the counuy needs 10 

survive too." 

• m ^ -m Republican senators, led by Mr. 

fy ~nfa Dole, are writing their own set of 

Jai/mM*/ AiflCw budget proposals in an effort to 

reduce next year’s projected budget 
t.D 1 1 deficit by $50 billion, 

an it Resolved Working with the White House, 

the Republican Senate leadership is 
A New York lawyer specializing sed^a smafler increase in r4- 
in First Amendment questions, t^ry spending than President Ron- 
Floyd Abrams, said the Sharon de- aid Reagan has proposed, 
liberations demonstrated that, in suggested that Mr. 

iKa kanMe nf q mncrSAfihniic iiiru mi • . 1 . _ « !!■* _ 


get cuts and an overhaul of the lax 
system, has derided to “take his 
case to the people,” adminis tration 
officials told Toe New York Times 
on Thursday. 

President Reagan will press for 
the spending cuts and tax simplifi- 
cation in speeches, interviews and 
television appearances around the 
country, the officials said. 

A key element in the plan, offi- 
cials said, is for Mr. Reagan to 
address groups of young profes- 
sionals involved in high-technology 
and space industries, where be will 
discuss the future in terms of re- 
ducing the federal budget deficit. 

Under Mr. Reagan's budget 
“freeze” concept, the military bud- 
get for the fiscal year 1986 would 
be allowed to increase by about 6 
percent after inflation while non- 
militaiy domestic programs would 
be held at 1985 levels, reduced even 
further or eliminated. 


Jewish Persecuted, said that no feared that, had the three sides 
Austrian Jew returning from a Nazi failed to agree on a continuation of 
concentration camp “was ever re- controls after the freeze, there 
ceaved by a member of the Austrian would have been an explosion of 


government in this way." 


price rises, tri ggering cost-of-living 


Mr. Wiesenthal also charged that pay raises and -wtmg off a new 
“a large part of the members and inflationary spiral. 

***=” « the Freedom Party are The accord is to become effective 
former Nazis. 


simplify the difficult task they 
faced. They had to apply the com- 
plicated law of libel to a morass of 
conflicting testimony on the re- 
porting process at Time, Israel’s 
actions in Lebanon and Mr. Sharon 
himself. 

But when the jury returned its 
third and final decision on Thurs- 


NEVS ANALYSIS 

ability to do so in this case, where 


Floyd Abrams, said the Sharon de- aid Reagan has proposed, 
liberations demonstrated that, in ^ si^ested that Mr. 
the hands of a conscientious jury, Weinberger’s attitude on military 
the Sullivan standard works wdL spending was hampering the bud- 
By protecting the press, even where g* efforts of Senate Republicans, 
it had honestly erred, he said, it “Tin willing to go after sensitive 
provided the “breathing room" programs,” he said of domestic 
needed to cover controversial is- programs that President Reagan 
sues and personalities. wants to “But don’t count on 

“Historically, it’s been vay diffi- me if Weinberger continues to sit h 


,v. iiu , -r. .. , niMunumy.it a uccu vciy uuu- mwu »huuuku wuuuuw 

cult for juries to separate the differ- out. We’re in real trouble if we 
ous item about him, David Halevy, ■ * Mlt TT : n 1^,1 ran-i ™ drfence mim. 


voiera or me rreeoom rany are The accord is to become effective m« wiwn tne jury returned its 

former Nazis.” on Feb. 4 and lasL for eight months, third and final decision on Thurs- 

The Freedom Party has a strong- j, ul on |,. during the first five day, the formula suddenly seemed 
ly conserrative wing but its mem- months is the agreement binding. Solomonic, 
bees cones tea tly deny that it is a After July 1. anv of the parties can . B X prowdmg an outcome that 

a-; V for a review of its terms or Wt both Time and Mr. Sharon 


- called on Mr. Reder to “avoid cv- facticm in recent years. 

■J : 

^Turkish Cypriot Leader 
Plans Elections in June 


refuge of etteme rightists ask for a review of its terms or 

. Frischenschlager, 41, is cop- unilater ally renounce the pact 

SKkrol to bdoMtofte party’s lib- spcaldm lo reporters Thursday 
end danml, wtadi ta tem mak- 

hafaonahst unprecedented step in a 

faction m recent years. danocratfc state.” 

“This is not a passing agreement, 
0 -w- -j but a powerful economic step. 


nationalist 


claiming victory, the trial brought 
about the sort of settlement the 
parties were unable to reach by 
themselves, and, in. the ead, spent 
more than $J niliicn to secure. 

The jury ruled that Tune had 
defamed Mr. Sharon — had sub- 
jected him to ridicule, hatred and 


BTdSSHh "ESS “ P * a- “ » taa’t^ht together oo drfense Hum- 

tta woritrf ST tofS “I won’t say nvnything is tost if 

ahurdli ethu ^ ^le to distinguish between its we don’t get more defense spending 
Tt«w. own ruling that Time had reported restraint,’ Mr. Dole said, but we 

aSSf 5 ®,* sssas^ tiMB. 1 - — » 

ifSSS ..a.- 

•.iM Ur “n nrt i,w I*. j. that hp«»ii «■ Mm maK«* oeiense Duogei or wrnon, out 


Republican senators, led by Mr. it T7 r TtM* 

ole, are writing their own set of I /. /%. IVIlItEirSm 

idget proposals in an effort to * 

duce next year’s projected budget 1 

fidt by $50 billion. ijOCll LMXXtU 

Working with the White House, 

e Republican Senate leadership is A - • P. ■ 

eking a small er increase in mili- /% 20 tSfXEih 

ry spending than President Ron- O 

ms . Talks Tuesday 

einberger’s attitude on military J 

ending was hampering the bud- The Associated Press 

t efforts of Senate Itepublicans. LONDON - Leaders of Brit- 
“rmwimng to gp after sensitive ain’s striking coal mmers and the 
Dgrams,” he sad of domestic National Coil Board wffl hold pre- 
ograms that Presadmt Reagan ijm^nr y talks n yst week about 
mis to cul “But don 1 count on p n & n? the 10-month strike, offi- 
sifWtanberger continues to situ ^ annomced Friday. But the 
it. Were in real double if we union rqected the state's terms for 
n’t get together on defense num- fun negotiations 

S’ ...... In separate announcements, 

“lwon’tsayevaythingislwtif each sid£ said the invitation had 
; don tga more defense spending come from the other. A coal board 
stramt, Mr. Dole said, but we spokesman, Michad Eaton, said 


oui a powcniu .econrauc step, conu^t — when it reported that ” , 3 " T TVl H 

wlndi I am convinced wfll bring k_ ^ lehanSeSfalm,- Ut ^ fasClsm and rad^alism. 


wui^u 1 am «mvua*u wu, wiufi he had met with Lebanese Phalan- 
about r^ovoy for the entire econ- ^ leaders shortly before the Sa- 


' Another time, he lumped what sloppy, irresponsible reporting. Weinberger has repeatedh- 

be perceived to be Mr. Sharon's “The Sharon verdict proves once cautioned congressional leaden 
political vindication in Israel with again that, under the Sullivan rule, nol l0 include Pentagon spending 
what he called “other signs of mys- the news media are virtually above in any aaoss-the-board spendinz 
tidsm, fascism and radicalism? the law,” said Arnold Forster, of freeze. 


omy,” he said. “I am sure that die 
country’s economy has taken its 


bra and Chatila massacres in Beirut 
and “discussed the need” to avenge 


Reuters 

' NICOSIA — The breakaway 

“Turkish Republic of Northern 
Cyprus” will bold elections in June 


— r against the government of enormous potentiid 
Archbishop Makarios. ^ to lts economic im- 

Mr.Denktashsaidthatpresiden- pact,, “e agrmnent has important 
rial and local elections would be Pphtoal ramifications i as Israel be- 


the assassination of Lebanods 

wfllSlart . l ^Sl^^ president-elect, Bashir GemayeL 


The requirement of actual malice Shea & GoukL The House minority leader. Rob- 

is sure to influence the record num- Many juries have found actual ert MicheL Republican of IBinois, 
ber of ubel actions, involving pub- malice in libel cases since the Sulli- also voiced frustration on Friday 
tic officials, that are pending ^ decision, but barely one in four with Mr. Weinberger’s uncompro- 
throughout the United States. Thai ^ fa e verdicts has survived The mixing attitude, but in a gender 


■i . Cyprus” will bold elections in June 
Rafter the failure of intercommunal held over a month from June 15. 
'■ .talks on the future of the divided Parliamentary elections would be 
island, Rauf Denklash, the Turkish held on Jane 23. 


rchbishop Makarios. 
Mr. Denktash said it 


includes General William C. West. 
Tune had erred, thejuiy further mordand’s suit against CBS. 


gjns an effort to win a huge increase 
in economic aid from the Reagan 


Cypriot leader, said Friday. 

'i But a statement by Mr. Denk- 
".xiash added: “Competing our con- 
^ : 'stitution and hiding elections do 
1- not dose the door to a federal solu- 
' -lion. On the contrary, they 
strengthen those who wifi attend 


The Turkish Republic of North- 


in economic aid from 
administration and Coi 
In a recent letter to 


found, when it reported that details 
of this discussion could be found in 
a secret part of an Israeli report. 

Bui the jury concluded its 11 
days of deliberations by finding 


of the verdicts has survived. The mixing attitude, but in a gentler 
rest were reversed, either by trial or fashion than his Senate colleague, 
appellate judges, usually on the “I never saw a defense budget 


That act malice was not ground the jurors did not properly that couldn't be cut,” Mr. Mi 


found in the Sharon case has re- understand the law. 

newed the 20 -year-old debate over 

The New York Times v. Sullivan, Ariel Sharon ohms 


cm Cyprus, declared to 1983, is ScacUijj of Stole Ocmy T. Shultt 


only by Turkey- 


warned that Israel could not expea 


Mr. Denktash arid that he was 
^^’withdrawing concessions he made 
x luring preparations for the talks, 
Add at the United Nations in New 
_^York. Hie talks, aimed at setting 
— — "L^ip a federal, bizonal republic, end- 
- -rrrr^^t & last Amday. 

x - v - 

His principal concessions were 
* - • '-o drop a demand for a rotating 
- •; . Sreek Cypriot and Turkish Cypri- 
1 jt presidency and to offer to reduce 
' i he area under his control from 37 
• . ■ _ *ercent to 29 percent of the island. 


ToTfcurSh^rsof u5b "in New a substanti^ increaseinitsaid 
York were moated by the UN package ifn failed to takeadditiqn- 
searetaiy-generaL Javier PSrez de ai steps toconm us stagnanu in- 
Cnellarr^^ were the first time flation-ndden economy, 
that Mr. Denklash and President A senior Israeli economic official 

Spyros Kyprianou had met face to was 111 n . e ^ ptJ ?, 

7ZL eiruv 1070 boos on extending controls said 

taw since iv, v. Friday that it was hoped that the 

PWiticai sources mNiaiaa said n ew agreement would^p satisfy 
that details of the Turkish Cypriot ^ conditions. 


that Tune had not acted with “ac- decision in which the test for public 
tual malice." Tune, it held, neither officials became law. 
knew that what it had reported was 

false nor entertained serious " 

doubts about its truthfulness. ^ 1 

Tune had been careless, even iyEUUneH iWUTder 
negligent, in its reporting, the jury 

declared in a statement, but not French Defense 
reckless or deceitful. 

, As in the dividing of a baby. MSwiatl-v 
however, this was not fully accept- ^JLUliat 

able to eilher party. The AuodareJ Press 

Mr. Sharon never expected to PARIS — A high-ranking offi- 


the landmark U.S. Supreme Court Kbe | ^ ^ filed against Time 
decision inwhich the test for public magazine in Israel Page 2L 


Ariel Sharoo plans to pursue tbe ■^f“ , ° 0 Pn! * Pn ®r 5 
Bbe. writ he ^^hme ^ 

magazme m IsraeL Page 2. So^litical lS^TfoTSe ia.3. 


““w 1 n/ - t 10 u the talks, between second-ranking 

Mr. WMberger has agreed to union and boanl officials, would be 
mm $8.7 bdhon from an proposed held on Tuesday. 

(kfense budgrtof $286 bdlion, but - We have responded positively 
that figure stfll represents a sub- the letter received froi the Na- 
atantial increase over the current tfonaj Union of Mbeworkers indi- 

^w 1 n, - v . ' ' ' eating that an informal discussion 

Mr. Weinberger has rroeatcdly will take place to set the parameters 
cautioned amgrasional leaders for further negotiations." he said, 
not to include Pentagon spending ^-^.5 pnadent. Arthur 

m any across- tbe-board spending 5 , 3 ^ said in a brief statement 
. . , , „ , that the union had accepted a 

Tbe House minority leader Jlob- ^ invitation. The union had 
enMichdRqjiibhcanofJJnois, offered on Thursday to negotiate 
ako voiced frtmrauon on Fnday -without preconditions." 
with Mr. Weinberger's uncompro- But ^ j fundamental dispute re- 
miang attitude, but in a gentler niained. The union raected de- 
fasluon than his Senate colleague, tnands by Prime Minister Margaret 

.K7 ae ^-^ a ^ t Tf Thatcher that it accept in writing 

that couldn t be cut, Mr. Micbd tfa e principle of dosing mooey-Ios- 

sa,d - ing mines Wore full talks are bdd. 

■ Reagan to Push Programs Mick McGahey, the deputy lead- 
Preadent Reagan, seeking to cr of the union, said it would give 
t ranslate his personal popularity 00 guarantees before talks. He told 
into political leverage for the bud- (Continued on Page 2, Cot. 2) 


The AssodarcJ Press 

PARIS — A high-ranking offi- 


dectipn were still under discussion -\V e tried to do our best" he win even a fraction of the $50 mil- dal in France's Defense Ministry 
and U was not dem whether a draft xjjd. “We cul all of our expend)- lkm in damages he sought — roon- was shot and killed 21 his home late 
constitution for lire breakaway tures. Now we need a little more ey that, he pledged, would have Friday, the ministry said. 

C ’ WOuld 1x5 help from the U.S. to bridge the gone toward anti-terrorist activities The outlawed terrorist organiza- 
carried out beforehand. * and disabled Israeli war veterans. *•'« ntr«*i am-.™ h had 


The present Constituent Assem- 
bly has 40 members elected in 1981 
under an earlier constitution and 


nre Peres government, however, 
has still not accomplished one of 
the key measures in its overall eco- 


was shot and killed at his home late 
Friday, the ministry said. 

The outlawed terrorist organiza- 
tion Direct Action claimed it had 


■« 





Now the former Israeli defense killed Rate Audran. 55, assistant 
minister will nol get any money at director of international affaire at 
afl. Thai may not pose a financial the ministry, in an anonymous tde~ 


’apWT 


.M.-I.VVfT'- 


unaer an earner consuiuuon ana the key measures m its overall eco- aiL 1 nat may not pose a financial the ministry, m an anonymous tele- 
30 nominated by Mr. Denktash. nomic program involving cots in problem for Mr. Sharon, whose phone call to tire French news 


• wcent to 29 percent of the island. Moves to approve the new con- the government budget. The cam- 
-rJ'^'S^rirkish troops have occupied the stitution and hold elections woe net has agreed in principle to a 
1 . sorth of Cyprus since they invaded shelved after Mr. Pferez de Cuellar $ 1 . 1 -billion cut in the budget for 

a 1974 after an Athens-inspired began soundings for new talks, the fiscal year that begins April I. 


INSIDE 


the government budget- The cabi-' lawyers have not expected him to agency Agence France- Presse. 


began soundings for new talks, the fiscal year that begins April I. 


■ A fashionable bar was the 


onage rings since India became 
independent. Page 2. 

■ Theshmtie’x secret satellite is 
intended to warn of Soviet at- 
tack, experts say. Page 3. 


barrassed Chancellor Kohl 
raising a debate on the reunifi- 
cation of Germany. Page 5. 


ARTS/LEISURE 

•V ISoarea MdBaaa reports on 
y_\ artsddais'reMwedintenstm 
antique jewelry. ' Page 6. 



cover the costs of tbe case on his He was hit by six bullets in the 
own. For the firm. Shea & Gould, western Paris suburb of La CeQe~ 
of Manhattan, the outcome is more Saint Ooud, police said. Tbe minis- 
problematical It spent more than try said that Mr. Audran super- 
Sl^ million on the case and has vised arms sales contracts, 
recouped $350,000, mostly from AFP said a caller identifying 
donations. himself as a member of the leftist 

Direct Action group claimed “the 


Time, too, spent far more than 


$1 million, most going to the firm execution” of Mr. Audran. 

. C .1 S* - fl f J J _ ci: 


of Cravath. Swaine & Moore, of 
Manhattan. Time’s costs, however, 
have not been solely finan cial 
As a result of the case, its ediiori- 


“Signed commando Elizabeth 
Von Dick, member of tbe Red 
Army Faction, killed at Nuremberg 
in 1978." tire caller said. Miss Von 




al processes and personnel have Dick was killed by West German 
been scrutinized, and criticized, as police in her Nuremberg apartment 


never before. 

Because Time technically won 


in May 1978. 

Direct Action, created in 1979. 


the case, it can appeal the jury’s was banned by the French goyern- 
d&tisions on defamation and falsity ment in 1982. It claimed the killing 
only in the court of public opinion, of two policemen last May. 


• ‘ • • I '*!;- 1 - ■- 

He taoaokd Press 

SABOTAGE — West Gennan police searched in the snow for evidence after a bomb 
blast damaged three electricity pylons Friday, shutting down a nuclear power plant at 
KriimmeL 40 kilometers southeast of Hamburg. The power station cut out automatical- 
ly when the Mast sent a high-tension pylon crashing down, dragging two others after it 
No one claimed responsibility for tbe attack, the third against die (riant in four months. 


Vietnamese Deserter^ in Thailand, Seek Refuge Anywhere 9 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 
■ Orders to US. factories for 
durable goods dropped 11 per- 
cent last month. Page 9. 


al for fort 
operations 


Page 9. 


SPORTS 

jp ■ Quarterback Doug Flu lie, 
•0... the Ra gman Trophy winner, 
will play football for tbe New 
yf Jersey (Senerals. Page 15. 


Hm Wotngion Pan 

Max M. Kampdman, head of the U.S. delegation to the 
new set of arms control talks with the Soviet Union. 

MONDAY 

Tass, reacting to reports of an unpublished article about arms control 
by Max M. Kampdman, Zbigniew Brzezinski and Robert Jastiow, 
pnii^ Mr. Kampdman a hard-liner who would treat talks “skeptical- 
ly ” Their article, to appear in The New York Times on Sunday, will 
be printed in full on Monday in the International Herald Tribune. 


By Barbara Gosserre 

New York runes Service 

BANGKOK — Huynh Quoc Tuan, his 
rumpled shirt loo big lor his small frame, was 
barefoot and trembling when Thailand’s top 
military chiefs paraded him before tbe press. 

A week ago Thursday (his 18-year-old 
plumber from Ho Chi Mmh City, who did 
not want to be a soldier, camp over Bridge 
No. 3 at the Ampfl border camp in Cambo- 
dia and deserted the Vietnamese Army. 

According to Thai authorities, more than 
30 of Mr. Tuan’s fellow soldiers have done 
the same since early January, when the Viet- 
namese look the Ampil border camp, the 


tions have become regular: two more were 
recorded Wednesday. 

Thursday, Mr. Tuan and Gve other Viet- 
namese defectors, two of them officers, were 
put on display in the Thai Supreme Com- 
mand's cavernous briefing room in Bangkok. 
Under the glare of television fights, they were 
encouraged to tell their stories. 

Thai officers say defectors like these have 
given them valuable insights into Hanoi’s 
strategies in this year's dry-season offensive. 
No high-ranking officers are reported to 
have deserted, however, so reports are main- 
ly from lower-level personnel in the field. 

The six young men at Thursday’s briefing 
none older than 24, were all from the south 


armed groups trying to overthrow the 
Phnom Penh government because forces 
from the north of Vietnam, who had previ- 
ously done the job, were being moved to the 
VietnairHOiina border. 

The defectors reported through their 
spokesman, Second Lieu tenant Nguyen Van 
Hung, whose words were translated by a 
Thai Army interpreter. They said that the 
Vietnamese had been told to dear out the 
Cambodian resistance camps this year so 
that the border could be turned over to 
Cambodian troops. 

The Vietnamese said they had been or- 
dered to dig canals or trenches along the 
Cambodian ride of the border to obstruct 


these Cambodians from getting into the 
country,” they said. 

All six, flanked by a Buddhist shrine and a 
portrait of the King of Thailand, and careful- 
ly numbered and identified for the reporters 
and cameras, said they wanted a new hone 
"anywhere where someone would take us." 

A spokesman for tbe Thai Supreme Com- 
mand said after the briefing that defectors 
were bang kept in restricted military areas, 
"not prisons." 


7rr , ( 1 1 — 7J V7T7 rft ^17, V. iV.MI,,* I | ) .^71 ^ I ’--'I- ■! il 'V-pV. I 


Vietnamese troops and Cambodian rebels 
battled along a 43-mile (70-kilometer) front 
Friday after a Vietnamese artillery barrage 
that lulled 15 persons in a refugee camp m»a r 




al Liberation Front. The Thais say the defec- the Cambodian" front to battle the three from Thailand. “We were told to prevent reported from Aranyaprathet. Thailand. 






Israelis Leave Lebanon With Relief — r Ifs Their Problem 5 Now 


% Edward Walsh 

u Washington Post Serna 

u£!£32!f¥^ ^“ x ® — E*cepi for rhc three 

^ irucits, roost of the men in the am vnya-rrr . inning 
Their granting faces could be seen through the wind- 
of about 12 vehicles that lumbered slowly 
oown a narrow mountain road. They were bred*** 
sooth. 

The convoys have been rolling for several days* 
canning soldiers and the dis mantled remnants of what 
was Israel s defense line along the Awali River. The 
“ticks ra the convoy were laden with the litter of a 
departing army and with huge concrete blocks that the 
Israelis used to barricade the entrances to thwr bases 
and outposts in the hostile southern Lebanese 
countryside. 

For the soldiers who are leaving with the equipment, 
there is a dear sense of liberation from what has 
become toe increasingly dangerous task of military 
occupation. There is also disgust with the ways of 
Lebanon and deep din'll usi onmen t, especially with the 
Lebanese Christians, who had bom thought of as 
Israel's allies in this country of waning religious 
factions. 

“I was scared all the time," said Sergeant Benny 
Pakulov. “It's their problem, not ours any more. We 
ate it enough here already.” 

Another soldier, who aslceri not lo be identified, said 
of the Quistians: “They'proved to be unreliable allies. 
They didn't do anything, and when they did, they did 
Sabra and Chatila." He was referring to the massacres 
at two Palestinian refugee camps in Beirut in 1982. 

The soldiers were among dozens here who watched 
idly as a huge construction crane with Hebrew letter- 
ing on its sides lifted (me of several temporary housing 
units onto a flatbed truck for the trip back to IsracL 

All altmg the Awali River, similar scenes are unfold- 
ing as the Israeli Army prepares to execute the first 
stage of a planned three-stage withdrawal from south- 
ern Lebanon. Israel spent millions of dollars to estab- 
lish the Awali line in September 1983, when it with- 
drew from the Chuf Mountains south of BeiruL 


Now it is spending milli ngs more to dismantle the 
line. The army bases have been clogged with heavy 
construction equipment that belong to private Israeli 
contractors. . 

The first stage of the .pullback is scheduled to be 
completed by Feb. 18. Before then, most of the bases 
and outposts along the tine, this one included, wfll be 
dismantled. On Feb. 18, the last of the soldiers wiD 

coastafhigbway, away from Sidon, the largest city in 
southern Lebanon and away from the Palestinian 
refugee camps east of Sidon. 

Along the coast, the Israelis will move as far south 
as die Ljtani River. From that pcant, the new line nil] 
run sharply northeast, keeping within the Israeli zone 
of control the city of Nabatijreh, a cct ter of Moslem 
Shiite resistance, and the Christian town of Jezrine. 

According to Israeli Army figures, the area to be 
evacuated in the first stage represents 5 percent erf 
Lebanon and slightly less chan 20 percent of the 
territory now under Israeli occupation. It is the most 
densely populated section in the Israeli zone, contain- 
ing as many as 400,000 Lebanese and Palestinian 
civilians. In withdrawing from this area first, the 
Israelis will almost cut in half the population under 
their control. 

There will not, however, be a parallel reduction in 
the size of the Israeli presence in southern Lebanon. 
Estimates of the number erf Israeli soldiers in Lebanon 
range from 12,000 to 20,000, and the bulk of them are 
concentrated in eastern Lebanon near Syrian Army 
lines. The pullback in the east is stage two of the 


Mashnaka unit a 26-year-old soldier with dose- 
cropped hair who identified hims elf as “Captain Ted- 
dy." He was chosen apparently because as a youth he 
lived for eight years m Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 
where his father was studying economics, and speaks 
flawless English. 

He sat on the hood of jeep, his rifle slung over his 
shoulder, and proudly called hims elf “a combat sol- 
dier." This was his answer to a question about how 
much it was costing to dismantle the Mashnaka base. 
Captain Teddy said he did not know anything about 
things hke costs, nor did he seem to care. 

“The important thing is we are not leaving with our 
rails between our legs but with our beads held hi g h , ” 
he said. "We are leaving only because of the govern- 
ment's decision to withdraw. Militarily, we could stay 
here as long as we like." 

For his part. Captain Teddy said he has seen enough 
of Lebanon. “It's a beautiful country physically, but 
the problem is you have to keep your eyes on other 

.v: I ■ ik. n k. : J 


thin gs and nol the view,” be 
He said he hoped the Israeli withdrawal would not 
be followed, as is widely feared, by an outbreak of 
fi ghting among the various Lebanese factions. But 
after two and a half years here, the Israelis have 
learned not to count on the Lebanese or, to judge by 
Pa ptain Teddy’s comments, to care much about them. 

“This isn't a country," he said “This is a collection 
of sects and religions, each armed to the teeth and each 
interested in kiilmg each other." 

“Maybe some of them are bitter about the with- 
drawal," Captain Teddy said of the Christians who 
populate the villages along the road that runs from 
f orma to the eastern outskirts of Sidon. “But that's 
their problem. They can stand on their own two fecL 
They nave to solve thrir own problems.” 

Christians in the area expressed mixed sentiments 
about the impending withdrawal Several of them had 
gathered on the open, second-floor patio of a home 
that overlooks an Israeli checkp oint at the Bisri cross- 
ing point of the Awali River. As they watched a crane 
lifting the heavy steel platforms of a temporary bridge 
structure, Jossun Hdou and Mona Boulos, both 20, 


withdrawal plan, but the time for the second step has 
not been set and will be affected bv how well the 


not been set and will be affected by how well the 
withdrawal along the coast roes. 

The several hundred soldiers here at Mashnaka, a 
command post and ordnance base situated hi gh on a 
□at bluff between Jezzine and Sidon, are among the 
lucky ones. It is a place where the Israeli Army 
regularly brings journalists and photographers to see 
the Awali Hne being taken down and talk to the 
soldiers. 

The army chose as the main spokesman for the 


said they were not afraid of the Dnize militias that 
control the Chuf Mountains just across the river. 

“We are strong," said Miss Boulos, who lives in 
Jezzine and will remain behind Israeli lines until the 
second stage of the withdrawal is completed. 

But in a restaurant in Jezzine, Ramzi Khammar said 
the Christians where he lives “are scared to death." 
Mr. Khammar is a Baptist minister who lives near 
Sidon in the Christian village of Miye Mi ye, located 
next to a Palestinian refugee camp of the same name. 

In Miye Miye, Mr. Khammar said, the people are 
stockpiling canned food, bread and wood and are in a 
much higher state of alert than they’ were before the 
Israeli withdrawal started. Meanwhile, Palestinian 
women and children are moving from the refugee 
camp to a larger and better protected camp, he said. 
Their fear is being fed. Mr. Khammar said, by the 
many statements by Israeli officials warning against 
dm dangers of sectarian violence and massacres after 
the withdrawal 

As they prepare to leave Mashnaka and other out- 
posts along the Awali Israeli soldiers appear to recog- 
nize that for more than two years they have brought a 
measure of enforced order to the area. That role has 
made them a target, and they’ will leave the steep, 
green hillsides along the Awali gleefully. Some of them 
will also leave with a gnawing sense of disappointment 
and failure: 

“1 Teel good that we're going." said Sergeant Yossi 
ETbaz. “But I don't fed. proud about leaving the 
Christians behind. I wouldn't want to be in their shoes, 
but we can't ihmlt about that any more.” 


■ UN Aide Hopeful on Talks 
Undersecretary General Brian Urquhart of the 
United Nations, seeking to resurrect lsradi-Lebanese 





■ f.-rir 
■ 


• N - 


* '.rsR^" 

" , .r^ur*. 




Asked if be thought the UN-sponsored discussions, 
canceled Thursday, had reached an end, Mr. Urquhart 
replied; "I doubt it I think the talks are still a useful 
framework for an orderly withdrawal” 


An Israeli soldier carrying a sign reading 
passes other soldiers dismantling install 
LsraeTs withdrawal from the Awali River 


« ‘Dining Room" 
ations as part of - 
area of Lebanon. . 


Indian Spy Case: Laxity in the Ranks 


By William Qai borne 

Washington Post Stria 

NEW DELHI — In the often- 
crowded bar at the fashionable 
Gymkhana Club in central New 
Delhi, a holdover from the days of 
the British Raj, one of the biggest 
espionage rings to be uncovered 
since India gained independences? 
years ago operated freely tmtil ear- 
lier this mrrnth 

There, where white-gloved wait- 
ers still serve gin and tonics on the 
veranda under ceiling fans, an Indi- 
an businessman named Coomar 
Nation mixed with social dnnbers 


the Defense Ministry's production 
department and two from the Min- 
istry of Commerce — have been 
touched by the scandaL 
As Indian mieUigence agents be- 
gan rounding up suspects, at least 
one diplomat from the French Em- 


As yet, no foreign government 
has been publicly linked by the 


bassy, the deputy military attach*, 
lieutenant Colonel Alain Bolley, 
departed from India, reportedly at 
the request of the Indian Foreign 
Ministry, and two French business- 
men were reported to have hastily 
left and flown to Paris. 

The Indian government has kept 
the investigation seem, holding all 
arraignments of suspects behind 
closed doors and sealing documen- 
tary evidence. The French Embas- 
sy has refused to comment on any 
aspect of the case. 

What has emerged from credible 
Indian sources and Western diplo- 
mats is a pattern of commercial 
espionage that appears to have be- 
gun with the sale of documents 
useful in securing government pur- 
chasing contracts, and gradually 
expanded into the wholesale copy- 
ing and selling of classified records 
that could hzvebeea useful to intel- 
ligence agencies of a number of 
foreign governments. 


eminent ministries, buying them 
drinks and introducing mem to his 
friends, according to Indian intelli- 
gence sources and Western diplo- 
mats. * 

Among Mr. Narain’s guests were 
said to be well-dressed French 
b usinessmen and embassy atta- 
ches, as well as low-level male sec- 
retaries wearing coarse-cotton kha- 
di pajama suits. 

Mr. Narain, who has been 
charged under the Official Secrets 
Act with bring the middleman of a . 
major spy network, is alleged to 
have entertained $90-a-month : 
clerks and personal assistants. It is' 
charged flat he accepted, in ex- 
change for bundles of rupees, pho- 
tocopies of military procurement 
orders, min utes of ministerial 
meetings, defense analyses, tech- 
nology-transfer agreements, weap- 
ons m anuals and other secret docu- 
ments that routinely flow through 
the labyrinth of the Indian bureau- 
cracy. 

Mr. Narain is also said to have 
entertained middle-level govern- 
ment officials in a spacious bunga- 
low in south New Delhi holding 
parties at which young women 
mingled with bureaucrats. At the 
end of the parties, the sources said, 
bottles of imported scotch and cas- 
sette recorders were handed out to 
the guests. 

Since the existence of the spy 
ring surfaced earlier this month, 
sending reverberations through the 
government of Prime Minister Ra- 
jiv Gandhi at least 11 government 
employees and three Indian busi- 
nessmen have been arrested and a 
dozen other officials summoned for 
interrogation. 

Most of those arrested have been 
personal secretaries, office assis- 
tants, stenographers and, in the lex- 
icon of the Indian bureaucracy, pe- 
on* or office boys who perform 
routine chores and run er ra nds . 

Six employees in the prime min- 
ister's secretariat —-two from Pres- 
ident ZaO Singh's office, two from 


nage ring, and no senior Indian 
government o fficials have been im- 
plicated. 

Official sources said they doubt 
that the spy network readied above 
the nniddlft - managmian t level of 
go vernmen t mims trie- 


Lawyer Says 
Sharon Filed 
Suit in Israel 


Deception Widespread, 
CBS Witness Testifies 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Goetz Indicted Only on Arms Charges 


British Coal Strike Talks Set 


(Continued from Page 1) 


a miners’ rally in Glasgow that 
Mrs. Thatcher had no right to de- 
mand that the “union guarantee 
her or anyone else these condi- 
tions.” 


“This government is alienating 
itself from the people with its de- 
mand for blood," Mr. McGahey 
said. “They are not having the 
blood of the miners with 80 percent 
of our members still on strike." , 

The board maintains that only 
60 percent of miners are still on 
strike, with hundreds more return^ 

ing each day 

A- coal board representative; 
Tom MacPhetson, said: "What we 
need is a piece of paper from the 
National Union of Mineworkers — 
we don't mind bow ruddy they put 
it — saying, “Yes, we are prepared 
to sit down with you and consider 
the methodology of the closure of 
uneconomic pits.' " 

The state-owned board, buoyed 
by crumbling support for the walk- 
out, reprated that 3,376 more min- 
ers had abandoned the strike this 
past week, the highest weekly total 
since Nov. 19. 


A board statement said more 
than 77,000 miners, or 41 percent 


of the union's 187,300 members, 
were back at work. The union dis- 
putes the figures, claiming that 
fewer than 50,000 have crossed the 
picket lines. 

The mass-circulation Sun said 
Friday that Mrs. Thatcher was 
moving “in for the kill” Many pa- 
pers predicted a swift end to the 
strike, with Mr. ScargzH losing. 

The last round of negotiations 
was in October. The talks foun- 
dered on Mr. ScargflTs insistence 
that there are no unprofitable 
mines among the 174 state-owned 
coal pits, only those starved of in- 
vestment. He has insisted that the 
rally closures should come when 
mines are exhausted of coal or have 
become too dangerous to wrak 

The coal board's chairman, Ian 
MacGregor, has offered talks lo 
compromise oh seme specific clo- 
sure plans but has insisted oo the 

board’s overafl right to dose uneco- 
nomic nwi« 

- The umon launched the strike on 
March 12 last year over coal board 
plans to dose 20 money-losing 
mines, eliminating 20,000 jobs 
through attntiom This would be in 
line with government orders to 
stem losses in. the heavily subsi- 
dized industry. 


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from 10 a m. to 6:30 p.m. 



The Associated Press 


TEL AVTV — A lawyer for Ariel 
Sharon, who lost the Anal stage of 
his libel suit in New York against 
Time magazine, said Friday that he 
would pursue a second lawsuit in 
an Israeli court against the maga- 
zine's European subsidiary. 

The attorney, Dov Weisglass. 
said the former Israeli defense min- 
ister stiO intended to sue Time 
magazine in Tel Aviv district court 
for defamation. 

Mr. Weisglass said that he filed 
suit in March 1983 against Time's 
European publishing subsidiary, 
which distributes the magazine in 
Israel and that be expected a trial 
in about six months. 

Mr. Sharon sued Tune in New 
York because of a Feb. 21. 1983, 
cover story. In his contention, the 
article implied he encouraged the 
1982 murder by Lebanese Chris- 
tian Phalangist militiamen of Pal- 
estinian refugees in the Sabra and 
Chatila camps in Beirut, following 
the murder of the Lebanese presi- 
dent-elect. Bashir GcmayeL 

The Tel Aviv defamation case 
was being brought cm the same 
grounds as the one in New York, 
Mr. Weisglass said, that Appendix 
B of the Kahan Commission report 
into the Sabra and Chatila massa- 
cres "does nol include any details 
of that kind," and that Mr. Sharon 
“never discussed the need for re- 
venge, either with the Gemayels 
nor with the Rialangists." 

He said Mr. Sharon had de- 
manded the equivalent of S250,000 
in damages. But he said that “like 
the case in New York, the lawsuit' 
was never filed to make money.” 

- Mr. Weisglass said that Mr. 
Sharon would not have to prove to 
the Israeli court that Time was mo- 
tivated by malice, the count on 
which his case failed in New York. 


More important than the com- 
promising of national security, 
some Indian officials said, was the 
disclosure of a pervasive break- 
down of procedures for handling 
secret documents and a laxity in 
even the most sensitive offices of 
the government. 


Classification of even routine 
documents has become so com- 
monplace in government ministries 
that controls over the handling of 
secret s has gradually lapsed, ac- 
cording to Indian government 


.It was in this atmosphere of care- 
lessness and vulnerability at low- 
paid civil servants, intelligence 
sources say, that documents have 
been routinely copied and sold to 
private middlemen working for for- 
eign interests. 


By MA Farber 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Gerage W. Al- 
len, a former deputy chid of Viet- 
namese affairs for the Central In- 
telligence Agency, has testified that 
the production in late 1967 of a 
“misleading" intelligence estimate 
on enemy strength m South Viet- 
nam was part of a broader “self- 
deception” by the administration 
of President Lyndon B. Johnson 
regarding progress in the war. 

Mr. Allen, testifying a second 
day for CBS in the trial of the libel 
suit brought by General William C. 
Westmoreland, said Thursday that 
the White House had tried to “head 
off mounting public opposition to 
the war” in the s ummer of 1967 
through a “massive public-rela- 
tions c ampaig n to influence, exag- 
gerate and misrepresent. " 

It was in this context. Mr. Allen 
testified, that he once described a 
dispute over the enemy strength 
estimate as “making a mountain 
out a molehill" 

“I was referring to the fact that 
the production of this dishonest 
estimate was only a small part of 
that bigger issue, that bigger exer- 
cise by the administration, which in 
fact caused its loss of credibility," 
Mr. Allen told the jury in U.S. 
District Court in New York City. 

That effort, he said, “produced 
an area of self-deception to the ex- 
tent that neither the Congress, nor 
members of the administration, nor 
tire population was prepared for 
the psychological impact mounted 
by tire Communist forces on an 
unprecedented scale” during the 
Tet offensive in January 1968. 


On Wednesday, he accused his 
superiors at tire CIA of “caving in" 


Israeli leaders allied with Mr. 
Sharon's Likud bloc called the out- 
come of the New York trial a “mor- 
al victory” and a “personal suc- 
cess” for Mr. Sharon. 


to the military. 

Mr. Allen, who retired from the 
CIA in 1979 but still works under 
contract for the agency, portrayed 
himself Thursday as someone who 
had rompromised his own integrity 
in 1967 and played “the good bu- 
reaucrat" until this case forced him 


i case forced him 


to confront his own failings and 
those of the government 

David Dorsen, a lawyer for Gen- 
eral Westmoreland, suggested that 
the 58-year-old witness had tai- 
lored his testimony to help Samuel 
A. Adams, a former GA colleague 
who is one of the defendants at the 
trial Mr. Allen denied it 

Mr. Allen said he wanted to as- 
sist the jury and the public in un- 
derstanding “the responsibility 
that many officers in the intelli- 
gence community have, to insuring 
that honest estimates are presented 
to the policy-makers." 

Mr. Dorsen then told the court 
that Mr. Allen, at the start of the 
second day of his preuial deposi- 
tion in August 1983, had asked to 
have the oath “to tell the truth, the 
whole truth and nothing but the 
truth" repeated for him. ft was “the 
whole truth" part that he wanted 
“verified," Mr. Allen said then. 

Mr. Allen explained that he told 
tire truth on the first day of the 
deposition but hadn't listened to 
the oath when it was read. He said 
be had “lain awake" the previous 
night “reviewing the seriousness of 
the situation and the events of the 
last 15 yean," during which time, 
he said, he had “rationalized and 
been evasive" regarding the 1967 
estimate an enemy strength in Viet- 
nam. 

Having the oath “reaffirmed" on 
the second day of the deposition, 
he said, “was a symbolic gesture by 
me that the time had come to stop 
dissemb ling, no m aftpr what toe 
personal embarrassment to me." 

General Westmoreland’s suit 
steins from a 1982 CBS documen- 
tary — “The Uncounted Enemy: A 
Vietnam Deception” — which 
charged that the general’s com- 
mand bad engaged in a “conspira- 
cy" to minimize North Vietnamese 
and Vietcong capabilities. General 
Westmoreland contends the docu- 
mentary defamed bum by saying be 
had lied to the president and the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff about the size 
and nature of the enemy. 


NEW YORK (AP) — A grand jury on Friday refused to indict 
Bernhard H. Goetz fra: attempted murder in the shootings of four young 
men on a subway and instead indicted him only on three counts erf 
criminal possession of a weapon. 

Robert M. Morgen than, the Manhattan district attorney, announced 
that the jury had failed to vote an indictment on four counts of second- 
degree attempted murder, four counts of first-degree assault and first- 
degree reckless endangermenL It was not immediately clear if prosecutors 
could press attempted murder charges on their own without the jury 
indictment. 

The jury indicted Mr. Goetz. 37, on one count of third-degree criminal 
possession of a weapon — illegally having a loaded pistol on Dec. 22, 
1984, when he admitted shooting the four teen-agers wbo he said asked 
him for S5 in a threatening manner. He also was indicted on two counts (rf 
fourth-degree c riminal possession of a weapon because he allegedly had 
two other pistols inride his apartment when police searched it 


Pope Calls Synod on Vatican II Issues ;j:_\ 


ROME (AP) — Pope John Paul II announced Friday that he is calling 
an extraordinary worldwide conference erf bishops to examine the Second 
Vatican Council which vastly revised the workings of the Roman 
Catholic Church. 

The pope, in a surprise announcement during a Mass in the Basilica of 
Sl Paul's Outside the Walls, said that the conference would “relive" the 
spirit (rf the council but also would re-examine the changes it mack “in 
the light of new demands.” « 

He added that the conference, known as a bishops synod, would meet 
in Rome from Nov. 25 to Dec. 8 this year. The Second Vatican Council 
commonly called Vatican II, was called by Pope John XXIII and lasted 
from 1962 to. 1965. Among many other things, the council permitted the 
saying of Mass in the local language, or vernacular, and stressed greater 
participation of lay people in the liturgy. 

It also stressed religious freedom, ecumenicism and condemned anti- 
Semitism. The pontiff made the announcement on the eve of his depar- 
ture on a 12-day tour (rf Latin America. John Paul said there would be 
representatives of Catholic bishops conferences from all five continents 
at the “coraordinary synod." He did not say whether he is seeking 
changes in the Vatican LTs reforms. 


Judges Ask Meese for More Details 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawyers for Edwin Meese 3d the White 
House counselor, were ordered Friday to furnish more details to support 
Mr. Meese’s plea for reimbursement of more than $700,000 in legal fees 
resulting from his investigation during Senate bearings last March. 


in Gwemment Act, told Mr. Meese’s lawyers to submit the documents 


in Government Act, told Mr. Meesc's lawyers to submit the documents 
by Feb. 7. Under the act, government figures subjected to investigations 
can petition the court for reimbursement if no indictment resulted frran 
the probe. 

The documents released by the court Friday confirmed that Mr. Meese 
is seeking to be reimbursed for over $700,000 in fees incurred his lawyers 
argue, because of the investigation by Jacob Stein, an independent 
counsel Mr. Stein investigated Mr. Meese’s financial ties to various 
individuals and their appointments to federal jobs. He found there was no 
basis for prosecuting Mr. Meese on any violations of law. 


Deputy Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Shamir said he believed that Mr. 
Sharon “achieved the twain thing 
by proving that he was 
that the thing s that were published 
mare a lie.” 


U.S. Says Iran Arranging 
OU, Arms for Nicaragua 


Botfaa Promises Bladks Greater Voice 


JOHANNESBURG (NYT) — President Pieter W. Botha of South 
frica pledged Friday that blade people living outside the tribal homc- 


But a leftist member of parlia- 
ment, Yossi Sand, said the New 
York verdict did not dear Mr. 
Sharon from guilt fra having corn- 
mi ued Israd to what he called the 
“terrible” Lebanon war. Mr. Shar- 
on was forced to resign his post as 
defense minister on the recommen- 
dation of a judicial commission in- 
vestigating the massacre. He is 
now minister erf industry and com- 
merce. 


CHURCH SERVICES 


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The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON— The Reagan 
administration raid Friday that it 
had reason to believe Iran was “in 

the form <rf oafsuttpks aiLcFf trad- 
ing fra armaments' 4 fra the leftist 
government of Nicaragua. 

Robert Sims, deputy White 
House press secretary for foreign 
affairs, said that “the potential for 
some expansion of terrorism in this 
hemisphere is always a concern for 
us.” 

President Ronald Reagan, in- 
creasing pressure on Congress to 
renew U.S. aid to Nicaraguan re- 
bels, brought up the subject of Ira- 
nian aid to Nicaragua on Thursday. 

He told a group of legislators 
from Western Hemisphere nations: 
“A new danger' we see in Central 
America is the support bang given 
to the Sandinistas by Colonel Qa- 
dhafi’s Libya, the PLO and most 
recently, the Ayatollah Khomeini's 
Iran.” 

Asked about the president’s 
statement, Mr. Sims said the cur- 
rent Nicaraguan visit by Prime 
Minister Mir Hussein Monssavi of 
Iran “is obviously evidence of po- 
litical Support” for the Sanding 

“There is also reason to believe 
that Iran is in the process (rf arrang- 
ing support in the form of ofl sup- 
plies and funding fra armaments 
which would add to the Nicara- 
guan arsenal and obviously we 
would be concerned about any ad- 
ditional involvement of countries 
outside the hemisphere," Mr. Sms 
said. 

u As to where it might lead," he 
added, “the potential for some ex- 
pansion of terrorism in this hemi- 
sphere is always a concern for us as 
wdL" 


Administration officials had pre- 
viously linked the Libyan leaner, 
Moamer Qadhafi, and the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization to 
Nicaragua, but Mr. Reagan's state- 
ment was the first suggestion that 
Iran had joined the radical forces 
assisting the country’s Marxist-led 
Sandinist regime. 


■ US. Move Puzzles Spain 

Edward Sdmmadier of The New 
York Tunes reported from Madrid. ■ 
Prime Minister Felipe GoozAlez 
of Spain said Thursday that he was 
puzzled by the decision of the Unit- 
ed States to break off negotiations 
with Nicaragua. 


Africa pledged Friday that blade people living outside the- tribal home- 
lands would have a greater political voice. But he mark it clear that hu 
government planned no dilution of the white Afrikaner power (hat has 
prevailed since 1948. 

“It remains the government’s point of departure that, because of the 
diversity of South African society, it is neither desirable nor practicable to 
accommodate all communities in the same way," he said at ute apeaingin 
Cape Town of a new tricamera] Parliament, a legislature based an racial 
segregation. He said the government had decided to treat Made commu- 
nities outside the homelands as “entities in their own right” which “most 
be givai political participation and a say at higher levels." 

Rightist whites termed the prescient’s promise a sellout of traditional 
apartheid and vowed to fightiL Black activists said it fell far short of their 


New Caledonian Invites Rebels to Talk 


PARIS (AP) — Dick Ukerwe, president of New Caledonia’s territorial 
assembly, offered Friday to meet with Jean-Marie Ijibaou, head of me 
Kansk Socialist National Liberation Front, in a bid to end the political 


He said that the action had crane 
at a “a moment (rf dear efforts of 
flexibility on Nicaragua's part” 
and that (he United States might be, 
missing a “historic opportunity." 

The Spanish leader said it was 
still unclear to him whether the 
suspension was merely a tactical 
move. 


turmoil in which 20 persons have died 
As assembly president, Mr. Ukeiw£ is also a member (rf the Frmcn 
Senate. He was in Paris for the parliamentary vote Friday that approved a 
bill extending until June 30 the right of French authorities in New 
Caledonia lo maintain s state of emergency that was imposed Jan. 12- 
Mr. Ijibaou, in a statement, said he would accept any exchanges,"^ 
matter where, no matter when," as long as they dealt with how the island 
group would achieve its independence. 


He praised the recent inaugural 
speech of President Daniel Ortega 
Saavedra of Nicaragua calling for 
political pluralism, and noted that 
opposition Roman Catholic bish- 
ops had attended the inauguration. 

Mr. Gonz&lcz made his remarks 
at a news conference in Majorca 
after meeting there with President 
Miguel de la Madrid of Mexico. 
Previously, Mr. Gonzikz had es- 
sentially agreed with the United 
States in accusing Nicaragua of 
rights abases, such as curinqg op- 
position parties and imposing cen- 
sorship. He showed Ins disapproval 


For the Record 


The 46th game of the world dies charnpionship has been portpoued 
until Monday because of a technical timeout, a chess official said Friday- 
The world champion, Anatoli Karpov, leads the match 5-1, and nceo* 
only one more victory to defeat his challenger, Gary Kasparov. (Art 
Aa earttHpodce shook Izmir. Turkey, on the Aegean coast early Friday. 


the semi-official Anatolian News Agency reported. It said the qorike 
measured 3.9 on the Richter sole but did not cause any damage- (dft 


sition leaders in December and by 
sending a low-level delegation to 
Mr. Ortega's inauguration. 


measured 3.9 on the Richter scale but did not cause any damage. (An 
Greece said Turkey violated its airspace Friday for the third day 
running, and the Turkish ambassador to Athens was summoned to 
receive a protest. A statement said Turkish jets had violated Gftoj 
airspace 11 times and infringed air traffic rules 13 times. (Revteni 
At least seven Yugoslavs (fied and 33 were injured when a passeng**! 
train derailed Friday after running into a mudslide oo the trades® 1 
Mount Zlalibor, about 130 kilometers (80 miles) southwest of 
the Tanjug news agency reported. (A** 

Presides! Ronald Reagan said Friday dmf he plans to n omfo ^, 

Richard T. McCormack, assistant secretary erf state in charge of eccsioffl' 
ic and business affairs, as UJS. ambassador to the Organization “ 
A mfri^an (r**‘ 




: 'rfSGS< 


c w; 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


Page 3 



ircanllfc 



** 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Waits, 20 Years Later: 
Tlie Problems Peraki 

Mast of the problems that 
ignited the dots in the Watts 
section of Los Angeles, in which 
34 people were filled, remain 
anresohred 20 years later, ac- 
cording to a joint report by the 
dry and- county Human Rela- 
tions commissi on a. 

.r; “Conditions are as bad, or 
worse, in sooth-central Los An- 
3jgdes today as they were” in 
'.21965, the report said, with near- 
; .ly 20 percent of the black adults 
Vand 50 percent of the black 
teen-agers in Watts unem- 
■■ ployed. School test scores re- 
■ mam die lowest in the city, and 
crime and gang activity have 
increased. 


Jet Fire Retardant 
A Blaring Failure 

A radio-con trolled jet airliner 
faded with anti-misting kero- 
sene (AMK), which was sup- 
posed to minimize foe hazards 
in airplane crashes, was three- 
fourths engulfed in a fireball in 
a test crash last month. The 
product “didn’t work as adver- 
tised,” said Tom Trip, a spokes- 
man for the Air Transport As- 
sociation, which represents 
many U.S. airlines. 

Now, to nobody’s surprise, 
the Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration has informed Congress, 
that the pretimxnary results of 
the test were “disappointing” 
and that “we plan to defer fur- 
ther regulatory action with re- 
gard to the use of AMK in air 
carrier aircraft at this time.” 


Short Takes 

The familiar bine-green 
punch-card check issued by the 
U.S. Treasury for 40 years is 
being replaced by a lightweight 
paper check in rainbow colors. 
The lighter stock will save $6 
million ft year in paper costs, 
according to Charlotte Me- 
haron, a Treasury spokeswom- 
an, and the vanegated colors 
are aimed at fofling sophisticat- 
ed color-copying mu4m>e& 

The aovy, which has restored 
the beO-bottom uniforms and 
nautical tenmnology that were 
jettisoned daring the 1970s, has 
taken a last lug step toward re- 
storing tradition by abolishing 
the beards that had been per- 
mitted during the past decade 
and more. However, “neatly 
tr immed, military-appearing 
mustaches” are allowed 

President Ronald Reagan is 



Th» ABobatad Pm 


MILK WITH A MESSAGE — A dairy in California 
carries pictures of —faring youths on its cartons as a 
public service. Doria Paige Yarbrough of Lancaster, 
California, shown in the top photo, saw her picture and 
returned home. She had been staying with friends in 
Fresno, Calif ornia, since leaving home in November. 


almost certain to appoint more 
men and women to the federal 
judiciary than any other presi- 
dent. Jimmy Carter holds the 
record with 262. But Mr. Rea- 
gan reached 167 in his first 
term, and more than 100 seals 
are vacant A main reason for 
the approaching record is that 
Confess has expanded the ju- 
dicial machiner y dealing with 
bankruptcy cases. 

Shorter Takes: The Internal- 
Revenue Service reports that 
299 couples or individuals with 
incomes of more than $200,000 
used deductions and tax credits 
to avoid paying a penny of fed- 
eral tax for 1982. . . . Although 
burglary is traditionally regard- 
ed as nonviolent, 30 percent of 


the 9 j 5 millio n U.S. burglaries 
from 1973 to 1982 committed 
when the occupants were at 
home ended in a violent crime 
... A federal appeals court in 
Sl Louis has rued, 5 to 3, that 
Indians may kill protected ani - 
mals, including bald eagles, the 

national cfflbfeffl, (Hi reserva- 
tion lands providing that the 
feathers or carcass are used 
only for religious purposes and 
not offered for sate. . . . Falling 
down stairs at work results in 
an estimated 33,000 disabling 
injuries a year, accounting for 
1 3 percent of all lost work time, 
according to the U.S. Bureau of 
Labor Statistics. 

Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Secret Satellite to Warn 
Of Soviet Preparations 
For Attack, Experts Say 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tima Sen** 

NEW YORK — A likely major 
use of the satellite taken aloft 
Thursday on the secret military 
mission of the U.S. space shuttle 
Discovery is to help warn of Soviet 
preparations for a nuclear attack 
on the United States, according to 
military experts not working for the 
government. 

By eavesdropping on radio, ra- 
dar, microwave and other electron- 
ic signals from the Soviet Union, 
the satellite probably is meant to 
do much more than monitor explic- 
it Soviet communications, they 

raid 

These experts say the satellite 
could gather data that would allow 
intelligence agencies to make subtle 
distinctions in the electronic nature 
of the signals and thus delect Soviet 
preparations for nuclear war. 

“These satellites can pick up 
things like changes in Soviet wave- 
lengths as they switch from peace- 
time to wartime modes,” said Paul 
Stares, an aerospace expert at the 
Brookings Institution. 

[Discovery's astronauts 
launched a 5300-million spy satel- 
lite on Friday that is designed to 
eavesdrop on Soviet mditaiy and 
diplomatic communications, 
sources at Cape Canaveral tedd The 
Associated Press. 

[There was no official confirma- 
tion from the air force or the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration, in keeping with the 
military secrecy surrounding the 
entire mission.] 

In addi firm to detecting changes 
in wavelengths, the satellite might 
be able to monitor signal strengths 
to detect the agitated activity in the 
Soviet Union that might presage 
the start of an attack. 

“You do pattern analysis,” said 
Paul Bracken, a political scientist 
at Yak University and author of 
the book “Tin Command and Con- 
trol of Nudear Forces.” “If you see 
a heavy traffic pattern between 
Moscow center and the missile 
Grids or the naval bases, you start 
to wonder if something is up." 

Such abilities to give advanced 
warning are well known in military 
and aerospace circles; they in no 
way explain the secrecy that has 
surrounded the shuttle's mission, 
these experts said. 

The Pentagon has made no com- 
ment cm the type of payload being 
tarried by Discovery. 

It was reported last month that 
the satellite was meant for signals 
intelligence, which the military 


calls sigmL Those news artides said 
the satellite was to monitor Soviet 
missile tests and to eavesdrop on 
military communications from 
22 r 300 miles (36,060 kilometers) 
above the Earth. 

The dealer impli cations of that 
kind of ability, according to Mr. 
Bracken and other military experts, 
go beyond routine monitoring to 
detecting Soviet prepare turns for 
war for days, and perhaps weeks, 
ahead. Intelligence agencies then 
would present evidence of those 
preparations to U.S. leaders. 

Mr. Bracken said that warning of 
nuclear attack was generally divid- 
ed into two types, tactical and stra- 
tegic. Tactical warning is mainly 
via photo satellites that use heat- 
senative infrared telescopes to de- 
tect hot exhaust plumes of Soviet 
missiles as they head for space. 
Most “early-warning satellites fall 
into the tactical category. 

In contrast, he said, strategic 
warning is meant to occur hews, 
days or perhaps weeks ahead. It 
relies on signal* from intelligence 
satellites as well as other devices 
and eavesdropping on the state of 
the Soviet muitaiy and its related 
industries. 

After its release, the new satellite 
is to be boosted into an obit 22^00 
miles high. This detail was made 
public when NASA reported that a 
qxrial rocket, known as an inertial 
upper stage, is an integral part of 
the payload. 

■ News Leaks Probed 

The U.S. Air Force has begun an 
investigation to find the source of 
news leaks about Discovery’s secret 
payload. The Washington Post re- 
ported L 

The investigation is one of sever- 
al that the Pentagon is conducting 
into news leaks, a spokesman, M? 
chad I. Burch, said Thursday. He 
said the inquiries are aimed at find- 
ing the officials or employees of 
contractors who provided informa- 
tion, and not at news organizations. 

Mr. Burch did not say what ao- 
tion the government would take if 
it could identify those who leaked 
information about the satellite. 

Asked about a photograph of an 
early- warning satellite published 
on the most recent cover of Avia- 
tion Week ft Space Technology, 
Mr. Burch said that such a picture 
"should not appear ” But the Pen- 
tagon later acknowledged that the 
air force had riven the photograph 
to Aviation Week after it had been 
“ a ppropriately reviewed and deter- 
mined to be unclassified.” 


Charities Try 
To Block U.S. 
Plan Limi tin g 
Tax Benefits 

By Kathleen Teltsch 

Nr*' York Tima Srrrict 

■NEW YORK — U.S. nonprofit 
organizations, battered by cut- 
backs in government grants arid 
threatened by federal tax propos- 
als. arc fighting back with a nation- 
wide lobbying campaign. 

“I have never seen the nonprofits 
so alarmed,” said Brian O’Connell, 
president of Independent Sector, a 
coalition representing 595 national 
nonprofit associations, philanthro- 
pies and fund-raising federations. 
"Every kind of organization from 
museums and colleges to small 
neighborhood associations or ad- 
vocacy groups is aroused about the 
administration's policies toward 
charities.” 

In the last four yean, federal 
grants to the organizations' wel- 
fare, educational and cultural pro- 
grams have been cut by $13.5 bil- 
lion. And now the nonprofit groups 
say the Treasury Department's 
proposed restrictions on the tax 
benefits resulting from gifts to 
charities will cost them almost 512 
billion a year more, reducing indi- 
vidual contributions from S59.S 
billion a year to $47.7 billion. 

One charity. United Way of 
America, has urged its 2^00 local 
affiliates and the 37,000 agencies it 
supports to write to President Ron- 
ald Reagan and Congress urging 
the rejection of the Treasury's pro- 
posals on charitable contributions. 

“The response has been over- 
whelming,” said Jack Moskowitz, a 
senior vice president 

The lobbying has already been 
felt oo Capitol H3L Expats there 
predict protracted negotiations 
(hat are unlikdy to result in all the 
changes the Treasury wants. 

The campaign is aimed at three 
Treasury recommendations: 

• A proposal to limit income tax 
deductions for charity to amounts 
above 2 percent of the taxpayer’s 
adjusted gross income. Hie groups 
say this would discourage dona- 
tions because the contributions of 
the average taxpayer amount to 
1.97 percent 

• A proposal to restrict the de- 
duction for a gift of property that 
has increased in value, such as se- 
curities, to the owner's original 
cost plus an adjustment for infla- 
tion. That ehenw p, the nonprofit 
groups say, would hurt colleges, 
museums and other traditional re- 
cipients of appreciated stocks. 

• A proposal to elimina te chari- 
table deductions if the taxpayer 
does not itemize deductions. - 

If an three r ecomm endations are 

approved, according to Charles 


Group Giving §25 Million 
To Support Peace Study 

Seer York /imps Service 

NEW YORK — A major American philanthropic organization 
says it will spend S25 million over the next three years on the study of 
international security and prevention of nuclear war. 

The grants, announced Thursday, almost double the privately 
contributed money for research in this field, according to die group, 
the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation of Chicago. 

"No issue threatens the collective destiny of humankind like the 
menacing threat of nuclear war." said John E Corbally. foundation 

president 

Planners of the program, including Dr. Jerome B. Wiesner, presi- 
dent emeritus of the Massachusetts restitute of Technology, said the 
undertaking sought to raise the number of experts in security issues 
and widen their concerns to indude social economic and environ- 
mental implications. 

Under the program. 25 institutions in the United States and two in 
Britain mil receive grants. Those in Britain are the International 
Institute for Strategic Studies in London and the University of Sussex. 

A key dement is a total of $62 million for 96 two-year fellowships 
to be administered by the Social Science Research Council. 60S Third 
Avt, New York, N-Y. 10158. The council has set a March 31 deadline 
for the first group of applications. 

• The largest MacArthur grant, a five-year award of SI J million, will 
go to the Brookings Institution. Brookings will also get a $450,000 
support grant 


Clotfelter. a Duke University econ- 
omist who made an analysis for 
Independent Sector, charities 
would lose $5 billion. 

Independent Sector says that 
nonprofit groups would suiter even 
greater losses from the Treasury 
proposal to reduce the top income 
tax rate to 35 percent from 50 per- 
cent Lowering the tax bracket 
would reduce the saving from mak- 
ing charitable contributions, reduc- 
ing the financial incentive to give. 
The chang e in tax rates would cost 
charities $6 billion to $7 billion, 
according to Mr. Clotfelter. 

But the groups are not fighting 
the overall rate reduction. 

The principle behind the Trea- 
sury's lower rates, however, is that 
the reduction would be made possi- 
ble by disallowing most tax prefer- 
ences. The deduction for charitable 
contributions is one of dozens.thal 
the Treasury would limit 

In addition, the Treasury argues 
that huge numbers of taxpayer 
abase their charitable contribution 
deductions, writing off more than 
they actually donate. 

But the limits on charitable de- 
ductions would raise relatively lit- 
tle revenue for the Treasury and 
may not be worth the fight. 

The latest New York Times-CBS 
News Poll found overwhelming 
support for the continued deduct- 
ibility of charitable contributions. 
A poll at 1,534 adults conducted 
Jan. 14-17 found that 81 percent of 
the public favored deductibility; 16 
percent were opposed. 

In organizing its campaign. In- 
dependent Sector is counting on 
the support from groups around 
the country that Mr. O'Connell and 
others maintain are more influen- 
tial than commonly recognized. 

A study by Independent Sector 


identified 1.155,000 tax-exempt 
nonprofit groups, and the authors 
said there were probably several 
million more that had not sought 
tax exemption. 

"In all four comers of America 
there are volunteers involved in 
some aspect of nonprofit activity," 
said Barber B. Conable, the former 
New York state congressman, “be 
they United Way workers, volun- 
teer firemen, members of church or 
social welfare groups. As far as 
politicians are concerned these 
groups represent opinion-sellers, 
they set the tone of the country. 
The politician ignores such groups 


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Page* 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


Heral 



Tbe Nev York That* and Thr WwU^ioa Pom 


Sribunc 


A Red Reformation vs. Red Orthodoxy 


ffi ■ 


Prospects for Growth 


The numbers published this week confirmed 
everybody^ impression: 1984 was a very good 
year for me American economy. Real GNP 
than in any year since toe early 
tvaus. income per person, after inflation and 
taxes, was once again higher than ever. Infla- 
Uot stayed tow, a: least by recent standards. 
What are the chances of an encore in 1985? 

Most of the current economic debate is over 

what is going to happen in the months immedi- 
ately ahead. But it is worth asking whether 
anything is developing to raise the prospects 
over the longer term for the strong and stable 
growth that is every president’s aim. So far 
there are not many sign? of it. 

The original Reagan program was supposed 
to gene ra te an enormous expansion of invest- 
ment capital by encouraging work and sav ing 
The personal savings rate is stQl in the range in 
which it has been moving for the past 
despite a number of tax incentives to raise it 


- uiwwiuiw UJ IriUK U. 

Business investment in plant and equipment 
has risen sharply from the 1981-82 recession. 
In 1984, as a proportion of GNP, it was back 
where h was in 1980; as the year ended it was a 
shade higher. There is no sign of the flood of 
new investment that was to have transformed 
the American capacity to produce. 

Most of the sources of long-term growth lie 
deep and are difficult for any administration 
to reach. Labor productivity mil rise hwww 


of demography; the numbers of inexperienced 
young people coming into the labor market in 
this decade will be lower than in the 1970s, 
reflecting the declining birthrates of the 1960s. 

Major contributors to economic growth, 
both of than difficult to forecast, are new 
technology and a rising (evd of education. 
Federal support for research and development 
declined from the middle 1960s until early in 
the Reagan administration. It is now rising due 
to military spending; civilian research and 
development is still falling quite rapidly. As 
for education, a child’s chances of finishing 
high school and getting a college degree are 
much higher in the United States than any- 
where else in the world, but educational op- 
portunity hit a plateau more than a decade ago 
and has not increased since then. 

The greatest threats to economic growth 
now come from the instability being built into 
the economy by the two mounting deficits — 
the federal budget deficit and the trade deficit. 
Both at present are sustaining America’s sense 
of well-being- The budget deficit s timula tes 
growth, and the foreign deficit permits the 
country to spend more than it earns. Mr. 
Reagan's second term is an opportunity to 
bring both those deficits under control But he 
does not seem to be making much progress in 
deciding how to do it, or at whose expense. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Points Made, Suit Lost 


Arid Sharon's long and bitter suit against 
Time has come out about as well as it could, 
given the circumstances. Credit should go first 
of all to the six members of what seems to have 
been a very conscientious jury. The result also 
owes much to the lawyers — to Time's, who 
proposed giving the jury a series of questions 
to guide them through the tangle of issues, and 
to General Sharon’s, who accepted the idea. 
That led to Judge Abraham Sofaers instruc- 
tions to the jury to consider the complex de- 
ments in a libel case one by one. 

Mr. Sharon got one thing that he badly 
wanted and to which he was entitled: a deter- 
mination that one para gr aph in Time maga- 
zine two years ago was wrong. It revolved 
around the massac re of Palestinians by Chris- 
tian Phalangists in the Lebanese refugee 
camps in 1982, and the commission estab- 
lished by the Israeli government under Yit- 
zhak Kahan, a former Supreme Coart presi- 
dent, to investigate it. Time wrote that a secret 
appendix to the Kahan report included details 
of a conversation in which Mr. Sharon, then 
defense minister, was supposed to have dis- 
cussed with Phalangist leaders their need to 
lake revenge cm the Palestinians. In the trial 
Tune’s reporter acknowledged that he had no 
source for the assertion, which was an infer- 
ence — “my evaluation." Time acknowledged 
before the end of the trial that there is “clear 
and convincing evidence” that no such conver- 
sation was contained in the appendix. The jury 
properly held the paragraph to be false. 


But if the jury gave Mr. Sharon the verdict 
to which he was entitled on that point it did 
not give him more rhgn he was entitled to. It 
did not give him any broader vindication re- 
garding the massacre. There the authoritative 
judgment continues to be that of the Kahan 
commission, which found that he bore “indi- 
rect responsibility.” Nor did the jury give Mr. 
Sharon the $50 million he claimed in damages. 
While the paragraph was false and its authors 
had been careless, the jury said. Time believed 
it to be true when it was published. Under the 
malice rule — devised to protect publications 
from being crippled by suits over unintention- 
al errors — that finding bars liability. The case 
never advanced to the issue of damages. 

The crucial innovation in this case was the 
segmented verdict. The judge asked the jury to 
come back with separate finding * on the ques- 
tions erf defamation, truth or falsity, and state 
of mind. The Sharon jury first decided that the 
famous paragraph was defamat ory — that is, 
harmful to his reputation — and then that it 
was false. It then proceeded to the question of 
Time’s stale of mind and found that the maga- 
zine had not knowingly printed a falsehood. 

These suits by officials over their official 
conduct are troubling enough, and Time has 
paid a heavy price in defending itself. But the 
procedural technique of having a jury decide 
each element of the suit separately can help 
ensure that the difficult standard for libel 
claims set by the Supreme Court is truly met. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A meticulous jury has found Time ma g azin e 
negligent and careless in printing a false and 
defamatory report about Ariel Sharon. But, 
after deliberating five days on the most crucial 
question, the jury found no malice. And that, 
given how American law treats public figures, 
means no libel — and the end of Mr. Sharon's 
$50- million Hamagp claim. He wins much of 
his case, but Tune wins the suit An issue that 
should never have had to come to trial has 
been resolved in a constructive way. 

Constructive and salutary. Seen from our 
interested perspective in the trenches of jour- 
nalism, the verdict affirms the law’s special 
protections for a free press — but also under- 
scores the obligations that the media bear. 
Public officials remain. ’on notice that they 
cannot easily punish criticism with libel suics. 
The press is on notice that it can nonetheless 
be held accountable — and that it needs to 
provide better forums of rebuttal and redress. 

This case turned on one paragraph in a long 
Tune story two years ago about Israel’s official 
finding that Mr. Sharon bore “indirect” re- 
sponsibility for a massacre of Palestinians in 
Beirut. The American jury, crisply instructed 
in the dements of libel by Federal District 
Judge Abraham Sofaer, read that paragraph to 
imply a greater guilt, and thus as defamatory. 
Late in the trial Time conceded that it was 
wrong to ascribe the implication to a secret 
document. But it failed to convince the jury 
that the account was still true. 

A false and damag in g defamation would, 
against an ordinary citizen, have amounted to 
libel. But because the U.S. Constitution plain- 
ly aims to protect and promote fearless report- 
ing and debate, the Supreme Court has made it 


harder for public figures to prove libel. They 
must also prove malice: not just honest error 
or even sloppiness, but lying or reckless dis- 
regard of a knowable truth. It was at this last 
barrier that the jury gave the case to Time and 
vindicated the Supreme Court’s purpose. 

Mr. Sharon, by coming so dose to dearing 
the malice barrier, showed that the law cannot 
be counted on to protect mendacious journal- 
ism. Yet the barrier remains high enough to 
protect anyone’s aggressive reporting. 

The jury found an absence of malice, but no 
shortage of arrogance. It went out of its way to 
reprimand Time for “negligently and even 
carelessly” defaming Mr. Sharon. It seemed to 
give voice to widespread discontent with influ- 
ential media that are quick to dish out criti- 
cism but unwilling or reluctant to present a 
contrary judgment or to confess error. 

Time think * the jury die crucial 

paragraph. But these jurors were typical read- 
ers of Time. If they found its words more 
maligning than intended, it should not require 
a long, costly trial to resolve the ambiguity. 

If. after studying the reporting, writing and 
editing routines at Time, jurors find some of 
them negligent, it is time for journalists to stop 
muting their criticism of one another. The best 
protection of free speech is more free speech, 
not less. To deserve the extraordinary protec- 
tions of American law. Tune and all of journal- 
ism need a stronger tradition of mutual and 
self-correction. The more influential the medi- 
um, the greater the duty to offer a place for 
rebuttal complaint, correction and reexami- 
nation. Beating the arrogance rap is even more 
important than escaping one for libel. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR JAN. 26 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Corporations Resist President 
NEW YORK — Of President W.H. Taft’s 
scheme for Federal incorporation of Corpora- 
tions, the Atlanta Journal says: “The Presi- 
dent's argument is an able one. But it is very 
doubtful if the advantages of such a plan 
would be equal to its disadvantages. The sys- 
tem would be an almost radical step toward 
Federal centralization of power." The Provi- 
dence Journal remarks: “If [the plan} should 
be declared by the Supreme Court to be consti- 
tutional the whole question of the relationship 
of corporations to the Government would as- 
sume a portentous phase.” The Chicago Inter- 
Ocean adds: “Think; if you can, of anything 
that would be left under a Federal incorpora- 
tion act for the American people to do except 
cry in public: *0 King, live forever!’ ” 


1935: liver Sinks OEE New Jersey 

NEW YORK — The liner Mohawk, which 
sank off the New Jersey coast [on Jan. 24] with 
a loss of 47 lives following a collision, is the 
third passenger ship wi thin four months to be 
lost in sea disasters. On Sept. 8, 1934, at 2:30 
ajiL, the Mono Castle, one of the luxury liners 
in the New York- Havana service, was de- 
stroyed try fire within a few miles of last night's 
scene, with a loss of 124 lives. 434 passengers 
and members of the crew being saved. On Jan. 
6, 1935, the Havana, which had replaced the 
Motto Castle in the New York-Cuba service, 
piled up at 3:40 am. on Mantilla Shoals, the 
northern extremity of the Great Bahama Bank. 
Fifty-one passengers and 44 members of the 
crew were taken off and picked up by rescue 
steamers. One passenger died. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 19S8-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 



LEE W. HUEBNER. JUfcfer 

Executive Editor 
Edtior 


Deputy Editor 
Associate Editor 



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Anadau PvH&er 
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Direcar of Onakeim 
rector of Aditn M ng Seles 




P ARIS — The Chinese are the only ruling 
Communists to openlv question acltnow- 


Bv Flora Lewis 


1 Communists to openly question acknow- 
ledged tenets of Marxism-Leninism. Having 
startled the world by saying that those tenets 
will not solve modern problems, Beijing backed 
off a bit; it did not intend to announce aposta- 


sy. But the subsequent explanations confirmed 
that something profound and far-reaching is 


AMZNCz 

/ 


takmg place, in ideological terms, to match the 
great changes in economic and social rules. 

In effect, Beijing is starting to redefine Marx- 
ism so that it can move toward the mixed 
market economy and the incentive system it has 
now chosen, without abandoning the faith. 

Lin Xili, a senior official who helped draft 


the economic reforms, was presented to foreign 
journalists to pronounce the new interpreta- 


journalists to pronounce the new interpreta- 
tion. He said Marxism was an “evolving system 
seeking truth from facts." That was a fiat con- 
tradiction of the Soviet view that it is a complet- 
ed analysis of social relations with the hard 
certainty of scientific law. 


Mr. Lin introduced a new name for what 
China is doing, railing it “socialist commodity 
production.” and admitted that this was not 
part of orthodoxy. But he said that Marx over- 
looked the fact that supply and demand affect 
state-owned — in Marxist terms, worker- and 
peasant-owned — economies as they do private 
capitaL “Seeking truth from facts is Marxism." 
Mr. Lin said. “Marx himself never made any 
specific prediction about the future.” 

The actual words of Marx are of secondary 
importance. They have always been subject to 
drastically different interpretations. The splits 
in the socialist movement after the Bolshevik 
revolution, producing pro-Soviet Communists, 


undermine the power of the party. Repeated 
attempts at reform in Eastern Europe have 
confirmed Soviet fears about the risks of easing 


-} >7 *3 


y.*7: * ’* T 


constraint. But they have also shown that 
Marxist orthodoxy does not produce satisfac- 


Marxist orthodoxy does not produce sanstac- 
tory economic ana social results. 

Even relative successes are misleading. East 


. s . i-; 

■ > a i * 


4>iiV 


Germany receives a vast subsidy from West 
Germany in such a variety of forms that it 


VJLIUUUiJ UJ OMWII » — — v ... 

cannot be accurately calculated. Il may be 510 
billion a year. It is surely over $5 billion. 


Hungary has a flourishing private sector in 
small business and considerable room for man- 
agerial initiative in many state-owned firms. 

Yugoslavia, which made a radical departure 
with its worker self-management system, has 
found that it is not good enough. 

All Communist regimes have found that the 
Marxist system of pricing brings economic dis- 
tortion. Regarding labor as the sole measure of 
value does not work. The cost of capital wheth- 
er state-owned or private, and incentive to 
management have to be taken into account. 

The impulse to seek “truth from facts,” 
which the Chinese have admitted, is at work 
throughout the Communist world. For the long 
term it presages some transformations that can 
sweep the global political landscape. 

The New York Times. 


social democrats. Trotskyites and other splin- 
ters. reflect the varietv of ways people always 


China’s Reforms Are Just a Start 


B eijing — The west is 

aeog over “capitalism" in 


D agog over “capitalism” in 
rhi na and alleged abandoning 
of Marxism-Leninism. The 
Western press has waited 35 
years to report this story. 

The evidence partially sup- 
ports these claims, but it is 
being overstated. And the ex- 
aggeration contributes to a cy- 
clical historical pattern of un- 
realistic expectations that can 


By D.L Shambaugh 

77ur is the first of two articles. 


bring deep disappointment 
and mutual recriminations. 


and mutual recriminations. 

For their part, the Chinese 
certainly also have overblown 
notions of the West and its 
ability to contribute to China’s 
quest for modernity. Through 
adept propaganda the Chinese 
media create unrealistic im- 
ages for the Chinese people. 

We Westerners are quick to 
selectively see what we want to 
see, and there is a strong ten- 
dency to see the Chinee as 
rejecting socialism because 
that confirms Western politi- 


cal and economic beliefs. We 
think we see in China today an 
awakening of the human spirit 
to seek freedom, democracy 
and profit. We may wdl be 
witnessing! ust that — but a 
sense of rhine<a» Co mmunis t 
history and practical experi- 
ence ought to suggest caution. 

What China is engaged in is 
partial introduction of capital- 
ist economic tools, and partial 
dilution of orthodox Marxism. 

I have seen dramatic eco- 
nomic and ideological changes 
during a year and a half of 
travel and research in China. 
But 1 see more continuity with 
the past than change, and a 
variety of factors that can in- 
hibit the pace and eventual 
success of recent reforms. 

Economic, scientific, tech- 
nological social and ideologi- 


cal change — in a word, mod- 
ernization — is a complex and 
lengthy process. We will have 
to wail several decades to de- 
termine the final outcome of 
the trends that are being un- 
leashed in China today. 

This is not the first time 
since 1949 that the Chinese 
leadership has tried to lap the 
entrepreneurial initiative of 
the people. AD previous at- 
tempts were short-lived. For 
there is, as Chinese Marxists 
would put il a “fundamental 
contradiction” between coo- 


lers, reflect the variety of ways people always 
find of listening to a prophet. 

What matters is that Moscow became the 
Rome of orthodoxy, claiming infallibility even 
when it veered from one thesis to another. A 
new. flexible definition of Marxism-in-power 
can be as significant to the future as Martin 
Luther's protest was to the Catholic Church. 

Beijing s proclamations have been notorious- 
ly mobile, caroming from “a hundred flowers” 
of Liberalization to a “great leap forward" of 
oommunization to a “cultural revolution” of 
chaotic repression. But if China sticks to the 
new course, that will be more fateful for the 
world than even early Marxist schisms, because 
it comes at a time when certainty about Marxist 
values is leaking away everywhere. 

Throughout Eastern Europe, regimes have 
been driven to tinkering one way and another. 


depending on local circums lances. 

The Soviet Union will be celebrating the 70th 
anniversary of its revolution in a couple of 
years. Its system can no longer be considered 
experimental recovering from upheaval de- 
serving a benefit of doubt as it embarks into the 
unknown. On the contrary, it is long congealed 
and its promises remain undelivered. 

Many people in the hierarchy are wdl aware 
of thaL There are complaints about a loss of 
direction. But reform is difficult, even frighten- 
ing. not only because of the vested interests of 
an entrenched bureaucracy but because the 
system rests on strict controls. Change requires 
relaxing controls. But Soviet officialdom can 
never be sure at what point a little liberalization 
will risk setting off a c hain reaction that would 


comic or ideological freedom 
and a state apparatus con- 
trolled by a single party that 
monopolizes power and ulti- 
mately d efine “truth." 


The writer, author of Ihe Mak- 
ing of a Premier Zhao Zfyang’s 
Provincial Career* has been con- 
ducting researc h in China since 
1983. He contributed this to the 
International Hmdd Tribune. 


UM»E_A 

TOQVcm. 

SCREHDRNK 

RJR0HLY3K) 


Forty Years of Armed Vigilance and Bitter 'Lessons’ 


P RINCETON. New Jersey — For most 
Americans, World War 1/ is a remote and 
half-forgotten historical event. For Soviet cit- 
izens it remains the “Great Patriotic WaY* 
and a recent traumatic experience. 

Those different national memories, and the 
political conflicts they generate, will be espe- 
cially apparent this year, which brings the 
40th anniversary of the end of the war. In the 
United States, few if any commemorations 
will occur before the traditional V-E Day 
ceremonies on May 8. In the Soviet Union, 
commemorations are already under way. 

It is a mistake to think, as many Western 
observers do. that Soviet memories of World 
War II are prolonged merely by the unending 
flow of official propaganda. The government 
promotes the remembrance, as reflected in 
more than 15.000 books on the subject and 
memorials in every town, but the popular 
emotion is genuine. More than any other 
event, including the Russian Revolution, the 
war shaped the Soviet Union as it exists 
today, as a political system, society and world 
power. Its legacy endures among citizens be- 
cause it was an experience of inseparable — 
and colossal — tragedy and triumph. 

The tragedy began on June 22, 1941. with 
the massive, unexpected German invasion 
and the near total Soviet defeat. After four 
years of savage fighting from Moscow to 
Berlin, it culminated in 20 million Soviet 
deaths, about equally divided between sol- 
diers and civilians. That often cited but little 
understood statistic meant that virtually ev- 
ery family lost one member or more. And the 
figure does not include the millions of sur- 
vivors who were maimed for life. 


By Stephen F. Cohen 


Europe; creation of the Soviet empire in East- 
ern Europe that was to guard a g^insi another 
invasion from the west; and the historic rise 
to great power in world affairs. So popular 
were those accomplishments that even embit- 
tered Russians often forgot, or forgave, the 
Soviet government's misdeeds that had con- 
tributed to tbe catastrophe of 1941. including 
Stalin's prewar massacre of Red Army offi- 
cers, his 1939 pact with Hitler and the general 
unpreparedness for the German onslaught. 

The shared wartime experience of “gran- 


temationalist ones in the official ideology. 

If nothing else, the war forged a lasting 
affinity between popular and official out- 
looks on (he Soviet Union's overriding pur- 
pose at home and abroad. Henceforth it 
would do everything to guarantee that it 
would never again be unprepared few a sur- 


prise attack. That alone explains persistent 
popular support, despite the sacrifices in- 
volved in everyday life, for the government’s 
obsession with national security, including its 
bold over Eastern Europe, its constant fear of 
“falling behind” in any area of weaponry and 
the high priority il gives to military spending. 

The war’s legacy also underlies deeply am- 
bivalent Soviet attitudes toward the United 
States. On the one hand, officials and citizens 
alike frequently recall warmly the Soviet- 
American alliance and gratefully acknow- 
ledge the U.S. aid, or Lend-Lease, that ac- 
counted for about 4 percent of gross Soviet 


deur and grief,” as a Soviet poet characterized 
it, changed tbe relationship between the Com- 
munist party-state and society in fundamen- 
tal ways. For the Slavic majority at least, the 
system finally became a truly national one 
and thus legitimate. But Soviet “commu- 
nism” also changed during the “war for the 
Fatherland,” as traditional Russian national- 
ist values overwhelmed revolutionary and in- 




Nor has tbe mourning stopped, particularly 
among women. Displaying worn photographs 
of lost sons, aged mothers of soldiers listed as 
missi ng in action (millions are so designated) 
stQ] haunt veterans' reunions in hope of some 
word of their fate. And because so few men 
between the ages of 17 and 20 snrvived the 
struggle, millions of women of that genera- 
tion remain unwed and childless, “their lone- 
liness," as Izvestia observed recently, yet an- 
other “terrible echo of the war.” 

National glory can never compensate for 
such tragedies, but for most Sonet citizens 
final victory gave sacred meaning to personal 
losses. In their eyes it brought three great 
achievements: destruction of the Nazi war 
machine that had conquered the whole of 





production during the years 1941-45. On the 
other band, they resent bitterly any American 
slighting of their role in World War II behind 
which they see a 40-year effort to deny the 
Soviet Union its hard-won right to full equali- 
ty in tbe postwar world. 

Perceiving such slights, as they did last year 
in the commemoration of D-Day at Norman- 
dy and as they win during this anniversary 
year, Soviet officials insist that their struggle 
was “decisive” in defeating Nazi Germany 
and in “saving world civilization." They argue 
that tbe war’s major turning points took place 
at Moscow. Stalingrad and other Soviet battle 
sites; that until mid- 1944 almost 95 percent of 
all Nazi ground forces were engaged on the 
eastern front, where Germany suffered 10 
million of its total 13.6 casualties; and that 50 
Soviet citizens died for every one American. 
Even after 40 years, no “historical truth” is 
more important in Soviet minds. 

Apart from the need fra “eternal vigi- 
lance." Soviet officials are far less united on 
the lessons to be teamed from World War II, 
especially as they may apply to the United 
States. Pro-detente spokesmen still rite the 
wartime alliance as evidence that improved 
relations between the two countries are posa- 
ble today. But other officials point no less 
adamantly to the German invasion as proof 
chat perilous threats always lie in the west. 

Their response to President Reagan's anti- 
Soviet crusade of the early 1980s was to 
equate him with Hitler. Americans outraged 
by that analogy should consider the Soviet 
reaction to some American “lessons” of the 
war. None is more offensive, even to many 
dissidents and fanigr ^s, tha n ar gumen ts that 
tbe Soviet Union is a latter-day replica of 
Nazi Germany, driven by tbe same violent 
cults and insatiable lust fra conquest and with 
which any serious negotiations are Munich- 
like acts of “appeasement." 

In the nuclear era, such “lessons” on both 
sides are as dangerous as World War II con- 
cepts of civil defense. Symbolic acts erf mutual - 
understanding and memory are needed to 
dispel them. If the political will cannot be 
found by May 3, 40 years after the day Ameri- 
can and Soviet troops met at the Elbe, there is 
no reason to believe it will ever be found, at 
arms talks or anywhere else. 


Cartoon by Pffrtdc hi NIN (Boteroae). DWrlbuted by Cartoonists A Writer* Syndicate. 


The writer is professor of politics at Princeton 
University and a commentator on Soviet affairs. 


Supporting the Eritreans Isn’t Feasible 


L ONDON — The Eritreans, an en~ 
j terprismg people who have bees 


J— / terpnang people who have been 
in revolt against the government in 
Ethiopia for the best part of 25 years. 


By Jonathan Power 


know that now is the time to the 

moment- Much of the outside world 


Unity came into being in 1963, a 
fundamental premise written into its 
charter was toe rccoemtkra erf colo- 


does not have an ounce of sympathy 
for the Marxist government of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Mengistu Haile Mar- 
iam, which has practically brought 
(he country to its knees. 

The Eritreans are not only step- 
ping up the war, they are also step- 
ping up their contacts with Western 
policymakers. But a dose look at the 
situation reveals a minefield for 
Western countries that might be 


charter was toe recognition, of colo- 
nial boundaries. For all their irrele- 
vance to traditional ethnic divisions, 
this seemed to the founding fathers of 


African independence tbe only way 
to avoid the tearing apart of Africa. 


tempted by a more activist role. 

Ethiopia has always fasc inated 
strategic thinkers because of its posi- 
tion at the mouth of tbe Red Sea. 
While Emperor Haile Selassie ruled, 
it was firmly in the Western camp. 
Today it is equally firmly in Mos- 
cow’s camp, hostmg 4,650 Soviet, 
East German and Cuban soldiers. 

Now, because of the famin e, the 
West is bong drawn bade in. But the 
governments of the United States, 
Britain, West Germany and Canada, 
tbe priori pal rid rivets, are not alto- 
gether happy with their role of bail- 
ing out a Marxist regime that has an 
appalling record rat civil liberties. 

To support the Eritreans is tempt- 
ing. They area thorn in Colond Men- 
gistu's side. They are a hardworking 
and creative people. They have a case 
in their demand for independence. 

But if the West came to the hdp of 
Eritrea it would need a watertight 
legal case, and there isn't one. 

When the Oiganization of African 


to avoid the tearing apart of Africa. 

The Italians colonized the province 
of Eritrea fra 40 years. Before that 
Eritrea had not existed as a separate 
political entity. Then during the Ital- 
ians’ short occupation of Ethiopia, 
early in World War II, they reunited 
Ethiopia in the image of the old Am- 
haric rule, bringing Eritrea again un- 
der tbe authority of Addis Ababa. 

Respecting tbe OAlTs colonial 
boundaries could mean r e spect in g 
the separate identity erf Eritrea. On 
the o ther hand, the aww colonial 
forces that colonized Eritrea in effect 


era nations had their way, although 
Eritrea was given a large degree of 
autonomy ana self-government. 

Ten years later, after a period of 
conflict between Eritrean separatists 
and Addis Ababa, the federal govern- 
ment cracked down, abolished the 
federal institutions and integrated 
Eritrea folly into Ethiopia in ifftL 

Since then the military conflict has 
escalated to its present proportions. 
It is estimated to have cost a quarter 
of a million Eves, with tbe most mili - 
tant dements fighting for total inde- 
pendence. Yet it remains undear 
whether a majority of Eritreans want 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Ethiopia Needs to Hope Meddlesome Kennedy® 


The editorial “The Koreans Need 
to Sell” (Jan. 8) notes that per capita 
income in South Korea jumped from 
$100 in 1964 to $2,000 in 1984— that 


is. in toe space of just 20 years — accused of meddling in another coun- 


to be independent. Autonomy is still 
probably toe majority aim. 


put their Stamp of approval on the 
old Amharic daim to Eritrea by rul- 
ing the two parts as one country as 
soon as they got the chance. 

The British complicated the argu- 
ment when they liberated Ethiopia 
from the Italians in 1941. Eritrea was 
returned to its prewar frontiers and 

Son for eleven years 

In 1950 the debate on Eritrea’s 
furore opened at the United Nations 
and the picture was farther confused. 
Britain, the United States and their 
allies favored federation of Eritrea 
with Ethiopia. Moscow — opposite 
torts present position — toot toe side 
of Entnean independence. The West- 


prooaWy toe majority aim. 

If the legal issue is blurred, politi- 
cally there are at least two good rea- 
sons for the West not to get involved. 
Tbe Eritrean resistance is split three 
ways. Fighting has been common: 
over the years, a number of leaders 
have been liquidated by opposing 
factious. Moreover, the group that is 
most effective on toe battlefield, the 
Eritrean People’s Liberation Front, is 
Manriswiominated. Fra the West to 
become deeply involved in support- 
ing the Eritrean cause would mean 
stepping into a minefield. 

Longer-term political factors also 
militate against involvement. Why 
should the West fed it has to involve 
itsdf in every African dispute? In 
Angola or Zaire it did not achieve its 
aims and only ended up giving itself a 
bad name as interventionist. 

The Eritreans may deserve sympa- 
thy, bat there are good reasons to 
withhold formal support. 

International Herald Tribune. 


largely through hard work and in the 
absence of natural resources like oLL 
Certainly it is difficult even to dream 
of a similar growth rate fra Ethiopia. 
However, f would be surprised if any- 
one dreamed of a $2,Q00-per-capita 
South Korea back in 1964. 

Everyone has heard a lot about 
Ethiopia's present agony. I think it is 
time to modify the news coverage a 
little to allow for rehabilitation po- 
tential and the goal of Ethiopian self- 
reliance in base needs. 

It is clear that toe major contribu- 
tion has to come from the Ethiopians 
themselves, both inside and outside 
toe country. But along with that do- 
mestic effort the United States, the 
Soviet Union, Europe, Japan, C hina 


try’s affairs. In 1957 Senator John F. 
Kennedy, speaking in toe Senate, 
urged independence for Algeria, 
where France was deeply mired in 
countering a rebellion. Tnls produced 


circles and of coarse in Paris, where 
the government of Premier Guy Mal- 
let could scarely find words to ex- 
press its exasperation. 

The speech was riled in many 
places as an example of John Kenne- 
dy’s irresponsibility in foreign affairs. 
Five years later Algeria was indepen- 
dent and Mr. Kennedy was president- 
ROBERT N. STURDEVANT. 

Juan-les-Pins, France. 


and the Arabs could play a decisive 
role. It ought to be possible to see a 
happier Ethiopia, if not a prosperous 
one, by the turn of toe century. 

Ethiopia has immensely contribut- 
ed to international civilization in toe 

past. If the better-off part of the 
world assisted her in this hour of 


Gossip Beside die Point 

Whether Margaret Heckler. US 
secretary for health and human ser- 
vices, condemned her husband “toa 
life of either celibacy or adultery" by 
refusing to haw catiisI relations with 


refusing to have sexual relations w® 

him is titillating gossip unworthy o 
the International Herald Tribune 


difficulty, the world would in a sense (People, Jan. 10). railing her political 
be paying back its debt ambitions “all consuming" and sng- 

I would like the international com- !J " 


munity to think erf Ethiopia as facing 
a great challenge, that can be met if 
there is a win. instead of a tragedy 
that implies a hopeless stale. 

GETACHEW TELAHUN. 

Development Projects 
Study Agency, Addis Ababa. 


gesting that they drove her to a voids 
divorce that could have been hanafiu 
to her career is gender-biased asfr 
sense. A more appropriate discussion 

would focus on the secretary’s pubuc 
performance at her job- 

AUSON JONES WfiBR 

Dakar. 




^“•'i • - . 


It could be added to your editorial 
comment (Jan. 16) on Senator Ed- 
ward Kennedy’s tnp to South Africa 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


Page 5 




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2 Officers Cry 
In Court as 
Film Shows 
Priest’s 


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■ United Press International 

TORUN. Poland —Two securi- 
ty police officers accused of kid- 
napping and murdering a pro-Sob- 
danty priest broke down and wepi 
Friday as a coon was shown film of 
his! body being dragged from a res- 
ervoir. 

Lieutenant WaJdemar Chmie- 
iewski slumped in the dock, sob- 
bing. Lieutenant Pekala 

cried and hung his bead to avoid 
looking at the two screens in the 
courtroom showing the film. They 
are accused with Captain G iz c got z 
piotrowski of kidnapping, beating 
and Idling Father Jerry Popie- 
luszfco. 

Their superior. Colonel Adam 
Pietniszka, who is charged with 
complicity in the killing , and Cap- 
tain Piotrowski stared at a blank 
wall dining the screening. 

Colonel Pietniszka has pleaded 
not guilty; the three officers have 
confessed to the killing but said 
they were acting on orders of thdr 

superiors. 

The court was shown black and 
white film of the priest's body be- 
ing lifted from the reservoir where 
it was thrown OcL 19. It was re- 
trieved 11 days later. 

The film showed the body, 
weighted by a bag of rocks and dad 
in a mud-smeared cassock, as it was 
lifted from the reservoir. Close-ups 
of his blackened face showed it 
braised and swathed in adhesive 
tape and gauze that was ased to gag 
him. 

As the body was being searched, 
a group of police officers surround- 
ing it were langhrng a defense law- 
yer explained that the officers were 
amused because they had discov- 
ered a railing card in his clothing 
that bore an address other Lhanof 
his home. The lawyer said the offi- 
cers hed assumed that the card con- 
firmed report? that Father Popie- 
luszko kept a secret apartment and 
a mis tress. 

Earlier, the court listened to a 
recording of lieutenant Chmie- 
lewski’s voice as he confessed. 

On Thursday, a pathologist. Pro- 
fessor Tadeusz Josonk, said the ex- 
act time of death could not be de- 
termined, bat be ruled but 
drowning as a cause. The autopsy 
results said the priest suffocated by 
being gagged, or by rope around his 
neck, or by choking on his blood. 

Another pathologist, Maria 
Byrdy, showed the court the weap- 
on used to dub the priest — a thick 
tree branch. “This was heavy 
enough to inflict powerful blows 
which wot delivered to his ear, jaw 
and the back of his skull,” she said. 



Maria Byrdy, a . 
shows a Pohsh court a 


who performed the autopsy on Father Jerzy Popiehiszko, 
tub allegedly used in bis murder by officers of the secret police. 

Soviet Delegates to Aims Talks Chosen 

Izveslia Continues Grilidusm of U.S. Space Defense Han 


United Press Intermit tonal 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
has chosen its delegation to coming 
arms talks with the United Slates 
and will announce the negotiators’ 
name s in a few days, the Soviet 
news agency Tass said. 

The agency reported that the rul- 
ing Politburo, at its regular meeting 
on Thursday, approved the negoti- 
ating team to the arms control 
talks. The talks were agreed upon 
by Foreign Minister Andrei A. 
Gromyko and Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz earlier this 
month. 

The United States announced its 
negotiating team last week 

“An appropriate derision was 


adopted, including on organiza- 
tional questions with regard to the 
Soviet delegation lo the talks," 
Tass said. An agency spokesman 
said later that the delegates' names 
would be announced in a few days. 

The government daily lzvestia, 
adding to the condemnation in ihe 
Soviet press of President Ronald 
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive, unofficially known as "star 
wars," said: “There is open talk in 
the United Slates about the advan- 
tages of deploying American space 
arms bemuse it would make it pos- 
sible to conduct an entire nuclear 
conflict exactly over Europe and 
not over the United States." 

It said that, although the White 


Gromyko’s Son Describes a Dream 
Of 'Captain Reagan 9 Saving World 

Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — The son of Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromy- 
ko of the Soviet Union has described a dream in which a Reagan-like 
figure saved tbe world from certain destruction through the arms race 
after being persuaded to change course. 

Professor Anatoli A. Gromyko, a former diplomat, said in remarks 
on Thursday to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute 
that he had dreamed of being a passenger on a ship commanded by a 
captain “with cowboy guns in his pockets,” one of the characteriza- 
tions of President Ronald Reagan m (he Soviet press. 

He said the ship was the planet Earth and was heading straight for a 
comet labeled “the ants race.” He and other passengers rushed to the 
captain’s cabin op realizing what was happening. 

“The captain was a strange person," the professor said. “He did not 
believe us, as usual with cap tains, who are often stubborn men who 
always know better than other people. He smDod politely at os and 
one could notice two cowboy guns in bis pockets. FmaDy, the captain, 
with the help of other captains, changed the course of oar planet 
bdore it was loo late.” 

“From that moment I became a firm believer that dreams come true 
— they must," he said. 


House had indicated that the Sovi- 
et Union was working on a s imilar 
system, “The Soviet Union does 
not have such plans and the people 
in Washington know this well” 

“Tbe Soviet Union, understand- 
ably, will not be sitting on its hands 
and waiting to see what will be the 
result of the American studies, but 
in its turn will be forced to take tbe 
necessary measures," tbe newspa- 
per said. 

Moscow has said that any agree- 
ment. in the arms talks would be 
linked to a hall in the U-S. space 
weapons development, but Wash- 
ington says it has no plans to halt 
its research on such a system. 

■ US. Aide P faajnfatie on Talks 

A senior U.S. official said Friday 
he saw little chance of agreement in 
the 1985 series of negotiations on 
European security and disarma- 
ment that opens Tuesday in Stock- 
holm, The Associated Press report- 
ed from Brussels. 

The statement by James Good- 
by. chief U.S. delegate to the talks, 
contrasted with reports from 
Stockholm earlier this week that 
Soviet diplomats expected an 
agreement by tbe end of the year. 

Speaking at the headquarters of 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation shortly after high-level offi- 
cials from the 16 member nations 
met to discuss their strategy for the 
Stockholm talks, Mr. Goodby said: 
“Ihe win is there on our pan to 
negotiate." 

But be added later that he con- 
sidered it unlikely that a deal could 
be struck much before the Novem- 
ber 1986 deadline of the 35-nation 
Conference on Security and Disar- 
mament in Europe. 


B onn Insists 
Missile Fire 
Did Not Pose 
Public Threat 

The Associated Press 

BONN — A fire in a Pershing-2 
missile that killed three US. sol- 
diers at a missile base earlier this 
month posed no danger to the West 
German public. Defense Minister 
Manfred Warner told the parlia- 
ment on Friday. 

Durum a debate about the acci- 
dent, Mr. Warner said “at no time" 
were local residents threatened by 
the missile that caught fire Jan. 1 1 
at the Redleg mi-gale base near 
Heflbronn. 

The U.S. Army said the first- 
stage rocket fud ignited while the 
missile was being unloaded from a 
packing case, faulty burning three 
soldiers and injuring 16. 

The army said there were no nu- 
clear w arhead^ near by and the pub- 
lic was not endangered. But it has 
not released results of its investiga- 
tion into the cause of the accident. 

Mr. Worrier said German news 
reports were false in claiming that 
Pershing-2 impales were inade- 
quately tested. He said 18 of 22 test 
firings in the United States have 
been successful 

But members of parliament from 
the leftist opposition Social Demo- 
crats and Greens advocated a 
freeze on deployment of the mis- 
siles and transporting them on Ger- 
man roads until the cause of the fire 
has been disclosed 

“The only sure protection is the 
removal of tbe missiles," declared 
Karlin Fuchs, a Social Democratic 
deputy. 

However, Mr. Warner and other 
deputies from the right-center co- 
alition government rejected leftist 
calls for a “binding parliamentary 
statement" on the matter. There 
was no vote. 

“We shouldn't allow the mass 
media and the enemies of our state 
to cause hysteria," said Ursula 
Kronc-Appuhn of the Bavarian 
conservative Christian Social 
Union. 

In a meeting last week of the 
parliament’s defense committee, 
coalition deputies voted down a 
motion from the opposition for a 
freeze on deployment of the Per- 
sbing-2s because of the accident. 

Military officials have said about 
50 Pershing-2 medium-range nu- 
clear missiles have been stationed 
in southern Germany since deploy- 
ment started in November 1983. 

A total of 108 Perehing-2s are to 
be situated in in West Germany. 


Silesian Debate Revive 

Proponents of German Reunification Embarrass Kohl 


By Tyler Marshall 

Los Angela Times Soria 

BONN —It has been almost 40 
years since the Silesian region of 
Hiller’s defeated Third Reich be- 
came pan of Poland, but those who 
Ded westward and b egan their lives 
anew in West Germany have never 
given up hope that the area would 
one day return to German hands. 

This week, amid political com- 
motion and pressure from Chancel- 
lor Helmut kohl. West Germany’s 
largest organization of Silesian ref- 
ugees was forced to reword a motto 
expressing these sentiments. 

The controversy reflects the divi- 
sions in West Germany on such 
basic questions as the definition Of 
any future, reunited Germany. 

The demands of refugee and ex- 
pellee groups have complicated Mr. 
Ktriil's efforts to improve relations 
with Eastern Europe. Poland, 
Czechoslovakia and the Soviet 
Union, which also owns such terri- 
toiy, bridle at talk of Germans re- 
gaining lands lost after World War 
IL 

This time, however, the motto 
selected for the annual rally of the 
Silesian League next June, “Forty 
years of banishment — Silesia re- 
mains (hits," provoked debate in 
West Germany as well. 

Mr. Kohl, who caused a contro- 
versy in the fall by becoming the 
first chancellor in almost two de- 
cades to address an expdlee group. 



ative and refused to honor a com- 
mitment to address the Silesian nd- 
ly unless it woe changed. 

Right-wing members of Mr. 
Kohl’s Christian Democrats have 
expressed understanding for the Si- 
lesian expellees, while the Serial 
Democrat opposition condemned 
the argument. Hans-Jochen Vogel 
parliamentary leader of the Social 
Democrats, called the debate an 
“unseemly game" that could dis- 
turb West Germany’s reconcilia- 
tion with East bloc countries. 

After meeting Monday with Mr. 
Kohl the Silesians modified their 
motto to: “Forty years of banish- 
ment — Silesia remains our future 
in a Europe of free people.” 

Herbert Hupka, head of the Sile- 
sian League and a member of the 
West German parliament, said 
Tuesday that Mr. Kohl had accept- 
ed the new wording and would now 
address the gathering, which is ex- 
pected to draw 150,000 people. 

However, in an open letter to 
Mr. Kohl on Tuesday announcing 
the change, Mr. Hupka maintained 
his hard line. “Silesia isn't just the 
home of SQeaans,” he wrote, “but 
the property of all Germans.” 

Social Democrats charged that 
the text of the letter and the new 
wording left the Silesians' position 
virtually unchanged. Horst Ehmke, 
their deputy paniamentaiy leader. 


Herbert Hupka 


called this “grotesque, shamefuL" 
In its 1970 treaty with Poland, 
the West German government ac- 
knowledged the present Polish 
western frontier, including Silesia. 
The border, which Poland shares 
with East Germany, runs mainly 
along the Oder and Neisse Rivers. 

Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich 
Genscher has repeatedly said re- 
cently that Bonn considers existing 
European borders “inviolable.” 

Bat the West German govern- 
ment also holds to a contradictory 
view that, sometime in the future, a 
peaceful realignment of Europe’s 
frontiers mil bring these lost areas 
back to German control 
Forei gn Ministry edSdnh admi t 
the policy is confusing, but say un- 
officially that it would be political- 
ly difficult not to offer some hope 
to those West Germans who trace 
their origins back to the lost eastern 
territories. 

The German £i1«sinna resettled 
in West Germany after World War 
n are estimated to number 2 mil- 
Hon, an important part Of the 13 
million Germans driven from the 
eastern territories of the defeated 
German Reich after the postwar 
bonier realignments. 

Silesia was conquered by Freder- 
ick the Great or Prussia in (he 
1740s, but its coal- and sted-pro- 
dnring regions were ceded to Po- 
land after World War L Poland 
acquired tbe rest of the province 
after World War IL except for two 
small districts that are now part of 
East Germany. 

■ Paper Describes Unification 
James Markham of The New 
York Times reported film Bom on 
Friday: 

A ma gftTine representing refu- 
gees from Silesia has published an 


article suggesting that the West 
German A rmy could move into 
eastern Europe and reunify Ger- 
many. 

The article by Thomas Finke, 
“Reflections About Germany,’ 
which appeared in the 
lion’s official organ, 
described a fictional 

sweep by the Bundeswehr _ 
eastern Europe to the Soviet fron- 
tier, saying that the “overwhelming, 
part erf the population greeted the 
Germans as liberators.” 

As Austria had decided to merge 
with the Federal Republic of Ger- 
many, German reunification had 
been achieved, be related. 

Mr. Finke wrote that reunifica- 
tion had been passible because 
West Germany had used its eco- 
nomic weight to weaken the Soviet 
empire. “As long as tbe Soviet 
Union is internally stable and 
strong in military and foreign po- 
licy terms, a solution of the Ger- 
man problem in the sense of the 
Federal Republic is not possible,” 
he wrote. 

In a statement that was cleared 
by the chancellor, Peter Bocmsck, 
tbe government spokesman, on Fri- 
day criticized the article as ‘irre- 
sponsible, damaging and unwise.” 

“The federal government expects 
fhai the leadership of tbe Silesian 
organization will draw the conse- 
quences fen- those responsible for 
this mistaken action," be said. 

Seoul Disavows 
Threat to Jail 
Returning Exile 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The South 
Korean Embassy says the govern- 
ment has disavowed a threat to 
imprison the opposition leader 
Kim Dae Jong if be returns from 
exile in Lhe United States as 
planned next month. 

A statement issued by the em- 
bassy Thursday said the comments 
by Choi Chang Yoon, secretary for 
political affairs to President Chun 
Doo Hwan, that Kim would be 
imprisoned if he returned “do not 
represent the views of the Korean 
government." 

“The embassy understands they 
were strictly his personal views and 
do not relate to the position of the 
Korean government in any man- 
ner," the statement said. 

An embassy spokesman said the 
disavowal had been approved by 
the Seoul government. He could 
not say what would happen to Mr. 
Kim if he flew back to South Korea 
as planned on Feb. 8. In the past, 
Seoul has limited its comments to 
saying that he would be dealt with 
according to Korean law. 


Angolan Rebels Appear to Be Overreaching Goals 




By Peter Wise 

Washington Post Service 

LISBON — The Angolan rebel 
movement UNITA appears to be 
overreaching its military capacity 
a ad iB showing signs of internal 
dissent as it miewnfia guerrilla 
and diplomatic activity to secure a 
significant role in negotiations to- 
ward a regional peace settlement, 
according to diplomatic observers. 

Tbe determination of the rebel 
leader, Jonas Savimbl to achieve 
impressive military successes to 
demonstrate the guerrillas' strength 
has met with apposition from field 
commanders who fear he is push- 
ing the offensive ahead too far and 
too fast, according to the assess- 
ment of Western analysts here. 

Recent tensions within the pro- 
Western rebel movement have been 
reflected in the acknowledgment 
by the rebels of a setback in plans 
to advance toward the Angolan 
capital of Luanda, open disen- 
chantment over closer U.S. ties 
with the Marxist government and 
uncertainty surrounding the status 



EDITO*. 




, hierarchy,” said 
a Western diplomat in Lisbon, “but 
it is 'difficult tor assess the precise 
si gnificance of the chan ges Most 
Africa watchers in this former colo- 
nial capital attribute the signs of 
agitation to rebd fears that they are 
being squeezed out of U.S.-Ied ef- 
forts to end bosh wars in Angola 
and the neighboring South Afri- 
can-controlled territory of South- 
West Africa, also known is Namib- 
ia. 

UNITA, a Portuguese acronym 
for the National Union for the To- 
tal Independence of Angola, has 
been waging an effective anti-gov- 
ernment campaign of economic 
sabotage ami guerrilla attacks since 
its defeat by the riding Popular 
Movement far the liberation of 
AngoU (MPLA) in a "brief civil war 


that fallowed independence from 
Portugal in 1975. Tbe Marxist 
MPLA draws on Soviet technical 
aid and the badting of an estimated 
25,000 Cuban troops in its war 
against the rebels who acknowl- 
edge logistical support from South 
Africa. 

Successive U.S. administrations 
have given UNITA tacit support as 
allies in a strategy to dimmish Sovi- 
et and Cuban influence in southern 
Africa, although Congress banned 
U.S. aid to the rebels m 1976. But 
the decision by President Josfc 
Eduardo dos Santos of Angola last 
fall to respond to three years of 
quiet UiL diplomacy in the region 
has led to a warmer chmatc in rela- 
tions between Luanda and Wash- 
ington that the rebels view with 
disfavor. 

“The United States seems to be 
forgetting that we are its real 
friends in Angola,” said Fernando 
Wilson dos Santos, a UNITA in- 
formation officer “Washington is 
Bering against its own global inter- 
ests by asking ns to make conces- 
sions and not the MPLA.” He ex- 
pressed concern that the Reagan 
administration would seek to ac- 
commodate Luanda by accepting a 
settlement in which UNITA had 
only a symbolic presence in a fu- 
ture Angolan gove rnmen t 

In a diplomatic offensive that 
seems to reflect rebd anxieties, 
Tito Chzngnnjl UNITA’s perma- 
nent secretary, has begun a tour of 
European capitals telling Western 
governments that UNITA is offer- 
ing the Popular Movement for the 
Liberation of Angola “a last 
chance" to negotiate its demand for 
full power-sharing in a government 
of national imity. According to Mr. 
Wilson dos Santos, the alternative 
is an intenrificatioa of the guerrilla 
war focused on besieging the capi- 
tal 

While Western observers recog- 
nize that the rebels’ strike-power is 



Jonas Savimbl, Angolan rebel leader 


Stn&sm Soys There h an 'Urgent Need’ 
For Changes in UN He Helped Create 


considerable, they note recent indi- 
cations that rebd forces may have 
been put undo - severe strain by a 
widening of the bush offensive. 

Over the past year UNITA 
rilnimc to have extended armed op- 
erations into every Angolan prov- 
ince except south western Mocame- 
des where the desert terrain is 
iinsirited to guerrilla combat. Tbe 
rebels say they control large areas 
of the southeast and are currently 
setting up thdr own administration 
in the remote northeastern dia- 
mond-mining province of Lunda. 

Rebel officials admit that they 


have been stalled in their declared 
aim erf massing 20,000 guerrillas 
into Luanda province by the aid of 
last year in a drive toward the capi- 

“So far only about 7,000 men are 
in the province but the mobiliza- 
tion is con tinning," said Mr. Wil- 
son dos Santos. Allowing Tor exag- 
geration, tite actual number is 
thought to be much Iowa 1 . Reliable 
sources estimate overall rebel 
strength at about 20,000. 

Mr. Savimbi claims to command 
a force erf 50,000, mdndmg regular 
troops, guerrillas and local mffitias. 




. 

’ V-' 


New. York Torn Serwor 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — Harold E Stassen, the 
onfy, American aow living to have 

original United Nations^^^tff, 
says thee is “a.vety orgeat need” 
for a second charter so mat “a new 
United Nations might grow out of 

theokr.. - y 

Mr. Stassen,- 77, a former gover- 
nor of Minnesota and five-tune 
presidential candidate, said Thurs- 
day the worid organization was 
“deteriorating” and without 
changes^ ' “the alternative is spread- 
ing terrorism and growing local 
wars.* 1 , • • ■ 

Mr. Stassen suggested that, tbe 
world ; organization could be 
stre n gthened bythe introduction of 


“wdghted voting” based on such 
factors as population and gross na- 
tional product rather than the cur- 
rent one-country one-vote system 
of the General Assembly. 

As the United Nations prepares 
to celebrate its 40th anniversary, 
Mr Stassen urged memlw states to 
consider establishing a new 22- 
member Central Cabinet of Ad- 
ministrators, a permanent peace 
force of 250,000 members and a 
more equitable system of financ- 

in ^le acknowledged that the Unit- 
ed Nations had been successful in 
meeting its primary goal of peace- 
keeping ana was “entitled to sub- 
stantial credit for the crucial fact 
that there bus not been a third 
world war.” 


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LHX GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS TRAVEL & 

ENTERTAINMENT: 

EUROPE. 

There’s never been 
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Trib business readers al 
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The result a book for 
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Turn cn ordinary business trip into a pteasan^more 
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Seven subdivisions for each city include: 1. Basic city 
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Signature^ Diners Oub /ntemafonat 
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FOOD LOVER'S 
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As restaurant critic 
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Page 6 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATIUDAY-SUIVDAY, JANUARY 26-27. 1985 


Recent Books Illustrate Revival 


ARTS / LEISURE 

of Interest in Antique Jewelry 


International Herald Tribune 

T HE slogan “small is beautiful" 
has reached the art a rc a rt ffmfr 
worid. Antique jewelry is becoming 


the theme by focusing on fully do- 
cumented pieces. 


It may have started five years 
ago when Yvonne Hackeubroch, a 
retired Metropolitan Museum cu- 


SOUREN MELIKIAJV 


rator, came out with “Renaissance 
Jewellery," published by Philip 
Wilson in London. A marvelous 
exhibition organized the year after 
at the Victoria and Albert Museum 
by Anna Somers Cocks, “Princely 
Magnif icence: Court Jewels of the 
Renaissance 1500 to 1630 ” refined 


In 1 983, another masterly exhibi- 
tion took place, at the Musee des 
Art Decoratifs in Paris. The subject 
was “Les Fouquet," a f amil y of 
French Art Nouveau and Art Deco 
jewelers. The organizer, Marie- 
Noel de Gary, using untapped Fou- 
quet archives in the museum, 
showed the sketches done by 
Georges Fouquet, who designed 
Art Nouveau and late An Deco 
pieces, and Jean, his brother, essen- 
tially an An Deco artist, side by 
side with the jewelry made from 
them. This was a coup. Jean Fou- 
quet and designers commissioned 
by the Fouquet company were 
shown to have created miniature 


objels d’art as significant, in their 
way, to the movement of Abstrac- 
tionist Cubism as the now-famous 
painters of that period. A book 
edited by Marie-Noel de Gary, in- 
cluding her catalogue raisvnne of 
the Fouquet production, is one of 


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#//, 


played by scbolarsbip in the revival 
that the author of the catalog, Bri- 
gitte Marquardt, was also the au- 


more appears to have been pre- histonan. Alter suggesting for 


years to the Melons and Albert 


gitte Marquardt, was also me au- Some idea of the respective pro- Museum — which has the finest 
thor of the book “S&muck, Klassi- portions may be gathered from Di- and most comprehensive cotieeiion 
zismus uod Biedermeier ana Scarisbrick’s survey of the jew- of jewelry in Lhe worid — that she, 
1780-1850.” Published in Munich eliy market, a bilingual volume in would donate her treasures to 
in 1 983, it covered new ground and Italian and English titled “A Valore them, she turned to the British Mu- 
triggered the exhibition. dei gicielii e degii orologi da code- seum at the 11 th hour because it 

In November, there was an out- zione." (Umberto Allemandi ), ren- complied wiih her demand that the 
burst of publications. Most reveal- dered in English as “Antique "pyramid" be displayed in its cit- 
ing of the new scholarly awareness Jewdleiy and Watch Values" — urety in a special room, 
of a potential interest on the part of that is. prices. After a brief essay on While it fails to make an impres- 


the finest ever published on jewel- 
ry. Unaccountably, there is no En- 
glish-language edition of “Les Fou- 
quet" (Flammarion). 


In the last few months, lhe jewel- 
ry revival has gathered momentum. 
An exhibition on neoclassical and 
Biedermeier jewelry, which origi- 
nated in the Schmuckmnseum 
(Jewelry’ Museum) at Pforzheim. 
West Germany, is at the Dusscl- 
dorf Stadtmuseum through March 
3. It is characteristic of the role 


While it fails to make an impres- 


the general public is a hardcover collecting essentially in the 18th sive displav. with its overflow of 
booklet, “Rings" pubhsbed by the and 19th century, the volume re- third-rate pieces, the Hull Grundy 


Victoria and Albert Museum. The produces the jewdry seen at auc- collection gives a perfect cross sec- 
writer, Shirley Bury, curator of lion and in the trade over the past tion of what could be had in the 


metalwork, is a top authority on four years, 
later 19th- and 2DLh-century objels ^ ^,5^ by period. sma11 number of 18th-century 

d’art. The text is short, captions are ^ ±c igLb-ccntur; section Z dis- a lzr & aumber oi 9th ' 

cut down to a mimmum and the thin century pieces anc Icaas 01 An 


market in the last 30 vears — a 


cut down to a minimum and the rr ^ dn( , l v century pieces and loads of An 

emphasis is on color photography. .... Nouveau. Of it alL almost nothing 

The aim is to make the book attrac- Th e most tedmg mdication of ^ be described for sure as ISth- 
tive to a wide readership “at the the scarcity of 18th-century French cetJlur ^- French jeweliy. True, tin 
lowest possible price," as the muse- jewelry is to be found m another ^lajog edited by Hugh TaiL a dep 



urn director. Sir Roy Strong, notes recent kx)k. a two- volume catalog ut y keeper at tiie British hluseum. 


on the back cover. of the Ann Hull Gnmdy oollecuon. appears to have been produced un- 

Whether “Rings” will succeed in Mre. Grundy, as she u’as knenvn to jg,. g^t pressure — the standards 
popularizing such wonderful pieces museum curator and dealer ^ photography are less than ade- 
as the Anglo-Saxon silver-gilt me- i n London, died last summer, tb e layout is a jumble and 

daflion of the 9th century found in shortly after donating the last of man y enLries'are reduced 10 a cou- 
the Tliaines river in 1856 is a moot the 1,188 items rounded m fhe cal- _ le pf w hile others run to 
question. But publications of this alos to the British Museum, where even so. it is obvious that 

land may reduce the destructive- they are now on show. scholarship is still daintily feeling 

ness that has wiped out so much . She was by all accounts a vora- lts gj-Qumj where the 18th century 
jewelry, so much of the past Small cious jewelry collector. Unlike an- ^ France in particular 

silver and gold objects, acddentally other pioneer m the field. Dame m concerned, 
dug up, have all 100 often been Joan Evans, who mhmied a great jb ere roil jd be no greater con- 
mishandled, lost or melted down. coUection and expanded it by add- ^ ^ ^ Canier - fj-ajiable in 
Family jeweliy handed from one ina ranue before donaLmg ihem ^ German, in a slum- 

generation to another has been dis- ^ to \he and AJbert Mu- bling F ^ h version and in a better 


An 18th-century aigrette from the Hull Grundy coUection. 


Opera Comique Stages 
Russian Rarity in Paris 


e — — — . , 0 -7< Lf-o ri.A nn , bling French version and in a better 

manllcd. ^ prcoous Jones ^t iin 1975 Gnmdy dK ^1 English uznshuon polished b> 




Rv TVivid •srcvm>; which the characters express them- 

selves in short phrases that, hover 
AR1S - Alexander Dmgo- permanently bet w-een recitaUve 


18th century has survived, although 
vast quantities are known to have 
been produced. In Britain, thanks 
to the more tradition-minded fam- 


wmen sue tniuuni uy ^ ^ ^ 

^“^^& dlsp yed 355» 5cBS. t£ Suit is a 

together in a single place. bookfullofdetails.almostayear- 

This collection is my pyramid, ._ vear ncotA of lbe a ,mnanv’s 


mon with some far belter known mauccumaxaas 

Russian operas — a story by Push- m “ ch . from lhe. P« “ tie / ^f SC V 


been produceo. in bntatn, manits ««««» « • r-*- 1JB book full of details, almost a year- \da and orchestration by Rimsky- 11 “ a fascinating work when 

to the more tradition-minded fam- This coUection is my pyramid, lo _ year record of the company’s Korsakov But these have not been listened to in its historical context 
ilies of the aristocracy, a good deal she is quoted as saying to one art with some irreplaceable enough to resene the work from the T ^ musica I 31111 tilei ^',. B V I 

— chronological lists, such as those of encyclopedias, where it is generally ^ ll * e Lnown works are usually utile 

succeeding watch models. It in- presented as one of the most influ- * cnow>-n f 01 " a , reasoa ’ ^ “ orl 


Sellars’ Season Announced 


nilUL. 11 UgMIVItkUT . j .1 ' . . 

presented as one of the most influ- { °T * . reaso ?* VT?*, ^ 


dudes countless bits of previously «3tial flops in operatic history. answer here is probably that Dar- 

• A r r J Hid n.M nntro «Ka talAnl 


unpublished information — a fain- ludeed, Daigomizhsky himself gomizhdrv did not have the talent 


The Associated Press 

r ASHINGTON —The direc- 


oos r briolette diamond weighing ( mim9)TlSd^w^e to match his reforming z^L There 
dents, the elderiv and the handi- 90.38 carats, constantly described West through his music, but rather 

capped as low as'S730. “ appearing m a picture of the through his role in trying to estab- bal demeubdi arethi ey b<^ 

^^iconoclastic SeUars, 27. for- 16th century Fontainebleau schooL ^ a new Russian musical idiom come . f^ii^, Md exi^t for a 


W ASHINGTON —The direc- capped as low as S730. “ appearing in a piciure oi ™ 

tor and producer Peter Sellars The iconoclastic Sellars, 27, for- ,6th Fontainebleau school 
has announad his plans for the mer artistic direaor of the Boston “ avc 0,1 3 

creation of a national theater com- Shakespeare Company, was named diamond dialer named Aranukhk- 
pany at the Kennedy Center, start- director of the American Theater shortly before its acquisition 


The iconoclastic Sellars, 27, for- 16th century fontamebieau school lish a new Russian musical idiom 

mer artistic direaor of the Boston wms out to have ban cm bv a _ efforts industriously propa^an- JSSJf 

— „„„ diamond dealer named Aramik Ek- hv- rk-ir r»; anrf character ot Laura and a uvay 


pany at the Kennedy Center, start- director of the American Theater 
mg this spring with productions of Company last July. 

Shakespeare's “Henry IV, Part L” His first season in the Elsenhow- 


by Cartier in 1909. 


dized by Osar Cui and exploited ot Laura am. a ura, 

with genius in the music dramas of 


rWithSThrip^ is rather flat. And, ft 
“The Stone Guest" poser seems to have 


.the corn- 
ed the gift 


and a comedy by Mae West 
The American National Theater, 
with a $6-million budget, will take 


in> year-round residence in the 
Kennedy Center's Eisenhower 


His first season in the Esenhow- Scholars now go beyond writing sky and Cui, “The Stone Guest" 
er Theater will begin March 23 with books and staging exhibitions. The had its premiere in 1872 in St Fe- iS 

a new version of the Shakespeare Society of Jewelry Historians, tersborg. The arrival of the work at possessed m the high 

drama, directed by Timothy Mayer Founded in London by British the Op^a Comique is a rare chance A 

— j ^ chifi.v n.. n . >a HiCmmuv ih» nihcimm HohinH Although Dargomizhsky set 


Kennedy centers tisennower 
Theater. The center's smaller, 500- 
seat Terrace Theater will showcase 


in June, uic company wm pic- »eu aa uwuu.i uwuj. u>» jju wnat me composer was alter r .,ii u Hramn Tie frwr 

sent “Come on Over," subtitled members from around the worid. was “truth” that involved bending 


productions from other American “Embassy Row." a never-produced The Hrsi issue of us yearly journal musical line to fit the infiec- 1 

theater groups, sometimes in col- comedy about Washington written running to more than 90 pages, is dons of the Russian language. The 

liberation with Sellars’ company, by the actress Mae West Sellars* due out shortly. Its next svmpo- result, in “The Stone Guest," is a Tncri- 

Top ticket prices, now $30, will staff discovered the script in the sium will be Feb. 19 at Burlington mus ical speech that is generally la- ^ SatwH ^ reflection 

he cut to $20. with seats for stu- Uhrarvnf Commas. House. h.i»H -ro^lnHir r^Taiiu,. ” in ^ pQitosopmcai_ reueewm. , 


laboration with Sellars' company. 

Top ticket prices, now $30, will 
be cut to $20, with seats for stu- 


by the actress Mae West Sellais’ 
staff discovered the script in the 
Library of Congress. 


’melodic recitative.' 


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Alitor Your Money 


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The principal episode is his effort^ 
to capture the love of Dona Amuf, : 
who here is the widow of the Com- 
mander he has kilted before lhe 
opera begins. It ends the same way 
as Mozart's version, though, when 
the statue shows up for dinner. 

The premiere Thursday at the 
Salle Favart was a mixed bag, 
strongly sung but often badly let 
down by the orchestra. The prelude 
sounded more tike a ragged first 
run-through, and although Jean-.. 
Claude Casadesus got things more 
under control as the evening con- 
tinued, Dargomizh&ky certainly de- 
served better than be got from (h$ 
band (or the house's notoriously 
raucous acoustics). 

Don Juan is written for a strong 
tenor, and AD an Cathcart delivered 
a stalwart and convincing perfor- 
mance, despite a certain dramatic 
blandness. The soprano Mariana 
Nicolesco was an Anna of dark, 
Slavic intensity, and mezzo sopra- 
no Glenys Linos a sultry Mediter- 
ranean Laura. John Paul Bogart 
made the most of the shat role of 
Don Carlos. Lhe Commander's 
brother, until being skewered in his 
turn by the Don. 

Bui even in this solid cast it was 
the Czech bass Sergei Koptchak, as 
Leporello, who swept vocal honors. 
Koptchak, who was heard at Lhe 
Paris Op6ra as Pimen in “Boris 
Godunov," sang tike a man with no 
vocal problems at all — full toned 
and easy in the role's dark Russian 
depths and ringing and Tree on top. 

Perhaps there is not much that 
can be done visually with this work, 
but the distinguished Coach stage 

director O to mar Kxejca, who 
mounted this production originally 
for La Scala, seemed content just to 
keep his characters on the move. 
The duel scene was splendidly cho- 
reographed, but tiie final scene fiz- 
zled, with Don Juan collapsing- be- 
fore the statue had a chance to 
shake hands. Guy-Gaode Fran- 
cois' double-arcade unit set was ef- 
fective and atmospheric, and Jan 
Skalicky designed idiomatic cos- 
tumes. 

For some reason, the program 
listed this lhree-acf work as bring 
in two acts, then played the whole 
thin g without an intermission. Per- 
haps the idea was to intensify the 
drama, but, if anything^ this helped ■ 
point up the weaknesses and. be- 
sides, made for a long sL 

Other performances of “The Sta* 
Guest” cure scheduled for Jan. 26, 28 ■ 
and 30, and Feb. 1, 4, 6 and S. 


AW 


x VII* 








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Al Capone’s Old Digs 
To Be Women’s Center 


The Associated Press 
CHICAGO — The old Lexing- 
ton Hotel, a one-time brothel d> aI 
was also headquarters and home 

for A] Capone, win be converted, 
into an international women’s mu- 
seum and research center in . time 

for the 1 992 Chkagp World's Fair. 

Patricia Porter, executive d trac- 
tor of the women's group organ#' 
ing the project, said the museom 
will not ignore the past oF the hotel 
which had 10 underground tunnels 
and a dozen secret staircases. 
















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


Page 7 


AETS/ LEISURE 


JS 
id\ 



^ , 


R fd Grooms Raises Another Ruckus Valentino Piles on the Embroidery in ’50s Show 


• ^Srifc 


• : '-s Vi; 
-■•-•VJ:-: 




'■* ■ 


gj^Max Wykes-loyce 

lerald Tribune 

)N — A “ruckus” is (fe- 
rn -that bible of the En- 
r, the Oxford En- 
as “an uproar, 
ffidifr ance or row,” while the 
Reaps Digest Great Hustraied 
‘bfctnaiy, developed from the 
databases of the Houghton 
Co, -of -Boston, defines a 
njc&s as “a noisy disturbance, a 
. sslaotkia.” Both dictionaries 
agilfiat the word is a hybrid of 
nSon and rumpus, while the 
0 *. D- adds that the word's earti- 
csfase was recorded by “ Ameri can 
pSfect Notes” as 1907 in north- 

wst Arkansas. - 

^Whatever its origin and usage, 
tfc American artist Red Grooms, 
bra .hi Nashville, Tennessee, in 
j37/has called his huge painted 
juhrtxir&I. works Ruckuses since 
^ when he produced the first of 
faese large environmen tal and figu- 

■ativc installations, “City of Chica- 
go." His cohort of collaborators 
and assistants is called the Rndcus 
Studios. 

For his first major exhibition in 
Britain he completed a three-di- 
mensional, 20 -foot-long ( 6 -meter) 
Ruckus called “The Alley,** depict- 
ing life in an alleyway in SoHo in 
lower Manhattan, framed * *' 

of buildings, tracks and o 
ures. 

A splendid mixed-media work, 
“London Bus,” was featured in 
Grooms's 1984 New York show. 
Earlier Ruckuses included the im- 
pressive “Ruckus Manhattan," in 
New York in 1975-1976, success- 
fully restated in Tokyo at the Seibn 
Museum six years later; the “Dis- 
count Store" at Nashville (1978); 
the “Bookstore,” now in the Hud- 
son River Museum in Yonkers, 
New York; the “Ruckus Rodeo," 
first Exhibited in 1981 at the Aspen 
Centr for Visual Arts and now 
ownsd by the city of Fort Worth, 
Tens; «nd the “Philadelphia Cor- 
Docrpia," commissioned dv the In- 



GaorgiHNOM 

Red Grooms working on his installation, “The Alley. 


by slices 
other Dg- 


stitute of Conlemporaiy Art for the 
city’s centenary celebrations and 
bought by a group of citizens for 
the Philadelphia Civic Center. 

Why do London Ruckus? “Be- 
cause I have not been here long 
enough to familiarize myself with 
die city," Grooms said. £ The Al- 
ley’ there" — he indicated the 
wooden-framed and acrylic-paint- 
ed foam-rubber construction — “is 
a block away from the studio I've 
worked in for 12 years and more. I 
walk alaqg if almost every day 
when Tm m New Yak. Even the 
installation 1 made in Paris wasn’t 
wholly satisfactory, since l didn't 
know Paris well enough-" 

And yet he has been much influ- 
enced by France in tins recent 
work: Among the 30 paintings, col- 
lages and reliefs arc many inscribed 
“Gordes," a place on the Vau- 
dusc- Provence border in southern 


•r:.3aa 

i - ''i; 
luift. S’ 



France, where many of his recent 
works were (heated last summer 
and fall 

“Thai was and is different When 
I came to stay in France last year, I 
brought oily my paints, not even a 
canvas. So I bad to begin by getting 
the feel of the available materials. 

And what 1 found was that in the 
Slates we are extravagant with the 
mass of materials we use, while in 
France people are so careful to con- 
serve everything for when it might 
be useful. The boxes you get with 
the groceries, the images on pack- 
ages. advertisements in the papers 
and magazines, I saved than all, 
even the foil and the corks from 
wine bottles.” 

He made good use of them — the 
collaged photograph heads of The 
Bathers"; the hang-glider and the 
present-day lovers, observing with 
amusement and even wonder the 

C&VOftingS of the dfln ring anh- 
popes on the “Bridge at Avignon”; 
the photo of the young pop singer 
cut from a magazine that provides 
(he face of “La Liberty” a 1984 
up dating of the chief figure in De- 
lacroix's “Liberty Leading the Peo- 
ple.” 

Not is this last image the only 

witty reference to other masters. r r o 

The cardboard, glue and collage numbers, which were carried in a 
fixates of “Les Demoiselles de coarse, interesting Hnen The col- 
lies" are a travesty of Picas- lection’s 78 coats came in strong 


By Hebe Dorsey 

liuemutOHol Herald Tribune 

R OME — Continuing in his 
long and successful “rich is 
better" tradition, Valentino has de- 
livered an uplifting gem of a sum- 
mer collection. 

Shown Thursday evening in the 
frescoed salons of the Grand Hotd, 
whose pillars were decked with 
green foliage, it was an event on 
Rome’s social calendar, the kind 
that attracts sequins, sables and di- 
amonds, all stacked on lop of one 
another. 

“It’s like going to the opera — I 
can’t believe it,” said Luisa Moore, 
who flew in by private jet from 

ROME FASHIONS 

Gsiaad. Her husband, Roger, did 
not make it; he was recuperating 
from seven weeks of filming anoth- 
er James Bond spectacular. 

Maria PSa Fanfare, in a long 
beaded Valentino tunic, flew in 
from Washington. The ultrathin 
Nan Ketnpner came from New 
York on her way to Paris, Gstaad 
and the Nile. The actress Clio 
Goldsmith came from Paris. So did 
the Comlesse de RaveneL who 
made the trip specially to select a 
dress — gold or yellow mandatory 
— for the March 30 housewarming 
of La Favorita, Jean-Pierre and 
Rosemarie Marrie-Rividre’s new 
home in Argentina. 

Valentino gave than just what 
they expected — a pretty, slim, 
cropped look for daytime and tons 
of embroidery for evening. Neal 
little dresses were topped % bole- . 
ros, grating draped waists. Shoul- 
ders were still very much there, 
good and square but not aggressive. 
This was an elegant, leggy look, 
with skirts well above the xnees. 

The mood was back to the ’50s, 
when girls were girls and knew tL 
Valentino’s most blatantly retro 
touches included short white kid 
gloves (the kind you only wear 
once), white collars and cuffs, 
white camelia buttonholes and 
blade Ascot ties 4 la “GigL" 

The collection was awash in 
pink, from a coy, bonbon-pink sQk 
crepe to startling neon-pink make- 
up. Next in line came turquoise, 
parma and a soft chartreuse. Black 
and navy were used as counter- 
points. There was a lot less beige 
than usual except for the opening 


Groomp’s “La liberty (1984). 


so’s Cubist damsels. A parody of 
van Gogh's “L'Arlfesienne’' is 
painted in bright colors on a shovel 
A van Goghish “Man in a Field” is 
painted on a hoe blade. “Simple," 
said Groans. T arrived in France 
without materials. I don't speak 
French. 1 went to a bricokur [do-it- 
yourself shop] and saw the hoe and 
those shovels there and thought 
how much personality and underly- 
ing dignity there was to those 
things, ana how wdl they’d suit my 
ideas.” 

As a loner who dabbled in Hap- 
penings and chose to be in New 
York at the height of Abstract Ex- 
pressionism, Grooms was, despite 
his figurative inclinations, influ- 
enced by Kline, Guston and de 
Kooning But there can be no firm- 
er nor finer mentor, even at this 
remove, than Rembrandt, the arch- 
realist. 

‘'Red Grooms: Recent Work," 
Marlborougfi Fate Art, 6 Albemarle 
Street, London WI, through March 
1. 


colors over dim black dresses. 

Although the embroidery was 
just short of mind-boggling Valen- 
tino’s best moments wore his most 
sober ones. His last dress — of 
plain red silk by Taroni held by two 
blade bows in back — brought 
down the house. Two other beau- 
ties were the panniered, Velasquez 
Infanta dresses. One was made of 
stiff black sHk with turquoise pan- 
niers; the other was solid black and 
impressive in its simplicity. 

Valentino, who started a trend in 
jeweled evening shoes, continued 
with stiletto heels in colors and 
patterns matching the dresses: pink 
and turquoise, silver and gold, 
black and white dots, glittering 
mirrors. 

One of the most ninaring thing s 
about Valentino is that year in, 
year out, the luxury of his collec- 
tions is unabated. He still employs 
130 seamstresses, who work until 
the last minute; there doesn't seem 
to be a single sewing machine in 


A Cornucopia of Objects from Holy Year Festivals 



By Edith Schloss 

Itamaiaml Herald Tribune 

R OMp — “Jubilee” conies from 
the Hebrew word yubel, for 
the rmrfs horn blown every 50 
years, wfam slaves were freed and 
debts cmoeled. The first Christian 
jubilee yas proclaimed in 1300 by 
Pope BmifaceVin, when everyone 
who voted the dandies of SL Pe- 
ter aac St Paul in Rome 30 times 
received plenary indulgence and re- 
nrissiot of all sms except usury. 

At ‘die first jubilee, pilgrims 
Qockd to Rome from every corner 
of Erope to adore the Holy Face 
on St Veronica’s vefl and to visit 
St. Pier’s grave. 

Smsequent jubilees, or holy 
ynqc— not only a time of renewal 
of faith, popular festival and pag- 
eant but also great occasions for 
porp as wdl as revenue — contin- 
uedat intervals of 50 and later 25 
yess. Occasional special jubilees 
art declared, as Pope John Paul U 
dhfor 1983. 

\ selection from the cornucopia 
ofertifaets ordered made fo r each 
kfy year. — paintings, sculptures, 
rosaics, frescoes, ceremonial ob- 
jets, manuscripts, books, guides 
nd so on — bang exhibited at the 
'n'umn Venezia is a dear indica- 
ion of the popular taste of each 
period as wdl as tbejndgmeni of 
the popes as patrons of the arts. 
Above all It mows the role of the 
papacy asapctitfeal power in Italy, 
One can see that, when that power 
declined under Pins DC is 1875, 
artistic production for the church 
declined as welL 

Though the material assembled 
comes from rnnseamii all over the 
world,- most of it- is from the Vati- 



Detail from the dborium of Sistns IV. 


is a freshly reconstructed dborium 
p pm missio ned by Sixtus IV, not 
only one of the first great manipu- 
lators of power politics and nepo- 
tism in the church, according to 
Madu'avelH but also an entapns- 
can Grottoes. This is the be- ing builder and urban mnovaror 
rweea thepavement of the Renais- who used to gteat advantogp the 
saaoeMetert and the floor of the wealth his jubilee of 1475 brought 
Constant™ hasfj jra under h. To him. To him we owe the start of the 
this basement, artists and archi- Sistine Chapel the bospiUl of San- 
lects relegated the wort of their to Spirito, the church of Santa Ma- 
pnsdecesbrs' when erecting their ria del Popolo and the :Poott Sim 
own additions to papal splendor, the bridge that ebannded holy-year 

ZTZi. h, , mffic badL 

sbow&Jis mast.to.be Rome’s S to to 

amwerteihe Mefiri adnbitians in Prate Sant ^8^. ™ e Tiber. 




dborium, a- structure surrounding 
the receptacle holding the host, has 
been reconstructed as it was in Sl 
P eter’s in the 15th century. There it 
stood on the spot where today the 
central altar in St- Peter’s is sur- 
mounted by Bernini’s baldachin, 
with its giant twisting bronze col- 
umns. It is not dear where the dbo- 
rium originated, nor which of the 
artists who were engaged in the 


hibition. After that, as some schol- 
ars had conjectured, the comer 
panels were found to dovetail with 
some larger panels to form the en- 
tire structure of the dborium. 

This is made up mainly of four 
large marble reliefs depicting the 
life of Sl Peter and his suffering at 
the hands of pagan soldiers. It 
stands squat and stem, willfully 
alluding to Roman art, Trajan’s 
column and the Roman sarcopha- 
gi But though it plays with the 
values of the past and means to be 
severely classical, this beautiful 
frieze is tempered by the attention 
to fine detail of the Renaissance, 
and by Renaissance balance and 
sensibility. 

Of pure Renaissance grace are 
other pieces of a resurrected monu- 
ment from the grottoes, figures by 
Mine da Ftesok from a tomb to 
Pope Paul H, who restored many 
ancient monuments and left a fine 
collection of antiques. He also built 
the palace in which the exhibition is 
housed, the Palazzo Venezia. 

Other exhibits include a “Sl Ve- 
ronica’s Veil" by H Greco, recently 
discovered in a monastery near To 
ledo; a finely simplified bust of 
Boniface VIH; a mosaic after a 
drawing by Giotto; and works by 
Melozzo da Forll Borr omini and 
Bernini among the most notewor- 
thy. 

But, in addition to the dborium 
of Sixtus IV, it is another great 
work brought before the public for 
the first time that makes the show 
especially worthwhile; the “Con- 
version of Saul" believed by most 
scholars to be by Caravaggio. Com- 
missioned for the jubilee of 1600 by 
Pope Clement VIII, it is the first 
version of the canvas on the same 
theme that hangs in the church of 
Santa Maria del Popolo. The sub- 
ject of the painting, revelation and 
rebirth, is an obvious allegory for 
(he holy year. Though it lacks the 


budding of the Ren ais sa n ce St Pe- sweep of the later version, this mas- 
ter’s — such as Bramante, Raphael terpiece presents a lavish scene of 
or Michelan g elo — was responsible drama and brooding, sharp shadow 
for its removal to the Vatican Grot- and sudden illumination, 
toes. There it lay forgotten for cen- uqq , 0 I875: 77 ^ 

tunes, until its corner panels were Art 0 f fa ^ Years.” Museum 0 f 
picked to travel with the roenl fa pdazzo Venezia, Piazza Vene- 
“Treasures From the Vatican" ex- through April 



Chari. Cerf 


Valentino putting the finishing touches on a red crepe dress. 


DOONESBURY 



SO FAR, THE. ONIX SIGN 
OFBEHmX.MCPBKA- 

twnueVgcbsek/ep/h 

MR.RSXmHf6BEN 
H!5 REQUEST FOR. NOUR- 
ISHMENT. 




INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 

-GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

_6, Rue Jeon-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.8Z44 - 


f= WALLY FINDLAY =a 

Galleries International 

new yorfc - Chicago - palm bench 
beveHy Kids - pans 

EXHIBITION 

BALARIN 

Sculptures 

GANTNER - F. GALL 
HAMBOURG - VIGNOLE 
MICHEL-HENRY - SEBIRE 


Impressionists and 
post impressionists 
2 Ave. Motignon - Paris 8th 

T«U 2257074. raoodoy thro. Hdoy 
IO cun. to I pm. - 2i30 lo 7 pm 


Hofei GeoraeY- 723.54.00 
31 Ave. George-Y - Paris 8th 

im fern ML 1030 am. 1 pjn.-3.30 ta V pm. 
today 7 pun. -9 pm 


U CENTRE INTERNATIONAL 

D’ ART CONTEMPORAIN 

27imTc(w- 75012 PARS -307 68 58 
Presorts 

LE SALON DES NATIONS AND 
LE SAION NTHtNATiONAL 
DE L'AKTtSANAT DART 
of hafian, English, Gemm 
pni H s T antEo ana anzionien 

FROM raejAJtY 4 TO 1Z 1985 
Every day from 1 pm to/ pm 


ZURICH 

GALERIE 

BRUNO MEISSNER 


w\ 


o' 1 ® 

.(i® . 


.Vt 



Great 
Paintings 

15th to early 20th ° 
century 

Bahnhufsiras^e 14 
CH-8001 Zurich 
Telephone 01-2119000 


GREAT BRITAIN 

= MARLBOROUGH = 

FINE ART 

6 Abomoria S*., W.l. 01-629 5161. 

RED GROOMS 

Recent Work 

(First major London Exhibition) 
Unt3 March 1 st. 

Illustrated catalog available. 
U=Mon.-FrL, 10*30, Sab.. 10-12=30=11 


OENEVA 


GALERIE 

C0RRATERIE 

ECOLE DE PARIS 

BOLDIN, RENOIR 
UTRILLO, 

VL4MINCK, MARQUEE 

1 8, CorrateHe, Geneva. 
Tel; 022/28.88.80 


"ART 

EXHIBITIONS” 

"ANTIQUES” 

"AUCTION 

SALES” 

appear on Saturday 


sight at his workshops. A Valentino 
dress still takes three weeks to em- 
broider. The designer himself, im- 
peccable in navy blazer and tie, 
worked tike an artisan during the 
showing adjusting a hat here, a 
button there, and generally watch- 
ing after the smallest detail. “I just 
love my work,” he said later during 
a dinner at his palatial house on the 
Via Appia. , 

One of his embroidered dresses, 
which would have done very well 
for Marie- Antoinette, was covered 
with tiny pink silk roses, diamond 
beans and gold leaves, all applied 
by hand Another was embroidered 
with multicolored crystal beads in a 
cross-stitch pattern, another still 
featured giant paisley patterns. The 
prettiest group were the mono- 
chrome, pearl-embroidered shirts 
over short, stringing skins — per- 
haps the world’s most luxurious 
sportswear. 

Valentino has left the Camera 


Nazionale della Moda, the Italian 
couture association. This could 
deal a fatal blow to the rest of 
Rome couture, which essentially 
exists only at the local level But be 
is not leaving Rome; he will show 
there and in Paris. 

Andre Laug, known for the pris- 
tine elegance of his cut. died recent- 
ly, but his staff put together 40 
dresses that were shown informally 
to buyers and journalists. The 
bouse is expected to go on; Laug 
left 60 percent of the company and 
the artistic direction to Ohvier Ros- 
setti a Rome hairdresser, who was 
Laug’s companion for 26 years. 
Helped by the dedicated staff, Ros- 
setti — who said Laug left about 
3,000 sketches — plans to hire 
someone with couture experience 
to help him coordinate the collec- 
tions. The best name that has 
cropped up so far is that of Jules- 
Franqois Crahay, who recently re- 
tired from Lanvin. 


AUCTION SALES 


SOTHEBY3 


FOUNDED 1741 


Geneva 


Entries are invited for the sales of 
Fine Jewels, European Silver, Gold Boxes, 
Objects of Vertu, Russian Works of Art, Carpets, 
Islamic Textiles and Works of Art and Miniatures 
in Geneva, in May 1985 




f 

i r * 

4b 


tk-t* 



A pair of 

Flemish table tandk- 
sticks. Charles dc 
Honiuir, wid in 
Geneva in 
Nuvcmber 1984 
lbrS.Fr. 38.300 



EUROPEAN SILVER, GOLD BOXES, RUSSIAN WORKS 
OF ART AND FABERGti 
Brands Monday 4th and Tuesday 5th February 
Cologne Thursday 14th and Friday 15th February 
Copenhagen Monday 28(h and Tuesday 29th January 
Frankfort Tuesday 12th and Wednesday I3lh February 
Geneva Tuesday 26th and Wednesday 27 th February 
Hamburg Monday 1 1 th February 
Monte Carlo Friday 8th February 
Munich Monday ~!8thr and Tuesday 19th February 
Oslo Wednesday 30th January 
Faria Wednesday 6th and Thursday 7th February 
Salzburg Wednesday 20th February 

Stockholm Thursday 31st January and Friday 1st February 
Vienna Thursday 21st and Friday 22nd February 
Zorich Thursday 28th February and Friday 1st March 

MINIATURES 

Geneva Tuesday 26th and Wednesday 27th February 
Zorich Thursday 28th February 

CARPETS, ISLAMIC TEXTILES AND WORKS OF ART 

Brussels Wednesday 13th and Thursday 14th February 

Berlin (Ambassador Hotel) Monday 4th February 

Cologne Monday 1 1th February 

Frankfurt Thursday 7th February 

Geneva Monday 25th and Tuesday 26th February 

Hamburg Tuesday 5th and Wednesday 6di February 

Munich Friday 15th February 

FXru Friday 8th February 

Vienna Tuesday 12th February 

Zurich Monday 18 th and Tuesday 19th February 

If you wish to make an appointment to see one of our experts, 
please telephone or write to us: 

32 Rue de f Abbaye, Brussels 1050 Tel: 343 50 07 
St. Apem-Sirasse 17-29, (Kreishaus GaJerie), 5000, Cologne 1 
Tel: 221 249 330 

Bredgade 27, 1260 Copenhagen K. Tel: 13 55 56 
Sieinlesirasse 7, 6000 FranJdnrt/M. 70 Tel: 62 20 27 
24 Rue de la Cii6, CH-I204 Geneva Tel: 21 33 77 
Aisle rkamp 43, 2000 Hamburg 13 Tel: 4106028 
Le Sporting d'Hiver, Place du Casino, Monte Carla Tel: 30 88 80 
Odeonsplatz 16, 8000 Munich 22 Tel: 22 23 75/6 
Bjomveien 42, Oslo 3. Tel: 1472 82 
3 Rue de Miromesnil, 75008 Paris Tel: 266 4060 
Arsenalsgnian 4, 1 1 1 47 Stockholm lei: 101478/9 
Singerslrasse 16, 1010 Vienna Tel: 52 47 72/3 
20 Bleicherweg, CH-8022 Zurich Tel: 20 200 11 


M« Pierre CORNETTE DE SAINT CYR 

Auctioneer 

24, Ave. George-V, 75008 PARIS. 

TeL: (1) 720.15.94, 723.47.4a 723.47.42. 
Telex: 21 03 T IF/ 608. 


HOTEL DCOUOT - PARIS 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985, at 2.-30pjm. - ROOMS 586 

SET OF TAPESTRIES 
OF THE 

XVfli to XXth CENTURY 


ART DECO CARPETS 


SERIE OF 3 SILK CARPETS 

expans: 

Messrs. CAMARD, LE FU&, PRAQWN, COQUENPOT. 
PubGc viewing; 

Wednesday, February 13, from 1 1 a.m. to 6 pm. 
and from 9 p.m. to 11 pjn. 

Catalogue on request at the Auctioneers’ Office: F.Fr. 80. 


Coin Auction in Munich 

from February 27 - March 2, 1985 

Detakond free catalogue front 

Aukfionator MOnzenhandHing Gerhard Hindi Naehf. 

Awnenodendab 10/S, 8000 Munehen 2, W. Gecmwy 
TeL (0| 89-272150, T dm 528105 









Pace 8 


INTERNATIONAL 



TRIBUNE, SATURDAT-SUNDAV, JANUARY 26 - 2 T. 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


il 


OMI Mfltl Low Loo 


Indus 126177 128467 126234 127636 + £63 

Trva 645.18 61149 59457 M 6J3 + 221 

Util 14733 14930 14731 148.18 + 035 

Comp 51141 S193D 51009 51536 + 1.97 


Compos I la 

Industrials 

Trorap. 

Utilities 

Finance 


HU Lew Close aro« 
10230 102-01 10242 + 037 
11835 117.06 11839 + «3 
7831 78.11 7831 +024 

5237 52.41 5235 + DJ7 
10570 10540 105.79 + 0.73 


Fridays 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


MSE 


NYSE Diaries 


Closing 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unctjoneeo 

Total issues 
New Hlefts 
New Lews 
Volume up 
V olume down 


Close Prev- 
in 258 

261 S3 

U2 343 

Sl« 823 

53 M 


Comcast !e 

industrials 

finance 

Insurance 

U tl'i lies 

BanWs 

Transo. 


Week 

Close CliTt Ago 
77LD0 + I3A 26345 
294J7 + IJ5 38055 
318 .95 + 1J7D 31123 
300.11 +22o 288.77 
26480 + 129 253.17 
24529 +069 239.19 
24073 +243 250.10 


HeUer 

WanoB 

Amdahl 

ProCTs 

MtflRtwt 

Ultmte 

TexAIr 

LoetaDH 

GHCdg 

TIE 

EcMBb 

WDJalfl 


AMEX Most ActVes 


voL KM Low Ut at 

r 15260 2V. 2 L — 

B 18479 29V. 27* 36 +' 

A! 3227 16 15* }T + 

rs 2999 19 * 19 * 1 * 

I wt 2517 3* 3* Jb + 

B 2195 1065 TO ifi + 

r 16*8 1175 11* lE + 

In 1458 29* 28V5 2b — 

a 1393 12* a* 1* 

1213 776 7* % — 

IB 1138 816 8* Jk 

IH 1185 12* 12 137 — 


Odd* Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Buy Sales 
341.772 662286 
225441 567.540 
241801 665679 
234864 549412 
1814*8 445864 



12Z4403M 



Prev consolidated dose 

170485,880 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


'Inducted In the sales figures- 


Tables include the nofioowWe prices 
op to the closing on Wo H Street 


industrials 

Tronso. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


High Low Close CM* 
199.37 197 1*55 +154 

15654 15566 156.16 ^OJl 
7629 ӣ55 7623 + 3.;6 

2044 2C9S 2028 + 0.13 
17775 "654 1-25 t OAs 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


AMEX Stock inde 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Inoustrtals 



36 

16*i 

25* 
6* 
42* 
IB*. 
15* 
35 
13*. 
19* 
5 * 
51* 
57* 
43* 
39* 
25* 

14* 7* 
55* 46* 
42% 2616 
78 62* 

73 50* 

33* 

7* 

43 




Dow Posts a 5.63-Point Gain 


Ci05* 
Lew Cuof. 


k 


ID Avioll n 
27 Avnel 
19* Avon 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Hie stock market posted a 
modest gain Friday and finished the week with 
broad market averages at ail-ume highs. 

Interest-sensitive stocks and brokerage issues 
were top performers, as a three-week advance 
kept building on heavy volume. 

The Dow Jones industrial average gained 
5.63 to 1,276.06. For the week, die Dow gained 
48.70. Since closing at 1,184.96, the blue-chip 
index has gained 91.10. 

The New York Stock Exchange index gained 
0.39 to 102.42, topjping an ah- time high set 
Wednesday. The pace of an average share in- 
creased 13 cents. Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
index climbed 0.64 to 177.35, also an aU-time 
high. 

Advances topped declines 975-628 among the 
2,036 issues traded at 4 P.M. EST. It was the 
15th consecutive session in which more stocks 
gained than lost. 

Big Board volume slipped to 122.4 million- 
shares, down from 160.7 milli on shares traded 
Thursday. 

“The fact that the stock market is consolidat- 
ing around these levels is very, very good,” said 
Keith Herteil of Drexd Bur nham Lambert. He 
said the prolonged periods of advances over 
declines “tells us that people are concluding it is 
reasonable to expect better-than-average re- 
turns on equities as opposed to other f inan cial 
instruments.** Mr. Herteil believes the rise will 
continue and take the Dow industrials to 1,300 
“in the near term." 

Before the stock mark et opened, the Depart- 
ment of Commerce reported orders for durable 
goods declined 2.1 percent in December. For all 


of 1984, durable goods orders grew 14.9 per- 
cent 


The latest figures were depressed by a 17.6- 
ercent drop in defense orders. Durables orders 


percent drop in defense orders. Durables orders 
were up 8.3 percent in November. 

The Department of Treasury reported that 
the U.S. government bad a deficit of $15.2 
billion in December. The total deficit since the 
1985 fiscal year began Oct. 1 is $72.4 billion. 

At that rate the fiscal year will have a deficit 
of more than $200 billion. 

Alan Ackerman of Herzfeld & Stem said the 
strength in the stock market is became “the 
fundamentals have turned very positive." Mon- 
ey costs have come down, be said, while “infla- 
tion is under control and a recession is not in 
sight," 

He said small er investors have been attracted 
to secondary issues while the cash-short institu- 
tions have been rotating out of some positions 
and into others. 

Composite volume of NYSE issues listed on 
all U.S. exchanges and over the counter at 4 
P_M. totaled 146.9 milli on shares, down from 
188.9 miilioa Thursday. 

Phillips Petroleum was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, up ft to 4844. Some investors 
may have purchased the stock to ha ve a vote on 
the company’s recapitalization plan. 

Federal National Mortgage Association was 
second, up Ilk to 17ft. The company is a heavy 
borrower and would benefit from lower interest 


527 X 
17 34 
1585 25* 
SOOz 53* 
10 99 
392 2* 

70 •* 

35 If* 

97 ZEP- 

23 35* 
44 47% 

2 14* 
49 36 
381 
100 
58 
30 
1264 

98 
135 
154 


21* Hoteiln 
204* HoustiM 
13* HOuFeO 
24 Hcuslnt 
36 Holm Pi 
61 Holirtpf 
17* Houlnd 
39* HouNG 
9* H0UOR 
12 HowICo 
2B« Hubbrd 
9-6 Huffy 
121“ HuShTI 
17V. HusnSo 
21 * Human 
17* HuntMf 
27* HuttEF 
l* 1 - Hydra! 


28* 28* 
35* 34* 
18* 18* 
34* 34* 
5B* 50* 
72 71* 

23* 22* 


10* 10* 
15* 14* 
25 24* 

12* 12* 
14 13* 

30* 20* 
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Merrill Lynch was third, up Hi to 33ft. Phi- 
bn>Salomon jumped 1ft to 38ft and Quick & 
Reilly Group advanced 1ft to 21ft. American 
Express added 1 to 40ft. 





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• • 1 



- N 

"llli 
5 'Si s ^ 1 

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M £ | ? 

' - ,3 i 


Statistics Index 


AMEX PrtCM P.10 
AMEX htote/lowsP.W 
NYSE prices P. 5 
NYSE Mgta/bwl P.10 
COMtSOA stocks P.14 
Currency row P. V 
CemtndMn P.12 
DfeUMdi P.13 


Euminsa rasom p.n 

FUng rale notes p.u 
GoW mrkats p. 9 
Interen rates p. a 
Market lummorv P. • 
Onions p .12 

OTC Meek P.12 
Other market! p.i* 


HeraltSE^ributtc 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 



SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


** 


Page 9 


jjfB* §|f_ 

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Utere is no appetite 

for raising tjryre or 
for making b igg er 
cots in the budget 


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A . 1 - 


ECONOMIC SCENE 

Reagan’s Budget: New life 
As Legislative Starting Point 

By LEONARD SILK 

Nm York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — President Ronald Reagan’s budget, 
which some Congressmen said would be “dead on 
arrival” when it reaches Capitol Hill Feb. 6, now seems 
to be alive and Inching The Senate majority leader, 
Robert J. Dole, and the House speaker, Thomas P. O’Neill Jr., 
have accepted Mr. Reagan’s budget as the basis for their own. 

Despite the moaning about the deficit, there is no appetite, 
among either Republicans or Democrats, for raising taxes or for 
m aking bigger cuts in the budget than those the president is 
proposing. 

To be sure. Congress will press the administration for more 
restraint on the rate of increase in the military budget than Mr. 

Reagan and the defense score- 

tary, Caspar W. Weinberger, 
are proposing. But the legisla- 
tors are divided on how much 
more to ask. Doves are calling 
for a freeze on (he military but 
hawks are ready to give Mr. 

Reagan whatever he wants for 

the Pentagon. 

In a preliminary plan Sent 

to the Senate .early this month, the administration proposed to cut 
military outlays by $8.7 billion in 1986, with savings resulting 
from those fust-year cuts projected at- $9.2 billion and $102 
billion in 1987 and 1988. 

These modest trims would bring down the rate of increase in 
military spending after inflation to 6.4 percent, from 8.7 percent 
next year. But in the two following years, the rale of mfliiaiy 
spending would rise by 8.1 percent and 8.8 percent, an increase 
over the rise of 6.6 percent in 1987 and 8.6 p er cent in 1988 that 
had been projected. 

To achieve a freeze in total program spending in 1986, not 
counting the increase in interest payments on the national debt, 
the administration wants to cut the nonmDhaiy part of the 
budget by $50 billion. A cut of that size would mean additional 
savings of $2 bflhon to $3 billion in interest savings. 

This would mean drastic cots in subsidy programs that “have 
not been touched in 50 years,” according to Edwin L. Dale Jr., a 
spokesman for the Office of Management and Budget. 

C ONGRESS seems unlikely to give the president all the 
social cuts hejs seeking. The prospects are that the total cut 
in spending is likely to be closer to $35 billion in 1986 than 
to the $50 billion the White House is seeking. 

Mr. Reagan has contended that economic growth will cause the 
deficit to vanish. He also called once more, in his inaugural 
address, for a constitutional amendment to balance the budget. 

But even cm the administration’s own optimistic growth as- 
sumptions, the deficit would not shrink without big spending cuts 
— or tax increases, which it does not want The OMB assnmes 
that the gross national product will cKmh at an annual rate of 4 
percent for the next three years and that inflation, after a slight 
increase to43 percent in 1986. will decline to 3.8 percent in 1988. 

The OMB is also assuming that unemployment will decline to 
62 percent by the end of 1988 and that interest rates will keep 
going down, with the Treasury bffl rate, now at 7.6 percent, falling 
to 53 percent in 1988. 

The administration’s assumption that interest rates will contin- 
ue to decline In the next three years in the face of rising output 
seems more optimistic than that of the financial markets, espe- 
cially as reflected in the slower decline in long-term than short- 

tom rates. . . - 

While three-month Treasury bills have come down to 7.6 
percent from 83 percent a year ago, the rate on 30-ycar Treasury 
bonds has dedined only to 1133 percent from 11.72 percent last 
January. Telephone bonds have come down to an average rate of 
1223 percent from 12.63 percent a year ago, and the average rate 

(Coatmaed oe Page 13, CoL 8) 


A New Try 
By OPEC 
Oil Prices 

Yamani Defends 
imuxrk 


•Z’Jti.k 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

GENEVA — OPEC delegates 
began gathering here Friday for an- 
other emergency meeting on prices 

amid reports that Saudi Arabian 
light crude oil may soon he aban- 
doned as the carta’s pricing base. 

Price differentials were high on 
the agenda at October’s meeting, 
but plummeting world oil prices 
forced the ministers’ attentions to 
production limits to bolster spot 
prices. It is to be on the agenda 
when the 13 ministers of the Orga- 
nization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries meet here Monday. 

Some OPEC officials in the Gulf 
said Friday that the cartel hoped to 
maintain ns general mice level de- 
spite price cutting by North Sea 
producers and weak spot markets. 

The officials said that as part of a 
pricing overhaul begun last month, 
the traditional policy of linking 
prices to the fondi Arabian light 
crude marker probably would be 
dropped soon to gjve OPEC new 
flexibility in adjusting to changing 
market conditions. Arabian light 
crude currently is priced at $29 per 
barrel 

“Another Saudi crude, or a bas- 
ket of crudes produced by the king- 
dom, could be adopted as a new 
reference tool,” one official said. 

But Saudi Arabia's oil minister. 
Sheikh Ahmed Taki Yamani, said 
Friday in Algiers that OPEC 
should continue to defend its $29- 
a-barrel benchmark price for Saudi 
Arabian light crude. 

He did not rule out a cut in prices 
of other light grades of ofl. 

“We don't intend to raise prices 
of heavy crude oDs,” Sheikh Yama- 
ni said, according to the Algerian 
Press Service: "We could look once 
again at light crude prices.” 

OPEC production has dropped 
below the ceiling of 16 million bar- 
rels per day set in October. Latest 
estimates of January output are be- 
tween 153 millton and 15.9 milli on 
barrels per day, with one estimate 
as low as 14 million barrels per day. 

The cold weather that recently 
swept the Northern Hemisphere 
has taken some immediate pressure 


Currency Rates 


] 


Lois interbank rates on Jan. 25 , exdudmg foes. 

Official fixings far Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Mian, Paris. New York rales at 
4PJA 


: a 


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• 

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OJM. 

PJ=. ILL. 

GUr. 

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17499 

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3249 * U2X 

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11900 

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lantern CM 

1.1105 

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10JSU 2.17L9B 

0*73 

70455 

X9S3 

28X31 

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MBs* 

LM9.7D 

2.181 JX) 

61669 

201.57 

5*SJ2 

3X851 

73400 

7477 

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94975 1/75X00 

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10584 

4*575 X 

2J025 15298* 

34402 3006 * 


Tokyo 

2075 

25475 

5524 

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481.77 • 

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USB 

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8X075* 

27*85* 0.1365 

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1 ECU 

0793 


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44*085 

10653 178299 


iron 

OV75M2 

557136 

XDS399 

9*2752 1 .«032 

3*831 

61.6716 

25912 247423 

a: f . 




Dollar Values 





-r. f 

— #t 

eL. c ™ r 

Par 

uss 

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Sooty. 

Par 

Zotrtna 


PIT 

DAS 

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UW JUHkraDuS 

12274 

59KS IrtteS 1JW7 

0*5» Staoapons 

2203 

MU ■ Aosfrtan scftHoo 

2221 

50015 

urarfaMM 471*8 

04139 X. African read 24221 

2 

mu* Mateo flu. fame 

6325 

3265 

KMMtHfRaor 

B304 

OJOOn X Korean WOO 03335 


0lH 5 : CtstedaoS 

use 

54105 HUar.rtaooO 14845 

0J057 SOHLOORfa 

17400 


aw Dated! krona 

1US 

0.1091 Morw. krona 

9.15 

01167 Swad. krona 

90S 

Jr a' 

auu PbaUhnor* 

ftJOS 

4*553 PWLoato UU8ZS 

00235 Taiwan S 

39.15 

oof Tl : 

ao vn oroaftteadma 

.129 JO 

00058 

ParLaccMto 171*6 

00366 TMbatd 

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atm Hana Kanos 

1391 

02792 Soma rfeol xssn 

02721 UJLE.(0rtM) 16725 


Jr * : . 

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Ctttrtias:U3SlrtibE 

la) Comrawxtol Irane lb) Amounts imcM la buy one round (c> Amounts imM to buvmedoHar(-) 
MO lx) UdHi of IM Irt UrtlS tS UMBO 
NjO; not roofed; N A.: nert o*c««*to. 

Sources; Bonquo da BmxHax IBnateit); Banco CommtrcMe Itolkxna (Milan); Bonmm 
Mattonato 00 Pm* (Paris); IMF (SDRJ; Bonauo Arobo 1 rntomaHonaio a-ln»*Mmmant 
tdtnor, rival, dirham), other data from Reuters aaJ AP. 


Interest Rates 


* 


* ^ f. . 

«.3‘ 


• - 3. 
- V- «• . 


] 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Jan. 25 


inane StartfM Pranc* ECU SDR 

IM. 8V% -8M. 5* -5* 5* ISHi-Wfc 1W*>10W. ** -9*. 7w-l*w 

2M_ M-M M-« U-Sh 121ft ■ TZfe Ifltfc- THU 9* - 7* 8 -81ft 

.3M. B* -S* S* -5* 514 - 5* T7IA - l» 10Wr IB» 9* - 9V, BK.-8* 

ML Wt - sn 3* -4* 5* - 3h 111% - 12 11 -11* V* - Wt. BVft - 81% 

IV. Vtt -flft ft -ft* 5H.-5W tl fefe- 11* lift*- life -**. M% - I* 

Pafsa awVfcaWff to fatmrbon* dmxxJts of SI million minimum tarmivtvaient). 

Swra; Maroon Guaranty (dollar, DM. SF. Pound. FFIt Lkmds Bant (ECU); Citibank 
(SDR). 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Jan. 25 


UM. 

M -SW 

Sourer; Reuters. 


Irate. 

8*>-BH> 


Smoe. 
Blft -W% 


ftraos. 
Bn in 


9h 


i 7- 


v . , i , • 

J ■ 

i iS ?V; • 

V ’il 

*T t. 


f «s 5' 

a fe 

V l.' 

i -V -« ro 


Key Money Rates 

UtitedSfeUes 


Close Pnt. 


- •* 

;• ■£» .»T • 

s ■* • - 




Discount Rote 
FMercd Funds 
Prim* Rof* 

Broker Loan Rate . 
Comm. Paw, 32-179 doys 
Xnootti Traosurv Blfls 
femontti Treasury Bills 
CD^ 30> dtjys 
-CCPs HWB days . 

West Germany 

' lxiutard Rom • 
OWnAAt Rat* 

On* Mutt imerbonk 
>mooa /rttertwnk 
frfllonlh' Interbanlc 

France 

Mtervwftan Rot* 

Can Money 
OkMnonm lafertsank 
amaniit tnteriionk 

ftmanth Ipterbuuk 


Chtse Pr*v. 

s a 
aw BH- 
lAW ww 
MOW 9-m 
1SJ 7 JO 

7i1 7JS 
7 JO 7JI 

7 JO 7J3 

m ix 


150 150 

1 55 150 
5Jtf 1*5 
5.90 A» 

6jD0 U» 


TOW J0W 
ItfW WW 
in* im 
10M 10W 

iom m 


Bank Base Rote 
Coll Money 
91-dov Troosorv Bill 
junetdh Intertm* 


T2 

13 

1H% 

124% 


12 

12 

nv> 

WH 


Discount Rate 
Call Monty 
ftO-dnv interbank 


5 5 

fib M% 

6 5/1 i ft 5/16 


Gold Prices 


Sources: /teuton. Cammenbonk. Cridtt Ly- 
onnais. uovda Bonk. Bonk of Tokyo. 


am. P-M. ay** 

MAAS WU5 - 
W9A5 - -IM 

30CL00 B9M — US 
30085 20MD -225 
399SS 26885 — £00 

- SUMO + M0 
Official ttttew ter London, Pori* o«l Lu«*m* 
taura. ooonlBo and doolna oricos tor Hong Kong 
aid ZorUA Ne* York Comm currenl contract 
AH prices ID UX> pot ounc*- 
Source : Reuters. 


Hon* Knot 
Luxembourg 
Pam (T2J kilo) 
Zurich 
London 
HflW Yort 


Franchising’s Renewed Popularity 

U.S. Entrepreneurs Try ^Updated American Dream’ 


By Philip S. Gucis 

New York Times Seniat 

NEW YORK — Carol Doooughe, 39, walked 
out on her job as a newspaper's advertising manag- 
er in late 1983, and bought & Pop-Ins maid service 
for $9300. 

A Gordon Findlay, 43, has an MBA. from 
Harvard and 18 years of corporate experience, A 
few mouths ago, he, too, walked out on the corpo- 
rate world and spent $27300 to buy a Sylvan 
Learning Center. He has bids in on two more. 

Both are taking part in the resurgence of a 
business method that has been around for more 
than a century: franchising. 

And quite a resurgence it is. Nearly 1,800 com- 
panies are fr anchising their wares to some extent, 
and about 7 percent of the U-S.’s working popula- 
tion either own a franchise or work for one. 

Indeed, f ranchising has become one of the busi- 
ness world's most pervasive institutions, helping 
companies reduce the costs of expansion and let- 
ting individuals reduce the risks of entrepreneur- 
ship. The US. Department of Commerce predicts 
that franchising will account for more than half of 
retail sales by the year 2000. And the method is 
starting to account for a hefty percentage of busi- 
ness in the service sector as wdL 

Not bad for a practice that seemed to have 
peaked — and to have been ready for a precipitous 
slide — only 15 years ago. Throughout the early 
1970$. under such headlines as “Franchising’s 
Troubled Dream World” and “Bursting Bubble: 
Many Franchising Firms FaD rat Hard Tunes,” 
national business publications had chronicled the 
rise and perceived fall of franchising. 

The method, which usually involved franchisees 
handing over a set amount of cash for the right to 
distribute a 0000 ) 011 /$ product, grew at a frenzied 
pace through the 1960s. By the 1970s, charlatans 
abounded, offering deals that seemed too good to 
be true — and often were. Even companies that 
acted in good faith often spread themselves too 
ihin, selling so many franchises that they could not 
fulfill the promises they had made of adequate 
business and marketing support — or, in seme 
cases, even of an ample supply of product.* 

The result was an abundance of lawsuits and an 
overriding feeling among business analysts that the 
franchising system, which Ray A Kroc, the 
founder of McDonald's, once called “the updated 
version of the American dream,” was turning sour. 

They were wrong, but for the right reasons. Had 
franchising continued to grow without restraint, its 
proponents concede, it might well have died a 
painful death. Instead in moves that even laissez- 
faire capitalists agreed with, franchising has been 
regulated. 

The Federal Trade Commission in 1979 decreed 
that any company wanting to franchise must make 
available information ranging from the business 


Franchising 

Picks Up Speed 

Total U.S. franchised 
units. In thousands 


475 



'69 72 75 ’78 ’81 '84* W 

* Estimate 

Source: Commerce Department 


NTT 

background of its officers to corporate financial 
data. 

Moreover, consultants and lawyers have estab- 
lished themselves as franchising experts. They are 
helping franchisees spot questionable fine print cat 
contracts. And they are helping franchisers to 
develop plans that wdl not overextend their ability 
to provide support. 

“Franchising is not the thing it was 15 years 
ago,” said Art Bartlett, presdeot of Mr. Build, a 
com pan y that f ranchises nome repair services, mid 
the founder of Century 21, a hugely successful 
chain of franchised real estate brokers. 

“Franchising is at the heart of the entrepreneur- 
ial system today” be said. 

It is nol immune to failures, of course. The move 
of consultants into the field has brought its own 
dangers, in that consulting is an unregulated indus- 
try and anyone can pose as an expert adviser. 
Moreover, some of the franchising ideas of the 
recent past have not caught the public’s fancy. 

For example, numerous franchisees lost their 
investments when tanning centers faded to catch 
on. Tantriffic, the Arkansas company that was the 
first to sell franchised tanning parlors, was one of 
the first to gp under, dra gg in g hundreds of fran- 
chised centers down with it. 

Still, the victories is franchising outweigh the 
defeats. The Commerce Department estimates that 

(Continued cn Page 13, CoL 6) 


U.S. Aides Urge Lifting of Car Quotas 


although probably only for a short 
while, delegates said. North Sea 
Brent crude, the most widely trad- 
ed variety, was traded Friday at 
around $27 a barrel compared with 
the mid-October level of $2630. 

{AP, Reuters) 


U.S. Upgrades 
Bank Loam 
To Argentina 

By James L Rowe Jr. 

VYashington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Federal 
banking regulators are upgrading 
the status of loans to Argentina in 
recognition of the progress that 
country is making in solving its 
international debt problems, bank- 
ing sources said. 

The regulators, who last fall clas- 
sified as “substandard” the bulk of 
Argentine loans on the books of 
113. banks, have decided to up- 
grade those loans now that the 
debtor nation reached an ac- 
cord with the International Mone- 
tary Fund and has paid a substan- 
tialportioa of its overdue interest 

The ruling will permit the banks 
to remove many of the Argentine 
loans from their problem lists and 
could be a shot in the arm to profits 
at many financial institutions. 

Approximately 320 banks 
around the world Have made loans 
totaling about $25 billion to Argen- 
tina. U.S. banks hold about $83 
billion of that amount- All told, 
Argentina has about $47 billion in 
outstanding foreign debts, includ- 
ing loans from other governments 
and multinational institutions as 
weD as debts incurred by its private 
companies. 

Sources said Thursday that the 
regulators would inform U.S. 
banks by letter that they have de- 
cided to remove Argentine credits 
from the substandard classifica- 
tion. Argentine government loans 
would be classified as “other trans- 
fer risk," a category that alerts 
banks to pay special attention to 
the loans but that does not require 
any other action. 

Most loans that regulators classi- 
fied as substandard generally are 
placed on problem fists at banks. 
That usually cuts into the income 
that they can declare for those 
loans. 

Regulatory and banking sources 
said that the upgraded status of 
Argentine loans might make it easi- 
er for Argentina and its major bank 
lenders to break down the resis- 
tance of smaller banks that have 
refused to lend the debtor nation 
any new funds in 1985. 

the loans to Argentina were up- 
graded by the Country Exposure 
Review Committee, an interagency 
panel that represents the Federal 
Reserve Board, the Comptroller of 
the Currency and the Federal De- 
posit Insurance Corp. 


By Gyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Most oi 
President Ronald Reagan's cabinet 
advisers are urging an end to im- 

S quotas era Japanese cars, and a 
decision may be made as early 
as next week, according to adminis- 
tration officials. 

“I can’t find anyone making the 
case for continuation of the quo- 
tas,” said one highly-placed official 
who asked not to be identified. Td 
bet any reasonable sum that they 
come off.” 

A senior official from another 
department said Thursday that it 
was no longer a question of wheth- 
er the restrictions would be lifted, 
but what trade concessions Wash- 
ington could extract from Tokyo in 
return foer the move. 

Should the restraints come off, it 
would mean marc Japanese cars at 
lower prices for U.S. consumers, 
many analysts believe. But it could 
also mean less investment in the 
domestic auto industry and fewer 
automotive jobs. 

“It would be of extreme benefit 
to consumers because it eHimnates 
an unlegislated auto tax,” said Lori 
Ccnsadori, executive director of 
Consumers for Wtnid Trade, a 
free-trade lobby. “In the four years 
of controls, new-car prices have ris- 
en by 48 percent from an average 
of $7300 to $11200.” 

The so-called voluntary quotas 
went into effect April 1, 1981, the 
beginning of Japan’s fiscal year. 
Initially, they were to have lasted 
for one or, at most two years. The 
fourth year, calling for an import 
ceiling of 1.85 million units, wiB 
expire on March 31. 


Japan Lags V.Se 
In Auto Output 

United Press International 

TOKYO — Japan remained 
the world's leading producer of 
ail types of motor vehicles in 
1984, but its output of cars 
slipped behind that of the Unit- 
ed States for the first time in 
five years, the Japan Automo- 
bile Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion said Friday. 

Japan's output of all motor 
vehicles, including cars, trucks 
and buses, totaled 11,464,920 
□nils last year, an increase of 
32 percent over 1983. But its 
auto production dropped 1.1 
percent to 7,073,173 units, be- 
hind the U3. output of 7.77 
mfllioa units for 1984. 

The association said auto 
production slowed because of 
sluggish domestic sales and the 
“voluntary restraint” on auto 
exports to the United States. 


Tokyo is now awaiting word 
from the Reagan administration on 
whether it wants ihe Japanese “vol- 
untarily” to curb shipments for an- 
other 12 months, and if so, at what 
level. The Japanese have been will- 
ing to follow Washington's advice 
each year because of the implicit — 
and at times explicit — threat that 
Congress might enact even tougher 
curbs. 

Japanese politicians here for the 
inauguration, led by Susumu Ni- 


Durable Orders 
In U.S. Drop]] 
2.1% last Month 


llrll 


kaido, vice chairman of the govern- 
ing liberal Democratic Party, said 
that, without restraints, shipments 
could reach 23 million units annu- 
ally, or 650,000 more than under 
the present ceding. 

The statement has prompted re- 
action here from those opposed to 
lifting the controls. These include 
Chrysler Corp., Ford Motor Co, 
the United Automobile Workers 
union, American Motors Corn, and 
legislators from auto-pnxuidng 
states. 

General Motors Coip, which 
has just announced a S5-billion 
program to build a small car in the 
United States by 1989, favors lift- 
ing the curbs. 

Ouysler’svirediairaaa, Gerald 
Greenwald, has warned that 

750.000 U.S. jobs could be lost if 
the restraints were ended. 

On Thursday, the UAW released 
a letter from its president, Owen F. 
Bieber, to Mr. Nikaido saying that 
“there is absolutely no way” the 
additional trade imbalance caused 
by the greater imports “can be tol- 
erated.” 

[Mr. Briber said that even the 
increase of 650, Ott) in imparts of 
Japanese cars, as estimated by Mr. 
Nikaido, could cost more than 

200.000 jobs in the U.S. auto and 
related industries, Reuters reported 
from Detroit. 

[He also challenged Mr. Nikai- 
do’ s suggestions that Japanese 
mak ers would limit production ca- 
pacity, saying the UAW believes 
that the Japanese industry has the 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Orders to 
U.S. factories for durable goods, 
buffeted by a large decrease in mili- 
tary orders, decreased 2.1 percent 
in December. But for all of 1984, 
orders rose 14.9 percent, only 
slightly below the pace set in 1983, 
the government reported Friday. 

The CcRnmercc Department said 
the gain last year was almost as 
strong as the 17.1 -percent increase 
in 1983, the first year of recovery 
from the recession. Orders for du- 
rable goods — large items expected 
to last three or more years — to- 
taled SI 211 trillion last year. 

But the momentum for 1984 
came in the first half of the year. 
Since late summer, demand for 
manufactured goods has softened 
considerably. The December de- 
cline ranrfc fH the third time in the 
last four months that the level of 
new orders has dropped. 

However, many analysts have 
been encouraged by a number of 
signs that U3. economic growth is 
picking up. Earlier this week, the 
government sharply revised up- 
ward its estimate for growth during 
the final three months to a rate of 
3.9 percent. This was more than 
double the 1.6-percent growth rate 
from July through September. 

Some analysts say growth in the 
first half of the year could well 
average 5 percent or more although 
many expect a decline in the second 
half as interest rates tiw* a prin 

New orders last month totaled 
$101.9 billion, down $2.1 biffion 
from the November lewd. 

The decline was the result mainly 
of a 17.6-percent drop in orders for 
anhiary hardware. Commerce Sec- 
retary Malcolm Baldrige said the 
trend in military orders was still 
strongly positive because the fall 
came after orders more than dou- 
bled in December. 

Without the drop in military or- 
ders, new orders would have 
dropped only 03 percent in De- 
cember. The December level for 
nonmilitary durable goods is stiH 
33 percent below the peak set in 
Ml£ 

“Recent efforts to curtail inven- 
tory investment have hdd down 
orders, and strong foreign conqjeti- 
tionhas meant some lost markets,” 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm Bal- 
drige said in a prep a red statement. 

Within the major industry 
groups, transportation showed the 
largest decrease, declining 6.7 per- 
cent with most of the drop resulting 
from the decline in military ordere. 

Primary metals were down 4.6 
percent to a total of $103 billion, 
near the low for the year of $10.1 
bSBoa recorded in September. 

Machinery orders, which have 
generally been dedining since May, 
dropped 1.1 percent in December. 

Shipments of durable goods rose 
0.6 percent in December to $102.4 


tuition. Ibis 1 
the year to $1,183 triTtirai a 153 
percent increase. In 1983, ship- 
ments had risen 10.8 percent. 

Meanwhile, the Labor Depart- 
ment said Thursday that moderate 
inflation helped limit wage in- 
creases secured in major collective 
bargaining settlements to 2.4 per- 
cent in 1984, the lowest ever re- 
corded. 

Lump-sum contracts also were 
died for the lowest wage-rate in- 
crease since the department began 
keeping the statistic 17 years ago. 
Under lump-sum contracts work- 
ers receive a payment that is not 
included in the wage rate. 

Separately, the department said 
Thursday that the number of 
Americans making first-time 
claims for jobless benefits rose 
80,000, to 437,000, in the wed i 
ed Jan. 12. 


US, Deficit 
$15.2 Billion 
In December 

The Associated Pres t 

WASHINGTON — The federal 
government spent $152 billion 
more than it collected in Decem- 
ber, making the deficit for the first 
three months of fiscal 1985 14.4 
percent worse than a year earlier, 
the Treasury Department reported 
Friday. 

For the first quarter of the fiscal 
year, which began in Oct. 1, spend- 
ing has outpaced revenues by $724 
bin inn. This compares with a defi- 
cit of $633 hfllion during the same 
period in fiscal 1984. 

The increase in interest pay- 
ments on the debt, already the 
third-lar^est item in the budget be- 
hind social services and defense, 
was even greater. Interest pay- 
ments for the first quarter of tins 
fiscal year totaled $49.4 biffion, 
233 percent above the level a year 
ago. 

The Reagan administration, 
which predicted in August that this 
year’s deficit would be Iowa than 
1984, now is braced for a red-ink 
total approaching $210 trillion. 

Thai would be wefl above the 
record of $195.4 billion set in fiscal 
1983. The fiscal 1984 deficit was 
$1753 bmian. 

The growth in the expected defi- 
cit this year, caused in pari from 
siowCT-than-antidpated growth in 
the economy, has left the adminis- 
tration and congressional leaders 
scrambling to find more ways to 
cut spending to keep future budget 
deficits from escalating even more.. 


Norway Approves Foreign Banks 

Reuters 

OSLO — The government gave official approval Friday for k 
banks to begin operations in Norway, but rejected 
three Swedish banks, 1 government spokesman said. 

It approved applications from Quire Manhattan Bank NjA, Citi- 
bank NA and Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. of New Yoric, 
Banque Paribas, Banque Indosuez and Banque Nationale de Paris of 
Paris, and Samuel Montaoi & Co. of Loudon. 

Citibank said late Friday that h planned to open its Norwegian 
unit. Citibank AS, on Monday. 

The government rqected applications by the Swedish banks be- 
cause Sweden does not allow operations by foreign banks. 

One U.S. bank representative said that the foreign banks’ opera- 
tions probably would concemrate on overseas corporate concerns 
involved in Norwegian industrial activity and foreign-exchange deal- 
ing- 

Under the new legislation, the banks would operate as Norwegian 
limited companies and not as branches of international firms. Finan- 
cial ceilings would be placed on their activities. 

Sweden is the last non-Comnranist country in Europe to ban 
foreign banking. Last October, a Swedish government committee 
rec ommend ed that foreign banks be allowed to Open subsidiaries, but 
not branches, by early 1986. 


Domestic W. German Orders 
For Autos Said to Fall 22% 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 
FRANKFURT —West Germa- 
ny’s an to industry experienced a 
22-percent decline in domestic or- 
ders in December from the level of 
a year earlier as buyers apparently 
continue to postpone purchases to 
await a decision an pending anti- 
pollution legislation, a spokesman 
for the Automobile Industry Asso- 
ciation said Friday. 

Compounding the industry’s 
nervousness about its home mar- 
ket, the Federal Motor Office re- 

ershad raised their share of the 
West German market to 30 percent 
in 1984 Cram 273 percent in 1983. 
A seven-week strike by IG Metall, 
tiie metalworkers’ union, brought 
the West Ge rman car industry to a 
near standstill last summer. 

“Domestic orders, which were 
down 16 percent in October and 18 
percent m November from year- 
earlier levels, fell 22 patent in De- 
cember for the industry as a 
whole,” said Wolfgang Weger, as- 
sociation spokesman. 

“We are in a vety difficult time, 
in which no one knows what might 
happen for the next two or three 
months regarding the government’s 


proposals to grant tax concessions 
to cars malting new emission stan- 
dards,” Mr. Weger said. 

Volker Lekhrering, Ford-Werke 
AG sp okesman, said domestic or- 
ders at Ford Motor Co.’s West 
German subsidiary were down 10 
to 15 percent in November and in 
December from year-earlier levels. 
“It’s not a crisis yet, but it oould 
develop into one.” he said. 

Reports on Friday by IG Metall 
saying that domestic orders in De- 
cember dropped an estimated 40 
percent at Bayerische Motorec- 
werke AG (BMW); 26 percent at 
General Motors Corp.’s subsidiary, 
Opel AG, and 20 percent at Volks- 
wagenwerk AG were denied by the 
companies. 

Heidi Gottstem. a BMW spokes- 
woman, said BMW has suffered a 

(Gommued on Page 13, CoL 9 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26-27. 1985 




(rida>^ 


MSE 


Closing 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
wtottiedoslim an wall Street 


V2MfMh 
HWLaw Stack 


Dtv. YU PE 


Sta. 

rpfa HW Lew 


Cftae 

Pud. Oi'flt 


JO 3J) 

.14 23 
1.12 £0 
S2 3.1 

M IJ 
-60 4 A 
.16 J 
M 2A 


236 46 
2JB M 


SJ* .3 PontPr 

14ft 12 PCml H 

«ft in;- pSSS 

26 12% Panic • 

12*6 6 PQrkDtS 
VVl 2S% PnrfcH 

’52 'TP ^6Pn 

71* IV, POTpJrl 
S’ 6 E?VIKW 
w 11 % Pqvnp 
m. 13% poycan 
O’! A’* PHbdy 
1J6 Panso 
gW 3646 Pen Qln 
44ft Penney 
2546 19% PqPL ^ 

wS S' 1 * £? PLb< * m 122 

s? 30 PoPLPl 4J0 1U 
POPLDf 840 128 
32? 5 S?PLdpr£« 127 
3£J 2L EOPLdPrtJM 11J 
t£? SJ? E?f*LdPf£25 125 

St 2K? E?P*-*»27S 128 
git EOPUBTllJDO 114 
St POPLBT1XOO 129 

aPSTB’S 

30*. pS 220 52 
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ssssgss ,z a 

SS ’Z* J6 10 

1 0*6 ,7ft Prmlon lJ5eT5J 
17*6 12*6 PwvDr 28 14 
36V, P«tli« UD 27 

32% 243% Pairs A72el47 

’55 m pairs pf ij? 104 
7ft <J6 Ptrlnv |JBs2£5 
*7% Nt Pfizer 148 27 
3746 TZft PTrTdD 
St 3£. Pjwloor 5,00 113 
37? 30ft Pluto'S M U 
1536 9 PtHJoEJ UD 140 
29% 22 PtlUE pf 320 114 

33 » L hllE *1 640 144 

34 25% PhllE pf 4J8 14J 
4M4 50% PhllE Of 035 144 
10% 79b PtlUE pf 141 124 
10% 6% PhllE pf 1J3 134 

43 PhllE pf 745 144 
10 4ft PhllE pf 128 125 
117 97 PMIpf 17.13 144 

20 15% PfelSub 122 74 

83% 62% PtellMr 340 41 
22V, 10% Phnpln 48 12 
S«% 24 Rrtllnpf 140 14 
56% 33% Phi I Pet 240 44 
16% PJUIVM 
£% SP £%dAvt 
32% 23% PleNG 
2T 14 Pier I 
«% n Pliabry 
to 21% Pioneer 
2Wl 17 PionrEI 

«% 26 Vi PItnyB 

81 53% PlfnBpt 212 26 

16 V, 9% Pimtn 
Mft Bft PtonRs ■« ’ x 
22*6 12% Plontm 
13% 7% Playboy 
35% 20% Plenty 
22% 1596 PogoPd 
32 24% Pworkl 

241* 11% Pondrs 
25% 15 PopTai 
19*6 13% Portae 
17*6 13 PortGE 


(Continued from Page 8) 


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361* 19V* PotmEI 216 84 
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371* 31 PofEfpf 444 104 
24% IA% Pramls 
35% 23 PrtmrK 240 59 
MV* 11% PiinwC 
27% 16 PrtmM .12 4 

K 4546 ProctG 240 4.7 
7% PrdRtfi 48 22 
47% 31 Prnlar 140 34 
19ft 16% PSvCoi 1.92 103 
60 51ft PSCorpf 7.15 11 J 
19% 16% PSCol Pf 210 ll.l 
9*6 69b PSInd 140 114 
8 6V* PSInpf 148 115 

50 369b PSInpf 7.15 165 

ra^BBS 848 162 
12% ^% PSvNH 9jW 16J) 
19% 6% PNHDfB 

® rRBSS 


7 PNHpjf 


21 5% PNHpf. 

22% 7*6 PNHptG 

26*6 15* PSvNM 248 114 9 858 _ 

27V* 20V* PSvEG 272 105 7 1783 »% 25ft 25% — I* 

13% 10V6 PSEGpf 140 114 4 12V> 12V* 12V* 


13 392 4% 4% 4W 

W 67 16 15ft 16 

56 1221 T7 16% 16% + l* 

11 , 45 16V* 15*6 15*6 — ft 

„ 1124 6% 6 6 — Vb 

13 291 37V* 36ft 37 + 1* 

28 58 169* 16% 16*b— I* 

... 186 1Tb I*i 1% 

18 2084 26*b 264* 26% 

12 92 13% 13% 13*6— W 

17 547 IV% 18% 19% + *6 

376 8% 7% B% + % 

99 4* % % 

12 512 53% 52% 53 +1% 

8 2870 51% 49V* 51 +2 

8 783 25% 25% 25%+ % 
lOQz 36 35 36 + % 

IBQr 35 35 35 — % 

>50z 67 66V> 67 +V 

40 Z7% 261b 26%— % 
8 24% 24% !4% + % 
42 26% 26 26 

25 29% 29% 29% 

6SQz 94V, 91% 94V* +1V* 

30Z101 101 101 + V* 
1201 601* 6«P* «OV=— V* 
12 151 3BY* I7V* 38V* + % 
16 23 22% 23 

10 637 42V* 41% 43 — % 

.102 82 m 82+2 
8 30V 16 15% 15% 

15 65 33% 33% 33% + % 

21 4814 44% 43% 43% + % 
17 2151 28% 27% 28 + % 

7 373* 8% 8 8% + % 

M 70 1%* 19 19% 

38% 35% 38% +2% 

25% 24% 25% 

15V. 15 15 

4% 4% 4% 

40V* 29V, 39%— % 
17% 16% 17% +1% 
48% 40V, 40% + V* 
39 37% 39 +1% 

.. 15% 15% 15% + % 

3ooz ib a a 

75Qz 31 301* 30 V» — l’A 

lOQz 32% 32% 32% 
ion, an 60 60 — 1 

536 101* 10% IF* + W 
119 9% 9V* 9% 

SDZ 54V* 541* 54V* 

246 •<* 9% 9V* + V* 

10Z1V7 117 117 

11 26 18 17% I7%— V* 

10 1877 83 81 82 +1<* 

22% 21 22% +1 

S3 53 S3 —IV* 

49 48 48% + % 

24% 241* 24% — % 

36 35 35% + % 

31% 31 31 — Vb 

19% 19 191* 

39% 38% 39% + V* 

32% 31% 31%— % 

23 22% 23 — V* 

40% 39% 40% + V* 

80% 78% 80% +1% 

11% 11 11% + % 

14% 14% 14% + % 

14% 14V* 14% + % 

11% II 11% — •- 

21 20% 21 + V* 

18 17 18 -61 

26V* 25% 26%— V* 

14% 14% 14% — Vi 

18V* 17% 18V* + % 

18% 18% 18V, — V* 

17% 17% 17% + V* 

IBQz 98V* 97V* 98% +11* 
3 21% 21% 21%— V* 
M 32% 32% 37% + «h 
7 32% 32 32 

167 35 34% 34% — K 

10x105 105 105 +4% 

302 251* 25% 25% 

2 4fe 42% 42 42% + % 

lOWttc 37% 36 37% 

16 167 23% 23% 23% + % 

33% 33V* 33%+ % 
19Tb 18Tb 19% + % 
29% 29 29%+ % 

55% 54% 55 — % 
12% 12% 12% + % 
41% 41% 41 %— % 

19 18% 18% + % 
930% 61% 61% 61% +*% 

21 19% 18% 19 + % 

3 415 8% BH 8%+ W 

lSOOz 8 7T* 8 + % 

SOz 43% 43% 43% —1% 
400i 60% 58% 60% +2% 
SOOt 51% 51% 51% 
lOz 60 60 60 

2 2713 5% 4% 5 

«2 Or III* 10% 11% + % 
111 12 11% 11%— % 
15% 16 16%+ % 

14% 14V* U% + % 
15% 14% 15%+ Vi 
13 12% 12% 

U 13% 13%+% 
25 24% 24%— % 


12 1113 

828630 
B 122 
B 391 
7 16 

13 54 
9 6085 
7 2511 

45 96 

12 397 
10 
70S 
H 739 

14 331 

3 112 
10 17 

18 246 
20 1416 

I 189 
64 
41 

5 375 


6 183 
17 5566 
23 169 
11 4247 
22 156 
9 25 

392 


20 

177 

s 


12 Month 
HWiLow Stock 


so dose 

Piv. YM.PE Wh Hhh Lot awt-Ch’Bc 



38% 27% QuokO s 5348 34% 33% 34% + % 

19% IS QuakSO JO 42 14 851 19% 19 19%— M 

12% 6% OuttW* 50 IOr 9% 9% 9% 

32% 21 Ouestar IJ0 5J 9 286 29% 28% 2B%— % 

21 14 QkRell Me 3 IB 614 21% 20% 21% +1% 


.16 1J 
1J4 23 n 
150 1U 
4J0 44 
2.12 74 
165 106 
30 23 10 

3J B 
28 U 
34 

44 47 8 
M 3 19 


160 

A0 


16 17 
42 63 


20% 6% RBlnd 
40 28% RCA 

34 29 RCA Pf 

91 67% RCA nt 

31% 24% RCA vt 
34% 27% RCA pf 
10% 6% RLC 
4% 3 RPC n 

17% 12% RTE 46 
36% 25 RaliPur 140 
10% 5% Romoa 

21 16% Ranca 

10% 4% RenarO 
77 47% Ray cm 

17% 8% Raymk 
46% 34% Ravthn 
13% 7% ReodBt ... ._ 
23V* 16% RdBat pf 2.17 106 
25 20 RUBatpf 3J4al54 

15% 9% RlfRe/ USB 94 II 
15Tb 9 RecnEa 
15% 8 R«tmn 

10% 7% Reece 
2% % Renat 

35% 23 RelCbC 
6% 3% ReeAlr 

2% 1% ReaAwt 

47U 25% ReaCp 
21Tb 9 RepGvp 
41% 31% RttbNY 

58% 52 RNYpfA 

57% 40 RNYp»447p8l 9 
32% 21% RnnBk 164 U i 
29 20% Rn»Bkpf2.12 

18% 14 RahCot 33 
34% 22% Raven 
13% 9% vIRltver 
40% 28% Ravton 
24% 17% Rextim 
20 11% Rex run 

74% 52% Ramin 
48% 46 Revlnpf 4M 
40% 26 RevMH 140 
30% 24% ROlVOC 1-48 
34% 18% RlapalT 1J0 
28% 17% RlteAM 
7% 5V* RvrOfcn 
35% 25 Robsftw 
«% 36% Rowan 
24% 12 Robins 
19% 12% RochG 

35 27% RodiTI 
34% 23 RDdCWl .... 

122% 83 Rklnlpf 145 
66% 48% RohmH 240 
47% 27% Retain 
20 l<m ftafCmn 
18% 6 RellnEs 
13% 6Tb Rollins 
6% 2% R onset, 

24 12% Roper 

34% 24 Rarer 
14% 8% Reman 
54% 41% RaylD 
48% 12% Rubrmd 
23% 13 RwiB n 
20 15% RusTop 

33% 17% RvenH 
57% 38% Ryders 
25V* 12% Ryiand 
19% 8% Rymeri 


94 9% 9 9 — % 

2894 39 38% 3I%— % 

420Z 34 32% 34 +1% 

90% 90 90 — % 

30% 30% 30%— M 

34% 34 34% + % 

9 8% 8% 

3Tb 3% 3% 

16% 16% 16% + V* 
35% 35V* 35% 

6% 6% 6%+ V* 

18% 18 U — Vb 
5 4% 4%— % 

63% 63V* 63%+ % 
13% 13% 13% 

44T* 46 44Tb + % 
9% 9% 9% — V* 
20% 20% MVb— U 

21 21 91 

IS 15 15 


233 

1235 

212 

82 

100 

775 

3154 


67 

6 

1377 

134 

32 

4 

14 



489 

14% 


14ft + % 

JO £5 23 

276 

raw 

11% 

lift— ft 

13 

21 

48 

0% 

46 

•ft 


JO 13 10 

136 

34% 

34% 

34%+ ft 

6 

912 

55 

6 

lft 

5% 

lft 

5% 

1ft + % 

M U 11 

40 


43ft 

42% 

J6 £8 9 

51 


20% 

20W— % 


32 

41% 

4166 

lift— % 

6J9ell.9 

204 

56ft 

55ft 

56% 


JO 


7J 
14 24 
12 11 


134 

20 


X40 44 


JO 

1.12 

140 

76 


5J II 
U 9 
11 11 
10 
EJ 

24 6 
50 10 

> A 

IJ 17 
17 

U 8 
43 IS 
32 17 
220 I1J 5 
144 72 9 
1JOO 23 10 
1.1 

10 10 
9 

JOB r £ 39 
■OH .1 22 
44 43 17 

il 17 1 
1.12 40 14 
JOB -B 125 
2276 54 4 
M 17 19 
16 

76 44 8 
IjOO 37 14 
1JKU2JI 10 
40 15 14 


273 50k, » 50% + % 

81 29% 29 29% + % 

24% 26% 26% 

17% 17V* 17%— % 
25% 25 2SU.+ V* 

1H* 11% 11% 

34% 33Tb 34% — K> 
19% 19% 19% 

14% 14 14% 

74% 73% 74% + % 


10 

56 

1619 

10 


61 

118 

2069 

6 

510 

342 

21 

390 

256 

5V 

78 


39% 38% 39V*— % 
29% 29% 29% 

21% 21% 21% 

3SV* 27% 28V* + V* 
7% 6% 7 — V* 

31% 33% 33% + % 
37% 36% 37%+ % 
23% 23% 23%+ % 
__ 19% 19V* 19% + % 

76 94% 34% 34% — % 

~ 35 34U 35 + H 

134 122% 124 +1% 

66% 66 66% +1% 
50 49% 49% 

38 17V, 20 

17% 16% 17 + Vb 
10% 10% 10% + Vb 
3% 3 3 

17% 17% mb— % 
28% 28% 2SU.— % 
18 9% 10 + % 

51% 51% 51% + % 

.. 49% 48% 4916+ % 
367 23% 22% 23%+ % 
70 16% 16% 16% 

27% 27% 27%— % 
S4VS 54% 54tt— % 
23% 23% ZH* 

11 % 11 % 11 % + % 


2S3 


98 

94 

UK 

355 

621 

as 

34 

38 

903 

3581 

66 


75 

274 

52 

17 


47% 33% SCM 
43% 23% 5FN 
12% 7% SL lnd» 

30 19% SPSTec 

26 15 Sabine 

23 16 SabnRy 

17V, tIH SMBs 
M 5% 5MSC 
2% SfodSwt 
30% lev* Sat Kin i 
29% 21% Safewy 
35% 26% Sana 
20 >5% SfJoLP 

10% 9 SFaul 
11% 6% Salon, 

3fl* 21 SatlleM 
53% 49% SalIMpt 
23% 17% SDteGj 
10% 6% SJuonB 
51 31 Sonars 

26% 18% SArdlRt 
27% 20% SFeSoP 
34% 24% Setwel 
17% 13% SQUIRE 
19% 13% SovElP 
ova 3% savin 
11% BV* Savin pf 1 JO 150 
23% 17% SCANA Z16 93 
40 
55 
15 
29 


2J0 4J 12 
1.28 29 20 
20b 1 J 10 
M S3 13 
j04 3 22 

2J3B15J 
34 I A 16 
72 

23 

M0 Si f 
*4 M 13 
IJ2 8L8 7 
120 112 

.16 S 16 
*JB3o13 
2.10 9.1 7 
tA 10 
14 14 
U 14 
37 10 
44 15 
12 44 
84 6 


J4 

144 

140 

1-40 

20 

140 


33 SCfirPla 

US 

4A 

11 

34% Seta mb 

uo 

23 

to 

7% 5dAH 

17 

13 

77 

19% Scoalnd 

36 

23 

12 

39ft 5aotFet 



10 

25% Scott P 

1.12 

£2 

to 

lift Seattvs 

J2 

£5 

11 

20% S covlli 

IJ2 

£6 

15 

18% SeaCntn 

J2 

1.1 

7 


11% 9% SaoCtpf 
15% 12% SeoCbfB 
15% 12 SaaCMC 


144 117 
110 132 
2.18 144 


123 44% 

18 43% 
79 11V* 
78 27% 

238 16% 
83 IB 
163 16% 
75 6% 

70 1% 

259 31 
3542 28% 
176 32% 
36 19% 
54 10% 
10 7% 

13® 31 
SB 52% 
1572 23% 
171k 8% 
1523 36% 
65 23% 
1821 27% 

33 30% 

19 17 
141 18% 

35 5% 

4 W 
217 23% 
624 38% 
5143 38% 
836 17% 
120 27% 
78 58 
1006 35% 
64 14% 
60 42 
150 37% 
28 111* 

34 15% 
91 15% 


46 46% — % 

43% 43% 

Iff to 11 + % 

27% 27% — % 
16% 16% — % 
17% 17% 

16% 16% + M 
61* 61*— % 
1% 1% 

29% 30% + V* 
27% 28% + Vk 
31% 32 + % 
19% 19% 

10% 

7 7Vh+ % 
29% 30% +1% 
52% S2%+ % 
22% 23%+ % 
8% 8%+ % 
35% 35%—% 
22% 23% + % 
36% MTS— % 
30% sms— % 
16% 17 + M 
18% 18% + % 
5V. 5% 

TO 10 
23V. 23% — Vb 
38 IO%+ % 
37% 37%— % 
11% 11% + % 
27V* 2714 — VS 
57% S7%— V* 
35% 35%— M, 
14% 14% 

41% 41% + % 
36% 36%— V* 
111S 11%+ 1* 
U 15% 

14% 15 — % 


12 Month 

HtohLnr Stock 


Dtv. Y1A PE 


51s. c ton 

WBaHtfitom Quol.Orai 


40% 

21% 

20* 

321* 

65% 

38% 

57% 

231* 

32% 

20% 

23% 

61% 

39% 

29% 

30% 

33VS 

9% 

18% 

16% 

37 
591* 
73 
35% 
30% 
18% 
31 
59% 
56V* 
37% 

38 
17% 
29% 
38% 
20% 
28% 
48% 
28% 
1216 
24% 
19 
36 
37% 

36 
24% 

37 
36% 
1914 
10% 
54% 
28 Vb 
22V* 
15 

71% 

27% 

23 

19% 

27% 

48% 

38 Ul 
42% 
S5V6 
2614 
22 

21% 

60% 

50% 

24% 

17 

27% 

30% 

to% 

24% 

4% 

17% 

121 * 

30 

231* 

» 

12 

44% 

40 

53% 
18% 
14% 
52% 
20% 
23% 
8% 
30% 
31% 
19% 
99% 
123 
49% 
15% 
9% 
36 IS 
37V* 
19 
23 
37% 
15 

52% 

38% 


14% 

2% 

30 

12% 

18% 

19% 

37% 

29% 

38 

lZVb 

20% 

11% 

10% 

43% 

28% 

1714 

18% 

2214 

4% 

12 

12% 

244* 

48% 

50 

20% 

2614 

1214 

9% 

50 

36% 

27 

27 

12% 

22% 

27% 

18 

22 

39V* 

22 

5% 

17% 

14% 

25% 

27% 

31% 

zin 

77 M 

23 
1114 
614 

45 

14% 

13 

10% 

5S 

19% 

17 
11% 

18 
33% 
30% 
31% 
37V* 
17% 
16% 

13 
48% 
39% 

9% 

11 

19V* 

zn* 

®% 

15% 

2% 

1414 

9% 

21% 

15% 

25% 

8% 

32% 

25% 

3714 

15% 

2 

30% 

20 

14% 

3Tb 

21% 

24 V4 
7% 

41% 

90% 

34% 

7% 

6 

23% 

191* 

14 
16% 
28% 
10 
37% 


Seaton 

Sec Can 

Eeasnn 

Seaaul 

SealAIr 

SeatPw 

SearteG 

Sears 

SecPoc 

SeffiU 

SvcCps 

Shofciea 

Shawm 

snetio 

StwftT 

ShelGla 

ShelGPf 

Shrwtn 
Shoe turn 

ShawM 

SlerPoc 

Slpnaf 

SJpnlPf 

Slump* 

Sinner 

SInsr pf 

Skyline 

Smllhln 

SmkB 

Srnuckr 

SnasOn 

5anat 

5anyCp 

Son Lin 

Source 

SrcCppf 

SoJerln 

SouOwn 

SoetBk 

SaetPS 

SCelE i 

South Co 

SolnOE 

SNETI 

Some pf 

SoRypf 

SounCa 

Souttnd 

So Rav 

Saumrk 

5omk of 

Syr Alii 

SmfFar 

SwtGas 

SwBell 

SwEnr 

SwTPS 

Sparton 

SoeetP 

Soerrv 

Sprlnus 

Sonar D 

SaulbO 

Staley 

StBPnt 

SlMatr 

StOInd 

SMOOh 

StPocCP 

Slondex 

StmiWk 

Sfaneff 

StaMSe 

StoufCh 

Sleeoo 

SlercM 

5 hi B cp 

5tertOa 

StevnJ 

SlwWm 

StkVCPt 

5 renew 

StaneC 

SMShP 

StorEq 

viStarT 

Storer 

SrrtMtn 

StrMRt 

SuavSh 

SunBkB 

SunCh 

Sun El 

SunCo 

SunCpf 

SuncbJr 

SunMn 

Sum tat 

SuarVl 

SupMU 

jWQnib 

Sybran 

Sybmpf 

SymsOo 

Syntax 

Sysco 


AO 20 
JO ID 

M U 
1J0 15 
J2 .9 
U6 SO 
2 At 4J 

JO IJ 
J2 SJ 
JO SJ, 
200 36 
Z12o 6J 
JO 29 
1J0 46 
36 13 

60 35 
160 10.1 
1JJO 20 
4.12 70 
208 20 
.10 J 
3J0 11J 
AS 13 
33 29 
2J0 43 
.96 IJ 
1.16 21 
IJ5 5J 
,16a 16 
100 5LD 
210 21 
260 116 
264 86 
JOb 1.1 
1J0 42 
165*206 
204 9.1 
1.92 103 
268 7J 
2.72 76 
302 IU 
260 10.7 
132 63 
100 24 
JOB 3 

30 25 
?.15el4J 
.13 J 

1J0 8J 
560 BO 
S2 23 
IJ8 80 
J2 3J 

102 4.1 
152 12 
1 J4 40 
160 20 
JO 36 
.54 27 
32 20 
3J0 SJ 
2J0 66 
60 17 
52 30 
.96 30 
100 30 
1O0O1I6 

164 70 
.12 17 
J4 40 
02 60 
1.16 4.1 
1O0 42 
168 56 
160 80 
160 17 
60 16 
US 23 
104 106 


IOO 29 
68 U 

200 40 
205 20 
1J0 37 


68 21 
62 1.1 
.90 55 
108 SO 


102 36 
06 16 


757 
190 
9 693 

18 195 
15 31* 

9 370 

19 2355 
9 7*44 
7 1017 

11 12 

17 53S 

31 573 

0 183 
10 797 

4 702 
7 262 

4 

12 364 
9 107 

14 33 

7 146 

15 1369 

26 

1 

10 371 

15 

25 626 

20 145 

9 5289 
15 17 

14 539 

7 573 

12 3259 

11 33 
62 

5 

10 32 

11 25 

8 273 

25 14 

7 6077 
615214 

7 103 
V 518 

12 

2 

77 788 

9 1351 

10 400 

5 632 

14 1511 

330 

13 185 

8 3531 

15 54 
8 319 

22 10 
28 239 

10 BB3B 

8 27 

12 810 

15 931 

18 5787 

11 553 

9 145 
7 4600 
7 2548 

9 260 
IT 266 

12 967 
tl 5 

IB 

2207 

5 

10 1 

10 33 
12 4941 

16 277 

19 83 
am 

9 26 

25 918 
9 AM 

14 75 
I860 

525 

55 

10 229 

20 

ID 414 
22 158 
124 
12 590 

3 

15 312 

12 434 
5 136 

11 424 

15 304 
10 SO 

12 126 

4 

19 513 

13 1531 

16 733 


24 23% 

4% 41* 

40 39% 

W* 16% 

261* 2S% 
28% 38% 
61 60% 
35% 34% 
57% 564* 
U% 14% 
37% 32 
14% 14 
ZI% 22V* 
56 55% 

32% 22% 
27% 27% 
30% 30% 
3JM 32 
64* 6% 
15% 15% 
15% 15% 

gy* 
59 58% 

78% 70% 
25% 34% 
31 30% 

17% 17% 
111 * 10 % 


37 36% 

34% 33% 
15% 15% 
241* 24 
38% 38 
20 % 20 % 
28% 28VS 
45% 45% 
27% 27% 
8 8 
22% 22% 
10% UM 
34% 33% 
36% 36% 
34 33% 

24% 24% 
M% 27% 
27V* 20% 
12 11 % 
8 7% 

49% 49% 
24 22% 

15% 14% 
15 14% 

70V* 60% 
22% 22% 
21 % 21 % 
15% 15% 
21 % 21 % 
47% 45% 
36% 36 
43% 42 
54% srv, 
23 22% 

20% 20% 
16% 16 
56% 56 
44% 43% 
23% 22% 
16% U% 
30 27 

30% 29Tb 
10V* 10% 
20% 19% 
3JS 3% 
17% 17% 
10% 10V, 
28% 28% 
19% 19 
30 29% 

11 % 11 % 
43% 42% 
33% 32% 
4 4% 43% 
18% 18% 
3% 3% 
52 51 

20% 20% 
17% 17% 
516 5 

30% 30% 
31% 31% 
10% 10 
47% 46% 
96% K% 
49% 48% 
7% 7% 
6% 6 
32% 32 
36% 36% 
16% 16% 
20% 19% 
34 33% 

12% 12% 
53% 52 
36 35% 


23%+ % 
416— U 
40 + % 

16% 

25Tta— % 
28%+ % 
61 + Vs 

35% + % 
56% 

14% + % 
32% + % 
U%— V* 
S3 + % 
S5%— % 
32% + h. 
27% +1 
30% 

32%+ % 

6% 

15% — % 
15%+ % 
25% + t* 

70% 

35% + % 

31 + % 

17% + % 
11%+ % 
59 +1 

54%— V* 

37 + % 
33%+ I* 
15%— % 
24V*— % 
38%+ % 
20% 

281*— V* 
45% — % 
27%+ V* 
8 + V* 
22%— % 
mb + % 
34%+ % 
36%+ % 
33Tb— % 
24% 

27H— M 
29%+ % 
12 + % 
8 

49% + % 
Z» + % 
15% + 1* 
14Tb — Vb 
69% +1 
22% + % 
21% + V* 
15% 

ZI%+ % 
47 + % 
36%- % 
43% +1% 
54%+ % 
22%— % 
20%+ % 
16% + % 
56%+ % 
43% — % 

a — % 
16%—% 
29% + % 
30V* + % 
18%+ % 
19%+ % 
3% 

T7% 

10% 

28%+ % 
19% + % 
29%— % 
11%— % 
43%+ to 
33 + % 

44% + % 
10%+ V* 
3% 

511* + % 
20V* + % 
17% 

5 — % 
30%— % 
31% 

10%+ % 
46H— % 
96% — % 
4S%— % 
7%— V* 
6%+ % 

32 — % 
36% — % 
16%— % 
20% 

14 + % 

12% + % 
51% +1 
35V* — % 


62 35% 

31% 24 
14% 7% 

14% 11% 
32% 17 
00% 58% 
174% 134 
13% 3% 
70 49% 

15% 9% 
17% 13% 
66% 46% 
37% 23% 
15% 11% 
74% 51% 
3% 2% 
302% 147% 
22% 13% 
47% 10% 
38% 25% 
44% 32% 
97% 871* 
35% 21 VS 
20% «* 
36% 20% 
40% 31% 
42% 32% 
48% 36% 
35V* 26% 
27 24% 

58 52 

40 25 

149% 111% 


09a J 
230 73 


TDK 
TECO 
TGIF 
TNP 1.19 BJ 
TRE 100 40 
TRW 300 3J 
TRW pf 460 16 
TacBoal 

TaftBrd 1.12 IJ 
Talley 

Talley pflOO SJ 
Tambttf 300 40 
Tandy 
Tndvcfl 

Tafctmx 100 IJ 

To, com 
Teldvn 

Teirate 32 IJ 
Telex 

Temotn JO 16 
Ten non isi 76 
Tone nr n jo ii j 
Tonlm 

Tmmara JO 4.1 
Teaorpf lie 93 
Texaco 3oo no 
TxABc 1J2 40 
TeuOn 1J6 19 
TxEstl UO 70 
TxETpf 207*100 
TxETPf 608x116 
Tex tad JOb 2J 
Taxlmf 200 IJ 


20 64 

9 779 
19 148 

7 13 
18 279 

11 400 

1 
141 
13 191 

12 370 

41 

13 207 
12 3162 

12 39 

9 96(2 
5 4 

10 320 
32 228 

13 11M 
10 158 

8 2870 

8 

8 2893 

9 25 
7 4» 
9 351 

5 

46 

10 W 
10 1673 


42% 42% 42% — % 
31% 31% 31% 

11% 11 1116 + % 

14 13% 14 + % 

25 24% 25 + % 

79% 78% 79% + % 

172 172 172 —3% 

4% 4% 4% + % 
62% 61% 61% — % 

15 14% 15 + % 
17% 17% 17% + % 
47% 46% 66%+ % 
28% 28% 28%+% 
14% 13% 14% + % 
64% 63% 63%— % 

2% 2% 2 % 

263% 256% 263% +6% 
20% 20 20% + % 
43% 42 42% + % 

36% 36% 36% + % 
39% 38% 39VS + % 
97% 97% 97%+% 
30% 29Tb 30%+% 

m m pts 
22 % 22 % 22 % + % 
34% 36 34 — % 

35% 35% 35%+ % 
40 29V, 39% + % 

30% 29% 30% + % 
2616 M% 26% 

55% 55 55%+ % 

32% 32% 32%+ % 
131 12816130% + % 


17 Month 
tatthLow Stock 


Piv- Yin. PE 


Slv 

ItEsHtoh Lev. 


Ckae 

guct.Chse 


I L : 


5% I 
27% 16% 
39 28% 

SSVb 20% 
7% 2 
43V* 25% 
47% 28% 
38 23% 

9% 5% 
70 23 V* 

21% 13% 
41 28% 

18% 12% 
MV* 13V* 
21V* 11V* 
29V* 17% 
9 4% 

48% S% 
22 12 
46% 28% 
66Vb 47V* 
36% 28% 

31 22% 
18% 13% 
27 24Tb 
27% 22 
25% 20 

32 25V* 

1BI* 13% 
17% 13V* 
48% 23 V* 
34% 16 
34% 18% 
15 9% 

4% 1 

23 11% 

15% 8% 

33% 21% 
29V* 18% 
13% 7% 
15% 11% 
24% 16V* 
28% 20% 
20 16% 
17% 10% 
55 1* 33% 
9% 42% 
25% 19 
16% 6% 
72% 63 
92% 80 

24 20 

mb 6% 

37% 28 
32% 23% 
16% 9% 
17% 14% 
41% 25% 
26% 21% 
23% VI* 
6% 5 
22 % 12 % 
29 20% 

36 Vb 24 
6% 4 
9% 5Tb 

23V* 13V* 
19% 11V6 
11% 8% 
35% 28% 
1M* 10% 
22% 16 
3BV* 25V* 
32% 23% 


Texlnt 

TexOOs .11 lj II 
TxPoc 60 U 18 

TexUHl 206 U 6 
Taxfl In 

Textron 180 40 14 
Textret 208 so 
Textrpt 160 « 
Thocfc 

Thacfc pf 4.1S 160 
Therm E 25 

ThmBts 104 SJ 16 
Them In 68b 30 10 
ThmMed 60 26 7 
Thrifty JO U 15 
Tidwrr .90 4 3 
Ttperin 

Time 02 lO 15 
TlmpVx 20 

TlmeM 106 30 14 
Timken 100a 36 12 
TodShP Ml U 7 
Tofchm 02 26 11 
TolEdb 2J2 147 5 
Tot Ed pf 302 130 
TolEdPf 303 14J 
TolEdPf 367 130 
ToVEdPf 408 135 
TolEdPf 206 13J 
Tel Ed pf 201 132 
Tanka 60 
Toot Ret 68 
Trchnis IOO 
TeroCa 30 
Tosco 
Towle 

Towlepf 64 
TovRUl 
Tracer 04 
TWA 

TWA pf 205 117 
TWA afB 205 102 
Traram 164 6.1 10 
Tranlnc 202 11 J 
TARltv UOe BJ 8 
Transca 116 42 9 
Trracpf 307 60 
Tran Ex 200 706 
Transai 7 

TrGPpf 666 93 
TrG pf 1002 11 J 
TrGPpf 150 10J 
TmsOfi 21 

Trunwv IOO SO 10 
Tmwld 60 lO 10 
TwMwtA 
T«vldP< 1J0 no 
Trawler 2m ts 70 
Tricon 353*130 
TriCnpt 150 103 

TrlSetn to 

Triaind 60 20 45 
TrtaPc 1J0 3J 9 
Tribune 04 26 14 
Trkntr Ota 82 9 
Trice .16 26 20 

Trlntv JO 11 
TritEnn .HRs 3 77 
TrltE pf 1.10 lio 
TUCSEP 3J0 BJ 7 
TviltJAA 02 40 ID 
Turin Ds JO +5 10 
TYCO Lb JO 11 10 
Tyler 30 20 9 


1001 

3735 

2 

2900 

29 
962 

30 
3 
12 


1% 

19Tb 

31% 

27 

3% 

38 

41% 

33% 

7% 


412 18% 
3441 BTb 
3652 48% 
28 20% 
669 46 
118 49% 


4S6 I7 1 - 
4S5 27% 
13 27V, 
2 25% 
7 30% 
32 177* 


J 

IJ 10 
30 12 
16 10 


SO 

24 
10 14 
67 


19 29% 
650 34 
156 15 
447 1% 

55 15% 
1 8% 
1630 30*. 
227 29% 


1 

tfl’y 
37 L, 
26% 
3% 

37% 

4T- 

33% 

7% 

26 

S'* 

?ar 

20% 

18V* 

7% 

46% 

20% 

45% 

49% 

2S 

16% 

26% 

26% 

25V* 

30% 

77 

lav* 

43 

29% 

33V* 

14% 

Hk 

15% 

a% 

30 V* 
28% 


1599 11% II 


Tit 

130 

1989 


M% 

22 

27 


4Bx 19% 

4 12 
290 51% 
101 58 

1970 20% 
360 11% 
SOz 71% 
SOz 91% 

i a% 

75 10% 
27 34% 
1362 32% 
150 16 

13 17 
1784X 41 % 

514 26% 
I 27% 
44 5% 

a 18% 

36 29 
658 35% 
29 4% 

133 6% 

81 16% 

5 14% 
3 10 

422 35% 
85 12T* 

14 IB 
664 39 
159 32% 


141* 

21V* 

26% 

19% 

12 

50% 

57i* 

19% 

11% 

71% 

91% 

23% 

10% 

34% 

32 

15 
17 
40% 
26% 
23% 

5% 

17% 

28% 

35 

4V* 

6 

16 
14% 
10 
35 

is? 

17% 

37% 

32V* 


487* 28 
32% 24 
15V* 7% 

23% 14V* 
11% 3 
14% 10 
30% 17% 
70V* 45 
62 40% 

28% 12% 
19% 13% 
94% 75 
41% 30% 
61V* 32% 

7% 4% 
16% 12 
29% 21 
32 25% 

35% 28% 
30% 24% 
23% 18% 
17% 13% 
23% 19% 
61 49 

51 341* 

1137* 82 
17% 7% 

68 53% 

6% S'* 
21% 10% 
17% 9% 
33% 20% 
29 22% 

23% 9 
28V* 19 

S % 11 

Vi 10 
22% 14% 
41% 33% 
36 25% 

16% 9V. 
3% 2% 
77% 22 
11% 5% 
39% 28% 
36 23 

31% 22 
58% 49% 
153% 115% 
31 22% 

41% 311* 
70% 55% 
41% 28% 

£* St 
2% 12 
33% 22 
23% 14% 
26% 18% 
22 15Vb 
131*30 


UAL JOB IO 
UAL pf 260 70 
UCCEL 

UGI 204 90 
UNCRm 

URS 60b 30 
USFGS 208 76 
USG 3 M 46 
USGpt IOO 30 
UnJDvn JO 2.1 
UnIFrst oa U 
UnlNV 420e 4J 
UCamps 1J4 46 
UnCarb 360 9.1 
UnlonC 

UnElec 1J2 103 
UnEIPt 3J0 TZ7 
UnEIPf 400 129 
UnElof 450 no 
UnElpMMOO IJJ 
UnElpf 208 127 
unEJ pf Z13 125 
UnEl Pf 272 120 
UElpfH BOO m 
UnPac 1J0 39 
UnPcpf 70S 70 
Unlroyl J3 a O 
Unrylaf 800 HO 

UnltOr 

UnBmd 

UBrdPf 

UCUTV .14 J 
UnEnru 268 86 
U Ilium 200 130 
Ulllupt 307 15.1 
UlttUPf UD 146 
Ulllupf UO 140 
unllind J2b 25 
Unltlrm 02 J 
UJerBk 156 40 
1/tdMM 
UPkMn 

UtctrG .12 J 
USHom 

USLoas 76 IJ 
USShoe 06 30 
U 55 ted 100 36 
USStlpf 669*121 
USStl PT 1275 95 
USStlpf 225 13 
USTab 164 4.1 
U sweet 560 77 
UnTctlS 160 36 
UTchpf 255 70 
UnlTel 
UWRi 


7 2342 

244 
36 370 

tl IS! 

247 
17 93 

8 1643 
7 196 

2 

U 912 
13 39 

9 178 
ID 938 
13 4924 

58 

6 5029 


47% 46% 47% ■ 
32% 31% 32% ■ 
15% UTfe 14% * 
Zf% 22V» 22% - 
9Vb 9 9 - 

12% 12% 12%- 
28% 27 28% ■ 

69W 68% 68**- 
61 61 61 - 

2BVb 28% 28% - 
17% 17% 17V*- 
94% 94 94 - 

37% 37V* 37%. 
38 JTVb 37V>- 
5% 5% 5%- 
16% 15% 16% ■ 
BOX 28 27% 27%- 

lOz 31 31 31 ■ 

140z 35% 34% 35W - 
30 30% 29% 30 
107 23% ZtV* 23V*- 
32 17 17 T7 ■ 

17 22% 22% 22% 
SOX 59 59 59 

II 1124 46% 45% 45% - 
65 104%103 103 - 

6 494 14% 14% 14%' 
4QZ 67% 67V* 67%- 
50 40 3% 3% 3% 

575 12% lf% 12% ■ 
11% 11% 11%- 
33VS 33% 33% - 
29 28b 28% • 

15% 15% 15%' 
26% 26 26% ■ 
6501 15% 14% 15% ■ 

13 12a* 12% ' 

21 20% 71 ■ 

38% 38% 38% - 
36 35V, 36 

15% 15 15% 

2% 2% 2%- 
37% 367b 37% ■ 
8% 7% 8%- 
41% 39% 41% ■ 
28% 28% 28%- 
27% 27% 27% - 


15 

73 

681 

114 

61 


53% 53 53% ' 

1132% 134%- 


192 80 
108 73 
30 3 

jm>3 3 


Unltrdn 

Untvor 

UnhtFd 104 40 
ULeof S .92 45 


74% 


Unocal 

UPtahn 


100 25 
2JA 3J 


9% 8% 


USLIFE 104 20 
USLFpf 20S 6 A 
UstteFd IJMalOJ 


48 

T3 71 
26 15 

8 41 

7 291 
1 101 

8 2925 
5096 

10 476 

11 1268 
3891 

105 ... 

75 134% 1 

362 » 28% 28% 

35% 3«b 35 
70% 69V* 619% 
41% 40% 41% 
36% 36% 36% 
231* 23 23% 

J7TA 77 J7% 

29% 28% 28%- 
18% 18% 18% 

40% »% 40%- 


941 

2953 

3876 

473 

1031 

41 

61 

20 

40 

99 


V-rTl- 
his* -a* 


5:ki 


Sis. 

In. >ia.»S i«h wun Lt>* 


OCS4 

CyoLCnue 


1% 

18% — T 
31% + 

26% + v. 
3% v* 

37% + V* 
41'. 

31% — 

7% + 

a — '•* 
20% 

39% 

17% f % 
14% + V* 
21% 4- % 
18% 

8% + ** 
47% + % 

20% — .1 

46 

49V* 

35% +1% 
29% 

17% + % 
27 

26% — % 
25% 

30% + % 
17V* 

164* 

43 

39% 

33V* + % 
Ifli— % 
:%— '* 
15% — % 
8% 

30% — % 
29% + V. 
11% + ‘a 
14% + % 

a + % 

25L — % 
19% 

17 

51 + % 

S7\i +1 
20b. + % 
11%+ % 
71% + % 
91V,— V* 
23% 

1D%— % 
341* 

32V* + U 
IS% + % 
17 

41% + % 
36% + '* 
23% 

5% 

18% + % 
28% — % 
35V. 

4% 

4% -*■ '* 
16 - % 
uv*— '* 
10 + % 
35Vb — % 
12% — '* 
17% — % 
38% +1% 
32% — Ik 


1012725 
13 7S2 
11 1163 
73 
65 


25, 25% uraPL 202 95 10 

H'i 21% UtPLet IOO 116 

25% 2,% UtPL a, 1.90 1IO 

19 15% U'PLM LUX no 


627 23% 23 33% + % 
8 24V* M% 24% + « 
82 25% 25% 2S% + % 
2 IBVs 18% 18% + % 


19% 

ZTi 

a 

5*. 

24% 

a-, 

54% 
14% 
25% 
6’» 
10% 
39'-: 
63% 
73 
80 
64'* 
tO 
21 ‘b 
38% 
7JL 


31% 
S'* 
14 
2-^ 
14% 
2 1 - 
S 1 a 
30'* 

9V* 

17% 

3% 

B% 

23% 

54 

40% 

66% 

53% 

49'.* 

14’, 

25% 

58 


VP Cera 

vaierc 

Voter at 

vcie* in 

vanOrs 

Vcrca 

vereexf 

vcrlon 

Von 

Veece 

Verde 

vesTSe 

Viacom 

VcEP pf 

vaEPpf 

vaEPof 

vaE pf J 

vcEPpt 

viinay 

Vomed 

VulChM 


t.T2 2J B 
364 19.7 
.92 40 6 


06 3 14 

60 11 10 
02 16 15 

100all6 
62 1.1 14 
732 120 
B04 12.1 
9.75 HO 
732 123 
730 1ZI 
1051 BJ 13 
13 

264 36 11 


747 29% 
1287 7 

7a 17% 

a 2% 

183 23% 
95 » 

IT 7% 
1133 37% 
278 13 

215 23% 
11 4% 

36 10% 
453 38'~ 
90Z 64% 
,00; 73 
lOOx 79 
]90z 64 
200r 59", 
36 Zl>* 
5 34 vb 
137 73 


29 

6% 

J7 

2% 

23- 

3Vi 

7% 

36% 

12% 

a% 

4>* 

10% 

371* 

64 
73 
79 
63V* 
59V* 
21% 
34 V* 
72 


29% 

7 + Vi 

17% + 

27* 

a--— % 
3% + % 
7% 

37 —1 
12% + % 
a% + % 

4%— % 
10% + % 

38 V* + % 
64% +1 

g 

63 V* 

S9%— % 
21% + Vb 
34V.— Vb 
72%+ % 


W 


7~T a)'. WlCCR 230 SO 6 


49 

25}-, 

100 

48% 

£7% 

16 

36 

a% 
29% 
377| 
19% 
27% 
10% 
50% 
26% 
ir* 
10 
in. 
a% 
3 r- 

52% 

60 

Si 

2D'* 

27% 

40 

50 
F* 
2'— 

18 

14% 

11% 

53% 

109 

3T, 

B7% 

69 

9% 

15% 

aft 

31- 

40V* 

34 

44% 

51 


‘JVOBR of 4J0 IOO 

20% Wochw i .92 LB 11 
16% Wachhl 60 XI I) 


+ % 
—1 

33% 324b 33% +1 
19% 19% 19V* 

9% 9% 9% 


s a 27% a 

TO* 44 44 
313 ” 

105 
302 





J 



47ft 

45ft 

46ft + % 






3 

103% 102 




JSB 

u 

17 

S73 

49% 







411 

20% 





JS 

lj 

18 

471 

35% 


35 — % 



120 

3J 


947 

36'b 

35% 




JS 

4A 


753 

20% 

20 







2259 

24% 

24 

34%- % 



1J8 

IS 

14 

1885 

37ft 

3Tb 

37% — Vi 



1J6 

SJ 

7 

90 

19% 

18ft 

18ft 



1X8 

4 A 

13 

265 

25 

246* 

34ft— W 



£48 

I2J 

7 

1421 

20% 


20 — % 



JO 

U 

IB 

3140 

48ft 





J2 

IJ 

15 

182 

25ft 





JO 

£1 

10 

13 

9ft 

PH 

9ft 

4 

WronU 




15 

6ft 

6% 

6%— ft 


9% 

12% 

29** 

30% 

40 

22% 

13% 

la'- 

34 

34% 

T% 


47 

81 

5% 

24% 

26 

2Vi 

4% 

5% 

19% 

31% 

a 

34% 

43% 


Weor.pf 

WeboD 

Ael^Mk 


00* 9 16 
10 14 


WellsF L1A 4.1 B 
Wei F Pf 503*11.1 
We, PM 200 iai 12 

Wenavs 08 IJ 16 
weefCe 44 U n 
WPenP p*l50 114 
wstPtP 200 50 6 
wnAlrL 
WtAIrvrf 
WAIrat 200 146 
W Air of £14 146 
WCNA 

WCNApf 705 149 

WPOCl A 

WUnlon 

WnUnpf 

WnUptC 

WnUpfS 

WnU stE 
WUTIPtA 

WstaEs 1J0 3 J to 
Westvc 102 34 9 
Weverh 1 JO 40 IS 
Weyr pf 208 d.*j 
Wevr or 450 9J 


1 

10 

10 

10 - 

ft 

340 

23ft 

23 

23W- 

W 

14 

36% 

36 

36% 



53ft 

52% S2ft + % 

1 

4Sft 

45ft 45ft + ft 

68 

27ft 

27ft 27ft 


802 

ISft 

18ft 18ft 


48 

20 

19ft 20 


31DZ 

38% 

38V 

38%- 

% 

174 

39 

XV 

38ft— ft 



4 

466 


151 

1ft 

1 

ft- 

ft 


13ft 

13 

13% + % 

91 

15W 

Mft 

14% + % 


347 4% 4Yi 4% + Vb 

30 48% 48% 48% + % 
3 107V. 107% 107V, + Vb 
1617 7% 7 7 — V* 

2 30 39V* 291b — Vb 

I 30% 30% 30V, + % 

81 3VX 3% 3%— % 

54 6 5% 5%— <* 

59 8 77b B — Vb 

4157 30% 30 30V*— Mi 

163 39% 38% 39% +1 
1929 33 32% 32% + % 

140 44 43’A 44 + % 

SO 50% 50V* 50V*— % 


Saws figures are unofficial. Yearly highs and lows reflect 
the previous 52 weeks Plus the current week. but not the tales! 
trading day. Where a sol if or stock dividend amounting to 25 
percent or mare nos been patd. me year's high-low nmoe ana 
dividend are shewn lor the new slack only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rates of dividends are annual disbursements based an 
the latest tMciaratriXL 
a — dividend also ectraUUI 
b — annuel rate of dividend plus stock dlvldenCL/1 
c — liquidating dividend.'! 
dd — caMed-'i 
d — new year, > low>l 

e — dividend declared or paid in preceding 13 monttisJI 

0 — dividend In Canadian lunds-subled la 15% non -residence 
tax. 

I— dividend declared after sow-uo or slack dividend. 

1 — dividend oaid this year, omitted, deferred, or no actio, 
taken at latest dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or p aid fftrs year, an accumulative 
issue with dividends in arrears. 

n — new issue in me oast 52 weeks. Tbe high-low range begins 
mim me start at trading, 
nd — next aery delivery. 

P/E — arlc+eamlngs ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, plus 
stack dividend. 

s — stack split. Dividend begins with date at split, 
sis— sales. 

l — dividend paid In stack in precedi n g 12 months. estimated 
cash value an ex-divkiend or ex -dish* button date, 
u— new yearly high, 
v— trading halted. 

vt— (n bankruptcy or receiver^, I d or being reonwnt a d un- 
der the Bankruptcy Act. or securities assumed by such com- 
panies. 

wd — wti*n distributed, 
wl — when Issued, 
ww— with warrant*, 
x — er-dlvtoend or ex-rtgtits. 
xdts — e* -distribution, 
xw— without warrants, 
y -ex-dividend and soles Ir, lull, 
vtd — yield, 
s— Sales In full. 


17 Month __ 
High Low Stock 


01*. Yld. PE 


sis, Cbm 

ins Waft Low fluaranne 


93 74% 

35 12% 

43 31’* 

X 75 
49V* 34 Vb 
45 34% 

49 47V4 

39% 17% 
23% 14V* 
9 6% 

13% B 
31% 22% 
BV* 2 
10% 4Vb 
35 25% 

18 7% 

14% 5% 

10% 3% 
33% 25% 
79 68% 

31 25% 

an 24% 
39% 27% 
17% 9V* 

27% 18% 
437* 29% 
60% 42V, 
5% 2% 

61 45 

7% 3% 

22V* 10% 
21 16% 


WhelLE SJ S « 
WhetPlf 

VWlPtfPf 400 17.4 
WhPllpf &« 172 
Whirfei 1® « J 
White 15 4J 9 
white PfAU» 6J 
WhlteW . .. 1* 
Whlttdk 60 25 8 

Mfebldf 5J 

Wlllrdn . 

William ,60 46 6 
WllmEI 

WllshrO .10 IJ 16 
WlnDlx 1J8 5-1 12 
wlnnbg -»e J 14 
Winner 14 

Wlnterj 

WlKEP 228 7J 7 
WbEPt 8.90 II J 
WlscPL £44 BJ 8 
WTscPS £56 82 7 
witco ij if » 
woivrw 24 £0 17 
woedPt 22 36 IS 
WOtarth UO 42 10 
Wotivpf 220 33 
WridAr 

Wrtotv 1 JOa £1 10 
Wurtfzr 

WvtoLb 22 £0 10 
JO £9 8 


110: 84Vi 
352 18% 
*7Dl 341* 
7401 29 
1459 47% 
440 31% 
1 47% 
95 25% 
206 23% 
9 8% 

295 13% 
391 29V* 

54 3Vb 
13 6% 

308 33W 
1508 17% 
46 7 

13 4% 

744 31% 
100Z 77V* 
415x 30 
4l JHb 
252 38% 
553 12V* 
258 21% 
796 42vi 
7 59% 
101 4\% 

5 57% 
4 3% 

lie is% 
67 21V* 


MVb 

14% 

33V* 

27 

47 

30% 

47% 

25 

23% 

BV. 

13% 

29% 

3 

6U> 

32% 

171* 

4% 

4% 

311* 

77V* 

29% 

31% 

38 

11% 

21 

41% 

59% 

4 

57% 


MVb+3K 
14% — 1% 
34% +1 - 
29 47 

4714—1 
30%— % 
47% 

25k, + (* 
23% 

BV, — V* 
13% + % 
29%-— ■* 

3 

6% — 
33% — 
17% + 
6%— 

4% 

31%- 

77%— 

29% 

31%— % 
38% 

17 + % 

21—1* 
42% + % 
59% —I 

4 

57% + % 
»— % 
15% + % 
21 + % 


<9% 33'- Xerox £00 J3 13 3691 

50V* 45% Xerox pf 563 10J 526 

34% 19 XTRA J4 26 10 220 


43% 42% 43% 

50% 50% 5»%+ % 
27 26% 24% 


29% 24 ZofeCP 1-32 4J * M 

24% 14% Zapata 34 53 13 993 

54% 28% Zayre AOb 3 14 160 

3*v, 18% ZenlthE ... 

2A lfl T»fw .40 1-5 lr 05 

vn n% Zurnln 1J2 44 11 74 


26% 26V* 26% + % 

16 15% 14 + % 

52% 51% 51%— 1% 
23% 22% 23% + V, 

26% 25% 26% + % 

29% 28% 29 



HEW HI QMS IB 


AMR Carp 
Alaska Alii 
AmExpreu 
Am Stares 
BkBastan 
Bectan Dick 
BosE BBOaf 
CalFedPf 
Cn La Elec pf 
QirtsCrfl 
CamMnlntl 
CwE 2 S7pf 
CruyRsch 
DaytPLpfG 
DefE 4 1MWK 
DukePptO 
E System 
Enserch 
FedMooul 
FlexIVan CD 
Gemini Cod 
G enS tonal 
Greyhound 

Holiday in A 

IllPwSPf 
Jewelcor 
Kauf Broad 
LeerSleoter 
LoewsCp wt 
Marin Mar p< 
MontDakU 
tfYS 1 TSafD 
PPG 
PepSovs 
PortGE pt 
Quick Roll 
Rocklnf afB 
RussBerr n 
5aurceCaapf 
Syntax 
TolEd 372pt 
Unton Elec 
UtdWbfers 
WalMart 
wHtsFarCo 
Xerax54Snf 


AccoWrld 5 
Alberta Chi 
A mGnCp 3 251 
AmerlcUn 
Bonkofvas 
BeliCdaa 
BosEl «6prf 
CenPEnta 
Cert-teed 
CtnG744pf 
CwE 11 70Pt 
Con Ed 6pfB 
CycloPsCp 
DeiuxCheck 
Dig Hoi En 
DuknPPtM 
Edwards 
Excel la 
Fst Boston 
RklhtS ttv 
Gen Banc 
Gansmr d( 
GHWS73PI 
HnwFdQD 
1ntlHorv57 
KN Energy 
KoutBdPfA 
LeeEnt 
MDCCorp 
Mcaonlds 
MaareCP 
Nwt PtP 2360 
PalneWcvpf 
PetrleSlr 
PatEI 450pf 
RCA 3 45Pf 
RafimHaai 
Softy Kins 
SauaroO 


AfftnOLfe 

Ail led Cos 

AmHerttLJ 

AndrsClav 

BnkTrNY 

Benef 550af 

BrbtMvers 

Celanese 

ChosMnti 105 

Collins Aik 

CwE 8 38pf 

CenEd46SPf 

Dallas 

DetE 7 68pf 

OukePPfG 

DuaLt 2pf 

EmersRads 

PMC 

FstintrstGcp 

FtDeartinS 

GenElec 

GotdWstFn 

Haroourt 

ICN PtxB-m . 

inters, Pw 

KCPL 3 SOPf 

KnlghtRld 

UncPtcc Fd 

Macmillan 


AtoPBZtof 
Am Cyan 
Am Hal Rees 
Arvtolnds 
Banker Trpf 
BorBWamer 

8 rock way 

CenfSoWest 
ChmNYpt . 
CoUtnFdss 
CwE 337of 
CorraanB 
DataGeal 
DetE 734D1 
DukePDfH 
EGG Inc 
Emtwrtpf 
FMCCp p, 
FstUnR Es 
f-uoun 
CaMotr E n 
G rtLofcei nt 
tierttagCam 
ICN Phrmpf 


Tucson EP 
UscirGc 
VaEP772pf 
WalMart PtA 
WnAJr 2 14pf 
ZaraCp 


MtaeRltv 
QhPw 227Df 
PennCenhi 
PMbroSal 
PSvCol 7 I5 p 

Reyn Wind 

Rohr Ind 

SvcbCds 

SlanlevWks 

Telex Com 

TyooLabs 

US Leasing 

WICOR 

Walgreen 

WllfredAEn 


KCPL 220P# 

Kvsorlnd 

LoewsCp s 

MartMar 

Meredllti 

NBDBoncp 

Omarklnd 

Pvaazl afB 

PhEI 14 15pf 

PSEGXOBPt 

Rscbwai 

Rubbermaid 

SlnanrCop# 

StatMuf 5*c 

ThrmvCo 

UALInc240o 
UnTch255Pl 
Wachovia s 
Walter Jbns 
Wyimslat 


NEW LOWS 1 



NEW HIGHS 53 


ATTFdn 
Baker Ml chi 
Ctornslor 
ESDn 

Hotel Prop wt 
I Of Com 
Maslnd San 
MlnPLBfC 
PUg4S0pf 
SCEI6(tot 
Start Exfrdr 
LtsairGp 87wt 
WashHomes 
WhtnHlttin 


BakkmBI n 


AffllPuM 

CanttaAMs 

ColnFds wts 

FrtochsRsts 

HqwnanEnt 

Instron 

MayftwrGP 

Mile Can, 

PravMEngv 

SCE2J0P# 

SupSurMf 

Valley Res 

W osh Post 


AmExnr wt 
atvGosFla 
Del Lobs 
GormRup 
HuballB 
Let, Press 
Met Pro 
MtoeRty wt 
Sole *65pf 
SCE 221pf 
Tech Sum 
VtrcoMf 
WatscoB 


Badger Mir 
Claremont 
Damtarg 
HeoltbCarea 

Hubbeuem 

Lundy Elec 

MefexCn 

Nucleorota 

SchethEtxl 

SCEBTgp# 

UniaorppfB 

watbK 

Wedtechn 


NEW LOWS 


IridiflS 

AMEX 

Closing 


VoLat 4 PAL— 
Prev. 4 PM. vd. 


.1BJMJM 

.lOLmUMO 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on wall Street 


12 Month 
HtoflLow Stock 


Wv. Yld. PE 


Ms. 

IPOs High Law 


Clasa 
QuotOrtw 


A | 

30ft 

19% 

766 

3% ADIn 21 

92 

5*1 

5ft 

SV, 


3ft 

1% ADI wt 

68 


Oft 

2ft— % 


3 

ft AfCPb 

10 


1% 

1ft 


15ft 

8% ALLabn JO lj 11 

17 


lift 

12 — Vb 


,6ft 

12 AMCn .12 3 13 

51 


16% 

1666— W 


4ft 

2ft AM inti 

441 


3ft 

3ft 


74% 

58 ATTFdn JJ2e 7J 

157 


74 

74% + ft 


6ft 

2% AcmePr 33 

44 


5% 

Wl— % 


IMA 

BW Acmeu 32 £3 11 

28 


Vft 

9ft — % 


17 

9% ActfcHT m 

336 

■ TV . ■ 

15ft 

14 


9W 

3ft Acton 

56 


4% 

4ft 


3ft 

1% AdmRa 3 

36 


2% 

2% 


27ft 

15ft AdRird .14 J 20 

48 


25% 

26ft 

lift 

24% 

15 Adobe JB U 12 

tJ 

^ pH 

T7ft 

17ft + W 


Sft 


ferj 

pf 

61* 

6%— Mr 



■ 1 ir ■11 

■ 1 


35% 

35% 


51 Mi 

38% AflIPub JO U 16 

20 

LfiyJ 

50ft 

SIft+ 16 

22 


J05 


141* 5% At root 
5% 28* Aiomco 
75% *5% Aim Hen 

14 6% AJboW 

81 57% AlgC wt 

9% 5% Aloha 
198b 9% A amain 
1% % A Hex 

36% 28% Alcoa pf £75 11J 
25% IT AteoCp 
194b 9V* AmdaM 
16% 4% Amedeo 
7% 4% AniBin 
9% 4 Am can 
29% 13V. A Exp wt 
7% 5% A F rue A 
7% 5% AFrucB 
12% 71* AHHtlM 

19% IMbAMzeA 
18% 12% AMzeB 
3 % AM Bid 

10 3 AmOll 

44% 53% A Pott 
8% % AjnPtn v 

17% 10% APrecs 
4% 2 ASclE 

15% 11% AmRoyal 
2% 1% Ampal 

5% 3% Andal 
Wa 3 AndJcb 

15 9 Andrea 
14% 6Vb Andes n 

3 % vlAns) v 

91* 3% AraoPt 

7% 5% Artevn 
12% 6% " 

1Z% 9V. 

9% 


43 9% 8% 8% 

7 11 3% 3% 3%+% 

105 72% 71 72% + % 

9 13 8% 8% 8%— % 

£ 73% 73V* 73% + % 
1 5 6% 4% 6%— % 

IS 66 11% 11% 11%— % 

ioi ii* m ivfc + % 

JOSfa 33% 33 33% 

60 334 24M 23% 23% 

JO 1 J 20 3327 16 15% 14 + % 

MB 3 47 10% » 10% + % 

.15 £1 5 m 71* 7 7% + 1* 

6 6 6 4 — % 

484 30% 28V* 29% +1% 
223002 7% 7% 7% 

711001 7% 7% 7%— % 

8 336 18 9% 9% — 1* 

J2 £2 8 40 17% 16% 16% — % 


21 

120 £3 13 


16 

327 

16 

7 

5 


16 14% 
75 4 


36 3J) 


32 53 


24 

11% 6% 
11% 8V* 
3% 2% 

17% 14% 

2% 1* 


JO £0 


ArrawA 
Arundl 
A*mr g .15 £0 
Aatrex 
Asfrotc 

Asfratpf UO 10 l7 

AMsCM 

Atlas wt 

Audatr jam 1.1 
AutaSw lJOa £1 
AvnxSi J0 S3 


* * W+ JT 

4N 4 4% + V* 

4016 40% WM 
% % % 

16% 76% — 1* 
3% 4 + % 

290 14% 13% 13% — V* 
2 1% 2 + V* 

5V. 5 5%+ V* 

3% 3% 3% 

12 % 12 % 12 % + % 
7% 7% 7% 

1% 1% 1% 

2% 3% 3% 

6V* 5% 6%+ % 

6% 


142 

18 

34 

9 

14 

26 

154 

22 

2 

98 

27 

96 

27 

431 

2 

91 

20 


10% 

19% 

7% 

10% 

2% 

16% 

1% 

3% 


10V* 101*— % 
19% 19% 

7% 7%— 1* 
low rot* + vi 
2% »+ Vb 
16% 16% + V* 
1 1 — % 
3% 3%+ % 
4% 4% 

47% 47% + Hi 
15 15 — U 


4% 

35 

M* 

5% 

31* 

11% 

11% 

9% 

6% 


* 

6% 

T 

22% 


12% 

4% 

24 

17% 

14% 

3% 

in* 

17 

22 

20% 

4% 

19 

11% 

331* 

14% 

33 

33% 

4 

4% 

34% 


2% BAT 
21% BDM 
W* BRT 

3% BSN 
W BTK 
7% Badger Mo 33 16 
7% Baker 
7% BaldwS 
2% BalyMwt 
21 Eton Fd 2JMe £4 


-12e £0 
.15 A 22 
8 
24 


J20 34 


414 4Xt 
155 

16 2% 
as 4% 
2 4k 
179 11% 
23 114k 


4 4*+fc 

34% 34% + % 
2% 2% + W 


JUS 

3% Borco 39 

7% Bomwl JO 15 
4 BaryRG 

10% Boroch J4t £2 14 


32 IJ 17 
49,123 
32 73 8 
JO £4 27 
.15 £4 
U» 4J 11 


JS 23 7 
JO £5 7 
J» 3 25 
JO 

14 

J4 2J 15 


14* BeofOi 
12% Beta Bln 

?r§sss? 

3% Borneo 
M BfcCo 
9% BtgV 
4% BIHrlta 
19% BkikMf 
14 BtoR B 
14% BtoR A 
46 BlocfcE 
9% Blount A 
1046 BlountB 
17% BotaiP 
11% BawVal 
2% Bawmr 
12 Bawne 
5% BradNI 
2144 arseng 
11% Brauns 
22% 8mF» 
22% BmFB 
24k Buehhn 
3% QucMipt 

18% Buell 


49 

13 

2 

299 

2 

SI 

5 

6 

12 

5 

*4 

167 

30 

42 

25 


9 
2% 
244* 
5% 
7% 
3% 
8% 
4% 
10% 
6 

2% 
8 124b 
41* 


4 

27% 

11% 

6% 

224* 

15% 

15% 

1W 

16% 

16 

28% 


1J0 


7 

SM 10 
23 10 


49 13% 
192 4 

140 15% 
84 8 

96 26 
45 U 


JO IU 
JO U 


2% 

4% 


13 294* 


% 

11 
10% 
8% 
2% 

24% 

5% 

7% 

346 

8% 

4% 

10% 

6 

2% 

12 
4V* 
384* 


11% 

4% 

22% 

14% 

15% 

IV* 

1446 

16 

27% 

12% 

3% 

15% 

74* 

254* 

12% 

314* 

32% 

2% 

4% 

29% 


46— K. 
12 +4* 

114b + % 
9 + % 

246 

SUV, + W 
5% 

7% 

34* + % 
8% 

4% 

10% 

6 — % 
2%— % 
12 — % 
4 k, — V* 
WW— % 
39 — M 
29% 

4 + % 

26%— 1% 

1146+ % 

4%— % 
224* — ■ % 
15%+ % 
15% + % 
IM 

14%— W 
14 — % 
28% +1% 
12%- % 

15%+ M 
7%— % 
»b+ % 
T24* — . % 
314b— % 
33% — U 
24a— % 
4% — % 
294* — % 


17% 11% CDI S 
14 9 CHB 

94* 4% CM, CD 
21% 13% CRS 
19% 9% CcncNJ 


9 

job IJ 13 


J4 


£2 15 
14 


17 17 17 + % 

14 134* 14 + % 

9% 8% 9 — % 

1546 15% 15% + % 

13% 12% 13 - % 


12 Manta 
Utah Low Stock 


Dig. VldPE 


SB. 

MOs Utah Lew 


Cfase 

QuoLOfee 


13% 10 Cal RE 


25 18% 

94* 7% 
Ml* 9% 
4% 2 

22% 13% 
24% 18% 
646 4% 
5% 2% 
11% 7% 
11 6% 
11% 5% 
43% 36 

1 3% 
17% 14% 
33% 254* 

84* 4% 
1% % 

2 1% 

27% 20% 
14% 11 
104* 6% 

5 2% 

17% 12% 

35% 19% 

35% 19% 
m* 14% 
15 9% 


Catmtn 

Catonop 

Cameo 

GompM 

CMorcg 

CdnOcc 

CoraiM 

Confll 

CareB 

CareA 

CaraEn 


1J4 10J 13 
JS 25 27 
JOt 9.1 3 
32 IS 11 

30 

JO 


18 1146 
57 24% 
17 84* 

90 13 
13 2% 


15 

.10e .9 15 

19 

CdTOP pf £00 11.9 
Cosfaton JMU9 4 
CostlAs JO 4J 9 
CasFd 2J0a 73 
Castlnd 

Cantata 

Cent! of 

CenMpf £50 142 
Cents* lJDellJ 
Cetec JO 24 to 
CtunpH 19 

Chmop 32 69 12 
ChrtMA J0 J 19 
ChrtMB JO J 10 
CMRy 1J0 6J 10 
CMDvg 

20 
7 

1Mb 42 7 
CtyGflB UO 52 12 
aarmi 145* £6 

J8e £0 8 
JOa 20 11 
.16 J 11 


17S 154* 
1 
a 
5 
M 


18% 
5% 
2% 
. 11 
a ii 


14 9% 

20 1 42 
10 4% 

279 184* 
2 30% 
1 5% 
114 1% 

5 1% 

450x 25 
28 14% 


496 

4 


8% 

4 

1446 


Chlltas 

Citadel 

> CltPst 


11% 
12% 6% 
9% 5% 

19% 12 
1144 54* 

7% 1% 

1 

94* 4% 

12% 5% 

34% »% 
MU 84* 
4 4* 

3% 3% 
% % 
9% 5% 
2% 1% 
3% % 

30% 23% 

si in* 

22% 9% 
9% 44* 

15% 8% 
4% 1 

17 2% 

2546 13% 
38 21% 


20 £4 9 


Cforfcc 

Claroat 

Ciopay 
Cognltr 
Cohu 
Col F wts 

Cam ul n 4 

Cam ins 

ComApf 1J2 102 
ComdrC 

Compo 109 

campD vo 

CmnCn u 

CmpFd 28 

Cndtm JOe £2 18 
CanodF 5 

Comfy 7 

CanrHm 7 

Cornu 38 

Cana wt 

ConsQG 4 

CanOGwt 
vicontA 
vICntApf 

CanfMH 8 

Cook In, JOa £5383 
CaraOm 
CosCrn 
CosCrwt 

CntCrd Mr 13 2D 
C ourtld JMe U 
CrwmJ 

Cram 123 42 14 
CrawVM IS U 7 
CroCP 

Crawnc 7 

Crown I 28 lj 8 
CrotcR I 

Crvsto 

Cubic 29 22 10 
Curtice JO 12 9 
CustEn 


372 34% 
4 34% 
20 18% 
2 10 
IM 1946 

586 19% 

41 23% 
51 23 
13 40% 
* 9% 

25 36W 

2 19% 

3 5% 
11 8% 

170 5% 

101 13% 
1 10% 

6 


837 

535 

12 

328 

129 

5 

U 


1S % 

74* 

9 

12% 

7% 

15% 


7% 
IM 19% 


11 % 11 %— % 
23% 24% 

8% 84* + % 
12% 12% 

2% 2M— % 
15% 15% + 46 
18% 18% + % 
5% 5%— % 

2% 2%+ % 
10% 1046— W 
10% 1044— % 
9% 9%+ % 
42 43 — % 

446 4%+ % 

17% 17% + % 
30% 30% + % 
5% 5% — % 
1% l%+% 

14* 1% + % 
244k 24 Vb — % 
M% 14% + % 
8% 8%+% 
3% 4 
U% 14% 

344b 344* 

34% 34% — % 
18% 184* 
to 10 
19% 19% + % 
18% 19% +% 
23 33 

22% 23 + % 
40% 40% + % 
9% 9%+ % 
34% 3546+1% 
19% 19% 

5M 5% 

8% 8% — % 
4% S% + % 
13% 13% + % 
10% 10% — % 
1546 154* 

% %— % 
7% 74b + % 
0% 9 — W 
12% IJ%— M 
7% 7% 

15% 15% 

9 9Vb + % 
7% 7% 

17% 17% — T% 
6% 6% 

2% 2% 


6% 

2% 

8% 

% % % 

946 9% 9% 

1146 T14* 

27% 22% + % 

^ TL 

41 ™- 

24 
M 
22 


97 11% 
61 22% 


% 




% w+% 

3% 3%— % 
% %+ % 

1% + “ 


22 


ft 

ft— % 



69X 27% 

Mft 

27 +16 

toft 

4W HAL 

3 



29% + M 

17% 

12 HMG 

M 



II + % 

13% 

9% HUBCn 










MW— ft 

34ft 

24ft Wanted 

65 


lft 

1ft 

2ft 

1W Harvey 

321 

3% 

3% 

3% 

62% 

23% Hasbro 

340 


17ft 

18 — % 

26% 

9% Hashed 




25% — ft 

30% 

22% Hasbrpf 

139 

1% 

1% 

IU 

46ft 

21 

25% Hasting 
14% Htmcrn 


3% 

26 

9% 

10% 

JH 

m 

zn* 

291* 

IM 

04* 

32% 

14% 

1146 

7% 

11% 

16 

10% 

10 

1146 

9% 

2% 

474* 

7% 

*% 

% 

27% 

11% 

4% 

43% 

% 

38% 


1% DWG 
15% DateEn 
5% DamnC 
3% Damson 3 

Hi Dam wtO 
18% Dams of £50 11 J 
2DV. Domspf 3JS 1*J 
13% DataPa -M S to 
346 Datarm 
3% DeRosa 

20% Damn, 

11% DeiVW 
2% Dahned 
4 Dsontrn 
7% Dasani 

94* DevkCp 
S4* Dlag A 
5V6 Dtao B 
0 DtaBtta 
2 Dlgkan 
% DHlicwt 
21% Dlllnl* 

3% Diodes 
6 DOTAtfn 
5% Dbdcs 
iv* DemeP 
2zw Damtra uo 
6% Downey 4 

1% Driller 

25% Ducam 30 IS X 
Vb Dunlap 

22% Duplex 34 30 11 
13 DurTd JOa 2J 15 
yv* Dvnlct £5e £1 13 
17% Dyneer JO £9 10 


J0MB9 10 
JX2 1J ■ 


13 

J2 IJ 10 
Ufl IU 8 

J3t 4J II 
322 115 M 
9 
16 
U 

30 23 » 


JO J M 
9 
6 

.17*22 10 


50 

8 

23 

102 

II 

3 


2% 

25% 

A 

4% 

U 

21% 

22% 


8% 

32% 

14% 

2% 

5 

7% 

154b 

7% 

7 

104h 

2% 

% 


6 

260 
12 
2 
51 
» 

20 
31 
78 
31 

51 45% 
17 5% 

299 7% 

23x 74* 
4 SB 14* 
1 28 
89 11% 
2 146 

W7 31% 
1016 K 
8 38% 
8 15% 
234 12V* 
2 204* 


24* 246 
25% 25%— % 
5% 6 + W 

* 

21% 2146— % 
22 % 22 % 

17% 1746 
5% 546 + Vb 
74* 8% + 46 
32% 32%+ % 
U 14%+ % 
2% 246+ % 
5 5 + % 

7% 7%— % 
15 15% + % 

71* TV*— U 
7 7 — f* 

vow isw 
2% 2% + % 
% % 

45% 45% — % 
5 5% 

7% 7% + % 

28 28 + % 
11 

1% 1%— Ml 
31% 81j|6— M 

28% 28% — % 
15% 15% — % 
114* 12% + % 
2046 mt 


It Month 
High Law Stock 


Dtv. Yld. PE 


5% 

lOBsWobLnw 


Owe 

QuoLOibe 


9% 

W% 

344* 

8% 

105 

21% 

32% 

2% 

8% 

32% 

9Y, 

64* 

14% 

18% 

144* 

8 

174* 


6% Faodrm 
7% FaateM 
33% Foote pf 
4% FlhlllG 
63% FordCn g 7 JBe 
15 FarstC A .15 J130 


11% FaresIL 
46 Fataml 
4V* FrdHIV 
14 FfmEI 
746 Frledm 
3 FrlesEn 
9% Frtana 
13 Frtacbs 
8% FratHd 
4% FrtAwt 
1046 Furvttn 


35 


22 

J8b 3J 12 


£1 9 
L2 16 


.m £6 


14 9% 9 9 — % 

1 8% 8% f%— % 

5 314* 3146 3146 + 46 
31 84* 84b 846 + V, 

210x103% 182% W3%— 1% 

3 204* 204* 2046 + % 
84 18% 184b 184* + % 

214 1% 1 I — % 

8 5% 5 5% + % 

95 24% 23 3446+2% 

4 846 8% 8% 

1» 646 64* 64b 

51 16 16 16 — % 

21 19 18% 19 + % 

525 1146 10% 1846— 46 
37 5W 44* 446— % 
23 174* 17% 17% — 46 


1T% 

16% 

846 


10% 

1246 

6% 

2% 

4% 

12 

6 

114* 

35% 

8% 

9% 

12% 

12% 

9% 

44* 


6% EAC M 53 U 

11% EECO 32 £1 26 

2M EaglCI 10 

31% Estep 6J6022JQ 3 
6% Echos g .12 
14* CTAIidD 

15% EtcAm 1J0 73 5 
5% E Minor 22 

UM EmMdn 
2% EmCar 4 

% EnaMar 
% EnrSrv 

12 ESOn JOe IJ 

3% Emir pf jneiAS 

5% Era Ins 10 

19% Esper JO U 7 

1% Esprit 

22% EfzLOv IV 

3% EtfOlR* 16 

74* EvrJ B .to IJ 

7 EvrJ A 30 2J 

7 Exccin JOB 4J 5 

2% EpMSv 48 


65 7% 
38 15% 
224 3 

9 3T46 
IIS 8% 
50 2% 

12 30% 
175 7% 

46 196 

2 4 

3 % 
2 % 

218 14% 

H 8% 

15 104* 
134 22% 
27 1% 

8 m> 

45 646 
3 7W 

31 9 

46 7% 

9 346 


78* 

15% 

2*b 

314* 

8% 

2te 

20% 

74* 

12 

4 

% 

% 

13% 

SVV 

10% 

21 

14* 

33% 

64* 

946 

9 

74* 

3% 


746— % 
15% 

3 +4* 
31% + % 

BW 

2%— % 
30% 

746 

1246+ Mi 

4 — % 
% 

% 

14% +1% 
3%+ % 
10% 

23% +1% 
146— Ml 
32% + 46 
646 

9%- % 
9 

7%+ % 

346— % 


12% 8% 
2046 14% 
11% 9% 
13% 11 
174* 12% 
19% 846 
28% 22% 
12% 8% 
38% 23% 
31% 3346 


FPA 19 

Pablnd 40 24 7 
FtConn 148a 9.1 8 
FWymB JO IJ 9 

FtechP 16 

PtteGE 1J0 11J 4 
FHGEpf 400 IU 
Flan Bn 

FtaRck JO lj 9 

FHito* 1471 63 12 


10% 

Wk 

11 


727 11% 
20 15% 
42 114* 
13 27% 
12 946 
1 37% 
25 29% 


M% 10%— W 
1646 1446+ % 
II II 
111* >14* + » 
15% 15% , 

11% 1146+ % 
2446 2446— % 
n* 946— % 
3446 37% + 46 
29% 39%+ % 


13 3V* GNC En 

II 3% GlExpf 
9% 4% GRI 
5% 2% GTI 
20% 941 GainsC 

3% 1% GalxvO 
33 244* Goran 

18% 10 GatUI 
1046 7 Gavlrd 
1546 9% GelmS 
5% 246 Gentco 
194* 12% GDefns 
5% 7% OnEmp 
T716 11% GriMfcr 

10 2% Gan, sea 

16% 11% GenvDr 
12% 7% Ova Res 

11 8% GeoRSPf 1X0 1DJ 

Sa 79% GtonfFd ' 

21% 8% GntYlg 
27% 1646 Glatfl s 
314* 22% Glnmr 
4% 7% GlbNRn 

17% 10% Glaser 
11% tPU GafdW 

M6 % GtiFkt 
24% 18% Gakknpf 2J0 104 
2746 23 GarRup 1.12 40 
30V. 26 GuldTpf 125 11J 
14% 846 GrahCp 32 £5 
26% 15% GmdAu JO £0 
11 8V* Grant 

246 I Grant Wt 
17% 946 GrTectl 

32 2446 GtAmf 

38% 94 GrtLkC 
1846 6 Grams 
94* 44b Dakar 

77% 27% Gross ! 

13 8% GrdCh 

16 10% GffCdg 

39% 19% OHStr 


JO ... 

JOa 4J 
931 93 
M 26 


9% 5% HRtiGh 

19% 1 14b Hlttl Ex 
13% 10% HelthM 
9% 6% HetnWr 
134b 7% Halnlck 
18 216 fleteer 

ru «H* LLOfLui 
-3TW Jk^m i IBIIJLI 

714* 3% ftoitont 
2% 4b HeimR 
B% 4V6 I terWiO 

5 2% Hlndrl 

M 9% matron 
746 2% Hcfmon 
13% 6% HollyCp 
32% 25% Horml 
22’V Rb HrnHor 
104b 2% HmHwt 
15% 11% HotIPty 
TA 14b HotlP wt 
9% 44b HauOT 

17% B HovnE 
13 6% Howtin JOe U 

38% 28% HubelB 1JA 34 
51% 38 HubblPf 2X6 4J 
21% 16% HudGn JO £0 
10 7% Husky g 



824b 

9 

5% 

11% 

6% 

2% 

34b 

34% 

10% 

21% 

3% 

3% 

9% 

9% 

M 

546 

2% 

19% 

17% 

11% 


24% ICH 

4% ICO 
2% I PM 
64b (RTCpn 

a ISS 
ImpGe 

1% Imp Ind 

254* ImpOHo 
6% Inflghl 
16% Instron 
1% Instay 
2% insSypf 
64b IntCtyg 
5 Intacta 
11 Infmk 

2% intaknt 
1 (ntBftwr 
ia% intern 
8% intHvd 

8% IIP 
3% intPwr 
1% mtProt 
1% IntDta 
16% Ionia 

m* IroaBrd 
3 isatv n 


B Month 
High Low Stack 


Phr. Yld. PE 


SO. 

100s High Low 


Close 

Ouctarge 


15 

5% 

<% 

5% 


5 Korea 
2% KkkJo wt 
3% KHarn 

34b Klnark 

3Mb 18% KlneR 
7% 3 Kirby 
3% KHMfg 
2% KleerVs 
8% Knooo 
8% Knelt 


JO 


36 

30 
10 
J 23 


S% 

34* 


TO 

X2r J 

16 

_ . - IS 

26% 21 KogarC £20 8J153 


i3 


5% 5% 
3% 3V* 
4% 4% 
4% 4% 
3BW 38% 
4 3% 

54b 5% 
... 3*6 3% 
69 13% 134* 
9 13% 13% 
151 26% 25% 


4 

379 

18 

156 


5%— % 
3V.— % 
4%+ 'J 
4% 

38% 

6 +4* 

5% 

3% 

13% — V* 
U%- % 
26 — % 


a i% 
4% 2% 
74b 2% 
<1% 23% 
14% 11% 
17% 11 

774* 9% 

12% 8% 
346 2% 
47% 25% 
7% J% 
94b 5 
5 2% 

4% 1% 

« 

71 31% 

19% 846 
11% 6% 
16% 10% 
M% 9% 
29 129b 

104* 846 


L8B 
La Barg 
LaPnf 
i — a 
LndBnn 
Ldmk 5 


Lournn 

LeePh 

LahWi 

LatsurT 

Levtttn 

UtfM 


36 £1 

7 

.15* 

J4 £8 10 
.16* S 11 
40 

14 

16 

24 

7 


52 1% 


14* 14* 

2% 2% — V. 
27 5% 54* 5%— V. 

15 27 26% 27 + W 

3 144b 14% 144* + W 

16 16% 16% 16% + 4* 

47 12 11% lift- % 

10 12% 12% 12% — % 

5 3% 3% 3%— % 

7 47% 47% 47%+ % 

26 5% 5% 546 

46 7% TV. 7%— % 

2% 2% 2% 


41 


Log Icon 

Lori mr 

LoutsCe 

Lutnex 

LundvE 

Lurta 

Lvdols 

LynCSv 

LvnchC 


* 29b 34b 2% + % 


JO 

3 

18 

1458 

29W 23% 

28ft- 

W 



17 

37V 

37U 

31% 

32% • 

% 

1X0 

IJ 

20 

2 

71 

71 

71 


XB 

J 

16 

74 

13V 

12ft 

13ft- 

% 



19 

2M 

124 

lift 

12ft +1% 

Jll 

12 

10 

1W 

12* 

12ft 

12ft- 

% 



4 

60 

I4U 

14 

14 — % 

.10 


19 

13S> 

28 

27% 

27% ■ 

% 

JO 

£1 

M 

155 

10 

•ft 

Oft— ft 


M 


1146 MCO Hd 

1% MCO R* 

74b MSAn 
1 MSA wt 
9% MSIDt 
3 M5R 
0% MocScn 
% Mocrod 
12 MIPS 
9% Merton g 
1446 Mnod 

4% MrthOf 

3% MorkPd 
aiv. Mormef £35 iox 
18% Mishin 8 

6% McrtPr 13 

8% Mosbxt JOa 1 J 8 



5 Mafec 


.12 J 


124b MOtRfltl 
8% MatScn 
IS Matrix* 

1ZV* May Eng £00 134 
13% Mayffw JRt £6 
8 McCOn 2X0*SU 
4% MCDOW £3 

52 Madid L16 17 
12% Media JO IJ 
20% MEMC9 1.16 4.7 
5% MercSL J71 45 
7% MefPro .15 \3 
11% Malax U9 

14% MetroC 
4% MctlGn 
8% MldAm 
13% Mhflnd 
53% MkiPpI 
65% MtaPof 
7% Mtasnw 


35 21 

to 402 


J4 CO 
JO U 
7J4 IU 
BJO 11J 


13 13 13 

2% 2% 2% + % 
8% B% B%+ % 
1% 1% 14b 

10% 104* low 

m s 3 

13 12% 13 + % 

1% 1% 1% 

13% 13% 13% 

9% 9% V% 

22 % 22 % 22 % — % 
54b 5% 59b + V* 

5% 5 5 

21% 21% 21% 

26% 26% 24%+ % 
15 MU 15 +% 
13% 13% 13% + % 
7% 7% 716+ % 

18% 18% 18% + % 
13% 13% 13% — % 
25% 24% 25% 

15% M% 14% 

30% 30% 30%+ % 
94b 9% 9% 

546 5% 5% 

69% 68% 60%— % 
16% 164b 164b— 46 
28% 27% 28% + % 
7% 74b 7%+ % 
12% 11% 11%— % 
1516 15V6 15ft + % 
23% Z1W 23%+ % 
360 7% 7% 7%+ ft 

20 II 11 11 

3 21 21 21 

253, *5 45 65 +1 

moz 764* 75 764* +14* 

6x “ 


2S% 

14% MK ME 

34 1A li 


15ft 

15% 

15% — ft 

«4 

33 MlteCp 



44% 

44% 


10% 

8% MonMs 

Ji 11 1 

19 

10% 

10ft 

lXI’I 

38% 

31% ManPpt 

4J0 1£5 

200S 35% 

35% 

35%— % 



30b 13 IS 

If 

15% 

U 

Uft+ ft 

IT-*! 


J8b IX 17 

349 

13% 

Mft 

15 — % 

3ft 


2517 

3% 

3ft 









n% 


13 

17 

4% 

4% 


8% 

4% MavleL 


20 

5% 


516 

5% 

3 Mumin 


27 

3% 

3% 

3ft + % 

15 

3ft MusaAr 


47 

5% 

5% 

5ft + % 

3ft 

S ftfejss wt 


2 

ft 

ft 

ft 

11 

7% Mverln 

JB £5 10 

1 

11 

11 

11 + W 


13% W* PGBafP 
17 13% PGEofO 

16V. n** PGEPfM 
18% 145* PGEDfL 
rr~, 134* PGEPfK 
18** 15 PGEPfJ 
9 1 * 74* PGEPtl 
20% 14% PGTrn 
37% 31% PoCLIPf 
43% 34 PacUpf 

^rSSlS! 

>04* JV* PWTlDSt 
234* 15ft ParkCs 
17% lav. PatTch 
Pa 2V. Pay Fan 
8ft S~5 PUMG 
11% 8% PeerTu 
24% 15% PenTr 
24b U* PE Co 
34V. 26 PenRE 
114* 8% PonobS 
MJb 1016 Pencil 
1ft ft Pentrnv 
33’4 3 PerfntC 
144* 10ft Perrin L n 
11% 94* Pencil pt 
10ft 3,. PetLw 
2ft W PetLwt 
14% 7% Pet Loot 

23% 124. PetLepf 

24b 1% PhlILD 

3% PlcoPd 
2% Pier l wt 
5 PtonrSy 
4ft PflWVa 
PltDM 
Plffwny 


11% 

* 

11 
7% 
17% II 
70% 57 


13% 6% Pina in 
20% 13% PterDe 
14% 7% pry Gin s 
216 PlrRA 

2’A PlyRB 
4ft PopeEv 
74* Pensva 
PostiPr 

PowerT 


3% 

3% 

a 

13% . 
17V. 12 
27% 1] 


7ft 4ft PralrOs 
24% >5% Pram. 
9% 6% Pratt Rd 
1% % PremRa 

9 4% PresR B 

6 34* Presto 

20% 15ft ProCTs 
25% 1BW ProvEn 
18% 14% PgtpfC 
33 25ft Pot pfE 
19% 15ft Potato 

10 4ft PuntoG 




5 RAI 
346 RM5EI 
3% RTC 
13ft Ragan 
12% Ronsfig 
10% Raven 
1ft Red law 
10% ReealB 
279* ResrtA 
30% Resrt B 
5ft RestAac 
J16 RexNor 
946 RlbtotP 
5% RchTpfv 
ft RtoGDr 
lift Rdnrvs 
20% Rogers 
2 RoonPn 
3ft RovPIm 
20 RudM 
3ft R8W 
1116 RumHI 
10% Ryfceft 


xa 47 13 

.12 J 23 
31 3J 
X 11 I 

56 £9 10 

19 

20 
■ 

JO IJ M 


£2 20 
A M 


J6o£2 13 

JO £1 to 
JO £5 12 


34 7ft 

5 4 

4 4 

8 16 

33 18ft 
12 13% 
72 2ft 
24 1446 
SM 42ft 

TUb -44 
65 6 

8 4ft 
115 lift 
21 746 

7 1ft 
123 24% 
48 28% 
307 4ft 
23 41b 

6 75ft 

47 6% 

256 14ft 
70 20% 


7% 7ft + % 
3% 4 
4 4 

H 14 
lift Oft— ft 
13ft 13% + V. 
2ft 2ft— ft 
14% MV. 

40ft 42+46 
43ft 44 + ft 

5ft 6 

3% 3%— 46 
11% 114b— % 
7% 746 
1% l% + % 
22ft 23ft— ft 
28 28 
4 44b + ft 

4Vi 4ft 
25 25 —ft 

Aft 4% + % 
14% 14% 

19% 20% 


3% SPWCp 
7 Sage 
7% Salem 
6V4 SDgoef 
6716 SDoapf 
49 'SDgoef 
17W SOooof 
31% SOgopf 

taw SDoapf 
32ft SanJW 
23% Sanaete 
3% Sanmrk 
4% Sound B 
4ft Sound A 
,3ft Scaatrn 
14 Schefe 
144 SchoelP 
10ft Schwa* 
3ft SchUat 
SdLsa 
30 

10% 
ft SetSDH 
3% Seku 
2ft Semfch 
114* SrvtsCD 
7ft Servo 
5n Sor*etr 
7% Setans 
8% ShoerS 
116 Sharon 
9% Shopwt 
10% Staran 
5ft SHca 


12 

JOr £5 
JB 1)J 
934 12J 
7 JO 124 
£47 11J 
4Jd 1£7 
TAB 123 
2A5 5J 7 
JB £1 10 
Mt BJ 13 
.IS £5 6 
JO 12 7 

J6 £5 T2 

JB 40 f 
.10 IJ 

14 

36 IJ 10 
.14. 1.1 1 



■■■■ 

MJTM 



■ || 

10% 

5% Jacobs 


1* ift 

6ft 

6% 

6% 

2% Jet Am 

1 

72 3% 

3% 

3% 

3% 

0% 

ft JetAwt 

AH 63 14 

1 9h 
BO 

% 

7ft 

ft+ % 

7% 

2% John Pd 

12S 4% 



11% 

7% JahnAm 

JO 2J9 16 


9ft 

10%+ ft 

7% 

4% jmnjkn 

6 

16 Sft 

5% 

Sft 

29ft 2ift J getter 

5 

3 39% 

29 

29% + ft 

Id 


K 



1 


Uft OHolnd 
134* Otstan 
3% ooklap 
346 OeanCin 
5V. OriotH A 
SftOrMHB JO 
1 Orraand 
316 Omn 
2140 OSuUvn JOb 1 J M 
4ft OverSc 

4% OxfrdP A2t 54 to 
7ft OanrkH JO IJ B 


5ft 116 KapokC 
M% to KavCp 
left 9% Keamn 
7% 3 Kantm 
21 10% Ketdm 

8% 5ft KerCo 
19 8 KJYPh 


JO U 17 

- “i? 
J8t 1? 27 
JO 15 

3 U 17 


21 

143 

2 

359 

2 

9 

579 


,«6 216 216— 16 
lift 1116 1146—% 
14% MW 14% + Ml 
416 4% 4% 

13 15 IS - % 

B 746 8 
toft 184b 10ft— 16 


K 

ft 

& 

26ft 

21ft 

ig% 

2M6 


10ft PGEpfA 

8% PGEpjC 

■ft PGEpfO 
8% PGEpfE 
8 PGEpfO 
28% PGEpfF 
2646 POEpfZ 
21% PGEnfY 
17% PGEpny 

159* PGEpfV 

17 PGGpfT 
17ft POEpIS 

7ft PGEpfH 

15% PGBpfR 


1J0 IU 
125 IU 
US 1IJ 
1J5 11 J 
IJO 1£3 
43* 13.1 
VL7 
330 123 

52 w- 5 

£32 12J 
SM i2j 
242 1£6 
U2 IU 
ISff lil 


5 1246 
to toft 
30 10% 
to 10% 
47 10ft 
66 33U 
49 91ft 
22 31% 
17 am* 

9 lift 
25 20ft 
13 21 
SB 9ft 

in wft 


12ft raft + ft 

9% toft 
10% 10% 

10 % lew- w 

946 9ft— ft 
33ft 33ft- 46 
3146 91ft + ft 
26 26% 

2D 9 * 20%— ft 
THb m — V* 

am* -20ft— ft 

20ft 20ft— ft 
9ft 946 
19% 1966 


av* Bllvresf 
2% SlmeoS 
10ft SmthA 
9ft SmthB 
12ft Snyder 
5W Solltron 
9b SnTex . 
7ft SCEdpf 
7ft SCEdpf 
7ft SCE d pi 
8% SCEdpf 
SCEdpf 

»W SCEdpf 
1646 SCEdpf 
15 SCEdpf 
53% SCEdpf 
61 SCEdpf 
6% SpHuchi 
Aft Sprfcnl 
15% Spectra 
3% SpedOP 
low, Spenoer 
2ft Sort) wt 
446 SfHOvn 
1W 5, Hov wt 
13% stdPrd 

? j stdsnr 
1ft SlontH 
6ft State* 
4% StrICap 

ift staner 


JSt 7J 7 
.12 3 12 

UOe BJ s 

.16b 1 J AS 
JO £9 11 
JB £1 50 
JO IJ 13 


19 4W 
75 BW 
71 8ft 

2 7ft 
lOQz 79% 
100k 58 

73 21 

68 38% 

20 27% 
4 45ft 
4 21 

31 5% 

10 6 
141 Aft 

1 4% 
56 22ft 

4 2ft 
12 12 
BO 4 
48 2746 
13 37 

2 1ft 
03 14% 

645 1% 

107 6% 

15 3% 

1 13ft 
15 1016 


JB £9 
JB 12 
2X8 MJ II 
16 

US 107 
1X6 106 
1J8 IU 
1.19 ll.l 
4X8 VJ 
US IU 
ua 11X 
221 11.1 
7J8 111 
UP 11.9 

9 

1X0 l£9 
.M J 12 

34 23 3l 

X8 1.1 55 

JO 19 i 
£791 4X 11 
19 


14 ... 

19 17 
28 12% 

3 1% 

33 13ft 

41 13ft 

15 6 % 
3B 13 
ve 4ft 

5 VA 
27* 16ft 
4AX 15% 
143 13ft 

42 7ft 

22 ft 
49 9% 

33 10 

1 9% 

10 1046 
2500X 42% 
» 13% 
M 21 
85 19ft 

20 62ft 

5 73 
» 7% 

1 746 

24 28% 
«l 5ft 
4) 10ft 
63 4 
55 74* 

17 1ft 
45 20ft 

2 67% 
9 15ft 

to 9ft 
17 4ft 
20 2% 


4 4 — W 
7ft 8% + % 
■ft Bft— 16 
7ft 7ft— % 

79% 79% 

58 SB +16 
V.toi 30ft + % 
36ft 36ft — ft 
22ft 2246 + I* 
45% 45ft + % 
2Sft 2546— ft 

5 5% 

6 6 — % 
6 Aft— ft 
4% 4V*+ W 

21ft 22ft + ft 
2ft 2ft— W 
lift 12 + % 
5ft 5ft— % 
Z7ft 27ft + % 
36ft 37 + ft 

1« 1ft 
13ft M — % 
lft Ift + ft 
4 AW+ ft 
3 3W+ W 

talk 13ft 
10 M — ft 
8ft 0ft— % 
Wft 17 +16 

lift 10 — ft 
1% 1%— % 
13% 13H + ft 
13ft 13*6 + ft 
A* 6% 

13ft U + M 
4*6 4ft— I* 
3ft 316 
1616 144* + ft 
15% 15ft— ft 
toft 13ft + % 
716 716 
ft ft + % 
Mb 9% + % 
9ft to + ft 
g% g%— w 
10ft 1046 
42% 42% 

20ft 21 +1 
1916 19ft + ft 
AM* 621b + ft 
72ft 73 + W 

7ft 7% — % 
746 746 

28 38 — % 

5ft Sft+ % 
10ft Wb— % 
3% 4 + % 

Cft 7ft 
lft 1ft 
20ft 2046 + % 
67% 69% 

15% 15ft— W 
9ft- 9ft 
fit 4ft 
2ft 2% 


m* 4% 
mb 5ft 
4V6 146 

8ft 516 
1046 Aft 
11% 5 
134b 546 
17ft 11% 
27% 16% 
4 % 

144b 6% 
M% 10ft 
AM 346 
946 3 

2% 1% 
31ft 19% 
846 Aft 
14ft 9ft 


JO 


StrfExf 
Starts ft 
SfrufW 
SamltE 
SunCtv 
SunSLn 
Sunoir 
SunJr 
SaprFd 
SupCra 
Sup, nd 
SuarSr 
5u weh 
Swantn 
SwftEn 
Swtflin 
Synatay 
SystEn .16 


IJ 
£7 38 


8 

9 

J* 13 15 
JB U M 
A4b 13 12 

JBe J 18 
J3 £2 10 
15 


UO 


46 11 
7J 

1.1 17 


34 

20* 

19ft 

20* +116 

IBS 

7ft 

7% 

7ft H 

- % 

30 

2% 

2ft 

2% 4 

• % 

1 

5% 

Sft 

Sft 


6 

10% 

10% 

toft 


20 

7ft 

7% 

7% 


TO 

6ft 

6ft 

«%- 

■ % 

3 

14ft 

Mft 

Mft— % 

85 

26ft 

26ft 

26ft— M 

726 

1% 

1% 

IU 


74 

9% 

9ft 

Oft— ft 

86 

Mft 

14% 

14% 4 

■ % 

2f 

6% 

61* 

6%-f 

- ft 

21 

4% 

4% 

4% 


30 

Ift 

lft 

lft 


2S3 

26% 

25ft 

26 4 

■% 

63 

5W 

4ft 

5% 


6 

14ft 

Mft 

Mft 4 

- % 


J 


lift 

12 

25ft 

17% 

lift 

1516 

13 

716 

5% 

19 

5514 

9ft 

toft 

139ft 

•ft 

3146 

12ft 

lift 

Sft 

Aft 

32% 

lift 

10% 

22% 

ISW 

3ft 

0% 

on 

IM 

59% 

56 

VM 

13% 

2ft 

1246 

toft 

18% 

7% 

14% 

4ft 

14ft 

26ft 

6% 


Aft T Bar Jit AX 27 

7ft TEC JMo J 19 

5ft TIE 11 

Aft nr 47 

13 Tabfta* JO IJ 18 

Aft TandBr 
9ft Tatv 
2ft room 
lft TchAm 
13% TdiSvm 
XM Tecbop 
3ft TeehTp 
7% Techfrt 
76 TelenR 
2 Telecan 
21% Tetflex 
8% TetDta 
7% Tend 
2% Tataeph 
3ft Tenney l 
25% Taxed g UO 
5ft TexAIr s 

5% TexAE JOt 65 5 
16% TexAE Pf 
3% moon I 

2 TftorEn 22 

4% ThrD B X6 1 J 13 
346 TtirDA M 23 >3 
Z% TWVMU 
47 TolEdPf BJ2 14X 
62 TolEd Pf 7J6 MJ 


JO £3 13 


16 

15 

I 

JB IX 9 
JBe J 96 

A4 IJ 15 
J6a 3J W 
55 

13 


4ft Tortel 
7ft TotIP to 
% TotPtwl 
84* TrnxLx 
lift TmTec 

13% Tranzn 

3» TrtHme 
3ft Trktax 
2% TubMex 
9ft Tuttax 
20% Tumc> 
3% Tvlerwt 


11 
■24 

.10 1.1 9 
36 23 9 
AO 23 S 
9 

11 

J6 34 12 
1.10 43 9 


40 Bft 8ft 8% — % 

16 9% 9 9% 

1213 7ft 7% 7%— % 
38 HR* 10% Wft + ft 
417 16% 16 16% + % 

14 8ft 8% Bft— % 
12 12ft 12ft 17% 

5 3ft 346 3ft 
11 2ft 2ft 7ft • 
T71 1*% left 18ft 
9 54ft 54% Wft + ft 
24 5% 5ft 5ft 

56 16ft Kft Ifib— ft 
2200x136% 129% 133ft— 3ft 
66 3ft 3% lft 

41 30% 29% 30%+ % 
166 10% ID 10 — % 
36 Oft BW 846 + ft 
243 3ft 3% 3% 

26 4ft 4% 4ft 
24 Z7 26ft 27 — % 
1688 lift 11% 11% + ft 
to 546 5ft 5ft— % 
29 17ft 17ft 17ft 
73 5% 5% 5%-% 

5 2 2 2 — % 

20 5 5 5 — % 

9 5% 5% 5H»+% 

49 4ft 4% 6% + % 
Ste 59% 594* 594b + ft 
lOQz 54% 54 54 —2 

40 Bft 8% 

46 9% 9 9% + ft 

20 46 46 46 

B7 Vft 9ft 9%- % 
X 16% 15% 14 

14 15 14% 15 

15 5% 5% M 

29 Sft 5% m+ % 
44 2ft 2V, 2% 

127 13 to 13 +% 

8 26% 24% 94% + % 
03 5% 5% 5%- W 


7 2 

*8 
15% 11% 
11% 844 
19% 14% 
3% lft 
3% 1% 
15% 10% 
21ft 10% 
lift 5% 
10ft 6% 
13% 7ft 
10% 5% 

23% 15 
17% 9% 


USRind 

Ultmta 

Unicom 

UMcppf 

Ufrtmrn 

UAtePd 

UFftadA 

U FoodB 

UMAed 

USAGwt 

UStckn 

Uni tatv 

UnvCm 

imtvRs 

LtnlvRu 

UnvPat 


36 

7 2195 
336 

35 43 48 

493 

Mb 33 10 12 

M 53 23 97 

20 104 
JS 5X 16 11 

92 

31 104 

JMtISJ 14 34 

17 11 

29 ISA 
JOa 45 7 5 


2ft 2% 

10 fc W ft 

15% 15% 
9% 9% 

17% 17% 
1% lft 
146 Ift 
13% 13% 
22 2Hb 
11% toft 
7 Aft 
12ft 12ft 
7ft 7ft 
174* 17% 
13% 12ft 


24b + % 

1546+ % 
9% 

17% 

Ift 

lft 

13% + % 
21ft + % 
11%+% 
7 + % 

12ft— % 
7* 

17ft + % 

12ft 


to 
21% 
25% 
15% 
20ft 
10% 
14* 
1646 
8% 
8 ft 
9ft 
7ft 
16ft 
59 
7ft 
124b 
16% 


94* VSTn 
15% VnJIyR 
15% Vataprs 
44* verbhn 
Mft Vt AmC 
3% VtRsh 
% Verna 
11% Varnlt 
3ft vertpie 
4ft Vtatech 
5% Vlcaii 
2ft vtntee 
10ft Vlrai 
44ft Valntt 
6% vtaualG 
8 Vaalex 
12% Voted, 


85 7 
U 13 


U 9 
IJ 

12 
J * 

3J 12 
3J 13 
2J 9 


49 10 
9 21% 
126 341* 
MS 6% 
S3 20% 
671 54* 

3 % 

68 12% 
41 6% 

2 8% 
40 7ft 
27 4ft 

3 16ft 

4 58 
,1 7ft 
46 10ft 

1 16% 


9ft 

21 % 

24 

5W 

30 

5W 

% 

12 % 

6 

Oft 

7 

4% 

16ft 

57% 

7% 

10% 

16% 


18 + ft 
21%+ W 
24 —1% 
4%+ W 
20% + % 

12%—% 

6M+% 

S%+ % 
7%+ % 

4% 

14ft + % 
SB +ft 
7ft + % 
10ft + % 
16% 


W 


15 

3416 

33ft 

5 

8% 

85% 

24% 

84k 

9% 

84* 

8ft 

5ft 

16ft 

13% 

lift 

6% 

5% 

33V* 

Ift 

Mft 

13% 

13% 

11% 

TBft 

29 

20ft 

AV> 

10% 

4 

15% 

2346 

4046 

10% 

16% 

6% 

17% 

36ft 

19 

7ft 


6% wrre 
17ft Watbar 
TOW Wales 
23 wanes 
2246 WangC 
ft WrnCwf 
3ft WshHi 
60ft WshPtf 
17 WRIT 
6ft VWrtSCA 

Cft watte b 
2ft Wftitad 
lft w ebc er 
,3% Wedm 
lift Wetficn 
7 WeldTb 
64* Wetotrn 
4ft wettea 
,2Jk weiGrd 
IM weaea 
ft Wteecp 
7ft wstSrC 
8% Wcttorg 
5% WDIgfll 
7% wtHittin 
14% WIRET 
1* Wgfn5L 
9% WhEnts 

3W wichtfa 

7% WlilcxG 
1 WUtnB 
12% Win Urn 

19ft Wbllln 

3S% WltPpf 


JO 13 
JO 30 
.16 J 
.11 J 


.1* 13 

.10 IX 

JO £5 


11 WkWeor 
,«6 WlMtoE 
Wft WWdepf 
2746 Warthn 

12 wraths 

3% WratHB 


JO 


lJOe BJ 
1 J3e 45 


30 33 
£24a10J 
4J0 IU 
JO 46 
JB 13 

1J0 12J 
JO IJ 
32 .1 
JBe 


20 331 7% 

13 140 23ft 

8 33 13U, 

1813478 29% 

18 18 2046 
AS 5% 

4 77 8% 

15 183 85ft 
17 20 24% 

5 7X 84b 
S Ux 9ft 

218 4ft 
IQS 2ft 

8 2 4 

IS 195 17% 

» 9ft 

12 40 lift 

12 SM 
31 34* 

7 3 23% 

IS lft 

14 100 146. 
II X 10% 
20 1135 12ft 
„ 406 12% 

15 22 lift 

7 214 27 

28 128 20% 
.. 10 3 % 

7 40 9% 

6 Ift 

U 348 15% 
52 22 
20r 39% 

9 5 846 

7 19 MW 

19 207 4 

10 Mft 
15 31 31% 

218 1846 

13 40 4 


646 7%+ ft 
23 23ft + ft 
U 13% + % 
27V, 2846+1% 
27% 50ft +1% 
7% 1%— % 

8% 84b + ft 
84% 84% — 4* 
34% 24ft + % 
■W 0ft+ % 

9 »ft + W 
4 4% + W 

2% 24* 

4 4 — Vb 

14% 17 +% 
9ft 9%— % 
II II — % 
5% Sft+ % 
3W 3ft + % 

50% 23% 

Ift 1ft 
14% 14% + %• 
9% 9% 
to 12%— % 
11% 12%+lft 
18% 18% „ 
26 27 +ft 

19ft 30% + Mi 
3% 3% + % 

9ft 9ft— % 
lft Tft 
M% 15W + ft 
214i 22 + M 
39% J9%~ % 

8ft 846+ Vb 

13% ,Mb- %• 
3% 3% 

14% 14%— % ■ 
30ft 31 
IB* toft + * 

l— » 


14% 54* Yankee 6 48 6ft 6% 646 + % 

5% 4 Vordnv M IJ 12 17 4ft 4ft 4ft 


12% .548 Zimer .to U 23 129 m 7% 7% + * 


*Sf 














































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDA Y-SUNPA Y, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


Page II 


** 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


* T^V 

“ rt.. 
- . :V 

-I 

*■ 5? 


3 European Telephone Concerns 
Sign Technology-Sharing Accord 

Agentx France- Preise 

MILAN -— "Hiree of Europe’s leading telephone companies have 
signed a technical cooperation accord hoe that is designed to enable 
l hem to compete with the world leader in telecommunications, 
American Telephone & Telegraph Corp. 

The agreement, signed Thursday, Knits Italtel of Italy, CIT-Akaiel 
of France and Semens of West Germany, with Britain’s Plessey PLC 
expected to join in the next few weeks. AT&T signed a and 

marketi ng agr eement with the Ohvem SpA group last year. 

The accord in effe ct ex pands an alliance formed )aV September 
between Italtd and ClY-AIcald and calk for joint research and 
development to promote equipment standardization in the next 
generation of telephone exchanges. 

The new exchanges, which could appear by the end of the decade, 
will be capab le of transmining pictures, texts and computerized data. 

The four companies account for 26 percent of the world telecom- 
munications marke t. They are eclipsed only by AT&T, which controls 
29 percent of the world market. 

The four European companies have 53 mini on lines between them, 
comp ared with 6. 1 million for AT&T and 23 million for another U-S. 
giant, ITT Corp. 

“The Europeans have understood that they absolutely have to 
combine their efforts if they want to meet U.S. and Japanese competi- 
tion,” an Italtel official said. 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


-pit | Australia 

•: ' S 


M1M Holdings 

111 Half TO* 1*81 

Revenue S 2*72 421.24 

Pretax Net— (a)*SJ 1626 
a: loss. 

Britain 

FHdi Lovell 

Isf Half MM IMS 

Revenue 2DLM 249.28 

Pretax Net — 7 m 7 JO 

Per snare _ 0JJ714 B.0827 

Canada 

Cons. 'Bathurst 

.I.- 1 manor. to* ms 

• - :- Revenue 3992) 3*9j) 

-a Profits 268 115 


V 


■■a. 

:■» 


K . Oner Shore . 


153 124 

Year TO* IMS 

Revenue Mm. i» 

Profit 7U 345 

Oner Share - 1*0 053 


Japan 


Honda Motor 

Manor. mm ms 

Revenue 6M200. S3W6*0. 

- Profit* 22JDO. 2254L 

Je Per Share _ 4107 2118 

I Months TO* 1*83 

** i ^RevBmie 195 T 173 T 

Profit 90BHL 65*70- 

Per Share— 97X1 7Z.11 

’• " T: trillion 

:i ; : > Toray hxL 
. zi isf hpm to* nn 

, V ^Revenue 397.550. 3646m 

8,180. 4030. 

US . 505 


. . . 3 ' 

V: £ Bangkok Bank 

~ - Tw HM ms 

1-5VQ. U9a 

> 'er Share 46J9 450* 

Hid rio i n o r* Bk 
i*m ms 

727.6 37SS 

■' Z- s «“-*#r Share— 3fl2» 4426 

1 "1 

; United Slates 

C J. Ahmansoa (HJF.) 

-r > - 4th Ctaar. 1994 1984 

:-i “evenue 7*49 BM 

-. - perNat 1167 2528 

r. o, -par Share— 80* 095 

L - •- Year TO* HR 

- - ’ evenuo 2 x 10 . mio. 

* •' 'Per Nef — *822 10709 

Share— 123 402 

rr • -? - IWJ nets axetrie oahu of 
J 1 1 s : J 4WW In ouortor and of 
- CUM) m roar from ttobt ro- 


Air Pdts & Cbeam. 
1 st Qoor. 1*85 1*84 

Revenue *355 4159 

Net Inc. 32.1* 3401 

Per Share.— 105 12)9 

Alex. & Baldwin 
«h Onto*. 198* ms 

Revenue 1213 117 J 

Met Inc. 1*3 145 

Per Shore— 089 07* 

Veer TO* 19tS 

Revenue 4840 *5X2 

Met InC. 644 511 

Per Share— 340 188 

Amdahl 

«t|Quar. TO4 t*83 
Revenue — 227.* 2251 

Net inc. 141 157 

Per Stare 035 03* 

Year lfM IMS 

Revenue 779* 7773 

OperHet 35* 433 

Oper Shane— 080 0*5 

1903 roar not axetudas tar 
crodtt of summon 

Amor. Bsc. Pwr 

4th Qua-. 19M 1983 

Revenue 1J30 U98. 

Net Inc. 12233 15205 

Per Stare 065 OBS 

Yecr IN* 1*83 

Revenue 4M a. 4370 

Nef Inc. 48737 Ss 6 

Per Share— mb 2 M 

Am. Hasp. Supply 

<thQaar. KM 19*3 

Revenue 879.1 8244 

Net Inc. 61.9 519 

Per Shore 085 073 

veer km mi 

Revenue 3*00 1300 

Net Inc — 237J 2119 

Per Share 233 2J6 

1904 auartor not Incl u des 
train of MLB million from sot- 
tlomont o! ctoim cwtd eftarvw 

at 011.1 mutton 


Avnat 

2nd Quar. 1985 TO* 

Revenue 3950 3958 

Net Inc. 122) 213 

Per State 034 060 

1st HaM 1*81 TOM 

Revenue 427 J 7513 

Net Inc 31.* 39.9* 

Per Shore 0.90 1.13 

Befl Atlantic 

4th Quar. 1IM 1*83 

Revenue 2.10s. — 

Net Inc 2*15 — 

Per&tare 2X3 — 

Year 1914 1*83 

Revenue EL690. — 

Net inc 9711 - 

Per Share— 954 — 

No comparisons available 
as caravan r was teemed Jan. 
1. 1904 tram divestiture at AT 
ST. 


4th Quar. 19M IMS 

Revenue 2815 1874 

Net Inc 745 575 

Per Stare 14* 083 

Year 19M 1*81 

Revenue 7793 7012> 

Net Inc UD9 11.17 

Per Shore 255 147 

1983 roar per share In- 
cludes gain ot 12 cants a 
share tram sale of imtt 

Boston Edison 
Year HM HO 

Revenue 1320. 12OT 

Net Inc 883 67 5 

Per Shore 485 340 

Cental 

Oh Qenr. KM 1*83 

Revenue 343J 3417 

Net Inc 2*3 250 

Per Shore 185 141 

Year 19M 1*83 

Revenue— 1370. 13)0 

Net Inc 121* 1113 

Per Stare 443 412 


i*m i9S] Clarox 

2.130 — 2ed Qua-. HM KM 

Net Inc. __ 2029 — Revenae— 2094 1B42 

Per Share— 107 .— Net Inc 12JJ7 1146 

Y— . HU ■ 1 MJ Per Share 045 042 

Revenue omd. - - WHoif IMS m* 

Net Inc 9*05 • — Revenue— 4601. 427.1 

Per Stare 1017 — Net Inc 3508 3487 

NoeomMsv avaUtMo PwStare— UO «• 

as comoanrnas formed Jan TO* d^non/tinet Includes 
him hum dtvestttare of AT gain of SZ7 mil Ban from safe 
AT. ... . 9ftmtt 


Avco 


4th Qear. TOW 1*81 

Revenue 8123 79*3 

Netinc 353 26.1 

Per Share — 139 097 

Yeor tom mi 

RMtwe 2920 2410. 

Nat Inc 1255 1027 

PorShore — 441 342 

jm roar not indudes gain 
at 129 million from ropur- 
cnaseofdeM 


Consumers Pwr 
nhQoar. 19M KB 
Revenue— 8972) 9240 

Net Inc (0)141 MX 

Per Stare — — 075 

Year TOM 1*83 

Revenue— 1230. 1970. 

Net Inc 221.1 3*78 

Per Stare 514 3.12 

a: loss. tMJ Quarter net 6»- 
dudes writedown of 546 mlt- 
tten. 


(Other Earning? on Page 13) 


Marimekko 
Acquired by 
Amer Group 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Marimekko 
AB, a Finnish maker of designer 
textiles, clothes and other products, 
has been sold by members of its 
founding family to Amer Group 
Lid., a Hnnisb tobacco, publishing 
and industrial conglomerate. 

Amer officials said Friday they 
paid the equivalent of 40 rnfflion 
Finnish mariAae ($6 million) in 
cash and stock for 75 percent of 
Marimekko’s voting stock, or 
around 33 percent of the total capi- 
ta} stock. 

Marimekko’s president. Kari 
Mattson, said the controlling inter- 
est was sold because Che three 
grown children of the company's 
late founder. Arari Rada, appar- 
ently disagreed over the future of 
the company. 

Despite a forecast of slightly 
lower earnings in 1984. Mr. Matt- 
son said “Marimekko is a company 
that was very desirable to many 
prospective buyers." 

Sales in 1984 rose to 110 miDion 

maritime from 103 million markkas 
in 1983, he said. Earnings have not 
been published, but are expected to 
be somewhat lower than the 1983 
net profit of 7 milli on markkaa 
Total worldwide sales of Mar- 
mekko brands, including items 
made on license, amounted to 330 
million marickaa in 1984. The Unit- 
ed States, with license sales of 145 
million Tnaririm*, was the single 
largest market for Marimekko 
items, followed by Japan. 

According to Mr. Mattson, the 
transfer of control will not lead to 
any change in management 

Amer had annual sales of 2 bil- 
lion marickan in 1981 Tobacco 
products comprised 35 percent of 
sales in fiscal 1983-1984, and in- 
cluded the liwniw manufacture of 
Marlboro cigarettes in F inlan d. 

Other activities include publish- 
ing. commercial printing and auto 
distributorships for Citroen and 
Toyota. 

Wickes Emerges 
From Chapter 11 

Reuters 

SANTA MONICA. California 
— Wickes Companies said Friday 
that its joint plan of reorganization 
will become effective on Saturday, 
thereby completing its emergence 
from Chapter 11 reorganization 
proceedings. 

It said its plan settled about S1.6 
billion of debt through the pay- 
ment of about S600 million in cash 
and through issues of debt and 
equity of the reorganized company. 

Under the plan, it will issue 
about S173 million in extendable 
two-year notes; $246 million of 
ninfr-year debentures; $150 million 
of 20-year debentures and about 96 
million shares of common stock 
and 12 million common stock pur- 
chase warrants. 


i > 


S- 

-• ■ 

r. "• 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 




j, vi 



If you like the challenge of a new job. Digital has a job that 
will challenge you again and again. An opportunity to develop 
and be developed. 


SENIOR CONSULTANTS 

FOR THE EUROPEAN MANAGEMENT 
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 


We are looking for several experienced self-confident professionals 
who will work with a selected group of senior consultants to design 
and deliver training courses to the management of our sales 
organizations. You will also be responsible for the design and 
implementation of effective sales management tools and processes 
utilizing a wide range of Organizational Development techniques. 

Based in the country of their origin and linked into our European 
Headquarters Office in Geneva, the successful candidates will 
pra ses? a training/organizational development background and at 
least 3 years experience in a similar position. Fluent English is 
required. Potential openings are in most European countries. 

Here is your opportunity to play a highly visible role, and enjoy 
a position of responsibiBty and professional growth. 

Interested? Please send your resumb in English to 
Rose-Mare CHASSOT or 'phone for an Application Form 


isii 


ns 


US 





DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION S 
INTERNATIONAL - EUROPE 


12 . av flea Moraines. CP 5 ) 0. 120 Pelil-Lancy i 
Geneva -SwiuerUnd. Te* 1022 ) 9333 n 



— ItilBENATIONAi COMPUTER AUDIT 1 

leader in the of aorricee irfotiia t» Data Pro**M*ng Security 

fa looking lor * 

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR 

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^INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS” 


TO PLACE AN ADVERTISEMENT 
contact your noamf 
htamatiana HeroU Triune 
representative or Max Fotreroi 
>81 Aw. QtorlaMfaOauHe, 
92521 Neuflhr Codecs. France. 
TeLt 757.12.65 . Telex, 613595. 


Scandia Reports Sharp Fall in Earnings Last Year 


By Juris Kaza 

International HenU Tiihate 

STOCKHOLM — Scandia, 
Sweden’s largest insurance group, 
reported Friday that 1984 pretax 
earnings plunged to 10 million kro- 
nor ($1.1 million) from 696 million 
kronor in 1983, a bigger drop than 
had been forecast. 

Scandia officials blamed the fall 
in earnings on a 310-miUion-kn> 
nor loss sustained in 1984 by Scan- 
dia International, its international 
casualty insurance division. 

Scandia International posted a 
profit of 407 million kronor in- 
1983. Natural disasters such as hur- 1 
ricanes affecting Scandia’s U.S. 
customers were given as a major 
reason for the reversal. It was also 
reported that stricter judgments in 
ILS. liability cases cat into Scan- 
dia’s results. 


Premium revenues totaled 12.83 
billion kronor, up 35 percent from 
9.45 billion kronor in 1983, but the 
rise included a 105-billion-kronor 
one-time item reflecting a change 


in bookkeeping practices. Adjusted 
for that amount, premium revenues 
rose 14 percent, Scandia said. 

Scandia also reported that earn- 
ings of its domestic operations de- 


Wang, flhina Sign 3 Joint Ventures 


Agence Franee-Prase 

PARIS — Wang Laboratories 
Inc., the U.S. computer company, 
has signed three joint-ventnre 
agreements with China to produce 
computers and software in Chi- 
nese, Wang has announced. 

The three agr eem ents cover com- 
puters and equipment worth more 
than $150 million over several 
years, Wang said in a statement 
received Thursday in Paris. 

The first of the three agreements 
with China, worth about $50 mil- 


lion. is for a joint company to pro- 
duce its VS series of minicomputer 
and to develop software. 

Under the second accord, a 
five-year project in Shanghai, 
50,000 Wang 1107 Assistant com- 
puters will be produced and Qri- 
oese-language software developed. 

The third agreement calls for 
more than 30,000 Wang PC office 
computers to be assembled in 
southeastern China, for sale 
throughout China and for export to 
Southeast Asia. 


dined in 1984. Business insurance 
earnings fell to 100 million kronor 
from 314 milfioji kronor in 19S3. 

Premium revenues for business 
insurance rose 14 percent in 1984 
to 2.03 billion kronor. 

The losses by Scandia Interna- 
tional greatly exceeded forecasts 
made in late September by the 
company. Ai that time. Scandia's 
management said the international 
division would have a loss of 
around 25 million kronor. The 
whole group, excluding a separate 
life insurance company, was then 
expected to show a profit of 180 
million kronor for 1984. 

Scandia's gloomy forecast in 
September caused the company’s 
shares to decline at the time on the 
Stockholm stock exchange, but the 
exchange was dosed Friday be- 
cause of building renovation. 


COMPANY NOTES 


BAT Industries PLC is hoping to 
acquire West German consumer fi- 
nancial service businesses and non- 
food retailing companies, but does 
not plan to buy a bank, according 
to the chairman, Patrick Sheehy. 

BP Smgqwre Pte. has entoed 
into a contract with China Nation- 
al Chemicals Import & Export 
Corp. to process 10,000 bands per 
day of Shengh crude for 1985, a 
company official said. 

Cheung Kong Holdings Ltd-, 
whose stake in International Gty 
Holdings Ltd. has risen to more 
than 35 percent, has been exempted 
from malring a general offer for 
International Gty, Hong Kong's 
Securities Commission mid- 

Deofcche Babcock AG has pro- 
posed a dividend of 3 Deutsche 
marks (95 cents) on ordinary shares 
for the year enided Sept. 30, 1984, 
after omitting a payment to ordi- 
nary shareholders for the two pre- 
vious years. Babcock said the year 


bad been satisfactory, but gave no 
profit figures. 

Federated Department Stores 
said it plans to sell its Boston store 
division, Fileoe’s. to Bergner & Co. 
of Peoria, Illinois, for $80 million. 

General Motors Coip. plans to 
spend abocl $105 million to con- 
vert part of its Oldsmobile division 
plant in 1 -arming Township, Michi- 
gan, for the assembly of a new 
front-wheel-drive car. 

BJ. Goocbicfa Co. said it expects 
to report a net less of about $7 
million for the fourth quarter of 
1984, largely because of a $6-mfl- 
lion after-tax provision associated 
with a phasing out of industrial 
rubber product manufacturing. 

Hanson Trust PLC said that its 
bid for Powell Duffryn PLC will 
lapse next Tuesday unless it has 
received enough acceptances to se- 
cure control Last Monday, Han- 
son said its stake in Powell Dufftyn 


amounted to 9.43 million ordinary 
shares, or 23.98 percent. 

Merck & Co. will cut its equity in 
its Indian subsidiary, Merind T M 
to 40 percent from 60 percent, 
Merck said. Merind, with 60-per- 
cent Indian ownership, wQl become 
an Indian company under laws on 
foreign investment in India 

Ogilvy & Mather International, 
the US. advertising agency, said it 
will change its nam e to Ogilvy 

Group, subject to shareholder ap- 
proval, at its annual meeting on 
May 14. 

Phelps Dodge Corp. workers at 
plants in Arizona have voted over- 
whelmingly to decertify 13 unions 
that have beat on strike against the 
company for 19 months. 

Rank Organization PLC said it 
has sold its Canadian investment 
Pnmerty 
& Development Crap, 
for 87.9 miDion Canadian dollars 
f$66.4 million) after-tax. 


portfolio to Hammerscm 
Investment J 


New Oil Strike 
By Occidental 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES —Occiden- 
tal Petroleum Corp. said results 
from a test well in a field three 
miles west of its Cano Limon 
find in northeast Colombia 
confirms a new oil field. 

“In Cano limon. we definite- 
ly have a field in the giant class, 
and each new discovery only 
serves to highlight the area as 
the newest major oil-producing 
region in the world,” Dr. Ar- 
man d Hammer, Occidental's 
chairman, said Thursday. 

The well tested light oil at a 
rate of 6.200 barrels a day. the 
company said. Occidental is an 
equal partner with EcopetroL 
the Colombian national oil 
company, in developing the re- 
gion. 


Officials Gose 
Filipino Bank 
After Bailout 

United Press International 

MANILA — Monetary officials 
on Friday dosed the largest savings 
bank in the Philippines and placed 
it under receivership just five 
months after attempting a bailout 
to save it from collapse. 

A statement by the Monetary 
Board said the Banco Filipino Sav- 
ings and Mortgage Bank “has be- 
come insolvent” and failure to 
place it under receivership would 
“involve probable loss to the de- 
positors and creditors." 

It was placed under receivership 
of the government-owned Philip- 
pine National Bank, according to 
an announcement from the presi- 
dential palace. 

The 20-year-old bank, the na- 
tion's largest savings institution, 
bad 89 brandies nationwide, assets 
of 4.7 billion pesos (S260 million) 
and 3.7 million depositors in 1983. 

Heavy withdrawals forced 
Banco Filipino to dose July 23 for 
a nine-day “holiday." 

President Ferdinand E Marcos 
ordered the central bank to rescue 
Banco Filipino with 3 billion pesos, 
a move that created problems dur- 
ing talks with the International 
Monetary Fund. 


Gold Options was* s/m.). 


hem Mi 




TOO 1*00-1550 7*502625 

300 725-875 1775-1925 25502825 

3K> 125 *50 12251375 30757225 

320 im- 200 am *j) 1525-1575 

330 cm ia> 525 675 11251275 

3*0 nm 075 325- 475 I 825-975 

GdU 300^0-30100 

Itawi WWte WcM&A 

I L Qui da Max- 
1211 Gam 1, 

Td. 310251 -Trim 28305 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


Project Director 

London and overseas Arabic speaking c.US$5 5,000 

Our diem is a large international group with i 
smesses in the Middle Last although it operate 


i ns core 

businesses in the Middle Last although it operates 
throughout the world. Its activities span many fields 
iadudmg distribution, manufacture, transport and property. 

The Chief Executive of its international operations is 
now seeking a high-calibre Executive Assistant who 
will be based in 1-ondon and who will assist him in 
all aspects of running a number of diverse interests. 

He or she wOl mainly act as a Project Director in a 
trouble-shooting role and a significant amount of 
overseas travel will therefore be involved. Successful 


BY 


performance in this role could lead to a senior line- 
man agemem position in a few years. Candidates, ideally in 
their thirties, must be fluent in Arabic and also have good 
English. Western educated, they must have experience of 
wonting in a multinational environment, preferably with a 
wide range of disciplines. A business degree would be a 
definite advantage. Starting salary will be in the 
range of $50,000 — $60,000 phis good fringe 
benefits. 

Please send a full cv, in confidence, to 
A M Dickson, Ref: GM41/9I03/IHT. 


PA Personnel Services 



[Two major international earner opportunities 
for Swiss and Austrian Nationals 


Switzerland 

Based Zurich 

Director Sales 

Travel Management Services 

The Job 

• To manage the sales force responsible for the 
sales of our Corporate Card and Business Travel 
products. To personally solicit our major clients and 
targettednew business accounts. 

•To develop short and medium term business 
strategies for both products and to work with the 
Director- Marketing in developing appropriate 
supporting marketing programmes. 

•To contribute to the overall success of our Travel 
Related Services business as a member of the Senior 
Management team. 

The Candidate 

•A Swiss National. 

•Bi-lingual in German and English. A working 
knowledge of French will be a distinct advantage. 

m Agedin30’s. 

• Educated to degree level. 

m A demonstrable record of sales achievements to 
major national and international clients. Additionally 
the successful candidate will have an understanding 
of modern marketing techniques including co- 
operative advertising programmes, market research 
analysis and product positioning techniques. It is 
essential that this experience has been gained in a 
multi-national organisation ideally within a service 
orientated organisation. 

• 3 years ’ Managerial experience. 

• Have highly developed written and verbal 
communication skills. 


Austria 

Based Vienna 



Director 

Marketing and Sales 

Travel Related Services 

The Job 

• To develop and execute the Marketing and Sales 
plans for our Travel Related Services products of 
Cards. Travel and Travellers Cheques. 

• To develop total marketing programmes including 
market research, product positioning and all 
advertising and acquisition programmes. 

• To manage the national sales force. 

The Candidate 

•An Austrian National. 

• Bi-lingual in German and English. 

• Agedin30's. 

• Educated to degree level and ideally with a 
professional marketing qualification. 

• A demonstrable record ot achievement in 
Marketing and Sales gained within an international 
environment. 

• A minimum of 3 years ' Managerial experience. 

• Have highly developed written and verbal 
communication skills. 


The Benefits 

For both positions, in addition to a highly 
competitive salary, company car, bonus and large 
company benefits, significant career opportunities 
both within and outside of Austria and Switzerland 
are open to successful candidates able to contribute 
to and further develop our existing high rate of 
growth. 

To Apply 

Please forward, in English, a C. V., giving details of 
career to date, education, age and current salary to: 
David Cornthwaite, 

Director- Employment & Employee Relations, 
American Express Europe Limited, 

Prestamex House, 

171-173 Preston Road, 

Brighton. Sussex BN1 6BX, England. 






±a. 


Over-the-Coimter 


Jan. 25 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


“Ham Nat 

IMi MWI Low SPJVLOTbb 


Solalll Nat 

IMS Hteh Law 3P.MLCtitoa 



y. Fleeter 
w Flokov 
u. Flexsti 
2 FlqRJI 
2 FINFIs 
* FiowSr 
Flurucb 
,T Fonor 
S FUon B 
- FUon A 
Far Am 
ForastO 
FortnF 

Fortns 
Forum 
Foster 
Foxmrr 
Frrmm 
Fudre* 
FulHBs 


Seta la Hel 

«0* Ktflfl Law JP-M-Oi'gs 

J2e 17 33 12*. 12 12b — b 

81 6 5ft 6 

48 U 265 16V* 15*4 16b + Vi 

3D* 1.1 561 18ft 17b 17=-— ft 

Ji 23 70733 31 U 3? + ft 

55 174. 57VJ 17ft 

3t U 85 13 12*4 12ft 

103 5 4=4 5 

,07 i am. 16ft 141*— vt 

S» A 260,4b 14Va MV* 

.94 15 40 27*. 27*. 3714 

1.00 S3 019ft IPS Wft— lb 

524 Iff- 17ft IB + ft 

152 214 TVs 244 — la 

JM A 5747 94* 91* 9ft + Vi 

.10 IJ 7 &*» 6*3 6ft — 'A 

743 24b 24 2514— U 

At 24 294 20 WV* 19ft + b 
12412H ITU I2ft — v* 
JO 73 102 137* 131b 13*.— V. 


U.S. Futures j»l 2 s 


Season Season 

High Low Open Higti Low erase Om. 


WHEAT (CBT) 





5JJ00 bu minimum- dollars oer bush.! 




484 

137b 

Mar 1441* 147 

143V* 

146b 

+JQb 

+8ib 

485 

133V* 

May KOb 142 

139 

1C 

190 

347V* 

Jul 131V* 133 

130b 

132V* 

+81 b 

376V* 

348b 

Son 132b 134b 

132b 

333b 

+80b 

163V* 

137b 

DOC 143V* 145b 

343V, 

34S 

+80b 

174V* 

143 

Mar 146V* 148 

346V* 

348 


Es>. Sates 


Prev. Salas 11920 




Prev.OavOpan lnL 0478 off 363 





Soasan 

Saason 






ChB- 

High 

Low 


Dorn 

High 

LOW 

Close 

ORANGE JU ice (NY CO 





1X000 Pa.- cants Par lb. 






ibxsu 

11850 

Mar 

18180 

18180 

17875 

1045 


18580 

15180 

I5S40 

May 

18150 

18150 

17975 

18X10 

18485 

Jul 

18X25 

18225 

1KL50 

1050 

—LOO 

18280 

15775 

Seo 

17945 

17945 

T77J0 

17870 

—130 

18180 

15780 

Nov 

17X73 

17X75 

17740 

17770 

-1-55 

18080 

15680 

Jon 

17X25 

17X25 

,77J» 

17650 

—170 

16540 

15630 

Mor 

17750 

17750 

17750 

17653 

—1.70 

16X50 

16080 

MOV 




17X80 

—170 

Est Sates 

,500 Prev. Sates 450 




Pm.DayOpanlnt. XI03 UC130 





Season Season 
Hlah Law 


Open High Low Ctaa 


Metals _ 


COPPER tCOMEXI 
TSOOOIbs-- cents per lb. 

92JW 5545 Jan 40JS 40JS «US 4048 

Fab «L7S 

93J0 5540 Mar 6120 4140 6040 61.10 

9150 567D Mav 61-70 41 JO 61JX) 6145 

88-25 57JM Jul 6150 62JH 61 JO 41.75 

82.10 57.50 Sep 42.10 4X20 6175 62JX) 

8425 5850 Dec 4135 4145 4220 4140 

84J0 5940 Jan _ 4150 

8000 5940 MOT 4180 4105 4280 4175 

7480 41.10 May 4175 6125 *125 4385 

7440 61 JO Jul 4100 63J0 6100 4115 

7090 6130 Sep 4X50 4410 4150 4145 

Ext. Sales 9800 Prw.Safes 11402 
P rev. Day Open lnL 91J47 up I860 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Jp«r dir- 1 paint equals SOtOMI 
J050 7444 Mar .7537 7540 J9Z7 7539 

7835 J440 Jun 7527 7527 -7527 JS25 

7585 -7500 Sep 7B0 -7320 7528 7519 

7544 .7474 Dec JSU 

.7500 7500 Mar 7304 7504 7504 7509 

Est, Sales 447 P rev. Salas 544 

Prev. Day Open I rtf. 8790 dH109 


SIB 6ft 6b 
48 91* 9 
JO J 152 39ft 0 

2 H » 
48710 9ft 
241 48k 4b 
328 BY* 71* 
232 4 Vi 3** 
75 2*> 2V* 
38 6ft 5ft 
802396 23b 
18) 4.1 33 341* 34 

50 5** 5*9 
9271* Z7ft 
82 221* 70b 
4414 171* 

1381 iob Tone 

160 U 17b 

290 3b 3ft 
144 22 Vi 21 Vb 
454231** 31b 
2034 8b 719 
108 2*4 21* 
77 13 12*6 

13 86 7b 
.14 1J 14412*9 1199 
136 8*9 6*6 

1823*3 41b 

905 449 6ft 
352 20 Vi 19*9 
7 6 5*b 

441 2b 2*9 
Ml 131* 13b 
9914 15% 

f 12 19V* 17V* 

159 14*9 13b 
930 8b 7b 
188 IN lb 
232 18b 17V* 
41 5 4b 
81a 7 73 5b 5 

643 9ft 9ft 
513 1299 

1386 6*9 5*9 


6V* + b 
9*9— *9 
39b 
2*9 
9*9 

4b— V9 
8b— b 

419 + *9 

2 ** 

6 + b 

23b 

34 — V9 
5*9— V9 
271*— Vi 
20b- b 
17V*— b 
10*9 

1 3b+ 1* 
22 + 19 

31V*— b 
8b 

2b+ b 
IS*- *9 
8 + b 

12ft + ft 
8V*+ ft 
42b +lb 
6**—l* 

isr* 

m* 

14V* + V* 
799+ H 
lb 

17b + b 
5 + b 
5 — b 
9b+ V9 
12V*— V* 
6b + *9 


LafiFm .lie 7 

LOlal- .16 1.1 

LamaT jo SJ 

AS 4.1 


40 4J 570 14 

14 7V. 

Jua 15 125 43 

JSe 35 « TU 

JS 18 lUS^ 

2 m 7b 

130 IS 

320 23 107 pi* 

233 3*i 
241 3*1 
JSe 17 2 12 

87 J 344 22b 
253 7 
JO 1J 1077 15 

436225b ■ 
220 72 77 31 

.16 26 23 6b 

1320 31b 
10 14V? 

1 J8 52 32 24b 

1404 30V: ■ 

32 22 
654 in* 


lib— ft 
15 

14 * + V* 

16V: 

14 

719- ft 
47b + b 

r.9 

*7*9— ft 
14b + b 

BLli? 

3b 

12 

21b— l* 

4 ** 

15 

25ft — V. 
30ft— *9 
6b + V* 

37 F 

14-.* + b P 

24b +<4 P 

30V* +1 P. 

21b P 

1 r* + ft 


910 U 14V* IS — Vi 
5* 5b 4*9 4ft— V* 
28 2Sb 2Sb 25b 
74 3b 3 3 — b 

1448 26b 25b 25b— b 
219 4ft #ft 4*9— ft 
32 11% lib lib 4- b 
3709101* 10 Wft + Vi 


NCACa 4 7b 7b 7b 

NMS 212 3*9 3*9 3*9 

NOPCSS 213*9 13*9 13*9 

N Bn Tax J4 48 273 21b 21 21 

NtOvs ura 47 38 40*9 40b 40b 



w* 


JBRast J4 18 
Jackpot t 
JoekLfe 
Jamwir 

JottBeti 180 47 
JefSmrf 80a 28 
JefMart 


Livestock 


Industrials 


KLAs 

KMWSy 

Kaman 64 XI 
Kcr-cftr 

Kauler AO* 48 

KavtSon 

KatyJn 

Kemp 180 38 
KvCnLf 80 23 
K eve* 

KevTm 

Klmbol 84 18 

KJmbrt 

Kincaid 

KhvJers 84 8 

vlKoss 

Kray 86 8 

Krugrs J2 22 
Kuicke .14 8 


16b 17 + ft 
4*9 4V* + ft 
34b 36V*— 19 
19b 19b— V* 
32b 33b +1 
19V* 70b 
8 I — b 
17b, ^ 

PA 4b + b 
4b 4b + Vi 
9*9 9*9— *9 
25** 26 
16b II +!*» 


20*9 22 +1V* 
TOVi 10*4— ft 
26b 24b— b 
14 16*9— *9 

12b 13b 

ift 1ft +>9* 

4Sb 44 + b 

27 37 — b 

6 6b + V* 
10** T0b+ b 
27b 28VI+ *h 
6ft 7 + V* 

9 9b 
15% 16*9+ *9 
<9 *9 

9b 9V* 

14*9 M*9 
27*9 2Sb + ** 


Financial 


FEEDER CATTLE (CM) 

44800 lbs.- cants per Dx 
7385 4575 Mar 1380 7382 

7295 6780 APT 7280 7300 

7090 6495 May 7085 7087 

7180 6480 AtlB 71JS 71JS 

71.10 67 JM S«P 7085 7090 

7015 0.18 Oct 4985 6997 

7075 7080 Mo*. 

Est. Sale* 1812 Prey. Sates 1844 
Prev. Day Open Int. 10,143 up 220 
HOGS (CUBE) 

30800 Rw.- cents per Rl 
5880 4767 Feb 5180 5280 

5485 43.10 Apr 4080 4985 

5580 4880 Jun 5380 5290 

SOT 093 Jul 5425 500 

507 4760 Aua 5320 5380 

51-75 4500 OCt 4982 4982 

3005 46-30 Dec 49 JO 49-25 

49 JO 44.23 Feb 4880 4860 

47J5 45J5 Apr 4697 4697 

Est Sates 4814 Prev. Sates M«l 
Prev. Day Open Int 27,785 up 844 
PORK BELLIES (OBE) 

384100 R>s^ cent* par tb. 

8185 40.93 Fab 7125 71.B2 

si jo 4aie Mar 71J# 722s 

8200 41.13 May 7X37 7X70 

8287 62.15 Jul 74.15 7480 

8066 4030 Alia 7285 7270 

75.15 4X15 Feb 4860 4860 

7380 44J0 Mar 

Eat- Sates 8134 Prev. Sales MM 
pmOsymn Int. 1X404 oKSl 


7X40 7380 
7285 7297 
7020 7082 

7180 7125 
7080 700 
69 JO 4997 
7075 


5180 5185 
4055 4X75 

5385 5162 

5480 54.18 

SXW 5X12 
4882 4895 
4985 49 JO 
4X50 4980 
4675 4780 


7095 71 JS 

7183 7190 

72J5 7XM 
7360 7365 
71 J5 71 JS 
6800 <872 


9219 92J1 
9180 9181 
9129 91J9 
9088 9088 
9063 90S 
9026 9026 
9080 9080 


1)5 T. BILLS (IMM) 

0 million- pts of 100 Pd. 
9221 0J9 Mar 

91J? 0.14 Jun 

9129 84.94 Sec 

9089 85J7 Dec 

9051 0660 Mar 

9022 0-01 Jun 

899 4 8X00 Sep 

053 093 Dec 

Est. Sales 10006 Prev. Si 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 4620 


10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

01-30 70-9 Jun 81-23 K-» 

81-9 75-18 SOP 81-3 0-13 

60- 22 73-12 Dec 60-15 80-16 

8M 75-18 Mar BOO 800 

79-24 77-22 Jun 

Est. Sales Free. Sales 11454 

Prev. Dav Open int. 398*4 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 ncMIOOkOOfrPt* B32ndso(100 pd) 
77-15 57-37 Mar 73-15 73-31 

77-13 57-20 Jun 72-18 73-1 

74-2 57-W Sep 71-30 72-9 

T6S S7-B DOC 71-6 71^1 

72-30 57-2 Mar 70-17 71 

704 56-29 Jun 70-fl 70-14 

49-25 56-29 SOP *9-25 700 

4006 56-25 Dec 40-15 49-23 

<9-7 56-27 Mer 404 49-12 

40-11 640 Jun 48-34 400 

68-18 6401 SUP 68-18 6406 

Est. Sates Prev. SateCtn. 107 

Prev. Day Open inLT9X6B3 upsjbz 

ONMA(CBT) 

STOaOOO prln-Ms X32ndSOfU0pd 
70-14 37-5 Mar 70-9 70-17 

4022 57-17 Jun 40-15 69-77 

49 90-13 See 49 404 

40-13 304 Dec 40-12 60-72 

67-15 58-20 (War 47-29 46 

0-4 58-25 Jun 0-8 67-8 

0# 65-21 SOP 

Est. Sales Piwv.Sdes U85 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 7JS4 up 199 

CERT. DEPOSIT 1 1 MM) 
si mlfllon- pts aimed 

njg 45.63 Mar n<4 *149 

91 JO 8X30 Jun 91.19 91 JO 

9066 SS M Sep 9089 7059 

9082 0&34 Dec 

89A0 8656 Mar 

HE 8*83 Jun 

086 086 Sep 

ESLSate* 792 Prev. Seda 722 
Pnrv. Day open tnt 14JS1 OHI70 

EURODOLLARS llMM] 
nmillleiHtBef lOOpet. 

•1J8 15.14 Mar 91 J3 9L37 

9088 8Z8» Jim Mtt 9081 

9020 8453 Sep 9028 90J1 

080 8480 Dec »J8 083 

0J7 6610 Mar 080 080 

0JM 1673 Jun 085 0.12 

88 JS 088 Sup BUS 0X75 

087 0J9 DOC 

Est. Sales 27876 Prev. Sates 34J09 
Prev. Day Open int 0806 UP3J41 


9X14 9X15 
91J0 7W2 
91 Jl 91J2 
9081 9082 

90L5D 90-46 

9023 9021 

9000 086 
0933 


BZ-,1 SMS 
81-16 81-19 


7X8 73-11 

72-10 73-15 
71-18 71-20 
70-0 TWO 
70-9 70-10 

69-25 69-25 
69-11 69-11 


6700 57-20 
0-5 as 
66-25 


9189 081 

91.10 91.10 
9059 9055 
9088 
049 
0J6 
088 


9186 91 JB 
9074 1078 
9019 9020 
0.72 0J3 
BJ3 0J4 
081 081 
8075 8X23 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMS) 
points and cents 

18025 15130 Mar 17X70 17980 178J0 17X7S 

18X30 15610 Jun 16280 16280 16165 16180 

18625 16080 Iw 1*485 18670 1B490 16385 

I0JO 17X20 Dec 189.10 1*9.10 18X110 18X25 

Est. Sales 62J96 Prev. Sola 78J64 
Prev.Dav Open int. 57874 eft 961 


VALUE L INE C KCBT) 
points and corns 

19670 ,6X18 MOT 1080 1080 1962B T964S 

20240 17X00 Jun 200-45 20050 20085 

20X55 18X75 Sep 20341 20385 20X30 20345 

EeL5ateS Prev. Sales 4448 

prev. Day Open int. 6351 up 313 


NY5E CO MP- I NDEX INVFEI 
paints and cants 

10440 8X2B Mar ,0645 164.15 WUO M340 

104-25 9086 Jun 1HJ5 HX90 10X16 M540 

10780 91 JS sea 10780 H7J0 107 JO 107.15 

10JD 10, JO Dec 10X25 10980 10X25 10X90 

EsL Solas 1X879 Prey. Sates 17465 
Prev. Day Open int. 10J28 aH3 


Commodity Indexes 


O toe 

Moody’S 965.10 1 

Reuters 1,99X20 

DU. Futures 125.06 

Com. Research Bureau^ 245.70 

Moodv^ : base 100 : Dae. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; l - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. IS, 1931. 
Dew Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 
969 JO f 
Z00A30 
124.94 
244.70 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 25 

Sugar In Frmdi Francs pit metric hn. 
Other Rwres in Francs per 100 kx 


High Low Close a 

SUGAR 

Mar 1J89 U5S 1475 1479 - 

MOV 1430 140S 1430 1430 Ur 

Aug 1^23 1465 1495 1410 

Od 1460 1450 1465 1473 

■Dec 1440 14<0 1460 1470 Ur 

Mar 1265 1,755 1J80 1283 

■ Est. wL: 24M tots of 50 tons. prev. od 
sales: 1518 tots. Open Interest: 19421 
COCOA 

Mar X20S X185 X190 X1W 

AM* 2230 2220 2221 2225 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2210 — ur 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2500 — ur 

Dec N.T. N.T. - 1130 

Ater N.T. N.T. — XI 38 

May N.T. N.T. — X130 

Brt. vaL: 60 lots of H) tens. Prev. ad 
solos: X tots. Open Intarvst: 8)6 
COFFEE 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2460 — Lfn 

Mor 2465 2457 2461 X5A3 1 

Mav N.T. NT. 2453 2475 

Jly NT. NT. 2445 — i 

SOP N.T. NT. 2460 — 1 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2468 — * 

Jan N.T. NT. 2453 — i 

Esl. vol.: 12 lots of S Ions. Prev. od 
sates: 21 lots. Open Interest: 236 
Sbto: Boarsm <ta Commerce. 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. 25 

W. GwtaBMwUZyflO matt astern out 


Strtks OHMdHe Pvta-Seltit 

Pries Mr Jn Ml ter Ju Seat 

x us — an oji — 

31 X90 129 182 032 B44 — 

5 686 Ul ,24 048 057 121 

» xm as an i46 141 u< 

M 045 131 041 224 — — 

35 D42 XII 044 U1 — — 

Estimated total 96L7J31 
Cdte: Thurs. HL4J69 open 1st, 3X527 
Puts: Tfturs. vaL 1429 epos M. 17JIT 
Source: CME. 


Cash Prices Jan. 25 




■yS **»» 




XV* Mi 

U 13b 


10b 
W* 16*x 
15V* I5V* 
«. 5b 
T7V* 17*6 
11*6 1W 
7V* 

3b 
TV* 


37 

37 24V* 

4 

. 923b 


83813*6 

B4 

174 20 

38 

131 29V* 


278 129* 

J 

HWV 


ST 0* 

24 

S3 13 


9010b 

68 

60b 


25 9*6 
10 9b 


0 7b 


232 ISb 

11 

4019. 

20 211* 


21217V* 

34 

1331 27 


<78 4ft 
227 Sb 

37 

42448b 
385 8ft 
22012b 
306 WV* 

18 

13912ft 

1.1 

418 6** 
100 3ft 

34 

184 23 

26 

iaa 6b 

XI 

018b 

11 

81 27ft 

1J 

3 8b 

27 

10 29b 


23b 

33b- 

23b 

23b 

13ft 

, ,3ft- 

W* 

> 20 . 

2? 

23 - 

12ft 

i 12b 

16 

16V* 

8 

Bb- 

131* 

12ft- 

10b 

Wft- 

47b 

47b 

9b 

9b 

Sb 

eft 

6ft 

Mft 

W 

7b 
18b- 
19 ■ 

29b 

16b 

20b- 

Ub 

25ft 

4 

25ft- 

4b 

7b 

8b- 

39V* 

40V* - 

8ft 

12b 

10b 

12b 

6b 

8ft ■ 

12b 

10ft- 
I2V* ■ 
6b- 

» 

3ft 

22b 

22ft- 

5ft 

<ft- 


22b 22b 
41* 4b 
lib 12b 
31 b 32 
5b Sb 
8 flb 
10b 11 
ltb lb 
lb IT* 


'(9.0 


London Commodities 

Jan. 25 

Figures In sterling per metric tea 
Gasoil In U4. dollars per metric tan. 
Gold In U.S. dollars per ounce. 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 25 


MOMG-KONGGOLD FUTURES 

ujls per oence 


Dividends Jan. 25 





■ r ' | 



-4 \ r >F ■ 





•f | 





Ppj}{ 

E'.j 







m / - v ’ m 


luM 


RSS 1 Fab_ 14940 17080 17180 17140 

RSS 1 Mor_ 17X50 17X00 17X00 17X50 

RSS2Fcb_ 15X75 1075 159JJ 160JS 

RSS 3 Fob _ 15X75 15775 15775 lJX^ 

RSS 4 Feb- 149J5 15175 15075 15275 

RSS 5 Fob _ 14175 14375 14275 1447S 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
iwoioysiaa rtaaotfs per 25 tens 


U90 1400 

1,140 1.190 

1.130 1,10 

1.129 1.160 


1.190 1.140 

1890 1.130 


volume; 2 lots of 25 tans. 
Source.- Awferx 




ID 2-U 2-1A 
16 Ml W3 


-L-i. 




S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. 25 


Market Guide 



M ter W Ml 

inj - - - 

1/16 186 _ - 
1/16 1/16 b - 
i/li Ifl6 H b 
in* 1546 » 
b l*k lb 2h 
» n n m 
S 6 6b lb 
« n n - 


London Metals Jan. 25 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Silver in pence per troy ounce. 


High grade capper camodn; 
spot 144250 1 J44J0 146480 124580 

3 months i.wa 125380 125180 125140 
Cooper cnihodas: 

set* 123080 143380 143880 >43580 

3 months 12080 144480 144000 144380 

Tin: spot 940080 941080 941040 942DJM 

3 month* 948540 979040 945000 945580 

LMUTlPd 3080 3080 38280 38&0Q 

3 months 35X50 3SL0O 35X50 35140 

anczwai 73980 74080 73680 73889 

3 months 73540 73680 73380 73150 

Silver; spot SOS 53X00 53X50 53950 

3 month* 54950 55050 5SM0 555 JQ 


3monttn 35X50 3SL0O 35X50 35140 

anczwtn 7080 74080 73680 73840 
3 monlhs 73550 73680 73380 73150 
Silver ;spg) 53150 53X00 53X50 53950 
3 month* 54950 55050 5SM0 5SS5Q 
AfumMum: 

■Pd 97160 97380 97100 0440 

Jmonltu 180,80 ,40280 ,80X00 <80X00 
NidIMIBW 459B88 44W80 452080 452580 
Jmonnq 45080 455080 451080 451S80 
Saum: Router*. 


Japan Prices Rose 
0.2% Last Month 

Ream 

TOKYO — The Japanese unad- 
justed consumer price index row 
02 percent in December from No- 
vember, when it was down 0.6 pd 1- 
cent from October, thegovemiwn 1 
said Friday. , 

The December index was up2-° 
percent from a year earlier alter J 
22 percent year-to-year increase ai 
the same point in November. 

As a result, the Japanese cofr 
sumer price index for 1984 rose aD 


a 1 .9-pcrcent increase in 1983 
2.7-percent increase in 1982- 






























































































INTERNATIONAL 


: i A i 


TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


AUTO SHOPPING 


cwiMATMA at 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED I holidays *™vel 


(Continued From Back Page) 


tp. vi Ji'.i 1 





53® 






l 





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Worldwide delivery 

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FOR SALE & WANTED 



Commodities 

Column. 


End Sought 
To Curbs on 
Japanese Cars 

(Continued from Page 9) 
ability to build an additional 2 mil- 
lion cars annually.] 

Each additional 100,000 units 
represents about $1 biffion in an 
automotive trade deficit that to- 
taled $17 billion in 1984. The auto 
deficit represented about half of 
the total bilateral trade deficit of 
$33 billion. 

Presidential advisers believe the 
United States must get the Japa- 
nese to open their markets to UJ5. 
goods rather than restrict the U.S. 
market to Japan. 

Trade officials noted that negoti- 
ations wffl begin next week in To- 
kyo as part ofthe follow-up to the 
Los Angeles talks on Jan. 2 be- 
tween President Reagan and Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone. 

The new talks will be aimed at 
reducing import barriers in Japan 
and increasing sales of U.S. goods 
sold in the areas of telecommunica- 
tions equipment, computers and 
software, lumber and medical ap- 
paratus frnri phaT TpaffTtfj f y lg- 

One analyst here suggested that 
thee has been a dramatic role re- 
versal in preparation for the negoti- 
ations. The Japanese, he said, now 
want the auto restraints continued 
because this would relieve pressure 
on them to make market-access 
concessions in the other sectors, 
which are politically sensitive for 
members of the Liberal Democrat- 
ic Party. 

■ Senator Seeks Extension 

The new Republican chairman 
of the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee, Senator Richard G. 
Lugar of Indiana, said Thursday 
that he favors con turning import 
restraints on Japanese cars for an- 
other year because the strong dollar 
prevents U_$. automakers from be- 
ing competitive. The Washington 
Post reported from Washington. 

He added, however, that he has a 
“hunch'* that Mr. Reagan would 
r emain dent on whether the quo- 
tas should be continued for a fifth 
year. This would place the Japa- 
nese in the uncomfortable position 
of having to make the decision 
themselves about whether to con- 
tinue the restraints. 

“Our best bet,” Mr. Lugar said, 
“is to keep things pretty much as 
they are,” although he said the quo- 
tas for the Japanese should be 
raised “slightly higher.” 


West Germany Sees Steady Growth 
Of Economy, Fall in Unemployment 

Roam 

BONN — The government has predicted continued steady growth 
of the West Germany economy in 1985 and the first fall in unemploy- 
ment for six years. 

At a cabinet meeting Thursday, top ministers predicted that (he 
German economy wodd grow by about 15 percent or more, broadly 
in line with the gamy maw last year. Independent predictions so far 
have ranged between 2 and 3 percent 

The forecasts are the crucial material from the government's annual 
economic report, which is to be published at the end of this month. 

The government said winaritm, currently at the lowest level of any 
major Western industrialized nation, was expected to fall to an 
average 2 percent from 2.4 percent last year. 

Unemployment, scat by Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s government as 
its main economic challenge, would drop for the first time since 1979, 
albeit only slightly, to average under 9 percent, after being at 9.1 
percent during the last two years. 


Page 13 


The Budget: 
New life as 
Starting Point 

(Continued from Page 9) 

of municipal bonds, now at 10.07 
percent, is a bit higher than its 10- 
percent rate of a year ago. 

Lawrence Kudlow, who served 
as chief OMB economist earlier in 
the Reagan administration and is 
now an investment counselor, calls 
the budget outlook “a disaster." He 
describes spending as “out of con- 
troT and the deficit “angling up- 
ward on a dangerous pro-cyclical 
path.” 

According to bis estimates, fed- 
eral outlays lea' the fiscal year 1985, 


Of Tfe pi errn ouuays ior me uscai year iy», 

Entrepreneurs Seek Profits, 

1 i ft ri n 1 • $737 bflhon, for a deficit of $245 

rreedom in U.S. Franchises 


(Continued from Page 9) 
franchising accounted for S456.7 
billion in sales last year, more than 
a fourfold-rise from 1969, when 
only $112.8 billion in sales came 
from franchising. 

“You can hardly buy anything 
today that doesn't go through fran- 
chising in some fashion,” said 
Thomas H. Murphy, publisher of 
the Continental Franchise Review. 

Moreover, large service compa- 
nies are going the franchising route. 
The Greyhound Corp., for exam- 
ple, recently said it would extend 
its service to more rural areas by 
franchising the right to use its em- 
blem to small regional bus linns 

In fact, many of the newer fran- 
chises are in services rather than 
products. Sylvan Learning Corp, 
for example, in 1980 started fran- 
chising centers to teach supplemen- 
tary reading and math s kills to chil- 
dren and adults. According to 
Berry Fowler, chairman and chief 
executive officer, the company al- 
ready has sold 152 franchises, and 
its revenues have zoomed to 516 
million a year. 

The growth of franchising has 
brought with it a new diversity in 
types of franchise deals. For more 
than 100 years after Singer Sewing 
Machine Co. sold the first fran- 
chise in 1863, so-called trade-name 
franchises, in which companies 
sold nothing more than the right to 
distribute their products, were the 
only franchises around. 

But now, many trade-name fran- 
chises are going out of business. In 
1976, for example, there were more 


than 226,000 franchised gasoline 
service stations. The Commerce 
Department expects that, when 
1984 figures are tallied, they will 
show that the number slipped to 
about 130,000. 

Today, the fastest-growing form 
of franchise is the business-format 
franchise, in which the franchisee 
gets access not only to the compa- 
ny’s products or trademark, but 
also to its business plans and cor- 
porate support services. For exam- 
ple, a typical franchise contract 
would spell out the accounting, hir- 
ing, training, advertising and mar- 
keting support that the franchisee 
can expect. The cost to the franchi- 
see would be a one-time fee of sev- 
eral thousand dollars and a yearly 
percentage of revenues. 

The- continued growth of all 
types of franchises is at least in part 
attributable to the growing number 
of women in the work force. Many 
want to run their own businesses 
and find that the franchising mode 
“lessens the risk factor,” says An- 
drew Kostecka, a Commerce De- 
partment expert on franchising. 

“I needed the direction a fran- 
chise would give me,” said Mrs. 
Donoughe, the former advertising 
manager who now runs one of 93 
Fop-Ins maid services. 


$737 billion, for a deficit of $245 
billion. 

James J. O'Leary, economic con- 
sultant to United States Trust CO. 

of New York, taking account of the 
budget deficits, supply-demand 
conditions in the credit markets, 
anticipated Federal Reserve poli- 
cies, mid the expectations of inves- 
tors, says the decline in interest 
rales “has bottomed out or is dose 
to doing so.” 

He expects both short- and long- 
term rates to remain ne a r current 
levels through the early spring be- 
fore starting to rise gradually in the 
second half as the rate of economic 
growth “strengthens somewhat and 
the inflation rate rises moderately.” 

But his big worry is that, with 
huge budget deficits hanging oyer 
the economy, interest rates wall rise 
sharply in every period when the 
private sectors expand and meet 
the competition of heavy Treasury 
borrowing. 

Such anxiety does not appear to 
faze Mr. Reagan. He exultal this 
week over the 6.8-percent increase 
in the gross national product last 
year, the biggest since 1951, and the 
3.7-percent rise in the GNP price 
deflator, the lowest inflati on since 
1967. “If they’re so smart,” be 
seems to be saying, “why ain’t they 
President?” 


West German Car Orders Off 


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(Continued from Page 9) 
decline of “around 7 percent” in 
domestic orders for December 
from the year-earlier period. 

A VW spokesman, Ortwin Wit- 
zd, said Vw’s domestic orders, in- 
cluding those for its subsidiary, 
Audi AG. were down 15 percent in 
December from the level of a year 
earlier. 

“Currently we have no plans for 
short shifts or layoffs, but we have 
withdrawn plans for increasing em- 
ployment this year," Mr. Witzel 
said. 

A spokesman at Opd said do- 
mestic orders in December trailed 


year-earlier levels by from 10 to 20 
percent. 

Officials at Daimler-Benz AG, 
maker of Mercedes, could not be 
reached for comment. Bnt industry 
sources say the company’s upscale 
domestic customers are not as like- 
ly to be deterred from buying new 
cars by possible future tax breaks 
as buyers of volume automakers. 
Additionally, they say, Mercedes is 
well slocked with various diesd- 
engine models, which have been in 
great demand recently. 

Daimler has said its domestic or- 
ders and sales have not been affect- 
ed by the emission-control issue. 


Company Earnings 

Revalue and profits. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATCRDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 26-27, 1985 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


1 Doesn’t 

give (is 

heedless) 

5 Twist’s 
"twister” 

10 One grand 

14 He has made It 
to Mecca 

18 Bit of biblical 
graffiti 

19 Cremona 
name 

20 Put to flight 

21 Bathe the 
stage with 
bathos 


ACROSS 


48 Caron film: 

1958 

<7 City once 
called Edessa 

48 Cricket sides 

49 Crib 

50 Servile, selfish 
hypocrite 

54 Sans 

(carefree) 

58 Littoral area 
58 Poirot’s 
explanatory 
word 


78 Copperfi eld's 
horrid 
stepfather 

82 Stendhal's real 
name 

83 Arms fora 
musical army? 

85 River of 
Wagner's 
••Ring” 


Dickens Take ’Em! by Frances hansen 


PEANUTS 


n | | | M | | In In MM In hi 1 1 M n i" i" | 


“ DEAR SNOOPY 
WE'VE HAD SOME 
COLD MORNINGS HERE 
ON THE DESERT" 


1 ‘ TODAY I ACTUALLY 
HAD A PIKE IN MY j 


PiREPLACE?; 5 


FIREPLACE " 


86 Quagmire 

87 Napoleonic 
victory site: 
1796 


I3fl 140 <41 





to ^ 


* i ' fl ! 


23 Seasonal 
sourpuss 

28 around 

(snoops) 

27 Square-sail 
rope 

28 Pizazz 

29 Economize 

30 Reaches 

31 Mopes about, 
Dogpatch style 

32 line 

(conform) 

33 On«*-Mner 

34 Nursery 
porridge base 

35 With suavirv 

39 Where Rene 

cuts the 
mustard 

42 Evil dwarf 
feared by 
Little Nell 

44 Sheepish 
comment 

45 N.C. college 


59 Faulkner's 
Eula 


80 Piquant 

81 •• You Glad 

You’re You?” 

82 Felt poorly 

83 Grow, as 
interest on 
money 

65 Traveller or 
Grani 

88 Sluggish 

89 Silver sal a cm 

70 Geo rgi ana’s 

pompous, 

Philistine 

father 

72 Early auto 

73 Old French 
coin 

74 River to the 
Ouse 

75 Get under 
one's skin 

76 Letter-shaped 
beam 

77 Miss Russell, 
informally 


88 One of the 
Keatons 

89 Practice play 
at 4 Down? 

93 Strindberg’s 
land 


BLOND IE 


161 182 I S3 


I 'Aft THE WORLD'S BEST] 
SALSSAAAN 


AND I'M T.-£ WORLDS 
TJOGHEST CJSTOAftEB 


AMD HEBE'S AAY T1E- 
0OEA<B3 „ v_-r 


95 Upright 
adjuster 

96 Anthro- 
pophagite 

97 Rachetbars 








98 Smike’s 
beastly 
tormentor 

100 On 

(fasting) 




1 79 100 181 


101 Quiz 

102 Athens seat of 
higher educ. 

103 Hindu's bad- 
luck day 

104 bitsy 

105 Incisiveness 

108 Savoir- 

107 Deodar or 

baobab 


loo 1 st 1 02 


BEETLE BAILEY 

mm 


WHaa ... 


WE'RE TESTING THE 
SECURITY SETUP IN | 
CAMP 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


© Netc York Times, 

DOWN 


DOWN 


1 One-celled 
animal 

2 Confute 

3 Concerning 

4 World's 
largest office 
building 

5 Daunting 

6 Congrega- 
tional echoes 

7 Parisian 
station 

8 Possessive 
pronoun 

9 Tenor Gedda 

10 Ore-sizing 

screen 

12 Targets 
for Dr. J 


12 Cry of distaste 

13 Peak in Colo. 

14 A target for 
Reynard 

15 Old-style love 
song 

16 Louisa 
Gradgrind's 
vulgar 
husband 

17 Shopping-list 
entry 

22 Precognition, 
for short 

24 Like a famed 
essayist 

25 Stir to action 

29 Calpunua's 

robe 


31 Of inherited 
factors 

34 One of the 
Bermudas 

35 Rides the 
waves 

38 Fit of the sulks 

37 Uhlan's 
weapon 

38 Arafat 

39 Socialist labor 
leader: 1855- 
1926 

40 Netman 
Nastase 

41 Old Martin's 
murderous 
nephew 


42 "The 

Doodle,” 1937 
song 

43 Riding whip 
48 Rub the wrong 

way 

50 Father of 
Meriones 

51 Dramatic 
Valentine 

52 Insomniac's 


59 Literary Gore 
61 "There’s my 
wife; look well 

Spring- 

Rice 


82 An Oakley 
63 Vinegary 
84 Warming 
bedtime drink 


53 U.S. peren- 
nial herb 

54 Shropshire 

55 Turgenev's 
birthplace 

57“ nome,' 

Verdi aria 


65 Fern- frond 
formation 

88 "God is Three, 

and God 

Newman 

67 Actress 
Patricia 

68 Made tracks 

76 1 wo 


71 Sting] ess, 
feckless bee 

74 Alan of "Wait 
Until Dark” 

78 Most long- 
limbed 

78 Flower-of-an- 
hour 

79 Words ana 
Wonderland 
bottle 

SOW.W.IZ 

acronym 

81 Hot surface 
from 

Tennessee 

82 Nigerian 
province 

84 Scads 


88 French 
financial house 

88 Coin stolen by 
Jessica 

89 “He is, or 

has to be”: 
Voltaire 

90 Cross as 

(irritable) 

91 ChAteau-Thier- 
ty’s river 

92 ADinsmore 

93 Bath, e.g. 

94 African gully 

95 Hack 

96402. to Fa bl Lis 

98 Network 

99 The Volga, in 
ancient days 


\ NS; 


ANDY CAPP 

iw ; 


ss s* AREVOU ^ 

U (LISTENING?! 





IOOK.MATE.1 
I'M NOT A 
MAGICIAN. J 
7- 1 CAN'T V 
PRODUCE V 
>. MONEY 
OUT OF \ 
THIN AIR ] 


HEARD -THERE'S 

a depression 
s going on/kS 





ATLANTIC CIRCLE 

By Kathryn Lasky Knight. 222 pp. Si 6.95. 

W. W. Norton, 500 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. WHO. 

Reviewed by Stephen L Petranck 

W E are all captive to the romance of seafaring 
tales, the b table of a bow wave rolling off on 
itself, the symmetry of sails set like vertical wings 
against an azure sky. But life aboard a small boat at 
sea is often otherwise. 

Far offshore, waves can seem to be higher than 
mountains, and the plunge into a trough between 
them is like an out-of-control ride down a snowy 
slope in a house on skis. Nevertheless, sailors bear 
the romance of their obsession proudly and tend to 
keep secret how much of serious sailing is punishing 
and miserable. Not Kathryn Lasky Knight, who has 
sailed enough miles to preach the troth with certain- 
ty. Her journal entry on July 8, 1974, when she was 
halfway across the Atlantic in a 30-foot sailboat: 
“This trip is just as awful as I ever imagined.” 

1 know what she meant And so do other sailors, 
though they rarely speak of it Even Knight admits 
to tempting daydreams of gourmet meals perking 
away atop a gim baled stove as a setting sun fires a 
sky orange. But then her alarms go off. She and her 


BOOKS 


husband-having crossed the Atlantic twice and 
sailed in and around most of Western Europe, the 
Caribbean and the East Coast of the United States 


again, a promise to herself penetrated by a night’s 
sleep and sailor's forgetfulness. 

No one, of course, held a gun to Knight’s head 
and said, “Sail, or else.” And it is partly the sensa- 
tions and memories of the grand moments that keep 


WIZARD of ID 


mm J* in 
dor Patrick 


mTGDtMfcrot&T00er 


Caribbean and the East Coast of the United States 
— know better. She remembers quickly the realities, 
and tells her tales. 


her not too far from a teak deck: leisurely motoring 
across Eurooe from Holland to the Mediterranean 


There are tales of other people met at sea, petty 
tyrants who like being captains, drunken ana 
threatening French soldiers who appear on deck in 
the middle of the night, drifters whose inability to 
get along on shore with normal people leads them to 
the isolation of oceans, where they float from port to 
port, having little to offer except carping about high 
food prices. 

There are tales, too, about weather, and not just 
the stormy stuff. After sailing through four straight 
days of smothering cold fog off the coast of Maine, 


across Europe from Holland to the Mediterranean 
via canals with the ever-present odor of French 
bread permeating the cabin, or exploring delicate 
beaches on tiny coastal Maine islands. 

Nevertheless, there were extenuating circum- 
stances that got Knight into all this. Fust her 
parents, ironically, gave the couple the sailboat as a 
wedding gift Then there was a deal: while sitting in 




WH4t 

A&W1 

4U4UFI0? 

l&CfcP 


OF UCYWS \OUP 





the copilot seat of a small Piper Cherokee airplane 
and staring at the gas gauge. Mrs. Knight agreed to 
cross the Atlantic in the wedding present if Mr. 
Knight would abandon flying. Such are the negotia- 
tions of terror, trading momentary high fear for the 
low continuous roll of anxiety. 

One can blunder almost anywhere into this jour- 
nal of adventures and meet with the author's strik- 
ing sensations: from a wave that knocks her splat 
onto the cabin floor, a “mammoth black shape as 
tall as the mizzenmast raring toward us" that 
“drops its black jaws into a death grin of while 
spikes," to an idyllic morning on the tiny Danish 
island of AnholL “a watercolor world of pale green 
dune grass, a milky sea, and fragile blue sky. Figures 
bronze-and-bisemt color walked down a wide beach 
fringed with sand dunes on an upper ridge.” 

Nevertheless, the charm, grace and character of 



; M aus/s 


Knight writes: *T experienced a kind of sensory 
deprivation that 1 had never known. I had never in 
my life felt so totally cut off. Trying to imagine there 
was a world beyond that contained within the 30- 
foot dimensions of our ketch required an extraordi- 
nary effort of the will and imagination.” Finally 
reaching safe harbor, she resolved never to sail 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 



□□□□b uaaa □□□□□ annuo 
uaoQD auanu □naan uuocja 
□aouuuaaaaaaaaaaaaciauuD 
aaaa aaaaa aoaaa □□□ddg 
ljuli uuanu LiLiaau BnaaaoQ 
□ddo □□□□ □□□□ 

□aaanEaaauaaaaaaaaaiiGciu 
□JIIUL □□□□ □□□□□ aBUD 

iLiauu nauui anuria auuu 
loaoaBDaaaaaaaaaauaaanoH 
□ao □□□□ aaaaaa □□□nao 
uuuuo □□□ □□□□□ 
laaoann oaaaao aaaa ooa 
uaoaBnoaaunoaaaaaaaaDoo 
(□□an Qnoaa □□□□ aoua 
ujuu muiiu uauu luiciuli 
unaaEBLjaaaaaaacjaaciaciaQC] 
doqq □□□□ nana 
□aaaEoa □□□□□ aaaaa bdo 
aaaaoo aaaaa aaaaa □□□□ 
aaaaBooaoaaaaaaaaaanaoo 
lanBao aaaaa aaaaa aanoo 
□aaaa aaaaa uaaa uauaa 


REX MORGAN 


THE DINNER WAS ^ 
DELICIOUS, MARTHA/ 
NOW. LET ME HELP 
you WrrH THE y 
DISHES ! v*sr 


r NO, BERTf GO INTO THE LIVING ^ 
KOCWV AND I'LL JOIN YOU IN A 
MOMENT { I WANT TO GET SOME- 
THING OUT OF MY PURSE ' - 


i\ 




fs lyrical travelogue and stunning statement 
enture would not he enough for those who do 


of adventure would nothe enough for those who do 
not know a tiller from a tack, so there must be more. 
One senses the former Kathryn Lasky would not 
stoop to simple boat-book writing, no matter how 
elegant She reaches beyond, to vulnerable autobi- 
ography and biography that chart the odyssey of a 
mixed marriage: a woman of Russian-Jewish heri- 
tage and a man who could trace ancestors to the 
Mayflower, she a nest-builder and he an adventurer, 
her writing and his Filmmaking, a woman of style 
and a man of nature. There is nothing at all simple 
about either of them, especially her love-hate rela- 
tionship with the sea and small boats. 


GARFIELD 


FOR YOUR PLEASURE, I ,dUPD 
CAT. WILL LAY A BASIC MOVE 
ON TUI5 HAPLESS BY5TANPER 


LEAVE ITUPTfc A 
PUMB FOG'S RUBBER TONGUE 
TO MANE A MOCKERY 
-v OF THE MARTIAL ARTS r 


Of 




Stephen L Petranek Ism the staff of The Washing- 
ton Post 













































Wf 


Flutie to Sign Contract 
With USFL’s Generals 



Th* Associated Press Woolf said tbe agreement "is 

BOSTON — Doug Flutie, the veiy acceptable. There were im- 
1984 Heisman Trophy winner, has provenjents made" in the oiler ini- 
itacbed verbal agreement on a bally presented by the Generals 
tong-term contract with the New early this month. 

Jersey Generals, and should sien He said the final oaoerwork son 


erworh still 
at that FIu- 
ort to New 
in Orlando 
aniidpaied 


| Jersey Generals, and should sign He said the final paperwork, still 
jl > 1 1, with the United States Football had to be completed, but that FIu- 
i!vv League club next Tuesday or be probably would repot to New 

• J5 Wednesday, his attorney, Bob Jersey's training camp in Orlando 

, Woolf said Friday. immediately after the aniidpaied 

“We’ve readied an agreement signing. 

■*T ’ and- we have given a commitment Flutie would be the third conseo- 

to them and Doug will be going to utive Heisman Trophy winner to 
the New Jersey Generals," Woolf sign with the new league, following 
. ’ ’“'v* said. running; barkt Herschd Walker, 

'• ' Woolf said he reached agreement whojamed die Generals, and Mike 

i . --sA on a contract for the Boston Col- Rozier, who was with Pittsburgh 

lege quarterback in talks Thursday last season. 

— ■ — _ with Generals’ owner Donald The National Football l e ag ue 



Johnson StiU Supremely Confident 

U.S. Downhill Champion Shrugs Off Austrian Hostility 


mm 




with Generals’ owner Donald The National Football l e ag ue 
,||.sn Trump and the club’s president, does not hold its draft until April 
Sffi Jay Seltzer. 30. The Buffalo Bills, who have the 


, jay seuzer. ju. tne uunato urns, who nave the 

>OjS/ He refused to reveal details of first pick, had said Flutie was 
. — -or ^ the contract, but it was believed to among several players they were 
I " be worth at least $7 million over at considering for that choice, 

a least five years. Woolf said Flutie decided to ac- 

■) The deal would make the Boston cept the Generals' offer, in part, 

— oj afe ,.'; College quarterback one of the "because this is a very attractive 
highest paid pro football players situation with the Generals. What 
and among the highest paid rookies is there to wait for. We have noth- 
JT* in any sporL ing else.” 

J V t . ..... i. n_t_i Im . — -r ni it 




any sporL 

Last year former Brigham 
rang quarterback Steve Young 
gned a 43-year, $40 millio n con- 


ing else." 

[ham Orlando cm Tuesday, Woolf 
oung and Seltzer met for about six boors, 
era- “We bridged a lot of differences 



mi 




By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 

WENGEN, Switzerland — A year after he beat 
the Austrians at their own national sport. Bill 
Johnson is s up reme l y confident about his eh-Wes 
for another major doing victory. The 1984 Olym- 
pic champion in the men’s downhill has his sights 
fixed on the siding world championships starling 
at the end of the month in Borario, Italy. 

“It would be nice to steal another medal from 
the Austrians," the 24-year-old American said. 
“Bonnio is nice and easy on top with open gliding 
at the bottom. It's the fcmd of run I Hke. Wouldn’t 
that be something to win there?” 

Savoring the memory of his Olympic triumph 
with one of his huge, self-assured grins, he went 
on: "Every kid’s dream in Austria and Switzerland 
is to win the Olympic gold. And I tot* h from 
them. The Swiss are good about it when they lose, 
but the Austrians just can’t handle it. The Austri- 
ans feel they should win every single race and I 
didn’t let than win the big one:" 

Not everyone finds Johnson's style 
says Harald Schoenhaar, director cif the United 
Stares Alpine skiing team. “It was awful in Krtzba- 
hd earlier this month, really frightening. People 
banged with their fists an the team car and tore at 





tract with the Los Angeles Express there,” Woolf said. "I thought in 
of the USFL, but Flu tie’s contract my own mind that we had a deal, 
would contain more in annual pay but I wasn’t sure." 
if the resorts are correct. Woolf was in New York Thurs- 


c if the reports are correct. Woolf was m New Yak Thurs- 

f Gary Croke, the Generals' direc- day morning for a television] ap- 

tor of public relations, said there pearance and contacted Trump 
1 would be no comment from the shortly afterwards. 

“-*V7 t- -J: team mtfl a news conference later "Based on that conversation" 

S in the day at the University of Cen- and another with Seltzer, he called 
! tral Florida in Orlando, where the Flutie in the afternoon and recom- 

‘ ikwti is now in training. mended that the player accept the 

X/r'i/ • offer, he said. 

_ J? said, why don't you talk it 

? VpSyV-j BS n T§y» over with your dad. He did and 

af , S nffllXWTO I y m called back about a half hour later 

2 l | || and jaid, Tine^ Fm ready to com- 

. 1st for Patrick ^ opportunity to play in the 

New York area was a major factor 
I United Press International in Flutie’s Hrririnn, his attorney 



IKWT1 is now in tr aining 


' ; 


Rangers Win -jjj 
lstfor Patrick 

United Press International in Flat 
NEW YORK — A snowstorm added. 


West Germany’s Maria Epple heads for victory in the slalom at Arosa, Switzerland Friday. 

Epple Edges McKinney in Slalom 


^ delayed his debut as head coach. The 5-foot-9K-indh Flutie set World Cup slalom victory. 
"L but the Detroit Red Wings could major college career records this 

; season for total offense and passing 

NHL FOCUS yardage as he led Boston College to 


United Press International rimipri poor weather and skiing 

AROSA, Switzerland — West conditions, which have plagued the 
German veteran Maria Epple European season all winter, farced 
edged American Tamara Me Kin- a switch to the slalom, 
ney by just one hundredth of a The West German posted an ag- 
sccond Friday to score her first gregale time of 1 minute 48.11 sec- 


onds for her two runs down the 


“I've been skiing in the Cup dr- Wrisshoni course, which had a ver- 
cuit for 10 years, and finally I won deal drop of 160 meters (525 feet). 



i : not stop Craig Patrick from win- victory over Houston. The Ea 
| ■' ning Ins first game behind the ended the ranked fifth in 

bench. national polls. 

Power-play goals by Ron 

; Greschner and Chris Kontos _____ 

Thursday night helped the New Mjt/j+1% H 

— York Rangers defeat the Red tt UmI mJCCw Jj 
_ Wings 3-1. 4 

H s victory came in Patrick’s nllfl/tfs fllfTl 
game as coach since talcing MJEMmmJGwO J. wMm f v t 

man interim basis from Hero , 

!S, who Was fired Monday. United Prerelnternatwnol 

k, who also serves as the LANDOVER, Maryland — ' 
as general manager, was sup- Washington Bullets’ meat and 
to begin his uc w duties To gs- taloes is their braising style of pi 
mi a game with the Sabres But with the “BeeTBrotfias” <S 
i was postponed when more than . ■■ n . 

"*^two feet of snow fdl in Buffalo. NBA FOCUS 

Tm happy with the effort," -said 

Patrick, who also saved as the sidelines, they have had to look 
■^Rangers’ interim coach in 1980-81. others to dish out the main cou 
\ “Our team became stronger and Greg Ballard and Torn McMI 


yardage as he led BostraCdlegie to a slalom,” said 26-year-old Epple, She docked the best tune of 54.93 
a 10-2 record and a Cotton Bowl whose four World Cup successes seconds for the first heal and was 
victory ova Houston. The have all come in the giant slalom, third fastest on ha next run, clock- 


A downhill race had originally ing 53.58 seconds. 


been scheduled for Friday but con- 


With 'Beef Brothers’ on Shdf, 
Bullets Turn to Old Hands 


and siding “If you want to win, you have to 
jlagued the ski like that. I virtually automated 
iter, farced my moves into the rapid gate 
poles," Epple said. 

an ag- ~Of course, if you win by next to 
: 48.1 1 sec- nothing, you are lucky," she era- 
down the tinned. “Bui I felt meat comma 
leaver- down in the first beadle inS? 
^ second, I lost my rhythm a bit in 

ae of 54.93 the mid-section.” 

nm. dock- McKinney claimed she was not 
^ too disappointed at placing second. 

r the open- “°f cow*. I would have pre- 
Je by 1.04 fened to finish first, but Maria 
the fastest real well I tried to catch ha, 
54 sfcoiwfc but I lost a bit of time in the mid- 
ite 1:48.12. section of the first run where the 
a second,” track was rutty and I skied erratic.” 
i disbelief, Hess, who has yet to win a race 


United Pna international when the 6-foot-7, 215-potmder to Switzerland’s World Cup cham- midseeft 

LANDOVER, Maryland -—The was . ( OTCe l 10 pion Erika Hess in another dose- she had 

aAiitgfnn Buficts’ ny»wf and po- P®® 1 * 011 a “? r McMfllen fouled rat caD last season. almost a 

toes is their bruising style of play, with four minutes re main i n g in the This tune. Hess finished third on a loo dir 

tt with the “BeefBrotbers” <Sl the ^ ame -' ' 1:49.15; jumping nine spots with a win, you 

"It presents a kind of challenge superb run in the second heat to she said. 

NBA FOCUS when your three teg men are out edge out Perrinc Pden by one hun- “I wa 

and your foorth fouls out with four dredth of a second. went for 

felines, they have had to look for minutes left," Ballard said. Blanca Fernandez Ochoa of fm ham 


McKinney, fifth after the open- course, l would have pre- 

ing heat, outskied Epple by 1.04 ferred to finish first but Maria 
seconds in registering the fastest skied real well tried to catch ha, 
second-run time of5154 seconds but I lost a bit of time in the mid- 
to finish with an aggregate 1 :48.L2. section of the first run where the 
“One hundredth of a second," track was rutty and I skied erratic." 
McKinney shouted in disbelief, Hess, who has yet to win a race 
mentioning she had lost out by a this season, dropped more than a 
mere four hundredths of a second second in a tricky, icy turn in the 
to Switzerland’s World Cup chain- midsection, of the first heal when 
pion Erika Hess in another close- she had to correct so modi she 
call last season. almost came to a standstill. “I took 

This time, Hess finished third on a too direct Hne, but if you want to 
1:49.15, jumping nine spots with a win, you have to risk something,” 


NBA FOCUS 


others to dish out the main course 
Gre® Ballard and Tom McMfflen 


“Our team became stronger and Greg BaDairi and Tom McMIIlm “scared, shakey and warned 1 
stranger as the night woe on. I was provided the muscle Thursday center “but it was a lot of fun. 


nervous, I was downright scared, night as the Bullets defeated the 
— Rookie Claude Loisdk gave De- Dallas Mavericks 93-92. 

’■ trait a 1-0 lead at 4:31 of the first The veterans' top-notch play was 
~ r r\\ ^Lrr: : .:period. needed with tire _Beef Brothers," 

.v.«- i - *4*':" Greschner’s goal at 16:11 of . the Jeff Roland and Ride Mahan, plus 
■ r z grsi put New York ahead to stay, high-scoring s mall forward Cliff 

•' \ ^.^..v-He tapped the rebound of a Grant Robinson sidelined with injuries. 
^Cr‘S - Ledyard point shot past Micalcf. McMfflen supplied a season- 
Elsewfaere, Boston stopped Buf- high 15 rebounds in a ddition to 15 
. *. fak) 5-2, Qudiec edged Montreal 4- points. Meanwhile, Ballard scored 

•' 3 and the New York Islanders 11 points, but hauled in a career- 
*■-«. ^^^Tvdun^ed Toronto 4-1. best 20 rdxnmds, sane coming 


when your three teg men are out edge out Perrine Pden by one hun- “I was real mad after that and 
and yomfon^ fads outwith four draith of a second. went for broke in the second beat 

minutes left, Ballard said. Blanca Fernandez Ochoa of p m happy \ moved from 12th to 

The seven-year pro said he was ^ third, but not pleased that I never 

“scared, shakey ami worried" at dipped badt to fifth mace ahead of put together two excellent runs in a 
center “but it vras a lot of fun.” R«a Marja Quanp of Italy row.” 

_ . . . Swiss Olympic downhil] champi- 


Ruland, the team’s starting cen- Mfeheia Figini scored ha first 
ta. is out with a strained right 5 ialom points with a seven th- 


European sports uew^japers have carried scathing 
desorptions of Johnson by Austrian downhiHers. 
“Dirty bluffer” was among the most polite. 

In a breach of skiers' etiquette, the Austrians 
even poked fun at his training runs, in which he 
lagged nearly 10 seconds behind the leaders. Johnr 
sou finish ed 30th in the first Kitzbflhel race and 
was disqualified in the second when he missed a 
gate; bringing cheers and hoots from the crowd. 

This dislike began in Wengen last year when 
Johnson, starting 22d in the prestigious Lauba- 
horn race, scored his first victory m World Cup 
competition, also the first for an American down- 
hill racer. 

Franz Klammer , the 31 -year-old Austrian skier 
who was known in the 1970s as Emperor Franz for 
his domination of the downhill, led (he jeering. In 
his World Cup career, which started in 1973, 
Klammer hag won 25 downhills, 16 mare than the 
second-ranked Bernhard Russi of Switzerland and 
22 mare than Johnson. 

Despite this record, Klammer is usually as soft- 
spoken as Johnson is brash. Although he will not 
discuss the reasons now, Klammer reacted strong- 
ly to Johnson’s Lauberhom victory, the winners 
revelation that he had bet $50 on himself with his 
coach and his remark that “Now it’s double or 
nothing for the next downhill,” at Kitzbuhd, the 
king of the downhill runs. 

Gleefully, Johnson remembered some of the 
unkind words Klamme r had far him, especially 
after the Austrian won the KitzbObel race. 

Not even Johnson remembered what Klammer 
had to say at Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, after Johnson 
boasted, “This is my kind of course and I think 
most everybody knows it" and then won the Olym- 
pic race. Klammer, the Olympic champion in 1976, 
finished 10th. 

“The Austrians don’t need me to lose,” Johnson 
said in the interview. “They destroy themsdves 
without me. Their narrow tnindedness destroys 
than." 

He said he was especially angry .with Klammer 
for attempting to change the fledgling Internation- 
al Association of Downhill Racers into an associa- 
tion of pro downhill ers. 

“We set this thing up basically to get things 
changed on the World Cup circuit ana the next 
thing you know Klamma is sending around letters 
and contacting advertising agencies.” Johnson 
said. "There’s a lot of money in store for the guy 


B31 Johnson 

'The Austrians just can't handle iL' 

who organizes a pro circuit, but Klammer won't be 
that guy if I can help iL" 

To all this, Klamma responded reasonably, if 
ingenuously, in an interview here last weekend. 
“It’s not true I don't like him," he insisted. “He's 
not a common guy, he’s different, he’s interesting." 

“Bui maybe the Austrians don't like somebody 
to beat thor racers. He said early in the season be 
would win at Kitzbnhel this year The Austri- 

ans didn't like iL Maybe that’s why they beat on 
Ms car.” 

Or, as Johnson explained his relations with the 
Austrians, Tve got no protean with them, bat 
they’ve got a problem with me. Well, that’s their 
problem." 

In fact, Johnson has had enough problems this 
season, his third in World Cup competition. After 
predicting rhar he would win seven downhills, he 
rqxntedm less than top shape and has finished in 
the top 10 only twice in five races so far. 

“Instead of training, I spent most of the off- 
season promoting Bill Johnson," he admitted, add- 
ing that a television movie about his life is to be 
filmari in Sarajevo starting next month. 

His coaches said Johnson was not yet in his best 
condition, but Schoenhaar was optimistic. 

“He has no mental problems with his riding but 
physical problems can give you mental problems.” 
the team director said. “He hasn’t won yet this 
year, or come close, but he’s going to win more 
because he’s so good." 

Johnson agreed with this judgmeoL “There are 
seven races left, including the championships,” he 
said. “My confidence is suD there. Who says I can’t 
win the rest?" 

If not, he continued, he could find solace in his 
record last year, the Olympic gold medal and 
World Cup victories at Whistler Mountain in Can- 
ada and at Aspen, Cokx, in addition to Wengen. 

“I’ve done everything I eva wanted to do, in the 
Olympics and m the World Cup," Johnson insist- 
ed. “Being the best in the world last year — I can 
live off that Nobody can take that away. Every 
time I win and somriiody says, Tt was too easy, 
that's why Bin won,’ I say. If it was so easy, why 
didn’t you win? ” 

Just then a skiing fan passed by and asked 
Johnson, “You going to win today?” 

“Why not?” he replied, nodding at one of the 
race organizers nearby. “They hope I do, Tm their 
whole show.” 


shoulder, Mahorn, the starting placed finish to extend ha lead at 
power forward, can’t play because the top of the overall World Cup 
of a wrist injury and Robinson is cmn/fmoc Finim's unexpected suc- 


ot a wnst injury and Komnson 
rat with injuries to his right leg- 


standings. Figmi's unexpected suc- 
cess boosted ber total to 214 points By Alan Eisner 

with compatriot Brigitte Oertli sec- Reuters 

ond with 166. SHFARAM, Israel — Every 

Epple stormed through the gates weekend, carloads of Jewish fam- 
in the most aggressive style of any iifes arrive in this Arab Galilee 


Star Arab Striker Boosts Israeli Soccer Hopes 


Elsewhere, Detroit walloped with compatriot Brigitte 
Golden State 137-118, Milwaukee ood with 166. 
nipped Kansas Gty 120-1 19, Den- Epple stormed throug 
va bumped New Jersey 1 19-1 10 in the most aggressive si 
and Cleveland edged Utah 110- competitor, save McKin 
109. second heat. 


“It meant a lot to me is an Arab for a teg man and is strong on the Anndi was first picked for the 
to be hoisted on fans’ shoulders ball. He likes to nm straight at national team in 1982 and has 
and hear them chanting my name," defenses and is good in the air. His scored 12 goals in 12 appearances, 
he said. success, and that of Rifat Turk, an “I fed very proud, both as an Arab 

But Anndi has also suffered ra- Arab from Jaffa who has been a and as an Israeli to wear the nation- 

rial hostility. “At away games, fans regular member of the national al colors," he said. “I am aware that 

try to taunt me with shouts of ‘dirty squad for the past five years, has as an Arab, I am unda constant 
Arab’ or ‘PLO filth,’ ” he said, re- inspired a new generation of Arab scrutiny and my behavior must be 
faring to the Palestine Liberation players to try to make their way in perhaps on a higher level than that 
Organization. “I try to ignore iL let Israeli soccer. of Jewish players." 


Anndi was first picked for the 




■ SCOREBOARD 

' Hockey 

NHL Standings 


tab 1 10- competitor, save McKinney, in the town to shake the hand and request 
second heaL the autograph of an Arab star — 

Zayd Anndi, the most explosive 
talent in Israeli soccer. 


Basketball 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick OtvWaa 


■*: 

W L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Vtatiingtan 

29 

12 

7 

65 

281 

144 

tiUodoHMa 

28 

13 

6 

62 

202 

140 

LY. Iskndira 

26 

19 

2 

54 

222 

187 

’Wstwrgti 

U 

23 

4 

49 

165 

202 

LY. ban 

M 

22 

8 

48 

168 

187 

lew Jersey 

IS 

26 

5 

35 

161 

193 

• - l r A 

tana 

DMstoO 



.. :'; V tontraol 

24 

15 

10 

58 

191 

162 

nnnno 

21 

14 

12 

54' 

170 

139 

hwbec 

23 

19 

7 

53 

188 

178 

•■■toUon 

22 

19 

7 

51 

172 

161 

‘ lortfard 

16 

23 

5 

37 

149 

200 


World Cm 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE ATT* A , 

Nani* dbuh 11DA < 

SL Louis 19 18 « 46 1M 171 

Chicago 21 24 3 45 190 ISO * 

- P r . Mir****. is at i as its m 

Datrelt M » * 34 172 226 _ 

2 S Toronto 9 31 6 34 14B SH 

iu m 2 MB Smyth* DMriga Boston 

2 “ JE Edmonton 32 9 6 70 241 157 

48 “J cotoWY 24 17 « 54 219 1M *■* Jer * 

K w WuEhtoO 24 29 4 52 204 210 M * w Yort 

35 161 1*S LosAngrtM, 19 19 9 47 212 199 tM ,.. 

_ m Voncouvw 11 31 7 39 1*2 261 

“ 111 1“ THURSDAY'S RESULTS 

54- I7D 138 • | ]_4 CMcogo 

53 tBS 170 2 i *_j Atlanta 

fl 12 M Beil 2 (5). Dufour (21. Aflrfon 113); Grwn '” tk ” 

37 w m (i),carfeomNM2(14).5MsaaMal:QiiaMc ciewo*™* 
(mi Penney} 94-11—25; Montreal (oa 5e- " 

- , . B_, ONW 

Sling H.T.Mn*n 2 I 2—4 

T rattler (20). B. Sutter U0>. Howson «>, 


NBA Standings 


fan letters from Jewish schoolchil- 
dren all ova the country.” said 
Anndi, 26. “When I recently went 
five games without a goal, I had 


faring to the Palestine liberation 
Organization. “I ay to ignore it, let 

it go in one ear and out the other. 
The best reply is to scare a goal or 
two." 

He began playing soccer as a 


of Jewish players.’ 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
ANonflc DMdea 

W L Pet. GB 


WOMEN’S SLALOM 
(at Ama gwhertanll 
■„ . Maria Epple. west Germany. I mlnuta. 

4 (11 mkqmNl 

- Tamara MetOrmev. Untied states. 1 : 49.12. 
i Erika Hess, Switzerland. 1:49.15. 

. Perrine Petan. France, 1:49-14. 

. atoned Fernande*OefM. Spain. 1:4MB. 
v Marta- Rosa Quarto. Italy. 1:5047. 

. Mktwta FtoM. SwtteertoHL 1:58.10. 

. uirifco Motor. Austria 1:502*. 

. BrtBtttt 0«1U, Swllwriand, 1:5057. 

. Paatstta Maoank Italy. 1:5045. 

. Olaa Charvatava. Czediastovakla. 1 :5058. 
. Aula Zmwflw. Yooattavta. 1JBJ9. 

. vrenl SdmeMer. Switzerland, 1-J1JO. 

. Karin Bader, Austria 1J1.T6. 

. Santa Oats. West Germany. 1:5L4£ 
WOMNITS OVERALL' STANDINGS 
, Fistm, 2 U potato. 

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f ; Marta watuser, S w toeilmd. 149. 

■" , Marina KleN. West Germany. T37. 

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Ctoletefle Gutanord Franca. 82. 
mia«2 (He). 


Tennis 

LS. Pro Indoor 

MEIK SINGLES 
TMrd Raaad 

atm McEnroe (11, UA. (tot Brad Gilbert. 
V. 6-1, 6-L 

tanny Caanors (2), UA.def.SMan Edbero 
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to [on Hradeyl N.Y. islanders (on 

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N.Y. Raepors 2 1 0-» bSib?*” 

Sundstram (91, Gresdhner 171. Kontos (4); 

Lobelia Cl). Stto*s on goal: OofroU (an Van- f”” 
btesDrouk) 1704-32; M.Y. Ronaon (an Mi- LAOlppora 

catofi 60-13— XL SISrstohi 

Buffalo l 9 *-* Go4< * efl 

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Boston (on Borrasao) IJ7-9-27. 


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New Jersey 

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Milwaukee 

29 

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Detroit 

' 25 

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A10 

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18 

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14 

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Cleveland 

12 

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WESTERN CONFERENCE 



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Houston 

24 

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Dallas 

23 

20 

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20 

21 

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LA. Lakers 

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14 

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21 

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Seattle 

20 

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Goidan State 191 Floyd 5) .-Detroit 34 (Thomas HlS TISC as Israd. S U» Striker and 

>91. one of its chief hopes for a place in 

Donas m i9 as 2s — 92 the 1 986 World Cup finals in Meri- 

womiMton a 30 26 19—41 rn h» been sn dd e m and dramatic. 

GUS williams 12-22 64 31. McMillan 7-16 1-2 *, cfarT^riacr r-rm, Ka tuac 

15; Aoulmi 11-26 64 2B. Harper 9-19 M 22. At UK Start .01 last SOISOn he was 

Roboonds: Dallas 50 (SrincantlSI; Waslilna- Struggling With the local team m UK 

depute the third division. Then 
man. Kantor 5). Washlnalon II (Dave KM. fae ^ txJinsSemA ^ fiist-divisiOT 


2 » ” Macabbi Haifa. 

36 32 27 29—119 htl„ - 


joined," Anndi said. He scored 13 
Mitwaukeo 32 (Hodoos N; Kansas ettv 30 goals in the ra ii a m ing 20 m a t c h es 
(-rtHua iu. and Haifa won the league’s title for 


re games without a goal, 1 naa He began playing soccer as a 
TripuduawM 34is: shorn i-a6-92a. wwie- hundreds of telephone call* from rhfiH in the ansty, narrow alley- 

“ “ ns, some Arabs but mostly Jews." ways of Shfaram, a hill lop Moslem- 

His rise as Israd’s top striker and Ouistian town of 40,000. 
e of its chief hopes for a place in “W e had no pitches, no boots, no 
e 1986 Wcdd Dip finals in Mexi- equipment of any kind," he re- 
. has been sudden and dramatic, caifed. “Even today, sprats facfli- 
At the start of last season he was jjgg iu [Israeli] Arab towns and vil- 
tiffiling wth theloral team inthe ^ ^ behbd what the Jews 

pths of the third division. Then have." 

“ rM_diViSi0n Al 16, Anndi joined tbeShfuam 
mahlh nta«. It 311(1 With it Ulltil laSt 

it «« thoo^i_tpp clubs vtac after 


Houston’s 'Twin Towers 9 Have 
Twin Records on the Court 


The Associated Press ket. And I like winning. But most 

HOUSTON — They call them of all, I like playing bas k etba ll ." 
the Twin Towers, and their similar- “Their record has shown they 
ities do not end with their size and can play together," New Jersey 
skill on the basketball court. center Mike Gminski said, “ft 


skill on the basketball court. 


center Mike Gminski said. 


M WW I.HT m a* i i -ll> „T« • ',1,1, _l_„ 11 LiUlU 

cummim is-29 4-4 34. Atoncritf io-i5 t-io Tn^ were in eighth place, 13 vca _ 
28.- Thorpe 9-i2 46 22. Woodson 7-i7 66 a. prants behind the leaders, whm I 3 ' 

ttdiMMdi- UlkamliwiiH Ifnrnmlnat. Urdu I « A 1- — 1 1 tVOT 


THURSDAY’S RESULTS 

0*0 33 » 30 36-111 


New Jartav 12 25 29 24—110 

Draw 29 31 31 23—119 

English 13-20 5-5 31. Lewor 3-11 6-10 22; W1L 
Homs 6-12 14-15 16 Gminski 616 46 20. Ro- 
uorads: New Jorsov M (Williams in ; Datwor 
54 (Nani!). Assists: NewJeneyWtR (chart- 
son 9); Denver 27 (EnalUi 9>. 

Clevalond M 22 M 24-110 

Utt* 23 20 39 32-139 

Free 1241 5-5 35. Davis 11-18 65 27; Dam toy 

9-M 11-12 29, Griffith 11-26 3-1 21 Rebounds: 
Cleveland B (Hubbart9J; Utah55 (Eaton 13). 


iuujcu, niiiEUMiu.nc3UHHi u „„ - K. 

goals m the r mwininE mnfrfiiw; ™efaryears, he said, 
and Haifa won the league’s title for A bustling center 
the first tinv meli has a surprising \ 


■trail 34 26 44 33-07 Aslch: Oevalond 21 (Botev 7]; Utah 21 

Lolmbeer 614 1612 26. Lons 11-22 1-2 21 (Groan 16). 


Transition 


CALIFORNIA— SionodRitoPort Jones, txrt- 

doMir, to a one-yew con trod with a secontf- 
year option. SstecM Dennis Moore, pttchw, 
from Aftwrto In the traeaowif aynponsafton 
POOL 

SEATTLE— Waived Richie Zbk, dwlsnat- 
ed hitter, tor the aurpaos ol oMns him hte 
unconditional ratoOM. 

TORONTO— Selected Tom Hrako . plteher. 
tram Texas In the tr ee aas n t conipajuurtton 
POOL 

national Loasea 

CINCINNATI— Named OJ- Poreo vice 
proDdcnt of finance* ** Chris Krabbe can- 
traHsfi 

MONTREAL— Reached an BBraomtntudtt 

Hirtfiy Bronte. NiorMoF. ono Hvw vewmi- 
troct. _ 

PHILADELPHIA— Purtftaiod the contrua 

of Ralph atarenn, Pltdhor. 

complete ai earlier deal In which St. Louis 


Selected U.S. College Results 




- 'ctYVc* Noon 15). Franca, d eU Cassia oqm d Mlk» umeoore. catOmr. 


t’.A'ttB. Brazfl, 6-L 62. 

‘ “oo Soares. BredL det Ores Hatmes.UA, 
. S-7. 6-1. 

. ] • ** Teltschar Ml. UJ5.de(. Tiro Mavatto. 
j ; - VA. 7-6 I6<IJ, 6-1 
• »tt Davis. US. M, Tomas Smld (91. 

s*«tov Nadr. CtndmskKtikia. det Ra- 
il Krtstmn (13), India, 7-i 6-L 
; jot PurcoU, U3.M. Ben Testerman (IU. 


EAST 

Army 79. Yale 63 

Buffalo <7, F radar ta SL 63 

Chicooo st n. Breoklvn ColL 70 

Columbia 72. Manhattan W 

Georae WasMnaton 69. Massachusetts 59 

Marts! 71 St. Fiwds* Pa. U 

MIT Z4, Curry 65 

New Hampshire 57, Northoostera 55 
RutMrs 83. St Bonaventuro 70 
Siena 7S> Nlasora 66 
SL Joseph's 48. Rhode island 44 
Temple 92. Duquesne 73 
Trinity. Com. 78. Coast Guard 59 
Tufts 96, E. Nazorane 86 
W. VI ruin la 69, Penn St. 56 
Worcester Tech 77, Brondeis 76 OT 
SOUTH 

Afa^BtrmlnBtam 56. Old Dominion 55 
Auburn vi Mississippi 73 
Betmonl Abbey 67, NX.-Ashevllte 60 
atadei 79, E. Tennessee SL 67 
Davidson 77, S. Carolina 61 
Eton 64. fLC-Greenihara 50 
Gaareotown. Ky. 94, Kentucky 51. 74 
Jocksonvllto 69. W. Kentucky 65 
Louisiana Tech 88. MeNoeu SI. 69 


.. . ‘rfel PurcoU, UJLdef. I 
-. 4 p2^,7-4 (74). 34,M. 


st LOUiS-Sefaded Anienis Sataor, Leulsluna Tech 88. MeNoese SI. 69 

srrN.^wJSs.r 89 

comper^onon b »Jj OCKE¥ RkSuiumd 72. James Madison 68 

NMfaMl HtdHy L e a gu e &. Carolina St. 96> Baptist 64 

K.Y RANGE RS— Recalled *6180 BtoflsfleiL va. commenweottti 71, 5. Alabama 70 
riaMwina from New Haven ri mo American vmi 71. Furman a 

wash- A Lee 58, Emory K Honrv 56 

noewnr a*. — — 

COLLEGE midwest 

HOUSTON— Statod Bill Yeomau.heodfaol- etaoujura 6i Prlncfaia S3 
amtroctexlerainn- Bratftoy 73. S, Illinois 66 


wash. A Lee 58, Emory K Honrv 56 
MIDWEST 

Blacksum 6% Prlncfaia S3 
Bradley 73. S. Illinois 66 


Cincinnati 5& Louisville 94 
Illinois SL 85. Indiana St. 93. OT 
town 66. Nortnweslorn 47 
Mich loan 96. Michigan St. 75 
Minnesota 72. Wisconsin 62 
N. Mkhluan sa Midi loan Tech 78. 20T 
Purdue 62, Indiana S2 

SOUTHWEST 

Arkansas SL 70, N. Texas SL 59 
Arkansas Tech 64, Harding 51 
ArfL-ManllcoJIe 73. Hcndorm St. 62 
Ark.-Plne Bluff 99. Philander Smith 73 
Bethany Naiarane 7s, Cameron 68 
Cent. Arkansas 61, Arkansas CalL 57, 30T 
Hard In- Simmons 66. S am f ort 62 
Houston 81, Baylor 71 
Lamar 89, Texao-Arllngten 63 
Toxos-El Pu» 79. Colorada Si. 45 
Tuba 11a w. Texas St. 98 
FAR WEST 

Brigham Young 71 Wyoming 65 

Cal iratne 99, Lena Beach SL 94 

Chapman College 65, Cal Polr-SLO 64 

E. New Me*kn 71 Denver 64 

Fullerton St. 38, CaL Santa Bartnra 72 

Gonxooa 53, San Dtoao 45 

Lovoia Cant 57, Porflmd 53 

N. Arizona 95, Ktobo 71 

Nev.-Los Vegas 92. Now Merica Si. 78 

Nev.-Rcno 87, Boise. Si. 75 

Oregon 91, Arizona SL72 

Oregon St, 59. Arizona s 

Peppenflnc 51 Sonia Qaro 52 

Pt. Loma Nazarene 8LU.S. Interaatlonal 59 

Puget Sound 49, E_ Montana 47 

Wamor Pacific UX Seattt# Pacific 98 

UCLA 80. Cotitorma 09 



A bustling center forward, Ar- at the season’s halfway 

iwrii has a surprising turn of speed P^nt, only five fewer t h a n they 

managed in all of 1983-84. 

The 7-foot Olajuwon is averag- 
ing 20.5 points, 1 1.6 rebounds aria 
2-5 blocked shots pa game, while 
Sampson’s norms are 20 J, 10 J and 
2J. Olajuwon has scored 863 
points to 862 for Sampson. 

“They are a lot alike in the num- 
ber of times they get the ball, the 
number of times they shoot and the 
spots they play on defense, so it’s 
not surprising that they have simi- 
lar stats," Rockets Coach Bill Fitch 
said. 

“If they weren’t evenly distribut- 
ed, the press would be jumping all 
over me and the guy who was be- 
hind, wondering what was wrong.” 

So dramatic has the Rockets’ im- 
provement been this season that 
the big postdraft question of 


Akeem Olajuwon and Ralph helps that they both can nm as well 
Sampson, the Nal picks in the last as a 6-footer. Akeem is such a good 
two National Basketball Assoda- transition player that once he gets 


tion drafts, are compiling remark- more experience, the only way he’s 
ably similar statistics for the Hons- going to be stopped is if ms mother 
ten Rockets, who have won 24 and father order him back to Nige- 





. •„ <«* 


With small forward Rodney 
McCray, who is averaging neatly 
IS points a game, the Rockets have 
a starting front line that only the 
Boston Celtics can rival. 

“They are the only team in the 
league that could nm a 100 percent 
Job offense,” New Jersey Coach 
Stan Albeck said after a game with 
the Rockets. “On defense, their size 
is in timidating . If you’re going to 
take a shot in the paint, it better be 
a dunk, because ihqr’re going to 

reject it." 


SCC' Wadkins Fires 63 

hind, wondering what was wrong." rp T J j A /i if 
So dramatic has the Rockets’ im- 1 0 JLiCoO. JLi»zx« ItOU 
provement been this season that New Ta rk Times Service 

the big postdraft question of PACIFIC PALISADES, CaK- 
wbether two All- Amenca college fomia _ tann y Wadkins tied a 
centers could coexist m tbe same course record of eight-ender par 63 
frralcoari has berarendoed moot Thursday in the opening round oT 
Despite their snnilantMS, when the 59th Los Angeles Open golf 
the Twin Towers are on the Dora: tournament, 
together, it’s obvious that Sampson The Rjviera Country Gob’s 
is the designated Mr. Outside and ^946-yard course is usually tough, 
Olajuwon the designated Mr. In- bui the conditions were easy Thure- 
side. day. 

“We have different games," Wadkins had a two-shot lead 
Olajuwon says. “That is why I over Tony Sills and Pat Lindsev 


knew from the first day of training who were at 65. Bob Gilder Gary 
camp that I would enjoy plaving Koch, Scott Simpson, Bruce 
with Ralph. And I have. I have Lietzke and Hal Sutton were at 66. 

Eight players were at 67, including 


beco content.” 




“I'm not surprised by our sue- Tran Watson in his first tourney of 
cess,” Sampson said. “Too much tbe yean Jack Nicklaus, who has 
wit made i<£ that being atee never won at Riviera, and Mike 


Zayd Armeh takes the ball around an Israeli defender. 


to play together, l iu enjoying pL . y 
ing at forward, and farang the bas- 


Keid, who got a hoJe-in-one on the 
170-yard, par-3 sixth. 


r/SflA. 


J 











Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, S ATUBDA Y-SUNDA Y, JANUARY 26-27. 1985 


* \ 

: f 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


Dinner Ala (Her) Card 147 Dog Years of Research on Humans Soccer Club Really Wins 


YX7 WASHINGTON — From a He: Having what now? 

[swedt story on Yuppies: She: Did anyone ever tell vou 

When American Express found that you have beautiful eyes? "fait 
Inal women were not responding to to me a little about yourself, 
their overwhelmingly male ‘Do He: It’s nothing exciting. I was 
You Know MeT senes, it launched raised in Iowa and came to the Big 
its ‘Interesting Lives’ campaign, Apple to make a name in advertis- 
which features up-to-date activities ing. 

such as [a woman] taking a man out She: i have some influential 
to dinner to break in her card,” friends on Madison Avenue who 
l ve seen the ads on TV and I've might hdp you. They all owe me 





been impressed 
with them. But 
I’ve always won- 
dered what hap- 
pens after the 
girl shows her 
charge card to 
the good-look- 
ing guy in the 
lobby of the sky- 
scraper, and 

they go off to a 

very expensive Bocnwald 
restaurant in New York. 

The maitre d’hdtel presents the 
menus. 

Woman with credit card to male 
guest: What is your pleasure? 

He: Why don’t you order for the 
both of us? 

She: Pasta verdi with pesto 
sauce, steak Diane, soufflfe pota- 
toes, endive salad with the house 
dressing, and a bottle of the nou- 
veau Beaujolais. slightly chilled. 
Kiwi souffle Tor dessert. " 

He: You certainly know your 
food. 

She: You have to if you’re on the 
fast track. 

He: I usually don't go to dinner 
with married women. 


favors. Here's my card. 

He: Please don't do that. 

She: Do what? 

He: Hold my hand, i'm not that 
kind of guy. 

She: What kind is that? 

He: You know. Someone who 
sleeps around with any woman who 
has a gold credit card. 

She: Let me refill your glass. 

He: You’re trying to get me 
drunk so I won't know what Fm 
doing. 

She: How can you say that? f 
wouldn't be a vice president of 
marketing if people didn't trust me. 

O 

He: Let’s talk about your hus- 
band. What kind of person is he? 

She: Let’s just say he doesn’t 
understand me. He’s boring. All he 
wants to talk about is having chil- 
dren. 

He: And you don’t want chil- 
dren? 

She: They don't issue gold credit 
cards to women who buy Pampers. 

He: Please take your hand off 
my knee. 

She: 1 was trying to find my 
na pkin . Here, have another glass of 


I rl n T^n „n Wrn wine w* your steak Diane. Do 
She: Come on, loosen up. We re M me attractive? 

out to have a fun evening. " He: Very much. But can't we just 

O have a nice dinner and be friends? 

He: I just didn't want you to get She: We are friends. 1 genuinely 
any ideas because you’re buying me like you for your mind. What 


a meal that it will lead to something health club do you go to? 


later on. 

She: What kind of upwardly mo- 
bile person do you think 1 am? 


He: I'm starting to feel tipsy. 
Maybe you better take me home. 
She: If that’s what you want. We 


Have some more wine. Let's drink could have a nightcap at your 
to having it all and having it now. place. 

— He: No way. I told you not to get 

any ideas about the evening. 

Los Angeles Ballet Folds . ac: ® UI w £ rc “Me” geneia- 
e tion, and we have the whole night 

Thf Aa.Kuiat Press - ahead of US. 

LOS ANGELES— The Los An- He: I vowed never to get in- 
geles Ballet has folded after 10 volved with a married woman, 
years, the company's founder and She: Why on earth not? 
its bankruptcy attorney say. “I be- He: Because I don’t want to be 
fieve unsecured creditors are owed the “other man,” waiting for the 
$400,000, but it appears there will phone to ring while you’re buying 
be no money to pay them," said the your husband dinner with your 
attorney. Eton Rothman. gold credit card. 


By Beverly Beyette 

Los Angela Timer Service 

S AN FRANCISCO — Fursl 
there were “Gnomes.” those 
beguiling creatures whose every 
quirk was analyzed in a book that 
sold a million copies. There fol- 
lowed, inevitably, over the next 
seven years, volumes about other 
marvelous or mythical creatures: 
fairies, wizards, witches. Now 
comes “Humans,” a deliciously 
irreverent look at the most baf- 
fling of ail bongs. 

And any resemblance between 
“Gnomes” and “Humans” is ex- 
actly the way the “Humans” cre- 
ators — two San Francisco 
graphic designers, Mike Dowdall 
and Pat Welch — planned it 
Thus began 147 years of re- 
search, living among the humans. 
That is, 147 dog years; the au- 
thors point out that humans 
“seem to be uneasy unless they 
know, at all times, their dog's age 
translated into h uman terms.” 

During these years of exhaus- 
tive field observation in the hu- 
mans' habitats, Welch and Daw- 
dan turned up data of 
extraordinary anthropological 
significance, to wit: 

• Objects to be found in the 
h uman female habitat include 
velvet ring caddies, crocheted toi- 
let-paper caries and framed cal- 
ligraphy that says things like 
“Life Is a Miracle.” 

• Objects to be found in the 
male human habitat include dead 
plants in abundance everywhere 
except in tbe refrigerator, “where 
you often find live plants. Very 
simple plants, to be sure, but defi- 
nitely living.” 

Dowdall and Welch decided to 
collaborate, they said, because 
they wear the same size clothes, 
which cuts down on luggage — 
“anthropological research in- 
volves a lot of travel” 
Presumably Welch's brother, 
Dennis, who helped write tbe 
text, does not wear the same size, 
as he was not with them on the 
book promotion tour. 

There were other motivations 
behind “Humans ” Though oth- 
ers jumped on the “Gnomes” 
bandwagon earlier, Dowdall and 
Welch aid not hesitate to say: 
“We knew we could draw better.” 
From a single drawing, originally 
conceived as a poster, a book 
sprouted and, as Welch put it, 
"the rest is obscurity." 



Ada on Pheoprapfo/Smon and Sduster 

Pat Welch (left), Mike Dowdall and subject. 


Bode contract in hand, they 
retreated to their studio, explain- 
ing to clients that they would be 
unavailable for three months. 
“Our clients took us at our 
word,” Dowdall said, grimacing. 

The months of “exhaustive 
field observation and meticulous 
scrutiny” began. Dowdall and the 
brothers Welch concluded, 
among other things , that: 

• “Where other beings scrape a 
meager living from nature, the 
ti nman has largely replaced na- 
ture with cheap, comfortable, 
dirt-free substitutes.” 

• H umans have replaced work 
with “symbols of work, such as 
the 'consul tarn." ” 

Dowdall 35. and Welch, 39, 
are, by their own definition. 
Young Adult humans, but “hang- 
ing on by the skin of our teeth.” 
After that, in the stages of human 
development, will follow “Still a 


Young Adult," “Not Getting 
Any Younger Adult” and 
“Cool” A coot “keeps seven 
drawers of socks in the original 
store wrappers, and occasionally 
awakes with a start at dinn er to 
shout ‘Cleveland!’ " 

Do ihe two view humans as 
ridiculous? “Incomprehensible 
might be the word,” Dowdall sug- 
gested. Is the male human or the 
female human ihe more incom- 
prehensible? Welch: “It’s a toss- 
up." 

“We have occasionally gotten 
slightly adverse reactions from 
some females.” he acknowledged, 
but insisted “We’ve not treated 
the male with any more dignity.” 

Most of (he females, be noted 
have objected to their portrayal 
of female humans as creatures 
with “large bottoms.” (It was an 
observation he first made when, 


as a child he watched a parade of 
polyester stretch pants at the K 
mart, he said.) 

Bui then, most of the males 
were drawn as decidedly balding, 
which Dowdall attributes to a 
personal phobia. 

Dowdall was one of the cre- 
ators, in 1975. of the Pet Rock, a 
S4 gift item that sold a million. 
Giddy with success, the same 
group marketed a “sand breeding 
kit." He would rather not talk 
about that little venture. 

The authors emphasized that 
they wanted “Humans" to be 
more than just funny. Said Dow- 
dall: “ ‘Gnomes' irritated me a 
little bit because there's a sort of 
extremism.” a message of return 
to nature, “all of which is fine, 
except it’s anti-human, really. 
These insipid six-inch twits who 
run around the forest with dirty 
finge rnails don't exactly broaden 
the horizons of civilization." 

Whereas he found the gnomes 
“real arrogant." Dowdall per- 
ceives h umans quite differently: 
“they're kindly, they’re sflly and 
they really cry hard to "make 
things work.” 

That is not to say they aren’t 
strange. For one thing," Welch 
said, “they all have jobs with pre- 
scribed purposes and titles, like 
assistant to the vice president of 
marketing. Now. what does that 
h uman do? Not a damn thing , 
except write memos." 

Nor are the authors able to 
fathom humans' passion for liv- 
ing ta suburbia, both of them 
having grown up in suburban San 
Francisco and happy to be City 
Humans at last They view subur- 
bia as a place where, “during the 
day. everyone is gone except the 
dogs, who sleep. At night, even- 
one returns to sleep except the 
dogs, who baric” 

Suburban humans “have ex- 
tremely sophisticated electronic 
kitchens, and spend most of their 
free time cooking over an outdoor 
fire." 

Already, Dowdall and Welch 
are considering a sequcL After 
all they left lots of areas of tin- 
man life untouched and others 
barely touched. Religion. politics, 
commerce . . . 

Aren't they themselves hu- 
mans? 

“1 like to think of myself as 
with them, but not of" them,” 
Welch said 


l jrift da SOva had two main loves: 
soccer, and a woman who died be- 
fore he could marry her. When he 
died last month at 65. he left about 
5140 million, or close to -half his 
fortune, to the soccer club in the 
low-income section of Rio de Ja- 
neiro where he met his sweetheart. 
“With this windfall, we'll buy the 
whole Brazilian national team, 
we’ll make the best side in Brazil” 
said Castor de Andrade, honorary 
president of the Bangu club in 
Rio’s north zone. Bangu, generally 
a losing major league team, has 
won the Rio championship only 
twice this cranny. Da Silva had 
followed Bangu religiously ever 
since he visited the area as a young 
man, met a young woman at a car- 
nival dance and fell in love. But the 
woman, who was not n»m«! in the 
bequest, died Da Silva, who died 
in December, never married or had 
children, said his lawyer, Humberto 
Gaza Gam described da Silva as a 
mathematician and engineer but 
said his fortune came mainly from 
stock and property dealing. Da Sil- 
va left most of the rest of the money 
to an old people's home. 

□ 

Walter Polorchak, who made in- 
ternational headlines when he re- 
fused to return with his parents to 
the Soviet Union, has some advice 
for Samantha Smith, the American 
girl who visited Russia in July 1983. 
“I suggest if Samantha Smith plans 
to visit the Soviet Union in the 
future, she should try to gp without 
government guides to one of the 
smaller cities or villages and see 
bow most people live,” Polovchak 
wrote in a Wall Street Journal re- 
view of. a book by Samantha, 
“Journey to the Soviet Union.” Po- 
lovchak.' who was 12 when he re- 
fused to return from Chicago to his 
homeland in July 1980, said in the 
review that Samantha’s “whole trip 
was a setup by the Russian govern- 
ment It had it all planned — where 
she was going to stay, where she 
was going to go and all the places 
she was going to see." Samantha, 
now 12. was invited to visit the 
Soviet Union after writing in De- 
cember 1982 to Yuri V. Andropov, 
the Soviet leader who died last Feb- 
ruary, to tell him of her worries 
about nuclear war between the So- 
viet Union and the United States. 

□ 

Paul Newman turned 60 Satur- 
day. but the blue-eyed actor, who 


still cuts a dashing figure in film* 
and on the auto-racing circuit, cele- 
brated the landmark last weekend 
with 40 family members, racing 
buddies and other friends at an 
informal cocktail and dinner party 
at the beachfront California. house 
be shares with bis wife, tbe actress 
Joanne Woodward. Newman and 
Woodward, who live much of die 
year in Connecticut, “decided to 
hold the party early to allow them 
to get on by themselves this, week- 
end for a private celebration of hh 
birthday and their 27th wedding 
anniversary, which falls mi the 
29th,” a friend said. The couple 
may have to cancel those plans, 
though, as Woodward came down 
with the flu this week. 

a 

Tbe government of President 
Raid Alfonsfn of Argentina won the 
first International Democracy 
Prize, the Center for Democracy 
announced at the close of a three- 
day forum for legislators from 
Western Hemisphere nations. Bos- 
ton University’s president, John 
S3ber, announced the award, say- 
ing, “Tbe drum of democracy m 
Argentina has captured the imagi- 
nation of men ana women through- - 
out the free world.” The center, a 
new, privately funded organiza- 
tion, is associated with the univera- 
ty. Alfonsin was inaugurated in 
December 1983, Argentina's first 
civilian president since 1976. The 
award will be given to him when be 
visits Washington in the early 
spring. 

□ 

The British Broadcasting Coip. 
says it will delay screening this sea- 
son’s remaining episodes of “Dal- 
las” until next autumn, but the : 
state-funded BBC denies the move : 
is a form of revenge against its 
independent rivaL The au tumn is 
when Thames Television planned - 
to start screening tbe package of 
“Dallas” episodes it bought this - 
month from Woridvision of Los 
Anaeies in a S 1 .5-nnIlkffl deal that : 
infuriated the BBC. Michael Grade, ; 
controller of the BBC-1 TV chan - . 
nd, which broadcasts “Dallas." 
threatened Jan. 16 to delay screen- 
ing the remaining BBC episodes, 
and now the BBC says Grade had 
planned all along to take “Dallas" - 
off the air soon and bring it back 
after (he spring-summer holiday 
season “It is not a spoiling tactic,” 
the BBC said. 


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