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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hone Kong, Singapore, 

The Hague and Marseille 


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Published With The New York Ti 


Washington Post 


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No- 31,707 


ZURICH, TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Bhopal Tragedy: Operation , 
Design of Plant Are Faulted 


By Smart Diamond 

Mns fork TZmes 1 Sendee 
NEW DELHI — The gas leak at 
a rheminal plant in Central India in 
December that kilted at least 24300 
people was the result of operating 
errors, design flaws, maintenance 
failures and training ririiHwiwy 
according to present and former 
employees, company documents 
and the Indian government's chief 
scientist. 

Those are among the findings of 


Union Carbide reported a $323- 
miSoa profit last year, fndwfing 
an $18-nnffioo write-off for dm 
Bhopal accident Page 7. 


.... ' n - 
• • 

. ; :l '' W- 

■■ ■ •» *t. ■*[> 


_ _ The 

New York Times alter the leak of 
uude methyl isocyanate gas at a 
Union Carbide plant in Bhopal, 
worst in- 
disaster. 

The inquiry unearthed informa- 
tion not available even to the 
Union Carbide Coip., the majority 
owner of the plant where the leak 
occurred, because the Indian au- 
thorities have denied corporate 
representatives access to souk doc- 
uments, equipment and personnel 

The investigation produced evi- 
dence of at least 10 violations of the 
standard procedures of both the 
parent corporation and its Indian- 
run subsidiary. 

Executives of Union Carbide In- 
dia Ltd, which operated the plant, 
are reluctant to address the ques- 
tion of responsibility for the trage- 
dy, in which about 200,000 people 
were injured The managing dim- 
tor of the Indian company refused 
to talk about details of the aeddent 
or the conditions that produced it, 
although he did say that the en- 
forcement of safety regulations was 
the responsibility of executives at 
the Bhopal plant. 

A spokesman at Union Carbide 
corporate headquarters in Dan- 
bury, (Connecticut, characterized 
any suggestion of the accident's 
causes as speculation. 

The limes inquiry disclosed 
these and other irregularities at 
Bhopal: 

• When employees discovered 
the initial leak of methyl isocyanate 

at 11:30 P.M. on Dec. 2, a supervi- 
sor — believing, be said later, that 
it was a water leak — decided to 
deal with it only after the next tea 
break, several workers said In the 
next hour or more, the reaction 
taking place in a storage tank went 
out of control. Workers said that 
the reasons far leaks were rarely 
investigated 

• Several months before the ac- 
cident, plant employees say, man- 
agers shut down a refrigeration unit 
designed to keep the methyl isocya- 
nate cool and inhibit chemical reac- 
tions. The shutdown was a viola- 
tion of plant procedures. 

• The leak began, according to 
several employees, about two hours 
after a worker whose training did 
not meet the plant’s original stan- 
dards was ordered by a novice su- 
pervisor to wash out a rope that had 

not been pnmerty«aled That pro- 
cedure is prohibited by plant roles. 



A fanner drives cattle past the Bhopal pesticide plant 


Workers think the most likely 
source of the contamination that 
started the reaction leading to the 
accident was water from this pro- 


• The three main safety systems, 
at least two of w hich, technical ex- 
perts said ware built according to 

dons drawn for a Union 
plant at Institute, West 
Virginia, were unable to cope with 
conditions that existed on the night 
of the accident. Moreover, one of 
the systems had been inoperable 
for several days, and a second had 
been out of service for maintenanc e 
for several weeks. 

• Plant operators failed to move 
some of the methyl isocyanate in 
the problem tank to a spare tank as 
required because, they said, the 
spare was not empty as it should 
have been. 

• Instruments at the planr were 
unreliable, according to ShakQ 
Qureshi, the methyl isocyanate su- 
pervisor on duty at the tune of the 
accident For that reason, he said, 
he ignored the initial warning of 
the accident, a gauge's indication 
that pressure in one of three methyl 
isocyanate storage tanks had risen 
fivefold in an hour. 

• The Bhopal plant does not 
have the comp uter system that 
more sophisticated operations, in- 
cluding the West Virginia plant, 
use to monitor their functions and 
quickly alert the staff to leaks, em- 
ployees said. The management. 


they added, relied cm workers to 
sense escaping methyl isocyanate 
as their eyes started to water. 

• Training levels and require- 
ments for experience and educa- 
tion had been sharply reduced, ac- 
cording to many plant era 
as a result, at least in part, of 
get reductions. 


Allies Urge Belgium 
To Deploy Missiles Soon 


Rexam 

BRUSSELS — Britain, the 
Netherlands and (he North Atlan- 
tic Treaty Organization appealed 
Monday to Belgium to meet its 
commitment to the alliance by de- 
ploying nuclear cruise missies on 
schedule in March 


Leo Tindemans, the Belgian for- 
eign minister, met separately with 
the British foreign secretary, Sir 
Geoffrey Howe; Foreign Minister 
Hans van den Brock of the Nether- 
lands; and the NATO secretary- 
general, Lord Carrington. They 
dismay ^ a date for deployment of 
die which the main gov- 

ernment coalition, party is seeking 
to postpone. 

Sir Geoffrey said that in the ab- 
sence of a U.S -Soviet arms control 
agreement, Belg ium should stick to 
NATO’s deployment timetable, as 
Britain had done since 1983. 

“We look to Belgium, as rate of 
(he s taunches t NATO sites over 
the years, once again to give full 
weight to the imp ortance of her 
daraAffl for the alliance and the 
trans-Atlantic relationship,” he 
said. 








Mr. Van den Broefc, whose cotm- 
f ,■ try has made its acceptance of 
erase missites dependent on fur- 
ther Soviet missile deployments, 
said that any uncertainty could 
hurt the U.S. position at the Gene- 
va arms with the Soviet 
Union. 

. He acknowledged that, the 
“ * ti? Dutch, who have delayed their E- 
,*£ nal decision on cruise missiles Tin til 
IfijF November, were in an unusual po- 
j ation to advise the Belgians. 

Bat be added: “I think that to 
give the i m p maaon that commit- 
ments may not be respected could 
be a burden on. the negotiations in 
Geneva." 

• A” senior NATO ' official said 
Lord PftnTngwn had told Mr. Tin* 



damans “that the Bel gians should 
meet their commitments.” 

Mr. Undemans has Hertined to 
say what starting date Belgium is 
proposing. But Prime Minister WB- 

fried Martens has pledged that a 
decision wifi be made by the end of 
March. 

The Flemish Christian Social 
Party, to which both Mr. Martens 
and Mr. Tindemans belong, has 
called for Belgian deployment to be 
delayed until sometime after the 
Geneva talks have started. 

Under NATO plans, the first 16 
of Belgium’s 48 cruise missiles are 
due to be installed by March IS at 
tbe Florennes air base, 44 miles (71 
kilometers) south of Brussels, 
where about 800 American special- 
ists are finishing work on a site. 

Mr. Undemans met in Rome last 
week with tbe Italian foreign minis- 
ter. Ghilio Andreotti, and is sched- 
uled to go Bonn on Wednesday for 
talks with tbe West German for- 
eign 'minister, Hans-Dieirich 
Genscher. 

An Italian spokesman quoted 
Mr. Andreotti as saying any delay 
would convey an image of weak- 
ness in NATO, and a senior West 
German official said Mr. Genscher 
would make the same point. _ 

Polls show a large majority of 
Belgians favor at least a temporary 
delay in deployment, and the issue 

may be decisive in tbe general elec- 
tion in December. 

The debate over the missiles look 
a new tom last week with govern- 
ment supporters accusing the op- 
position Socialists of having sup- 
ported the NATO decision to 
deploy the missiles, including the 
timetable. 

The Soriafists rgected the charge 
and said the defease minister who 
approved tbe timetable in 1981 was 
Frank Swaden, a member erf the 
government coalition who is now 
y#4ritig to delay deployment. 


3 Shells Miss 
NATO Fleet in 
Lisbon Attack 


l Jailed Frets International 

LISBON — Extremists appar- 
ently armed with a 60mm mortar 


cutty armed wito a oumm i 
fired three shells at a NATO i 
ran anchored in the Tagus River 


estuary early Monday, but the pro- 
expfoc 


jec tiles exploded harmlessly in the 
water, the authorities said. 

It was tbe second such attack 
against a NATO target in Portugal 
in seven weeks. 

An anonymous caller telephoned 
Portuguese news organizations 
claiming responsibility for the ac- 
tion on behalf of the April 25 Peo- 
ple’s Forces, a far-left revolution- 
ary group that earlier took 
responsibility for similar strikes 
against the U.S. Embassy and NA- 
TO's Iberian- Atlantic headquar- 
ters outside Lisbon. 

The port authorities said three 
“loud explosions in the river” 
rocked the port area at 3 A.M. but 
pincwt no damage and were “con- 
siderably short" of tbe NATO frig- 
ates anchored in the estuary. 

The frigates were part of a six- 
ship NATO squadron that had 
been in port since Wednesday. The 
squadron set sail from Lisbon as 
scheduled six hours after the at- 
tack. 

Tbe police said they suspected 
the attack was carried out with a 
60mm mortar likely tired from a 
small park on a hfil about 200 yards 
(183 meters) from the waterfront. 

The April 25 People’s Forces 
fired four 60mm shells at the U.S. 
Embassy compound Nov. 25 and 
three shells at NATO’s suburban 
Comiberiant headquarters Dec. 9. 
causing only minor damage to vehi- 
cles and shattering windows. 

Fifty suspected members of the 
group are awaiting trial for a series 
of bombings, bank robberies and 
killings. 


OPEC 

Discusses 
Price Cut 


Meeting Marked 
By Bickering 
Of Nigeria, UAE 


• The staff at the methyl isocya- 
nate plant, which had little auto- 
mated .equipment, was cut from 12 
operators on a shift to six in 1983, 
according to several employees. 

• There were no effective public 
warnings of the disaster. The alarm 
that sounded on the night of the 
accident was similar or identical to 
those sounded for various pur- 
poses, including practice drills, 
about 20 times in a typical week, 
according to employees. 

• Most workers, according to 
many employees, panicked as the 
gas escaped, running to save their 
own lives and ignoring buses that 
sat idle on the plant grounds, ready 
to evacuate nearby residents. 

In Danbury, the parent corpora- 
tion said last month: “Union Car- 
bide regards safety as a top priori- 
ty. We take great steps to ensure 
that the plants erf our affiliates, as 
well as our own plants, are property 
equipped with safeguards and that 
employees are property (rained.’’ 

Last weekend, a corporate 
spokesman cited tbe “excellent re- 
cord” of the managers of the Indi- 
an affiliate, adding that because of 
the possibility of litigation in India 
“judicial and ethical rules and 
practices inhibit them from an- 
swering questions.” 

VJP. Gokhale, the chief operat- 
ing officer of Union Carbide India 
LtcL, would not comment in an 
interview an specific violations or 
the causes of the accident, but he 
said the Bhopal plant was responsi- 
ble for its own safety, with little 
scrutiny from outside experts. 

The Bhopal plant was inspected 
in 1982 by experts from the parent 
company in the United Stales, and 
they filed a critical report but Mr. 
Gokhale contended that the many 

(Cominaed on Page 5, CoL 1) 


By Rjobert Bums 

The Associated Press 

GENEVA — In a session 
marked by open-discord, OPEC ofl 
ministers discussed two pricing 
proposals Monday that if adopted, 
could cut the cartel's base price for 
only the second time in its history. 

The 13 ministers of the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries met twice in closed ses- 
sion in a Geneva hotel and said no 
agreement had been reached. They 
said they would resume the talks 
Tuesday. 

The president of the conference, 
the Indonesian ofl minister, Su- 
broto, told reporters that Nigeria 
and Saudi Arabia had submitted 
separate proposals aimed at nar- 
rowing the price gap between the 
cartel’s highest-quality crudes and 
the lower-quality ones. 

Nigeria said the spread should be 
$2 instead of the current S4; Saudi 
Arabia favored a $2.90 gap, accord- 
ing to Mr. Subroto. In either case, 
tbe price of Saudi light, tbe OPEC 
benchmark crude, would be expect- 
ed to come down, sources said. 

When asked, Mr. Subroto de- 
clined to rule out a cat in the Saudi 


said the possibility had grown more 
likely. 

“Let us not prgudge" what wiD 
come out of Tuesday's meeting, 
Mr. Subroto said. “There are many 
possibilities." 

Less than an hour after the con- 
ference started, the oQ minister of 
the United Arab Emirates walked 



U.K. Acts 
To Prop 
Pound 


Interest Rates 
Raised to 14% 
Amid Oil Fears 


Reusers 

LONDON — Renewed 
on the British pound 


TlnA miu ld FVna 

Mans Said al-Oteiba, die oil minister of the United Arab Emirates, top left, accused 
Nigeria, represented % Tam David-West, top right, of breaking price rales. Ahmed Zaki 
Yaroani of Saudi Arabia, above, said that the dispute was caused by a misunderstanding. 


out, complaining that Nigeria was 
OPEC in 


pushed up British interest rates for 
the third time in as many weeks to 
their highest level for three years, 
and caused heavy setting on the 
stock marfceL 

The pound has been undermined 
by a widespread market view that a 
glut of cnl will force lower prices for 
Britain’s North Sea crude. The 
pound had fallen to a record low in 
London on Monday when news of 
disagreement at the talks in Geneva 
by ministers of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries 
Lipped the balance in favor of an- 
other rate rise. 

Barclays Bank PLC, Britain’s 
biggest commercial bank, was the 
first to raise its base rate to 14 
percent from 12 percent in re- 
sponse to higher money-market 
rates. The move was swiftly en- 
dorsed by the Bank of England and 
matched by the three major rivals 
of Barclays — National Westmin- 
ster, Midland and Lloyds Bank. 

The base rate is the rate on which 
the bank determines tbe interest 
charged to borrowers and paid to 
depositors. 

On the London Stock Exchange, 
shares suffered their biggest tingle 
drop since 1974 only a week af la- 
the market hit a record high. The 
fall was attributed to fears that the 
rates increase would further weak- 
en economic recovery in Britain by 
raising the cost of loans for indus- 
ny. 

The Financial Times mdex of 30 


“stabbing OPEC in the back” by 
breaking its rules. 

Sh aikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani, the 
Saudi Arabian oQ minister, said lat- 
er (he incident was sparked by a 
“misunderstanding” between UAE 
minister, Mana Said al-Oteiba. and 
the Nigerian minister. Tam David- 
West The Nigerian refused to dis- 
cuss the incident 

Later, the oil minister of Qatar, 
Abdul Aziz al-Thani, said when 
asked if the ministers were consid- 
ering a cut in the OPEC base price 
of $29 a barrel: 

“We’re thinking about as a con- 
cept, [to] lower it" he said. He 
declined to specify any figures un- 
der consideration. 

The conference was recessed 
shortly after Mr. Otdba left the 
hotel. He later returned, but he did 
not immediately rejoin the confer- 
ence when it resumed in late after- 


U.S, Diplomat, Seized 10 Months Ago 
tn Beind, Makes a Videotaped Plea 


industrial shares plunged 43 points 
as (he value of shares lost almost £7 
bilHon ($7.77 billion). The index 
recovered to end at 977.9, down 
24.9. 

In London, the pound was 


closed at $1,111, up from Friday’s 
5. Hot 


noon. 

Mr. Otdba said that Mr. David- 
West was undermining the pricing 
structure because his country was 
exceeding its production quota of 
1.4 million barrels a day. 

“He is stabbing OPEC in the 
back and I was not going to stay 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL I) 


United Press International 

LONDON — William Buckley, 
a kidnapped U.S. diplomat, ap- 
peared in an amateur videotape 
screened here Monday and asked 
the U.S. government to act for his 
release and that of other Americans 
held in BeiruL 

Mr. Buckley was political officer 
of the U.S. Embassy in Beirut when 
he was kidnapped March 16. A 
television film agency, Visnews, 
which aired the tape here, said it 
was apparently the first public 
proof that Mr. Buckley was alive. 

U.S. officials in Washington 
confirmed ihat tbe man in the tape 
was Mr. Buckley and said they be- 


lieved he and four other kidnapped 
alive. 


EVSIDE 



Milan Kundera, the 
Czechoslovak writer, has 
had his sole stage work 
directed in the United 
States by Susan Sont 
A review is on Page 


■ Pope John Pari II, in Vene- 
zuela, urged Catholics to avoid 
(cachings contrary to those of 
(heir church. Page 2. 


■ New evidence is found that 
Homer’s heroes may have been 
real historic figures. Page 3. 


■ Vietnam, in need of develop- 
ment aid, is said to want an 
improvement in relations with 
the United States. Page 5. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ AT&T reported a 1984 profit 
of $1 J8-biIlion, below its fore- 
casts. Page 7. 


TOMORROW 


Two key Republicans, Robert J. 
Dole and Richard G. Lugar. 
have pointed the Senate down 
paths that could force change at 
the White House, Pentagon and 
State Department 


Americans in Lebanon were 

In tbe tape, which lasts 56 sec- 
onds, Mr. Buckley said, “Today, 
the 22d of January, 1985, 1 am wdl 
and my friends Benjamin Weir and 
Jeremy Levin are also wdL We ask 
that our government take action for 
our release quickly." 

The Reverend Benjamin E Weir, 
60, a Presbyterian minister, was 
kidnapped in May, and Jeremy 
Levin, 52, Beirut bureau chief of 
the Atlanta-based Cable News 
Network, was seized in March. 

Two other Americans who were 
kidnapped in Beirut were the Rev- 
erend Lawrence Martin Jenco, 50, 



“Karami announced last night 
his rejection of the resignation I 
submitted two days ago,” the Sunni 
Moslem minister said Monday. 
“Of course I accepted his rejection, 
thanking him for his support of my 
position." 

On Sunday, the government an- 
nounced measures to “revitalize the 
Lebanese pound, safeguard free 
trade and a free economy,” after 
the Lebanese pound slumped to a 
record low of 12.10 against the U.S. 
dollar Friday. 

Beirut radio said the measures 
would be carried out Monday, but 
did not give any other details. 


■ Israelis Bar Press 


WiOIaai Boddey 


five Christians to submit his resig- 
nation since the coalition was 
formed April 30. 

Speaking to reporters before an 
extraordinary cabinet meeting 
Monday cm the economy, Mr. Hess 
said he had agreed with Mr. Kar- 
ami on “a common stand" to cure 
economic and security problems. 


Israeli troops sealed off southern 
Lebanon on Monday to Beirut- 
based reporters after security 
sources in tbe region said that Is- 
raelis fired on a car carrying right 
children, killing a three-year-old 
girl, Reuters reported from Sidon. 

The child was among at least 
four persons killed and eight in- 
jured — including her father — 
throughout the south during the 
night and morning. Four attacks 
were reported on Israeli troops in 
which at least three were wounded, 
the sources said. 


dose erf $1.1 105. However, the dol- 
lar gained on other European mar- 
kets, ending at 3.1638 Deutsche 
marks in Frankfurt, up from 3.1599 
DM on Friday. In Paris, the U.S. 
currency dosed at 9.69 francs, up 
from 9.663 francs. 

Analysts said that the increase in 
interest rates may rule out tax cuts 
in tbe British budget in March. The 
cuts are a cornerstone of Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher's eco- 
nomic policy. 

The deputy leader of the opposi- 
tion Labor Party and its economic 
spokesman, Roy Hatlersley, de- 
clared that the Conservative gov- 
ernment’s financial strategy was in 
ruins. “Today’s announcements are 
a tragedy for households, industry 
and the unemployed," Mr. Hatters- 
ley said. 

Nigel Lawson , the chancellor of 
the exchequer, said the anxiety in 

financial mar kets over the pound 

was greatly overdone. He told a 
parttamentaiy committee that he 
saw no likelihood of tbe pound 
falling to parity with (he dollar. 

Sir Terence Beckett, director- 
general of the Confederation of 
British Industry, the employers’ as- 
sociation, said (hat Monday's rise 
in interest rates would cost indus- 
try an additional £540 million a 
year. 


a Catholic priest who was abducted 
Jan. 8, and Peter Kilburn, 60, a 
librarian at tbe American Universi- 
ty of Beirut who disappeared in 
November. 

In Washington, Larry Speaker 
the White House spokesman, Mr. 
Speakes reacted cautiously to tbe 
television broadcast of the video- 
tape. 

“We are pleased that he is alive 
and appears to be well,” he said. 
“We ore and have been and will 
continue to seek information from 
a number of sources in the Middle 
East on the five people held by 
terrorists there." 

“We wiU actively seek the release 
of these individuals on the basis of 
quiet contacts.” he added. 

Kevin Hamilton, the Visnews 
managin g editor, said at a special 
screening of the film in London 
that be could not disclose how the 
agency got the film or who supplied 


U.S. Seeks New Nicaragua Approach 


Aid to Rebek 9 FamiUes Considered in Policy Deadlock 


By Joanne Oraang 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration and members of 
Congress in both parties are con- 
sidering new approaches to break 
tbe apparent policy deadlock over 
Nicaragua, including “humanitar- 
ian aid" 10 f amilies of anti- Samtin- 
ist rebels and expanded economic 
sanctions. 


Nicaragua is essential in our opin- 


ion. However, we are willing to 
ersof Con- 


iL 


In the tape, the man identified as 
Mr. Buckley is holding a Beirut 
French-language newspaper, and 
although the date is not legible in 
the film, the pictures on the front 
page identify it as the paper fa 
Jan. 22. There was nothing in tbe 
tape to indicate where it was made. 


Both sides agree that the Demo- 
crats appear to have blocked fur- 
ther covert military aid through the 
Central Intelligence Agency to the 
guerrillas fighting the leftist San- 
dimst government in Nicaragua. 

But the Democrats, no less than 
the Republicans, still want to main- 
tain pressure for political change 
there and are casting about for ac- 
ceptable alternatives. 

Many Democrats are uneasy 
over recent developments that ap- 


work closely with members of ' 
grass as we seek this assistance.”] 
The Reagan administration's lat- 
est proposal would replace the 
nominally covert program of aid to 
the rebels with overt humanitarian 
aid to families of the fighters, and 
to Nicaraguan refugees living in 
Honduras, according to Republi- 
can Senate sources. 

The assistance would total about 
S14 million, the same as the admin- 
istration allocated for the rebels, in 

the hope that it can win a 

ticmal vote scheduled in M 
This approach would bow to the 
insistence tty some key Republi- 
cans, including tbe chairman of the 
Senate Select Committee on Intelli- 
gence, David F. Ehirenbergcr, Re- 
publican of Minnesota, that any 
aid program to the guerrillas be 


pear to indicate growing political 
and economic repression inNict 


B Hoss to Stay in Cabinet 

The Lebanese education and la- 
bor minister, Salim al-Hoss, said 
Monday he would remain in the 
cabinet after coming under pro- 
sure from Prime Minister Rashid 
Karami and other ministers to do 
so. United Press International re- 
ported Monday from BriruL 

Mr. Hass’s resignation on Satur- 
day was seen as a serious threat to 
Lebanon's fragile coalition govern- 
ment. He was the firet member of 
the cabinet of five Moslems and 


and economic represson in Nicara- 
gua. They want to help halt that 
trend. 

Administration officials fear 
that the program to tbe guerrillas is 
dead but they continue to push for 
it — in various forms — because 
they have made it the keystone erf 
then- policy and have no backup 
positions. 

["The U.S. will not break faith 
with those who seek freedom and 
democracy in Central America or 
elsewhere,” the White House 
spokesman, Larry Speakes, said 
Monday, United Press Internation- 
al reported. “Assistance to those in 


The law forbids efforts to over- 
throw governments with which the 
United Stales has diplomatic rela- 
tions, and the rebels have made it 
dear that their objective is driving 
out the Sandinists. 

Humanitarian funding for asso- 
ciates of tbe guerrillas was dis- 
cussed briefly during the long dis- 
pute last year in Congress over 
Central America policy and was 
dropped as too obvious a subter- 
fuge. 

Other approaches under discus- 
sion include a new argument, 
which Mr. Reagan used Thursday, 
that funding the rebels is self-de- 
fense under the charters of the 


United Nations and the Organiza- 
tion of American States. The char- 
ters provide for “individual and 
collective security.” Conservatives 
are known to be pressing Mr. Rea- 
gan for a major televised speeds 
appealing for public support for 
the aid program to the guerrillas. 

Republicans also are considering 
some land of expanded economic 
sanctions, possibly including pres- 
sure on UA allies to halt ail trade 
with Nicaragua. 

A leader of Nicaragua’s domes- 
tic opposition, Arturo Josi Cruz, 
recen tly voiced opposition to such 
sanctions as too damaring to Nica- 
raguan civilians- Mr. Cruz is a for- 
mer central bank president and 
ambassador to Washington. 

Several Democrats pointed out 
that previous UJ5. efforts to orga- 
nize international boycotts a g^incr 
Cuba and the Soviet Union had 
limited success. 

In developments that impressed 
many members of Congress as sig- 
naling serious erosion erf rights in 
Nicaragua, Mr. Cruz came out in 
favor of more funds for the armed 
rebels, who are known as contras, 
and the opposition publisher Pedro 
Joaquin Chamorro announced he 
was going into self-imposed exile in 
Costa Rica until conditions im- 
proved in Nicaragua. 

As further evidence, several 
Democrats cited recent published 
reports of forced widespread re- 
cruitment into the army and black 
mariceteenng in Nicaragua. 

“There is something to be said 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. JANUARY 29. 1985 


Pope, in Andes, Urges 
Avoidance of Teachings 
Contrary to Catholicism 


The Associated Press 

MERIDA. Venezuela — Pope 
John Paul 11 brought his South 
American pilgrimage to the foot- 
hills of the Andes Mountains on 
Monday, urging tens of thousands 
of people during a Mass to steer 
clear of ideologies contrary to 
church teaching 

The pope arrived in Merida to 
cheers on a clear, crisp morning, 
and emphasized the theme of his 
tour — fidelity to the Roman Cath- 
olic Church and religious disci- 
pline. He flew to this university 
center from Venezuela's oil capital 
of Maracaibo on the third day of 
his sixth Latin American tour. 

“To be faithful to the church," 
John Paul said "means to not let 
yourself be taken in by doctrines or 
ideologies contrary to Catholic 
dogma, which some groups of ma- 
terialistic inspiration or of doubtful 
religious content would like." 

Before celebrating Mass, the 
pope greeted the faithful, many of 
whom had camped out since Sun- 
day night. He helped plant an ever- 
green while thousands chanted 
“Long live the pope?" 

[Meanwhile, Governor Angel 
Zambrano of Zulia state said that 
security forces have arrested 32 
leftists and seized weapons in 
Maracaibo, United Press Interna- 
tional reported 

[Mr. Zambrano said that “anar- 
chists" were arrested at a nursing 
school building in a security check 
before the pope arrived in ‘the city 
on Sunday. The governor said that 
32 people were arrested and that 
the confiscated material included 
“small arms, some of military qual- 
ity. and subversive literature." 

[The nursing school belongs to 
the University of Zulia and is situ- 
ated near the grounds where John 
Paul said Mass on Sunday. The 
authorities would not comment on 
whether the arms were intended for 
use during the pope’s visit or were 
being stored for other purposes.] 

Vatican officials describe Meri- 
da, 442 miles (716 kilometers) from 
Caracas and the home of Lhe Uni- 
versity of The Andes, as one of the 
most religious areas in Venezuela. 

John Paul planned to attend a 
youth gathering on Monday night 
in Caracas and to meet with mem- 
bers of the Latin American Ecclesi- 
astic Conference, which includes 
Archbishops Arturo Rivera y Da- 
mas of San Salvador and Miguel 
Obando y Bravo of Managua. The 
pontiff, who welcomed them dur- 
ing a Mass on Sunday night, has 
offered to mediate the conflicts in 
El Salvador and Nicaragua. 


More than one million people 
turned out for papal Masses on 
Sunday in Caracas and Maracaibo. 

Since arriving in Venezuela on 
Saturday to start a 12-day, four- 
nation tour, the pontiff has restated 
traditional teaching on family is- 
sues and told Roman Catholic 
bishops to discipline theologians 
who deviate from church doctrine. 

In a Mass on the theme of the 
family, celebrated near a poor Ca- 
racas neighborhood, the pope con- 
demned contraception, abortion, 
eu thanasia and divorce. 

He said that the “plague of di- 
vorce” r uins families and told the 
throng: “Remember, it is never le- 
gal to end a human life with abor- 
tion or euthanasia." 

In Maracaibo, John Paul, the 
first pope to visit Venezuela, 
stressed the importance of Catholic 
education. 

The pope, in a speech to bishops 
Saturday night, set the tone for his 
tour of the region, where many 
priests and theologians have adopt- 
ed Marxist theories in the struggle 
to help the poor. He warned against 
those who “disfigure the evangeli- 
cal message, using it as the service 
of ideologies and political strate- 
gies in search of an illusory earthly 
liberation." 

John Paul also will travel to Ec- 
uador, Peru and Trinidad and To- 
bago before flying back to Rome 
on Feb. 6. 

■ Pope May Visit Cuba 

John Paul could visit Cuba on a 
future tour, but the Vatican is not 
aware of any invitation from Presi- 
dent Fidel Castro, a Vatican offi- 
cial said Monday in Maracaibo. 
Reuters reported. 

The official was commenting on 
reports that Mr. Castro had told a 
group of UJS. bishops visiting Ha- 
vana last week that he would be 
willing to invite the pope to Cuba. 

While visiting Lhe Dominican 
Republic in October, John Paul 
sent special greeting; to Catholics 
in Cuba and later said that be had 
not gone there because he had not 
been invited. 

■ Bombings in Peru 

Leftist Peruvian guerrillas dyna- 
mited an electrical power plant, a 
police station and other targets late 
Sunday in the southern city of Aya- 
cucho, where the pope plans to visit 
next week. United Press Interna- 
tional reported from Ayacucho. 

The police said at least three per- 
sons were wounded and more than 
100 suspects were arrested as a re- 
sult of the attacks by the guerrilla 
group Shining Path. 



Th» AucxnBccf Pr«a 

POpe John Paul II gets a hug from a Venezuelan child in Maracaibo. 

U.S, and EC Split on Danger to Ozone 


OPEC, in Tense Meeting, 
Discusses Cutting Prices 


(Continued from Page ij 

with him in the conference," Mr. 
Oteiba said. 

Many OPEC members, includ- 
ing Nigeria, are feeling a severe 
economic pinch from declining ofl 
revenues, partly because of stiffer 
competition from Britain, Norway 
and other non-OPEC oil produc- 
ers. They also have been hurt by a 
substantial drop in world oil con- 
sumption in recent yeans. 

Nigeria bolted from the OPEC 
pricing system Last October, cutting 
its price by S2 a barrel in reroonse 
to similar cuts by Britain and Nor- 
way. The decision shook OPECs 
pricing sysiem and reinforced a 
perception among oil buyers that 
the cartel cannot stop prices from 
falling. 

The price of Saudi light crude 
has traded recently on the open 
market for about $27 JO a barrel, or 
S 1 .50 below the official Saudi price. 

Conference sources said Sunday 
that a consensus had emerged with- 
in OPEC that the Saudi light price 
must be reduced. Some reportedly 
favored a reduction to $26.50. 

Opposition led by Iran and Alge- 
ria made it uncertain, however, 
whether any pricing agreement 
could be readied at this meeting. 

Shortly before the meeting start- 
ed, Sheikh Y amani said that he 
expected a gmaTl price reduction to 
be agreed on at this meeting. 

He also said OPEC production 
bad dropped to 14 million barrels a 

day, two minio n below its self-im- 
posed ceiling. 

Later, the Iranian oil minister, 
Mohammad Qarazi, said Ms coun- 
try “will never agree" to a price cut. 
Algeria and Libya also nave said 
they oppose price reductions. 

■ Reporter Is Barred 

Youssef Ibrahim, the chief ofl 


reporter of The Wall Street Jour- 
nal, was denied access to the meet- 
ing's opening session in a dispute 
over an article he wrote on alleged 
extravagance by ministers, Reuters 
reported from Geneva. 

The article said there was compe- 
tition among delegations for the 
best hotel suites in Geneva. 


By lain Guest 

International Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — A United Nations 
meeting has ended here with the 
United States and the European 
Community deeply divided over 
the extent of the threat to the ozone 
layer in the atmosphere and specif- 
ic proposals to protect it 

The meeting, which ended Fri- 
day, was held under the auspices of 
the UN Environment Program. It 
was the last of a scries on the ozone 
layer, which extends for approxi- 
mately 50 kilometers (31 utiles) 
above the earth's surface and filters 
out ultraviolet rays of the sun. 
These rays are known to cause skin 

cancer and damage crops. 

The disagreement stemmed from 
recent warnings by scientists in the 
United States that the ozone layer 
could be critically depleted within 
50 years if measures were not taken 
to curb emissions of chlorofluoro- 
carbon*, which are chlorine-carry- 
ing gases that rise into the atmo- 
sphere and attack ozone. 

Chlorofluorocarbons are widely 
used in aerosol quay cans, refriger- 
ators, plastic foam and industrial 
solvents. Last week, ax nations — 
Canada, the United Stales, Nor- 
way, Switzerland, Finland and 
Sweden — formally proposed a 
worldwide ban on their use as pro- 
pellants in aerosols within four 
years. 

This proposal was rejected by the 
10- member European Community 
and d e l egate s said it would now 
prove “exceptionally difficult” to 


reach final agreement on an inter- 
national convention to protect the 
ozone layer at a diplomatic confer- 
ence in Vienna, due to start March 
18. 

Concern over the ozone layer re- 
vived recently after a group of sci- 
entists from Harvard warned of the 
risk of what they called a “chlorine 
catastrophe." writing in the maga- 
zine Nature, the scientists said the 
depletion of ozone could accelerate 
quickly once the amount of chlo- 
rine in the atmosphere passed a 
threshold ratio, which they estimat- 
ed at around 16 parts per billion. 

Other research has suggested 
that the composition of the ozone 
column may be already changing 
under the impact of chlorine and 
that this could lead to changes in 
climate. 

These warnings were endorsed 
by U.S. delegates al the meeting. 

“Once the chlorine threshold is 


"The margin of error between 
complacency and catastrophe is 
too small for comfort" he added. 

This was dismissed by a Europe- 
an delegate in private' as “scare- 
mongering." George Strongolis, a 
spokesman for the European Com- 
mission in Brussels, said at the 
meeting that emissions of chloro- 
fluorocarbons were still more than 
five times lower than required to 
trigger a "chlorine catastrophe." 

Delegates agreed that present 
data was not conclusive. On Oct. 
19, a scientific group established by 
the UN Environment Program 
found that the production of 
chlorofluorocarbons In industrial- 
ized countries fell by 14 percent 
between 1974 and 1982. but that it 
rose by roughly 8 percent, from 
599,000 tons to 644.000 ions, be- 
tween 1982 and 1983. 

Much of the reduction in chloro- 
fluorocarbon; was due to a 1979 
reached, it will be like going over 0 l ban on their use in aerosol sprays in 


diff very rapidly," said Stephen 
Weil of the Environmental Protec- 
tion Agency. “The effect would be 
dramatic.” 

While no one disputed that a 
chlorine catastrophe was posable, 
there was disagreement over when 
it could occur. Richard E. Bene- 
dick, an environmental official in 
the State Department, said that it 
would only require a 3-peroenl in- 
crease in chlorofluorocarbons a 
year and that it was “not unreason- 
able" to expect such an increase 
given the present rate of chloro flu- 
orocarbons production. 


the United States and their substi- 
tution by hydrocarbons. U.S. dele- 
gates said the conversion had cut 
chlorofiuorocarbons emissions in 
the United Stales by half and re- 
sulted in savings 10 consumers of 
$165 million in 1983. 

Based on this, the six govern- 
ments .have proposed a worldwide 
ban on the use of nonessential 
chlorofluorocarbons in aerosols 
within four years. This has been 
rejected by the European Commu- 
nity, which instead favors freezing 
the capacity to produce all chloro- 
fluorocarbons at the present level. 


South Africa 
Says It Hired 
U.S. Citizens 
For N-Plant 

By Alar. Cowell 

.Vf» }jri T:n:es Sen:ce 

CAPE TOWN — South Africa's 
state-owned power company ac- 
knowledged Monday that it had 
recruit ed’L : -S. personnel, including 
atomic reactor operators, to help 
run the Koeberg nuclear power sta- 
tion near here.' 

However, at a news conference, a 
spokesman for South Africa's Elec- 
tricity Supply Commission. .Andre 
van Heerden. denied suggestions 
that .American personnel were 
working in contravention of U.S. 
laws. 

Other officials said the full ex- 
tent and legality of private Ameri- 
can involvement at the French-sup- 
plied reactor had yet to be 
established. 

The officials said the Electricity 
Supply Commission had met with 
its .American employees recently 
and had circulated a U.S. request 
that they contact the Department 
of Energy in Washington so that 
their lawful status could be ascer- 
tained. 

Under regulations published in 
February 1983. U.S. citizens need 
official authorization before pro- 
viding expertise to some countries, 
including South Africa, that could 
assist in the production of plutoni- 
um. 

Plutonium con be used to build 
nuclear weapons and is one of the 
by-products of reactors such as the 
two installed at Koeberg. 20 miles 
(32 kilometers) north of Cape 
Town. South Africa's only nuclear 
power plant 

Mr. van Heerden said the Ameri- 
cans at Koeberg were in two cate- 
gories: those working directly for 
the Electricity Supply Commibion 
and those working for American 
contractors hired by : L He estimat- 
ed the number of those employed 
directly at around 20. but did not 
say how many were employed by 
contractors. 

Officials said the presence of au- 
thorized U.S. contractors at Koe- 
berg had been known for some 
time, but the presence of directly 
recruited individuals had only be- 
come known to the UJS. authorities 
in November. 

"The majority' of Americans are 
here as consultants.'’ Mr. van Heer- 
den said, but others included oper- 
ators in charge of reactor systems 
and “people 'who helped us with 
emergency planning." Mr. van 
Heerden said foreigners were ex- 
pected to help train South Africans 
in the running of the reactor. 

South .Africa, widely suspected 
of either seeking or already pos- 
sessing nuclear weapons, has re- 
fused to sign lhe Nudear Nonpro- 
liferation Treaty. But Mr. van 
Heerden said South Africa has 
agreed to inspection of the Koe- 
berg plant by officials from France 
and the International Atomic Ener- 
gy Agency. 

The United States has suspended 
shipments of enriched uranium to 
South Africa because of its refusal 
to sign the nonproliferation treaty. 
Japan and France. Mr. van Heer- 
den indicated, have not applied the 
same restrictions. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

6 Rebels Arrested in New Caledonia 

NOUMEA. New Caledonia (AP) — Six members of the pr o-indepen- 
dence Kanak Socialist National Liberation Front were arrested Monday 
in connection with the sabotage last week of New Caledonia s largest 
nickel min e, the prosecutor, Jacques Gauthier, said. 

Fourteen other members of the group appeared in court in anmecum 
with the wounding of six European settlers Friday on the island of Mart, 
judiciary sources said. A trial date was set for Feb. 8. 

Twenty-one trucks and bulldozers and other equipment were damaged 
in the early morning hours Wednesday at the Kouaoua mckd nunc near 
the center of the main island of New Caledonia. The authorities were 
continuing their investigation into a similar sabotage of the mme at Tbio, 
on the east coast, several days earlier. The separatist group formally 
denial participation in the sabotage at Thio and condemned that at 
Kouaoua. 

Iran, Iraq Claim Victory in Battle 

BEIRUT (UPI) — Iran said Monday that it bad "completely crushed” 
an Iraqi offensive in the southern part of their disputed border. It raid 
there had been heavy fighting in the marshy Majnoon Islands area and 
that Iraqi forces had been unable to advance. 

Earlier, a statement from Iraq said four Iraqi divisions had launched a 
successful offensive in the region late Sunday. The statement, quoted by 
the Iraqi News Agency, said Iraqi forces “captured three targets set by the 
operation and are now consolidating their new positions." It said the 
Iranian casualty toll was heavy. 

The attacks came one day after Iran reportedly shelled an elementary 
school in the southern Iraqi border hamlet of Al Zaher, wounding nine 
pupils and a school employee. 

The ground fighting coincided with new attacks on Gulf dripping. The 
Sefiros. a 47,869-ton tanker registered in Greece, was hit Sunday by a 
missile apparently fired from Ir anian warships near the Saudi Arabian oil 
terminal of Ras Tannura, causing damage but no casualties, Lloyds of 
London said. The attack came hours after Iraq said its warplanes Mt two 
naval targets south of the Iranian oil terminal at Kharg Island. 

Austrian Rightist Threatens to Resign 

VIENNA (Reuters) — Vice Chancellor Norben Sieger, leader of the 
rightist Freedom Party, threatened Monday to resign from the the 
Socialist-led coalition and bring down the government if Defense Minis- 
ter Friedhelm Frischenschlager, focus of a dispute about a war criminal 
sent back to Austria, was dismissed. 

At the request of Chancellor Fred Sinowatz, Mr. Frischenschlager cut 
short a visit to Egypt and was Dying back to Austria on Monday night for 
the regular Tuesday cabinet meeting. He faces criticism at the meeting 
and a no-confidence vote at a special parliamentary session Friday. 

Chancellor Sinowatz apologized Sunday to Jewish leaders after Mr. 
Frischenschlager personally met Walter Reder, a convicted war criminal, 
after he was released after three decades of imprisonment in Italy last 
week. 

Egypt, Israel Hold Talks on Taba Issue 

BEERSHEBA. Israel (UPO — 

Egypt and Israel, in a second day of 
talks Monday on the disputed re- 
sort town of Taba on the Gulf of 
Aqaba, discussed a future role for a 
multinational force to police it. Af- 
terward, both sides expressed satis- 
faction. 

“There is substance in the talks," 
said Abdel Halim Badawi, head of 
the Egyptian delegation. His Israeli 
counterpart, Zvi Kedar, said: “I 
believe we have gone a long way 
together. We are negotiating in 
good spirits and good will We are 
exc hang ing formulas." 

Taba is one of 15 Sinai boundary 
points still in dispute between Isra- 
el and Egypt. 




U.K. Official Tried for Falkland^ Leak 

LONDON (UPI) — A senior Defense Ministry official went on trial 
Monday accused of leaking secrets on the sinking of the Argentine 
cruiser. General Belgrano, to an opposition Labor politician. 

Clive Posting, an official at the ministry, pleaded not guilty to the 
charge under a section of the 191 1 Official Secrets Act that forbids giving 
confidential government information to “unauthorized” persons. Mr. 
Pouting admitted through his lawyer that he had passed on two docu- 
ments to a Labor member of parliament, Tam DalyeU. But Mr. Ponting's 
defense is that Mr. Dalydl, as a legislator, was authorized to receive 
government information. 

One of the documents was a report dealing with changes in the rules of 
eugagemem for the South Atlantic Task Force during the Falkland 
Islands war in 1982. The other was an internal memorandum recom- 

mending how information about the decision to sink the cruiser on May 

2 1 982, should be kept from the House of Commons select committceon 
Iff Pmfic Aufl foreign affairs, which was investigating the inddenL 

To GetGreek Rabin Is Confident on U.S. Arms Aid 

WASHINGTON (UPI) — Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel, 
speaking Monday after meeting with Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger of the United States, said be had no doubt that Washington 
would increase military aid to Israel next year beyond this year's $1.4 
billion. 

“How much, the president of the United Slates will decide" Mr. Rabin 
said. He was to meet Wednesday with President Ronald Reagan. 

Israel has requested $22 billion in military assistance for fiscal 1986, 
but U.S. officials and diplomatic sources said the administration has 
decided to give Sl.S billion, in grants that do not have to be repaid. 


Leaders of six nations met Monday in New Delhi and 
urged a ban on nuclear weapons in space. From left are 
Rmnaswami Venkataraman, India’s vice president; Presi- 
dent Raid Alfonsin of Argentina; Prime Minister Olof 


Thi Amcnted Praa 

Palme of Sweden; President ZaB Singh of India; President 
Julius EL Nyerere of Tanzania: President Miguel de la 
Madrid of Mexico; Prime Minister Andreas Fapandreou 
of Greece, and Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of India. 


Indio, 5 Other Nations Urge Ban on Nuclear Arms 


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By Steven R. Weisman 

New York Times Service 

NEW DELHI — Leaders of six 
notmli gned and pro-Western na- 
tions joined here Monday in urging 
a ban on nudear weapons in outer 
space as part of an overall end to 
the arms race. 

At an rmmaial one-day summit 
conference, the leaden of India, 
Mexico. Argentina, Ta n za n ia. Swe- 
den and Greece also said they 
would personally urge restraint on 
nuclear weapons in their meetings 
in the next several months with 
leaders of the Soviet Union and the 
United States. 

Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
presided at the meeting of the so- 


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called five continent peace initia- 
tive. His role marked his first expo- 
sure in the realm of international 
politics since he took office in No- 
vember. 

On Monday, however, Mr. Gan- 
dhi spoke bluntly on the need to 
curtail the nuclear arms competi- 
tion. indirectly criticizing the Unit- 
ed States on the issue. 

Referring to the last arms initia- 
tive by the six nations, which was a 
call for a “freeze" on the produc- 
tion of nudear weapons, Mr. Gan- 
dhi said this measure “got a very 
positive response from at least one 
nuclear power.” 

He was referring to the Soviet 
Union, which has endorsed such a 
“freeze." The United Stales main- 
tains that there should not be a 
freeze until the U.S. weapons 
buildup is completed. 

As chairman of the nnnalign rd 
movement, as well as leader of a 
country that receives heavy Soviet 
assistance, Mr. Gandhi nonetheless 
appeared to take care to avoid hav- 
ing the peace initiative be seat as 
anti-American. 


The conference Monday was the 
outgrowth of work done by Parlia- 
mentarians for World Order, an 
organization of legislators that has 
been active in the peace movement 
in various countries. 

The statement by the conference 
participants asserted that “a small 
group of men and machines in cit- 
ies far away” are the ones who 
“decade our fate.” 

Participating in the session were 
Mr. Gandhi, President Raul Alieni- 
sm of Argentina, President Miguel 
de la Madrid of Mexico, President 
Julius K. Nyerere of Tanzania, 
Prime Minister Olof Palme of Swe- 
den and Prime Minister Andreas 
Papandreou of Greece. 

Mr. Papandreou, whose country 
is a member of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization, reiterated 
what he said was his “determina- 
tion” to eliminate U.S. nudear 
weapons on board ships stopping 
in Greece. He said that if the unit- 
ed States did not agree to such a 
step. “I shall act unilaterally.” 


Representative Thomas J. Dow- 
ney, Democrat of New York, at- 
tended the conference as the UJS. 
participant in the Parliamentarians 
for World Order. Of the initiative, 
be said there was “no doubt in my 
mind that this will help marshal 
public opinion in the United States 
behind the need for arms talks to 
reduce world tensions." 

■ Security Is Strict 

Security for the conference was 
described by officials as bong as 
heavy as for the much larger meet- 
ings in 1983 of the Commonwealth 
brads of government and leaders of 
the nonafigned movement, Reuters 
reported from New DdhL 

Commandos, aimed with auto- 
matic weapons, guarded the hall 
where the six leaders met- Marks- 
men took up positions on nearby 
rooftops. Streets around the meet- 
ing hall were sealed off. 

Indian newspapers have report- 
ed recently that Mr. Gandhi and 
President Zail Singh may be the 
targets of assassination squads 
from the Punjab region. 


Cooperation 

Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Jacques Delors, 
the new president of the European 
Commission, proposed a package 
of grants and loans to Greece on 
Monday in an effort to remove the 
threat of a Greek veto on the entry 
of Spain and Portugal to the Euro- 
pean Community. 

Diplomats said Mr. Delors made 
his proposal to the foreign minis- 
ters of the 10 community members 
at their meeting in Brussels. Be- 
tides Lhe problems in negotiations 
on the entry of the Iberian coun- 
tries. scheduled for Jan. 1, 1986, 
they are expected to discuss the 
community’s cash crisis. 

The diplomats said Mr. Delors 
would soon present a plan with 
figures for the proposed aid to 
Greece, which had sought it as part 
or a plan to help the community’s 
poorer Mediterranean regions. 

The diplomats said the package 
would indude grants from the 
community’s regional and social 
aid funds, and low-interest loans 
from the European Investment 
Bank and other EC credit institu- 
tions. 

The previous commission under 
Gaston Thorn had proposed a 
S4.5 -bill ion Mediterranean aid 
scheme that was rejected by most 
community governments as unreal- 
istic. 

Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
dreou of Greece threatened at the 
community's summit in Dublin in 
December to block the entry of 
Spain and Portugal if special aid 
was not agreed for his country’s 
poorer regions. 


Church Says 63 Killed in El Salvador 

SAN SALVADOR (UPI) — Six cy-three people were killed in political 
violence in El Salvador last week, according to Bishop Gregono Rosa 
Chivez, the second-ranking Roman Catholic churchman in El Salvador. 

The church's Legal Rights Office reported that three persons were 
“captured” and that seven more “disappeared" last week, the bishop said. 

Among the 63 killed were a rightist candidate in the March 3 1 elections 
for the Legislative Assembly and a government official from the Chris- 
tian Democratic Party, Bishop Rosa CbAvez said in a sermon at San 
Salvador’s Metropolitan Cathedral. He said the killing s provoked fears 
“that in the coming days a string of political crimes will be unleashed, 
filling the electoral campaign with blood, irrationality and frustration-" 

For the Record 

The 46th game of the world chess championship match between the 
titleholder, Anatoli Karpov, and Gary Kasparov ended Monday in a 
draw on the 42d move. (Rruien) 

E cu ad or has proposed a candidate, Alfonso Barrera Valverde, 50, to 
succeed the UNESCO director-general. Amadou Mahtar M’Bow, when 
his term expires at the end of 1987, sources said Monday. He is a former 
foreign minister and editor of the newspaper, Meridiano. (AP) 

President Ronald Reagan wffl meet with President Radi Alfonsin of 
Argentina during a state visit to Washington by Mr. Alfonsin on March 
19, a White House spokesman announced Monday. f AP ) 

U.S. Weighs Aid Approaches 



The Global Newspaper. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
for keeping the Sandinists under 
pressure or in doubt as to our inten- 
tion," said Representative David 
R. Obey. Democrat of Wisconsin, 
who is expected to be named chair- 
man of the Appropriations sub- 
committee on foreign operations 
this week. But he said utal U_S. 
involvement with the guerrillas 
tends to make the United Slates 
“the point at issue, rather than the 
shortcomings of the Sandinists." 

The Democrats acknowledge 
that they have come up with few 
alternatives but contend that they 
retain a firm House majority 
against the rebel operation. 

Representative Michael D. 
Barnes, Democrat of Maryland. 


chairman of the Foreign Affairs 

subcommittee on the Western 
Hemisphere, said. “I continue to 
struggle with trying to find a com- 
promise that could achieve the ends 
the administration wants to 
achieve, while getting us out of this 
program .” 

Ambassador Carlos Tunner- 
mann acknowledged that some 
Democrats perceive a worsening 
situation in his country. “That per- 
ception is not c o rre c t," he said. 

He noted that President Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra has promised J 
broad amnesty program, continued 
mixed economy and political plu- 
ralism, and said that reports of 
draft resistance and speculation 
fleeted isolated cases. 









r 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1985 


Page 3 


Space Shuttle’s Success 
With a Booster Keeps 
3 Missions on Schedule 


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The Associated Press 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida 
— Except for minor riamay to 
beat-protection tiles, the buttle 
Discovery returned in excdlem 
shape from its first' military space 
trip, the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration said Man- 
day. 

Crewmen on the secret mission 
successfully deployed a giant spy 
satellite with a booster {Hat once 
bad performed incorrectly. 

Because of the success of the 
rocket stage, three more shuttle 
fUghls using the same booster can 
proceed as scheduled this year, 
space officials said. Had the rocket 
failed, as it did on its only other 


Update Urged 
For Canada's 


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By Christopher S. Wren 

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New York Tima Service 

OTTAWA — A ranadian Sen- 
ate committee has urged an over- 
haul of the country’s air-defense 
system, but the defense minister 
has suggested that Canada cannot 
afford all the paneTs recommenda- 
tions. 

The Senate Committee on Na- 
tional Defense, in a report mad** 
public recently, descrioed Cana- 
da's air-defense system as obsolete 
and vulnerable. 

“At present, hostile bombers 
could fly undetected into the heart 
of North America and attack UK 
deterrent forces without warning," 
the report said, because of huge 
gaps in the early warning radar 
system manned by the United 
States and Canada 
The committee recommended 
that an Airborne Warning and 
Control System, called AWACS, 
be used to help plug the gaps untfl 
Canada could deploy its own sur- 
veillance and communications sat- 
ellites . 

It also called for Canada’s air 
force to buy 20 more F-18 Hornet 
fighter planes from the United 
States before its option expires in 
April. 

A total overhaul of the air de- 
fense system, including the pur- 
chase of AWACS and F-l 8s, would 
cost about $2.4 billion, the report 
said. 

It further estimated that a major 
nrihiary space program would cost 
Canada about SI 13 millian annual- 
ly for the next five years and up to 
$265 million a year through the 
. . 1990’s. 

f" OlklaiMbli “1 would -say we can’t afford' 
r some of the things they’re talking 
•r 1 - about right now," said Defease 
•'t--; ' - -Minister Robert C Coates, “but we 
- maybe aide to afford other things." 

■ '-■ ? Mr. Coates called research and 

development in space-age technol- 
. • • ogy “very exotic" and sard, “I don't 

r: "• know whether we’re in that 
: league." 

. The Senate proposal goes well 

beyond a plan that f- ppariian and 
_ _ ,r_-.r American officials are working on 
- _.-L: to spend J1.2 billion to modernize 
I.’: ’-- the eristing radar network in the 
’ : Arctic. The Distant Early Wanting, 
,-r or DEW line as it is called, was 
built in the 1950s to guard against 
Soviet bombers. It stretches across 
Alaska, northern Canada and 
.Greenland. 

■t 4 V Arnt- The DEW line was neglected af- 
*“*■"** .... ter the Soviet Union started em- 
— phasizing land-based interconti- 
- -- r: 7 i'nental ballistic missiles over 

. .aircraft But the report made public 
- "last week took note of a new threat 
.. from Soviet Backfire supersonic 
.bombers and air-launched cruise 






shuttle assignment two years ago, 
those shots would have been in 
jeopardy. 

The mission ended Sunday after- 
noon with a perfect landing near 
the launchpaa where the flight be- 
gan Thursday. 

Left behind in orbit, 22J00 miles 
(36,150 kilometers) above the equa- 
tor, was a $300- million satellite 
that sources say is capable of moni- 
toring Soviet missile tests and 
eaves d ro ppin g on selected military 
and diplomatic communications in 
much of Europe, Asia and Africa. 

NASA repealed that only about 
a dozen tiles were damaged on Dis- 
covery, less than on most shuttle 
flights. 

“There were no significant orbit- 
er systems problems during the 
flight.” a space agency statement 
said. 

The five astronauts, all military 
officers, flew back to their training 
base in Houston on Sunday night 
for debriefing sessions. In keeping 
with the secrecy imposed by the air 
force on much of the mission, they 
did not make the usual public de- 
parture statements. 

But as they arrived in Houston, 
reporters overheard one of the 
crew, Major Gary E. Payton of the 
air force, ask some mission control 
officials, “Why did you bring us 
home so early? 1 ’ 

Replied one of the officials, “We 
were really worried.” 

The commander. Captain Thom- 
as KL Mattingly of the navy, was 
overheard to say: “It was a long 
two years, but it was worth it It all 
went super ” The two years appar- 
ently referred to his t raining peri- 
od. 

Sources reported that the ship 
returned early because the weather 
forecast called for deteriorating 
conditions Monday at Cape Ca- 
naveral The weather Sunday was 
sunny. 

Ca ptflm Mattingly is retiring af- 
ter three space missions. He is leav- 
ing NASA to become space pro- 
gram director with the Naval 
Electronic Systems Command. 

The other crew members were 
Lieutenant Colonel Loren J. Shri- 
verof the air force. Lieutenant Col- 
onel James F. Buchli and Major 
Ellison S. Onizuka of the air force. 

Discovery was towed into a pro- 
cessing hangar to be prepared for 
for its next mission in March. 
Then, one satellite is to be deployed 
and a second recovered. 

Because of Discovery’s success 
on the just-completed flight, 
NASA can proceed with launching 
Challenger on Feb. 20 with a pair 
of communications satellites and a 
crew of seven that includes a 
French astronaut and a US. sena- 
tor, Jake Gam, Republican of 
Utah. 

One of Challenger’s satellites is a 
NASA tracking and data relay sat- 
ellite to be boosted to high orbit by 
the same type of rocket stage that 
sent Discovery’s spy satellite to its 
lofty outpost. 

The rocket is called an inertial 


upper ! 

ous shuttle assignment, in April 
1983, propelling a communications 
payload into an incorrect orbit. 
The trouble was traced to second 
stage motor overheating that col- 
lapsed a flexible seal in the steering 
mechanism. 

Major modifications were made 
and extensive testing was done be- 
fore officials felt oonfide&L in flying 
the rocket on the militar y missi on. 

NASA now can return to its 
open information; policy, until the 
next military mission, scheduled in 
September. Full-scale briefings 
with flight directors, the astronaut 
crew and payload experts are 
scheduled this week for Challeng- 
er’s February flight- That was not 
done before the Discovery launch. 


Canada has traditionally as- 
; . sinned 10 percent of the North 
' American an defense costs unde r 
Usteeaty with the United States, 

tithe size dM^wpula^mmd econ- 
omy compared with those of the 
■ .United States. There have been re- 
imports from Washington that the 
: two countries will split the cost of 
modernizing the DEW line radar 
: network. 

The agreement for a new North 
'-Warning System to replace the 
' DEW line could be signed when 
President Ronald Reagan comes to 
' -Quebec City on March 17 for con- 
- solutions with Prime Minister Bri- 
an Mulroney. Joint defense is one 
of the issues expected to be dis- 
missed by the two leaders. 


U.S. Begins Campaign 
For Use of Safety Seats 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON —A UK safe- 
ty board began a nationwide cam- 
paign Monday to convince Ameri- 
cans that child safety seats in care 
would reduce the number of deaths 
and injuries suffered by children. 

Patricia Goldman, vice chairman 
of the National Transportation 
Safety Board, said at a one-day 
symposium that about 600 infants 
and children »mHw the a gp of 5 
were killed in highway accidents 
each year. She said another 50,000 
suffer injuries because they are not 
buckled into a safety seat or the 
devices are used improperly. 


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Ancient 'Wilma’ Text Gives New Support to Historicity of Homer’s Iliad 


By Colin Campbell 

New York Tima Service 

CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — 
Three months ago Professor Calvert 
Watkins, a linguist at Harvard, was ex- 
amining some dry documents in an ex- 
tinct language of ancient Anatolia when 
he came upon a string of words that filled 
him with excitement 

Translated, the words said, “When 
they came from steep Wilusa.” 

The text broke off at that point. But for 
many reasons, Mr. Watkins believed that 
he had found the op enin g line of a song 
or epic about Troy, the “steep flios” of 
Homer’s “Iliad,” that was written down 
in the Trojans’ own language more than 
500 years before Homer, who lived in the 
8th century B.C. 

Mr. Watkins’s “Wiluaad,” as he calls 
it. has been greeted by other linguists, 
classicists and archaeologists as brilliant 
detective work. It has added another tan- 
talizing soap of evidence to a body of 
research that has made the Trojan War 
and the world of Homer’s heroes seem 
more plausible than they did as recently 
as a decade ago. 

It has also strengthened the professor’s 
recent argument that the Trojans’ native 
longue was I 11 via n, an Indo-European 



J ariya-muwas was trans- 
formed into Priamos by the Greeks. 

And what of Paris, Priam's son, who 
Homer says set off the Trojan War by 
kidnapping Helen, wife of Kang Menda- 
us of Sparta? The name Paris, too, is from 
Luvian, Mr. Watkins says. 

The Trqjan War as pomayed by 
Homer left the deepest imprint on the 
Western ima ginati on. It became the pro- 
totype of all struggles between East and 
West, and it profoundly affected subse- 
quent ideas about poetry, tragedy and 
fate. Yet more than a century after the 
German a rchaeolog ist Heinrich Schlie- 
mann discovered Troy’s high-walled ru- 
ins in northwestern Turkey, no one 
knows whether the war ever occurred. 

For the past two decades, archaeolo- 
gists working on the Aegean coast of 
Turkey have discovered evidence at Mile- 
tus, lasos and elsewhere that Mycenaean 
Greeks occupied the area as early as the 
15 tb century B.G, two to three centuries 
before the dales that Grade historians 
assigned to the Trqjan War. 

“Many more sites are producing new 
evidence,” said Professor Machtdd J. 


Mellink of Bryn Mawr College in Penn- 
sylvania, a past president of the Archeo- 
logical Institute of America. “They come 
out practically every year.” 

It seems more likely than it used to, 
scholars are now arguing, that the ancient 
Greeks were at least in a position to make 
war against Troy. 

In 1981 new linguistic evidence began 
to indicate that the kingdom of Mycenae- 
an Greece was probably the same king- 
dom of seafaring, chariot-driving war- 
rims who were mentioned in ancient 
royal documents of the Hiuiies, who 
were then the dominant force in Aria 
Minor and whose language was related to 
Luvian. 

The theory that the Ahhiyans (or Ah- 
biyawans) referred to by the Hittiies 
might in fact have been the Achaeans of 
Homer’s Greece dates to the 1920s, not 
long after day tablets bearing Hitiite 
inscriptions in cuneiform began being 
unearthed and deciphered at Bogazkoy, 
Turkey, the Hittite capital 

The equation of Ahhiyans and 
Achaeans. however, was also hotly con- 
tested. 

But since 1981. Professor Hans G. Gu- 
terbock of the Oriental Institute of the 
University of Chicago has reasoned in a 


series of papers that the Ahhiyans were, 
after all, the Achaeans. His findings are 
based on newly assembled day frag- 
ments, enlarged photographs, new lin- 
guistic interpretations ana new datings. 

The Ahhiyans are described in Hittite 
documents dating to the 15th century 
B.C. as having a “great king” across the 
sea, a man with the stature of Homer’s 
Agamemnon, and as controQmg the Ana- 
tolian city of Milawata, which Mr. Guter- 
bock and others equate with the Greek 
Miletus. 

The Ahhiyans also engaged in one-on- 
one combat with Anatolian leaders, sent 
out squadrons of chariots, negotiated 
truces with the Hittite king and behaved 
much like the Greeks in Homer. 

Last October, shortly after Mr. Wat- 
kins discovered his “Wiluriad,” Mr. Gu- 
terbock elaborated other possible linguis- 
tic parallels at a symposium on the 
Trqjan War held at Bryn Mawr, near 
Philadelphia. 

Given the likely identity at Ahhiyans 
and Achaeans, Mr. Guierfaock said, it 
now seemed more plausible that the place 
called Wilusa in Hittite texts was the Dios 
of the Greeks. 

In an interview, Mr. Guierbock called 


Mr. Wa t kin <j ’t discovery of a Luvian song 
about Wilusa “brilliant." 

Most of the Luvian literature that has 
been found is embedded in Hitiite texts. 
Mr. Watkins said. These texts sometimes 
instruct Hittite priests to ring “in Lu- 
vian,” and then a Luvian passage follows. 

A number of these passages had the 
rhythms, word placemen 1 ■mu other un- 
mistakable qualities of epic verse, Mr. 
Watkins told the Bryn Mawr conference. 
He had no doubt that the line “When 
they came from steep Wilusa.” which 
other linguists had noted without excite- 
ment, was in fact poetry. 

Mr. Watkins has since discovered an- 
other apparent reference to Wilusa: four 
badly broken lines of Luvian verse that 
begin, “When the man came from steep 

Troy’s steepness made a strong impres- 
sion on the ancient world. In Luvian. the 
epithet appears as alati. Homer’s Greek 
word for steep, aipene, was applied by the 
poet to Troy and to a mountain near 
Troy, but to nothing else, Mr. Watkins 
said. 

He and a colleague. Professor Emily T. 
Vermeule. a Harvard classicist, conceded 
thar his “Wiiusiad" did not mention a 
Trojan War. 


O’Neill Makes Peace With Reagan, but Olive Branch May Have Thorns 


By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Posi Serna? 

WASHINGTON — Before the 
November election, the House 
speaker, Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., a 
Democrat, raged nearly every day 
against President Ronald Reagan, 
calling him unfit, a “cheerleader of 
selfishness” and a man with a “sin- 
ister” message. 

Today, a much quieter Mr. 
O'Neill praises the president’s 
arms-oonlrol efforts, pledges to 
work “constructively” with the ad- 
ministration and tells the president, 
“In my 50 years of public life. I’ve 
never seen a man more popular 
than you are with the American 
people." 

Mr. O'Nefil's concilia lory ap- 
proach has been welcomed by the 
While House and by congressional 
Republicans. But there is ample 
reason to believe that the strongly 
partisan Massachusetts representa- 
tive may be biding his time to fight 
another day. 

“He generally knows when to be 
the lion and when to be the fox," 
said an O'Nall spokesman, Chris- 
topher J. Matthews. “Right now, 
he’s the fox." 

The House minority leader, 
Ttent Lott, Republican of Missis- 
sippi, said, “lt*s a good political 
strategy. It appears to be open and 


willing to cooperate. One thing Tip 
O’Neil! is not, is dumb." 

Mr. O’Neill's new lone is based 
in part on politics and the desire to 
have the Republicans take the 

Marne for the unpopular measures 
bring considered, including cutting 
student aid and veterans benefits 
and possibly freezing increases in 
the Social Security system of retire- 
ment benefits and disability pay- 
ments. 

But associates said it also reflect- 
ed a genuine respect for Mr. Rea-' 
gan's electoral landslide and an un- 
certainty about Democratic Party 
policy. 

“1 think be feels, the president 
won 49 states and we have no right 
to say he's wrong," a party official 
said. “On the other hand, it’s not 
just that he’s wan, but the belief 
that if he's allowed to go ahead, he 
wQl overintapret his mandate." 

Thus, Mr. O'NeOl would rather 
have the public focus on Mr. Rea- 
gan’s proposals, at least initially, 
rather thaw on Democratic attacks 
against them. 

For example. Mr. Matthews said 
that Mr. O'NeilL who last year met 
the press every day the House was 
in session, may wail until after Mr. 
Reagan's Feb. 6 State of the Union 
address to resume the meetings. 

“He feds strongly that there’s 



The AMoodod fans 

Speaker Thomas P. O’Neill Jr. with President Reagan. 


going to be communication in the 
next three or four months between 
Reagan and the people, and the 
Democrats can’t interfere with' 
that," a Democratic official said. 
“It makes the water muddy to have 
a fight between Reagan and the 
.Democrats. That's what happened 


in 1984, and that's why we didn't 
get our message across.” 

Mr. O’Neil] adopted a similarly 
conciliatory tone after Mr. Reagan 
was first elected in 1980, when Re- 
publicans and conservatives held 
more House seats than they do 
now. 


Then, saying the new president 
deserved the opportunity to press 
bis case, Mr. O'Neill gave Mr. Rea- 
gan's program priority. Much of 
Mr. Reagan's budget and tax pro- 
gram became law, and Mr. O’Neil] 
and other moderate and liberal 
Democrats then used the “fairness" 
issue to go after the president and 
the Republicans. 

When Democrats recouped 
nearly all their House losses in the 
1982 elections, the strategy of giv- 
ing the Republicans what they 
wanted so that they would fall on 
their faces was said to have worked. 
Many House Democrats think that 
allowing the Republicans to win in 
budget battles this year might lead 
to similar results in the 1986 House 

licans emPup pushing a freeze on 
Social Security benefits. 

After meeting with Mr. Reagan 
at the White House last week, Mr. 
O’Neill said that the Democrats 
would not rule out Social Security 
revisions in any effort to reduce the 
deficit, but that such a move, like a 
lax increase, would have to be pro- 
posed by the Republicans. 

Mr. O’NeflTs recent low-key ap- 
proach also reflects the questioning 
within the Democratic Party after 
the November election losses, party 
officials said. That means being' 


open to suggestions from the White 
House. 

Far instance, agreeing to pm So- 
cial Security on the table for deficit 
reductions this year would never 
have occurred a year ago, an aide to 
Mr. O’Neill said. 

“1 think he feels it’s time for a 
very sober assessment of where we 
go as a country and where we go as 
a party," Mr. Matthews said. 

“There’s no question.” said a 
close O’Neill associate, that the 
speaker, as a result of the (984 
ejections, “believes the parly is seen 
as too weak on national defense, 
too viewed as tax-and-spend and 
that there are programs on the do- 
mestic side that should be re- 
viewed.” 

In the meantime, Democrats and 
Mr. O'Neill have felt less pressured 
to jump inLo a debate over Mr. 

^tiKrenewedtiide^end^ce of the 
House and, especially, Senate Re- 
publicans, who weeks ago began 
drafting thrir own budget after the 
White House indicated it could not 
achieve the deficit goals (he admin- 
istration had set for itself. 

“It's a lot easier to sound concil- 
iatory when the Republicans are 
gang after the president's budget 
and talking about cutting defense," 
a Democrat said. . 


Meese Violated 
U.S. Ethics Code, 
Report Asserts 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — A staff report 
by the Office of Government Eth- 
ics has concluded that Edwin 
Meese 3d, the counselor to the 
president, violated the U.S. govern- 
ment's ethical standards, it was re- 
ported Monday. 

The Senate Jndknmy Committee 
has scheduled a hearing Tuesday 
on Mr. Meese's nomination as at- 
torney generaL 

An article in The Wall Street 
Journal said David H. Martin, di- 
rector of the agency, confirmed 
that two lawyers in his office evalu- 
ated an investigation of Mr. Meese 
by an independent counsel and 
concluded that two of Mr. Meese's 
financial transactions appeared in 
conflict with his official duties. 

Government ethics standards, 
among other things, forbid an offi- 
cial from taking actions that 
“aright result in. or create the ap- 
pearance of. ..giving preferential 
treatment to any - - - person.” 

Mr. Martin said one transaction 
involved a $40,000 loan arranged in 
1981 for Mr. Meese by John R_ 
McKean, who later was appointed 
to (he U.S. Postal Board of Gover- 
nors. In the other transaction, Mr. 
Meese's home in California was 
sold with the help of Thomas J. 
Barrack, who gpt a job with the 
Interior DepartmmL Mr. Martin 
said he ruled out any “appearance” 
problem on the Barrack matter af- 
ter being convinced that Mr. Meese 
bad not been aware that Mr. Bar- 
rack had helped on the home sale. 


U.S. Law Tying Drugs to Foreign Aid Faces First Major Test 


By Jod Brinkley 

New York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — This Fri- 
day, Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. 
says, “is when the donny brook will 
come" for the drug-producing na- 
tions. 

The Delaware Democrat re- 
ferred to the due date of a Slate 
Department report to Congress 
that will give a nation-by-nation 
breakdown of how much progress 
has beexftnade against internation- 
al narcotics trafficking 

Based on that report, under a law 
adopted a year ago, President Ron- 
ald Reagan is to decide whether 
countries that have not made sub- 
stantive progress should continue 
to receive UK aid. 

“We’re not gong to just wring 
our hands anymore,” Senator Pau- 
la Hawkins, Republican of Florida, 
said recently. She sponsored the 
International Narcotics Control 
amendment last year. 

Some nations may be in immedi- 
ate jeopardy because they have not 
achieved significant progress or 
promised any in the future. Belize 
is one, State Department officials 
said. That Central American coun- 
try is a major marijuana producer, 
and it also receives more American 
aid per capita than most other 
countries. 

Representative Charles B. Ran- 
gel, the New York Democrat who 
was one of the narcotics amend- 
ment’s sponsors in the House, said 
his information was that “not one 
of these drag-producing countries 
expects less than a bumper crop 
this year," despite the threat of los- 
ing UK aid. 



Joseph R. Biden Jr. 

“Not one of them has been able 
to produce some kind of timetable 
for when the total eradication of 
narcotic oops wQl lake place," he 
said. 

Even in countries that have 
promised to eradicate marijuana, 
coca or opium-poppy plants, UK 
officials acknowledge that they 
face significant obstacles in deter- 
mining how much progress the 
countries have made. 

To know, for example, what per- 
cent of the acreage of coca bushes 
the government of Bolivia or Peru 
has eradicated in the last year, the 
United States has to know what 
was there to begin with. Officials 
say that may be impossible to de- 
termine with any certainty. 

“Look, this is an illicit business," 
caid Gary D. l bn mg deputy assis- 


tant administrator of the U.S. Drug 
Enforcement Administration. “It is 
not an exact science." 

A State Department .official in- 
volved in compiling the report to 
Congress said that in many cases, 
“all we have are guesstimates.” 

Yet those estimates, which offi- 
cials say may be off by as much as 
50 percent in some countries, will 
be used to deride whether the Unit- 
ed States should cut aid. 

The obstacles to counting the 
acres of coca bushes in Bolivia, 
Colombia or Peru, the principal 
coca-growing nations, are consid- 
erable. Coca is used to make co- 
caine. The primary means of count- 
ing the bushes is by aerial 
photography, but analyzing the 
photos is difficult. 

Rayburn Hess, an officer in the 
Slate Department's bureau of In- 
ternational Narcotics Matters, 
said: “Even when we identify the 
fields, they are often mterplanted,” 
meaning (he fanners plant other 
crops between the coca bushes to 
hide them. “If it’s plantain, coffee 
or yucca, the color signature is very 

similar, so it’s hard to tell which is 
which.” 

From the air, coca bushes that 
have just been harvested often do 
not snow up at alL Since the leaves 
have been picked, the photos seem 
to show bare Grids. Checking the 
fields on foot often is impractical, 
since in remote areas of South 
America, drug traffickers frequent- 
ly shoot strangers. 

Finally, no one can be sure all 
the Grids have been found. Colom- 
bia, Peru and Bolivia together cov- 
er nearly li million square miles 
(3.9 million square kilometers). 


Much of that territory may not be 
suitable for coca cultivation. Still, 
“they could be growing it in areas 
we don’t know about,” said an offi- 
cial with the Drug Enforcement 
Administration. 

That was dramatically demon- 
strated in Mexico in November, 
when the authorities raided several 
marijuana plantations. About 
10,000 tons (11,000 metric tons) of 
marijuana plants, much of which 
had just been harvested, were 
seized and burned. That is right 
rimes more marijuana I hp p Ameri- 
can and Mexican authorities, using 
aerial photos, had estimated was 
grown m all of Mexico last year. 

Further investigation showed 
that the plantations probably h«d 
been harvesting their first crop. 
Even so, the huge farms had re- 
mained unnoticed for at least six 
months, the time it takes to grow a 
mature marijuana plant. 

Enforcement officials acknowl- 
edged that other big plantations 
could be growing large quantities 


of marijuana, as yet unnoticed by 
authorities. For example, "we think 
Brazil is growing extensive quanti- 
ties” of marijuana, Mr. Taylor said. 
“Some of it they grow under cano- 
pies. It has never heen surveyed." 

So how wiB the While House and 
Congress determine if Brazi] and 
other countries have carried out 
what the law calls “the maximum 
achievable eradication" of drug 
crops? 

“We can require reductions in 
areas we know about,” Mr. Liming 
said. “But they could still have oth- 
ers we don’t know about.” 


TRANSLATIONS 


Fnendv, Gann, Span., Hd.. ftxt, 
Dutch, Elan, Norw, Sued, Ria, Czech, 
Slav., Pot, Sarh, Croat, BuJg, fount. 
Hung, Ptl, Grit, Lai, Afean, Arab, 
Twk, Perv, Mdgg, Via., Loot, Gtenh, 
Thai, Indm, Kor, Jap, Chin, ale. 

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INTERNATIONAL 


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Eributtc 


The Mountain Labored 


The mountains labor but bring forth a 
ridiculous mouse, wrote Horace in an un- 
translatable line of Latin. When the finance 
ministers of the five largest non-Communist 
economies assembled recently in Washing- 
ton, did they produce even a mouse? 

pie dollar was soaring because nobody 
believed American interest rates were going 
to fall. This was awkward for everyone. And 
sterling was sinking because nobody be- 
lieved Britain would be able to balance its 
accounts when North Sea oil ceases to be the 
jewel in the crown. This was awkward for 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who is 
dedicated to eliminating inflation. Could 
cooperation do anything to check the dollar 
and put some floor under the pound? 

Not much, according to Treasury Secre- 
tary Donald Regan, when you cut through 
the verbiage he had to adopt as chairman. 

There are two ways in winch governments 
might influence the currency market. They 
could intervene in concert, each unloading 
dollars in order to buy pounds, francs, 
marks and yen, hoping to force the dollar 
down and the other currencies up. Or they 
could change the conditions in which the 
market operates, concerting macroeconomic 
policies so as to reduce American interest 
rates in relation to those prevailing else- 
where. That might induce international op- 
erators to switch from the dollar to the other 
currencies of their own accord. 

Massive concerted intervention seems to 
have been ruled out — as always in recent 
years. It was thought to be unlikely to deter 
operators who believed they knew a good 
thing (the dollar) and a bad one (Lhe pound) 
when they saw it: and unsuccessful interven- 
tion would be costly. This attitude was prob- 
ably judicious. The currency markets are so 
enormous today that it is doubtful whether 
governments can influence them fundamen- 


tally by coining in as buyers and sellers — 
uying to lean against the wind. 

Intervention can, for a while, make cur- 
rency movements slower. And it can, possi- 
bly, help them change course if they are 
about to do so anyway: This could — per- 
haps soon — be the case if America’s trade 
deficit continues to mount But intervention 
is unlikely to shift market sentiment if the 
market isn’t about to change on its own. 

Exchange rate movements that are un- 
helpful to the world occur when the econom- 
ic policies of the nugor countries are imper- 
fectly aligned. That is (he case today, even 
though the countries in fundamentally weak 
positions axe fighting hard to keep thrii 
currencies up. Britain has raised interest 
rates despite the need to get its unemployed 
back to work. France’s Socialist government 
has swallowed the pill of austerity even 
though elections loom next year. But Ameri- 
ca's policies are clearly out of line. Until 
there is action to shrink the budget deficit, 
orderly reduction of interest rates and the 
dollar’s exchange rate is unlikely. And that is 
not a problem that meetings of finance min- 
isters can solve. Budgets are proposed by 
governments but voted by legislatures. 

The Jan. 16-17 meeting of the Group of 
Five (Britain. France, West Germany, Japan 
and the United States) got a bad press. The 
session was not liked by the countries not 
invited. And it is unlikely to lead quickly to a 
better orchestration of national policies. 
StDl, holding these meetings is better than 
letting them drop. They can produce what 
Horace, again, called “harmony in discord." 
They are better than hurling accusations 
across oceans, because distance always 
makes the words sound harsher. They can 
help establish the understanding on which 
international cooperation relies. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


More Medical Research? 


Medical researchers in America are splutter- 


ing outrage- Last year Congress approved 
6.500 new grants for them, but the Office of 


6,500 new grants for them, but the Office of 
Management and Budget has now directed 
that only 5,000 be awarded, as the Reagan 
administration requested in the first place. The 
researchers say that the promise of their field 
has never been higher and that more research 
will hasten the conquest of disease. So how 
much medical research is enough? 

Congress does not know. Besieged by lobby- 
ists for research against this or that disease, it 
always raises the budget of the government’s 
medical research agency, the National Insti- 
tutes of Health. Knowing that Congress will 
spend more, the budget office always asks for 
less. Thus medical research policy is set by the 
outcome of an annual poker game, not by 
estimation of costs and opportunities. 

Medical researchers may know how much 
research is worth dang, but they have a vested 
interest in pressing for ever more funds regard- 
less of bow efficiently they are using those they 
already have or how’ well they could use more. 
It is worth trying harder than Congress does to 
answer such questions because research has 
become a prominent share of the directly cut- 
table pan of federal spending. 

A reasonable goal for basic research policy 
is to maximize the natural rate of discovery by 
leaving no promising avenue unfunded. But is 
too much money already chasing too few good 
ideas? The quality-control mechanisms of aca- 
demic science are so loose that they regularly 
fail to detect outright fraud. The possibly 
doubtful quality of many research reports is 
evident from the rapidity with which most are 
forgotten. Only 36 percent of published scien- 
tific articles are cited two or more times in 


subsequent research reports. The rest — two- 
thirds of researchers' published output — may 
contribute negligibly to the march of science. 

Yet research cannot be wholly efficient. 
Failure is inherent in experiment, and duplica- 
tion is a necessary pan of research competi- 
tion. Perhaps much of the seeming waste is 
unavoidable and more money for research 
would still bring positive returns. 

Even if so, must the government always be 
the source? Intense federal support of research 
has unseen side effects. If draws the best re- 
searchers toward universities and academic 
goals and away from industry — the opposite 
of Japan, where industry funds most research. 
It shrinks the opportunities for private bene- 
factors, of whom many are prepared to give 
remarkably generously. There are also times 
when a field erf research no longs needs the 
government as nursemaid. The rich flow of 
venture capital into biotechnology means that 
the government need no longer support that 
element of biomedical research so heavily. 

The argument between the budget office 
and Congress is whether the government 
should continue supporting medical research 
with 5,000 new grants or raise it by 30 percent 
with 6,500 new grams. In ordinary times there 
should be no high barriers to investing in 
intellectual capital. With aS200-tnllion deficit, 
it is worth asking harder questions: Are there 
really an extra 1,500 scientists whose ideas 
merit support? Why have not industry or pri- 
vate benefactors beaten a path to their doors? 
Why can't they be supported by shrinking the 
mass of forgettable research? Very possibly, an 
excellent case could be made for those extra 
grants. Let Congress make it. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


No to America's Tennis Punks' 


The two “stars” of the U.S. Davis Cup team 
were blown away by the Swedes, and I for one 
am glad. That defeat may take some of the 
disgusting arrogance out of tennis punks Jim- 
my Connors and John McEnroe. And one may 
at least hope that it will shock our tennis 


organizations into forcing these guys to clean 
up their act before they permanently sullv the 


up their act before they permanently sully the 
reputation of American men's tennis. 

Anyone who watched Connors and McEn- 
roe perform in Sweden on Dec. 16 saw one of 
the most vulgar displays of childishness ever 
seen in a world-class sporting event. Here was 
Connors reveling in internationally televised 
obscenity, berating the chair umpire in the 
vilest street language and scornfully rejecting 


the sport's traditional courtesies. Here was 
McEnroe, the petulant Super Brat, an explo- 
sion of bad manners just waiting to happen. 
Nor is this anything new. These two have been 
carrying on like this for years. 

How long must we endure this atrocious 
behavior? It’s bad enough when they behave 
this way on the pro circuit, but when they are 
representing their country in Davis Cop play 
it becomes utterly intolerable. Tennis has 
always placed a high value on ritualized cour- 
tesy and gentlemanly behavior. The perfor- 
mance in Sweden by these spoiled little rich 
kids now puts the reputation of tennis's spon- 
soring organizations on the line. 

— From a syndicated cohem by William £ 
Simon, president of the U.S. Olympic Cormunee 
and a farm# US. Treasury secretary. 


FROM OUR JAN. 29 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Change ia Soatb-West Africa 
BERLIN — General Schuckmann, Governor 
of German South-West Africa, between whom 
and the Minister of Colonies, Herr Deraburg, 
a controversy has been raging for some time, 
has resigned! The resignation came in time to 
forestall an inquiry into South-West African 
affairs by the Reichstag. The controversy is the 
outcome of the position taken up by Herr 
Demburg regarding the mining concessions in 
the colony. It has been the Minister's desire to 
retain mining rights for the Government, while 
the citizens of the colony have been agitating 
for greater freedom in their own affaire. A few 

weeks ago a demonstration in favor of Gover- 
nor Schuckmann was made in South-Wet 
Africa, which the Governor permitted. 


1935: The Japanese Pressure China 
PARIS — Japan has been angling in China for 
recognition of her Far Eastern supremacy, and 
not without success. The Occident’s fad tire to 
tight China’s battle for her has resigned the 
Nanking government to a resumption rtf com- 
munications with Mandmkuo, which Japan 
interprets as a tadt recognition of that state's 
independence. With the collapse of the Ameri- 
can- British- Japanese naval arms negotiations, 
it was reported from Nanking that Japan was 
pressing for relations. China’s experience has 
led her (o suspect that whenever the Japanese 
diplomat becomes urgent it is because he is 
trying to get results that wall forestall some 
action by the military which would be difficult 
to explain in Europe and America. 


HVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1956-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Oudfmm 


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ROBERT K McCABE Depart Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Aaooou Pd&h* 

SAMUEL AST Damn Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dinaar cf Opaanoa 

CARL GEWIRTZ iuoUaw Ediuv FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Grata* 

ROLFD. KRANEPUHL Dmaer cfAAtrt&ng Scks 
International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue dariesrde-Gaulk, 92200 Nem&y-sur-Srine, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Tdex: 612718 (Herald). Cabins Herald Pans. 

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- 19. SJ. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. ■Sfia&i 


. _^i-v « . »> -r-i lit . 


TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1985 




Middle East in Arms: Swelling Armies 
Lead the World in Weapons Imports 











C AIRO — Egypt put on an exhi- 
bition Iasi November 10 show 
representatives of 200 international 
companies the products of its newest 
industry. Eleven types of weapons 
were on display, ringing from a ra- 
dar-equipped missile, the local ver- 
sion of the Soviet SAM-7, to the Fahd 
armored personnel carrier, named for 
the king of Saudi Arabia. There were 


By David Lamb 




if 


long-range 122mm artillery pieces 
and 23mm anti-aircraft guns, plus the 
Alpha ground-support ieL me Ga- 


Aipha ground-support jet the Ga- 
zelle helicopter and the Mirage 2000 





zelle helicopter and the Mirage 2000 
fighier, all French but all produced 
and assembled in EgypL 
It was an impressive arsenal for a 
country with per capita income of 
only S560 a year. Egypt's fledgling 
arms industry already brings in SI 
billion a year in hard currency. It has 
surpassed such traditional pillars of 
Lhe Egyptian economy as cotton, 
tourism and Suez Canal revenues. 


“The Egyptian Indus triaJ-mitiiarv 
base is at the service of the Arab 
world,” Defense Minister Moham- 
med Abdel- Halim Abu Ghazala said 


Oftmlns bv Graff -In ArfcaMcrbkxtot (Oslo). Distributed bv Cortaontsfs X Writers Svndlcoie. 


in a press conference at the show. He 
added that Egypt’s motivation was 
not economic — “We aren't arms 
dealers” — ■ but was based on the 
desire to provide Arab governments 
easy access to weapons at low prices. 

Few others see Egypt as being so 
altruistic. It hopes to become a major 
weapons merchant for the Third 
World. Its first tanks are scheduled to 
roll off the production line by 1989. 
Meanwhile, the November exhibition 
illustrated the frantic arms race that 
has made the Middle East t he world’s 
principal weapons- Importing region. 

The region has less than 3 percent 
of the world's people yet accounts for 
more than 8 pacent of the world’s 
military spending. Its govmunents 
spend $350 per person per year for 
military purposes, three times the 
world average. They import almost 
half of all the arms sold to the Third 
World, according to the Stockholm 
International Peace Research Insti- 


tute. The 17 Arab armies now total 
2.2 million men and are growing. 

Even with declining oil revenues, 
military budgets are usually the last 
to be cul Oman devotes 40 percent of 
its budget to defense. Saudi Arabia 
spends $2,700 per capita per year on 
its military. Defense spending in the 
United Arab Emirates has increased 
56-fold since 1974. Egypt has more 
men in uniform today (4 60,000) than 
it did in 1979. before the Egyptian- 
Israeti peace treaty. 

Bui who is the enemy? 

Fifteen years ago it was Israel 
Rhetorically, at least, that is the ratio- 
nale most Arab governments contin- 
ue to cite for mmtasy buildup. 

Kuwait's Defense Minister Salim 
al-Sabah said in 1983: “We need to 
protect Kuwaiti territory and provide 
backing to other Arab armies so they 
can ... regain- iheir usurped lands." 

Realistically, though, most Arab 
governments neither seek nor expea 
renewed war with Israel The legacy 
of Anwar Sadat, the late Egyptian 
president, was to shift the focus of the 
Arab- Israeli conflict from the battle- 






Outsiders Can Restrain the Middle East Arms Race 


J ERUSALEM — As the Soviet 
Union and the United States 


J Union and the United States 
come out of their political trenches 
and move forward into the field of 
diplomatic dialogue, this may be a 
good time to reflect on the hazards of 
the arms race in the Middle East. 

Unlike the superpowers and their 
allies, who mmagp. to conduct their 
international affairs with consider- 
able prudence, the countries in the 
Middle East ipjea a lot of emotion. 
The region is characterized by insta- 
bility, interminable feuds, smolder- 
mgccmflicts and open wars. 

The area stretching from Kabul to 
Casablanca is as overstocked with 
arms as it is overburdened with con- 
tention. What are these weapons for? 


By Gideon Rafael 

ant to ensure hoarding. Whether the debt pile will 


Or are these arms meant to ensure hoarding. Whether the debt pile will 
the survival of domestically imperiled collapse before the stockpile blows 
regimes? But AW ACS surveillance up is a matter of conjecture, 
planes and ground-to-air missiles are In this long-distance race Israel has 


designed to pul down rebellions. 

The real purposes of these arms are 
to wage local wars, buy influence. 


aggrandize the prestige of the pur- 
chaser and enrich the procurer. 


chaser and enrich the procurer. 

Relatively few of these weapons 
are locally produced. The Arabs' 
main suppliers are the Soviet Union 
and the United States, followed by 
France, Italy, Britain. Brazil Czecho- 
slovakia and China. 

Arms are the customary currency 
to pay for ofl. The profitability of the 


To defend the Middle East against anns-for-ofl business is subject to 
outride aggression? The governments fluctuation. Spiraling oil prices and 


of the region lack the joint will for the technological sophistication of 
strategic cooperation. To protect oQ weapon systems brought a sharp rise 


resources against Soviet encroach- in the cost of arms. Yet the decrease 
meat? If Moscow derided to interfere of oil exports has hardly reduced the 


with the free flow of Gulf oil it would The purchasing states — inch* 
more likely activate local saboteur Israel — are amassing debts tom 
gangs than Soviet airborne divisions, the stockpiles of weapons they 


the stockpiles of weapons they are prepared by the United States, in- 


was tabled in 1967. the original draft 
prepared by the United States, in- 


e A Citizen Exercising a Basic Right 9 


N EW YORK — Sometimes the 
mail deserves to be heard not 


By Sydney Schanberg 


because it is agreeable but because 
it tdls us about some of the anger 
and frustration and dark feelings 
out there. And occasionall y it tens 
us about racial hatreds. 


Someone won't be pushed off the 


than others from these abuses, be- 
cause, as you point out, they are the 
mass of subway riders” 

• “Why have you not written 


platform or raped on a roof because again and again about the utter 
they were hospitalized. 1 wonder failure of the police and the courts 


how many murders they commit- 


My mail on the Bernhard Hugo .ted. New York is a dying city." 

offair hnp fhWn li kni !■_*! 


Goetz affair has been like that. 
What this man allegedly did on 
Dec. 22 — pull a gun and wound 
four youths who accosted him on a 
subway train — has stirred a na- 
tionwide debate about crime and 
vigilantism and public safety. 

The mail is running about fi ve- 
to-one in his favor. Here are some 
excerpts from the pro-Goetz letters. 

• “Me, m take the Wild West 
any day. At least it had a certain 
wholesomeness, a thrust toward de- 
cency and order. True, bystanders 
might get hurt in confrontations, 
but suffering from an exchange of 
bullets is better than suffering at 
the hands of subway sadists.” 

• “Thank God for that Vigilan- 
te. Bernhard Goetz for mayor.” 

• “Bernhard Goetz has been 
wrongly labeled as a vigilante. In 
fact he was a citizen exercising a 
basic right: Self-protection !” 

• “Those four slobs out of com- 


It's a risk ... but isn’t it 


time we tried another approach to of his respoi 
the crime problem? It might even resist And s« 


to protect the ordinary citizen?” 

• “His excess, if any. must not 
blind us to the essential legitimacy 


nse: He was right to 


get more police protection and dis- 


We need a legal system that 


suade would-be criminals, and isn't does not forbid us in court to men- 


that what we all really want?” 


non the Fecord of the habitual crim- 


L too, blanch at the concept inal. There are a thousand punks — 


of vigilantism, but I, too, as a 
ally law-abiding citizen, wou 
safer with vigilantes roanrij 


ull, loo, as a gener- black and white — watching this 
; citizen, would feel case and if Goetz doesn't get a fair 
antes roaming the shake, we might as well all quit 


streets in place of the muggers that striving for law and order.” 


are out there now.” 


“Why do you conceal the truth 


• “It’s not that everyone will be and write that merely ‘a lot of the 
armed, but that potential muggers crimes in the New York subways 


believe they may be. Perception Ts are caused by blacks and Hispan- 

1-- J L a Ci " » I V I. ... ..... _11 .1 . L 


everything, and so be iL" 

• “They used to hang pet 
stealing horses. It worked'” 


ics? You know very well that they 
le for commit virtually all of the crimes.” 
• “One problem is that the sub- 


• “Bernhard Hugo Goetz makes ways are used only by tittle, unin- 
me proud, P-R-O-U-D, to be a fluential people. The mayor, coun- 


me prooa, r-K-u-u-u, to De a nuenuai people, i De mayor, coun- 
whiie, male American! At long last cil president, governor all have big 
we can hold up our heads again! ” autos supplied at our expense. They 


• “People are sick and tired of don’t have to use subways to be at 
being abused and of being told that work on time. Our local goven i- 
ihey are bigots because they don't meat is not doing the job; that’s 


meat is not doing the job; that’s 


mission probably are responsible like being abused. Blacks and His- why the guy with the gun is a hero." 


for a crime a week in the subway, panics, unfortunately, suffer more 


The New York Times. 


art -'fOV 






Noisy , Dirty, Smelly, Crowded and Unsafe 


P ARIS — Popular support for 
New York’s subway vigilante. 


■L New York’s subway vigilante, 
Bernhard Goetz, has focused inter- 
national attention on the plight of a 
great but sinking city. Its people are 
fed up with hostility anti degrada- 
tion, assaults on dignity and priva- 
cy, and the random, senseless quali- 
ty of most of these assaults. 

Tie New Yorker of the 1980s 
lives with his nerve endings jang- 
ling. Homeless bums and “crazies” 
— former mental patients now- 
judged not to be too dangerous — 
populate his streets, sometimes 
shouting obscenities and threaten- 
ing passeisby. Trash lies every- 
where. Noise is incessant and often 
aggressive: automobile horns, bus 
engines, trucks hitting potholes, ihc 
blaring of big portable radios. 

Merely crossing the street can be 
dangerous, because running red 
lights has become the norm for mo- 
torists and cyclists alike, and ihc 
latter routinely pedal against the 
traffic on one-wa% streets 


By Roger M. Williams ; 


Crime itself is a relatively minor 

consideration. My wife and I lived 

in Manhattan for 10 years without 
being mugged or having our apart- 
ment robbed. Yet each of us was 
subjected to the kind of near-crimi- 
nal assaults that are commonplace. 

Two examples: When my wife 
objected to a woman who pushed 
into tine in front of her. the woman 
hit her in the face. As 1 was walking 
up Broadway talking with a friend, 
a man coming in the opposite direc- 
tion thumped me on tic chest with 
his forearm and snarled, “Hey, 
man, watch where you’re going!” 

For most of these assaults on the 
self, the subway is an all too real 
symbol. It is noisy, dirty, smelly, 
crowded, mechanically unreliable 
and a favorite bunting ground of 
muggers and gold-chain snatchers. 

For most New Yorkers the sub- 
way is the onlv feasible means of 


travel; they almost have to use it 
That adds to resentment and mag- 
nifies the vicarious satisfaction 
when somebody like Mr. Goetz 
‘Tights back.” The film “The Tak- 
ing of Pelham 123” scored a com- 
mercial success a decade ago by 
portraying a New Yorker stalking 
the subways to zap predators. 

The race of the young men who 
harassed Mr. Goetz is irrelevant to 
an understanding of the public re- 
action. For the typical subway suf- 
ferer. the harassers could just as 
swell have been while — or green. Iu 
the netherworld of the New York 
subway, danger is always dark, but 
it is a metaphorical darkness, not a 
skin color. Dark, too, is the despair 
inspired in New Yorkers by much 
of their everyday environment. 


The writer is a former New York- 
based editor who moved to Paris wuh 
his wife and daughter Iasi August. He 
contributed this amuitini in the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune 


eluded a provision “for joint mea- 
sures to regulate the arms trade in the 
Middle East.” The Soviet counter- 


draft contained a paragraph on the 
same subiecL Both were deleted from 


not been a lonely runner, but it has 
been a lonely voice. While straining 
not to lag behind, it has proposed 
time and again to end the mad race. 

In 1963 Gotda Meir. then foreign 
minister, submitted to the UN Gen- 
eral Assembly a six-point plan for the 
reduction of tensions in the Middle 
East topped by a proposal for negoti- 
ations “to achieve disarmament with 
mutual inspection, covering all types 
of weapons In 1966 Prime Minister 
Levi Eshkol called on the great pow- 
ers to halt the arms race in the Middle 
East, and on the stales in the region 
to agree on measures of aims con troL 

Tie idea of curbing the Middle 
East arms race has been discussed on 
numerous occasions and in various 
forums. When UN Resolution 242 


same subject. Both were deleted from 
the final British texL apparently due 
to the opposition of Arab stales that 
felt a need to replenish their arsenals, 
depleted in the 1967 war. 

All agreements concluded between 
Israel and Arab states, from the armi- 
stice accords of 1949 to the peace 
treaty with Egypt in 1979, contain 
provisions on arms control, limita- 
tion of forces, demilitarized zones 
and third-power Supervision- 

All those agreements reflect a bal- 
anced mix of military prudence and 
political perspicacity. The experience 
gained in the application of these 
measures could be of considerable 
value in settling Middle Eastern dis- 
putes — the Arab- Israel conflict as 
well as inter-Arab conflicts. 

Obviously, success in disar mamen t 
depends on progress in defusum dan- 
gerous conflicts. An unbridled aims 


field to the negotiating table. Today’s 
Arab leaden are less preoccupied 
with Israel than they were a decade or 
so ago. Instead, the enemy is within. 

Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states 
Tear the spread of Iran's religious 
extremism and worry about their in- 
ternal security. Lebanon is in chaos 
The Iraq-lran war is in its fifth year. 
Egypt and Syria are suspicious of 
each other's military aims. No one 


n\c.u' n ; 


WKK 


Stir 


nf 

rtf jl - ‘ 


j$ Disoi 


trusts Libya. Morocco and Algeria 
support different sides in the 10-year- 
old Western Sahara war. Oman views 
with concern South Yemen, against 
whom it has fought a war. 

An exception is Tunisia, winch 
tries to get along with everyone and 
spends only 2 percent of its budget on 
defense. So it is dismissed by its Arab 
neighbors as insignificant. A Western 
diplomat commented, “If you've got 
no guns you've got no respect.” 

Although war with laud is not on 
the minds of most Arab leaden these 
days, they nevertheless want to main- 
tain some sort of military parity with 
Israel Thus it is U.S. arms shipments 
to Israel that in many ways set the 
pace of arms sales in the Middle East. 

The United States and France are 
the principal arms suppliers to the 
Middle East ranking far ahead of the 
Soviet Union, whose major regional 


race, however, not only frustrates ef- 
forts to terminate conflicts by peace- 


fons to terminate conflicts by 
ful means but also intensifies 


is ting ones and generates new ones. 
Since most of the arms used or 


clients are Syria, Libya and South 
Yemen. But Britain, West Germany, 


Since most of the arms used or 
stored in the Middle East are of for- 
eign origin, the possibility of an 
agreement on regulating the aims 
trade should be explored in the first 
instance by the exporting states rath- 
er than by the importing states, which 
for the time being refuse to reason 
together on any subject. 

The resumption of the superpower 
dialogue mi arms control offers an 
occasion for consultation on steps to 
reduce the ever increasing risks of the 
Middle East arms race. Responsible 
governments should support action 
to reduce the risk of an explosion that 
could harm their countries no less 
than the states immediately affected. 


Yemen. But Britain, West Germany. 
China, Spain, Brazil, Canada, the 


China, Spain, Brazil, Canada, the 
Netherlands and Turkey also sell in 
this lucrative market 
According to a U.S. Library of 
Congress study last year, the United 
Stales has passed the Soviet Union as 
the major eroorier of weapons to the 
Third World, with nearly S10 billion 
in deliveries in 1983. 


The writer is the Los Angeles Tones’ 
correspondent in Cairo. 


The writer is a former director gen- 
eral of Israel's Foreign Ministry. He 
contributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune 


Letters intended for pubBcarim 
should be addressed “Letters to da 
Editor” and must contain the writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


<i ~ . ~ 

J* 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Nuclear Reprocessing Hitler. The broadcast was m 

r ™ shiv intpnAf-f)" k ‘‘imnif* hi 




Nuclear Reprocessing Hitler. The broadcast was not “prob- 
r “ ably intended" as “ironic humor” — 

Regarding the report “ Nuclear Re- but dearly identified as satire. It was 
weting: Europe Is Ahead" (Jan. 5): a transparent parody of a Hitler 
It is true that in the field of repro- speech, illustrating similarities be- 
cessing spent nuclear fuel, “Europe is tween Nazi and Communist slogans, 
ahead.” It is sad, however, that the The text did not originate with Ra- 
United States perceives this techno- dio Free Europe. We broadcast, with 
logy as a good thing and is apparently clear attribution, fragments, a 
anxious to catch up. From a Europe- spoof published by Polish writers in 
an perspective, it is as if America the WesL And not Hitler’s alleged 
could not wail to join the game of speech but a section of that spoof. 




J***.' 




A ft"-- - 


Russian roulette that Britain and 
France in particular have been play- 
ing since tne 1950s and '60s. 

Reprocessing plants represent an 
irresistible target for terrorists. Had a 
plant of the size of Windscale fin 
Britain) or La Hague (in France) ex- 
isted in Europe during World War II, 
large areas would still be uninhabit- 
able today and thousands of people 
would still be dying lingering deaths 
from exposure to radiation liberated 
by an inevitable attack on the plant. 

Reprocessing, particularly of ther- 
mal oxide fuel such as is produced by 
most nuclear power plants, is not a 
proven technology. The only plant 
which actually tries to treat oxide fuel 
on a commercial basis is La Hague, 
but it has failed miserably. 

It is uue that a “relatively small 
amount” of high-level radioactive 
waste is generated. Bui there are large 
volumes of intermediate-level waste 

(cladding from the fuel rods) and 
low-level waste (contaminated con- 
crete. piping, tools and garments). 
No satisfactory disposal method for 
either category has been agreed on. 

Low-level waste is subject to a sea- 


emitled “A Cubbyhole of Memo- 
ries.” was dedicated by the editors of 
the parody to General Jaruzdksi. 

The case has drawn the attention 
of the press and criticism from the 
U.S. State Department. But when the 
Communist press systematically 
compares President Reagan to Hitler, 
nobody seems to find it noteworthy. 

ZDZISLAW NAJDER, 
Director of the Polish Service. 

Radio Free Europe. 

Munich. 


I,.-,:. : 


■filler. Jfai ^ __ 

jrthy- Jasper- <:=/ • 

ice- ie ^ W--*: ' 


Not Gnprintably Serious 


Regarding “ Killing the Arms Race 
(Jan. 15) by Art Buarwald: 

In an age when intelligent men 
have to be humorists, what may mw 
say of the serious men who rule the 
world? Something, 1 think, that may 
not be prime! Meanwhile, Art Buch- 
wald is cutting near the bone. 

PHILIP O’CONNOR. 

Uaes, France. 


: V !0 ' :l ' 


C^uce-,-. r- ! ~z!v • 
hC *idsr.- . - 




Hie Goal of Arab Unity 




dumping ban imposed by the Lon- 
don Dumping Convention. Interme- 


Regarding "Young Nation-States -d.-l .Yyj’ . 

Shake Up the Old Arab Nation" (JiB 1 ^ -7^ lb--. ’ 


Nation-States 

laden* (Jan- ^ 


voce up me ma /truo nanm wun.™ , — - 

Flora Lewis's views on Arab unity S55? ,8H '*wed<.-.. I 
in r\U,c^ ui.ct.OT ctmteeisu .‘fltiwryniCjt, •_ r 1 


“ tap 1* Arab world 


r -as 


lion from communities threatened by 
disposal plans. Vitrification is far 
from being a proven way of dealing 
with high-active waste. 

The tragedy is. of course, that if we 
are looking for a readily available 
source of energy to take us into the 
21st century, we have to look no far- 
ther than beyond the closest walL 
Wind, waves, the sun and tidal and 


divid.ed, and also the many Arab rut- ™ 

ers who are guided by self-intn® 1 ; A: .iSpon : 

But I can assure you that Arab unit) *r,e ■ 

will remain the most important pilfer tocySae: p 0 -^ : ms 
of our national aspirations. Trie Arab or 

nation will eventually rise again w,rv 20 accj^. 

in one united country. ' w k ~ :n -cuic , 

WAEL EL-MIQDADI. C 

London. .*H jJfS. ‘■seem. 

I,. * 


geothermal power represent renew- D 

able, safe and sustainable sources of Recover)' Might Be KWie 
energy that do not rely on high-tech. Columnist Anthony Lewis. 
high-risk industries. But, of course. “Forecasting Slow Death for Britain 


& me i 

M 0P in-. ; 

.. Ter.;, l -«si . 


they do not produce plutonium. 

PETER WILKINSON. 
Greenpeace International. 

London. 


One-Way Indignation 


(Jan. 25), rites the weakening w { 
change rate between the pound anu 
the dollar as evidence of 
decline. He may be right- But 
this “dignified demise" can 
is it not likelv that Britain will t*e 




^.'bilged to take strong measure * lL 
Regarding the report “Poles Assail defend its balance of fusmenis 
U.S. Program Unking Hiller, Jam- put its people back to work" And a- 11 ’ 
■fhA/" tJan. Py will be sorry then? 

There was no "parallel drawn" be- R F. LYONS- 

tween Wctcicch Jaruzelski and Adoif Ville d’Avray. France. 


—I,;’- uc*..‘ ] 

' Us*?*-!.;. 









'• ^.- e PW 

S 

■• ••.r i .-- e ?*R? 

i-.-A'.?- 

n'ih 






L 


* ~ 




INTERNATIONAL HFRATO TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1985 


Page 5 



GANGLAND AT PRAYER — Members erf a Japanese gangster 

Vamagncfii praying as a van passed carrying the body of their 1 

Take- in Osaka on Sunday. The gang leader was gunned down Saturday nigh» T 
probably by members of a rival crime syndicate, and died in a hospital mi Sunday. 


Ths Aaoocrad Pros 

ion called 
Masahisa 


Vietnam Is Said to Want Better Relations With U.S. 


By Barbara Crossctte 

New York Tima Serrice 

HANOI — “Vietnam has lived 
without you for a thousand years, 
and we can live without you for a 


ne 


taiy-general raised the question of and its allies Laos and Cambodia “It is impossible to 
560 American ainnai still listed as rank as the poorest countries in the paranoia of Vietnam," a 
missing in actum in Laos. They said Southeast Ana. mat said, 

the subject was brought up at U-S. In the streets of Hanoi, shabbily These fears of vulnerability, cou- 

^ request The Tate of other Amen- dressed people crowd into run- pled with a historical ten d ency to 

rhmiewid more," g foreign Minis- ca °5 listed as missing in Vietnam down dwellings and ride streetcars see Greater Indochina as its sphere 
try official told a group of visiting expected to arise in his talks in brought decades ago from Stras- of influence, make Hanoi reluctant 
Americans recently. Hanoi.] bourg, France. The electricity sup- 

But diplomats and development In a ssess i ng the Cambodian im- ply is erratic. A worker's basic wage 
experts from both the West and the passe, the Vietnamese leadership hovers around Si a month at the 
East, interviewed here on the eve of appears to be tom between staying black market exchange rate, about 

in Cambodia for reasons of nation- $25 at the inflated official i 


the arrival Monday of Secretary- 
General Javier Fbrez de Cutilar of 
the United Nations, told a different 

story. Vietnam, they said, is desper- 
ately in need of Western assistance 
and wants to improve relations 
with the United Slates. 


al security and finding a way to 
leave in the hope of attracting more 
development aid. 

In Vietnam, the diplomats and 
aid officials say, malnutrition and 
intestinal infections that have dis- 


The major stumbling block is appeared from much of Asia are 
Hanoi's occupation of Cambodia, still major problems. The s tandar ds 
which has led to the curtailment of °f many goods and services are 


most Western aid. The visit of Mr. 
Pira. de Cuellar, his first to Hanoi 
as secretary-general, is therefore 
being watched closely by diplomats 
for signs of new initiatives on Cam- 
bodia from Hanoi. 

[Mr. Mrez de CudJar arrived in 
Vietnam from Laos and was met by 
Foreign Minister Nguyen Co 
Thach, United Press International 
reported from Hanoi. 

[Aides said that during titles in 
Laos with Foreign Minister 
Phoune Sipaseuth, the UN secre- 


falling. One of the most sought- 
after skills is the repair »nd reha- 
bilitation of obsolete machinery. 

“Every time I pass through 
Bangkok on my way here," an 
American scholar said, “I see the 
gap between T hailand and Viet- 
nam gening wider.** 

According to its own figures, 
Vietnam failed to meet most of its 
major economic targets last year. It 
is nearly a decade since the fall of 
Saigon, and Vietnam, with a per- 
capila income lower than India' s, 


rate. A 

bicyde can cost as much as 5100. 

Vietnam's critics say Hanoi al- 
ready may have decided not to give 
ground on the Cambodia issue. Ha- 
ooi, diplomats say, may be hoping 
instead to persuade the United Na- 
tions, which has called for Viet- 
namese withdrawal from Cambo- 
dia and does not recognize the 
Phnom Penh regime, to accept the 
status quo. 

If this is true, diplomats say, the 
reasons are complex, more often 
conjecture than known, because 
Hanoi remains one of the most se- 
cretive capitals in which to work. 

This atmosphere, according to 
foreign residents, grows out of an 
overriding obsession with national 
security, born of 40 years of war 
and possibly encouraged by the 
presence of large numbers of Scrviei 
advisers. 


Gas Disaster Seen as Fatal Combination of Operation, Design, Upkeep Faults 


to abandon the Cambodian buffer, 
diplomats say. Some diplomats 
sympathetic to Vietnam say Hanoi 

may have rightly calculated that 
the loss of control over Cambodia 
may be too high a price to pay for 
what might turn out to be a disap- 
pointing amount of Western aid. 

|mwnal disagreements may «ko 
be playing a part in tire reluctance 
to co m p ro m ise on Cambodia, dip- 
lomats suggest. Hanoi’s apparent 
change of heart on the mease of 
“re-education" camp inmates — 
now called “criminals’’ here— may 
reflect pressure on foreign policy 
makers from national and provin- 
cial security officials, some diplo- 
mats say. 

Fear of foreign-supported sub- 
version has kept high the levd of 
accusatory polemics directed at 
China , T hailand and the United 

Stales. What is not certain, accord- 
ing to diplomats, is whether this 
hard line is unanimous. They say 
there seem to be those in the leader- 
ship who want better Chinese ties 
and who might prefer wading with 
Peking than Moscow despite centu- 
ries of China- Vietnam rivalry. 


Preoccupation with security has 
led, aid experts say, to an inatten- 
tion to development needs. There 
has been little long-range planning 
and little construction of necessary 
energy plants, roads and buildings. 
Vietnam, already heavily in debt to 
the Soviet bloc, is now thought to 
Spend more than half its gross na- 
tional product on the military. Its 

armed forces are the fourth largest 
in the world. 

There are known to be younger 
men in the ranks of future political 
leaders who want to outgrow the 
“perpetual struggle" mentality of 
the past and concentrate more on 
economic development, taking a 
more pragmatic approach and 
drawing on Western technological 
and management skills- Efforts to 
loosen controls on both agriculture 
,mri small industry have already 
paid off in some areas, but the 
experiment remains controversial 

Soviet aid, thought to be worth 
more than SI billion a year, has had 
little effect on daily life, residents, 
of Hanoi say. 

■ Khmer Rouge SheDed 

Vietnamese gunners blasted 
Cambodian strongholds of the 
Khmer Rouge with heavy artillery 
Monday, sending 10,000 refugees 
fleeing to the Thai border, United 
Press International quoted Thai 

militar y sources as saying. 


(Continued from Page 1) cause it had a maximum design 
problems died then had been cor- pressure one-quarter that of the 
reeled. leaking gas. according to plant doc- 

The precise relationship between umenisand employees. 

Union Carbide’s U.S. headquarters The third safety system, a flare 
and its Indian affiliate is a subject tower that is supposed to bum off 


that Mr. Gokhale and other com- 
pany officials have refused to dis- 
cuss in detail. But an understand- 
ing of that r elationship is a key 
dement in pinpointing responsibil- 
ity for the disaster al BhopaL Law- 
yers from both the United States 
and India say it is also, central to 
the lawsuits brought by Bhopal res- 
idents injured in the accident. 

J-M. Rehfidd, an executive vice 
president in Danbury, sits an the 
Indian company’s board, Mr. Gok- 
hale acknowledged, as do four rep- 
resentatives of Union Carbide 
Eastern Inc., a division based in 
Hong Kong. 

Srinivasan Varadarajan, the In- 
dian government's chief scientist, 
said his staff had been told by man- 
agers of the Bhopal plant that the 
refrigeration unit designed to chiS 


escaping gases, would theoretically 
have beat capable of handling 
about a quarter of the volume of 
the leaking gas were it not under 
such pressure, according to Mr. 


the methyl isocyanate had been dis- 


Bm the flare tower was not oper- 
ating al the time erf the accident 
A framer executive at the Bhopal 

C it said the parent corporation 
provided guidelines for the de- 
sign of the scrubber, the flare tower 
and the spray system. Detailed de- 
sign work for those systems and the 
entire plant, he said, was per- 
formed by a Bombay subsidiary of 
Humphreys & Glasgow Ltd. of 
London, owned in turn by the En- 
serch Crap, of Dallas. 

Employees at the plant recalled 
after the that durin g the 

evening of Dec. 2 they did not real- 
ize how high the pressures were in 


connected because the managers the system. Soman Dey, the senior 




-v ‘i-r 


had concluded after discussions 
with U.S. headquarters that the de- 
vice was not necessary. 

A spokesman at corporate head- 
quarters in Danbury, Thomas 
Failla, said: “As far as we have 
been able to establish, the question 

was not discussed^i^a^raic at 
Union Carbide Corporation.” 

The methyl isocyanate operating 
manual in use at Bhopal, which was 
adapted from a similar document 
written fra the West Virginia plant, 
according to a former senior offi- 
cial at Bhopal, says: “Keep circular 
tion of storage tank contents con- 
tinuously ‘ON’ through the 
refrigeration unit." 

A senior official of Union Car- 
bide India said few if any people 
would have died Dec. 3 had the 
□nit been r unning because it would 
have slowed the chemical reaction 
and increased warning time to per- 
haps two days. 

Many employees at the Bhopal 
plant described a factory that was 
once a showpiece but that, in the 
face ofperaisteal sales deficits 
since 1982, had lost much of its 
highly trained staff, its morale and 
its attention to the details. 

“The whole industrial culture of 
Union Carbide at Bhopal went 
down the drain," said Kamal K. 
Pareek, a chemical engineer ^vbo 
was senior 

pal during thebuiUirig of the meth- 
yl isocyanate facility eight years 
ago. 

“The plant was losing money, 
and top managemen t decided that 
saving money was more important 
than safety,” Ire said. “Mainte- 
nance practices became poor; and 
things generally got sloppy." 

Mr. Pareek said he resigned in 
December 1983 partly because he 
was disheartened about develop- 
ments at the plant. 

Mr. Gokhale termed tire compa- 
ny’s cost-cutting campaign simply 
an effort to reduce “avoidable and 
wasteful expenditures.” 

Details of the accident and its 
causes have been provided by tech- 
nical experts such as Mr. Varadara- 
jan ana Mr. Pareek and by three 
dozen plant workers, past and pre- 
sent company officials and other 
people with direct knowledge of the 
factory’s operations. 

Nealy all those interviewed con- 
tended that the company had been 
nathgr tarbiwnlly jjnr mnnaggrial- 
ly prepared for the accident The 
1982 inspection report said the 
Bhopal plant’s safety problems 
repre sa ued “a higher potential for 
a serious accident or more serious 
consequences if an accident should 
occur.” 

That report “strongly” recom- 
mended, among other things, the 
installation of a larger system that 
would supplement or replace one 

of the plant's mam safety devices, a 
water spray desi gned to contain a 
chemical leak ‘Th^if rhang e W25 
never made, plant employees said. 

Another of the safety devices, a 
gas souUrer ra neutraloer, was un- 
able to cope with the aotident be- 


operator an duty, said he was in the 
control room at about 11 PM. and 
noticed that the pressure in 
one tank read 10 pounds a square 
inch, about five tunes nor mal. He 
said he had thoug ht nothing of it. 

About 11:30 PAL, workers in 
the methyl isocyanate structure, 
about 100 feet (30J meters) from 
the control room, detected a leak. 
Their eyes started to water. 

V.N. Singh, an operator, spotted 
adripof liquid about 50 feet off the 
ground, and some yellowish- white 
gas in tire same area. He said be 
went to tire control room about 
11:45 and told Mr. Qureshi, the 
supervisor, of a methyl isocyanate 
leak. He quoted Mr. Qureshi as 
responding that he would see to the 
leak after tea. 

Mr. Qureshi contended in an in- 
terview that he had been told of a 
water leak, not an escape rrf methyl 
isocyanate. 

No one investigated tire leak un- 
til after tea ended, about 12:40 
AM_ according to the employees 
cm duty. 

Such inattention merely com- 


pounded an aircady.dangerous sit- 
uation, according to Mr. Varadara- 
jan, an organic and biological 
chemist who heads tire Council of 
Scientific and Industrial Research, 
the government's central research 
organization. 

In tire two weeks after the acci- 
dent, Mr. Varadarajan said, he and 
his assistants questioned factory 
managers at Bhopal, directed ex- 
periments conducted by tire plant's 
research staff and analyzed the re- 
sults of those tests. 

Mr. Varadarajan said that rou- 
tine tests conducted at tire Bhopal 
factory used a faulty method, so the 
substance may have been more re- 
active than the company believed. 
For example; he said, tire Bhopal 
staff did not adequately measure 
the incidence in methyl isocyanate 
or the possible effects of chloride 
ions, which are highly reactive in 
the presence of small amounts of 
water. 

Hie Union Carbide spokesman 
in Danbury said: “Tests fra chlo- 
ride-containing materials, includ- 
ing dilnride inns in the tank, are 

made routinely.” 

Mr. Varadaraian’s analysis, 
atemal 


along with interna] Union Carbide 
documents and conversations with 
workers, offers drctmistantiaJ evi- 
dence fra at least rare explanation 
of what triggered the accident. 

There were 45 metric tons, or 
about 13.000 gallons, of methyl iso- 
cyanate in the tank that leaked, 
according to plant workers. That 
would mean tire tank was 87 per- 
cent full 

Union Carbide’s spokesman in 
Danburysaid the tank contained 
only 1 1,000 gallons of the chemical, 
“which was well below the recom- 
mended maximum working capaci- 
ty of the 15,000-gallon tank” 

However, even that lower level 
— 73 percent of capacity — ex- 
ceeds the dO-perceni limit set in the 
Bhopal operating manual. 

The reason for tire restrictions, 
according to technical experts for- 
merly employed at the plant, was 
that in case of a large reaction pres- 
sure in tire storage tank would rise 
less quickly. 


For 13,000 gallons of the chemi- 
cal to have reacted with water, at 
least 1.5 tons or 420 gallons of 
water would have been required, 
according to Union Carbide tech- 
nical experts. 

But all of those interviewed 
agreed that it was highly unUkdy 
that 420 gallons of water could 
have entered the storage tank. 

This observation led Mr. Vara- 
darajan and his staff to suggest that 
there may have been another reac- 
tion: water and phosgene, winch is 
used in the manufacture of methyl 
isocyanate and which inhibits reac- 
tions between tire compound and 
water. 

Mr. Varadarajan said his study 
had found that the water-phosgene 
reaction produced highly corrosive 
chloride Ions, which can react with 
the stateless steel walls of a tank, 
liberating metal corrosion products 
— chiefly iron — and a great deal 
of heaL 

The heat, the action of the chlo- 
ride ions on methyl isocyanate, 
which releases more heat, and the 
chloride ions' liberation of tire met- 
als could combine to start a run- 
away reaction, he said. 

But that is not the only possible 
explanation of tire disaster at Bho- 
pal. Although water can react ex- 
plosively with liquid methyl isocya- 
nate in a closed tank. Lye can also 
react with it in a closed tank, butte 
the gas neutralizer, or scrubber, a 
solution of water and lye neutral- 
izes escaping gas. Beyond water 
and lye, methyl isocyanate reacts 
strongly, often violently, with a va- 
riety of contaminants, including 
adds, bases and metals such as 
iron- 

investigators from both Union 
Carbide India and its parent corpo- 
ration have found evidence of at 
least five contaminants in tire tank 
that leaked, according to nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectrographs 
that were obtained by The New 
York Times and analyzed by two 
Indian technical experts at the re- 
quest of The Times. Among the 
contaminants, a senior official of 
the Indian company said, were wa- 
ter, iron and lye. 

Mr. Varadarajan said he was 


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particularly troubled that the meth- 
yl isocyantee had been stored in 
such large quantities. 

Many plants store the compound 
in 52-gallon drums, which are con- 
sidered safer than large mnki 

The Union Carbide Corp. decid- 
ed that it would be more efficient to 
store the chemical in large quanti- 
ties, former officials of the Indian 
affiliate said, so that a delay in the 
production of methyl isocyanate 
would not disrupt production of 
tire pesticides of which it is a com- 
ponent 

Some of the operators at tire 
plant said that previously, they 
were trained to handle all nv 


term involved in the manufacture 
and storage of methyl isocyanate. 
But at the time of the accident, they 
said, only a few of about 20 opera- 
tors at Bhopal knew the whole 
methyl isocyanate planL 
Workers raised questions about 
lower employment qualifications. 
Methyl isocyanate operators’ jobs, 
which once required college science 
degrees, were filled by high school 
graduates, they said. 

The workers also complained 
about tire mrimmanff of the Bho- 
pal planL Starting in 1984, they 
said, nearly ah major maintunanm 
was performed on tire day shift, 
there 


Ive sys- and there was a backlog of jobs. 


SC/ 

IH A N N E L 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 29. 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Scherrer Does Japan, Cardin Gets Loose 


By Hebe Dorsey 

International Herald Tribune 


F ) ARIS — It's Paris summer 

couture week and the Question 


A couture week and the question 
after Jean-Louis Sdierrer's show 
Monday morning was: Is Mrs. Va- 


PARIS FASHION 


burgundy paisley suit — “Scfaer- 
reiT “ Naturellematt * — the for- 
mer French first lady said this was 
the first lime she had attended the 
collection; when her husband was 
in office, she had the clothes shown 
to her in private. 


l&y Giscard d'Es laing . a quintes- 
sential Parisian, going to look likea 
geisha? 

The answer is no. What she liked 
best in tins startlingly Japanese col- 
lection were the simple black-and- 
white dresses. Sporting a youthful- 
looking crew-cut hairdo and a 


As she sat center stage, neatly 
framed by the wives of the British 
and U. S. ambassadors to France, 
observers noted that her being at 
the collection coincided with her 
husband's recent high profile. 
Asked if her appearance had politi- 
cal implications, she said, shocked: 
“Absolutely not” Still, as Isabelle 
d’Omano, a close personal friend. 


Sorting Directs Kundera Play 
With Pomposity, Lack of Fun 


By Frank Rich 

Ne*> Fdrft Times Service 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — If ever there was a Cultural Event, 
it is “Jacques and His Master," the Milan Kundera play now at 


V/ it is “Jacques and His Master," the Milan Kundera play now at 
Harvard's American Repertory Theater. Not only is this production the 
U. S. premiere of the Czechoslovak writer’s sole stage work, it marks the 
U. S. debut of Susan Sontag as a theater director. 

There's nothing wrong with a Cultural Event, of course, provided its 
perpetrators do not let the event upstage the culture. I am not convinced 
that this trap has been avoided in Cambridge. Kundera's play, as 
translated by Michael Henry Heim, is a liberating folly — a playful 
“homage" to Denis Diderot and his proto- modernist, late 18th-century 
novel, “Jacques the Fatalist.*' 

Son tag has staged it with fastidious care, but also with a pomposity that 
can drain away the fun. It is all too characteristic of the production that 
the director gratuitously drags a bust of Diderot on stage. 


Kundera wrote “Jacques and His Master" in 1971. after his literary 
banishment in Czechoslovakia, before his emigration to France. Like its 


source, its meaning is to be found as much in its prismatic form as in the 
anecdotes filtered through that form. In one beguiling digression, a 
character laments plays that proclaim such “unnecessary truths" as “The 
world is rotten !“ Rather than ply us with unnecessary truths, Kundera 
asks if — and how — we can ever know what the truth is. 

During the work's three acts (played without intermission), the servant 


Jacques (Thomas Derrah) and his aristocratic master (Robert Drivas) 
trudge rudderiessly through a void inhabited only by an innkeeper 


trudge rudderiessly through a void inhabited only by an innkeeper 
(Priscilla Smith). Along their way to nowhere, the men swap tales of their 
romantic misadventures. But Jacques and his waster keep interrupting 
and amending their stories — and are themselves interrupted by the 
innkeeper, who recounts still another tale of sexual betrayal. 

The play's techniques — the contrapuntal use of multiple narrators, the 
variational structure, the interjected metaphysical debates — take us 
from Kundera's first novel “The Joke," through “The Book of Laughter 
and Forgetting" and “The Unbearable Lightness of Being." Yet “Jac- 
ques" usually achieves its disquieting effects through ribald comedy. 
Son tag's staging lacks the requisite velocity and fizz, and the perfor- 
mances, especially those of toe seven actors populating the internal 
narratives, are madly flat and sexless. 

While Drivas summons up the appropriate dandified style of the 
master, Derrah's nondescript Jacques denies him a foiL Only Smith 
brings the play fully alive. Acting out the tale of the Marquise de la 
Pomineraye. the actress leaps between wildly disparate social and theatri- 
cal roles with perfect timing and sly humor. Her performance alone 
unlocks the explosive Laughter in existential anxiety. 

Even if the other actors rose to Smith’s level the production would be 
hobbled by its set and score. Kundera demands an empty stage; Douglas 
Stein provided an eggshell-colored Roman ruin abstractly patterned after 
a Piranesi engraving. The music is by Elizabeth Swados, who punctuates 
every sexual reference with distracting percussion noises that are arty 
equivalents of the dnimrolls that fleck a Johnny Carson monologue. 


put it, the Giscard d'Esiaings* “se- 
clusion period is over." 

Politics aside, French couture is 
alive and remarkably well Jacques 
Mouclier, president of the French 
Chambre Syndicale, said the fig- 
ures have never been so good. 
Thanks partly to the strength of the 
dollar, couture business for 1984 
totaled 270 million francs (now 
about $28 million), an increase of 
35 percent from 1983. Things start- 
ed turning around four years ago, 
Mouclier said, and the movement is 

still up hill 

This may explain why Paris cou- 
turiers are fedmg so safe nowadays 
— feeling they can do pretty much 
as they please. Especially Pierre 
Cardin. After 30 years, 70 collec- 
tions and 20,000 dresses, Cardin 
hardly qualifies as a couturier any 
more. He is an institution, and an 
incredibly wealthy man who owns 
Maxim’s, more than 600 licenses 
and a large chunk of Paris real 
estate. There is a Cardin style, like 
there is a Saint Laurent style or a 
Chanel style. Ail it takes is a dedi- 
cated staff, fantastic workrooms 
and a collaborator like Andre Oli- 
ver, who designs a good part of the 
Cardin collection. 

Cardin revisited was plearing to 
the eyes and a lot softer than usual, 
qualifying as pretty, even romantic. 
The scalpel tailoring was still 
around, but everything was looser, 
with bloused jackets, draped dress- 
es and floating panels. There was a 
lot of air between the clothes and 
the body, and a feeling that women 
did not need to starve themselves to 
be elegant 

There was also a strong whiff of 
the 1920s: Rapper dresses, with 
pleated, swirling hemlines, became 
sequined for evening and punctuat- 
ed with huge organdy bows. 

Cardin's fascination with sleeves 
showed up in a group of six suits, 
with wide shoulders and all with 
different sleeves. The coat story, 
which continues to be one of the 


most interesting around, came off 
best in two beautiful pieces cut on 
the bias, with pleated fronts. 

The fabrics were exquisite, the 
workmanship up to par and the 
bats fun as always. 


Scherrer went to Japan in No- 
vember and is not about to let any- 
one forget iL To strains from “Ma- 
dama Butterfly," he showed a 
heavily lacquered collection, start- 
ing with an oildoth fabric that he 
found in Japan and fell in love 
with. He used it for everything 
from suits — short and sexy — to 
draped obis in red or blade. 

The models wore pointed, lac- 
quered straw mandarin hats, spiky 
chop stick-like jewelry, even lac- 
quered-lace gloves. The Oriental 
influence continued in a Suzy 
Wong world with Chinese dresses 
slit to the rides and the kind of 
embroidery usually found in Hong 
Kong kimonos. 

The ending was another fantasy 
— crystal-encrusted caftans that 
are sure to sell in the Gulf coun- 
tries. where Scherrer has a staunch 
following. 

Here, as at Cardin's, the colors 
were explosive and sharp. Purple, 
red. yellow, green and orange alter- 
nated with soft shades such as va- 
nilla and pistachio. 

At Dior, as long as Princess Car- 
oline of Monaco is around, Mare 
Bohan won't have much to worry 
about. Looking slim and pretty, her 
hair in a ponytail, the princess 
came with her husband, Stefano 
Casiraghi, and sat next to the 
French rock star Sylvie Vartan, an- 
other Dior fan. 

Dior is under new mpagement: 
Paul Audrain is the director, fol- 
lowing Jacques Rouet, who was 
there 47 years. A spokesman said 
Dior’s 1984 couture figures were up 
57 percent from 1983. 

One wonders if 1985 will be as 
good. Even a faithful follower such 
as the American socialite Carrol) 
Pietiie, who said she had been 



By Michael Zwerin 

Iniemjiiivul Herald Tribune 


P I ARIS — Benny Waters. 83 last 
week, came in on reeds with 
Charlie Johnson's big band at Ed 
Small's Paradise dub in Harlem for 
10 years starting in the 1920s. He 

says he was disappointed with 
Frands Coppola’s film '"The Cot- 
ton Gub" because “Small's Para- 
dise was not even mentioned and 
anybody who knows anything 
about Harlem show business 
knows that we bad a better show." 

Waters recalls: “The Colton 
Club may have had the most beau- 
tiful Negro girls in Harlem, but we 
had the best dancers. The Cotton 
Club was more prestigious, more 
expensive, but ordinary people pre- 
ferred Small's. You know, popular 
people. We were packed every 
night. We had 40 entertainers. 
Charlie Johnson hired and Fired 
them all." 

Charlie Johnson had so much 
money, he bought two different ar- 
rangements of “Rhapsody in 
Blue.” Johnson would buy an ar- 
rangement from anybody who 
brought in something nice. Waters 
has been telling people lor years 
bow Johnson’s pockets were “burn- 
ing," “It was never primed any- 
where, not even the Down Beat, but 
I’m writing a book now. it's ah 
Finished, 1 got this in my book. 
Charlie was asked to come into the 
Cotton Gub but he was making so 
much r unning the whole show at 
Small’s that he didn’t want to move 
for just leader money, so they hired 
Duke Ellington instead. We bad a 
very underrated band, ask Benny 
Carter — used to sit right next to 
me 

“We were one of the first Negro 
bands to record for RCA Victor in 
1926. It was racism too. but one 
reason Negro bands didn’t record 
earlier was because they weren't 
good enough. 1 sav what [ think. 


OnfeGwfa 

Cardin evening dress. 


dressing at Dior since the house 
opened, had a hard time defending 
this collection. “Il doesn't look like 
couture," she said, adding: Til 
find something. 1 always do." 

Bohan made a fair be ginning — 
gray suits, with T ahitian shirts con- 
trasting with the menswear fabrics. 
The second part of the show — 
including mostly draped dresses, 
slouchy big shirts and hemlines nei- 
ther here nor there — frankly 
floundered. But the end, with its 
embroidered evening dresses, may 
put this coDection back in the 
black. 




Oratoi Rom 

Benny Waters 


cal saxophone, not tour d fail classi- 
cal stun like *Noia.’ f was in (his 


DOONESBURY 


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(WfB/S j jSt ARB (MS*! 
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hvi/jm | 




Negro jazzmen, fantastic. The best. 
Bui when Negro musicians said 
that white bands didn't sound 
good, they were prejudiced too. At 
the beginning, before we had the 
chance to go to the conservator, 
sometimes our tonation wasn't 
good enough. We could swing bet- 
ter and we had better soloists, but 
white bands had better tonation." 

Waters spent extended periods 
with Fletcher Henderson, Jimmie 
Lunceford, Claude Hopkins and 
Hot Lips Page before arriving in 
Paris in 1952 with the Jimmy Ar- 
chey Dixie! and band. “Europe was 
good to me right away. I found a 
very nice girL I went from one nice 
girl to another nice girL and 1 still 
have a nice one. I work in 1 1 coun- 
tries a year, 13 if you count Scot- 
land and Wales as countries." 

A hand-printed legend taped 
over the bathroom minor at his 
studio in a 20th arrondissaneni 
high-rise reads: “You can't keep 
the sun from rising." The studio is 
so s mall, his saxophone seems to 
take up about half of it. Now he is 
home more, he admits to “slowing 
down lately." 

He can still stretch exciting ener- 
gy out of a standard, though, stylis- 
tically somewhere between Ben 
Webster and Johnny Hodges. He 


cal, stun like *Nola.’ f was in this 
band in Boston that played on the 
radio for the Howard Clothing 
Company — no jazz, just show 
tunes — three tunes a week and 
people came to take lessons. 1 had 
over 60 pupils when 1 was 18. Peo- 
ple weren't used to a Negro playing 
that type of marie on a saxophone. 

“1 went to New York to join 
Charlie Johnson's band. The pay 
was $70 a week, but 1 was making 
so much recording on the ride with 
Joe I King] Oliver and writing ar- 
rangements for Charlie that some- 
times I didn't draw ray salary till 
the end of the season. 

“Girls would come in to try out, 
dancers and singers. They'd say, 
‘You know “Sweet Georgia 
Brown"?’ Now everybody knew 
‘Georgia Brown,' but Charlie said, 
‘You got music? No? We need mu- 
sic.’ So they would ask. well where 
could they get the music? And 
Charlie said, *We got some good 
arrangers in the band.' 

“Small’s closed at 4. Then we'd 
go out I like to go out, 1 still go out 
a lot. It was nothing to get hone at 
9 in the morning. 

“That's how it used to be in Har- 
lem. And I was right there. See, a 
lot of things kids are anxious to do 
today. I've done ail that." 

Benny Waters: Paris, Slaw Chib, 
Feb. 5-9; Petit Opportun, FA. 23- 
26. 


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Germany 
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j Italy 

! Luxembourg 
j Neltertands 
1 Btarpjr 
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Cord expiry due 


Luxembourg . L Fr 7.3Q0 3.650 

Netbsrtands FI 450 2SS 

Mntwar N Kr 1 . 160 -5B0 

PorTuoaJ Eac 11.200 5. 600 

Spain Etas 17 -IOqT 3 TOO 

SsttfJfn S Ki 1 160 5Uf» | 

Swici.-rund I JLD 372 Iflfil 

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Benny Waters Recalls ’ 20s Harlem, 
Paradise Club, Jamming With Krupa 


^ F yTUS£ 5 ** 


admits to having, been a “juice- 
bead," an alcoholic, until becoming 
a Christian Scientist in 1935. He 
describes himself as a “tortoise (hat 
just keeps moving along." 

“1 like to keep working. Here in 
Paris I worked for 10 years at the 
Cigale in Montmartre. A lot of peo- 
ple said. 'Well he can't play the 


jitton E* fbaI 


saxophone because he's playing at 
the Cigale with those Martinique 


the Cigale with those Martini ques 
and that’s not a real jazz club, 


they're not real iazzxnen,' and so 
on. So the Blue Note wouldn't hire 


on. So the Blue Note wouldn't hire 
me. But then when the Blue Note 
dosed, I was still working. 

“See, it all has to do with pres- 
tige. The Cigale had no prestige, 
just good music. Like the prestige 
was at the Colton Club but the real 
show was in SmaFs. 1 wish 1 bad 
1,000 francs for every lime Jack 
Teagarden sat in with us. Miff 
Mole, Jimmy Dorsey. Gene Krupa 
— all those guys would come up 
and jam." 

A self-described prodigy, play- 
ing piano at age 3 in Pennsylvania, 
where his aunt raised him, he stud- 
ied the classics but, “well man, 
when I went into ja 2 z dubs and saw 
all that whiskey and those beautiful 
women, I mean — . 

“But I did study. I learned dassi- 


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Statistics Index' 

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AMEX Mien I P,12 .gamines noons p. 9 
AMRX U i n ta 8p w P.12«/Fltna rota note P.lj 
NYSEPCkfet Gold mortal* ' P.-7 

NYSE hteSa/tajrP.K) Intanst rota P.7 

cnwqqn (feats P.14 Mortal sunmorv P.8 

CorrwMVnMs P.7 Opttom P,1# 

OammoflliM P.10 OTC Mock Ml 
DMdtnds P.1S OHwf mortata P.H 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2971985 


FUTURES AND OPTIONS 

Cotton Exchange Devises 
A Contract on the Dollar 


Erahangift offi cials 
gay they were 
going nowhere 
trading orange juice. 


Currency Rates 


Lota interbank rates on Jan. 28 , excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfort, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 
2 PM 



• 

« 

DM. 

FJ*. 

ILL 

Oldr. 

83 . 

SF. Yea 


15625 

1 S 8 B 

llUi 1 

34385 * 

8.1834 


5351 * 

13 * 9 - 141 X 0 r 

Bnmctata) 

613938 

>703488 

3030 

6 MI 3 

1344 * 

173878 

— 

237975 3 * 935 * 

FrnmtIBrt 

11488 

3335 

— 

32 J 0 S* 

1323 x 

8834 * 

1001 * 

11 X 99 * 12515 * 

London lb) 

i.ro 

_ 

i sea 

M 7545 

2.14735 

19781 

70345 

27578 282285 

Mta 

1,95175 

2 . 172 J 8 

6 ) 6.18 

28135 

— 

54524 

38819 

731 X 3 7379 

HMYorMc) 



1.1177 

114 

*3435 

1351 JO 

33725 

6333 

26575 25*80 

Porta 

9*9 

1078 

33576 

— — 

4362 z 

27845 

1529 * 

333418118 * 

Tt*m 

2 S 4225 

38137 

■035 

3423 

1197 • 

7131 

401 X 0 - 

9536 

Zurich 

24633 

23471 

84 . 185 * 

27395 • 

0.1365 

7 * 38 - 

4305 * 

1 X 474 * 

1 ECU 

•0807 

03294 

23281 

67875 

136772 

23088 

443947 

1 X 459 171113 

1 SDH 

0 L 974 D 49 

187888 

338457 

933853 

NA 

14895 

617399 

25849 247281 




Dollar Values 





UrolbSElribunc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


Page 7 


By H J. MAlDENBERG 

New York Times Service ’ 

N EW YORK — - If the main purpose of trading futures 
on commodities or any other market instrument is to 
earn dollars or hedge against changes in their value, 
then why not eliminate all the intermediate steps and 
simply trade the currency? 

Last Wednesday, the Nov York Cotton Exchange 
plans to do just that, and if, as expected, government regulators 
agree, hedgers and speculators should be able to trade futures on 
the dollar itself by early summer. 

Gone will be the need, accor ding to the Cotton Exchange, to 
indirectly take positions on the dollar's value by using futures on 

foreign currencies or the vari- 

ous financial-debt instrument r L , 

contracts introduced for that rJCCnange officials 
purpose sauce 1971. .« 

“For the first rima . the fu- ^ “*Cy were 
turns market will be exposed «om« nowhere 
to an instrument that looks, 8°™ nownere 
feels and trades like the dol- t rading n ranop . i triw ». 

Jars in our pockets,” said ° ° 

Adolf G. Reinhardt, chairman 

of the exchange. “Given the fact that the dollar is now the global 
currency, the potential of our proposed market is enormous.” 

Mr. Reinhardt may be excused for a bit of hyperbole. What 
would actually be traded are futures contracts based on the 
Federal Reserve’s trade-weighted dollar index, which is calculat- 
ed using a basket of 10 major foreign currencies. While the index 
was created by the Federal Reserve, the Fed will have nothing to 
do with its computation for the Cotton Exchange. The exchange 
plans to calculate the index itself u s i ng the Fed formula *»nrf to 
update it continuously during the t rarirag day. 

The dollars that would actually change hands will go from the 
losers to those who were on the right side of the market when the 
contracts expire each March, June, September and December. 
The mechanics of the dollar- index futures will be quite similar to 
those on Eurodollars, Treasury bills and the foreign-currency 
contracts now being traded. 

B UT why was it that the Cotton Exchange and not one of 
the big Chicago markets, which pioneered financial fu- 
tures. came up with the idea? The question was answered 
by the man whose idea it was, Paul Tudor Jones 2d, president of 
Tudor Investment Corp., commodity-trading advisers. 

“Our 115-year-old futures exchange may be the oldest in New 
York, but, frankly, wasn’t going anywhere trading cotton, frozen 
orange-juice concentrate and liquid-propane futures,” Mr. Jones 
noted. “At the same time, our lean, hungry and frugal exchange 
had amassed plenty of cash over the years. I and many other 
members thought it was rime we did something innovative.” 

What Mr. Jones did not say was that the industry knew that 
Chicago’s ever-innovalive exchanges were working on new ways 
to trade and speculate on the dollar. 

Among the ideas bang discussed there are futures on the 
European Currency Unit, or ECU, which is a basfeet of trade- 
weighted currencies that is increasingly bang used to denominate 
bonds and other debt issues. Chicago’s innovators are also 
working on futures based on the International Monetary Fund’s 
special drawing rights, or SDR’s, which are another surrogate for 
the dollar. 

Rather than devise new wpys to trade the dollar, which has 
become the most important influence in most futures markets, 
Mr. Jones came up with the idea of trading the dollar itself last 
summer. « 

The contract was designed by Mark Pfiwers, president of 
Powers Research, of Jersey City, New Jersey, who designed the 
Treasury bill futures contract and helped devise several other 
financial contracts. Before that, Mr. Powers gained wide respect 
in the industry as the Commodity Futures Trading Commission’s 
first chief economist. . j . 

“I believe that the doDar-mdex futures will prove to be far 
(Cooliined on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Carbide’s 
Earnings 
Up in ’84 

A Charge Taken 
For Bhopal Costs 

Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 
DANBURY, Connecticut — 
Union Carbide Carp, reported 
Monday that its 1 984 earnings rose 
to $323 million, or $4.59 per share, 
despite an extraordinary charge of 
25 cents a share in Lhe final quarter 
to cover actual and antkapaled 
costs in connection with the Dec. 3 
leak of untie gas in Bhopal, India. 

More than 2,000 people died in 
the central India city when methyl 
isocyanate, used in the production 
of insecticides, leaked from the 
Union Carbide plant there. 

The extraordinary charge 
amounted to about 518 million, 
said Stephen Galpin Jr., a Union 
Carbide spokesman, and did not 
include any liabilities that might 
arise from the accident. 

The company said that in its 
counsel’s opinion, no charge or ac- 
crual is required for any amounts 
that may become payable for liabil- 
ities arising from the Bhopal acci- ; 
dent ■ j 

Excluding the charge. Union i 
Carbide said it earned 5341 mil- i 
lion, or 54.84 per share, on sales of ■ 
S9J billiop in 1984, compared with I 
earnings Of $79 nnition, or 51.13 a * 
share, cm sales of 59 billion in 1983. 

The 1 983 remits excluded a one- 
time charge of 5218 milli on, or’ 
$3.1 1 a shire, from the closing of 
certain production facilities, the 
company said. 

Fourth-quarter net income for! 
1984 was $31 million, or 44 cents , 
per share, before the charge related i 
to the Bhopal accident, and $13 j 
milium, o*; 19 cents per share, after ; 
the charge. 1 

Foimli-quarter operating earn- | 
ings a yeaJ earlier were $28 million, j 
or 40 cents a share before the non- \ 
recumngdharge,andalossor$lll j 
million aftp that charge, the state- | 
meat said.; { 

Revenues in both periods were : 
$2.4 billion, the company said. 

The company said its fourth- I 
quarter earnings reflected weak re- 
suhs in its jrarochemicals and met- ! 
als and carbon products industry ! 
segments and the impact of two ; 
special charges. . 

Those charges were a 38-cents- ' 
per-share write-down of an invest- 
ment in an olefins-produring com- 
pany operating in Sarnia, Ontario, j 
and a 10-cents-per-share cha^e re- i 
laled to the temporary suspension 
of opera tiaras at a Puerto Rkan \ 
petrochemical facility. 

These charges were partly offset 
by a gain of 22 cents a share from 
the liquidation of low-value inven- 
tories, the company said. 

Domestic customer sales in 1984 
increased 9 percent from 1983, 
while international sales, affected 
by divestitures and the strong UJ>. 
dollar, fell 3 percent in comparison 
with 1983, jhe company said 
Export sales, included in domes- 
tic sales, increased 37 percent, 

(Ar, Reuters). 


A New Mood of Optimism in India AT&T Posts Net 

Below Forecast 
At $1.38 Billion 


Gandhi Election 
Seen Giving lift 
To Economy 

By Roger Browning 

Insemmlonal Herald Tribune 

NEW DELHI — A general 
mood of optimism about lhe In- 
dian economy has been given a 
lift by the strength of the dectian 
victory of Rajiv Gandhi’s Con- 
gress (I) Party. 

The new government is ex- 
pected to push quickly ahead 
with the sort of industrial and 
trade-liberalization measures 
that were tentatively introduced 
during the last two yean of rule 
by Mr. Gandhi's mother, Indira. 

“There is a great ferment of 
rethinking on trade; industrial 
policy aim style of government 
toward less intervention,” E. 
’ Bevan Waide. the World Bank’s 
chief of mission for India, said in 
a recent interview. “This election 
increases the government’s free- 
dom to move." 

And D.H. Paf Panandikar, 
secretary-general of the Federa- 
tion of Indian Chambers of 
Commerce and Industry, said, 
“My expectation is that there 
will be substantial liberaliza- 
tion.” 

Mr. Panandikar pointed out 
that on his first day in office, Mr. 
Gandhi introduced a one-step 
procedure for monopoly clear- 
ance for large companies, which 
he said would cut bureaucratic 
delays in starting new ven hires 
by up to six months. 

Mr. Gandhi has since an- 
nounced that customs duties on 
computers would he reduced 
from €5 percent to 5 percent, 
opening the field to imports of 
technology and allowing foreign 
collaboration. 

“With Mrs. Gandhi as Con- 
gress (I) leader, liberalization 
was at the periphery," Mr. Pan- 



D.H. Pm Panandikar 

andikar said “But these are dras- 
tic measures, not tinkering.” 

He said the new leadership is 
“more dynamic in outlook and 
has different notions about what 
progress means: that it should be 
based on modernization; that we 
should have new technologies; 
that, we should be competitive; 
that government should not be 
procedure-oriented but result- 
oriented and that people should 
work." 

He said there are good signs 
that the new lead^ -shi p would 
favor policies that are likely to 
stop up the rate of development. 

From the mid-1960s until the 
mid- 1 970s, the Indian economy’s 
growth rale was stuck at around 
3 ^percent a year. 

T.N. Nainan, executive editor 
of the respected news ma garine 
India Today, said, “This became 
known as the ‘Hindu rate of 
growth.’ Whatever yon did, it did 
not seem possible to cross that 
level. But the Hindu rate has 
been broken.” 

But in lhe last decade, he said, 
growth has been running at more 
than 4 J percent, and is poised to 
grow at a much faster rate. 


E. Bevan Waide 

“Government policy is no longer 
a hindrance,” ne and 

He said that investment is run- 
ning at 22 percent to 23 percent 
of gross national product, and is 
expected to go higher, and indus- 
trial growth thig financial year 
might reach 7 percent, compared 
to about S percent Iasi year. 

In agriculture, an estimated 
153 million tons were harvested 
in 1983-84, and the next crop is 
also expected to be good, be raid. 

■Mr. Nainan said that poverty, 
however, is still a major issue. 
Moat estimates are that about 
half the population still have in- 
comes below the poverty Imp. 

He said that because of auto- 
mation and the growth of popu- 
lation, the parentage of employ- 
ment in organized industry had 
remained virtually stagnant for 
30 years. 

Small industry, however, 
which is less capital intensive, is 
a success story, he said, rising 
from a few thousand businesses 1 
20 years ago to about 600,000 to 
800,000 today. 

Shit 80 parent of the popula- 
tion still lives in the villages- Be- 

(Continued on Page 9, CoL 6) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. said Mon- 
day that it earned almost $1.4 bil- 
ikm in 1984, its first year of 
operations after giving up its re- 
gional telephone companies. 

But its chairman said, “We ex- 
pected to do better.” 

In November 1983,- before the 
breakup of the BeD System, the 
co mpan y had projected a profit of 
S2.I tritium, or $242 a snare, for 
1 984. However, it reported profit of 
$138 billion, or 5135 a share; on 
sales of $33.19 billion for the year. 

In the final quarter, profit was 
S379 million, or 34 cents a share, chi 
revenue of $8.41 Nihon. 

Because of the divestiture of the 
operating telephone companies of 
the Bell System at the start of last 
year, the 1984 results are not com- 
parable to any 1983 periods. 

After the divestiture, AT&T kept 
its long-distance, equip men t manu- 
facturing and research operations 
and was also freed to venture into 
computer manufacturing and data 
transmission. 

“We expected to do better,” said 
Charles L Brown, AT&T’s chair- 
man. “We mood to do better in 
1985 and better still in the years 
ahead.” 

In the meantime, he said, 
“AT&T remains a financially 
strong company with nearly $40 
billion in assets and excellent pros- 
pects in rapidly growing markets.” 

AT&T said Monday that the 
forecast it originally made for 1984 
was based “on the best assump- 
tions possible at that time, particu- 
larly with regard to regulatory mat- 
ters. Re gulator y, decisions did not 
match those assumptions, and as 


the year progressed AT&T said it 
not expect to earn the level forecast 
earlier.” 

The company complained of de- 
lays by the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission for resolving a 
dispute on the fees paid to local 
telephone companies for access to 
their lines. 

Mr. Brown said problems related 
to divestiture were some of the fac- 
tors bearing cm the company’s 5- 

He smHhat some otheri influ- 
ences on AT&T’s financial results 
“reflect gains made by competitors 
in markets where we had previously 
faced little competition. Some were 
the results of regulatory rulings. 
Some were of our own making." 

The company earned $227 mil- 
lion, or 20 cents a share, in the first 
quarter of 1984; $456 miffi on, or 43 
cents a share, in the second quar- 
ter; and $317 million, or 28 cents a 
share, in the third quarter. 

There were 1.03 bflHoii shares 
outstanding in the 1984 fourth 
quarter ana 1.01 billion outstand- 
ing in the full year. 

Mr. Brown pointed out that cus- 
toms demand for AT&T's flagship 
products was strong in 1984, a year 
“that established a basis for the 
sncessfol transformation of the 
company.” 

He added that AT&T Bell Lab- 
oratories maintained its leadership 
in research and development last 
year. 

The government appeared will- 
ing to modify outdated regulations, 
and AT&T penmnd demonstrated 
the ability to be competitive by 
lowering costs and improving mar- 
gins, he said. 

(AP, UP1 ) 


Florida’s Citrus Fruit Growers 
Race to Beat Freeze Embargo 


Bonn’s Current-Account Surplus Up 


i The Associated Press 

j MIAMI — Growers in Florida 
'raced to harvest their fruit before 
!lhe start Monday of a weeklong 
■embargo designed to protect the 
reputation of the state’s citrus' 
fruits, damaged by severe winter 
i weather conditions, 
i The embargo, adapted in an 
lemergauy meeting Thursday of 
jtbe Florida Citrus Commission, 
was scheduled to begin at 7 AAL 
jMonday. Any citrus certified free 
Of freeze damage, packed and 
■ready for movement before then 
could be shipped. 

1 Growers had laborers picking 
fruit Sunday, trying to get the fruit 
to processing plants before they 
dosed and state officials stopped 
inspecting at midnight. 

J “They’re working seven days a 
week,” said Jerry Chicone of the 
(abonsrs. He owns 500 citrus acres 
(200 hectares) near Orlando, Flori- 
da. 


However, some packing bouses 
shut down as early as Friday when 
the pace of emergency harvesting 
outstripped the capacity of ship- 
pers. 

“They weren’t accepting any 
more fruit as of Friday afternoon,” 
said Philip StrazzuHa, who owns a 
grove in Sl Lurie County and was 
turned away by a packing house 
after be used op his allotment of 
trailers. 

An arctic air mass last week 
caused what officials said was the 
worst Florida freeze of the century, 
reaching farther south in the stale 
than ever before. The weather 
boosted fruit and vegetable prices 
and put thousands of Tarm workers 
out of jobs. 

The Florida Department of La- 
bor estimates that as many as 
12J300 farm workers in southwest- 
ern Florida may be out of work. 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT— West Germa- 
ny's current-account surplus rose 
to- 17.9 Union Deutsche marks 
($5.6 trillion) in 1984, the highest 
level mice 1978 , as a weakened 
mfcxk helped boost the nation’s 
merchandise-trade surplus to a re- 
cord 54 billion DM, the Federal 
Statistics Office reported Monday. 

[The surplus in the current ac- 
count, the broadest measure of 
trade performance which indudes 
merchandise, services and mone- 
tary transfers, was up 73.8 percent 
from the 10 3 billion DM surplus in 
1983, but fdl just short of the re- 
cord 18.1-bfllion-DM current-ac- 
count surplus posted in 1978. 
Economists had anticipated a 15- 
bfllion-DM surplus. 

The merchandise-trade surplus, 
up from 42 billion in 1983, was 
catalaled on the baas of esqxxts 


“The current-account surplus 
was certainly better than tire most 
optimistic expectations,” said 
Hans-Georg Kupper, senior econo- 


One economist at a major West 
German bank said privately, how- 
ever, that euphoria over the results 
is somewhat misplaced. 

“We would be happier if West 

results and the United Stares^had 
lower trade-defidt figures because, 
as our surplus grows, the US. defi- 
cit widens and threatens world eco- 
nomic recovery in the long run," be 


mg 11 percent, to 434.2 


These economists are optimistic 
about West Germany’s chances to 
widen both its current-account and 
me rchandise -trade surpluses this 
year, on the assumption that the 
dollar will remain strong, as many 
are now convinced. 

Mr. Kupper foresees the current- 
account surplus widening to 
around 20 billioa DM this year, 
and expects (he trade surplus to 


American National Gets Boost as Rivals Suffer 


r. UJU 

AodraBaaF U245 
Antrim s*mna 3223 

Mata OLfrUC tax 
Cnandtat U 2 *A 
DnU bw I LOTS 


ASMS KMC 
QJH15 tararttataf 
UUB KMMHtdtaf 
MBS Mata*, lianf 
LW Horw-krnaa 
turn PUL MM 
&IXIX PorLwcada 
MM3 Saudi rival 


U&* Eta. IULS 

1J147 (USD StaaparaS UM 
«7U> 24139 S.Afrk»raU 24221 

UM3 tUXOT S. Korean WOO 83085 
24845 U857 Staa.l*Mta 17U» 

9.T72S 01 MS talkm 9MT 

121 U 08254 Talmas 39.12 
T7VJJ0 UDUTMMU 27JB5 
35808 02323 tLAJLdMwm S432S 


< tartta:UJ53 imo c 

(a) OomnarcW trade lb) Amauals neadad to Buy ana pound lei Amount* needed to bt» ana dBHor p» 
IMh oMM (x) Unit* oflM iy) Units ol 10BH 
NJU not ousted; NA: not awfktfe. 

Sources: Banquet* Benelux (Brussels); Banco Commeedah Itattana (Ml ton); Ormlcnl 
Bank (Hew York).- Banaue Hadonate d» Parte (Ports); IMF (SDR); Banaue Ante at 
Infmorionaie avwmttssanmd (dbtor, rival, dirham). Other data from Renton andAP. 


^^^^^^^nteres^ates 

Eurocurrency Deposits 


Jan. 28 


Swisfr Fvudi 

rww o Mart Franc M bi H w Franc ECU SDR 

1M, Ih -Ih 5A -5H P* - SV» 14M- MW IMS- W* 99W 7ft - 8M 

281 M -M 5% - S<h 51V - 91b MVS - U* 10W- IK »8W-9^ 7ft - BV* 

3M. Ih-ta. - 5ft 5fc -Sfc 13* - MMi IB*- 10*. 9-*. -PM, < - 8U. 

AM. n-W 1 - iVt 5U.-5* 11 - 118 9SL-9WL S» • 8 A 

1Y. m. .«« &K. - 6K s il ■ 5W lam- 1» iHfe.im m ■ w» bw - w 

Rates Btotkat* to totMtxmk deposits of SlmmnmMrrw , ■ 

Scarcer: Mam Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FF ): Uavdt Bank (ECU); CHttank 
(SDR}. 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

CHICAGO — Last year, when 
most of this city's major banks 
were mired in trauma and uncer- 
tainty, American National Bank & 
Trust Co. of Chicago, (he dry’s 
fifib-largest bank, put together a 
record year by capitalizing on the 
problems of its hometown competi- 
tors. 

It did this by continuing to do 
what it does best: serving the highly 
profitable “middle market" of 
small and medium-sized compa- 
nies. 

So successful was 1984 for Amer- 
ican National that its earnings 
jumped by 32 percent, its client 
rosier by more than 20 percent and 
its loans outstanding by 30 percent. 

In addition. First Ch i cago Corp., 
the city’s largest bank-holding 
company, impressed by American 
National's record, acquired the 


bank from Walter E. Heller Inter- 
national Ccup. last May. 

“Growth inis past year has come 
in a very big way,” said Michael E. 
Tobin, 59, the chairman of Ameri- 
can National Corp_ the bank’s 
bolding company. 

But if Mr. Tobin relishes the 
bank’s expansion, he is also wary of 
it, noting, “We are mindful of the 
dangers that rapid growth can cre- 
ate.” He has only to look down 
LaSalle Street, this city's answer lo 
Wall Street, to Continental Illinois 
National Bank & Trust Co. for a 
reminder of bow rapid growth can 
fell a bank. 

Until lhe federal government 
rescued it from collapse last May, 
Continental Illinois was easily the 
leading banker for the city's 
sprawling middle market — an esti- 
mated 5,500 companies with annu- 
al revenues ranging from 55 million 
to 5150 million. 


“Quite a few banks have taken 
advantage at Continental's adver- 
sity, but I don't know anyone who 
has dime it more effectively than 
American National,” said Smart L 
Greenbamn. a professor of finance 
at Northwestern University’s Kel- 
logg Graduate School of Manage- 
ment 

Indeed, one official at American 
National, which has $3.8 billion in 
assets, estimated that 65 of Conti- 
nental's middle-market customers 
in the past year switched to his 
bank. That raised American Na- 
tional's roster to 1200 customers 
—mainly middle- sized companies, 
but also many law and accounting 
firms. 

This year American National, 
which had about 16 percent of the 
middle market in lv83, hopes to 
surpass Continental which had 
more than 20 percent before its 
decline. 



Michael EL Tobin. 

The middle market that Ameri- 
can Has chnsm as its ninhe has 
become increasingly attractive to 
otherjmks, too. Mach of the na- 
(CajuUmed on Page 13, CoL 2) 


French Plants Lag in Chip Use 


Asian Dollar Bates 


Jan. 28 


is -a* 
Source: Reuters, 


3 mac. 
Btu -Bh 


United States 

Discount Rata 
Fedtral Funds 
Prime Rota 
Bretar Lddn Rota 
Comm. Paper. 30-m days 
Sfnontti TraaGurv Sifts 
tmanih Tramprv BMs 

CD'S 3(KSf (toys 

C04«IWdD» 


Lombard Rata 
■OverntaM. Rale 
One Manta Into bunk 
*■*00111 intamanfc 
ft-mantti Ihtaiwik 


Intervention Rale 
Can Money ; 
OnMnonSi I n to bu n k 

3- montti interbank 

4- tanfli tnhrrtmk 


Sovran; Reuters, Co mm erzbank. Credit tp- 
aaonte uotxri Bonk, Bank a ( Tokyo. 


dose Pre*. 

I S 

9 7/M Wt 

. 10* W» 
HK4 W0I6- 
7J5 UP 
TJB Ml 
M0 M0 
7 JO 7 JO 

7J5 7.72 


530 U0 
US £55 
&J5 MSS 
5.M SS 0 
4J» (JO 


MM >0fc- 
MM W* 
IBM 10* 
TO S/14 Ttftfc 
1014 1M 


Britani 

Clan 

Pm. 

Bonk Boh Rota 

14 

12 

12 

114b 

Coll Money 

113m TreoBiry BUI 

13 

13 7/14 

34noiitti IntMtanh 

14 

124b 

Jvm 

Dbcount Rata 

Call Money 

5 

4 5/14 

3 
64 b 

tBdav Intertonk 

4 5/14 

6 S/14 


Cold Prices 


XM. MA- Woe 

—— “ *“ 

2*'“" E S3 -!£ 

-i. “ S Til! 

Official nxMa far LataOi P aris and LUXB7V 

Mure, opening and etaltio nrfce» far H»* X»W 
tuMl Hew rat * Come* current contract. 
Ml price* In USJ per ounce. 

Source: Routen. 


LONDON — French industry 
lags West Germany and Britain in 
the use of microchips, a survey of 
factories in the three countries 
showed. 

The survey, conducted by a 
group of independent research 
bodies including Britain's Policy 
Studies Institute, found that 47 
percent of West Goman factories 
use microchips in production and 
13 percent incorporate them in 
their products. 

In Britain, ose in production was 
43 percent and incorporation in 
products was 10 percent. In 
France, use in production 35 per- 
cent and in products about six per- 


LAND MVESTMEH7S IN 
HOUSTON/ TEXAS, U&A. 
nauanopraenems 

par infor matio n contact; 

Lloyd jJWUlfauu Realtor? 
5629 ™ I960 W m. Safer 210 
Booatoo, Tk- 77069. 

TeLt (713) 586-9399. Tbu 3373S6 


cent, according to the survey, 
whose results were released Sun- 
day. 

A report on the survey said that 
industrialists in all three countries 
complained of a shortage of micro 
electronics experts- 

It found that three-fourths of the 
factories using rmcrodectrattics re- 
ported no change in the size of their 
work forces. 

The French vehicle industry was 
using microchips more than its 
British and West German rivals. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PBCESATHISS. 

.A.- US DOHA* CASH . S10.13 

B; MJUlQJH!ENCy CASH , 5 975 
C DOLLAR BOMS 51051 

Di MLITCLSKNCY 3CN3S SIMM 

Ei SIHUNG ASSETS £1021 

FOfiSGK & C0LONAL 
, MANAGEMSVT (JERSEY) UMTTH2 
'■14 MJjCASTR SIREE(5T>BJBUSSEY£1 
TB_- 053427351 THEC 4192043 

‘ FOB OmBF&C FUNDS. SEE 
• INTERNATIONAL fWMDS JJST 


Notice To Commodity investors: 


Tawir*] 


Rudolf Wolff has developed considerable 
expertise in money management and is 
able to offer proven programs for qualified 
investors who do not have the time or 
expertise to manage their own investments. 

Minltmm initial investment $10(VM& 

Rudolf WtalH, eotabtehed in 1BSB, Is a member of tto NOttfMa group of 
companies, a mining and resource group with a not worth of S27 bHHon. 


AlduH Worn Future* Inc. « m m m m m m wit 
295 Madison Avenue, New Ybrk, NY 10017 UAA. I 
Phone (212) 5730440 Telex ITT 423840 I 

Aim: William Rafter, , ■ 


INCREASE 

YOUR 

WORKING 

CAPITAL 

100 % 


RECEIVE 
EARNINGS OF 

280 % 

ON CASH 
INVESTED 


TERMINATION 
PERIOD 
15TH YEAR 



grow to between 55 IxDion and 60 
billion DM. 

Herbert Wolf, chief economist at 
Commerzbank AG, takes a mpre 
optimistic view. “We expect the 
trade surplus to increase by some 
10 biDioii DM in 1985, to around 
65 hfllian DM, and the enrrent- 
account surplus to grow by 8 bil- 
lion DM, to about 25 billion DM.” 

But Mr. Wdf noted that the De- 
cember trade-surplus figure, 're- 
ported by the statistics office Mon- 
day to be a provisional 6.1 billion 
DM, was down from the record 7 
billion DM surplus reported in No- 
vember. 

Exports, which are projected to 
grow between 6 percent and 7 per- 
cent this year, are s een in combina- 
tion with capital investment as pro- / 
viding the chief impulses to, a » 
projected 2J5 lo 3 percent rise! in : 
West German gross national prod-. 
uct for 1 985. The economy grew 2.6/ 
percent Iasi year, double the rate in 
1983. 






a|c Containers are high earning, 
frilly insured, tangible assets 
with a 15 year working life. • 

* The Transco Group is the 
world’s leader in producing the 
highest annual rental return 
with the lowest commercial risk. 
$ 2000 serious investors have 
already purchased containers 
worth over US$35 million 
which are managed by the 
Transco Group. 

$ These serious investors 
enjoy a secure US DOLLAR 
income from participation in 
international trade. 

* DO NOT MISS THIS 
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
TO ADD CONTAINERS TO 
YOUR INVESTMENT 
PORTFOLIO. 

& Forfeit details, without 
obligation, fill in our coupon 
today. 

TRANS 

CONTAINER 

AG 

GeUertstrasselQ, 

CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. 
Tel: (061) 42^3.77 
Telex: 64446 taco ch 
MMMUM USS 12 A 00 INVESTMENT 


GUARANTEED 




A 



To: Trans Container Marketing AG 
GeHertstrasse 18, CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. 
Please send roe full details without obligation. 


Please send 
a detailed 
Rudolf Wolff 

Information Kit. 


NAME: . — 



BIOCK CAPITALS 

ADDRESS; 

* ' 









-fcKMUNfc | 

M£: OFFICE: htJ 




J 







I 




PageS 


NYSE Most Actives | 


VOL HfRft Low Lost 0*9 


PWtPet 

AT&T 

IBM 

MsrLvn 

SmithCs 

CMcn> 

Exxon 

PhibrS 

ABdat 

FBftlM 

irdHarv 

TtxOGs 

FedExp 

Sears 

EsKod 


37518 47* 
27057 21% 

19340 13SV. 

1W4? mi 

163*9 id* 

lira 44to 

13B87 46 V. 

13298 39* 

12177 W 
12358 49* 

11675 10% 

into i« 

10025 3M 
10811 36% 

1QS43 74* 


4Mb 

21% 

133% 

33% 

18% 

42% 

45 

38% 

65 

48 

10% 

18 


35% 

73% 


47 —1% 

21% -% 
1349b +Hb 
33 — Mr 

18% 

42% — % 
«»* — % 
39% + % 
65% -8 
48% —1 
18% + * 
189* — % 
329b + % 
3534 + to 
739b + % 


Dow Jones Averages 


OMWgk LM La* Ohio 


IntfWV 127AM 129097 T 26424 1277J3 + 1J7 

Trans 606AO 6U37 60020 607.17 + 044 

UHr 14024 149.16 14741 14839 + 021 

Coma 51061 52130 51097 5102B + 062 


Composite 


Previous Todav 
High Lew Close JPJ*.. 
10260 102.01 10242 10X34 

Industrials 110K 1IM6 11BM I1U4 

T remap. 9051 98.11 9051 9076 

5267 5241 5265 S2A3 

105.90 10040 10079 10561 


Utilities 
PI nonce 


NYSE Diaries 


Close Pnnr. 


Advanced 

Declined 


Uncfwitoed 
Total Issua 


970 977 

677 616 

414 450 

2061 2043 

214 183 

6 1 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Jot- 25 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 22 
Jan. 21 


-Included In the sales Fleures 


Bit 5aks *ShVt 

207.127 55X573 2.910 

241J72 662286 BJM0 

S2&441 567640 7.078 

MUM 665679 1648 

234064 549612 5212 


MSE 


VOL at 3 PAL 


IWi&NiOOO 

101660^880 


Pnv.3PJH.vol.. 

Prev consolidated dose 151678410 


Tables In dude Hie nationwide trices 
on ta Hu dosing on Won Street 



Composite 

Induslriall 
Pi nance 
Insurer! te 
Ulilllles 
Bants 
Tronso. 


week Year 
aou Noon am 

274JM 775J7 26105 
2«4J7 295.90 7B0.9S 
118.95 - 31US 
mn - J»-97 

2*460 - JO-? 
24539 — 239.19 

260.71 — 250-10 


AM 

27118 

31116 

2B3JO 

25262 

76587 

210.95 

26178 


Standard & Poor f s Index 


Induslrlab 

Tranm. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


Previous TkW 
him Low Close 3 PM. 
iwjrr 197.64 19B55 19112 

15664 15566 156.16 15615 

7AM 7565 7613 '6H 

a3 am 

177JS 17*64 177J5 177J3 


BAT 

WOnoB 

GIICdB 

HouOT 

TIE 

Amdotil 

Defined 

FIMIIG 

FmtNd 

MfgRtwt 

EchoBO 

trtstSv 


VOL 

Hlflta 

LO* 

Lori 

ana 

9174 

4% 

6 

4% 

+% • 

8583 

29% 

28* 

28* 



2906 

19 

12* 

12* 

+ 

* 

9669 

4* 

4% 

4* 



2226 

7* 

7H 

7* 

+ 

% 

1966 

16U 

15* 

IS* 

— 

* 

ins 

3% 

2* 

3% 

+ 

* 

1619 

8% 

7* 

8 

_ 

* 

1493 

ID* 

10* 

W» 

+ 

* 

1317 

3* 

3* 

3* 



1285 

8* 

■ 

8% 

+ 

% 

1263 

2* 

2* 

2* 

+ 

% 



| Hmn tnnes Bond Averages 


> s. ■ • 
jLv 

•" \ \ ^ •* 


- -je 


DKi. YM. PE 


OioLGrtn 


48 


£3 16 
12 


23% 16% AAR 
27% 9% A 05 

209* 129* AMCA 160 74 

T7% 13% AMF 60 12 

51% 49% AMF pf SJBOo 98 

39% 24% AMR 

20% 18% AMR pf 118 ll.T 

» 27% AMR pf 2.12s 56 

2SU 22% AN Rot 247 108 

14% 8% APL 
699* 44% ASA ISO 62 

2Mb 16 AVX 62 U 11 

48% 36% AMLob 1J0 24 14 .... 

24% 16% ACcaWdl 44 1J 20 1330 


261 
34 
17 210 
4 

9 4743 
11 
Ufi 
1 

3 35 

90S 


95X 20% 2Mt 20% + 9fc 


413 


11 

62b 12 12 BV 
XllelZJ U2 

62 16 9 84 

Alt LI 21 386 

14 2678 

.12 18 181 
13 69 

£64 <7 33 3909 
5670184 292 

180 36 14 1372 
28 111 
26 11 77V 

24 13 151 
17 


180 


297 

2 

58 


26% 12% AaiteC 
12% 8% AcmeE 
17% 15 Ada Ex 
U% 11% AdmMI 
19% «b AdvSn 
41% 25% AMD 
12% 6% Advert 
U% 8% An-flex 
39% 27% AetnU 
58% 52% Aen.pt 
33% 15% Ahmnx 
«b 2% Alleen 
43% 3*% AlrPrd 

27% 13 AlrbFrt 

2 % AiMoae 

31% 26% AlaP PtA 362 1Z7 
7% * AlaP dpi 67 12.0 

72% 61% AlaP pi 9J» 124 

66 56 AtaPaf BJBJX7 

13% 104b A lame 9 “ 

16% 9% AIsfcAIr 
ZB* 15% Alberto 
29% 22% AibfJRJ 
3Bfc 23% Atom 

35% 27% AtCDSW ._ .. . 

26% 17 AlexAlx 160 36 B02x 26% 25% 26 + % 
28% Iff* Atonfr 25 1363 22% 22% 224b— % 

H7% 624b AlloCp 2661 24 8 57 W* 78% 79% +1% 

26% 23 AleCppf 266 116 46 26% 25% 26 + % 

31% 18% A/pint 140 58 28 195 27 26% 26% + % 

224b 15% Alain pf 2.19 118 21 18% 18% 18%— % 

939b 01 AJ8lPfClM5 112 31 92% *2% 92%- % 

30 249b AUgPw 2J70 98 ■ 813 29* 28* 29% + to 

24 15% AltanG 40b 11 11 146 19% 18% 19% + % 

37% 28% AlldCPE 180 46 8 3371 

63 53% AMCppf 684 11.1 4* 

23% Hito AlldPd 47 

36% 30 AlklStr 260 36 8 953 

16% 5% AltlsCh 104 

39% 24 AllsCpi 2 

a6% 20 ALLTL 164 76 9 242 

33% 27 ALLTpt 2JM 6.1 1 

27 20% AiphPr 40o 1.9 IS 2 

WJ 35% Alcoa 180 

27% 15% Amax 


.92 
.14 
64 
48 

188 36 12 3673 
180 34 12 75 


7.1 8 

6 9 
28 IV 
25 12 


169b 16% 16% 4* Vb 
13% 13 11% + 9b 

15% 15% 15% 

51 51 51 

39% 38% 38% — % 
19% 19% 19% 

29 38% 38% 

24% 24% 24% + % 
10* TO* 10* + to 
48% 47% 489* + 9b 
18% 16% 18% + 9b 
46 45% 45%+ % 

25% 24% 25% + % 
18% 18% 18% + % 
9% 9% 9* + % 
16% 16% 16% + % 
IB 17% 18 +1 

13% 13% 13% + % 
35% 34% 34% — % 
10 % 10 % 10 % — % 
139b 13% 13% 

39% 39 39% + % 

55% 55% 55% — % 
31% 30% 31%+ 9b 
2% 2% 294- % 

489b 479b 48% + 9b 
22 % 21 % 22 % + % 
1 % 1 % 1 % 

30% 30% 30% + % 
79b 7% 7%- % 
302 719b 71% 71% 

1th 66 65 65 — 1 

20 13 12% 127b— % 

499 169* 16% 16% + % 
30 23% 23% 23%— 9b 
316 28% 27% 27%— % 
31% 30% 30% — % 
33% 33% 33%— % 


43% 32% Amax pi 3J» 

34% 22% ArnHaa l.W 
144 98% A Unapt 380 

2% 1% AmAer 
19% 14% ABokr 
65% 52* A Brand 175 56 
27% 34% A Bed Pf 285 104 


38% 36% 37%—% 
60% 60 60% + % 
19% 19% 191* — K 
52% 52% 529b— % 
7% 7% 7% + 1* 

28% 28% 28%- % 
26% 25% 26% + % 
34 34 34 + % 

21% 21% 21% 

11 12 2754X 39% 37% 389b— % 
18 <07 17% 17% 179* — % 


14 


f 2560 


33% 32% 33% + to 
.. 26% 241* 34%— to 
5 105% 10394 105 + % 

944 2% 2 2%— % 

202 19% 19 19 

626 64% 63% 64%+ % 
22 36% 26% 26% + 16 


77% 3D% ABdCSt 140 28 1012977 68 65 *5% —3 

254b 19% ABWM J» M 15 88 353fe 25 25 

23*1 17% ABusPr 56 £5 13 2 229* 22% 229b + % 

54 40% AmCon 2.90 38 U 2295 55% 54 54% + % 

34% 21% AConpf 280 126 7 23% 23% 23%— % 

47% 36 ACmpf 363 &3 137 48 47 48 +1 

10V 103 ACon pf 1175 126 1 107% 107% 107% — <6 

19% 16% ACapBd 220 114 123 19% 1916 19% — % 

33% 2S% ACoaCv 6860218 63 30 29% 30 + % 

13% 6% ACentC 3 106 8% 8 8% + to 

55 42% ACvan 1.90 38 12 1540 55% 54 SB + % 

29% 18% AOT 82 38 24 359 24% 23% 34%— % 

21% 15% AElPw 22601011 8 2222 21% 20% 21 — % 

188 12 15 8519 41% 39% 40*— % 

44ta 28 13 581 2716 26 26 —1% 

80 38 io am 

376 
S 
3 


41% 25 Am Exp 
28% 13% A Fan 11 
38% 19% AGnCp 
9% 5% AGnlwt 
57 51% AGnlpfA *81*118 

7716 57% AOnl pf B 3.95a 78 


58 


1 

3457 
14 13 8 




13 


61 43% AGfl iPf 385 

57% 39% AGnpfD 244 
31% 25% AHertt 168 
14% 7% AHalSt 
55% 46% AHMIMt 244 
147% 210% AH me Pf 260 
39% 26% AHaap 1.12 

J 63* Amilcfi 660 
SB* AinGra 44 
112% AIQppf 569 
28% 18% AMI 82 
7% 3% AmMot 
44% 27% ANtRSS 282 54 8 
38% 22% APreatd 841 26 5 
139* 9 ASLPta 8 

10 ,5 

229* Amatd 140 

26% AmStor 44 
AStrpfA4J8 
AStrpfB 660 128 
14% AT&T 180 54 14261 
30% AT&T pf 344 186 64 

31% AT&T Of 174 98 
27% AWntr 260 48 
2016 AmHotl 248 98 
53% ATrPr 585o 11 
4% ATrSc 

58% ATrUn 585e 78 
»% 26% Ameren 140 58 
ai% 17 AlHHDl 80 - 

85 60 Amespf 582 

29% 21% Arnett* 40 
30 18% ARtfoc 

18 10% Amfmc 

38% 26% AMP ■ 31 

2* 14% Ampco 80 

21% 129* Amreoj 
26% 19 AmStn 
37% 259b Amsfed 
M* 1% Anocmp 
* 199* Analog ■ 

33% 19% Anchor 
36% 2*% AnCJov 
11% 9% AndrOr 
23% 16% Angelic 

78% 53% Antvuj 

57% 44 Anheupf 340 64 14] 

22% 13% Anlxtr 88 18 23 190 

29% 13% Ante 2 

15% 89* Anthem 64 J 15 12*8 
16 1M Anthnv 44b 38 7 51 

149* 9% Apodte 88 V TO 
4 % AnchPwt 

20% 15% ApchP im2JXta1! J 
60 SO APPwpf 740 136 

24% 21 AePwpf 245 116 

31% 2716 ApPw pf 4.18 134 
339* 1796 ApIDtO 1-129 34 20 
22 ■ AppIMb 1.14tl06163 

23% 15% ArchOn .14b J 14 1550 
229* 14% ArtzPS 240 116 
91% 71 ArlPnf 1046el14 

29 23 ArIPpf 158 1Z1 

95% 79 ArfPpf 1080 126 

239* 19% Ark But 40 1.V 

27 \16 Arkla 168 68 


27% 27% 27% 

9% 9% 9%+ % 
53» 53% 531* 

75% 75% 75% 

59% 59% 59% — % 
5* S% 55% 

31% 31% 31% 

10% 10 IBKi + % 
45 11 2650 54% 53% 54% +1 
8 1 242% 24216 342% 

bib mmmt 

4 14 6S7 72 71% 71% + 16 

48 4 125 123% 125 

12 U 3772 22% 21% 22% 

1316 4% 4 

54 • 10SS 43% 39% 

26 5 857 37% 16% 

B 68 13% 13% .... 

ss % w=a 

.... 49% S?¥ S +1 
61% 61% 61% + % 
53% 53% 53%+ U 
21% 21% 21%- % 


.+ M 


—2% 
+ % 


^ elm 


8 16 
61 

26 15 


190 

29 

119 

SO 

9 

512 

2 

* 

.22? 


r&FzB 

65% 65% A5% + % 
0% 8% 8% — % 
74% 74% 74% + % 
30% 30% 30% — % 
30% 30% 30%—% 


86% Bi% +1% 


29% 2M* 28%— V* 


140 

140 


7 

5.1 8 
48 12 


19 

148 65 19 
182 38 17 
15 23 
27 12 


2979 


80 

86 

360 


in 

214 

17 

821 


24% 24% 34% 

„ 13% «% 13% 

26 19 1869 36% 36% 36%- % 

17 SO 49 10 17% 10 + % 

14% 14% 14% 

27% 26% 27%+ % 
37 36% 36% + % 

3% 2% 316— % 
27 26 26%+ % 

22% 22% 229*— % 
36% 35% 35%—% 
10 % 10 % 10 %— % 
_ ... 20% 19% 2SS% + % 

27 10 1507 74% 73% 73%—)% 
‘ 55% 54% 54% — % 

19 18% 18% — % 

14% 14% 1«%— % 
15 14% M%— % 

13% 13% 1M+ % 
lOJjji 10% 10(6 

17 16% 17 

lHh 57 57 57 +16 

4 24 24 34 — % 

2 31% 3116 33% 

229 33% 32% 33 + % 

204 11% 11 11% + % 

20% 19% 20% + % 
7 1132 22% 22 22% + % 

32002 90 90 S® +8 

2S 29% 29 29% + Vb 

7TU aavi 87% S7%— % 


40 

329 


1% ' % ArlnRf 
13% 9% Armada 
22 V Armcc 
31% 18 Armcpf 2.10 
22% 15% AnttlRS 


923 
140 
27 1 

10M 
95 22 

2.1 9 259 


36% 2216 Arm Win 180 13 10 
29 18% AroCp 180 61 9 

26% 13% ArowE 80 1.1 8 

22 16 ArtTO 82 18 

22% 14 Arvtare 9 

S3 34% Arvtnpf 260 37 
34% 17% Asarca 
79 an* Ash ion ijo 54 

40% 33% AshUpf 480 114 
45% 31% AshiO pf 3.M 108 
61% 45% ASdDG 240 44 9 
25% 18% AIMone 140 7.1 18 
25 19% AtCYEI 248 161 


52% 40% ATI Rich 360 
36% 32% AtIRepf 375 
125 97 AHRcof 260 

20 11% AftdSCp _ 

39% 18% Aueot 82 
43% 29% AutoDt 42 
50% 24 AvcoCp 
99% 52 AVCSPf 
23% 15% AVCMC 40 
35% 23 Avery M 
15 10 Avfolln 

41 27 Avne! 

26 1916 Avon 

39% 18 Avdm 


20 % 20 20 % + % 
17% 1716 17% + % 
% 

12% 12% 12%— % 
11 % 12 % 11 
22 21% Zl%- % 

23% 22% 23%+ % 
36% 36% 36% 

2916 27% 2916+1% 
18 17% 17% + % 

18% IB 18 
22% 22% Z%+ lb 
53% 53% 53%+ % 
20 19% 19% + % 
Z7% 27% 27%+ 16 
39% 39% 39%— M 
37% 37% 37% 

... 96% 56% 56% + % 
37X 22% 221* 22% 

190 24% 24% 24% — % 


69 17 6223 44V* 40% 43% — I 


93 

27 


7103 38 
4 IK 


18 15 
14 19 
10 


80 

260 


28 13 
17 IS 
7 

14 16 1447 
-98 10 2126 
11 214 


37 

104 


38 

104 


+2 

-a% 


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Stocks Mixed in N.Y. Trading 


Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — Tbc stock market turned 
mixed late Monday, after blue chips backed 
away from aL-time ’highs. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 
1.77 io 1 J7419 about an hour before closing. 

The Dow had been up more than 8 points and 
within striking distance of its all-time high of 
1 ,28720 before reversing direction. 

Advances led declines by a 3-2 ratio among 


Although prices in tables on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. dose in Sew York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 


reasons 

P.M. 


the 2.002 issues crossing the New York Stock 
Exchange tape. 

The Eve-hour Big Board volume amounted to 
about 109.85 million shares, compared with 
101 36 miliu m in the like period Friday. 

Prices were higher in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

Analysts said some corrections could be ex- 
pected along the way as the stock market drove 
higher on an improved economic outiook. 

The Dow had gained 48.70 last week and 
more than 90 points in the past three weeks. 

John Smith of Fahnestock & Co. said a gener- 
al feeling of confidence was driving the stock 
market higher. 

“Confidence is the most important ingredient 
in a market such as this, as long as you have 
confidence and enough funds they'll be in here 
buying stocks," he said. 

Mr. Smith said pessimistic economic fore- 
casts late last year deterred investors, and now 


with the outlook for a growing economy funds 
are finding their way into the stock market. 

He said the stock market also was enjoying 
the benefit of international interest. “Important 
money has no other place to go,” Smith said. 

He said the rally would continue for a long 
time “and whatever corrections you get will be 
minor." 

Hildegard Zagorski of Prudential Bache said 
the strength of the stock market has been due to 
the end of fears which surfaced late last year 
that the economy was about to slip into a 
recession. 

She said if oil prices slm further in the spring, 
the positive effect on inflation will be another 
shot in the arm for the stock market. 

At an OPEC meeting in Geneva on Monday, 
there woe new signs of disarray when the Unit- 
ed Arab Emirates oil minister briefly left the 
session complaining about the actions of Nige- 
ria. 

Last October, Nigeria dropped its prices to 
match cuts by non-OPEC Britain and Norway. 

After the stock market closed Friday, Salo- 
mon Brothers economist Hairy Kaufman said 
the Federal Reserve may cut the discount rate 
from its present 8-percent leveL 

He said last week's report of a drop in the 
money supply indicated the strong money 
growth seen in December had slackened. 

On the trading floor, AT&T was near the top 
of the active list and off a fraction. AT&T 
reported earnings of 34 cents per share for the 
fourth quarter and SI25 per share for the full 
year. 

General Motors was up a fraction at midday, 
while Ford and Chrysler moved Iowa. 


12 Month 

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35% 26 
37 33 

27 10% 

19 12* 

24* 11* 
22% 11* 
29% 19% 
23* 16% 
14* 10* 
74 59% 

36% 29% 
36% 21* 
SI* 39% 
1% 4% 
40% 27 
<8* 38% 
29% 16% 
23 15% 

23% 19% 
50 34% 

38* 27* 
51% 43 
<3% SO 
36% 18% 
29% 12% 
88% 61% 
10% 8% 
48% 30% 
46% 27% 


Cptvsn 

CanAax 87 11 
Coralr 84b 1.1 
CwuiEx U2 89 
CftoNG 240 94 
Cannae 40 23 
ConxEd 240 &A 
ConCpf 445 11.1 
ConE Pt SJ» 114 
ConsFd 144 44 
ConPpf 632n 88 
CnxFrts 180 38 
CnxNG 232 54 
ConsPw 

CnPpfB 440 1U 
CnPpfD 745 174 
CnPpfB 732 114 
CnPpfG 7J6 184 
OlPprV 440 189 
CnPprU 340 19.7 
OlPprT 3J7B 189 
CnP pfH 748 184 
CnFprR 480 208 
CnPprP 398 188 
CnPprN 385 179 
CilP PTM 248 179 
CnPprL 281 188 
CnPprS 480 198 
OiPprK 243 108 
CnttCo 240 69 


17 2110 42* 
M 6CS 28 

12 667 22 

7 5 17% 

9 49 25% 

6 164 14 

7 3666 30% 

1502 42 
5 43% 
10 1332 32 
94 54 

13 BOA 33% 

■ 131 41% 
5 2630 6% 

lOQx 25 
1445Hz 44% 
940z 42% 
VVBz <2 
136 23% 
MO T9 
m 20 
lOOz 41% 
106 21% 
117 22% 
130 21* 
S 14* 
57 12% 


Conti II 

Contllrl 

Cntlll pf 

CtllHdn 

ConfTet 

CtOotn 

CnDf pf 

CMiwd 

vlCookU 

Coepr 


182 78 
32 28 
440 121 
180 34 


42% 42*+ * 
77* 27*— % 
21 % 21 *— % 
17% 17*— % 
25% 23% — % 
13% 13* + % 

a a — % 

41% 42 + % 

43% 43% 

21% 31* + * 
56 56 + % 

32 33% +1* 

41% 41*—* 
5* 5*—* 
25 25 — 1 

40 42* + * 

42 42%+ % 

40% 42 +1% 
22% 23%—* 
Iff* Iff* 

19% 20 
41% 41% — 1 
20 20 — 1* 
21% 21*— * 
21% 21%—* 
14 14 — % 

11* 12*—* 
30% 30*— 1% 
13* 13%—* 
_ 37% 37% + * 

a* a% ■%— % 
_. 2* a* 3* + u 

41 41% 40% 40*+* 
1407 1% no i*— % 

9 1220 23* 23* 23%—* 
14 20« 36* 36 36*—* 


103 21% 


1654 


13* 


180 


48 

COOPlPf 290 u 
CoopLb JOB 8 
CoprTr JO 21 
Ooopvtx AO 21 
COpntd 88 39 
Cpwtdpf 248 118 
Centura 84 38 
Coraln 86 48 
CornG 246 38 
CdmGwl 
CorBlk 180 38 
CaxCm 84 4 

Craig 

cram 140b 48 
CravRx 

CrocXN AO 14 
CrckNpf 218 114 
CnnpK 180 58 
CrvmCk 

CntZai 180 29 
CrZotpf 483 94 
CrZel pfC450 78 
Cutbra 40 15 
Cidlmtx 

CumEn 380 25 
Currlnc 1.100104 
CurtW 180 38 
Cvdapx 1.10 23 


12 



ytn] 

29 

m 

16 

396 32* 

21* 


SD 34* 


a 

352 14* 

rCrl 

8 

36 18* 

18* 

U 

008 19% 

ly* 

12 

80 15% 

14* 


20 22* 

, j 

15 

67 21* 


12 



« 


*/■ - I 


■IJ 

pjH 


39 
l* + 




18 


.. _. 37 + % 

— 40 36% a +1* 
532 55% S3* 55% +1% 
46 8 7* t +% 

31 326 33* 33 33% + Vi 

72 3744 71* 69% 71 +3* 

346 2SU 29% 25% 

46 1>% 10% 16% 

18 57 22 31* 22 + % 

14 317 SO 48* 49% — « 

13 548 35 34* 34* + % 

34 48* 48 48* + % 

9 57% 57% 57% + % 

7 V 34% 24% 34% — * 

42 2267 29* 28 38* + * 

S 8M 87% 85 87% +3% 

21 10% »% 10% 

10 31 33* 3Z* 37% — % 

12 53V 47 45% 47 +1 


22* 

19% 


7* 

15 

87* 

69% 

25% 

12% 

18* 

37% 

16% 

57* 

HO 

29* 

36% 

22* 

45% 

8% 

62* 

2S 

36% 

16* 

69% 

57% 

56% 

34% 

2S% 

35* 

24% 

33% 

36* 

36% 

30% 


-18b 18 
486 49 


80 18 
84 18 
84 20 


113 111 
385 128 
148 111 


IT* 

23* 

U 

25 

37* 

22* 

38% 

saw 

59 

no 

n% 

40 

6* 

16* 

30* 

23% 

son 

38% 

«% 

33% 

51* 

14* 

33% 

W* 

43% 

51% 

34% 

44 

30* 

76% 

70 

67% 


33* 

101% 

72 

16* 

16% 

14* 

15% 

16% 

17* 

18% 

34* 


13* Dalkn 40 27 
9U DamanC 80 18 
21% Dana Co 188 44 
5* Danaftr 
8% Daniel 
66* DcrtKr 
39 DofoCn 
13% Datont 
B* DiaDxg 
13% DOYCO 
26% DaytHd 
11* DaytPL 200 125 

45 DPLpf 787 128 
OPLPl 1250 123 

20% DaanF X 48 19 
24* Deem 190 3.1 
17% DeimP 1.93 9.1 

37 DetfaAr 40 14 
4% Del tone 

35% DIxO* 186 38 
17* DanMfx 180 68 
26% DaSafo 140 19 
11% ObtEd 148 114 
59 DeTEpf 942 112 

46 D«fE pi 7^5 113 
45% DME Pf 786 111 
IV* DEpfF 275 118 
20 DEnrR 124 111 
19* DC pfQ 113 134 
19 DEPfP 
19% DE pfB 
19* DEpfO 
19% DE PtM 342 110 
24% DE PrL 440 138 
24% DE pTK 4-12 1U 
13% DetEpr 228 129 
17* Dexter 40 38 
V* DIGtar 44 4.5 

17 DIG* pf 80 16 
21* DIGIopf 285 68 
16* DtomS 186 94 
34* DIaSh pf 4J» 114 
aau. DtoMd 180 18 
43% DtoUdwl 
77% Dlaitai 
45% DUnav 
30 DEI 
3* Dlvraln 
6* Domug 

20* DORlRS 

16 Oonckd 
32 Dan toy 
ZJ% Doragy 

26% Dover 

35* DowOl 

35% DOW Jo 

IKk Drove 
15% Orw 
14* OrexB 
23% DreyftM 

42* duPont 

30* duPntPf 380 104 
39 tfuffMpf 450 HL3 
22% DukeP 246 68 
64 DuhtPf 880 118 
$9% Dukgpf 880 114 
57 Dukgpf 780 118 
21* Dukgpf 249 105 

38 Dukgpf 185 118 

8*% Duka pf 1TJJ0 U8 
51% DunBrd 148 24 
11% DuqLf 20A 117 
14 Dm pfA 210 124 
11% Dot pf 187 134 
13% Dot pf 200 111 
12* Dua PNC 210 129 
13* Dwpr 231 138 
_8% DvcoPt 46 27 
17% DynAm 40 8 


138 


180 

240 


M 

273 94 
46 34 
180 20 
180 64 
42 20 
180 61 
88 18 
SO 62 
80 61 
200 164 

J0g 18 

300 19 


11 310 H% 32% 2Z% + % 
53 103 T1* 11* II*— % 

9 1170 29* 26* 28% — * 
101 7% 7% 7% 

420 13* 13* 13*+ % 
M 10B1 87 85% 86* + * 

20 3365 71* 68* 70 +1% 
19 5562 20* 19* 2D* + * 

11 196 II 18% 11 + % 

7 Mix it* M* It* 

14 1521 36* 35* 36* + % 
7 650 16% 15* 16 + % 

1470* 57% 56* 57% + * 
70x102 99 102 —1 

14 336 2t 25% 25*— * 
31 2910 37* 32* 32*— * 
• 756 21* 21% 21%— % 
7 3600 44% 43* 44% 

77 6% 5* 5% 

16 298 62* 62% 62* 

12 105 27% 37% 27* + * 

10 39 36% 35* 35* + % 
7 1049 IS* 15% 15* 

1140* 70% <8* 70% +1 
BOOx Si 56 56 — % 

501 56 56 St — % 

34 * 24 * 24*— * 
25* 24% 24* 

24% 23% 24% 

24* 23% 21% — * 
23 22* 21 + * 

26 26 26 
26* 26% 26* + % 
30% 25% S0» + Kb 
31 30% 31 + % 

17% 17* 17% — % 
71% 30* 71%+ % 
V4* 14* 14*— * 

lOOOz 24* 24* 24* 

S 27% 27% 27% 

11 1819 18* M* 18* 

27 36* 36 36* + * 

12 433 62* 61 61 + * 

2 55% SS 55% +2 

14 250? 120*118*119% + % 
36 617 m% 6V* 69* + % 

5 35 37% 37 37%+ % 

. 4% 4* 

7* 7 7*+ % 

29* 28* 36% — * 
19* Iff* TV* 

SO 49* 50 + % 

38* 20 28* + * 

40* 39* 40%+ * 
30% 29% 29* 

44* 43% 44* +1 

im n 12 

19* 19% 19% 

16* 10% IB%— * 
43% 43% 43* + % 
a w. 51% 50* 5D*+ % 

8 33* 33% 33* + % 

, 7 £3% 43% 43% + % 

7 12» 39* 2ff% 29% + % 

1770Z 75 74% 74% — % 

MO* i9% 69% 69%— % 

4500Z 67* 67* 67*+ % 

M 25% 33% 23%+ % 

1 1 .37* 31* 3Z* + % 
ran«ziD3% ioi im + % 

23 1373 72* 71* 72% +1 

6 631 15* 14* 15 + % 

100* 17 IT IT + * 

300x 13* 13* 13* + * 

15Bz 14% 14% 14% 

l it* it* + % 

_ 6502 17 It* 16*— tt 

74 |0% ig% id* + * 

29 2M. 24* 24*— * 


66 4* 


8 3507 

9 SS 

15 SO 
12 19 

14 32 

11 3446 
23 719 

345 
It 836 
77 

12 lit 


13 


37* 

30% 

26* 

21 

7* 

4* 

1* 

II 

IS 

18 

28* 

18 

78 

57* 

38* 

30* 

41 

18* 

29% 

22* 

29* 

28% 

14* 

14* 

7* 

6% 

10* 

24% 

16% 

11* 

77% 

11* 

23* 

31% 

19* 


5 

B* 


am EGG 81 18 

71* ESvxt JO 1J 

20% EeuleP 186 3 3 

13 Eoxco M 28 

3% Eon Air 
1* EALwtO 
% EALwtA 
6* ExAIrpf 
6* E Air pfH 
9* EAlrpfC 
19* EflstGF 
12% EOttlfll 
10* Extend 
37* Eaton 
20* ECfiHn 
20* EOumt 
33% EdHBr 

13 EDO 

18% Edward ... _ 
19* EPG6M 385 108 
25% EPG Pf 175 112 
23* EPCpt 
9 Err ora 
0% Ekor Jt IS 
2% EMMAS 
4* EMM 

7* EMMpf 140 10,1 
13 EldSPi 88 J 
II* Elgin 80 53 
5* Ettdnt 

58% EmrxEl UO 38 
5* EmRdx Ml 73 
11* EmrvA 80 24 
24% Emhart 18b* 
14* ErnoOs 1J6 98 
3* Emppf 87 108 
4 Emppf 80 103 
7 Emppf .91 108 


1JB 5.1 
1.94 118 
U09 43 
180 10 
36 28 
180 33 
140 44 
84 U 
80 2.7 


21 4M 37* 
15 715 30* 
9 119 24* 

2583 T 

JS ^ 

129 13* 

«n 15 * 

114 lt% 
IS 615 25* 

6 <2x 17* 
1510543 74* 

10 B2 59* 
M 402 30* 

m im m 

■ 13 36* 

13 1307 17* 
28 2334 30* 
331 2J% 
6 23% 

M 22S If* 
iS T* 

17 422 t% 

. n * 

28 180 24* 
If 55 15% 
33 371 ff* 
IS 1M9 71* 
IS 3794 13* 

11 IffTJx mg 

9 291 30% 

7 123 19% 

600t 4% 
2O0C 4* 
1007 B* 


M* 36*— 1% 
29% 29%-* 
26 26*+ U 

18% 18* + % 
4 4* 

3% 2* 

* * 

13 13* + * 

14% 14*— % 
16* 16% + * 
26* 25*— % 
16* 17 - 16 
73% 73*+ % 
57* 59% +1* 
29* 30* +1 
30 30M+ * 

36* 36*- % 
It* 17*— % 
29* 30 + * 
22% 23% + * 
28% 28% — * 
28 SB* + * 
12* II + % 
10 10* + * 
2* 4 + * 

5* 6 + % 
9% 9*+ * 
24 24% + % 

14* 15* + * 
7* 7*— * 
75% 35*— * 
II* irk + % 
IV 19*+ * 
30% X*— % 
19% 19% + * 
4% 4% 

4*+ % 
B* B* + * 


% 

35% 

»% 

25* 

103 


107 

3* 

21* 

20 

21* 

25* 

5* 

17* 

38% 

14* 

14% 

17% 

22* 

31* 

37* 

V* 

10* 

14% 

41* 

16* 

48% 


% Endue 

22* EnoiCp 32 23 
18* EnhBu 86 1.7 
17% Eraorch 140 64 
97 enxch pf1032 103 
51% Enschpf 635e1i4 
91* Emenpfl I33»ii4 
1% Enxrca 
9% Enfora 

16% EntxE n 185a 69 
16 Entgxln 1J0 63 
23* Equifax 130 67 
3 Eaulmk 
11% Eamkpf 2J1 158 
28% EntRes 1.72 4.9 
9% Eaullc n 

8% Ertxuni 
12* ExsBxn 
15* EssexC 
20* Estrlng 
20 EHtVl 
3 EvanP 
Mb Evan of 140 208 
10% Evan Pi 2.1D 19.1 
30 ExCgto 140 19 
13* Exartar 181gll3 
36% Exxon 340 74 


1719 

17 1150 31* 
13 37 33* 

21 1553 25* 
14600x101 
IIDBX 54% 
ISO 99 
X 275 2% 

30 


% % 
30 31* 

33* 33* 
24% 251b 
101 10T 

54 54 


17 IB 
112 20 * 


29 35% 
51 4* 


.12 T.1 
J0e 18 
J9g 8 
JOb 3.9 
.72 13 

89 24 


22 15 
117 35* 


155 11* 
121 II* 


17 
47 20% 


5 
8 
17 
IT 

19 .. - 

10 470 23% 
738 36 
309 4 

103 7 

5 11 
Z14 41 
1 


10 


10 


16% 


713887 46* 


2 7 

9% 9* 
18 18 
20 * 20 * 
35% 35* 
4* 4* 

14* 14* 
35% 3SU. 
II* 11* 
13 13 

16* It* 
20 * 20 * 
21* 21* 
35* M * 
3* 4 

6* 7 

11 II 
40% 41 
16% 16% 
45 45* 


+1* 
- * 
— % 
+ * 
+ * 
— * 


+ % 
— % 


— * 
+ % 
— 1% 
+ U 
+ * 
+ % 


u 


— % 
— * 


11* 6* 
64* 41% 
79 51* 

4S* 35* 
22* 22% 
13* 9* 
14* 9% 
IB* IS 
38% 33* 
16* 9* 
31 16* 

19* 14* 
28* 14* 
12% 8% 
7 4* 

37* 29* 
45% 27* 
48% 40 
17 29% 

Zl* Iff* 
27 16* 

21* 16 
18% 13% 
56* 42* 
33* 22* 
38% 23* 
24% 4 

5* 3% 
48 14* 

9* 2% 
19% 15* 
26* 19 
31* 21* 
33 24% 

60 34* 

27 18* 

30* IJ« 
51 38% 

31 11* 

18% 10* 
47 30* 

X* 21 
13% 7* 

48* 11* 
7* 4% 
27% 20* 
29% 20 
20* 14* 
28% 16 
54* »* 
12% 8* 
32* »* 
47% 42% 
27% 14% 
36% 22* 
32* 23* 
12* IO* 

S i 19% 
1* 12% 


50 

198 

7 

391 

45 

60 

63 

867 

36 


Fay Dm 


FH tnd 6 

FMC £20 15 9 

FMCPf 225 2 3 

FPL Go 17i M f 

FPL Go wl 

FobCir 88 28 16 

Facet 

Folrtoto 80 48 9 

Falrcpf 380 9.9 

RrtrM .16 18 10 7X 

FamDJr 22 J 24 220 

Fanstln 80s 34 14 68 

Faroh 88 4J 8 37 

80 12 18 487 
II 185 
Fedtco 144 48 7 23* 

Fed Exp 2010825 

FdHmpf 1066 

PDMaa 182 61 11 84 

FedNM .16 .9 9334* 

FodPBs JO 34 7 617 

Fad Rif 144 68 13 148 

FdSgnl 80 48 19 109 

FgdDSt 240 44 9 371 

Forro 1.39 65 9 85 

Float 240 64 1 1 10 

F1nC«A JO 18 3442 

FlnCPPf 40 UJ 6 
FlnCppf 674*188 636 

FnSBor 173 

Flrcstn 80 63 10 1112 

FIAtlln 88 24 8 48 

FBkSvS 148 67 8 496 

FBkFla 180 48 10 20 

FBost 40a 18 11 357 

FstChlc 1J2 5J 21 728 

FfBTex JJ0 SJ ff 261 

FIBTx Pf 248e 58 20 

FICIty 13 365 

FFmJAr 899 

Flrttta 2J4 5.1 7 6983 

Pints! Pf 237 61 88 

FtMIXS 84 14 9 563 

FNStS 248 61 7 

FKJPa S 

FstPa Pt 262 98 


316 

603 

192 


FlUnRr 184 63 14 115 


58 

39 

47 

2C5 

202 

30 




FIVbBk 84 62 

FIWlsc 180 44 8 

Fixdib 180 2J 20 

FUJI Fa JS5e 4 

FlfFnGl 1J2 48 ■ 
FIlFpf 443*9.9 
FtoelEn 86 18 11 ... 

Ftomng 88 24 14 312 

FtoxIV 80 25 13 235 

Flgxlpf 141 138 

FliglSI 80 4 21 

16 722 
■16a 4 13 37 


FToalPt 

FiaEC 


16 

120 


23* 11* 
8% 3* 
19* 11% 
23* 14% 
54% 43* 
51* 33 
12% l> 


FlaSK 

FtwGen 

Ftowra 

Ruor 




II* 6* 
36 27 

11% 5% 
25* 13% 


M*»* 


29* 

34% 

34 


FtaPro 2.16 84 9 463 

“ " 40 25 13 95 

311 

40 21 19 452 

40 28800 Mil 

FaafeC 280 45 9 M 

FardM 2J10 61 3 IBM 

FtDoar 1J6 115 31 

FfHowd 144 24 15 
FastWi 44 38 14 
Faxsrp 48 7 A 14 ... 

Faxbm 184 35 61 406 

FMOG 2.13B23J 238 

M 38 14 6615 

40 18 


FrptMc 

Friotrn 


Fruoht s 40 28 7 10 


Fruhf pf 280 63 30 

W 417 


Fuqua 40 18 


B 7* 
63* 63 
78% 78% 
44* 44% 
22* 22* 
13* 12% 
13% 12* 
17 16* 

36* 36 
15% 15% 
31* 30* 
17* 17* 
20 % 20 % 
it* n% 

Mb 6* 
36* 36* 
33% 32 
45% 41'% 
37% 36* 
18% 17* 
71* 20* 
21* 21% 
16* 16* 
55% 54* 
26* 26* 
31* 30* 
ID* IO* 

5* 5% 
37* 35* 
4* 4 
19% 18* 
26 25* 

31* 31* 
29* 29% 
60* 59* 
25% 31* 
15% 14* 
42 41% 

17% 17 
17* 17% 

47 45% 

29* 29% 
10% 9* 

47* 46% 
6* 6% 
26* 26% 
29* 29% 
23 % 20 
27* 27 
36* 35* 
10 * 10 * 
32* 31* 
47 47 

20 27% 

36% 36 

32 31* 

12% 12% 
36* 36 
2B% 27 
37* 36* 
25 34* 

16* 16* 

5% 5* 
IS* 18% 

49% 48 

9% 9% 

wT" 

IV* 18* 

33 2* 

31% 31% 
34* 33* 


7*— % 
63*— * 
78% — % 


22* 

17* + * 
13 + % 

17 
36* 

15% + Vi 
30*— * 
17*+ % 
20* 

11*— * 
6* 

36*+ U 
32*+ * 
42 —3% 
17*+ * 

18 + U 

20% + * 
21% — % 
16* + * 
54*— * 
26%+ % 
31* 

10% — % 
5% 

37 + % 

4 — % 
Iff*— % 
25* 

31% 

29* + % 
60% + * 
24*+ * 
14*— % 
42 

17% — * 
17*— % 
46 —1 
29% — * 
9*— % 


47 


6* + * 
26* + % 
29% — M 
» 

27%+ % 
36*+ * 
10V. 

31* + * 
47 -¥2 

27*+ * 
36 + % 
31* 

12% — % 
36* + <4 
20 +1* 
37* 

25 + % 
16*— % 
5*+ Hi 
18* + to 

4M6+ W 
48% — 1 
11*— % 
64 +1* 

13* + * 
9*+ * 
29*—* 
9% — % 
18*— * 

ELM 

31%+ % 
34% + * 


G 


38* 

35 

36* 

3Mb 


10% 

13* 

64% 

39% 

25* 

22* 

10 

SJ% 

25 
30* 
20* 
68* 
39 
17% 
46* 
38% 
29* 
21 

78* 

64% 

59* 

31% 

23 

18* 

34* 

60 

85 

51% 

38% 

50* 

11 

11* 

67* 

10* 

51* 

12 
12% 
8% 

32% 

22* 

36 

36* 

33 

27* 

30% 

71 

25% 

62* 

63 

31* 

21 

ID* 

11* 

36% 

50% 

17* 

9* 

26 
13% 
5% 

Z7* 

36* 

29* 

19* 

33% 

44% 


IS GAF 
20 GAFpt 
35* GATX 
19% GCA 
48* GEICO 
4 GEO 
5* GFCp 
M* GTE 
31* GTE pf 
21% GTEpf 
IV* GTE Pf 
4* GalHou 
33* Gawlt 
17% GanSfr 
10% Gaartit 
13* Qglco 
51* GamCa 
30* OnCorp 
14* GAlnv 


■IOb A 
180 X4 
180 38 16 

48 14 11 


473 20* 
36 35% 


420 37% 
34W 29* 


27* 

34* 

36* 


3JB 78 
2150 64 
2JU 74 
248 114 


80 

’?? 

2983 44% 


38 + % 

35 + % 

37%+ * 
29 + * 
63*— % 
5*+ % 


1.4B U 21 
40 24 14 
•40 17 13 
34 U 14 
134 

140 44115 
I43P104 


63* 

5* 5% 

Mb 6% Mb 

43* 43*+ * 

3 SB* 38* 38*— * 
IS 26 25* 25* 

12* 22* 22*— * 
5% 5* 5* 

55* 54% 54*— * 
— 31* 25 + % 
10* 10* 

It* It* + % 
68 * 68 * 

37* 37*— 1 
IS* — % 


M 

49 

1321 


>10 25* 
118 10* 


. 14* 
14 68% 
194 38* 
173 17 



IJO 

£2 » 

S7 

KJ 

ai 

45* 


16* GCInmx 

40 

IJ 10 

502 


TJr 

re - 

* 

16* OCnpfs 

46 

14 

U 

re 


29% 


12% GnOotx 


.. P 

Mi 

18* 

DT 

18%- 

* 

42 GnDvn 

MO 

1 J 10 

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61 GMal 4J5r SJ 4 8966 84* 
33 GMEfl 
33* GMutPf ire 
44% GMotpf 540 


3* GNC 
7% GPU 
46* Gan Re 
5 GfiRetr 


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94 

98 

24 15 

2.1 34 
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1939 59% 
1 38% 
5 


50* 
134 t% 
1122 11% 


39* Gfl&Jgni 140 15 14 
9* GTFlpI 18S 114 


10 GTFlpI IJO 11.1 
5% Gonxoo 9 

13* GnRod .10 4 19 

IS Gens? a 140 
M GonPtx 142 39 14 
IB GoPoC 40 11 12 
30% GoPcpfC224 64 
27* GoPwpf 344 125 
25% GaPwpf 3J« 134 
17 GaPwpf 1ST 12J 
21% GaPwpf 2J5 118 
52 GaFWPf 740 >24 
51% GaPwpf 7J3 124 
20% GerbPs 1.16 44 10 
12 GorbS 3 .12 4 14 


7* Giant P 
5* GIWFn 
16* GJtfMHI 
42* Giuong 
11% GleaxC 
4% GlaUUW 


JO 11 if 
240 4J 11 


84 61 


14* 

18 

43* 

31% 

43% 

67% 

28% 

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15% 

28 

5 

19% 

12* 

9% 


26% 


27* 

35 

M% 

30 

13* 

50* 

29* 


17* GJobMpfMO 174 
0% GtdHue 
1* GUN wt 
11 GMWF 
24* Gdrlch 

23 Gaodvr 
13* GordnJ 

19 GauM 
36% Grace 
47 Gradncn' 

8* GfAFsf 
11* GtAtPc 
37% GfLkln 
15% GNIm 
31 GfNNk 
51% GfNNk Pf4JS 
16% GW Fin 
9% GWHsp 
11% CMP 
18* Gravh 
2* Cruller 
II* GrawG 
8% GrawG wl 
6* GrubEI 48 .9 12 

2T* Grumn IJJ0 34 7 

24% Grum pi 240 107 
4% Grunlaf .16 23 11 

14% Guandl J2 1J 13 

20 GuHfrd 48 3.9 8 

25% GlfWBt 40 24 10 

11% GutfRs 2 A J 

16% GulfRpf 1J0 64 

10 GirSIUf 144 114 6 

39 GtrSUaf 54*11.9 

24 GftSU or 112 

27 GHSU «r 440 1X1 

12* GAera Sim 14 9 

14 Gulton 40 38 12 


89 J 7 
18 M 7 
140 SJ 7 
82 38 I 
48 24 47 
240 64 11 
184 1.9 14 
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1450104 7 
182 63 8 
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180 64 U 
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648 52* 
4501 10* 
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409 6 

2222 17* 
150 22* 
660 35* 
7053 26 

3 32* 
47 27% 

4 29 

2 20* 

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2SOX 62% 
2701 61 
375 25* 
915 20* 
23 10* 
1B2 10* 
499 24* 
532* 55* 
61 13* 

795 5 

128 20% 
1631 12 
566 3* 

1389 26% 
1334 29% 
3289 28 
140 15* 
32S6 24% 
409x 42% 
73 65* 


83% 

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38% 

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6% 

10* 

67 

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51% 

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22% 

35 

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32* 

27* 

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20% 

24% 

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40% 

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19% 

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54% 

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2378 15% 
2071 15* 


48 43% 

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133 

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77 23% 
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28% 

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9% 

27* 

26 

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23* 

22* 

31* 

14* 

19* 

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32* 

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15% 


83* + lb 
57* +3* 
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50* + * 
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67* +1 
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53% + * 
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641%— % 
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58% —1 
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26 19% 

44 26% 

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13* 11% 
19* 15* 
47 31% 

23 15% 

24% 16* 
49% 21% 
53% 32% 
13% 7* 
33* 14% 
40* 22* 
15 10* 

36* 19 
33* 33% 
16% 13* 
23* 15* 
17% 8 
34* 15* 
13* 9 
14* 9* 
21% 13* 
38* Iff* 
22 15* 

fi 33 
10 12* 
35* 18 
5% 1* 
13%'ITW 
36* 2 TV. 
19* 13* 
23* IB* 
41% SB% 
21% 5% 

11% 9 

44% 31% 
3D 17% 
IB* 12 
12V; 8% 
S3* 17% 
58* 45% 
44* 3! 
a* 35% 

re* 55% 
re 49% 

27* 12 
31* II* 
9* 8 
36* 20% 


HRTn 

Ha I IF 0 140 44 

Hadbfn 140 64 10 
Hal mb 48 54138 
Halwdpf 46 61 
KamrP 24* 48 8 
HanJS M7010.9 
HonJI 144a 94 
HandJra .93 34 It 
HandH 46 £B u 

24 U 
1J 19 
9 

Zt 18 
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8 5* 

694 25% 


MarBrJ 140 
Ha rind .92 

Harnlsti 
HrpRw 48 
Hams 48 
HarGrn 

188 48 U 
1JB 43 9 
HaftSe 140 IM 10 
MawEIS 144 rj 9 
tknresA .He 4 9 

HazHrtn Jt M <9 
HaxLab -32 ZJ 20 
Hecks J6 Iff 30 
htoC'OM 886 14 38 
HoHmn 48b 24 V 
HgiM Jt 1J n 
Hgfnr 140 23 II 
HdneC 25 

HgfmP J4 IJ at 
HgmCo 

Ham Inc ,90g 7 3 
Htrcuta MO 44 W 
Heme JISfl J 34 
HgrltCPtlJD 63 
Herjfrv M0 34 II 
Hesitun 
M**»npf 
HewfPk J2 
H excel 40 
H (Shear 50 
HlVoft .15 
Hnnb<M 54 
Hinon 140 
HflacM 88i 
Hoi MOV .90 
HIMvA ‘ 

Holly £ 


829 1% 

166 9* 

149 49% 
444 13* 
60 19% 
96 46* 
78 17% 
I5S 18* 
KM 49% 
693 55 
349 11* 
17 30* 
3651 11* 
S3 14* 
23 77 
124SX 3% 
11 15* 


143 27* 
148 12* 


212 29* 
207 11% 


384 !2% 


993 14 
130 17 


31 

2577 43* 


5* 

IT* 


1856 36* 
46 19* 


3 34 
101B 37% 


101 I* 


4 14 
Z1 19 
2J 36 
IJ 10 
24 IS 

i 4 13 
. . 1.9 14 
1JW 3A 
100 1A n 


n% 

6753 36* 


29% 
467 18% 


Home® 31 

HfltFSD 7 

HDMGpf 1.10 134 
Hnrdkg 40 .9 27 


325 II* 
244x 33% 
170 58 
1378 14% 
102 47* 

i re% 
9 re 

830 17% 
1585 31* 
12k Ub 
934 31* 


5* 5* 

34* 34* + % 
27* 28% — % 
1% 1* 

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49 49 — % 

13* 11% 

19 19% + % 

46% 46* + % 
17 17% + H 

18% 18* + H 
49% 49* + % 
53% 55 +1% 

11 11% + * 
38% 33*+ * 
38* 31%+ % 
14* 14% + % 
26% 26*+ * 
30 301b— % 

15* 15* 

23% 22 %— Hi 
12 % 12 * + % 
28% 28* 

10 * 11 % + % 
II* 11*— % 
IJ% 14 + % 

16* 17 
20% 20* + % 
4in 4i% — r* 
M* M%— % 
19% 30 + % 

5% 5*+ % 
II* II* 

36% 36% 

19* 19* + * 
34 34 + % 

38* 36*— % 
8* B%+ M 
12% 13%— % 
35* 3t% + % 
28* 29% + % 
18% 18% + % 
11% 11% 

» 77 - % 

56* 57 — * 
34% 34*— % 
47% 47* 

70% 70% — % 
ink 69*— * 
16* 17% 

21% 91% 

B* B* + V. 
21 21*+% 




AMEX Stock index 


Pixv lPU t 

Low Clote 

319.29 22053 


20* 

60% 

46% 

27% 

26* 

10 

48* 

29 

36% 

19* 

35% 

51% 

72* 

23% 

62 

30 
26 
13* 
21* 
25 
33 
25% 
36* 
24* 


B% HmsTFn 
41% Honda 
46* Honwell 
19% HoovrU 
IS HranBn 
3* Horizon 
35% hospCp 
SI* Hotel In 

20* HoughM 
13* HouFcn 
24 Hcuslnf 
36 Hotnt pf 
61 Holnlpf 
17* HMlnd 
39* HouNG 
9* HouOR 
20% Hubonfl 
9* Huffy 
12% HUBhTI 
17% HughSo 
21% Human 
17’b HuntMf 
23* HufTEF 
1B% Hvdrol 


A0 24 
.40e J 
1.90 3.1 
144 XV 
1.12 44 


JO 1.1 
240 9J 
Jt 2J 
A0 XI 
1.75 54 
2J0 44 
625 8.7 
248 104 
240 44 
2JSOIIJ 
220 BJ 
.-,S 3L4 
48 34 
J2 M 
j£ 24 
44 14 
40 £2 
1.92 74 


5 49 
10 4300 

12 4706 

10 147 

9 121 

52 

13 5916 

13 14 

13 124 

11 71 

9 1757 

7 

IS 

6 3026 

10 414 

41 

12 91 
I 328 

674 

10 ire 

14 1578 

16 51 

25 6943 


15* 15* 
58* 56* 
61% 60% 
77 26* 

25* 25 
5% 5 
44* 43* 
28* 28% 
35% 34* 
IB* 18* 
35% 34* 
52% 52 
72% 71* 
23 22* 

44% a* 
10* io* 
25% 24* 
12% 11* 
14% 13* 
21 20* 
27* V 
24* 24% 
35* 34* 
25* 24* 


15*+ % 
57% +1* 
61% + * 
26* — * 
25% 

5 — % 
43%— % 


35% + * 
18* 

35%+ % 
52% +1* 
72% + % 
23 

43% — % 
TO* 

25% + % 
11*— * 
14%+ % 
21 + % 
27* 

24*— % 
35* +1* 
25% + % 


IJO 61 
3-50 34 


3.70 94 
1.92 II J 
MO 84 
1.D0 12 
440 SB 
440 69 
540 H_S 
£25 SJ 
*JU 73 
MO 6J 
3J8 SJ 


31% 21 ICIndx 
94* 62* iCInpf 
19* 19* ICMn 
11* 4* ICN 

27* 22% ICN pf 
17% 14 INAIn 
19* 13* IRTPrx 
44* 30* ITT CP 

73 44 ITT pfj 

70 40 ITTofK 

ta 44 % itt pro 

54 28 ITTpfN 

73% 42% ITT pfl 
24% 15% IU In? 

40% 30* IdohoP 

74 13% 1 deals 
237b 17* IllPawr 
19% 14% llPowpf 
19% 15* UPowof 
30* 25 llPowpf 
50* 48* llPowpf 
32* 25% llPowpf 
34% 21% ITWs 
37% 27* ImoChm 

9% 5* ImnfCP 
14* 6* INCO JO IJ 
54 4S IndIMpf 748 1X1 
59% 49 IndIMpf 7J6 1X2 
6A% 54% indlMof 848 1X2 
17% 14 IndIMpf £15 124 
171b 14* IndIMpf £25 12J 
28% 23% IndIMpf 343 1X1 
25* 16* IndlGl I IB M 
15 


£64 11.1 
£10 UJ 
£35 1X7 
3-78 124 
679 11.4 
«m i£3 
44 1.9 
£00 54 


31* 30* 31*+* 

93% 93% 9316 + % 

19* 19* 19*— % 

11* TO* 11 — % 

27* 27% 27% — % 

17 16* 17 

IB* IB* 1B% — % 

31* 30* 31% — * 

59 59 59 — 1% 

50 55% 50 — * 

59 53% 58*— % 

42* 42* 42*— * 

62% 61% 61%—1% 

18% 18% IS*— % 

38 37* 37*— % 

15* 15 15* + * 

__ 23* 23* 23* + * 

5Qz IB* IB* IB* — * 

)350z 19* Iff% 15% — % 

23801 30* 30 30% — * 

324 50* 50* 50*+ * 

16 32* 32* 12* 

91 34* 34 34*+ * 

987 36* 36* 36* 

336 9% 9 9*— * 

3715 13* 13% 13* 

JlOOx 54* 53 54% +1% 

32dr 59 J7 59 +2 
loot *6 6f, 

2 17 17 17 

12 17* 17* 17* + % 

3 27* 27* 27*— * 

21* 24 34%— % 


9 3124 
9 
1428 

At 38S 
30 
21 

10 38 

8 4248 
I 
76 
5 
61 
3 

25 350 
7 108 

121 
6 1652 


5% inexca 

.14 

£4 

IS 

377 

5* 

5* 

5* 


13* Inhnfc 



IS 

115 

19* 

18% 

18% — * 

35% lnoerR 

340 

5.5 

IB 

165 

47% 

47% 

47*+ % 

Z7* IngR pf 

3.T» 

7.1 


17 

33 

32* 

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9 

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1Kb inkJStl 

JO 

XD 


323 

25 

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24*— U 

38* inidSfPf 

<75 

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37 

47 

46* 

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14 insllco 

IJOfa 

<9 

11 

353 

20* 

20 

30% -f 

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£10al1J 
348 4J 


7JS S4 
40 54 


£60 SJ 


32 15 
640 £3 


121'. 3* InsoRs 
26* it* intaRxe 
31 19 MtgRPl £03 124 

3B% 25% infsRof 4 25 13J 
14* 7% IntKFn 

IB* 15% llepSe 
65% 53 Irrtnrcn 
140 120 Inter at 
15* 9% infrfxl 
51% 41 Intrlk 
17* B* Inlmed 
20* 14* inlAki 
134% 99 IBM 
29% 22* intFlav 
12* 5% intHarv 
8* 2% intHrwt 
45% 23% IntHptC 
47% 20* InfHpfA 
32% 17* IfltH pfD 
45U 32% Inf Min 
31% 23 InfMulf 
57* 46 InfPrar 
17* 9 Inf Res 
42* 32* IntNrfh 
36 24* IntpCos 

17% 10 IntBakr 
19* 15* IntstPw 
20 16* hlFWPf 

19% 14% lawaEI 
29 71% lawllG 

19% 17 lawlDpf 
30* 25 HmaRs 
33* 26 I pal ca 
13* 9* IpeoCp 
34* 23% IrvOkx 


12 


83V 

291 

14 

31 

718 

29 


4* 4% 4% — % 
19% 18* Iff*— U 
24% 24* 24% + % 
32* 32 32 

11% II 11%+ % 
10* IB* 18* + % 


492 65 64% 64% — % 

75 139* T3V* 139* — * 
837 11* 10* Iff*— * 

S3 50% 49* 49*— % 

453 10% 10% W* 

122 28* 20% 20* + % 

.... ... 1319340 135% 133% 134* +1* 
1.12 £1 15 493 28 27% 271k— % 

litre io* io% io* + * 


10 


£60 65 
1J6 61 

£40 4J 


£48 58 
lJOO £9 


1263 

57 

58 
838 

12 236 
9 35 

30 8673 
18 406 


1J0 9J 
£28 II J 
1.90 1(U> 
£74 94 
2J1 1Z1 

KTiS 

£ U 


7% 6* 7% + % 
47% 46% 47% +2% 
40 38% 40 +t% 

34 32 34 +3% 

40* 39* 39*— * 
29% 28* 28*—* 
57* 56* 56* + * 
14* 14% 14* + * 
42% 41* 43%+ % 
34* 34% 34* 

15* 15* 15* + * 
19* 19* 19* + % 
270* 19* W% 19% 

91 19 Iff* 19 + % 

219 29% 28* 29% + % 
1640* 19% 19* 19* + % 
65 31% 301'-. 30* + % 
33% 32* 33 


110 


94 


248 


51 II Iff* 11 — * 
115 34% 34% 34* 


JL 


37* 20 
34% ZI% 
22* 12% 
M* 10* 
41% 23* 
29% 24% 
16% 13* 
9 S* 
40 3ff 
48* 37% 
30% 21* 
23* 15* 
38* 31* 


JWTx 

J River 

Jamxwv 

JapnF 

JeffPlx 

JerCuf 

JtrCPf 

Jewtcr 

JohnJn 

JohnCn 

Joraen 

Jaded s 

JovMfa 


S"i 

.18 J 10 
M4el1.1 

10 

£10 134 

23 

1J0 X2 15 
IJMa 61 HI 
IjOO 60 15 
M 3J 14 
MO SJ 14 


27B 26 
6817 29* 
604 22% 
165 13 
751 40* 
lOOz 27 
11 16% 
73 9* 

4571 37* 
121 45* 
54 25* 
363 23* 
165 25* 


Ant— m 


25* 26 + * 

27* 20% — 4 
21* 

12* 

39* 

36% 36%— 1 
15* 16% 

9 9*+ % 

36* 37*+ % 
45* 45* + % 
34* 25 + % 
23% 23% 

25% 25% — % 


10% 

Iff* 

39% 

39 

36% 

20* 

24* 

21 

lt% 

20* 

36 

54* 

IB* 

35* 

22% 

20* 

33 

•4 

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It* 

83% 

42* 

31* 

4* 

XI* 

25 

IBM 

36% 

35* 

36% 

6* 

30 

35% 

51* 

50% 

37% 

27 

29* 

23% 

ID] 

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39* 

20 

67% 

20 


JO 24 


430 123 
U4 SJ 


40 3J 
JD 1.1 
1-37 73 
A0 Xt 


A* KDI 

9* KLM8 
33 KMlpf 
26* Kmart 
34% KN Ena 
13* KahrAJ 
14* KalxCa 
15% KolCPf 

S% Konob . ... 
14% KClyPL 2J6 114 
29% KCPLpf 4J0 1X7 
36% KCSOU 140 1.9 
12% KanGE £36 1X2 
28* KOTPLt £96 84 
18 KaPLpf 2J2 11 J 
17% KaPLpf £39 11 J 
17* Katvln 
49 Kafyaf 
10* KaufBr 
12* Kaufpf 
68 Kaufpf 
27 Kellogg 
21* Kellwd 

1 Koran* 

19* Konirtf 
20* KyUlH 
Ii KarrGi 
IB* KerGpt UO 84 
26% KerrMc 
18% KeyBk 

2% Keren n 
14 Krraint 
26% Kiodo 
42% Kktoeol 1-64 X4 
39* KlrnbCX 220 44 
21% KnahtRd .76 23 
17* Kager £30 84 
18% Kolmar J2 U 
17% Kopere m £9 
*6* KopprpflOJIO HLO 
12* Korean 
29% Kraaar 240 SJ 
11 KuhJmx jX XI 
44* Kyacerx .141 J 
13 Kvsar 40 XO 


9 441 
14 1497 
3 

9 3178 
18 504 
658 
317 
6 
658 
373 


0* 7* 7*—* 
13* 13% 13* 

36* 30* 36* + % 
39 38% 3ff* + % 

36* 35% 38 - % 
16* 16 16% 

18% 18 18% — % 
17* 17* 17*+ % 
11% 11 11 — % 
20* 20% 20* + M 


lOOz 35% 35% 35% +1% 


137 

6 1374 

7 100 

9 

14 


146 IJ 
-40 XI 
1J0 85 
BJ5 102 
US 41 
IJO 3J 


M 3J 
£36 VJ 
44 34 


1.1C 

IJO 


48b £5 
120 XI 


52* 52% 52% — % 
17* 17* 17* + * 
35* 35 35% 

21% 20* 20*— % 
» 38' 20 

36 31 34% +2* 

W 80 88 +8 

19* 18* 19% +1* 
17* 17 17* + * 

87% 84% B6 +2% 
43% 42 43 +1% 

31* 31* 31% + % 
1% 1% 1% 

34* 34 34 — * 

24* 24* 24* 
f2% 12 12% + % 

19* 19* 19* + % 
28* 28% 29* — % 
26* 25* 25*— * 
3* 3% 3% + % 
IF* 19 19 

31% 31 31% + * 

iff* 48* 48*— % 
47* 47% 47*— * 
33* 31* 32* + * 
27% 26* 27% + * 
21* 20% 20*— % 
20* 20* 20*+ % 
101% 100% 100%— * 
382 13% 13% 13% + % 
19 1094 k 38* 97* 3B 


36 

6 1149 

46 

27 

13 1870 

7 63 
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18 49 

8 418 

90 

3 

13 933 
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20 284 


1 


10 1694 
16 904 
80 55 

15 292 
19 873 
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27* 

15* 

10 

17% 

5% 

11 

18* 

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31 

69 

17* 

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12* 

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17* 

3* 

14% 

25% 


49* 

18* 

37% 

31% 

13* 

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4% 

37 

16% 

17* 

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37% 

37* 

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79% 

29% 

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32* 

41% 

22 

80 

25% 

48* 

43% 

127 

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93* 

35 

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53 

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31% 

S3 


53 


23* 

23% 

27% 

22* 

18% 

17% 

48% 

29* 

IS 

34* 

27% 

31% 

24 

28% 

49* 

29% 

24% 

32 

19% 

15% 


22* LNHo 
7* LFE 
4% LFE Pf 
12% LLE R» 
2 LLCCp 

8 LLCPf 
8* LTV 

45% LTV pt 
10% LTV pi 
50% LTV pf 

13 LTVpff 

10% LQukrl 
15* LocGxi 
ff* Lotoree 
23* Lofrgpl 

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JOr B6U B6U B6J6— » 
848 16* 15% 1*«+S 
7 1*. I»* 19%+ w 
130x107 106 107 +1 
10xW7 107 W7 +1 

22* a a%- 5 

20x 7* 7* 7*-“ 
u» 3<* mu s*** 
3 3T6 37* 37* 

44$ 9V. f* 8%-2 

37 17* 17% IT* +* 
22S 31* 30* 31* t 2 
96 34* 24 34 * + « 

IM 9* 9% ™ 

54 a 22 * n + J* 
13a it* ink ")*; 2 

19 8% 7* 7* f ™ 

296 29* 26% 2M* t 2 
227 27* 27* 27*+ % 
451 30* 3Kb 
53 16* IS* IS*—” 
I2S5 JS-.b JS% 3F4- «■ 
1990 42% 41 41%—! 

7 75% 75% 75% + 2 
171 12% 12* 12* + « 


9 444 


31% Iff 
39* 24* 
24* is 
18% 13* 
12* 11% 
17* 12* 
42* 30% 
29 20* 

W* 5* 
» 13% 

17% 11% 


PHH 

PPG 

PSA 

PSAdpf 

PocAS 

PoeGE 

POCUB 

Pd-uta 

PocRes 

PoelUM 

PocSci 


J U II 
140 4J 9 
40 £7 
1.90 104 
IJO 1U 

1J2 104 6 
132 £3 II 
IJO 44 14 
OSf B 
9 JO 1X9 
40 £5 13 


Ml 

1002 

141 

100 

63 

31*8 

309 

86 

33 

72 

45 


3 7% 27* 
40 38* 

22*4 21* 
IT* 17% 
12 * 12 * 
16* Iff* 
40 32* 

27% 27% 
6% 6* 
15% 15* 
16% M% 


27%— * 
40 + * 
a + * 
ifto + w 
ID* 

77* 


(ConiimKd on Pace 10) 


V- ' ^ 

j*:.. ■ 

S<Z-~ ' ; 


51 


j.J6»* k "". 


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rid. to 















sales 

ll,3 r f in ‘84 


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h $ . 

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S»3 ftfe 
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V. ! j» iy_ A. 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


'“ ^ Z?ir 

^ V vi ; 


v h •*! X 

* * '** 

\ ? 7 i :* t\ i 

• “" V 1 st:. 

: ■". :-.?■ 


Sales Hi^ier at Swiss Chemical Firms 


Reuters^ 

ZURICH — Switzerland’s larg- 
est chemical concents, which in- 
clude Qba-Gdgy and Ho ffman n - 
La Roche & Co, have reported 
sharply higher 1984 sales, due 
mainly to tfic benefits of the rising 
UJS. dollar and the world egonomir 
upturn. 

Analysts predict that the indus- 
try's profit rises will outstrip in- 
creases in revenues and expect the 
compa"!* 8 to reward their share- 
bofrfers with higher dividends. 

The main chemical groups, all 
located in Basle, are highly export- 
orienied and account for more than 
20 percent of all of Switzerland's 
sales abroad, with the United 
Stales a key customer. 

Yves Sohnamn, of the Swiss 
Chemical tadustiy Association, ac- 
knowledges that the strong dollar 
helped to make Swiss goods attrac- 
tive last year. "But it was a genuine 
recovery,” he says. 

The imp r o vement in the U.S.- 

COMPANY NOTES 

Chinese Petroleum Corp. of Tai- 
wan said that it will soon sign an 
accord on joint oil exploration in 
Indonesia's Nauka field with Con- 
oco Inc., Texaco Inc. and Chevron 
Corp. of the United Slates, Ge. 
Frangaise des Petroles SA of 
France and an unna m e d Canadian 
company. CPC will invest $4.8 mil- 
lion m the venture, in which i Lhasa 
20-percent stake. 

Eastern Air Lines, the Florida- 
based carrier, said its three main 
unions have agreed to start talks on 
a new plan to help the airline make 
a profit this year. The accord fol- 

Nestle Says 
Sales Rose 
11.3%m’84 

Compiled by Oar Staff Front Dapauha 

VEVEY, Switzerland — Group 
sales of Nestlfc SA, the large Swiss 
food company, rose 1 1 3 percent in 
1984 to 31 billion Swiss francs 
($1 1.7 baDioii), the company an- 
nounced Monday. 

In a press retease, it also said that 
net profit, at 1,261 miHirm francs 
last year, was expected to "grow 
slightly faster” than the consolidat- 
ed sales. 

In 1983, Nestlfc’s group revenue 
was 28.1 billion francs. Net profit 
rose to 1.26 billion francs from!. 10 
trillion. 

It said the increase in revenue 
was not only due to the growth in 
volume "but above all to the 
strengthening of Ihe doHar” against-" 
the Swiss franc. 

“Thus, sates progressed in a very 
satisfactory way particularly in 
North America and Asia,” the 
statement said. "The sates drop in 
Africa, as a consequence of for- 
eign-exchange problems of certain 

countries, was compensated for in 
other parts of the world.” 

The revenue increase last year 
compares with a rise of only 1 per- 
cent in 1983. Nestlfc, the wand’s 
largest food mnltmariocval, is ex- 
pected to announce foil details in 
April. 

The company painted out that 
Carnation Co. of Los Angeles and 
Hill s Brothers Coffee Inc. of San 
Francisco, taken over this year by 
Nestlfc, will be consolidated for the 
first time in die 1985 results. 

Carnation, which markets food 
and other dairy products, was ac- 
quired by Nestlfc for S3 billion. Its 
1983 sales totaled $3.4 trillion. 

The takeover price for Hffls 
Brothers Coffee, whose 1983 sales 
totaled about $350 million, Was not 
disclosed. 

(AP, Reuters) 

Dnnlop Shares 
Are Said to Rise 
On BTR Bid Hope 

Roam 

LONDON— Shares of Dunlop 
Holdings PLC are bring sustai n ed ! 
by hopes of an improved bid from 1 
BTR PLC, though uncertainty sur- ] 
rounds same other recent develop- i 
meats, dealers on the London j 
Stock Exchange said Monday. 

Industry sources said the Wall 
Street dealer Ivan Boesto bought i 
an unknown quantity of Dunlop j 
shares late last week. Mr. Boesky, | 
who also heads Cambrian & Geo- j 
oral Securities PLC, a British-listed 
company, has asked the Dunlop < 
board for more information about j 
its ftnurial position and reooo- 
struetkm plans, they added. 

A Dunlop spokesman declined j 

to comment on the Boesky initia- j 
tivc. He also declined comment on 
a press report that Donlop’s credi- j 
tor banks nave offered to revise the 1 
l etffnrfwrmg parbigp to give Small t 
shareholders the opportunity to 3 
subscribe for mote shares than pro- [“ 
posed so far. . 

Dunlop ghan ac witted Monday at 
38 pence apiece in London, un- 


auto industry as well as an increase 
in demand for textiles were impor- 
tant factors behind the higher 1984 
sales, he said. Sales of agrochemical 


for higher crop planting. 

Sales at Ciba^Geigyiby far Swit- 
zerland's largest chemicals con- 
cern, rose 19 percent, to 56.6 billion 
< 17-5 billion Swiss francs), in 1984. 
Hoffmann- La Roche's sales rose 10 
percent, to $3.1 billion, while reve- 
nue at Sandoz LtxL, the third-larg- 
est group, was up 14 percent, to 
S2J5 baSm. 

According to Claudio Werder, 
who follows the industry for Bank 
J. Vonlobel, the companies have 
prospered within the framework of 
restrictive government practices in 
most countries in which they do 
business. 

In Britain, for example, the gov- 
ernment has ordered that drug 
prices be reduced while other coun- 
tries, such as tire United States, are 
promoting cheaper generic drugs 


lowed a refund of January pay- 
check deductions to employees. In 
1983, Eastern averted a filing for 
protection from creditors under 
Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy 
Act when union and nonunion 
workers agreed to a bailout plan. 

General Motors Corp. and the 
United Auto Workers onion 
reached a tentative agreement cov- 
ering nearly 5,000 hourly workers 
at plants in Kentucky and Missou- 
ri, ending strikes which had halted 
production of some of the compa- 
ny's most profitable cars, GM said. 

Hydro-Qufcbec, the Canadian 


over the companies' name brands. 

But Mr. Werder says tire groups 
are still marketing new products 
successfully, which is particularly 
important for Hoffmann-La 
Roche, whose U.S. patent for the 
drug Valium expires next month. 
Valium is the trademark for the 
t ranquilizer diazepam. 

Some analysts predict that tire 
1984 profits of Gba-Grigy, which 
began a belt- tightening program in 
1981 to counter falling earnings, 
will be around $380 million. 

Mr. Werder sees Ciba’s profits 
□sing to about $403 million from 
$292 million in 1983. 

Part of Gba-Geigy’s turnaround 
program involved ridding the 
group of activities which were not 
compatible with its main prod tret 
lines. Most recently it sold Airwick, 
a brand-name toOetxy products 
subsidiary, to Britain's Recldtt & 
rWman group for $190 mfflin n. 

The three companies mil publish 
full results in the spring. 


utility, signed a 20-billion-yen 
(S78.8-mimon) syndicated-loan ac- 
cord with a group of 23 Japanese 
banks and other financial institu- 
tions, according to the lead manag- 
er, Bank of Japan Ltd. The 10-year 
loan, guaranteed by tire Quebec 
government, carries interest at 0.2- 
percentage point above the Japa- 
nese long-term prime rate, which is 
7.4 percent. 

PHB Weseririltie AG the West 
Ge rman heavy engineering con- 
cern, has won a 900,000-dinar 
(S231 -billion) contract to build a 
wharf and loading facilities at tire i 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, ore In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


Canada 

Fakanbridgo 

n Otter. HM im 

Oper Net vss i&s 

Oper Share— US 1J5 
Year hm mt 

Revenue 73X3 4154 

Oper Net 217 (a)3U 

Oper Snort— X9B — 
a: loss. 

Japan 

Matsushita a Wks 
Year vm m3 

Rsvsnue cti mi 

prams uam. 1X980. 

Per Share 2M1 »J* 

Sanyo Bectric 

Yew* . HM IM 
Revenue WlJTfl 819,770. 

Pram vs*. 2ut7B. 

Per Share— 27.17 2X79 

United States 
AT * T 

' «h Qaar. HM TM 
Revenue _ Mia. — 
Net lire. OT.. — 

Per Share— M4 — 

*■ 

Net Inc. — ' UHL — 
PerShare— 1 3S_ — 

Ptr Mhcn molts olltrm- 
furrmddMdenetsNocompan' 
Ban ovaMaMe hecottf# of Ob 
veeWun* of AT A T Jon. I. 
I9U 

Armstrong Worid 

R^ar_ m sr 

Year 1IM TM 

ssis*— ® as 

Per Share— X7V 253 


BoHsoufh 

Oh Qaar. HM IM 

Revenue __ -2J®3. — 

Net Inc. 362J — 

PerShare — U2 — 

i® vn 

Revenue— — 

Net Inc. MML — 

PerSha re 458 — 

No camoartaona avaHabto 

r. 

Blade it Decker 

MQaer. H« HM 

Revenue 50X0 350.1 

Nat Inc. VM 2L7 

PerShare — 057 054 

7#S4 net Includes hause- 
Honr bushwis acoulrad from 
General EfoeMcAprH 2X 

Celanete 

4*auor. HM IM 

Revenue «2SJJ 0500 

Nei Inc. 320 520 

PerShare — VR 355 
Year 19M IM 

Revenue— am asm 

Net Inc. MU> 1120 

PerShare 1007 609 

Cans. Foods 

2nd deer. ms HM 

Revenue 2080. UU 

Net Inc. 544 47J 

PerShare &M 001 

1st Half ' IM UM 

Revenue 4MO. 3570. 

Net Inc. 9B.I 875 

PerShare 100 15B 

Cans. Fretf i tways 

etbOnar. HM IM 
Revenue — 45U 357-1 

Net Inc 2151 1X01 

PerShare— am 056 
Year 19M IMS 

© © 

PerShare 201 242 

H«3 rasotfa odhtsted for* 
br-i split la Jutr. 


Revenue 1725 1S44 

Net Inc ZU2 155 

PerShare — UH 0-72 

Year HM HM 

Revenue — 68X3 5713 

Net IrtC 805 490 

PerShare — 170 125 

7PM year nef hictudss 
Cham of *ZJ million tram 
plant dartaa. Par than /»■ 
stihs adhatmt fort-tor-l spm 
tn Dec. 

Cox Comm. 
«hQow. IN} ^ 

Revenue ‘7J6 

Net Inc M-J 

PerShare — U>1 ON 

Yew HM IM 

Revenue 709 6K4 

PKSJwre — 309 ZW 

soM 


4th Qaar. HM IM 

Revenue 1B70 )MJ 

Oper Net M 4J9 

Oper Share.. 102 046 

Year IN* HM 

Revenue 7920 771.7 

Oper Met 3097 26JB 

Oper Share— 120 254 

W83 nets oxdutls losses of 
ms million kiouarter andot 
S1S5A million In mar from 
tUseon hn uo d oeors H an s and 
nmfructurtno. im nor sharp 
nsoUsadlu*todfDr 2 % sloc k 
dMdendln Fob. 190*. 

DsLuxe Click Proit. 

4th Qaar. HM IM 

Revenue 1770 1560 

Net Inc 242 2091 

PerShare 1.12 093 

Year HM 1983 

Revenue — 68X8 61X7 

Nat Inc 8702 765 

PerShare— 401 X37 

Diobold 

4th Qaar. in* IM 

Revenue 120J 12X0 

Net Inc 155 1654 

PerShare— 155 lOI 
Year 19M HM 

Revenue — 4741 ms3 

Nat Inc 560 49.14 

PerShare — 652 S55 

Grcm (W.R.) 

4B.QWT. IN* IM 
Ravanue — IOO. 1» 

Net Inc 59.1 su 

PerShare U2 1.19 

Year IfM HM 

Ravarwa — 6220- 6310 

Net Inc 1955 1597 

PerShare— 402 aa 
Ysar nets tnduds pal ns of 
tu II ndWon vs a million. 

Hutton (E.F.) 

moaar. m* HM 
Revenue — 8950 5710 

Net Inc — 243 as 

PerShare 094 023 

Year HM IM 

Revenue — im 

Net Inc 529 11U 

PerShare— 205 442 

NstsMudochqnsoolSU 
mUHon bi vwar m sf.TmUUeo 
In both periods TVB4 voor aat 
oUolnduds* tax credit of S14 
million. 

1C Mustrtes 

«th Qaar. HM HM 

Revenue UOO 1030. 

Oner Net — 442 

Opot share— 091 1X8 

Year 19M IM 

Ravanue 4230. 1730 

Oper Net 133J 960 

Oper Share— 117 150 

1984 nets oxdude dtaroos 
of 23 cants a sham In aiwrter 
and of 38 cents In rear from 
discamirwod operations 


Year HM IM 

Revenue— 9305 8790 

Net Inc M2B 5146 

PerShare— 258 448 

Nats mauds chorees a# » 
coats a share vs a aonts m 
ovarian and oaki of 2 cants 
vs loss of 37 cants In roar 
from Aimb shnent losses. 


Safeco 


4th Qaar. HM IM 

Revenue sbm *254 

Oper Net T793 3843 

Oper Shora_ 146 103 

Year 1N4 IM 

Revenue 19% WffiL 

Oper Net — 111X3 13X29 
Oper Share— 30* 356 


4th Qaar. IfM 1983 

Revenue 6265 5585 

Net Inc 234 185 

PerShare— U6 050 
Year HM HM 

Revenue 1720. 1361 

Oper Net 1390 300 

Oper Snare— 454 103 

fRD near not aedudes «*> 
of 25conftsa share from dhu 
continued operations and 
ootn of 19 cents from dobf- 
eauttrstWL 

McDonald's 

ftoSSTL. mS S 
&!££= S iK 

Year HM IM 

Revenue lftOta UR 

Net Inc 38909 34264 

PerShare — 439 353 

Results restated lor 3-for-3 
split in Sevt- 


Popwi 

4ltaQaar. 

IfM 

im 

Revenue 

IW 

ms 

(ttnimua 


U«L 



15*4 




3072 

156 

Par Stare — 

031 

— 

Wfi 

UKT 

072 

Year 

1*M 

IMS 

1*84 

IMS 


6640 

5690 

4Ui Qaar. 

6943 

57X3 

MeJ Inc. 

7535 



806 

4W> 

Per Stare — 

UD 


OoerSWf 

xn 

125 

a; bos. 



Oner Share— 


Nabisco Brands 


till Qaar. 

HM 

W*3 

Revenue — 

1.730 

1660 

Net Inc. — - 

1072 

1009 

Per Stare— 

1J» 

166 

Yen’ 

WC* 

1983 

Revenue — 

6250 

MBO . 

Net Inc. 

yen 

TM t. 

PerShare — 

ssa 

*66 


OMo Casualty 
4* Oner. HM iM 

Revenue — 23X4 2MJ 

Net Inc 859 1X4 

Per Share 877 112 


Union Camp 
QhQeer. in* in 
Revenue — 4775 44X7 

Nei Inc 3X5 41X2 

PerShare. 099 052 

Year HM HM 

Revenue — 197D. 1480. 

Nat Inc— 1815 13X7 

PerShare- 392 292 

Per shore results adjusted 
for 2- for-1 spllf In April 

Union Ctvbidb 

_ 4lh Qaar. HM IM 
Revenue— 2400. 240a 

Oper Net — 310 2M 

Oaer Shore— 044 non 
Year HM IM 

Revenue — UR 9000 
Oner Net — 3410 21X0 

Oper Share— *S4 111 

Nefr wxetude charges of 2J 
cents a sharovs SIJ8 

Union Podfic 

4th Qaar. HM IM 

Ravanue 1418 zoia 

Oper Net 1243 1062 

Oper Share- 105 056 

Year HM IM 

Revenue— 7910. ISO. 

Oper Net 4941 4410 

Oper Share— 451 357 

IM3 nets axdude tosses of 
SIM million At mortar end of 
>1441 million in rear from 
rHscanttnuod vo ora n ons 

US. Home 
4thQear. IfM IM 
Revenue— 2729 2842 

Net Inc Iali19 1.77 

PerShare — — 005 

Year HM HM 

Revenue 1.100. 1.15a 

Net Inc tal439 275 

PerShare— — &B0 

a: loss 1984 nets include 
writedown of S4A mutton In 
ouarteran d afBilmnHanln 
roar ond provision for claims 
of S2J million In auarfer and 
of S U million In veer. 

Utd Technologies 

RnwncL 5 3Jm. 

Met Inc 1490 1341 

Per Share 1.10 ioi 

Year 19M 1983 

Revenue — 16330 144 m 

Net Inc 64502 509.17 

PerShare 490 174 

USAHt Group 

4th Qaar. IfM 1983 
Revenue — 4149 38X4 

Net Inc — K8 306 

Per Share— 1.11 1X6 

Year IfM IfM 

Revenue 1520 1430. 

Net Inc 1215 805 

PerShare — *92 149 

Vafley Natiand 
«NQuar. IfM 19M 

Net Inc 654 1H 

Per Share — 151 158 

Year 19M 1983 

Net Inc 147 1*9 

PerShare— 695 601 

Vartan Ass. 

1st Quit. H8S IfM 

Revenue 2299 l«9 

Nei Inc 1X5 115 


198* 1983 

6834 649.1 


Year ISM 1983 

Ravanue 1140 X7X8. 

Oper Net 18957 16X0* 

Opct Share— 618 *47 

Wiim-Dixta 

2nd Quer. ms IfM 
Revenue— 2558. 3 . 20H 

Nef UK. — 30.1 KOI 

Per snare — 073 006 

let Halt HM 19M 
Revenue — <080 3050. 

Net UK. 4956 5*41 

PerShare- 191 102 

IMS 4-manlh net Includes 
apln of Sf million from sole of 
securities 




BTR, a Lcaidon-bascd industrial 
hoktiag canpany, announced Jan. 
18 a £&Mon (S49-miIlion) offer 
for Dtmlop. The offer came as 
Dunlop was seeking shareholder 
approval for a plan to raise £142 



STOCK BID ASK 

USS LSS 

DeVoe- Holbein 
International bv S 6 

{jty-Gock 

Inlcmalioaal nr 2% 3 Vi 

■Quotes as of: Jan. 2B, 1985 


J I’iil i uTriyj ;TK>T1 rv';f icTf i 


TOKYO — Japan’s seaso n a ll y 




dot rose 1.4 percent - in December 
over November, wten it was down 
0-8 percent frran October, the Min- 
istry of International Trade and 
Industry said Monday. 


GN6 39995.3002! 

VUan White WeM SLA. 

U Qnd * MouMMmk 

IZllGreere 1. Stntwtaid 
TeL J1 S2SI - Trie* 28305 


personalities plus 

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Telephone: 10)3 120 .260901 
Telex: 14507 firconl 


Honda Studying 
NewBondlssues 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Honda Motor 
Co. is considering going to the 
domestic and foreign-bond 
markets for funds to produce a 
new car model to be developed 
jointly with BL PLC. a compa- 
ny spokesman said Monday. 

However, be declined to con- 
firm a newspaper report that 
Honda plans to come to market 
with three issues in late March. 

According to the report, the 
issues win be a 35-bmjoD-yen 
($ 137.8-million) six-year con- 
vertible bond domestic issue; a 
20&-mi llion-Deu tsch e-mark 
($633-mi]lion) five-year bond 
issue with warrants in West 
Germany, and a 100-mDlion 
guilder ($27.8-million) five-year 
bond with warrants in Holland. 

Honda last raised funds in 
the capital markets in 1983. 


Jordanian Red Sea port of Aqaba, 
a Jordanian transport ministry offi- 
cial said. The project, to be com- 
pleted this year, win increase Jor- 
dan's phosphate-export capacity 
by about 1.5 million tons to 6 mil- 
lion tons annually. 

Sanyo Electric Co. of Japan said 
it has won an order for 12,000 high- 
speed and thermal printers worth 
13 billion yen ($51.2 million) from 
Benson Inc. of the United States. 
Hie contract covers three years 
with shipment starting this month. 


Hong Kong 
Office Tower 
Contract Let 

Rentas 

HONG KONG — Hongkong 
Land Co. said Monday that it has 
awarded a contract valued at 128 
million Hong Kong dollars (S16.4 
million ) (q i ranimnn Lt d, for the 

construction of the third tower of 
the Exchange Square project on the 
waterfront. 

Work on the third tower, which, 
will indude office, retail and park- 
ing space, will start March 1 but 
doailed architecmralplans are still 
to be completed. The estimated 
cost of the tower is 750 million 
Hong Kong dollars, including fees 
and interest. 

The entire Exchange Square pro- 
ject is expected to be completed in 
mid- 1988. 

The company said the decision 
to go ahead with the third tower 
was positively influenced by the 
cash sale of its 34-percem stake in 
Hongkong Bectric Holdings Co. 
for £9 billion Hong Kong dollars 
last week. 

David Davies, the company’s 
managing director, said the receipt 
of the cash meant that the compa- 
ny’s total debt was reduced by 
about 20 percent, to 14J billion 
Hong Kong dollars. 

He said the company’s debt- 
eouity ratio is now less than 1:1, 
adding that the projected surplus 
cash flow from operations will now 
be sufficient to support the pro- 
posed capital expenditure. 


Gandhi’s Proposals for the Economy 
Generates a New Optimism in India 


(Continued from Page 7) 
cause pressure on land is so enor- 
mous, people should be guaranteed 
work on public projects, he sug- 
gested. or given taw-interest bank 
Inane so that they ran take on iu- 

come-generating industries. 

But Mr. Panandikar says he is 
against sponsorship, which he ar- 
jjues would promote an uneconom- 
ic scale. Liberalization of govern- 
ment regulations will allow large 
industries to grow and the ancillary 
industries on which they depend, 
which are much more labor-inten- 
sive, "will come about on their 
own,” he says. 

He also said that poverty exists 
not because of unemployment but 
because of low-productivity unem- 
ployment. “If a man looks after one 
cow, be thinks he is employed,” 
Mr. Panandikar said. “BmhecouJd 
look after 10 cows.” 

T jhrralrv.'itiftn jj also the anSWCT 

to corruption, Mr. Panandikar 
s aid . 

He said that estimates of India’s 
“black economy” — the portion of 
the economy carried on beyond of- 
ficial eyes — range from 5 percent 
of gross national product to 40 per- 
cent. 

“One cannot shut one’s eyes to 
corruption, but a lot is due to the 
very controls that have been 
brought about to check the black 
economy.” he said. “If you inter- 
vene with market forces, you get 
into a situation where legitimate 
profits become illegitimate gains.” 

Mr. Nainan said that a govern- 
ment study of the black economy is 
due to be released soon. But, he 


said, "it is almost a part of daily 
life. 1 can’t see ihe government 
coining up with a solution.” On this 
score; he said, Mr. Gandhi is an 

“unknown.” 

Mr. Panandikar said that India's 
imme diate problem is on the export 
front. While India is liberalizing its 
import policy, “the rest of the 
world is moving toward protection- 
ism,” he said. 

He said there is likely to be a 
record balance of payments deficit 
of 60 billion rupees (S4.7 billion) in 
1 984-85, on the basis of the current 
deficit. 

Added to tins, he said, is the 
problem of short-term, high pay- 
ments on a S4- billion loan from the 
International Monetary Fund and 
repayments to the World Bank. 

He said that under the seventh 
five-year plan, Much will be an- 
nounced soon and which starts on 
April 1, total investment is expect- 
ed to rise by 19 percent. 

The total expenditure is related 
to the rale of fixed internal savings, 
which are expected to rise and gen- 
erate the rupee finance required. 
But the country would still have to 
depend on external borrowing, es- 
pecially for foreign exchange. 

“I don't rule out the possibility 
of larger commercial borrowing," 
he said. But he added that public- 
sector projects such as power sta- 
tions and telecommunications, 
where the return is low, cannot be 
financed from commercial borrow- 
ings. 

Mr. Nainan said that in 1981-84, 
India had a trade deficit of more 
than 50 billion rupees. 


On the other hand, he said, oil 
production has risen from 10 mil- 
non toms in 1979-80 to abont 30 
milli on in the current year. This 
had halved the dependence on oD 
imparts, but ail still makes up more 
than half the trade deficit and new 
finds are few. 

Lending by the World Bank’s 
soft-loan affiliate, the International 
Development Association, al- 
though cheap and long-term, is al- 
most half what iL was a few years 
ago. India is getting more from the 
world Bank, bat the cost of that 
lending has gone up and h has to be 
repaid quicker, he said. 

He said that the debt-servicing 
burden as a parentage of foreign- 
exchange earnings is expected to 
rise from 10 percent or 11 percent 
in the early 1980s to about 20 per- 
cent by the end of the decade. “This 
is going to be a big drain and 
strain.” be said. 

Mr. Waide said that World Bank 
commitments to India for 1984-85, 
at around $X5 billion, are down 
from $2.7 billion the previous year. 
Kit he said tirat 1983-84 was an 
exception, and that loans in the 
previous year totaled S2.1 billioa. 

He said the IDA side was going 
down, but there was a limit to how 
much the World Bank ride could go 
up. The bank does not want to have 
more than 40 percent of its portfo- 
lio in the five largest borrowing 
countries, he said 

India's share of IDA borrowing 
had dropped markedly, to 27 per- 
cent, but he said this was because 
China hgeam* a borrower again in 
1982. 


All of these Securities have been offered outside Ihe United Slates. 

This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


New Issue/ January. 1985 

U.S. $1 ,296,956,000 
Prudential Realty Securities III, Inc. 

(incorporated in the State of Delaware) 

U.S. $386,049,000 11%% Guaranteed Sinking Fund Bonds 

Due January 15, 1992 
U.S. $545,691,000 12%% Guaranteed Sinking Fund Bonds 

Due January 15, 1995 
U.S. $365,216,000 Guaranteed Zero Coupon Bonds 

Due January 15, 1999 

Unconditionally guaranteed by 

Prudential Funding Corporation 

(incorporated in the State of New Jersey) 

A Subsidiary of 

The Prudential (A Insurance Company of America 


Salomon Brothers International Limited 
Prude ntia f- Bache Securities International 


Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 
Hambros Bank Limited 


Banque Bruxelles Lambert S.A. Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft Goldman Sachs International Corp. 
Merrill Lynch Capital Markets Morgan Guaranty Ltd Morgan Stanley International 

Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited 

Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. BankAmerica Capital Markets Group Bankers Thist International Limited 
Banque Nationale de Paris Banque Paribas Capital Markets Chase ManhattanjCagtaMdarkets Group 
Citicorp Capital Markets Group County Bank Limited Credit Lyonnais Daiwa Europe Limited 

Dresdner Bank Aktiengesellschaft Klelnwort, Benson Limited Manufacturers Hanover Limited 

Mitsui Trust Bank (Europe) S.A. Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited Nippon Credit International (HK) Ltd. 
Orion Royal Bank Limited S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. Yamalchi International (Europe) Limited 

Banca Comma relate Italians Banca Nazionaie del Lavoro Bank tiir Gemetnwtrtscliaft Bank Gutzwlller, Kura, Bungener (Overseas) 

AMtongtMftKtivH Umftotf 

Bank Leu International Ltd Banque G6n§rale du Luxembourg SJL Banque Internationale d Luxembourg SA 

Banque de Neuflize, Schlumberger, Mallet Banque Popuiaire Suisse SA Luxembourg Banque Worms Barclays Bank Group 
Baring Brothers & Co., Bayerische Hypotheken- und WechsehBank Bear, Steams International Limited 

United 


Bayerische Hypotheken- und WechsehBank 

AUtenBeaaQeehaft 


Caisse des D6pdts et Consignations Cazenove&Co. CIBC Credit Commercial de France Credltanstalt-Bankveretn 

Und ted 


DaMchi Kangyo International Den novske Credltbank uu dahis wommion securities ntneiu urexei oumnam t-amoen 

United Deutsche C e uu eee mc h e f ti benk United Incorporated 

Enskilda Securities Euromobiliare European Banking Company First Interstate Limited Fu|[ International Finance 


DG BANK 


Dominion Securities PHfield Drexel Burnham Lambert 

United Incorporated 


SUndhiomfca EneUde Untied 

Geflna International Limited 


Genossenscliaftiiche Zentralbank AG 

Vienna 


Girozentrale und Bank der tisterrelchischen Sparkassen 

AkBtn flMeHic hatt 


Great Pacific Capital SA Hill Samuel & Co. Kidder, Peabody International Kredietbank N.V. Kredietbank S A. Luxembourgeotee 

United United 

Lloyds Bank International LTCB International McLeod Young Weir International Mitsubishi Finance International Limited 

Limited Limited Limited 


Mitsui Finance International The Nfkko Securities Co., (Europe) Ltd. ’Nippon Kangyo Kakumam (Europe) Limited Nomura International 

United Limited 

Norddeutsche Landesbank Sal. Oppenheim Jr. & Cle. dsterreichische Underbank Pierson, Heldrlng & Pierson N.V. 

Gbountrtea AkUengneUadtefl 

PK Christiania Bank (UK) Limited Rothschild Bank AG . N.M. RothschDd A Sons Sanwa International Limited 

United 

Sa resin International Securities Limited J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. Schweizerische Hypotheken- und Handelibank 


J. Henry Schr oder Wagg & Co. 

Limited 


erbank Pierson, Heldrlng & Pierson N.V, 

d A Sons Sanwa International Limited 

Schweizerische Hypotheken- und Handelibank 


Smith Barnes Harris Upham & Co. Strauss, TUmbali & Co. Sumitomo Trust International Limited Svenska Handelsbanken Group 

Incorporated 

Swiss Votksbank The TaJyo Kobe Bank (Luxembourg) S.A. TokaJ International Limited Tracfition International SA. 


Vereins- und Westbank 
AMlefign*9ectoft 


Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale 


Tracfition International SA 
Yasuda Trust Europe Limited 











'age 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1985 


Monday^ 


MSE 


Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 


Sf i IR 
i£ raw 
A 23 303 
47 
U 
34 
02 
16 
m 

3 A 
3-5 
U 

u 

£7 
(J 


H Month 
High Law Stock 


3ft Iff* ROIC 
lEWc 6 Rom 
1311 6*1 RDM 

6ft 2* Ron! 
22* 12 * ROW 
34* 24 Ron 
14* 8* ROM 
54* 41* Rovl 
49* 320k Rub) 
23* 13 Russ 
20 15* Rusl 

33* 17* Rvai 
55* 38ft Rvrt 
24* 12* RvM) 
IB* flVj Rym 


Div. YkJ. PE WhHWUrw Qud.Qfc 


i;winm 

Mien Low Slock 


Div. 1 Id. PE IBS HlBtl LOW QuOt.Ol'lB 


30« 16 » 161 

J31 .1 22 1065 
M <1 J7 iSS 
48 

m u e as 
1.12 3.9 14 157 
48 4122 920 

2JJ70 56 4 3504 
M 1,7 19 lift 
1 A 1S2 
J4 4J 8 171 
1J» £4 15 149 
lJOBb 20 10 408 
40 24 13 86 

4 30 


20* m 

im i7* 
1116 NBb 
1* 3 
17* 17* 
an 28* 
10 9* 

SI* 9% 
49% 49* 
23* 23* 
17 16* 

27* 27* 
55* 54* 
23* 224* 

12 114k 


20 

17* + * 
11*4-* 

17*+ * 
28* + * 
9ft- * 
51 — * 
«* + * 
23*— * 
16*+ * 
27*+ * 

23—* 
11 *- * 


5JW 117 
54 14 
El 200 140 
Pf 360 136 
Pf 7J0 134 
Pt 873 144 
Pf 1.41 114 
: Pf 1443 145 
Pf 173 134 
Pf 735 14.1 
PI 138 113 
7.12 147 
930 143 
7 JO 143 
7.75 145 
132 74 
340 41 
68 12 
130 14 
240 LI 
40 14 
40 3 

232 75 


3S* 27* QuofcOs 10 1342 35* 34* 35 + * 

19* 15 QuakSO JO 42 14 409 19* 19 19* + * 

12* 3* Quarax 51 167 9* 9* 9* + * 

32* 23 OuMha- 140 54 V 258 28* 28* 28* + * 

21* 14 Bk^ JOB S 18 OBI 22* 21* 22* + * 


.12 35 

JA 44 10 


.14 

6 

168 

86 

2.00 IM 

Z97 

(5.2 

220 T4J 

4jo m 

1.90 149 

S!bU 

22 

A 

1J6 

O 

.12 

2 

J6 

1.0 

M 

M 

1J0 

16 

660812.1 

1175 

9J 

225 

76 

164 

4.1 

560 

77 

160 

3J 

2J5 

6J 

1.92 

02 


72 

2D 

J 

68b 17 

1J4 

*2 

31 

46 

1J0 

26 

256 

15 

124 

26 

225 

66 

IJUO10.9 

222 10J 

2JS0 116 

2.90 

116 

226 

116 

204 

112 


* V*' . J 

» ■ . 

Czechs Report Economy j ^ f! g** a **~ J *~ 
Grew 3.2% Last Year 


Reuters 

VIENNA — Czechoslovakia's 1984 gross na- 
tional income, a measure similar to gross na- 
tional product, rose by 3 2 percent, compared 
with a rise of 17 percent in 1983, according to 
government statistics issued Monday fay the 
official Ceteka News Agency, which was moni- 
tored here. 


21* VF Corp 
5* Valero 
14 volar of 
2 * voievln 
14* vanOrs 
2* Varco 
5* Varcapf 
30 'A Varicn 
9* Varo 
17* VeecD 
3* Vendo 
8* vratSs 
Z3* Viacom 
54 VaEPpf 
40* VoEPpf 
68* VaEPpf 
52* VoE Pfj 
49* VaEPpf 
14* VTsfrav 
25* Vomad 
SB VuloiM 


8 562 30 
POT 7* 
41 17* 
24 2* 

7 IB2 23* 
47 3* 

15 8 

14 3474 38* 

10 129 13* 
16 294 24 

56 4* 

23 io* 
14 1131 38* 
54001 65* 
480Z 74* 
2004 BO 
530z 44 
I5JHz 60 
13 97 21* 

13 19 34* 

11 67 73* 


29*+ * 
7* + * 
17*— * 
2 *— ft 
23* + * 
3* 

0 + * 

38* +1* 
13* + * 
23* + * 
4* 

W* 

38*+ * 
65* + * 
74* +1* 
80 +1 
64 + * 

4ff + ft 
Zl*+ * 
34*+ U 
73* +1 


a 3- percent rise in 1983. 

Agricultural output rose 3.6 patent in 1984, 
compared with a 2.2-percent rise in 1983. The 
grain harvest was a record 12 million tons and 

drought in 1983, also^ase^the figures showed" 

Communist countries accounted for 783 per- 
cent of Czechoslovakia's foreign trade, with the 
Soviet Union having a 45.1-percent dare, the 
figures showed. 

Czechoslovak exports grew by 10 percent and 
imports by 10.4 permit, with exports to Com- 
munist countries rising 12.1 percent and im- 
ports rising by L2.4 percent, according to the 


Exports to the West rose by 3.9 percent, more 
than planned, but the planned s tr ucture of 
exports was not achieved. 

Czechoslovakia continued to export raw ma- 
terials and low-technology goods instead of 
quality engineering products to the West, a 
report with the figures added. 


15 *— * 
34*- * 
59 

35*+ * 
30*- * 
17*+ * 
II* + * 
59*+ * 
(6 54* 
36*— * 
33* — * 
15*+ * 
25 + * 
38*— » 

* 20* 21*+ M 

* 31* 21* 

27* 28 — * 
45* 46 + * 

27* 27*—* 


U.S. Futures Jan.28 


Beeson Season 
High Low 


Open High Low Ctosa 


Season Season 
Hloti Low 


Open HMMi Low Close an. 


Grains 


ORANGE JUICE {NYCE1 
ISaOOORn.* cents par lb. 

1*5-50 11830 Mar 17B75 18060 17650 176J8 

185 JO 151.00 May 17V JO 16175 17720 17725 

18425 15500 Jul 18050 18ZOQ 17850 17885 

18220 15775 Sep 17B25 179.25 17450 W&M 

18120 15720 Nov 17450 17875 17620 17570 

18020 15620 Jan 17L50 17720 17550 17550 

17750 15650 Mar 17650 17650 17650 17550 

16150 lafl-00 Mov 17550 

Eat. Sales 1200 Frev. Soles 1500 
Prow. Day Open Inf. UN upl07 


Metal 


* 

‘-J 

* 


* 


- * 

>#" 

* 


* 

;* 

% 


M 

6 

■ U 

1 

y 

* 


* 

■- 

» 


M 

urn 

* 


* 

~ m 

U 

1 

r 

ft 


* 


ft 

•i" 

ft 


ft 


* 

L 

ft 

r 

ft 

rr 

ft 

■% 

ft 



NYSE Higfag-Lows 


Jan.28 


49* 33* Xann 320 72 13 3111 41* 42* 43 — * 

50* 45* Xerox Pf 525 102 290 50% 50* 98ft 

33* 19 XTRA 54 22 11 996 27* 26* 27*+* 


W* 34 ZaleCu 1-32 45 ■ 22 26* 24* 36* 

24* 14* Zapata 24 56 12 253 IS* 15* 15*— M 

54* 20* Zoyre 50b A U 686 52* 50* 52* +1* 

34* 18* ZeniftlE 8 3044 24* 23* 24* + * 

26* TS Zero 58 15 20 8026*26 24* + * 

29* 21* Zumln 122 66 10 234 29* 28* 28*— * 


Industrials 


2B UAL 5Do U 
24 UALpf 250 75 
7* UCCEL 
16* UGI 224 92 
19* UGI Pi 275 125 
3 UNCRas 
10 URS 60b U 
17* USFG i 228 7J 
45 USG 320 42 
40* USGpf 120 25 
13* UnlDyn 20 21 
13* UnlFrst JO 21 
49 Unltvr 226a 35 
75 UnlNV 4504 45 
30* UCanws 164 45 
32* UnCarb 350 05 
0* untanc 

12 UnElee 172 103 
25* UnEI Of 420 129 
24* UnEle#M600 IJL2 
48* UEIPfL 020 135 
10* UnEI Df 258 125 
13* UnElpf 213 125 
69 UnElpf 754 121 
49 UEIpfM 820 135 
34* UnPac 120 19 
82 IlirPcpf 725 7.1 
9* UrOrovl 23a 5 
53* Unrylpf 820 122 
3* UnlfDr 
10* UnBmd 
9* UBrdpf 


7 2941 48* 46* 46*— I* 
196 32* 32 32 - * 

36 372 B 14* 14* 

12 220 22 * 22 * 22 * + * 

40Bi 22* 22 22 — * 

116 V* 9 9 

17 58 12* 12* 12* 

■ 1320 29 fflft 28* + W 
7 761 70* 68* 69* + * 

8 63 62 62* +1* 

14 2*3 28* 28* 28* 

14 59 18* 17* 18* + * 

9 6 54 92* 54 

9 56 93* 93ft 93*— * 

10 1545 37* 36* 37 — * 

13 3903 38* 37 38 + * 

150 5* 5* 5* — * 

4 1541 16* 16* 16* 

lOIR 31 31 31 

27 JW* JB 30* + * 

1601 60* 40 60 

134 33% 23* 23* + * 

7 17 16* 17 

2Qz 58 57 57 —2 

loor 60 60 60 +1 

11 2913 45% 45* 45*— * 

6 102 * 102 * 102 *— * 
6 3740 16 14* 16 +1* 

340z 67 66* 66*— * 

48 29 3* 3* 3*— * 

ID 517 12* 12* 12* + * 

7 II* II* II* 



Livestock 



Paris Commodities 
Jan.28 

Swot hi French Fronts per metric ton. 
Other figures in Francs oer in kg. 





7^^ 







COCOA CRY CSCE) 
tOmelrlcloro'Sstoripn 

2570 rMfl Mar 2250 2263 2218 2225 

M70 2S2B MOV 2 272 2270 2240 2247 

2400 2049 Jul 2290 2259 2230 2994 

MIS 2053 500 2228 2230 7105 2105 

2337 1999 DOC 2140 2141 2103 2104 

3125 9S88 Mar 2140 2142 2130 2108 

2110 2030 May 2108 

Enf.Sdei Pm. Salas U 39 

Prov. Day Open inf. MJ72 


Financial 


US T. BILLS fIMM) 

SI million. Pts Df 100 pet. 

9221 87 J? Mar 92.12 92.17 

91J1 87.14 Jim 91J7 91 J6 

91.27 8694 SOP 91.19 9156 

90J9 8L77 Doc 9029 9085 

9093 8660 Mar 9047 9051 

ms« ssm Jun 

9000 8800 Sea 

09.53 8933 Dec 

EsL Sales Prev. Safes 10006 

prav. Day Open inf. 46302 
Ifl YR- TREASURY (CBTl 
5100000 Prim pta A 32mJs of 100 pd 
83 70-25 Mar 839 82-22 

82-3 70-9 Jun Bl-lS 81-JS 

81-13 75-18 Sea 80-29 81-2 

80-22 75-13 Doc 80-10 00-15 

M 75-18 iwar 

79-26 77-27 Jun 

EaL Salas Prav. Sales 9J17 

Prev. Day Ooan InL 39481 off 383 
US TREASURY BONDS ICSTl . 
(8Dcf-S100kO0Oat9&32ndsef IOOp^I 
77-15 57-27 Mar 73-7 73-25 

77-15 57-30 Jun 730 7337 

762 57-10 Seo 71-19 72 

76-5 57-8 DOC 7U-7T 71-9 

72-30 57-2 MOT 70-8 70-33 

70-16 56-29 Jun 69-22 70-2 

70-3 56-29 Sep 69-9 4620 

60-24 56-25 DM 4+3 4+7 

69-12 56-27 Mar 68-27 68-27 

69- 2 64-3 Jun 

4644 64-21 SOW 45-13 68-13 

EsMSahm Prw. So min 416 

Prav. Dav Open lirf.199430 up2J*7 
BNMA1CBY1 

Simom PfllV- Ph&32n«50f 108 pd 

70- 17 S7-S MO T 4M1 7+4 

69-27 57-17 Jun 694 69-14 

69-4 59-13 Sop 68-29 68-25 

68-13 59-4 Dec 68-6 60-4 

68 58-20 Mar 47-17 67-33 

6X8 50- 25 Jun 47-3 67-8 

67-3 6*21 SOB 6+22 64-25 

Est. Sales Prav. Sates 573 

Prw. Day Open ini. 7375 up 21 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- PH of 100 od 

91.70 0543 Mar 9133 9161 

91 ZB 6558 Jun 9IJ3 «J9 

9040 65.00 Seo 9040 TO+5 

90JQ B5J4 DK 9305 «US 

8940 0654 Mar 

E8JS 8643 Jun 

S7M 6786 5cp 

Est. Sales Prev.SaRH 70S 

Prey. Ooy Op«> int 14J51 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

« mllltoiMrts of IMacf. 

91JB 6&14 Mar 91.23 9IJ8 

9088 8349 Jun 9Q.70 9078 

9031 8453 SOP 90.14 9021 

89X3 8LSI DOC 89+8 B9J4 

89.40 66.10 Mar 99^8 S9J4 

89.12 3073 Jun 67.01 MJJ1 

6075 mM Sep 

B9Z7 57.99 Dee 

e»-Satas Pipy, sain 27J7a 

Piw. Day Open Hit. 97JW7 up l 

BRITISH POUND (IMMI 
S per pound- 1 point earn* SLOW 

1.0995 Mar 1.10*5 1-IIIM 
1JB90 Jun IJ9S5 U»80 
1.0888 SOP lifts: 1.0908 


CRUDE OILUTTMEl 
i joa tm.- daifars par bbL 
31 JO =502 Mar 2485 2547 

31.45 Z485 APT 24-70 2506 

30-23 2465 May 24« 2SM 

29J8 2440 Jun 2425 2475 

29.54 2450 Jul 2410 2465 

29J7 2441 AUO 2425 2425 

29JD 25.16 Sen 24IB 2450 

2930 2470 DOC 2420 2422 

Est- Sales Prev. Sales 7J58 

Prav. Oav Open Ml. 55475 up 373 


3446 2521 

2414 2SJ0 
2428 2490 
24J0 2475 

2410 2465 
2425 2425 

2408 3450 

2190 2422 


Stock Indexes 



Hlab 

Lew 

Clou 

ent 

SUGAR 





Mar 

1635 

1615 

1610 

1615 

+ 35 

MOV 

1665 

1660 

1660 

1603 

+ 40 

AUO 

IJ6S 

1J45 

1640 

1642 


Oct 

1629 

U15 

1600 

1610 

+ 45 

Dee 

1.710 

1200 

1690 

1.700 

+ 30 

Mar 

1630 

1610 

1600 

1610 

+ 20 

1 Eat. voL: 755 lota pf 5D loos. Prev. actual 

satam 

3239 lata. Open Interest : 19643 


1 COCOA 





Mar 

2200 

3240 

3297 

2299 

+ 104 

MOV 

3223 

2270 

2233 


+ 100 

Jiv 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2300 

+ 100 

Sea 

227S 

2275 

2290 

2320 

+ B5 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2225 

+ 90 

MOT 

N.T. 

N.T. 

— 

UB 

+ 90 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

w-w 

Z22D 

*90 

1 EsL vol.: SO lots pf ID tans. Pr«v. actual 

MUM 

58 tats. Open Iirloi-Hf: 857 



COFFEE 





Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

mem 

2540 

Unch. 

Mar 

2257 

2555 

2550 

2573 

— ii 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2550 

2575 

-5 

Jly 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2555 

2205 

— 10 

Sap 

N.T. 

N.T. 

I960 

1680 

Unch. 

NOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2548 

— — 

unch. 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2550 

— 

— 3 

Eaf.voLr 5 lots MS fans. Prev. actual Mas: 

12 lots. Ooan lataraal: 239 



Sowar: Bourse do Commerce. 




(Indexes compiled snortly before market efci ae) 

5 P CO MP . IND EX (CME) 
points and cents 

1C32S 15130 Mar 17860 179.90 17745 17X75 

ISJJt? 15410 Jun 18160 IB3J0 1BLS5 IB2JW +J0 

18425 16000 Sen 18480 18410 183.70 18440 —AS 

swjso 175JO Dec le&jo inn ibajd imjo +jss 

EsI. Sales Prwv.SdM 54778 

Prev. Dov Open InL RIB up 764 

VALUE LINE IKCBT) 
pobm one cents 

ira^ i«» mot mm mso mas m*s +ub 

324C 17130 Jun 3XL55 20185 3B.10 300.90 +A5 

Est. Sous Prev. Sates 1209 

Prev. Day Opan Inf. 4134 eH 217 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE1 
pcinrs and cents 

10460 SLID Mar 10150 10429 10Z83 HUB _JK 

!fS9 i un IS 40 1Be - ,D 'O 1 -®* ,BSJ ° 

1E-S .H-S 5» E- 35 WJ ° ,0 “° —.15 

. 1C9.50 WIJ0 Dec 10840 M860 18840 10040 —50 

: Es». Sales Prev. Sales 12479 


London -Metals Jan.28 

Figures In gening per metric ton. 
Silver In obiko per tray ounce. 


Today 

Hton a rads copper eainodes: 
SPM 153200 T2DOO 
3 monlM 144500 1J4S60 
Copper eatfwdas: 

SPOl 1.77 1 on IJKM 

3 montfis 153400 1J945D 
Tin: spof 9JOUO 95*000 ' 
3 imnttH 942400 943000 1 
Load :S0Ol 38740 MR 


146158 144450 
L2S3L50 1JS3JU 


—7 j Pr»v. Day Ooan InL 10607 off 121 


Laad:spal 
3 mantas 
Ztacisoat 
3 man His 
Silver .coot 
3 months 
Aluminium: 
sort 


34840 36940 

73800 74000 
73600 73700 
545J0 54600 
56150 56190 

97200 97300 


Commodity Indexes 


3 months 100500 100600 
Nlckaf.-SPOf 467800 448000 
3 months 46*540 465000 
Source: Routers. 


97200 97180 

180100 140200 
ASHUft 4ftl0L» 
45*940 455000 


Close 

Moody's.. 962401 

Reuters — 2019JB 

DJ. Futures .... — NA 

Com. Research 0ureou„ NA 

Mcodv's : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 

5 - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : Dcse 100 : Sep. IB. 1911. 
D=w Jones : be sc 100 : Dec 31, 1976. 


Previa* 

965.10: 

1.99&20 

125.0ft 

245JD 


S&P 100 Index Options 
Jan. 25 


SMB CaSMM I Plt+UH 
pna mb Mar AH itarlM Her Asi Mey 

MS — — — — 


Market Guide 


I NYC5CE: 
I NTCE: 
COHEX: 
NYME: 
KCBT: 
NYFE: 


cnicsco Beard of Trade 
Cldooso Marcantiie Exduwe 
inMnufionu Monetary Mart of 
Of CtilcaBD MorcanUla E«4wn*a 
now York Cocoa. Suoar, Coffee Exannee 
New rort Conan EMhanoa 
Comitwiflfy euttieme. »wr York 
New York Mercantile Emttcnow 
Kcmas CH» Boons d Trade 
New York Fulura* Enehanoe 


London Commodities 
Jan. 28 

Figures In sJerllng per melric ton. 
Gasoil in UA dollars per metric ton. 
Gold m UA dollars per ounce. 


Mak Law Ckna Previous 

SUQAR 

Mar 13060 12660 17860 129.00 12760 12760 
MOV 13840 13460 I JSJ® 33740 US 40 13540 
Aug U7J0 14340 14483 14SJW 1«H 14460 
Oct 15X60 l*9j6fl 15160 15140 15ZOO 152J0 
DCC 19940 19940 157^0 15960 I5E60 19940 
Mar 17360 17240 17240 17240 17=80 17360 
MOV 17040 17830 17760 1 7968 1 77 JO 18060 
3.7M lots of SO tans. 

COCOA 

Mar 2,183 2,120 2.172 Z173 2405 2487 
-MOV 1197 2.140 1181 1182 1113 1115 
Jly 2.185 1114 2.172 1173 1105 HOB 
Sep 2.180 2.130 1162 1118 2104 2107 
Dec 2077 2033 2064 2070 2014 2015 
Mar 2073 2033 2069 2065 2007 2010 
May N.T. N.T. 2453 2470 1,997 2010 
6456 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFER 

Jan 1385 1365 1370 2J80 1375 1380 
Mar 2416 2395 2607 2608 26S« 2610 
MOV 2431 2430 2435 2436 2424 2625 
Jh> 2459 1440 2453 2457 2644 1445 
Sea 2646 2647 2660 2663 2450 2655 
Nov 2470 2656 2665 2670 2456 2465 
Jen 2646 2650 26S5 2660 26S5 2640 
161 6 lots of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

Jan 22 6 c n man wenn 2W go 234 |to 71 4 1 2 1 
Fob 217.75 21923 219-50 Z2SJD 225.25 

MOT 21663 21025 2129) 712-75 21725 717-50 
AM 2KLSS 305.50 207-7S 3QSJX) 21125 211 JO 
May 207.50 2WJB 305_» 205.75 206.25 209 JO 
Jun 20325 70325 20450 70525 707.75 BUI 
Jhr 70100 203 J0 202M 20SJ0 208J0 209 JO 
Aug N.T. N.T. 301.90 212J0 208JD 212J0 
SOP N.T. N.T. 201.98 21100 20RJ0 215J0 
6522 tall Of 100 tans. 

GOLD 

Fab 300 JO 99020 39130 — MOJO — 

API 30358 X150 J0160 KUO 30350 — 

63 kits of 100 fravoL 

5mrcn. Reutm ana London Petroleum E»- 

cnantH (matti 


Magazine Ad Revenues 

Rose Last Year in U.S. 

The Associate hvn 

NEW YORK — U.S. magazine 
advertiwig revenue sei recced 10 - 
lals in 1984. the Publishers Infor- 
mation Bureau reported Monday. 

Revenue for the year climbed to 
S4.6 billion, up more than 5660 
million or 16.5 percent from 1983, 
ihe report said. There were 153.803 
advertising pages — up more than 
12,000, or 8J percent. 


Dhaka's Trade Gap Widens 

Reuters 

DHAKA, Bangladesh — Ban- 
gladesh's trade deficit increased to 
SU3.6 million in September, from 
S10S.4 million in August and S99.6 
million in September 1983, a cen- 
tral bank official said. 



Cash Prices Jan. 28 


Com modify and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb 

Prlntc loth 64730 38 *. va _ 

Meal billets f pitt.i. ten 

iron 3 Fprv. Ptiiku Ion 

5taai scran No 1 in Pin. 

Load Spat, lb 

Copoar elect, ta 

TTn ( Strolls!, lb 

Zlru. E. St. L_ Basis, lb 

Pafl odium, or 

Silvar N.Y.oi 

Source; A0. 


Dividends Jan- 28 


Export Contracts Rise 
For Big Japan Traders 

Reuters 

TOKYO — The value of export 
contracts won by 13 major Japa- 
nese trading houses in December 
rose 10.4 percent from a year earli- 
er to 55.39 billion after a 24.8 per- 
cent year-oQ-year November rise, 
the Japan Foreign Trade Council 
said Monday. The 13 trading 
houses represent about 50 percent 
of Japan’s total exports. 

Dtxeraber import contracts rose 
1 percent from a year earlier, to 
57.89 billion. November import 
contracts were unchanged from a 
year earlier, the council said in a 
survey report. 


J Company 

Per 

Aim 

Par 

dec 

| INCREASED 



Gfbsan Gripinas 

a 

J9 

US 

3rl 

Kentucky Utilities 

0 

61 

3-TS 

2-15 

Southdown Inc 

Q 

25 

3-1 

MS 

UJL Loosing inti 

0 

20 

3-1 

2-15 

INITIAL 




j Wodco Tocti. Inc 


m 

3-15 

MS 

STOCK 




CranaCo 


3 PC 

2-21 

2-7 

Sierra Sara wir Co 

_ 

2 PC 

3-22 

J-B 

/ STOCK SPLrT 



Medlpl«K Croup Inc — 

War-2 



USUAL 




Dakar Ini' 

O 

23 

7-77 

2-4 

Barry WrftM 

a 

.15 

5-10 

+19 

Cant Louisiana El 

a 

69 

3-15 

W 

Crown industries 

Q 

J7 

>1 

MS 

Eledraanaca Svs 

a 

m 

725 

S-ti 

Em«overt Cwuollv 

Q 


3-1 

3-M 

Fiarloa Mni 

O 

.10 

3-12 

2 -a 

Foster Wheeler Co 

a 

.ii 

1-15 

7-15 

Frank. Age Hfafi Inc 

M 

-041 

3-TS 

M 

Frank. Cal Ton-Free 

M 

J5 

MS 

31 

Frank. Eaufty Fund 

5 

C6 

3 IS 

2-1 

Frank- Fd Tan-Free 

M 

J6j 

MS 

H 

Frank. N.Y. Ts-Ftob 

M 

08 

2-15 

M 

Frank, income Fund 

O 

.05$ 

MS 

M 

Frank. UA cov Sec 

M 

.075 

Z-15 

7-1 

Hollfaii Engineering 

S 

02 

3-1 

2-lf 

HBUv Sugar 

Q 

25 

«! 

VS 

Komostaka Minina 

O 

25 

2-19 

2-5 

■nil Research & Dev 

0 

J0 

2-3 


Kruaser IWA1 Co 

Q 

XB 

2-25 


Lear Stagier 

Q 

.45 

M 


LlntHjcra 

a 

04 

H 

2-»* 

MMUM-Rtlt 

q 

25 

+1 

3-15 

Crlan CaalioiCaro 

a 

.19 

+1 


Uni led Tech. Cp 

a 

25 

M0 

322 

woven SngaMfa 

a 

22 

4-t 

H 

Zimmer Carp 

e.u* 

M 

3U 

A-Annoal: M*tafitlily, 

0 -qvartariv; s^ewl- 

Annual. 





Source- UP! 






DM Futures Options 

Jon. 28 

w Gcrawitok-nuni m as* cif raft 





































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1985 


Page 11 


Over-the-Counter 


Jan. 28 


nasdaq Notiorwi Market Prices 


Salas In No! 

IMS HM Low 3 P.M. CTOS 

Dwnko J2 i j 9i 2sw am am— % 

Dwrtiwn M U Sim 11% 1114— 14 
DurFR .1* 1.1 126 IS IW IS + Vi 
Pmen I KM A Sft+ft 
OYirtcns 80 22ft 22% 22%— % 

Dvson 42912% law 12ft 


Solos in Nol 

in HM Low IPALCVK 


Semin n«t 

IMS HIM Low IPALOroo 




387 47% 4716 
M ns i% 
115 7 6ft 

n m ru 
896 12% life 
64 7% 7% 
14719% in 

seam ins 
U29 am 
M 7 6% 

170 Oft 7% 
35 42ft 02 
33 
35 
123 
IN 


U 




4fi 


C COR 



96 Bfe 

> 

8% 

bn 

D 

CP Rife 



196 9 

8% 

8% — % 

D 

CUT 

UD 

44 

52 39 

36% 

39+16 

D 

OWL 



59 10% 

Wft 


DH 

CPI 



189 IBM 

17% 

W16 + fe 

Dl 

CPT 



733 7ft 

6% 

7 — » 

D 

C5P 



435 7fe 

714 

7%— fe 

Dl 

CoWTV 



17 3% 

3% 

3% 

D 

Cache 



158 3% 

3% 

3%+ fe 

Di 

CACT 



298 5% 

5% 

5% 

Dc 

CbfYSc 



1421814 

17% 

1» — % 

Dl 

Cal fere 



157 lfe 

1 

1 — % 

Dl 

CalAmp 



41 4% 

4% 

4%— % 

Dc 

Col MIC 



MB HP* 

w% 

W%+ % 

DC 

Go IS hr a 



157 3% 

3ta 

3% 

Of 

CaltonP 



75 3fe 

z% 

■S— fe 

Di 

Calnv 

.16 

IS 

471 11 

Wfe 

11 + % 

Dt 

CanonG 



35870% 2014 

20% + fe 

Dl 


■Sh 


45 
447 
73 
94 
1415 
56 
*9 

X360112 19425 
MSolILD 371716 
3JC U2 37625ft 
21 a% 

1J U 55 40 
AM 16 30 5K 

164 5ft 
ZM 3.9 31 34% 

495 15U 
42 4% 
I MS M 


14S 

<40 11 g 


Hnwcfi 

HmoSL 

HDnlnd M 11 
HoaWr US 4 jt 
Hoorn 1JO 14 
Konind 
HwBNJ 
HunoTo 

HufflJB JDSo 2 
HntpRs 

HuntgB 148b 4.1 

HUTGB 

HyorlK 

HvaoAl 

Hvponn 

HvtOfcM 


Z» M Itt 
•i lm i7% 

ai u n 
1922 31ft 
50Z30fe 29% 
147 Stk 5% 
nsi9% im 
252 514 5% 

34 25% am 
8710 9fe 
4135% 35% 
122 S% 514 
42120% I9fe 
257 516 6 
7 5% 5% 
40 8% 7ft 


Bfe + 14 
18ft + Ml 
10 + Mi 

22 +fe 
29%— fe 
5fe- fe 
19% 

Sft— % 
am — im 
is 

35% + 16 
s%— % 
20 + 16 
6fe + U 
6% 

8 — % 



H%+ 14 
S%— fe 
6 

114— fe 
20 %+ % 
4ft— % 
55% + W 
2714 — % 
6 % + % 
life— 16 
41% + 14 
51—16 
25% + % 
15 + 14 

15% + % 
7% + % 
7% 

11% 

23% — '4 
2714+ fe 
27% + % 
S3 +14 

17 — % 
20 + % 
1314 + % 
11fe+ M 
1516 

20 

2014— % 
23% 

33 +14 

36U— % 
31% 

1714- 14 

53 

14% 

19% — 14 
2»%+ fe 
2114 

914— 14 
22% + 14 
3216 + 14 
37%+ % 
25 — U 
6 

1514— fe 
IB +16 
31% — % 

18 + % 
12 % 

4%- M 
15% + % 
1414— % 
» + 16 
1514— % 
13 
2% 

914—% 
5% + fe 
25% + 16 
20Vi + 14 
1214— fe 



Safes In Not 

lies HIM Low SPALOree 


Safes In wel 

IBM HIM LOW 2 PAL CUM 


PntcCsf .16 3 

PMRsk J4 24 

PrvdLo 

Prswov 

Priam 

PrtcCm* 

PrtcCoa 

PrtfOrtu 

pnmop .16 u 
PrasCa .16 A 
ProntTr 120 04 
Protect 

Previn 

Pol IT m 

PurtBn 40 24 


3233% 32% 
220% 21% 
47 5% 6 
191 4 3% 

717 6% 4% 
issim MM 
45334% 53% 
701 14% 15 
2M S 4% 
1483594 36% 
2514% 14% 
11 214 2% 
5713% 15 
951 5 <U 
172 life 16 


32Ui— 14 
2M— % 
6 %— % 

«6 + ft 
1414“- 14 
5314—116 
14 

5 — % 
36% 

14% 

2% 

U% + % 
4% 

M%— ft 


2L 


JBResi 

M 

14 

173 17% 

15% 

14% — fe 

Jackpot 

t 


89 414 

4% 

4%— fe 

Jock Lfe 



booaevj 

35% 

38'6 +lft 

JamWtr 



1319% 

» 

19% 

JeHBsti 

140 

44 

16 33% 

33 

33 — % 

JetSmrf 

40a 24 

98 20% 

19% 

2016 + % 

Jot Mart 



184 8% 

8 

8% + % 

Jerks 

.12 

J 

IS 17 *; 

17% 

17%—, ft 

Jttv s 



to 

fe— Hi 

Jontcbl 

t 


224 5ft 

4% 

4% + ft 

Jcmel A 

t 


354 4% 

4% 

4% 

Jmpfnn 

JO 

54 

71 9% 

9 

9% 

Juno 



79 27 

25% 

U +1 

Justins 

JOI 

1J 

33018% 

17% 

17%+ Ml 


KLA 3 



783 23 

21% 

22% + fe 

KMWSv 



510% 

10% 

10%+ % 

KV Ple- 



8 5% 

4% 

5% + % 

na man 

45 

2.1 

59 26ft 

25% 

26%— % 

Karcftr 



2492 17% 

16% 

17% +1 

Kaslor 

40f 

44 

54 M 

13fe 

13ft — % 

Kavdon 

KelvJn 



272 Oft 
322 1ft 

7% 

1% 

rc+v 

Kama 

140 

3.9 

314 47 

45 

45%+ % 

KvCnLf 

40 

2.1 

35 37% 

37 

37% 

Kavex 



43 5% 

6% 

6ft 

KeyTrn 



75 W% 

10% 

10% 

Klmbal 

44 

14 

7 20% 25% 

28% + % 

Klmbrk 



22 7 

6fe 

7 

Kincaid 



4 V% 

5% 

B%— fe 

Kinders 

45 

4 

112915% 

Tfc 

16M— % 

vDCoss 



23 % 

% 

Kray 

45 

J 

248 9ft 

8% 

9 — % 

lows 

42 

22 

801 14% 

14ft 

14% 

Kulcke 

.16 

4 

957 29% 38% 

29 + % 


>4215 1514 Hft-16 

116 5 4% 5 + M 

14 2516 34% 25% 

114 3fe Zft 3 
30327% 25 27 +1% 

200 m m 4%— % 
239 12% life 12 + fe 
223111% TO% 11 


B — % 
17 

14% —1 
9 — fe 
»% 

9%+ 14 
6% + % 
25% + % 
4%— % 
2214+1 
1716+14 
2116+ % 
m— % 

3114 +3% 
7%+ 14 
716 + % 
14% + % 
26% 

10% 

4 

18 % — % 
9% 

1414 

2 — fe 
13%+ % 
11% + fe 
22fe — % 
1214+ 14 
4fe+ ft 
3M6 
1414 
10% 

2146+ 14 
316 + % 
13ft + fe 
33»+ fe 
7%+ fe 
15% 

10 %— % 
16 

2214—1 


4114— % 
2 

1914 + 14 
8% — fe 
6%— % 
9 %— % 
1254— fe 
3116+1 



1J 16 716 
4J 2134% 
SJS 55m 
584 9% 
2513% 
2J 99 
2.1 


193921% 20% 
2.9% 9% 

2131214 life 
14918% 17fe 
15 5% 4% 
97 2% 214 
48 5% 5% 
657 lft 1% 
29 14% 1414 
40 34 3Jft 
305 29% 29 
2221114 10% 
3210 9fe 
387 19 

59 1814 1714 
18 7% 7% 

445 4 3% 

73 34 23% 

39 25 2514 

17T 5% B 
227 31 30ft 
45 3716 37ft 
1044 44 

i m 4% 
335 21% 21fe 
24 12 11% 

1325 715 7 
321% am 
8816 15% 

3474 life II 


2114+ 14 
9%+ fe 
11%— 14 
18% + fe 
4%— % 
2fe 

ft"* 

uvs— fe 
33fe 

2914— % 
11 +1 
9%— fe 

1916— fe 
18 

716— % 
3% 

23% — % 
25fe 

8 — fe 
31+16 
37% + % 
44+16 

m+ % 

2114 

12 + % 
7 

2014 

15% + fe 
11 %+ % 



125 

3% 

3ft 

3% 


58 

4% 

4ft 

4% + 

fe 

49 

3ft 

3Vh 

3ft— 

% 

47 

3% 

3% 

3% 


553 

17 

16ft 

W% + 

% 

2d 

3ft 

2% 

2% 


659 

38 

37 

37ft +1 

108 


47% 



59 

25% 

26% 

26% — 

ft 

623 

3141 

30% 

30% — 

46 

19 

21% 

21 

«% + 

H 

in 

17% 

17% 

17%- 

% 

9 

6 

SV!i 

6 + 

ft 

358 

2% 

2% 

2% 


MO 

14ft 

14 

14ft 


SS5 

39% 

31% 

38% 


16 

15ft 

15% 

15)6 + 

ft 

ISO 

5% 

6ft 

546 + 

fe 

15 

5% 

5% 

5% 


35 

18% 

18% 

38% 


55 

17% 

17ft 

17% + 

% 

27 

28ft 

28% 

2Bft + 

% 

35 

1416 

14 

U 


9 

14ft 

14% 

14ft 


119 

4 

3% 

3% 




Floating Rate Notes 


Jan. 25 


Dollar 




v+. 






m 





Non Dollar 




law/Mla am/Mal. 
Am -91 

Bk Mwilraal 5%-W 
Bk Tokyo -84/90 
Ba IndeMwiSUAl 

aueorniiMciMO 
CeomeSH-W 
Credit Fond*r5%-W 
Cnd Mali Sfta P44I/9S 
Denmark 93/98-10 
U.LS-94 

Kincaom BttflUmi SM 
Uovds5-t5 
Snd S16-W93 
Yorkshire 5tt-9179t 


Coom Nazi Dk> AiU 
I IK l+? 9935 99.95 
life 27-3 9945 »40 
9% 21-2 9933 010 
W. 31-2 99 AS 99 JO 
BCt 15-2 99.1J99J7 
10ft JW 99J0 99.7S 
IDS. 94 99J0WA5 

9% IM 99J0«J5 
set 23-2 9985 MOJO 
12% 158 W Jfl 9WS 
10ft ItM 9935 9950 
9% 25-2 99jO 9VJ3 
I7L 2S4 UDJ51D0JD 
10ft 37-3 9933 WJJ 


Source : Credit Svoae-First Boston Ltd. 
London 



an invitation to the 

NOMINATION 

FOR THE KING FAISAL 




■JlkTvSTVMt M (IV7.1 

I LH IHM I 


IN 

AND; 

IN SCIENCE 



The General Secretariat of The King Faisal International Prize, in Riyadh, Kingdom of Soudi Arabia, has 
the hounour to invitB the Universities, Academies, Educational Institutions and Research Canters all over the 
World to nominate qualified candidates for : 

1. The King Faisal International Prize in Medidna, which will be awarded in 198B. 

Topic : DIABETESl MELLITUS 

end 

2. The King Faisal International Prize in Science, which has been postponed to 1986. 

Topic : BIOCHEMISTRY 

(a) Selection will be according to the discretion and decision of a Committee consisting of National and inter- 
national assessors selected by The Board of King Faisal International Prize. 

lb) More than one parson may share each prize. 

(d The Winner's names will be announced in December 1985 and the prizes will he awarded in an offtciri 
ceremony to be held for that purpose in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 

fd) Each Prize consists of : 

(1) A certificate in the name of the winner containing abstract of his work that qualified him for the prize 

(2) A precious medal. 

(3) A sum of three hundred fifty thousand Saudi Riyeb {S.R. 350,000}. 

(e) Nominees should satisfy the following conditions : 

1. A nominee must have accomplished an outstanding academic work in the subject of the prize leading 
to the benefit of mankind and enrichment of Jiuman thought. 

2. The prize will be awarded for specific original researches but the life-time background of works Drill be 
taken into account 

3. The works submitted with the nomination for the prize must have already been printed and published. 
If possible, an abstract in Arabic should ha attached if the works are published in any other language. 

4. The specific works submitted must not have been awarded a prize by any international educational 
institution, scientific organization, or foundation. 

5. Nominations must be submitted by leading members of recogniad educational institutions and of 
world-fame such as Universrtities, Academies & Research Centers. Tha nominations of other indivi- 
duals and political parties wilt not be accepted. 

6. Nominations must give full particulars of tha nominee's academic background, experience* and/or 
his/her publications, copies of his/her educational certificates, if Brabble, and three 6 x 9 cm photo- 
graphs. The nominee's full address and telephone number are riba requested. 

?. The nominations end works in ten copies ere to be sent by registered «f mall to the address stated 
in 10 below. 

8. The latest dan for receipt of tha full nominations with copies of works is the 3rd of August 1985. 
The nomination papers received after this date will not be considered unless the subject of any prize 
is postponed to the following year. 

9. No nomination papers or works will be returned to the sen dan. 

10. Enquiries should be made, and nominations should be sent, to the Secretary General of The King 
Faisal International Prize, P. 0. Box 22476, Riyadh 1 1496, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Telex: 
204667 PRIZE 5J. 


% 

































































Mon day^ 

AMEX 

dosing 


13 Month 
H igh LM Stotl 


Sis. cue 

Dfv. YM.PE lllOt High Low Qwt.Qi'M 


i7A^Nim 
Midi Low Slock 


Oi*. iM. PE ’SK un» Guri Cr w 


4 31* BmFpl 40 100 7 4 4 4 

4 Tin BucUm 9 2ft 2ft 2% + Hi 

4ft 3ft BuCkhPf 50 115 21 4% 4 4 — lb 

3M ia% bubii jo ij a ii am 2m— ft 


7444 mm evoirs 17 100 4 ft 6 % m + % 
5 ift av 2 * + % 12 % 7 % evtj b .» i.i i o « 9 — % 

21 41 * 4 4 — lb 12 % 7 EvrJ A JO U I M A Bft— I* 

II am 3 m 2 m— ft m 1 Excel n JOe 40 3 33 W TVS 7 H 


3514 17ft iroqBfd 15 

5V, 1 IMlv n 08 2J 24 


25 3m 31 ft 32’- 
44 Jft J% Jft 


V0Lot3P.NL 

-Hawn 

Prev. 3 PJA. vol 

Prw. consoKdoted dose 

.i&wrn 

ltUKOiOH 


Tables include Itie notion wide prices 
up to me closing on Wall Street 


53 5V SV 54b 
55 Vk 21* ZVS 
46 12 117b 11% 

550 16% 16 16% 

771 W 3% 341 
175 75% 74% 74% 
54b 54b 
94 b 10 

m 14 

4% 44b 

hi % 
2 % 2 % 
6% 24 Vi 
7Vi 17% 
614 


38% 30 
304b 1214 
7% 54b 

73 k 5 % 

12% 71b 

64b 4 

im m 

IBVi 124b 

3 % 

10 3 

64% 53% 
17% 104b 

fl« tva 

6 % 3 
15% 11 % 
2% 14b 

54b 3V| 
10% 3 

14% 9 

14% 61b 

34b 4b 

3 lb 

9% m 
74b 5% 
124b 6 % 
1246 9% 

v m 
11 % 6 % 
11 % m 

Jft 216 
2% tit 
5% 2V, 

7% i'A 

499b 32% 
24% 13% 


34% +1 
244b + 4b 


414 2% 
35 21% 

3% 14b 

54b 3% 
3% % 

1716 716 

11% 7% 
94b 7V, 
6 % 216 
24% 21 
6 % 4% 
10 6 % 
5 3Vb 
5% 2% 
13 7% 

6 % 4 
m 44b 
4% 1 4b 

22 % 1216 
8 % 3 % 
2% % 
50 23% 

50% 27% 
26 19 

5% 316 
304b 14 
12% 916 
64b 4% 
24 19% 

164b 14 
16% 14% 
25% 17% 
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16 16ft— ft 





Meet the 
NewEench 
Cabinet 

February 26, 1985, Paris 

Following the success of our 1982 conference, we are pleased to announce a one day briefing session 
focusing on “ Modernization : Priority for the French Economy”. 

With the cooperation of the French Government we have gathered together the key ministers most 
directly involved with policies affecting business activities in France. 

The program will include presentations by: 

Pierre Beregovoy, Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget 
Edith Cresson, Minister of Industrial Redeployment and Foreign Trade. 

Hubert Curien, Minister of Research and Technology. 

Michel Defebane. Minister of Labour, Employment and Vocational Trading. 

Roland Dumas,* Minister of External Relations. 


26ft 

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AMEX Higbs-Lows 


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1 4 '0m * 


Reaching More 
Than aTMd of a 
Million Readers 
in 164 Countries 
Around the World. 

HcraDj^Eribunc 


AckJticxrd insights will be provided by a 
panel of international businessmen end 
bcr^cer^nTcJucingiEricBourcbBdeChar- 
bonniere, S.VJ 3 . and Generd Manager, 
Morgen Guaranty Trust Company of New 
York and Lbik le Rocb-Prigent, Chairman 
of Rhone-Poulenc 

Eadipresentatknwillbefelfawedbya 
quesiiorwnckiiswer penod,cindarnulfo- 
neoos Frendv&iglish translation vmB be pro- 
vided at dl limes. 


"A% Duiuk&uQi|jnJii|3x^t 

An importartfaspeef of the confer e nce 
wiB be the extensive opportunifies toenga^ 
in infonrid cfiscussion vwth the currert poBcy 
makers and wilh other business executives 
actively doing business with France. 

On February 27, the Mnistry of Industri- 
al Redeployment and Foreign Trade is orga- 
nizing full day visits, exclusively for corrfer- 
ence attendees, to industrial 
plants inducing _ Hj 


the Aerospatide plcaTt m Toulouse. FuH de- 
tails wil be sent to afl partidpants registering 

fwlheo3nferenae.Toregplerfbrtbsexoep- 
tiond ajnference, please asnplele and 
retum the registrat io n foim today. 

HcralhSSEribunc 


PP C30NFBJBNCE LOCATION 
The conference wifl be hokidt 
: Irter-Cortinenfol Hotel - 3r hiedeCosfidbrie 

75040 Raris Cedox 0T -Td.: 260 37BQ * Telex: 220114 
A.Wockof rooms has been reserved fex parik^ianls at 
jjreferentid totes. For details please contact the hotel 
xSrediy • 

. fbtlidpation fee: 17 2$5G or equivdent.per person 
Jabs VAT 18.6% for registrations from Iranc^. The fee 
indudes codtoSs, lunch and can&Bnce documerrta^on. 
feduded in fee documerfaffen wi bea copy of die 1985 
ed&on of the Frendt Company Handbook, the only 
English language guideto French companies. 

□ check endosed O please inyoic& 

fees ore poynble in odvonce of me conference, and 
wfflbereflum^fefefiferQnyconcrfaiionlfwtisporfmctfv 
ted on or before February 15. Ccmc^ofons after that 
date wA be chcaged fee feH fte. 


Please return to: Infemafonal Herald Tribune 
Conference Office -181, avenue Charies-dteGauNe 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1985 


Page 15 



-■ 3 1 its 

•' « 

■■ ? i: 

.* FVV. 


; i- 



i.'.t t “ 


It: ..V V 



Syrian Oil Strike, Said to Be Huge, May Reduce Nation’s Flow of Red Ink 


By Charles P. Wallace 

Los Angffc Times Service 

DAMASCUS —In remote east- 
ern Syria, in a field behind a wind- 
blown gasoline station, a U.S. com- 
pany has discovered an apparently 
significant amount of otL 

While neither the Syrian govern- 
ment nor the company, a Shell Oil 
Co. subsidiary, Pecten Internation- 
al Co., has released any details, 
diplomats and businessmen in Da- 
mascus estimate that the find will 


eventually produce as many as 
150.000 barrels of oil a day. 

A discovery of such a magnitude 
would have a value of SI butSon to 
$1 .5 billion a year at current prices, 
at a time what Syria's economy is 
in chaos. 

There is persistent speculation 
that an infusion of petrodollars 
into the moribund Syrian economy 
may alter Syria’s close relationship 
with Iran, which has been a major 
source of financial aid to the 
mascus regime. 


The oil discovery was made near 
the town of Deir ez Zor on the 
Euphrates River, about 250 miles 
(400 kilometers) northeast or Da- 
mascus. 

Pecten has drilled three wells, 
which are each reportedly produc- 
ing 6,000 to 10,000 barrels a day. 

The oil is said to be extremely 
light and low in sulfur content, the 
two qualities of high-quality crude. 

The Syrians also produce about 
170,000 barrels a day of less valu- 
able heavy crude in an operation 


(hat was set up with the help of the 
Soviet Union. 

The Deir ez Zor exploration is a 
joint venture of Pecten, the Royal 
Dutch/Shell Group and Demin ex 
MbH, of West Germany. 

Pecten took over exploration of 
the area last year from another U.S. 
company. Syrian-American Oil 
CO., a subsidiary of Coastal States 
Gas Corp., which concluded aftw 
four years that there were no com* 
meraally exploitable deposits of oil 
in the area. 


According to a Syrian official, 
the government now expects to be- 
gin commercial production of 
about 35,000 bands a day by early 
next year, rising to 150,000 a day by 
1990. 

To transport the oil to the sea, 
the Syrian government has given 
Pecten permission to use a pipeline 
that formerly belonged to Iraqi Pe- 
troleum Corp. but has been dosed 
for several years in a dispute be- 
tween the rival regimes in Damas- 
cus and Baghdad. The pipeline 


passes through Ddr ez Zor on the 
way to the Syrian oil terminal at 
Baniyas on the Mediterranean Sea. 

Pecten has begun preparatory 
work for the construction of a 20- 
mile (32-kilometer) feeder pipeline 
to cany oil produced at the new 
field to the Iraqi pipeline. 

But officials are worried that the 
discovery could leave the country 
worse off if Iran and the Arab 
states of die Gulf region cut their 
financial aid sharply before the 
pumping can begin. 


Fund for Africa in Doubt 

New York Tima Sentee 

WASHINGTON —The Worid Bank hopes to raise an extra $1 
bffiion for Africa at a special two-day m owin g of donor coonjnes 
— in Paris, but there are doubts that the target win be 


All prospective donors face domestic budgetary restraints. The 
United States has said it will refuse to contribute, and other ind u st ri al 
countries such as Japan and West Germany have not disclosed their 
plans. 

France and the bank staff are the chief sponsors of the Africa fund. 

“They’ll be lucky if they get 5500 million," said one Western 
representative of the fund’s organizers. He criticized the United 
States's stand because of the example it might serve for other donors. 


A Contract American National Gets 


: f ?! On Dollars Boost as Rivals Suffer 


(Continued from Page 7) 
more important than a useful trad- 
ing instrument," Mr. Powers said. 
“It could finally be the catalyst, the 
first real step, the core product, 
that eventually unites New York 
futures markets." 

He pointed out that the Cotton 
Exchange has offered to grant free 
access to its dollar market to the 
traders of the other three exchanges 
now operating at the World Trade 
Center. They are the New York 
Commodity, the Mercantile and 
the Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa ex- 
changes. 

The open-door policy, obviously 
aimed at increasing the liquidity of 
the new market, is unprecedented 
for a futures exchange. If and when 
the New York Futures 
moves in or merges with one of 
four at the World Trade Center, its 
members are expected to be offered 
the same privilege. 

The only restriction imposed by 
(he Cotton Exchange is that the 
floor traders trade for their own 
account and not execute outside 
orders. But Mr. Powers noted that 
most major banks and other finan- 
cial institutions already own seats 
on one or more of Ok exchanges. 
Thus the restriction should not 
prove bothersome. 


Rouen 

SEOUL — South Korean ex- 
ports of shipping con tainer s to- 
taled $360 mini on last year, more 
than double the 1983 exports of 
$173 million, officials of the Korea 
Container Industrial Association 
said Monday. They attributed the 
sharp rise to new orders from major 
U.S. shipping and container-leas- 
ing firms. 


(Continued from Page 7) 
tion’s economic growth is in small- 
er companies. Furthermore, many 
large, blue-chip corporations have 
beat eschewing bank loans and 
borrowing directly through the 
credit markets by issuing notes and 
bonds. 

But American National was pre- 
pared as the battle for the midcUe- 
market business has heated up. 

“We know the market quite 
well," Mr. Tobin said. “It’s a limit- 
ed universe, and we hare a whole 
dossier cm every middle-sized com- 
pany in the Chicago area." 

An economist by t rainin g, Mr. 
Tobin was president of the Mid- 
west Stock Exchange before be- 
coming American National's chair- 
man in 1978. 

Medium-sized companies are a 
boon to American National be- 
cause their demand deposits are 
interest-free and they often borrow 
at above the prime rate, while large 
companies borrow at or below 
prime. 

With 50 percent of its money 
coming from demand deposits, 
American National gets its money 
much more cheaply than do most 
other banks. As a result, its net 
interest margin was 5.15 percent in 
the fourth quarter — almost twice 
that of many hank< 

Keene R Addington, American 
National’s president, acknowl- 
edges that his bank has benefited 
from the “disorientation in the 
marketplace." 

That disarray has included not 
only the woes of Continental Ilh- 
neds, but also the acquisition last 
'year of Harris Bankcorp, Chicago's 
third-largest bank-holding compa- 
ny, by Bank of Montreal. 

Northern Trust Corp., the city's 
Nou 4 bank, meanwhile, was en- 


gaged in a search to replace its 
ch airman, and named a non- bank- 
er to the post last December. Last- 
ly, First Chicago had its own prob- 
lems, notably its 5279-million 
write-off of bad loans in the third 
quarter. 

But if American National, which 
had record earnings of $34.1 mil- 
lion last year, has prospered be- 
cause its competitors nave been 
distracted, the competition has not 
disappeared entirely. 

Other major banks, such os Citi- 
corp, Chemical and Mellon Bank, 
have also been working the Middle 
West market actively through Lheir 
Chicago offices. 

B. Kenneth West, chairman ol 
Harris Bankcorp Inc., another key 
player in the middle market, add- 
ed: ’The middle market is the hot 
place to be. Profits have been 
squeezed out or some of the other 
areas.” 

Each year American seeks to call 
on every one erf the area’s 5,500 
middle-sized businesses. “Middle 
market companies require a lot 
mine personal service than larger 
companies,” said Ronald J. Gray- 
heck. American National's senior 
executive vice president. “They 
may want hockey tickets or an auto 
loan for their secretary.” 

One of the many companies 
lured by American National was 
Thermodynamics Inc., a S25 mil- 
lion-a-year mechanical contractor 
based in a Chicago suburb. Ther- 
modynamics had been shopping 
around for the most competitive 
banker and Michael R. Meyers, its 
president, called American’s pro- 
gram “the most aggressive.’' 

American offered more flexible 
financing , Mr. Meyers noted, in- 
cluding collateralized borrowing, 
which he said was important if his 


Havana Got More Than $100 Million 
From Cuban Tourist Industry in ’84 


By William R. Long 

Los Angela Tima Service 

HAVANA — Cuba has found a 

way to earn hard currency by offer- 
ing bargain tours to West Europe- 
ans, Canadians and Mexicans. 

Before the rise of Fidel Castro in 
1959, Cuba was a magnet for high 
rollers and good-timers drawn to 
Havana’s casinos. The new Cuban 
tourism makes do mostly with sun 
and socialism. 

For about $800, a West German 
can escape the European winter 
and spend two weeks rat a Cuban 
beach, air fare and hotel included. 
The price from Canada is $700. 

The formula's success in the past 
three years has turned tourism into 
one of Cuba's main sources of 
much-needed Western currency 

a nd encouraged the Communist 
government to plan ambitious new 
investments. 

Jorge Debasa, general man a ger 
of the government's tourism agen- 


cy, said in a recent interview that 

120.000 Westerners bought Cuban 
tour packages in 1984, up from 

56.000 in 1981. 

Government revenue Tram tour- 
ism in 1984 was well over $100 
million, Mr. Debasa said. Tourism 
will be the country’s Na 2 earner of 
hard currency in 1984, after sugar 
exports. By 1990, Mr. Debasa said, 
“I am sure tourism will be No. 1." 

To accommodate more Western 
tourists, Cuba is starling a $280- 
million investment program that is 
to include a dozen new government 
hotels and an international airport. 
Eight of the hotels and the airport 
will be at the seaside resort of Vara- 
dero, 85 miles (137 kflometers) east 
of Havana. 

Hold companies from Spain, 
West Germany and France will 


and construction, Mr. Debasa : 
When completed in the late 1980s, 
(Ik new hotels will double Vara- 


dero’s 5,000-bed capacity. They 
will offer “five- star" luxury, along 
with water-sport facilities and 
nightclubs, but no gambling, he 
saxL 

They will also be low-rise build- 
ings to preserve the coastal area's 
natural beauty, Mr. Debasa said. 
Tt is not going to be an Acapulco 
or a Cancun where you don't see 
the beach," he said, rcfening to two 
Mexican resorts. 

Work has started on the new 
Varadero airport. It is being carried 
out by the Cuban construction bri- 
gade that was helping to build an 
airport in Grenada at the time of 
the U.S. invasion of that island in 
October 1983. 

Mr. Debasa. 43. has been in 
charge of the Cuban tourism agen- 
cy, called Cubatur, since 1981. Be- 
fore that, Cuba made little effort to 
attract Western tourists. "We were 
dosed to the world," he said. 


597 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 

FOR LEASE 



35,000 S.F. 


OPPOSITE ROCKEFELLER CENTER AT 48th STREET 
PUT YOUR CORPORATE NAME ON THIS LANDMARK BUILDING 
SEVEN FULL FLOORS— PLUS PENTHOUSE ABOVE 
SCRIBNER’S BOOK STORE AND RIZZOL1 CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS 
Contact Nonnas Briefed or Stanley Markowitz 
( 212 ) 5414337 ■ Tdex RCA 238-724 
Exclusive Agents 

BRICKELL ASSOCIATES 

(2SI AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS. NEW YORK, NY 10020 
SowaiAkk&MWM Corp./MJn*pn| A*e» 


American National’s Strong Performance 


$36.0 

Netjumbtfi a 

Total n—ts 

$4.0 





30.0 

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/ 



26.0 

fr . -S/ * ‘ 


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— y 



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•» * * 

15.0 . 



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T» 

10 W 11 « tl 

*re 10 w 

H 14 


company got into a tight spoL He 
also praised the services offered: 
“They allowed us to hod; up our 
computers into theirs so we could 
look at our accounts. 11 

Stanley P. Weiss, chairman of 
Logan Brothers Books, a $30 mil- 
lion-a-year distributor of medical 
texts, also switched to American 
National. 

“They were willing to show me 
some courtesies that other banks 
weren’t," Mr. Weiss said. American 
National offered his company a 
$2- 5 -milli on line of credit, $1 mil- 
lion above his previous bank's line. 

Bany F. Sullivan, First Chica- 
go's chairman, said he became 
more interested in increasing his 
bank's role in the middle market 
when be saw more blue-chip com- 
panies turning to the credit mar- 
kets. 

But be feared that his bank 
would find it hard to focus success- 
fully on both large companies and 
medium-sized ones. That is why he 
chose to buy American National 

First Chicago paid $270 milli on, 
which many analysts called a gen- 
erous price. But Mr. Sullivan said 
American’s earnings were already 
exceeding projections. And not 
wanting to tinker with a winning 
formula. First Chicago has not 


It* Now York Tim 

meddled in its new subsidiary’s op- 
erations. 

“It was a very smart move be- 
cause Fust Chicago wanted to ex- 
pand into the middle market," said 
Joseph F. LaManna. an analyst 
with Duff Sc Phelps. “It would have 
taken years to develop that busi- 
ness in-house." 


Ford Cut Output 
In Europe in ’84 

Reuters 

COLOGNE -Ford-Werke AG, 
Ford Motor Co.'s West German 
subsidiary, said it cut carproduo- 
tion five percent, to 791,770 vehi- 
cles, last year due to easing demand 
in some European countries, in- 
cluding West Germany. 

Car exports fell to 533,564, or 
643 percent of production, in 1984 
from 573302 in 1983, Ford-Werke 
said Monday in a statement 

Ford said its 1984 West German 
market share was the highest in six 
years, up 0.5 percent to 115 per- 
cent, or 288,000 newly-registered 
cars, from 282,734 in 1983. The 
European market share rose to 12.9 
percent from 116 percent 



FINAL NOTICE TO HOLDERS OF SECURITIES LISTED BELOW 

Persons holding the securities listed below must surrender them to .the Exchange Agent, Raymond F. Glenn. Director. 
Reorganization Accounting and Claims. The Penn Central Corporation, 1700 Market Street. IVB Building — 29th Floor, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 19103. not later than April 30, 1985 in order to be certain they will receive payment for such securities. Securities may 
also be surrendered' between May 1. 1985 and December 31,’ 1986; however, payment will only be made with respect to the first $3 
million in face amount of bonds and distribution value of securities surrendered in that period. The date of actual receipt of securities 
by the Exchange Agent shall determine the timeliness of the surrender. 

BONDS 

Boston & Albany RR Co. 4W% Improvement Mortgage Bonds due 1978 
Carthage & Adirondack Ry. Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due 1981 

Cleveland. Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Ry. Co. 4% Series A and 5% Series B General Mortgage Bonds due 1993 

Cleveland, Cincinnati. Chicago & St. Louis Ry. Co. 416% Series E Refunding and Improvement Mortgage Bonds due 1977 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Ry. Co. 4% SL Louis Division First Collateral Trust Bonds due 1990 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Ry. Co'. 4% Cincinnati, Wabash & Michigan Division Mortgage Bonds due 1991 

Connecting Ry. Co. 3'A% Series A First Mortgage Bonds due 1976 

Elmira & Williamsport RR Co. 5% Income Bonds due 2862 

Kanawha & Michigan Ry. Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due 1990 

Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Ry. Co. 316% Gold Mortgage Bonds due 1997 

Michigan Central RR Co. 416% Series C Refunding and improvement Mortgage Bonds due 1979 

Mohawk & Malone Ry. Co. 316% Consolidated Mortgage Bonds due 2002 

Mohawk & Malone Ry. Co. First Mortgage 4% Bonds due 1991 

New Jersey Junction RR Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due 1986 

New York & Putnam RR Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due 1993 

New York Central & Hudson River RR Co. 316% Gold Mortgage Bonds due 1997 

New York Central & Hudson River RR Co. (NYC RR Co.) Ref. & Impr. Mortgage 416% Series A and 5% Series C Bonds due 2013 
New York Central & Hudson River RR Consolidation Mortgage 4% Series A Bonds due 1998 
New York Central & Hudson River RR Lake Shore Collateral 3 16% Bonds due 1998 
New York Central & Hudson River RR Michigan Central Collateral 3V6% Bonds due 1998 

New York Central RR Co. 5V4% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1980 , 

New York Central RR Co. 5 J A% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1980 

New York Central RR Co. 6% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1980 

New York Central RR Co. 6% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1990 

New York Connecting RR Co. 2H% Senes B Bonds due 1975 

New York. New Haven & Hartford RR Co. 4W% Harlem River Division First Mortgage Bonds due 1973 

Northern Central Ry. Co 416% and 5% Series A General and Refunding Mortgage Bonds due 1974 

Penn Central Co 616% Collateral Trust Bonds due 1993 

Pennsylvania RR Co. 4 l A% Series D General Mortgage Bonds due 1981 

Pennsylvania RR Co. 4!A% Series E General Mortgage Bonds due 1984 

Pennsylvania RR Co. 316% Series F General Mortgage Bonds due 1985 

Peoria & Eastern Ry. Co. 4% Income Bonds due 1990 

Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington RR Co. 5% Series B General Mortgage Bonds due 1974 
Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington RR Co. 416% Series C General Mortgage Bonds due 1977 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis RR Co. 5% Series A General Mortgage Bonds due 1970 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis RR Co. 5% Series B General Mortgage Bonds due 1975 
Pittsburgh. Cincinnati. Chicago & St. Louis RR Co. 3%% Series E General Mortgage Bonds due 1975 
West Shore RR Co. 4% First Mortgage Bonds due 2361 


Beech Creek RR Co. common capital 
Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 
Ry. Co. common and preferred 
Cleveland & Pittsburgh RR Co. guaranteed 
7% and special guaranteed betterment 4% 

Delaware RR Co. capital 

Erie & Pittsburgh RR Co. capital 

Ft. Wayne & Jackson RR Co. common and preferred 

Holyoke & Westfield RR Co. capital 

Kalamazoo, Allegan & Grand Rapids RR Co. capital 

Little Miami RR Co. capital and special gtd. betterment 


STOCK CERTIFICATES 

Mahoning Coal RR Co. common and preferred 
Michigan Central RR Co. capital 
Northern Central Ry. Co. capital 
Norwich and Worcester RR Co. preferred stock 
Peoria and Eastern Ry. Co. capital 
Philadelphia & Trenton RR Co. capital 
Pittsburgh. Fort Wayne & Chicago Ry. Co. common, preferred, 
original guaranteed 7% and guaranteed special 7% 
Pittsburgh, Youngstown & Ashtabula Ry. Co. preferred 
United New Jersey-RR & Canal Co. capital 
West Jersey & Seashore RR Co. capital 


BY ORDER OF THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA. NO DISTRIBU- 
TION WILL BE MADE UNDER THE TERMS OF THE AMENDED PLAN OF REORGANIZATION OF PENN CENTRAL TRANSPORTATION 
COMPANY AND CERTAIN OF ITS SUBSIDIARIES, DATED MARCH 17. 1978, TO ANY PERSON WHOSE SECURITIES ARE RECEIVED BY 
THE EXCHANGE AGENT AFTER DECEMBER 31. 1986. AND DISTRIBUTION IS CERTAIN ONLY FOR SECURITIES RECEIVED BY THE 
EXCHANGE AGENT BY APRIL 30. 1985. NO EXTENSIONS OF TIME OR OTHER EXTRAORDINARY RELIEF BEYOND THE DECEMBER 
31. 1986 DEADLINE WILL BE GRANTED. 

I f you are uncertain about your rights as a security holder or you need forms to apply for the distribution pay able.in respect of 
your security, it is suggested you write the Exchange Agent or call (215) 972-3065. 

THE PENN CENTRAL CORPORATION 
By: Francis A. Kareken, 

Secretary 


•f 


J 









HBiiiiiiaal 







THE CHIEF: 

A Memoir of Fathers and Sons 




BLONDIE 


By Lance Morrow. 303 pp. $16.95. 
Random House, 201 East 50th Street, 

Sew York A'. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Richard Eder 

A S a rite of literary passage, evoking one’s 


WAM'JA TWV T>-e CHEF'S *- 

NEW 'TrapLE-C' OME LETTE 


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A S a rite of literary passage, evoking one s 
father lacks the expansiveness of first love, 
’or of striking out for the territory. It is more 
ingrown antT narcissistic. To seatdi for one’s 
father is to search for one’s self, I suppose, but 
it is all indoors. It is a kind of intenor redeco- 
rating. 

Lance Morrow's memoir of his father, Hugh, 
is a notably uneven example of the genre. It 
bops with unresolved tensions; its aforts to 


across 

2 Brouhaha 
0 Bearded bloom 
I© Head of 
Franca 

14 Bird's 
abnormal wing 

15 "Pygmalion” 
actin- 
ic Came to earth 
17 High-class 

status symbol 
19 "Twittering 
Machine" 
painter 
23 Beauty’s 
praceder 

23 Atomic 
number SO 

22 Shows up 

24 Wreck 
completely 

23 Betty followed 
her 

27Satdouplay 
S3 Business costs 

25 Vicinities 
33 Pad of the 

pride 

37 Within: Comb, 
forrc 

33 iviU. officers 
39 Parlcr pieces 

4G On 

(available for 
duty) 

41 Do a 
diaskeuast’s 
job 

42 Turgenev's 
birthplace 

43 Badgerlike 
creature 

JVar York 


44 Semi driver 
4© Four-flushers 

47 Wood for skis 

48 Range 

50-^— peanuts 

54 Be a tattletale 

55 High note 

58 Issue forth 
38 Street urchin 
62 Bgoa 


63 Neighbor of 
Minn. 

64 Chanticleer's 
realm 

65 boarder 

66 About 

67 Otherworldly 


13 Summers cm 
the Seine 
18 "Educating 
."iSffifllia 

23 Palmer’s 
concern 

24 Dinner V.I.P. 

25 Timber wolves 

27 Gem side 

28 Wear down 

29 Author Ephron 
32 Small glass 

container 

32 Growing out 

33 He established 
the Ethical 
Culture 


SSs#*- 


BEETLE BAILEY 


POhl'THELP / THAT 
ME, I'M / MEANS 
TRVlNS TO \ TURN 
LEARhJ A LEFT 


WlLLVOU ENTERTAIN 
SU6SESTIONS? 


r~. 

cC i. 


understand sprout new misunderstandings. 
Far from settling past-due bills, new claims are 
levied, as if Morrow were still on some kind of 
spiritual weekly allowance that was in arrears 
and that he was trying to collect. 

’ And yet partly because of its unease, the 
book at times becomes a fascinating picture of 
a father-son relationship that seems certain to 
q'mmw on while either one lives. Lance Mor- 
row is a senior writer for Tune magazine. Hugh 


Morrow wrote for the old Saturday Evening 
Post and then, for 23 years, worked for Nelson 


34 Items froma 


5 jUOff 

| ufeugg 


1 A Roosevelt 
2 Country dance 
5 Regulation 

4 Ultimate effort 

5 Clerical 
figures 


3 One of the 


7 Lopez of 

chess fame 

8 Manco Capac, 
for one 

9 High- 

(spirited 

horses) 

10 Excel 


11 First name In 
scat 

12 Shea ‘ 

component 


patch? 

36 Traditional 
knowledge 

38 Actress Ann 
and family 

43 Sheer ecstasy 

45 Kennedy 
visitor 

46 Firefighting 
substance 

49 Short-billed 
bird 

59 Rose Bawl 
“zebras" 

51 Neglect 

52 "0 patria 
mia" source 

53 Wall base 

55 An effort 

56 Virnanf films 

57 Kitty’s birth? 

69 Whale group 

61 Giant, to Lee 




ANDY CAPP 


HOWPO 

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GREAT RUBE. 
» WE HAD j 
> THEM -< 
03MPLETELV> 
CUTO-ASSED, 
MADE THEM j 
>■ LOOK ■<< 

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THEN THEY 
s. GOT ^ 
'Six OR \ 
SEVEN \ 
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.GOALS > 


A BAT UP 


Post and then, for 23 years, worked for Nelson 
Rockefeller in a series of progressively more 
exalted public relations jobs. The jobs ended 
when Rockefeller died of a heart attack; die 
exaltation ended when, apparently misin- 
formed, Morrow told the world that Rockefel- 
ler had died while working in his office. It came 
out that be had beat in his apartment with 
Megan Marshak. 

Once Morrow’s feelings about Rockefeller 
were almost as mixed as those for his father. 
He acknowledges Rockefeller’s generosity to 
his famil y, with presents amounting to more 
than SI C& 000 at moments of need, and the 
occasional satisfaction he took in his own indi- 
rect connection. He quelled a taxi driver who 
had demanded an exorbitant fare by telling 
him that he could get his license revoked. There 
is a deep resentment, at the same rime. Rocke- 
feller treated even his most highly placed asso- 


ciates as upper servants, whose function was to 
ease his wav. Morrow writes; “Hjs feet seldom 


touched the ground.’’ He was ashamed of his 
father. Hugh, for accepting the patronage; and 
the shame fed the tensions- He found himself 


cursing Hugh after reading a mawkish eulogy 
that the latter had written in the DaOy News 
after Rockefeller’s death. That, too, is not 
endearing; Lance knew whal a public relations 
man's trade involved, and Hugh was doing his 
job. 

"The OrieT includes sketches that are more 
or less unrelated to Hugh. Morrow tdls of a 
boyhood summer meat with a black tenant 

farmer on the Maryland shexe, of his days at a 
tough Jesuit high school, of working as a cub 
reporter on a small Pennsylvania daily, of a 
trip to Europe, of covering the 1968 Democrat- 
ic National Convention. The recoOecting is 
rather flat; it is memory told nicely but nn- 
transfonned. His account of his heart attack 
and bypass operation, mi the other hand, is 
vivid and moving, particularly in his descrip- 
tion of the state of anguished alert that one 
lives in afterward. 

But the book’s heart is the wary relati onship 
between Lance and Hugh, half-loving and 
half-poisoned After the heart attack, lot ex- 
ample, the author muses on Iris illness, on a 
brother’s death and on his father's continuing 
good health. 

The book opens with a deadly and finely 
written scene. With both men at tbe peak of 
their careers, Hugh takes Lance to lunch in a 
private dining dub at the (op of Rockefeller 
Center. No better evocation has ever been 
made of the agony of such adult rituals. 

These are subliminal skirmishes. Are they 
real ones? A long-healed wound hurts in damp 
weather, and Lanoe's invariably throbs when 
the wind blows from the paternal quarter. It is 
not clear what tbe wound was. rajhaps an 
occasional display of paternal severity years 
before; more likely, the aloofness from Hugh 
and his journalist wife as they pnrsared careers 
in Washington when Lanoe was a child. “Their 
ideal of success depended precisely upon the 
degree to which the public merged with the 
private; the degree to winch their private lives 
were associated with power, the degree to 
which they knew its wodrinsp and weal to 
dinner with the senators and Cabinet members 
and ambassadors who held it” 

It was a whirlwind of activity, and like ah 
whirlwinds, it left its dead roots. “The Chuf 
works its way over these dead roots of the heart 
but. despiu: moments of tenderness, it never 
works its way out of them. 


■ ■■ 


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Richard Eder is on the staff of the Los Angela 
Times. 


VIZARD of ID 

' THE HUNS /IRE GOWN®! 


,\etr York Tunes, edited by Eugene Moksha. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




Hit them 

WTW»7H^“ 


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* tbe first time it was played this 

HROUGHOUT the roa- early was in tbe game between 




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REX MORGAN 


1 DON'T UNDERSTAND x 
WHAT WAS MY SISTER'S 
REASON FCR GIVING YOU 
THIS MONEY, MARTHA? . 


f I SUSPECT IT WAS A ^ 
BRIBE— BUT I DON'T 
WANT TO MISJUDGE HER 
MOTIVE— SO PLEASE. ASK 


r ITS BEEN A LONG, DIFFICULT PAY; \ 
BERT i I THINK IT BEST THAT YOU 
LEAVE NOW— BUT TAKE THE MONEY 1 
w WITH YOU! TELL BARBARA TO GIVE 
«***_? IT TO ANOTHER ONE OF HER 
V CHARITIES i TM NOT TAX 
> Zr* DEDUCTIBLE ' - ^ 




GARFIELD 


DO VOO KNOW WMAT I HATE. 
ABOUT VOUNEAMAL? VOO'RE 
. SO ONE DIMENSIONAL v- 


i OH VEAH? 
AND WHAT 
DIMENSION 
_ IQ THAT? . 


fDTM DAVfS 



VOUTHi 


I- m 


) 1985 Ur* led F*W»» SynociM.lrc 


the world championship chess 
roactch in Moscow last week, it 
looked as though the challeng- 
er. 21 -year-old Gary Kasparov, 
held a slight advantage. But be 
could not pin down the elusive 
Anatoly Karpov to anything 
serious, and the result was an- 
other draw. 

Karpov, the 33-year-old 
champion, kept bis 5-1 lead but 
still needs one more victory to 
defend successfully the title he 
has had since 1975. 

The draw was the 38th in the 
series. Draws do not count in 
the scoring, but each time these 
players agree to one they set a 
record for pacifism at the 
board. They had earlier estab- 
lished a record for consecutive 
draws, 17. This is also the long- 
est title match in the modern 
era, easily surpassing tbe 1927 
contest between Jose Raul Ca- 
pablanca and Alexander Alek- 
hine, which ended after 34 
games. 

For this 44th game, Karpov 
offered a defense of the Ruy 
Lopez in place of the Petrov 
Defense that he bad been using, 
he chose the currently popular 
Flohr-Zailsev Variation. 

9.. .B-N2. 

The idea of giving up a pawn 
toehold in the center with 

12 . . . KPxP. so that, after 


der Ivanov last year in tbe Sovi- 
et UniotL 

Zeshkovsky tried 14 P-Q5, P- 
B4; 15 PXPe.p„ NxBP; 16 N- 
B1 with about an even game. 
Kasparov now looked for 
something better with 14Q-K2. 

The challenger obtained the 
two bishops wiih 20 NxB, 
RPxN. but the solidly posted 
blade knights prevented the 
white bishops from achieving 
any real effectiveness. 

Tbe exchanges with 
24 . .. BxN; 25 RxB, RxR: 26 
PxR e limin ated another trishop 
for a white knight, but Karpov 
was free to advance his newly 
acquired queenside pawn ma- 
jority with 26 . . . P-QB4 Ka- 
sparov was not able to stop the 
cramping thrust, 27 ... P-B5. 

While it would have been de- 
sirable for Kasparov to create 
open lines for lus bishops, a 
clear opportunity did not pre- 
sent itself. For example, 30 P- 
K6 comes to naught 
against30 . . . N-B4; 31 PxPch, 
QxP; 32 Q-B3, N-N6; 33 
QxQch, KxQ; 34 R-R7ch. K- 
BJ; 35 BK1. P-N5. 

Tbe effect of 30 Q-Q4, Q- 
N3!; 31 QxN/5, QxPcb; 32 K- 
R2, QxB; 33 R-KB1, Q-N4! 
(33...R-KB17); 34 P-K6! is 
dangerous for Black); 34 
QxPch, K-RI; 35 P-K6 was 



KMNnw.'inm 
Final pa rit lon 


only' to simplify tbe position 
since Kasparov’s passed KP 
was easily manageable after 
35.-..N-K4! 


The challenger initiated die 
exchange of queens wihr 38 
QxQ and simultaneously of- 
fered a draw. In view of the 
barren rook-and-pawn ending 
that would arise from 
38. . . PxQ. Karpov at once 
agreed. 


» ms m 
a p*p bip 


Canadian Stock Markets 


Now arrange the circfflfl letters to 
lorn the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Answer here 


(Answers lomonowl 

yesterday s I HEDGE CHASM JETSAM GIGOLO 

I Answ-ii: The D.rthday cake bad SO many candies on 
it so he could make this — 

LIGHT OF HIS AGE 


















































:£iM g 


- - ~ -ir-rv, .■ _*■«. 


Quarterback Joe Montana throws a pass in the Pro Bowl while being pursued by defensive 
rads Mark Gastineau, left, who was chosen the game’s outstanding player, and Howie Long. 


AFC Wins Pro Bowl on Lineman’s TD 


Get ’em gooe. Can't do it too 
soon. 

For everybody’s good, especial- 
ly their own. 

It’s ali Tight for McEnroe to act 
like McEnroe and for Connors to 
act like Connors when they’re 
playing on the pro tennis curort. 
The only reputations they rain are 
their own. If they still have repu- 
tations. 

But when McEnroe and Con- 
nors play Davis Cup, they repre- 
sent America. 

As for this l-220,000,000thpart 
of the nation, I don’t want either 
of them representing me. 

What McEnroe and Connors 
have done in the past few weeks is 
anew low, even for them. It’s time 
to drop the big one on these guys. 

Earlier this month, the U.S. 
Tennis Association felt it neces- 


. 

: - T 
'V 

V : 

’.V rS*? 


Their reactions to their latest 
nap were revealing. They’re both 
so shdl-shocked by years of crid- 
rism, so deep into the mind-set 
that nothing is their fault, that 
they have no idea how far over the 
line of socially acceptabl e behav- 
ior they’ve wandered. 

“I resent finding out about this 
from a carbon-copy letter " said 
Connors of the sponsor's letter 
concerning his misconduct. 
“McEnroe and I are big bqysL If 
someone had something to say, 
they could ay it to oar face." 

Gee, Jimmy, too bad about that 
carbon copy. Guess you've never 
hurt anybody’s feelings. See how 
it feds? At hast yon were right cm 
the “boys” part. 

Oh, yes, about that “to our 
face." you seemed to forget the 
recent Volvo Masters, when you 

mad* m phyyn* gesture hffhinrf 

Ivan Lendl’s back so all the fans 
and a hundred reporters could see 
it but he couldn’t 
McEnroe even topped Connors 


Uniied Pms international “ After the first 20 or 30 yards? NFC had the ball on the 14 when 

HONOLULU — The end zone the end zone started swaying,” he the Lomax- Dickerson misplay oc- 
was “swaying" as he rumbled said, “and it seemed like Td never curred. 

along, but Art Still of the Ka n sas get to it But I guess I struggled The NFC, which was blanked in 
City Chiefs made it Sunday to give along and got there." the first half and trailed 9-0 at the 

the AFC a 22-14 victory over the Along the way. Still got some midway mart, scored in the third 
NFC in the Pro Bowl. convoy help from Steve Nelson of quarter on a 13-yard pass from Joe 

Still, a massive 6-foot-7, 257- New England and Deron Cherry of Montana of San Francisco to Lof- 
pound defensive end, pounced on a Kansas City and twice managed to ton and moved ahead early in the 
botched handoff between quarter- elude Green Bay’s swift wide re- final quarter on a 1-yard dive by 
back Neil Lomax of St Louis and ceiver James Lofton. Payton, 

running back Eric Dickerson of The score made it 19-14 and Se- The AFCs first points came in 
Los Angeles just when it appeared attic's Norm Johnson put the game the second quarter when Mark 


along, but Art Still of the Kansas get to it. But I guess I struggled 
Gty Chiefs made it Sunday to give along and got there." 
the AFC a 22-14 victory over the Along the way. Still got some 
NFC in the Pro Bowl. convoy help from Sieve Nelson of 

Still, a massive 6-foot-7, 257- New England and Deron Cherry of 


sary to write a code of conduct for in his supercilious reaction. “I 
future U.S. Davis Cup players. think the whole thing is one big 
Why? Because McEnroe and joke. I didn’t even see the letter." 
Connors acted like such spoiled gp jd McEnro e at first. “I might 
babies in December when a Swed- have gotten one. Maybe they sent 




Vi 



Ha AuoboKd Pro* 


ish team full of underdog teen- it to my father and he didn’t tell John McEnroe on a 
agers trounced them, 4-1. me about iL He knows better than 

In Gateborg, Connors was to ten me about things like that.” ^ ^ backbone to stand up to 
fined $2,500, some of it for his Told of the new Davis Cup a winner? 
familiar obscene gestures and foul team rules — which don’t call for tk* totrine i« that with kino- 


John McEnroe takes on a TV cameraman be felt was too dose to courtskle Sunday. 


running back Eric Dickerson of 
Los Angeles just when it appeared 
that the National Football Confer- 
ence was ready to sew up the gam* 
The NFC was up 14-12 and at 
the American Football Conference 


ceiver James Lofton. Payton. 

The score made it 19-14 and Se- The AFCs first points came in 
attic’s Norm Johnson put the game the second quarter when Mark 
out of reach when be kicked a 22- Gastineau of the New York Jets, 
yard field goal with 43 seconds left voted the game’s outstanding play- 


The NFC, which had won the er, sacked Lomax for a safety, 
the American Football Conference last two Pro Bowls with an often- The safety capped three consecu- 
14 when SliD dove on the ball. He srve explosion, appeared ready for live sacks of Lomax, starting at the 
then needed some coaxing from Joe the clincher after Miami ’s Reggie NFC 20. Gastioeau's Jet teammate 
Nash of Seattle and Rod Martin of Roby got off a 4-yard punt at the Joe Klecko dropped Lomax for an 
the Los Angeles Raiders to get up AFC 44. 1 1 -yard loss and Rod Martin of the 

and ran. Still did and somehow Walter Payton of Chicago Los Angeles Raiders put the Sl 
managed to cover the 83 yards. rushed twice for 33 yards and the Louis quarterback down on (he 


familiar obscene gestures and foul 
mouth. McEnroe was his usual 
petulant, name-calling, match-de- 
laying, equipment-smashing, 
gamesmanship-playing 12- year- 
old self. 

These prima donnas were such 
pips that Hunter Ddatour, presi- 


tbey boo because it was too easy. 
If I don’t play well, they boo be- 
cause I wasn’t playing as well as I 


dent of the USTA, felt he had to giving them a thousand and one 
apologize at a poslmatch dinner, chances. For 10 years. I’ve been 


teamruies — which don t can tor The betting is that, with king - cause I wasn’t playing as wdl as I 
an organ donation, just “courtesy of-the-good-gnys Arthur Ashe can." 

would quuflion , wwealS? A ta. of 

If only we would finally stop too long. 


athletes in other sports can ques- 
tion some things. Why can't I? 

“Tm a good person and the 
good people rise to the top,” he 
said. “There are bad people who 
keep trying to pull me down. The 
bad people will slither to the bot- 
tom." 


Bird’s Last-Second Basket 
Gives Jones East All-Star Job 

United Press International who dribbled to the comer and 

BOSTON — Larry Bird hit a 16- fired the winner to put the Celtics 
foot corneriomper as dme expired, into sole possession of first place in 
giving the Boston Celtics a 128-127 the Atlantic Division, a half-game 
victory Sunday over the Portland ahead of Philadelphia. 

■in i — — ■— — — — The victory also enabled the 
NBA FOCUS Celtics to overtake the 76ers for the 


■in i — — ■— — — — The victory also enabled the 

NBA FOCUS Celtics to overtake the 76ers for the 

best record in the Eastern Confer- 

Trail Blazers and ICC. Jones a job ence. That mark gives Jones the job 
as East coach in the NBA All-Star as coach of the East in the All-Star 


Joe Klecko dropped Lomax for an 
1 1 -yard loss and Rod Martin of the 
Los Angeles Raiders put the Sl 
L ouis quarterback down on the 
three to set the stage for Gasii- 
neau’s play. 

The AFC defense also set up the 
AFC’s first score when Fredd 
Young of Seattle partially blocked 
a punt by Brian Hansen of the New 
Orleans Saints to give the AFC (he 
ball at the NFC 15. 

Dan Marino of Miami hit Mar- 
cus Allen of the Raiders from 12 
yards out to give the AFC its 9 first 
half points. 

The game featured the Super 
Bowl's two glamour quarterbacks. 
Montana completed 10-of-14 for 
1 12 yards and Marino 10-of-21 for 
139 yards. 


M Injured McEnroe Wim Title 

fe eding hearts who should be “fired” now. Who cares J 


Also, the sponsor of the team, among the bleeding hearts who should be “fired” now. Who cares 
Lousiana-Padfic Corp., wrote to have looked for something decent if the Unit e d Stat e s wins th* Da. 
the Davis Cup chairman, saying beneath McEnroe’s bearishness vis Cup? Do Americans really 


the U.S. team ‘Tails badly when it and excused Connors’ public in- want it if McEnroe and Connors 
comes to living up to minimum decencies because he had guts, are the ones who bring h home? 


comes to living up to minimum 
behavior standards on the court, 
during awards ceremoaies and at 
other Davis Cop events." 


decencies because he had guts. 
But we’re not doing them any 
favors. 

Excuse them all you want. 


are the ones who bring h borne? 

■ McEnroe Hits Back 
To bear McEnroe teQ it, he 


When you violate ‘• minimum they're still a pair of prize jerks, can’t please anybody. United 
behavior standards’’ in tennis, What we need to tell McEnroe Press International reported from 
you've really done something be- and Connors now is, “Who needs Philadelphia, 
cause pro tennis has no behavor- you? We can lose the Davis Cup “It’s been going on for years,” 
Lai standards. It is ironic that the without you.” he said Thursday ni ght. “Some 


American sport that most aligns 
itself with money and soda! sta- 
tus — the game that think* it's so 
ritzy — has become the most nou- 
veau riche, no-dass game cm the 

map 

And McEnroe and Connors 
epitomize it 


“It’s been going cm for years,” 
he said Thursday night. “Some 


Unfortunately, the only time a day it will be different and people 
jock finds out what people really will respect me for what I’ve done 


think of him is when he sums 
winning. It's typical that nobody 
in the cringing tennis community 
managed to raise a stink until the 
Davis Cup was lost You don’t 
think anybody in tennis would 


for tennis. They always complain 
no matter what I do. 

“They come out to see a few 


United Press International 

PHILADELPHIA — Top- 
seeded John McEnroe, shrugging 
off a knee irgury midway through 
the match, rallied from a second- 
set deficit Sunday on his way to a 
6-3. 7-6, 6-1 victory over Mil oslav 
Medr to win the U.S. Pro Indoor 
Tennis Champi onships for the 
fourth straight year. 

McEnroe, who wot more than 
$2 nhllioQ last year in posting a 
match record of 82-3, pocketed 
$54,000 in his first event of the 
official 1985 season. He glided 
through all five matches in the 
$300,000 tournament without los- 


things and if I say a few things, mg a seL 


they boa If I don’t say an 
they boa If I play a good 


McEnroe almost lost that per- 
fect record, however, in the sec- 


Game next month. 

Boston was trailing 127-126 after 


Game. 

Jones held the same position East 


Gyde Drexler hit from the top of year, leading the East to a 154-145 
the key with three seconds remain- overtime victory. Pat Riley of the 
ing. Boston inbounded to Bird, Los Angola Lakers will coach the 
West in the Feb. 10 game at India- 
napolis. 

Rohr! Leads Monte Carlo “At the end of the game the ball 

United Press International ftdongS in Lany Bird’s hands,” 

JSsr&FtssttA SS&JS& 

Germany, driving an Audi Sport- 

Bird, wbo tied a season-high with 


Wadkins Shatters Par by 20, Wins L. A. Open 


The Associated Press 


LOSANGE 
kins set and ti 


three weeks ago — also with a re- bole total on the tour since the fall 


— LannyWad- oord score — collected $72,000 of 1983. 


kins set and tied a flock of records from the total purse of $400,000 Wadkins started the cool sunny 
wth a front-running. 7-jmder-par and pushed lus earning for the ^ ^ ft ^ ^ ^ 
64 that provided him with a 7-sbot young season to $172,350. He be- never tied. His gaudy card 

victory and his second triumph in came only the ninth player to go ^ bogeys, no 5s. 

three weeks Sunday in the Los An- past $2 million in career winnings ^ 

gries Open Golf Tournament and now has $2,049,789. Hal Sutton claimed second with 


gries Open Golf Tournament. 

Wadkins, one of gplfs most ag- 
gressive players, declined to play it 


“ WUU . KHU « V “ \MSSr** ' 48 points, hit for 16 in the final 

tanen in a Peugeot 205 i after seven scoring the Celtics’ last 

^bad^lich needed to ro- 


Some other figures: 

• In 13 rounds this season. Wad- 


Hal Sutton claimed second with 
a birdie on the 1 8 th hole that broke 
a tie with Ravin. Sutton had a dos- 
ing 69 and a 271 totaL Pawn, a 



Carlo Rally. The 105 drivers who 

left Domaine du Rouret on the ral- ^ 

l/s third stage are to arrive in Gre- Elsewhere, 

noble early Tuesday morning for a ington 1 15-10 

12-honrrest period. . fealed San Ai 


r**TET« 


Elsewhere, Detroit beat Wash- 
ington 115-105 and Milwaukee de- 
feated San Antonio 106-93. 


safe despite his growing lead and kins has not been over par and ff 8 V* “ # ? totaL ravin, a 
punished the proud old Riviera reduced his scoring averages 672. hon j elown toy, shot 70 for a 272 
Country Gub course with a record • His w inning margin was the K,laL 

264 totaL 20 strokes under par and largest on the tour since Calvin Craig Startler. with a closing 66, 
six better than the previous Stan- pedc won the Pensacola Open by came on to lie for fourth at 273 


• • • ' .. vs/;; 


dard set by Johnny Miller in 1981. 
Wadkins. who won the Bob 


the same margin in 1982 


with Chip Beck and Gary Koch. 


• His score — on rounds of 63. Beck shot 70 over the final 18 boles 


Hope Classic that opened the tour 70, 67 and 64 — was the low 72- and Koch matched par 71. 


Basketball 


Hockei 



A - • », 


NBA S tandings 


Selected U.S. College Conference Standings College Top-20 Results NHL Sta ndin g s 




EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DJvMoa 

W L M. G! 

1 Boston M u jna — 

PHlodrtpMa 3S I JU ft 

Washington 20 30 MS 11 

■ Now Jersey 20 24 ASS 16 

Now York 16 29 J56 20ft 

Central Division 

: Milwaukee 31 14 A89 — 

: Detroit 27 16 428 3 

Chlcaoa 22 21 SO 7Vi 

Atlanta . IB 26 -409 12V: 

Indiana 14 30 JIB 16Y9 

Clevetand 12 38 J86 17lk 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

Denver 27 17 .614 — 

1 Houston 24 20 -MS 3 

Dallas 23 21 S23 « 

San Antonio 21 22 ABB 5ft 

. Utah 20 25 -444 7ft 

; Kansas Ctty 15 28 J49 lift 

PocMc DMskm 

LA Lakers 30 15 .667 — 

' Phoenix 21 24 ,467 9 

, Seat) In 20 26 A35 Mft 

Portland 19 25 XO 10ft 

I— A. Clippers 19 25 .432 10ft 

, Golden State ID 33 -233 19 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Mllwaafcee 39 30 23 19-106 

Saa Antonie 91 21 SI IB— 93 

Cummhios 1 1-22340 3& Lister HoUpkB- 122' 
2 19; MllefieH 13-23 9-11 3S. Gervllt 5-12 64 U 
: Retwaads: Milwaukee 33 (MokeskJ 10), Son 
Antonio 43 (Gilmore U). Assists: Milwaukee 
. 39 (Hattons 6). San Antonio 21 (Moon 71. 
Wtotolnotoa 31 29 22 27—105 

Detroit 37 V 2S-39-415 

Lfllmbnr 13-18 1-3 27. Long 10-22 1-1 31; 
Maione 14-19 4-1 32. Gus Williams 8-20 3-t 91. 
Retmwds: w ns hta otow 31 (BoUan) 10), De- 


ATLANTIC COAST Kansas 

Conference All Games Nebraska 
W L Pd. W L Pet. Iowa SI. 

N. Carolina 4 1 JO 0 14 3 J2* Oklahoma St. 

Maryland 3 1 J90 15 S J3B Kansas St 

Gearato Tech 3 2 AM 14 3 J34 Colorado 

Wake Forest 3 2 JOB 12 5 J06 Missouri 

Duke 4 3 .57! 14 3 JD4 M 

N-Caroilna St. 3 3 JOO 11 6 M3 

Clems an 2 5 J06 10 7 JBB 

Virginia 1 6 .143 9 9 JOO Mempnis St. 

BIG EAST Cincinnati 

Conference All Games Virginia Tech 
W L Pet. W L Pet. s. Carol too 
SL John's 7 0 1 JOO 15 1 .938 L Mississippi 

Georgetown 7 1 S75 18 1 M7 Louisville 

VflkinovB S 2 J14 13 3 J13 Tulane 

Syracuse 4 3 .571 t2 3 800 Florida 51. 

Boston Col leg 3 5 375 12 5 306 

PIHstWrah 2 4 333 10 4 314 

Providen c e 2 5 306 9 10 374 

Connecticut 2 5 386 6 9 M Harvard 

Satan Hoi! 0 7 JB0 9 9 SOS Yale 


.750 is 1 333 Kow the Associated Press rao-20 college 
350 13 4 765 haunt fared last weak (through Jaa. 37): 
»b 15 6 ,7t4 G eorg e town (ll-ll del. Connedtcut 79-66; 

300 II 7 All tost la 5t. John* 66-65. 

350 10 7 388 Southern Metbodfct (16-31 det. Texas 34-«6; 

350 7 10 412 kst lo Texas Tech 64-63. 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick otvlslea 

W L T PU. GF GA 









SOUTHEASTERN 


Mississippi St. 

Louisiana St. 

Georgia 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Alabama 

Auburn 

vanderblH 

MlsalsslOPi 


Conference All Games Cornell 
9 L Pet. W L Pd. Columbia 


3 7D0 13 4 765 Pennsylvania 


3 325 13 4 765 Dartmouth 

3 425 12 4 750 PACIF 

3 371 13 6 484 

3 371 9 7 363 

4 Si 13 5 732 Nev-L4rs Vegs 

9 J7S 11 6 347 Fresno SI. 

7 .125 8 9 471 Fullerton St. 


W a sh In g t o n 
Philadelphia 
N.Y. Islanders 
N.Y. Rangers 
Pittsburgh 
New Jersey 


69 211 147 
62 204 146 
54 TB 197 
42 173 192 
41 171 214 

35 163 197 


Adams Division 

Montreal » 15 ID 60 194 164 

Buffalo 22 15 12 56 175 144 

Quebec 24 If 7 55 1M 179 

Boston 23 20 7 S3 183 169 

Hartford 17 24 S 39 IS6 300 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norm Dtvtsloa 

St. Louis 20 19 0 48 175 181 

Chicago 22 25 3 47 197 IBB 

Minnesota 15 25 9 39 171 199 

Detroit 14 29 7 35 176 230 

Toronto 10 32 6 26 148 213 


4 3 371 9 7 363 

5 4 356 13 5 722 

3 J .375 -11 6 347 

1 7 .125 8 9 371 

I 8 -111 7 10 312 

BIG TEN 

Conference All Gaines 


Mich toon 
Illinois 
Iowa 
Ohio Sl. 


hnn53(Lalinbeerl6>.Asiish:WaEMnglon26 Minnesota 
(Days 7), Detroit 31 (Thomas 17). Purdue 

Portland 2* 27 35 36—07 Indiana 

Bostoa so 29 35 36-08 Michigan st. 

Sira 17-28 12-12 48. Parish 13-20 4-8 30; Pn*- Wisconsin 
ion IMt 43 24. vandewagtw 9-14 W 22. R*- M urth waslBm 
ftomst: Portland 40 (Bowie 71, Boston «a 
(Parish 12). Assists; Portland 28 (VaJonHne 
»>, Boston 25 ID Johnson ID). 


W L P d. , w 
5 2 714 13 

5 2 714 16 

5 2 714 16 

4 3 371 12 

4 3 371 11 

4 4 380 U 

3 3 300 11 

3 4 329 12 5 706 

1 6 .14} 10 7 388 

1 6 .143 S 12 794 

PACIFIC n 


n t Ati Fullerton St. 

7 10 412 Cal -Santa Bit 

San Jose SI. 
All Games poctiic 

t L PcL Cal- Irvine 


Pd. , w L PcL cal- inrlne 
2 714 13 3 313 nw Mesc Sl. 
2 714 W 4 300 Ulan St. 

2 714 16 4 306 Lana Bch SI. 

3 371 12 4 750 

3 371 11 6 347 

4 300 13 5 722 


I J00 10 9 326 St. John’s US-1) det. Syracuse 82-80. OT; aef. n.t. Rangers » » ' “ 

Conference All Gomes Mem pkUSI.il 5-1 1 del. FlorkJo St. 74^9 .del. New Jermv V 5 163 197 

W L Pd. W L Pd. Virginia Tech 09-79. ,4, 

S 1 333 IS 1 .938 Duke n«) tost to North Comlina St. 09-71; **£,?»* “ | 

5 1 333 11 6 347 det. Ctemsan 10043. SSS 2 19 7 55 min 

* ; ; 2 ■; ; s 2S? s s ; s :» » 

d 2 3 380 6 12 333 OoPom HWI tost to Dayton 6W4. Hart ^ CA u l p BeL1 . ’LnfJr^CE 5 * 

2 4 733 10 8 3S6 North CoroDna (14-4) lost to Georgia Tech CAMP * EL ^ t ? WF . ER EMCE 

n j <m q D m HOlTli DiVttlOO 

0 5 JOO 7 9 338 OMohomo IIS-4) del. Iowa St. 81-74; deL st - 2 !! ! 5 12 !!! 

IVY LEAGUE Kansas 51. 94-75, 2 2 l 2 I7? 199 

Conference Ali Games Oreooe SL (14-2) deL Arlmna 5M5; losi to ! 2 1!! 

W L Pci. W L Pet. Artzono St. 8340. 20T. la » I to 14B m 

3 1 750 10 1 309 Stroeese (12-3) lost lost. John’s 82-81 OT; Toronto 10 32 • » 148 213 

2 1 367 8 6 371 det. Pittsburgh 80-75. . ^ „ .„ 

2 1 667 5 10 733 LouWaoa Tech (16-21 det. McNeese SL O- «nwrton 34 9 6 74 HI « 

1 1 jod 7 7 300 69; tost to Lamar 72-64. Calgary H 17 7 p Hi 192 

I I 300 5 B 705 Indiana 111-41 tost to Purdue 62-52. Iasi la Winnipeg 2 2 1 ^ 21 2 

J I 300 5 8 785 UMnols 52-41. Angetos 20 20 9 49 222 IBS 

a 1 1 300 4 9 700 VlUueoya 113-4) dH. Providence 65-57; losi Vancouver 12 32 7 21 171 271 

1 5 .167 2 13 .133 Maryland 77-74. SUNDAYS RESULTS 

T ATHLETIC Kansas US-41 det. Missouri 7tW8: det. Colo- N.Y. INaoders 0 0 2-1 

nference Ail Games rodo 7MB; l “ } 18 Mlchtol Washington 10 1-5 

>cL W L Pet. GeorgloTecb (15-3) del. Clemson6659; del. Louahlln <10>. SAurptiv (9). Gartner 2 (31). 

1700 IS 2 782 North Carolina 6662. carpenter (38); Bossy (39). Ftattev 114). 

757 11 5 388 Telsa 06-2) deL West Tevas St. 11G90; def. Shotoangeal; N.Y. Islanders (on Rtodn) M- 

.&2S 9 6 329 Southern Illinois 6640. 11—25; Washington (on Hrudev) 12-6-7— 25. 

300 8 9 771 Miehtoop (167) del. Michigan SI. 86-75; det. Boston 2 3 1-8 

300 9 8 329 Kansas 96-77. Hartford 2 1 1—4 

^29 7 « A38 Virginia Com m onwe a lth IH3I def. West Crowder 2 (201. O'Reilly (71. Slelaher (4), 

744 9 II 750 Virginia 7240; det. South Atohame 71-70; last Goring (6), ReU 12), Blum (2), Milbury (21; 

J75 6 11 353 to Aurnamafllrmlnghom 6641 ftoufdd (13). Johnson (Ift.SHtaMII WJ.Difr 

3B6 9 7 363 Nevaao-Las Vegas 115-2) def. New Mexico een (7). Sbatsea gad: Boston (an Milan IS-W- 

im 9 ii m St- W-70; dri. Long Beach St. 7541. 13—28; Horttord (an Keans) 15-12-13-40. 


The Adsoritfed has 

Chris Evert Lloyd celebrates upset of Martina Navndilova. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Girardelli lo Ski in Championships 


BORMIO, Italy (AP) — Marc Girardelli will 


i7i 199 Alpine Sri Qiampioadups bere this week thanks to a last-miiime change 


in the World 


be Division 
34 9 4 74 
25 17 7 57 

25 21 4 54 

20 20 9 49 


of passport. 
The 2l-y< 


announced Monday. 


PACIFIC COAST ATHLETIC 

Conference Ail Games 


W L PCL W L Pet. 
vees 8 0 1700 15 2 782 

I. 6 1 757 11 5 788 

1 St. 5 3 325 9 B 329 

1 Bit) 4 4 300 B 9 771 

SI. 4 4 300 9 8 329 

3 4 729 7 9 438 
e 4 5 744 9 II 750 

lC SI. 3 5 J75 6 II JS} 

2 I S I 7 JO 
■ SI. 0 8 700 2 14 .125 

WEST COAST ATHLETIC 

Conference All Gomes 


s-vth. mvtoton the 21-year-old skier, the current leader in the 1985 Wodd Cup 

Edmonton 34 9 4 M 251 162 s tanding s , has been racing for Luxembourg since the age of 1 3 following a 

wtort£g 25 2 i 4 54 2? 4 2 i 9 dipole with ski officials in his native Austria. 

los Angeles 20 20 9 «9 222 208 "The International Ski Federation has given us today the green light to 

Vancouver 12 32 7 it 171 271 accept Girardclli’s application to compete here," said Bormio spokesman 

SUNDAY'S results G ianni Riane n 

wwilHS"” iow Girardelli skipped the Olympics in Sarajevo last year because of the 

Louohiin (ID). iAurphv (9>. Gartner 2 on. controversy over his nationality. Ski officials expected be would be forced 


nnd set against the hard-hitting 
Medr, a 20-year-old citizen of 
Czechoslovakia who upset No. 2 
seed Jimmy Connors in Satur- 
day’s semifinal. 

The world’s No. 1 player twist- 
ed his right knee while hitting his 
first serve at 30-40 in the second 
game of the second seL He dou- 
ble-faulted on the point to lose 
serve and lost his serve again in 
the sixth game, daring which Me- 
dr pflgwJ him three times, to gp 
down 1-5. 

But McEnroe, who was treated 
twice during changeovers by a 
trainer, ignored the injury and 
roared back to take the next four 
games and the set which eventual- 
ly went to a tie-breaker. 


Lloyd Whips 
Navratilova 

T 

The Associated Press 

KEY BISCAYNE, Florida —“I 
don’t think I’ve ever played that 
well in my life,” Chris Evert Lloyd 
said Sunday after ending a 25- 
month loss-streak in matches 
against Martina Navratilova. 

The former queen of women’s 
tennis whipped her successor, Nav- 
ratilova, 6-2, 6-4 in the finals of the 
Virginia Slims of Florida women's 
tennis tournament after breaking 
Navratilova’s serve in the first and 
third games. 

In the second set, Lloyd scored 
three service breaks, including love 
games in the seventh and ninth 
against Navratilova’s serve. She 
won ter third match point when 
Navratilova looped a forehand 
long- 

“I was a little afraid after the 
first set," Lloyd said at a joyful 
news conference after the 66-min- 
ute match, “because 1 don't think 
I’ve ever played that well in my life. 

“My passing shots and my return 
of serve were the best ever, and I 
have to do that to beat Martina.” 

Navratilova, ranked No. 1. had 
beaten No. 2-ranked Lloyd 13 con- 
secutive times in the past two years. 

“What can l say. 1 just had abad 
day in the office,” said Navratilova. 
“I never got into a rhythm. When 
Tm not hitting 50 percent of my 
[first] serves. I can’t play serve and 
volley. 1 was missing a lor of balls 
by inches, but 1 was missing a lot of 
halls by 10 feeL" 

Navratilova, now tied with 
Lloyd 31-31 in their lifetime series, 
had said Saturday that she thought 
she could teat Lloyd even on a bad 
day. 


Girardelli skipped the Olympics in Sarajevo last year because of the ]|f ¥ ]_ 

coptrovefFy nvgrhk nationali ty Ski officials expected he would be forced uaJirus luOYC Up 
out of the World Championships in this Alpine resort for the same mo i ni 

reason. To SeCOIlQ PlaCC 


corgentor (38); bokv 09). Ftatiev (U). out of the World fliamnifinsht ps in (his Alpine resort for the same 

Shota OB goal : H.Y. [dander* (an Riggin) 84- 

11—25; Washington (on Hrudev) 12-4-7— 2S ‘ Q “Y n - , ... ... ... 

Booted 2 3 3-8 Girardelli tops the men s World Cup standings with 215 points, leading . 

Hhrtfcrd * > i-« PrtTmn Ztirbriffien of Switzerland at 179 and Andreas Wenzel of Uech- united Press international 

OtoiNtar 2 CXI. O'Reilly (ii. mi. tOTgt ^ wfth ITL BUFFALO — The Buffalo Sa- 

N*!rfMd ( n3)?jtomto7S^ smuefTirL out- He beat Wenzel in a super giant slalom race in Gaimisch on Sunday for bres are lucky Gilles Hamd listens 

een 17). snot** g«d: Boston i on Miiien) s-»- seventh World Cup triumph this season. before be shoots. 

100 Keons) Girardefii’s fatha\Helmut, had said last week that his son had sought a *1 tna<fe the play to Gilles Hamel 

Winnipeg i ) m Luxembourg passpOTt to race in Bonnia His presence here makes him — ■ ■■ 

bravy favorite in Ae men’s evmis. WHL FOCUS 

Es. l ” L ” r “" 7 - ,l v!T: Loctridge Beats Bon Ali in Title Fight 

"iL' S S I /St eoHu m .Ltf RIVA DEL GARDA. Italy (UPI) — Rocky Lockridge of the United made a perfect pass on my stick," 
n n.McKwnev mi. stetson ooai: Minneso- Stales defeated Tiudsbui c Mtai ge r Kamd Boa AH cm Sunday to retain said Mike Foligno Sunday ni^it 
to (on Hai ton) 16-14-22—52; n.y. Rm»n (on his World Boxing Association j nninr lightweight title with a sixth round after Hamel set up his game-win- 
Metoftfc*) 1M4L.27. technical knockout. ning goal m Buffalo’s 3-2 victory 

sumo i 2 9—3 The victrey boosted Lockridge’s career mark to 35 wins against three over the Quebec Nordiques. 

Foligno 3 ( 2 D>. Andreychuk i 26 ); Bed i6). losses. Bou Ah now stands 17-1-1 after sustaining his first defeat in eight The goat which came at 1 8:07 of 
££££ years of sporadic professional fighting. the second period was the second 

6—29. “I just overpowered hint, lockndge said after the victory, vdnoi power-play tally of the night for 

Toronto j * j-6 earned him $200,000, his biggest career payday. Foligno and helped the Sabres 

vaive2(32).Frvcer ( 20 ), ihnocnk (i2), Lee- . n 1 T J tt ti n*- i avenge a 4-2 loss at Quebec Friday 

mon (31. Gavin (9); Savard ( 26 ). Lnlak 1111. FOStCF BrCaKS llldOOr Hlirdle Mark night 

SMtaoaooal: Toronto (on Ba nn er manl 11-14- -tl_ -.u-j n,,rr i 

9-34; OiKBOo (on BtonhordH l?*7-37. (CHICAGO fAPi — Ohrmoian Gn» Foster, rannin? before tm ■ viLtory enaDIM Buffalo to 


Gonzogo 
Peoperdlne 
Santa Clara 
SL Mary's 
San Dfoga 


ContorwiceAll Games fjmlo 


W L Pd. 

3 1 J 

3 1 3 

2 1 7 

2 I 3 
1 2 J 

1 2 J 


l JS) 13 S TO 

1 350 14 7 767 

1 767 13 6 784 

1 767 10 8 SU 

2 .333 12 6 767 

2 733 1 9 JOO 


Golf 



College Remits 

EAST 

■Cast Mon 51 88, Lvnten St W 
Dow Una 81, Kean 88 (OT1 
st. Tlio, Aquinas m. Hawall-HIto 72 
SOUTH 

Armstrong SL 88, Berry 60 
E. Kentucky 74 Vaunastawn Sl. 41 
Georgia Tech 66. North Carolina 62 
Mtoyiana 77, VUlanovA 74 
T um oAMui 81, Kentucky 65 
Virginia 54 Arkansas 52 

MIDWEST 

, Beloit 71. Mingle Cell. 59 
Cent Michigan 9% No. imnto* so 
CratoMan 71, Marawett* 59 
Illinois 52, Indiana 41 
Weft toon 9 a Kansas 77 
'Monmouth 53. SL NartxrTi 52 
SOUTHWEST 
rexn AAM 71. Houston 69 
FAR WEST 

=resne 5L 55, Cto-Satoe Barham 45 


Oregon SL 

Southern Cal 

UCLA 

Washington 

Arizona 

Arizona St. 

Oregon 

Wtnli inatar St. 

Stanford 

California 


1 XD II 

2 -750 9 
2 JT4 13 
J J71 13 

4 XS 8 

5 .284 7 
5 J86 18 

5 .167 9 

6 .141 9 


C 4 SOB 10 9 .526 ^ 

WESTERN ATHLETIC Carey Povla S27J00 

Conference All Games Croto S rod tor. S14533 
W L Pet. W L PO. Garv Ku ch. MASH 


Final scam and earatan In Hm Lm Abbb- 

toc oam Gelt Taamamaat whkS Hdtd Stm- 

day m itt« 4M6-yar4 par-71 (Uytara Country 
a Ufa c aana: 

Lannv Wadkins. StlOOO 63-70-6746— 264 
Hal Suttoa 54X200 6664-7069-271 


SOUTHWEST 


So. Methodist 
Houston 
Yens Tech 
Texas ASM 
Arkansas 
Texas 

Texas Christa 

Rice 

Bavtor 



Conform** All Gomes 

w L 

Pet. 

W 

L 

Pet. 


1 

557 

16 

2 

589 


l 

533 

13 

4 

765 


1 

714 

12 

5 

J06 


2 

747 

12 

5 

.706 


3 

-571 

13 

6 

584 


5 

575 

ID 

B 

566 


5 

.286 

ID 

8 

556 

1 

6 

.143 

B 

9 

471 

T 

6 

.143 

8 

ID 

444 


Texas- El Peso 
Brigham Yana 
New Mexico 
San Dleao Sl. 
Colorado St. 
Wyoming 
Utah 

Air Farce 
Hawaii 


. Pet. W L Pci. Gary Koch, 814533 

1 775 15 5 JSO Chip Beck, 414533 

2 .750 13 7 732 Pooler, 312050 

2 .714 12 6 767 Larry Rlnker. *1X050 

2 .714 14 4 J78 Larry Mize. S12050 


2 700 11 
4 JOO II 
1 39 I 
4 JOO 4 


INDEPENDENTS 


BIG EIGHT 

Conference All Garries 
w L Pet w L Pet. 
4 0 1JH0 15 4 J» 


DoPaui 
Noire Dame 
Marauetta 
Texas- San Antnlo 
SW Louisiana 
Pan American 
Chicago Sl. 

Utica 

Radford 

Stetson 


5 A47 Scan Simpson. 512AS0 
8 5* BreM Upper, 510X00 
13 JSO Mark O'Meara. t&SOO 
11 J67 Howard Twllty. 5&800 
13 J35 George Burns. S7J00 
Calvin PMle. *7.280 
. Pet. Mark Lve. 57 XB 

I .765 Gil Morgan, tSJH 

.765 Keith Fergus. *5700 
: .714 Mike Re Id. &UOO 

70S Jack Nicklaus. *5700 
> 725 Georga Archer. *020 

: Tto Dan Pohl. S4320 

563 Bruce Uenke. *4320 
550 Andy Bean. *020 
52 0 Fred CaualM. SX36 
500 Tam Watson, S3J67 
.474 Po»ne Slewaii. *3207 


6HM744-264 

66- 66-7079 — 271 
68-70-64-70— Z73 
6879-7077-273 
6666-70-71—273 
71-6676*70-273 
694670-70-275 
71-70-65-69—275 
7079-71-73— TO 
47-71-47-73-275 
68-69-70-69— Z74 

67- 67-74 69 277 

67- 7348-69 — 277 
49-22-6*79-278 

68- 70-70-70-27$ 
6*47-70-72-278 
7079-71-69 — 279 

70- 7049-70-2)9 
67-7348-71—279 
47-71-70-71-279 

71- 69-69-71—280 
71-7046-73— 280 

66- 7078-76-280 
47-7177-75-380 
71-71-6*71—281 

67- 7*72-72—28 1 
7047-72-73—281 


r^-tadntrnta*" 13 lon KBBns) Girarddli's father, Helmut, had said last week that his sou had sought a 

Winnipeg 3 2>-4 Luxembourg passpOTt to race in Bormkx His presence here makes him 

ibe heavy favorite in the men’s events. 

Lockndge Beats Bou Ali in Tide Fight 

■■iass LKtwtl M. l .VJi RIVA DEL GARDA, Italy (UPI) — Rocky Lockridge of the United 
intSSSSiimiM‘» doo if Minneso- States defeated Tunisian challenger Kamd Bou AH on Sunday to retain 


“I just overpowered him,” Lockndge said after the victory, which 
1 4 earned him $200,000, his biggest career payday. 

SSSSS Foster Breaks Indoor Hlirdle Mark 

nol; Toronto ton Bonnermon 1 11-14- 

licapo (on Bernhardt) 12*7-27. CHICAGO (AP) — Olympian Greg Foster, running before an appre- 

dative hometown crowd , broke Renaldo Nehemiah’s world indoor best 

“ in the 50-meter hurdles of the Bally Invitational Track and Field meet 

Transition Foster's 6.30 time in his qualifying heat Sunday broke Nehemiah’s 

record of 6.36 seconds set in 1979. 

NcrttoMi i LOTut “My start did it,” Foster said of the record. “I’ve quit worrying about 

san fran ci sco- Trade* Gan- Loveito. the rest of the race and started worrying about the start.” 

SSTJ; " T ^ l .' s j™ ij e rirel » f Ndwmh-t reconb," be said. "The one 1 really 

Hrioer. wanted is the 55 meters (60-yard hurdles.) 


over the Quebec Nordiques. 

The goal which came at 1 8:07 of 
the second period, was the second 
power-play tally of the night for 
Foligno and helped the Sabres 
avenge a 4-2 loss at Quebec Friday 
night 

The victory enabled Buffalo to 
regain second place from the Nor- 
diques in the Adams Division with 

56poims. 

^ Elsewhere, Washington beat the 


really Minnesota 3-2 and Toronto defatt- 
ed Chicago b-2. 







Page 16 


ART BUCHWALD 

Words to Remember 


W ASHINGTON — Now that 
the inauguration is over, his- 
torians can ponder some of the 
great words spoken during the 
weekend by statesmen who partici- 
pated in the events. 

Probably the most memorable 
were not uttered by President Rea- 
gan in his inaugural address, but by 


pn in hi< j n augur 
Frank Sinatra, 
who told “En- 
urmameat To- 
night’s” Barbara 
Howar, "You’re 
all dead, every 
one of you. 
You're all 
dead." 

At the time it 
was believed 
Sinatra was re- 
acting to a piece 


• jfl W pE 



Bnchwald 


about him in The Washington Post 
concerning his association with 
Hollywood’s so-called “Rat Pack." 

But after giving it a lot of 
thought, Washington historians are 
now divided on the meaning of the 


singer’s outburst. 


Last Friday night the issue was 
discussed at the “2 Did It My Way 
Bar and Grill” 

A reporter from the National 
Review said, “1 can’t believe Frank 
was talking about the press. No one 
let him finish his sentence. What he 
was trying to teO us was that we 
were all dead if we didn't support 
President Reagan’s 'Star Wars’ 
program.” 

A columnist from The Washing- 
ton Post disagreed. *T ran the tape 
of his remarks over and over a gain 
and he was talking about the me- 
dia. The only thing I haven’t decid- 
ed is whether he meant it figura- 
tively or literally." 

“I’m sore be didn't mean it liter- 
ally." a lady from Women's Wear 
Daily said. “Even Frank Sinatra 
couldn’t put out a contract on every 
person covering the inauguration. 
My interpretation of his remarks is 

'Vineyard' Wine Goes Official 

United Pros International 

BOSTON — The resort island 
Martha’s Vineyard will become an 
official winemaking area Sunday. 
The designation by the federal Bu- 
reau of Alcohol Tobacco and Fire- 
arms means a bottle of wine made 
in Massachusetts from Martha’s 
Vineyard napes may cany the des- 
ignation "Maltha’s Vineyard." 


that we woe all dead as far as 
talking to him was concerned." 

"But we've aQ been dead for 
years in Frank’s mind," a CBS re- 
porter protested. “That’s not 
news." 

□ 

“It was only news,” I said, “be- 
cause Frank was in charge of the 
inaugural gala. Fm inclined to gp 
along with my colleague from the 
National Review that Sinatra’s 
words were rrrismterprcied. I have 
it from a high source m the surgeon 
general's office that what Frank 
was really trying to say was that 
we’d all be dead if we had to cover 
the inaugural parade in min us- 20- 
degree weather. His main concern 
was that we would bundle op and 
keep warm.” 

Howar, the only one who had 
been there, said, "He didn’t sound 
as if he was worried about me get- 
ting pneumonia." 

“Frank never likes to show his 
true feelings," I told her. "Every 
time a sparrow falls, he cries.” 

The Washington Post reporter 
refused to be persuaded. “I still 
believe he wanted us all dead. May- 
be not dead dead, but enough so we 
would never write about him 
again." 

A photographer from People 
magazine said, “Is it possible 
Frank was saying we’d all be dead 
if we bet (m the Miami Dolphins in 
the Super Bowl?" 

*Could be." I agreed. "Now that 
you mention it, Frank was always a 
big '49ets fan." 


The Wall Street Journal man 
said, “The big question is, if Sinatra 
was referring only to the media, 
was he speaking for the administra- 
tion or just himself?" 

“Ronald Reagan doesn’t want us 
all dead," Sam Donaldson said. “1 
talk to him every day." 

“What about the CIA?" 

"No one knows who they want 
dead and who they don’t,” a report- 
er from Jack Anderson's office 
mused. 

I insisted on having the last 
word. “I don't believe we’re in a 
position to jndge what Frank 
meant by h is remarks. The impor- 
tant thing is, they wiD be remem- 
bered long after all the other 1985 
inaugural utterances are forgotten, 
and win be an inspiration to gener- 
ations of inaugural gala chairmen 
for years to come.” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1985 

'Beverly Hills Cop’ May Be 
Omen of a One-Film Future 


By Vincent Canby 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — In "Room 
666," a short documentary, 
the German director Wim Wend- 
ers (“Paris, Texas") asks a num- 
ber of directors attending the 
1982 Cannes Him Festival to 
comment on the future of theatri- 
cal films. Not unexpectedly it is 
Jean-Luc Godard whose remarks 
are the most ironic, outrageous 
and cogent. 

Beginning by describing the 
impromptu symposium as "an in- 
quest on the future of films," Go- 
dard goes on to say, among other 
t h i ng s , that Hollywood’s ultimate 
goal is to make one — just one — 
superblock bus ter a year that will 
be seen by absolutely everybody. 
Hollywood, he knows, is not espe- 
cially interested in movies as a 
means of expression, self-exami- 
nation or even emertainmeoL 
Hollywood’s primary interest is 
profits, and what more efficient 
way to run a b usiness ihan by 
annually manufacturing one all- 
new, snperimproved, all-purpose 
item thru, somehow manages to 
satisfy everyone. 

Last month, during the Christ- 
mas-New Year holiday season, 
traditionally one of the biggest 
moviegoing periods of any year, it 
seemed, as usual that Godard 
had been a lot more prescient 
than his colleagues. What he pre- 
dicted in 1982 bad almost come to 
pass tn 1984: One out of every 
three movie tickets sold in the 
holiday period was for "Beverly 
Hills Cop," the comparatively in- 
expensive (S 14-million) Eddie 
Murphy comedy that opened in 
Dec. 5, by the end of the holiday 
season had earned SI 00 milli on in 
domestic rentals. 

[After seven weeks of release, 
"Beverly Hills Cop” had earned 
$122.1 million. The Associated 
Press reported.) 

Yet the success of “Beverly 
Hills Cop" is also another, rather 
scary demonstration of the way in 
which society is being increasing- 
ly homogenized, possibly through 
the pervasive power of television 
to plant the same ideas, the same 
fears and the same fads in more 
people, more quickly, than has 
ever before been possible. Only in 
a society where impulse buying is 


encouraged and where anything 
less than instant gratification is 
regarded as dangerously frustrat- 
ing can success be made — and 
unmade — so qtuckly. 

There is noway of idling exact- 
ly how the “Beverly HiDs Cop" 
phenomaon will affect the think- 
ing of the Hollywood power men. 
These are not the actual produc- 
ers but the financiers, the bank- 
ers. They have the final word on 
which films get made and which 
are put — in the jargon of ihe 
trade — in “turnaround.” a term 
that suggests a limbo where 
screenplays forever float like the 
loose objects in a space capsule. 

We may end up with be more 
Eddie Murphy comedies than can 
be easily absorbed even by a pub- 
lic that dotes on him. as well as 
the “disco very" of a number of 
Eddie Murphy look-alikes. More 
probable, and more insidious, will 
be the increasingly obsessive im- 
pulse to make Inal one special 
film that will swamp the competi- 
tion by having some thing for ev- 
eryone. And, as the costs of pro- 
duction and distribution rise, that 
impulse becomes more and more 
risky fra- the financiers, and less 
and less promising for the people 
who want to make movies that 
cannot immediatdy be identified 
with some earlier hit. 

In its 79th anniversary issue, 
which came out fan. 16, the show- 
business weekly Variety pub- 
lished what amounts to a profile 
of the U. S. movie business as it is 
reflected in the profit-and-loss 
statements of individual films. 
Though the reporter, Lawrence 
Cohn, reports that about half of 
whal he calls 1984’s “megabuck” 
movies — those costing at least 
$14 million — would at least 
break even, the losses of mega- 
buck movies that do not break 
even are staggering. 

Cohn says a film stands a good 
chance of making a profit if its 
domestic rentals “approach” the 
cost of the film’s production, also 
referred to as "the negative cost.” 
Domestic rentals are defined as 
the portion of U. S, and Canadian 
box office receipts returned to the 
distributor after the theater's 
costs have been deducted. 

Domestic rentals, he writes, 
"generally dictate the value of the 


film in all subsequent markets," 
including foreign theaters, sales 
or video cassettes, cable televi- 
sion, network TV and television 
syndication. 

The kinds of profits possible 
today certainly are alluring. 
“Ghostbusters" I984’s most suc- 
cessful film, earned 5127 million 
in domestic rentals against a neg- 
ative cost of $32 million. "Indiana 
Jones and the Temple of Doom,” 
with a negative cost of 527 mil- 
lion. had domestic rentals of $109 
million. In addition to “Beverly 
Hills Cop,” the year's other big 
moneymakers include “Grem- 
lins," “Terms of Endearment” (a 
holdover from 1983), “The Kara- 
te Kid” and “Star Trek Ql." 

Now for the bad news: 

“Swing Shift,” Goldie Hawn’s 
charming World War U comedy, 
directed by Jonathan Demme, 
cost $16 million but has brought 
in $4 million in domestic rentals, 
which probably doesn’t even cov- 
er advertising and publicity. 
George Roy Hill’s “Utile Drum- 
mer Girl” with Diane Keaton in 
the adaptation of the John le 
Carre novel has earned S3 .5 mil- 
lion on a negative cost of $15 
million. Brian De Palma's “Body 
Double” has brought in $3.7 mil- 
lion against a St 9- mini on nega- 
tive COSL 

Whether or not “Beverly Hills 
Cop" catches up with “Ghost bus- 
ters" in terms of total income, the 
Murphy film is mind-boggling for 
the speed with which it has earned 
so much money, and this may be 
of more significance in the long 
run than its earnings. In raking in 
so much in such a short time, 
industry pundits say. it was taking 
money away from other new 
films , notably “The Colton Club” 
(cost: $48 million) and "Dune” 
($42 million). 

Godard's vision of a one-movie 
future may not be all that fanci- 
ful not because the producers 
suddenly decide that one movie is 
enough but because the members 
of the public, increasingly sheep- 
like, decide, for whatever reasons, 
that they want to see just one 
movie. 

In December, “Beverly Hills 
Cop” was that movie. 




ifi! 




mmm 

X * *te V >C : w W.V* w.*i 


Eddie Murphy in “Beverly HiDs Cop.” 

Murphy: Mister Sof tee’s Loss 

By Dean Lokken 

Reuters 

L OS ANGELES — As a teen-ager he worked in nightclubs for $25 
# a day. Now. at 23, be is Hollywood’s latest superstar, a $75- 

milli nn-a -month draw. 

Eddy Murphy’s latest film, “ Beverly Hills Cop,” in which he plays 
a smart-mouthed Detroit policeman chasing 3 kifler in California, 
has averaged about $2.5 milli on a day since it opened Dec. 5. 

In films, on televirion and records. Murphy slips chamdeo alike in 
and out of impersonations — of his hero Elvis Presley, of the 
singer /composer Stevie Wonder, of an Irish priest. 

He began doing impersonations as a child on Long Island, 
mimi c king Bugs Bunny and Laurel and Hardy. His father was a 
Brooklyn policeman who died when Eddie was 3. His mother later 
married an ice-cream factory foreman. 

Murphy says his early aim was to own a Mister Softee ice-cream 
truck, but that was before he discovered how his routines affected 
the opposite sex. “Girls started screaming, and I said . . . you can’t 
make girls scream in a Mister Softee truck.” 

At 15 he started taking his routines to local bars and youth centers. 
Five years ago. he tried the Comic Strip, a popular Manhattan 
nig htclub. His quick, often raunchy humor encouraged the club’s co- 
owners, Robert Wachs and Richie Tienken, to become his managers. 

From the Comic Strip, it was an easy leap to television's “Saturday 
Night Live.” Murphy stayed four seasons, winning a national 
audience and cafrhm g the attention of filmmakers. Next month he 
will take his act on a 28-city tour. 

Last month he was booked at the Comic Strip for a benefit for the 
Save the Children Federation's Ethiopian food fund. A snowstorm 
kept him from making it, but he donated $20,000, twice the amount 
collected in ticket sales. 


PEOPLE 


4 Top Golden Globes 
Awarded to 'Amadeus* 

Milos Foreman's film “Ama- 
deus,” dealing with the rivalry be- 
tween Wolfgang Amadens Mozart 
and Antonio Salieri, swept, four top 
awards in the 42d annual Golden 
Globe presentations by the Holly- 
wood Foreign Pres Association: 
best movie drama; best screenplay, 
for its adaptation of Peter Staffers 
play: best actor, F. Murray Abra- 
ham, who played Salieri; and best- 
director, Foreman. David Lean's 
“A Passage to India" won best for- 
eign film, best original film score 

AdKMrft^SSer^ awaids:^fo^ 
man ning the Stone.” best movie 
comedy, and its Kathleen Tomer, 
best actress in a movie comedy; 
Safly ReJd, best actress in a movie 
drama, “PI aces in the Heart”; Dud- 
ley Moore best actor in a movie 
comedy, “Midti & Maude.” 


A dramatic escape from a Soviet 
prison, detailed in a new book, has 
been characterized as total inven- 
tion by forma* officials of the U. S. 
Embassy in Moscow. “Transit 
Point Moscow" by Gerald Amster 
and Bernard AsbeB, was published 
Friday by Holt, Rinehart & Win- 
ston. Amster, arrested with two 
other Americans during a stopover 
at the Moscow airport in June 
1976, confessed in a trial open to 
Western journalists that the three 
had intended to smuggle heroin 
from Kuala Lumpur to Amsterdam 
via Paris. Sentenced to eight years 
in a labor camp. Amster was re- 
leased in December 1980 under a 
section of the Soviet criminal code 
applicable to prisoners with chron- 
ic mental disease: Amster said the 
claims about mental illness masked 
an agreement between U.S. and 
Soviet officials concerning his re- 
lease. Bui State Department docu- 
ments for the period in question 
quote Amster as having trad U. S. 
consular officials in Moscow that 
during three months between Au- 
gust 1979 and February 1980 — the 
time that Amster said he was hid- 
ing out in Moscow after his escape 1 
— he was undergoing psychiatric 
treatment in a Soviet hosphaL’The 
whole story of the escape is a fanta- 
sy," said Steven R. Mans, then vice 
consul at the U.S. Embassy in 
Moscow and now a State Depart- 
ment official in Washington. T. 
Dennis Reece, who wasa U. S. vice 
consul in Moscow, also also denies 


LEGAL NOTICES 


M IHE SUPREME COURT 
OF SOUTH AfVCA 
DURBAN AND COAST LOCAL 
DIVISION 

CASE NO 7602/84 

M THE MATTES BETWEEN: 
PATBOA ANN MORACHA _ 

— PVxitiff 
and 

MISHA MOftACHA — Defender* 

BSCTALOTAnON 

To: MISHA MOBACHA, «Ut ™te, 
2193 Broad- 


moor, Polni Springs, 

LOTTED STATES OF AMBBCA and 1 
Place du Tertre, PAfitS 18 TH, FRANCE, 
but whom prosert whereabouts 
itfAnovmt 

TAKE NOTICE that by summm sued 
out of the court yw haw been cdbd 
upon to grvs notice, writer one (?) 
marfh after pubteotian hot no#, lo me 
imjuIiui and to tbn □ItetelTi tftornoy* 
ofyaur intention to defend ff arryj si cn 
aeben wherein 

PATRICIA AIM MOBACHA dans 

S A decree of cfvorai 
An order that sole gweiiandep end 
custody of the minor difld. MASCO 
CHARLES, bom on 1 5 October 1901 
be awarded to the pMntifi. 

Q Cadi o f sut 'm the event that Ihe 
de fcn c k rt defends the action off 
D] Further or afcmative reSef. 

TAKE NOTICE RJRTHS that if you 
faB to {jve such notice, judgment may 
ho granted agarref you wrfnouf further 
reference to you. 

DATED at DURBAN tfu 3 Sh day of 
November, 1984 

Chapman Dyer Incorporated 
PkentifFs attorneys 
4 th Hoar, NJLS. BuWng 
300 Smith Street, Durban 
BepuhEr of South Africa 


MOVING 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


INTERDEAN 


WHO Et 5 E FOR YOUR 
NEXT INTERNATIONAL MOVE 

PO* A FREE ESTIMATE CALL 

J On 1 * 9 . 93.24 
01 ) 961 . 72.12 
03 6523111 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL 

NBCTTO COLOGNE/BONN 

Wefl done construction apuilinortt 
house with 24 umfe - 1 to 3 hod me ns - 
UHOufciit location, ides price DM 5.98 
mMoa fuly rented, rertd income pa 
DM 32 0 F« further detab. ptease 
ronfoefc 

UJBtBi a OUWEKG 
Dodtentedener Sir. 30 
D -2000 Hanborg 55 
Tefc West Germany 
10 ) 40-86 36 2 / 

Telex 2173509 UP D 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


AGENCE DE L’ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

330 26 08 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA 


SB 




GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


SALES 

Muwfcdurcr of security amwncD- 
bora ft coyntef-inteftgcnce equipment 
ap»icfing European sdst tarn Wto 
seek successful dam with proven (fi- 
red scJos experience. High earrings, 




GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 




EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 




ST ANDRE DES ARTS 

TPS 7 AW, England' " | IWt.owitwy buMngJreac *>**> + 

mostK&tuntoOus residence. I bed- F76OJ0U Tdb 223 64 54 


Register of the Supreme Court view, gangs. FI 
Esplanade. tSjrban Goimii* oEtOO < 

wTn.GriAM3401 


56 sojtv. My 
trap terrace. Sea 

OtfSn. SSI 47 la 
im [ 93 ] 38 19 19 



Apartments in Mantraux cm Lake 
Geneva. Abo axcAtbie In f rewo u* 
moantdn retort*: ViJcts, Verier, let , 
ftatterets, Cheteai D'Oex near 
Gstaod, leysn- Chalets ovedable. Bc- 
cefcnt oeportunttes far foreran®*. 

Priam from SFI 2 ^ 000 . 
liberal mo rtgage s at 6 W 6 interest. 

GLCBfc PLAN SJL 
Av Mon Repos 24 , 1005 Lousawie, 
Switreriand. Tel: pll 22 35 12 
Telex- 25 185 MBJS CH 
Tin Terraco* of Geneva Golf end 
Country Onb - Lovely towrtoouses 
avertable cl atupctive prices. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


P o rti on of officers to be held March 
21 Nommotio rs nrev open. Ary demo- 
crat Weeuet n njmng, pteatooorv 
tort Dorothy Zener, Bodcm, 377 . 
2994 NJ-The Hague, The Netherionm. 
Tefc 070 4764 m before Feb. 12 


International Business Message Center 


International Secretarial Positions 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


COLLATERAL 

lAto oar prowde prime bote notification 
of wtaertd for arbitrage t sixu o rttore . 
Reasonable fees. Prompt service. 
London based. Tdex 0951622. 

Tefc 01-385 5*97 / 01-930 8926 


PERSONALS 


HAPPY aattHDAY JOHN BOSSANT 
- Tha bat b yet to be. 

MOVING 

; 

ALLIED 


VAN LINES INTL 

OVB 1000 AGB4T5 

IN UJJfc. - CANADA 

350 WQRUMMDE 

FREE BflMATB 

PARIS Draborxto* hitomatirtwti 
{01J 343 23 44 

HtANWUCT JST32? 

(069)250)66 

MUNICH I.M5. 

(0*9) 142244 


1 rWJTVMJ Miirauiaw 

lAJIWUW InH Marina 

(01) 9S3 3636 

CAIRO ABtad Vrel Una* Inti 
(20-2) 712901 

USA Afiwf Vai linos hrtl Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 




U. S. A. 

OPPORTUNITY 

Industry located in the Sun Belt, 


with ample equity protection. 
Write to co nfidence tos 
Bax 1630. Herald Triune, 
92521 New Cedax, France. 


BUSINESS SERVICES j OFFICE SERVICES 


2 WUCH-ZUR 1 CH-ZURICH 

BAHNHOfSIRASSC 52 
TOW? OFFICE AWAT FKOM HOftC 

• Office. 1 ' Moragemert Services 

• Company Formaeon&s 

• Hew to do Bums m/a/ 

FSOM SWITZERLAND 
Brai n—* Send—* Consult Cora, 
aahnhoftrraae S7 CH-802? Zur A 
Tefc 01/711 97 07 . Thu 013 OB 


YOUR RAMSHED ORKE 
M IOMXM 

• 7 day 74 hour occgg & areweiphone 
■ FuS support services fncWn® 

se c re n yial. telex, ropyxig. «. 

• Corporate Representation Service 

• SkxI or long term awxtabfcty 
Werfcf-WM* Bramoes Contra* 

1 10 The Steand loadcn WC2SOAA 
T*L- 01 836-0918 Dxr 24973 



ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Dept HI, 

3 Victoria St 
Doogien. Id* af Man. 

TikOiZi 26591 
Telex 627691 SUVA G 


MBS • LYON • MARSOIE 
IIUES MCE 

Ml moving by spuds? ham major 

dbw in France to <dl ahes in the wand. 
Tol free fr om France 16 <051 74 10 82 
ras fisiMunir 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Imp o rtan t American Group 
ip e dafa t d *i Ihe agMxmes. 
srtuded m the heart at PAMS 
5«efa 

to enhance its operation. 

SECRETARY 
SHORTHAND TYPIST 

B 4 GUSH MOTHBt TONGUE 

She v«fl handle dl generd le c i etanol 
dot** te l eph one , telex, maJ, fifcng. 
booUng ap p oint m ent* for otmol wool 

The successful ca v hdotB wiE have o 
BTS or tindv. previous e e p w nce & if 
pemibie btowedge of office equipment 

Weose aiiess handw ritten Irtte r, CV, 
photo and salary requirefnentsd Im 


Com a ne Pufcficte. 20. Aw* Opera, 
75040 Paris Cede* 01 who wd lorwara 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


of on * 4 bi noti onal orporxzaeon in 

F r mn a recruiting fat 

iTSMUtmNGUAL rWtG POOL 

1 SENIOR TYPIST/ 
PROOFREADER 
ft 1 QUALIFIED TYPIST 

Appicatiam with CV. & photograp h 
should be sent re soon as parade n > 

M1B PA. Under Ref. 3941 
BP 508 

75066 Parii Cede* 02 «4>o «*l forwred. 


MALE TYPIST 

for American tow firm 
Evetengt & weekend pantion, long term 
a u rgnment. Spoken French & raid 
wartong papers. Call 322 76 96. 




i«a 


CUITURAL CENTER needs young b- 
finguol sertetory. Engfah mother 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY / or hostess. 
Cremopofiton German tody, 30s. at- 
troctnm. encebert presert o twn, imdfc. 
rant, traveled worldwide. E ngfah / 
Sierthand. knowledge af French & 
tfaian. Excedenr refa-ences from Eu- 
rope &ov*neas, BenUe, free to relo- 
cate & travel. JMb new chaSengjng 
position rath mil busumiiman, PR, PA, 


m 


*-■ 758 12 40 Porx#* 




tongue, permaner* posmon. worbng segetQ Qisopd. howl g ynp cn yi or 


papers eswnftof. Send CVS Ms. ftthop,. 
AmefKoi Canter, 261 Bd. Raspai.l 
75014 Peris I 


ortnm. PDnly lenota offenL Please 
write to Baa 2111 . IHT, Friednchsri, 
15. P-400Q FronicfurT/Mren. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 

rar hench/EnaMi^weM seeks of- 


. . i; 


are Frandi/EngStit/SwaM]. seefo of- 
fice work, some typmg. telex, switch- 
board experience, wit eonoder any 


wira experience, wit aawder any 
• ftara - S» nou * rdfer* only. 

15 W. Herald Tribune, 92521 

Ne«x»y Cedex, Frreice. 




MNCRVC SWS for amEBCAN 
RUMS to PAtoS- 

Engtoh, Belgian, Dutch or German 
tecretaries, knov4edoe of French re- 
qu*«d, English shortKond. Bingud 
tekxars. Write or phorv* 138 Avenue 
V ictor Hias, 75116 Ports, Froxe. Tel: 
727 61 69. 


tvA; '.iK ’ZJ, 


SECRETARY — 

AIR STEWARDESS 

Age 22 to 35 fw this demoncKng but very intomting 
petition with on international group of companies. Al- 
though working moMy in their London office, there h o 
certain amount af flying Involved on their executive air- 
craft. This position vrffl only wit someone who is obie to 
work flexible hours. 

It is essential that applicants have ai excellent knowledge 
of French, a confident telephone manner together with 
suitable office and in-flight experience. 

A top salary and other benefit* c o m me nsurate with the 
position are offered. 

Please send CV. , recent passport photograph and names 
of three referees ter 

Box 34,7 35, laiemutioaMl Herald Tribune. 

6S Loop Acre. I mu don WCZ£, England. 


(J) Synthelabo 

a French Pharmaceutical Group 
is seeking an 

ASSISTANT TO THE 
DEVELOPMENT MANAGER 

FOR ITS RESEARCH CENTER IN CLINICAL NUTRITION. 

In addition to secretarial duties, 
the successful applicant will be responsible for : 

— the definition and fallow-up of research plans. 

— the organisation of development reunions. 

— the preparation of official files for various Ministries. 

At least 5 years secretarial experience with similar responsibilities is 
essential and the candidate should he bilingual (French -English ; 
a third language is desirable. 

Locution : Initially at Meudon (921 followed by Nanterre (92). 

Applications in writing, including C.V . phi u>i .mil 
preienlinni should be adrcsscd under relcrenic 15 to ' 

M> D. VOLTZ - SYNTHELABO 
/ 22. avenue Galilee 

\ 1 / V2iSI * Lt pl ESSIS ROBINSON (FRANCE).