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Narrows Dispute on Price Cuts 


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W 7S» Associated Press 

GENEVA — OPEC narrowed 
_ ast S- its disagreements Tuesday on a 
n a lX?i P^n to reduce prices, according to 
the otganiration’s president 
uJ” 10 * « tK.®'- After rooming and" afternoon 

4*5 best sesaoos, the namsteiB called a rer 

cess. A planned late-evening ses- 
sion was later canceled, and. the 
next meeting set for Wednesday. 


FV*£F'i 

y - 


of OPEC, said the size of the pro- 
posed price cuts was the main poiin 
of contention inside the meeting. 

“We made progress in the sense 
that we narrowed** tire difference in 
views among the ministers, he f»fd 
during a break in the talks 
Because OPEC is seeking to raise 


lr anunK 
detaihd i 


Pressure on the Organization of 
petroleum Exporting Commies to 


the- price of its least expensive ofls 

while cutting prices for the prami- dozensof diner 


ctaracie-j 7 > L aQc *£ take decisive action was heightened 
>\ fe-nr-rdr 6 hj, when Egypt, an .observer, left the 

'&s*2yj 


The dollar moved higher in late 
U.S- (ndtag and die pomd sta- 
bilized Tuesday. Page 7. 


. . The Egyptian, walkout was 

iaraard M a setback in OPECs ef- 

•y b\ H^lr fadtogahi cooperation from 

a ■"* "" 

Anencans 

1C MOiCOtt jj- , 

OPEC. He said he 


crudes produced by Sand Arabia 
and some others. 

Mr. Sobrato bad said Monday 
that Nigeria-wanted to narrow the 
S4 spread to $2, while Sandi Arabia 
favored S25XX Evm if they could 
what tiro spread should be, 
ministers still faced the task of 
ices for each of the 
ferent grades of OPEC 
ofl. 

The organization is under pres- 
sure to set new prices because, un- 
der the current prices, some mem- 
ber countries cannot find 
customers for their allocated share' 


m, mate. fl« ovmn dtat of any * 0PEC ^ b ono 


I uies outside its ranks. 
t ■ Egypt's ofl minister, Abdul-Hadi 

I*. Kandn, said bis country did not duction of approximately 2£ J^ots 
gton to oratinue cooperating with in the price otagalloa<3iniieta}of 
~ "* ' re had grown tired refined petroleum products, «nrf> 


changes is likely to be small, con- 
ference participants have said 
Each Si cut in the price of a 
barrel of oQ is equivalent to n re- 


bee, Nigeria cm its prices by up to 
$2 a bared without OPEC approv- 
al, in reaction to smaller cuts by 
two nonmember producers, Britain 
andNorway. 

The pricing plans under discos- 


Egypt’s oil price. - 
Wi hi October, OPEC invited Egypt 
jn «-t- r T?' Cc la attend a meeting as : an official 
• .v!,Vr observer. The Egyptians accepted 
:~V f and pledged solidarity with the car- 
;-.t- l *a | c. Afflft. td while dedining to seek member- 
ship. 

p*:r rr,t Wa-ti-j Afterward, Subroto. who is In- 
doueria's ofl minister and president 


Arabian fight oil, at S29 a band, 
is OPECs benchmark price. Prices 
for OPECs other grades of ofl are 
arranged above or below Arabian 
light, depending on the offs quali- 
ty- 

. OPEC prices range from 530.50 
a bared for the top-quality extra- 
light crude oh produced by Algeria 
to. $2650 for the lowest-quality 


U.K. Miners Offer Plan, 


:n;3 But Strike Talks Blocked 

): UTjliSES^ ■ • • 

Tier." :r. 2 pV- v - • ffieAssa 

• -• V" ai£ LONDON — 

•' — NetaRM®-. ain’s coal miner 


Vie Associated Press 

Tbe leader of Brit- 
S.Ma ; ain’s coal miners. Arthur ScaigiiL 
■i j‘. V ? {~ said Tuesdayhis union had offered 

v :;a ^ new proposals for ending Its 46- 

’ -■'L r Wsz week strike. 

rj 1 . Reset rr- i-.-- ‘ But hopes of . a settlement faded 
- i-V.X'a j- when the stale-owned National 
.. r COal Board indicated it war not 

preparedto resume fonnal neKOtia- 
tions, whichbroke off three months 
E.MPL0BF *80. • 

Mr. 


ident of the Na- 
tional Union of Mmeworicers. said 
llie^ union had put forth several im- 


The purpose of Tnesda/s meet- 
ing was to set an agenda for the 
resumption of ne gotiations, which 
broke off OcL 31. 

Mr. ScargQl said the union’s ex- 
ecutive -committee would . meet 
Wednesday in anticipation of * re- 
sumption of talks. 

Mr. ScargUl <fid not disclose tbe 
nature oftheimion’snew proposals 
or say. whether "the onion' was 
changing its demand that unprofit- 
able mines be kqpt open, the key 


£TOULiQ£ ... . 

issue ih the (fispute. 

ttrsi m saw. tea aafaig tfr rW. -Hie mnon has contended that 

vT uTF* ing three tomiof tateSsday only pmrftm l»ve om of oral 

sa p* 1 *:’** ■*■**—. 5JSSS 

Euan, the coal “W oul phms to dial down 20 




-- proposals ■- 

r ^ afaoal 2^660 jamfifs jobs through P™»- 

aanhoq. ' 

The coal board, which runs 174 
state-owned mines, says about 
78,000 miners are defying the 


ference sources, who asked not to 
be identified. 

But h was unclear whether the 
plans would force a cut in die price 
of Arabianlighl, they said. 

The prospect that Nigeria would 
roll, hade some of its October price 
cut, and that OPEC was approach- 
ing a decision on prices, helped ofl 
markets recover man a turbulent 
session Monday. There was little 
change in prices Tuesday on the 
spot, or noncontract, market. 

Arabian light crude for February 
delivery confirmed to be quoted at 
$27.60 a barrel on the spot market, 
according to Telerate Energy Ser- 
vice, a private market-information 
bareness. West Texas Intermediate 
crude; the major U.S. grade of oQ, 
rose to $25.40 a barm far March 
delivery in spot markets, after 
dropping bdow $25 on Monday, a 
five-year low. 

None of. the acrimony that 
marked Monday's meeting was evi- 
dent Tuesday. On Monday, the ofl 
minister of die United Arab Emir- 
ates, Mana Said al-Otdba. walked 
out temporarily, accusing the Nige- 
rian minister, Tam David-West, of 
undermining the OPEC- pricing 
structure. . 

On Tuesday, Mr. Kandil said: “I 
just went in to salute them and I 
told them Fm leaving and please 
don’t invite me anymore to the 
meetings.!* He said that the pro- 
longed talks were .driving -down--- 


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Death Sentence 
Is Sought for 
Polish Captain 


Senate Republicans Join Call to Gut 
Defense Costs; Weinberger Unmoved 


By Gerald M. Boyd • 

Nev York Times Serrrtr 

WASHINGTON — Several Re- 
publican members of tbe Senate 
Finance Committee have joined 


two choices. Ether we can have the 
military cuts you want, but in that 
case we cannot get a spending cut 
program, or the military has to take 
what is perceived to be a fair share. 


er -tea* 

:- oo-c had arered i. _ _ 

..assurances thifitwas 


•x'ji ; : v 


D0MEw.cuss the dmtral issue of 

it. wnwww pule: doade of mecWMjpic ■ union by working, with 

s-.. «p*a- o® M^mines. ••■■. .. -y' : ahandomi® the strike. each day. 

- “The NUM. general secretary Mr. -ScargiU, whose union has 

>; V— a said he would consult with his cof-.. 187,306. 'members, disputes rite 
l v leagues, and the board awahithdr board’s figures ^but admits strikers 

v ~^~~^^nsp<yase” ib. Eatimsaid. ' ■ . . art rettumng to worL 

■ ^ s -■** . .■ ■ ** • • * ■ ■ i 


Asked if his country would con- 
tinue to cooperate with" OPEC by 
restraining production and moving 
cautiously mi prices. Mr. Kandil 
said, “I doubt ft.” 

On Monday, the observing Mex- 
ican . delegation told the OPEC 
munsters that Mexico was growing 
weary of the carters lade of disci- 
pline and internal bickering. 


the calf in Congress jcr-Prerider.i- °f cutsJK.30. we e 
Ronald Reagan to reduce bis isiiii- * spending iot 
taiy spending proposaL 
Bui Defense Secretanr Caspar 
W. Weinberger said Pentagon pro- 
grams had been cut enough. 

Senator Bob Packwood of Ore- 
gon, chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, said Monday that he 
thought even some of those who 
supported the president’s plan for a 
military buildup were idling him: 

“Mr! President, we have one of 


a whale of 


But Mr. Weinberger, arguing 
against cuts in mifilary growth be- 
yond the $8.7 billion be has volun- 
teered for the next fiscal year, said 
Monday cm an ABC television pro- 
gram: “I think it’s a mistake to 
believe that defense alone, or de- 
fense primarily, can get this $200- 
biilion deficit down.” 

Mr. Pack wood's comments, and 
those of Mr. Weinberger, were pan 



Europeans to Vote on Upgrading Space Program 


JLWA?5A»K 

r “ J ’," ••• • By Axel Kraaac-: ... 

faumatimtl HeroU Tribune 

— PARIS^-The ll^ member govertunentsof 

the European Space Agency, at a two-day 
^ : s'- ' -meeting banning Wecfoesday in Rome, are 
expected to endorse a long-term space pro- 


and of Canada, which has observer status at 
the ESA. 


file and launch services to space agencies and 
telecommunication companies. 

Eurospaee . estimates that the market. Although delicate issues remain to be ne- 
through 1993. has a value* about S!L2 3h the National Aeronautics and 

bflhon a yen : Rrt prareectivdy far larger space Administration of the United States, 
markets are likely, mvolvmg the processing the ministers also are expected to pledge 


pAfi* | ram fl g”j al as suring Eu roptmi^epm- and manufacture in space of a range of European participation in a U5.-led pS 

*5 products from drags to semiconductor. Etrr- gramto establish a permanently 
FOR fn^UnitedStetes, notably m thefidd of manned ospace estimates this market to be as high as mace station, which isto be designed and 

aae ntgE L . $7 biffion a year. - built by NASA at an initial cost of about S8 

•Therealre^Bacqnsensusasvregpmto — - 

'the martfag that important oqianarm in onr 


provide such elements as pressurized mod- 
ules and platforms that would plug into tbe 
main body of a U.S.-built space station. 

ESA estimates the total cost of Columbus 
at tbe equivalent of $2.12 billion. The West 
German cabinet on Jan. 16 approved expen- 
ditures for its 375-percent share of Colum- 
bus. and will assume leadership in the pro- 
ject 

The other main contributors to Columbus 


Tbe proeram would increase the levd of billion through the early 1990s. The program will be Italy with 25 percent, and Britain and 
me mseimg inai important cspansooin our aurmai apanrftng to the equivalent of was announced by President Ronald Reagan France, with 15 percent each. 

SI.22 MBon iHTW laxTfrom U, jusi o«r a yar L. Cte Tuaaiay, S Cblumbua i, ,o be 
Ste'LS SSa ««»*“ 1733 Department of Kk said i, woold o^a aooivarsr 

director general of tbe Paris-based agency. 

ThepitreiamismipratedbyEnro^wir^a 


. Tbe ESA’s members are Bdgjum, Britain, 
Denmark, France, West Goimiiy, Ireland, 
1 of ^qot 40 European aerospace com- Italy, tbe Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and 
names and banks. Eurospaee estimates that Switzerland. Also participatiBg in the nrinis- 
^Enropean industry can wm about 20 percent terial meeting will^ W representatives of Aus- 


orge 

other members of the ESA to participate in 
the program. 

As a first step, building on previous ven- 
tures with NASA, the ministers are expected 
to endorse the budding of a European space 


r>- mC'AD --Enropean maostry can wm aoom zu percent icpai mecung wrn uc lepiracuuiuvca ui mia- tu cuoux uk uuuuing 01 4 curopcan space 

r SAN*^ the worldwide market for supplying sa tel- tria and Norway, both associate members, station, known as Columbus, which would 


in 1992, coin- 
ciding with lhe500lh anniversary of Christo- 
pher Columbus’s first voyage to the New 
World. 

ESA sources emphasized that Columbus 
was the “logical outgrowth** of the German- 
led Spacelab project, a manned and reusable 
(Condoned on Page 2, CoL 1) 



Egypt Under Mubarak: Stability 
Restored, but Hard Choices Put Off 


By David B. Otraway 

Washington Post Service 

CAIRO — After more than three years running 
Egypt, President Hosni Mubarak has succeeded in 
restoring stability to a society traumatized by the 
assasanation of Anwar Sadat. But be has failed to 
project any overall vision of the country’s future or 
strategyfor dealing with its gaigantuan problems. 

TheEgyptian leader bus m«H» his hallmark a cau- 
tious, slow-motion approach that, to critics, at times 

Mubarak’s Egypt 

Seeking the Middle Path 

First of four articles. 

conjures up the image of a rudderless ship of state 
marooned m de ad water. 


and probably the root of his extraordinary caution. It 
is now even more important as the threat of Libyan 
subversion looms larger and Modem fundamentalists 

once again become active. 

“He is obsessed with security.” an Egyptian politi- 
cal commentator said of Mr. Mubarak, “and he is 
overiy.cautious." 

Neither beloved nor disliked by his people, Mr. 

Mubarak, at 56, has yet to make his own mark on 
Egyptian politics. His instinct always to seek the 
middle path and avoid controversy makes it difficult 
to determine who he really is or what he wants for his 
nation, other than the broad goals of stability, pros- ' “° m everybody there, as we went 
perity and peace around the room, was spending 

He has tried to cast himself as the “great reconciler “J ^ 

of Egypt. He has sought to appease at once Islamic ^ “ r * * reSi ^ cot ’ after 

and Christian militants, to maintain the country’s twin 
commitment to both the socialist and capitalist sec- 
tors, to rehabilitate both Sadat and Gamal Abdel 
Nasser, to re-establish normal relations with Moscow 


of a strode over how to reduce tbe 
federal deficit, -now running at 
more than $200 billion a year. 

Robert J. Dole, the Senate ma- 
jority leader, said. Friday that .It 
would be diffiagt^ jfhKag ^ae. 
cats in popular domestic progra ins 
unless the president agre&to cut 
bade military spending. But in an 
interview broadcast Saturday Mr. 
Reagan nqected that view, calling 
farther reductions in the growth of 
military spending, “very risky.” 

The budget that Mr. Reagan is 
prorating projects a 5178-billion 
deficit for the next fiscal year, if 
about S51 billion in spending cuts 
can be achieved. The administra- 
tion had earlier estimated that $50 
billion would have to be cul 

The figures were confirmed by 
administration officials Monday 
after tbe budget director, David .V 
Stockman, reportedly used them in 
a private White House briefing for 
business executives. Mr. Reagan’s 
budget for tbe fiscal year 1986, 
whidt starts Oct 1, is scheduled to 
go to Congress on Feb. 4. 

The eco no mi c forecast to be pro- 
seated with the budget includes sig- 
nificantly lower inflation rate this 
year than had been predicted as 
recently as a month ago, according 
to economists who hoped prepare 
il The administration’s expecta- 
tions on growth and unemploy- 
ment remained constant 

Under tbe administration pro- 
jections. the deficit would be odd 
10 $140 billion in fiscal 1988, nearly 
$40 billion more than Mr. Reagan 
estimated recently. 

After a White House meeting 
with Mr. Reagan and his top eco- 
nomic advisers, the Finance Com- 
mittee members said that rigid op- 
position to further reductions m 
the administration’s military 
spending proposals could jeopar- 
dize congressional support for oth- 
er elements in tbe $5I-b31ion sav- 
ings package. 

- The senators, who were joined at 
the White House by Republicans 
on 'the House Ways and Means 
Comnritiee, advised Mr. Reagan to 
proceed first with speeding cuts 
before seeking a simplification of 
the federal tax code, that contrast- 
ed with a dual-track strategy sug- 
gested by James A. Baker id, the 

secretary-designate of. the Trea- 
sury. 

Senator Packwood said: “Die 
uniform advice to the presdent 


By Michael T. Kaufman 

. AW Vdrft 7»w» Smfcr 

TORUN. Poland — The chief 
prosecutor at the trial of four Po- 
lish security policemen charged 
with the murder of a pro-Solidarity 
priest demanded the death sen- 
tence Tuesday for the key defen- 
dant. Captain Grzegorz Pio- 
trowskL 

He urged that the other accused 
be sentenced to 25-year prison 
terms. 

The prosecutor. Leszek Pietra- 
riwdti, demanded tha t Captain Pio- 
trowski be hanged for his part in 
the murder of the Reverend Jerzy 
Popiduszko on Oct. 19. The three 
men accused with him are Colonel 
Adam Pietruszka, who was charged 
with instigating the crime, and 
Lieutenants Waldemar Chmie- 
lewski and Leszek Pekala. both ac- 
cused of participating in the lulling. 
All except Mr. Pietruszka have 
pleaded guilty. 

All four defendants have been 
stripped of tbdr police ranks. 

Mr. Pietrasinsb devoted nearly a 
third of his ihrcc-hour summation 
to a bitter attack upon Father Po- 
pieluszko, who he said had “taken 
extreme positions that gave birth to 
no lesser an extremism, culminat- 
ing in the crime, ” 

The prosecutor repeatedly linked 
tbe murdered victim’s attitude to 
those of his kfllers. 

The statement, at points deliv- 
ered in a rising voice by the prose- 
cutor, provided the clearest assess- 
ment available so far of how the 
government of General Wojdech 
Jaruzelski weighs the political im- 
pact of the crime and the triaL 

The prosecutor emphasized 
threepoints: that the accused acted 
alone; that their act was political 
provocation aimed against the gov- 
ernment’s policies of soda! recon- 
ciliation; and that the authorities of 
the Raman Catholic Church were 
partly responsible because they did 
not imipig the dissident priest 

The prosecutor showed some 
sympathy for the youngest defen- 
dants, Mr. Pekala. 32, and Mr. 
Chutietewski, 29, when be said they 
had been enticed into the .plot 
thrtw^h'nfi^jndtti loyalty. - 

He .strongly attacked Mr. Pro 
truszka. 47, on trial for aiding and 
abetting tbe crime, for having in- 


ing to cover up the crime. But 
saved his angriest words for Mr. 
Piotrowski, 33, whom he de- 
nounced as “a cold and cruel man.” 

“Let his friends judge him.” said 
the prosecutor, addressing a five- 
man panel Of judges. 


“Lei him judge himself.’' he 
shouted. Then, abruptly, he asked 
for an adjournment, during which 
Mr. Piotrowski fainted ana had to 
bercvived. 

When the court resumed, the 
prosecutor changed both his lone 
and his target, beginning his attack 
on Father Pqpieluszko. Mr. Pietra- 
sinski said that Father Popiduszko 
had “tried to convince the faithful 
that the Polish government was 
. anti-democratic.” He said the 
priest had cast doubt on the “legiti- 
macy of this government” while 
attacking Poland’s friendship with 
the Soviet Union. The prosecutor 
said the priest had traveled around 
the country spreading anti-govern- 
ment propaganda. 

“I know one should not speak ill 
of the dead,” said the prosecutor, 
“but these things have to be said.” 

He tried' repeatedly to associate 
the victim with his killers, once by 
noting that while the state authori- 
ties were dearly taking action 10 
■ punish the “functionaries who 
break tbe law.” church authorities 
were showing “too great a toler- 
ance for certain priests who used 
their religious position to agitate 
against the government.” 

Throughout the trial, Mr. Pietra- 
sinski has insisted that the activities 
of the dissident priest were ger- 
mane to the proceedings since they 
explained Mr. PiotrowskTs stated 
motives for the crime. 

Mr. Piotrowski has insisted that 
he was driven to pursue Father Po- 
piduszko because of his frustration 
at the government's failure to pros- 
ecute politically active clerics who 
supported the outlawed Solidarity 
union. 

The prosecutor said the priest's 
murder was in fact a provocation 
aimed at the polides of the govern- 
ment. “Whatever their intentions,” 
he said of the defendants, “their act 
helped Poland’s internal and exter- 
nal enemies.” 

He said that a search far a possi- 
ble instigator was continuing. He 
added that , that figure could turn 
out to be either an opponent of 
recent Communist Party decisions 
or. someone associated with “for- 
eign setiujry services of capitalist 
countries.” 

In this regard, be mentioned 
there was another case pending 
against Mr. Piotrowski in which he 
was accused of having received 
automobile parts from a Pole now 
living in West Germany. 

Verdicts in tiro case are expected 
after prosecution and defense at- 
torneys complete their summa- 
tions. 


Early in Match, Mr. Mubarak will make his fifth 
trip to. Washington. This time he is in search of an while keeping on good terms with W ash i ng ton, and to 

- r n, s_-nr ■ up ■ J 1 - . ‘ w-i.iaM.1. Lnmi i. tA ilia 4nh nrhir whila dill iul. 


UAd Frna l itoi^ a nJ 

Ho^ MubarSt wth Ronald Rcagsn IsstfalL - 


increase of dose to $1 billion in U.S. aid and in quest 
oT a new activism by the Reagan administration to 
revive the Middle East peace process. 

If Mr. Mubarak is still something of an enigma for 
Washington, the same is true for his own country. The 
honeymoon he enjoyed after Sadat's death is dearly 
over. But tbe Egyptian public has yet to pass judgment 

on him. 

Meanwhile, Egypt's social and economic problems 
are be ginning to dose in on him. Hie time for hard 
choices, which he has adeptly put off, is near. 

Under Mr. Mubarak, Egypt has been noticeably 
outside the international limelight. 

From tbe very start of Mr. Mubarak’s administra- 
tion, security has been a central factor in all decisions 


re-integrate Egypt into the Arab orbit while still ad- 
hering to the peace treaty with Israd. 

‘"Egypt’s foreign policy under Mubarak is a search 
for balance," in die view of AH Dissouki, a political 
science professor at Cairo University. "It is tow pro- 
file, cautious and an attempt to strike a middle road 
and build a consensus around iL r 
The result of this complicated balancing act, howev- 
er. is that it is often difficult to see in which direction 
Mr. Mubarak is taking Egypt. 

What’s more. Mr. Mubarak is not a Great Commu- 
nicator, as President Ronald R eag a n has been called 
because erf his perauasive abilities m talking to Ameri- 
cans. For gnamplp , uben Mr. Mubarak was asked 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


we've tackled (hat, after we’ve tried 
and hopefully succeeded, lei’s look 
at the tax reform bilL” 

■ Tax Reform Delayed 

Republican, congressional lead- 
ers said Monday after meeting for 
an boor with President Reagan that 
the White House would delay sub- 
mitting a tax-simplification bill 10 
Congress for several months. The 

torararPadcw^raidRepuMi- 
cans in both houses agreed that die 
tax proposal should wait until Con- 
gress has dealt with the budget 

“The point was -made forcibly 
that many of the allies we need on 
spending arts are going to be ene- 
mies on tiro tax bill,” Senator Pack- 
wood said. 


Austria Accepts Regrets 
From Minister Cher Nazi 

Renters 

VIENNA — The government 
accepted a public apology Tuesday 
from Defense Minister Friedhelm 
Frisdronschlager for having greet- 
ed a Nazi war criminal who was 
returning from an Italian prison. 

The acceptance averted a threat to 
tbegoveroing coalition. 

There had been pressure for Mr. 

Frischenschlager to leave after be 
met the Nazi, Walter Reder, last 
week at an airport in Graz, south- 
ern Austria. On Monday, Vice 
Chancellor Norberl Steger, a mem- 
ber of Mr. FrischenschJager’s Free- 
dom Party, threatened to resign if 
Mr. Frischenschlager were dis- 
missed. 

On Tuesday, Chancellor Fred 
Sinowatz said the 12 Socialist and 
t hr ee Freedom Party ministers had 
accepted the apology and that Mr. 

Frischenschlager would remain in 
office. 

The Freedom Party has bdd the 
balance of power in the Sodalist- 
dominatea coalition of Mr. 

Sinowatz since elections in April 
1983. 

The government faces a further 
test Fnday, however, when the 
People's Party, a conservative op- 
position party, plans to submit a 
no-confidence motion in Mr. Fris- 
chenschlager in tbe Nalionalrat, 

Austria’s parliament 

Mr, Sinowatz said be would re- 
sign if the motion succeeded, but be 
expressed confidence that his coali- 
tion would defeat it He drew atten- 
tion to an offer by a People’s Party 
member of the Nationalrat, WD- 
hdm Gorton, to look after Mr. 

Reder and give him a job. 



Friedhehn Frischenschlager 


“Under these circumstances, I. 
don’t understand why the OVP 
wants to bring a motion of no- 
confidence in the defense minis- 
ter,” Mr. SSnowatz said, using the 
Goman initials for the People's 
Party. 

Ota Thursday, Mr: Frischensch- 
lager flew to Graz to greet Mr. 
Reder, a former SS major, and to 
accompany him to Vienna. 

In 1954, an Italian court sen- 
tenced Mr. Reder to life in prison 
For his responsibility in the massa- 
cre of more than 1,800 people in 
1944: The kill m gs in northern Italy 
were carried out by troops under 
his command. 

In 1980, a military tribunal ruled 
that he could be released this July. 
Villagers voted overwhelmingly 
last month against freeing . him ear- 
ly, but the Italian government over- 
nil ed the vote. 


INSIDE 

■ Israel receives U5. assurances that it will not 'directly involve 

Russia in a Middle East settlement. Page 3. 

■ Three witnesses for CBS have criticized General William C. West- 
moreland's figures cm Viet Cong strength. - Page 3. 

■ Jamaica has failed to gain the rewards of free enterprise. Its bauxite 
industry collapsed and foreign debt is growing. • Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE . 

■ Bernard Latiuere, managing director of Airbus Industrie, the Euro- 
pean consortium that builds airliners, is to leave the organization, 
according to Franz-Josef Strauss, president of company. Page 11. 

■ A late surge pushed the Dow Jones industrial average of New^ York 

Slock Exchange shares to a record ^9162, ' Page 7. 











Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1985 


I 

a 


U.S. Rejects Soviet Proposal 
For Treaty on Nonuse of Force 


Reuter* 

STOCKHOLM — The Soviet 
Union presented a draft treaty on 
the nonuse of force to the 35- nation 
Conference on European Security 
and Disarmament on Tuesday, but 
it was rgected by the United States 
in its current form. 

Oleg A. Grinevsky, the Soviet 
delegate, presented the draft at the 
opening of the fifth session of the 
conference, the first to take place 
since talks earlier this month in 
Geneva between the Soviet Union 
and the United States. 


“A large rale in improving the Soviet draft as imprecise. “Once 
situation in Europe would be you depart from clear-cut language 


played by (be conclusion of a treaty of long standing, you get it 
on nonuse of military force and the minable negotiations whii 


an ding, you get into inter- 
negotiations which I can 


maintenance of peaceful relations, assure you would be totally unsuc- 
as proposed by the Warsaw Pact cessfuL" be said. 


states,” Mr. Grinevsky told dele- 
gates. 


The U.S. delegate welcomed 
Moscow's stated readiness to begin 


“I can say that the Soviet Union detailed, in-depth discuss on of 
and the socialist countries arc specific proposals and said NATO 


ready to conclude an agreement in would present working documents 
the very near future.” he said. “The of its own in the next few weeks 


instructions I have make it possible elaborating on its existing propos- 


Geneva between the Soviet Union to reach agreement quickly." als. 

and the United States. The North Atlantic Treaty Orga- Mr. Grinevsky said there could 

The U.S. delegate, James Good- nization always has been wary of be no movement forward unless 
by, said the Soviet, move was not nonaggressioo pacts, but reaffirm- both the political and military as- 
encouraging and that the United ing the principle of nonuse of force pects of security were dealt with 
States and its allies were not willing is one of the few Soviet proposals together, 
to negotiate such a treaty. “I can’t on which the Western alliance is He said the Geneva meeting bc- 


encouraging and that the United 
States and its allies were not willing 
to nejgotiate such a treaty. “I can't 


say it advances our work very willing to negotiate in Stockholm 


Mr. Goodby said that a treaty Gromyko and 


He said the Geneva meeting be- 
tween Foreign Minister Andrei A. 





WORLD BRIEFS 


_ «*»*v/*r ...» _ ... 



m 

• V-v . 


Gasoline Price War Looms in France 




LUXEMBOURG (Reuters) — The European Court of Justice, in a 
n.iing that seemed certain to set off a price war among service stations in 



France. Tuesday upheld the right of a French entrepreneur, Edouard 

Lederc, to sell gasoline at cut-rate prioes. 






Leclerc, to sell gasoline at cut-rate pnoes. 

Mr. Ledenr’s attempt to entice shoppers into his supermarkets by 
offering more than double the discount allowed under French law at 


- \ 
v’\. •* 


age had already indicated they were set for a price war if the ven&t went 
Mr. Leclerc’s way. 

The court ruled that the method the French government used to 
calculate its minimum price breached European. Community rules, 
French courts have already ruled in favor of Mr. leclerc, who head s a 


family with the reputation of France’s most aggressive cut-rate traderc. 
La st week the French government, anticipating the court’s verdict, 
announced its intention to adapt the price law that dates from l92&. 

The m^imnm discount allowed in France was 17 centimes a liter (8 
cents a gallon), whereas Mr. Leclerc offered 35 centimes a liter. Gasoline 
in France has ban selling at about 5.30 to 5.80 francs abler. 




Secretary c 
iltz of the 


much,” he said. Mr. Goodby said that a treaty Gromyko and Secretary of State 

The document proposed a bind- was an inappropriate instrument George P. Shultz of the United 
ing obligation on all signatories to for the European cooperation pro- States had created a more favorable 
renounce the use of military force, cess because neither the 1975 Hel- atmosphere in Stockholm. 

This included an obligation “not sinki accords on European security “Of course a great deal will de- 
to be the first to use either nuclear and cooperation nor the I9S3 Ma- pend on the extent to which the 


renounce the use of military force. 

This included an obligation “not 
to be the first to use either uuclear 


or conventional arms against each drid agreement that gave rise to the 


atmosphere in Stockholm. 

“Of course a great deal will de- 
pend on the extent to which the 
United States and other NATO 


MANILA HEARING — A special court beard pleas for bail for 23 military men 
Indicted in the killing of a Philippine opposition leader, Benigno S. Aquino Jr. Three, 
including the chief of staff. General Fabian G Ver are free on bail. The judges are, left 
to right, Angusto Amores, Manuel Pamaran, prewfing, and Bienvenido Vera Cruz. 


other” and to make efforts to ore- Stockholm conference were in trea- countries are prepared to negotiate 

. r e- ■_ l 11 V' W. r’-T- 


vent an arms race in space. 

The proposed treaty would cover 


the territories of all parties and discuss a reaffirmation of the prin- 
their armed forces, wherever situat- ciple in some form, provided this 


ed, a clause that would extend its was accompanied by concrete, con- 
scope beyond the purely European fidence-biniding measures, Mr. 


iy form. in a businesslike way,” Mr. Grin- 

But the alliance was w illing to evsky added, 
scuss a reaffirmation of the prin- Both envoys said the atmosphere 
jle in some form, provided this at Tuesday’s opening session was 


Mubarak Now Facing Hard Choices 


EC Vows New Ideas on Iberian Entry 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) —The European Commissian pledged Tuesday 
to present new ideas next week to speed up the stalled negotiations for 
Spain and Portugal’s entry into the European Community. 

Community foreign minis tern had set a March deadline an Monday for 
completing negotiations to enable the two countries to join on schedule 
Jan. 1. 

Community officials said that Lorenzo Natali of Italy, the mt-mfrfr of 
the Executive Commission who heads the negotiations, told ministers 
Tuesday that the commission would present a balanced package of 
proposals by the end of next week to reconcile conflicting national' 
interests. 


(Continued from Page 1) 


that clearly favored the r uling par- But while the courts have sue- 


_ m I - __ . « i \ ■ ■ — - - — O • um i VIMU If lUTVltU Ulk UMUig pOJ 

w ^ al thought erf Yasser Arafat's ty, kept all the leftist parties out ceeded in reopening Egyptian poli- 


mandate of the Stockholm confer- 
ence. 


Goodby said. 


of the confer- 


visit here in December 1983, a 


«ce in January 1984, when East- | ong _ awaited event with much 'po- 


ty, Kept ail the leftist parties out ceeoea in reopening Egyptian pou- 
and allowed only the New Wafd tics to some opposition parties, the 


Peres Says Soviet Rebuffed Overture 

JERUSALEM (Reuters) — Prime Minister . Shim on Feres of Israel has 


He criticized the language of the West relations were at a low point 


litical significance for both Egypt politics before the 1952 revolution, 
and the Palestinians, he replied to gel a foothold in the assembly. 


Europeans to Vote on Upgrading Space Plan 


cryptically: 

“Egypt is Egypt. 
Nor is Mr. Mi 


Party, which dominated Egyptian government bureaucracy and the 
politics before the 1952 revolution, ruling party have time and again 
to gel a foothold in the assembly, blocked proposed changes and 


said he seat a message to die Kremlin recently appealing for a thaw hi 
relations but received a negative response. 

He told a group of schoolchildren Monday he sell the message through 


The elections disappointed 
Egypt's restless intelligentsia and 
ubarak credited crushed its hopes for the birth of 


fought to preserve their powers. 
The result has been that the rul- 


Armand Hammer, the American ofl magnate known for. his Soviet 
contacts. Mioscow broke off relations with Israel in 1967. 

“The answer we have just received was that the question of Israel 


i/m; vu ■ • mwf~m mmmammmgr ruw m. mm** nor is iwr. muoanu urcuiicu cTusueo iis nupes lor me pitch oi : na ,_j D.Tvrnimwn nfim depends on the web of relations between the Soviet Union and the Umicd 

rrr © r With breadth of vision, and the full democrac/For Mr. Mubarak, ffiSSn^S States," Mr. Peres said. 

Columbus station, and possibly the doubtedly be mentioned in the fi- popular jokes in circulation — a it raised questions about his ability declared intentions of MrMu- ^ T . __ 

building of a reusable, manned nal communiqufc,” Mr. Lust, the iraAtional indiator of pubheam- to control his own prune minister barak. This gives outside observers Egypt WlTlS T AflTI for Nl1PiPJ|r Plant 

“mmi-shultie" known as Hermes agency director. aides m the absence of polls here- and government that sun have no: the impression that Mr. Mubarak is , « , , , 

• * ■ ■ ■ r-n a. C* .rtf f-l . r» J As> *int hie iMtaTlinonfVi nr Uami _ *_ W A CUlXIf i l AM l>a Pnvw+ Tmnorf Rtmlr iin/ldv 


(Continued from Page 2) 


Laboratory that for several years building of a reusable, manned 


has operated on an orbiting NASA “mini-shuttle” known as Hermes agency uuccuh. uiu M1 uvii Sfl u«.u«, M i 1 «i H iiu l — musuthuiiiui 

shuttle and represented the second that is being urged on other ESA Space officials of France and do not flatter his intelligence or been answered. 


most-important ESA project dur- members by France. 


German 
tors to 1 


iy, the two largest contribu 
ESA since its founding a 


project. already sai 

‘The Germans have always been of develop 
more research and US. -oriented, the progra 
whereas the French have always Rome me 


ing the past 10 years, after Ariane, However, West Germany and tors to ESA since its founding a At the ce 
the French-led rocket-launching several other ESA m em be rs have decad e ago, will be seeking “Euro- political pn 
project. already said they consider the costs pean autonomy” in negotiations has been tin 

“The Germans have always been of developing Hermes excessive for ^ith NASA for the cooperative power base- 
more research and US.-oriented, the program being discussed at the linkup between the US. space sta- The hero 
whereas the French have always Rome meeting. They have not tion and Columbus. The talks are Force in the 


linkup between the US. space sta- 


political acumen. "With all due respect, Mr. Mu- 

At the center of Mr. Mubarak's barak is a sincere and honest man 
>iitical problem, from the start, being misled by people in the gov- 
is been the absence of a personal eminent. " said Mu muz Nassar. 
jwer base. leader of the New Wafd opposition 

The hero of the Egyptian Air bloc in parliament. “He has good 


not fuUv b comS. WASHINGTON (WP) - The Export-Import Bank, under 

• .... . pressure from the State Department and the National Security C 

The question being increasingly reversed its earlier opposition to helping Egypt hnfld a nuclear 

sed by WestOT analysts b how plant and has offered the Egyptian government $250 million to f 
r. Mubarak wdl fare now that he thepurchase of UA-made equipment for the prqect 
s overcome the “Sadat legacy Tne bank, a government-funded, independent agency, had reft 


posed by Western analysis is how 
Mr. Mubarak will fare now that be 
has overcome the “Sadat legacy” 


a government-funded, independent agency, had refused to 


tion and Columbus. The u»ik« are Force in the 1973 Arub-Israeli war. intentions and I'm sure he wants own rati e m fi 


and begins faring problems of his approve the lo an on the ground that I^ypt’s policy of qthrirfmrrg energy 


pressed Tor strategic-commercial ruled out supporting the project in 
ventures and independence,” a se- the final communiquh. but without 


prices at artificially low levels would prevent the proposed plant from 


expected to begin shortly after the he was selected by Sadat as his vice democracy, but if the rules remain Such tests are not far off. The becoming economically viable. The cost of the project is estiinated at S2 


nior ESA official said 
“We are coming together on 
those issues in Rome,” be added. 

He also said he expected the 
minis ter* to endorse tire develop- 
ment of Ariane 5, a new generation 
launcher. This is a crucial element 


committing funds. 

According to ESA estimates. de- 


Rome meeting. 

“We teamed durin, 
e xp er im ents that tire 


president, remained a silent under- the same, there can be no democra- government is planning a series of 


nited States 


Aiiaire 5 would cost about had domination and the leader- 


study in his shadow and was sud- 
denly propelled into the presidency 


cy in Egypt." 
The efecti 


pL” price increases for key commod- 

ections, whatever their ities such as gasoline, electricity 


S2.12 billion between 1986 and 
1995, roughly the same as Colum- 


ship,” said a senior German diplo- ber 1981. 


dai’s assassination in Octo- faults, did make clear nonetheless and bread. In 1977. this led to vio- 


mat responsible for technology Unlike Sadat, be had neither the 


that Mr. Mubarak is up against lence in the streets of Cairo. 


in assuring what an ESA bade- proceed. Building Hermes, which 
ground paper describes as an inde- could haul personnel and equip- 
pendent capability to remain ment to and from tire Columbus 


bus, and most ESA membere, in- matters, “and this time we want a legitimacy of being a “founding fo- 
duding West Germany, want to far greater role, assuring our long- ther” of the 1952 revolution, a base 

i n .l JV tv ! _l_ * - 3 * w in fha inmi tfttfi vtilin nf tho 


range independence. 


in the army, the main branch of the 


pendent capability to remain 
“competitive with space transpor- 


He added that most ESA mem- Egyptian armed forces, or any flair 
bees agreed with the draft of an for politics. In the words of Mo- 


space station, would require an ad- agreement that will be submitted to hammed HeikaL a journalist and 

_ 1 « l 1l». J 1 - 1 » — — XUrrai-’c IrtnflHma /VinT J'int U Uo ie 


tation systems existing or planned di tional 51.1 billion during the ministers in Rome, and contains Nasser’s longtime confidant, “He is 


elsewhere,” a reference to the U.S. same period and would indude 
space shuttle, and projects in China only the first stage of development 


and Japan. 


ie period and would indude the following provirions: 
y the first slue of development. • That Europe should be respon- 

Our view is that Hermes should sible for tire technical and financial 


Ariane 5, for which France be part of a package deal involving management of tire design, devd- 
would bear 53 percent erf the devel- Ariane 5 and Columbus, because it opment, exploitation and develop- 
opment costs, could become opera- provides a highly important, meni of several elements of tire 
tional by 1995, and would be an unique opportunity to develop a U.S. space station, primarily Co- 
important step in the building of a European shuttle — independent lumbus. 

European shuttle system. That of others, mainly the United •That members Jre guaranteed 


the only technocrat-president that 
we have had.” 

“His experience is that of a pi- 
lot,” used to depending on indica- 
tors and gauges to guide him, Mr. 
Heikal said. “The trouble with poli- 


U.S. space station, p rimari ly Co- tics is that you sometimes should 


lumbus 


react to indicators that have no 


include development of the States," said Frtdfaic d’AUest, di- use of all of tire U-S. station facili 


• That members be guaranteed bands. You have to react to ab- 


&omerftt QBiubtraft? 

Jnfcepmtent 


of the - Centre Na- ties without an obligation to use the 


tional d’Etudes Spatiales. France's “whole of the American system.' 


stractions and public opinion.” 

Mr. HeflcaJ, a tetter opponent of 
Sadat, gave Mr. Mubarak high 
marks for his first six months in 


Somerset University is Britain's first 
independent university to offer 
Bachelor, Master and Doctoral 

degrees in most subjects by 
distance learning. 

For a prospectus send $8 
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r ran SomamttMwraity / 


space agency. • That “no discriminatory mea- marks for his first six months in 

Mr. D’ABest has repeatedly hint- sure" against European users power, in defusing the sectarian 
ed that if other ESA governments should be possible and that “free and political tensions that have 
do not support Hermes at Rome, circulation of materials and per- brought Egypt to the boiling point. 
France may start development sons should be guaranteed," a dear But he said he feels Mr. Mubarak 
work on its own and seek support reference to the eventual use of has since missed many opportuni- 
from other interested European Hermes, shuttling from Earth to ties to es t a blish himself as a true 


from other interested European 


gover nments, such as Belgium and the European station. 



Sommaf TA 19 O 0 Q 
Engtand 


Sweden. 

Aerospace industries may also 
contribute to the development, in- 
dependently of government fund- 
ing, ESA sources said. 


• That European costs of operat- 
ing the space station be fixed “in a 
fair manner.” ESA officials ex- 
plained that calculating Europe’s 
participation and financial contri- 


ties to establish himself as a true 
leader and is still moving too slow- 
ly, a view shared by many Egyp- 
tians. 

Was he, then, the right man for 
the time in Egypt? 

“More or less,” Mr. Heikal con- 



billion to S3 billion. 

However, administration officials said tire bank’s directors switched 
positions last month after Secretary of State George P. Shultz and 
President Ronald Reagan’s national security adviser, Robert G McFar- 
lane, argued that American aid was of major importance to the UjS. 
strategy of keeping President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt a dose ally in the 
Middle East 


[L Israel A 
foFree-Trat 


Baker Confirmed to Head Treasury 


WASHINGTON (AP) —The Senate voted, 95-0, Tuesday to confirm 
James A. Baker 3d as secretary of tire Treasury. Mr. Baker, a Texas lawyer 
who has been chief of the White House staff for four years, is tradingjobs 
with Donald T. Regan, a former Wall Street executive. Tire switch is to! 
take effect Monday. 

Mr. Baker, 54, was confirmed after Senator William Proxmire, Demo- 
crat of Wisconsin, the only member to question the nomination, finally 
praised him as skillful and effective. 

Earlier, the Senate Finance Committee unanimously recommended 
confirmation of Richard G. Darman as deputy secretary of tire Treasury 
and of Ronald A. Peariman as assistant secretary fix’ tax policy. Mr. 
Darman has been a senior aide to President Ronald Reagan; Mr. . 
Peariman has been acting as the administration's chief tax authority. 




For the Record 


Hermes will certainly be dis- bution could become the renter of ceded. “Egypt wanted a man to put 

^ nMTrttiah.Vie KAfnwon CftmP IPP nil lK trt lnWPT tlP 


Hosni Mubarak, left, who at the rime was vice president, 
with Anwar Sadat on the day of Sadat’s assassination. 


cussed at our meeting and un- 


KNTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


“protracted” negotiations between 
NASA and ESA during the next 
several months. 

Agreement on these points is ex- 
pected at Rome, with a view to 


some ice on its head to Iowa tire 
temperature and I think he did that 
very weU." 

In retrospect, it now appears that 
Mr. Mubarak missed an epportuni- 


three formidable conflicting politi- The increases will come at a time 
cal blocs. Two of them, the rising of high inflation and general grum- 


Wafdist current and the Moslem bling about conditions. But it is 
fundamentalists, are hostile to the hard to tell whether they will touch 


Syria’s parfiament, the People's Council unanimously nominated Pres- 
ident Hafez al-Assad on Monday fix a third term and set Feb. 10 as the 
date of a presidential referendum. Mr. Assad, who has been in office since 
197 1, will be the only candidate. (AP) 

Funds bekm^ng to Licio Gcffi, a leader in Propaganda Due, the Italian 
Masonic lodge, will remain frozen, a Swiss court ruled Monday. Mr. GdU 
was arrested in September 2 982 at a Geneva bank, and accused of 
presenting false documents concerning accounts held there. He escaped 
from a Geneva prison in August 1983. (Reuters ) ; 

Aaucv 4 «d Pm &x convicted crintin^s escaped Tuesday from a prison near the Italian 

e ({mg was rice president Adriatic coast city of Pescara, after a sbootoui in which six guards were ■ 
of Sadat’s assassination, wounded, the ANSA news agency said Four of tire guards were reported- 
ly in serious condition with bullet and knife wounds. (AP ) . 

Oxford refused to grant Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher an hanor- 

The increases will come at a time ary degree Tuesday because she has cm funds for education and research, 
high inflation and general gram- Scholars and administrators defeated the motion, 738-319. (AP) 


>; \-jr 




providing Mr. Lust a mandate to ty in May to establish both his 
negotiate with NASA officials, popularity and legitimacy by his 


1952 revolution and want to off new violence. The government 
change radically tire existing order, plan is to proceed in piecemeal 


agency officials added. 


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COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — The 
governing United National Party 


handling of elections for the Peo- 
ple’s Assembly. Instead of emerg- 
ing as the standard bearer of a 
“new democracy,” Mr. Mubarak 
came out of them looking like an- 
other Sadat, who regularly won his 
referenda with 99.9 percent of the 
vote. 

Mr. Mubarak insisted on what 
was probably the most free elector- 


The third force, the 315.000-man fash *°" ^ “ mUc Publicity as 
army, remains silent but is unlikely P osslb ' e 


to allow power to slip. 


Egyptia 

sxethat 


Another test for Mr. Mubarak, 


tian and foreign analysts perhaps his most important, will be 


Moslem, Coptic Discord 
Again Brewing in Egypt 


MTf-CSSLS | • ' 




f - 1 - ’ 

- ^ < i b- ! 

with ! 


heavy political legacy from Sadat, among the Moslem extremists. 


Washington Pan Service 

CAIRO — Militant Moslem fun- 


The assassinated president had Since the 1952 revolution, all se- CAIRO Militant Moslem fun- 

alienated almost every segment of rious threats to Egypt's stability damentalisis are on the march 
society in the last months of his rule and its presidents have come from n p a in in Egypt and the first signs of 
— Moslem fundamentalists, Chris- this quarter. Extremists tried to a resumption of sectarian discord 


this quarter. Extremists tried to a ^sumption of sectarian discord 


has accused India of carrying out a aJ campaign since the 1952 revolu- tian Copts, leftist and rightist poli- shoot Nasser and succeeded with surfiriiie. 

unvl “lip farln inua«inn" hv arm. Iirwi Rul tlipn hr mpmlir-iWn i_ l I ■ c.j.. “ 


secret “de facto invasion" by arm- 
ing and training Tamil separatists. 

The statement Monday came six 
hours after India repatriated seven 


lion. Bui then he inexplicably al- 
lowed the prune minister at the 
time, Fuad Mohieddin, to mobilize 
the country’s huge bureaucracy to 


ticians, intellectuals and business- Sadat. 


men alike. 


Arousing little notice or com- 


Since the end of ihe trial of 302 
Jihad members in September, Mos- 
lem militants have again been com- 
ing out in numbeis. 

They are active and well -orga- 
nized on the university campuses. 
They made a strong showing in 


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It took Mr. Mubarak until early direct outgrowth of Mr. Mubarak’s ^ oj<j gathering places, the 
this month, or three years and three conciliatory approach toward the Mesgid Ennur Mosque, to hear a 


Sri 1-a nk a n sailors whose boat was produce a crushing victory for the months, to absolve himself of this fundamentalists. Some of them, chokh recently released from t»ris- 

detamed by the Indian coast guard ruling National Democratic Party. “ -Sadat legacy." The final step was like Omar Telmisani, leader of the on _ v 

Jan. I l. Sn Lanka on Monday re- U ;won 85 percent of the vote and ending the banishment to a desert Moslem Brotherhood, a militant y 0 3nvone who lived here 

leased 17 Indian fishermen charged all but 58 of the 448 elected seats. ----- 


their old gathering places, the majority of student counril seats -at; 
esgid Ennur Mosque, to hear a the engineering faculty of Cairo, 
eikh recently released from pris- University. Ofien they appear- 
l clean-shaven and dressed in Euro-- 

To anyone who lived here pean-style clothes, instead of that’. 


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with poaching. 


I but 58 of the 448 elected seats, monastery of tire Coptic Christian Sunni Moslem organization, are ihrough the events leading up to usual beards and white robes, to 
tins tactic, plus an electoral law patriarch. Pope Sbenudah I1L and dearly prepared to stay within the ^ assassination of President .An- avoid the watchful eye of university 


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his reinstatement. This has gone a rules m pressing for a stricter appli- war Sadat, the theme was like an 
long way toward appeasing Egyp l ’ s Ration of ihes/unio, or Moslem law, f r0m jj, e was an attack 

five to six million Copts. in Egypt- on the recently reinstated Christian 

On SepL 30. a special security Others who are more militant, Coptic pope, Shenudah III. 
court made another decision that however, are fitting the govern- 0mar AWul R ., hmn , a 


police. 

At street comers in downtown 




the recently reinstated Christian Cairo and at busy traffic stops, 
ptic pope, Shenudah III. bearded men dressed in white are 


assuaged the Moslem fundamen- mem's present leniency to orga- 
talists: 174 extremists implicated in nize, convert and preach. This sc- 


an uprising in the southern town of tivity leads observers to predict 
Asyui immediately after Sadat's as- that it will not be long before an 
sassination. in which 87 persons incident occurs that forces Mr. Mu- 


ws pr^.«i^rtroS- Kr5f kh ^ m f, A ? ul ^^ a 

nrw. convert and preach. This ac- spiritual leader of Jihad, a 

tirity leads observersto predict M “ , . eni ««nust and him- 
ffi, 'Suno. b. beL an , «?5ELS * ^ S 


Sheikh Omar Abdul Rahman, a *8** app«iluig on buDhorns te 
blind spiritual leader of Jihad, a P^ssersby for donations to tafld 
Moslem extremist group and him- mosques, 
self just acquitted in a triaL was Po F* ^enudah. 
passionately addressing 1.500 foi- from ^ ^siooem ro a dewl 
towers after Friday pravers. monastery, has aireadygiven mH* 

_ ... . " . , views that even some Christians say 

Sddiera who were members of they regard as verging an the polto. 
Jihad or one of its offshoots shot 


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»Viuicraauaisa>- him. » . , narannairiv aridnx&inv 1 500 fnU from UlS Damsnmeni to a acsai 

which 87 persons madcntocaus forces Mr^Mu- KSJite ^ monastery, has aireadygiven intff.- 

died, were acquitted; 107 others barak, like Sadat and Nasser before towers arter Friday prayers. views that even some Omstians say 

were sentenced to prison terms him, to adopt a new. tougher ap- Sradiers who were nrembers or they regard as verajng aP Ihe pdap, 

ranging from two years to life im- proach. “ j" ofrshoots shot M(J unnecessarily provocative.- 

prisonment but nobody was exe- How Mr. Mubarak handles such ^^.TTna , a f .1 There have been op reports 

cuted. a mwlf/inwn multi doermine the P 3 ™® Get- o. 1981, and then a few inridwiM hetwmi Moslem and 


a crackdown could determine the 


incidents between Moslem and 


<4 U40.&UUWU UriiiU UWiHtiyilr UA j I . . . « | lULJUtUZJ WW »U.li IVJ 

A new freedom for institutions is fate of his presidenev. Both Nasser W la j; cr a . “ y, ° ns “P”* - Coptic militants. But the release of 
veloping under Mr. Mubarak, and Sadat overreacted to the Mos- ,n 6 “ M* 1 - 10 which 87 pe^ons shenudah. an activist by nature. 


developing under Mr. Mubarak, and Sadat overreacted to the Mos- 
The most remarkable example is feni extremist ^haUmg e , imprison* 


Biotonus 


the courts. They are showing an ing thousands, silencing their mu* 
unusual degree of independent de- ezzins and forcing them 


were killed. 

Why, demanded Sheikh Rah* 


and the revival of Moslem mtihants 
seem to be setting the stags to 


cisi on- making, throwing out as un- 
constitutional many of Sadat's de- 


man, was the Christian pope ai- sectarian trouble. 


The leading medical center for revitalization 
in Montrcux. Switzerland 
Provides: 

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underground. 

Mr. Mubarak is dearly aware of 


lowed bade in the pulpit to preach ]t has already started again bef 


when Sheikh Rahman and other tween Moslem militants and sea* 




sheikhs accused of extremism but rity forces. Jainid-Naremberi so* 
cleared by the courts were not? dents at the Islamic Al Azfcr 


inccmctjuugpinuKinaioi uk Drn hlem and has studiously tried to Llcamt uxwa wacum. dents at UK LSiamK Ai rum 
Moslem extranisls later defended JJjJy malHw £ ^ san^Sore. But Wh > had the pope received so University rioted and clashed w* 
the leniency of the sentences m an j. Q bs«don with security and his muc ^ publicity in the local press thousands of police of the Central 
interview, significantly with the ^ ^ ^ ^ | C *«■« o-»h_ ~,i;^ , «^n! ur- 


Why had the pope received so University rioted and dashed.wfrh 
much publicity in the local press thousands of police of the Central 
upon his release when Sheikh Rah- Security Force police, a special ur- 







pro-goverameni Al Ahram. The , analvsteav tnmedicthowhe maD ^ trfber sheikhs were ik- ban anti^iot force, after a studen 1 
judge said was persuaded by t«ti- “h in \ simHar Ssis. noted, along with their demands was killed in a hit-and-run acrideoj 

for the application of the sharia, or by one of the unit's officers. Several 


HOLDING AG 


"Cell therapy. / believe in il No mote anxiety every lime / hegm a rrponinp’ / 
| set out, certain of snso; m/A no problems or depression." 

N. Narnia. Document Fbris-Match, June 82. 
“The mtdlipUciiy of ihe therapeutic techniques offend by Biotomts.- Clinic Bon- 
Am determined our choice for lha center for our inquiry, " 

Dr Caro. SI. D. Special Same. March 1*184. 
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will react in a similar crisis. 

Not until Mr. Mubarak faces his 
first serious crisis, which he has so 
far avoided mostly by not making 
any radical decisions, is the real 
Mr. Mubarak likely to stand up, 
observers say. Until then, it will 
remain undear whether he is mere- 
ly a caretaker president and interim 
leader or the next modern-day pha- 
raoh of Egypt. 

Tomorrow; Clouds un the eco- 
nomic horizon. 






Moslem law, in 


i Egypt? 

Another sheikh. Hafez Salama. during four days erf demanstm^ 
told the crowd that freeing the tions. ' . . 


hundred students were detained. 


pope without a court passing judg- The students initially demanded 


ment on the charges Sadat had lev- only that the officer be arrested^ 

_ t > u: ..... mu i « . . . n..i t_. 


eled against him was “illegaL” put on triaL. But by die ihne d^ 


A leaflet handed out at the pray- demonstrations were over, the w*y 
er service decried the rdease of the versily had to be closed fat ’•J 


pope, calling him “the head of sec- weeks and students were demon*, 
tarian strife" and decrying the fact ing that women be obliged towear- 


tha t he was “hailed bj the state and 
returned to his papal seat.” 


Islamic dress and that Utc sharia- 
become the law trf the land. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 


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U.S. Assures Babin 
On Mideast Talks 
With Soviet Union 


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By John M. Goshko 

tt'ashingitm Past Senicr 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States has assured the Israeli de- 
fense minister. Yitzhak' Rabin, that 
while the United States intends to 
resume “working-level talks” with 
the Soviet Union on the Middle 
EasL it remains firmly opposed to 
any attempts to resolve the Arab- 
Israeli dispute through an interna- 
tional conference in which the So- 
viet Union would participate. 

Sources said Mr. Rabin received 
those assurances in separate meet- 
ings Monday with Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz, Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger 
and Robert C McFarfane. the na- 
tional security affairs adviser. 

The sources said Mr. Rabin had 
expressed Israel's concern about 
the meaning of a recent announce- 
ment that the United States period- 
ically will exchange views with the 
Soviet Union on regional issues, 
including the Middle East. 

Mr. Rabin, according to the 
sources, said that broadening the 
Middle East peace process requires 
the removal of what he called “two 
major stumbling blocks” — com- 
pletion of Israel's withdrawal from 
Lebanon in a way that guarantees 
the security of Israel's northern 
borders, and an end to the freeze 
that President Hosni Mubarak of 
Egypt has pul on continued nor- 
malization of relations with Israel. 

The sources said Mr. Rabin, who 
was beginning a three-day visit to 
Washington, also gave Mr. Shul iz a 
reply to a recent message from the 
secretary to Shimon Peres, the Is- 
raeli prime minister. Mr. Shultz re- 
portedly told Mr. Peres that a U.S. 
decision on Israel's request for 
$800 milli on in emergency econom- 
ic aid could not be made until the 
United States had evidence of a 


U.S., Israel Are Close 
To Free-Trade Accord 


ad Treasir 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States and Israel are near agree- 
ment on a free-trade pact that with- 
in 10 years will erase all tariffs 
between ibe two countries, Reagan 
administration and Israeli sources 
said. 

The major issues were reported 
to be resolved, and the negotiators 
were “tying up loose ends" on the 
pact, which is more than 99 percent 
complete, the sources said Mon- 
day. 

Under the agreement, some 
products will become duty free as 
soon as the UJS. Congress acts, 
probably early this spring, while 


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import-sensitive items such as tex- 
tiles, footwear, some farm goods 
I and electronics mil take 10 years to 
. reach a duty-free stage. 

The idea of free trade between 
• the two countries was one of a 
, number of military and economic 
} concessions made by President 
Ronald Reagan during a Novem- 
1 bar 1983 meeting with Yitzhak 
; Shamir, wbo then was prime minis- 
. ter of Israel, in an effort to help 
[ Israel's economy and strengthen 
. strategic lies between the rwo coun- 
tries. 

: Israel's economic situation has 

. grown worse since then, -and De- 
, tense Minister Yitzhak Rabin be- 
: gau talks here Monday on requests 
for increased military and econom- 
ic aid Israel’s request for an emcr- 

I gency oft of $800 million on top of 
$1.9 billion in economic aid for 
1986 is under consideration by the 
Reagan administration. 

The free-trade agreement is un- 
likely to have an immediate impact 
on Israel's economic problems, said 
Dan Halpern. economic minister at 
the Israeli Embassy and the key 
negotiator for his country. But the 
pact will help Israel's long-term 
economic prospects by increasing 
its exports to the United States and 
by directing more American invest- 
ments to the country, he added 
“1 think the whole package is a 
good one,” Mr. Halpern said. “This 
package can work only if it is of 
mutual benefit. A trade agreement 
that is not mutually advantageous 
will not last more than a few years 
and we want this to last forever." 

Israel already has a free-trade 
pact with the European Communi- 
ty, the second- largest market in the 
world ranking just behind the 
United States. 

The pact will not be made public 
or signed, however, until key con- 
gressmen and advisers in the pri- 
vate sector from affected industries 
in the United States have a chance 
to review it. This process is likely to 
be completed within 45 days, ad- 
ministration trade officials said. 

Egypt, Israel 
Fail to Reach 
PactonTaba 

The Associated Press 

BEERSHEBA. Israel — Three 
days of talks on a border dispute 
between Efevpl and Israel ended 
Tuesday with the two sides failing 
to reach a final agreement. Israeli 
sources said. 

The sources said agreement was 
reached on technical aspects of de- 
ploying a multinational force in the 
disputed Red Sea resort of Taba.. 
But they said Israel rejected 
Egypt’s demand that Israeli border 
police be completely withdrawn 
from the 250-acre (101 -hectare) 
tract, which includes an Israeli-run 
hotel and holiday village. 

Ehud Gol, a spokesman for the 
Israeli Foreign Ministry, said the 
two sides would issue a paper sum- 
ming up the three days of talks. He 
said that a few points could not be 
answered Tuesday and that he ex- 
pected further talks at a later date 
would be necessary. 

Officials have said that the talks 
may be reconvened ai Ismailia. on 
the Suez Canal. 

Mr. Go! said the summary paper 
was drawing ideas from both sides 
and that the teams were “trying to 
formulate them so that both sides 
can agree.” 


v; t-'i*. - 

V >; ' ■ 

- ■•••V 


comprehensive plan to curb Israel's 
inflation and restore the country's 
economic health. Recent Israeli 
government figures put the annual 
inflation rate "at more than 1,200 
percent 

According 10 the sources, the re- 
sponse delivered by Mr. Rabin in- 
cluded a summary of the steps tak- 
en by IsraeL 

While the sources indicated it 
was likely to be some time before 
the administration derides about 
Israel's requests for economic aid. 
they added that President Ronaid 
Reagan was expected to inform 
Mr. Rabin on Wednesday that he 
would ask Congress for $1.8 billion 
in military assistance for Israel for 
next year, an increase over this 
year's SI. 4 billion. 

■ King Fahd Plans U.S. Visit 

King Fahd of Saudi Arabia plans 

to visit the United States on Feb. 1 i 
to discuss a U.S. role in solving 
Middle East conflicts. The Associ- 
ated Press reported Tuesday. 

The Saudi foreign minister. 
Prince Saud al-Faisal. said. “The 
visit will crystallize the trends of 
the U.S. government, not merely 
toward establishing stability in the 
world but also toward exploring 
what Washington can do to solve 
the Middle East crisis," according 
to reports in Saudi Arabian news- 
papers . 

■ Karami and Syrians Meet 

Rashid Karami. Lebanon's 

prime minister, met Tuesday with 
Syrian leaders in Damascus, Reu- 
ters reported. He said the discus- 
sions concerned Israeli troop with- 
drawal from Lebanon and his 
country's economic crisis. 

He said Lebanon would contin- 
ue to coordinate with Syria “be- 
cause our interests are one." 



RouonvLWled Rian MwraMnd 


George P. Shultz, left, the U.S. secretary of state, greeted 
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel as Mr. Rabin 
arrived for a conference at tire State Department. 


Reagan to Visit Bonn, 
Madrid, Lisbon in May 


By Bernard Weinraub 
,Vev York Times Sentce 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan will visit West Ger- 
many. Spain and Portugal in May 
on a tour aimed ai underscoring 
U.S. commitments to those three 
Western European countries. 
White House officials said. 

Mr. Reagan's swing through 
West Germany May 5-8 will follow 
the two-day economic conference 
of industrialized nations in Bonn 
May 2-4. During his visiL White 
House officials said Monday, Mr. 
Reagan will commemorate the 40 ih 
anniversary May 8 of the victory in 
Europe over the Germans, and 
confer with Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl. 

Larry Speakes. the White House 
spokesman, said the visit to West 
Germany would be followed by a 
(rip to Spain May 8-10. Wiite 
House officials said the European 
trip would then continue to Portu- 
gal May 10-12. The scheduled visits 
will be Mr. Reagan's first to Spain 
and Portugal as president 

While House and State Depart- 
ment officials emphasized that the 
trips to Spain and Portugal were 
especially significant because both 
countries are fledgling European 
democracies in which the United 
States has pivotal military bases. 

“Here are two nations who. with- 
in living memory, became democ- 
racies, and the visit of an American 
president will highlight the fact 


Perez de Cuellar, Dong 
Hold Talks in Hanoi 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Tima Scmce 

HANOI — The secretary-gener- 
al of the United Nations and Viet- 
nam's prime minister and foreign 
minister held several hours of talks 
Tuesday that United Nations offi- 
cials called “frank and useful." 

The men apparently had some 
blunt exchanges on Cambodia and 
other problems in Southeast Asia. 

The discussions with Foreign 
Minister Nguyen Co Thach, which 
were due to end T uesday morning, 
have been extended to Wednesday, 
when Secretary-General Javier Pe- 
rez de CudUar is planning to return 
to Bangkok. 

Mr. Perez de CufeUar, aides sug- 
gested. has been delivering mes- 
sages to Lhe Vietnamese from the 
Thai government, and will return 
to Thailand with Vietnamese re- 
plies. 

Thailand believes that it is taking 
the brunt of the effect of the Viet- 
namese war against guerrillas at- 
tempting lo overthrow the Cambo- 
dian government installed by 
Hanoi in 1979. Vietnam accuses 
Thailand of giving active support 
to the guerrillas. 

Mr. Perez de Cuellar is also dis- 
cussing the Vietname&e-Chiiiese 
border conflict and international 
issues of interest to Vietnam. 

On Tuesday afternoon, the sec- 
retary-general met with Prime Min- 
ister Pham Van Dong at the presi- 
dential palace. The prime minister. 
78, a founding member of the Viet- 
namese Communist movement and 
head of government since 1955. 
walked unsteadily as be ushered 
Mr. Perez de Cu&Uar into the meet- 
ing. The two men spoke in French 
without intepreters. 

The secretary-general told Mr. 
Dong that their meeting was a 
“very important opportunity for an 
evaluation of so many problems." 


Prime Minister Dong replied: 
“We must look after what may be 
possible and feasible regarding the 
problems that preoccupy us." 

Mr. Perez de Cutflar, who earlier 
Tuesday visited the mausoleum 
where the embalmed body of Ho 
Chi Minh lies in state, also brought 
to Vietnam a message from Jeane J. 
Kirkpatrick, the U.S. delegate to 
the UN, asking Hanoi to cooperate 
more actively with the United 
States in searching for the remains 
of Americans missing in action 
from the Vietnam War. 

A similar message had been 
passed on to the Laotian govern- 
ment when Mr. Perez de Cuellar 
slopped in Vientiane on his way 
from Bangkok, the UN aide said. 

The subject of missing Ameri- 
cans is a contentious one in Viet- 
nam. where many Vietnamese citi- 
zens are still unaccounted for a 
decade after the end of the war. The 
Reagan administration has made 
the issue of the missing a major 
obstacle to improved relations with 
Hand 

The Vietnamese and Laotians in- 
sist that they cannot afford to con- 
duct extensive searches, particular- 
ly since so many of their own 
people are missing. They do not 
want the United States to do the 
job for them. 

Diplomats in Hanoi say most if 
not all of the missing Americans 
are dead, and they say it is unfortu- 
nate to encourage false hopes 
among relatives. 


Polish Leader to Visit India 

The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 
Wojciech Jaruzdski of Poland will 
visit India Feb. II to 15 at the 
invitation of Prime Minister Rajiv 
Gandhi, the Indian government an- 
nounced Monday. 


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Westmoreland Troop Figures Assailed 


that these are democracies," an ad- 
ministration official said. "They 
have joined the Western democrat- 
ic world, and Reagan being there 
will help the process." 

Details or the visit to West Ger- 
many have not yet been worked 
out, and officials said the trip was 
delicate because it coincided with 
V-E Day. Mr. Reagan shelved a 
plan to visit a concentration camp 
because he wanted to underscore 
the “reconciliation” after the war, 
not recall the horrors of the con- 
flict. a White House official said. 

In his talks with the Spanish 
prime minister. Felipe GonzAlez. a 
Socialist, Mr. Reagan is expected 
to seek better relations wiin Ma- 
drid and to explain administration 
policy in Central America, which 
Mr. Gonzalez has at times criti- 
cized. 

Administration officials empha- 
sized that Mr. Reagan, with his 
visits to Spain and Portugal, would 
seek to underscore U.S. reliance on 
military bases in the two countries. 
In Spain, the air force has bases at 
Tonqon. 19 miles (30 kilometers) 
north of Madrid, and Zaragoza, 
north of Torrqon. The navy has a 
base at Rota, near Cadiz. 

In Portugal White House offi- 
cials said. Mr. Reagan will endorse 
Prime Minister Mario Soares's ef- 
forts to cement democracy. The key 
U.S. base controlled by Portugal is 
the -military airlift command out- 
post in Lajes. in the central Azores. 


By M.A. Farbcr 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK -A former U.S. 
representative and rwo former CIA 
analysts testified Monday that 
General William C. Westmoreland 
should not have removed the Viet 
Cong’s self-defense forces in 1967 
from the official listing of enemy 
strength known as the order of bat- 
tle. 

The decision to delete those 
forces, which also resulted in their 
not being counted in a special intel- 
ligence estimate for President Lyn- 
don B_ Johnson in November 1967, 
is a key issue in the 16-week trial of 
Genera] Westmoreland's SI 20- mil- 
lion libel suit against CBS. 

The suit stems from a 1982 docu- 
mentary, “The Uncounted Enemy: 
A Vietnam Deception." that ac- 
cused the general's command in 
Saigon of engaging in a “conspira- 
cy" to show progress in the Viet- 
nam War by understating the size 
and nature of the enemy. 

That thesis was based largely on 
15 years of research by a former 
analyst for the Central Intelligence 
Agency, Samuel A. Adams, who 
was a paid consultant for the 
broadcast and is now a defendant 
in the lawsuiL 

General Westmoreland, who 
commanded American forces in 
Vietnam from January 1964 to 
June 1968. contends that the 
broadcast defamed him by saying 
he had lied about enemy troop 
strength to President Johnson and 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

The witnesses for CBS in Federal 
District Court in Manhattan Mon- 
day were Paul N. McCloskey Jr., a 
representative from California be- 
tween 1967 and 1982 who ran for 
the Republican nomination for 
president in 1971 ou an anti-war 
platform, and Douglas J. Parry and 
John I. Dickerson, who were CIA 
analysis in 1967. 

Mr. Parry, who had worked at 
CIA headquarters in Langley. Vir- 
ginia. said CIA officials had been 
“cowards" for “conforming" in 
1967 to the newly adopted position 
of General Westmoreland's com- 


mand: that the part-time, hamlet- 
based self-defense forces were in- 
consequential militarily and could 
not be estimated accurately. 

Mr. Parry also testified that, af- 
ter the Tet offensive of January 
1968 the CIA estimated that North 
Vietnamese infiltration into South 
Vietnam during the fall of 1967 was 
20,000 to 30,000 a month, quadru- 
ple the rate stated at the time by 
General Westmoreland's com- 
mand. The documentary used a 
monthly figure of 20 , 000 , too, and 
said that the command had 
Mocked reports about the higher 
infiltration. 

Judge Pierre N. Leval twice re- 
minded the jury that the “uuth" 
issue in the case was not whether 
the command's estimates “were 
right or even close to right." The 
issue, he said, is whether they were 
made “honestly." 

Mr. Dickerson, who worked in 
1967 at the CIA's station in Saigon, 
said he came to believe that the 
military was involved in a “con- 
scious effort, a deliberate conspira- 
cy to keep the numbers in the order 
of battle below a certain pre-de- 
fin ed, arbitrary level." 

Like other witnesses for CBS, 
both Mr. Dickerson and Mr. Parry 
were called to the stand to demon- 
strate that Mr. Adams had a rea- 
sonable basis for his views about 
the enemy strength dispute and was 
not alone in those views. Both said 
thqr conveyed their sentiments to 
Mr. Adams in 1967. 

Mr. McCloskey recalled meeting 
Mr. Adams in the spring of 1973. 
when they both testified at the Pen- 
tagon Papers trial of Daniel Eils- 
berg. Shortly thereafter, Mr. Mc- 
Closkey said, Mr. Adams went to 
his office on Capitol Hill with a 
package of documents two or three 
inches thick, that he wanted Mr. 
McCloskey to keep in his safe. 

“He was afraid that something 
would happen to him or Lhe docu- 
ments," Mr. McOoskey said. 

Mr. McCloskey, who is now a 
lawyer in California, said on cross- 
examination by David Dorse n. a 
lawyer for General Westmoreland, 


that Mr. Adams “felt his superiors 
were opposed to his views." 

He wanted to be sure that, if 
anything happened to him, and he 
feared it might, the files would be 
safe," Mr. McCloskey said. 

Two years later, according to 
Mr. McCloskey, Mr. Adams re- 
lumed for the package and showed 
him some of its contents. Among 
the documents, Mr. McOoskey 
said, were cables that had been sent 
in August 1967 from General West- 
moreland's command to the Penta- 
gon and the CIA. 

Under questioning by Michael 
R. Doyen, a lawyer for' CBS, Mr. 
McOoskey identified one of the 
documents as an Aug. 19, 1967, 
cable from General Creighton W. 
Abrams, General Westmoreland's 
deputy, to General Earle G. 
Wheeler, chair man of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff. 

In the cable, which General 
Westmoreland supported in a brief 
message lo General Wheeler the 
next day. General Abrams mini- 
mized the abilities of the self-de- 
fense forces, opposed their contin- 
ued inclusion in the order of battle 
and warned that the press would 
draw “*an erroneous and gloomy 
conclusion" from new intelligence 
estimates that would increase the 
□umber for those forces from 
70.000 to 120,000. 

Mr. McCloskey said he was 
“shocked" when he read the docu- 
ments “and I told Adams, I may 
even have been the one who used 
the word, that I thought it was a 
conspiracy" by General Abrams 
and General Westmoreland and by 
Robert W. Komer, who was head 
of Lhe pacification program in 
South Vietnam. 


PiageT 


“I told Mr. Adams that ‘it was- 
almost a criminal thing’ to say that 
the self-defense forces ‘weren t ef*. 
fective,^ ” said Mr. McOoskey. a 
retired colonel in the Marine Corps 
reserve. 

Mr. McOoskey, who served pA 
active duty in Korea but not in 
Vietnam, said the self -defense 
forces “probably caused as many 
casualties as North Vietnamese or 

VC regular forces. In my opinion; 
they had to have been included in 
the order of battle." , 

U.S. Approves [ 

Oral Medicine 
To Treat Herpes ] 


NEW YORK — The Food 
and Drug Administration has 
approved the first oral medica- 
tion for the treatment of genital 
herpes, the drug's maker. Bur- 
roughs Wellcome Co_ has an- 
nounced. 

The company said Tuesday 
that the medication, called Zo- 
virax, would be available in 
about six weeks for persons 
holding prescriptions. Zovirax 
is the company name for a drug 
called acyclovir, which was first 
used in ointment form in 1982. 

The oral drug can be used 
daily for up to six months to 
prevent new outbreaks among 
people who suffer frequent re- 
currences of genital herpes, the 
company said. It can also be 
used on a short-term basis for 
first or less frequent outbreaks. 


Pope Proclaims Priority 
f Of Labor Over Capital 9 


By E.J. Dionne Jr. El Salvador said Archbishop Rive- 

New Yitk Times Sentce ra y Damas intended to ask the 

CIUDAD GUAYANA, Vene- pope to step into the discussions in 
zuela — Pope John Paul II has Central America, 
issued a ringing defense of the Venezuelan government officials 
rights of workers, asserting the were also expressing their eager- 
“priority of labor oyer capital" and ness f° r P°P® to ^ involved, 
warning that the individual must ■ Advice for Pope 
not become “the slave of the ma- Bisho p Gregorio Rosa Chavez, 
dune. .... the auxiliary bishop of San Salva- 

In the most radical speech of his dor< ^ Mondav ^ ^ were 
visa i® Venezuela, thepope Tura- ways the’ pope could help 

day told a crowd of about 200.000 ^ve talks between government 
in this industrial city- that Gods officiak ^ ^ rebels. which 
iniauion.ii dearly seen in that sU ||ed after two meetings. The 
woric is made for nun. man is not,_ New Y ork Tunes reported from 
made for work. He was on the < 5 ^ Salvador. 


Gmf*l watch 
in 18 carat gold, 
water -resistant, 
with extra-flat 
quartz movement. 

Inuaru time zona change. 


fourth day of his 12 -day visit lo 
Latin America. 


The pope could intervene direct- 
ly and ask that new negotiations 




The pope, who worked in a place, bishop said, or he 
chemical factory before becoming co ^ d Vatican officials or 

a priest, condemned an “ideology p^paj nuncio in El Salvador to 

of technology that he said im- ^ role in pressing for 
posed the primacy of matter over m end t0 ^ five-year civil war. 

spirit, of things over the human 

person, of the technical over the 

moraL" __ 

The pope underscored his own — 

theme by lunching after Mass with , 

a group of about 100 steelworkers, J 

who. according to an official at the r 

plant where they work, earn about 1 1 

$300 a month. , f 

{The Vatican confirmed Tuesday -A, V^/ f 

that it had given Nicaraguan f v — -’y* 

priests an ultimatum to leave their \ / y 

government posts or face suspen- J 

si on from their priestiy duties. The \ / 

Associated Press reported from .V / v 

Rome.] \ 

On Monday in Caracas, the pope / > \ \ 

said that the church must not “re- \V/ 

sign itself passively" to social injus- _ 

lice. A fPO{] 

“There are sectors in which so- ^ 


/i\0\ 


rial progress and well-being mani - 1 
fest themselves in a luxurious ego- 
ism," the pope told an enthusiastic 
group of priests and nuns, “while 
other sectors remain in poverty, on 
the fringes and illiterate." 

“The church, committed to 
man." the pope continued, “espe- 
cially with the most poor and alien- 
ated, cannot ignore these situa- 
tions. It must not resign itself 
passively to leave these things as 
they are or. as often happens, to 
degenerate into worse situations." 

Efforts, meanwhile, were bring 
made by Salvadoran church leaders 
and government officials to have 
Lhe pope play a mediating role in 
the conflicts of Central America. 

Archbishop Arturo Rivera y Da- 
mas of El Salvador flew from 
Maracaibo. Venezuela, where he 
dined with the pope Sunday night, 
to Caracas. The archbishop attend- 
ed the meeting Monday evening of 
priests and nuns at which the pope 
spoke, and an auxiliary bishop in 


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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1985 


* 


Hcralb 


PldUiabed Wilh The Mew Yorfc Tubm and H* Waghj^flon PM 


(tribune 


Botha Tries Bargaining 


Echoes of the new constitution introduced 
in South Africa last year continue to reverber- 
ate. By offering a political voice to the Asian 
and mixed-race minorities but not to the black 
majority, it produced a wave of black unrest. 
The government responded evasively with a 
vague promise of black “political participa- 
tion-” Black agitation surged, tbe white busi- 
ness community started declaring that apart- 
heid is bad for business and anti-apartheid 
pressures, popular and official, began building 
in America. Result: President P.W. Botha, 
insisting that Pretoria will not bend, is bending 
— on the key issue of black political rights. 

His latest step is an unprecedented hint of a 
political role for urban blacks, who work in tbe 
while economy and live outside the artif icial 
“homelands" to which apartheid consigns 
them for the purpose of denying them political 
rights in South Africa. It is only a hint; this is 
the typical crab-like performance of a leader- 
ship that, while anxious to disarm foreign and 
domestic criticism, is no less anxious to avoid 
further erosion of its core white constituency. 
But it is a major event all the same. 

Among whites, liberals reacted with cau- 
tious approval Tbe Afrikaner element that has 
broken with Mr. Botha found confirmation of 


its certainty that he is pursuing racial integra- 
tion. It appears, however, that he designed his 
words to preserve his political base — whites 
who believe in controlled change to survive. 

Can their son of change meet the sort of 
change blacks demand? Mr. Botha pleads with 
“responsible black leaders to take the hand 
that is bang extended to them." But a huge 
burden rests on him to offer enough promise of 
equality and dignity to let them take his hand. 

Here it is fascinating to ask what Mr. Botha 
bad in mind by allowing South Africa's best 
known nationalist, the long-imprisoned Nel- 
son Mandela, to give a rare interview to a 
(British) newspaper just now. Last month Mr. 
Botha said be would not negotiate with any 
group favoring diange through violence. Mr. 
Mandela now says that his African National 
Congress would bait violence if the authorities 
“legalize us, treat us like a political party and 
negotiate with us." That, like Mr. Botha’s 
remarks, is, in effect, bargaining. 

In such bargaining Americans have a role 
that is secondary but: to press unremittingly 
for change. The Reagan administration en- 
courages change quietly, others push more 
forcefully. It seems to be having an effect 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Not an Attorney General 


Eleven months have passed since Edwin 
Meese went before the Senate Judiciary Com- 
mittee seeking confirmation as Attorney Gen- 
eral- Althoujpi slight of legal stature, he had 
the warm endorsement of a popular president 
and seemed easily confirmable. But questions 
arose about his fitness for the office, and they 
were serious enough to require a special inves- 
tigation by an independent counseL 

The counsel concluded that none of the 
charges warranted a c riminal indictment, so 
the president renewed the nomination. This 
week the Senate returns to the crucial ques- 
tion: What qualifies Mr. Meese for this job? 

There is much to be said for letting presi- 
dents have their choice of cabinet officers. But 
unless the qualifications are cut to fit the 
candidate, Mr. Meese is not a desirable choice. 
Some senators seem in no mood to measure 
the nominee. For them the key factors are Mr. 
Reagan's landslide re-election and tbe inde- 
pendent counsel’s report that Mr. Meese has 
done nothing criminal. Yet senators voting to 
confirm or reject should apply a higher stan- 
dard of what an attorney general onght to be. 

The person entrusted with the Department 
of Justice need not be a legal scholar or master 
of every legal specialty under his direction, but 
he should be learned in the law and he should 
have distinguished hims elf in its practice and 
application. Moreover, he should aspire to be 
the conscience of any adminis tration, guiding 
the president in setting its ethical and moral 
tone. He should become not only the presi- 
dent's advocate but also his chief legal adviser. 


ready to give the unwelcome advice that the 
law limits his client's power. 

When viable, Mr. Meese’s approach to the 
law has been aggressively opportunistic. As 
White House counselor he sought to wipe out 
years of gains in civS rights by restoring 
tax exemptions to schools that discriminate 
against blades. Even at the risk of abusing 
executive power, he led the effort to sabotage 
Congress's repeated affirmation of a law creat- 
ing a federal program of lawyers for poor 
people. Without a trace of courtesy to a re- 
sponsible adversary, be kept calling the Ameri- 
can Civil Liberties Union a “criminals' lobby." 

In explaining his failure to report financial 
favors by benefactors who then obtained gov- 
ernment jobs, Mr. Meese convinced the inde- 
pendent counsel, Jacob Stein, that he attaches 
no legal significance to some of these trans- 
actions and simply could not remember others. 
That negates c riminal intent but it does not 
make Mr. Meese a bloodhound when it comes 
to questionable conduct in high office. 

Tbe United States has endured some undis- 
tinguished attorneys general. It has also been 
blessed with some whose achievements in law 
enforcement, civil rights and the protection of 
liberties marked them for honor. Mr. Meese 
would be a throwback to the kind of attorney 
general that the last Watergate prosecutor 
warned against: the political manag er, the 
presidential buddy. The standard for perfor- 
mance in this critical job has been rising. Mr. 
Meese doesn’t measure up. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


A Quilt for Unmade Pakistan 

Pakistan remains not so much a nation with 
an accepted constitution as a collection of 
peoples held together by an army and by the 
pressures of the Cold War. It is riven, too, by 
the populist urban proletarian pressures which 
the Bhutto movement rode. The military 
could, if it so decided, replace the president 
overnight in classic Pakistani style. Radical 
elements of the army could unite with the 
quiescent urban mob. A relaxation of inter- 
national tension could leave the United States 
less adamantly opposed to Sindhi or Baluchi 
autonomy. The new constitution way be a 
skillful patchwork quilt but it is no more than 
a quilt thrown over an unmade bed. 

The problems that President Zia inherited 
remain. They are the problems Pakistan has 
juggled since its bloody birth. There is good 
reason to suppose that those problems will 
outlive even the adroit President Zia, his Is- 
lamic republic and the restricted assemblies 
he is calling into being. 

— The Guardian (London). 

America, China and Bystanders 

It is the grass that suffers when elephants 
fight, says an African proverb. Tbe grass, as a 
bit of inspired retelling had it, does not fare 
any better when elephants make love. 

This is a point worth recalling at this junc- 
ture when China and the United States are 
talking about military cooperation and Wash- 
ington plans the sale of military equipment to 
Beijing. Do the interests of smaller powers 


need always be trampled underfoot when the 
world's greatest power starts supplying arms 
to a potential global power? [It has been 
agreed that] China, worried about Russia's 
intentions, needed help in modernizing its al- 
most antique navy and that all the nations on 
the Pacific rim would gain by that . . . 

— The Singapore Monitor. 

Meese Shouldn't Be Confirmed 

If Edwin Meese is confirmed as attorney 
general wc will be taught a dismaying lesson 
about the sure of our public ethics and about 
the moral code of the United States Senate. 

In Washington, it seems, the finding of the 
independent counsel that there was insuffi- 
cient evidence to prosecute Mr. Meese for 
actual crimes is being interpreted as a clean 
bill of health that should lead to his speedy 
confirmation by tbe Senate. But the indepen- 
dent counsel's 385-page report is anything but 
a vindication. It contains detailed, largely un- 
con tested evidence of Mr. Meese 5 low regard 
for ethics in government and of his willingness 
to engage in behavior that raises the most 
serious questions about his fitness to become 
our country's chief law-enforcement officer. 

The president of a large university asked me 
last spring: “How can you and I continue to 
uy to teach young men and women to recog- 
nize moral standards if the Senate votes that 
what Ed Meese did does not bar his confirma- 
tion as attorney general of the United States?" 

— Archibald Cox, a former Watergate 
special prosecutor who teaches law at Boston 

University, writing in the Washington Post. 


FROM OUR JAN. 30 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Asqmtfa Needs Labor and Irish 
PARIS — The most eventful general election 
held in Great Britain Tor a century came to an 
end [on Jan. 29]- Liberals and Unionists prac- 
tically balance one another, and Liberal Prime 
Minister Herbert Henry Asquith is dependent 
for his majority on such doubtful allies as the 
Labor Party and the Irish Nationalists. At the 
moment of the dissolution the Liberal Cabi- 
net’s platform included reform of the House of 
Lords and acceptance of tbe Lloyd George 
Budget. When the Lords threw out the Budget 
tbe Liberal Cabinet had a majority. Now that 
it has returned dependent 00 the Irish Nation- 
alists there is little chance of the Upper House 
showing itself more complaisant In its strug- 
gle to weaken the veto of the Lords the Cabinet 
can count on John Edward Redmond and his 
followers, as this would get rid of one of 
the obstacles to a Home Rule bilL 


1935: Senate Rejects World Court 
WASHINGTON — The Administration suf- 
fered its first major defeat from the new Con- 
gress [on Jan. 29] when the Senate rejected the 
Robinson resolution providing for America’s 
adherence to the World Court, by a vote of 52 
to 36, which was far short of the two-thirds 
majority required for ratification of tbe proto- 
cols signed thirteen years ago. Tbe vote came 
as a surprise, as shortly before the roll call 
Senator George W. Norris (Republican. Ne- 
braska) and other court foes had indicated that 
their chances of defeating adherence were al- 
most hopeless. A last -min me effort to assure 
passage of the Robinson resolution was exert- 
ed by the Administration, Secretary of State 
Cordell Hull visiting the Capitol [on Jan. 28] 
and pleading with opponents to withdraw 
their objection to the United States entering 
the Permanent Court of International Justice. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

CfhChabmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publaher 

Executive Editor RENE BONDY Deputy Pubhsher 

Editor ALAIN L£COUR Assoaou PubSdur 

Deputy EtStar RICHA RD R. MORGAN Asstxuue Pubiaker 

Deputy Edtor STEPHAN W. G5NAWAY Director of Operators 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Qrtutaaon 

ROLFD.KRANEPUHl Duracr of Advertising Sde 


Onturtf Advertising Sales 

International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Qudes-de-Gaulk, 92200 NedRy-sui-Srine, 

Fiance. Telephone 747-1265. Telex; 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

Director de la pvbbcttOcrv Wither N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Hautcssy R i. Hong Kang Tied 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
ManagjngDr. UJL Rabin MaMan, 63 Lung Am?London WO. Td 83&480Z Telex 262009. 

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U.S. ndisaiptiorv $284 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Lang Island City, N.T, W01. 

6 1983, International Herod TWmte. AR rights reserved 



When Opinion Leads , Government Follows 


W4 issues, government leads 
and public opinion follows. Certain 
gut issues have the capacity to turn 
that process around. We are now 
witnessing a singular example in the 
framing of U.S. policy toward fam- 
ine relief in sub-Sahara Africa. 

Until television brought the des- 
perate faces of Ethiopia into Ameri- 
can living rooms, it was a case of 
“out of sighL out of mind." Tbe 
Reagan administration was main- 
taining an arm’s-length relationship 
with die Marxist regime in Addis 
Ababa. The leaders there were de- 
scribed by Washington as hostile to 
America and indifferent to their 
own people. Limited quantities of 
food were channeled through pri- 
vate agencies such as Catholic Re- 
lief Services, which has worked in 
Ethiopia for a generation. 

All that changed in October when 
the pictures from Koran, Makale 
and Bad dominated the daily news. 
Americans were profoundly affect- 
ed, and showed their concern 
through private contributions and 
requests for more information on 
the causes of f amin e in Ethiopia 
and elsewhere in Africa. 

Public opinion began to lead pol- 
icy. Washington moved quickly to 
approve increased aid requests 
through private agencies, and initi- 
ated a bilateral government grant of 
food. As the news media began re- 
porting from Sudan, Mali, Niger 
and Mozambique, Washington ex- 
panded UJS. aid throughout Africa. 

Another striking indication that 
policy is being shaped by public 
sentiment occurred last week when 
the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee opened bearings on whai 


By Robert J. McCloskey 


more the U.S. government should 
do to aid the famin e victims, which 
is a topic that was not originally on 
the committee’s agenda. 

House members who had been to 
Ethiopia had earlier introduced a 
bill calling for more than SI billion . 
in supplementary assistance, and 
scheduled hearings for this week. 
AD but two of the 64 co-sponsors 
are Democrats. Now the Republi- 
can side has announced a bill seek- 
ing $628 mill i nn. A current admin- 
istration request calls for $235 
milli on in new money while re-all o- 


If, as macro-planners contend, 
there is ample food 10 feed everyone 
on Earth, then the world communi- 
ty is neglecting — or at best dealing 
inadequately with — its moral re- 
sponsibility. Thus a meeting of do- 
nor governments is a good idea. 

But it now appears that Washing- 
ton prefers to have the United Na- 
tions assume tbe catalyst role. Giv- 
en that organization's proclivity for 


politicizing issues, not to mention 
the fact that the UN General As- 


cating other Agency for Interna- 
tional r 


Development funds from ex- 
isting accounts. Catholic Relief 
Services and other private agencies 
believe that the administration's 
proposal does not go far enough. 

The contrast with last year is 
noteworthy. Congress that appro- 
priated $150 million in supplemen- 
tary aid after the administration ar- 
gued that $90 million was sufficient. 
The administration went along re- 
luctantly, but not before it sou {pH to 
attach an amendment for money for 
military aid in Central America. 
The effect was to encumber a “dean 
bOT that had broad congressional 
and public support with an amend- 
ment that had virtually none, and 
$60 million in desperately needed 
African aid was delayed in the pro- 
cess. If ever an admmistraiion was 
out of step with the will of the' 
people, that was a clear example. 

In November the Agency for In- 
ternational Development called for 
a meeting of donor governments as 
a way to coordinate responses to 
Africa’s needs. That was a wise step. 


sembly recently approved §73 mil- 
lion to build a conference hall in 
Ethiopia before addressing the fam- 
ine, it is difficult to see what it could 
contribute to alleviating the conti- 
nent's food problem, fi would be 
more appropriate to get the United 
Nations to work toward obtaining 
cease-fires in countries where civfl 
wars hinder food distribution. 

The generosity of individuals in 


response to the suffering in Africa is 
unprecedented in modern times. 
Their help will permit Catholic Re- 
lief Services to spend $15 million on 
programs in Ethiopia alone. 

In Iowa, for example, where farm 
foreclosures are common, residents 
contributed $630,000 recently 
through a statewide appeal by tne 
Des Moines Register to assist Cath- 
olic Relief Services and Church 
World Service programs. 

Public opinion cannot always 
shape government policy so direct- 
ly. When it does happen, as it has 
with the African famine victims, it 
generally makes good sense. This 
experience has shown us the kind of 
values that Americans truly cherish. 
It is good to be reminded. 


The writer, a former U.S. ambassa- 
dor to Cyprus, the Netherlands and 
Greece, is senior vice president of Cath- 
olic Relief Services. He contributed this 
comment to the Los Angeles Times. 



Drawing Or EWK In AftenNodet iStadttaumj. Da*rftxrt«J tn> Cortaontth & writer* Svndtarta. 


They Won’t Let the General Show You His Pictures 


MS Belgium — The com- 


manders at Supreme Head- 
quarters Allied Powers Europe 
(SHAPE) thmk they have the goods 
on the Soviet Union's dark designs 


By Philip Geyelin 


in Europe: Secret aerial photographs 
satellites dearly 


from American spy sa 
reveal military deployments that can 
have only offensive, as distinct from 
defensive, purposes. 

Publication of this evidence, they 
believe, might work wonders on Eu- 
ropean public opinion and in turn on 


Wfc y? General Bernard Rogers, the 
supreme allied commander in Eu- 
rope, would like to know. He has 
been told that publication of these 
photographs could compromise U.S. 
intelligence gatherin'’ but he is puz- 
zled by the “nuance” between aerial 
surveillance from fixed-wing aircraft 
over Nicaragua and satellite surveil- 
lance of Warsaw Pact deployment 
General Rogers is a Rhodes schol- 


ocher is a growing temptation among 
“serious people, not just kooks, 
to think in terms of pacifism, neu- 
tralism, accommodation. 

As these trends converge; he be- 
lieves Europe might “wake up some 
morning" and find the Soviets in a 
commanding position — not to start 


a war, necessarily, but to subject sus- 
itrbledip- 


r You can show the offensive nature of the Warsaw 
Pact if you can show the massive amounts of 
prepositioned rmer-crossin g equipment 


parliamentary votes on defense 
spending. A bigger European effort 
amid conceivably silence a growing 
□umber of American critics who 
threaten to puD out UR troops if the 


allies are unwilling to take on a larger 
eNATO' ‘ 


share of the NATO burden. 

The Reagan administration, which 
has not hesitated to use similar aerial 
photos as evidence in seeking public 
support and congressional funds for 
its policies in Central America and 
the Caribbean, has steadfastly re- 
fused to make this evidence public. 


ar, a combat veteran and a former 
army chief of staff. He understands 
tbe problem of the intelligence gath- 
erers, but he also believes profoundly 
in the business of balancing risks. 
And the “basic challenge we face in 
this alliance." he told me in a long 
intervi'.-w, is “to convince the people, 
particularly in Western Europe, that 
there is a threat to their freedom.” 

General Rogers sees two ominous 
trends. One is a widening Soviet ad- 
vantage in conventional military 
power along the European front. The 


ceptible Europeans to irresistit 
lomatic and economic b lackmail 

“I'm convinced that the time has 
come, or passed, for the common 
good of collective defense, to have a 
tittle give on the part of tbe intelli- 
gence community,” he says. 

Even if be is wrong, tbe runaround 
be has been getting from Washington 
is a commentary on the Reagan ad- 
ministration's management of na- 
tional security affairs. 

Tbe point is not so much whether 
release erf this evidence would do ev- 
erything the general imagines. Tbe 
point is that he has been pressing 
what he thinks is an important case at 
the highest levels of the U.S. govern- 
ment and even getting a sympathetic 
hearing for almost four years. What 
he has not been getting is anything in 
the nature of a considered response 
reflecting a serious effort to choose 
between risks and opportunities. In- 


agreement to deploy countervailing 
in wests 


U.S. missiles in Western Europe. At 
least one recipient, Belgium, is having 
serious second thoughts. General 
Rogers says the spy photos would 
show the sites and even the Soviet 
missiles, unmistakably. 

The European man on the street, 
be contends, does a lot of wishful 


thinking about the purely defensive 
■ Pact fo 


AU Aboard! Tax Reform 
Is About to Cast Off 


By George F. Will 


"Y^ASHINGTON — What we 


have here is “High Noon 
played by the Marx brothers. The 
gunslingers are warily walking 
down the dusty street — Pennsylva- 
nia Avenue — but they are not 
eager to sling guns. The winner may 
be the one who draws last 

Tbe president is going to submit 
a sort of budget, in a perfunctory 
sort of way. The Home of Repre- 
sentatives, the last redoubt of Dem- 
ocrats, must — the law is picky 
about this — pass a budget. But it 
does not want to do that until Sen- 
ate Republicans write one. 

Their leader, Robert Dole, is go- 
ing to run for president as a Re- 
sponsible Republican, meaning one 
who will countenance some Social 
Security cuts and deeper defense 
cuts than the president wants. 1/ 
Mr. Dole oversees Senate passage 
of a budget like that. House Demo- 
crats will stand back aghast, entro- 
py will spread through Congress 
and there will be government by 
continuing resolution until 1986, 
which is an election year, so . . . 

So let’s kill time by reforming 
taxes. Rub, rub, rub. rub. There. 
We have erased every line in the 
wickedly complicated tax code, be- 
cause Americans say they crave 
simplicity. And yet. and yet . . . 

A few months ago the Reagan 
administration was said to be bent 
on establishing a theocracy, turning 
the government over to the nation's 
parsons. But to! The Reagan ad- 
ministration's tax simplification 
plan would erase the provision 
whereby parsons are not taxed on 
the value of tbe compensation they 
receive in the form of their parson- 
age or housing allowance. Taxing 
that will give the government $164 





Now, about that progressive idea 
of ending the deductibility of mort- 
gage-interest payments on second 


homes. That change would perse- 
" ‘ WdL it 


cute the plutocrats, right? 
will not amuse Aspen. Colorado, 
Sun Valley, Idaho, and Jackson 
Hole, Wyoming, for starters. And 
three states have as many senators 
as California. New York and Texas. 

The end of second-home deduct- 
ibility would alarm the lumbermen 
who harvest the trees that make the 


million in 1990. Bui that is $164 . beams and shingles and floors in 
million that congregations will have second homes. And the union mem- 


to make up, or take from charities. 
So parsons and their flocks will put 
the fear of God into Congress. 

Furthermore, America itself — - 
meaning, of course, baseball — is 
endangered- Last year 15 milli on 
tickets — one-third of all tickets 
sold — were deductible as business 
expense. The government, in one of 
its sweeter moods, has declared that 
a major league stadium is an “ap- 
propriate business setting.” For 
business entertainment, that is. 
Change that, and much revenue will 
be drained from sports. So, sports 
fans, let's keep a little complexity in 
tbe uut code, to protect sports. 


bers who make the 


. fix- 
tures may oppose any tax change 
that would inhibit construction. 

Concerning the three-martini 
lunch, who will die in the last ditch 
in defense of permissive rules on 
the deductibility of “business'* 
meals? Not cats grown fat on too 
much gin and not enough ver- 
mouth. They are too fat to figfaL 
The defenders will be tbe restaurant 
and hotel workers’ unions. And (for 
starters) tbe two senators from 
Louisiana: New Orleans is kept 
afloat by deductible spending at 
business conventions ana meetings. 

WeU. at least we can agree about 


radically restricting the right of 
state and local governments to issue 
tax-exempt bonds, right? 

Such bonds finance construction 
of public works — schools, high- 
ways, airports, hospitals, bridges. 
There were $83 billion worth of 
such bonds issued in 19S3. Restrict 
them and you restrict the wealth- 
amassing try the wealthy. But you 
also restrict construction, so you 
will hear from the construction 
unions (Democratic) and the con- 
tractors (Republican), And so on. 

So what will happen in this year 
of budget cutting and tax reform- 
ing? This year will be momentous if 
much happens, or if nothing hap- 
pens. If much happens, that will be 
momentous. If nothing very much 
happens, we will have established 
the momentous fact that the rood- 


posture of Warsaw Pact forces. “You 
can show the offensive nature of the 
Warsaw Pact if you can show the 
massive amounts of prepositioned 
river-crossing equipment, the mas- 
sive amount of prepositioned pipe- 
line and their ability to lay that pipe- 
line up to 90 Idlomelera a day 
He also has photographic evidence 
of the location and the specific weap- 
onry or Warsaw Pact units. 

He has tested his theory. With the 
permission of Defense Secretary Cas- 


par Weinberger he did a slide show 
to 


for a select group of European cabi- 
net ministers. “You could hear the 
breath being sucked in when they saw 
the pictures for the first time,” he 
says. He believes in it enough to have 
signed ret for another two-year hitch, 
wiLh the administration's blessing. 

Few American authorities ques- 
tion his analysis. The debate is over 
what to do. And the remedy of 
choice, increasingly, is to think in 
terms of threats that the United 
Slates will simply walk away from the 
problem. Genera] Rogers makes a 
good case thai before it comes to that, 
the administration ought to lay out 
its best evidence of the Soviet threat 
and see how the Europeans respond. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


The Later 
We Retire 
The Better 


By Giles Merritt 


g RUSSELS — Early retirement is 


stead, intelligence techni cians have 
been bottling up useful and damning 
evidence at a tune when (a) Europe- 
ans regularly fall short in meeting 
NATO commitments, (b) the Soviets 
are moving ahead in sneer numbers 
of tanks, helicopters and other arma- 
ments and (c) Senator Sam Nunn, the 
Georgia Democrat, is using his con- 
siderable prestige to round up Senate 
support for drawing down American 
forces if the Europeans fail to do 
more in their own behalf. 

General Rogers believes that this 
would be the “unraveling” of the alli- 
ance. He sees hard-pressed and in 
many cases shaky European coalition 
governments under heavy pressure 
for social welfare spending. So he 
would try to strengthen their band 
with public opinion. 

Many Europeans seriously doubt 
the numbers— or even the existence 
— of the Soviet intermediate-range 
ballistic missiles that constitute the 
rationale for the hard-won alliance 


now one of the most widely used 
tactics for combating unemployment. 
It is also folly. Far from retiring earli- 
er. people should be t hinking about 
extending their working lives well 
past their 65th birthdays. 

Current thinking holds that the 
middle-aged should “make room” in 
overcrowded labor markets for un- 
employed young people. But before 
long the strongest economic pres- 
sures will be those directed at keeping 
people out of the pension queues. 

In Lbe last few years the average 
age at which people retire has 
dropped dramatically. In Europe to- 
day something tike three-quarters of 
all employees retire before reaching 
65, ana a third or more before 60. In 
America the shift is even more strik- 
ing: In mid- 1984 only 15.9 percent of 
men were still working at 65. 

Statistics indicate that in 1900 two- 
i birds of American men worked past 
tbe age of 65. If true, that was proba- 
bly because there were no pensions 
for them to go to. But if today we 
keep on retiring people prematurely 
we could find ourselves m much the 
same petition, for soon there may not 
be the pensions to draw' on. 

For a man to stop working at 55 is 
nowadays quite normal and stop- 
ping at SOnoionger excites comment. 
Industrial restructuring and the 
streamlining of 19tb century “rust-- 
bawl” sectors like steelmaking and 
shipbuilding have made early retire- 
ment a respectable euphemism for 
tossing skilled men in their prime 
onto the scrap heap. 

With the pressures of rising un- 
employment — in Europe at any rate, 
where EC unemployment is' 13 mil- 
lion and will go to 15 million at least 
and maybe even 18 million — early 
retirement is inevitably seen as a safe- 
ty valve. It is also widely reckoned a 
fair technique, as the retirees have 
enjoyed “their turn to work.” while 
the alternative is for unemployed 
youth to molder and eventually decay 
into a politically volatile workless 
generation. No one doubts that ur- 
gent action has to be taken to ensure 
that Europe does not create a “lost 
generation" that will never work. But 
retiring people early is emphatically 
not the way. It is arguably creating an 
even more serious long-term problem 
than joblessness itself. 

Even if people are not pushed into 
early retirement, the rising propor- 
tion of pensioners threatens to bank- 
rupt the rich industrialized countries’ 
pension schemes by the early 21st 
century. And with early retirement 
the crunch may instead come before 
the end of this century. 

Last year the OECD warned its 24 
iadustrtalaed member countries that 
by the year 2010 there will be a 
worldwide pensions crisis and that 
“the structure of pensions may come 
in question." For to accommodate 
the extra millions who by then will be 
depending on pensions, governments 
must either pump in much more 
money or pay out much less. 

The problem is not just that there - 
will be more old people, but also that 
there will be fewer younger ones to. 
support them. United Nations ex- 
perts say the over-60s population win 
have grown 90 percent by 2005 in a 
world where total population growth 
will be 70 percent. In other words, in 
the United States, for instance, there 
will be 5 1 million pensioners by 2020 
instead of today's 26 million, and in 
Japan the position wiH be worse stffl. 

At present, due to World War U 
deaths, each pensioner is supported 
by 15 workers. By 2015, each will be 
supported by only three. Seniority- 
related pay, meanwhile, will by the 
1990s have added a third to Japanese 
companies’ present labor costs. 


In short, even a comparatively dy- 
umerica’s will by 


namic society like America's will uy 
1995 have the age profile that Florida 


has today. And the cost of keeping a 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed " Letters to the 
Editor " and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


steadily growing proportion of non- 
working people will be considerable. 
Europe’s governments are well aware 
that the share of GDP taken by So- 
cial Security has gone from 12-18 
percent in ifae early 1960s to 20-30 
percent, and that share is bound to 
rise further. It costs six or seven tunes 
more to provide health care for a 
person past the age ol 65. 

The outlook for the national pen- 
sion schemes' finances is also poor, as 
after the baby boom comes the baby 
bust; there will not be enough work- 
ing-age people on present snowing to 
support the elderly. 

Retiring workers early may seem a 
convenient way of wiping them, oil 
the unemployment statistics in the 
1980s, but it is storing up double 
trouble for the future. 

Intematimai Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

The Colonel’s a Marine Schaften, Skoff, Scoff 


em state has grown weak by grow- 
biuzfld by 


ing big — that it is immobtuz 
the constituencies it has created 
through tbe services it has rendered. 

By 1986 we may have the proof 
that the modem state has so woven 
itself into the fabric of society that 
it cannot move without ripping the 
fabric, and thus cannot move, 

Washington Pm Writers Group. 


In a Jan. 29 reptpn on the latest 
U.S. space shuttle mission, you incor- 
rectly identified crew member Lieu- 
tenant Colonel James F. Buchli as a 
member of the U.S. Air Force. He is a 
U.S. Marine and a 1967 graduate of 
the U.S. Naval Academy. 

LH. AMBROSE. 

Hong Kong 


Brooklyn May Survive 


Would all of you oot there 
who think that the “star wars” pro- 
ject is workable get in touch with 
me, please? I happen to have a bridge 
you might like to buy. 

CHARI CO AN E. 

Milan. 


Never Heard of Him 

W illiam Satire, in his Jan. 14 lan- 
guage column, cites "tnigrainear.” 
French has “migraiaeux,” meaning 
“prone to migraine headaches,” but 
“migrameur” doesn’t mean a thing. 

MAURICE WERTHER. 

Fans. 


Regarding William Safin's Jan- 7 
“Language^ column and a letter from 

J. W. Hemingway ( Jan. 19): 

The word “scoff” was used m 
South Africa well before tbe Boer 
War. In the semi-desert Karoo region 
where f was born, food was catted 
“skoff" as early as ihe end erf the 18th 
century when the “trekboers" still 
lived in their ox wagons cm the vdd 
The word was brought to the Gage 
three centuries ago by Dutch saftw 
who spoke of “senafterf' — to take * 
noon meal In forming the AfritaWJS 
language, the trekboers, mapy-tf 
whom were semi-literate, took «*» 
from Dutch, German and Frchch,- 
which were then spoken at the 
and simplified the spelling and 
nundation. “Schaften” tints bee®* 
"skoff” The word is still usedifl# 
Karoo, where the local spedahiessf* 
called “Karoo skoff.” 

The word also means a 
stage or trek, bat is ibax speflea 
“skof.” The trek bow’s wife served* 
meal after each working lap. ' ' “ 7 . 

MARILYN TOMLINS. ‘ 

Pans.- 


j 












\S 

,s 

li <Vr Ri»jL 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1985 


page 5 -*■* 


Fruits of Free Enterprise Elude Jamaica 

Prime Minister Faces Disappointed, Populace After Collapse of Bauxite Industry 


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By Blaine Harden 

IVashingtm Past Sfrrtiv 

KINGSTON. Jamaica — Four 
Years ago. Prime Minister Edward 
Seaga of Jamaica was the first for- 
eign bead of state to be received by 
a freshly inaugurated Ronald Rea- 
gan. At lunch in the the White 
House, the two leaders made toasts 
to their faith in the power of free 
enterprise. 

Mr. Reagan later designated Ja- 
maica as the jewel of his Caribbean 
Basin Initiative, a program intend- 
ed to revive island economies with 
the ‘'magic of Lhe marketplace.” 

But the magic has eluded this 
island 500 miles (800 kilometers) 
south of Miami 

After one promising year. Jamai- 
ca under Mr. Sea g a has wandered 
into an economic twilight zone oT 
large foreign debt, collapse of the 
key bauxite industry, record deval- 
uation of the currency, anemic 
American investment, mgb unem- 
ployment. high inflation and al- 
most no growth. 

Doubling and tripling of prices 
for necessities such os food, elec- 
tricity and fuel has squeezed the 
working class in an economy where 
the per capita income last year was 
$932. 

A government-imposed, 21 -per- 
cent increase in oil prices sent the 
poor into the streets two weeks ago, 
ending four years of relative calm. 
Demonstrations closed down parts 
of the island for two days, claimed 
seven lives, and frightened away 



economy. We never have been and 
I doubt that we ever can be ” 


The lack of a substitute industry 
have constricted the flow of foreign 


The most severe blow to the Ja- exchange into Jamaica. Since for- 
maican economy in the past four eign exchange to buy raw materials 
years — the collapse of the bauxite and equipment has become so 
industry — would have occurred scarce, Mr. Seaga has been forced 
no matter whose hand was guiding to restrict the ways in which Jamai- 
the economy. cans can spend their money outside 


the economy. 

Sale of bauxite, the ore from 
which aluminum is obtained, has 
been Jamaica’s primary source of 
hard currency for decades. 

Worldwide recession, a glut of 
aluminum and cheaper sources of 
the ore elsewhere combined in the 


cans can spend their money outside 
the island. 

He has also imposed credit re- 
strictions that prevent all but the 
richest Jamaicans from buying im- 
ported luxuries. 

Jamaica is showing some signs 
that it can recover. Tourism is 


past four years to cm the island's booming, up 50 percent in three 
bauxite exports by one third. Mr. years, and there is some growth in 
Seaga said it would take at least manufacturing and agriculture. A 
five more years before bauxite sales World Bank official said Jamaica 
could return to pre-recession levels, was building a “firm foundation 


poor into the streets two weeks ago, j* es s n * en and government officials, 
ending four years of relative calm, both here and in the United Stales, 
Demonstrations closed down parts diis resort island has not been ame- 
of the island for two days, claimed n pble to the “magic of the market- 
seven lives, and frightened awav P“ c !’. because of bad luck, the 
some American tourists and their " a S| l, y °f economy and the 
needed dollars. profligate consuming tastes of the 

Jamaican middle class. 


According to a World Bank offi- 
cial, the bauxite collapse reduced 
foreign -exchange earnings and 
weakened the economy to the point 

P l , £. AP where it is now hostage to its 52.8- 

bdrord Seaga billion fore jgn de b,. Payment on 

that debt, which is higher on a per 
United States, the World Bank and capita basis than the debts of Mexi- 
the International Monetary Fund; “ eats up 40 percent of 

and a concessionary trading agree- everything Jamaica earns in foreign 
mem under the Caribbean fa “change, the official said. 
Initiative that gives Jamaican busi- The failure of the bauxite indus- 
□esses duty-free access to most try has been accompanied by a re- 
U .S. markets. luctance on the part of large Ameri- 

According to economists, busi- SEaS* 0 ™* 00 * 10 inve “ in 


for the future” and added that Mr. 
Seaga has “shown more courage 
than most Third World leaders” in 
disciplining his nations economy. 

The key political issue remains: 
Will the Jamaican people submit to 
several more years of this disci- 
pline? 

Mr. Manley's political appeal is 
that he says such sacrifice is not 
necessary. Mr. Seaga is not re- 
quired to call another election until 
1988, and so further street violence 
is likely to be the most important 
gauge of this nation's willingness to 
take Mr. Seaga 's medicine. 



FATAL ACCIDENT — Workers inspect the wreckage 
in which one man died and four were injured as a truck 




Ihr Awotf Pies 

crashed down an embankment and into a how je at 
Petrie, Australia, on the northern outskirts of Bri .sbane 


Four years ago, Mr. Reagan said 
Mr. Seaga’s commitment to “free 


In Southern Sudan, Rebel Warning Prompts Foreigners’ Exodus 


people, a democracy, and free en- because he promised he could man- 
terprise.” buttressed by financial ^ the economy better than Mr. 
a«i«nnrf from the United States, Manley, who had presided over 
would enable the prime minister to seven years of economic decline. 


Jamaican middle class. By Judith Miller 

Mr. Seaga was elected in 1980 New York Times ScrvUe 

because he promised he could man- JUBA, Sudan — The U.S. compound is almost 
age the economy better than Mr. deserted. So is the UN enclave. Norwegian Church 
Manley, who had presided over Aid, a mainstay of the relief and development effort in 
seven years of economic decline, southern Sudan for more than a decade, has evacuated 


the government bas not kept its word. An irritant has 
been the government’s effort to impose Islamic law on 
the south, whose population is mostly anim isi or 
Christian. Islamic law has not been enforced here and 


Jittery soldiers guard a bridge across the Nile. Two menL the army destroyed 3. rebel base at Winjibull 
tanks are dug in along the west bank of the river. More near the Ugandan border. • 

than a dozen armored personnel vehicle have been Bui some residents expre ss concern about the army, 
deployed at an army base near lhe bridge to help They say the war is unpopi liar with the soldiers, many 


is openly derided by regional officials. Alcohol for defend Juba in case of an attack from the east bank, of whom are northerners. 


“fulfill the trust that is placed in His Socialist policies frightened about 150 staff members and dependents to Nairobi 
vou bv your country and embody away about 30 percent of the is- Ninety percent of the foreign aid and relief workers 


you by your country and embody away about 30 percent of the : 
the hope of all free people.” land's professional and manageri 

a counter Mr. Manley’s Socialism. 


away about 30 percent of the is- Ninety percent of the foreign aid and relief workers 
land's professional and managerial have left Juba and nearby towns in the past two weeks, 
talent.' Mr. Seaga was seen as a free- On Monday, the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, 
market capitalist who would insurgents opposed to President Gaafar Nimeiri who 
counter Mr. Manley’s Socialism- have been fighting in Lhe south since 1983, warned all 


example, is widely served in Juba. where rebels have recently made inroads. 

Mr. Nunem” s division of the south into three re- For the past month, the Sudan People's Liberatii 
gions in June 1983. however .has been bitterly resen ted Army broadcast has reiterated its intention to ta 
by many southerners, who see it as an effort to dilute- Juba, compounding anxiety in this city of 190,000. 
the south’s autonomy. Most residents here say the rebels would not try, n 


Of particular concern was a rebel ambush of an 


For the past month, the Sudan People’s Liberation army company on Dec. 2 5 at'Malek. a town near Bor. 
Army broadcast has reiterated its intention to take about 100 miles north o' f Juba. The army completely 

lukn p/imnAitn/linii invi » m ikif aT T Qfl f¥¥l 1 ■ < — — ? — - a . ■ 


Manley, a Socialist whose amiable has been quite willing to use his iJZj “ TcZL S 6 & H 3 

relations with Fidel Castro’s Cuba gpvernmait to both goad amJ prop reb els. But their entry 

into the southern province of Equatoria and the? 
ton, has started a campaign to fora P°®“* f 6111 conlrols developed proximity to Juba, its capital constitutes a new. pivot- 
Mr. Seaga to call a national elec- a fading .program that wfllgjve P 7, accordin l0 Sudane J 

non. Unless the economy stops food to nearly.one million of the 2J r - 1 „ ,u 6 

hurting poor Jamaicans, many here mffioftpmliL to «he past yar. The rebdB £“ ill ^ south also poses the most 

say, more violence is likely. Mr. Seaga s government has aU but ^ -Hall*™,, m iWArnf MitTw.iVrTBovftmrr.cnt 


die south’s autonomy. Most residents here say the rebels would not try, nor 

Moreover, lhe south bas received too little of the would they be able to. take Juba, for reasons that 
country’s resources, they complain. The south receives illustrate the war’s politics, 
only 5 percent of Sudan's on imports, economists here Equatorial various tribal groups have been cool to 
say. lhe rebels, because most of the Sudan People's Libera- 

Mr. Nimein has taken what southerners, and some don Army, including its leader. Colonel John Garang, 
Westerners, regard as an inflexible stance toward the a U^.-ed’ucated army defector, come from the Dinka 


south's complain is. 


tribe. The Dinka, mostly from the Upper Nile and 


say, more violence is likely. 

This has happened despite UJS. 
aid that in 1984 made Jamaica the 
third largest recipient in the West- 


oximity to Juba, its capital constitutes a new. pivot- “Southerners have lived off the cotton produced in Bahr al-Ghazal provinces, comprise almost 2 million 
phase in the civil war. according to Sudanese and ^ oorth once 1926,” Mr. Nimeiri said in a recent of the south s six million paple. 
estem residents here interview. “They have land, water, and resources, but The military sitution is clouded. Brigadier General 

The rebellion in the south also poses the most they don't work. Now that we have discovered oil they Osman AbduUah, director of operations of the Suda- 
rious challenge to President NimeufsEOvernmait ^ il is ours. I say no. it belongs to the central nese Air Force, said that Colonel Garang had about 


ZV serious challenge to President Nimeiri’s government it is ours, i say no. 

ZZSXZjiSSS* ^ ended 15 years ago. resi- 


losl its cohesion, accord mg to authoritative accounts. 
■ Ransom for Foreif jpers 
A French construct icm company paid S20O.OOO or 
more for the release o [ four employees who had been 
held for nearly a year ; by Lhe Sudan Peoples'- Libera- 
tion Army. The New ‘ Y oik Times reported from Addis 
Ababa, Ethiopia. Tv ro other hostages were still being 
held. _ . 

Western diploma .is said lhe company. International 
Construction Co., 'paid $200,000 to $1 million for the 
four hostages. The .y were handed over by the Ethiopi- 
an authorities at ti ne French Embassy in Addis Ababa. 
Those freed M' on day were identified as two French 


ass to import consumer goods. 

In an interview, Mr. Seaga said 


dents say. 


With government and rebel attitudes hardening, no 


General Nimeiri negotiated an end to 17 years of political solution to the civil war is in sight, 
ivil strife between north and south by promising the So Juba is awash in tumors, and the lack of facts 


3,000 to 6,000 of his 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers in engineers^ Yves ‘Pams and Michel Dupire; a British 
Equatoria. Three weeks ago, the army began an of fen- technician, Ian F lain, and a British-born Kenyan pilot. 


sive against them, he said. 


era Hemisphere, behind El Sa Iva- his free-enterprise convictions have crvil strife between north and south by promising the So Juba is awash in tumors, and the lack of facts 
dor and Costa Rica. not been tempered by the poor per- lesser-developed south greater autonomy and a huger heightens local tension. At the Greek Gub. the Equa- 

Oth er assistance arrived through formance of the economy. But he share of the country’s resources in 1972, three years tom Inn, and Juba's other major bars and restaurants, 
U5. efforts to encourage business added: “We are not a country that after he overthrew the civilian government and look the remaining foreigners swap information, much of it 
to invest here; an estimated $500 has large-scale capital resources power. inaccurate, about road closings, rebel sightings, and 

million yearly in loans from the that can indulge in a totally free The rebels argue, and many southerners agree, that skirmishes between rebel and the army. 


Gwyne Morson ; They were captured.Feb. 10, 1984, in 


to invest here; an estimated $500 has large-scale capital resources 
million yearly in loans from the that can indulge in a totally free 


inaccurate, about road closings, rebel sightings, and 
skirmishes between rebel and the array. 


Major General Babikir Abdul Raheem. spokesman southern iiuda’n, where they were working on the 
for the government forces, has said that the govern- Jonglei canal p roject for the company, 
men l had successfully engaged the rebels in early The two rerciaining hostages, a Swiss freelance jour- 
Januaiy at Terakeka, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) nalist, Michae J inke, and a friend, identified only as 
northwest of Juba, and at La Fon, 70 miles northeast Astrid, were captured when they tried to find the 
of the capital. On Jan. 19. according to the govern- construction company employees. 





Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1983 


INSIGHTS 


Dole and Lugar: New Leaders Steer Senate Back Into Foreign Policy 


By 


Helen Dewar 

huemaiional Herald Tribune 

ASHTNGTON — Despite lovaltv to the Reagan a dmini stra- 


~\\ T ASHTNGTON — Despite loyalty 

y\j don's global goals, the new Republican leadership of the Senate 

T T is showing a streak of free- thinkin g independence that could 
revive the Senate's role as a powerful force in sha p in g U.S. foreign policy. 

The two central players. Robert J. Dole, oF Kansas, the majority 
leader, and Richard G. Lugar, of Indiana, the c hairman of the Foreign 
Relations Committee, have already pointed the Republican-controlled 
Senate down paths that could force change at the White House, Pentagon 
and State Department. 

Senator Dole has been pushing a deficit-reduction plan that would 
deeply cut if not freeze President Ronald Reagan's costly military 
buildup, possibly further jeopardizing such weapons programs as the 
MX missile. 

Senator Lugar has declared that covert U.S. aid to anti -gov eminent 
guerrillas in Nicaragua is no longer “viable" and pronounced the 
program to be virtually dead in Congress. 

Moreover, both Mr. Dole and Mr. Lugar have put emphasis on 
independent initiative that is at least partly aimed at reviving the Senate 
as a. creative national force in foreign policy. Such initiative was last seen 
when former Senator J. William Fulbright, an Arkansas Democrat, 
headed the Foreign Relations Committee during the ferment over the 
Vie loam War. 

R es toration of bipartisanship in Senate handling of foreign policy is 
another key goaL 

**I vould like to have people in the future look back at this Congress 
an d sa y that, it made a major effort to reinstill a bipartisan spirit in our 
confide Tati on of foreign policy issues." said Mr. Dole in answer to a 
quest.' on' about his top priority for the session. 

He Ktt ed that the first substantive act of the Senate after it convened 
Jan. 3 was passage of a bipartisan resolution commending the adminis- 
Lration's eft ons to resume arms control negotiations. At the Democrats' 
insistence, ti he resolution included the appointment of official Senate 
"observers” u o monitor the talks. 

In an intern 'ew. Mr. Lugar emphasized the fact that he and Mr. Dole 
have been ad mi nist ration loyalists, but he used this fact to indicate they 
can be expected . to act independently of the White House when adminis- 
tration and Senal c priorities are at odds. 

"We are both s.uppor.urrs of the a dminis tration but because of this 
loyalty we both ha ve an opportunity and obligation to speak out in 
independent ways,” t'-aid H dr. Lugar. tie subsequently proved the point in 
a speech to the Natioiial F *ress Cub that posed questions about some of 
the most basic tenets c'f U -S. foreign policy. 

Neither Mr. Dole, 61, a 24-year congressional veteran, vice presiden- 
tial candidate in 1976 and L Ikely contender for the Republican presiden- 
tial nomination in 1988, nor Mr. Lugar, 52, a former mayor of Indianap- 



Tt» WmHimton ftnt 

Senator Robert J. Dole: Poshing deficit reduction. 


oward H. Baker Jr., of Tennes- 

foiwon nnlirv see, the majority leader who retired to consider a possible bid for the 

lainly on the domestic front, although their p reiden ff, and C torles H. P en? d ;miw who ™ chaimrn of the 
preoccupation with economic poficy, trade, agricultural and industrial 
issues — and in Mr. Lugar’ s a. «e, intelligence problems — gives them a 
perspective that is bound to i nftuence their approach toward foreign 


policy. 


advocate than Mr. Lugar, at times crossing swords with the administra- 
tion on the issue. And he e 


B OTH are political centrii ts. pragmatists rather than ideologues, 
Midwesterners who fit m. Vuher the mold of the liberal Eastern 
estab lishmen t nor the New Right conservatism within their party. 
While their basic political pbilo: top hies ami world views are distinctly 
compatible, they differ in style. 

Mr. Dole is a bold, even daring leg tislative charger, gregarious, energet- 
ic and witty. He has a reputation of . having been a "hatchet-man” of the 
Republican Party, but he now comm lands wide respect on both sides of 
the aisle. Chosen over four rivals — i n pan because of his personal and 
political dynamism — he has elect rified Senate Republican ranks, 
although his leadership remains untes. ted in actual votes. 

By contrast, Mr. Lugar is reserved an ‘d ca utious, a Rhodes scholar with 
a keen, analytical intellect but little pretentiousness about his well- 
regarded skill's at mastering difficult issi res and forging coalitions to deal 


with them. He is known for phickunt compromises out of difficult Europe unless NATO countries meet their finandal commitments for 

ni...,:.... fmm iliff ' / iirif Gitv nn /4 rTinrelw Giim _r .1 ti: . ra_.. .1 -I j .t f, — .L. : 


situations — ranging from the New . forte Qty and Chrysler Corp 
financial bailouts in the late 1970s to a procedural accord last year on 
monitoring the CIA. He has, said an adxn iring aide to another senator, a 
“flair for blandness." 

In terms of policy differences, Mr. Lug iar. has spoken of the need to 
continue the Reagan administration's military buildup regardless of 


support of the alliance. But they also contend that more burden-sharing 
is necessary. 

“Very frankly the Nunn amendment was a good thing as long as it 
didn't pass," Mr. Dole said recently. "Perhaps ithas helped convince our 
NATO allies that we have a real problem on burden-sharing and that we 
in the United States take that problem very seriously.” 


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Neither Mr. Dole nor Mr. Lugar figure in the strong trade protection- 
ist movement in Congress. 

As a Kansan, Mr. Dole has a strong interest in grain exports, which 
showed up in his vociferous opposition to the anti-Soviet grain embargo. 
Even though Indiana is a major steel-producing as well as agricultural 
state. Mr. Lugar has taken a lead in opposing quotas on steel imports and 
generally regards himself as a free-trader, although be recently endorsed 
continued restraint of the importation of Japanese automobiles. 

Mr. Dole, however, has warned that protectionist pressures may gain 
in Congress unless obstacles to U.S. exports are removed. "Protectionist 
pressures here can be contained only if those industries now in ascendan- 
cy — like agriculture, telecommunications, advanced electronics and 
services — are allowed fully to compete in export markets." he said. 


N broad terms. Mr. Dole has put his foreign policy priorities in these 


terms: "First, I think we need to make sure that our relations with 
our allies are in good order. We've got to keep the NATO alliance in 


success or failure in arms control talks, while Mr. Dole has led the charge 
for across-the-board spending cutbacks, including in the military. But 
this may stem as much from their disparate roles as from any fundamen- 
tal policy difference: they appear to work well together, and Mr. Dole has 
delegated chief responsibility for foreign policy issues to Mr. Lugar. 


On basic policy. Mr. Dole and Mr. Lugar are expected to depart little 
oiis wholm ^rved in the . Senate only eight years, has any extensive from , lh “ r ^P 1 th ® r predecessors: Howa 


Foreign Relations Committee when he was defeated for re-election. 
But Senator Percy tended to be more of an outspoken arms-control 


generally tended toward more liberal positions 
than the Republicans as a whole in the Senate, making it difficult to forge 
a majority within his party. This factor contributed to the stalemate over 
foreign-aid authorization bills in three of the four years of President 
Reagan's first term. Senator Baker often assumed command of foreign 
policy issues when they reached a critical poinL 
Mr. Dole and Mr. Lugar opposed the SALT-2 treaty but backed the 
Reagan administration's strategy for moving to arms reduction talks, 
including the Space Defense Initiative, or SDL 
"SDI has already made its first contribution to arms control” said Mr. 
Lugar in his Jan. 23 press dub speech. "The Soviet Union is back at the 
negotiating table. We should not expect the SDI to do too much too 
quickly, but we should be prepared for the fact that this research effort is 
here to stay and that its consequences wfl] be great" 

Both sided with the administration in opposing the move last year by 
Senator Sam Nunn, a Georgia Democrat, to reduce US. troop levels in 


good shape, keep p ushing on burden-sharing — without being threaten- 
ing — and doing what we can to resolve differences among individual 
NATO members. We've got to make some progress with Japan on our 
trade imbalance, so that doesn't disrupt what otherwise is a very sound 
and mutually benefidal relationship. We've got to continue our support 
for Israel without forgetting the legitimate interests of our other friends 
in the Middle East. 

"Second, we must follow through vigorously — as I know the adminis- 
tration intends — to seek effective nuclear arms control agreements with 
the Soviets. That's almost certainly going to be a long, tough, sometimes 
frustrating process, but we've got to try. 

'Third, we should take a fresh look ai a number of the regional trouble 
spots that we've been dealing with over the last few years — the Middle 
East, southern Africa, Afghanistan and South Asia . . . 

"It may be that we will decide that what we’re going on these issues is 
about right and we shouldn't change. But on some of them, 1 expect, a 
fresh look might allow us to better focus on our current goals and give us 
some fresh ideas about how to achieve these coals. And perhaps I should 
include here as a separate high priority doing something about Lhe 
African food situation, (hough I regard that as much more of a humani- 
tarian than foreign policy issue.” 

Mr. Lugar sketched out his concerns in a more philosophical vein in 
his press dub speech, which was largely devoted to a lack of consensus 
over critical foreign policy issues in the United Stales, especially since rbe 
Vietnam War. 

In the aftermath of Vietnam, he said. "The United Slates has been and 
continued to be uncertain about the use of force in the conduct of 
American foreign policy. A broader popular involvement in foreign 
policy questions has deepened the historical reluctance of Americans to 
employ force to achieve our national purposes.” 

Ln poll after poll he continued, “Americans express their concern 
about hostile governments which imperil our interests in Latin America 
and elsewhere. But in these same polls, Americans display an equal and 
overwhelming opposition to any course of action which might actually 
frustrate governments which are harmful to us.” 

Then Ire asked the following questions that are expected to be central 
to his reappraisal of U.S. foreign policy, starting with five or six weeks of 
wide-ranging, hearings that begin Jam 31. 

"Do we really have vital interests all around the globe?” he asked, 
without pretending to have the answers. “Do we have the economic and 
military capabilities and the political will to support these interests with a 
safe margin of risk? Do we have a long-term, substantial and correct view 
of the Soviet Union. Do we have an appropriate understanding of the 
economic, political and spiritual forces mat move nations?” 



Ito Aoooated Pres 


Senator Richard G. Lugar. Against covert aid to rebels. 


Scientists Clash Over Space Defense; 
Some See ' Promise 9 9 Others 'Tragedy 9 


By Henry Tanner 


International Herald Tribune 


“To make nuclear weapons truly obsolete is 
"saidJai 


ERL1N — Albert Einstein was a lifelong 


Jj^ pacifist But when he was told that Nazi 


Germany was close to developing an 
atomic weapon^ be joined other scientists writ- 
ing to President Roosevelt urging him to take 
“quick action" in atomic bomb research. After 
Hiroshima, Mr. Einstein became a fervent advo- 
cate of world government as the only way to 
prevent a nuclear holocaust. 

Robert J. Oppenheinrer was in charge of the 
Manhattan Project which produced the first 
atomic explosion. A few years later, with other 
U.S. scientists, he passionately opposed build- 
ing the hydrogen bomb. 

Today, scientists again are fervently taking 
sides. 

The issue now is President Ronald Reagan’s 
Strategic Defense Initiative, popularly known as 
"star wars,” which many scientists say raises 
military, scientific and moral questions of a 
magnitude comparable to those resulting from 
presidential decisions on the atomic bomb. 

Mr. Reagan's space defense system could 
bring vital changes in the "balance of terror” 
between the United States and the Soviet 
Union. Many think it could be decisive in mak- 
ing or breaking East-West negotiations on nu- 
clear arms control for the next 50 years and 
determine the question of war or peace, even 
human survival. 

A roundtable of about 20 U.S.. Soviet and 


totally unrealistic, a fantasy,” said Jack Ruina, a 
professor from the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

He spoke of “the fallacy of the last move,” the 
idea that U.S. weapons technology could 


ble. with most of the materials needed for them 
available from the moon. 

He also had a solution for disposing of nucle- 
ar waste. 

“Let’s put it on the backside of the moon,"-he 
said. “Ten thousand years from now people will 


achieve something so final that the other side say, ‘This is exactly what we need,’ and the 


would never be able to make a countermove. 

"This is as far from reality as putting a man 
on the sun or building a bridge to the moon," 
Mr. Ruina said. He said that the arras race has 
shown that there is an answer to every new step 
one side may take, and that each adversary can 
build improved offensive weapons to overcome 
the other’s defensive system. 

Several participants pointed out that the 
United Stales would probably be forced to test 
its space defense weapons at an early stage of 
their development. Such testing is prohibited 
under the 1972 anti-ballistic missile treaty with 
the Soviet Union. The U.S. would be forced to 
violate the treaty, they argued, making future 
arms talks virtually impossible. 

“The tragedy would be if we killed all chances 
of an arms agreement only to find out that there 
is no such thing as an effective missile defense,” 
said Paul Doty, the professor in charge of the 
Department or Science and International Af- 
fairs at Harvard. 

Several scientists proposed research on a lim- 
ited space defense system aimed at intercepting 


technology for putting it there is no problem.' 

The deputy director of Arianespaoe. Klaus 
Iseriand, introduced himself as “a man who is 
gaming a living in space.” 

“In some areas, space industries can live on 
their own and be self-earning," he said. “We sell 
launchers the way other people sell aircraft; we 
compete with NASA for each customer, just as 
Boeing and Airbus and others compete for each 
sale of a plane." 


RIAN ESP ACE, the marketing arm of the 
European Space Agency that was stait- 


. . U.S. scientists argued that 


European scientists and officials early this anyt hing short of a Pf perfect 

of how these J _ r 


month conveyed an impression -. , 

men talk among themselves when they argue space defense system would fail 
about the “promise" or the “tragedy” inherent 


in the UJS. plans. The symposium was held at 
the Aspen Institute in West Berlin. 

The discussions were polite — first names 
were used, almost exclusively — and the pas- 
sions were reined in. But the disagreements over 
“star wars” were fundamental. 

The U.S. program calls for $26 billion to be 
spent in the next five years on research to 
develop a space-based, ami-tnissile system that, 
iT effective, would make (he arsenal of Soviet 
intercontinental ballistic missiles obsolete. 


to deter the Russians from 
building more ballistic weapons. 


some but not all Soviet offensive weapons. Some 
asserted (hat the technology for such a limited 
objective either exists or could be developed 
relatively easily. 


Alexei A. Vasilev, the principal Soviet partici- 
ber of the Soviet Acade- 


G EROLD Yon as or the Pentagon, the 
scientist in charge of the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative research program, and 
Gilbert D. Rye. director of space programs for 
the National Security Council, argued strongly 
for the program. Other U.S. and European sci- 
entists questioned its feasibility as well as the 
basic political and strategic assumptions behind 
iL 

Mr. Yonas asserted that the development of a 
“credible” U.S. space defense against ballistic 
missiles would leave the Soviet Union with few 
options and would induce them "to discontinue 
further investments in offensive nuclear weap- 
ons and to abandon their strategy based on a 
first-strike capability.” 

The challenge is to develop technologies "far 
ahead of any possible response." Mr. Yonas 
said- "This is the essence of our research pro- 


pane and a leading mem 
my of Sciences, said that, as a scientist, he would 
be inclined to ignore the U.S. space defense 
initiative as unrealistic. But. he said, as a politi- 
cal leader responsible for the security of his 
country, he could noL 

“We’ will be watching carefully, and I am sure 
that our industries will be told to match the 
American effort’’ with countermeasures, he 
said. 


O 


I gram. 

* He said there would be dramatic innovations 


in the next five years and that deployment of the 


N another subject, scientists pursuing 
civilian scientific and economic goals 
laid out ambitious plans of their own for 
the future of the space age. 

“Next we will have to sec whether we can go 
to the nearest star.” said Roger Bonnet of 
France, who is in charge of scientific programs 
at the European Space Agency. 

“We have been looking at Jupiter trying to 

understand how a thunderstorm is working 
there, and that’s really amazing because we 
don't even know how a thunderstorm works on 
Earth,” he said. 

The moon is the “Panama Canal leading to 


space defenre system could begin "within the j upiler - M Heinz-Hermann Kolle. the dircc- 


next 10 or 15 years. 

No one at the table questioned the need for 
U-S. military research in space. The fact that 
Moscow, too. is engaged in such research was 
not denied by the Soviet participants. 

But the U.S. scientists present who were not 
connected to the Reagan administration argued 
that anything short of a “perfect” space defense 
system not only would fail to deter the Russians 
from building more ballistic weapons but would 
actually compel them to build more and de- 
stroy. perhaps forever, the hope of any agree- 
ment on nuclear arms control. 


They criticized U.S. civilian leaders, notably 
President Reagan and Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger, for holding out the impos- 
] able promise of a "perfeci" defense. 


tor or the Aerospace Institute of the Technical 
University of West Berlin. 

Mr. Kolle and others agreed that the moon 
must be turned into a “staging area," with a 
permanent installation there serving as head- 
quarters. base camp and refueling station from 
which it would be possible to "go almost any- 
where in the solar system, including Jupiter." 

They explained that the moon can be reached 
with existing shuttle engines and that it can 
provide the oxygen that accounts for seven- 
eighths of the fuel needed for “connecting 
flights” to other bodies in the solar system. 

Mr. Kolle expects the Earth's present popula- 
tion of 4.8 billion to double in 50 years. That 
population will require much more energy and, 
he said, solar power stations in space are pt»si- 


X 1 . - . 

JL A_ed in 1980, oversees the production of 
rocket launchers by 35 industries in 1 1 Europe- 
an countries. It does not produce satellites. 

“When somebody tells us he wants to have a 
satellite launched, we order the launcher and 
conduct the launching operation.” Mr. Iseriand 
said. 

He estimated that the world market for 
launchers and launchings would be between SI 
billion and S2 billion a year for the next 15 
years, and that Arianespace would get between 
33 and 40 percent of the business. The rest will 
go to the National Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration or to private industry in the United 
Stales after lhe U.S. space agency drops the 
Atlas Centaur and Thor Delta launchers, as it 
has decided to do. 

Mr. Iseriand said that lhe world market for 
satellites would be between S3 billion and 56 
billion a year for the next 15 years. 

Caesar Voule. a professor of geology and 3 
specialist in remote-sensing programs from (be 
Netherlands, made an impassioned plea to the 
hi-tech nations to develop and finance (he dis- 
tribution of space technology that could serve 
Third World countries. 

Although the Earth now can be observed 
from space, he said, geological mapping in many 
parts of the world is still at the level used by the 
Egyptians 3.000 years ago. 

He described an experiment in which soil- 
moisture measurements obtained by satellite 
have been turned over to a station in Nigpr 
where they are being used by African farmers 
stricken by drought. 

Bad weather may be only an inconvenience to 
some people, he said, looking out on Berlin's 
frozen Wannsee, but it may make the difference 
between life and death in many parts of the 
world unless the rich nations step in with the 
latest technology. 

In the 27 years since the Soviets launched 
their first Sputnik, space has become so over- 
crowded that /light paths of U.S. shuttles must 
be charred to avoid collision with about 5.000 
other orbiting objects, according to Mr. Doty. 

A recent shuttle passed within 14 kilometers 
(8.6 miles] of a satellite as both were traveling a! 
a speed of about 10 kilometers a second, he said. 
The observation port of another shuttle was hit 
by an small object. . 

Of 14.000 objects launched into space since 
the first Sputnik, about 9,000 have fallen U> 
Earth or burned up in the atmosphere. That 
leaves 5.000 still in space, he said, about the 
same number as there are ships on the worms 
seas on any given day 3,000 y ears after man first 
started sailing. 

Some scientists at the meeting said th^' 
Feared that military men were gaining more 1 ™ 
more influence on space policies both in uk 
U nited States and in the Soviet Union, and thai 
scientific research would be increasingly sa®’ 
ficed to military objectives. 

NASA, umil iwo years ago. received a greater 
share of the annual federal budget than did the 
military, but this trend has ban reverted, a 
participant noted. . 

Mr, Yonas. the Pentagon scientist, countered 
that about half the hinds spent on research fora 
space defense system also serve civilian uses. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRJBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1985 


Page 7 m 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Godard’s f Marie’: No Symptoms of Piety 



•-.Kfe 

■'.j'JiaSS 


?X54w| 


? * 
«v 


Bv Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

hitcnvtiiHHtl licruld Tritium- 

P I A RIS —Though Jean-Luc Go- 
dard is 54. he remains the bad 
bov of the cinema. He loves to turn 
everything topsy-turvy. to startle 



Jean-Luc Godard 


traditionalists and to tweak hyper- 
sensitive noses. 

His latest opus. ‘‘Je tous saluc. 
Marie” (I Salute You. Man), was 
threatened briefly with censorship. 
Its showing in Versailles lust week 

w as halted after protest s from two 

MOVIE MARQUEE 

Catholic organizations, but the 
Catholic daifv I..» Croix called the 
work "a great Christian film.” A 
court reversed the Versailles ban 
Tuesday, but the film meanwhile 
has received invaluable publicity. 

“Marie” sets the mystery of the 
Incarnation against a eon tempo- 
rary background, though employ- 
ing Bach's sacred music as occa- 
sional accompaniment. Marie 
(Mary) is a gasoline station atten- 
dant. Joseph is a taxi driver. The 
angel Gabriel visits them in the 
guise of a drunken roughneck. This 


bold transposition is realized in 24 
'•ketch-like sections done in the 
typical New Wave manner. 

There is an episode in which Ma- 
rie. after miraculously becoming 
pregnant, lies in her bath contem- 
plating her body, and another in 
which she disrobts for examination 
in a doctor's office. Ii seems these 
scenes have brought the charges of 
sacrilege, though both are quite in- 
nocent. A line here and there is in 
dubious taste. One sample will suf- 
fice: When the child Jesus is 4. he 
runs off into the woods during a 
holiday excursion and Joseph asks 
when he will return. “At Easter.” 
replies Marie. Some of the talk is 
lough, to fit the chosen milieu, and 
may offend the prudish. 

Godard, perhaps remembering 
St. Thomas Aquinas's dictum that 
faith is beyond human reasoning, 
accepts the' authenticity of the mir- 


acle. but shows no symptoms of 
incipient piety in this endeavor. In- 
deed he is very much his familiar 
self in his dry’ objective narration 
of a drama that, theatrically, calls 
for .-t lyric eloquence to which he 
never rises. 

Myriem Roussel, playing Marie, 
is remote front the serene Madon- 
nas of the Italian masters. She is an 
athletic virgin, a member of a bas- 
ketball team. She is outspoken, of- 
ten rude. Thierry Rode as Joseph. 
Phillippe Lucoxie as the angel and 
the other players are regulation 
New Wave robots. Godard has ne- 
glected to individualize them while 
concentrating on the situations of 
his script. As a film. “Je vous salue. 
Marie" is a curious and not wholly 
successful experiment. 

Accompanying Godard's sensa- 
tion-maker is “Le Litre de Marie." 
by one of his disciples. Anne-Marie 



Ungaro , Chanel Turn Out Germ 


Myriem Roussel as Marie. 

Mievtlle. This is a brief account of 
an I i -year-old girl's reaction to her 
parents' separation. Rebecca 
Hampton is the puzzled child. Bru- 
no C renter plays her father and 
Aurore Clement is her mother. It is 
an honorable first directorial try in 
no wav related to the main feature. 


Cottesloe ’s Medieval Mystery Plays Are a Breathtaking Vision 


f.. . j.-i--- • 

' -‘ "T? aiciiiri 


% By Michael Billingron 

liUcmuiumal llerulj Tnhuuc 

L ONDON — One of the commu- 
ting delights of the National 
-Theatre in recent years has been its 
.'rediscovery of medieval mystery 
.plays with a company directed by 
■Bill Bryden. They started in 1977 
.with “The Passion.” added “The 

’ THE LONDON STAGE 

f : . - 

•Nativity" in 1980 and have com- 
'pleted this triptych with “Dooms- 
day.” The three plays, in the Cot- 

iesJoe Theatre repertory, are on 
'rare occasions performed in a sin- 
.gle day in strict chronology, under 
■the collective title “The Mysteries." 
The result is a breathtaking vision 
-of humankind, from the Creation 
to Judgment Day. 

They were originally written and 
performed by 14th-century crafts- 
men but. far from being crude, they 
show a profound understanding of 
drama. When Abraham prepares to 
sacrifice Isaac he expresses his pite- 
ous dilemma in simple words — 


"Make thee ready, my darling, for I 
must do a little thing" — that 
pierce one to the hean. And when 
Lite soldiers nail Christ to the cross, 
the emphasis is on the sheer back- 
breaking difficulty of levering the 
cross into position. The deepest re- 
ligious matters arc dealt with in 
homely language. Tony Harrison's 
five-hour adaptation of the three 
plays together preserves their collo- 
quial. alliterative power. 

The other reason for the plays' 
success is that Bill Bryden's pro- 
duction combines a democratic 
simplicity with an intense theatri- 
cality. Most of the audience mem- 
bers promenade on the floor of the 
Cottesloe with the action erupting 
amid them: the actors wear work- 
ers' clothes (Christ is crucified in 
overalls); and (he guttering, over- 
hanging lights are suspended in do- 
mestic utensils such os garbage 
cans, colanders and cheese graters. 

Bryden also managers to find a 
distinct tone for each play. “The 
Nativity” is festive and celebratory . 
“The Phasion" is somber and low- 
key. The most remarkable is 


“Doomsday ” which veers between 
apocalyptic vision and redemptive 
joy. Die designer. William Dudley, 
brings off one monumental visual 
coup with the vision of souls in 
torment: Black curtains part to re- 
veal a sp inning , skeletal, metallic 
Ferris wheel with a relief map of 
the world on the outside and. in- 
side, people twisting and writhing 
on parallel bars. At other times, the 
production achieves its effects with 
utter directness. The resurrected 
Christ appears amid his followers 
in a shabby coat; when he eats 
bread and fish with the disciples, he 
licks his fingers in mortal fashion. 

One minor cavil about "Dooms- 
day" is that the notion of everlast- 
ing perdition is treated as a slight 
joke: When selected members of 
the audience are seized (“Thy life 
was one lecherous lay”) and dis- 
patched into a waste-disposal unit 

DOONESBURY 

IMP W 60 NNA 

LOOK, YOU YOU, MAN I 1 ST JUS 


it all becomes a bit larky. But. that 
lapse aside, the triumph of "The 
Mysteries" is that they bring reli- 
gious drama alive for a modem 
audience in a modem wav. 


The last play by the 38-year-oid 
English political dramatist. How- 
ard Barker, was "A Passion in Six 
Days." but that was concerned 
with the backstage machinations of 
a Labor Party conference rather 
than Christ’s sufferings. Barker's 
new play. “The Power of the Dog.” 
presented by the Joint Slock Com- 
pany at Hampstead Theatre, is 
about the eternal battle between 
the individual spirit and the jugger- 
naut of slate tyranny. Ii shows 
Barker's usual flair for strong im- 
ages and tangy dialogue but it lacks 
the narrative clarity that makes for 
good drama. 


L£T$ SHOtU 

SHOOT HIM! twsq&ep 


Getty Museum Buys Bouts Painting 

United Press international to reveal the price. The work will gp 


. WANT THIS I JUST PUNK PUSH I FOR- 6005 SAKE, AUTOS 

hernsns gaysup wmm scmsbow srmrjus- 

VCRHOTT SUOUNSl >1K SHOOT HIM! 7JCS/>iK 


It starts promisingly, with a post- 
Stalingrad meeting between Stalin 
and Churchill in which the two 
leaders carve up Europe and in 
which the latter proclaims that “no 
medieval prince could reach down 
as we do into the lives of the as-yet 
unborn.” But Barker then intercuts 
between the Kremlin and the Po- 
lish plains, where a fugitive Hun- 
garian photographer is seeking her 
dead sister and is being amorously 
pursued by a Russian Army officer. 
The point seems to be that the 
individual can do relatively little to 
combat the mad dog of history. Bui 
despite very good performances 
from Stephanie Fayerman as the 
Mother Courage-like photographer 
and Philip McGougji as a bull- 
necked. brutally jocular Stalin, the 
play never makes one care about its 
people and it buries its message 
under shock juxtapositions. 


A SCREW- 

MST am ABOUT pRT/SRt 

evesxm 

THBtE?&$60T nn/iMil 

A SCREUPRm^ K 


United Press International . 

L OS ANGELES — Die J. Paul 
* Getty Museum has purchased 
a 15th-century Fl emish painting 
that is pari of a lost masterwork, 
officials say. 


on display in mid-February. 

Scholars believe the piece the 
Getty bought is a section of Bouts’s 
lost masterwork, The Altarpiece 


By Hebe Dorse.' 

fmenkuiunul Herald Tribune 

P ) ARIS — Tuesday was a good 
day for Paris couture, with 
Emanuel Ungaro and Karl Lager- 
fdd (for Chand) delivering acme 
de la creme collections. The clothes 
looked (ike jewels and the feeling of 
luxury was supreme. 

Perfection was carried out in the 
smallest details. At Ungaro, the 

PARIS FASHION 

Alexandre chignons were divine 
and the coifs by Jean Barthet out of 
a fairy tale. Barthet. an artisan 
from the old couture days, stayed 
up two nights to glue pearls and 
sequins onto these coifs. Chanel 
was also exceedingly quality-con- 
scious, with pearly makeup match- 
ing the ISth-centuiy pastel silks. 

Although these clothe* are sup- 
posed to go to a limited, almost 
confidential audience, couture is 
beginning to attract the trade as 
well. Sonja Caproni. in charge of 
fashion for i. Magmn of San Fran- 
cisco. attended all these collections. 
“1 like them better than ready-to- 
wear," she said. 

At Ungaro, the first row told the 
story: color, color and more color. 
Mari e-HelCne de Rothschild wore 
a red cardigan over a purpley dress 
and Marie-Hdene (Bootsie) Gal- 
braith was in a cheery green. Lynn 
Wyatt of Houston, whose husband 
is an oil tycoon, was in petrol blue, 
and the Brazilian Carmen Mayrick- 
Vega had on a hot-pink coat. Isa- 
belle d’Ornano’s red stockings 
matched her bag and sweater. 

None of them, however, came 
anywhere close to the brilliancy of 
Ungaro's paleue. His opening trio 
consisted of very short suits in par- 
akeet colors such as turquoise, 
green and hot pink. Thereafter he 
mixed bold colors with a fearless 
hand. There was a tircusy, slightly 
garish dement in the mixtures of 
turquoise, yellow and pink, but the 


H&m MAKE MY 

hi laiim T' 1 II 




The depiction of the “Annunda- ^ Sacrament,” a five-part work 

lion” by Dierick Bouts was pur- ««utod in about 1464 to 1468 for 
chased privately. Hie museum re- church of St. Peter to Louvain, 
fused in its announcement Sunday Belgium. 






net result was as invigorating as a 
pep pill. 

Ungaro also showed stunningly 
cut pantsuits in gray or white. The 
look was unmistakably his. with 
pants cut on the bias and important 
but softly gathered sleeves. The up- 
dating came from simply cut. light- 
ly embroidered. V-neck blouses. 
Jackets stopped either at the waist 
or on the hips, where they were 
strongly draped. The new lapds 
were huge and floppy. When Un- 
garo mixed gray and white, it was 
quite pretty. 

The most significant new look at 
Ungaro was a short and flirtatious 
little dress, draped within a milli- 
meter of the figure and with a rose 
planted smack on the derriere. His 
strapless dresses were often deco- 
rated with long shawls, draped 
around the neck and ending in a big 
silk tassel. 

Most of the ev ening dresses were 
short and sexy, except for some 
complicated, vaguely Ballets- Russ- 
es concoctions with much too much 
going on. But Ungaro said he had 
to have a little Tun. 

At Chanel Lagerfeld did a Wat- 
teau look, inspired by the recent 
Watteau exhibition at the Grand 
Palais. Lagerfeld has always been 
an lSth-ceniuTy fan: he has worn 
his hair in a ponytail for years and 
both his Paris apartment and his 
Brittany chateau are crammed with 
18th-century treasures. 

He is not the only one wearing a 
ribbon in his hair these days. The 
Grand Hotel salon, where the show 
was held, was full of ribboQ bows; 
Princess Caroline of Monaco's was 
in brown velvet. Watteau and Cha- 
nd may sound like oil and water, 
and white ruffles may come as a 
shock to Chanel lovers, yet Lager- 
feld made it work, especially in a 
navy and white Pierrot suit that is 
sure to become a best seller. The 
Watteau notes included the decor, 
with a backdrop of forest and stat- 
uary painted by the stage set de- 
signer Claude Maury. 

There were big satin berets, 
courtier’s satin costumes, shoes 
decorated with ribbon cockades 
and 18th-century colors such as 
lime and ice blue together. At the 
end, a group of Petit Trianon milk- 
maids reproduced the period look 
to the smallest detail, including 
crushed roses in the hair and stiff 
petticoats under full skirts cropped 
above the ankle. This worked only 
on the prettiest and youngest mod- 
els; everybody else looked like dec- 
orated mules. 

Lagerfeld also had a lot of bread- 
and-butter suits, changing the 
shoulders here (bigger and broad- 
er) and the sleeves there (with a 
particularly good new one). The 
Chand length is no longer with us. 



Ungaro's criss-cross draping. 

and Lagerfeld is playing around 
with hemlines, including some well 
below the calf. This was particular- 
ly pretty in a huge jersey coat with 
trcnchcoat epaulets. 

Nobody need worry about the 
future oT this house, whose bottom 
line evidently reads Like a gold 
mine's. Marie- Louise de Oermont- 
Tormerre. spokeswoman for Cha- 
nel, would not reveal the 1984 fig- 
ures except to say that they had 
doubled, for bout couture and 
ready-to-wear, from 1983’s results. 
A new Chand boutique opened in 
Hawaii last fall and one is opening 
on Los Angeles's Rodeo Drive in 
February. 

With scores or rich and elegant 
women in town, Paris is in a festive 
mood and all kinds of parties are 
going on. But the nicest, neld Mon- 
day night at Maxim's, went virtual- 
ly unnoticed next to the big bash 
given there at the same time by the 
house of Dior. No princesses here: 
just 35 starry-eyed students, quite a 
few of them from the University of 
Delaware, who were celebrating 
the conclusion of their fashion and 
interior design programs at the Par- 
is American Academy. Their host 
was the school's director, Richard 
Roy, who said that in addition to 
dining at Maxim's (They give us a 
[group] rate") the students were go- 
ing to see several collections and 
visiting the Louvre and Versailles. 




.... 

VOL 

HHrti 

Low 

Los* 

C*W 

ATS.T 

43002 

21* 

201% 

21* 

— 46 

AM Rich 



434% 

4JK, 

— 46 

GnMHta 

17613 

55* 

S3* 

5546 


South Co 

17371 

15* 

17* 

1816 

MBfLyn 

15242 

344% 

32* 

344% 


WUnlon 

151*3 

9 

74% 

9 

1 PMtarS 

14100 

40* 

38* 

40* 


! vlMonvi 

13934 

716 

6* 

7* 

Otrydr 

13659 

36 

3316 

34 

+ 4% 

Mobil 

13577 

771% 

264% 

2716 

Tamm 

TI424 

39* 

2946 

39* 


Tbmko 

41346 

34* 

344% 

34* 

■W46 • 

IBM 

>1275 137 

in* 

136* 

Nurtlna 

10741 

50* 

484% 

50* 

-* 

FordM 

10675 

604% 

47* 

484% 

— 16 


Dow Jones Averages 


Oum HUi Low Lost Ctroo 

Indus 1277.72 1295X9 126609 12*242 + 1479 

TrtmB 60639 61*55 59054 61407 + 709 

Util 148JH 149.42 147.47 MOJO + 051 

QHTIP 51559 52106 511-23 52169+ 541 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Htatn 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


TOO* 971 

573 474 

471 416 

20SD m3 

199 234 

5 6 

71J2I>7DQ 
31,448.120 


NYSE index 


High Low Close CbUe 
Composite 1B143 192.12 10353 + 070 

Industrials U9J7 1T7-75 11907 +1.12 

Transo. 1MLJ2 9U6 100.92 +1.90 

Utilities 5253 SU9 5253 +0.17 

Finance 10*51 1QU9 106*1 +0.93 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Buy Sales -ShYt 

Jon. 2B 254,331 63M96 18558 

Jan. 25 207.127 5S£S73 2510 

Jon. 24 241,772 MZ2B6 8540 

Jan. 23 225L44I 567.540 7571 

■Jan. 22 241501 645579 1548 

'InduM In the sales figures 


Tuesday^ 

N 


E 

< 

losing 



NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 

Close 

218 

Pro*. 

393 

Declined 

256 

214 

Unchanged 

265 

207 

Total 1 sauna 

119 

•34 

New Htahs 

a 

to 

New Laws 

5 

1 

Volume un 
volume dawn 

4J55335 

2JI5J85 



Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

utilities 

Banks 

Transo. 


Week 

dose Orte Age 
274.17 + 1.14 24852 
29652 +1-53 28756 
320.77 +071 31559 
30559 + 242 29L78 
264-63 — 1.96 755-20 
247.95 +1.15 242.15 
26426 +154 25*59 


volompm lisnmna 

Prev.4PjlA.voL 128510500 

Prev coMoMdBtod dose 15UM588 


ToMe* beta* the MttamMe prices 
op to the ctastog an IMI Street 


Standard 8s Poor's Index 


Htab Low Close arte 
industrials 20053 19752 20053 +158 

Tram®. 1M51 IS*-» «048 +351 

UIIIINM 7712 7*28 77.10 +152 

Finance Til-53 2053 29-53 +051 

composite 179.19 17651 179.18 + ITS 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 



VoL 

Htab 

LOW 

Last 

am 

BAT 

12338 

4* 




WongB 

4571 

2846 

28 

28* 


GHCdo 


m% 

13* 

IJVb 

+ * 

□•Imod 


846 

346 

3* 

+ * 



11 

urn 

11 

+ 46 

Halier 

2889 

2* 

2 

24b 

+ * 

TIE 

2035 

7* 




Lorlmr 

2024 

34 

3316 

34 

+1* 

Citadel 

T9M 

» 

19 

19* 

— » 

HaabT* 

1567 

24* 

24* 

24* 


CrvstO 

1462 


346 

3* 

+ 16 

MatScn 

MSB 

IS 

43* 

15 

+1* 



Bands 

Utilities 

Indhnftrloli 


Close Ch'ge 

7448 +059 

7158 + 0* 

7*98 + 0.12 


AMEX Stock Index 








IS 



Up 
















Dow Sets a Record at 1,292.62 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


SI* Close 

Dlv. Yid. PE 100s High Low Quot-Orto 


l/niied Press International 

NEW YORK — A powerful upward move in 
the last 30 minutes of trading took the stock 
market to record heights Tuesday. 

Many of the 30 blue chip stocks in the Dow 
Jones industrial average had gains of 1 poin t or 
more as the index surged 14.79 to an all-time 
high of 1092.62. The previous record was 
1.287.20. set Nov. 29. 1983. 

The Dow Jones transportation average rose 
7 JO to 614.37, also an all-time high- 

Advances outnumbered declines by a 2-1 
ratio. That set a modem record of 17 consecu- 
tive sessions of advances leading declines. 

Volume was 1 15.73 million shares, down 
from 128.41 million traded Monday. 

Newton Zinder of EJF. Hutton Co. said the 
stock market “just doesn’t want to go down. It 
absorbs any selling easily and the path of least 
resistance is pointed upward.” 

He said the market has enough momentum to 
take the Dow industrials to the 1 J20-1340area 
without much trouble in a week or so. 

The stock market had been lower through 
most of the day although the deficit was small 
with 30 minutes of trading left in the session. 

Jeny Hinkle of Sanford C. Bernstein Co. said 
there was evidence of short covering in the final 
hour. He said reports of organized-buying pro- 
grams by large investors sent short sellers “run- 
ning to cover.” 

In a short sale, traders sell borrowed stock in 
hopes the price will fall. If the market starts to 
go up. they sometimes cover their positions. 

Two broader slock market averages which hit 
all-time highs a week ago and have been hitting 
new records in almost every session since did 
the same thing again. 


5346 ATrPr 5J5* 8J 
9 44* ATrSC 

74 * 5814 ATrUn 5554 7 3 
3346 2691 Ameron 150 55 8 
31* 17 AmtsO* 3D J 16 
2916 21 Vi Ametek JO U IS 
30 18* Afflfoe 

IB tow Amtesc 6 

38* 26'* AMPS 72 1.9 20 

24 14* Airmen 30 13 49 

21* 124* Am rap I 7 

271k 19 AmStti 1.40 £1 8 

37* 25% AnttM 150 43 12 

6* 14k Amaru* 

30 19* Analogs 19 

3326 1916 Ancnor 158 65 19 
3642 24* AnCtaV 1-32 33 17 
1148 9* ArtarGr 30 15 24 

23* 161* Angelic M 27 12 

7S46 5346 Anheus 250 27 18 

STVi 44 Antwupi 350 65 _ 

22* 13* Anlxtr JS 15 22 

154k 8ft Anliwm 54 J 15 

16 10* Antony 5 to 11 7 

I44« 916 Aaocfte 39 28 W 
4 ft APchPwi 
2016 15ft APOiP un250r!17 
31«h 37 Vi AOPwuf 4.15 135 
29ft 26 APPwpf 350 129 
3346 1746 ABt Ufa MB 35 20 

33 8 AurtMs 1.14TKM157 

23ft 15ft Arch Da .1® 3 14 
22ft 14ft ArtzPS 250 122 7 
29ft 23 ATlPpf 158 123 
95ft 79 Art Pol 10.70 125 
23ft 13ft ArkBst 50 25 I 
27 M Arista 158 5.9 14 
IV. 16 ArtnRt 
1346 9ft Armada 27 

22 9 Armen 

sift ib Armcrt 2.10 95 


1 AMPs 33 1.9 20 
i Ampcn 50 33 4V 
i Amiwi ^ 

AmStti 150 £1 8 
I Airtttod 150 45 12 
i Amaru* 

> Analogs 19 

Ancnor 158 65 19 
Anttav 1-2* 33 17 
AnurGr 50 1 J 24 
Angelic M 27 12 
Artteus 250 27 10 
Antwupi 350 65 
Anlxtr JS 15 22 
Antown 54 3 15 
, Antony 54b 11 7 
Aoacfte 39 ZB 10 
AochPv* 

APdiR un250el M 
AOPwpf 4.15 135 
APPwpf 350 129 
ArtDta MB 35 20 
AprtMg M 4T 105 157 
AfOlDn .146 3 14 
ArtzPS 250 122 7 


302 46 
220 8ft 
27 74ft 
4 3046 
168 30ft 
148 2846 
217 241% 
65 13ft 
2062x 3716 
2S4 171% 
26 1446 

90 37ft 
110 36ft 

1691 316 

354 27ft 
415 2246 
47 35ft 
211 10ft 
344 2046 
643 74 
12 5446 
190 18ft 
204 14ft 
46 14ft 
*7 

301 17ft 
9 lift 
7 2JV* 
230 33ft 

91 lift 
1314 20ft 
3269x 21ft 

112x 29 
100V 851k 
77 20ft 
1250 1816 
59 ft 
1 1216 
699 lift 
7 2216 


65ft 65ft— ft 
Sft 8ft + ft 
74ft 74ft 
30ft 30ft+ <6 
29ft 29ft— ft 
28ft 38ft- ft 
24ft 24ft- ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 
35ft 37ft +lft 
17ft 1746— ft 
14ft 1446 
27ft Z7ft+ ft 
36ft 36ft 
2ft 3ft- ft 
26ft 26ft 
2246 22ft— ft 
35ft 35ft + ft 
10ft 10ft + ft 
30ft 20ft + ft 
734% 74 + ft 

54ft 5446 + 16 
18 18ft— 4k 

Mfe Wft— Hi 
1346 1446+41 

to Wft— ft 

ft ft 
16ft 17ft + ft 
31ft 3116 
29ft 29ft + ft 
324k 32ft — ft 
10ft 11 —4% 
20 20ft + ft 
2116 21ft- ft 
28ft 29 + ft 

B5ft 8516 + ft 
20ft 20ft- ft 
17ft IBft + ft 

12ft 12ft— ft 
10ft 11 

22 2216 + ft 


The New York Stock Exchange index rose 

O. 90 to 103.43 and the price of an average share 
increased 30 cents. Standard & Poor's 500-stock 
index gained 1.78 to a record 179.18. 

Composite volume of NYSE issues listed on 
all US. exchanges and over the counter at 4 

P. M. was 137.326 million shares, down from 
149.029 million Monday. 

Harry VUlec of Suiro & Co., Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia, said investors were responding to “the 
realization that the economy is better, interest 
rates are down and inflation is lower and it's 
been this way for some time.” 

He said the strong finish “is a dear indication 
this market is going to pick up another 25 to 39 
points easily." 

On the floor. AT&T was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, off V* to 21ft. 

Atlantic Richfield was second, off W to 43ft. 
A block of 1.219 million shares crossed at 43ft. 

General Mills was third, up Sft to 55ft. The 
company is selln° its toy and fashion business- 
es. which counted for about 25 percent of 1984 
sales. Analysts said the move was positive be- 
cause the company would be able to concen- 
trate on foods and restaurants. 

Exxon gained 1 ft to 46ft and Mobil ft to27V 4 . 

Chevron, which reported fourth-quarter net 
of Simper share versus $1.18, gained ft to 32. 

General Motors gained ft to 84ft. Ford was 
unchanged at 48ft and Chrysler lost ft to to 
33ft. 

Merrill Lynch, a strong gainer recently be- 
cause of increased stock-market volume, gained 
]ft to 34ft. Paine Webber advanced 2ft to 38. 

IBM added 2ft to 137, Digital Equipment I ft 
to 121 ft. Hewlett-Packard ft to 37 and Texas 
Instruments I to 1 30ft. 


23*% 

IS* ArmsRs 

.48 

2.1 

9 

30 

23* 22* 23* 

36* 

2216 ArmWIn 130 

34 

to 

262 

36* 

3616 36*+ * 

291k 

18* AraCn 

140 

44 

9 

T29 

38* 

29* 30 + * 

264% 

136. ArovuE 

40 

l.l 

8 

253 

18 

17* IB + * 

22 

16 Artro 

33 

14 


65 

1BV% 

1816 18* + * 

21* 

14 Anrlns 



9 

7/6 

27* 

22* 22*+ * 

53* 

34* An# hint 

2J30 

37 


2 

53* 

51* 53*— 16 

144: 

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no 

21* 

20* 21* +1* 

29 

20* Ash IOII 

140 

57 


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38* 

27* 2816 + * 

4016 

23* AsfrSO Of 4 JO 114 


4 

40 

39* 40 + * 

40* 314% AshIO Pf 196 1IL5 


9 

37* 

3716 37* 

614% 

45* AsflDG 

9 A A 

46 

9 

856 

57* 

56* 57* + ta 

98 

73 AsdDrt 

4.75 

52 


134 

9116 

91 91 'A +1 

25* 

18* A to tone 

liO 

74 

18 

3 

22* 

23* 23*-* 

25 

W* AtCvEl 

2L48 10.1 

S 

130 

34* 

24* 24* 

53* 

40* AIIRIch 

LOO 

69 

1620303 

43* 

43* 43*— Ik 

38 

324% AtlRcnl 

375 

9.9 


lOQz 38 

38 38 

125 

97 AtIRcpf 

280 

2.7 


14 10316103 103 -1 

20 

11 * Alias Cn 





14* 

14* 14* + 1% 

39* 

18* Auaat 

J2 

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IS 

140 

H 

23* 34 + * 

43* 294% AuMDt 

62 

M 

19 

585 

43* 42* 43*+ * 

50* 

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11) 

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50 


99* 

52 AvcbpI 




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194k A«en 

LOO 

8.9 

10 2759 

21* 

31* 22* + * 

39* 

18 Avain 



11 

181 

28* 

2716 27*+ * 


224b talk BMC 58 17 16 255 134% 12% 13 Vb— V9 

32 MM Berimes 50 15 12 29V 3i« 314% 311% 

23iv 15 Bkrlnll .92 £7 15 793* 164% 16 HU. 

2446 184% Bower J4 15 16 32 23 324% 2246— >6 

Z4% 4b VIBOMU MS !V» 116 19b 

1046 2 BtaU Pi 49 6 51% 546 + 1% 

SO TBVi BOllCP 1.28 25 12 93 487% 4HW 484% 

23ta llVb Bally Ml JO IS 172 719 1346 131% 1346 + Vfc 

154% 74% Bally Pk 12 36 II 1846 IBS 



334b 264% 
8746 614% 
10 6<k 

104% 816 
48 27 

39 234% 

40* 21 
10* 84% 
41* 34 U. 
194% 144% 
2* 1m 184% 
149 117 
384% 22 
12* 7* 


Dallas 5a 2 3 

DamcnC 30 1.7 
DanaCp 13S 44 
Dmritr 

Daniel ,18b 1J 
DortKr 4 26 49 
DalaGrt 
CtatMrt 

DtaOaa 30 15 
DaVCQ -24 14 
Derma J4 25 


22* 224% 
1216 1146 
29* 28* 
74% 7* 
13* 1316 
17* 8646 
704% £746 
21 * 20 * 
llVb ffi% 
17* 164% 
364% 3546 


(Continued on Page 8) 


22*— 4% 
n»+ 46 
294%+ 16 
74b — Va 
13*- 46 
874% + 1% 
704% + * 
21 * + * 
111% + 4% 
174% + * 
36V%+ 4% 































.'•'.y'K**., 



* !»»** N 


Tuesdays 

MSE 

Qotjing 


Tables Include me nationwide prices 

upfotfte closing on Wall Street 


Sis. Close 

Dlv. YkL PE I005Hlgf) Low QuU, 01*00 


17 Month 
Hhh Low 


Stock 


SI3. Clost 

Dlv. Yld. PE IQOsHtah Low Quot. Ch‘o« 


(Continued from Peg? 7) 


ltu II* 
5** 45 
TP* 70 V 
36% H*t 
22* 17% 
4 5* 37 

SV# 4V. 
62% 35% 
38 17% 

36% 26% 
16% 11V» 
87V 67V 
70% 59 
99* 47% 

57% 46 
SM 45% 

m% m 

25* 2D 
254* 19* 
23% 1914 
26* 194k 
26% 19% 
3U% 2414 
31 34% 

1011k BA 
17% 1JV 
23V 17% 
IS 9% 
25 17 

27% 21% 
22% 1A% 
38% 34% 
88% 65% 
59 <3% 

120% 77% 
71% 4514 
40 30 

6% 3% 
16% 6% 

30% 20% 

23% 16 
50% 32 
38% 2314 

40% 28% 

33% 25% 

51% 35% 

14% 10% 

23% 1 514 

18% 14% 
43% 23V 
51% 42% 
3414 30% 
44 19 

30% 22V. 
76% 64 
70 99% 

67% 57 
25% 71% 
32% 28 
103% 89V. 
69% 60% 

72% 51% 

16% 11% 
1814 14 
15% 1214 
16% 12% 
55 43% 

18% 8% 

24% 17% 


DayIPL 200 123 
OPLPf 7 JO 1X0 
OeanFs .48 u 
Deere lOQ 21 
DeimP 1.92 9.1 
DeltoAr OO 10 
DeHona 

DrxCMk u* zo 
DenMM uo 40 
DeSata 140 40 
DetEd 108 11.1 
DetE pf 500 65 
DetEpf 9J2 135 
DetE pf 708 1U 
DetE of 705 121 
DetE of 756 120 
DEptF 275 110 


663 1614 16 16% 

80z 59% 99% 59% 


14 164 
21 1181 
• 339 
7 1766 
30 

17 185 
12 391 
10 32 

7 743 
1 


25% 25 25% 

32% 31% 32% 
21% 71% 21% 
44% 43% 44% 
6 5% 5% 


+ % 

% 


+ % 
— % 
— % 
— % 
— % 
— 1% 


DEprR 
DE (HQ 
DEntfi 
DEPfO 


354 130 
3.13 1X1 
275 120 

300 111 

DEpfM X43 135 
DEprL 450 135 
DE pfK 4.12 135 
DEpfl 1208 124 
Cut IE DT 258 729 
Dexter 50 30 12 
DIGtar 04 45 22 
DIGIoPt 08 16 
DIGIOPf 255 85 
DtqmS 176 95 11 
DSaShpf 400 UO 
Dlebld 150 15 12 
DttHdwi 


Dteltat 

Disney 

□El 

Dlvrsln 

Domed 

DemRs 

Donald 

Donley 

Dorsev 

Dover 

DbwOi 

DowJn 

Drava 

Drear 

□rex 8 
Dreyfus 

do Pont 


63% 61% 63% 

27% 26% 27% 

35% 35% 35% 

15% 15% 15% 

85 85 85 

40z 69* 69 69% 

220c 59 59 99 

1D7 57 S7 57 +1 

920Z 57% 56 57% +1% 

5 24% 24 24%— % 

10 24% 24% 24% + % 
33 24% 23% 23% — 14 
10 23 22% 23 

96 26% 26 26 

97 27 26 26% 

B 30V 30 30 

16 31 30% 31 

62 104 103 103 

19 17% 17% 17% 

194 72V. 21% 22% + '4 
217 1446 14% 14% + % 
20Qz 24% 24% 24% 

3 27% 27% 27% 

1909 18% 18% 18% + % 
33 36% 36V 36% + % 
700 81% 78% 79% — 1% 
2 55% 54% 54% —1 


— % 

+1% 


15D 

200 


IS 2946 121% 116% 121% +1% 


100 

150 

52 



37 

1080 

71 

69* 

70* +|U 

70 

5 

34 

37* 

37V 

37*- 

V 




4* 

4* 

4* 





7* 

7* 

7*- 

V 




9* 

28* 

29V • 

* 



30 

19% 

19% 


u 



272 

49* 

49* 




213 

28* 

27* 

28* - 

% 




40% 

40% 


* 


11 

5767 

.10* 

29V 

30 ■ 

u 


22 


44% 

43* 

44% - 

% 








16 


19* 

19 

10*— U 




10* 

18*- 

* 

17 

12 

169 

43* 

43 

43V 



300 55 8 


duPflt p» 350 1QO 
duPntpt 4_50 105 
DukeP 208 SO 
Duke Pf JL70 117 

Duke pt 130 110 
Duke pf 750 110 
Duke PI 249 105 
Duke pf 355 117 


3445 

10 

5 

1428 


Duke nf MOO 100 


Duke pf 028 117 
DunBnl 158 20 
DuaLf 256 127 
DM PfA 210 120 
Duqpt 250 121 
□uaprK 210 127 
Duqpt 750 123 
DvcuPf 58 20 
DynAm 50 0 


51% SO* 5144+1% 
33% 33% 33% 

43% 43% 43% 

29% 29% 29% + V4 

15502 75 74 74% 

700* #9* 49V 6944 + V 

79007 61% 6746 68% + % 

1 25% 25% 25% 

24 33 32% 33 + % 

26100z 103V 103 HU%+!ft 
BOCte 70% 70% 70% +1 
22 784 R% 71% 71%— % 

6 8136 1SV 15 15 

VOOz 17 16V 17 

270t 15V 15V 15V + V 

13 16% 16V 16% + V 

1201 54 54 54 + V 

7 87 10% 1DV 10%+ V 

12 28 24V 24 24 — % 


37% 26% EGG 08 15 

30% 21% ESYSt -50 17 

2644 20% EoultP 154 45 

21 12 Eosco 04 23 

714 3% East Air 
414 1% EALwtO 

1% % EALwtA 

13% 6% EsAIr Pf 
75% 6% EAlrpt B 


22 625 
15 601 
9 48 

356 
1432 
84 
94 
73 
» 


30% 36% 38% +2 
29% 27% 29% 

2644 26V 26V— % 
19% 18V 19V + % 
4% 4% 444— % 


2 S * « 


13% 13% 13% — % 
15 14 V 34% + U 


IB 

28* 

9* EAlrpfC 
19V EartGF 

1J0 XI 

35 

85 

1003 

16V 15% 
25% 75 

IS%— 1 
25% + % 


12% Eastutl 

7T4 117 

6 

351 

17% 16* 

17% + % 

E~ fM 

MJV EsKod 

xaoo +J 

IS 

MM 

74* 73 

74* +1% 


37* Eaton 

170 20 

10 

7Kbf 

59* 58* 

59* +1 

I’l 

20V EchUn 

76 20 

14 

775 

30* M 

30% — V 

30* 

20V Ecksrd 

100 XI 

13 

1780 

31 MV# 

30* + % 

41 

32% EdtaBr 

100 +4 

a 

IS 

36* 36V 

36*+ % 

18* 

13 EDO 

74 10 

12 

784 

17V 16% 

16* — % 

MV 

18% Edward 

00 20 

21 

1110 

31* 30 

31* +1* 

29* 

25% EPGnf 

375 1X0 


ID 

28* 28* 

28%+ * 


23* EPGnr 

9 ElToro 


14 

15 

1373 

28* 28% 
13V 12* 

28%+ % 
13V + V 

ITtl 

BVb El Ctv 

J6 30 


5 

10% 10% 

10%— % 

7* 

BVb 

2* ElecAs 
6* EMM 


17 

84 

1064 

4% 3* 
6% 5* 

3*— V 
5%— % 

10V 

7* EMM pf 

100 90 


20 

10% 10% 

10 V + * 

24% 

13 Elctaps 

M J 

29 

530 

25 24 

25 + * 

18% 

11* Elam 

00 S3 

13 

37 

15V 15 

15 — V 

77* 

5* Elscint 


35 

189 

8% 7* 

8V#+ * 

77% 

58% EmrsEI 

260 30 

15 

549 

76* 74* 

76* +1% 

17* 

5* EmRds 

-94t 77 

15 

1493 

12% IT* 

12% 

23* 

11* EmryA 

00 20 

12 

1660 

19* 19% 

19*+ * 

31% 

24% Emhart 

l0Ob 40 

9 

316 

31 MV 

31 + * 

19* 

14* EmpDs 

176 9.1 

7 

a 

19% 19* 

19*— % 


444 3V Emppf 07 107 


Emppt 
Ik % EnExc 
35% 22% EnotCP 
35V 18V EnlsBu 
25% 17% 
m3 97 
a 51% 

3V 1% 

21% 9% 

20 16% 

2144 16 

17% 11% 

38% 28% 

10% 9% 

14% 3% 

17% 12% 

2244 15% 

31% 20% 

37% 20 
174 104 

9V 3 
10% 6% 

14% 10% 

4iv a 
16V 13% 

48% 36% 


105 


600* ffi 


4V 444— % 

309 % + 

17 272 31% 30V 31 — 44 

13 111 33% 3244 33V 

Enserdl 150 65 21 1560 25V 25 25V + % 

Ensch ptl032 lOl 14800*10144 101% 101% + 44 


72 13 
56 17 


Ensch pf 623el!7 
E rarer 26 


6100* 


EntxEn 

Entrain 

Equifax 

Equlmk 

EamkPf 

EqtRes 

Entitle n 

CrlxTinJ 

EssBsn 
EesexC 
E shine 
Ethyl 
ethyl of 
EvanP 
Evanof 
Evan of 
ExCek) 
Excel sr 

Exxon 


1750 65 
150 63 
170 47 


251 150 
172 49 
.12 19 
70# 1-5 
9% 5 
900 35 
72 37 
55 14 
200 17 


81 

29 

49 

46 

36 

60 

120 

1^ 

39 

43 

s 


53% 53% 


53% — % 


15 

ss 

13 


151 197 
2.10 197 
140 39 
I0I«11.1 
350 77 


9% 9% 9% + % 
18V 17% 1BV + V 

20% 20% 20% 

35% 3SV 35% 

4% 4% 4%— % 

15 15 + % 

35 35V 

11% 11%+ V 
12% 13 

16% 16% 16% — V 
20 % 20 % 20 %+ % 
22% 21% 27% + % 
.. 35% 35% 3544— % 
1 184 184 184 +14 

241 4% 4 4% + % 

79 7V 7 TV + V 

7 10V 10* 10%— V 

95 41 40% 41 

8 16% 16V 16V + % 

7852 47 45% 47 +IV 


1TV 6V 
64V 41% 
79 51% 

45% 3SV 
22% 17% 
13% 9% 
14% 9% 
18% IS 
30% 33% 
16% 9% 
31V 16V 
19% 14% 
»V 14% 
12% 8% 
7 4V 
77% 29% 
45% 27% 
48% 40 


FH Ind 
FMC 270 
FMCpf 225 
FPL GO 374 
FPL Cowl 
FabCtr 78 
Facet 

Folrdtd 90 
Falrcpf X60 
Ffllrfd .18 
FamDfr 22 
Farattn 00c 
Farah 98 
FayOro 70 
Feders 
FedIGo 154 
FedExp 
FdHmpt 


6 

35 9 
29 

85 9 


27 15 


47 9 
99 

17 10 
7 24 
35 13 
45 0 
17 IB 
II 

<4 7 
21 


76 B 
295 64V 
6 79 
350 44% 
46 22% 
5 12% 
1 H 
1175 17% 
317 36% 
196 15% 
639 30% 
9 17% 
lllx 70 
190 11% 
147 6% 

89 37 
3836 33% 
3002 41% 


7% B + % 
43% 44V +1 
7* 79 + % 

44% 44% 

22% 22% 

12% 12% — V 
13 13 

14% 17% + % 
36 36% + % 

15 15% 

38% 30V 
17% 17%— V 
19% 19% — V 
11% 11%+ V 
«V 6% 

36% 37 + % 
32% 33%+lV 
39% 39% — 3V 


min 

102 40 

n 373 

37* 


37* + 

% 


.16 .9 


IS* 


18* 

+ 

« 

17 16* FeflPBS 

70 U 

7 269 

21 

V~, f A 

r 



21* 16 FcdRIt 

104 &£ 

M 201 

21% 

21% 

21V 

+ 

% 

18% 13% FdSgnl 

00 +7 

19 52 

17% 

16* 

17% 

+ 

* 


240 +0 

9 410 

55% 


55 

+ 

* 


170 40 

9 122 

26* 


26* 



t ■ 

200 60 

10 V 

31 

1 '^1 

30* 

— 

% 

24% 4 FlrtCnA 

70 1.9 

2461 

10% 

| i ■ 

10% 



5* 3% FlnCppf 

00 UJ 

6 

5* 

5% 


+ 


48 14% FlnCpof 

674elXl 

158 

37* 

36* 

37% 




9% 2% FnSBar 
l*% 15% FI rest" 


28 4 » 4 


26% 19 
31% 21V. 

33 24% 
60V 34% 

27 18% 

2QV 13V 
56 40 

21 II* 
18% 10% 
47 30V 

»v 21 
13% TV 
48% 31V 

7V 4V* 
27% 20V 
29% 70 
20V 14V 
26% 16 
56% MV 
12% B* 
MV 20V 

28 14% 

3AW 22V 
32V 23% 
12% 10V 
36% 19% 
31V 12% 
38 29% 

25V 18% 
23 V 11% 

8% 3V 
19V 11% 
23% 14% 
54% 43% 
51% 33 
17% 10V 
65 45V 

15% 10 
11% 4% 

34 27 

11% 5% 

25% 13% 

34% 20% 

29% 19 
34% 25 
34% 20 
52 35 


JO 47 10 743 IB* 18% IS* 


8 25* 
4V4 31% 
27 2 Wt 


FtAHin 98 K 
FBkSvS 158 47 B 
FBkFKt 170 <0 tO 
FBast 50a 19 M 822 63V 
FstCMc 172 57 21 1455 25 
FtBTra 170 87 8 236 15 
FIBTxpf S770137 I 42% 

FTC My 13 286 18 

FFedAx 453 17V 

Flnhrte 274 59 B 1252 46% 
Flnfslpf 277 87 382 39% 

FiMbs 74 25 9 10% 

FNStB 278 6.1 7 50 47% 

FHPO B 1794 7% 

FstPoPf 252 95 741 27* 

FtUnRI 174 «J 14 14 29V 

FIVaBk 74 47 B n 28% 

FIWlsc 170 45 B 49X 26% 

Flschtj 170 27 20 B1 36% 
FIshFd 05# 0 57 10% 

FltFnG 4 172 47 8 M 32 

Fleet En M U 11 i3S0 28% 

Flemne 78 25 14 160 36% 

Flex IV 70 25 13 

Flex I pf 151 12.9 
FllotSf 70 5 21 

Float Pt 

FlaEC .16a 5 12 
FlaPre 2-16 85 9 

FlaStl 50 25 13 

FlwGen 186 5% 

Fkwrrs 50 22 19 206 18% 

Fluor 50 22813 2021 18% 

FootcC 270 45 10 197 50V 

FordM 290 4.1 310675 48% 

FtDeor 176 IU 25 12 

FIHowd 154 25 15 547 64% 

FortWi 54 37 14 332 13% 

FoxStP 58 75 14 19 9% 

Foxbro 104 14 62 IS 30% 

FMOG Z13e23J 165 9% 

FrptMe 50 37 14 122B IB* 

Frtstrn 50 22 IS 110 26% 

FraoMs 50 2.1 7 1027 2B% 

Frutllpt 290 62 49 32V 

Fuaua 50 u 10 Z78 34% 

Fuaapt ITS 27 2 53% 


2S* 25% — M 
31% 31% 

29% 39% 

MV 63 «* 

24% 34% — % 
14% 15 + % 

42% 42%+ % 
16% 17%+ % 
16% 17 — V 
46%+ % 


16 220 
26 


32 
12% 
36% 
28 
37V 
186 25V 


28% 

9% 

46% 

6% 

26% 

29% 

20 

26V 

36 
10% 
31% 
27% 
35* 
31% 
12% 
36% 
27% 

37 
25 
16% 
5V 
18% 
17% 
48% 
47% 
II* 
63* 
13% 
8* 

29% 

8* 

18% 

26% 

27% 

31% 

34% 

S3 


29 — % 
10%+ V 
47%+ % 
7% + W 
27% +1% 
29% 

20%+ % 
26V— % 
34* 

10*+ % 
31% 

28V + % 
36% + % 
31% 

12% + % 
36V 

27% — % 
37 — % 
25% + % 
16V 

5% + V 
18% — V 
18% + % 
50V +1% 
48% — V 
12 + % 
64% + % 
13% — % 
9 — V 
30%+ % 
9% 

18* 

26% + % 
28% +1 
32V + % 
34% 

53%+2V 


28% 15 GAF -10e 5 
35% 20 GAF pf 170 35 
37% 25% GAT X 170 12 16 
45 33V G ATX pt 2.50 54 

51% 49 V GATXPf ST4el05 


34% 19% GCA 
64% 48* GE1CO 
>0% 4 CEO 
13* 5UGFCP 
44% 34* GTE 
39% 3TV GTE pf 
26 21% GTE Pt 

22% 19% GTE Pf 
10 - - 


17 1391 
-88 14 II 66 
89 
70 

108 7.1 8 3727 
150 67 1 

290 75 16 

258 107 


28 28%+ % 
34% 35 
36% 37V + % 
46% +1% 
50% 50%+ V 
28% 29V + V 
63% 63%— % 
5% 5% — % 
6V 6V— * 
43V 43% — V 
38% 38% 38*— % 
26V 26 26V + % 

23V 22% 23V + % 


2B% 

35V 

37V 

47V 

50% 

29V 

63* 

5% 

6% 

43* 


33* Gonstt 

100 

7.1 

a 

1010 

55% 

54 

55% 

+ 

* 

17V 

17% GopSfr 

00 

20 

M 

90 



25\* 

+ 

% 


10% Georht 

00 

Xft 

13 

141 



11 

+ 

% 


13* Getco 

06 

37 


140 


V * 

17* 

+ 

% 




34 

1 



40% 

— 

% 

so* 


100 


3M 



37V 

-n- 

* 


1L :’e'. , '.'l', 

1 43< 

9.9 


30 


r t 

16% 

+ 

% 


Tr 

100 

2.2 

9 

IQS 



45 

— 

* 



00 

13 

10 

1271 



30* 

+ 

-4 



06 

10 


3a 



29*V 

+ 

* 


rs^ M I 



23 

m 


r 7’ 

18% 



59% 


1.00 

1J 


557 



77V 

+2 

66% 

< 1 '. 1 jH 

270 

30 

13 

4564 



64* 

+1V 

17% 


200 

40 

9 

10R4 



54V 

+ 

V 

17% 







30% 

+ 



12% GnHosi 

00 

20 

3 

431 


■ 

70% 

+ 

V 

25* 

8% GnHous 

,24 

23 

31 

M 


nT 

10* 



15 

15% Gnlraf 

00 

36 

18 

6a 


w 

19 

+ 

% 

24V 

41* GflMIIIS 

224 

+1 

1317613 



55% 

+5* 

53% 


475 T 55 


60 

BS 61 GMat 
59V 33 GME n 
36% 33% GMotpf 375 109 
50* 44% GMotpf 590 109 


II 3* GNC 
11* 7V GPU 
67* 46V Gen Re 
10* 5 CnRefr 
52% 39* GflShml 
8% SV Gen sen 
32% 13% GnRad 
22* TJ Gerafe 
36 24 GonPte 

26% 18 GaPac 90 
27* 22* GaPwpf 354 1 
30% 25% GaPwpf 176 1_ 
21 17 GaPwpf 272 127 

25% 21V GaPwpf 275 112 
62* 52 GaPwpf 790 120 
31V 2D% GerhP S 1.16 49 
21 12 GertoSs .12 

10* 7* GtantP 
11% 5* GlbrFn 

26V 16* GltfHIII 
58% 42% Gillette 
17* 11% G lease 
9* 4% cum 


26 17* GlabMpf 300 177 

13V 8% GfdNup 

5V 1* GUN Wt 

27 
36 
29 
19 
33 
44 
66> 

IS 

43% 27% GtLkln 70a 29 11 
21% 15% GNlm 195010.9 7 
43V 31 GtNNk 152 U I 
67% 51% GtNNk pf47S 8.1 
38% 16% GtWFln 98 12 11 
19* 9% GWHW 39 

15% 11V GMP 172 119 • 

28 18% Grayti 1-28 <3 13 
37% Greyhpf 475 109 



11 GldWF 

70 7 

7 

307 27 

2«* Gdrtch 

106 53 

7 

748 29* 

23 Goodyr 

100 50 

7 

2S39 28% 

13* GordnJ 

03 X3 

6 


19 Gould 

06 30 

66 

1874 26* 

36% Groce 

200 b6 

11 

736 42U 

47 Gnotngr 

174 1.9 

M 

197 65* 

0% GIAPsJ 
11* GtAfPc 

00 27 

9 

9 

1Z10X 15 
2061 M% 


5 2* Graller 

if* 12* GrawG 50 XI 17 
12* 8% GrawG wl 
9% 6* Grub El 90 T II 
29% 21* Grumn 190 15 8 
26V 24% Gram pt 290 laj 
8% 4* Gruntal .16 23 32 
21* 14% Guardi 72 17 13 
27* 20 Gvllfrd 98 29 8 
35 25% GifWst .90 28 10 

24V 11% GultRs 23 7 

M 16% Gulf R Pi 170 67 
13* 10 GtfStlft 194 119 6 
29* 24 dtSUPT 395 12T 
33* 27 GlfSUpr 4.40 1X4 
20% 12* GAera -SSe 16 9 
17V M Gutton 90 18 13 



H 


1% 

9% 

55* 

13% 

19* 

47 

20 

74% 

49* 

55 

12% 

33% 

40V 

15 

27 


4W HRTn 
19* HotIFB 
26V Haltrtn 
* Hallwd 
5* HalwdPt 
38* HomrP 
11% HanJS 
15% HanJI 
21% Handlm 
15% HandH 
16* Hanna 
23% HorBrj 
32% Harlnd 
7% Harnlih 
14% HrpRw 
22* Harris 
io% HarOra 
19 Horses 
23% Hartnu 


190 49 
190 63 10 
98 59138 
36 XI 
294 47 8 
157P10T 
1940 99 
.92 29 16 
18 II 
2.1 13 
29 14 
29 19 
9 

29 18 
29 14 


56 

798 


343 

IM 

107 

43 

27 

164 


50 

190 

1.12 


138 49 13 
138 43 9 


76 

126 

221 

459 

29 

2216 

210 

56 

1300 


5% 5* 
25 34% 

28% 27% 
1% IV 
9* 9% 
49% 48% 
13% 13% 
19V 19% 
46% 45 
17% 17 
19% 18* 
49% 48% 
56 55% 

11* 10% 
31 30% 

3t% 30* 
14% 14% 
27% 36% 
30% 2Mb 


5%— % 
25 + V 

28% + V 
1% 

9%— % 
48*— % 
11% 

19% — % 
45%— * 
17% + V 
I9V + % 
49 — % 
55% + % 
11V 

30*+ % 
31% 

14* + % 
26*— % 
3**— % 


12 Month 
H Jan Low Stack 


Sis. Close 

Die. YKL PE lOPsHMi Low Ciwl Ch^e 


16V 13* HdttSe 
23* 19% HawEls 
12% 8 HavesA 
34% 15* Hmletn 
12% 9 Ha* Lob 
14* «* Hecks 

23% 13* HectoM 
»* 14% Helium 
22 15% Helllp 

45 X Helot 
30 12* HelneC 

25% 18 HeifliP 
5% 3% Hern Co 
12% 11% Hem Inc 
36* 27V Herculs 
19% 13% HerltC 
4iv av Herahv 
23V SV Hessian 
44V 31% HewIPk 
30 17% Hracel 

18% 12 HlStear 
12% 8% HlVatt 
23% 17% Hlknbrd 
58% 45% Hilton 
44% 31 Hitachi 
48% 35V Holiday 
70% 55% HlkJyA 
75 49% HoHyS 

27* 12 HomeD 
21* 11* HmFSD 


190 119 
194 77 
.108 9 
M 1J 
72 29 
78 29 
70c 19 
58b 29 
76 1.7 
190 39 


10 
9 

y 
49 
70 

a 

31 

9 .. 

12 25 

11 1096 


10 15* 
76 22% 
94 12% 


73 28% 
101 11% 


_ 11V 
7M 14V 


J4 


,90b 77 
190 47 
95c 9 
150 17 


72 9 
90 Z1 
90 27 
.15 17 
94 27 
190 11 
TB e 9 
TO IT 
I70t 29 
190 14 


15% 15% 

22 % 22 %+ % 
12 V 12V- % 

as* as%- v 
]]* 11* + % 
10% !1%— * 
13% 14% + % 
16* 16*— % 
20* 21 + * 
-O 41* 41* + % 
24 163 14% 13V 14% — % 

17 23 327 20% 19% 19%- % 
12 Wt 5% 5% 

ID 11* 11* 11* 

10 2093 37% 36* 37 + % 
24 19% 19* T9% + % 
38 36% 38 +1* 

8% 8 BVb— * 


181 17 
21 


880 

60 


14 6240 37V 35% 37 + * 


250 

170 


55* 29% 28% 29% + % 

81 18% 16 16 V- V 

12 11% 12 + % 

_ 23 22% 23 

. 129 58% 57 58% +1% 

12 7920 34% 34% 34% + V 
14 Mil 47* 47% 47% — % 
I 70% 70% 70% 

12 24 69% 69% 69%— % 

31 1095 17* 17 17 — % 

7 344 21V 21% 21V 
8 % 8 * 8 * 




70 

T 

28 

«04 

22 21% 22 + * 

L ■ 


00 

20 

5 

45 

15* 15* 15* 



00# 

J 

10 

918 

544* 56 54*— * 

r t ~r~' 


1.90 


>2 

7150 



19% HotwrU 

104 

XV 

10 

54 

26* 2S* 26* + * 

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v rv 

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IB* 18% IB* + V 



1.75 

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200 

40 


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52 51* 51*— * 



623 

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i;7T"n 

200 100 


656 

23 22* 22*— % 

trtf 


200 

40 

10 

1718 

43* 43 43* + * 



22Se20T 


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10* 10* 10* + % 



00 

20 

20 

8 

15* 15% 15* 

pi 


270 

BJ 

11 

391 

25% 24% 25% — % 



00 

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8 

288 




08 

23 


1209 




32 

10 

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25 

14 

1703 

77* 26* 27* 



M 

10 

16 

22 

24* 24% 24* + % 


mrerra 

00 

21 

27 

7985 

38* 35* MV +2* 

25* 


1T2 

70 

B 

36 

24* 24* 24% — * 


31% 21 
94* 62* 
19* 19% 
11% 4% 
27% 22% 
17V 14 
19% 13* 


73% 46 
70 40 

M 44% 
54 TO 
73% 43% 
24V 15V 
40% 30* 
7A 13% 


5% 

t% 

49 


16% 

5% 


34 27* 

15% 10% 
30% 19% 
48% 38% 
20% 14 
12V 3% 
26% 11% 
31 19 

54V 42 
38% 25V 
14* 7% 

IS* 15% 
65* 55 
140 120 
15% 9% 
51% 41 
17% 8% 
20* 14* 
135* 9* 
29V 22% 
12* 5% 
8% 2% 
47V 23% 
47% 20* 
34 17* 

45V 32% 
31% 23 
57% 46 
17% 9 
42% 32* 
87% 82* 
96* 86V 
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17V 10 
19% 15% 
20 16* 
19% 14V 
29V 21% 
Zl% 25 
33* 26 
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1C Ind s I JO 4T 
ICInpf 2.50 X6 
ICMn 
ICN 

ICNpf 270 90 
INAIn 172 115 
IRTPrs 1.60 06 
ITT Cp 1JX) 3T 
ITT pfH 4£0 6J 
ITTptK 4.00 6-9 
ITT pfO 5230 85 
ITTpfN 275 5J 
ITT Pfl 4 JO 7J 
IU Ini 170 4J 
I do Imp 378 87 
IdMlB 

JllPowr 244 11.1 
llPowpf 204 126 
llPowpt 213 117 
llPowpf 221 127 
llPowpf 378 121 
llPowpf 575 115 
llPowpf 470 127 
ITWl 44 17 

impQim 270 55 
ImpIQi 

1NCO 70 15 
IndiMpf 776 129 
IndlMpf 848 125 
IndiMpf 215 124 
IndlMpf 275 126 
IndiMpf 163 111 
ludIGso 170 77 
Inaxco .14 25 
I Ilf n ife 

lrwerR 260 5 A 
InsRpf 235 77 
InerTec 54 37 
InktSM 50 27 
InldSt pf 47S 10.1 
IraJJco IJOb 4T 
InsuRs 
IntpRac 

IntgRpf 373 123 
IntgR pf 643e14J 
IntpRpf 475 Til 
IntRFn 

itcpSr 210011.1 
Inter co 370 47 
Inter pf 775 56 
Intrfsl 40 jj 
intrik 260 57 
inhned 


5 

1171 
59 736 
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2 
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45 
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25 529 
7 119 
121 
4 1007 


33V 31V 32% +1% 
97 94% 97 +3* 

19% 19% 19% 

10% 10% 10%— % 
27* 27% 27% 

16% 16% 16% — % 
18% 18% 18% 

31% 30% 31% 

64 64 64 4 

58 56% SO 

5** 58* 59* + % 
42V 42 V 42 V— % 
62 62 62 + % 
10% 18 10% 

37% 37% 37% + % 
15* 15% 15*+ % 
23% 23% 23* 

16V 16 loV + V 
500* 19 19 If +1 

4Q0x 18 18 16 

100* 31% 31% 31%+ % 
50 50* 50* 50* 

1 32* 32* 32*+ % 
18 323 34* 34% 34* + * 

14 1312 37 36% 37 + % 

170 9% 9% PV — V 

4641 13% 13% 13% + V 
20* 60 60 60 +1 
HWh 69% 68% 69% +3% 
4 17% 17 17 

I 17% 17% 17% + % 
3 27% 27% 27*— % 
6 33 24* 34 34V + % 

15 416 6 5* 5% 

15 82 79 18 18* + V 

II 407 4S* 47* 48% +1 

24 33 32* 32*— % 

28 5 14V 14 14V + % 

990 25% 24% 25% + % 
TIB 47V 47 47V + V 


11 


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2172 

171 

40 

5V 4* 5%+ * 
10* 10* 18* 

24* 24fa 24% + % 

r~ 



M 


1 

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72 

10 24 

4584 

22* 21* 22 — % 

2 

45 45 45 — % 


34* MCA 

08 

20 31 

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44V 43V# 44V + * 

13 

32V# 32 32% + % 

Mb 

16* MCorp 

100 

60 6 

166 

22V 21% 22 

300 

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13* 

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J2 

24 10 

153 

13V 13 13%—* 


m 1899 !8* + * 

40 

31% ME) 

04 

1.1 15 

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14 


04 

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13% 13V 13% + % 

112 139*139*139%— fa 

12 

9 MCMGr pt44 

30 

33 

12V 12 12% + % 

613 

11* 10% H* + * 

16V# 

10 MGMUo 

JO# 10 25 

324 

12* 12% 12*— % 

19 

49* 49* 49* 

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2% MGMuwt 


45 

3 2% 2* — % 

3726 

10* 9 9% — 1% 


17% MGMHO 

MO 28 14 

143 

a* 21% 21* + % 


IntAki 
IBM 
I "I Flow 
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I nt Hr wl 

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IntHpfA 

IntHpfD 

InlMln 268 45 
Ird Mutt 176 41 
intPvr 250 47 
lot Res 

InfNHfi 240 58 
IntNtpf 058 97 
IrttNt pfHQJO Hi) 
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InJBafcr 

intstPw 1.10 96 
■ nPwpt 270 120 


Iowa El 

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1-90 V-9 
274 95 
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74 11 
174 53 


54 42* IrvBkpf &l«0lO7 


10 31 20* 20% 20% — % 

13 11275 137 133* 136% +2* 
15 759 27* 27% 27% — % 
7740 10% 10% 10% 

1106 7* 7 7* 

50 40* 47* 47% + * 
60 40 40 40 

197 34 33% 33% — % 

12 446 40 39% 39% 

9 58 28% 28% 28* + % 

30 6592 56% 55 55%-l% 

18 2S 14* 14% 14% — V 
_ 43* 47* 47*+ V 

IQ* 87* 17* 67* +1* 
] 95% 95% 95% 

475 34% 34 34% — V 

126 15* 15% 15% — V 
84 19% 19% II*- % 
600* 19V 19 If — % 
95 19V IB* 19V + V 
414x 28* 28* 28% 

100 31* 30% 30% 

565 33% 32% 33 
90 11 10% 11 

27 34% 34% 34% + % 
400 49 «% 48%- % 


8 287 


27% 

34% 

22% 

14% 

41V 

29% 

56 

98% 

16% 

9% 

60 


30V 

23* 

30% 


20 JWTl 
23% JRIvor 
12% J arrowy 
10% JqpnF 
23* JettPis 
24% JerCaf 
46% JerCpf 
90 JerCpf 
12* JerCpf 
5% Jewlcr 
28 JohnJn 
37% JafxiCn 
71% Jar pen 
15% .fastens 
21* JoyMfg 


1.12 47 11 
76 20 8 
-10 £ 10 

154eKLS 
172 23 10 
4T0 140 

8.12 14T 
13J0 VUJ 

218 128 

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170 

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3534 

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26% 2k 
28% 27- 
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39% 39% 
20% 28 
56% 54% 
96% 96 
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45* 45% 
25% 25 
23% 22% 
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26*+ % 
2774— V 
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10% 

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39% 

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101% 

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36 

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18% 

35% 

22V 

20% 

34 

90 

19% 


70 25 


4-50 127 
174 71 


60 27 
70 1.1 
177 77 
16 


A* KOI 
9% KLMs 
33 KMfpf 
26% Kmart 
24% KN Ena 
12% KabrAI 
14% KaVCe 
15V KalCpf 
0% Kaneb 
B7 Kaneb pfl 263el4J) 
14V KCtvPL 236 115 
29V KCPLpt 470 12T 
14V KCPL pf 270 117 
15% KCPL pf 2JJ 11.7 
36% KCSou 1-00 IT 
10* KCSopf 1-00 77 
12% r.onGE 236 121 
28* KanPLt 296 85 
IB KaPLpf 232 117 
17* KaPL pf 223 117 
IT* Kafr in 
49 Kotvpf 156 16 
10* KavfBr 50 21 


294 

7% 

7* 

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411 

13% 

13fa 

131#- 

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36* 

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3217 

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573 

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1095 

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117 

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18% 


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17* 

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100: 

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Dlv. mi pe HBKHtanmwGuol.Orge 


IT* 12% Koufpt 
87% N KoulP< 
43V Z7 r.ellooa 
31* 71% Ketiwd 
4* 1 Kenai 

33% 19% Konml 


170 86 
875 102 
176 4-0 13 
33 7 


1-00 


25 20% KvUtil 

18% 11 KerrGI 


70 

254 


170 

1.10 

170 


23 19 
97 8 
36 
87 

XB 13 1433 
SO 8 79 


jObZS 30 
170 28 20 
400 55 


2&V9 18% KerG Pt 
35* 26V Kerr Me 
26% 16% Key Bit 
«% 2% KWCnn 

20 14 Key slnt 

35V 26V Kick* 

77V 62 Kid PfC _ 

50V 39% KlmbCs 220 47 10 
33* 21V KrtOWHd .76 7J 16 
27Vj 17* Kooer 230 87 82 
29* 16V Kalmor 32 17 15 
23V 17% Kppera 70 3T 26 12Z3 
103 96* KapprofTOJA TOD 

16 12% Korean 

39% 2*% K roper MO 57 12 
20 11 Kuhlms 60 21 11 

•7% 44% K racers .141 7 29 

20 13 Kvsor 70 4,0 7 


17* 17V 17% — V 
86% B* 86 
47% 42% 43%+ 9 
31% 30% 30% — % 
IV 1% IV * % 
24i; 24* 24% + % 
24* 24% 24%— % 

is* 12% r:% 

20% 20 30% + % 

29V 27% 29 + * 

24 25% 25% + % 

}% 3* 3% V 
19V 19 19% + V 

31% 31% 31* + V 
73% 7315 73%— % 
47% 46* 47* — V# 
33* 32% 131c + 'S 
27% 271 • 27* + % 
Si* 21 31* + i* 

_ 20* 20% 23* + V 
15 100*100% 100% 

149 13 V 12% 13 V— V 
213 38V 38 38V + U 

00 19% 19 19% 

26 53% 53% 53% — % 
IBS 70 19* 20 


Stack 


SK O0S8 

D>w Md. PE 1 GOsHIgn Low Quo!. Ch'ge 


46% 41% NIPS pi 463*106 
44V 33% NoSlPw 374 77 7 
23% J3 NSPwp! 360 115 
36’s 31% NSPw of 4.10 116 
34% 32 NSPrt 4.16 1U 
60 51 NSPw pi 7.09 116 

NorTel .40 16 
5% 2% NfhpatQ 
39 't 23% Nsrtrps 170 35 II 
62V 40% Nwtlrvd 260 57 1610741 
IT--. 19% NwiPpf 236 10J 2 


2849107 9 


27% 22% LN He 
15% 7% LFE 
17V 12V LLE Rv 272# 1+1 
SV 2 LLCCe 
1) 8 LLCpf 

18% 8% LTV 

40 45% LTV pt 

31 1BV LTV Pt 
17* 13 LTV pf 
17 10% LQuInl 

29% 15% LocGes 
12% BV Latoree 
31% 23* Latrgpt 244 
17% 12% Lamaur 74 
3* 1* LamSes 


X0A 135 
175 7 5 

15 

170 7.1 7 
70 22 
9.1 

IT 14 


14% 10% Lawtlns 
25% 13% LeorPi 


26 

29 

433 

20 

9 

2795 

3 

361 

989 

743 

130 

111 

17 

129 

23 


47 13 1011 
7 IS 2033 


23V 20% LearPof 287 103 
49% 37% LearSa 1T0 3T 10 
116% 95 LeflrS pf 22S 17 
19 14 LraRrts 50 22 14 

37% 24% LswyTr 130 46 11 
33% 20% LeeEnt 70 25 17 
13% 9 Lea Mas 70 IT 23 
20% 15% Lea P kit 54 23 9 
4U 2% Letival 
16* 13% Lehmn 133*103 
17* 9% Lennar 70 17 22 
33% 16 LewcNi 6 

is 20 Leucdpf 270 57 
37% 23 LevISt 
37% 23* Lewltz 
S0% 38* LOF 
79% 62 LOF pf 
29* 21 UMvCp 
70% S3 Uliy 
32% IS* Limited 
41% 26* LfOCNtl 
22 10% UnePI 

00 56V Ulton 

48* 30V Locktfd 
42V» 30% Loctlle 
131% 70V Loews s 
44V 23% Loews Wl 
32% 19 Lem Fin 1.16 36 13 
3SV 24* LumMl 354e 93 TO 
28* 17* LAS lor 1-90 77 9 
a 44 LoneS pf 577 107 


141 

565 


SB 30 
IT 9 

18 8 

67 

15 16 


49 

110 

46 

117 

250 

27 

33 

2 

428 

2sl 

43 

66 


175 
72 
172 
475 
72 

170 4T II 2065 
76 7 24 450 

174 4J 9 233 
27401 0.1 54 

200 20 10 B3S 
-45c S 10 1607 
70 23 13 51 

170 7 10 


II 3* ULCo 
53 21% LI L Pf J 

23 1% LILpfX 

23* 9 LILBfW 

23V 9% LILpfV 

27% 11V LILphJ 
a* s% LiLprr 
16% A LILotP 
■ 7% 7 LIL PfO 

48% 34 LongOr 

29* 10% Loral 

15 19% LoGenl 

34% 27* La Land 

27% 17 LoPoc 

37% 28% LaPLpf 478 153 

24 16* LaPLpf 3.16 147 

28V 22* LouvGs 244 97 

49* 36 Lowsfs 

29* 16V Lowes 

24% 11V LuOrzf 

23 ZJ* Lubys* 

19V 15% LuckyS 

15V 10* Lufcens 


270 

72 

1.16 

34 

1.16 


23 
23 
6 
16 
8 

200 
812 
22 
571 
053 
22 
31 
890 
47 6 24 

1.1 17 1733 
57 14 1454 
17 20 76 

67 10 403 
27181 79 


178 27 13 
58 16 17 
.54 LS 9 
170 37 10 
70b 37 W 


26* 26% 261 1 — * 
12* 121# 12* — * 
15% 15V 15% 

?* 2* 2* + % 
9% 0% 9%— * 
11% 11* 11% + V 
48% 48 V 48%— % 
22% 22% ZP» + V 
16% 16* 16% + * 
12% 11% 11%— % 
23% 22% 23% +1% 

9* 9 V 914.— V 

26% 26* 26* 

16 15% 15% — V 

3 2Tb 3 + V 

12* II* 12 — V 

25 23% 23% — IV 

27* 27* 27*— % 
51 48% 51 +1*, 

1 124 124 124 +11 Uj 

60 18* 18V I3V— * 
SB 33V 32* XT*— * 
32% 32V 32% 
r j% ri% rj% + * 
19* 18* 19 
3* 3V 3* 

15 14% IS + * 

15V 14% 15 
31% 33* 33% + V 
35 35 35 + * 

32* 30% 32 +1% 

37% 37% 37% 

48% 47 47*— IV 

76% 75 76 

29V 28% 29 — V 
70% 68% 70% +1* 
33 31* 33 +1 

40% 39% 40% + % 
22% 21* 22% + V 
72* 71% 72* + * 
48 46* 48 +1% 

35 34 V 34V— I 

497 129V 126* IM — V 
138 43% 42% 43 — * 
491 32* 32 33* + V 

43 35V 35 35 

906 25 24% 24%— * 

15 5D% 50 50 

846 7* 7% 7Tb 

IBOz 42 42 42 

41 19% 19V 19% + V 

20 19% 19% 1«% 

19* 19V 19* + * 
23% 21 23% + V 

18V I0V 78V — tb 
13* 13% 13%— V 

17 16* 17 + * 

40 47% 47% — V 

29% 28% 29% + % 
12* 11* 12 — V 
31* 30% J!*— % 
24* 24* 24% — % 
31 X* 30* 

22% 3* E% + V 
26Tb 26 V 26* + * 
46% 46% 46% + V 
29V 28* 29V + * 
23% 23* 23*— % 
30V 29% 30V + % 
18* 18V 18* + * 
15* 14% 14% — * 


25* B% NwSIW 
38 30% Norton 

32% Jrt Narwst 
56% 3Tx Nows 
39'i 26 Nucor 
9* 4* NpfrJS __ 
77* 58* NYNEK 600 


1 

200 14 12 152 
1-BO 70 13 450 
J9e IT 1? 3773 
76 IT 13 296 
32 7.1 72 

77 8 2085 


» 43 43 43 — * 

281 43 V 42* 43V + V 

200* 31% 31% 31* 

54001 35* 35* 35*- % 
40l 35% 35% 35% 

4000* 61* 60V 68V + * 

2733 39* 38% 39%— V 

40 3% 3* 3% + * 

865 35% 35 35*— * 

SO* 48% 50* — * 
22 * 22 * 22 * + * 

13 13 13 + % 

37V 36% 37 — * 

25* 25* 25*+ % 
29* 28* 29% + * 

36% 36 35 — % 

4* 4% 4%— % 
78* 76* 78* +1* 


5* 2 Oak Ind 365 

32% 23* OaklleP 172 +6 13 40 

35% 23* OccIPet 250 97 6 1227 


JQt 

100 

174 


70 


21 16 

22 12 3028 
192 

27 7 


72 

.15 

120 


IT 6 
17 17 
7 21 
85 5 


__ 27 3* 

120 7-0 

54 .7 17 

240 40 44 
174 27 


56 

JD 

170 


6 2 

17 14 


17 14 
97 12 


3f% 17* MB Lie 
48 25 Mocmll 

S3* M% Mocv 
19% 11* Mad Res 
39% 24 MaalC t 
29% 20V Mol Art 
23* 12% Manhln 
19 13* Monti N I 

21 V 10% MQnrCs 

41% 22% M Fr Hon _ 

59 41 MfrHpf *J7el27 

57 40 MfrH pf ST19125 

17V 5% vlMonvl 

28V 18V vIMnwlpf 
30% 21 MAPCO 170 35 11 
4* 3 Marat* 

2* * Morale 

32% 1*6 MorMJd 140 5.1 I 
51% 40% MorMpt SJ3e1IJ 
4fl% 27V Marlon 52 1.1 32 
11% 9% MarttC 

19 14% Mark pf 
81% si% Martial 
4«% 35% MrrtiM 
48* MV MartM 
76* 55 MrlMpf 477 
15% 8* MOTYK .12 
32% 22% Masco 
13 TV MauM r 

20 15% MasM 

5* TV MoseyF 

2»* 20* MajCp 
11* 9* Maslnc 
51% Matsu E 
6% Mattel 
4% Motel wt 
16% Matt! pf 
9V Max am 
46* MV MayOs 
49* 36V Moyle 
32% 25% McDrpI 220 7.9 
23V 20% McDrpI 260 127 
31* 23% McDerl 170 6.9 76 
12 6* McDrl wl 

10 4% McDkJ 70 

T9* 40% McDnlx B2 
76% 47* McDnD 174 
40* 31* McGEd 270 
48% 34 McGrH 174 
23% 19% Me Inf p 
41* 32* McKese 240 
66 54 McK Pf 170 

15% 10 McLean 
6% 3* McLeawt 
25% 19% McNeil .90 
41% 27% Mead 170 22 
22% 12% Mesnix 74 1. 

43V 24% Medfm 76 26 
41% 31% Melton 248 57 
27 22* Mellon pf 250 107 

45% 30% Melvlll 144 ‘ 

61* 40V Merest 170 


32 

300 


22V 22 22 

48% 47% 48* + * 

47% 46V 47% + V 

_ 12% 12% 12% ■+■ * 

3TB 39% 39* 39*— % 

176 16% 26* a* + V. 

164 15% 15* 15% 

40 17* 17* 17% 

20* 19* 20* + * 

M 36% 37% 

51% 51% 3t%+ % 
47V 47* 47V + V 
7V 6* 7% * * 
21V 20* 21 + * 

28% 28* 28V + % 


149 

1252 

SO 

11 

513109 

534 

195 


7 

120 

175 




139 

57 

21 

316 

547 

1545 

103- 

481 


83 

10* 


278 117 60 

172 117 51 

45r 7 10 1069 
1250 


IS* 


370 


97% 71V Merck 
M* 39 Merdtti 
33% 22 MerLyn 
3* 2 MesoOf 

22 13% Mesa Pt 

35% 24* MeeaR 

9 5% Mesab 

6* 2V Mortek 
28 21% MtE pfC 290 1X9 

57% 47% MtE pf J 872 147 
3% 2* MexFd .179 65 

18* 17 MltCnpf 275 10.9 
6* 4% MicUDS 76 
43% 32* MMcan 
14% »V MldSUf 
K* 17 Mid Hen 

28% 22 MWE 

17% 11V MIltnR 

85% MV MMM 

31% 23% MlnPL 

25v 7% Mbnlns 

20* IS MaPSy 

20% 17% MoPSpf 244 120 

21% 18% MoPSpt 241 120 

33 V 71% MoPS Pi +13 127 

14 4 Mitel 

32* 23* MObH 
4 % vIMoMH 

9% S* ModCPt 
24 l«V MotaX 
15% 8% MohkDt 

23 14* Monrch 70 

51 40* Morans 2J0 

31% 26 MntDU 


31* 31* 31*+ * 
47 47 47 + % 

40V 47* 48 — V 
11V 11 11* 

17% 17V 17V 
81% 80% 81% + % 
60% 59* 60% + % 
50 48* SO +1% 

79 77 79 +2* 

... 11% 11* 11*— * 
17 IS 1035 33* 31* 33* +1* 
- * 12* 12V I2V- V 

10% 18% 18% — * 
2* 2% 2* 

26* 25* 26V + * 
11* II* 11V— * 
62 61% 62 — * 
12* 11* 12* 

8* 8* 0* 

29% 29* 29% — * 
13% I3V 13% + * 
46% 45% 46% + * 
48% 47% 48V— V 
27% 27V 27% + * 
21* 21% 21% — V 
26% 25% 36V + % 
7% 7* 7% + V 

10 9% 9* 

59V »% 59% + % 
75* 74* 75* + * 
40V 39% 40 
- 44* 4314 44* + * 
a 32* JO* 32* +2V 
527 M 37* 37*— % 
3 60% 60% 60%— 1% 
83 13% 13* 13% + V 
142 5* 5% 5* + % 

6 24% 24* 24%— * 
43ta 37V 36* 37* + * 
810 22* 21* 22 — * 
205 29V 28* 29V + V 
3S27x 47* 47* 47V + V 
Six 26* 76 26*— * 

37 12 Ila 40* 40V 40%— V 
20 10 49 41* 41 41* + V 


7 

1.72 27 10 
2600 24 'll 


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118 

13 

516 


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20 21 .. 

1+ 14 1310 
24 9 413 
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20 


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14 14 1840 
JO 17 14 M 
JO 27144 15242 
793 
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133e 60 

-78*106 8 


94* *2% 94* + % 
60% M «Pb— * 
34% 32* 34% +1% 
2% 3* 2*— * 
?X 17% 17% 17% + V 
7 28% 2S% 20% — V 
94 7* 7V 7* + V 

34 3% 3* 3% + * 

70x TB 28 28 

100* 56 V 24V 56V + V 


276 5-5 
1.78 129 
100 57 
248 « 


256 87 


1700 5.9 


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111 

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50 

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21 

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33 

7% 

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a* + * 

33—1# 
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9% Oct IP wt 
27* 12% CccfP 3f 270 122 
51* 4Rx OccIP pf 675 124 
113 105* OcciPpf 15.50 14.1 
lOBValOlV OodPf 1+62 137 
10* 100 OccIP of 1400 120 
34% 22 ODECO 100 +1 15 
30V 24% Ogden 100 60 15 
85 71* Ogdnpl 107 22 

M* 9* OhloEd 104 1X3 
30 SS% Oh Ed pi 290 130 
34 26% OhEdPf +56 129 

53% 41 OftEdPf 774 125 
60* 45 OriEdpf 870 1+1 
M 25% OhEdPf lJ8e 5-5 
26% 18 V OhEdPf 3-50 1X3 
28V 21 OnEdpr X92 1+1 
14% 10% OhEdPf 100 126 
65 51 OhEdPf 9.12 1+3 

62 47% OhEdPf &64 140 

17V 12V OfiMofr JO 25 18 
19% IS OhP pfG 227 11.9 


7 

15 

242 


2* 2* 2*+Y» 
32% 33 32%+ % 

26* 26% 26* 

10* 10% 10* 

19 18% IB*— * 

_ 50V 49* »V + % 

154 107*109*109%+ * 
3 105* 105% 105*+ * 

300*108 in in + % 

471 24% 24 24* 

548 SOU 29% 30V + * 

6 85 85 B5 +1 

S 1163 13* 13% 13* + Ml 
1000* 30 29% 30 + % 

210* 33 32% 32% — IV 

2000: S3* 53* 53*+ * 
10007 3 SB 58 — % 
56 28* 28% a* + V 
49 2AV 25% 26U + % 
56 28 27% 27% 

5 14V 14* 14V + * 
200* 64 64 64 

220* 61* 60% 61% — V 
167 16 U IS* 15*—* 

7 19% 19 19 — V 


23% 19% QkJoGE 200 90 9 1346 22* 22 52V + * 


8V 

7 OklaGpf 

00 103 


430: 

8 

7* 

7* 


25% Olln 

100 

+4 

9 

424 

37* 

33* 

34 + % 



108 

29 

19 

20 

37V 

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F+J 

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14 Oneida 

00 

40 

9 

10 

534 

20 

17* 

8* 

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17* 

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256 

80 

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334 


31% 

32% + % 

15* 

19V OranRk 

204 

80 

8 

54 

24 

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13% 

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50 

13 

50 

9% 

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a* 


76 

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52 

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15 

nvs 

8% OrlonP 


6.3 

36 

1310 

13 

10* 

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10% 

10* 

B + % 

30% 

a* 

24 Orion Pi 

275 

04 

90 

23 

9 

331 

110 


2SV# 

27% 

28* 

57% — % 

30* 


04 

27 

13 

330 

29* 

29* 


20 


00 

XI 

9 

48 

16V 

15% 



25% OwmC 

100 

3T 

9 

591 

35% 

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rvc 

31V Owen IU 

108b +0 

9 

1019 

42 


42 4 A 


10% Oxford s 

04 

30 

9 

112 

13 

IU 

13 + % 


M 40 


31% 18 PHH 08 37 11 

40 24% PPG 160 +0 9 

24* 15 PSA M U 

18* 13V PSAdpf 1.90 10A 41 

12* 11% PocAS 1 JO 1)0 36 

17U 12* PoCGE 1.72 !07 6 1BS0 

42* 30* PocLio 372 87 II 244 

29 20% PCLum 170 +4 14 165 

10% 5% PatRcS 05r 0 22 

20 13% PocRSPfZCO 12.9 14 

17% 11* PacScI -40 25 13 33 

71% 57 j PacTele 500 70 8 1270 

13 9U PocTin .« 47 II 

26V 31 Pocircp 127 0.9 7 1651 

33* 27% Pod tot +07 127 13 

37* 2 23% PalnlWb -00 16 65 
29% 26% PalnW pt 275 
39 24* PolmBC 170 

2 14V 20V PanABk 66 
B% 4 Pan Am 

5* 1% PonAvrt 
30Pi 13% Pondckn 70 
39* 31 PorrtiEC 2JD 

6* 3 PantPr 

16* 12 Paprctt 

18* lov Pardvn 

26 12% ParkEs 

12% 5* ParkDrl 
37% 25V PorkH 
18V 12% PorkPn 
Tib 1% pal Phi 
27% 14 PavINW 

17% 11% PavNP 

21V 13% PavCsh 

13% 6V Peotxtv 
1* Penoo 
53% 36* PenCen 
55% 44* Penney 
25* 19% PoPL 
37% 30 PoPLPf 4-50 127 
67V 57% PaPLPf 860 120 
27* 23V PaPLdcrX42 126 
24% 20 PoPLdprZM 110 
65% 56% PoPLpr 860 120 
26* 22* PaPLtfPrtTS 123 
29% 25 U PoPL dPf275 129 
97% 81% PoPLprl10O 11 J 
62 54% PaPLpr 800 127 

39% 31% Penwtl 270 ST II 
23% 20 PetIWPf 160 
45* 30% Ponraol 270 
16* 9*u PeopEn 106 
34V ZJU Pen Bay 76 
45% 34% PepsiCo 168 
29% 17* PerkEJ J6 
10% 7% PrmJan 

19* 12* PervOr 


.16 

1.12 

J2 


236 +6 8 


77 1409 

37 10 442 

28 8 a 

1434 

759 

1.1 IS 26 9 
60 TO 928 
14 1309 
14 155 

59 1#65 

11 23 

IS 1193 

10 12 B58 
30 29 204 

796 

17 IB 2392 
40 12 232 
0 17 Z3B1 
232 
29 

12 326 
1539 

8 471 


23 


9.9 


+9 31 

57 10 2043 

15 I IM 
1.1 IS 69 
3.9 2D 4233 

__ 1.9 18 2627 
175el&7 7 456 

16 15 237 


38% 26% Petrie 160 17 17 271 
22* 74* PelRs 372el+7 68 

17* 14 PeIRsPf 1J7 I0J 13 

7% 4 Ptrlnv 103e22J in 

42* 29* Pfizer 168 16 13 3999 
27* 17* PhelpO 7723 

48% 34 Phetopr 500 11+ 166 

39% 20% PfllbrS 04 17 1314180 
15* 9 PhlloEl 278 1X9 * 1407 
33 25 PtiflEpI +40 U0 

14 25% Phi IE Pt +68 146 

51% 40 Phi IE pf 700 130 
61% 50V PfillE pt 875 1+3 
10* 9* PhllE Pf 161 1X1 
10* 4% PhllE Pi 173 1X6 
55% 43 PhllE pt 705 140 
10 6* PhllE Pf 10 115 

44% 51 PhllE pf 900 1+3 
56 44 PhllE pf 700 1+2 

56* 40% PhllE pf 735 14-5 

20 15V PMISub 172 77 11 

B3V 62* PhJIMr 360 
22% 10* Phi IP In 60 
04% 36 Phlllnpf 100 
56% 33* Phi I Pet 260 
M% 16V PMIVH 60 
16U 57% PledAwi 
32* 23% PleNG 

21 14 Pier 1 

45% 33 Pllsbry 
33 21% Pioneer 

29% 17 PIonrEl 
4IV 26% PUnyB 
82 S3V PITnBpf 212 
is* 9 * pi twn 

16 B* PlonRs 70 
22* 12* Plontra .16 
1JV 7% Playboy 
15V 20V Plejey 


IBS 27% 27V 27% 

724 99% 39 39%— V 

74x 22% 22 2% + % 

18V 17* 1BV + * 
12* 12% 12% 

16% 16* 16* + * 
#0 3#% 40 + * 

27* 27 Z7 — * 
6 * 6 % 6 * + * 
15% 15* 15% 

16* 14 16V 

JO* 69V 70* +1* 
9% 9* 9% 

26V 26 a* 

32V 31% 32 + V 

37* 35* 97* +299 
30% 39% 30%+IV 
37% 37% 37% 

23* 22* 23* +1 
4* 4% 4* 

2* 2 2*+ * 
18* 18* 18% 

38V 37* 38* + * 
4V 4* 4V + V 
14% 16* 16% 

17* 17 17* + * 

14 15* 15* 

6* 5* 6* + * 
37* 37* 37*+ Ml 
17* 17 17V— * 

2 1% 2 + * 
26% 26% 26% 

13% 13* 13* + * 
20% 19V 20 +1 

52% 51V 51*— * 
51 499k 51 + * 

25* 25* 25*— * 
300* 3S% 35% 35% 

100* 67 67 67 

16 27% 27V 27V— M 
69 24% 24% 24% 

100* 65% 64* 65% + % 
37 26* 26 26* + * 

8 29* 29% 29* 

2S20* 95V 95* 95V +2* 
300* 63 62 63 +2 

250 17% 37 37% — % 

23V 23 23V 

42% 40* 42V +1 
16V 15% 16V + * 
34* 33% 34% + M 
43% 42 43* + * 

29% a 29% +1% 
8* 8* 8V— % 
19% 19V 19% + * 
38* 37% MV + * 
25* 25 25% 

15V IS 15 
4* 4* 4* + * 
41* 39V 41* +1% 
18% 18V 18W+IV 
44V 43 44 +IV 

40* 38* 40* +1* 
15* 15* 15*+ * 
100* 31% 31% 31% +1 
10* 32 32 32 — % 

60* 52 51 52 + % 


U0* 41 61 61 +1 

102 10% 10* 10% + * 


10 % 10 % 

175 10* 9* 9% 
mz 54% 54* 54*— 1* 
a 9* 9* 9% — * 
10te 46% 66* 66* +1 


78 

232 


106 

174 

■17r 

104 


67 

4.1 10 2079 
22 12 775 
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Sil 0 
16 9 

0 8 
70 7 
13 


640* 55 54% 

3 DC* 53% 539 


2 

5541 

IM 

941 

46 

77 


X7 10 I860 


29 
J SO 
20 12 
27 


10 13 
1.1 IS 


05eX2 9 
40 11 II 
100 30 20 
.40 J 9 
00 +1 
.40 27 
102 107 5 


200 50 


.12 
260 
78 
l-*0 
172 10.1 


25 

8% 


270 21 9 11577x 27% 26% 27V + * 


A0 


30U 16* Monpw 
II* 14* MonSt 
9 6% MO NY 

48* 34% MooroC 
25* IS* MareNi 


108 
24 

17 10 1339 
233 

40 a 201 
50 8 2240 
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200 100 
IJOalO.I 
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200 +1 13 
104 +4 12 


■ 2290 


a* 23% MorMpt 2J0 90 
45% 28* Morons Z2D 50 
84* 75% Moran pf 7_77e 97 
30 MorKid 170 30 

31% 10% MoneS 00 +1 


ai 
58 
230 
19 

8 1529 

3 

9 90 

■ 33 


N> * 

7* 7* 7* 

24* 23* 24* + * 
11% 11% 11% + * 
17% 17V 17* + * 
45% 44* 45* + % 
31V 31 31* 

19% 18* 19V— * 
17* 17% 17% 


8* 9 


49 48* 46V 

23% 22* 23* + * 
26* 76 26V + V 

44 43% 44 + * 

90 SO 90 + % 

36% 34% 36% — V 
19% 19* 19*— * 
IP* 19 19%— V 

30% 29% 30 


20 12 MlBRfy 1.71e 80 11 423 

31% M Morton# 04 21 11 622 

44V 29* MolrJaa 04 U 12 3807 39* 37V, 39 lb +1* 

24V 15% Muntrd 04b 24 12 55 22* 22V 22% + * 

23* M Munsng Is 6 19% i? 19 

43 26 Murehc 1-40 X4 9 113» 41* 41 41V + * 

M% 23% MureO 100 3J H 746 26* a* 26* + * 

X>% 16* MurrvO 170 5.9 W 13 m% 20* 20* 

13% II MirtOm 1 04*100 28 13* IS* 13* + * 

U* 3* MverLn a 4% 4* 4*— * 


23* 14 NAFCO 
59U 39* NBO 
24% MV NBI 
20% 16% NCH 

39% 23 NCNB 
20* NCR# 
21% 13 Nl Ind- 


00b 10 IS 

200 +1 a 
11 

72 30 14 
173 30 9 


00 30 


1 

45 

525 

337 

279 


17 

2* 

£ 


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78 1J 


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21 21 21 
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16* 16% 16* 

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38% 37 MV + * 
29% 28* 29% + * 
21 * 21 * 21 %— * 


208 


270 80 


9.9 


108 77 
230 11.1 
176 +1 


100 



For our 19X4 Annual Report, write: 
Grow Group,! nc. Pan Am Building, 
201) Park Avenue. NY 10166 Dept.G. 


Grow Group 

Awlgrip. Devoe, Ameritone. three ot our well-known 1 bn 


brand names. 


33% NWA 
38% HatacB 

21 NoKa 170 +6 

2** 2D Nashua 
37% 30% NOTCan 100 30 
11% II* NtCflV 3 76 11 

29% 22% HotDfrt 

19V 16V NOW or 105 
20 12% NIEdus 

29% 17V MOtFG# 

S 19% NFGbf 
44* 27 NOTGvp 
4* 7% NtHom 
36% 23* Nit 
24% 17* NMedE 
12* 6* N MineS 
27* 20* NfPrert 
16% 9% Ntseml 
29* 21* NtSvcIn 100 30 
T7 11* N Stand 00 27 
11* 10 Nercen 00# +5 
29V 21% P4evPvr 276 9.9 
1«V 11% NevP nf 100 117 
2D% 19 NovPof 270 110 
K% 14* NevPpf ITS 117 
14% 8* NevSvL JO +4 S 
28* NEngEI 300 90 6 
26* 19 NJRk 204 7,9 7 
23* 14% NYSEG 204 IU 6 
90 24 ifYSpf 975 120 

67% 55% NYSpt 800 IXI 
24 19% NYSpt A 30*120 

>8 IJVj NYSpt 2.12 N0 
29% 34 NYSpfD 175 128 
18> 13V Nrwetl JO 22 12 
43* 70 Newhol 
13% It NcwMl 
10* TV NwMfti 
5«* 31 Ptewml 
A* I* Nwpgrk 
17% 13 NlaMP 
32 24V NlaMnf 

48 38* NlaMcf 

92 75 NiMot 

19* 15* NtogSh 
if* 10* Nhwlel 
29* 24V HICOR 
s*% 94 NICOnf 
19 12% NoHAf ___ 

60V m North Sa 300 
37% 16* MorUn 



69? 

11* 

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285 


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387 

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13 

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13 6009 
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100 


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200 117 6 
190 120 
6.10 U0 
1000 120 
1.959121 
.» .7 75 
306 100 IS 
1.90 67 
.12 .9 37 

57 


38V 29% Worvtr 140 63 8 
17* IS Nartrfc 08 J I 
54 42 NACapI 100 20 6 

41% a* NAPhl# 100 20 * 
21!h 13* NEurO !04elO0 10 


14* 10* NoertUt 108 107 
IS* 10* NindPS 106 121 


12* 12% 12* 

29* 79 fftt 
IS M% 15 + * 

■0* 10% 10% 

28V 27% 78 + * 

1220* 14V 13% MV 
■z 20* 20* 20* + V 
5 16* 16* W%— * 
45 11* U* »* + * 
188 38% 38* 38* 

12 25* 25% 25% 

621 22% 22% 22* + * 
200* 98 29% M +1% 

TO 67 67 67 + V 

tO 24 24 24 — * 

ft 17% IB 
29* 29* 29* 

18* 18 M%- V 

42% 42V 42* 

13* 13* 13* + * 
9* 9% 9V + V 
4> 40* 41 + % 

zu 2 2% + * 

17% 17* 17% 

60* 31 31 31 

2901 47 47 47 - % 

SO* U IB n -1 

78 16% U* 16*— V 
’ 17* 17* 17* + * 
M* 23* 20* + % 
28V asv a%- * 
M 13% 14 + % 

65* 64V 45 + * 
17% 17% 17% — * 
102 37* 36% 37 — * 
121 17V 16* 17V 
2 58 50 50 

IIIB 48 39U 40 

a 15% 15* 15* 


4 

2 

133 

24 

a 

6$i 

239 

1039 


•5 

645 
I 

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6 1384 
1 


S 1800 
7 907 


14% 14* M% 
II* 11% II* 


50 

1 21b 
17% 
18% 
26V 
23% 

a* 

Siy 

22V 


3-50 147 
104 1X4 
108 1X7 
904 1X9 
802 150 


22% 15*9 p 090 Pd 

32 74V Polo rid 

23* 11% Pondrs 

25 15 PooTol 

19* 13V. Portec 

17* 13 PortGE .... 

71* 17% PotGpI 260 127 

33V JBu PorGpt +40 1X4 

32% 22V PorGpt 472 1X4 

3SV 25% Pollfch 106 40 

26% 19% PohnEI 216 87 

421# 36 PolElpf +50 11 J 

371# ai Pul El pi 404 110 

24% 16% Preml S 

35% 23 Prlmrfc 

20V llU PrlmeC 

29* )4 PrlmM 

59’.b 45% ProcJG 

13* 7% PrdRsh 

47V 31 Proler 

19* 16U PSvCol ..._ ... 

IW lav PSCol pf 210 11.1 

9% 61b PSInd 100 110 

19V PSInpf 
6 PSinpt 

6% PSInpf 
49% PSInpl 
44% PSInpf 
31# PSvNH 

6 P5NH d( 

6* PNHptB 
8V, PNHpfC 

7 pnh pro 

7 PNH PtE 

5% PNH pIF 
7* PNH pIG 

26 V 1#*^ PSvNM 20B I IT 
77% 301* PSvEG 272 100 
13V 10V PSEGpt 1.40 117 
34V 20 PSEGpi +M 110 

35 Jr# PSEGpf +10 120 

36 59% PSEGpf 470 114 
42% 33% PSEGpt 505 122 
18V IS P5EG Pi 217 120 
20% 16% P5EG Pf 243 127 

103% «6 PSEG Pf 1275 120 
66% S3 PSEGpf 7.70 I2J 

64 55 PSEGpf +DB 1 14 
67V 511# PSEGpt 702 121 

65 51 PSEGpt 700 11.9 

79 65* PSEGPf 902 123 

4% 2% Public* 

13* 7% PuobJfl .14 10 
10* 6% PRCem 
15 9U PugetP 1.7* 12a 
22* 10% Pur I# Hr" .12 
S4V Bf Puratoi ITS 
9% 51# Pyro 


16 
6 
14 
0 23 
+6 13 
22 73 
37 9 


* 53% 

17% 17V 17V— * 
83* 81% 83* +1* 
21* 21V 21* + * 
S3 S3 S3 
47V 46* 47V 
25V 34* » + % 

35« 34% 35% 

31* 30% 30*- V 
18% 18 V 18% + * 
42 40 42 +1% 

32 31% 32 + V 

25V, 25 25*+ % 

40* 39% 40* 

80 80 80 —a 

II* 11% II* + V 
13% 13 V 13% — Vi 
14* 14% 14% 

12 II* 11*— U 
J0% 20 20%—* 

17* 17% 17*— V 
287 26% 26* 06* 

153 14% 14% 14% + % 
Kht 19* 18% 19% + % 
17 10% 18V 18% 

323 17* 17% 17% — % 
21% 21% 21% 

33V. 32* 32% 

33 BV 32V + % 
34% 34% 34%— % 
2»% 25% » 

39* 40 — 1% 
35% 35% + * 


580 
77 
764 
30 
451 
59 
' 42 
16 
120 
73 


6 
58 
62 
31 
320 
50Qz 40 
3450, It 


119 


161 


126 

30 

7a 

7 

416 


32 

SA 15 1422 
8 ISS 


24 23* 24 — % 

34* 34 34*+ * 

20% 19% 20 
29% 28% 28* 

57% 54* 57% +2% 
I2U 12* 12*— % 
41* 41% 41* + * 
19 18* 19 + V 

19% 18* 18*— % 
8% BV 8% 

200* 24% 24% 24% — % 
BBOi 7% 7% 7% 

3»z 8 7* 7*— it 

JOOz 59V, 59% 59% — 1 
100* 55 55 55 +1 

633 4* 4* 4*— V 

670* 11* 10* 10% 

14 l|% 11% 1t%— * 
6 14% 16% 16% — % 
14% 14% 14% — * 
IS 14% 14% — V 
12 % 12 % 12 % 

13% 13% U* + U 
24V 2t 34% 

26% 25* a 
12% 12% 171# 

700* 34 33% 34 

SOOz 34% 34% 34% + V 
410* 35% 34% 34% — V 
20* 41V 41V 41% 

69 18% 18% 18% + lb 
I 20 M 20 
100*102 103 102 + % 

3000* 63 62% 62U +1% 

100* 65 65 63 +1 

5000: 62% 62* 62*+ * 
100: 62 62 62 — * 
320* 79 78 78 — % 

35 2% 2% 2%— % 

49 11* |i* 11* + % 

I 7% 7% 7* 

496 14* 14V MV 
944 JIU Mh 20*— V 
2SH 25 2S%— V 

8* 8% 8* + % 


2 

55 

5 

61 

61* 

2297 

10 


38* 27* OuahO i 
19* 15 QuohSO 
12* 6* Quonex 

32* 23 Ounur 

22% U Ok Rail 


II 1102 
00 42 14 429 
53 IB 
100 50 9 910 

TOC .9 19 679 


35* 34* 35% + % 
19* >9% 19V 
10% 9% 10% + * 

29* 25* 39U -r % 
22 * 22 22 * + * 


19% 6* RBInd 
40 28* RCA 

31* 24* RCA pf 


.16 

104 

212 


10 M 

27 12 2619 
7.1 160 


9 8* 9 — % 

38* 37* 38*— V 
30* 29* 30% — V 


I NYSE RighfrLows 


Jan. 29 




NEW HICKS Iff 


AklPw 15 Mp 
Alaska Alii 
AmSLFIa 
AmericPrm 
Arvlnlnd s 
Boor laps 
BoUBernk 
Brackvtov 
CSXCn 

Carter Wall 

CinG 4 7501 

GonnNG 

CornoGfW 

Cydop&Cp 

DHE4or 

DukepfP 

EastnAlr Pt 

Edwanto 

FstBasian 
GAFCant 
GTE 2 475pf 
GnMsirEn 

Genstorp 

GrowGp 
Hareplbrtnc 
iriPw4 2epl 
MdM776Bf 
IBM 

IpwaRogrc# 
K4UO0OGO 
LeeEnt 
Mocmll Km 
Medan Id# 
mootcCp 
NO tModEn 
NYNEX 
PalneWcvpf 
PoopieEn 
PhiloEl Tpf 
PSEG 7 52pf 
RltoAld 
SFeSeuPoc 
SwrtBeil 
Talley bib 
T aled 3 75at 
Trnwtd 2 d I 
UnIDvnatn 
VF Coro 
Visitor Inlrt 
Wleboidl Sir 


AlaPwdenpf 

ALLTEL Cp 

AmSIera# 

AmSouBcs 

AutoDato 

fiemlsCos 

BasESBSpf 

Brunswick 

CSXCPPf 

CanturyTei 

ClrdeK 

CaraFrghts 

CoragGi wi 

DeKjxCheck 

DetE 12BBpf 

(X+aPpfO 

Eaton Cp 

Etvctrrap# 

FstPannoDf 

Gat x cp 
GopS torn 
cm Recarp 
GrtLakaint 
GrowGp wl 
Hutton EF 
IIIPw7 56cf 

IndlM 0 68pl 

inttHory 5 7 

Jcwolcar 

KororProa 

Lbnlled 

MartMar 

MortiLvn 

MuttOmoh 

Kawhail 

OtiEd 7T4W 

PprkHan 

PerkElmer 

PhilipMorr 

Quick Rail 

Ronr ind 

5caCntLtd 

St erehi Bra 

Tamorand 

Trocor 

TrKCanip* 

WnEI29Bpf 

VaEP772pf 

Vulcan Mail 

Wlnnebogo 


AJoPwTpf 

AmEx 
AmStar, 
ArmWIn 
Averylnl 
BevertvEitt 
BrtrtMver# 
BurlNth 
CalFadpt 
Chain 120M 
CwEB3frtf 
GantGora 
Cray Rich 
OelE 73tpt 
Digital Eq 
DukeP pf K 
Ecnilnlnc 
EthvlCa ofA 
FieetwEn 

GAT X Co of 
GofiCbims 
GenRefroc 
GmMiPwr 
HortandJti 
IC ind* 
JllPwiof 
InalKuCerp 
IntNrtn B <8 
Kmart 
Lear Sieg let 
UnePkXFd 
MuituMw pf 
MoPS 361 W 
NCH Corn 
NoSPwT W 
OwcroC/fd 
PgPL342pr 
Perry Dr oo 
PariG4 32pf 
ROrtMea 
RoillnCom n 
5m 1th Beck 
TNPEiM 
Tconc llpr 

Trancwtd 
TvlarCn 
UnllTech * 
VaEP 9 7Saf 
WallJ I 60pf 
ZtrvO> 


AlgP9 44pf 
Amertiech 
AmTT pt A 
Aru Caret 

BankotVa* 

Block HR 

BrfstMy pf 

Burrahs 

ConPEntg 

OwHea Ind 

CwE 7 24af 

ContCopfB 

Carr Incem 

DelEJrtrtM 

DukeP pfH 

EGG Inc 

EckerdJk 

FodMoem 

Fuaua i 25af 

GTE2pf 

Gen Elec 

GanSlgnal 

Grevhndpf 

Hanco 

icindspl 

ITWl 


Inti 


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KCPLSMnf 

LuarSfeg of 

MGMGHII of 

MoksCp 

Malwseo 

NWA Inc 

NwTPIpSMp 

Poln e We fa r 

PoPL BOOpr 

PMbroSal 

PSEGBOBPf 

Reich Chem 

Saftv Kin s 

SaurceCoppf 

Tonev Ind 

ThrlflyCP 

Trans wtdwtA 

UCCEL 

UnTch2S5pf 

VoE P 7 2DPf 

WMHakr 


HEW LOWS 


CanalRoK 

RobrtviH 


Comdrelnt FedtHmcLnnt P l eas e r 


VALUED 

PROPERTY 


a. >'2 


i 



Europe 

Into 1 


: 5 . % Hr K?n 


EXTREM&Y DESIRABLE; 
EXCELLENT ALL YEAR ROUND; 
GRACIOUS LIVING. 


12 Month 
High Low 


Stack 


Sis. Clow 

□hr. Yld. PE lOOsHlah Low Quot. Chw 


3^m 29% RCA pi 
10* 6* RLC 
4* 3 RPC n 
17V 12V RTE 06 
36% 25 RotsPur 100 
9* 5% Ramad 
21 16% Ranca 04 

10* 4U RongrO 
75 47% Ray cm 04 

17% 8% Rom* 

46 Mb Raythn 100 


005 100 
70 22 II 


13% 7* ReadBf 00 +3 43 
27% 16* RdBotpf 212 100 
15% 9% RltRst ITSe BL9 11 

15* 9 RecnEq 15 

14% 8 Redrrtn 70 20 24 

10% 7% Reece 13 

2% * Regal 

34% 23 ReJrtiC 00 27 10 
6% 3V ReoAIr 6 

2 1% RtrtAwt 

42V 25* RepCo 00 10 11 
21% 9 RepGVD 06 29 9 

41% 31% RapNY 104 40 8 

26 SV P.NYpfC 212 121 

32* 21% RepBk 104 50 6 

79 20V RepBk Pf 212 77 

104* 86* RepBk OCBTI* 5T 

18% M RshCat 72 10 24 

33% 22% Rrvco 

13* 9* y I Rover 

40* 28* Revlon 

24 V 17* Rexhm 

20 it* Rexnrd 
74* 52* Reyn in 
107*100% Reyin pf 


,st 

■J j™ m m 
30 8 64 16* I6U 16% 

20 13 2429 35V 34* 35% + % 
38 5012 7% 7 7% + to 

4T 9 8 1W6 a U - S 

S26 4* 4% <%— % 

J 19 189 64* 63% 64 — * 
2 13* 13* 13*+ * 
30 17 2152 46* 45V 46% +1 


137 


XI 11 1744 
tt 

104 57 11 3402 
30 30 8 2 

04 XI 11 158 

300 40 IB 2662 


242 9% 9U 9*+% 

40 20* sv ant + 5 
35 15% 15% 15% 

02 14* 14% 14%— u 
199 12 II* 12 
8 8 * 8 * 8 * 

39 * * *+fc 

31 35 34* 35 4-16 

6% 5* 6% + % 
T* 1* I* 

42* 42 42 — % 

167 1» 19* 19% — V 
16 41% 41* 4?*— % 
1 2SU 25* 25* 

64 SOU 29* 30*+ Vi 
37 26* SV 26V 
75 90 90 90 + % 

17* 17* 17* + % 
26* 25* 26 
II 10* 10*- Vt 
35% 34* 35*+ % 
19* m# 19* 

14V 14% 141b— % 
74 V 73* 74V + * 


15 105*105*105*— * 


40% 

26 RevMft 

108 

26 

6 

702 



as 

5BV RnvMpt +50 

50 


2 

r iv ' - 


ITT 

108 

50 

9 

246 

K I T 


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Irrl rnk! 

100 

XI 


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Lifi f .v'fM 

. ■ •* 

38* 

7* 

17% RtteAld 
5% RvrOkn 

00 

17 

18 

18 

im 

247 

29V 28* 29V + * 
7* 7Vk 7% + * 

- . ■ 

15* 

25 Robsnw 

1.13 

37 



3SV 34 V# 35V + * 


48% 

36V Robtsn 

100 

43 

15 2313 

37% 35V 37 + Vb 


24* 

12 Rubira 

76 

30 

16 

1140 

23 21V 21*— 1* 


19A 

12V RochG 

220 110 

5 

161 

19% 19% 19*+ V 

— ‘ - , * • 

35 

27% RochTI 

204 

7.2 

9 

60 

34 V 33* 34% + * 

- . 

35* 

23 Rocfcwi 

100 

20 

10 2081 

35* 34% 35%+ fa 


66A 

51 

48% RohmH 
27V Ronrln 

200 

30 

10 

TO 

943 

07 

46% 66 46% + * 
51* SO SI* + « 

«:• 5r-x- 

20% 

to* RcICmn 

JDe T0 M 

.968 

20* 20% 20*+ * 


18V 

6 RollnE s 

0Se 

J 

» 

1167 

18 17* 17* + fa 

“ ‘ 



06 

+2 

17 

<77 

99 

II* 10* 11 — * 

3% 2* 2*— lb 

":i 1 • 

Erl 

1 1 — m 

04 

30 

8 

47 

17* 17* 17* + * 

1— ■ ' 

34% 


1.12 

XT 

14 

779 

28* 2BV 28* + Vi — -- 

|f|'| 


08 

0122 

1195 

9* 9* 9* 

• 1 

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M Li ‘ 

207# 50 

4 

093 

51% 50* 51* + U 

• 

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04 

17 

19 

16 

l» 

204 

49* 48% 49%— V 
»* 22* 21% 

. _ . . . 

70 

IF* RUSTDO 

76 

+3 

9 

93 

17% 16* 17% + * 


33% 

17* R/onH 

100 

16 

15 

168 

27* 27V 27%+ fa 

Xlirr-' 


38% RyderS 

108b 20 

K> 

613 

55 S4V 55 

24% 

18* 

12% Rvtond 
8% Rymer# 

00 

20 

14 

5 

34 

70 

23% 22* 23%+ * 
12V 11* 13V + % 

. m ’ : : ‘ ' 


1 


100 

02 

1J5 

108 


24 
50 9 
10 13 
7 


its 


.16 

2.10 


47% 33* SCM 200 +4 12 
43* 23* SFN 120 2T 20 
17V 7* SL Ind s 20b 10 11 

M 19% SPSTec 00 30 14 

76 15 Soblra 04 2 72 

3 16 SoOnRy 2B3B16.1 

17% 11* SfgdB# 24 10 17 

10 SV SfodSc 72 

2* Studs wt 
31% 19% SafKIn# 

29* 21V Satgwv 
35% 24* Saga 
M 15* SUoLP 
W* 9 SPoul 
11 V 6% 5akmt 
34% 21 SailieM 
21* 17* SDfeG# 

ISS ffif Juan 2 

10* 8% SJuanR 
51 31 Sandrs 

24* IB* SAnllRt 
27* MV SFaSoP 
34V 24V SglWcf 
17* 13V SouIRE 
19* 14V SavElP 
M% 15* Sav€ A 
11% 9* SavE pf 
8% 3* Savin 
23* 17V SCANA 
40 33 Schrpla 

B 34% setrimb 
14* 7V SdAll 
29 19V Sena Ind 

59V 39* ScolFet 
36* 25V ScattP 
15% 11* Scattvs 
43V 20% Scovlll 
102 56 SCOvll Of 250 

371# 18% Sea Cnt n 02 1.1 
11* 9% Sena m 106 126 
15V 12% SeaC PfB 210 13T 
15V 12 SaaC pfC 210 119 


06 

1.94 

100 

100 

JO 


J 16 * 

9-1 7 539 

026 90 10 175 
20 29 

10 15 2541 
U 14 27 

30 II 6138 
+6 15 10 

IT 43 93 

XB 6 67 

49 6 

11T 13 

37 

97 8 163 
+5 11 1851 
XI 10 7743 
T S 1269 
28 12 604 
10 433 
37 HI 
35 11 
102 30 15 
28 


ITS 45* 44* 45* 

41 43* 43% 43% — lb 
45 11* 11% II* + % 
a 27 26* 24* — U 

154 16* 16* 16* 

19 17* 17% 17*—% 
09 17 16* 17 

86 4* 6* 8% 

00 1% IV T% + % 

03 31* 30* 31* + * 
IS 28% 28% 28%+ V 

S 30% 29* 30% +1 
23* 23 23*— % 

8* 8% B*-U 
9* 9V 9U 
36* as* 36* +1 


174 

1.‘ 


1$; 


30* 30% 
17 16* 


10% 18% ^ 

19* 19* + V 


216 

108 

170 

.12 

J6 


19* 

TO* 10* W* + % 
SU 5* 5» 

23* 23* 23% 

37* 36* 


M% 37* 

12 12 *+* 


1.12 

02 


656 

87 

19 


Wfc ._ 
27V 27 
58% SB 


37* 'j--- . 

38% + % 


27V— V 
58%+ % 


35* 34* 3SU + ta 


IT 


00 20 


00 

100 

02 

176 


TO 
MID 
75 

9 384 
17 24 

10 15 240 
X4 9 56 

.9 19 3581 
9 7494 


25% 14* SooLdn 
2* stoGon 
0* M Seogrm 
21% 12% Seagwl 
28* IB* Seal Air 
31 V 19* SeolPw 
65% 37% SoorteG 
37* 29% Sears 
102% 97 Sears pf 608# 60 
57% M SccPac 204 +3 
28* T9 SecPewl 
22U 12% SctaLf 
32* 20* SvcCp a 
20V 11* shoklee 
23% 10% showln 
61% 52% ShellO 
39V, 2B% ShellT 
29% 17V ShelGIO 
33V 22V Shrwin 
8* 4% 5hoetwn 
18* 12 Showbt 
16* 12* SlerPoe 

37 24% s tonal 

5»% 48* Slgnl pt 
72 50 Sfonl Of 

20% Singer 

24V SJnprpf 300 117 
12V Skyline 08 17 75 
9* Smith in 
59* SO StnkB 
J6V 36% Smudr 
37% 27 SnaaOn 

38 27 sanat 
17* 12* SanvCp 
29% E* SoaUn 
38% 27* Source 
21V 18 

22 


15V 14* - 
42 41* 41*— M 

2 180 100 100 
2S*x 37* 36V 36*— % 
14 11* II V 11* + * 
1JV 14* 15% + * 
15% 15 15* 

2S 24 75 +* 

4* 4% 4% 

40V 39* 40% + * 
16* 16% MW— % 
26% 25* 26 — * 
X 29* 29*— % 
60* 59% 60V- % 
36% 35% 36*+ * 





re no 


258 101 100* 107 


80 

122 

5651 


18 

20% 


11 

00 IT 17 
72 50 31 
00 20 7 
200 30 10 
212e 60 4 
00 29 7 
76 23 12 
9 

00 40 14 
100 10.1 7 

100 28 IS 3876 
+12 +9 6 

200 29 3 

.10 J 10 350 
1 

154 

J2 28 20 500 
700 40 10 2377 
.96 10 IS 32 
1.16 XI 13 
105 56 6 
.IM 10 13 
170 +7 12 
110 87 
SrcCppf 240 117 
SaJerln 204 X9 10 


100 


30 9 
J 10 
20 5 
0 15 


48* MV 5ovdwn 100 12 11 
28% 22 So* tB* IT0 40 B 
11* 5* SoetPS l6St7T0 25 

24* 17% SCalEs 204 90 
19 14* Soumco 173 10J 

36 25% SofnGE 208 70 

37% 27* SNETI 272 70 9 
36 31% SONEpt 302 11.1 

49% 41* Some Pt +62 105 
24* 31% SoRvpf 200 1 0.9 
31 21V SoUnCo 173 60 18 

36% 23 Sour Ind -- - 
18% 11V SoRov 
10* 6U Soutnrk 
26lb 14* SwAIrl 
22% 13 SwtFor 
15 10* SwtGos 

21? S5 SwBell 
27* 19* SwEnr 
23 17 SwtPS 

l»V 11% Sporran 
27* 18 SpoctP 
47* 33* Sperry 
37* 30% Springs 
43% 31% SouorD 
S5U 37% Saulbb 
26 17* Staley 

2 16% StBPfrt 

21 13 SIMotr 

♦mb 48% 3 tO Ind 

50% 39% StdOOh 

n 74% SOOhPf 375 
24* 9* StPocCp 00 

17 II Stnndey 
30* 19% Sronwk 
30* 23* Storrett 
10% B* StOMSe 
24% 15* stouten 

4* 2* Steeoe 

18 14V sterctrt 


56* 55* 56%— V 
28* 28* 28* 

14% M* 14* 

32% 32% 32* 

14% MV Mft + * 
23% 22* 22*— * 
55% 54* SSV + H 
32 31* 32 +W 

1464 » 27* 27* 

367 J3 32* 33 + * 

171 6* 6% 6% + W 

145 IS 14* 15 
121 15* 15* 15* + % 
35* 34% 35* + * 
59% 59 59%+ % 

70 70 JD — % 

35* 35% 35% 

»% 30* 30* „ 

17% 17% 17%- % 
11% 11* 11*- * 
40% 5916 60* + * 
54* 54V 54% 

37 36% 36* + % 

33* 32* 33V — Vb 
15* 15% 15* 

B* 25* 25% ♦ % 
38* 37* 38 -J* 
21% 21V 21*+ W 
275b 27% 27% - % 
46% 46 46 

27* 27% 27% + * 
75b 7* 7*- * 

a 22% 22* + * 


'Vr. 

#1!3 




8 

1867 


617371k IS* 17* IB* + % 


170 

500 

02 

100 

S3 


XI 13 
70 0 
20 15 

sr a 

30 21 

a ... 

1.92 +1 10 3383 
102 +3 8 244 


106 

1-60 


43 12 776 
10 IS 1961 
35 18 475 
04 27 11 135 

J2 XI 9 497 
3JO SS 7 *112 
208 60 7 
50 

17 9 
02 12 II 
M U 12 
100 13 II 
1700110 
104 70 

.12 17 
76 +1 10 


194 34* 34% 34* 

490 36* 36* 36* + % 
7 34* 34* 34* 

100: 44 44 44 

2 24 23* ZJ* __ 

107 w a *v + * 
M7 29V 29V 29*— % 
404 12 ITU II* „ 

485 B 7* TV— % 
674 34U 24 34* + ’- 

293 IS 14* 14* 

114 14U 14* W* + la 
048 71* 70% 71*+1 w 
31 22V 22 22 — % 

SS4 21% 21V 21*— W 
18 15% 15V 15*— % 
IM 21* 21* 2Mh 
— 47* 46* 47%+ V 
35* 34* 35V— * 


43% 42* 0%+ S 
54* 53% 54 - Z 

Z3V 22* 22* + ** 

19* 19% 19* 

15* 15 I5%— * 

. _ 56 55V » - » 

2905 42* 42 42*- 

50Z 74* 76* 74* 

317 23* 3U 23*+« 
2S4 16* 16% 16V + % 
4S7 30% 29* M + u 
I 29* 29* 29* 

" 10% HV 10% + V 
19* 19% IJ*—. 1 ? 
IV 3% 3V. + }* 
18* 1BV 10% + W 


1902 


10 


(Continued on Page 10) 


Sales figures ore unofficial. Yearty Mohs dfld ta*S f ?2S 
hw previous 52 weeks plus the eurrenl weak, but not the®“2 
trading dev. Whore a sail! or slock diutdona amoiiMM ■ 
percent or more ho# boon uota- the year - # hjgh-tow WWS 
dividend ora shown lor the new stack only. Uhi aq jffl S 
noted, rates ot dluxlends are annual dlibrnsement# base" 
ma ratm Declaration, 
a — dividend aria extra's) 
b — annual rata at dividend plus stuck dividend, 
c — I tau (dating dividend, 
dd— called, 
d— new yearly tow. 

e —dividend dedored or Paid in preceding 12 months 
a - dividend .n Canadian funds, subieet to 15* non./eswe™' 
lax. 





I —dividend declared after idUlmd or sloek fllutdood. ^,, 
I — dividend paw mis year, omitted, deterred- w * 00 


taken at latest tftvWond m eet i n g . 

* — dividend declared or polo this veor. an accm* 0 ** 
lisue with dividends m arrears. , w_int 

n - new issue in fho post 52 w«k+ The hloMow re«» ^ 
wtm me start ot trading, 
nd — next ffljy delivery. 

P/E — price-earning# ratio. 


nc — iinvimvninn r^im. .hw 

r — dividend declared or paid In preceding 13 nwnw 
stack dlviaend, 

s— stack spin. Dividend baains with data el saUf . 

t — dividend poM In stack in preceding t? months. esHt ,lgtg3 

cosh value on ex-dividend or w -dwrioutton daw. 
u — new yearly high. 

v — lradma nailed. ___uwjun- 

vi— In Bankruptcy or i ecem e rmip or being remoanijx®,. 
derfhe Bankruptcy Act, or »#Cur.!M# oSSuittM B» «*•’ CD1 
ponies 

Wd — When distributed, 
wi — when tuned. 

*w — with warrants. 

« — tx-dividend or ex-rlgBK 
xdls — exrtistriteif ion. 

■w— wwnoui warrants, 
v — « -dividend aid sow In URL 
yld — new. 
e — sains in fult. 



-CP 















Statistics Index 


AMEX ones MS 
AMEX Wahs/tomP.lI 
NYSE pried •*. f 
NYSE moM/tam P. B 
Ccwklian stocks P.14 
CwrencY row* P. 9 
CommadiliK P.10 
DivMentf* P.ro 


Eontirm report] p,|j 
Fllrw rote note* P.13 

Gold morteii p. 9 
interest rates p. 9 

Merkel summary p. 1 
Options P .10 

OTC stock P.10 
Ofner mortal! PH 


Hcralb^Sl^nbunc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1983 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

More European Executives 
Move Into Top Posts in U.S. 


U.S. Stocks 
Set Record, Page 7 

Page~9 






i-1 £l 

J-. L. 

* 

'c 


A still small, but 
growing, number of 
Europeans occupy top 
U.S. corporate posts. 


• :r 


I • ‘ m * -* 1 ^ 

- <y.- 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

Imcmaiiomil Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK. — Increasing numbers of European exec- 
utives working for American companies overseas are 
finding that their corporate horizons are no longer 
limited to the subsidiary itself. In the past 10 years, 
U.S. companies overseas have increasingly replaced American 
managers with Europeans. These Europeans, m turn, are now 
moving into top slots at the parent corporations. 

Still, the numbers are small. If there are barriers to the No. 1 
and No. 2 corporate slots, they seem to be the same for alt 
executives regardless of their passport. Senior executives point 
out that there isn't much room at the top in the first place. 

“We must be rather a small club of Europeans at the president 
level of U.S. corporations,*' says J.P. van Rooy. the Belgian 

- president of Carrier Interna- ~ 

tiooai. a subsidiary of United * ... ,, , 

Technologies Corp. “I A Still small, DUt 

'SS&SM.™ growing, number of 

^The'small^Iiib^ ^Europe- E^OpeanS OCCupy top 

ans occupying the top two U.S. corporate posts. 

spots at major American com- r 

panics includes Harry Taylor. 

. president of Manufacturers Hanover Trust, who is British; Den- 
nis Weaiherstone, executive vice chairman of Morgan Guaranty, 
also British'. Anthony J.F. O'Reilly, chief executive officer of HJ. 
Heinz Co., from Ireland; Michel C. Bergerac, chair man and chief 
executive of Revlon Inc., from France, and Pierre Gou&seland, 
chairman of AMAX Inc., the big meiais concern, also from 
France. 

In comparison, there are hardly any Ameri cans heading large 
European companies. Foreign accents, for one, do not seem to be 
a problem in U.S. boardrooms. “2 could never manage to lose 
mine,” says Mr. Bergerac of Revlon. 

Most of the executives that have made it in the United States 
started out one of three ways. A few. of course, have arrived from 
the European subsidiaries of U.S. companies. Some came to the 
United States during World War n and planned U.S. careers 
from the outset. Others arrived on scholarships, and stayed on to 
join U.S. corporations. 

Mr. Bergerac, for example, who came to the United States on a 
Fulbright Scholarship, spent a year working on farms and ranch- 
es. “It wasn't a conscious decision, 1 ' he says of his derision to join 
Cannon Elect rical, a California-based company that was later 
bought up by ITT Corp. “Getting the opportunities is what is 
important here. Unlike in Europe, youth is considered a virtue." 

C LEARLY, there is no major trend under way; European 
executives are not swarming into the country to fSi top 
U.S. corporate positions. For one thin g, UJ£ companies 
. who do not wish to promote from within typically look for talent 
among competing U.S. companies in their industry. “A client 
wouldn’t want us to look outside the United States until we 
exhausted our search in the U.SL," said Mike Hyde, a partner with 
the executive search firm of Egon Zehnder in New York. “Seldom 
will a U.S. company, for a top position, say I want you to look 
around the world." 

. For most Fortune 500 companies, the U.S. market is still the 
primary source of management talent. “If you get a very large 
corporation with 27 local managers, it doesn’t mean there is a 27- 
to- 1 chance that the CEO be a foreigner,” said Alexander Brody, 
the Hungarian-born president and chief executive of Dentsu 
Young and Rubicam Inc., a major advertising company. “But it’s 
not impossible to make it. Of course manufacturing companies 
wiil'lbok for tbezr people where business is large.” 

Although there are no available statistics for the number of 
European executives employed by U.S. corporations. Brooks 
Chamberlin, vice president erf Korn Ferry International, the 
executive search firm, suspects there are more Europeans in U.S. 
service businesses — banking, insurance and management con- 
sulting — than in manufacturing. “In the service industries the 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 3) 


Currency Rates 


Lota interbank rates on Jcxl 79 , excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rate* at 


/-• 

' -Zb 

4PJA 

S 

C 

DJ4. 

P.F. 

ll-L. 

OUT. 

ILF. 


• " 

Amsterdam 

U785 

35*7 

urns * 

365** 

0.1014 

— 

54SB* 


• / -■*- * 

BnnMk(B) 


7073 

3000 

6-5425 

^ im » 

17489 

— 



Frankfurt 

1164 

1535 

■ 

3171 ■ 

1422 X 

80435* 

5501 • 


. ; L'' 

■ 1 mwicll (b) 

1.1152 

_ 

3-5406 

10.7*6 

2-17545 

35995 

7049 



MI fen 

1J51 SO 

ziauo 

617JJ2 

201 as 

— — 

54544 

30838 


"V - ? • 

Hew York id 


1.1155 

1173 

MSS 

1,95500 

3J895 

6150 


- ■ *■ 

Pori* 

*473 

10817 

30573 

— 

4.9S6C 

2504 

1559* 


"" - 

rokva 

BC02S 

28304 

B0J J 

2026 

1357 * 

71XM 

40MB * 

-• * 

" : 

Zorich 

14578 

25703 

04.06 • 

27-40- 

01362 

7429* 

4J11S* 


* : ' 

I ECU 

O701B 

0427B 

2.2205 

07804 

1,36950 

2-5107 

444794 


- 

1 SDH 

0575115 

087355 

3JD8526 

*-43229 

NJQ. 

14395 

615102 


l Per 

erne. '* T ™ C ' 

Um AadraBao S 1JJM 
IMS AasIrkK schilling 2250 
"0J0157 BfltotanHit. franc 6158 
Q75W CmnfionS 1J26S 

BUM DcsiUS) krooe 113S7S 
IW Rsaisfe nnt 6429 

icon Greek Oraduoo l»J0 
01283 Hone Ken S TJ97 


Dollar Values 
; 

05041 Mill I 
00815 (trail shekel 
13669 KvMtHAoBr 

04023 Motor . rfossH 
05091 uorw.knMc 
00552 MLpoM 
00050 ParLMewM 
12793 SmtffrfrBl 


S.F. Yen 
13455 *140.90 V 
218065 »«J1* 
11988- 1-245- 
2.M 28X29 
73450 7883 
2863 25422 
384 3809- 

PSJ9 

10445* 

18648 17889 
15919 247.769 


1 __ Per 

EueW. CarrrtKy USA 
04535 Singapore! 22B 
0473 S.AfaiCBarand 2.1MI 

08017 S. Korean won B3BJB 

08057 Sum. potato 17538 
0.1104 SwwLkrm 9844 
08254 Taiwan S 39.10 
08946 TMbatt 27 335 
02723 UJLE.mrhaai 18725 


(Sterftaa:l.lKO IrWiC 

lolConimorttalffWietBj Amounts needodloMiyono pound tc| Amounts iwodrt to Ouv one Mller(*l 
Units of 100 (xl Units of UBD iv) Units d HUW 

. NA: ngl quoted.- 6 LA-: not avoHamo. . - 

Source s:- Sanotw do Benelux (Brussels); Banco Commerdafe /Mtima (Milan); B anave 
Nofkmsrie do Peris (Parish' IMF (SDR); Banauo Aratm et Internationale dlnvestissemenl 
(dinar, rival, dirham}. OBwr data from Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Jan. 29 


fjtfuHf French 

Donor D4kark FtW Starling Franc ECU SDB 

. _ . . rt. _ m. .a. iiu . iiu in u.. lou 9 - ion a • 8 Vi 


1 M. 

Ih 

-81k 

5V. 

- 59b 

5* 

- 54k 

144* - 

144* 

2 M. 

a% 

- SW 

5 9k 

■ 5*. 

SVi 

- 54* 

14 1k- 

Mlk 

M. 

OK 

- lib- 

5* 

- 6 

Sri 

- » 

I4va - 

14 th 

UK 

Oik . 

- 09k 

6 tk 

■ 6 Ik 

ste 

- Sri 

I3»* ■ 

134* 

1 Y. 

91k - . 

■ 91k 

6 4k 

■ 6 tk 

9<k 

■ S Ik 

13 Ik- 

13 Ik 


'Rotes apetlcooto to interbank deposits otSl million minimum (oreeulvatenf). 

Sourcos: Morpon Guaranty (dollar. DM, SF. Pound. FF); Lloyds Bonk < ECU u Citibank 

(sort). 


Asian Dollar Rates 


lim. 

8*i -lh 
Source: Reuters. 


J mol. 

an -a*. 


" . ' ;Key Money Rates 
- United States ci 


□Kceurrt Rot*. 

Pettorti Funds 
Prlmo Role 
Broiler Loan Rote 
Comm. Paoor, 30-179 davs 
Unontti Tracaurv Nits 
fr-rfianth Treasury Bill* 
CD's 30-59 donrs 
CD-* 40-09 days 


Lombard Rale 
Ovomiflhl Rate 
One Month Interbank 
3-manm interbank 
6- month interbank 


Intervention Rate 
Call Money 
One-montn Interbank 
X mourn interbank 
6-fnonib interbank 


8 8 

P* 8» 

low tow 

9-iDu> 9-iDtt 
110 780 

780 788 

. 7.98 7.95 

789 783 

779 7.73 


SJ0 5J0 
SJO 585 
585 585 

5.90 8.90 

480 400 


TOYS lOW 
1M 10W 
10 7/16 low 
I0W ID 6/16 
10 3/16 >0W 


Britain 

Bank Base Rate 
Call Money 

9140V Treasury Bill 
3- month interbank 


Discount Rote 
Can Money 

AKdav Interbank 


1 rear 
9H.-9N 


14 14 

14 14 

13 7/1# 13 7/10 
13W 14 


5 5 

61fa 0 SH6 
& $716 6 5/16: 


Gold Prices 


Sources: Reuters. Commerzbank. Credit Lv 
onnaa. Lloyds Bank. Bank t* Tokyo. 


AJA. PJA. Cb*9B 

--2- S3 50 -* IS 

a 1 " 1 " ^ ss is 

2J£, 30380 30325 + 5J0 

- 30180 - 1.10 

Oineibi fluings tor London, PW« 

Dourb. oMmno and closing 

ana ZorWv «e* Co"** "" enl cw ^ 3 ' 

AH prices (n US* oer ounce. 

Source: Peuiem 


U.S. Steel 

Rebounds 
In 1984 

$ 493 -MUUon Net 
After loss in ’84 

The Associated Press 

PITTSBURGH — U.S. Steel 
Corp., the leading American steel 
producer, reported Tuesday 1984 
profit of $493 million, compared 
with a loss of $1.16 billion in 1983. 

Earnings per common share 
were $3.52 Tot 1984. Sales reached 
$19.1 billion for the year after $17 5 
billion in 1983. 

The company’s fourth-quarter 
profit was $29 million, or a loss of 1 
can per common share after ac- 
counting for dividends on pre- 
ferred Slock. Sales for the quarter 
were $4.7 billion. 

In the last three months of 1983. 
U.S. Steel had a loss of $983 million 
on sales of $4.7 billion. 

In steel and related resources, 
the company had a 5752-million 
turnaround during 1484. posting 
annual operating profit of $142 
million after a loss or $610 million 
the previous year. 

A major ILS. Steel subsidiary. 
Marathon Oil Corp.. posted oper- 
ating income before foreign income 
taxes of $127 billion on sales of 
$10.2 billion last year, compared 
with nearly SI . 14 billion on sales of 
$»J billion in 1983. 

“We expect another profitable 
year in 1985, with continued em- 
phasis on debt reduction and oper- 
ating efficiency,^ " David M. Roder- 
ick. the U.S. Steel chairman, said in 
a statement. 

Mr. Roderick called the annual 
earnings “especially satisfying" in 
light of ga gg in g demand for steel 
and lower oil prices. 

“These results indicate the suc- 
cess of actions taken during the 
past three years to diversify, re- 
structure and streamline our opera- 
tions." he said. 

■ Prefuninary Steel Ruling 
The US. International Trade 
Commission has made a prelimi- 
nary ruling that allegedly unfair 
imports of steel from countries in 
the Eastern bloc and elsewhere 
were harming American producers. 
Reuters reported from Washing- 
ton. 

In initial votes, the commission 
ruled Monday against steel prod- 
ucts from Austria. Sweden. Nor- 
way and Venezuela as well as from 
the Communist nations of Cze- 
choslavakia. East Germany. Hun- 
gary. Romania and Poland. 

In complaints filed with the com- 
mission. U.S. Steel. Bethlehem 
Steel Corp. and Chapparral Steel 
Co. charged that the sted was ei- 
ther illegally subsidized or sold at 
prices below fair-market value. 

The Commerce Department 
musl investigate further to deter- 
mine if there were violations, 


mQr r 
.• • 

■- . 

*■> * 



Productivity 
Of U.S. Business 
Rose in 1984 


Tin Naw Yo* Timu 


Lou Guoji, general manager of the privately owned Minsheng Shipping Co. in China 

In China, an Improbable Comeback 


By John F. Bums 

New York Tmes Senior 

CHONGQING, China — Each morning at day- 
break. a group of old capitalists gather in a drafty 
warehouse in this port city to plot a little competi- 
tion for the state-owned shipping company that 
more or less expropriated the Yangtze River 30 
years ago. 

Long before the mists lift from the old Chao 
tianmen port, where freight still moves on shoul- 
der-poles and barges rest on mudflats at low tide, 
work is in hand on an improbable comeback. 
Minsheng Shipping Co., (ion of the Yangtze before 
the Communists came to power in 1 949. has risen 
from oblivion to challenge for cargos once again. 

From nothing a few months ago, Minsheng has 
already started to stir the muddy waters around 
Yangtze River Shipping Co., the slate-owned giant 
that dominates the 1,800-mile (2.880-kilometer) 
river. The privateer's barges and tugs are winning 
contracts with lower tariffs, well-drilled crews and 
on-time deliveries. Local shipyards are working 
around the clock to expand its fledgling fleet, and 
the first profits are starting to show. 

For Lou Guqjj, the company's 61-year-old gen- 
eral manager, it is the realization of a dream. The 
company, started in 1926 by his father. Lou Zuofu. 


grew over lime until it employed 8,000 workers. It 
helped keep Nationalist China alive by running the 
gauntlet of Japanese bombing during World War 
II. The older Lou was called a patriot by Mao 
Zedong, but in 1954 his 148 vessels were seized 
without compensation and Minsheng disbanded. 

But now. under China's new leadership, compe- 
tition and profit are back in, and survivors of the 
property-owning class are being asked to brush up 
old skills. Banks that have been sitting on expro- 
priated millions are eager to lend some back to new 
businesses with the old entrepreneurs. 

“Just like my father, I intend to see that this 
company is the best and most efficient in China," 
Mr. Lou told a visitor as they walked out to a barge 
silting below the towering gorges where the Yang- 
tze and Jialing rivers meet. 

“We w£U give the state-owned companies the 
competition they need to shake them from their 
"iron-rice- bowl’ mentality, where everybody has a 
secure job no matter how little he does." 

As China's leadership prods the entire country 
into an experimentation with capitalist economics, 
Minsheng is the largest and most famous old 
company to make a comeback, it is a modest 
business' so far with two tugs and seven barges, 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


Key Index in Japan Rises Sharply 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Japan's index of 
leading economic indicators rose 
sharply in November to its highest 
level in eight months, the Economic 
Hanning Agency said Tuesday. 

The agency said the increase was 
a sign that the Japanese economy 
probably would strengthen in the 
next few months. 

In a separate repot, the govern- 
ment said production at Japan's 
factories and mines fell .0.4 percent 
in December from the previous 
month. 

But despite the decline, Japan’s 
industrial production climbed 1 1 2 
percent during 1984. the largest an- 
nual increase in 1 1 years. 

Production had risen 3.6 percent 
in 1983. the government said. 

In its report oa leading indica- 
tors, the Economic Planning Agen- 
cy said the index rose to 75 in 
November, the latest month for 
which figures are available, from 


45.8 in October and 66.7 in Sep- 
tember. 

The agency sard the November 
reading was the highest since 
March. 

The index has 12 economic sta- 
tistics, including overtime worked, 
machinery orders, production effi- 
ciency and the Tokyo Stock Ex- 
change index. 

The agency considers any read- 
ing above 50 to mean that Japan’s 
economy is still expanding. - 

It had previously described Oc- 
tober’s below-50 reading as a tem- 
porary dip. 

The decline in industrial produc- 
tion in December followed a re- 
vised 0.3-perpem gain in Novem- 
ber, the Ministry of International 
Trade and Industry said. 

A ministry official said the 
monlh-to- month decline reflected 
a slowdown in exports of electric 
machinery and other products. 


The double-digit industrial pro- 
duction gain for all of 1984 was 
largely the result of increased pro- 
duction of electric machinery, the 
official said 

■ More Orders Received 
Japan’s Construction Ministry 
said Tuesday that orders received 
by major Japanese construction 
firms rose to an unadjusted 9,617 
billion yen ($37.86 billion) in 1984 
from 9,475" billion yen in 1983. 
Reuters reported from Tokyo. 

The ministry said that the 43 
major companies received 5.2 per- 
cent more orders in December than 
November, at a seasonally adjusted 
794. 16 billion yen from an upwards 
revised 754.83 billion yen. 

The November figure was origi- 
nally reported at 750.72 billion yen 
Unadjusted December order 
were down 22 percent from a yea 
earlier, after a revised 8.8-percen 
year-to-year November drop. 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — The pro- 
ductivity of America's non agricul- 
tural business rose 3.1 percent fast 
year, reflecting a booming econo- 
my in the first half of 1984 and an 
encouraging year-end recovery, the 
Labor Department said Tuesday. 

The rise was less than the 33- 
percent increased recorded in 1983. 
Nonetheless, it reflected an eco- 
nomic resurgence since the reces- 
sion of the first two years of the 
Reagan administration, the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics said 

The bureau’s productivity index 
rose 13 parent in 1981 and 0.2 
percent in 1982. 

Productivity is a measure of the 
volume of goods and services the 
economy puts out in an hour of 
paid working time. 

In the nonfarm business sector in 
1984, output grew 83 percent and 
hours worked rose 5J2 percenL The 
increase in nonfarm output was the 
hugest since 1950 and the increase 
in hours was the biggest since the 
Labor Department began collect- 
ing the information in 1947. 

Including the volatile agriculture 
sector, all business productivity 
rose 3.6 percent in 1984 over 1985, 
the largest jump since the 3.6-per- 
cent increase of 1971. 

Output in 1984 including agri- 
culture rose at 8.8 percent, the fast- 
est rate in more than 30 years. A 5- 
pereent gain in hours was the 
largest recorded since 1947. 

In the fourth quarter, nonfarm 
productivity was up 1.7 percent, 
while in the third quarter it bad 
declined 1.1 percent in a slackening 
economy, the bureau said 

“The fourth-quarter figure was a 
very positive one given a fairly 
sluggish performance for the econ- 
omy," said Allen Sinai, chief econ- 
omist and managing director of 
Shearson Lehman /American Ex- 
press. 

Of significance to analysts were 
nonfarm unit labor costs in the 
fourth quarter, up just 1.8 percent 
from the previous three-month pe- 
riod when they jumped 4.7 per- 
cent 

The fourth-quarter growth in 
nonfarm productivity was the main 
factor in lowering labor costs. 

“We’ve really locked in low in- 
flation," said Edward Yardeni, 
chief economist for Prodential- 
Bache Securities. “Business has 
come to terras with labor to slow 
down the rate of increase" in unit 
labor costs.” 

Hourly compensation last year 
went up 4.7 percent the smallest 
increase since the 3.4- percent in- 
crease in 1965. 

Mr. Sinai said the performance 
of productivity growth in 1984 “au- 
gers well for continuing low infla- 
tion." 

The fourth-quarter performance 


“is a surprisingly good one," said 
Thomas D. Thomson, senior rice, 
president and chief economist at 
Crocker National Bank in San 
Francisco. 

Mr. Thomson said the prospects 
for controlling inflation remain 
bright because of productivity 
growth combined with soft energy 
,inH commodity prices plus slower 
growth in compensation rates. 

Productivity in the manufactur- 
ing sector last year was up 4.7 per- 
cent, the biggest one-year gain 
the 5.4-percent boost in 1973, 
the bureau said. 

Output in manufacturing rose 
11.7 percent in 1984, more than 
double the increase of 1983. 

President Ronald Reagan haded 
the figures as a reflection of an 
economy that continues to gain 
strength. 

“More people are working now 
than at any lime in our history” 
Mr. Reagan said in response to the 
release o? the productivity figures. 


Dollar Is Higher 
In Quiet Session; 
Pound Steadies 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
turned higher in quiet late trad- 
ing Tuesday, reversing earlier 
losses. The British pound stabi- 
lized after f alling to record lows 
in Europe on Monday. 

Daniel Holland, an assistant 
rice president at the Discount 
Corp. of New York, said the 
prospect of dollar sales by cen- 
tral banks kept the U.S. curren- 
cy from rising. But no interven- 
tion was reported Tuesday. 

Late dollar rates in New 
York, compared with late rates 
Monday, included: 3.173 Deut- 
sche marks, from 3.1605; 2.663 
Swiss francs, from 2.658. and 
9.695 French francs, from 
9.661. 

Frank Pusateri, a foreign-ex- 
change analyst, said (he dollar 
received a lift from one large 
purchase of the currency. He 
said trading was so light that 
the transaction had an exagger- 
ated impact on exchange rates. 

In London, the pound recov- 
ered to $1.1152 Tuesday as 
OPEC ministers in Geneva 
worked on a price-cutting plan 
to stabilize the oil market 
among the Organization of CHI 
Exporting Countries. The 
pound had fallen to $1.1 1 1 after 
discord at Monday's session 
threatened to break up the 13- 
nation oil cartel. 


ChmatoStep Up Its Efforts 
To Improve Civil Aviation 


United Press Jntemaiionui 

BEIJING — China, which last 
year purchased 19 passenger air- 
craft from foreign manufacturers, 
announced Tuesday that it has de- 
cided to speed up modernization of 
its civil-aviation fled. 

An official of the CivO Aviation 
Administration of China told the 
state- run news agency. Xinhua, 
that last year’s purchases repre- 
sented the nation’s largest aircraft 
purchases. 

Xinhua did not reveal the cost of 
the 19 aircraft, which are seven 
Boeing 737-200S. nine Soviet-built 
Tu-164s and three European Air- 
bus A-3 105- 

Fifteen out-of-date planes will 
be retired from the fleet in 1 985, the 
official said, adding that more jet- 
liners and advanced telecommuni- 
cation and radar equipment would 
go into service. 

“The CivO Aviation Administra- 
tion’s major tasks at present are 
updating the air fleet, ensuring 
safety and improving the quality of 
service,” said the official, who’ de- 
clined to be identified by name. 

“The Chinese government has 
decided to increase investment to 
modernize its civil air fleet," he said 

An aging administration Soviet- 
built turboprop airliner crashed in 
Jinan on Jan. 18, killing 38 of 41 
people on board. 

The aviation administration, 
which until last year had a monop- 
oly on commercial air service in 
China, has been criticized for its 
surly employees, poor service and 
inefficiency. 

“In order to have civil air ser- 
vices keep pace with the rapid de- 
velopment of the national econo- 
my, the Chinese government has 


[Gold Options (price* in 5'oz.J. . 


tan 

hh 

Me* 

Aug 

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1500.1650 

74753525 



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77V *2S 

10502000 

25502700 

310 

325- 450 

12504400 

1*757125 

330 

1D0 200 

891000 

15001050 

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11XDH50 

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Gdd 301/5 -302} 


Vilens WIrite WeM&A. 

I, Ouai da Moal-Bhac 
1211 Ciwii I, Smtzcrtud 
TeL 110251 - Tctn 28305 


decided to decentralize the Civil 
Aviation Administration and sepa- 
rate its government functions from 
business management,” Xinhua 
said. 

“Five new international and do- 
mestic airline companies will be set 
up and a number of new local air- 
line companies will also be estab- , 
lished." it said. 

“This will intensify competition 
and bring about better service. It 
will also tend to accelerate the de- 
velopment of China's civil aviation 
business." 

In the 1950s and 1960s, most of 
the agency's planes were purchased 
from the Soviet Union. 

In the 1970s, Beijing bought 35 
Trident jetliners from Britain and 
more than 30 aircraft from Boeing 
and McDonnell Douglas of the 
United Slates. Five of the Boeing 
aircraft are 747 jumbo jets. 


ilPTAFMAN 

I MANAGED 
I COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 


PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTREND II 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded the tatowing 
after an charges: ' 

IN 1980; +165% 
IN 1981; +137% 
IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983; —24% 

IN 1984; -34% 

JAN. 24, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $103,757.68 
More then $50,000,00000 
currently under management. 

Call or write RopaR Fraser at 
TAPMAN. Trend Analysis and 
Pwitotio Management me.. 
Wal Street Raja. New Mxk, 
New Msrfc 10005 212-269-1041 
■fetacBMI 667173 UW 


We think the 
U.S. market 
is about to 
make a move. 


Action Alert 


1985 INVESTMENT OUTLOOK 



At Bache Securities, we see the pieces to fiiel a major U.S. market 
rally falling into place. U.S. inflation is down, interest rates are falling 
and we see solid earnings growth rather than a recession in 1985. 

The time to take advantage of the U.S. market is now, but not 
without our 1985 Investment Outlook. It offers all our thinking, plus the 
45 stocks we recommend for the coming year and many promising bond 
opportunities. 

Make sure the U.S. market doesn't take off without you. 

Call or send in the coupon to the Bache Securities office nearest you. 

London: 5 Burlington Gardens, England WJX JLE, Tel; 4394191. Telex; 263779 
New YorkslOO Gold St., Special and International Accounts, U.S.A. 10292, Tel: 791-4425 
Hong Kong: Shell House, 24-28 Queens Road Central, B.C.C., Tel: 852-5-229051 
Telex: HX 62201 

Singapore: Wing On Life Building, 150 Cecil St., Republic of Singapore, 0106. Tel: 224-6122 
Zurich: Wasserwerkstrasse 10, Switzerland 8035. Tel: 361-4422. Telex: 81336 

Please send me a free copy of your "1985 Investment Outlook." 


Name — 
Address 


Telephone 


Bache Securities 


International offices: Amsterdam, Athens . Basel. Brussels. Buenos Aires. Chiasso, Cologne. 
Dusseldorf. Frankfurt Geneva, Hamburg, Hong Kong, London, Lugano, Luxembourg, Madrid, 
Monte Carlo, Montevideo, Munich, New York, Paris, Rotterdam, St. Croix, St. Thomas. San Juan, 
Singapore, Stuttgart, Tokyo and Zurich. 






Tiiesda^ 

N1SE 


tz \ i -l- 


Tobies Include me nationwide prices 
up to tM dosing on Wall Street 


72 

48 

1.U 

41 

170 

48 

158 

57 

1X0 

85 

180 

37 

80 

17 

180 

27 

184 

107 

40 

8 


16 
5% 

+ % 24% 

+ Mi 4% 

- V. TDfh 

+ % sm 

+ % 13% 

+ % 25% 

+ * m 

+ % I»% 

+ U. 39% 

676 
74% 
79% 
BO 
4414 
60 
63 V: 
31 % 


U Voter pf 
3 Vi Vatevln 
14% VonOrs 
TA Vorw 
9% v or co pi 
30 u> vanan 
9Vi vara 
17V vnco 
Mt Vendo 
8% VestSe 
23V Viacom 

M vaEPpf 
60% vaEPpf 
*7% Vo El pf 
60% vaEPpf 
saw voEofj 
49% vaEPpf 
51% vaEPpf 
14% VI shay 
25% Vernad 
SB VutcnM 


47 17% 
44 2% 
4 1M OTk 
37 3% 
22 8 

14 1525 im 
io a mk 
16 273 23% 
19 4Vi 
S3 lOW 
14 296 30% 
lOfflh 65% 
950* 74% 
30z 76 
10* 81 
300* 64% 
1807 40% 
UQz 41% 
13 300 31% 
13 6 34% 


17% I7%— % 
2% 2%+ I* 
33% Z3%- « 
3W 316— % 
7% 7% — % 
30% 39% + % 
13 1314 — H 

23% m.- % 

4% 4% + % 

10 % in— m 
3b% an + % 
«H 65% + % 
73% 74% 

76 76 —1 

81 81 +1 
6414 64Vk + % 
60 60 
61% 41% — % 
31% 2T%— % 
34% 34% 

73% 74% + % 



30 21% VF Carp 1.12 17 8 722 30% 29% 30 + % 

23% 5% Valera 1533 7% 6% 7% 


U.S. Futures Jan. 29 


Season Seaton 
Htah Lm 


Open Htoh tow claw Che. 


Grain 


WHEAT (CBD 

5000 bu minimum- dal lore pot bushel 
<04 137% Mar 385U. 149% 

405 332% May 140 143% 

190 127% Jul 131% 334 

176% 128% Sap 132% 335% 

163% 137% DOC 144% 146 

174% 143 Mar 

Est. Sales Pnrv.SalBS 4484 

Prev. Day Open inf. 31486 up 403 
CORN ICBTJ 

5400 txi mini mum- dollars per bushel 
125% 245 Mar 249% 171% 

130 177% May 176 177 % 

131 226% Jul 220% 229% 

121% 170% Sop 271% 222% 

195 165 DOC 165% 146% 

110 274% Mar 275 225% 

321% 229% May 180 100% 

Est. Sales Prav. Sales 18303 

Prev. Day Open Int.l 3A312 upIIB 
SOYBEANS ICBT) 

MOO bu m Ini mum- dollars par bushel 
7.90% 549% Mar IAS 4X8% 


7.97 SAP 

7.99 5.911 

736 195 

621 595 

648 197 

bJ9 6.10 

742 624 


541% May 6.17% 620% 
591% Jul 627 629% 

195 Alia 626 630 

595 Sop 6.16% 630 
597 Maw 6.17% 620 
510 Jon 531 531% 

524 Mar 645% 545% 


IAS 148 +22% 

340 342% +41% 

331% 132% +40% 
132% 134 +41 

344% 145 +40% 

148 +41 


249% 220% 

175% 276% 

270 279 

271% 171% —40% 
245% 245% —40% 
224 % 274% — 40% 
240 180 -40% 


598 59B% —49% 

510% 510% —49% 


62?'* 621% -48% 
513 513 —46 

514% 514% —AS 
527 627 -45 

541 641 -44 

649 -46 


779 645% May 

Est. Solos Prow. Sales 37788 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 71,953 up 1262 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBT1 
100 Ions- dolla re par fon 
20940 140.10 Mar UZ20 14270 

20540 14540 MOV 14BJ0 14550 

19650 15050 Jul 15180 15520 

18040 15120 Aug 15630 15550 

179J0 15440 SOP 15540 15540 

19050 155.50 Oct 14050 16050 

104.00 16140 Dec 16550 146.00 

Est. Sales P rev. Sales 9.137 

Prev. Day Open Int 37.127 up3M 
SOYBEAN OIL ICBT} 

60000 ll»- dollars per 100 Rm. 

3M0 2195 Mar 2745 2740 

3010 2780 May 3672 2745 

3030 22.70 Jul 26.15 2645 

2770 3150 Auo 2520 36JM 

2SJO 2150 5«P 2550 2550 

2640 2190 Od 2440 2440 

2475 2270 Dec 2375 2475 

Est Sales Prev. Sales 13401 

Prev.OavOoan Inf. 36431 up 1428 

OATS ICBT) , 

5400 bu mini mum- dal lore oar Bushel 
1.96% 170% Mar 172% 174% 

1.91 149% May 1.71 172% 

178% 148% Juf 148% 148% 

179 145% Sep 146% 146% 

142% 148 Dee 

Est. Salas prev. Salas 344 

Prev. Day Open int. 3714 up 19 


Est. Sides 1400 Prev. Sales 1452 
Prev, Pay Open Int 0753 0H137 


COPPER {COM EX) 

2S400 lbs.- cents per lb. 

Feb A1I5 811S 

9320 5540 Mar 6280 6150 

9150 3670 MOV 6125 61*5 

9075 5740 Jul 6335 6195 

8110 5740 Sep 6345 6420 

8425 5150 DOC 6440 6470 

BOSS' 39.60 Mar 6445 6479 

7460 &L10 May 6480 65X0 

7440 6120 Jul 6645 6SJ® 

7070 62JB Sep 6640 6640 

Est. Sales 17400 Prev. Sales 15491 
Prev. Dav Open InL 94514 UP 2466 

SILVER (COMHXJ 

5000 travaz.- cants per tray a*. 

7215 6165 Feb 6214 6214 

16204 5855 Mat 4284 6374 

1 51 10 5954 May 6388 6468 

14614 6034 Jul 6484 6549 

11834 «HB Sep 6684 6614 

12104 6304 DOC 67D.0 6772 

11934 6494 Mar 6475 6884 

10484 6604 MOV 

9454 4734 Jul 7145 7145 

*404 6814 Sep 7324 7324 

Est. Sales 31000 Prev. Soles JU7D 
Prev. Dav Aten Int. 84687 up 1449 


62.15 6270 
4240 6345 

0240 6130 
6115 6160 
6270 6385 
6340 6425 
6410 6665 
6480 6495 
6470 6525 

6540 6540 


CANADIAN DOLLAR CIMM1 
Snertflr-I pabil equals moooi 
4050 7446 Mar 7325 7527 7521 7526 

-7H3S 7440 Jun 7308 7510 7505 7511 

7585 7500 Sep 7505 +1 

7566 7474 Dec 7496 7496 7496 7502 +3 

7504 75OT Mar 7499 +3 

Est. Salas 456 Prev. Sates 897 

Prey. Day Open Int 8792 off 48 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Spgrfronc-1 paint MuafsOOuOOODl 

■IH03 .10180 Mar .10285 .10285 .10285 .10085 — { 

.11020 .10100 Jun .10060 

.10430 .111.10 Sap .10160 

Est. Sales so Prev.Salas 1 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1380 off366 

GERMAN MARK I IMM) 

Spar mark- 1 point aqua tsMAOOT 
Alio 4137 Mar JT72 3173 4155 3161 — % 

3733 4160 Jun 4193 3193 3179 3181 — IS 

35« jibs Sep 3316 3216 3204 420* 12 

„J*'0 3234 DOC 3238 — 1 

EsI. Sales Prev.Salas 15377 
Prev. Day Open Int. 51348 up3364 


6153 —147 
6193 —145 
627.9 — 146 
6363 —148 
6463 —143 
6623 — ISA 
6784 -15.1 
6908 —132 
7017 -M3 
7141 — 154 


SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Sperfnmo- 1 point equals 508001 

3035 3734 Mar 3775 3777 3754 3763 

4WM juts Jun 4009 4809 3718 4794 

4830 3812 Sep 3842 3SA2 3835 4825 

-4340 •WM Dec JB64 

EsI. Sales 93*7 Prey. Sales 8774 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 34599 up 1373 


14U3D 14060 —ZM 
14630 14630 —230 
15130 15130 -230 
155JM 15440 —1.90 
15730 1S7JD —40 
19930 15930 — 40 

16400 16430 —2.10 


27.15 7733 -v32 

2630 2632 — 30 

2681 2687 —.11 

XM XM — X5 
2535 2532 —AS 

2440 2430 —85 

23.95 2485 +.10 


172% 173% +81% 
171 171% +80% 

136% 136% —80% 
136 136% +80% 

139% +80% 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 lbs.- cents per tb. 

6730 6280 Feb 6530 6685 

6872 63.40 Apr 6825 6830 

6683 6500 Jun 6675 6980 

6670 63.15 Auo 6630 6682 

65.10 6130 Oct 6455 6485 

65.90 6130 Dec 6580 65.90 

6540 667S Feb 

Est. Sales 19326 Prev. Sales 22774 
Prev, Dav Open InL 57806 uP<25 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44000 lbs*- cents Per to. 

7473 6575 Mar 7435 7470 

7405 67.40 Apr 7400 7480 

7132 6493 May 7133 7140 

71.90 6630 Aim 71.90 71.97 

7140 6780 Sep 7130 7135 

7040 67.10 Od 7030 7030 

7135 7040 NOV 7130 7130 

Est. Sales 2321 Prev. Sales 2332 
Prev. Day Onen int. 10302 up 402 
HOGS (CME) 

30800 lbs.- cents per fe. _ 

5840 4747 Feb 5149 5187 

5445 45.10 Apr 49.12 4935 

3330 4836 Jun 5435 £447 

55.77 48.93 Jul 5435 5475 

5437 4740 Auo 5340 53-95 

31.73 4580 Oct 4935 4930 

50.83 4630 Dec 4935 4930 

49J70 4625 FeO 49.15 49.15 

47.35 4575 AW 

EsI. Sales 6829 Prev. Sales 7847 
Prev. Day Open InL 28373 up 826 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38800 lbs.- cents per lb. 

S1J5 60J5 Feb 72.15 7240 

8130 60.10 Mar 7240 7125 

■2X0 61.15 May 7429 7480 

8237 62.15 Jul 7430 7S.T7 

B035 UUO Aua 7230 7280 

75.15 63.15 Feb 6680 6680 

7130 6430 Mar 

Est. Mas 5483 Prev. Sole* 1823 
prav. Dav Open Int. 11495 up 130 


Industrials 


0% 1% 
8% 9 
38% 38% 
me io% 

17% IB 
6% 6% 
7% 7% 
3% 3% 
3% 3% 
5% 5% 
17% 17% 
1 % 1 % 
4 4 

W* 10% 
3% 3% 
2 % 3 
MR* 11 
26 % 21 % 
15% 16% 


4575 4545 
4803 6835 

4857 6893 
4650 6672 

6455 6472 

6580 6540 


7415 7432 
7122 7166 
7U0 7137 

7130 71.90 
7175 7135 
7B.15 7032 

71 JO 71 JO 


5135 5135 

4890 4897 

54.10 54JT 

5430 5472 
5150 5382 

49.10 49 JO , 

9980 99 JO 

99.15 49.15 

4695 


7195 7127 
7240 7280 

7485 7430 

74J0 7435 

7230 72JS 
4580 45.90 

66J2 


Financial 


London Commodities 

Jan. 29 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil In U5. dollars per metric ton. 
Gold in US. dollars per ounce. 


jBRest 

74 

14 

247 17% 

1644 

%% — 

% 

Jockooi 

t 


174 4W 

454 

4% 


JockLfe 



3110 38% 

37% 

38% — 

% 

JomWtr 



133 19% 

18% 

19 


JeffB sh 

140 

48 

434 

33% 

33(6 + to 

Je/Smri 

Mo 2J0 

52020% 20 

20% 


JefMart 



94 8% 

8 

8 — 

% 

Jorlco 

.12 

7 

44047% 

17% 


jirvs 



HOT % 

% 

JonlcM 

t 


153 5 

4% 

4% — 

% 

J oriel A 

t 


183 4% 

4% 

. 4% 


JfHPhsn 

50 

54 

302 9% 

9% 

9% 


Juno 



101 27% 

26% 

27% +1 

Justins 

701 

1.7 

142 11 

17% 

17% — 

%' 


KLA 1 
KMWSv 
KVPhr 
Kaman 

Karctir 

Kasler 

(Cardan 

KefyJn 

Kemp 

KyCnLf 

Kevex 

KeVTm 

Klmbal 

Klmhrfc 

Kincaid 

Khutor s 

vIKo&I 

Kroy 

Knigrs 

Kuiefce 


477 23% 22% 
211 10% 
27 5% 4% 

56 II 44 24% 26% 
1000 18% 17% 
301 43 103 13% T3% 

139 0% 7% 

477 1% 1% 
180 38 235 47% 44% 
80 2.1 42 37% 37 

135 6% 6% 
7210% 10% 
54 T.9 4 28% 2B% 

8 7 6% 

23 9% 9 
86 3 351 16% 16 

1 A 4 
86 7 741 9% 7% 

J2 2J *8314% 14% 
.16 3 394 39% 28% 


22% — 
HP*. 

5% 

26% + % 
18%+ % 
13% 

3£ + Vfc 

44% + % 
37% 

»%— % 
10%— % 
20 % + % 
6 %— % 
9% + % 

B%— % 
14%+ % 
28% — % 


«?* 1 2 — % 
8 67 14% 14% 14% + % 

50 11% II !1%— % 


10 %—% 
5% 

4 + % 

18 

19%—% 
11 + % 

to* 

ss • 

p+* 

50% ■ 

11 — Vi 
49% 51% +1% 

^^+1% 
27% 27% + % 
H% WU-V. 
4% 4% + % 

oS&iJ 

« is 

8%-lfc 
4% 5% 

16% 14% 

21 21 - % 

y L™ s *- v ' 

GW 

14% 15 + % 
24% 24% + % 
33% 33% 

44 44% + M 

12% 13 +% 
25% 25% + % 
43 43 ■ 

32% 32%—% 
U 15%— % 
15% 16 + ** 
10U 

17 — % 
!2%— % 
33% — % 
3 %+ % 
W*-» 
5% 

239.— It 
5% + » 
S%- % 
S%— % 
19% 

29%— % 
3% 

3% 

40% 




(Continued on Page 12) 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 29 


Dividends Jan. 29 1 1 1 Cash Prices Jan. 29 



BSgJCgggg 


SP COMP . IND EX (CME) 

poln^t and c^iU irajo 1S1JE 177.90 18175 +385 

1800 156.10 Jim 18130 18496 18095 1MA5 +3.15 

1847S 16880 SAP 18450 18770 1849) 18U0 +380 

1B9 JO 17570 Dec 187.20 M720 1878S 191.15 +1 aS 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 72372 

Prev. Day Open let 59315 up 677 

VALUE LINE (KCBTJ 
point* and cent* 

19671) 166.10 Mar W750 201.96 19635 20135 +415 

20830 17180 Jun 201.13 20680 20070 204JH +455 

XDUB 18575 _Sep 20975 +440 

Est- Bale* Prev. Sale* 4699 

Pray, Day open Int. 6365 up 531 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
punts and cents 

10438 8*80 Mar 10380 ML45 10185 ML45 +1.90 

1062S *080 Jun 101.10 W7JS 10495 XJ7J0 4-195 

J£'S ,!!55 5s ion.90 idbjo iooto Jot.jb +200 

tWJSO 101 JO Dec 11890 4-285 

Sid. Sale* 147*0 Prev.Bain l&a» 

Prav. Dev Open int. ILMl up 434 


Klen Leer Close 
SUGAR 

Mar 12980 12480 12480 12580 
MOV 13630 132.00 13280 13230 
Auo 14480 l«ja 14090 14070 
OCT 15130 14680 14690 14780 
DCC N.T. N.T. 15X00 15480 
Mur 17080 16930 16730 16400 
Mov 17680 17680 17480 17580 
2719 tof* ol 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Mar 2J00 1150 1191 1194 

MOV 1220 1163 1209 2710 

Jly 1209 1152 1200 2703 

SOP 1201 1147 1187 11BS 

Dec 2865 2857 2869 2870 

Mar 2875 2840 2840 2864 

Mav 2840 2840 7iwn iju 

1X628 totool 10 tons. 
COFFEE 

Jim 1365 1332 1340 1341 

Mar 1400 13*8 1368 1349 

MCry 2330 1397 2J9S 1400 

Jly 2345 2320 2320 2322 

See 2350 2330 2331 2335 

NOV 1452 2345 1445 1*46 

Jtm 2352 2353 2340 2345 

3738 lots at 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

jan moo moo moo moo 

Feb 22*80 22100 22375 22480 
Mar 71680 21125 21150 21575 
AM 21075 20775 710 JO 21073 
MOV 20980 20550 20680 20B7S 
Jun 20680 20550 20675 20850 
Jlv 20880 20575 20880 208.50 
Aug N.T. N.T. 20580 21280 
Sip N.T. N.T. 20280 21480 
1489 MS oflOO tank 
GOLD 
Fee 


12830 12*80 
U680 13780 
14480 14500 
15180 15180 
15730 15980 
17100 17380 
17780 17980 


1172 1173 
1181 1182 
2,172 1173 
1167 1168 
2864 2870 
■i/m 2845 
2X52 2X70 


1378 2J80 
2307 2308 
2335 2336 
2353 2357 
2340 2363 
2365 1470 
2355 2340 


22580 23380 
2197S 21*50 
21150 21275 
207.75 30880 
20550 205.75 
*nien 20575 
35250 30550 
201.98 21100 
201.98 21280 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malays tan cents per kilo 
Clow 

DM Ask 

Feb 18875 18975 

Mar 19350 19450 

AW 19450 19880 

May 200-50 28250 

Jun 20280 204.00 

Volume: 19101s. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
smeapore cent* per kite 
CMC 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
18850 18950 

191S0 19350 

1«400 1*7X0 

20080 20280 
21050 20350 


Company Per am Pay Rec 

INCREASED 

A. H. Bela Cora O 30 3-11 2-B 

American Brands Q .97 '7 3-t 2+ 

Claremont Co*. Co - S193 2-26 2-7 

KoaerCa Q 58 +19 4-1 

STOCK SPLIT 

Par Pharmaceutical Inc — 3-tor -2 
USUAL 


RSS I Mar.. 171.75 17100 1 

R5S2Feb_ ’5880 15980 1 

RSS 3 Feb- >5680 157.00 1 

RSS 4 Feb.. 14980 151.00 1 

RSS 5 Feb- 14180 14100 1 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Molaymlan rtaetrtt* Per 25 teas 
Oast 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
16675 166.75 

17175 171.75 

15750 15880 

15550 15650 

14S50 15050 

14050 14256 


BM Ask 
1.180 l.Wifl 


Feta 1.180 1.11 

Mar 1,140 1700 

Apl 1,130 1,160 

MOV 1.120 1 . 14 " 

Jun 1.110 1.1 

Jly 1.110 1,1 

5cp 1.100 1.1 

Nov 1890 1.1 

Jon I 8"0 1.1 

Volume: 1 tats of 25 Ion*. 
Sourer: /Teutons. 


1.110 1,150 

1.100 1.158 

1890 1.140 

1890 1,140 


1.150 l» 
1.140 1JW) 
1.130 1.1*0 

1.120 1.170 


1.100 USB 
18*0 1.140 



455 

455 

441 

482 

486 

486 

471 

471 

5.18 

519 

504 

5JH 

545 

545 

570 

570 

560 

540 

545 

545 

6.12 

6.12 

A.U 

580 

480 

LSI 

437 

477 

675 

475 

488 

489 

lie* 15803 



5 UOU2S 



2286 

2289 

2241 

2288 

2300 

23 17 

2290 

214 

2278 

2289 

y**c 

2291 

22S2 

2241 

248 

2240 

2150 

3150 

7125 

2150 

2145 

2145 

3135 

7134 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

MOODY'S 968.80 f 

Reuters — ... 1035.90 

DJI. Futures 125-57 

Coni. Research Bureau. 24X30 

Moody's : base 100 : Dee 31, 1931. 

P - preliminary; f - final 

Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jams : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


Previous 
96280 f 
2819.00 
T2W9 
246.70 


London Metals Jan. 29 


Figures to sterling oer metric ton 
Silver In pence per tray ounce. 


loony 

High grade cotkwr cathodes: 
mat 1 J6780 176880 
3 months 178100 178350 
Cappar cathodes: 
snot 17S580 175480 
3 months 177100 177480 
Tin: spot 977088 977580 ' 
3 months 9jnu» 970580 
Liad:saa! 38580 38780 


173280 173340 
174588 174550 


L *00:8001 

3 month* 

ZliK:spor 
3 months 
Slivartipar 
3 months 
Aluminium: 
snot 


34880 34850 
74250 74370 
74180 741J0 
55*80 55780 
57480 57780 

98480 98880 


3 months 182080 181180 
NlekallSPOl 471080 471280 
3 month* 457780 466080 
Sooreo: Bruton. 


97280 97280 
180S8B 180680 
467080 468000 
4645X0 4550X0 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 29 

Sugar In French Francs net nslr cion. 
Other figures In Francs oer 100 ka 


High low Close ch'oe 

5UGAR 

Mar 1530 1 JW IJ91 I J95 - 19 

MOV 1465 1430 1431 1417 —79 

Aua 1745 1810 1812 1817 -78 

OCI 1880 1800 1875 1580 —25 

Dec N.T. NT. I5M 1475 —24 

Mar 1.785 1775 1779 i.ng _j| 

EsI. vol.: J.1S0 tot* at SO ton*. Prev. actual 
»gl«; 1876 lots. Open interest; 19890 
COCOA 

Altar 2740 ZHB 2720 2723 + 24 

MOV 2J46 2295 2330 2735 +« 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2318 — UKh. 

Son 2710 2710 2700 2735 + I] 

DM N.T. N.T. - 2JW) IJrKh, 

Mar N.T. N.T — 22311 unen. 

Mav N.T. N.T. — 1220 Unch. 

EsI. vol.: 300 lot* at 16 Ion* Prev. actual 
sain 1 259 lots. Open interest: 306 
COFFEE 

Jan N.T. NT 2470 2520 —40 

Mar 2545 25» 7520 2525 — 20 

Mav N.T. N.T. 2515 2845 —35 

JtV N.T. N.T, 2825 - —30 

Sec N.T. N.T. 2850 2865 —10 

Nm N.T. N.T. 2837 2870 - 73 

jan NX N.T. 2830 - -» 

BU. vo/,: 13 tots of S Ion* Prey, ochiol 
sales: I tot*, open inlemi: 23) 

Sourer: Baortrdu Commerce 


Amer Family Coro 
American Fiiirana 
Amur Graeilnas 
Amor Hrtge Li inv 
Amur Hrtae Lf Inv 
Amer Hnao LI Inv 
Apoaae Enterprises 
Arwnlrana Wrtd tnd. 
Daunhln Depa. Carp 
FCA International 
First Sec Carp 
Flr*l Wisconsin 
Heck's me 
HowtHI Corn 
IBM Carp 
Koger Proa. Inc 
Uly-Tullp Inc 
Mayflower Cora 
Palm Beach Inc 
Philo Surburban Co 
Poaa Producing Co 
Republic Gvosum Ca 
Scoa Incur. 

Stone Container 
Triangle Indus 
union Bncp Mkh. 
U8. SioeJ Cara 
Warner- Lambert Ca 
Weis Markets 
wnfamerieo Bnca 
wnitoms Ca* 


0 .14 3-1 2-15 

Q 73 2-25 Ml 
O 14 to >8 2-22 

M 09 3-22 2-11 

M 89 1-22 3-tt 

M X9 +36 +15, 

a xa mi 24 

O JO 3-1 2-8 

O 49 +26 3-29 
O .04 3-29 3-15 

a 77 V, 3-11 3-22 

Q JO 7-1S 3-4 

a 87 3-1 34 1 

a .10 3-18 3-2 

a SI. 10 3+ 2-13 

Q 87 % 4-19 +1 , 

Q JJS 2-21 M 
Q 70 3-4 MS 

O 70 M 2 15 

O 73 3-31 2-15 . 

Q .15 3-11 7-8 

Q .14 3-15 2-38 

O .19 MS 2-15, 

Q .15 3-13 2-27 

Q 10 7-18 2-8 , 

O 75 3-15 2-15' 

O 7S 3-9 28 

O 77 3-8 2-8 

0.17% J-25 3-11 
-.17% 58 +19, 

Q .35 3-29 34 

; O-Ouarteny ; 5-SemL 


Commadltr and Unit 

Coffeo 4 Sanlos. lb 

Print cloth 44/30 38 %, vd _ 
Steel nil lei* (Pin.), tan — 
Iron 2 Fdrv. Philo- ton — 
Steel scrap No 1 n%> Pitt. . 

Lead Spot, lb 

Caaaer elect* lb » 

Tin ISIraltsl.lb 

Zinc E. SI. L. Baris, lb — 
Palladium, az ■ 

Silver N Y. or 

Source: Af*. 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. 29 

W. Gcrnxw AtoX-dUm inerts, res mpk 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. 29 


strike Uhih I PrikLsil 
Pfk* Feb Mar AN Mot | Fed Mr an 


ISill IK 2 
!fc lu 4'. 


To Our Readers w s 

Because oT a teduiicaJ problem. ^ 
ihe wrong prices have been quoted 
in the Iasi few issues far Nesile and 
Ciba-Gdgy in the Zurich slock Um. f 
The problem has been corrected. *£4 









































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1983 


4* 

s§*>- 

s j'! r ' 

S£$ 

a|f! 

•*b' Vs 
®I i I?’ 


business roundup 


people 


Banks to Sell Swiss Watch Group I Managing Director to Leave Airbus 

A — . . . ■ _ J !_»_ 3 . C* L. J & 




m 

US pi 
. 3i>4 

- £• V r,» 

. : 'fc Ik.; V, ; 


BIENNE Switzerland —Swiss banks, which rescued the country’s 
two principal watchmakers from bankruptcy two years ago. have 
unveiled plans to sell the restructured group to Swiss investors. 

Asuag-SSJH. which the banks created by mer ging two existing 
companies, are the makers of Omega, Tissot, Longings and other 
classic watch brands. 

The company announcement on Monday noted that it h»H re- 
turned to profitability last year after posting an operating loss of 87 
million Swiss francs (J317 million) in 1983. 

The company said that 7 percent of its shares will be sold to a Swiss 

business consultant, Nicolas Hayek. and to Ste phan Schmidhriny. a 
'Swiss- industrialist. Additionally, a group of Swiss investors is bong 
offered an option on 51 percent of share capital, the company said. 

The company said that Heme Arnold, the former head of the Swiss 
retail chain Migros. would become president and chief executive 
officer. 


r|X Texaco Net Off Sharply; 
= || Chevron Has Slight Gain 

V The Associated Pre* been down 13.1 percent, to SI .07 

< § *i NEW YORK — Texaco Inc., the billion, or $4.22 a share. 

- sc At third largest U.S. oil company, re- Revenue rose 17 percent toS48.1 

‘“'l . >m)hI nn Tiiecrtau 9 UCl.mniU. r - - cm 1 


* •-> M 

" : ' <e s ! Ni 

■g r S5|i. 


. . ‘«i T : ji . 




tH 

- .. < i ; * ■/.; 


... . 

■“ ■ r V 


: - >1 i . 

t / If }\ 
" M 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Texaco Inc., the 
third largest U.S. oil company, re- 
ported on Tuesday a S552-million 
loss in the fourth quarter, citing a 
previously announced writedown 
that reflected a more pessimistic 
assessment of the value of its oil- 
producing assets. - 

Meanwhile, Chevron Gorp., the 
U.S. oil industry’s fomtb-largest, 
said its fourth-quarter earning 
rose 7.7 percent from the 1983 peri- 
od. 

Sun Co. said its profit rose 123 
percent, in large part because its 
results in the oomparable period of 
1983 were reduced by plant clos- 
ings and the disposal of some oil 
and natural gas properties. 

All three companies complained 
that earnings were dragged down 
by falling prices for refined petro- 
leum products. 

' Texaco, based in White Plains, 
New York, said the large loss in the 
fmal quarter compared with a prof- 
it of $256 million, or $1 a share, a 
year earlier. Revenue rose 1 62 per- 
cent, to $122 billion, from SlOJ 
Ullion. 

The less was a result of a $765 
million writedown of assets, which 
was announced in November. 

Without the writedown, earnings 
in the fourth quarter would have 
been $213 million, or 82 cents a 
shares still a 16.8 percent drop from 
a year earlier. 

Texaco said the 1984 results of 
its Getty Oil unit, which Texaco 
acquired last year for S10.1 billion, 
“virtually offseT the financing 
costs related to the takeover. 

•' For all of 1984, earnings fell 75.2 
percent, to $306 million, or S1.03 a 
share; from $1.23 billion, or $4.80 a 
share, in 1983. Without the write- 
down, annual profit would have 


been down 13.1 percent, to $1.07 
billion, or $4.22 a share. 

Revenue rose 17 percent to $48. 1 
billion from $41.1 billion. 

Losses from Texaco's refining 
and marketing operations widened 
to $309 million in 1984 from $30 
million a year earlier. 

Chevron said its fourth-quarter 
profit increased to S434 million, or 
51.26 a share, from $403 million, or 

51. 18 a share, a year earlier. Reve- 
nue fell 5.4 percent, to $7 billion, 
from $7.4 billion. 

For all of last year, earnings 
slipped 3.5 percent to $133 billion, 
or S4.4S a share, from $139 billion, 
or $4.65 a share. Revenue held 
steady at $292 billion. 

Refining and marketing profits 
fell 76.9 percent in 1984, to $75 
million from $324 million a year 
earlier. Chevron said it would have 
had a $230 mini on loss from those 
operations if it had not realized a 
profit of $310 milli on from the sale 
of oil inventories. 

Chevron said financing costs re- 
lated to its $13.3 trillion purchase of 
Gulf Oil last year totaled $541 mil- 
lion, but that Gulf still contributed 
$40 milli on to its earnings. 

Sun, based in Radnor, Pennsyl- 
vania, said its profit in the fourth 
quarter rose to S136 nriDion, or 

51.19 a share, from $61 million, or 
53 cents a share, a year earlier. 
Revenue fell 9.9 percent, to S3.81 
billion from $423 billion. 

In the final quarter of 1983, 
Sun's earnings were reduced by $83 
million as a result of belt-tighten- 
ing moves. 

For the year, Sun’s earnings rose 
18.8 percent, to $538 million, or 
S4.67 a share, from $453 million, or 
$3.84 a share, in 1983. Revenue 
slipped to $15.4 billion from $15 3 


The Associated Pres 

PARIS — Franz- Josef Strauss, 
president of Airbus Industrie. Eu- 
rope’s airliner consortium, said 
Tuesday that its managing director, 
Bernard Lath&re, will leave the or- 
ganization. 

Mr. Strauss made the statement 
after a meeting with Prime Minister 
Laurent Rabins or France. Mr. 
Strauss also said that Mr. Lath- 
ifere's No. 2, Roger Beudllc, the 
director-general at Airbus, also 
leave soon for health reasons. 

A spokesman at Airbus head- 
quarters in Toulouse noted that 
Mr. Lalhiere’s second five-year 
term will expire next month, but 
said that no decision had yet been 
made about the future of the post 

Mr. Lathiere was abroad and un- 
available for comment. 

The spokesman said that Mr. Be- 
teiDe had already made known that 
he would be leaving the consortium 
during the year for health reasons. 

Mr. Strauss, premier of Bavaria 
in West Germany, is on a private 
visit to France. He said he in- 
formed Mr. Fabius of Airbus In- 
dustrie’s “industrial plans for the 
rest of the century." which be said 

Europeans Fill 
Top U.S. Posts 

(Continued from Page 9) 
contribution of one individual is 
much dearer than in manufactur- 
ing, where being an organization 
man is important,” he said. 

Whatever the caveats that limit 
the number of Europeans that can 
mak e it in the U.S. corporate 
world, some of the new generation 
of Europeans who made good as 
managers of U.S. subsidiaries in 
Europe are finding their way to top 
jobs at U.S. headquarters. “Maybe 
European businessmen have 
gained more respect,” said Reto 
Braun, a Swiss national from the 
small canton of Saint-Gall en who 
is president of Burroughs Corp.'s 
$700 million office and media- 
products group. Mr. Braun, who 
started with IBM and moved on to 
Memorex International, said. “1 
was one of the first Europeans to 
he ad up a U.S. subsidiary b Eu- 
rope. Europeans have learned how 
U.S. business works and now 
Americans are putting them in 
charge.” 

“I was offered five times over 10 
years to come to the United 
Stales.” said Mr. Braun. “I thought 
I was too European. But at some 
point there is a ceiling b Europe 
and I don't have the culture to go 
bio a European company, if you 
want to go ahead, that's where you 
have to go ahead.” 


required quick derisions by govern- 
ments. 

“1 want to know what the French 
proposals are.” he said. "The next 
Airbus will be a long-haul, four- 
engined aircraft” known as the TA- 
IL “because the market d eman ds 
it." 

Bui develop meat of future air- 
craft would only be possible on the 
basis of a consensus between 
France and West Germany, he 
said. 

The two nations are the major 
partners b the consortium, the 


French state-owned Aerospatiale 
having 37.9 percent and Mes- 
serachmidl-Bolkow-Blohm of West 
Germany holding an equal share. 
The other participants ore British 
Aerospace, 20 percent, and CASA 
of Spain, 42 percent. 

At the end of last year, the con- 
sortium had delivered 46 A-310 
and 242 A-300 short- and medium- 
range aircraft to 44 airlines, it has 
orders for 109 A-10s, 251 A- 300s 
and 51 A-320s. It biggest client is 
Pan- Am. which has ordered air- 
craft worth more than 1 billion dol- 
lars. 


Phelps to Sett Arizona Mining Stake 


Los Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Phelps 
Dodge Corp. has announced that it 
will sell as much as a 40 percent 
stake b its Arizona mining opera- 
tions to Japan's Sumitomo Corp. 
and Sumitomo Metal Mining Co. 

Phelps said Monday that it ex- 
pects to use proceeds to reduce 
long-term debt, which totaled 
about $570 million last year. The 
company declined to say now much 
it will realize from the sale. 


COMPANY NOTES 

Ivan V. Boesky Corp. of New 
York announced that it has no in- 
terest b acquiring control of Dun- 
lop Holdbgs PLC of Britain. The 
statement was issued b view of 
recent press articles associating 
Dunlop with Boesky. 

Cement-Roadsfone Holdings 
PLC of Britarn said that its U.S. 
subsidiary, Oldcastle Inc., has con- 
ditionally agreed to buy C-allanan 
Industries Inc. from M&S Re- 
sources Inc. for $40 million cash. 

Datapoint Corp. introduced two 
new storage systems as well as soft- 
ware enhancements for office-auto- 
mation and communications soft- 
ware. The Texas-based company 
said the office-automation soft- 
ware includes spelling verification 
and correction. 

Walt Disney Productions, which 
spent $90 million last year on ad- 
vertising. announced that all of its 
major divisions will now use New 
York-based Young & Rubicam 
Inc. Disney’s adverlisbg outside 
the United States will be handled 
by a variety of companies. 

Dunlop Olympic Ltd. of Austra- 
lian reported that it had acquired 
CRA Ltd-'s 14.9-percent share- 
holding b Chloride Group PLC 
but did not disclose the price. Dun- 
lop Olympic said the holdbg is the 
largest stake b Chloride. 

Guinness Peat Group PLC of 
Britarn announced that it has con- 
ditionally agreed to buy 3423 mil- 


Phelps said it would continue to 
own and operate the properties, 
which can produce and process 
more than 200,000 tons of copper a 
year. 

Phelps Dodge reported losses of 
$74 million b 1982, $63 million b 
1983, with an additional loss of that 
magnitude expected in 1984. While 
consumption Of copper picked up 
at the end of the year, a spokesman 
said, copper prices continued to 
slump until recent weeks. 


lion ordinary shares, or about 23 
percent, of Britannia Arrow Hold- 
ings PLC from United Kbgdom 
Temperance & General Provident 
Institution for Guinness Peat 
shares worth about £36 million 
($4025 million). 

Kaiser Aluminum & flmnif al 
Corp. announced that it had met 
with union officials last week to 
discuss contract changes to help the 
company regain profitability. Kai- 
ser said it discussed changes, in- 
cluding wages, but it disclosed no 
details. 

Peko-WaDsend Ltd. of Australia 
announced that it has raised its 
multi-option borrowbg facility to 
100 million Australian dollars 
(S81.7 million) from 75 million dol- 
lars. The facility enables Peko to 
draw advances and issue notes b 
either domestic or foreign markets. 

Tate & Lyle PLC of Britain an- 
nounced that a preliminary agree- 
ment had been reached to purchase 
Colonial Sugars Inc. of the United 
States. No price was reported. Co- 
lonial's net bode value of the assets 
being acquired is $143 milli on 

Xerox -Corp. announced that it 
will sell and lease back its head- 
quarters building in Stamford. 
Connecticut, to a limited partner- 
ship organized by Integrated Re- 
sources Inc. of New York for $5 1 .5 
million. Xerox said the arrange- 
ment would have no effect on earn- 
ings. 


Pache Tapped 
AsGuurman 
At Pechiney' 

By Brenda Hageny 

htiemutiona/ Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The board of Pe- 
chiney Uginc Kublmann SA. 
France's nationalized metallurgical 
company, on Tuesday nominated 
Bernard Pache as chairman to suc- 
ceed Georges Besse. 

Mr. Besse was named last week 
as chairman of Renault, the ailbs 
French state-owned automaker. 

The French cabinet will meet 
Wednesday to give its approval to 
Mr. Pache’s appointment, a 
spokesman for Pechiney said. 

Mr. Pache, 50, joined Pechiney 
in 1967. For the 18 months up to 
Jan. 1, he served beside Mr. Besse 
as director delegate. 

In that post his responsibilities 
included heading Pechiney ‘s social 
affairs and communications. On 
Jan. 1, he became director of the 
nuclear and electro-metallurgical 
division, one of Pechiney 's main 
branches. 

Mr. Besse leaves Pechinev after 


serving as its head since 1982. He is 
credited for a rapid turnaround b 
the group's results after it was na- 
tionalized two years ago. After 
posting losses of more that 3 bil- 
lion francs (S3 10 million) b 19S2, 
Pechiney expects lo record a profit 
of about 500 million francs b 19S4. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co. has 
named Jorgen Lauridsen general 
manager of its operations for Bel- 
gium and Luxembourg. He moves 
to Brussels from his post as market- 
bg director of Colgate Denmark. 
ML Lauridsen succeeds Barrie M. 
Spelling, who has returned to the 
New York head office of Colgate, a 
health-care, cleaning, sports, food, 
and laundry-products concern. 

Credit Lyonnais has appointed 
Bernard Thiolon managing direc- 
tor. a move designed to ensure £i 
smooth succession upon the retire- 
mem next year of the bank’s cur- 
rent managing director. Jacques 
Roche. The two will work together 
until Mr. Roche's retirement. Mr. 
Thiolon has been with the bank, 
France's third largest, since 1951 
and has been bvolved b its inter- 
national division. 

Wells Faigo Bank has appointed 
Jacques de la Chauviniere senior 
vice president and division manag- 
er. Europe. Middle East and Afri- 
ca. based in London. He will take 


Page 11 


over the duties of Richard J. Borda, 
who is leaving the San Frandsco- 
based bank IQ join National Life 
Insurance Co. of Vermont Mark F . 
Fries. Wells Fargo’s representative 
in Spain, will become London 
branch manager. 

Chase Manhattan Bank has 
named Jos6 Fenian countiy manag- 
, er for Spain, succeeding Kd May, 
who takes over as country manager 
for Chase in Brazil Mr. Peman 
moves to Madrid from London, 
where he was executive director of 
the new busmess team at Chase 

Manhattan Ltd., a merchant-bank- 
ing unit 

Plessey Co. has appobted Alan 
Jones to the new post of interna- 
tional director with responsibility 
for its operations outside Europe 
and North America. Since 1979, 
Mr. Jones has served as managing 
director of the displays-and-sen- 
sors division of Plessey Electronic 
Systems Ltd. 

Logics PLC the British comput- 
er-software concern, has opened an 
office b Houston to marker its ca- 
pabilities b automation systems 
for the oil and gas industries. Andy 
Wyke has been named to bead Lo- 
gjca Energy Systems and he moves 
to Houston from a senior market- 
ing post with Logica’s Dutch oper- 
ating company. 


HOW CONTRARIANS REALIZE D 800% PROFITS 

In 1982. while the DOW wasdrooping under 800, when the ma)orityo tseers were bearish, we rebuked the 
consensus, predicting THE DJi WILL TOUCH 1 .000 BEFORE HITTING 75i 3". II is aiso riveting to recall that at, or 
near, the nadiro! despair, a prestigious publicat ion featured a story hear jlined: "The Death of Equities". Their 
orthodoxy boomerang ed; the Bull rampaged to 1290. our optimism was vindicated. Afterthe market soared, 
thesame magazine released an articleentilled: ‘The Re-Birth otEquities s". Once again, they were myopic; the 
market sagged A month ago. Business Week published a lengthy di: scourse with the scalding title: "The 
Death of Mining*, an obituary for the North American mining industry. 

Our cerebral juices stir, we chaifenge their prosaic thinking. "Powe •rEfrtisfs'are pre-conditioned to buy 
Into weakness, to sell into strength, as we recognized when our researc .Tiers recommended BOEING al $ 16, 
FORD around $ 17.G.M. at S 39,SEARSunder $ 19 (before splits), andotl ler seasoned shares that the “Street" 
once scorned, misguided by herd instinct. What gurus fail todivine tslh at “misery” has already bee n fact ored 
into the price ot AMAX. ASARCO. INCO. NEWMONT, NORANDA and I ^ELPS DODGE, that to sell afterthe 
‘Group* has been decimated is to defy logic. When Elitists are ready! o peddle their inventories, the Group 
will undergo a metamorphosis; fiscal events are rarely spontaneous combustion, movements are 
orchestrated. 

Our forthcoming letter discusses why the DJI will gallop over 15* 30, why mining shares will recover; in 
addition. CGR focuses upon a low-priced equity with the dynamics ! to vault to prominence, emulating the 
success of a recently recommended “special situation" that escalati ?d 800% in a brief time-span. For your 
complimentary copy, please write to, or telephone.. 

* CAPITAL FP5. Financial Planning Services bv ^ 

a Kalverstraart H2, 

GAINS 1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 

Phone: (020) - 21 ’ 51 81 
Telex 18536 


, Name: 

f Address: 

I Phone: 

i n 

Past performance does not guarantee future results 




w rao/i 








Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1985 


luesdsos 



Gosoig 


Vol.oM 

Pre».4 PM »l._ 


JM2U»o 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up ta the closing on Wall street 


in ll 
3D 14 ID 34 
IB 456 


n wonin 

Hign Low Slock 


Sb. Close 

Div. YW. PE IQOSHton LO-a Quel. Ctl-pe 


20 5? 19V 

IM » 
100b 4J 7 10 23 


7'- 7** ADI n 

31. lft ADI wt 

3 in AIC Ph 

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16ft 12 AMCn .12 J 

7*t AMlntl 

75ft 56 ATTF-ln 5J20 7A 
a<i> 2'b AcmiiPr 

153- B'“ AtmcU J2 3.1 

■7 IVi Adlan 

9ft J»j A cl an 

3=4 IV; Admfil 

27V 15to A3P.USI .14 J 

S«U 15 A dote .33 1A 

8 s * 4ft Aercnc 

ZS'-i 15V; AtllHsa AA 13! 

35ft 25*1 AHIPba 

m * & 6[f£*P 

U A I real 

5- Z*c Al'Srncd 

75vj eSta Almllon 

9ft Vk Alohc 

19 91b Alpha In JQ5 A 

14k to Allen 
3<V 3B% Alcoa Pi 3.7S 112 
2Sto 1 1 AIhjCd 

19% 9to Amdanl JO IJ 

16'.-: aV; Amedm m J 

7% 4% Am Bill .15 2.1 

9*3 A Am Cap 

36% 30 ACoittrl ,92a 24 

30% 12’- A=«pwt 

7ft 5*S AFrvc A 

7ft 5% AFruc B 


22 1*7 5H. Pi 5%+h 
02 2V 2Mi 21b 
5 1% IWi 1% 

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611 3V JMl 3b 
155 74% 74 74% + ft 


30 15 5V 

j: ii n <3 lo'fa 
40 369 161* 


74 74% + V* 

5% 5%— '4 

10 101m 4- Vi 

15% 16 
4% 4% — H 

2 2 — % 


1 S 311 1 2 — % 

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.73 1A »1 27 17% 17% 17% 4- % 

7 37 *ft 6% 6% 

41 12 IS 2 35% 25% 35% 4- % 
77 X 36% 35 34%+7% 

9 58 7% 7% 714 — % 

47 9% i3**i 9% + % 

7 31 3% 1% 3'ft 

193 73% Tito 73 + V 

1 2 6% -t% 6% 

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283 1% ."4 1% 

I.7S 113 SOOz 33% 3H% 33% — 1 
52 329 24% 24 24% + % 

JO IJ 20 145S 16% 15% 16 4-14 

n J 46 10% 104* 10% — 14 

.15 2.1 5 108 7% 7 m 71A— V 

7 5% T* S%+% 

■92a 24 10 6 38 38 38 

363 31% 29=4 31% 4-1% 
IllCOr 7% 73k 7% 

111007 7% n* 7% 



7ft AHIfflM 




121 


<n. 

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iW- 

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17 



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16V i 

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10 

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377 



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100a 20 

20 

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48% 

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Mv. 9 CHB JOb IA 13 
9% 4% CM I CP 

19% 9% CaasNJ 14 

8U 4% CoOleA 6 

13% 10 CaiRE 1.24 llLA 13 
25 IflV) Colmtn M SL5 27 
9% 7% Coterop JOt «J 4 
1414 9% Cameo J2 15 11 
22% 13% CMarcs JS 
34 Vi 25% CWlne >0 

6% 4% Cardiff 
5% 2% Car dll 

11% 7% CoroB 15 

11 6% CareA ,IOo .9 15 

11% S« CareEn 18 

4m 36 CarpP pf 500 110 
7% 3% Gnbftin 06f 143 4 
18% 14% CastiA 5 JO 44 9 
33% 25% CasFd 120a 63 
8 4% costind 

77V, 20% CenM pf 1H) 130 
14% ll Centse tAOell.l 
20% 14% ctryFa 178 

10% 4% Cefac 30 14 1 0 
4% 2% ChlT»H IB 

35% 19% OirtMA JO 0 19 
6% 5% ChrtMpf 75 1U 
19% 14% OllRv 1J0 6.4 10 
15 9% CMDvb 

20% 9% Ollllns 20 

20% 11% Citadel 8 

24% 16% ClIFst 100b 4J 7 
23 17 CfvCas I3D S3 12 

41% 28% Clarml lA5e 15 
9% 6% ClarkC 2kU 1 
36% 21 Vi Cfarpst .70s 1.9 II 
19% 13% Clopov .16 J 12 
10% 3% Coanllr 

I0U 6% Coho JO 22 10 

5% 2 ColFwIs 
15V, B Comfdn 4 

15ft 8% Comlns 
15% 12 ComA pf 102 102 
4% V- ComdrC 
11% 7 Compa 111 

17% 6<M ComuD m 

19% 7% CmoCn 13 

9Vj 5% cmcFct 27 

22 11% CncMn J0e 10 11 

9% 5% Connlv 7 

19% 12 ConrHm 8 

11% 5% Oo-rwisf 40 

7% 1% Coma wt 

11% 8'* ConsOG 4 

% % ConOGwt 

9% 4% VlCOTlA 

121 m 5% vfCntApf 

34% 12% ContMII « 

14V, 10 Coofclrrt 50e 15285 
3% % cor ad kin 

3% 3% CosCrn 

l % CasCrvri 

9% 5% CntCrd J4r 3 j0 23 

2% 1% Court Id 06e AA 

2% % Crwfrd 

10% 7% CrstFo -15o 15 10 

39% 23% Crass 1J2 42 14 

E% 9% Cm CP 

17% 7% CrCPB 

27 16 CwCPpf 122 1U 

9ft 4% CrownC 16 

15V. 8% Crown! 28 10 8 
4% 1 CrutcR 3 

17 2% CrvsIO 

25 17% Cubic 39 1.9 12 


80 13% 
370 16% 


20b U 13 82 14 |4 IS 

119 9 8% 8% 

14 28 13% 13 13% — % 

6 10 6% 6% 6%— % 

24 106 13 39 11% Tin 11% + % 

M 25 27 140 23% 23% 23% 

.SOt S3 4 28 9%9 9% + W 

37 15 11 80 13% 12% 13 

28 370 16% 16% 16% + % 

10 31 34% TUi mi — iia 

12 5% 

1 2% 

15 7 11 

,10a .9 15 12 10% 

18 12 9% 

JM 100 120z 41% 

667143 4 23 4% 

JO 4.4 9 IS 18% 

20a 62 S 32 

33 5% 

LSI 106 1902 25% 

AOell.l 43 14% 

178 11 16 

30 14 ID 36 5% 

IB 456 4 


J 19 127 34% 
IJ 2 6% 

14 10 7 18% 


28C U 8 
.70s 1.9 II 
•la J 12 


71 15% 

373 % 


.SOe 10 11 
J 
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40 


111 S3 7% 
89 2 8% 

13 363 12% 
27 111 7% 


119 3 

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148 9% 

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117 23% 
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33% —1% 
5%+ % 
2% 

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10% 

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41%- % 
4%— % 
18% + % 
31% + % 
5%— % 
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14% 

16 — % 
m— % 
3%- % 

34%+ % 
6% 

18% — % 
10 % — % 
19% + % 
19%- % 
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2 2%— % 
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J»— 14 
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Tirtf 

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18%— % 
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25 

J4r U 23 SOT 
Me 4D 28 


-15s 15 10 8 10% 

1J2 4.9 14 162 27V4 

71 II 


22 8% 
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176 1414 


21% Curtice 
ft CuslEn 


39 1.9 12 401 20% 


11% B% 
38% 23% 
30% 22% 
9% 614 
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105 62% 

2114 15 
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29 11% 

-2% % 
814 4% 

27% 14 

9% 7% 
7% 5 
16% 9% 
19% 12 
14% 8% 

' 7% 4% 
17% 10% 
12% 3% 
11 3% 

9% 4% 
5 % 2 % 

20 9% 
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33 24% 

nvs ia 
1514 9% 

5% 3% 
18% 12% 
5 2% 

16% 11% 
9>4 7% 

16% 11% 
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M 19% 

21 Vi 8% 
27% 16% 
31% 22% 

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’]£ % 
22% 23 
22% 15% 
11 8% 
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16% 9% 
32 24% 

38% 24 
19 6 

9% 4% 
13% 8% 

16 10% 
32% 19% 
10% 4% 

17 12 

131* 91* 

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30% 22% 
46% 25% 
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18 2 


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> .15 2130 

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59 19 18% 1I%— % 

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749 24% 23% 24% — % 
3 9 9 9 + % 

231 7% 7V, 7% + % 

II M 16 16 

15 19% 19 19% + % 

098 11% 10% 11% + % 

53 5% 4% 5%+ % 

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2ft % Pope a 

39 2716 Police A0 1.1 
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58 1116 11% 11%— % 

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54 22 7 7 7 

24 15 16 6 16 15ft 16 + ft 

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152 6 5% a + % 

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150 12) 17 12V 72% )3%— % 

1J7 11J 10 11% 11% 11% 

125 11J 1 10% 10% 10% + % 

125 11.9 41 lOVb 10% 10% + ft 

125 IIA 2 10ft 10% loft + ft 

120 117 27 10ft 10 (Oft + ft 

424 125 37 33ft 33% 33% + ft 

4J06 127 68 31ft 31ft 31ft 

320 12.1 156 26% 26 26% + % 

257 12J 49 21ft 20% 20ft + % 

2J2 125 14 19ft 11% 18% — % 

254 I2A 18 20% 20% 30ft— % 
2A2 125 7 21ft 21 21 

1.12 IIA 20 9% 9% «% + ft 

237 IZ1 97 19% 19% 19% 

2J5 1Z1 17 17ft 17 17 — ft 

200 122 31 16V 16% 16% + ft 

1.96 115 7 16% 16% 16% + % 

225 124 6 18ft 18% 18% 

204 12A 88 14% 1416 14ft— % 

232 12J S lllft 18ft 18% + Vi 

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426 1Z1 130* 34 34 34 

4 AO 12A 2310* 37 35 35 —IV 

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42>m 32’6 Pen EM 120a 32 9 

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12V 6ft Plzuln J8 S 9 
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29ft 50 Radii 
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3% % scarfo 

7% 416 SDaoPf 48 115 
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21 ft irM SDoopf 2A7 1Z1 
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44 32ft SanJW 245 57 7 

36 23% Sandote JO ll 10 

4% 3% Sanrnrk A3f 82 14 

6% 4% Sound B .15 2A * 
6ft Aft Sound A JO 32 6 
22ft 14 Schell! 54 2A 12 
13% 10% Schwab AS 40 8 
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9ft 5ft Servatr 42f 7A 7 

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3Vi 116 Sharon 

14V 9% Shopwf 

15% 10% Stored 

8% 5% 5lfco 

13 8 SlkeaA* JO IA 12 

8 4ft Sllvrcst 

5% Zft SlmcoS 

19ft 10ft SmthA 

17V 9V SmttiB 


600* 12 tl 11 — 1% 
8 9% 9 9% + ft 

6 39ft J? 39ft + ft 
20 11 17% 18 + ft 

107x 1% 116 lft 

2 33ft 3316 33ft — % 

*> \ ,2 a ,3 * 

14 13ft 12ft 13ft + ft 
82 11 10ft 11 + ft 

138 4% 4 4—16 

20 7% 7ft 7% + ft 

30 9% 9% 9% 

32 13% 13% 13% 

46 2ft 2 2ft + ft 

71 4ft 4 4 — ft 

19 4 3ft 4 + % 

124 6% 6% 6% 


11 —1% 8ft 6ft SrtWteY J« J* „ W 

9 % + 14V Oft BvstEn .16 1.1 17 47 

jnS + % lift 6% TBor Jit 64 27 17 

HI + % « Tft TEC J6* A 19 13 

“% 23% 5% TIE 12 2035 

«% M, 17% 6% Til „ 46 30 

18ft 13 TOOPOS X U 11 
K UV, 6% TondBr 

13ft + ft W m Tasty A M 13 

ii+i* 6V 2ft Team 

4 — V Sft lft TdtA/n 

7% + % 19ft |3% TchSym 16 

9% 96 33ft TediOp 14 

13% Sft 3K TechTp 8 

2% + % 17% 7% Tech irl JO 15 9 

4 — % 139ft 76 T tianfi 30c 2 94 
4 + ft Jft 2 TOIOflOn 
6% 30% 2116 Telflai A4 15 14 

0% 12% Bft TeJDfa J6a 3A 10 

916 ~ ft l» 7% T.lscJ 61 

Sft 2ft Telesnb 

Aft + ft 3JS Ttnqevs 13 

+ Vk 12V 5ft Tensor 

5v + ft lift 5% TexAIr 5 

5% 10% 5% TexAE 3ft 6A 5 

9% 22ft 16% TexAE Pf 

7ft + ft 17% 3ft Txaoan 8 

9% +2% » TftrDA .10 20 13 

c* 11% 2% Tidwell 

lft- % 72% 56 TWEdPfWOO 1*5 


5 70% 70% 70% 


4$ 9% 916 9ft— ft 

IS 18% 18% 18% 

162 14ft 13% 14ft + ft 

2 2% 2% 2% + ft 

1 23ft 23ft 23V + ft 

147 5% 5ft 5% 

48 Oft 9% 9% 

13 1716 17 17ft + ft 

163 29% Z7% 29% +2% 

45 6ft 6ft 6ft 

8 23 22% 32% — ft 

si Tl H W 

23 9% 9% 9% 

8 3% 3ft 3ft 

1 19% 19% 19% 

A 25% 25ft 25% 

22Si 36 35% 36 +1% 

22 181* 10 18% 

14 31% 31% 31% + ft 

7 5ft 9b 5ft 


189 5ft 5 5% 

47 15ft 14V 14ft + ft 

17 8% lft S* - 

13 18% 9% 9ft + % 

03S 7% 7ft 7%+ % 
30 10% 10 10%+% 

80 16% 15V 16ft 

174 Bft Bft Bft 

18 12ft 12% 12ft + ft 

119 Sft 3% 3ft + % 

49 2ft 2ft 2% 


vJap 3 ” 


16 HJ7 19ft 19% 19(6—4* 


14 8 56ft 55ft 56ft + ft 

8 35 516 SVk 5%— % 

JO 15 9 116 16ft 15ft 15% - ft 
JOe J 94 W0fcJ25% 124 129% -Tft 


.516 SVk 5% — % 


113 4 3ft Sft— % 

A4 15 14 24 29ft 29% 29% — % 
J6a 35 10 ISO 10% 9ft 10% + U 
41 447 9V Bft 9ft + ft 

104 3ft 3% 3% 

ii a « 4% 4v + % 

_8 5% 5ft 5% ' 


9% 4% TortW 
13ft 7% TotIPtB 3A 
Zft ft TotPtwt 
TZV Sft TrasLx .10 
1816 lift T ms Tec 56 


518 11 10% 11 

53 J» Sft Sti + ft . 
12 18 17ft 18 
182 5ft 5% 5ft + ft 

S 5 5 5 — ft 

£ 4% 4% 4% 

» 69 69 69 -1% 

8 9 9 9 + Vk 

68 9V 9% 9ft+ ft 
30 V ft ft 


1816 1316 Trmm A0 Z6 B 


18 22% 23ft 22% + % 


56 35 11 

19 

20 
10 

9 

JO 1J 17 
1 


JO 20 11 
50 25 12 


56 2A 12 
41 41 1 
.10 IJ 

14 


50 10 6 
17 

.lie 1.1 > 


22 Tft 7% 7% — Vhl 

6 4% 4 4 ! 

15 15% 15% 15%+ % 

186 19 18ft 18% + ft 
1111 

10 13% 13K 13% 

3 7% 7 7% 

464 3ft 2ft 3ft + ft 
18 I4ft 14% 14ft + ft 
448 41 39ft 41 + % 

555S2 44 44 44 + ft 

69 6% 4ft 6% + % 

11 3V 3ft Sft— ft 
57 11% 111* lift 

32 2ft lft 1ft— % 
1111 
53 24ft 23V 23% — ft 

7 27% 27% 27V— ft 

162 5 6% S + % 

2 4% 4% 4% 

1 29 25 25 

3 £% 4% 6% — ft 

SB* 15% 14ft 15K +1 
148 20% 20ft 20% + % 

5 4K 4V 4ft 
15 4 3% 3%—% 

27 7% 7% 7»— ft 

12 8% BV 8% + ft 

31 1% 1ft lft— ft 

I 7% 7% 7%+ ft 

3 7% 7% 7% 

11 20% 20% 20%— % 
17 37% 37 37ft— ft 

12 22% 22ft 22%—% 
11 46% 46 46% + K 

11 2S% 25% 25% — % 

14 5% 5ft 51* 

11 5ft » 5V— ft 
45 6U 6ft 6ft 
62 22 21K 21% — ft 

9 1M 12ft 12ft 
2B Sft 5V 5%— ft 

15 27% 27% 27% — ft 
10 12% 12V 12V + ft 

4 49ft 49 49ft— ft 

5 2 2 2 + ft 


22 

AST 5.1 15 


31 

J4f ISA 14 
14 
17 


15 7% TrtSM AOe 41 23 

8V 6% TrffiCp A9t 9.7143 
7ft 3K TrIHme IB 

14ft 3V Trtdex 
4ft 2% TuMAe* 13 

M% 9% Tmtex A4 3.1 12 
27% 20% Tumc* UO *1 9 
5V 3% Tyler wt 
4% 2% UNA 7 

7 2 USR Ind 

34% 9% U Write B 

% ft Union 
15V 11% unlcppf JS *8 
lift BV Unlmrn 
19% 14ft UAlrPd 54b 12 10 
36ft 33ft UnCoeF 100b 2J 7 
3% 1% UFoodA .10 SJ 22 

3% lft U FaodD 22 

15 101* UtMed A5f 5.1 15 

22% 10% USAGwt 

11% 51* ustefen 31 

9% 6% UdltrtV jMfISA 14 
20 16% UnlfvB 

13% 7% UnvCm 
10% 5% UnfvRs 

16 9% UnvPcrt 

10 9% VST n 

2tft 15ft VnllyR 1J2 8J 7 
25% 15ft Vartpre A4 KB 13 
15*6 4V vertrfm 

20% 14% VlAmC AOb 15 10 
9% 3% VtRA 
1% % Verna 

16ft lift Veridl JO >A 10 
9 4% vtafadi 

9ft 5% Vlcon 12 

7K 2V Vfnfyo 

17ft 10% Vinca 04r j 9 
59 45 Vaintt 

7V 6Vk VbuafG 38 3A 12 

12% 8 Vopte* J6 13 14 

16ft 12% ValcCp AOa Z4 9 
BV 6ft WTC 
4 17% Walbar 

15 10% Walca 

31% 23 VttmoB 
32ft 22K WonaC 

4V v wmcwf 

BV 3% WStiH s 6 


J4 U 9V 9% m + ft ■ 

30 V K K 

.W J 10 73 KHt ip TOK +i 

56 13 9 54 17 16% 17 + ft 

AO Z6 B 4 1516 15ft 15% + ft- 

AOb 4.1 23 42 9%9K9ft+K 

A9t 9J143 10 7ft Tft 7Vb 

10 75 »b 5ft Sft + ft 

23 5V 5% 5%— % 

13 135 2V 2% 2V + 16 • 
A4 Z1 12 312 14% 13% 14 + ft 


361 5% 5ft 5% 

7 2 3 3 3 

5 2% 2% 2% 

B 591 10% 10ft 10% + 

231 %%%+%- 

72 15ft 15 15ft + ft . 
190 9% 9ft 9% 

10 9 17% 17ft 17ft— 16- 

7 1 35ft 36% 35% + ft • 

22 37 1% IK IV 

22 49 1% IV IV 

15 30 13ft 12% 12ft— ft" 

29 22ft 21ft 21V— %' 
31 6 lift 10% 11ft+ 16 

14 21 7 7 7 + ft 

14 7 19% 19% 19%— ft 

17 19 13ft 13 13 — ft 

31 126 8ft 7% 8 + ft 

29 12ft 12% 17V, — ft 
39 10 9% 10 + ft 

7 3 21ft 21V 21ft + ft 

13 23 24%24%24%+ft 

463 6ft 5% 6ft 

10 65 21ft 21 21ft + ft 

16 5ft 5% 5% 

14 ft Ti ft 

10 46 12V 7296 UK + 14 ^ 

25 Wt » 9ft + ft 

12 18 7% 7% 7% 

44 4% 4ft 4ft— 16 

9 9 17 17 17 — ft 

10 57% 57ft 57ft— ft 

12 3 7V 7K 7V + ft 

14 20 11 10% 10% — ft 

9 10 16ft 16(6 16% + ft 

31 261 7ft 71* 7ft + ft 

13 92 24 ZW 24 

8 48 13% 1316 1316 

18 4571 28ft 28 28V , 

17 24 28% 28 28% — ft 

62 lft lft 116 — ft 

6 122 8% 816 tft— V ' 


Company 


United 5h 


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.-*• ft- 


Beetal 




A 18 4571 28K 28 
A 17 24 28ft 28 

62 1ft ll 
6 122 8% 8i 


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A2t 7A 7 
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Une 9J 5 


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AO 11 10 
JO 30 24 


12ft Snyder ZOO 1*7 11 


7V SVk Solftron 


38 177 5ft 4% 5ft + V 


11 8*k SaefCap J5e 33 

9ft 7% SCEdpf 102 110 
10 7% SCEdpf 106 104 

9V 7V SCEdal 1410 11.1 
lift Bft SCEdpt 1.19 11.1 
13V 10% SCEdpf 1A5 lOA 
71 16V SCEdPf 2JD IIA 

31 16 SCEdpf Z21 11 J 

65 53ft SCEd Pf 7 JB 115 
77 64ft SCEdpf B.96 IIA 
16ft 6% Sprkmn 9 

10ft 6ft SprkRf 100 1Z5 
2BV isft Spectra - - 
6ft 3ft 5pedOP 
15 lav Saencar J4 Z2 21 
4% 2ft SarDwf 
10ft 4ft Sfffavn 
25V ]jft stdPrd 
71ft 53 SMSlm ZTVt 40 1< 
lift 8V Stanwd 
17ft lift siarrtH 
121* 6V State* 

18ft 14ft Stepan 
4 4V SlrJCoo 
3% lft SlertEI 
22 6ft SfrfEef 
11V Sft SterlSM 
4ft IK stmfw 
8% 5ft Sum ME 
mv 6ft SunCfy 
lift 5 SunSLn 
12ft 5V Sunalr 
T7ft ill* Sunjr . 

271* 16ft SuprFd A4b 1.7 13 
J% ft Sup Cra 
14V 6% Sualnd 

15M 10ft SuprSr 
6% sv Suewefi 
9V. 3 5wanfn 
2% lft SwftEn 
30V 19ft Swftfln 1J0 4A 12 


01 IJ 47 
JO 35 7 
2791 40 U 
14 
20 


17 2% TV 2K— M 

396 1% 1% 1%— % 

45 6% Sft 6% 

6 4% 4% 4ft 

14 3% 3% 3ft 

12 13ft 13V 13%+ ft 

23 10V 10 10V +1 

B 8% B% 8%— ft 

25 16% 1616 1616— 16 

13* M I0V I UK— U ; 

80 1% lft 1%+ft 

36 13% 13ft 13% + ft , 

22 13% 12% 12ft — ft ! 
22 6% 6V 6V — ft . 

71 12V 12% 12%— % : 

9 5 5 5 

2 3(6 3(6 3(6 

<2 17% 16V 16% + ft 

78 14 15V 15% + M 

40 13V 13% 13% 

78 7U 7ft 7ft 

5 10% 10% 10% + ft 

97 9% 916 9ft— ft 

2S> 10 9% 10 

29 10ft 9ft 9V + ft 

16 11 3ffV 10K— ft 

MO 13V 13% 13ft + ta 

20 20% 20 20(6 + ft 

9 20% 19% 19% + ft 

4 65 63% 63% — % 

3 77 7616 77 + V 

52 7% 71* 716— ft 

3 0 7% 0 + % 

42 28% 7k 1 * 28% + U. 

9 5V 516 5% 

B 10V WVfc 10V— ft 
55 4% 4% 4W+ ft 

10 4V 6% 6%— ft 

157 73ft 22% 23ft + % 

5 69% 69% 6946+16 

4 9 9 9 

43 16% 15% 16ft + % 

2 9% 9ft 9ft 

10 17 17 17 


60V WshPst 

.96 

Ll 

15 

33. 

86ta 

8SV 

85V — 

% 

17 WRIT 

1A0 

6J 

T7 

17 

34V 

244% 

3446 — 


6V WatscA 

JO 

ZA 

5 

17 

m 

av. 

Bta 


2% Wtttftnd 




37 

4% 

4 

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13% Wttrfd pf 

282 

6J 


TO 

16ft 

16ft 

MU 


IV Webcor 




113 

2ft 

Zta 

2V— 

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3ta Wedco 



8 

11 

4 

4 

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11% WOdfcn 



15 

90 

17% 

IKK 

17W 


7 WrkfTb 

021 



35 

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9ta 

9ta 


6V wakftrn 



13 

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11% 

11% 

11% 


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A 

5ft 

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31*— 

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15V Wasco 

02 

26 

7 

IS 

24V 

24 

24 



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• -rU 'V 


tarda* 


-i. -» 


38ft 31% WTexpt 440 1Z3 


14ft 7K WsfBrC 
13% 816 Wxtfarp 

13% 5% W Dtp Ml 
13% 716 WtHHtin 


49 FK IK IK 

30z 35% 35V 35V— % 

33 14V 14ft 14K + 16 

22 10ft 9% 99k— ft 

058 12% 1216 12ft 
496 13% 12(6 13ft 


friends 


18% 14% WIRET lJOe BJ 15 130 18% 18 18% + I* 

29 16 WsfnSL 1 J3e *5 71 129 27% 26% 27%— ft 

TDK 9ft WtlEniS 20 121 19% 19% 19V— ft , 

6% 3ft UncMfD 2 316 316 316— ft 

7ft WincxG 7 26 9ft 8% -9W j* 

3V 1 WUsnB 6 IV IV IK 

15ft 12W Wlnklm JO 13 12 15 15<* 15V 15K + (2 

23% 19% wmrm zjtaioo ss 22% 21 v 22% + ft 

10V 8 Wdafrm A04A9 30 9 8%9+lb 


WKWeor 52 3L7 


6V 2K WWdeE 


17V 

12% WVM9P4 1 JO 120 


20 

15 

36% 

27% Wort hn 

JO 

10 

11 

IS 

31 

19 

12 Wraths 

02. 

.1 


142 

’St 

7% 

3% WrntHp 

06e 


14 

49 

16% 

5% YankCd 




9R 

6V 

5% 

4 Yardny 

08 

)J 

13 

77 

5% 

12 

5% Zlmer 

.10 

IJ 21 

67 

7% 


2 316 3V 3V— ft 

26 9ft 8% -9ft j* 
6 IK IK IK 
15 15V 15V 15V + G 
SB 22% 21V 22%+ ft 
30 9 8% 9 + I* 

36 13% 13% 13% + Vk' 
Dl 4% 4% 4% + %m 

20 IS 14% 15 +%., 
15 31 30ft 38% — % 

s ^ * ’ss+ft- 


Ucc 

+ V? 

-- ~ ?. ; if. 

[r ■> i ’ 


Bfigss A Sir 


iiicr Rate Note 


wer. 


AMEX ffigh»>Lowi 


Jan. 29 


NEW HI OHS 


516 5Vb 5ta + ft Iciaramant 


AfllPuMs 

OopavCarp 


7ft 7V+ft HubbeiZOSp 
2% 2ft j Lvdafl s 


I Fries Enter n FrtacftaRsU 
G toner Heinfcfce 


J4 3J 14 
AO 3J 14 
44b 1.7 13 


05e S It 
33 22 TO 
14 


307 5% 5ft 5% — • ft MetexCa 

32 10K TOV 10V + ft 0061 eo 

249 716 7 7 — (6 PlyGem a 

43 6% 6V 4%+V Redkiwlnd 

6 14ft 14% 14ft + ft SCElBOpf 
311 26ft 26 26% + ft TecbOps 

467 lft IV m Vufcon Carp 

A 10 9V 10 + V WStBrttoC 
54 14% 14% 14% + ft 

33 t<A 6ft Sft 

5 4V 4V 4V 

to 1% 1% lft— V BelctanBin 


InfControl 
Lynch CSvk 
Motrocare 


AmExprwt 
DawrwvSL 
FurVaultn 
HatvfPmprv 
KJna Radio 
NUrtScf n 
NY Times 


PGE196PIM PLto4 40Pf 
PowarTest PSvCal 4 25 p 


Rykoff 

SCEZZlpf 

VallevRex 


SanJaMW 
Sterl Extrdr 
VtormnlAm 


MtakfiHonws WastiPost 


CDI Corps 
ESDfl 

Gi Export - 
Hotel Prop wt. 
Loti Prims 
Media Genl 
Olsten 
Pay Fane 
Quebcor as 
SCE120pf 
SvsfEno 
Vkrtech Inc 
wesepFM 


• nr - ■ ■ ~ 

0 % - • I “4 


JC.V •• 

■+z- _ _ l- ■■ 


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26ft 27ft + ft RIchmtfTCv 


MalartcHan Noeiindusf 


n. *s : . . 


Over-the-Counter 


NASDAQ Nallonal Market Prices 


iBERIi 


Sales in Net 

10*1 High Low 3 PM.CH ■90 


(Continued from Page 


The Gran Via of Spain. 


Mated r- 



45 9ft 


Wolex 

03 


360 36ft 

35ft 

MipiCO 

1 AO 

21 

115 45% 

44% 

Vancar 



63 3K 

3% 

ftonfCI 

J5e 20 

3917% 

17ft 

WonAnt 



104 UV 

9V 

UanolH 



1602 16% 

16% 

MonuC 

IJO 

4A 

18 29ft 

29 

UorFio 

01 




VIorKg 

■I2e 10 


lift 

Warrsn 

A8 

27 



Moseley 



490 6to 

Wfc 

More® 

JO 

IA 

914% 

I4K 

Moltmd 

06 

IJ 

168 43ft 

43 

MvKm s 

.101 

J 

2792 33ft 

3E!ft 


»V + ft 
36 V— W 
45% + V 
3% 

17V 

10 —IV 
16ft— % 
29i* + V 

18 

tt%— % 
18 + V 

Sft— V 
I4K + ft 
43 

33ft + ft 



J*k JM.— v, 
13’* 13V 
20V Zl 
47 41 

46ft 46 Vi + V 
23 V 23V — ft 
9K 9% 

24V » +1 

5 SVk + ft 
4ft 4% 

3ft 3ft— ta 
4% 4ft— ft 
6% 6ft + V 
IV IV 
6V 6V— ft 
10% 10% — % 
Bft BV + ft 
26ft 26% + ft 
SV 54k— to 
21ft J1V + V 
7K 8 
31% 31% 

2J% 23% 
av 24ft + V 
SV 5% 


10% 10% — ft 
I 25V av + V 
1 5V 6 
I 3% 3%— ft 
1 91* 916 — ft 
1 18 18 + V 

a% 37 % +1 
* 2 % 43 % +i% 

I 6% 6%— % 

a av + v 

1 9% 9K + ft 
T7V 17% + ft 
42ft 42V + Vk 
34ft 34% + ft 
22% 22%— ft 
4ft 4ft + I* 
15% 15V— ft 
3% 3% — ft 
46% 46K + ft 
5V 5V 
8% 8ft + ta 
8% 9 + ft 

11V 11K — ft 



516 3% 
13 4ft 
177 3% 
81 3% 
612 16V 
17 Zft 
7» 38ft 
67 48 
I TO 26V 
84 31 
52 21ft 
138 T7K 
3 Sft 
396 2% 
182 14ft 
1102 38V 
4815% 
643 7 
16 5V 
301SV 
44 IBU 
98 28V : 
14514 
T714K 
149 3ft 


lft + ft 
4ft— ft 
3ta— ft 
3ft— % 
16ft 

3ft + W 

av + k 

47ft 

at* + v 
•Mm— w 

21% 

17% 

5% 

2% + V 
14V 

37ft— lft 
15ft— U 
6*k + ft 
SV— ft 
18V— ft 
IB VI + ft 
28V+ V 
13V- V 
MV + V 
3% 


Worldwide, Iberia flies to 21 European, 2T North & 
i American . and 15 African & Middle Eastern 


South American, and 15 African & Middle Eastern 
destinations. 

Within Spain , Iberia flies an average of 260 times aday 
offering the most extensive domestic network in Europe 
And, in 19S3, Iberia ranked third In on-time 


So, take advantage of iberias worldwide network and 
competitive service on 4 continents. And, when in Spain, 
fl)’ the most extensive domestic network offered by any 


for you both in Spain and In 160 cities throughout the 
world. Their efforts have made Iberia not only Spain s 
number one multinational company, but also one of the 
world’s leading airlines, Europe’s third largest, flytngover 
13 million passengers yearly. 


airline, anywhere in Europe, at the lowest relative ares in 
Western Europe. 

Flying Iberia is the best way to reach more places. It’s 
no wonder we call Iberia the "Gran Vfa”. 

Iberia: Spain's Highway to the world. 




AIRLINES OF SPA/N 




Petit of 
FoutHr 
PaulPf 
PnvN 

Pflvchx 

PeofcHC 
Pear | H 

PwGW 

Ponbcp 

PefioEn 

Pen far 

Pemmt 

PbobE* 

PcapRt 

Percept 

Parse pi 

Petnte 

Phrmci 

Phrmki 

Plirm wt 

PSFS 

PfillGI 

Pfinn*m 


38338% 
61510 
19651ft 
568 9K 

2 14V 
206 12 

’ a* z% 

182 17% 
10 lift 
5914V 
102 6ft 
203 8% 
227% 
1 33 
IBS 16 
32 7V 

3 22V 

9 11V 
433 14% 

238 an* 

474 S% 

3 43V 

10 261 * 
67 2916 
75 9 

s ia * 

as 9 

111 u 

24 28K 
Z71 8 
8910% 
51 8% 
3264 9% 
3491 16% 
If 4 


49% 30 + ta 
9% 10 +ta 
50 51 + % 

9ft 9V + ft 
14 14 

lift 17 +ft 
7% 7% 

17V 17ft + V 
lift lift— ft 
14ft 14% + % 
6ft 6%— ft 
Bft |%-ft 
27ft 27ft + V 
33 33 —1 

15K 16 

TV 7V 
22V 22% 

11% lllft— V 
14% 14K 
34% 2Sta + ft 
5% 5%+ V 
42ft 42ft— ft 
26. 26 
29% 29% + V 
8% 8% 
lljj ,, £ — w 

BV 9 — V 
W + % 
28 28 
TV 8 + ft 

?4k 9%— ft 

gk BV + ta 
w «v 
16ft 16% 

3% Jft+ ta 


























Ji >•>; 

^ $ *> 

,* A^ f 

;;; is 
J f §; 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1985 


Page 13 


U.S.- Japan Talks End Without Pact 


■t. fc* 4 

k \ h! 

h & ■ 

a S’, *: > 

sii S S. 

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?• '!•■+! 


V . 

•>. V •/• • 


The A acetal cd Press 

TOKYO — Trade negotiators 
from Japan and the United States, 
ended two days of talks Tuesday 
without agreeing on the extent to 
which Japan should open its mar- 
kets to foreign products. 

The subcabiaet delegations 
promised to meet again ip Febru- 
ary to wort toward opening Japa- 
nese markets further to American 
goods, particularly in four areas: 
medial equipment and pharma- 
ceuucaJs, forestry products, dec- 
ironies and telecommunications 
equipment. 

Japanese negotiators insisted 
that much of the U.S. trade deficit 
with Japan is caused by the strong 
dollar, which makes American 


products expensive in foreign 
countries and makes Japanese 
products cheaper in the United 
States. 

But the U.S. undersecretary of 
state for economic affairs, W. Allen 
Wallis, contended that most of the 
U A trade deficit “results from Ja- 
pan’s failure to provide market ac- 
cess to competitive U.S. exports." 

The Japanese deputy foreign 
minister, Reishi Teshima, reported- 
ly rejected the American conten- 
tion that increased access to Japa- 
nese markets would be enough to 
allow U.S. imports to flourish in 
Japan. 

A ministry official quoted Te- 
shiroa as saying “Market-access 
freedom does not necessarily con- 


tribute to an increase in imports. 
Therefore we cannot arixpt the 
perception that Japanese markets 
are closed" 

Japan’s trade surplus with the 
United Slates swelled to about S34 
billion last year from $21.6 billion 
in 1983, according to U.S. figures. 
Japan accounts for 30 percent of 
the American trade deficit, accord- 
ing to U.S. Officials. 

Wallis said the U.S. government 
estimates that if it were not for 
Japanese trade barriers. American 
companies could boost their sales 
in Japan by $10 billion a year. 

Japanese Prime Minister Yasu- 
hiro Nakasonc has pledged to come 
up with a new trade package by 
March. 


AT&T Plans Increase 
In Chips Capacity 


KANSAS CITY. Missouri — 
American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. announced Tuesday 
that it plans lo raise its capacity 
jo make computer chips. 

The company, which pro- 
duces a 256K random-access- 
memory chip and a 32-bit mi- 
croprocessor. recently 
announced plans to produce a 
chip with 1.000 times as much 
memory as those now id use. It 
said Tuesday that it is gearing 
up capadiy “to ensure ail our 
customers that well be able to 
meet their needs." 


Improbable Comeback Story on China’s Yangtze 


* </ > ' 
\ Z'SJ. 
•. V- 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits. In millions, ore in local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


■JH Britain 

i Gcdaher 

X ?>£. tw WJ4 IM 

- pMam ZMQ. 7 . SWI 

3 .fiT-.RSSIw- WBJ lDl-l 

■: ? * : Remit Org. 

* r- Year HM MBS 

•j b. Revenue 73*7 742.9 

, L .v . .profit— f Q5J WJ 
*: r ; Per Short Mn Lid 


Canada 


Imperial Oil 
Moor. in* wo 

- Revenue 1410. 1450. 

■ Over Net 14941 106-0 

Over Share— UK0 0*4 
r year W4 MB 

" Revenue Wit 9jm 

Oper Not 533.0 3320 

.oaer Share- 302 109 

Total Nth Amor. 
4tn Qbot. MM im 

Oner Net— IQJ 191 

Oper Share— 042 0.11 

Year M Jgg 

Revenue — 1270. 107a 

Oner Net II J (a)31J 

Oper Share— 023 — 

* a: toss. Full name of com- 
pany Is Total Pomatum ol 
Norm America. 

Netherlands 

Also 

Year 19M WSJ 

Revenue l«ti 1M90. 

Oper Net 7504 4204 

Oper Share— 1942 1291 


United States 
Aikmfic Richfield 

4(0 Qaar. 19M WO 

Revenue 4400. *450. 

Net Inc. 3S54 4194 

Per Share 1.15 1*2 

Year 19S4 190 

Revenue 24*50. 2*910 

Net Inc 5474 1.550. 

Per Shore 241 643 

1904 year nef excludes pro- 
vision ot On million. 

Boeing 

4th Quor. IfM 190 

Revenue UK 1730 

Net UK- 1344 984 

Per Share 147 141 

Year lfM 190 

Revenue 10350. 11.130. 

Ooer Net 2904 3554 

Oaer snore— 441 347 

1984 year net excludes gain 
at 097 million tram tor tow 
Chorum. 

Borden 

4th Quor. 1914 190 

Revenue i.ihl 1.170. 

Net me - 5239 52*5 

Per Share 242 143 

Year mt 190 

Revenue *570 *270 

Net Inc 191*1 18947 

Per Share 7.13 556 

1984 nets Include sains of 
SJJ million In Quarter and of 
S9 million tn rear tram settle- 
ment o/ ckUm end sole of 
property. 

nrlei a 1 a # f I --1 1 — -- 

onggs & jiraTTOYi 
2nd Qaar. 190 19S4 

Revenue 197.0 1119 

Net Inc 1046 244 

Per Share 073 0.16 


lit Halt 19SS 190 

Revenue 331 J 191* 

Net Inc 1124 (a}2* 

Per Shore 045 — 

Ottos*. 

Chevron 

4th Qaar. 11*4 if*) 

Revenue 740a 7*oa 

Net Inc 43*4 4034 

Per Shore 126 l.lf 

Year 1984 19S3 

Revenue 292Ml 2920a 

Net Inc 1430- 1490. 

Per Share 4** 4*5 

Cydops 

4th Qaar. 1964 HU 

Revenue 3M* 2982 

Net inc *34 192 

Per Share 1*5 Ui 

Year 1964 19*3 

Revenue 1270. 142a 

Nel inc 1843 (0)12 

Per Share 442 — 

a.- As* 

Detroit Edison 

4 th Qaar. MS* MU 

Revenue 6454 579.1 

Nel inc 77* 715 

Per Shore 056 05* 

Year 1984 WO 

Revenue 2400. 2300. 

Not inc — — 2974 2644 

Per Share — 120 221 


rthQuar. 
Revenue — 


1*8* 1*0 
3490. 3350. 


Floating Rate Notes 


Net inc 3«3J 2404 

Per Shore— - MS 129 
Year MM HO 

Revenue 14*50. 129*0. 

Net inc 1.130- 955* 

Per Share— 555 520 


Jan. 29 


Maytag 

ftfi Qaar. IfM 190 

Revenue 1513 14)2 

Nat inc 15.18 1*81 

Per Share — 1.12 146 

Year 1964 190 

Revenue _i 6*2* 597.0 

Nel me 63-14 stuff 

PerShore — *63 *37 

Noble Affiliates 

4m Qaar. 19*4 190 

Revenue — 714 694 

Net me *«* 4* 

PerShore — all 0.10 

Year I9M 190 

Revenue 2B5J 2724 

Net Inc 174 23J 

PerShore 0*0 052 

Penn roil 

tn Qear. 19M MO 

Revenue 5908 52*4 

Oper Net 1924 6114 

Oner snare— 03) 1.11 

Year ntt MO 

Revenue 1350. 2460. 

Ooer Net 21355 180*8 

Oper Shore— 359 325 

Philadelphia Bee 

4th Qaar. T98, 190 

Revenue 70*1 632* 

Net Inc 11744 8744 

Per snare 0*0 8*8 

Year IN* 1IO 

Revenue MW. 2*00. 

Net inc 49139 38*59 

Per 5hcre — 170 2*0 

Pub. Svc Colorado 

etbQuar. IN* 1983 

Revenue 4485 391* 

Net Inc 384 258 

Per Shore 066 0*4 

Year 19M 190 

Revenue 1400. 1*20. 

Nel Inc 1452 106.4 

Per Share— 255 IM 

>98* rear net Includes 
choree a! S7J million iron* 
operating dttftcutttos. 

Pub. Svc N- Ham p. 

4th Qaar. 19*4 190 

Revenue 1304 1264 

Net inc 4158 417 

Per Share — UI 192 

Year 1984 190 

Revenue 525* 4615 

Net inc 156* 151.7 

PerShore— 347 149 

Full name ot company is 
Public Service of New Hump- 

ckln 


Retdihold Chem. 

4th Qaar. 19*4 190 

Revenue _ 177.1 I7*J 

Net me 5.92 S*1 

PerShore— 040 0*9 

Year WM MO 

Revenue Wi* 747 J 

Net me 25.71 21.7 

Per Shore. — 3*3 174 

Schering-Plough 

eta Quor. 1964 MU 

Revenue 448.1 43*5 

Net Inc 37J7 3*2 

per Shore — 075 071 

Year IfM WO 

Revenue— 1470. 1*10. 

Net Inc 1772 190.1 

Per Shore 350 3*0 

Sun Company 

4ttl Qaar. IfM 190 

Revenue isia. *230 

Nel inc 1364 614 

Per Shore 1.19 053 

Year MM 190 

Revenue — is*oa 15520 

Net Inc 5300 4534 

Per snare 4*7 344 

1983 nets Include ooms ot 
s 127 mutton In Quarter and of 
IIS million toy tor tram LIFO 
toyentory 00 a ch ar ges OtStsS 
million In both perrons. 


Texaco 


4th Quor. 1984 190 

Revenue 1:40a 1050a 

Net Inc (a >5524 ^0 

Per Shore — — 140 

Year 19M 1983 

Revenue 48.100. 41,100. 

Net inc 3064 1230. 

PerShore— 143 *80 

0: toss. 

lime 

4th Quar. 1984 WO 

Revenue &S14 7634 

Oaer Net — UJ 445 
Ooer Share- 146 070 

Year 198* 1983 

Revenue lh». zjoa. 

OPer Net 21*4 1432 

Oper Shore— 137 225 

1964 Quarter net Includes 
onto ot le cents 0 share tram 
sale ol unit but 1963 nets *«- 
dude gains of SHU million -a 
Quarter and ol S2L7 million In 
year from discontinued ooer- 

an ~ UAL 

4th Quor. IfM 190 

Revenue 157a 1.6*0. 

Nel Inc 6745 56.12 

PerShore u* 144 


Year MB* 190 

Revenue 6.970. 642 0 

Nel Inc 28229 14245 

Per Store— U6 JR 
1964 nets Include goto of S3 
million to Quarter and ot OKS 
million in year. 

Utd aluminaring 

4tb Qaar. 19M 190 

Revenue W4J 1224 

Mel InC 2349 21*9 

PerShore 1*0 1*3 

Year 1984 190 

Revenue 5895 449* 

Net Inc 883 805 

Per Shore 5*0 5*7 

U.S. Steel 

4th Quor. WM »*D 

Revenue 4300 *700, 

Not me 294 lalfO. 

Year 19M 190 

Revenue— 19.100 17500. 

Net inc 4934lo>M60 

PerShore 352 — 

a- toss. Per share results 

otter preferred tdvidencts 

U^. Tobacco 

Oh Quor. 19M 190 

Revenue 11*8 1025 

Net Inc 224 18? 

Per Share 076 0*4 

Year »M IVO 

Revenue 4434 3824 

Nel Inc 8173 7065 

Per Shore. 2*6 2*2 

1984 year net Includes loss 
ol SI* million Pom Inventory 
writedown. 

Unocal 

4th Qaar. 19M 190 

Revenue 2.970 2*80 

Net Inc 153* 1784 

PerShore 8*8 142 

Year MM 190 

Revenue 11560. 10*90. 

Net Inc 7004 *25.9 

PerShore *03 360 

Warner-Lambert 

(tti Qaar. IfM 190 

Revenue 7915 7864 

Net Inc 51.18 48*9 

Per Share 0*5 0*1 

Year WM 190 

Revenue 1170 3.11a 

Net Inc 221? 3015 

Per Share 2*1 UI 


(Continued from Page 9) 

4,500 tons in all. Its headquarters 
are two dimly lit, unheated rooms 
in a building belonging lo the state- 
owned monopoly that is supposed 
to be shaken from its sloth by its 
tenant's competition. 

Minsheng’s revival aims at some- 
thing belter. The spur came from a 
visit to the dty by the secretary- 
general of China's Communist par- 
ty, Hu Yaobang, who ordered that 
something be done about shipping. 

Most industrial growth is coming 
along the coasts, where markets 
and materials are less hampered by 
transportation. The Yangtze, 
stretching from Shanghai deep into 
the interior at Kunming, serves a 
hinterland of which much is inac- 
cessible by road or rail 

Old Minsheng employees gath- 
ered last spring. Old Mr. Lou was 
dead, but survivors who built the 
business with him were eager to 
resume work. The Bank of Sze- 
chuan posted a loan of the equiva- 
lent of SI.4 million, and on Ocl 1, 
with a speech by the mayor and a 


blast of foghorns, the first two 
barges downstream. 

Mail from across the country 
quickly brought more than 2,000 
job applications from captains, 
deckhands and engineers. 

Compared with 1954, the new 
Minsheng has on uphill climb. Old 
Mr. Lou had ships sailing through- 
out .Asia, and had bought vessels in 
Canada and the United States- He 

owned a shipyard, a coal company, 
a textile plain and a hospital 

From (be 1920’s, when foreign 
companies dominated Yangtze 
navigation, he used mergers, tariff 
cuts and wartime demng-do to 
make Minsheng the dominant 
force on the river. Potentially one 
of China's richest men, he gave 
much of his wealth to charity. 

This has smoothed the way for 
Lou Gouji. The bank has autho- 
rized a capitalization of uptoS17.8 
million, and each employee will be 
Offered up to 53,570 in stock. Own- 
ership and control will rest within 
the company, freeing it to set tariffs 
and wages, to hire and fire staff and 
to expand into other fields, subject 


to new laws on private enterprise 
that are bring worked out 

Mr. Lou has formulated ambi- 
tious plan* In three months he ex- 
pects to have four tugs and 21 
barges plying the river. By the end 
of the year the company will have 
700 employees, he says, and ought 
to be expanding into all the areas of 
the old Minsheng — shipbuilding, 
coal mining , textile manufacturing 
and passenger shipping. 

Minsheng. in talks with U.S. 
companies, also is sc h ed u led to ex- 
plore joint ventures in hotels and 
tourism. 

Meanwhile, at the offices above 
the wharf, a camaraderie has devel- 
oped. Fifty of the company’s 200 
employees were with the (rid com- 
pany. Jiang Chansui. 78 years old, 
returned to write the company’s 
rule book, and says he has not en- 
joyed himself as much in years. 
“Here, we can all develop our tal- 
ent,” he said. 

The company has its own blue 
uniform and motto, “Have you fin- 
ished the task you set for yourself 


today?** The office walls are pa- 
pered with handwritten slogans, 
but their topic is production, not 
politics. 

Mr. Lou spent nearly 30 years 
working as a hired hand in his ra- 
dio’s old coal business after it was 
expropriated, and he and his broth- 
er both suffered along with tbe rest 
of the old property^wning class 
during the cultural revolution. 

Isnza to Sell Trucks, 
Technology to China 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Isuzu Motors Ltd. 
announced Ihesday that it has 
signed a 75-billion-yen (5295-tml- 
lion) contract to sell trucks and 
truck-manufacturing technology to 
China. 

A company spokesman said that 
beginning in April tbe company 
will ship 40,000 trucks to China 
over two years through G Itoh & 
Co„ and will ship truck-manufac- 
turing technology over seven years. 


AUTO SHIPPING 








INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

for 1MMEEM7F deivory 




‘.-j i-VJ 

tffciTliE 

■JU ST 77TH ZEgS g 




mmm 


AUTO CONVERSION 


10 YEARS 

Wo Mrvw Cm to *o World 

TRANSCO 

Kaepuig a consort stock of more then 
300 brand new an. 


r— . " y i 


TAX FREE CARS 
P.C.T. 

lagM Showroom t inventory 
AS make* al tn odflh. brand new 
berioan 1, 2008 Antwerp, Betgium 
TeL 3/231 59 00 
tbe 35546 PHCART B 
Apply for our coker adabgue 
USS5 cosh 


FRANCO 

BRITANNIC 

TAX FREE CARS 

ROLLS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

JAGUAR 

ROVER 

RANGE & LAND ROVER 
European & Worldwide 
delivery 

21 Ave Kleber 
75i i« PARIS 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTL DELIVERY 

We keep a brae node of 
most coy brands 

TeL 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 rue Lent, 

1050 Brunei* 


TAX REE CABS: MRCHKS, Rofls 
Boya, Audi Volvo, Porsche, BMW. 
We keep o large ilodt at brand new 
and good used cor* We do the 
D.O.T tmd EJ*A an our awn ore- 
meet. We dso take core of the dip- 
png and bond rg m U.SA Centner m 
<8 these nwTKJt*fc lei. Betaum 
050/715071, teL USA. XI/ 6338611. 
lb Belgium 82209 BJSOAU B, tb 
USA *795689 *n US. NV Euro Aw- 
to' i Intemotiond, Koninan Astndbon 
47. 9990 Akddegem. Befrum- 


MRKBB500SL 
ad 568 - Leaher Bkxk 27 
• 44,000 km, from 


Sv<d fad 568 - ledher Block 271. fidv 
loaded - 44,000 bn, from 5 '83. 


US$29,000 

Anlnlw *iiml G^H 
BadiianerStr 703, 4350 facktnghauen 
Tal 02361/7004 Tx *29957 LHS D 


Tax free Con/ Tax Freo tab 
Shop around, Fmd the bed pncM 
you am gel end then cane to 

RBMEX 

Get your Europeon Merced^ Porsche, 
BMW or Rofc Boyce front 
RBMEX GmbH, Gertingstr. 100. 
D-C30 Mueha m aA Ruhr, W Germ. 
Tek (OJ206-434099 Tb. 8561188 


TAX RS NEW MStCBIES 
500 SB, SEC, a, rmradote dekvwy. 
fu6 export service. Sewn money) 
UefceMnMe wboiesdn priced 
Cofl Sderto n - col expwwnce! 
S n i e cti on heahtaart Gaddi 
P.a Bon 13Z7. d 30B Sykn, 

W. Germany. Tel: f>) 4242^0458, 
60459, 60450. TIk 24109. 




SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY GUIDE Tel 527*9 40 


PARIS YOIMG LADY 341 21 71. 
WP PA & bfingud intetpreter. 


ATHB *£iOT fo**’*™ 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


N.Y.- 




TO USA ROM £119 one way. 
NATC London 01734 8100. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 



HOTELS 


FRANCE 


BUSBESS A IM8MGBANT 
VISAS TO USA. 

Attorney SJ. Levm. w9 be in Europe I BBMGUAL ASSISTANT to busness 
1/X to 2/1 Leave nsagu: Zunch I executives. Pens. 500 58 17 
pi 121 1-92-07, FronUvrtWft') 1344-1 45 

Head office: 1611 Conn. Ave. N.W. 

Washington 20009, USA 

1 Tek London 01 381 9847 


HOm. UJTET1A, PARS •**» 

FF315 per person, poubie occupcrcy, 
Nov 23- March 31). A Iradkiond I9H 
style , r enovated how in heart of Pan* 
300 rooms, ar-condtioning & sound 
proof window* on boulevard. Codkal 
lounge & typical Pbrsicn restaur ant. 
45 83 80^1X7^106. Td (1) 544 38 10 


BOOKS 






SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/l i tteipteter & Tounsm Guide 

PARE 562 0587 


PARS PA 

BBJNGUAL YOUNG IADV 

PARIS: 520 97 95 


YOUNG GOMAN LADIES. MuUn- 
gud, annwcSote service. Trowd com- 
prnons from BRUSSB5/RANXFUKT 
to Europe. Brussels 322/734 38 86 



YOUNG HEGANT LADY 

M^tecded -27^00 km. from 5/B3, JWWJUJNG ^ 525 ,, 01 


W " '■ 


4 T 7 i i, -w , 






1= 1 

qi .-*,w a'. 1 ,* 

F/./uT'-f/.n 




Place Year Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

in the 


ui i n l [», v LT¥Ti=TT I »■ rl i 


Bf Phone; CaB your load IHT representative with your taut. You 
wS be mfonrwd of the cast immetSotdy, and am prepayment ts 
mode jtoor ad wl appear wither 48 hours. 

Carts The bene nXe a $9.80 per Ena per day + land taxes. Them am 
25 leNcfi, signs and spaces n the first Kne and 36 in the folowiitgknes. 
Minimum space is 2 ine* No cMmvioAons accepted. 

CrndR Cade Ameriaei Express, Diner's Club. Euraaxd. Master 
Card, Access and Voa 


Pam: (For dms ified only}: 
747-4600, 


Arm to r then. 26-36-16 
AUteoto 361-8397/360-2421. 
Bmmrtt 343-1B99. 

Cnp enii agai n pi} 329440. 
fmnlBhsrfc p69J 7267^5. 
Lo w on tos 29-58-94. 

Uabon: 67-27-93/66-2544. 
London.- pi) 8364800. 
Morbid: *55-2891/4553306 
MRore (02)7531445. 
Norwoyi P3) 845545. 
Bonne 679-3437. 

S wode m 08 104632. 

Tel Avhr; 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 


Now York: (212) 752-3890. 


LATIN AMERICA 


Bogota- 212-9608 
Buena* Airet: 41 40 31 
Pept312 
Cream: 331454 
Gaayaamk 431 943/431 
IW 417 852 
h a m 64-4372 
Sim Jonm 22-1055 
SartkoBo: 6961 555 
5oo Porto: 852)893 

mlddleeast 

Brtnoin: 246303. 
Jotdm 25214. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
Qatar. 416535i 
Saadi Arabia; 

Jedde hi 667-1500. 
UAL Duba 224161. 

BAR EAST 

Bangkok: 3909657. 
Hang KantB 5420906 
Manlae 817 07 4?. 
Seoul: 7258773. 
Singapore: 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 75244 25/9. . 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 


Sydney: 929 56 39. 

Mafcoema: 690 8233. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES ] ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS* 


ZURICH 


ALEXIS BCOBT SERVICE 
TEL- 01/47 SS 82. 


MADRID APPLE 

ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL 2503496. GREET CARDS. 


★ MADRID * 

TASTE BCOBT SStVKX 
Tek 4117257 - 4117602 


SHE- AMSTERDAM 
Escort Service. 227837 


GENEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tab 46 09 28 


GENEVA -BEAUTY* 
ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL 29 51 30 


ROME CTOB BJROK ESCORT ■ 
& Guide Sennee-Teh 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm) 


MiSS SCAMXNAV1A 
Copenhagen Escort Service 
Tek 01-5417 OS, aedf cards 


CCA Escort Agency. 0211-304369 


GENEVA- HBBC ESCORT SHtVICE 
Tab 36 29 32 


BRUSSELS M1CHB1E BCTRT AND 
GUIDE SaCVKZ. TEL 733 07 98 


BBUSSas. BEUBUM V JJ». ESCORT 
A TRAVEL 5BVKX. 02/ 537 33 97 



BRUSSB5. OLANTAL ESCORT Ser- 
vioe. Tek 02/520 23 66 


MUMCH mars Escort + Guide 
Service. Tek 089/4486038 


V S°^^?^ IRffKCOeTSefvi0B - 

Tot 52-30-355. 


LONDWI USA BCORT SERVICE Tek 
402 0557 


MUMCH. PRIVATE Bead Service, 
Tek 91 2314- or 918132. 


AMSTERDAM JEAfET Escort Service 
Tek (D2DI 326420 or 340110. 


r-. r. - . ’ /j ’. "rj. il - i 


Eioort Service. 0221/124601. 


UtAMCniBT “TOP TBT Eworl Ser- 
vice. 069/59-60-52. 


MUMCH -HOMY 4 TANIA fioori 
Service. Tat 3) ? 11 D6or3JJ 7900 


KAREN - FRANKFURT ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tek 069/88 62 88 


AM5TE9DAM: CLASS Escort Serwce. 
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DOMNA, AMSTERDAM ESCORT 

Guide Service. Tek 10201 762842 


FRANKFURT SONJA BCOBT Ser- 
vice. Tet 06968 34 47 


AMSTERDAM 07Y Escort Service. 
Teh 02013416 07. 


AMSTERDAM, Escort 5erviee 75" 
Tet (0201-994/82. 


h •iTiiVi'ttii 


LONDON ESCORT 
Tek 935 5339. 



CHSSEA ESCORT SBVKE. 

51 Beouctamp Plow, London SW3. 
Tek 01 584 6513/2749 {4-12 pm) 


GENEVA RR5T ESCORT SERVICE 
Rerervcdiara ISAVB/WStDR) 
A Sta STATIONS. TB< 31 49 87 


G84EVA-BBT 


TEL 022/ 29.13 J4 


AMSIBDAM JASMINE 

ESCORT SERVICE. 020-366655 


CHARLENE G&CVA 

Guide Service. Tat 2S3 397. 


LONDON RAKBE BG0RT Servce. 
Heathroer/Gatwicfc. Tel 624 9844 



BRUSSELS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 
Escort Service. Tek 02/7317641. 


AGB4CY. FRANKFIKT -AWC^ Escort Service. 
Tek 069 / 2881-03. 


RANXHAT- KBISTN ESCORT + 

Travel Service. 0617274540 


RANXRIRT AREA. BASEUFS b- 

aort & Travel Smut 069/ 62 88 05. 


RtANKHIKT AREA. SHERAZ/US’S 
E sc ort & Travel Service. 62 84 32. 


RANKRJST/ MUNICH Mde Escort 
Service, 069/386441 & 099/3518226 


HAMBURG -BStGtTTE Escort Service. 
TeL 040/58 65 35. 


MONTREAL, CANADA, CLAIRE Es- 
cort & Gude Service. 514768*535. 


Qmdi- 

1756. 


VBWA ETOllE ESCORT SHTVICE. 
Tek 56 78 55. 


VIBMA’S RUST ESCORT Service. 
02244*191 or 722*32. mgltiinaid. 


MADRID IMPACT ESCORT & Guide 
Serve*. MrttOngurt. 261 41 4^ 


HOUAMkJB ESCORT SSVKE. 020- 
222785, 030944530, 02997-3685 


IONDON TOME BCOBT Service. 
Tet 01-373 8849. 


■&D0MNBM BCORT Servce. 
Tet 370 7151. 




1!S2!'Td!o?mSr 4 a * fe [*«“.YP'.BO»T sanra. 




























































































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30. 1985 



PEANUTS 


I THINK 1 HAVE TOO \f fDOP 00 MV HOMEWORK 
MUCH 5TRE55 IN MV LIFE.. FOR ME. IT UJOUIP REPUCE 
I THINK MY ARTERIES MY STRESS... 

ARE a05IN6... ^ , 



BOOKS 


YOU CAN'T PO 600P \ 
HOMEWORK WHEN YOU ? 

CAN FEEL YOUR l 
ARTERIES ClOSINc.. I 


WHITE NOISE 


By Don DeLillo. 526 pp. SI 6.95. 
Viking, 40 West 23d Street, 

New York. N. V. 10010. 


Reviewed bv Richard Eder 


BLONDIE 




ACROSS 


I Down Under 

birds 

5 Jai-alal basket 

10 Down Under 

product 

14 A Carnegie 

15 "Wait 

Dark" 

16 Pelvic bones 

17 "The " 

(subject of this 

puzzle) 

20 Even If, for 
short 

21 Modify to suit 

22 Requires 

23 Preminger 
product 

24 High kite 

25 Koala’s 
"kitchen" 

S3 Indigo dyes 

34 Consumer 

35Numbat*s 

morsel 

30 Brief 

autobiography 

37 Drafty places 

39 ‘‘Money 

object" 

40 When Paris 
sizzles 

41 Stopper 

42 Ancient Greek 
theater 

43 1988 bicen- 
tennial city 

47 Unmatched 

48 Amateur radio 
operators 

© New York 


40 Diving 
apparatus 
52 “And the 
rockets’ red 


24" Death”: 

Grieg 

25 Lower borders 
of roots 

26 Oneness 



_ NOW l — > L 


D ON DeLILLO assembles a scene of con- 
temporary American well-being out of 


.©Is '\ 



BEETLE BAILEY 


54 Half a dance 
57 Southern lights 

60 Alum 

61 Prospect 

62 Suva Is its 
capital 

63 Supporter 

64 Allen or Frame 

65 Down Under 
marsupials 


27 Quoted 

28 Finnish] 


28 Finnish port 

29 Seagoing org. 

30 Supporting 
frame 

31 Boredom 


1 Prepare for 
publication 


2 Long-run TV 
show 

3 Indians’ shell 
money 

4 Tasman or 
Timor 

5 Lovable 

6 Bivouac 

7 Traffic sign 

8 Hue 

9Hgt. 

10 One- 
dimensional 

11 To the 
sheltered side 

12 Obey 

13 Cricket 
equipment 

18 Fastens 

lBTchr. 

23 FJD.R. dog 


32 Mouthlike 

opening 

37 He played 
Hopalong 

38 Brazilian 
macaw 

39 One of the 
Argonauts 

41 Fragrant wood 

42 AbaJone 

44 Not a soul 

45 Kind ol daisy 

46 Scottish 
garment 

49 Tale of 
derring-do 

59 Ringlet 

51 Russian river 

52 Rate; speed 

53 Luxuriant 

54 Muse of 
history 

55 Son, In Buenos 
Aires 

56 Sale sign 

58 St. 

58 Neighbor of 
Eur. 



you shoulp have seeni it 

BEFORE ME ATE ALL TME 

BLUEBERRIES * 



tor 



the civilized cusioms of a college town: and 
contaminates it. The contamination comes lit- 
erally from a cloud of noxious gas escaping 
from a raptured railroad tanker. But the poi- 
sonous leak is related to something more gen- 
eral: the expedients of an encroaching technol- 
ogy whose means displace our ends and our 
humanity. 

It is a novel of disintegration, of familiar 
things hijacked and spoiled, of nature, love and 
civility leached and estranged the way a famil- 
iar face grows strange in a dream. It is a novel 
of hairline prophecy, showing a desolate and 
aU-too-believable future in the evidences of an 
all-ioo- recognizable present. 

The wonder, though, is the sense of well- 
being that steals around us as we read it It is 
tbe feeling of being in the best of hands. The 
author is Charon as a master mariner: he 
brings us across the Styx in a lilting maneuver 
that is so adept that we can't help laughing as 
we go. Indeed. “White Noise,” besides bong 
prophetic and sad, is very funny. 

Jack Gladney, his wife Babette. and four 
children by various marriages live in the bucol- 
ic Midwestern town of Blacksmith. They are a 
tender, nervy bunch: they cherish and surprise 
each other, and DeLillo portrays them with an 
endearing, warmth. 


private corporation moves into town to hold 
regular disaster drills. Jack's daughter arranges 
her calendar around the days when she has io 
play a corpse. The fear of dying that both Jack 
and Babette have bottled up inside them now 
emerges, and twists their lives into melodramat- 
ic patterns. 

Toward the end, DeLillo lets the wildness go 
briefly out of control but that is a minor defect 
in a stunning book The author has engaged us 
thoroughly with his Gladneys: we adopt them 
as our Noahs; we register the damage when the 
contamination and alienation of a society past 
human control mark them, and we cheer their 
struggles to resist 

The toxic cloud, terrifyindy described, is the 
central symbol of humanity's inability to mas- 
ter its knowledge. But through tenderness, wit 
and a powerful iron)', DeLillo has made every 
aspect of “White Noise" a moving picture of a 
disquiet we seem to share more and more. 


w er 


Fir 




Richard Eder is on the staff of the Las Angeles 
Times. 




BEST SELLERS 


Ike Nen Yoifc Times 

This list i> harfJ on report* from more than 1000 hort.vnnr> 
ihnwghoui the United Suit-. Week* on lot an: not mvoKuilt 

tWtsrt.ll II <.C. 

FICTION 

TTr. I.M Week 

Week Week oaMo 


" _f 


dealing warmth. 

They Eve the normalcies of an academic 


THE SICILIAN, by Mari.’ Puzo 

THE TALISMAN. h> Stephen King and 

PVtcr Sinuib .’. 

SO LONG. AND THANKS FOR ALL 

THE FISH, bv DimieU> Adam* — 

THE LIFE AND HARD TIMES OF HEI- 
DI ABROMOW1TZ, h\ J«ui Ritvw - — 

LOVE AND WAR. biJohn lakes 

ILLUSIONS OF LOVE, hv Cvnihia Five- 


"-’-k 


ANDY CAPP 


JVE STILL GOTflOMEY ...i 


/ft 


HELLO, HELLO. 
I THINK WE’D. 

r- BETTER.. r< 

HfltVEAWOBO) 
. DCWNATTHE ) 
V SWTK7N, < 
f SUNSHINE > 


r GfVEADOS 

.AB40N4ME-, 


community, yet all these normalcies have a 
wild, parodic edge to them. Jack's academic 
specialty is Hitler: he gives courses in Ad- 
vanced Nazism and tutors his Nazism majors. 
He is ensconced, appropriately enough, in the 
department of American pop culture. Babette, 
warm and upbeat teaches adult education 


classes in posture, and in eating and drinking. 
Babette is Jack's fourth wife; one of his 


7 IF TOMORROW COMES, bv Stdncv 

Shcldon — 

* THE FOURTH PROTOCOL by Frakrr. 
ick Forevih S 

9 LIFE ITS OWNSELF.bv Don Jenkins.... 10 

10 JITTERBUG PERFUME, by Tom Rob 

11 “ .AND" LADIES OT THECUHLby 

Helen Hoown Sanimvvr b 

12 STRONG MEDICINE, bv Arthur Hoi lev 12 


, . . J-.j; 




f.«I 


WIZARD of ID 


Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


<#uat gaooop muxiop (max 
6* i^etootfQocct&oacr 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


HAVE /I 

NICE owl 


f -mum \s 
\\ 
U 

earumtX \ 





a 


fer ■ \f-to 








!!■■■*■>■ Itcl S e taCH l 


Babette is Jack's fourth wife; one of his 
previous wives lives in a Hindu ashram in 
Montana: another works for tbe Central Intel- 
ligence Agency. A 14-year-old son. Heinrich, is 
pretematurally old with up-to-the-minute sci- 
entific knowledge; be is growing bald and 
insists that any emotions he may feel are sim- 
ply neural activity. 

Information — the "White Noise" of the 
title — invades and displaces. Jack feels a sense 
of validation by higher authority when the 
electronic machin e at his bank confirms that 
his balance is roughly what he supposes it to 
be. Shopping at the supermarket is a rite, and 
its profusion of food is a guarantee that society 
is still holding together. Objects are transient 
When Jack passes a garage sale, he thinks of 
the items as Tailed possessions." 

Odd things occur. The school is evacuated 
one day because of a real or suspected toxic 
emanation; one of tbe teachers was reported to 
be rolling on the floor and speaking in foreign 
languages. Wilder, the Gladneys' toddler, cries 
for seven straight hours one day, and then 


13 LrNCOLN. by Gore Vidal II 

14 ST1LLWATCH, by Mary Higuiu Clark . 15 


14 ST1LLWAILH. by Mom Hiahuu Clark „ 15 

15 CiOD KNOWS, by Joseph HcTfcr 13 


NONFICTION 


1 LACOCCA: An Autobiography, by Luc la- 

ccoca with William Novak ! 

2 LOVING EACH OTHER. by Leo Btucag- 

3 TH E BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER^ by 

Richard Bach ...» 

4 PIECES OF MV MIND, by Andrew A. 

5 HEY^ATTA MJN Lftt l WROTE A 
BOOK.! by John Madden with Dave An-i 

' denoo _ — 1 

(. ■■THE GOOD WAR_" bv Studs Tcitccl ...; 

7 DR BURN'S PRESCRIPTION FOR' 
HAPPINESS, by George Bum* I 

H MOSES THE Kinmby James Heniot s 

9 SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 

Evan S. Connell — _ — .. 

10 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Shtd Silver- 

1 1 HERITAGE, bv Abba Ebao 

12 ELVIS IS DEAD AND I DO NT FEEL 
SO GOOD MYSELF, bv LcwL Grizzard 

13 THE BRAIN, bv Richard M. Result 

14 THE WEAKER 'VESSEL by Antonia Fra- 

15 ONE WRITER'S BEGINNlNGr by Eu- 

doraWelty 


! \ -V 
1 -* 


REX MORGAN 




i 



WHEN DID BERT T 
LEAVE, MOTHERT 
WILL HE BE BACK 
TOMORROW? > 


f I DONT KNOW, KENNY f l ^ 
THIMK HIS SISTER IS LEAVING > 
FOR LONDON IN THE MORNING f 
k HElL BE TAKING HER TO J 
Wines THE AIRPORT — . nifltl 


stops suddenly. These are signs, omens. 

Then a black cloud appears over tbe railroad 


doraWeliy 13 44 

ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 


BERT, EMRLJN&—Z 
DIDN'T EXPECT VOU 
HOME SO EARLY? , 
. HAVE YOU HAD \ 
fe-T DINNER* A 


yards, and the town finds itself beading toward 
evacuation sites. Gladney is initially skeptical. 
These things don’t happen to professors, be 
says, “but to people in mobile homes in the 
scrubby parts of tbe country where the fish 
hatcheries are.” 

The doud passes, but Hfe grows stranger. A 


WHAT THEY DONT TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 

Mari H. McCormack 

WEIGHT WATCHER’S QUICK START 


PROGRAM, by Jean Nideich - 4 

NOTHING DOWN, bv Robert G. Allen 5 


NOTHING DOWN, bv Robert G. Allen 
WOMEN COMING OF AGE by Jane 

Fonda with Mignoo McCarthy — ~~ 

THE ONE MINUTE SALES PERSON, 
by Spencer lohnuwi and Larry Wilson .... 


fuaSior Oijrr-wc " viluiKs S 


of 



BRIDGE 


fc- - - 




Bv Alan Truscott 


The ace and king of hearts 
were taken, and South took 


•If KXI THINK THIS IS BAD.tJUSHOOUW SEEN THE 
STORMS WE HAD WHEN 1 VWS Y(J|JR AGS ' * 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


1 NERMAL . VOG'R£ CUTE, &OT . 
VOO'RE NOT VERV BRIGHT. { 
POESN'T THAT BOTHER VOO?] 


Nihe diagramed deal after 
vJ a strong artificial opening 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to lorm 
four ordinary words. 


WOSOP 


u 


OH NO 


1 C FfGORE r'LL GROW OOT Of 
THIS COTE STAGE SOONER j 

OR LATER -Y 

/ 1 REST K 
C AftV CASE S 




O 

O 

o 




YEJON 


UNPOCE 







DAVftj 


©1 MS urwwf Fhm 5tncncBla.Mc| 


v-r a strong artificial opening 
of two diamonds and an artifi- 
cial response or two spades. 
North showed a strong bal- 
anced hand. Tbe bidding con- 
tinued as it would have done 
after a two no-trump opening, 
with a S layman response fol- 
lowed by a cue-bid. There was 
one trick, however: South be- 
came the declarer in six spades. 

South won the club lead in 
dummy, cashed two top 
trumps and the remaining club 
winners. Diamonds were 
thrown from the dosed hand. 


note of tbe appearance of the 
jack on his left. According to 
•he principle o/ restricted 
choice, the jack was much 
more likely to be part of a 
doubleion than a false card 
from J- 10. so South finessed 
the nine on the way back. 

If West had ruffed, he would 
have been end-played. He 
therefore discarded, and dis- 
carded again on the heart 
queen. But this only postponed 
the evil day. South led a trump, 
and West was forced to lead 
from the diamond king or con- 
cede a ruff and sluff. 


NORTH 

* A K52 
V K 82 

9 A73 

* AK J 


WEST 
* Q 3 8 
J7 

OKU 

*10 793 2 


EAST (DJ 
*03 
9 10 fi 5 4. 

0 9 82 
*98*4 ' 


SOUTH 
* 10 I 7 4 

9AQ93 . 

0 Q 10 fi 9 

«Q 

Neither side wu vulnerable. The, 


~-c". re 

— .'J-;; 

, r TS 


hhWIng: 

trot 

Sondt 

Veot 

Nordi 

Pass 

Pan 

Pan 

2 '/ 

Pma 

2* 

Pass 

2 N.T.. 

Pxss 

3* 

Pass 

3* ' 

Pass 

4* 

Pan 

4 4 ** 

Pass 

4 ♦ 

Hass 

6 ♦ . 

Pass 

Pan 

Pass 



Wen led tbe dub ten. 


TIQUEY 


WHAT A YOUNG /IAAN 
OFTEN HAS TO PO 
AFTER DECIDING TO 
POP THE QUESTION. 


Canadian Stock Markets Jan. 29 


Amsterdom 


Prices In Canadian cents unless marked S 


Now arrange the circled tellers to 
lorm the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon 


Toronto 


High Low Clew Cn 1 ** 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday s I KN1FE CLOTH PILLAR LADING 

Answer What there was a lot of at the employment 
agency— “IDLE” TALK 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Alberts 


Belgrade 

Berta 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

BadWKsf 

Capaaliagm 

Caste Oe< Sal 

Dobttii 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfort 

Caneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisboa 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Paris 


5 23 a 

2 36 d 

■ 2 2S fr 

-4 TS fr 

-« 25 O 

9 48 fr 

1 45 r 

2 34 O 

5 fl fr 

0 32 a 


Bangkok 

Berlins 

Hong Kong 

Manila 

New Dean 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Stneonera 

To tort 

Tokvo 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
31 SB 21 73 
-3 24 -10 14 
18 64 U 57 
30 86 25 77 
20 68 B 46 
■10 14 -14 7 

-I 30 -I 30 
26 7V 24 75 
15 j? TZ 54 
IB 64 3 38 


AFRICA 


-16 3 sw 

5 41 r 
15 5V tr 
10 50 d 


Algiers 

Coirs 

Cope Town 

CotaUaaco 

Harare 

Loess 

Nairobi 

TboIi 


14 61 5 41 cl 

23 73 13 55 tr 

31 88 21 70 d 

IB 64 10 50 fr 

25 77 17 64 d 

47 41 24 75 d 

24 75 >5 59 d 


Tools 11 52 10 50 sh 

LATIN AMERICA 



-4 25 ir 

4 39 fr 

-2 » 0 

5 41 r 

■ 9 16 fr 

-4 25 a 

41 tr 


Buenos Aires 22 72 15 59 Ir 

Unto 23 73 19 44 fr 

Mexico CUr 44 75 5 41 fr 

RMdeJanelro na 

SaoPtnria — — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 


38 

to 

55 

d 

32 

fr 

43 

d 

SO 

d 


High Lew Close Choa 
S34 34 J4 

S17^ 14^ 16»*- 
HFa IT- ITU- '* 
S4''l 6'a 4>*+ , a 

MffU tt't 201 * + 
5151a ir* ISAa 

.*19 19 IV — n 

21 r i 22N+J 
20. 241u 
I71a 17=. 

11'j IMi — '.V 

5’'. Fn -r '» 

Sfk 9'k + u 

26W 27 + 

4 4'a 

14: ■ 14W+ 'a 

35 138 — 2 

14 i 16’a 

as 400 + s 

F’e 5>S 

17»a 17>j. + 
10 1040+ at 

HVg 1Ha+ "a 
51 2S3 — 6 

23 2X. 

1S»» 15SO— 'S 
18'^ IFa— >1 
144a ITV. + 

Z T* 27" »— s» 
4'a 6-4 + Vi 

l4l’l 15 
Z3ta 21-e — ¥1 
2t*» 2 «H 
31'1» »■ + 
b3 42 
rtJ* 31 "j 
I ffH UTS + ■» 
17 17 — 

I1‘* Ill's— !s 
71a 7T a + 
4".s + ’i 
4 U 674 r U 
ll»k 1IV»- Vfl 
at* S*64 4*k 
255 260 4 S 

IJU 

17 IT 1 .* + ig 

55 157 +2 

W 297 
15 33 +10 

15 IS — 4a 1 

I4H 14’*— 

«a* J*|- 1 * 

HI 450 -*-lJ 

» 440 

>0 273 +10 i 


8675 Jonnock 
14fla Kam irotia 
BOO Kelwv h 
1256 Kerr Add 
2S706 Laban 
JV786 UJC Mnrts 
120 LOnl Cem 
2220 Locono 
40LLLOC 
3485 Lob law Co 
1200 MDS HA 
I0O0MICC 
13504 Melon H X 
200 McGrow H 
15252 Merfand E 
26132 Matson A I 
1692 Motion B 
9200 Murphy 
4730 Nablsca L 
96524 Naranda 
47D1 Narcen 
170536 NVOAIIAI 
4100 NOW6CO W 
12407 NuWsI so A 
J62SOakwaod 
4310 Osftawa A I 
2829 Ponwur 
72SO PonCon P 
300 Pembina 
sag Phonlx Oil 
100a Pine Point 
1500 Place GO o 
35141 Placer 
I960 Pray loo 


S12I* 114. I219+ it 
103 HQ 103+3 
S3* 38 38 — 

SI 41k 163* 16«k 

Ul'< 24V; 24V. 4- 

5254. 2»W 2514 
SIOJ* 1019 ltP* + 
*10 9t* 10 

*276* 2T+ 77** + V* 
119W 19ti |9 'm— 


ABN 

ACF Holding 
Aeaen 
AKZO 
•Ahold 
AMEV 
A'Dam Rub 
Amrobank 
BVG 

BuatirmainT 
Co rood HkW 
Clsevler-NDU 



*l«vj 18 IBW 
330 230 230 —10 

S2S 349* 25 

WIVs 31** 21VI+V9 
450 440 450 

*1B"* 17*9 18 
518 W* IS +14 
S20V; 30'*. 20** +9* 
SP», 25U 25»*+9s 
*2B»* m-3 2014 + 
*15M» 15 15—19 

S79* 73* 71k— Vi 

*191* 1914 194* + 8* 
61 SB 58 

480 4 25 475 -5 

*25'. 24% 75 
470 460 470 —5 

527 74V* 2W4— 

S17 1 *! 17V; 17V- 

*719 7V: 7Vs 

*25'. 25H 251* + V* 

tra ioo 100—2 

S24V, J4V4 2446 + 
5171* 17’4 in* + 
370 340 36S — 5 

S6 59% 53-— 9k 

S7'6 6*k 7V. + V. 

S32V. 32 331*+ IB 

S20W 195* 20 — Ik 

*9’- 9 9‘4 + 

175 175 175 

130 120 120—6 

SB*. 8** 89k + Vk 

sis 12V. nr, 

S41*k 414. 4141+ Vj 
SVj 59k + Vk 

la’ll 19 

7*k 79k 

21 22ib-l* 

BV* BW 
»»* 12 + Vi 
SP % 57*1 + 14 
I2V% 121% 

23 U. 239a + Vk 

m ^ - 3 

24H 243* + 
2B 38 

73 73 -3 

183* + 

i: 


£lMrv«er-NDU 

Fokker 

Gist Brocades 

Iiel n efcen 

Haonovcns 

KLM 

Noarden 

Hal Neddw 

Hedliayd 

QceVandarG 

Pokiwed 

Philips 

Rob eco 

Radamoa 

Rollnco 

Rorcnto 

Naval Dutch 

Lfullcvar 

VanOnuneren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


ANP.CBS General Index :I92JB 
P nra lo wi :iHM 
Source; AFP. 


Bow 

Baver.Hvoa 

Baver.Ver&mfc 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Con 1 1 Bum ml 
Daimler-Benz 

Degussa 

Deutsche Babcock 

Deutsche Bank 

Dresdncr Bank 

□UB-Schuttw 

GHH 

Hadifief 

Hoechsl 

MtWSCft 

Hoizmaim 

Horten 

Kan U Salz 

Korstetfi 

Kaufhof 

KMD 

Kloeckner Werke 
Krupp Stall 
Unde 
Lufmanso 
MAN 

Mannesmann 

Mefaiigeseilsctiait 

Muencn.Rueck 

Preumaa 

Ruefoers-Werkc 

RWE 

Sdierlna 

Slefnens 

Thvssen 

Vtsrto 

Vaba 

VEW 

votkswosenwerk 


Other Markets jan. 29 


Closing Prices in local currencies 


C(pw Prev. 
wheel oe k 430 4J25 

Wlnsor iJO 5.25 

World lnr> 1.93 1.91 


H«ig. Seng Index : I43SJ7 
Prevlaum :1J74J9 

Sourer; Revtcrx 


Johannesburg 


AECI 

Barlows 

Blvvoor 

BulfelS 

Elands 

GF5A 

Harmony 

Kloof 

Nedbank 

Pst Sleyn 

Rusfpfaf 

5A Brews 

St Hetona 

Sasoi 


725 725 

965 940 

1650 NO. 
6400 4100 
1300 1390 
2750 2750 
3635 3600 
7100 JW5 
910 930 

5400 5625 
1450 1430, 
590 590 I 

3075 3Q50 I 
540 565 


Com post to Stock Index ;944J8 
Previous : 949 JO 

Source: AFP. 


Brussels 


Arbed 
Bekoert 
Cocke rill 

|BES 


Commerzbank lade* r 1,14750 
Prevtooi ; LHIJO 

Source: AFP. 


London 


Hoboken 

Kredlefbank 

Potroffno 

SacGerMtralg 

3otaa 


pr 

CZ 

r, 

m 


Hong Kong 


Trod Ion EM 
VMonrasne 


Stock Exchange index : 1J41.1I 
Preview; W39J4 

Score*: AFP. 


Frankfurt 


«EG-Telefunkon 110.70 ill 
Allianz very 1042 1043 

Bast 17850 173JM 


Bk East Asia 
Choung Kona 
Cn Ina Light 
Cross Harbor 
Hone Seng 
hk eiee 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HKShanonai 
hk Tel 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whomooa 
Jar dine Math 
joremesec 

New World 
snow Bros 
SMK Props 
Slme Darby 
Stelux 

SwIrePaclUcA 
Wheel Mar 


AA Coro 
Allled-Lvons 
Anglo Am Gold 
Babcock 
Barclays 

BOSS 

BAT. 

D oe Cham 

BICC 

BL 

BOC Group 
Boots 

Bowoter Indus 
BP 

am Home si 
Brit Tolocnm 
BTH 
Bur man 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cone 
Coats PahxK 
Cons Gold 
Court au Ms 
Dahnlv 

D* Beers 
Distillers 
Drlefantebi 
Dunlop 


PI sora 

Frre si Gcd 

GEC 

GKN 

Gia«oE 

Grand Mel 

Guinness 

GU5 

Hanson 

Howker 

IC1 

Imps 

Llovds Bank 

Lonrba 

Lucas 

Marks and Sp 

Motal Bdx 

Midland Bank 

Nal West Bank 

Pllkirwion 

P lease v 

Racal Elect 

Randtenteln 

Rank 

Reed mu 

Routers 

Raval Dutch E 

RTZ 

Shell 

STC 

SM Chartered 
Tala and Lyle 
Tesco 
Thorn EMI 
T.I. group 
T ratal oar Hie 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever t 
Untied Bisculls 
Vickers 
w.Deep 
WXoMIngs 
War Loon 3Vi 
wool worth 
ZC1 


391 296 

*3) 520 1% 

200 196 

192 198 

1161/44 12 3'33 
288 393 

235 23! 

707 729 

21B 220 

419 431 

817 <32 

191 194 

549 553 

177 177 

365 273 

123 134 

415 423 

334 344 

449 654 

286 290 

lib 182 

an m 

*MV» 184 Vi 

118 313 

560 570 

338 328 

45V, 45 47/44 
634 434 

703 705 

254 254 

497 513 

453 455 

324 237 

423 434 

224 234 

357 378 

147 153 

195 198 


Gen Eaux 

Hodieffe 

Irnetal 

Latorac Cap 

Learond 

i'Oreal 

Moira 

Michel In 

MM Pernor 

Maet Hennessv 

Moulinex 

Nord-Est 

Occidental® 

. Pemod Rlr. 
Pefrofes Ifse) 
Peuoeol 
PacHrin 
Prln temps 
Rodtolechn 
Redouts 
Roussel UClal 
Skis Rosslonal 
Sjttur.Perr hi r 
Tefemeam 
Thomson CSF 

vaiea 


iS 1& 

76 79 

400 399.10 
2080 3093 
2444 245D 

1819 IW5 
800 813 

68J0 MM 
1956 1975 
101 lflljfl 

BO 81 A0 
60S 493 

713 715 

349 361.50 
271 A0 271.10 
49.90 49.15 
187 185 

349 345 

1319 1220 

1599 1402 

1915 IV|5 
484 474 

2268 22SS 
441 443 

238 335 


RGC 
Santas 
Slelah 
South land 
WoadsMe 
War mold 


380 378 

510 330, 

180 179 

21 33 

88 .90 

315 315 . 


** 0 ;' V;- - . 

7 ?■ 

J 

£®opei'v-’"r :: 


‘Y ICK 

;;; :* n 


All Drdlnarta* Index : 751.10 
previou s ;7*«J0 
Source: Reuters. 


■J “fiu h ; . 7 ' 

.'■ 8 #idi> --7 "" 


Tokyo 


AkOI 

AsatK cnem 
Asahl Glass 
Bonk Of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

D Nippon Print 
Dal *a House 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 


Aged index : 195.49 
Previous : 195.91 

CAC Index : nut 

Previous : 194A0 

Source: AFP. 


Singapore 


Bauslead 
Cold Storage 
DBS 

FroserNoove 

Haw Par 

lneheope 
Kenoel Shta 
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prev tool : *77.70 

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Canadian indexes 


Solution (o Previous Puzzle 



Clow Previous 
Montreal 1 VM 119^3 

Toronto Z5BQJ0 SL565.90 

Montreal: Stock Ewhonge industrials index. 
Toronto: TSE 300 index. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1985 


' r - nv\ s . \ 

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SPORTS 


Soccer’s First Knight Returns to the City of Bis Legend 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Give an Englishman time 
and he fondly turns to nostalgia. 

His letters now carry postage stamps de- 
picting the lost age of steam railways — great 
old individuals like the Flying Scotsman, the 
Golden Arrow and the Chelt enham Flyer — 
and his sporting literature harks back to Stan 
.Matthews, the wizard, of the dribble. 

Sir Stanley, the first soccer knight, turns 70 
on Friday, and on Monday, after they have 
. done feting him in Toronto, where be settled, 
be will make a rare return to Stoke-on-Trent, 
the En glish potteries city where he and his 
legend look shape. 

There will be a banquet in the Sheraton 
Center in Toronto, a grand ball in Stoke, 
and. age never having withered Matthews’s 
addic tion, at least one gentle game of soccer 
for him to express himself. 

Memories of the old maestro, revived in 
baggy pants and sepia tones, became endemic 
last weekend. The most cynical of soccer 
scribes dipped their pens into human kind- 
ness; the young observers among them sud- 
denly became witnesses of the prune of Stan- 
ley Matthews. 

More dun one would suspect have memo- 
ries that stretch back to swept-back hair- 
styles, parted down the center and held down 
hv Brvicream. to their streets, every kid 


ihc imbalanced defender. Second-generation 
Matthewses. 

Since I, alas, confess to missing out — to 
coming into play when tactical bores were 
beginning to re-invent the game so that No. 7 
was nothing but another functionary — I 
gratefully latch onto this descriptive prose 
from one J.P.W. Mallalieu: 

‘'Have you ever watched a dragonfly, bow 
; it hovers in one spot with its wings vibrating 


and then apparently, without changing gear, 
dans away at top speed?" he wrote. 

“Many times 1 have seen Matthews, the 
baU as ever at his feet, hemmed in by a 
watchful opponent. There has been no room 
to move, so Matthews has hovered, his whole 
body vibrating, while his opponent watched. 

Rob Hughes 

“Suddenly Matthews has made his dan to 
the right and bis opponent has darted with 
him. It is only seconds later that we and his 
opponent see that Matthews has in fact dart- 
ed to the left” 

A marvelous vignette, though possibly col- 
ored by the gentleman's political leanings. 
For most other followers insist that Mat- 
thews, “the one-trick magician." invariably 
feigned to go left but ended up sprinting 
down the right touchline outside bis oppo- 
nent. 

By the time my generation caught up, Mat- 
thews was nearing so, still playing First Divi- 
sion. still performing the same tease, able by 
then to put a man on the seat of his pants 
almost by reputation alone. 

Speed off the mark was a winger’s asset, 
but more than anything, Matthews used in- 
stinct to know precisely when a defender’s 
balance was toppling, and that a devastating 
bodyswerve to spring dear. 1 doubt any mat- 
ador did it better in the bullring. 

Bow-legged and bony, be would set up 
goals with crosses that, so legend has it, not 
only delivered the heavy old leather ball with 
unerring accuracy but also with the lace fac- 
ing the other way, so as not to hurt the center- 
forward's head. 

He was a pro through 35 seasons, well over 
1,000 games, and, at 4 1 , nearing the last of his 
54 internationals. I just barely recollect him 
bemusing the great NQion Santos while En- 


gland scored four times against Brazil at 
Wembley. ^ 

His astonishing longevity was a product of 
three things; obsessional love of soccer, fa- 
naticism for fitness and the era that placed 
more emphasis on artistry than long-distance 
running. 

Matthews was bore two miles from Stoke, 
son of Jack, “the Fighting Barber of Hanky," 
whose nifty footwork serviced 350 feather- 
weight boxing bouts. Taboos of alcohol and 
tobacco were instilled from the cradle; deep 
breathing and wrestling with chest expanders 
were ap order of the early morning, and 
father’s severe regimen bred Sum's introver- 
sion. 

The player inside him, however, was liber- 
ated at II. Until then school center- half, he 
broke rank to score eight goals in one game 
(who says Franz Beckenbauer invented at- 
tacking tibero?}. 

Very much a winger — though modem 
coaches, refusing to acknowledge anything 
good came from the past, call them “wide 
men" — Matthews became Stoke City prop- 
erty. Office boy at 15, first learner at 17, 
England International at 19. 

After war years spent on the RAFs wing, 
be transferred to Blackpool where he could 
nut his hotel and inhale sea air. And in 1953 
the nation inhal ed the Matthews final, the 
pure theatre of a supposedly aging star of 38 
fulfilling his ambition to win the FA Cup. 

Gray newsreel revives the last 20 minutes 
in which Blackpool 3-1 down, asto nishing ly 
won. 4-3. It forgets how injury reduced Bol- 
ton to effectively nine men. bow others 
scored the goals. Stan was. by destiny, the 
hero. 

Not noted for industry —indeed indignant 
if passes came a foot too short— Matthews is 
thus remembered as Wembley’s Pimpernel 
dancing here, darting there, desperate to in- 
spire one of history’s comebacks. As a perfor- 


mance it hardly equaled his throe goals, all 
left foot, struck from inside-forward where he 
bad replaced an injured England a> n*ngnr. 
against Czechoslov akia in 1938; in lasting 
value it was second to Matthews’s return to 
Stoke in 1961, lifting his dub to promotion 
from Division Two and the crowds from 
10,000 to 33,000. 

There followed, after 50, a brief, tainted 
attempt at management with nearby Port 
Vale, a dub caught making underhand pay- 
ments. Stan then went abroad, walking out 
on a long mar riage, and nomadically treading 
the turfs of Malta, Australia, South Africa, 
the United States and. finally, Canada. 

He was welcomed in every port as a coach; 
known everywhere for sorcery that tran- 
scended the difficulty of a pre- television age. 


Sir Stanley no ill. 

The Victoria ground stadium he will find 
more palatial and more empty than ever he 
knew il The team, youngsters without suffi- 
cient guile, is marooned hopelessly at the foot 
of Division One. The manager recuperating 
from nervous exhaustion. The crowd long 
gone, and the bank overdrawn up to half a 
mil li nn pounds. 

True, his No. 7 shirt is worn by the best 
Stoke has — Mark Chamberlain, dubbed 
“the Black Matthews," who hopes soon to be 
sold to a worthy club. It is cruel but possibly 
true, that Matthews could take the fidd in his 
overcoat and at his age waltz around the 
defense wearing his first chib's colors. 

It may also be that he would fail today, to 
measure up to the media hassle, the require- 
ment to sweet-talk into a microphone before, 
immediately after and (down South America 
way) during play. 

And that failure would be our loss, proof 
that we no longer know bow to let a man’s 
ability do his talking 





s ■ . . 

I? 




• ' . $£ '* : • 


. s.i *—•***•" 


Stan Matthews, at age 48, still dancing and darting. 






! . . 


. . V-‘: 

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Mavericks Upset 76ers, 111-109 


Imw/lWri f*r«g I t t a raotcnol 


A change for Olympic medalist Scott Hamilton: There wifl be no new title this year. 

i New Kind of Judging for Hamilton 


By Malcolm Moran 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The judges have 
")t stopped examining Scott Ham- 
‘•■"ml They have just moved to a 

• r 1 . Herein location. 

X Their approval or disapproval is 

* ■ ! - reflected in numbers ranging 

om 6.0 down that once defined 
s figure-skating career, but tire 
•me sQenl questions axe being 
‘Jted. Is he ready? Is he rested? Is 
”7* costume right? Is the musk 
* . odting? The difference in HamQ- 
n’s new professional life is that 
jDst of the judges can be found 
" " A side his head, 
is* b “I'm not going to wave at the 
£owd for a hying,” he said. Tm 
: I r)l gang to do that. Fm working 
.* “ird.” 

;* vAt the time of year Hamilton 
jigw to live for, with the amateur 
~ .Aiinnal champ io nship s bo be held 
*"* "is week, he is an entertainer after 
t [years as a competitor. It is uear- 
five years since be carried the 
-• merican flag in the opening cere- 
....j^onies at the "Lake Placid Olym- 
^ i# es, and nearly one year since he 
the gold medal at Sarajevo and 
that extra victory lap around 
ITT — e Zetra arena, waving an Ameri- 



'17 years as a competitor 


can flag and leading the three med- 
alists round the ice. 

After all those years in which his 
existence was carefully arranged to 
meet the demands of those peak 
moments, Hamilton’s schedule has 

been revised. He is appearing in Ice 
Capades performances. He will 
skate in two shows at Madison 
Square Garden on Wednesday, two 
on Thursday, me on Friday night, 
three on Saturday, two on Sunday. 

There are two dearly defined 
parts to his skating these days. In 
the first half of the show, Hamilton 
performs a competitive routine, to 
the second half, with the house 
lights on and with a microphone in 
his hand, he encourages children to 
go wild. He teaches me fine points 
of The Wave, and if the kids don’t 
get it right the first time. Hamilton 

race that the crowd at a nearby 
arena did this much better. 

■ He shares the audience with blue 
Smurfs when he performs in the 
West, multicolored Snotks in the 
East Years of effort were required 
for Hamilton to convince the estab- 
lishment of the sport that a 5-foot-3 
(160-centimeter) skater could reach 
the same athletic achievements of 
someone much taller. Yet when 
that convincing was finally com- 
pleted, be moved on and took ad- 
vantage of the economic opportu- 
nity that comes with a gold medal 
only to share a stage with Smurfs. 

He was always conscious of the 
balance within the sport of at hletic 
drill and artistry. Now, at different 
times, he appreciates the added ar- 
tistic license and misses the com- 
petitive urges that a show can sel- 
dom satisfy. 

“The greatest feeling in skating is 
the 10 minutes after you win," he 
said. “Because you see that every- 
thing you’ve done — all the work 
and all the time that you’ve put into 
H, injury and everything else — was 
worth iL The feeling of acoompfish- 
tnenL The ego inflation you get 
from just winning a competition. 
That 10 minutes is the neatest 
thing in the world. That’s what you 
work all year for, that 10 minutes. 
Then you have it forever, the fact 
that you did il and you won it, and 
yoa proved yourself. I'm going to 
miss those 10 minutes for a long 
time." 

And now? “It’s not the same 

high-high,*' he said, “but it’s a con- 
sistent fix, an audience fix. It s like 
a disease. You like being in front of 
them, and you like showing off and 
you like the applause. It*s a feeling 
of acceptance. 

“But I will miss getting a new 
title each year. New Year s Eve is 
the worst night of my fife, because 
New Year’s Day I don’t nave my 
title anymore. I fed kind of naxeo. 

So each year on New Years Eve, i 

sulk." 

Still he can sometimes yearn for 
that satisfaction thal the approval 
of judges can bring. Hamilton won- 
ders if open competition will come 


ro the Olympics in time for him to 
have a chance at another gold med- 
al He is 26 years old, and there is 
still time. He remembered Irina 
Rodnina of the Soviet Union, who 
was part of three gold-medal win- 
ning pairs, with Alexei Vlanov in 
1972. and with Alexander Zaitsev 
in 1976 and 1980. 

“And she had a baby," Scott 
Hamilton said. Tm not about to. 
do that" 


TTTTT'T 


The Associated Pros 

DALLAS — Mark Aguirre, 
snubbed by the All-Star selectors, 
drilled 17 of 25 shots from the floor 
and scored a career-high 49 points 
Monday night leading the Dallas 

NBA FOCUS 

Mavericks to a 111-109 National 
Basketball Association victory over 
the Philadalphia 76ers. 

“I was kind of upset" said 
Aguirre, who made last year's All- 
Star team. “1 came out to win." 

And he helped nail down the 
triumph with eight points in the 
final three minutes after the Mavs 
saw a 13-potm lead disappear lo a 
98-98 deadlock with 4:36 to play as 
Julius Erving and Moses Malone 
rallied the Sixers. 

Elsewhere in the NBA it was 
Denver 104. Utah 100; Houston 
97. New Jersey 93, and New York 
.117, Los Angeles Clippers .91 — 

Besides Aguirre's heroics, which 
eclipsed his previous high of 46 
points. Brad Davis made three free 
throws and Derek Harper hit a pair 
in the last 50 seconds. Philadel- 
phia's Maurice Cheeks missed a 25- 
foot jump shot with one second to 
play. 

Philadelphia, which had won 
eight of nine previous meetings 
with Dallas, fell one game behind 
first-place Boston in the Atlantic 
Division. 



Mark Aguirre 

Malone and Erving scored 26 
points apiece for the 76ers. 

--This -was a great- victory," - 
Aguirre said. “When you play the 
76ers, it’s not just another game. 
They have six players who could be 
on the All-Star team. We needed a 
win like this." 

■ All-Star Additions 
Bernard King of the New York 
Knicks, the NBA's leading scorer 
with a 3 1. 5-point average, was 
among 14 players named by the 
coaches Monday to Till out the ros- 
ters for the 35lh AU-Slar Game, 


Hockey 


National Hockey League Leaders 


Notional Mocker Leam ft 
Job. 27: 

OFFENSE 

Overall 

Gretzky, Edmonton 
Kurd. Edmonton 
BOSSV. N.V.I. 

Haworchuk. Winnipeg 
Dianne. Las Angeles 
B. Sutter. N.Y.I. 

Mac Lean. Winnipeg 
Kerr. Philadelphia 
Sovard. Cnlcoon 
Carpenter. Washington 
Ogrodnlck. Detroit 
Gartner. Woshlnoton 
Coftav. Edmonton 
Nieholls, La* Angeles 
Nilsson, Calgary 
Yzerman, Detroit 

Cams 

Gretzky. Edm 
KurrL Edm 
8 ossv. N.V.I. 

Kerr. Pho 
Carpenter. Was 


Gretzky. Edm 
Dionne. LA 
Haworchuk. Win 
KurrL Edm 
Coffer. Ed 

Power-Play Goal* 

Kerr. Pho 
Andreychuk, Buf 
Bullard, Pit 
Dianne. LA 

Gartner, was 
MocLeon, wm 

Short-Handed Goals 

Gretzky, Edm 


A P Plm 
t 88 140 24 
! 49 95 IS 
I 42 81 13 
I 49 B0 bB 
) 4? 79 33 
) 43 73 33 
I 44 72 77 
i 28 *7 25 
i 41 67 28 
I 28 66 59 
I 33 6b 16 
I 35 66 41 
I 48 66 66 
I 36 65 37 
I 42 65 10 
I 44 65 23 


Kasper. Bos 
Pre® p. Phi 


Karri. Edm 
Gartner. Was 
Gretzky, Edm 
Stotsny. Que 
Carpenter. Was 
Kerr. Pho 
Naslimd. Wan 


Bouraue. Bos 
Gretzky. Edm 
Dionne, LA 
Gartner, was 
Mnctimts, Cei 
NKholls, LA 
Ogrodnlck. Dot 


GP GW 

46 I 
SO 7 

49 7 

47 7 

50 6 

46 6 

SO 6 

GP S 
50 247 
49 213 

49 282 

50 198 
49 198 

49 198 

50 198 


(minimum 44 shots) 


Young. Pit 

GP 

47 

G 

27 

S 

79 

Simmer, LA-Bes 

45 

26 

9Q 

Karri, Edm 

46 

46 

162 

D .Sutter. Chi 

29 

14 

51 

Nasiund, Mon 

50 

29 

108 


Janecvk 

Ellal 

Los Aagetes(i) 
Slanlowskl 
Ml lien 
Weeks 

H ar tfo r d ID 
Hayward 
Holden 
Behrend 
Winnipeg (51 
Bernhardt 
Besler 
St. Croix 
Wreggett 
Toronto (41 
R oma no 
Herron 
Dion 

Pittsburgh <2> 
5tefon 
Mia 
Mica let 
Detroit (4) 

B rodeo r 


1838 117 
1,158 17 

MM 288 
20 1 
2454 158 
428 40 

2494 280 
1491 122 
213 15 
1428 77 

3437 219 
847 48 

633 43 

540 41 

893 75 
2416 211 
1X07 69 

1491 100 
553 43 

2451 214 
1400 IDS 
251 19 

1489 99 

3448 220 
1413 139 
«U 85 
407 44 

3.108 271 


GP PP 
46 16 

45 12 
35 11 

49 11 

50 11 

50 11 

GP SH 
49 9 


must NHL Standing? 

that yOU wei EC rnecFi 


OOALT6N DING 

(Empty-net goals Vi parentheses) 

MP GA SO Avg 
Berras*© 2443 89 4 241 

Sauve 895 47 0 3.15 

Cloutier 45 4 0 349 

Bottom (•) 3403 144 4 US 

Mason 361 74 1 247 

RlOOln 2.174 102 2 241 

Jenson 305 16 0 115 

Washington (5) 3JK2 t«7 1 198 

Frame 484 17 0 111 

Lindbergh 2430 126 1 111 

Phi l adelph i a (31 1914 146 I 141 

Penney 2430 105 1 110 

Soelaert 1425 56 0 128 

Montreal (1) 10SS 164 1 122 

MODO 1457 67 1 2J6 

Fufir 1414 93 1 146 

Fuhr and Moog shared stvjiout Jan, 8 
Edmonton (2) 1971 162 3 127 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dhrtsiea 

W L T Pts GF GA 


Washington 

Philadelphia 
N.Y. Islanders 
N.Y. Rangers 
Pittsburgh 
New Jersey 


11 12 7 69 211 M7 

28 14 6 62 204 146 

26 21 2 54 225 197 

17 23 B 42 173 192 

18 24 5 41 174 214 

15 27 5 35 163 197 


Adorns Division 

Montreal 25 15 10 60 194 164 

Buffalo 22 15 12 56 175 144 

Quebec 24 19 7 55 194 175 

Boston 23 20 7 53 183 168 

hurt Ford 17 24 5 39 156 200 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris (X vision 

SI. Louis 20 19 B 48 175 181 

enksao 22 25 3 47 197 18 

Minnesota IS 25 9 39 171 199 

Del roll 14 29 7 35 176 230 

Toronto 10 32 6 26 148 213 

Smrtbe Division 

Edmonton 35 9 6 76 255 165 

Cawary 25 IB 7 57 234 196 

Winnipeg 25 21 4 54 214 219 

Los Angelo* 20 20 9 49 233 SB 

Vancouver '2 32 7 31 171 271 

MONDAY'S RESULT 

CoMorv 3 1 0—1 

Edmonton 1 I 3—4 

Greizkr 1531. Colley 2 (20). Krusnclnyski 
(271 : Loot) (71). Nilsson (24J.Tom0olHnl 1 171. 
Shots on eoai: Calgary (on Moog) 17-7-8—37: 
Fdmnnlnn (m Lemtfln) |-I3- 13—34. 


Peelers 

2JOS 

no 

0 106 

contract. 

Keans 

771 

43 

0 3JS 

NEW YORK— Reached on agreement with 

Svlvestrl 

in 

6 

0 LSI 

Ed Lynch, pitcher, on 0 one-year contract. 

DaUtalakls 

164 

14 

01)3 

PHILADELPHIA— fieoeftod an agreement 

Boston ai 

IMS 

161 

0 333 

With Glenn Wilson, outfielder, on a one- year 

Beucnerd 

1J91 

75 

0 324 

contract. 

Sevigny 

439 

24 

1 328 

BASKETBALL 

Ganelin 

1J17 

75 

0 170 

National BasketbaU Association 

Quebec (1) 

1M7 

175 

1 345 

CLEVELAND— Activated Ron Anderson, 

Skoreaensfel 

808 

41 

1 304 

forward. 

Banner mon 

UI3 

145 

0 3.93 

DETROIT— Extended ihe eenlroa ol 

Chicago (2) 

2JB1 

IB 

1 373 

Chuck Daly, head coach, mraugh me 1*8586 

Heinz 

70 

3 

0 277 

season. 


Womslev 

Lful 

St. Louil (31 
Lemetin 
Edwards 
Calgary 11) 
VanniesoroucA 
Hanlon 

H.Y. Rutgers (31 
Krudev 
Smith 
Mafarnon 
H.Y. islanders 
Mel echo 
Beouore 
Mel arson 
Sands 

Minnesota 13) 

LOW 

Reset) 

•camppurl 
New Jersey (31 


IJ47 SO 
1,444 95 

2461 181 
1AS2 107 
1.137 84 

2J82 192 
1440 91 

1491 98 

U33 192 
1448 80 

1.194 82 

425 35 

1967 197 
1.232 76 

965 64 

709 48 

87 8 

2.993 199 
914 55 

1464 107 
372 33 

in in 


FOOTBALL 

Nattoaof Football League 

INDIANAPOLIS— Homed Rad Dgwhower 
head coach. 

N.Y. JETS— Named Dan Rodokovich line- 
backer coach. 

HOCKEY 

Nofteot Mocker League 

LEAGUE— Suspended gogitender Billy 
Smith at the N.Y, Islanders torsi* gomes far 6 
slick -swinging Incident In a Jan. 13 game 
oaainsl dikoga 

HARTFORD— Returned Ray Ferrara, eer- 
ier, 10 Blnenamlon at Ihe American Hockey 
League. 

WINNIPEG — Recalled Mare Behrend. 
aaaltmder.trom Sherbraokeaf the American 
Nocsev League. 

COLLEGE 

GEORGIA— Named Joe Halils assistant 
football coach. 


The Associated Press reported 
from -New York. 

In addition to King, the East 
reserves consist of centers Robert 
Parish of Boston and Jeff Ruland 
of Washington, forward Terry 
Cummings of Milwaukee and 
guards Dennis Johnson of Boston. 
Sidney Moncrief of Milwaukee and 
Micheal Ray Richardson of New 
Jersey. 

Named to the West squad were 
centers Akeem Oiajuwcm of Hous- 
ton and Jack Sikma of Seattle, for- 
wards Alex English, Calvin Nait of 
Denver and Larry Nance of Phoe- 
nix and guards Rolando Blackman 
of Dallas and Norm Nixon of the 
Los Angeles Clippers. 

The starting teams previously 
were elected by fan balloting. Vot- 
ed to the East squad were forwards 
Larry Bird of Boston and Julius 
Erving of Philadelphia, center Mo- 
ses Malone of Philadelphia and 
guards lriah Thomas of Detroit 
and rookie Michael Jordan of Chi- 
cago. 

The West starting team is made 
up of forwards Ralph Sampson of 
Houston and Adrian Dantley of 
Utah, center Kareem Abdul-Jab- 
bar of the Los Angeles Lakers and 
guards Earvin (Magic) Johnson of 
the Lakers and George Gervin of 
San Antonio. 

Of the 23 NBA teams, 17 are 
represented. The game will be Feb. 
10 in Indianapolis. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Oilers Defeat Flames in Final Seconds 

EDMONTON, Alberta (UP!) — Mike Krushelnyski scored with two 
seconds remaining in the game to lift the Edmonton Oilers to a 4-3 victory 
over the Calgary Flames in the only National Hockey League game 
Monday night. 

Krushelnyski fired the puck from the slot past the Flames' goalie. 
Rejean TinipHn. after pickmg up a rebound from a Wayne Gretzky shot 
Mark Napier, who along with Gretzky drew an assist on the play, tied up 
Lemelin in front of the crease. 

Zurbri^en, After Surgery, Sets Pace 

BORMIO, Italy (UPI) — Pimnn Zurbriggen of Switzerland, in his first 
serious outing after knee surgery two weeks ago, Tuesday set the fastest 
time in men’s downhill training for the World Ski Championships. 

Zurbriggen covered the 3,430-meter course, with a vertical drop of 
1.010 meters, in 2 minutes, 10.04 seconds, almost 1 J seconds quicker 
than any of the other top racers. 

Opening ceremonies for the Championships are Wednesday, with the 
first race — the women's combined downhill — dated for Thursday. 

For the Record 

Muhammad AK, the former heavyweight champion, was among those 
named Monday as recipients of annual awards given by the Boxing 
Writers Association of America. Ali will receive the James J. Walker 
Award for “long and meritorious service to boxing." (AP) 

Milton McCrary, the World Boxing Council welterweight champion, 
will fight fellow American Pedro Vilella in a title bout March 9 in Paris, 
organizers said. (UPI) 

Alan Jones, who won the Formula One championship in 1980, is 
reluming to the Grand Prix racing circuit it was announced Tuesday. 
Jones, 38, will emerge from a three-year retirement lo drive for the new 
Beatrice »«»". which expects to make its debut near the end of the 1985 
season. (UPJ) 

Defending champion Jack Nkklans and the 1984 runner-up, Andy 
Bean, bead a list of 87 golfers who have qualified and been issued 
invitations for the 1985 Memorial Tournament (AP) 


Basketball 


National Basketball Association Leaders 


tfroogfc Jon. 27; 

TEAM 

Denver 

Damn 

San Antonia 

PamantS 

Boston 

I— A. Lakers 

Kama City 

Philadelphia 

Utah 

Chicago 

Atfonta 

MMwaukoa 

Dallas 

Indiana 

Houston 

Phoenix 

Now Jersey 

Golden Slate 

LA Clippers 

Cleveland 

Washington 

New York 

Seattle 


OFFENSE 
G Pt. 

44 5237 

43 4995 

43 4993 

44 5056 

44 5045 

45 5154 

43 4888 

43 4828 

45 4923 

44 4779 

44 4773 

45 4861 

44 4749 

44 4748 

44 4724 

45 4815 

44 4679 

a 4532 

44 4420 

42 4405 

46 4017 

45 4654 

46 4582 



G 

Na 

Avg 

Milwaukee 

45 

ra< 

101.9 

Seattle 

46 

4718 

1026 

Washington 

46 

4789 

104.1 

Houston 

44 

4663 

1Q6J) 

Dallas 

44 

4670 

106.1 

Boston 

44 

4M5 

1067 

New Jersey 

44 

4711 

107.1 

PhitodotpWa 

43 

4604 

107.1 

New York 

45 

4827 

1077 

Phoenix 

*5 

4832 

107.4 

Chicago 

44 

4749 

1077 

LA. Clippers 

44 

4780 

1084 

Alton hi 

44 

4796 

I09J8 

LA Lohers 

45 

4779 

109J 

Utah 

45 

4983 

1107 

Cleveland 

42 

4692 

1117 

Detroit 

43 

4809 

I11J 

Porttoiid 

44 

4953 

1126 

Indiana 

44 

4993 

11X5 


Golden Slate 
San Antanlo 
Kama city 
Denver 


43 

4937 

1148 

43 

4961 

115-4 

43 

5017 

1167 

44 

5166 

1174 

SCORING 

G FG 

FT PtS 

Avg 


NBA Standings 


Kino, N.Y. 31 371 234 97i 31.5 

Short. GS. 41 458 249 1191 29:0 

Donttev. Utah 34 326 287 939 274 

Bird. Bos. 44 496 190 1206 274 

English. Dm. 44 486 214 11S7 77 J) 

Jordan, Chi. 44 443 296 1186 27 J) 

Wilkins, Att 44 449 261 1165 265 

Malone, PMI. 43 345 3M 1086 25J 

Cummings, MIL 44 435 200 1070 2*3 

Johnson, ICC 43 415 190 1027 23.9 

Natt. Den. 47 37* 251 999 235 

Aguirre. DaiL 43 399 203 1014 234 

WOOlrtaae. Chi. 41 371 722 964 ZL5 

Moncrief, Mil. 40 XU T6l 912 225 

Griffith, Utah 45 417 121 1015 225 

Thomas. Del. 43 358 229 960 2U 

Vondewe gh e, Prt. 43 366 213 951 22.1 

Abdul-Jabbr. LAL 45 410 142 982 215 

Chambers. Sea. 46 XV M2 981 2JJ 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

FG FGA Pet 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON RED— Signed Dave Stapleton. In- 
flekler; John Henry Johnson, Charlie nutat- 
ed. Ron Woodward. Mike Tniliiio. Jim Dor. 
sey. and Ed Ghma ol letters, and Gas Burgess. 
Kevin Ramlne end Mike Green well, outfield- 
ers lo one-veor contracts. 

CHICAGO WHITE— Reached an auree- 
ment with Roland H em e n d. executive vice 
president and genera) manager, on a Ihree- 
ygar contract. Signed Jose Castro, tnfkrtder. 
and din Speck, Pilcher. 

OAKLAND — Signed Rob Plcdolo. Inflekfor. 

TORONTO— Signed Bryan Clark, Pilcher, 
to a o n e ye ar c ontract. 

Motional Leasee 

MONTREAL— Readied an agreemenl with 
Tim Wat loch, third basemaa on 0 ttwee-veor 


College Top-20 Ratings 

Tug top 21 teams in the Associated Press' 
rehear baskenali poll WcsJ-eioce vales la 
nor minium; total points based oa 1WHI 
ale.; record thrauah Sunday, Jan. 27 aed last 
week's roakiogs): 


Record Pts Pvs 
15-1 1249 3 

1B-1 1202 1 

15- 1 mo 4 

16- 2 1016 2 

17*4 988 6 

14nI 867 S 

154 850 9 


1. Si. John's (52) 

X Georgetown 110) 
1 Memphis Si (1) 

4. So. Methodist 

5. Illinois 
A Duke 

7. Oklahoma 

8. Georgia Tech 
*. Syracuse 

10. Michigan 
I). North Carolina 
IX Tulsa 
IX DePaul 
14. Oregon St. 

IX Louisiana Teen 

16. Nev.-Les Vegas 

17. Maryland 

18. Vlllanova 
)9. Kansas 

20. Ala-Blrmlngham 


The United Press intergaHogal board of 
coaches too-S coUeae basketball ratings 
Mlb first-ptace votes and records lb rough 
games el Jua. 27 la parentheses; total points 
based gp t J ref of* for first place, M lor second, 
*90; 

1.51. John's (31) (15-11 592 

1 Ge or ge to w n IB) (18-1) S*9 

X Memphis SI. (1) (15-11 518 

A So, Methodist (16-21 4S3 

5. Duke (UOi 351 

A OfcMwmn (1541 336 

7. Illinois (1) (174) 307 

X Syracuse tlW) 231 

9. Georgia Tech 1154) IBS 

10. Tulsa (16-7) '« 

11. Michigan (14-3) 157 

12- Oregon 51. 414-21 139 

11 Nevado-Las Vegas (15-2) 120 

14- North Carolina (1*4) 111 

15. DePaul (1141 110 

16. Louisiana Teen 1 16-21 69 

17. Maryland (16-5) 65 

1ft. VltlgnevD (134) 57 

19. AkL-BIrmingham 1184) 55 

20. Kamos (154) 39 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Boston 

36 

8 

JIB 

— 

Philadelphia 

35 

0 

795 

1 

Wash tool on 

26 

20 

JiS 

11 

New Jersey 

20 

25 

.444 

I6to 

New York 

17 

29 

770 

20 


Central Divides 



Milwaukee 

31 

14 

689 

— 

Detroit 

27 

16 

628 

3 

Chicago 

23 

21 

J23 

m 

Atlanta 

18 

26 

609 

12911 

Indiana 

14 

30 

710 

16’* 

Cleveland 

12 

30 

786 

17V*i 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Midwest Division 



Denver 

28 

17 

622 

— 

Houston 

25 

20 

-556 

3 

Dallas 

24 

21 

.533 

4 

San Antonio 

21 

22 

688 

6 

Utah 

20 

26 

63S 

H9S 

Kansas City 

15 

28 

749 

12 ' 


Pacific Division 



LA. Lakers 

30 

15 

667 

— 

Phoenix 

21 

24 

667 

9 

5eutlie 

20 

26 

635 

10tv 

LA Clippers 

19 

2b 

622 

11 

Portland 

19 

25 

632 

lOVz 

Golden State 

10 

13 

733 

19 


Donaldson. LAC 
Gilmore. !LA. 
Banks, sa. 

Nance. Phoe. 
AMuiJobbor, LAL 
CheeM, Phil, 
worthy. LAL 
Thorp*. K.C. 
Johnson. LAL 


MONDAY'S RE5ULTS 
LA- Clippers 28 21 17 25- 91 

New Torn 22 36 21 31—117 

Cummings 14*21 4-4 32.0IT B-130-1 16; Smith 
9-18 9-10 27, DonaUsan SB 7-11 17. RuMnds: 
LA. Clippers SO (Dondaldson 9); New vor* St 
(Cummings 10). Assists: LA. Clippers 18 
(Nixon 7); New York 34 (Sparrow 10). 
PbUaOeWhia 34 V 20 31—189 

Dalles 23 35 29 24—111 

Aguirre 17-25 13-1949. Blackman 8-11 2-2 19; 
Erving 13-23 3-3 U. Malone 9-17 8-12 26. Toney 
5420 14. Re bonds: Philadelphia 49 (Malone 
121; Dallas 45 (Aguirre 9). Assists: Philadel- 
phia 20 (Cheeks. Toney 4); Dallas 30 CDavb 
111 . 

New Jersey » 22 » 21-93 

Houston 24 24 32 17-97 

Ofoluwan B-14 64 22, McCrov 7-10 14 17; 
Birdsong 11-18 0-1 22. Gmlnskl 10-19 1.2 21. 
Rebounds: New jersey 43 (Williams 101; 
Houston Si fOtahiwan 151. Assists: New Jer- 
sey 23 ( RonsOV 8) ; Houston 26 {McCray. Hol- 
lins 5). 

Denver 27 27 27 33—1*4 

Utah 26 17 25 32—188 

English 11-75 2-J3L Non v-15 1-219; Danrlsv 
9-18 10.1028. Eown 6-125-7 n.RetaDMls: Den- 
ver 62 (Ceooer 13); Utah 61 (Eaton 13). As- 
sists: Denver 28 ( NoH 6); Ufoh 19 (Greet) 51- 


Moione, PhiL 
Lalmbeer. Del. 
Williams. NJ. 
Sikma, sea 
Oialuwon, Hou. 
Eaton, Utah 
Gilmore. 5A- 
Smfth. GJL 
Thompson, ICC 


Themes. Oat. 
Johnson. LAL 
Moore, sjl 
N ixon, LAC 
Them, KLC 
Richardson, Nj. 
Valentine, Port. 
Green. Utah 
Gs. williams, wash. 


C 179 259 Ml 

Z7S 442 IBS 
146 268 419 
383 631 407 
LAL 410 693 592 

226 389 J81 
338 586 .577 
181 314 SJb 
281 495 56B 

REBOUNDING 

G OH Det Tot Avg 
43 193 336 529 12J 

43 145 365 510 11.9 

44 165 344 509 IM 

46 127 405 532 11A 

44 233 275 508 IIS 

45 113 384 497 UA 

43 131 340 471 11J) 

43 213 253 466 106 

. 43 135 326 461 10J7 

ASSISTS 

G NO. Avg. 
43 551 128 

42 507 1X1 

43 <34 10.1 
43 350 XI 
43 349 XI 

J. 44 352 LO 

I. 44 351 8J 

41 326 SjO 
Fash. 43 308 72 


College Results 

EAST 

American 64, William & MWY 62 
Boston Colt 94 Hartford 77 
Brown 74 Rhode Island Coll. 54 
Dickinson 55. Susouetmnna 52 
Memphis St. 81. Cfoeltvtall 61 
Slone 66. Boston U. 59 
Syracuse 45. Georgetown 63 
Tufts 9s, Hellenic 61 
Urslnus 57. Moravian 56 
SOUTH 

Marshall a. VMi 63 
Miss. Valley St. 07. Alabama St. 73 
5. Carolina- 90. So. MteabsiDPI 72 
Tuiane 64. Florida si. 61 

MIDWEST 

Dayton 61 Miami. Ohio 54 
Drake 69. Indiana St. 67 
Notre Dame 70, Providence 63 
FAR WEST 

New Mexico 4t, Colorado SI 42 
San Diego 5t. 74 Air Farce 44 
Stanford 60, So. California 54 
Washington 74 Nevada- R mo 62 





Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30. 1985 


OBSERVER 


Medicine's Bitter Bill 

By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — I recently un- 
derwent (he emerience of p 


> derweni the experience of pay- 
ing a hospital bill out erf pdckeL As 
a. result of the experience, I have 
discovered an important cause of 
inflation, which economists seem 
to have overlooked, 

like so many great discoveries, 
this one will seem obvious when I 
disclose iL 

, You didn't see it before, friend, 
because you have not had to pay a 
hospital bill with your own hard- 
earned money. And why should 
you? Nowadays hospital bills are 
paid by governments, or by insur- 
ance companies, or by combina- 
tions of the two. And here lies the 
key to my discovery. 

The hospital people who compile 
your bill naturally assume that it 
will be paid in the bulk by some 
immense bureaucracy wallowing in 
money. 

These hospital people — decent, 
humane people devoted equally to 
physical and moral antisepsis — 
never imagine that the bQl they toil 
night and day to lengthen might 
have to be paid by a h uman being, a 
person made of the same fragile 
clay as they and, as such, just as 
capable as they of being financially 
destroyed when confronted by 
double-digit aspirin tablets. 


This, I supposed, meant a resi- 
dent was drinking coffee and read- 
ing newspapers in the hospital cafe- 
teria. Still. I didn't argue this. Only 
fools and masochists court the ven- 
geance of anesthesiologists. 

On the other hand, Otis arithme- 
tic error that has turned a $96 item 
into a $960 charge is insupportable. 
“Your machine just arbitrarily 
multiplied the cost by 10." I com- 
plained. 

“All right, ail right." grumbled 
the biller. 

“Don’t ‘all-right’ me, buddy. I've 
got to refinance the mortgage and 
sell two children into slavery to pay 
this bill,” I said. 

1 could bear him turning while 
with shock at the other end of the 
telephone. “You are paying the bill 
with your own money?" 

From his gasps. 1 gathered it was 
a first for him. 

I am still negotiating on a few 
disputed thousands, but the hospi- 
tal has been merciful since deter- 
mining that I wasn't joking about 
the money coming from a human. 
□ 


The bureaucracies, upon receiv- 
ing such a bill, will commit it to 
amazing machines accustomed to 
dealing in billions though operated 
by modestly paid humans whose 
spirit has been broken by the ma- 
chines. Will such people, humbled 
by their sense of inferiority to the 
machines, intervene to say, “Here, 
here, machine! You don't intend to 
pay that absurdly inflated hospital 
bill, I trust?" 

They wilt not. The Pentagon has 
demonstrated with blood-chilling 
effect that such whistle-blowers al- 
ways end up sleeping with the fish- 
es. 


So the hospital bill compilers la- 
bor to produce bills like this one, 
which asks me to pay a couple of 
big bills for an anesthesiologist. 
"But there was no anesthesia ad- 
ministered,” I tell the bill compiler 
on the telephone. 

"True, but we had an anesthesi- 
ologist standing by in case be was 
required.” 


From this experience, I conclude 
that the r easo n bills are grotesquely 
inflated in certain areas of Ameri- 
can life is the billing agent's as- 
sumption that he can do his worst 
without causing any h uman pain. 
This explains the comic absurdities 
of the bills that military contractors 
send to the Pentagon. 

It is not as though Cap Weinber- 
ger will have to sell his car to pay 
them; something monstrously 
freighted with money and called 
“the government" will pay them. 

In the same way, fancy lawyers 
charge $250 an hour for their ser- 
vices. That's $500,000 a year for a 
lawyer on the 40-hour week, but no 
human beings are paying that kind 
of money, it is paid by corpora- 
tions — things — which in lum 
account it to the expense of doing 
business, thus reducing their tax 
bills so that — aha! — something 
monstrously freighted with money 
and called* “the government” is 
really doing the paying. 

Juries understand this, of course: 
they dispense milli ons to people 
suing for libel and medical mal- 
practice. The theory is: It's no skin 
off anybody human. And so we get 
Pentagon hamm ers at the price of 
gold and the double-digit aspirin 
tablet. 


New York Times Sernce 


The Durability of Ann-Margret 


By Stephanie Mansfield 

Washington Post Serrnc 

W ASHINGTON — There is 
one scene in Ann-Margrei’s 
film repertoire that says it all. 

It's a bedroom scene, in the 
1965 “Cincinnati Kid.” Bui it’s 
not her sultry purr or sex-kitten 
strut that is* so quintessential!)’ 
Ann-Margret. 

She kneels on a bed. dad in a 
scanty negligee, a jigsaw puzzle 
spread before her. She takes a 
piece and places it on the puzzle. 
It doesn’t fit. She tries forcing it 
It still doesn't fit. Karl Malden, 
playing her gambler husband, 
scowls at her. idling her to give 
up. She cocks an eyebrow, picks 
up a nail file, shaves away one 
side of the piece and bangs it into 
place with her fisL 
Determination. That and a sly 
vulnerability are what make Ann- 
Margret,.43-year-old motorcycle- 
riding grandmother and veteran 
of 38 movies, one of the most 
durable stars Hollywood ever 
dished up. 

Never mind all the bimbo parts 
(“Kitten With a Whip." “Bye- 
Bye Birdie," “The Pleasure Seek- 
ers,” “Bus Riley's Back in 
Town”), the steamy gyrations 
(“Viva Las Vegas”) or the ex- 
changes with leading men from 
Steve McQueen to Elvis Presley. 
Joe Namath to Jack Nicholson. 

“1 knew 1 had something to 
offer in the way of dramatic abili- 
ty a long lime ago." she said, 
sipping tea in her Washington ho- 
tel room. She was in town to pro- 
mote the British film “Return of 
. the Soldier." 

It is a breakthrough of sons for 
the Swedish-bom actress. She is 
cast as a dowdy, aging spinster — 
a part, she said, for which Ameri- 
can directors would never have 
considered her. 

“It was achallenge not to stand 
out like a sore thumb, but I never 
felt intimidated.” she said, refer- 
ring to her co-stars — Glenda 
Jackson, Julie Christie and Alan 
Bates. “Did I ‘surprise’ people? I 
just think it's so funny.” She 
laughed with gusto. “That word 
has been used so many times. I 
love surprising people. 

Recalling her early carerr. she 
said in her familiar, little-girl 
whisper. “I was extremely serious 
about my work. Always. The 
roles were fluff." 



Iuiiim A. Pureri/Th« Wtahn^on Pott 

Ann-Margret: “Much more of a peaceful feeling.” 


Now the roles are more sub- 
stantial. It began in 1971. when 
Mike Nichols chose her for the 
part of overweight, victimized 
Bobbie Templeton in “Carnal 
Knowledge." She was nominated 
for an Academy Award and won 
a Golden Globe. Then came a 
daring role in “Tommy." another 
Oscar nomination and the Gold- 
en Globe for best actress. Recent- 
ly she starred in two made-fer- 
teievision films — as a cancer 
victim and moiher of 10 in “Who 
Will Love My Children." and as 
Blanche DuBois (whom she nick- 
named Blanche Du Bonkers I in 
Tennesee Williams's “A Streetcar 
Named Desire.” 

The same firmness of purpose 


got her back on her feet after a 
face-smashing, nearly fatal fall 
from a Lake Tahoe hotel stage 
platform in 1972. Her father was 
dying of cancer at the time; 10 
weeks later — “1 had to prove to 
him that I could do it" — she was 
back on stage. She won a settle- 
ment for 51-5 million from the 
hotel. “I still get a sick feeling in 
my stomach when 1 look down." 
she said, glancing at the window. 

The same driving force kept 
her going, show after Las Vegas 
show, film after film, television 
special after television special. 
There was a nervous breakdown 
in 1980. A year later her husband 
and mentor of 18 years. Roger 
(“77 Sunset Strip”) Smith, was 


diagnosed as having tmaslhenia 
gravis, an incurable neuromuscu- 
lar disease. 

Smith walked into the room, 
looking tan and fit. “Unbeliev- 
able" whispered Ann-Margret. 
knocking the wooden end table 
with her knuckles. “HeS in remis- 
sion." 

Whatever talent she may lack 
— no one would confuse her with 
Meryl Streep — she has more 
than made up for in hard work. 
She is known as tireless perform- 
er. a total professional. “I’ve been 
known to be obsessive." 

But there is one thing even 
Ann-Margrei's determination 
cannot overcome — her inability 
to have children. “We’ve been 
trying for !3 vears." she said. Her 
husband has three children from 
his first marriage, and Ann-Mar- 
grei is a step-grand moiher. 

She has been off the stage for 
nearly two years. Can she live 
without the applause? 

“That's interesting.’' she said, 
staring into space. “It’s interest- 
ing because I don't miss it — for 
the first time in my life. I guess. ! 
get it now from doing a role, from 
acting. I’m gratified when I come 
home from a day’s work and I’ve 
done the best I can in portraying 
a character. I get that same feel- 
ing of gratitude." 

She placed her hand over her 
bean, 'it’s much more of a peace- 
ful feeling going on in here. I’m 
very lucky." she sjid. knocking 
the table* again, “that I’m not 
crazier than 1 am." 

Her next project will be star- 
ring in a made-for-tefevis/on 
movie about a Midwestern teach- 
er who is raped, becomes preg- 
nant and decides to keep the 
baby. Again, not a typical role for 
a woman once considered some- 
thing of a Hollywood joke. 

“I really feel for people who 
come out of a different area of the 
enrenainment world and go into 
drama. It's much easier for some- 
one to come out of the ranks of 
the New York theater. off-Broad- 
wav or whatever." 

The way Ann-Margret did iL 
“it takes more lime for people to 
think that they're serious about 
iL" 

Now. she said, looking very, 
very determined. “I just want to 
do things 1 want to do." 


PEOPLE 


Royko: 66 % Opt for Sex 


The results of Mike Royko's "sex American Music Award ceremo- 
or bow ling” survey are in: 66 per- nies to record a single to raise mon- 
cem of the men who responded ey for African famine victims. The 
said they preferred sex over "bowl- participants included Richie, 
ing. drinking, golfing, cuddling or Springsteen, Jackson. Rogers. Tina 
just about anything else." In a col- Turner, Stevie Wonder and Ra> 


umn titled “Cuddle Up With This 
Survey. Ann," the syndicated Chi- 
cago Tribune columnist reported 
Tuesday on his poll, which he said 
drew responses from about 10,000 
men and “several hundred angry 
female persons who wrote to con- 
demn me as a male chauvinist pig.” 
Royko said 22 percent of the men 
indicated they would opt for bowl- 
ing, drinking, golfing, cuddling or 
almost anything else. He said the 
other 12 percent included men who 
couldn't decide “or took this as an 
opportunity to write a creepy note 
to my secretary'-” Royko’s poll was 
inspired by Aim Landers's recent 
survey, in which the majority of the 
more than 90.000 women respond- 
ing to a question in the advice col- 
umn said that, if they had to 
choose, they would be content to be 
held close and treated tenderly, and 
would skip sexual intercourse. . . . 
Almost 70 percent of people re- 
sponding to a Denver Post survey 
rejected the Landers poll. “1 can’t 
believe Ann Landers's results.” one 
woman wrote. “She set women 
back 1,000 years.” 

□ 

Lionel Richie has won six Ameri- 
can Music Awards, including four 
for videos, easily outdistancing 
Prince and Kenny Rogers in voting 
for the United States's favorite 
ringer. Richie fell one short of the 
record seven awards received last 
year by Michael Jackson, who was 
nominated four times this year but 
did not win. Richie defeated Prince 


Charles: the producer Is Quincy 
Jones. The effort follows the single 
“Do They Know Ti's Christmas?" 
recorded late last year by British 
rock stars. Richie said he and Jack- 
son wrote the American counter- 
part. “We Are the World. " 

□ 

Martin Scorsese, whose films 
have often explored alienation in 
the modern world, may be taking 
on a 19th-centuty opera. Scorsese, 
director of “Taxi Dnver." “Raging 
Bull" and other films, is expected 
to be named director of Giuseppe 
VerdTs “Rigoletio.” to be staged at 
a cultural festival near the Adriatic 
port city of Ancona from July 20 
through Aug. i 8. the Rome dauy fi 
Messaggero reports. 

□ 

Indira Gandhi was posthumously 
presented the 1984 Jawaharlal 
Nehru Award for international un- 
derstanding. Her son, Rapr Gan- 
dhi, who succeeded her as prime 
minister of India after she was as- 
sassinated, accepted the prize, and 
said the $20,000 cash award would 
be put in the Indira Gandhi Memo- 
rial Trust 




IfS 


;• % 


Cathy Evelyn Smith has been ar- 
raigned in Los Angeles on murder 
and drug charges in the drug-over- 
dose death of the comedian John 
Bdustu. Smith, a former singer, did 
not enter a plea. 


in voting for favorite pop-rock and 
fc music male vocalist, a 


Mary Decker, who has been un- 
able to live down her display of 
temper at the Summer Olympics. 

Doves Cry" for favorite pop-rock has - **** fin5t 

«■««* * "fi* ssrs. 13 22 S 

Richie for favorite pop-rock and 


black music male vocalist, and pop- 
rock and black video artisL His 
“Hello" bested Prince's “When 


black album with the hot-selling 
“Purple Rain" and black single for 
“When Doves Cry." Rogers won 
Lhree awards, for country male vo- 
calist, for “Eyes That See in the 
Dark” as countiy album, and with 
Dotty Parton for “Islands in the 
Stream*' as country single. Brace 
Springsteen beat Prince in voting 
for another major award; his 
“Dancing in the Dark” was the 
favorite pop-rock single. . . . Do- 
zens of singing stars went from the 


Mr. Nice Guy" award for boorish 
behavior. Decker entered the Los 
Angeles Olympics as the favorite to 
win the 3.000- meter race, but got 
tangled up with her top rival, Zola 
Budd, and fell, injuring her leg. 

□ 

The Greek shipping heiress 
Christina Onassb-Rousse! had a 
baby girl Tuesday at the American 
Hospital in Ncuilly, a suburb of 
Paris. She married a French busi- 
nessman, Thierry Roussel, her 
fourth husband. last March 17. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS m 
bifc 634 9? 65. Geneva 
Rome 39 48 91 


LONDON, ENGLAND. One pnv«efy 


aboard hetaric 


vneh. Reservations. 


using ship to Green- 
ra Tel 0! - 480 7295- 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Eurqet deSvery. 

*. POB 2. B1000 Brunet 


Write Keyset. 


PERSONALS 


NMA- Coming to fade Feb. 12.0*1 
us coisct Em 


Normon A Cary. 


Hampton. Love 


MOVING 


DEMEXFORT 

PARIS • LYON • MARSEILLE 
UL1E* MCE 

bit! moving by speri a fet from moor 
dtie* in France to ul ahes in *e wtxfd. 
Toll free from France 16 105) 24 10 82 
FB& ESTIMATES 


CONT1NEX (near Opera): Caabus- 
ter* to 300 ofes worldwide - Ax/Sea 
Cdl Charlie 281 18BI fW Cars too 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D’AZUR; ST. PAUL DEVB4GE 

Ewefrtond panoramic seaview, very 

Iuwk'cvs ground-level vila, 100 jqjn. 
firing, 6 betfrooms, 5 berffa, covered 

Mmmmu noal summer/wimer. wh- 

im. F13.aa0.00a Tel- Mms Walter (93) 
32 9610. 


VERY RARE — CAP D'ANTBES. In 
townhouse, srientid 3 bedroom 
apartment: ISO sqjn.. 2 bathroom*. 
£*®»r>rd terrace 300 sgjn. barbe- 
cue. SS, <7 Ln Gocrite, 06400 
CANNEf Tefc (93) 38 19 19. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


HENOI lOVStA. Beautiful itudo 

apartments overtooJang Nice, cpset & 


pooa-fvV yiri a panes throw from 
Pramendtjoe 


dns Anglos. From 

U5S48.400. Broken muted. Write to 
Sir Froqemo, 13-15 rue du Pont des 
9453S Kuige Cedex. Telex: 
Goal A. TeL 687.3209 . 
57526J8 


CANNES RESHJBfllAi— Ne»cnm 

modities in a snal residence, SVMTTV 
mmg pool, garden. Mce 2 bedroom 




kitchen. Terrace, garden l: 

odor, garage, law rumxro expenses. 

Exdusiv* nrix*. FBOQjOOO 5S 47 

La Oabelte. 06400 CANNB. Tefr (93) 

38 19 19. 


MOUGMSRESUNTiAL- Marvelous 
vSa. “provenod" style, 9 rooms, 300 
reception-fireplace: 75 sqjis, 6 
bedrooms. 5 bathrooms, staff quar- 


ter*. 2600 sqjn. perk. New switrimg 

■ ‘ ‘ fl/Xim S3. 47 La 


pool Sea view. 

Crasrite 06400 
|93) 38 ft 19. 


Tefc 


NICE, VERY RARE: Abort ler Gor- 

don. Hrpwb 5-room 200 so/tl Foong 
south, high floor, refined decoravon, 
F2jJOOpOO. Promotion Mozart. Nee 
87 08 207 


GREECE 


HYDRA. 412 *vra. terrain, moonbeam 

view. *50,000. Tefe Athens 724 59 01 
or CO. telex 021 69 14 CAST 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


HUGO In. 
nous tavmhouse. lowly 
2 bedrooms, 2 - 
c8 decorated ad 
Rosen 272 40 19 


Kcmde 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


71HrCAR CHAMP MARS 


High dass apartment, exceptional 
old briefing, 315 sqm. FB.dOO.000 


16TH NEAR TROCADERO 


500 N-n. townhouse, 

mam + caretakers house. 


with broe go 

Excellent c ondition. FI 5,000.000. 

CABINET MARCEAU 

720 01 44 


NEAR AVE FOCH. Lovely reception 

+ 5 bedr ooms. 2 baths. 2d0 sqm., 

hidt comforts + needs room + 
partang. F4 JOOJOa TeL 727 88 96 


VESMET. tfgh dost, view on tc*e, 100 

vs^m. reception, 5/6 bedroons. beou- 

OU&fai 


averts'* house. IMM06. 
A PI 976 18 ia 


SWITZERLAND 


CHOOSE 

SWITZERLAND 

We haw lor for errors- A very bg 
choice of beautiful APARTMENTS/ 
VU1AS / CHALETS m the whole 
regmn of Lake Geneva (Switzerland). 
Monlrev* & d famous mountain «e- 
JOrts. Very leasonabh freed but abo 
tha best aid ffosi cxoiavc, Price from 
about U5S40.000. fVase visa us or 
Rhone before you moke a decision 
H. SfflOLD SA. 

Tour Grne 6. CH-I0O? Lausanne. 
Tel: 21/25 2611 Idea 2429 b 5BOCH 



Subscribe 
the IHT at spe- 
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new subscribers and 
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in most European countries. 

' Twice as much news for your money. 
Tb: Subscription Manager, 
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.: 74X0X29. Tlx 612832. 

Yes, I would like to accept your bargain offer. 
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The rest of Europe North Africa, former French 

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I SJ CS4) \K\ 


Ran of Africa Canada La on America GuK Sraws | 

Abb | S| 396 1 19g| IC9| 


Card account 
number 




REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


GENEVA . FOR SALE 
2 EXCEPTIONAL 

ADJACENT 

Commerce! txemees. Exduuvel|f for 
TOP-GRADE Laps. SF400.000 each. 
75 0,000 both, ion □ term lease. 

Write to: Mn. Btekhardt. 

39 MoeeOuboufe. PeM-Socomex 
0+1209 GENEVA. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


lOtOON. For the besi furnished flas 
and hoses. Cotauh itie Speorfsy 
Tel London 
352 


ftillps, Koy and lewis. 

! BUI. Telex 27846 9ESDE G. 


ANSCOMBE t RMGLAM) with of- 

fices in Si Johm Wood & Kensngtan 
offer the best service m ie>denftul 

letTmg- Tel: 722 7101 (OIL UK. 


HOLLAND 


Renthouse International 
020448751 |4 lines) 


Amsterdam. Boiestein 43. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


SHORT TERM m Latin Quarter 
No agents. Teh 329 38 83. 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

Embassy Service 

8 Are. de Macons 

75008 Preh 

Trie* 231o96 F 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGB4T W PARIS 

RATS FOR RENT 

PHONE 562-7899 

RATS FOR SALE 

PHONE 562-1640 

OFFICES FOR RENT/SALE 

PHONE 562-6214 


jg§| 

5T G3UNA1N Des PRE5. Sublet 2 sndl 
room, hkhenrite, WC sink, shower, 
color TV. 10 Feb. - 10 March. 5550. 
Tel: 325 21 21 


“flROKHT PARISH*, matures C»e- 
irufcys recherche pour dfcvrioppe- 
menr nouveaux lecfeuis, ‘ nober” 
confirms huile vfcgMale au nz ou Ite- 
me atr epices. firwayer CV a Bo* 1673. 
Herald Tribune. 92521 Merely Cedex, 
France. Dntfefton ossuree 

CHAMPS B.YSSS. Lovriy Eying + 
bedroom. F595a Tri: 281 10 20 

TROCADERO. Luxury, hm ted 
rown. garden. F7JXJ0; 525 3 aJ1 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

SAi£S 

Mamifactura of security communca- 
txn 8 counter ^nlelljgerice equxnert 
expancing Euinpexj, sales lean. We 
seek succesdJ dasers with proven di- 
rect sales expenence. High earmngs. 
eMcehnt pottmtoi tor riyv person 
Openings Paris. London. Genera, Rome 

Cai Mr CoPms (U5A) 212-949.1479 

71R RUE DE LUMVBC5ITE 52 sqjn. 
siucko, btchen, both F3.800 + 
charges + oOO parfang. 563 4? 13. 

AGENCE DE L’ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

764 03 17 

USA 


74 CHAMPS4ELYSEES 8lfi 

Sludio. 7 oi 3-room tyonmert. 

One month a mare. 

IE CLARiDGE 3S9 67 97. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

IDEAL FOR SHORT TERM 5TAY. Pais 

srudm&2rccm.decorond Conrad 
SoreEm: B0 rue Urivtisne, Pars 7th. 
Tri- |1| 544 39 40. 




EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


REQUIRE A COOK KM a resort Is- 
land of 100 beds in ihe Mddves. 


Mnanum experience 3 veers worfang 
m a hotel with knowledge of pastry. 


Salary US$800. 2-year contract. I 
nxjrrlti 


i paid leave vwih return 
pw yew. Free 


Uriel 


Iran. Please apfiy with bodata to- 
UnrvervJ Enterprises bd. P O. Bo* 
2015. Arte. Republic of frtdves. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


WHL BE YOUR Pubkc Relations 
agent. 28, erceBem references. 5 


years experience m USl very efficient. 

d. Perfect American 


te«y prcAessiord. 
rretxri & 


German. W"J study any 
n Pons in video business 

commerool, shows, press. 

icalw — — — " 

art gdtenes. 


comnxrrecahon. print, ix emotion & 

0* 354 06 21 Para. 


n-.uiiwim, juvnw 

resident n France seeks cammasions. 
Tel: (50) 04 8c. 34 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


k. efficient PA. mternatunal bexi- 


rjround. seeks post involving travel 


Mne-wasters please. Tel London 
(01) 941 2665 (after 7pm) 


GR - It* CREME DE IA CREME tm- 

pyqry help peop ta rec ruit bAngud or 
o^yisri mother longue secretaries. 


Para 758 82 30. 


EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Don’t mite 
INTERNATIONAL 
SECHTARMi POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in the IHT Oaserfind Section. 


HT CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT is 

kxdung hr young bingud Engfah- 
/Frendi secrcdcry with emphae e an 
lypng A telex skife in both 
languages. Mrs Sobered 747 12 65 
Pans from l JOi30pm. (ret: 4302) 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


YOUNG COURE. seek young gki to 
took after 17 month old child + Small 
domestic dunes in Pans. 5 day week. 


ri day, possbfly for bomd Modg- 


unp. Write in French or EngWt: 

Pent Lopange, 63 Awe de ViFers. 
75017 Pans 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


NARNE/GOYBNE5S, rekabfe. 

capable girl, very praferaonal 
children from brth upwards, 


bid, 

with 


now. Ft jr^Sta ff Coreultams. 


upwards, free 

■hems, 7 High 


Street Aldershot. Halts UK, Lcenced 

UK. Tef; 0252 315369. Telex 858902 

Bex on G. 


BENCH CHEF, 34 RUa-fT EngWj. 


Egon Roney Award 1981. 82, 
seeks respondble position with troveh 


kng person or family, rtghest refer- 
Herald Tribune. 


Box 1705. 

92521 NeuiBy Ceoex, Frtrea 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE LONDON only 
b ofeyn u nrfers & Id dose denfy mads. 
0*1 Soane Buteai, londort 730 
B1 22/5)42. UCEMP AGY. 


EMPLOYMENT 


•fein? 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ALWAYS AVAHABU - AU PAHS, 
children's nanny, mum's helpers & at 
Ua tehes of Id doss fiveei domestic 
help worldwide. Ca8 Skate Bweau. 
London 730 8122/5142(24 hand U 
C.EMPAGY. The 895aS70SLO*N£ G. 


EATON BUREAU E5T 1969. available 

now nannie s , mothers' helps & rf 
rfo less i onol hvm-m domestic Srtrff. UK 
a Overseas. Ori London 730 9566. 
Uc. UfC Employment Anency. 


ENGLISH NAM4SS & Mother's Helps 

free now. Nash Agency, S3 Ovch 
Road, Hove, UK. Tefc [02^3) 2904475 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAHC RENT A CAR. PnshQe cur 

cuar. TWW. 


BoDs Spirit, Mercedes. Japuer. 
hmouMML smoR can. 4c me Prene 
Charron. 75008 Pans. TeL 720 10 40 
Tete. 630797 F CHAROC. 



AUTO SHIPPING 


More Am Wadwide Car 




Direcity in the setvtorts - frsl & 

service - fuB doamenWran 
TRANSSHIP GMBH 
Bue»grrmeoter-Sinidt-Slr 5840 
D-28H) Bremen 1. W. Germrmy 
Tet 042M4264. TV 246584 


PAGE 13 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 




International Business Message Center 




Gaid expiry dote. 


Stcoatuia. 


Mv name. 


Address. 


City. 

TeL- 


-Country. 


-Telex. 


30-1-85 


I 

I 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

in ** b ito rtationc J Hmmkrfit 


at. a mffion n wdw worfd- 

witia, meat at wh a m me in 
bwfrien and indvttry, vriS 
read H. Jvrt fetor at (Park 


6I3S95J batara TO tun. an- 

that we am tator you 


outing 


»w 

wtfcr 48 hour*. The 

US.f9.80 


equteeleat per One. Yea mat I 
mdvda c o mp l ete and ver if i- 
tdde b8Kng 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


INVESTMENT PARTNOS 
USDS) 


• Select lord sir oteocolty located near 
i-Orcrdo 


Daneywocld- 
i Option to pwchoe at well below 
su n ent market value 
* Addmond finsned po>iners raquned 


i concplete ptrdnae and take olle 

i bgHy vafuct 


ifucHe land 


Short” holifing pc nod before ver y 
*le rwote (protected el '00% 


crafrayp 
plus) to developers interested in 
briding inter nctiand tounsr 
stnacnon. hotefe. shonxr^ cemm 

I tnvevfnwm rqnge 

USS2^00LM0 


BfROAMBUCAN 
INVE5TMB4T CORPORATION 
100 N. Bscayite 8Jvd 
Sute T !20^M«^ft33l 32 

Trwrv 803237 EURO MIA. 


UQUID GOLD 

JOJOBA 

The mroe'e bean grown m die 


JombpL 

U5A *to! o naturN We soon cf 100 . 
200 years Use*; L u hieal i on cosmet- 


iev, phanrxjcevhtoU. food bwu- 
no*.CaWort»fl 


feduhng. Dr. D. Yrmanos 
y-rvTTBhr, rioted. No other ptant 
product in the world is cnpotJc of e- 
pfoang petroteum bond (ubneecs 
Existing fields provide return on bi> 
wssbnent in fust year. Entire amount 


-ef-jitted by feth ^eq^ aeCTag show 


om«H income ■' petite of 33%. 
Enanidet from t n v ei t mi and 
broken welcome. 

For canalete delays contact. ALJ06A 
fiBEAROL Box 1643. Herald Tnbu«e. 
72521 Nauiy Cede>, Frc*i« 


FOR SALE - EXCH1ENT 400 co« 
fcm. Fcc4ities_caws i aigs. hvwr- 
nxer cr w^_ V_ Gmcda. E0 mdc north 
Ot Ottawa. VVAam Breen, Kurd 
■toute 4. Cctden. Qntano 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


UK & OFFSHORE 

COMPANIB FROM £78 


UK + hie oi Man + Anguilla 
Guernsey Jersey + GtycArx 
Liberia Pormrt o Delowore 
Rndy made or ta uni 
Fu4 namm ee. adminslrarive 
and aaovn*<ng bacl-up mdudng 
baik mtioduchare 


SELECT COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Mt Pleasaii. Douglas. Isle of Mon 


Tel- Douglas *0624} 23718 
eiex- 628554 SELECT G 


UMTED STATES 
INTERNATIONAL 
OOMMBtCE GROUP 

You- PASSPORT TO PROFITS m USA. 
cxtvbt vovr products 365 days ■ year 
at mtema*o<iel tarhtorf^m center in 
New Jersey. RESERVE SPACE NOW. 
Pnmc oppo rtuni ty to obtan eutastre & 
ides lor your produOL cd US S22 pet 
1 “i y ou* own 11 ;q. meter tp oca. 
Tb*£ o&tVTfogf fff fro opp^ r V'•^ , 
NOW. For details contact. 


US Intemcnorvd Commerce Group 
P.O Bo. 247. Woocfcndge. NJ (P® 5 
-U-7VX, Tit 


Tek [201) 254-7006. Tit 135056 


PUM1S AVAILABLE IN 
USS « SWISS HtANCS 


Far viable pro/Bdi. business loom, cdL 

latetdtearamortgogefooWiesetc*n- 
tere*t equal to mqo« low«t rate. 

Broken pro te cted. 


Send details of requramente to kcenced 
Swu trust fund's oc a edited ogenc. 


Burebank Haldna Ltd. Bank House. 
Uurdnan Rood. Laddon. Norfolk, 
NR] < 63 England. 

Tel- «4] 508 2027V? Tb: 97J449 B8H G 


COMPUTE PORTRAITS 


T-SHIRT FOTOS 
NOW V4 FUa COLOR 

cn afi-cadt Fuuieu that am ecn you 
38000 - SI 0.000 manh New tmd used 
istenn horn 319000 - 13QJXQ. Kemg 
cmruter Co. Oft. JX EecRto—ftr 9 


&C0 frarirfutl.W. Germany. 

412713 KEMA 


W 06ff-7A7S» Tbu 412713 


Immigration. Residency 
Naturalization 


Artctfe toroegh Government 
prow sms m Cw£t«jr. Cfirard & 
South Ametica. Ccrtacf IMVE5T 


Id Golden Smjrrr L omion Wifi 3AF 
Teh (01 ) 734^77 ft SB240 Wodd G 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


UNIVERSAL CONTAINSS LTD. 
High fi l t e red Income Han 

17%% P/A 


in US$ 

UQ. prowdas investors with a fvgh 
fried mum with security by Dfxiohng 
a globol co rea m er teosmg and manage- 
mem service. Ingumes at 19% offer wfl 
caWtar ta be deck with os recurved 
For detafc cf iha hilv guaranteed and 
insured investment pen. cantos): 

UNIVERSAL CONTAfNSIS LTD. 
P.O.BOX. S62 LONDON SW5 ODZ 
Tel 350 0667, Tk 896757 


CARLS8BIG 

One of CcMama't meet tuacaaful Red 

Estate camporaes has a select io n of 
lard pmcats ovalabie far armrnmionrf 
•nvestors. The properties, located 


throughout the Hoi* rerese m pnee 
frern^ 10.000 ta SaOOK, 3l avoJabte 
vmh terms. For m formation 


about the 

company, their track record and the 
properties, contact: 


CAU5BERG LAND COW. 

PO Box 412 
London NW3 4FP 

Tel: 936 9119. Telex: 268048 <*3013 


INTERNATIONAL OFFSHORE 
COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
FROM £110 

Comprehereve Aefcnrarirmion. 
htamnee serwees. Foweri of Attorney. 
Regmered offices. Telex, tel ephone, 
mol ferwdng. 
fifemf Rhwhcm Ltd 
Bofcxume Home. 

Summer hJ. 

hte of Men. 

M (0624] 3020-20240-28933 
Telex 628352 blond G. 


OVBSEA5 WHOUSAIflB, drib* 

im. stores, Greal Ldtes Resarcet a 

your U5 source for mtepfccnd low 

pndng on iityfcmcfls, hordwcie, 

toys, electronic products h-R, TVs, 

video dob, video topes, Beta VO L 
Ouosai. Morontz, 5yf«nw. Ptaneer, 
etc). Respome on company dokonety 
ody wiS bring 500+ c o totog a our 

to the first 50 
HetwrcaL 
. Syria, Oho 

44035 USA. 


RDUQAEY BAMONG an largo ad- 

loter du e d bans. The only rammer. 
eri bank with o representotw* office 

n London ipeaafiang m 6 m wvxt 

Arab Overseas Bank & Trust (W.t.) 
Ltd. % Btaids Pmoe fid. London 5E1. 
Tef 735 BI71 


PRIVATE DETECTIVE SCANOTttVTA 

S. Fmfcmd. call NOP-toy. 2* ho«ri03. 
41 » 14.1b 1P4 0 Mraoner 
G- BeHev, former poeae-'ormy effv- 
eer, contacts worldwide Wnto Jern- 

faaratoiaet4. NOI54 Odo 1 Norway 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


YOUK mm COMPANY IN 

SWITZERLAND 

_ZUWCH. ZUG - LUZBIN 


From SF500 per annum • up 
Confideso. 8o»erstr. 36. CH-63W Zug 
Tefc 0041 4? 21 32 8B. Tlx: 86 49 II 

A Present for Your Son 


SPAJN K WORUTS No. I tourer 
eowitry. Jonmg EEC in 1986 mokes 
future stfl brighter. Urwfue opporfum- 
ty tor busmen investor spectators, 
wring owner sells now operat ing 
hotel & howry residency cti sea. In 
center fomtxr. tourol resort m Costa 
Brava near France. Freeway, errporr. 
harbor, etc Yearly income + htgh 
appreocton expected Write Bar 
1651. Herald Tribune, 92521 Neielly 
Cedex, France 


PANAMA COMPANIES with notraneo 
droctars and confideriticJ Swiss/ Pan- 
ama bank account formed m 48 hows 
or ready-made. Offshore banks 
formed for $7000. Currencies or funds 
moved mto Eurocurrency tm deposit 
accounts with tax free interest and 
guaranteed anonytmty tor deposton. 
Manex. ID Pori: flare, Sr. Ja mes's . 
London SWIA UT. Tel: 01-408 2007. 


COLLATERAL 


We can provide prime benk notification 
of c oBat i rt for rntreage transactions. 
Reason ab le fees. Pratnot service. 
London breed. Tnte. B951622. 

Tefc 01-385 5492 ■ 01-930 8926 


AN EXHIBIT OPPORTUMTY to m- 
veil m the none refustry. Seebng 
investors for o major feature film 
rirnody in pregroducuoa Hvase re- 

B*r to: RTR Production*. 9903 So*d 

Momca BM, Side 349, Beverly hWs. 
Cd. 90212 or Tel: 213&7W& 


DWKT FACTORY Dsmbutors For 
Isjh qualrty speodty item less W 0 k 
were Several fees andb fate weft 3, 
5. or 7-ply oewructon. Convenhond, 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SWISS BUSINESSMAN tiavefing i 

Saudi Amino often, a wdbig ta to 

dte oddtwial osBanmenB on a fr 

bant. Office m Jeddah and 12 yea 
experience twaJade. Contact-. CJ 

32. CH-1873 Atoryts. 5witrertond. 


ess: 

23 KmII. Tefc 


Export, Jungmanretr. 52 8. D 

' " tqffl-686605 


■G f ref 2570 ) 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


MTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC. 
U.S.A. A WORLDWIDE 


„ j coBeoton of 
talenied. vtnatfe & mdAngual 
vtckviducjfc fer. 


FeshonCbeeeeroaLPnns. Pr o monom 
CenvenhoaTrode Stows-Press Parties 
Speod Erentsrtage Mokers-Pfij 
Soad Hosts- Hosteaes-EntertOTen 
Sood GMtqxnons-Tour guides, etc. 


212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56rti St, NYC 10019 


Service Braretenronves 
ed Worldwide. 


Needed 1 


OFFSHORE 
LIMITS COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


tome or wwd cover knob assembly. 

te. 92521 


Bax 1646, Herald Trfeew. 
NeuBy Cedec France. 


LONDON Property Deah located t 

undertaken tor serious dwnh ody. 
Fees requred but no profit shore. 
France ovohde at oca dem terms 
subjeo to stages. Prmopds only 
Phase write toBw 402B4, 1.H.T.. 63 
Long Acre. Londog WOE 9JH UJL 


LONDON KOFOTY DEAI5 Locoed 

/ undertaken for serious cfienls only. 
Fees llprom shore requred. Eepty 
63 long Acre. Lon- 


HAVE BUYERS 5EEXING to invest & 
monm piditade French busmcsies. 
Ware: JrUeVAtt LTD. Sax 241957, 
L05 ANGELB. CA. 90024. USA 
SfHffiT • Investor 'Partner wnntad 


tor hwhfy siitcwrful pkuhe wmdow 
raonufactunng 


_ _ j company. 4Q9 Hw rer 

Cresene. Ednamm Tlx. 373739 


Worldwide 

Nammee: Adnnmstianoii 
Boat Regutroftcre 
Boadvmade or Spert 


LONDON REPRBBITAT1VE 


ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 

DeplHI. 

B Victoria Si 
Doudm, We of Mon. 

T5- 0624 26591 
Triex 627*91 SPJVa G 


Are You Looking For o 
R ep res infiit hro in SwHxortreid? 
Expwaneed comp any with mterntMn- 
d oetnnws is offering any services, e.g. 
famanan of comtnmes. otf<6 space, 
tehx/tel. answering service, represen- 
tation etc. Phase contact. 

HUBERT Truri Co. Inc P.O.B. 222. 
CH-8027 Zurich. Telex CM 56421. 


YOUR OFFICE Si NEW YORK. Fifth 
Ave. address end / or phones os your 
USA office. Mml. phone calls received 
S forwarded. New York Mi Service, 
210 fifth Are. NYC 10010. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 

COSNHia INTERNATIONAL Fman- 
ori & Bmmm Coredtonts. 287 E. 
Oakland Prirk BM. Suite 1 10, Fort 
LnuderdoJe. R 33308. U.SA Tri 305- 
5614)994 Telex: 30288. 



FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

INVESTMBIT 

OPPORTUNITY 

5-storey building. 10 newly converted 
to*. <2 n‘A beds. 3 x 1 bed 8 5 audios), 
estimated rental income £673)00 per 
crown (12 + ft rtd). 

£5500)0 freehold. 

Geo Josfin TeTLondon (01) 352 37«6 





OFFICE SERVICES 

GENEVA 

Fdly eqweped afiie« » rent DanBe*. 

won (mol. trier S phone). Trate. utles 
rftwwrrimon A Kcrerand temces 

W. Stta de Owns. 1207 Genmro 
Tri. p2| 86 17 33. He *23358 KBS 

YOUR LONDON OfflCE 
at the 

CHE5KAM EXECUTIVE CMRfi 

Campret enure range of serum 

ISO tmgm St ret. London W1 

Tel: (01)439 6288 Tlx; 261426 

I#p3| 


y2r-.- 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSINESS CENTRES 


, 




«^Ul 


Furnished Executive Offices 


Cas^tte with Seaetarid, Tdex 


ihfrative. Corporate 
Reprecentafion A Other FocSthf 


AM5TBDAM Euro Busmou Center 
Kwtenm. 99. 101 5 CH Anatrdan 
TdSnfl 2271)35. Teten 16183 
ATH&45 Executive Services, Alhaa 
Tower 6. Suto 506. A them 610. 
Td. 1301) 7796 232. Tele*- 216343 
IOMBAY: Raheia Chambers. 213 
Nothtkx' Paint. Bombay 400 02'. 
Td- 744949 Tele*. 01 1-6897. 
BRUSSELS: 4. Rue dc ta fieue 
1000 Brusseh. TeL- 217 B3 60 
Trier. 25327 

DUBAk P.O. Bo* ISIS. DNATA 
Arfne Centre Dubai, UAE 
TeL 214565 Tele*- 4^911 
LONDON; 110 The Strand. 

London WC2K OAA, 

Tefc fOil B36 8918. *. 2*973 
AADfcd: C/Otense N* 684 
Modnd 26020. Id 270 56 00 or 
270 66 04. Trira 46642 
MILAN; Wo Boccaccio 7. ^ 

20123 fvUan. Tri 86 75 89^80 59 27* 
Telex.- 3 ZO*3 

NEW YORK 575 Mafiton Avenue^ 
New York. NY 10022. Td {2121 60S- 
020a Telex: 13864 / 2376W , 
PARIS'. (80S. 15 Avenue Wow Hug: 
75116 Pare. Tel- 502 18 00 
Tetetb 63Q893F. 

ROME Wa Savon 7R £0198 
T* 85 32 41 - 844 80 70 ■ 

Trier- 413458 ' _ 

SINGAPORE 111 North Brrige 6L 
-11-04/05 Penmuto Ptea SPe-e 
0617. Tel- 3366577. TU. 


yl* 7.^ 

IL,T 


■■ft," . ' >- 


Telex: 812656/812981. 


IOSANGBS 


a uiui in Bereny « — ■ 

preshgioui address. TU. r*** 
id & had i 


levonoi » toad tenures. - 
fereeutiv* Busineet 5*^*?* 
n 8W, St*. 609. Bw 

90212. Tel 013 B59-«r 

Teh*: 472-Q457 


Se*e 1957 ISP 

trier, mnernig rooin S rue OtWofc 
75008 Tefc 359 47 04 Tk64S&«. _ 


WW4AI3J . 

tde*. seaetorid «rvt M* 

Men Eumess CKh'-. lfS 

517 92 11 (12 knesl Th 61344 c 


OFFICES FOR SALE 


to the heort of Marie Co»to- S«ct>n 
office ocwmmcMBtcn h w “ 
lent. 8es tobe w your tf&*y Fr 
more mformahan ipnone: Mrt. Brc- 
drnnenp?9B4i07<» wnteLeM"’- 
Soane, mC. 9KDD ■ Mon*e Cato- Tel 
|«f56A307 Th 470 022 



Imrirne par Offprint, ?$ rue de tEvangile, 7 5018 Paris. 


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