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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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The Global Newspaper 
- Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 

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1 1 ■ ■ r i 


EC Summit Stalls 
On Short-Term 
Reform Procedures 


By Steven J. Dryden 

International Herald Tribune 


MILAN — European Comma- 


member states “delayed, post- 
poned and procrastinated.” 

Mrs. Thatcher md she had little 


nity leaders, at acontmtiousam- hope for the mccess of tte conf «- 
mil meeting, have failed to agree on «x*,smce changes ro te cqnsid- 


short-M measures to mpmvc ^ 

their dedson-malriiig procures, and that had been ladong at the 


But they agreed to call a confer- summit meeting. 


ence to discuss institutional re- 
forms. 


Her voice a 
Mrs. Thatcher 


The leaders ended a twenky 
meeting Saturday evening in din- 


S5 «™VB =E«-jb= 5 = 


; in irritation, 
ded, “Britain 
h hopes.” But, 
changes, she 


HjuGcmcau u*a wuctara Lucy uou ■ , „ . . i , ■ 

made significant progress toward hntai n ha d pro- 

changing cambersome roles reouir- P 05 ®^ t hat the leaders agree on a 
ingunanimity, winch are seeHs ■£“ «* <* OSS?*"* 

holding backihe development of "““S! , # 

6 r She toid a radio interviewer lat- 


tbe community. 


Prime Minister Bettrno Crari erf 

Italy, who chaired the meeting and **.**£*? jmd . now 


pushed through the idea of a re- 
form conference, said that the re- 
sults were “positive” and would al- 


low the community to move was a 


want this airy-fairy conference.” 

Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers of 
the Netherlands said the meeting 


“perhaps slowly, but stcadDy” to- His foreign minister Hans Va 
ward a “broader »nd more commit- Den Brock, added, ^fe expected 
teH Piimnnm union - Qualitative lean forward whic 


ted European union. 

But Prime Minister 1 
Thatcher of Britain, who 


qualitative leap forward which 
failed to materialize.” 

The summit, held in the f- nstelln 



Berri Asserts U.S. 
Will Not Retaliate 


The Associated Press It was led by a Lebanese Army 

BEIRUT — Thirty-nine Amen- truck with an anti-aircraft machine 

1 I" _ 1 L. .1 J . On' 


Shiite Moslem captors Sunday af- 
temoon and driven to Damascus, 


from where they were to be flown 
to freedom in Frankfurt 


The Americans, some smiling gage from die plane. 


and waring, climbed into a Red 
Cross convoy of station wagons af- 


ter 17 days of captivity that indod- narrow streets of the Shfitedum 


ed the slaying of a fellow passenger, no-hbothood. 

thr^thri&ccunmdndeCTcdair- ^ the convoy began to ■ MUkD . <f.' 

craft would be blown up. and hours „-i ft... lSTw Nabih Bern . . 

under the guns of raffia] Modern 

packers and the more moderate tn ,y p shook hand* with unidenti- Frenchmen, Michel Seurat and 
Hri. Bed Lebanese who gave him pink - WPaul^KauHman. would be re- 


des carrying Druze ndBtmen. 

They were followed by at least. 10 
Red Cross station wagons and a 
Red Cross truck carrying their lng- 


An Amal trade was at die tail Of 


die convoy as it rolled through the 


Nabih Bent 


Amal militia 

Seven other Americans kid- 
napped in Lebanon stjOare mss- Ca ptain Testrake, 57, of Rich- An aide to Mr. Beni, speaking 

»“*3! Missouri, ottered the lead- op condirion he not be identified, 
dggpte "S 08 ” ing Red Cross vehicle, smiting and said the hostages had been gaifa- 

Rt Tf VS®! “ Sito JittanSott end in wStiMmt riter fe* 

^fcBerri said that he had gotten split into smaller groups overnight- 
mS guarantees from Syria and the One ffoup slept Mtoe Husseinr 

Nabih Bern, who had bdd the fj^ted Stales. ieh mosque near the Shiite Modem 

*T received promises from Syria Tahweita girls’ school where 35 of 
said a U5. statement pledging to ^ g c tg>w1v f; t f TTm , ^ u.i A. the hostages had been gathered far 


leased within two days. 

An aide to Mr Beni, speaking 


to that of the hijacking hostages. 

The Shiite Moslem Amal leader, 
Nabih Beni, who had held the 
Americans in Beirut for two weeks, 
said a U.S statement pled ging to 
respect Lebanon’s sovereignty had 
been accepted as the demanded 


today.” he said, 
“there will d 


will definitely be a very 


Je^actag °f the TWA Athens- ^ whole ^ to trcnmrs.Nhiie 


Rome plane. 


On Satniday. the ndwtolcd it- 


posed the conference, said that Sforzesco, a 15th-century fortress 

in Milan, lasted for an unusual two 



fuB days. The atmosphere was de- 
scribed by officials as tease and 
frequently argumentative. 

“This has not been an-easy con- 
ference," Mrs. Thatcher said. 

The proposal to call a special 
reform conference was backed by 
all the member states except Brii- 


A militiaman hands flowers to a hostage in the Red <{ross convoy leaving Beirut 


lease of the hostages was hdd up ““j "““.3; 
i e..ii j nj:.. real terrorism. 


Long Farewell Was Justia Rehearsal 


for a full day over a Shiite demand 
for a pledge from Washington and 
Israel that there would be no retali- 
ation. 


Mr. Beni said two kidnapped 


One jpoup dept at tbe Hussefa- 
ieh mosque near the Shiite Modem 
Tahweita grds’ school where 35 of 
the hostages had been gathered far 
Saturday’s abortive release. ; 

Abu Rabiya, a senior Amal offi- 
cial, said four of the hostages who 
had been hdd by the radical Shiite 
HezbaHah, or Rutty of God, woe 
brought to Beirut from “a faraway 
place” after Syria purportedly so- 
(Cootiimed on Page 2, CoL 6) 


By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Past Service 
adootion of short-term measures to morning fwthehostaga. a trmerf 


adoption short-term measures to Sriri^toat jSTtrf- 

to- midnight with a farewell miMl at 


,1 ■ u-j.1 1 IC1 nuuumu wuu <s ioicwcu umi «u 

p™ TLT«,JciPr tertaiiean. The endwas supposed 


Prime Mmisto Andreas Papan- ■"W” 

dreoS^toSlteshort-terinW jo come Saturday aftonoon wdt a 

S&.MM ^ 


the conference, officials said. 


base m West Germany. 

- By 11 AM. the hostages from 


Bettmo Craxi 


/t ~ near Beirut Intenmtionai Airport, 

mml fonndmg the amnmm.ty. Rd 

The conference is to be called 

(c* i n — • « drive t hem across the border to 


(Continued on Page 2, Coti 5) Syria. They listened gleefuUy to ra 
dio reports of their impending lib- 
eration. 

IYia Nearby there were plenty of 

HIP luliU agns of suffering: the homes of a 

Palestinian camp shattered by re- 
A T) 1 1 cent fighting, truck-mounted ma- 

tienPJfi chine guns on nearby streets. Ev- 
^ erywhere were reminders of the 

j j u „ - wars of Beirut — wars that had 

dence under bbmknile for Namfo- reached out and grabbed them. But 


South Africans Raid 
Angola, Kill 45 Rebels 


I Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PRETORIA — South African- ia, which has been governed by ^ spirits were* high- Their bags 
led soldiers pushed 10 miles (16 South Africa since 1915, and in w^e packed. Theywere ready to 
kilometers) into Angola on Satin-- defiance of the United Nations g(X 
day in pursuit <rf blade nationalist since 1966. But they did not go. 

guemflas and killed 45 of them, a fa June, South Africa handed “We’re readv far thk mlW 

cw the territory's haemal admit- coaster tide tf&tffan 7, xm 

bMt Klld,CT EttrSSSESSS: “ -* .«■ 


died in the raid. but retained amtrol over its foreign 

Tbe spokesman. Colonel Tim affairs and defense and seenritypo- 


Kraynauw, said the soldiers picked bey. 
up the trail of insurgents of the T 

South-West Africa Prople’s Orga- Western governments, indoding " A1 , ^ 

nizatibn near the northern border the United States and Britain, be- 
of South-West Africa, the South cause it otdnded SWAPO, recog- 


bnt rettine d oantni i o mits fore ign 

affairsanddefenscandsecuntypo- come the main voice of the group. 


lau.-miucic^auu^iypo- come the main voice of the group. 
That move was condemned by 



pledge appeared to stem from Pres- In White House, Spirits 

ident Reagan’s threat in a speech •' ' • «» . ■ 

Rose and Fell Hourly 

support them. J 


jpport them. 

The hijackers, radical Shiites, 
killed a 23-year-old UB. Navy div- 
er, Robert Dean Stethem, on June 
15. 

There was no imtimdiatf; com- 
ment from the United States about 
the release. Washington had de- 
clared it would not act on the hi- 


tfew York Times Service 


were on their way by bus to Da-. 


WASHINGTON - Tte US. . My. togn w, t° !un« 

.-tea 


ta, aptotic 


1 i ... wuiuuiu«untinuuuuui 

diannds Fnd^r evemng that the force pia^ Frankfurt 
American captives in Lebanon -- F 


dared it would not act on the hi- might be released soon, , senior St. ' 

j ackers* demand that Israel free. White House officials said. That set SS-SIJKLiSfrffSfi 
morefaa^LAane&pritoito^- offu actraon^^^to saw 

roret of tem anto toad sard rt spurts nseand fall throughout Sat- At, Mr! SpeateSSJ to^ 
hadmtmd^tofteethepnsortos mday. ^wdedge^AefflSn was 

as secuniycotgitiansm south 1^ The information prompted an 1 a* it had w . 


had intended to free the prisoners 
as security corah tiems in south LA- 


anon warranted and would not free all-night session at the White 


them in connection with the Ameri- 
cans. 


ikes appeared to ac- 
t the situation was 
as it had been. . 
e officials said Mr. 


House as staff members, reporters Shultz first received information 


and others tried to piece together about the plan to release the cap- 
in Jerusalem, Yosa Berlin, the die latest pieces of mtotmation tivessometii«Jafto5PMfiiday ' 
Israeh cabinet secretary, said “no about the fate of the hostages as through what an official said were 
decision whatsoever” had been that information was .counqg out of ^ pinmaHr diannds” rf $yr» 
made at a cabinet meeting Sunday. LAanon, Syria and Israel About that trine. Mr. Reagan 

^ ic ^, an ^ The White House officials who was conducting an hcrariong meet- 

wmte iwA Boeing 727 was aban- . recounted tins activity Saturday ing with his nationa l security advis- 
doned by the two armed hijackers, provided details of prolonged can- ers, where he reportedly -hamed erf 
who were taken into the airport’s don on die part of administration the possibility of a breakthrough in 
transit lounge by Amal rmhtiamen. officials, punctuated by moments tbe crisis. 

With i pistols jammed mto their of optimism and frustration. The Top White House spokesmen 
belts, the two read abatement de- worst pant, they said, was readied conferred with Mr. MriFariane at 
nounang the Umted StMes, whose early Saturday when it was learned about 7 JO PM, then aaeed on a 
“warmadmK, it smd/Ts nothing that the Amencans, who supposed- strategy of informing thepnbUc 
Dot dnklrras toys. They wamed ly were to be taken to Damascus about the release. Ine plan was 
the United States to see that Israel and then to freedom in West Ger- that an announcement would be 
released toe Lebanese prisoners as many, stiH were being held in Leba- made at about 3 AM, the time tbe 
dfimanded - • non. White House believed that the' hos- 


oitedly Iramed of 
a breakthrough in 


Top White House 


demanded. 

“We staged this hijack to show 


White House believed that thehos- 


“The worn moment was when tages would be in a heavily guarded 


stances give up hope.” 

All the wink, a few miles away. 


wrangled over by men in a down- 

« tne ... i_ i, -it: i .. i 


„ ^ i _ pressed to confront America and 

vJnc o* the hostages, OintOD Suggs, se at ed, of Noifolk^ harass its interests evaywhere,’ 
Virginia, t alking in Beirut with Shiite Moslem nrilhramen. they said. 


the wodd the ability of the op- the rnmors came this mooring that rnntmcwfa heading ont nf J r hannn 


were at a scboolbaast? south to Da ma sc us . 


an officia l said. “We “We came in about 2 and wait 


The soldiers, of the South AM- Nan 
can forces and South-West African g 9 
territorial units, followed the guer- v 
rOias into Angola in a “hot pursuit - T 
operation" and killed 45 of them, 
the spokesman said. ^7 


“ ~Zl-:r2r cir at-the-heds office among battered 
^l^timaterepnsj^tiwofihe 

Namibian people. (UPl, Reuters) 


A South African aShtaiy spokes- 
man said Sunday that the soldiers KSfJS p!£ 


■ Mozambique Rebels Kifl 37 

MAPUTO, Mozambique — Re- 
bels fighting MoeamWone’s gov- 
ernment machine-gunned a convoy 
of five buses Saturday, kflKng_37 
passengers and wounding 67, The 


apartments with sandbagged en- more evident as tbe afternoon _ __ _ _ 

tranc« not far Iran tbe mam battle dragged on that something had ; The telephones were tbe focus of Assad,” erf Syria, that 735 Leba- Reagan had twan'fniH at « mw-fing Hopret rffi cial s T nomtori n g thesim- 
lme urn has divided Beirut since brought tbe freedom train to a hall; 'everyone’s attention. Mr. Beni, his nese, mostly Shiites, hdd in Load’s shortly after 5 PM Friday rrf what a&m State Department 

107^ HnrHfKI rwr mr f ^rc h*i/f Wt tLo L'J. L* ^ r 11 AfUt — — L. .• 1 . j... •*. 'a • 1 . rvMfanfr fliM* In 9 


Inside the office, it became ever gan’s talk on Friday of thugs and release the hostages “after guaran- ’ Larry ^eakes, the White House ^ 


checked and checked and checked and talk ed to Bod, and he , had 


to and found that they were." 


heard nothing,” an official said, re- 


jnurderers. 


tees sponsored by Preaden t Hafez spokesman, raid Pre adant Ronald 

Accnri w aT Cvrnn thn* 7TC T aLa w* — ^ » V- — - a j a* 


to Mr. McFariaoe. 
concern monntingj White 


1975. Hordes of repartees had left the tension haname palpable. 


re’s gov- already for Damascus to witness 
a convoy the arrival of the hostages when 
tilling 37 they got there. 

1 67, The Those who were left woe sum- 


Assotiated Press reported, quoting mooed three times to hear the 


.were returning to Namibia but xcprawu, quoung 

■ added thattSsy could be delayed Mozambican press 

by further skirmishes with SWAPO vjr*' • , 


news from Nabih Beni, the Smite 
leader who made himself the man 


Mr. Beni's No. 2 man emerged 
at one point to pray: his sleeves 
rolled up, his tie loosened, his face 
and hands wet from the ritual ablu- 
tions. He looked as if he had just 
emerged from a steam bath. 


hide said, was waiting for a call 
. Outside in the dark, the streets 
among the barricades had emptied. 
Guards strolled and played with 
their AK-47 rifles. 


Attit prison would be freed 


The convoy carrying the nos- on the pan ot me Moslem smites run - ; «y to* uum 

acc om p anied by Red Cross holding the hostages. Throughout 8X1 hour while they sought ccmfir- 
ls and Syrian Army officers, the evening, the president was pv- nation that the hostages had left 


officials described as a shut in tone contacts tbeadedded to &sy ihe 3 


tbe bos- on the part of the Modem Shiites AM antioimcaneiit by more than 


began roDfy almost two hours af- en updates about the duration by ** e *f u L . 


It was 9; 15 PM and the call had ter Mr. Bern announced the release Robert C. McFariaoe, his national Al 4:20, they announced catanfr- 


» uni — „ - Late in the day a young US.- 

or the discovery tflumscaSes™ The Mozambican agency said in the middle of the crisis during educated banker cdose to Mr. Beni 
South Africa; which invaded An- theattacktook P la ce 30 miles north the past two weeks. Three times, Jaafar Jalabi, tried to stifle reports 


not come. Mr. Berri walked of the hostages. 


security adviser, who awakened the tmdy that the hostages were on 


through the office surrounded even The convoy began Co move at president several times during the their way to Da ma scus. At 4: If, 

: l:. i ru: i i i r <» n ,/ STLj . .... L.-j., c i .. ° Mr tnM mu. 


«rfa in what it said was an oner*, of Maputo, near the site of an am- the last just before dusk, the report- 
lion against SWAPO bases JO** 1 * 


announced the withdrawal erf its 
last troops from Angola in mid- 
April bnt said it reserved the right 
to protect its security interests with 
cross-border raids. 

The withdrawal came undo- an 
. agreement readied in Febmaiy 
1984 with Angola, which pledged 
to keep the area vacated by South 
Africa free of SWAPO fighters. But 
South Africa said Angola 1 could not 


portedly killed 24 persons. 


that there woe new d«nnnH^ and 
new obstacles beyond tbe difficulty 
raised by President Ronald Rea- 


inside his buddi 
and then down 
npartmenL 


bodyguards 5:40 PM from Beirut’s southern night, Mr. Speakes said. 


Mr. Speakes told reporters: “We 


stairs to his subtnb of Botge Barajni. Tbe Inter- At a news conference at 4:20 have se en [r eports that the 


national Committee of the Red AM, White House nffidals an- 8 ecs °f TWA Flight 847 


Mr. Jalabi said Mr. Bern was Cross ran firmed that all 39 bos- nounced — erroneously as it Been hdd hostage in Lebanon since ’ 


going to try to sleep. 


tages were in the convoy. 


tamed oat — drat tbe hostages (Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


Poor U.S. Patients ^Dumped’ in New Era of Profit Health Care 


INSIDE 


"V w * S rtU * 5M “’ ^ p au i Tavlor scious consumeis, led by the big- 

Sooth Africa said Angola could not DALLAS —When G. R. Lafon , 

or would not keep its side of the walked riialdly into the emergency bfS 

targab. room of PuHasd Manorial Hos- lo o5t M 

After the withdrawal, two South pital, a noising supervisor asked if jSh 

African soldiers vma Hied and *eoouldhelp. 
one was captured in northern An- “I hope so,” said the uninsured 

gola on May 2Q in what South Afrv 56 : year-old laborer, displaying a 10 ** tamm ® 

ca desmibed as an intelligence- third-degree grease bum an his side ^ cal inflation, 

gathering operation but Angola and bade “I’ve already been to leading players m tins new 

said was an attemot to sabotage three hospitals today that marketplace — ho^ntals, counties, 


dents a month, twice the level of too often overwhelmed 


He hospitals that monitor dumping managers," said Dr. Arnold S. Rd- poor repub 
report si m il a r increases. Last year, man, editor of the New En gland the least of 
Cook County Hospital in Chicago Journal erf Medicine. fnihenc 


■ A Belfast man has been 
charged in the October bomb- 
ing of a Brighton hotcLPage 4. 1 


** zc^uuuiuiu. Duurouuman u ia lexas, wnere the proprietary' 

e least of these hospitals' worries, hospital industry has its strongest 
fa the new medical marketplace, foothold, 30 percent of all hospital 


African soldiers were killed and toe could help, 
one was captured in northern An- “I hope so,” said the urn 
jgola on May 2Q in What South Afti- 56-year-old laborer, tfispla 
ca described as an intelligence- third-degree grease burn on 1 
gathering operation but Angola and back. “I’ve already b 
said was an attempt to gtiyitay three hospitals today 
Gulf Oil installations couldn’t” 

On June 14, South African Mr. Lafon had been “din 


e ffi c ie nt health care to everyone. 
They already seem to be taming 
medical inflation 
The leading players in tins new 
marketplace — hospitals, counties, 
states, the federal government and 


transferred from other fatuities, a 
five-fold increase in four years. 

Parkland and Cook County are 
tax-supported, and their charge is 
to care For the poor. Both are teach- 
ing hospitals; their staffs have ex- 
cellent reputations. So the question 


Dr. Rebnan and other critics also public hospitals are being pres- beds are owned by -for-profit • 
fear that the United States is bead- sored from all sides by cost consid- chains; nationally, the figure is 11- 
ing toward a two-tiered netwoik of erations. Federal cathada in Med- percent, and ir is expected to grow 


■A 1LS. mfitmy commander 

says be is opposed to a UJS. , 
invasion of Nicaragua. Page 3. 


hospital care, with private hospitals ica ^ ^ Medicare, the medical to 30 percent within a decade, 
for paying patients, and public hos- oavment nroerams for the noor Public hospitals nationwide 


to paying patients, and public bos- payment programs for the poor Public hospitals nationwide 
pitals for the poor and uninsured, and the retired, have reduced their spend II percent of their gross pa- 
“It doesn’t take too long to figure reimbursements. Employer cut- tent revenues on “mdigeat care,” 
out who loses in a system nke that,” backs in health benefits have added that is, the care to uninsured pa- 
said Dr. Rem Anderson, preadent 10 the pool erf the un in sured for tients too poor to pay, too young 


Mr. Lafon had been “dumped,” private insurers — are sorting out arises: What is wrong with putting 


troops raided Gaborone, Botswa- or turned away from emergency new roles and protecting old ffirf. uninsured patients in plaos like 
na, and killed 13 persons in what rooms to lack of a deposit ranging In the meantime, however, “tbe im- that? 

Pretoria said was an attack on from S500 to $1,500, V three for- insured aretheonra who are left” One set of concerns is strictly 
homes of members of the banned profit hospitals closer to his home, gqio yd, aeymdmg to John Cravras, medical; the other involves access 


uninsured patients in places like of Parkland, who beheves that a whom! 


African National Congress. k 

The military spokesman said dog,' 


Saturday’s operation followed a skm graft and 2 9 days of medical 

nilr.nA T9JS ■ t. A. .a D 


“Kind of makes you fed like a president of the DaDas-Fort Worth 

Last year, a Harvard Medical 

dmz graft and 19 days of medical Dumping is toe prune symbol of School research-team analyzed re- 


SWAPO attempts Friday night to care at Parkland, a county-owned that exposure. The honor stories trf 3^ ^ ^ 453 03^^ trans- 
bomb a mflitaiy base near the Na- hospital ’ patients bang sent to other hospi- fetmJ during a six-month period to 

nnWa-Angola border and to sabo- Dumpmg is not new, but it is a tais while in labor or while coma- Mr_omnnrt«r? HicHjmd 


arc ultimately respond- for Medicare and unqualified to 

community wQl sharply limit the ble. The Skimming” of paying pa- Medicaid, whose eligibility guide- 
amount of tax money spent on tients by the aggressive marke ting lines provide to only half ihena- 
pubiic hospitals. techniques of for-profit hospital cion’s poor. 

Dr. Anderson bumps into those chains have taken away many of Private hospitals, on the ^tii T 
limits every day. Parkland, he their paying customers. hand, spend 3 percent of their gross 

jokes, has an "open-door” policy. At least 70 American public hos- P atienS *«««“ on care for the 
XJur doors are kepi open by the pitals have closed in the past five m£ ^8 ai1 ’ despite state laws reguir- 
long lines of people trying to get years, and 180 others hare been hospitals with emergency 
care, he says. bough* or come under the manage- roo ^ s 10 provide emergency care 

Waits at same of his hospital's IBeilt °f for-profit hospitals, there- w ^° it, regard- 

outpatient dinics can run five or six tiy adding to the strains on the w® 5 “ abmty to pay. 
hours. During busy times, Farit- re m a tihn g public hc^riials- Givea that disparity, a of war 

land’s four-bed hospital rooms “Health care is now a comma’- ^ developed, m Texas and na- 


■ Tass has warned that unless 
the United States chafes its 
armspoBcy, Moscow may reas- 
sess the Geneva talks. Page4. 

■ Sandro Perthn, Italy’s presi- 
dent, ba$ steppeddown 10 days 
ahead of schedule. . Page 2. 


at the border town of 


in the United fose or immediately after devastal- 


wted Highland General 
in Oakland, California. It 


20 mfiliaa to 35 miHion ing accidents are atypical but they flat in 12 percent of ific 


cording to the South African mili- the face of the health industry: the denis are dumped nationally; lew 


■ favegfigatora haveimndno 
evidence of a bomb in the crash 
of an Afr-fadia jet Page 3. 


At least 70 American public hos- P®"®* nwenues on care for the 
pitals have closed in the past fire ““S® 11 * despite state laws requir- 


■ Matte! S. Gorbachev is % 
2y to be appointed the Sovsu 
head of state Tuesday. Five 4 a 


ascendancy of for-profit Imspitals hospitals keep records. Parkland 


^ ^ ■ ■ ■■ “ j r - - ■ — — — ,r AVWAWWv A lUBiiUiU 

SWAPO is fighting for indepen- and the emogence of price-con- doe. It receives 150 dumped pa- 


result 

“Medical judgment, compassion 
and common sense nowadays are 


land’s four-bed hospital rooms 
have five beds. Just gettiog in and 
out can be a chore to visitors, 
doctors and nurses, 
ft is crowding, rather than the 


Given that disparity, a of war 

has developed, in Texas and n*> 


■ Investors in Uqy<Fs of Lon- 
don insurance syndicates smd 
they will file smi to escape li- 
ability for recent underwritinit 


d care to the mdigents are 
to finish last, wntcs Uwc 


(CoiUlinied on Page 3, CoL 1) 


■ The Bank of Fraace has tight- 
ened its^rcserifMTri^J te^are-i 
meats forbffliks^ P^e7. ■' 


; > 7‘. ’ ■ • V 7 ' T ‘ *'-,-^’.■5 ’ • v -a ' 


.-T -a; 












Page 2 


Airline Group Says Athens Airport 
Now Provides Acceptable Security 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 


By Kenneth Freed 

Lot Angela Tima Service 

MONTREAL — Greece has 
raised security at Athens airport to 
acceptable intematioaal standards 
since the June 14 hijack of a TWA 
airliner, according to the Interna- 
tional Air Transport Association. 

The finding was marie, after five 
experts spent three days in Greece 
reviewing bow the hijackers got 
weapons aboard the TWA flight, 
according to David Kyd, spokes- 
' man for the the association, which 
' represents airlines. He spoke Fri- 
- day after an emergency meeting of 
the association’s security advisory 
committee. 

The association has been con- 
ducting airport security checks for 
more than 10 years. 

• Mr. Kyd would not be specific 


but did say that, apart from prob- 
lems with the airport's layout and 
the perimeter fence, “ihe key ques- 
tion is the motivation and attention 
of the people opera ting security 
equipment.” 

He said that a survey of 40 key 
airports around the world over die 
last six years had pinpointed secu- 
rity problems at Athens and “five 
or six” other dries. 

Mr. Kyd would not name the 
potentially dangerous facilities oth- 
er than to say that “two are in the 
Far East and three are in the Mid- 
dle East or Africa." 

“To be more specific,” he said, 
“would gjve terrorists information 
they would like to knew.” 

The Greek government and offi- 
cials of the other countries were 


In White House , Spirits 
Rose and Fell Hourly 


(Continued from Page 1) 

June 14th are now departing Bei- 
rut. We hope and pray that this is 
the be ginning of a journey to free- 
dom.” 

At Lhe same time, a high-ranking 
official, who did not want to be 
identified, was appearing optimis- 
tic, saying Mr. Reagan expected to 
make a statement about the hos- 
tages between 9 and II AJvl. He 
added that Mr. Reagan had asked 
that Vice President George Bud 
interrupt his itinerary in Europe to 
greet the hostages in Frankfurt. 

This official said the administra- 
tion had been advised that the 
Americans would be transported 
overland on a four-hour trip to Da- 
mascus in the company of the In- 
ternational Red Cross, and with a 
Syrian military escort Once there, 
they would remain about 90 min- 


NINARKCI 

Before the presentation 
of the Autumn Collection 

SALES 

of the Spring 
Collection Models 

Boutique 
Accessories Hats 

Wednesday July 3 

from 10:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 

39, Avenue Montaigne 


utes at a hotel before being flown 
out of the capital 

Administration officials said the 
information that the transfer had 
noL occurred marked the worst 
point in the drama. Mr. Reagan 
was described as “obviously disap- 
pointed." 

One of his senior advisers said 
the breakdown was “just a matter 
of each side gauging the credibility 
and endurance of each other." 

Another aide said the problem 
was being worked on with Syria. 
He said that President Hafez al- 
Assad’s ability to demonstrate his 
standing as a power broker was 
being challenged by die failure of 
the Lebanese Shiites to deliver the 
hostages, since Syria had said that 
the hostages were expected to be 
freed Saturday. 

“Assad is being asked to go back 
to his guys in Lebanon and tell 
.them to stop the haggling." a State 
•Department official said. “The 
price has been set. You cannot re- 
negotiate it." 

200 Injured in Rioting 
After Dublin Concert 

Reuters 

DUBLIN — More than 200 peo- 
ple were injured Saturday in rioting 
In central Dublin after an open-air 
concert by the Irish rock group U 2 , 
the police said. 

Fifty persons were arrested after 
shop windows were smashed and 
stores were looted when thousands 
of fans poured out of a stadium 
into city streets. None of the in- 
jured. who included six policemen, 
was hurt seriously. 


advised in 1980 that they were bo- 
low recommended security stan- 
dards, Mr. Kyd said. While some 
improvements were then made, be 
said, they bad not been suIfitienL 

Friday’s meeting at the associa- 
tion's headquarters was called after 
six violent incidents involving air- 
planes and airports over the last 
three weeks, including the hijack- 
ing and ultimate destruction of an 
airliner in Ionian and the crash of 
an Air-India Boeing 747 in which 
329 persons died June 23. 

Mr. Kyd said that the committee 
dealt with “new measures to thwart 
terrorist activity and emphasized 
the need for member airlines to 
make every endeavor to secure 
their government’s ratification or 
implementation” of existing trea- 
ties and agreements designed to 
prevent terrorism and pumsh ter- 
rorists. 

Mr. Kyd emphasized that the In- 
ternational Air Transport Associa- 
tion, a voluntary group, bad no way 
to enforce its recommendations nor 

to penalize countries or airlines 
that did not conform to the group's 
standards. 

■ V ul nerable Airports Listed 

Lisa Belkin of The New York 
Times reported from Washington: 

The Reagan administration has 
received a report from the Federal 
Aviation Administration listing 
airports around the world that may 
be vulnerable to hijackers because 
of lax security, federal aviation of- 
ficials said Friday. 

The While House is considering 
restrictions on air traffic between 
the foreign airports cited and the 
United Stales. 

On June 18, President Ronald 
Reagan announced that he had or- 
dered the FAA to review security 
systems at airports around the 
world in response to the TWA hi- 
jacking. The resulting report was 
delivered to the White House cm 
Tuesday, according to Edward Pin- 
to, an FAA spokesman. 

The Kst of airports will not be 
made public in the near future, Mr. 
Pinto said Friday. 

A spokesman for the Depart- 
ment of Transportation, which 



Richard Herzberg, 33, arrivep 
Nabth Beni He and three 
separately from the hostages 


Bwisn 

Sunday at the home of 
other Americans were kept 
skken from the TWA plane. 


* 

Chronology ojf Hijacking 


report, 

not publicize those deficiencies.” If 
the United States said, for example, 
that a certain airport “had a terri- 
ble security system and you can 
drive a truck through their baggage 
area," the spokesman added, it 
might encourage terrorism at that 
airport. 

The spokesman said, “If there 
are deficiencies at any particular 
airport, we will try to work with 
those countries to bring security up 
to our standards." If improvements 
'are not made, be said, “the secre- 
tary of transportation win take ac- 
tion to suspend service to and from 
those countries.” 


Friday, June 14 — TWA flight 
847, with 145 passengers and 8 
crew members aboard, is hijacked 
by two Lebanese Shiite gunmen mi 
its way from Athens to Rome. The 
gunmen force the Boeing 727 to 
Beirut, where the hijackers are 
joined by about 10 more gunmen . 
They demand the release of 766 
Lebanese, most of them Shiites, 
held in Israel The gunmen free 19 
passengers, fly to Algiers and re- 
lease 22 more. An accomplice of 
the two hijackers is arrested at Ath- 
ens airport. The plane returns to 
Beirut, where the hijackers kill one 
hostage. 

Saturday, June IS — The plane 
returns to Algiers, where 67 hos- 
tages are released and Greece frees 
the accomplice. 

Sunday, June 16 — Hie aircraft 
flies to Beirut, where the remaining 
hostages are taken off. Nabih Bern, 
lhe Amal Shiite leader, becomes 
the negotiator for their releaseJsay- 
ing if the Lebanese prisoned are 
not freed “then L as a mediator, 
will wash my bands of the cash." 

Monday, Jme 17 — Mr. Bern 
announces that the hostages nave 
been moved to several hidemays. 
Israel says it will consider rdtLricg 
its Lebanese prisoners only Jfjt 


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derives a top-level U.S. request, 
bht Washington says it will not 
n ate such a request. An ailing hos- 
u ge is released. 

Tuesday, June 18 —Three more 
hostages are released. 

Wednesday, June 19 — Captain 
Ji hn L Testrake warns that in any 
nscue attempt “we would all be 
d ptrt men." 

Thursday, June 20 — President 
Reagan declares that the 
its of U.S. patience “have been 
Five hostages appeal to 
Mr. Reagan to refrain from using 
force. 

1 Monday, June 24 — Israel re- 
leases 31 Lebanese prisoners, but 
Mr. Bern says the hostages cannot 
be freed imf««« the others are re- 
leased. He also demands that US. 
Waishit 

coast, be withdrawn. 

: Tuesday, June 25 — Mr. Reagan 
threatens to Impose sanctions 
against Lebanon. 

Wednesday, June 26 — Mr. Beni 
releases an aumg hostage and of- 
fers to transfer hostages to a West 
European embassy or to the Syrian 
government. 

Thursday, June 27 — Mr. Berri 
asserts that the crisis is nearly over. 

Friday, June 28 — Syrian offi- 
cials say the 39 hostages will be 
moved to Damascus. 

Saturday, Jime 29 — Most of the 
hostages are moved to a school in a 
Beirut suburb, but their release is 
delayed. TheShrite Moslem leaden 
demand guarantees that Israel and 
the United States will not take re- 
prisal actions against Lebanon. 

Sunday, June 30 — The hostages 
are driven to Damascus to fly to 
Frankfurt. 'i 

— Compiled by Sytske Loajen, staff 
researcher. 


Hostages 
From Plane 
Are Freed 


(Continued from Page I) 
cured American assurances there 
would be no revenge strikes. 

The “faraway place" was be- 
lieved to Baalbek in the Bekaa, a 
stronghold of Shiite radicals linked 
to Iran's revolutionary regime. 

The four hostages held by the 
Party of God were identified by the 
other Americans on Saturday as 
Robcn Brown, Richard Herzberg, 
Jeffrey Ingalls, and Robert Traut- 

Two Shiite terrorists seized the 
Americans June 14 on TWA flight 
847 between Athens and Rome. 

The terrorists released more than 
100 other passengers and crew as 
they shuttled for two days between 
Beirut and Algiers. The remaining 
hostages were taken off the plane in 
Beirut on June 16 and hdd under 
guard in several different places 
while Mr. Beni negotiated the con- 
ditions of (bar release. 

■ List of Hostages 
Following is a list, compiled by 
United Press International, of the 39 
ho stages : 

Contain John l_ Tartrate 57. Richmond. 
Missouri. 

Philip Marasco. flrrt officer, a. Baldwin. 
New York. 

Bonlomln Zim m ormmm. Htont endnaar, 
45. Cascade. Mete. 

The Reverend James McLaughlin. 45. Ge- 
neva, Illinois. 

Thomas V.S. Collins. 42. BurllnstDa Ver- 
mont. 

Claude E. WN (mover, Severn. Maryland. 
Michael Brawn. 27. Harm Miami Beach. 
Florida. 

Bob Pool Jr. 32, H id cM man, Kamos. 
William Darrau SL Aurora Illinois. 
Raymond Jahnswb 62. Aurora Illinois. 

Dr. Richard Moan, 62. Asheville. Norm Car- 
olina 

Jerome Barack. S3. St Louis. 

James Hoskins Jr. 22, Indianapolis. 

Peter W. Hill, 57, HoHaran Estates. I llfnofs. 
Ran w. Tnwoatt 32, Lunmbura. Massa- 
chusetts. 

Grant Elliott, 27, Atoonautn. Illinois. 

Stave Willett, 36. ThlbodUH. Louisiana 
Kenneth Anderson. 62. Fax River Grove, 
Illinois 

Stuart Darech, 26. Dorchester, Massachu- 
setts. 

Dr. Arthur Tooa 33. St. Louts, 
victor Mitany, 31, San Francisco. 

Simon Gro mim ayer. 57, Alaanaula Illinois. 
Bioko Svnnestvedt, 24. Bryn Altiva Penn- 
svtvcnla. 

Lea Byron, a. Harrisbura Pennsvtvanta. 
Georoe Laweekv. 51 Aiaenaula Illinois. 
Ailyn B. CmwaU.-M. Houston. 

Thomas NL Murry, 57. Newbury Parte, Calf; 
lamia 

The Reverend Thomas J. Dempsey. 4V, St. 
diaries. Illinois. 

Jock McCarty, 39. San Frandsca 
Vicente Garza Jr. S3, Laredo, Texas. 

Kena Bowen, 23. viroMa Beedv Virginia. 
Robert Brawn, 42. Stow. Massachusetts. 
Kurt Carbon, 38. Rock lard. I ill mb. 

Stuart DM, 31. Noriolk. Virginia. 

Richard Horzbero, 33. Norfolk, Virginia. 
Jeffrey inswiiv 24. Virginia Beach, Virgin- 
ia 

Clinton Suggs. 29. Virginia Beach, Virginia 
Robert Trautmaen Jr. 17, Lareda Torn. 
Tory Datiel Watson. 37, Virginia Beach. 
Virginia 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Finns Say UN Soldiers Were Beaten 

HELSINKI (API — Finland’s Ministry of Defense has assent 
Israeli officers watched Lebanese militiamen beat kidnanfedp ^ 
toldieni serving with the United Nations in Lebanon, but didm»t^ ■ 
help them. n0l «t%i e 

The ministry said the Furnish soldiers were bsateavnih iron h*. 
hoses and rifles by members of the Israeli-backed South LebaiS>’ a 31 * 
militia after their capture June 7. There was no 
Israel to the assertion. ™anaie respo^ fc . 



Doss interviewed 1 1 Shiite deserters who said they did not wkh to ^ 
to the South Lebanon Anny. A United Nations ‘inquin,- found 
Furnish troops had colluded in the desertion of the fl ntilmanwli l? 
staging a mock battle in which the deserters supposedly were camSS ^ £ 
the Finns. ' ‘-'‘Panic by ft 

Greenpeace Boat Escapes Detention 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Sirius, a protest vessel of the Greenne** 
environmental group, escaped from detention in Antwerp under erww^ 
darkness Sunday and headed home to the Netherlands, Grecrm^r*' 5 
Antwerp port police said F ^ c ^ 

The boat had been chained for about six weeks to moorings pending 
Antwerp court ruling, due July 12. on claims for abom 
damages against Greenpeace for having used the boat last momfe f 
obstruct work on dumping chemical waste in the North Sea. ^ 10 

A statement issued by Greenpeace said the escape did not mean that 
the organization would defy the legal consequences of its actions he- 
described the damages claim as fantastically high and aimed at mini 
Greenpeace financially so that it could not continue its actions to ’ 
the environment 


Mugabe Assails Whites as ^Racists’ 

HARARE Zimbabwe (UPJ) — Prime Minister Robot G. Mmabe 
sharply criticized Zimbabwe’s whites on Sunday, calling them racists for 
supporting the rightist party of Ian Smith, the former prime mimster in 
last week’s general election for the 20 seats in Parliament reserved f« 
whites. 

While voters gave Mr. Smith’s party 15 seats, rqecting a group of 
moderates encouraged by Lhe Mugabe government Mr. Mugabe's guer- 
rillas fought a war in the 1970s against Mr. Smith’s whlre-minortiv 
government, but after coming to power Mr. Mugabe adopted a poliev erf 
reconciliation with his former enemies. 


Mr. Mugabe, at a rally in the town of Chinhoyi for Monday and 



U.S. Court Rejects Case 
On Grenada Invasion 

The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — A UE ap- 
peals court dismissed Friday a 
challenge by a group of congress- 
men against the Reagan adminis- 
tration s military invasion of Gre- 
nada in 1981 

The three-member panel, in an 
nine-page opinion by Judge Ed- 
ward Allen Tamm, said the issue of 
the Oct. 25. 1983, invasion was 
moot because the action lhe con- 
gressmen called unconstitutional 
had ended. 


enjoy the comforts of this country,” he said, “and those therefore win 
have voted for Ian Smith and continue to support him will have no one to 
blame but themselves." 

Reagan Urges Curbs on Soviet Envoys 

WASHINGTON (UPI) — President Ronald Reagan has accused the 
Soviet Union of “stealing or buying" U.S. military and industrial secrets, 
and said the United States should restrict the number of Soviet diplomats 
allowed in the country. 

Mr. Reagan said in his weekly radio address Saturday, “We're in a long 
twilight struggle with an implacable foe of freedom.” He said that 30 MO 
percent of Soviet diplomats “are known or suspected intelligence officers 
and all can be called upon by the KGB," and “we need to reduce the size 
of the hostile intelligence we’re up against in this country " 

Mr. Reagan also called for an end to many restrictions on the CIA 
imposed in the 1970s that he said “unduly hampered us.” t 

For the Record 

An un de r gi o und midear exptogoo “of extraordinary magnitude" in the 
Soviet Union was reprated Sunday by the Swiss Seismdogica] Institute in 
Zurich. The institute said that the explosion at Senripalatmsk in Kazakh- 
stan, near the Chinese and Mongolian borders, reached 63 on the 
open-ended Richter scale. - fReuun ) 

President Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S* Gorbachev. Lhe Scmci icsJcr, 
have agreed “in principle” to hold a summit meeting before the end of the 
year, a U-S. administration official said Saturday, but the time and place 
have not been decided yet. (UPI) 

Spain's Roman f-riwie bishops said Saturday that Catholics who 
obtained or promoted abortions would be considered excommunicated. 
A statement issued by a plenary meeting of the episcopal conference 
condemned a new law allowing abortion m certain cases, reiterated its 
view that abortion was immoral, and said that the church believed that a 
strong measure such as excommunication was appropriate. (Rouen) 

Police in Sarah Korea arrested 66 persons Saturday in predawn raids 
on nine universities in Seoul and two other cities, a police spokesman 
reported. (UPI) 

The United States has aban do ned a plan to have relief agencies ran by 
Ethiopian rebels in Sudan distribute 200,000 tons of food to famine 
victims in northern Ethiopia, U.S. officials in Khartoum said. (UPI) 


7*1 

Ml. - • 


Pertini Leaves Office 10 Days Early 


United Press International 

ROME — Sandro Pertini has re- 
signed 10 days before the end of his 
seven-year term as Italy’s president 
in an apparent rebuke to a govern- 
ment and political parties that 
failed to re-dect him as bead of 
state. 

“I present my resignation as 
president of the republic so that the 
new president can more quickly as- 
sume his fuD powers,” Mr. Pertini, 
88, said Saturday in his letter of 
resignation. 

“Fleave the Quirinale Palace 
with a secure conscience of having 
done my duty in the exclusive inter- 
est of the Italian people, whom I 
have always loved immensely.” the 
letter said. 

Howevra, all the signs were that 
the president-elect, Francesco Cas- 


siga, 56, would have preferred not 
to be rushed into office. 

When Mr. Pertini sent his resig- 
nation letter to the presidents of the 
Senate and Chamber of Deputies 
and to the government, Mr. Cos- 
aga was on the third and final day 
of a visit to bis native Sardinia. 

Mr. Cossiga immediately cut 
short his trip and fiew back to 
Rome, wherebe took onx as provi- 
sional head of state until be is 
sworn in before a joint session of 
Parliament and regional represen- 
tatives Wednesday. 

This was possible because Mr. 
Cossiga remains president, or 
speaker, of the Senate until a new 
speaker is elected. The Senate pres- 
ident is obliged to take over as 
acting head of state if the incum- 
bent resigns or is incapacitated. 


President of PakmKMed By Unidentified Gunman 


The Associated Press 

KOROR, Palau — President 
Haruo I. Remeliik of the western 
Pacific island of Palau was shot 
and killed early Sunday, and a un- 
identified Palauan was arrested in 
connection with the assassination, 
officials said. 

Mr. Remeliik, 5!, who was in his 


second tom as the U.S. trustee- 
ship's only elected president, was 
shot four times as be walked from 
his car to his home in die capital of 
Krara, said an aide, Bonifacio Ba- 
<iKiw Thomas Remengesan, Pa- 
lau’s minis La of justice, was named 
acting president until Vice Presi- 
dent Alfonso R. Oiterong returns 
from a trip to New York. 


Mr. Pertini's sevm-year term 
was doe to expire July 8 and ar- 
rangements had been made to 
swear in Mr. Cosaga on July 9- But 
in view of the resignation the joint 
parliamentary session was urgently 
convened fra July 3. 

Prime Minister Bettino Craxj, a 
fellow Socialist, also was out of 
Rome on the day Mr. Pertini chose 
to stop down. Mr. Pertini knew that 
Mr. Craxi would be in Milan pre- 
siding over the European Commu- 
nity summit meeting there. 

Political commentators said that 
Mr. Pertini’s decision to leave of- 
fice early apparently was attended 
as a rebuke to the politicians who 
faded to reelect him to a second 
tram. 

Mr. Cosaga, a Christian Demo- 
crat, was elected June 24 in voting 
by members of Parliament and re 
gional representatives. Mr. Pertini 
received only 12 write-in votes 
among 1,011 cast and Mr. Cosaga 
received two-thirds of the vote. 

Although Mr. Pertini declared 
two weeks before the election that 
he was not a candidate, dose asso- 
ciates said be had been hoping fra 
re-election and was upset when his 
Socialist Party and the Commu- 
nists went along with an arrange- 
ment to vote fra Mr. Cossiga. 



Sandro Pertini 


EC Summit Stalls on Ways to Institute Reform 


(Coatraoed front Page 1) 

'before the end of October, and its 
results are to be submitted to the 
(December EC summit, officials 
‘said. It was unclear whether EC 
leaders would attend the confer- 
ence or only their foreign ministers. 
Spain and Portugal who are to join 
the EC in January, also will be 
invited. 



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Mr. Craxi said that . the confer- 
ence would consider amen dmen ts 
to the Treaty of Rome to improve 
decision-making and expand the 
power of the executive European 
Cwnmissiop and European Parlia- 
ment. It also will e xamine ideas for 
a separate treaty coordinating 
more dosely the member states’ 
foreign and security policies. 

The idea fra dose consultation 
on foreign and security affairs had 
farmed the core of a last-minute 
French-West German proposal 
and also was part of the British 
initiative. 

Responsibility for convening the 
rdorm conference mil fall to Lux- 
embourg, which takes over the 
chairmanship of the community 
this month under the EC's su- 
- month rotating presidency. 

EC. officials consider ii essential 
that a move to more use of majority 


voting be made before the entry of 
Spain and Portugal. The officials 
said they believe that the communi- 
ty will face virtual paralysis if it 
must continue to find unanimity 
among all 12 member nations. 

Italian officials, playing down 
criticism of the summit results, said 
that the decision to call the confer- 
ence was agrtificant. For (he first 
time, they said, a majority of the 
states overruled a minority cm a 
major question, establishing a pre- 
cedent fra future majority voting. 

Preadent Francois Mitterrand 
of France said that the vote was 
important, because it “‘marked (Hit 
clearly those who desired a strong 
united Europe from those' who 
were reticent/’ _ 

Mr. Mitterrand said he was par- 
ticularly pleased with the support 
given by the leaders to France's 
proposal to encourage the develop- 
ment of European high technology. 


known as F»y»4fa. The summit also 
backed a European Qumnissoa 
to increase community 
research and devel- 
opment. 

France was asked to organize a 
committee representing member 
stales and other interested Europe- 
an countries to meet in July and 
discuss the coordination of tech- 
nology efforts. 

The leaders also gave broad ap- 
proval to a European Commission 
program fra completing the remov- 
al of national barriers to trade 
within the community by 1991 The 
barriers are seen as holding back 
the economic potential of Europe 
and exacerbating the ECs current 
' level of unemployment. 

!: priori ties of rhe program in- 
clude the creation of a free markcl 
ra the financial services and irans- 
port sectors^ and lhe liberalization 
of capital movemira ls. 



» 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, . JA . -/JULY I 


■ — ■ r* f> “-* v 
■aor*' 1 - 


serials :-o- 


Page 3 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Baltimore Man Flew 
On 2 A-Bomb Flights 

Jacob Beser of Baltimore was 
8 24-ycar-dd radar specialist 
aboard ibc Eoota Gay on Aug. 
6, 1945 when- it dropped the 

atooac bomb nicknarn^ “Lit. 

lie Bov” on Hiroshima. Three 
days later, he was aboard an- 
other B-29 when “Fat Man" 
was dropped on Nagasaki He 
wanitt only person to serve as a 
crewmember on the attack air- 
craft oa both missions. 

Rec ently retired from the 
Wcstinrixmsc Carp., where he 
waricea mostly cm classified 
projects, Mr. Beser told The 
Washington Post that fee ques- 
tion he is asked most often is, 
“Would you do il again?’’ And 
would be? 

■‘Given the same circum- 
stances in the same kind of a 
context, the answer is yes,” he 
said. “However, you have to ad- 
mit that the circumstances 
don’t exist now. They probably 
never will again. I have no re- 
grets, no remorse about it” 

Estimates of the number of 
people who were killed, injured 
and missing in the bombing of 
Hiroshima and Nagasaki range 
roughly from 200.000 to 
3DOJOOO. Like others before 
him, Mr. Beser said that if the 
United Slates had invaded Ja- 
pan instead of bombing it, 
“there was a casualty potential 
of over a million people; that's 
what was avoided.” 


Short Takes 

The world's youngest profes- 
sion may be construction man- 
agement, which developed 
about 15 years ago. Lee Mc- 
Chxre. a leader in the effort to 
give construction managers 
professional standing, says that 
unlike a general contractor, a 
CM is an agent of the construc- 
tion project’s owner. As such, 
he handles “cost control and 
quality control, scheduling, 
management and reporting sys- 
tems, and procurement. He co- 
ordinates subcontractors, elimi- 
nating the need for a general 
contractor." CMs will meet at 
Hilton Head. South Carolina, 
in September to institute stan- 


"...-Jr?, 



ARRESTED — James 
Ramseur, who was shot 
by Bernhard H. Goetz 
on a New York subway 
last year, was arrested 
Friday on charges of 
rape and of robbery. 


dards and cer tification in their 
profession. 

Boise Cascade Carp, is gear- 
ing up to produce a new fine of 
paper that cannot be photocop- 
ied. The company says that it 
will begin selling the nrnq ra» t 

spy-proof paper to the UjS. 
government in September. Each 
sheet is impregnated with a hot- 
pink dye that blinds copying 
maphinw and ranws thfiirp tO 

turn out blackened paper. 

Presided Ronald Reagan was 
once a lifeguard, and is the 
1950s aad '60s, films like “The 
Girl from Jones Beach" and 
“Beach Blanket Bingo” glori- 
fied the job. Back then there 
were plenty of applicants. Now, 
however, hfeguards for beaches 
in the New York City area are 
hard to find. Up to 50 hours of 
training are required, but the 
pay is only about $6 an hour, 
compared to S9, for example, 
for a construction worker. 

Washington's exclusive Cos- 
mos Club, trying to stem what it 
calls an “unseemly” controver- 
sy over its refusal to accept 
women members, will require 


prospective members to sign an 
oath stating that they will not 
seek to change the bylaws that 
exdude women. That move has 
simply escalated the furor. 
Members who want women ad- 
mitted are considering chal- 
lenging the policy in coon. 


Notes About People 

John W. Boddey Jr. 28, 
nephew of William F-,tl« com- 
mentator. and James L-, the for- 
ma New York senator, is press 
secretary to Representative 
Jack F. Kemp of New York, 
one of the dnef prospects for 
the 1988 Republican nomina- 
tion for presiaent. Mr. Buckley, 
a onetime rod: mode critic for 
Rollin g Stone »nd The Village 
Voice, was deputy press secre- 
tary for the 1984 Reagan-Bush 
campaign. 

The press secretary for 
Thomas P. O’Neill Jr., speaker 
of the House of Represmta- 
•tives, is C h r is topher J. Mat- 
thews, 39, who says of his lo- 
quacious and articulate 
employer: “Doing press for Tip 
CWem is Eke doing makeup for 
Catherine Deneuve. The best 
work is'done before you get 
there.” 

Nancy Reagan's summer 
reading list, according to U.S. 
News & World Report maga-. 
ant; h yJndm P hilip Ziegler’s 
biography of Lord Louis 
Mount oa'tten and Herman 
W cult’s novel "Inside, Out- 
side.” 

Ait Bmhwild, the syndicated 
humorist, is endowing a 51,000- 
a-year journalism scholarship 
at his the Universi- 

ty of S flniii*ra California. He 

hat g ome imranwl pmMiriM 

for the award. “The student 

chnnlH he anfi -gs taMfcltm«n r 

and contemptuous of the schol- 
arship,” he says, and “if the 
person is on probation for 
something he or she wrote, that 

chnniH be considered a phis." 
He added that the winner 
“doesn't even have to say thank 
you." 

— Compiled bv 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Jet Inquiry 
Said to Yield 
No Evidence ! 
Of Bombing 

Corroded by Ovr Staff From DisptHcha 

LONDON — Investigators 
studying the wreckage and Dodics 
recovered from the Air-lndia jet- 
liner that crashed off Ireland nave 
failed to find evidence of sabotage,, 
the Observer newspaper reported 
Sunday. 

The Observer said the experts 
were “now moving toward the tho- 
rny that it might have been aircraft 
or pilot failure” It did not elabo- 
rate cm fee phrase “pilot failure” 

But the newspaper also reported 
that air coatraQks bad recorded “a 
dull bang” in the seconds before 
the jet crashed, and a Canadian 
newspaper published a story sug- 
gesting i bat <5Viw may have been, 
involved in the disaster. 

The Observer’s report, written 
by the weekly newspaper’s aviation 
corresp on dent, said that the initial 
inspection of the recovered bodies 
“indicates f ba> gmrn» died from de- 
compression and others from 
drowning.” All 329 people aboard 
fee plane were killed. 

“Examination of the bodies hay 
failed to reveal any bums, shrapnel 
wounds” or other evidence of an 
explosion on board, the report said. 

evidence has alto wiwp ggd feat 
suggests that fee Boeing 747jet did 
not break up at 31 ,000 feet (9,428 
meters) before it crashed June 23, 
“but probably hit the sea more or 
less in one piece,” it said. 

It recalled that the cause of an 
Air-lndia 747 crash into the sea off 
Bombay in 1978, which killed 213 
people, “for a long time was 
thought to be a bomb. 

“But the inquiry showed that the 
crash was earned by a faulty cock- 
pit indicator combined with a poor 
response from the crew” the report 


U.S. General Opposes 


By Richard Halloran 

New York Times Service 

MACDILL AIR FORCE RASE, 
Florida — • General Wallace II 
Nutting, who retired . Sunday as 
commander of army and air force 
combat forces in the United States, 
says he is strongly opposed to a 
U.S. invasion of Nicaragua. 

Instead, the army general said in 
an interview on the ere of his retire- 
ment, the United States should 
seek to isolate the leftist Sandinist 
government by building a demo- 
cratic coalition among other Cen- 
tral and South American nations 

“We have learned to live wife 
Cuba for 25 years," said General 
Nutting, 57, who also commanded 
UJS. forces in Latin America from 
1979 to 1983. “I think we are going 
to hare to learn to lire with Nicara- 
gua. 

“instead of worrying about in- 
vading N icaragua and throwing 
out fee Sandimstas, we should be 
concentrating an developing the 
hemispheric idea of coalition, 
building strength through political 
reform and economic development 
in the surrounding countries.” 

“Ultimately,” he said, “maybe 


Nicaragua ami Cuba, if they see 
everybody rise better off than they 
are, then perhaps internal move- 
ments will generate and the prob- 
lem w31 solve itself.” 

General Nutting deplored recent 
talk about a possible invasion of 
Nicaragua that, according to 
Washington officials, has been dis- 
cussed by civilian members of the 
Reagan administration. 

“Frankly," the general said, “all 
fee talk about invading Nicaragua 
is counterproductive to fee long- 
term coalition we ought to be 
budding in the hemisphere.” 

Officers in Washington said feat 
General Nutting’s opposition to in- 
vading Nicaragua reflected a view 
widely held among senior military 
officers and echoed recommenda- 
tions made by the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff to the president and the secre- 


tary of defense. 
General Nutt 


General Nutting, who spoke at 
the headquarters of fee Readiness 
Command here, retired after 35 
years in the army. Serving officers 
often are reluctant to speak out in 
public bat sometimes feel freer to 
do so as they approach retirement. 

The commander in ch ie f of fee 
Readiness Command has opera- 


tional control over 235,000 soldiers 
and airmen in nine army divisions 
and four brigades, and 52 air force 
fighter, reconnaissance and elec- 
tronic combat squadrons. 

Southern Command, with head- 
quarters in Panama, would control 
forces engaged in combat in Cen- 
tral America. But it has relatively 
few troops, so most combat units 
for any invasion would come from 
Readiness Command. 

General Nutting cautioned feat 
overthrowing fee Sandinists would 
be “a major operation" requiring 
“multiple divisions and air support 
and sea support." 

“There would be a big fight to 
dislodge them,” he said. 

The general declined to be more 
specific. A military rule of thumb 
holds that an offensive force must 
have three times fee power of the 
defense to succeed. General Nut- 
ting said in a recent speech that fee 
mili tary force in Nicaragua totaled 
\ 19,000, including reserves and mi- 
litia. 

An invasion of Nicaragua, be 
said, would jeopardize North 


nvaswn 


Am mean -La tin American rela- 
tions. 

“We are paying a high price now 
for what they calfmilitary interven- 
tion for fee last 50 years,” he said, 
“and I don’t feint we want to do 
feat again. I don’t” 

“If we invade Nicaragua, not 
only will we jeopardize working re- 
lationships within the hemisphere 
but we wiQ with a bunch of our 
NATO allies as well” he said, add- 
ing that it would also drain US. 
forces, funds and attention from 
other parts of fee world," 

The general added: *Td rather 
see us work fee positive side of fee 
problem, solidify democratic con- 
trol in El Salvador, try to help the 
Hondurans to maintain it, help the 
Guatemalans get their act together, 
which they are trying to do, bolster 
Costa Rica and P anama. 

“There is a strong urge for de- 
mocracy all over Latin America. 
The military today in Latin Ameri- 
ca realty are. 1 think, exhibiting a 
social conscience and acknowledge 
a need to change. If we don't sup- 
port them, they won’t make it” 


Salvador Rebel Chief Backs 


laueo io reveal any minis, snrapnei * j T T O It ffil • if a t . — * — — - — * — 

Attacks on U.S. Military Aides T ua RTNF,R (T 

Evidence has also emerged that New York Tima Service The four unarmed marines and v>4 IVlill LAIN J_J_L I. k-7 VJ 

snesiesLs that the Boeine 747 let did caxt ctr vatvid tl. 


Cost Crunch Strands Public Hospitals 

A the Air-lndia aidiner had been per- 

ers bad little cbrace but to go along formula was changed to a fixed suaticd b y ® ^acquaintance to 


crashed. 

In Toronto, the 


(Continued from Page 1) 


ivuuwuwu v -/ iwm umv VU V IM. uui w 5V awufi iwitiiiua wiw iv “ nnr l fnr iiTinrirrT 

own more than half of all beds with “cost plus” reimbursement price, rather than cost-based, ap- a Peerage aDO ™- 

... l.o ,-V Dmnl* IRC nCWSDSpeT S3IQ t 


nationwide, have generally sat on formulas. p roach. Private insurers followed . inc 

fee side l in e s, feeling sympathy for from 1965 to 1980, cost-shifting suit, emboldened by fee govern- 

both combatants. £d gJSsfloSSS mrert. cample and anracd by the M ^t a ng tonghth.^^ the 

In Dallas. Parkland has pushed a Their share of tbehealth-care dol- doubling of Wife-care costs as a ““ S ' S Bmdcr ’ 

bill in fee Texas Legislature feat ^ grew from one-third to more percentage of gross national prod- ~ - 

would have placedTl^omit tax feLfto p^Gndfee cma-Stas EfefeTprevious 25 years. 
on fee net revenues of all hospitals, formulas chew entrepreneurs mro Much good has come of this cost J®*”® 
and used the money to set up a fee field. So began fee era of for- squeezing. Medical inflation has who was a supporter of fen Skh 

state fund to care for the medically ^ 0 fii tosfet^ bSaiTin half, average hospital 3%** & 

indigent. Florida recently enacted a the ooor were stays have bem shortened. anS in- 

dSSSSHE -■? -g 2SS3aut 

andMassachusetts, factor the cost indusliy»s standpoint, however, the Nfcassauga^ wtomthe paper did 

of indigent care into their rates. ? S2L5 Pgj £L!5 sqneeze has meStarttbroal pres- «* jfentiiy. he gemed having 

The anti-tax forces contend feat rf^^ula^by soi^S- sores to economize and to compete 

guaranteeing health care for fee in- ^ ™ fw paying customers. ™s^ JKJmew me pitot ana nan 

digmtK fee responsibility of gen- Thmt^g^ingmedicilinna- ^ p^to^nanSMeSralAre df^arture, but had asked £ pDot 


also a Sikh. 
- This paid 


digeni is fee responsibility of gen- _ ’ . - . na - A few blodcs down fee street 

nSnmt from Parkland stands Medical Ans 

“We don’t expect Safeway or !vL Hospital, tme of fee new “medical 

A&P to give away free food for ty. boutiques” feat have carved oat a 

people who can’t afford Li." said R. ptfenraflymtolCT- nidie by offering hospital 

Bruce Andrews, executive vice inpatients such ameaiities as nndaf- 

■wwiAdni rtf AmmMn llMlinl In. Otied tO reverse field. Alter 15 laninnn ninr snirl i'll w fitirt rKirtfl 


grates & 

ing American ambivalence toward ainc; “ m B re< “ 


mg American ambivalence toward cnncai “pwuem. Suburban shopping strips are r 2 ™ 

funding rn edir?! care for fee poor. Infee early 1980s, Medicare and fiSmg up with minor-anergency 110111 P J ’f’7p®EL 

The United States spends more Medicaid budgets were cut or centers — “Doc-in-a-Bax," as fee (Ar t Ui 

per capita on health than any coun- capped, and for fee first time in genre is called. There, “McDoc- 
try in fee world, yet it is fee one nearly 20 years, fee number of un- tors” treat broken aims and runny 

Weston industrial democracy' that insured started rising again. noses for less money and with less k*t«wjbtvwh>on 

does not treat health care as a basic Moreover, in a key change in waiting time than traditional gen- kJdcmkcemItz 

rational right. Or. the other hand, it 1983, fee Medicare reimbursement eral practitioners. eaohuotcwntheht 

will not stand for any health ddiv- 

ery system feat shuts out critically , 

21 patients because of their inabil- j 

. . j 

Over the years, an improvised i 
system of hidden subsidies came [ 
into being to address the problem. • 

Tbs hospital bills of me unin- > 
sued were paid by fee hospital ; 
taSs of the insured, a mechanism of 
“cast-shifting” that thrived, until j 
the onset of fee 1980s. m a milieu of 
generous hospital-reimbursement j 

formulas built into fee Medicare 

3sS®s?s 1 BVLGARI 

ness m 1965 wife Medicare and: < 

Medicaid, it said to fee hospitals, in j ■ 
effect. We lack fee political con- ■ 

MSI? PRESENT THEIR 
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MONTE CARLO 


The fHght recorders, which mon- 
itor crew conversations and the air- 
craft’s op eration and which offer 
the best pJumee of solving the mys- 
tery, are bong se&rchedTor on the 
seabed, more than 6,000 feet down. 

The Observer stoiy also said that 
Irish air traffic controllers at Shan- 
non recorded “a dull a 
gnAmg noise and finally a h«m«\ 
shriek” in the secouds before fee jet 


that a Sikh 


l iiililia on giivniv iiiijinuia ivuvfmi « . • 

From 1965 to 1980, cost-shifting suit, emboldened by the govern- tbl 

thrived, and hospitals flomiS ^fsex^teandmtsnsedbyfee 

Their share of fee health-care dol- doubting of healfe-care costs as a p^ra^fe fee puot, s. nmaer. 


reportedly was in- 


New York Times Service 

SAN SALVADOR — The lead- 
er of a small, non-Marxist rebel 
political party that last week pub- 
licly criticized a rebel attack in 
which 13 persons were killed, four 
of them LLS. marines, declared 
fhm u s militar y advisers and 
President Jos6 Napoledn Duarte 
are legitimate targets of war. 

The statement, issued Thursday, 
appeared to contradict hopes 
among Salvadoran and U.S. offi- 
cials that more moderate memb rn t 
of fee rebel coalition would try to 
bah attacks on UR military' per- 
sonnel and government figures. 

The statement indicated that 
there was no si gnifican t rapture in 
the rebel alHance, as sane Salva- 
doran officials suggested. 

Rub6n Zamo ra, the leader of the 
Popular Social Christian Move- 
ment, said in a telephone interview 
that Us party Had condemned fee 
attack June 1 9 in which fee marines 
died only because unarmed civil- 
ians were among the dead. Killing 
civilians is a violation of the Gene- 
va Convention, Mr. Zamo ra said, 
and as such cannot be accepted. 

He said, however, that his party, 
considered one of fee most moder- 
ate in fee rebel coalition, consid- 
ered fee marines and all Other UJL 
military advisers “to be targets just 
like Salvadoran soldiers.” 

“The American advisers are part 
of fee war and are subject to the 
Ms of war,” he said. 


The four unarmed marines and 
the nine ci vilians were killed when 
a rebel unit opened fire on a cafe 
here. Fifteen o vflians were wound- 
ed in the shooting. 

There were c onfli cting reports 
about whether any of the civilians 
had been armed and whether any 
had fired back at the attackers. 


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from Parkland stands Medical Arts departure, but had asked fee pflot 


nospuai, one ui uuc new mcmcai ~ ^ — “ V -i -Vn 

boutiques’* feat have carved out a G* 0 ** and Mad said it was 

market niche by offering hospital ^ty common toito-Indiam- 
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1 SSFi s 







Page 4 


Police Charge Man 
In IRA Bombing 
Aimed at Thatcher 


RF T? 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUIA 1, 1985 

HL 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Police have 
diai^pd a Belfast man in connec- 
Uon with the hotel bombing in Oc- 
tober in Brighton that lolled five 
persons and narrowly missed Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher and 

members of her mining 

Patrick Joseptf Magee, 34, was 
flown to London from Srnrianrf 
under heavy guard with five other 
suspected Irish Republican Army 
guerrillas. He was charged late Sat- 
urday. 

Three other men and three wom- 
en were charged with other terror- 
ist-related offenses. 

Mrs. Thatcher and most of her 
cabinet were in the hotel on the 
morning of Oct. 12 during the Con- 


had planted the bomb. Police said 
it was a sophisticated derice with a 
long-delay fuse that had been hid- 
den behind a bathroom panel on 
the sixth floor. 

Mr. Magee and the six others 
charged Saturday night were de- 
tained after police, acting on a tip. 
found and defused a similar bomb 
June 23 in the Rubens Hotel in 
London near Buckingham Palace. 

The seven people had been held 
under the Prevention of Terrorism 
Act, which allows suspects to be 
detained without the filing of 
charges for up to a week. Scotland 


Gorbachev Is Expected 1 

To Receive State Tide \i 
When Parliament Meets 




I \ jetm 
riran i 













United Press International 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
has warned that it will be forced to 
“reassess” the Geneva arms talks 
unless the United States makes 
drastic policy changes to break the 
deadlock in the 10-week negotia- 
tions. 

The warning Saturday from 


/rk'v x-v:- 




ill 


Tass, the Soviet news agency, came 
three days after a nearly identical 
statement by Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader, and was 


reminiscent of statements by Mos- 
cow before the Soviet Union 


servarive Party's annual conference 
wben the explosion occurred. 

The prime minister's bathroom 
was shattered, but she was unhurt 
Five party members were killed 
and more than 30 others injured, 
including the minister for trade and 
industry, N orman Tebbit, and bis 
wife, Margaret who remains para- 
lyzed. 

The IRA said afterward that it 


Yard announced last week that it 
bad uncovered an IRA plot to 
plant bombs timed to explode in 
mid-July at 12 English coastal re- 
sorts. 

In addition to Mr. Magee, three 
men and two women were charged 
with conspiracy to cause explosions 
between Jan. 1 and June 22 this 
year. 

They were identified as Dona] 
Dominic Craig, Gerald Patrick Mi- 
chael McDonnd, 34, Peter John 
Joseph Sherry, 30, Martina Eliza- 
beth Anderson, 23, and Ella O'D- 
wyer, 26. 


.-****■*, j ZZT 

Norman Tebbit, British minister of trade and industry, and Ms wife, Margaret, who is 
paralyzed from the waist down as die result of an IRA oomb attack at the hotel where the 
Conservative Party held its conference last year, watch a tends match at Wimbledon. 

Mr. Shenv was an nnsurraKFuI neoale still were ban® held in das- Jawed them threw Slones at police. 


Mr. Sherry was an unsuccessf ul people still were bring held in Glas- lowed ihem threw sumes at police, 
candidate last year for Sum Fein, gow and five in Lancashire in Five officers received minor inju- 
tbe political wing of the IRA in northwest England. ries, according lo a spokesman for 

local elections at Dungannon, Meanwhile, police in Belfast iht Royal Ulster Constabulary. 
Northern Ireland. fired plastic bullets Saturday to <fis- I 

. .. _ _ . perse groups of youths who fol- Police said youths threw rocks 

Another snsnecL Centra low- r^ . r . i — J, .. . Ire inn n . 


local elections at Dungannon, 
Northern Ireland. 


*“«“ suspect, Cedtia Low- Ml 

■^.21 MscbaigHlw.thfadmgi 0 

**S*ia«s 


Scotland Yard said four other 


Marchers who participated in 
the traditional parade woe peace- 
ful, but the young people who fol- 


youths who fd- Police said youths threw rocks 
the militant Prat- ami bottles at officers as 300 Prot- 
der. estants demonstrated Friday night 

participated in agbinst a police order to reroute a 
xade wore peace- march to avoid the Catholic area of 
i neoole who fd- Cqokstown, west Of Belfast. 


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PfiRlS - FRfiNCE 


New Polish Film Portrays a Solidarity Lec^ 



Movie, Made With Government Funds, Contrasts Sharply Wim Gdansk Trial 


By Michael T. Kaufman 

New York Times Service 


CRfiZY HORS 


WARSAW — Four days after 
three Solidarity activists were sen- 
tenced to prison June 14 by a 
Gdansk court for planning a pro- 
test strike, a movie opened here in 
which an imprisoned Solidarity 
strike leader was portrayed in 
wholly sympathetic and noble 
terms. 

In the Warsaw movie theater 
where the film — originally to be 
called “Happy Ending” but now 


retitled “Without End” — was 
watched by an audience that in- 
cluded young men wearing miliiaiy 
uniforms, the sense of paradox was 
at i»m«t staggering. 

After afl, at the Gdansk trial, the 
government prosecutor and the 
presiding judge, a man with dose 


ties to the ruling party, had at- 
tacked the defendants — Wladys- 


tacked the defendants — Wladys- 
law Frasyniuk, Bogdan Lis and 
Adam Michnik — as enemies of 
state for haring met with Lech Wa- 
lesa, the leader of the banned trade 
union, ostensibly to discuss plans 


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for a J 5-minute general strike that 
never took place. 

The trial was held beyond die 
view of disinterested observers, and 
lawyers for the defendants de- 
scribed the proceedings as “opera 
buffo" and a crude burlesque. 

In the immediate aftermath of 
the trial, Jerzy Urban, the govern- 
ment spokesman, criticized Mr. 
Walesa for wearing a T-shirt im- 
printed with a Solidarity symbol 
when he appeared as a witness in 
the case. With an ironic tone, Mr. 
Urban sneered at those who would 
regard the accused as heroes. 

And yet in the film, produced 
with government funds and passed 
by government censors, the ethical 
burden is different and completely 
contrary. Solidarity placards are 
shown hanging on the walls of -the 
imprisoned strike leader’s apart- 
ment, and more significantly, the 
man himself is depicted as honor- 
able, admirable and a moral giant 
compared to those around him.! 

At its care, the film, directed py 
Kizystof Kieslowski, tells the stay 
of preparations for the strike leas- 
er's tnal on charges similar to those 
faced by the Gdansk defendants’. 
The man’s lawyer dies and (be de- 
fendant’s wife obtains the help of a 
wily old lawyer being forced lo re- 
tire because of age. 

The basic tension in the movie 
comes from the arguments between 
the lawyer and client. While the 
defendant wants to argue the case 
on its merits and tints hold govan- 
ment policies up for scrutiny and 
criticism, the lawyer favors a limit- 
ed strategy that stresses procedural 
pants. 

The defendant talks of the need 
to preserve his dignity and favors 
using the trial to demonstrate injusr 
rices in daily life. The lawyer is 
undemanding but makes it dear 
that his first priority is to free thd 
defendanL 

In terms of the genera tions-Lang 
Polish debate, the defendant is the 
romantic, pure in heart and pur- 


e and linked with a national 
htion of sacrifice, while the law- 
is the pragmatist, knowing in 
heart thatliis client holds the 
ral high ground but trying to 
at the best advantage he can — 
ler the circumstances. 

Even the defendant’s wife re- 


to urge him to take the prag- 
itic approach, saying that she 
mot ask him to trade dignity for 
edom. Still, the lawyer prevails 
d the activist receives a suspend- 
sentence. “Yon are free,'’ the 
Igesays. 


: film’s original tide, “Happy 
g," was intended to under- 


The In-ternationol Herald Tribune's daily paid circulation continues to break records, up 5% in the 
pest year end 24% in the past four years. More than a third of a million people in 1 64 countries 
c.-cand the world nov/ see each issue. And latest figures indicate that this rapid growth continues. 


In'emotions! Herald Tribune circulation 
figure prepared fer OJD audit for period 
from January 1, to December 31, 1934. 




Ending," was intended to undcr- 
sebre with irony this last scene. 
There is no jubuatiou. Instead, the 
edmera pans to the faces of the 
defendant, his wife and the lawyer. 
They sit sQenlly in their separate 
pirts of the court as everyone files 
out, each of them reflecting shame 
and defeat, in recognition that 
principles have been compromised 
for the sake of tactical success. 

film so many aspects of contem- 
porary Polish me, there is no obvi- 
ous explanation for the appearance 
of a Ehn that so dearly dashes with 
the orchestration of the real-life 

Gdansk trial In fact, the film was 
completed more than a year ago 
and its release involved tong debate 
within party-run cultural circles. 

One argument that reportedly 
was raised for its release was that in 
light of the rich and free outpour- 
ings of writings from illegal pub- 
lishers, only frank treatment of 
controversial themes can compete 
with the best of the unofficial cul- 
ture and bestow some credibility on 
government-sanctioned works. 

Fear example, while “Without 
End” was released, another film, 
“The Interrogation,” which 
showed the brutal imprisonment of 
a woman in the 1950s, has been 
withheld since it was made in 1981. 
StiQ, hundreds of video tapes of the 
film have been made and it has 
been shown widely, if illicitly, in 
homes and chibs and churches. 

Another possible explanation for 
the public screening of "Without 
End" lies in the stick-and-carrot 
techniques that the government of 
General Wojdecb Jaruzdski has 
adopted. 

Currently, for example, there has 
been a concerted crackdown on H* 
legal publishers, with dooms of 
people jailed for writing and dis- 
tributing clandestine books and 
journals. 

At the same time, Kolora, an 
official weekly, has been publishing 
a nostalgic serial about the days of 
Solidarity, and in the last se gment 
reproduced words of Solidarity 
songs and poems that earlier could 
appear only in illegal publications. 

A number of readers woe star- 
tied when the weekly reprinted 
such lyrics as these, which come 
from a Solidarity anthem begin- 
ning: 

from lie lo lie. 

From error to error. 

From the southern hills to Gdansk, 

We hose had enough insanity. 

October uprising and December 
too. 


cow before the Soviet Union 
walked out of the previous arms 
talks 18 momhs ago. 

“It is high time that Washington 
drastically reconsider its position 
at the Geneva talks,” Tass said, 
“and abandon the attempts to use 
than as a cover for military pro- 
grams." 

“Should the American adminis- 
tration continue its present policy," 
it said, “the Soviet Union will be 
compelled to reassess the current 
situation with due account of all its 
integral elements." 

On Wednesday, Mr. Gorbachev 
said that “if our partners in the 
Geneva talks carry on their line . . . 
we, of course, wifi have to reassess 
the entire situation." 

Tass did not specify its objec- 
tions, but Viktor P. Karpov, the 
chief Soviet negotiator, said Satur- 
day in Geneva that the United 
States was “violating" negotiating 
rules by continuing Strategic De- 
fense Initiative anti-missik defense 
research. ca 

Mr. Karpov’s comments fol- 
lowed a U ^.-requested meeting in 
Geneva, with Vice President 
George Bush, who said he had told 
Soviet negotiators that Washington 
remains committed to reducing nu- 
clear arsenals. 

[*T did not come here to negoti- 
ate," Reuters in Geneva quoted 
Mr. Bush as saying. “I did not 
come here to try to get some instant 
agreement But from our ride it was 
worthwhile to reiterate the convic- 
tion we have cat the need for pro- 
gress in these talks.” 

[Mr. Karpov said: “We have pre- 
sented our views on the dangerous 
situation created here by the U.S. 
departure from the tasks and prin- 
ciples of the negotiations.”] 

President Ronald Reagan’s Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative, a space- 
based defense system, aims to de- 


Reuten 

MOSCOW — The Soviet parlia- 
ment is expected to appoint Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev, the leader of the 
Communist Party, as official bead 
of state this week. Western diplo- 
mats said. 

The session of the Supreme Sovi- 
et, which meets for only a few days 
each year, is scheduled for Tues- 
day. The Communist Party Central 
Committee is expected to meet 
Monday. 

When Mr. Gorbachev was ap- 
pointed general secretary of the 
Communist Party in March, after 
the death of Konstantin U. Cher- 


nenko. it appeared certain that par- 
ty leaders also would gram him the 
title of president. Mr. Chernenko 
and his recent predecessors held 
both posts. 

Leonid I. Brezhnev was the first 
to acquire the title of president af- 
ter Nikolai V. Podgomy was re- 
moved from the position in 19T7. 

Brezhnev, who was party leader 
at the time, believed that the cere- 
monial head-of-staie title, chair- 
man of the Presidium of the Su- 
preme Soviet, conferred extra 


leadership, coming after a dccafc 
of direction from distant and fha 
party chiefs, has made a visible 
impression on the Soviet public. 

Foreign analysis see Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s position in the Politburo as 
unchallenged, despite the continu- 
ing presence ia the 13-inanlsr 
body of eideriy men who are seen 
as representing the interests of the 
entrenched party apparatus. 

Diplomatic speculation about 
personnel changes that could be 
made this week have centered on 
some of these men, who were ap- 
pointed by Brezhnev. ^ 

Some analysts say Prime Minis, 
tea- Nikolai A. Tikhonov, 80, soon 
may step down and be replaced by 
a Gorbachev ally such as Vitaly j, 
Vorotnikov, premier of the Russian 
republic.- 

Others have suggested that 70- 
year-old Viktor V. Grishin, the city 
party leader in Moscow who was 
viewed last year as a rival to Mr. 
Gorbachev, could be removed from 
the Politburo. 


prestige on the party chief, espe- 
cially abroad. Mr. Brezhnev had 


dally abroad. Mr. Brezhnev had 
held the post for four years under 
Khrushchev, his predecessor as 
party leader. 

Diplomats said there was little 
doubt that Mr. Gorbachev would 
receive the title Tuesday at the 
meeting, given the way that he has 
consolidated his personal power 
since taking office. 

Mr. Gorbachev, at 54 the youn- 
gest Kremlin chief since Stalin, has 
promoted his close allies to the top 
of the ruling Politburo. He also has 
started a campaign against corrup- 
tion and has proposed economic 
reforms. 

His vigorous and open style of 


Soviet sources said Mr. Grishin 
had the backing of Grigory V. Ro- 
manov. 62. who has beat one of 
Mr. Gorbachev's rivals among the 
younger Politburo figures. 

Rumors have been drcalaxiiig in 
Moscow that Mr. Romanov, party 
secretary in charge of the ddetue 
industry, could lose his PoStbffln 
post this week. 

Few expea him to hold his post 
beyond the Communist Party Con- 
gress next February, when demos 
of younger and better-educated of- 
ficials mil be appointed to the Cen- 
tral Committee. 

Mr. Gorbachev has given the 
task of preparing major personnel 

changes to Yegor KLi^dtev, who 

became a Politburo member in 
April. 


Soviet Georgia Musicians 
Expect Spying Charges 


_ : rimer '.5 m : 


velop weapons that could destroy 
incoming Soviet missiles. 


manning Soviet missiles. 

Moscow wants all research on 
the program stopped and warns of 
military countermeasures. The 

United States refuses, maintaining 
that s imilar research also is under 
way in the Soviet Union. 

The Geneva talks opened in 
March, resuming superpower arms 
negotiations for the first time since 
the Soviet Union left (he previous 
round at the end of 1983. 

The walkout was to protest UJ5. 
deployment of new intermediate- 
range missiles in Western Europe 
and was preceded by months of 
Soviet hints and threats. 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — Two members of 
an unofficial musical group in So- 
viet Georgia are to be charged with 
spying, a capital offense, another 
group member said Sunday. 

Eduard Gudava said by tele- 
phone from Tbilisi, capital of the 
southern Soviet republic, that the 
latest move against the group. 
Phantom, followed searches of sev- 
en apartments on Friday by the 
KGB security police. Sin«» then 
two band members, Svetlana Knr- 
diani and Marina Teraan, had dis- 
appeared, he added. 


Marian Nasfamli of the KGB to 
report with “clothes suitable for 
prison" on Monday when he and 
Tengiz Gudava weald be arrested 
and charged with treason. The 
maYTTTrmn penalty is death. 


unmunii 






Members of Phantom indude 
Jews who have been refused exit 
visas, Christians and human rights 
activists. 


lsai Golds h Lein, a computer spe- 
cialist, Mr. Gudava and his brouter 
Tengiz were among nine persons 
detained and questioned on Fri- 
day. Tengiz Gudava and another 
nun were kept at the KGB’s cen- 
tral TbOiri prison. 

Eduard Gudava said that Mr. 
Goldshtdn was told by Colond 


An American diplomat attended 
a concert in June by Phantom, 
which plays traditional Georgian 
folk music as wefl as rock, in May 
four American muskaans were ex- 
pelled after they played with Phan- 
tom at a Tbilisi apartment. 


Eduard Gudava, who said he 
faced lesser charges of anti-Soviet 
activities, also stated that, despite 
KGB measures. Phantom gave a 
concert in bis apartment Saturday 
and 10 American tourists were pre- 
sent. 


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Regime Meets as Poles Plan Strike * 


• i :■ i> »!¥■? 

; isf 


The Associated Press 

WARSAW — Poland’s leader. 
General Wojdecb Jaruzdski, con- 
vened a rare meeting of the Nation- 
al Defense Committee before a 
threatened one-hour strike by sup- 
porters of the outlawed Solidarity 
trade union. 

Solidarity leaders have tuged 
workers to strike for one hour 
Monday, when the government 
plans to raise the cost ofmeat by 10 
to J5 percent. 

The official Polish news agency, 
PAP, did not specify the purpose of 
Saturday’s committee meeting. But 
there .was speculation that it was 
called to discuss possible govern- 
ment responses to the strike. 

Created in November 1983, the 
panel has broad powers to declare a 
state of emergency in the face of 
any challenge to Co mmunis t rule. 

“Tie committee analyzed the 


which more than 600 political pris- 
oners were freed. 

The Solidarity leader. Lech Wa- 
lesa, on Sunday told 10,000 church- 
goers in Gdansk that be would not 
publicly back the strike because a 
state prosecutor had warned him to 
stop making anti-government 
statements. 

“People should understand that 
I am not afraid to go to jail,” Mr. 
Walesa said, speaking over a loud- 
speaker. “But these are tactics He 
added that workers “have the right 
to protest,” 

It was unclear bow workers 


would respond lo the strike call 
Solidarity has had only limited suc- 
cess in calling strikes since the 
union was outlawed in 1982. 


-- - »>«*. 


■ ■ ' . ' frSlrtffc 

-T •- - *>- 


Solidarity had urged the govem- 
lent to postpone the increase ia 


ment to postpone the increase a 
meat prices until it approved a gen- 
eral pay increase of about $1230 a 
month. The average monthly salary 
in Poland is $107. 

Meat is rationed in Poland, with 
factory workers receiving nearly 
nine pounds (about four kilograms) 
a month and others five and ahsff 
pounds. 


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U.S. Drug Unit’s Effort Called TVIinimal’ 


" r " r ~-t v <x .rrs£ 
'--T sis 


key assumptions of defense of the 
Polish People’s ReoubHc.” PAP 


Polish People's Republic," PAP 
said in a brief report. “The Nation- 
al Defense Committee undertook 


appropriate decisions on the re- 
viewed issues." The agency did not 
elaborate. 


The panel had not met .tinea: Inn* 
1984, one month before the govern- 
ment declared a general amnesty in 


Lae Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON —Efforts of a 
special unit beaded by Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush to cooidiiiaie a 
drive to halt ilhdt drugs at U.S. 
Jjorders have achieved “ minimal " 
results, a UK Congress agency re- 
ported. 

While the National Narcotics 
Border Interdiction System has 
made some improvements in two 
years, according to a report issued 
Saturday by the General Account- 
ing Office, it “still falls Ear short of 
wnal is needed to substantially re- 


duce (he flow of illegal drugs into 
the United States.” 

President Ronald Reagan estab- - 
fished the drug force on March 23, 

1983. 

The General Accounting Office's ,~- 

criticism, which was challenged im- /_ I 

mediately by Mr. Bush’s office, was 
issued against the backdrop of ef- C 

forts by the Drug Enforcement Ad- ^ 
ministration and other agencies to -q K 
end the National Narcotics Border l I.' 

Interdiction System’s role role by 
folding it mta the existing drug T>\ 
intelligence network. -a ^ : 


>• J i 

*W t 




7 :-. 


KK?®- William dark, U.K. Diplomat, Dies 

dSsiSIsS? 

aldaffl Clark, 68, a writer, diplomat TheObserver. In 1955, he became career in journalism in 1949. 
propaganda viewpoint, a movie and forma- vice president of the press adviser to the prime minister, FmmiMtniM iwwMito- 1 

jjgKsssar- sagjgaar- BfigBSB 

— I He fadd a variety of posts ai Institute for Environment and Dc- 


e^ZX^r Tima J^ ia! rx Street figiffe in the early 1950s as a don editor of the Encyclopedia Bri- 
NtWYORK — William Don- foreign affairs correspondent for tamrica, a post he left to begin a 


sMiVtl-, 4 





Observer. In 1955, he became career in joumahsn in 1949. 

From I960 to]968, he was direc- 1 
tt^^^birthereagned utr of the Overseas Derefopment' 


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BROADCASTING to cable companies 



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"Biropen Best View" 

PROGRAM. MONDAY 1st July 

UK TIMES 

13 36 MOVIN' ON 

14 30 WAYNE & SHUSTER 

15 DO SKYTRAX1 

1545 SKYTRAX2 

16 30 SKYTRAX 3 

17 30 MR £0 

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SWAN l iSu2?i7-l9 S^VTFrSl^ S » V CHAN *EI- SALES, 

SWAN _•,» 


[ posts ai Institute for Environment and De- 
home and overseas in which he was vdopmenL 
able to indulge his pasaons for _ ; • 

writing, conversation and traveL In ■ utter deaths^. 

1968 he moved to Washington to fi7f - a Fl 5?S 

handle public relations for the painter, in Cannes, on June 15 a 





World Bank. He was vice prerident the aftereffects of 
in chai^ of externa] relations from daughter ArieDe has 
1974 to 1980. Hr. Harm* Swar 


74 to 1980. Ik. Haras Swawnski, 81, a 

He was bom July 28, 1916, in scholar erf medieval art and a for- 


Haltwhistle. After graduating from oter anator of decorative arts and 
Oriel College, Oxford, he attended sculpture at die Museum erf Fine 


the University of Chicago in 1938 Arts in Boston, on June 22 at bis 
as a Commonwealth -fellow and home in Wiizbofen, West Germa- 


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wodwdduroig World Warll doing ny. 

public relattons fqr Britain in the Werner Diems, 85, a Gennan- 




United States, ; 

After studying and working. in 
tbe United States; during the war, 
he retunied home in 1946 as Loh- 


bom painter who later became a 
airi working, in founding member-erf. the Amerieut 
during the war. Abstract Artists groop, on June 21 
ni 1946 as Lori- in Restori, Virginia. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 


Page 5 


% Ti 



id Vietnam Gousiderinj 
erican Office in Hanoi 


. 'iiti 
*■*11*-, ‘m 

Wr. Mochtar said Friday in an that the two countries had not db- 
J ^r,7^ mtenruw ibai, althongh Waring- cussri U directly. 

JAKARTA— The UmledSuiics l0n reluctant to establish any The United Stales, which does 
^Vietnam appear willing to con- presence in Hanoi that might be not have an official presence in 
(deropefling an American techni- “^construed as the begjnmng of Hanoi, says that progress on the 
- fe! of&e nr Hanot to h asten the diplomatic recognition, the idea erf issue of the n wsri ng Americans, 
. teces s of agounri n g for Amen- 3 technical office was very modi along with the withdrawal of Vfct- 
ib serviesum sussing since the' a ^ Vt - namese troops from Cambodia, are 

. fjetnam War. according to state- The U.S. statement issued -in piweqoisiies to better relations. 

. gents iffflu bout countries. Bangkok said that there did not A aecade after the end of the 

The Reagan administration, in a a PP*^r to be any necessity at this Vietnam War, more than 2,400 
BUment issued by the U.S. Em- time for a technical office. Americans are still listed as missing 

assy m Bangkok, made it dear Bat it added* “Were dmm. * : mlndochma, 1,375 of them in Vkt- 
- w such a move would depend on stances to fln H vi#S nB £B- 

•‘agniTicamly- hfefcr level of foopcnooJScrasi^Sf- 
Vietnamese cooperation m the ly m such a way as to rSrethe . ce ? ^ Mocb_ 

each for nnsang Americans. more frequent 6r wen Sw S 

The proposal has bam discussed ^oyment of technical personnel, nr^nmTl LS. mSnS 

»y Indocesus foreign mnuster, ation. This would, of course, have 
J^Kusumaatma^ho^ notation to the issue of diplomat- 
CCS serving as go-between with ic relations.” 

T T. Thach ’ a s P° kcs ® an from the Joint Casualty Resolution 
V&oaauon of South-East Asian for the Vietnamese Embassy in Center in Hawaii, travel to Viet- 

Va S£!5f r 9 m f SIfin Itt0lVC **“ Ban S kot confirmed thatSdea nam on short Sts, but no US. 

■ - goMem or LampoflUL was under consideration but said oigansaiionswork there full time. 


. if , 

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T 4 r 



A Chinese driver stands before die fleet of new CaifSilac Emon sfnes in Beijing. 


Cadillac Communism Comes to China 

Beijing Buys Limousine Fleet, Including f Car of Stars 9 


v- 


By John F. Bums 

.Vnt' York Tunes Serr.ee 

BEIJING — China, amid some 
ceremony, has acquired a fleet of 
Cadillac limousines. 

Chinese officials lined op Friday 
o accept the 20 dark-blue vehicles, 
• iescribed in Cadillac brochures as 
•the car of the stars," each 
equipped with a built-in television 
>ei. refrigerator and bar. 

It was the kind of occasion that 
left Wes loners with memories of 
Mao's China shaking their heads in 
disbelief. The ceremony was Held 
aaiy a shore bicycle ride from the 
itadium where Mao's enemies once 
Acre paraded in dunce caps as 
'■capitalist readers." 

An extended or “sireidT version 
of the car. IS fern 15.45 meters) long 
^and festooned with red bunting, 
"stood at the steps of a 29-story 
skyscraper that was ma l d ng its own 
denut as a symbol of China's new 
directions. The building, the tallest 


Italian Police Recover 
Stolen Painting by Brill 

7 m Atsocuurd Press 

ROME — Police searching for a 
kidnapped woman have recovered 
a painting by Paul Brill a Renais- 
sance master, that was stolen from 
Rome's Capitoline Museum on 
June 4. Brill, a Flemish artist, lived 
from 1554 to 1626. The painting 
was valued ai S25.00G. 

The painting, "Pilgrims of Em- 
ma us." was found Saturday at a 
deserted farm north of Rome, po- 
lice said. They were searching for 
Marchesa Isabella Guglielrai. 37, 
who was abducted by three gun- 
men from her estate in that same 
area early Thursday. The police 
said the)’ found the painting by 
chance. 


in Beijing, was deaned up ahead of 


making 5y executives of 
Motors and O'GaraCoachworks, a 
Los Angeles-based company that 
delivered two similar, armor-plated 
vehicles for use here by President 
Ronald Reagan last year. 

Beyond a wrought-iron railing 
separating the building from a 
broad avenue that sweeps across 
Beijing, hundreds of people return- 
ing from work stopped to gaze. 
Their comments, initially at least, 
were a public relations executive's 
dream. 

-Magnificent! The most beauti- 
ful cars I’ve ever seen,” said Huang 
Liang, a 25-year-old construction 
worker as he watched from ibe sad- 
dle of his Flying Pigeon bicycle, 
“How much do they cost, three or 
four thousand yuan?” At the offi- 
cial rate of exchange, his estimate 
came to just about S 1,600. 

Told that the version of the lim- 
ousine that had caught his eye sold 
in the United States for 539,000, an 
amount it would take him 115 years 
to earn in his current job, he was 
dismayed. “That's a laugh,” he 
said, using an expression of sur- 
prise common among Chinese. 
“TeD me you’re joking.” 

Chinese officials were evasive 
when asked who would use the 
cars. While eves under Mao the 
most powerful figures in the coun- 
try were chauffered around in im- 
pressive limousines, the vehicles 
used then were almost exclusively 
the Chinese- made Red Flag cars 
that looked like a cross between a 
Soviet ZD and a Cadillac of the 
1960s. But the Red Flag has fallen 
into disfavor as unreliable and un- 
wieldy, and Western engineers 
have been consulted on ways to 
improve it. 

Deng Xiaoping, the man who 
succeeded to Maas power and who 
has proclaimed Western-style eco- 


nomy changes, is believed to favor 
a Mercedes-Benz for his own trav- 
el. One official at the hand-over 
ceremony Friday said that "state 
leaders" would be among those us- 
ing the Cadillacs Others said the 
main reason for buying the cars 
was to provide the comfort expect- 
ed by ‘‘foreign guests,” and that it 
was "unclear whether such offi- 
cials as Deng would use them. 

"It will depend on the opportu- 
nities,” said Rang Yiren, chairman 
of the Chink International Trust 
and Investment Corp., which 
bought the cars. 

Although General Motors de- 
scribed the Cadillacs as the first 
ever delivered to China, Mr. Rung 
acknowledged after the ceremony 
that he had owned one in the 1940s. 
when his family was one of die 
richest in China. When the Com- 
munists took power in 1949, most 
of the family fled bat Mr. Rang, 
now in his late 60s, remained. 


Pakistani Banks Cease 
Interest-Based Acconnls 

Reuters 

KARACHI, Pakistan — Banks 
in Pakistan win stop accepting in- 
terest-bearing deposits or open new 
interest-based savings accounts, 
starting Monday, in the latest 
phase of the government's plan to 
reorganize its banking system 
along Islamic ime^ Existing ac- 
counts win be converted into so- 
called profit-and-lass sharing ac- 
counts. 

The change also applies to for- 
eign banks in Pakistan. It is part of 
a move by President Mohammed 
Zia ul-Haq to enforce an Islamic 
order in Pakistan. Islam forbids the 
receiving or paying of interest but 
allows borrowers and lenders to 
share profits and losses. 


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Chinese, Russians 
Agree to Re-open 
2 Key Consulates 

The Ajsodaud Press 

BEUING — China and the Sovi- 
et Union have agreed to re-estab- 
lish consulates in Leningrad and 
Shanghai after a lapse of nearly 20 
years, according to the govern- 
ment. 

The latest indication of a thaw in 
rotations came shortly before Dep- 
uty Prune Mmisier YaoYilra's visit 
to Moscow to sign a long-terra 
trade pact. 

A Foreign Ministiy statement 
said Saturday that the two coun- 
tries also had agreed to simplify 
visa procedures, ft did not give de- 
tails and did not say when the con- 
sulates would re-open. 

“China and the Soviet Union 
have reached agreement on the set- 
ting up of a consulate-general re- 
spectively in each other's country, 
narady a Chinese consulate in Len- 
ingrad and a Soviet consulate in 
Shanghai,” the statement said. 

The consulates functioned until 
1966. six years after the start of the 
feud between Moscow and Bairag. 
They dosed with the onset of the 
Cultural Revolution in China. Em- 


Europe, July 1985. 

in the exclusive midde-range 
saloon market 

there’s now a completely 
new reason for choosing the 
BMW 5-Series. 

It’s the competition. 

m • 

Are you aware of dl the facts? 



Over the past few months, BMW 5-Series 
competitors have been getting quite 
excited. 

As a result of some admittedly not entirely 
uninteresting new model introductions. 
We welcome the news. 

Because it at last gives Europe's more 
demanding drivers a real basis for 
checking out which car actually offers 
them the best value for their money. 
Naturally, you can take features like high 
quality construction, a contemporary 
design concept, exceptional standards of 
comfortand safety forgranted in any inter- 
nationally recognised car of this class. 
And they’re all reasons enough for driving 
an above-average car. 

However, we still don’t think they're 
enough to help you choose between the 
very best alternatives at this level. 

We believe it’s essential to take a closer 
look at the fundamental differences 
between the leading makes before making 
your decision. 

So we'd like to give you a few factual hints 
In that direction. 


1. Electronic fuel injection. 

You'll be surprised how many cars with 
impressive-sounding names, and equally 
impressive prices, still offer conventional 
carburettor technology. 

Not so BMW. 

More than anything else, BMW exclusivity 
stands for the very latest in automotive 
technologies. 

That’s why you can take all the perform- 
ance, economy and environmental con- 
sciousness of electronic fuel injection for 
granted with BMW, starting with the 5181. 
Not only a significant contributor to long- 
lasting quality but also to lasting value. 


2. Digital Motor Electronics. 5. Contemporary. 


These days, any so-called quality car 
range that doesn’t offer you Digital Motor 
Electronics, isn’t offering you the best in 
engine technology. 

With BMW, you'll discover it’s already a 
standard on the 525e. 

Digital Motor Electronics (DME)-the 
completely computerised engine manage- 
ment and control system - ensures 
far-reaching fuel-mix and ignition advan- 
tages, in terms of performance, economy 
and exhaust emissions, even when used 
in conjunction with a catalyst 
As many as four of the 5- Series models 
feature DME: a technology you’ll search 
for in vain on comparable cars of another 
make. 


3. 6 cylinders from 2000 cc. 

An in-line 6-cyflnder engine guarantees 
noticeably smoother running refinement 
than 4 or 5 cylinders. 

BMW gives you ail the benefits from as 
low as 2 litres. 

The fact that It’s universally accepted that 
6 cylinders are a prerequisite for really 
top-class motoring refinement is amply 
illustrated by the numberof manufacturers 
who offer it on their higher capacity and 
higher priced models. 

A BMW owner is someone who isn’t willing 
to compromise on refinement even at two 
litres. 


4. No doss constraints. 

You can also judge the quality of a model 
range by its top models. . 

With the BMW 5-Series you can get up to 
3.5 litres capacity and all the torque and 
unrivalled performance that goes with it. 
Although the BMW 5-Series models 
belong to the so-called "exclusive middle- 
range’’ category, they nevertheless reflect 
- especially the high performance 535 i, 

M 5351 and M 5 versions - many of the 
superlative qualities of their larger 
stablemates, particularly in the exceptional 
ride and safety reserves of their advanced 
suspension system. 


The BMW 5-Series doesn't just meet the 
strictest quality criteria. 

It also reflects the demands of our time. 
BMW exploits the most advanced techno- 
logies available to resolve the conflict 
between dynamic and responsible driving. 
And the BMW 5-Series combines the 
classic sporting personality of a BMW 
with a strictly functional sense of style to 
create a car with a truly unique character: 
the concentration on inner values, without 
the usual obtrusive demonstration 
of status, leads to a pleasingly new and 
unpretentious dimension in exclusivity - 
an understatement that takes a positive 
step towards the more critical and rational 
attitudes of our day. 

If you compare, point bv point the various 
alternatives in terms of price and value . 
you're sure to come to the same 
conclusion as us. There's really only one 
answer 

BMW is the better wav to drive. 

But that’s something you should expe- 
rience for yourself. 

So why not ask your nearest BMW dealer 
for a personal test drive? 

Model and equipment availability in the BMW inter- 
national range may vary from country to country. 


BMW AG, Munich 










Page 6 


MONDAY, JULY I, 1985 


HcraliQESritmnc. 

PabliA w i Vtfh TV New York Tima and Tht Washington Port 

Quebec Alter Levesque 


Uie recent resignation of Quebec's premier, 
Rfflifi Levesque, marks the end of a turbulent 
chapter in Quebec’s and Canada's history. 
Ostensibly, Mr. Lfevesquc leaves office under a 
political cloud. His Parti Qufcbfcois trails the 
opposition liberal Party by more than rwo-to- 
one in the polls and seems sure to lose the next 
provincial election. The party is split between 
those who agree with Mr. Levesque's emphasis 
on economic issues and those who want to 
fight the next election on the issue of separat- 
ism from the rest of Canada Q early the party 
has failed in its purpose of separating mostly 
French-speaking Quebec from the mostly En- 
glish-speaking remainder of the country. 

Yet in another sen$e Mr. Ltvcsqne and his 
movement have been successful They have 
resolved, though at some cost, a difficult prob- 
lem that deeply affects the daily lives and 
prospects of about six million residents of 
Quebec. The problem is language, and it came 
to the fore m the 1960s. Quebec's French- 
speakers, part of a tradition-bound rural soci- 
ety, educated only scantily in church schools, 
suddenly were receiving the education they 
needed to get ahead in industrial North Ameri- 
ca. But in the big office buildings of Montreal, 
important business was conducted in English. 


Mr. Levesque's party came to power in 1976 
and passed a series of laws requiring the use of 
French in everyday lifeu This was costly: Many 
businesses left Montreal. It was often unfair to 
individuals. Yet it opened opportunities to 
those whose first language was French. 

Mr. Levesque was less successful in his goal 
of achieving separation of Quebec from the 
rest of Canada. His 1980 referendum calling 
for some form of independence was rejected 
not rally by the English-speaking minority but 
also by the French-speaking majority in Que- 
bec. In a recent poll only 4 percent of Qqpbec 
respondents said they favored independence. 

the road for the Parti Qutbecris has been 
mostly downhill since. But Ok party has been 
the victim just as much of its success as of its 
failures. The problem that it and Canada’s 
federal government have been grappling with 
is not likely to recur. Economically, if not 
linguistically, Quebec is part of industrial 
North America. Politically, Quebec is firmly, if 
still a bit uncomfortably, part of Canada. That 
is a solution — and given the passions and the 
violence that attended the politics of separat- 
ism, it is one of the better solutions that 
could have been imagined. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



A few weeks ago the Northrop Corp. offered 
to sell the U.S. Air Force the new F-20 fighter 
jet for less than the service is paying for Gener- 
al Dynamics’ F-16. Northrop said the planes 
are generally comparable, so its offer amount- 
ed to equal firepower at a lower cost Now 
General Dynamics has countered by offering 
to sell a somewhat stripped-down F-16 for less 
than an F-20. The company said it was re- 
sponding not so much to Northrop as to gener- 
al “budget pressures" and to an apparent new 
willingness by the air force to have its planes 
outfitted according to their specific missions. 
A customized plane needs less equipment than 
one such as the existing F-16, wfakh is built for 
a variety of roles. 

it is not every day that two defense contrac- 
tors compete downward; competition works, 
as defense reformers said it would. Northrop's 
offer, born of an inability to sell the F-20 
abroad, and General Dynamics' response cre- 
ated a buyer's market. Taxpayers are the buy- 
ers. The home team wins one for a change 

The air force could also win. The prices of 
tactical aircraft have increased mightily in re- 
cent years. A fully equipped F-16 now costs 
about $20 million (the air force’s most sophis- 
ticated fighter, the F-15. costs still more). Gen- 


eral Dynamics says it can cut that cost by 
about $6 million on customized planes. The air 
force is in the process of buying more than 700 
F-16s. The new proposals would let it buy the 
same number of planes for fewer dollars or, as 
General Dynamics noted hopefully in its offer, 
more planes for the same number of dollars. 
Who can be against that? 

There is, however, another dimension to this 
competition. The companies are not simply 
squeezing their prices on a product; they are 
squeezing the prod ucL They are offering to sell 
the air force lesser airplanes. This is a case of 
competition acting as a check not just on the 
contractors but on the ambitions of the service 
as welL To those who think too many weapons 
are “gold-plated,” this may be good news. 

But military arguments ought to be heard 
along with fiscal ones. Defense Secretary Cas- 
par Weinberger warned last year against buy- 
ing the F-20 on the ground that it “cannot 
meet scenarios our pitots may have to face." 
That issue is to be reviewed by defense plan- 
ners next month. The Pentagon ought to buy 
the cheapest planes possible. But it should not 
be driven by good procurement sale smanship 
to make bad weapons decisions. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Young and Poor in America 


A serious measure of a society is how it 
treats its children, and by that measure, the 
United States is in trouble. In the last few 
years, children have become, before our very 
eyes, the poorest segment of the population, 
and every day brings new evidence that their 
plight is, if any thing, growing worse. Think of 
a social ill; unemployment, continuing at a 
rate that would have alarmed Americans 20 
years ago ... the decline in family and rise in 
single-family homes ... the increase in hungry 
Americans. All affect children worst. It is 
utopian to think of solving all such soda! Sis. 
but it is only decent to think of trying to do the 
next best thing; saving the next generation. 

According to recent Congressional reports, 
children now constitute 40 percent of the na- 
tion's poor — nearly 14 million youngsters. 
One of five young Americans lives in poverty. 

The proportion is already twice that for 
poor people in general and it is growing. More 
than half of poor children live in female- 
headed households, most of which are poor 
almost by definition. The mothers are likely to 
be young, unmarried, undereducated and inca- 
pable of earning more than poverty wages. 
Nor ore things improving. The number of 
illegitimate births is rising. In 1980, nearly 20 
percent of all births, and nearly half of black 
births, were to unwed mothers. 

A new study by the Children's Defense 
Fund shows bow blade children, especially, 
have been “sliding backward” over the last five 


years. They are now twice as likely as white 
children to die before their first birthday, three 
times as likely lo be poor, and five times as 
likely to live on welfare. 

Though the need for governmental action 
seems obvious, there is no consensus on what 
should be done. President Reagan's proposed 
tax revision would reduce the tax burden for 
poor families, but that promise is offset by his 
plan to diminate deductions for state and local 
taxes. Senators Daniel Patrick Moynihan of 
New York and Christopher Dodd of Connecti- 
cut are pushing two measures that aim lo help 
poor children through a combination of tax 
relief and better social-service programs. 

Mr. Moynihan would establish a minimum 
benefit level for families receiving welfare and 
food stamps. He would give welfare benefits 
even to two-parent families while helping the 
states to reduce welfare dependency with work 
programs. Mr. Dodd, more ambitiously, 
would raise the minimum wage from $3.35 to 
$4 an hour and increase fun ding for child 
health, welfare and education programs. Both 
measures would expand efforts to reduce teen- 
age pregnancy. These bills may not offer the 
right mix of remedies and they are expensive, 
costing from $6 billion to $14 billion a year. 
What they say above all however, is that 
inaction is a graver sin, and still more expen- 
sive. A society whose children are the poorest 
citizens loses every claim to greatness. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


When Policy Is Hijacked 

No amount or rejoicing at the hostages' 
promised deliverance should blind anyone to 
the fact that terrorism has secured a victory 
while international order has suffered. There 
can be no doubting the brutality of those who 
seized the TWA 727: The body of a marine 


bears witness to that. But that does not excuse 
some of the alarming reactions in America. If 
some U.S. spokesmen had their way, this crisis 
would have ended with the bang of a bomb; 
there could be no more vivid demonstration of 
the price we pay for the United Stales allowing 
its [Mideast] policy to be “hijacked." 

— The Observer (London). 


FROM OUR JULY 1 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Iflack Rand’ Sajs ft Killed Boy 
NEW YORK — Dr. Mariano Srimeca, the 
wealthy Italian physician of this city whose 
four-year-old son, Michael, was kidnapped 
some ten days ago. received a telephone mes- 
sage [cm June 30] from an unidentified mem- 
ber of the Black Hand, staling that the child 
had been killed by the kidnappers because the 
ransom of $8,000 was not paid at the required 
time. Dr. Sdmeca was warned that Ms second 
child, Gustavo, who is only seven months old, 
would be the next to be taken if the ransom 
were not paid It is believed that the physician 
has been marked down by the Black Hand 
because be was an in tima te friend of Lieuten- 
ant Pclrosino, who was active in pursuing the 
gang, and who was Idled by the Black Hand 
mSicily several months ago. 


1935: Electioiieeraigm an Edgy Spam 
MADRID — “For God and the Country” is 
the slogan for a nation-wide political cam- 
paign which was opened [on June 30] by Don 
Jos6 Gil Robles, the War Minister, aim five 
other Ministers of the Catholic Popular Action 
and Agrarian parties with two huge open-air 
meetings, one in the ancient Castilian town of 
Medina del Campo, and the other in Valencia, 
the center of Left Republicanism. Meanwhile, 
Barcelona, the stronghold of anti-clericalism 
and syndicalism, is under martial law by order 
of the government. Senor Robles, the Catholic 
Popular Action leader, flew to the Catalan 
capital [on June 29] and decreed that persons 
responsible for disturbances in the city shall be 
subject to summary jurisdiction by military 
tribunals immediately after they are captured. 


international herald tribune 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Ouantw i 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Fubiaher 
Executive Editor RENE BONDY 


Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Associate Editor 


Deputy PubBsher 
Associate Publisher 
Associate Pvbkskcr 
Director of Opmuums • 
i- i n n.„ ^v. Director of Gradation 

KRANEPUHL Dinar of Adrenning Saks 


ALAIN LECOUR 
RICHARD R MORGAN 
STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 
FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS 

rolfd.: 


Direaeur de la publication: Waller N. Thayer. 



The Walk Cbse In on White South Africa 


By Stanley Uys 


“national forum" he wants to set up, 
and which some of his advisers are 
already suggesting should be expand- 
ed into a national convention. 

Some observers believe the present 
unrest will subside and the black 

only if recognized Mack leaderecan 
be persuaded to talk to their people 
— that no act of reform (outside of 
granting the vote) can restore calm. 

Consultation between Mr. Botha's 
government and credible black lead- 
ers, therefore, is the key to evolution- 
ary change.JBul where does this leave 
the ANC. the oldest and most impor- 
tant black qrganizalion? 

A few months ago. South Africa 
buzzed with talk of negotiations be- 
tween ANC leaden and prominent 
South Africans. While it was accept- 
ed that Lfaeltime was not ripe for the 
ANC and Mb-. Botha’s government to 


talk face-to-face, ii was hoped, never- 
theless, that others might take Mr. 
Botha’s place, particularly business. 

An important change has come 
over business; It has made up its 
mind, finally, that it is not ] 
down the drain 


with apartheic 
demand it is making is to abolish pass 
laws — about as dramatic a sup as 
any government could take. 

But recent indications arc that the 
ANC does not want to talk to i 
nized business just yeL Whether i 
is because it is preparing for its water- 
shed post-Nkomati conference, to be 
held soon, and does not want to be 
seen fraternizing with the enemy, or 

whether the motive goes deeper — an 

intensification, perhaps, of the armed 
struggle — is still to be seen. 

But if ever white and black South 
Africans are to come together to 
build a common society, and not de- 


fames. Res ton 


L ONDON — A namesake of mine 
/ in South Africa, who makes a 
handsome living satirizing the gov- 
ernment’s race policies, once wrote a 
play called “Paradise Is Closing 
Down." It was about whites suddenly 
finding their situation reversed — in- 
stead of being on the outside, looking 
into (he black enclosures, they were 
in their own enclosures, looking out. 

The first glimmerings of this situa- 
tion can be detected in the present 
unrest in the country. In the Kirk- 
wood area of the Eastern Cape, white 
farmers are fencing their properties, 

installin g floodlighting, and calling 
for night patrols. In Kwanobuhle 
black township, the homes of all 32 
Mack policemen, representatives of 
the white authority, have been de- 
• sLroycd, and the policemen and their 
f amili es live now under protection in 
a new block. S imilar ly, m the Trans- 
vaal many black councillors — 

"apartheid collaborators" — are be- 
ing given collective protection. 

Not too much should be made of 
this yeL The segregated white sub- 
urbs are still insulated from black 
unrest and the capacity of the while 
state to lash back has scarcely beat 
tested But there is no doubt that a 
qualitative riumgw has come over the 
black struggle in South Africa. Noth- 
ing quite Dke this has been seen be- 
fore, even after the Sharpeville mas- 
sacre in 1960 or Soweto m 1976. 

Minister of Police Louis le Grange 
has disrfffferi that 381 blacks died in 
the unrest in the first four months of 
this year and 1,300 were injured. No 
one had suspected the figures were so 
high. Some blacks were killed by the 
police, others by fellow-blacks. The 
minis ter said the unrest was spread- 
ing and that the situation was “ex- 
tremely worrying." 

The African National Congress, in 
exile now for 2S years, is jubilant. 

Last February, it called on South 
Africa’s urban blacks to make their 
townships ungovernable, and almost 
imm ediately they responded Now 
the ANC has issued a statement from 
its Lusaka headquarters. “The future 
is within our grasp,” it said claiming 
that the legi timac y of white authority 
had been “largely destroyed*" in 
black townships and that “the condi- 
tions for a revolutionary leap forward 
are be ginnin g to mature." The ANC 
believes the white ruling class is in 
“economic and political crisis.” 

In its long years in exile, the ANC 
has delivered a fair number of wildly 
unrealistic prophecies, but this state- 
ment has a new ring of sdf -confi- 
dence and excitement, exuding a new 
perception of the future. 

The ANCs February call fell on 
receptive ears because tne tinting was 
right A combination of factors had 
produced just the right clim ate 
among urban blades. 

First, dose to a quarter of the black 
labor force in South Africa is unem- 
ployed And an academic. Professor 
He rmann Gfliomee, damns tha t “ half 
of the black population now lives in 
absolute poverty." 

Second the Nkomati Accord sev- 
ered the ANCs trails into South Afri- 
ca, and the effect of this has been to 
internalize the black struggle. 

Third, the new blade trade onion 
movement has reached take-off. it is 
on the verge of becoming a dominant 

factor in black politics. • c • . .* , 

Fourth, President Pieter Botha’s J™**; *™ oas ' . 

repeated talk of apartheid reform has downngfat dsbonesry m our budget people ! . 

convinced opponents of apartheid nimbera. debate and advocacy. bemrfits, services and protections, 
becn reached The Times reported this and more 
under the headline “Stockman Says 
Tax Increase May Be Best Budget 
Solution.” This headline, not sup- 


Taiwan’s 

Choices 

On China 


stray each other, the government and 
the ANC will have to talk. Apart 
from Chief Butbetari’s huge, but 
largely Zulu-based Inkatha, there is 
no blade group with the ANCs expe- 
rience, influence and stability. 

The dav is coming when Mr. Botha 
will need 'to talk to Hack leaders who aimnrrM « 

can speak for their people; only they YflJ ASHlNGTON ■— Deng Xiao, 
can bring the townships back into Dinas proposed caw «■»- 
govemabtiity. The present vacuum in 


By Guo-Cang Huan 


organized black leadership could eas- 
ily produce a dangerous anarchy;. 

As Professor Giliomee writes: 
“White South Africa should once and 
for all leant the lesson that there is 
one thing more dangerous than a 
strong black political party, and that 
is the absence of it," 

The tuuhor, a South African, is a 
free-lance writer who has been a corre- 
spondent for several British and South 
African newspapers. This is adapted 
from an article in The Guardian. 


Stockman: 
TnjthWitha 
Sharp Edge 

By ja 

W ASHINGTON — For the first 
timejsmee the last world war, 
according to the U.S. Treasury, the 
national government in May spent 
more than twice as much money as it 
look in. This set a new monthly bud- 
get deficit qf $40 5 billion. 

Also, according to the Commerce 
Department, the nation’s trade defi- 
cit amounted to $12.7 billion in May, 
the second [highest on record. UJS. 
imports that month rose to a near- 
record of Sp.l billion, while exports 
sank to the lowest level in IS months. 

These were the administration’s 
own reportiof the facts, and its reac- 
tion to these facts was interesting 
when David Stockman, the director 
of the Office of Management and 
Budget, spoke privately about them 
June 3 in Washington to directors of 
the New York Stock Exchange and 
several members of Congress. 

Mr. Stockman, who always seems 
to gel in trouble around here for 
telling the truth, said that unless Pres- 
ident Reagan and the Congress 
agreed to raise taxes, the federal defi- 
cit would probably remain around 
$200 billion a year through 1988. 

“As a policy matter,” Mr. Stock- 
man said, “it is obvious enough that 
to dose tlus threatening 5200-billion 
budget gap, we must either massively 
cut spending or raise taxes by large, 
unprecedented magnitudes — or by 
the likes of some, enact a sweeping 
mixture of both.” 

Dip New York Times got a copy of 
’ the 



worsened 
and the political conflict intensified," 
Mr. Stockman said, “we [be spoke for 
both the administration and Con- 
gress] have increasingly resorted to 
squaring the circle with accounting 


that a critical point 
where apartheid is on the defensive. 

Mr. Botha and his ministers admit 
now that apartheid is obsolete — that 
it is a pre-industrial ideology unfitted 
for a post-industrial country. South 
Africa has confirmed de Tooque- 
vflle’s thesis that the dangerous mo- 
ment for a bad government comes 
when it introduces reforms. 

This explains why recent apartheid 
reforms nave had so little internal 
and international impact Measured 
against apartheid principles, some of 
these reforms are of fundamental im- 
portance. But because Mr. Botha 
himself has been undermining the 
credibility of apartheid ideology 
since 1979, his opponents now focus 
on the dismantling of the structure. 

To dismiss all apartheid reforms as 
cosmetic is to accept that apartheid is 
static; that it is durable, impervious 
to pressure. It implies, too, that the 
whites of South Africa are unable to 
perceive that their whole lifestyle is 
being endangered, and too stupid to 
know how to try to save it The 
ANCs Lusaka statement begins to. 
correct this superficial dismissal of 
the significance of the reforms. 

Every reform affects the psycholo- 
gical balance between ruler and ruled 
and cannot therefore be dismissed as 
“meaningless." The ANC statement 
is nearer the mark when it interprets 
the reforms as symptoms of a “deep- 
ening crisis" in the South African 
government. What is happening is 
that the ideology of apartheid, which 
has underpinned the system of while 
rule since 1948, is breaking up. White 
rule can continue without it, but it 
gave the system a cohesion and, in 
Afrikaner eyes, a'lmtimacy that will 
no longer be there. The resultant con- 
fuaon is important psychologically 
for Afrikaners. They are not merely 
quarreling, they are deeply split 

To expect Mr. Botha at this stage 
to grant Blacks “meaningful political 
rights” is to miss the point of the 
current process. By the time he is 
ready lo give blacks these rights, the 
game will be over This is the end of 
tbeprocess of change, not the start. 

The turmoil will alter the whole 
pattern of white politics, terminating 
the structure whereby Afrikaner rule 
is superimposed on white rule, and 
bringing, first, the more pragmatic 
English-speaking whites into the de- 
cision-making process, and then 
black leaders themselves. 

There can be no doubt now that 
Mr. Botha is preparing to talk to 
some of his Marx political 
nents, starting probably with 
Gatsha fiutheTea, but also including, 
possibly. Bishop Desmond Tutu, Dr. 
Nihato Motlana, and others. 

Mr. Botha must know, too, that 
there is no point in talking to black 
leaders unless he has something to 
talk to them about. This means talk- 
ing eventually about a federal system 
nf government for South Africa. The 
Hcene of thiN: talks would he the 


ported by the story, gave the impres- 
sion that Mr. Stockman favored a tax 
increase, though be merely called it 
an option. So the administration ig- 
nored the burden of the speech and 
turned its anger on the headline. 

Mr. Stockman's off-the-record 
speech — as if anything said before 
50 stockbrokers, congressmen and 
their wives can be off the record — 
may have been imprudent politically, 
but nobody could question the accu- 
racy of his facts or the clarity of 
his criticism at the administration 
and the Congress. 

“The degree of political divisions 
and policy conflict within our gov- 
erning institutions has now reached 
such an extreme and intense state 
that it is nearly impossible to see 
where the political will and consensus 
will come from that is necessary to 
enact any plan big enough to balance 
the books — or even substantially 
close the gap,” he said. 

“Die basic fact is that we are vio- 
badly, even wantonly, the car- 
rule of sound public finance: 
Governments must extract from the 
in taxes what they dispense in 
s, services and protections. 
Perhaps not every year, but certainly 
over any intermediate period of time. 

“Indeed,” Mr. Stockman added, 
“if the Securities and Exchange Coro- 


Stavt Mends H on 
Tho WosWnoton post 


mission had jurisdiction over the ex- 




many of us would be in jafl.” 

How did the administration react? 
It not only denied the headline but 
also the body of the speech. “He 
didn’t say it," President Reagan said 
on his way back from Chicago. “The 
story is fallacious. We have the 
speech. We know what he said.” 

Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said the Times story was 
“totally off base," and suggested that 
the reporter “ought to have his mouth 
washed out with soap." 

Even Ed Dale, an old Times re- 
porter who is now Mr. Stockman’s 
news secretary, said bis boss's re- 
marks were “completely distorted.” 

Well, as the president is always 
saying all you have to do is read in 
The Times the text of what Mr. 
Stockman did say, and Judge for 
yourself- The responses of Mr. Stock- 
man’s masters in the White House are 
a diversion and a disgrace. 

Mr. Stockman laid it on the line: 
The government spent twice as much 
in May as it took in. But he was not to 
blame, say the president and his 
aides. The Times was to blame. 

The New York Times. 


• ■ • 


. And the Last Shall (Finally) Be First 


W ASHINGTON — Archie 
Lewellyn Grant 84, died yes- 
terday in a nursing home in Oka- 
loosa, Florida, following a short ill- 
ness. He was the last driver to have 
signaled before turning. 

Mr. Grant, known to generations 
of school kids as “Mr. Last" 
claimed to have made the turn that 
made him famous in 1984. He was 
living in Washington at the time, 
and ,was about to make a right turn 
on Connecticut Avenue when for 
some reason be signaled his inten- 
tions. “I don’t know what got into 
me.’. he said later. “I just flipped 


the stalk and the signal went on." 

Mr. Grant's claim was never offi- 
cially verified, but most scholars of 
extinct customs take him at his 
word. In fact, the more -they studied 
Mr. 'Grant the more apparent it 
became that he was the last person 
to do a number of things. He was, 
for instance, the last person to stop 
for a yellow light, come to a com- 
plete stop at a stop sign or give 
pedestrians the right of way. He 
was also the last person to turn 
down his car radio at night when his 
windows were open. 

Mr. Grant, a short, fastidious 
mao, was also the last person to say 
“lhahk you” to strangers and to 


By Richard Cohen 

hold the door for someone behind 
him. He never opened his car door 
into traffic (the last person not to 
do that) and was the last person not 
to ask “Who’s this?” when suspect- 
ing he had called a wrong number. 

A native of Washington, Mr. 
Grant was in the last graduating 
class of the old Technical High 
School, then went to work at the cSd 
War Department He was the last 
person to call it by that name. In 
1984 he called a Freedom Fighter a 
mercenary and then, gigg lin g at 
what he had done, apologized. 

After his move to Florida, school 
children visiting Disney World 
came to see him. He would teO them 
some of the things that he had beai 
the last to do. He was the last per- 
son to read an entire book, eat hot 
pasta, become engaged before mar- 
riage, never have ham and cheese 
on a croissant, and never wear col- 
ored underwear. “White is the only 
color for me,” he would assert. 

_ Mr. Grant had other “lasts" to 
his crediL He was the last person 
never to have been in therapy, to 
have been married only once and to 
be absolutely sure he was a hetero- 


sexual He was also the last person 
to have worn knickers in his youth 
and to have been in a movie theater 
with more than 100 seats. He 
claimed to be the last person to 
have paid less than $2 for a box of 
popcorn, but scholars disputed that 
assertion. He was indisputably the 
last person to have gone to a “men's 
only” barber shop and, shortly be- 
fore his death, hie became the last 
person never to have jogged. He 
was very proud of that. 

Even in speech. Mir. Grant com- 
piled some lasts. He was the Last 
person to say ice box or phono- 
graph or (in 1974) Victrola. Until 
the end, he spoke of Armistice Day, 
not Veterans Day, and be never 
knew what President’s Day was. 
Until the end, Mr. Grant regaled 
school children with the way ti mj g s 
used to be. Just last Friday, hetoTd 
some kids how he had beat the last 
person to have eaten plain v anilla 
ice cream, to have had nis groceries 
packed in a paper bag at Safeway, 
and not to have been computer lit- 
erate. None of the kids believed 
him; one of them cried. 

Mi. Grant is survived by his wife,- 
Martha, and a son, Walter. 

There were no last words. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


pwgs proposed "exte state, 
two systems' formula for reunified 
lion of Taiwan and the mainland pre. 
seats the Taipei government with 
four possible responses. The wisest is 
to seek to reduce tensions and amnd 
informal contacts. 

first is a “cold war" policy wj^ 
the stated aim of reunifying Chiu 
under Taipei's rule. Taipei would re- 
ject direct trade with Beijing, limit 
indirect trade and further muring 
informal contacts between the min. 
land and Taiwan. Taipei would in- 
crease defense spending, continue to 
compete with Beijing in international 
institutions and make every effort to 
damage Chinese-American" relations. 

Taiwan would then face the possi- 
bility of an invasion, or at least a 
blockade, from the mainland. This 
policy would slow Taiwan's soda! 
and political pluralizaiion and 
heighten political struggles between 
conservatives and liberals. Taiwan's 
economic-upgrading program would 
be damaged, for businessmen would 
be pushed to channel more of tho- 
rn vestment overseas, and the educat- 
ed elite would be discouraged from 
returning to the island. Foreign in- 
vestors would be less inclined to 
move capita] and technology there. 

If Taipei chose another road, inde- 
pendence. its internal politics would 
be destabilized. The Koominiaiig, 
whose authority rests on the claim 
that it is the true government of all 
China, would lose Legitimacy. Politi- 
cal conflicts would heighten between 
supporters and foes of independence. 

Facing a prospectively indepen- 
dent Taiwan. Beijing would be 

S led to launch a pre-emptive 
: because of strong natio nalism 
and fear that a “do nothing” pohey 
would damage its international credi- 
bility. Independent, Taiwan would be 
more isolated than even No major 
power would be likely to recognize its 
new status. Washington would pub- 
licly support it poly at the risk of 
confronting Beijing and chanrina a 
fundamental change in the Pacific 
power balance. Taipei might Jose 
most informal or nongovernment 
contacts with other nations and inter- 
national organizations. 

A third — at present, theoretical — 
option is that Taipei could accept 
Beijing’s proposal of reunification u 
the near future. This would relieve , 
Taipei of immediate feats of a pre- « 
eruptive attack but would ignite an 
internal political upheaval. 

The fourth, and wisest, option is to 
reduce tensions and expand contacts, 
even informal ones, with Beijing, bat 
not start formal negotiations about 
Taiwan’s future status immediately. 
Taipei pursued this policy somewhat 
from 1981 loList summer. This in- 
volves a gradual shift away from the 
aim of reunification under Kuomnt- 
tang rule. The key policy issue would 
no longer be whether both sides 
should talk but when and how. 

In this period, while both sides 
maintained well-trained military 
forces, Taipei could shore up its poElr 
ical support in America ana be mare 
flexible about its status in interna- 
tional forums. Tensions could be de- 
creased by Taipei's redwing hostile 
propaganda ana provocative military 
ana intelligence operations against 
die mainland. There could be gradual 
reduction of curbs on direct trade, an % 
exchange of mail and travel and en- 
couragement of “people- to-peopte” 
contacts and scholarly exchanges. 

For this approach to be adopted, a 
liberal group with broad support 
must play a key policymaking row in 
Taipei, and Beijing must continue its 
reform program and “open door” po- 
licy, and pursue moderation toward 
Hong Kong and Taiwan. 

Thu overall approach would re- 
duce the possibility of military attack 
by Beijing and gradually create an 
atmosphere favorable to forma! ne- 
gotiations. Taipei's autonomy and in- 
ternational standing would not be 
harmed, for Taipei would not have to 
promise anything specific. Taiwan 
would be able to transfer more re- 
sources from defense to economic de- 
velopment. Business confidence 
would be increased. Taipei would en- 
joy wider international contacts and 
could increase its. participaaoB m 
various international orgamzations- 

It took both rides 30 years to un- 
dertake policy shifts toward each oth- 
er. Time, and a well- reasoned ap- 
proach, might allow further progress 
toward peaceful reumfication. 

The writer, a graduate of the Insti- 
tute of World Economics and Fohtia 
of the Chinese Academy oj Sodal Sci- 
ences, in Beijing, is a senior fellow at 
the Atlantic Council, a private fariff 
• organization. This was adapted 
e New York Times firm an am- 
• in Foreign Affairs. 


I 



iK 


America: Bully in the UN? 

In bis opinion column “UN 
Friends Can Easily Be Counted" 
(June 21), Senator Robot J. Kasten 
Jr. bemoans the lack of support that 
the United States finds at the United 
Nations and suggests that “Congress 
should keep this widespread lack of 
support at the United Nations in 
mmd when it reviews requests for 
foreign assistance." 

The idea that the United Nations is 
a forum for which support of the 
United States can be bought, or alter- 
natively demanded under duress, is 
repugnant It is surely the one place 
wnere all nations should be free to 
vote according to their own interests 
and to what they perceive as (he in- 
terests of the world at Large. 

Increasingly blatantly, the United 
States attempts to force'other nations 
to toe the UJS. line, and shows anger 
when .they don’L Growing global 
ami-Americccism has been a concern 
of the Reagan administration but 
only us something u» he countered by 
"correcting iIum* who miMindcrstanil 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


would 


us,” never as cause for intromection. Perhaps 

been desenbed variously as the rag- U.S. aid might vote with it?5 percent 
mg of fanatics and as further evi- or 100 percent of the time, 
deuce of the spread of lawlessness, 
and both are tzue to some extern. 

However, is it not also symptomatic 
of the increasing frustration of the 
less powerful directed against what 
appears to many to be the self-ap- 
pointed global policeman, whose 


DAN GERBER. 

Ch&lefineau, Belgium. 


to know where- ti* . 

States stood with its friends. 

Wedid not rate too weD— though w 
were good friends — and she said tms 

was because we had consistently ^ 

failed to support the United States ou VC 

Mid east ana South African issutf- , V ' 
But there arc many difficulties i® T- 
voting on such important matters. ^ v 
One u the definition, and^evoahanu* ■ - 
ed appli cation, of .criteria such ss , ^ 
“intervention,’ 7 “iuterference,” “for- 


While attending the UN s ywrial 
session an disarannnn»nl m 1982 as 
foreign minister far R»ngiaH*HA j 

i.” — T W3S 10 meet both witfl Foreign HUervaiBOn, luwaraem*. 

him to get Minister Andrei Gromyko andUS. eign presence" arid “aggression, 
huroy without much insight or un- Ambassador Jeanc Kirkpatrick. And there are important issues on v. . ■* 

dra^goftttas’vfew*? n»= So»ie™Sw ™ not nWdTeSi^Sfritnds are f -. 

pleased with our positions on Af- ten unableto agree these include the 

gharri oton — J ' -« — 4/W«l Arimm ■>'-.• 

trained 


Despite numerous setbacks from 
Vietnam to Nicaragua,. from Tehran 
to . ® e * ru ^ successive American ad- 
ministrations have failed to hear the 
message that is so apparent to non- 
Americans evtaywhere. It is perhaps 
in rite nature of superpowers robe 
deaf. No doubt Britain was also deaf 

at the’ 

years 


we had carefully 
matters at meetings of the Islamic 
Conference Organization find the 
Nonaligned Movement and that our 

, j, ■ . — -r-- -7— UN votes on these issues reflected 

S BriiS? d f dm, W both <wr national sentiment s and our 
of the Bnush Empire. 1 would commitments to the two conferences. 

At the meeting with Mrs. Kirkpat- 
rick. I learned tnai her -mission had 
Sir JOHN WHITMORE. prepared a “score sheet" hased on 
London. voting records. She told me ii vsj> j 


Empire. 

not know. I did not hear anything, 
nor did my ancestors. 


even within the U.S. government- , ^ *. 

The United States is in the.unenvi- V •. 
able position of having to balanced 
domestic commitments against^ : . r 
worldwide - responsibilities / 

maintaining sensitive ties to the Sort-.. \ ■■ 
et Union. I do not know if regulating .. - 
aid is an effective way to do this. • £*■ 

AJL SHAMS-UD DOHA 
■ ' London- . 



ONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 


Keral^MSfeSribune. 



Page 7 


Eurobond Yields 

For Weak Endad iuna 26 
VSS Is term. Int'l Inst. 

U.&S ions iarm, IncL . 
U.S5 medium term, Irtd. _ 
Cams medium term - -- 

French Fr. short term 

Sterling medium term 

Yen medium term, int'l Inst. 

Yen ig term, fntt Inst 

ECU short term - — 

ECU medium term -- 
ECU long term — 

EUA long term 


LuxF med .term inn Inst 
LuxF medium term _____ 

Cotcukma by the Luxembourg Sto ck E '*■ 


11X83 % 
11.16 % 
1064 % 

11.13 % 
1258 % 

11.14 % 
6.95 % 
6.97 % 
9JQ % 
9 JS 6 % 
9 JO % 
954 % 
9 J1 % 
9A7 % 


Market Turnover 

For Week Ended June 27 

(Mlltora at UJL DoUorml 

Nondollar 

Tate) naiiw B uulml nt 

Ode) 13572,1 107645 MTO S 

Eurodear 385085 255995 35193 


EUROBONDS 

i Record First Half Sees 
Diversifying From Dollar 

ByCAKLGEWERTZ 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — The Eurobond market closed out a record first 
half last week. Data compiled by the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development shows that $66 
biiHon in bonds were marketed during the first six 
tooths, almost double the volume of the fust half of 1984. The 
rcat tmyority of thi s pa per con turned to be denominated in UJS. 
ollars. But the OECu data shows the dollar slipping to only 77 
excentof total activity so far this year, down from 80 percent last 
sar and 84 percent in 1982. 

This te nd e nc y by investors to diversify away from the drJIar is 
iown also by the introduction of new Eurocurrencies — tbs 

hmish krone and the South 

iricsn rand — die reemer- 
-nee of the French franc, 
xe popu l ariz a tion of such 
inge currencies as the Aus- 
• aiifln and New Zealand 
ollars (with volume already 
lore than double the total 
jraliof 1984) and the strong 
rowth in the more tradition- 
1 alternatives. 

The volume of' bonds de- 
ommated in European cur- 
acy units, for example, is 
Iready 9 percent ahead of 
ye total 1984 level at the 
qirivalent of $3.2 billion, 
uroyen issues, at $1.9 bil- 
on, are 57 percent ahead of 
ye 1984 total The leading 
Jternative currency, the 
>eutsche mark, is 50 percent 
head of the first half of 1984, with $3.7 billion. 

Within the U.S. dollar market, the most notable 
fas the surge of floating-rate notes — now accounting for 56 
ercent of that total against 40 percent for classic fixed-rate, 
traight debt, according to data compiled by Salomon Brothers, 
a 1984, they were virtually equal with FRNs taking 47 percent 
f the dollar market and straights 46 percent. 

This, the OECD notes, is largely the result of increased 
fferings by banks wishing to strengthen their balance-sheet 
tructures. 

r HE banks' shift away from their traditional loan business, 
the OECD notes, “is no doubt the most important change 
that has confronted the international capital market dnr- 
ig the past decade.” It added: It “is clear that these changes do 
ot necessarily imply a diminish ed role for banks in the process 
f international financial intermediation. Rather, the experience 
f recent months suggests a growing involvement of banks as 
orrowers, on the one hand, and as investors, inte rmediaries and 
-aders in the securities markets, on the other." 

There is no measure available on the volume of bonds bang 
eld by hanks. But the trend has investment bankers worried! 
ivestment banks hold bonds as inventory to trade with their 
ients — not as portfolio investments for their own account 
The fear is that when it is no longer profitable for commercial 
onks to hold these securities — when the short-term financing 
3Sts stan rising to levels exceeding the coupon income of the 
onds — there will be a tidal wave of selling mat the market will 
ot be able to bear. 

For now, however, such worries cany little weight The market 
nded the week cheered by die prospects erf yet lower U.S. 
itercst rates and further capital gains on outstanding issues. 
The reasons for this view were: A less ebullient increase than 
tpected in the leading economic indicators for May; a better- 
uin -expected reception in New York to the Treasury's sale of 
17 billion of notes and bonds, and the resignation of Lyle E. 
rramley, a Carter appointee, from the Federal Reserve Board, 
tr. Gramky’s resignation opens the way for President Ronald 
eagan to fill the post with someone more likely to favor 
Tgressivc easing of monetary policy. 

The improved outlook, coupled with more generous pricing on 
trot issues, helped revive the fixed-coupon sector of the Eurodol- 
r market. With the 10-ycar, 10-percent bonds of a week earlier 
ading at substantial five-point discounts, the new issues were 
:ostly about five years, carrying yields of around 10 percent. 
Statoil the Norwegian state-owned oil company, sold $170 
iHon of five-year. 10-percent notes at a price of 100V4 for a yield 
’ 9.93 percent! The issue got off to a rocky stan when it became 
town that the paper did not carry an explicit government 
laraniee as had previous Statoil issues, but by week’s end it had 
covered to a discount of l'-s points. 

Barclays offered $250 million of l(M-percent notes at a price of 
X3'i and Rockwell $200 million of 95*-pcrcent notes at 99 H. 
oth ended the week at discounts of 1% points. 

Two Japanese issuers — whose paper can be bought by 

(Continued on Page 9, CoL 1) 


Last Week’s Markets 

AU/louroaonasid ctoMoftrTKitnoFrUBY 

Stock Indexes Money Rates 

United States tuavn. pmun. 

9ft 9ft 


LostWk. 

Prev.WK 

arm 

induv— 

IJ34.12 

1.2115 

■*■075% 

UW 

16119 

IrtB 

— 160% 

Tram — 

6635'. 

M958 

+ 2.14% 

.pioc_ 

IBJ? 

7£2Jfl 

+ 1J7% 

.P500 — 

191.70 

1895? 

+ 1 16% 

•seep- 

!1!56 

10953 

+ 113% 

/*. P.-jifctt: 

^■3awS«rr_Vi 


iam 




5E 100 

1.ZM.90 

liASJC 

— 2.17 % 

X 

938J0 

96140 

—257% 

Kona 



•nvSona 

157=60 

1516-13 

+ 159% 

m 




Urn iCJ_ 

1358709 

17/3176 

+ 1.96% 

'cstGomam 



oinMnU 

U350 

\J37 10 

—011% 

m ^oes^otiCtLi. car. 



Discount rat* 

Federal funds rat* 

Prime rate 

Japan 

Discount.. — 


S 

7Vj 


75/16 

7VS 


Cali money ... — 
AOOov intorftenk — 
West Germany 



Overnight. 


5 S 

65/16 6ft 

65/16 6ft 


l -month Intoroonk. 

Briom 

Bank boa* rate 

Call money. 


6 

550 

550 


6 

5 

550 


3-month inliruank . 


rcvi 12 ft 

17ft 12ft 

129/16 13ft 


Currency Rates 


Raw« 


1154'i 

ilBtf 




DM. 

; :m*' 
?:cs 

If 143 
OX 
ina 

ra 

CM 1 

::a 


June 23 
LF. Ye* 
i mo* nu2t 

HOC 2*JI« 


F.F. nL. GUr. B-F. 

■ sores* II" • — §»' 

uez iu * :;ac — — 

rrs‘ 15495 a SL/3' flWO* 

4jt»M 19.91 ua 

11JS3 75959 7 XU 

**923 WSJfl WW W90 

, 4.7*7 m UB S7 16144* 

a 7 > ’179* 1132 43U7* 

• T48s* taa* J*M* usw* 

inn i^nis isms 453#5S 
»JSC9f N-2- 415*17 

■nsnxr Scrapev'centors- Nan York rotes oH PM. 
'ion: -sen w pc**/ tel Amounts oceMd to buy one 
, J Unmet fi£*» N.G.: not menu: na. : not avotiobio. 


lit MX 
nw 1K2* 

97.36 

18717* 

US* 10.113 
3591 24523 


■WUtfll 
Mhn 

Wbu; — — 

loo i*4»«0 

+ Vorkio — 23*3 ■ 

rts ijtr 

Ifre M 

ffcli 1 m. iS*i 

CU Z-~sa 

d* ;wer ins' 

*ne» tn Lotteun Mi _'UT ■CTt tilt Jtsi 
I Cc.TMTWiV.J-' IfQK i5-‘ Ar«vitS f 
ncr (*J MiHol !X 1*1 -7J •> c t ( 

'i Tbher am toum. CUX1JS9 

dorr Bdiar Valaw 

ecr itlS Ciinwr per UJU 

•Mouiln^ 04C PnLQMrkU 

«nai xa crtNOKi 

r<e, wreunt MO 

k*i« o:n iMUnnoiee "C 

•BUenu, “.SCX lUoralffl t.tltX 

■"■I let*** 25U* 

ftlbM iimi.iM. iriX 

1 ***.oocm c.*s:r Kwotfidioor ck: 

"totem Pn.t .ftw.fi, ny* {*« rc*»e : 'ckttu: t.t»f BAtl , outer, nta. 

^ WW tram UautertenaAP. 


Cumacv per UAI 
Maunr. me. 14*15 
HV oiwi 31 SCC 
Harw.krtM Ui 

pnh.pcM 1730 

Pgrr efcsda 173JO 
Sana mol 14*15 
inoL* 130 

l *lr. rood L97S4 


Currency pot 
l Kor.MPi 

Soon, peseta 

S waft krona 
Taiwan t 
Thai eatt 
TorUfhllra 
UAEthroani 
VOMLBOSV. 


UiS 

BUB 

T7A2D 

U775 

am 

27J95 

SJUO 

1*725 

1290 


France 
Revises 
Bank Law 

Tightens Rides 
On Ccqntal Ratio 

' Heuteri 

PARIS —France’s banking r^- 
niatio n committee has agreed to 
new rules expanding its require- 
ment that banks should raise 
enough net equity and Long-term 
debt to cover at least 5 percent of 


In flTinnrnnrir jg the rule chang e 
late Friday, the Bank of France 
announced that banks would now 
have to satisfy the capital require- 
ments at least once a year, rather 
than every three years. 

The 5-percent requirement, 
which is based on rules dating from 
1979, was previously set as the 
banks’ target for June this year. 

Banks that have not attained the 
5-percent re qui rement will now 
have to cover at least 6 percent of 
new assets with fresh capital until 
they do, the central bank said. 

The committee also derided to 
implement a European Comumiri- 
ty rule that hanks should fully con- 
solidate subsidiary earnings in their 
accounts »nri simplify the weight- 
ing of different irmd.o of risk in its 
calculation of capital ratios. 

The Bank of France said the sol- 
vency of French credit establish- 
ments would be better controlled as 
a result of the in regula- 

tions. 

Banking sources said France’s 
major state-owned banks are 
among die least capitalized of the 
world’s big banks and they have 
had to set aside large risk provi- 
sions in the past three years be- 
cause of the Tnfgmatimuil drill cri- 
sis. 

At the beginning of the year, the 
government sought to encourage 
the major hanks to improve their 
capital base by permitting them to 
exceed credit allowances if they 
went to financi al markets to build 
up capital. 

In another action, the govern- 
ment announced Friday that the 
interest paid to consumers on their 
passbook savings accounts would 
be lowered from 6.5 percent to 6 
percent. Interest on other savings 
accounts would be lowered from 
15 percent to 7 percent 


The Saudi Threat to Seattle OPEC 



ig of Pact : 
On Prices, Quota 
Angers Riyadh 

By Stanley Mdslcr 

las Angela Tunes Service 

' PARIS — A decade ago, 
OPEC was powerful enough to 
raise oil prices on no more than a 
political whim. Now it spends a 
good deal of time in crisis, trying 
desperately to catch up with the 
demining world market and 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

demonstrate that it still has 
tmftngh infhtfgioe to keep prices 

from c rashing 

The latest attempt, which may 
he the most crucial and divisive, 
wiD came Friday when oil nrinis- 
ters of the 13 OPEC govern- 
ments are convened in Vienna. 
Their problems will be campK- 
cated by the impatience of Sandi 
Arabia over the failure of most 
otter countries to stick to the 
prices and production quotas of 
the cartel, the Organisation of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries. 

Shrilrh Ahmed TSlri Y anumi, 
the Saudi Arabian oil minister, 
has warned the others publicly 
that his country will increase its 
production if the otters continue 
to flout the OPEC rules. 

“If we increase production, 
then prices will start dropping,” 


SfwyTrh Yamaai told Petroleum 
Intelli gence Weekly. “Prices will 
drop sharply to something below 
$ 20 ." 

That would be a reduction of 
more than $8 a barrel, a drastic 
action that could effectively de- 
stroy OPEC. 

Indeed, it is widely assumed 
that die OPEC ministers will 
have to cut prices. Dr. Joseph 
Stanislaw, a director of Cam- 
bridge Energy Research Asso- 
ciates, recently predicted that a 
cut of between SI and 51.50 a 
barrel would emerge from the 
meeting. But Sheikh Yamam has 
said that no cut will be necessary 
if all OPEC members keep to the 
production and pricing agree- 
ments. 

The ministers were to have 
met routinely in Geneva toward 
the end of July for then' semian- 
nual meeting but, troubled by 
the way the market was behav- 
ing, they decided to advance the 
date ana meet in Vienna. 

{The British newspaper The 
Observer said Sunday that 

Yamani and minis ters 


SwwflHT 

OPEC oil ministers 
meeting in Taif, Saudi 
Arabia. Amid wide- 
spread quota violations, 
the Saudi oO minister, 
Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Ya- 
mani, is thre atening to 
sharply increase Saudi 
Arabia’s production. 

from Nigeria, Venezuela and 
Gulf states would confer secretly 
in London tins week before the 
Vi««i» tnupting Reuters repott- 
ed from London. The meeting 
would follow talks in Algiers 

Kuwait and Mexico, not an 
OPEC member. 

[The paper said the meetings 
were expected to .discuss new 
production targets to help Saudi 
Arabia deal with financial trou- 
bles stemming from its produc- 
tion cuts. The Observer said the 
Saudis wanted f carnal arrange- 
ments on production discipline 
and a reduction in OPEC’s pro- 
duction ceiling from 16 miflitm 
to 15 million barrels a day.] 

At the heart of the conflict in 
OPEC is a basic division of pur- 
pose and need among the mem- 
bers. 

Some countries, like Sandi 
Arabia, have great wealth and 
relatively few people, and can 
afford to limit oil production to 
same extent in the hope of bd- 
(Continned on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Lloyd's Investors 
Plan I^egal Action 
To Recover Loss 


By Colin Chapman 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Investors of three 
Lloyd’s of London insurance syn- 
dicates, who face underwriting 
losses of £130 million ($167 mil- 
lion), said Saturday they plan court 
actions m Britain and the United 
States to recoup the money. 

The investors, or “names," who 
put up money for underwriting but 
take no active part in the insurance 
business,- deny liability for the 
losses and attribute than to fraud 

In a meeting on Friday night, 
about 300 investors in Lloyd’s syn- 
dicates voted unanimously to take 
legal action to recoup the money 
from the former PCw Underwrit- 
ing Agencies, Richard Beckeu Un- 
dertime Agencies, which suc- 
ceeded PCW, and; Beckett’s parent, 
Minet Holdings PLC. They also 
plan to seek money from two for- 
mer Lloyd’s members, Peter Ca- 
meron- Webb and Peter Dixon, and 
from Lloyd’s itself. 

The investors endorsed a recom- 
mendation from their action com- 
mittee that they not meet any calls 
for cash to meet future claims by 
Beckett and agreed to refuse to 
submit to solvency tests that 
Lloyd's requires before allowing 
“names" to continue underwriting 
insurance 


and, in some cases, face bankrupt- 
cy," he said. 

Mr. Rozak, who said be stood to 
lose about £200,000, added: “We 
were told about serious malfea^, 
sauce going back over many years. 
People were fairly disgusted by tte 
noo-bad-for-you-chaps' attitude of 
the Lloyds' coundL" ' 

Mr. Rozak said Hying to coordi- 
nate the legal action in the United 
States was difficult because Lloyd’s 
had declined to release a list of 
those in the afflicted syndicates. 

The London solicitors, Ashuret, 
Morris, Crisp & Co., are in chaige 
of the legal action. 

Although writs are expected to 
be drawn up swiftly, h may be 
months before the action goes to 
court. Before then, the findings of 
the Uoyd's inquiry will be made 
available to the investors. And a 
British government prosecution 
cannot be ruled ouL 
1 Sir Michael Havas, the attor- 
ney-general has told Parliament 
that both he and the director of 
public prosecutions are “anxious 
that large-scale fraud should not go 
undetected or unprosecuted." 


The “names” behind the disput- 
ed syndicates include Adrian Kha- 
sboggi, a Saudi Arabian financier, 
arid the Duchess of Kent. Under 
Lloyd’s rules, the investors have 
unlimited liability for the syndi- 
cates’ losses. 

At Wednesday’s annual meeting 
of Lloyd’s, the chairman, Peter 
Miller, said there could be no “life- 
boat” to rescue the underwriters, 
but announced that Lloyd's was 
setting up an inquiry into the con- 
duct of the syndicates. 

Thomas Rosak, a property de- 
veloper Grom Coral Cables, Flori- 
da, and one of the “names" at Fri- 
day’s meeting, said the mood at the 
session was “de termine d-" 

“People were not irate, but they 
did feel they would use all their 
collective wraith to fighi this case, 
rather than just pay up the money. 


Poor Nations 
Show Positive 
Trade Balance 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — For the 
first time since 1981, the devel- 
oping nations last year sold 
more than they bought, the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund re- 
ported Sunday. 

The group’s exports reacted 
$521 2 edition, against imports 
of $5103, the IMF said. Last 
year their imports were $5163 
billion and exports were $499 
bfltion. 

The surplus was $10.9 billion, 
contrasted to a deficit of $173 
bfltionin 1983. 

Experts call that a positive 
trade balance, meaning that as 
a group, the 62 developing na- 
tions that the IMF monitors 
had money coming in rather 
than going’ out 


StatoU Starting Takeover 
OfStaifjord Operations 


Reuters 

STAVANGER, Norway —Nor- 
way’s state oil company, Statoil 
which begins to take control of a 
huge North Sea oilfield this week, 
is looking abroad to expand into 
global exploration, r efining and re- 
tail operations. 

On Monday, Staiofl begins an 
18-month transition period to take 
over from Mobil Coro, as operator 
of the Stalfjord field, which pro- 
duces more than half of Norway’s 
oil output of around 800,000 bar- 
rels per day. 

Later in the weds, the third plat- 
form on the Grid will begin produc- 
tion, and Norway's production is 
expected to rise to almost 1 million 
barrels per day by the end of 1986. 

Statoil framed in 1972, has pur- 
sued polities fiercely independent 
of the Conservative government in 
Oslo. The company president, Arye 
Johnsen, a supporter of the opposi- 
tion Labor Party, has survived 
dashes with Kaare Kristiansen, the 
ofl and energy minister. 

The government of Prime Minis- 
ter Kaare WDloch has sold some 
stale concerns to the private sector, 
but has avoided upsetting Sta t o fl , 
which had a turnover of 35.6 billion 
kroner ($4.04 billion at current 
rates) and net profits of 2 billion 
kroner last year. 

However, the government has at- 
tempted to reduce StalatTs inde- 
pendence by drawing more oil reve- 
nue directly into state coffers. 

Statoil hit the international stage 
last October, when it provoked a 


chain of price-cutting by slashing 
its prices unilaterally. Until then, 
thepridngof Norwegian crude had 
followed that of Britain, the larger 
North Sea cal producer. 

With an automatic share of 50 
percent in all licensing blocks 
awarded on Norway’s continental 
shdf, StatoU is looking to expand 
refinery and retail outlets around 
the world to cope with increased 
erode production. 

“We are not looking for large 
retail dmim at the moment, but we 
are looking at projects in Western 
Europe and, further ahead, in the 
United States," said a company 
spokesman, Haakon Lavit 

Industry sources said Atlantic 
Richfield 'Co. offered to sell Statoil 
the Arco chain erf gasoline stations 
in the United States this year but 
that Statofl rq'ected the offer as too 
large. 

The Oslo government in June 
approved (he purchase of Esso's 
service stations in Sweden. 

Statoil hopes to raise the 65 tril- 
lion barrels of crude it exported to 
the United States in 1984. 

Mr. Lavik said Statoil had span 
50 billion kroner cm exploration 
since 1972. It has exploration and 
production projects m Denmark, 
China, Tnnwinw and T hailand, and 
is seeking to break into exploration 
in the British sector of the North 
Sea. 

Mr. Lavik said Statoil had held 
talks with Canadian authorities 
about exploration in the North 
American Arctic area. 


Dollar uniwt pw*n, can* 

Bk Engl IndW — 14370 145.70 — 056% 

Cold 

London DJn.fix 5 317.75 313^5 +1J^ft 
tunsuascax nr cataskStna Jana Orel 


Union Leader Says Renault 
To Lend AMC $175 Million 


Compiled by Ow Sufi From Dvpattha 

PARIS — A union leader said 
Friday that Renault, France’s 
state-owned auto company, will 
lend $175 million to its U.S. affili- 
ate, American Motors Crap. 

Amiri Sainjon, secretary of the 
metalworkers branch of the Cam- 
mimisl-Ied Confederation Gfcnfcr- 
ale du Travail said in a prepared 
statement that Renault’s board ap- 
proved the plan last Tuesday and 
that the decision was made in 
agreement “with the highest state 
authorities.” 

A spokesman for AMC in De- 
troit said the company knew noth- 
ing of the planned aid. A Renault 
spokesman declined to comment 
on Mr. Sainjon's statement. 

Mr. Sainjon said it would be 
“unacceptable” for Renault to in- 
vest in unprofitable ventures 
abroad to the detriment of its do- 
mestic operations- He said the 
company had estimated that AMC, 
ir. which Renault has a 46-*wmt 


stake, would lose 5100 minion this 
year and the same in 1986. 

"This strategy may 
threaten Renault’s future,”^ said. 

Georges Besse, an industrialist, 
was brought in to head Renault this 
year to tty to turn it around from 
1984 losses of IZ5 trillion francs 
(about $1 J billion). The company 
plans to malrg cuts that will rapef 
the loss of about 20.000 jobs 


sdl off subsidiaries to concentrate 
on car manufacture. 

Renault has ffcrffpwt to com- 
ment on its plans for AMC, al- 
though Mr. Besse has reaffirmed 
Renault’s mteni to keep its stake in 
the UiL automaker. AMC is oir- 
renily engagpri in union bargaining 
and hasthreatened to dose its Ke- 
nosha, Wisconsin, plant, which 
makes Renault Alliance and En- 
core models. 

AMChad aS15-nriDioBpiofit in 
1984, compared with a 5258-mH- 
lum loss in 1983, and a loss of S29 
nrillion in the first quarter of this 
year 


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Today, IBJ in- 
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Phone: 214-1111 Wat J22325 

YOUR RESOURCEFUL BANK 






Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNK MONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 



\fyfeekly International Bond Prices 

provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.: 01-423-1277. 

Prices mav vary according to market conditions and other factors. 


RECENT ISSUES 


Ami Security 

MMC RkMlaWCo 
ecu g SumtRm Rnanca Asia 

• 8m IS! Sac Ceatr Nudcalra 

5300 NewZHhnd 
*IK HnZcataod 
1H0 EsfflmEMdtrSwuHv 

Sin Port Motor Croon Cc 

sno Concalnc 
sun QueeMomi 

■ cgSB Gntslar Financial Ca 

SIDS Export-import Bonk 
acuU Mitsui T(M Pin (Mil 
SiB Eiedrtclte France 

■ JS WwenCrtdllBank 
■ dm ii ftolovita 

vim New Brunswick Provkic 
>M Qantos Alrravi 
srOB Aluminum Co Canoda 
, ecu to DrattnarRnana 
Jig onnraHolYnmcrH*i 
SIM Sonot Finance 
SIM TmetoCnrp 

• sics Conodton PocHlc 

8m W South Ahica Tronmr 

s 150 vehe 

•'SS3S 

coin Sumitomo Cera rattan 
SIB Dal-ldil Konovo Flnon 
SMO Export Devetoa Carp 


Sir/ 

Con* UWRT. MU Pr. YWd 
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9 *2?“w s i Mft bft mi 


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MWU IBM SOI 
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7ft*V5Jun i HU 99V: m 
Blh^TJOa 0 100 99tt9J2 

HSU % TO Jui 1 IBM WViWSB 

S 99ft 91ft HOT 


STRAIGHT BONDS 

All Currencies Except DM 


Ami Security 


nua — 

Middle Am 
P rice Mol Utr Cut 


AUSTRALIA 


350 Amtralla 
5120 AuVroHo 
5100 Australia 
*15000 Auttrnlla 
550 Australia 
3US Australia 
*15000 Australia 
sno Australia 

SUM Aintrtfki 
115 AushcAa 
3100 Australia 

s loo Australia 
SB Atom AusiraHa 
SB Alcoa Of Australia 
39 Alcoa U Australia 
i»s Alcoa Of Australia 
is Alcoa 01 Australia 
•ca® Austro New ZraksidBk 
375 AiotraUra Ind Dev CB 
3 too AiKtndm Ind Orv Co 
540 Austro! km Ml nl Smelt 
330 Australia! r 
I MO Auitrallan l„ 

113 AntrasMtas 
SB Broken Hill Ptv 
SIM Proven HK Ptv 
s mo Broken HID Pt* 

$70 Broken mil Ptv 
SB Comakn Invest Euraoo 
SB Cornaku Invest Eorno* 

525 Comakn Limited „ 

SIM Co m monweal tn Bk Auetr IWTOHav 


320 HilWtAtl 

120 Hanenle* Iron Fin 
323 Hanasiev Iron Pin 
S 20 K Mart Finance 
325 Mauni Ih FMatce 
3 100 Mnmt In Fima 
39 Nailonai AustrBotk 
00153 Primary Industry Bank 
ecu a Primer* industry Barit 
3140 Qontoi Airways 
3 ISO Queensland 
IW Queensland 
330 Queensland Alumina 
32S Queensland Alumina 
SB Rural liKkHtrtoS Bank 
3100 State Bk New SWatos 
129 Tnl Overseas Ftngnco 
3 19 Troasurv New 5 WDtra 

SIEI Victor la PuCflcAutno 
59 western Mining Corp 
SB Western Mtalna Cora 
3105 Wastpoc Banking Co 
ecu® wkipoc Banking Co 
3 10C Westpac Ind Finance 


MW Jill 9* MO 314 
BftWOd W1 !Jt 356 
lift TOOd IB 9.H 1171 

M 71 Aug 104 7A5 5.17 

M-910d m 928 940 897 
S3, 77 Sea 95V, 4.17 IJ7 344 
BftTOOd U5V3 740 319 

It 75 MOV H2V| 1157 1072 

llftVSOd 10M 1054 HLB7 
m 7» Jot ssv; tin tui nut 
lift TOOd WTft MOT 1001 
Ilk, 70 Mo* IB3VD 1090 1093 

IfcWAnr 93 1042 9.14 

n njan mw hot hjbz 

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nW-flAur 111 1171 till 

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11 74 Mar HBtt 172 1249 

UW 77 Aar U4 U49 1245 

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Bta 71 Jut 92 12WQL0011.il 

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9 74 MOV ICO 094 193 9J» 
77 No* 9} 114713.11 IW 


W44 ».I5 TJ7 fjn 
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in, 77 Jut 105W 1041 

IlHiTOApr 151 1095 

9k, 72 APT lBIW 942 941 

till 73 Jut WTO 941 1027 

lTOWJul 9M 1044 1044 

114k 79 Dec UK 1041 11477 

1M75AUQ 97V, 1070 1044 

TO 76 Mm 9TO 9.17 9.17 044 
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12 71 Feb 1m 1142 Uj£ 

inuTajun 1829. 1044 1147 

9 17 Aug 97W 1024 1127 923 
113k TO MOV 1BTO 1040 1120 

11WT2AIM- IHVj 1336 1123 

15W 78 Dec TOW 1444 1490 

V 71 Od B8V> 1U5 1145 HI7 
171k 72 Jan TO 1237 1242 

TO -W Nov I0B3_ i.it 945 

it WMay l DOW 1045 HOT 


AUSTRIA 


3150 Austria 
130 Austria 
f ton Austria 
ISO Austria 
KulRO Austria 
1209 Austria 
yioma Austria 
H«a Austrian Control Bank 
aiS41 Austrian Control Bank 
3100 Austrian Control Bonk 
3175 Ausirien Central Bank 
in Aintrtai Control Book 
iC. Austrian Control Bank 
IB Austrian Control Bank 
SM Crnflianstatt-Bankwer 
SL49 Crrtitamtott-flan X/w 
3lfti Crsdilansiaii-BaiUMr 
I >5 CrodltanstTOFBankver 
3100 Crsdilansiait-Baiikver 
343 Dcnaukrgttvwke Ag 
ISO Canassen Zontralbank 
SUB BenossenZenmmank 
19 Ijlroe Bank Sanriumm 
::i cure.- Bun* sccrkasson 
CM 75 Qtnu Bank Soarkasssn 
Knit Qlrai Bonk Sparkasson 
321 FmlscarfcatM 
330 TaiwnautatMl*! Ag 
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34T Vtanna 


1M7I Mar 11233 996 1171 

MTOAaa 94W 1016 1*26 926 
11TO 107| 1240 

BTO 1145 12J1 VJ5 


133t17jul 
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ITU 71 Jan TO 1143 
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12 TO Doc 7071, M4J 
IB*. 75 Jun 1DTO WJ3 
14 71 Jut 110 HUM 
ll'UTOJul ICOVy 11.10 
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9'i77Mar 
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SB? 

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cnlW Cemralsoamo-Kammon lIlkTSFBB TOB 1126 

BELGIUM 

ecu 55 Eurwaan Banking Eta 
SIM uMtftnonc* 
era 75 Kradimank lltma 
II 125 Sul mov 


<43 941 063 
9.77 H9S 7£J 
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11.15 
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13 73 Jan 
91i77 Apr 


EK .077 

10B4* 11J9 
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TcJ 

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lots 


Amt Seoul rr 

340 New BranswlcBiE Mart 
575 NewBnirawio: Etactrl 
$75 New SrunSwiCk ElKtri 
575 rww Brumurfti. Prartnc 
cnJTS New Brunswick PmkK 
cn$75 New Bnmswldi Prartnc 
riCODO New Bnuwwkk Prartnc 
524 NAwtauneaBd L3b Hvdr 
375 Newfoundland UffiH ra- 
sas NewtoontUMMunldpa 
rasa Newtwndkml Province 
la Newteundlaid Province 
350 Newtounoirad Prnvlnn 
540 Newfouneknt Province 
SU Newfoundland Provlncs 
350 Mowfaundtand Province 
175 Newtaundtaat Province 
<75 Nowtaundkmd Province 
IS Nowlmj-sasni Province 
ariM Ngrcen Enargv Res 
5100 Nava An AMano Coro 
550 Nova Scnita Power 
raSU Nora Scalta Power 
175 Nava Scoria Pravlna 
$75 No«a5«aHaProrlncs 
sss Kora Santa Province 
5100 Nova Seoflo Province 
$75 Neva Scutio Province 
raSHO Nava Sartta Pravlnca 
3 NO Nora Sadia Province 
3100 Ontario Hydra 
3T2S Onto-laHvaro 
3150 Ontario Hrtsre 
3200 Ontario Hydro 
5250 Ontario Hydro 
3200 Ontario Hydra 
Sin Ontario Hyflro 
3150 Ontario Hydro Aug 
3200 Ontario Hvdra Nov 
3150 OnfortoHvdro 
s tea onto-to Hydro 
3200 Ontario HvOro 
$25 Ontario Kydro-ElKtr 
325 ottawa-Carietan 
ral» Ottawo-Corletan 
34 OsaswaCjtrtsfwi 
era 65 Poncanodkm PotroHtum 
ert SO Panoanadlan PdfnWnn 
ISO Pslysar 
cnS25 Quebec City 
era 25 QuaMcCItV 
c« 15 QuabecCtty 
cnS 15 QuabecCtty 
SUM Qoobtc Hydro 
OHM Quebec Hydra Mar 
arise Ouvbec Hydra May 
01175 QuatMc Hydro 
SIM QiMbK Hydro 
01*60 QuabacHyika 
3 1D0 Quebec Hydro 
oriK Quebec Hydro 
11$ Quebec Hydro-Electric 
330 Quebec Hydra-E Metric 
3125 Quebec Hydro-Eledrlc 
IB Ouibec Hydro-E Metric 
s» Quebec Hvdro-Eteclrlc 
SIM Quebec Hydro-Electric 
SIM QiMbee Hydro- Electric 
3125 Quetwc Hydro-El rndric 
550 Quebec Hymn-Electric 
ots 100 Quebec Hydro-EMctrle 
STS Quebec Hydro-Electric 
cnS SO Quebec Province 
IX Quebec Province 
□riSD Quebec Pro* Into 
orS X Quebec Provtnco 
SID Quebec Province 
erase Ouebac Province 
oris Quebec Province 
OtJ5D Quebec Province 
ita Quebec Province 
319 Quebec Provkx* 

119 Quebec Province 

373 “ 

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14 Vi 79 Mar Ita tUO Ufl 
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119k 7J Jim UOta 1140 

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9 79 Feb 9t H124 9a 
I7U790CI HI 1114 1487 

S3Vb7BFA 105h IIS IU4 1210 
91k 70 Jim Wft Ull 949 
15ft TO Aun 114ft II J9 

13 71 Aar 1 ID 1048 

18 WMor 92ft IL38 
12947] Aug 10394 1L99 
talk 79 Jon 110 DJI 

TO 79 May 96ft 1022 1025 MO 
IhTIJal 97 HUS 9L79 

159* 72 Mar 114 1091 1282 

15V4 79Aug 113ft 1196 UU 

lOQWJul 109V5 1041 1054 HUH 
119471 Feb IB 1L21- T142 

15 71 Jim W 1274 376 

11*675 Fab HBft 1151 151 

1194 78 Feb USft 1150 1.14 

lft76Sea 99ft ia 158 
9 77 Aar 98 <22 Lie 

IA.79APT 113ft 1848 UB4 
11M7PDM HU HUM HUB 

IMTOMOT 101 957 1115 

1194 70560 106ft tall 1US 

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ta 71 Aw 114 1214 1199 

14 71 NOV 114 1220 1XW 

U 73AUD 119ft HOT 1257 

1294 72 Od l\\ M49 1159 

111474 Fob l» tall 1197 

81* 76 Jon <WI<JH<A3L2T 
9ft 70 Mar <3 1147 T25B WB 

nftTtOK 105 1152 1190 

m 77 Jus 1111. 12X51288024 
lift 78 Dec 106ft 14M 1179 

17ft TO Apr H594 IU1 1U2 

<*>76 Dec talk Mf 1£l 
16ft 77 Fet) IB TLO 1141 

13*4.72 Dec W 11J3 1230 

189k TlOd <8 lUt WL97 

10 TO NOV 45 not ns 

left 78 Fab ISM rut 

KHft M41 ISM 

16ft 79 MOV 106ft US 1549 

14 TUm 1B7 1Z28 1UB 

17V, 71 Od 125ft 1L33 015 

M 72 Nov M* 1244 1321 

lift TO Dec HB »A7 urn 

179k 73 Sen KS I US T2.lt 

TOTOOcr lM*k m 756 9J2 
Slk 76 Mar 99ft 10 850 129 
8ft 76 NOV JSft 947 843 

8ft 76 Nov 98ft 943 IlH 143 

8ft 79 Feb Wft HU8 H2I 859 

13 71 Feb 10414 1187 1247 

lift 72 Jim 102ft HOT IIS 

9 77 Ana 89 11J] tall 

7ft 73 Jul m-7 1137 1050 

121k 75 May IM 1U1 1149 

10 7<May 92 11.11 1087 

IW* To AW 9994 1048 1031 

15ft 77 Aar 104 HAS 1443 

18 77 Od N7 14J9 MB 

17ft 77 Nov llBft 1444 1659 

7ft 78 Jem TJft HL49 1220 8A2 

17 78 Mar IK MB 15.19 

l&HTSSao 105 M40 1553 

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l*ft 79 AW 1H 1121 an 

15ft 7* Dec 1179k 11J9 1333 

i] to nov un, nn UK 

W9T3JU1 18TO 1X7. 1341 

12 73 Jul HB 1148 1U4 

lift 7» Feb Mkft IU1 1051 1150 
12 75 Jon 114 1127 1134 

9 75 Nov 87 ILH 1182 (034 

169k TSJun 104 liflO 16.11 

I 79 See 90ft 1157 954 

14 76 Apr 1M 842 U44 

H 74 May Wft 1152 IDS 

TftTSApr 97ta M44 llil 922 

lift 71 Feb M2 HUB U27 

HlftTOMer 104ft L38 984 

lift 70 Mar 101ft IS47 HOT 

109171 Dec 969* 1138 1121 

IT* TO Jan 107 1225 1250 

9 TO F*b Oft HIM 1184 98. 

11 7* MOV 9514 10151054 1850 



— "YBHd— 

Mkfdii Ave 

K Mjt Prn Mat LtfeCurr 

KtlTTApr HBft 945 9531828 
7ft 77 Mar 91ft 083 MM 752 
7ft 77 ACT 95 1041 1121 759 

9V8dMta7 98ft TL54 950 
15ft 72 Apt U? IlH B97 U49 
UftVHBV Ml ft 1M8 TUI 
13 71 FlO US 11J0 1129 1258 

9 73 Dec <0 1183 

Wh 72 Doc 101 ai] 
lift 73 Mar 104ft 1099 
lift 74 Mar talk: HOT 
HftTiMaV 189 948 

TO 77 Mar 97 11J3 


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5 145 BalOvMNW* 

H Mo Bad Irons* kmttca 
IUB Baverlntl Fmancx/w 
538 BawInHFInancX/w 
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lift W Nov M3 972 
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3160 Deulscbo Bank . 

I3M MutxdwBankFMmce 
IM Deutodw Bank FTnance 
SIM Deutsche talk Lux W/w 
sno Deutsche Bank Lux Mi 
StaO Drrariier Finance 
ecu 70 DrasdaerFhaia 
32S GuHbonnungriiuette 
SOT KeectnJ Ftamo XAv 
S8S Haedod Flmma XJw 
149 Sdwrina Ital FkiX/w 
sm Stamens Western fm 
3350 SUmwn Western X/w 
in iMo inti Finmee tvw 
3150 VOHawownOyerSBai 

ecu ID WaflbFHeece 

suo wnttaFtaaice 

ecu a Wntti Finance 


TOftTJJUl Wft 941 
TUVFoD 92ft 988 
lift 7900 189 ta51 
in 71 May M3 M.I4 
184,7900 Wft ILN 
lift 78 Jan 182 1088 
11 71 MO loon lots 
7 18 Jim 111 U2 
7 78 Jun 91ft tail 
SU 73 Mar HE 7* 
IU73MDV 88ft HOT 
lift 77 Od HBft Wifi 

UUTIAuu 117 KUO 
Oft 79 Sen 110 HOT 
61k 71 Mm 137ft 87 
6U 71 MW IS ta 
11 70 APT H3ft HB2 
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73,78 Fib 
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HHbTi Jem 

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98ft 1259 047 9.M 
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57ft 1824 9LM 
97 954 7.99 

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106ft 721 


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SM Icefond 

sis Krioad 

SH Icekml 

sa Icetond 


* 25 Ireland 
- ISO Iretand 
ecu 20 Ireland 


SUIM Jan 99ft 951 981 839 

8 77 Feb 94ft IUI 1152 847 

9 77 Feb Wft 1U9Q43 »23 

12ft 77 Dec 101 0510461242 


IRELAND 

su, 7< Feb 
lift TO Apr 

lift 75 Jan 


<2 1189 1251 857 

w> ii.es 1143 

H4 957 984 


ITALY 


eca 2H Italy 

3M Canwria Dl Cmlta 

ecu 71 Credito ItoHano 
IS Eni Errte Naz Idrnar 
>50 Bnl EnteNaz Idracor 
$30 EMEntfHaxIdnxnr 
1» ErU Enle Max lik-Dcar 
325 FerTDvtoDeilo Staid 
315 OHvetfl inti (TinJ 
S» Turin Cbv 


TO 79 Apr m 9 25 921 

TftTOJw M 1899 028 85 
9ft 72 Mav HBft 957 9JO 
6ft 77 Am 93 1U4I231 757 

7 78 Jon BSft 114I14J3 751 
WTBJun 94ft 854 1844 7.14 
4ft 78 No* 94ft 849 Ills 7.M 
■U 74 Feb <8 032 019 893 

9ft 75 Now ta 1154 1151 <40 
9 71 MOV Oft 1053 1141 <53 


JAPAN 


HR Bank a Tawo Curacao 
S 125 Baik Qt Tatrn Curacao 

I HD Bank Ot Tokyo Curacao 
a»4l Bank 01 Tabya Curaaw 

3 HO Baik Of Tokyo Curacao 
ecu 59 Bank Dl Tokyo Curacoa 
SUB Bonk 01 Tokyo Curaam 

I I BO Bank Of Tokyo Curasao 
in Garin Computer W/w 
380 CorioComgutorX/w 
1JB Chubu EJKirle Power 
ita anisDko Electr Pew 
S25 Curacao Tekvn Holdlao 
SUO DaMcMKangyaBank 
SMO DaUcM Kongys Phan 

S7S EwwrMmpqrt Bank 
sun ExsorUmaort Bank 
IM Fall toil FTnonce Hk 
330 PulBajKiLMW/er 
SM Fuilkura LWXAv 


UftV95en TTOft T854 
11 TOApr 101ft 1149 
lift 70 DSC HBft 1053 
10ft 71 Feb U5ft <55 
EBbTIJim 112 1080 
lift 71 Nov TOM 954 
lift 73 Jan Ml ft 1124 
lift 75 Jul ISM HU4 
5ft 7* Mar 14Bft U1 
5ft 79 Mar 85ft 1070 
□V, 71 AM H7ft 1146 
T3ft19 Aug Italy WO 


BftTSDsc 
lift TO Oct 
lift TO Jut 
13ft 71 Jim 
13ft 75 Jim .. 
lOftTOMcnr Ml 
7ft 79 Mav <1 


1353 

tall 

1128 

1821 

1117 

H29 

1144 

1187 

All 

185 

1223 

1U3 


89ft 1153 1382 <44 
197ft 1*31 11. ^ 

taft IS5D 1043 

1U 981 1182 

99ft HO 1048 

1059 1877 

037 75 


7ft 79 MOV 91 1070 


182 


HIGHEST YIELDS- 


3 HO Saikaiciwwgn Province 
312S Saikahhewan Province 
3100 Saritaldwmm Pravtme 
■ Province 
iProviner 


$125 SnuromCaWrw 
erase Sean Acceoarat 
Slot Stull Conoda 
$125 StieS Canada 
cm 75 Shell Canada 
$40 Slmpwme-Siari Acaml 
cn$ 40 Slmnsoni-Searo Accept 
era so Soc Habitation Quebec 
enSH socHvnaBcaueProean 
I7S SuMarlnc 
ad 25 TetmauH Canada 
$25 Toraam 

51 DO Taranta-Damlnlan Bank 
ISO TurontaOcvnlnian Bank 
ensa TnmUo-Oamlnlan Bank 
ariM Toronto-Munldoailrv 
aria Trontotta utBirie5 
oriUB TrwMlMUmitfH 
520 Tronsamodo Ploetlnej 
5T3 Troracanudo PIctHilnes 
I IM Traracanada Plprilrws 
5101 Tro--ecarnda PlDcHon 
cn$ S3 TruecOrp 
era 30 union Cornua Cenoda 
era SO union Carbide Canada 
crass vimeouver 
s la wmmoeaCTtv 
54) Wkintpeg city 
Sit wmntMgCiry 
artS Wtomtaeg City 
cn$40 hamCanada 


12ft78Nav 103ft 11.17 
nv,79Jul MTft 1181 
I7ft 71 Dec IB 1380 
IftTiSeo 99ft 9.1* 
14ft 71 Nov 117ft 1151 
14 WMor 114ft 1037 
lift 79 Nov lOSft HOT 
lltft 70 Mar 101ft 1023 
HFhTONtar HBft 1882 
U 72 Aw 1191b tall 
12ft 79 Od Hi 1147 
7 73 MOV IH 111 
71 Aug 110ft 1150 
15ft 71 Sep 11416 1230 
Wft TO May ltlft 1157 
lftTOJul IH 1124 
7ft 71 Nov 115ft 1157 
16ft 79 Aar 111 1121 
lWTIJaa IE 1151 
17Vi 74 Dec 187 1183 

1249 71 Nov W 1123 


10 74 Jun 
5ft 76 Jim 
3ft 74 AOT 
12ft 7< Apr 


12.17 

1188 

1443 

859 

1441 

1233 

hi: 

IBS 

W3I 

1259 

1254 

*2S 

1287 

079 

1184 

1125 

15.15 

1553 

nm 

1424 

1181 


to Average life Below 5 Years 


SB Cotombla N1U 

1» Brazil lft77DaC 

$ IS wvdFoodi 074 Capita wtohov 

$15 Venaiueian Tetaphano BU 77 Dec 

325 Gu» Internaltaicl BVl TlMcr 

IB Venezuela W 72 Oct 

340 Amanria Han XA* W77Jut 

330 BaucnetOeGlIlaM S TO Dec 

ISO Enl EnteNaz Idracor 7 78 Jan 

MM Bass Charrington 7ft77Aug 

IflB Bat Inti Flnaice 7ft 7J Nov 

ad 31 Union Carbide Caaada 9ft 74 Mar 

nn ttanoun mamor 

NIB BajITneuatianttca 7ft 77 MOV 


lift 1744 2381111: 

14 1551 2031 959 

72 1745 1942 799 

Wft M2* 1927 926 

15 144*1*75 895 

B 1115 ILH 1094 
91ft 1133 1542 7JB 
12ft 1254 1541 920 
88ft 1349 ILH 791 
90 1535 1542 833 

»ft 1283 1420 131 
96ft 1*33 1*35 13.18 
91ft 1183 MB 782 
91ft 1391 UO. 123 


-HIGHEST YIELDS- 


talk 1200 HOT tall 


10W 980 
IK 1029 
1B4 18*1 


IK* 79 NOV HI 
13 *94 Oct 187ft 
!> 79 Fob 111U 


13k, TO Dec taro 11.41 
5" 77 Jan 91ft 1X02 
ITOTOOct M9 U03 
14 79 Dec 104 1341 

16 72 MOr 111ft 1136 
13 7* Od TOW 1129 
TO 7> May 
11 79 Jan 
13 TOApr 

17 76 Oct 

DU, 77 Mav 

IWTOJun 
1ZU 715*0 
13 78 Sop 


1*44 

IU0 

1191 

1225 

1289 

1125 


to Average life Above 5 Yean 



IB HudmBov 
its Noraae KowmmtMnk 
SUM Eci Earn Coal L Sttri 
SB two at* 
iso Iceland 

375 Etb Eirap Invait Bank 
123 CaraoddaNO-Batnunt 
IB Macmillan Blapdri 
SM Mo an M an BloedB 
113 NattwcMd tnvHakSn 
oils Canadian UHIMm 
120 Cntcaro o/i Ftaonce 
in Eft Einwimwt Bank 
ezri .4 Royal Bar* OtCCnada 


r* 3 i£ p— “ 

wtowSv u 

17H TO Dec HI 
BHTODk BSft 
9 72 Oct ,86ft 
9 72 Fib 14ft 
TO TO Mar Hft 1281 1234 
Wft 79 Aug H3 1342 063 


iauS3£ 

U» 1249 10421 
Z5B 1384 1242 

[SJSE3H 

205 1221 KW 


DENMARK 


CANADA 


37B Canada 
*500 Canada 

65«J Canada 
i» AHiiM-pncp 
IM Air Canada 

SB Aluminum Co 0X1000 
3109 Aluminum Ca Canada 
$61 Ames Inti 
era 25 Avca Financial Canada 


eniM Avca Financial t 
train Bank Di Brit CntimiMa 

SIM Bank (X Montrool 

3100 Bank 01 Maiiraal 
ori7j Bank Ol Man treat 
SIM Bank Oi MarTriBl 
$25 Bant Ci Nava Scalta 
3100 Bank Oi Nova Seafla 
OriM BankmwH Really 
too BeiiCmria 
cm 61 BeQCaoaca 
IWO Ball Canada 
craioo Bril Canada 
era 13 Bail Canada 
323 Brtucan Inil 
taw BrBCokimbia Hydro 
3150 Brit Columbia Hydro 
I HO Bril Columbia Hydra 
130 Srll Caiunftta Hydro 
3159 Brit Columbia Mvdra 
3300 BrH CHwnMa Hydro 
356 Brit Cokflibla Muddp 

emu Si It CcJumnla Munich) 
ariM Brit Columbia Munkta 
013125 Bril Columbia Prorinc 
oil 100 Bri 1 . Columbia Pmrtnc 
ori 100 Bril Columbia Provlnc 
ens 125 3rii Columbia Provlnc 
ariM Bril CriumWa Telepha 
cram Srit Cdumbia Triasia 

317S Cancdalr 
STS Canadian liaDerkzl Bk 
3 HO Canadian Himrialfik 
eras Canadian I moor UBk 
ari 75 Canadian Inwerlal Bk 
cnSW Canadian Imperial Bk 
STS CanadtaA Imcarlal Bk 
Sim Canadian imperial Bk 
IS Canadian mm Rullm* 
craw Caiadtcm NoJI Railway 
5K4 CanacHan Nall Rafiwav 
ori 10) Canadian Natl Raihny 
ori IfO Canadian Non RaUwav 
ori 6* Cmadhn Ocdd Patnrt 
01340 Canoafcui PocHlc 
oriSO Cancdkm PocHlc 
350 Canadian Padflc 
ail 75 CanatSanPodne 
$75 Cmidkei PocHlc 
STS Canadian PociRC 
SMO Conodkei PocHlc 
crass COnadtan UIIUHas 
craa Canadian unniH 
SB Caaadtan Wheal Board 
ariM amniw CruPI Can 
Ori 60 Chrysler CnxBI Can 
craw conwHdaM-Banxm 
IM ConjoHdoied^aiiwni 
325 GmsaUdatoiFBaflmf 
ariM CrnBI Fane Fmnc-Cim 
SB Dame Petroleum 
350 Dame Petroleum 
$25 Dominion Bridge 
565 Du Port Ganada 
era 9 E dm o nto n CM* 

SB Eldanxfo Nucfear 
■ 150 Eiporl Develop Caro 
SMO Export Deveiae Carp 
SBO Export Davakp Cmo 
s too Export Develop Caro 
$125 Export Develo p Corp 
119 Exsarl Davriop Corn 
1100 Export DevriW Corp 
era iso Emmrt Develop Core 
SUO Export Develop Carp 
1 100 Export Doveteo Cara 
ari7S Fora Credtl Carp 
enSB F«zn CrodH Caro 
$75 Farm Credit Cm 

9 SB Fester Builness DM Bk 
ori >00 Feder Business Dev Bk 
CnS 9 Fedpr BminoSS Dev Bk 
ori 40 Fmter Buslnras Drit Bk 
ori 26 Ford Motor CrodH Cut 
eras Goz Metroprinmn 
ori TO CmMrireaofltoUi 
ori 59 CazMelroeoHtaW 
(3TJH) General MhlCDAcOWl 
ariM General Motors Accent 
OUTS General Moms Acne* 
ariM General Motors Accmv 

ariM Cenenrt Motors Accenl 

atlM Generoi Motors Acted 

SB G raste r 
$75 Gmwft»_ 

Ori 75 G«ro*» Financial Co 

tin Gad Conte 

IB Hiram Wnlker HoUBAU 
SB Hiram WafkirHoUDOS 
$75 Hiram Wofker Htadfam 
IS Home 00 
ori«0 Hudsons Bov 
aiSW Hudson Bay 
ari« HbdsdM Bov 
crass HtxtamsBoy 
ITS HudmiBav 
$9 HtxfeansBn 
SB I muses 
SUO Inca 

crib mtmrovta Pteo Uw 
cnl!S Intt Hamster CradH 
SB itaCanadlaiFlnaacx 
aria Im C onadtan Floancs 
ori 30 Laval Cttv 
ori 20 LovdCftY 
ori 35 Uftkm 
SB MaanBln BlosM 
SB MocmOkpi Biaedal 
J7J Manttabb PfWlnCT 
SWO Manitoba Pronina 
3125 MonHoba Province 
SUB Manitoba Province 
SUN Manitoba Province 
ori 3$ Maritime Tell Tel 
its KkmovFcrmHcn Ned 
SS7 Montreal CHy 
01540 Montreal aty . 

aria Montreal city 
Sta Montreal CHy 
ori 50 Montreal Qlv 
b 4W Montreal Qlr 
HUB MoaHTdlCny 


UftHTjun 

loft 78 DO 

U'iTOMOV 

<1779 Apr 
if. 75 Jim 
lift 70 Jun 
lift. Td Mav 
» No* 

7 MOV 


14b 74 

Hill 


14b 71 Dec 
'PiTOJun 
13ft 77 JUI 

iwrasw 

86,114 JiU 

10*. 74 Od 


106 

18 

Hife i: 

z-y 

99b 115 
107 11.19 

TOU *223 
»<b tira 
<61.- 12fl< 
May lUft <30 
May ,07ft ^<J| 

112 13J9 

HBft <J 
tcaft <9f 
nn b rut 

W*. L99 

Wft 1IJD 

1144 



7ft 

14 W Jun 
12b 77 Mar HB 
8k. 77 Oct 97 <351 

10V. 73 Mar HBft <99 
12ft 70 Jlrt HBft <92 
liriTaOd Ita 1X69 
Wft 79 Mm 112ft 1041 
ISbTOJUl 129 111" 

lift 7] OCt 106 10 



TTh 71 NOV 104ft 11.14 
n 73 Dec WTft 1149 
17V.785W 107 1*29 


12ft 79 Nov 107ft 
UbTlJu! 106ft aa 

14 77 MV I0TO <3* 

lift 77 Jim 107ft 1188 

15t 79JOO HBft 1U0 

12ft 79 May IDS 1147 

11 TO MOV WV) 1084 

14*. 71 OCt 116 1284 

21b 76 Nov 99ft 831 
IQ 77 Mar 97ft 10J4 
Wft TO DOC in 1L» 

lift 71 Jun 100b 11-37 

lJCTSAur 1U ll/a 

12ft TV Mar HDb 1186 

17ft 77 NOV «9 12J9 

WftWApr IP 1383 

9ft 79 Mav 97 HJ2 1034 taOS 
11 ft TO MOV HQft 1I.M 11-54 

UftTOOa 107ft 1055 1143 

Wft TO Jun ll«k 122S 

10ft 73 Jim HBft 1065 1BJD 

17 77AUP 1IB 1X44 153. 

17 TO Dec 115ft MI4 1US 1*72 

lib 70 Dec Mlft 1159 1IOT 

14 TO OCt 106 1253 1321 

1 2ft TO Mur 103 1185 1226 

17V. 77 Fed 102 ,557 1SPI 

TTY, 18 NOV 110ft 1UI 1286 1584 

9 TO Oct lift 11851X421040 

17ft 79 Apr 1 12ft 1X76 15J3 

13ft 77 May XU >239 13.11 

10 TO Jul 90ft 11361X18 1185 


74 Jun soft 103O 
Oft TO Feo 101ft 1255 
13ft 79 Aug 106ft 1146 
Oft 76 Mar nro U4 
m 74 Jan HBft U5 
T3Vk770cf Wlft <84 
lift 77 NOV 104ft 946 
18*4 78 Jan no <J7 
H 78 Mar HUM 934 
lift 79 Feb 102ft 1122 
12 KNev HBft taO 
UW 79 Dee HBft 1181 
TOftTtMay 112ft 933 
10 TOJal 99ft KL23 
12V. 70 Sep U5ft 1084 
12ft TO Mur 104ft IL20 
lift 73 Oct 104ft 1040 


12ft 75 Nov 
1714 740a 
12ft 77 Sw 
lift to Jul 
BH77MOV 

iro-woct 

Wft 72 Dec 104ft 1344 
13ft 74 Od 1BTO 15.13 
Oft 74 F0b “ ■— 
15ft 76 Jon 
16 77 JM 
13 77 Od 
He 78 Od 
lift 79 Feb 
H KJuB 
Oft 79 DO 
lift TSJun 
IATOAO- 


9.14 
1206 
1191 
1283 
<45 
1244 
113* 
HL54 
9.95 
in be 
1,37 
1144 
1037 
HU9 
1184 
1140 
1092 
1X13 
UJ2 
1288 
1144 
Ml 
1541 
U88 
IXP 

98ft 1X03 1280 944 
HOft 11.91 1534 

103 1150 1553 

Wlft 1499 17u3 

97ft HUS 1091 1080 


101 9.13 

105V] 1X17 
HOft tail 
HBft 1134 
<SU 939 
I TOft 1*23 


107 1381 

95ft 1147 

H9 1444 
talk 1X03 
_ .. HMk tXM 
140.76 Aar 101ft 1280 


14 74 Jun 104 092 

U WMor 114 11.10 

9ft74JM 99ft U106 HUS 9JS 
II 77 Nov 184 1*45 l&B 

WftTVAor 95ft 11.92 tail HOT 
17 79 MOV W7 M45 1589 

lift 79 JlH nab 1157 1X14 

lift 70 Jun 95ft 1177 1201 

10 TIM (7ft 124)13281141 
Uft 79 Jtal Wft 1199 1*53 

4 TO Dec 87 1181 1IOT 

1211 73 MOT W 1143 11.71 

Oft 14 APT 97ft 13.11 UII MB 
<ft 74MOV no 94] 9B 
10 74 AW 91ft 11J3 1,91 llta 
lift 71 Sep Wft in iin 
M TO Ju< 97 1047 1U1 

Oft 70 Dec 183 1148 1X14 

9 TO Ft® lift HB 1338 tatf 

»7S m 86ft wn 1LM «i9 


$20 Dramork 
H 103 Denmark 
3I00 Denmark X7w 
I7J Denmark 
Sin Denmark 
ens 100 Denmark 
SIS Denmark 
3100 Denmark 
$ too Denmark 
SUO Denmark 
IM Donmort 
ecu 75 Denmark 
$100 Denmark 
3100 Denmark 
! loo Denmark 
SICS Denmark 
v 2Q0W Denmark 
two Denmark 
3 250 Denmark 
nk/250 Denmark 
3100 Pemiartt 
visas Denmark 
S1W Denmark 
3 15 Cartsbero-Tubarg 
SIS CnpenhagenCHv 
IIS Caaenlteacn Cttv 
$25 Copenhagen Dtv 
$15 Coaraliaacn County Aul 
315 Copontogen TrtapnaiM 
310 Copenhagen TciMtaone 
312 Mortgage Bora Denmark 
$25 Martoagc Bank Denmark 
y locoo Morruoae Bora Denmark. 

SB MorTgagn Bank Denmark 13 
eeuifl PrhrattMnken 
oaTS Prhmtfaanken 




Tftl 


981 981 9J5 

- 1LW11B 781 

1M7AH HB NU2 1X79 
10ft TOApr tab II J! 108* 
lib 79 Mar 101» mas 1184 
11 KOa IDSb I1J4 TU5 
1ft 70 Jan V IDAS 1186 L43 


101k 70 Mar W2 HOT 
lift TOApr 1E4 1174 

IlftTOMay Wlft 1187 
Ilk. TO Jun M3 MM 
Wft TO Mar HMft 431 
II 71 Mar lDlft 1ILS7 
11 TO Mar 109b HOT 
14 TO Jul IHft 1,80 
13b TO Sen ,10ft 1082 
6ft TO Jw 98ft 78* 
13 72 Jon 101ft 1241 
12b TO Fee lllft 1X37 
9VyT9A*or <74* <94 
tl Vi TO Apr 102V. HJ9 
BV. TO Mav MS 789 
12b 7] Dec HBft 1LM 


17 7*D«e 115ft 1*141X55 
W 73 Mar «ft llii 1149 Ita 
13 71 Jut HBft 1148 1L32 tL?1 
9 TOFxb 91ft 1084 ILH 981 

^ I —HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS— 

*79 Norttinn Indiana Publ 17b 71 Oct 10316 1581 
S7S PgmnPgtraleMMaxlc TTftHNav W5 QJN 
SS4 Brtt CalumBla Munldp 17 75 Oct 103ft IM 
sib cm** service 04 17 71 sep tab i&h 

Sin Maxico lift 77 Jul I12ft 1*08 

$90 Corn Product! Coe <6* 76 Sec n» U42 
375 Tranxcanada Pipeline* 17ft HOC 109 1*03 
*« Cud Statu O/l Final 17ft 71 act nft 1X99 
*73 GeitHor I7ft TWOct M9 1446 

ori 60 GeneruMatan Accept II 77 Od teivo 1699 
oow HutboniBav 11 77Nov 104 1*44 

ari« Cmqo M aNd-Baltnirol 171*771% IIS 15J7 
ori 100 FMfer BuNaeu Dev Bk 17ft 74 Od HBft 12JE 
orilO Quetwc Province tl 17 Dd H» M89 


ill* 

1143 

11JD 

1141 

tail 

1141 

1190 

1287 

1189 

487 

1181 

1151 

9J2 

1185 

78k 

1181 


i£3 

1*41 

1LB 

1*21 

U.Q 

1*04 

I7J1 

1*91 

1*91 

iiS 


OftTlAar 9fft Ml M4 839 
< -asoct lOOb 7J4 tS 

i BNb <9 LB 154 486 
4ft 22 Apr 95 983 10J6 684 

7ft 77 Fob 97 9J7 1044 789 

(ft 74 Fib 99b 989 9M *54 
4ft 76 Apr H <83 982 *» 

6b 76 Jan lift 114 041 *31 
7ft TO Jan 071k 1059 US L57 
" 73 Mav 90 7JS 7.U 

.. 73 Jan 110 NOT tun 

lib TOM 106ft <80 US* 

10 73 May Wlft 988 985 

FINLAND 


1 IDO Fbttamf 
374 Finland 
$>00 Finland 
ISO Finland 
nkr20Q Ffthmd 
v 15000 Finland 
v 150CD Finland 

350 Finland 
$73 Flnkxid 
S5D Ense-Cutnrt, 

115 Final ih Export Crodll 
350 Fkmhh Export Credit 
$75 Fkaibn Expert CrodH 
SWO Finn hh Exporter X/w 
3 IS Ftantai Munidpa Loan 
$15 Rnnhh MunJdoa Loon 
IIS HoMnklCIIV 
3 te me Mtge Bonk Ftetand 
$25 hiduitn Funo-Flnland 
115 Mcrtoooc Bon* Flntaod 
ns Mortgage Bank Fintend 


9ft 76 Mur 100b 980 948 

15b 77 Apr 106b 984 1489 

lift 78 Jon ltUft 9X1 11.11 

ill* 78 See Wlft UJ5 njn 
lift 79 Jun Wlft 992 DOT 
8ft 79 Nov 103 783 113 

6ft TO Act <0 785 *89 

5b 72 Oct 88ft 1LI1 1272 989 
12b 7. Nov HBft 1070 1184 

lift TO Mar 101ft 118. IU3 
13ft 76 Apr 187 1649 1148 

Wft 7* Dec 107b 199 1X75 

12ft77Nov HBft 9.W 12H 

'2b 79 Nov Wtn IL77 1197 
8ui77Mar <5ft 1122 1341 184 
BftWFeb «ft Tin 1124 987 
8ft 74 Nov Wft 1110 1184 897 
8 77 Dec <2ft 1183 1295 185 
8b 87 Sep 98ft 899 9J2 138 
3ft 76 Feu tab 982 181 L56 
lift 79 Nov 188ft 1185 1181 1189 



FRANCE 



Notional i 

National f 


NalCied Auric 

NatCrodAaric 


« ffi££5r E tS^ 
3 *>m SSSScSSlS 

$ too Calm Franc Manana 
I7S Calm No, Autoroutos 
IB Cariu NdtAutaraum 
$03 CatowNarAutoroula 
$73 Come Not Autorauiu 

M 

ilggsis 

$100 Cataa Nat Enargle 

■SH SSSISSSS 

^ MmNmTaSamim 
sub CafwNal Tdecamn 
SH Calm Nat lafocarnm 
120 Cobse Nat lelrcnmm 

Sin Cause NiP Tetofsnm 
sen 3o Catose mi Tetocomm 
ecu 75 CWsMMat TetecDmrn 
$75 CkdmNalToteMim 

cnS4S Churtonagos Franco 
$75 Cle Boncalre 
J toe Cie Fin De Purlins 

Hasfisr 


iFmeter Franca 

smHM OwSiFomw Franca 
ecu 70 CrodH Fonder Franco 
350 Credit NtfloiMi 
IW CrorilNOlUndl 
ecu SO Credtl Natknot 
ecu SO CrnSf National 

Idle Franca 



ta] 77MOT W» 947 
13ft IPS* Ulft ION 
lift 79 Nov W5ft 1110 
IIMTOJun HI 1023 
1 2ft 74 fist 110ft W 
llbTOOel 109 lia 

9 ft 71 Jun 84 135V 

10b 77 Jul in H24 

10 79JUD 95ft HOT 

11 70 Dec MSft 1088 

12ft 71 MOT W7 HOT 
nft ft MOV 113 11J0 
13*6 71 NW 102ft 118* 
15ft 72 MOT 111 1183 

17ft 77 FOB in 1089 


BriM McntrooiSdwofCounc . lno 

175 Monlreel uraan ComtlMI «2 70Nw IMft JIH 
ori 3i Notcon Beatty Cora JJJJJJFg |Uft JI.rt 
ori 50 Notional Bank Canada 16ft 78 Feb W IUM 


950 

1233 

11.11 

1040 

1U4 

TZJ6 

1181 

W3S 

1113 

1L37 

ILH 

1L9S 

11*2 

lie* 

I1J7 

12J0 

ti*2 


SUO 

^ 

1W0 EiactricHe Franc X/w 
SWO ElodrlcHe Franco 
SUB Etoctodto France 
r 20000 Elcdrldh Franca 
S12S Elodrtefle Franco 
1150 EH Aautnino 
$W Erap [franco) 

120 FrtucoKe Fetralm 
$88 GaiOc France 
nkr HB Cm Da Fnaxa 
oriTS QdilMFrance 
SITS Cat De Franco 
H 300 CacOe Franco 
140 LaftaWCaeaH 
320 LeHkftrt 
97S Mfchgim 
338 Mldwilfl 
IIS Mldwilfl 
SH UictialinOto 
325 Ptchlnev 
>22 Peueeof 
>1175 PeugroXilroen 
HIBD Pijnf A-MaiflWl 
id Port Authorities 


13ft 77 Aug Wlft 1384 1187 1383 

is 75 Ho* raob in axs <ji 

Wft 74 Mar T03 9.9J _ 

U 74 Nov MV. 92. MB 

Wft 77 Jim 105 II8< 1381 

lift 78 MOV lOOft 11.16 1141 

< TO Mar 95 1887 IL6S 947 

9ftT3J»i MTV] <J1 981 

IS 79 Mav 114 1041 1114 

lift 79 Aug IW 1SJ5 1U0 

U TO Aug nn 1239 “ 

Hft725<P 102ft 1U8 IU4 

llftWOd 100ft HOT 1241 

14b TO Mav lOTZk 3202 UXJ 

13ft TO Jaa HD 1284 tall 

n TO Jun IDb 1123 11-37 

lib TO Jul HBft 977 1154 

151*72 Jun 171ft 1123 1U4 

12ft 75 Sen 117b 1187 11.17 11 J7 
t lb 77 Dec 104ft II1B W89 IL2I 
□8576 Nov WJft 1,73 I1.TO 

< 74 May Wft <_57 us 

9b T! Sep <2 1UN 1X39 MLOS 

12b75Mav 115b 1180 1X11 

15b 9* Jun 113b 1292 U47 

15ft 77 Mar Ulft 11021X26 1X83 
91.77MV Hft 1184 1X31 MB 

UbTOJfll 102ft 1049 1091 

TW 71 MOV tatak 1097 1X10 

lift TO APT 102ft 1093 1122 

lift TO Jun 106ft 11 Jh 1196 

11 73 Feb WS 11-93 1X38 

lift <5 Fob 115b 1QO 11.1* 

llbTSJri IM H.I2 HLH 

8 7* Mar 180 7,10 789 UO 

9ft 74 jun HB 948- 981 

lb TO Oct 91 HOT 1X74 987 
17ft 7900 HOb HJ4 
13b TO Jun 113 1089 

12ft 72 Jgn 112ft 988 

9073 APT 183 9J3 

9 TO Mav 98ft 1*84 

<ft7SApr U7M 944 

13ft 75 Dec 10112 KL07 
■lift TSJun m 1185 
in to jun no n.ii 

12ft W Sep ltJ7ft 1143 
W760d 91b 971 _ 

SbTeMar tab <91 9J4 $17 
7ft 77 Jul 95b IKS 1144 787 
12ft TO Fab 107b 1185 
raw 7i mov non mi 
13W72 Jlrt 107ft HOT 
lift 73 Fab 106ft 112) 

9ft 75 W 102ft 984 

lift TO Aug IHft tail 
13ft 74 JOB M2 <85 

8ft 76 Dec tab <88 9J0 181 
lift 71 Feb IWft 191 H89 

19ft 74 DOC Wft 9 JO f» 
9ft 74 Apr 99b m 985 
IftTSMar 99ft fjB 15. 
8ft 77 Jun Hft IIS 891 
Ob 77 Od IDSb 781 noi 

13 TUbll IB 119* 12J5 

H 71 Jut IHI (188 1880 

Wft 79 Apr 111b 1089 1392 

Utt 70 MOV 101ft HUB 11JM 
lift 73 May Wlft HOT 1894 
AftTIJtai W 781 *94 

10 TSJlH 95ft 1U5 1147 

12 78 Nov M(ft MJ2 114* 

<b 75 Nov 180b IK 9931 

4 75 OCt If 9J3 9JJ 686 
IK-HJOIl HBft 981 1122 

1] 77 SCO 105 HUT 1X30 

u 79 No* in lusnau* 
12b 73 Mov 106 11JB ILSi 
lib TO Mov 108ft 11.14 11.17 

15ft 79 Apr IWft 1184 154 MI] 

9 74 MOV 99 1119 1E19 989 

<bWMor Wft 987 <81 9M 
7ft TIF 4b n HUS 1085 086 
It 74 Aug 91 1184 (US MB 

YvTtSeo tSft IIHIIJS 989 
0 75 Dec 180ft 781 749 0.94 

14 78 Aug IB 1X9813931*00 

9b 77 Feb 97ft 113J11J9 997 
TlkTOAua 95b 98} UJ? 783 
< 7> Nov <0 1125 IXri 1080 


IlH Lanp-Tennu 

$85 Utw-Term CrodH Bat* 
3125 Long-Term CrodH Bank 
3W8 Long-Terra Credit Bank 
in Long-Term Crod it Bank 
on 180 Lm-Term CrodH Bank 
sno Marubeni Cara 
SUO NUrabeaCeW/b 
IlH MbkteeaCoX/w 
SB MltesMM Chunk: W/ei 


□mule X/w 
Coro W A* 
coro X/w 



.. JBRIL 

,S SS'SSSSSi 

Ita 



S« Senna ine X/w 

^ S5UHS.W 

SB Santea Inti Ffnancs Hk 

II 3 

530 Samara Bn 

!i 


9b 7* Nov 101ft 7.11 LB 
9b 79 Nov Mft Mil 9.K 
llftTOMar 104 1025 1113 1184 
1 31*79 Nov IHft 1075 1188 

12ft WOct 1U MAS 
Wft 78 Apr 102ft 995 
llftTOMar 101ft MOT 
lib 79 JUI 107 9JM 
,7ft TO Od HMft HOT 
llftTO NOW 107 1029 

lift 75 Dec ID 11J0 10M11JV 

TDftTlFen Wlft taO 1L71 

13ft 71 Jui 115 WOT 

D TO Dec W4b tata 

10« TO Jan 187ft Ills 
10ft 75 Jan IH tain 
,1ft 75 Mov 110 <84 

ii w Feb Itaft-nuj 
11 77 Feb 103 UU 
7ftWMoy T22ft Gj 
7ft 79 May ta 1U6 

Kb 79 Aug IM 1*42 

TO Jan HH 797 953 HOT 
2ft 7. Hoy 113ft HUI Il.Tl 

3b TO Aug 117ft 1051 11J8 

1 77 Nov IH tall 1104 1U 

Wft 78 Apr 184ft HB 1089 ILH 
UftTTFH IN UB 

KbTOOd Tf7 JU2 
7b 79 May 104b 574 
7b TO MOV 97 taW 

0 78 Dec 142ft 786 

1 70 Dec 93 HUD 

KHTOOCt 100 1089 

6b TO Feb I11U. 295 
6b 79 Feb V 1171 
12ft 78 Mm 189 tail 
Kb TO jul Wlft taB 
lift TO Apr ta* HOT 
15b TO Aug MB 1282 
lib TO Jan 182 11.12 

11 78 Mar 181ft WOT 

13 78 Mv 106b HUS 
m 70 Jun in 1047 
12ft TO S*P 10t Ills 

134*71 Jui 115 I0J0 
12ft 71 Nov HK HJ86 

12 73 Dec 108 1081 

IlftTOMay in H40 

llftTl Dec in HOT 

4 b TO Feb ,11ft UO 
4b 7* Feb L7 1070 
II 77 Jan waft 258* 

11 77 Jan W2ft 9J6 

5b 71 Nov 122 83 

5b 78 Nov 87 1046 

131k 79 Jut lUft 9.13 
10ft 70 MOV Mb HOT 
12ft 71 MOV 189 1134 

Wft 73 Feb 90ft UH 
WftTSFeB tab 1091 

I lb 78 Mar Wlft 9J7 

13ft 79 Nov WB HLH 
llftTO Jan ts» U3B 
4ft 79 Mar IB 534 
4ft 79 Mar BBft 1074 
5* 79 Feb 140ft 781 
5b 79 FeB Uft 1071 
7ft TO Nov M2 7J1 
71k TO Nov ta Mil 
< TOApr 94 1180 

10ft 77 Dec 111 174 

10ft 77 Dec 99 1LD. 

7ft 78 Oct 101 689 

7b 71 OCt « HOT 
lift w Dec in mu 
12ft TO Aug wnk HI* 

12b 72 Feb HD IL74 
12ft 79 Nov HJ7 1091 
llftTO Jan H2ft 1182 

12 71 Feb 107 HOT 

BftTOKov 96b 983 

OS] 79 Jul 110ft 1081 

15b 79 Aug 114 1097 

II TO Mav MOV, Hus 

12 TO Ago m HU 

Hft 70 NO* HBft 105. 

11 7J MW lBft *99 9 JO HOT 

13ft72JU Wlft 1249 1288 

11b TO Frit 101b 1197 ll.l, 

Wft 75 Jul WYi 1987 1DJ3 

13ft 71 Sop IN 1134 1XU 

4ft TO Star UTft 7.15 *H 

6ft TO Mar 18 WJ1 W 

17ft 79 Od HS IUB 17B 

Hft 72 Fob 94 ,191 1L71 

IftTOMgr <fft 1145 *x» 

MU 70 Jon in 

llftTO Feb 1® 941 

IS* 71 Aug IWft HOT 
Wft 72 Feb HD 99* 

UftTOAw W9 1084 

fftTOFlb m *84 

4K)79Fib ■ 1884 

131871 Dec Wft I1J4 
6b 74 Mov IQ LA 
WTO NOV 88 Hi* 

7ft TO Aw KSft L93 
raw apt ta iuo 

64k 19 Apr H 852 

*ft79 Apr (7 1097 

7ft TO Air 124ft 95 

TV] TO Aar talk W83 

9ft 74 Jul 99ft 1U4 WB 

4 TO Feb 96ft 7.17 

8 TO Fib H HUT 

llftTOMar 101 1L1I 
lift TO Dec 
□ftTOSap 
lift 72 Jot 


1199 


1L91 

ILH 


12 ® 

1144 

1049 


1^ 

S5 

TUB 


• IMI 

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871 

hot 

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1.18 

11M 

1231 

114Z 

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1184 

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191 

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118 

HOT 

1089 

10X1 

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1*94 

& 

151 

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<.W 

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11JI 


984 9J4 Ml 

Hd 


Amt Security S r:& 

ecu IS kumitomi Finance Alio 9 TOHo* 
$48 Sumtftmu Heavy in W.'er i'«79Mgr 
$40 SuiMMiw Heavy m t-k* euTOMp r 
SO Sumrtoma Reoily Wet 0 TTCec 
$ wo SsRiitomTresrFhHk i7ftTOF«i 
shh icivoKno* FfnonctHk n todh 
$ 30 Tgfcgky Electric PWw/ RftY*s«a 
sno rouiAMcra U'xTifoo 

two Taka Ana Lid HuTOMor 

STB Tokyo Euaric Co V77> 4-] TO *=r 

sis TokroEhcMeCoXiN 4ft W /Aar 
tin Tokyo Eted/te Fexwr nft TO Jul 
353 Tokyo MeirtteOJts Wft TO Jul 

»M T<*ro5an»EleclW/w If . TO Jun 
ISO rotraScnyaEucf X'a Hft TO Jun 
*58 Terav industries W/« WftTOAftr 

S53 Tom Industries X'*. HfuTOMcr 

130 Toro en gineer lea arm oftWMsr 
$30 T0WEaotewrte0X,w tftTOMW 
SWO YontOKMIlM Hft 71 Dec 

SWO YmudaTnat Fhona t2ftTOApr 

LUXEMBOURG 

S24 DM- Bonk Inil mi* r.zta/.tov 

S24 BtlFBaHl rntl X/w T/iTOMny 

ecu 40 SadSocrufCrHInv id la 74 May 


Miifflc 

Ave 

PrKl 

r.-c 

Ufe^urr 

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<41 

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tf-p 


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44 

1!25 

727 

139 

£1 

523 

,3 In 

1234 

1244 

H&’i- 

,022 

,15* 

ns-.-: 

11X1 


136ft 

KM. 

11X6 

7C3 

1V.5 

1127 

94 

547 

Ml 

sa 

UJ3 

7J7 

JW 

1334 

1LT 

IE 

9xC 

,173 

W; 

X38 

A47 

154ft 

BJ< 

ista 

111 

1X4 

DM 

IX 

tfl.II 

1322 

13T.ll 

IU 

UP 

N 

1034 

)J< 

95ft 

11J4 

1189 

UK 

1135 

1147 

m 

4X7 

AOT 

05ft 1184 

177 

in 

983 

9.93 


Ant 


Seuinf. 


— TOiW I 

AW * _ 

Mel Pries Mat Ute Cut.- j 


5*snfi 


MEXICO 


. $40 Mcxfce 
SB Medea 
S 175 Merira 

SB CenrtsMaFedEtodrie 
$71 CombkwFeoEtectnc 
CnS 59 Nodonol Flpaneera 
$75 Pcnm FetroleosMexlc 
130 PemexFetroleos Mettle 
$20 pHna4 Petrofeu MexK 
.$125 Penn Petralees Mexfe 


St TO Mar «ft 11471143 890 
8A.71DK B4 1195 11781117 
IBftTTJal 11212 lfrTB 1444 

i TOFaO ft 1119 11.94 833 

U -E7NDV 100 1291 IUB 

iraTOMor WSft 1384 1882 

lr.yUltn U5 1380 WOT 

UftTOAw lfi£ Oft 1584 

IftTOSan 16 0431196 885 

lift 7B Jul 97 1234 1283 1186 


MISCELLANEOUS 


330 BwxStesDtGulnee 
$73 DntfcBBkSmxsore 
tea 91 MegolFtaance 
rau 75 Mogul Finance 
IB Singapore 
137 TroMAfeine Finance 

NETHERLANDS 


8 70 Dec 87ft 1254,541 W0 
ISftTOAuB WB 1281 1*31 

, lb 7< Apr IH ULII HU, 
Hft TS Apr IBM 95S MB 
74 TO Nov 93ft 1U3 1*00 UO 
iftTSOd Wft 1097 1099 140 


. *50 Aeean 
$40 AmevNv 
*300 Ann Bate 
SOS Amro Bank 
340 Drat Dutdi State Mine* 

SB DsmDgtdi State Mfms 
sl» DsmOsidi State Mbm 
SM EnnieNv 
SWO Hal land Afrltms Fin 
- $50 Nederiawe e Cuamft 
575 HmkrtomfsaCdsurte 
v S75 Nedartonsa Gasunie 
$2>o PHDMGtoenaapWA* 

-ta* PttUtaGtooaonBiX'n 
loin Phlltos Inti Ftnaaoe 
. 175 Rabobank Nederland 
•cuts RabobateMadarioad 
$40 Ehefl lotf Ftaance 
* in Shell l nil Roaoce 
$300 5heU Inn Flnoncu 
-3900 Shall InH Flnonce 
$50 Tbynai Ba Flnoncs 
1100 Unilever Nr 
$U0 UnbevorNv 

NEW ZEALAND 


Uft 71 Feb TU OB 1U0 
I TO Aid 95ft 10481X43 828 
13 TO Nov m WN 12.13 

Wb 70 Abb ID) HIT 1084 

B 1 * 77 Jun <7ft <70 <72 446 
SL-fflAuo 95ft HU! 10J9 187 


lift 71 MOT 103ft WJ4 11.10 

Uft 77 May 1 09ft <JB 14.14 

IN Tl Mav 181ft 11.15 1192 

1DH TOApr 101b HOT 1149 

HbtaOd UfU 11U lflJV 

lib Tl Mar iflft W82 1810 

4*4TOJal HBft 4X1 6OT 

6b TO Jul 87K 1002 7J1 

9 *93 Mav HOft 890 894 

11 Tl Mar HDb 1144 W76 

9ft 75 Mov 10», <JD <28 

8 74 Dec 98V, 9 JO. 990 814 
7ft TO Jan 97U 982 987 7J1 

TftTOMV 971t 988 798 

ItuVOFeb <3 TOOT 6X7 

10ft TD Mar 101ft 10X1 ta7J 
W, TO Jul 99ft 982 928 

WTO Jut tab 994 TOO. 9X2 


SU NewZealond 
IWO NewZitdaad 
THU New Zealand 
. 1108 NewZedaad 
VlSOOB New Zealand 
ecu un New Zealand 
ecu 110 New Zealand 
ISO Hew Zealand 
: iuo Hew Zealand 
$50 BaakOt New Zealand 
IS Nz Farad Prakictn 
$3 Hz Farad Products 
' 150 Othherallkrina 


6ft t4 Mar .. 

Bb 74 DK tab 877 
8ft TO Doc 104ft 4X1 
Uft TO Apr 98ft 1LZ3 
7ft TO See Wlft 683 
9b TO Jun HBft 9.12 

K 72 Jon HBft *88 
75 Jill ft 1892 
Wft TO Jul 95b 11JJ9 
ltftTJMor 102 095 

9 74 Mar Wft 983 
19ft 78 NOV 182. 1191 
IbTSDK MB 807 


77% 981 984 60S 
821 
804 


1883 

7J7 

920 

985 

1081 

UL97 

ms 

9JB 

1280 

83 


NORWAY 


SU Bergen aty 
115 Borregoord 
SSO DwiNorkknCrotfHbeitk 


1*100 EkMortilnons 


sin iSSSrttanXto 


781 

tS 


TOM A 

r« ^ 

HOft 1186 HU* 1187 



HfcTOten 

wn WS 

11.,] 

139) TOJUl 

KC 

W95 


4bW®ar 

93ft 

UO 

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SI 

IUB 

7.90 

II ¥«r 

101 

1029 

no 

It 17 Dee 

1*1 

16X4 

18X9 

IlftTBJon 

98 

1129 

1141 

TftTOApf 

107 

4X3 

7« 

7b TO Apr 

m 

W47 

161 

7ft -89 Apt 

wn 

27 

171 

7ft TOApr 

to 

10X5 . 

8J3J 


Wft 72 Mar 183k, U.18 
VbTJOd Wft 923 . 
IM TO Jut 1U 1184 
10ft TO Jun HOft M.73 
12b Tl May U0 tui 
ilbT2Mar 103ft 1094 


1181 

BX2 

1181 

M3 


. 150 Ekiportlilnani 
SWO Etamrtflms 
SMO Efcseortftnanf 
nfcrTse Eksuortflnara 
SUB Eksportflnm 
(dir Mft Names HvootnWorenk, 
sa Horges Kon*wno»ar* 


S40 Ngraai Karntnundbank 
173 Ngrga Kommunalbank 
in 


ISO NorpkMi 
nkr 250 Norik Date 
150 Hank Hydro 
in Monk Hydro 
130 Honk Hydra 
150 HankHytap 
148 Nenk Hydro 
ate- 204 Nor* Hydro 
in Norsk Hydro 
SIOO Norsk Hydro 
SSO Monk Hydro 
nkr M0 OdoCHv 
315 0*1 at V 
HIM Olio Cttv 
3« Oik, City 

nkr Mi Olio aty 
tea 150 OxIaCHv ' 

SSB Olio Cttv 
SIS HahiaFMdai Krofl 
SWO Stated Dea Nonke 
two satoo Daa Narskt 
SMO StataO Den Marika 


■ 77APT 97 9J9 1B80 83 

0X1£Fob 99ft IM 988 879 
U 91 Way HBft tin n« 
11b 73 MOV taft 1124 TL3I 
,0V. » Da HSU, 254 HO 
lib 74 Jun HOft WOT 1U7 
9 74 Sep *9ft 9J9 US 995 
1116 77 Jm HO 921 _ IUB 

9ft 17 Jtli IHft. 925 9X2 IM 
DftVSw 104 1084 1X30 

12 TO Jan Wft HOT 1180 
Uft TO Mar WSft 057 1,59 1874 
9ft70M> 97ft 1854 1085 HU3 
lift TONsv ID IlH 11.17 
10U.T2 Jon HBri 9J4 1602 

lib 72 Mar 101ft 1085 1186 

10ft 71 Apr IBM U36 NOT tail 
7ft 77 Feb VI HOT 1128 Ml 
7ft TO Die 80 HL47 007 882 
■ft 71 DSC 99ft 1058 1196 9J9 
M72MOV ta 1L1411.il 924 
MTS Apt K 1180 1^1074 
<14 76 APT 99ft <85 93 9 JO 
8ft WMor 94 W801L23 <3 

10b TO Dec IDS US 1144 

9ft 76 Feb 99ft 11121 M3 985 
1. ft 77 Jul 983ft 1282 1401 

12 TO Fed Wlft HOT 1L71 

116* V) Mar mv. 11JM 1U7 

9 Tl Sep <3 1188 981 

12 Tl Oct 105b 1087 M3 HOT 

8ftT3AUr 93 9971872 9.14 

19b T7 Nov HJ7 1IOT MOT 1199 

9b 74 Jsi 91 W81 IUB 995 

VKTOJai IBM 90* 9OT 

IbWMar 99b 9J2 9X1 821 
714 77 Mar 92b 1X22 1399 7X2 
9 78 Mar 97 W20 1095 928 

WUTOFtei HBb 1081 986 1117 

lib Tl Alia 105b 994 1084 

MT7NOV 86 11.191X491082 

6l4 750ct 99 <24 927 42) 

12 TOApr 105ft 903 11OT 

13ft TO Jld 110b W28 1236 

fftWAug 19 992 HUM 9.72 


SOUTH AFRICA 


ta satin Africa 

S3 SauRi Africa 
ecu 40 Saute AMcn 
140 South AMca 
- $51 Anglo Ainaricati Corn 
S3 EfcamEMctrSunciv 
STS EACom Etectr 5upalv 
115 Esqhh Etodr £S5y 
ecuSD Eicom Etactr Supply 
375 Eocnm E tor Supply 
SIOO Eicon Dedr Supply 
acute Pod Telecom Pretoria 


8 TO Feo N NJ91105 823 
7b 77 Dec 92ft IU511J2 83 

lib to Mr mm iuo n.n 

I2ft TO Jill 101 aT7 1X30 

7ft 77 Mar 96ft 9jn 1419 JOT 
M 74 Dee n 9.0 HUI 887 
llftTO Jun Wft TUT 1181 
fWTOMar 95ft 1076 1U8 989 
1 Ob TO May TO 9.0* 10X4 

12b 71 Fab ffft 122. 1221 

lift 71 Jul 97A 1XW 1129 

lib 77 Oct ID 1483 1180 


SB Brat! 

SM CotanUa 
in Venaweio 
IIS venuiaitei Tafashone 


SOUTH AMERICA 
IbVDac 
Mill Fen 
8bT20d 
lb TO Dec 


14 15832133 9J9 
DU 1784 2IJB HR 
a* UI1 16.14 1194 
Mft 16291927 9 Jo 


SPAIN 


(lot Spain 
SM AotooWia 
sa iteiodtMNac IMu 
SIS Petraner 
SIS Petraner 


IH TOApr 
7 77 Jut 
I 77 Oct 


WS HMS 1488 
Wft ia 921 7.1* 
99ft 822 83 884 


7b 78 Jan 94ft HOT ,1X3 

SUPRANATIONAL 


acute Afrkroo Develop Hoik 

ecus AlrteaB Deuetaa Bank 

S3 Aslan Develop Bow 
*190 Alton Develop Ba* 
yUM . Asha Develop Bank 
v 15001 Aston Dfuetop Bank 
SWO Adan Deveiee Bank 

v 15000 Aston DevMoo Bank 

S7S Council O. Eurem 
150 Caendl Ot Europe 
ecu 35 CoixicB O, Eptopb 
3*0 ECS Euro CeatlrSteol 
SIS EcsEuroCoatlSto® 
S3 Ea Eura Cote A Stoat 
SB Era Euro Cool A Steal 
SB Eta Euro Cote ASM 
sa Ea Euro Cate ASM 
SWO Era Euro Cote a stoat 
ia Eca Euro Cote A Steal 
■cute Ea Euro Cool A Steel 
IB Ec» Euro Cote A Steel 
ta EcsEwaCote ASBMl 

isissastMsa 

sa Era Euro Coot ASM 

•cate Era Eurocrat A Hail 
$50 Era Eurocrat A state 
SIN Era Euro Cote A Steel 

SWO Era EuroCoal A Slate 

S23 Era Euro Cool A Steal 



lift TO Dec 183b 982 HUS 

,0ft 71 Dec Wft <81 10.17 

lb 74 Aug 99 981 121 

5b 74 Sop 99 L19 581 

lb 71 Apr HMft 724 709 

0b 72 Aug 1« 780 814 

lib 71 Nov 105ft 1020 ,L!4 

7b 74 Feta win 7.13 7 OT 

11 TO MOV IHft UB llta 

lib 72 Mar 101ft n.w hot 

in* 73 Mov apt, HOT 92THUI4 

9b 74 Jaa 108b 888 180 921 

4 ft 14 Jun 90ft 117 AH 640 
4ft 74 Dec Wft 9.77 1484 674 
4ft T7 Mar 95ft 948 1UN 601 
Mb 77 Mar 107ft 929 1322 

Aft 77 Od 94 987 1229 7-OS 

IlftTOMay Wlb 14951IU<1184 
UftTOOd Wlft 1285 1150 

in TO Sep HBb 9X3 HR 
BbTOOd <2 Hid 11.11 497 
fbTODec Mb 1121 11851421 
llbtaAog HIM HLU 113 
IbTl Jot 93 HOT 1128 
‘ J» HOT 1871 1 
Wft 929 WOT 
11 1181 11XT HL47 

II 1129125010X7 
Mft 11.11 11871034 
81 112711221024 

■3ft 1181 1127 1878 
KQU 921 M» 

HBft 9.U MJ3 
mn 902 HLH 
108 HOT W55 1189 
ion* nn 9x0 mm 

W9 nn Tl, « us 
HBft 987 116) 

ton <07 439 1086 
W7ft WOT 11.16 
HBb 11.13 H85 

983 8251111 
104 WJH HOT 
102ft HUB 11.W 
IM HUI U83 TL84 
ft 1880181811111 
HI 1613 1171 HOT 
ft 11.16 H22 11.11 
Wft 123 819 603 
tab -9X7 9X7 677 
IN <21 981 

ffft 9J4 OT 12* 
99 (48 989 889 

taft 70S 9.W *80 
Mft 981 881 

M 785 79? 483 
HO 925 <25 

92ft 1184 1144 7X4 
M 923 1U( 785 
93ft tear im 789 
W* 9 JO 1X03 
9714 981 8)0 

Hft 1120 1180 WJO 
HBb taN 1(24 
94ft 1081 924 

HBft MOT 15JI 
WYi 111X3 899 

l« 12 903 

IM TOM ,483 1184 
W2ft 11X4 T2X4 
W W72 HUB 
Wlft 721 784 

nft 9X5 WJO 820 



HBft 1002 HOT 

114ft 1321 I4OT 

104b 1020 1181 


ZERO-COUPON BONDS 

2TS."1SS 


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Atnarfren Inti Group 
Atera Dewlap Brak 
ABobftc RkMMSOi 
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Coternktor FlnServ 

CrtkrpntarFinSery 
Ceobust Smrtogs Baric 
C%»Qtatcte 
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Etacortftniun 
Etecaridto Fraira 

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GenoreiEMicCnd 
GewuEleSjcCMf 
Benerel EteSrteCred 
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Gmtrte EtedrleCred 

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Girard MfiS toe 

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GitaOUFtriiMe 
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21 JUT 1995 
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Rariand Ftnance 
Reynolds HJ Oft 
S*arkOver*og$ 
SaonOraiTHn 
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4wwisb Export Creai 
Swadhh Export Credit 
SwfeD Bonk Cora 
mb Forao Intt Fm 
XiTdx Crodil D/iPln 


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27 MOV 1994 

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II Feb l<92 3 250 


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llftTOMar Wl» 1124 
n. to jun m iuiii« _ 

Ob TO May P BUB HOT .051 
lift TO NOV Rib 111 UM 

n TOOcf tw nn ii*! 

raft to fh tab tfxi 
W TO Jul <9 W3I 

11 Tl FlO ID UH 

SftTIAiW taft UM 
IMuTOMOV talk UK 

8 VAtar taft 987 1* Uj 

n ti Dec to» iui nx 

® TOMor Ml 981 « 

MTO&taft^TO “ 

11* TOApr IO0» HU5 IMS 

MTOAW » .HI W '- 

11 ft TO Od 1B9» 

Uft TO Apt 101b IkM 
lift T7 Apr TOM HOT 

14 Vktov MS 1U1 
fftTOJM 180ft 171 
II TOJOi KH6 1X7 
is TOJuiov wft nu 
n TOOd ran* <J2 
Hft TO Fra IDft 1L17 
M TOFaS IHft *X3 
14ft 00 Am MW TUB 
U TO MOV 108ft UU 
Wft TO F»e MW U23 
lift TOOd .fSft HLg 
iib 77 apt nm run 
6ft T4 Dec 97ft 721 
7ft TO MOV JM 7J8- 
11b TO Mar m 1185 
Uft TO Aug INK U£ 

wwJri wS»S«wi« - 

Uft -TOOcf IDlft 112* U» - 

HUTADec 99 MOT . !» - 

17ViTOOCt HBft UW 

14 TOApr HBft UA4 WJ v 

U TOMor WHu 11X1 B» 

Uft WMor BMb HOT TO 

0ft "04 Jun 99** 9J] 92, Jrt 

15ft TOApr 115ft UAi ___ U7* OT, .*•«.• 

7ft TO NOV 95ft J» 1UJ ft c- - 


I U3I 

'nus' 






2 -- 


SS 

im 

s 

B§ 

IUI 


18b TB Mar im 1181 
IS TOOK ID 075 
lift TOOd 104 9X4 

WftWFra wmv W29 
11 TO Dec M4 <D 
fta TO Mar Wft Ml 
UteTOAua HBft IUI 
13ft TOOd H7U 1034 
ffft 17 Jun ta 121 
U TO May MM 1624 
nkTijgn nn 484 
IteTl Jim 09 1181 

13ft Tl Oct WSft 11X4 

HtaTOFeB in mo 

Mft T* Dec 104 Ute 
Mft TO Jan 105k. 1230 
12ft TO Apr HMft 1181 


Uft TOOcf m KUlMteBJI 

(Gmtinaed oa Page 10} 


HU7 - 

K5 
8 
uS 

ii* 

u 

1187 
7J7 
957 

un 

B 


Hft 




West LB 


Eurobonds ■ DM Bonds • Schuldscheine 
for dealing prices call 


dOsseldorf 


Wsstdeutsdie Landesbank. Hoad Office, EO. Box 1128, 4000 DQssddorfl 
Intamattonal Bond Trading and Sates; Telephone 825 31 22/8 26 3741 
Tetex 8 5B1 881/8581 882 

London . 

Westrieutsche Landesbank. 41. Moorgate, London K2R 6AE/UK 
Telephone 6386141 -ldex 887984 

jjggnbourg - - 

WestLB International S.A. 32-34. boutevard Grtnde- Duchesse Charlotte, 

' Luxembourg, Telephone 44741- 43 ■ Telex 1678 

Hong Kong ' 

Westdeutsche Landesbank, BATbwer, 36th Floor, 12 Harcourt Road, 

Hong Kong, Telephone 5-8420288 - Telex 75142 HX 

Marketmakers in DeutschrnarkBondsVVSSt LB . 

Westdeutsche Landesbank 


<-C;V 


.' C 4 - 


3.‘ 




%?- 



ii 

• * a* * P: 









viSe-t- 


TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 


Page 9 




New Eurobond Issues 


■v-.- Amount 

rf^. {miffions) 

aMftltAffWOTg 
iNaocnafatcW $100 

o . • 

i ofcdwci $100 

B&laan 



98-75 Onr 3-iaoatfi Libid, tatamxti 13X, Noecaldte- Fw 
(U5K. Dsnopancaiom $1 0,000. 

99i0 Ow 3-moflih Ubof. Colabla at par ^>1987. CaBatorriimf 
byntortaaot portic i pc<procstffi M to».Fs«n45XDtoiofl» 


SfaflofadWW* : - 

f4#ond Aw*rofa 
to* 

J4mWofl*che 

fr Sd tJw tttan dsbordc 

TdyoKobe finance 

WftfeForgo 

jlXHMXHJFON 
SordbysBankRoonce 
Afidtfatown Trust 
Middtetawn Trust 
MddMcwn Trust 


Nippon Telegraph 8. 
Tdephone 

jtodcwaB 

5**oi 

Tokyo Sadric Rawer 

Jntofcontowntal 
Rubber Finance 

World Bonk 

Oub Mad Inc 

Kyushu Boctric Power 

NipponMetaJ 
industries 

Unten Bonk of fintand 
Southland Canada 

Comnonvredfh Bank 
of AustroSa 

DEC Finance 

Ente Oesterraichtsehe 
Spor-Gaae Bonk 

Midland Inti Australia 

New South Woles 
Treasury Corp, 

Toronto Dominion 
Bonk 

EQUtTY-UNKED 


Kyatam 

Mitsubishi Bank 

Sandaz Holdings 
Nsdsdond 

Tokyu Department 
Stores 

Trio-Kenwood 


Viacom Inti 


BHF Bonk Finance 


Compagnie Gfakr o le 
des Etabtasements 
MccheKn 


ECU 15 
C$50 
AmST25 


99-50 0*r 6-fnooth L&id. Mt mort*Uy, fjwrimutn TOHfc. Nonaoflo- 
Ue. Fmn 0j0%, Danonariafaom $10,000. 

99.50 Ow 3-nonih Libid, madnum 13K. NoncdMdk F*m 
055*. D*newtrtk»t 510,000. 

— /Vu. / mnnih 1 DUU mmiinniM 1W hhnrrJH^ Km 
V» l’ OiiMPn l iP " Q | ihWHimh 14*> 

own. 

99A5 Ow 6-mortti Liiar. iradnun- UH0k Nanaddbia. Fw* 
040%. Denoamlian $10,000. 

99M Ow 3-month Ubid, manraun 12WL ttoncciobls.F«st 
WKOiiiai fc ejQiiijljW L ' *• 

99.40 OwSmuift Libor, mnmum 13%-CafaUsot par brlWO. 
Fm 070%. Danoowiafiont SIQflOO. 


100% 98-73 Noncdabto. OaaomiKtiiom $10,000. 

100 — Noocqlnbh. Strfcng fund *a produce a Syr o wog* Hs. 

100 — Nonoaloblt. Sinkng fund to product an 11-yr awaga Eh. 

100 — YMd UWk Nooc d fahto. In 199B. todting fund wi Oort 

nduming copM pita occnwd irtisrsri jopprox. $31,195 far 
oaeh $5,000 notaL ond atua wdi boom a fiaadinWMt 
HWSbond 

99% 100.00 NoncoOobla. 

99% 98.00 Nona***. 

100% 99.13 Noncoflnble. Panominafan SlOJOCL 

100% 100-25 Noncollabls. • ' 

36% 35 JO YWd 6J95K. ProcMdi S3 raSon maria. 

100% 100.38 NoncnBoble priw plneMwi S. 

100 99.88 Noncolabls. 

100 9825 Nonczilabt*. Smiting fund to produce aiSyr awtraga Efts. 

100 9775 Nanadabi*. 

100 9828 NoncaOabla. 

100% — Coflobla at 1D1M m 199a ' 

100 % — lnrr*ntmA fmm AmflflQ rrlinn - 

100% 9875 Noaocdahle. 

100% — Noocolabh. In crttnad from Am$40 mBoci 

100% 98-13 Noneciobfa. 

100% 9928 Nanadable. 

100 98-00 NoncaRabi*. 


9825 CaDabia c* 103 in 1989. Conwffcia at 2^25 francs par sham 
and at 9.32 fran a par dofar. 

9920 SaniannudFy. GdoblatflCSVS in 198B.ConwtMaat1^0 
ytn pa r rfwra and of 20.80 yon par doflar. 

— Coupon indfcatod at 3%. Nancakbia. Caowtfeto at an 
axpadad 5X pramim Twm to ba ml July 9. 


York TOnes Strike f 

NEW YORK — Economists 
studying recent U.S. ectmomic dat^ 
are generally concluding that thq 
outlook is troubled, a perception? 
that appears Ekdy to sustain the 
bond madset rally dm devdopcxf 
ax the end of last week. , 

there continues to be a mix ofi 
data to interpret f or signs of whcthi 


DA CREDIT MASEEHS I 

xr the recovery is in a lull, off~ttack| 
completdy or about to take olfi. 
But there is confidence that the? 
Federal Reserve Board wiU mahri 
tain its accommodative stance^ 
keeping downward pressure in oh 
tercst rates. | 

. “Rates have come down fastog 
and sooner than 1 expected, bub 
they have had to because of th^ 
psbbJfiffijs in the economy," said* 
Edward Yardem, chief economist? 
for Prudential-Bache Securities^ 
“Overall, despite the occasional 
sign to the contrary, the economy is? 
ladduster. The market win retain^ 
its huffish bias.” f 

The U.S. government estimate^ 
two weeks ago that the economy, 
was growing at a relatively robust 
3.1 -percent annual rate in the seo- i 
and quarter. The projection shook . 
die hoed market, and prices tum- 
bled < 

Toward the cad of last week*) 
however, perceptions shifted The 
Treasury’s nam-refunding — in 
which & sold S17 billion of new 
securities over 3 days last week — j 
did not dampen the maHrw- 
“We saw record demand last 
week from both the U2. amf 


Sudan to Seek 
Rescheduling 
Of Foreign Debt 

Reuters 

... AMMAN, Jordan — Sudan’s 

Fmanfy nrhrritf w said here Sim. 

day that his country would try 
to reschedule its foreign debt 
but would not resort to the Eu- 
rodollar market for funds. 

“Our creditworthiness does 
not allow us to go to the Euro- 
dollar market. But we are re- 
scheduling our debts and are 
very optimistic this MD be ac- 
cepted,” said A wad Abd Ehna- 
gied, v*o is in Jordan for an 
economic conference. “All 
countries have signified that 
they will give substantial sup- 
port to Sudan to enable it lo 
stand on its feet-” 

Sudan's leader, General Abd- 
ul Rahman Swareddahab. who 
overthrew Gaafar Nlmdri in 
April faces serious economic 
problems, big internal and ex- 
ternal debts and the country’s 
worst famine in a century. 

The minister said about S 22 
billion of Sudan’s total foreign 
debt of $9 billion has fallen due, 
including $450 nwffo n owed to 

romTTtp rrjal hflnVc that have 

tentatively agreed to resched- 
ule. 

Mr. Abd Hmagied said he 
exposed the “Pans dub” of 
creditor countries to meet by 
October to agree on reschedul- 
ing the rest m long-term gov- 
ernment or government-guar- 
anteed loans. Sudan will also 
approach the World Bank for 
balance of payments support, 
he said. 


Japan Trade Still a Sore Point in EC 

By Steven J. Dry den Greece, Commission graphical location make it diflicu 

Inumakml Herald Tribune to give up titt monopoly. 


Greece, Commission 
Dispute Oil Monopoly 

Greece and the Commission are 


By Steven J. Dry den Greece, Commission graphical location make it difficult 

International Herald Tribune to give UD ihe monopoly. 

„ Brussels - The b*. ^Monopoly gg-- 

Be^ community offidak said. 

markets to foreign trade and end nopoly <rf the Athens government Officials GtC flcsdbililY 
unfair export practices, on baying oil .. . , . / 

tu. rtr p eter Sutherland, the comims- In Muitl-r lber Accord 

SS£bSf^;S 4 iSS ThcOMniBimmdlaawcct 

kasone of Japan begmc a European thatilwas^entoneribilityinlhe 

tour laterthu month, induding a “ f new mteraaLonal 

vurt to Brussels. taCr ^ Mnllj-Kber Airangement. The 

At the MDan summil commum- The deadline was spedfied in the agreem “ L expaes m Jnly 


At the Milan summit, connmmi- The deadline was spedfied in the 
hr leaders singled out Japan in their treaty s)pn«i by Greece when it 
final statement, saying they were joined the community in 1981. 


the deadline was speoned m the 19$$. 
treaty signed by Greece when it r^mim«inn officials would not 
fp ooBiinunity in 1981. specify whether the flexibility 

„ Sf ° r v k cn £ ey ?r ster ’ ^ Wly to certain newh, in- 
uuu^ Eleftherios Veiyvalds. said his gov- dustmlized countries that are look- 

“Japan should undertake to in- emmem planned to open up the ing for better access to markets in 
crease significantly and contino- market, but only gradually. He was the West or to so-called sensitive 
ously its imports of manufactured u n a b le to provide a target date by products. 
products and processed agricultnr- which the monopoly would be The Multi-Fiber Accord regu- 
al products,” as well as liberalizing abolished. lares the world market in textiles, 

Rnanraai marVrfg and improving Greece main tarns that a security protecting aging Western indus- 
the in ternatio nal position of the threat from Turkey and hs geo* tries while they modernize, 
yen, the statement 

Last week, the community’s ex- 
ecutive commission criticized Ja- . i 

pan’s tariff-reduction program, 
saying the changes announced by 

Tokyo on June 25 were “unlikely to ______ _____ _____ 

bring immediate or sustained relief ^ 

to the trade imbalance” between 

the EC and Japan, which in 1984 • H H 

was $10 bifikm in Japan’s favor. H H ‘ “ 

The Commission last week also 

impofied definitive anti-dumping — ml 

duties on roecxfic categories of Jap- w •ym ju w w w ir i tf g 'l' w v 

anese bafi bearings and roDer bear- T_| A i'll Li I I Li 


crease significantly and continu- 
ously its imports of manufactured 
products and processed agricultur- 
al products,” as well as Hberalizing 
finVnrial markets and improving 


The Multi-Fiber Accord 
lares the world market in U 


d regu- 
textfles. 


e 


duties on Japanese electronic type- 
writers. 


Hong Kong Domestic Exports 


porting countries to importers else- 
where, rose 40 percent m May from 

the previous year, to 923 trillion 


week from both the VJS. ana n n J* n 1 /i „ • w 

abrmgto s^up all the supply,"! J <qU JOT 3t l (jmMXltWB MOUth 
said Scott Pardee, executive vice J 

president at Discount Coip. oB . . 

New York, a bond dealer. f By Dinah Lee pmtmgcountaestoinipoitersdse- 

A factor in the background is the Imenumonai Herald Tribune ^iere,n«40perx^mMayfrom 
resignation from the Fed’s board of HONG KONG — Hong Kong’s ?*, P 1 ^ 0 ^ y^. to 923 bulion 

^^ofLyleEGiamley,^ do^c^tshare^t^a 

gaxded as a conservative about drop for the third consecutive *agnmcant effect 

keeping the money supply and the month, tempering predictions of 7- 111 boosting Hong Kong s manor ac~ 
economy growing at a restrained 1 percent growth in grass domestic taring sector, local economists said, 
pace. product for 198S. Huy attribute the decrease in 

His departure allows the Reagap; Figures released Friday showed domestic exports in part to the con- 
administration, which favors apj that d Anvs tic exports dropped 7.7 muting dump in demand from the 
easier-credit, fastcr-growth poJicy f ; percent, or 896 mQHon dollars United States. Hong Kong’s largest 
to appoint Someone with a similar; ($ 1 152 mOfion), to 10.8 billion dcri- TnarVr t w hich lay t ywtr afif!n nnted 
viewpoint j lars from May 1984. The drop tot tor about 40 percent of Hong 

The dollar’s fall on forrign-ex4 March through Mav was 11 j vet- Kona’s domestic exoorts. The 


viewpomL j lar 

The dollar’s faD on foreign-ex^ March through May was 112* pen- Kong’s domestic exports. The 
dtange markets Friday, Mr. Eardee cent. am»ng th of the Hmig Kong dollar, 

said, was due to the expectation, Last year’s growth in GDP. was which has been linked to the U.S. 
that an easier monciary palicy and 9.6 percent, and in January, Hong- currency since October 1983, is also 
lower interest rates mimt result^ Icons A Shang hai Ranking Carp, blamed. Both factors had been pre- 
He added that this coda begin to* was more optimistic than most m dieted at the beginning of the jnsar. 

J P^l^grow.hwocldhit 

long Trffl^bcS — the 1114- ftriaTbis budget eddress in SSSIJi 

percent issue doe 2015 —finished February, the financial secretary, Si! 

art 107 11/32, to yield abom 10.44 «Sh^ Brcmridge, gave a mofc “S GrtfJZ 

percent, after dosing on Tltursday Sservative esthSte of 72' per- S 'L S 

at 106 17/32. U> Jtefd 10^2 per- cent growth m GDP. to toal SS- 


March through May was 112 per- 
cent. 

Last year’s growth in GDP was 


He added that this coda begin tr£ 
boost bbnd prices. ; 

In Friday trading, prices of the 
long Treasury bend — the 11%-: 


4% 100 — Cotobto of 103M m 199a Gcmariffah ton penfai p aSon 

cwDfeato* at $589 pur arifioato. 

7% 100 — NoncaXabl*. Each $5,000 no** with or>« warrant mxacauO* 

nto iharw al 504 yan par than and or 250 jam par dolor. 

open 100 — Smorawal asunoa Mficstod at 3U& CoSo hh at KM in 

19B8. Convwtihto wan axpoctod 5% pminm. Tom* to ba 
it July 3. 

7% 100 9830 Golctoio at 106 hi T985. CoumHUo at $55 a *ar». an 

llJWt pwtniunv 

7 115 — Y»ld5iH%.Coidakan00 ! Kinl991 Bach 1JX)0<naHuioto 

with 3 wmcfanBfc *od» •xarcaiafata intofharacat 323 aarici 
•och. a (USX dhcounL 

Open 100 — Gwpon indandat 7-7Mrtt. tUdamabla to pa-in 1990 far a 

10%-1(HCX ytod. Conwrlihh at an wpadad 2025%. Tmtw 
tobawtiwirB. 


put m 
income 


U.S. Consumw Rotas 

Far Waak B nded km M 

P a w b pofc Savlnga SSO 

Tax Exwnat Bends 

■one Owr toBond litow BJt 

Harm Mariurt Panda 

Donoob u ra 7-Qqy Avrxm. 7J< 

Bonk Mem Marturt Accounts 
Bank Rato Monitor into* ■ 6.9! 


TZdiiSZrim ^^HongKor^butromecon. 
operations toad. m 

“““ - . - r almrlv rmnrtina chum unite in nr. 


ly in Hong Ktmg, where external ^ for ^ rest of the year. 


HACHETTE 


KEY FIGURES 1984 (in millions »T franca) 



2.420 2,199 

127 115.1 

53.1 135.1 

180.1 


1872 
63.4 I 1422 


265.4 3293 


DIVIDEND 

TAX CREDIT. 


Fr, 

..Fr 


HACHETTE sharehoUera mri on Jane 20, 1985 to approve ibe Group’s 
management accounts for 1984. The meeting was chaired by M. Jean-Lac 
LAGARDERE, President. 

HACHETTE S.A.. the parent company, posted a net profit in 1984 of 
F Jr. 180.1 million, including FJFr. 53.1 million due to capital nuts. 
Meanwhile, the Hachene Croup’s share of consolidated [Wit lor 1984 
reached FSr. 202 million, u opposed to FJr- 1872 million in 1983. After 
taking account of capital ana and looses, consolidated profits were 
F.Fr.265.4 million u oppofedto F.Fr. 329.5 million in 1983. 

President Jean-Luc LAGArdERE, assessing thed: figures, laid consider- 
able stress os the Hacbette Group’s policy cm devdopmeni and Investment 
introduced in 1984-1985, winch u to be continued throughout 1986 both in 
France and abroad. 

As a result of ibis policy, the Hachette Group has in Ihe last 18 months 
bought 100% of SEYMOUR PRESS, increased its shareholding in HA- 
CHFTTEGOT- 


CHETTEGOTCH (from 50% to 100 %) and acquired a majority stake in the 
company which publishes TELEPROG RAMA, a high-circulation Spanish 
TV magazine. Hachette also took control of 42% of the capital of PATHf 
CINEMA, bb also 50% of HARLEQUIN FRANCE, among other moves. 


tiadc is viewed as the lifeblood of 
the colony. 


japan has also been hurt by Chi- 
na's restrictions on forrign-cur- 


s aumesuu gw 

Diversification Seen in Eurobond Market’s Record (First Half EiS 


(Continued from Page 7) 

•apanese institutions without 
Hunting against their limits on for- 
9gn currency holdings — offered 
seven-year nows of 5100 mfflioa 
sach. Nippon Telegraph & Tde- 
Atme’s carried a coupon of lOpcr- 
xni priced at 99% and Tokyu ficc- 
mc carried a KHA-percent coupon 
priced at 100%. NTT ended the 
week at a small premium and To- 
kyo Electric at a modest discount, 
reflecting the special attraction in 
Japan. 

A particularly complicated 
transaction was put together for 


and Aetna is guaranteeing die lease At that point, holden will earn rional Australia Bank and Wcfls tfconly when placed with final in- 

Sgto^ScSS^L 11 mpI&A hag 4 lKSs otKiSo^aS^ became the firat sovereign fTto week shmld see Crt& 

^ fimdwul start redeenung this paper issner to use this new formula, set- eommercial de France tap the 

The financin g consists of $68 jjj jjjg 14th year. ting a cap of 12% percent, but com- market for 80 mil lio n ECUs, the 

QHon erf eight-year notes bearing _ . _ . hinedilwiththeminnatehfonnula Bank's first fixed-coupon offering. 


| Last yrai’s total value of exports rency spending by its proymcul 
Was 2212 bflHon Hong Kong dd- governments, and Japanese indus- 
Sra,anizu3easeof38pezoaat£rom nudists report that Chinese orders 
1984. for cars and electrical goods have 

I Re-exports, goods passing dropped significantly, 
mrough Hong Kong from other ex- Otot. which mtod « on to 

1 list of markets for Hong Kang’s 

I domestic goods in 1979, leaped to 

|o^ t -a n second place last year. The climb 

|14 Ho IT fed confidence among traders that 

.ffl. JJL Olf • B i*l ■ imports of Hong Kong prodnets 

f * would replace storJrenfng demand 

y only vdien placed with final in- [rom Western Europe Japan. 

(Tbis week should see Crfcdh _ M ^ H 

(Sommercial de France tap the ■■ mm mm mi m 





3 


The Business Travel Column by 


Friday in Weekend 


bands — both offered at par. 

The complicated part is S37 mil- 
lion of 25-year bonds. For the first 


at par. w ^ ch mm* generous than on bank bid rate) monihty. Misniatcfc- 
rt f« 977 (nil- otiier oM^jaraoiy dated securities ing is not ainerttly popular and the 


(the identical yield erffercd on the 
zero portion). Unlike most zeroes, 
which are sold at substantial dis- 


placements. 

In theFRN market, seven issues 


point, the fall front-aid fee. 

The market for ECUs and Ans- 


Middletown Trust, a special-pur- counts from face value, this paper 
pose company created to finance is being offered for sale at face 


totaling S32 billion were offered Indian and New Zealand dollar is- 
with maximum coupons. The caps sues continued to be affected by the 


Aetna Insurance's sale of property value, $5, 
to General Electric Credit and ka- poundinf 
seback to Aetna. GEC is guaran- have m 
teeing the first in tercst payment S21200. 


value, $5,000. At year 13. the cam- «... ,, .. . - . 

oounding of accrued interest wiD Middenstandbank) to 13 percem TTnsmeans the paper trades at sub- 
ve made the paper worth (Banca Nazionale del Laboro, stantial discounts while still in the 

* * % f - - ^W . . ^S*S - - VT « LtaJa nf ^ *■ — — 


ranged from a low of 12% 
Kobe Bank and Nedede 


fact that coupon levels are lower 
than short-term financing rates. 


Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Na- hands of underwriters ami moves spight debt 


rst convertible in four years was 
unched last week by Micfadin. To 
suage investor worries about the 
coveryproqiects after three years 
losses and the high 20-to~25 per- 
nt premium they will be ariced to 
iy for Micfadin shares, the tom- 
my is offering holders the option 
> redeem the 15-year bonds after 
re years. The redemption price 
ill be at a premium, giving headers 
yield of l(H6-to-10% percent, 
tout a percentage point less than 
jchdm would currently pay for 


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1 1 76 ha. {190 acres) of beautiful, elevated, exclusive half- !| 

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■ a.« AJRUE ?EACH, Queensland 4802, Australia. | 

® | OMl C LOCATtOW -.WARM CUMATE - BARRIER REEF - ENGLISH LANGUAGE ■ 


Shift From Euroloans to Bonds Is Said to Hit Peak 


By Carl Gcwirtz 

Initntatvmtt IJeraLi Tribune 

PARIS — The transfonnarion of 
iuernauacul aedit markets away 
from syndicated bank loans to se- 
curities or related instruments, 
Much began in 1982 in response to 
[the debt crisis, was completed in 
the first six months of this year. 

The data documenting this shif t 
is axuained in the June issue of 
Financial Market Trends, which is 
bang published Monday ty the 
Organization lor Economic Coop- 
oation and Development. 

The study says many market par- 
tapanis believe the decline of con- 
ventional vy wdipaitHf foan buq'n«S 
is not transitory buu instead, “re- 
fiecis a behavioral change of bor- 
rowers and tenders, both at which 
show nowadays a marked prefer- 
race for more flexible financing in- 
stnnnenti." 

In 1932, the year developing 
cwunries' debt burdens reached 
proportions, the volume oT 
nttemational bank lending was 
double the annual rate of activity 
ra the international band market 
— 5104 btUwc versus S50 bt Hi on . 

By 1984, with fremk fending on a 
««dy downtrend and the Euro- 
°osd market in full expulsion, the 
markets provided about equal 


annual rate of 5130 billion, as the Euronotes actually sold does not writers an annual fee of 1 25 basis 
bank market, at an annual rate of exceed 57 billion. points. If the baida take the notes, 


Want market, at an animal rate of exceed 57 billion. points. If the ranks take in 

564 billion. These instruments are popular they wul earn 122 baas points over 

The figures further show that in- because banks earn fees forprovidr Libor. The margin rises 5 baas 

temational bank loans, which in ing the backup without having to points if banks wind up * -w ” 

1982 accounted for S3 percent of include the lending coxmnhinem in more than half of the notes 

total Hanir lending, have shriveled their balance sheets. Thar popular- Bums PhQp & Co-, a dft 

ity was demonstrated hist week Australian group, is adrinj 

cVNRir A TFD TilANS when Sweden’s Sl-5-bLQioxi facility to provide a $35- trillion 

LUAiys _ ^ increased to 512 billion. credit to back the sale of nj 


toul bank lending, have shriveled 

SkTroiCATED LOANS 


Bums PM^j & Co, a diversified 
Aust ralian group, is arirmg banks 
to provide a $35- trillion line ofj 
credit to back the sale of up to 570 [ 


• .... c Even facilities that dearly wiU be mfiHon of Euronotes, commercial 

drawn —such as OxarCola Co,*s paper or Aigaliaa-doDar pronris- 
5^iS2JST* bdflSlO,flyM0fr financing of reeeivabtes through a sory notes. The conmany win pay 
deriu percncL .. . mtmnse emmsanv. EBS Fi- an annual fee of 12.5 basis Damts 


ullendii 

whatthe 


what wUmto o™ “ - 3^ banks to provide lines to emotes, the company will pay 20 
nautmal facilities. bad: the sale of $365 millinn wrath bass p<anls over Libor. The mar- 1 

pmedjwt 5 percent of detoida ^ notes tad received over $700 gin rises by 15 basis points if banks 
1982. These million in offers from banks eager take more than one-third of their 

note issuance facilities, mum-year an d e rwrite the deal. underwriting commimeni and by 5 

JSShhih-ht-*. ESI Zc 

^iESStosyndica.- to.tacto* to to ak of OOO *• «** «f *- — 

a &TO10M5 and foreign bank mdbon^ion-tmn norea. Banb »» , 

SnTVLcd S17.6 WlST- to art ^redto pr°«dci aera-year 

jSLSflaSiiffi BnBea Gas listing in Peril 

iv^lurchleneriod in 1983 “Other cent, or 25 basis points. If the tm- Reuun 

ammmted to SIS 7 bD- derwritm cannot sell the ntytes and OAKLAND. California — 

facilities amounieo to >ia./ ou th™ Phwm n«ti M * nn r« it h«t 


to nnderwrite the deal underwriting comutitmeni and by 5 

Peugeot SA is in the market seek- ^ ^ Mra take mete 

' for the sale of 5300 two thirds of thar oanmnt- 

art-tenn notes. Banks roent 


Rouen 

OAKLAND, California — 




i raiKwnt of cnxfii. running at an Let estimate that the volume 


myo.TX. roonmos 


BID ASK 

olio Comp. 20% 20% 

Gasket 9% 9% 

tor Carp. 3 3% 

idulatre 8% 8% 

fme 7% 8 

& WITH COMPLIMENTS OF 
9 CONTINB^TAI AMB8CAN 


^ en,n / ^A 

Wjjhmtom, nc | 

asewmcji * 

WS*j. 

Adpumt oi ibr QUhimnito Mmsi I 
«a T Lvi tab y '■ 


| Gold Options (pdcataS/as.), 


3» IS2S4&75 

330 ft/sua 1875X21 

330 VS 735 Q7$l$2 3WWM0 
M 32-OS 1000413) UaVtUQ 
350 12- 275 72. 875 niUUjD 

m OS)- ISO 4TO AS) 1021173 

VQ I 15a SOS 1 77S.P2 

OsU3M5P-3l»D 

White WeMSJL 

L Osrf As Mato-BtoK 
ItltCMCi*t.SMtHfM 
Td V1025I - Trin SMS 


Merck & Co., In c 

through its wholly-owned subsidiary, 

MSD Sharp & Dohrae GmbH, 
and 

C.H. Boehringer Sohn 

have formed a joint venture in the 
Federal Republic of Germany under the name of 

Dieckmann Arzneimittel GmbH 


We assisted Merck & Co H Inc. in this transaction. 


*J$*nAold atufsA. ffileuJt/Mxxietj&tiG. 


June I98S 




















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lift IB ft r r 

CwsCt! SSI 811 r r 

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C«3no lj r I r 

s« a W r >6 

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2k*k 1 Mi K r 

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270 VI 4 * 

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16Vr 2ft r 
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2 SW a r >16 r 

CanW J 7 W r s H» 

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to'i 40 4 ft 4 W 5 -M 

44 '- 45 1 W 3 r 

Ootom II Ilk K r 

1ft* IK in TO * 

»» 15 W lWi r 

_ in* 20 1-14 t r 

DicbU « 14 < jh r 

P'i 45 *-M r t 

Ed«r<H 1 ]* <4 W 

B1 » K ft 19-14 2 

fbiwc in jft an j -14 

1 % a V IV. r 

l»*« Sift >U V» r 

»** 25 Ml i- r 

Cn 0 »n H 15 s l-U 


I«1 25 Ml 

Cn 0» n H lj 

7**» 45 10’- 

’«H 70 « 

■JW M 2 ii 

7 «W H I 


r 1.-2IH4 ftft M Jii 5 
»i, in 4'a 7*1* 60 I 1 

7 3; • > <l * *S 3-1* I'i 

34 t ' G«H 1 4 o 65 r W. 

15-16 r r ai 70 II’-. 12’. 

jl* i f Ol 75 71 - 0 : 


inn a w i w 

biubs a at ft 

JW B lh « 

SOW 40 1 Hi 

94* 41 ft 3 

Colon ISO r B 

tan US 16 ’- r 

mw no iiw * 

120ft IU 0*4 r 

IMft 119 3ft 8 

COomlR a Tft 4 

23ft IT’i Vi r 

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MW 40 li 1*7 

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W. ^ 















































JOTERNATIGNAIi HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 


Page 11 



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u* u 3433*164816 
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38 1.1 134BK* IBM 
101016 TOto 
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ms 4% 
180023 2214 


: ' ***t 

lew art* 

IBM— 

«& 
2314— ft 
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in 

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non— i% 
-im— Mt 

181ft 

m— ft 

4* 

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A 

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IBM IBM 
M Sh 1ft 
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10ft 10 10b 

IBM 15VS IBM 

41* 4 4 Vi 

lib io% ion 

mb n n 


82 .1 
S .12 .6 


17b + % 
34V.+ 1ft 
im+ ft 
ft 
it 
ftk 


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714+ lb 
3M + M 


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251 

785 

180 17 »4i 
1-48 7A 2H; 
3800118 
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2S+ .*• 

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an 

6ft + ft 

51 

12 — n 

.85 + » 

14 



2VS 

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14 141% 

51% 51% 

17 I7K 
71% 71ft — A 
36 36M + V4 

S 2Wfc+ M> 
UK IBM— * 
1714 IBM + A 
40Yb «H4— M 
20M 21 + M 

IM 151ft 
5M 5M— M 
281ft 20*%+ M 
5M 5M— ft 
4 4M— 1ft, 

Cfe 1 + M 
CIA «%+ 1% 
81ft BA— n 
B ft + to 
U 171%+ lift 
UM 15 — to 


IB IBM + 214 
5to *14— M 
41ft 414 
CM At 
2BM 30 
2M 2K— 14 
4M 4W 
UM 14M+ M 
1514 15K+ M 

m *to+ m 
21ft 2ft+ ft 
17M 17V.— 14 
M M 

4014 4114— to 
38b 55+1% 
3M 3ft + 1ft 
*14 TO 

3f*% 3*4%— M 
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51% 5K+ to 
U 13 
7M 7M+ 1ft 
Z» » +1 
301ft 3014— 14 
31ft 4 to— to 
714 0 

l*1fc 2A%+ 1% 
31 3114— lift 

414 4M 
714 7to 
B A4+ 4% 
Uto 141ft — lfa 
131% 141ft + M 
A% ftto + 1% 


1316 

414 5M+ 4% 
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401ft 41 — I 
*lft *M— to 
* *44+ 1ft 

51ft 5to— 1 
214 24% 

4BM 471%+ 1ft 
141b 1514+ lift 
22 2M+2I4 

11 — to 
12+7 
IBM + lb 
1M+ to 
31ft— 1% 

48to— ito 

fi + * 

4M— 1ft 

171% 

Sto+ to 
14+14 
UM 

2244 + 2to 
» + M 
2Wft 

to 


M IT 54 BV 8 

*» r-'i r.i 

TOfti r-i i 
Jt U UM 35 ton 
451* I8-. 

tJOBlIft IBM 
will in: 
2337 «4fe ftto 
sin n 
t Kti no 

::t n. 

43* 21% 2*% 
1*77 44* Ito 
id 31 TMtllto l*to 

■36 U 1321 B-i 

317 9ft Jto 
543 3V| 2to 
fl»U 1230 8 

30*811 Cto 

U. 

t. » jg.fi ,£ 

r* 


B - to 
8* r M 
S.t * ft 
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Uto— to 
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J* 5 * to 
13 * lie 
3b 

3b + to 
41%+ to 
Uto + Ito 

ao« 

35'S- 3to 
id**. to 
4« ri 
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7b 

I3.-5 * \ 

rt- 

I — 



M 13 
I 1 JO 65 


1914+14 
134% + 4% 


PussGM Mt .7 
PennVn 1400 34 


*r. 


46 47 

IBM IBM 
3S*% 35*%— 2 
31ft 314 
381ft 3*M+ 14 
UM L51A 
214 2M+ 1% 
714 814+ to 
211ft 2314+ 2 
1314 1314— 1ft 
91ft *14+ 1% 


TO 104% 

101ft TOM 
1314 1314— — 
ftto 71% + tft 
1*1%+ to 
ftto + m 
34 + 4K. 

4414+ Ito. 
ito + 1% 
IBM + 2 . 
B*%+ to! 
3M- 1ft 



UPrasd 

US Ant 

USBcp 

US Cop 

USDxon 

USEnr 

US HCs 

USH1H 

US Prco 

US Shit 

U5SUT 

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% 
412 
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M U 9» 
1330 

2J0 35 305 
1353 

JO 62 1510 
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117 

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JOB 5 .051 

. . ’“4 

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270 

A 58 m 

too U 68 
2 80 12 SU 
AO IB 284 
-54 23 1657 
.12 14 21* 




421% + In 

iim+ to 



I HOI 1^5 « 


American Esdiange Options 


Flaunts as of doso of trodlns Friday. 


30 

747 5 * } 

4336111% 11 Vi Ilf* 
74*15 > 3b 14to' 

ISSU'b 13-7 Uto 
136 Sto SL 5b. 
15362*1* lift, an*' 

1*4 5 35b M'ft 2to- 

IGK-. Zito 2? - 
i3*:r- tob IBM 
H75B IS- I* ‘ 
_ 3X7126 - 25 2fl ■ 
* JC41?-3 ??» »» 


2DM 2Tto + IM 
7to 10M + 3 
6M 71ft 
4M 5 + 1ft 
41% 4M+ « 

um in 

2Sb 26 

3214 23 + 1A 

ftto 4»+ M 

MM IM + tft 

24 V. am- )% 
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SDK 2114 + IM 
12M 1414+ Ito 
42 4214+ 14 

M >14— to 
tl T1 

UM 1514+154 
231ft 34 + M 
12 121ft 

4 IM 43K 
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41ft Aft— ]*% 

a* a»+ « 

19M l*to— 14 
1714 1714 

* n- to 

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1A% IB 
B1 4214 + 1 
29* 3Ah + 1 
5M SM 
s*to sn + m 

2 21ft + 1b 
11M 1U4 
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2* 2*M + 1% 

UK U + lift 

4«I Aft + to 

* * — to 
34* a 

wv. to* 

Uto 1114+ to 
3B 31 + I 


MlM 

35 



r 

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40 

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45 

ito 

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1 

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r 

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216 


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77ft 

11-U 3MB 

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n 

■ 

to 

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m 

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t 


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r 

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r 


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45 


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r 

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r 


CMHT 

Bft 

r 

IM 

(ft 



a 


r 

r 


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22ft 

r 

i 

r 


2M% 

S 

MB 

3-U 

r 


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r 


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40 

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416 

r 

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27ft 

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716 

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r 

t 


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r 

i 

r 


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130 

146 

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2m 

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101% I7VS 1 5-1* 
IB» » to 
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Tandy » 15b 

3» 25 184ft 

JSK 30 Stk 
3» B TM 

3H « 3-U 
Texaco 30 r 
8ft M 31k 
371% 4* MB 

TUrtty 20 1 11-14 
m* 2M 1-14 
214% 25 r 

U Cartt 35 111% 

441b m VH 

461b 45 2 

**» a to 

A S IM 
U 5 St 25215-U 
271% 30 M 

rnit Un 35 (to 
43to 40 3to 
M B Ml 
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MM as ft 

1A% 40 r 

Auo Kov 
AM F U (Ift 
181% IS Ito 
Uto I7to I 

Uto 20 ft 
Uto ITto r 

AMR IS B* 
47* X 13 
47* 40 8 

47to 45 31% 

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4*14 501 U-U 

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Artda U 3M 
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10* 30 to 

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lf« S 3-li 
AWMI 20 Ito 
30V> 35 to 

30to 40 Mt 
Bully » m 
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33ft 25 4% 

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r r 


OMIon & price Colls Puts [ Option ft price Calls 


Firm a i% >4 r 

2ito 22ft 7-U 1 r 

2lto 25 3-1* r r 

FMW 30 2V> 3ft ft 

21M 22to 11-14 Ito r 

21* 25 to 13-U r 

Q C a IS Sto r to 

171ft 17to 11% IM lift 

171ft 30 Mt 1 3 

1714 234b 3-U to At 

1714 35 1-16 1% r 

GoftMB » 23-1* 3ft r 

12 12ft IM* 13-U r 
U 15 r ft r 

Croc# 40 lift 1ft 1 

HollFB 25 SH 3ft ft 

aft a to i » 

Lfl Poc 20 23-U r r 

22ft 22to r r tft 

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MACOM 15 4to 4b t 

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t*4b 30 ft 1ft Ilk 

i*ft 23ft r ft r 

lift 25 Mb r r 

K DU U 2ft r r 

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NMMEn 25 (ft r r 

31ft 30 2tt 3to ft 

UM 35 to ft r 


N 5Mtf M 25-1* 21ft 

12 12ft ft r 

17 15 1% to 


Nov 

ft s 
2 2b 
4ft f 
ito r 
*ft r 
r 
Mb 

3-14 r 
15-U 214 

3ft r 
MB to 

b ii-u 

2» 3ft 

SM Bib 


r 4 7-1* 

M 13-U215-U 

t r Tft 

r r l-U 


■ft 40 to 13-U 

■ft 45 t T 
yarn 40 r t 

34 4S f r 

54 » r r 

54 55 15-u Zto 

A « 16 13-U 

Revca 22ft 3ft r 

»* 25 15-U 7 

Uto 30 r to 
RovDiit 55 414 r 

Aft A TH6 lb 
Saerte A tft r 
» SS Ito 3ft 
M 40 Mi Ito 
A 65 1-U r 
Skmr OS 3 r 


54 55 Ito 3ft r 

Si 40 M6 Ito r 

A 65 1-U t ' 

Skmr 35 3 r b 

Uto 48 1 2 316 

Atrip 25 r r t-tt 

31ft 30 25-14 3b 7-U 

sun a *-u ito 3b 

Storer « Sto s r 

7t%- A 23b r r 

7R6 40 18 r r 

»ft 65 Uto r r 

Till. 70 *14 r f 

7K 75 4M 6 to 


25 r r t-tt 
30 25-14 31% 7-U 


3>U ft 

1% 116 

r 3 

ft r 

0% r 


s-u b 

2U213-U 


7M 75 
71ft V 
Ttoqce 35 
411% A 


(to 6 to 

l 2ft r 

r r Mi 

Tft r ft 


4» 45 5-u 15-U r 

A B 1-U r 76- 

Verlon 30 r 3ft r 

Z*to 35 to 15-U r 

ZanUn 171b r T 5-16 

l*ft 20 tft 2 13-U 

)*» 27ft T-U r r 

»to 25 to ft r 

S*p Ok Sep Dec 
Alcan B ft lb l 

25ft 30 ft 3-li r 

junsx IS to r 13-U 

Ub 29 >• 5-U r 

AmBrna 45 r r l 1 : 
























































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n 


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business trailers with 
contributions from business travelers 

Turn <¥i ordinary business Irip into a pleasant, more 
efficient journey Guide covers Amsterdam, Brussels, 
Copenhagen, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, Geneva tendon, 
Lyon, Mien, Munich, Pahs, Stodchohv Zurich. Over 
200 fact-filed pages, this hardcover eefeion is a great gift 
idea for cofleagues, business contacts, or yourself. 

Sevon subdivisions for each city ndude: 1. Basic city 
overview with vital information. Z Hotels, vrifh emphasis 
on busness service! 3l Restaurants, for on- and offidufy 
pleasure. 4: After-hours suggestions. 5. Diversions, from 
grand opera to jogging. 6. Shopping. 7. Weekending 
ideas. 

fawf e vk w sfomlhttnBv d ^ 

'Where to stayefine and revel in Europe-. a handy /•. 
companion.' 

Tkwef and Leisure, American Express. 
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Srgnafure, Oners Gbb International 
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As restaurant critic 
for the Trib, Patricia We9s 
has explored the 
treasures of food 
shopping and eating in 
Paris, from the bistros, 
cafes, cheese shops and 
outdoor markets, to the 
classic feasts. 

The gastronomic 

delights of Paris ore - 

varied, historic, abundant - and too de&otus to be left 
to chance. Food Lovers uncovers the many delights to 
be found afi aver this extraordinary afy arid takes an 
uprto-date look at some of Paris' internationally known 
restaurants. 

Weis includes critical commentary anecdote^ 
history, local lore - as wefi as basic fads Bee business 
hows end nearest metro station. To recreate the taste 
of France at home, 50 recipes are included, gleaned 
from the notebooks of Parisian chefc. 

Paperback, over 300 pages featuring a French/ 
Engfish food glossary and 140 evocative photographs. 


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: Gbe/Q^en^NewlforfcJllogcujiia 

'An lustrated tour ftnwgfu one oflhe great food 
dSesoflheworkL m 

PhBadelphia Daily News 


4 © 

~£*a siIl* 


.Country. 
. Telex _ 


International Herald Tribune Book Divtsbrv 
181, avenue Charles-de-Gauk; 

92521 NeuiyCedex, France. 


» dwdc method of payment 




□ f 1 Enclosed is niy payment (Payment can be made in any 
I 1 convertible Eucoean aiwn ntnrnrf awfwma mk. 


H i nil ittid iTW 

espies ofUit GUIDE ID BUSINESS 
TRAVH.& BOHnAMMENT: EUROPE 
at US$16 aadw plus po s ta ge , 
add $1^50 each m Europe, $4 each outside Europe. 


ftaefama Nj'-nAfocs fcr-« ^’TrxJiArntE.USA. Fiendi 


□ Please suspend mysubsenpfion during my absence and etfendlhe date of expiration Hit I aedtedrd m IHI . CflS 

QCCOrrfnalv afterward. ™ 


copies of FOOD 10VBTS GUIDE TO MRIS 

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add$T50 eadi infurape, $4‘each outside Europe. 


accordingly afterward. 

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Page 13 


• * 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


t 




nmn 


QuneManl 
To Buy Spam’s 
BancbFmanaas 

Ream 

MADRID — Chase Manhat- 
tan Bank said it has signed a 

ptfidit ioml a gree r r yn t to 

91 percent of the share czuxl 
□f Banco de Fmanz&s SA from 
the major shareholders, Gnipo 
Fierro SA. 

The second, annonneed Fi> 

f&sl authonzation^a^the 
purchase before July 20 and on 
certain changes within Finan- 
zas. iadhHfing the setting aside 
of iSbflfron pesetas ($20.1 mil- 
lion) of its capital to clear non~ 
perfonning loans. 

Bnanas’ total capital and 
itserves arc 3 .5 Union pesetas. 
The spokesman said Cha«> 

tas pashanrfor the remammg9 
percent of Faamzas' share capi- 
tal after the Grnpo Fierro pur- 
chase is dosed. 

He would not disclose the 
priceto be paid to Giupo Fierro 
for its 91-percent stake in Fin- 

auras. 


Occidental Signs China Coal Pact 


By Jim Mann 

Los Angela Times Sauce 

BELJING — F-nrKq^ ntORS Than 
five years of negotiations with Chi- 
nese officials, Occidental Petro- 
leum Corp. on Saturday si gned t he 
final contract for development of 
one of the world’s la rgerf surface 
coal mines. The accoitL valued at 
about $650 million, bad been “an- 
nounced” several times in the past 
fewyears. 

The coal mine will be built 220 
miles (330 kilometers) west of the 
capita! in Shanxi province and will 
supply an estimated 1 5 mfllkffl tong' 
of coal a year after production 
starts in 1987. Approximately two- 
thirds of the coal will be exported, 
and the remainder will be used 
within China 

' With the exception of an avia- 
tion co-production agreement 
signed in April involving McDon- 
nell Douglas Corp., the Occidental 
contract is the biggest joint venture 
signed to date between a U.S. en- 
terprise and the People’s Republic 
of China. 

The final contract was signed in 
ceremonies at the Great HaSof the 
People here by Dr. Armand Ham- 
mer, chairman and chief executive 


officer of Occidental, and' officials 
of (he China National Coal Devel- 
opment Corp. and die Rank of Chi- 
na, the two Oiinese partners in the 
joint venture. 

Over the last half dwadp Occi- 
dental has taken part in four previ- 
ous ceremonies here to sign or ini- 
tial preliminary agreements 
involving the coal mine project 
Each time, the proposed accord 
stalled because of problems in ar- 
ranging financing 

“I guess you are wondering 


the Nebraska Construction & Min- 
ing Corp. unit Of Peter Kiewit Sons, 
Inc. Under this proposed arrange- 
ment, Kiewit was to bold 25 per- 
cent of the Chinese coal venture 
and Occidental another 25 percent,' 
with the Chin ese mining corpora- 
tion bolding the rest. 

However, Kiewit dropped out of 
the project last fall after the price of 
coal sank to 540 a ton. Its 25- 


and there wiB-be another, Dr. 
Hammer told reporters Saturday. 
"There will be no other signing. 
This is h.” 

Under the contract signed Satur- 
day, Occidental will have a 25-per- 
cent interest in the project- Another 
25 percent will be nda by a wholly 
owned subsidiary erf the Bank of 
f!hina | and the r e na m i ng 50 per- 
cent will be held by the China Na- 
tional Coal Development Corp. 

In April 1984, miring President 
Ronald Reagan's trip to China, Dr. 
Hammer had put his signature to a 
tentative pact under whidi Occi- 
dental had an American partner. 


of China, and as a result, 
China’s share of the investment in- 
creased from 50 percent to 75 per- 
cent 

Dr. Hammer said Saturday that 
his company’s total investment in 
tlv- mmmgprqcct ™~n bp. S175 mfl. 
Bon phis$25 maKou in interest, for 
a total of S200 million. The length 
of the contract is 30 years. 

China is the tinni-largest pro- 
ducer of coal in the world after the 
Soviet Union and the United 
States, and coal accounts for as 
much as 70 percent of the country’s 
energy. However, in the face of a 
severe energy shortage, China is 
among to increase its coal produc- 
tion to needy twice the current lev- 
el by the year 2000. 


Montedison Unit, Compo to Merge 


Reuters 

MILAN — Ausimoni SpA, the 
' j chemicals unit of Monte- 
SpA, has agreed to 
with Compo Industries, a U. 
company specializing in synthetic 
materials, Montedison's chairman, 
Mario Schimbemi, told sharehold- 
ers Friday. 

Mr. Schimbemi said the merger 
would enable Ausunant to pene- 
trate U.S. markets with the help of 

l’S local manaynwn t and 

j lead to timitar arran gemen ts 

with other companies. 

He gave no details of how and 
when tne merger would take place. 
He said, however, that if the merger 
goes through, it would enable Anri- 
moot to obtain a listing on U.S. 
stock exchanges. 

Aimmont, which also makes 
high-performance materials, had 
revenue last year of 5162 billion 
lire (S26S million). Compo had rev- 
enue of SI 32.4 milli on. 


The U.S. company acquired Van 
Heugten BV, a Dutch company 
that is a world leader in the produc- 
tion of synthetic carpets, in 1981. 

Montedison has expanded its in- 
ternational presence m recent years 
through a series of altiimneg and 

Investor Group Acquires 
Stake in Ctoett, Peabody 

Ratos 

WASHINGTON — An investor 
group led by Craig Hall, a Dallas 
financier, has acquired a 9 5-per- 
cent stake in Cluett, Peabody & Co. 
common stock and it intends 


company private 


er or taking 
through a 

The grotm tokf the Securities and 
Exchange Commission Friday that 
its members acquired their 790.900 
Gnett, Peabody shares for about 
5252 million. 


acquisitions. Hie group has a 50- 
percent interest in Himont Ina, a 
producer of polypropylene, in a 
joint venture with Hercules Inc. 

The company said MoataHsan 
group sales rose 14 percent in the 
first quarter of 1985, to 3200 bil- 
lion lire. 

Mr. Schimberni said Montedis- 
on’s controlling syndicate cf share- 
holders had increased its share in 
tire company's equity capital, from 
26£7 percent to 34 percent 

Industry sources said four insur- 
ance companies and three other 
business groins had been admitted 
to the controlling syndicate, boost- 
ing its share of company capital by 
around 7 percent. 

The four are Sotieta Assicora- 
trice Italians, HAS, Assicuraaom 
Generali and La Foodoria. They 
were joined by the Femnzi group, 
which controls F.ridania Zucduen- 
fid SpA, and the Maltauro and 
Inghirami groups. 


Arab Bank Buys 
Into Dutch firm, 

Raters 

BAHRAIN — Arab Bank- 
ing Corp., based in Bahrain, has 
bought a stake in the Dutch 
construction company Hol- 
landsche Beton Groep NV, a 
bank official said Sunday. 

Peter Faberij de Jonge, of the 

martrwtahlf! wirririfs depart- 
ment, said the bank acquired a 
block of 200,000 shares of the 


to 7.1 pe rcent of its issued capi- 
tal, at a cost of 133 to 140 guil- 
ders (53830 to $4030) a share. 

Mr. Fabaij de Jonge de- 
clined to say whether the 'pur- 
chase had been made for the 
bank or for a customer. Arab 
Banking, owned by Kuwait, 
Libya and Abu Dhabi, is 
known to run discretionary 
portfolios for investors. 


Shadow of Saudi Threat Hangs Over OPEC Talks 


(Coutmued from Page 7) 
serin g prices sow and cashing in 
later when prices go up again. 

Others, like Nigeria, cannot af- 
ford to wait They are populous 
countries with development prob- 
lems that ay out for solutions now. 
These countries fed that they must 
rapidly sdl as much oil as they can, 
at whatever price. 

In a series of meetings late last 
year and early this year, OPEC 
tried to reach compromises that 
would satisfy the different factious. 
Production quotas and price levels 
were set, but they have not worked 
wdi 

OPEC set a limit on the 13 coun- 
tries’ c o mbi n ed production of 16 
million bands a day. The hugest 
quota was assigned to Saudi Ara- 
bia, a bit more than 43 million 
bands a day. 


During the yrar, OPEC has man- 
aged to keep wi thin the UnmOioa 
limit — in fact. Russell Seal, gener- 
al manag er of British Petroleum 
PLC, estimated recently that 
OPEC production had slipped be- 
low IS imffioa bands a day — but 
only because Saudi Arabia, trying 
to salvage the agreement, has cut its 
own production to somewhere be- 
tween 23 million and 22 million 
barrels a day. Nigeria and others 
are obviously pumping more oil 
than is authorized. 

In a price agreement on Jan. 30. 
OPEC out the benchmark price of 
Arab light ofl to S28 a bared. Butin 
this agreement OPEC decided not 
to cut the price of Arab heavy oil at 
the same umc, keeping it at 52630 
a band. 

This was aimed at satisfying pro- 
ducers of light oil. like Nigeria, who 


had complained that they were hurt 
by the big differential between the 
price of their oil and the price of 

heavy ofl. 

Iran, Algeria and Libya voted 
against the cut in price, and Gabon 
abstained. Nevertheless, almost all 
members were still expected to 
honor the agreement. 

But OPEC producers, even those 
who voted in favor cf the agree- 
ment, have failed to adhere to these 
prices. They have discounted prices 
and engaged in barter deals to meet 
the competition from non-OPEC 
members. This has contributed to a 
general decline in the juice that 
most refiners are paying for oil 

On June 26 the price for Arab 
light oil in the European root mar- 
ket was $26.95 a barrel a bit more 
than $1 below the OPEC price. The 
price of Arab heavy was ! 


rd, 5130 below the OPEC price. 

The Saudis’ impatience was 
made dear in early June, in a letter 
delivered by Yamani to the 
OPEC Executive Council meeting 
rnlhif, Saudi Arabia. In the letter. 
King Fahd warned OPEC mem- 
bers not to take Saudi Arabia for 
granted as the producer willing to 
cot back so that the overall produc- 
tion limit could be held- If the oth- 
ers continued to exceed their quo- 
tas, he raid, Saudi Arabia would 
increase its production to 5 million 
bands a day. 

Prompted by die Fahd letter, the 
Executive Council wall submit a 
resolution to the Vienna meeting 
calling for sanctions against mem- 
bers who violate production or 
pricing agreements. Under the res- 
olution, an offender could be ex- 
pelled. 


V 



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JP Inca 
Jonas 
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vemur 
jomt 
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USGvT 


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, L 1*38 KL ■ OFM 121* 

cmtai jtn HLtoircG nl y*!!. 

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1051 

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1042 ITJ* 
1.10 NL 
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1354 1343 
842 9.17 
124* IIP 
10*3 1148 
1135 14g 
*43 *05 

H is mi 

25.94 2L35 
1245 1273 
145* 15.91 
9 .15 *53 


1*37 

IU9 


Cue B4r 
CUB Kir 
Cue K2r 


BM Ask 
75* NL 
904 NL 
708 NL 


Cue Sir 2075 NL 
Cus S3r 843 NL 


Cue S4 r 
inti r 
KPM r 
TiiFr r 
KJdPeo r 
LMH 


Leblnvet 

Levme 


557 NL 
504 NL 
1X1* NL 
AM NL 
T3JH NL 
2530 NL 
2404 NL 
1444 NL 
17.** NL 
772 NL 

Gcp: 

Cl or te 1X04 UOO 
GaMM 341 NL 
GNMA 77* NL 
Gmw 9.12 NL 
Re* 1734 NL 
UBertv Group: 
Am LA- 1145 NL 
Tic Pre *42 NL 
US Gvt imovpH 
UndDw 2X54 NL 


LMnr 
Loomis 
Cartt 
Met 
Lord 
AHUM 
Bnd Ob 
Dev Gi 
incom 
TajcFr 
TxNY 
ValAo 
Luttieran 
Fund 
Incom 
MUM 
Man 
MFI 
MFG 
MS NC 
MS VA 
MIT 
MIG 
MID 
MCD 
MEG 
MFD 
MFB 
MMB 
MFH 
MM H 
MSF 


1900 NL 

■amidBce 

2X34 NL 
1903 NL 
Abtaettl 
100* HUB 
«U7 1144 
745 U* 
XW 
*78 1048 
1021 1872 
M2S llJfi 
Bra: 
1554 1447 
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7 JO 741 
FI aand: 
1003 1051 
WJO MJI 
uufttoj? 
10.15 ULA* 
11.94 12JJ7 
1144 12J57 
944 HL3V 
1174 048 

1*11 U29 

0.11 1306 


Mescnrt 
Merrill 
■ Bale 
Caotri 


1002 

*93 747 
*77 M 3t 
752 *43 
3*59 NL 
2421 NL 
Lvndi: 

1544 1*74 

W S 274 

Eau Bd 12.19 070 

FedSc 959 ULS5 

1272 NL 

*1* US 
11.00 114* 
1*13 IIP 
KIM 1UI 
955 9.95 
947 907 
7J* 747 
147* 17.93 
115« 1244 
90S 959 
unaval! 


FdTm 
HI Inc 
HI Oil 
IntHM 
inTrm 
UMaJ 
MwnM 

MuaUn 

PocFd 
Ptml* 
SdTeh 
S (4 Val 


MM AM 
MMAKI 
MSB H 
Midwest 
Sana 
imGv 


UCKVOR 
unavail 
2042 NL 
Grauo: 
1U4 NL 
1071 NL 


LG Gvt WJ« UN 
Mui Ben IU* 1X43 
Mutual of Omaha: 
Amor mot nl 


Grwtti 
incam 
Tx Fre 
MdOim 
MuTShr 
Nat Avia 
Naund 
Nat 
Baian 
Bead 
CaTxE 
FedSc 
Grwlti 
PtvM 


*44 758 
*93 *71 
KLM 11 J* 
1*53 NL 
S£lf NL 
1043 1143 
1242 NL 
Securities: 
11*7 154* 

3J3 159 
11,91 1157 
114fl25{ 
*45 M3 
771 IP 
647 7.1* 
U9 94* 
971 952 
*91 941 
677 *74 
978 1075 
1X72 1346 


RealE 
Stock 
Tax Ex 
Tor Re 
Ffllrfd 
NatTete 
NCJtonwtOe 

NatFtf 05* 125? 


NatGBt 

Narad 

NELlto 

EouM 

Grwtti 


949 953 
943 1*41 
Fund: 
2944 2241 
1406 2*13 
1091 1158 
Sot Eo IIP aa* 
.T ax Ex 1 3S 7J7 
ttmtemer »*«"■ 
Enrwv WP nl 

Guard 4170 NL 


LB4V 


NY Mun 
Newt GI 
Newt Inc 
NNftatot 
Ntawi 
Nidi It 
Naunc 
NEInTr 

Nonn 

Apolto 


BM Aik 
438 NL 
754 NL 
1742 NL 
U4 NL 
2*31 NL 
842 NL 


3034 NL 
1460 NL 
354 NL 
1221 NL 
13J2 NL 


970 NL 
1051 NL 
1834 NL 
13J1 NL 
1478 NL 
759 NL 
unman 
_ 1250 NL 

Ouot meli i ier Fd: 

1*32 1674 


Ren ton 
Slock 
NevaFd 
Nuveen 
OMDun 


Direct 
Eainc 
Owen 
Gout 
HI YW 


R*cv 
Sped 
Taraet 
Tx Fra 
Ttaie 

Aoresv 

CpHf 

HtohYW 

Paine 

Atlas 

Aiaer 

GNMA 

HIYld 

InvGd 

Olvmp 
Tax Ex 
PaxWld 
Penn so 
Ptnw Mu 
PetmPiT 
Pnikj 
paaonbe 
Satan 
CVFd 
Grwtft 
HIYld 
Stock 
PC CP 

Pilgrim 

CapFd 
GNMA 
Manna 
PAR 
PBaFd 
PlioHi 
Ptoaetr 
Band 
Pund 
II Ine 
in inc 
PUtrnd 
Price 
Gram. 
Gltiiac 
HIYld 
incnm 
Ml 
M Era 


3005 2151 
778 *50 
949 1QJ 
*8* 742 

USl 1477 
3046 2X36 
16541771 
841 *88 
1477 1549 
1*65 1*10 
Hertam; 
1945 NL 
1250 NL 

154* NL 
Webber: 
MM4 1143 
142* 1542 

*59 1*43 

1079 1075 
1054 1*49 
940 U49 

UU510JU 

1247 NL 
*83 NL 
*78 NL 
1077 NL 
*69 950 


1155 1255 
1673 1*21 
.1X57 7657 
977 957 
UTS 1448 
1L12 NL 
Grp: 
7J9 861 
ISM 1640 


2350 2375 
unaval! 
*10 846 
Fond: 
975 1*11 
2171 2X1$ 

1756 U44 

1471 1551 

1353 NL 
Funds: 
1*57 NL 
tall NL 
1849 NL 
844 HL 
IXJ* NL 

UN NL 

N HarU 1X17 NL 
StiTrB 50* NL 


TxFrl 

TxFHY 

T*PfSI 

PrtnPTE 

rO 

MOOT 
Fund • 

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Prudmflat 

AdlPftf 

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E*MlY 
GtoU r 
GvPto 
G^tSc 
HIYld 
HYMo 
MbNY 
NOec 
OrtnG 
QtytiK 
Rsdi r 
UfllllY 
Fidnara 
C am# 
Carr* 

ccd2 

InioSc 
lift Ea 
Geora 
Gratae 


ITS NL 

1078 NL 
SJ1 NL 
940 M6 

Swvlm*; 

041 NL 

1079 HL 
*65 NL 


HUaao 
Ml YU 

incom 


St N NL 
TAN NL 
1*0*1*91 
am NL 
MJ7.NL 
1045 105* 
1071 1077 

US! 1543 

BUS NL 
1X31 1191 
MJI 1745 
1X4*1*31 
9J4 NL 
U.13 TX77 
Funds: 
1441 1553 
1430 1**| 
7.17 NL 
47J0 4*.t6 
48305005 
11.18U29 
1174 1X10 
1775 1155 
1X1* 1X2* 
1145 U73 
1970 30.99 

1X11 0.9* 

7*43 1655 
7.14 74* 
HLM 1200 


NYTx 

Optn 

Ootnll 

TW Ex 
USGtd 
VUd 
vuvao 


RaHw 

RoaGr 

RochTx 

RaweTF 


Bid Ask 
HUB 1*29 
1L12 T2J5 
1155 1X06 
3359 3402 
1441 1X34 
1734 1895 
BM 1972 

5X4* NL 

432 NL 
1X52 1478 
*93 HUB 


SFTBqt 


74* NL 
1*61 1140 


Eauft M71 NL 
Grwtti 1751 NL 
inco 1153 NL 
Monlc 1243 NL 
rodder Funds: 

ColTx HLII NL 
Dove) *171 NL 
COPGI 1*13 NL 
Grwln 14JI NL 
Incom 1242 NL 
Inti Fd 2348 NL 
MMB *27 NL, 
NYTogc 1066 NL 
TxFrtO 1803 NL 

Security F» 
Action 830 
Bond 808 8481 
Eddy 546 6J9L 
Invest 854 9461 
Ultra 878 940] 

Selected Fuads: 

Am She 1159 NL, 
Sol She 1849 NL 

Settoman Group: 

Cop Fa 1X12 1X25 
CmStk 1270 1X49 
Oman AM *77 
Growth 568*12 

Inco 1241 1340 
MaHTx 7J2790 

MlchTx 773 *t2 

MftinTx 747754 

NOIITn 746 *02 
NY Tax 743 8J01 
OhloTx 748 755] 


COT a* 
CoTjcQ 
Sentinel 
Bakm 
Band 
Com S 
Grwtti 
Sequoia 
Sentry 

"Sro* 

AurGr 

Apptv 

CalMu 

Fdval 

GtaOal 

HfYld 

MoGvT 

MMun 


*M *» 
*77 *571 

1057 1U» 
*45 7JJ5 
T940 2170 
1458 tSJJf 
4X05 NL 
1148 1270 


1059 NL, 
117a 1X34 
3*5*2144 
U69 154*1 
7.15 753 
ZL10 2X21, 
1170 1948 
111* 1353 
1453 1477 
1*04 1553 

m nli 

M46 NL 
Ftxids: 
1543 1**7 

mu ram 

Barney: 
1451 NL, 
946 UJSl 
1X61 1646; 
1440 W 
104* NL 
497 ML 
2147 32X1 
id Grp: 
S60 *12 
*56 7.17 
145 *4S( 
NLZ7 NLi 
1*75 NLj 
tnv: 
mown 
Gram r imvon 
, Inwt 7173 7370 
Steadman Food*: 
Am lad 279 ML, 
Auk J* NL 
invest ua nl 
, Ocean *32 NL 
Siebi Roe Mi: 
Bead 889 NL 
Cop Oa 3Z48 NL! 
Otter 1832 NL 
HIYld 1047 NL 

Sued 1*78 NL 
i Stock 1*65 NL 
TaxE* *52 ML 
TofRer 2X77 NL 
_lMv 1855 NL 
)SiraMMc Funttu 
CopW *79 742 
tow* 5*5 *50 
. Myr 4JD 577 
]S»nrtnDv 2517 NL 
Str at Gt& W41 NL 
fstraneln nji 1*53 
IT IMS 174? 
TetlaSn iso* 


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loco 

invwt 
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{Smith 
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incGre 
, USGvt 
SoGenln 
SBwstGt 
ISWlplPC 
Saw to 
SWe Be 
Cam St 
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ton 
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SI Frm Bl 
SOtfiMl 



Teamletan 
Fran 
Global i 
Stab II 

TOgrami 

i OWIII 

Inca 
Omr 
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tTrvat 
EqGttl 

h4. bJbc 13 

ami 

GUI r ___ 
Grwlh 14J1 NL 
Select 2*69 NL 
Ultra r 758 741 
USGv 9956 NL 
Vtata r 4J9 *91 
SAA Group: 

Corattn m» NL 
Gold 772 NL 
Grwth 1473 NL 
Inco 1177 NL 
SWt I47B NL 
TxEH 1X46 NL 
TxElt 1146 NL 
TxESH J0L5S NL 
umitod Mamnt: 

Ganrl 818 NL 
Gwth 1952 NL 
Inca 1240 NL 
indl *10 NL 
AAatl MB NL 
United Funds: 

Aocm RX7 9.15 
Bend 571 *24 
GvfSec 578 540 
tnKvth 571 *26 
Can lac 1*62 1876 
HI Inc 1X56 1*82 
Incom 1*47 1541 

Monl *86 7.15 
NwCCpt 444579 
■Wire *05 *61 
Sc Eng *99 *43 
Vana 541 *25 
utd ... Services: 

GUShr 573 NL 
GBT 1456 NL 
Growth 741 NL 
Pnod 44 NL 
ValFra 1048 NL 
Value Line Fd: 
Bond 1248 NL 
Fond 1370 NL 
679 NL 
1*41 NL 
1048 NL 
1129 NL 
1546 1642 


Lev Gt 
MunSd 
Spi Sit 
VKmoM 
VK US 
Vance 
COPE! 
□BUI 
Dverf 


1556 1*36 
ExchanM: 


NL 

£L05 NL 
3U9 NL 

ExFd » 11145 NL 
ExBsf 9*94 NL 


FklEf 
ScFldf 
VWWrt 
E®rtr 
Gamin 
IvtsI 
Mara 
NactiT 
ODtvl 
QDiv || 
OOvlII 
STAR 
TCI« 
TCUh 
GNMA 
WYBd 
■GBnd 
SWITr 
tad Tr 
MuHY 


MuLO 
M1BL0 
MaSht 
VSPGd 
VSPW 
VSPSv 
VSPTc 
W6ttll 
Welim 
wndsr 
VMlur* 
NYVen 
ftPF Bd 
iKPt 

WPG 
Well St 
WWn Eo 


S9J6 NL 
64J3 NL 
Graup: 
3255 NL 
7878 NL 
1779 NL 
1147 NL 
3*43 NL 
1*61 NL 
870 NL 
2X52 NL 
1056 NL 
2745 NL 
3X56 NL 
MS NL 
867 NL 
*14 NL 
1041 NL 
2247 NL 
*48 NL 
1U8 NL 
9JU NL 
1*65 NL 
1*33 NL 
7J8 NL 
1X51 NL 
1*13 NL 
1047 NL 
1469 NL 
U43 NL 
1442 NL 
Advtura:- 
173 *54 

778 NL 
104* 1148 
2272 NL 
IJO 868 
1*9* NL 
1147 ELM 


deVea 053 nl 

NOUW 2041 NL 

, Ptoe 1*10 NL 

YBPtf *30 862 

NL — No toad 
(sates enamel 
*— Pfevtm dOyM 
Fauoto. r- Re d emption 
raaree may aoeiv. 
n— E x dMdamL 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


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OCEANWIDE 
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i, BMW. bwa- 


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for 
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port, . ... . 

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a detwy. M saraia httatUm- 
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Pori* 5S3 S6 27, p Tot & 1 


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Tut 01-S7fj 9658. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


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XK & XX Century watts of ari 20th 
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Head ofifae in New York 
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TEL 724 2972 


** MADRID GIPSY ** 

nVXZ. Tefc 233.03.19 


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10 KEN5MGT0N CHUHCH ST, Wl 
■TBj 937 913* OB 9379133H 


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bat Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


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67 ChBtom Shoe* 
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Tefc 486 3724 or 4B6 1158 


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Tel: 38 29 32 


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Tefc 0T/2S2 81 74 


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MuMnouc*TM3429 55. 

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: rt ’ll'T-BRiBB 




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y/i, .’t ,^v.i 





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-1- area Pam’t Etaws & trawi ier- 
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cotl Service. Trt tOU 38676 71. 


TM 411-6877. Visa 


Servioe. Tel: W2084373S. 


vice. Tel 08988 34 42. 


Td, 91 84 59 


THi 411 72 57. VGA 




N.Eu- 


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: Tofc 02/520 23 65. 


Tefc 283397 


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Guide SetvicB. Tefc KOO) 763842 


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Tefc 01-3738849. 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Service. 
Hemtaw/GtowidL Tefc B34 7945. 


1CNION. French wcott „ 
llarelOptn. Tefc <01) 589 490ft 


MAENHD SQECllOBB ESCORT Sur- 
viee Tefc 401 1507. GedH Ctmk 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Service. 
Tefc 0711 /262115a 


VBMA VB* ESCORT SBVKE. Tab 

tWannol 65 41 5B 


VBMA CD - BOOST SERVICE 
0222/9205 612 


LONDON GENE ESCORT Service. 
Tok 370 7151. 



Oxford on America. 

(A Confidential Document) 

America is changing; that is agreed. 
Why, and from what, and to what, 
are not agreed. 

Yet these questions touch us all 
For two years, 15 senior scholars 
from Oxford University studied these 
questions in depth.Their findings are now 
presented in America in Perspective. 

J America in Perspective is a detached, comprehensive look at 
‘ the state of America today and the potential of America tomorrow. 
; It grinds no axes and pulls no punches. It is based on feet, not 
: opinion. Its purpose is understanding, not advocacy. 

In 269 pages, America in Perspective casts a penetrating light 
on American politics, economics, markets and society. And a 
controversial light on the future of the American dream. 

Above all, America in Perspective provides an objective 
account of America now and where it will be in ten years time. 
: It may be the most comprehensive study of America in existence 
today. 

Commissioned privately as a major $200,000 Oxford Analytica 
; study, America in Perspective had such a profound effect on its 
sponsors that they now urge that it be given a wider audience. 

Accordingly, a limited number are being released for public sale. 
You can obtain a copy by means of the coupon below. 

America in Perspective: the more important America is to 
your company or you, the more you will profit from it. 

OXFORD 
ANALYTICA 

X S : SS2?$? i^SSSSUHS- ^•^ V rSS?. H .5J REET » OXFORD oxi «J. ENGLAND, please send me cofy'ies 

OP AMERICA ^PERSPECTIVE □ I ENCIiJSEMY CHEQUE FOR S285 PER COPY. □ PLEASE BILL ME MY COMPANY. 



NAME- 


ADDRESS. 


1-7-85 




















































































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 




PEANUTS 


iVe been thinking 

„ ABOUT SCHOOL- 




|Ve decided to 

5TUDV REAL. HARP 
THIS YEAR^P BECOME 
RICH ANP FAMOUS™ 


IF YDull HELP ME WITH 


AW HOMEWORK EVERY NIGHT 
5 I'LL SPLIT WITH tfXJ.. 


NOT THE RICH.. 
JU5T THE FAMOUS' 


BOOKS 


-a> 


AiBliMMMn 




FIRE FROM. TOE MOUNTAIN: 
The Making of a Sa n d infa ta 


president of the United States, Americans 


\Yimb! 


BLOND IE 


7/i/es 


ACROSS 


1 Home plate, 
for one 

5 Bound 
collection of 
maps 

1# "Sultanate" of 
Babe Ruth 
14Pteroid 
IS Offenbach's 


48 Contend 
verbally 
51 Mexican vine 
53 Future fish 
56 Kingdome 
Stadium team 
59 Hebrew letter 
68 Dwarf 

61 Med. course 

62 Music to a 
matador's ears 

63 Soothed 

64 Type of lie 


Parisienne’* 

16 Roof border 

17 Anaheim 
Stadium 
player 

20D.D.E. 
predecessor 

21 Cars 

22 Portion 

23 Pier 

24 Theater sign 

25 Riverfront 
Stadium team 

32 Sweets 

33 Epochal 

34 voJente 

35 Dance In Hilo 

36 Gangling 

38 He took a 
ribbing 

39 "The Heart 

Lonely 

Hunter" 

49" 

Timberiane” 

41 Reckon 

42 Bronx team 

46 Hop- 

thumb 

47 Cape , N.C. 

© New York Timet, edited by Eugene Mnleska. 


1 Johann 

Sebastian 

2 Wellaway! 

3 Arms-taik 
acronym 

4 Silkworm 

5 Tropical 
rodent 

6 Kilt 

7 Typesetting 
mach. 

8 Monkshood 

9 Red or Coral 

16 Cider 

11 Conduct, as 
war 

12 With, to Ren4 

13 Distant: 
Comb, form 

18 Caprice 

if Fools’ 

Day 

23 A lick 

promise 

24 Remain 

25 Reason 


26 Relative by 
marriage 

27 Filled with 
information 

28 Neighbor of 
Okla. 

29 Cantor or 
Fisher 

30 College 
officials 

31 Indefinite 
amount 

32 Yak 

38 Senator Hart 

37 Inquire 

38 Unoriginal 
person 

46 Halley's or 
Eocke's 

41 Congolese 
mammal 

43 Lads 

.44 Blazing 

45 Approached 

48 Concerning 

49 Stagger 

56 Box-office 

figure 

51 Site of a 
Napoleonic 

victory: 1806 



By Omar Cabezas. Translated by Kathleen 
Weaver. 224 pages. $13.95. 

Cram PubEshers Inc . / Park Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. 10016 

Reviewed by Arid Dorfman 

I N 1928. the U.S. Marines were bogged 
down in Nicaragua, unable to contain the 
guerrillas led by Augusto Sandina Instead of 
recognizing that Sa rd™ 0 was winning because 
he had the support of his 


read his story with an open mind mayfind it 
difficult to say after finishing it. “This am k 
my enemy. This man must be eliminated." 

Cabezas is unquestionably a rnrofetiouarv 
He tells how be joined the Sandinista mow! 
mem as a — J — — * 


."■XT 


BEETLE BAILEY 


SETUP. Yfr# 

beetle.' J/ ' 


X THINK HEfe 

TAKEN ROOT 



Me, instead of 

r lies initiat- 

ed theTirst dive-bombing missions in aviation 
history. Not for the first, and, unfortunately, 
not for the last time, the United States was 
expressing its confidence in victoiy through 
technology. 

But something more disturbing, and equally 
persistent, was being expressed by those 
planes. By deciding tobomb what it could not 
control, the United States was setting up a 
barrier that still stands. Almost 60 years later, 
the United States is still tormenting an adver- 
sary th«t it refuses to look in the face, dive- 
bombing it with more remote, less viable 
methods. 

Generals and politicians have always known 
that it is easier to kill an enemy one can portray 
as a demon. By coincidence, the year of the 
(five-bombing, 1928, was the year Erich Maria 
Remarque's anti-war novd, M AH Quiet on the 
Western Front," was published- In its culmi- 
nating so me , the protagonist, Paul, fatally 
wounds an enemy soldier and then must spend 
a day in a trench watching him die. It was (he 
abstraction of the enemy that Paul stabbed; if 
be had known bis face, his family, his past, he 
would have had difficulty lolling him Half a 
world away, dive-bombing became one more 
way in which the Pauls of this world could be 
separated from the Diegos and the Marias they 
were being asked to massacre. 

To fraternize with the enemy is not easy. 
Even when the will to do so is present, the 
practical obstacles may be insuperable. Once 
in a while, however, abook appears that allows 
us to know the enemy without having to watch 
him die, a book that shows us that the enemy is 
a human being, a book that if widely read, may 
prevent a war. “Fire From the Mountain" is 
«awfr a book- Though Swndinistas like Omar 
Cabezas have been branded the enemy by the 


to tram as a _ — 

the peasants! escaped Somaza's raids. 
cans who have forgotten that their country « 
the product of a revolution tend to find sndi 
stones dreary or repellent. But even they I •' 
believe, will be in for a surprise 

Even for those who disagree with the an- 
ihor’s politics, in other words, to story is - *‘ 
fascinating. It is the story or how a pitifully 
small handful of people overthrew a dictator f 
whose family had been in power for 40 yeas, \ 
When they began, in the 1960s, scarcely any. ■■ ' 
body could have predicted that the Sandina. : 
las, bounded by (he police, surrounded by 
impoverished people who were too frightened 
to collaborate, would be able to build up 
enough support to destroy Somoza’s army t» 
1979. The Sandinistas themselves had 
ty keeping the faith. 

■ In order to explain how this political narade 
occurred, Cabezas does not mouth slogans or 
undertake windy sociological analyses. In- 
stead, he undresses himself in public. Hecoc- ' 
centrales on his own evolution. Because Cabe- i 
zas became the roan he is by hiding nothing I 
from himself, be hides nothing from the rcajf j . 
er: weaknesses, doubts, illusions, nustifag 
machismo, astonishment —all wittama dqfr 
of narcissism. And because Cabezas has ex- 
posed the inner landscape of his humaniiy, the 

reader believes him when he gets around to his 

idealistic commitment to liberation, freedom 
and the common good. 

There is much more than politics to this 
book. In Kathleen Weaver's energetically col- 
loquial translation, there is the authors a. 
traordinary sense of humor, the irreverence d : ' 
and earthincss of his language, the sensnafity • 
of his imagery. There are breathtaking, erotic, ' 
almost mystical descriptions of nature; medita- 
tions on history and the absurd, on the need for ■ 
tenderness in the midst of toughness, an the - 
way in which the past traps and forms the 
present 

Such virions seem astounding in a. man who 
does not consider himself a writer at afl— mui| 
we note, as Carlos Ftzenles does in to striking 
introduction, that Cabezas comes from the 
country of Ernesto Cardeoal and, above all, of 
Ruben Dario (1867-1916), the greatest Span- 


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Solution to Friday's Puzzle 


I? 


□noaa Hnnaaa 

iTDQQuuiQ 
□□□□□□□ nnoaiisa 
□cn canmaDBa mm 
bedd □□□□□ anna 
□□□□a aaa naaaa 
ontnsn ciQotiiaEin 
□ana □□□□ 
Esnanaa Haona 
□□□□□ ana aaaaa 
eohe anaas aaaa 
□oa aaaaaaa mnm 
□EEnanaa HHaaama 
Bcnnaaa oaanasa 

BEQI1S0 □ 30030 


where poetry Tus survived not m senrinarsl , 
in the streets, conld have prodnoed Cabezas, a 
only Nicaragua could have produced the 80- 
year-old man who, when he saw the guerrillas :■ * 
coming, said he had been expe ctin g than to 
ftick up the weapons that they left the last time: 

The old man had been wahmg 60 years for the : - 
sons of Sandino to coureagam. •, - 

To Americans, such a country must seem a r- : 
mystery. Indeed it is a mystery to Cabezas, who 
discovers its secrets only dovrfy, treating it as 
one would a new lover. Let us tope that, rather . 
than destroying Nkaragnafiom afar or, . 

yet, dive-boatbmg tire country a second . . 

the United States will start reading Nkara- - ■ 
gua’s poets — and Omar Cabezas. _ . 


sen 

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Ariel Dorfman, a Chilean, is working on a 
Jrtoge version of hu novel “Widows.” He wrote 
this review for the Los Angeles Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


Unscramble these tour Jmbtas, 
one letter to each square, to tom 
tour ordfewy wordti. 


YABBE 


“nr 

~n 

‘r-SK=2““ 

THRAW 


err 



YECKAL 


~rrc 


ACTUFE 


u 1: 



W HEN a partnership has- 
two balanced hands, the 
decision whether to play in an 
eight-card major suit fit ratho- 
than no-trump may be very 
dose. 

The sort of consideration 
that may influence an expert is 
shown on the diagramed deal. 

The three-heart response to 
two no-trump was a transfer, 
and when North foDowed with 
three no-trump. South knew 
that his partner held a five- 
card spade suit and a balanced 
hand . As it happens, three no- 
trump would have Bfeea sim- 
ple, became North held die 
spade queen. 


The stHt feame was likely to 
if North- did not have 


be better if 

the spade queen,- and South 


reasoned that the crucial card 
was probably with an oppo- 
nent. They had exactly the 
same nmnber of spades as 
North, and much more than 
half the missing high-card 
strength. 

So South bid four spades 
and regretted hjs acoon when 
West led the-Spade jack and 
the dummy app e are d. If the 
red-suit honors were with 
West, as they were, he was in 
danger of using tricks. He. 
found a neat solution, howev-" 
er. Trumps were drawn and 
four rounds of dubs were 
played. On the fourth round a 
di am ond was discarded from 
the dmrany and West had to 
lead a red suit to give Sooth his 
10th trick. 

Notice that four spades by 
North, the normal position. 


would haw been in jeopardy. 
The lead of thedianxmdquee& 
would have been fatal, and a 
heart lead would havtffeft die 
declarer widr^fficull prob- 


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| WHAT THE HALFBACK 
WAS IN HI© 
[CLASSROOM WORK. 


Now arranga tne circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


™ — ^ rmcm] 


Swimmer Gross Sets His 4th World Record 

st Germany (AP) — Olympic champion Michael Gross alt 
, in the 200-inrter butterfly, with a time of 1 minute 57.dl 
krman Swunmnut rtwitipi^i^ jpn qq Saturday. i 

Jon Sieben 


Stub 


i on; 
1:57.04 that 


Friday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: QUASH ARBOR GAIETY CLOTHE 
Answer What the zookeraer said his life 
was— “BEASTLY*" 


REMSCHEID, West 
another world record, 

seconds in the West C „ _ 

Gross, 21, regained the record he had lost to the ,v,.vt um* jnw, ? 
Australia wan wuh during the 1984 Ofympics in Los Angeles. Gross now holds four 
worid marks, having set one Thursday in the 400-meter &eesiyie. His records in tlfc 
100-meter butterfly and the 200-meter freestyle were set at the 1984 Olympics in 
winning gold medals. _ j 


Gross won the silver medal, bdnnd Sdjen, in the 200-meter butterfly at tfje 


emptied bf Oar Stiff Fran Dispauhts 

DETROIT — Dave Stieb’s 
pitching bdied his wmds. 

Toronto’s right-hander 

■down the importance of 

mghds 2-0 victoiy in Detroit, birt 
Stieb pitched as if the American 
e Eastern Division duunpi- 
i was at stake. When the Buie 


Stieb, who grew zqp in the same Bruce Hunt started in place of ail- 
nrighborhood of Anaheim, Cali- ing Brace Kison and gave up only 
fomia, as Paiy, struck out six. and Gary Roenicke’s honw in the sev- 


WEATHER 


s but lost bis worid record to the Australian. Sieben bettered the mark 
that Gross had set Aug. 26, 1983 at Rome. 


EUROPE 


otfo 


HIGH LOW 
C P C P 
M 79 30 a d 

W M 13 31 a 

31 H 22 72 fr 

26 79 n 63 Ir- 
as 77 12 54 Ir 

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36 79 M 97 d 

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20 66 10 50 d 

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16 61 10 SO r 

17 61 10 30 a 

30 86 U 57 fr 

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Matthys Takes 2 Stages of Tour de Fran 


4 


FRIDAY RASERAIL 


walked two in 

tearfing caroed-nm average to L93. 

It was, however, his Gist shutout 
this year — an indication of his 
fortunes. Petry, who pitched a five- 
hitter in defeat, fdt no sympathy 
for Stieb’s tough hick. The Tigers 

have not scored a run for him in 21 


VTTRE. France .. 

de France bicycle race nere Sunday but fa^d to dislodge Belgian compatriot 
Vanderaerden from the overall lead. 

Matihys edged Iri^bman Sean Kelly and Vanderaerden in a pack finish aftexta 
final spimt to win the flat 2A2-k5ksmeter (15-mile) teg from Lonenl in 6 hours, 29 
minutes and 21 seconds. Matthys took Saturday’s opening stage of the 1985 tour; 
256 kilometers from Vannes to Lanester, in 6:32^52, He nipped a groin) of 10 ridei, 
including Vanderaerden, Kefly, Italian Guido Bonlenqn Frenmtnan Fi 


innings 

Jays and Tigers meet again in the George BdTs two-run home run 
Erst week, erf October, Stieb’s three- in the second riming was afl the 
hit shutout over Dan Petiy wifi be offense Stieb needed. With his East- 
remembered. baD rising, Steib got all but nine of 

“1 don't regard tins as a really his outs an fly balls and pop-ups. 
important series,” said Stieb. Red Swc 6, Orioles 1: In Bostim, 


Mate Easier wait 


in Septan! 


in two runs a gamna- Baltimore 


enth. Hurst struck out seven, in- 
cluding Fred Lynn three tunes, be- 
fore leaving bocause of a groin pull 
in the seventh. 

Yankees 5, Brewers 2z In New 
York, Ron Guidry beat Milwaukee 
for his eighth straight victory and 
' Dave Winfield hit a two- run home 
run. Guidry had shut out Baltimore 
and Detroit in his last two starts, 
hot gave up two runs in the first 
timing, His winning streak is the 
longest of the year by an American 
League pitcher. 

Rmss 7, A’s S In Arlington, 
Texas, Toby Harrah to a tie-break- 
ing two-run homer in the eighth 



Law Society Narrowly Wins Sweeps Derby 


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36 29 17 63 


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Beirut — — — — na 

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OCEANIA 


NORTH AMERICA 


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DUBLIN (AP) — Law Society, the 15-to*8 favorite ridden by Pat Eddery, won 
the Irish Sweqis Derby on Saturday by half a length. 'I 

Eddery, who won his third Sweq» Deity, drove his mount through a bundled 
Raid on the inside rail in the final straight at Hie Curragh. Just before die 
Law Society caught up with Theatrical, who had taken the lead two furlongs out 
Danrister was thud and Infantry fourth. f 

The nobeaten record of Frena Derby winner Mooktar^ was spoti ed as he ffcded to 
seventh afta bmg a dose third until the turn for home. 

Law Society collected a $218,400 prize. Trainer Vincent O'Brien had kept Law 
Society free erf a virulent virus that has attacked every other horse in ins stable at 
BaHydoyle this year. 


Burns Leads U.S. Golf Tourney by 2 Shots 


et-eJoudv; fo-toasv: fr-fnir; k-holi; ng-not ova I ■ o^wereaitf 
poaarttvdoudv; muIiu aft- ahtmers; wn o— , wwmr. 

1RBCA5T - 

s&azusm&u&sate 


MONOAY*S FORECAST 
Storm*. Tama. “ “ * 



HONG MONO 
Tamo. 31 — ' 
SINGAPORE. 

Tamo. 55— 19 I77-64J. 


imp. 24-— 11 ITS — S2J. PAHmwttj. S . Vh. ^Onmit 


MEMPHIS, Tennessee (AP)—^ George Bums shot 2-under-par ^ 70 Sa&nday fora 
two-stroke tod over Daiid Ogrin and Andy Bean after three rounds of the 
Memphis Classic golf tournament. 

Burns, at 206 for 54 holes, began the round tied with Ogrin and Bfll Sander at 
eight under, with Richard Zokol and John Mahaffey a stroke behind. Playing with 
Bums and Gain, Sander got two birdiesmthe first nine holes tat doubJe-bogeyed , 
No. 13 and bouryed 16, where he hit his iee shot into the water. He finished at 
73/209, with Manaffey at 73/210 and Zokol at 74/21 1. Bean shot 69 Saturday.' ' 

Bums, despite a double bogey on the 17th hole, shot 69 Friday for a share of the 
lead. Sander shot 71 and Qgrin 70 the second round. Hal Sutton, whose -65^ 
Thursday tied him with Sander for the lead, skied to 76. 



after Oakland had raided for a tie 
from a 5-0 deficit 

Twm 5, White Sox 4: In Chica- 
go, Kent Hibek drove in two runs 
and Frank Vkrfa survived a tbrec- 
nm eighth to win forlfirausota. 

Royals 5^ Angels 4: In Kamas 
Qty, Missaui, Greg ftyofs Mu*, 
inning single scoru pmcfa-iunnsf 
John Wathan from second bme to 
beat California. Hal. McRart 
pinch-bit two-run boner -m the 

home eighth tied the scoe at 3, and 

both teams scored in the 13th- Bc - 
byGrichsir^edmanminthetop 
of the inning, and with two out ffl 
the bottom' of the riming Locnk 
Smith tripled in arun. 

Marioeis 8, Indbns 6s In Setfte 

fi ommii Thnmm' ^ tfmtywpm saft- 
hming hwiiwT*^ (]jywliiwl^ M lb 
Mariners rallied from a 6-0 deficit- 

Cadnsls 3, Mds 2: In die Na- 
tional I . e a gre, in St Loris, Ton 
Nieto drove in two runs and Tom- 
my Hen: homcred as John Tudor 
racked up his sixth victoiy hrAtt 
without a loss. 

Expos S, Piffles 3: In Montreal 
Bryn Snath hdd Phfladdnlni Jo 
e^it hits and MSke-Fi 
■ tad been batting .1! 
home runs. . . 

OAs 5, Pirates (h In fittsbmgk, 
Keith Moreland went 3-for-5, at- 
dwfing a tase&enqin tamer, red 
Steve Trout scattered seven tats as 
Chicago won. Trout has beaten the 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


Seven Wimbledon Seeds Gone, Rain Stays 


WIMBLEDON, — Hie 

field of seeded players m the Wim- 
bledon tennis Tou rnamen t grew 
sparser Saturday although rain 
continued to faH 
For the sixth straight day bad 
weather interrupted the tourna- 
ment three times; play advanced 
through the second round — and 
seven seeds did not make the third 
round. Pat Cash (No. 6), Johan 
-Kriek (No. 9) and Thomas Szxdd 
(No. 15) were lost from the turn's 
field, mid Claudia Kohde-Kilscb 
(No. 6), Bonnie Gadnsek (No. 9), 
Kathy Jordan (No. 10) and Ga- 
briclfl Sabatim (No. 15) from the 
women’s. 


Also gone was Hu N&, the first 
native of China to play in the wom- 
en’s singles at the AE England 


Gub. She was eliminated by _ . 

Uys of South Africa, 6-2, 4%, 6-0. 

Other seeds struggled. Second- 
Tanked Ivan Lendl, after playing a 
horrendous fourth-set tie breaker, 
beat Mike Leach of the United 
States, 6-3, 1-6, 6-2, 6-7 (4-7) 6-4. 
Jimmy Connors (No. 3) found hint- 

Self Trailing Rpmesh K rishnan of . 

India by5-S in the third set with die 
match tied at onc sct alL But after 
changing to a tighter racket be took 
nine straight games and won, 7-5, 
5-7, 7-5, 6-2. 

Harm Mandlikova (No, 3) of 
Chechoslovakia was forced to the 


linrit before beating Dianne Bales- 
trat of Australia, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5. An- 
ders Jarryd (No. 5) finished off a 5- 
7, 7-6 (S-6) 7-5, 64 victory over 
Scon Davis, getting even for an 
upset by Davis in the first round 
last year. 

Tun Mayotte (No. 16) came 
dose to joining the losers. He 
dropped two sets to Panl McNa- 
mee of Australia and had to go into 
a third-set tie breaker. But he sur- 
vived that and, after a rain delay 
that ranglii him trailing by 1-2 in 
the fourth, won the last 11 games 
for a 3-6, 46, 7-6 (7-2) 6-2, M 
victory. 

“It was a different court when we 
carry back,” McNamee said. “It 


was slower and he started re turning 
better. It was like two matches.” 

The biggest upset was (me that 
bad been virtually completed Fri- 
day. When rain ended the even in g, 
Ricardo Acuna of the United 
States was one game from beating 
rash , h olding a 7-6 (7-3) 6-3, 3-6, 6- 
7 (7-9) 5-3 lead. 

After Cash saved a match point 

to reach 54. Acuna served out the 

mathh, ending it with an ace. At 27, 
Acuna is ranked No. 133 in the 
world - 

Said C-Mb, a semifinalist here m 
1984, “Last year Wimbledon saw 
me at my best, this year at my 
worst." * ‘ 

In a rare early round battle, Mar- 


i 


Becker, 17 , a Poised and Powerful Prodigy 


By John Feinsccin 

Washington Post Service 

LONDON — Because the 
weather at Wimbledon has been so 
horrific, Centre Court spectators 
often have been AWOL during 
matches. They leave for a drink 
when the rain begins and don’t rush 
bade even after play has started. 

But when West German Baris 
Becker walked onto the court 
Thursday afternoon, there was not 
an empty Tennis fans lfln* to 
be present when the great ones an- 
nounce they've arrived. And 
Becker, at 17, has arrived. 

“He's the best player I’ve ever 
seen at 17" said Hank Pfister, 
Becker’s first-round victim. “I just 
can’t mmgitiff someone that age 
having as much power and poise as 
he does. I wish I bad that much 
poise now." Pfister is 30. 

*Tm still a nobody," Becker said 
with a shy smile when asked about 
his rise to a ranking of 20th world- 
wide. “When I go out there with 
McEnroe, Connors and Lendl I fed 
like I don’t belong. . .yet.” 

Since E^Om Borg left the scene in 
1981, men's tennis essentially has 
been a three-man game: John 
McEnroe, Ivan Lendl, Jimmy Con- 
nors. Mats WHander has west four 
grand slam events but has never 
made SO much as a semifinal at 
Wimbledon or the U.S. Open. 

That s tagnation at the top has 
made the men’s game almost as 
predictable as the women's, where 
Martina Navratilova and Chris 
Evert Lloyd have won the last 14 
grand slam titles. 

“I think it would be very good 
for the game if someone else really 
came together and became a major 
factor," said McEnroe. “We need 
new faces. Fve thought for the last 
year that the two guys who can do 
that are Becker ana Stefan Edbag* 
of Sweden. 


$ 


“Right now, Becker’s really play- 
well,” McEnroe continued, 
e’s very dangerous because he 
goes for so many things. He's at 
that Age where he doesn’t think a 
lot about whether a shot is right or 
wrong. He just teas for broke, and 
when he’s confident lrkt he is now, 
he’s very tough." 

Said Pfister “He has to be one of 
the four or five best players in the 
world, regardless of his ranking.” 

Becker recently won (he Wim- 
Jrtedon wanuup at Queens Club. At 
the French Open, he destroyed Vi- 
tas Gexolaitis in the opening round 
before lasing to WHander. Here, his 
firet-round victory was impressive 
because Pfister is a prototype, lag- 
serving grass-court player who has 
reached the round of 16 three 
times. 

“In 10 years of pro tennis Fve 
never elected to receive, but I did 
against Becker,” Pfister said. *T 
wanted to try something to shake 
him up a Utile because he returns so 
well. It worited, for a while." 

Pfistex won the first set but even- 


tually Becker wore him down with 
huge ground strokes, slashing re- 
turns and a superb first serve. 

“I was a little nervous at the 
start,” Becker said. “To play an 
Centre Court my first match was an 
honor, but maybe if I had been on 
another court I would not have fdt 

so much pressure." 

Pressure. The old buzz word, es- 
pecially these days when tennis 
players mature so young and get 
pushed on to the tour (Becker, tike 
many, has dropped out of high 
school to devote full time to tee- 
ms). In addition to his longtime 
wwh, Gunther Bosch, he travels 
with Im Tuiac, who has deserted 
Guillermo VHas to hook on with 
the youngster. 

“He stSl has a lot of learning to 
do” Tuiac said. “The potential is 
there. It has to be brought out of 
him." Tuiac met Becker through 
Bosch, who grew up in the same 
tiny Romanian town as Tiriac and 
later played Davis Cup doubles 
with him. For several years, Bosch 
had told Tuiac he had a phenom. 
Only recently, after VHas began to 
slide, did Tiriac lode at Becker. 

He liked what he saw. But, Thiac 
, said, “He still hasn’t beat tough- 
ened up enough. I am going to take 
him to the Alps and gel him work- 
ing there. People say he has good 
footwork. What I see is no foot- 
work.” 

Tiriac already has worked with 
Becker on condoning his temper. It 
seems to be working. During both 
his matches hoe (he routed Matt 
Anger in the second nxmd, losing 
four games) Becker has played al- 
most stoically. At match point 
against Pfister, after serving Mutt 
looked like an ace, Becker walked 
to the umpire's chair to discuss a 
fault that had been called. Then he 
calmly walked away and finished 
the winteli 

“Once, I would not have been 
able to do that," he said. "But I 
have learned that it doesn't do any 
good to argue. Yon have to keep 
playing and not think backwards.” 

When someone asked Becker 
when he had learned all this, Tiriac 
answered, “Yesterday." 

^-Tiriac almost always is standing 
near Becker. Geariy, he sees him as 
his next prize pupil- Becker is al- 
most 6-foot-2 (1.87 meters), weighs 
175 pounds (793 kOograms) and 
has broad shoulders beneath a wide 
face that easily breaks into a strain 
His rakish hair, which he cuts him- 
self, is blondish-rcd, giving him a 
wild, teeny-bopper look. 

But with a racket 'in Iris hands, 
Becker is very "nirih a man. 

The youngest men's senrifinalist 
here was McEnroe, who made it in 
1977 at age 18. ' 

Becker began drawing notice last 
November, when he reached the 
quarterfinals at the Australian 
Open. After a straggling winter, he 
made the semifinals at the Italian 



H*AmtMdnm 


John McEnroe calls Becker ‘dangerous — he just goes for broke.’ 


to eventual win- 
ner Yannick Nc 
One thing certain is that Becker 
will be pushed hard. He knows peo- 
ple are watching him, waiting for 
him to make a big splash. “I blow 
now when I lose to somebody lower 
than me in the ranking it is a trig 
tiring, Fm not supposed to lose," he 
said. “I know as I go higher, there 
will be more pressure. But that's 
OJC Fm looking forward to it." 

Becker split sets with seventh- 
seeded Joaidm Ny strom Saturday 
before rain stopped their match at 
8 PM. Nystrom, an accomplished 


and consistent player, often made 
the youngster look bad with crack- 
ling ground strokes. But the com- 
petitive Becker hung in to win the 
second-set tie breaker, 7-5; they are 
to complete the match Monday. 

“Whatever happens now, it is all 
a learning experience,” he said. “1 
do not go around thinking 1 will 
win Wimbledon this year. But may- 
be someday, if I'm lucky." 

When be does, luck wfll probably 
have little to do with it. As Pfister 
put it, “He’s this good: I don’t 
wonder if he’ll win Wimbledon, 1 
wonder when.” 


tim Navratilova (co-No. 1 among 
the women) needed the bdp of a 
ballboy to get by Bettina Bunge of 
West Germany, 7-6 (7-3) 6-3. 

On the first point of the tie 
breaker, Bunge played a brilliant 
point, ranting down a lob, and 
appeared to nave the point won 
when die snapped a lunging back- 
hand volley crossoourt Navrati- 
lova managed a weak return. 
Bunge, at the net, had an open 
court for an easy winner. 

Bat just as the ball crossed the 
net, one of the baUboys, thinking 
the point over, started across the 
court. He jumped back, but too 
late. Bunge put the ball away but 
umpire Jeremy Shales ordered the 
pant replayed. 

“I thought about giving her the 
point but it wasn’t a judgment; like 
a bad call, it was a rule/* Navrati- 
lova said. “The rule is, we have to 
play two. If she misses the ball we 
play two. It was a bad break fm 
her, rough hick really, but there was 
nothing I could do." 

Bunge agreed. “I didn't expect 
Martina to give me the point. I 
wouldn't have given it to her.” 

The incident seemed to unnerve 
Bunge. She nris-hk a service return, 
botched an overhead and netted a 
hanfclumri Navratilova won the tie 
breaker and Bunge had little left. 

Fifty yards away, on Court L, 
Bales trai led 4-2, 30-0 in' her third 
set with Mandlikova, then lost four 
straight points, and the match. 

“I really let her get away,” said 
Balestral who, as Dianne From- 
haitz, was ranked as high as No. 4 
in the world in the late 1970s. She 
quit the tour for more than a year 
and has just returned. 

The most popular victory of the 
day was Englishwoman Jo Dune’s 
5-7, 6-2, 6-1 triumph over Kohde- 
Kilsch, the West German, who 
reached the semifinals of the 
French Open. Dune, 24, has been a 
q oaricrfinalis t here and as high as 
No. 5 in the rankings. But after a 
terrible 12 months, she has 
dropped to No. 56. 

The least popular victory was 
that by Catherine Tanvier of 
France over Sahatini, After the 15- 
year-old Argentine was ousted, 6-7 
(4-7) 6-4, 6-1, Tanvier was often 
asked, “Do you fed bad about 
beating GabbyT 

Anne Smith upset feflow Ameri- 
can Gadnsek, 2-6, 64, 6-2, and 
Larissa Savchenko of the Soviet 
Union beat Jordan, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3. 

Andreas Maurer of West Germa- 
ny busted Kriek of the United 
Stales, 6-1, 64. 3-6, 6-3, and Sam- 
my Giammalva of the United 
States stopped Sntid of Czechoslo- 
vakia, 6-3, 6-1, 6-2. 

* On Court 1 Connors had looked 
very capable of making a quick 
eJfit Knshnan plays with grace that 
belies his chunky build and has no 
serve. But he runs down every ball 
and has sofid ground strokes. 

“It was one of those things where 
I fdt like I should be breaking him 
every game, but I wasn’t,” Connors 
said. “When I was down 2-5, I 
changed” rackets and “I think it 
made a difference. Shots I was just 
missing, I started malting." 

By contrast, Lendl never started 
making shots; Leach just missed 
more. It was a strange match, 
played over two days, interrupted 
three times by rain. Lendl served 26 
aces, and 22 doable faults. 

The bad weather continued to 
bedevil the tournament. Because 
Wimbledon officials will not play 
on the middle Sunday, the schedule 
is almost two days behind. Even if 
there is no more rain, John McEn- 
roe is going to have to play five 
matches in seven days to win the 
men’s singles title and Chris Evert 
Lloyd will have to play five in six 
days to win the women’s. 

One week into Wimbledon, ev- 
eryone left still had a lot of playing 
to da (WP, NYT, AP) 


VANTAGE POINT/ Steven Crist 


On Athletes and Drug Testing 


• New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Should jodreys and harness- 
racing drivers be subject to maudattny random 
testing for drug or alcohol use? The New Jersey 
Racing Commission says yes, has been conducting 
such a program in har ness racing for the last year 
and has been upheld in lower-court ratings. The 
Illinois commission this month approved suefa a. 
program that is expected to be in place soon. 

The harness and thoroughbred people have split 
on the Issue. The harness industry almost unani- 
mously supports random testing, and such hose- 
men’s grams as Harness Horsemen International 
have pushed vigorously to implement the program. 
Bui ibcJockcys’ Guild, representing thoroughbred 
riders, adamantly opposes it 

Five riders, including Angel Cordero and Bill 
Shoemaker, have filed suit in Federal District 
Court in Camden, New Jersey, to keep the pro- - 

gram from extsrdmg to thoroughbred racing. 
They argue that random testing is unnecessary, 
demeaning and possibly unconstitutional 

La refusing to issue the jockeys a pretiminary 
injunction against the tests last month. Judge Stan- 
ley J. Brotman said their rights were not being 
violated and that testing was needed to protect the 
commission’s “ability to adequately police this 
industry." The harness groups say that testing 
riders protects both the hoses and the public, ana 
that the drivers should have nothing to fear. 

Brotman and the harness groups are missing the 
point. In tbe narrowest sense, mandatory drug 

ti-stfn g is n a<l 1y Hitf n'minatn ry fn -an g lin g out riders 

and drivers within the industry. If they are going to 
be tested, then so should owners, trainers, stew- 
ards, starting-gate crews, pnblic hand [cappers and 
anyone else whose actions affect the odds, or out- 
come of a race. Hoses wifi fly before that happens. 

More important, the mandatory testing of ath- 
letes in any sport for their personal use of drugs 
and alcohol is, if not technically unconstitutional, 
an attempt to legislate morality that may be an 
invasion of privacy. 

To keep racing honest, all tracks test horses for 
prohibited drugs that might be giving them an 
edge. That is similar to testing human athletes for 
performance-enhancing substances. 

In both cases, the testing is done to prevent an 
athlete from getting an unfair advantage, but that 


is a far cry from prying into an athlete’s personal 
problems or preferences. If a jockey or a second 


. owner or (he team .owner has every right not to ride 
or play him, butitis not the business of the spoil or 
of government to order the athlete.ro be rated. 

Proponents of testing say that drug use is fflegai 
md therefore a criminal rather than personal prob- 
lem. Technically they are correct Technically, 
adultey is illegal in some places and so is prostitu- 
tion. Should athlete be subject to some kind of 
mandatory tests to see if they have been unfaithful 
to their spouses or consorting with call girls? If an 
extramarital affair is affecting a jockey’s perfor- 
mance, is it the business of government to deter- 
mine his guilt and mandate treatment arpenalties? 

Of course not, and it should not be any different 
with drugs and alcohol Those wbo employ athletes . 
should have the compassion, as wdl as the sdf- 
protecti vc business sense, to be alert and sensitive 
to possible drug , and alaihoi problems that are . 
affecting their employees. They have every right to 
determine their own policies and penalties. " . 

That’s the way it works in other professions. No 
one is advocating mandatory random drug testing 
for surgeons, attorneys, corporate executives or 
other professionals. 

Why, then, ibis current obsession in sponswith 
cmnlring out athletes with drug or alcohol prob- 
lems? It is probably no coinddence that . many of 
those who are beating the issue most strongly are 
the same ones who bemoan the high salaries of 
today’s athdtes, the strike threats by their onions, 
their sometimes unorthodox styles of living. 

No one is snmkriy outraged by the salaries of 
movie stars and brain surgeons or the labor griev- 
ances of industrial workers, but athlete art held to 
a different standard. Because “we" — the public- 
pay their salaries, athletes are supposed to be more 
accountable, to hew to deaner morals. Never mind 
that “we" also pay the salaries of surgeons and 
construction wankers and others whom “we” allow 
to lodge legitimate labor actions and conduct their 
personal lives as tlrey see fit. 

It may be dudUurioning to children of all ages 
that almetes, like anyone else in society, are sus- 


ceptible to drug and alcohol problems. But the 
dvfiizcd answer is not to treat athletes like chDdrea 


or second-class citizens. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Friday’s and Saturdays Major League line Scores 


Altana 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

■M M MS — 3 S t 

Detroit MMM-4 1 ■ 

Stab and wtutt; Patty and PwyWl W— 
Stab, *4 L— Petty. M. HR— Toronto, Ml 
«UJ. 

Baft! mare MS M> MO-1 7 1 

Barton 211 111 Mb— 4 M 1 

Davis. Dixon (31. AOM HI. T. Martinez HI 
aid Dempsey; Hurst. Stanley (B) and Ged- 
mon_W — Hurst.3-7. L — Davit, 4-4. HR — Balti- 
more, Roe niche (6>. 

Milwaukee 3M *M Mt— 3 7 • 

New York Ml SIB H»-S 9 ■ 

Darwin and Moore; Guidry. Ftabar <||, 
RMwiH (B) and Hoan. w— Guidry, M. L— 
Darwin. 6-7. Sv— Rlohottl 03). HR— Now 
York. MnfMd (9). 

Oakland BN BN ltB-S U X 

Tome IBB BBB Bn— 7 12 l 

CodlrolL warren (4). Ontiveros («), Ather- 
ton (7) and Heath; Maun, Harris (7) and 
Slauarn. W— Harm. 3-1. L-Atherton, 3-4. 
HRs— Oakland. Baker (9). Murphv (111. Tex- 
as, Ward (5). Harrah (6). 

Minnesota IBB B13 WB-5 II • 

rsym BIB BBB BM— 4 M 1 

Vkrto. Qavts HI tmd Solos. Laudner (9); 
Tanner, AsostoUl.Spinner [ffl.UHIar UUand 
Fisk. W— Vtota.9-6. L— Tanner. ML Sv— Davit 
(». HR— Chicago, Walker (13). 

CMHemla IIS All BBB BOB IB-4 11 B 

Kansas CHy BBB MB MB IBB 11-4 17 1 

witt, dements (B), Moore (Bl.CIRwrn (11), 
Corbett (14) and Boone, Natron (14); Saber- 
haaen. B ec k wtm (I). Qutanberry (121 and 
Simdtera. W— Gutanfaerry.4-4. L-Cortwtt.2- 
l.HRs — Cal Honda. Scon tors (1). Kansas City, 
Motley (I), McRae (S). 

Cleveland IBS BBB BBB-4 I 2 

ip fl ll MB IN llfn I f | 

Heatan. Barkley (6). Thomason (7) tmd Wil- 
lard; SwW. Thomas (3). Nunez H) and Kaar- 
nev. W— ’ Thomas, ML L— Barkley, 0-3. Sv— 
Nunez (10). HR— Seattle, Thomas (11). 


NOW York MB MB ns— 3 1 I 

St. Louis. HI MB Mn— 3 ■ B 

Lynch. Gormai (5), Leodi (7). Orosco H) 
and Carter; Tudor, Lahtt (B).Davtey l«) and 
Nleta-w— Tudor. 7-7. u— Lynch. 4-5. Sv— Day- 
ley (6). HRs— New York. Faster (lH. Wilson 
13). St Louis. Herr (3). 

CkKhnatt BS1 30 Ml— 11 12 I 

S<m Diego BHB41I1B-9 1B3 

Price. Rabkaan (5). Franca (7). Power U) 
and Krtcety; Shaw, DeLeon (6), Thurmond 
(6). Loftons (7), St ud d or d m and Kennedy. 
W — Robinson. 34. L— Show. 6£ SV — Power 
(13). HRs— OndimaH. Parker (14), Kren- 
cMckl (3). San Diego, Ramirez (1). 

Atlanta BBB M B44— II 11 B 

Les Ango l a s NB1MMB-3 « 1 

Badroslan. Oedman (7), Camp (9) and 
Owen; Honercntt, Castflto (B), Howe (91 (Bid 
SctactaW— B edra ri an,64Ltj-ttoneyCutt,6 
7. HRs— Atlanta, Hubbard (3), Harper (6). 
Houston TH (14 MB— 3 7 2 

Baa Francisco - MM an MB— 1 11 2 

Nlekra, Calhoun (7). Smith (1) and Ashby; 
Laskey, Davis (7J, Garretts (I) aad Brenly, 
W— Nlekra, B-7. L— Laskey. ME Sv— Smith 
(13). HRs— Houston. Walling (3>; Ashby (4). 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

PUMeWUa 0« im Bit — 3 I • 

Montreal •» in Blx-5 11 » 

Hudson, Andersen (8) and Diaz; Smith. 
Burta (9) and Fitzgerald. W— Smith, 94. L- 
Hifdsan. 3-7. Sv— Burke (2). HRs— Phlkxlet- 
nWa. Schmidt (93. Montreal, Fitzgerald 2 Q). 

m n« ms 9 ■ 

Ml BOB SOS « 7 ■ 

Trout vd'Lofee; DeLeon, Holland (7), 
Gaanht U) mid Pena. W— Trout, 7-3. L— De- 
Leon, 2-10. hr— C hicago, Morel an d (B). 


Cards’ Andujar Keeps Mouth Shut, Mets Shut Out 


Tennis 


Wimbledon Results 


BESTS SINGLES 


The Associated Press 
ST. LOUIS — Joaquin Andujar 
was not talking to the press after he 
■became the major leagues' first 13- 
game winner Saturday night. But 
catcher Tom Nieto said it all “He 
was the same old Joaquin,” Nieto 
said after Andujar pitched a six-hit 
shutout to help the Sl Louis Cardi- 
nals beat the New York Mets, 6-0. 

“He had a gpod, staking fastball 
and slider,” said Nieto. “He didn’t 


SATURDAY BASEBALL 


throw the chang e that ntiir'h | may- 
be four or five times, but it was 
working, too. He had good stuff.” 

Nicio helped Andujar by driving 
home the game’s first two nuts with 


The victory pushed the Cardi- 
nals, who have won 11 of their last 
14 games, into first place in the 
National League East, a half-game 
. jhead of the Montreal Expos. 

' Asked about his performance, 
Andujar replied. “Sony, no com- 
ment/’ Ik has refused to talk to 
most of the press this season be- 
cause, he said, he has not beat 
shown proper respect. 

Meanwhile, in the other dub- 
house, the Mels’ manager, Dave 
Johnson, held a 15-minute dosed 
. door meeting following the loss. 
“We had a meeting — that’s it,” 
Johnson said at first. Then he add- 
ed, “We haven’t played that well in 
a mouth and a half. We haven’t hit 


\ like we’re enable of. There’s no 


excuse for it We have a better ball- 
-tab than we had last year and 
Should be playing better. 

And ajar (13-3) had lost his last 
two decisions, but be struck out 
three and walked one in rostering 
his seventh complete game this 
year. 


The Cardinals got to New York 
rookie Rick Aguilera for four runs 
in the second inning. With one out 
Curt Ford singled and stole second. 
Ivan DeJesos readied on an error 
by third baseman Howard Johnson 
and Nieto tripled down tire right- 
field line for two runs. 

Andujar struck out and, after a 
39-minute rain delay, Vince Cole- 
man singled in a run. Coleman 
stole second, bis major league-lead- 
ing 5 1st tbeft, and raced to third on 
catcher Gary Carter’s throwing er- 
ror. From there, he scored on Ozzie 
Smith’s gn glpL 

A crowd of 47,891 pm the Cardi- 
nals’ home attendance at 1,010,218 
after 33 home games. The team has 
drawn a million fans for 23 straight 
years, but this is the earliest pmnt 
in a season the Cards have reached 

a Tnfliinn. 

Pirates 6, Cubsfi: In Pittsburgh, 
Tony Pena's home run off the first 
pitch in the bottom of the 15th 
ended Chicago’s three-game win- 
ning streak. 

Dodgers 3, Braves h In Los An- 
gles, Jeny Reuss held Atlanta to 
five hits before leaving in the ninth 
after Bob Homer’s two-out, two- 
run homer. 

PhiKes 6, Expos 2a hi Montreal 
Garry Maddox had three hits and 
drove in three zuns far Philadel- 
phia, and Kevin Chens pitched a 
four-hitter for his first complete 

game thfc ticiynn. 

Astros 8, Giants 1: In San Fran- 
cisco, the Giants lost their ninth 
straight as Bob Knepper pitched a 
four-hitter and drove in tour runs 
with a home ran and a single. 

Pwfres 3, Reds (k In San Diego, 
Dave Dravecky, with his second 
shutom of tire year and his fourth 
consecutive victory, checked Cin- 
dnnatfs four-game winning streak 
by striking out four and escaping 


several jams. The Reds’ Mario Soto 
lost his fourth straight yielding 
only five hits. 

Orioles 16, Red Sox 4: In the 
American League, in Boston, Balti- 
more gpt 19 hits after losing four 
straight and eight of its last 10. 
Floyd Rayford had four hits and 
John Shdby and Lee Lacy each 
three, with Rayford and Lacy each 
driving in four runs and Ed die 
Murray three. 

Tigers &, Blue Jays 0: In Detroit, 
Chet Lemon, Dave Bergman and 
Kirk Gibson homered as Wall Ter- 
rell hdd Toronto to two hits with 
the help of some outstanding de- 
fensive plays. 

Brewers 6, Yankees 0: In New 
York, Moose Haas pitched 6ft hit- 
less innings before finishing with 
the third onc-hitta - in the 17 years 
of the Milwaukee franchise, mas 
had retired 13 batters in a row, 
including Km Griffey on a pop to 
short to start the seventh, before 
Don Mattingly drilled a 1-1 fast- 
ball to the gap in right-center. 
Catcher Charlie Moore wanted “to 
pitch him inside," said Haas, “but I 
wanted to pitch him away, the same 
way 1 got him out [on a grounder to 
second] in tbe fourth inning . I 
shook Charlie off. It was supposed 
to be a sinking fastbafl, but it didn’t 
sink.” Haas walked one and struck 
out four in ending a four-game 
Yankee winning streak. 

Twins L White Sox (k In Chica- 
go, Mike Smithson had a no-hitter 
For 6% ifming g and Dave E ngle 
homered to give Minnesota the voc- 
toiy. Each team got only three hits, 
with Smithson losing ms no-hitter 
on Qzae Guillen's tine single to 
cento- with two outs in the seventh. 

A’a 7, Ranges 6: In Arlington, 
Texas, Bruce Bochle’s three-run 
home run in the seventh gave Oak- 
land its victory margin . 



Ricardo Acuna. Chile, dcf. Pat Cosh (B). 
Australta7-6 (7-41,6-3, 3-&B-7 (7-9). M; Sam- 
my Gtanundvo, US. del Tomas SmW(VS), 
CzectiasloiraMa 64 6-2 6-2; Chip Hooper, 
UJwdef. Terry Moor. UJ.UU 7-5; Vine* 
Van Patten, Matt MHched. UA.7&6- 

X 62; Anders Jarryd (5), Sweden, del Scott 
Davis, UX Vt. 7-6 (Ml, 7-5. 6-4. 

Christo Stevn, South Africa def. Oirte Lew- 
Is. New Zealand. 3-6, 7-4 (7-1). 6-4, 64; Tam 
Gudikson, US. del. Jay Laaklus. U.S. 6-7 11- 
7), 6-7 (5-7). 64. 6-2, 6-3; Ivan Lendl (2). 
CzeetMaw*{a.def. MUce Leodt. U.S-6X 1-6, 
6-16-7 (4-7). 64; Grog Holmes, ua. del Bud 
Schultz. U.S.64. 6-7 (X71.67.6-3; Vl|ay Amrt- 
traL India del. Brad Drawett. Australia 7-6 

(6-41,6-7 (671. 7-6 (741). 7-5; VltOS GeniMtth 
U a. del. John SadH. US. 67,64, XL 7-6 (7-2), 


SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Baltimore » 2TB MB— 16 19 I 

Barton 211 IBB Ml— 4 12 2 

(XMartfnaz, Snell (7) and Rayford; Boyd, 
Dorsey (5), Clear (6) and Gedmaa SolHvon 
(7). W— OMarttnez, 4-5. L^-Boyri, 94. Sv— 
Snell (3). H Rs— Bail Imora, Murray (11). Ray- 
ford (2). Boston, Rice (14). 

MB •erOBS-B 2 I 
in m ns— i ii i 
LeaL Lamp (4). Mussel man (7) and Whitt; 
Terrell and Parrish. W-Terroll. 9-3. L— LeaL 
34. HRs— Detroit HR*- Detroit, Lemon (4). 
Bergman (1), Gideon (IB). 

Milwaukee BIS 22S BBB— 6 II I 

New Yerfc MB IM MB— B 1 B 

Haas amt Moan; Nlekra, Rasmussen (4), 
Bardl (71, Armstrong (9) and Haney. W— 
Haas. 7-0. L— Nlekra 7-7. 

BM Ml J30— 7 13 I 
atr BIB IM MB— t- 7 I 

Lugo and Beane; Black. LaOass CQ< Jena 
(llandSundbera-W— Luea, 3-1. L— Blade, 5-fl. 
HR— Kansas CHy, White (9). 

Mtateeeta IM MB MB— 1 3 B 

CMcooo MMM-4 3.1 

Smithson. Eutemld (9) and Engle; Bums. 
Jama (9) and FWc. W— Smithson. 6-7, L— 
Bums, 7-4. Sv — Eufemio 0 1- H R — Minnesota, 
Enate Cl). 

OsMand 111 BM 3M— 7 IB I 

Texas 3M IM BIB-6 12 B 

Btrtsos. Atherton (5), Krueger (6), Howell 
(t) and TettMon; Haotna. Razema (61, 
Schmidt (7). Stewart (9) and Sought. W— 
Krueger. 57. L— Enem a 3-5. Sv— Hawed 
(IS). HRp-Oakland, TettMon (1), Bochto (3). 

•J0 9M MB-3 9 B 

m on Mx— z ■ ■ 

Btyleven and Wfllcml; Aioora Vdn da Berg 

(91. Nurwx (9) and Keamev. W— Maora, 64. 
L—B lyfavetu 7-7. Sv— Nunez (11). HRs— 
Cleveland. P ermn o rd (6). Seattle. Cowans - 
(71, G. Thomas (12). 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

M IM M2— 2 J 3 
IM Ml N)M 9 B 
Mahler. Shields M> and Benedict; Rwb, 
Nledenfuar (9) aid Sdasda. w— Reuse, 64. 
Lr-Mahler ll-7.Sv— Nledenfuer (6). HR— At- 
taitn. Homer pi). 

PhOadeMMa 2MNI2M-4 9 1 

Montreal MM HU 4 I 

K-GnmandVIrgH; Mahler. Grapenthb) (6), 
Lucas (7) and Fitzgerald W— tCGrass, 6-7. 
L— Mahler. 1-2. HR— Montreal. Fitzgerald 
(3). 

Hawetoa B11 202 1ST—* U 2 

Sow Frandsae IN BIB BB^-1 4 2 

Knepper and Bailey; Hanraaker, Williams 
(6).MJDavts (9). Minton (9) and Brtmly.W— 
Knrtige r ,B-4.U-Hnmmaker^BiHHs Hous 
tan, Bailey (SL Knepper (1). San Francisco, 
Doer (3). 

New York MB BM Ml r* < 3 

SLLasM MMIlS-1 9 I 

Aoullera, McDowell (3), Leach (S),Sttk{9) 
and Carter; Andular aad NletaW— Andular. 
TML Lr-Aoullera-1-2. 

CMcage MB IM Ml «M MF-5 13 3 

Pittsburgh 3M B1B BM BM SM-4 13 2 

Ruthvon, Braeslar (5), Sorensen (», Smith 
(10), Frazier (IS) and Lain, Davit (9); Tun- 
nan, Rafamsen 15). Candelaria (», Guante . 
Jill, Holland (13), Reuschet 05) and Pena 
W— RevactwLS-L L— Frazier, 3-1 HR— Pltts- 
burah, P*na (SI. 

CMckenatl BM BM MB-B ■ B 

Son Diego Mi Ml 5 1 

Seta Hume (7) and Knfcaiy ; Dravecky and 
Kennedy. W— Dravecky, 14. L— Sato, B- 


Major League Standings 

' AMERICAN LEAGUE 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Taranto 

45- 

2B 

■616 



Detroit 

41 

29 

su 

2U 

New York 

37 

33 

s» 

61k 

Barton 

M 

34 

-531 

Of* 

Baltimore 

36 

34 

•514 

Tfx 

Milwaukee 

33 

37 

A 14 

11 ‘ 

Cleveland 

22 

49 

-310 

22 


wear Dfvbtar - 



California 

41 

31 

-5W 

_ 

Oakland 

39 

34 

-521 

3' 

Chloaao 

35 

34 

sta 

Of* 

Kamos City 

36 

39 

so 

4V* 

Seattle 

36 

-36 

j ns 

5. 

Minnesota 

*32 

39 

JS3 

1 

Texas 

21 

45 

-394 . 

nvs 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


SL Louis 

Montred 

New York 

Chkage 

PMtaMpMa 

Ptneburah 


W L Pet. GB 
42 » .5*2 - 

43 31 JB? M 
3B » JOS 4 
37 33 £29 4M 

31 41 AST 11 
24 46 3Q-17M 


San Dieuo 
Cincinnati 


Houston 


San Franclico 


44 39 AO — . 

39- 3» J33 5 . 

37 34 JOT ' 4 

37 36 JB7 7 

33 9 "A M 

26 47 3SE IB 


TMrd 

Jimmy Connors (31. U& dot. Ramesh 
Krhhnrtv India. 7-5. 5-7, 7-5, 6-2; Kevin Curran 
(8). U.5,det. David Mustard UA. 60, 60. 74; 
Andreas Maurer. West Germany, net Johan 
Kriek (9), UA. 6-1,64, W,«; Tim Movatte 
(16). UJL drt. Paul McNtumm, Auefralla. 3-4 
4-6. 7-6 (7-2), 64 60; 

Joaklm Nystrom (7). Sw eden vl Barts 
Bectar. west Germany, 64 67 (57) (sus- 
MMM.dBiriMessJ; John Uoyd, Britain, v*. 
Henri Leconte, Prance, 74, 34,24 (suspend- 
ed, darkness). 


UwAaocml Pm 

Moose Haas shackling New York: One fastball didn’t sink. 


Angels 7, Royals 1: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, Urbano Lugo 
pitched a seven-hitter and Brian 
Downing and Gary Pettis each gpt 
three hits as California breeccd. 

Mariners 3, Indians 2 : In, Seattle, 
Gorman Thomas broke a 2-2 tie 


when he led off the bottom of (he 
sixth with a homer that gave the 
Mariners a club-record eighth 
straight victory. Burt Blylevni had 
a personal four-game winning 
streak ended but completed his 
I Oth game of the year. 


WOMEN'S SINGLES 
Second RoeoB 

Pan Shriw(fl,Ufi^Jef.Anm Hobbs. Bril- 
am," 6-0, 67; Elbe Burafn, U.&, do(. Adriana 
VUmgran, Araeattna. 64.63; Patty Fandk*. 
UJL dal. Kathleen Cummins*. uA, 6-1. 4-3; 
Stephan la Rohe, UA. def. Ehmka I nous, Jo- 
pan. 6-1. 6-3; Jenny Byrne. Australia 4 4L 
Ywtmo Vermoak, South Attica, 6^ 63; Jo 
Durio, Britain dot. Claudio Kanda-KOsch (6), 
4* 6.1. 62; Wendy Turnbull (ML Australia 
deL Elizabeth Mhttar. Australia 7-5, 7-5; no- 
Bella Demonaeot, Franca def. Litton 
Oraeetwr, Swtteertond, 6< 4-3; Antw Smith, 
U£.<ieL Bonnie GadiiMk (9],U^.2-6,64,6L 
LoriMo Savctwnka Soviet Union, del. 
Kafliy Jordan (10), U.Sw3-S,3a 6-3; Eltzobota 
Sm vl tew AwtraHOrdef. Joanne RunetL U J-4- 
A 62; Monurtn Mataevo (4), Butgorfa drt. 
Terry HolMav, UA.67 (1-7), 61,6-4; Barba- 
ra Puttw, Ui. del. Sore Gomor, Britain, 64.7- 
5i HanaMandltkora (31, Czechoslovakia del. 
Dkenm BatadraL Australia 44. 62, 74; 
Katav Rinata (ML U A. dot Rosrtvn Patt- 
banfc, south Africa 7-5, 6-4; VttoInJa wade. 
Britain, dof. Borhare Gartan, U4. 63, 67 (3- 
7). 74 

Third Round 

Rene Um South Africa. def. Hu No, CMna.6 
2> 44, 60; Catherine Tanvier. France, del. 
Gahrieia Sabatmt IIS), Araenllna,67 (3-71.6 
4.61; Hetena Sukova (7). Czechoslovak la, tor. 
tMndv White, u JL61.64; 2ino Garriun (9), 
U J.del.AUureel la Maikar.Nethoilaii 09,63,6 


t. 



Staganl 


-. . 




I 


, , 4 . . 






Page 16 


Shizuko Go’s 'Requiem’ on 


By Christine Chapman 
y OK.OHAMA, Japan — “I didn't have 
X trouble until the end of die war be- 
cause I believed what I was told absolutely. 


Then I spent many years lying awake in 
bed thinking, about the meaning of the 


bed thinking about the meaning of the 
war” saidShizuko Go. author of theprize- 
winning anti-war novel “Requiem. 

. The meaning of war for the pacifist nov- 
elist is apparent throughout this powerful 
book. As one of the characters says: “To 
"the people, individually, war is like a storm. 
It arrives unwanted, smashes their lives, 
and then suddenly blows over. We, the 
people, are the ones who sustain and cany 
on the war, but we’re not the ones who 
begin or end iL" 

“l needed a lot of time to change my way 
of thinking,” Go said, “because I was de- 
voted to the war. No one around me went 
against it until the cud." 

TwenhHhree years after World War II 
coded, Shizuko Go. now 56, wrote “Requi- 
em,” a semi-autobiographical novel that 
depicts the suffering of Japanese citizens 
during the U. S. air raids on Yokohama. 
“Requiem” is a Japanese counterpart of 
Anne Frank's diary: It chronicles the re- 
lentless horror of war from the point of 
view of a 16-year-old girl 

Written in 1968 Tor a Yokohama literary 
magazine, the intense, 122-page “Requi- 
em" was published in hardcover by Bungei 
Shirnju Co. of Tokyo in 1973. That year it 
won the highly regarded Akutagawa Prize, 
awarded to outstanding newcomers in fic- 
tion. In Japan, 200,000 copies have been 
sold. As the nation prepares to commemo- 
rate the 40th anniversary of the atomic 
bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 
bookstores are stocking the 10th paper- 
back edition of “Requiem." 

The book was published in English in 


May bv Kodansha International, translat- 
ed by Geraldine Harcourt, a New Zealand- 
er. This autumn the Women’s Press in 
London plans a 6,000-copy paperback run 
as well as a hardcover edition. 

The style of the novel reflects die fevered 
confusion of the last days of the war, shift- 
ing from present to past from optimism to 
(repair. The 16-year-old Setsuko, seriously 
ill, lies in the dark underground of a crum- 
bling dugout shelter. Memories of family, 
friends, school and factory make up the 
story. Setsuko’ s family and friends die one 
by one, her father in the air raid, her 
mother in machine-gun strafing from a 
U. S. plane as she waits for a rice ration, 
her brother as a kamikaze pilot. 

Striking images of the war-wrecked city 
underscore the impossibility of Setsuko's 
growing up normaL “Normal," for most 
Japanese, was to believe that Japan’s cause 
was just and to accept, killing as an ordi- 
nary event. 

“The idea of killing or bong killed is not 


unnat ural in wartime," Go said. “People’s 
way of thinking' is completely changed." 

In “Requiem," the rebellious Naomi, 
Setsuko's 14-year-old friend, remains the 
exception. She is the daughter of an .impris- 
oned traitor, a university economics pro- 
fessor who spoke out against Japan’s ac- 
tions. Until her death, Naomi bums “with 
anger and hatred" at those who tortured 
her father for his beliefs. 

Setsuko, ever loyal to Japan, becomes 
numb to tragedy, finally admitting, “I 
don't understand anything," but believing 
that “what I*m doing is nghL” Sent from 
high school to work in a factory, she tells 
Naomi: “At first,, working the treadle on 
my welding machine took all my concen- 
tration, but I’ve finally grown accustomed 
to factory life. There are more steps to* 
making a vacuum tube than Td ever have 
guessed, and mine is a very small part of 
the process. ... It brings home to me 
thwi as a member of Ihe Japanese nation I 
am playinga part in the sacred war for our 
i deal of a Greater East Aria Co-prosperity 
Sphere." 

In 1944, Shizuko Go was a schoolgirl 
recruited to work in a vacuum-tube fac- 
tory. On May 29, 1945, when the U. S. Air 
Force bombed Yokohama, she was at the 
factory and escaped the burning of the city. 
Like Setsuko in the novel, she walked to 
her home in central Yokohama through 
“bodies strewn about the road like so many 
charred pieces of wood.” 

Go said, however, “I was neither Setsuko 
nor Naomi. Setsuko’s ideas were mine, bat 
the story is fiction. I was an only child and 
my parents are still alive. They were in our 
house during the raid. It burned down, but 
they got out." The family then lived, with 
several others, in a railroad car. 

“I was in that railroad car for only two 
weeks," Go said during an interview in her 
comfortable study. “Bui, as in the novel, 
we all got lice. The train was crowded, the 
bee jumped from head to head, also on our 
bodies, fre couldn't wash. We had no soap. 
I don’t want to remember it!" She gri- 
maced. 

Using half-burned pieces of wood, Go's 
father built the family a hut on the land 
where their house had been. Friends had 
offered to evacuate than to the country but 
they refused- 

“My father said the same place would 
oot be hit twice.”'She smiled. “Yes, we 
were attacked a gain, but not burned. Peo- 
ple who moved to the smaller cities were 
attacked again and again. After the great 
Tokyo raid of March 10, the Americans 
began to bomb the dries to lei people know 
that Japan was losing." 

In a description of the May 29 raid in 
“Requiem," Setsuko's mother finds a place 
to mde under a bridge: She bolds onto a- 
girder and observes: “Firebombs kept 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 1- 1985 — ' . * 

— — ■ ■ LANGUAGE 

l the Meaning of War Haw Athletes Get Their Dandruff Up ‘ 

near’ Yokohama Station after the war that R fZmU Mma * One of his coaches was concerned last season about 

^ T ^ TSLh mv bead one Ihcwaj .HyniWyg! 

it wasnt a good place for a -young gin. 




She returned to the dty after two years, 
took a part-time job ana began to study 
literature. She joined a leftist writers' 
yhnrVi , Nihon R ungalm Gakko. and start- 
ed to write stories and essays. 

The tuberculosis recurred. In 1955, with 
the disease becoming worse, Go entered a 
Tokyo sanatori um. Her left lung was re- 
moval. After her recovery, she met and 
pMrriori Ouzo Oshuna and gave up writing 
to raise a family. In 1968, when the Japa- 
nese Self-Defense Agency announced a 
new military budget, Go decided to write 
“Requiem.” 

“I had two young sons,” she explained. 
“I was afraid reaming was going on. You 
can buy arms from other countries, but you 
can’t buy soldiers." 

Active in the peace movement through 
speeches, essays and appearances at anti- 
war conferences, Go attacks the Orwellian 
use of language to describe Japan’s rearma- 
ment In an angry essay, “War on Words,” 
she rails about “the world's dghih-largcst 
aims buildup, which is allowed to east 
alongside Japan’s war-renouncing consti- 
tution." She derides such euphemisms as 
“Sdf-Defeose Agency." 

“Not ‘defensive capability,’ she writes, 
“but ‘military strength’; not ‘self-defense 
force,’ bnt .‘army.’ " She insists: “The one 

S I amply won’t stand for is being ' 
a dupe of by state authority, as we 
woe in the past.” 

“Housewives especially are very active in 
the peace movement these days," she said 
at ho- home. “The general public is rather 
unconscious. ‘If you ask people if they like 
war, they say no. But in voting, they vote 
for Jinan to, the Liberal Democratic Party. 
There’s no .connection between their feel- 
ings and the way they vote. People think 
Jmrinto brings us wealth. In fact, it may 
also bring us militarism, but people are 
afraid of being poor again." 

Although she is the author of two other 
novels, and of short story and essay collec- 
tions, “Reqpiem" is the ^one that I thought 
I must write. I. had been thinking about it 
such a long time, but finishing the bode did 

not put an end to my experience of war." 

Last autumn Go went to the Philippines 
to research anothernovel about the Japa- 
nese experience during World War IL The 
story centers around a family sort to Ma- 
nila by the husband's company and evacu- 
ated to northern Luzon mien the city be- 
comes dangerous. Go expects to finish 
writing the book this year. 

% I could believe peace would last for- 
ever," she said, “I might fed more calm." 


By Gerald Eskenazi 

N EW YORK — I began to scratch 
day last winter when a football co 


head rate 
started to 


Kocfcnhd tamcMid 

Shizuko Go 


g pVing into the river right before my eyes 
and sputtering out WeuTl thought, Ameri- 
ca’s not stingy with its bombs." 

When her husband does not return 
home, she goes searching for him, “day 
after day, even when the dead had been 
buried everywhere in temporary graves." 

When she gives up, she tells Setsuko: “I 
just couldn't keep moving. I sat among the 
dead with my eyes closed as if I was one of 
them myself. I wondered if that mightn't be 
your father beside me for all I knew. And 
even after the bodies were cleared away I 
went back and sat there every day. It comes 
to the mm thing. Whether it was him or 
not, it was all toe same to me." 

The official count at deaths in the Yoko- 
hama raid is 4,000. 

Bom in 1929 as Michiko Yamagucfai, Go 
used several pen names when she began 
writing for the nrn wmiie Yokohama Liter- 
atnrein the 195$ Shizuko Go was the 
name she used to write “Requiem." 

During the war she developed tuberculo- 
sis. After her graduation from high school 
in 1947, her father sent her to the country 
to live at a temple with a priest and jus 
wife. There she was to recover and to team 
the arts of housekeeping and etiquette re- 
quired to get a good husband. Her father 
wanted to protect hen “There were so 
many. Amer ican soldiers and prostitutes 


IN day last winter when a tootoau coacn ssanco w 
praise his players. 

“It shows what the guys can do when they gft their 
dandr uff up," said the coach. 

Of course, I knew what he meant. And be knew 
what he meant Dander, dandruff —what's the differ- 
ence? It cranes from flying off the handle, doesn t it? 

While many of my colleagues in the press box woe 
chuckling over the malapropism. it occurred to me 

that I haw heard my share, in covering sports for more 

than two decades. 

When I was a young reporter covering the Mets, the 
, _p. _ ; flilwn h* Hpliiininl 


skjppy. The coach was going to do soancthi 
“We’ve got to nip it in the butt," he said. And £ 

went out and kicked some bods around. The team wm 


the next week, too. 

One of the play 
many physical prol 
over the years. lnd< 
can’t remember wh 


i wrong with 16m. 


“How’s the ankle?" be was asked dneday. f 
“About the same; getting better," came the reply. I Air 

^ i ' 1 ? * ' 

Even the playing fields of academe ate femLk lilaill * s 
ounds fonhis sort of refreshing Fnglish. The 41**- 

L*£. *»i 1 • ... 


The manager didn’t last, and mere woe rumois mat 
the renowned Yogi Berra was going to take his place. I 
telephoned Bara to determine whether he would be 

joining the Mets. . 

“Yogi,” I asked, "have you made up your mud 
yet 7” 

“Not that I know of," he replied. 

In my brief fling covering basketball, 1 stole a gem 
from a HaU-of-Fame player who had become a coach. 
His was terrible. 1 asked him what he was trying 
to do to get it untracked. 

“We’ve got to coadbere," he explained. The team 
never cohered, adhered or coalesced. He was soon 


rrwni w J -J — 1 — C 

extraordinarily successful football coach. He says h 
happened to a coach he knew these. 

The coach was in his office and was being inter, 
viewed by someone, who remarked that one of 

SC "Whaf? > scouted the coach. “Will he be O.K. by 




v.".v 


[ know of," he replied. Saturday?" 

r fling covering basketball , I sto le a gem Reporters were always ready for verbal 
f-Fame player who had become a coach. ^off-game news conferences of Dainty 
terrible. I asked him what he was trying ^ Philadelphia PhiHics. 


“Daouy, what about your outfielder Mike 
Anderson?" 


JUC. 

Far most of the 1960s, I covered hockey. It was a 

spon garnished with the occasionally fractured En- a ^ with a classic swing. His ng^h) 

gash of some Freach- Canart i ans . But others con i n but- lac i turn teammate was Jim Rice. I wanted Rice’s 
ed, too. One of my favorite people was Emile Percy impression of Lynn, but trying to get Rice UJ agree in 
(The Cat) Francis, who ran the Rangers as coach and an interview was tantamount to squeezing wn fq - fom 
general manager. He was a tough, wiry little guy. He a slone ^ Finally, he became communicative; !_ 
liked Ins players to hh back. “Fred Lynn?" he asked rhetorically. “A ptetareont 


“His limitations are limitless." Ozark responded. 




an interview was tantamount to squeezing water fiom 
a stone. Finally, he became communicative. : 

“Fred Lynn?" he asked rhetorically. "A pstne oot 


One of the coaches who succeeded Francos was a j bem intrigued with the sensitive Denis Rif- 
night person. He roamed hotel lobbies after tns players ^ ^ showed up for his first ngns confer- 

went to bed. In his native Montreal, there had always M a ]9-year-old rootte, smoking a meerschaum 
been something to do late at night Invariably, he H e ^ become one of hockey’sgrear stars with 
would want to eat after a game. the New York Islanders. 

" Send ^, 1 “There are two Denis Potvins," he sad one after- 

noon on a park bench not far from Ins three-acre 
w was estate in Old BrookviHe, New York. “There is the 
One of his predecessor* tire rioy^Wat^Lwas . andthereal person— and they haven’t met yet. 

an aggressive skater from another era. In one game m $ ... «*. rn ? v- 

the TWOS? he met his match in the Toronto Maple 

Leafs* aging, but still burly, defenseman. Bucko Mo- hockey My personal We wiii Uve tower. 

_ _ . ii i ... i nr _ A* ■ haralvin s we ni n arnA nmtfiriail 1 


11 0uny v oacmcmafli du l&u ivut- - - - ... 

atedly bumped Watson to the ice Another baseball person who provided unexpected 
not retaliate. He derided to get verbal insights was Steve Boros, who managed the 

Oakland A’s two years ago r He wastbe onhr manager I 
re a heen-has!" veiled Watson. knew who had been a liters tore (at the Lfnivera- 


DonaM. Bucko repeatedly bumped Watson to the i 
and Watson could not retaliate. He derided to j 

baric verbally. ■ — •- j — --o— r— — y ..... . < 

“McDonald, you’re a been-hasr yelled Watson. knew who had been a literature major (at toe Unnersi- 

_ ty of Midhigan). 

u In describing the dual worlds of the game and his 

Football though, seems to he the mother lode of off-ihe-field life, he told me: “Thorta bawdy humor 
mdded expressions. I think this is because it has a in Lbelocker roomandlloveiL.There’sashaipedgeof 
tradition of dramatic locker-room speech. wit And then I can go home and read my Uterature.” 


RnbrrtA 


Christine Chapman a a Tokyo-based 
writer who specializes in the arts. 


tradition of dramatic locker-room speech. 

I was kidding around with a Jets* receiver. He was 
giving me generalizations wheat 1 wanted specifics. 
Finally, I reminded him of an embarrassing mode m 
that had happened to him. 

“Cmon. Jerry, let a dead hone rest," he said. 


wit. And then I can go borne and read my literature.'’ 
Vw York Tima Service 


Gerald Eskenazi is a sports reporierjar The New 
York Tones. William Safire is m vacation. 


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