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PARIS, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 


■PT. 



BawnAJnM Py«B Ideindioftal 

Prudent Ronald Reagan and his wife, Nancy, placed a Stethem, the navy (Ever killed by Shii te hijackers in Leba- 
wreaih Tuesday on the Arlington, Virginia, grave of Robert non. Sherry Sierralta, Mr. Stethem’s sister, looked on. 

Reagan Greets Returning Air Hostages 


Camptied try Oar Staff From Dtspauha 

WASHINGTON — The main 
group of the remaining Americans 
who were taken hostage aboard 
. TWA Flight 847 arrived home 
Tuesday to a red>carpet welcome 
from President Ronald Reagan and 
hnndnafc of Americans. 

A chartered TWA jetliner cany' 
ng 30 of the former hostages and 
some family members touched 
. down at Andrews Air Force Base 
sear Washington. Hundreds of 
cheering people crowded near the 
tarmac, many carrying signs and 
flowers or waving American flags. 

President Ronald Reagan met 
^v ith the hostages for six minutes 
— privately on the plane — which 
— took off from Frankfurt — shortly 
after laying a wreath at Arlington 
National Cemetery in Virginia at 
r -- lie grove of Robert Dean Siethezn. 
a U5. Navy diver killed by the 
hijackers in Beirut. 

Mr. Stethem. 23, was beaten and 
then shot by the Shiite hijackers 
:_V r.^mnundeepcd thfra/rficsr ic 
Greece. 

“Gbd you’re back," read one 
sign. Others said; "There's no place 
like home,” and “How sweet it is.” 
. ir . The crowd loudly applauded an air 

U.S. Decision 
On Lebanon 
,Is Criticized 

t ruled Press !<i:er national 

BEIRUT — Lebanese cabinet 
Banisters on Tuesday strongly criti- 
cized President Ronald Ragan’s 
decision to isolate Beirut Interna- 
tional Airport, and the Lebanese 
1 1 • ’ ambassador in Washington was re- 
potted to be preparing a formal 
protest. 

Finance Minister Camille Cha- 
moun asked the U.S, administra- 
tion to recoasider its decision, say- 
ing that it "harms America’s image 
~ ll _, as much as it harms Lebanon's 
economy, particularly after 10 
>e>r5 of war." 

"Today Lebanon is in desperate 
rased of a friend's assistance and 
this fnend should be Mr. Reagan.” 
Mr. Quunoun said Tuesday. 

The United Slates announced 
■ .Monday that it would to try to 
iteiate the Beirut airport and to 
' other nations to join in 

me crackdown by barring their air- 
las. from flying to Lebanon. 

The Stare Department an- 
nounced a termination of U.S. 
landing rights- for the Lebanese na- 
nism' earner. Middle East Airlines. 

4»f authority for air cargo ser- 
'ice between the United States and 
Lebanon by American or Lebanese 
ranim. 

Sehm Salatu (he MEA chair- 
BBO, said: "1 am very sad. We are 
Already losing a lot of money- W'e 
»e already iasias our sluns. II ’« 
«rc denied European capitals 
bow, »e would lose our pants." 

The Christian-run Voice of Leb- 
anon and die Sunm-nm Voice of 
Nation radio stations said Leb- 
, aeon's ambassador to the United 
States. Abdullah Abu Habib, 
would present a Foreign Ministry 
fef tey on Tuesday to Richard W. 
Murphy, the U.S. assistant secre- 
te} cf sate /it Near Eastern and 
South Asian affair* 

Lebanese Foreign Ministry offi- 
s*U could ow be reached immedi- 
ately id confirm the reports. 
t - A spokesman for President 
Jr Auaiii GemaycL meanwhile, said 
3ai aJKtior Lebanese Army officers 
’We meeting Tuesday to discuss 
kw to ur.prove security at the air- 
pin md in Beirut. 

Educstian Minister Salim a!- 
Vow 5»>d; “We recognize that out 
?sritv situation is cm a heclthy 
it The iu*pon situation leas es a 
A to he desired." 

But be said that the US. deepen 
*aa "depioraWe because » «i : >' 

iCautoaed on Page 2. CoL 71 


MORE ON THE HIJACKING 

• The White House is said to have embed the FBI’s efforts against 

terrorism. Page 3. 

• U.S. tderison networks were drawn into the rote of a participant in 

the crisis. A news analysis. rage 1 

• Hostages teBhow hijackers passed through Athens airport. Page 6. 

• Tbe Pam of God is a growing, disciplined Islamic force. Page 6. 


force band that broke into “Ameri- 
ca the Beautiful” as the plane came 
into sight and played “The Star 
Spangled Banner” just before Mr. 
Reagan spoke. 

The president told tbe crowd at 
the start of his brief remarks, “TH 
wait for a second until I swallow 
the lump in my throat " 

He tarn tad the former hos- 
tages, “There’s only me thing to 
say and I ray it from the bottom of 
my heart: Welcome home.” 

“We’re so happy you're back 
safe and sound.” be-added 

He said that “there is no forget- 
ting.” the death of Mr. Stethem. 
“His murderers musi be brought to 
justice.” 

Mr. Reagan also referred to the 


seven Americans kidnapped earlier 
and who are still being held in Leb- 
anon. 

“The homecoming won't be 
complete until ail come home,” he 
said 

In Beirut, a leader of the Shiite 
group Amal said Tuesday that his 
movement “will do what we can" to 
free the seven Americans stiH held, 
but only if there were a direct re- 
quest from the U-S. government 

“We have not been asked so far 
directly by the Americans to medi- 
ate, but we will do what nr can if 
wc get a direct approach,” Colonel 
Aka Haidar, second-ranking lead- 
er to Nahib Beni, the Amal chief, 
told The Associated Press. 

John L. TesnaJte, the TWA plot 


PoU Backs Reagan’s Crisis Handling 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Americans overwhelmingly approve of Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s handling of the hijacking of Trans World 
Airlines Flight 847, but only about one-third believe that the U.S. 
response wifi deter similar acts, according to the initial findings of a 
Washington Post-ABC News polL 
About four in 10 people surveyed said that the hijacking ended 
more as a victory for the terrorists, but more than half said that they 

T sed mOimiy retaliation. 

interviews with 654 people Sunday afternoon and evening — a 
time when the 39 freed Americans were moving from Beirut to 
Damascus and eventually to Frankfurt — the poll also showed a 
sharp, favorable turn of sentiment toward Israel after a period daring 
the crisis when a growing minority favored distancing the United 
States from Israel as a means of stemming terrorism against Ameri- 
cans. 

There were these other findings as wril: 

• Two of every three people interviewed said they were afraid io 
travel on some international flights because of the threat of hijacking 
or terrorism. 

• Two of every three also felt that the incident had made no change 
in lie way the world views the United States; the remaining third was 
about equally divided over whether the nation now appears stronger 
or weaker to others. 

* On the question of military retaliation, about one-third approved 
of the idea, but half of these backed away from any action that might 
bring about a war. 


- - ¥■’- 


U.S. Assesses Ways of Striking Back 

AmericamSlMHddmLebcanm Gaining Factor 


By BUI Keller 

,Vw York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — Reagan ad- 
ministration officials say they are 
holding in reserve a number of mti- 
ii.-iry options in response to the 
hijacking of the Trans World Air- 
lines plane. The options include a 
bombing strike against Bonn In- 
ternational Airport, attacks on 
guerrilla mining camps, and using 
agents to track down the hijackers. 

But the officials said that the 
prevailing desire was to attempt 
diplomatic moves first. One factor 
inhibiting a military reprisal 
against Shiite Moslem extieinisis 
believed to lx behind the hijacking, 
the officials said, was the possible 
nsk to seven missing Americans. At 
least six of them arc believed to be 
held in Lebanon. 

Officials also said that while they 
believe they know the identities of 
the men who commandeered the 
TWA plane on June 14. they do not 
know which one killed one or the 
passengers, Robert Dean Stethem, 
aU.S. Navy diver. 

“The man who pulled the trigger, 
as of now, w e don't know, a State 
Department official uifL_ 

Administration officials said 
thev hoped to learn details about 
the" hijackers, possibly including 
the identi’*- of the killer, by debriri- 


ing the 39 passengers and crew 
members freed Sunday. 

The officials said that lawyers at 
the Central Intelligence Agency 
had been asked to study the legal 
restraints that would apply to U.S. 
agents if President Ronald Reagan 
ordered a manhunt. 

For example, the officials said, 
the agency's lawyers have been 
asked whether a presidential order 
forbidding assassination also 
would apply to the use of deadly 
force in merely attempting to seize 
the hijackers. 

An official said: “We want 
Sicilians kilters brought to jus- 
tice," But he added that the United 
States hoped to accomplish this 
through the Lebanese government. 

In describing the measures an- 
nounced on Monday to dose Bo- 
nn Internationa] Airport, a State 
Department official said they were 
“the beginning of a campaign" 
against terrorism. But when asked 
about the possibility of bombing 
the airport, he said; “No comment, 
I am not going to speculate.” 

Another official said that, unless 
tbe sanctions were accompanied by 
destruction of runways, terrorists 
would be able to land at the airport. 

“We are not ruling h out, he 
said. “But it is pretty Strong medi- 
cine.” 


Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said Mr. Reagan met 
for an hour with his national secu- 
rity team on Monday, discussed the 
hostage situation, and “reviewed 
the Uni led States program of coun- 
terterrorism." 

Robert C McFarland, the presi- 
dent's national security adviser, 
said after the release of the TWA 
hostages that the United Slates had 
identified “two or three strategic 
locations in the Middle Hast” that 
might be targets of a strike. 

Mr. McFarlane, in an interview 
with International Network News, 
was asked whether it was necessary 
to “surgically retaliate" against 
those responsible for the hijacking, 
to maintain credibility. 

“Well, I think that is true," Mr. 
McFarlane said. “.And I think the 
focus of it, the purpose of it, has to 
be, not u conduct a random act of 
violence, but instead, to focus our 
power an dealing with the root 
causes of terrorism —where people 
are trained, where they are housed, 
fed. sustained over time. And there 
are two or three strategic locations 
in the Middle East in particular, 
where that is the case.” 

Other officials have said that 
they believe they know ihe location 
of two or three training camps in 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


surprised diplomats, 
nadze 


who flew the hijacked airliner back 
and forth between Algiers and Bei- 
rut, said upon arriving at Andrews; 
“We’d like to take this opportunity 
to thank and applaud you. I'd like 
to say that many of my fellow hos- 
tages share with me the profound 
conviction” char God brought them 
through their ordeaL 

At the dose of tbe ceremony, Mr. 
Reagan waved and said, “Go 
home.” 

The 30 men were given a rousing 
send-off by a crowd of 350 Ameri- 
can well-wishers when they 
boarded a chartered Trans World 
Airlines plane at the U.S. Rhein- 
-Main Air Base for the test lap erf 1 
their journey. 

The former hostages were flown 
to the Rhein-Main base from Da- 
mascus on Monday. They were re- 
leased Sunday in Bonn after being 
held for 17 days. 

The American Forces Radio 
Network said in its West German 
broadcasts that tbe method of de- 
parture was decided on’ curing a 
meeting of the former hostages 
Monday night In Wiesbaden. 

U.S. officials said that two of the 
remaining nine former captives 
were staying at a U.S. military hos- 
pital at Wiesbaden to await the 
results of medical tests. Others had 
made private travel arrangements, 
some staying in Europe tor vaca- 
tions. 

Those who left were accompa- 
nied by US. officials and about 40 
relatives who had come to Frank- 
fort to meet them. 

Most of tbepassengas and crew 
were freed within the first Tew days 
of the crisis; the remaining 39 men 
were handed over to Shiite Mos- 
lems from AmaL 

Robert Gilmore, who headed the 
team of eight doctors who exam- 
ined the former captives, said (hey 
bad suffered no significant psycho- 
logical or physical harm. 

Dr. Gilmore said the beg in ni ng 
of the crisis had beat the most 
traumatic, and that six or seven 
hostages had suffered physical mis- 
treatment that now amounted to “a 
matter of bruises.” 

He said he did not expect the 
former captives to suffer anything 
more serious than sleeplessness and 
disorientation now. Test results 
two were awaiting were for possible 
infections or parasites. 

(NYT, AP, UPI, Reuters) 


Gromyko N 

Shevardna 


By Serge Schmemann 

Sew Yak Times Service 

MOSCOW — Andrei A Gromy- 
ko was named Tuesday to the pres- 
tigious but largely caemonial Sovi- 
et presidency, ending his 28-year 
reign over Soviet foreign affairs 

Shevardnadze: a reputation as a 
tough adn rim steaior. Page 5. 

and opening tbe way to a new style 
in international relations. 

Mr. Gromyko was succeeded as 
foreign minister by Eduard A She- 
vardnadze, head of the Communis t 
Party in the Republic of Georgia, 
who was promoted Tuesday to full 
membership in the Politburo. 

The choice for foreign minister 
s. Mr. Shevard- 
has had little experience in 
beyond leading a few 
legations abroad. 

Some diplomats thought that in 
•selecting a lifdong party official to 
run the Foreign Ministry, Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev was si gnaling that 
foreign policy would come from his 
office: 

They added that Mr. Shevard- 
nadze, 57, an elegant man with a 
reputation for toughness and flexi- 
bility, could be expected to intro- 
duce Mr. Gorbachev's relatively 
more open style into foreign af- 
fairs. 

Mr. Gorbachev personally nomi- 
nated Mr. Gromyko as president of 
the Presidium of the Stmreme Sovi- 
et, a post that carries the functions 
of chief cf state, at a session of the 
nominal parliament- 

in doing so, Mr. Gorbachev 
broke a pattern set by his three 
immediate predecessors, all of 
whom had combined the leadership 
of the party with the presidency. 

Mr. Gorbachev explained that 
daunting domestic tasks he has 
made the cornerstone of his admin- 
istration required that, as general 
secretary ot the party, he should 
“concentrate to the maximum" on 
organizing “a successful implemen- 
tation of the charted course.” 

Mr. Gorbachev paid tribute to 
Mr. Gromyko as a man whose 
“deep knowledge and multifarious 
experience are combined with prin- 
dpledness and consistency.” 

On returning to His seat cm the 
uuiy, he reacl&d iu from, of die ■ 
prime minister, Nikolai A. Tik- 
honov, to shake Mr. Gromyko’s 
hand warmly. 

In accepting the presidency, Mr. 
Gromyko capped a remarkable 
diplomatic career that began in 
1939. In 1943. Stalin chose him to 
be ambassador to Washington. In 
1957 he became foreign minis ter. 

He met every UJS. president 
from Franklin D. Roosevelt to 
Ronald Reagan. He was present at 
every major East-West diplomatic 
conference from Yalta to Vienna, 
and attended every General As- 
sembly of the United Nations save 
one. 

He skipped the session in 1983, 
when his plane was denied landing 
rights at civilian airports near New 
York Gty, following the Soviet 



ESTABLISHED 1887 


viet President; 
eign Minister 



The A no c i oted Pres 

Andrei A. Gromyko, left, is congratulated by MQkfiaO S. Gorbachev, Prime Minister 
Nikolai A. Tikhonov, center; Vitaly L Vorotnikov, rear left and Mikhail S. Solomentsev. 


U.S. Officials 
Reveal Date 
Of a Summit 

By Gary Lee 

WtakbtgUm Prat Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, will 
confer in Geneva from Nov. 19 to 
21, a Reagan administration offi- 
cial said Tuesday. 

It win mark the 11th postwar 
summit between a UiL ana a Sovi- 
et leader and the first since June 
1979, when Jimmy Carter and the 
late Leonid L Brezhnev met in -Vi- 
enna. 

The confirmation of place and 
timing, made in a meeting between 
U_S. officials and the Soviet ambas- 
sador, Anatoli F. Dobrynin, at the 
State Department Monday, ended 
months of negotiations that began 
in March when Mr. Gorbachev as- 
sumed power and Mr. Reagan pro- 
posed a summit meeting. 

The formal announcement was 
expected to be made by Washing- 
ton and Moscow later this week, a 
U.S. official said. 

The two leaders will likely hold 
at least two sessions together and 
“do more than just get acquainted 
and shake hands,” a UJS. official 
said. 

U.5. officials cay (hat (lie two 
sides settled on Geneva, the venue 
of arms talks between the United 
States and tbe Soviet Union as a 
“neutral compromise” between 
Washington and a site in the Soviet 
Union. 

Noting that former presidents 
Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. 
Ford went to the Soviet Union dur- 
ing the 1970s, administration offi- 

(Cootiqned on Page 2, CoL 4) 



Eduard A. Shevardnadze at Tuesday session of paiiumenL 


downing of a Sooth Korean airlin- 
er. 

Mr. Gromyko faithfully repre- 
sented Soviet interests from the 
depths of the Cold War to the 
heights of detente, maintaining dig- 
nity and professionalism. 

Within the Kremlin, Mr. Gro- 
myko survived the ups and downs 
of Soviet politics and eventually 
emerged at the top, by all accounts 
through competence in his field, 
rather than through political ma- 
nipulation or patronage. 

In 1973, Leonid L Brezhnev 
made him a member of the Politbu- 
ro, and in 1983, Yuri V. Andropov 
added the title of a first deputy 
prime minister. 

It was characteristic of Mr. Gro- 
myko’s career as a master diplomat 


that, in assuming the presidency, be 
left Western analysts divided on 
the meaning of the move. 

Some thought that he had been 
effectively “kicked upstairs” as 
part of Mr. Gorbachev’s deter- 
mined efforts to bring a new team 
into the Kremlin. 

Yet, it was Mr. Gromyko who 
nominated Mr. Gorbachev as gen- 
eral secretary after the death of 
Konstantin U. Chernenko. 

From his demeanor and the tone 
of his address, it seemed as if Mr. 
Gorbachev was rewarding a re- 
spected, deserting elder statesman. 

For Mr. Gromyko, who will be 
76 this month, the presidency of- 
fered an honorable c ulmina tion to 
a long and arduous career. It was a 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 6) 


INSIDE 


■ A confrontation is feared in 
the EC between tbe original six 
and three newcomers. Page 2. 

■ UJ& lobbyists depend more 

on subtle skills than on clout 
and connections. Page 3. 

■ Italy's new president, 
Francesco Cossiga, has a law- 
and-order reputation. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ U-S. factory orders and hous- 
ing sales rose in May. Pfcge 9. 

■ General Electric PLC lists a 

15.5-pereent rise in profits for 
the fiscal year. Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

Researchers believe they have 
found the “suture” with which 
Florida was connected to North 
America 250 million years ago. 


A Hard line Emerges in U.S. House 

Democratic Moderates Led Way on Military Bill Shifts 

By Margaret Shapiro 

Washtngiou Past Service 

WASHINGTON — In two 
weeks of voting on the military au- 
thorization bill for fiscal 1986, tbe 


Pond Recommends 

Apartheid Change 

. United Press International 

JOHANNESBURG — Apart- 
heid policies have failed to solve 
South Africa's racial problems and 
could have "catastrophic conse- 
quences” if they were not urgently 
changed, a government-funded re- 
search council reported Tuesday. 

The Human Sciences Research 
Council began to investigate rela- 
tions between the races four years 
ago. In a report, the council said 
that South Africa's system of insti- 
tutionalized racial separation “has 
reached an impasse,” and that con- 
structive relations between the 
races “cannot be developed further 

L these lines.” 
report by 30 academics, in- 
dustrialists and community leaders 
from across the political spectrum 
recommended the institution of a 
democratic political system “nego- 
tiated by ail population groups and 
in which all can participate. 4 


House of Represeutatives shifted 
to a harder line on defense and 
foreign-policy issues. 

The House voted to create or 
expand weapons systems and to 
authorize new measures to prevent 
or penalize espionage Some mem- 
bers attributed the votes, which of- 
ten went beyond the recommenda- 
tions of the Democratic leadership 
and committee chairmen, to the hi- 
jacking; of a TW A jetliner and other 
recent incidents involving U-S. for- 
eign policy. 

An equally significant factor ap- 
peared to be the desire of a key bloc 
of about 55 Democrats to move tbe 
party toward the center on military 
spending issues. 

Not every vote confirmed the 
shift toward a tougher line. For 
instance, tbe House voted to halt 
further depkmnem of the MX mis- 
sile and to ban tests of an anti- 
satellite weapon. Bui even anus- 
control lobbyists saw dements of 
the new mood in ihdr victories. 

“It's John Wayne day up here,” a 
Capitol Hill aide said. 

In perhaps their most idling 
vote, the House authorized the pro- 
duction of neve gas, a weapons 
system it had consistently rejected. 
The margin by which it was ap- 
proved. more than 30 votes, sur- 
prised both Republicans and Dem- 
ocrats. 

The House also voted to: 

• Increase spending by SO per- 
cent for President Ronald Reagan's 
proposed defense against strategic 
missiles. The amount was less than 
Mr. Reagan bad sought, but more 
than a Democratic alternative 
would have provided. The lawmak- 
ers also imposed no arras-control 
restrictions on space defense, as 
some Democrats bad wanted. 



c We ought to 
distance ourselves 
from the left by 
voting for some 
weapons, but also 
from the 

administration by 
supporting less 
money and more 

arms control.’ 

— Les Aspin 
Democrat ot Wisconsin 


• Provide an additional $150 
million for the Midgetman mobile 
nuclear missile above the $774.5 
million recommended by the 
House Aimed Services Committee. 

■ Permit the Pentagon to use lie 
detector tests to monitor the loyal- 
ty of more than four million mili- 
tary and civil employees with ac- 
cess to classified information, 2 nd 
allow mili tary courts to apply' the 
death penalty against those found 
guilty of espionage in peacetime. 

These and dozens of other items 
must be reconciled with the legisla- 
tion enacted earlier by the Republi- 
can-controlled Senate. After Con- 
gress returns next week from its 
Independence Day recess, a confer- 
ence committee will try to agree on 
a single plan that can be approved 
separately by both houses. 

Lawmakers and lobbyists said 
last week that the votes in the 


House clearly reflected the frustra- 
tion many members felt over the 
hijacking of TWA Flight 847, the 
killin g of four U-S. Marines in El 
Salvador and revelations of possi- 
ble dannty by a spy ring allegedly 
working inside the U.S. Navy. 

“Tbe whole debate is influenced 
by what's happened internationally 
in the last two weeks,” said Repre- 
sentative Leon E Paaetta, a Demo- 
crat of California. 

“The way you can lash out and 
feel strong is to vote” for increased 
military prowess, said Representa- 
tive Ronald V, Odiums, a Demo- 
crat of California. 

The bloc of about 55 House 
moderates on the military spending 
issue was able to have such a great 
effect because in the 435-member 
chamber there are about 190 repre- 

tCmrtinnpil on Pane 3. CoL 2) 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 


Confrontation Is Feared in EC 


Original Six, Plus Ireland, Want to Amend Treaty of 1957 


By Steven J. Dryden 

International Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — The divisive out- 
come of the European Community 
conference in Milan has created tire 
conditions for a confrontation be- 
tween the ECs original members 
— Belgium, France, Italy, West 
Germany, Luxembourg and the 
Netherlands — and its independent 
newcom er s. 

In calling the first conference to 
amend the Treaty of Rome, the 
document founding the communi- 
ty, those states and Ireland over- 
ruled Britain, Denmark and 
Greece, all of whom joined the EC 
after it was formed in 1957. 

The three, for various reasons 


Pope Urges Unity 


Among Europeans 


United Press International 

ROME — Pope John Paul n, in 
his fourth encyclical, called Tues- 
day for an end to “incomprehen- 
sion and mutual distrust" between 
Eastern and Western Europe. 

The pontiff issued the special let- 
ter to Roman Catholics to mark the 
1,100th anniversary of St. Cyril and 
St Methodius, the Greek mission- 
aries who took Christianity to the 


Slavs. Their feast day is July 7. 
“Cyril and Methodius made a deci- 
sive contribution to the building of 
Europe," the pope said, “not only 
in Christian religious rammnninw 
but also to its civil and cultural 
union." 

He called on “the whole of Eu- 
rope" to “feel ever more strongly 
the need for religious and Christian 
unity and for a brotherly commu- 
nion of all its peoples." 


such as concern about preserving 
national sovereignty, are opposed 
to changes in the treaty. The Dan- 
ish paxiiaznent has even explicitly 
forbidden its government to take 
pan in a conference called to alter 
the document. 

Ireland also has reservations, 
about the determination of other 


Europe," the de facto separation ot 
those EC states that agree on goals 
and means of achieving- them, from 
those who cannot. 

' The idea has long been a popular 
fall-back position when the strains 
of reaching unanimity prove un- 
bearable, but it has never really 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


been put into widespread use. 
“Nobody knows the co 


states to formally restrict the use of 1 
the veto, and the strengthening of 
the ECs security and foreign policy 
coordination. 

Both of those subjects are on the 
conference agenda as defined by 
Prime Minister Bettino Cnuti of 
Italy, who was chairman of the Mi- 
lan meeting. 

While all member states are ex- 
pected in the end to attend the 
conference, (he chances for agree- 
ment on revision are regarded as 
extremely slight. The question 
many diplomats and EC officials 
here are asking this week is: what 
happens then? 

A diplomat, outlining what be 
called the worst-case scenario, said, 
“The majority would tell the oth- 
ers, ‘if you don't ratify this you can 
leave.' ” This option is not thought 
likely, although the battles at the 
conference may have a similar psy- 
chological effect. 

. Some community leaders, such 
as President Francois Mitterrand 
of France, believe it is beneficial to 
identify those countries who are, in 
his words, “reticent" about a 
“strong, united Europe." 

Another outcome could be the 
decision of the majority to move 
ahead informally on their own. 
French officials continue to speak 
about the creation of a “two-speed 


“Nobody knows the conse- 
quences of a real two-speed Eu- 
rope." another diplomat said. The 
idea seems to run counter to the 
oft-stated need for European coun- 
tries to. combine their economic re- 
sources and political power to im- 
prove the well-being of their 
citizens. 

The direction EC officials plan 
to take may become dearer baler 
this month when foreign ministers 
attempt to agree on a mandate for 
the conference, as well as on the 
short-term measures to improve 
decision-making that were almost 
adopted at Milan. 



WORLD BRIEFS 




Bush Says U.S., France Narrow Rift 

PARIS (UPI) — The U.S. vice president. George Bush, ending nJ 

days of talks with French leaders, said Tuesday that thereis sJ > " 
,uiic IT? V* W 


incompatibility" between the U.S. space defense program and France? 
Eureka project for European space and technology research. - : 

After meeting with President Francois Mitterrand, Mr. Bush indicaierf " 
that a rift between the two countries over space research was nairoww '■ 
He said that their differences were due to misunderstandings on bX ", 
rides, including a feeling in Washington that Eureka was a “coom^T! \ 
the U5. program. 


The vice president said that the problem of terrorism also was a mai* 
subject in his talks with French officials, as it was in other Eum~»! 


capitals. Mr. Bush left later for London, the last stop in his seven-natW 
European tour. ^ 


Controls Tightened at Rome Airport 

ROME (Reuters) — Strict security controls were placed Tuesday oin 1 
transit baggage and freight at Fiumicmo Airport as police investigated* :j 


theory that a bomb that exploded in a suitcase there Monday 
have been destined for Madrid. 


Baggage pasting through the airport, which by international convey f 
on air freight caused long loading delays, airport sources sahL r - 


Israelis Protest Economic Austerity Plan 


The meeting should provide in- 
ica Cions as to bow far Luxem- 


dications as to how far Luxem- 
bourg, which took over the presi- 
dency of the EC this month, wants 
to take the conference idea, in view 
of the divisions it has caused. In 
any event, the EC has been left 
racing to reform its cumbersome 
dedaon-maldng procedures before 
the entry of Spain and Portugal in 
January. 

At the end of the meeting, Mr. 
Craxi said the EC was making pro- 
gress toward a “broader and more 
committed European union.” 

The problem lor the community, 
as Prime Minister Garret FitzGer- 
ald of Ireland gently put it earlier in 
the week, is that “European union 
is not a precise concept." The real 
struggle over the meaning of (he 
idea appears to have just begun. 


A demonstrator lashed out at a police officer Monday night in Jerusalem during a protest against the 
emergency economic measures taken by Israel to curb inflation. On Tuesday, business districts of 
Jerusalem, Td Aviv and Haifa were dearly deserted during a one-day national strike called by 
Histadrut, Israel’s labor federation. The union said the austerity plan would outworkers’ real income 
by a third. The strike also closed Ben-Gurion Airport and prevented newspapers from publishing. 


on air freight caused long loading delays, airport sources said. . - 
Twdve persons were injured when the bomb went off on a bagg»g 1. . 
trolley in a luggage bay at the international terminal of R®2c£ 
Rome's main civilian airport. Police said it has been speculated that % il\ 
suitcase was meant to be loaded on a flight bound for Madrid. On •: 1 

Unn^air nna y umtah uiqc WTImI ItU’l tfi mw a in .Hnftl. . B ... . J " 


suitcase was meant to 


Mem day, one person was killed and 28 were injured in attacks on British 
American ana Jordanian airline offices in Madrid. ^ 


U.S. Aides Confirm Geneva Summit Date 


(Continued from Page 1) 


that protocol 
the Soviet leader to come to the 
United States, and Mr. Reagan ini- 
tially invited Mr. Gorbachev to 
Washington. 

The Russians apparently de- 
clined and long consultations en- 
sued, a US. official said. 

When a Soviet official said in 


April that Mr. Gorbachev would 
travel to the United Nations in 
New York in the falL it was widely 
assumed that he would meet with 
Mr. Reagan there. 

But reports that Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz and Foreign 
Minister Andrei A Gromyko did 
not advance those plan* when they 
met in Vienna in April, followed by 
a recent Soviet announcement that 


Mr. Gorbachev would not attend 
the General Assembly session, ap- 
peared to doom a New York meet- 
ing. 


■ Moscow Is Silent 
The Soviet Foreign Ministry re- 
fused to confirm or deny Tuesday 
the statement by the officials in 
Washington, Agence France- 
Presse reported from Moscow. 


Af ghan Generals Reportedly Captared 1 

ISLAMABAD. Pakistan (Reuters) — At least two Afghan general* I 
and a Soviet adviser may have been captured in escalated dashes in tfe f 
Pam shir Valley where an Afghan general was killed last month. Western 1 
diplomats said Tuesday. .1 

Quoting reports from Kabul, they said the three were reported to haw 
been captured last week at Dan-i-Darra, a village near the town d 
Rokheh in the government-held lower pan of the valley. The ^ 
Jamiat-i-Islami party said it had no inionnatian about the reported 
captures. . 

The diplomats said Afghan troops and about 2,000 Soviet reinforce-- - 
men ts sent into the valley were said to be taking heavy casualties froni* 
guerrilla attacks in the former rebel stronghold north of Kabul Af fl u x 
commando troops parachuting into the upper reaches of the valley last 
week met heavy resistance and many were said to have been killed brforc 
they reached the ground. The report could not be independently con- - * 
firmed. 4 -• 




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Bodies of 13 MIAs Returning to U.S. 

WASHINGTON (AF) — The r emains of 13 U.S. airmen killed in the • 
crash of their air force gunship in Laos more than 12 years ago havebeai ‘ 
recovered by a U.S.-Laotian excavation team and are bring returned (o - 
the United States, the White House announced Tuesday. 

The chief presidential spokesman. Larry Speakes, said the ranting 
recovered last February, have been identified by the U.S. Army’s identify • 
cation laboratory in Hawaii and the families of the victims have bed 
notified. The remains will be flown to Travis Air Force Base in California . 
on Friday for burial later, he said. 

It is the first time the Communist government of Laos has cooperated . : 
in a joint recovery effort leading to the return and identification of ' 
Americans long listed as missing in action. 


Zimbabwe Elections to Re Extended 


HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Voting in Zimbabwe's first general - ' 
election since independence five years ago win be extended two days*, 
because the heavy turnout cm Monday overtaxed the dection system? 
government officials said Tuesday. * — " — 

A half -million black Zimbabweans, about one-sixth of Zimbabwe's 19 1 

million black electorate, voted, some of them waiting in long queues for T' , 
hours in winter tain, lie contests are for 79 of the 80 seats allotted to ; -r- 
blacks in the National Assembly. 

Zimbabwe’s 100,000 whites, a fraction of the population of about «ghi — 
million, filled the 20 assembly seats allotted to them last week. Conserve 1 
lives Jed by Ian Smith, the former white prime rmnister, won all bn l five of (•'- 
them. • ■ I.. • 


Lebanese Charged in Paris Slayings ’ 

PARIS (UPI) — A Lebanese man has been indicted and held for trial ■ PI 

after a Czechoslovak pistol found in his Paris apartment reportedly ! ' ' 

turned out to be the weapon that killed a UJS. ana an Israeli diplomat^ 
court officials said Tuesday. ;i. 'ii!:;! Ui 


turned out to be the weapon that killed a UJS. 
court officials said Tuesday. 

Georges Ibrahim Abdallah, considered by 


lio 




leaders of the terrorist group, Lebanese . iv , t . 

was ordered held for trial by ajudge on Monday on charges of c omplici ty 
in homicide. • 

Police found the 7.65-caliber Czechoslovak CZ-70 pistol, as well as 
explosives and other weapons in his apartment in ApriL Investigators' 
said they confirmed that the pistol was used in the murder of Lieutenant 
Coload Charles R. Ray. military aitachfe of -the U.S. Embassy in Paris, 

Jan. 18, 1982. and of Yacxrv Barsimantov, second secretary of the faradr-:. • 
Embassy, on April 3, 1982. ■ • 


to be one of ft* 


Revolutionary FactioAI »»’ \ 


For the Record 


Pilots cm Ireland's state-owned afrime, Aer IJw gns, began a four-day 
strike Tuesday to protest the government’s refusal to start negotiations on. 
pay increases. (Ream} 


. Prime Minister Engoria diaries won re-election in Dominica, unoffi- 
cial results showed Tuesday. Her Freedom Party woo nearly 59 percent of 
the vote and 15 of the 21 elective seats in the Parliament (AP) 
A London magistrate remanded three persons in custody Tuesday nr 
connection with an alleged plot to conduct a bombing cfl imwi g n in 
Britain this year -to back independence for Northern Ireland {Reuters) 


U.S. Considers Its Options 


(Commuted from Page I) 
the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon that 
are reportedly used to train the 
militia of the HezbaQah, or Party of 
God, a Shiite extremist group. 

In other interviews, Mr. McFar- 
lane and other officials have said 
that Hezballah is not vulnerable to 
reprisals because it is sheltered in 
urban areas. 

Government officials and out- 
ride experts on terrorism also reit- 
erated concerns about using vio- 
lence in response to the 
hostage- taking, noting that the kill- 
ing . of innocent emtians might 
daniage U.S. stature and that it 
might amply incite more terrorism. 

Ray S. Oine, a former deputy 
director of thej CIA who recently 
completed a study for the army on 
terrorism, said the best response - 
was to avoid ^rilitary action and 
use the occasion to mobilize world 
opinion against t erroris m, includ- 
ing an effort to persuade the Unit- 
ed Nations, which often is hostile 
to US. positions, to take a stand 
agamst-Shiile terrorism. 


“Willingiiess to use force is youf. . 
key card," Mr. Cline said. “But that- 
does not mean you don't play the 
other cards first." 

A Slate Department official Srid^;' 
that while some in the administra— : 
tion were eager for a military show 1 
of strength, There is a oounteraF 
gwneat that reprisal, particularly / 
against this kind of group, onty 
feeds more terrorism." 


A statement signed by Islamw ^ 
fihad said Tuesday thanhe United. 

States would face “Eri^tmare" at-' ^ ‘ ■ 

tacks if h retaliated for tire TWA ‘ : 

hijac king , Reuters reported Emm ’ 

BeiruL - - 


Wa shingto n also would be held ‘ 
responsible for any Israeli reprisal' 
a ttac ks, a typewritten starwnwit’ 
delivered to a news agency in ha* 
nit said. Mamie J ihad fighters'. 


would be “a nightmare that pur- 
sues than wherever they may be,^- ’ 
it said. There was no way of an*# 
then dealing dm staiemenL 


Beirut Criticizes U.S. Decision 


J{ 


(Codthmed from Page t) 


fret everybody in Lebanon. It is 
indiscriminate in its effect." 


HEWLETT 

PACKARD 


A senior Reagan administration 
official said that other Western 
governments would be encouraged 
to lake action similar to that taken 
by the United States to' dose Beirut 
airport and discourage terrorists 
from using Lebanon as a baie of 
operations... 

■ UJL Indicates Support 

Britain indicated Tuesday (hat it 
was ready to support the United 
States in dosing BeinU airport to 


international travel. The Associat- 
ed Press reported from London. A' , 
statement isoed by the Foreigr ... 
Office said the matter would be-' Y, 
discussed with Vice President- ' 
George Bush who was to arrive ^ 
Tuesday .in London. 

The Foreign Office said that it 
was consulting with Britain’s part- ^ 
ners on what action might be ap- j ; 
propriate ^to ensure that terroririr?^ - 

aretmabletouseBdriitarrpdrtasai'. 

means of launching attacks outsid^’ *«. 
Lebanon." It smdtmsindudedsnS'' 
penrion of air services to and from' ‘V 
Beirut - ■ . 









INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 


Page 3 


AMERICAN' TOPICS 


li, 


pe ftroS cCTeigiy Caspar W. 

Kberafe bm?ow! 
f^t^iasKntinn 
tay buildup dedining, he ap- 
’ p can tohavt Tos t some of his 
testa 1 foreansenatives as wtsB. 
•i .Several leading advocates of 
i strong defease were queried 
by tfc£ Heritage Foundation, & 
conservative researdbi organiza- 



flnili ( 





turning tvl 


* li 1 i.\!rc>- 


. Caspar W. Weinberger 

non, f<r a fort hc omi ng conser- 
■, vativo appraisal of the military 

. '■’-1 budgetTbc New York Tunes 
‘ reported that they praised Mr. 
.- V Weinberger's tenacity in sup- 

port of more money for the nnl- 
'' itary, but accused him of failing 
to seize control of the Pentagon 
bureaucracy, letting the cansen- 
r l |ti j 60S for mifitaiy spending dwin- 
dle, lacking a coherent military 
-i strategy and advocating onnec- 
. .! essatynmiis on the use of force. 
' -t “He has dot mastered the 
. Pentagon," sad Senator Mat 
- .> . calm wallop, a Wyoming Re- 
; / publican, one of the bluntest 
- . ... .critict “It has mastered him." 

, •’ The one unequivocally favor- 
able review came from Richard 
V. ABea. who was President 
Roaakl Reagan’s national secu- 
rity adviser in 1981 and 1982 
and who now owns a Washing- 
tan consulting firm. Mr. ASen 
said, “I think be has done as 
wefl or better than any secretary 
of defense in the postwar peri- 
i i od." 


Washington: City 
Of die Long Drink 

According to a 1983 survey 
by the National Institute on Al- 
cohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 
Washington has the highest al- 
cohol consumption rate in the 


United JSUtes: 522 gallons 
(about 20 titers) pa person a 
year, or nearly twice the nation- 
al average of 2^9 gallons. 

Why? Health experts and' Al- 
coholics Anonymous agree .that 
| the alcoholism rate is no neater 
1 than in other l a r ge a ties. Steven 
Hogfamd, 39, a reformed afct> 
hotowto has pnbHshoi a book- 
let listing thin gs to do and 
places to go in Washington 
where them is little or no drink- 
ing. rites the national capital’s 
cocktail parties, often a stand- 
19 extension of work, and the 
high rate of job turnover, result- 
ing in a steady stream oflondy 
newco m ers to the dty who seek 
com panionship ia bars. 

Short Takes 

A I4-year-o!d Boston boy ac- 
cused in February of shooting a 
young woman and toasting 
about it on a subway train with- 
in earshot of the victim’s moth- 
er has been found not guilty.. 
The juvenile court did not elab- 
orate, but the defense attorney 
said there was not enough evi- 
dence to convict him. The boy’s 
name was withheld because of 
Ins age. The young woman was 
not seriously hurt. 

The a d m h nst r atioB of Mayor 
Edward L Koch of New York 
has improved basic dty services 
in ihe past four years, reversing 
major declines caused by die 
fiscal crisis of the urid-ISTOs, 
according to a private study by 
the Citizens Budget Commis- 
sion, a nonprofit research 
group. It reported mare arrests, 
cleaner streets, faster ambu- 
lance responses, higher reading 
scores among pubhc school pu- 
pils, but no improvement in the 
frequency of fire inspections. 

The SmUhsoiran Institution 
in Washington, a series of 10 
museums is often 
“America’s Attic” where arti- 
facts of the past are stored, is 
burrowing three Boots beneath 
Washington's Mall to create 
two new museums, one devoted 
to African an, the other to Ori- 
ental and Near Eastern art To- 
tal cost: S75 million. 

Shorter Takes; What is base- 
ball tO? In tO 

the usual beer, soda pop and 
hot dogs. Memorial Stadium in 
Baltimore is now vending 
chilled white wine. ... John 
Huston’s moch-acdaimed new 
film is called “Prizzfs Honor,” 
but not on New York’s garish 
West 42d Street, where the Em- 
pire Theater marquee bills it as 
‘‘PrizzTs Killers* and adds 
“Horrifying Gruesome Bloody" 
for good measure. 

— Co mpiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


White House U*S. Officials Say Assad’s Aid May Bring Better Ties 

Is Said to R\r Tiviirh Milter 


By Judit 

New York 7 


JJ3 UOIU W By Judith Miller 

^ ~ * ' ... New York Timet Service 

t urn FRT Alt ■ NEW .YORK - US. officials 
LiUIJJ l MJ A UU say that the role of Syria's presi- 
- dent. Hafez al-Assad, in resolving 

Tui«tiAinfiVVl the Bond hostage crisis has im- 
J. wJX J. U1 1.01 1 1 proved his i mage in Washington 

for the moment and brought hopes 
By Gcorge Lardner II that better relations between the 

Washington Past Service tWO government*, might be pOSSl- 

■ WASHINGTON — The FBI ble - 

h» been trying to expand Its coun- But it has failed to allay concern 

tenerrorist foras smee last year w«hm the Reagan administration 
fdnmM£? and anraj moderate Arabstttts 

the White House, according to a ai>aai *■«*» Pp^y. lls 

member of the Senate Sdect Com- support for terrorism, and its dose 
minet 00 Intelligence. . ties to lie Soviet Umoa, according 

Senator Uoyd M. ' Bentsen, a to officials m the Middle East and 
Democrat of Texas, srid he teamed Washingm 
of die budgetary Ed as a result of A senior Stale Department offi- 
hisinq^^^tthe adequacy of dal said on Mowtey that the ad- 
theburean's resontces. mnnstration was “highly appreoa- 

-t«*c rive" of Svria’s heto msecunnji the 



here,*’ Mr. Bentsen said. “Here yen 
have terrorism on an increase 


Lebanese Shiites, hot a subsequent 
State Department briefing, bowev- 


Hafez al-Assad 


^ound the woffiand youknew mascus of fomenting teiTOrism in Assad have 

Such, ^ihey have haTvetSf^ 

-still Sed Syria as a supporter of diar S cd ’ ^reeled against re- several contacts over seeming the 
. Accoid mg to figurm congakd ayna 85 a - sa PP° ncr cent attempts by moderate Arabs release of the seven other Ameri- 


n*mp what he called “reliable to wwvene an mteraabonal peace cans held by radical Shiite groups 
portal Mr. Kalb said that Syria to resolve the protract- in Lebanon, be said, 

d aided “a number of terrorist “ Arab- Israeli conflict. “In this area, we hope to cooper- 


princjptes of a joint bid for peace the visit to Prague originally sched- 
with Israel uled for June 21 

Syrian officials have frequently Last Wednesday, Syria took the 
denounced the accord, which they unusual step of announcing that 
see as an attempt to. exclude Da- the visit was rescheduled for July 2 
mntfais similar to the 197S Camp in a move widely interpreted as 
David peace agreements between signaling his detenmnaiion to solve 
Egypt and Israel or the 1982 plan the hostage crisis by then. 

proposed by President Ronald 

Reagan for Palestinian autonomy 1 ■ - - ■ 

in the West Bank in federation with . » / / / / 

Jordan. 'fh' ne** ofe** 

The Syrian cabinet, which met 

on Monday, vowed to “resist tto. /*,y4 4aAc ) ^ * 

Amen can- Israeli scheme which < 

;rims at liquidating the Palestinian § . 

cause; and at keeping Lebanon in fttAJ* 

turmoil," according to the official • / 

Syrian news agency. SANA. , _____ 

Syria, however, has denied com- U GRAIH1 SUNOS 
pliaty in the recent spate of hijack- B^hf. Ae N em.Ymit M MS ffi® 

ings and other terrorist attacks Tel 723.98.21 Posed Monday 

against its neighbors m the region. 

A -wnlnr administration official 

noted approvingly an Monday that 
Mr. Assad had denounced the kid- 
napping of diplomats. 

Mr. Reagan and Mr. Assad have 


A Syrian presidential aide said: 
“We do not want to beg for grati- 
tude.” Another said, “It would be 
humiliating to say we are disap- 
pointed” because “we did not do 
what we did” on the hostages' be- 
half “to get thanks. But you can say 
that we are displeased.” 




Martin NbwbHdw 

26 th May1985 


According to figures stm luted syna as a supporter ot 

by Mr. Bentsen and his staff and terrorism, 
verified by other sources, the Fed- vjat he jaDed “reliable 

oral Bureau of Investigation had W Mr- Kalb said that Syria 
been seeking a n teoeSTof Sil bad aided “a number of terronst 
m ini rm ova- last year’s budget of fflganjzanons" by permuting them 


539 5 mfliinn f OT to maintain headquarters or train' terv,e *f^ Monday by tel^hone, 

SpmrtoWmSrSSS teg facilities teSyria or Syrian- hocused Syrou pf playing 1 intern a 
surfMmd otofSSSr controlled parts of Lebanon. ^ Jorda- 

Hi^W^S^theaddi- “Reroov^Syria from the list is nian au^ Aba. On Mondg, two 
tional appropriation, about 557' nc * nnder consideration at tins an Alia office m 

Sn,1ffiS^lxSmed » tto^Mr.Kalb^d • h^withtuDets,wouiidnigtwo 

expand FBI counterterrorism task Officials mtemewed by tele- Persons. 
forces set up with local police in pbone this wedc in Washington, Other Jordanian officials said 
Boston, New York, Chic&goasd Amman, and Cairo, continued to that Jordan had recently been un- 


cd Arab- Israeli conflict. “In this area, we hope to cocjper- 

A senior Jordanian official, in- ate with Syria and otho - countries," 
terviewed Monday by telephone, the official said. 


Washington' since 1980andto es- “press concern about Syrian has- covering incidents, at a rate of 
tabHsh new ones in Newark. Los tihty toward efforts, led by King about one a day. aimed at destabi- 
* Hussein of Jordan and Yasser Ara- Bring the kingdom, most of them 


5 and San Francisco, 
rest of the money would 


fat, chair man of the Palestine Lib- launched from Syria.. 


have been devoted to strengthening ^ration Organization, to revive 
the FBI’s elite Hostage Rescue Arab-Israeh peace talks. 


ate of attacks against the Jorda- ® Assad Offlfflfe Prague Trip 
an airline. Alia. On Monday, two Mr. Assad abruptly postponed a 
inmen sprayed an Alia office in state visit to Czechoslovakia that 
adrid with bullets, wounding two was to begin Tuesday as presideD- 
arsons. tiaJ aides expressed “displeasure" 

Other Jordanian officials said the Reagan administration's 
at Jordan had recently been un- perceived lack of gratitude for his 
Bering incidents, at a rate of role in freeing the American hos- 
iout one a day, rimtri at destabi- ts s es. The Washington Post rqxut- 
ing the kingdom, most of th em ®d from D am asc us , 
anched from Syria.. The aides specifically mentioned 


The number of incidents had ris- “certain U.S. government state- 
ea sharply, officials sai d, since ments" as well as the “general Mid- 


Team, now said to have about 50 Hussein and senior Egyptian of- Hussein and Mr. Arafat signed an die East situation” in explaining 
agents, and broadening the scope finals repeatedly have accused Da- accord on Feb. 11 outiimng the why Mr. Assad again postponed 

of the National Terrorism Re- 

search a nd Analysis Center, begun 

SSSs Lobbyists! Courting Congress Quietl 

proposals last fall in t ri mm in g a 

Most Survive on Subtle Skills, Not Chut and Connections 

ore Congress! S By J *” est and aria a simple question: byist fw the Society of Ame 

- N** York Times Service What is the position Of the aide’s Florists. _ . . „ 


aiHI fl y i j /UUUJS 1 & y_ J.l 1 I Q, 

SSs Lobbyists: Courting Congress Quietly 


The FBI declined to voice pubSc 
damn, A spokesman sam the 
agency’s director, W illiam H. Web- 
ster, is “su pportive of the adminis- 
tration’s request to Congress for 
fiscal 1986 in connection with our 
Terrorist activity, and we’re also 
grateful for the support we’ve re- 
ceived from the admmistiatian *nd 
Congress in combating terrorist 
operations.” 

Mr. Bentsen is expected to offer 


est and nAs a simple question: 
What is the position of the aide’s 


New York Times Service What is the position of the aide’s 

WASHINGTON— In the pub- boss on this issue, for example, or 
lie im agin at i on , a copgrcsBOiial what is the st ains of that bill? A call 
lown in or two later, when he and the aide 


lobbyist is someone well known in or two later, wnen he ana tne aide 
the circles of power, often a former are on a firat-name basis, he sug- 
U.S. government official with chits gestslonch. 


to call in far past favors or with old “You can 
school or social ties among the peo- ‘La's meet,' 
pie he or she lobbies. blatant” An 


“You can't just call and say, 
et’s meet,* ” he said. “That’s too 


e he or she lobbies. blatant” And blatant, be added, is 

But for the average lobbyist, the one thing a lobbyist does not want 


situation is far different 
Robert Monice, who 


an amendment g i vin g the FBI the the National Associ at ion 


additional SI 1 mOlion. The sena- facturers, is writ awj 
tor’s spokesman ^ that Mr. skills a lobbyist me 
Bentsen probably would try to at- instance, he arranj 
tacb it to “the first handy appropri- l un c h the way a sc 
Mtions bill enmes down the arrange a first date, 
pike.” Little opposition is expect- He decides whid 
ed. aide be would like t 


factmos, is weO aware of the subtle trade organizations or ! 
drills a lobbyist must perfect For groups, working quietly 
instance , he arranges a business scenes to affect the corn 


Rifl- 'L- 


He de cides which congressional 
aide be would like to g/rt to know. 
Then be calls the object of his inter- 


Offer to Buy upi JJ ouse Shifts to Hard line on Military 

For $17 Million 


Reported in U.S. 


(Continued from Page I) 


distant* ourselves from the left by stances. These include 


suudva favor continuing a p tm g„ fof ”■? *° 

big, mffimy bufldnp, rmd an ^ 

cqS mimbtf it to hr [«mng less money and more arms 


Las Angeles Tunes Service 

, LOS ANGELES — A group of 
investors, including “several prom- 
inent individuals from the world of 
jews and finance," reportedly of- 
” cred Monday to buy United Press 
International’ by paying off up to 
S17 million of the news agency’s 
debts and guaranteeing money to 
sustain it for at least a year. 

UPL which has been operating 
under a federal bankruptcy court 
l - • since late April, was asked to pre- 

seat the offer to its committee of 
creditors and to respond within 

- two weeks. 

."We think it is very unlikely that 
a more generous offer will be fortb- 
coming^ said David Rubcnsirin. 
-■ an attorney. 

Mr. Rubensiein said there were 
fewer than six persons in the group, 
some of them frran Washington, 
, ^ who “have had prominent careers 

I I m? 1(^1* « the news-publishing business 
™ f 1 and the finan cial world.” He add- 
ed: “Their names would mean a lot. 
They are people who bring the 
aedteility of sound financial man- 
vageoient and good journalism.” 

% A person involved m the offer 
said that the investors warned to 
remain anonymous until they had a 
raponse from UPPs creditors and 
management. The investors may 
still uy to odist an additional par- 
topant or two, the source said. 

- ’ ‘ Denuding of Forest 
Called Major Problem 

Vmted Press Insemmata! 

. MEXICO CITY — Conserva- 
tion of world forests has become 
<*e of the major ecological prob- 
toa, the bead of the Food and 
Agrteulinnl Organization has 

- toned the World Forestry Con- 


airtaflaL 

“Since the 1984 election there is 
concern about the party projection 
of being soft on defense,” a Demo- 


uiation of Soviet-made 
itera. 


L to be. 

> represents Most of the more than 5.600 lob- 
noiManu- hyists in Washington represent 
if the subtle trade organizations or single-issue 
lerfecL For groups, working quietly brmind the 
a business scenes to affect the coarse of legis- 
Iboy might lotion and bureaucratic regulation. 

__ . L ■ “It’s not like the caricatured im- 
age in that they don't throw their 
wei^it aretsuv* said Lavona M. 
of hismter- G ray, a former lobbyist for Com- 
mon Cause who now is adnrimstra- 
f tor of a course at George Washing- 

4Jll y ton University that trains 
J lobbyists. “Only a few have enough 

Nicaraguan to throw.” 

nade MG «“ 1 

wavs erf doing this,” she said. Here 


Nicaraguan 
made MiG 


^SSSiaSSS? SS5SS*Bf5SS 

hoek n» moderates also helped bring penalties on military contracting lbem: 

about the handful of victories that and procurement abuses, had as • Make friends, c o ns tantl y. A 
House liberals felt they got oat of mnch to do with a bipartisan belief lobbyist is only as effective as the 
this year's nrifitaiy budget: die de- that the Pentagon has not dealt number of congressional staff 
„ n olovment limit ot the mnltiole- enouzh with waste and fraud. members and federal bureaucrats 


aatic official said. “People are re- ui» «* 

loctant to take on themridenL” P k T e 5\^ t 011 ^ enrn^i with waste atoftaud. 

The leader of the modems MX mterconmmJnaa- _ 


lough with waste and fraud. members and federal bureaucrats 
“There are two dnaenriona at he or she oua call in a pinch. So 
jrk hoc,” sad Representative most lobbyists do nmch of their 


question: byist fat the Society of American 
the aide’s Florists. 

ample, or The florists association holds a 
rill? A call “lobbying day” every March, fill- 
d the aide ing a meeting room on CapitdHfll 
s, he sug- with 510,000 worth of flowers and 
giving them away to the represmta- 
and say hves and senators who stop by. 
Ibafs too “People don’t forget you when you 
. pri ori is give them flowers,” Miss Acevedo 

i not want said -_ . . 

• Be conase. “Never hand acon- 
< <nn uu gressman a memo that's more than 

page,” said Roy MDlenson, 
who has spent more than 30 years 
011 both rides of the fence, as a 
fStZ Senate aide and as a lobbyist for 
L“ u ‘Sr nonprefit organizations, 
eguiatwn. ^ gonversaQo^ keqi it short as 
itured nn- wdL “I call it Dick-and-Janeing,” 
uow their said John T. Grupoihoff, who 
avooa M. teaches medical lobbyists to do jnst 
for Com- that “Your visits are never more 
toarcslra- than 10 minutes — you explain 
Washing- during the first five, answer ques- 
t trains 0^ during the second five, then 
ve enough ^ jj they want to extend it” 

• Be a go-between. "A lobbyist 
md wrong can talk and talk, bat a constituent 
said. Here is listened to” said Leonard S. Si- 
5, as ad vo- mon of the United Stares Confer- 
: followed eace of Mayors. The group recently 

arranged for mayors around the 
tamiy. A country to write letters to Congress 
jve as the w ^ m ^ Reagan administration 
nal staff proposed that a program for water 
jreaucrats treatment projects be phased ooL 
ninch So • Be flexible. “You can't win ev- 



’\eV 


The leader of the : moderate ^ ^ ^ 19g6 5,^^ ] vaCt - said Representative most lobbyists do mnch of their eq fight,” raid Helen Blank, a lob- 

^rending to the rate of inflation Dick Cheney, a RepuMcSof Wy- busmess by not discasring business byist to s 

nnlitaiy bill on the Ho me floo r, SdTciixb cm further testing of onring. “Wl£n Wma; about pro- atalL Fund. Kfrs. Blank, farngoghibiUs 

sijtoifiram ^ ^ ^hOTat soda! 

-5KSS5HSSSS S^mntainhmclstenachfld- 


S 3 * SBtfASEr.SS 





5 sS?J 5 s 2 ts»ssi. — 

M K .oroa CT «mormnDbCTSof ^ J^ri-liiu: njood ™ to 11* I 

generally conservMivc comma- vjaa} ^ ThO DaflV 

Mr. Anrin said the House-ap- The liiniting of the MX program S/ M trrio fnr 


moved in the president’s direction y^jck of tickets to an old timers' 
arms- tins year. The Vietnam syndrome is baseball nmc this we* and invil- 
it last not as pronounced in the past.” ^ a number of congressional and 


proved rotary bill is “what I think allows the production of an indefr 
we ough t to do cm the defense bud- nite number erf missile s for opera- 


get, which is vote for some wrap- ti on al and testing purposes. Several 
ons. The Democrats should be for longtime MX opponents had want- 
some stuff — for MX, for binaries, ed to kill the program, 
for more money for the Midget- The House also votra to ban 
man, for more money for convert- U.S. combat troops m Nicaragua, 
tional weapons.” Binaries is a term but the prohibition was weakened 
referring to chemical weapons by sevoal Republican amend- 
whose two components arc housed ments that authorized Mr. Reagan 
in separate artillery sbrits. to deploy troops without consult- 


The Daily 
Source, for ^ 
International 
Investors. 



White House staff members. 
“You'd be a social boor if you sat 
there and talked busmess.” 

Instead, she tries to develop a 
rapport, to “team where they’re 
coming from so I can talk freely 
when it is time to discuss business. 5 ' 

• Be visible. “It hurts my feel- 
ings when I go to lobby someone 
and they say, Tve never heard of 
you,’ ” said Elaine Acevedo, a lob- 


care food program, opted to con- 
centrate on averting the cut 
“You go where your most immi- 
nent threats are, and your most 
likely opportunities,” she said. 


Mr. Aspin said, “We ought to ing 


troops without consull- 
■ess in specific tircum- 


The main threat was from the 
cutting of trees for firewood and 
JiAer uses, while reforestation 
ragged behind. Edouar d Saounu, 
the director of the FAO. said Mon- 
ky A the opening of the 10-day 
, 4 toofemt. M Sodetv cannot permit 
t i -jiV : wofW’s forest resources 

j mK i ' t tontioae to be harmed and to dete- 
* nortte,” be said. Representatives 

from 95 countries ore participating 
® the ninth World Forestry Cto- 
pHshere. 


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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 


4 K INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune. 


Pobtiehed With The New Yarfc Times and The Wasirinytaa Post 


The Road to Argentum 


The deficit of the United States in its foreign 
trade has become gigantic and ominous. The 
trade deficit is not one of the numbers to which 
Washington reacts sharply, like the inflation 
and unemployment rates, but it ought to be. 
The Commerce Department has just published 
the trade data for May: Americans imported 
530 billion worth of goods and exported 517 
billion worth. The country is now riding a 
great boom of spending and consumption, 
much of it with borrowed money. A crucial 
part of that borrowed money comes from 
abroad. As credit-card statements sometimes 
say, you don't have to make any payment this 
month but interest charges will accumulate. 

Americans as a society are now consuming 
more than theyproduce at a rate of about $120 
billion a year. The world’s largest creditor until 
several years ago, the United States by now is 
probably a debtor. The statistics here are not 
entirely reliable, but you can see the net earn- 
ings on foreign investment dropping like a 
stone. In the peak year, 1981, the United States 
had a net income of $34 billion on its foreign 
investments — meaning that it collected 534 
billion more abroad than it paid out on foreign 
investments in America. That income was 
down to $19 billion last year, and was running 
at a rate of 510 billion in the first quarter of 
this year. By the end of the year it is likely to be 
zero. By this time in 1986, if it continues on its 


present path, the United Slates will be borrow- 
ing abroad to pay interest on its foreign debt. 
That is the road to Argentina. 

“Overconsumption — unduly raising cur- 
rent consumption at the expense of future 
levels — is like a time bomb,” observes one 
dose watcher. John D. Paulus, chief economist 
for the investment banking firm Morgan Stan- 
ley and Company. “As it tides away it seems to 
be burring nobody, but ultimately it has great 
destructive potential” In time, he points out, it 
would lead either to a fall in the dollar with 
higher inflation, or rising interest rates with 
sluggish economic growth — or both. 

If foreigners eventually tire of tending to the 
United States, it will have to meet its debt 
obligations by running a trade surplus. Revers- 
ing the present congenial pattern, it will have 
to sell more abroad than it imports. That has 
happened to the Latin American countries, as 
they struggle with their debts, and it has not 
been a comfortable change. 

For the present, life is prosperous and the 
sun is shining for most Americans. But at some 
point in the coming years, and no one knows 
when, the credit will run oul Then Americans 
will find themsdves working harder and earn- 
ing less. Why? Because they will be paying for 
the great surges of foreign goods that they are 
currently buying on the installment plan. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Time for Air Boycotts 


Of course the United States is right to spon- 
sor a boycott of Beirut's airport until some 
force in Lebanon deprives hijackers of that 
safe harbor. But chaotic Lebanon is already 
boycotted by all but some small Middle East- 
ern airlines, and travelers need no further 
warnings about Beirut’s hazards. Why not 
widen this campaign? Tighter safeguards are 
needed, but the most effective ounce of pre- 
vention would be a declaration that Washing- 
ton will block air service to any country, allies 
included, that refuses to punish'aerial terror. 

No security system wQ] work unless diplo- 
macy assures the universal application of pro- 
tective measures. More overt pressures should 
be welcome now even in countries like Japan 
and India that used to hesitate to give offense. 

With the promise of American enforcement, 
the first step is to tenor-proof airports. By all 
means eliminate curbside luggage check-ins 
and tighten procedures to prevent unaccompa- 
nied baggage from bong slipped aboard. Put- 
ting armed marshals on airliners, as President 
Reagan proposes, is worth more debate. Pilots 
are terrified of shoot-outs at high altitude. 
They do not agree that H AL the Israeli airline, 
owes its impressive security to armed guards 
aloft; far more important has been meticulous 
checking of passengers and luggage. 

But how to make ail airlines and airports 
equally diligent? The U.S. Federal Aviation 


Administration offers inspectors to look for 
chinks in security systems. International agen- 
cies also help. But when their recommenda- 
tions are ignored, the only effective remedy 
may be to p unish the indifferent country by 
alerting travelers to the risks on its soil. 

Above all, the odds against hostage-takers 
have to be changed. That wQl happen only 
when the world begins to enforce the multi- 
tude of agreements requiring the p unishmen t 
of aerial piracy. They have not been enforced 
against Iran, which still shelters the hijackers 
who murdered two Americans last December. 
There has been no retaliatory boycott of Teh- 
ran's airport because Washington fears Oat 
even its friends would shrink from iL That 
kind of resignation just won't do. 

If America, with its lucrative air traffic wffl 
not lead, who will? If the headlines of recent 
days have not made the time ripe, what win? 

Secretary of State George Shultz now co- 
gently distinguishes four strands of a serious 
anti-terror policy: better public understanding 
of the threat, improved intelligence, tighter 
airport security and raising the costs of terror- 
ism. Three of these goals will be advanced if 
President Reagan proclaims that he mil dose 
America's airports to the planes or countries 
that harbor hijackers and of those that indulge 
them by refusing to join in the ostracism. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Bad Habits in Zimbabwe 


Like the man in the rhyme who isn’t there 
but won’t go away. Ian Smith lingers as a 
political presence. It was Mr. Smith who in 
1965 proclaimed the illegal independence of 
Rhodesia. His white minority regime spumed 
all proposals for majority rule and waged war 
against two guerrilla armies until 1979, when 
Britain brokered a bargain that gave Zimba- 
bwe independence under a, multiracial consti- 
tution . Now, in Zimbabwe’s second election, a 
majority of 35.000 white voters are apparently 
sticking with “good old Sanity.” 

Under a constitution that cannot be 
changed until 1990. whites have 20 of 100 seats 
in Parliament. Thus Mr. Smith can make 
speeches but not governments. Power is in the 
hands of three million blacks, whose votes are 
now being cast, and of Prime Minister Robert 
Mugabe, leader of ZANU, the majority party. 
Even so, Mr. Mugabe is furious. He is castigat- 
ing whites as racists. The vote shows, he says. 


that whites cling to the past and reject recon- 
ciliation by supporting a leader who “created a 
series of horrors against the African people." 

Those horrors are real, and so is racism. But 
Mr. Mugabe's indignation is selective. After 
independence his authority was confirmed in a 
lopsided election, yet be turned vengefully 
against a tribally based opposition party led by 
his erstwhile patron and now chief rival Josh- 
ua Nkomo. Army and paramilitary forces 
made bloody sweeps through Mr. Nkomo’s 
stronghold in Matabddand. A censored press 
was kept from reporting these raids against 
opponents that the government called “ban- 
dits.” AD this was done under Mr. South’s 
emergency laws, which Mr. Mugabe has kept 
on the bodes. It would appear that Zimba- 
bwe's white voters are not the only tinners who 
scorn reconciliation and ding to the sorrier 
traditions of the pre-independence past 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Why Wasn’t Mengele Found? 

How was it possible that Josef Meogde 
eluded capture for 35 years? In the light of the 
evidence, catching him would not nave been 
difficult His protection and cover in South 
America was not at all elaborate. 

For most of the 10 years he spent in Argenti- 
na from 1949 to 1959, he was running a firm in 
Buenos Aires under his own name, and in 1956 
he applied at the West German Embassy there 
— again under his own name — for the deliv- 
ery of his birth certificate. In Brazil [he lived] 


in the scruffy suburbs of perfectly accessible 
towns and a ties. Here he received numerous 
visits from Europe. The emerging catalogue of 
[Ms] trips to Europe is even more outrageous. 

The pretensions of the Israeli secret services, 
and their claims to be close behind Meagde, 
are revealed as empty bombast. Most culpable 
are the West German authorities and — it 
must be said — the world media. It is now 
plain that a good pair of investigative journal- 
ists. given plenty of time, commitment and a 
little luck, ought to have found Mengde. 

— The Observer (London). 


FROM OUR JULY 3 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: For a World Arbitration Conrt 
NEW YORK — “Secretary [Philander Chase] 
Knox demands an arbitral court for the 
world,” says the Philadelphia Inquirer, “where 
all international disputes shall be settled with- 
out recourse to war in any event. It is now up 
to the world.” The New York Tribune re- 
marks: “Mr. Knox reminds us that the princi- 
ple of international arbitration was one of the 
very first established in our diplomacy, to 
which we may add that American diplomacy 
was the first to establish that principle in 
modem times.” The Providence Journal adds: 
“In urging that the time has come for making 
peaceable adjustments the concent of judicial 
procedure, as distinguished from the diplo- 
matic, Secretary of Stale Knox is justified in 
proclaiming American leadership.” 


1935: Soviets Gte Border Violations 
MOSCOW — A warning that “serious conse- 
quences for the relations” of the Soviet Repub- 
lics and Japan might result from the recent 
series of border incidents was made [on July 2] 
when the Soviet government filed a strenuous 
protest with Tokio holding Japan responsible 
for future violation of Soviet territory by Man- 
churian troops. The protest delivered by Am- 
bassador Konstantin Yurenev at Tokio listed 
recent incidents where the Soviets charged that 
either Japanese ships or troops violated Soviet 
territory or territorial waters. The protest con- 
cluded: “The Soviet government expects Ja- 
pan to declare her intention to maintain peace- 
ful relations on the border and take prompt 
measures to prevent provocative action on the 
pan of Japanese Manchurian authorities." 


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JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chaim** 1959-1992 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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WALTER WELLS 

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Associate Pvbhshtr 
Associate Publisher 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Piddohcr 
Executive Editor RENfi BONDY 

Mux ALAIN LECOUR 

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£W Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

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ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director cf Adwtsutg Saks 

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France TdL (l 1747-1265. 1 l£x: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 029W052. 

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0 1985. International Herald Tribune. AU rights reserved 



IF - *4' 

A Vu3C 



Argentina: Help Will Have to Come From Outside 


S AN DIEGO — The return of de- 
mocracy in Argentina and Uru- 
guay has opened political space for 
the expression of economic demands 
long repressed by military dictator- 
ships. Both new democratic govern- 
ments inherited a double handicap: a 
bankrupt country and a mobilized 
population demanding compensa- 
tion for long years of sacrifice. 

The fun damen tal issue is the enor- 
mous foreign debt accumulated un- 
der the mmtary. Early last month it 
stood at $1,700 per man, woman and 
child in Argentina and $2,025 in Uru- 
guay — a combined total of about 
$54 billion. The debt has created a 
vicious circle: Payment of principal 
and interest virtually eliminates in- 
vestment in economic development; 
absence of development guarantees, 
in turn, that future payments must be 
made out of costing resources. 

Who will pay? The governments 
have four possible answers. 

The first is amply not to pay, or to 
reduce or postpone payment. Raul 
Alfonsin’s government m Argentina 
moved initially in this direction, but 
retreated in the absence of support 
from other Latin American debtors. 

A second solution is to make local 
capital pay through heavy taxation or 
outright confiscation, out neither 
government appears willing to na- 
tionalize the economy. Both count on 
private initiative, so measures that 
stimulate further capital flight and 
dian vestment must be avoided. 

A third solution is to sacrifice the 
military establishments, 
responsible for the financial 
and they consume sizable portions of 
the national budgets. The problem is 
that these bodies, parasitic and use- 
less though they be, retain the inter- 
nal monopoly of force. Civilian au- 
thorities must exercise great caution 
in their dealings with (he military 
hierarchies lest these be provoked 
into renewed coup attempts. 

The only avenue left is to social- 
ize the cost by further compressing 
wages and social expenditures. How- 
ever. the economic logic of shifting 
the debt burden to the mass of the 
population runs contrary to the polit- 
ical logic of the new governments. 
That muss, after alL is their princip al 
source of legitimacy and power. 

But the lack of alternatives has 
led both governments reluctantly to 
adopt this solution. Mr. Alfonsin’s 
announcement of a “war economy” 
pointed in that direction. The dra- 
matic measures that followed, includ- 
ing wage and price controls and the 
symbolic change of the peso to the 
austral, confirmed bis determination 
to push down this road. 

Announcing austerity measures is 
one rhing and implementing them 


By Alejandro Ported 


quite another. Although long 
nant, Argentina and Uruguay st 
boast some of the higher indicators 
of economic and social development 
in the Third World. Paradoxically, 
though, past development conspires 
against present efforts to spread the. 
debt burden, for two reasons: 

• There is no large rural peasantry 
that can fend for itself. In these Rio 
de la Plata neighbor countries, almost 
the entire population is incorporated 
into the money economy ana is thus 
crucially dependent on government 
wage and price decisions. 

• With high levels of education 
■rut long experience in matting de- 
mands on government, these popula- 
tions are both aware of what is taking 
place and able to mobilize in self- 
defense. Everyone knows the govern- 
ment’s predicament and everyone is 
determined to avoid paying the price. 
Stale bank workers m Uruguay wear 
lapel buttons stating, “We wifi not 
pay the debt with our salaries.” Mu- 
rals in Buenos Aires show a starving 
child, with the message, “Let’s not 
pay the debt this way.” Soon after 
Mr. Alfonsin’s initial “war" an- 
nouncement. speakers at a huge labor 


rally demanded to know “war against 
whom?” and told him to resign if he 
could not keep his populist promises. 

Pressures such as these account for 
the .recent reincorporation of 
employees in the Uruguay- 
an state payroll, in direct contradic- 
tion ” T ~ * — 

fin a , 

payments 
activation failed, producing a 1, 010- 
percent inflation rale. 

Such events exemplify how little 
room for maneuver these govern- 
ments have. Their growing difficul- 
ties have prompted groups on both 
extremes of the political spectrum to 
b egin reorganizing. Failure to solve 
economic problems have ted to re- 
peated revolutionary upheavals and 
mOitaxy coups in the past 
Although repressive military re- 
gimes are the most probable sequel to 
railed democracies, a second alterna- 
tive cannot be discarded. After de- 
cades of unsuccessful mili tary and 
civilian experiments, these societies 
might incline to the one national 
course not yet attempted — that pro- 
posed by the extreme left 
Against such formidable odds, the 


Argentina: Alfominm. Despondency 


earners arc short, 
of the signs are hopeful but 


N Buenos Aires last month to take 
stock of Argentina’s first 18 months 
of constitutional government. I was 
looking for a coherent account, but 
I beard only a cacophony of com- 
plaints. The only tense used is a fitful 
present Hyperinflation has been the 
cause and the symptom of a futile 
bustle. T< 

Some 

most are sad. Perhaps the histrionics 
of rumor and movement are just so 
many ways of evading the facts. 

While I was there, a rainstorm left 
100,000 people homeless. Poverty 
was in any case already visible at the 
gates of cosmopolitan Buenos Aires. 
Argentina today faces problems that 
it had solved 50 years ago: hanger, 
illiteracy, infant mortality. Industry 
is paralyzed and obsolete; cattle have 
dwindled on the grasslands; many 
workers are unemployed; managers 
and shop k eepers remain, idle. Only a 
well-dad middle class keeps up a pre- 
tense of frivolity and affluence. 

I hoped to detect something solid 
behind the facade of cynical despon- 
dency. But the lack of a common 
skeleton — a shared sense of the 
country and its destiny — haunted 
me wherever I went A Gallup Poll 


By Juan E- Corradi 

revealed that 25 percent of Argen- 
tines .want to live somewhere else. 

The exhaustion and fragmentation 
seem to affect aD sectors, 
groups and parties are deeply divid- 
ed, unable to come forth with dear 
proposals. Confidence in the govern- 
ing Radical Party has also lapsed In 
politics, perceptions often become re- 
ality, ana if the power of the govern- 
ment has eroded, the public percep- 
tion of it has eroded exponentially. 

So far President Ram Alfonsin has 
withstood the erosion. His most im- 
portant decision was a stylistic one: 
He chose sobering truth rather than 


es, wage and price controls — aD are 
designed to bring inflation to a halt. 
In Europe, similar shock treatments 
have been applied in the past, with 
varying measures of success: Germa- 
ny m 1932 and 1948, Belgium in 1944 
and Austria in 1945 are cases in 
point. They all hoped to make good 
currency displace the bad. 

President AUbnsin may be lucky. 
' wffl not, m any case, 

re living standards, as 
some Argentines havecaaiged: It will 
merely eliminate the illusions of 
wealth created by hyperinflation. 

I brought back this picture: An 
erstwhile proud nation, now impov- 
erished but volatile, is taking its first 
steps in democracy. It stilf larks a 


His new 
drasti 


demagoguery. His main accomplisb- - firm system of institutions and par- 


meat was to restore new confidence 
in the rule oflaw. But his procrastina- 
tion on the economm front pm him in 
jeopardy: Given his country’s stag- 
gering internal and foreign debt, cap- 
ital flight and 1,000-percent inflation, 
Draconian austerity was dearly in 
order. Finally, last month, he took 
the painful economic steps necessary 
to reverse the mounting damage. 

The creation of a new currency, the 
pledge not to print it in excess of 
revenues, budget slashes, higher tax- 


Yes , Reagan Has an Industrial Policy 


T) RADDOCK, Pennsylvania - 
D The small, dean, cool, quiet 
world of the microcfaiphas made 
northern California’s iSHcon Val- 
ley” a symbol of America rearing to 
“go for iL” But Pennsylvania's Mo- 
nongahda Valley — the hot, mus- 
cular world of blast furnaces — is 
not yet gone. Not yet. 

Pittsburgh was recently rated 
first among America’s 329 metro- 
politan areas as the best place to 
live. The air is now dean because so 
many smokestacks are cold; the 
largest employer is not U.S. Sled 
but the Umveraty of Pittsburgh. 
The transformation of Pittsburgh is 
a tribute to the suppleness of Amer- 
ican society. But in the mean streets 
of Braddock just outride Pitts- 
burgh, you see- the weary flesh and 
blank faces of the people who are 
casualties of the wrenching re- 
adjustment — the poor, who break 
when more supple people bend. 

The steel region is no stranger 
to suffering, william Manchester 
says that in 1934 the average sted- 
worker idled in dangerous settings 
to earn 5369 a year, supporting six 
people. When the 1936 film “Mod- 
ern Times” came To Pittsburgh, 
“blue-collar audiences did not 
laugh at Cbariie Chaplin's parody 
of a workman’s five-minute break, 
when his hands continued to mime 
the machinery at first and then 
slowed down just long enough to 
allow him to grab a glass of water.” 

Soda! Darwinists, living in co- 
coons of abstractions, say with icy 
complacency that the United Steel- 
workers union did its work too well, 
pricing labor, and hence American 
steel, out of competition. There is a 
tat of truth to that, but it takes a 


— By George F. Will 


tougher moralist fhan I to lamwif 
the physical safety and economic 
gains that the USW won for work- 
ers in the Mon Valley. 

Besides, the steel industry's pri- 
mary problem is that h is compet- 
ing not with foreign corporations 
similarly disciplined by market 
foroes, but with fc 


among 

invest- 


govern- 
the world 


iut with 

meats that have flood 
with excess capacity and are run- 
ning nationalized steel plants as 
jobs programs. For most Ameri- 
cans, too young to have experi- 
enced the Depression, this valley is 
a stu nnin g classroom in which to 
learn about the death of the spirit 
that follows the doth of industries. 

In Braddock, a slimmed-down 
labor force in a modernized plant is 
making steel in a drama of fire and 
sweat that any American could 
profit from watching. But the plant 
is an island of wholesome roar m an 
ocean of deadly silence, an ocean of 
idled humanity that laps up to the 
plant gate. Much of American in- 
dustry is back and standing tall but 
steel is flat on its back, woozy and 
wonted that the tax-reform plan 
will deliver a roundhouse punch. 

How big the American steel in- 
dustry should be is debatable, but 
the need for an efficient core of that 
industry is not American steel- 
makers can compete if, but onlytf, 
they modernize their plants. The 
tax proposal would make such in- 
vestment less attractive. 

It would lower rates for individ- 
uals and raise revenues, from busi- 
nesses even while towering the busi- 
ness tax rate from 46 to 3 j percent. 


It would manage that bv, a 
other things , repealing the i 
meat tax credit and ma 
rialion schedules less generous 
in many other industrial nations. 
This would raise production costs 
and diminish relative productivity 
in heavy-investment industries at a 
moment when the strong dollar 
handicaps U.S. companies in inter- 
national competition. 

The federal tax code collects 
approximately one-fifth of GNP in 
a complex industrial nation. Such a 
code cannot help bat embody an 
industrial policy. Under President 
Reagan’s plan, the increase in the 
tax burden on those industries that 
demand constant heavy capital 
purchases, such as steel and antes, 
would help pay for a three-year 
extension of the research and devel- 
opment tax credit and a cut in the 
maximum capital-gains rate. These 
are boons to venture capitalists and 
to the high-technology industries 
they currently favor. 

Under the tax plan as proposed, 
Ronald Reagan's yuppie entrepre- 
neurs would do better than Lane 
Kirkland's stru g glin g blue-collar 
manufacturing workers. But many 
Democrats know that the rising 
blight of rust is nrimng their neigh- 
borhoods. So before concluding 
that the tax treatment of business 
-— the Reagan industrial policy — 
is settled, remember: 

Representative Dan Rostenkow- 
do, chairman of the House Ways 
and Means Committee, is as Demo- 
cratic as is his hometown, * 

And he resembles a yuppie about as 
much as Pittsburgh's Iron Gty beer 
resembles Perrier. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


ties, but it enjoys i 
leadership. The problem' is that by 
their nature, crisis management ana 
civilized political compromise work 
at cross-purposes. The question is: 
Wifi the unruly, impatient Argentine 
people grant their democratic gov- 
ernment enough confidence to steer 
them through this hard passage? 

Belt-tig ht e n i n g is necessary but not 
sufficient. Only fresh approaches to 
the debt problem can redress Argen- 
tina’s woes. It is the responsibility of 
Western creditors and institutions to 
entertain new ideas on how to chan- 
nel new funds into Latin America — 
including the conversion of part of 
the debt into investments. 

Unfortunately, the United States is 
sadly distracted — by both the flames 
inCentral America and the adminis- 
tration’s efforts to fan them — from 
tire issues that confront key nations 
of South America. The real battle for 
security in the hemisphere is bring 
fought in the workplaces, homes and 
minds of expectant Argentines. 

The writer, associate professor cf soci- 
ology at New York Umversitv, is author 
of "The Fitful Repidfic Economy, Sod’ 
ay, and PoBtks bi Argentina.” He con- 
tributed das to The New YarkJimes. 


hopes of the current governments for 
survival hinge on two factors. One is 
the ability of (he elected presidents. 
The second is the collective memory 
of atrocities committed by the mili- 
tary regimes. But neither force will be 
enough to presave political stability. 
Time, in particular, runs against 
making use of past memories to josti- 


depends on external support. 

Transnational banks that happily 
financed the economic policies of 
military dictatorships have not 
proved willing to give their successors 
much breathing space. The U.S. gov- 
ernment will thus have a decisive 
rote, given its ability to provide direct 
aid and to lessen the severity of con- 
ditions imposed by the International 
Monetary Fund. Costs of assisting 
these governments, including those 
of facOitating modest economic re- 
activation, area fraction of those that 
could be required to cope with politi- 
cal chaos after their Ht-mise. 

The writer is a professor and re- 
search fellow a the Center for U.S.- 
Mexican Studies at the University of 
California. San Diego. He contributed 
this to the Los Angeles Times. 


Awaiting ,ii; 
A Vertical j* 
Takeoff 

By Tom Wicker 

G ENEVA — John Kenneth Gal- 
braith. the American econo, 
mist, evoked the only spontaneous 
outburst of applause at an inter- 
national colloquium on nuclear war 
and nuclear proliferation that cot. 
eluded in Geneva Sunday. Mr. Gal- 
braith, mildly rebuking a militaatiy 
anti-Soviet speech by Richard Pate, 
a Reagan administration nudear ex- 
pert, observed that the conference 
would not “get far on the assmuptioof 
that one side iscompletdy wrong and 1 
one ride is completely right.” 

Mr. Perte had been no more one- 
sided than Soviet representatives, no- 
tably Anatoli Gromyko of the Soviet 
Academy of Sciences and Georgi Ar- 
batov, director of the Institute o{ 
U.S.A. and Canada Studies. Mr. Gal- 
braith took them to task, too. primar- 
ily for their insistence that the United 
States had used atomic bombs on ! 
Hiroshima and Nagasaki not just to - 
end World War I! but primarily u> j 
intimidate Moscow and keep Soviet ! 
armies out of the war in Asia. ; 

Lewis Dunn, assistant director of ! 
the U Anns Control and Disanna- i 
roent Agency, produced what ap- ! 
pared to be the most negative audi- 
ence reaction at the three -day 
meeting when in its last hour he gave 
a flat “no” — speaking, he said, for 
himsrif and the Reagan administra- 
tion — to the question whether he 
would support an “immediate mora- 
torium" on nuclear testing. 

Mr. Dunn was only repealing es- ♦ 
tablished Reagan administration pol- 
icy. and his reasons — the “question 
of verification” and the priority the 
administration gives to deep aits in " 
existing nuclear weaponry — had 
bent stated before. But he had been £"' ; 
preceded by David Owen, the former 
British foreign secretary, trim un- 
equivocally supported a moratorium 
on testing and stated his belief that it 
could be adequately verified. 

Mr. Dunn was fallowed by AA 
Kokoshkin, a deputy to Mr. Arbatov, 
who said that Moscow “already has 
made such a proposal” and that 
agreement on a moratorium would 
improve Soviet-U-S. relations and die 
prospects for other anus control 
Mr. Dunn's bald response not only 
accented the generally negative im- 
pression that he and Mr. rede made 
on a group representing mostly Euro- 
pean and Third World nations. It 
also jolted the hopes of sane that the " 
superpowers might take steps to head 
off further “horizontal proliferation'’ . 

— the acquisition of nuaear weapon# 
by nations not now possessing mem 
Those hopes, however unrealistic. - 
dearly centered on a icstmoratorium 
leading to a comprehensive test ban 
treaty. Mr. Owen said Pakistan was 
now so dose to hs First nudear test 
that it probably could be sopped 
only by an immediate agreement to 
a moratorium on testing,” foflowd 
by a comprehensive test ban treaty 
signed by the five nudear states. 

Ambassador Javan lha Dhanapala 
of Sri Lanka said such a treaty or 
“steps toward tins as an earnest of j 
good faith” would be the best evi- | 
deuce that the nudear powers were : 
doing their, part in observance of j 
the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. j 
Without such proof of efforts to stem 1 
“vertical proliferation” — the expan- ! 
rion of nudear arsenals — it was ! 
often predicted here, horizontal pro- j 
tiferauon to Pakistan and India, Iraq j 
and Libya, perhaps North and South / 
Korea, was only a matter of time. ^ 
The discussions, organized by 
Prince Sadiuddin Aga Khan, were 
unofficial!, under the sponsoislnp of 
the private Groupe de Beflerive. But 
they acquired a tone of urgency ow- 
ing to tire coming Third Review Con- 
ference of the 126 nations that have 
signed the Nonproliferation Treaty. 

Much will be beard at that confer- 
ence, to convene in Geneva in Sep- 
tember, about the failure of the su- 
perpowers to meet their obligations 
under its Artide VI, which requires 
them to “pursue negotiations in good 
faith” on a cessation of the arms race, 
nudear disarmament and “general 
and complete disarmament” 

Despite Article VI, as Ambassador 
Dhanapala pointed out, there has 
been “escalation of the arms rax 
involving tire realm of outer space," 
“armaments expenditure is running 
at $1,000 trillion per annum,” “there 
are an estimated 50,000 nuclear war- 
heads” and “every year nudear testatj 
are conducted (43 by the U.SA. andri 
the U-S.SJLin 1984 alone).” i 

Tbe superpowers are not even close ! 
to observing Artide VI, which miglil . 
have some restraining effect on bori* ■ 
zontal proliferation. So the review • 
conference in September, like the 
Groupe de Beflenve colloquium, is : 
to consider evidence that bolh . 
of proliferation mil continue. 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Don’t Appease Khomeini 


■ I disagree with Robin Wright- 
CThc Case far Talking With /ran,” 
June 25), who says that Iranians are 
prepared to “endure further hard- 
ships to protect tbdr Islamic form of 
government.” Despite fears of ex- 
treme reprisals, the Iranian people 
took to lie streets in the thousands 
on May 17. at the request of Shahpur 
Bakhtiar, to say peacefully to the en- 
tire world that they are sick and tired 
of the Khomeini regime 


I further 
statement that £ 


with the writer’s 
inism is certain 


to survive Ayatollah Khomeini, and 
with her prescription that the West 
should attempt a rapprochement 
with him. She should rememba that 
terrorism has paid high dividends for 
the Islamic Republic. In Lebanon, 
two fanatics, two. trades and perhaps 
$50,000 worth -of. explosives forced 
a superpower to withdraw with a 
bloody nose. Can the writer suggest 
why, after such .an astounding vic- 
tory, the Islamic Republic should 
want to change its tactics? Her for- 


mula for appearing terrorists wiQ 
raily encourage more terrorism. 

MEHRDAD KHONSARL 
London. 

Perhaps it is correct that retal i ation 1 
by the U.S. government against the 
Suite “crusaders” would result Ujf 
even more hostile anti-American ter' * 
rorism. But if Robin Wright’s counsel 
is followed, terrorism wmbe a growth 
industry with a cost-benefit ratio jn- 
-creasing in arithmetic proportion. 

1 EDWIN BARROW. 

Glyfada, Greece. 

Stranger Than Diction 

In “ Talkative’ fftimp Impresses 
Researchers” ( June 27), a scientist b 
paraphrased assaying “that humans' 
ancestors may have somehow de- 
vdoped' an- ability to comprehend . 
speech before they had tie ability to J 
' ” I wonder if die scientist ha* 
it through the ramifications of; 1 
, s tatemen t . 

A. HELD. 
University of Bern. 





Paf'e 5 



***% - — — . 

V Italy’s New President: 

ak e <jf A Law-and-Order Man 

J utn Cossiga 9 ^ Anti-Terrorist Campaign 

2 V -.v M Minister Brought Personal Grief 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 




< : By Henry Tanner 

. - IrurnuHinno! Henjki Tnhme 

X The most famousand 

w..- •• most moving photograph of 
.* " ftancisco Cossiga. .who is being 
’ • X Sworn 8 i as Italy's new president 
\J„~X Wednesday, has reappeared m the 
- .X (oiiaii puss. 

‘ ‘it was taken more than seven 
X ■y-'vyears ago on a cold, rainy day and 
hareheaded. a hand cov- 
-r ■ cringhis face and hiding his tears, 

• : ’.;X sundfflK aJone against the flower* 
, 'X covered tomb of former Prime 

. S'. VDfflster Aldo Moro.his friend and 
. . ' v iwotftf who had been killed a few 
X jays earlier by the Red Brigades. 

•• • ‘ Mr. .Cossiga had been absent 
’ ' Y from the funeral banished like all 
other pefitidans-by Moro's widow 
who Murad him and the govera- 
. - ’ V ' : inem for her husbands death. 

* ; X . [t had been Mora as prime min- 
• X ister. who had brought the young 

7 lawyer from Sassari. in Sardinia, to 
jhe capital and the political big 
; ^agues by giving him his first ca- 
- binet-rank job as undersecretary 
- X and then, a 1976, made Juju inicn- 
_ or minister. 

■ ■ • '. > ■ Mr. Cossiga. much to his later 

- v*.‘ regret, kept the post under Mr. Mo- 
■ :-I ros successor. Giuiio Ajidreoiu. 

■-‘X And thus he became the man di- 
- , ' reedy responsible in the fruitless 
hunt for Moro's kidnappers in that 
spring of 1978. 

" X As interior minister, the mild, 
• ”■ introspective Mr. Cossiga. who is 

- . : Amnesty Alleges 
Torture in Spain 

- 7 Reuters 

v LONDON — The human rights 
• organization Amnesty Intemation- 
.. a| said Tuesday that it had evidence 
. ' of torture in Spanish jails during 
v -:iw3. 

Detainees were said to have been 
- beaten, burned with cigarettes. 
• . bung upside down, given dearie 
shocks and partially suffocated 
’ during interrogation, the London* 
•based group said. 

.Amnesty said its representatives 
discussed the report with Prime 
^ " Minister Felipe Gonzalez in Octo- 

. her ami agreed to publish the Span- 
."ifish government's response. Interior 
• ■ Minister Jose Barrionuevo Pena 

- - _ . sakl it was “normal for terrorist 

'■ groups to accuse the authorities of 
.- . ■" torture and ill-treatment as a way 
of interrupting incommunicado de- 
- 1 : tentions and hindering police in 
yestigations.” 


sow 56. had become identified as a 
law-and-order man 

He was one of the first to recog- 
nize the dimensions of the threat of 
terrorism in Italy'. 

- He became the pet hate of the 
far-left movements that had sprung 
up to the left of the Communist 
Party and w hose main objective 
was to disrupt thejrowing cooper- 
ation between the Communists and 
the. Christian Democrats that More 
and Enrico Berfinguer, the Com- 
munist Party chief who died last 
year, sought to bring about. 

The extreme left accused Mr. 
Cossiga of acting in concert, almost 
in conspiracy with, the Communist 
Party’s own “law-and-order" man, 
Ugp’Pecchioli. 

His name, misspelled Kossiga. 
the -double “S" drawn in the form 
of the symbol of the Nazi SS. ap- 
peared on thousands of walls. 

An official of his ministry or- 
dered as many of these graffiti pho- 
tographed as was posable. The col- 
lection, filling three volumes, was 
presented to Mr. Cossiga as a gift 

After Moro’s abduction. Mr. 
Cossiga voted with the majority of 
the ministers to refuse all negotia- 
tion with the guerrillas who de- 
manded the release of imprisoned 
Red Brigades leaders as a condition 
for Moro’s release. 

The government’s position was 
emphatically backed by the Com- 
munists. Only the Socialists of the 
current prime minister. Betdno 
Craxi, then not in the government, 
advocated negotiations with the 
Red Brigades. 

Friends said that Mr. Cossiga 
was wracked by doubt and perhaps 
remorse as soon as he bad con- 
curred in the decision not to try to 
save Mr. Moro through negotia- 
tion. But his doubt remained pri- 
vate. 

What he did betray was his bit- 
terness at being frustrated at every 
turn, in spite of a huge police drag- 
net. in all his efforts to find a trace 
of his captive friend. 

On the day after Moro's body 
was found in an abandoned car 
near the headquarters of the Chris- 
tian Democratic and Communist 
headquarters, Mr. Cossiga said: 
“From this moment you must con- 
sider me politically dad” 

The next day he resigned, the 
only minister to do so. taking full 
personal responsibility for what 
had happened. His resignation was 
an extraordinary occurrence in the 
history of Italian politics. 

But in 1979 after Parliament re- 
jected several Christian Democrat- 
. ic candidates in a row. President 



aray% 


United KnMeniMnd 


Francesco Cossiga, the recently elected Italian president 
visited the grave of Aldo Moro after his murder b 1978. 


Sandro Pertini asked him to try to 
form a government He accepted 
and succeeded 

But by then the historic compro- 
mise that Moro and Berlinguer nad 
tried to engineer between the 
Christian Democrats and the Com- 
munists, had been abandoned. 

Berlinguer, another. Sardinian 
from Sassari and Mr. Cossiga 's sec- 
ond cousin, opened afl-out political 
warfare on the Cossiga government 
over economic issues and foreign 
policy, including the stationing of 
U.S. cruise missiles in Sicily. 

Mr! Cossiga. despite the mutual 
respect between the two men. re- 
marked about the family tie: “1 
don't know who should fed more 
embarrassed, he or I.” 

His worst moment asp rime min- 
ister came Mien Mr. Cossiga was 
accused of having tipped off Carlo 
Donat-Cattin, another leading 
Christian Democrat, that the lat- 
ter's son was sought by the police as 

U.S. Envoy Meets Denktash 

The Associated Press 

NICOSIA — The Turkish Cypri- 
ot leader. Rauf Denktash. met 
Monday with Richard N. Haas, the 
U.S. envoy for Cyprus. Recent 
UN -sponsored peace talks between 
Spyros Kyprianou. the Cypriot 
president, and Mr. Denktash broke 
up after failing to advance on the 
issue of reuniting the island. 


a member of the leftist terrorist 
organization Prima Lines. The 
younger Mr. Donat-Cattin was 
spirited across the border to Swit- 
zerland and arrested years later. 

Mr. Cossiga always denied any 
wrongdoing. 

He was brought down once as 
prime minister, then immediately 
formed a new government. After he 
had won a vote of confidence in 
Parliament, be turned to his oppo- 
nents in his own party and told 
them: “Now you nave voted for 
me, you can start bringing me 
down.” They soon did. 

Mr. Cossiga was elected Senate 
president in July 1983 on the first 
ballot, and has since confirmed the 
reputation he had before — of an 
unusually independent politician 
who has remained aloof from the 
factions and clans within his own 
party. 

This quality was one that attract- 
ed Clriaco De Mita. the Christian 
Democratic Party seartary who is 
bent on doing away with the rule of 
the dans. 

Mr. De Mita imposed the choice 
of Mr. Cossiga on other, more en- 
trenched party leaders who had 
presidential ambitions of their 
own. The opposition Communists, 
who had fought Mr. Cossiga as 
prime minister, but appreciated the 
fact that as Senate president he had 
remained emphatically above party 
lines, went along. 


Europeans 
Send Aloft 
Satellite to 
Meet Comet 


By Thomas O'Toole 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Euro- 
pean Space Agency launched Tues- 
day its Giotto spacecraft on the 
first leg of an eight-month journey 
that will take it to a rendezvous 
with Halley's comet between the 
sun and the Earth in March 1986. 

The launch from the Kourou 
Space Center on French Guiana on 
the northeastern coast of South 
America was the ninth straight suc- 
cess for the European agency’s un- 
manned Ariane-1 rocket. 

Placed by Ariane in a “parking 
orbit” 22300 miles (36,152 kilome- 
ters) above the equator, the 2 , 1 12 - 
pound (958-kilogram) spacecraft 
will use an onboard “kick” motor 
to move it oat of Earth orbit on 
Wednesday into what engineers 
call the “cruise” phase toward deep 
space. 

During its cruise, Giono will 
take a curved path that will cover 
an estimated 360 million miles by 
the lime it intercepts the coma 
next year. 

One of three instrumented 
spacecraft already launched to 
meet up with Halley's comet next 
year. Giotto will come the dosesL 
Its encounter with the comet will 
occur on March 13. when it is ex- 
pected to come within 310 miles of 
the comet's nucleus. 

Giotto is not expected to survive 
beyond the encounter distance, 
where it will be sandblasted by bil- 
lions of high speed dust particles 
pouring off the cornel's nucleus. 

The Giotto spacecraft gets its 
name from Giotto di Bondone, a 
14ib-cemuiy artist who witnessed 
an apparition in 1301 of what 
turned out to be Halley's coma. 
The Florentine painter was so im- 
pressed by the coma that he made 
it the “Star of Bethlehem” in a 
fresco he called the “Adoration of 
the Magi.” 

The Soviet Union has sent two 
Vega spacecraft to rendezvous with 
the comet at a distance of 6300 
miles. 

A fourth spacecraft named Plan- 
et-A will be Launched in August by 
Japan but its encounter distance 
will be no closer than 160.000 
miles. I is primary task will be to 
photograph the coma's tail and the 
huge cloud of hydrogen gas that 
surrounds all comets as they aide 
the sun. 

At least two US. space shuttle 
flights are to observe Halley’s com- 
et One flight will take place in 
January, the second in March. 


Shevardnadze: a Tough Leader 

In Georgia^ He Pushed Economic Reform and DiscipV ine 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Eduard A. She- 
vardnadze, the Georgian Commu- 
nist Party leader who was chosen to 
succeed Andrei A. Gromyko as for- 
age minister, has a reputation do- 
mestically as an articulate parly of- 
ficial in the mold of Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev. 

Mr. Shevardnadze’s reputed 
modesty, his crackdown on corrup- 
tion in Georgia and his pioneering 
of economic experiments mark him 
as a supporter of Mr. Gorbachev's 
campaign for disdplinc and limited 
reform. 

His relative lade of foreign expe- 
rience also leaves the way clear for 
Mr. Gorbachev, backed by Mr. 
Gromyko as president, to play an 
important role in making any new 
foreign policy initiatives. 

The 57-year-old Georgian was 
first considered a candidate for 
promotion when Mr. Gorbachev 
became Communist Party secre- 
tary in March, succeeding Kon- 
stantin U. Chernenko. 

But Mr. Shevardnadze, who has 
had alternate, or noovoiing. mem- 
bership in the ruling Politburo 
since 1978. was passed over when 
three clear Gorbachev allies, Viktor 


M. Chebrikov. head of the KGB. 
and Nikolai I. Ryzhkov and Yegor 
K. Ligachev. both Central Com- 
mittee secretaries, were promoted 
to full Politburo membership in 
April. ■ 

Mr. Shevardnadze was elected to 
full Politburo membership on 
Monday. 

He has beat the host of confer- 
ences for Third World nations in 
the Georgian capital of Tbilisi and 
has headed some Communist Party 
delegations on visits abroad. 

He has also traveled to Austria. 
Brazil, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, 
Hungary. India. Portugal and Tu- 
nisia. 

He has spent almost all his life in 
the Georgian Communist Party, 
rising through the Komsomol 
Communist Youth League and 
serving from 1965 to 1 972 as Geor- 
gian minister of internal affairs. 

A Western diplomat said that the 
naming of Mr. Shevardnadze as 
foreign minister left room for a 
continued foreign policy role for 
Mr. Gromyko. 

The diplomat, who asked not to 
be identified, called Mr. Shevard- 
nadze “an intelligent, articulate 
man who can handle the nuts and 
bolts while Gromyko lakes care of 
the really important stuff.” 


Mr. Shevardnadze wa- > born Jan. 
25, 1928. in Mamati ne?j the Black 
Sea coast west of Tbi lisi. He be- 
came a Communist Proxy member 
in 1948 after two years as a Komso- 
mol instructor and a full member of 
the Georgian party’s Central Com- 
mittee in 1958. 

He has a reputation for persona} 
modesty and as ri capable and 
tough administrate r. 

it was as minister of internal 
affairs that Mr. Sh evardnadze drew 
the national alien lion necessary for 
any Soviet party career to develop. 
He played a key role in investigat- 
ing a wefl-pirhlii.Tzed case of nepo- 
tism and briber/. 

The case involved Otari Lazish* 
vili, a friend of a former Soviet 
general prosecutor. He used that 
connection to- protect his illegal 
economic dealings. 

Mr. Shevardnadze successfully- 
moved against Mr. Lazisbvili in 
1972. He was then made party lead- 
er, and conti nued the crackdown. 

In the economy, Mr. Shevard- 
nadze has 'Overseen a number of 
economic experiments, most nota- 
bly the development of regional ag- 
riculiural- : industrial complexes, 
that have d rawn national attention. 


Gromyko Is Named Soviet President 


(Continued from Page 1) 
position that guaranteed him a 
more prestigious niche in Soviet 
history than be would have had as 
foreign minister, and a burial plot 
behind the Lenin Mausoleum in- 
stead of in the Kremlin wall 
As chief of state. Mr. Gromyko 
will be responsible for meeting with 
visiting leaders and for making 
state trips abroad. As a member of 
the Politburo he will continue to 
have a major voice in Soviet policy. 
■ Gorbachev Aide Promoted 
Yegor K. Ligachev, a key aide to 
Mr. Gorbachev, was elected Tues- 
day to a position in the Soviet par- 
liament that has ben ordinarily 
held by the No. 2 person in the 
Communist Party, Reuters report- 
ed. 

Mr. ligachev. 64. was named 
chairman of the Foreign Affairs 
Commission of the Soviet of the 
Union, one of the two chambers in 
the Supreme SovieL 
The post has been held in the 
past by the party secretary in 
charge of ideology, traditionally 
the unannounced deputy leader. 

Mr. Gorbachev was named to 
the foreign affairs post last year at 
the same time as Mr. Chernenko 
took over the presidency. 

Mr. Ligachev and Mr. Gorba- 


chev smiled broadly from the ros- 
trum when the vote was taken in 
the Grand Kremlin Palace. 

He has risen rapidly to the top 
echelons of power in the Kremlin 
since Mr. Andropov summoned 
him from Siberia to Moscow in 
1983. In April he was promoted to 
full membership of the 13-man par- 
ty Politburo, bypassing the usual 
phase of candidate, or nonvoting, 
member. 

■ Washington Reacts 

U.S. officials said Tuesday that 
the naming of Mr. Gromyko as 
president had cleared the way for 
Mr. Gorbachev to take over control 
of Moscow's foreign policy. United 
Press International reported from 
Washington. 

The Soviet moves came about 
the same lime as an announcement 
in Washington that Mr. Reagan 
and Mr. Gorbachev would meet, 
for the first lime, in a three-day 
session Nov. 19-21 in Geneva, the 
site of nud ear arms miles. 

The White House and the State 
Department had no official com- 
ment cm the Gromyko move. 

But some U.S. officials said Mr. 
Gromyko was, in essence, “kicked 
lids lairs” and that Mr. Gorbachev 


now was in a position to take over 
foreign policy. 

Mr. Gfromyfco’s role will be cere- 
monial. one official said. “But it's 
not clear whether he’ll maintain his 
influenix in foreign policy.” 

The U.S. chief delegate to the 
United Nations. Vernon A. Wal- 
ters. commenting on Mr. Gromy- 
ko's el evation on television, said: “I 
think it is a reward for long and 
faithful service to a very ornamen- 
tal job." 

Mr. Walters, asked if the move 
represented any loss of power for 
Mr. Gorbachev, said: “No. I think 
the fact that Gorbachev could 
make him president, could secure 
his approval as president, could se- 
cure a number of other changes in 
the Politburo, is an indication that 
Gorbachev is getting his power 
base firmly settled." 

Officials said Mr. Shevard- 
nadze's experience was “limited in 
Moscow and in foreign policy” but 
they added that he was “very 
bright” and “attractive in denting 
with other people.” 

Secretary of Slate George P. 
Shultz will be able to size him up at 
a Helsinki meeting soon, on the 
10th anniversary of die Helsinki 
accords on European security and 
human rights, officials said. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY; JULY 3, 1985 


US. TV Networks Debate Propriety of Role in Crisis 


By Alex S. Jones 

.Vnr Yuri Times Serriee 

NEW ■ YORK —The role of tele- 
vision in the 17-day American hos- 
tage crises promises to fuel debate 
dial will Ibe difficult to resolve. It is 
a matter I'Jhai is troubling to many 
journalists' because it appears to 
have set pr ecedents for coverage of ' 
future such incidents. 

Almost throughout the crisis, 
.television functioned not only as 
observer ami reporter, the tradi- 
tional joumfelisuc capacity, but 
also at times as'an actor in the 
unfolding events. 

In effect, tbt; sophisticated tech- 
nological meebmism that had been 
developed in the West to serve a 
free press entered into a symbiotic 
relationship with those holding the 
hostages, the captors were trading 
access to the principals in the dra- 
ma for what they viewed as publici- 


ty, and interviews were conducted 
in the inhibiting presence of armed 
militiamen. 

In their role as a participant, the 
nation's networks broadcast state- 
ments and interviews with rep re- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

sentauves of Antal, the Shiite Mos- 
lem mflina that took responsibili ty 
for the hostages, and also transmit- 
ted interviews with the hostages 
that were carefully controlled by 
the captors. In some cases the ma- 
terial was broadcast without being 
edited at all. 

'‘You have journalism, which is 
thoughtful and considered, and 
you We what I call ‘dectrooics,' 
which is the use of our facilities to* 
transmit pictures and words, but 
does not have a lot to do with 
journaHsm,” said John Chancellor, 
senior commentator at NBC News. 


ihe episode has served to point 
up the problem of being an aggres- 
sive provider of news, long consid- 
ered a virtue among both print and 
broadcast journalists, without be- 
ing exploited by the subject of the 
reporting. 

Print journalism, which by its 
nature requires editing, does not 
suit the purposes of terrorists near- 
ly so wetl and, hence, is less vulner- 
able to being used by them as a 
vehicle for propaganda. But, dar- 
ing the crisis, newspapers frequent- 
ly published - transcripts of ex- 
changes that had been broadcast 
on the networks because the ex- 
changes themselves were the news. 

Journalists and others have 
raised questions regarding whether 
the television networks were ma- 
nipulated by those holding the hos- 
tages. Statements by the captors 
were repeatedly broadcast, as were 
statements by hostages that seemed 



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to cast the Shiite Moslem cause in a 
sympathetic light. 

Mr. Chancellor and others have 
said that the networks should have 
delayed broadcasting the material 
until it could be edited and accom- 
panied by informed commentary 
that explained the context of what 
was being shown and theinfluences 
on hostages and reporters. 

Journalists in Beirut say there 
was great pressure not to inflame 
the situation by asking questions 
that might offend, for example by 
raising the issue of the murder of 
Robert Dean Stethem, a passenger 
who was a U.S. Navy diver. The 
reporters, who were also interview- 
ing people who were armed, real- 
ized that they themselves could 
have been seized as hostages. 

Whether statements by Nabib 
Beni, the Shiite Moslem leader, 
and the hostages had much influ- 
ence on U.S* public opinion is still 
uncertain. Such coverage prompted 
a storm of public self-examination 
wi thin the nation's news organiza- 
tions, calling attention to the role 
that television in particular was 
playing and feeding what many 
think is a broad public sense that 
news coverage aided those holding 
the hostages. 

Some reporters and network ex- 
ecutives specolated that the public- 
ity given the situation may indeed 
have aided the hostages, m that it 


diminished the : likelihood of harm 
coming;to them, • ’ l."/ 

Adding to the controversy was 
an atmosphere of frenzied comperi- 
tion in- Beirut among news organi- 
zations, and. especially among tele- 
vision networks. 

All the networks CQtjamitted 
enormous resources to the ‘cover- 
age, with dozens of reporters, pla- 
toons of drivers and. translators, 
chartered airplanes to fly videotape 
to the nearest available transmis- 
sion point, and intense pressure' 
from network headquarterslto pro- 
duce something exclusive. 

Coverage of the crisis in the 
United States was extensive. The 

S dominated regularly sched- 
aews broadcasts, ana the mar 
jor networks produced special pro- 
grams of expanded coverage. 
Network news bulletins and live 
broadcasts concerning the hostage 
developments frequently cut into 
regular programming. 

. The intense competition was giv- 
en a sinister twist because of the 
atmosphere of lawlessness, _anarchy 
and danger in Beirut, which con- 
tributed to what a reporter de- 
scribed as a “jungle- mentality 
where anything goes.” 

Rumors have drcolaied widely 
among the journalists in Beirut of 
news organizations paying those 
holding the hostages for interviews 
and favored treatment, such as op- 



In an interview on ABC-TV on Thursday, three American hostages expressed 'support for" 
demands made by the Shiite Moslems holding them. -From left are the Reverend James, 
McLougUin, Aflyn B. Con well and Ralf W. Traugott. At right is a Shnte nuKtiaman.^ j 

poitunities for exclusive access, al- of the hostages, that -has prompted bang ^mtthis we^, said . 

though aD of the networks deny criticism from some journalists. Fred Fnendly, the Edward k.Muj> ■. 
paying for news. “There is no doubt in my miner that now professor emeritus at the Ofc 

In addition, there has been a there was some ‘Don’t te£i me what hnubia Graduate School of Jour- f 
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Hostages Saw Hijackers Dupe Airport Security 


By Michael Wines 

‘ Los Angeles Times Service 

WIESBADEN, West Germany 
— With incredible luck, two Leb- 
anese hijackers duped security 
guards and devices before hijack- 
ing TWA Flight 847 on June 14. 
according to two passengers from 
Indianapolis who said they wit- 
nessed the entire affair. 

An account of the two men's 
maneuvers was provided Monday 
by James W. Hoskins Jr., 22, who 
was among those just freed, and 
his girlfriend, Kathryn A. Davis, 
21, who was among the women 
passengers released m Algeria* 

The two said that they moved 
through the Athens Airport secu- 
rity procedures immediately 
ahead of the two hijackers. 


. “They were right behind us, 
and 1 made the comment to 
Kathy that they both looked 
strange.” Mr. Hoskins said. “One 
guy was really veiy edgy and the 
other guy was very calm. 

“As we went through, we put 
our bags down to run through the 
X-ray machine, and the guy 
stuffed his bags in between our 
bags, and it ran through thafwajc 

**I thought that was a tittle 
strange at the time,” he said, “and 
1 nvirf.» the wmnwnl to him that 

he'd better back off. I'm glad I 
didn't get much stronger than 
that.” 

Mr. H oskins said he presumes 
that the bags contained the gre- 
nades used by the hijackers- to 


terrorize the passengers aboard 
the plane. If so, they went unde- 
' tec ted. 

The second hijacker was 
stopped by the metal detector be- 


fore poardingthe flight, Mr. Hos- 
kins and Miss Davis said. 

“He went through right behind 
' me, and' he flunked the first 
time,” Mr. Hoskins said. “The 
, buzzers went off, I turned around 
and looked, and he threw hus- 
bands in the air . . .and he was 
shaken.” 

. Mr. Hoskins said the Athens 
Airport guard. in charge of die 
metal detector removed a metal 
pen and a cigarette lighter from 
the hgacker’s pockets. 

Ydt, he triggered the alarm on 
his second walk through the scan- 


ner, Mr. H oskins said. The hi- 
jacker finally succeeded in clear- 
ing in a third effort to. pass the 
metal detector by. walking 
through it backwards, -Mr. Hos- 
kins Raid . 

' “immediately after the guy let 
him go, he. ran for his bag, and 
pushed through the crowd,” Mr. 
Hoskins added. “I think he was 
the first guy onihe transport that 
took us out to the plane.” 

Miss Davis said the two men’s 
behavior made them suspicious 
but not suspicious enough. "Mr. 
Hoskins, she said, “didn't want to 
get on the plane, but be thought 
be was really being paranoid, you 
know.” 

Twenty minutes after takeoff, 
die two men took over the plane. 



burnoUT 

’James W. Hoskins Jr. 


Lebanon’s Parly of God: A Growing, Disciplined Monde Force 


By John 

Near York Ti 


n Kifner 

Times Service 


BEIRUT — Hezballah. or the 
Party of God, the pro-Iranian Is- 
lamic fund ament ali si movement 
whose followers are believed to 
have been behind the hijacking of 
the Trans World Airlines jet on 
June 14, is a growing, powerful 
force iir Lebanon. 


High Style 

FINE SERVICE IS ALWAYS IN FASHION 


“We strive to be in the vanguard 
of the people that are engaged in 
holy war for independence and 
freedom,” said Sheikh Ibrahim al- 
Amin. the key political lender of 
the movement 

Sheikh Amin spoke in an inter- 
view at his home, guarded by 
bearded young men with Islamic 
decals on the stocks of-their AK-47 
assault rifles, in the southern sub- 
urb of Bir Abed. 

“The American state and gov- 
ernment" the young cleric said, 
“lops the list of the states that acted 
by all means in killing the people of 
the area, especially the Islamic peo- 
ple." 

The sheikh said that the 39 
American hostages from the TWA 
plane were who released Sunday 
were “held by the hijackers” and 
not formally by Hezballah. 

“But we support the cause linked 
to this." he said. “The taking of 


hostages was done not to deprive 
the innocent of their freedom-but 
tb secure the release d detainees 
held by Israel in an illegal and 
inhumane manner.'” 

Led bymilrtanf young clergymen 
filled with admiration for Ayatol- 
lah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran, 
Hezballah has a secure base in the 
area around the ancient city of 
Baalbek in the Bekaa region of 
eastern Lebanon. 

It is struggling with the main- 
stream Shiite Moslem movement, 
Amal for control of the Shiite re? 
gjons of southern Lebanon- It was 
the Amal militia, led by Nabih Ber- 
ri, Lebanon's minister of justice, 
that took over the job d guarding 
the American hostages when they, 
were brought to Beirut 

The fundamentalist movements 
here and elsewhere in the Middle 
East are receiving strong support 
from Iran through an organization 




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called the Committee for the Islam- 
ic Revolution, headed by Ayatollah 
Hussein Montazeri. He is regarded . 
as a possible successor to Ayatollah . 
Khomeini 

Usually thought of as an exclu- 1 
avely Shiite movement, Hezballah 
also has begun to develop support 
. from a new breed d Sunni Moslem . 
fundamentalists in Lebanon. _ . 

“ There are about six Sunni leaders 
in West Beirut now allied with Hez- 
ballah. In Sidon, south of Beirut, 
an Islamic front .was formed earlier 
this month. Under the direction d 
a Shiite, cleric with -strong ties to 
.Iran, Sheikh Maher' Hammond, it 
united Shnte and Sunni derics co- ! 
operating with Hezballah. - 

In northern Lebanon, .Tripoli 
now is controlled largely by the 
Islamic Unification Movement, or 
Tawheed, led by a Sunni -funda- 
mentalist, Sheikh Saeed Shabaan, 
who also has links with Iran. . 

The Iranian connection is one d 
the strongest features of Hezballah. 
The movement made its formal ap- 
pearance as a political group m 
February, with the publication d a 
4S-page manifesto outlining its po- 
litical. position.' - 

It includes a demand that 


WE’RE AIMING EVEN HIGHER 








“America, France and their allies , 
must leave Lebanon once and for 2 
alL” It says that the largely Maro- 1 
nite Catholic Phalangist Party, | 
which dominates the government, 1 
“must be subjected to justice and 1 
be brought to trial for all the crimes! 
tbfcy have committed- against theS 
Moslems and the Christians witfifr 
racourageirienl from America aadf 
htiAr; * '■-'•j 

Hezballah, according to the! 
manifesto, believes that both Westjj 
em. capitalism and Communism! 
are evil and that “the only answeigj 
lies in the mission oflslam.” 1 

“We are headed for dealing wilhS 
evil at the roots and the roots are! 
America,” the manifesto said. 9 

A prominent Shiite clergymen* 
complained that Hezballah w&sjj| 
“misleadingly described as a hand-g 
ful of fanatics bent on killing, pltm-JS 
derand robbery” and was “blamedf* 
for every unpleasant incident.” , & 

Baalbek is regarded as a strong-S 
hold of Shihe. fundamentalism an da 
the probable hideout of a numbed! 
of . Iranian-linked groups tint haves 
carried oat hijackings, suicide| 
truck-bombings and jadnappings| 
of Westerners. 1 


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Poster few Jericho’s “Free Fda” tour. 


New Cast, Choreography 
Destroy r Guys and Dolls 9 

By Sheridan Morlev Nicely. But even his great show 
T ONDON - The production of 5lo P? er piiDp*® You’re Rode 
Jb “Guys ami Dote” that first ®8 *“ 1125 bcen destnvei 


that first 


opened at the National Theatre in 
March 1982 was a remarkable tri- 
umph for its director. Richard 
Eyre. The original joy of this pro- 
duction lay m the way that a direc- 
tor accustomed to dealing with 
great plays could bring that nonor- 
chestral talent to bear on a great 
musical 

But the production that has new- 

TlET LONDON STAGE 

iv arrived at ihe Prince of Wales 

v if ter a long tour bears so tittle rela- 
’ \ uon to the 1 982 version that, for the 

sake of their own reputations. Eyre 
and the National Theatre should 
remove their names from it as soon 
as is decently possible. 

Some catastrophic recasting and 
over choreographing has set the 
case for (he British musical theater 
hack about 20 years, to those ghast- 
ly. 1960s Drury Lane versions of 
Broadway hits that made you won- 
der time "and again why we could 
never do justice to Rodgers and 
Hammerstein or Lerner and 
Loewe. let alone this greater 
Loesscr. 

Admittedly. “Guys and Dolls” is 
■.me of the most difficult Broadway 
musicals to get right. Back in 1950 
at least 10 different authors tried 
rearranging the many Broadway 
folktales of Damon Runyon into 
some sort at coherent single plot, 
until finally Abe Burrow's and Joe 
Sterling came up with the winning 
jf variant on the idyll of Sarah 
Brown, building into it such other 
Runyon stalwarts as Harry the 
Horse and Nicely Nicely Johnson. 

But even then it was realized that 
the show could work only if it were 
cast »uh actors rather than singers 
or dancers. The original cast bad no 
scars but a group of the best New’ 
York chancier actors in the busi- 
22^5 ness, led by Sam Levene. Robert 
Aida and Vivian BLunc. 

What happens if you put a show- 
biz star into “Guys "and Dolls" was 
painfully illustrated by Frank Sina- 
tra’s hopeless performance in die 
film, and it is now equally painfully 
underlined by Lulu on stage as 
Miss Adelaide It is not just that 
she can’t act and manages to reduce 
her routines at the Hot Box to the 
finale of some long lost Sunday 
night at the London Palladium. 
The crucial problem is Out we do ■ 
not believe in her love for Nathan 
'V )eIra,, or to her eagerness to es- 
cape the Hoi Box. where she looks 
eminently wdl suited. 

The only survivor of the original 
i-tei is cow 1 David Heals as Nicely 


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INTORNATIQNAt HEfLtfJDTRIBIJNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


e Jailed in Nigeria 


. . By Michael Zwerin 

Timnuakmal Herald Tribune- 

F I ARIS — An all-star collection 
of African . musicians recently 
formed a group called Jericho, 
which is performing under (be ban- 
ner “Free Feta!” 

Fela Aniknlapo Kuti — known 
as the “king of Afro-beat,” "black 
president." “verbal guerrilla.” a 
mega-star of African popular mu- 
sic — was arrested at Lagos Inter- 
national Airport last Sept 4 and 
charged wilh illegal exportation of 
foreign currency. He was sentenced 
to five years in prison. The mem- 
bers of Jericho contend that the 
accusation was trumped up, the tri- 
al irregular and the sentence exces- 
sive. 

Whatever the truth behind the 
charges, the group Jericho is dearly 
for Fela, right or wrong. Yet the 
human rights group Amnesty In- 
ternational has expressed reserva- 
tions about the nature of the 


The idea for Jericho originated 
with Ren& Lenoble, a partner in 
Fda’s ma nag ement firm, Yaba. He 
was in New York on the day of the 
arrest, waiting for Fda’s 40-mem- 
ber trotipe to arrive fora U. S. tour. 
“We’d already had a hard time get- 
ting visas from the American em- 
bassy in Lagos,” Lenoble said. 
“Fela has always said what’s on his 
mind — about everything, the CIA, 
for example.” 


A controversial populist with an 
. enormous ego and fallowing, Fela 
recently announced Ins intention to 
.run for the Nigerian presidency. 
Lenoble describes him with admi- 
ration: “He’s a troublemaker." 

“Music,” Fda once said, “is the 
weapon of the future." His albums 
have titles such as “Authority 
Stealing," “Coffin for the Head of 
State” and “Sorrow, Tears and 
Blood.” His new album is called 
“Army Arrangement." 

- When Fda was 7 (he was bom in 
1938), a fortune teller told his 
mother: “He will be obstinate, im- 
petuous, uncontrollable. ... His 
fife will be full of turbulence and 
violence. . . . He will have many 
women. ... He will be called an 
outlaw because he will mock con- 
vention-" 

H is father founded the Nigerian 
Teachers Association/ His mother, 
also a teacher, was president of the 
Union of Nigerian Women and 
played a key role in winning female 
voting rights. 

Politicized by his mother, who 
bad met Kwaxne Nkrnmah, the 
Ghanaian leader, Fela deepened 
his political consciousness when he 
went to London to study law and 
began to question the role of the 
black man in a white world. 

. In London he formed his first 
group, Koola Lobitos, and it took 
the “James Brown sound" back to 
Lagos. He opened a nightclub. The 


Shrine, announcing that his 
rhythm-and-blues-based “Afro- 
beat'’ — featuring his own energet- 
ic saxophone playing — was going 
to replace the popular but unso- 
phisticated ethnic “High-Life” 
dance music. At that lime he had 
two “wives." 

While making increasingly pro- 
vocative statements against wfaat 
he saw as the “corruption of pow- 
er,” he changed his middle name 
from Ramsone (calling it “a slave 
name") to Anikulapo. He pro- 
daimed his neighborhood in Lagos 
to be the Independent Kalakuia 
Republic, and when the police 
found marijuana in his home, he 
said that he could do what he want- 
ed in his own country. 

By 1975 his JO albums had each 
sold in six-figure quantities, ac- 
cording to a biography prepared by 
bis managers. He eroded a barbed 
wire fence around his house. In 
1977 the army entered the “Kala- 
kma Republic" in force. His moth- 
er somehow fell out of a window 
and later died of her injuries. Fela’s 
leg was fractured, and he was 
thrown in prison. 

According to the biography he 
“lost all bis savings, equipment and 
master tapes. He was totally 
ruined." He recorded the album 
“Unknown Soldier" to commemo- 
rate the incident, and left for exile 
in Ghana. 

He later moved back to Nigeria 


and “married” the 27 women living 
in his compound. According to 
Lenoble; “Toe police arrested him 
more than a hundred times, for 
everything from disturbing the 
peace to armed robbery." 

“Ruined, abandoned by his old 
friends," says the biography. “Fela 
was forced to recruit inexperienced 
young musicians to reform his 
troupe,” which toured Europe dur- 
ing ihe summer of 1984. The same 
troupe was leaving for the United 
States in September when be was 
arrested for having an “unde- 
clared” £1,600 (about $2,000) in his 

pockeL 

He was tried by 3 special court of 
two military judges and one civilian 
judge. The defense maintained that 
he had indeed declared the money 
but that a clerk demanded a bribe 
and, when Fela refused to pay iti 
got even. Every traveler leaving Ni- 
geria must fill out a blue Ibreign- 
ctirrency form. The defense stated: 
“Blue forms for all passengers trav- 
eling on the date in question 
... are not .tendered as exhi- 
bits. . . . [They] were suddenly 
made ‘missing’ by the Board of 
Customs." 

Lenoble says that £1,600 would 
only have paid one night's hold bill 
for 40 people in New York. 
“Why?” he asks, “would Fela take 
such a risk for that smaD amount of 
money? It was his first major tour 


of the States; it was extremely im- 
portant to him." 

Amnesty International has said 
that it is concerned that the govern- 
ment’s motive in prosecuting Fela 
“may have been political, and that 
his trial was unfair. . . . Members 
of the family have publicly alleged 
that two customs officers, named 
Aregbesola and Monye. were will- 
ing to testify in court that they had 
seen Fela declare the currency in 
the correct way. . . . They were 
detained without charge by the au- 
thorities during the trial in order to 
keep them from testifying." 

Feta's brother Beko. a doctor 
and first vice president of the Nige- 
rian Medical Association, conduct- 
ed press conferences and fought to 
free his brother until he himself was 
arrested and detained without 
charge. He is accused of being 
“concerned in acts prejudicial to 
state security" for his role in a pro- 
tracted boycott by doctors seeking 
Unproved health care in Nigeria. 
Amnesty International is taking 
“urgent action" on his case. 

On April 26, one day after Fela 
granted an interview to' the French i 
newspaper Liberation in Lagos's 
Kiri Kiri jaS, be was transferred to 
a prison in Maidiguri. a remote 
northeastern town. 

Since then, no news, so Jericho 
was formed. Consisting of well- 
known musicians such as Mory 


Kame and Ray Lana, and others 
from Guinea, Zaire, Cameroon and 
Senegal, the group hopes to “blow 
down the prison walls" on a world 
tour. 

“When I come out of prison," 
Fela told Liberation: “it is going to 
be explosive. . . . People are real- 
izing every day that Fela is really an 
alternative, so every day they talk 
about me. Because every day every- 
thing is getting worse in Nigeria. So 
people say. ‘Fela has been saying 
this and saying that alrea- 
dy.’ . . . Things have to change.” 

Jericho: Rome, July 5 ; Antibes, 
France, July 12; Pais, July 19; 
Brussels. July 20; Berlin, July 27. 


— WKU~ 
in Madrid 
Remember ... 


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Main distributor. 

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Nicely. But even his great show- 
stopper (“Sit Down You're Rock- 
ing the Boat”) has been destroyed 
by some of the most nauseatingly 
overehareographed reprises that I 
have seen. 

The problem with Clarke Peters 
as Sky Masterson is not (as one of 
my colleagues asserts) that he is 
black; one of the best “Guys and 
Dolls” I ever saw had a black, cast. 
The problem is that his Sky is an 
impressive solo show that has in no 
way been integrated with what is 
going on around him. Granted, he 
is not given much help by Betsy 
Brantley, who as Sarah Brown 
gives a reasonably adequate under- 
study performance until yoo lode 
at the program and realize that she 
is not the understudy. 

There is really only one moment 
where this “Guys and Dolls” even 
begins to recapture the dignity and 
intelligence and distinction of its 
original National s tagin g. That is 
when John Warner (though himself 
also a newcomer) does the heart- 
breaking “More T Cannot Give 
You" with an understated grace 
and style that, alas, only serves to 
make you still more aware of whax 
you have bear missing in the rest of 
a shoddy evening. 

Though some of the David To- 
guri choreography is still reason- 
ably intact, a kind of terrible tour- 
ing tackiness has broadened and 
coarsened this great tapestry of 
small-time losers and big band 
numbers to the point at which it 
becomes a constantly and deeply 
depressing experience. If you 
didn’t see “Guys and Dolls" at the 
National, don't see it now. If you 
did, don't go bade. It simply isn’t 
there anymore. 

□ 

At the Bush, a lady of considera- 
bly courage named Rose English 
does a two-hour routine entnled 
“The Betared,” which is of eerie 
fascination because it is about so 
very lirtle. Unlike such earlier ex- 
ponents of the an as Joyce Gren- 
fell, Fjg lish does not believe in 
anything so structured as a script or 
a performance: She potters abouL 
the stage, has a little sleep, tries on 
a few old clothes, chats to custom- 
ers in a desultory way and occa- 
sionally encourages than to sit on 
her knee. 

There were seven of us there 
when her show' started the night I 
went, and I have to say that there 
were also seven of us there when it 
ended. Irritating and aimless 
though much of “The Beloved” is. 
vou have to admire English’s loony 
dedication to the idea of doing 
nothing on stage at very great 
length. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU1SE. WEDNESDAY, JliLV 3, 1985 


INSIGHTS 


In Bulgaria, 
Private Plots 


Aid Incentive 
(And Harvest) 


By David Binder 

Sew York Times Service 


S ANDANSKI. Bulgaria — Tbe most star- 
tling aspect of Bulgaria's Communist sys- 
tem of agriculture is the extent to which 
private farmers are involved. 


This was evident on a recent Sunday in the 

his 


fields alongside Route 2, the modern highway 
that leads south from Sofia, tbe capital, to the 
frontier of Greece. The fields in the fertile Stru- 
ma Valley have been plowed by tractors belong- 
ing to one of Bulgaria's relatively new agro- 
industrial complexes. But they have also been 
divided into small plots that are at the disposal 
of individual cooperative farmers to use as they 
see fit. 

Now on weekends they can be found, hun- 


dreds of them, hoeing rows of potatoes and 
L Bui Die 


other vegetables. But there tbe resemblance to 
their forebears ends. They have driven to these 
fields in their own four-door compact cars, and 
when they are done they may stop by the village 


tavern or drive to a wedding. 
According to Professor Todor 


Pandov, first 

deputy chairman of the Bulgarian Academy of 
Agriculture, tbe amount of land set aside for 
private use, 1,729,770 acres (696,949 hectares), 
represents “13 to 14 percent” of the total under 
cultivation. He notea that “27 to 28 percent of 
total output is from private plots.” 

The growth of these private-farm undertak- 
ings becomes evident when these figures are 
compared with earlier statistics. Two years ago, 
for example, the amount of land in private plots 
was 1,606,215 acres, according to a dispatch by 
the Bulgarian Telegraph Agency, and the ootput 
from them amounted to 25 percent of the coun- 
try’s total. 

A year ago. the free time these fanners have to 
work on their plots doubled when the govern- 
ment workweek dropped to five days from six. 

Much of the meat, eggs and vegetables pro- 
duced on the personal holdings of the collectiv- 
ized fanners is sold to state purchasing organi- 
zations. Still, a lot finds its way to what 



German Greens Facing 



A Crisis of Existence’ 


nil 


7 i 


By James M- Markham 

Sett York Tunes Serticr 


v. 


H AGEN, West Germany — In its six 
years of existence, the Greens party has 
been living on a roller coaster of elector- 
al expectations. 

After two demoralizing drubbings in state 
elections — fust in the Saarland in March and 
then in North Rhine-Westphalia last month 
the anti-establishment, anti-nuclear, anti-North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization party now is at the 
very bottom of the roBer-coaster run. fearful of 
leaving tbe rails altogether. 

In a chastened, dispirited temper, about 700 
mostly youthful delegates of the Greens re- 
paired for a June weekend to the bleak Ruhr 


fust-belt city of Ha|ep to contemplate their 
future. They i 


problematical future. They managed to confirm 
that they are irreconcilably split betwrcn Uto- 
pians and moK-or-iess realistic politicians. 


pi arts a ad . 

Tbe expressions “crisis'* and “crisis of exis- 
tence” echoed for two days in Hagen’s utilitari- 
an conference center, which, in contrast to pre- 
vious, ebullient Greens congresses, was not 
bedecked with the banners of tbe assorted 
cau ses that have coalesced under tbe party’s 
nmhr dia Only the anti-vivisectionists draped a 
painted sheet from the balcony. 

As it happened, the opponents of experiment- 
ing with animals provided the sole “issue” that 
was debated at the congress, which some dele- 
gates said privately was a commentary on the 
party’s conceptual barrenness. Bizarrety, a dele- 
gate's position on how strongly he was opposed 
to vivisection became a tonebstooe of how much 
be was opposed to the real issue before the 
party: contemplating a governing coalition with 
the Social Democratic r 



It was symptomatic of creeping gains by the 
Reato,” or realist, wing of the Greens, which 


The party is irreconcilably 
split between Utopians and 
more-or-less realistic 
politicians. 


TL. New Yeri Tin 


A woman takes part in cherry harvest in Bulgaria’s Kyustendil district 


Professor Pandov called “free cooperative mar- 
kets." He said there were five or six of these in 


Sofia alone. 


E 


ACH smaller city, like Samokov in the 
Rib Mountains, has such a market, 
where on a recent Saturday local farmers 


tion of agriculture immediately after the war 
was borne more easily here than in other East 
European countries. 

The number of people directly engaged in 
agriculture has been steadily declining. Two 
years ago, it was 964,000; now it is 860,000. Put 
another way, the Bulgarians involved in agricul- 
ture and associated enterprises, together with 
their families, represent 23 percent of the popu- 
lation. down from 35 percent in 1970. Professor 
Pandov said. 


rable rise in the use of artificial fertilizers. Out- 
put has dramatically increased. 

Now grain production has readied about nine 
mQlion tons a year, or “one ton per capita,” as 
Professor Pandov put it “We still lag behind 
developed European countries,” he said, adding 
“We are not satisfied” 


were displaying big bunches of fresh radishes. 


scallions, cabbage, lettuce and strawberries. 

“But it is not all private,” Professor Pandov 
said in an interview in Sofia, “because the farm- 
ers got fodder, fertilizer and tbe use of machines 
from the slate for their private plots." 

In other words, tbe Communist government 
is directly fostering the private undertakings of 
the fanners, but on the foundation of what is 
now a powerful public agricultural sector. In 
1982, for example, individual farmers were pro- 
vided with 96.000 sows and 361,000 piglets to 
tend for their own use. Similar distributions are 
made of second-crop fruit and vegetables, in- 
cluding com and raspberries. 

According to the professor, a Bulgarian farm- 
er may cultivate a maximum of about 10 acres (4 
hectares) and use an additional 3.7 acres of 
pasture. This would represent nearly twice the 
average amount of land available to Bulgaria’s 
1.400,000 peasants before World War II, and 
may explain why the Communist coQectiviza- 


This is still a high percentage by modern 

■ - • -- i St 


European standards? In the United States, 25 
percent of the population is engaged in farming. 
Yet for Bulgaria, where 80 percent of the 


population was directly dependent on farming 
for its livelihood until 1944. the shii 


the shift in agricul- 
ture has been almost cataclysmic. 

For a quarter of a century after the 1944 
Communist takeover, under the guns of the 
invading Red Army, Bulgaria’s agn culture was 
run on the Soviet model: 100 percent collectiv- 
ization, followed by “unification” of collective 
units, with mechanized services provided by 
machine-tractor stations and quotas for delivery 
of products to tbe government. In addition, 
large state farms were established for stock 
husbandry and seed. 


Asked if the industrialization of agriculture 
was destroying some of tbe essence of tbe “Bul- 
garian way of life,” with its roots in peasant 
traditions and virtues, he replied: 

“That is difficult to answer, but I think we 
gain more than we lose. Forty years ago, peas- 
ants produced what they liked, and as much. 
But they worked seven days a week and ate meat 
three or four times a month. Now they work a 
five- to six-day week and, since 1976, farmers 
earn the same as factory workers.” 

They earn the same, that is. or more. At a 


showcase dairy farm near Botevgrad in the Bal- 
kan Mountains, Marin Chcryeukoy, a husky, 
red-headed husbandry technician, said the aver- 
age wage of his fanners was 350 leva a month, or 
5336.50 at tbe official exchange rate. The aver- 
age industrial wage is 250 leva a month. 

Mr. Oiervenkov said that most the members 
of his agro-industrial complex owned a cow or a 
pig and that “almost every family has a car.” 

As he spoke, a woman led a large blade 
Holstein- Frisian down the road. The cow 
seemed to be dancing. “That private cow is 
gpingto be bred with one of the state's bulls,” 
Mr. Chervenkov said with a grin. 


favors getting into the dirty business of govern- 
mental responsibility, that the congress did not 
endorse an all-ont tea on animal experimenta- 
tion. Votes In' this position were solicited from 
the podium and from a corridor video show that 
displayed laboratory monkeys wired and 
squirming wretchedly under electric shocks. 

Instead, embracing a Realo view, the congress 
called modestly lot a moratorium on animal 
testing by the pharmaceutical industry and 
medical researchers. 

This position outraged many members of the 
fundamentalist, or “Fundi.” wing and provoked 
its guru, an apocalyptic-minded East German 
GxQe wampri Rudolf BahtO, to anno unce that he 
was leaving the party. The erstwhile Communist 
dissident said that the Greens had failed to 
become an “implement against the spiral of 
death." 


I 


HE Greens won only 25 percent rf the 
' Saarland and 4.6 


T popular vote in the 

percent in North Rhine-Westphalia. ley 
than the 5 percent needed for seats. The Social 


Democrats won both elections stunningly, as- 
sembling unexpected majorities of seals, 


“You are going the way of a normal party.” 

es that 


The farm hss begun to branch out. Loo, with a 
plantation of morcllo cherries that will be 
turned into jellies and juices and greenhouses 
for growing carnations and roses commercially 
for markets m Sofia and Plevea. 


warned Mr. Bahro, who said he believes 
rising unemployment is a positive development 
that will bring about tbe collapse of industrial 
society. “Thai is not my project.” 


Thomas Ebennann. a Marxist Greens leader 
from Hamburg, acknowledged that Ik was sur- 
prised that the Social Democrats bad been abk 
to revive their fortunes so quickly, partly by 
appropriating the Greens' concern for an en- 
dangered environment. The Social Democrats' 
new slogan is. “Jobs and Environment." 

Mr. Ebennann said that a showdown between 
the Greens' two wings was inevitable before the 
1987 elections. “Everybody knows dm before 




Then, in 1970. the government ordered “the 
beginning of integration of agricultural produc- 
tion and food processing," to combine functions 
that were previously separate — growing, pro- 
cessing and marketing, Professor Pandov said. 
Specifically, the first 200 agro-industrial com- 
plexes were formed, averaging 30,000 acres in 
size. 


More or less simultaneously, the government 
began creating what it called vertical institu- 
tions to complement the “horizontal" agro-in- 


dustrial complexes: milk and meat processing 

to array of 


installations, canning factories and an array 
scientific institutes. 


NVT 


The professor said there now were central 
institutes dedicated to fostering production of 
fruits, vegetables, grapes and poultry and even a 
special group of “20 scientists near Sofia study- 
ing strawberries.” 

Altogether, he added, there are 292 “pure” 
agro-industrial complexes, most of them spe- 
cializing in particular crops. They average about 
12.700 acres, he said, and productivity has risen 
about 2 percent a year. 

Agricultural mechanization has increased 
more than 65 percent in the last 15 years, by 
Bulgarian measure, and (here has been a compa- 


European Arms Makers Retreat 
From Wave of Pentagon Rules 


IVashingloti Post Service 


S URESNES, France — Jean-Claude Al- 
lard. manager of a small high-tech 
plant in this Paris suburb, is perplexed. 
Tbe Pentagon has invited him to bid on a 
contract to build air defense simulators. Sim- 
ulators are Mr. Allard’s specialty, but the 
invitation is 463 pages long and two inches 
(51 centimeters) thick. Just to reply, he esti- 
mates, will take six of his engineers half a year 
and 2,000 pages. 

“An these standards, procedures, employ- 
ment regulations, cost regulations, union reg- 
ulations,” be said with a sigh, thumping the 
U.S. document. A comparable French bid 
request on bis desk is 13 pages long. 
Nothing is more baffling to foreign arms 

makers than trying to crack the Pentagon and 
Congress. Tbe U5. system, as Henri Martre, 
president of France’s Aerospatiale, delicately 
put it, “is very complicated for a European to 
understand." 

Lured by the Pentagon’s big budget and 
stymied by arms spending cutbacks else- 
where, Europeans have an eye on the Up- 
market. With much of the wood “saturated," 


one French defense official said, “we have to 
go after the States." 

“But it’s very difficult," he said. “You have 
to pay S 30, 000 or $40,000 just to get started 
with a lawyer, a consultant and so on 

Then, he said, “you have to answer to the 
Clean Air Act,” adding: “What is that? The 
minorities, the small business. And then you 
have to fight the industries, hire lobbyists.” 

Tbe European plea for a “two-way street” 
in arms trade has become a fixture at NATO 
meetings, where allied ministers complain 
that they import seven times as much U.S. 
weaponry as tbe Pentagon boys from them. 

“The problem is, there’s a very large design 
and development lobby in this country,” said 
Richard N. Perle. the U.S. assist ant secretary 
of defense for international security policy. 
“Do you know there’s even an acronym for 
things that aren’t made here? It’s not called 
‘Not Invented Here,’ which is what it should 
be. It’s called NID. for Non-Internal Devel- 
opment” 

Mr. Perle contends that the United Slates 
boasts economies of scale that European 
manufacturers cannot match. 


P ETRA Kelly, an American-educated 
founder of the Greens, lashed out, too. 
against those who favor coalitions with 
the left-of-center Social Democrats. She said 
that coalitions should be formed with East Eu- 
ropean human rights movements, such as 
Swords Into Plowshares in East Germany or 
Charter 77 in Czechoslovakia, or with the eco- 
logical activist group Greenpeace, “but not with 
the SPD." 


“Without ministers, without coalitions, we 
are capable of politics,” Miss Kelly insisted, 
“because we have a different claim to power 
than tbe Social Democrats. We have to make 
this state system of repression superfluous and 
not start to repair it. What happens when the 
Greens start talking about ‘the acceptable lim- 
its' of dioxin?” 


Earlier, sitting among the delegates. Miss 
Kelly, 37, conceded, “A lot of the people who 
started with us in 1979 are very depressed.” But 
she said she did not have any plans to abandon 
the party. 

Tbe fundamentalists are an unstable coalition 
of doctrinal purists, like Miss Kelly, and Marx- 
ist-Lemnist veterans of defunct groups of the 
leftist fringe who cut their political teeth in tbe 
1968 European student upheaval. The latter 
group, strongest in Hamburg, Frankfurt and 
West Berlin, are getting on in years, pushing 


His prediction was fulfilled Thel&ato wing 
pleaded for what WalrraudSchoppe. a Bundes- 
tag member, called “a dear coafatibn declara- 
tion” that would make voters know, that baQots 
for the Greens could be translated into results. 

But the delegates, fearful of an 'open split, 
finally approved a Rtafett^jcontpromise 
resolution that kept opataffoptiuns from "op- 
position to governing afche," including coali- 
tions, hut that condemned “striving to come to 
power at almost any pike." 

For the Greens/tbe spotlight now swings u> 
the state of Low Saxony, which w2L haw j 
legislative elections new spring. At the Hagen 
congress, there was unanimous accord among 
Fundis and Reaks that failure to retain seats in , 
Lower Saxony would be fatal to the Greens' 
chances in the 1987 general elections. 

The party's chapter in Lower Saxony has an 
undeniable flair. After the Hannover jidfac re- 
tired a drug-stiffing boar named Louise fro® 
the force out of fear for.iis nuaff. 
demanded the replacement ;g ^ r . 
sniffing German shephenfe 

writs.' 

since pigs wouldnever attack demonstrators. 

A' key figonrTn the Greens’ Lower Saxony 
chapters Jtdn&t JLjppdt, a teacher and some- 
trine historian, who has been nudging theotga- 
nfcamfflfbWard the idea of forging a coalition 
ndttL&e Social Democrats. Now in the 
tkai tiie Social Democrats are given 




Ha 


precariously toward middle age. , 

Within the paly, tht Fund* position to tontioT winning n majority in llm statn. 
weakened since like-minded comrades in the Mr. Lippelt prophesied tbal^ the G 
Saarland and North Rhine-Westphalia —“both “ ' ’ 

heavy-industry, high-unemployment states -t 
led tbe Greens into electoral < 
forms that spurned coalitions. 


on plat- 


.... Greens 

would win seats again In Lower Saxony. “The 
Greens always need crises, so that they can 
confront reality, like a child,” be said. “Lower 
Saxony will lead the way out of the valley." 


-fc, 


U.S. Anthropologist Contrasts Black, White Approaches to Power, Politics and Sex 




By Juan Williams 

H'lzatwijum Past Service 


W " ASHTNGTON — Blacks and whites 
have sharply contrasting approaches to 
politics, power and sex but often fad to 
recognize iU according to a German- American 
anthropologist, who is white.. 

This failure leads to misunderstandings be- 
tween individuals and to a growing divergence 
between the black and white communities, said 
Thomas Kochman of the University of Illinois 
at Chicago. 

A Kochman example: 

The Reverend Jesse L. Jackson is speaking at 
a political rally. He Starts out by chanting, “I am 
somebody!" Mr. Kochman sees whites in the 
audience frown. He feels himself pull back. 

“I can’t believe that academics, black col- 
leagues of mine, can stand up and start shout- 
ing. clapping.” Mr. Kochman said. “In my gut 
Tm shocked. Tm not used to being brought into 
a scene that way." 

He suggests that a while audience equates 
emotional involvement with loss of control; 
such scenes raise the specter of demagoguery to 
whites — they suspeei that a highly chained 
speaker is trying to manipulate than. From the 
black perspective, he said, the impact is very 
different. 


Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Jackson and other 
black leaders most often show them with their- 
mouth open, hands extended, emphasizing 
some point in a speech. 

“To blacks, that says the man in the picture is 
powerful, strong, seeking truth by emotionally 
engaging ideas, taking them on,” said Mr. 
Kochman. “Whites have a different p e rs p ect i ve. 
They see themselves bong harangued.” 


a long way before physical confrontation is 
threatened. 


“Tbe extreme of arguing is “woofing,’ like Ali 
and Frazier, like the Black Panthers and Louis 
Fanakbaa” the Black Muslim leader, Mr. 
Kochman said. “Whites hear the same words 
from the same people and think - fight, danger. 
Blacks understand woofing is going on. Whites 
think figfrt before blacks think fight" 


The mayor of Chicago, Harold Washington, 
who has said that he feds misunderstood by bis 


city’s whiles, especially the press, distributed 
r. Kochman’s book ‘ 


He said, however, that in this case his defini- 
tion of “white" really applies most to the while 


“If she had been white, the sexual interest 
would have been implied by his actions," 

Mr. Kochman, adding that an open discussion 
of sex would have been considered offensive 
and pushy. 

For the black woman, however, an honest 
discussion would have been preferable to the 
approach the man took. “To a black woman,” 
be said, “it is not an offense to have her sexuality 
acknowledged.” 

According to Mr. Kochman. a blade male’s 
more aggressive, verbal approach would have 


“Black and 


copies erf Mr. 

White Styles in Conflict" to the city hall press 


corps. 

“A careful study of the news coverage of the 
mayoral campaign and of this administration 
over the past two years." the mayor told the 
journalists, according to Chicago newspapers, 
“demonstrates the need for all reporters to read 
this book.” 


The mayor of Detroit, Coleman A. Young, 
told Mr. Kochman in a letter that he fell that the 


White Americans generally restrain differences and anger as 
well as styles of speech and dress so as not to impose on one 
another, Mr. Kochman says. As a result, they feel threatened 
or disturbed by displays of anger or ostentatious dress. . 


book explained a lot of Mr. Young's problems 
with whites in Detroit 


“The sister who faints at the Baptist revival 
never seems to lose her glasses, so how much 
control is lost?" he asked- Blacks are accus- 
tomed to dealing with high-energy speakers and 
are able to look beyond the style to (he sub- 
stance of Ihe message, he says. 


‘Whether spirited speaking can be manipu- 
s‘ ability to control it doesn't 


lated beyond blacks' , . 

concern blacks — it concerns whites who make 
the ethnocentric judgment that to be emotional- 
ly involved with a speaker is to be manipulat- 
ed," Mr. Kochman said. 

He pointed out that posters of the Reverend 


M R. Kochman’s theory is (hat blacks 
have a “higlwjffense, high-defense" 
culture, in which aggressive lan guage , 
cocky behavior and florid clothing not only are 
accepted but also enjoyed as a source of power 
that “feeds” life. Blacks are able to handle the 
brashnesstrf such language or behavior in others 
without losing control or being overwhelmed. 

While Americans, in Mr. Kochman’s view, 
generally restrain differences and anger as well 
as styles or speech and dress so as not to impose 
on one another. As a result, whites feel threat- 
ened or disturbed by displays of anger or osten- 
tatious dress. 


For example, be says, blacks make a distinc- 
tion between arguing and fighting that whites 
do noL For blacks, verbal confrontation can go 


Protestant tradition. Ethnic whites, particularly 
Jews, Irish and Italians, often “love to argue, 
love to boast and joke,” he said. "It is the 
difference between self-contained cultures and 
expressive cultures as much as black and white." 

The differences apply to private matters as 
well as to public ones. 

Mr. Kochman cites the case of a young black 
woman who complained that a white co-worker 
had put his hand on her thigh after lunch one 
day without first broaching the subject of his 
sexual interest. 

“Why ttid he have to be so damn sneaky?" 
Mr. Kochman said she asked 

Yet, he said, from the white perspective there 
was nothing sneaky about it. The man had 
offered her rides home, had discussed business 
projects with her^had talked about TV shows 
and current events, and bad taken her to lunch. 
Then came the touching. 


been easier for the black, woman, to deal with 
because she would have recognized it as sexual 
interest and been able to accept or rqect it 
appropriately. The more subtle white approach 
supped under her “radar.” 


M 


R. Kochman was bom in 


and grew up in npper Manhattan. He 
never lived in a black neighbor- 


has 


and colleagues, and by bunding networks for 
interviews and Odd work among bis blade con- 
tacts. 

He acknowledges that his ideas have been 
slow io be accepted in academic circles. The 
orthodox view, he said, is that blades have no 
separate culture and that differences between 
black and while behavior are due to the effects 
of discrimination and poverty on black families. 

That approach, teaigims, tes led both whites 
and blades to assume mal discussing differences 
between them would lead to the condurion that 
black "behavior is inferior. 

“It’s the politeness conspiracy” said Mr. 
Kodiman, “and ft leaves many prejudices in 
plaoe.” : . 

He said bis worst moments come when mid- 
dle-class blacks, interpreting bis work as an 
attempt to show them to be inferior to whites 
because they are different, react by saying, “Tve 
never seen blacks act like that” 

“That makes whites wonder if 1 know what 
the bell Tm talking about," said Mr. Kochman. 
“At that paint I have to rdy on other black 
people, even some whites, to say- they know the 
reality Tm referring to but they ve never put it 
into thoughts and words: Blade peopleand 
white people act differentiy.” 

Differences in approach extend to blade and 
white professional situations, according to Mr. 
Kochman, and as a result* good workers with 
the best of intentions often end up at odds when 
one is black and one is while. 

Blacks value confrontation in an office setting 


habit even as blacks see it as evidence of cari£ 
about producing die best work. 

One of Mr. Kochman' s examples of confK 
in the office occurs when two white managed 
are taUting as a black colleague approaches. -flw 
two whites finish their conversation -beta* 
greeting the colleague. Tbe blade person consid- 
ers tins behavior rude and is angered before lu . 
says anything. This creates distance and tensoa v. - 
between the black and the whites. Mr. Kocbtasj 
said be believes that a group of blacks would 
typically interrupt their conversation to to- 
knowledge a person approaching the group. 

litis tension results bean the practice of 
whites' emphasizing subject matter over person* : 
al relationships versus blacks' favoring personal r ij, 
relationship over subject matter. 

“That’s a cultural dash, a difference in 
styles,” said Mr. Kochman. “And h laves both > 
people offended, and puzzled because the? V; 
don’t appreciate the other cultural perspective.'' jS 

Mr. Kochman argues that cultural difference^'-.' 
often confuse attempts to deal with racism - 
both rides. In his book he cites the example c \/ 
Macks condemning racist whites beforearariri' V. 
ly .mixed group. Some whites in the group fed * ' 
uncomfortable and begin to defend 
as not racists. 





ti-._ 


will not confront another colleague about a 


hood. 

Yet he finds himself te a c hing blacks and gg weJl as at home, Mr. Kochman said, as a way 
whites about black cultural signals and con- of “truth seeking.” To blacks a i-sgne who 
cedes that it makes for tense ablations when ~ - * 

blacks find themselves bring lectured about 
themselves by a white. 

“Al one point,” he said, 
sense that I was an interior 
Tm accepted as an anomaly. 

Mr. Kochman said he works by observing life 
in black neighborhoods, among black students 


there was a strong 
r in this field. Now 


problem is not concerned — they fed he does 
~iertbe 


t problem or 


sot attach importance to either 
the other person involved. 

But whites, Mr. Kochman saitLfind confron- . 
rations and arguments a agn of disunity or 
conflict in' the office: " Whites interpret black 
desire to dispute differences as a troublesome 


“To blades that itself is evidence that they are 
racists.” said Mr. Kochman, “because in black 
culture a person may speak generally without 
directing his remarks against the people who are 
listening. Bui if those people start to react as if 
it’s about them — the old saying is the rime 
fits, wear tt.’” 

R ecognizing cultural - differences may im - 
prove understanding, but Mr. Kochman ac- 
knowledges that this is not always enough £< 
overcome prejudice. 

“If a person doesn’t know the difference 
cultures, -tharis ignorance,” Jw said. “But u a 
person knows the difference and^tffl says that 
die m ains t re am culture i* best,- that ‘white is 
right,’ then you’ve got racism.” ; 



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HcralbSSribunc 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


If WEDNESDAY y JULY 3, 1985 

■&. . • • 


** 


Page 9 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 



A major problem 
is the More 
of the family 
to adapt abroad. 


How Some Finns Handle 
: ... *}?\ KJtress of Transfer Abroad 

. By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

" totentauonal Herald Tribune 

A RIS- ~E xecutiv es going abroad generally receive salary 
increases, .depending on the location of their new job, 
- cost-ot-hving adjustments, relocation premiums and 
bousing and school allowances. 

, . coordjng to a recent study of managers of major corpora- 

, L was^w.aitmion rate among executives working abroad is hi gh 
tt ^coa^ » show that added creature comforts may not be enough 
A th em happy. Between 5 and 30 percent, depending on the 

of U.S. executives working overseas go home before 
irfflftjspiof “«ir assignments, said the study, by the University of 
VPaw^vania's Wharton School. Ten percent of European execu- 
- - TtW® working abroad leave before the end of their assignments, 
said the study. ~ 

For an Overseas assignment to be successful, companies have to 
- ■ . choose- U>e right person for the job. give adequate boding ftiH 

training, provide support dur-‘ — 

v ' jog the overseas assignment 

"St" 7 . ' and make provisions for rein- 

- * legrating managers back at 

• 'headquarters. 

Some multinationals do 
nothing at afl. others are try- 

ing to do a bit 'more. Here are 

. sotnecrfifie things being done: 

• Selecting; the adaptable 

executive. In addition to the traditional interview, some UJS. 
"** companies arc using a selection test for ex ecu lives going abroad, 
. ^ called the Overseas -Assignment Inventory (OAT). The test, which 
Tfc has not been marketed in Europe yet, measures a person’s 
adaptability to a foreign environment. It looks at a person's 
attitude about other ethnic groups, patience and interpersonal 
skills as well as their motivations and expectations about an 
overseas assignment. 

^ rp HE lest was developed by Moran, Stahl & Boyer Inc. of 
I Boulder, Colorado. It has long been used by the U.S. Navy 
and the Peace Corps and was introduced to U.S. campa- 
. tries three years ago. Moran. Stahl & Boyer rhagy* a company 
. : ’ .51,500 for certiricalion and S140 per person for the test 

“It’s a good screening device," said Dan Copeland, in charge of 
‘ expatriates at General Dynamics Services Co. in Fort Worth, 

: * .Texas, a subsidiary of the huge UJS. defense contractor. “I 
• - ~ haven’t ruled out anybody because of it, but 1 came dose a couple 
of times.’' Mr. Copeland cannot link, a low overseas attrition rate 
/ - -*• directly to the use of the test “But it’s good enough for me to keep 
nsing it" he said. 

; ‘ • Sticking with career expatriates. Some companies in Britain 

• J recruit managers specifically interested in international careers. 
Often these career expatriates had parents who worked abroad. 
Because they know what to expect from an international assign- 
ment they may represent a lower risk. Out of the 5,400 expatri- 

• ales working for the Royal Dutch Shell Group, 2,100 are career 
expatriates. 

■ - BAT Industries PLC. the British food and tobacco group, has a 
■tf similar recruitment pattern. In the last eight years, according to 
- BAT, only two career expatriates who stayed with BAT decided 
to change from an international to a domestic career. "To redirect 
their careers in the organization is not easy because we don’t 
anticipate they will change horses,” said John Wilburn, manager 
i '., of expatriate affairs at BAT. 

• Interviewing the spouse. “The failure erf the family to adapt 
is the number one reason for the failure of international assign- 
ments,” said Paul Evans, professor of organizational behavior at 

. the European Institute of Business Administration in Fontaine- 
; . bleau, France, and co-author of “Must Success Cost So Much." 
Some companies such as Volvo AB, the diversified Swedish car 
company, interview the spouse along with the executive being 
offered a job overseas. 

For some Scandinavian and UJS. companies, where dual- 
career families are increasing, interviewing the spouse is essential. 
"About 90 percent of out managers going abroad are dual-career 
families,” said Anders Sonddeus, vice-president in charge of 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 4) 


* «* : 

; .1 

?»■-•• : 
3 V 



15.5% at 
GEPLC 

Figure Is Lower 
Than Predicted 

Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

. LONDON — Britain's largest 

electronics group. General Electric 
Co. PLC. announced pretax profits 
of £725 minion ($942.5 milli on) 
Tuesday for the fiscal year ended 
March 31. I5i percent ahead of 
the previous year's £671 trillion but 
below analysts’ expectations. ' 

The per-share figure fefl to 142 . 
pence from 14.9 pence the year 
before. 



Volume for tbe year rose 6.8 per- 
cent to £5.98 billion from £5.6 bil- 
lion. the company said in its pre~ 
Hrainary report for the year. ' 

In trading Tuesday on the Lon- 
don Stock Exchange, GECs stock 
closed ar 166 pence, unchanged 
from Monday. 

GECs preliminary statement 
contained no detailed comments. 
The annual report of the company, 
which is not connected withGener- 
al Electric Co. of the United States, 
mil be issued Aug. 8 . 

Although GEC moved ahead in 
its electronics systems and compo- 
nents- division , with pretax profits* 
of £235 million compared with 
£197 milli on, a 19J percent in- 
crease, it disappointed in a number 
of other sectors. 

Telecommunications and busi- 
ness systems, at £81 minion, did 
not match last year’s £93 millio n; 
electrical equipment was down to 
£42 million from £49 milli on and 
automation and control brought 
£48 million compared with £52 mfl- 
fion. 

Sectors that showed an improve- 
ment included power generation at 
£55 million, up from £52 milli on, 
medical equipment at £29 million, 
up from £24 milli on, and consumer 
products at £27 triffion, up from 
£23 million. 

GECs profit announcement 
showed it was still a cash-rich com- 
pany, with bank deposits and other 
short-term assets standing at S\A 
IrilEdh, down slightly from the pre- 
vious year's £136 billion. In the 
past year, market analysts have 
been critical of GECs chairman. 
Sir Arnold Weinstock, for not us- 
ing this cash reserve to expand the 
company. 

GEC has improved its volume in 
every area in vouch it operates, ex- 
cept in Africa and Australia, where 
sales fell sharply. (IHT, Reuters) 


American Express Is Shifting Focus 

New President 
Says Emphasis Is 
Qu Core Activity 


By Leslie Wayrie 

Nw York Tima Service 
NEW YORK — Tbe new 
president of American Express 
Co, Louis V, Gerstner Jr- bears 
scam resemblance to the man he 
replaces, Sanford I. Weill, the 
Brooklyn deal-maker who be- 
came a sultan of Wall Street 
Where the flamboyant Mr. 
WclD basks in the glow of media 
attention, Mr. Gerstner shies 
from the limelight. But, in his 
quiet way, Mr. Gerstner has in 
the past decade masterminded 
American Express's domination 
in credit cards, the cornerstone 
of the 513-tuDion financial-ser- 
vices empire. 

From now on it will be almost 
impossible for Mr. Gerstner, 43, 
to remain m the shadows. As No. 
2 at American Express, the for- 
mer McKinsey & Co. director 
will help chart tbe course for a 
company unlike most others: It 
is at once a global travel agent, a 
brokerage house; an insurance 
company and an international 
bank. Its green, gold and plati- 
num credit cards are held by 20 
milli on people and the company 
remains a household word for 
the product it invented in 1891, 
the traveler’s check. 

“Gerstner has got a real ’Blue 
Box' mentality.” said Peter A 
Cohen, chief executive of the 
company's Shearson Lehman 
Brothers subsidiary, referring to 
the famous American Express 
blue-square emblem. “He's been 
the architect of a great deal of the 
strategy that has been extraordi- 
narily successful” 

George C. Sheinberg, vice 



The Nm Tort Tima 


Loots V. Gerstner Jr., American Express president 


chairman of Shearson f-riwmn, 
added: “He's a terrific strategic 
thinker, and he's been key in im- 
portant decisions.” 

Along with American Ex- 
press’s chairman and chief exec- 
utive, James D. Robinson 3d, 49, 
Mr. Gerstner wflj face tough is- 
sues in the years, perhaps de- 
cades, to come. American Ex- 
press must decide bow to spend 
the SI billion to $2 billion it is 
likely to receive later this year 
from the sale of two operations. 
Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 
and its 50-percent interest in 
Warner Amex Cable Communi- 
cations. The company also 
stands astride two turbulent in- 
dustries — financial services and 
travel services — both of which 
are undergoing deregulaioty up- 
heaval And. it will have to devise 


even more innovative ways to 

maintain the anrp ial earnings 

growth of 15 to 20 potent it has 
set for its core business, credit 
cards. 

Yet Mr. Gerstner is confident 
that tbe company’s solid growth 
in the past will continue. “Both 
financial services and travel ser- 
vices are going through tremen- 
dous penods of discontinuity, 
and discontinuity is when for- 
tunes are made,” he said, in 
shirtsleeves and puffing on a ci- 
gar as he sat in American Ex- 
press’s 40th-floor conference 
room overlooking New York 
harbor. Tbe room looks like any 
corporate conference room ex- 
cept for one distinctive Ameri- 
can Express tonch: the rug, 
which has been woven to resem- 
{Con tinned on Page 1L, CoL 3) 


Dutch PTT Monopoly Is Criticized 


Romm 

THE HAGUE — The monopoly 
of the Dutch state Postal and Tele- 
communications Co. on the sale 
and installation gf telephone and 
telex equipment should be broken, 
a report commissioned by the gov- 
ernment said Tuesday. 

Tbe report said tire freedom to 
choose from the many types of 
equipment available was essential 
for tire competitiveness of Dutch 
industyy in the world market 
’Meanwhile, the stafe-owned 
Swiss Post and Telephone ' Author- 
ity said Tuesday that it had pro- 
posed a draft law that would gradu- 
ally end its monopoly over tbe sale 
and installation of user terminals, 
including telephones, telex ma- 
chines and in-house switchboards. 

in the Netherlands, the govern- 


ment-sponsored rep ort recom- 
mended that the PTT be given the 
status of a private limited company 
and made more independent of 
government control but that all 
shares remain in the government's 
hands. 

- The report said the PTT was 
hampered by government control 
over its spending. Large invest- 
ments are needed Tor facilities such 
as digital telephone systems and 
glass-fiber networks and in order to 
boost the PTTs competitiveness it 
is essential to reduce its depen- 
dence on government finance. 

The company's control of the 
public telecommunications net- 
work should be preserved, the re- 
port said. 

The secretary of state for trans- 
port, Jaap Scherpcnhui 7 .cn. said 


Factory Orders, 
Housing Sales 
Are Up in U.S. 


that he agreed with the main points 
of the report and that he hoped the 
cabinet council would discuss it at 
its meeting in October. 

In Switzerland, while recom- 
mending an end to the monopoly 
over terminals, the PTT said a 
should keep telephone cables and 
the basic Swiss telecommunica- 
tions network under stat e con trol 

At a press conference; PTT offi- 
cials also said free competition in 
the user terminal market should be 
’limited to models that it deemed 
safe operationally. 

Foreign manufacturers should 
only be admitted to the Swiss mar- 
ket if foreign markets are opened to 
Swiss products and as long as the 
survival of the Swiss telecommuni- 
cations industry is not endangered, 
the officials said. 


The Associated Press 

■ WASHINGTON - Orders to 
UJS. factories climbed 2.1 percent 
in May, while housing sales rose by 
an even more robust 9.7 percent, 
the government reported Tuesday. 

In the first of two new May re- 
ports that seemed to point to a 
rebounding U.S. economy, the 
Commerce Department said orders 
of manufactured goods advanced 
for the first time in four months. 

It said sucb orders totaled $195.1 
billion in May. a $4-billion gain 
from April and the largest increase 
since a 4.4-percent rise in Novem- 
ber. The gam followed declines of 
03 percent in April 0.8 percent in 
March and 0.9 percent in February. 

■ Tbe gam in braising sales was the 
biggest increase in right months. It 
reversed much of an 115-percent 
decline in April It was the largest 
increase since a 20.3-percent jump 
last September. 

The May gain left sales of new 
single-family homes at a seasonally 
adjusted annual rate of 676,000. 
Many analysts are predicting fur- 
ther sales gains in the months 
ahead, spurred by substantial de- 
clines in mortgage interest rates. 

On Monday, the Commerce De- 
partment had reported new-con- 
struction spending rose 13 percent 
in May for its second straight 
monthly advance. 

But the Conference Board said 
its measure of help-wanted adver- 
tising in major U5. newspapers 
was unchanged in May, and one of 
its economists said that might por- 
tend a rise in tbe national unem- 
ployment rate. 

Economists said recent declines 
in interest rates contributed to tbe 
May increase in construction 
spending, which had risen 1.4 per- 
cent in April after declining in 
March and February. 

May’s increase was the biggest 
advance since January and lifted 
spending 8.8 percent above its 
year-earuer level 

Michael Sumichrast, chief econ- 
omist for the National Association 
of Home Builders, said the May 
increase reflected & continued 
surge in nonreridential construc- 
tion. with construction of office 
buildings running 29 percent above 
a year ago, industrial plant con- 
struction up 27 percent and shop- 
ping center construction up 30 per- 
cent from May 1984. 

"These are sizable increases and 
the gains are widespread,” Mr. Su- 
nrichrast said. But he cautioned 
that “there is a lot of overbuilding 


in office obstruction, which is be- 
ing supported by a lot of specula- 
tion. It can’t continue.” 

Tbe Conference Board, a busi- 
ness-sponsored research group, 
said its Help-Wanted Advertising 
Index remained at 131 in May after 
dropping to that level in April from 
138 in March. 

Tbe index, which uses a 2967 
base of 100 , measures the volume 
of help-wanted classified advertis- 
ing in 5] major U3. newspapers. 

In May, the index was six points 
above its level in May 1984, but 
was 14 points below its recent high 
of 145 reached in December 1984, 
the Conference Board said. 


Industrial 
Output Rises 
In Germany 

Reuters 

BONN — West German indus- 
trial production rose a provisional 
0.6 percent in May after falling 03 
percent in April, tbe Economics 
Ministry said Tuesday. 

The production index, base 
1980, rose to a provisional 101.1 in 
May from 1003 in April and 99.8 
in March. It was 2.8 percent higher 
than in May of last year, when it 
stood at 98.3. 

Construction output in May rose 
2.9 percent from April while man- 
ufacturing industry output in- 
creased 0.6 percent 

Overall industrial production in 
April and May combined increased 
03 percent over dfe Febnuuy- 
March figure and by 4 percent over 
April-May last year. Manufactur- 
ing industry output was also 03 
percent higher than in February- 
March, with all sectors showing in- 
creases. 

Construction output in April 
and May increased by 9 percent 
from Februaiy-March, when activ- 
ity was weakened by unusually cold 
weather, but fell oy 73 percent 
compared with the same period last 
year. 

Manufacturing" industry output 
increased an overall 53 percent in 
April-May over the year earlier, 
with capital goods production 
showing the biggest rise at 10 per- 
cent compared with the same two 
months last year. 


N -.V 


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Memos Indicate Former Hutton President Approved Overdrafts 


- CiMimn at Lcnacn ana Zurich. H* mgj m other European centers. New Yon rates at * Pjhl 
' cJ ConunerCKii tranc :o: JUnam; neeOea to cmr one pound (c) Amounts needmt nbovoae 
' outer i - V unite of Wm/ Mts at UHOttl L'n.-nat IOJKON.O. : mU turned. fUL.-noTmaanate. 
fat To tntr orm pcomt: tus.-,3m 

Oxhrr Dollar Valuer 


By Roberr L Jackson 

Lai Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A former 
president of EF. Hutton & Co. 
personally approved regular over- 
drafting of the brokerage house’s 
bank accounts in the early 1980s, 
according to internal Hutton 
memos obtained by a House Judi- 
ciary subcommittee. 

The memos, written in early 1 982 
to George L BaD, thenpreadeiuof 

ler, Michael P. ^^San<\SScaie 
that Mr. Ball had authorized over- 
drafts in Hutton's regional bank 
accounts. 

Mr. Ball said Monday through a 


grounds that senior management at 
the firm apparently had no knowl- 
edge of the scheme, similar to 
“check kiting.” 

Tbe Castellano- Bah correspon- 
dence is bong studied by the House 
Judiciary subcommittee on crime 
as part of thousands of documents 
obtained by subpoena from Hutton 
in that case. 

Abuses by the brokerage firm in 
its overdraft practices, initially un- 
covered by the Justice Department, 
dealt with the years 1980, 1981 and 
1982. 

Mr. Ball was the president of 
Hutton for five years until July 
1982 when he left the company to 


t Sferlrffl. I li) >/>lb : 

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Jra« rtwa itert ffr vten wa ap 


spokesman he was referring only to become the president and chief ex- 
“legitimate overdrafts that are a " ! ' - 

normal business practice.” 

Last May, Hutton pleaded guilty 
to 2,000 counts of wire and mail 
fraud for excessive, illegal over- 
drafts. 

While accepting Hutton's grnliy 
plea, the U.S. Justice Department decision togjve branches credit for 
has decli n ed to prosecute any past interest earned via overdrafting erf 
or present Hutton executive on the Regional Bank Account, bow 


ecutive officer of Prudential-Badie 
Securities. 

A memo to Mr. Ball from Mr. 
Castellano on Feb. 9. 1982. and 
furnished to the subcommittee, 
says in pan: 

“Although you have made the 



George L. Ball 

these branch interest credits are de- 
termined and accounted for is still 
unresolved.” 

later, Mr. Castellano wrote Mr, 
Ball he had asked Hutton's region- 


Mark Eurobond Volume Rises Sharply 


Realm 

FRANKFURT — The volume 
of Deutsche mark Eurobonds 
launched in the second quarter of 
1985 surpassed the first three 
months by nearly 40 percent as 
moves by the Bundesbank to liber- 
alize German capital markets al- 
lowed the issue or new instruments. 
Berliner Handels- uitd Frankfurter 
Bank said Tuesday. 

The bank, in a study of Euro- 
bond markets, said the sharp rise 
was mainly the result of the volume 
of DM-doiominated floating- rate 
notes issued. These had not been 
allowed by the Bundesbank until a 


liberalization of markets on May I. 

At the same time, a fall in U-S. 
interest rates made dollar bonds 
less attractive and their volume fell 
back. 

Figures compiled by Berliner 
Handels show- the number of DM 
Eurobonds launched in the second 
quarter rose to 39 from 34 in the 
first three months, while the vol- 
ume rose to the equivalent of $239 
billion from S l £8 billion. 

The overall Eurobond market 
share of DM-dencmunated issues 
rose to 83 percent from 63 per- 
cent 

In the second quarter. 139 dollar 


Vi- .-* 5 , StyJiri. i.ViWVi 
.‘**0., , if..* 


liovire wwinw*. 


World Bonk Says Lending Declined 

The AatKMied Pirn 

WASHINGTON — Lending by the World Bank, the largest source 
of international aid for poor countries, totaled $14.4 billion in the year- 
ihai ended June 30. down from the previous year’s total of SI5.5 
billion dollars, a bank spokesman said Tuesday. 

The bank approved three loans totaling 5915 million to Yugoslavia 
for use in expanding natural gas production as the bank's fiscal year 
ended, the spokesman. Thomas A. Blinkhom. also announced. 

The reduction in World Bank loans stemmed both from declining, 
contributions from some donor countries and the growing reluctance 
of poorer nations to assume new debts. 


bonds were issued, compared with 
165 in the first three months, with 
the volume dropping to $2036 bil- 
lion from $2250 billion. Tbe mar- 
ket share declined to 683 percent 
from 78.9 percent. 

Berliner Handels said the 
Bundesbank’s latest move to foster 
lower German interest rates 
through its open-matket operations 
in the domestic money market pro- 
vided hope that capital market 
yields would decline in the third 
quarter. 

While first class borrowers ore 
currently offering 10-year Euro- 
bonds with a coupon of about 7 
percent, the hank said they might 
well be able to offer lower rales 
than that during the third quarter. 
However, it added that the scope 
for a decline markedly below the 7- 
peroent coupon level was probably 
limited. 


CHARTER =r 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE" 

12V Ft. 12 ptisuns p< jwwherr 
MLV ml- flu. ncM in Crfi-ik KLinu*. 

Mediterranean Cruise, Lid. 

3 Statfiou Sl. Athens. 

Tel: 3236494. Tlx.: 222288. 


al offices “which bank accounts 
they were using to overdraft the 
branches.” 

Representative William J. 
Hughk, Democrat of New Jersey, 
the subcommittee chairman, stud 
the pane! will hear from “a variety 
of witnesses” in the Hutton case, 
induding Mr. Ball 

“Many have criticized the Justice 
Department for not proceeding 
against individuals,” Mr. Hughes 
said of Hutton’s guflty plea. “One 
of the purposes of these bearings is 
to review just that issue,” 

Mr. Castellano has said that he 
and other executives at Hutton 
“did not become aware of any im- 
proprieties” until May 1982, when 
they were asked by federal investi- 
gators about flagrant overdrafts. 

Hutton ordered tbe practices 
halted and ultimately agreed to pay 
a fine of S2 million and to reim- 
burse banks for millions erf dollars 
in interest-free loans obtained from 
the illegal “float.” 

Last month the Hutton group 
chairman, Robert M. Fomou, tola 
the Hughes subcommittee “I have 
absolutely no evidence” that senior 


company officials ha d been in- 
volved m illegal overdrafts. The 
Justice Department has taken the 
same position. 

Mr. Fomon said banks were will- 
ing to permit corporate customers 
such as Hutton to “overdraft on a 
day here or a day there." 

Mr. Fomon said that there was 
“nothing wrong with overdrafting 
as long as it isn't consistently an 
overdraft.” 

Peter Costiglio. a spokesman for 
Mr. Ball said tbe memos subpoe- 
naed by the House subcommittee 
“were reviewed by the Justice De- 
partment, and there is nothing in 
them which indicates an abuse in 
the system. They dealt only with 
procuural bookkeeping.” 

Although Hutton has contended 
that two unnamed middle-levd 
managers were partly responsible 
for excessive overdrafts, the firm 
has appointed former Griffin B. 
Bell a former U.S. attorney general 
and now a private attorney in At- 
lanta, to conduct his own review 
and make public a report later this 
summer. 


Dollar Higher 
InNewYork; 
Gold Steady 

(Mud Press InUmatkmal 

NEW YORK — Higher 
short- term interest rates and ev- 
idence of U.S. economic 
strength bdped the dollar move 
higher against most major cur- 
rencies Tuesday. Trading was 
thin before Thursday’s U3. In- 
dependence Day holiday and 
Friday's meeting of the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries in Vienna. 

Late New York prices and 
comparable Monday rates in- 
cluded: 23440 Swiss francs, 
down from 2.5520: 3.0400 
Deutsche marks, down from 
3.0460; 9.2650 French francs, 
up from 9.2625; 194030 Italian 
lire, up from 1936.00 and 
248.05 Japanese yen, un- 
changed. 

The pound was at SI. 3075, 
up from $13045 on Monday. 

Republic National Bank 
dosed gold at S3 1035 an ounce, 
up from $309.75 Monday. 


flPTAPMAN 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE ' 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTREND II 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF 5100.000 
ON JANUARY! 

OF EACH YEAR 

ywktetf the Wowing 
aftaraJl charges: 

IN 19*0! +135% 

IN 1981: +13?% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: —24% 

IN 1984: -44% 

set 

JUNE 27, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT ' 

U.S. $88,333.99 

Cal or wnte Royal Frazier ar 
TAFMAN. Trend Analyse and 
ftrdofo Management, inc^ 
Vta Stmt Plaza New Mxk. 
NSW '&* 50006 212 - 269-1041 
Tetax BMt 667173 UW. 


CARRE, ORBAN & PARTNERS 

INTERNATIONAL 

management consultants 


are pleased to announce the appointment 
of 

PETER A.D. GIBUN 

as Group Chief Executive and Partner 


AMSTERDAM. BRUSSELS. 
DOSSELDORF. GENEVA. 
LONDON. MILAN. NEW YORK. 
PARIS. ROME. ZORICH 


34 St James’s Street 
Lo ndon S Wi 
UNITED KINGDOM 











Page 10 



Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 133586 134335 1329.19 1IUL01 — 3.13 

TMM m3? 3o8B 'Sto «38l + 1.17 

Ulll 16i21 16*34 14434 145.52 + 0-15 

Comp 55173 55736 SSD31 SS3J7-- <UD 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 
Ul I Idles 
industrials 


Advanced 
Occllnad 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Htflhs 
New Lows 
volume up 
volume down 


dm Prev. 

837 fDI 

754 <84 

440 438 

2031 201$ 

12? 13? 

U 11 

47.437.8 10 
47J42.140 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUIA 3, 1985 


NYSE index 


Composite 

industrials 

Tronso. 

Ufjiinn 

Finance 


Hiati low Close Ch*?4 
1112J5 HI 78 Jlia— 
12431 12653 1US —038 

no.?? na27 nag —0.14 
Afl.14 (£ JA 6039 — 0J5 
130. *6 12040 120-55 +WI 


ln »Tr.8 B 8ff !i ]ffl lG KKM ll 


■ 

Buy Soles 

•SKTt 


r — 196540 456JS3 

10038 


2U558 429042 

1,154 


mi75 MS30 

154* 


, — 194J7S 412581 

928 


204,178 447.1 IB 

1107 

'included In IM soles Hon res 



1 

iiesdaos 


N 

VS1 

E 

< 

Tosing 



VoldMPJA 11WWW 

Prev.4PJ8.voL 96477,080 

Prey axisofidaltd dose 117fl?TJW 


r antes include ftie nationwide prices 
up to the do si no on wall Street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via Jhe Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


Advanced 

Declined . 

Uncnonaed 

Total Issues 
New Hipns 
New Lows 
Volume ufl 
Volume down 


Standard & Poor's Index 


him Lew Close Cti’ee 
Industrials 21243 TTIjU 211 84 —Oil 

Trans* T7uo 1710? tar-au 

Utilities 88.03 B7JD 8750— MB 

Finance 214? 2313 2343 +009 

Composite 19241 171.84 19201 —042 


Cmruiotlte 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

UHiirtos 

Bonks 

Transo. 


Week 

Close caw *00 
290.91 4-143 392 JO 
30400 +008 29V 4* 
56(00 + 1.91 37404 
35142 Ml KU2 
J04JW — 032 28888 
29104 + 101 38703 
24405 4- 1.17 24006 


AMEX Sales 


4 Pjw. volume 
Preu.dPJUL volume 
Prev. cm. volume 


AMEX Most Actives 


.2% I'm 
»5ft 14'1 
4’- *** 

Si? w-* 

in* io* 
383* M 
5 ft 

wt 395% 
Ml 173% 

lift MIS 
UO IK* 
4ft 4 
1^ ft 
16-'* 1M 
11L. 1| 


Lint on. 

« 

■’S + T - 

lift — ■ 

ff* +-2 
jn! +"% 

T3H 

21% Z 5 

!» + '- 


AMEX Stock index 


Him Lew Owe 

23209 231.52 SB39 - M , 


NYSE Prices Finish Mixed 


16*. A 
3D’« 25ft A 


9S B5ft + ft 
84% B5* + ft 

VS 

IS 
2 
% 




S% It 

471%— 3% 

Itil 


12% 12ft 
19 


United Press fniernuuonal 

NEW YORK - Prices on ihe New York 
Slock Exchange finished mixed Tuesday, as the 
market stalled at the record levels attained in 
the previous three sessions. 

Bank stocks advanced, and aerospace issues 
continued to strengthen. 

The Dow Jones industrial average gave up 
3.13 to 1. 334.0 1. Advances topped declines by a 
ratio of 8-7. Volume increased to 1 1 i. I million 
shares from 96.1 million Monday. 

Analysts said the market was taking a breath- 
er in the historically dull Fourth of July week. 
Tuesday's trading left “very little to be in- 

? >ired abouL” said George Pirrone, of Dreyfus 
oro. 

The marker’s relative stall was pan of a 
“near-term topping phase." said Thomas Ep- 
person, of Wood, MacKenzie & Co„ New Or- 
leans. 

Investors are still looking for clarification on 
the economy, especially on the federal deficit, 
he said. But because alternatives to stocks are 
less attractive, ‘'it’s difficult to make a conscious 
switch from equities." 

The realization that the economy is not going 
into a recession has fueled the market's 
strength, said John Brooks, of Sbearson-Robin- 
son-Humphrey. Atlanta. 

Because yields in the bond market are lower, 
and defensive stock, groups, such as foods, are 
already higher, “you’re almost forced to funnel 
money into more aggressive" issues. 

Mr. Brooks said he expects to see stocks 
break past the 1,400-level by August. 

American Hospital Supply was the most ac- 
tive NYSE-listed issue, slipping to to 40to after 


the Justice Department said its merger with 
Hospital Corp. of America does not violate 
antitrust laws. 

Merrill Lynch followed, losing ft to 33ft. 
Federal National Mongage Association was 
third, unchanged at 2114. 

• Other financials firmed, with Citicoro gain- 
ing 1ft to 50ft, Bankers Trust 2ft to 72ft and 
First Boston Ift to S4. 

IBM feD ft to 124%. _ 

General Motors added ft to 73ft, Chrysler 
lost ft to 36ft and Ford fell ft to 45ft. 

Exxon continued to slide, losing ft to 51%. 
Among other oil stocks, Unocal slipped ft to 
29ft and Occidental Petroleum lost 1 to 32%. 

MCA added 3ft to 64ft and CBS advanced 
Iftio l!7ft. 

RCA Corp. fell lft to 46ft. 

General Dynamics, climbing lft to 77, led 
defense issues higher. Boeing tacked on 1 to 
46ft and McDonnell Douglas % to 78ft. 

Anheuser Busch added ft to 32%. 

Airlines improved. UAL jumped 1 to 55ft 
and Delta gained lft to 50ft. 

AMR shed % to 48ft after it said its American 
Airlines would develop a major hub at Raleagh- 
Dur ham, North Carolina, and that it expected 
to post record traffic results for June. 

Sperry added 1 to 53ft in active trading, on 
rumors that Ford would make a $65-a-share 
tender offer. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

Dome Petroleum led the actives, dosing un- 
changed at 2 5/16. Western Digital Mowed, 
climbing % to 14%. 

BAT Industries was third unchanged at 4ft. 


lift EmpDs 136 8.1 
4 EmP of JO 9JB 
EnExc 

2248 Errol C p 32 ZB 
18ft EnJsBu -56 I A 
17*3 Eraser eh LAO 64 
97 EitMAPflO.32 10.1 
20 EnsExn .AM 10 
11% E rarer 
?ft Enters 

ISH EntxE n I50el4j 
16 Entexin 150 68 
17%, EquhS 1.14 17 
2 U Eouimk 
111% Eamkpf 251 123 
2893 Eat Res 132 14 
?ft Eaultcn ,12 3 

91* Erbrtinl 59 15 

12% Ess Bin M 10 
lBli EwexC .BSfe 10 
151% Esfrtno .77 AM 
io»), Emyl I 51 U 
1% vIEvanP 
2 V, vlEvonnf 
31% vIEunpfB 
30ft ExCeto 132 4 A 
7316 Escelsr 154*1 LI 
38 Exxon 140 6 a 


8 39 2114 
rah 51% 

17 

? 13? 259% 

14 89 391% 

17 20*1 251a 

902102 

i68 m 
22 43 21% 

889 11% 
97 171% 
II 128 19 
17 35 30* 

528 4V» 
6 19V. 
b 911 47 % 
11 18? 14% 

15 149 12% 

13 80 22 

14 16 26% 

17 13S 18’4 

14 1177 25ft 

120 11% 
25 21% 

3 4 

10 127 39% 

34 J fl* 
810717 52V% 


211% 211%— V% 
5% 51% 

1% Vt 

25ft 25ft - Vi 
3W% 3V1k- ft 
241% 25 — Ik 
102 1132 +9. 

17ft 19ft — <6 
2 2 
114% lift 
171% 17ft + ft 
18ft 19 + ft 
30ft 30ft + 4% 
4 4ft- ft 
19 19 

47Vl 47ft 
16ft 14ft 
lift lift- ft 
2111 21ft- ft 
241 26ft + ft 
r/ft 1 7ft + ft 
2S 25 
lft 1ft— ft 
2ft 2ft — ft 
4 4 

3Sft 39ft + 1% 
16ft 14ft— ft 
51ft 51ft- ft 


r 


29 15ft 
*0ft 20ft 
27ft 14 
1 21 ft 42ft 
44V, 34 
IS 7ft 
*5 34 

2*1% 17 
26ft 17ft 
30ft 17ft 
44 36 

am 142% 

271% 10ft 
37 2«% 

12ft 8ft 
204% 13ft 
12ft 2ft 
lift 7ft 
23ft leu. 

20ft 15ft 
241% 16ft 
24ft 16ft 
54ft 43ft 
10 8 
«ft 1 
14% V, 

4ft lft 
*1 3Sft 

42 52ft 
48ft 36*% 

57ft 51 
311% 15ft 
34ft 241% 

43ft 23ft 

43 24 
56ft 401% 

39ft 31ft 
38ft 31ft 
37*% 29ft 
00 127 

Wft 53V; 

27ft 144% 
lift 7ft 
$4 27ft 
lift 10ft 
131% 5 

13ft 91% 

54 42 

Jgft 341% 

75 3*ft 
621% 50ft 
20U. 12ft 

27 20 a lea 
50ft 36ft OnB 
18ft 97ft ClnG 
341% 24 ClnG 
72ft 50 ClnG 
aft 39 ClnG 

73 48 ClnG 

74 50 ClnG 
77 Mft CklM 
37 23ft Clrcl 
31 18ft ClrCI 

28 ft 14ft cira 

SO 77V: Cilia 
81 49 ClHa 

43 ms cityii 
oft ci obi 
*ft a 
234% Cl 



m 


I9*i Lubnl 
24 Lubvsv 
16 UKkrS 

101% Lukem 


! B* i 

I'.y 






144% 1*4%— I* 
im 12ft— c 


20 JWT» 
23V. JRIver 
14 Jamswy 
101% JaraiF 
241% jeffPli 
24ft JerCof 
47 jerCol 
45ft JerCof 
79 JerCpf 
13 JerCof 
6 Jewrtcr 
28 JohnJa 
37ft JoiinCn 
2lft Joraen 
15% J arras 
211 & JovMfa 


1.12 U 18 
56 I-B 10 
.12 J ii 
1A49127 
15! U 4 
4.00 125 
mm 320 
788 115 
VJ30 I7J7 
21B 111 

29 

« 29 16 
B4J 9 

Tin 4.1 n 

JK 12 74. 
1.40 5J 14 


99 34 
1*69 32 
21 25ft 
123 lift 
338 43ft 
50Z 32 
285te 66ft 
10Z 63 
65OMfl0«. 
1 lift 
4 10ft 
5868 46 
234 « 


331% 34 + Ml 

31ft lift + 1% 
255* 25ft + ft 
lift 111% 

42ft 43ft— 1% 
32 32 

*41% 64ft +2 
63 63 

100ft 700ft +|ft 
MH» 18ft— ft 
10% 10% 

45% -gft— ft 
421% 42% + ft 
24ft 24ft — ft 
34ft 24ft— ft 
231% 231% 4- ft 








to 


33% 33% 
2ft 2% 

If 1 1?* 

33 33 

S On 
2 % 

Ji« 32 
Uft 41ft 

l*i ; 

S-sr 

a«- 


7r4*4? 


48 

13 

22 

255 

42 

1J6 

73 


142 

lift 

JO 

14 


864 

3» 

154 

43 

i 

107 

m 

M 

23 


397 

19* 




tm 

8* 




47 

3% 




81 


1.18k 


39 

21% 

140k 


75 

23* 




15 

27 

150 

5.7 

78 

430 

23ft 

256 

9.1 


W 

27* 

120 

4.9 

12 

4V3 

45% 

1.40 

24 

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33ft 

256 

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175 

128 


21 

29ft 




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17% 

56 

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15 

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1284 

74 

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241 

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12 

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s 

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30ft 



22 - 1 % 
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8* + ft 
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23% + ft 
24% 

22%- % 
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45% + ft 
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2m- «* 

31ft + ft 
14 A + ft 

29% 

88% 

171%— ft 
10ft- V. 

24%+% 

41% 

73% + ft 
lift— ft 
17ft + 1% 
29ft — 16 


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180 62 11 
» £8 17 
56 SJ 
156 3J 11 
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54 17 10 
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5* 15 22 

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6 

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138 35 11 
1J0 10.7 II 
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32 25 IB 
32 


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30 13221 
58 23 13 
50 15 16 
150 19 14 
24 

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150 44 11 
M 24 
150 45 

17 


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5553 29% 
S58 1% 

32 VK 
236 37ft 

39 14% 
143 21% 

sir 

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1805 10% 

41 ara 
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413 13% 
177 29V% 
240 30% 
16 17% 

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44 18ft 
84 25% 

r 7 12ft 
5592 23ft 
201 22% 
544 21ft 

45 lift 
401 15ft 
575 X% 
114 29ft 
746 54ft 

9 17% 
200 20 
’SI »% 

2U 18ft 

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42 30% 


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T% + ft 
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36%—% 
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27% + ft 
17% — ft 
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65% —lft 
35 — ft 
10 + % 
25%-% 
24 + ft 

30% +1% 
37%- %- 
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29 

34%-% 
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10 
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191* —4% 
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15ft— ft 
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54% - ft 
17% 

19% 

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31 - ft 
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55 
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33 


















































































































Page 11 


iV.‘» ~wV» g-"..;* 




I BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


1 


>y ., 


■-•.„■ 'm j 

—■■; ' 


irn^ERNATlONAL BERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 


For U.S. Exceed 1984 


- . ’ Reacts 

} - DETROIT — With the contia- 
•: ued*ippprt of a robust market, (he 
JJjS- aoiomotuk industry is sched- 
: uBng production of new cars in (he 

• second half of 1985 ahead of last 

• year's strong pace, industry sources 

- ^Snles of Axoerican-buili cars in 
tbe first half of this year exceeded 
last year's rate ana would have 

, been even stronger but for a dn^j in 
output at General Motors Corp^ 

- where strikes late in 1984 disrupted 

- operations and had after-effects 

• thatit carried over into this year. 

' Industry sources said GM has 

■ scheduled U.S. production of ncar- 
" jy 300,000 more cars in the last half" 
! pf-?985 than it did a year earlier. 

Fur the industry as a whole this win 
' more than offset lower output 
pfenoed by Ford Motor Co. and 
' Chester Cprp. 

GM. the sources said, expcctscar 
/output of 2.244,000 units for the 
second half of this year, up 14.5 
percent from the 1,960,000 built a 
‘ year earlier. 

Ford projects its car production 

■ in die usl six months of 1985 at 

702.000 units. 17.4 percent fewer 
; than last year's 850,000. 

• Chrysler expects to be roughly 
even with last year’s second-half 
production, with plans to buQd 

344.000 cars, off 23 percent from 
i 1884* SS7J0UO units. 

Adding production by smaller 
contpames such as American Mo- 
tors Corp., Volkswagen of Ameri- 
ca, American Honda, Nissan and 
ihe new United Motor partnership 
of -Toyota and GM, U.S.-based 
compames are expected to build 


3,756,000 cars in die second half, 
up 5.6 percent frost 3456,000 both 
a year earlier. 

If these plans hold up, analysts 
said, manufacturers will buQd 
about 8.16 million cars in 1985, a 5- 
percent increase over 1984 and the 
industry's best production since 
1979, mien slightly more than , 8.4 
million cars were built. 

Industry sources said GM has 
scheduled particularly heavy car 
production in the third quarter, 
which traditionally has been the 
industry's weakest because of the 
summer vacation period «nd die 
revamping of plants for model 
changeover in advance of the new 
selling year. 

’‘Employment and consumer 
confidence levels scan to be favor- 
able, interest rates have come 
down” and gasoline prices are no 
problem, said Harry Stark, editor 
of the authoritative Ward's Auto- 
motive Reports, which monitors 
auto production. 

Analysts said Detroit wants, to 
sdl as many cars as it can before 
Japanese competition boos up. Ja- 
pan is expected to take an increas- 
ing share of the U.S. car market 
now that Washington and Tokyo 
have permitted a four-year-old im- 
port quota program to lapse. 

Wall Street analysts expect De- 
troit’s profits to dedine this year by 
as much as $2 billion from the 
record 59.8 billion the Big Three 
earned in 1984. That would still 
give the American industry its sec- 
ond strongest financial results in 
history. 

The expats remain sharply di- 
vided on the outlook for 1986. 


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Toyota Says 
It May Open 
Own U.S. Plant 

Rouen 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor 
Cop., is considering opening a 
wholly owned car plant in Sic 
United States but has not de- 
rided mi details, a company 
spokesman said Monday. 

■ Nihon Kebu i Shimhim, a 
daily Japanese business news- 
paper, reported that Toyota is 
looking for land in the Ameri- 
can Midwest to open a factory 
by mid- 1988 to mate 200,000 
cars a year of 2^)00 to 2,600 
cubic centimeter engine capaci- 
ty, which would be in the com- 
pact range, turning later to 
standard-size cars with a capac- 
ity of 3,000 to 4,000 cubic centi- 
meters. 

Toyota and General Motors 
Carp, already have announced 
jdans to make up to 200,000 
can a year for 12 years in a 
50-50 joint venture at a farmer 
GM factory in Fremont, Cali- 
fornia. 


BNQC Stops Purchasing Oil 
Under Participation Pacts 


Reuters 

LONDON — British National 
Oil Coro, the govenunmt-owned 
oQ-tradmg company, said Tuesday 
that it had arranged with its suppli- 
ers to stop-buying virtually all the 
ail to which ii was formerly entitled 
. under its partiopaDon agreements . 
The British government is gradual- 
ly dosing down BNOC and return- 
ing its functions to the private sec- 
tor. ‘ 

Until early tins year, BNOC was 
obliged to buy 51 percent of all 
Batch oO output, now averaging 
around 2.7 ‘million bands a day. 
However, it has been reducing its 
commitments ahead of the aboli- 
tion planned for BNOC later in 
1985. 

A spokesman for BNOC said it 
wonld not set a price for July deliv- 
eries from its suppliers. Its last 
price was S26.65 a barrel for June 
deliveries of its main Brent Field 
blend. 

The spokesman said BNOC was 
still negotiating the wind-down of 
purchases under long-term ar- 
rangements. Industry sources esti- 
mated that BNOC had been han- 


dling 100,000 to 200,000 barrels a 
day under these arrangements. Un- 
der the procedures, small, indepen- 
dent producers with no marketing 
facilities of their own sell the cor- 
poration their foil output, not sim- 
ply the 51 percent due under the 
participation agreements. 

In recent discusaans with Coun- 
ty Bank Ltd. and (he stockbroker- 
age of Field, Newson-Smith over 
the proposed fonnaucm of a North 
Sea oil-marketing cooperative to 
replace BNOC functions, some 
sniail producers s aid they intended 
to continue their marVpHng ar- 
rangements with a BNOC succes- 
sor. 

But the government has said the 
planned government-owned oil 
and pipelines agency, winch is due 
to replace BNOC, would not act as 
an agent for small producers that 
currently sell their output through 
BNOC 

The spokesman said the suspen- 
sion of dl acquisitions under par- 
ticipation agreements applied also 
to liquefied petroleum gas, for 
which BNOC formerly set quarter- 
ly prices. 


Mesa to Report Gain on Unocal Fight 


By Nancy Rivera 

Lot Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Countering 
predictions that it would lose mil- 
lions,- Mesa Petroleum Co. said 
Monday that it will report an S83- 
mflKon after- tax gain on its thwart- 
ed bid to take over Unocal Carp, 
for the second quarter, ended Jane 
30. 

Analysts had predicted that an 
investor group lea by Mesa and its 
chairman, T. Boone Pickens, would 
have a loss of between 540 mxlBon 
and $60 million because of the 
enormous costs of trying to take 
over the oO company, bared here. 

Mesa has denied that it would 
show a loss since the battle with 
Unocal ended in late May. 

Under the settlement, Unocal 
was to boy back about one-third of 
its stock with securities valued at 
572 per share. In exchange, the 
Mesa n Partners investor group 
agree d to end its takeover attempt 
and to vote its remaining shares 
with the majority of other Unocal 
shareholders. 

Instead of losing money. Mesa 
Petroleum, which accounted for 
more than 90 percent of the inves- 
tor group, could earn more than 
583 mini on if the price of Unocal’s 


pnrV rises, i wid Sidney Tassin, as- 
sistant to the financial vice presi- 
dent at Mesa. On the New York 
Stock Exchange; UnocaTs stock 
dosed Monday at 529.75, up 50 
cents. 

Executives at Mesa, based in. 
Amarillo, Texas, believe that the 
price of UnocaTs stock wiD rise, 
especially in light of a master limit- 
ed partnership that Unocal is form- 
ing, Mr. Tasnn said. 

Mesa achieved a profit from the 
hostile, three-month takeover bat- 
tie by malting a gain an the sale of 
its Unocal notes and through same 
dever tax a coptmting. The tax 
strategy will allow Mesa to realize 
about 5200 miTHn n in benefits from 
a arable capital loss to be recorded 
in 1 986 when Mesa sells its remain- 
ing 14.6 million Unocal shares: 

Mesa is treating the exchange of 
its 7.8 miffion Unocal shares for 
notes with a $56 5-miHion face val- 
ue as a dividend rather than as a 
sale of dock. As a result, a large 
portion of the valne of the notes 
will be taxed at the mare favorable 
corporate dividend rale. Mesa has 
sold the notes for 5589.4 million, a 
roughly 5255-milfioa gain over the 
cost of acquiring shares. 

If Mesa holds its Unocal stock 


for at least one year, the tax basis of 
the shares it has f^rJiang^H will be 
combined with the tax basis of the 
14.6 miDion Unocal shares that it 
still owns. 

The result, Mr. Tassin said, 
would be a “very big” capital loss 
that could be used to offset part of 
the capital gains frontMesa’s previ- 
ous takeover attempts far a net 
benefit of about $200 mflHon. 

Mesa also is writing off about 
$60 million in expenses in the sec- 
ond quarter, plus roughly $300 mil- 
lion because it marked its 14.6 mil- 
lion Unocal shares down to the 
current market value of about 529 
per share. 

“It sounds to me like pretty fan- 
cy footwork,” said Bruce Lazier, an 
analyst with Prescott, Ball & Tur- 
ben. “I think it might be something 
that the IRS might challenge.” 

M. Craig Schwerdl, an oil indus- 
try analyst with Los Angdes-based 
Morgan, Olmstead, Kennedy & 
Gardner, said Mesa was “taking 
their loss and making die taxpayers 
pick it up." 

Mr. Tassin said (hat Mesa's 
strategy “isn’t some trick that we 
foundm the back or the book. This 
is described by Unocal on page 15 
of its (exchange) offer.” 


American Express Is Shifting Focus 


Wjridw.Sr fed Lrt. v — Si«W Pi’HH •Kl-Z'W 07«lKI. 9W,y 


(Co ntinued from Plage 9) 
ble a giant American Express trav- 
eler's check that bears — as do the 
real checks — Mr. Gerstner’s signa- 
ture. 

“We’re a hard-working crew” he 
said, in an imerview the day after 
hi* promotion. “But we take that in 
stride. And we are positioned bet- 
ter than any other company to take 
advantage of where the industry is 
going. We have a dear consumer 
franchise. We are accepted as a 
deliverer of high-quality financial 
services, and weSw got entrepre- 
neurial tnanagemwit that «w react 
quickly and is capable of taking 
risk in a ^-hang in g marketplace." 

Perhaps the biggest decision be- 
fore American Express's top man- 
agement will be how to invest the 
proceeds from the sale of Fire- 
man’s Fund and beam its share in 
Warner A max, a money-losing car 
We-tdevision venture. WaD Street 
is keeping a dose watch. 

*Tbe lag question is what wifl 
they do with that money,” said 
June Hoffer, an analyst with Pru- 
dent: al-Bache Securities. “They 
seem to have no plans for the short 
term.” The conmany said last week 
that it would seu most of Fireman’s 
Fund's troubled property and casu- 
alty bu s i ness In a stock offering 
that analysts estimate could bring 
in $1.8 billion, potentially one of 
the largest undid stock offerings 
ever. 

Additional money should come 
in from Warner Amex. Mr. 
Gerstner said the company will re- 
ceive notice “within a week” from 
its partner, Warner Communica- 
tions, on whether Warner will buy 
American Express’s stake or 
whether the entire joint ^ venture will 
be sold to someone else. An earb'er 
nunored boyar — a joint endeavor 
of Tune Inc. and Tele-Commumca- 
tions Inc. — was said to have of- 
fered $750 million in cash and the 
assumption of $500 million in debt 
But there have been no further in- 
dications that the agreement will go 

through. 

One thing is dean American Ex- 
press is not planning major acquisi- 
tions comparable to the trig-ticket 
companies it purchased in the past 
two years. During that period, it 
acquired the venerable Wall Street 
firm t/*man Brothers K uhn L oeb 
for 5360 millio n; it paid $727 mO- 
Eon for Minneapolis-based IDS fi- 
nancial Services, a marketer of per- 
sonal financial-planning products, 
and it bought Trade Development 
Bank, a Swiss-based private bask, 
for S52Q million. The purchases are 
still being blended into the compa- 
! ny, some more smoothly than oih- 
! ers, coding acquisition fever. And 
I the experience with Warner Amex 
! has been sobering. “With the bene- 
fit of hindsight, that was not a good 
investment," Mr. Gerstner said. 

“We’ve got no current pirns to 
make any acquisitions," he said. 
“We went through a tough-minded 
strategic review over the last six 
mouths, and we’re very pleased 
with the hand we've got in the fi- 
nancial-services poker game. 1 
don't see any major niches that we 
will have to fill with acquisitions.” 


The Major Activities 
Off American Express 

Revenue* (pte 9aen»ntS} and net mconM 
OieigM of eegnents) for Anerican 
Express's major files of bushes*. 
Mdse ere In masons of dofera 


MenatkMBi 

BanUns 


LAS. Financial 



Still, he left the door open: “This 
company vrill always be opportun- 
ist and entrepreneurial and Fm 
snre we'd do an acquisition if some- 

thing Aff HlTu L” 

But the first priority in spending 
the money, be said, wfll be to invest 
in the company's existing business- 
es and to restructure its balance 
sheet by retiring scone debt and 
buying bade some stock. Such a 
move could win favor with inves- 
tors. “1 would prefer that there be 
no more acquisitions,” said Miss 
Hoffer of Prudential-Bacbe. “Anar 
lysts like to see a buyback of 
stock.” 

For two years, derisions like 
these have fallen to Mr. Gerstner, 
Mr. Weill and Mr. Robinson, who 
formed the company’s policy com- 
mittee, similar to. an cfficc o/ the 
dnef executive. This troika passed 
on all trig corporate derisions. As 
No. 1, Mr. Robinson oversaw 
Shearson Lehman Brothers and the 
company's international banking 
operations. As No. Z Mr. Weill 
supervised fireman’s Fund and 
IDSL Mr. Gerstner, Na 3, was chid 
executive of the Travel Related Ser- 
vices subsidiary — credit cards, 
traveler’s checks and travel agen- 
cies. He was also assigned responsi- 
bility for Warner Amex. 

The offices trf the three were 
within shouting distance of one an- 
other, which fostered fluid policy 
making. The three men caflanoral- 
ed on major derisions and often 
socialized in their off-hours. But 
during the course of this year, Mr. 
Gerstner’s rote started to expand. 
Already the company's driri strate- 
gist, he took over the corporate 
finance fractious — tax, treasury, 
acco u n ti n g and auditing — from 
Mr. Weil 

Where Mr. Weill thrives on deal- 
making and working alone, Mr. 
Gerstner is comfortable with cor- 
porate projects ami teamwork. The 
years Mr. Gerstner spent in a ser- 
vice company have given him po- 


1h» Nnr Yerfc Toms 

lish and a sensitivity to working 
with people. 

“Lou is the perfect guy for 
American Express, especially since 
the firm is getting out of the deal 
business,” said a investment bank- 
er dose to the company. “They’ve 
accumulated a significant pile of 
assets, but they have not integrated 
item. They don’t need a guy doing 
deals. They need someone with a 
management focus." 

Mr. Gerstner, who is generally 
described as a quick study, was an 
a last trade at McKinsey. He made 
partner in a mere four years, two or 
three less than the norm and, while 
still a young associate, led (he 
firm's financial-services group. 

Ctosest to Mr. Gerstner’s heart is 
Travel Related Services. It is the 
heartbeat of American Express as 
well, the biggest and most profit- 
able ctf the company’s many busi- 
nesses. In 1984, fm instance, it ac- 
counted feff more than half, or 5387 
million, of the emmany’s 5610-mil- 
lion-net income. Inis pattern con- 
tinued in 1985 1 s first quarter, dur- 
ing which Mr. Gerstner’s 


subsidiary provided $86 minion of 
the company's 5152-million net in- 
come. 

The division's biggest and best- 
known product is the American Ex- 
press Gird, which rang up 550 bil- 
lion in purchases last year in 46l 
million separate transactions. It is 
the card most used by Americans, 
followed by the Sean card and the 
Gticqrp’s combinati o n of Visa, 
Mastercard, Diner’s, Carte 
Blaadie, Choice and private label 
cards. 

The card is a huge source of 
profits. Last year, it alone earned 
5317 million on revenues of $2.8 
billioii, according to estimates from 
fiist Boston Carp. And despite 
those who say the card cannot ex- 
pand endlessly, it has displayed re- 
markable growth; hs earnings have 
risen by about 31 percent ammaBy 
in the past five years. 


Group Sets 

Planfor 

Channel 

Caaptfed by Oar Staff From Dtspadta 

LONDON — A British: 
based consortium unveiled mi 
Tuesday a £2-biflion ($2.6- bil- 
lion) plan to construct a twin- 
bore rail tunnel linking the two 
countries under the English 
Channel and disclosed French 
backing. 

The rfiftiTman of the Channel 
Tunnel Group, Sir Nicholas 
Henderson, said (he rail system 
would transport cars and trucks 
between terminals at Cberiton 
near Folkestone on the south- 
ern English coast and Sangatte 
near Calais 

Shuttle trains would leave ev- 
ery five minutes and the tiro 
would last 30 minutes, he said. 
The consortium said the link 
would take four and a half years 
to buikL 

Channel Tunnel, which is led 
by the British contractors Cos- 
tain, Tarmac. Taylor Woodrow 
and Wimpey, said it had been 
joined by five French construc- 
tion companies and three 
banks. 

The contractors were identi- 
fied as Bouygues, Dumez, So- 
c&& Arodliare (TEntreprises, 
Socfcte Generate (TEntreprises 
and Spie Barignolles, and the 
banks as Credit Lyonnais, Ban- 
que Indosuez and Banque Na- 
tkraale de Paris. 

Proposals fm the tumid are 
doe OcL 31. The British and 
French governments are to se- 
lect a plan before the end of the 
year, and construction is ex- 
pected to bran in 1986. 

flann el T nnneP s principal 
rival is Euroroute Ltd, another , 
Anglo-French consortium. i 
(AP. UPI ) ! 


Pilots’ Union Supports Icahn 
In Effort to Take Over T WA 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The Air 
Line Pilots Association, stepping 
up its efforts to thwart a TWAInc. 
takeover bid by Texas Air Corp, 
granted pay and benefit conces- 
sions Tuesday to Carl C Icahn to 
support his competing bid for the 
amine, the union said Tuesday. 

Under the plan, the pilots' union 
would take a share of common 
stock and profits. 

The union said its members 
agreed to grant wage and benefit 
reductions of up to 20 percent if 
Mr. Icahn is successful in his take- 
over bid for TWA. 

The union said the agreement 
has been ratified by its executive 
council, and. is subject to comple- 
tion of comparable agreements be- 
tween Mr. Icahn and other TWA 
unions. 

Exxon to Appeal 
Order to Refund 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Exxon 
Ccnp. said Tuesday that it will ap- 
peal a ruling by a special federal 
court ordering it to pay $1.9 billion 
in refunds rad interest for over- 
pricing crude ofl from aTexas Add. 

An Exxon spokesman, Henry 
Beathard, said the world’s largest 
company would file a motion ask- 
ing the Temporary Emergency 
Court of Appeals to reconsider its 
ruling. In Houston, S. J. Reso. Ex- 
xon executive vice president, said 
the case should not have been de- 
cided without a trial 

The court, appointed to resolve 
disputes over federal price controls 
that existed in the 1970s, upheld mi 
Monday a ] 983 federal court rating 
ordering Exxon to pay 5895 million 
for overpricing cal from its Haw- 
kins field near Tyler, Texas. 


The union said the agreement 
requires concessions to nut through 
the year 1988, and provides that the 
members of all the TWA uruons 
receive 20 percent of TWA com- 
mon stock and profits. The pilots 
said that in return they would re- 
ceive a share of the 20 percent of 
the TWA common stock. 

The union said they believe the 
concessions will allow Mr. Icahn to 
acquire TWA on terms more favor- 
able to shareholders than those of- 
fered by Texas Air. 

The source said that under the 
agreement tie unions would end up 
with a 20-percem ownership of a 
privately held company-beaded by 
Mr. t rain, and would receive 20 
percent of the company’s profits. 

A spokesman for the union ex- 
plained, “we don’t like [Texas Air 
Chairman] Frank Lorenzo,” citing 
his pan in having Continental Air- 
lines seek protection from its credi- 
tors under federal bankruptcy laws 
and rescinding agreements with pi- 
lots and other onions. 


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Tuesdays 

MSE 

Closing: 

Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


hmi Lew sme* Die. ym. pe Wh High low art- cnee 


(Continued from Page 10) 


17 Morin 
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cw» via PE 100s Wad Low Quoi. OVgf 


a* 73 RekhC jo 2X n ig »to 39to W* 
v\ Jto BepAir 12 t J? 

7 Ua RccAwl 228 14k 14k 144+14 

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ilw !+«• lowfwns _+B 3 


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32U 24 Orion pf VS 86 Hi 

3H% 184k Outbd** 64 U 9 198 

33*4 18*4 OvmTr .17 72 11 S3 

1* 13 OwShlP JO II II W1 

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4844 34*4 Owefllli 1J0 18 10 1883 

I5to 10*4 Ox lord M 3.1 13 St 


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32to J3 32*4 — *4 
224k 22»4 22K>— <4 
3244 32 32*4 + <4 

14 ISVi 16 + '*i 

35*4 35 35*4 + 44 

471% 47*4 47’k + '4 

14*4 14 14 


5191) 2094 Tretwik 1X0 


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33*4 Phil 
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34 — *4 
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27 — ’A 
9*4 

11 — *4 
37 — 1V4 
24*4— V4 
33**- V. 
43 — Vj 

31*4— V4 
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11*4 + *4 
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27V; — <ft 
44*4 + Vi 
38*4— 14 
12*4 + *4 
32*4— 14 
60k. + V% 
41*4— *4 
13*4— 14 
41*4— *4 
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16*4 + 14 
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23*4 + » 1 
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42*4— *4 
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53*4 + *4 
37*4— *4 
103*4— *4 
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37 37 

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37*. 37*4 — *4 
6*4 6*4 + to 

12*4 12*6 
1894 19 
<2*4 47*4 + to 
60*4 60*4 + *4 
36*4 37 + Mi 

31*4 3154 
13*4 131% + to 

69*4 + Hi 
69*4 +194 
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LLSiRitiires 


2 

S £K° s tg2 n Hiph uw cm* as. 


Grains 




2005 

1980 

2005 

2068 

2043 

2050 

2058 

2020 

2837 


2029 

20*6 

2475 

20SS 

2055 

209 

2052 

2060 

3777 

2095 


SQYBRAH OIL (CUT) 

soeoo rw- delta rm perl 00 n».„ 

3Z72 2270 Jul 29J5 2964 

3155 2250 A UP m.15 2829 

31.10 2258 SeO Z7.15 27.30 

3137 22W Ocf 2+3S 2+J7 

29-55 2290 Dec 2 SJg 2SJ3 

29JT7 2X60 Jan H95 25.12 

2X60 2+40 Mar 2475 2+95 

Z7.45 2+20 MOy 2+60 2+BO 

2535 2195 Jul 2+30 2+3S 

25.15 2+15 A»l* 

Est. Sotos Prev.Sale* U835 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 60222 up 366 


29-36 29+4 —.12 

2753 28.11 —.17 

2653 27.12 —.12 

2485 2+25 — X7 

23.17 2S+0 +03 

2+90 2SJJ0 +X5 
2+61 2+94 +.17 

2+48 2+7D +05 

2+20 2+33 +JJ3 
2+00 +07 


SUGAR* ORLD 11 OtYCSCG) 
iiZ000!Ds.-ce«it»perib, 

S 3 % & i g [* £ 

3 SA | | g g 

7.15 3JB May W W 5^ Uj 

+69 179 Jul 194 1« MS 3X3 

+94 +05 Oct *20 +» 4W A ,D 

Est. Sales +350 Prev. Sales 3349 
Prey. Dav Ooen Inf. 81J35 ohm 

cocoa cnycscri 

1 0 metric tans- S per ton 

2400 1U3 Jul 1940 2D0S V990 SB 


2190 1W5 Mar 3U3 £060 

2130 i960 May 2475 247$ 

71*0 1960 Jul 2052 20S7 

2330 2073 5ep 

2060 2055 Dec 

Est, Sales Prev.Sale* +404 

Prev. Dav Open int. 21634 uon» 

ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15X00 ib+-ceals per lb. _ 

18+85 t38J0 Jul 141X0 M JO 

ibao uSxo Sep 137J0 nwo 

181 DO 132J0 NOV 13+90 IK6S 

180X0 13100 Jan m35 3365 

177 JO 13100 Mar 13315 13125 

142JD 13+45 Mar 

157 JO 14120 Jul 

180J0 179J5 Saw 

NOV _ . 

Est. Sates ISO Prev. Sales 282 
Prev, Day Open Int. 5613 Off 91 


Metals 


COPPER (COMEXl 

25600 ita^canls per lb. 

B8JS 57 DO -UP 5125 58JS 

59 JO 5+65 Auo 

62.10 57 JO SOP 59.15 SMS 

lu-TX 5BJ0 Dec 6X10 6X30 


13175 140J0 
13+30 137.15 
13+30 13+90 
13125 13145 
13125 13X45 
13X45 
13X45 
13X+5 
13X45 


62.10 57 JO SOP 59.15 SMS 

si- n 5BJ0 Dec 6X10 6X30 

8 <55 99 JO Jan 6X45 4X45 

6XX 5960 Mar 61X0 6125 

7+00 61.10 MOY 61J5 41-55 

7+40 61 JO Jul 6X05 62J0 

7X90 6230 S«P 62J0 62J5 

TO JO 6X75 Dec 

7X20 65J0 Jen 

67XK 6+45 Mar 

MOV 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales +819 

prev, Day Open Int. 8+677 011236 


Industrials 


24*4 + Ui 
4lto + 1% 


13*4 +lto 
1814 + to 


14*4 + to 
2914 + 14. 
3] +to 


34 21*4 1 

12to 544 * 
234% 14 ' 

4to 2*4. ' 
3814 19 ' 

3to 214 ' 
46 Va 34*4 ' 
13*k Vto 1 
2594 17*4 ' 
B14 3*4 * 
11*4 B*k ’ 
51*4 28 ' 

72to 54 
78 Mi 67*4 

91*k 49 ’ 

73 S2to 
48 SI 
70to S2to 
23 '4 1184 
45 Vj 28*4 ' 
74<4 alto 


1.12 2 9 10 
144 1+8 


3 33K 
* M |S 

UOalOJ 
M IX 21 
1 7J2 1X7 

’ 160 IflJ 
9J5 10J 
7J2 11D 
7 JO 1X9 
[ 745 10J 

ll 

2J0 X6 13 


132* 3814 
1831 12tt 

so zrw 

1^ 
32 3*4 
485 30 
106 llto 
153 19*4 
237 914 

32 11*4 
484 47*4 
299Z 72 
79 

13SQZ 90*4 
3002 70 
51 BO* 07 
27B0Z 4914 
257 22*4 
3 4294 
27-78 


37*4 38 +to 
12*4 12*4 + »4 
2294 2314 + *4 
2to 2to + to 
22*4 2284 + *4 
2*4 2*4 
2*to 38 + to 

11*4 ll*k— to 
1814 1914— *4 
8*4 914 + to 
llto llto— to 
47to 47*4—14 
72 72 

79 79 +1 

90V4 90*4 + 1% 
70 70 

60 66 —3 

6914 0914— to 
22 23*4 +114 

42*4 4Zto + to 
77*4 71 + 14 


1J4 11.1 

.12 .7 24 

128 +9 42 


f t* 29to OuakOs TJ4 1A 15 6o? s*t S2 Hlj 

to 90V} QuoOpf 9 JO 9J IDzlMJ* 103to Igto +1 

V. 15 duaKSO JO 36 30 219 22*4 23*4 22*4— '■* 

1X5 6*% Oucne* W 397 7+ TV ,n« 

23 Queslar IJO 5J id *30 31 to Jlto 31*-- % 

35 to 14 QkRefl MO ID IS 408 23*4 23 23*4—14 


1014 6'- RBlnd 
4914 »■« RCA 
357*1 24*4 RCA Pf 
37*u 30 RCA Df 
9*4 6% RLC 

4*k 3 RPC 

lBto 12V RTE 
12*4 7 RattiCB 

40to 25+. RalSPur 
8V 5*4 Ramad 
3l*i> lOto Ranco 
7*4 2'4[ RanorO 
oo 47 1 - Raven* 
17*4 9'v Roymr 

SOto 35 Ravthn 1 
11*4 7*4 ReadBI 

21 to 10*4 RdBofPt! 
1«1 m II RltRef 1 
ITU S*k RecnEq 
12*4 7to Red m<i 
9'4 7to Reece 
1*4 *4 Reaal 


BV B*i 
48*4 40to 
35 34’» 

Srk 37*4 
71. 7*4 

3*4 3 Vs 
1B*» 18to 
12 "4 12*4 
44*4 *4’ . 
7V* 714 
17*. I7*i 
3’V 3 
63 62’* 

li>v llto 
M' i 491. 
Sto 8>1 
18V I7'4 
13*4 13*4 
11 U 11 
9»- 8to 
9J4 9V 


81. 

MVj — 1V4 
34V- *4 
3774 + *4 
71. + to 
J*»— to 
18+. + to 
121- 

44i«— to 

754 

17V- 

314 

624 

11*i 

50 

8*4— to I 
18V + to 
13*4 + V| 
11 

•to + to 

'%-V, 


Eamiiigs 

Revenue ana orolltL In millions, art in total currencies 
unleas otherwise wfiieotea. 


»to 34*4 

35 24to 
l?to 7to 
20 llto 

2574 17to 
81 to 03(4 
150 116V 

7to 2*4 
77*4 52to 
19*4 I3to 
21*4 IS 
7V*k 44*. 
30 IlV 
15*4 12*4 
OSto 5114 
S'- 2to 

302 to 771 

34 lito 
48to 24to 

83*. 60 
35V 20 

1«* 9*4 
29V TOto 
4fJV 31to 
38*4 31 to 
40'4 31 to 
39 201% 

57 52 

34*e a 
147*k 80V 
3*4 I 
24*4 15*k 
39 Wto 
3lto 21 
4's J 
55 27 

00 39*k 

48to 24+ 
into 5to 
28to 1«*4 
Oto 28' . 
I8to 12*4 
25*4 134. 
23to 14 V 

24to 13*. 

lOto 5*4 
60*4 2n> 
23to 12*4 
58'. 34 V 
S8to 40 
•to 4*4 

71 7% 

39to 76*4 


TGIF 

TNP 

TRE 

TRW 

TRW pr 

TacBoof 

Tattard 

Tolley 

rellevof 

Tombed 

Tandy 

TndYCtt 

Teklrnx 

Talcam 

Teldyn 

Telrate 

Teto* 

Tcmain 

Tennca 

Tone pr 

Terdvn 

Tesorcr 

Te*orof 

Texaco 

TrABc 

Te«Cm 

TexEsf 

TxETpl 

Texlnd 

Texlnsl 

Texlnl 

TexQGs 

TkPpc 

TetUill 

Texfl In 

Textron 

Temlrpf 

Tc»lr pf 

Tnack 

TnermE 

ThmBis 

Thomm 

ThmMed 

Thrllty 

Tldwtr 

Tiger In 

Time 

T.mpfx 

TimeM 

Timken 

Titan 

Tlfonpf 

ToaShP 


-2fle J 
2J* U 9 

15 

1J5 OJ 10 
1X0 +0 17 
iOO +0 11 
+50 32 

1.12 1J 14 
.10e J 14 
1X0 +9 
X20 +0 15 
10 
13 

U» 1J 9 
0 
10 

J2 1J 20 

11 

A II I 
2.92 7X 12 
7+0 8.9 

II 

+0 3X 
Z16 9J 
100 ELO 35 
1J2 +7 8 
136 +9 6 
:x 6l 4 9 
A29911J 
XOb 19 13 
100 10 10 

.18 1.1 10 
+0 1-3 20 
252 83 7 

1J0 33 13 
108 15 
MO 19 

93 

25 

136 18 IS 
+A) 4.1 10 
+0 25 0 
AO 18 14 
.90 63 

1J» 1 J 17 

16 

136 2+ 17 
IXOa 3J IS 


87 3774 37*4 
S37 35*4 3494 
67 10 914 

35 20 19*4 

75 2S*4 25V4 
705 731% 75 
2 139Vj 13994 
8S 2*% 2*4 
81 74to 74 
83 llto 18*6 
12 20*4 20M 
122 81 BO 
4372 35*k 3494 
40 1«V 14J% 
737 6! 60to 
17 3*6 3*4 

85 259V) 257 

206 19 to 18*4 
1488 40*4 38to 
751 35 3494 

2308 4114 41to 

isti ^;g*4 
119 lDto lOto 
16 23*4 2394 
3165 37*4 36*4 
42 32*4 Bto 
423 3194 31*4 
964 35*4 3494 
35 551% SSto 
52 27*4 271% 
1101 99*k 9Sto 
1249 214 2V4 
1931 lOto 16 

5 3144 3194 
3824 30to 30*4 

74 3*4 3*4 

1009 54*0 54V 
7 59*k 591% 

6 4 8to 48*6 

2 9*4 9to 

90 2844 28V 
311 36V 35V 
38 16*4 16*4 
234 loto 169% 
214 2114 21*4 

86 14*4 14 V 
1639 TV 094 
1316 57V 56* 
3S1 189% 1794 

68*8 STto 57*4 
390 49to 49 
174 7*0 7Vi 

2 10*. 10*4 

3 X 30 


S2 + *% 

914 

i^to— 114 

2V1 

74V4 + V 
18*4 + V 
JOto + V 
80*4 + *4 
14V— *4 
14V + JJi 
618% + to 
3(% 

25814— to 
19V + *4 
39V— 1 
35 +1 

4144 
83 

23*4 + V 
lOto— *4 
23*9 + to 
37*4 + ** 
32*4 — *4 
31V + to 
34*4—1 
5514— V 
271% + *k 
9«to— *4 
2to— *4 
T6to + V 
llto + to 
JO to— to 
3*6 + to 
54 V— *« 
59*4— to 
<8*4— *4 
9 V— V 
25*4— V% 
3514 + V 
16V 

1614— to 
21*4— to 
14V— V 
7*4— to 
57Vt + to | 
18*4 + V 
57** 

49*4 — *4 
7*4 

10V— to 
30 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40x00 ibv- cents per tb; 

67+7 54JS Auo 56J0 58-25 

A5LJB .57.75 Oa 57X0 5X90 

67*5 6X05 Dec 6X00 61J0 

67+5 6X95 Feu 61.15 61.92 

S7J7 62J5 APT 02-30 4X77 

6625 63X0 Jun USD 63+5 

Eif. Safa 22,i?fl Prev. Jala lo£<4 
Prev. Day Open Int. 49JB6 off 308 

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

4+000 lbs.- cvn Is per Uj. 

7370 6+00 AUO 64X7 65-25 

7X00 6+10 Sea 6+70 65J0 

7132 6+10 Oct 6+50 6535 

7X20 6535 Nov 0135 66+0 

79+0 40-60 Jon 67-5 D 68X0 

7X55 0+10. Mot £760 68X5 

7X65 67X0 Apr 07X0 6XDO 

EU.5ata3 1.935 Prev. Sales L518 
Prev. Day Open Int. +969 up 49 


3X000 toA-cerTfs per IX 
5577 47X5 JUI 49X7 4975 4X82 

5+37 4+57 Auo 4730 48-22 4775 

5175 41+0 Od 4335 4+07 4X00 

5X85 4570 Dec 45+Q 4550 4+80 

5X47 4+25 F«b 4777 4777 4670 

4733 4+50 Aar 45X0 45X0 4+55 

49J25 4+90 Jim 47+0 47+0 4+90 

49A5 4770 JW 477S 4775 47X0 

51.90 48X0 Aufl 

Est- Sales 6+43 Prev. Sotos +219 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 2+193 oft 614 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38X00 On.- cento oer IX 
82+7 5+67 JUI 5830 5937 57.92 

«U5 59.42 Auo 59X0 59 JO 5+J5 

7620 6X15 Feb £720 6830 6+95 

75+0 64X0 Mar 66X0 68.10 6£X0 

7+60 68X May 6+55 6855 6855 

76X0 6+M Jul 6870 68X0 £7 JO 

73.15 47JD Auo 

Eif. sola 7+71 Prey. sales ojBo 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 10X50 upiif 


Currency Options 


PHILA DELPHIA EXCHANGE 

UnSvHrina Price Cnita -L int Puts— Last 

Sap Dec Mar So w Doc Mar 
nxia British PouedKSAto Per anit 

B Pound 11D 2030 X t r T T 

13073 115 15J0 r _ r Q+o 1X5 r 

13073 120 1070 r 12+5 1X5 3.00 X 

13073 125 675 +15 r 2JD 5X0 X 

130.73 UO 370 6X0 , X +60 X X 

13073 135 2.15 4X5 5.10 7X0 X X 

5tXM Canadian Dollorvctnts per unit 
CDcHir 72 r r 2X1 r r r 

73-69 73 r i,l« r 0+7 r r 

73X9 74 0X4 r 0X6 r X 220 

63X94 Weil a irman Marlcvceots per nit. 

DMcrk 30 190 r X t X X 

32J9 31 125 r r 02* x r 

32J9 32 1+3 r 234 031 r X 

J2J9 33 0X6 1+7 X X X X 

32J7 34 CLS2 1JH 1+4 X X X 

32X9 35 _ 077 . 072 r r x r 

+259X98 Japanese Yen-HMEs of a ctuf per aait 
J Yen 37 X30 r r r r r 

4030 38 r r r oxa r r 

4030 39 1J9 r r 033 X X 

40JC 40 071 r r oji r r 

4030 41 0+5 0X8 r 1X7 X x 

40 JO 42 r r 8J7 r r r 

4030 43 r 031 r r r r 

ajw Swim Frano-cento per aolt. . 

s Fro pc 37 r r r 0J4 r r 

39X9 38 r - r r 0+5 r r 

7979 39 134 r 2+2 X r r 

3979 40 0J5 X X X X X 

7979 41 171 XI7 r r X _ r 

Tefal call tvLXXM CaH< Mf toft J £UM 

THvI pat veL xSl Pit open Int. 90972 

_r — Nof I retard. 4 — No option offered. 0 OfcL 
Lost Is premium (ourchcM price). 

Source: Ap. I 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMI) 
n mlOlon-ptsot 7<HPCt _ 

9370 8654 sen 92X8 93.99 

9251 8577 Dec 9231 92X4 

92.54 16+0 MOT 92.17 XLV 

9273 87X1 Jun 91X2 9132 

9154 88X0 Sep 91X9 91X9 

9173 89X5 Dec 

91 J» 09-fl Mar 9171 91J1 

Jun 

Est. Sales prw. Safes 5X»? 

Prsv.Doy open Int. 34X40 UP 335 

ID YR. TREASURY (CB1) 

w-ww "tor*** 

87-13 75-13 MC 85 85-12 

86-2 75-14 Mar- 80S 84-10 

85-7 7430 , Jon 83-7 83-13 

82-29 82-20 S*P B2-U 82-13 

SI-30 80-19 Dec ff-II 81-28 

Est. Soles Prev.Satoi 7384 

Prev. Day Open InL 50328 up 91 9 

US TREASURY BONDS tCST) 
lBpd-VvooxaFar»i32nci5oriooDCT) 
79-12 57-10 Sep 77-5 77-22 

78-13 ST-9 Doc 76-6 76-21 

77-29 57-2 Mar 756 75-22 

76+ 56-29 Jun 7*7 7*22 

75-31 56-29 Sep 73-10 73-25 

74-24 56-25 Dec 72-13 72-31 

74-15 56-27 Mar 723 72-3 

74-26 68-12 Jun 

72-27 63-4 Sep 7W 70-26 

72-18 62-24 Dec 

69-16 684 Mar 

Est. Soto* __ Prey.SalesnSTM 

Prw. Day Open 1n».19SX92 off 1739 


£5 33 

9217 9274 
91X2 *1.93 
91X9 91X7 
91+4 
*171 *174 

*1X5 


85-3) 86-3 
84-30 85-1 
84 84-2 

83+ 83-6 

82-11 82-13 
ffl-II 81-22 


77-3 77-18 

763 76-8 

75+ 758 

747 7*1 1 

73-10 73-14 
73-13 72-19 
71-26 71-26 
_ 71-2 

70-9 70-12 

69-24 
6*4 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cents 

195 A0 160X0 Sod 19430 195X5 193X8 19+20 —71 

199.10 175.70 Dec 1*7 JO 19+00 19+85 1*7.15 —JS 

202J5 190.10 Mar 200.15 201.10 200.15 200.15 —34 

30260 300X0 Jun 20270 302.70 202.70 203.15 -+3S 

E it. Sam 48762 Prev. Sales 46.121 

Prev. Day Ooen Ini, 59X50 up 263 ~1 

VALUE LINE IKCBT) 
paints and cento 

21270 1857S Sep 20190 20+78 20570 205.95 -JJ 

213X0 200X0 Dec 209X0 21075 209X0 209.75 — J5 

E it. Sales Pnrv. Sc lea SJ43 

Prev. Day Ouen lot. 7.393 up 837 
NYSB CO MP. IN DEX CNYFE) 

poFf. r i and cent s 

11360 9175 Sen 11290 11135 11260 T12JS- —71 

J1S» 101JM Dec 1U.90 11570 11+60 11+45 -LjO 

11720 109 JO Mar 114X0 11+80 116+5 11+50 >08 

118.10 11650 Jun 11*35 —JO 

E*t. Sates 9X75 Prev. Soles 7.750 

Prw. Dav Open im. 9+56 off 21 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's 

Reuters 

DJ. Futures 

Com. Research Bureau - 


Close Ptwtas 
*1370 f ' 91779 f 
7^4 UR? _ L74UB . 
1147* • . I®* 


Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 193L-- 
p - preliminary; I - final -,ri' 1 

Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1*3fc,^ 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 3VM£ ‘ 

.i'.V. r. ‘ 


Market Gutfle — 

Chlooaa Board of Trod*' T ~ ' 

Chlcaoo Mercontlto ExchnoOB .... ; 
International Monetary «#«_•. " 

Of Chlcaoo MeroanlUe EodwnW 

New York Cocoa Suw. CeftoefbBW*- 
New York Gotten Exatnpov - . 
Commodity E+chanoa New -Tan - - 

New York Mercantile ExChanee ; 

Kanxa* aiv Beard ot node - 
New York Future* E+chaeee 


NY CSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT; 

NVFE: 


54V 33V Xerox 3X0 5J 23 4966 54to53*4 54V + V% 

54to 46to Xerox Pf 5+5 70.7 1547 VH 53V 54 + V« 

29 19 XTRA X4 2X 10 73 25V 24*4 24*6 + to 


30V4 24to ZakCo IJ2 4J 9 Hi 2734 2M 272* + 28 

11*: 9*4 2aPdta 34 87 20 283 10V 10 10V 

5> 25 Zayret At .9 IS 915 57 56 56 - 


30 I8to 
21to IS*" 


7 1576 19*4 19V 19to — 


London 

Commodities 


JWri’ 

CtoH Pnevtout 
fftoh Lew Bid Ask BW Ask 

SUGAR 

Storthm per metric ten 
Aue 86X0 83X0 83X0 84+0 86X0 8480 
OO 9070 87+0 8760 8860 9020 90+0 
MC 9+00 9120 91X0 9200 9420 9+40 
Mar 10500 101 JO 10220 1Q2+0 T05J)0 10520 
May 109X0 10660 10420 107X0 109+0 10960 
Alto 11+80 11140 112X0 11260 11JJ» 11520 
OCt 119X0 114X0 11440 117X0 119+0 119X0 
Volume: to tots of SO Ions. 

COFFEE 

Storflne per metric lea 
J to 1476 IXg 1440 1445 1A4 1460 
S«p 1.930 1X78 1X81 1X83 1.910 1.914 
Nev 1.975 1.925 1J30 1,933 1257 1X60 
Jen 2020 1,977 1X77 1,980 2X02 2X08 
Mar 2X2B 1,975 1.981 1,985 2X01 2X05 
May 2X40 2X13 f,99C 2X70 2X30 ZX« 
Jto Z095 3XW 2X00 2X40 2X60 2X90 
Volume : 3X71 lets at 5 farts. 


UX. defiers eer metric fen 
Jhf 2)458 31+00 215X0 21550 21+75 215X0 
Aoe 212X0 211 JO 211 JO 212X0 71220 31275 
S9p 31325 211X0 21125 211 JO 21225 21Z50 
Oct 21325 212JS 31250 30X0 37350 27275 
NO* N.T. N.T. 214X0 2)5X0 21+50 21650 
DOC M.T. N.T. 215X0 218X0 216X0 220X0 
J« N.T, N.T. 315X0 119X0 21 5 60 220X0 
Feh N.T. M.T. 21+50 2)9X0 215X0 220X0 
Mar R.T. N.T. 70350 215X0 209X0 218X0 
volume: 752 lots of 100 tons. 

Jounces.- Reuters and London Petroleum Ex. 
chonoe (oatolll. 


4430 

Commodities 


HONG-KONO GOLD FUTURES 
UXJaeronce 

NWl Lew BM°*Ask 
Jly— N.T. N.T. 310X0 312X0 
AUO - N.T. N.T. 3T2X0 314X0 
Up — N.T. N.T. 31+00 316X0 

22.- L JU L J7Afl0 

D^ - 320X0 330X0 319X0 3T1X0 
Fab - N.T. N.T. 323X0 yk nc 
API _ 321X0 328X0 M7X0 329X0 
■Jvn— N.T. N.T. 332X0 334X0 
Vbfume: 24 letoenOOae. 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U-SJ her ounce 


Hleh Lew' Settle Settle 
312X0 311 JO 312+0 317+0 



BHlxio 

GEC 

Year 1984 1983 

Revenue 5,980. 5X00. 

Pretax Net 775 A 67lx 

Per Share 0.U9 0.143 

•llRBR 

Mitsui M & 5 

Year 1*84 1983 

Revenue. 311450. JH+30. 

Proflti 5,140. 2X70. 

Per Share-. 5.140. 2X70. 

Full name or company is Mit- 
sui Minmp and Smeltino. 

I'nilPdJiUlm 

Carolina FroigM 
2nd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue __ 11*68 109 05 

Net Inc 130 111 

Per snare (L50 OJe 

Ut Half 1985 1984 


2nd Qaar. 
Revenue _ 
Net Inc _ 
Per Share. 
Iff Halt 
Revenue — 
Net Inc. „ 


1*85 1*84 

1X00. 2x0a 
130.0 146X 

087 0.98 

1985 1984 

3400. +100. 
222X 261 X 


Per snare 1+8 1.77 

Fleetwood Enter. 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue 1.274. 1+20. 

N#l Inc 5357 6192 

Per Share ZJ9 17? 


Revenue 229.74 307X7 per Snare 


2nd Quar. 
Revenue _ 
Nef Inc _ 


1985 1984 

1X00. 8246 

4X1 366 


Net Inc. +V9 

Persnure <ua 

Cones ro 

in Quar, 1985 

Revenue UPC 

Net Inc 25.7 

Per Snare — 0.74 

Year !9jj 

Revenue XMO. 

Nol Inc 91 J 

Re* Snore „ 2 a5 


5400. 1300. 
?IJ *74 


net include* ton at 
* 4.H million from diicantui. 
uea operations, tots el I7.w 
million on disposal, ana an 
eiiraardinorv com ot 5*5 

million. 


Per Share . 160 IJ8 

1« Heft 1*85 1984 

Hcyenuo 1X80. IJ70. 

Nel Inc. 70.7 S9.7 

Per Share... 262 7.18 

7 984 Quarter and hall net in- 

clude* earn c » C.i million 
ftvtnsaie 


lit Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 24177 235+3 

Net (nc. 168 1.13 

Per Share 0JQ 0J0 


Sales ftourei are unofficial. Yearly Mohs and Ians reflect 
the previous 52 weeks plus »he current week, but rial the la teal 
trading dor. Where a split Of » HKk dividend amounting to 25 
percent or more has been paia ine veor-i hioh-taw ranee and 
dividend are shown for me new stacx cm IV. unless ainerwlse 
noted, rales of dividends are annual disbursements based on 
l he tales! declaration, 
a ^-dividend alsoe«ira(s). 
i b —annual rale of dividend Plus stock dividend, 
c — liawfdotlno dtviaena. 
cid — called. 

1 d— new rearlr law. 

e — dividend declared or ocld In preceding 13 months, 
g — dividend in Canodlan funds. sublect l« 15* nonresidence 
, ta«. 

! I — dividend declared oiler split-up or stoat dividend. 

I — dividend paid rMs near, ami Med, deferred, or no action 
token at latest dividend meeting. 

k— dividend declared or paid Ihfc vear, an accumulative 
Issue with dividends in arrears. 

n — new f3M» In llto Pd^ 52 weeks. The hfgn+ow raw oegtas 
with the start of trading, 
nd — ne«f oov delivery. 

P/E — prlce-eominas ratio. 

r — dividend declared or aotO In preceding 12 months, ulus 
stock dividend. 

s — stack sotli. Dividend begins with dole of spill. 
sl& — soIm. 

t - dividend pom In stock In preceding 12 moot ns estimated 
cash value on ex-4ividend or en-dlstrlbullan dale, 
u — new vearlv high. 

v - trading hailed.' t , . , 

vi - m uankrupfey or rwatvorship or being roorBonbed un- 
dor Bankruptcy Act. or securities assumed W such com. 
ponies 

m) — when distributed. 

wi —when issued. 

ww — with warrants. 

x — es -dividend pr ev -rights. 

•dls — ev-distribuMon. 

rw — Wilhoul warrunli, 

y — e ■ -dividend mid sales In lull. 

*rcf— viera. 

i — sales in lull. 


35V. 22W Zumln U2 4X IT 447 3211 33to 32*%— to 


MSE 


Ijondoii Mdab 


NEW HIGHS lit 


AMR Carp 

I A Is Inf 21 ?P 

Angelica 
ArlzPSv 3S8 
BosE 888pt 

I a l core 
Comsat 
CnPw 440ar 
EGG Inc 
FamCHrSI » 
FiWrtSItYS 
GeidWstFn 
Hausiind . 
UIPv* 7S£pf 
KCPL220of 
LangsOrugss 
MonarCres 
Moorecarps 
NewEng El 
NJMilOpf 
OrionPictPl 
Portec 
PSInd 715Pf 
RCA3e5Pf 
SfsngfCa 
SwspAlrl 
5uarVafue 
Toted 375Pf 
Tronswid 
UnlicverPic 
UliiCe4l25 
wtuiehali 
Xerox Cp 


CampbRs pf 
EnvchExptn 
Pago Prod 


Adams Exp 

Alienee 

Antwusrs 

BcstcOne 

Ceton«e 

Cl M carp , 

CompufScJ 

CnPv#39Bpr 

Ethvti 

FstBaslan 

Gap lr>c 
HanJhn Inv 
111 Power 
IpalCoEnl 
KomPL 232 p 
MCA IK 
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spot 761 JD 7 0 .50 759X0 7S«JD 

iorword 784X0 785X0 781 JO 7PX8 

COPPER CATHODES (High Great] 

Start tog per metric loo 

loot 1X43J0 1X6+50 1X77X0 1X77 JO 

forward 1X91X0 1X9150 1X87X0 1X87 Jo 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling eer metric ton 

teat 1X69X0 1X7 X0 1X58X0 1X60X0 

forward 1X79X0 1X81X0 1X74X0 1X74X0 

LEAD 

Stenmg pm metrician 

xpgt . 305X0 306X0 30100 303.00 

tarward jnjo 30+00 *nxo 302x0 

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forward 465X0 44650 475.75 476X0 

TIN (Standard) ! 

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spot 9J4IXB 9 J58X0 9J55X0 9J6B40 

forward 9+2SX0 9+38X0 *+00X0 9+05X0 

ZINC 1 

Sterling par me trie tea 
SPOT 611X0 612X0 409X0 61000 

forward J9T0C 593X0 9*1X0 592X0 

Source: AP. 


, N.T. N.T. 31+40 3)9+0 

y — N.T. N.T. 316+0 321+0 

Osc N.T. N.T. 32060 »S60 

Volume*. U7 letonl 100 cb. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
, Mnlnyiion cents PWUte 

Clone Previous 

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§ I8S 3S M $ 

^ IS “2 J8 

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A -Anneal; M-MovtMy; G-Ooerterty; S-SMli- 
AnwaL.. 


Japan lists Areas^ 
For Import Effort 

The Associated Press 

■ TOKYO — Prime Minister Ya- 
snhuo Nakasofle cm Tuesday iden- 
tified five target areas for the gov- 
ernment's program to open 
Japanese markets to imports, an 
official said. 

"Mr. Nakasone urged ministers ai. 
a cabinet meeting to speed up ihdi ; 
search for changes that can be 
mode in road aria transport regula- 
tions. the acceptance of foreign 
testing data, food ami sanitation 
rules, quarantine procedures and 
electric-appliance regulations, said 
an official in hts office who de- 
clined io be named. 

The changes are aimed at simpli- 
fying obstacles other than tariff 
barr iers -that lave beat 
Japan's aiding partners.’ j&f&jz 
rial said.. Japan annoubcE&l* 1 "* 
cuts - June 25 on more l&nrT&K) 
products. .-"-.'V 















































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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL 


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MIFED 

October.14-26, 1985 


AoDointment 


x 


>r.:\ 


Vr 


2 PORI 


All cinema businessmen y 

recognize the leadership of /\ 

MIFtD's three markets: / \ 

/ 


MIFED TV 
to trade any film 
ior circuit and TV > 
( October 14-16)/ 

/A MIFED EAST-WEST FILM MARKET 

\ to sell 

\ movies to Eastern Europe 

\ (October 14-18) 

/ 

MIFED INDIAN SUMMER 
to buy latest 1985 
feature films 
(October 20-26) 

The 23rd U.E.R. Screening Session 
will lake place 

from October 14 to 18, 1985. 

- 


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we II give you an extra month of Tribs fee with a one-year 
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Mend 

























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 



Trying to Take the Trauma out of Transfer 


TuamB ma l H 


Japan —leaving the 
'■fiowpeaft fidd lo Barclays Bank 
ytCwd tht lwo hading Swiss 
banks — said Tuesday dial it 
jtup a new Asian head- 
™.for Us imfjgpaitana] divi- 

"The iew office; responsible for 
fai Liiiw^irfr aad rqyesenrative of- 
1 Tstts^djcAiia-Paaric regioa, wil! 
L . Michad Riding, cur- 

’ al managerof i& Far 
fjajjWgnn m London, who be- 
coqxs- YP 8 ^ nianager. Mkhad 
. fl gHZ. tyrcotly ragkari manager, 
Southeast Asia, win be deputy gen- 
CT*} manager. The new ofQce is 
espeettd to be in place next fall. 

’ TOfiNrwt, Benson, Lonsdale 
ptC. dK> bolding company of the 
jCJenwort Benson .merchant bank- 
jHi rftran, has appointed Sir David 
{Amman of the Weflcotne 
Tru» and former chairman of BP 
fLC, and Andrew Rutherford, se- 
nior partner oT stockbrokers Grie- 
vesoo Grant, to the board. 

QibnrTT Mnhmi and Co, the 


London merchant bank, has ap- 
pointed Alan Broughton executive 
director in charge of treasury oper- 
ations. Mr. Brighton. ' who re- 
places Fraser Jennings, was for- 
merly head at European treasury 
operations for the Royal Bank rtf 
Canada! prior to which he was 
managing director of the Orion 
Bank. Mr. Jennings is to take up a 
new post as managing director of 
Guinness Mahon Securities. 

. J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co., 
has incorporated its investment tfi- 

vision as a separate company called 
Schroder Investment Management 
Ltd. and has. appointed G.H. Pp- 
pham as chairman- and LP Sedg- 
wick as chief executive. 

Vickers da Costa Ltd, the Lon- 
don stockbroker, has named JLD. 
Paulsoo-Ellis as chairman, suc- 
ceeding Sr Kenneth Benin, who 
has to became chmrman of the gov- 
ernment’s Securities and Invest- 
ment Board. 

Northern Telecom LtcL, the sec- 
ond largest manufacturer of tele- 
communications equipment in 
North America, has appointed Da- 
vid G. Vice asp res deaL Until now, 
Mr. Vice has been president of the 


Canadian subsidiary. Northern Te- 
lecom Canada Ltd. He is succeeded 
there by Robert A. Fercbat. whose 
new duties will indude running 
.Northern Telecom CALA, the op- 
erating subsidiary serving Latin 
America and the Caribbean. • ■ 

Northrop Corp. has named 
Wdko E Gasich to the new poa- 
tjou of executive vice president for 
program management. Mr. Gasich, 
previously in charge of advanced 
projects, is to take charge of a cor- 
porate-wide renew of major pro- 
grams. 

Bank of New Zealand has ap- 
pointed several new executives in 
order to beef up its Australian op- 
eration in advance of the arrival of 
16 new foreign banks in the coun- 
try. It has hired Leigh Scott-Kem- 
mis. treasurer of the Australia 
Bank, to become chief executive in 
charge of Australian operations. 
Lloyd Coakkyis to take charge of 
corporate and treasury matters, 
and Eric Dodd, formaiy of the 
brokers. Ban & Cp„ is to be man- 
ager of retail hankin g ami manage- 
ment services. 

Honeywell Eraope SA has pro- 
moted Ted Gibbon to take charge 
of tire strategic and operational ob- 
jectives of its industrial products 
group in the Middle East. Mr. Gib- 
bon. who will have the title of in- 
dustrial products' group director. 
Middle Easu joined Honeywell Inc. 
in 1969, ana most recently was 
business unit manager in Brussels. 


(Continued from Page 9) 

executive development 31 Volvo. 
“There has been an increase in 
managers turning down offers to go 
abroad because of the spouse's ca- 
reer. 

• Finding a job for ihe spouse. 
Some U.S. companies such as Bris- 
tol Myers Co. and Qticorp hdp 
spouses of executives going over- 
seas find jobs. But most European 
multinationals still don't think it is 
their business to look for a job for 
the spouse. “We have two couples, 
where all four are working for Shell 
with jobs overseas in the same loca- 
tion,” said Barbara Fordred of 
Shell International. “But is it the - 
responsibility of the company to 
leak, far a Job for a spouse (who 
isn't with SbeflJT k 

A problem in many countries it 
is impossible to get a work permit 
for the spouse. And it is often diffi- 
cult to find work that fits into a 
spouse’s career pat tern. 

“Staffing for overseas is tough 
enough,** says Mr. Copeland of 
General Dynamics Services. “We 
don’t consider finding a job for the 
wife at alL" 

Some spouses decide to go it 
alone, which can result in interest- 
ing commutes. “If you have a seri- 
ous career and want to continue it, 
don’t follow your husband .over- 
seas,” said Barbara Hornby, a free- 
lance writer who commuted from 
London to Jakarta every two 


months while her husband was 
posted there. Following her experi- 
ence, she has just published, “In 
Another Dimmskni, A Grade for 
Women Who Live Overseas” with 
Nancy J. Pret-Pdon. 

In another case, a woman man- 
age- was posted in Jakarta for three 
years. Her husband, who didn’t like 
the climate, did the commuting 
bade and forth from Geneva. 

• Briefing and training to soften 
culture shock. Many major multi- 
nationals in Europe send managers 
going overseas to' the Center for 
International Briefing at Farnbam 
Castle in Surrey, England. Most 
companies also pay for wives and 
children to attend. 

Farnbam Castle provides brief- 
ings on specific countries and re- 
gions by people who have just re- 
turned from an assignment there. 
Another briefing center for expatri- 
ates in Europe is the Institute for 
Tropical Medicine in Rotterdam. 

■ Some managers may not be re- 
ceptive to briefing before they 
move abroad. It’s the these-prob- 


lems-wouldn’t-happm-to-me syn- 
drome. And few companies have 
facilities abroad to provide briefing 
and training. 

• Sending executives to get the 
feel of a country before a perma- 
nent posting. Some French compa- 
nies send executives abroad for 
three-month trial periods, “Fust 



* Mi KM Law SPJft.Cb'V* 

(Continued from Page 14) 

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1742 ift ift 4ft + ft 
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27 7 6ft 7 + ft 

307 107 HJ7 

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139 TOVi 10ft 10ft— ft 
19014V, 141b 14*8— ft 
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26020ft Ifft 20 + ft 

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1015 81k 7ft 8 + ft 

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181 »b ft » , 

79223ft 27ft » — *S 
2543 42 43 +1 

1133ft 32 3» +»ft 

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243 3ft 7ft 2ft 
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138 ift 6ft 6ft- ft 

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105 5ft 5ft 5ft 
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218 17 18 +ft 

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1 II II >1 
1838 27ft 28 + ft 

822IU Sft 2Tft + ft 
1835ft lift 35ft + ft 
Iffi W 74k 8ft + 4k 
37413ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
21 Uft U 16ft + ft 
302 91k M Jft + lk 
9 10 9ft 9ft— U. 
303141a Uft Uft 
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70 254k 25 2Sft + ?* 
3537*4 26ft 27ft +■ lb 
HU 96 tt* +Tft 
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47121ft 21 21ft 
3073644 M14 Mft + ft 
83 4 3ft W — ft 

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39625ft 55ft »^-ft 
5679ft 3ft 29ft + ft 
1184a lift Wft-ltk 
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185 74k 7ft 7ft— ft 
9S» 171k 18 

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7 10 10 10 

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13 5ft 5ft Jft— ft 
20963b 27-i 28tb +1*. 
317 tub 10ft 11 — ft 
12 y-k 2 2 ft + • 
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214 3ft 20ft 20ft 
3712 17 12 

4034ft 344. 34ft— J. 
21020ft 20ft 70ft + ft 
833ft 22ft 23ft + ft 
3 7ft TH 7ft + ft 
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3418ft 18ft IM 
1045 45 45 — 1 

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228% 28ft 28ft + ft 
14015ft lift 15ft— ft 
23 ift ift 6ft— ft 
51723ft 2Tft 23ft + lb 
1314ft 14 U — ft 

now M m 

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2112ft 12ft 12ft „ 
15 — ft 

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417 T 4ft 17 
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14 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 

133924ft 23ft 24ft + lb 
524., 24 24 +1ft 

172 3ft 2ft 3ft 

42 ift ift ift 

29310V. 10 10V, + % 

112 12 12 —ft 

918ft 18 18 

7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
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14ft 15 + ft 

27 27 

8ft 9 +ft 
ift 6ft 


275 SO Ifft 20 
1114ft 14 14 

146 7ft 7ft 7ft 
9922ft 27ft 22ft + ft 
30696ft 25ft TSft— ft 
25215% lift 15ft + ft 
1823ft 22% 23 — Ik 

14 4 5% 5ft 

19141b 14ft 14ft— ft 

OBJ 71b i* .J!* + ft 
4215ft 15V, ISft— ft 
7 14 13V, 13% + ft 

5 Ift Ift Mb 
21 Uft 12 12ft +1 
413ft Uft Uft + ft 
119 W 9*1 9ft— ft 
26 7ft 7ft 71k 
1411% TTY, 17ft— ft 
9214 13% 13%— ft 

171114ft Uft lift— ft 
HI 15 Uft Uft 

15 7ft 71b 7% 

4 71b 71b 7ft + ft 
5 lift lift lift— ft 
66714ft 13% Uft + ft 
714ft lift lift 
24 33ft 32% 33— ft 

874 8% Mk *% + Ik 

62 6% ift ift— ft 
34540 39ft 39% 

111ft lift lift 
50814 13ft Uft— ft 
fft 9ft 

^lb 7ft— ft 
2ft 2ft 
5ft 5ft + ft 
7% 716— ft 
17% 18 

. ift ift— 1b 
25131b Uft lift 
27428ft 23ft 21V. 
12% 12ft- ft 

8 

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13 18 W A 


2 *ft 
1453ft 
134 71b 

6$% 

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At 12 27428ft 28 

J| 11 5412ft 12 
.15* IS 70 8 S 


XL Data 
Xebec 

XJcor 

TUdax 


381 13% 12% 13% +1 
ill 3% 3% 3ft— ft 

■82 9 8ft Mb— ft 
30213ft Uft 139k + ft 


YlOWft 

YortcFd 


140 li 
AOb 37 


18238ft 38% 
1517 


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Ztbntal 

ZenUas 

ZaoNtl 

Zanlac 

ZlaMar 

ZJonUt 

ZIM 

Zlynd 

Zoodwn 

Zycod 


141 3ft 3ft Jft— ft 
102623ft 72ft 22ft- ft 
227 3D 19 19ft + ft 

44 2ft 2ft 2 m 
3011ft 11% 11% ^ 

7935% 35% 35% + ft 
21 3 2% 3 + ft 

77 4ft 4V. 4% + ft 
2010ft 10 10ft + ft 
671 U 13% 13% — ft 


32 Nations Win 
Duty-Free Status 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has conferred spe- 
cial trade status on 32 Third Work! 
countries, d earing the way for 
duty-free exports of certain goods 
from those nations to the United 
States. 

Administration officials said the 
action, which permits duty-free ex- 1 
ports of eligible products to the 
United States, was intended to hdp 
promote economic growth in the 
countries. 

Beneficiaries under the new cate- 
gory are: Bangladesh, Benin, Bhu- 
tan. Botswana, Burkina Faso, Bu- 
rundi, Cape Verde; Central African 
Republic, Chad. Comoro. Djibou- 
ti, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, 
Guinea. Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Le- 
sotho, Malawi. Maldives, Mali, Ne- 
pal Niger, Rwanda, SSo Tome and 
Principe, Sena Leone, Somalia, 
Sudan. Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, 
Western Samoa mid Yemen. 


GM Division Will Sell 
Deere Diesel Engines 

Jtewm 

MOLINE, Illinois — Deere & 
Co. said Tuesday it reached an 
■cement with the Detroit Diesel 


Allison divirion of General Motors 
Corp. that gives Detroit Diesel the 
right io buy and distribute the John 
Deere diesd engine line. 

Deere said that during the next 
90 days it will phase out its current 
engine distributor organization, 
and Detroit Diesel will assume re- 
sponsibility for engine sales. 


- 


impressions are seldom right," said 
Mr. WHburn of BAT. “We try to 
send the managers first, ideally 
without their wives, so you don't 
have both adults wandering around 
in a fog at the same time: 

• Guaranteeing a job when go- 
ing home. Few companies have a 
policy that guarantees a job at the 
end of an overseas assignment. 
“We have no fixed program for 
executives coming back,” said J. H. 
Kuipers, director of the corporate 
staff bureau at Philips NV. the 
Dutch electronics mhltinationaL 
But some companies, soch as Shell 
and Volvo, have set up networks to 
keep the expatriate in touch with 
hnrw- 


Kuwait Endorses Han to Support 
Banks With Government Deposits 

Reuters 

KUWAIT — The cabinet endorsed a plan Tuesday to hdp banks 
and investment houses recover from a debt crisis caused by the 
collapse of the unregulated Souk al-Manakh stock market in 198Z. 

The minivtpr for cabinet affairs, Rashid al-Rashid, said the govern- 
ment would deposit funds in banks to boost liquidity hi the financial 
sector, the Kuwait News Agency reported. The stock market crash left 
investors holding more than $90 billion in mostly worthless postdated 
checks and caused a severe economic recession. * 

The report did not indicate how much aid the government would 
provide; Mr. al-Rashid said the plan would be administered by the 
Central Bank of Kuwait. 

The newspaper Al-Qahas reported last week that the plan included 
a credit package of S l.oS billion. Banking sources said the figure coold 
be higher. 

Mr. Rashid said the plan would be referred to the National 
Assembly for approval 

Tbc repercusaoas of the 1982 crash became most evident last year, 
when a significant outflow of capital prompted the Central Bank to 
stem the fli gh t of money. The bank took a lough stance, including 
higher provisions, a decline In assets and lower published profits ana 
dividends. 

The government also approved a bill calling for settlement of snare 
Ruling s to limit bankruptcies. In April, the state-controlled Kuwaiti 
Investment Co. reported a 1984 loss of 32J million dinars (about 
$10.7 million), 66 percent more than in 1983. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


AUTOMOBILES 


• AUTO RENTALS 

KENT A CAR IN FRANCE 

M«fh or without diouffear 
pocfcnnw with ixAmrtBd bfarnmen. 

' Sb 587 27 04 - D«a. 

60 Bd St. Morel, 75005 do n 


AUTO SHIPPING 

HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR MTO THE ULSJL 

Ufa doromonl explore fiily what one 
out do to bma a oar into the LLS. 
tafety and iegaly. B fadudte new ft 

iilifs£sra{2a& 

lam dereonce ft dipping procedure 
re wefl re legtd patois. Becauee of 8ie 
Wrong dcAr, you .con save op to 

USSlftODO when buying a Meroedei, or 
BMW n Europe & importing it to the 
Statex. To receive the manud. tend 

7000 StiXtgort I, Wfaf Germony 

MATMASHIFFMG 

Stifapfag to/Fwre USJL 

MAIMAi Antwerp (3] 234 36 68 
234 35 72 

Special CendM—e td fan lining 
Antwerp Seritei EureteL 


i 1 /: i R vjI i Afj f}.- Jit 




AUTO CONVERSION 

EMISSION 

ENGINEERING 

MOoncAnoN op mr Mooa 

CARS M GOOD EUFMNG 
CONDITION. MOST: 

MBCHS $4,000 

BMW $4,000 

PORSCHE $4,000 

JAGUAR $4,500 

FBUARJ 308 $5^00 

TESTA ROSSA $6,000 

• ONE OP TWtARGCST CHUBB 

• AIL WORK G0MPUE1B) AT OUR 

• raSr OUAUTY COMPONB6I5 

• AU TESTMO M OUR OWN 

FHJ0UU.Y KCOGMZB3 
.LAROtATORY 

• CUSTOMS BSOKBIAGE AW 
BONDMG AVAIABIE 

USA 1714) 898-2182 

TtX 70435* TfRAIH COM UD 

MeraedevBmz Fondte BMW Ferrari 

EPA/DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

hot bxrvcrtwnd toe. Al wort done 
an prmnam. Scfas & faosna. 
A1MC EXOTIC MOTOR OUt 
' 114 Anderaon Street 
Hacfamodi. NJ 07601 USA 

Tbu 322234 201-430667 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTO CONVERSION 


DOT/EPA CONVBBIONS to US. 
0 ( 0 . Aaraknce guaRrtecd. VIA 
GorpZ.lTfizf&W AiSk, Bakknon, 
71087. T* 301-T 
4995689 VIA US. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


FRANCO 

BRITANNIC 

TAX FREE CARS 

ROLLS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

JAGUAR 

ROVER 

RANGE & LAND ROVER 
Europe®! delivery 

21 Ave Kleber 
ran* PARIS 
T1:(l)757 50 80 
Telex: 620 420 


TR ASCO 

THE MBKXDES SKQAUStS 
Swtoarioni, W« Goracny & England 

Tax free - IHD - Eurpoean dtfvery - 
US EPA/OOT- 
Slipping by the mp«1L 

N STOCK: 500 SE/lr Bad, Cray. Hue 
• 380 SK> Bod. »** 

280 SE/l- Bkw, Blue 

DREQ HUM SOURCE 

Tratea London Lkl 
6*67 PcHt Low. L ondo n Wl. 

T«L- 01629 7779 
Trin 8956022 TJEA5 G. 


ROUS-ROrCX CDMOC 
CO M UB l t i 1983 

lagoo bn . fwmoo *5 £*■ 

KQI1SR0YCE SM» Spire 1983 - 
13S00 Km* - FKWXMli* 
nous- ROYCE Strer Shadow P IWtl 
3 WW X* - KJ50a»tat 
JAGUAR VAN DB4 PUS 1985 - 

MOOKm- m^ogo . 


^^tsassi^sc 1 ” 

21 Arere tab 16ft. 
Tel. 757 50 80 - 500 85 19 


10 YEARS 

We Defiver Cre« ft Ihe 

TRANSCO 

Keeping a comant bode of more tf**i 
300 brand new care, 

pn.hm tfa 1 * *~y. 7 eQr - 

ter free mubiajiar analog. 

Tf awep SA, 95 NoortWaon. 

Td 323® ^TCANS B 


SPECtAlSTS FOR 
US. + MIDDLE EAST MAIKET 
once 20 yean. Lcr^ stodc of 
raw MercedH an. 

280 S, 280 St, 280 58, 500 SB, 
500 SEC with boJh, Vekm & 
Merior. Stoaenl ft 
dtfivery worldwide. Cal or visit 
us BI our new showroom. 
NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 
ftaneer tresftb. 191, 
D-6000 Fraftfert/M 
let 10)60-73 30 61, The 414018 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


NEW MERCEDES 

rORSOft Car wma tlu e deiwy 

FROM STOCK 




in USA 

RUTEMC 

TAUNUSSIR. 52, 6000RANKJUXT 
W Germ, td f0)«7-23Z3ST, Ac <1 fSSV 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Shoe 1972, expenenced mr trader far 
Mercedes, ffaredc. BhW. l u ree ifcit e 
defivery. Ful service iofxjrt/enxxt, 
US. DOT ft shijpirfl far louria 
and dsder. Ocmm£mdM GmbH 
Tcnteegmr. ft 4 DuesMfdorf, W. 
Gtrmt (0) 211-434644 Ac 858^374. 


DAWAJI TRADE 

WFL DELIVERY 

i o taraa ssocfc of 
most car brands • 
TeL 02/648 55 13 
Tefa* 65658 
42 nn Lem, 

1050 r 


We 1 


• BUY YOUR TAX HS CAR * 
Mercedes, Porsche, BMW, Ferrari. 

DM Area mm 

ftS tag toBw 

SELECTION IreMtoort (WA, 
ItarlfareJtar. bJaoTsito, Wtsl 
Germany, |C»42<260458^, Tc 24109 


TAX RS CARS 

P.CT. 

AS malms, J models, brand new 
l*kW. 

OO-lleat 

cofcdog 


AS nukes, OS models, arena new 

t!± 3/231 5^ Tbf^^i^STB 
Send Un5 far cob6og 


FOR IMMBNA1E DELIVERY: 

500 SI hate hand chin 
white with wit brown leather. 

LKD. 500 SEC SL SB. 

tasebe 930 Tixba. 

Al new and hily loaded 
Genresiy 06868/51 7 1x445242 DSD 


EUROPORT TAX HK CARS 
CaO far free adabo. 

Ban 1201 l, 8 atMdm Airport, Ifalond 
Tefc 0106^3077. 7ht 2M71 TC4R M. 



CARBMLY selected 


owvica nwaaoL rofjuwj 

StiparvL EPA/DOT sm^ 
12 05301 


BMW 

twill. 

-- Dr. 
05300 Bonn 
Tlx. B 8 55 94 

lOTUS. VOLVO, SAAB, Ala Romeo. 
Al moded in dodc. ft( 9 H*K*£hcm- 
det ei Go. Merer Coda Tet (93) 
3048S1 Telex 4791 15MC FARAL 


TRANSMUNDi BCLGRIW, 21 Gre6 

sebogn, ft-2247 Z orrad, Antwerp Tet 
03384.1054 He 32302 Transm ft In 
iteefa Mereedn, BMW. A50 


PORSCHE, EB0UUB, 
BMW. Rafis tare. D34 Cars Telex. 
Madrid 46340 TXG-E. 


TAX Free ears, al malms ft models. 
ATK. NV.Aiterrri 22, 2000Ai#Mm 
Bedims. Ye) 03^31 16 53 Tx 31535 


LEGAL SERVICES 


VISAS ft inewiyaAon. Any. 
SJ. tamcL 1611 CcmnOot Are, 
NW, WrSs. D.C 20009 USA. Tet 
(202 2326617; tire 35O0M n 
££). In Athene 7/37/6001 0} 323- 
0251 i Venire 7/1 37/16fflUl 765- 
971; Rome 7/17-7/20 (39JW545 


LEGAL SERVICES 


P OM— C A N DIVORCES. Box 20802. 
Sarto Domngo, Domimaan Repwic. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE MAGNffKBfT 
STHLA 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greelt kkre^Turipy. 
SaSng Evr^^tooday from Ptroeus 

THE YACHT-UKE . 
STELLA 
OCEAN1S 

3 AND 4 DAY CRUISES 

To Mm Greet Uanft ft Turkey. SaSng 
every Monday ft Friday from fVoew 

n«»e apph Aflere ^ 

2. Kar. Sew S, Athens IOS67 
Telex; 215621, Phone 3228883. 

Preis tel. 265 80 36 
Munich let 395 613 
Geneva tot 327 110 
Zurich tet 391 36 56 


Crvko in Begmc* 

Io Ihe GREBC ISLANDS 
EGYPT, ISRA&& TURKEY 

(HOKE OF 7-4-3-2-1 DAY 
CRUBB on* el Athens (PtrreeieJ 


TIC MODBN LUXURY SHVS 


41144 

W. MBMSMNa MGONAUr. 
ORPHBJS, N&TUN9. PEGASUf 

HIROTHQ CRUiSB 


.26 60324 

■.4430321 


Mere Yrefc- 


L_ 7340805 1 

WG&SnVt 

(2121 5991750 
1213 8551736 


HOTELS 


GREAT BRITAIN 


IOMX3N OUST HOUSE FROM SI 5 
per day. 01-4553764 or 202 7325 


SWITZERLAND 


Louscmne-Swftzeriand 

HOTEL CARLTON 

A dsrehg t«*t star 


mMur. 

4 ova. dm Core ■ 1007 butanee 
fet 021/26 32 35 - Tbc 24 80ft 


ARTS 


THE MAN WHO FOOL&D 
THE ART WORLD FOR 
AttUONS OF DOLLARS 

ELMYR DE HORY 

RC MASTBl IORGB 
OF THi 20ft CENIIRnr 

Own a magrdieM Monel, Renoir, 
Van Gogh, McxS^fare. 

frafah coiedor has far sab (hem 
ureque agned ofi parting by Ihe late 
Ektryr de Hare. 

Tft London (01) 485 482ft 


IERVRE GALLERY - 30 Breton St, 
London Wl - 01-493 21 07. Important 
XIX & XXCenirey worts of art 20h 
Jim - 27 th July. Mondaws - Fridays 
lOam-Spni. Saturday 10am- 123Qpm 


BOOKS 


FOR YOUR STA1GSOX BOOK Needs, 
write or phone* BOOK CAI1, do 
New Canaan Bodbfop, 59 Hm St, 
New Canacn O 06840 USA. 203- 
966547ft Mdl orders welcome. 


WINES & SPOUTS 


UQUORS 
CHAMPAGNE 
FAMOUS FRENCH WINES 
Far Export Only 

RAMPyaSvfcESMC. 
01-1290 VBSOfX-GBCYA 
Fhanec 0041 22 55,4042 

Tetex: 28279 04 


■ORDEAUX WINS — DIVMORD, 

10 ret Morire, 92110 CSdty^Fnmre 
Tefc [1) 73030 56, At 6411& BJTA 



in tiie Trib. 


New hot from the 
trading floor in 



Rohrbadhs 
Wall Street 
V\&tch, 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT satvtqL 
EVBYWHBS YOU ARE OR GO!- 

1*813-921-7946 

Col Free from US: 1 -800-237-0892 
CoS free from Florida: 1 -300-232-0692. 
laml Eanem wetmmes yoo bodd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT S9VICE 
M NEW YORK 
TEL- 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

DAY/EVB6MG ESCORT AGENCY 

TEL 724 2972 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SERVICE 

TO KBSWOTWCHUKH ST, W8 
TB,- 937 913* OR 9379133 
AB reafar aid) card* 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Esccrt Serrisa. ’ 

T«fc 736 5877. 


LONDON 

PorimaD Escort Agency 

6 T CMtom Sheet, 
tendon Wl 

Tefc 486 3724 or 48* ITS! 
AR «ofar graft creds adap te d 


REGENCY NY 

WORUMfOE ESCORT SBtVKX 
212-R38-3027 or 753-18*4 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


★ LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE SCORT SBMa 

01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


ARISTOCATS 


128 iMamore St. lendon W.l. 
Al raefar Credt Cards Accepted 
Tet 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - mitkigh) 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

OUB3E S BIVIOE Trent 5pn» 
80TTBEDAM (OM<MS475* 
f>« HAGUE (0170-60 79 96 


ZURICH 

Creatine Ereort Service 
Tefc 01/252 *1 74 


ZURICH 

ALEX& ESCORT SBMCE 
TEL 01-47 55 82 / *9 55 04 


** GENEVA-HRST ** 

DAILY ESCORT S8MCE 
Tefc 022/32 34 18 
+ WEEKEND + TRAVEL 


MADRID INT’L 

ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL: 245*541 CRBXT CAROS 


ZURICH-GB4EVA 

ONGCTS ESCORT SBNIOft 
TBiOI/363 08 64 -022/3441 ft 6 


JASMINE 

AMSTERDAM ESCORT SBtVKft 
TBj 020-3*6655 


ROiitt CLUB EUROPE ESCORT 
ft Gude SetweeJeh 0&/5B9 2608- 589 
1146 {here 4 pm to 10 paf 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

AMSTERDAM 182197 

PRIVATE LADYESaW 

Wl Travel + Weekend Service 

GBCVA * BEAUTY* 

BCORT SERVICE 

022/29 51 30 

LONDON 

RAYSWATB ESCORT SBtVICE 

TB- 01-229 077* 

** LONDON BITE ** 

ESCORT SBtVICE 

01-223 0368 12 nean-12 e*M#ri 

PRESTIGE 

London Escort Service 

Tefc 988 3163 f 08833 3163 

ROME OUR BACK ESCORT 

8 . Gita SwvicaTefc 06/58? 2604- 589 
1146 (From 4 pm to 10 pra) 

CHELSEA BCORT SBtVICE. 

51 aeaaehaapHm UnfanSMQL 
let 01 584 6513/274? [4-12 pm) 

GBCVA -BEST 

ESCORT SBMO. 022 / 1* 15 W 

* AMSTERDAM SHE * 

ESCORT * GUSS. 020-227837 

RANWURT. + SWIOtJNDMGS 
Gx nines Esaki + Trawl Sarvia. 
Engfcdt, French, Saanish ft German 
tom 

GBCVA BCORT 

SBMO. Tefc 4* 11 58 

** MADRID G»SY ** 

SBMCE Tefc 233.03.1? 

AMSTBIDAM BARBARA 

BCORT SBMCE. 0209543** 


DIANA E5CORT S9EVTCE loreton 
Heahrcmr > Getwiefc. Eon 01-381- 
060ft 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

AMSTERDAM KIM SUE 

ESCORT SBtVKX. 020^53892 

ZURICH KCORT 

SERVKX. THj 558720 

VBMA ESCORT - AGBMCY 

TEL 37 52 39 

OBCVA-HBEFC BCORT SERVICE 
Tefc 36 29 32 

MILANO + LUGANO BCORT ser- 
vice, aide and travel service. Tel: 
Mfan (0/685035 

IW3flE5?#li3 


fc^j*;v?ri:7j3 


VBHI ETOU ESCORT SBtVICE 

Tefc 56 78 55. 

MAOtiD IMPACT wcort and grade 
service. MuUnteXrf. 261 4142 

VBHA YOUNG BCORT SBMCE. 
Contact B3 33 71 

MONTREAL CANADA, OAIRE Es- 
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DUSSBSOIF/COLpGFE/BONN 
Dorma Escort Service 021 1 / 3S 31 41 

FRANKBJ8T + SURROUNDINGS B 
axl Service. 069/364656 Visa 1 DC 

MUFOCH - BION&Y ft TANJA Euori 
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OCNEVA MBA E5CORT SBMCE. 
Mjti&naud M 34 29 55. 

LOWON ft HEATHROW. VMB4 Es- 
cort Service. Tet Oil 3BS 76 71. 

AM5TBUAM HIGH SOCIETY Escort 
Senrice. Tefc [0120-843735. 

FRANKFURT SQNM ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tefc 069-68 34 42. 

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vice. Tefc 01-661 2800. 

MlffBOf WBCOME Escort Serwre. 
Tefc 91 84 59 


AMSTODAM FOUR ROSE5 Escort 
SerarefD) 30-964376 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


CHARiae GBCVA Guide Sereire. 
Tefc 283-397 


DOMNA, AMSTERDAM BCORT 

Guide Service. Tefc P201 762842 
RANKHJRT/MUMOf Mate Escort 
Service. 069/386441 & 089/3518226.' 


RAMCFURT JBMV BCORT ft trarel 
Tefc 069/55^7-10. 


HOUANDJB ESCORT SBtVICE. 02ft 
22Z7B5. 030-94453Q, 02997-3685. 


LONDON ESCORT 

Tefc 935 5339. 


AGENCY. 


LODON ESOOET SBMCE. Tefc 937 
6674 


lONDON TRUME ESCORT Service. 
Tefc 01-373 8849. 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Serrice. 
Herehrore/Grevridc Tefc 834 7945. 


IOWOK fRSMCHESCOWfavwa. 
1 pra-11 put- Tel: (01) 589 4900. 


MADRID SHJBCITON5 BCORT Ser- 
vice Tefc 4011507. Gedt Cords. 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Semen, 
worn /262115ft 


VKNNA VR> ESCORT SERVICE. Tefc 
jVianncd 65 41 58 


VB4NA CD • ESCORT SBtVKX 
0222/92 OS 612 


DOMUMCHK ESCORT 

London Tefc 01-4021963 


SBtVKX. 


HtANKRlRT - PETRA Escort ft Trowd 
Service. Tel. 069 / 68 24 05 


LONDON OLYMPIA BCORT Ser- 
vo. Tel: 01-381 6852 

MKH ESCORT SBVKE London (01) 
961 0154. 


AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Serene 
TeLlCT 326420 or 34011ft 


BRUSSSS. ANTWBtP NATASCHA 
Escort Service. Tel: 02/7317441, 

COLOGNE/ DUESSaDORF/ BONN 
Enpbh Eemri Service 0221-5247? 


FRANKFURT - CA8EN Esoorl Service. 
Tefc 88 62 88 - 56 56 17 


FRANKFURT “TOP 1W Escort Ser- 
vire. 069/59-40-52. 


FRANKFURT AREA, SIMONE'S & 
CDrtftTroretSenece.Ri9-62B432 

WATHROW LOreiON ESCORT Ser- 
wce. Td. 994 6682. 


HONG KONG - 3-620000 AsrorV 
Western Escort Service. 


UXOON WAYTOU8 ESCORT Sv 
vice. Tefc^rione London 6)1} 821 0281 


MINCH - PRIVATE BCORT 
Greds Service, TeL 91 23 14 


U3FOON GStiE ESCORT Strutt 

Tel; 370 7151. 




.if".. 







i 

2 

a 

“ 



17 



20 







6 

7 

8 

9 

15 













10 

11 

12 

13 

16 








1 

22 





ACROSS 

1 Pinnacles 

6 Goose-flesh 
arouser 

10 A memorable 
Pitts 

14 Actor Peter 

15 Polish river, to 
Germans 

16 “Jug-of-wine" 
poet 

17 Vaudeville 
“royalty" 

20 D.C. group 

21 Milkmaid '5 
measure 

22 Conrad setting 

23 A. A. Of 
mysteries 

24 Needle 

haystack 

26 Clears the 
windshield 

29 Allegory 

33 Poplar popular 
in puzzles 

34 Woodsy misfit 

35 Boy in"The 
Yearling” 

37 Actress Gan- 

38 Alleviated 

39 Eye part 

40 Writer 
Bombeck 

41 Cager 
Archibald 

42 Sportscaster 
M us burger 

43 In a miserly 
way 

45 Wrinkle 

46 Sound detector 

47 Cheap trinket 


48Huxtableor 

Rehan 

51 Partisans 

54 BexorDax 

57 Makes fun of 
Ellery? 

60 Neural 
network 

61 Bounce 

62 U.S.S.R. range 

63 Holly 

64 Framework 
for plaster 

65 Nine: Comb, 
form 

DOWN 

1 Singer Lane 

2 de grace 

3 Pianist Hess 

4 Architect's 
add-on 

5 Lake dweller' 5 
worry 

6 Moslem 
mendicant 

7 Hebrew month 

8 Letter for Moses 

9 Necessary 

10 Emoter Caldwell 

11 Author Ben 
Williams 

12 Grey of the 
purple sage 

13 Major or Mi- 
nor preceder 

lSJene quoi 

19 Funny-bone 
neighbor 

23 Maple covering 

25 Renounced 

26 History-quiz 
detail 


27 German 
statesman 

28 Noted Italian 
physicist 

29 Londoner's 
meat pie 

30 in one's 

bonnet 

31 "I 

Parade" 

32 British noble 
family 

34Canaanite 

deity 

36 EucalypR 

38 Mezzanine 

42 Abrupt in 
speech 

44 Skyline 
overcast 

45 Grimalkins 

47 “Pride 

before . . 

48Dugoul 

shelter 

49 Event for 
seconds 

50 Commedia 

dell’ 

52 Turquoise 
cousin 

53 Keen desire 

54 O'Casey or 
Connery 

55 He kicked to 
conquer 

56 Amphora 
handle 

58 “The Joy 

of 

Brandreth 

59 Keatsian 
container 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene M ateska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



*AnO THE BEST MRT IS THAT THEY WERE FREE ! 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD OAME 
■ • by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these (our Jixnbles. 
one tetter to each square, to form 
tour ordinary words. 


KNITH 


Txr 

. 


OAKEW , 





CEDROF 



znz 




GOEMAH 


znz 

33 


SOME GUYS 
TOM'T KNOW WHEN 
TO STOP UNTIL. 
THEY'RE TOLPTHIS. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


f Answers lomorrowi 

Yesierday-9 I Jun ' We = : PARCH BEFrr JOYOUS DRUDGE 

Answer: When It comes to love, an engagement ring 
Is usually Just this — A "BUY" PRODUCT 

WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 


01 on rye 

24 

7 S 

IS 

64 

cl 

Bangkok 

31 

88 

25 

77 

o 

OrncierdDin 

20 

48 

10 

so 

d 

Belling 

24 

75 

18 

64 

SI 

Alhen* 

30 

84 

19 

46 

lr 

Hong Kang 

31 

88 

24 

79 

a 

■onceioBo 

26 

79 

17 

&3 

Cl 

Manila 

n 

91 

26 

79 

cl 

Beta rode 

73 

73 

15 

59 

cl 

Hew Demi 

40 

104 

27 

B 4 

a 

Berlin 

11 

64 

11 

53 

a 

Seoul 

31 

88 

20 

68 

lr 

Brtnueli 

IT 

73 

11 

S 2 

cl 

Shanghai 

38 

82 

24 

75 

a 

Bucharest 

28 

82 

14 

57 

cl 

Singapore 

34 

93 

24 

79 

a 

Budapest 

17 

43 

14 

57 

r 

Taipei 

30 

80 

74 

75 

a 

Copenhagen 

19 

46 

10 

» 

fr 

Tokyo 

26 

79 

19 

>4 

Cl 

Casta Dei Sol 
Dublin 

31 

20 

68 

68 

17 

M 

63 

57 

lr 

(a 

AFRICA 






Edinburgh 

28 

48 

8 

46 

sb 

Algiers 

27 

B! 

71 

70 

a 

Florence 

31 

88 

IS 

59 

(r 

Cairo 

36 

97 

21 

70 

lr 

Frankfurt 

21 

70 

13 

54 

o 

CaaeTown 

21 

76 

13 

55 

lr 

Geneva 

25 

77 

13 

55 

fr 

Casablanca 

25 

77 

17 

43 

k 

Helsinki 

16 

41 

ID 

SO 

0 

Harare 

17 

63 

7 

45 

Fr 

Istanbul 

25 

77 

14 

6 l 

lr 

Lagos 

2 g 

04 

24 

75 

6 

Los Palme* 

27 

81 

21 

70 

fr 

Nairobi 

21 

72 

17 

54 

Cl 

Lisbon 

23 

73 

14 

61 

Cl 

Tunis 

34 

93 

22 

72 

lr 

London 

23 

73 

n 

55 

lr 




Madrid 

38 

84 

18 

64 

Cl 

LATIN AMERICA 



Milan 

29 

34 

17 

43 

fr 

Buenos Aires 


— 

— 



MOSCOW 

IB 

44 

10 

59 

0 

13 

55 

4 

43 

Cl 

Munich 

19 

46 

12 

£4 

e 

Caracas 

74 

75 

8 

46 

Cl 

Nice 

24 

75 

19 

66 

Cl 

Lima 

21 

70 

15 

59 

O 

Oslo 

71 

70 

12 

54 

Cl 

Mexico City 

20 

48 

13 

55 

r 

Paris 

3 a 

79 

14 

57 

lr 

Rlode Janeiro 

25 

77 

17 

43 

la 

Prague 

Pevklavik 

17 

12 

43 

54 

12 

9 

S 4 

48 

Cl 

0 

NORTH AMERICA 



Rome 

77 

SI 

17 

63 

It 

Anchorage 

19 

46 

13 

55 

PC 

Stock balm 

17 

63 

9 

4 

cl 

Allan to 

28 

82 

17 

41 

PC 

Strasbourg 

74 

75 

15 

59 

fr 

Boston 

21 

70 

15 

59 

to 

Venice 

34 

79 

19 

66 

lr 

Chicago 

29 

84 

15 

59 

PC 

Vienna 

17 

63 

14 

57 

r 

Denver 

32 

98 

17 

54 

PC 

Warsaw 

IS 

64 

10 

50 

d 

Be trail 

25 

77 

li 

41 

<1 

Zurich 

24 

7 S 

13 

55 

d 

Hanoi chd 

31 

88 

23 

73 

If 

MIDDLE EAST 




Houston 

32 

90 

21 

70 

PC 



— 




Las Angeles 

41 

104 

74 

79 

fr 

Ankara 

25 

77 

8 

44 

lr 

Miami 

32 

90 

75 

n 

DC 

Bemn 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Minneapolis 

79 

84 

14 

Al 

lr 

Damascus 

15 

»5 

17 

63 

lr 

Montreal 

20 

B 2 

14 

57 

Cl 

Jerusalem 

24 

79 

14 

57 

lr 

Nassau 

33 

Ol 

23 

73 

PC 

Tel A*iv 

W 

84 

31 

70 

lr 

New York 

24 

75 

19 

44 

r 

OCEANIA 






Son Francisco 
S*o me 

35 

57 

95 

8 » 

17 

12 

63 

54 

lr 

lr 

aacklana 

16 

41 

9 

48 

la 

Tnronlc 

25 

77 

17 

54 

cl 

Svanev 

21 

70 

II 

S 3 

ii 

Washington 

39 

84 

19 

64 

Cl 

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. EXPERT AT.„ J 



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I DON'T EAT 
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[ESPECIALLY WHS3E THE 
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IN THE SUITSHE'S WEARING 
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MARRIAGE {_ 


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| THE RETS A PROBLEM' AM 
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WEDNESDav^POBECAST - CHANNEL: Smoolh. FRANKFURT: Fair. 
Icmp.Si — 13 177 — 551 LONDON: Cloudv Temo 24— U 175 — 571 MADRID; 
C'ouov Temo k NEW YORK: Cloudy. Temp 24-18 (»-«». 

fSF'A-.?.?*"'*- Tomo r '~ — STi ROME: coir Temo J®- la 184 - ui 

AVIV; Ngl available. ZURICH : Fqlr Temo 77 — u mi — 571 BANGKOK: 
STSEr.'I T t mD J * -?'<*» — 81* HONGKONG 1 Fqlr. Temp. 31 - 26 IU - 79l. 

Clejtfl*. Ttrnu JJ-- J4 i»l — SEOUL: Snowers Temp. 31 — ■'I 
^SS-^^SING A PORE: r#,, Temo 33- 2* (91 - 79J. TOKYO. Rainy. lamp. 


Wirfld Stock Markete 

Via Agence France- Presse July 2 

dosing prices in load currencies unless otherwise indicated. 



| Amsterdam 1 


OOM 


ABN 

448 


ACF Holding 

740 

try to 

Aegon 

96.40 

9550 

AKZO 

11240 

11180 

Ahold 

23280 

232 

AMEV 



A'Dam Rubber 

820 


Amro BosA 

8140 

80.90 

BUG 


197 

BuBhmnnnn T 

09 JO 

B 8 J 0 




Elsevier-NDU 

12620 

124 JO 

Fohktn 

71 

6850 

Gist Brocades 

197 

197 

Helnekon 

140 

148 



59 JO 

KLM 


59 JO 

Naardan 

4940 

49 

1401 N odder 

71 JO 


Nedllarri 

(60 JO 

160 J 0 


329 JO 

32 SJ 0 

Pakhoed 

6050 ' 

40 JO 

Philips 

53 J 0 

5210 

noboco 

77 JO 

7490 




Bounce 

7040 

7 DJ 0 

Rorenta 

44 J 0 

44.10 

Royal Dutch 

IO 270 

200.90 

Unilever 

357 

pLyJL’jn 


29.50 


VMF Stark 

20250 


VNU 



ANP.CB 5 Gcal index : 217.11 

Previous : 215 JM 



If UnmeLs | 

Ar bed 

HTT 

wm 

Bekowl 



Cockerili 



COCeoa 



EBES 



GB-lrmo-BM 


■'‘t' 

gbl 

^■PTi 

■tVi 

Gevaeri 



Hoboken 


5700 

intercom 



Kredieibank 


■TTj 

Pelroflna 



Sec Generate 



Sot 1 no 

fKrTv 


5 o!vav 



Trgrlion Elec 

3740 


UCB 

53 JO 


Unera 

1715 


Viellto Montagna 

7000 


1 Current Slock Index : 237177 

Previous : 2331.03 



!l Frankfort f 

A EG- Tele tun Iren 

140 JO 139.20 1 

Allionj Vnrs 

1485 

1484 

Allans 

375 

370 

BASF 



Barer 

22700 22400 

Bov Hvoo Bank 

347 

342 

Bay Verclnsbank 

3 W 37 XJ 0 


235 23450 

BHF-Bank 

348 

331 

BMW 


Com men-bank 

320 JO 31 7 JO 

Coni Gurnml 

) 42 JO 


Dalmier-Beni 

85 » m\.m 

Degussa 

37 SJ 70 J 0 

□ouische Babcock I SA 1 5150 

Oeuiscnc Bans 

532 579 JO 

Dresdncr Beni-. 

360 

257 


170 JO 17050 

Hu* nunor 



Hochllct 

530 

525 


Close Prev. j 


2 Z 7 J 0 

227 

Hoesdh 

110 

109 





206 . 



308 

317 


294 J 0 

288 


233 231 JO 


248 245 J 0 



267 

Kloeekner Werke 


69 




5*2 



203 

198 

MAN 



Monrwsmann 

196 

191 

Maench Ruack 



Nixdorf 

584 

571 

PKI 

628 

621 

Porsche 

1510 

1500 

Prcussaa 

295 JO 

292 

PWA 


RWE 

IB 3 J 0 183 J 0 

Rheinmetall 

294 29350 

Scherlng 

502 

497 

SEL 

3 W 365.90 

Siemens 

578 JQ 5 A 8 J 0 

Thvssen 

1 MJ 0 112 J 0 

V*ba 



Volkswii-jenwerk 

33 X 40 

322 

Wei la 

583 

584 

Commerzbank Index : 143210 

Previous : 1421 JO 



II "«»**««* II 

bi. e«i Asia 

24 X 

Z 4 J 0 

Cheung Kona 

1640 

16-70 

cmna Lieut 



Green Islond 

8 J 0 

8 J 0 

Hono Sena Bank 

47 

44 J 0 

1 lender son 

Z 1 S 

110 

China Gas 

10 JO 

10 JQ 

HK Electric 



HK Really A 

11.40 


HK Hotels 

36 J 5 

35 

HK Laid 

5 JS 

i 65 

HK Shana Banc 

7 J 0 

US 

HK Telephone 

102 

101 

HK Yaumaiei 

1725 

3 J 0 

HK Whorl 

6.15 


Hutch Whampoa 

25 

3510 

HVsan 


OJ 9 

Inn City 

0 J 6 

084 

Jardlne 

11 X 0 

11 JO 

Jordlna 50 C 

11 JO 

11-60 

Kowlaan Malar 

8.70 

lUfl 

Miramar Hotel 

38 J 0 

38 

Nesv World 

7.25 


Orient Ovarseas 

215 

215 

SHK Props 

1190 


Sreiux 

280 


Swire Pacific A 

24 J 0 

2190 

Tai Cheung 

IJ 9 

178 

Wah Kvrang 

1.12 

1.15 

WhneiocfcA 

m 

7 JO 

Wing On Co 

105 

110 

Winsar 

4.95 

5 

wand urn 

1.95 

1.91 

Hoik Sena index 

I 59 U 3 


Prey km* ; 157660 






L 1 


aeci 

Anq to American 
Angle Am Gold 

Barlow* 

Blvvoor 
Bui in* 

Op Bwi 

Orlelgnloin 

Eland* 

OF 5 A 

Harmony 


800 no 

WO W5 
14700 17050 
1135 1140 
1235 1206 
7050 7100 
HDD lie: 
4575 4475 
1750 17*0 
3 300 3350 
3*00 7*50 


Hiveid Steel 
Kloof 

Nedbank 

Pres Stem 
Ruaoial 
SA Brews 
51 Helena 
Sasol 

West Homing 


478 480 

7*50 r*oa 
1480 1520 
4750 4925 
1S4S 1580 
790 BOO 
3050 3335 
450 457 

5400 5800 


Composite Stock Index : 11 04 JO 
Previous : 111358 


London 


AACorp 
Allied-Lvons 
Angia Am Gold 
Ass Bril Foods 
Ass Dairies 
Barclays 
Bass 
BA.T. 

B eecft a fn 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boats 

Barrator Indus 

BP 

Bril Home SI 

Brlr Tolnenm 
Bril Aerosmce 
Brlloll 
BTR 
Burma ti 
Coble Wire loss 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cons 
Commercial U 
Cant Gold 
Courrauld5 
Dalgctv 
Do Boer* • 
Distillers 
Driefanleln 
Fisons 
Free 51 Ged 
GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 
Glaxo t 
GnaidMet 
GRE 
Gmnness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
L lavas Bant. 
LAnrho 
Lucas 

MarksandSa 

wlai Bo* 

Midland Bonk 

Nat west Bonk 

PandO 

Pllkington 

Plesscv 

Prudential 

Roc a I Elect 

Randtantein 

Ponk 

Reed inri 

Reuters 

Royal Dutch c 

RTZ 

Soatchl 

SauKburv 

Sears Holdinos 

Snell 

STC 


J14L. 5144% 

217 217 

SMU «7V. 
220 214 


146 

384 

SJ9 

321 

323 

204 

37 

513 

270 

184 

255 

528 

279 

170 

353 
214 

354 
248 
545 
161 
181 
203 
499 
143 
411 
523 
298 

SDL. 


144 

374 

529 

321 

325 

206 

37 

508 
271 
189 
254 
526 
283 
16Y 
355 
213 
353 
248. 
545 
142 
181 
204 

509 
141 
401 
5Z7 
799 

S23K. 


CMM .Prw. 1 

Sid Chartered 

477 

477 

Sun Alliance 

453 

450 

Tata ond trie 

465 

445 

Tesco 

248 

245 

Thom EMI 

361 

371 


250 

254 

Trotalspor Hse 

334 

331 


132 

131 

Ultramar 

208 

206 

Unilever c 11 19/64 

mo 

united Biscuits 

178 

176 

Vickers 

285 

278 

Woe (worth 

393 

395 

FT. 30 laden : 9S4J0 


Previous : 95150 



FT^E-IBO Index 

1250* 


Previous : 1M6JH 



II mb— II 


21090 20410 1 


3549 

3500 

Ctoahohris 

10150 

10000 

Cred Hal 

2270 



10400 

10390 


13150 13050 

Fiat 

3750 

3700 

Flrraktar 


- 

Generali 

■ .ii, i 

11=1 

■ i: ■ 

IiLJI 


K: „ . Z 1.11 

1 tataas 

1446 

1429 

llalmoblllarl 

91500 90000 

Mediobanca 

UEv-U['.:vJ 

Montedison 



Oil volt 1 

SJSfl 


Pirelli 


'11 

RAS 

75050 75200 

Rlnascenle 

B«) 

8SJ 

SIP 

2451 


SME 

1338 

1330 

Snla 


BiTTI 

Slaoda 


Stat 

3270 

3246 



Previous: 1487 



I PSBpfos | 


345 345 

S234% S25W 

164 144 

619 404 

230 277 

1229/441213/32 
2B5 285 

703 

247 
820 
182 
411 
754 
183 

248 
247 
684 
3B7 
167 
315 
132 
458 
379 
462 
348 
271 
122 
644 
132 


I975i S971? 

324 324 


412 

321 318 

45 37/44 45 5/64 
554 554 


304 

93 

710 

138 


670 

304 

919. 

Tflr 


Air LkHilde 
Aistnom ail 
A v Dassault 
Banco! re 

BIC 

Bong rain 
Bauvoues 
BSN-GD 
Carr el our 
Chorgeurs 
Club Med 
Dorty 
Dome* 
EH-Aaulialrtc 
Europe 1 
Gen Eou> 

Hochette 
Latarge Cap 
Learand 
Leslcur 
roreal 
Martel) 

Moira 
Merlin 

MICtWHtfl 
M64I Hanem 
Moulinex 
Oca dentate 
Pernod Rle 
Perrier 
Pei/oies (lee) 
Peugeot 
Prlnlenun 
Rodloteehn 
Rcdouta 
Roussel Uctal 
SCnol! 

SMt Rmtienol 
Teiemecan 
Thomson CSF 

Aged Index ; 314.13 
Previous : n&Bi 
ZAC index ; 22*70 
PTHVleo* i 734 JO 


728 

299 

1260 

438 

535 

1941 

828 

2470 

2180 

461 

544 
1501 

701 

208 

831 

495 

1485 

540 

2270 

480 

2455 

1710 

17SS 

2045 

1190 

2010 

9050 

710 

7SS 

545 
234 
397 
382 
307 

1359 

1700 

753 

1523 

2425 

574 


714 

301 

1288 

438 

532 

1950 

Bit 

2495 

2140 

452 

543 

15l» 

495 

20SJ0 

840 

894 

1490 

540 

2245 
489 
2458 
1722 
1780 
2078 
1200 
Ml 
92 
773 
750 
545 
235 
395 
201 
308 
1389 
1685 
747 
1550 
2610 
- 534 


BOOKS 


ATHOS, THE HOLY MOUNTAIN 

By Philip Sherrard. Phoiogruphs hy Takis 
Zenoultikos. 176 pages. $27.95 
The Overlook Press. 12 West 21st Street. 
New York. N. Y- 100 10. 

Reviewed by John J. Yiannias 

I F you. like me, think the character of Zorba 
has done more to distort the popular image 
of Greece than any other bit of hype in memo- 
ry, you will find the proportions restored by 
Philip Shorard's sensitive book about the 
Hoiy Mountain. 

Adi os is a wooded peninsula in northern 
Greece, very beautiful in a wild way. about 35 
miles (55 kilometers) long and 2 to 5 miles 
wide, ending in a bait whitish mountain that 
rises out of the Aegean Sea to a height of 6.500 
feet (1.980 meters). Twenty monasteries and 
scores of monastic habitations bearing other 
names — sketes. ketba, kalyvia. hesiduisieria. 
kathismata — are scattered abouL on the 
shores or high above them, built into ihe clifT- 
f aces, nestled inland. A huge majority of the 
monks are Greeks, but in keeping with its pan- 
Ordiodox character the peninsula is home also 
to ascetics from the Soviet Union. Yugoslavia. 
Romania. Bulgaria and Orthodox communi- 
ties in other countries. 

The Holy Mountain has long intrigued 
Westerners by its isolation, iuv sheer sue as a 
piece of real estate consecrated to a religious 
purpose, and its prohibition of women and, 
theoretically, females of every species. The 
earliest records suggest that monastic life on 
Athos began in the 9th century. Today ihere 
are considerably fewer than 3,000 monks, 
about a third as many as at the turn of the 
century. But these are not by Aihonian stan- 
dards, "hard times. At one point the depreda- 
tions of pirates had reduced its population to a 
few hundred. Lately there has been a sizable 
influx of young university graduates into the 
novitiate. 

Sherrard’s book is a revised version of one 
that he published 25 years ago under the title 
“Athos. Mountain erf "Silence." There are three 
new chanters: on changes (particularly new 
roads) that portend a secularization of the 
environment; on the art and relics and their 
deeper significance for Orthodox spirituality, 
and on the layout and appearance of the mon- 
asteries. 

The photographs are new and, with few 
exceptions, technically of high quality. Those 
that show church services in progress (a subject 
ordinarily barred to photographers, and there- 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


r«re of ipeLial interest) are naturally not verV 
evocative of the constant movement, theechr^ 
ir.g chant and the aroma of incense. . 

From the severe i studies that he tun written 
on modem Greek culture and its historical 
roots, such as “The Greek East and the Lanq 
West" and "The Wound of Greece," one su* 
peels that Sherrard's first encounter with ifc 
country's Byzantine heritage triggered a Pfo. 
tonic anamnesis, su a i tuned is he to that fen. ;[ v - : ‘ ' 
inge. His enthusiasm puts him squarely on one 
side in the He)!as-or-B>iantium comroreny 
over modem Greece's identity. It also helps, 
explain whv his final chapter. “The Wav of 
Stillness." is such a good, even moving.' ac- 
count of the mystical yet practical tftedog 
that shapes and sustains Atncs. 

JnhnJ. y ionnias. an associate professor of a# fT | 
fusion at the University of Virginia, wwetb 1,1 * 
review for The Washington Post. 

BESTSELLERS 


The Nrw Vo»k Tinv*. 

This iiM i-. tun'd un ny ■ 91 • fi''m nuwihia LOT hrtiiitu, 
ihrmghaijt (he Uaii.ii Si uli> W Ak' 'i'i *rt iVil namanh 

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A CREED FOR THE THIRD MILLEN- 
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FAMILY ALBUM, by Danieilc Skfl — ; 

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THE LONELY SILVER RAIN. b> John 
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FOOTFALL, try Larry Niven and Jeny 
Pnumcllc — — — j 


W°" U 





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13 


NONncnoN 

LACOCCA- An Autobiography, bv Lee La- 

cocej «iih William Novak ... . 

A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Peicrv and N.-nev Anson 

SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES, 
bv Ctfnndl Cowan and Melvy-n Kinder - 
MY MOTHER'S KEEPER, by B D Hj- 

man 

CON FESSIONS OF A HOOKER, by Bdb 

LOVINU EACH OTHER, by Leo Bnscag- 

lia — 

MOUN TBATTEN. b\ Philip Ziegler 

BREAKING W ITH 'MOSCOW, by A*- 

kadv N Shevchenko — 

A Liniri IN THE ATTIC hy Shel Silver- 

ONCE UPON A TIME bv Gloria Vander- 

TH E SOO NG DYNASTY, "by Sterirag 

Seopra'c - — 

THE HEART OF THE DRAGON, by 
Alas-dair Ctavn: 


4 34 
■2 7 


3 12 

4 t 

6 •(, 
■k 

43 

4 


s 

7 
* l) 


13 133 
11 f 


12 10 


_ 9 3 


THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Richard Bach 

THE COU RAGE TO CHANGE byJTcn- 

nivW’holcv - 

"SURELY YOU'RE JOKING, MR. 
FEYNMANN." by Rj chant P. Feywnann 

ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

DR. BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER - 

DIET, bv Smart M Betgcr ] 

WEBSTER'S NINTH NEW COLLE- 
GIATE DICTIONARY - 

THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jelf 


14 42 
10 1 « 


13 


2 18 


7/3/85 


Smith - - — - 

NOTHING DOWN, bv Robcn G. Allen 
WEIGHT WATCHER'S QUICK START 
PROGRAM COOKBOOK, by Jean Ni- 


.3.12 
5 M 


- 22 


tr_- 

5... 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal, 27 
international match 
points hinged on the opening 
lead. To show his remarkable 
distribution. South needed to 
bid dubs once followed by 
spades three times. He set out 
to do this, but a wildly compet- 
itive auction followed, and he 
ran out of space at the seven- 
level. 

It is easy to conceive that it 
is necessary to lead a singleton 
to give a partner a ruff, but 
there were some clues for 
West South clearly held a dis- 
tributional freak. North had 
shown a strong hand with a 


dub fit when be cue-bid two 


NORTH 
* A J 
S7863 
0 AK2 
*A J1084 

EAST 
*82 
C K J7« 
OQ 1097834 


WEST 
*643 

V A Q ID 9 5 2 
<► J83 

*q 

SOUTH (D> 
* KQ1Q973 
O- 
> — 

*K9S75 3 2 


Neither side 


vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

Saadi Wnt 

North 

East. 

1 * 

1 V 

29 

4* 

4* 

S V 

7* 

7 O 

7* Pws 

Pan 

DbL 

Pass Pass 

P 0*8 



West led Hie dia m o n d three. 


hearts. And East bad cotnrib* 
uted an interesting jump cue-' 
bid in clubs. That presumably 
showed heart support and v 
desire for a dub lead if tW 
opportunity arrose. ■ 

However, East confused the 
issue by bidding Ws seven-lev- 
el. This caused West to think 
that his partner bdd die dia . L-. 
mond ace. and he led a dii>J^> 

mond. 

North scored 1,770. and 
gained 15 intetnalionai. mak|ih 
points. They would have to* 

12 after the lead of lhe;dttt 
queen, for in the replay Noireh 
Sooth were in the surprisingly 
modest contract of four 
spades. 


Close Prev. 

1 Sfaiflapore 1 


2JH 

252 

DBS 

5JM 

5J5 


5JJ5 

SJD 

How Pur 

2.13 

IM 


2J2 


Mol Banking 

5.40 

545 

OCBC 

US 

885 

OUB 

1ST 

US 

OUE 

2A7 

270 

Shangri-la 

NjU. 

— 

Slow Darby 

1.95 

1J5 

S’oore Land 

2*7 

248 


5.90 

5.95 

S Steamship 

1 

181 

51 Trading 

138 

X40 

UnSSad Ov®ri6as 

1.76 

1.77 

UOB 

3J2 

IBS 

Straits Times I od Index : 747 JO 

Previous : 77523 



1 j] 

AGA 

114 

117 

Alla Laval 

183 

3 

Asea 

293 

Astra 



Atios Copco 

104 

104 

Bouden 

NJ. 

__ 

Electrolux 

255 

251 

Ericsson 

285 

284 

ESSMtO 


N8 

Hondo Isbanken 

152 

NO. 




Saab-Sconla 

N.a 


Sandvlk 

345 

NO. 

Skanska 

83 

84 

SKF 

204 

206 

SwedlsnMaioi 

184 

188 

Volvo 

210 

207 


Previous : 344X0 



II Sydney 1 

ACI . 

156 

7 ffl 

ANZ 

4J1 

445 

-BHP 

6J6 

6J2 

Barol 

3J0 

321 


1.90 

1.90 

Costiemoln® 

L44 

6J0 


ffi 

383 

Comalca 

1.9D 

CRA 

5.94 

5.98 

C5R 

L86 

285 


US 

2J4 

Elders Ixl 

1SS 

7.98 

ICI Australia 

1A4 

185 

Magsttafl 



MIM 

275 

272 

surer 

U4 

2.22 

Not Aust Batik 

4.15 

4.12 

News Cars 

470 

6JD 

N Broket) Hill 

2J5 

2J3 

Poseidon 

3.15 

3J5 

Old Cool Trust 

IA5 

182 


5J4 

5J4 

Thomas Malian 

7Jtb 

1.99 

Western Minina 

372 

175 

WeJIpQC Bonking 

4.1D 

408 

WoodsMe 

1X5 

1J0 


Previous : UU0 



ll Tdky. ■ 

Altai 

416 

394 

Asahi ChOifl 

910 

918 

AsafU Glass • 

888 

884 

Bank ol Tokvo 

«a 

817 

Brtdgestano 

582 

577 

Canon 

1180 

1150 

Cash) 

1620 

1620 

ci ion 

432 

SM 

Dal N logon Print 

1150 

1138 

Dalwa House 

£49 

A» 

Doiwa Securities 

940 

944 


Forme 
Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
Fvlttsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 
Honda 

Mr Air Lines 
Kol line 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Steal 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elac Inds 
Matsu Elec works 
Mitsubishi Bonk 
Mitsubishi Oran 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hcow 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mlisul and Co 
MlfsukosfH 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NikkoSec 
Nippon Kogaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yuson 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Pkmeer 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Shhnazg 

Shtnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo JWarlne 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tatsel Carp 
Taisno Marine 
TakedoCMm 
TDK 
Tellln 

Tokla Marine 
Tokyo Elec Power 
Taapan Prtnllnp 
Torov ind 
Toshiba 
Tarata 

YomaicM Sec 


dm Pre*. 

8120 51 DB 
1* 146S 
1910 202D 
1020 1010 
741 734 

65B 649 

1440 1450 
7318 7390 
310 315 

1880 1879 
149 149 

494 693 

472 474 

355 358 

4270- 4280 
1400 MOO 
781 772 

1830 1450 
510 513 

398 392 

320 322 

850 682 

400 401 

610 619 

B2S 835 
1050 1040 
825 835 

810 810 
1140 1140 
922 922 

159 141 

2M 301 
640 631 

1279 1280 
1170 1790 
1850 1870 
974 971 

898 900 

734 730 

791 885 

4000 4130 
1910 1930 
248 248 

724. 744 
151 151 

244 5*5 
575 582 

B38 - 843 
4720 4730 
483 485 

920 934 

2050 2050 
BOO 875 
405 415 

369 546 

1270 1270 
. 854 8S8 


Nlkkat/D-J. Index ; 1291175 
Previous : 12717.62 
New Index : 1*2121 
Previous : \niS7 


Ad la 

Aiusuisse 
AutaPhcxi 
Bank Leu . 

Brown Boverl 

Clbc Geloy 

Credit Suisse 

Electrowatf 

HoMerbank 

Inter dHeounf 

Jacob Suchord 

Jetmall 

LandhiCvr 

Moevenplck 

Nestle 

oerllkan-B 

Roche Baby 

Sanaox 

Schindler 

Suteer 

Surveillance 

Swissair 

SBC 

5wfSl Reinsurance 
Swiss VoHubank 
Union Bank 
wintentiur 
Zurichln* 

•SBC index: 49170 
Previous : «86J0 


3160 3120 
775 770 
5850 -59j» 
3890 38T 
1820 11 . 
3270 3225' 


750 7951 

2300 ZF5 
4500 6500 
wm woo 
18S0 1850 
4750 4650 
6330 6290 
1520 1530 
9175 -9150 
1380 1375 
4550 4590! 
398 J9J 

NJQ. 4IS0 

1375 1310. 
472 462 

sow anal 

1770 !725i 
4290 41B5: 
5175 5160; 
2380 2345 


MMtraal 


Juh-2 


Canadian stocks t it AP 


548V4 Bank Mom 
490 BomhrdrA 
19830 BombrdrB 
5300 CB Pale 
5165 Cascades 
2500 Cil 
11730 ConBolh 
1125 DomTxtA 
6750 Caz Metro 
2175 MnTTrst 
53575 NOT Bk CdO 
170*5 Power Carp 
100 RonandA 
37383 Royal Bank 
1776 RayTrstco 

300 StatabniA 
Total Sales 1.507.986 shares. 


High Law Close Chat 
S30 Vj 301% 30H+ to 
5 12Vi 1ZW 121b— W 
S 12*9 124k 124k— V% 
sam wn 707%+ i% 
515 14Vj 141% 
5301% 384% 304%+ U 
5164% 1644 164%+ '6 
SUM 114% lift 
5114% 11V< 114% 
5161% 16 16 

52 TW 2844 21 +14 

118*% 115V 1B4h + 4% 
S21» 211% 21W— <6 
*301% 30 304*+ !i> 

*214% 2114 21<4 
5211% 211% 211% 


ladoftrtats Index: 


Close 

1IL21 


Previous 

11122 


To Our Readers ; 

Canadian stock markets gpou 
tions are not available in lh& m 
tion because of transmission prot 
lems. 


#1 



in the Trib. 


Get the latest 
low-down on 
high-tech in the 
weekly column on 


-• 


tain tjl v 







•LV. - 




H.Q.: nal quoted: NA; n 
available: *d, c«-divldcnd. 





t: 


ra. ,,# * . 


4 


•ffcv 


"‘"'l ■- 








I 



IU* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBENE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1985 


Page 17 


; i*n» ft 

- V 

? A..- 


SPORTS 



sets 2d-Seeded Lendl 


r . U^^ss^dtHcilPms 

J England . — 

j I^contC-.a stylish Freach- 

C 2 seed Ivan Lendl 


m the Wimble- 

^ iffltfe dtagyionslujg on Mon- 
qualifier 



Mantua Navratilova and .Chris 
Evert Lloyd advanced to the quar- 
terfinals. ' 

Leconte rallied lo beat a sub-par 
LendL 3-6. 6-4. 6-3. 6-1, while Van 
Nostrand upset the No. 4 women's' 
seed. Manuda Maleeva of Bulgar- 
ia. 7-5. 6-1 

Boris Becker, the West German 
teen-ager, continued his 
through the men's division. 





Where on Earth 

. 1 ? 



* .' -*flf John Feinstein 

^ Washington Post Semce 

^ ' LONDON — Eleven years ago. 
, - ^aacirtJWinMedOfl champions* 
: -diimermlptjvs 1 . 48 have been 
, a 1LS- cow# prom. The first 
' dance. whS* traditionally goes to 
‘ ibe twosingI«titTists. paired James 
■ Scott ComiofSi -21, and Christine 
,f - . Marie* Evert. 19, - 

"That year's tournament marked 

- , beginning of an era in which the 

United - Stales dominated profes- 
gorjal fcuHS. Commies have ai- 
Ways faken turns at the top: the 
fngtwh and the French first, then 
the Americans and the Australians. 
■?. -for the fetUyears.it has been the 
rUmted States. 

True, BJftrn Borg won five 
straight WimNedons during this 
. period. Bat he was surrounded by 
U£: challengers at every turn — 

- Connors, John McEnroe, Vitas 
Gerulaitis, Roscoe Tanner. Even's 
dndtengers were Evonne Goola- 

i gong (Anstrahfl}. Tracy Austin and 
w Martina Navratilova, who shortly 
after becoming a U.S. citizen sup- 

- planted her as No. 1 in the world 

Begjmvmg in 1974, six U.S. men 
.. have woe Wimbledon; four of 
Borg’s victories in foals were over 
Americans. Nine American men 
. have won the U.S. Open; U.S. 
women -have won Wimbledon six 

- times, the open nine tones. 

- But the era may be drawing to an 
cod. At the French Open, Connors, 
32, and McEnroe. 26, were the old- 
.. est quanerfinalists. There are six 
Ui men among the top 15 in the 
' world. Among them, only Aaron 
* JCricksten, 17. is under 25. And he 
'";p a one-surface (hardcourt) player 
with so many holes in his game it 
may be. hard for him to advance 
: beyaod his current No. 1 1 ranking. 
“Where," asked UJL Davis Cpp 
tap tain Arthur Ashe, "is the next 

- McEnroe?" 

The answer lies across (be ocean. 
Perhaps in Sweden, where Mats 
Wilander, 20, already is No. 4 in 


titles; where Stefan Edberg. 19. is 
No. 14 and dang rapidly. Perhaps 
.in Australia, where Pat Cash. 20. is 
"No. 7, or in West Germany, where 
Boris Becker, 17, has jumped to 
-No. 20. 

. . Americans? Other than Krick- 
nein, in the top 50 are people like 
: Tim Mayotte, who is 18 months 
younger than McEnroe; Scott Da- 
ns, 23, mudi improved but not a 
iop-10 threat; Paul Annacone, 22. 
and just now in the top 25; Jimmy 
Arias. 20, but already ranked 20 
Ipots lower than two years ago. and 
'ureg Holmes, 21 . a two-fisted play- 


er who might make the top 10 
someday but probably not the top 
five. 

The women looked to as succes- 
sors to Evert and Navratilova are 
Helena Sukova. 20, of Czechoslo- 
vakia: Steffi Graf. 16, of West Ger- 
many. and Gabriels Sabatim, IS, of 
Argentina, who are ranked Nos. 7. 
1 1 and 14, respectively, worldwide. 
None <rf the younger U.S. women 
— Bonnie Gadusek, Kathy Rin- 
aldi Kathleen Horvath — are in 
their class. 

“1 think a lot of it has to do with 
the money," said Connors. “When 
1 was coming up, if you wanted to 
get noticed, if you wanted to make 
money, you had to win tourna- 
ments. Now if you’re making the 
fourth round, or the quarters, you 
can get rich. If you are in the lop 50 
in the world, you're doing very 
well. 

“If you are an American and in 
the top 50, you have every endorse- 
ment you could want and a great 
living. When Z was young, if you 
were ranked No. 50, you were no- 
where. You need the incentive to 
win tournaments, not just match- 
es." 

Others point to “the Even influ- 
ence,'’ as a reason for fewer U.S. 
women at the top. “For a long time 
everyone’s copied Chris.” said Pam 
Shriver. “Nowit's r**<-hmg up with 
us. The Europeans are oeing 
coached and are playing with far 
more imagination t han Americans. 
I'm probably the youngest Ameri- 
can woman [23 this week] playing 
serve and volley. 

“Everyone has tried to copy 
Chris, but what they don’t realize is 
that somebody like her comes 
along about once every 100 years. 
You can't win these days just slay- 
ing hank The Saba thus and tne 
Sokovas and the Grafs do more 

than that " 

“Tennis changes." McEnroe 
yriri. “Americans have so many 
sports that a lot of the good athletes 
never think about tennis. In p laces 

America, a lot of good athletes, the 
best ones, play tennis. That's not so 
with us.” 

StiH the United States is. not 
soon going to fade from view as a 
tennis power. Forty-seven percent 
of the players at Wimbledon are 
from the United States. Twenty- 
four of the top 50 men in the world 
are Americans, as are 21 of the top 
50 women. 

But No. 1 is a different story. As 
Ashe says, the next McEnroe is 
nowhere in sight. And the next 
Connors may be Brett, Jimmy’s 
son. Heissix- 


ing out Tim Mayotte, the 16th seed 
and a grass-court specialist . J 
McEnroe, Ok d( 


on, beat West German qualifier 
Andreas Maurer, &0, 64, ' 6-2, 
while Navratilova took, only 55 
minutes to dciwn Rene Uys of 
South Africa, 6-2, 6-2.' 

• Leconte, die world's 26lb-ranked 
player, began hesitantly but went, 
on to produce a cascade of winners. 
It was ins third consecutive victory 
over Lendl and his fifth in eight 
meetings. But the experienced 
Czech, a two-time Wimbledon 
semifuiafist, bad been expected to 
master Leconte; who mil turn 22 
on Thursday, in the pressure atmo- 
sphere of Center Court. 

Lendl took the opening set, bnt 
could not contain Leconte' in the 
□ext three and didn't help his cause 

by serving numerous double faults. 
IBs temper and concentration fi- 
nally cracked in the sixth game rtf 
the fourth set when one of his 
serves was called out by the umpire. 
Who Overruled tbe linesman 

“How can you say tbe ball was 
omr Lendl screamed at the um- 1 
pire. “Have you never had a match 
where yon screwed up." He lost the 
game to trail 5-1, and Xeconte 
served out die match. 

“I. know how to play Lendl," 
Leconte said “When he's. saving 
weU, there's nothing to do — like in 
the first set But 1 know when he 
gets tight and nervous. 1 just said to 
myself: 'Let him play, let him make 
tbopoint or the fault.' " 

Evert, die Australian and French 
champion and co-top seed here 
with Navratilova, took just over an 
hour to beat fcBow American Anne. 
Smith, 6-0, 64, and has lost only 1 1 
games in ber first four matches. 

Van Nostrand, a 20-year-old 
right-hander ranked 155 in tbe 
world, surprised Maleeva with con- 
sistently hard service returns. In a 
see-saw opening set, the American 
began well but then lost four coo- 
secutive.games to trail by 3-5. 

She won the next four games to 

take tbe set, but lost ber composure 
early in the second stanza when sbe 
double-faulted to give Maleeva a 2- 
0 lead after the previous point had 
been controversially awarded to 
the Bulgarian. But instead of wilt- 
ing. Van Rostrand, who lost in the 
qualifying event last year, ripped 
off the last six games. 

It was Van RostraruTs first tour- 
nament since a three-month layoff 
because erf a foot injury. “I almost 
didn't come because 1 was not play- 
ing that wefl. But I was really 
pumped up." sbe said. “I never 
expected to get this far." 

Connors, moving better than at 
any. time during the champion- 
ships, downed Sammy Giammalva 
of the United Stales. 6-3, 64, 6-3. 
The 1974 and 1982 Wimbledon 
jhanpjgi broke Giammalva_once 
In cadi of the first two - sets and 
twice in the third. 

Becker, tbe unseeded 17-year-old 
power hitter who on Monday elimi- 
nated seventh-seeded Joalrim Nys- 
trom of Sweden, battled through 
his second straight five-setter be- 
fore beating Mayotte, 6-3. 4-6. 6-7, 
7-6, 6-2, in 3 hours and 32 minutes. 

Toward the end of the fourth set, 
Becker went down duiching his left 
ankle, but finished the match to 
become die youngest player since 
Bjflm Borg in 1973 to reach the 
quarterfinals of dm men’s singles. 

Mayotte's defeat meant that 



Heon Leconte 

‘La him make the point or ihe/duh' 

three ifngwfrti players reached the 
last eight. Heinz Guenthardt of 
Switzerland and Chilean Ricardo 
Acuna also advanced with respec- 
tive victories ova Vyay Amntraj of 
India and American Robert Se- 
gosa 

In a battle of seeded players, 
No. 8 Kevin Curren was too strong 
for the rising young Swede, Stefan 
Edberg, seeded No. 14, and won 7- 
6. 6-3. 7-6. Fifth-seeded Anders 
Jarryd of Sweden — who had never 
gone past the first round in four 
previous appearances here — ad- 
vanced to the quarters by beating 
Danie Visser of South Africa, 6-1, 
64.6-1. 

In the women’s division, other 
re ed s to gain the quarterfinals in- 
cluded Pam Shriver, Zina Garri- 
son, Kathy RinaldLand Helena Su- 
kova of Czechoslovakia. 

Garrison, the eighth seed, defeat- 
ed France's Catherine Tanvia, 6-1, 
6-3. No. 5 seed Shriver West Ger- 
man teenager Steffi Graf, s e e d e d 
15th, 3-6. 6-2. 6^C Rinaldi the 
No. 16, ended the hopes of Austra- 
lian Elizabeth Smyhe. winning con- 
vincingly by 6-2, 6-1. 

Pascale Paradis, the talented 
French teen-ager who e limi nated 
14tb-seeded Wendy TumbuU of 


Australia in the previous round, 
was beaten by Sukova. the No. 7 
seed, 64, 7-6. In a battle of two 
nonseeded serve- and-volleyers, 
American Barbara Potter beat Brit- 
on Jo Durie. 7-6, 6-7, 6-1. 

McEnroe zipped through the 
opening set against Maurer in just 
19 minutes, losing only 14 points. 


Mattingly Homer Puts Yankees Past Jays 


Cvaptkd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TORONTO — Don Mattingly 
dsdn’t give it a second thought. The 
New York first baseman was think- 
ing home run all the way when he 
came to bat in the eighth inning, 
and Us shot over the right-field 
fence broke a I-I tie and sparked 
‘ victory over 


K „ Jan *c Yankees to a 4-1 victor 
t 1 Jd' 1 the Blue Jays here Monday. 
‘ "1 went un there lookini 
" . boner," sai 


went up there looking for a 
lid ihe 1984 American 

BASEBALL ROU1NDUP 

.league batting champion, who 
' fais league-leading runs bar- 
total to 53. “With two out, 
Sere’s not much chance for a single 
and then two more singles. I decid- 
ed I was going to look for a fastball 
in and pull it. And I did" — drilling 
a 10 delivery from Doyle Alexan- 
der for \as seventh home run of the 
year. 

dinner Joe Cowley limited To- 
rouo to two infield singles and a 
ova eight innings before 
Dave Rkhetii pitched a 1-2-3 
®ath. “J had a good curve and a 
changeup. and I also chal- 
Ned them with the fastball.'* said 
who recorded his seventh 
v Wory in his last eight games. 

Hie Blue Jays took a 1-0 lead in 
fourth. Lloyd Moseby beat out 
bouncer and went to second 
**o Cowlev threw wildly trying to 
first. Willie Upshaw 
®ed with a double off the 
. to-fidd fence. 

The Yankees tied it in the fifth 
Mike Pag! fa rul o doubled 
Willie Randolph from first. 
W added their final two runs in 
tiitilh (m a double, two singles 
*cood baseman Damaso Gar- 
throwing error during an ai- 
double play. 

"J»Haeis3,WKteSott: InChi- 
Cowan's three-run homer 
2™* eighth lifted Seattle to ii» 
victory in 10 games. 
»»rvW, Aa*K5i In Arling- 
'CMs. fee O'Bnen drove in 
i 6 "“tv on a. homer and two d«i- 
Texas powered past Califor- 
■ Hookie Gkm Conk won his 
T”*® ; tfan after being called up 
^■aiinim the minors, 
n ‘tentOriofev 1; In Baltinuf e. 

a iwn-nin homer 


in the second and Kirk Gibson and 
Larry Herndon added bascs-empty 
shots in the third and fourth to 
prooel Detroit. The loss was tbe 
Orioles’ third in as many games 
against the Tigers this season; Bal- 
timore is 2-10 against New York 
and Boston, the other Eastern Divi- 
sion contenders. 

Indians 5, Twins 2: In Minneapo- 
lis, George Vulcovich’s three-run 
home run in the second helped 
make CTevetand a winner erf back- 
to-back games for the first time 
since May 19. 

Brewers 5, Red Sox 1: In Mil- 
waukee, Ge df Cooper had two dou- 
bles, including a two-run shot in 
the first, as the Brewers won their 
third game in a row and handed 
Boston its third straight setback. 

A*s 4, Royals 3: In Kansas City. 
Missouri, Dusty Baker hit a three- 
run homer with two out in the ninth 
off relief ace Dan Quisen berry lo 
lift Oakland to victory. Baker also 
drove in a run with a third-inning 
grounder. 

Padres 6, Astros 5: In the Na- 
tional League, in San Diego, Brace 
Bochy's two-out home run off No- 
lan Ryan in the 10th gave the Pa- 
dres their decision over Houston. 
San Diego had drawn to within 5-3 
in the eighth on Tim Flannery's 
double and two infield outs, and 
tied the game in the ninth on a 
sacrifice fly by pinch-hitter Kurt 
Bevacqua. Ryan struck out seven to 
bring him within 10 of 4,000 career 
strikeouts. . , w 

Expos X Cardinals 2: In Montre- 
al, Andre Dawson's single with two 
out in the 10th scored Jun Wom- 
terd from third base and moved the 
Evpos within a half-game of first- 
place Si. Louis in the Eastern Dm- 

M Brave. 4, Gianls 1: In San Fran- 
cisco. Dale Murphy hit his 19th 
home run of the season land rookie 
Zaire Smith allowed three h.b m 

his 7*i innings as Atlanta handed 
the Giants their Uih loss in 12 

3. PhiUi« I: In Philadel- 
phia. Rjv Fomcnot Mattered seven 
hits in his seven innings o[ work 
and Steve Lake's sixth -inning 
squeeze bum scored Davey Lopes 
with the decisive run. Chicago re- 



*»—i IXad ft— tfcnoiond 


The Fatherly Godfather of Sampdorm 


International HerabJ Tribute 

LONDON — At some unbearably crucial 
stage during Wednesday's Italian Cup final 
in Genoa, someone (probably his young law- 
yer daughter Francesca) wQl hand Paolo 
Mantovani a cigarette. A placebo, not tbe real 
thing. Thai with tus delicate heart, might kill 
Sampdoria's president. 

But as Mamovani's little dub mounts the 
threshold to history, the daughter will watch 
the beads erf sweat on the father's brow, the 
temples rising, the lie wrenched from its col- 
lar. She will hear expletives never uttered 
during his billion-lire shipping deals and she 

Rob Hughes 

will know his need to hold, to fondle, to crush 
the closest thing to a cigarette doctors will 
allow. 

With it pnsidenie, Sampdoria is living its 
fantasy. In the season that Verona climbed 
past giants Juvenuis, Torino and Milan to 
capture tbe Italian League title, “Doria” has 
become the cup favome. 

Nothing (hat depends on players can be 
taken for granted. Man tovani will be repeat- 
■ ing that under his breath. Yet Graeme Sou- 
ness's stunning goal giving Sampdoria a 1-0 
away victory ova AC Milan last Sunday 
raises tbe scale of expectation for tbe return 
leg. Hold bard to your nerve, Sampdoria, 
control the palpitations, and surety the first 
major prize in y our 40-year existence will 
arrive. 

Anyone might think a single match a speck 
in the ocean to a man risen from $1 1-a-monlh 
office boy in Rome to multimDlionaire ty- 
coon. A man living by tbe grace of one of 
America’s best heart surgeons; a father whose 
four children are entering the professions 
after expensive Swiss schooling; a man whcee 
libeny remains threatened by fraud investi- 
gators who have hounded him for five years 
and, despite still not satisfying courts, would 
dearly like to imprison him for alleged mas- 
sive tax evasion and export irregularities. 

Unless you can accept as an act of faith an 
Italian's love affair with his soccer, you will 
not begin to understand why Sampdoria U.C 
— with its drain on his hank balance and 
demands on his time and nervous system (it 
was at a soccer game in Cagliari that Manto- 
vani at 51, suffered the heart attack that 
required a quadruple bypass) — should so 
consume Hini. 

He will shrug and attempt a self-effacing 
smile. Wednesday, be win insist, is for die 
players; Paolo Man tovani is just a fan. a 
wealthy one who has chosen to help things to 
happen, but a fan like thousands of others. 

Let me tell you how, on past observation. 
Wednesday wtD come to him. 

Unable to pay more than passing attention 
to the break/ast and lunch his cook meticu- 
lously prepares, be will by early evening — 


far, far too early for the journey time required 
— call his chauffeur and bodyguard. 

They will leave the tranquility of his villa, 
overlooking the high seas on which his for- 
tune was made. The green Mercedes will glide 
down the .mountainous route east of Genoa 
toward the docklands and then into the medi- 
eval dry where Andrea Doria. aristocratic 
naval commander and contemporary of 
Christopher Columbus, became an inspira- 
tion for a second Genoese soccer team to 
imagine it could go out and take on Europe 
and the world. 

For once Genoa will be a united soccer 
port. The passions will ooze toward the mu- 
nicipal stadium on Via del Piano (and over- 
looked by the prison where some would have 
Mantovani). Inside the arena, the president 
will walk the dingy corridors slowlv. nervous- 
ly, trying to keep to a minimum his contact 
with players, with whom he will have ritually 
shared a meal and a few hands of cards the 
previous evening. 

Fifteen minutes before kickoff he will walk 
out onto the turf, his deliberate step hinting 
at tbe care he must take with his health. Tbe 
crowd, especially the faithful ultras, bearing 
gigantic banners in blue and red and while, 
mil greet him with a roar that transmits itself 
down to the dressing rooms. 



Paolo Mantovani 


For the next 90 minutes Mantovani and his 
opposite number, Giuseppe Farina, will 
share a haunting sense of impotence. From 
their seats, they cannot kick any leather nor 
any opponenL 

They already share much. Farina is no less 
ambitious, possibly as generous and certainly 
more impatient than MamovanL As Milan s 
president, he too has more an obligation than 
a desire to win. 

Gub presidents in Italy decide which over- 
seas stars they will buy. And uniquely, almost 
perversely. Mantovani and Farina prefer 
British to Brazilian, Argentine or French. 

Mamovani’s $2 million bought Trevor 
Francis to score goals, Souness to make tbe 

S . Farina paid about the same for Mark 
rley’s courage in pursuit of goals and Ray 
Wilkins’s coolness in midfield. 

Ironically, Mamovani's biggest regret is 
that Francis mil miss the final because of a 
thigh injury caused by a collision with Wil- 
kins. In personality and in style, Francis has 
been MantrovanTs favored son. 

Even Sampdoria supporters who have seen 
tbe best of Francis have grumbled at (be 
frequent injuries that dilute his contributions. 
Mantovani scalds them. Francis, be insists, 
has no need to feel in debt to Sampdoria. Tbe 
more people have doubted Francis, the more 
paternalistic have been his president's re as- 
surances. 

This apparent softness — especially com- 
pared to rarina's ruthless cm e-season hire- 
and-fire of another British goal-scorer, Lu- 
ther Blissett — and Mamovani’s strategy in 
nurturing young Italian prodigies alongside 
his foreign pair made people doubt the presi- 
dent’s resolve. 

“We have like a marriage to go toward the 
future with patience," Mantovani answers. “I 
pay what I can afford for the dub without 
making debts that can destroy Sampdoria. 

“We are like Florence and Verona and 
Udinese, reaching up to the dominant three. I 
have been sure in my five years as president 
that we will go into Europe, but l wanted 
always a place to sit at the table, not to go 
there as waiter. For such a future you have to 
pay.” 

Italy being Italy, and Genoa being Genoa, 
there have alays been plenty whose minds are 
as suspicious as those of the tax inspectors 
who suspect aloud that ilpresidente has been 
too successful too soon. 

“They did not say 1 bought results when 
Sampdoria lost so many matches at the end 
of the previous season,” he reflects. The dark. 
Roman eyes show neither annoyance nor 
surprise. “This job is already difficult without 
anything bong bought. If anything could be 
bought, there is always the chance that some- 
body cm the other side is paying more. No 
matter how many important presidents are 
involved, in the end only the strongest teams 
are winners.” 


SCOREBOARD 


Transition 


Baseball 


BASEBALL 


.. BALTIMORE^ l»«£j Jm JMLXUcafEfwr. 
on 31-day dliobM U*L Rocallod At Panto, 
oatchor. from Rochester of tne International 


Monday’s Major LeagpeLSne Scores 


CHICAGO — Purchased the co ntract of 
Slew* Pireovld, pitcher, from Buffalo of me 
Amerlttm Amodotton. Optioned Brace Tan* 
oer. Pitcher, to Buffalo. 

CLEVELAND— Purchaced the contract of 
Jerry Reed, pitcher, from Malneot the Inter- 
nal tonal Leaoac. Placed RJcfc Betienna Pitch- 
er. an the 15-dav dtaabted HO. 


LOS ANGELES — Recalled Demis Powell 
pitcher , (nun AibuoMcoue of the Pacific 
Coast Leasito. 

MONTREAL— Recalled Fiord Youmane, 
pitcher, from Jacksonville of the Southern 
Leoauo. Sent Die* OrapenMA. pitcher, to In- 
dianapolis of Hie American Association. 

NEW YORK— Placed Mookle Wilson, out- 
fielder. on 31-day disabled list. Recoiled Lon 
Dvfcstra. outfielder, from Tldeeater of the 
Internal tonal 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
New York 0H tia Sn-4 7 1 

Toronto OH M0 000—1 3 1 

Cowley, Right til (») and Haney; Alexan- 
der. Acker r») and whin. W— Cowlev. 7-1 L- 
Akocander. 7* Sv-RMwttt CM). HR— New 
York, Matrtnalv 17). 

OH IOO HO— 1 S 0 
300 TOO Oft*— 5 10 ■ 
TndUtokOoor W and Gedman; Vucfcovich. 
Gthoon |7) and Moore, w— VucftovtcliM. L— 
Trull Do. ML Sv — Gttjson CS). HR — Boston. 
Rice ns). 

Detroit on in 003—7 0 o 

Baltimore OH OH 010-1 7 C 


Tennis 


(Vfike SdmAIfs pregane show stopped (be boos^ — temporal^. 


liever Lee Smith struck out five 
batters, including Mike Schmidt 
with two outs and two on in (he 
ninth. A Montreal newspaper re- 
cently quoted Schmidt, who has 
heard boos all season while strug- 
gling at the plate, as saying that 
Philadelphia fans are “beyond help 
and uncontrollable." The boos 
changed lo cheers during Monday’s 
pregame warmups, when Schmidt 
took the field wearing a grotesque 
wig and dark glasses (“1 was just 
trying to ease the tension.** he said) 
and continued as he went 2-for-4. 
extending his hilling streak to 10 


FOOTBALL 
laa Football L 
BRITISH COLUMBIA— RolMMd Milton 
Corttwmond Randv Founder, ofKndvt line- 
man; Mark Dr BruevL No toot*; Vomon 
Goan**, Bernto Gller. Alfred Jorw, Dwrell 
Stator and WondeB Williams detefiNve 
backs; Mkhoc* Gray and Bemlo Jonas, at- 
fanstvo Hnamen; Dava McNooL U«totooc*er; 
Don Taylor. Dava Tojownu and John Htnrv . 
Whitt, running bocks; Slave White and KarL 
tan VMsoa Quarterback* and JM Utfte. 
wida receiver. Sent Jo Je Heath, defensive 
back, to Ottawa. 

CALGARY— Released Garrett Doll and 
E I la Harris. Mnebackers; Soon MclCoown.de. 
tensive lineman; Kurt Page, quarterback, 
and Rkfc Wegfier, running back. Sent Jerry 
Dobrawotny. offensive lineman, to MontreaL 
EDMONTON - Re l eased Frank Bolkovec 
end Joe Jenkins. Uneboekers; Dove Cutler, 
oloce-Mcker; Conrad Coy* Murray McKov. 
David sparenberg and Richard Thorpe, de- 
tensive Itoemen; Ross Francis, offemdve line- 
man; Anthony Rome, wide receiver; Dale 
Thompson, datoralve back, and James 
Woody, quarterback. Sent Brian Fryer, wide 
receiver, to Ottawa. 

HAMILTON— Released Owrtes Cohen and 
Arthur Tolliver, defensive linemen; Afortbi 
DkSabattno, Howard William and Dale San- 
derson. offensive linemen; Rkhanl Fish- 
bock. corneraodL- John Green, Ron Ingram, 
and Mark Robbfra. wide receivers; Mark Ho- 
gan, Mark McIntyre. Jeff Smith and Dennis 
Veal* defensive backs; Elmer James, run- 
ning bade; Lance Thompson, linebacker, and 
AriWquams,quorterbock.PlocedMaiTc&ra- 
oooncfa and Rufus Crawford, rurarino bocks; 
Gree Gerv. linebacker, and Ken Habari. quar- 
to rbec k an reserve list 
MONTREAL— Released Patrick Bushier 
and Germaine Yeung, wide receivers; Barry 
Copeland. Brian Dudley. Mike ODonnel I ana 
Ed StoMkowski. defensive backs; Jimmie 
James and GeoraeSmith, defensive linemen; 
Bill MintsoulH. Alan Reid and Freddie Wells, 
rarwitw bocks, end Al WimertgoofUlnetiack- 
'er. Sen! sieve SmHtvquortert)ock.ta Ottawa. 

OTTAWA— Released White Burnett, Harry 
Gasier. Mike McGruder. and LatYV Nesmith, 
Defensive backs; Lance Chomyc olocekkk- 
er; Hewrttt Wwn. Bin Horvath, Juan Jones, 
and Lorry Janes, running bocks; Albert £l> 
lirt. defensive lineman; Peter Muldoon. quar- 
terback. and Tom Munra, David NfrwmiPi, 
Corey ReM and wow Smltte wide receiver* 

HOCKEY 

Mattansd Hockey League 
N.Y. ISLANDERS— signed Mlkko Mokete. 
forward, to a muttlveor contract. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Named Jock Birth and 
Reg Hives mslitnnt coaches. 

COLLEGE 

IONA— Named Richard Quh m assistant 
athletic director. 

SOUTH CAROLINA — Named Chortle Lvle 
aBiletlc department recruiting COOCh- 
wiNGATE— Named Sieve Wilt football 
coach. 


Wimbledon Results 

ME ITS SINGLES 
Fourth Round 

John McEnroe, holder. 111. U«L net An- 
dreas Maurar. west Germany. ML A4» *-3. 

Jimmy Connors. (3). US. dot. Sammy 
Gfammalva US. e-X A4. ML 

Ricardo Acuna. Chile, del. Robert Seausa 
UA. 6-4. 7-6 {7-41. 6-X 

Berts Becker, west Germany, del. Tim 
Mayotte, 06). US.6-3.4-4.6J (4-7),7-6 <7-51.6- 
X 

Kevin Curren, U), U.S.det. Stefan Edberg, 
V4, Sweden, 7-6 17-4). 64 7-6 (7-3). 

Anders JarTvd. (5). Sweeten, def. Dante 
Visser. South Africa, 6-1. 64. 61. 

Heinz GuenfhordL Switzerland, def. Vllav 
Amrltral, India. 64, 64. 61. 

Henri Leconte, France, def. Ivan Lendl (2). 
Czechoslovakia. W. 64. 64 61. 

Q u arter fin al Patina 

McEnroe vs. Curran, Connors vs. Acuna 
Jarryd vs. Gunttiordt. Becker vs. Leconte. 


OTfeaLHemandez ft) and Parrish; McGre- 
VOr. Stewart (4) and RavfonL W— O'Neal, 61. 
L— McGregor. 67. HRs — Detroit, Evans (U), 
Gibson (171. Herndon (6). 

Cleveland 030 M0 1H-S 10 ■ 

MtonOSOM Hi OH 106-3 7 1 

Ruble. Barklev (7) and WUIard; Schram. 
Brawn IS). Ward le (■) and Salas. W-Rutile.3- 
i L — Schram. 74. Sv Ba r kley (11. HR— 
Cleveland. Vukovlch (3). 

Ca atomic 3H OB 000— S II 3 

Texas Hi t63 >to— 10 11 7 

Stolon. Sanchez (3). Clement* (6). Cllburri 
<6).Corbettf» and Boone; Cook. Rozema (7). 
Schmidt (9) and Brutnmer.W— Cook. 3-0.1 — 
5taten.67.Sv— Schmidt (3). HRs— California, 
Jones 113). Texas. O'Brien (9). 

Oakland Ml OH 0B7-S 7 0 

Kansas CUy OH U 001-3 13 3 

Sutton, Atherton ft). Howell (9) and Tettte- 
too; Jadcsan.Qulsenberry (9) and SwnMwre. 
W A ther to n. < 4. L — Joctcjor, 6-i Sv Howell 
(17). HR — Oak lend. Baker (10). 

Seattle HO OH 030-3 5 0 

Cfeicoeo OH 0H BIO— t S 0 

Wills, vonde Bern (B), Nunez 19) and Kear- 
ney; Bannister, Salllner (B) and Fisk. W— 
Wills. 61. L— BaWitar, 67. Sv— Nunez (13). 
HR— Seattle. Cowans (B). 


Fontenot Smith (8) and Lake; Denny. Cor- 
man (Bland Virgil. W— Fonlcmt,34 L— Den- 
ny. 66 Sv — Smith (l7J. 

Onctaeatl OH OH BIO-1 '« 3 

Las Angeles 31B B11 *»— * ID 1 

■nans. Robinson (61, S taper <» and Knice- 
N; Hantil3arandSck»ckLW-Hortfifsor.61 
L— Tibbs. 4-10. HRs— Lo* Angelas. Anderson 
(31. Brack (12). 

Houston HO BH UB 0-S 11 B 

San Diego CM HO 011 1—6 9 1 

Ryan ona Bailey ; HoyL Thurmond (8>,Ga6 
sage (IB) and Kennedy. Bochy (9). W— Gas- 
man. 61. L — Ryan. 64. HRs — Houston. Iran- 
too (4). San Dlaoa. Martinez (11). Bachv (31. 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DivIslM 


St LOuiS 


WOMEN'S SINGLES 
Fourth Round 

M arti n o Navratilova Ico-l). U.5., del. Rene 
uvs. South Africa 6-Z 62. 

Molly von Nostrand. US. def. Manueto Mo- 
teevn, (4), Bulgaria 7-5, 62 
Pam Shriver, Ut.vS.dol.SIM Grot. (11). 
West Germany. 34, 6Z 64. 

Helena Sukova (7), Czechoslovakia del. 
Pascale Parma*. Franca 64. 7-6 (7-5) 

Bor boro Potter, U.S- def. Jo Durie, Britain. 
7-6 (66). 67, (67). 61. 

Kathy RJncddL (16), US. del. Elizabeth 
Smyile. Australia 6Z 61. 

dirts Evert Lloyd. Ico-l). U6- del Arme 
smith. US. 60. 64. . 

Zina Garrison, (8), us. def. Cathy Tonvler. 
Franca '61, 6-3. 

Bam tat fi nal Palrtnes 
Evert vs. Patter, Rinaldi vs. Sukova Gam- 
sen vs. Van Rostrand. rtavratn^o vs. Shriver 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

MM»M ■ ■ 

BH Bll OH 1— 3 4 B 

Kegshl re. Alien (71. Campbell (9). Lahti (9). 
Horton (Ml. Forsrtt I IB) and Nleta Hunt (7) ; 
Youmans. Burke (7). Lucas (9) and Fitzger- 
ald. w L u c as . 6tt L — Horton, 0-2. HR— Sl 
L ouis. McGee (3). 

Atlanta M» 119 MB— 4 9 1 

San Francisco BOB BH BIB-1 4 B 

Smith. Dodmon (8), Sutter (9) end Bene- 
dict; Krakow, jeftcoat (9) and Trevino. W— 
Smith. 64. L— Krakow. 64. Sv— Sutter IIS). 
hrs— Atlanta Murphy (19). Harper f7). 
PHtsburgb tlO BH BH— 1 4 • 

Mew York BOO BH 886—0 ( 1 

ReuscheL Candetorla (7) and Pena; Per- 
nandez. McDowell (8) ond Carter, w— Rnus- 
chet »-I. L— Fernandez. 65. Sv — Candelaria 
(B). 

Cblcuoo let HI Ml — 3 7 3 

PhUadeiPbla BM BH BBB-1 B 3 



W L 

Pet. 

GB 

Toronto 

46 29 

613 

— 

Detroll 

42 3D 

-583 

2K» 

New York 

38 34 

538 

6W 

Balttmaro 

37 35 

514 

7V*. 

Boston 

» 36 

514 

7V*. 

Milwaukee 

36 37 

Alt 

IB 

Cleveland 

24 49 

Wist Division 

J29 

21 

Caltfornta 

41 33 

554 

— 

Oakland 

40 W 

541 

I 

Kansas CMy 

37 36 

507 

3W 

Seottle 

37 V 

500 

4 

CMcooo 

35 36 

493 

4W 

MInrmsata 

33 39 

■45B 

7 

Toms 

29 46 

J87 

12V) 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

East Division 



W L 

Pet- 

GB 

SL Louis 

43 30 

589 

— 

Montreal 

44 32 

579 

w 

Qilcoao 

39 33 

542 

3VS 

How York 

38 35 

521 

5 

Philadelphia 

32 41 

438 

11 

Pltteburah 

25 47 

West Division 

J47 

17V) 

Son Dleao 

45 30 

400 

— 

Clndnnafi 

39 34 

534 

5 

Lai Anoetn 

79 U 

534 

5 

Houston 

38 38 

500 

m 

Allan to 

34 40 

459 

IBM. 

San FrencijH 

27 4V 

-355 

IB* 


Cycling 


Football 


games. But the abuse resumed 
when he fanned to end the game. 

Pirates 1, Mets (h In New York, 

Marvell Wynne lined a run-scoring 
double in (he second and Rick 
Reusche) and John Candelaria 
combined on a six-hitler lo send USFL Playnffs 
the Mets to their sixth straight loss. - J 

Dodgers 8, Reds 1; In Los Ange- 
les. Orel Hershiser pitched a six- 
strikeout rour-hitter for his fifth 
complete game of the year. Her- 
ohiser had a one-hitter until the 
■eighth and was on the verge of his 
fourth shutout until Cincinnati 
scored an unearned ran. (A P. UP!) 


QUARTERFINALS 

June 19*. Btrmln gh orn 32, HouNoa 30 
June 3D: MematiK 48. Denvrr 7 
Oakland 30. T outdo Bov 27 
July 1: Baffimore 50. New jersey 17 
SEMIFINALS 
July «; Oakland at Momotils 
July 7; Baffimore at Bn-mlmpiom. 3 JO BA 


CHAMPIONSHIP 

juty 14. at EaM Rwhertort, New Jersey 


Tour de France 

FOURTH STAGE 
CFeuaeres to Peat-Awfemer) 

(239 Kitoneten/ i«u Mite* ) 

1. Genii StHteveM, the Nether la ods. 6 
hours, 31 minutes. 46 seconds (30-secand bo- 
nne! 

2. Bnmo Leall, Italy, same time f204eaind 
bonus) 

3. Paul Koghedooren, Belgium. XT. 116 
nftrrwi bonus) 

4. Hemite Ku(P*r. the Nelrter lands. S.T. 

6 Gmwd Vektoehotteta Hoiiond. S.T. 

6 U»l» Herrera. Coiam&ia, S.T. 

7. Kim Andersen, Denmark, S.T. 

X Joret Usckens. Beialm, at 46 seconds 
behind 

9. Semi Kelly, Ireland. S.T. 

10. Adrl van der Pool, the Nffthertands. S.T. 

If. Body Maffftys. Beietum, S.T. 

12. Beany van Bretant, Belgium. S.T. 

13. Philippe LaurMro, France. S.T. 

M. Ludwig Wllnantfc Befgivm, S.T. 

l i Jan Bogoert, Betghm, 5.T. 

Overall Leaden 

1. Andersen, 21 hours. 12 minutes. 40 sec- 
onds 

2. Ertc Vondsraerden. Bolgium, 19 seconds 
behind lender 

X D etn crd Hlnautf, France, at 1 minute. 1 
second 

A Slave Bauer. Canada, rt 1 :12 

S Greg Lemand. U6. al 1 :» 

a VetasetwltHi. at 1:25 

7. Bernard vmm, France, at 1:3B 

B, Niki IMtimorm. Swftzertand, of 1:35 

9. Alain Vtgnoron, Prance, al 1:36 

10. Marc Gamez. France, al 1:37 



by hand, are 


{steal gokj'StBel'IBt'sOld]. 


Arfan 

JneilKer Horiogec Medaflle JAigenl <le U Ville de Paris. 

35, boulevard de* Capurines, 75002 Paris. Tel 261.66.74 et 261.75J5 









L 8 


OBSERVER 

The Same Old Story 

Rv Russell Baker liai ^ chan § e !“PP“ ed 
By Kusseu oaKcr . u. . ^ ^ 


Preserving 'Emerald Forest’ 


N EW YORK — like most of 
us. Albert Packman of Queens 


IN us, Albert Packman of Queens 
keeps hearing that the world is con- 
stantly changing. And yet, he says, 
when he turns to bis television set 
he sees only the same old thing, to 
wit: 

“No. 1. President making a 
speech on the evils of Communism 

“No. 2. A space rocket is 
launched. 

“No. 3. Tanks and misery in the 
MideasL 

“No. 4. The pope is waving. 

“No. S. Blacks and Hispanics are 
either being arrested or ansoned. 

“No. 6 . A tall white guy with 
long hair and a mustache is throw- 
ing a baseball. 

“No. 7. A tall black guy with 
muscles and a mustache is throw- 
ing a basketball. 

“No. 8 . A bunch of huge guys in 
astronaut uniforms are battling 
over a football. 

“No. 9. Paunchy, middle-aged 
white men are debating over why 
they should be elected. 

“No. 10. Bob Hope is telling 
jokes. 

“No. 1 1 . Johnny Carson is telling 
jokes. 

“No. 11 Frank Sinatra is argu- 
ing with someone. 

“No. 13. Gloria Steinem is mak- 
ing a speech. 

“No. 14. So is Jesse Jackson. - 

“No. 15. Howard Cosell is inter- 
viewing someone. 

“No. 16. So is Barbara Walters. 

“No. 17. Jacqueline Onassis is 
wearing an evening gown. 

“No. 18. James Micbener is on 
the best-seller list” 


that the change happened yester- 
day, they have a hard time with it 
Here is a letter from Rry Barry 
of Charlottesville, Virginia, sug- 
gesting several chang es that have 
occurred in recent American life: 

' “Buttons used to stay on gar- 


By Holcomb B. Noble 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — Trying to 
make as anthropologically 


of interviews and in a diary he 
plans to publish in the United 
Stares later this year. 


ments; socks used to fit feet; pic- 
ture frames used to cost less than 


ture frames used to cost less than 
the pictures; garden hoses used to 
last several seasons and good ones 
several decades; springs in furni- 
ture and beds went a generation 
without sagging; toys came assem- 
bled and stayed that way; cars used 
to have windows that allowed ven- 
tilation without a draft; auto 
bumpers used to be steel connected 
to steel supports and not plastic 
connected to lord knows what; the 
two-by-four building stud actually 
measured two inches by four inch- 
es.’' 


His list goes on, wn phasi 7 ing his 
point that 99 percent of what 
passes for news is actually nothing 
but olds. “To paraphrase Last year’s 
bit commercial, where’s the 
change?” he asks. 

The answer. Packman, is that 
there is plenty of chang e. This list 
of television’s monotonies doesn't 
tell us that the world is changeless. 
It tells us only that television is not 
very good at detecting and report- 
ing change. Newspapers and maga- 
zines aren't much better. 

The rales of the news business 
make it hard to report change. Un- 
less the change creates an arresting 
picture, television isn't much inter- 
ested. Unless newspapers can say 


Barry’s catalogue illustrates an 
important result of many recent 
changes — the triumph of gallop- 
ing tackiness — but one that is hard 
for the news business to report. 
Consider a current instance of gal- 
loping tackiness: the decline of 
American telephone service. 

Everybody senses that some- 
thing unhappy Is happening to the 
telephone. Newspapers have tried 
to cover the stoiyr, only to get hope- 
lessly entangled in incomprehensi- 
ble statistics that stupefy the read- 
er. Coverage of mass unease and 
unarticulated suspicion is not easy. 

The customers know that some- 
thing disturbing is happening. 
They sense a long, slow, erosive 
assault on their spirit, but news 
people cannot report that. Mystify- 
ing bills arrive. Baffling explana- 
tions are given when they call for 
help. Talking machines dis pens e 
wrong information. 


The newspaper, of course, can- 
not say, “Americans sank yester- 
day into melancholy and despair 
because of possibly incorrect suspi- 

are going to get worse and worse.” 

Melancholy is not like an explo- 
sion in Beirut. It grows gradually 
over weeks and months. 

And things that have been going 
on for months are hard to justify as 
news, especially when an entertain- 
ing space rocket was launched yes- 
terday. 

New Vorfc Times Service 


IN make an anthropologically 
authentic movie in the Brazilian 
rain forest about isolated Amazon 
Indians is a trip to the Stone Age, 
but it’s never quite clear who’s 
traveling in Much direction. 

Is it the Xingu Indians who are 
the primitives, the uncivilized 
re mnan ts of a well-forgotten 
past? Or are the cement and steel 
of the construction dams now 
flooding parts of the Amazon 
closer to the Stone Age? In a 
sense, both the film and the mak- 
ing of it are a revealing two-way 
minor. 

John Boorman produced and 
directed this trip in making “The 
Emerald Forest,” starring Powers 
Boothe, Charley Boorman and 
Meg Foster The movie is based 
on the true story of a 7-year-old 
boy who was kidnapped in 1972 
by Indians. The boy’s father, a 
Venezuelan engineer, spent every 
summer for the next 10 years 
saflirhing the forests for his son, 
and finally found him. But when 
he did, be also found that the boy 
bad become thoroughly integrat- 
ed into the tribe. 

The father decided to leave him 
there rather than bring him back 
to the “dead," as the Indians call 
the land of dries and polluted air 
and hydroelectric power projects 
that have irreparably damaged 
their territories and lives. 

Boorman, who pursued themes 
of man against nature and man 
against man in “Deliverance” and 
“Excabbur,” wondered whether 
this story might not take him fur- 
ther. 

Using a screenplay by Rospo 
Pallenberg, Boorman shot the 
film in the heart of the lush forest, 
using Indian actors, a Texan 
(Powers Boothe) to play the part 
of the engineer and has own son as 
the boy lost forever to another 
culture. But, building on the origi- 
nal story, he set its climactic 
scenes dose by the actual con- 
struction of the world’s fourth 
largest dam, the Tucunri. even as 
the Indians' beloved trees were 
being chewed up by giant con- 
struction equipment 

Boorman has described the 
making of the film in Brazil, be- 
ginning in August 1983, in a series 


The director did not want to 
make the film in a real Indian 
village using tribal people because 
of the disruption it would cause 
them. For the most pan he hired 
professional Indian actors from 
families in Rio de Janeiro or Be- 
lem. people who had left tribal 
life, and had them taught rituals 
and dances of the Kamaira tribe. 


more juice.” After an agent per- 
suaded him to meet Boothe, he 
didn’t even let him read for the 
parti “I felt a shock of recogni- 
tion. He simply war tbe part, he 
said. 

But casting tbe boy was anoth- 
er matter. He felt his 17-jrear-oId 
son, whom be bad used in “Ex- 


thc company was staying nibbed 
herb juice on their feet as an effec- 
tive repellent. But when Charley 
asked for some, they said no. and 
roared and rolled on the jungle 
floor with laughter. “They 
thought it enormously funny that 


i was in pain and obviously inferi- 
or to them." Yet these Indian; 


calibur," was too young. The boy 
in the film must grow up with 


Choosing the American engi- 
neer was easy. Boorman rejected 
the idea of a Robert Redford or a 
Clint Eastwood as too expensive. 
He fllso turn ed down a suggestion 
by his producer friendT Jake 
Eberts, that Ik use Sam Water- 
sion, whom Eberts hired for “The 
Killing Fields.” 

“I need Jess of a racehorse.” the 
director said, "someone with 


in the film must grow up with 
frightepingspecd. Bur every other 
candidate was disappointing. 
And when he eventually settled 
on Charley, Pallenberg, the 
screenwriter, was very much op- 
posed. 

Early in the forest scenes. Char- 
ley as wen had moments of think- 
ing that his father had made a 
mistake. In an interview, he de- 
scribed being repeatedly and 
painfully bitten on the feet by 
ants. 

Indian tribesmen with whom 



Charley Boorman, the director’s son, in a lead role. 


or to them." Yet these Indians 
invited him on a canoe trip after 
the shooting was over. . 

“1 wouldn't let him go,” said 
Boorman. “This life imitating art 
could get a bit much.” 

Both the stuntmen and Boothe 
did indeed witness a boy growing 
up on the set It was Chaney, not 
his stuntmen, who learned to be 
the best climber for a skyscraper 
score in which the boy comes out 
of the jungle and scales a high-rise 
to his parents’ apartment to seek 
the help of his father against an 
enemy tribe that has acquired 
guns. 

And it was Charley who recog- 
nized that Boothe was not acting 
during a scene in which father and 
son are supposed to be nearly 
drowning m rapids. Tbe crew 
could not at first bear Boothe's 
cries for help against the roar of 
the waterfall Charley, according 
to his father, kept Boothe afloat 
until trained divers could pull him 
out. Char ley had swallowed a 
great deal of water himself, and it 
was hours before Boothe, who 
was given oxygen, could get to his 
feet. 

The film crew eventually found 
several appropriate sites, one with 
beautiful waterfalls, one right 
next to the huge dirt clearing for 
the Tucunri Dam. A village was 
bnOr near Paraty, a town down 
the coast from Rio, and during 
much of the 17 weeks of shooting 
40 minibuses carried 300 actors, 
crew members, and construction 
workers back from town to the 
edge of the forest 

Preserying the life of the rain 
forest with a minimum of this 
kind of disruption is dearly the 
overriding concern of the movie. 
Yet by tbe current thinking of 
both economists and anthropolo- 
gists, the film oversimplifies and 

romanticizes the problem a bit. 

The notion, for example, that 
40 patent of tbe world’s oxygen 
supply is generated by the rain- 
forests has long been discredited. 

“It’s one of those enduring 
myths,” says Thomas E. Lovqqy, 



Diana. Princess of Wales, han® 
give up the gold and diamond ring 
given Jo her for her 24th birthdav 


because of Buckingham Palace 
protocol on presents from uomrnr. 


John Boorman 


vice president for science at the 
World WBdli/e Fund. “Tropical 
forests, through decomposition 
and animal respiration, consume 
as much oxygen as they give off." 

Tbe suggestion, too, that all In- 
dians are good and wise Indians if 
only left alone is one that anthro- 
pologists want to correct. As Refl- 
ate Rosaldo of Stanford Universi- 
ty says. “We lend to portray them 
as noble or savage, but they're no 
more or less evil than the rest of 
us." 

Bui the earth's delicate ecologi- 
cal balance is a concern. Recent 
deforestation and rapid plant de- 
composition are adding enor- 
mously to the atmospheric level 
of carbon dioxide. And some- 
thing like 53 percent of all forms 
df life are found in the tropical 
forests. Experts agree that the 
movie is conservative, if anything, 
in asserting that 5.000' acres 
(2,000 hectares) of Amazonian 
rain forest are disappearing every 
day. 

Finally, it must be conceded 
that white tivihzaiion has bees 
painfully slow in recognizing the 
wisdom of the American Indians, 
South and North, since tire two 
cultures first met 500 years ago. 
Those who have seriously studied 
the matter say the point is not that 
the Indians should be left alone 
now and shut off in a preserve, 
but rather that they should have a 
greater say in the future of their 
lives and of a world that must 
sustain life. 

The conflicts between peoples 
and nature presented by the film 
are real enough, as are its conclu- 
sions: Reconciliation is possible, 
but it probably cannot be 
achieved without some pain for 
everyone and not without each 
side listening to the other. 


protocol on presents from commer- 
cial enterprises. Tbe ring , a aft 
from the jeweler Look Gerard, will 
be auctioned by Birthright, a chari- 
ty of which she is a patron. News- 
papers valued the ring al as much 
as £10,000 (about S13.000), but Ge- 
rard said the figure was exaggera- 
ted. ... The Foreign Office is in- 
vestigating plans by the British 
Virgin Islands to issue a set or post- 
age stamps bearing a picture of 
M i chael Jackson instead of Queen? 
Elizabeth EL The Caribbean colony , 




7 1 

ih - ^ 


bad planned to have a stamp bee- 
ing both the queen and the con 


mg both the queen and the cop 
superstar, but Buckingham Pater 
said the queen's head could not 
appear on any stamp portraying 
another living person. 

□ 


Australia plans to join the Brit- 
ish- American Live Aid pop concert 
for African famine relief, an orga- 
nizer. Bin Gordon, and the Austra- 
lian Broadcasting Corp. said Tues- 
day. They said the seven-hour show 
would be July 12 in Sydney, with 
groups such os Men at Work, Aus- 
tralian Crawl and the Angels. The 
other two concerts, in London and 
Philadelphia, will be July 13. 

□ 


George C Scott may have bees 
indifferent to winning an Oscar for 
his role in the film “Patton,” but he 
has agreed to play General George^ ' 
S. Patton again. “The Last Dots erf* ' 
Patton." a CBS television movie, is 1" 
in production in England, co-star- 
ring Eva Marie Saint as the gener- 
al's wife. 


The actor Sean Penn has been : 
charged with assault and battery I 
and freed on 5 1.000 bond in Nash- 
ville. Tennessee, after two journal- 
ists said he had attacked them with 
a rock while his girlfriend, the sing- 
er Madonna, locked on. Tbe jour- 
nalists, Ian Markham-Stnith, a re- 
porter, and Laurence Cornell, a 
photographer, said Penn, who is 
filming a movie, a ssault ed them 
when they asked him Tor an inter- 
view. “To be honest, we really 
didn’t expect the interview," Cot- 
trell said. “But he could have just 
said ‘No.* He didn’t have to get 
mean about it." 


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flax 2429, Herald Tribune. 

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