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ZURICH, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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By Stuart Auerbach 

- • fHufeftgton Post Service 

‘ jflgV DEUQ — Pakistani and 
'AMan diplomats made progress 
jjsfffiomh at United Nations- 
awiaored talks mined at getting 

Soviet troths out of Afghanistan. 

batthe core issue —a timetable for 
ibe withdrawal — stiQ remains to 
be resolved, Pakistan's foreign 
tpmister- Sahahzaria Yaqub Khan, 
said here Wednesday. 

blr. Yaqub Khan expressed 
“cautious optimum” and said in an 
l - . v interview that there appeared to a 

< - .“V. newmood in Moscow for a politi- 

- .. V. : 3%1 ; cal seUkment that could end the 
■ - \ Soviet mflilaiy presence in Afghan- 

istan- 

Tbc timetable for a withdrawal 
of Soviet troops, winch would be 
part, of an interrelated four-part 
package fnrJndtng guarantees of 






*R r l . N*,,;: ... 


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JuKS.U - 
s - Ijs: '!i.T,ruL>w 


Officials Set 
~ Gorbachev 
Travel Plans 


The Associated Press 

— MOSCOW —The Sonet Union 
. formally announced Wednesday 
. l^ii’ that Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the 
Sl Communist Party leader, would 


.y.r. 


K.fi 




pah : m 


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meet Preadent Ronald Reagan in 
Geneva on Nov. 19 and 20 and 
would visit France from Oct. 2 to 5. 

The official confirmation of the 
Reagan-Gortnchev summit meet- 
ing was nuKif? simultaneously in 
Washmgtou. 

Ai-T? J'.i -v’Sa. Mr. Gorbachev’s visit to Fiance 

. win be his first to a Western coun- 
try since be became Soviet party 
leader on March 11. 

The November meeting, which 

- — : — — US. officials on Tuesday had said 

.*.11— would continue to Nov. 21, wfl] be 
Mr. Reagan's first meeting with 
Mr.Gortadiev. 

\ y A Soviet Foreign Ministry 
*•. spokesman said that the talks 

• would cover a wide range of topics 
. and that it could not be exduded 
: that noefcar and space weapons 
would be discussed. 

“AD that has been agreed so far 
is when and where the meeting win 
take place.” the spokesman said. 
“Other issues wfli be talked about 
through diplomatic channels and 
will be derided in the near future.” 

Mr. Gorbachev was expected to 
be accompanied on both the 
French visit and the summit trip to 
Geneva by Eduard A. Shevard- 
nadze, 37, who on Tuesday suc- 
ceeded Andrei A Gromyko as for- 
eign minis ter Mr. Gromyko was 
named president. 

fat Washington, a senior U.S. of- 
ficial said that the two leaders 
plannM “genuine substantive ex- 
changes” at the November summit 
meeting, 

itioos 


r . ■ 


Vi 

J*v- 


Given the relative brevity of the 
meeting, U.S. officials said Tues- 
day that they did not think there 
would be time to negotiate any 
breakthroughs. The New York 
Tones reported from Washington. 

Bat they said that the meeting 
could be used to announce agree- 
ments already worked out in such 
areas as commerce, and cultural 
aid consular exchanges. They add- 
ed that it might also give some 
stimulus to the deadlocked Geneva 
anzs talks and promote an easing 
of tensions on regional issues. 

The Geneva negotiations cover 
rektttioas in strategic and medi- 
um-range n uclear arms and efforts 
to prevent as arms race in space, 
vur expectations are not great 
^ at iQ," a senior administration offi- 
-r. '-A dal said. "Its main purpose will be 
y j-to rame the new Soviet leadership 
• ->. ®d tor each side to have a beuer 

i 1 • wdestanding of the other." 

U& officials said that they ex- 
P“ted Secretary of State George P. 
Smite and Mr. Shevardnadze to 
v- .... ®en in Helsinki on July 31 and 
■ • ' rJt ^g- l while they arc there for 
: 4 ~ Q debrations maifcag the 1 0th an- 

■ mvenaiy of the agniog by 35 na- 
• Sens of the document on coopera- 
. **» ax»d secarity in Ernope. 
v - ■ ■* . •' . /Huy are also likely to meet at 
. i opening <rf the United Nations 
^ "-V Assembly m New York in 

r * • ■ SdMemfaer. 

By announcing a mining almost 
, i »ve months ahead of time, a senior 
a a 6- pepanment official said, the 

r - ViC*’ t- m effect arc providing 

’ . *0 their bureaucracies to 

5!r‘vS** Progress on unresoh-cd is- 

wqcSh 


Afghan security by Washington 
and Moscow,- wiB be the key item 
when a fifth round of talks is held 
Aug 27. The discussions are taking 
jdace in Geneva. 

. In these tana , a UN special en- 
voy, Diego Gardovez, acts as an 
intermediary b e t w een between the 
p*..;, Afghan and Pakistani diplomats, 
who never meet face to face. 1 
■ * x “If those talks go wdL” said Mr. 
.v! Yaqub Khan, “we will have gone 


Experts say the new foreign 
minister is from the same mold 
as Mflchafl Gorbachev. Page 5. 


beyond clearing the decks for ac- 
tion.” 

The foreign minister, hoe for 
talks on improving his country’s 
relations with India, presented one 

of the most optimistic appraisals of 

Moscow’s wiDmgness to withdraw 
more than 1 10d)00 troop* from Af- 
ghanistan. The Soviet Union inter- 
vened in Afghanistan in December 
1979. installing Babrak Karma! as 
president. 

Mr. Yaqnb Khan cited the 
quickened pace erf the talks, which 
resumed in late June after a lapse of 
two years, as one basis for his opti- 
mistic view. 

He credited the new attitude of 
Prime Minister Rmiv Gandhi of 
India as “a positive factor” in mov- 
ing the talks forward. 

Mr. Gandhi said after his return 
from Moscow in May that be had 
detected a new serious interest in 
the Soviet leadership for negotia- 
tions that could lead to a neutral, 
nonafigned Afghanistan. 

Indian sources indicated during 
Mr. Gandhi's visit to Washington a 
month ago that he had received 
hints from the Soviet leader, Mik- 
hail Su Gorbachev, and other Soviet 
officials of a change in the Krem- 
lin’s attitudes toward its long, 
drawn-out Struggle in Af ghanistan. 

But Mr. Gandhi has declined to 
say whether India would take a 
more active role in the Afghan 
peace process as a result of his laBts 
with Mr. Gorbachev and with Pres- 
ident Ronald Reagan. 

During their presence in Afghan- 
istan for the past five and a half 
years, Soviet troops have achieved 
only limited success in gaining con- 
trol Over that nigged and isnUlaH 
land 

Afghan resistance groups in fair 
dia and in Pakistan, meanwhile, are 
expressing concern that the bright- 
ened moves toward a political set- 
tlement could leave their fighters 
without support. 

The resistance forces operate 
with covert aid. founded through 
Pakistan, from the United States, 
Girina and some Arab nations. The 
UJS. Congress has been presang 
the Reagan administration to in- 
crease its support to the anti-Soviet 
forces, including direct aid 
amounting- to $8 mfllion'for hu- 

(Conthmed on Page 2. CoL 4) 


ins Gonzalez 


Dismisses 

Minister 

Moran. , Architect 
Of EC Entry, 
Opposed NATO 

By Brian Mooney . 

Remen 

MADRID — Foreign Minister 
Fernando Ldpez Morin was dis- 
missed Wednesday as the Socialist 
prime nmuster, Felipe Gonzdlez, 
began ins first cabinet shake-up 
since taking office 31 months ago. 

an, Hdg» Soto, saLf’thaT'Mr 
Moran, 59, had been informed by 

the pr ime minister nf his /Hcmitwl 

a few hours before the cabinet was 
scheduled to meet 

Official sources said that 
Eduardo SotiDos, a government 
sp okesman, als o was dismissed and 
would be replaced by Culture Min- 
ister Javier Solana. 

There was no annoaucaaem 
about who would replace Mr. 
Morin, who has long diplomatic 
experience and who is credited in 
Spain as being one of dm architects 
of Spanish entry into the European 
Community. 

EFE, the state news agency, said 
Mr. Morin aright be replaced by 
Francisco Fernandez Ordonez, 
chairman of the lhnm Exterior, 
Spain's export financing bank. Mr. 
Fernandez has held a variety of 
public posts. 

Mr. Morin’s dismissal had been 
widely forecast because of his op- 
position to Spanish membership of 
the North Atlantic Trialy Organi- 
zation. 

This contradicted a derision by 
Mr. Gouzilez to reverse the tradi- 
tional anti-NATO policy of his rul- 
ing Socialist Workers’ Party and 
cafi for a vote in favor of NATO 
membership in a referendum be 
has promised next year. 

Mr. Gouzilez gave notice of the 
ca lling shako-up last week, indi- 
cating dial he wanted to give his 
government a new image preceding 
the elections next year. 

Mr. Morin was expected to be 
the ooly senior member of the cabv- ■ 
net to lose Iris petition. 


<-v 




ShOte Moslem captives, some Hashing the *V* sign, jog out of a yard at the Israeli prison at Atiit as 300 inmates are freed. 

Israel Releases 300, Says More WUlFoUow 


Reuters 

RAS AL-BAYADA, Lebanon 
— Hundreds of prisoners whose 
release had been demanded by the 
hijackers of the TWA airliner 
crossed Wednesday into Lebanon 
after they were released from an 
Israeli prison. 

An. armored troop carrier and 
dozens of Israeli troops escorted 
the 300 prisoners, mostly members 
of the Amal Shiite militia, as they 
arrived in seven Israeli buses at this 
checkpoint on the edge of the secu- 
rity zone established by Israel in 
southern Lebanon. 

Wearing black-and-red or blue- 
and-whhe track suits, they passed 
through a roadblock held by the 
Israeli-backed South Lebanon 
Army militia to board nine Red 
Grom bases. - 

As Israeli soldiers bound their 


wrists with plastic strands, one of 
the prisoners whispered through a 
crack in the blackened bos win- 
dows, “A victory far the Shntei, a 
great victory.” 

The Shiite Moslems who hi- 
jacked the Trans World Airlines 
plane June 14 had demanded the 
release of more than 700 Lebanese 
prisoners held in Israel’s Atiit ] 
on near Haifa as the price for 1 
ins the American botiages. 

In Jerusalem, Defense Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin Hwiiad that the re- 
lease of the 300 prisoners was relat- 
ed to the hyacking. 

- “There was no linkage,” he told a 
group of Jewish fund-raisers from 
the United Stales. Mr. Rabin said 
thiit the release had been planned 
for weeks, but was delayed by the 


The Shiites freed woe among 


1,200 detainees brought to Adit in 
April when Israel dosed its prison 
camp at Ansar in sooth Lehonon. 
The United States and other coun- 
tries the removal of the 

prisoners /nan Lebanese territory 
as a violation of the Geneva con- 
ventions. 

Israel withdrew its regular army 
units from Lebanon in June. It has 
freed aboot 500 prisoners from Ai- 
lit, and officials said they expected 
the remaining captives, who num- 
ber about 400, to be released soon. 

An official army announcement 
concerning Wednesday’s release 
said that Brad “wfll continue its 
policy of releasing the detainees in 
accordance with the security situa- 
tion in south Lebanon.” 

Amal’s leader for the south, 
Dawoud Da wood, said that his 
happiness over the liberation was 


maned by the detention of 43S 
other Lebanese and Palestinians. 

Speaking from a vehicle packed 
with Amal bodyguards on his way 
to greet the freed captives, Mr. 

Id 


Dawoud said he would continue 
they 
'call 


__ _ ‘until 

release all our boys and liberate 
our land." 

Israel and the United States, 
whose contacts appeared strained 
at the height of the hijacking crisis, 
sought Wednesday to repair rela- 
tions. 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz sent Prime Minister Shimon 
Peres a letter thanking Israel for its 
cooperation while Mr. Feres, in a 
speech to businessmen, praised 
Washington’s handling of the hi- 
jacking as “a brilliant political op-' 
eiation.” 


Up to $5 Million 
May Be Offered 
For Capture 

By Robert C. Toth 

Los Artgeks Tima Serriee 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration is considering offer- 
ing a cash reward of as much as S3 
million for the capture of the Shiite 
militants who hijacked TWA Flight 
847 out of Athens and murdered a 
U.S. Navy diver, according to 
sources. 

The State Department an- 

President Hafez al- Assad of 
Syria, in secret note, resolved 
hijacking deadlock. Page 2. 

nounced Tuesday that it would for- 
mally ask the Lebanese govern- 
ment to extradite the hijackers 
under terms of an air piracy irealy 
signed by Lebanon. 

But, officials said, the adminis- 
tration is also laying the ground- 
work for possible abduction of the 
hijackers to bring them to justice 
outside Lebanon. 

The State 

man, Bernard Kalb, making a 
frank threat that the Ltaited States 
might attempt to seize the hijack- 
era, said: 

“Should our diplomatic efforts 
fail, we at least have laid a basis for 
further unilateral efforts in appro- 
priate circumstances." 

[The White House rejected 
Wednesday suggestions that the 
United States might try to abduct 
the hijackers. United Press Interna- 
tional reported. 

[“I would assume anything the 
United Slates would do would be 
within die bounds of United Slates 
law,” said Larry Speakes, the 
spokesman. Abduction, he noted, 
is not He declined to comment on 
the report a targe reward might be 
offered for the hijackers.] 

Beyond steps aimed at punishing 

- (Continued on Page Z, Col S) 


Department spokes- 
rd Kalb, making a 



INSIDE 

■ A 1983 accord under which 
Jutan agreed to said the Unit- 
ed States militaiy technology 
has been sain motion. Page 2. 

■ Fidel Castro is pressing far a 
solution to the debt ensb in 
Latin America. Page 4. 

■ Radk) Free Evope and Ra- 
dio liberty were criticized by a 
U.S. agency for some of their 
broadcasts. 


crisis 

pears to have little effect on 
average citizen. 


£ 

Page 5. 


SCIENCE . 

* A rare Mi malady, the in- 
ability to recognize a familiar 
face, has yielded dues to the 
subconsdons. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Hie Organization of Arab Ofl 
Exporting Countries said 
OPECspnx 
have to bean. 


John McEnroe, the top seed, lost Ins 
mfltrfi Wednesday at Wimbledon against Kevin Cmren 
of Austin, Texas, in straight sets, &-Z, 6-2, 6-4. Page 15. 


■ AT&T bitched a major joint 
venture with a group ot U 
anese firms. 


TOMORROW 

The an boon has setoff a mu- 
seum balding spree in the 
United States. In Weekend. 


Freed Hostages Talk Bitterly About Captivity 


Emirates Lead in Personal Income 



The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The United Arab Emirates, 
Kuwait and Switzerland led the world itf personal 
income in 1983, according to figures released Wednes- 
day by the World Bank. 

The report placed the figure for the Uni ted Ar ab 
Emirates at $22,870 a person. The emirates, a group ot 
seven independent states on the Gulf with a towl 
pop ulatio n of 1.18 million, obtains its wealth from ou. 

Kuwait, an oil-producing neighbor of the emirates, 
with a population of about U million, had income of 
$17,880 a person, the report said. 

In both Kuwait and the emirates, much of the 
average person’s income is in the form of free bousing, 
education and health services, the report said. 

Switzerland's average was $16,290, followed by the 
United States with $14,110 and Norway with $14,020. 

Switzerland, the Nordic countries and the United 
Slates were among the bank’s 19 high-income “indus- 
rrial market economies.’* That list included Spain, 
with income at S4.780 a year. 

Others countries with average incomes more than 
S10000 were: Sweden, $12,470; Canada, S12JI0; 
DeMiark, $1 1,570; Australia, $11, 490; West Genna- 
™T$1M30; Finland. S) 0,740; France 510.500; and 

Saudi Arabia, which was not included mjeindus- 
uial group, had an average income of $12^30, the 
report said. 


' The lowest income is in Ethiopia. $120 a year, a bit 
less than Bangladesh with $130. 

The report offered no figures for 21 countries, 
including the Soviet Union and most others with 
Communist gove rnments 

It calculated the income in China at $300 a year, and 
said it had risen at an annual rale of 4.4 percent from 
1965 to 1983. Others of the 29 countries in the lowest- 
income group had annual growth rates enual to or 
below 15 percent, which is Pakistan rate of growth. 

There were 30 nations in a group the bank called 
‘Tower-middle-mcoine countries.’' They ranged from 
Colombia, with $1,430, to Senegal, with $440. five 
countries showed long-term declines in average in- 
come: Senegal Zambia, Egypt, Nicaragua and 
Jamaica. 


The most prosperous of the 19 
income” nations was Trinidad and 
$6,850 a yean the lowest income in this group wj 

! natipn CttDe, 


r-middle- 
with 

was in 

Jordan, with $1,640. Only one nation, Chile, was 
reported to have had a long-term decline. 

Iran and Iraq were also included in this category, 
although the Wodd Bank said that it does not try to 
estimate titer income. 

The report also noted that there woe six African 
countries in which the average incomes showed de- 
clines in recent years. They were Zaire, Uganda, Niger, 
Somalia, Ghana and Madagascar. 


• By Joseph Beigcr 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Several of the 
39 Americans freed Sunday after 
bang held hostage in the TWA 
hijacking have begun expressing 
bitterness and desire for vengeance 
against their cap tore, in sharp con- 
trast to earlier sympathetic state- 
ments by other hostages. 

Peter W. Hill, a 57-year-old 
guide for religious lours, said in an 
interview at Wiesbaden, West Ger- 
many, that after his 17-day ordeal 
he felt “anger, frustration, a sense 
of being raped, ravaged by these 
animals.” 

“I think that Reagan was abso- 
lutely right when he called them 
thugs, thieves and murderers,” he 
said in an interview with the CBS 
television network. “Becansc that’s 
what they were, thugs." 

Until Tuesday, the statements 
that the hostages were permitted to 
make often suggested approval of 
their treatment or sympathy with 
the Shiite packers’ principal de- 
mand — release by Israel of 766 
detainees, most of them Shiitea. 
Some hostages, like Mr. HU1, had 
been noncommittal 

But more recent comments often 
bristle with rage. The first rf the 39 
to arrive in the United States, Dr. 
Arthur W. Toga. 33, said “justice 
should be served against the nijack- 
eis who are responsible for that 
land of terror.” 

“I have no sympathy for terrorist 
activities, no matter what the 
cause,” said Dr. Toga, an assistant 
professor of neurology a t Washing- 
ton University. 

Dr. Toga sad later, according to 
Reuters, that his captors had sub- 
jected him u> a form of Russian 
roulette. He said they would hold a 
revolver to his stomach, spin (be 
cylinder and pull the trigger. The 
gun did not go off. 

Mr. H31 was critical of the Shiite 
Amal militia, which took ova 1 most 
of the hostages from the hij&ckeis 
after they murdered a UJL Navy 
diver and pushed his body from the 
plane. 

Nabih Beni, the head of Amal, 
portrayed bis followers as working 
to protect the hostages from the 
hijackers, who woe members of 
Hezballah, or the Party of God. 
They seized tbeplane out of Athens 
and beat, robbed and terrorized 
passengers. 

“Thae is no distinction in terms 
of just what their motivations are, 
who they are, whatever,” Mr. HiB 
said. “There was a definite camara- 
derie between the original two hi- 
jackers and the rest of the bas- 
tards." 

“And I don’t view the Amal as 
our saviors and protectors,” he 
said. “If some of us do, then I 
heartily disagree with them.” 

Asked about the compliments 
that Amal had received from some 
of the hostages about the treatment 



Th« AaogaM Pub 

Sue Eflen Deotsdi Herzberg and her husband, Richard, 
who was held hostage, happily board airliner in West 
Germany for flight home after hiadting intemuition. 


The people who took us off the plane are 
vile, disgusting animals . . . and they should 
be treated as animals. They should be 
brought to justice somehow.’ 

Rickard P, Herzberg , 
Freed [fi. hostage 


in captivity, Mr. HHl replied, 
“Some people we sucked in." 

“You have to understand that 
most of those people, those hos- 
tages, couldn’t find Lebanon on the 
map lime weeks ago," The Associ- 
ated Press quoted him as having 
said. “So the only thing they kne w 
about this was the indoctrination to 
which they were subjected. So I 
don’t blame them.” 

Richard P. Herzberg. 33. one of 


the men separated from the other 
hostages in Lebanon, initially it 
was thought because they had Jew- 
ish- sounding namas said the ter- 
rorists had “duped the American 
public into thinking this was fun 
and these were nice people.” 

“The people who (oak us off the 
lane are vile, disgusting animals,” 
said in an interview with CBS- 

Mr. Herzberg offered one stark 


£ 


insight into the terror endured by 
him and the others. 

“The hijacker comes into our 
room four days ago brandishing 
the same gun he had on the plane.” 
Mr. Herzberg said. “He goes. ‘Do 
you know raeT And when we said 
‘no,* he pulls out a 9-mm chrome- 
plated gun and says, ‘You know 
me.’” 

“These are animals,” Mr. Herz- 
berg said, “and they should be 
treated as animals. They should be 
brought to justice somehow.” 

Such comments amounted to a 
starkly different picture from the 
one painted earlier. 

Allyn B. Conwell, 39, who had 
acted as the spokesman for the cap- 
tives, made several statements fa- 
voring release of the Lebanese pris- 
oners held by Israel. 

Stuart LJ. Dahl. 31. a US. Navy 
officer, said just before his release 
that the “Amal mflilia really saved 
our lives by pulling us out” 

Even after the hostages had been 
freed in Damascus, Robert Brown, 
42, praised the conditions under 
which they bad beat held in Beirut. 

Experts say that people held hos- 
tage often develop emotional links 
to their captors, and may even start 
to adopt their views. 

Mr. Hill, leader of a group of 34 
Illinois residents on a tour of the 
Holy Land, said the hijackers 
“broke every rule” in the Koran. 

‘They could never justify that to 
me, no matter how hard they tried, 
and 1 let them know it.” be said. 

Timmy Dell Palmer Sr., who was 
freed a few days earlier than the 
other hostages because of a heart 
aDment, criticized Mr. Conwell’s 
performance as spokesman. 

While be had agreed, he mIH 
with the group's spokesman most 
of the tune, “Towards the last 7was 
beginning to get the feeling that he 
was slipping a little bit too much 
toward their side.” 

■ Crew Describes Ordeal 

The three-member flight crew 
held hostage aboard a TWA plane 
for 17 days described at a news 
conference Wednesday how the hi- 
jackers bnitally beat two navy 
divers, one of whom Iky eventual- 
ly lolled, apparently over frustra- 
tion in getting their demands 
across. The Associated Press re- 
ported from New York. 

John L Testrake, captain of 
Flight 847, said the hijackers 
brought two men up to a section 
right behind the cockpit 

“They beat on them quite severe- 
ly ” he said, apparently referring to 
Robert Dean Siethem and Clinton 
Suggs, both Navy divers. 

“They wrenched one of the arms 
off the flight engineer chair and 
used that as a club to beat 
young men.” Mr. Testrake said. 

"They would jump on them with 
aO of their weight, on their bodies 
They jumped on their bodies re- 
peatedly and did this on and off ” 


-i 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1985 


Japan Ready to Start Sending 
Military Technology to U.S. 


By Gyde Haberman 

New York Tima Service 

TOKYO — After more than a 
year and a half of inaction, the 
United States and Japan have set in 
motion a 1983 accord under which 
Japan agreed to provide its main 
ally with advanced military tech- 
nology. 

U.S. officials, for the first time, 
have singled out a piece of Japa- 
nese high-tech garigetry that they 
want: an “image-seeking*' device to 
help guide missiles to their targets. 

From the U.S. viewpoint, the 
specific technology may be less sig- 
nificant than the fact that a request 
had been made at alL "The real 
importance,” a Japanese military 
expert said, Is that it finally opens 
the pipeline” for what the Ameri- 
cans wipe will be a steady flow of 
Japanese technological skul in their 
direction. 

Over the last two years, teams of 
U.S. military specialists have visit- 
ed Japan and returned home im- 
pressed by the wide range of avail- 
able technologies that were 
designed for civilian nse but that 
also have clear military applica- 
tions. 

An informal shopping list of 
three damn items has been drawn 
up. Among the technologies men- 
tioned frequently hen by the press, 
citing Japan Defense Agency offi- 
cials, are heat-resistant ceramics, 
composite materials such as car- 
bine fiber, lasers, fiber optics and 
gallium arsenide, which is used in 
computers and other electronic 
equipment. 

Japan’s self-imposed regulations 
forbid arms exports, bat in Novem- 
ber 1983 the government agreed to 
malm an exception in the case of 


military technology to be sent to 
the United States. 

The agreement did not cover ac- 
tual weapons but rather high- tech- 
nology components that have 
“dual use,” civilian as well as mili- 
tary. 

Nothing has ever prevented Jap- 
anese companies from exporting ci- 
vilian technology, even to military 
buyers. Japanese-made items such 
as semiconductors and che m ic als 
have been used by foreign armies 
and even, on occasion, terrorists. 

But the anns-export ban had 
made Japanese companies reluc- 
tant to sell their more advanced 
equipment for obviously adhtary 
purposes. In deciding to make an 
exception for the United States, 
Japanese officials said they recog- 
nized the special demands on them 
created by the security treaty be- 
tween the two countries. 

The 1983 agreement has made 
business people cm both sides un- 
easy. Some executives in the Japa- 
nese electronics industry worry 
that their discoveries might be put 
to commercial use in the United 
States. 

For their part, some American 
military contractors have expressed 
concern that Washington perhaps 
was opening the door to the same 
sort of Japanese competition that 
crippled the American auto and 
steel industries. 

Since 1983 the two countries did 
little more than talk about technol- 
ogy transfers, until the Americans 
set the agreement into operation 
recently by asking for specific 
equipment A Japanese military ex- 
pert said the missile-guidance sys- 
tem may have been chosen first 
because it was developed by the 
Defense Agency and not by a pri- 
vate company, thus making it 


somewhat eyrier for the govern- 
ment to act quickly. 

Japan, in turn, has its own re- 
quests of the United States, includ- 
ing access to American “over the 
horizon" radar to hdp its military 
forces trade Soviet aircraft. 

No firm deal has been struck, 
and officials from both countries 
caution that discussions will proba- 
bly continue for several months be- 
fore the expected agreement is 
reached. Bat an American official 
said, “We wouldn't have made the 
request if we thought they would 
say no.” 

“In a way, it’s a test case to m 
the basic system set up,” the offi- 
cial said, adding: “Eventually, 
most of the significant mQitaiy 
technology won't be publicized. It 
won't even be identified as mili- 
tary." 

Given the improbability — and 
many non-Japanese add, the unde- 
sirability — of Japan soon becom- 
ing a mili tary power, some UiL 
officials view technology transfers 
as Japan's most important contri- 
bution to mutual defense. 

In particular, Japanese coopera- 
tion has been sought for President 
Ronald Reagan’s initiative for 
space-based defense agains t mis- 
siles. 

Prime Minister Yasulnro Naka- 
sooue on many occasions has an- 
nounced his “understanding” of 
the Reagan plan, a deliberately 
vague sta tement implying possible 
support, -but he has not pledged 
actual help. 

Technology transfers could as- 
sist Japan in ovocoming persistent 
complaints in the United States 
that it does not spend enough to 
defend itself for a country so strong 
economically. 



Fire Moves Near Los Angeles 

At least 65 homes were destroyed and two persons woe killed 
by fires that swept through areas of Southern Cafifanna. This 
H« «■ was in a Los Angeles suburb. Other fires burned 
Wednesday in other parts of California, and in Idaho, 
Arizona and Washington. Many were blamed on arsonists. 


Assad , in Secret Note , Solved Hijacking Deadlock 


By Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — In a confidential 
message to Washington last week. President 
Hafez aJ- Assad of Syria proposed the artful 
diplomatic formulation that ultimately re- 
served the conflict between the Shiite hijack- 
ers’ demands for release of prisoners by 
Israel and the Reagan administration's re- 
fusal to make concessions to terrorists, ac- 
cording to UJL and diplomatic sources. 

Mr. Assad's message, which followed a 

finny of e xchang es between W ashington and 
Damascus in the preceding day or two, care- 
fully avoided asking for a formal commit- 
ment that Israel would release the 73S Leba- 
nese Shiites and others it held in r e turn for 
freeing the U.S. hostages in Lebanon. 

Instead, these sources said, the S yrian 
president off and to take the problem of 
“linkage" on his own shoulders. 

He stated his willingness both to accept 
custody of the Americans and then release 
them, and to give the hijackers a guarantee of 
his own that Israel would release its Leba- 
nese prisoners. 

“Hie informed us what he would do and 
asked. Is this 0-K.T" an official 


el would then release its Lebanese prisoners. 

At the same rime, the United States and 
Israel derided they could credibly insist that 
“no deals, no concessions" were made to the 
hijackers or the Lebanese Shiite militia lead- 
er, Nabih Beni, who took responability for 
the Americans in the days after the hijacking. 

The tuning of the message from Mr. Assad 
casts a new light an the White House an- 
nouncement late June 23 that Mr. Reagan 


the hostages would be sent to Syria and 
released within hours of their arrival. 

Still another explanation o f Mr. Reagan's 
threats of reprisals on June 25, most explicit- 
ly the threat to dose Beirut airport and cut 


is that they were intended to increase the 
pressure on Mr. Bern to accede to release of 
the Americans. 

This explanation was offered by a senior 


"He informed us what he wonlddo and simply asked, ’Is 

thisO.K,r” 

U.S. official describing offer of help from President Assad 


Within a few hours — after what a source 
said was a telephone conversation between 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz and 
Prime Minister Shimon Poes of Israel — the 
United States informed President Assad in 
guarded language that there was no objec- 
tion to the proposed course. 

As a result of this tadl arrangement, Mr. 
Assad could go forward to accept and then 
release the American hostages last Sunday 
with a well-founded understanding that Isra- 


was prepared to take retaliatory steps, in- 
cluding nriHtaiy action, if diplomacy did not 
succeed in freeing the hostages within several 
days. 

One explanation given by official sources 
for the decision to threaten retaliation, on 
the same day that Mr. Assad was offering a 
diplomatic solution, was domestic politics. 

The threatening White House statement 
was intended as a response to rising public 
and political demands that Mr. Reagan “do 
something,” according to some sources. 

Another explanation is that despite Mr. 
Asad’s adroitly worded offer, officials did 
not know on June 23 whether he would be 
able or willing to follow through. 

In fact, according to an informed source, 
nothing authoritative was heard from Mr. 
Assad about his proposal from June 23 until 
the evening of June 29, when word came that 


White House official in a meeting with re- 
porters as the hostages were bring released 
Sunday. 

In a speech Sunday night, Mr. Reagan said 
that “Syria has had a central responsibility” 
for the release of the Americans. About the 
same time, Mr. Reagan sent a message of 
th a nks to Mr. Assad as the 39 Americans 
flew out of Syrian airspace aboard a U.S. Air 
Force plane. 

Aides to Mr. Assad expressed displeasure 
Monday with what they described as a lack 
of UiL gratitude for Syria’s rale. 

The White House disclosed Tuesday that 
Mr. Reagan spoke by telephone with Mr. 
Assad for about IS minutes on Monday, 
thnniring him and also asking that be now 
use his apparently considerable influence in 
Lebanon to win release of seven other Amer- 
icans. 

Mr. Reagan previously appealed in confi- 


dential messages for Mr. Assad's help in 
freeing the seven kidnapping victims, who 
are believed held by several different Mos- 
lem extremist groups in more than one loca- 
tion. The Syrian president reportedly com- 
mitted himself to do everything he could. 

U.S. sources said they believed Syrian 
forces had been able to identify sites where 
the abduction victims are, or have been held. 
But they said the Syrians concluded that to 
free than without their captors' consent 
would require military action that could re- 
sult in injury or death for the Americans. 

Some administration officials said they 
believe that I ranian authorities, who have a 
dose relationship with the most militant Shi- 
ite groups, used their influence late last week 
to persuade the extremist Hezballah, cr Par- 
ty of God, to submit to Mr. Assad's authority 
mid release four TWA hijacking hostages the 
group was holding. 

“We think the I ranians did help,” a U.S. 
source said. This belief has given rise to hope 
that the same thing might be arranged in the 
case of the abduction victims. 

The captors of the seven kidnapped Amer- 
icans are believed to be associated with the 
Hezballah, which held some of the TWA 
hostages and which created an llth-hour 
obstade by refusing to let them go. 

Some reports said Hezballah leaden cited 
Mr, Reagan’s tough speech in Chicago 
Heights last Friday for their refusal. 

White House sources said that Mr. Rea- 
gan’s remarks had actually been drafted two 
days earlier, and were generated by a con- 
cern that the hijackers night think the TWA 
hostages had become “more valuable” be- 
cause Mr. Reagan was .meeting with family 
members. 


South Africa 
Police Hunt 
Door to Door 
After Blasts 


The Associated hat 

JOHANNESBURG — Hun- 
dreds of South African police and 
soldiers searched dots- to door in 
the black township of Tembisa 
near here Wednesday after two ex- 
plosions kafled three people during 
unrest overnight. 

Meanwhile, Colonel Gerrie van 
Rooyan, a police spokesman, said 
Wednesday that the bodies of Mat- 
thew Gcnrwe and For Calata, both 
dissident black leaders, were found 
Tuesday outside the Cape Province 
industrial center of Port Elizabeth. 

The bodies of the two men were 
found five days after they were re- 
ported missing. They had been 
stabbed. 

The burned bodies of two other 
blacks who had been traveling in 
the same car were discovered in the 
same area last weekend. 

Residents of Tembisa said police 
entered houses and soldiers stood 
guard outside. Motorists reported 
seeing fines of army troop canters 
heading toward the community, 
which is east of Johannesburg. 

A reporter said police and sol- 
diers checked all vehicles entering 
and leaving the township, arresting 
a number of people. Police on 
horseback joined riot patrols. 

Police said five Slacks were 
killed Tuesday in Tembisa and 
Kwazakde, near Port Elizabeth. 

A woman was killed and three 
men were injured in Tembisa when 
a bomb exploded under the steps of 
a skip operated by Mayor Lucas 
Motmba. 

In Kwazakde, police said one 
man was killed and one was 
wounded when police used shot- 
guns and tear gas to disperse a 
crowd stoning police vehicles. The 
stabbed body of another man was 
found after police scattered dem- 
onstrators stoning a private house. 

More than 400 blames have been 
killed in 10 months of unrest, the 
most prolonged and widespread vi- 
olence against white rule in South 
Africa's history. 

Many Macks contend that some 
of the deaths attributed to fighting 
between the Azanian People's Or- 
ganization and the United Demo- 
cratic Front, rival groups that both 
oppose South Africa's system of 
racial segregation, have been the 
work of pro-government Msa wins- 

Police said several houses in 
Kwazakde were heavfly damaged 
by firebombs in an apparent up- 
surge of feuding between the Azan- 
ian group and the United Demo- 
cratic Front, a nationwide 
multiracial umbrella organization. 

In Tsumeh, a farming center in 
South-West Africa, the official ra- 
dio reported that two people were 
figured man apparent bomb attack 
on the post office. Most guerrilla 
attacks ut the territory, also called 
Namibia, are attributed to the 
South-West African People’s Orga- 
nization, which is fighting to end 
South African rule. 

In Lusaka, Zambia, on Tuesday 
a bomb damaged the headquarters 
of the African National Congress, 
the main guerrilla movement fight- 
ing white minority rule in South 
Africa. 

The African National Congress 
and the Zambian government 
blamed South African a gents, a 
claim denied by a South African 
military spokesman. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

1 

Sectarian Fighting Resumes in Beirut 

nnn,n< iVTVn Clckrin* krnb* ran Wndwcdav <Mw»4 - 



cease-nre Qeiwccn dquic nmiRiimni ouu «««« *■ wwmmbw, 

The police said a personal quarrel around the Sage Bangui camp 
developed into rocket and heavy machine gun excha nges for three hong, 
promptin g intervention From an eight-man coordination committee th % ; 
was fonned to supervise the cease-fire arranged by Syria on June 18 . 

The agreement ended a month of clashes in and around the Borg ! 
BaranlSabra and Chatila camps. The committee coorists of represents { 
lives from the Amal Shiite militia, the Damascus-based Palestinian 
National Salvation Front and a leftist Lebanese group, the National [ 
Democratic Front j 

Groups Haim Madrid Airline Attacks} 

BEIRUT (Reuters) — Two undoground youpsdaimedrcsponsbiljty 1 
Wednesday for Monday's attacks on U.S. British andJorchnian airline 
offices in Madrid which killed one person and wounded 28. 

The claims by the Black September Organization and theRcrahaka. 
ary Organization of Socialist Moslems were m typewritten statements a 
Arabic, dcKvered by the same person to a foreign news Mcy m Bant. 
Black September said it had attacked the offices of Jordanian anfioc, 
Alia, while the other group said it had bombed the offices of Trans Waft 
Airlines and British Airways in the Spanish capital. 

One person was killed and 26 were injured m the atmdtou theTWA 
and BA offices. Minutes later, two men and a woman fired m a c h ine gum 
and threw explosives althe Alia office about 220 yards (200 meters) away, 
wounding two persons. 

Opposition Joins Bangladesh Cabinet 

DHAKA, Bangladesh (AFP) — Three prominent members of fe 
opposition were among 11 new cabinet ministers named Wednesday to 
the military government by President Hussain Mohammed Ezshad. 

The appointments increase the cabinet to 26 members. Seven of the 
new appointees are members of the pro-government Jana Dal party®*] 
one is a civil servant A presidential palace spokesman said that the civil 
servant, Giayun Rashecd Chowdhury, was given the portfolio of ottetnai 
affairs. Other portfolios are to be announced later. 

The three opposition figures were Kazi Jafar Ahmed, head of tbe , 
United Peoples Party; Hussain Khan, chief of the Gonotaatrik pav X 
and Zafar Imam of toe Bangladesh Nationalist Party. All of the parti® I 
are components of opposition affiances. . . 

San Frandsco Approves Growth limit 

SAN FRANCISCO (NYT) — San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors 
hac approved a zoning law deamed to limit the construction of skystap. 
ers ana reduce fay half the number of office jobs projected for ite dry's; 
congested downtown over the next 15 years. 

The plan what are thought to be the most stringent growth 

restrictions ever enacted by a major American city. It was passcdTucsday 
in response to complaints from residents that San Franriscri’s scenic 
beauty and quality of life were being spoiled by developers who war 
filling the downtown skyline with look-alikfc, glass-sheathed skyscrapers 
that gave rise to serious traffic, parking ami housing problems. 

The law, an amendment to the city planning code, drastically Jinan tie 

twighr ciw and number of b uilding s mat can be erected in a large section 
of the downtown; imposes rigid design controls, and shift s the ca y’s focus 
of development from its crowded financial district to a largely undevel- 
oped, rundown area south of Market Street, the city’s central thorough- 
fare. 

Austerity Plan Is Discussed mlsrael 

JERUSALEM (WP) — Senior Israeli government and labor tomb 
officials met Wednesday in an attempt to reach a compromise on the® 
implementation of an emergency economic plan that was decreed Moo-* 
day by the government. There was no reported progress. 

The meetings followed a one-day general strike called Tuesday by the 
Ffistadnn, Israel’s national trade union federation, and sporadi c u nre st in 
some of the poorer neighborhoods of Jerusalem to protest tbe ecocomfc 
plan. Yisraei Kessar, the Hisiadrui secretary-general, has sud that the 
emergency measures would mean a one-third redaction in the real income 
of workers over tbe next three months. 

For the Record 

Police In Iimpocd detained another three soccer fans Wednes day on 
suspicion of instigating the May 29 riot in Brussels in which 38 persons 
were killed. Fjght«»n suspects have been questioned. (Raters) 

The Swiss government, yielding Wednesday to pressure from etmroo- 
mental groups concerned about polluted lakes, declared abaaonphi* 
phates in soap powders from Jury 1986. - (Balers, 

A major earthquake rocked part of Papua New Guinea on Wednesdw, 
causing panic among the Pacific nation’s residents but no casualties. fArj 

Gerhard SchBrer, an East German deputy prime minister, *31 visa 
China next week to lay the groundwork for a trade agreement, tbe 
Foreign Ministry in Beijing said. . (AFP) 

Correction ■ ■ . 1 

The percentage increase for General Electric Co. of Britain’s pretn 
profit was incorrectly reported in Wednesday’s editions because of o 
editing error. The correct increase was 8 percent. 


Egypt Reinstates Women’s Rights 
As Wives But Reaffirms Polygamy 


Pakistan Cites U.S. May Offer $5 Million in Cash for Hijackers 


By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Pott Service 

CAIRO — While vowing to 
make “no encroachment on a 
man's right to polygamy” the 
Egyptian government has passed a 
law recognizing certain basic rights 
Tor women. 

The main effect of Tuesday’s ac- 
tion was to reinstate the law on 
marriage decreed in 1979 by Presi- 
dent Anwar Sadat without the con- 
sent of parliament, but ruled un- 
constitutional two months ago. 
Public discontent with the law had 
been mounting for months. 

The new legislation demon- 
strates President Hosni Mubarak’s 
desire to avoid a major confronta- 
tion with Egypt's Moslem fundar 
men tails ts. Its passage came in the 
face of growing political pressure 
from f nntiamenfalis is d emanding 

that Islamic law, called the sharia, 
be strictly applied in Egypt 

Because it touches on issues of 
family and deep tradition as well as 
religion, tbe law dealing with mar- 


riage is at the emotional center of 
this debate. 

“For some of these sheikhs," or 
religious leaders, said an American 
scholar here, “this issue is as emo- 
tional as the abortion question in 
the United States." 

Often called “Jihan’s law” be- 
cause it was championed by Sadat's 
wife, who was often criticized as 
having a Western orientation, the 
1979 decree declared that polyga- 
my was legally harmful to a first 
wife and automatically gave her the 
right to divorce her husband. 

Moreover, it gave the wife the 
right to custody of young children 
and to the family dwelling after the 
divorce. 

The notion at giving up living 
space makes the issue of divorce 
extremely sensitive in Cairo, a city 
of at least 12 minion people, where 
conditions are crowded. 

Until 1979 a man could divorce 
his wife by saying, simply, “I di- 
vorce you” three times. The 1979 


c!^r fa £&& A&evt/eusu 

Tennis courts and coach * Indoor golf 
Putting green * Indoor swimming pool 
Solarium « Sauna * Massage • Bridge 
. . . relax an let us spoil you 

Chair-lift to the Suvretta excursion area 
Surfing • Sailing • Mountain climbing 
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Phone 082 2 11 21 Telex 74491 R. F. M Oiler, Mgr. 



law required that all divorces be 
legally registered and that the wife 
be told what had happened. 

When tbe 1979 law was repealed, 
however, these rights vanished and 
the effective law was the one passed 
50 years before. 

A woman, who is an intellectual, 
said the law of 50 years ago was 
“medieval.” But there were many 
men — and some women — who 
considered it a ppr o priate in Egypt, 
a society where religions funda- 
mentalism is increasingly conspicu- 
ous, becanse its provisions are 
ciosdy linked to the standard inter- 
pretations of Islamic law. 

Tuesday’s passage was criticized 
by many women activists, who had 
proposed new legislation, as not 
protecting women's rights suffi- 
ciently. Shahida Baz of the Com- 
mittee for the Defense of Women 
and Family, called the new law “a 
kind of avoidance,” adding, "Ihe 
government did not want to be ac- 
cused of being anti-Islamic.” 

Yet even its liberal critics con- 
cede that the new law could have 
been much worse. 

“It wasn’t the best,” said Aziza 
Hussein, one of the most promi- 
nent activists for women’s rights in 
Cairo. “But it is better than noth- 
ing." 


July 4fh of 1 

Sam Kearny 

restaurant and codddi bar 
wSh Km adty vok» of 

Miss DAWN A HARDEN 

9 fan PrineMM, 75006 Paris. ' 
•T#Li 329.B9.80i 


Progress in 
Afghan Talks 

(Continued from Page I) 
manimrian relief within Afghani- 
stan. 

Mr. Yaqub Khan said mutual 
assurances by Afghanistan and Pa- 
kistan of nonintervention and non- 
interference across their common 
borders had been drafted into legal 
l angnagr . This presumably would 
outlaw the use of Pakistan as a 
conduit for the rcristance forces, 
many of whom use the mountain- 
ous terrain on the Pakistan ride of 
the border as a sanctuary. 

Pakistan steadfastly has denied 
aiding the reristance movement in 
the face of increased threats and 
cross-border attacks by Soviet and 
Afghan forces. 

Mr. Yaqub Khan added that the 
two countries hove worked on the 
phrasing of international guaran- 
tees of Afghanistan's security that 
would be affirmed by the United 
States and the Soviet Union. 

No language has been presented 
to Washington or Moscow, howev- 
er, and the guarantees did not come 

up June 24 m. the first set of formal 
talks between the United States 
and the Soviet Union on Afghani- 
stan. 

Also still under discussion is the 
return of more than three mfllioa 
Afghan refugees, most of whom 
flea to Pakistan to get away from 
the Soviet-imposed government in 
Afghanistan. 

However, tbe key issue of a time- 
table for the Soviet withdrawal and 
hs interrelationship with the other 
three pants r emans the potential 
hurdle. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
tbe hijackers, additional steps con- 
tinue to be discussed among offi- 
cials of the State Department, tbe 
Defense Department and the Cen- 
tral Intelligence Agency, sources 
said 

Military attacks on terrorist 
t raining camps, including one in 
Ulna, have been examined, they 
said, as well as attacks on tbe 
Sheikh Abdullah barracks in Baal- 
bek, Lebanon, which is believed to 
be tbe administrative center of tbe 
Hezballah, or Party of God, ex- 
tremists. 

The barracks have also beat 
used by the Iranian Revolutionary 
Guards, who collaborate with Hez- 
ballah. 

There was widespread feeling 
among senior officials that “some- 
thing must be done,” one said, to 
show that the United States .can 
respond to hzjjadtings. 

In welcoming bade 30 of the 
Freed hostages Tuesday afternoon, 
Mr. Reagan said that “there is no 


diver, Robert Dean Stethem. 

“His murderers must be brought 
to justice,” the president said 
Mr. Reagan’s remarks reflected 
his administration's attemp t ani* 
the TWA hijacking to portray pos- 
sible U.S. action against the terror- 
ists as punishment of individual 
criminals, ratter than broad, indis- 
criminate retaliation or retribution. 

Congress auth o rized the secre- 
tary or state last year to pay re- 
wards of up to $300,000 each to 
persons furnishing information 
leading to the arrest or conviction 
of any person for committing, con- 
spiring or attempting to co mmi t an 
act of terrorism overseas. 

In seeking to extradite the hi- 
jackers, the administration will be 


in the position of again doling 
with Nabih Bern, who, as leader of 
the Suites’ Amal nuHtia, represent- 
ed tbe hijackers in negotiations. 

Mr. Bern is Lebanon’s minister 
of justice and. thus would handle 
extradition requests. 

The formality of seeking their 
extradition will, permit their arrest 
by third nations if they are detected 
outride Lebanon. 

Failing that, officials said, the 
legal move prepares ground work 
for a U.S. team to seize the men in 
Lebaacax some day, to “do an Eich- 
mann,” said a source, referring to 
Adolf Eidmumn, the Nazi SS war 
criminal who was abducted by Is- 
raelis in Argentina in I960, snug- 
gled to Israel, tried and hanged 

Officials indicated that the 
whereabouts of the hijackers in 
Beirut was known. 

Meanwhile, the Department of 
Transportation proposed to ban 
ticket sales in the US for flights to 
Lebanon, saying that “the security 
of aircraft transiting that country 
and the safety of passengers on 
board such aircraft r emain m jeop- 
ardy." 

The proposal, winch will be sub- 
ject to public comment until Fri- 
day, would prohibit tbe sale of any 
ticket in the United States that has 
Lebanon on the itmoary, even if 
the flight rally stopped in Lebanon 
and even if it originated outride the 
United Stales. 

The -department revoked the 
temporary authority of the Leba- 
nese air carrier, Middle East Air- 
lines, to serve the United States. 

Middle East Airlines will be al- 
lowed to lease aircraft and crews to 
EgyptAir for Cairo-New York ser- 
vice. ' 

■ UJL Hesitant on Sanctions 

Prime Minister Margaret 



Mme Minister Margaret Thatcher welcomes ’Woe Pfesi- 
dent George Bush to 10 Downing Street for tiscaaftBS. 


Thatcher of Britain agreed 
Wednesday to work with the Unit- 
ed States to stop international ter- 
rorism, but she declined to join, at 
least for the moment, in the U.S. 
campaign to isolate the Beirut air- 
port, The New York Times report- 
ed from London. 

After' meeting with Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush, the prime minis- 
ter said that Britain would be very 

pleased “to stm T *h»,**» A 


this country, provided that we cm 
get all the Bom rammtt oouniiw 
to stop than as wdL”' “ 

■ Beni Threatens M Sne 
Mr.’ Bern, lefamko’s Justice 
Minister, threatened Wednesday to 
sue the Uni ' before tbe 
International: Gocrl -of Justice ill 

The Hagwp$fi^-S- v - 
managed s airport to 

internatiooaltrave^Thc Associat- 
ed “ - 


INTERNAnONAL 



***** HftThf.-W Yotfc TW, mi Thr T^iylnn ft* 










Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY *, 1985 


Castro Edges to the Forefront in Pressing, for Solution to latin Debt Crisis 



By Edward Gody 

Washington Pott Service 


“Right n0 w t there is somethin* more important than Mr. Castro is also emphasizing his new iemc ai a omc 

when many Latin American leaders fear that the 

.k7u«;«n nnumimic FYnflsiar. “and that is our administration’s emphasis on Central American confnonta- 


dances. 



teacher. 

The sight of children cheerieading for international finan- 
cial reform might have seemed inoonghious elsewhere. hut in 
Qiba it was just another sign of President Fidel Castro's 


intensive raun p ai g n to become a leader in a search fen President Castro. 


issues for Latin American and other underdeveloped coon- alternative to most Latin countries ties to the United suites 
tries. So cial rfmwfl gs ato p*- are not the solution." and U.S. banks. 

.. . jT, . t' .u_ -r jAmr critemum U.S. officials have estimated that the Soviet Union prc> 
Aocoiding to diplomats here, vidcs Cuba with $4 billion a year in subsidized track and 

and.pohtwd sage have grown increasingly attractive tor ^ ^ a fiv{>ycar cooperation accord, The 


U.S. Copter 
Flew Into 
War Zone in 
El Salvador 


f i>rti‘ 


ojie& 

%0» 


w*-'m 

* . 

■ 

•* 



Soviet Union 


solutions to Larin Americas foreign debt ensis. The Cuban leader, whose beard is turning gray a? he it and Fowi? Europe, efllmaied to total S9 billion. 

In interviews, speeches and actronsOT his government, the approaches 59. reticles his place among Latin Americas «w e have beoi able to postpone payment of our debt for 
Cuban leader has made the S36Q-bilhon Latm American m0St durable and experienced leaders. jq. 15 and even 20 yearn without interest," Mr. Castro 

debt burden his top roncerm^ . _ Expressions of concern about Latin debts also fit in with boasted in the Excelsior interview. 

uJS? Sl/Sw to rSfaTBut adraSv theffi increasingly successful effort to end his kmg jsokjion Cuba also has trade relations with the West, although they 

SLSr from other Latm American governments. Several formerly ^ aboat 13 percent of the total And despite his 

P 0 * 451111 ® 1 hostile governments have wafmed to the Cuban. ^amadoJ Thai UiiZa^s foreign debt is beyond 

HeS iS>catedlv irndeS the gravity of the crisis, For these governments, Cuban chants about the debt payrant, j^^tCasto’sgoi^i^ 


rfwTtmgflg for the United States. 



Ie had repeatedly underlined the gravity of the crisis, For these governments,, uio an mans K 

talliMthedSkSmlaestiinposahl^pay.Assdutions, crisis have, been sweet music for lapprodwnoiL They hare own S3-bflbon debt to West Eunroean govern 
Ssu^«cd a sort of ur^ «te US. St'S «, pay fa.Urf&ri^ 


governments and 
ordine to the new 


government to assume the debts so UJS. banks could release much as did Cuba s 
b - Falkland Islands, or 


governments from the obligations. 

Mr. Castro, who for years has been regarded as Ok symbol 


ition during the 1982 war over the schedules. 

vinas. Cuba's $3-bQlioa debt, however, has little in common with 

. - D n >. (M ui;« (OCUIIInn nr immfma'c UK 


D ay i re oppoation to the junta then ruling Argentina, " Brazil’s $98 billion. Mexico’s $96 billion or Argentina s $48 


of revolution, accompanicd his concern with warnings that Cuba was careful to support Buenos Aires against the bnnsn Dunon. 
ftiliuetoi^eve thecSttburden soon could leadtosodai outsiders. -. . 

imheaval across the continent. “Fidel has struck another chord that began with the remam outside any LaUn d^tors _3ub, if such » 


upheaval across the continent. 

Rather than rejoicing in this pn 
need to avoid H, and has as s um ed 


1 IM vl t UV-fL (UiyUiw uiav L/Mf, »»•»* ■ r — , - *i ■ 

prospect, he has stressed a Malvinas," tte diplomat said. “And that chord is that we are fanned ta he has advocated Wuh or -wttoul ■<^“P I £ 
ted the role of statesman he Latin Americans and we arc countries in our own right, and a cirtd likely tecome attain the 

ir»»n fnctitiitirtnc fnHudins w ohontrin’t fet rhp iinitwi Qtntes nush uc around. side of the U.S. government, smce U.S. banks hold most 01 


Fidel Castro: Seeking a regional leadership role. linVc to the U.S. banks bolding most of the debt. 


wants to preserve 1>tin American institutions, induding we shouldn't let the United Stales push us around." 


The United States supported Britain in the conflict- the debt. 


U.S. Seeks to Deport Ex-Rebel Chief 
Critical of Reagan Nicaragua Policy 


U.S. Stations in Europe 3 Ex-Envoys 


By Kendall J. Wills Chamorro and the critic 

Hew York Tints Serwe meats made by him. 

NEW YORK — The U.S. Inuni- The exclusionary order s 
ration and Naturalization Service Mr. Chamorro is in the 


Chamorro and the critical state* right after 3 lobbied before Con- 


The exclusionary order says that 
r. Chamorro is in the United 


grass and wrote articles." 

5 that Mr. Chamorro said the CIA had 
oiled provided him with an American 


started proceedings that could stales illegally and that he must w* and a valid Nicarag u an pass- 
1 to the deportation of a former appear before an immigration port to aid his travds while he was 


Nicaraguan rebel leader who has judge to state why he 
been critical of Reagan administra- deported, 
tion policies, according to an immi- _ 

gralion ofiitiaL 


lmmi gr; 
should e 



May Have Violated Code Want Shultz 

" TV* * . T tildv to come under fire. 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON— Are 
a government agency says 


Dismissed 

ic,” of a Jew who assassinated 


By Bill Keller 

Nw York Tuna Service 
WASHINGTON - A U.S 
Army helicopter flew into an e& 
battled region of northeastern B 
Salvador last month to recover a 
downed Salvadoran military he& 
copter, according to Pentagon and 
State Department officials. 

' Officials said Tuesday that (he 
rescue effort apparently the Era 
time such a mission has been un- 
dertaken in El Salvador, was ap- 
proved by the Slate Department 
and the U.S. Southern 
in Panama and did not violate re- 
strictions on American military 
personnel entering combat zones. 

A spokesman for the Americas 
Embassy in San Salvador said the 
site of the damaged Salvadoran 
UH-1H helicopter “was well jro- 
tected by the Salvadoran armed 
forces at the time of the primp 
and we do not consider thatUj£ 
personnel involved were subjected 
to jeopardy or the likelihood of 
hostile fire.” 

Under operating rules imposed 
to prevent Americans from bring 
drawn into combat, American 
forces areprobibited from entering 
areas of El Salvador where they are 
likely to come under fire. 


casts to the Soviet Union and East- Prime Minister Pyotr A. Stolypin 
em Europe financed by the U.S. of Rnssia in 1911. 


government may have violated in- • A reference to the Soviet for- 


By Joanne Omang 

Washington Past Service 


not be working with the rebel group 
against the Sandinist government. 

nnl of In an aoinkm pace article in the 


New York 


sssssar^ “ JlsteSSM JSmwcw 

The official, Peny A . RhtoJ. £? £*£££ titat teSM- ^ Mr. Chamorro wrote that 
the immigrauon service dutnet d*- dosed infojmaiion about secret Reagan administration «>haes m 


i 

\ 

i ! 


tonal guidelines 18-times during eign minister as a bandit. 


the first eight months of last 
The General Accounting ( 


• An interview “suggesting vio* sadors 

■ n t n - . f i». _ » _ f 


drawn into combat, Anreriao / f 
forces are prohibited from enlerim f > ilf 1 * 9 

areas of El Salvador where they Ml?" ' 

likely to come under fire. * § , • * _ 

The emteKy spokesman said; infkhlkt* f 
^TrerecouW be activity m virtually 

any part of the country at any tiny 
It becomes ajudgment can as to the .* T. 
likelihood of putting one's self ia \pf[T I rf 1 ( - 

iermandv ” 1” 


leal action" by Soviet soldiers in Ronald Reagan to replace Secrc- rules." 


A PenUgon spokesman said. 
“We were operating within the 


a congressional watchdog agency, Af ghanistan against their snperi- tary of Slate George P. Shultz, 


said in a report obtained Monday 
that Radio Free Europe and Radio 


obtained Monday ora. 


T^tor in Mami smd Tucsday Unt 
he had reviewed the file of Edgar 
Chamorro after reading an article 7“"“ 
written by Mr. Chamorro last week 
that was critical of Uilactivities in -Qnc 
Nicaragua. Mr. Chamorro is a for- pdn tl 
mer director of the Nicaraguan Mr Chi 
Democratic Force, the mdor goer- int^xvier 
rilla group fighting the Sandmist Biscavn 


nanced by the CentrdmteUigence OA had tried to bto tberebds 


Liberty were retimed to avoid officials inNwi war criminals. 


of former Soviet is 


that the State Department 
■r mirring Preadeat Rea- 


tion took place four 


-emotionalism, vindictiveness, fad- . A description of an unidmti- 

liow wn mf nnMMihiwenMC rw iv»n_ _ “ . 


gan's foreign i 
Speaking T 


days before gunmen attacked a 
President Rea- suuiwalk cafi m San Salvador, ItiB- 
r" ing 13 persons, including four off- 

iy at a forum of duty American marine 
sritage Founda- U.S. officials said the Salvador- 


for mining Nicaraguan harbors. 


Nicaragua. Mr. uiamorro is a ror- FDN, they stopped my privileges,” 
mer director of the Nicaraguan ^ Chamorro said in a telephone 
Democratic Force, the maor^ner- interview from his home in Key 
rilla group fighting the S andmis t giscayne, Florida, where he has 
government and known m Nicara- with his family since 1979. “Is 
gua as the FDN. tins just a coincidence? My legal 


Mr. Rivkind denied that there 
was any connection between the 
exclusionary order issued to Mr. 


-O^I^wortdngforU* 

DRthey suS>^ my pnvdraes, utidR mA discoveredtff the 
r. ChamOTro stud matel^phone state Department had denied his 
terview tom his tome m Key appUc^for asylum in Decem- 
sayntj, Hirntto there to has ™ ^ ^ issued the exclusion 
■ed with his family since 1979. Is ^ 
is just a coincidence? My legal ' 


-r. 


hgerraicy, pretentiousness, or con- fied u^aStss as having “warm the conservative Heritage Founda- U.S. officials said the Salvador- 
desccnsion, and programming sympathies" with the Soviet Union. tion wwe David B - Fn ? dert ”?*r 3,1 government requested hdp in 
that could be oongdowd mflamma- J “T ambassador to Romania from 1981 mnnvinE in nounded Mihm* 


tony. 

r- MnwA W The report, dated June 24. 

Edgar Chamorro quoted the director of the Broad- 

cast Analysis Department of Radio 
said. “Thai would be a violation of liberty and Radio Free Europe as 


He said he had not previously creased 


tted June 24, contamea “nosiupnses. ^ alternate representative to the az4n province after it was groiHid- 

r of the Broad- “Eve^f all^auon wasknown to United Nations from 1981 to 1984. ed 14 during an offensive 
rtment of Radio the board beforehand through onr and Cnrtin Winsor Jr^ ambassador aMinst Roerrillasui the tecioiL 
Free Europe as cheebmg system, Mr. to Rica from [983 to 1985. They sa 

: broadcasts in- Shakespeare said Monday. Two officials of the foundation, Chinoo 

“We didn’t find anything that we the vice president. Burton Yak 0™ jh 


status had never been questioned ^ . „ . — . — — — 

while I was working with j conclusion that this was done for logof immigration cases and “part- Soviet Union, while Radio Free on the air m 21 different services James T. Hacked, also called for lifted it ouL 

_■ « .1 w * a ? ranrnnp n X/>* DitrUinrl l\l Iwroildn Af kmlMIV v r<ati«* MTfir h F umn* A* ******* iwwmmE tA nlltttr nri4 urai'rA rt reamin a Anff fllAlU m M . . d '- ' * 


aooable broadcasts in- 
year. 


to Costa Rica from 1983 to 1985. They said an »manwd US. n£fi 
Two officials of the foundation, Chinook helicopter flew into the 


“Everyone wants to draw the acted on the case because of a hack- Radio liberty broadcasts to the felt was systematic. When you’re pines, 


ce president. Burton Yak area the following day tom Pd- 
and the publications editor, merola Air Base in Honduras and 


question why this is happening political reasons," Mr. Rivkind ly because of bureaucratic error. 1 


DOONESDURY 


directs programs to other and you’re streaming out ttou- 
ropean countries. They are sands and thousands of words in 


Mr. Shultz's removal. 

Mr. Funderburk, now a profes- 


the Board for International the period of a year and you have a sor at Campbell University in 


i 2 Missions Reported 
An B Salvador nahtar! 


HA.HAIUIOK 
AT THAT KIP 


OONTUWi 
TOMMY. VB 


|j arm no tan! jopbwuu? 

U tt/tiKUF ..a f&m 


BOY, 15 HE 
OUT OF IT J 


HG/y COUP THAfcnGHKtOMMY, 
trimo- ANPJMhsrewil 

j k3w YOU ONLY LOSERS 

maUL UOMm**! 
TANNING r*jL 
CHAMPXMC- 
ER.HABVS! 


50ODI t YlJUNBSIBZ. ■ 

BUT- BUT BUTTHffiltUSBPUP. G/Wl 
I THOUGHT GE£7mf£#LTHY / _ 

tanning aourwsAaasBL x fi&Cnol 
UA5C00L, UXJK!'sr^ . 

mb M ommi 1— V \ 


GETSMART. 

COYERUE 

ALOHA'' 


Broadcasting, appointed by the number of programs that were in- North Carolina, said State Depart- man said Wednesday that U5. k- 
presuknt. The board chairman is appropriate, that's par for the mt-nt behavior toward Romania hcopter pilots twice flew missions 
Frank Shakespeare, a former CBS course,” Mr. Shakespeare said. was ‘Tragically wrong” and “a pro- into H Salvador last month, appar- 
executive. The stations were founded by the slavery policy” in contrast to Mr. «“tly contradicting the Pentagon's 

The possible violations included Central Intelligence Amicy. Their R«.«ran’s staled ooliev of “devdoo- contention that only one such nkht 


The pofitibk violations included Central Intelligence Agmcy. 


the following: 


uAsaxL, um\ 

MfLHAFm S* 


connections with it were severed in j^g human 


‘An anatomical obscenity to 1981 by direction of Congress. For torn Soviet dommatiofl. 


lts and freedom tot* place, Reuters reported ton 
fnarinn " San Salvador. 


describe a Polish government offi- the year ending 


provided them wii 


Sept 30, Congress 

nth $108 milli on. 


He said that a network of State Salvadoran spokesman said I- 


Anglicans Vote to Allow 
Women to Be Deacons 


Department career officers “works CH-47s were sent to El Sal v ado r by 
frantically to denigrate infonna- the US. mili t a ry on June 14 and 
tion from the field^tm Romanian June 18 to retrieve two Salvadoran 


tion from the field on Romanian 
violations of human rights. 

He said that Romania provided 
haven for “thousands of radical Ar- 


helicopters damaged during an an- 
ti-guerrilla drive. 

The reports of the flight, or 


Untied Press Inxcnuaionai obstacle 

LONDON — The Church of En- churches- . - A spokesman for the Romanian 

gland's General Synod, the' No precise figures for Britain^ Embassy said the allegations were 
church’s ruling body, voted over- were disclosed, but the conversion “a very dirty calumny." 
whehmngjy Tuesday to aOow worn- to Roman Ca t holicism of several Mr. Winsor, now a W ashing ton 


Ly *« ambassador to Washington was 

“one of the great bars of the uni- 
obstade to uniting the Christian verse" 


abs and other terrorists” and aided Bights, appeared Holy to arouse 
guerrillas woridwide. He said its concern among oincs of the Rea- 


gan administration in the United 
States who fear direct US. involve- 


AUTO CONVERSION 


MaroKhfrSanc fandw BMW Fan u ii 


EP A/ DOT 


CONVHHON5 

Fort tunwxound AB worii done 
cm piwniw- Srf«s Z t’UiJmg. 

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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Bade Page) 

CHAUFFEUR LEGAL SERVICES EDUCATION 

SERVICES US IMMIGRATION wkb. Altys. SpSot 


I HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


rmiiinin inhr. to ^ or ^ no ^ 35 deacons, a prominenidergymen made nation- consultant, criticized Mr. Shultz’s 


mg, mV hoeing in aJm beautiful set^' mOVC SCOl by ORJOnCIItS BS bl 

feWflaHww 06072 ^&d« jog women a step closer to 
priesthood. 


BWJUPOMT nmir.Giidi Europe. 
Mfoidw Coupe. Pare; 620 0392. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


■ Tet |305J 609600, txJ 

EDUCATICMM 


DOT/EM CONVERSIONS to US. 
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"51087. T«t aoijnam ti* 
4995689 VIA US. 



from Government IMvaolm. For 


ImriMridoi Eduediand Guivftnrtv ! 
PO Bate 7092. Mcoiia, Cypnu. 



GREAT BUTTAIN 


owe seen by opponents as bring- al headlines in recent months. opening last year of direct t a l ks 
g women a step closer to the The Bishop of Chichester, Eric with the leftist government of Nic- 
iesthood. Kemp, regarded as a leader of the aragna. 

The General Synod voted, 320- Anglo-Catholic trend in the Angli- ‘They could have had only one 


Wallace Sterling, 
Ex-President of 
Stanford, Dies 


IONDON GUEST HOUSE HtOM SIS. 
pw doy. 01-455 3764 or 202 7325 = ; 


83, on Tuesday to approve the mea- can Church, at the time appealed to outcome: die sellout of Honduras 
sure that would enable women to waverers to stand firm. But he con- and our other friends in the ro- 


be styled “reverend" and perform ceded that 


women to waverers to stand firm. But he con- and our other friends in the rc- 


IHWRE OAUafY - X Bruton SC 
Utndoo wn - 01-493 2107. Important 


n faced acri- giem,” Mr. Winsor said. The State Wallace Sterl 
in 150 years Department favors “international- president of 

nf iIuuaTaaiin* > 1. — TT It 4T 


Los Angela Times Savior 

LOS ANGELES — John Ewart 
allace Sterling, 78, who served as 
esident of Stanford Umvnsity 


”**• ^ rauksjust bdow a priest in the man, converted to Cathohosm and he said. 

Ju» - 2/tti^Wy. Mwrioyj . Fri*rA ZwiZL 


ist thinking" al tbc expense of U.S. for almost 20 years, has died of 
interests and misleads U.S. allies, cancer, the imivendtv unnromced. 


1 Daovfipm, Sohinfay 10m - 1 


ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS A GUIDES I ESCORTS A GUIDES j 


Anglicaa nimd i: - 
lie decision must be approved 
by the, British; Pariiainent, which 
oversees the established church 


rose to become a cardinal 
The Reverend Peter Geldazd, 


cancer, the university announced. 
Mr. Sterling, who used the name 


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secretary of the traditionalist An- our own front yard, 
glo-Catholic Church Umoo, said expect us to fulfill on 


“If they cannot trust us to dear Wallace, was a member during to 
out the bear-infested garbage from lifetime of dozens of academic and 


leader of Tuesday in a.tdeviaon interview dons?" he said. 


d, tow can they 
our other obliga- 


tiiar he usod to rounsd up tea Mr. Lkbaastan. now a senior niaVraost pres 
dozen msfliusaoned Anglican ckr- fellow at Heritage, said career dip- - He was also 


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- He was also the recipient of nu- 


PRESTIGE 


OM«A ^ESCORTSNrvKX h ^ gymen a yeartot now was dealing lomats “control the sopply of both 

” VA 'Sxf5Mw rsawa 1 pm-n pm. T«fc has about 350 women deaccms, but with one a week. carrots and sticks” within the Stale der of Merit of wSt Gmnany the 

MAM® «KTJONS EKOCT s«^. That is a lay position, and there One convwt. Frances Flatinan, Department and foil poliries they L*oi„ n iTHnnnron- 


- E *« rt SSE*" 
Tab 988 3163 / 08833 3163 


1 — T * «ii,5iy. Cradt Cg& i were predictions that the advance- wife .of the Anglican wear of the dislike by raitwaithig political an- 


Department and foil polities they L6gj 0 n (THoimeur of France 'and 


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church by because of Anghcan latore to This is “rolerated" by Mr. i^SSaESE^SS toi 
sanxwusto nmve closer to Rome, and because Shultz, Mr. Lichen stein said. 1W2 to 1 
which flatly ^ 1 ^^^ a PP caredto ^ Asked why, he said, “We have the Stanford torn 


because of Anglican failure to 


Tfah —iwLwM m mniea hoi 
b«m IW w d m ft* tap A mact 
•wiaatva bat Same* by 
USA 1 WwT Mftw d iwwi nMtfla 
fcwhwfcig mdb end TV. 


67 ChRtam She*. 
London WT 

Tot: 486 3724 or 486 1158 
AH major cm A mb accoatod 


AMSTERDAM 182197 r«w«ru»»nr LLi , mu. co - kcpw sannesi bwhtioutiists wfw are anxious to move closer to Rome, and because 

HnMR toiw nemnr W" 0 ?* ***** “U® Sonnco I M .uo. .f i j 


i ad m i n - a historian, Mr. Sterling served 
, as regular evening news cranmenta- 

by Mr. tor cm the CBS radio network from 


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i move closer to Rome, which flatly of bishops who appeal 
| oppos«priesthood for women. fundamental bdiers si 
f The Times of London and other Resurrection erf Christ 
| newspapers have reported that An- Her husband, the 


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■ clergy to the Roman Catholic The Church of England has 
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Reuters 

LONDON Most of Brit- 
ain’s distinctive red telephone 
booths are being replaced but 
about 3,000 will Be preserved as' 
part of the nation’s heritage. 

The Departomt of the Envi- 
ronment said it would wodt 
with British Telecom and the ~ 
Historic Buildings and Monu- 
ments Commission to identify 
booths of historical and archi- 
tectural significance. . 

British Telecom is carrying 
out a fl60.maBan (about $210- 
miHk») drive to replace, the _ 
phtme boss, 8$ the Bntidi call 
them, with glass-paneled 
booths, trimmed in ydkm and 
designed along the tines of 
those used in the United States. 

The 6Q£00 red, dome-roofed 
booths with small panes of glass * 
were designed in the 1930s by 
Sir Giles Gilbert ScotL British 
Telecom srid.abdut 3,000 are to 
be preserved. 


grew in prestige, staff and facilities 
while retaining a rdanvtiy <™M 
enrollment, now at 1 1,500. The 
graduate program was upgraded, 
and Stanford became the first ma- 
jor U.S. university to establish 
branches overseas. 

. Gifts and bequests to Stanford 
totaled nearly $330 million daring 
Mr. Steriing’s years as president lu 
times the amount raised in the 40 
previous years. The value of the 
physical plant in Palo Alto, Cafr 
forma, rose from $22 million to 
$143 imltirai. 


James A. Dewar, 88, 
Inventor of the Twinkle 

CHICAGO (LAT) — James A. 
Dewar, 88, who in 1930 invented 
Twinkles, the popular American 
finger cake, has died. 

Denounced as the quintessential 
junk food and hailed as “the prole- 
tarian cream puff," the tittle cakes 
with super-sweet creamed filling 
have entered American folklore. 

Mr. Dewar, who died Sunday in 
a Chicago suburb, invented Twin- 
Ides as manag er of a Continental 
Baking Co. plant near Chicago. He 
be gan wiri n Tig for Continental in 
-1920 as driver of a horse^irawn 
pound-cake wagon and retired in 
1972 as a vice president The cakes 
filled Continental’s need for a low- 
priced item during Che Depression. 


ter 


Paris 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1985 


PageS 


Portuguese, With 16 Governments in 11 Years, Seem Little Worried About Latest Crisis 


By Edward Schumacher 

y*w York Tuna Serna 

LISBON —The government of 
prime /Minister Mario Soares of 
Portugal has all but fallen, but at 
tim vohmteer fixe station an the 
plaza of Happiness, there are few 
people who seem to care. 

“weSe had so many political 
crises tens in so few yean that we 
doift pay too tmichattention any* 
more,* said Ramiro da Fonseca, 
30 . His friends, gathered in the twi- 
light in this popular neighborhood 




’***“'' r.ji 

E> 

i’lc-.r- - . ; 

'■* N. < v. '* ■■Jb 


Last Thmsday night. President 
Antdnio Ramalho Eanes an- 
nounced thal he would dissolve the 

National Assembly in about two 
weeks, which means the calling of 
ejections and the end of Mr. Soar- 
es's Socialist government. 

It wQI be the I6th change of 
government since a right-wing dic- 
tatorship was overthrown 11 years 
ago- 

There were no rallies after the 
announcement, no flourishes of re- 
action from potitkal leaders, not 
end new graffiti to cover the graf- 
fiti on walls everywhere saying 
"Reagan Go Home.*’ Those rem- 
nants of President Ronakl Rea- 
gan’s visit here eight weeks ago are 
now fading in the hot s umme r sin. 

Newspapers, though for weeks 
declaring a “political crisis,” dealt 



Socialist Party members greet Prime Minister M&rioSoares of Portugal, 
left, wbo offered June 23 to resign. He wiH stay in office ratiS the political □ 


Th» StwdaaH FWg 

il, second from 
crisis is sotred. 


with its denouement the next day Forest were oddly poisoned drink- last, meeting of European Comniu- 
as just one more front-page story, ing themounlain water from a pob- nity beads erf government in Milan, 
sometimes above, sometimes bo- lie fountain. - It is not tint Portugal's 10 mil- 

low, news that several children on a Even Mr. Soares went away. He Son people are apolitical Election 
school outing to the nearby Sintra attended his first, and maybe his turnouts are usually high, and in 




Polish Leader Shevardnadze: Cut From Boss’s Mold 

Of Strike Gets Experts Fed He and Corbachev Will Form a dose Team 


Of Strike Gets 
Year Term 

Reuters 

WARSAW — A Solidarity activ- 
ist who led a protest strike Monday 
against government-imposed meal 
price rises was imprisoned for a 
year Wednesday, opposition 
sources said. 

Henryk Grzagidski, 31, was ar- 
rested Tuesday m the northern city 
of Slupsk where be works at a fac- 
tory that makes farm eqiripment- 

Mr. Graagidski was accused of 
leading an illegal protest. Four oth- 
er people alleged to have been in- 
volved in the action were fired by 
die management and right were 


Lv>JOn> rv-. jv-TrJ 


Hiuv 

Pn- 

ni«»r* 




The sources said that 70 percent 
of the 1,500 workers at the plant 

tk' leadenfof the 
"" union for protests. 

The government has denied that 
any strikes occurred despite Soli- 
darity claims that there were stop- 

- pages in factories in Warsaw, the 
Gdansk shipyards and plants 
around Poland. 

Opposition sources Wednesday 
made available a cassette tape re- 
cording smuggled from prison by 
Bogdan Lis, one of three leading 
Solidarity activists imprisoned last 
month for union activities, in which 
he complained of an unfair triaL 

Mr. Lis, who was imprisoned for 
two and a half years, repeated accu- 

• rations thal evidence against him, 
Adam Michnik and Wladyslaw 
Frasyniuk was rigged and that the 
trial violated “aflbasic principles 

- of law and Older." 

Mr. Michnik was imprisoned for 
p . three years and Mr. Frasyniuk for 
«■. three and a half years. The three 

• have filed appeals against their 
ii * convictions but no date has been 

set for the hearing. 

■ Giemp Goes to Prague 

Cardinal Jazef Giemp, the pri- 
mate of Poland, left Warsaw on 
Wednesday for Prague, where he is 
to meet with the Czechoslovak pri- 
mate, Cardinal Frantisek Tomasfik, 
The Associated Press reported 
from Warsaw. 

A Polish church spokesman said 
Cardinal Giemp hoped to attend 
celebrations Sunday in honor of 
the two saints who helped bring 
Christianity to parts of what is now 
Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia. 

West Germany Orders 
10 MBB Minesweepers 

Reuters 

BONN — The Defense Minisuy 

- i ordered 10 ships Wednesday cost- 
- ing about 12 billion Deutsche 

marks ($400 million) from the 
country’s leading armaments 
group, Messerschmiu-Bdlkow-B- 
tafcm, a ministry spokesman said. 

The 18-lmot craft will allow the 
navy to perform minesweeping and 
laying duties with one type of ves- 
sel far the first time. They are the 
first of 30 such ships the ministry 
plans to order by the beginning of 
the 1990s under a modernization 
program. 


By Gary Lee 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — USL ana- 
lysts of Soviet affairs behove that 
Mikhail A. Gorbachev has picked a 
new foreign cut from his 

own mold; a man of political ability 
and wit who trill allow Mr. Gorba- 
chev to shape his own foreign po- 
licy over the long term. 

To several U.S. specialists, 
Eduard A. Shevardnadze, 57, the 
new foreign minister, may lack ex- 
perience; but he has, they said, 
shown hnnsdf to be ‘imaginative,’’ 
“breezy” and forcefuL 

Dimitri K. Srmes, a specialist at 
the Carnegie Endowment for Inter- 
national Peace here, predicted that 
Mr. Shevardnadze would first 
change the. conduct and style of 
Soviet foreign policy and then, with 
time; its substance. 

Jetty Hough, at the Brookings 
Institution in Washington, said: “If 
you want to bring in your own man, 
at the time of complicated foreign 
policy, that’s how you do it Ifs 
very much a break with the old." 

“Ids raw thing to move Gromy- 
ko, and another to replace him with 
your own. man," Mr. Hough stud, 
referring to Andrei A. Gromyko, 


who has been a diplomat since 1939. 
and foreign minister since 1957. 

Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. She- 
vardnadze have similar po litical 
roots. Mr. Shoes said both “come 
from the school of dynamic and 
ambitions angry young men of the 
1960s.” 

Mr. Shevardnadze was a leader 

~ NEWS ANALYSIS 

of the Communist Youth League in 

when Mr. Gorbachev occupied 
similar posts in Stavropol, at the 
northern edge of the Caucasus. 

Weston analysts say such prox- 
imity means the two probably 
knew each other, likely meeting at 
regional conferences, and thus have 
contacts back 25 years. 

UJ5. specialists on the Soviet 
Union sam thal Mr. Shevardnadze, 
during his years as bead of the 
Communist Party of Georgia, ac- 
quired a strong reputation as a 
“doer" with a sense of style. He is 
“a tough cop who knows bow to 
flatter,” a Stale Department offi- 
cial mid 

Mr. Hough said Mr. Shevard- 
nadze’s speeches show a graceful- 


Cossiga Takes Office in Italy 

thdstd Press Inurvadoaal bCCSiDC CAlicutely popnlfiT 

ROME — Francesco Cosstea ordinar Y Italians during his tom. 
w£ siL wS^in^ ItaVs^Hecto^them^ 
eighth president oUtal/s postwar’ 
republic before a joint session of 
Pa ffiamem. as president June 24. 

Mr. Cosaga, 56, is a fanner _ _ 

prime mini st pt and interior minis- / _ . > . 

ter respected across the political Every piece Or jewe 
spectrum for his integrity. 

Standing cm the podhnn of the 
Chamber of Deputies, Mr. Cossiga 
pronounced the ample phrase: “I 
swear to be faithful to the republic 
and to observe faithfully the consti- 
tution.” 

Almost immediately a 21-gun sa- 
lute freed by an artuloty detach- 
ment from the Janictuum hill 
boomed out over the city to an- 
nounce the installation of the new 
head of state. 

The swearing-in was originally 
scheduled for July 9, the day after 
the normal end of the seven-year 
term of the outgoing president, 

Sandro PertinL 

But it was changed to Wednes- 
day after Mr. Pertmi, 88, resigned 
Sunday before the end of his term, 
in a move political commentators 
interpreted as a rebuke to political 
parties that failed to elect him 
again. /Ov 

Mr. Pertiiri dropped from sight (A/j\ ;i; I A I 

after Ms gesture. But as a former WV/ |||q^> LMl 

president ne automatically became 

a life senator and be was on the park - 364. RUE ST-HC 

Socialist benches of the lower geneva . -BON GBVI 

bouse for the swearing-in. ATHENS - 6, PANE 

At the outset of his speedi to the H ° Ta< MYCON^C 

senatorsand deputies, V NEW YORK - 4 WEST 57 1 

paid tribute to Mr. Pertmi, who X 


Dilias LALAoUNISl 

PARIS - 364. RUE ST-HONORE (PLACE VENDOME) 
GENEVA - -BON GENIE". ZURICH - "CRIEDER* 
ATHENS - 6, PANEPISTIMIOU AVENUE 
HOia GRANDE BRETAGNE & ATHENS HILTON 
MYCGNOS, CORFU, RHODES 
NEW YORK - 4 WEST 57 TH STRHTT & FIFTH AVENUE 


front of a Co mmunis t Party office a 
huge banner in bold green and red 
celebrating the 1974 revolution in- 
dicates that passions can be, toa 

But adding to the popular lethar- 
gy at the moment is that the beach 
weather is balmy — .political lead- 
ers could not be found over the 
weekend — and that the govern- 
ment’s fall is unfolding in slow- 
motion half steps and whole confu- 
sion. 

At the root of the crisis has been 
a split between the Socialists and 
their junior partners in the govern- 
ing coalition, the more conservative 
Social Democrats, over plans by 
Mr. Soares to ran for president in 
elections scheduled for December. 

- Under the Portuguese system, 
the pome minister runs the govern- 
ment, but the president molds a 
long-term vision for the nation 
through select powers such as caU- 
ing elections. 

Nearly a month ago the Social 
Democrats announced they were 
pulling out, but not until after the 
signing of the EC treaty in early 
June. 

Then, Mr. Soares dramatically 
declared his intention to resign, but 
he did not submit his resignation 
until last Tuesday. 

In a Hurry of meeting that went 
nowhere. President Eanes and 
Prime Minister Soares, normally 
bitter enemies, found themselves 
allies seeking to avoid assembly 
elections. Mr. Fanes argued that, 
ejections would be destafiliring as 
living standards have been drop- 
ping. the government is in the 
. midst of a tough but needed auster- 
ity program, and Portugal lags in 


preparations to enter the EC in 
January. AH parties but the Social- 
ists disagreed. 

Finally. Thursday night, in an 
announcement that had been 
scheduled, canceled and then is- 
sued by surprise, Mr. Eanes said in 
a statement read by an aide over 
national television that he was dis- 
solving the National Assembly — 
but not until after it ratifies the EC 
treaty. 

The ratification, which enjoys 
overwhelming support, is sched- 
uled to be voted on July 10. But a 
cnag in the tuning could throw all 
plans awry. The president’s consti- 
tutional power to dissolve the as- 
sembly runs out July 14. six months 
before the end of his tom. That 
gives him four days after the sched- 
uled vole. 

President Eases also refused to 
accept Mr. Soares’s resignation. 

The president said he would am- ! 
sider it “at an appropriate time,” 
Much his aides said meant that he 
wanted Mr. Soares to stay on until I 
the assembly elections, probably in 
early October. 

Mr. Soares bad wanted to disso- 
ciate himself from the lame-duck 
government and focus an his presi- 
dential campaig n, though in office 
he at least has control over pork- 
barreling and the stale-run televi- 
sion. 

The government bureaucracy, 
meanwhile, is largely paralyzed. 
and there is no renef in right. The 
Portuguese can look forward in the 
next 9 or 10 months to five elec- 
tions: far the assembly, for presi- 
dent, for local offices, for the Euro- 


pean Parliament and another 
assembly election that almost every 
party has said it wifi call after the 
presidential vote to clarify the pub- 
lic wOL 

Three of the four major parties 
-center-left Socialists, the centrist 
Social Democrats and the center- 
right Christian Democrats — have 
governed in a variety of combina- 
tions and each collapsed. Mr. Soar- 
es’s two-year-old Government was 
the longest lasting. 

An untried option is with the 
fourth party, the Communists, who 
regularly receive about a sixth of 
the vote. But the others rgeci the 
Co mmunis ts as “nondemoaatic” 


for having tried to subvert the 1974 
revolution. 

And now President Eanes, an 
austere army general and revolu- 
tionary hero who has served his 
Until of two five-year terms, has 
formed his own party to back his 
ambitions to be prime minister. It 
could mean a switch of jobs with 
Mr. Soares. 

The Portuguese, whose 1974 rev- 
olution was known as the Carna- 
tion Revolution for the flowers put 
in the barrels of guns, seems to be 
taking the confusion in stride. 

At the Plaza of Happiness. Mr. 
Fonseca sighed. “It’s our tempera- 
ment,” he said. “We just adapt to 
circumstances.” 


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ness, “a nice, light style,” with u a 
touch of humor.” 

“If you’re looking far a foreign 
minister who's going to present 
himself weD to the public, to hold 
some press conferences and make 
than work, he’s dearly a good 
dunce,” he said. 

Specialists at the State Depart- 1 
ipent, who that their tiamaa 
not be used, played down prospects 
for eariy change in the substance of 
Soviet foreign policy. In their view, 
Mr. Gromyko was not removed i 
from the foreign policy area, but ; 
promoted. 

But they noted that having a So- 
viet foreign minister who has never 
been to the United States and who 
does not appear to have strong . 
knowledge of U.S. politics or po- 
licy, might work to the disadvan- 
tage of the United States. 

Mr. Gromyko^ by contrast, knew 
Washingto n weflL He was assigned 
to the Soviet -Embassy there in 
1939, and was named ambassador 
in 1943. 

Professor Robert Legvdd of Co- 
lumbia University in New York i 
emphasized that Mr. Gromyko re- 

folio and-toreat^Sie^^tlmo, 
where the most important political 
decisions are made. 

Mr. Hough said he thought that 
Mr. Shevardnadze's style would 
eventually develop into a knack for 
dealing with the west on its own 
terms. 

Others commented that the new 
foreign ministers personal appeal 
and ability to respond weu to 
changes would be popular with 
public opinion. 


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Korean Air inaugurates its 
3rd Paris-Seoul direct flight. Now 
you can leave for Seoul Tuesday, 


Thursday or Saturday with Korean 
Air. Ifs now even easier to fly from 
the heart of Europe to the heart of 
Asia - and under the best possible 
conditions. You mil enjoy the ame- 
nities and conveniences offered on 
Korean Air's Prestige Class. There 
you will find all the services of a luxury 
business class, but you'll also disco- 
ver a warm welcome, great charm 


and refinement Because in Korea, 
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KOREAN AIR 









Page 6 


THURSDAY. JULY 4, 1985 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Phbiiatkd Vilii Hie New Yak Toot* %od The Washington Ptwr 


Sribunc. U.S. Television Was Hijacked to Beirut 

Thr WarfuBfiton Po*E of 


Gorbachev on the Move 


Mikhail Gorbachev is transforming the So- 
viet government, trying to get bis country 
moving again by drawing compatible ana 
younger men to the top. That much is plain 
from his first 100 days as Soviet Communist 
Party chief. President Reagan is right to move 
toward a meeting with him next fall, to form 
his own first impressions. 

Mr. Gorbachev is the fourth Soviet leader in 
the four and a half years of Mr. Reagan’s 
presidency, but obviously the first with the 
energy and life expectancy to pull the economy 
out of stagnation. With impressive speed he 
bas now retired his principal rival, Grigori 
Romanov, and moved Andrei Gromyko up- 
stairs to the ceremonial presidency. The choice 
of Eduard Shevardnadze, a Georgian reform- 
er, instead of a diplomat as foreign minister 
seems to underscore the Gorbachev theme dial 
all must flow from domestic development. 

Mr. Gorbachev, 54, preaches discipline and 
reform and is busily promoting reformers, but 
from a party hierarchy that has always put 


political control ahead of efficiency. Little is 
known about the new men. How far they mean 
to take decentralization, and bow sincerely 
they let market principles shape their decision- 
making, will not be evident for years. 

Mr. Gorbachev has hinted that economic 
development will get higher priority than his 
military budget. He has shown particular in- 
terest in easing tensions with China that claim 
a large part of that budget No comparably 
large savings are likely from better relations 
with the West but a moderation of the arms 
race could benefit the economy and improve 
Soviet prospects for more trade and access to 
Western management and technology. These 
are reasons enough for Mr. Reagan and Mr. 
Gorbachev to gel to know each other. They 
have a chance to lighten their burdens not only 
in military spending but also in Afghanistan 
and Central America, If Mr. Gorbachev means 
to devote himself to the home front, there is 
business to be done with America. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Israel at War With Israel 


Israel has often enough proved that it can 
mobilize against formidable military threats. 
Now it will learn whether it can mobilize to 
meet the subtler yet potentially deadly internal 
threat The austerity plan just announced by 
its cabinet is not likely to leave people hungiy, 
but the plan must sharply cut living standards 
if it is to make a difference. Ideally it must also 
jolt into flexibility an economic system long 
enfeebled by state intervention. 

Israel's permanent problem is how to stretch 


a little a long way. It is a tiny country, poorly 
endowed with resources and unable to create 


endowed with resources and unable to create 
integrated markets with its neighbors. Yet it 
must spend 20 percent of its income mi de- 
fense. 5 percent to service foreign debts and 
perhaps another 5 percent to support the un- 
hindered immigration of Jews. And it must 
manage these burdens so well that it remains 
attractive to a productive elite that could easily 
move to Los Angeles or Toronto. 

The less obvious but no more tractable 
problem is bow to bend a welfare state to the 
needs of a modern economy. The government 
employs 30 percent of the work force, shoring 
up the inefficieucy of state enterprises with 
subsidies and legal protection against competi- 
tors. Private industry is swaddled in enough 
regulation to make a Bulgarian bureaucrat 
blush. And anyone who seeks reform must 
take on a highly politicized labor movement 

Israel used to muddle through on a combi- 
nation of nationalism, hard work and U.S. aid. 
But in recent years competition between the 
two main political coalitions has made it im- 
possible for either to say no to special interests. 
Now the chickens are coming home to roost. 


Since 1977 the government's budget deficits 
have averaged 15 percent of GNP, three times 
the rate in America this year. Wages have been 
negotiated to levels that exceed productivity, 
and have been indexed against price increases. 
With too much buying power chasing too few 
goods, inflation runs at 400 percent Israel's 
reserves of foreign currency, its overused 
rainy-day fund, have sunk to just $2 billion. 

To qualify for badly needed extra American 
aid, the coalition led by Shimon Peres has once 
before tried and failed to implement programs 
that would force Israelis to live closer to their 
means. The newest plan, enacted by emergen- 
cy decree without resort to the Knesset re- 
duces food subsidies, freezes wages, de-index- 
es savings, devalues the currency and trims 
back government employment The idea is to 
reduce consumption by about 10 percent free- 
ing output for export and investment 

Prime Minister Peres’s plan is temporarily 
shielded from the Likud opposition in his 
coalition. Likud has no alternative and no wish 
to be blamed for more failure. Success in the 
short run thus turns on the government's de- 
termination to hold tbe line. 

But in the longer run, even more than belt- 
tightening will be needed Nonmilitary spend- 
ing must be reduced enough to permit tax cots. 
Inefficient public enterprises must be priva- 
tized Most important, the protections and 
subsidies that make the government a partner 
in every private company must be antangled 
Is Israel ready for a heavy dose of free market 
capitalism? If not, no conceivable help from its 
friends is likely to save it from stagnation. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Learning Their Language 


A generation ago. few American school dis- 
tricts gave much attention to educating chil- 
dren with limited or no knowledge of English. 
There had been no substantial immigration 
from foreign-language nations since the 1920s, 
and in the few areas of the country (mostly in 
the Southwest) with many non-English speak- 
ers, tbe procedure all too often was to conduct 
classes in English and lei children whose pri- 
mary language was Spanish sink or swim. By 
tbe early 1970s it was widely recognized that 
this was neither fair nor effective. Moreover, 
tbe sudden and almost entirely unanticipated 
rise in immigration, mostly from Latin Ameri- 
ca. East Asia and tbe eastern Mediterranean, 
meant that for the first time in half a century a 
substantial number of pupils would enter 
America’s public schools without knowing En- 
glish. How are Lbey to be educated? 

The federal government more than a decade 
ago began funding what it called bilingual 
education — teaching the child in his original 
language while also, at least theoretically, 
leaching him English. The Carter Department 
of Education, in administering federal bi- 


lingual aid and interpreting the Delphic pro- 
nouncements of the courts, favored this form 
of bilingual education. Not surprisingly, a po- 
tent lobby, including foreign-language teach- 
ers, grew up to support it. Many school dis- 
tricts wanted to take different approaches, 
some because they could not find teachers 
proficient in Lao or Hmong, others because 
they believed that children were being held 


back from learning English as quickly as they 
could; but they found it difficult to do so. 

The Reagan administration's Department 
of Education has played a more constructive 
role by not masting on one rigid approach and 
by giving school districts more leeway. Federal 
policy used to be premised on the often correct 
assumption that local authorities could not be 
trusted to do the right tiling and bad to be 
closely regulated. But on this issue, as on other 
education matters, local authorities, prodded 
by parents and voters, have been making sensi- 
ble changes. Washington does well to encour- 
age such experimentation in the important 
work of helping children learn English. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


A Cause Criminally Served 


President Reagan's promise to “fight back" 
against {the Shiite hijackers] has a hollow ring 
A more meaningful option than revenge would 
be for the administration to moke a sustained 
effort to bring about better international co- 
operation on airport and travel security, while 
at the same time addressing the frustrated 


hopes and the pains of those who turn to terror 
as a weapon to address perceived injustices. 

— The Oregonian {Portland}. 


The hijackers conducted themselves not as 
political activists but as common criminals 
committing uncommon crimes against inno- 
cent victims. They must be treated as such. 

— The Chicago Sun-Tunes. 


FROM OUR JULY 4 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Hopes for a Safer 4th of July 
NEW YORK — The observance of the Fourth 
of July will be marked by the first serious and 
practical attempt to celebrate independence 
Day with some reduction of the slaughter that 
has long seemed on unavoidable accompani- 
ment of the annual patriotic thrill. New York 
City, on the invitation of Mayor Gaynor, is 
leading the way toward a realization of the 
long-cberisbed dream of a sole and sane 
Fourth. The Mayor, having ordered that no 
fireworks be permitted on open sale, urged the 
organization of an old-fashioned Fourth, mi- 
nus promiscuous explosions, ambulance calls, 
fire alarms and mothers in tears over black- 
ened and fragmentary patriots in knickerbock- 
ers. Funds have been raised for firework dis- 
plays in certain public places, so that youth 
may not be deprived of any of its inherited 
rights and may yet preserve its anatomy. 


1935: Abyssinia Tests the League 

LONDON — Tbe basing of British foreign 
policy on the principle of collective security 
will be abandoned if it is found that collective 
action by the powers for the security of all is. 
impossible of realization, it was slated in well- 
informed circles here [on July 3], following a 
Cabinet meeting almost wholly devoted to the 
Abyssinian question. The British government 
regards Abyssinia as the test case of the effica- 
cy of the collective system. If the League is 
unable to assert its authority by settling tbe 
dispute between Italy and Ethiopia in a pacific 
manner, the functioning of collective machin- 
ery will be considered as having definitely 
broken down. The continued sending of Ital- 
ian troops to East Africa and the apparent 
preparation for military conquest of Abyssinia 
are taken as evidence that Italy has no inten- 
tion to abide by the Covenant of the League. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM W1LLLAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Pubkshrr 

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WALTER WELLS Edncr A LAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

SAMUEL ART Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Pubhher 

ROBERT K. McCABE Deputi' Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director o( Openuumx 

CARLCEWlRTZ Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS Director of Cirtubtkm 

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L.S subscription: S322 \eurh\ SetimJ^hus postage puij at Long hhm/ Car. N.Y. JIIDJ. 
1985, International Herald Tribune AH rights reserved 


W ASHINGTON — The bizarre siege is 
over and a certain amount of mutual 


YY over and a certain amount of mutual 
congratulation is going on. Except for young 
Robert Dean Swsthem, the enlisted navy diver 
who lies in Arlington Cemetery in a martyr's 
grave, the hijack victims have beat freed to go 
home. The last of the burbling interviews, 
even these with the families hired by the 
networks, will be coming to an end. 

There has been nothing like it in the history 
of terrorism. Amal Shiites, for two unbeliev- 
able weeks, came dose to malting terrorism 
folksy. Once the initial horror of Mr. Stcth- 
em’s murder had passed, the whole episode 
took on the surreal coloration of some kind of 
exchange program, a seminar in U.S.-Mideasi 
relations, conducted under tbe gun. Appar- 
ently. after long bull sessions on religion and 
politics, each ade came away with a new 
appreciation of the other’s point of view. 

What did the rest of us learn? Americans 
discovered again the awesome power of tele- 
vision. Amal bad figured out that television 
sanctifies people for Americans. By appear- 
ing on the screen over lunch at a seaside 
restaurant in Beirut, attending a last supper 
with their captives and being kissed goodbye, 
the terrorists restricted Mr. Reagan’s options. 

At the outset Mr. Reagan was bang impor- 
tuned to take the hard line by other tdevisioa 
luminaries such as Henry Kissinger and 
George Will; to put “national interest” over 
the mere saving of lives. The battle, if there 
ever was one, was finished once tbe first mad 
news conference flashed on the box. The 
Amal Shiites had turned the hostages into 
television celebrities, and Americans take 
television celebrities seriously. 

Hostage spokesman ADyn B. Con well was 
made for toevisica. He nas lig ht eves and 
regular features and looks something Hke JJL 
Ewing. Mr. Con well could have been the hero 
of a daytime soap: earnest, troubled, articu- 
late — and with narrow interests of his own. 

He made statements that caused a certain 
flinching at the highest levels in Washington 


By Mary McGrory 


and prompted expert comment about the 
"Stockholm syndrome,” a phenomenon m 
which hostages are said to come to identify 
with thar captors rather than with the people 
who are trying to free them. But you dan t 
have to be ahostage to urge the Israelis to 
release 700 Lebanese prisoners, most of them 
Shiites. Indeed, it was official U.S. policy that 
those prisoners were being held illegally. 

When Mr. Reagan ana Secretary of State 
George Shultz belatedly tried to include the 
seven “forgotten hostages" in the deal they 
vigorously denied they were making, Mr. 
Cbnwdl protested. He was perhaps reflecting 
self-interest rather than the Stockholm syn- 
drome. As Mr. Conwel] doubtless saw things, 


Nabih Beni, tbe Amal leader, had at best a 
tenuous hold on the Shiites that the hostages 
could see. and none on those out of sight. 

Mr. Reagan acquired a new best friend in 
the Middle East in tbe person of Syria's Presi- 
dent Hafez al-Assad, a rather sinister figure 
he used to think of as an agent of terrorism 


and a Sorier puppet. Mr, Reagan had to pvt 
upon the seven forgotten victims. He had to 


upon the seven forgotten victims. He had to 
back down at “no deal " He made no risible 
progress against international terrorism. But 
he win calTita victory, stoutly averring that 
IsraeTs release of more Shiite detainees is 
sheer coincidence. If he says it often enough 
on television, he will be believed 
The madc-for-television hostage crisis has 
shown us that the box is the real source of 
truth and power in the world 

Washington Post Writers Group. 



But the Alternative to Popular Media Is Worse 


XT j ASHIN GTON — When bearded cold- 
YY eyed hostage-taken assemble thar vic- 
tims at the point of a gun and whistle up the 
television cameras to make their case, the 
“media" turn into a stage for terrorism and 
Henry Kissinger turns apoplectic. 

“It is a humiliation for the United States to 
have American citizens trotted out one by 


By Philip Geyelin 


tion when this is over." He insisted that the 


Reagan administration “make it absolutely 
clear that any damage to any American win 
lead to very violent reprisals. 

Manipulation of the media, then, bas ev- 


to carry anything, inducting the terrorists.” 

Not carry anything? Not even Henry Kis- 
singer hustling from one network studio to 
another, logging at least equal time with Na- 
bih Berri, exploiting the same stage to inflame 
public passion in support of a course of action 
sharply at odds with tbe policy that the gov- 
ernment in power is struggling to pursue? 

Along the way, Mr. Kissinger demanded 
“no concessions, no negotiations and retaha- 



I Feet. 

Fine. 


auiri 


ba nans, accomplices to hostage-taking, or the 
elite of the American establishment. 

It will not surprise you that this message- 
carrying member of the media thinks that 
proposition stands the problem on its head 
In an age when camera angles, photo oppor- 
tunities and the easy command of network 
prime time have become a political art form 
— with the media as willing collaborators — 
manipulation of the media is not the issue. 

The solution to wfaat is, indeed, a real 
problem turns on actual consequences, estab- 
lished values in an open society, practical 
alternatives. We are talkingabout a fiercely 
competitive free enterprise. The alternative is 
a news business subsidized and controlled by 
government. So, yes, a freewheeling press gets 
in the way of orderly foreign policy-making. 

But if we can stipulate that government 
censorship of the end product is not the 
answer, serious concern nas to center on sen- 
sible restraints at tbe source — imposed by 
government discipline and discretion, or self- 
imposed by the news business itself. It comes 
down in toe end not to dogma but xo cases. 

Reckless speculation about troop deploy- 
ments, it is generally agreed endangers lives. 
Reports of the dispatch of tbe UlS. Delta 
force to Cyprus broke the rules. Yet it has to 
be noted that for every such report there is 
usually a government source. The administra- 
tion that could invade Grenada without pub- 
lic notice ought to be able to move its most 
sophisticated strike force in similar silence. 

Much less is to be said for the Kissinger 


case: that the hostages and their captors 
should be unseen and unheard by American 
audiences. The hostages said they were being 
well treated were opposed to any rescue ef- 
fort and favored a swap for Israel's Shiite 
prisoners. That this did not fit the Kissinger 
theory of the case does not mean it was not so, 
and still less that they were “forced" to say it. 
As to their treatment, we had the evidence of 
their appearance, not to mention the indepen- 
dent judgment of the Red Cross. 

As to the rest, you could argue that tbe 
hostages were belter positioned than anybody 
to judge the chances of a rescue effort, if only 
because they knew' more than anybody else 
about the conditions under which they were 
being held — the level of security, the loca- 
tions. Their sense of how to strike a deal for 
their release was not all that different from 
the adminis tration's sense, from the start. 

The argument is heard that Nabih Bern 
should not be given access, over the head of 
the U.S. government, to the .American public. 
But if he is part or the problem, and potential- 
ly a part of the solution, surely American 
television viewers are sturdy enough to be 
trusted to take their measure of all the play- 
ers. If not, who is to pick and choose? 

That is really the nub of it: the confidence 
you have, or don't have, as tbe case may be, in 
the good sense of the American people. If the 
news coverage has been obsessive and over- 
whelming. that is in the nature of the beasL If, 
as a consequence, it plays into the hands of 
terrorists, the American people 2 re smart 
enough to lake that into account. 

In any case they are at least as likely to be 
swayed by so prestigious a figure as Henry 
Kissinger as Lhev are by a bearded gunman in 
Beirut. Not bring dummies, ibey may even 
have a better sense than the media critics and 
the public relations junkies in tbe thick of 
policy-making about wbat they ore seeing — 
and about when they have seen enough- 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


Third World Development: The Nightmare Is Probably Over 


L ONDON - In its “World Devel- 
/ opment Report” published this 


JL opment Report” published this 
week, the World Bank observes that 
the economic turbulence of die past 
few years has subsided. With an enor- 
mous budget deficit in the United 


By Jonathan Power 


soned oul; lessons of profligate oyer- 
lending and undisciplined spending 


fed that we are Aill in a sinking boat. 
We are noL The worst is probably 
over and there are good reasons to 
start thinking more positively again. 

The debt crisis took an awful tofl. 
Dozens of Third World countries 
have lost a decade or more of devel- 
opment. But the damage is not irrep- 
arable, and there is no ground for 
concluding that bank lending is nec- 
essarily a bad thing or that the future 
cannot be bright. Even with aD the 
setbacks, the economic record from 
I960 to 1980 bas no precedent 

Never in the history of mankind 
have so many people had their cir- 
cumstances improved so dramatical- 


ly. Tbe GDP growth of the Third 
World countries averaged 6 percent a 


countries averaged 6 percent a 
year, average life expectancy rose 
from 42 to 59 years; infant mortality 
was halved and primary school en- 
rollment rose from 50 to 94 percent 
True, these are rough figures, and any 
average for 3 billion people conceals 
extremes. Bul this has been a remark- 
able period or human change. 

Piecemeal, tbe debt crisis is being 


lending and undisciplined spending 
are bong widely digested; painful 
remedies are being swallowed. 

The period of heavy borrowing in 
the 1970s, using the Eurodollars de- 
posited by the oil states, is not un- 

g recedeated. Between 1870 and 1913, 
ritain invested an average of 5 per- 
cent of its GNP abroad, and recipi- 
ents like Canada, Australia and Ar- 
gentina woe taking in foreign capital 
in such quantities that it made up 
about half of all domestic investment 
At the most, during the 1970s, foreign 
capital inflow to the developing 
countries amounted to 20 percent of 
their gross investmenL 
Debt crises in the past, too, have 
had worse calamities. There was no 
major default this time, unlik e die 
Peruvian and Turkish crises in the 
1970s and the Argentine and Brazil- 
ian crises of the 1880s and 1890s. 

Even the debt rescheduling that 
has gone on does not seem so serious, 
when one recalls that between 1955 
and 1970 Argentina, Brazil, Chile, 


sirens in the public debate suggests, lence seems to be over. Recovery in 
More than ItiO developing countries the industrialized countries works to 
continue to service their foreign debt ease some of the liquidity jnessures 
without interruption. in the developing countries. World 

Some differences in today's situa- trade grew by 83 percent last year 
tion are worrying. Bank loans have and real interest rales have softened, 
far outstripped equity finance; the For the future, the two critical 
proportion of debt with floating in- issues facing the industrialized coun- 
tered rates has risen sharply: maturi- tries arehow to bringdown real inter- 
ties have shortened considerably, est rates and how to resist protection- 
And many of the countries in trouble 1st pressures. Beyond this is the need 
are low-income developing countries to keep up capital flows to the devd- 
whose difficulties are exaggerated by oping countries. In the next five years 


the fact that erratic aid flows have two-i 


been diminishing of late. 

Bul toe period of intense turbu- 


of their debt will have to 


be rolled over or paid off. 

The challenge for the devdoping 


For an International Debt Conference 


T HE fall in mineral prices, as wdl 
as a continuing stagnation in 


J. as a continuing stagnation m 
other commodity prices despite the 
reactivation of same industrialized 
economies, and particularly the re- 


cent reduction in the price of oB by governments 


meat policies, as set out by the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund, wBl have to 
reassess their email commitments. 

The outlook is sufficiently grim for 
us to make this urgent calf to the 


Ghana, Indonesia, Peru and Turkey 
were forced to reschedule a total of 17 


were forced to reschedule a total of 17 
times. Tbe numbers in trouble are 
greater now — there were 31 resched- 
ulings Last year — but it is not as 
worrying as the cacophony of alarm 


several oil-exporting countries, has 
created a new dimension of toe debt 
crisis likdjy to set off a new process of 
debt rescheduling, with potentially 
dangerous and far-reaching conse- 
quences for the wold economy. 

Even those indebted countries 


turns of the industrialized world to 
meet in an international conference 
with the developing countries. Such a 
conference should seek agreement on 
a comprehensive analysis of the crisis 
and specific solutions. 

Debtors and creditors alik e share 


which have pursued stringent adjust- responsibility for the current situa- 
tion. What is at stake in most devel- 


oping countries is not only debt but 
development itself. A painful but uni- 


sharp pace of the lan 10 years. 
Africa mart, one can imam 


America Could Use a Dependence Day 


GSYON — Americans 


have chosen some other day. 
/be SepL 3, the day the British 


By Ell en Goodman 


Maybe SepL 3, the day the British 
signed the peace treaty in Paris. 


tybe March 4, the day the UJ5. 
Constitution became effective. Ei- 
ther one would have made a decent 
enough national holiday. 

But July 4 was the day when that 
audacious group of Americans de- 
clared independence, 1 suspect it 
was independence which seemed 
then, and certainly now, the Ameri- 
can thing to celebrate. 

Independence was what united 
toe different peoples of the suspi- 
cious states of late 18th century 
America. Independence was what 


This . ambivalence runs among 
modern Americans as wriL Our de- 
sire to belong stiB rubs up against 
tbe more fierce desire to separate. 

. In the book "Habits of the 
Heart," five sociologists describe 
this duality in the American char- 
acter as “the deep desire for auto- 
nomy and self-reliance combined 


lence, we go on valuing marriage 
but become increasingly wary of 
“losing ourselves” in it Even hus- 
bands and wives deeply committed 
to each other are less able to explain 
why, except in the fed-good terms 


tbe polyglot population of immi- 
grants in toe late 19th century all 
read into the exploding firecrack- 
ers. Independence is wnat the late 
20th centuiy population of Ameri- 
can self-seekers march to. 

What connects Americans back 
through history to our founders and 
across space to each other is, ironi- 
cally, a shared sense of the impor- 
tance of separateness. Together we 
deTend our right to be independent 
of others, including each other. To- 
gether we value self-reliance, and 
often forget our togetherness. 


We mutually pledge 
to each other our lives, 
our fortunes and our 
sacred honor . 9 


with an equally deep conviction 
that life has no meaning unless 
shared with others in the context of 


community.” Bul they are aware, as 
most of us are, that the centrifugal 


most of us are, that the centrifugal 
forces are more powerfuL 
The authors met people who 
were virtually tongue-tied when try- 
ing to explain tbe meaning of com- 
mitments in their lives. The lan- 
guage of toe self was everywhere, 


how they serve individual needs. 

“We strongly assert toe value 
of our self-reliance and autonomy. 
We deeply fed the emptiness of a 
life without sustaining social com- 
mitments," write the authors of 
“Habits of toe Heart.” “Yet we 
are hesitant to articulate our sense 
that we need one another as much 
as we need to stand alone, for fear 
that if we did we would lose our 
independence altogether.” 

1 don't know why Americans see 
the “T as fragile and toe “we” as 
threatening. Or why it is easier for 
us to ward off intrusions on our 
freedom than to welcome support- 
era. It may be because we are a 
nation of inveterate leavers. It may 
be because we still fed essentially 
that we have to make it on our own 
— we are loners in the economy, if 
not the wilderness. It may be amply 
that we need a language to desenbe 
the values of sharing and toe ways 


lateral adjustment process would be 
neither fair nor appropriate. Totally 
u n acceptable demands which under- 
mine the dignity and wefl being of the 
pffnpl^ nr whtrih mr p gril thq 

efforts to enhance democratic forms 
of government, must be rejected. 

The conference should seek agree- 
ment on rescheduling specific debt 
obligations, len gt h ening the time pe- 
riods for repayment, lowering and 
imposing a ceding on interest rates 
and limiting debt servicing payments 
to a . level tied to export earnings. 

— - From a statement this week 
by the Socialist International. 


IN B 


B 


-v? f)m 


•-,! f -i 


[rail s ’ :,: 


I ra 


it- irt 


countries is not to get financially 
overextended as they did" in the late 
1970s, and to help persuade the fi- 
nancial banking system to become 
more sophisticated and flexible. The 
developing countries need to be able 
to borrowneavfiy with longer periods 
of maturity. This means increasing 
tbe resources of the World Bank ana 
the regional development banks. 

it means making sure, with future 
commercial loans, that borrowers do 
not have to assume all tbe risks of 
adverse developments in the world 
economy. More instruments for 
hedging risks need to be brought into 
play. Likewise, risks could be spread 
further by introduction of more di- 
rect and portfolio investment For 
toe African countries in particular, 
there is going to be a greater need for 
more aid, but aid better coordinated 
and more tightly focused. 

It is not pie-in- the-sky thinking to 
be optimistic about growth. It is pos- 
sible to conceive of the industrialized 
economies growing at more than 4 
percent a year, of trade barriers faH- 
rng, capital flows expanding and the 
Third World countries growing once 
more at around 6 percent a year. 

Even in toe most optimistic scenar- 
io, though, no one sees much hope for 
Africa. The prognosis is coabnmng 
decline, although hopefully not at tbe 


Hummit** in 

AN)phisii(*a 


Africa apart, one can imagine m 
the lifetime of most of us a Third 


World that far outpaces toe growth 
rates of toe industrial revolution 
experienced in Europe and North 
America. Despite toe severe stress 
and strains of population growth and 
communal and ethnic tensions, the 


developing world (with the exception 
of Africa) is far ahead of the Westar 


a comparable stage of economic de- 
velopment- There are some advan- 
tages in starting lau*. 

As tbe nightmare of the early 1980s 
recedes, the last thing most of toe 
Third World needs is pity. What it 
does need is capital and technology. 

International Herald Tribune. 

All rights reserved. 


S(i Ur-h I- 


OTTERS TO THE EDITOR 

A Revolutionary Tactic entitled “The U.S. and Capital Pun- 

• ichnvMlf n nuMicliprl ku i 




i ne west should respond to toe national Herald Tribune on Dec. 6, 
* A hgadting not as a terrorist act 1974, be advocated abolishing capital 
as a rcve^tionary tactic. We face punishment as inhumane, 
enraged Islamic faction, and we - t ma&ttw 

si be careful not to retaliate blind- TBhuro 

iM'mct iciam nt torn* if intjurg, Netherlands. 


Americans are quick to demand especially in toe popularized lingo joint effort enlarges any sanse of 
the independence of our country of psychology- But the vocabulary enterprise and mutes loneliness. 


from toe world; eager to protect the 
family from toe government; most 
eager to protect individuals from 
every intrusion. It is easier for many 
to think of toe pursuit of happiness 
as a getaway plan. The words "I 
have to find myself' have become 
the farewell address of many rela- 
tionships. Yet the founding fathers 
of the country declared a split and a 
new union on toe same dav. 


of connection was sorely limited, 

I have seen some of that in daily 
life. Many of us get our greatest 
sustenance from home life and yet 
raise our own children to leave 
home. Often we live in families 
counting on each other for support, 
and yet we teach our children “the 
importance of self-reliance as the 
cardinal virtue of individuals.* 1 
In the .same cultural ambiva- 


emerprise and mutes loneliness. 

But on at least c me July 4 It is 
worth recalling that the ori ginal day ' 
of independence was a day of com- 
mitment and community. It was 
not self-seeking loners who closed 
the declaration by saying: “With 
a firm reliance on the protection 
of divine Providence, we mutually 
pledge to each other our lives, our 
fortunes and our sacred honor.” 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


The West should respond to toe 
TWA hgadting not as a terrorist act 
bat as a revolutionary tactic. We face 
an enraged Islamic faction, and we 
must be careful not to retaliate blind- 
ly against Islam at large. If America 
retaliated blindly, it would undoubt- 
edly further radicalize uncommitted 
Moslems and immeasurably add cre- 
dence and spiritual fire to toe radi- 
cals' holy war. Blind retribution 
would serve only to undermine the 
moderate Sunni states’ positions and, 
.indeed, their very existence. 

ROBERT B. ASH. 

University of Aberdeen. 

Scotland. 


enuuea ine u.s. ana uapitm pun- 
ishment,” published by the Inter- 


No BoD Was Interviewed 


I am appalled by toe crass indiffer- 
ence of William Lyon in “Bullfight- 
ing is ‘In’ Again" (Special Report on 
Span. , June 20). One may understand 
primitive traditions steeped in igno- 
rance, but the wanton killing 0 f 
harmless creatures isws'in' agam. 

JAMES R. McMAHJLL 
Bern. 


A Confrontation of Wills 


.• "V • •’ *ur.3 •. 


1 have no quarrel with George F. 
WBFs assertion (in “Silent Subs” 
June 19) that traitors who sell mili- 
tary secrets to toe Soviet Union 
“should receive punishment as seri- 
ous as the damage (hey do; capital 
punishment." But Mr. 'Wilj seems to 
have changed his mind, fn a column 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and fuB ad- 
dress. Jjetters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of. 
unsolicited manuscripts, ■ ■ 


s’> - . "■ ■' 









Page 7 


IN BRIEF 


When Continents Collide: Scientists Find 'Suture’ in Florida 



Huy Marsupials Bred in Captivity 

. WASHINGTON (NYT) — • Successful breeding, in captivity of-10 
ifli m hffi , cro ^f ihc wodd’s smallest marsupials, has raisedhopes that the. 
dnyanroate— an adult numbai can be hdd in one hand— can be saved 

jssarastmoiaa. 

Acec®fing to the Australian Science and Energy Newsletter, nmnbats 
were ctwea- conunoo sight in southern Australia, bal dening of dies 
woodland habitat hasten only two colonies of them in thesoufiempart 
of western Australia. Nmnbats are listed as an endangered sceoes by the 

WorW WMife Fund, which, has sponsored thebreeqiiig prqect. . . 

It is hopedtoat the births, at the Western AustraGaWkDifeReseaK* 

Center hear Perth, win encouragezoos toestaUitebrei^cofoaiesand 


r Walter Sullivan 

'ew York Timer Sarbr 


— — M. * _ Q- WWW UIIHHMMU IffVUUUiJ 

make posable aremtrodnctwn of the animals to the 


Anti-Cataract Drug Is Tested in U.S. *£££ 

i irmYlL T\ rt mr. ■ * % ■' . JKSS® 


VJ Umveisitjr sdeaitistshayefoand what 
they beEeve. u the geotogic connection 
where Florida and southern Georgia Joined 
North America 2S0 nnHioQ years ago. 

' fn the final stages at Africa's, coflisrai 
wjth 'Noffth America, according, to the 
wid^accq«edtheow<rfriatetectOTics,a 
part of Africa now forming Florida and 
southern Georgia was squeezed against 
North America. When, SO mfflknryrais 
later, the continents, brake apart hod the 
modem. Atlantic Ocean began forming, 
those regions remained as part of Norte 


finder is dose to the “fall fine" where the 
. In ftify Waflmnn t drops to the coastal plam. 
Many East Coast cities evolved along the 
-fall line, mrfmfing Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Rjduuofld, Virginia, and Augusta and Ma- 
con, Georgia, because that was where wa- 
ter power was available or because the line 
was -the upstream Hunt of ocean shipping. 

TbeCoraefl scientists befieve, however, 
dm instead cf foflowmg the fan line, die 
suture follows an east-west jsouc of weak 
terrestrial magnetism, known as the Bruns- 
wick: Magnetic Anomaly, which runs out 
into the Atlantic Ocean aajbss the coati- 
neutalshdf cast of Georgia. . 

The suture is then thought to torn north 


orse 


MEDFGRIXOreg<ffi(UW)~A<hugTBedmEiiropeasanalteniative 

to surgffy for cataracts in the earhr stages has been approved for 
experimental usemthe Unbed States. Eimipemdoctora and phanuacot 


- klb 


certain cataracts. . 

The dru ^caD ed beudazac, was patented in die late 1 960s by an 1 **^ 
pbyadan, Fran cesco An gd i ni In Europe, it has been in. general use for 
more than uve years; but therc is no anti-cataract drug approved for ose 
m the United Mates. 

Alt ho ug h ca t ar ac ts, or clouding of the of the eves; can often be 

remedied by surgery, beudazac the real hope teat there will be a 
medical rotation to cataracts,” said Dr. John Retzlaff, an Oregon oph- 
t ha hnolotftt^ho is one of five physicians conducting U.& research on 
tbedrug. . 

Animal Found Using Photosynthesis 

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The discovery of a cme-cdled argamsm diat 
uses light for food — the first animat known to do so — couldleadto an 
maiart aiidfog of how light is COnvnted to other ener gy f hrmjt , a jwaMfieh- 
ersa ys. 


“Sdentists don’t often dance in tee streets, but there seems to be very 
high interest aadlpts of discussion” abom tee discovery,$aidPaul Loach, 
president of tee American Society of Photobiology. Previously, only 
plants and bacteria were known to photosynlhesize, a process in which 


■ * ■ “7 - — * aiM/kwuuAUgj. A iwvn/uj 

‘ ''zb.t L plants sad oacftTta were known to photosynlhesiz)^ a process i 
to, Sght is changed to energy, Mr. Loach said. 

^ PDFSoon Song of Texas Tech University found evidence of photosyn- 


thesis in & 


I* ■5c* “^ 7 *^ w nn i A i uwwwi 

It might he possible to enable other nr gam ' m is tn ire* K pb t as f o o d, fitter 

“*>* t-°-. . . _v„ TT7 


;>Iv Over 


Metal Deposits Are Found Off U,S. 

WASHINGTON (AP) —Government scientists exploring the Atlan- 
tic sea floor have discovered potentially significant concentrations of 
minerals, according to the U.&. Geological Survey. 

The minerals were discovered 5 to 10 mites (8 to 16 kflometers) off 
Georgia and Virginia by survey officials aboard the research vessel ! W. 
Powell. An initial analysis indicates concentrations of 3 percent to 10 
jwffffnt heavy iwwh, inrinrimg zircon and the titanium-rich mineral - 
ilmenile. the survey said. 


Mummies in Chile Show 
A Sophisticated Society 


..t By Malgosia Frank 

Washington Pass Service 

2 x QANTIAGO — Water workers 
.;. r F O in northern Chile have discov- 
1 ered a collection of human mom- 
- r ‘ ; mies 3,000 years older than tee first 
... mummy of an Egyptian pharaoh, 
~.S and scientists are now revising their 
< theories on South America's earii- 

' est societies. 

c. Excavations fora new water jpipe 

in the city of Arica led arch&eolo- 
jv- gists to one of their richest finds — 

- 96 mummies preserved in the hot 

- desert sands Tot periods ranging 

: _. from 3,670 to 7,810 yean. Recent 

carbon dating tests have confirmed 
the mummies* antiquity. 

“This discovery will change our 
; ~ view of primitive societies, said 
. • Dr. Marvin Allison. 64, an Ameri- 

can pathologist who works at Ari- 
es’s Umvereuy of Tarapaca. 

'-■’-1 “I think it shows teat these soci- 
eties were much more complicated 
tfam origin aCy thought,” he said. 
■’ “They must have had a good sorial 

- .^structure. Don’t forget th^r main- 
■ " 'l tamed themselves twice as long as 

Christianity." 

His laboratory dissections have 
shown that the techniques used to 
' preserve the bodies woe far more 
complicated than the embalming 
: practiced on ancient Egyptians. 


Dr. Allison said the mummies 
were prepared by skinning the 
body and emptying tee bodycavi- 
ty. Then die body was dried over 
bot coals and stuffed with rnmorals. 
feathers and vegetable matter. , 
Sticks were used to reinforce the 
Hmhi; and, y w n Mt mes, the t nmlct- 
The skin was pulled on again 
“just bice a glove” and sewn up 
neatly. The dry, rigid corpses were 
decorated with clay masks for face 
and wigs of their own hair. 

The elaborate preparation sug- 
gests teat the bodies were bom 
converted into statues for ritual 


“This is probably tee beginning 
of a complicated system of reli- 
gious beliefs, if you will, or at least 
magic, that they were trying to uti- 
lize;” Dr. Allison stud. 

The degree erf social organization 
required for such burial rites .has 
led Chilean scientists to rethink 
ideas about the Indians who settled 
on the Pacific coast of South Amer- 
ica. 

“We have always thought that 
man built his first villages in the 
years 500 to 1,000 B.G, and now 
we food a high degree of settlement 
long before^ said Hans Metayer, 
director of Chile's Natural History 
Museum, who also found mum- 
mies in the area, six years agp. 


This sequence of emits had been indt- 
a ted in leant years by rode samples more 
thap 350 minion years old that were ex- 
tracted from, deop holes drilled through 
sediments of tbe&wanneefiasmofnorm- 
ern Florida and southern Georgia. The 
sample* contained fossils of African, -rate- 

printed in the rock also showed that it teen 
lay in ihesame magnetic latitude as Africa. 

The new evidence; however, appears u> 
have identified tbexooe where tlte twoland 
masses became welded .together. Accord- 
ing to the Cornell srienfists, it is die first 
time- such a d^ly toned “suture” has 
been located precisely. 

TtoevictenrewastotamodfoamliiKSaf 
seismic soundings that ran Wan DuneUon, 
Florida, north to GrantvOle, Georgia. A 
complex of deep-lying adsaic reflectors 
recorded in the zone between Butter, Geor- 
gia, and De Soto, Florida, 40 rules (65 . 
kSameterx) to the south, is believed, to 
mark the suture, or zone of codnoa. . 


Id s fto rertw edg e pf tee continental shelf. 
A similar magnetic- zone hssbeen mapped 
along tee Amcan coast from Dakar north. 
If Amca could be moved tod: to the posi- 
tion it is bettered to have, occupied when 
welded to North America, before birth of 
the Atlantic, these two magnetic zones - 
would merge. 

. This, it is thought, not only was tee 
suture between the two continents, tot 
narks. where they split apa£- An excep- 
tion, however, fe that portion, of the suture 
where Florida and southern Georgia re- 
mained joined to North America. 

Prosing of the deep structures under 
Florida and Georgia was canted out by 
Douglas Nelson and his coBeagnes at Cor- 
nell as a project of tee Cdnsortinm for 
Con tinental Reflection Profiling. It has 
been financed lazgdy by the National Sci- 
ence Foundation. - 

The project uses a technique; originally 
developed for oil prospecting, in which 


vibrator trucks shake the ground at various 
frcqucndes- By recording lbe reflections of 
these vibrations from underground struc- 
tures, 1 formations can be identified at 
depths as great as 30 miles. 

Profiles obtained in this ™n nw have 
already revealed deeply buried and hither- 
to unsuspected features of the continent. 
Among tee discoveries has been teal exten- 
sive sections of the landscape were thrust 
across what were once features near the 
surface. 

According to Jack Oliver, director of the 
project at Cornell, the suture zone appears 
to be triangular in cross section, with a 
relatively narrow top at a depth of three 
miles and a broad base where it reaches the 
base of the crust, or “Moho ” 20 mite 
below tee surface. 

Below the Mobo — a nickname for Mo- 
horoviric discontinuity — tee rock be- 
comes substantially denser and therefore 
transmits earthquake waves at hi gher ve- 
locity. A striking feature, Mr. Oliver said in 
a telephone interview, is EaOnre of the su- 
ture structures to penetrate below die 
Mobo. This bad been seen m other surveys, 
hut never so deady, he added. 

It is assumed that the continental blocks 
that merged extended far deeper into tee 
Earth. The feet that evidence of the suture 
does not extend below teat level im plte 
Mr. Oliver said, that the Mobo somehow 
“reconfigured itself.” 

A pinalmgfind, at a depth of nine miles; 
was a sdsnac “bright spot” of the type 
often assoriated with nl and gas toposts. 
Mr. Oliver is uncertain whether it repre- 
sents fossil Aids, molten nxk or some 
other material 


East Coast Magnetic Anomaly 


West African Coast 
^Magnetic Anomaly 


Norfolk' 


NORTH AMERICA 


AFRICA 


Charleston * r 


Brunswick \ 

Seismic Unes-"^ * 


GAMBIA 


Tfca New York Tna 


The areas of “magnetic anomaly” have helped scientists map where 
Africa and North America were once connected at the suture zone. 


al-.lz*: through genetic engineering. Dr. Song said. 

•J-C' • . . 

Drag Aids Leg Transplants in Bats 

■ -ttl-s IRVINE, California (UPI) — Pr ritm i t m r y <awrp»3; in twnK ptimtmg ihf 
• kgs of laboratory rats could stimulate progress in human transplant 

■ smgezy and help doctors repair damage caused by bums, scientists say. 
r " '-A : A seven-year study at the University of California, Irvine, involved tee 


smgery and help doctors repair damage caured by bums, scientists say. 

A seven-year study at the University of California, Irvine, involved tee 
use of the drug cyclosporine to promote tee kmg-tetm survival of the 
transplanted rodent Kmbs, a spokesman ^said. The drug, a potent immu- 
nosuppressant already used in organ transplants, allowed tee rats to 
protect themselves against serous infection trfifle suppressing teal pan of 
the immune system involved in tissue rejection. 

“We don't, however, want people to believe we can transplant a leg 
from one person to another,” said Dr. Bruch Achaner, a member of the 
research team. “There is much more to be done.” The recipients rats, for 
example, were rarely able to do anything more with their new limbs than 
put weight on them. 


By Boyce Rensbergcr 

' ' * Wcotengton Pees Strike ■ 4 

W ASHINGTON — Research on one of 
tee « n m w« a nd rarest brain disorders 
in the literature has helped explain- 

one of ltfe’s xoost common experiences — 
recognizing a fanrihar face. 

The research also shows that it is possible 
for the brain to reaet to people anchplaces by 
triggering psychosomatic reactions, from 
sweaty palms hi perhaps even ulcers, with so 
conscious perception. ■ ' • 

The new evidence comes from a study of 
people who have lost the ability to r ecognize 
faces. These people are normal in all ways 
except ^ that when they see tbeJace of some- 
one familiar, even somecne they have known 

Victims of die brain^dboider, aH.afffictcd 
after suffering brain damage from an infeo- 
tfon or a stroke; cannot even recognize their 
own face in a minor or photograph. 

A victim of the disorder shown a photo- 
grapb of himsdf and of a famous actor or 
politician — say. President Ronald Reagan 
— could not say which was w hich. 

Victims say they haw learned to recognize 


people important in their life from other 
dnra, such as body build, dothing or voice, 

ant! by Tn*»mnming fwc3^ wirfi jib that “Hail it 

bald” or that “the boss always wears a bow 
tie.” •• 

Those with the disorder have normal vi- 
sion <wiH reading ability wiH have no trouble 
describing facial features or pointing out 
differences between faces. They can even tdl 
when certain people look alike. Their defect 
is in connecting their perceptions with a 
stored memory of the same face and produc- 
ing a sense of familiarity, or recognition. 

The disease is called prosopagnosia (from 
the Greek words prosq p«v meaning ^per- 
son,” and agnosia, meaning "inability to per- 
ceive”). In a rricent issue of the journal Sci- 
ence, a University of Iowa neuroscientist 
reports that he has found something in vio- 
ihn* that suggests how the normal brain 
works. 

- Antonio R. Damasio said he wondered 
whedwprosopagnosicsnnglumfactbeiec- 
q gnmng familiar faces st'a subconscious 

jad .. _ 

Tirin g instrumen ts snnilar tn a ti#! defec tor , 

Dr. Damasio tried to detect emotional re- 
sponses that altered the body in subtle ways 


without producing a conscious reaction. He 
ps ffd aHartj f-H to the hand to mea- 

sure dunges in the ability of die skin to 
conduct im perceptible electric currents. 

Dr. Damasio said he found that, even 
though experimental subjects could not rec- 
ognize photographs of faces that should have 
been familiar, tee electrodes picked up a 

<Minhi> dimy m rirfn conductance. 

When the faces were of people that Dr. 
Damasio knew the subject nad never seen, 
the conscious reaction was the same; but the 
Hflrtro des picked up no skin rhang i* 

Dr. TTamadn concluded that the brains of 
prosopagnorics were carrying out part of the. 
process of recognizing a face, but were 
blocked at a key stage in the sequence of 
brain events. 

, The first step in this series is teat nerve 
fyifap in the eye gather the farinl imwyr. 
and send signals to the optic region of tKe 
brain. The pattern of incoming signals, 
which is known to correspond in a-raiher 
maplSrc way with the features of the face; is 
matched against “templates” representing 
familiar faces in the memory. If a nmtrh j$ 
found, associated memories, such as the 
face’s name and history, are retrieved from 


storare and the whole set of associated mem- 
ories Wornes consdoas. 

Dr. Damasioft explanation of the se- 
quence of events, like many in brain re- 
search, refers to presumed functions rateex 
than known structures within the brain. No- 
body knows exactly what parts of tee brain 
might account for these processes. But be- 
cause prosqpagnnsicg have a skin response. 
Dr. Damasio said he believes they must be 
carrying out the necessary stq» to the point 
when the associated memories would nor- 
mally reach the conscious brain. 

If Dr. Damasio's scenario of brain events 
is correct, it provides a model that may apply 
to other forms of memory. If so, he suggests, 
subtle forms of brain dimmy, too ma ^ to 
cause diagnosable problems, may be depriv- 
ing people of conscious reactions to the 
world around them but still permitting side 
effects of those reactions to alter not j ust skin 
co nductance but perhaps a variety of other 
physiological reactions. 

Subconscious activities in the brain are 
known to alto* heart and breathing rates, 
blood pressure, digestion, and a host of other 
bodily processes that play roles in psychoso- 
matic disease: 



30 bis, Rue de Paradis 
75010 PARIS 

(thru the archway) 

Tel.: 770 64 30 

When in Paris... 
visit our Museum 
and showrooms 

Open Monday - Friday 
9 am. io 6 pm. 

Saturday 10 - 12 ajn. - 2-5 pm. 
Also in selected stores 
near your home. 
Catalogue on request 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


to No. 2> or No. 3% e w inlly wHh mriut 
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CJTY OF LONDON EARNINGS $1 0a000-$200,000 + 

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GMn&L-MSIlH UBMlWR kMOIlSK IBfifB, 35 10 NNB SfiET, UIM ECU 1M. 


ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR 

B y y w hap itll in AtTiewt, Greece to hire an tdoinutn- 

lire director, lbe ideal candidate should have sound background 
and experience for such a position and very good knowledge of 
the English lanpaer- He mould not he more than 45 yean old. 
The main duties or this position one management contro l and 
coordination of the andRary departments h order to achieve the 
set target. The center offer s very good working condtiara. Salary 
w3t bo deter mi ned according to the qudffkxrtions, experience and 
pefsonaTdy of the candidate. 

Applicants are requested to send their C.V. Uk 
Personnel Director, Hygeia Hospital 
. Klf&gslas Avenue and Erytbroa 
Stavron 4, Athens 15125, Greece. 


HI 



McheHn Tire Corporation, the leader in 
raefial tire technology Is reorganizing its 
marketing and advertising group. As a resutl 
of Ihis reorganization, them is a need tar an 
aggressive and creative indSviduai to take 
charge of all advertising and promotional 
activities. 

rato Reporting to 
Wr the Director of 

Marketing for 
North America 
and located in 
Michefin's new 
corporate 
headquarters in 
Greenville, South 
Carolina, this person 
will handle contacts with 
the advertising agencies 
responsible for our United 
States’ advertising programs. 

Experienced in both agency 
ana efient environments, the 
successful candidate can 
look to career development 
and compensation based 
on performance and abfity. 
For consideration send 
your resume and salary 
history in confidence to 
Jim Foster, Department 
AD-7, Michetin The Corporation .Post Office 
Box 2846. Greenville, S.C. 29602. 


RESIDENT DEAN -.FLORENCE, ITALY 

The American Irwfifeto ter Foreign Study requires o Raskfertf Doan to 
supervise 75 Amoriam studmb In Fkmnce. Ruant Kafiai and an interest 
in act history essential, plus pastoral experience . Knowledge of/warfc 
with American universMes. on advantage. Must be erasable no later 
than September 1 5 th, T 985 . Salary $1 MOO plus pension scheme and 
medfaal benefits. 

Apply in wdtag to Karee SeeHy, AMS, 37 Qeeee, Goto, lendae Wf 7 5 H 1 


Mteftean Is eneqixtl opportunity e mployer. 


rf(>H 


Treated Alcoholics EXECBTIVES AVAILABLE 
Found Unable to i ... ■ ■■ - ■=— - ~ 

Drink Moderately INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVE 


The Anodaud Press 

BOSTON— Fewer than 2 per- 
O ceil erf people treated for alco- 
boSsm are able to drink socially, 
■ and most of those who conquer 
their condition gjve up drinking 
yconqdctdy, according to a pub- 


Sell® 


“We would have to urge alco&ol- 
' ' ics teat tee only feasible cure for 
j tear proMan at this point is total 
, jr’^- abstinence,” said Dr. John E. 

; Refaa,. who directed the study- ■ 

*v TTiai would scan to be the case for. 

; ' Ihc vast m^ority.” 

The report, in the New E n gl and 
-■ r Journal of Medicine, found pioder- 
ale social drinking to be “strikingly 
rare" among reformed alcoholics, 

■ ’■ 1289 of whom were interviewed 

. five to seven years after t re at men t . 

The research disputes the asser- 

* .tea teat poqdewite alcohol prob- 

• wans can learn to drink socially. _ 

“This study suggests that there is 

hale cause for optnnism about the 
iiefihood of an evolution to long- 
term, stable, modoate drinking 
among treated alcoholics the re- 
searchers wrote. 


45, German nationality, fluent English, 25 years experi- 
ence in North America and Far Barf, proven fnxdc record 
in marketing capital goods, experience in all areas of 
management and sales, is seeking a new position in the 
Far East, North America or Europe, (resume will be sent 
upon request). 

Please reply to: 

International Herald Tribune, 

Bear 2170, Friedrichstr. 15, D-6000 Frankfurt/ Mon. 


"INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS” 

appe&rs every Thursday A Saturday 

TO PUCE AN ADVERTISEMENT contact your nearest 
International Herald Tribune representative or Max rerrero: 
18t Ave. Charles-de-Gaull*, 9252 1 Neuilly Cedex, France. . 
Tel.; 7X7-12-65. Telex: 613 595. 


Directeur Europeen des Systemes 

de Gestion 

Banque Internationale Bruxelles 


Suite a un dfcveloppement rapide et rtgulier not re client recherche 
un Direqeur des Systemes de Gestion au niveau europeen qui 
agiraen tant que conseil pour la strat^e informarique de la 
banque et coordonnera les devrioppements menes par les ^quipes 
iravaillant dans trois centres ioforrmiiques equipes cbacun (fun 
IBM System/36. la fonction eegfobera egdamil h responsabihte 
des t^communicatious au sein du groupe. 

Le candidal choisi presemera les caracteristiques suivames: 

• agfede 35A45 ans 

a avoir des bonnes capadres relationnelles 

• (fisposerd’uneexpttence confirmee des systemes de gestion 
dans le domaine bancaire inlernathmal acquise de preference 
en Europe rontinentale 

• pratique counuite'di* I'anglaLs et du fronts 


• fitre prfit a royager de temps en temps partant de Bruxelles 

• avoir effectutdes rtalisations importantes en informatique de 
gestion. 

Les conditions de remuneration p revues pour ce pqste seront 
paniaili&remem interessanies pour un candidal de vaieur. 

Pri&re d'adresser curriculum vitae en anglais a Mr Allan Read a 
fadresse suivante en mentionnant la reference M85/KT. 


IfimT 


HaskinsSeSs 

Management Consultancy Division 

728 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4P 4JX. England 








Pape 8 


intk.WWTIOXAL HERALD TKIBl'XE. THLRSD.VY, Jl LY 4. 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


Wednesdays 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


voi Htan low Last Cno. 


was 125 
20m «'* 

1»M2 13Mi 
18111 30 
162D1 301) 

ISOM 27* 
14141 2l*t 
non 40ii 
11073 34V* 
11144 tri 
10273 54 
9453 47V, 
9479 24ft 
BS17 7ft 
0721 29ft 


IIBH *■ ft 
ua +3'« 

ll'A + 4 
29ft + Vt 
30 - ft 

28 -m 

10% -n 

39ft - ft 
32 —7*. 

46 Ml — ft 

sm th 

47 — ft 

23*. — ft 

7 - 1* 

29V. + V. 


Open HKrti Um Loft CW. 


Indus 1331.77 1J37.59 02023 132639 — 782 

Trons 67589 479.19 66989 67589 4 12B 

UNI 14SJ2 IMJU 14444 16526 — 024 

Corns 55322 55580 54080 551.93— 184 


Previous TOdOT 
HUB LW CUM 19A 
| Conwosito 11J-S5 lUg 111JB 1H» 


iS^ob 12431 12483 126JQ 12S79 
KS221 11079 1HL27 11037 11004 


11079 1HL27 11037 11006 

6081 4036 4039 4025 

13064 12048 12055 120X7 


NIKE 


CtoH l *rw». 


dosing 


Advanced 
Declined 
uncnonsed 
Total issues 
New Httfts 
New Lows 


253 254 

262 277 

250 354 

7U 7B 


Composite 

Ijyhatrto to 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Trams. 


Week rear 
Oan mom Aao 
39#J1 29099 39230 
304X0 30347 29946 
38030 - 27644 

351X3 — 34332 

29698 — 38848 

291X4 — 38743 

26635 - 26066 


HM Ur Lot a*. 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lat Trading in N.Y. 


Close Pro*. 


V0L013P.M MM" 

fW.3PJA.vol KS3M» 

PrevcootoSftrteddOM WUHrtfl 


DomeP 2994 2*> 2ft 

GDetrra 164$ 37>'i 17 

xerPn ism ion ra 

Mien IE M8Q Ip, 13 

WengB IJW lift Ills 

Conow 1352 8*. 7a 

Gtonf % 1230 19ft 19 

WDiam 1178 is mu 

Te*Alr 1107 16*. tort 

PetLw 1023 78n » 

Amflafil 9(2 14 I3*S 
AMfltt 9M Tm 3»> 

AM mil 844 4ft 4 

TIE 843 S 4ft 

BergBr 797 30*. 30 


if" ri 

85 

jBS 

W*. — ft 

’SJ 

'S+Z 

416 — ft 
30 ft + ■* 


1(1' 




Standard & Poor's index 


AMEX Sales 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages I 


Bends 

UIIIHtos 

Industrials 


Free. TOMT 

Close man 

7940 2-75 

7731 77.15 

81.90 8101 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanseo 
Total l»u*s 
New HlgM 
New Lows 


790 837 

740 756 

458 438 

SOM 2031 

114 130 

11 12 


•Included In the sales flaures 


Bov Sain *ShTt 

iUSZiSSS M 

HfiflS !:JS 

19637* 4110*1 92* 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dost ns an Wall Street end 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


hm ^TSw** am Ip5£ 

¥SK?* &S 9K ffig ^ 

utilities no 5JS E-S S-2 

Finance 2X49 2333 2X43 03 

SSte mu 19U4 moi 1913* 


3 P.M. whan* 

Prwv. 3 PAL volume 
Prtv. cons, volume 


AMEX Stock index 


fo ^ 


mm 1913* 


prwhm Today 

HM Law Qua 3 PM. 
23209 33132 23179 23144 


12 Men in 
Won low Stock 


Dlv. TO PE lMsKMiLow 


OqblcmmI 


Pre-Holiday NYSE Trading Light 


56, Qast 

IDO* Hlgll LOW QuoLOTee 


72 Month 

HWiLew Meek 


ML dm 

Ctfv. VM.PE HBsHtaauw Oonl.Oi'oB 


It AAR 88 23 16 380 21 

3ft AGS 14 245 Mb 

gfe, AMCA 30 10ft 

lift AMF JO UMK» ]W 
24'S AMR II «357 49VB 

ISVb AMR Dl 11 B 9.7 19 22ft 

221t ANR pf 167 114 T Mft 

7Xm APL 5 

4448 ASA 100 4.1 247 48ft 

AVX II K 11 72 lift 

16 AZP Ut M I 1331 27ft 

16ft AMLOD 180 23 17 715 57ft 

lift AccoWdS 30 M II M 71 ft 

12*1 AcrneC AO 25 42 16ft 

7ft AcmeE J26 4.1 10 11 .2* 


7ft AcmeE J2t> 4.1 
IS AdoE* !.V9e1I.O 
11*1 AdmMI J2 13 


Sft AdvSw 831 4.7 If l« IPS 

22ft AMD II 3081 26ft 

6ft Adml .12 1.4 10? ■£ 

9 Acrllex 13 

27'. AehiLI 144 5.7 34 9237 46ft 

52ft AelLP< iTVelOJ 10 5M 

17ft Ahmns 1J30 34 14 IPO 34ft 

3ft Alleet, 14 2ft 

38ft AlrPrd 120 12 12 396 54ft 

13 AlrbFrt 40 11 II 79 19ft 


United Press fniemationai 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange headed lower Wednesday in 
light trading prior to the Fourth of July holiday. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was off 
5.72 to 1,32828 an hour before the close. De- 


MCA was also active, up sharply on rumors 
that RCA would make a bio. RCA was up a bit 


American Hospital Supply was lower after 
reports that its proposed merger with Hospital 
Corp. of America may fafl. 


Hining stocks outnumbered advancing ones by 
a 5-4 ratio. Volume was about 78.2 million 
shares, down from 92.93 million in the same 
period Tuesday. 


TWA was unchanged. Its pilots agreed to a 


2D 15ft 
21ft 16 
22ft 17ft 
Aft VU 
20V* lift 
49ft 28ft 
17 9ft 
14ft 9ft 
23ft 12ft 
2*K I8W 
31ft 15ft 
25ft 19ft 
4ft 1ft 
9ft 2ft 
41ft 30ft 

17ft 13ft 
54ft 38 


BntxEn 150«14<4 
Entaxtn 1J0 7JJ 11 
EtWlki 1.14 17 17 
Eaulmic 

Eamkaf 2JT 123 

EatRn i,n u I 
Mien .12 3 11 
Ertnmd JO IS IS 
EnBsn 44 iO 14 
EsaaxC Ma XI 13 
EstTUft .72 40 11 
Ettrvls <56 U U 
vievanp 
vlEvanaf 

ex Cato 1J2 4J u 
Exaftr IJtoelU 
Exxon 3.40 64 B 


54 1786 
63* 

53 3Dft 
325 4ft 
6 19 
847 41ft 
91 16ft 
142 12ft 
14 22ft 


59 18ft 
2217 25ft 

60 19h 
7 2ft 

76 3Vft 
IB 16ft 
5466 52ft 


17 17ft— ft 

ISft Uft— ft 
30ft 30ft— ft 
4 6ft 
IBM 1SW— ft 
47ft 48ft +1 
16ft 16ft 
lift H + ft 
21ft 22ft + ft 
26ta 24ft— ft 
17ft 1* + ft 

M 24ft— ft 
1W 1W 
2ft 2ft 
38ft 39ft + ft 
16ft 16ft 
51ft 51ft 


I AiMoas 
27V. AlaPplA 3.92 1X2 
6ft AMP Jpl 87 11.1 
*rt: AtaPpt 1U 
88 AlaPDf 11J0 10J 
63*1 AtoPpf 9 M I1J 
ST 1 .*! AMP pl 8.16 II J 
56 AMP Pi U8 11.7 
lift Atotncs 1JB4 aB 
9ft AIsLAIr .16 3 

10?D Albrlos J8 2J 
24'.ii Album .76 2J 
23U Alcan 1 JO 48 


165 1ft 
22 21 
1.1 43 7ft 

12 !2fe Sift 
OJ I70j102'.'j 
1J 200s B4 
1J 3b 72 
1.7 1401 71 

AB 9 13 15ft 

J 10 179 23ft 

22 21 898 30ft 


Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 


.76 2J 13 349 33 
120 48 12 1734 25 


27*1 AlcoSW 120 XI 13 158 3Sft 
17 AlexAlx 120 3 A 2920 Wft 


i 10ft Alo.dr 21 n 22ft 

: 77ft AltoCa X06I 22 25 99 81ft 

23ft AloCPPl 186 108 I 26ft 

I 1 8ft Ala Ml 140 S3 295 25ft 

15ft Alain Pi XU 108 16 20ft 

81ft Alfll Die II 25 115 63 98 

I 24ft AllaPm 170 82 10 714 33ft 

i 15ft AllenG 50b 28 16 179 lift 

i 28'. AlldCP 180 43 9 2136 43ft 

S3ft AWCP pi 624 104 116 64ft 

I 99 Aldcppnxoo 108 58 111 

,100ft AldC pf 1221*1X0 60 102ft 

i 15ft AlldPd 15 SI 17V. 

I 41ft Aliastr 1)2 X* 9 4» to 

, 5 AllllCh 77 5ft 

i 24 AltoCPl 14 Uft 

i 20 ALLTL UM 65 « 46 28ft 

, 29*. Alcoa 120 35 17 1393 Mft 

, 14ft A max .23 I.« 1134 MW 


32'7 Amax Pi 380 B.B 2 34 

22ft AmHes 1.10 18 21 I4M 29ft 


“Most of the market is behaving quite steepi- 
ty, with very little enthusiasm of any kind,*’ said 
Eugene Peroui of Bateman Eichler, Hill Rich- 
ards in Los Angeles. 

“Most stocks are not very attractive right 
now," he said and institutions are running after 
hot, special -situation issues rather than com- 
mitting longer-term funds. 

Because of the holiday and oT and uncer- 
tainty about the outlook for the U.S. economy 
and corporate profits in the second quarter, 
“any advances will be sdecuve and tempered by 
cautions profit- taking," he said 

The market will probably continue its some- 
what listless and directionless trend Friday, said 
Jack Sullivan, of Van Kasper. & Co. in San 
Francisco. 


^TWUVUUtUUUMiiUJUWAyvir ■ ■' — t 

Can C T cahn, wins control of the carrier. In an 
attempt to thwart a bid freon Texas Air, Mr. 
Icahn is also < a»<*Vrrng concessions from TWA's 
two other major unions. 

CBS, another takeover target, was higher af- 
ter anno uncin g it would start a S954.8-million 
offer to repurchase 21 percent of its common 

stock outs tanding , offering Si 50 a share in cash 

and notes. It also said it would seD $300 million 
in assets and that its second-quarter net could 
fall as much as 25 percent. 

Sperry (ex-dividend) was up a bit 
The Organization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries denied a report that most of the 

carteTs ministers agreed to a crude-o3 price oil 

Some oils were lower, with Chevron and Azco 
down a bit 

Technologies were losing, with IBM, Bur- 


1ft Am Ayr 

15ft ABoxr 

54ft ABrand 3.90 5.9 

24ft ABM Pi 2 25 98 


Federal National Mortgage Association was 
near the top of the actives and slightly lower. 


Technologies were losing, with DBM, Bur- 
roughs and Honeywell off fractionally. 

Squibb was op sharply after it said received 
approval from the Food and Drug Adxninistra- 
ooo for expanded use of a hypertension drug. 
Other drugs were lower, with Merck, Abbott 
and Pfizer all slightly lower. 

On the Amex, active issues included Dome 
Petroleum, Giant Food Inc. class A and Key 
Pharmaceuticals. 


S6": ABdCft 150 18 17 2135 114ft 


mft Aflusl’r 84 28 M 


40ft AmCan 2J» 58 11 930 SSft 


, 21ft AConpf 2JQ 112 
37 ACanof 100 58 
103 A Can ol 132$ 12.1 
i left ACaoBd 220 10.7 

■ 75’b ACapCv 25le B8 

6ft ACcilIC 213 

. 4]ft AC van 1.90 X7 12 

i 15ft ADT .9! 3J 25 

■ 16ft AElPw 226a 95 9 

i 25 AmEXP 120 2 3 16 

4ft AFanilS 80 28 16 

r 19ft AGnCo 180 X» 10 

, 6*. AGnlwl 

. 51*li AGl, I Pi A 6340118 
. 40'A AGn pID 284 X8 
i 25ft A Hurl I 120 X5 10 
i 7*i AHotort 
46ft A Home 2.90 48 13 

26', AHou 1.17 18 131 


13 Month 
HWhLow Stock 


filt. O0M 12 Month 

Dlv, YM.PE WmtMiLnw QuotOTW MW* Law Stotk 


FH Ind ,15n 18 3 10 

FMC 230 32 42 82 

PMC M 225 28 13 

FPLGa 186 78 9 2696 

FabCtr JS 22 23 134 

Facet 7 116 

FalrcM 20 1J 323 

FalrcM 380 102 40 

Fclrfd .18 1J 9 148 

FomDIs 20 2 28 2250 

FrWstF 4 1 

Forth 2 47 I 60 

FayDra 30 XI 17 75 

FlOtro SOe 8 7 196 
FedtCO 184 48 8 189 

Fed Exp 33 TD46 

FdMoQ 182 42 11 42 

FndNM .16 8 14141 

FcdPBs JO X8 7 261 

FPoPpf 231 83 a 

FedRK 184 62 13 42 

FdSSnl 80 48 15 259 

Food SI 284 48 f 1096 

Ferro 120 X9 16 53 

Fldcst 180 38 13 200 

FlnCPA 851 404 

FlnCppf 681B3Q8 40 

FnSBor 31 

Flmtn 80 18 10 476 

Ft AH ( 88 28 10 293 

FtSkSy 180 48 9 603 

FBkFIs 180 3J 13 49 

FBott 280a 13 13 664 

FBastwl 491 

FstChlc U2 58 27 633 

FtBTax 1J0 1U B 887 

FIBTxpf 586*168 31 

FtBTx pf 5886168 461 

Fiatv 9 645 

FFedAc JO* 12 8 99 

FFB 280 38 B 73 

FIFW PM 23*118 
Flntxte Z5D 48 9 2B6 

FlnfStpf 2J7 7.1 190 

FtMlst 24 23 8 81 

FtNatnn 16 86 

FWO 368 

FstPa pf 282 BJ 159 

FtUnftl 186 68 15 28> 

FtVaBk JS 34 II 146 

FI Wise 120 42 9 43 

FWlSCpf 635 118 loot 

Flschb 180 X0422 61 

FIstlFd 85* A 181 

FHFnC 1 122 32 10 294 

Fleet En 44 28 10 344 

Ftotima 180 2J 13 1810 


9ft 

69ft— ft 
8616 — ft 


HM + ft 
13ft + ft 
IS — ft 
35ft— ft 
13ft— ft 
25ft— 1 
29ft 
18ft 
9ft 

5ft— ft 
3W6— ft 
43ft + ft 
36ft 

20ft— ft 
19ft + ft 
21 + ft 

21ft— ft 
17ft 
63ft 
30ft 

as 

7ft 

33 + ft 


27ft 20ft 
1* Bft 
fflSfe 43ft 
66ft 46ft 
34 19ft 
27ft 20 
716 3ft 
49ft 36ft 
30ft 22ft 
42 23U 

19ft 13ft 
39ft 34ft 
57 36 

HIP 61 
2Sft ISM 
70 39ft 
17ft B 
2316 14ft 
27ft 20ft 
13ft 9ft 
17ft 12ft 
23ft 17ft 
34ft 21ft 
28 19ft 
47ft 23ft 
31ft 18ft 


23ft 23ft 
14ft 14ft 
59ft 59ft 
61ft 61 
32ft 32ft 
27ft 27ft 
4ft 4ft 
48ft 48ft 
29 2Sft 
42 41ft 
149b l«ft 
36ft 354b 
53ft 53ft 
79ft 79 
29 lift 
69ft 69ft 
10ft 9ft 
18ft lift 
26ft 26 
101% ID 
13ft 13 
20ft 20ft 
33ft 33ft 
27ft 27ft 
35ft 34ft 
30ft 30ft 


23ft + ft 
14ft * ft 
59ft +■ 9b 

61ft— ft 
32ft— ft 
27ft + ft 
4b 
48ft 

2fft + ft 
41ft + ft 
lift 

46ft- ft 
53ft— ft 
79 - ft 

28ft + ft 
69ft + ft 
9ft— ft 
lift— ft 
26 — ft 
10 

13ft + ft 

20ft 

33ft— ft 
37ft 

34ft— ft 
30H 


ACQUISITION 

OPPORTUNITY 


21ft— ft 
26ft 

39ft + ft 
299b + ft 
S6 -H 
43ft +1 
23ft— ft 
lift- ft 
37ft + ft 
33ft 
Vft 4-1 
23 + ft 

58 —ft 

103 —1ft 

55 — ft 
33ft — ft 
81b + ft 

24ft + ft 

7ft 

30 4- ft 

209b 4- ft 
26ft— ft 
30ft— ft 

56 — ft 
33ft + ft 
lift 

*>:b + ft 
22H— ft 
37ft— ft 
13 — ft 
29 + ft 

2916— ft 
42ft 4- ft 
27ft 
14ft 

5ft 4^ ft 
19 — ft 
II + ft 
55ft +■ ft 
45 — ft 
12tt + ft 
71ft— ft 

SS-ft 

25ft- ft 


144 4.1 13 
-22e 18 

105 

182 108 
27* 38 
120 82 7 
180 32 ID 
480 tf 
580 8U 
225 S2 
4JB 73 
120 18 


244 108 7 

2 m 102 

221 MJ 
235 118 
3Jt Its 

483*108 
480 118 
22 22 13 
289* 53 9 


20 18 
78* UJ 
141 118 
215 118 
225 113 
343 123 
188 78 6 

" 32 

260 S3 17 
235 6J 
-54 4.1 24 
.58 23 
05 102 
180b 52 11 


3491— ft 
16ft— V, 
10ft— ft 
17ft 4- ft 
25ft— ft 
19ft 4- ft 
31ft 

59ft— ft 
59ft 4- ft 
43ft 

61ft— ft 
13ft + ft 
24 4- ft 

lift— ft 

26ft 

20 4- ft 

20ft +lft 
20ft 

37 — Ift 
42 — 9b 

35 —in 

33 + ft 

39ft— b 
lift— tt 
121b 
60 +1 
73 + ft 

181b + ft 
19ft 4- ft 
29 ft + ft 
25ft 4- ft 
4ft— ft 
26ft- ft 
SO 1 * + ft 
35 

13ft 4- ft 
22 — ft 
44ft — ft 
19ft 4- ft 
49b— ft 
20ft- Ml 
25ft— ft 
32ft -t- ft 
12ft— ft 
19ft + ft 
65ft + ft 
10ft + ft 


IMPORTED 


- * - 


A RARE FIND; 

WORTHY OF INVESTMENT; IN DEMAND. 


n Month 
Wafa Low Stock 


ShL 

IBSsHWLdw 


32 26 9 
286 68 9 
80 13 14 
84 25 44 
*44 38 
20* 12 
















































Statistics Index 

.AMEX Brio* ' 'Ktr Horn Iran resorts P.10 
f f*e* hUtm/jamaP.M Pflns ran* notes P.13 
'pitSE Peats ' • P.0. Gold mortem P. 9 
fiYSE 'blototnoMs P.tO - interest rotas P. 9 
'OnodonHoMr 1M4 Market summery p. a 
orren rotes P.9 Osttost ' p.u 
DBSmOdttfc*. :P.» OTCBoefc p.io 

p ui Mea Ot - P-» «*r mortals P.14 


• iL MWMTHtNU.rta# * a 

iicralo^fi^tribuiic. 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1985 


Page 9 


WALL STREET WATCH 


1EX 


Stcc*. 


- Is 



Focus on Present Gives 
Perspective to Market 

By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

Immatimri HcrtfflTHbme 

ARIS — Everybody looks toward the future on Wall 



— - ,v, a U/UtVWU TUtfl 

analyze is that most-elusive of moving targets, the present. 

. But Francois Scan, a Frenchman who has worked on Wall 
Street for 16 years and is vice chairman of Tucker Anthony 
Management Corp., handling more than S200 mirerm, dwells on. 
the past as prologue and is fascinated by what is currently 

transpiring. 


Sicart is buying 
technology issues 
for the first time 
in his career. 


• .1-. .« i 



•<S i. 

*: * 




“In New York, Fm kind of 
a hermit,’* he said. “I inten- 
tionally don’t talk mreh to 
people on the Street. I try to 
understand the present by not 

becoming too immersed in it. I 
think analysts and market 

strategists get confused that 

way, or they become overly 

influenced by details and lose sight of the big picture.” 

So what has Wall Street got its head in the sand about right 
now? 

“It’s this ‘ead-of-the-worid’ psychology,*' he said. “The con- 
sensus is that the U.S. economy is f undamentally side, as illustrat- 
ed by the country’s gapi ng trade and budget deficits. Thus, as 
investors, we are living on borrowed time and should keep our 
'investment horizons very short. It would be unwise, therefore, to 
pay a premium for companies with higher intrinsic rates of 
growth because, when the collapse comes, they cannot escape it 

T HIS has produced what Mr. Sicart called an “unsustain- 
able anomoly” in today’s stock market: “Practically all 
companies are selling in the same general price/ earnings 
valuation range.” 

But in reality, he emphasized, “All companies, of course, are 
not alike. Some have better balance sheets, for example, and 
certainly some have better long-term growth potential than 
others. 

What has happened since the Dow average first approached 
1300 in late 1983, he continued, is that a wide disparity has 
developed between various categories of stocks, with many indus- 
trial and technology shares losing 30 or 40 percent of their 1983 
values while others, traditionally regarded as “defensive” issues, 
often have risen by a similar percentage. 

He underscored this point by comparing Campbell Soup, a 
high-quality defensive stock, with IBM. He noted that the two 
were selling for exactly the same P/E ratio and, at a multiple of 
12, which was also where the Dow 30s P/E rested. 

Yet other yardsticks, such as past growth and reinvestment 
rates, were widely divergent, he observed. 

“In practically every respect. Campbell Soup’s stock is today 
more expensive than IBM's in spite of the fact that the latter’s 
growth rale has been significantly higher,” he said. “Moreover, 
there is every reason to believe IBM will continue to grow at a 
faster pace.” 

It was a case — and the history of the stock market is replete 
with them, he pointed out — of investors “mistaking the ephem- 
eral for the structural” 

Comparable with the current situation on Wall Street, he said, 
is if Bloommgdale’s decided to sell every item in the store far the 
same price. 8y screening 1,512 “seasoned” companies on die 
New York Stock Exchange list, he found only 23 currently 
sporting P/Es higher than 23, which is a very tame multiple 
compared with past markets, let alone one at an all-time high. 

If past market patterns prevail, how does Mr. Sicart see the 
future? He thinks this “excess of a single-tier” marke t will 
continue for some time, fueled by the current mood of “skepti- 
( Continued on Page 13, CoL i) 


| Currency Rates 






» 

C 

DM. 

r=j=. 

ILL. 

Ottr. 

■UP. 

OF. 

Ym 


ABHtonwn 

was 

*m 

11349 • 

vm m 

0177* 

— 

5499 ■ 

1349* 

uuay 


• : i f— tetnl 

rmiivn 

41275 

7l« 

3013V 

64103 

S.HH- 

17J64 

— 

<IWt 

*14«H* 

T- 

0403 

MU 


3244* 

1-54*5 x 

H74* 


ms* 

u»* 

1 J 

f Omi CM 

un 

— 

ism 

HIM 

10193 

ova 

80.U5 

una 

32501 

> 

Mflat 

MSU0 

1527 JC 

437J9 

2D9J5 

— — . 

06525 

>1433 

warn 

7J» 


* NawYorkfe) 

__ 

aw* 

un 

9.2325 

ifflnt 

1005 

41X7 

24395 

3044 

- 

Porta 

uw 

ate 

3J3M4 

■■ - 

4WSX 

2JTO3 

1403* 

14032 

3W5* 


TOkro 

ML10 

3304 

B1J* 

24JB 

Mi- 

7U} 

40499 ■ 

9M4 

- 


Touch 

ZMQ 

1WB 

tux* 

27J1 ■ 

aou- 

749- 

4.1443- 

— 

lias* 

’ 5 

•; lieu 

8J4M 

05444 

12506 

6459 

1AX254 

l son 

4UW5 

14826 

nun 


1 SDR 

UB073 

OH71M 

3JM4S3 

9JE9M 

U3992 

NLA 

4U022 

urn 

244331 


OMtam In London and Zurhn HxUvs S' other European cantors. Mow Vtart ratal of 2 RM 
to! Co mt nuraeUmnc Os) Amounts needed to buy one pound MAmom d onaedod to Huron* 
dollar fj Unit* of too M UnttaofUOBM Units of UUeoUA: not moled,- HJU notovaJiobte. 
(•) ToOoyoM pound: tUJXM 

OdnrBritarValBH 

per VS* Cumae* per IfcSJ 

LM Fm. marten 6JS 

1-SOW Oneok droc. 134* 

21* Hena Kona I 710 

6143 Indian raw 1Z34 

&MUM lads. MW 1.11000 

14576 MAC 0.9*43 

1042 Israeli dutk. 143130 

17519 KimatN dinar 13029 


Am tro ts 


Csmncr par IUS 

mkn.tm. 24*5 Iter, ana 87130 

Max. peso 320D0 SPoa. peseta 173* 

None, krone 17BS Send, krona JL7B5 

PML mu 17.50 tens 40 jB0 

Portescado 17240 TDaiM*- 27445 

sawn rival 2451 Tortlsh Hra SSSSS 

Shots 12335 UAKdlrfamn 347W 

S-Mr.rand 1470* Voaex.battr. 1190 

-KI4S* Irish I 

Sources; Bantam xtu Benelux (Bnasots): Banco Commercial ttaUana (Mtkm); Ommtad 
Book iNsw York): Bottom Nanonawac Ports r Parts): Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR): 
BAll tcunar. rival atrham)- Other data from Reuters and AP. 



farniii ■ imj fl ep o ritt 


JmhS 





1««aM 

Donor 

7«r7« 

D-Mark 

5W-SW 

Mu 

Franc 

NULr— 

Sfarflna 

12 iw-12 ob 

9=nwcb 

Fnmtc 

IQMhlM 

ECU 

9V4-«4 

SDR 

714 


, 


2 route 

7 Ob-7 W. 

5U*SVt 

9L*,— 

12*4-12* 

lmt-ievi 

9W-W4 

744 




loMMtn 

7 5b-7*b 

Sta-SVi 

5WrSK. 

12 lb-12 lb 

W Mr-10 1b 

9Vb-Wfc 

7 0b 

- 


W 

tONotte 

79M 

1Mb 

5*4 lb 

12 lb-12 lb 

10 lb-10 W 

• Hr9 lb 

79k 




lyoor 

StUM 

5*W4T< 

5HrdVl 

12W-12H 

1H6-TM4 

9h-91b 

8V. 


Sources: Alarm Guaranty (Dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FFJi Uovds Bonk (ECU): Routers 
tSDHf. tones orvUcobie to MterOonk deoasfts of St mUtton rrMHtmnv taromttvafenfi. 

Aaian Hollar Beposlls 

Jefy3 

1 montt 7W-7% 

1 months Jis-79. 

SmooHts W-THi 

amanita 71V -8 

1 year ttt-Bfc 

Source: Reuters. 


Kay M-ey Batm J*h3 

Ute* Slate 


Cln Pnv. 
TVS 7VS 
Bit 7% 
fb Vfi 

(Mter»miM 745 730 

1— eHiTimurrMBs 6.T1 Ln 

^wbTracmmrBfflt 7J» 7JB 



cbummow 

Oiftaam 


owiimui 


725 725 

73 74S 


440 U 0 
158 SSB 
168 188 
540 165 

545 170 


UnutaM m KM 

ino lOVk 

OwoishUi leterboah 10X714 lOin* 

1UV. wfc 
10in4 183714 


safe 

SukhosellaH lift 

Cos Ate* !» 1276 

Tides Trseiutiai Hint 13 

6‘MtehtUirBMfe 12 129/14 


5 S 
63/14 41/14 
frl/U 45/1* 


'< *“*0*.- deem Cenumnaunk. Cnau 
4 ‘•rmmoia.Lbras Barn, aa* of Tokyo 
■ k 


OflUtey 



Jofy3 

AM. PM. OftO 
How Kona «US MX -JB 

Luxembourg 31U5 ■— —OZ* 

peris (123 kOa) J1044 3JOD -2J4 

Zone* m35 WAX +230 

Loadss J1MD W* JJH 

Ntwvart — T* 5 -* 8 +aw 

Unsembovm- Paris and Umdott oMettU*- 
HCne tens and Zurkjt etmtuno ana 
deorrtS prices; New York Com** current 
axumet. A!) prices in US Spot ounce, 
source: Reoiora. 


Markets Gosed 

Financial markets, banks and govemmeni offwes will be dosed 'Ihurs- 
day in ibe United Suits for the Independence Day holiday. 



»e, 

AT&T in 
Venture 

U.S. Sees Link 
As Policy Test 

By James Tyson 

ThtAadcuaedProi 

TOKYO - ATAT launched a 
joint <x vmTT,nrr w**i ti p r < venture in 
Japan on Wednesday, mpecting to 
dramatically increase its ales share 
in a sector that the U.S. govern- 
ment sees as a key test of Japan’s 
willingness to open its nmket wid- 
er to Foreigners. 

American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. joined 16 Japanese com- 
panies to start Japan Enhanced 
Network Services Corp^ & system 
to permit com munication among 

riksimilar lftnHft of cnmp ntws ft 

wffleom^tewth other cosy sajcs 

rnimj^ti^nn ipaflfrl 

Thenewcompain'wiD “dramati- 
cally increase AT&T’s market 
share in Japan” and boost U.S. 
revenue in. the sector, said John 
Quick, an AT&T spokesman. 

UJL officials have said J^au’s 
policy toward its tekconmnnuca- 
tions m*Arr* still symbofize its 
overall wiTtingness to open up to 
greats foreign competition. 

Last year, U.S. companies sold 
only 5126 nriffion worth of tele- 
communications equqimmt in Ja- 

K^bflKon WOT^i^t^lMhed 
Stales. 

Overall last year, Japanese ex- 
ports to the U.S. market exceeded 
American sales here by $36.8 bH~ 
Don. 

“the tie-up wQl hdp AT&T 
erase its own deficit with Japan,” 
Mr. Cusick said,. noting that the 
communications giant bought $230 
million worth of Japanese products 
last year while sdhng only $80 mil- 
lion worth to Japan. 

US. trade officials have urged 
Japan to speed the entry of foreign 
companies into the tdecommnni- 
cations market by rehumg strict 
standards and certification proce- 
dures and granting them a partin 
«hapmg the structure of the mar- 
ketplace. 

AT&T’s new service enables 
computers erf different makes to 
talk to one another. It could tie a 
company more efficiently to out- 
ride information and- streamline 
die customer's complete opera- 
tions, from manufacturing and the 
warehouse to distributors. 

In "Artitirm t o providing an in- 
formation m w mmn ifairinn system 
modeled after AT&T's Net 1000 
service in the United States, the 
consortium wffl offer to process in- 
formation, develop software, and 
seQmrem computes, cooumimca' 
turns equipment and other related 
goods. 

AT&T dans to Knk Tokyo, Na- 
goya and Osaka with the enhanced 
network by October, launch a na- 
tionwide service by the end of 1986, 
connect the United States and Ja- 
pan Net 1000 systems with an opti- 
cal fiber running below the Pacific 
Oceania 1988, and indnde a com- 
tible system from Europe soon 


it share 
and 


AT&T holds a S0-] 
in Enhanced N 


IJ^.M«wy9farfcetnadi 

Jol/3 

Mama LTiidi Ready Astei 
Mdav average vttld: 7 M 

Telerafa Moran Rata l Mtee NX 

Source: Merrill Lvnctl AP 


Jobless Rate 
In We Germany 
Erased in June 

CooqrSed by Our Staff From Dapadta 

NUREMBERG — Unem- 
ployment in West Germany, 
unadjusted fm seasonal factors, 
fell to216 million in June from 
2.19 in May, the federal Labor 
Office reported Wednesday. 
The figure is 8.7 percent of the 
work force, compared with 8JS 
percent in May. 

Seasonally adjusted unem- 
ployment was 2J3 nuUkm, un- 
changed from a month earlier. 

Separately Wednesday, the 
Economics Ministry reported 
that incoming orders for the 
manufacturing industry, sea- 
sonally adjusted, rose a provi- 
sional inflation-adjusted 0.9 
percent m May after rising a 
downward-revised 1.9 percent 
in April The mhristxy bad earli- 
er estimated the Apm increase 
at 2^ percent. 

In June 1984, unadjusted tm- 
amptoymenlfefltoZllniiffion, 
or 8 J percent of the work force, 
from 2.13 million, or 8.6 per- 
cent in May. Seasonally adjust- 
ed unemployment in June 1984 
rose to 230 million from 228 
milli on a month earlier. 

The Economics Ministry said 
the order index, base 1980 and 
expressed in volume terms, rose 
provisionally to 109 in May 
from 108 in April and 106 in 
March. The moviaonal May 
figure was 6.9 percent higher 
than a year earlier. 

Foreign and domestic de- 
mand were both about l per- 
cent higher in May this year 
.-■ gains t April (Rcu/crs, AP) 



Um tewYorii Tit 


Smokestack America Reconsiders 

Tax Han’s Impact May Not Be Severe in Some Areas 


By Gary Klott 

New York Turns Service 

NEW YORK — Across the industrial belt from 
the auto plants in the Middle West to the sted mills 
in the Northeast, the threat posed by President 
Ronald Reagan’s tax plan seemed char: Smoke- 
stack America was to be the sacrificial lamb in the 
eflort tocat taxes for mdmchials and foster devel- 
opment of faster-growing sectors of the U3. econ- 
omy. 

But in the past few weeks, some prominent 
industry executives, Wall Street analysts and pri- 
vate economists have raised strong doubts that the 
plan would be as crippling to the industrial heart- 
land as initially was tuDugbL 

Although the preadenrs proposal would scale 
back trillions of d ollars in investment incentives, 
man y depressed companies have accumulated 
enough tax losses to keep themselves immune from 
tax (manges for years. And others would find the 
cutback in investment incentives at least partly 
offset by the lowering of the corporate tax rate. 

Furthermore, many smokestack companies are 
no longer as capital-intensive as they mice were, 
and orders to the smokestack industries are not 
expected to dry up because erf the loss of tax 
benefits. 

“A thesis has been proposed that the president’s 


proposal would severely impact on heavy basic 
industry,” Donald H. Trantiem, chairman of Beth- 
lehem Steel Gem, told the Senate F inan ce Com- 
mittee recently, we believe this may be an over- 
statement.” 

■ Mr. Trautlrin is but one of several leaders in 
heavy industry who have joined forces with high- 
technology and sendee companies to support the 
president's plan. 

The chairman of General Motors Corp. predict- 
ed that the plan would increase car safes. The 
chapm an of Minneso ta, Mining & Manufacturing 
Co. said it would promote more productive “ lvc ?^ 

foreign man^cturers. A^Selwd^^^niai 
Resources one of the largest UJS. electric 
utilities, estimated that the plan would allow his 
company to cut customer mils in Virginia by S 
percent 

Such endorsements have not, however, been 
accompanied by a shift in sentiment among most 
members of the owntguadr community. 



senting 

dudes 


companies that also m- 

1 Steel Co„ Armco Inc. and Chrysler 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 2) 


CBS Bids $1 Billion to Re-Buy Stock 


company’s $40 millioo in capi- 
tal 

ENS shareholders indnde the 
Industrial Bank of Japan, Mitsui 
and Co. and Sony Corp. ENS offi- 
cials said Hitadn and Fujitsu also 
plan to provide equity and techni- 
cal support 


The Associ at ed Press 

NEW YORK — CBS Inc, 
ing a hostile takeover bid by 
Turner, offered Wednesday to buy 
bade 21 percent of its stock far 
$954.8 million In cash and securi- 
ties. 

CBS said its financial adviser, 
the investment banking firm Mor- 
gan Stanley & Co. Inajhas advised 
it that its offer of $150 a share is “a 
dearly preferable financial alterna- 
tive to the proposed Tomer Rraadr 
casting System offer from the 
standpoint of CBS shareholders.” 

Mr. Turner has valued his bid for 
all CBS stock, which involves no 
cash payments, at SI 75 a share. But 
financial analysts have put a lower 
price tag cm the offer. 

In Atlanta, Arthur Sando, a 
spokesman fm Turner Broadcast- 
ing System Inc., said the company 
had no irrHTwxfifltft comment 

CBS said it would pay $40 in 
ash and $110 in 10-year notes 
rearing 10.875-percent annual in- 
terest tor each of the 6365 mflTin n 
ihans it is seeking, 

CBS stock closed Tuesday at 
$1 1730 a share in New Yorit Stock 
Exchange trading. 

“The purpose of this offer is to 
provide CBS shareholders with the 


ty to receive a ccwsder- 
"affle premium over recent market 
prices of CBS shares tor a signifi- 
cant portion of their shares while 
retaining a substantial equity in- 
vestment in the company,” Thomas 
Wyman,chainnanafCBS,saidma 
prepared statement 

Mr. Wyman said CBS would re- 
duce the added debt burden of the 
repurchase program by selling as- 
sets and reducing corporate and 
divisional expenses in the next 
year. The announcement did not 
disdoise which assets might be sold. 

CBS operates a television and 
radio network and owns 14 radio 
and five tdevirian stations. Its oth- 
er businesses indnde the world’s 
r.toys, 

movies 

Turner Broadcasting System Inc. 
began its tender offer for CBS on 
June 25, torn days after getting 
clearance on its prospectus from 
the Securities and E xchang e Com- 
mission. 

While the SEC gave permission 
for Mr. Turner's company to offer 
high-interest securities for CBS 
stock, the bid also must obtain per- 
mission from the Federal Commu- 
nications Commission and the U3. 


Dpartmeni of Justice’s antitrust di- 
vision. 

The FCC is still reviewing Mr. 
Turner's offer because it would 
ch an g e ihe ownership of broadcast 
licenses for local radio and televi- 
sion stations owned by CBS. The 
Justice Department must deter- 
mine whether antitrust laws would 
be violated if CBS and Turner 
Broadcasting, which awns Cable 
News Network, were allowed to 
merge. 

In addition, the New York Legis- 
lature has passed a bQl that would 
make it difficult for Mr. Turner to 
acquire CBS. The measure, cover- 
ing companies incorporated in 
New York and having 15 percent of 
their stock owned by New Yorkers, 
would require a takeover bid to be 
supported by two-thirds of a com- 
pany’s shares, a majority of stock- 
holders not involved in the bid and 
a majority of the board of directors. 

Mr. Turner initially is seeking 67 
percent of CBS stock. If successful, 
he has said be would acquire the 
remaining shares. 

Mr. Turner has said he would sdl 
CBS’s publishing division and its 
Philadelphia television station, 
WCAU, to help finance his pur- 
chase of the network. 


Export Curbs Cited by World Bank 


By Gydc H. Farnsworth 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Nearly a 
thud of devdoping countries’ agri- 
cultural exports to industrial coun- 
tries axe restricted by quota re- 
straints or other nod tariff barriers, 
and so are nearly one-fifth of their 
exports of manufactured goods, the 
World Bank said in its annual 
Worid Development Report 
The report, released Tuesday, 
warned that farther proKferation of 
such barriers could “wD revive 
{and justify] the export 
that prevailed m many 
countries in the 1930s and l 1 
The 243-page report by the In- 
ternational Bank for Reconstruc- 
tion and Development, as the 
World Bank a formally known, fo- 
cused on the growing financial in- 
mdence of developed and 
ring countries. It said that if 
to urism was resisted and 
gpt into better balance, 
the industrial and Third 
World countries would ergqy faster 
growth in the next five years. 


Increased trade between these 
countries would be one of the 
spurs, the report said- 

II estimated that undo - optimum 
conditions industrial countries 
could expand by 33 percent annu- 
ally over the next five years while 
developing countries’ growth could 
average 53 percent In the 1980-85 
period, industrial countries grew 
23 percent and devdoping coun- 
tries 3 percent 

A.W. Clausen, president of the 
bank, said in a Rome speech re- 
leased by bis Washington office 
that as far as debt repayments were 
concerned, the next five years 
would be a trying period. 

He reported that about 60 per- 
cent of the $1 tritium of outstand- 
ing debt over one-year maturity 
would need to be rolled over ac 
amortized in this period. Smooth- 
ing out debt service payments 
would test cooperation by debtors, 
creditors and international institu- 
tions, he said. 

In another development, James 
B. Burnham, executive director for 
the United States on the board of 


the World Bank, told the board 
Tuesday that he was resigning after 
three years. 

He joined the Reagan adminis- 
tration as a staff member on the 
Council of Economic Advisers. He 
name to W ashing ton from Pitts- 
burgh, where he did risk analysis 
for the Mellon National Bank. 

Mr. Burnham said Ik was return- 
ing to the private sector but gave no 
details. It is understood, however, 
that he win be back at the MeOoo in 
a senior position. 

The Reagan administ ration has 
not yet derided on a successor. The 
administration must also decide 
soon on the future of Mr. Clause a, 
whose World Bank term expires 
next June 30. 

l to officials who asked 
itified, Mr. Clausen 
has put out feelers about staying 
on, if not for a fuD term that until 
he readies the age of 65 in Febru- 
ary 1988. 

An American is traditionally ap- 
* i ted as president of the Worid 


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Arab Countries 
Urge Lowering 

Of OPEC Ceiling 


Complied by Dvr Siafl Fran Dupaidm 

VIENNA — The Organization 
pf Arab Oil Exporting Countries 
advocated on Wednesday a lower- 


necessary to halt the downward 
slide in prices on the worid oil mar- 
ket 

It warned of a possible split 
within the Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries if the 
situation were not remedied. 

A bulletin of the Organization of 
Arab Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries before Friday’s ministerial 
sesaon of OPEC in Vienna said lie 
desire of most members of the 13- 
natioo cartel to increase revenues 
by increasing their shares within 
the fixed-production ceiling was 
“threate n in g a breach within the 
organization.” 

The current overall ceiling is 16 
million barrels a day. 

Seven of the Arab countries — 
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, the 
United Arab Emirates, Iraq, Alge- 
ria and Libya — are also OPEC 
members. 

The OAPEC bulletin chided 
non-OPEC “production maximiz- 
ers, who leave to OPEC producers 
the unenviable job of adjusting 
their output in order to stabilize 
prices." 

Meanwhile, the Kuwait News 
Agency, in a report that was imme- 


diately denied, reported Wednes- 
day that a majority of OPEC oQ 
ministers have agreed in principle 
to reduce the pnee of light-crude 
oil by $1 to SI 30 a barrel when 
they meet. 

The state-owned agency, which 
gave no further details, quoted 
‘Veil-placed Gulf oil industry 
sources." 

But Gulf oil delegates assem- 
bling tor the conference expressed 
surprise at the report. 

“As far as 1 know no such pre-a- 
greement has been made," a senior 
Gulf delegate said. 

European spot-oil traders were 
generally doubtful about the report 
that most OPEC ministers were in 
favor of the price cuts. 

The news agency also reported 
that the ministers had agreed in 
principle to cut 500.000 barrels a 
day from the 16- million -barrel 
quota during the summer months. 

The spot traders said they saw 
the reports as the “usual pre-OPEC 
hype.* In any case, such a move 
would mak e mile real difference to 
the spot market, they said. 

The agency report did not make 
dear which light crudes were under 
discussion, the ultra-tights of Alge- 
ria and Nigeria or light crudes simi- 
lar to the former benchmark crude, 
Saudi light- (AP. Reuters) 


The OPEC Decision: 
Cut Prices or Output 


By Olfat Tohamy 

Jmenuukmtd ReraU Tribune 

CAIRO — Members of the Or- 
ition of Petroleum 
i tries are deeply 
price and production policy. 

Their meeting Friday in Vienna 
is expected to determine whether 
the organization will lower its over- 
all production in an attempt to sup- 
port prices or formally cut prices. 

Sheikh Ahmed T^ki Yamani, 
Saudi Arabia’s ofl minister, prefers 
price cuts, saying, “The time has 
come for reducing the price of 
heavy crude oil. because of the fall 
in demand for fuel oil and the drop 
in rts price.” 

Light-crude producers, including 
Iran, Nigeria, Algeria and the Unit- 
ed Arab Emirates, have indicated 
that they disagree with Sheikh Ya- 
mani, and would rather ciitjuodiio- 
tkm. The emirates’ ofl minister, 
Mana Said al Oterba, has called fm 
catting OPEC’s production limit of 
16 million barrels a day set last fafl. 
He did not specify how much of a 
reduction he favored. 

The recent weakening of dl 
prices that started the last week of 
April was brought about by a com- 
bination of factors, mdudmg the 
end of the long coal miners' strike 
in Britain, winch caused a major 
deterioration in the price of heavy 
fud ofl. 

Also helping to depress prices 
was the end of the cold season in 
the Northern Hemisphere and an 
increase of supplies from the Soviet 
Union and the North Sea produc- 
ers, Britain and Norway. A number 
of major non-OPEC exporters, be- 
ginning with Britain and Mexico, 
have started a wave of price drops. 

The spot market price of other 
light crudes has droppedsteadily in 


the past two months. That trenc 
was led at least in part by Britain 
whose ofl production, estimated a 
2.7 million barrels a day. now ex 
£ Arabia, 


on ceeds that of Saudi 


wind 


has a potential capacity of 10 mil- 
lion barrels a day, and the reduc- 
tion in the price of Britain's mostly 
light Brent crude. 

As a result of the past two 
mouths’ market developments, the 
spot price of a band of Arabian 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

light crude was $2720 a band 
•Tuesday, down from $27.80 on the 
first of April Saudi heavy crude 
fdl to $25.05 from $26_50 in the 
same period. British official spot 
prices, for Brent tight crude, in the 
same period have tallen to $2630 
from $28.65. 

Britain’s prices have affected the 
sales of OPEC’s light-crude pro- 
ducers. who have reacted by offer- 
ing reductions on the prices fixed 
by OPEC Heavy-crude producers 
also have faced such difficulties, 
although heavy-crude prices have 
not deteriorated to the same extent. 

The issue of revising price differ- 
entials between light and heavy 
crudes, directly influencing the 
marketability of OPEC members' 
main source of revenue, will come 
up d«winp the mwtfing g Six of the 
carters O members are exceeding 
their quotas in a bid to make up for 
the revenue that their countries lost 
with the price slump. OPECs 
price-monitoring committee has 
warned thorn to stop the practice. 
Adherence to OPEC quotas is ex- 
pected to be a major subject the 
meeting. 

Members that have sought to get 

(Continued on Rage li, CoL 3) 



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BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY *. 1985 ' 


Page II 


Trafalgar Home k to Take 
298tft Stakeinjohn Bwtm 

Reuters 

LONDON —Trafalgar House PLC, which owns Cunanl 
fine and has interests m construction, publishing, gas aad aiL 
on Wedae*fcy to laic a 29.9-percent stake in the troubled Total 
Brown PLC engineering group. 

Ibc two companies said Trafalgar would pul up £?Q3 nrflhnn 
(J26.2 inffirai) as part of an effort to r efinance John Brown and to 
reduce the group’s debts by about £70 rnOlian ($91 nriffion). 

.John Brown is the best known for constructing Cunanrs Quern 
Elizabeth 2 beany liner and its predecessors. Queen Elizabeth and 
Queen Mary. 

Since to 1960s John Brown has branched out into other areas, 
including the construction erf turbines used oh the piping that hwng t 
Soviet gas ihxa Hbena to Westom. Europe. 

The engineering group said Wednesday that in the 
in Maui; it 

tn n M>wiai pd 

year- 

After taxes, however, to group recorded a net loss of £1.78 uriffion 
($2-3 mural) compared with a loss of £43.8 million ($56.9 nriffion) the 

previous year. 


eenng group saut Wednesday that in the year that ended 

t made a pretax profit of £1.01 mfflinn ($u nriffion), a 
from a loss of £5 million (S6J5 nriffion) in th 


the previous 



Cites Costs of Cutbacks 


Reuten 

LONDON — Reflecting the 
problems in the British telecom- 
munications industry, STC PLC 
fonneriy Standard Telephones & 
Cables PLC, said Wednesday that 
it would show a loss in to first half 
of 1985 because of extraordinary 
charges. 

A company spokesman said the 
charges would cover efforts to re- 
duce expenditures, indmfag clo- 
sures and disposals. The group has 
already announced 2*300 job cats 
this year. 

“We’re tiling the bullet and tak- 
ing aQ the charges in the Gist half," 
the spokesman said. Results for the 

period are not expected until Ang. 

STC said it expected much lower 
iting profits in the first half 
a year earlier but that the 


board was confident about the 
group’s long-tern projects. 

For thefirst half of 1984 , STC 
rqxkted pretax profit of £52J2 m3> 
tarn on sales of £5173 mini on 

ITT Conn, winch holds a 24- 
percent stake in STC, recently de- 
nied reports that it planned to sell 
its interest in the British company, 
but market speculation about a 
possible sale continued. 

STC shares were quoted at 126 
pence an Wednesday, down 12 
pence from the level of late Tues- 
day. 


Belgian JoUesanesB at 12% 

The Associated Press 

BRU SSELS — Belgian unem- 
ployment was 12 percent in Jane, 
down from 123 percent in May. 


FinancicdTimes 
Prints in U.S. 

Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — The Finan- 
cial Tunes of London published 
its first American edition Tues- 
day, sending news by satellite to 
a plant in New Jersey where the 
paper was printed. 

Ammriam and Canadian qfb- 
scribers used to receive an inter- 
national edition delivered by jet 
from Europe. But that system 
was plagued by delays, accord- 
ing to Laurence Allen, the pa- 
per’s director for North Ameri- 
ca. Mr. Allen said the American 
edition would be available early 
each morning in 16 North 
American cities. 

The Financial Times, which 
has a daily circulation of 
225,000, sells about 6,000 
caries in Nath America, Mr. 
Aden said. New York accounts 
fa almost half that total. 


Yeba Reports 48% Rise in Profit for 1984 


DUSSELDORF — Yeba AG rc- 

netprofit rose 4/ percent 
cord 696.9 million Deutsche mails 
($2283 mQHoa), from 471.7 million 
DM in 1983. 

Revenue rose slightly, to 4932 
billion DM from 49.19 trillion. 

The chairman, Rudolf von Ben- 
nigsea-Foerder, at the annual news 
conference Wednesday, attributed 
the increase in profits to an up- 
swing in the economies of industri- 
al countries and Veba’s rcstnicmr- 


Daimler-Benz Reports Sharp Rise in Sales 


COMPANY NOTES 


•.5 C . 


r-i kei* 


«- 


Reuters 

STUTTGART — Daimler-Benz 
AG reported Wednesday that it 
had increased sales in the first six 
months by 24 percent to about 25 
billion' Deutsche mails ($83 bil- 
lion) from about 20.1 billion DM in 
the tike period of 1984. 

Werner Breitschwerdt, to man- 
aging board chairman, told (be 
company’s annual meeting that the 
mIm comparison with the 1984 pe- 
riod was restarted because of a seri- 
ous labor dispute early last sum- 
mer, but that the figures still 
reflected considerable expansion. 

Concerning future dividend 


prospects, Mr. Breitschwerdt said 
shareholders and employees could 
expect 10 be “smtahfy rewarded" 
next year, which marls the 100th 
anniversary of Kari Benz’s 
of a patent fa his first car. ! 
paid a I03-DM dividend on last 
year’s results. 

Mr. Breitschwerdt said Daim- 
ler’s share of the German market 
had risen to 1M per cent . He also 
said Daimler expected to increase 
U3. sales to 85,000 this year from 
79,000 in 1984 and total car pro- 
duction to 540,000 from 478350 
last year. 

It also expected to maintain its 




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strong poritkxi in domestic and 
foreign commer cial vehicle max* 
kets, with its worldwide track and 
bos prodnetioa prqected to rise 
riiditly from last years total of just 
under 211,000. 

Mr. Breitschwerdt also an- 
nounced tot his company plans to 
assemble cars in nwns 

Daintier will start by assembling 
1^00 of its “nrid-dasr cars a year, 
although to figure coold be raised 
if Amvmii was niffiriwii, he said. 
The models would be from a mid- 
-dass range no longer in produc- 
tion. 

natmlfr sar alcn hnifjfng mffli- 

ations on various track projects in 
ffcma, Mr. Breitschwerat added. 
He did not say when car assemWy 
would begin and gave no farther 

Cuts in Price 
Or Output? 

(Coatimied from Fage 9) 

around official prices by offering to 
accept payment over extended pe- 
riod, in most cases stretched from 
one to three months, or conefadtag 
countertrade agreements under 
which ofl is bartered for other 
goods, are also expected to be criti- 
cized dnrmg the meetings. Nigeria 
and Iran, in particnlar, have been 
involved in barter arrangements. 

Saudi Arabia’s oil production 
has hit its lowest level in several 
decades recently by reaching 23 
nriffion bands a day, while its 
OPEC quota amounts to 43 mil- 
lion baxids. 

Shdkh Yamani, representing 
OFECs string producer, which at 
ten its level of production to pre- 
vent to overall output f 
the ceffing, has lately 


ASEA AB, to Swedish electrical 
and electronic engineering group, 
was awarded a $50-mflh'on contract 
by to Kuwaiti government to 
build a number of substations. 

Bath Iran Works, a nugor ship , 
builder for the U3L Navy, refused 
the invitation of a 4300-member 
s triving union to resume contract 
talks/nie strike, which began Sun- 
day ni rf it, shat down three plants 
in Mame and put $1.4 When in 
Navy contract work on hold. 

* *■■■-■— *■ AG, the West Ger- 
man pipe, steel and heavy engineer- 
ing group, said it was likely tot 
profits tins year would return to the 
higher levels recorded m 1982. But 
it added that adjustments would 
have to be made for 
its in 1983 and 1984 before a’ 
dividend could be paid. 

Sodftt Nationale Hf Aquitmoe 
of France agreed to pay $85 nriffion 
plus interest to Basic Resources In- 
ternational of the Bahamas to settle 
a three-year legal dispute between 
to two oQ wnpBniea. Baric con- 


Sandi Arabia’s inability to tokrate 
frirtber prodnetion increases. 

At a. preparatory ministerial 
meeting held last month in Saudi 
Arabia, Sheikh Yamani echoed the 
threat that had been made in a 
letter by King Fahd to raise his 
coimtxyS production to 5 nriffion 
bands a oay, according to OPEC 
officials who attended me meeting. 
The vinplnm will “not remain 
handcuffed if overproduction con- 
tinues," he sakL . 


Ford to Make 
New Engines 
AtU.K. Plant 

International Herald Trtbme 

LONDON — Ford Motor 
Co. will invest £157 ™iTHnn 
($204 million) to produce 
"taro-bum” en gines at its plant 
at Dagenham, east of London, 
the company announced 
Wednesday. 

Production of up to 200,000 
third-generation “lean-burn” 
engines is to start in 1987, it 
said. “Lean-burn” en gines burn 
a higher proportion of oxygen 
to fud. cutting to amount of 
toxic emissions. 

Dagenham was the only site 
among several under consider- 
ation in Europe where the new 
production facilities could be 
accommodated without an ex- 
tension plant, a Ford spokes- 
man said. But Dagenham will 
lose to existing medmm-rize 
overhead-camshaft engines fa 
Sierra and Granada models, 
which will be transferred to Co- 
logne. Production of all Euro- 
pean diesd engines will remain 
at Dagenham. 


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islE 


. OFFICE:-.- 


HT1 ^[ 


tended that Elf mishan dled an oil 
venture in Guatemala. 

Prcussag AG said it expected sat- 
isfactory 1985 profits because of 
increased earnings during the Gist 
five months of this year compared 
with the same period in 1984. 

Nissan Motor Co., Japan’s sec- 
ond-largest automaker, said it had 
acquired 25 percent of Taiwan’s 
Yne Loocg Motor Co, which con- 
trols 40 percent of Taiwan's car 
market. Yue Loong produced 
67.401 cars and commercial vehi- 
cles designed by Nissan in 1984. 

Hoeehst AG, the West Goman 
ch«niftftl concern, said its U.S. sub- 
sidiary, American Hoeehst COqx, 
bought a 74-pacent share of Her- 
ffnfmfl in Hanover, North Carolina, 
from Hercules Inc, but refused to 
specify the price. 

Matin Marietta Corp. won a 
$4473-nriHioD contract from the 
U-S. Air Force to assemble and test 
the proposed Midgetman missile, 
which would be deployed in to 
1990s. Martin Marietta, the 12th- 
largest U.S. weapons manufactur- 
er, holds a riniilar contract for the 
MX missile. 

User Engineers Ik* a contrac- 
tor based in Oakland, California, 
will pay Cincinnati Gas & Electric 
Co. S3 Tniffinn in a federal court 
settlement involving the Zimmer 
Dudear power plant in Ohio, which 
never was completed. 

Sonffih Coqn said to U.S. Food 
and Drag A dminis tration hod giv- 
en it permission to market the drug 
capo tea. Squibb «dd more than 
three millio n people worldwide 
have been treated with capoten for 
hypertension or congestive heart 
failure. 


used the profits to strengthen 
a reserves and raise its dm- 
to 9 DM from 1983*s 730. 

Mr. Benmgsen said Veba’s profit 
rose slightly m to first five months 
of 1985 compared with the same 
period in 1984, strengthening the 
expectations Of another good year. 
He said that group net profit rose 
7 j 6 percent in to first quarter of 
1985 and that gains continued in 
May. He gave no figures. 

Phillips Sets Sale 
Of Assets Valued 
At $140 Million 

United Press International 

BARTLESVILLE, Oklahoma ^ — 
Phillips Petroleum Co. said 
Wednesday it has sold or contract- 
ed to sell $140 million in assets to 
reduce debt resulting from its 
muItibiliion-doUar restructuring 
program tot warded off two hos- 
tile takeover attempts. 

The company raid it also has 
received strong interest in addition- 
al properties valued at more than 
5800 million. 

Phillips plans to sell about $2 
biliinn m assets to reduce debts 
anting from its $43-billkm ex- 
change offer following unsuccess- 
ful takeover campaigns by T. 
B oo ne Pickens, the Texas mlmnn, 
and Car! G Icahn, a New York 
financier. 

Phillips said sales of about $53 
mffli nn have been completed, in- 
cluding its interests in the Union 
iciawd gas field in California. 


Group revenue rose 34 percent in 
January-May, compared with the 
like 1984 period, he said 

As in 1984, developments at Vc- 
ba’s chemicals subsidiary, Che- 
mische Woke Hals AG, contribut- 
ed heavily to improved results is 
the first five mouths of 1985, he 
said. Hflls's performance should be 
satisfactory lor the full year, partic- 
ularly after further restructuring 
since January, including the sale of 
its pesticide operations to Du Pont 
Co. and of two fertilizer plants to 
Norsk Hydro AS. 

The operations were sold to Du 
Pont at a loss, be said, but he de- 
clined to give details. 

Mr. Bennigsen said Veha’s previ- 
ously announced plan to absorb 
three units into the group should be 
realized by January. The three are 
Prcnssische ElektnzitiLts AG and 
Nordwestdeutsche Kraftwerke 
AG, which wiD be merged before 
they are absorbed, ana Cbemie 


Verwaltungs AG. Veba plans to 
hold stakes of nearly 100 percent in 
all three. i 

Mr. Bennigsen said the compa- 
ny’s oil unit, veba Od AG. which 
returned to profit las! year, has 
been making a profit on refining 
since April of this year. 

In the first quarter, Veba Od, 
raised crude-oil production by 30 
percent 


Options (iliac* fa v/ck.). ■ 


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30 

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*3511.25 

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ELF AQUITAINE IN 1984 


Annual Stockholders’ Meeting held may 20, 1985 

Petroleum 

In 1984, oversupply and reduced demand led to declining dollar prices. OPEC withstood sharp internal divi- 
sions which arose and which have continued, but was not able to counter moves to cut prices as in the past 
Others, particularly North Sea producers, have become increasingly important on the international scene. 

With regard to exploration and production. 1984 was a very good year for ELF Aquitaine. Both production 
levels and quantities discovered were greater than in 1983. Also, the appreciation of the dollar, although raising 
exploration costs, clearly increased income from production. 

Refinery and marketing operations posted losses unchanged from the high level of 1983. 

The continuing slump in the overall consumption of petroleum products has shown a slight improvement in 
major countries. Consumption of heavy fuel oils, however, is down sharply in all countries. France is one of those 
most seriously affected and refinery operations face major problems adapting to the constantly falling demand. 

The formula automatically determining the price of fuels and domestic fuel oil continued to be applied, but the 
French government intervened to limit’ its effects. The service station price war significantly worsened in 1984. 

Chemicals 

77ie strong recovery which began in the second quarter continued throughout most of 1984. This good 
overall economic situation was also a profitable one. In 1984,' Atochem sales exceeded FF 19 billion, a 14% 
increase over 1983 on a comparable basis. Resources provided by operations totaled FF 750 million, whereas in 
1983 a deficit was shown. 

Restructuring of ELF Aquitaine's chemical operations was begun in October 1983 and continued through 
1984. In November 1984. the Group announced the formation of two operational management stwetures: 
Atochem for fine and specialty chemicals (excluding biochemicals) and Sanofi tor biochemicals 

United States 

ELF Aquitaine Petroleum extended undersea mining operations and Texasgulf's sales of phosphate treated 
products increased 19% compared with 1983. 

Consolidated highlights 

- Sales: FF 177 billion compared with FF 134 billion in 1983. 

This 32% increase is due mainly to the consolidation of Atochem sales over one complete year. 

- Resources provided by operations (after deducting costs of unproductive exploration): FF 217 billion 

compared with FF 16.6 billion in 1983. . 

- ^vestments; FF 14.7 billion, unchanged from 1983. 

- Net income (attributable to stockholders of SNEA) : FF 6.5 billion compared with FF 3.7 billion in 1983. 

- Net income per share (taking account of new shares issued wifi) rights at the beginning of the year): FF 65 
compared with FF 41 in 1983 

Parent company highlights 

- Net income: FF Z437 million, compared with FF 2,270 million in 1983 . 

- Nef dividend per FF 10 par value share paid on new and existing shares: FF 13.50 (plus tax credit ofFF 6.75). 
compared with FF 12 (plus tax credit of FF 6) in 1983. 

Payment is to be made on or after June 28, 1985. 

The Annua/ Stockholders' Meeting appointed Louis Astre as Director for the remaining term of office of 
Mr. Pronteau, recently deceased. 

Extraordinary Meeting of Stockholders 

An Brtraorcf/naiy Meeting of Stockholders, held following the Annual Stockholder's Meeting, authorized the 
Board of Directors to grant options on the purchase of ELF Aquitaine shares to personnel in the Parent Company 
and Group. 



societe nationale 
elf aquitaine 




*.-& Li,' .),!•, .a 
















INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1985 


Wed nesdays 

AMEX 

dosing 


rubles inchicfe the nationwide prices 
up to the doting on Wall Street 
mki do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via Vie Associated Press 


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Growing with 
the need to manage 
our water resources 

Products from several Aroetek 
Divisions are used to manage 
the capacity of deep wells, help 
farmers reduce irrigation 
needs and provide clearer, 
better tasting drinking water. 
Write for latest reports to 

ANIETEK 

Dept. H, 

410 Pork Avenue, 21st Floor, 

New York. NY 10022. 


How to get More Gold 
for Your Money. 

Krugerrand gold bullion coins 
combine the age-nld security of 
gold with instant liquidity. Because 
they are legal tender they are 
traded 24 hours around the globe 
at an advantageously low premium. 

Gold gives you the security. 
The Krugerrand gives you now 
more gold for your money. 

Ask your bank or broker. 

Or write for a free copy of the 
European Gold Guide to: 

International Gold Corporation 

Coin Division 

1, rue do la Rotlsserie 

CH - 1204 Geneva 

Switzerland c 


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KRUGERRAND 

Money you can trust 

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PT Com Me £ 144913 * 13 * 12 *-* 


N.V. AMEV, Utrecht 

8^0 Debentures due 1978/1987 . US $ 40.000.000,- 

In accordance with the terms and conditions of the above- 
mentioned debenture Joan, the undersigned, trustee for the 
debenture holders, announces lhai the final redemption of 

3769 debentures of US $ 1.000, - each, 
will take place on the 1st of August 1985. 

The paying agents are the hcadofficcs of 

Pierson, Held ring & Pierson N.V., Amsterdam 
Banque Generate du Luxembourg S. A., Luxembourg, 
Deutsche Bank A.G., Frank furl/Main, 

J. Henry Schroder VVagg & Co. Limited, London, 
Union Bank of Switzerland, Zurich, and 
Irving Trust Company, New York. 

After this redemption (he debtor has fulfilled all its obligations. 

The Trustee: 

AMSTERDAMSCH TRUSTEE’S KANTOOR B.V. 

Amsterdam, 17th June 1985 
Nicuwe Zijds Voorburgwal 326-328 


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Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on June 30 , 1985 : U.S. $ 127 . 04 . 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pierson, ffekMngA Pierson NY, 

Hmngractt 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 


XL Data 


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Son Names McOements 
As Chief Executive 

United Press Intemahoaal 

RADNOR, Pennsylvania — 
Robert McClnjKats Jr. has been 
elected chief executive officer of 
Sun Co^ succeeding Theodore Bur- 
ns, who wiH remain chairman of 
the board, the company announced 
Wednesday. 

Mr. McCtanents, 56, wiH also 
continue to. serve as Sun president 
and chief operating officer, posts 
he has held smoe June 198 1. He was 
named to his sew post by Sun's 
board of directors. 


tfc] Chinese Oil Output Rises % 

Amec Fitmce-Presse i 

_ BEUING— China’s oflproduo- 


.94 4J ism 19* 19*— * 
-24 1.7 . 8314 13* 14 

29 716 7* 7* 

1J6 7A 1B23* 2M 23* + * 
20 22 12125* 2SV6 SS* + * 


don jumped 10.7 percent: in die 
first six months of this year com- 
pared with the like period in 1984^ 


i8»i5* g* is* + * to reach 6 U5 million urns," the 03 

hi ij §* 4 * < + * Ministry announced Wed nesd^f. 






























































- 1 


with 

*° m anaqB 

'P --V2 

f -■*.■ 7‘ “fc 


lETfiij 


focusing (hi 
The Present 

(Cootaned from Page 9) 

psin8Mi<kfeati^" ftot he recom- 
mends a folly invested pod don in 
the stocks that have been “unduly 
left bdriad in ' the very selective 


U.S. Industry Reconsiders Tax Plan | US. Futures 


Rtf thefim time in ins ujvest- 
iacot career, Mr. Scart, who de- 
scribed himself as “vabe-orfent- 
cd," is baying technology stocks. 
Bot he B not «rre they wm reassert 
fteiriarfv g* before, aaother mit H 

cccrectkjo. 

His most recent' purchases in- 
dude Esterline, K u fi drc & Sofia 
aodPteddihElmer. His biggest sin- 
gle holding is Norton Co. and an- 
other favorite is BakJor Electric 
Etftnuri M_ Kerschner, chairman 
d i Paine Webber's investment po- 




‘ : “l'c 




.CjI.KRAND 


ogy stocks frantho same perspec- 
tive of comparative valuation. 

“It’s the best sector in the market 
today" he said. “The last time 
technology stocks were this cheap 
(tbs 1978 when IBM was at $59 a 
share.” . 

This contrasted with 18 months 
ago when -Paine Webber’s valua- 
tion model showed the group to be 

the “most vulnerable" on Wall 
Street. 

Mr. Kerschner said the trick for 
investors was to distinguish be- 
tween simple - computer stocks that 
woe still vulnerable and compa- 
nies which recognize that their 
business is technology. 

“The classic story is told of two 
buggy whip manufacturers at tbe 
tun of the century, the ABC Buggy 
Whip Co. and XV2 Transportation 
Impfemai ts Inc," Ik said “As the 
antomobQe replaced the horse and 
carnage. ABC went out of busi- 
ness. XYZ understood that hs bust- 
ness was transportation and realized' 
ihe potential opportunity by fas- 
tening the ads of its buggy whips 
together and supplying fan belts to 
the automakers!" 

Mr. Ke rschner maintained that 
technology’s long range prospects 
were as bright as ever, but that the 
future lay with companies that of- 
fered “office solutions rather than 
just office products." His picks 
were IBM, CoBineJ, Digital Equip- 
ment, Motorola and Prime Com- 
puter. 

Shearson Lehman/ American 
Express this week produced its an- 
nual mid-year stock selections: As- 
sociated Dry Goods, CM-Chfs, 


(Comfmied from Page 9) 

Corp. “There is an increasing 
amount of . concern about the pro- 
posal, A lot of people have called 
toe in the past two weeks that 
didn't call tte first two weeks after 
the proposal came out" 

Indeed, at first glance, the tax 
plan’s proposal to take away $220 
billion in inves tmen t incentives in 
the next five years portends drastic* 
consequences for capital-intensive 
industries. 

To lower the corporate tax rate 
to 33 percent; from 46 percent, the 
plan would dirnmate the invest- 
ment Lax credit, which is worth 6 to 
10 percent at the cost of equipment 
purchased, and stretchout the peri- 
od over winch companies must 
write off the cost of plant and 
equipment, winch means smaller 
depredation deductions each year. 
In addition, those who daixued big 
depredation write-offs in the past 

five years would be forced to pay a 

special windfall recapture tax. 

Nevertheless, tbe impact of the 
plan win vary considerably from 
industry to industry, and even from 
company to company. 

Some segments of smokestack 
industries are no ton yr as capital- 
intensive as they once were, No- 
where is this so apparent as in the 
electric utility industry, traditional- 
ly one of the most capital-intensiveL. 

Cutbacks in investment incen- 
tives would crane just as most utili- 
ties in the anokestaefc regions are 
finishing up their last maj or invest- 
ment projects fra: some time, said 
Barry M. Abramson, an analyst at 
Prudential-Bathe Securities. 

Thus, tike Dominion Resources, 
the parent of Viigim& Electric A 
Power Co, many utilities would 
not greatly mi« the investment in- 
centives, bat would benefit signifi- 
cantly from the lowering of the 
corporate tax rate. And smee utili- 
ties tend to pay high dividends, 
they would also benefit from a pro- 
pond 10-percent deduction for 
dividends paid to shareholders. . 

The chemical industry is also no 
longer as capital-intensive as it 
once was. As John Henry, an ana- 
lyst at ELF. Hutton A Co, pointed 
out, many of these companies have 
diversified into areas, such as spe- 
cialty chemicals, that involve less 


table Resources, Golden West Fi- 
ynanrinl, Frank B. Hall, IBM, Up- 
- — -john and Wal-Mart. 

— Eliot Fried, the firm’s director of 

m3 research, said the recommendar 
L tions reflected three baric themes- 
rTixst, that consumer buying will 
continue to be strong; technology 
stocks will stocks have to came 
- % bade; and that interest rates will 
■ > remain modest" 


A ifudt— ft* 11 


2 FORI 


Void through Mwth 


l+Imgrthfree) 
□ 6 months 


I (+lwe*M 


I Hen charge mp 


UWasJerard 


Cad eqvy dels 

Card account! 


nies that have had the mostprob- 
lems is oaecf the chief criticisms of 
tax incentives. ; 1 . 

Indirectly, however, the repeal of 
the investment tax credit would 
hurt some of these compares. 
Many of them have saved on equip- 
ment financing ihmng fr lease ar- 
rangements with banks and other 
companies that are in a posmoa to 
use the tax credit, said Mallory J. 
Lennox, a rice president at Salo- 
mon Bro thers Ids, 

Nonetheless, an overriding con- 
cern of all smtkestackcompanies is 
whether the cot in investment in-, 
ceatives wiD cause their ctetomets 
to «i**h spending do plant and 

equipment: 

Mr.Trauildn and others believe 
the answer is na 

One reason is that after dose 
Mrnimtmtinn of the depredation 
proposal, many executives have 
bees surprised to find that the 
benefits areneariy as good as under 
the current system, and . in some 
cases even better. 

Even th p w gh the depredation 
deductions would have to be 
spread over alonger period, a com- 

deductions than iul^'now. Hie 
icason is that tbe new Syrian 
would be indexed fra inflation. 
This inflation bonus was a major 
(hetrc in tbe Congressional Budget 
Office's finding last week that the 
tax plan would cost the govern- 
ment a significant amount of reve- 
nue in the next 15 years. 

As for the raped of the invest- 
ment tax credit, Mr. Traction ar- 
gued that “the trade-off be tw een 
tbeloss of die investment tax credit 
and die rate reduction may not 
have die serious impact on the 
heavy industrial sector which is 
commonly assumed." 

There are other indications that 
businesses would not slash capital 
spending plans as as some 
have feared. David G. Sutlif, a cap- 
ital-goods analyst at Salomon 
Brothers, said he surveyed about 

“They dUn*? 

were going to change plans at all,” 
be said. tne reason: Most orders 
have been fra goods that were 
needed either as a cost-saving de- 
vice, to make a new pnxhict, or for 
a restructuring of operations. He 


said none of these purchases would 
be canceled if tax benefits were no 
: longer available. “The tax benefit 
was just a freebie m their minds;" 
he said. 

As for the machine- tod mdns- 
txy, Efi X, Lustgaiten, an analyst at 
Fame Webber, said the two biggest 
buyers are the automotive and 
aerospace industries, and be did 
not expect buy radical cutbacks in 
ardexs from other. 

Nevertheless, the doefinein cash 
-flow from reduced investment in- 
centives, Mr. Sutlif said, is bound 
to have some dampening effect. 
*nhe tax plan has a negative bias to 
it anyway you dice it, 8 he said. 

If the anto industry, for example, 
enters a cyclical downturn, earn- 
ings alone might not be enoogh to 
cover their capital expenditures, 
said Scott Merits, an analyst at 

Slwawffi Triimim 

American Airlines Flans 
flight Hnb at Raleigh 

fFfljnmf/Dfl rOSr pernw 

WASHINGTON — American 
Airlines win open a $60-mflbon 
hub at Rak^b-Duzham Airport in 
North Caronna in a major expan- 
sion of its nortb-sonth route, the 
co mpan y announced Tuesday. 

American plans 40 to 45 flights a 
day at Raleigh- Durham serving 20 
to 25 cities, most of them along the 
Eastern Seaboard. The airline 
would be competing directly in 
riunkets primarily served by East- 
ern, Piedmont and Delta airlines. 

Output, Saks Records 
Announced by Jaguar 

IMttd first International 

LONDON — Jaguar Cars set 
new production and sales records 
in the first half of 1985, the compa- 
ny stfd Wednesday. 

Production at its three English 
plants rose to 20,195 units, 17 per- 
cent more than Jazmaxy to June lari 


Seaton saoun 
Hton Law 


WHEAT COT) 


Mr 3 

Open High Low Oase Chg. 


5400 bu mini mum- dolkrt pm bwhri 
an xi2vt Jui aiM Tuvk iism 


uSm ais sep iinb \iw> iuk : 

143* 3.11 D*C 124* 125V- 122 : 

3J4M M« Meria 1Z 12 

im 2.T2 MOV 124 124 111 

172* ifS Jui 339 2*9 737* 

EsLScl« Prev. Stole* 11096 

Prav. Day Open lot. 3SJM oft 2 D 
CORN (CBT) 

SXOO&u minimum- doiiareperbuiM 
in 147* Jui lags 170 li* 

U1V* 152 StP 153% 253* 151 hi 

155 147V. OK 3 M 2AM 2X6ft 

3. TO 157 Mar ISIVi isn> ISVi 

121 U 2X0* MOV 2X1fc 261to lWi 

£86 240V> Jui 151 1*1 15* 

IIM 7M Sep 2M>V, 247V 2ABH 

Est. Sales Prev.sfies 27405 

nvu, Dev Open InLIBUSD 0ft4tf 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 
unbu mlMiiun- Sellars Per busbal 
7 S* 5S1 Jut 55* UW 155 

7J4 5M Kju iJW ZS4 SSf* 

ATI S4B Sep SA5 SjOVi 544V, 

448 54» NOV SM 557 S47Vj 

U9 552* Jon 5J9V. SJM 5J7V. 

742 SJ3 Mar 549V, 571 548 

7J9 571 MOV 527 571% 524 

458 5J4 Jot 551 i£2Vz 5J1Yl 

474 • Ail Aua 571 5J8 574 

Etr. Sales Prm. Sales 224C 

rVeu.DavOpwrlnt 4U4D ut>65 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CIT1 

1 55S*‘, dB }^ pef Jui l vnm nuo ™» 

it5S W SS S3 IS S3 

19040 12500 Oct 12450 12400 12420 

. 1I4A0 T W IW l Dec 131 JO ynnn 13158 

14X00 mso Jan 13500 13550 1300 

2000 I37J3 Mar HOJB 14000 U4» 

14X93 14X00 Mm UASD 144J0 MOO 

147 U720 Jill W9II0 14930 14900 
Ext. Sales Prev. Sales 15338 

Prev. Dev Open InL RUBS oft 740 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

46000 Bw- dW len per 1 00 fes. 

^72 2170 jJl™A5 29 AS -BJO 

3105 2150 Aua 2505 2510 77-75 

V 77 22-90 OCt 2A2S 7t23 2&JJ1 

2955 - 2190 Dec-2541 2541 23£ 

2907 2140 Jan 2500 250S 1455 

K40 2X40 MOT 2500 2500 2405 

%£ ^ ET sts %£ ^ 

24-15 Pn»v!s«rtrf 1 l4» 1D 

Prev. Dav Open I nt C107B up 05 

iOGObu mKInwft- Ooltan per MnM 
17 tV, L45W Jul 151 15193 \JS 

179 141Vb 5ep 1A4VS Tja IXFtt 

102 V, 145 Dec 147 l3 144 

T47M 148 Mar 149 149 1.49 

143 153 MOV 150 150 150 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales 491 

prev. Day Open Int. 2018 Si 29 


Lt3» —9 1W 
LUft — 
L2716 —01% 
L22 —02 

Lll — tolW. 

L97» —01 


+2$ 
558 -J» 

Ifito-tSg 

&77fc -JW 
578 


12070 +100 
12240 +1.M 
12508 +1.10 
12740 +170 
13270 +170 
13450 +100 
13300 +00 


» =£ 

2409 —*23 

2401 —74 

2578 —.U 

2408 —04 

3405 — %09 

2470 _ 


149 -011A 

is 


Season Season _ __ 

High Low Open High Low Clan ChP, 




COEfEE C(NYCSCE) 

375O0Hm-- cents oer Us, ,, 

14940 12100 jul 13050 13050 13700 13742 — 

15000 12700 Sap 14 IM 14141 13950 13977 — IJ 

15840 12975 Dec 14308 14278 UlB 141.19 — 2J 

14975 12558 Mar KUO 14200 14070 1 A 0 O —1.1 

MOJO UVM May 14225 1*375 14050 IAS — li 

14500 is£n Jill KITS 14lS 14075 14007 —1.1 

74750 13275 Sen 14150 14150 M05B 14050 — IJ 

Dec MOTS — U 

Est.SMM Prev. Sales 2017 

Prev. Day Open lirt. 11,150 U0379 
su OAR WORLD II INYCSCE) 

112000 H&r cents par Its 

975 207 Sep 207 2T1 £64 208 +J 

905 274 OCf 203 204 275 203 +J 

775 300 Jan 300 U5 300 300 +5 

973 3J4 Mar 348 347 37? 347 +A 

7.15 158 May 306 307 159 307 +0 

849 179 Jul 104 303 300 307 +1 

CM 405 Od 4L13 4.13 405 4,15 +J 

Eel. Sales Prev. Sales 5545 

Prev. Day Open I nl. 81509 oft 344 
COCOA (NY CSCE) 

19 ^n2rJST 2032 mg 2025 »71 * 

2415 1963 Sep 1985 TOf 19B1 2117 + 

2337 19*5 Oft 2072 2093 2067 2091 + 

2190 19S5 Mar 2084 2092 2075 2090 + 

2130 i960 May 2096 209S 2O0B M94 +: 

2110 I960 Jul 8090 2105 2090 2105 + 

2330 2023 Sw 2115 + 

2DM 2055 OK . 21« + 

Est. Soles _ Prov.sales 5778 

Prev. Dor Owen J/rt 21002 upim 
ORANK JUICE {NY CE) 
liMOtbi-cutilBtfltL 

18405 IfflJO Jul 14100 142J5 14025 MS48 -.1 

102 OS 13400 Sep 13750 13775 13450 13700 — ’ 

IS 10 O 13270 Nov 0600 13808 13410 13450 — J 

18008 13200 Jan 1330B 13308 13308 13320 — i 

17750 13200 Mar 13340 13340 13140 13120 — J 

16250 13845 MOV 52 -< 

168 ISS £ |g 5 

EW- Soles 208 Prw. Salas _ 230 

Prow. Dav Open Int 5J43 oH70 


year, it said. Saks in Jaguar's two 
largest vobme markets also rose, 
with 5-percent increases recorded 
m both die United States and and 
Britain, it said. 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 Ite.- cents per lb. 

Z& 66 » SS S5 

%% %£ %£ SS 

6757 62.15 AST 62JS 6370 

■ 4* -x ne jun 6350 6305 

Est Sates 18012 Prev. Sales 20026 
Prev. Dav Open InL 49443 up357 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44,000 RyirCTfitSPy i»- 
7370 6185 AUS. 6503 6835 

T3JK 63JS Sep iUS 

7132 6*05 OCt 61*0 6637 

7300 6505 Nov 6470 6735 

7968 6660 Jon 6B.U 6065 

7055 6410 MOT 6805 6850 

7065 6760 APT 6805 6905 

Set Sales 1567 Prev. Sales 2036 
Prav. Dev Open Int 1457 off 312 
HOBS (CME) 


5577 C 4705 P *Jui 4907 50.10 
5437 4657 - Aua 4*05 4B45 

5175 4100 Ocf 4400 4437 

5005 4400 Dec 4545 .4570 

. 5047 4605 Feti 4702 4705 

4705 4450 APT 4450 45JB 

4905 4650 Jun 4870 4675 

4905 . 4700 JljI 4700 4760 

5170 4000 Aua 48» 4600 

Est Sales 4.U5 Prev.Sctes 6682 
prev. Day Open Int. 23054 o«S3? 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

“WSTA 590. SMS 
Hn A5 5605 Aua 5950 6005 

7600 6115 Feb 66.M 062 

7500 6400 Mar 6770 6840 

7564 4600 May 6877 MX 

7600 8700 Jul 6050 6850 

7X15 6750 AMR 

CsL Sales SJ06 Prev. Salat 70S*. 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 18.132 pH 718 


Moreover, many of the compa- 
nies that remain heavily capital- 
intensive, such as steel, machinery 

amt mtning . WOllld DOt fed any 

direct impact from the tax plan far 
some time. Because of the de- 
pressed mmtitinn e theoe tnrtmtrips 
have faced in recent years, (hey 
already have more deductions than 
they can rise. They have accumulat- 
ed enough tax tosses from years 
past to insure that they pay no 
taxes for years. 

Such is the case with Bethlehem 
SteeL The fact that investment in- 
centives are of httk help to compa- 


HoatiogfiaieNoks 


Dollar 




Tate advantage of owspedd rates for new subscribers c*id 
p we'B give you an extra month of T ribs free with a one-year 

: : •• subsaipHoaToid savings: nearly 50% off the newsstaid 
! - price in most European countries! 


Ta Stiascripiion Manager, Intemafkxri Herdd Tribune, 

| 181, avenue Oxrt es<fe-Gaulle, 92521 NeutByCedex, France. | 

I Pleaseertermy SdBtidSpdudafyiSKfcirBMwsSS^ 1 1 
subscription for: I 1 



I VACAnoNwsrajenoNS I 

I Iw4heira«^fcra » .. . ” ^ * 

I DP^wsp^rnysiiKTipiionc^ I 

1 oooonfingly. □ I would Re lo fiove the paper sent to my vocancn address. 



59.15 +05 
59.18 5905 +100 
4105 4172 +77 

6205 6275 +03 

6275 6305 +75 

6X50 6305 +70 


8525 8507 +02 

45L45 64.15 +0S 

6540 6600 +70 

6665 67.17 +02 

46.10 6660 +60 

6X25 6800 +55 

6800 6805 +65 


4905 4975 +08 

4802 4802 +07 

4400 4405 +00 

45X2 45X7 +.10 

4870 4705 +01 

4408 4677 +.17 

4870 47.17 +02 

4700 4760 —.10 

4820 4840 -100 


5900 50X0 +108 
5900 9U5 +08 

6702 57.95 +03 

57 JB 5760 —.10 

6877 — 05 

48SQ 6X90 —JO 

67 70 


Currency Options 



PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
OpHeaX Strike 


& S&JSW 

7541 99X0 9968 



Sep Dec MOT iw ok Mar 

''Zr*£g' mr r*- ere r 
115 1560 r r 0X0 103 r 

120 1o3. r 12X5 105 300 T 

125- 875 US r 260 500 r 

130 190 800 r 4X0 r r 

US 2.15 405 5-10 760 r r 

too Donera-raele per BeM. 

72 r r 201 . r r r 

3 r 1.18 r 0X7 r r 

0X4 r 006 r r 100 







DMarlc 30 270 r r r 

3209 31 225 T T 004 

3209 33 1X3 r 204 851 

3209 33 006 1X7 • r r 

3209 34 062 104 104 f 

3269 35 007 873 r r 

U5U00 jepmKY«-iWhi of oceet per eelL 

JYen 37 *00 r r r 

40J0 3i r r r tun 

4X30 39 169 T T 003 

4X00 40 071 r r Gf 

48J0 41 OX5 000 r 107 

4000 42 r r 007 r 

480Q 43 r 801 r r 

62XM Swfse Prns-ceals per eeR. 

5 Franc ® r r r 004 

7*09 31 r r r 0X5 

3109 J» 104 r 2X7 r 

3909 40 005 • r r r 

J9L29 41 101 X17 r r 

Trial catl vaL4064 COB opw 

TOM pet VOL 3748 Pfl eei 

r— Nat trxBiedL %— No option offered. o-Old. 

• Lari la premium (purdme price). 

Source: AP. 


US T. BILLS (UIM) 
SlmliDan-ptsoflOODcL __ 

9320 0604 Sep 9272 9110 

9271 8577 Dec 9261 9200 

9264 8660 A tor 9200 9203 

9203 8701 Jun 9200 9200 

9U6 CM* Sep 91X7 91X7 

91X1 B905 DOC 

9109 0968 Mar 

Jun 

E*t. Soles Plw.SatoK 6062 

Prev. Day Open Int. 34.175 up 129 
It YE. TEBASO RYCCrn 

irttb 

82-29 82-11 Sep 

11-30 80-19 K MT M7 

EW-Saia Prav.WBS iai7r 

Prev.DayOnwi Int S20OO UP 1772 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
t» PCMWOJOO^hi & 32nd!rt 100 tmOJ 
79-12 g-W Sep 77-18 77-23 

71-13 57-8 Doc 76-17 7^23 

77-2* 57-2 Mtr 75-16 76-21 

784 54-29 Jun 74-17 7+20 

75-31 56-29 Sri 1 73-24 73^14 

7+24 5+25 Dec 72-1* 72-19 

7+15 5+37 Mar 

SJ 7 & 1W3 70.13 

73-18 62-24 Dec 

60-16 684 Mar 

EW. Seles Prav. Sale* 114X37 

Prav.DayOPMlntJ95.T77 OM715 

BMMA(CBT) 

5KXL006 prIn-Pta&32ndS[X lOOPCt 
7+34 »-U Sw 76+ 784 

75-29 5+4 Dec 75-7 75-7 

75-10 5+30 Mor 

7+23 5+25 Jun 7+7 7+3 


Sep 1*450 194M 19LM 1«OT —68 
199.10 175.70 DOC 19760 19765 19650 11+70 — X5 

20205 198.10 Alar 2D06D 20059 20CL50 20800 —.15 

EW. Sales Prov. Sales 49004 

Prev. Day Open InL 5*076 UP 26 
VALUE UHE(KCBT) 

Sep 206X5 20665 20500 20605 +.10 

21300 20000 Dec 20960 20960 209X0 20X0 —15 

Est. Sales Prav. Sale* U87 

Prav. Day Open int. 7036 up 343 
NYSE CO MP..IM OEX (NYFE) 
points ond cents 

113X0 91 JS Sep 112*0 11300 11250 1128 —00 

11560 10100 Dec 11405 11405 11440 UE — M 

11700 10960 Mar 118X0 116X0 116X0 118X0 —TO 

11L10 11850 Jun 118.15 11R1S 11805 118.15 —30 

EW. Sales __ Prav. Sales 9X75 

Prav. Dav Open InL 9J38 unB2 


Commodity Indexes 


Clue 

Moody's 

Reuters 173X30 

DJ. Futures — M-A. 

Cam. Resaard) Bureau. NA 

Moody^ : base TOO : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep- IB. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 




Previous 
91X70 1 
1,741.50 
116.79 
22X90 




Ijondon Metals 


m 

0-11 


u 

• 770 


* a 

H 2 

tt ' r 

BM, 

v 1 5 • 

'Ti T Y 

fik 

K -J 

_u..x 


K rj » 

1. r 

Wk 

1 , ‘ 




CO PP E R CATHODES [HU OrOHel 

SS nOOMr TSLOO ta f0e40O 10B36O 1084M 
forward 109160 109200 1X9100 109140 

COPPER CAT HOD ES (StaeOsnl) 

SS”*" P * r ’tSSkmWoO 10J90O 10JLOJ 
forward 107500 107700 107900 100108 

LEAD 

tlwlfcie per B riUtct oe M 3^5 ^ mum 
forward 30300 30340 30340 30400 


Coi^wflkies 


KM Lew HI Ml w U 
Jly _ N.T- N.T. 30900 31100 31000 31200 
Alia _ 31200 31200 32000 31200 31200 31400 
Sep _ NX H.T. 31200 J14O0 J1400 MAX 
Oct — 31500 31500 31400 31600 31600 31500 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. 31700 31900 31900 3210D 
Feb _ NX. N.T. 32200 32400 32100 32500 
API — l+T. N.T. 32500 32700 32900 

Jun— N.T. N.T. 33808 33200 33200 33400 
Milemi: 33 totset IPOoa. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 


■00 i , r ™ ra AJWjffp 


45100 45200 
46500 46840 


TIN (Woodard) 
Start lee ear me 




prav. 

Hlefe Law settw 

AUB 31240 11100 31200 

imp N.T. N.T. 31400 

oS N.T. N.T. 31600 

Dec N.T. N.T. 32000 

Volume: 119 tots Ot 100 az. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mcdeyslon cents wr kite _ 

ctoee _ Prat 
Bid Ask BM 

Jly 19600 19*00 2BL50 

Aug 19360 19500 19SJS 

Sep 192J0 19400 19500 

OCt 1WJ0 19600 19LM 

Nov 19700 19900 20066 

Dec 19960 20140 20060 

Volume: 19 lets. 


forward . 56800 
Source: AP. 


58400 61100 61240 
56900 59200 59300 


Dividends 


Mr 3 

C o rne i) Per Amt Pay Rk 

STOCK 

CartenrtSliL _ 15% B-14 74S 

USUAL 

HMManMIRoyelTr M .1228 77-25 7-15 

Morrfwei tne Q .12 7-31 7.1* 

NWAInc -SlVt 9-X 9-13 

OmoMottraw a -So 7-31 7-T7 

smith inn ■ a 08 B-30 8-u 

WntirarMondCool Q .W 9-M S-18 

A-Aeoueli MH w rf ttr; Q-QoMlorty; S-SemL 



L S&P100 

Index Options 


ErW^ .CrfK __ MM 
ntmJfr Aw to Od At M !■ 0d 
III 2M - - - - 


Mr 3 

SftRe CoO+Sdlfc Ps«t«e 

Price S* ok Me to DK tor 

II 53 2J5 LIB 114 (£ W 

32 !J? Z07 2X5 OJJ L73 099 

3* 602 LS2 LS7 8X7 L16 — 

34 Ui- 104 IXJ 132 1X8 — - . 

as ta u) i.i5 201 23i u 

» in 8X6 - 252 300 220 

Efl l e nd ed letol vet 2067 
Cahs:Tue.«eLUX ewe M. 27065 • 

Pri» S Toe. «L UO 9PW let 16X0 

Sauna; cue. 


CommwlMes 


Hleb Lew Bid AM 

SUGAR 

FramOi I ru ecs per metric too 
Alta LZIO 1,175 1.180 1X92 

Oct 1.195 1,170 1.175 1,110 

OeC N.T. N.T. 1,132 7,192 

Mor 1435 1010 L210 1014 

May 1075 1055 1060 1070 

Alto 1025 .1025 1007 1015 

Est vet: 1X35 lots of 50 tarn. Prmr. i 
■ales: 1036 lots. Open Interest: 19476 

pp ^ris 

Preach imes per in Kg 
Jly N.T. N.T. 2000 2.100 

Sep £105 2054 ZOSi 2091 

Dec 2055 2045 2036 2042 

Mar 2040 2050 2041 2064 

May N.T. N.T. 2050 — 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2055 _ 

iw N.T. N.T. 2056 — 

&L vaL: 100 Ms of 10 ton*. Pray, i 
sates: 80 tots. Oeen Interest: 7*4 
COFFEE 

Rsech tresice per NO ke 
Jly N.T. ILT. — 2.149 

Sep 2045 2.171 Z185 £188 

Nov 2085 2019 2025 £230 

Jai ILT. N.T. — 2010 

Mar ILT. N.T. — £310 

May ILT. ILT. — 2010 

Jly N.T. ILT. — £309 

EM. voL: 110 lots Of 5 ton*. Prev. i 
mice; 46 lots. Open Interact: 409 
soiree: Bourse ao Commerce. 


London 

Commodities 


High LOW BM ASK Bid Art 

SUGAR 

SttfllM NT IBOMCtM 

Am asm bub kjk uj» mb slq 

od 8*00 B6X0 B8X0 BU0 B7X0 HUM 

DK 92X0 9200 92X0 9200 9100 9200 

Alar KUO 10100 10240 moo 1IH2D 102X0 

MPT H.T. N.T. 18700 107X0 10820 10700 

AM 11131 111X0 11200 113X0 11200 112X0 
Oct N.T. N.T. 11740 11840 1UX0 117X0 
Votome: *48 lols of SO tons 
COCOA 

SterttaB per metric ton 
Jl* 1411 IJ* UNO 1400 NA NA 

Sep 1J59 L7T 1064 1765 — - 

Dec 1038 1039 1^30 - - 

Mm- 1042 1005 1032 1025 — — 

MO* 1069 1022 1046 1067 — — 

Jly 1053 1058 1055 1042 - - 

Sep J06O 1060 1060 1064 — — 

Volume: 4051 lots of IB tons. 

COFFEE 

S to rt i eg p er me t ric t o o 
Jly 1469 10*2 1093 1400 1440 1465 

Sep 149* 1412 1443 1465 1481 1482 

Nov 1040 1483 1483 1084 1030 1433 

Jan 1081 1025 1020 1425 1477 liS 

Mm 14M 1420 1,915 142B 1481 1485 

sr- m m m m m an 

Volume: 30B8 lots of 5 tons. 

GAlDIL 

hi Alltel am metric Ipb 
J ly 21800 21605 21740 21705 21540 2154D 
AM 21405 21275 21425 2Uft 21100 21240 
See 2130S 21240 21300 SUM II LZ 21100 
S3 21460 2143 21460 71505 21260 71 IDS 
NOV 21625 21523 71423 21740 ZMX0 21540 
Dec N.T. H.T, 21700 22040 215JB 21840 
Joe N.T. N.T. 21740 22800 21540 21940 
F*b ILT. N.T. 21740 22100 21600 21*40 
Mar K.T. N.T. 29940 21640 29800 21540 
whirne: 1481 loti onoe Iwil 
S ources: RtvMes and London Pttroitvm Ex- 
PtomAwaWL 


Cash Prices 


CamiMdity end Unit 
Ce tf ee*Sontoa.l l> 
Printrietti 64/30 30 ft. yd — 

Steel billet* (PlrU.ton 

Iran 2 Fdrv. PtiBp- ton 

Steel scrap No 1 hw Pin. - 

Lead Spot. B» 

Copper elect- B) 

Tin (Straltsl. lb _ — 

Zinc E. SL t_ Basic lb 

Palladium, az ■— — — ■ 

Silver ILY.as 

Source: AP. 


M3 

Y "*' 
Wed Ago 
1X0 1X4 

0X8 806 

473J8 45XD0 

213X8 2134* 

7203 198-MI 
19-21 JO-B 
(HI 664+69 

KA- HJL 
0X+X7 960-63 
93-99 149-152 













































Page 14 


Is |0 Ho in 


47 

48 

49 


□ 




u 

so 




LT 

51 




1 

52 



1 

S3 




□ 

54 




■ 

55 




58 




Lj 

57 




■ 

98 



m 

» 






ACROSS 


1 Defect 
5 S.A. country 
8 Groove 

12 Knobby of Joe 
PaJooka slrjp 

13 Actor Gorcey 

14 Bobof U.S.O. 
fame 

15 Dejected 

16Mapabbr. 

17 Kind of 
hygiene 

18 Start of a 
patriotic sang 

21 Song: Part II 

22 Stan a 


47 More of the 
song 


52 Ending for 
Jersey 

53 Still more of 
the song 

54 Bill of bites? 

55 Kind of 
American 

56 Helpful 

57 Opposed 

58 Bandleader 
Brown 

58 Sheer nonsense 


15 Sooth of 
France 

19 Drying ovens 
28 Attacks 

24 1876, e.g. 

25 Part of the 
U.S.A. 

26 Cambridge 

Inst. 

27" if by land 


paragraph 
I Not Dem. Oi 


23 Not Dem. or 
Rep. 

24 Tidies 

25 Latin l word 
28 Panorama 
30 Wind a rod 

after a bite 
32 The George 


35 Bargain 

36 Hate 

37 Light raft 

38 Hardened 

39 Job security 

41 Give try 

44 Hemingway 

45 "No an 

island": 

Donne 


DOWN 

1 wide 

(extensively) 

2 Actor Nolan 

3 Test 

4 Declaration 
starter 

5 New owner, in 
law 

6 Mignonette 

7 “Do unto 
others . . /' 

8 Discharge a 

musket 

9 Olivier is one 

10 Gemstone 

11 Part of TV 


12 Helen Reddy's 
•■jAm " 


28 Pronoun for 
Old Ironsides 

29 His orientation 
came in 
Oriente 

31 Monroe's 

of Good 

• Feeling 

32 A.M-A. people 

S3 So-so mark 

34 Mel of 
Coopers town 

35 Word before - 
blanche 

37 Large amounts 

40 Irritate 

41 Implosion * 

42 Championship 

43 Pale 

44 Boredom 

45 Soprano Anna 

4fi Cookery term 

47 Crimson Tide 

48 Portent 

49 Lease 

50 Kind of soldier 


© Sew York Tima, edited by Eugene Moieska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


2 il . n'-lL-L.. * 


Happq tirHiday, 

USA.'-^ 



<r • \J 2 a 

ir s- c? «■ * * s* -fir * « * sj> v 

A^nkeeDoodileTJanrfy 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 

$ by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
lour ordinary words. 


AGMOD 


iv - a*} zr 


HOPAC 


LEWFOL 


RETAN B 


WHAT A YAWN 
OFTEN IS. 


Now arrange me circled tenors to 
form the surprise answer, as si^j- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


a* Amn^Qm 

(Answers tomorrow} 

Yesterday's I THINK AWOKE FORCED HOMAGE 

| Answer Some guys don’t Know when to stop until 
they're told this— WHERE TO GO 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Sarcuona 

Beta rode 
Berlin 
Brussels 
Bucharest 

Budapest 

CopetiBnBfln 
Caste Del Sol 

Du blip 

Edinburgh 
Florrnco 
Frank furl 
Geneva 

HelUnKi 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Mlha 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Nice 

Otto 

Pori* 

PrtMvs 

Revklovlk 

Rome 

Sioduwtm 

Strasbourg 

Venke 

Vienna 

wo now 

Zurich 


MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 30 8* 


LOW 
C F 

17 a tr 

H S3 tr 

22 72 fr 

IS St o 

u 57 d 

m 5a fr 

IQ 50 tr 

M 57 r 

13 55 cl 

n s: tr 

i? a fr 

13 55 o 

14 57 r 

W 04 fr 

10 50 fr 

12 54 fr 

11 SI d 

H 3) cl 

te 48 d 

17 a ci 

13 SS fr 

14 51 sf 

W 64 fr 

13 55 o 

> 45 tr 

H 44 o 

13 55 e 

H *1 tr 

11 S3 cf 

8 40 a 

18 64 tr 

t « d 

12 5* fr 

18 04 a 

12 54 cl 

8 46 a 

1! 54 fr 


Bangkok 
Milov 
Hon Kan 
MM hi 
New Delhi 


Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

28 62 25 77 o 

35 77 16 64 cf 

28 92 26 79 o 

32 «0 96 70 el 

« 1M as 62 fr 

24 75 21 70 r 

26 79 25 77 3l> 

30 86 26 79 a 

E 90 26 79 o 

34 75 20 66 »h 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1985 


PEANUTS 




* # 
* t 



NEVER TKY TO 57ANP UP 
[N51PE A MAILBOX! 


BOOKS 



BLOND1E 

I AW FIRST HUSBAND IP 


I HAP ALARS6 
insurance poucy 

ON HIM w 


REALLY? WHAT 

r Did vdu set ^ 
. R3CM rr ? r 


IMY SECOND 
| HUSBAND r 


SWEETNESS AND POWER: The 
Place of Sugar in Modern History. 

By Sidney W. Miraz. 274 pages. Illustrated. 
$ 20 . 

Viking Penguin Inc, 40 W. 23d Street, 
New York, N. Y. 10010, . 

Reviewed by John Gross 


duction by the Atlantic islands and then by the 
New World, where Columbus introduced sua- 


arcane from the Canary Islands on his second 


voyage. At every stage slave labor was used — 
“the fink benreen sugar cultivation and slavery 


“the fink benveen sugar cultivation and slavery 
which was to last until the 19th canny became 


-'I : 

{ U f . 

u ih< 


ill III 

ui U 


firmly forged in Crete. Cyprus and Morocco.” 
Mintz quotes the geographer J. H. Gallowav a$ 
saying —but what particulailv imeresis Mjcu 
about the plantations that developed in the 
Caribbean ts that he believes they can best be 
thought of as “a^ro- industrial” enterprises, the 
closest thing to industry that the 17th century 
has to show. They were also, be argues, if not 
"capitalistic” themselves, at least “an impor- 
tant step toward capitalism 
However we define them, there can be no I 
doubt that they produced sugar in unprece- 
dented abundance. And what was the market 
they aimed at? In turning to the consumes. 


B ECAUSE the associations of 

predominantly pleasurable, it is hard to 
grasp how significant a part it has played in the 
nistoiy of the past 300 or 400 years. Unlike 
iron, say, or gold or cotton or wheat, it some- 
how does not seem quite serious enough for a 
starring role. Yet it has sustained empires', its 
soda! influence and economic impact have 
been immense; and it has also been, as Sidney 
W. Mintz says, “one of the massive demo- 
graphic forces in world history,’' responsible 
for the uprooting, resettling and as often as not 
the enslaving of millions of people employed in 
its cultivation. 

Mintz, a professor of anthropology at Johns 


BEETLE BAILEY 


Soft 


Mintz confines himself to the British expert 
ence. which partly involves him in strictly local 
considerations. In most respects, however. 



the Caribbean. Here at least is a part of the 
world where no one could doubt the impor- 
tance of sugar, it has shaped the region’s histo- 
ry, and it remains the most important crop. 

Yet, for a time, even as thoughtful an observ- 
er as Mintz, whDe he immersed himself in the 
life of the growers, tended to take for granted 
the other half of the equation. The Caribbean 
supplied the sugar — but where did the de- 
mand come from, and why bad it increased so 
rapidly? Since the answers did not seem to him 
sen-evident, he gradually felt impelled to study 
the European end of the story. Now he has 
written a book in which he traces the history of 


considerations. In most respects, however, 
Britain can serve as a representative case: as 
the first industrial nation, it opened paths that 
others have followed. 

Mintz distinguishes five main uses to which 
sugar has been puL of which two ore now 
unfamiliar and one of only marginal signifi- 
cance. In medieval times it was regarded as a 


spice; until the 19th century it was prescribed 
as a medicine. It was also widely used, by those 
who could afford it, as a form of decoration, 
and Mintz gives a fascinating account of the 
sugar and marzipan sculptures, known as 
"subtleties,” that were a feature of royal ban- 
quets from the 13th century and taken up by 
the nobility and wealthy commoners. 

As the consumption of sugar increased, it 
lost much of the symbolic value that such 
extravagances bad implied. Instead, it came to 
be used primarily as a sweetener — above all in 
conjunction with those other exotic imports, 
coffee, chocolate and tea —and as a preserva- 
tive. By the end of the 18th century it had beta 
transformed from a luxury into a necessity: by 
the end of the 19th century it was supplying 
almost a sixth of the calories in the average 
British diet and a higher proportion still in the 
case of the poor. 

“The first sweetened cup of hot tea to be 
drunk by an English worker was a significant 
historical event,* 1 writes Mintz — but it was an 
event that be regards with mixed feelings. It 
prefigured a diet that was not only unhealthy, 
but also, he argues, made it cheaper to main- 
tain the new industrial proletariat, with sugar 
functioning as a land of drug. At one point he 
refers to it as an “opiate.” 

Mintz 's general conclusions are controver- 
sial and no doubt they will provoke disagree- 
menz from other historians. But they are too 
solidly based to be set aside, and you do not 
have to accept them in toto to find “Sweetness 
and Power" an important and stimulating 
work. 


ANDY CAPP 

I W4STHINK3M3 ABOUT ThFS 
BOSTON THE Wav HOWE, PET. 
IF r HAD TO CO IT ALL CA/ERr-' 


'THAT'S 
WHAT . 

>\ou < 

THINK ! 



WHATW4S 

wTHAT?y-> 



WIZARD of ID 


7 P&MCWSriSInNiJ/T-rtte . 
umzmryjm&i m mp © 


SgNP IN 


THerwoTrBIrlTe-rtlEfz 


THg'ffKORs! 


tales on the ways in which they interlock. 

Cant* sugar was o riginally domesticated in 
New Guinea and originally processed in India. 
Few Europeans knew of its existence until 
about A. D. 1000, but during the Middle Ages 
it became a well-established luxury. A mass 
market began to develop in the mid- 17th cen- 
tury; by I 800 about 250,000 ions of sugar were 
reaching consumers through the world market; 
90 years later the figure (which now included 
beet sugar) had shot up to more than six 
mini on tons. According to Mintz, “world sugar 
production shows the most remarkable upward 
production curve of any jiutjor food on the 
world market over several centuries, and it is 

cnnliniiing upward stfll" 

The first European-controlled sugar planta- 
tions were seized from the Arabs during the 
Crusades. Eventually the eastern Mediterra- 
nean was succeeded as the main area of pro- 


ivi 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 




jsa 






RJEX MORGAN 


TELL me what ) 
VOU THINK is 
WRONG WTTH OUR 
MARRIAGE WHILE 
I GET READY A 
. FOR MY BATH (A 


f I DIO NT 
SAY THERE 
WAS ANY- 

r THING -4 

WRONG, 1 

CLAUDIA (1 


f rr JUST CONCERNS 
ME THAT WE DON'T 

^CcS^UNlSiTE Jifj 

IV ANYMORE' vlif 


r IN 
WHAT 
WAV'? 


YOU'RE REALLY NOT 
LISTENING TO WHAT 
r-7 I'M SAYING f 






deobei saaa ansa 
□Enaa aano sana 
□EnnaHBtnsEaQamH 
odd raanaacDH obd 

QHDul □□□ 

EBQEraB 

□□□na aasB nana 
oonio □□□□□ maun 
oecio anas □□ana 
GDEaaaa ebbbbb 
oaa Bnaa 
□on □BBQEOB □□□ 
OEDOBHaassaniBBa 
□□no ebbei Hanna 
nnoo nnnm amaon 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 


Ancient 'Cure’ for Plague Found 


The AaedacJ Press 

MUNSTER. West Germany — Historians 
at (be Westfalen-Lippe archives here say they 
have found a 500-year-old recipe for a mixture 
of egg, mustard and crane's beak to be used as 
a cure for the Blade Death. Plague sufferers 
were advised to swallow tbe mixture and re- 
frain from eating anything else for seven hours. 
There is no indication whether the treatment 
had any beneficial effect 


BRIDGE 


GARFIELD 


By Alan Truscott 


Pf COME CLEAN, EP. 

P \ YOO CAN'T TELL ME 
// ( VOOVE NEVER BEEN 
f / ( on the groonp. 

/ V THAT'S IMPOSSIBLE 


% r rM 

r N7*. I 

I / 

> lip 


maVBE 

YOU'RE 

RIGHT : 


MOM, HAVE I EVER ^ 

5EEN ON THE GROUNP?. 


A FTER raffing the opening 
zY heart lead on the dia- 


bility. South wanted to make 
sure that if West won the trick 


' WHAT'S 
G BOONS 


gramed deal. South saw that he 
was safe if East held the spade 
queen. The trumps were un- 
likely to break, and he wanted 
to guard against the possibility 
that West held Q-x-x of trumps 
and found a remarkable sohj- 
tion- 

At the second trick, the 
spade tea was led. This was not 


JBMP 0 WTS U* 


so much in hope that West 
would be fooled into playing 


NORTH 
487932 
V»l 
0 10 4 
4 M I 83 

111 

4 8 76 9 2 «QJ# 

4KJ54 4 Q 7 2 

SOUTH (D) 

4 J 10 
O J 10 8 S 4 2 

oaks 

*A8 

Mb aides were vulnerable. Tte 


If South had played routine- 
by raisMng the top trumps 


would be fooled into playing 
low, although dial was apossi- 


Jy by the top trumps 

and then leading a third round, 
his best chance, East would 
have had the opportunity lo 
signal for the killing diamo nd 
shift. 


Wwrkl Stodk Markets 


Via Agence F ranee- Presse July 3 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Sun Alltenot 4S 

4g 

TJxmEMI 33S 

TJ, Group 2S3 

TroSatoar Hw 333 

THF 130 

UUromar 201 

UnlhTWt H 11/3211 ' 
BlscuMs 1W 

VKtara 2 as 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

AKXQ 

Ahold 

AMEV 

ATXrm Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

Buef u n i din T 

CafandHWo 

euevter-NDU 

Fotkcr 

GUI Brocadax 

TMnekan 


Hussei 
IWKA 
KaB+Saii 
KaratodI 
Kaufhd 
KtoecknorH-O 
KfaKknw- wtrrko 
Kruppstahi 
Undo 
larfltionsa 
'MAN 

Mottnestnann 
Muanch Ruacfc 


117 no 

It* IBS 
290 264 


SS SS 


F.T.M ladas : teUi 




3S8J0 248 

» 273 
6*sd am 
noioejo 

S44 S42 


V465 1480 
4600 <750 
I5M 1S6S 
TVS 7VD 
3350 3350 
660 650 


F.T-M-U6 Udtt : I239JI 


Cold Storage 2 JR Z49 

DBS SJU ISO 

Fraser Heme 5.10 i05 

Haw Par 2.14 ZU 

InchcoM 233 232 

MOlBonkir® 5.40 5.4B 

OCBC IB5 8A5 

OUB 26* 2S7 

OUE HJi. 167 

ShenorWa KJ2 — 

Wmeutrtv IK 1JS 

Spots l_£nd US 267 

S*pero Prase Sfl DO 

SSteomshln 131 1 

SI TradtrHj 334 331 

United Overseas 137 136 

UOB 3J0 J82 


Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Firiltw • 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Catote 


Japan Air Unas 
Kallmo 


KtJWCSDld SM 

KlrtaBrmarv 

K oToats u 

Mftsobtftri Bank 
MlteutMil Chetn 

Mitsubishi Elec 


iSSES 2 

1400 Aon IcoE 
1B745 Alt Energy 
4600 AHo Nat 
3650 Atewiw sr 
Antes WAf 


— 1 1630 LI, Lac 662 6IV4 62 - W 

e. ,r.rCr, n rtrrl. </» 3600LObtowCC SW4l WU IWfc— 16 

Umadutn texfe aa AP jrasLamanta sum. 2 t>* 21 ’a— t 

HU Law rhM ctwe SZ] “ ,c c 420 41Q 415 —It 

Sltek 1BV4 lBVb Melon HX S]4H Ute 14V% 

SIAVi MVb JiS 18030 Morttlinef S7B4 1 tyi 15Jb— I* 

15te 15>fc— Vfc E 370 260 365 -5 

SIM TBVj 1FM+S 34 iS*i oteon ** SM* Ute 7M 


Ht*h LmCM.OIP 

662 4t*b 63 — Jk 
5H4b TSte iWe— It 
«lft 21 ft 21 ft— Jf 1 
430 410 415 —II 

S14H Uft Mft 


14ft 5“0*OtonB 




AFRICA 


KLM 

Naaraen 

Hal Madder 

NedHovd 

Oca VandarG 

Pakhoad 

PhlllW 

Rabaea 

Rodamca 

WoHncg 

Rorenta 

Raval Dutch 

Unilever 

Van Ommeran 

VMF Stork 

VNU 


*W 

Porscha 

Praujsog 

PWA 

ttwe 

Rhein matoU 
Schertno 

Thycsan 


S M 

.500 584 


tesr" 


notts Timeslot Index : 76117 
Wray teas : lose 


, 51 iS?SS 

280 264 

SJ4 503 


AACorn tl« 614ft 

Amea-LyofM 216 217 

Anute Am Gold 584 S84U 

As* Brit Foods 216 220 

As* Dairies M2 ua 


57150 57BSB 




1162011451] 
566 583 


BhMCIrdo 
OOC Group 


534 SJ9 

321 321 

216 323 

205 206 

37 37 

510 513 

247 773 

104 lit 


, Canimmteate lag 
I Prey too* : M3260 


Wen 30 66 IS 64 fr 

cow a *1 It 41 tr 

Copy TOWN 24 75 13 S3 o 

CweWoma 24 75 14 61 cl 

Harare II u 6 46 tr 

LOWS 27 81 25 77 a 

Noh-oM m 

Titeli » 84 22 73 tr 


ANP.CB9 Seen In 

PrayJoci : 217.10 


Bk East Ado 
Cheung Kano 


Pm me in 


China Llalrt 
Cteen Island 
Hang Seng Bank 


Art»d 
Bek Bert 
CockeiHI 


LATIN AMERICA 


BamosAim 19 66 10 50 d 

Canxa* 27 BJ jo 66 r 

Lima 20 68 15 59 r 

MUjraCHy 16 M 13 55 cl 

Rig te Janeiro — — no 


EBE5 

GB-inno43M 

GBL 

Gevoert 

Hobok en 


NORTH AMERICA 


Mekarooa 

Atlanta 


Ankara 
Balrut 
DamoKin 
Jenna fem 
THAvhf 


OCEANIA 


9 48 fr 

— — no 

— — no 
17 63 fr 
20 68 a 


Auckland 12 55 s 41 o 

Sydney 21 70 9 4| »r 

ei-doudv; to-teoav: tf-tcur; njiaii: 

th- showera; y**naws st-starmv. 


Chicago 2d 

Doanr 39 

Dtfralf 36 

Homlirtn 31 

Haudan 34 

LetAnwIet 36 I 

Miami 32 

MtmaapeOt 32 

Monlraat 28 

Hauau 32 

HnrTOTk 27 

Sod f ranches 28 

Seattle 30 

T Brents 25 

WaUiTngftn X 

o-overcnsl; ac-aartty 1 


Kraatetbmik 

Pefroflno 

SecCefurgla 

Sanaa 

Solygy 

Tnscflon Else 

UCB 

Unorg 

VMlteMomaoM 


China Gas 
HK Electric 
UK Rmhv a 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HKShang Bank 
HK Telephone 
HKYounwtel 
HK Whan 

Hutch Whampoa 

Hywn 
Inti City 
Jcrdlne 
Jardlna Sec 
Kowtoeo Water 
Miramar Hotel 


BOC Group 247 773 

Boats 104 166 

Bmeoter Indus 258 255 

BP 521 SB 

BtltHojmSI 773 77) 

Brti T atecawi \a 170 

o^Arraopace w 353 

ICfoS 713 716 

BT« 343 3J4 

Burmah 349 24| 

CageWIntos 540 S« 

Codbunr Schw 757 141 

Charter Cons 176 wi 

Commerckri U 2D5 2B3 

S?iSS* m lS 


UaUnoblllarl 

Ma te ptx m ca 

Monied Hon 

OUvottl 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rmwcente 

SIP 

SME 

Snta 

Shsldo 

Stet 



Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mtteuknshl 

Mitsumi 

NEC 


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25ft I5ft B4602 Harmda 


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$27ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
*15ft «ft 15ft + ft 
*15ft 14ft 14ft- It 


9ft 9ft 

22ft 32ft 


6106 HgwSCoW 
298W NuWst *p A 
XSOainmed 


S6W 6ft - 6ft 
SIVft 19ft 19ft 


44 41 41 +1 

5ft 5ft It XOOukmood S7ft 7ft 7ft 

1» ^OshuwoAF 631ft 3lS 3lft+ ft 

31 133+1 gw* Alrtn *14 13ft 14 

19 19 - 67ft 7ft 7ft— tt 

25 SSI — 5 4652PanCmiP S32te 32 37ft— ft 

60 460 KfflPemWha 616 16 16 — ft 

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9 9 +ft as I4ft 2fft+ H 


NQjUgwtetor* 

Nippon Kooaku 

Nippon Oil 
.Mlppan steal 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
Olympus 


I AGA 
Alfa Laval 


| AWra 
Altai copcq 
Bouden 
Electro ha 


115 116 

ts ts 
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30210 BC Rb. 
9T75BC Phone 
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47915 CAE 
600 CO. A 
Cad Fry 


^ +' 
375 3» — S 


460 460 460 BSD PemMna 

V T Tt ft 

^ter 004 * jS 

634 237k 24 ,aeo Frtrvhao 527 

S5£ wills 353 

SL l ?* 1 isk+ft 


*32ft 32 37ft- ft 
S16 16 16 — ft 


Ifflft 8ft 6ft— JJ 
as 24ft 24ft + ft 


S25 24ft 24ft 
125 125 123 ■ 

* 22 ft niu 2 Tft 


S27ft TTU 22V. 

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MO Ram Pet S6ft 6ft 6ft 

' 67ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

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*22 21ft 22 + ill 
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108 Rothma n J39ft 30ft 39ft + « 

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500 Slater B I 517ft 12ft 12ft+ft 

42039 5ouimn *63ft 61 63+7 


HMMmImi 


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Voted 


S nS 
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114 186 

210 210 


MlB Current Index : 1637 
I fttiliw : 1443 




Correal Stock tote* : 2JJM1 
prevkxn : 23HJ7 


gar* 


S-flroPodflcA 
Tal Cheung 


ftimMiat 


Temp a in- SSI. NEW route: FWr. ,, 

^o?sS^TT^ 2 t 5 ^^Sf» Sta ^ 


AEG-TelefunkBi 

Allianz Vera 

Altana 

BASF 

Barer 

Bay Hype Bank 
Bmr Veretauank 

BHF-Bonk 

BMW 

; CommariBank 
Cant Gurrmil 
I Daimler-Benz 

DNUM 

Doutschc Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 

nr*** 

HoSssr 


139JD 1«J0 
ISIS less 
J73 JJS 
224J0 m« 
234JO277J0 
351 3*7 

399 296 

237.55 235 

3*7 348 

445 442 

231 U50 
16* I6Z» 
897 JO 159 
382 379 

JM 1 » 
588 5W 
20250 260 

171 JO 17020 
SB 3Z& 
5*0 530 


Tal Cheung 
"“fiji* 

Wlmluck A 
Wlpg Oh Co 
Mow 
World Inti 


Hang Se ng Index ; 
Pr u rie u s : 101 js 


AEC1 

Anglo Amer l a m 
Anglo Am Date 


Bivuaar 
Butte is 
De Beers 
OrfefanMii 
Elands 
CFSA 
Harmony 
KIvaM Steel 


W0 800 
,3850 2610 
14475 16750 

JiS 

7025 TKd 
1046 1 33C 
4475 4575 

3590 3306 

478 471 


C6urtau«* 142 143 

Dateety 408 41) 

Of Beers* 52 523 

DWniers 297 298 

Drtetonteln 523ft J23ft 

Ffcrara 343 

Free steed «3ft 523ft 

GEC 158 146 

GenAttJdanJ 610 6T0 

GKN 22S 230 

Gtalme 12ft 12 29/6* 

Orond Met 36 7& 

GBE 703 703 

Gi*uies3 344 247 

CCS 610 629 

Haraan TO to 

Howk«- 399 411 

■Cl 746 754 

imperial Group 1*3 ijj 

Joousr 270 2u 

LandSecurtHao 257 257 

Legal General 679 664 

Ugwte Sank »9 3*7 

Lenrho 167 167 

Lucas 311 3U 

Mark* and Sp 132 132 

Metal Bex 456 458 

£ S 

Pjfflon £ m 

£tetsey 118 122 

Prudential 639 644 

RacaiEleo 126 132 

ROMtentein WTVj S9714 
Rank 316 3 } w 

, Reed Inti 422 2n 

! Reteera 216 Z71 


Air Lkatfde 
AtemamAfL 




Banco! rs 
BIC 

Banaraki 

Bouvawev 

BSN-GO 

Correfogr 

Qjoroeurs 

a u& Med 

Dorty 

DutTW 

EH-Amiltalne 
Europe 1 
Gen Eaux 


S 38 

S & 

1*7 U7 

311 315 

132 132 

S3 £ 

382 379 

572 6*2 

351 348 

266 27T 

118 123 

639 644 

126 132 

59791 597ft 

111 326 

622 612 

.314 321 


I Lafarge Cep 
■Lagrand 
Lesleur 
rOreol 
Marie H 
Matra 
MtrUn 
Mldtelln 
Meet Htnnessy 
Moulinex 
Ocd dentate 
Pernod Me 



ACI 

ANZ 

BMP 

Borel 

Beugalnvflte 

ciMiemaine 

Cole* 

Comalcn 

CRA 

CSR 

Dun top 
EWorslxl 
■Cl Awrtralla 

Mosel tan 

MfM 


INfH 

Nat AMt Bank 
NetesCan* 

N Broken HIM 


GW Cool Trust 

SOTfW 

Thomas Motion 
Western Mnlap 
westpac BankMg 
WBodsfde . 


15 256 

448 441 
AN iJi 
322 3J0 
1J6 150 

650 *4* 

« fft 
St SS 

230 225 
Z9S 255 
157 154 

222 222 
250 275 

241 226 

4.16 415 

6 J 0 m 

22 S 225 

322 3.15 

120 155 
SM £54 

16 « 

M4 T4S 


Ricoh 

Sham 

SfthtKSu 

Sftiaotfti atomical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
SumltotnaChem 
Sum ttorno Merino 
SumHomo Metal 
Take! Cora 
Taisho Marine 
TUceda Cbem 
TDK 
Tellln 

Tofcio Marine 
Tokyo Elec. P ower 
Tappan Print tee 
Torav ind 
Todtftg 
Toyota 
YamalchlSec 


Sfft 15 15ft ,liSS Sy taoth 

mr 515 14* 15 , ™S asft,n,K 

Canveaof S2S 24ft 2S + ft lj°P RooersA 

C ~or West ntft 24ft Sft+ft ’Kg*?* 

C Packrs 53) ft 30ft 31 + ft W* Rothman 

Cun Trad B7 3m 3*»+ ft 

71 71 +3ft 12200 Scatta f 

36ft 36ft +- ft 26® Swnrs Con 
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.... -1 194aaierTltt 


15733 Con Trust 

*«B 2 cf£kcom 


Crfa Nat Res 
CTlroAf 


■CTlreAf 
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.ana Colon 175p 
1*154 CentrlTr 


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l^twtweltA^ 
■300 Coeefca R| 
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13531 Crownc I 
6*00 Czar Reel 
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12611 Denison Ad 
11510 Demean B f| 
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W73Fkw>raoeJ 
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_ 300 F«d Pion 
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UNOmdbA ■ 


Hew bMex : ib»J7 


AM Onttaaries Index : M9JQ 


Row I Dutch e 455/6*4337/1 
RTZ 5 53 * 

Soot^il 6«5 H 


Satestjury __ 

SemsHdlsfoies 93ft 93 

S?" TO 716 

5TC 112 ts* 

SM Chartered 489 rn 


Petrotes (tse) 
-Pe ugeot 
Pi Internes 
Rodkrttcta 
Redout# 
Raussei udaf 

Sanafl 

Skis RtJSSktaCH 


I 

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7a AKM Own 


Thomson C5F 


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Aaofl Index : iuh 
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cac index s &n 
Pre*le«s : 22476 


Atasdsse 
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££* ir 

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Winterthur 
Zurich ms 


SUM* 104* 15ft + ft 194*1 Sherrl tj . 57 ft 7 . 7ft 
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|£A Oft 8ft— ft 1*^9 So a Aero | *279* 27Vi 27ft + VS 

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241 33S 740 -16 

215 215 215 -S 
36 25 * +1 


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290 290 290 — 5 3 Wt mb + ft 

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219 271 215 , J^gTrimcAf 

«?ft 77H 17ft— ft . 

31ft 21ft— ft l^lfalcorwAt 


526ft 36ft 26U+ ft 
Vs 3614 26ft- ft 
430 426 425 —5 




SZ7 26ft 26ft— U 

48 46 47 

WM 71ft 31ft— ft I »Bg _8ft 9ft + ft 

«ys 4 25 4m+iw -SSHaSlSl pft 12 V* + v. 

STft 7ft 7U> 3M8U6wtartsg SI lft lift lift 

»1724 I7W 1724+ M «»■ , 8 ft .flft-ft 


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1« 193*-— ft Mao VeraHAt 

3 ft 23 ft + ft iraowestmln 
aft to5?3 “" 2 * 12 - . 

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— — n—r, — r— 29ft 27ft + ft l«0 Tfc Bear 

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15H0 GuocrudB — . — — 

1200 Gibraltar. 

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, W» .,8ft + ft 490 BomhrdrA 

165 16S ttBX BarobrdrB 


h 

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86 —4 
475 — W 


term H rdlng AM 
Hawker ■ 


273 270 Z70 — 3 UJ _ 

58 8 8 T5E 389 Index; 

56ft Cft 6ft— ft , 

67 65 63 — 2 f 


Verst! A t 485 4/n *75 tg 

gj*; t Kl 

’SwSSnJf'* 51?* H* l 311 *- ta 

s !» isr* 

TWrtSw L804^ht.^ 4 ^ + 

_ . • Qwt PiMoas 

09 Index; 2J33J0 Z7I25B 




:-ii' si 




v»3‘t • 


he would not ioaow whal to do. 

The plot worked. West did 
tbt right thing by taking his 
queen, but had no idea what to 
do next He guessed wrong by 
leading adub, and South hap- 
pily won, drew trumps and 
made his game by discarding 
dummy’s diamonds. One of bis 
diamond losers was luffed. 


HORESO 








V ft , 


gen aft aft+ ft sadacapok 


490 BomhrdrA s izft uft i 
11930 BombrdrS S 12ft 12ft 1 


BUSS* 


™ la sis I ’isffiffa 


2SjO ifttprFteei 
.4900 IpicqMM 


!SS J5ft— ft 6930 Gaz Metro 
Wft 28ft 20ft 2175MrrtTraf 

S9 8ft 9 51575 HalBkCdo 


f *+ J* 17045 Power Corn 

*}4ft «V* 14ft + ft I 100 RoltohdA 


539ft 30ft 30ft+ U. v — , . 1 
S 12 ft 12 ft 12 ft— ft ‘ '* 

S 12ft 12ft 12ft- ft y. -» . 

520ft 20ft 28ft+ ft • « • 

515 14ft l«ft 

530ft 39ft 30ft + ft ft. - 
SUft 16ft Mk+ ft 
Sllft lift lift “ffv' '■■T*' • - ’ 

ntft lift lift 9 ‘S ;■ v 

516ft 16 U- m .... 

I 21 ft 20 ft 21 +ft S'-*. - 

raw nftioft+ft .'A.-'r*. 


-• r ... ' i 


»C Index - W6J6 


HA: opt quoted; HA.:' not 
ovaifattter mt: ee-divWend. 


Ketaey H 
lm Kerr Add 
2314 Lnbott 
39S78 Lac Mnrfs 
750 LOntCem 
12600 Laeona . 


% 8 'S;b 


S2Tft 21ft 21ft— ft 
ndft 30 30ft+ft 
OTft 21ft lift 


• "* 4- ' ~ 9 * '* 



]*ft + ft ' 390 SteinaraA 121ft 21ft JW w 

SL, ^ »+ft Krtal Soles 1J07^M shares. ^ 

512ft 12ft Hft“ ‘ "‘' v ’.ml 

sunk BRt ft fl 1 rt a t aw a Index: tIUl tit* ^ 


■’ ' V' * O *■ iv* 






Page 15 


cmitNATlONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1985 


SPORTS 


This Man 
Is Blind to 
Nothing 

By Dave Anderson 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When he was 8 
years old, Craig MacFarlane earned a 
gold medal for winning a wrestling 
tournament. That evening at ids home 
m Sault Sie. Marie. Ontario, he hung 
the ribboned medal on a bedpost in frfc 
mom. And when he woke op every 


over and caressed the medal 
“I knew then," he recalled, “that 
wrestling was my vehicle out" 

Out of the daftness. Six years earli- 
er, at age 2V5, MacFarlane had bm t 
playing with welding equipment. 

Somehow the sparker that fights a 
welding torch accidentally seared his 
left eye, blinding it instantly. Within 
three weeks, “sympathetic” ophthal- 
mia, a severe inflammation of the eye- 
ball had blinded his other eye. 

"I remeanber hurrying into the house 
after the accid en t," he said, “and running into a 
door that was partly open. 1 never saw the door." 

Not long before his accident, MacFarlane had 
been out in the Ontario woods with ids father, Ed, 
a contractor whose bobby was trapping animate. 

* “I don’t remember nry parents’ faces or ray older 
brother Ian’s face," be said. “The only thing I have 
a memory of seeing as a tittle kid was a porcupine 
that day in the woods with my father — a big 
porcupine with all those quills sticking out That 
porcupine is the only thing 1 remember seems. 
People think thar because fm blind, I see black. 
But why would I see black? I don’t know what 
b lack is.” 

Husky at 5 feel 7 inches (1.7 meters) and 155 
pounds (70 kilograms), his voice bursting with 
energy and enthusiasm, MacFarlane does not even 
seem to know what being Wind is. In a white golf 
shirt and blue jeans, he resembled young athletes 
everywhere. And he is probably the wood's most 
accomplished blind athlete, certainly the most ver- 
satile: a wrestler, a runner, a discos thrower, a 
swimmer, a dow nhill skier, a water skier, a golfer. 

“But now." he said, Tm in the transition from 
being an athlete to being a businessman." 

At age 23. MacFarlane, who has dual dtnenship 
Imwiw hit mother, Joyce, is an American, was 
recently named a consultant to the President's 

Craig MacFarlane is certainly 
the world's most versatile 
blind athlete: wrestler, 
runner, discos thrower, 
swimmer, downhill skier, 
water skier, golfer. 


Council on Phj 
program development for the Living WdlPounda- 
tion of Houston. He plays 1 1 musical instruments, 
be composes songs, rings and plans to record an 
album. He is collaborating cm his autobiography. 

“l’d like to see a motion picture of my fife." he 
said. “And I'd like to portray myself in it It’s all 
pan of my drive to be an equal" 

Before leaving Carlton University in Ca nada 
after two years, MacFarlane had a B average in 
pre-law and political science. 

"If you store it in your memory bank, you don’t 
need to study much," he said. "But halfway 
through college, I got bared and left.” 

He is not bored now. In addition to all his 
athletic and musical talents, be is an 
speaker who addressed the 1984 Republican Na- 
tional Convention, one of his 231 speeches in 39 
states last year. His next ambition is to be a host on 
a weekly half-hour network radio show. 

"I want to call it, ‘Craig MacFarlane on the 

Road,’ " *“ “U* xran ie rhp vnnth of Ameri- 

ca." 

The 
what 



MacFarlane i 
States 


TV. N» Tot Tina . 

;in the torch relay across 

summers 


that was boring," be said. “I 
water-ski jump. They asked 
and 1 told them right 


582-44 record over 1 1 

opponents. He would have been a candidate for 
the Canadian Olympic wrestfing team in 1980, but 
that team was never selected. Canada had agreed 
with the U.S.-inspired boycott of that year’s Sum- 
mer Olympics in Moscow. 

As a youngster at wrestling matches, MacFar- 
lane often would hear himself described by oppo- 
nents as “that Mind kid.” Seldom by his mw- 

“1 used to tell myself, Tve go! a name and you're 
going to know it before the day’s over.’ " 

Ins opponents and observers in eyeiysport have 
learned ms name. Although wrestling is the only 
sport in which he has competed against righted 
opponents, MacFarlane has adjusted to other 
sports quicker than most sighted people. In early 
August he wifi be in Orio for tite woddmind water- 
skiing championships less than a year 
tbe sport fm- the fust time at Cypress 
Florida. 

“Just! 

asked them if I 
me when I wanted to do it, 
now." 

. Taken out to the ski-jump ramp in a boat, 
MacFarlane walked around an it to. get the fed of 
hs dimemmnt u wdl as the upward dope of the 
21-foot ramp that projects a jumper as much as 50 
feet in the am. 

“I fefl the first time, the rope popped out of my 
hands,” he recalled- “But 1 endn’t nave any more 
trouble. I landed on 93 of my first 100 jumps.” 

Upon nearing the ramp, MacFarlane water- 
skied alongside a companion who darted him to 
his approach with a numerical countdown. 

“Hed yeD *5 .. .4...3 . ..2... 1*." he said, 
"and off I’d go. Snowskimg was a little differ e n t 
The guide skier dried behind me, tdhng me which 
way to turn, but I asked him to ski ahead of me so I 
could bear where he went By the end of my first 
day at Smuggler's Notch, Vermont, I was coming 
down from the top of the intennediate mountain. 

When be began playing golf last year, MacFar- 
lane applied the sanx -philosophy. 

“I always say, Tf 1 can ‘see* it I can do it — 
that’s the title of nn bode," he said. “And in gojl 
especially putting, I see the green by walking on h. 
I fed the terrain, whether it’s uphifi or downhill, I 
fed how far it is to the cup. I tiy to fed a magnet in 
the bottom of the cup coming out of my bram. My 
third month, I broke 100." 

One of MacFariane’s regrets is that his blindness 
prevented torn from playing hockey. 

“If I wasn’t blind,” he sad, *Td probably be a 



‘he said. “My target is the youth of Ameri- 

e youth of America might be embarrassed by 
MacFarlane has date. As a wrestler, he had a 


nickname. As a little kid, I thought Bobby On was 


i years ago I met Gordie Howe, 
me to live in Connecticut with him and his family. I 
stayed there 14 months. That’s when I ran on the 
Olympic torch relay." 

And for blind people, MacFarlane is a torch in 
the darkness now. 

“If you don’t believe in yourself,” he said, “how 
can you expect other people to believe in you?" 


Curren Overpowers a Listless McEnroe 


n t 


iZUXiiU 


■ Beat* Leconte, 
Other Seeds Triumph 

By' Andrew 1 Warshaw 

The Asso ci ate d Pros 

.WIMBLEDON, England — De- 
fending champ ion ana top-seeded 
John McEnroe was eliminated' 
from the Wimbledon tennis cham- 
pionships Wednesday, beaten by 6- 
2, 6-2, 64 in the quarterfinals by 
Kevin Curies, the No. 8 seed. 

With McEnroe’s defeat, which 
followed Monday’s c&nfnation of 
second-seeded Ivan Lendl, No. 3 
ranked Jimmy Camas became the 

highest r wmnmng seed m the men’s 
semifinals by beating Ricardo Acu- 
na, a qualifier from dale, 6-1, 7-6 
(7-3), 6-2. 

Defending women's champion 
Martina Navratilova was faced 
with ber toughest set of the tourna- 
ment so far before beating Pam 
Shriyar 7-6 (7-5), 6-3 to reach the 

Chris Evert Lloyd, co-top seed 
with Navratilova, continued her 
march toward the Grand Siam by 
tronndng Barbara Potter, 6-2, 6-1. 

Connors and Curren will meet in 
one men's semifinal while Anders 
Janyd of Sweden, the No. S seed, 
win face unseeded Boris Becker, 17, 
rtf West Germany in tbe other. 

Janyd heat Heinz Gunihardt of 
Switzerland, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2. Becker, 
the rising young star of European 
tennis, saved 12 aces en route to a 
7-6 (9-7), 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory over 
Henri Leconte of France. 

Two, other UJ>. women. Zina 
Garrison and Kathy Rinaldi, 
reached their Garrison, 

the No. 8 seed, rallied to beat quali- 
fier Molly Van Nostrand, 2-6, 6-3, 
6-0, white Rinaldi scored a 6-1, 1-6, 
6-1 victory over Helena Sukova of 
Chechoslovakia. 

Curren, whose power serve, 

shar p returns and tig frtmng jMmwng 

shots contrasted with a strangely 
listless McEnroe, won in i hour 49 
rninntgs to. reach tbe semifinals far 
die second time. 

McEnroe, 26, who was aiming to 
become the first American to win 
the Wimbledon men’s singles 
crown three straight times, could 
not htmrile the pice of Curreu's 
game and appeared mentally and 
physically dov. The New Yorker 
won the title in 1981, 1983, and 
1984 and had not lost a singles 

match hnV dnm COPDOf S hraf him 

in the 1982 finaL 

“It was obvious he was hitting 
the ball harder than me. He just 
overpowered me,” said McEnroe. 

"I played a sub-par match and I 
was surprised bow badly I was serv- 
ing. when you lose, everything 
seems to hnrt a whole lot more.” 

Asked if (here was any time in! 
the match when he thought he 
might still win, McEnroe replied 
jokingly: “Only if he broke an an- 
kle or something. He completely 
outplayed me." 

After the first four games had 
gone with serve, Curren ripped off 
five straight to win the opening set 
and gain a quick break in the sec- 
ond. 

The match burst into controver- 
sy midway through that set when 
McEnroe questioned a service by 
Curren. As umpire David Howie 
declined to overrule his service 
judge and asked McEnroe to play 
on, someone in the crowd shouted, 
“Don't wony, John." 

That upset Curren, and the con- 
fusion continued when McEnroe 
was gives a wanting for unsports- 
manlike conduct, for punning the 
original line-call argument and 
muttering sarcastically. 


SCOREBOARD 

Tennis 

Cycling 

Baseball 


Wimbledon Results Tour de France 


Tuesday’s Major League Line Scores 


MBITS SINGLES 
Quarterfinals 

Kevin Curren in. Uidef. John McEnroe 
holder (1), UA. 0-2. *4. 6-4. 

Jimmy Connors 131. U.S. del. RJcordo Acu- 
na Chita. 6-1. 7-4 (7-3), 6-2. 

Anders Jorrvd (5). Sweden, Ort Helm 
GuenHiardL Swi t zerl an d. 
i Boris Becker. West Germany, del. Henri 
" Leconte. Franco. 7-4 (0-7), 3-4. 4-3. 4-4. 
semifinal Matches 
Curren vs. Cannon 
Jorryd w Becker 

WOMEN’S SINGLES 


Morttoa Navratilova, noider ICO-)). UA. 
art. Pom Shrtver C3i. U.S- 7-4 (7-5). 44. 

Chris Evert Lloyd (co-ll. UA.drt Barbara 
Patter. Ui *4. o-l. 

ZmoGorrtsonH).UA.drt*4ollvvonNos- 

frond, ui. 24k 6-1 4-0. 

telhv RlnaW 1161. ua- dof. HaWrtO SukBW 

17). CseeftostovaMcL 6-1, 1-6 4-1. 

Semlftooi Mafctmo 
Even Lloyd vs. Rlnafcfl 
Go mean vs. NovrofBovc 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
A me ri can uwoae 

California — R eleased Steve Rouen, 
otteher. from their Edmonton affiliate Of the 
Pacific Caect Leaoue. 


ATIjujta— A ctivated Hide Ceraw. cald*- 
cr« from the disabled IbL Sent Lorry Own. 
catcher, to Richmond of the intemoilonoi 


SAN FRANCISCO— Recalled Ban Ro6»- 
Wta. Outfielder, from Phoenl* of Itw Interna- 
t tonal League. Sent Garv RfllSi eh. outfielder, 
to Phoenix. 

BASKETBALL 

NaNonat Bsrttsttan AsncMtaa 
LA. CLIPPERS- Retrod Don Casev, ns- 
*Wont coach. 

SEATTLE — Named Bab Ktawenbunt and 
Larin Miller osstenmi coortWL 
FOOTBALL 

Cmwdfaq Footted Lew* 
SASKATCHEWAN— Released Fred Brown 
«»a Sterna Jones, wide receivers: Carmelo 
Carter i, Oerwood Clark and Kin line- 

barters; Darrekf C tardy and Mike Wt*hh»- 
No. nmnlna baeke; Pawl HiCKIe»Pta*kidwr; 
Aten Johns, defensive lineman: Steve Joftfi- 
*«*. Jerry Hart*. David ShodradL and DorreU 
remaint, defensive backs; H orttU Smith. 
Mrleroack, and Kevin Mnile. Mork Umoss. 
end Ray whaattev. Offensive linemen. Sent 
MU* Heheiuee. auorierback. to Toronto. 
TORONTO— Retaaoed Walter Bender, run- 

nteviKKk; Steve Cae and Thod Jemlsan. wide 

tecefran; JUdty Turner, euortertock; Kris- 
ten K«itaT. offensive lineman; Franklin Kino, 
defensive ltaeman.oiW Oovta Loveorove.de- 
temlvr bock. 


FIFTH STAGE 

CN ouf chot ot en-Brwr to K s o b ste) 
tm KBofloetonrUf.i* MBas} 

1. Henri Mondem HottonO. a neurs, 27 mm- 
utas. K seconds 130 second bonus) 

2. Sean Keltv, iretand, at 11 seconds behind 
leader (20 second bonus) 

1 Phil Anderson, AwtraHa. at 11 110 second 
bonus) 

A Eric Vondaraerden. BeteJam, at 11 

5. Bernard Hinault. France, at » - 

6. Ad wilnandL Holland, at II - 

7. Leo van Vital. Holland, at T1 
& Allan Petoer. Australia, at 11 
«. Michel Derates. BMafcxn. at 11 

M. Jean-Laubi Gauthier, France, at 11 
it. Marc Seraeanb Belgium. at 11 
12. Stephen Roche, (retard. of It 
IX Greo Lemond. United States, at 11 
1* Vvan Freberf, France, at 11 
IS. Jan Basaeri. Belgium, ai 11 
14. Jesus Rndrteuez. at 11 
17. Ludwte Wllants. BetoJum. at 11 
IX Pout Sherwen. Britain, at 11 

19. Jon wilnonts. Befotum. at 11 

20. Claude Criawteiton. Betetaen, at 11 
71. Phfltepe Poteomter, France, N 11 
TL Adrl van houwellnaen. Hortsrt at 11 
23. Frederic vktrt. Franc*, al n 

34. Jerome Simon. F ranee, at 11 

25. Dandntaue Gatth. France, tit II 

26. Stephan Mutter. Swttzeriand. Of 11 

27. Pascal Potaon. Prone*, at IT 

20. Pella Rule Cabesfonv. Spate, at 11 
73. Rudv Rosters. Betetem, at 11 
30. Steve Bauer, Canada al II 


Overall Leaden 

1. Kten Anderson. Donmoric, 27 hours, 41 min- 
ute*. 14 seconds 

2 . ErIc Van deracrdea Betefc»m.cH9 seconds 

behind inod*r 

X Bernord Hlnouil, Franca at 1 mlnuttt. 1 
second 

4. Slav* Bauer, Canada, at 1:12 

5. Gres Lomond. United States, at 1;» 

A Gerard Vetdxholten. Hodond. at 1:22 
7. PhD Anderson, Australia, at 1J1 

X Niki Rutttanark Swltzerum. at 1:33 

9. Marc Games. France, et 1:37 

10. seen KeUv. Ireland, at 1:4V 

il joqp Zaotemefk, Holland, al 1 07 
12. Pnd Ho a l te do o r on, Befafum, of 1:54 
IX Lude Peelers. Befotum. at 2:03 
M. Alan Peteer. Australia at TVS 
id. Rudy Mafffiyi. Betetem. of 2 :0i 

16. pascal Simon. France, at 2:W 

17. Robert Milter. Britain, at 2:12 
IX Steven Rooks. Holland, at 2:16 
19. Ad tffil rands. Hoi land, al 2:18 

3L Dam siiaplra United States, at 2:19 

21. Peter wfnnea Holland, al *21 

22. Robert Forest. From*, at 2:22 

2X Gilbert Dudos-LaisolM, Franca, at 2:24 
21 Stephen Rode. Ireland, at 2:25 
25. Pascal Pofsson. Franca, at 2'Jt 
at Vvan Frabert. France, at 2:X 
27. RdbteW Vtaenfin!. Itolv. at 2:X 
2 & Mara MadtaL France, at £37 
29. Lean Van vital Hoi lend, or 2:42 
SOL Jaraen Pedersen, Denmark, at 2:42 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

•M M2 010— 3 6 4 
Ss F ranches IN N1 13X-8 13 2 

BedrosImvDedman (6), Came (81 and Bon- 
edlct: Celt. Garretts (71 and Brenly.W— Celt, 
♦S. L— Bedra*tan,5-7. H Rs— Attenta. Muntay 
(20). San Francteca Trtlta (1). 

PUteburak M « 003—4 8 8 

New York 292 910 Bis— 5 9 1 

McWllfiamAGudnte (7) and Pena; Dortina 
McDowell (91 end Gofer. W— DorHn9.7-XL— 
MCWnttams. «. Sv— McDowell IS). HRs— 
nttsburarv Roy M>. Medlock (4). 
chksH ooe M 0 vn— i a s 

P h E Ho Mlta «M 122 no-IT 12 1 

SufdHfokBrusBt*F(6).Soronoon{7)onaDo- 
vjs.Lafce(7); Rovrfev and Virol LW — Rovrtev, 
*d.L-^s«dcllf*A7-7.HR»— ChleaBO.Dovtal7). 
PtUtedolpMo, wilscn («K Thomas (2). 

K Loots - 384 NO #te-4 IS 8 

MoMreal 0M 000 OO C 0 3 I 

Tudor and Ntatw Palmer, St. Claire (7). 
O'Connor (91 and Fltzsercrid; W— Tudor. 8-7. 
L— Palmer. 4-7. 

Hoestea M Ml 0W- 3 * ■ 

Saa Dtoae TN W 4 1 

NtakraCateoua UlandAltaW. Wolno,L*L 
torts (8) and Kennedy. W—Ntakra 7-7. L— 
watea T-L Sv-Cateowi (3). 

CtadOMdl MMNM 3 1 

Lot AngdB M 2M hi — J 9 ■ 

Price. Hum* (81. Franco (B) Ofld von 

Gonter; Valenzuela end ScJoeda. W— Vatan- 

zuefa. U. L-Prtee. M. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
New Yw* HI IN 1U-8 O 1 

Toronto M8 IH N3— 1 4 8 

Wtriteotv RWwtw W «l Ewtaa. Hassey 
<8)i Key. Coocnn |B| and wtiHL w-wMtm, 
44. L-Kcv.ea HRS-Kew York. Henderson 
(18). Baylor (13). Toronto, Bell CIS). 

Detroit 4M ON BN 8—4 4 1 

M—W Ni 824181 t— S W 9 

Tam. LePts Pl.Hemandoi (8) ana Par- 
rish; Darts. Aom (Bt and Dempsey. W—Aase. 



PGA Money Leaders 

Meter Loaders on tee 1985 Protasuonal 

Getter* AssoetatlceWrthreoah tea 57-Jado 

tneiiinfiri fflmfn efefd) ended June I: 


1. Curts Stronae 
*. Low Btedkln* 

X RoV Ftovd 
4. Murk PMVO 
i Calvin Porte 
A Carry Paefti 
7. Crala Stwfler 
X Bernhora Longer 
*. Hal Sutton 

10. Lorry Mt» 

11. Furv Zoelter 

12. Tom MlMnst 

IX Roger Mattel* 

14. Hate inrtn 

t i Tom Kite 


S42X574 

833X242 
s vasts 
(2734 IS 
athOs 

S27O40B 

827X479 

8X47438 

834X282 

8184481 

nans 

S17945B 

S176482 

817X121 


Basted 

3b 37 

SO 

MlhnukM 

J35 37 

jmt 

ClMtaM 

94 50 

WMt Dmttea 

33* 

CnUfbrafa 

42 33 

J40 

Gotland 

. 40 35 

sa 

Kansas Otv 

31 34 

su 

CMoods 

38 34 

so 

Srtrtte 

37 38 

Ml 

‘■Innsin Ai ■ 

nwnowa 

34 39 

Mi 

Tern 

29 47 

SB 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

EON Dtetalsn 


W L 

Pd. 

St, LOIlts 

44 30 

J95 

MMitmi 

44 33 

J71 

Chicago 

39 34 

SH 

Ne« Yorts 

29 31 

SB 

PMbKtotaMa 

33 41 

J46 

PHtstairgli 

25 48 

Wirt Division 

sa 

San Dtego 

45 21 

J92 

Las Angcfes 

40 34 

541 

Onetantff 

39 35 

5Z7 

Houston 

3* 38 

584 

Atlanta 

34 41 

JB 

San Franctass 

21 49 

544 



V .i*,' , 

Hmaki . 

Kerin Curren lunges for a shot during 6-2, 6-2, 6-4 upset of top-seeded John McEnroe during Wimbledon quarterfinals. 


Then McEnroe called for tour- 
nament referee Alan Mills and 
Grand Pm supervisor Km Farrar. 
After more heated debate, (he 
matrfi continued with Curren hold- 
ing serve for a 3-1 lead. Three stun- 
ning service returns gave him an- 
other break for a 5-2 lad. 

A fired-up Connors, 32, who 
looked relaxed and confident, pro- 
duced several spectacular winners 
to end the challeng e of Acuna, 
ranked 133d in the world. 

After being swept aside in an 
opening set that took just 19 min- 
utes, Acuna broke Connors* serve 
early in the second and held a 5-3 
lead. But while Acuna was 
up inspired shots with 
mistakes, Connors broke back with 
a series of service returns. 

Leading 6-5, Connors squan- 


dered three set points before Acuna 
pushed the set into a tie breaker. 
But Connors raced into a 4-1 lead 
anti clinched the tie breaker on his 
fifth set point, when Acuna hit a 
weak forehand into the net 

In the final set, Connors brake in 
the first Mpg; then a g ain in the 
seventh and moved into his ninth 
Wimbledon «mifinal. 

In a high-quality tnatrh that en- 
thralled the capacity crowd rai a 
sun-baked Centre Court, Navrati- 
lova squeezed tiuough her opening 
set against Shriver and captured an 
early break of serve in the second 
set, enough to win her tbe match. 

Shriver hod beaten hex long-time 
doubles partner only three times in 
23 tries, but in the opening set she 
matched her opponent stroke for 
stroke. And although Navratilova 


was never behind after breaking 
serve in the opening game, she was 
made to fight for every potnL 
After saving a set point in tbe 
10th game. Shriver tied at 5-5 with 
a magnificent service return. Both 
players then held serve to send the 
set into a tiebreaker. Shriver quick- 
ly established a 3-1 lead, but could 
not rpprt«li™ on her advantage. In 
the second set, Navratilova again 
gained an early break and led, 3-0, 
while her opponent still was racing 
rt ii» chanc es she miswri 
"I think the whole thing was how 
I played the tie breaker," said Shri- 
ver. “I set up about two or three 
points that I didn’t win.” 

. Becker, the youngest player ever 
to reach the semifinals of the men’s 
singles at Wimbledon, could be- 
come the first West German to 


reach the final since Wilhelm Bun- 
ged in 1967. 

After he and Leconte had ex- 
changed breaks early in the open- 
ing set, each held serve to 6-6 and 
moved into the tie breaker. Leconte 
had a set pant when he led, 6-5, 
but Becker unleashed a big serve to 
save the set and three points later 
broke Leconte with a stunning 
backhand down the tine, then 
rKtirhfld the tie breaker. 

Leconte, who upset Lendl in the 
fourth round, rallied to level the 
match, breaking his opponent in 
the seventh game of the second set 
But he rarely threatmed Becker’s 
serve in tire last two sets. 

“When he serves, it's difficult to 
see the ball" said Leconte. “You 
can’t tdl whether it's his first or 
second service.” 


Cards Speed by Expos on Tudor’s 3-Hitler 


SO. L- te nwJM 4-4. HR* — Detroit, Ev«ra 

(16) . BaKtmora. Loev (41, Sakata (2J. Rtofcon 
(12), Young (6). 

Oakland 006 001 000— 1 6 8 

Kamos city Ml 3N n»-lB 11 2 

Longford, warren (4). Mura (6) and Hoota; 
Lrtbrondt. Backwfiti (9) ad Sandberg. W— 
Laterondi, 76. L— Lanuford. 0-1 HRs—Kan- 
tm City, Brett 2 (TO). 

528 BN 008-7 12 • 
ON NI IW— 2 8 ■ 

McCmklll. Moor* (9) and Boon*; Satan. 
WaMi (2). Harris (». Stewart (91 and Brum- 

mr.W McCaiVHL 3-5.1 Setoro. M. HR— 

Ca Morula, wnfcoa (3). 

Seattle NO TO MO— 4 2 ■ 

Chicago 8M 530 9*0—12 II 2 

Snvdor, Thomas (4). Lang (U. Barelas 18) 
and Kearney, Scott (6); Loiter. Stanton (6), 
James 111 andHW.W-Lollar.3-t L-5nwter. 
frl Sv— jams 1171. HRs— Seattle. Presley 

(17) . Chlcaaok Baines (71. 

«M CM MO-7 II 2 
288 2N 48B— 8 11 2 

(4), Clark (4), Waddell J7L 
Easterly (71 and W1 Hard: VlotaEutemto (5). 
FI toon (|) and Satoe, Engle (7). w-Eurtmta. 
ML L-VtaddeU. M. Sy^-FtoOfi CD- 
Bested MM1NL-1II 1 

MRWW*N IN IN 881 1-4 12 2 

Clemens, Kben (5). Stan fry 19] and Sufit- 
von. Gedmon tW; Hfgucra L add (7). Fto- 
uers iv» end Moore. W— Fingers. 1-3. L— 
Stanley, X HR— Boston, Buckner (I). 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Divtstad 

W l Pd. M 

Toronto 46 38 ^85 — 

Detroit 42 31 J73 2 Vj 

Hew York » h jm m 

BaWmore 3B 35 SO 4te 

7li 


4ft 

5 

7 

13ft 


GB 

lft 

4ft 

5 

11 


4 

5 

6ft 


Corrplied by Our Staff From Dijpazdta 

MONTREAL — The SL Louis 
Cardinals are making a name for 
themselves by terrorizing oppo- 
nents on the basepaths. Not to be 
outdone by his speedy teammate*, 
pitcher John Tudor is winning 
games at a rapid pace. 

Tudor, at oat point 1-7, pitched 
a three-hitter Tuesday night as the 
Ca r d inal s beat the Montreal Ex- 
pos, 4-0. The triumph was the left- 
hander’s seventh straight 

“I'm on a good streak now," Tu- 
dor said. “1 had a tough April and 
May, but Tm back on the track and 
finding the groove. Thaf s the best 
ball game Tve pitched this season 
and it was even a bigger game be- 
cause we finally won a game in 
Montreal. Tbe Expos have been 
beating up on us tins season." 

For Tudor, who Tuesday was 
named the NL Richer of tire 
Month for June, it was his fourth 
complete- game and third shutout 
this season. He allowed three sin- 
gles and (fid not permit a runner to 
reach third bast. 

Backing Tudor was Jack. Clark 
— who went 3-for-3, scored a run 
and drove in a run — and tbe 
Cardinals’ usual speed. 

They stole four bases but, more 
importantly, rattled the Expos’ 
starter, David Palmer. 

Vince Coleman led off the first 
hming with a sing le and palmer 
proceeded to make 13 throws to 
first base trying to keep the 
leagues’ leading thief honesl 
man still stole his 54th base, Palmer 
followed with a wild pickoff throw 
into center field and tire Cardinals 
were off to a threc-nm inning. 

Coleman soored on a bunt single 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


3, Reds 0: Fernando 
Valenzuela checked Cincinnati on 
three singles in Los Angeles and 
Pedro Guorero had three hits and 
drove in two nms. Valenzuela, in 
pitching his ninth complete pm* 
and NL-Jeading fourth shutout, 
struck out eight 

Giants 8, Braves 3: Jeff Leonard 
and Manny TriDo each had two 
RBI in San Francisco. whDe Tun 
Got! and Scott Garretts held At- 
lanta to six hits. 

Royals 10, A’s 1: In the Ameri- 
can League, George Brett hh two 
three-nm homers w Kansas City, 
Missouri, as Oakland was routed. 

Brett singled and walked in bis 
other two at bats, leaving the game 


after six innings; the last two games 
against the A's he has 6 hits in 8 at 
bats with 8 RBL In Oakland re- 
cently, the Royals lost two one-nm 
contests and had to gq extra in- 
nings for their victory as Brett 
watched from the bench with a 
pulled hamstring. 

Yankees 5, Blue Jays 3: In To- 
ronto, Ed Whitson hdd the Blue 
Jays to three hits for tight innings 
and Rickey Henderson went 3-for- 
5, leading off the game with his 
10th homer, as New York won. 

White Sox 12, Mariners 4: Ozzie 
Guillen hit a bases- loaded triple 
against Seattle during a five-run 
fourth in Chicago and Harold 
Baines hit a grand slam bracer in 
the eighth as the White Sox ended a 
six-game losing streak. 

1 4b Mike Young 


led off tbe bottom of the 10th with 
his sixth homer of the year — and 
the Orioles’ rourth of the game — 
to beat Detroit. 

Teammate Cal Ripken’s homer 
with two out in the ninth tied the 
score after Darrell Evans hit a 
grand slam for Detroit in the first 

Brewers 4, Red Sox 3: Ted Sim- 
mons’ 1 0th -inning bases-loaded 
sacrifice fly beat Boston in Milwau- 
kee after teammate Charlie Moore 
doubled in tire tying mn with two 
out in the ninth. Boston has lost 
four straight and 11 of its last 14. 

Twins $ Imfians 7: Greg Gagne's 
tie-breaking RBI double nighfigbt- 
ed a four-run seventh that over- 
came Cleveland in Minneapolis. 

Angels 7, Rangers 2: Reggie 
Jackson drove in three runs with 
two doubles as California won in 
Arlington, Texas. (UP l, AP) 


U.S. Crews Make Splash at Henley 


by Willie McGee, whogot four hits 
and stole two bases. Tommy Herr 
walked and although McGee was 
caught stealing third, Clark’s dou- 
ble scored Herr and Terry Pendle- 
ton’s single scored Clark. 

“Palmer threw too many balls to 
first base and lost his concentra- 
tion,” said MontreaTs manager, 
Buck Rodgers. “But there is no 
other reason fra: losing the game 
other than John Tudor, and” Tve 
never seen a faster team in basebaD 
than the Cardinals. ’’ 

Astros 3, Padres 2i In San Dk{p. 
kmiddebaBer Joe Niekto, despite 

reooft^his 200th victory in^ 
uugos when Houston pindi hitter 
Phil Gamer doubled in tbe winning 
run. in the eigh th 

Niekro, 40, and his brother, Phil, 
46, who pitches for the New York 
Yankees and has won 291, need 38 
more victories to pass Gaylord 
(314) and Jim Perry (215) as base- 
ball's winmngept brothers. 

Mete 5, Pirates 4: In New York, 
Ray Kuight drove in two nms with 
a two singles against Pittsburgh to 
help end a six-game losing streak. 

PlaSes 21 Cabs i Glenn Wil- 
son’s three-run homer d 
four-run first inning in I 
pfaia started Chicago toward de- 
feat. Wilson has 55 runs batted in 
— and is tied for third in the NL — 
on only 71 hits. 


By Norman Hildes-Hdm 

Sew York Tima Service 

HENLEY-ON-THAMES, En- 
gland — When the draw and start- 
ing times for Thursday’s opening 
rounds of tbe 140th rowing of the 
Henley Royal Regatta were posted 
Wednesday the accent of this 
uniquely British sporting event was 
decidedl y Yankee. 

Of this year’s record entry of 348 
crews competing in the 14 events, 
U.S. crews r epresented as many as 
a third or more of the total entry in 
the 10 events for which they are 
eligible. 

Three of the seven entries for 
Tbe Grand Challenge Cup, the 
most prestigious race of tire regatta. 


are from the United States. And for 
tire first time since the U.S. Olym- 
pic tight won “The GraruT in 
1980, a U.S. crew has a strong 
chance to capture tbe cup. 

Harvard and Princeton, the two 
collegiate tights in this event, have 
been “selected" — Hailey’s ver- 
sion of seeding — at opposite ends 
of the draw. Should each progress 
through the tiunination heats, they 
could extend their rivalries to tins 
side of the Atlantic. Harvard beat 
Princeton three times during the 
UJ3. collegiate season, most recent- 
ly rallying on June IS for a 47.01- 
second victory in tire Cincinnati 
Regatta to take the national rowing 
title. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

NFL Browns, Kosar Agree: $6 Million 

CLEVELAND (AP) — Framer University of Miami quarterback 
Bemie Kosar was. selected, as expected, by the Cleveland Browns on 
Tuesday in the National Football league supplemental draft. - 
Then the team said that Kosar, 21, had agreed to a series of five one- 
year contracts wrath 56,000,000, including a Si million signing boons. 

Kosar bsd two years of eligibility left at Miami, but became eligible for 
the supplemental draft last week by graduating one year early with a 
major in business and finance. 

Holmes-Spinks Fight Set for Sept 30 

NEW YORK (AP) — Undefeated Larry Holmes will defend his 
International Boxing Federation heavyweight title against unbeaten 
Micha e l Spinks, the undisputed light-heavyweight champion, on Sept. 20 
in Atlantic City, New Jersey, co-promoter Butch Lewis «wiramrrH 
Tuesday. 



1“ 

* For die Record 


The World Umoe of Karatenfo Organizations has been recognized by 
the International Olympic C ommitt ee, paring the way for karate to be 
recognized and approved as an Olympic sport, Ryrachi Sasakawa, the 
murai’s president, said in Tokyo rat Wednesday. (AP) 


Chris Fenny, who graduated in 
June from Princeton and who rows 
sixth in the Tigers’ eight, is at Hen- 
ley for his last collegiate race. 

“It’s a lot more fun rating here," 
he said. "In a way it's more intense 
than any other regatta because ev- 
ery heal is a side by side dhnina- 
tion. You put it on the line each 
fhne you race — there is no provi- 
sion for equipment failure, no ex- 
cuses. 

“To gel to the finals you have to 
be a winner. Once tbe racing starts, 
it’s almost more pressure every day. 
But (he Henley atmosphere makes 
it fun. It's so amazingly beautiful 

“In the U.S-," said Penny, who 
rowed in the four seat of die 1984 
U.S. eight that won tbe Olympic 
saver medal “we have a Jot of sub- 
urbs. Here you have cities and 
country —-ancient forests so green 
because it rains so much, and m the 
midst ctf this countryside here's 
Henley. 

“At home we train every day, 
day in, day onL Here, training be- 
fore tire regatta, you draw up next 
to another crew and have a brush, a 
race for a portion of tire course, 
nothing to lose, just frm. And then 
there are the showers, just cold wa- 
ter — tire whole atmosphere is real- 

hf fun.” 

Thursday the intensity begins to 
build as the elimination races com- 
mence. The Prinoc FttiDip Cup, for 
fours with coxswain, has drawn five 
U.S. entries out of a total of nine. 

Eleven of tire 32 entries in the 
Ladies' Challenge Plate are U.S. 
college crews, with Princeton’s 
lightweight varsity and Harvard's 
junior varsity heavyweights anoth- 
er possible matchup m the finals 
should both progress to Sunday. 

VS. ere ws have been competing 
at Henley since 1876, when Colum- 
bia University entered the Visitor 
Challenge Cup. Columbia is her 
again contesting that event, an 
attesting to the conimnin 
ity of Henley with UA 
crews. 











Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 198S 


ART BUCHWALD 


My July 4 Is Your July 4 


W ASHINGTON — I received 
a call from Michael Jackson, 
the syndicated talk show host who 
owns the morning radio audience 
in Southern California. Michael 
was taping a program that had tc 
do with the Fourth of July and 
wanted to discuss it 
I was surprised when Michael 
informed me that Calif o rnians cel- 
ebrate ow July 4 
with the same 
fervor as the 13 
original states 
do. 

“Why would 
that her I asked 
him. “California 
had nothing to 
do with the 
founding of the 
country." 

Michael re- Bucbwakl 
plied: “As long as I can remember. 
Californians nave always support- 
ed life, liberty and the pursuit of 
happiness, and Independence Day 
does have a special meaning for us. 
We even have a greeting in Spanish 
out here, *My Fourth of July is your 
Fourth of July.' " 

“That’s fine now. Ben where was 
California when our founding fa- 
thers needed you?” I asked. 

Michael was slightly nonplussed. 
“We may not have fought in the 
revolution,” he said, “but Califor- 
nians have paid their dues. We gave 
the country two presidents of the 
United States.” 

□ 



“California was not in a position 
in 1775 to fight the British,'' Mi- 
chad said. 

Tve beard the same story from 
Oregon and Montana. Everybody 
west of Pennsylvania sat it out until 
they saw which way the wind was 
blowing.’’ 

I could tell Michael wasn't quite 
sure be wanted to continue the con- 
versation. “What did you expect us 
to dor he asked. 

“Did it ever occur to you to say 
thanlr you? Do you realize that if it 
hadn’t been for our forgathers, 
California would be no better off 
today than it was 200 years ago? 
While you people out there were 
getting tan. lifting weights and 
(ruling real estate. Tommy Jeffer- 
son, Johnny Adams and Ben 
Franklin were sweating it out in 
Philadelphia dying to write a paper 
that would guarantee your rights as 
freemen.” 

□ 


“And we gave you one back. 
Don't get me wrong. You people 
have a right to celebrate any Amer- 
ican holiday yon want to. Efcit those 
of us who fomented revolution and 
put our lives on the line to over- 
throw that rotter George m are 
suspicious of states who came into 
the Union after the hostilities 
ceased." 


Chagall Painting Stolen 
From New York Gallery 

The Aaatiaud Pros 

NEW YORK — Thieves who 
avoided an alarm system at an art 
gallery escaped with a 5250,000 
painting by Mare OtagaB. 

The break-in at the Ffelix VerceJ 
Galerie was discovered Tuesday. 
Also missing were two brass figures 
worth a total of $16,500. 


“There were 37 states that were 
not involved in the revolution,” 
Michael said. “Why pack on us?” 

“Because Californians are al- 
ways telling people along the East 
Coast what fools we are for living 
here They keep bragging about 
their lifestyle. What they forget is 
that, if George Washington hadn’t 
crossed the Delaware, there 
wouldn't be a California lifestyle.” 

“Is there anything that we can do 
now to make Up to YOU for missing 
the Revolutionary War?” Michael 
asked. 

“One thing you might do is tell 
your President Reagan to stop at- 
tacking the 13 original states be- 
cause they want to deduct their 
local income taxes from their feder- 
al returns. He goes out West ridi- 
culing the government spending 
habits of the people back East and 
gets everyone mad at New York 
and New Jersey. We fought a lot of 
bloody battles against the Redcoats 
so Ronald Reagan could sleep in 
the White House.” 


□ 


“Why don’t you tell Reagan 
yourself?” 

“Because he doesn't listen to us. 
He considers people who live in 
Washington part of the problem.” 

“Having said all that, may we 
Californians celebrate your Fourth 
of July?" 

“I imagine so, if you don’t make 
too much noise.” 


Tate: Conductor of Exemplary Career 

By Joseph 

Washington 


McLdlan 

Washington Post Soviet 

WASHINGTON — “I corse 
occasionally, but it doesn’t really 
do any good,” said Jeffrey Tate. 
The 42-year-old conductor has 
more to curse about than most of 
us, but also more reason to be 
thankful 

Tate, who conducted the Met- 
ropolitan Opera in two recent 
Washington performances of 
“Lohengrin” and one of “Cod 
fan Tutte.” is one of the hottest 
opera conductors on the interna- 
tional scene. Besides bring busy 
at the Met, he is principal con- 
ductor of the Geneva Opera and 
is about to take the position of 


principal conductor at the Royal 
Opera House, i" 


Covent Garden, in 
his native Englan d. 

He is also severely handi- 
capped, with two spinal malfor- 
mations (spina bifida and kypho- 
scoliosis) that have twisted Us 
6-foot-6 (2-mrier) body down to 
a height of 5 feet 8. His left leg is 
paralyzed and shorter than his 
right. 

Tate, who cannot work stand- 
ing up, conducts from a chair. 

Stiff, his arms and hands — a 
conductor’s essential tods — are 
in fine condition. So is his state of 

mind 

“My problem is not as serious 
Itzhak Perlman’s,” he said (the 



□early a year and a half after he 
had made his debut at the Met. 

“I did not originally think of 
becoming a conductor at all” 
Tate said. “With my experience 
as a singer and a pianist, I 
thought I could be useful as a 
vocal coach and might eventually 
get into administration. That was 
my original objective at the Met. 

“But almost purely by chance, 
I happened to be invited to con- 
duct ‘Carmen’ at Cologne, and it 
went very well so I was invited 
back to conduct ‘The Magic 
Flute' the next year, and then 

before I knew h 1 was conducting 
on radio." 

Then, be recalled, at the Met, 
while be was playing the piano 
for rehearsals, the opera compa- 
ny’s conductor, James Levme, 
trad him, “You’ve got to con- 
duct” 

“Finally, I was scheduled to 
conduct ‘Con.’ Then it was can- 
celed because of the strike, so I 


found myself instead making my 
Metropolitan 


ThiWMineiaoM 

Because of disabdity, Jeffrey Tate conducts from a chair. 


as 


violinist was crippled by polio as 
a child), “and I'm not so militant 
about the rights and problems of 
the handicapped, though f am 
willing to do whatever 1 can to 
help. I try to ignore my disability 
as much as possible; otherwise, 
you end op wing very angry and 
wasting energy.” 

So far, he says, his experience 
has made him think that “obsta- 
cles can ultimately give you ad- 
vantages.” 

Ignoring his disability and 
turning obstacles into advan- 
tages, Tale followed two careers 
simultaneously until 1970. In that 
year, having earned his degree in 
medicine at Cambridge Universi- 
ty and finished his internship in a 
London hospital, he was ready lo 
go into practice; but he decided 
instead to devote his life to his 
other love, opera. 

‘Technically speaking,’’ he 
said. T could still go into medi- 
cine, but I would have to take a 
refresher course. A lot has 
changed since 1970.” 


Tate’s story is a familiar musi- 
cal biography. He showed a spe- 
cial love and talent for music at 
an early age, but his parents, who 
encouraged him to overcome his 
handicap, also worried that their 
son might become a starving art- 


ist They insisted that he learn a 
profession. 

He was a dutiful son, following 
his prescribed path, but contin- 
ued to be active as an amateur 

mnririan Ihmughoni his years of 

study. The hospital where he in- 
terned had a staff orchestra and 
chorus, and he became the con- 
ductor. Earlier, at school he 
played the piano for student op- 
eratic productions — for exam- 
ple, an “Amahl and the Night 
Viators” for which its composer, 
Gian Carlo Menotti, was in atten- 
dance. 

He was also a singer, in the 
internationally respected choir of 
King's fWlqg *. fnmhrifly , and 
in some student productions. 

T was one of the pickled boys 
in one of the first productions of 
Britten’s ‘St Nicholas,’ ” he re- 
called. “That’s when I met Benja- 
min Britten; he came to hear us, 


even though it was only a school 
production. I think it was then 
that I realized that music was a 
way of life. I don't call it a career; 
if you think of it as a career, 
you’re finished.” (The “pickled 
boys” are the subjects of one of 
the miracles attributed to St 
Nicholas and celebrated by Brit- 
ten in his cantata.) 


l Opera debut con- 
ducting ‘Lulu’ without ever hav- 
ing bad a chance to conduct a 
rehearsal. Of course, I had 
coached it and hdped Fiene Bou- 
lez to prepare his premiere per- 
formance of the complete score 
— but was that enough? Georg 
Solti, said I was crazy, and I 
thought be was right. Jimmy [Le- 
vine] kept saying, ‘Of course you 
can do it,’ and he turned out to be 
rigfat.” 

That was December 1980. 
Since then Tate’s conducting ca- 
reer has been moving quickly and 


“My family was not particular- 
ly musical" la 


steadily upward. As chief con- 
doctor at Goveat < 


Tate said, “and my 
father, who was a postal worker 

— decidedly lower middle class 

— made me stop taking piano 
lessons because he thought they 
would interfere with my academ- 
ic work. But 1 went on playing 
even after the lessons stopped.” 

He began to study opera at Che 
London Opera Centre during his 
18-month internship, and when a 
vacancy opened for a rehearsal 
pianist at Covent Garden he ap- 
plied for and got the job — a full- 
time post in one of the world's 
leading opera co mp a n ies within a 
year of leaving medicine. But his 
work was all backstage; he did 
not conduct at Covent Garden, 
where he is now to beajme princi- 
pal conductor, until April 1982, 


Garden, he wiD 
share responsibility for the opera 
boose’s musical life with its muse 
director, Bernard Haitink. He is 
also becoming the principal con- 
ductor of the English Chamber 
Orchestra and has just signed a 
four-year recording contract with . 
HMV that will include a com- 
plete cycle of the Mozart sym- 
phonies. 

“It will be nice to have my life 
centered in England again,” Tate 
said. T have been there, of 
course, but 1 haven’t lived there 
since 1977 and Fm homesick. I’ve 
been a New Yorker since 1978, 
and I have acquired the Manhat- 
tanite's natal prejudices a gainst 
the rest of the world, but I'm 
homesick. I need to be pari of an 

En glish landxrap g again " 


PEOPLE 


Denver Seeks Open Door 




rwinfl has offered Jotm Denver 
the Gieat Wall but he is holding 
out for the Forbidden City. For a 
year and a half the pop singer has 
been trying to arrange to do a Chi- 
nese conceit in September that 
would be telecast live worldwide. 
The main hnrdle seems to be where 
he would ring. “ ‘John Denver live 
from the Great WriT has a nice ring 
toil but where are you going to put 
the audience?” Denver said soon 
after arriving in China for another 
round of negotiations af ter a Soviet 
concert lour. He said a riot in May 


Clark Gable. “I haven't shot for 
years, but you never lose the 
much,” said Rogers, who is a 
spokesman for the National Rifle 
Association. Another competitor 
was the star of TVs “Leave It to 
Beaver,” Jerry Mathers. 

□ 



after a soccer game in Beijing ap- 
! the Chinese authori- 


pearedtobavei 
ties “scared to death” about crowd 
control “My fans are not the kind 
of people who riot or are antagonis- 
tic,” he noted, Denver's tunes, es- 
Home, Country 
arc very popular in China. 

O 


in his first address to a 
group in more than four years. 
Indian guru Bhagwun Sbree Raj- 
neeshtold 10.000 of his followers in 
Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, that 
“only the retarded sod utterly me- 
diocre people can believe in God” 
and that “no sane person can be- 
lieve in God. only in sin.” The oc- 
casion was the Rajneesh sea's 
fourth annual Worid Festival. For 
a spiritual leader, the aim was hard 
on religion; his speech criticized aU 
the major faiths. 






’•IS 


is H 


Jack 1-ftng. the French culture 
minister, has made three Ameri- 
cans officers of arts and letters; the 
producer Irwin Winkler and the 
jazzmen Herbie Hancock and Dex- 
ter Gordon, stars of Winkler’s new 
production “Around Midnight” 
The ceremony took place Tuesday 
night at the studio near Paris where 
the Franco-American production, 
directed by Bernard Taventier, is 
being shot 

O 


Two native Philadelphians, the 
comedians BID Cosby and David 
Brenner, donated their time io 
headlin e a concert for the 270 peo- 
ple left homed ess tty the fire that 
resulted from the city police attack 


on the radical grouj^ MOVE. Tm 


tie Cosby 


group 

here because I love uil 

said before the concert “It’s sort of 
tike a family." As a cbfld, Brenner t 
said, be lived several blocks from i 
the neighborhood involved. 


The sydicated advice columnist 
Abigail Van Boren, acting on a 
reader’s inquiry, recently told fol- 
lowers of “£>ear Abtty” that spruce 
gum, a rare concoction that Abby 
suggested as a substitute for chew- 
ing tobaoco. was available at the 
celebrated L. L. Bean store in Free- 
port, Maine. At least that's what 
one misinf ormed Bean’s employee 
told the columnist Now Bean’s has 
been deluged with orders for a 
product that the store hasn’t car- 
ried for about a year. “Spruce gum 
is scarcer than hen’s teem,” D. Ra- 
ton Andrew Jr., the company's pub- 
lic affairs manager, said in a tetter 
to Abby. “Please let your readers 
know that we are trying to get 
someone interested in spruce gum 


The actor David Sold has sued 
the city of Pittsburgh, its mayor ; 
and chief of police, several other *■ * 
city officials, two steel corporaiko 
executives, a Presbyterian church 
and a Lutheran bishop for $50 mil- 
lion, contending that they violated 
his right to free speech because he 
was arrested outside the church on 
Easter while reading a Bible 
sage in a demonstration cm f 
of unemployed steelworkers. 


production because our supplier 
has retired.” 


: The king 


No one was 

of the cowboys, Roy Rogers, 
won the Celebrity Cup at a trap 
shoot in China California, with a 
25-year-old rifle he bought from 


Jacqnefine Khnberiy, 34, a figure 
in Roxanne and Peter Pulitzer’s 
child-custody court battle, has filed 
for divorce from James Kimberly, 
78, of the Kimberiey-Claik Coro, 
paper-goods company, after 13 
years of marriage. Mis. Kimberly, 
34, said her husband believed that 
their 15-year marriage was “irre- 
trievably broken.” The divorce pa- 
pers list her income as “50.00" and 
her monthly expenses as S3.225 for 
food and tips, S2500 for a dress- 
maker and 53.000 for travel 


] line Fn*v 
Bop llf'lil 
hr 30 Yrtirs 


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REAL ESTATE 

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FRENCH PROVINCES 

MOUGtfB REMDOfTIAL umye. a 
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GANPB OKXSETTE Spforx&d 2 bed- 
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IBEX BATON 630.895 F 

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PARIS * SUBURBS 


45 ICMS NORTH OP PARS. Beoden- 
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.5600 sons Td= Office: 561 
(11 70 01 03 


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SWITZERLAND 

V1LLARS 

WINTR & SUMMER 
MOUNTAIN PARADISE 

Apartments, rarrang from startos 
io 4 rooms. Avcdabto Fa Sola Ta 
foreigners. HKjhdaa reodwmrt a. 
eas with nroavnbent rews Prices fran 
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for information: 

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red eetoto speortirt* 

Av. MamBepos 24. 

OVI005 LAUSANJ't Swimriond 
Trt: (21) 22 35 12 Tlx 2l85 MHJS CH. 
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fO» hour from gemv^ 
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WMi nrimtnng pool aid beach 
From SR453»-G«& 50% 
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1 52 MtxrtbriBort. CH-1202 G6MEVA. 
Tefc 022/341540. Telex: 22030 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 

LONDON. For the best famished Rais 
and houses. Coreult the Spedofati: 
Ph 8n Kqy aid Lmris. Tefc Scab of 
Park 352 Bill. North c# POk 722 
5135. Telex 27B46 RE5B7E G. 

HOLLAND 

DUTCH HOUSING CB4T8E B.V. 

Dekate rentals. Vrtunusstr. 174 
Amsterdam. (00-621234 or 623222. 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

Embassy Service 

8 Ava.de MHstoa 

T5«M Parim 

Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
562-7899 

RATS fOR R£NT 

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RATS FOR SAl£ 

OffKXS FOR fSNT/SAtE 

8TH ST. AUGUSTIN 

6TH EXCHTONAL VIEW 

ON LUXEMBOURG 

Luxuriate receptions, + 3 bsckooms, 
3 baths + maid's roam. FI 6X00 

EMBASSY 563 68 38 

STAYING IN PARIS? 

AHMSHED A IMURNEHS 
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Miwnum rental 2 months. 

Ako fiats A boon Cor sofa. 
INTO URfilS. 1. rue Molten, 

Faris 563 17 77 

FACING HOTEL 
CONCORDE LAFAYETTE 

Lmunauf duplex stwfios, both, phone. 
No agency feel. F6000 im by morth. 
Short term foaie. Voir today: 95 fid 
Gouwn 5f Cyr, ftxi 17tft 574 35 67. 

CHAMPS ELYSEB 

SfUI>05. Comfortable 

Bath, telephone, cofa.TV, ihorr (arm 
lease dvecKy by owner. Fe^OO-'monto 
ehrnes nckjded Veit 33 rue Matauf. 
Pons & Tel 574 82 57 


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Townhouse. 2 receptions, 4 bedrooms. 


BEAUmJL 3 IOROOM HOUSE on 
spurious (rounds, 15 mm Qnnps- 
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15^31/8, 741 0438 or 307 8096 


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dwrgk. Tefc 747 4472. Owner 


INVALIDS 




Tel: 306 74 06 


SHORT TBtM STAY. Adwages af a 
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cie rUntverriti. Pars 7th; 544 39 40 


WAR PLACE ALMA. Two ram. 

kitchen & bathroom, artique Futt*- 
tore. qriel udh leafy asurtywd, prv 
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723 58*3 marniEp. 


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TO8U.Y BO(S. Luxury, in tawtooree; 
2 i racxw + preraa r gartfen. F97QQ + 
rioex. 3 rooms: FofiQO 4- drarad. 
Tefc Bo 36 00 

7TH: 2 ROOM APAKTA04T. F4900. 
Long or short term. Vait today 39 Awe 
Duquesne 1 it floor. 123)to Tefc 

071 60 02 

NEUOlY. 120 sgm 4 Miraces aa 
gtodm. Prnrticrt PteosaX. To Jdy 
B6. Canerary to company. 747 59 68. 

MBS U DBME. Vary luxury fur- 
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UxtB term. Direct owner. 50' 95 86. 

Bos de Boutogne. rttuu + depose: 
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NEAR MCNIMARIK. hO y 
equipped rtudn. July, August & Sep- 
tember. F3000/manto. TtiTS6 60S 

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TROCAOERO. Luxury 2-room rexirt- 
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S MM&. ETORE. 3 room flat. July / 
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SUMMER 8EMTAL House, flatten, 20 
ran Paris center, SI Maur. e89 3335 

HIRMSHS STUDIO. Comfort, short 
or tang term. F400Q net Tefc 525 3212. 

NO AGENT- Granite dertex fur- 
rushed apartment, 257 04 14 

1S1H. Plearait aperttnent, 58 sam, 
TV. M. FISOO/imk Td: S3 1 2& 

16TH. Very rtsidentirt, 100 sqm. July- 
AuateriSfaeatoer. TM 5510M5. 

ISTH. JULY-AUGUST. Artist sturta 
F33QO/momKTefc 5 77 8715 momma. 

T67H TROCAITOOL 2 rooms, garden. 
F7900rTefc(l)72094 9S 


7TR Shod or lorn term. Granting J 
room. Tefc (1)29 17 23 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


16TH Sa HBRB PATW. 
enprion, 1 bedroom 75 kjjtl 
I rage r n cm Uon 2 bedroortB. F800Q. 

Tefc 577 9514T 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


4TH QUAI DES CHEST9B. PM- 
hause, ivvry, dring, A bedrooms, 3 
beds, office, mrirfsioom 1600*)Jn. 
torroa.faitaifviewonSein e.il 3 
Louis and afl Peris. Vtstt Gucrrfan 


every day eoazpt Saturday afternoon 
erri Sunday* f6 - 


75004 Paris 


i Qud das Cekariro, 


HOnaMABMfa 5006351. lou- 
veriemeac tying, 4 icon*. F750Q- Si 
Germarii Sving, 6 rooms. FI50QO. 
ftxrgueuu iwx). 10 roost*. F150001 

USA 


WUMA. AHZONA Warehouses 
230X00 sq.fi d 10 tarts/ s^it. mveri- 
ment tar oecfii avoiable. PXX Boe 
4406. Hayward Cbfif. 9454a USA 


EMPLOYMENT 


FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSmONS 
LOOKUMn 

■1NTBD4A710NAL POSmONT’ 
PAGE 7 


oxarnvE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


■ TOUCH POfUME t U 
ACCESS ORY COMPANY 

M IO rr^m 


with wide experiencE in DfS/airfeie 
throoghoul die world. Atar 


dd potion for h^h 

Bis eecto r. Pari s base. Bo» 

Ttfaeie. 92521 Neudy Cadex, France 


AGBO COM MOOtTY TRAQB t A wtl 
coninerrid feed company is looti n g 
fa a profcss i cnd trader to beoome 
toe manoger of their French Opera- 


the manager of tor 
Son. In adtihon to . 

ha vril have demonstrated cn abity 
to buy apo raw materials on world 
nraies. French/Engfish fluency is 
nraxtaqry. Plerae sand yoor reune 
Bax 2*55, Herdd THfae, 92521 
Neu#y Cede*. France 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 
AMB8CAN ATTORNEY, 10 yecn ex 


panenco seels 1-2 ywr posting wito 
wV Uin 


or carpi Advertaar, _2624 
grfaon Awr, Son Pedro, CA 9®31 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


SCAMMAVMN 37. MIA 6 fat- 
es in Fori 


.broods 


_ US 

_ profit nwirlnrt, top 
enoei, eontodi, uwta emplaymaof 
portnarsfap based. Sputoeasf Ada. 


HtnM Tribune. 92521 
Neutiy CwfaCPrance 


ADMRRStlATIVE AS SISTANT, 27 . 
molars in sit pvdc airenistrahorv 
bsfaani in Ml faxes A trade, 
Frenai & conwuta fluent wdt trav- 
ang Third Worid experience, 
Dougim Cdder, 40 Sanford, 


Colorado Springs, CO 80906 USA. 


Tefc 303471^ 


WiANCUU-EXHaiflVE . 10 »55w 


penenoe with Aificnn . .... 

m Europe seek* conlroSer /assistant 
cortroner poritian m Paris - no agerts- 
Bax aMlTlfadd Triune, fell 
Neuay Cede*, Frstoco 


GENERAL POSfTIONS 
AVAILABLE 


MTONATTONAi EMMOYMB4T: 

Processionals, managws aid sUbri 


Amancnn muffinrtionat Write for 
edo and fast Wemodond Career 
Cbradlerts, 2730 Sot Pedro PC, Suile 
H, Aibuquerque, NM B7I10 USA. 


tiloofa 


WTHB4ATKJNAL 
ing for wefl edu 

exeefant aqpearme as 

d eon^ramon, parend secretary. 
Photo eesertM Gaeksn 127 Aw Vic- 
tor Hupp Paris 8tK 


TKWRCALSALB. Agmt /Consd- 
fonts reqwred for mod couJtoteL Ap* 


BWimsKMaNG 

pamo or imojnrrxv rAKnJmoac 3 
rde du Hektir, Paris 9, Metro Opera. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


DYNAMfc AMBKAN LADY vta 

position Paris. SUled oefarintitr ota t - 
/ mu eitoi eLd e r ew et to any office. 
Position wonted: tasofort to eraadve 
/ company, PJL Wifo a to travel 


CbntadCurry. tefc 813837-8266 USA. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECt/nveS 

hyaurk 


. where r 


mmm 

AoioMd 


of a edim tw de s worid- 
wido, m o ot of wAosn oe n 
budnen and indulry, v/Jt 
rood (t Am4 Mk is (fare 
613S9S] boforo TDttflv, oo- 
maf tew con frier you 


back, and yoor maseafle wiB 

wfthb 43hovn. 


Urn 


ram k US. $9 JO or bad 
•qomdant ptr Bna. Yaa mod 
tndudo miffcli and Ysrift- 
tdda bdKng addraa. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & LHC 
LTD COMPANIES 


, Aj nameL Ua 

r dtw offsiore oreai.- 

* Coohdened advin 

• fa errafae av^obiity 


• Bearer share* 

• Boat regfardiore 

• Accounting A odmirestraikai 

• Mad. leisdMM & Mn 


lTE 


M» 


SBVKE5UD 
Head Office 


2-5 
Tel 01 


-493 4244. Tfai2B247 SC5UR4 G 


WANTS} 
ogwto far new faitottc dress gome 


PANAMA URSA. CORPORATIONS* 
from USS40Q nvtafcjbte now. Tel 
10674) 30740 43357 ISLAND 

G- (via UK]. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

BROKERS 

IWESTMENT ADVISORS 

Yam cfcents can mvesl in are af Ameri- 
cos nw*t_er«nu>g tecfmofeflicrt brec*- 

BMdlndi Paid. Ugh ctxwoJ earnings 
assured fa mm, urawyena Ge—r- 
oat tao—rieiuMC apq fieow. Mrtati- 
afarajbfctemfriflUi, French. German. 
ContadJ 

GLOBE PLAN SJL 

Av AtarvAspai 24, 

Tefc (21] CH 

COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T^HRT FOTOS 

NOW IN fUU COLOR 

an dfccmh business tool can aant you 
18000 - SlO^OO/mortk hW and umd 
nstana from J9500 - $76^00. 
tima. Drat J12, Postfoch 170340, 
6000 rrtriFurt/W. Getrix»y. 

Tefc 069747308 11b 412713 KEMA 

USA 

_ BUSNE5SB A REAL ESTATE 

resfctiteM rert eBare-safa & leans. 
Property moraotenetti & busmen de- 
velupntert. Wrfro with your regiero 
nw 4 mocha specs to Hbon feafiy 
& fiusnes Broknre, 1CTS Jeffrey 1 id, 
#210. fame. CA 92714 USA. 714651- 
8030, Tlx: 570194. 

OFFSHORE TAX SHttTER 

. COMMW5 

UK. Ne af Man, Tutto. Qxxxfa Iskxvfa 
Paxma. Lbena tud tno*l offshore 
metis. Complete support toddies. 
Very strict axtfidenftaety. 

Free' oonsuftaiiort 

Eager Griffin LLEL, fJLK 

firocfarei Garaarate Manageaiete UtL 
Wctran Heme, Vidono Street, 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

wn 

BEAUT1RJL PEOFIE 

IMlMITED MC. 

UAA. A VTORUMK 

A eompfoto persond & business senses 
proitkCng a uriqw aAecoan al 
tofonted, wrsc0e & nwhEngud 
mdwdurts fa d soad & 
promobond occasions, 
212-765-7793 
21^765^794 

330 W. 56to 9 W N.Y.C 10019 
Service hpresattiutiwa 

iNVESTMttTS 

SS OUR AD ON PAGE 
PAGE 11 

TRANS CONTAINS 
MARKETING AG 

5UFSMASKET PIOFTS. Former U5. 
Ktobbt Merdwndwr and axauttant 
to Arar»» Food Semctii cm ittaaase 
your satis and pafifc by improving 
wur pwrdwna rtctrfcrton, pridaft 
rtsptoy. rtfocoMtt and uegroifing 
equfontert. Write W. Mtar/Bar 274; 
Ptyhot Cyprus. 

COMIC BOCK PUBUSHB 

saafaArtwtaVsgants 
far its Engfali ianguage asm 
Wnla QMS* S jCX902Su|«me 
House Bldg. 2A. Hart A« 

Tam Sho Tux Rowfoon, Hang tong 

HOW TO GET A 2 mi PASSORT. 

report > 12 cauteries cxtalynd De- 
*Al WMA, 45 tyndhrt Terrace, 
Sale 503. Central. Hong Kong 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


DO YOU WANT TO BUY or any 
merchandise Bi fceoprf Liechtenstein 
07524956. Bom 225R9495 Trienwv 


F INANC IAL 

INVESTM^JTS 


HAVE IAS. DOUARS TO 
for 5F or wry currency, wg atio 
barrow large sums of SF, 3 or 10 
vsore. How ftwdBory nores. Td 
23731 4510 * 


MAJOR LATIN AMBUCAH country 
wB provide failed number cf dtaav 
jHba paapem to hcnonile persons 
w*ng to nvtot Pfense write ndudng 

France 


EARN 30% - 35%. MVBT fa dun 
wfaL A/Sed 


term eornetarad poper nda. Ailed 

^5j^90lTlSl^* 5, * Ura Yif ' 


OFFICE SERVICES 


GENEVA 

SWIZBUW 

Ful Sarvte* 
is our Business 


• bttemdwnd low aid taxes 

• AAAom. faiephtjne and lei 


tdex 


• Tranddfon and teoiw ri ranaeas 

• Ffaftfaion, dotrvcfaK i o n and 
adnli«tra(iefl af Swis ad foreign 
oompaws 

Ful cenMenae ad tfaadian osmd 


W5MB5S ADVISORY 
SBMCESSA 

I2Q7GBCVA. 

I Telex: 23342 




Runo > telex f majtbax 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AKTKULATE, RBffiCTAILE bkxk 
woman worn wry much to experi- 
ence Europe. Seek position with 
roo» u/boc«u Not wecenrafy au par. 

HaexuJert lyo n u g uimnul, com- 
riadhm dtSs. 1A«be in Engfand 5ept 
& HUe to Star wort 2 weefa ofltir. 
Needs reply by July 25. M Wctoer, 
465 Norm Grave S»., East Grange, 
NJL 07017 USA 


YOUNG AUSTRALIAN WOMAN, 


Engfah mother tongu^ftteni^d^ 


„ . Arts, pubic . 

e J tond ad trersfaioa. 5eeis 
podtian in Pan com- 
Currerriy am. 


nwnaig Ud/Ne 

played dplamatic 


French, MBA, fluent 

fcSSSKwS'J!! 

m«ia or aranc in- 
duslry Port time conddered. Write: 
Bax ilM, Herald Tribute, 92521 
Newly Cede*. Fnxte 


VBtY ATTRACTIVE GSURAN lady, 

26, fandWrepresantatfai seek PX 
postioa bowfag welcome. Phase 
write to Box 2156, LHT_ Frfcfaichar. 
15; 06000 FroSvt/Mtfa. 


mot. 20 , 


writer A 5tdinus, 32 Wr 
FuCxxa, London 5W6. 


Sbeet 


do updates ii 

Box 2464, } 

Newly Cedex, France 


. Here* Trfoune, 92521 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


UMDUE SEEKS far AMBBCAN 
mjP * KVt ffRftS in PAZSt 


EngfaK. 


CMdi or Gennan 
_ « French re- 

cpxred, Engfah Mxftnd BOngurt 
t e hrdsts . Wrfa or phone: 138 Awnue 
Vfaor^l^p, 751l6POti, France. Tefc 


727 i 


EDUCATKXVAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


DMECTOR FOR Aewrian University 
Study ftagran et Pin GtaditaB de- 
gree TKyirad- Afco wed port lime 
professor of ftnoro, doetorote pro- 
faned. Write Box 2472, Herald Tri- 
bwt^ 92521 Neofly Codex, France 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


TEApB OF OME5E toff defaxe. 

| WB rrmel 6 roonlhi intansiw trmrina 
tone hgrting prinriples, Trerid 
breatomoteehrerptei Onrese mStary 
strategy, phinophy, psychology. P n- 
vrrie oseuaon far rtftad child inter- 
erted nivichxtis & Ahary or fajhtii^ 
faoupL For info write or ccA: Fraras- 


coVdmPX). Beat 50327. LatAaga 
les, CAWOiQ. Tefc (2131 8^-141Br 


AMBBCAN BIGUM TEROB, 3* 

M years in Europe, fiuerti Gerem 
t“tec Rendt. experienca pubtic/pri- 
vo*e rchoofe aid Industry. Plecse 


wifa MBm Tl^UiT, tmdrkiar. 
3 Frartidvt/Mdn 


15.60001 


DOMESTIC 

POSTTIONS AVAILABLE 


COUlUWANfBfw aWein Aima. 
|ca 45 mfe from WashpxjSon, DC 

PATS 

[sep arate gue rt m. Soiary ne- 
■■bxalorri rererettew re- 


AU.PAB FUR MANHATTAN court* 
wfc 1 yea old. 2nd due FNyoory. 

Minimum 1 yea. Nan- 


tded 


smoker. Please send photo. Witte la 
Tiium, 92521 


Ban 2436, HeraU 
NnsBy Ced*x, France 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


YOUNG G9& 22, serious, seeks cu- 
USA ( year or more. Write; 
, rue Vd Cotnenf, 


TU3S0670I 


Forteaqy an fans. Franca. 
>6701 rati. 


m CBtlTR P R0K550K hxrfly seeks 

ou peif poet far Iheti doogher )7, in 
emmidem fancy Etfaond from 
14/7,10 7/B. Farit 336295 pn 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EUROPORT TAX 
Hitt CARS 


Crf at write fa tree cofafoa. 
12011 


Ti 

Tefal 


Mar - 

. 25tm EPCARM 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 


THE NBtCBKS 5PEOAUST5 
5 wtearlond,West Gernraty AEngfart 


Tot free - IHD -^L^eon delvery 


US 

Shipping by toe experts. 


14 STOCX 500 SEA, Bfock. Gray. Blue 
380 SEC- Blodt Steer 
280 SE/L Rodt. Blue 


DOfficr MOM SOURCE 


Tratco London Ud 
6567 Potfc fane. London Wl. 
Tefc 01-629 7779 
Telex 8956022 IRAS C. 


COOPS ST JAMES 


exnciALAGOir 
OF BMW (OR) LTD 


Whfa you are in Ewape. we oat offer 
oonederable soring* an braid new 
BMW art to ant s p edficOtoa. FuH 
fadory wwranty. 


We art cAo^s^p^rigrt of loft hend 
BMW 


drive tax 
We abo 

range tat free. 


tourist jjrnaM- 


Cal London (01) 629 6699. 


10 YEARS 

Wn DeReer Cen tie foe Wald 


TRANSCO 


Kuphg o contfort cod of mo*% thun 
300 bmd rwwcan. 




T roraco SA, 95 NowdSona 


Tel 323 ^iO^L7£ ^^IRaNS I 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, fa inraefate tWwiy 

ROM STOCK 


in USA 

Rl/IEfNC 

TAUNUSSTS. 52. 6000FRAMOURT 

W Germ, tel (#-232351. tlx 41155? 


OGANW8X 
MOTORS GmbH 


Suet 1977, rxptr ka ad tar trader far 
Mercedes, Porsche, BMW.-hnmedato 


Germany 


r. Oceamride Motors GsnttoL 


“TAX Hitt" 


19» Medbb (ARMdAosEX. Stock) 
Fleet orders ctifcwred fa port 
tovnf adete Mnitid ex-Eurape 


Bxopeai aid Ui spec, models 
Contoe#; The bqm in Europe 
G.T. VeKde Exports W 




EXCAUBUR 

Us Automgbtot E xti uo t J ipees 
Pork Prkxr, Matte Colo 
Pmdpautt de Monaco 
Tefc (99-8709, Tfa 469870 MCS 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


SPECIAL SPORTS CARS 

Porsche and Mercedes from G et ma n y 
af wrtioni asdaxnplate Anna Mser- 
impart / export. Please reply la 
» 2172. liuT Fnednchstr. 11 
M00 hankhrt/Maa 


Bat ! 


FOR MfcMBXAlE DBJVOY: 

500 SI rirtrt tend cfriwe 
white witojSx brown leather. 
LHD. fOl 5EC SL SR 
florahe 930 Tixbo. 

Afl new ax) faSy loaded 
il71xt 


Germav 06868/517 Tx 4452430B0 


NEW MHKB1ES: 500 a red awkfc/ 
arm, DMW.0C0. 280 St sfvar/ 
blade, DM74TO0. 280 SL red/prto- 
rrtna. DM79jOOO. 500 SR b&/ 

black. t»«onoa sen sec tiau 

bfcx*. DM%OOa All fully loaded cop 
for mmedote detivety. TaL fcte ted x 
|0) 89-958510. 


BMW80.633CSJ.USJ9N)0 i W8Q i 
3B0 SLUSSUXIOO. M8 76?450Sa, 
USSiOOO. AJJ fiK loaded, erafart 
oontSforv Qrfail GMBH, Mandm. 
Tefc BB B9-71 58 ft Tfa 5218230 


LOTUS, VOiVa SAAR. Affo Borneo. 
Al modeh in stock. BagnussosOrat- 
det er Oe. MoOa Corio Tefc (K? 
304851 Telex 47911 SMC FARM, 


TRANSMUNDI BBjGOIM. 21 Gatiti- 


03^84.1054 Ttr 32303 TransniB. In 
stock: Mercedes. BMW. ASO. 


JAGUAR’S <2 Souv. Spot defan 

mssoo-ifc 


MDFAAniw.ipzP); 


AUTOMOBILES 


FORAR1400 

Broad ne w ti e aid e ter ren dMitati fl 

MADBD(W&fcS^S67564 


FBUtARI BB 512 


BRMCNEW 

dor wetedBc attte rod iatester 
MADRID (SAKT 4S67564 


14000 km. metdfa . 

trfher interior, bfccfc CCTOrt, 

3 conation. Tel: Gensw 022r 
36 25 


Fxtfrgia e MONETS ca w agedfa i 
+ cato for top ea France (93)391294 ja 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 


TWCARSWPMG 

PARS W * aAUST ni 225 64 44 
CANf>C5/J4CE J9S 39 43 44 

FWMOW (drifOT] WJI 

BOW / COLOGNE 10238)21 
STUTTGART 


1921 


MUP4CH 
BSEMHHAVBg 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
LOS ANGELES 
MONTREAL. 

AGB4TS WOOD 

Lmw it to us to bring it to you 



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