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WEATHBt DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With The New York limes and The Washington Post 


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s No. 31,842 


** 


PARIS, SATURDAY -SUNDAY , JULY 6-7, 1985 


ESTABUSHED 1887 




"Tis 


Beirut Asks Europe 
To Refuse U.S. Call 
‘To Boycott Airport 


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Ccmpiitd by Qv Staff From Dispatcher 

BEIRUT — The Lebanese gov- 
ernment said Friday that it was 
trying to persuade European coun- 


to dose Bonn International Air- 
port in retaliation for the hijacking 
of a Trans World Airlines jet. 

The Foreign Ministry said Fuad 
Turk, ih&underseaeiaAr of foreign 
affairs, had summoned European 

ambassadors and sought assur- 
ances that their nations would not 
ban flights to and from Beirut. 


from President Ronald Reagan on 
Friday explaining the reasons for _ 
his attempt to isolate Beirut air- ' 
port. Lebanese officials said. 

The U.S. ambassador, Reginald 
Bartholomew, delivered the mes- 
sage to Mr. Gemayel, who told him 
that Lebanon bad officially de- 
nounced the hijacking ana had 
helped in negotiations to free the 
hostages, the officials said. 

State-owned Beirut -Radio 
quoted Mr. Gemayel as telling Mr. 
Bartholomew that Lebanon “re- 


Mr. Gemayel also repeated ins 
view that Washington should “di- 
rect its attention to the roots of 
terrorism, which lie outside Leba- 
non,” officials added. 

(AP, UPI. Reuters) 


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The leftist Bdnrt newspaper, As- gretted and was surprised at Amer- 
Safir, said France, Italy, Greece tea's unjust action.'’ 
and Switzerland had promised not 
to join U.S. measures in retaliation 
for the hijacking of TWA Flight 
847 loBdrutand the holding of 39 
US. hostages for 17 days. 

But France also has stressed the 
need to bring the hijackers to trial 
for killing a U.S. Navy diva:, Rob- 
ert Dean Stethem, aboard the com- 
mandeered jetliner. As-Safir said. 

The Italian ambassador, Anto- 
nio Manrini, said after the meet- 
ing: “We have discussed ways of 
improving Beirut airport, because 
thuisa very important problem for 
us air 

“We have also demanded that 
the Lebanese government emphati- 
cally condemn the TWA hijacking 
and tell us about the means with 
which it will deal with the situation 
after the hijack,” be said. 

Mr. Turk later met with the am- 
bassadors of the East European 
bloc and with Far Eastern envoys. 

Selim Saiam, chairman of Mid- 
dle East Airlines, said in a State- 
ment published Friday that the 
boycott would not “break the 
back” of Lebanon’s national carri- 
er. But the company would be in 
serious trouble if Europe joined the 
sanctions, he said. 





& agsgsyggg: 




Voters in Wales 
StunT^ite^r 
In By- 


Two Lebanese 
Beirut International 


men stood by an earth barrier at 
on Friday. The barrier, de- 


signed to block access to runways, was built as part of anti- 
hijacking measures after U.S. moves to dose the airport 


Iron and Syria Nurture an Uncertain Relationship 


By Richard Bernstein 

New York Juna Service 

DAMASCUS — Women and children, 
the relatives of “martyrs” from the recent 
struggles of Iran, dismount from buses at a 
mosque on the southern edge of this dry and, 
antid the pilgrims from Saudi Arabia and 
Kuwait, pray before the tomb of a grand- 
daughter of Mohammed. 

. Many of them are in Syria courtesy of the 
Iranian government, whose official Martyrs 
Foundation pays their expenses for the pil- 
grimage and provides them with some spend- 
ing money. 

Near the 


ring ceiling fans, is one aspect of the complex 
relationship that has existed between the two 
hard-tine, bitterly anti-Israeli nations of Syr- 
ia and Iran, particularly since the I ranian 
revolution m 1979 and the outbreak of the 
Iran-Iraq war nearly five years ago. 

Other aspects of the relationship are also 
visible. There is, for example, the Iranian Air 
Force Boeing 747 that arrives ai a remote 
end of the Damascus airport once a week, 
carrying revolu tionar y guards and military 
supplies destined fa* the Bekaa region in 
Lebanon across the border from Syria. 

Less visible are various understandings 


1 well diminish in the 
id. 


*“> proKKcls bewtra tbc two muta* 6y 


He said he had received “positive 
~ Switzer- 




; :*i\ r. 




SO .¥. 


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assurances’ from France, 
land and Greece that they would 
not stop flights to or from Beirut 

At the airport, meanwhile, 
moves were started to improve se- 
curity. Police used bulldozers to 
construct earth barricaded to block 
12 access roads to the runways. 
Gunmen withdrew from the area, 
transferring authority to army 
■ units. 

President Amin Gemayel met for 
three hours with the army chief. 
General Michel Aounu Mr. Saiam 
and the finance, defense and interi- 
or ministers to discuss the airport, 
which has been the scene of seven 
- hijackings this year. 

The group agreed to transfer 
control of the facility from Shiite 
Moslem Antal militiamen to “le- 
gitimate authority” and upgrade 
the facility by purchasing new con- 
; trol tower equipment. 

• Mr. Gemayel received a letter 


Chinese Start 
Reappraised 


; dusty trees, where the 
from Iran buy quartz watches and Instama- 
tic cameras. On a wall of the Sitt Zainab 
Mosque, the holiest Shiite shrine in Syria, is a 
rare sight in this rather secular country: a 
large portrait of Ayatollah RuhoQah Kho- 
meini, the leader of lran. 

The busy scene at the mosque, a glittering 
structure of stiver mirrored arches mid whir- 


of common interest — an enmity for Iraq 
and a desire to eliminate Israeli and Ameri- 
can influence from Lebanon. 

Diplomatic observers of the scene here 
suspect than, while relations are close and 
cooperation extensive, strains or at least am- 
biguities are also present in the Iran-Syrian 
connection, and some believe that their mu- 


tual 

months and years 

“These two countries are good friends,” a 
diplomat said, “particularly because they 
have a common enemy in Iraq. But thar 
dose relations often don't go beyond the old 
notion that the enemy of my enemy is my 
friend. There’s a great deal in both style and 
substance that makes these two countries 
somewhat uncomfortable allies. 

“Syria is largely a secular state; it can even 
be called anti-regions,” the diplomat con- 
tinued. “It is entirely different from Inn, 
where policy steins almost entirely from a 
fanatical religious vision.” 

One area of ambiguity in the relations 
between the two countries seems to have 
emerged during rite recent hostage crisis, 
when 39 American passengers on a Trans 
World Airways flight from Athens to Rome 
were held in Beirut for 17 days. The hijackers 
are believed to have been members of Hez- 
bollah, or the Parly of God, an extremist 
Shiite militia that, in the view of most diplo- 


By R.W. Apple 

New York Times Stem i 

LONDON — Prime 
Margaret Thatcher suffered a poli 
ical shock Friday as her party fin- 
ished a feeble third in a closely 
watched by-decLion in Wales. 

fn the voting in Brecon and Rad- 
nor, a sprawling rural constituency 
in the southeast, Richard Livsey. a 
Liberal, won a narrow victory over 
Richard Willey of Labor. 

Mr. Livsey's triumph gave a 
sorely needed boost to the Liberal- 
Social Democratic Alliance, which 
needs continuing by-election vic- 
tories to lend credence to its asser- 
tion that it should be taken serious- 
ly as a third major force in British 
politics. 

The result was also a good show- 
ing for the recently rejuvenated La- 
bor Party, which had never counted 
Brecon and Radnor among the 
seats it was likely to win. 

But for Mrs. Thatcher, the out- 
come was a calamity. Until his 
death several weeks ago, Tom Hoo- 
son, a Conservative, had held the 
seal, but the man chosen by Mrs. 
Thatcher and her party to succeed 
Him, Christopher Butler, polled 
only 27.7 percent of the vote, com- 
th Mr. Hooson's 50 per- 



matic analysts here, gets its chief backing 
and political inspiration from Iran. 

The crisis was resolved through the per- 
sonal intervention of the Syrian president. 

Hafez al-Assad. In the view of diplomats 
here, Mr. Assad is interested in fashioning a 
new, pro-Syrian political structure in Leba- 
non and views radical, independent militias, pared wi 
supported from outside, as harmful to that cent in 1983. It was only the fourth 
goal- by-election since 1918 in which the 

The Syrians do not say so publicly, but 
they are believed by foreign analysts here to 
want Iran to reduce its support of Islamic 
militants. It is assumed that that was one of 
the subjects discussed when the speaker of 
the Iranian parliament. Hashemi Rafsanjani, 
was here on an official visit while the hostage 
drama was being played out. 

During the visit, according to reliable re- 


ports here, Mr. Assad asked Mr. Rafsanjani 
for help in ending the crisis, presumably by 
using Iranian influence to persuade Hczbal- 
kth to release the hostages it held. 

Whatever strains may lie beneath the sur- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


candidate of the party that had 
held the seat fell into third place. 

The voting took place on Thurs- 
day but the result was not an- 
nounced until Friday afternoon, af- 
ter a long recount. The count 
showed the allianc e with 13,753 
votes. Labor 13,194 and the Con- 
servatives trailing with 10,631. 

Taken in conjunction with the 
results of local elections last month 
and the national opinion polls, the 
result at Brecon and Radnor was 
interpreted by politicians as a seri- 
ous warning to Mrs. Thatcher. The 


e/Welsh contest, 
ler, were repea:- 
fe government has 
economy going, 
Jed the National Health 
Service and other welfare programs 
of funds and has taken a supercil- 
ious attitude in general. 

Mr. Butier. a former adviser to 
Mrs. Thatcher, came to regard her 
as a liability during the three week:- 
of the campaign. 

Labor spokesmen said that they 
would have won except for two 
factors: Arthur Scargill and the lo- 
cal polls. Without those, comment- 
ed the deputy Labor leader, Roy 
HaueisJey. “we would have had a 
general -elec lion-winning perfor- 
mance in Brecon.” 

Mr. Scargill the radical leader of 
the miners’ union, made a speech 
on Tuesday demanding that the 
next Labor government give hi* 
union the right to select the bosses 
of Lhe state-owned National Coal 
Board. Neil Kinnock. the Labor 
leader, immediately said that he 
would do nothing of the kind but 
Mr. Scargill had revived memories 
of the bitter coal strike with his 
comment and Mr. Willey, a moder- 
ate. found undecided centrist vot- 
ers drifting away. 

Polls, especially the most recent 
one by Market and Opinion Re- 
search International were far off 
the mark. The firm, usually the 
most accurate on British elections, 
had Labor ahead by 18 percentage 
points on Tuesday. 

Anthony King, a leading politi- 
cal scientist, said that that may 
have frightened many Tory sup- 
porters into switching to the alli- 
ance as the only means of beating 
Labor. John Smith, a leading Labor 
strategist, described the role of the 
alliance in this election as “a refu- 
gee camp for disgruntled and terri- 
fied Conservatives.” 


France, in Strategy Shift, Takes On Defense of West Ger 

By Joseph 
Iniemaaanal Hi 


Lany 


Of Reft 


orms 




N 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Posi Service 

BEIJING — The Chinese Com- 
munist Party has been conducting a 
high-levd re-examination of the 
scope and pace of the nation’s eco- 
nomic reforms because of disap- 
pointing results and negative side 
effects in certain key sectors, ac- 
cording to Western diplomats. 

The party chiefs have focused in 
particular on how to bring corrup- 
tion and other abuses under stricter 
• coniroL 

The diplomats are divided as to 
what some of the implications 
ought be. But based on a dose 
reading of the Chinese press and 
talks with Chinese officials, they 
, tend to agree that, while the re- 
forms could be slowed down in 
' some areas, it is inconceivable at 
tins stage that they will be reversed. 

Divisions persist among Chinese 
leaders as to how far and how fast 
to proceed with the reforms, but 
they will try to reach a consensus 
before a special party conference 
convenes in September. 

In the words of one diplomat, the 
most reform-minded leaders suf- 
fered a “severe jolt” toward the end 
of last year when bank lending ran 
out of control and foreign exchange 
» reserves dropped. 

Decentralization of authority 



Ths AaKxkntd Prou 

The defense ministers of France, Charles Hertiu, left, and of West Germany, Manfred 
Womer, observed joint military field maneuvers last month in training area near Stuttgart 


Ficcherr 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France is modifying 
its military strategy to guarantee 
the defense of West Germany, a 
major shift in attitude that experts 
see as a significant step toward 
closer West European military co- 
operation. 

West Germany is cautiously en- 
couraging this development, while 
Dying to be sure that an enhanced 
French role is compatible with 
West Germany's basic defenses, 
based on the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization. 

The moves reflect two new 
thanes in French strategic think- 
ing: concern about a potential for 
neutralism in West Germany and a 
growing realization that military 
costs are starting to outrun 
France's ability to finance them 
alone. 

“There is a lot of subterranean 
movement occurring in French de- 
fense arrangements to forge closer 
ties with West Germany,” said a 
former top rmbtary official. 

Pnblidy, France's minister of de- 
fense, Charles Hernu, described 


French and West German security 
interests as “inseparably linked.” 

West Germany's defense minis- 
ter, Manfred Warner, said he was 
“grateful to hear that France no 
longer considers West Germany 
just a buffer.” 

This week, the French Socialist 

~NEWS ANALYSIS 

Party wait further, calling for 
France to prod aim that its conven- 
tional and even nuclear forces 
would defend West Germany. 

Describing these steps as “essen- 
tially trial balloons,'’ the former 
French military official, who de- 
clined to be ni fljiari said that the 
crucial step, to be taken now, is Tor 
President Francois Mitterrand to 
make a public commitment to this. 

While waiting for France to spell 
out the policy, the West German 
chancellor, Helmut Kohl has not 
commented publicly on the issue. 

The view of most German strate- 
gists was expressed recently by 
Horst Empke, a spokesman of the 
opposition Social Democrats, who 
said that West Germany seeks tan- 


gible French support, including 
more French troops stationed in 
West Germany and possibly a 
clearer commitment about 
France's nudear force. 

As a step in this (Erection, 
France has set up a special force 
designated to reinforce NATO 
units in West Germany in the event 
of a Soviet attack. 

But senior French commanders 
and West German politicians have 
pointed out that this so-called 
“rapid action force” will require 
increased military spending. 

General Jeannou Lacaze, retir- 
ing head of the French general 
staff, warned last week that the 
Socialist government might cut the 
military budget next October — a 
view echoed by conservative oppo- 
sition parties and by Western mili- 
tary attaches in Pans, 

Even if the military budget is not 
cat. General Lacaze pointed out 
that France could not provide, for 
example, the air cover that the rap- 
id action force would need in war. 

To reduce the costs of military 
equipment, France and West Ger- 

(CoatunKd on Page 5, CoL 2) 


Swedes Limit Sterilization Gains Popularity in U.S. 


Antibiotics 
In Livestock 

Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden will 
become the first country in the 
world to ban the use of antibiotics 
u> make grow faster, the 

Swedish Fanners' Meat Marketing 
Association said Friday. 

Under a law sponsored by the 
association that will take effect in 
January 1936, the use of antibiotics 
in the future will be allowed only 
for preventing or curing annual dis- 
eases. The ban will not, however, 
apply to imported meal 
The Swedish association said 
keeping animats contented and im- 
proving their environment was a 
mere effective way of promoting 
growth than the use of antibiotics. 

, ----- — r - i „ ■ “Sweden is ahead in this area 

brought by the reforms has m- ^ ^ ^ ^ antibiotics 

creased rural prosperity. But some ^ ^ prom£>lc both the internal 


Tubal ligations Have Almost Quadrupled Since 1965 


conducted, 26 percent had been 
sterilized. 

At the same time, the use of the 
pH] among married women was on 
dm wane, going from 24 patient in 
1965 to a peak of 36 percent in 1973 
to 20 percent in 1982. 

According to the survey, 5 per- 


; -TM I • ‘ 

!Wv 


provincial officials and Comm- 
munisl Party cadres have taken ad- 
vantage of that same decentraliza- 
tion to reap personal and illicit 
profits. Officials have singled out 
for criticism the Shenzhen Special 
Economic Zone adjacent to Hong 
Kong, winch was once cited as a 
model by Deng Xiaoping, the 
country's principal leader. 

It had been hoped that Shenzhen 
would attract substantial amounts 


market and Swedish meat exports, 
an association spokesman said. 

The association said consumas* 
concent was one of the main fac- 
tors behind its sponsoring of th^ 
ban. The organization represents 
most Swedish meat producers and 
the ban was also backed by Swer 
den's main farmers' unions. 


By E. R. Shipp 

New VorA: Times Service 

NEW YORK — Seven yean 
ago, when JoEDen Mayes was 36 
and her husband, Gordon, was 44, 
they had a terrible fright: Mrs. 

Mayes thought she might be preg- 
nant. 

It was a false alarm, bat the idea 
of a “second family," as Mr. Mayes 
put it, when their two daughters 
were nearly grown and their mort- 
gage was almost paid, upset them 
so much that Mr. Mayes bad a 
vasectomy. 

The Mayeses, who live in Los 
Angeles, thus joined an increasing 
number of Americans choosing 
sterilization. 

In 1983, the last year for which 
statistics were available, 622,000 
women and 455,000 men were ster- 
ilized as a contraceptive measrae, cent of married men had been ster- 
according to the Association for - m 1965, as against 15 percent 

Voluntary Sierihzaaoo, a private - m 19 g 2 . ' 


wly : 
rider 


mar- 

ster- 


The whole fertility 
revolution has to do 
with an almost anti- 
child posture/ 

EL Theodore Groat 
Professor of sociology 




"wuu attract suoaianun •*u*«u**« c . , * » »n p^toat 

of foreign investment and technoL Spanish Air 1 error rrotesi 
ogy while generating major export Reuters 

earnings. Instead, Shenzhen's main MADRID — Spain's air traffic 

contribution has been in service in- ^ baited briefly Saturday 
dustries. Investment has been dis- ^ ^ 0 ^ s tag C a stoppage at .... . 

appointing, and the special zone ainwts to protest recent attacks on operations, a tubal ligation. By 
iCuotunred on Page 2, CoL 2) commercial airlines. 1&2, when the latest survey was 


educational and research center in 
New York. 

According to the most recent 
survey of the National Center for 
Health Statistics, a division of the 
UJ5. Department of Health and 
Human Services, the use of steril- 
ization by married men and women 
has risen dramatically since 1965. 

In fad, the survey concluded, 
sterilization has replaced the birth- 
control {till as the most popolar 
form of contraception for married 
women. In 1965, 7 percent of mar- 
ried women had had sterilization 


The greatest increase in the use 
of steriSzation, female or male, has 
occurred among couples with at 
least one child and in which the 
wife is 35 to 44 years old. 

“It seems to be a major form of 
birth control for the married mid- 
dle class," said Dr. John J. Barton, 
chairman of the obstetrics and gy- 
necology department at the Illinois 
Masonic Medical Ceuta in Chica- 
go. 

H. Theodore Groat, a sociology 
professor who studies fertility con- 
trol at the Population and Society 
Research Center at Bowling Green 
Stele University in Ohio, said it 


was now common for new! 
tied young couples to const 
ilization as a future option. 

“The planning for thar lives is 
such today that, unless they can 
plan their fertility as wdl the plans 
for other aspects of their lives get 
knocked out of killer," he said. 

Among unmarried younger 
women the pill remains the over- 
whelming choice, according to Dr. 
Louise B. 1>rcr, vice president for 
medical affairs for the Planned 
Parenthood Federation of Ameri- 
ca. 

“Bui sterilization is being uti- 
lized by women younger than ever 
before/* sbe said. 

An anaiyss of hospital records 
conducted by the federal Centers 
for Disease Control demonstrates 
this. From 1970 to 1980; the analy- 
sis showed, 17 peremt of the tubal 
Ligations were performed on wom- 
en under 25. 

According to Dr. Nancy Lee, an 
epidemiologist in the federal cen- 
tos' reproductive health division, 
this same review of hospital records 
showed that in 1979 and again in 
1980 about half the tubal ligations 
were perforated on women under 
30. This included women who were 
sterilized for contraceptive or other 
reasons, and the vast majority of 
them. Dr. Lee said, had bad chil- 
dren. 

Professor Groat attributes this 
tread to “the devaluation of fertil- 
ity, the devaluation of children as 
important in one's life.” 

“The whole fertility revolution,” 

(Continued ou Page 5, Col 4) 


INSIDE 



Kevin Curren beat Jimmy Connors in straight sets in 
Wimbledon singles semifinals. Rain stopped the match 
between Anders Jarryd and Boris Becker. Page 15. 

■ A robot submarine reportedly round Air-lndia airliner wreckage off 

Ireland believed to contain the flight recorders. Page 3. 

ARTS/LEISURE ~ 

■ Prices are duribing for Old Master drawings, two recent auctions 

have confirmed. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The U.S. tmemptoymenl rate in June remained at 7 J percent for the 
fifth month in a row and the economy gained no new jobs. Page 9. 

MONDAY 

Many bond investors are following the big institutions into the 
highest yielding game in town — junk bonds. Personal Investing. 


Terror Camps 
Are Reported 
In Nicaragua 

United Press Inienwaonal 

NEW YORK — Hundreds of 
West Europeans are being trained 
in terrorist tactics by Cuban and 
Palestinian instructors in Nicara- 
gua, a US. television network has 
reponed- 

A senior Defense Department 
official who asked not to be identi- 
fied. told the NBC Nightly News 
on Thursday that according to re- 
cently declassified information, 
about 200 Italians have rompleted 
their training at two Nicaraguan 
training camps in the past year. 

Some of the Italians were said to 
belong to the leftist Red Brigades 
terrorist organization, the official 
was quoted as saying. He said the 
trainees also include hundreds of 
West Germans and Spaniards. 

Many of the Europeans attend 
comps run by Cubans and Palestin- 
ians, who teach methods of urban 
warfare, including use oT explosives 
and assassination techniques, the 
official told NBC. He said that the 
Europeans are in Nicaragua posing 
as volunteer agricultural workers. 

Details of the operation were 
said to be contained in a secret 
report prepared by the Pentagon 
and given to the Senate Intelligence 
Committee. A Defense Depart- 
ment spokesman said he did not 
have anv information on the Sub- 
ject- 

Senator David F. Durenberger, a 
Republican of Minnesota wno is 
chairman of the committee, was 
quoted by NBC as saying that be 
believes the information is valid. 

“In fact, Nicaragua is serving as 
a staging place far terrorism,” be 
said. “It is a fact that we have 
known, and this seemed to be an 
appropriate time to let the Ameri- 
can people in on it" 

Senator Patrick J. Leahy, a Dem- 
ocrat of Vermont, was quoted as 
saying that be believes the adminis- 
tration declassified the information 
to justify a US. military strike on 
Nicaragua. 

“Thai's not where our airplanes 
are being hijacked, that's not where 
our embassies are being bombed, 
that's not where our ambassadors 
are being assassinated.'' he said. 
“It's the Middle Easu We’ve got to 
shift our priorities there ” 

■ German Woman Released 

Nicaraguan rebels have freed a 
West German woman captured 
June 14, a Honduran military 
spokesman told The Associated 
Press in Te 


The spokesman said Thursday 
that rebels belonging to the Misura 


group released Eva Regime Schme- 
mann, 34, an ecologist wor king for 
the Nicaraguan government, to a 
Honduran military patrol She was 
turned over to West German diplo- 
mats Friday. Misura is made up of 
Miskito, Sumo and Rama Indians. 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 




Pilot Says Amal Took Over Hijacking to Stop Killing 


By William Robbins 

.Yfir Y,*k Twin Servin' 

:• KANSAS CITY. Missouri — 
The hijackers of Trans 'World Air- 
lines Flight 847 killed Robert Dean 
-Slot hem. a U.S. Navy diver, to 
force the Shiite Moslem Amai mili- 
tia to participate in the holding of 
.passengers and crew, [he captain of 
the plane has declared. 

The captain. John L Testrake, 

>yid in an interview late Wednes- 
day on his night home to Rich- 
mond. Missouri, that Amal appar- 
ently responded to prevent further 
Savings of American hostages held 
by die two hijackers, who appeared 
>o be members of the radical Hez- 
ballah. the Party of God. This was 
jonsistent with "an earlier report by 
officials in Washington. 

"They were demanded in." Mr. 
festrake said, adding that u the hi- 
jackers demanded if as Flight 847 
vas making its approach for a sec- 
< -nd landing in Beirut. 

“As soon as we landed. 1 ' the pilot 
Slid, “they asked where the Amai 
were. When they were told they 
were not here, that caused a furor. 
That was when they snatched the 
young man to his feet and stood 
him in the door and shot him. They 
aid. ‘See. there will be another in 
five minutes.' At that point the 
\mal said. 'OK. well be right 
'here.* “ 

Also emerging from the inter- 
iew was a picture of quiet courage 
in the face of horror and brutality 
n the first days of the 17-day or- 
deal and of a setting of filth and 
personal indignities. 

The picture the captain drew of 
the hijackers was one of men bor- 
dering on panic, uncertain of their 
ability to tnainLain control over 
their large number of captives. He 
gave fresh details of the brutality 
that, he believed, resulted from 
those fears. 

Later, he said, “it got pretty rot- 
ten back in the cabin” because of 
garbage strewn on the floor, where 
the captors had earlier thrown pas- 



sengers' belongings after rifling 
them for cash and jewelry. Then 
came a "culture clash” over filth in 
the plane's three lavatories. 

“They were not used to toilets to 
sit on or toilet paper.” he said. 
"They used water and the water 
would splash on the floor. Then we 
would encounter greasy, nasty 
footprints on the seats. It was just a 
foul mess. We cured that by talking 
to one of the more intelligent ones. 
We asked how would it be if we 
used one of the lavatories and they 
used the other two. One by one we 
were able to correct those prob- 
lems.” 

At a news conference earlier. Mr. 
Testrake and fellow members of his 
flight crew. Philip G. Maresca. the 
co-pilot, and Christian Zimraer- 
mann, the flight engineer, had men- 
tioned brutality to crew' members 


Resignation 
Seen as Blow 
To Gonzalez 


Return 

•' MADRID — The surprise resig- 
. nation of Finance Minister Miguel 
Boyer in a cabinet shake-up has 
deprived Prime Minister Felipe 
Gonzalez of his economic policy- 
maker and the architect of Spain’s 
recovery, analysts said Friday. 

The new Socialist cabinet was 
sworn in Friday by King Juan Car- 
los I at the Zarzuela Palace. 

A source dose to Mr. Boyer said 
it was ironic that the shake-up. de- 
signed to strengthen the finance 
minister's position, ended with his 



Gorbachev 
Urges U.S. 
To Reaffirm 
ABM Treaty 

By Cdestine Bohlen 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW —Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. the Soviet leader, urged Fri- 
day that the United States reaffirm 
“in a bin dm g form'’ its commit- 
ment to the anti-ballistic missile 
treaty signed in 1972. 

In a message to a group of Amer- 
ican scientists, Mr. Gorbachev re- 
peated Soviet charges that Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan's project for a 
space shield against nuclear mis- 
siles, the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive, posed a threat to the 1972 
treaty and the entire process of 
arms control 

The ABM treaty, as it is general- 
ly called, is considered by the Sovi- 
et Union to be the foundation of 
the arms control process and its 
most successful product 
In the message, reported by Tass, 
the Soviet press agency, Mr. Gor- 
bachev stated that the Soviet 
Union ‘'unswervingly observes the 
spirit and the letter of that docu- 
ment of paramount importance.” 
"The Soviet Union is not devel- 
oping attack space weapons or a 
large-scale ABM system?" he said. 
He argued that the UJJ. space 
weapon "would invariably lead to 
the breakup of that document — 
the key link of the entire process of 
nuclear arms limiiatioiL 
The message was in reply to a 
proposal by the Union of Con- 
cerned Scientists, to both the 
Kremlin and the White House, for 
a ban on space weapons. 

It was Mr. Gorbachev's first 
statement cm the arms control pro- 
cess since it was announced 
Wednesday that he and President 

Reagan would meet in Geneva in 

"" ■ November. 

-*■ -pi T T 1 T ana jf 1 • pi • The Soviet Union has intensified 

Ulster Ushers in Marching season 

thpt a continuing UJL conurd intent 
to the space weapons program 
could jeopardize progress at the 
arms in Geneva. 


Il» M uKM td Pte»/ABCNw 

John L. Testrake, the TWA captain forced to fly to Beirut spoke with an ABC News crew 
on June 19. Top left a hijacker stood behind the captain as be spoke; top right he e nd e d 
the interview; bottom left he waved Ids gun; bottom right he told the ABC crew to leave 


passenger 
period after the plane was com- 
mandeered June 14. 

In the interview, the pilot said 
(hat after dumping a missed- up 
young man into the cockpit and 
beating him with an armrest ripped 
from the flight engineer's seat, the 
hijackers continued with further 
brutalities. 

"They would support themselves 
by holding onto the door to keep 
their balance and jump up and 
down on him, landing solidly with 
their heels,” the captain said 

"I think they used that as a de- 
vice to get our attention." be said. 
“In the initial stage there were just 
two of them, i doubt they felt in 
control. They were very hyper, and 
they tended" to be fanatical. They 
had ISO people (o dominate, and I 
can understand that they might 


have had some fears about that. 
They warned to establish that they 
were ruthless, fanatical, deter- 
mined terrorists." 

After “going up and down the 
aisles" with "rabbit drops" and pis- 
tol blows to passengers, he said, "as 
a continuation of that they would 
rake pistol butts and hit Christian ." 

“It was pretty severe,” be said. 
‘‘You coold see blood coming 
through his shirt. Then they 
reached past him and did the same 
thing to PhiL" 

Asked why the same thing had 
not happened to him, Mr. Testrake 
replied: 

“1 think 1 kind of intimidated 
one of them. He was about 20 years 
old. fm nearly 60. He would still 
tell me where to go, but I was able 
to convince him 1 was not going to 


do anything that would endanger 
my airplane." 

When they relumed to Beirut, 
the captain said, the captivity en- 
tered a new phase, with less ten- 
sion. 

“Some extra fellows came on," 
he said, and they included both 
members of Amal and members of 
the hijackers' own HezbaDah. 

“One of the new guys there 
seemed to be one of the leaders, 
because he made pronounce- 
ments," Mr. Testrake said. “There 
were other changes, simply because 
of the extra manpower. It was less 
tense. They had more guys plus 
they had fewer people to control" 

Early on, the captain said, he and 
fellow crew members began to re- 
gard Amal as a favorable influence, 
and they requested the presence of 
Amal members at all times. 

“By and large," he said, “the 
Amal guys were more mature, more 
intelligent, more pragmatic, less in- 
terested in disputes and less mili- 
lanL” 

Asked why, since the crew mem- 
bers seemed to regard Amal as pro- 
tector rather than guards, the mili- 
tia did not simply free the hostages, 
he said, “They weren't strong 
enough." Hezbailah members were 
also always present, be said. 

■ Hostage Stands By Remarks 

The former hostage spokesman, 
Allyn B. Con well, said Thursday 
that be stood by a statement that 
some hostages felt sympathy for 
the cause and plight of the Leba- 
nese Shiites who look custody of 39 
Americans from their two original 
bi fackers. The New York limes re- 
ported from Houston. 

Mud of the debate over his role 
as spokesman stemmed from a fail- 
ure to distinguish dearly between 
tiro two hijackers and the Amal 
militiamen who ultimately took 
charge of the hostages and partici- 
pated in negotiating their release, 
Mr. ConweU said at a news confer- 
ence. He described the original hi- 
jackers as murderers and fanatics. 


Protestants Protest Restrictions on Demonstration Routes 


resi&ianon. 


wo weeks ago Gonzilez 
agreed to create the post of deputy 
prime minister for economic affaijs 
to broaden Boyer's powers, which 
is what he had asked for," the 
source said. 

“This infringed on Deputy Prime 
Minister Alfonso Guerra, Gonza- 
lez's close political associate and 
power broker. Gonzalez bowed to 
political pressure from Guerra de- 
spite the fact that most of the new 
cabinet members were chosen Tor 
their support of Boyer's austerity 
policies." the source said. 

The other major replacement in 
the cabinet reshuffle was Foreign 
Minister Fernando Moran. 39. dis- 
missed in what political sources 
said was a clash over Spanish mem- 
bership in NATO. 

Mr Moran was replaced by a 
liberal banker. Francisco Fernan- 
dez Ordonez, a former minister of 
justice and finance who is a keen 
advocate of Spanish membership 
in NATO. 

The leading Spanish daily El 
Pais said the shake-up had removed 


Carlos Sofchaga 


the backbone of Mr. Gonzalez* pol- 
icies. 

Mr. Gonzalez said at a news con- 
ference on Thursday that Mr. 
Boyer’s resignation was an unfore- 
seen event that had turned the cabi- 
net shake-up into a government cri- 
sis. 

Mr. Bover was replaced by Car- 
los Solcbaga. the industry minister 
who carried out a sweeping 1 tril- 
lion peseta ($6 billion) industrial 
restructuring program. 


New York Tunes Service 
PORT ADO WN. Northern Ire- 
land — Obins Street, known here 
as the Tunnel starts at the junction 
of a railroad overpass and a 
bombed-out bar and runs six- 
i tilths of a mile past real estate that 
in recent years has been shot up, 
run down and blown up. 

For all its ragged appearance, in 
recent weeks it has become the 
most talked-about street in North- 
ern Ireland. For Protestants say 
they plan s march on Sunday that 
will take them along the Tunnel — 
which runs its entire length through 
a' Roman Catholic neighborhood 
— despite an order by the British 
authorities banning parades that 
seem likely to incite violence. 

This is what Protestants call the 
“marching season." when Loyalists 
drape their towns with the red, 
while and blue of the Union Jade 
and stage parades to commemorate 
the victory of. King William of Or- 
ange at the Battle of the Boyne in 
1690 and to celebrate being both 
Protestant and British. 

On Wednesday the Orange Or- 
der sponsored what it called “a 


monster rally" in Portadown to in- 
sist on the Loyalists' right to pa- 
rade through the TunneL Police, 
who estimated the crowd at 14,000, 
said Thursday that the route was 
still under negotiation. 

Policemen and Orange Order 
marshals blocked the road to the 
Tunnel, and the march was peace- 
ful but later youths threw bottles 
at the police and accused them of 
taking orders from Dublin. 

The Tunnel has been on the 
route of Loyalist parades in Porta- 
down for l50 years. On many occa- 
sions Catholic homes have been 
wrecked, and from time to time 
residents have been shoL Like 
many Catholics elsewhere in the 
province, residents of the Tunnel 
have had to choose between leaving 
town, which many of them do, or 
staying home to watch the neigh- 
borhood fill up with soldiers and 
policemen. 

Tension started building last 
week when 500 policemen in riot 
gear manned roadblocks to keep a 
Protestant demonstration out of 
Casdewdlan. a village in County 
Down that is 95 percent Catholic. 


The demonstrators who clashed 
with police were waving the Union 
Jack and shouting allegiance to the 
Crown. 

In Cookstown. County Tyrone, 
the police pushed marchers away 
from Catholic areas and were pelt- 
ed with bottles and paving stones. 
Posters reading "Puppets of the 
IRA" were bung on the police bar- 
ricade. 

Afterward, the Reverend Ian 
Paisley, the militant Protestant 
leader, accused the police of “in- 
citement to riot." ‘ 

During and after an Orange pa- 
rade in Belfast last weekend. Loyal- 
ist youths threw stones and fire- 
bombs at police, who fired 25 
plastic bullets at the crowds. 

On Monday, Mr. Paisley’s Dem- 
ocratic Unionist Party cha r ged that 
the Irish Republic, which has been 
talking with Britain about solving 
the province’s problems, was be- 
hind the banning and rerouting of 
the Loyalist parades. 

Douglas Hurd, secretary of state 
for Northern Ireland, denied this to 
the Northern Ireland Assembly on 
Tuesday. 


The United States has argued 
that research on space weapons is 
not banned by the ABM treaty, and 
has countered that the Soviet 
Union itself is in the midst of simi- 
lar research. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s appeal fm pre- 
serving the ABM treaty came one 
month after Marshal Sergei F. 
Akhromeyev, the Soviet chief of 
staff, charged that the United 
States with trying to undermine the 
treaty. 

In his meymg e to the scientists, 
Mr. Gorbachev repealed Soviet 
proposals fm a ban on space attack 
system, and a moratorium on anti- 
satellite system. 

He called on the United Stares to 
join in scrapping any existing anti- 
satellite systems, including those 
not yet tested. “The actions of the 
American side win show already in 
the near future winch decision the 
U.S administration wiD prefer.” 

Testing of a U.S. system has 
been delayed indefinitely fm what 
have been described as technical 
reasons. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

— ■ — 

Fog Helps California Firefighters 

LOS ANGELES (AP)— -A cooling blanket of fog helped firefighters in 
Southern California beat bade the largest of forest and brash fires 
burning in 10 Western states on Friday. 

Encouraged by reduced winds and lower temperatures after days of 
heat exceeding 100 degrees Fahrenheit (37.75 degrees centigrade), leaders 
of 2,700 Firefighters said that a blaze that has charred 69,500 acres (28,100 
hectares) in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties was 40 percent under 
control' 

Thousands of firefighters battled fires in .Arizona, Idaho. Montana, 
Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico. Oregon. Washington. Wyoming, as well 
as California, which has been the hardest hit since the waves of fires 
began June 27. Three persons have been killed, more than 150 homes 
destroyed and 170,000 acres burned. 

Tax Push Unaltered. White House Says * 

WASHINGTON (WP) —The White House has not altered its sched- 
ule for promoting President Ronald Reagan s tax plan because of the 
hostage crisis or criticism of the proposal, according to Larry Speakes, the 
admin istration's chief spokesman. 

Mr. Speakes took issue Thursday with a Washington Post report that 
the Reagan campaign for the tax plan is being "postponed" until 
September. 

Mr. Speakes said that from the outset While House officials expected 
Mr. Reagan's speeches and appearances to taper off during the summer 
and that he would return to the tax issue after Labor Day. Sept. 1 

Doctors Cited in South Africa Death 

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — A medical panel found two white govern- 
ment doctors guilty Friday of misconduct in the 1 977 death of Steve Biko, 
a leading black figure who became a martyr in the struggle against the 
rule of the white minority. 

The pond ruled that the two physicians failed to provide adequate care 
shortly before Mr. Biko died in police custody. One doctor was repri- 
manded and the other was barred from practicing medicine fm three 
months, but that penally was suspended. The panel said one of the 
doctors allowed police to move Mr. Biko 750 miles ( 1.206 kilometers) by 
road to a prison hospital after he was injured, the panel said. 

An inquiry at the time of Mr. Biko’s death found that be probably died 
of brain injuries received in a scuffle with police. The death in September 
1977 drew a world outcry. His family claimed Mr. Biko. 30. died of head * 
injuries inflicted when police beat him during interrogation. Police said 
he accidentally hit his head on a wall while officers were subduing him 
after he became violent during questioning. 

Pope Is Invited to Visit Yugoslavia 

DJAKOVO, Yugoslavia (AP) — Pope John Paul II was publicly 
invited Friday to Yugoslavia during a High Mass that climaxed two days 
of celebrations marking the 1,100th anniversary of the death of St. 
Methodius, who with his brother, St. Cyril, evangelized the Slavs. 

In a rare display of strength of the Roman Catholic Church in this 
Communist-ruled country, six cardinals and nearly 300 priests and 
bishops from several East and West European countries took part in the 
church service, attended by 15,000 faithful, organizers said. 

The Czechoslovak leadership denied requests by foreign church digni- 
taries to attend similar celebrations at Velehrad this w eeke nd. But the 
ceremonies in Djakovo were held without official interventions or re- 
straints. 

China, Indonesia to Resume Trading 

BEUING (WP) —China and Indonesia signed an agreement Friday to 
resume trading For the First time in nearly two decades. 

The official Chinese news agency, Xinhua, had announced earlier that 
die new agreement, described as a memorandum of understanding, 
constitutes a “major breakthrough" in relations between the countries. 
Diplomats here cautioned, however, that any progress toward the estab- *■ 
hshment of full diplomatic relations was likely to come slowly. 

A Western diplomat said that Indonesia appeared to he primarily 
motivated by a desire not to miss an opportunity to compete lor export 
sales in a Chinese market that has opened up dramatically m recent years. 
Indonesia suspended relations with Chin? in 1967, two years after 
crushing a Communist-led coup that the Indonesians said had Chinese 
support. 

Mugabe Leads in Zimbabwe Election 


CHURCH SERVICES 


PAHS 

AMERICAN CATHEDRAL IN PARIS, 23 Aw. 
Geo rge V , 75008 Poris. The Very Rev. 
Jamm R. Leo, Dean. Metro. Gearge-V or 
Afmo-Mortww. Sunday: 9 cun.. 17 am. 
Church school and nursery > 1 am. Week- 
der>: 12 noon. T«L 720.17.92. 


CENTRA! BAPTIST CHURCH. 13 Rue du 
Vnux-Coionibmr, 75006 Peril. Metro 5f.- 
Sutpice. Sunday worship in Engliih 9:45 
a m.. Rev. A. Sommervifle. Tet: 607.67.0Z 


PARIS SUBURBS 

EMMANUa BAPTIST CHURCH. Rtuil-Mai- 
■noiun. English speaking, all derwn in o- 
lioni, Bible study: 9:45, worship: 10.45. 56 
Rue Bom-Raisins. Tel.: 749.1 5J9. 


MONTE CARLO 

Inti Fe ll owship. 9 rue L. Notari. Sunday 
Bible hr. (all ages) 9,45 Ojn. Wanhip 11+6 
p.m,TeI. 255151/253115. 


EUROPE 

UNIT AR1AN4JNIYER5A11ST, worship and 
activities in Europe. Contact EUU, Steve 
Dick. Se r inp s troat 20, 1 271 NC Huiten, The 
Netherlands. Td.: (+31)10) 2152 55073. 


STOCKHOLM 
IMMANUEL CHURCH near dry center. 
Friendy Christian fe ll owship. Sunday It. -00. 
Tel.-. (08| 316051, 151225. 


TWPOU 

UNION CHURCH OF TWPOU. P.O. Box 
6397. Andotas. Tot., 71468. Friday services 
1 0:30 a m. 


SALZBURG 

uTEBNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH. Schv- 
machentr. 18 fm Lehen). Phones: (QA62) 
2891 3 or 337442. WORSHIP far aU denomi- 
nations. 11,15 anu, Sundays. BIBLE STUDY: 
'0 a.m.. Sundays; 7:30p.m. Tuesday. 
£> toy W. Benfiefal Pastor WELCOME 
(Only English Language church here.) 


To place an adrertisemenl 
in this section 
please contact: 

Me Elizabeth HER WOOD 
18 1 A»*. Ch.-de-Cautle, 
92521 Meuilly Cede*. France. 
Tri.: T 4-7.12.65. 



•HARARE (Reuters) — Prime Minister Robert _ .... 

African National Union-Patriotic Front won 27 of the first 31 seats 
announced Friday in Zimbabwe’s Fust postindependence general ejec- 
tions. 

Mr. Mugabe was widely expected to win the four-day poll with a 
landslide, but without any seats in Matabddand, home of the minority 
Ndebele people. The mam opposition, led by Joshua Nkonso. took die 
first four seats in Matabdeland, Mr. Nkomo s stronghold. 

Six political parties were contesting 79 of the 80 seats reserved for 
blacks in the 100-member Parliament Voting for the 80th seat: was 
postponed because of a candidate's death. In separate voting last week 
former Prime Minister Ian Smith and his Conservative Alliance won 15 of 
20 seals reserved for whites. 

U.S. Says Networks Violated Pledge . 4 

WASHINGTON (UPI) — U.S. television networks broke a promise 


• , r | , r w when they broadcast President Ronald Reagan's remarks about handfiiw 

Soviet Is dcua to Launch ^ - ° ” thc rilm “ Rra,bo ' . 

— # ^ • Before delivering a radio 

Mysterious Space Object 

' » * ** “Ramhft " Svlvster Stallr 


Sm*m 

New construction at China's Shenzhen Special Economic Zone adjacent to Hong Kmig 

Chinese Review Economic Reforms 


(Continued from Page () 
has been a dram on the govern- 
ment’s foreign exchange reserves. 
Only one- third of the zone's pro- 
duction is exported, according to a 
high-ranking official quoted by the 
Far Eastern Economic Review'. 

Moreover, on two occasions in 
recent days. Mr. Deng, whose prag- 
matic approach has been the driv- 
ing force behind die current re- 
forms. has expressed caution over 
the reforms. Some diplomats sug- 
gest that this has amounted to a 
“pre-emptive strike” on Mr. Deng’s 


The Global 
Newspaper. 



part designed to make the issue of 
problems in the reforms his own 
and head off some of his more 
hard-line opponents. 

On June 29. Mr. Dens told an 
Algerian delegation that the Shenz- 
hen economic zone was an experi- 
ment. 

“We have yet to see whether this 
course is right or not," Mr. Deng 
was quoted by the official Chinese 
press as saying. “We hope it will 
succeed, but if it fails then we can 
draw lessons from iL" 

The comment stood in sharp 
contrast to a statement made by 
Mr. Deng following a visit to 
Shenzhen in January last year. At 
that time, he said: “The develop- 
ment and experience of Shenzhen 
have proved the correctness of the 
policy of establishing special eco- 
nomic zones.” 

This week, the Xinhua news 
agency quoted Mr. Deng as saying, 
“Although China has bon canying 
out reform policies for five years, 
we can only call it an experiment.” 

Shenzhen is the largest of four 
special investment zones estab- 


lished in 1979. They offer tax in- 
centives and allow for Western- 
style management of industries. 
Foreigners are given liberal provi- 
sions to invest in and run factories 
to enable China to absorb foreign 
technology and business methods 
as well as boosting its exports. 

In 1984, the Chinese government 
extended the concept and an- 
nounced the opening of 14 coastal 
cities and Hainan Island to foreign 
investment, with many of the same 
incentives. 

But Mr. Deng’s cautious remarks 
on Shenzhen and other areas of 
reform suggested that a readjust- 
ment or shift in emphasis might be 
in the making, diplomats said. 

"If 1 were thc mayor of Shenz- 
hen. I’d be a little nervous right 
now,” said a diplomat. 

The South China Morning Post 
of Hong Kong quoted a Shenzhen 
official this week as saying that in 
1985. because of stricter controls 
on foreign currency spending, the 
budget for “infrastructural devel- 
opment" had already been cut 33 
percent. 


By Thomas O'Toole 

Washington Pact Service 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union launched a secret rocket 
from its Tyuratam base last month 
that could have been an anti- satel- 
lite weapons test or the first launch 
of a new rocket that bums liquid 
hydrogen instead of kerosene, ac- 
cording to UB. experts. 

So mysterious was the launch 
that Moscow did not announce it 
or give it a name and number. The 
last time it sent something into 
space without a name and number 
was in 1966. when it tested a rocket 
designed to carry a nuclear war- 
head into orbit briefly before 
plunging back to a target on Earth. 

The Soviet Union usually gives a 
name and number to every space- 
craft it launches, even its most se- 
cret satellites. The same is usually 
Cosmos, which is used to describe 
almost every unmanned satellite. 

The mystery launch on June 21 
followed two* other launches that 
day — Cosmos- 1663 and Progress- 
24, a remote-controlled craft that 
took supplies to the Salyut-7 space 
station occupied by two cosmo- 
nauts. 

On June 26, the Soviet Union 
launched Cosmos-1664, resuming 
its numbered series and skipping 
the June 21 “no-name” launch. 

The officers of the North Ameri- 
can Air Defense Command, or 
NORAD, have given the mystery 
bunch a name and number. They 
call it 1 985-53- A. which stands for 
the 53d object put into space this 
year. The “A" means it was classi- 
fied as a payload not a launcher. 

NORM) gives the suffix “B" to 
launch vehicles that go into orbit 

The object launched June 2i 
broke into three pieces. NORAD 
said that one piece burned up in the 
atmosphere June 24 and that the 
two others came down June 28. It 
said the largest was no more than 
three feet across, a bit under a me- 
ter. 

The objects were in an orbit 121 
miles (196 kilometers) high at its 


lowest point and 215 miles at its 
highest. The orbit was inclined to 
the Earth’s Equator by 64.4 de- 
grees, meaning it took a northeast- 
erly path around the Earth only 


J instrumented 
course that the Soviet Union uses 
to test new rockets and satellites. 

U.S. intelligence sources say they 
are baffled by the small size of the 
pieces. One source said tins sug- 
gests that the object’s launch vehi- 
cle exploded just before orbit, with 
most of the debris falling to Earth 
out of radar contact 
If this is so, the “no-name” 
launch could have been the test of a 
new rocket using liquid hydrogen 
fud. The Soviet Union lags far be- 
hind in the nse of liquid hydrogen, 
the most powerful LLS. liquid fuel 
If it was not a new rocket, one 
source said, it might have been a 
new anti-satellite weapon that ex- 
ploded by accident. Or, the source 
added, the device might have delib- 
erately blown up. 


Shultz Opposes 
Sihanouk Plan 
For Talks on War 

Woxhipgion Part Service 

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Sec- 
retary of State George P. Shultz 
expressed opposition Friday to an 
Asian-backed plan to open indirect 
negotiations aimed at a political 
settlement of the Cambodian war. 

Mr. Shultz, on the first leg of a 
two-week Asian and Pacific trip, 
rejected a proposal endorsed eairiier 
this week by Prince Norodom Siha- 
nouk, a former Cambodian chief of 
state, for indirect discussions be- 
tween Cambodian resistance 
groups and a Vietnamese delega- 
tion including elements of the Ha- 
noi-backed Heng Sam tin govern- 
ment in Phnom rah. 

"I don't think anything that has 
in it implicit recognition of the 
puppet arrangement the Vietnam- 
ese have in Cambodia is a good 
thing,” Mr. Shultz said. 

He also seemed to reject estab- 
lishing a U.S. "technical office” in 
Hanoi to assist in identifying re- 
mains or American soldiers missing 
in action from the war. "We don't 
plan ro open anything in Hanoi” 
under present conditions, he said. 


Iran and Syria Nurturing 
An Uncertain Relationship 


(Continued from Page 1) 
face, relations between Iran and 
Syria are dominated by the issue of 
Iraq. The Syrians, diplomats say, 
provide help to the Ir anians in a 
number of ways. They purchase 
arms from the West that are even- 
tually destined for Iran, and they 
have cut the Iraqi oQ pipeline that 
goes across Syria and Lebanon to 
the Mediterranean. 

Whatever concerns the Syrians 
have about the rise of uncontrolla- 
ble fanaticism in Lebanon. Mr. As- 
sad’s government permits Iran to 
export its revolutionary Islam to 
that country. This is viable on the 
Syrian ride of die Lebanese border, 
where the main highway divides 
into civilian and mflitaiy roads. 
The Iranian convoys, visitors to the 
border have reported, use the mili- 
tary road where there are no cus- 
toms checks or border inspections. 

“Lebanon is vital to Iran," adip- 
fomar here said. “It gives their rev- 
olution momentum, and it shows 
that there is somebody else who 
believes in it And it provides the 
revolution access to its most impor- 
tant targets. Israel and the United 
States.” 

AU of that is rather remote from 
the women and children making 
pilgrimages to the Sitt Zainab 
Mosque here, but they, too, bear a 
relationship to the complex and fa- 
natical world of Iranian politics. 

With many of them financed by 
Tehran, they arrive overland 
-through Turkey or by air from Teh- 
ran, carrying pistachio outs and 
rugs that they sell or barter away in 
Damascus’s ancient and bustling 
bazaar. 

Their presence is assured by a 
rigned agreement between Iran and 
Syria specifying, the numbers that 
can enter dus country. They travel 


a hostage crisis in a similar way to the 
according to the White House spokesman. 

Before delivering a radio address Sunday after the release of the 3? US. 
stages held in Beirut, Mr. Reagan said into an open mtexuphrme: “Bey, 
I saw Rambo last night. I know what to do the next tinttihishappens.’Tn 
“Rambo,” Sylvester Stallone plays a Vietnam veteran who enacts, a 
violent rescue of U.S. prisoners held in North Vietnam. 

Larry Speakes, the spokesman, said Thursday that the networks had 
violated a pledge to keep the microphones dosed. He declined -to 
comment on a report that he was considering banning network micro- 
phones from presidential appearances. 


in tour buses and stay, in ooe d 
several hotels in the center of the 
dty that are virtually reserved fa 
Iranians. 

.Near the Sitt Zainnh Mosque, in 
an area of dusty concrete urban 
sprawl, is a bureau where Iranian 
S/mte women c on tract what are 
known in Suite custom as “• tempo - 
rary m a rri ages.*’ unions for a Gcat- 
ed time. The husbands, residents of 
Damascus report, are normally 
poor Syrian men who are riven a 
cash payment, a kind of bride price 
in reverse, when they agree to mar- 
ry the widow of an Iranian martyr. 

The agreement specifies that any 
^Idmtm^lreltoratoatHnpo- 
rarily married comrie will remain in 
Syria with her fatner. Boys will go 
to Iran with their mothers where, 
presumably, they wifi be available 
for martyrdom themselves as die 
revolutionary struggle continues. 


'Enas Agree . 
To Cooperate on Eiireia 

Return 

PARIS — The state-owned 
French aerospace company Aero- 
spatiale has concluded a research 
agreement with Messerschmiu- 
-Befirow-Blohm of West Germany 
as part .of the European Eureka 
research program, Aerospatiale 
said Friday. The accord domes 10 
days after four electronics firms 
tentatively agreed to cooperate on a 
number of Eureka projects. ; 

Eureka, concaved as a European- 
high- technology research drive to 
counter possible effects in Europe 
of .the U^. Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative. was launched by France in 
April Ministers from 16. countries 
are doe to meet July 17 to discuss iL 

















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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 


Page 3 


. : >t 


■ i 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Teddy Roosevelt . 

And a Hostage Crisis 

When a Tangier bandit named 
Ahmed ben Mohammed Raisuli 
kidnapped the elderly Ion Ferdi- 
carism T904 and demanded a 
ransom. President Theodore 
Roosevelt proclaimed “Perdi- 
' cans' alive or Raisuli dead!** and 
. dispatched warships to the scene. 
' Mr. Perdicaris was promptly re- 
leased. Thai was the way one 
American president dealt with a 
hostage crisis. Or so the story 


-Theo Ljppman Jr„ writing in 
The Baltimore Sun, says that the 
story has a few holes. Mr. PerdF 
cans, to avoid Confederate sei- 
zure of his property during the 
Civil War. had renounced Ins 
American citizenship in favor of 
Greek nationality. Mr. Roosevelt 

made public only the first sen- 
tence of the Slate Department 
cable seal to the Amen can con- 
sul general in Tangier: .“This 
government wants Perdicaris 
alive or Raistili dead,** but not 
the -second: “Do not land ma- 
rines or seize customs without 
department's specific instruc- 
tion.” . 

No further instructions were 
necessary: France, the dominant 
power in Morocco then, wanted 
the ransom paid for its own rea- 
sons, and even lent Morocco's 
sultan the money to pay ii Mr. 
Perdicaris was - freed before the 
president's message reached the 
kidnapper. 


Short Takes 

Half the work has been done to 
restore the Statue of Liberty and 
Hhs Island in New York Harbor 
and about two-thirds of the mon- 
ey. or about S170 million, has 
been raised. Lee A. lacocca, 
Chrysler Corp. chairman and 
head of the restoration project, 
said $60 mini on to $95 milli on is 
still needed. The target date for 
completion is mid-1986 when the 
statue's centennial observances 
will be held. 

Although San Francisco's 
Board of Supervisors has ap- 
proved a plan to limit the size of 
new office . buildings and save 
historic structures, some people 
say the measure is too little and 



DOING HER PART — Erie Largen, 85, played the 
role of the Statue of Liberty on a nursing borne float in 
an Independence Day parade in Shawsvflter Virginia. 


too late to save the city's charac- 
ter while others say it win choke 
off the creation of new jobs. But 
Doris Ward, a board member, 
said she had checked around the 
country and “no other aty has 
taken such bold steps.” 

An appeals court has ruled that 
Mayor Edward I. Koch of New 
York City cannot legally deny' 
city business to firms that dis- 
criminate against homosexuals 
in hiring. T^e court says such 
authority belongs to the city . 
council, which over the past 14 
years has repeatedly refused to 

enact a n ranticrrinifnatin n 

requirement. - 

Shorter Takes: In Washing- 
ton, the Capitol buildings West 
Front, built in the 1820s, is being 
restored at a projected cost of 
$49 nnllion. Work is expected to 
be completed by October 1988. 

. ; . Americans will drink more 
soft drinks this year than tap 
water, 43 gallons (about 162 li- 
ters) per person, compared to 39 
gallons of water, according to 
UJ5. News & World Report mag- 


azine. ... A -50-caliber heavy 
machine gun at the recent Dallas 
grat show had a poster sitting on 
its barrel that said, “Reach out 
and touch someone." 


Cartoons Urged 
For Congress -. 


Representative Andrews Ja- 
cobs Jr. is urging Ms colleagues 
to permit political cartoons to be 
published in the Congressional 
Record, The New York Times 
reports. “If a picture is worth 
1,000 words.” the Indiana Dem- 
ocrat reasons, “a political car- 
toon is worth r,133 political 
speeches” 

The Record’s “Extension of 
Remarks” inHudac re- 

printed newspaper articles, edi- 
torials. studies, statistics, even 
essays and poems —endless gray 
pages of words, wards, words. 
Mr. Jacobs said “one other bene- 
fit” is that “people might start 
-reading the omai T «winnat Re- 
cord.” 



Parts Found Mexican Vote Is Test of Party’s Dominance 
Ol India Jet 
May Contain 
Black Boxes 


The Associated Press 

‘ LONDON — A robot subma- 
rine searching the floor of ihe At- 
lantic' off Ireland found wreckage 
Friday »h t>i is believed lo contain 
the flight recorders of an Air-India 
jumbo jet that crashed June 23, the 
operators said. 

All 329 passengers and crew died 
in the crash. 

Neville Hunter; a spokesman for 
die Cable and Wireless Telecom* 
wminleatinns Co., said in an inter- 
view that the company could recov- 
er the wreckage, believed to contain 
the plane's “black boxes,’ as soon- 
as Indian and Canadian authorities 
gave authorization. 

Based on Engineering drawings 
of the Boring 747, Cable and Wire- 
less specialists believe the flight re- 
corders axe inside a panel from the 
aircraft's tail. Mr. Hunter said. 

The' panel was found among 
wreckage scattered along a three- 
mile (4.8-kilometer) path on (he 
seabed under 6,700 feet (2,040 me- 
ters) of water, be said. 

“It could be r e covered if we re- 
ceive instructions from the Indian 
and Canadian authorities,” he said. 
The underwater robot, named 
Scarab, could attach lines to the tail 
panel so that the mother ship could 
Haul the panel up. 

Boeing 747s cany two flight re- 
corders. One stores information 
from p lan* instruments showing 
the direction, altitude and engine 
readings, and the other records 
voices and sounds in the cockpit 

The Toranto-Bombay flight had 
made a stop in Montreal and 
crashed off the Irish coast less than 
an hour before it was scheduled to 
land in London 

Air traffic controllers monitor- 
ing ii by radar in Ireland said the 
plane amply vanish ed. 

In dian government officials and 
aviation experts here have said they 
suspected a bomb explosion. 

The leader of an Indian govern- 
ment investigative team said 
Thursday that- examination of 
wreckage found floating, and au- 
topsies on the 131 bodies recovered 
from the . sea, suggested that the 
plane had exploded in flight. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

HERMOSILLO, Mexico — 
Mexicans vole on Sunday in an 
important dot oral test of tbrir po- 
litical system and its domination by 
one party for the past 56 years. 

lie ruling Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party has controlled Mexi- 
can politics since its foundation in 
1929. winning every ballot for pres- 
ident and state governor with more 
than 70 percent. The party, known 
by its Spanish initials PRL has nev- 
er faced an effective challenge in 
the national legislature. 

Sunday's elections are being 
closely watched for signs of wheth- 
er the “moral renovation” Presi- 
dent Miguel de la Madrid has pro- 
moted extends beyond the 
bureaucracy into the traditionally . 
shady world of Mexico's electoral 
politics. 

Seven of 31 state governorships, 
all 300 elective seats in Congress 
and hundreds of state legislative 
and municipal offices will be derid- 
ed in the first nationwide elections 
«nee Mr. de la Madrid took office 
in 1982. 

The party controls every gover- 
nor’s office in the country, ft also 
holds 299 of the 300 elective seals 
in Congress and all but a few of the 
2J77 mayoral posts. (One hundred 
seats in Congress are reserved for 
ibe opposition to keep them from 
disappearing.) 

Even the opposition concedes 
that the party will retain control erf 
the vast majority of the posts. The 
question is whether the opposition 
will be allowed to nibble at the 
party’s near monopoly of political 
power. 

Mexican political analysts said 
that in Sonora and Nuevo Le6n, 
two prosperous northern states, a 
conservative group, the National 
Action Party, could win governor- 
ships, making political history and 
pointing the way to a more genu- 
inely democratic system. 

Officials of the conservative par- 
ty, known as PAN, insist that the 
ruling party is determined to resort 
to large-scale fraud to avoid defeat, 
and it has responded with accusa- 
tions that the opposition is plan- 
ning violence to influence the poIL 

Bernardo Batiz. general secre- 
tary of the National Action Party, 



Supporters mob Adalberto Rosas Ldpez, candidate for governor in the state of Sonora- 


said Thursday that the party had 
filed suit against the National Elec- 
tion Registry in northern Chihua- 
hua state over what it claims are 
millions of fraudulent voter regis- 
trations and is planning to take 
similar actions a gains t authorities 
in other parts of Mexico. 

Pablo Emilio Madera, the na- 
tional president of the opposition 
party, said at least four million 
names of nonexistent people were 
added to registration lists in the 
states of Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon, 
Puebla, Coabuila, Durango ami 
some districts in the Mexico Gty 
area. 

A spokesman for the ruling party 
blamed the “fantasmas,” or “ghost 
voters,” on computer error and 
promised to remove the false 
names before voters go to the polls. 

The opposition claims erf elector- 
al fraud fed to a string of violent 
incidents late in 1984 and early this 
year, including riots and gup bat- 
tles in which two persons were 
killed in the border town of Piedras 
Negras. 

The riots deeply embarrassed the 


administration of President de la 
Madrid, who took office with a 
pledge to end abuses of power by 
the political establishment and 
clean up the corruption that 
marked the administrations of 
some of his predecessors. 

The incumbent party has been 
designed to perpetuate itself. The 
country’s major labor organization 
and peasant association are both 
formal affiliates of the Institutional 
Revolutionary Party, and the mu- 
tual benefits of those links are con- 
tinually reinforced. In addition, the 
party has developed systems of pa- 
tronage and favors. 

“Nearly everyone has been co- 
opted by the PRi in one way or 
another, admittedly not always by 
legitimate means,” said a govern- 
ment official. “If you arrange to get 
taxi plates for someone, no matter 
how, that man win vote for you for 
life, because you've given him his 
way Of making a living.” 

■fhese are things that the opposi- 
tion cannot offer. What it is trying 
to offer instead is change, which 
may be an attractive prospect for 


those who have been pummeled by 
inflation, economic austerity, and a 
sharp drop in the standard of living 
in the past three yeare. 

Balancing a desire for change is 
the fear that by electing an opposi- 
tion governor, a state could lose the 
ear of the federal government, and 
tbe money and favors that Flow 
from Mexico City. 

For example, the president re- 
cently visited Nuevo Ledn, and 
while malting no particular pitch 
for Jorge Trevino, the ruling party 
candidate for governor there, he 
spent the day dedicating a new air- 
port and 1 8 other public works in a 
not-so-subtle reminder of the bene- 
fits of having friends in high places. 

The federal government has an- 
nounced in recent days the con- 
struction of a major dam to provide 
sorely needed water to Sonora, 
where the ruling party candidate. 
Rodolfo Felix Valdes, a dull but 
efficient public servant, is in a close 
race against Adalberto Rosas Lo- 
pez. an agricultural engineer with a 
charismatic political style. 

(Reuters, NYT, A?) 


Cocaine Deaths Rise Sharply in U.S. 



The Associated Press 

CHICAGO — Americans are 
finding “more intensive and de- 
structive” ways to take cocaine, 
which claimed more than three 
times as many lives in 1984 as it did 
in 1980, the former director of tbe 
National Institute on Drug Abuse 
has reported. 

“There has been a striking in- 
crease in medical emergencies and 
deaths associated with the use of 
cocaine;" Dr. William Pollin wrote 
in an editorial published Friday in 
the Journal of the American Medi- 
cal Association. 

The editorial accompanied a re- 
port saying that laboratory a n i m a ls 
given free access to cocaine died at 
almost triple the rate of those given 
such access to heroin. Such a result 
has “obvious implications for hu- 
man drug abuse,” the study’s au- 
thors said. 

Dr. Pollin, who recently stepped 
down as director of the drag abuse 
institute, said Thursday that deaths 
associated with coc a i n e rose from 
169 in 1980 to 598 last year. 


No statistics exist on whether 
numbers of users have increased, 
but “more intensive and destruc- 
tive patterns of use” are dearly 
occurring, he wrote. Such patterns 
indude: preparing tbe drug using a 
technique called freebasng to al- 
low it to be smoked; injecting the 
drug into the bloodstream, and us- 
ing cocaine in combination with 
other drugs. Dr. Pollin wrote. 

Michael A. Bozarth and Roy A. 
Wise of Concordia University in 
Montreal, who conducted the 
study, said: 

“While many drug users recog- 
nize the inherent danger of opiate 
addiction, they fail to recognize the 
potential danger of long-term co- 
caine use." 

Cocaine use, they said, “is con- 
sidered by many to be a relatively 
safe habit." Deaths blamed directly 
on it are relatively few because the 
availability of tire drug is limited 
and purity tends to be low, they 
said. 

In the study, tire researchers im- 
planted tubes in tbe necks of 23 rats 


so that each animal could press a 
lever to self- administer a set dose of 
drug. The rats were divided into 
two groups, one for heroin and one 
for cocaine. 

After 30 days, 11 of the 12 co- 
caine-using rats were dead, com- 
pared with only 4 of tire 1 1 heroin- 
using rats, the researchers report ed. 

“Cocaine produces a more tena- 
cious dependency,” said Dr. Ron- 


ald K. Siegel, a pharmacologist at 
tbe University or California at Los 
Angeles School of Medicine. “With 
unlimited access, you will reach 
toxic levels faster." 

Government estimates put the 
number of U.S. cocaine users at 5 
million to 8 million. Dr. Siegel said 
Wednesday, but he said his studies 
indicate 24 milli on would be a 
“conservative” estimate. At the end 
of 1984, 400,000 users were be- 
lieved to need clinical help, he said. 



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Willem Visser f t Hooft Dies; 
Led World Church Council 


New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — The Reverend 
Dr. Willem Adolf Visser 't Hooft, 
84. who led the World Council of 
Otnrches as its general secretary 
from its formation in 1948 until 
1 966, died of emphysema Thursday 
at his home in (jeneva. 

Dr. Visser T Hooft. a minister in 
tire Netherlands Reform Church, 
was a pivotal figure in the rise of 
the ecumenical movement. Under 
his leadership the World Council of 
Churches, which represents all the 
world’s major Christian faiths ex- 
cept the Roman Catholic, grew 
from 147 denominations in 40 
countries to nearly 300 in 90 coun- 
tries. 

From tire time be began studying 
for the ministry, Dr. Visser 't Hooft 
was active in organizations whose 
goals were further cooperation be- 
tween churches. When the provi- 
aonal committee of tire Weald 
Council of Churches was formed in 
Utrecht in 1939, Dr. Visser ’t Hooft 
was made general secretary and tbe 
organization's headquarters were 
established in Geneva. 

During Worid War II, Dr. Visser 
*t Hooft s work was partly inter- 
rupted. After the Nazis invaded the 
Netherlands, he organized courier 
contact between & Dutch resis- 
tance movement and the Dutch 
governmen l-in -exile in London 
from 1942 to 1944. 

After the war he became a leader 
in a movement to revive religion in 
Ormany and spoke on the topic at 
special ecumenical services in New 
York in May 1945. 

He lobbied for the formation of 
ihe World Council of Churches in 
speeches in the United States and 
sought lo dispel the impression that 
tbe council was largely a Westers 
and Anglo-Saxon organization. 

■ Other dm hs: 

Jm de Quay, 83, prime minister 
of the Netherlands from 1959 to 
1963, in Beers, Netherlands, Thurs- 
day. 

T.E. Kalem. 65. drama critic for 
Time magazine since 1961 and a 
former president of the New York 
iDrama Critic’s Circle, of cancer 
'Wednesday in New York. 



Wifleni Visser ’t Hooft 

Jarosiar Died, 56, a Czechoslo- 
vak who wrote one of Europe’s 
most popular television serials, 
“Hospital on the Edge of Town,” it 
was reported Friday. 





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Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 


Heralfr 


INTERNATIONAL 


PtdriMbed Whfc The !Srw York Time* and The Washington Pont. 


Why Japan’s Chips W on 


JVo Winners and No Panacea in Lebanon 


The battle for the latest generation of com- 
puter memory chips is over. Japan has von. 
American companies, despite investments of 
hundreds of millions of dollars, cannot match 
the price at which Japanese 256.000-bit memo- 
ry chips are flooding the market An Idaho 
firm has accused the Japanese of dumping 
64,000- bit memory chips at 50 percent below 
production cost Yet another segment of man- 
ufacturing has fallen to Japan, and thousands 
more Americans have lost their jobs. 

* How can further inroads be prevented? The 
Semiconductor Industry Association believes 
if is unfairly locked out of the Japanese mar- 
ket so that its competitors have an unassail- 
able home base from which to capture markets 
in America, it wants Washington to browbeat 
Japan into buying more American chips. The 
chip-makers’ predicament affects others, too. 
If the Japanese should seize the lead in design- 
ing memory and logic chips, they wlU gain a 
strategic advantage in every product that uses 
them, from autos to robots and computers. 

' Faults of national policy have contributed 
to the chip-makers' distress. The strength of 
the dollar mokes Japanese chips 20 to 30 
percent cheaper than American equivalents. 
The Hitachi office in Sau Jose, California, ran 
advise its distributors of another kind or mem- 
ory chip: “Quote 10 percent below competi- 
tion. If they requote, bid 10 percent under 
again. The bidding stops when Hitachi wins 
... 25 percent distributor profit guaranteed,” 
A major and long-standing disadvantage for 
American chip-makers investing in new plants 
is that their cost of capital is at least twice that 
enjoyed by their Japanese competitors. That is 
not because Japanese chip-makers get subsi- 
dized loans. It is because the pension and tax 
systems in Japan strongly encourage saving 
over borrowing — • the reverse of America's 


pattern — and household savings are passed 
on at low rates to corporate borrowers. Ameri- 
cans save 5 percent of their disposable income, 
Japanese more than 25 percent. 

Besides the advantages America creates 
for them, Japanese manufacturers also have 
home-grown assets. Foremost is a highly 
trained and motivated work force. The govern- 
ment often protects infant industries, particu- 
larly those trying to develop a new technology 
to world standards. But behind protective 
wails, Japanese companies vie fierady with 
one another, gening the ability to compete 
abroad what protection is lifted. 

The industrial policy pursued by the Minis- 
try of International Trade and Industry may 
not deserve all the successes attributed to it, 
but the ministry is part of a consensus-making 
process from which Japan seems to draw the 
benefits of both competition and cooperation. 

These general advantages leave little maneu- 
vering room for American manufacturers un- 
less they happen to be protected by superior 
technology or know-how. In the case of memo- 
ry chips. Japanese companies worked for years 
at refining production technique and increas- 
ing market share. Maybe clannish buying 
practices and government protection played 
a role. But thrift and hard work are more 
significant, explanations. The Reagan adminis- 
tration could best help the semiconductor and 
other industries with fundamental reforms 
rather than tailor-made remedies. 

To reduce the strength of the dollar by 
reducing the deficit is the immediate priority. 
Increasing saving is the long-term solution. 
Too bad that incentives for saving have almost 
evaporated bom notions of tax reform. To 
search for a quick fix is to ignore the reasons 
for the loss of the memory chip race. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Pressure on the Lebanese 


-The Reagan administration's announce- 
ment once the TWA hostages were bee that it 
would seek to “isolate” Beirut airport pro- 
duced some predictable responses. Those who 
seek forceful retaliation have deplored h as a 
mere gesture, a sign of weakness. Many Leba- 
nese have deplored it as an overreaction that 
unfairly stigmatizes them, will hurt their coun- 
try but miss the terrorists and may even play 
into the hands of factions who have their own 
political reasons for isolating Lebanon. 

* Prime Minister Rashid Karami said that 
Lebanon “is all hijacked, as President Reagan 
knows.” He added that “if any power is to 
blame for the slate of violence prevailing here 
.a. it is the United States. Of what is Lebanon 
guilty, that it is treated in this manner?” 
i Lebanon, of course, is not “guilty” It is a 
victim, not a criminal among nations. It is. as 
ijb government says, the theater and not the 
agemofienorisnL YttlheRraganadmimstra- 
ijon is proceeding down the right track. The 
isolation of Beirut airport —actually, it will be 
die further isolation of a facility whose use is 
already much restricted — is not a complete or 
satisfying response to the hijacking. It is not 
qffered as that- But it does seem to us to 

j 


provide some of those who have power on the 
ground — Nabih Bern, for instance, and the 
Syrians — with an extra incentive to limit at 
least this one form of terrorism. It does not 
email the unwise use of force. 

Washington is asking other governments to 
join it in barring flights to and from Beirut 
airport, including flights by Lebanon's Middle 
Eak Airlines, which is one of the country’s 
largest employers. Not all other countries may 
formally join — the French own pan of the 
airline — - but some surely will. Secretary of 
Slate George Shultz says the purpose is to put 
the airport off limits “until the people of 
Beirut put terrorists off limits” At lean it is 
worth a test; that much is fair. And the pur- 
pose is as much precautionary as retaliatory. 
An airport should be safe to be sanctioned. 

When the TWA flight was hijacked from 
Athens, the Reagan administration also put 
pressure on Greece, warning Americans away 
bom the airport there. The Greeks complained 
bitterly at having been singled out, and agreed 
quickly to step up security at the airport. 
Pressure is not the single solution to the hijack- 
ing problem, but it can help. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion. 

Qieaper 02: A Mixed Blessing Reasons lor Reagan’s Thrall 


* Western pundits are rooting for cheaper oQ, 
v^hich they believe would lower inflation and 
interest rales and spur economic growth 
Worldwide. It may not be so simple if the UJ5. 
(foliar, in which o0 is traded, remains strong. 
While consumers stand to benefit from lower 
crisis of certain goods and services, savings 
cpuld lake some ume to Alter down, if at all 
« A large drop in the oil price could further 
spur Western governments to levy taxes on oil 
imports. And even if it occurs, a broad pickup 


A Washington correspondent is a preadent- 
watcher, and the question most often thrown 
at me — especially by Europeans on the liberal 
left — is how can a flawed old man of limited 
brain power and curiosity, with a stunted sen- 


in industrial economies need not benefit (the 
developing countries] if trade protectionism 
continues to close off their major markets. 

■ As painful a blow it will be for their national 
treasuries and economic development, an oil 
price cut would nevertheless underscore yet 
again for Malaysia and other [developing 
countries] the dangers of heavy dependence on 
primary commodity exports and the necessity 
for economic diversification. 

, . — The Business Tunes (Kuala Lumpur j. 

The world would undoubtedly benefit from 
a gradual further fall in the price. As financial 
pressure on even the Gulf stales increases, 
even the Third World countries who have 
benefited from Gulf aid and jobs to counteract 
oil costs must be thinking that almost everyone 
would be better off without OPEC. 

— The Tunes (London}. 


political foes and blamed for foreign failure 
and domestic hardship, as Mrs. Thatcher is 
hated and blamed for British woes? 

Part of the answer is so obvious that it is 
often ignored. Americans, despite their melt- 
ing pot origins, form a cohesive society — with 
many exceptions, including most blacks — 
enjoying shared goals and a high degree of 
equal opportunity. It is revealing that m Brit- 
ain the term “middle class” means the special- 
ly privileged, while in the United Stales it 
covers everyone who earns a decent wage. 
Classlessness creates political cohesion. 

Representative government is most of the 
time a misnomer. It is not “representative,” it 
is elitist People who know better, or believe 
they know better, are put in charge of a na- 
tion's affairs. [But] Mr. Reagan is the people. 
[He is] The sort of guy who could be on the 
town bowling team. The average [American] 
has been quite prepared to forgive Mr. Reagan 
his ignorance and his holidays, in return for 
having a human being in the White House. 

— Robert Chesshyre, The Observer (London). 


FROM OUR JULY 6 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Race Riots After Boxing Match 
NEW YORK — Thirteen persons killed, hun- 
dreds wounded, the jails of several cities full 
both with white persons and negroes, riots and 
panics — such is the toll of the day after the 
heavyweight championship fight in Reno [be- 
tween Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries on July 4]. 
The New York Evening Post declared that ibe 
National Holiday was disgraced. In London, 
The Standard said; “The great prize-fight in 
Nevada has had a characteristically disgrace- 
ful sequel It was looked upon as a trial of 
strength between white men and black. The 
victory of Johnson, a black, was the signal for a 
furious outburst of racial violence In Johan- 
nesburg, places of entertainment refused to 
exhibit films of the fight on account or the 
possibility of racial antipathies breaking out. 


1935: U.S. Leftists Design New Parly 
CHICAGO — More than 200 representatives 
of assorted Left groups from thirty states met 
here [on July 5] is “an explanatory^ gathering 
which will attempt to unite on principles of 
calling a National Convention. There is some 
division of opinion as to whether the gathering 
should fall in line with the Mid-Western group 
and use the name of Farmer-Labor for the 
third party or adopt the suggestion of the 
Eastern group and use the name Common- 
wealth party. Howard Williams, secretary of 
the Farmer-Labor party, presented a program 
which, he said, would guarantee an annual 
income of 55.000 to every family under the 
“rule of technccracy," Its preamble declared: 
“We are allowing an oxcart method known as 
the profit system to rule an airplane age.” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 
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Co-Chairmen 


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^ J985, International Herald Tnbune. All rights reserved Kk19 


P ARIS —The crisis ofthe TWA hostages has 
oven the American public a glimpse of the 
hopeless, shifting imbroglio that has gripped 
l . Lebanon for a decade. The argument about who 
has won this round reflects intricacies of the 
murderous fight in the area and distortions of the 
limelight’s glare. Nobody wins in Lebanon. 

Nor does anyone trying to use its passions and 
greeds for outride purposes impose an order for 
long — not the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion, not Israel not the United States, not Iran, 
not Syria. Advantages tilt But there is no settle- 
ment because there are too many rival factions 
backed by too many competing interests. 

The focus now is on terrorism, but that is a by- 
product, not a cause. The region's growing prob- 
lem, it has been said, is not the rise of extremes 
but the rise of an extremist center whose sympa- 
thies are engaged by violence. 

The lack of effective authority, the convenient 
location and cosmopolitan flavor, easy access to 
arms and money have made Beirut the hub of 
international terrorism for years. It is not the 
source, but it cannot escape degradation for 
harboring such a commerce. 

Attempting to cut off the airport makes sense 
as a temporary preventive measure that will 
complicate the plans ofhij ackers. They have had 
it too easy. But the underpinnings are too amor- 

blows at a ccnnmanding nerve center to Jestroy 
the “infrastructure," as Washington suggests. 

The effort must be to isolate and frustrate the 
terrorists. There are some signs that a sense of the 


Bv Flora Lewis bk because this happens to be a period of unpa- 

* lien! awakening, spaded by Iran. 

Several factors have converged: the spread of 
world’s revulsion is spreading even among those education and broadcasting; the mirage that oil 
who have sponsored terrorism in the past Even power could restore ancient glory, the yearning 
Iran denounced the hijacking. for equal standing; the sense of failure, which the 

But it may also be a new recognition^ that orthodox can attribute to divergence from the 
governments must accept some international path of pious righteousness, 
rules if they expect the international privileges of Understanding this backmound is necessary 

statehood It is time to draft a convention, like to be aware of the pitfalls. There is no more a 
the Geneva convention on prisoners of war. simple wot to deal with it than there is a simple 
States that refuse to sign and apply it will name way for the afflicted people to overcome tnor 
themsdves accomplices of terrorism, furies. Neither retribution nor appeasement will 

The fact is that no political cause has been won work. But it is possible to strengthen the appeal 
by using terrorism. lW)risis figured in the fight of reason and peace, avoiding illusions, 
for Israeli and Algerian independence, but the Sometimes this takes subtlety. The U.S. state- 
ment on “the preservation of Lebanon, us gov- 
ernment, its stability and security” that broke the 
las t obstacle to the hostages’ return was indeed a 
concession, although to Syria, not to Lebanese 
militants. It abandoned the standard phrasing of 
policy on Lebanon's “sovereignty, independence 
and territorial integrity." which had been aimed 


ware were won because of broad popular sup- 
port. The same was true at Iran's revolution. 

The recoil spread of Moslem terrorism based 
oo fanaticism has no such dearly defined goal. 
Robin Wright wrote in her forthcoming book, 
“Sacred R ag e — The Crusade of Militant Islam,** 
that tbe militants' “revolution is against foreign 


domina tion and encroachment in every aspect of against Syria. Tbe change was realistic, 
thrir lives — symbolized most often and most Israel also needs a realistic change: It should 



their lives — symbolized most often and most 
recently by the United States.” 

The Shu te militants’ stand is a shriek of frus- 
tration a gain s i the pains and human cost of 
joining the modern world and against tbe inabil- 
ity to share in its benefits. It is a mistake to 
conclude from the latest outrage that Shiism has 
a particular affinity far terror, or that terr ori sm 
is especially Shiite. There are several forces of 
violent fanaticism in the world. Islam is vutnexa- 


. • *£*£52k 


end its attempts to create a frontier buffer zone ■ 
with its puppet South Lebanese Army, in return 
for pledges by the Shiites to do what they are 
determined to do anyway — keep Palestinians 
from the area. Lebanon is so cnsnarled that it is 
possible to Find common interests among erst- 
while enemies. That is better than finding more 
enemies on the tricky road ahead. 

The New York Times. 





.BEN*!. 

WINS 






£ 


if 



am^TF 




Relieved Bystanders Can Return to Tax Reform 


W ASHINGTON — It is a good 
thing tbe American hostages 
came borne when they (fid Not just 
for their sake. The yellow ribbons 
had begun to come OuL 
Like tbe radio campaigns to turn 
on car headlights during the day, 
yellow ribbons are a well in ten dal 
show (for whom?) of ‘'support” for 
tbe hostages' release. Unfortunates 
ly, freedom is not something that 
you can honk for. A show cl soli- 
darity is fine, but only if attached to 
some real action. Otherwise, yellow 
ribbons and headlights and all the 
other substitutes for action become 
mere advertisements of defeaL 
The yeQow ribbon mentality, a 
land of domestic variant of the 
Stockholm syndrome, springs not' 
from cowardice or Jack of nerve but 
from bewilderment. From a special 
kind of bewilderment — that of the 
innocent bystander. Its plea is the 
bystander's plea: Why me? And its 
demand is the bystander’s demand: 
to be left alone. 

But, as Ronald Steel points out in 
the current issue of The New Re- 
public, to be a postwar American is 
to give up such innocence. America 
is a country with values, interests 
and a destiny, all of which it has 
decided, democratically, to take 
abroad. Americans support a cer- 
tain international order, which 


By Charles Krauthammer 


makes them, all of them, the enemy 
of those at war with that order. 
Bystanders may move to Geneva. 

In contrast, the characteristic yel- 
low ribbon response to disruption 
of cozy normahty is to take offense. 
Forty years ago Walter Lippmaim 
noted tins same irritation m the 
American view of war as “an intol- 
erable criminal interference with 
the nature of things,” and as “an 
outrage upon our privacy and upon 
our rights.” So today with terror- 
ism. How dare it disturb travel. 


Passivity and a bystander’s world 
view are not alL A feature of the 
yellow ribbon mentality is its confu- 
sion of survival with courage. It 
figures: If to be left alone is a great 
end, then surviving is a great virtue. 

man,’* was the subject of effusive 
media praise. So what if he said that 
he was “distressed” by President 
Reagan’s demand for the release, 
together with the TWA hostages, 
of the seven previously kidnapped 
Americans? “Not wise or prudent,” 
advised Mr. ConwdL In similar cir- 
cumstances, any of us might step 
over the body of another to climb 
out of our prison. But is it heroism? 

The yellow ribbon mentality is 


more man a psychological oacuty. u 
has policy consequences. If the ideal 
is simply to tend one’s vineyards 
unmolested, then, when an outrage 
like the TWA hijacking ends, the 
objective becomes an immediate re- 
turn to bystander status. Put it all 
behind you. No reaction- 
while the hijacking is taking 
place we are told that it is too early 
to talk of any reaction. And after it 
is over we are told it is too late. It is 
over. Why make trouble? 

The wish to hide at all costs is 
embarrassing to admit So it wears a 
moral doak: How can one retaliate 
if it wifi injure innocent bystanders? 
(Bystanders, again.) Fine. If what is 
required is that any retribution be 
discriminate and just, there is a so- 
lution: Repeal the executive older 
prohibiting assassination. Or, bet- 
ter, amend it to read: “except those 
who carry out or support terrorist 
attacks on UJS. citizens.” 

Instead the Reagan administra- 
tion’s first response was to ask Leb- 
anon to extradite the murderers. A 
sad joke. There is no Lebanon. And 
its nongovernment can no more ex- 
tradite terrorists than it could ex- 
tricate American hostages. 

The administration calls for dos- 
ing Beirut airport. The secretary of 


state asks others to join ina boycott. 
What can that do beyond dealing 
the runways for the exclusive use of 
terrorists? It takes a bomb, not a 
boycott, to (dose a runway. 

Where is the president? As the 
advocate of a muscular foreign pol- 
icy, he does not look like a worship- 
er at the church of the yellow rib- 
bon- But be seems indined to lei its 
pacifying influence do its work: 
That nicely reduces the pressure on 
him to take any real action — and 
permits him to return to his funda- 
mental interest: taxes. 

White House officials say that 
Mr. Reagan will “attempt to con- 
vert his enhanced popularity” com- 
ing out of the hostage crisis, by 
“stepping up his campaign for tax 
reform and budget cuts.” 

This is an old story, perhaps the 
story, of the Reagan presidency: a 
president who professes an ambi- 
tious foreign policy, and then in- 
vests his vast but finite political 
capital on other, more domestic 
matters. The result: The defense 
consensus he inherited (a gift from 
Iran and Afghanistan, among other 
disaster areas) has eroded. The ter- 
rorism he vowed to fight increases. 
And America, awaiting the articula- 
tion. of a foreign policy for non- 
bystanders, ties yellow ribbons. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


The Oil Surplus Is Big, Disarming and Temporary 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — 
The crisis in OPEC is dear to alL 
Hardly noticed, though, is the extent 
to which tbe second ofl price shock — 
tbe rapid rise in prices between 1979 
and 1981 — is almost over, at least 
for the American cons umer . 

Tbe price of ofl has been falling for 
four years. Since 1981 it has dropped 
more than 25 percent. Thus drop is 
even sharper if we take inflation into 
account In real terms, ofiprices have 
fallen 40 percent since 1981. 

Yet even this does not capture tbe 
full extent of the drop. When correct- 
ed for inflation, American ail prices 
in 1985 are just about back to where 
they were in 1975. If we put 1975 oil 
prices into 1985 dollars, we find that 
a barrel of imported oil in the United 
States in 1975 cost $27.66. Compare 
that to the April price of $27.61. 

The change is even more striking if 
we turn to the price at the American 
gasoline pump. Again, putting 1975 
prices into 1985 dollars, the Ameri- 
can motorist was paying only a dime 
less then than now — $1.12 in 1975, 
compared to today’s $121 
Four factors have been responsible 
for this: conservation, the recession, 
weak economic activity and growth 
of alternative, non-OPEC supplies. 
All of this has brought an era of 
surplus in which oil prices have no- 
where to go but down. 

To be sure, what is true for the 
United States is emphatically not 
true for other parts of the world. Oil 
prices, for tbe most part, art denomi- 
nated is dollars, and tbe strengthen- 
ing dollar has overwhelmed falling ofl 
prices for Western Europe. The result 
is that in real torn the Europeans are 


Bv Daniel Yer/rin worldwide is so large that tankers and 

J ® oil installations in the Gulf region 

paying more than they ever have in tition with each other: from those can be attacked and the price of cal 
tbe past The effects of the strong involved in alternatives and conser- -goes down, not up. That cushion will 
dollar on tbdr prices are tightly re- vation to those involved in domestic be quitera number of years in eroding, 
ferred to as the third ofl shock, oil and gas. Many banks, looking at Oil will become more like other com- 


dollar on their prices are rightly re- 
ferred to as the* 1 third ofl shock.”" 
Tbe forces that brought oil prices 
down continue to work. World oil 
demand is proving very slow to re- 
cover, even with renewed economic 
growth. Many markets far ofl have 
shrunk permanently. Coal and nucle- 
ar power have taken over much dec- 


their energy portfolios, will share mat 
distress. These are the groups that 
will seek a tariff to protect America’s 
domestic energy economy. 

Further weakness in price wfll un- 
dermine the rationale for a great deal 
of existing and. new investment in 


'Wiftch-Huirt at the UN? 


tricity production from oil — to such - energy. Energy consumers will con- 
an extent that France, for instance, is 'elude Lhat consemtion investment is 
now trying to sdl its nuclear-gcncrat- less important. Oil companies will 
ed electricity, once a program of na- reduce tbdx efforts to develop new oil 
tiona] survival, to its neighbors at fields in frontier regions, 
bargain rates. And other markets will Does this mean that the world wfll 

be constricted. Americans will coo- . again face a difficult energy situation 
tinue to replace cars that gel 12 miles in the future? Not for several years, at 
to the gallon with cars that get 26 and least. The swplus of oil and energy 
27 miles to the gallon. 

American consumers are winners 
from falling ail prices. Less of their 
budgets will go to paying for energy, 

meaning dial they wfll have more __ „ ' 

money to spend for other purposes. WltCfa-Uunt at the UN? 

The nourofl developing world is a 

big winner. And so is the Reagan ad- The comment by Senator Robert J. 

ministration: Falling ofl prices stiniu- Hasten Jr. (June 21) on countries that 
late economic growth and are a most take American aid but do not always 
welcome antidote to inflation. Both oblige in the UN General Assembly 
are very valuable in a time of huge .' is re m a rk able for its explicitness. Is 
and intractable budget deficits and the senator seriously contendmg'that 
uncertain economic performance. states that receive UiL aid should 

If America were only a consumer abandon whatever policies or prind- 
of energy, afl this would be enough. It pies they may have and turn into 
is also a producer, and falling ml hirelings of U.S. foreign policy? 
prices trouble and threaten “good I am not talking about the merits 
faith" energy investment. This ap- of the respective positions of die 
plies right across the spectrum — United States, its adversaries or those 
malting allies, ironically, of people who usually hold ihe middle ground, 
who have seat themselves in compe- Third Wood countries have, to say 


OU will become more like other com- 
modities. with volatile prices. 

Barring a major technological de- - 
velopmeut, however, the reduction in 
energy investment will come back to 
haunt us at some poinL Market reali- 
ties mil again give way to geological, 
realities — the concentration of oh 
reserves fat OPEC and in the Middle 
East And (hat win eventually put the 
era of surplus behind us. 

The writer is president of Cambridge. 
Energy Research Associates andediiarqj 
“Just Another Commodity? The Reshap- 
ing qf the Oil Industry. He contributed . 
ms comment to The New York Tones. 


Japan Sees 
Little Need 
To Change 

By Hobart Bowen 

T OKYO — It has been suggested 
that Japan's reaction to muhie 
pressure on the trade issue may be to 
re-examine the American partnership 
in economic, strategic and other 
terms. But conversations with offi- 
cials and influential private citizens, 
indicate that the Japanese, although 
they fume oxer demands that they do 
thing s the American way. are too 
coolheaded to moke such a mistake 
In the first place, American hawks 
are right in one respect: For Japan 
there is no substitute for the huge 
American market. Through exports 
and joint ventures, the two econo-' 
mies are increasingly integrated. 

As for “playing” a Russian or Chi- 
nese “card,” the odds are against iL 
“Nobody i rusts the Soviet Union,", 
said Hisashi Shinto, chief executive 
officer of the newly privatized Nip- 
pou Telegraph and Telephone Cor- 
poration. Just back from a visit to 
China. Mr. Shinto believes that Chi- 
na has so many problems that it wiU 
be many years before it is either a big 
market or a major competitor. 

Meanwhile, though, a backlash is 
developing to U.S. congressional de- 
mands that Japan increase its mili- 
tary spending beyond the ceiling (1 
percent of the budget] set in 1976 by 
the government of then Prime Minis- 
ter Takco Miki If Japan spends 
more, some civilians ask. why should 

The government is 
under no real pressure 
from the public 
to boost spending ; 

it not have a greater rdc in saying 
how the money is spent, instead of 
taking orders from Washington? 

Yasushi Hara. an Asahi Shnnbun 
editor and former Washington corre- 
spondent, snapped: “Why shouldn't 
we have an aircraft carrier or a cruiser 
instead of supply craft or heScqptexs 
the U.S. wants us to finance?” 
Yotaro Kobayashi, chai rman of 
Fuji Xerox, points out that pushing 
military spending will merely acceler- 
ate productivity in a new field Last 
year experts at a seminar I attended 
said that an inevitable result of the 
American push on Japan to become a 
stronger military power would be to ■ 
turn Japan into a competitor in ihe 
arms-exporung business. 

But “tbe real problem is macro- 
economics." said M K-hihikn Knoi- 
hiro, a Foreign Minisuy official, re- 
ferring to heavy American consump- 
tion fueled by an overvalued dollar, 
and to under-consumption in Japan 
due to fears that expansion would 
regenerate inflation. “And there we 
have a responsibility. I believe and 
1 argue inside the goimimcar that we 
should take more positive steps to 
increase domestic demand." 

But this is where the conservative 
streak in the Japanese psyche comes 
into play. A visit to Toypo Gyohten, 
director-general at the Finance Min- 
istry, confirmed that officials have an 
overpowering fear of letting the bud- 
get deficit grow any further. 

Mr. Gyohten made dear that a 
government-financed program to ex- 
pand bousing and soaal services is 
out of the question beca u s e interest 
costs already soak up too much of 
government expenditures. Following 
Ronald Reagan's line, Mr. Gyohten 
stresses tbe role of ibe private sector 
in an increasingly deregulated econo- 
my. If more housing is needed, be 
said, let the private sector take care of 
it “What we are moat afraid of,” Mr. 
Gyohten said, “is giving the impres- 
sion that the government is not con- 
cerned about the deficit.” 

The political reality is that tbe gov- 
ernment is under no real pressure 
from the Japanese public to boost 
spending for such things as better 
bousing, even though it is painfully 
apparent that housing is one of Ja- 
pan's most critical needs. 

Politicians know that Japan has 
made enormous strides in its stan- 
dard of living Per capita income ap- 
proaches two-thirds of that in the 
United States. “We started off with 
nothing at the end of the war," said a 
Japanese friend, “and now 90 percent 
of the people say in response to polls 
that they are in the middle class, ft is 
a pretty egalitarian society." 

Mr. Knnihi m agrees: 

“The biggest shortage bar is land, 
but people seem to be satisfied with 
their small residences. They have 
plenty of money for cars, or to go 
abroad for vacations. They save mon- 
ey to send the children to school. 
There’s no threat of war, and very 
liule violence. So everybody is satis- 
fied to some extent, and there is very 
liule force for change.” 

The Washington Past 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the mum of 
unsotiated manuscripts. 


The comment 


oongc m tne uw yeaerai Assembly 
is re m a rk able for its explicitness. Is 

states that rec^^U^Sd^^ouhl 
abandon whatever policies or princi- 
ples they may have and turn into 
hirelings of ILS. foreign policy? 

I am not talking about tire merits 
of the respective positions of die 
United States, its adversaries or those 
who usually hold the middle ground. 
Third World countries have, to say 


imEBSTOTHE EDITOR 

the least, their share of faults, and ] 

those among them that solicit U.S. 
r; aid yet remamitostite (as opposed to 
t honest dissent) .add hypocrisy to i 
5 whateverofher vices they may nave, i 
f This, however, is not the point here. [ 
s Tbe pram is die rich. man's attitude i 
t that Reaganites unabashedly flaunt, i 
j Rather than cany on a w^tch-hunt « 

- at the United Nations, those who i 


Deba: Read All About It 

I was shocked bry diaries Mohr’s 
report (“Deha Force: US. Counter- 
terrorism Untested," June 22) on the 

tional &dadn^S^tewriter^n- 
ates staffing, training, tactics— and 

shortcomings. He reports in precise 
technical detail on weapons, their 


coach Ambassador Vernon Walters types and their captibflrties in future: 
should reflect on some of the policies use. Any terrorist headquarters will 
that fail to rally -even the closest of view the report as pricriess intrilL- 

HO hIKm TL- i. r — 1— i _ . * - - - * -.« - _ 


U JS. allies. Tbe need is for less arm- 
twisting and more reflection. 

' CHRIS WONG. 
KnalaLompurl 


cewhm pianmsg. actions against' 
United States and its citizens. 

STEPHEN BRO WN; v 
-Cannes, France, 


t.'r .1 





- v ; 


‘Pans 


psesA*- ■• - 


.** 


>,**!• r.ti'i -^.'■‘A/l ■_ 


JWTTSRJVAXrONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDA Y-SUNPAY, JULY 6 - 7, 1985 


Page 5 


Mle X* mm Thai 'Vasectomy Festim F Changes Mind ; 22 Children Just Aren 9 t Enough 


°Qia 

• n^Ho, 



;Y: • r. 


*4 


?.: r . 7& 


EL; ; 
- .. ? 

uc* 



„c. 4 — -r. A :Si 

cfli 


; — I • 










•.aj. v. 


• TVju 


' ‘-L- 


^5«V. 


With a doctor standing befaind Trim* Tek Kw explains why he decided against a vasectomy. 


By William Branigin. . 

Washington Fat Service 

BANGKOK — Tek Kor's days as Thai- 
land's one-man population explosion arc not 
oreryet., : 

The 41 -year-old meatball vendor and fa- 
ther or 22 arrived here Thursday to undergo 
a much-publicized operation at a free “va- 
' sectomy festival" organized by Thailand’s 
yetting f amily planning campaigner. 

But he flhang ari his mind at the last min* 
roe, riniming be had been tricked into believ- 
ing he would be paid 1 million baht 
($ 36 , 586 ). He drove off with six of his seven 
wives wiih.a tow to many his eighth wife 
soon and produce still more children. 

: Mechai Viravaidya, the organizer of the 
free vasectomy clinic, had hoped that the 
.conversion of Thailand's “family p lannin g 
enemy No. ]** would help dispel fears among 
Thai men that a vasectomy would result in 
sexual impotence. But he denied having of- 
fered any money to Tek Kor and said be did 
not knew how be got the impression he 
would be paid. 

Before Tek Kor withdrew, there had been 
concerted efforts by local and American 
groups that oppose birth control to sabotage 
what they called Mr. Mcchafs “depopula- 
tion program.” 

Mr. Mechai said July 4^ Independence 


Day in the United States, was chosen for the 
festival as “a way of thanlring the United 
States for its assistance in family planning." 
The Thai program receives about S 150,000 a 
year in US. aid, be said. 

Tek Kor, whose real name is Saisupat 
Terrapabsakulwong, is from Nakhon 
Paihom, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) west 
of Bangkok, He is also known as the Nakhon 
Fathom Casanova. He said he had been 
influenced by letters and cables sent to him 
by the American-based Oub of Life and 
other organizations urging him io renege on 
his earlier pledge to have a vasectomy on 
July 4. 

A June 23 letter from the Chib or life, 
which claims 50, MO members in 40 coun- 
tries, expressed “deep concern” that Tek Kor 
would be exploited for what it called Mr. 
Mecbai’s “geuocidal” and “treasonous*' 
famil y planning program. 

Tek Kor declared before leaving the vasec- 
tomy dinic, set up in a ballroom of a luxury 
hotel here, “1 think ambitious, hard-working 
people like me should be encouraged to have 
lots of children to bdp build the nation.” 
He also said, “Vasectomies are meant for 
those who are lazy, poor and unable to afford 
more children. I am better off and able to 
afford many more children.” 

Before Thursday, Tek Kor had said pub- 
licity that he warned a vasectomy because it 


was cheaper and safer than providing his 
wives with contraceptives and he could not 
afford any more additions to his family. 

Polygamy, although illegal in Thailand, is 
tolerated under a system in which some men 
take “minor wives" Only the first wife is 
officially recognized, but the minor wives are 
often socially accepted and the children have 
legal status. 

Tek Kor married his fust wife. Siera-ung, 
when he was 21. and his seventh about two 
years ago. Siem-ung said she was “furious” 
when a month after marrying Tek Kor. be 
took a second wife. But she said she learned 
to live with- the situation and “had no emo- 
tional problems when he married the third, 
fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh wives.” 

Tek Kor. who says he sleeps with his wives 
in a rotation system according to their se- 
niority. now plans to marry a fanner's 
daughter from northern Thailand, he said 
Thursday. He said he met her eight years ago 
when he married his fifth wife, Sotnboon. 
who also introduced him to wives No. 6 and 
7. 

Tek Kor said he needed many children to 
help him with his meatball business, but be 
has rejected suggestions that having a large 
family is merely a way of obtaining cheap 
labor. 

He tirdesslypromotes his pork meatballs. 
He arrived at Thursday’ s vasectomy festival 


in a pickup truck with a billboard advertising 
them and he credits his special meatball 
recipe for his sexual prowess. 

Mr. MechaL the family planning advocate, 
has never been one to pass up a gimmick 
either. At the vasectomy festival, his private, 
nonprofit Population and Community De- 
velopment Association offered for sale T- 
shirts emblazoned with slogans such as, “A 
condom a day keeps the doctor away.” 

Also available were T-shirts depicting 
Winston Churchill flashing his “V” for vic- 
tory sign above the slogan. “Stop at Two.” ' 
Mr. Mechai, who also seems fond of sym- 
bolism, served free hot dogs and meatballs 
Thursday to recipients of vasectomies. 

Three other mass vasectomy festivals are 
held annually: one on the birthday of the, 
king of Thailand, and the others on Mother's 
Day and Labor Day. 

Thursday, tour doctors planned to per- 
form 80 to 100 Tree vasectomies on volun- 
teers who came to the new Imperial Hotel 
across the street from the ITS. ambassador's 
residence. 

Among the patients was the hold's man- 
aging director, who said that from now on. 
he was offering rooms for half price to any 
guests who had had vasectomies. But he 
acknowledged that the hotel would have to 
take guests at their word. 


Guinea Says Military 
Crushes Coup Attempt 


“ — - Agaux Frtmct-Prast 

& norm' menl it CONAKRY, . Guinea — The 

A - miHtaiy government of Guinea an- 

T flu mjj n rPmh nounced Friday that its armed 

, 1 forces crashed an overnight coup 

HI! Uirpuliiir attempt by Kara Traorfe, minister 

r of state for education and a former 

u«.«f prime minister. 

*• A statement from the rulingMB- 

h itary Committee for National Re- 

T.TV " • ‘it corny, broadcast by the Conakry 

• r ~'s. radio, said the attempt, made while 
. L'i.' the head of the mdxtaiy regime, 

• Colonel La ns ana Conti, was 

abroad, “has failed and its originar 
‘ l "_ ' ■ : ‘ 'L ton have been rendered harinkss.” 

‘ Various reports in Conakry said 

rhnf an nqdrtffrminad number of 

- - people, rndnrKng some civilians, 

K had been killed or inured. 

^ Casualties were said to have oc- 
curred near the radio buflding, 
«•• •' which was serious^ damaged in the 

tirv-- - tighting. The official radio has been 

^ : broadcasting from police head- 

•- 5 quarters. 

7' - [The radio trooted the minister of 

~ - - replanning ana natural resources, 

Jean Traari, not related to Colonel 
v Traori. as saying that there had 
r. . •_ been dvitian casualties, The Asso- 

i ■ • _ dated Press rqrorted. 

: . ;• [He did not specify the number 

. of dead or woubdeo, saying only 
^ - . ■ _■ they went into the streets to sup- 

port the government even 0 jou^i 
. . . the rebels had asked everyone to 

r,. -i ■ ; stay doom} . . 

h- ... v . • • i The mibtaxy committee said it 

L - ; . _ ; _• had dosed the country’s airports 

irt - . j ’ and ports to prevent conspira- 
• . r. tors from fleemg the country. 
i . It remained undear what had 

, ” \ : happened to CcJond Traorfc and 

; - his supporters. Some reports said 


in the radio 
Officials in Lomfc, Togo, 
said earlier that he was on the run. 

The coup attempt occurred 
shortly after Colonel Conte left to 
attend a meeting in Togo. 

Its defeat was confirmed in 
Lonte by officials dose to President 
Conte, who was to return to Guin- 
ea lata- Friday, and also by the 
Guinean Embassy in Paris. 

The dud of staff of the gendar- 
merie, Major Makan Camara, said 
the coup attempt began at 10 PAL 
Thursday when Colonel Traote, ac- 
companied by a small number of 
policemen, entered the radio sta- 
tion with the complicity of some 
technicians working there. 

The rebel leader had the techni- 
cians broadcast a rapp- gnnr m nrrng 
seizure of power, the major said. 

He said attempts by loyalist 
troops to recapture the radio star 
tion began shortly after 3 AJd. and 
that the forces were able to enter 
the building an hour lata, after 
shelling its generator plant He 
added that some ledmidann were 
arrested 

Colonel Traort was second in 
command of die April 1984 coup 
led by Colonel Conte, which oc- 
curred a trade after the death of 
President Ahmed S6kou Toute. 

After serving as prime minister, 
Colonel Traote was demoted in 
December to education minister. 

Colonel Traote, as was Mr. Sfe- 
kou Toute, is from the MaHnke 
tribe, which had considerable pow- 
er under President S6kou Toute- 

The 1984 coup against the civil- 
ian successors of middent Sdcou 
Tourfe, who had led Guinea 



Sterilfaation 
Rises in U,S 
Survey Shows 

(Continued from Page 1) 
he said, “has to do with an almost 
anti-child posture.” 

The popularity of sterilization 
has risen as medical procedures 
have become simpler. 


Diara TYaar6 


through a long period of isolation 
after independence in 1958, 
brought widespread rejoicing. 

Guinea’s new leaders released 
hundreds of detainees, promised 
economic and political liberaliza- 
tion and took a generally favorable 
hne toward France and otfier West- 
ern states. 

President S£kou Toute, after 
many years of dose links to Com- 
munist nations, was moving toward 
the West by the end of his rule. 

Under die Conte government, 
however, improvements have been 
slow in c oming , and Guinea, which 
has enormous economic potential 
with its huge reserves of bauxite, 
has remained one of the poorest 
countries in the world. 

Rumors of disagreement be- 
tween Colonel Conte and Colonel 
Traote had surfaced in recent 
months, although both jvere known 
as political moderates. ' 


4 l 

it* ‘ 
l J “ ' 


Si 








. J t 


Socialists 
; ii In France 
Review Rift 

Reuters 

PARIS — Fiend) Socialist chiefs 
planned to meet Saturday to set out 
' party strategy for next year’s par- 
Hamcntary elections and to narrow 
embarrassng differences between 
the party leader, Liond Jospin, and 
Prime Minister Laurent Fames. 

Political analysts predicted a 
' stormy debate between rival fac- 
tions at the 131-member executive 
committee m eeti u g . 

The Socialists, who bold an ab- 
solute majority in the National As- 
sembly with 285 members out of 
491, are expected to lose more than 
100 seats in the March elections, 

- according to party estimates. 

With the introduction of propor- 
tional representation, the party 
■fy leadership is likely to have a greater 
say in the nomination of candi- 
dates, parry sources said- They said 
the committee will study a report 
on how to designate candidates. 

Overall strategy was also likdy 
to be a thorny issue. Mr. Fabius 
■ and Mr. Jospin have been at bitter 
odds in recent weeks over who 
should lead the party’s campaign. 

• President Frangbis Mitterrand 
has praised both men for their 
achievements and has said that 
each had a refle to play in the cam- 
paign. 

“ft is obviously the responsibility 
of the leader and other officials of 
the party to handle the campaign- 

- They are not accountable to any- 

- body, not even me,” be said. 

Mr. Jospin, 48. succeeded Mr. 
Mitterrand as party chief in 1981, 
but analysts said his influence with 
h the president has declined since 
« Mr. Fabius was appointed prime 
nanicigr Iasi year. 

UJL Lords Vote to Ban 
^ Corporal Punishment 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — The House of 
Lords has voted to outlaw corporal 
punishment in British schools, 
dealing a defeat to the government 
which wanted to put the matter in 
.’ the hands of parents. 

Bya narrow i08 to 104 vote, the 
• ; upper house adopted a change 
■J Thursday in a government bd3 
seeking to take the derision on cor- 
poral punishment out of the power 
of local authorities and enabling 
individual parents to say whether 
, they wanted their duldren b eaten 
for misbehavior. 


France Widens Defeme Role 
To Include the West Germans 


(Continued from Page 1) . 
many are ex pa n d in g their indnstri- 
al cooperation on military projects. 
Tot example, a jointly bunt attack 
helicopter is under construction 
and notary satellites are being dis- 


The idea of tmking the defenses 
of France and West Germany was 
political heresy when de Gaulle was 
m power. 

Under President Valiry Giscard 
d’ Estates, France experimented 
timidly with that. At the time. Hel- 
ium Schmidt was the West German 
chancellor. Bui Mr. Giscard <TEs- 
taing retreated under pressure from 
his GauHist coalition partners. 

But France’s Socialist govern- 
ment, smee taking power four years 
ago, has moved steadily in tins di- 
rection, and now the other main 
political parties have joined the 
trend. The only exception is the 
Communist Party, which has ac- 
cused the Socialists of trying to 
lead France back into NATO. 

France is a member of the alli- 
ance but does not belong to its 
military command structure. 

However, since the Communists 


tidy noncommittal, say in private 
that closer ties between tee .two 
biggest Western forces in Conti- 
nental Europe is the starting print 
for any wider military cooperation. 

. In recent months, the change has 
gathered momentum, since the 
Qxnmumsts left the government 
coalition and started a political 


campaign on domestic issues, “po- 
litically, Mr. Mitterrand has noth- 
ing to lose now,” commented Jean 

Boissonat, a French analyst. 

The alliance planners, while pub- 


French Chib 
In Shanghai to 
Become Hotel 

Return 

SHANGHAI — Shanghai 
has closed its old French Oub, 
famous for its opulent interiors, 
and is tearing down the art- 
-deco indoor swimming pool to 
make way for a new Japanese 
hoteL 

The dub, built in 1921, was 
the center of the former French 
Concession in Shanghai. Its 
smoke-filled billiard rooms, 
bowling alley and restaurants 
complete wjth orchestra were 
the most cosmopolitan of 
Shanghai’s old dubs. 

nhinea- authorities have not 
published plans for the site, but 
foreign businessmen say they 
understand that the front see- 
tion of the building, now known 
as the Jiajiang <5ub t will be- 
come the foyer of the new bold. 


The issue has triggered the most 
lively strategic debate in France 
since President de GauDe Dulled 
troops out of NATO in 1967. 

Now that a change is being aired, 
French public opinion seems gen- 
erally well-disposed toward h. A 
recent nationwide poD showed 57 
percent of those who responded 
were in favor of going to West 
Germany's aid if die country were 

threaten pH 

Among West Germans, a wait- 
and-see attitude prevails, according 
to diplomats. . 

In France, most strategists sup- 
port the change although some- 
times for diametrically opposed 
political motives. 

For example, French coopera- 
tion with West Germany is urged in 
recent books by both Pierre Ld- 
loucbe, a conservative analyst at 
the French Institute of Internation- 
al Relations, and R£gis Debray, 
until recently one of Mr. Mitter- 
rand's most left-leaning advisers. 

Mr. Lefloucbe, alarmed by grow- 
ing Soviet military strength, wants 
France-.to contribute more lo the 
defenses of the Western alliance, 
primarily through Germany. 

Mr. Debray, an outspoken critic 
of the United States, thinks that the 
Soviet threat is overstated, but 
wants a French-West German core 
for a more “European” defense of- 
fering greater independence from 
both superpowers. 

But both analysts agree, as Mr. 
Ldlouche says, nj the West Ger- 
mans believe that they are not well 
drfftndad, they will naturally be in- 
creasingly inclined to seek accom- 
modation with the Soviet Union.” 

Mr. Lellouche adds that a weak,, 
divided West Gennamr exposes 
France to Soviet intimidatipn. 

Mr. Debray, for example, in Ms 
book, “Europe against the Em- 
pires,” claims that the Reagan ad- 
ministration is exaggerating the So- 
viet threat to make Europeans align 
themselves with the United States 
— an argument reminiscent of the 
popular GauHist thanes of French 
mdependeDce. 

But Mr. Ldlouche, in his book 
“The Future of War” contends 
that France can no longer afford 
GauHist alooiness from its allies. 


been a mino r operation in whi 
ducts that carry sperm are blocked 
to prevent the sperm from mixing 
with semen; it is perforated under 
local anesthesia, usqaHy in a doc- 
tor’s office. 

For women, a tribal ligation in- 
volves cutting and tying the Fallo- 
pian robes, which cany the eggs to 
the uterus. Until the development 
in the early 1970s of the technique 
of laparoscopy, which involves in- 
serting an instrument through a 
tiny abdominal incision, a tubal 
ligation required several days of 
hospitalization. Now, a woman 
typicaHyhas the surgery in a hospi- 
tal on a Friday m orning , goes home 
a couple of hours later, rests ova 
the weekend and retains to work 
on Monday. 

As medical advances were being 
made, other factors were making 
sterilization mori attractive. 
Among them were rising fears 
about the safety cf the pill and the 
intrauterine device. 

Miriam Rriben, spokesman for 
the Association for Voluntary Ster- 
niratioQ, cited other factors, in- 
cluding the influence of the wom- 
en’s movement and economic 
concerns. 

After Angela and Alfred Carde- 
nas of Long Beach, California, had 
their third child, Mrs. Cardenas, a 
receptionist, was sterilized. She and 
her husband, a director of security 
for a manufacturing firm, bad de- 
cided that if they were going to be 
able to afford a house they would 
have to K«rit the si 7e of their fam- 
ily. 

“This way, it’s better for the 
whole family Mrs. Cardenas said. 

Other couples have decided teat 
duldren simply do not fit into their 
fives. 

For years, some states made vol- 
untary sterilization a felony. But 
even where there were no legal re- 
strictions, many hospitals required 
a committee's approval before a 
tribal ligation could be performed. 

Tbat-began to change in 1969, 
when the American College of Ob- 
stetricians and Gynecologists said 
the decision should be made by the 
patient and the physician, not by 
committees. 

Now men and women receive 

c^vma^that their detisian is an 
informed one, the inquiry ends. 

“The critical question is: Can 
you look me in the eye and say you 
would never want to bear a child 
again?" said Dr. Robert S. Neuw- 
larth, director of obstetrics and gy- 
necology at Sl Lnke's-Roosevdt 
Hospital in New York. 

Despite the operation, pregnan- 
cies still occur in four out of 1,000 
cases, as Evelyn Robinson, of Park 
Forest, Illinois, discovered. 

Some parents become 1 so angry 
because of a pregnancy fdDowing.a 
sterilization procedure that they 
site the doctors for “wrongful life. 

New York state's highest court, 
the Court of Appeals, ruled in 
March that Brian and Sosanne 
O'Toole' of Queens County were 
not entitled to cMld-tearing ex- 
penses from two doctors who per- 
formed an unsuccessful tubal liga- 
tion on Mrs. O'Toole several 
months before she became preg- 
nant- . 

Other state epurts have made 
similar rulings, although some have 
allowed parents to recover actual 
medical expenses involved in the 
pregnancy and damages based on 
the shock and suffering brought 
about by learning of the pregnancy. 

Despite the inoeasing accep- 
tance of rieriliratinn, famil y-plan- 
ning prof essionals noted, many 
men stiH shy away from vasecto- 
mies; 

“There's something in the back 
of the male psyche teat rebels 
against having, their manhnnd tin- 
kered with.” Dr. Barton said. 


Ice BlockFalls cm UJL Home 

The AssockUed Press 

CADNAM, England —A wom- 
an escaped injury when a lump of 
ice, thought to have fallen from a 
trans-Atlantic aircraft, crashed 
into her kitchen. 


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Reaching MoreThan a Third of a Million Readers 
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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 


*■ 


AETS / LEISURE 


Visions of Venice: Exhibition 
Recalls Centuries of Dreams 


By Michael Gibson 

International Herald Tribune 

V ENICE — The good archi- 
tect s reward in ibe life to come 
must be a dreamed-of opportunity 
to build a bridge or a palace in 
Venice, a place that in 1494 was 
already being described by the 
French ambassador, Philippe de 
Commynes, as ‘‘the most trium- 
phant city that ever was seen." 

Venice is already a dream, but an 
exhibition at the Museo Correr on 
the Piazza San Manx) presents a 
whole series of dreams within the 
dream — plans, architects' draw- 
ings, scale models and painters' vi- 
sions of constructions that were 
□ever built, although many of them 
could well have been. 

One of the earliest is a 1554 de- 
sign by Andrea Palladio for the 
reconstruction in stone of the 
wooden Rialto Bridge, which had 
been destroyed by fire 40 years ear- 
lier. Palladio's plan was not adopt- 
ed, but he published it in one of his 
books, ana his drawings inspired 
artists such as Canaletto and 


Francesco Guardi to paint the site 
with Palladio’s bridge in the scene, 
rather than the existing one. 

Indeed, there are a number of 
paintings that could be similarly 
misleading out of the context of 
this exhibit because of the liberties 
they take with fact. 

Without a doubt the most strik- 
ing of these is “Veduta fantastic* di 
San Marco" by Monsu Desiderio. 
(Art historians are still trying to 
decide whom this pseudonym con- 
ceals.) In this painting, done 
around 1625, the Doges’ Palace has 
been transformed into a Palladian 
structure, and the opening onto the 
square is vastly enlarged. 

The actual merit of t be painting 
is in the fantastic contrasts in lumi- 
nosity. The dark side is represented 
by thunderclouds overhead and. in 
the foreground, the black Bucen- 
taur (the doges’ official vessel) fol- 
lowed by black gondolas. Light is 
almost exclusively concentrated on 
the tall campanile, which the paint- 
er has spun out like a minaret. This 
painting, on loan from a private 


collection in London, is alone 
worth the visit. 

The subsequent centuries are 
represented by a variety of archi- 
tectural designs for churches, pal- 
aces and a theater. The 19th centu- 
ry bongs in various new elements. 

Megalomania is one of them, 
though Venice was never exactly 
famous for its modesty. The archi- 
tect Ludovico Cadorin drew plans 
for an enormous complex that 
would have included restaurants 
and an arena, as well, presumably, 
as lodgings. 

A second 19th-century feature is 



Soane Museum Reveals 
An Architect, Collector 




By Margot Patterson 

L ONDON —Tucked away in the 
/ middle of London’s law 
courts. Sir John Soane's Museum is 
a little-known curiosity, the idio- 
syncratic expression of one man's 
fertile, often fantastical imagina- 
tion. 


Built by Soane in 1812. the muse- 
i is a showcase 


Detail of Niemeyer drawing for a bridge at the Accademia. 


hygiene, including projects, sub- 
linn. 


milted by a French firm, for struc- 
tures that are gcmedly referred to 
as “ chalets de necessite." 


The third novelty is that afford- 
ed by the extraordinary develop- 
ment of engineering in the industri- 
al age- A plan was proposed to 
build an underwater tunnel for pe- 
destrians to the Giudecca, an island 
too far removed from the rest of 
Venice to allow the building of 
stone bridges- That might have 


been a good idea, because even 
today the boat connections are in- 
frequent, especially in the evening. 
It seems fortunate, on the other 
hand, that a plan for a large iron 
bridge was turned down. 

The 20th century brought one 


particularly memorable event- On 
July 14, 1902, the campanile or San 
Marco collapsed. Miraculously, 


tomontages were produced show- 
ing the new campanile in various 
other places around San Marco. Se- 
veral plans for new towers in a 
variety of styles, including “gothic” 
and “electric," were presented for 
public approval. 


nobody was hurt and the surround- 
ing buildings were not Hameopd 
Reconstruction of the tower fos- 
tered all manner of fantasies, fho- 


More recent times saw the defeat 
of a palazzo designed by Frank 
Lloyd Wright, a hospital by Le 
Corbusier, -a Palazzo aei Congressi 
Louis Kahn and, as recently as 
i year, a project for a new bridge 


at the Accademia by the Brazilian 
architect Oscar Niemeyer. 

All these architects of various 
centuries have produced a sugges- 
tive, variable vision of a Venice that 
never was or will be. No other dty 
in the world is 
quite as 
tectural 
dream. 


a 

by L 
this' 


Le Venezie Passibili da Palladio a 
Le Cotbusier, Museo Correr. Piazza 
San Marco, through Jufy 31. 


urn is a showcase for both his tal- 
ents as an architect and his taste as 
a collector. Two celebrated Ho- 
garths and an outstanding collec- 
tion of architectural drawings are 
among (he museum's finest pieces. 
The dizzy profusion of objects that 
overspills the rooms testifies to 
Soane’s eclectic and obsessive col- 
lecting, which ecompassed every- 
thing from classical antiquities and 
Renaissance bronzes to Peruvian 
pottery and Napoleonic Medals. 

Hardly less remarkable is the 
building itsdf, which Soane de- 
signed and decorated in a highly 
personal style. Students of archi- 
tecture admir e the ingenuity of the 
construction and the elaborate ar- 
chitectural conceits Soane em- 
ployed; others simply marvel at the 
astounding oddity of the place. 



The Gropius House: A Modernist Symbol in Old New England 


Central staircase of the Gropius house in Massachusetts. 


By Joseph Giavanmni 

New York. Times Service 

L INCOLN, Massachusetts — The Gropius 
/ boose, a symbol of modem architecture 
in the United Slates since it was built in 
J93S, opened for the first time to the public 
last month. 

For many years the Gropius family infor- 
mally shared the white, geometric, flat- 
roofed house, surprisingly modest and per- 
sonal inside, with visitors and professionals. 
It was a model of the new architecture Wal- 
ter Gropius brought to the United Stales 
from Germany, and through a bequest to the 
Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities from his widow, Ise, who died in 
1983, it will continue in a similar role, fur- 
nished much as it was when the architect 
lived in iL 

On a country road in Lincoln, 40 miles (65 
kilometers) from Boston, the boose is sur- 
prising even to those familiar with it through 
photographs. More intimate than its ma- 
chined image implies, the Gropius house has 
a wide character range — from simply func- 


tional in the bathrooms to romantic in the 
surrounding grounds, where the house’s geo- 
metric form breaks down and opens to the 
countryside. 

Many of the fu rnishing s — - mhular steel 
chair s, for example — were created by 
friends and colleagues of Gropius, ana 
t houg h uns entimental by design, they are 
charged with both personal associations and 
a sense of 20th-century design history. 

Built with standard, mass-produced mate- 
rials, the house nonetheless incorporates 
many elements of traditional New England 
wooden architecture. According to Lynne 
Spencer, director of properties for the antiq- 
uities society, the Grooms family had trav- 
eled throi _ 
nacular built 
directness and 
buildings, the structure is framed and sided 
in wood, is painted white with dark trim and 
once had a screened-in porch. 

Surprisingly, this monument of the mod- 
ernist era sits on a fiddstone foundation 
stmTlar to that under many did buildings in 



the area. Gropius saw great similarity be- 
tween the styldess, anonymous and practical 
New England buildings and the industrial 
architecture he was advocating with this 
budding. 

Unlike his other buddings, for which, wood 
is easdy obtained today far repairs, the Gro- 
pius house is presenting restoration difficul- 
ties for the society because production of 
some industrial materials and parts, such as 
1930s window hardware, has been discontin- 
ued. Budt for 518,000 and still in relatively 
sound shape, the bouse wdl gradually be 
repaired by the society, which is dedicated to 
the preservation as well as interpretation of 
architectural and cultural artifacts of New 
England history. The house is the oniy one of 
the society’s 42 buddings built after 1850. 

Even today, nearly half a century after its 
construction, the house is somewhat startling 
in its setting. The country roads that pass 
woods, fields and shingled buildings — and 
nearby Walden Pond — lull motorists into 
the comfort of a day in the country until the 
crisp, simple structure, standing on a slight 


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EDUCATION 
DIRECTORY 


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The roan responsible for thii 
monument to Englisb eccentricity 
is regarded as one of Britain's.' 
greatest architects. Born in 1753, 
the son of a bricklayer. Soane rose 
to become the most eminent archi- 
tect of 3 generation (bat included 
such talents as Thomas Mash,. ■' 
James Wyatt and Henry Holland. J " 

A Pnvol "AiMriemv oolri mertal f * . 



h01 beyond a fteldstone wall breaks (be 
drive. 

In tbe entry near the from door hangs an 
old black-and-white photograph of a build- 
ing Gropius designed in 1925-1926 for the 
Bauhans. the school in Dessau, Germany, 
where he taught; it was dosed by the Nazi 
government in 1933. The photograph is one 
of many family possessions renaming. 

In (he living-dining area there are many 
casually placed pieces -of chrome-plated tu- 
bular steel furniture from the early 1920s. 
The Nazi minister of propaganda, Joseph 
Goebbels — who was instrumental in dosing 
the Bauhans — gave Gropius permission to 
take these pieces out of Germany after being 
told that the architect would be the first 
German to head the Beaux-Arts-dominated 
Harvard School of Design. 

The Gropius house. 68 Baker Bridge Road, 
Lincoln, Massachusetts. Open Saturday and 
Sunday, noon to 5 PJkT, through Oct 15; after 
Nov. 1, opai the same hours on Friday. Satur- 
day aw Sunday of the first full weekend of 
each month. Admission SI' 


A Royal Academy gold medal for 
architecture won in 1776. was an.' 
early achievement. Soane's ap- 
pointment as architect to the Bank 
of England in 1788 secured his ca- 
reer. The Bank and the Dulwich 
Picture Gallery in south London 1 ; 
are considered his greatest public 
works still standing. 

Visitors to the museum, at 13 
Lincoln's Inn Fields, will find it- 
lodged between two other houses 
built by Soane. The building to the 
west. No. 14, was constructed in 
1824 but never occupied by him. 
No. 12 was Soane's home from. 
1792 to 7812. It was left in trust a$ 
part of the endowment and now . 
contains a reading room open to 
scholars and most of tbe 20,000; 
architectural drawings executed by ‘ 
the Adams brothers. 

The bulk of Soane's collection is 
in No. 13, the museum proper. The - 
trustees have attempted to preserve, 
the house as it was when Soane , 
lived there, with his furniture,.. 
books and pictures arranged as he 
had them. The effect, wrote Henry-. 
James in “A London Life,” is of “a 
sort of Saturday afternoon of one's 
youth — a long, rummaging vish, 
under indulgent care, to some ec- 
centric and rather alarming old' 
traveled person." 

Most of the paintings and draw- ' 
ings in the museum are exhibited in 
two picture galleries on the ground- 
floor. The New Picture Room, so’ 
called because it was added to the- 
museum alter Soane's death, coo- 
tains works by J.M.W. Turner., 
Canaletto and the British artist 
John Flaxxnan. 1 

The original Picture Room in- 
cludes many of Soane's ardhitecUtrT 
al drawings, several drawings by. 
Piranesi and tbe Hogarth paint- 
ings. Hogarth's cynical view of pol- 
iticking, portraying the corruption 
and buffoonery erf “An Election,* 
was painted in 7754. It is one of the 
artist's most important paintings,, 
and it hangs beside another 



Ijiirpn-inil 

from ‘Lnu 




r 






better known: “The Rake’s Pro- 
gress” is Hogarth's most faunas 
work. The eight pictures in the se- 
ries depict Thomas Rakewdl's 
moral degeneration and decline, 
from his inheritance of a fortune- 
through his non by profligacy and 
ultimate confinement in the mad- 
house. 

Architecturally, too, The ;Rctmt 
Room repavs scrutiny. Broil in 
1824, when Soane was 71, it is sad 
to represent his efforts to mage the 
classical tradition of architecture 
with the gothic, as witness the 
arched canopy of the ceiling. Bat- 
tbe most strikmg peculiarity of the 
room is the paneled walls, which 
swing open to display further pic- 
tures. This almost triples tbe nam- ' 
ber of pictures dm can be bung 
and. so Soane believed, offers lhe 1 
additional advantage of enabling 
ibe pictures to be seen from differ- ^ 
entangles. 

Tbe breakfast room, located in 
the middle of the bouse but lighted 
from all sides by skylights, is anotb-. 
er example of Soane's original ar- 
chitectural style. In the dim warren; 
of rooms in the basement, he gave! 
full ran to his eccentric! 
impression given is af a 
impulse run riot, but the catacombs 
and d casters do contain some trea- 
sures amid the duller. 

Chief among these is tbe sar- 
cophagus of Seti I (1303-1290 
B. C.X inlaid with scares from tire' 
Egyptian Book of the Gates. 

Soane dreamed oT founding a 
dynasty of architects and for mat 
end acquired and rebuilt a country 
bouse, Pftzhanger Manor, which be 
intended Tor the artistic education 
of his two sons. Neither son bfr 
came an architect; both proved dis- 
appointments to their father. 

The elder son suffered from de&- 
cate health and died before his 
ther. The younger son, George, Ted 
a life that in dissipation has been 
compared to Thomas RakewdTa 
Father and son became estranged; 
a situation that did not improve 
when George Soane began writing 
articles denouncing his father’s 
work. Sir John mounted tbe dip*, 
pings and kept them in aprormnent- 
piacc in (he house, labeled “Blows 
Given 




rea by George Soane.” 

Family acrimony did not end 


with John Soane's death in 1837. 
George Soane contested his fa- 
ther’s win and unsuccessfully petK 
boned Parliament to have the mu- 
seum disbanded and its 
distributed to Soane's family. 



tune for the establishment and ups J 
keepof a museum in his honor-- 1 
“The Soane Museum is a shrine 'j 
to tbe classical tradition erf arcfcb 
tectnre," said its curator. Peter 
Thornton, who described the muse- 
um as “not just curious but excit- 
ing/’ In tu postmodernist era. 
Thornton believes,, contemporary 
architects may find a fresh source 
of inspiration in Soane’s clever anj 
inventive architectural style. ■] 


c--: »- 


It:- 


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Is. 


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■ .• 


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v. 

v/ ■ 


Morgol Pooersori is a London* 
based jourmUst . - ■ « 



Tliyseea CoflectemExiubil 

The Associated Press 


FLORENCE — More than 10} 
■ThyS 


i« 


modern paintings from tire 
j^Q-Bonremisza collection west 
display at the Pirn Palace here I 
dty. The works mdnric pain" T 
by Renoir, Gangnin;: D«5gi^ 
Crcgh, Chagall and Picassd 


sastejrr- 










INTERNATIOP^AL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY , JULY 6-7, 1985 


Page 


nRe 

Collect,, 


ARTS /LEISURE 




( 



JONDON — The paces of OM 


fn; 


Masierdrawings haw spared , 
in the i last; two or three years, lids 
- — . inflation involves not just major 
icn; Jr-* masterpieces, asa result of the Get- 

* ?. >} ty. Museum's buying .power, but 

ctv.c;.* .VJ '■*•*>& also more modest drawings that are 
cf :rv “ little affected by museum buying! 

■■■ .. . . 

SOUREN MEUKIAN 


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Tims trend was demonstrated 
twice this week, first at Christie's 
on Tuesday and then at Sotheby’s 
coTbmsday. 

Christie’s auction was hardly of 
the .kind that makes headlines. U 
started with a contingent of Italian 
Baroque drawings o T the 17th ccn- 
ouy, went on to 18th-ceatnry Yes- - 
ice sad France, and concluded with 
aa assortment from the Northern 
schools. 


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The.firtt 30 lots or so, which 
eomastad-rf conventional studies 
sucfras ‘'Study for the Figure of 
Chart'- ■ - V* “ A Nude with a 
' Stag” and die tike, had one re- 
: deeming featurerVirtually all had 
saccessne^bdoogedtothreeearfy 
llaBari collectors, including A. 
MaapoiL The latter made many 
attnbutkms, . of which Christies 
Nod Annedey .had retained many. 
In addition, Maggiori scribbled in- 
dications concerning the places he 

-.i, had bought the drawings. This 

helped boost prices, because coBec- 
., v< t tors have always had a soft spot for 
: early Mow collectors’ marks. 

~ -Bartolommeo Cesi’s study of a 
n ' 7 'S: m »t*d trwn seen from below may 
not be terribly inspired. The breast 
is bared and a drapery is thrown 
over his knees and legs. The head 
looks op three-quarters left as the 
man make s « gprtme with his raised 
aim — cut off bdow the wrist 
through cropping, alas. Red and 


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white chalk on blue paper makes it 
abide better than a gifted student's 
tdferts.- 

But Maggiori boldly wrote in the 
lower comer “/Z Cedftct," Adding 
at the bottom that he had acquired 
it in Bologna in 1791. Combine tins 
with Annesley’s clever speculation, 
“perhaps connected with the figure 
of Chfist in the ceiling fresco of the 
Coronation of theVIrrin in the 
church of Santa Maria deiBulgari, 
Bdogna,” and the trick was done. 
The drawing, which carried an esti- 
mate of £800 to £1,200, was 
knocked down at .£2^00. • 

Identical ' enmad^tions b^lpad 
studies of nodes devoid of any oth- 
er interest. The walking 'frnde 
With a Staff” in red chaOc. ascribed 
by Maggpori ip Francesco Monti 
arid, acquired by Maggiori in Bolo- 
gna in 1791, doubled its estimate of 
£600 to £1,000, rising to £2^00. A 
sketch a woman by Retro Testa 

— a big name anvmg mfnnr mas- 
ters — had been estimated at 
£600 to £800 went up to £1^00. 
The drawing is a first thought for 
“Diana Leaving the Searing En- 
dyrnioa,” but despite the title it has 
few stoking merits aside from 
Maggiori’snote to the effect that he 
bought it in Rome in 1808. • - 

races such as this last illustrate 
the value now pm on any identifi- 
able work by an unimportant artist 
wherever backed by the mere sug- 
gestion of. some historic prove- 
nance or link. 

Drawings that, a quarter of a 
century ago* would haw been sold 
in batches of 10 or 20 and acquired 
at a 20th of today’s price by a 
handful of collectors with an inter- 
est in the creative process of art'are 
now glorified into works of art to 
be acquired for their own sake, 

A typical example Tuesday was a 
study by Agustmo CSampdfi. The 
drawing, in black chalk, pea and 


brown ink, is made mildly attrac- 
tive by the addition of some green 
wash and touches of white, but it is 
otherwise little more than an aca- 
demic exercise on the subject of- 
“Ecce Homo." AnnesWs estimate 
of £600 to £800 would hove been 

generous until recently. But the 
drawing was identified as “a study 
for an altaipiece of Santa Prassede, 
atwy! 1 * and that was enough to 
scad it soaring to £2,SOO. 

A more spectacular effect of the 
historical connection was jnovided 
minutes later a drawing of “A 
Statue of Pan, After the Antique.” 
Ihe drawing was obviously intend; 
ed as a preparatory study for ah 
engraving, as indicated by the criss- 
cross shading done with, painstak- 
ing care. It is from a great hand and 
comes from the collection of a great 
Fngfah painter. Sir Peter Ldy. 

Annesley, who noted that “the 
classical prototype with restored 
head «nd arms is at' Versailles,” 
attributed the study to the Italian 
BaldassareParnzzi and estimated it 
at £1,500 to £2,000. Some profes- 
sionais in the room thought, how- 
ever, that they recognized the hand 

(J Martin vauHeemskerck. If thdr 
hpp/?h is right, this would rnrilre it 
worth about £10,000 to £15,000 
t raditional — th^ngh hard-- 
{y the £30.000 that & fetched on 
Tuesday. The Ldy connection, 
badeed by the posnlulity that tire 
study was inspired by the statue at 
Versailles, accounted for the differ- 
ence. 

. Jnlien Stock, the Old Master 
drawing expert at Sotheby’s, who 
followed up Thursday with some 
pikes that were even more stun- 
ning, said a whole pmeration of 
new buyers who studied art history 
in the la le 1960s hadbecomeactive. 

tfiemfliiMiffe nfpmifBMnns 

such as Frauds HasEoll at Oxford 
and Anri Sutberiand at New York 


University. He also rioted the im- 
pact that the progress of scholarly 
literature had had on the maiktt. 

Some of the prices paid at the 
Sotheby's sak directly reflected ibe 
impact of recent scholarship. A 
drawing by Giovanni Battista 
Bacrido), done as a pre- 
study for a fresco of Di- 
ana and Endymkm, was bought for 
£5,200. by Lutz Riestor of Fmburg, 
a German deale r in . prints and 
drawings who is very much a schol- 
ar: The drawing was recently 

shown by Hugh Macandrew, an art 

historian, to be of great hmonance 
to ihe artist’s early style: when the 
Pn gfi-ri 1 Richard Bagley, 

who. was -selling it Thursday, 
bought it in 1965, it post him £65. 

Another typical case is a portrait 
of a girl by Benedetto Luc, which 
Bagky bought at Sotheby’s in 1966 
for £35 as a drawing of the French 
school of the late 18th century. No 
one bad beard about laid then. On 
Thursday the portrait was'knocked 
down at £4.200. 

It would.be wrong, however, to 
get the impression that bookish al- 
titudes leave no room for purely 
aesthetic considerations. The new 
breed of collectors indudes buyers 
who will pay enormous prices on 
tite strength of an impulse. 

Christie's sale included one ad- 
mirable drawing. This is a sketch of 
“The Deposition” in brown and 
cream ad paint. Annesley considers 
it to be by Palma n Giovane. An 
earlier owner who thought other- 
wise inscribed it “Tmtoretti,” pos- 
sibly for Tintoretto. Armesley ten- 
tatively dates the study around 
1610 and observes that ra number 
of pictures of the Deposition of this 
penod are known. . . . None cor- 
responds dotefy.” 

Such a drawing, in contrast to 
some mentioned before, is thus sur- 
rounded by complete uncertainty. 



Water color Landscapes 
From Wales in London 


L ntf s he?»ri of young girt (derail), sold Thursday. 


But it is a powerful work erf art, in 
which mudi of what 19th-century 
art tried to achieve is anticipated. 

, A leading French expert desper- 
ately wanted it Tor his collection. So 
did one of the greatest collectors in 
Europe, Wolfgang Rfllchen of Va- 
duz, Lichtenstein He outbid the 
French expert via a dealer and got 
the prize at £40,000, four rimes 
Christie's medium estimate. 

A similar expression of passkm- 
-ate interest came out at Sotheby’s. 
A reclining figure of an adolescent 
by Francesco Salvia ti, which Stock 
had very plausibly estimated at 
£20,000 to £30,000, soared to 
£92,000. paid by the London dealer 
John Motion-Moms. Stock said 
after the sale, in reference to his 
estimate, that Salviati bad “proba- 


bly been until now the most under- 
rated Florentine Mannerist." 

No such comment could apply to 
Luca Penni, whose “Entomb- 
ment," previously attributed to Pri- 
matiedo, went up to £26,000. A 
follower of Raphael, Penni is now 
virtually unobtainable — if rW^ is a 
Penni The real reason for the fan- 
tastic price is that, whoever its au- 
thor, tire “Entombment” is a won- 
derful Mannerist drawing. 

■ 2 Canalettos Sold 

Two views of the Grand Canal in 
Venice by Canaletto were sold for 
£734,400 Friday to the New York 
dealers Hiischl and Adler at Chris- 
tie’s. The Associated Press reported 
from London. At the same sale of 
Old Masters, an anonymous buyer 
paid £496,800 for two landscapes 
by Jan Brueghel the Elder. 


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Surprising Satisfaction 
From ^Emerald Forest’ 


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By Sheila Benson 

LesAngda Tuna Service 

■' —■ \ YSTERIOUS and powerful 

- JVJL “The Emerald- Forest” is the 
'--.summer’s greatest surprise and 

r most solid satisfaction. 

-7 . John Boorman has made an iu- 
.7 IdVigwi t film of mw patw-ng heanty 

-- MOVIE MABQUEE 

: adventure with an ache of urgency 

’ -- behind iL In its stay of family and 
loss, growth and separation, it 
spea^ tolhe deqKst fedings aD 
5- people share.' Arid m its sensuous 
and magjcal portrait of primitive 

- tribal Hfe, it may prove a classic. 

' The screenwriter, R«po PaBen- 
wfao cowrote “Excalibnr” 
, BooDQnm, has given the story 
r of a boy kklnamied by Endians a 
— ■ colossal ending that seems a little 
Hke a metaphysical afterthought 
T But he has kqa its core intact: the 
dogged faith of a father who for 10 
years has spent all his free time 
. searching for his son. 

/ When Bill Markham (Powers 
Boothe) finally encounters his son 
'-f Tommy (Charley Boorman), the 
; boy has becrane Tomme, a fuE- 
fledged memb er of an almost un- 
■■■ known Amazonian tribe that calls 

- iL<tdf the InvisiUe People- Mark- 

" " ham, an American engineer, has 

■■ I been part erf a groop ccarstmcting 

— ; an i mmens e dam in the Amazon 
headlands. The dam has dirolaced 
a tribe called the Fierce People, 
who have consequently moved into 
the Invisible People’s territory. 

“The Emerald Forest" fflumi- 
nates an exotic people with an at 
most hypnotic fascination. All the 
. - film’s donents conspire in that its 

• •• beautiful otherwondly score by 
. •> Junior Homrich; the cmemalogra- 

• phy of Philippe Rraisselot (“Dira") 
Hrvt Simon Holland 's ^production 
-j design, which give the fihn a haiml- 
l ingly verdant look; the costumes 
.-“and woven feathered headdresses 
•: by Christd Boorman and Clovis 
Bueno; and Peter Framptot’s con- 
. j' stantly changing body painting. 

Such details make the jungle chi- 
faatirtn profound and tangible and 
•' sharpen the conflict that follows — 
_ the fathers desire to bring bis son 
1 home and the boy’s feeling that he 
already has afather (the tribal lcad- 
er), a mother, a sweetheart and his 
sure place in the natural world. 

There is another, larger issue, 
7 one that has preoccupied Boorman 
in alm ost every fiun (“Ddiver- 
; ; ance,” .“Hell in the Padfic,” even 
; “ExcahTmr"): the aMsequenoes 
- when blu ndering outsiders invade 

• v or affroit a civilization held in its 
■ : own delk? tf balance. Hoc the 

damay both to oatitre and to 
e: Markham’s brinsin£ of a 


dreadful metaphors far this intru- 
sion twtft the natural order of 

thhig t 

Capsule reviews of other films 
recently, released in the United 
Stales: 

Paul Attanasio of The Washing- 
ton Post on “Back to Ok Futrae”: 

In this glwting meoy-go-round 
of a movie, everything is precisely 
machined, but nothing seems quite 
safe. It’s a wildly pleuurahte sci-fi 
comedy, filled wdh enchantment, 
sweetness and zip. Marty McFly 
(Michael J. Fax) is_a.high school 
senior who pbls. around with. Dr. 
Brown (Chrikopher Llcyd), a mad 
scientist. Marty's mother (Lea 
Thompson) is a prudish scold, and 
bis father(Gispm Glover) a push- 
over. Brown invents a time ma- 
chine, and Marty is transported to 
1955, where he meets his parents in 
high schooL This is basically a one- 
joke movie, so the writers, Bob 
Gale and Robert Zemeckis of 
“Used Care” and “I Wanna Hold 
Your Hand” (Zemeckis also direct- 
ed), work tite basics. For all its 
comedy, thongh. the film is about a 
kid coming to terms with his par- 
ents’ inadequacies, a moment fa- 
miHar to everyone. 


Janet Maslin of The New York 
Times on “Day of the Dead”: 
Greatly admired in sane circles 
as the honor fihn sardonic enough 
to kt its zombies go shopping, 
Geonge A. Romero’s “Dawn of the 
Dead” had in its suburban-mall 
setting a central metaphor Romero 
may never top. “Day of the Dad” 
has a las startling setting, since 
roost of it takes place underground, 

but it still affords Romero the op- 
portunity fa intermittent philoso- 
phy ntifl satire, without compro- 
mising his reputation as the 
grisliest guy around. The dead have 
the edge, of course, so Romero 
keeps the few nondcad characters 
locked in discussion about toe fu- 
ture of the human race and in sus- 
picious gossip about the medical 
methods of cne of their coHeaga ~ 
whose nickname, Dr. Frank! 
stein, is something of an under- 
statement 


DOONESBURY 


. M BUDGET* AR&VOU 
nxve, cAs&E? th&shoot 
to 7He&v&wcFvewK/ 

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rTTUBG OUT 20*8*. &A 
oamsm NATURAL NBVffT 
v. 


oejusr&oa&imiAsr 
StVT.AWL&MBTELU'nu, 
THE&UASttrADWBE 
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ac- 


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j weapon into a Stone Age 

civilization is one qf the most 


Colleetor 9 s Guide 


and artefacts for sale 
boa of sod 


AUSTRALIAN 
ABORIGINAL ART 

seleo 
ah 

D - and 

artmds horn AmMni 
Ga. Unique nKStoat opp ortu n it y. 

Phase writer 

CHve Evan, Box D 113 
TOT, 181 Avb. Gurfefrde-CaaOe, 
92521 Nenifly Cedes. 

(In Paris July 8-12) _=■= 




, * 



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ANOITNOUmr 

ML5UNUAS 

OURFHEW. 

70NKER. POWER! 

J I / 


By Max Wykcsjoycc 

L ONDON — At the Leger Gal- 
/ 1 erics, with a catalog sold in 
aid of the National Trust (Trust is 
Wales), are 47 watercolors from the 
National Library of Wales, almost 
all landscapes and mostly of Wales, 
a romantic terrain particularly at- 
tractive to watercolorists such as 
Paul Sandby (1730-1809), Moses 
Griffith (1747-1819), Julius Caesar 
JbbeLSOD (1759-1817), Michael 
•‘Angelo*’ Rooker (1749-183'x), 
Nicholas Pocock (1740-1821) and 
John "Warwick” Smith (1749- 
1831). 

“Watercolors from the National 
Library qf Waks,” JLeger Galleries, 
13 Ofd Bond Street, Wl, through 

July! 2, 


Thomas Gibson Fine Art is 
showing works oo paper by 19th 
and 20th century masters, includ- 
ing a page of drawings of a dancer’s 
feet and calves, in effect sketches 
for “La Petite Dansense de Qua- 
ttsze Ans" by Degas, and one of his 
superb pastels over monotype; pas- 
tels by Renoir — such as“Jeune 
Fille Assise" — and Vuillard (“Ma- 
rie aux Jarinthes”); a Cfaanne wa- 
teroolor study of “A Card-Player”; 
two flower pieces by Odilon Re- 
don; a fine late bach scene by 
Bonnard: and a tremendous, atypi- 
cal, classical “Still life with Arti- 
chokes" by Baltous. 

“Works on Paper," Thomas Gib- 
son Fine Art, 9 A New Bond Street, 
Wl. through July 12. 

□ 

Serene, stylized village streets 
and hilly landscapes of southern 
France and Spain by Gwyneth 
Johnstone are at Sally Hunter & 
Patrick Seale Fine Art Johnstone 
studied in Paris with Andri Lhoie 
and in London with Gecil Coffins; 
the former gave her an almost ar- 
chitectural eye for landscape, and 
the latter encouraged the poetic 
fantasy at which many British art- 


ists exceL This combination pro-* 
duces quiet, small, simple but deep- 
ly satisfying images — "The Goat 
Girl." “The Harbor,” "Bog lin- 
gerie, " “Misty Village." "Woman 
with Loaves” —that bring, as Giles 
Auty remarks in his catalog fore- 
word. "a dreamlike exemption 
from toe rules of time.” 

Gwyneth Johns rone, Sally Hunter 
A Patrick Seale Fine Art ’ 2 Mot- 
comb Street. Belgrave Square, SW1, 
through July 19. 

□ 

Agnews has mounted a selection, 
partly loan and partly stock, of 
major 18th-century Veueiian 
painting s, with a catalog sold in aid 
of the Venice in Peril Fund. The 
most famous names — Tiepolo, 
Ricci, Longhi, Guardi and Canalet- 
to — are well represented. Canalet- 
to’s “Warwick Castle: the South 
Front” shows what an extraordi- 
narily fine painter be was when not 
compelled to make yet another 
half-dozen souvenirs of Venice be- 
fore sundown for the Grand Tour- 
ist trade. A nobl.e aspect of 
Francesco Guardi, too, is to be seen 
in “Architectural Capriccio with a 
Campanile and (he Lagoon in the 
Distance.” A colorful surprise in 
this stunning show is Jacopo Ami- 
goni (1682-1752); born in Naples, a 
student in Venice, an itinerant 
painter in Rome; Flanders, Bavaria 
and England (where he stayed and 
worked m 1730-1739), he ended his 
prolific life in Madrid as court 
painter to King Ferdinand VI. 
Here are toe rich imagery of “Ve- 
nus and Adonis," “Bacchus and 
Ariadne" and “Europa and toe 
Bull," painted in the bright but 
subtle colors for which he became 
famed while in England. 

“Venetian Eighteenth Century 
Painting," Thas. Agnew A Sons, 43 
Old Bond Street. Wl, through Jufy 
19. 


Max Wykes -Joyce writes regular- 
ly on London art exhibitions. 



LA NAPOULE ART FOUNDATION ■ 


HENRY CLEWS MEMORIAL presents at 

CHATEAU DE LA NAPOULE 

SYMPOSIUM 1985 CONCERT 
19. 20. 21 JoU 21 Jnly 

"Aspects of Realism" 

discussion on in Chamber Music 

painting held in Fngtiicii 

Partiapaiing artists: S. ABELES - M. ANDREJEVIC - S. ATHERTON 
W. BAILEY - J. BEAL - L. CABASSO - J. DUVAL - S. FRECKELTON 
A. McGARRELL -J. McGARRELL-J. MANNING - R. MOYNIHAN 
J. SHANNON - M. STRAND - J. WILLIAMS. 

FRANCE- (93) 49.9S.0S or (93) 49.1439 or (93) 4955.05 
_________ f A M-P h a private non profit organization — ___ . 


2 FORI 


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auuin^y. □ I would Ske to have the paper sent to my wooationadcIrMS. ■ 

pecseendesewtrudior^. • j 


DTTEMATlOm ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 

WAHZFENDLAY 

GhAULJERIEB 


Chicago PabnBaach Bovoriy H 1 B 

EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY 
ARTISTS 

represented exclusively 

Andrfe HAMBOURG 
Constantin KLUGE 
LEPHO 
Gaston SEBIRE 
Andrfe VIGNOLES 

FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS 
POST-IMPRESSIONISTS AND MODERN MASTERS 

2 Avenue liatignoc, Paris 8th - 22S.7fl.74 
Moa.-FTi, 10 ua-1 pan. - 2:90 pan.-7 pja 
HMel Georee-V, JI, Avenue Getrce-V, Paris 8th - 72154JJ0 
L-SaL, 10:90 am-l pun.; 2:3M pm; Sun, 74 pm 


YoUnde ARDISSONE 
FMEppeAUGE 
Louis FABIEN 
Francois GALL 
Bernard GANTNER 


MUSfiEDE LA MARINE Palais deChafllot 


La g6n6reuse et tragique 
expedition Lap6roizse 
BREST 1785 - PARIS 1985 
• Exposition du 13 luln ou 23 septembrw — m—— 


GALER1E MOMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

_ 6. Rue Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PAMS. Tel.: 359.8Z44 


r 


GALERJE DINA VfERNY 

36, roe Jacob 75006 PAHS - 2602118 

KABAKOV 


i Until Jufy 73,1985. 


MUSfaE RODIN 


77, rue de Varenne, Pais (7*} - M&tro Vcrenne 

Rodin/ five Conte mp orary ph o to gr aphers 

Tto BRIMS, Krttoi Hlif, hm MBET, BkuAQb TNIMB, Npr itillSCt 

DaSy {except Tuescby) 10 am. - 11i30 am. and 2 pjn. - 5^5 pin. 

FfeOiM MAY, 3 to SEPTEMBER, 30 


\j/r. 

VENARD 


GALER1E FELIX VERCEL 
9, avenue Matignon - Paris 8 e 
ttl. : 25&2519 


June 12 -July 12 


GALEREE SCHMJT 

396, rue Saio^onorf, 75001 PARIS 260.36.36 

DE COROT A PICASSO 


exposition - jusqu’au 20 juillet 


LONDON 


ESKENAZI 

Oriental Art 25th Anniversary Exhibition 
12 June - 12 July 1985 
Ancient Chinese Bronzes 
Gilt Bronzes 
Inlaid Bronzes 
Silver 
Jades 

Ceramics r.rs/oaue avstteblo 


Foxglove House 166 Piccadilly London W1V 9DE 

or- C.ra Boro Si too') •••’opl'onn 0* J93 b-;'i4 


Frvt cvropzr.r-. Fxhsbitio-. c : Decomr ; va Work by 

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT 

InntiWL-. rumi.-ur-. 

26 June - 30 August 


FISCHER! 
FINE ART 

limited: 

LONDON 


30 King Street 
St. James’s 
London SW1 
01-839 3942 
Monday— Friday 10-5.30 


MARLBOROUGH HNE ART 
(LONDON) LTD. 

6 Albemarle St., Wl. 01-629 5161 


BACON 

My 31, 1985 

Mcn^fri 10*30. Soft. 1002i30. 


PARIS 

GAIBUE LOUISE IBRiS 

-47, rue de Moncscu, 75008. 
TeL 563 28 85/37 14 

HENRI 

LAURENS 

60 works -1915-1954 
June 12 - July 20 

Im Dotty Kccmpt Sunday and Monday 


PARIS 

= MUSfiE RODINas 

77, rue de Varenne (7*) 
M tl ro Varenne 

KIRILI 

Sculptures exhibited 
in the museum gardens 
Daily, except Thursday, 
from 10 a.m. to 5.45 p.m. 
tSmJune 26-Soptember 16 5= 


■ ROBOT FOUR TAPESTRIES ■ 

MONET, K1H, PICASSO, F010N, 

t£GBt, LURCA7, CASZOtL. 

AUBUSSON 
handwoven TAPESTRIES 

Original presHpots hand-knotted 

SAVONNER1E CARPETS 

28 Rue Bonaparte, Paris 6fh 
Telj 329X60 


BASEL 


June - September 1985 

MAX ERNST 

LANDSCAPES 

GALERIE BEYELER 

Baumleingaese 9, Basel 
Tel: 061/23 54 12 

Opening hours: Tues., Fri- 9-12, 14-18 & Sat. 9-13. 


Art Exhibitions & Auction Sales 

appears every Saturday 




EVTERNATIOlNAli HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 


NYSE Mosf Actives 


VM. HiSD LOW LOU city. 


iase« -m’i 
1J254 SI 
*316 « 
S7U 117*a 
am t TL 
7581 32'* 
748* 

«10 IV a 
6134 MV 
27 

SMO 2D'» 
S489 3#'< 
5179 «'4 
5167 in. 
SlU U'5 


57V + 's 

44 Alls 

II*»« — 2*4 

64'4 -3V 
23'. 


34% A >i 
44*. + 1* 

17% — t» 

in» + 1» 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

UlillllM 

Industrial* 


Dow Jones Averages 


Oka ttwfr Low LOW CM, 

Ira us 1J28J9 1340 a! 1324.93 133WS + 0.06 

Trans 671*3 461 JO 672.7S 478.96 + 1*7 

Ulil 1*5.11 163-01 164.9) 16&2? -t IJ3 

Como S 52.19 557.73 550.8? SSS.74 * 341 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Uncttonged 
Tefal Issues 
Haw highs 
N(W Lows 
Volume up 
volume down 


dose Pm. 

1115 793 

403 75? 

463 456 

1901 20M 

1*7 117 

5 11 

41042.990 

lusazoa 


NYSE index 


Hisft Lew Oo*e DW 
Composite 11173 1112! 111.67 +065 

Industrials 124J? 124,18 1247? +0*1 

TKnse. I HU5 11033 1)055 +05? 

Ullunes 6060 6050 606* +037 

Finance 121.43 121.14 121 A3 +092 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Bur Soles •Sh'f* 
100440 382-445 1J91 

19SW4 442083 U|S1 
1943)40 45&0B3 10038 

21 4558 439J42 1.154 


•inrHaiMt m fne sales I 


fridayfe 


NVSE 


Closing 


VoLrt4PJI4 OOSMOB 

Prev.4PJiA.vol JMIOJOI 

Pm cnuoUdotetf dose llfclBMW 


Tables fndodo the nationwide prices 
dp to the ctosina on Wall Street and 
do not rafted late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


aov anted 
Declined 
Uncftcnoed 
Total J55U« 
New Ml or™ 
Mew Lows 
Volume up 
V olume down 


Close Pm. 

370 253 

174 240 

248 253 

735 745 

a » 

4 11 

2435348 

407 JOD 


Standard & Poor's index 


industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Ftacetce 

Composite 


Hm Low aoK CRUM 
21148 311.12 21227 +1.15 

■3 SfiUVV 

S3 7x5? 3X50 +019 
19X67 1?1 j4S 19252 + 1D7 


NASDAQ Index 


Camomile 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Transit. 


Week 
ClYO* A 00 
+ 125 79420 
+ 1.03 3036! 
+ 226 37766 
+ 169 350.14 
+ '..32 J94j0$ 
+ 1.11 2*6.49 
+ 123 261 79 


AMEX Sales 


4P66. volume 
Prev.4 PJ«. volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


AMEX Most Actives 


HM low losi Ota. 


:l»77 4' r 

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13/i t- ■ 
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NYSE Higher in light Trading 



Unu#i Press fatenudotui 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange rallied Friday to dose with 
broad gains in the slowest session of the year 
following the July Fourth holiday. 

Technology stocks and drug issues made 
strong advances. 

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 8.06 
10 1,334.45. For the holiday-shortened week, 
the Dow lost 1.01. 

Advances exceeded declines by more than a 2 
to 1 ratio. Volume dropped to 62J million — 
ibe slowest session so far this year — compared 
with 9S.4 million Wednesday." 

Analysts said the stock market was taking its 
cue from strength in the bond market. Prices 
rose and interest rates fell in the U.S. bond 
market because many participants interpreted 
Friday's unemployment report as a sign the 
economy was in a slow growth period. 

Interest rates fell on the assumption that a 
slow economy means demand for credit will be 
weak. 

The Labor Department reported that civilian 
unemployment held at a steady 7J percent in 
June. 

Jerry Hi/ikJe of Sanford G Bernstein said the 
stock market climbed on the expectation that 
interest rates will continue to falL He noted, 
however, that a weak economy might lead to 
lower corporate earnings estimates, which 
would limit the market's upside move. 

Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index added 
1.07 to 192.51 The New York Stock Exchange 
index rose 0.65 to 111.67. The price of an 
average sham jumped 21 cents. 


M-l Up $ 2.6 BUlion 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORX —The narrowest measure of th 
U.S. money supply, known as M-l, spurted up 
S2.6 billion in late June, the Federal Reserve 
Board said Friday in a report that dampened 
investor hopes for an imminent cut in the dis- 
count rate. 

The surge in M-l "makes it more difficult for 
the Fed to respond to the economy with re- 
duced interest rates," said Maury Harris, chief 
economist at the New York investment firm of 
PaineWebber Inc. 

Analysts said the report of the unexpectedly 
.sharp rise left M-I so far above the upper limits 
of the Fed's anti-inflation growth targets that 
monetary policy-makers must await convincing 
evidence on whether the economy needs anoth- 
er shot in the arm before pushing interest rates 
lower. 

The Fed said M-l rose to a seasonally ac^ list- 
ed 5591.9 billion in the week ended June 24 
from S589J billion the previous week. M-I 
includes cash in circulation, deposits in check- 
ing accounts and nonbank travelers checks. 


Johnson Controls led the actives, adding ft to 
43%. 

Exxon followed, inciting on % to 52%. 

Allied was third, gaining I to 43ft after a 
major brokerage firm upgraded its recommen- 
dation. 


T2 Month 
High Low Start 

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SATURDAY-SIJIVDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 


economicscene 

^ U.S. Position Endangered 

» By 2 Persistent Deficits 

*: : ' V : ; ; . By LEONARD SILK 

Sfe • ' ■ New fork Tima Service 

V "YL - T EW YORK — Budget Director David A. Stockman, 
; |\j in Jhis June 5 address to.lhe board of the New York 
. ' J y| StocfcExchaqge, said, “It is nc*w nearly impossible to 
where the political will and consensus will cqwir 
‘ fnwpihat is n ecessary to enact any plan hig ehnngh tn haiaf»v» thp 
boofo r— W even substantially close the gap.** 

■ Would the United States face a disaster if, as Mr. Stockman 
' warned, budget deficits of $200 billion or more He in prospect for 

• the neki several years? 

; •. A common belief is that big deficits and government borrow- 

■ ing depress the economy by crowding out other borrowers. But 
’ Robert Ortner, chief economist of tbe Commerce Department, 
; contends that this is a misconception. ' 

r : In 1982, he says, there was apprehension that, because of the 

’rising federal deficit, private • — 

borrowing would be crowded «« ¥T - , « 

r out; yet economic activity and United otates 

could soon become 

'.*» biggest debtor 

menfs share of total borrow- in th«> 'world. 
ing 1 shrank to 28 percent from ; 

38 percent in 1982. 

! <s Why. did the economy grow despite the rising deficit?” Mr. 
W ’ Ortner asks. “It didn't. It grew in part because of it.” 

• The budget deficit is a form of ^dis- saving” — a reduction in 
the proportion of national imrane saved and an mcrea y- in the 
^proportion spent cm consumption, which is stimulative. Yet, 
' whether less public saving is translated into real growth desjends 
on two other factors: the rate at which the economy is already 
'operating and the ease or tightness of Federal Reserve monetary 
.policy. ■ 

, - AT the end of 1982 the operating rate of American industry 

• /\ was down to about 70 percent and the unemployment rate 

-R- was nearly II percent. With that much slack and an 
-accommodative monetary policy. Mr. Ortner finds that the 
deficit contributed to growth, rather than retarded it. Today, 
after more than two years of growth, with rising business invest- 
ment, there is less idle capacity but the economy is still not slon- 

■ tight. Industry U operating at less than 81 percent of capacity and 

- the unemployment rate is 72 percent The budget deficit stffl 

‘ ’looks more s timulati ve than inflationary. ■ • 

* But this is not tbe whole deficit story. For the budget deficit is 
aggravating tbe other great U.S. deficit: the international trade 
deficit. This year, according to the commerce secretary, Malcolm 

- Baldrige, the trade deficit is likely to soar above $140 billion and 
could reach $150 billion, compared with last year's record $123 
-billion. 

- With such trade deficits piling up, the United States would 
jur soon become the world's biggest debtor. The implications, says 

• - James D. Robinson 3d, chairman of American Express Co, are 

■ “very serious” — financial markrt volatifity, a compromising of 
foe ^dependence of American monetarypolkyand the danger of 

- rapid dollar drops that could rekindle inflation. 

The trade deficit is acting as a drag on the e conomy and 
damaging American industries dependent on foreign markets 
/ and competing with imports. The trade deficit is by no means 
independent of the federal budget deficits. On the contrary, as 

■ Martin S. Feldstrin of Harvard, President Ronald Reagan's 
former chief economic adviser, observes, “The primary reason 
that tbe United States has become a capital importer and an 

- international debtor is our vast federal budget deficit." 

He says this is a universal story that explains the capital inflows 
of the Latin debtor nations as well as our own: When the 
government borrows on a vast scale, it creates a vacuum in the 
domestic capital market that sucks in capital from abroad. 
Those huge borrowings in turn drive up real interest rates on 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 5) 


Currency Kates 


jfCrsfwBatee JufyS 

% t dja. F.F. ir.u mar. bj=, sjf. yh 

Amsterdam 14H (SOI IT267* JM0S* B.I7W* SS»» 13450* 13757 » 

BnnMbCa] 61.13 BUB7S ZLU75 6613 11616 • 17M 2(06 3*676* 

Frankfort US S iM Z2M5- IJMSx gtJ5* 4M2- JJM65- UM5- 

Loodon U» U773 3.9*01 HU*S 15000 *691 8U2 13*13 3D 36 

Milan 1.73*40 154550 43760 TSB2S 56549 3U» 7605J 7J0S 

NwYorklc) 03482* 19965 9.1375 1,911.00 1383 #U5 .2506 34635 

Ports 9M 12177 50446 *7795 x 1302 1S1M* XSU 373* 

■t»»0 3*730 32590 81-70 2585 1231* 7238 40576 ■ 973 

ZarKb 25265 3356 8332* 273* 0.13B* 7432* 4.10*" 13225" 

i ECU 0J4Z3 05638 23S22 48566 131534 25376 ’ *53714 13165 183772 

I SOU 130247 076073 20*27 9J6382 28X58 2*274 61J061 15485 20JC 

Ctoslnus In London and Zurich. minus In other European centers. Hew. York rates at 4 PM. 
talCammer dot hone w Amounts oeoaed to buy one eouna(c) Amounts n eede d to buv one 
ao oar C) Units ot 100 (x) Unite of WOO If! Units of lOOOO N.O~;no! ouoted; HA-inot avaOc&e. 
(«] ■nbBYoaetxxHm: UiJS.\XJ& . , 

Other Dollar Values 


Qvmcv wr 

U.&S 

Cummer per UAJ 

Currency per IUS 

cacreacy per IMj 

feimvowtraf 

JUS 

Fia. markka 

AUK 

Motor. r*» 


AKer.nsp 

87430 

AtntroL 1 

1A8J7 

Greek Otoe. 

13&35 

Max. pen 

31AM 

Sp™. peseta 

17100 

ftMlr.KfiH. 

71.77 

HOMKOMS 

7J49 

Narw. knm» 

1722S 

vrowl.kTepn 

169 

Ms. fin.tr. 

62JS 

radian rupee 

12J». 

PUL OMB 

ISM 

Taiwan t 

*aoo 

kracdlcnR. 

Into, niplah 

U1MD 

PWLetcwto 

17100 

Tho* baht 

27J15 

Croodons 

1JS7 

JrtaJi k 

0.9667 

Saadi rival 

1TO ' 

TurtbkHra 

SOSO 

Dontsti kra» 

10SB 

Israel Hek. 

1,231 JO 

Sino-s 

1235 

UAEdrtan 

16735 

E«nt.Mnd 

07692 

KtnralH dinar 1303 

5. AIT. rand 

1.9743 

Vnez.beOv. 

MM 


CStarttaa: 22739 Irish c 

Source*; B mw tiu Benelux (Brussels); Banco COmmencMe itaBono t Milan I; Bmrnx 
Ueaalem Paris (Parts): Bank at Tokyo (Tokyo): IMF (SDR): BAll (dSnor. rtytA tUrham). 
i Other data tram Reuters andAP. 


Intend Hates 



Dollar 

D-Mark 

Swiss 

Franc 

Sterflno 

Fraach 

Frame 

ecu 

SDR 

lewun 

»k-7V 

SW-Sto 

JVrJO. 

I2»-12<Hi 

lmv-lM 



iwniia 

TVrTVl 

5Wf. 

SMrSIL 

124W-12N 

WW.-10V*! 

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7* 

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7H.-7* 

SW6 


JTUrlM 

10 ib-10 

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7«, 

ttosetks 

7 IVflV, 

SKrSh 

5V»5Ki 

12M-12W 

lOva-lffU 

tth-m 

71k 

lyeor 

BV.-OH 

SUj-SK 

svsfc 


mm* 


IM 


Sureti: Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FFt: Lloyds Book (ECU): Reuters 
(SDR). ftte m toW tu Interbank deposits of SI mfUlon minimum (oreoutualeatt. 


&e? Money HaU* 1 JufyS 

UMtwmatM clots Pit*, 

nmiwi Th 7Vj 

r*den4F<mh » 9 

PlteRBta 9V. W, 

Bwtar Loan Rats WtVk IMf* 

UK* PBMrtO. moan 730 735 

*4MBTHMfurT0Atr 
i we U i Troncrr BHlt 680 10* 

lUCDlMoan 725 IX 

f anutn 725 725 

BgC gSBi 

l3nt«oaate MO 600 

OwnUMBM* JJS 3M 

OwMoaOi MsttaMk 555 ' 530 

»«MB10lef®Oll8 555 550 

. 560 585 


Aslan BeDar Deposits 

JufyS 

1 bmiuHi 7%*70k 

1 mounts 7M.-7*. 

Smoatts 726-7W 

4 months 7W.I 

1 VMT 0»-«a 

Source: Reuters. 


VAMeieyMarketfnB* 

JufyS 


fee** 

•*WW«S0IW« 

own Mr 

■ ■■ II I Ml IflWWW 

5*bo*i imertua* 
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venrmicfMHk 


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SJS 

SSi 

5J5 

6J0 

' 5M 
iSB 

Mena Lynch Ready assets 
Xdftv average yieM: 
TriaraM interaU Rate index: 

12k 

HJl 

wo 

L6i 

Source: Merrill Lynch. AP 


ink 

HHt 




10 VU WV32 
Kft* 104 
103714 10 3/1* 
WW I®* 


Gold 


13 

IK 

AX 

PAL 

ettaa 

1113/16 

115(16 

HaasKoaB 310SS 

31130 

♦asB 

KM 11 31/32 

Luxenfloarg 31IJK 

— 

+ 035 



Paris (123 kUo) 31U1 

31136 

+ 0j06 



Zortcb 311JB5 

31175 

+ U0 



Loaaoa ]IUI 

VIM 

. +u» 

9 

5 

New. York — 

Osd. 


63^ 

65/16 

63/14 

6506 

Luxembourg. Ports and London official fix- 
ings: Hm Kona ana Zurich opening end 


KmtiS^nbune. 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

Page 9 


U.S. Still 

Has 7.3% 



Rate Unchanged 
For 5 Months 

■ i 

UmietJ Press International 


Major Independent Television Stations 

Independent television stations ranked by market and their 
percentage of designated market share in those markets 



OPEC Ministers 
Fail to Agree on 
Price Strategy 


Washington Poet Sendee 

WASHINGTON —TbeUS.' ci- 
vilian unemployment rate in June 
remained at *7.3 percent for the fifth 
consecutive month despite the con- 
tinued deterioration m manufac- 
turing employment, which now is 
bdow tbe levels of last summer. 

Few new jobs were added to the 
U.S. economy in June, according to 
the Labor Department’s survey of 
bus uesses. The number of people 
without jobs remained at 8.4 mil- 
lion, the same levd snee February. 
The number of people working 
dropped from 107.0 mulioamMay 
to 106.4 million in June. 

The unemployment report did 
not hold out much hope for a 
strong rebound in economic activi- . 
ty dining the second half of the 
year, and economists said they 
would not be surprised if the Unem- 
ployment rate rose next month. 

Ust nmnft the mnnher of fao- 
toiy jobs dedined by 4S/100, bring- 
ing the total of factory jobs lost 
since January to 220,000. Employ- 
ment in service industries, however, 
rose by 85.000 jobs. 

Since the recovery began more 
than two years ago die gap between 

Services and m » rwif a rtming hue 

widened, in large part because of 
the influx of imports that have cap- 
tured sales bom American manu- 
facturers, and sluggish growth, 
economists said. 

“A look at -the employment 
changes over the entire 31 months 
of the current recovery underscores 
die extent of the esqtipymcst re- 
structuring that has occurred in the 
nation's factories,” said Janet L. 
Norwood, commissioner of the Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics. . 

“Manufacturing as a whole has 
recovered about 58 percent of the 
cumber of jobs lost during the 
1981-1982 recession," she said, 
lifting that major indus tries which 
have lost employment are sted, tex- 
tiles, chemicals, petroleum, and 
cod and leather products. . 

The deterioration in manufao- 

Davicl Wyssfchief financ^^ccuio- 
mist far Data Resources Inc. The 
decline in manufacturing employ- 
ment is part of a long-term trend 
that accelerated because of “the 
raficuloos overvaluation of the dol- 
lar* that has made imports more 
attractive. 



77* Associated Press ing and ael together to solve their 

VIENNA — Oil ministers of tbe problems. 

Organization of Petroleum Export- "We must save OPEC," Mr. Da- 

ing Countries /ailed in a full day of vid-West told reporters after the 
informal meetings Friday to agree moiping session. He declined to 
on a strategy for halting a decline in say specifically what had been dis- 
oil prices, the president of tbe 13- cussed in the closed-door meeting, 
nation group said. Analysis have said the confer- 

“We haven't come to any oonclu- eoce may turn out to be one of the 
sions,” Oil Minister Subroto of In- most difficult in OPECs 25-year 
donesia told reporters after a two- history, 
hour afternoon session. The In the past, the cartel has re- 
ministers also met for nearly three duced the price of its oil and or- 
hours in the morning and were to dered members to cut production 
resume their talks on Saturday, Mr. to reduce tbe glut on the world 
Subroto said. market and make their crude com- 

OPEC sources said ail 13 minis- petitive with that produced by Ban- 
ters met at tbe same table but were OPEC members, such os Britain, 
unwilling to call a formal opening But Mana Saeed Oteiba, the 
to their conference before they be- United Arab Emirates oil minister, 
lieved there was likelihood of broad said Thursday that the OPEC min- 
agreement. isters would seek a different answer 

After Friday’s morning session, this lime. 
i tv- miniy ten airf they h a doot **v»*n “We are suggesting a new way. 

riiwnwH any concrete proposals. This time we are not talking about 
Some erf the ministers also were prices or production" Mr. Oteiba 
seen meeting informally outside the s&id- 

hotel during an early afternoon “We are talking about income, 
break in tbe conference. constant income,” he said follow- 

OPECs immediat e fear is that “ga meeting of the six-member 
Saudi Arabia, its largest producer, OPEC monitoring committee. Mr. 
wiD cany thr ough on a threat to Oteiba, who chairs the committee, 
boost production unless the others would not elaborate on the steps it 
slop cheating on OPEC rules. In- would propose to the full ministeri- 
creased Saudi output would be cer- al conference. 
min to push oil prices even lower, Mr. Oteiba said Friday that the 
industry analysts have said. 006 tiling that could be agreed on 

Mr. Subroto, the current prea- w tiie need to defend OPECs 
doit of OPEC, said the oil cartel basic fuice of 528 a bared for Ara- 
was considering two basic strato- bian Light oil. 
gjes: stick to current policies or try In the spot, or no neon tract, mar- 




The New Yw* T« 


Independent TV Stations on a Roll 

But die Days of Staggering U.S. Prices May Be Ending 


Mr. Oteiba said Friday that (he 
one tiling that could be agreed on 
was the need to defend OPECs 
basic price of 528 a bared for Ara- 


By Thomas C. Hayes 

New York Thnea Service 

LOS ANGELES — The realm of independent, 
commercial telewskm stations has never been rich- 
er in the United States. Staggering sums have 
recently .been paid for big independent stations in 
major markets. 

Moreover, the number of independents has dou- 
bled in the last six years, and many of these 
stations that areiwdj established in major markets 
have captured increasing numbers of viewers, 
raised aovenising rates closer to those of stations 
affiliated with foe networks, and posted consis- 
tently rising profits. 

“After a decade of growth from second-dass 
citizens to folly competitive television stations, foe 
. independents now have an entrenched position ip 
the starting lineups of most large cities, 6 said Paul 
Kagan, an industry analyst and publisher of 
Broadcast Investor. 

Nevertheless, many analysts and investment 
bankere say they bdirve that the big gains of these 
stations against the network affiliates have about 
ended, and predict a period of slower overall 
growth. 


The Association of Independent Television Sta- 
tions is predicting that the independents* share of 
total spot ad revenues will remain unchanged, at 
about 23 poosnt, in foe next five years. The 
es timates that the independents wQl 
get $42 billion of a total $18 wW in 1990, 
compared wifo $22 IslliQD of $9 J hOlitm in 1984. 

Bidding battles for av ailab le programs have 
sharply increased costs. With 214 independents 
now operating — compared with about 200 affili- 
ates for each of tbe three major networks — the 
risks for investors in new independent stations 
appear much higher. 

“There is a limit to how far this can go,” said 
John S. Ready, a media analyst with Drexd Bran- 
ham Lambert *Tbe independents have to lode 
different, with something that people like. But that 
is getting increasingly difficult" 

~ Martin Pompadur, managing general partner of 
Television Station Partners, pointed out that the 
profit margins at independent stations are general- 
ly lower than those of network affiliates: “Estab- 
lished indepe n d en ts in major dries usually have 
margins of 30 to 40 percent, while margins for 
(Coatinoed on Page H, Cot 5) 


“a new treatment altogether.” 
Asked to explain what new ap- 
proaches had been suggested, Mr. 
Subroto said only, “Something dif- 
ferent than we have done so far." 
He added, “We haven’t arrived at 
precise consensus yet-" 

Following recent terrorist at- 
tacks in Europe and the Middle 
East, Austrian authorities imposed 


ket Friday, Arabian Light oil for 
July delivery was quoted at $27.10 
a bared, or 90 cents bdow the offi- 
cial price, according to Tderate 
Energy Service, a private market- 
information firm. Arabian Heavy 
was quoted at $25 a bared, against 
an official price of S26A0. 


Sr^” raI ” Jobless Figures 

Members of the federal anti-ter- ^ , n « 
rorist squad armed with automatic JJTWB UOllOT 
weapons ringed tbe two luxury ho- _ . t t o 

tds where the member delegations JJoWfl Ul U.O. 


Members erf the federal anti-ter- 
rorist squad armed with automatic 
weapons ringed tbe two luxury ho- 
tels where the member delegations 
were staying in central Vienna. 

Everyone entering foe hold was 
forced to walk through a metal- 
detecting booth and submit to a 
check of hand baggage and person- 
al effects. 

Ten years ago terrorists attacked 
an OPEC meeting, kflUng three 
persons and taking 81 hostages, in- 
chKting 1 1 OPEC min isters. 

•Tam David-West, the ofl minis- 
ter of Nigeria, said all 13 ministers 
agreed they must end their bicker- 


Debt-Ridden Brazil Unveils $6.5-Billion Austerity Package 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tunes Service 


foreign banks on restructuring As a result of Thursday’s pack- 


BRASfLlA — Brazfl’s new gov- 


5453 hflliou in foreign debt com- age, the government 


,t between 1985 dnee its public-sector 

erament^bas* anm*^Tk£g- ^ “f 00 * 

awaited of austerity met- ‘ lebl * , 5 j°? b®"® K devdop- dthough of&ads co nceded that 

suits aiznedai redncinc inflation m *^ 0f ^ rs hugest- the .IMF had been prwsmg for 

and preparing tbe wayfor a credit The finance minster, Ecanosco com^dimmat^ofttedefiaL 
agreSratxrith the International Docndlcs sa«l the newmeasnres The balance would have to be cov- 
Monetary Fund. should help control inflation, ered by printing new money or 

•I nifiioli m onvHiol raff* r\f frarii K/\ r ■ r wu inlte 


i pack- to reconsider the viability of 20 The immediate question faring 
to re- major investments being planned Brazil, however, is whether the 
to $43 by the state sector through the end IMF will be satisfied with these 
s year, of this centmy, “This evaluation austerity measures. A fund mu- 
d that will take place over the next 60 sion, which bdd talks here last 
ng for days,” Jofi Sayad, the planning month, is expected to return in 
deficit, minister, said. “In the meantime, mid-July, 
jecov- nofomg will be spent on these pro- ihat 


should help control inflation, ered by printing new money or jects.’ 
which readied an annual rate erf fresh borrowings. Th 

230 percent in 1984, but should not The reduction in tbe deficit is to dear 


The $6-5-biHion austmty pack- 230 percent in 1984, but should not He reduction in the deficit is to 

age is expected to result in the loss affect the government's plan to be achieved through $2-9 billion in 
of abort 200.000 jobs ttwdl as achieve 5 percent economic growth mcreased tax revraoes and $3.6 bfl- 
postponement or cancellation of_a thic year. Hon in s pendin g png, principally 

numba of major investments in At a news conference earlier in by the state’s numerous huge cor- 
oil, bydrodectnc and nuclear cner- foe week, Mr. Sarney said he would porarions. These cuts foDowed an 
gy, milling and sted. not accept a recession as the price earlier $12-btIBou reduction in foe 

Thursday’s announcement had of reaching agreement with foe budgets of state enterprises, 
been repeatedly postponed because IMF countper commercial credi- Thursday morning, Dorothea 
of shop differences within Presir tors. Weroeck, bead of the Jobs and 

dent Jos6 Sarney’s cabinet over foe Mr. Sarney, who took office after Wages Department of the Labor 

social and political impact of foe tbe death April 21 of foe president- Ministry, said a $3-biDion cut in 
cuts, although it is still not known elect. Tancredo Neves, has been government expenditures would re- 
whetber they will satisfy the IMF. faring gr ow in g criticism in recent salt in the loss of at least 200.000 
Brazil must reach agreement weeks for what has been described jobs, 
with tbe fund before it can con- as foe indecision of his administra- Over the long term, perhaps the 


Foreign bankers have noted foal 

d^ccSlexm foe Amazon Ba- cute- ^ fry said foal 

sin, ciqSi of a steel plant, a ™f^ pomts . ,sa 

railroad, and the countr/s third demand that foe fund continue 
nuclear energy reactor at Angra mwrtoring the Br az ilian economy 


commercial crcdi- 


Werneck, 


Dorothea 
Jobs and 


dos Reis. 

Savings this year would 
only $100 nrimon, but foe 
sector deficit would be foa 
duced by as much as SS 


throughout foe life — perhaps as 
would involve long as 16 years — of foe restruc- 
riit foe public tureddrttpadage. “Brazilian pd- 
be shar ply re- itirians find this very difficult to 
as S5 tamon swallow ” tbe representatives of 


with tbe fund before it can con- as foe indecision of his administea- 
dude interrupted negotiations with tion on economic policy. 


most sweeping derision taken was 


duced by as much as $5 buhou swallow, toe itpresentai 
annually after 1988, Sayad said, one American bank noted. 

Other officials ad de d that many of 

these projects would eventually be . . 1 

needed, but that postponement of 

most investments was now a near . M 

certainty. 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The doDra 
eased Friday following foe re- 
lease of U S. unemployment 
data for June. 

Foreign exchange trading 
was subdued as many partici- 
pants extended Thursday’s In- 
dependence Day holiday into 
the weekend. 

The U3. Labor Department 
reported that civilian unem- 
ployment held at a steady 7.3 
percent in June. But the dosdy 
watched number of people on 
nonfarm payrolls increased less 
than expected. 

113. interest rates fell be- 
cause many participants inter- 
preted Fridays unemployment 
report as a sign foe economy 
was in a slow growth period. 

Late New York prices and 
comparable Wednesday rates 
included: 2.9965 Deutsche 
marks, down from 3.0320; 
Z5060 Swiss francs, down from , 
25405; 9.1275 French francs, 
down from 9220; 1,911 Italian 1 
lire, down from 1,930; and | 
246.85 Japanese yen, down 
from 247.85. ! 

The pound was up in Loo- j 
don, closing at Sl.3365 against I 
Thursday’s $13150. 

Gold rose in London to i 
$311.75 from $310.75 Thurs- 
day. ! 


Head of Bonn Central Bank Sees Record Surpluses 


By Warren Getler 

Jmerwukmal Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT —The president 
of West Germany's central bank, 
citing surging exports, said Friday 
that he expected the country to 
post a record surplus in its current 
account for tins year of $10 biffion 
(303 billion Deutsche marks). He 
also projected a record 525 billion 
to 5 30 bUhon merchandise- trade 
surplus. 

Karl Otto P5hl said cumulative 
trade-performance figures for foe 
first five months of theyear, sched- 
uled to be released by tire Bundes- 
bank on Monday, led him to be- 
lieve that surpluses in West 
Germany’s 1985 trade accounts 
will “certainly fallat the higher end 
of expectations.” 


“Right now, I see a current ao- 
cotmt surplus of $10 hilUrai, at cur- 
rent exchange rates, and a trade 
surplus erf between $25 and $30 
billion,” Mr. PSfal said in an inter- 
view. 

Last year. West Germany’s sur- 
plus in its current account, which is 
tbe broadest measure of trade per- 
formance and indudes trade, ser- 
vices and transfers, soared to a 
near-record 17.9 billion Deutsche 
marks. Tbe merchandise trade sur- 
plus last year widened to a record 
MbfihonDM. 

In May, a provisional current 
account surplus of of 53 biKon 
DM and a provisional trade sur- 
plus -of 7.47 WEon DM wore 
among the highest surpluses on re-, 
cord for that month.' 

Mr. PQhl said the likelihood of 


West Germany nearly doubting its 
key trade surpluses this year does 
not rdy only on Bonn increasing its 
exports to the United States. 

“West German exp o rts to foe 
United Stales in the first five 
months increased 29 percent from 
a year earlier, winch compares with 
the 43 percent increase m exports 
to the U.S. for the full 1984 year," 
Mr. PShl said. 

“But at foe same time, oar ex- 
ports, to European Community 
countries increased by 13 percent 
and to Western industrialized 
countries, including the U.S* by 15 
percent So even if our exports to 
the UiL, which account far only 10 
percent of total exports, would not 
increase al rates ampfrhle to last 
year’s, we’re still going to see a 


strong export performance as ex- 
ports to other areas have increased 
substantially." 

The Bundesbank president said a 
(Continued on Page 131, CoL 7) 


On. the French Riviera 

THE ONLY FRENCH 
CASINO WITH A FULL 
COMPLEMENT OF 
FEMALE DEALERS 


Stock.' Reuters. Commentxnk. CrriSi 
Lnmals. Lords BoUl BOM at rum 


dosing pric es: Mew York Crowe current 
centroct. An prices fn US. Spercuaee. 
Source : Rooters. 


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Page 10 




















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 


XiS-Ritiires 


Season ttonn • 

• HWi LOW ■ Oeen Hfeh LOW-. 

3ft». 5« oa - 2415 247a . 2410 

Dn 3KM 2400! 2545 

-2M7 ' B 1 ® Jan KU 2£»- 2S.M 

*40 2440 . Mor. 2400 2580 2500 

'gg gg-J^.Mio.auo 2^0 

Est-Satf* Prev.Sotaa 11,291 -• 

Prav. Day onnitn. *14» up 71 a 

OATS ICBT1 

W"S£j* minimum- MoriMr bushel 

I-4SV5 Jul 140 jJOlk L49V6 

4 Mite S» 143*. 14S» 14HA 

1*2 °*e MS* 1/0 

i-fj* }M .mot u»v» ijw u» 

Jj ft, , • 158 May 1.5Mb 140W 150* 
EiJ. Sales Prw.Sa tea 281 . 

Pw.DoyOAmint. 2459 up 41 


2*56 +Ji 
2MS +18? 
2455 +49 

2SJ0 +45 
2430 +40 

2440 +J5 

24S5. +J0 


VW +8044 
14516 +JJ2vb 
148 . +JE 
Lff% +31* 
1-581* +009* 



SMW SMBOfl-. _ . __ 

Mon ; _ uw Open Hlsti Lam. d«4 . CKO- 

• Doe . 6330 -7330 .7325 .7331 — 1 
Mar . 6MC —0 

J*. JW JW-. 

. pray, sates an. 

Pro* My** ow tat 4334 up 34 
FRENCH FRANC 
S POT from? 1 potel wools SM8B8I 

sop .10650 +70 

. L Dec .10015 +70 

- UHpH.IWH»PR. . ... 

Prav port opoa Hw 397. ' 

GERMAN MARK 

* pot bmp*; 1 p*Mt wuak nJHBl 

5eo jnp -3354 6310 .3353 +37 

Dec ^4 6376 5J34 .3374 +37 

. . .. Mar JJM 639$ 3380 6377 +M 

Jug - JAM + 35 ' 

inf jM'Jttk'M. 

Prav; Ni*t 1252s.' 

Prav aoy 4 * open tat 4»4Sli off 2»: 

JAPANESE YEN 

. 8 oar van; 1 palaf aauaisSUHMl 

sap ifttum iMp onsMi 1*9+2 +u 

Doc JW066 JP«n JMtf'JVJCOI +15 
Mar JMflw 

Loot .SPOl J04054 Pp U. 

■ Prev. ante* 1 JTL 

Prav day* span tat 22647. up m 
SWISS FRANC 

9 per franc; 1 psW Moots 508601 

- Stp- - 6W4 4015 J9S3 4011 +50 

- 4 Oac 6985 4044 J»85 AMI +55 

MOT 4055 4035 4055 4045 +52 

KUSU&f* 

Prav Par 4 * opes tat. 1740, aH 1451. 


UUUCR- 

UMNM.ff4SpcM7M0b4.ff. 

. JUl 14780 UMO T4780 1484D +160 
Sap 14740 14180 147.10 141*0 +350 

MOv 14940 15180 14940 15040 +260 

JOT 15440 15SJXJ 13*48 15750 +340 

Mor 14340 1«4D 14240 14100 +130 

May 167.00 WM 16780 16740 +100 

Jul 17100 +130 

CM. sates 810. Prav. sates 1M. 

Prav day’s apaa fad 9465, op 38. 


ToOarReiiders 

Sane commodity-futures were 
not available in inis edition be- 
cause of the Independence Day 
holiday. 


Stock Indexes 


IIS T. RILLS 
n n HI lop; on of Ml pet. 


9250 9033 9244 
92-53 9167 9153 
9246 9158 9240 
92.1a 9225 nil 
9142 9261 7182 
91 J8 9in 9U8 


Jon 

Prav. soma V57. 

Prtv florls apap-tot 2SM7, ofl .1 
EURODOLLARS 
51 mil Ban Ms a* IN pcL 

MS 9267 

DK 9UV 

Mar 9164 

Jun 9166 

Sap 9064 

D#c SO* 

Mar 9060 

Jan . 8995 

prav. solas 2UH. 

Prav flaYs opm tat 112691, off 
CERT. DEPOSIT 
51 «H tea; pis at IN pet 

Sap 9244 

Dec 9Z3M 


SP COMP. INOEX (CME) 
point* and cants 

19540 14060 S«p 1946S 19550 

199.10 17366 Dec 19760 19040 

20225 19Q.10 Mar 20046 20040 

202.70 30060 JM 

Eta. Sales 348Z1 Prav. Salas 25428 
Prav.OavOpanlnt. 58682 off 994 
VALUE LIME (KCSTl . 

AllllffCMl(A8llla 

potiPa ana lhus 

21260 1*563 SOD 20760 208.15 

71360 20060 Dec SEMJ0 21260 

Est. sates Prav. Sales 1345 
Prav. Day On a n ltd. 0,175 uo439 
NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYFE) 
points and cent* 

11340 ' 9165 Sep 11X05 11340 

11550 10160 Dec 11440 11540 

11766 10958 Mar 11590 11768 

11X15 11450 Jun 11965 11765 

Est- Sates 5485 Prav. Sates ADOS 
Prav. Day Open 1 nt 9405 offlta 


“ 23S 


28558 207 JO 
21030 31160 


11265 11345 
TM8Q mjO 
11590 117.15 
11968 119J0 


London Metals 


m iprCiG par mametan 

S»l 75750 758-00 TS750 7350 

.3 tonward 77958 78060 7S0JD 78160 

COPPER CATHODES (HNR GradO) 


SSt 167500 167760 167460 167760 

gvmrd. J6B7JIUJ88J0 168860 16883 

. ; COPPER CATHODES CSSaaflanfll 

• Stenta* par mMrtc ten „ 

. . SOOI 165260 165460 166160 16U60 

bnwni 167160 167360 167*60 167860 
. 1 LEAD 

- • ssmteapernrawcjoa 

spot 2983 2993 29*60 »8D0 

. • forward 3613 30260 36160 3813 

. NICKEL 

-■* ■; Zff* 9 "' 348560^369060 3.92060 3J3060 

forward 341060 341560 340060 3.97060 

SILVER 

■■ .Njrapraffwrggra 
■ . farvmrd 4*266 4*360 4*43 4*560 

- • TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metne too . „ 


91.15 91.15 91.15 


prav flaw area tat XN7. off 78. 

BRITISH POUND 
S per pond; 1 paint aaaaN 10680 1 

-Sap IJ045 16245 160*5 U23S +205 

DOC U920 16125 16920 16110 +200 
Mar 16900 L29H 16900 16030 +200 

.. - Jun 1J930 16100 16930 16975 +H95 

Last spot 16210, op 178, 

Prav. sales 7609. 

Prav day* opm fad 4XML «Nli 
CANADIAN DOLLAR 
s par din 1 pom aaaalE ssJOti 

Sap 6312 6350 6332 6344 


Commodity indexes 


Qom Previous 

Moody's Clsd.t ■ 914.1 Of 

Reuters 1,727-30 1,72560 

DJ. Futures 117 JO . 118J7 

Com. Reseorcf) Bureau. 228*0 22410 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p-prellmlnarv; f- final 
neuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974 


Market Guide 


CRT: Oilcooo Board of Trode 

CMC: . Oifcago Mercantile Exctxmga 

I MM: intvrmtlanol Monetary Mortd 

Of ChIcaBO Mercantile Exdunee 
MY CSCE: New York Cocoa. Sugar. Coffee Eadianae 

NYCE: stew Yarn Cotton Exchange 

COM EX; Commodity Excrtanj*. Mew York 

NY ME: Now York Meraarllts Exchonpa 

KCBT-. Kansas Cttv Board at Trade 

NYFE: New York Futures Exctwnge 


. ONC 

'tf£T 


949S68 93060 93660 
940040 940160 941060 


metric Ian ___ 
1360 mm 
55260 55360 


Gommwdides 


SUGAR 

FrancftltaoKM par nsefrlc tea 
Aug N.T. N.T. 1485 1,13 +3 

Oct N.T. N.T. 7.17* Ljf4 ' 4 +2 

Dec 1647 UT7 1,190 1,195 UnCtL 

Mar 1693 1.143 ■ 1615 1620 — 1 

May-- -• 1637. — 16*6 16711 +J 

Aug 1693 1643 1620 1630 +7. 

EsL VOL: 7*0 tots of 50 lav. Prav. actua* 
salts: 744 iota. Opan knarast: 20435 

COCOA 

FtvBtte iraara par HO kp 

Jly ILT. N.T. 2630 1130 + 20 ! 

SOP - 2.120 2J08 2,111 X11V +17 : 

Dec N-T. M.T. 2655 2665 +21 . 

Mor 264* 2648 2640 2670 +14 

Mev N-T. H.T. Z0S7 2605 +15 1 

Jhr N.T. N.T.. -3660 — +5 

val.: 48 'laN^af* 10 ‘tors. Prav. achxa 
sates: «N Ms. Opos fnlaraat: 813 


Jly NT. N.T. 2,100 2J75 —20 

Sep 2630 1190.2226 2630 +31 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2650 2695 +Z7 

Jon N.T. N.T. 2690 2J40 +15 

Mar N.T. N.T: 2605 2635 +30 

May N.T. M.T. 2602 — +2S 

Jly N-T. N.T. 2620 — +20 

EsLveL: 25 lots of 5 itauPrev. actual oafaa: 
295 lot*. Ooen Interest: 373 


Gonmmtties 



London 

Commodities 


Mr 5 

Claw Previous 
HU Low RU AM BW Ask 




Options 


Ite r B na per metric ton 


I nai lu m 

- ON 1840 8768 8866 8840 8760 8760 

D« 9240 9260 9260 9360 9140 9L50 

Mar 10260 10260 10260 10260 10160 10260 

, Hay 10760 10760 10480 10760 Htefl l^g 

■ A**9 11240 112*0 11260 113J0 11260 11360 

. O q 11760 11760 11860 11740 11*40 11780 

Voluite: 221 lots at 50 tans. 

. £?<»* 

. SterffsB Per metric foa 

' . fy 1821 1810 1813 1818 1805 180* 

' 3«P 1677 16*0 16*9 1671 1660 16*1 

Ota: 1J3* 1620 1631 1633 1,721 .772 

JJOr 1638 1,727 1635 163* 1® 162* 

Nay 164* 163* 1643 1648 1635 1638 

. Jly 1652 16*5 1652 1640 1638 1650 

- S«P 16S 1653 1JSB 1,780 16« 1,773 

Volume: 2849 Iok at ID ions. 

,«PPRE 

“eritea per metric loo 

- J>v 1«7 1698 1820 1830 1810 1820 

1891 U43 18*4 18*5 18*7 18*8 

t 1,911 lB 1.902 160* 1,902 1.905 

1-9*5 1.92S 1,937 1.9*0 1.938 1644 

1.9*0 1,930 1843 1.945 1,943 1848 

1875 1,940 18*0 18*2 1.945 1,900 

1.999 1,999 1.990 2820 1.975 28M 

■ Votunie: 4608 lots at 8 ten*. 

. -GASOIL 

UJ. flatters per metric toa 
Tty 71X50 71765 21865 218J0 21765 71880 
. ,*UO 7I5JS 2W5D 2I5JM 2IJ6S 2T465 21580 
- Sw 21488 21340 71365 2142$ 21365 71480 
go 71525 21525 21565 21SJ0 21580 21540 
, {Nv 21880 21888 21780 21880 21*40 21*80 

-< ?*C 22080 22080 21880 22040 71740 22080 

■ ten N.T. N.T. 11740 27180 21780 22Q4C 

N.T. N.T. 21740 22180 21440 22040 

.Nor ILT. N.T. 20980 21580 20980 71*40 
, VMunie: *3Q lets of 100 ton*. 

■ Spihccs/ fieutvns and Lonttar Petrotoam Ex- 

olarwv faateaj. 


IW J698 1820 1830 1810 1820 
1891 180 18*4 18*5 18*7 18*8 


121365 71480 
I 71580 71540 
I 71*40 21880 


sm ■ Consist! priUal 

PrtaJW *sa Ste 0d Jtt tea See oa 

ma»- - -- -- - 

165 2Hfc — — M _ 

iTo - ?7 ir* w in* it in* i* 

175 119. U5* 14* 1/14 VM te 0 

18 W M M 1» * *. I n* 

NS 31/M» M 7 ilk 2 .27/1*2 

m k M R H A S 5R 51* 

«5 1/1* W 17/U2W 91* — — — 

Tetoi osirawTH wuk 
T otal ate wan tt. SOBS 
Total wl vafaene SUtl 
TaM Put opm W. Bin 

index: 

HW18*n LowBLS OesE 11434 + 162 
Sourcm.CBOE. 


DIM Hitures 
Options 

IK German Mor*. USNtnarta. end per nm 


JufyS 

P oll Sta ti c 

a Dec M» 
U* 0J8 

HAS 181 - 

as Bs 

243 269 J* 


EsHmoMWta vta. 4881 , 
CoOs: WML «eL lju epee t 

Pete : Wad. veL U*» opoo 1 
Source : CME. . 


SINGAPORE BOLD FUTURES 


HH Lew Settle 

Aim ILT.- ILT. 31240 

Sep ILT. M.T. 31440 

Oct ILT. N.T. 31440 

Dec N.T. N.T. 30040 

VBlomKlt lots of 100 az. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Motantea cants pw Uia 


Jly— 19440 19540 19480 

Auo 19240 19340 19140 

SOP 19780 19240 irUDO 

OCt 19140 19150 19140 

Nov 19S40 19740 19548 

Dec 19*80 . 20880 19880 

VWim: n lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 


RSS 1 JfV_ 17440 moo 17480 17580 

RSSlAua- T724D 17380 17165 T726S 

RS5 2JtV_ 1*540 1M40 14*00 1*780 

RU3JIV_ 1*340 -155 1*480 1*5-08 

RSS 4 Jly _ 15940 16140 14080 1*288 

RSS 5 J tV 14*50 14*50 15580 15788 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


JIV 1800 1850 1820 1870 

AUO 990 1840 1800 1850 

Sep 978 1820 980 1830 

Oct I — 950 1800 W0 1810 

NOV 94a PHI .950 1800 

DOC 930 980 MB 990 

Jan 930 970 930 980 

MOT — 920 . 970 930 980 

Mov 910 NO 920 970 

Vofemo: a totsal 25 tens. 

50um; Reuters 

i . Treasury Bills 


31588 Copper elect, 0) __ 
31*88 Tin (Straits), lb 
3X100 - 23nC E. St. L. Basts,! 

32480 PattoHum, OS 

32980 SHvwlLY.0* 

33180 Source: AP. 


Dividends 


USUAL 

Condata Network O 84 7-23 7-1* 

Maine NotVxyl -a M 9-io j-i5 

Rovai Bonk Cwoda Q 4B s-23 7-24 

ArAuatai MM sta R ty; O Qaarterty; 1 1 sad 


Earning 

Revenue and nroAte, fci rrrtMam. are la 
locpfcurrenctes untegoteerw tee 


Ail nomato 

IN* 


Otter 

■fat 

Yltad 

Yield 

666 

664 

#67 

7J* 

*JB 

4J0 

7.16 

744 

68S 

*43 

742 

761 


See 

Bee 

Mar 

182 

236 

273 

1.14 

161 

il8 

087 

162 

183 

067 

085 

165 

at7 

063 

— 


Sourer: Solomon Bnttms 


Swiss Inflation Slows 

Reuters 

BERN — The Swiss consumer 
price index showed a 3.4- percent 
increase in the year to June 1 , down 
from a 3.8 percent year-to-year rise 
in May, the government reported 
Friday. 


June Car Sales 
Fall in Britain 

Reuters 

LONDON — New car sales in 
Britain in June were 135,708, down 
I Z87 percent from last year, a pro-. 
! linrinjiy report from the Society of 
Motor Manufacturers and Traders 
shows. 

Imports took 59.78 percent erf 
the June market compared with 
59.98 percent a year career. Japan’s 
share fell to 8.64 percent from 9.46 
percent. 

Ford Motor Qx, the market 
leader, took 28.74 percent of sales, 
down from 3L3I percent a year 
ag°- .. 


An Imitation 
to Oxford. 

The International Herald Tribune 
and Oxford Analytics 
present a Special Conference on 
.The International Business Oudook. 
Christ Church, Oxford, September 19-21,1985, 


:. 4 J- JTi 

* !vi 


fif®*- ■ mm & 


m 


a? £ ^ 
¥ ? i 


in ^caed tc^i ewasives 

actenefingan intensive cwervkwcf * 
tibelraanarional Business Chtkdt 


-fldyourbosiiios 

- 1 . - 









I “"-f 


Independent U.S. Television Stations Are on a Roll 


(Continued from Page 9) 
network affiliates in the same mar- 
kets should be betwea 35 and 55 
percent 

“ Affiliates get about 65 percent 
of their programming from the net- 
woks, but independent stations 
have to buy all thdr own shows,” 
Mr. Pompadur said “Because new 
TV stations are constantly coming 
on the air, competition for those 
shows is in lease, and it is getting 
tougher to ir mwiiahi margin* As a 
result there is in cre ased focus cm 
controlling costs. 7 ' 

The eye-caiching offers by Ru- 
pert Murdoch's News America 
Publishing IntL, which agreed to 
pay more than $2 HTHrm for seven 
Metromedia stations (before ar- 
ranging to sefl a Boston station to 
the H caret Corp. for $450 mOEon), 
and the Tribune Company of Chi- 
cago, which bid $510 million for 
K1U in Los Angeles, involved 
special circumstances, analysts 
said. Prospective buyers, they add- 
ed, may not have the same opportu- 
nities that independents do 
— buying or producing programs 
in bulk and group ad sales — that 
m»<<4» riuiM high prices pltHwiblft. 

In News America's case, Mr. 
Murdoch, the Australian media ex- 
ecutive who purchased half of the 
20th Century-Fox Film Corp. earli- 
er ihiti year, is planning to many 
the studio's Hollywood production 
unit to a new television delivery 
system linked to 18 percent of 
homes in (be United States. Per- 


haps most important, he is expect- 
ed to arrange for Barry DOler, for- 
mer chairman of Paramount 
Pictures and ABC programming 
chief, and now chief executive of fl- 
ew at Fox, to mastermind new pro- 
ductions and management of the 
stations. 

Marvin Davis, the Denver oil- 
man who owns the other half of 
Fox, elected last month to back out 
of his agreement to jean Murdoch 
in the Metromedia purchase. Da- 
vis's motives have not been public- 
ly disclosed, but some investment 
bankers suggest that a more uncer- 
tain environment for independents 
could have mfliiencert his thinking. 

For the Tribune Company, the 
addition of KTLA would give it a 
long-sought presence in each of the 
top three markets, rounding out an 
existing lineup of five mdependents 
that tndude New Yorrs "WPIX 
and Chicago’s WON. If Mr. Mur- 
doch and the Tribune Company 
both can produce consistently ap- 
pealing programs that cut into the 
networks’ nightly prime-time audi- 
ence, some analysis say, they will 
have materially altered the televi- 
rion industry. 

“Diller especially has a visionary 
sense of^ what a television group can 
be," said Jeffrey E Epstein, an in- 
vestment hanriw s pecializin g in 
media companies for the First Bos- 
ton Corp. Tf anyone can make it 
work, it win be DiBer or people like 
Dfller." 

He said the high prices won by 


America’s Persistent Deficits 


(Continued from Page 9) 

long-term government and corpo- 
rate bonds, and the increased de- 
mand for dollar securities causes 
the value 'of the dollar to rise. 

The strong dollar rauw the 
trade deficit to swell, hurting a 
wide range of American industries 
iprihiding agriculture and timber, 
'steel and chemicals and even high- 
technology companies. “As a re- 
sult," Mr. Fddstein recently told a 
Congressional committee, ‘‘the lev- 
el of industrial production is actu- 
ally lower than it was last summer 
and the level of manufacturing em- 
ployment has been falling every 
month since the beginning of the 
year." 

Thus the big budget deficits are 
helping to create America's two- 
tier economy, with strong growth in 
service sectors and slow growth or 
recession in industries exposed to 
the international economy. 

The persistent deficits in the fed- 
eral budget endanger the stability 
of the economy by making h risky 
for the Fed to accommodate the 
huge budget deficits whenever the 
economy moves up strongly toward 
full employment. A stop-go coarse 
threatens the economy, as long as 
the big budget defid ts peoisL And, , 
if Mr. Stockman is right, they wQL 


National Australia Bank 
Cuts Loan Rate 0.25% 

Reuters 

MELBOURNE — National 
Australia Bank Ltd. said Friday 
that it will lower its benchmark 
prune lending ram Monday to 18 
percent from 1825 percent 
The bank said the lower prime 
rate reflected an ease in the cost of 
short-term funds after weds of 
strong upward pressure. It said its 
base rate, the component of its 
prime rate linked to long-term 
trends, will remain at 17.25 per- 
cent. 


IMFQuefUiges 
Quin U.S. Deficit 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The head of 
the lutern a tipral Monetary Fund 
asserted Friday that the U.S. bud- , 
get deficit threatens the interna- 1 
bonal economic system and must 1 
be reduced. 

Jacques de Laroadre told the < 
United Nations Economic and So- < 
dal Council in Geneva that the 
defirit was bong financed by sav- 
ings from overseas and that the 
funds could be put to better use. 

He also described government 
mending in Western Europe as a 
“structural weakness," noting that 
it accounts for 50 percent of Ibe 
region's gross national product 
compared with 35 percent in the 
United States. His remarks were 
made available in Washington. 

AT&T to Lay Off 875, 
Open Singapore Plant 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. said Friday 
that it would lay off 875 workers at 
its Shreveport, Louisiana, plant on 
July 12 because of "market condi- 
tions.” At the same time, it said it 
would setup a new plant in Smga- 
pore to produce residential tele- 
phones. 

■ The company said the layoffs are 
not directly related to the estabKsh- 
mmt of the new plant, where pro- 
duction is expected to start in Janu- 
ary. The -company said the 
Singapore plant ‘is required to re- 
duce production costs and remain 
competitive in the domestic and 
international market for interna- 
tional telephones.” 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 



Iffehofci loan equal oppmtuniiy «nptoyw. 


DIRECTOR OF MARKETING 


Praiffdow i io mat kx ml amsfavefion m gta g a a i tmt firm, WKWn a ig ki bulking 
L t utetni dion for blue drip efiarrtt, tasks qualified bsfiviaud far now bwness 

rln i sfaR i mrn* ~ w ~*r“ *■— T* ai-fl I < -J w81 rJfnrrl 

fo» idaal earfdete on cppwtunH? to achate bote Ewapaen and Amorican 
eoq*affs-far actual construction end/ or consultancy work on bath pdas of tho 
Allaflk. Es** rionct -with c a ntar u cfio n industry ana prawn toads record in tta 
Wataarn Bnpaan market are required. This k a dwianglng, jpuwfiwirianted 
opportunity wUi on esca lart sriwy and banafits psxfcoflA. 

Qu aUUemdUam duaUMadefmm* inckxingst^orylAforykaxtMorsolo: 

UHK/McGOVRtN, Inc, Ifr. ML Lobar, 

3B7 fe* Ara. Sou*. Now York Cfly. N.Y_ 10016. 


Metromedia and KTLA’s owners 
have brought a new intensity into 
the market for independent sta- 
tions. 

“When prices go up, the number 
of transactions increases signifi- 
cantly,” Mr. Epstein said. “There 
are companies who are saying that 
because these unique stations are 
available, it might be a good time to 


Owners and programmers at in- 
dependent stations, in asserting 
their success, argue that the poten- 
tial to make big profits is greater at 
independents than at network affil- 
iates. The biggest factor, they say. 
is simply that independents have 
control over more advertising time, 
about 12 minutes an hour, com- 
pared with about 90 seconds an 
hour at the affiliates. Others ob- 
serve, however, that independents 
must buy all their own program- 
ming whereas affiliates are even 
paid to carry network evening pro- 

gr utHtflmg . 

Under a new FCC rale, a media 
company can own 12 television sta- 
tions, an increase from 7 stations. 
The Taft Broadcasting Co. which 
owns four affiliates and three in de- 
pendents, has received FCC ap- 
proval to become die first company 
to reach the new limit. It will add 
three affiliates and two indepen- 
dents when its $755 million pur- 
chase of Gulf Broadcasting Inc., 
which includes seven radio sta- 
tions, is completed in September. 

Mr. Kagan, the broadcast ana- 
lyst, said skeptics have repeatedly 
anticipated a slowdown in the over- 
all growth of television, including 
the independent stations. The slow- 
down is still not in sight, he main- 
tained. 

“I don’t think Murdoch overpaid 
for Metromedia," he said. He rea- 
soned that the newspaper publisher 
paid approximately 1 1 times the six 


stations' approximate cash flow 
projected for 1986. As for KTLA, 
the price works out to 9.7 times 
estimated cash flow for 1986. 

**lf Tribune hadn't paid it, some- 
body else would have.** he said. 
"You con assume that most of the 
large players in ibe industry want 
to expand their station groups." 

There is little debate about the 
independents' appetite for pro* 
grams. They spent $637 million for 
syndicated programming last year, 
compared with S426 million by the 
netwoik affiliates, according to the 
independents' trade association. In 
1975, the combined purchases of 
syndicated programming totaled 
$242 million, with network affili- 
ates accounting for 69 percent. 


Japan Considers 
Tokyo Bay Span 


TOKYO — The Japanese 
government has tentatively de- 
cided to build a highway across 
Tokyo Bay, a newspaper re- 
ported Friday. The Construe^ 
lion Ministry declined com- 
ment on the report. 

The Nihon Keizai Shim bun 


said the proposed 10-year, one- 
trillion-yea <$4.03-biUioQ) pro- 
ject linking Kisarazu and Ka- 


wasaki would involve a 
five-kilometer (3.1-mile) bridge 
and a 10-kilometer undersea 
tunnel. 

The newspaper said no deci- 
sion had been made on whether 
the National Highway Author- 
ity or a private-sector consor- 
tium would undertake the pro- 
ject- 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
5 July 19B5 ’ 

rn» not anrt value qootaHoastaWwa batow ore tupaUed By Hie Funds UtaadwHIi me 
ajKBMton of some fundi wMse quotes arc based on Issue prices. The tanowlM 
morainal symbols fauncate t raa u oacy of quotations supoUod for too iHT: 

(d) -dally; <w) -weekly, lb) -bt-moolMy; tr) -raoolarty; HI -Uregu tarty. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
tw) Al-Mal Trust. LA 


(wl Lloyds Inn N. America-. S 10880 
(W) Llovds inn PacHic — 5F 13*50 
tw) Lloyds infL Smaller Cos— SM8* 


—(dl Cantor SF 124380 -Id I Class A 

3511 Mttfcr-rfflSS 

=S ! If S&83 QMiffij™ 

— Id) Stocktor 

— (vr) Dollar Lana Term— 

S 10*8 — <**> Japanese Yto 

SF 8460 — lw» Pound Sterling 

SIM* — <w) Doutacfw Marie 

812.19 — (wl Dutch Florin 

51*88 — tw) Swiss Franc 

.*,§4? ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
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BANOUE IND05UEZ 
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— (W) FIF — PoCttlC 
— (d > indowazMultttonds A 
— <d ) indoauaz Mutttaonds B 

— (d 1 Indosuez USD (MJULF) ___ 

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— SF 91.95 
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— (w) BrtLGota Fund sun ZlSlnSt'liuIjlN^^^L Y f¥^«2J4 

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—its ) Brtt. World Techrv Fund 50633 ROYAL B. OF CANADAJ l OB2ILGUERNSEY 


-td B(U Jainn Dir P«1. Fd 50831 Z S pJeimTER FUND - 

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CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— I wl Capital I an Fund — . 


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n, -+(w) RBC Far EasKFadflc Fd 
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CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) -fid J RBC MooXurrwcv 

—(d) Actions Solsses SF40S85 -Hw> RBC Nordt Airier. F 

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—Id Convert Valor Swl — — - SF 117JH SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

— « Convert Voter US430LLAR. 5IM 17 Devonshire So. LondwvOl 677-80*0 

— (d Cana »#c__: SF 80180 — (b ) SHB Band Fund —S2268 

—<d cs Foods— Bonds SF7765 — |») SHB Inti Growth Fund 52168 

^(S SESSHU Fund_ .sroSS *”!“ ®^S£j£255i <,ss * JE 

/ri r T iiiinY flflnrlrnl riinrt DMIDCBO — ifl > AntTtCD-vowof 5rj#U5 

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—(d) msec 

=J31KSS?^S15' 


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SFW3J0 — W ) Dollar Bond Selection S1XL37 

SF i*loo — M I HDflit Band Selection- PLlZUn 
SF 1*565 — 10 1 Intarvolnr . . SF 9080 

sr inn _ (d } Jgm Poft(B , to SF 8*565 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC — (tf j starting Bend Selection — v e 1 04.1* 

WinttoWH- House , 77 Lond on Well —id j Swiss Foretan Bond SeL SF107M 

LONDON EC2 (01 92097971 _(d ( SwNovalar New Seritt- SF 33080 

(w) Finsbury Grew Lt d — 51ta.11 — <a ) Universal Band Sotad — SF 8*65 

(ml Winchester Diversified** SHLO —id j Universal Fund SF12L4) 

l in I winchester Financial Ltd -51167 — (d { yen Band Selection Y 10,1*980 

(wlWlwchetata-HeMnas F F j%ig UNION BANK OFSWITZERLAND 

fwi Wortdwfde lecurttta t/$ »*—. SUM — U > Amea UA Sh. 5F«5B 

(w) Worldwide Special S/S ZW. 5181162- 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
— Hd 1 Cancentra 

— +W ) mn RaateMaM— . 


Id I Bond-Invest 
—Id > Fonsa Swiss Sh. 

—Id } jaoan-lnvast— , 

DM2961 — (d)Saflt South, Air. Sty 
DM 9583 —id > Sima (stack erica) 


Dunn A Haraltt * Lloyd Georae. Brussels UNION INVESTMENT Fnaikturt 

— I ml DAM Commodity Pool- 5 3W.I9 — (d > Urdrento — DM4482 

— lm> Currency t Gold Pool — S 182** *** — (d ) uidlends DM25A2 

—In) Winch. Ute Fut Pool— 559241 ••• — (d ) UnlfOk DM 7184 

—tel) Trans world FuL POOL. S 829.1* — (d 1 UNIZINS DM11368 

fac mgmt. lt6l inv. advisers Other Funds 

HUL EC4, (w)Artlbonds investments Fund. 521.91 

cirorknhi t I ml Allied Lt d 

— HW ' IW) Awulla international Fund 

FIDELITY POB 570. Hamilton Bermuda ir ) Arab Finance i.F 
—(ml American Value* Common* S98H5 (b 1 Arlone ... 

— ImJAnwr Values CumFrof. — S1UA (w) Trustcor Inti Fd. IAEIF) 

— W 1 FldeOty Amor. Assrfs — _ S718Q (wl BNP Intertwnd Fund 

—13 1 Fidelity Australia Fund 5867 (w) Bondxelex-ltSue Pr— 

—la i Fidelity Discovery Fund — 5 1047 (ml Canada Gtd-Mortgaee f 

—Jd ) gtr- Sraj-Tr—. *12445 id) Capitol Preserv.FO.lnl 

— (0 ) FldeOtv Far Easl Fund *2060* (w) Citadel Fund— __ 

— (d 1 Fldeffty mn. Fund 5*347 (d I CJ.R. Australlo Fund 

— Id 5 FldelltY Ortant Ftrnd- *38.99 Id 1 CJ.R. Joato Fund — 

—id J Fidelity Frontier Fund 81X77 im) Cleveland Offshore Fd. 

-Id 1 Fidel tv Pooflc Fund--— 5 134 87 |w) Columbia Seeurit 

— Id I Fidelity SocL Growth Fd- 51445 (b 1 COMET E 

—Id I Fidelity World Fund S33J2 (wl Convert. Fd. I nt'J A Carts 1949 

FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAVMAN FtL lnn 0 CertS SZJM 

.ua (d ! Darner Wld Wide IvtTsl 

— (wl Forbes Hlah Inc. GUI Fd ' * Id ! Drevfu* Amorim Rxid V 

-<w) Gold Income 5 745 SS., 

— (wl Gold Appreciation — . 5389 j® ! “T'S}” -7 

— (ml Strategic Trod big S1.1* IS! 


— (w) Dollar Income 

— ( wl Forbes Hlah Inc Gm Fd. 

— (w) Gold Income — 

— (wl Gold Appreciation— — 
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— uniHSKSK <nwmg » ( wl Tne Esiabllstunent Trust 

GEFJNOR FUNDS. Id > Europe ObKootlons 

— (Wl Ead Investment Fund S 33988 (w» First Eagle Fund 

— (wl Sasfttsti world Fund C 11280 (0IFlttvS1arsLld._ 

— I w) State 5L Amortcan 5 16A3S (wl FIkmI Income Trans 

CCBfl.Trvta.LMLLacAaant8M9MB (wl Fonataexlssua Pr. 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. !„) FDrmu'iaSelcctk^ Fd. 

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(wl GAM ErmttOM 514.71 5 HSSn Rj 

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wl&T. Acta Fund 
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dt&T. Dollar Fitnd 

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G.T. HoralKi PatbHnder 
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luS (ml NOSTEC Portfolio 


™ iw} - lmiestmtnl FunCL _ S9457 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTL.SA. (w) NJLM.F 516066 

Jersey, PD. Bex *1 Tel 0SM 76029 im) NSP F.l.T. .... 1 16940 

Borne. PJX Box HXL Tel 4131 2M051 id ) Pacific HorUan Invt. Fd 


Id > Crossbow (Far East) 

CSF (Bata need). 

—Id 1 In+jL Bond Fund 
— Id ) inL Currency U4 
— fd 1 ctf Fd (TeetmotooW 
—Id 1 Crseas Fd (N. AMERICA) 

EBC TRUST CO.( JERSEY! LTD. 
1-3 Seal* SUL H«iier;QSU-3U3i 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

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DldlCad.: Bid— 51061 Offer _ 


SF 10.91 (wl PANCURRI IM. 51*48 

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(d 1 Putnom inn Fund 

lb 1 PrV-Tecn 

(wl Quantum Fund N.V... 5 4810.13 

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-<d iStwrl TerTB -B lOWrl, Iw) Stnmav inumlmani FumL_ 52069 

— (w) Long Term 52249 {<J ' Synttn lkl 4 (Class At 4 

JABDIME FLEMING, POB 70 GPO MB KB _ I Wl Tert»n o_6rOwth F imd.. 

—(b) J^ Australia — S372 (w) Takva Poe. HekL (Sea) 

-(b) JJF Hang Kang Trust S349S (wl Tokyo Pot H^N.V.. 

— (b l J.F jam Trust Y4557 Iw) Tronspaclth: Fund — ...» — 5 7960 

— 3bl J.F Japcxi Technotoav— Y 1B6» (d j Twmitate Fund — - 5IK.10 

—(w) Korea Growth Trust KW iwj Twteedvirowne iLv^to* 52,17*70 

- — S (w) TweadvArawne avXtessB S143SB9 

-4b) JJF Pacific SOCS.IACC) 5540 imt Tw^.Bra^lU.iCIn.^ 51800* 

LLOYDS BANK INTL, POB 43^ Geneva 11 (5 1 uhi' wtS^ndT! * ,JB 

— MW) Llovds mn Dallor 5114.W IS! uni CaoMtaFSid 

— +jwi Llovds mn Europe — SF ll&SD tw , v meter Ml) Assets 

— i-jw> Lfayds jnn Growth — SFWfc« W 5 Wartdl Fund SA^ 51167 

— +iwt Lloyds inti Income — SF SIS) 

dm — Deutsche Man,; B(= — Belgium Francs. 4 FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs: SF — Swiss Francs; a — asked; + — Offer Prloes;b — bid 
change P/V 510 to 51 par unit; NA. — no! Available: NC— Not Communicated ;o— 
Hew; S — suspended; S/S — Slock Split; ~ — Ex-Dividend; “ — Ex-Rts; ••• — 
Grass Performance index Mav; » — Redenwt-Prloe- Ex -Coupon; — Formerly 
Worldwide Fund Lid: 9 — Offer Pries Ind. 3% prelim. Charge; ++ — dally stock 
price as on Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


,t 























Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6 - 7 . 1985 


Over-die-Couiiter 

NASDAQ National Market Prices 


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Vilens Write WeM &A. 

I. Qoei du Mml-Bboc 
1211 Geneve 1, Switzerland 
Tel. 31 02 51 - Tele. 21305 


^311 RESERVE 

V INSURED DEPOSITS TRUST 


RES IN DEP 

An Account for lt*e Cautious Investor 
to Protect and Increase Capitol 


U.5. Doflar Denominated 
insured by U.S. Govt. EnKfies 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Confidentiality 


CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATlOr-JAL SANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

PES IN DEP 

Cose Poslale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 
account application tor 


Name , 


Address . 


tSn imrixrfr <«W»n v* US A 


Semin K*t 

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GoldDepo«ts Near Prague 

The Associated Press 

.. PRAGUE — Exploratory 
probes have confirmed the exis- 
tence of large gold deposits near 
here with an estimated value of SI 
billion, a state geologist said Fri- 
day. The ore is located along the 
Vltava River, about 55 kilometers 
^34 jnfles) south of Prague, he said. 


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Canada’s Jobless Rate Steady 

Rouen 

OTTAWA — Canada’s season- 
ally adjusted unemployment rate 
was 103 percent m June, un- 
changed from the three-year low 
reported in May and down from 
1 L2 percent in June 1984, Statistics 
Canada said Friday. 



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0 ?omEMIPo 8 ts 31 % Fall 
I® Profit, Increase in Sales 


uRattm 


V ■ I0mX)N —Thom EMI PLC 
«orted op Friday a pretax profit 
,ii. tf£10&3 million ($144 millioa) for ' 
j?*. tteyearaHkd March Jl, down 31 
I,*, percent from £156.8 minion the 

' I*. lUii lufnm ■ ■ 


lc also reported sales of £32 bit. 
>J Bear for the mosi recent year, up 
f-- I3t5 ^roent from £232-bmiofl the 

i''ifj ptfuTQs n Graham Wilkins said 
, Jj '^^oup expect^ a dcapponit^ 
l gjsthdr m the yearending March 
r- 1986 but was more hopeful- about 


profit would be lower ilmtiie pre- 
vious year. The finaldmdraa for 
the year was, however, hdd un- 
changed. _■■■ 

Snce the beginning of 1985, In- 
inas has been under severe pressure : 
because of woridwide overeapply 
in a major product sector, Mr. wit 
kins said. This has been aggravated 
by tedmical problems in tEemann- 
factorin* process, some of wtach ' 
predateTnorn EMI’s acqnigiHnw of 


Mr. WilkxBS said problems at the 
5* group’s Ferguson and Inmos units 
r> apditemogc division continued to 
i adversely affect trading in the first 
L. quarter of the current financial 
year. — 

A. Xbe seasonal Mttera of profits 
1 woold also cdnmbute toward dis- 
appointing first-half results, he 
- n: sa& He made no specific forecasL 
. 1' The company announced on 
Monday that Peter Laister wasre- 
■ T; w mrt g as chairman to be sncceed- 
: ^ cdbyMr. W3kmsand that 1984-85 


He said he believed these priob- ' 
lems had been resolved and, new. ; 
products were bang . introduced, 
but it would be some time before 
Inmos eonld be expected to mate a 
satisfactory return. 

In the music division, efforts 

con tinued to improve Capitol's sit- 
uation, including major investment 
is a new label based in New York 
that should provide a sound return . 
in future years. 

Thom EMI believed it had iden- 4 
tified its major problems and fur- 
ther large nonrecurring charges 
were not expected, Mr. Wfljam 
said at a press conference, 


Soviet Asks Toyota and Nissan 
To Aidin Auto-Engine Output 


ENTERJiATIONAl HERALD TRIBUNE, SATTJKPAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 


■ v,s. Bank to Cut Daiwa Leads Way Into U'.S. Market 

1,745 Positions. By Susan Chira still not allowed to enter any kind modal banks hope to move i 


Page 13 


Caepikdbf OarSwff Aww Diqxnchcs 

TOKYO — ‘ The Soviet Union 
'aas asied Japan’s top two auto- 
makers to provide technological ex- 
pertise for the production of car 
engines^ the Japanese companies 
sad Friday. 

Toyota Motor Coro., Japan’s 
No. i automaker , said the company 
has tamed down the request while 
its chief rival, Nissan Motor Co^ 
said the matter is being studied. 

A Toyota official, wbo asked not 
tu be identified, said Soviet offi- 
cials approached the company at 
the end of last year for help with 


technology to produce car engines, 
for the Moskovich, the Soviet com- 
pact passenger car. But Toyota de- 
cided a gainst the proposal in late 
May because “it was almost impbs- 
able to modify onr engine to satisfy 
tfaefr requirements,” he said. 

Nissan, No. 2 in Japan, is stfll 
conducting a feasibility study on 
working with the Soviet Union and 
has made no firm derision, a Nis- 
san official said. 

“All we can say at tins stage is 
that we are studying the matter” 
the official said. 


NEW. YORK — Manufao- 
tnrers Hanover Cosgv wffl etina- 
nate 1,745 positions worldwide 
by the am of the year as part of 
its effort to cut operating ex- 
penses, a spokesman said Fri- 
day. • 

“Wages and benefits are the 
biggest part of oiir noninterest 
expenses and we are trying to. 
get cur arms around - it," the 


whose positions are Co be dtm- 
natedwfll be absorbed into oth- 
er jobs, filling spots normally 
-vacated by attrition or retire- 
ment, the spokesman said. The 
cats are expected to result in ' 
savings of about 554.6 million 
dm year, ihe spokesman added, - ' 

The spokesman said the com- 
pany had been trying to cut the 
rate of growth m its operating 
expenses from the level of 20 
percent per year in the early 
1980s. Manufacturers Hanover 
had net income of $1002 mil- ! 
lion in the first quarter of 1985. 


Airports of Paris has been award- 
ed a contract by. the Emirate of. 
Abu Dhabi to participate in the 
development of a new international 
airport at A3 Ain, the company an- 
nounced. 

Cables S A, a Swiss cable compa- 
ny, has signed a contract for 38 
million Swiss francs (about $14.6 
bullion) with Kuwait for thesnpply 
of electric cables and for civil engi- 
neering work, the company said. 

Castle & Cooke plaruto develop 


BySusan Oiira 

. York Tima Service 

: TOKYO — Daiwa Securities 
saysilwiflopaia trust bank in the 
United States, noting it the first 
Japanese securities company al- 
lowed to enter the field overseas. 
- The move is expected to trigger a 
rush into the v£. market by its 
competitors. 

The action, announced Thurs- 
day, reflected the gradual financial 
• deregulation now under way in Ja- 
pan. As in the United States, the 
line between banking and securities 
businesses is beginning to erode in 
Japan, although at a much slower 
pace. 

The Finance Mmistiy of Japan 
has traditionally maintained ngid 
barrios between banking and sau- 
rilies businesses and has allotted 
hanks narrow charters, with trust 
banks separate from large city 
banks. 

Over -the past year, firms here 
have beta fighting to cross those 


in the Hawaiian Islands, into a lux- 
ury beach resort with two holds, 
according to David Murdock, who 
controls Flexi-Van,. which has 
merged with Castle & Cocke. 


Hoes, and the Finance Ministry de- 
rision reflects a trend in that daw* 
non, said Shigsyosiri Geojida of the 
finance Ministry's securities bu- 
reau. Japanese securities firms are 


Continental Granm-Wexke AG 
has increased world group and par- 
ent-company sales in dm first five 
months of 1985 by 9.1 percent and 
82 percent, irepeclivdy, from the 
1984 period but first half parent 
company net profit stagnated at 
the year-ago leveL 

Dateety ’PLCs agreed-upon bid 
for Gfll and Duffus Group PLC 
will not be referred to the British 
monopolies commission, the Trade 
and Industry Department said. 

Honda Motor Co. is negotiating 
with Tdco LlcL, a major Indian 
automaker, concerning the possi- 
bility of assembling mull cars in 
India, a Honda spokesman said. 


still not allowed to enta any kind 
of banking business in Japan. 

Just last month, the Finance 
Ministry gave permission to nine 
foreign banks to open trust banks 
in Japan, a path still barred to Jap- 
anese city banks as well as securi- 
ties firms. Daiwa officials said they 
believed that the ministry allowed 
them to enta the trust business 
overseas partly to compevsate for 
the increase in foreign competition 
in Japan’s domestic market. 

A spokesman for Daiwa Securi- 
ties said that its American invest- 
ment advisory subsidiary, Daiwa 
International Capital Management 
Crirp*L had applied on to the New 
Jersey B anking Board for pennis- 
skm to a wholly owned 

trust banking subsidiary and that it 
expected to receive permission in 
October. Daiwa chose New Jersey, 
the -official said, because it allows 
asset management firms to enta 
trust banking — a move some other 
states fortrid. 

. Daiwa's target is the American 
pension fund market, which a 
Daiwa official Thursday estimated 
to exceed Si trillion. Eventually, 
Japanese securities firms and corn- 


adding that ‘Honda plans to ship 
parts for assembly from Japan. 

House of Fraser PLC mid its 
slake in Debenhams PLC readied 
13.15 mflli fm ordinary shares or 
938 percent by Thursday. House 
of Fraser has been gradually buy- 
ing Debenhams’ shares in recent 
weeks during the period Burton 
Group PLC has been bidding for 
the company. 

Malaysia Mining Coro, has ap- 
pointed the Boston Consulting 
Group of the United States to de- 
velop a diversification program to 
identify new business areas to sup- 
plement its tin operation, the com- 
pany said in its animal report. 


modal banks hope to move into 
Japan's fast-growing pool of pen- 
sion funds, now estimated at more 
than $50 billion and expected to 
exceed $300 billion by the 1990s. 

The Daiwa official, who asked 
not to be named, said the move to 
trust banking would give Daiwa 
considerable experience in manag- 
ing pension funds. Pension man- 
agement is now limited to a small 
number of trust banks. And be- 
cause Japanese clients have gener- 
ally preferred conservative invest- 
ments. such as government 
securities, Japanese money manag- 
er & have not generally been ex- 
posed to the range of sophisticated 
investment strategies used in the 
United States. 

“In the future, we expect that 
Japanese banks and securities com- 
panies will eventually get into pen- 
sion-fund management.” the offi- 
cial said. “We can accumulate 
experience by setting up this sub- 
sidiary.” 

The move would also allow 
Daiwa's U3. subsidiary to manage 
investment portfolios for overseas 
diems who are interested in Japa- 
nese securities, the official said. 

Drug Firm Head 
In Sweden Resigns 

Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — The chair- 
man of the Swedish drug concern 
Pharmacia AB, Gunnar Wessman, 
resigned Friday after a special 
board meeting. 

The pharmaceutical company 
said that Mr. Wessman, who had 
been chairman only since 1984, 
planned to devote his time to inter- 
national activities. 

The resignation followed reports 
in the daily Svenska Dagbladet that 
a major shareholder, Volvo AB, 
was pressing for Mr. Wessman’s 
otmer to open the way for the com- 
pany to concentrate more on bio- 
technology. 


Head of Bundesbank 
Sees Record Surpluses 


(Continued from Page 9) 

hypothetical 10 percent decline in 
the dollar would “not hurt West 
GamM^dustryve^'mt^h. ,> The 

since last winter against many ma- 
jor currencies. 

However, Mr. P&hl cautioned: 
“The accumulation of U.S. foreign 
debt, at an enormous pace of more 
than $100 billion a year, could lead 
to “some instability in foreign ex- 
change markets the longer it Lasts.” 

Mr. P&hl said that he “found it 
a muring that the dollar exchange 
rate was so tittle aiTected by the 
substantial decline in U.S. interest 
rates recently,” which, he said, 
“seems to show the underlying 
strength” of the U.S. currency." 

Mr. P&hl said ihe relative weak- 
ness of the Deutsche mark against 
the dollar on foreign exchange mar- 
kets is “only one reason and maybe 
not even the main reason” why 
West German companies have be- 
come “very competitive again” and 
are enjoying strong exports and 
hardy profits. 

“Than are other reasons, as well, 
which are of a more lasting nature, 
I hope. These are a decline in unit 
labor costs in the manufacturing 
industry for three years in a row, 
strong increases in productivity in 
manufacturing — the backbone of 
the German economy — very 
strong efforts by German compa- 
nies to automate, and Iowa costs,” 
he said. 

Mr. P&hl said he expected West 
German manufacturers to increase 
investment in equipment by at least 
10 percent this year, after adjust- 
ment for inflation. 

Mr. P&hl said business invest- 
ment of that magnitude was the 
best cure for the country’s unem- 
ployment problem. He rejected the 
need for Bonn to send a “signal" 
that it was ready to relax fiscal or 
monetary policy to boost growth, 
and generate jobs. 

On Thursday, the Bundesbank's 


policy-making council decided to 
leave unchanged the central bank's 
key interest rates, with the Lom- 
bard rate being held at 6 percent 
and Lhe discount rate at 43 per- 
cent. The Lombard rate is the rate 
at which the Bundesbank supplies 
short-term credit to commercial 
banks that have pledged securities 
as collateral. The discount rate is 
the rate at which the bank supplies 
long-term credit. 

The council, in its half-year re- 
view of monetary policy, also de- 
cided to maintain a 3-peroem to 5- 
percent growth corridor for 
expansion in the West German 
money supply, which currently is 
growing at an up to 4.5 percent. 

Several leading economists, in- 
cluding Karl Heinrich Oppen- 
laender of the IFO economic re- 
search institute in Munich, argue 
that the Bundesbank’s money sup- 
ply Israels are too restrictive m 
light of sluggish private demand 
and should be reset to f osier money 
supply growth of 5.0 to 5.5 percent 
ai present. 

But Mr. P&hl indicated that no 
such change in offidal money sup- 
ply targets or in official interest 
rates is likely for some time. 

Rather than Iowa the Lombard 
or discount rates, Mr. P&hl said, the 
Bundesbank is inclined to encour- 
age a further downward trend in 
money market rates, aiming to 
push rates toward 5 percent by of- 
fering security repurchase agree- 
ments at consistently Iowa rates. 

“There’s a lot of room for lower- 
ing our de facto market rates before 
we touch our official rates,” he 
said. 

On Friday, the Bundesbank of- 
fered commercial banks a security 
repurchase agreement set at a 5.25- 
percem interest rate, slightly Iowa 
the than 5.30 rate offered last week 
and signaling further Bundesbank 
efforts to foster Iowa rates in the 
money markets. 


.4 - 

a : k 

"•d • i 

ti . J 


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Simply circle the appropriate number on the coupon at the bottom of this 
page before August 30 and the report (s) will be mailed to you by the. companies in- 
volved. 




BMW AG 


Business at BMW developed favorably again in 1984 as a whole. 
The essential economic figures of the previous year were exceed- 
ed. Production, domestic registrations and exports reached new 
record levels. Development again contrasted dearly with the 
general market data. All the BMW series of automobile; contribut- 
ed to this, demand for 3 series even surpassed that of the previous 
year. The motorcycle business has dearly review since the intro- 
duction of the new K series, it was excellent overall. 

„ The expansion of business and the continuation of projects with 

good prospects for the fu- 
ture entailed a further in- 
crease in the number of em- 
ployees to some 52,000 

© worldwide. Sales of BMW 

DM12.9 billion, sales of the 
BMW group reached 
DM163 billion, 173% up on 
the previous year. 

BMW offers a broad range 
of automobiles and motorcy- 
cles of top quality, sporty 
character and high perfor- 
mance. Thus, tiie company 
can be expected to perma- 
nently expand its market po- 
sition. o 


SKANSKA 


. J Skanska is one of Europe’s leading civil engineering and 
."^building contractors, and o full-service corporation offering 
r a complete range of resources for projects of all types and 
- sums. Within the Skanska Group there are a number of 
divisions and subsidiaries specializing in every phase of 

construction: design, engi- 


Annual Report 





neering, component fabri- 
cation, erection, manage- 
ment, administration and 
finance. Outside Sweden. 
Skanska specializes in 
large, technically complex 
and advanced projects, 
often on a deagn-con- 
Strud or turnkey baas. 
Consolidated invoiced 
sales for the Skanska 
Group in 3 964 amounted 
to SEK 14,765 million 
(about US $1,640 mil- 
lion}. The number of em- 
ployees is about 29300. 


HoechstAG 

Hoechst s one of the leading chemical compa ni es in the world end 
operates in aft important fields of the che mical industry. 

Hoechst was particularly successful 1984. Profit before tax of the 
Hoechst Group increased by DM 897 mflfion to DM 2, 85 2 miiSon. 
Sales reached DM 41,457 million, 113 percent more than in the 
previous year; 75 percent of Group sales were achieved abroad. 
Considerable expansion of sales took place in the agriculture, 
plastics film, fibres, organic chemicah and technical information 

systems divisions. Accounting 
for 16 percent of sales, phar- 
maceuticais continues to be 
the fa-gest cSvison. 

For Hoechst, broadly based 
research a the most impor- 
ts# investment for Ihe future. 
In 1984 DM 1 ,81 8 tmlGon was 
spent cm research and devel- 
opment, which is 12 percent 
more than in the previous 
year. Some 13300 peoie in 
14 countries work m the re- 
search laboratories. Hoechst 
has around 178;000 employ- 
ees worldwide, a 


I- ■ ‘ ■■ . , • -V ^ *•»« ”ivv- 

r H' \ v .-X 'v - : 




Spie Batignolles 


SPIE BATIGNOLLES is one of France's 
engineering concerns, organized ara 
activity: 

•aecnKALtniNua£« 

• CML QkStmUG ad RAIDING 



construction and oviV 
BiMng man fields of 


• OIL and GAS 

* ENGNS8NG and 
GB«AL CONTRACTING. 

Working throughout the 
world in more that 60 
countries, &0X of the com- 
pany's sales are made 
abroad 

1984 SALES: 

FJV. ISfiQQ mificn. 
Human Resources: 33/100 
employees inducing 3300 
engineers and 83® techni- 
cians. 

Tour Affou 

33 Quoi de DiotvBouton, ' 
92BU Puteaux . . 

TeL 776 43 64. 

Telex PARS. £20834 F. 

8 


AEGON 

Insurance Group 


Formed in 1983 by the merger of AGO and Ennia, AEGON is 
the second largest insurance company in The Netherlands 
and one of the European Community's top ten. 1984 gross 
receipts amounted to D.FL 1 0.1 billion, 54% from infernation- 
. al operations. A major 

j proportion came from 

our American subsidiar- 
,» r C. !, " ’ ' ies: National OB' Line 

■ n ' . ■ . ''•Li ;• Insurance Company, 

:** . l&p :- and life Investors, as 

•*!.' . ? well as our 25% interest 

‘It"-; • ' in Crowroc, Canada 

if;-: * wfc" ’ AEGON 

. m-_ ■ " Y force in Life Assurance , 

• ‘JkW \ V Accident and Health, 

. -Jr - V andisctfiveinGenerci 

. V " . Insurance. 

-«i; AEGON Insurance 

: — . Group. International 

•S jSf 1 growth from Dutch 

•-* roots. I 


i .Ti ■ 

■CL"- 


IKB 


Industriekrecfitbank AG — Deutsche Industriebank 0KB) 
makes medium and long-term loans to businesses at fixed 
rates. Funds are provided for investments in plant and 
equipment, takeovers, conversion of short to long-term 
borrowing, and capital goods exports. Hs refinancing is 

done entirely by issu- 

: — ing its own bonds and 

by other long-term 

Industriekreditbaiak AG borrowing. 

DeHtscbe Industriebank within the bank’s 

d’ry DM 14 billion bal- 

mJmm a nee sheet total loan 

periods have been 
progressively length- 
ening. IKB, directly or 
through subsidiaries, 
also operates in the 
Euromarket, hire-pur- 
chase credit, leasing 
and business consul- 

Finandal Year 1984 /85 

Annual Report will be 
— — — — published in August.) 

5 


a 


Annual Report 
Financial Year 1984/85 


CAM. ZEISS, West Germany: 

Strong stimulus from abroad results in aD-time record - 
turnover for 83/ 84 busmen year fops ihe bilfion mark 

Tto mmol in the woetj economy, the consjerofib efforts inverted h r and d and lhe 
tfranoto of Hie dofer how d played thdr part in ensuring the planing ctwru feared by 
the ccnpony in lhe business yoor enditg Septe«T*er 30, 84. 

OrdHt iceried, Mating DM 1JD66 n*on, showed an inereae of 20 percent the 
perartage of fortifln Crd« rate to 56 percent p2 percem), wHi lhe USA. Japan, the 
Lie od Fran® being fai mcior cwtomea. 

For rt» Snt time cm, lurraer topped lhe bSan matk, reading a Md of DM 1JM2 
mSon and thus rap ma ting on improvem en t of 9 percent on me previous yera. 

The total wortforae ampfayed bjr Qrf Zefcs, West Germany, ^ die end of (he taensi 
y*ar numbered 7,891 (7^32), expenditure on mooes and srtirin, social i a s u r a nce and 
the company pension sdwne a mounted to DM *MJ nSon.aiincrBeuofUpcnait 
* - __ . — ,. fl onlfoprevwoii«eor.Thetvraovef of 

Carl-Zeiss-Stiftung 

otloin DM 1 JO biion, 

At the don of the bunas year the 
number of pawns ampfayed by the 
Zens Group worldwide totalled 
... J— 15*501 P12M). 

.. . Gondiftanf were good for the 

bundling of the new buonea yw. 
l ' i .: Good utiCxotion of production 
■’ Ctoodly « oaraod by h od% 

.V infow of ondon in Pk MU norths 

and by we H tied order books. New 
■' ; . . .v". • morWng poabDiei wti be openU 

c. ,5’C. • up by new pmdueti which ore be 

- . ipub of the B cnaaopfad efiort ptf 

V : ‘> • .jT^htaat into r. + d Prodded *e economy 

’• ' PfiKl boat not tote a turn fier ho worsen 

- :=r: ; - r ’ ‘ C(rf2«o,Wetf Gfmarty, toe* every 

£: -'-. ur: " . eboneo of continuing with the 

. - T.- ‘ r nn--n.irii moderolfl growth recor d ed far die 

,1 busnesi yw 83/84. ^ 


BAYER 


I984wuasuoca»fulyeer for Boyer. Bayer World «des rata by 153% to DM 43J) 
biSon. Income before law jncreraed by 34.1% to DM 2,901 mBBan and aftertax 
income by 557% to DM 1,174 ndbon. 

Bayer AG increased its sales by 1 107% to DM 167 btiun. Income before taunt rose 
by 19.1% » DM 1,365 ndfion and after-tak income by 31 j 0% to DM660 raOion. 
On Ihe bans of those strong earning in 1984, Me we pleased to raoommand to you 
Ifa payment of a dividend of DM 9.00. The taU dividend would than amount to 
DM460 mi ten, the highest Bayer hai ever paid far my faeai year. 

In acoordanoe wWi our kng^enn poGcy, we agda wish to strengthen oar thtyahM- 
ers’ nqaly- We hsnm therefore increased Bayer AG’s free reserve by DM 200 m i t u L 
DM 879 mitten hoe been ollooraed to Boyer World's retained earrings. 

■ _ . ■ . - — Bath externa t raid internet factors 


BayarMchtotfiber 
tlte fi a reh g ftUtif 1984 


contributed to the positim trend 
in 1984. Atom favor able econom- 
ic conditions in many countries 
led too strong demand for dhorr*- 

icd products. Barad on its broad, 

riversified product spectrum and 
its worl d wide presence, our Conv 
pany parfSopated faly m the up- 
turn. Our mter n trionai txxopeh- 
tivenoss was streniphened by the 
high eedw n ge value of lhe U5. 
dolor mid tiw yen and by the 
law rote of inflation in the Feder- 
al Republic of Germany. Good 
oopadty utfcahon at our pro- 
duction fad&Bes resulted in «ub- 
sfantiafy lower unit cads. We 
contmued the enpenditure stobii- 
wfian pafay inssituted in the pro- 
vtotayeor. 2 


NIXDORF 

Nixdorf offers o diverse product spectrum, ranging from micros to 
mainframes, word processors arid future-oriented systems, such as 
ctigitd PABX's and digital telephones, addressed to new markets 
arising from the intermix of computer oral telecommunications 
technology. The company owes its strength to its ability to focus on 
market needs, and convert new technology into innovative products 
serving^ user requirements. It offers system solutions tailored for 
specific Industries like banking, ihe retail area, hotels and restaurants. 
In a year of renewed growth m fiscal 1984, net income wes up by 29 

percent to DM121 miffioa 
Total revenue rose 21 percent 
to DM 3.27 bilEon. 49 percent 
/wu* Ftawt BBi came from the German 

market and 51 percent from 
international activities. 
55 percent of revenue was 
generated by safes of 
computer systems, and 
45 percent by income from 
rentals and services. Higher 
employment levels. in 1984 
raised the Nbcdorf workforce 
worldwide by 2,672 to 
20,193. 

In its global network, Nbcdorf 
is represented by more than 
500 sales and service bases in 
41 countries around the 
world. 

o 


■ Mail ttiis coupon to: 1 

- Anne Watt/ Annual Reports 
I International Herald Tribune 
! 181 Avenue Charles-de-Gaulle 
I 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 

! Please send me the annual reports of 
J the companies circled, at no cost or 
! obligation. 


Name — 
Address. 


Country, 






ACROSS 

1 Swagger 

GCalendarabbr 

10 Gridiron gear 

14 Slate 
forcefully 

20 Usher's beat 

21 Hosiery fabric 

22 Fntice 

23 Elementary 
textbook 

24 Iron alloy 

25 Salts or Downs 
preceder 

26 Berlin’s "He's 
Picker" 

27 Air 

28 Theme from 
"Candida"? 

32 Hands-up time 

33 Other, in 
Oviedo 

34 Olive product 

35 TV spots 

38 Bus. degree 

41 Theme from 

"Bus Stop"? 

45 Actor Marvin 

46 Awkward 
person 

48 Inlet 

49 Evangeline's 
Grand — - 

50 Singer Lane 

51 Forte 

52 Graven image 

54 Pub missile 

57 Recess 

58 Companion of 
Artemis 

59 Shortly 

60 End: Prefix 


ACROSS 

61 Reproductive 

cell 

62 Kinsman 

63 Theme from 
"The Playboy 
of the Western 
world"? 

67 Sun. talk 

68 Autocrat 

70 A grandson of 

Adam 

71 Release from 
confinement 

72 Dawdles 

74 Reddish brown 

76 Stout holder 

77 Dog star 

78 Taiwan, once 

80 Large 
rishhooks 

81 Clan 

82 Places in 
opposition 

85 Italian 
diminutive 
suffix 

86 Theme from 
"Lady 

Windermere's 

Fan"? 

90 Jock's 
negative 

91 Close-fitting 
jacket 

93 Matriculate 

94 Regretful Miss 

95 Point of view 

97 Surrey district 

98 Hammer part 


across 

99 Vivacity 

100 Dtdustold 

101 Chow follower 

102 Word with 
dance or hold 

104 Wapiti 

105 Menlo Park 

family 

106 The works 

107 Theme from 
"Under Milk 
Wood"? 

113 "For shame!” 

114 Letters for a 
fall Sunday 

115 Female lobster 

11$ "And 

bed" 

117 Monogram 
unit: Abbr. 

118 Theme from 
"Once in a 
Lifetime"? 

127 Ultimately 

130 City on the Oka 

131 Pied pony 

132 Signorina's 
love 

133 Birthplace of 
Virgil 

134 Shadow 

135 Close, to 
Coleridge 

136 Last 

137 Vouch for 

138 Kind of 
clarinet 

139 Munich mister 

140 Vagabond 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU1VE, SATUKDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 

PEANUTS 

Musical Adaptations by richard shvesthi 



HJH IMHIlilHHHgHH 



DOWN 

1 Back talk 

2 In the 
company of 

3 Out of port 

4 Ruck 

5 Tiller 

6 Tube Tor 
transferring 
liquid 

7 Early ascetic 

8 Get rid of snow 

9 Musical 
subject 

10 Neb. river 

11 The dawn 

12 Puff of 
songdom 

13 Slate flower of 
Utah 


DOWN 

14 Ornate cabinet 

15 Decorous 

16 Vendition 

17 Tokyo, 
formerly 

18 Rubescent 

19 Examine 
judicially 

21 Emit 

29 Benefit from 

30 System of 
exercises 

31 Kind of frost 

35 Theme from 
"The Zoo 
Story"? 

36 Candidate, at 
times 

37 Inquirers 

38 N.Z. natives 


DOWN 

39 Theme from 
"Peter Pan”? 

40 Hawkeye 
portrayer 

42 Subtle 
sarcasm 

43 Nothing 

44 Author Sinclair 

46 Glazed ware 

47 Part of R-E-O. 

50 Weapon 

52 Bar of metal 

53 Carries out 

54 Regard as 
contemptible' 

55 Saucer 
creature 

56 German W.W. 
i novelist 

57 Foundation 


© JVew York Tunes, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DOWN 

59 Strengthen and 
temper 

60 Melodious 

61 Pointe, 

Mich. 

64 Private's reply 

65 Efflux 

66 Klipspringers' 
kin 

69 Pirate's drink 

73 Pourboire 

75 Johnny 
Appleseed, e.g. 

76 Native Israeli 

77 He replaced 
Kerensky 


DOWN 

78 He goes to 
blazes 

79 Reflexive 
pronoun 

80 Ike in W.W. II 

81 "I've 

Secret" 

83 Scout's quest 

84 Tennis 
rankings 

87X 

88 Vitelline 

SONobelistin 
Physics: 1944 
92 Marsh 
96 Hatching post 


DOWN 

99 Slippery tree 

100" Billy 

Joe" 

102 "If you can't 

stand 1 

103 An O’Neill 

104 Organic 
compound 

105 Masthead 
listing 

107 Gland of 
uncertain 
function 

108 Stellar 

109 Amen 

110 Verdi opera 


DOWN 

111 Hancock or 
Franklin 

112 Spangle 

118 Tiny arachnid 

119 Church court 

120 Moonfish 

121 Thrice three 

122 Goofy 

123 Mideast prince 

124 Lady of Spain 

125 Sixty grains 

126 Shrill cry 

127" little 

teapot . . ." 

128 A Turner 

129 Shell filling 


THE AMATEURS 
By David Halberstam. 221 pages. S 14.95 . 
William Morrow, 105 Madison Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by John Jerome 

I N “The Breaks of the Game,” David Halberstam 
investigated the gritty, ghetto-based world of 
professional basketball, the jazziest athletic enter- 
prise American society has developed. In “The 
Amateurs'* he moves to the other end of the scale, 
examining what passes in the United States for 
gentleman-athletes. Halbers tarn's subjects compete 
at the very highest level in rowing, “an anomaly, an 
encapsulated nineteenth-century world in the 


sports." The battle is for the right to represent the 
United States in men’s single sculls in the 1984 
Olympics. One seat is available; four exceptional 
but generally unknown athletes, simon-pure ama- 
teurs, are competing for it. 

Amateurism, invented by the British to avoid the 
mingling of sweat among soda! classes, has been a 
deatfissue since the first stadium sear was rented for 
cash. But rowing, virtually spectator-proof, never 
got the word; it survives, even thrives, supported, 
only by its own addicted competitors. 

“Those who competed at this level did so with 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


7- in 


BOOKS 

rifawnnir: passion. Yet there was no overt financial 
reward at the end, nor indeed was there even any 
covert financial reward, a brokerage bouse wanting 
and giving special privilege to the famed amateur. 
Yet the athletes were almost always the children of 
the upper middle class, privileged, affluent, a group 
I hat m this society did not readily seek hardship. 
One could understand the son of\a ghetto family 
playing in the schoolyard for six hours a day hoping 
that basketball was a ticket out of the slum; it was 
har d to understand the son of Beacon Hill spending 
so much time and subjecting himself to so much 
pain to attain an honor that no one even under- 
stood. Perhaps in our society the true madness in the 
search for excellence is left for the amateur.” 
Halbers lam’s concern is not economics but pas- 
sion, true madness. The complexities of rowing as 

an athletic task, of its structure as an athletic task, of 

its structure as an international sport are only 
sketched in passing. “The Amateurs" is not about 
rowing but about the four rowers: Tiff Wood, the 
favorite — Beacon Hill, Harvard crew. legendarily 
tolerant of pain, a bronze medalist in the World 





, UlVJ&i outm/iv, “ 

area — Vale, the most abrasive, the small- 
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est but the fiercest trainer and the best tech ni cia n ; 
and Brad Lends — Westerner, outsider, mystic. Add 
a fifth character Hanry Parker, enigmatic Harvard 
mai-h acknowledged Zen master of rowing, for 
these Olympic Games demoted from coaching the 
glamorous eight-oared shells to handling the lowly, 
and quirky, scullers. 

“Swing” is the oarsman's term for the moment 

when all eight oars approach perfect synch, the boa! 
leaps and drives, the sum is greater than the parts. It 
is the sensation that makes athletes fall in love with 
crew. In the single sculls, however, cooperation is 
out, purest ego is in. "You could be on a champion- 
ship eight which won all its races,” says Tiff Wood, 
“but you mi ght only be the fiftieth-best oarsman in 
the country. But the angle sculler is the best, and 
everyone in the world of rowing knows iL" 

What John Bigjow says he likes most about swing 
is that “it allowed you to trust the other men in the 
boaL A boat did not have swing unless everyone was 
putting out in exact measure, and because of that, 
andonly because of that, there was the possibility of 
true trust among the oarsmen." Trasus a problem, 
particularly in tne matter of effort What makes a 
sculler, or any other solo alhlett^ is insistence on full 
responsibility for one's athletic fate — no trust 
required. And level of effort is exactly what obsesses 
there individuals, in training as weO as racing. Who 
is making how ranch effort? When in the race, when 
in the training pro gr am? How can I make more? 

In his usual fashion, Halberstam, a former oars- 
man, interviews everyone, triangulates every opin- 
ion, gets incisive insights and hud judgmen ts even 
from the oarsmen’s mothers. The result is pure 
reporting on a level undreamed of elsewhere in 
sports. It is also an extended rumination on the 
limits of human effort, on true madness in the 
search for excellence. What further sets it apart 
from other writing about sports is that most of it is 
presented from the viewpoint of members of society 
whom circumstances have blessed with unlimited 
expectations. Thus in a peculiar way it tells what the 
best and brightest — Halberstam’s larger obsession 
— are op to. This is one way that they learn their 
expectations are not unlimited after alL 

John Jerome, die author of “The Sweet Spot in 
Time, ” wrote this review for The Washington Post. 



BLONDEE 





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b GREATEST 

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ENOUGH TO LAST ME A COUPLE 
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i MUST NOT FORGET TO CALL 
MORGAN'S OFFICE IN THE MORNING 
AND TELL HIS NURSE THAT J 
CAN'T GET IN FOR THAT HEART 
S— -x MONITOR < JHM 


THERE'S NOTHING 
WRONG wrm ME/ 




GARFIELD 

1 THIS IS JUST GREAT. 1 
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■’AfGRR'Se^’S 



. . INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATliRDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 

Page 15 


SPORTS 




t»«ss 


ms vc-^Tr 

33S 

n%~ 

Sh21 v & 

V"',. 





- jCcHqnfri/^i- Our Staff Fnm Dbpatehei 

ATLANTA — The rockets' red 
ive proof long through the 
at the Mets and ibe Braves 
still there. 

fact, they were at the ballpark 
ul nearly 4 AAL,. playing a,I9- 
iug. rain-ddayeS game that the 
•Mets. finally, won, 16-13. 

' rBy the time the postgarae F ounh 

ifose to dawnFriday, the Mei^had 
tidten a dub record with 28 bits. 
".m ; Keith Hernandez had hit for the 
:^Ete 1 gening a single, double, tri- 
$ 0 - and home run, and a Braves 
'■pitcher, Rick Camp, batting be- 

; BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


cause no pinch hitters were left on 
rih$ bench, had hit his first home 
ran in the major leagues to tie the 
: sctfre with two out in the bottom of 

■ ,*0111 Ray Knight, who earlier had 
' failed three times with the bases 

^ . jj ■ loaded, doubled home Gary Carter 
O 0 .'in the top of the 19th, on his 10th at 
bar of the game. That began a five- 
inning for die Mets that held 
when the Braves rallied for two 
' with two outs in the last gasp 
; the longest major-league game 
r 0us. season. 

The game ended with the Mets' 
Rod Darling striking out Camp. 

The Braves used -22 players, the 
Mets 21, with seven pitchers on 
each side. Keeping score was a task 
.. I that eluded even Mets pitcher Tom 
/T\y: German. 

wjf ■ “I Could have won it. 1 could 

■ have lost it and I could have saved 
"P ’it — and l didn’t do any of those 
<5, -. things,” Gorman said. 

— „ ; _ Actually, he did. He was credited 
with the victory after pitching 
" .-set Hwiing s Darling, the Mets’ No. 

Bed on to work the 


Trt& ^2 Zr\ ^’ 2 starter, was call 
V last of the 19th. 


» 

l 

r-,_- - 


- — • The Mets started the winning 
J. : aBy when Carter, who had five 
■ ?}■ lafi, singled off Camp. After a sac- 
v* : iffice. Rusty Stanb was imendonal- 
t . _ W passed before Knight broke the 
- T *7. ta^rith his hit into the right-cenier- 
^ J: Add gap. Danny Heep added a 
'^.tno-ran single, and an error by 

f odell Washington accounted 
another run before Wally Back- 
maxi singled in the fifth run. 


" Camp, who became the/iosmg 
pitcher. soit the game into the 19th 
by swinging against Gorman with 
two strikes andtwo out in the 18th 
and hitting his first home run in 
168 major league ai bats. 

■"1 thought then I had seen it alfi” 
Gorman said. "When you ihrow-a 
pitch in the 18tb inning that some- 
one can hit out, it's .embarrassing. 
But, then. I’ve n m pitched before 
at 3:30 in the morning." * 
The Mels had taken an li-10 
lead in the lSlh on an error by 
Camp that set up a sacrifice fly try 
Len Dykstra. 

Atlanta’s Terry Harper pro- 
longed the game in the bottom of 
(h« 13th with a two- strike, two-rim 
homer off Gorman. That negated 
Howard Johnson’s two-run homer 
in the top of the inning off Terry 
Forster 

The Mets also had a game-saving 
rally, tying the score at 8 in the top 
of the ninth on Dykstra’ s infield 
single off Bruce Sutter. 

That followed the Braves' four- 
run eighth, in which Murphy dou- 
bled in three runs. 

Rain delayed the scheduled 7:40 
PM. stan of the game for 1 hoar 24 
minutes. The star pitchers of both 
staffs, Dwight Gooden of the Mets 
and Rick Mahler of the Braves, 
then went to work before a sellout 
crowd of 44,947. But Gooden was 
removed after two and one-third 
inning s when the ganv* was held up 
by rain for another 41 minutes, and 
Mahler was knocked out in the 
fourth. 

Two other Mets also got an early 
departure. Manager Dave Johnson 
and Darryle Strawberry were eject- 
ed from the game in the 17th inning 
for protesting a called third strike 
by umpire Teny Tata. 

Giants 6, Cubs 4: In Chicago, 
Bob Brenly hit a two-run homer 
and Jose Uribe's two-run single 
ended a 3-3 tie in the seventh as San 
Francisco wot despite hitting into 
five double plays, a league-high this 
season. 

Padres 9, Pirates 1: Garry Tem- 
pleton went 3-for-3 and drove in 
four runs as San Diego won in 
Pittsburgh. Eric Show scattered 
seven bits for his second complete 
game. 

PMEes 3, Reds 1: In Philadd- 


It WasaGame 
To Remember 

The AsXociated Press 
. ATLANTA —Said ihe Mete* 
first baseman, Keith Hernan- 
dez, “l saw things Td never seen 
in a game before in my career. 
At the 17th innmg j I figured I 
just had to call, somebody. I 
called my brother Gary and 
told him 2 just wanted him to 
know 1 was still oaf here play- 


lte Ray Knight, who 
left the bases loaded three times 
but doubled home the gamc- 
. winning run in .the 19th: 
think I’ve never been more ex- 
cited about one base Ml" 

The Braves’ center fielder, 
Dale Murphy, who played the 
whole game: ”111 be feeling it 
for the next week.” After pitch- 
er Rich Camp hit his home run 
in the 18th, "I figured, This has 
got to be oar night-’” 

The Braves’ left fidder, Terry 
Harper, who tied the score with 
a two-oat, two-run homer in the 
13th, on whether such games 
are fun: “It’s fun to win 'em." 

Braves pitcher Rick Mahler, 
reminded that he started the 
game: “Did I?” 

Ann Patrick of Smyrna, 
Georgia, who did not leave her 
seal in the upper deck until the 
final out: “ft was great” 


Curren Routs Connors; Rain Halts 2d Match 


By Andrew Warshaw 

77ie Associated Press 

WIMBLEDON, England — Ke- 
vin Curren powered Ms way into 
his first men's singles final at tin 
Wimbledon tennis championships 
on Friday, defeating a lackluster 
Jimmy Connors, 6-2, 6-2, 6-L in 
just 1 hour 32 minutes. 

But Curren's opponent in Sun- 
day’s final was stm to be decided, 
with -West Germany’s Boris Becker 
and Andos Jarryd of Sweden tied 
at one-set all when a driving rain- 
storm, the second in a few hours at 
the AH England dub, suspended 



'our de France Turns 
to a Tour of Force 




United Press JmemaikmaJ 

-L REIMS, France — The winner 
J of the sixth stage of the Tour de 
le race was disquali- 
; fidi Thursday night for engaging in 
r a too spirited sprint to the 

Eric Vanderaexden of Belgium, 
•w-f *,\i'who had finished first, and Sean 
V-nCeOy ^ j r ^ anc j were disqualified 
far pushing during the dosely- 
^ sprint. Francis Casi 

_• of France, who finished 


phia, Juan Samuel and Von Hayes 
hit first-inning home runs and Qz- 
zie Virgfl homered in the sixth to 
back Kevin Gross' three-hit pitch- 
ing against C incinnati ,' 

Cardraals 3, Dodgers 2: In SL 
Louis, Tom Nieto haa two Mts and 
drove in two runs to hdp Joaquin 
Andujar beat Los Angora. Andu- 
jar, 14-3, who has the best record in 
the majors, allowed eight hits, 
walked five and strode out five. 
Expos 9, Houston 3: Vance 
Law’s two-out double began a six- 
run 12th inning that Tim Wallach 
capped with a three-run homer as 
Montreal won in Houston. 

Yankees 3, Twins 2: In the 
American League, Ron Guidry 
pitched a six-hitter to beat Minne- 
sota in New York. Guidry, 10-3, 
equalled his season high with eight 
strikeouts and is tied with Detroit's 
Dan Petry for the league lead in 
victories. In Ms last 12 starts, 
Guidry has nine victories without a 
loss. 

White Sox 5, Twifam 0: Britt 
Bums pitched a four-hitter and 
Carlton Fisk’s angle drove in the 
go-ahead run -as Chicago won in 
Cleveland. 

Rangers 4, Tigers 1: In Arling- 
ton, Texas, Pete O’Brien’s two~nm 
single, during a f oar-run first to- 
ning, backed Burt Hoo ton’s ax4iil 
pitching against Detroit*. The/ 
, *"'■ ‘ ' Rangere had not beaten the Tigers 

bculed over during the 65 kuome- since July 8, 1984, a span of ei^n 
ter-per-hour sprint that swept rid- games. 

en i into a snake-like pattern. . Mariners 7, Brewera 1: Dave 
Bernard Hinault of France, a far Henderson hit a three- run homer 


Jarryd had taken the opening set 
6-2; Becker took the second, 7-6. 
And the score in the third was 1-1 
when officials decided to call off 
the semifinal until Saturday, when 
it was to be resumed before the 
-final of the women's singles, be- 
tween defending champion Mar- 
tina Navratilova and her long- tune 
rival, Chris Even Lloyd. 

-Curren, the South African-born 
naturalized U.S. citizen who ousted 
defending champion John McEn- 
roe in the quarterfinals — also in 
straight sets — served 17 aces and 
hit stream of service winners to 
send Connors, 32, the No. 3 seed, 
out of the tournament 

Cumm's victory ensured a new 
name imi the men’s trophy this year. 
Neither Jarryd, the No. 5 seed, nor 
Becker, the unseeded 17-year-old, 
have reached the finaf. 

The first match had begun al- 
most two hours late because of a 
storm that swamped the AB En- 
gland club and sent torrents of wa- 
ter cascading off the stands. Three 
trees were , 
whoa the action 
struck with Ms own lightning, serv- 
ing an ace on only the second point 
of the first s emifinal . 

Connors, retiving the horror of 
last year's final against McEnroe, 
when be won n 





n» hucoM Pint 

A driving rainstorm swamped the All England dub and 
delayed the start of men's semifinals almost two hours. 


Dashed by the 32-y ear-old Ameri- 
can and two-time champion, who 
only occasionally managed to pro- 
dnee Ms renowned service return. 

When be was not being beaten 
by the pace of Ms eighth-seeded 
opponent’s serve, Connors made a 
host of unforced. errors; especially 
from the back of the court from 
where he netted a spate of fore- 
hands. 

’It was a bad day at the office.” 
said Connors. 


DaABoomdPKK 

Jimmy Connors went a long way but could not stave off 6- 
2, 6-2, 6-1 loss to Kevin Curren in Wimbledon semifinals. 


Two years ago, Curren, now the 
first South African -bora finalis t at 
Wimbldeon since Brian Norton in 
1921, served a remarkable 33 aces 
to beat Connors in the fourth 
round at Wimbledon. That 
Connors was the defending i 
pion. 

“He was 16 short today." Con- 
nors said dryly. “Tve played him on 
all surfaces, baton grass it’s rough. 


t year, 
cnaro- 


He's goes for it constantly. When 
he’s high, he’s high.” 

After beginning with an ace and 
three service winners in the open- 
ing game, Curren then broke for a 
2-0 lead. 

In the third game, Connors had 
Ms only break point of the match 
when Curren double-faulted. But a 
searing ace saved the game and 
Connors never had another chance 


to threaten Ms opponent’s serve. 

Curren, deverjy mixing up top- 
spin and sliced groundsirokes. 
forced Connors into mistakes and 
broke champion a ga in in the eighth 
game to win the opening set in 32 
minutes. 

The pattern continued for the 
rest of . the match. Curren serving 
hard and skillfully mixing up his 
groundsirokes. Connors forced on 
the defensive. Twice in the second 
set, Curren served three aces in one 
game os Ms opponent remained 
rooted to the baseline. Attacking 
Connors’ weak second service, 
Curren broke twice more for a 
commanding two-set lead. 

The third set was even more one- 
sided and not even a shout of 
“Come On. Jimbo” from a specta- 
tor could rouse Connors into a re- 
vival 

Instead, he grew even more frus- 
trated and won only one more 
game, when he served to save the 
match at 0-5. But any hopes of a 
comeback were dashed as Curren 
served out the match with three 
more aces and a smash. 

“1 knew Jimmy has the best re- 
turn in the game and that I could 
not let him into it," said Curren. “It 
was very humid when we came out 
and the balls were a bit heavy. The 
conditions were very slow. But that 
act helped me on his serve because 
it gave me time to play." 


Becker, who with power serves 
and supreme confidence became 
youngest man to reach Wimble- 
don’s semifinals, appeared to have 
met Ms match in the opening set 
against Jamil With lightning re- 
flexes. Swede unsettled Ms oppo- 
nent with his court speed and re- 
turn of serve and took the set in 34 
minutes after two breaks. 

Becker improved in the second 
set as he anticipated Janyd's pass- 
ing shots, cutting off several of 
them with crisp volleys. Playing 
positively and aggressively, the 
West German teen-ager broke Jar- 
ryd, 23, in the fifth gome and 
staved off two break points on Ms 
own serve for a 4-2 lead. Two 
games later. Jarryd did succeed in 
breaking bade and held for 5-4. 

In the next game. Becker saved a 
set point with an uninhibited cross- 
court volley and finished off the 
gome with an ace. He did it again 
two games later to level at 6-6 and 
send the set into a tie breaker. 

An early break gave Jarryd a 3-1 
lead in the tie breaker but Becker 
stormed back to take the next six 
points and square the match. Each 
player held serve at the start of the 
third set and the match was deli- 
cately poised when the rain, which 
had plagued the first week of the 
tournament, began falling again. 


Harvard Wins Easily 



Complied by Our Staff From Daptncha 

HENLEY ON THAMES — The 
U JS. crews co m peting in the Hen- 


challenge once Harvard had gone, 
ahead by the quarter-mile stage. 
"They got two seats on us at the 



t 'ftr* 
i > 

W- : 




‘ ; waS declared winner of the 221.5- 
“C " 'S (1 37.6-mik) sixth stage. 



.wig Wijnams of Belgium 
-'-rt'-’Wiftn Friday's seventh stage, be- 
Owen Roms and Nancy, when he 
- ‘ piobed ahead of ace Colombian 
i (Ember Luis Herrera, wbo led most 
<V tbc way. 

■ Castaing said Thursday’s race 
had become a war and many riders 
were indignant after tensions 


Vanderaerden was disqualified 
after referees watched the finish oh 
video film five times before voting, 
3-1, against him and Kelly. The 
decision cost the Belgian his 30-' 
second victory bonus and Kelly 10 
seconds for tnird place. They were 
pm at the back of the main bunch, 
with the same time as those riders. 

“1 absolutely wanted to win. I 
won. It’s not the first time that 
sprinters have had to take risks,” 
Vanderaerden said. 

One commentator said "the two 
men have never liked each other 
anyway.” 


last 13. 

Orioles S, Ronds 3: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, Floyd Rayford and 
Eddie Murray each drove in two 
mas for Baltimore. 

Angels 5, Red Sox 4: Reserve 
catcher Jerry Natron's three-run 
homer with one out in the seventh 
beat Boston in Anaheim, Cahfor- 
nia, before 62,951, the- largest 
crowd to watch a major-league 


A’s 3, Bine Jays 2z In Oakland, 
Dave Collins singled home the run 
in the bottom of the ninth that beat 
Toronto. (AP, UP!) 


ra tors just sizzled with 
heaL 

Harvard University started im- 
pressively in its bid to become the 
first U& rowing crew in five years 
to win the 146-year-old regatta’s 
premier event, the Grand Chal- 
lenge Cup. 

Against an outstanding D anish 

natjnrtf t) lightweight 

vard, just eight 
heavier, won by four and due-third 
lengths on the second day of the 
four-day regatta. 

The Danes, starting three strokes 
a minute higher at 43, briefly went 
ahead but could not offer a serious 



SCOREBOARD 


Cycling 


Transition 


Tour de France 


SncatH SHOT 

, ' R*lm M Nancy, 1T7 J * Home ran <nu 
. ‘ miles) 

. ). LucM? wUnonJs. BeJphjm. 5 Bows, SS 
Mnute& 7 seconds (30 second bonus) 

. I Luis Herrera Cotomota. at S seconds M- 
. £fld leader (20 second bonus! 

‘ VPrtw wrUwwn, Holland. Same Time. (10 
J# ban “tf 

. Gann. Spain, S.T. 

■ xwillem van Evnde. Belgium, ai B 

’ *• Benny Van Brabant. Belgium, at * 

• 1. Sean Kettv. Ireland, ST. 

• 1-lean-PhfllMWVon Her Brands. Belgium, 
■ .SX 

-VPWt Anderson. Australia S.T. 

• » - lB Erie Vanderaerden. Belgium. 5.T. 

- U. Ccfestlno Prim. Spain, at * 

. .O. Pedro Delgado, Soala S.T. 

. IX .Greg (.emond. Untied States. IT. 

**■ *•« Segtra. Belgium. S.T. 

■ H Marc SenManl, Belgium. S.T. 

JJ Zoatemetk. Holland, S.T. 

, ». Rtfiert Millar, Britain. S.T. 

:* Claudio Fasela, Holy. S.T. 

. «« taad i nt. Franca, S.T. 

- .Qauta CrhuleUon. Belgium, S.T. 


WOMEN’S TOUR de FRANCE 
(AI Nancy, France) 

Fmti Stage— MM kHametere (M miles), 
from Ugav-eflhBarrais 

1. Joskmr Vanhuvsse. Belgium, 2 noun. 33 
miiwles. W wanett > *5 second beaus) 

2. Jeannle Longa France, at 14 seconds be- 
hind leader ( io second bonus! 

1 Greta Fleeradutrs, Belgium, at 14 (3 sec- 
ond bonus) 

i. Nomalle Pedetler, France. Same Time 

i. Marla Can Ins. Italy, S.T. 

6. Paula Westtwr. Sweden, S.T. 

7. Hetoen Horn. Hollcnd. S.T. 

8. Tuullkkl jatire, Sweden. S.T. 

women* Overall Leaders 

1. Jeannle Longa, France, 10 hours. 33 min- 
utes. 33 seconds 

Z Marla Can Ins. Italy, at 32 seconds behind 
leader 

1 Valerie Simon riel. France, at 49 

4. h e t ee n Hage. Holland, at 1 minute. 7 sec- 
onds 

5. Mandv janes, Britain, at 1:14 

6. Hennv Too. Mol Iona, at l:3» 

7. Tuullkkl janre. Sweden, ol 1:47 

B. Codle Odin, France, at 1:57 


BASEBALL 
Amortaai League 

CHICAGO— Placed Ran Uinta outttetder. 
an Ihe 15-day disabled List. Recalled Bryan 
Lmto.inftetder.lrom Buffalo ot the American 
Association. 

CLEVELAND— Recalled Roman Rotnenv" 
Pitcher, front Maine of me International 
League. Placed Rov Smlta. oltdter. on tao 15- 
dav disabled list. 

KANSAS CITY— Activated Pat Shorldan, 
outfielder. Sent Dave Leaner, outfielder, la 
Omaha of mo American Association. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 

HOUSTON— Signed Mike Roller, running 
back, tea tour-year contract Obtained Drew 
Hill, wide receiver, from the UL Rams tor 
draft choices. SI gnedTlm Smlta. wide receiv- 
er: F lor ion Kempt end Lee Johnson, kickers, 
and Steve Tasker, kick returner. 

NEW ENGLAND— Signed Tim Goldin, - 
llnebotfc er . to a one-year contr ac t. 

5T. LOUIS— Signed IU3. Dunn, tight end. 

WASH I NOTON— Signed Tony ZmOelBS, 
kicker, to a thro#- year axthnoef. 


HOCKEY 

NoHoaoI Hftcfcav 1 ***— 

HY. ISLANDERS— Sinned AMkko Motceta 
forward to o mu It Wear contract. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Named jack Birch and 
Reg Higgs assistant coaches. 

QUEBEC— Placed Morion Siastnv. right 
wing, an warivers. 

VANCOUVER— signed Mae Lomov, ftft 
winger, to a multwear con trod. 


COLLEGE 

HOFSTRA— Named John Danowskl men’s 
lacrosse coach. 

INDIAN A N am ed Jorlo E. Haehn worn- 
Hi's basketball coach. 

. MONTANA STATE— Named Ed Crettan 
and Gary Gilbert a ssis ta nt football coaches. 

PEACL BOWL— Announced resignation of 
George Crumblev Jr. executive director. 

5 ETON HALL— Extended contract Of PJ. 
Garfesiim, bask et ball coach, for two years. 

SIMPSON— Honed Bruce Wilson basket- 
ball coach, to reoiace Denny Deanfen who 
resigned em-fler tMs summer. 

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURi-HANSJlS— 
Named Tony Guy assistant baskeftwir caaen. 


how easy-it was.” 

Harvard will row against Cam- 
bndge Univtraty for a place in the 

It was Cambridge University’s 
notorious craft — smashed in a 
river bank collision before last 

year's Boat Race against Oxford — 

t, Har- thai carried Temple Universi 
a i pan Philadelphia to victory in T '“ 
second most important 
rights, the Ladies Plate. 

There now is nothing wrong with 
the craft, but there was a great deal 
wrong with Tempi’s steering, de- 
spite a one-length victory over the 
Palm Beach Rowing Association of 
Florida. 

“It was just awful. It nearly got 
us disqualified,” said Temple's coa- 
ch, John Hooten. 

Temple did, however, row well, 
overcoming a one-length lead that 
the Florida crew had built over the 
first third of the course. 

Temple next meets Princeton, 
which rallied for a quarter-length 
victory over Bristol University. 
Princeton, however,- was giving 
away 28 pounds per man. 

Brad Lewis of the United States, 
who won an Olympic double sculls 
gold medal last year, as expected 
reached the last eight of the Dia- 
mond Single Sculls. He beat 



WORLD GAMES — Sweden's Patrick Sjoberg backed into a Ugh jump victory at 7 
feet 6 Vi inches in Helsinki. Romania’s Maridca Praca ran the fastest women's 5,000 
meters this year, 15 minutes 6.04 seconds; Britain's Zola Budd, leader unto the last lap, 
was sixth on Thursday. Willie Banks of the United States won the triple jump at 57-2%. 


man of Australia, and Ricardo 
Ibarra of Argentina. 

Ibarra bad to wait nearly two 
Charles Watkins of Britain by five hours before winning by three and 
lengths. - three-quarters lengths over Juan 

Lewis, 30, from (he Dirty Dozen Felix of the Club de Remo. De San 
Rowing Club in California, is bid- Juan, Puerto Rico, because his op- 

I the 


• MEN’S OVERALL LEADERS 
V 1 AnHanon, Denmark. 40 hours. 5 rwn- 

utanaettv 

Erte VOndoraordon. Belgium, af 40 SK- 
.■ptoiBB A* leader 
. i- Lomond. United Stales, oi 1:05 
• ‘J ®* fn wil Hinault, Franco, at 1.07 
*■"" *■«». Ireland, ol 1:0* 

. . ? tvt Bouer. Canada, ai 1:18 

■ , •••wn VoMuhoiten. Hoi fond, ot 1:28 
■_j™nAniNmoB. AMImiia. ot 1 37 

r Tt Ukl ftWlimon. Switzerland, ai l:i1 

, Nr**Wc Gamez, France, at 1:43 
iff feootemolk. Holland, ot 1;5B 

, S ^° UJ Hagliedooron, Belgium, at 2:00 
^taPeter tmnn^ Holland, ot 2.07 
H mag P oe m - , . Belgium, af 2M 
'• u p * teer < AusifWla, of 2:11 

■ „ Simon. France, ol »:M 

" Millar. Britain, at 2:18 

Room, Holland, ol 2 :n 
Wimon*. Holland, of 2=2« 

Farm. France, at 2:28 


Baseball 


ding to become only the second 
man' to win both the single and 
double sculls. 

Advancing in the singles were 
Steve Redgrave, as Olympic gold 
medalist for Britain in the coxed 


ponent broke a rigger and had 
race delayed for repairs. 

Ibarra next meets Jamie Hanson 
of Harvard, who came from behind 
with a magnificent spurt after the 
halfway mark to beat Mike 


fours, who easily beat Adrian Nor- Allow ay of Britain. (NYT, AP) 


Thursday’s Major League Lmescores 






Tennis 




□ Results 


MEN'S SINGLES 
SEMIFINALS 

■. "“CftaYffc UA, drf. Jimrflr Connors. U.3. 
. . Jff*. t-1 

•.gth Becfcor. we« Gtrmony. n. Andort. 
Saomh. match Mispcnded e* roi" : 

■ «• 1-1. 1 Jarryd 6-Z Becker Ml. 
°l l Dome all to Ihe mud sat. 
WGMCWS DOUBLES 
. SEMIFINALS 

NavratUava, UA. Q"d Pom Snri- 

r', IJ -S.dtLt4onoMgndlikova.C2«f>a5tovo- 

Womv Turnbull. AuHratio. *-2 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
MimMBsn m 200 ooo-a & » 

New York 300 880 M» — 3 I S 

Butcher, Word I e 17) and LOudner; Guidry 
and H assay. W— Guldrv. 10-3. L— Bulet»r.5-H. 
HR— Mmnnota. Brunanskv (lSl. 

enkago MO fU 020-4 8 0 

Cleveland COO M0 000-0 4 1 

Burns (Mi Fbk,- Bivlevm and Banda, WU- 
hwd <91. W— Burns. M. L— 8 tv [even. 7-8. 
MifwOUkM OM 000 100-1 4 1 

Seattle Ml HO 0**-7 M .J 

Haas. Ladd (2). McClure (8) Mid Mwro; 
Moore and Keonwy.W— Moore. 7-4. L— Haas, 
7-4. HR— Seattle. HentUnon (7). 

BoWmare 003 B20 000-5 10 8 

KaMOtCny 000 803 000-3 8 0 

D. MorllnoLSneli (8) and Demosev : Black, 
LaCoso 15) and Sundbem. W— D. Martino*. 7- 
4. L— Block. 5-9 HR— Kansas Ctty.MMev (9). 
Detroit OOOOfllOOOL-i « i 

Tens 4*0 800 00*— 4 5 0 

Terrell and Melvin: Hooion and StauOht. 
W— Hoo fan. t-2. L—TdrrefL W. 

Barton 000004 006-4 8 1 

CoUfemta 010 010 30»— S 7 1 

Bovd. Clear (B> and Ocdmon. Lugo. Cle- 
menis 1 41. Moore (91. W-Clemonls. S4t L— 
BOVd, 9-1. Sv— Moore (Ml. HR*— Bosttrfc 
Easier (91. CaUtenra. Narran IS). 

Toronto ooo 020 Mt-l 5 l 

Oakland 0(0 BOO 001-4 8 0 

tamp, Acker HI. Lpuellc »«)■ Caudill 18) 
and Martinet, wnirt 17); Birisos. Oniiwera* 
(t>. Mowed (»i and TerWeton. W— HawalL84. 
L— CaudiiL *-*. HRs— Toronto. Garcia *31. 
Oakland. Bechte 141. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

So* Otoga 000 <15 T19-t t 4 

PHMMKVll 000 BOO Ml — 1 7 2 

snow and Kennedy; Rhoden, Winn (7L 
Guonta (9) ond Orl It W-Shaw, WL L— Rho- 
den, HL 

San Franaece ooo 2M 2W-4 I4 • 

CMcaae on 000 DIB— « 8 1 

Lartcev. Garnetts IS), MDovfS 15). Minton 
19) and Srwily; Trout, Fnakr t7), Ruftvon 
(»l and Davis. Lake (01. W- GamettaW, L— 
T rout, 7-4. Sv— Minton (2).HRs— San Fronds- 
co, Brcnlv i»|. Chicago, SonSbaai (10). 
CMdutatl M 108 000-1 J 0 

Philadelphia MOOT Ota-3 I 1 

Seta Hume (8) and Van Carder, KntceJy 
(7); KjGra»and VlraiL W— iLGrass. 
seto. WL HR*-Ptillodetptila Samuel (7), 
Haves III. Virgil HI}. 

Las Angelos 018 WO MO-2 8 3 

SL Louie 7 

Honeycutt, Niodentuar (4), Howell (8) and 
Scfcada.- Anduiw and Nieto, w— Andular, t* 
3. L — HawelL 4-4. 

Mmtroal NO 020 010 008-0 14 S 

Hoastaa g» IH "0-3 1* > 

(12 Innings) 

Smith, uia» (8). Burke (Bl.St. CWra (10), 
OXOftnof (13) and Fllzgorald. But era (W); 
KnoFnor.Smltti IlDl.DIPIno nM.Dawtey (121 
and Bailey. Ashby HK- W— SL Ctolro. »l. L— 
OiPlna T-i HRs— MonttreaL Wetafer J «). 
Wallactt (51- 

NY UN 401 ill 008 2M 001 5—14 21 2 

Alter 1BJ OM 040 000 2M BB1 3—13 II 3 

119 Innings) 

Gooden. McDo-MI »>- Loach (4), Draco 
IB!, Sisk (Ik Gormofl 113), Dotting (191 and 
Carter; Mauler. Oedmon (4). Shields Io), Sut- 


ter 19). Forster (10), Garber (M), Coma (17) 
and Cerone. Benedict (11). W— Gorman, 4-3. 
L— Camp, 24. HRs— New York, Hernandez 
(5), Johnson (3). Atlanta. Honor (8), Coma 
(1). 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Norman Tied for Canadian Open Lead 


ToroAfo 

Detroit 

Now York 

Boillmore 

Boston 

Milwaukee : 

Ctevetand- 


East Dfvtsfon 
W L 
47 31 
43 32 
40 35 
39 34 
39 38 
35 39 
34 52 

Wfert DMtlen 


Pd. GB 
403 - 
573 TVs 
-533 5Ui 
JS2D 4ft 
506 7ft 
jn io 
J16 22 


California 

44 33 

571 

— 

Oakland 

41 36 

532 

3 

Kansas Cltv 

39 37 

513 

4ft 

Mattie 

39 38 

506 

5 

Oiteaao 

37 37 

500 

sva 

Minnesota 

33 40 

M 7 

8 

Tyxas 

30 48 

585 

14ft 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Dl vision 




w L 

PCf. 

GB 

St. L4ul8 

45 30 

400 

— ■ 

Mont root 

45 33 

577 

1ft 

Nsw York 

41 » 

539 

4ft 


QDcom 

PNiadteiPtita 

PittsDuran 

San Dteoo 
Las Angetes 
OnclrmaN 
Houston 
Atlanta * 

San Fnmdtsce 


. . <0 35 

U 42 
. 25 10 
west D.lvbtoa 
40 31 
40 35 
39 34 
19 3? 
34 42 
29 49 


533 S 
M7 lift 
M 90 

597 — 
533 S 
520 1 
530 7ft 
547 lift 
572 17ft 


OAKVILLE, Ontario (AP) — Defending champion Greg Norman of 
Australia played the four par-5 holes In five under par and shot a 5-under- 
par 67 on Thursday to tie Jim Gallagher for the lead after one round of 
the Canadian Open Go if Tournament. Johnny Miller was at 68. 

Gallagher, who has played infrequently on the PGA lour, bogeyed his 
last hole. Norman got three birdies and an eagle on the par-5s, missing a 
second eagle when be two-putted from five feet on 16. 

Ballesteros Leads in French Open 

ST. GERMAIN-EN-LAYE, France (AP) — Severiano Ballesteros of 
Spain maintained his lead Friday by one stroke over Carl Mason of 
Britain iit'the halfway mark of the French Open. Ballesteros was at 130 
after a 68 ltd go with his opening 62. Mason shot 64 on Friday. 

For ihe Record 

Vasia mSagjkxnj, w bo came up lame after a soity peffonnance in last 
year's Kentucky Derby, won his third straight of 1985 by leading from 
start to finish for an eight and one-half length victory in die Suburban 
Handicap at Belmont Park in New York on Thursday ntehi, (AP) 

Ayrton Sma of Brazil set an unofficial lap record Friday in winning 
the pole position for Sunday's French Grand Prix auto race at Le 
CasielleL (UPI) 



- ~r^"L=7r , .-Tf h • 


:Tvfr. r z-li' 


iX*'. *&<>, 



JOAILLlfR 











Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 6-7, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Vacation Contract 


The Decline (and Fall?) of Yuppie Civilization 


W ASHINGTON — You have 
heard about marriage con- 
tacts being negotiated, but 111 bel 
you never heard of a vacation con* 
tract. Neither had I until the Gulls 
showed me the one they drew up 
before going to Cape Cod. 

“In the past we have had big 

fights about our 
summer,' 1 C.C. 

Gull told me. 

“So this year we 
decided to draw 
up a contract 
and spell every- 
thing oul" 

He showed 
me a legal docu- 
ment that had 
been witnessed _ , 
by a notary. “It BuchwaM 



by a notary. “It 

says here that I don't have to go to 
any cocktail parties on the Cape 
where (he men wear green blazers 
and white slacks with whales on 
them." 

“In exchange for that,” Martha 
Gull said, “I don't have to clean 
any fish that C. C. catches.” 

O 

“Article 4 states that no work- 
men or decorators will be allowed 
in the bouse while I am on vaca- 
tion,” Gull said. “And further- 
more. the kid who cuts the lawn 
may not start his mower before 10 
o'clock in the morning or while I'm 
taking a nap." 


Silk Bed Hangings 
Traveling to Show 

The Associated Pros 

L ONDON — Bed hangings made 
/ of Chinese embroidered silk, 
which lay in an attic for more than 
200 years in their original box, are 
among 700 precious objects from 
220 stately homes going to the 
“Treasures of Britain” show, open- 
ing in November at the National 
Gallery of Art in Washington. 

The art historian Gervase Jack- 
son-Stops, the British organizer of 
the exhibition, found the hangings 
at Calke Abbey in Derbyshire. 

J. Carter Brown, director of the 
Washington museum, said the Na- 
tional Gallery was being “turned 
upside down" to clear the East 
Wing for paintings, sculpture, tap- 
estries, arms and armor, furniture, 
jewels, porcelain and silver collect- 
ed by wealthy British families. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


“I demanded Article 7." Martha 
said, “C C. may not come home 
from a tennis game and tell me 
what a wonderful woman player he 
had for a partner.** 

“I gave her that one," C. C. said, 
“on the condition she wouldn’t 
make me drive into town for a 
pound of butter jusi as I was ready 
to leave for the court.” 

Martha stud, "Tell him about 
Amendment 6.” 

□ 

“I must give her 24 hours’ notice 
on people I've invited for dinner, 
and she has to give me a week's 
notice on house guests," C. C. told 
me. "We've drawn up a list of 
house guests who have to be agreed 
on by both parties. They include 
friends of our children; relatives, 
including teen-age nieces and 
nephews, cousins, and in-laws; and 
people we haven't seen in five years 
who just found out we have a house 
on the Cape. Martha’s mother may 
only stay for one week or seven- 
days, whichever is the greater. My 
mother can stay for a similar period 
of time, but Martha has the option, 
if it gets to be too much for her, of 
taking off and visiting a friend on 
Long Island." 

Martha picked up the document. 
“Article 9 refers to missing clothing 
and other objects such as sneakers, 
t ennis rackets, boat and fishing 
gear and any other vacation para- 
phernalia that G G has misplaced. 
I am no longer responsible for find- 
ing any of the above-named things, 
nor will I be held accountable be- 
cause said objects were lost." 

□ 

“I agreed to the clause on the 
condition that she take care of the 
Jdds on rainy days.” C. G said. 

“But he has to take them to the 
library." 

“Article 10 was the one we had 
the biggest row about,” C. C said. 
“It has to do with our sailboat. 
Martha wanted a clause staling 
that she no longer had to set foot on 
my sailboat, or any friend's sail- 
boat. for the entire summer. I said 
she couldn't do that to me because 
she is a very important part of the 
crew, particularly when nobody 
else is around." 

Martha said, “The compromise 
is that I will only go on board if 
C C. can find absolutely no one to 
sail with. If 1 do and he yells at me 
just once, I am to be taken to the 
nearest port and put ashore." 


MOVING 


By Maureen Dowd 

New York Times Semite 
NEW YORK - Lately, Gil 
Schwartz has been suffering guilt 
pangs all over the Upper West 


“There are things 1 feel 
ashamed of doing now," he said, 
“like dming cm Columbus Avenue 
or wallring my baby in Central 
Park in her McOaren stroller or 
eating David's cockles. 

■*1 fed like everything I do is a 
trend," said the 34-year-old cor- 
porate public relations executive. 
“I can’t boy imported cheese in 
good conscience anymore, or 
state-of-the-art booties. I can’t 
even buy a feisty little Beaujo- 
lais." 

“There's something vaguely 
nauseating now about being a 
yuppie,” he said. “No one wants 
to be called that anymore." 

There have not yet been any 
reports of Akitas, Apneas or Adi- 
dases being flung out of windows. 
(Tor the uninitiate d, those are 
dogs, strollers and shoes of choice 
for yuppies, or young urban pro- 
fessionals.) Nonetheless, a num- 
ber of cases of “yuppie guflt" and 
“yuppie denial” have been diag- 
nosed, a syndrome that analysts 
say si gnals the end of yuppie civi- 
lization as we know it, 

“By the end of the summer," 
predicted Lee Atwater, a Repub- 
lican political consultant, “the 
yuppie movement will be dead.” 

Michael Kinsley, writing in 
Gentleman’s Quarterly, reveals 
that shame has led the once un- 
abashed yuppies to hole up “be- 
hind the bolted doors of thetr con- 
dominiums, bentwood rockers 
jammed up under the door- 
knobs.” ' 

“Some,” he said, “have made 
the tragic discovery that a Brie 
can actually get too ripe." 

Many young professionals in 
Manhattan agree that, with the 
recoil spate m “yuppie bashing.” 
as one calls the mocking news 
coverage, they no longer find the 
label clever and amusing. 

Karen Clark, a 27-year-old 
buyer at the clothier Brooks 
Brothers, said she and her hus- 
band, Brooks, had noticed a new 
“hostility.” She recalled that 
when their gas barbecue grill was 
being moved into their apartment 
recently, two observers looked at 
each other knowingly and hissed, 
“Yuppies." 


: 












“It started out as son of a fun- 
ny thing,” Mrs. Clark said. “But 
now it's turned into a bad thing 
that implies shallow people who 
care more about Gucci shoes than 
their mother's birthday ” 

She said she had become some- 
what defensive about the assump- 
tion that yuppies live “an acquisi- 
tive lifestyle that has nothing to 
do with real feelings or mteUea." 

- “I start saying things like, ‘Oh, 
I go to foreign films, too. I've seen 
‘Jules and Tun,' ” she said. 

Although they may crave indi- 
viduality and loathe their label, 
many of this generation of grand 
acquiritors say they remain com- 
fortable with the basic tenets of 


“On the whole, in spire of the 
pejorative aspect, yuppies still 
take a masochistic glee in being 
yuppies," said Jonathan Silver, 
27, a financial analyst “If you can 
in fact think about yoursdf in this 
way, it says something about your 
own achievement record and suc- 
cess rate, and that’s an important 
and valuable thing.” 

But in the comic strip Doones- 
btuy, Michael Doonesbtny balks 
Mien the h Y word,” as he disdain- 
fully calls it, is mentioned at the 
advertising agency where he 
works. And, indeed, the retreat 
from the yuppie image has been 


duly noted by Madison Avenue 
which had frantically been pitch- 
ing products to this consumer- 
minded group. 

American Express has now be- 
gan a campaign that salutes 
“those who know there's more to 
life than a VCR, a food processor 
and a new pair of running shoes." 
The company plans to pick young 
people across the country who 
have combined successful careers 
with volunteerism and award 
them a vocation and a $1,000 be- 
quest to their favorite charity. 

“The smart marketer has to rec- 
n gniw- that most thinking yuppies 
are going to reseat bang looked 
upon only as mannequins on 
Much to drape aD thee didst 
products,’' says Jane Fitzgibbon 
of OgQvy & Mather, the advertis- 
ing agency that handles American 
Express. 

Many of those interviewed 
talked of the ways in which they 
were trying to break out of the 
smothering, collective image. 

“I won't hay any product that 
has an ad with a guy in horn- 
rimmed glasses,” said Schwartz. 

Dan LeffeB, a 30-year-old cor- 
porate lawyer, said he had been 
trying to put distance between 
hims elf and the yuppie tag but felt 
discouraged. He recalled that he 
started collecting Hawaiian shirts 




a year ago as an act of defiance 
but soon stopped when the Upper 
West Side spouted a rainbow of 
Hawaian prints and Brooks 
Brothers began selling all-cotton 
versions. 

“Yuppies keep trying to find 
avenues out of yuppiedom, but 
they end up just starting a new 
trend that catches up with them.” 
he said. “It's only a matter of time 
before yuppie mot start wearing 
earrings and Brooks Brothers 
starts selling earrings.” 

Renee Icfcson, a 25-year-old 
public relations executive, says 
she “thinks about it all (he time, 
how 1 can strive to be different.” 
She eschews Yoplait yogun and 
sneakers with business suits and 
headphones and certain restau- 
rants. 

But. still, she frets that she is a 
clone. “There’s nothing more 
frightening than seeing 20 other 
people who lode just like you 
walking down Amsterdam Ave- 
nue.” she said. “It’s like a pack of 
wolves. 1 keep asking my boy- 
friend, Bruce, TM was standing 
with my back to you, would you 
be able to pick me out?* " 

Those interviewed seemed 
skeptical about the notion of a 
new surge of altruism. 

“I bough 1 a 'We Are the World' 
album — does that count?" asked 


Hie Nr* Toil Tanas 

David Blum, a 29-year-old writer. 
“That's about as altruistic as yup- 
pies are aping to get this year.” 

Betsy Webb, a 27-year-old as- 
sistant legal supervisor who vol- 
. unceers at a church shelter for the 
homeless, said she saw little evi- 
dence of blossoming bumanitar- 
ianis m among her peers. 

“A11 they’re concerned with is 
which summer house to go into," 
riie said. “When we need new vol- 
unteers, ray co-workers say. ‘I 
wish 1 could do that.' and I say, 
*Why don’t you skip squash or 
skip a night of hanging out at (he 
bar, and spend the night in the 
shelter?* But they say, ‘Maybe 
□ext year.' ” 

Many specialists in social 
trends maintain, however, that 
the current b acklash will lead to 
more social concern. 

“There’s going to be a rebirth 
of social consciousness," said 
Atwater, the political consultant, 
citing as a harbinger the renais- 
sance of 1960s music, as well as 
the boom in sales of psychedelic 
clothing and peace symbols. 

“When yuppies start baring 
children, then they'll start think- 
ing about what kind of society 
they want to live in," said Marilee 
Hartley, a co-author of “The 
Yuppie Handbook.” “Children 
will have a h umanizing effect." 



j rWMf 1 ' 1 1.’.. 1 lr 






INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


NICE 85 
JVC 

Grande Parade 
Du Jazz 


JULY 10-20 

JXRDMSOB ARENES DE OMCEZ 
Milas Davis. Fad Danina. Dizzy Giles- 
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EvfAnhn Force *1 Jazz, with Thad 
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Stevie Bay Vaughan and Double Trou- 
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Go* and Sp iaal Guest Bud Shank 
Bob James, the Johnny Otis Shaw. 
Dirty Dam Brass Band trom New Or- 

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Stara. Jon Faddb Quintet. Woody Her- 
mon AJLSkei Jodoe Me LeanJKene Me 
Lean. Marian Me Portland James 
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Art Hodoi. Panama Franca taid Ixj So- 
voy 5ukjm. Lew Tobocbn. Jay Lean- 
hart. Kevin Eubank*. Bobby Rasemmr- 
den. Tele Momafiu AU- Stars- Benny 
Warn Working Week. Midid Sca- 
daby Trio. Ojintette S.O.S. The ten 
Express Afl- Stars. Bre5 Laorene Ereem- 
ble. Andt* Vileger Quartet. Georges 
Arvarvu Tria EBsabefh Caunant 
Quartet. Claude Tmendier Sextet. 
Stedmr Tubopadr. Confute Quendo. 
Tickets purchased Wore July 10fh 
mo only F70 

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Tax free - IHD^Ewjgeai deorery. 

ShRxng by tie experts. 

IN STOCK. 500 SL‘L Bkrck. Gray, B* 
380 SEC- Bind. U«r 
260 S£ L Black. Sue 

DRECT FROM SOURCE 

Trasat London lid. 

4547 Pari Lane. Lcndoa W1 
let 01-429 7779 
Telex 8956022 TRAS G. 


500 SL RED METALLIC 
CREAM LEATHER, DM 104000 

500 SL SLACK 

CREAM LEATHER, DM 103/100 

500 SSL BLACK 
BLACK LEATHER, DM 92,000 

500 SEC BLACK * 
BLACK IEATHBC DM 99,000 > 

280 SL RED 

PALOMINO LEATHBLDM 80000 


Cufl Munich (0)89-95 85 10 


10 YEARS 

We Defiver Can la *# Wedd 

TRANSCO 


Exclusive DAKS 
clothes and 
accessories for 
men and women 
available from 
: DAKS stockists 
: around the world 

DAKS -Simpson l. ; mifed,' 
'. : .. 3d Jersrsyri Street,.. 

: London SW1 ; 

V. OAKS % -J.id ; 

or? reg^Vr-d Vocf^rc-^o' 


„ UNKXJE OPPORTUNITY 
Swat company for Hie. Owner of o 
magnificent W>»us **** Hotel end 
epngren compleK in South Span. 
If hole poff course under abject. 

5 fan or fine utile sand modi. 
INTBBHtr ZURICH Td 01/461 2464 


Pnndpah travel Europe & Far East. 
Tete^OTm^A^to^DavB 

Or write PjQ. Bax 10344 
Vancouver, BXL V7Y IGfi Canada 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


WANTS FURNISHED ROOM or 
ppartmrt m/or around Geneva dur- 


PO Box 9, 1961 Boar. 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DJAMONDLAND 

The larged showroom h . 

Antwerp, Diamond Oty 

Appelmandr 33A Tet 323/23436R. 


Sdiam Diamonds, Jewelry 

Byortpnoa dwl fun factory. 

, Jit s?* . y ^ 

J210 Brunet T«fc 322 / 218 2883, 
open weekdays 9om4pn\ Sot. 2-4pm. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR WTO THE UJA. 

TK* doaenent expWro Uly whal one 
musk do to bring a ax into tbe US, 
safely and legally. It mdudes now & 

iaj i 

oe wefl as legal pairttEtaouw of the 
strong doQcr, you can rove up to 
USil 3.000 when buymg a Mercedes, or 
BMW m Europe & importing it to the 
SWm 'To receive tit tumid, sand 
US5IBJD(pdd US$1.50 for poctoge) n 
Pi- Schnwfi, (tostfoch 3T3I 
7000 Stuttgart l f West Germany 


FOR USA + MDDLE EAST 

leather rierior. Stnmei* & 
defivery worldwide. Cafi or vtsit- 
- us ii our new shawroomi 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 
MMNZaLANDSTR-191, 
ZM00O RANKFUET/M 
T&: (0)69-73 30 61 
TlX: 414018 


Kee^xng a cornua* stock of more ^ 
300 bread new COT, • A 

fnnm SA, 95 Noorrfcfcxxi. 

Tel 323^ StitANS® 


IAU.SA „ 
omaAL nous fterfa 

DEALS) FOR BELGIUM 

TAX FRS CARS 
ROUS ROYCE 
RANGE end IANDROVB 

roe MlDDELfiOURG 7*82 
1170 Bnmrf* 

TH. 2-473 S3 92 
' TOC; 20377 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, tor ranadoM dekwtt 

FROM STOCK 

Bw» townA 

bond, c mi i twwmi m USA 

RmEINC. 

TAUNUSSTR. 52, 6000 

W Gwia, lei (qW-232351, lb 4ll| r 


FROM STOCK 

M ercedes 500 Srt. ixw^blurfijcfc 
Meramdes 500 SL'safe. nr* 
and mcew others at 
Orifoc, Ferrari, Afiuce. Range 8 bW 
land Rover, Porscfia, Mercams o» 
rtjier tetrfng makes. 

Same day reg a froBon poa M o 

KZKOVTTS 

Onrxi e n sk oat 3d. CMOS Zed 
Tdfc V\rm 76 10. Telex: 81WI5. 


RG TEAM 

Offers tax free an at low prices. 
mokes & typ«: new !, used. Fad de 

FO &w 2050. «00 0, BREDA 
Hoflond Tel W 76451 550 Tb: 74?? 


IWSUAR, M8KSB, PORSCHE 
BMW, SAAB, vava Best Prices 
■mmeduto ostvery. CoS Hofiand 

VAN IAARHOVB4 B.V. 

90 Bm 2178, 5400 CD EemawX n 
40-424055, 8x 51213 HOA » 


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