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The Global N&vspaper 

EdiAjfiriis 


P, 


Printed Stumlfaneoualy 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 


* in rans, London. Zurk 


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No. 3U844 — “ 



INTERNATIONAL 


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Published With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 


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ESTABLISHED 188“ 


CIA Said to Aid 

Cambodians 
Resisting Hanoi 


By Charles R. Babcock 

And Bob Woodward 

Washington Post Senice 

WASHINGTON — Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz met with 
three non-Communist Cambodian 
resistance leaders Monday in Thai- 
land and is scheduled to visit a 
Cambodian insurgents’ camp on 
the Thai-Cambodian border Tues- 
day, a sign of growing U.S. support 
for non-Communist rebels fighting 
the Communist regime installed in 
Cambodia by Vie tnam 
But, according to informed 
sources here, Mr. Shultz's public 
gesture is actually a complement to 
a program of covert CIA aid. 

According to these sources, the 
Central Intelligence Agency has 
been providing millions of dollars a 
year since 1982 for noomilUary 
purposes to two non-Commimist 
Cambodian groups, including 
more than SS million this year. 

(A senior U.S. State Department 
official traveling with Mr. Shultz in 
Asia declined Monday to comment 
on any CIA involvement in funding 
the rebels, The Associated Press 
reported from Bangkok.] ■ 

The CIA’s aid goes through 
T hailand, ibe sources said. The 
goal is to strengthen the two non- 
Communisl resistance groups* po- 
sition in their loose coalition with 
the Communist Khmer Rouge. 

The Khmer Rouge, under Pol 
Pot, has been accused of responsi- 
bility in killing more than two aril- 
lioa Cambodians while they ruled 


the country from J975 to 1 979. 
Vietnam invaded Cambodia, re- 
moved Pot Pot, and install e d a re- 
gime in in 1979. 

There is a congressional ban on 
aiding the Khmer Rouge, but liber- 
al Democrats in the House of Rep- 
resentatives have encouraged an ef- 
fort to give aid openly to the 
□oo-Communist insurgents, pro- 
posing a grant of S3 million in 
military assistance this year. 

Several mteffigence sources insist 
that CIA officers in Thailand work 
closely with the Thai military to 
ensure than oone-of the covert aid 
gets to the Khmer Rouge. 

The United States has become 
more involved in T hailand , where 
its aid has tripled once the Viet- 
namese invasion of Cambodia, to 
nearly $100 million a year. 

This year. Congress has moved 
to provide overt military support to 
the non-Communist opposition in 
Cambodia. Representative Stephen 
J. Solans, a New Yoik Democrat, ia 
pushing for $5 million in such aid, 
although the House has yet to act 

UJ5. officials at first opposed 
overt military aid, but recently 
shifted and are supporting a ver- 
sion of Mr. Solarrs provision, al- 
ready passed by the Senate, that 
lets the administration decide 
whether to supply economic or mil- 
iiaiy aid. 

Many officials say the effort to 
strengthen the non-Communist re- 
sistance is a long shot An informed 
source said, “Of oourse, if the coali- 



George P. Shultz onhis ar- 
rival in Bangkok Monday. 

tion wins, the Khmer Rouge will 
eat the others ahve.” 

The Khmer Rouge are the stron- 
gest of (he three factions fighting 
the Heng Samrin regime that the 
Vietnamese installed in Phnom 
Penh. Pol Pot has about 33,000 
fighters, according to State Depart- 
ment estimates. 

The non-Communist group 
headed by former Prime Minister 
Son Sann has about 15,000 troops, 
and the one led by Prince Norodom 
Sihanouk, the former head of state, 
has about 9,000. 

A number of experienced UiL 
intelligence officials who have 
worked in Southeast Asia are wary 
of new CIA involvements there. 

They Sly that nuinfjrining con- 
trol of both money and and covert 
operations Is difficult, if not impos- 

(Continned as Page 2, CoL 3) 


Sri Lanka and Tamil Separatists 
Open Talks on Possible Autonomy 




By Steven R. Wtisrmn 

New York Times Service 

NEW DELTA — Negotiations 
between ibe Sri I-ankm govern- 
ment and leaders of the country’s 
major Tamil insurgent groups be- 
gan Monday in the Himalayan 
kingdom of Bhutan in what the 
Bhutanese government said was a 
“relaxed and friendly atmosphere." 

The first substantive discussions 
were expected to take place Tues- 
day, the Bhutanese government 
said 

Bhutan has barred journalists 
from entering the country to cover 
the talks, winch mark the first time 
that the various parties have sal 
down together snee the insurgency 
by Tamu guerrillas began spread- 
ing in Sri I^nka two years ago. The 
guerrillas seek a separate slate in 
Tamfl -do mmate d areas of the na- 
tion. 

Although he is not a party to the 
talks, Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
of India played a key role in bring- 
ing them about by putting heavy 
pressure on the Tamil groups to 
take pan. Most of the groups are 
based in the southern Indian state 


INSIDE 


of Tamil Nadu, where they are be- 
lieved to have set up supply and 
training bases. 

The Indiaa.govcmmcnt, which 
helped negotiate a cease-fire 
among - the parties hut month, 
made no comment on the talks 
Monday. A press release issued by 
the Rhntjwi government said the 
talks were “characterized by mutu- 
al tmHpt^ tandfng aryl ar rrarwnnria- 

tion." 

The talks are expected to focus 
on proposals by the government of 
President Junius R. Jayawardfcae 
for increased autonomy for (be 
northern and eastern parts of the 
island. Some analysts say that the 
Tamil guerrillas might be posnadr 
ed to Lay down their arms if they 
can secure greater self-government 
for the areas in which they domi- 
nate. 

Tamil leaden initially expressed 
skepticism about the talks after the 
cease-fire was arranged. Some even 
talked of boycotting the negotia- 
tions. 

But after meeting in New Delhi 
over the weekend with senior Indi- 
an officials, representatives of the 


Tamil guerrilla organizations 
boarded planes chartered by the 
indi nn government and flew to 
m mpu, the Bhutanese capital „ 

- Taking part are the'PfcopfefcIJt£- 1 
eration Organization of Tamil Ee- 
lam and the four groups that form 
the Edam National Liberation 
Front: the liberation Tigers of 
Tamil Edam, the Edam People’s 
Revolutionary liberation Front, 
the TamO Edam liberation Orga- 
nization and (be Edam Revom- 
tkmaiy Organizers. 

Also in the talks is the moderate 
Tamil United liberation Front, 
which started out as a mainstream 
Sri ijmtiw organization ™tfl Mr. 
Jayawardene banned its members 
from Paifiaznenl a few years ago. 
The front engaged in talks with the 
government last year, but they 
broke down in disagreement. The 
group appears to have little support 
among the guerrillas. 

The discussions are expected to 
continue through this week. 

Reports from Sri Lanka indicate 
that both sides have charged viola- 
tions of the cease-fire, but nothing 


S. Africa 
Trade Cut 
By Canada 

Sanctions Due 
To Apartheid, 
Ottawa Says 

By Michael Parks 

Leer Angeles Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Canada - 
has taken steps to curtail its trade 
with South Africa, announcing 
some of the broadest sanctions by a. 
Western government so far against 
the white minority government for 
its apartheid policies. 

The measures were detailed in a 
s tatemen t made public Sunday in 
Pretoria and Ottawa. 

They include an end -to export 
and investment incentives for Ca- 
nadian companies doing business 
with South Africa and restrictions' 
on high-technology sales of “sensi- 
tive equipment," such as comput- - 
ere, to South African government 
agencies and state-owned compa- 
nies. This is to prevent their use by 
police and other security forces, the 
statement said. 

The South African Foreign Min- 
istry, which bad expected Canada’s 
new Progressive Conservative gov- 
emmem to be more sympathetic to 
Pretoria than the Liberal govern- 
ment of framer Prime Minister 
Pierre EDiott Trudeau, was sur- 
prised by the action and had no 
comment. 

The Canadian measures, ap- 
proved ala weekend cabinet meet- 
ing, stopped short of requiring Ca- 
nadian companies to {mil out of 
South Africa, where they have an 
estimated $200 million invested. 
Nor does it bar new Canadian in- 
vestments. 

At present, the major Canadian 
companies doing business in South 
Africa indude Bata Shoe Gx, Mas- 
sey-Fennison, Alcan and the Ford 
Motor Co.’s Canadian subsidiary. 

Sunday's statement, issued by 
External Affairs Secretary Joe 
Clark, cited a "rising tide of revul- 
sion” in Cana da over continnation 







fes-V* • 






w 


Brogan Asserts 

5 Nations Aid 
Terrorists as 
f Acts of War’ 


By Lou Cannon 

Washington Post Senice 


version of Murder, Inc." This was 
the popular name for a ll.S. crime 


u/acutmi-tv'hj organization of the 1930s that per- 

WASHINGTON - President fonMd contact kfllings. 

Ronald Reagan said Monday that 


Iran, Libya, North Korea, Cuba 
and Nicaragua, by sponsoring in- 
ternational terrorism, were en- 
gaged in “acts of war against the 
government and people of the 
United States.” 

“And under international law,” 
Mr. Reagan said, “any state which 
is the victim of acts of war has the 
right us defend itself.” 


formed contract killings. 

Mr. Reagan said the goal of ter- 
rorists is to disorient the United 
States, disrupt its foreign policy, 
sow discord between it and its al- 
lies, frighten Third World countries 
and euro U.S. influence. 

“Yes. their real goal is to expel 
America from the world,” he said. 

“That is the real reason these 
terrorist nations are arming, train- 


President Ronald Reagan 


2 Are Sentenced to Jail 
In Hitler Diary Fraud 


In a speech to the American Bar and supporung attacks against 

- - - J Association’s convention, Mr. Rea- dns nation, he continued. 

tatowjn five ,^^ 0 ^ had “oui- “And U“i is why we can be clear 

inald Reagan law governments" that are “united ° n one point: these terrorist states 

by one simple, criminal pbenome- 416 now engaged in acts of war 

-non — their fanatical haired of the against the government and people 

_ _ United States, our people, our way «* *&* United Slates.” he went on. 

\£%£%A #/) l/fif of life, our iniemational stature." imder miemauonal law, any 

[Uoli MI mStMM The government of Syria, which is the victim of acts of 

the Untied States previously con- war has the nghr to defend itself.” 
, IT* J sidered a supporter of terrorism. He vowed that “the American 

lf"Y M. TUMll was not mentioned with the others, people are not — 1 repeat not — 

m/ The Reagan a dministra tion has going to tolerate intimidation . ter- 

By Tames M. Markham tion by the West German Federal thanked Syria’s president,. Hafez ror and outright .acts of war against 
New York Times Senice Archives found them to be erode. al-Assad, for his assiaance in free- this nation and its people. 

BONN — A former reporter for forgeries, written ou cheap postwar “tg the re mai nin g 39 American “And we especially are not going 
Stem and a Nazi memo- paper and based on rudimentary hostages from a hijacked TWA air- to tolerate these attacks from out- 

rabilia dealer were convicted Mon- hirtorical sources. hner in Beuut last month, and is law stales run by the strangest col- 

day by a Hamburg cram of the Mr. Heidemann and Mr. Kujau s«kmg his help m obtaining the lection of misfits. looney tunes and 

invention of the bogus diaries of were arrested in May 1983 and fdcase of seven Americans soil be- squalid criminals since the advent 


invention of the bogus diaries of we 
Adolf Hitler. hv 

. Judge Hans-Ulrich Schroeder du 
handed down sentences of four an 


wi uvauj uumvo wi — j ' ■ < i • ■ . • 

ler. have been in preventive detention ^6 held in Lebanon. 

Hans-Ulrich Schroeder during the trial. The scandal led to Mr. Reagan said the list of states 


of the Third Reich," be said. 

Mr. Reagan called upon other 


years and eight months in muon 
for the journalist. Gerd Htide- 
mann, and four years and six 


in its circulation and a chast 
tone in much of its coverage. 
The trial quickly estrange* 


S he identified as sponsors of terror- governments to help wage war 
ism was not all-inclusive. But he against terrorists. “Now much 
asserted that the increase in terror- needs to be done by all of us in the 
the isi incidents in recent years was a community of civilized nations," he 


months fra the self-confessed frag- two main defendants, with Mr. result of the increasing involve- said. 

ex of the diaries, Konrad Kujau, a Heidemann masting that he had meat of Iran, Libya, North Korea, “We must act against the crimi- 

collectorof Nari-m materials and acted h> good faith for Stem and Cuba and Nicaragua, which he nal menace of terrorism with the 

amatetzrartisL had given ah of the money to Mr. called “a confederation of terrorist full weight of the law — boihdo- 

Tbe judge sentenced Mr. Knjau’s Kigau, who had duped him. states." mestic and international, Mr. Rea- 

compfution, Edith Lieblang, to one 


Kujau, who had duped him. states." mestic and international, Mr. Rea- 

The forger’s defense, as present- “Most of the terrorists who are gan added. “We trill act to indict. 


Mr. dark said: “The fundamen- 
tal changes in Sooth Africa we had ' 
hoped for during the past quarter- 
century have not come about One 
tragjc incident fellows another, and 
almost 400 South Africans have 
lost their lives in the past year.” 

He said Una in these c trc um - 
stances, tbeperaisteoce “of institu- 
tionalized racism can only cause a 
widening gulf between our two 
countries. We regret (hat, but the 
time has come fra a basic change, 
fra the repudiation of apartheid as 
a concept and a policy. 

The announcement said that Ca- 
nadian companies operating in 
South Africa will be required to 
adhere to a code of fair employ- 
ment practices, ensuring black 
workers equal treatment with 
whites, and that exemption from 
Canadian taxes for such companies 
would end. 

Canada will also phase out over 
three yean its processing of iiram- 
um from South-West Africa, a ter- 


year in prison. Hie prosecution had cd by his attorney, Knrt kidnapping and murdering Ameri- apprehend and prosecute those 
demanded seven years’ imprison- Grocuewoid, was that Mr. Kujau can citizens and attarfring Ameri- who commit the kind of atrocities 
meat lor- Mr. Heidemann and six wb* a mere accessory in a modi can installations,” he said, “are be- the world has witnessed in recent 


years for Mr. Kujau. 


larger fraud by Stern and Gnmer& ing trained, financed and directly weeks. H He referred to the Ameri- 


Thc verdict capped legal pro- Jahr- The lawyer contended that or indirectly controlled fay a core can hostages in Beirut who wer 
cMdingp that grew out of the pur- (he management and editors of the group of radical and totalitarian held for 17 days in June and the 
chase of 60 hand-written efiaries (Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) governments, a new, international (Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 

between January 1981 and April - _ _ — . — 

1983 by Gtuner & Jahr, the owners 

of Stem, for $3.7 milliou (93 rnO- . tt» p^wwt 11 a nr nn --- T 

At Vietnam 'Wall, Mementos Pile Up 

burg on April 25, 1983. Stem’s edi- A 

maim had secured the pu ^ U r Se Preserving Ilenw Left by Veteram 9 FoinUies 9 Friends 

diaries from a village in East Ger- , = 

many where they had been re- By Barbara Carton 
trieved by fanners after a plane Washington Post Service 

erwh at me aid of World War IL WASHINGTON — One night 
Fet» Koch, the editor of Stem, -shortly after the 1982 dedication of 
prodanned that the weekly maga- the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, 
zine’s scoop would frarescfoJars to someone left a pair of old cowboy 
rewrite the history of the Third hoots a i the base of the gleaming 
Reich. International publishing Sack dabs, 
companies, including Rupert Mur- _ ‘ . .... 

doefa’s empire andNews*£ek mag- T 1 ** ^ 001 h°® J»hshed or 

azme,ried for rights to the diaries. “*** m a f “j J “i 


(Cantiaaed oa Page 2, CoL 3) (Coatinaed on Page 2, CoL 2) 


Stern published one article based Scruggs, 
on the notebooks before examina- the Vitfnam Veterans Manorial 

Fund. “The parents must have left 

: them there. It was just so eerie.” 

Shortly after that, Eleanor Wim- 
~r* if bish left a basket of yellow flowers 

f t fY/I / and the first of more than 20 letters 

JL l/I she has since written to ha dead 

C7 son. William R. Stock, who was an 

i ■■ . — army sergeant. 

■Jl a m “I hurt to nut wvnethiug there to 

IklllVfKOn Msrkda bring some warmth to that blade 

wall,” said Mrs. Wrmbish, who is 
from Glen Burnie, Maryland. “It 

, was just so empty. And people 

1 could look at the names, but none 

iropean Economic Community ta of them had any meaning. I wanted 
shed by a treaty signed in Rome to bring something persona) to the 

rch 25, 1957. by France. West ^ti rT° 

iny.Hafy, Belgium, the . . . . , 

lands and Luxembourg. The Since men, tiunoreos ot war me- 

look effect Jan. 1,1958. memos, from Purple Hearts to 

" 111 11 — ■ tear-stained letters, have been left 

i at the memorial by the friends and 

i, Ireland and Denmark Join the Families of the more than 50,000 

who died and by those who served 
1 1 and survived. 

I No tapecting the volume of sou- 

venirs or knowmg what to do with 
, . than, the National Park Service 

*~C periodically collected and stored 

\ things in cardboard boxes in goy- 

eminent offices. 

J A Now, the Park Service has begun 

A I \ an rffrat to presove the most un- 

i usual of the memorabilia — the 

/ camoufla^ jungle fatigue, the yel- 

U ■! lov«d pictures of teen-age soldiers, 

plastic roses and chDdbood ted- 

“I think we all came to the con- 

elusion that keeping than in caid- 

ijoard boxes just wasn’t right,” said 
vafiai *n?g .Tg^wr^i ■ Earle Kiuleman, a Park Service 

spokesman. 

Western Europe as a whole, was . ’^ iere ** n . ow cabinets and 
guided by the original virion of the drawers full of mementos m a 
CommM MaiStTaTa political eo- ^.OGa^quaro-foot (7^square- 
dey tying Europe together. meter) bnck warehouse where oth- 

When, under the stewardship of er Park Service property is stored, 
such leaders as Konrad Adenauer Ttewarehouseisnotopai tothe 
of West Gomany md Jean Mon- public, though the Park Service 
net of France, six countries created hopes someday to offer timiled 
the original Gammon Market in the wurs. 

1950Mheir overarching goal was a There are an estimated 1,300 

political and economic integration items in the Vietnam collection, 
that would, in the first instance, shut away from rain and son and 
make war among Western Europe- stored under controlled conditions 
an. nations impossible. where the humidity is kept between 

The specific, practical goal was 50 and 55 percent. Even the faded 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) plastic roses and the olive-colored 


‘They had not been polished or 
used in a long time, 11 said Jan 
Scruggs, president and founder of 



f Europessimism 9 to Greet Spain , Portugal 


By Richard Bernstein 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — Die expansion of the 
European Community to include 
Spain and Portugal comes at a time 
of deep doubt and discomfort 
among many Europeans about the 
community itself. 

The mood is summed up by the 
voguish term Eitmtessimism, re- 
flecting the view that Europe is 
f alfang increasingly far behind in 

EC Expansion 








bMTAM* 




atom Rom 

Dizzy Gillespie, a found- 
ing father of bebop, will 
be at the Nice Jazz Fes- 
tival. Page 6. 

■ The rating Mexican party 

claimed victory in Sunday’s nar 
tkmal elections Page 3. 

■ Egypt, worried by religious 

strife, acts to restrict Moslem 
zealots. PageS. 



1 ..*1. c 


mm 

J 


business/finance 

■ The EC and the United 
States reportedly agreed to a 
one- week truce in their trade 
dispute over pasta. Page 7. 

TOMORROW 

As the Pentagon wrestles with 
problems of cost and quality, 
many would-be reformers are 
looking to Europe fra solutions. 


First of two articles 

competition with the United Slates 
and Japan. 

Lying behind the pessimism is a 
growing belief, arising from the 
deep divisions within the EC in the 
last that the organization is 

not the vehicle of a European re- 1 
birth dreamed of by its founders. 
Those who hold this view believe 
that the EC has promoted a modest 
degree of economic cooperation 
but is not capable of fostering a 
genuine “United States of Eu- 
rope," a once common term that is 
rarely heard today. 

As a result, as Portugal prepares 
to ratify the entry treaty next week 
— Spam will do so later this year, 
and the two countries are expected 
to become the 1 1th and 12th mem- 
bers of the community on Jan. 1 — 
two moods seem to be at war with 
each other- 

One is the hope that the inclu- 
sion of the two new .danocracks, 
both of which were dictatorships 
isolated from the rest of Europe 
weQ into the 1970s, will energize 
the whole, open up new vistas for it 
and give it greater standing as a 
force in world politics. 

Bui there is also the fear that the 




BELGIUM 

FRANCE 






On June 12. Spain and Portugal 
/ sign a treaty admitting them to the 

organization. The two countries are 
schedufed to become the 1 1 tfi and 
u* nm York Tm 1 2th members on Jan. 1 . 1986. 


addition of two countries different 
in character from other members 


sive problem, the quarrels ana divi- 
sions that have left the grand goals 
of unity a hostage to whai the Ital- 
ian writer Luigi Bazzmi called 
“squalid quibbling about money” 
“There are both positive and 
negative aspects to the entry of 
Spain and Portugal," said Jean- 
Framjois Deniau, a former French 
tn'miciw of foreign trade and the 
author of two books on the com- 
munity. “What’s positive is that 
Spain and Portugal belong to Euro- 


pean history, and there can be no 
Europe if commies that have made 
such a contribution to Its culture 
and identity do not belong." 

“But the enlargement of the 
community to include Spain and 
Portogaf also makes for some diffi- 
culties," he said, “particularly diffi- 
culties in derision-making. It was 
difficult enough when the commu- 
nity bad six members; it was more 
difficult when it had 10; with 12, it 
will be more difficult stilL" 

To a great extent, the entry of 
Spain and Portugal, which are eco- 
nomically less developed than 


f T^foifipaii Market: 
HowliHasGrown 

2958 

The European Economic Community is 
f Z established by a treaty signed in Rome 
on March 25, 1 057. by France. West 
Germany. Hafy, Belgium, the 
Netherlands and Luxembourg. The 
C treaty look effect Jan. 1,1958. 

1 fl97i 

Britain. Ireland and Denmark Join the 
group. 

LTt h 

1982 § 


Jill 



- ’ mm 

■’S 1 . ■■ ■■ '.-VJ'** 1 - - 

m %m: ■ v 

*** ••••• afe:*:- 





Western Europe as a whole, was 
guided by the original virion of the 
Common Market, as a political en- 
tity tying Europe together. 

When, under the stewardship of 
such leaders as Konrad Adenauer 
of West Germany and Jean Mon- 
net of France, rix countries created 
the original Common Market in the 
1950s, then overarching goal was a 
political and economic integration 
that would, in the first instance, 
make war among Western Europe- 
an, nations impossible. 

The specific, practical goal was 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


p4#? 

'Aslkii-. 


A disabled veteran examines the memorial in Washington. 

1 had to put something ihere to bring some 
warmth to that black wall. . . 

The mother of a war victim 


cans of cinnam on nut ioD C- ra- 
tions are kept at 20 degrees centi- 
grade (68 degrees Fahrenheit). 

The oily requirement for inclu- 
sion in the collection is that the 
item must have been found at the 
manorial, so the wide-ranging col- 
lection includes Detroit Tigers and 
Boston Red Sox baseball caps, 
worn dog tags (“Anderson, R.C. 
USMC. 094098. Presbyterian”), 
crumbling high school football 


dippings, diaries and a POW-MIA 
bracelet that says, “Ron, you are 
with us in spirit, always." 

There are the postcards and 
notes. “Dear Dad. I really miss 
you. Lou of luck to aD you B-52 
guys. I love you,” scrawled on 
freezer paper. 

And the letter wrapped in plastic 
that Mrs. Wimbish uut at the me- 
morial in 1983, nearly 15 years af- 

(Cootinued ou Page 3, CoL 1) 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


In Spain, Austerity 
And Political Drama 


Popularity of Gonzalez Under Strain 
In Conflict Over Pension and Job Cuts 


By Edward Schumacher 

New York Tima Service 

MADRID —Prime Minister Fe- 
lipe Gonzalez, after nearly three 
' years in office, remains highly pop- 


ular despite Spain’s depressed 
economy. But the problems have 


begun to take their tolL Last week, 
Mr. Gonz&lez gave his squabbling 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


cabinet a radical shake-up, replac- 
ing six of IS ministers, including 
. the most powerful Miguel Boyer, 
minis ter of the economy. 

One of the prime minister's big- 
gest problems has been dealing 


with labor. Unemployment has ris- 
en to 22 percent, the highest in 
.Europe. Mr. Boyer was one of the 
prime movers behind an austerity 
program making dismissals easier 
and pension eligibility harder. 

Nicolas Redondo, bead of the 
-General Union of Workers, a 
group allied with the Socialists, 
-bailed Mr. Boyer's removal as a 
victory but warned of possible con- 
flict ahead 


“We will give a margin of confi- 
dence to the new government. 


which does not mean giving it a 
-blank check," he said. 

- Mr. Redondo had been under 
pressure for a tougher stand by the 
Communist-led workers' commis- 
sions, which called a one-day strike 
two weeks ago on the pension issue. 

The government said that only 
. 10 percent of Uk work force struck, 
: but transportation was chaotic in 

-.some places and many factories in 
the industrial centers of Barcelona, 
Bilbao and Valencia were shuL 
The pension changes were the 
Immediate target and the strike had 
.enough strength to induce the So- 
cialists to offer a revision of a plan 
; the party had pushed through the 
lower house of parliament 
The compromise would soften 

■ provisions requiring people to 
; work IS years and pay into the plan 
> for at least eight years before being 
eligible. But Mr. Gonziiez served 

■ notice that the sweeping change of 
.ministers would not affect the po- 
licy of austerity. 

i Although clashes of individuals 
were a major factor in the cabinet 
.upheaval in the background was a 
under struggle between Socialists 
and Communists to dominate 
•Spanish labor. All but govemment- 
: controlled unions were banned un- 


Critics Say 
Madrid Move 


Backfired 


Hue of Finance Minister Miguel 
Boyer and Foreign Minister rer- 


sh uf fling manner, had come to be a 
national hero and a power inside 


national hero and a power inside 
the party. 

According to sources close to 
Mr. Morin, much of his bitterness 
was a result of the manner in which 
he learned of the dismissal; he was 


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der Gene ralissimo Francisco Fran- 
co, who died in 1975- 

The Co mmunis ts, as a clandes- 
tine group, were better organized 
and emerged quickly as the most 
powerful union force. But the So- 
cialists have caught up. Today, 
each controls about a third of the 
organized workers; the remainder 
are divided among the anarchists 
and regional unions, as in Galicia 
and the Basque country. 

Mr. Redondo accused the work- 
ers' commissions of opportunism 
and refused to take part in the 
strike. But the two confederations 
buried the hatchet long enough to 
join in a protest march. 

At the moment. Prime Minister 
Gouz&kz can afford to resist the 
unions. They represent only 20 per- 
cent Of the work force. They never 
fully recovered from the Franco era. 
and the growth of the service and 
technology industries has cut into 
manufacturing, their key base. 

While the unions rely on party 
affiliations for their identity, they 
look to the government for money. 
A government-controlled union 
fund built by contributions from 
workers and businesses under the 
Franco regime today holds nearly 
52 billion. The unions have been 
living largely off that. 

Hie Communist threat to Mr. 
Gonzalez, moreover, often appears 
exaggerated. Few members of the 
workers’ commissions are card-car- 
rying Communists. The Commu- 
nist Party commands only about 4 
percent of the vote. 

Mr. Gonz&lez concluded a pact 
last fall with business groups and 
unions seeking to balance austerity, 
economic flexibility and social jus- 
tice with economic modernization. 


This may not last. Among So- 
cialists. Mr. Redondo remains a 


somewhat feared figure. As he not- 
ed recently, “The interests of (be 
government and the interests of the 
unions are very different-" 




New York Times Service 

. MADRID — Spain's new cabi- 
net was sworn in last week amid 
assertions that Prime Minister Fe- 
lipe Gonzfilez had been weakened 
politically by a dispute over a gov- 
ernment shake-up. 

Newspapers, foreign diplomats 
and many political leaders, from 
right to left, said that the cabinet 
changes, designed to strengthen the 
Socialist government, hid back- 
fired, at least temporarily. 

They said that Mr. Gonzilez had 
allowed a minor government face- 
lift to develop into a showdown 
that ended in the rancorous depar- 


Soyer and Foreign Minister Fer- 
nando Ldpez Morin. 

Mr. Moran implied bitterly that 
be might oppose Prime Minister 
GonzAJez’s already shaky cam- 
paign to keep Spain in the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

El Pals, the country’s leading 
daily, said in an editorial: “The 
right will be concerned that Boyer 
is not in the dialogue with the fi- 
nancial world. And the anti-NATO 
left will be concerned that Morin is 
not in the Foreign Ministry. 

There were tears Friday as Mr. 
Moran, 59, who is credited with 
negotiating Spain's coming entry 
into the Economic Community, 
was applauded by employees at the 
Foreign Ministry and by Socialist 
Party leaders at a conference on 
Europe. 

The emotions were a reminder 
that Mr. Morin, an independent- 
minded politician wbo was once 
the butt of jokes because of his 



Felipe Gonzftlez. 


informed by a foreign visitor. Presi- 
dent Richard von Wedzs&cker or 
West Germany. 

The Bonn official learned of it 
when he met with Prime Minister 
Gonzalez, who made the decision 
two days earlier, according to 
sources close to the prime minister, 
but did not advise Mr. Morin. 

The sources said Mr. Gonzdlez 
had dismissed Mr. Morin because 
of personality differences and what 
he saw as coyness by Mr. Moran 
over whether he would campaign 
for Spain to remain a member of 
the Atlantic defense alliance. The 
issue is to be put to a referendum. 


Canada Sets 
Trade Curbs 


(Continued from Page I) 


ritory that South Africa adminis- 
ters in defiance of UN resolutions 


calling for its independence. 

Sales of South Africa’s gold Kru- 
gerrand coins will be discouraged 
by the government, Mr. Clark said, 
although such sales will not be for- 
mally prohibited because of inter- 
national trade agreements. 

“It is a first step, " he said of the 
measures. “111616 will be others 
taken over the next year to 18 
months.” 


West Germany called last week 
on its companies to do more to 
promote rarial integration and 
black advancement in South Afri- 
ca. West Germany is a large forego 
investor in the country and, along 
with the United States, Britain and 
Japan, one of its most important 
trading partners 

In Washington, the Senate is de- 
liberating on proposed U.S. sanc- 
tions against South Africa. A biU 
approved last month by the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee 
would bar bank loans to the South 
African government or state- 
owned companies, prohibit com- 
puter sales to security forces and 
end cooperation in nuclear energy. 



Aaoeand Tim 


8 Killed as Train Hits Trailer-Truck in Normandy 


Figh t persons were killed Monday and 55 injured when the Le 
Havre- Paris express moving at 100 mph and carrying 500 
passengers strode, a trailer- truck in Saim-Ptare-du-Vauvray, 


60 miles northwest of Paris. The truck driver was killed. 
Witnesses said the crude got stuck between crossing barriers 
and the driver was trying to back off when the crash occurred. 


Pessimism Gripping EC as Spain, Portugal Enter 


(Continued from Page 1) 
to integrate West Germany into a 
web of relationships and aiHanees, 
with the United States and with 
Western Europe, that would offer it 
a secure place in world affairs. 

For Spain and Portugal, there is 
a parallel goal European officials 
say. The intention is to create a 
network of ties and alliances that 
will bring the two countries into the 
West European mainstream. 


Membership, for example, in- 
udes not only economic arranse- 


The pact held wages near the 
inflation rate, limited strikes, and 
called vaguely for a tightening of 
pension eligibility and loosening of 
Franco-era laws that made it diffi- 
cult to dismiss a worker. 


chides not only economic arrange- 
ments but also participation in 
such institutions as the European 
Court of Justice and the European 

Par liament 


‘From the purely economic 
print of view there was no real 


In return, the government ex- 
panded unemployment benefits. 
Despite a boycott by the workers' 
commissions of the negotiations, 
the agreement has been highly suc- 
cessful in reducing strikes. 


der Schaub, a stall member of the 
European Commission, the EC's 
executive staff in Brussels. 

“The basic purpose of their 
membership was to achieve long- 
term clarity and stability. If they 
know that they are definitely part- 


pa ted, one of them directly affect- 
ing the Atlantic alliance S pain wfl] 
find it easier to remain a member of 
the alliance now ihat it has been 
accepted into the EC, officials say. 
The issue will be put to a referen- 
dum there next year 

Another result, commonly men- 
tioned but less certain, may be new 
EC avenues to the Arab world and 
to Latin America, with which 
Spain, in particular, has special ties 
of history and culture. 

Still the new members are enter- 
ing the community at a time of 
considerable public and official 
skepticism over its ability to tran- 
scend national differences and 
move closer to real unity. 

“It should not astonish us that in 
each of the state members, the com- 
munity is a scapegoat for national 
difficulties,” Simone Veil of 
France, a former president of the 


uine economic integration, with 
free trade and the end of restric- 
tions on the flow of money, goods 
and technology. A specific element 
of the vision, in those optimistic 
times, was the emergence of trans- 
national industries that would re- 
place the multiplicity of national 
enterprises with their tendency to 


compete rather than cooperate. 
Beyond that, the founders hoped 


European Parliament, told a 
French magazine recently. The 


nets in the community, they will 
have a stable context for the fu- 


have a stable context for the fu- 
ture.” 

Some concrete effects are antid- 


Frcncfa magazine recently. The 
community no longer knows where 
it is or what it wants; or perhaps the 
members no longer know what-it is 
that they want from the communi- 
ty” 

The documents that created the 
Common Market envisaged a gen- 


that economic integration would 
lead automatically to higher de- 
grees of political and military coop- 
eration. There were hopes that the 
European Commission would be- 
come an overall government, that 
there would eventually be common 
defense and foreign policies and 
i hat a concept of European citizen- 
ship would emerge, in which people 
would view themselves less as Ital- 
ian dr a French than as members of 
a larger community. 

But much of this vision foun- 
dered in the face of what some 
scholars see as a conspiracy by na- 
tional enterprises to bold on to 
their power and prerogatives. 

Indeed, the EC remains first and 
foremost an agricultural customs 
iminn and a highly complicated 
network of farm price subsidies. 


“Some people believe that the 
process in unbearably slow,” a 
British official said. But he argued 
that the pace reflected the commu- 
nity’s growth. 

“For Spain and Portugal to get 
in,” be said, “the number of specif- 
ic items that had to be ne gotiated 

was far more than it was for Britain 
in 1973, but that’s because the net- 
work of community relations is 
that much greater.” 


Sri Lanka Opens Talks With Rebels 2 Sentenced 


(Continued from Page I) 
serious enough to undermine the 
negotiations. Some splinter guerril- 
la groups are not part of the cease- 
fire. _ 

Although the Tamil groups con- 
tinue to say they favor an indepen- 
dent nation, known as Tamil Ee- 
lam, many analysts believe they 
might be satisfied if the govern- 
ment proposes to increase the au- 
tonomy of the northern and eastern 
parts of the island, where Tamils 
predominate. 

But many of the analysts also 
question whether Mr. Jayawardene 
will come forward with autonomy 
proposals that will satisfy the guer- 
rillas. 

A Tamil insurgent leader said in 
an interview here Sunday that the 
Sri Lanka government delegation 
appeared to consist mostly of tech- 
nicians rather than political figures, 
which he said suggested that they 
would have little latitude to negoti- 
ate. 

“We are not fighting for the sake 
of fighting,” said K. Umamahes- 
waran, secretary-general of the 
People's Liberation Organization 
of Tamil Eelam. “We are not seek- 
ing a separate state tor the sake of 
separation. We are trying to protect 
the basic rights of the Tamil peo- 
ple.” 

He added. “If the Sri Lanka gov- 
ernment proposes something which 
can protect the basic rights of the 
Tamils, and if they implement it, 
we will consider it” 

The insurgency stems from a 
longstanding rivalry between the 
Tamils, who are Hindus, and the 
Sinhalese, who are Buddhists and 


To Prison in 




r •’] 

tv-’ ' 


Diary Fraud 



K. Umamaheswaran: ‘Not fighting for the sake of fighting.’ 


make up about three-quarters of 
the island's population. 

As recently as January, Mr. 
Jayawardene, a Sinhalese, vowed 
that he would not talk to any of the 
guerrilla leaders, “even if I am 


pura, in which nuns, women and 
children were among those lolled. 
The economy of the island has been 


guerrilla leaders, “even if I am 
dragged to them by an elephant.” 
But after that declaration, the in- 
surgency spread, with hundreds dy- 
ing each month. 

The violence culminated in a 
raid by Tamil guerrillas in the holy 
Buddhist township of Anuradha- 


devastated by the fighting. 

Mr. Jayawardene said recently 


that he was prepared to challenge 
those within his own camp who are 
counseling a hard line against the 
guerrillas. He has sent ms brother. 
Hector Jayawardene, as the princi- 
pal delegate to the talks, rather 
than a senior member of his cabi- 
.neL 


■ Hehtemam Is Freed 
Mr. Heidemann was freed Man- 
day aftemooa pending his appeal 
The Associated Press reported. Mr. 
Kujau remained in jail because of 
an arrest warrant for tax evasion 
that is outstanding against him in 
Stuttgart 


CIA Is Said to Support Cambodian Resistance 


(Coutmoed from Page 1) 
sible. in a region where local in- 
trigues magnify the dangers and 
uncertainties of clandestine activi- 


link it to the Vietnamese presence 
in Cambodia and other matters. 


■ Sbultz Condemns Hanoi 

Mr. Shultz condemned on Mon- 
day what he called the "Illegal and 
arrogant” Vietnamese occupation 
of Cambodia, The Associated Press 
reported from Bangkok. 

He met Monday with with two 
leaders of the Khmer People’s Na- 
tional Liberation Front — the mili- 
taiy commander. General Sak Sut- 
sakhan, and Abdul Gaffar — and 
with Prince Norodom Ranariddh, 
whose father. Prince Norodom Si- 
hanouk, heads another non-Cotn- 
munist resistance group. 

Mr. Shultz also met for 40 min- 
utes Monday with Prime Minister 
Pram Tinsulanonda and reaffirmed 
Washington's support for Thailand 
and the other members of the Asso- 
ciation of Southeast Asian Nations. 

Mr. Shultz signed an agreement 


Mr. Shultz praised Thai efforts 
in recent years to eradicate the 
growing of opium, from which her- 
oin in refined, and moving against 
drug traffickers and warlords in the 
so-called Golden Triangle of where 
Thailand, Burma and Laos share 
borders, according to a Thai For- 
eign Ministry spokesman, Sawanit 
Kongsiri 

■ Hanoi Offers Deal 
The Vietnamese foreign minis-: 


ter, Nguyen Co Thach. said in an 

inrprviMu niiMicKpH UAtwImt 


interview published Monday that' 
Hanoi would pull its troops out of 
Cambodia if Pol Pot were dropped 
from the rebd leadership ana if 


China and Thailand stopped help- 
ing the rebels, Reuters reported 
from New York. 

Time magazine quoted Mr. 
Thach as saving in Hanoi: “We 
demand the liquidation of Pol Pol 
That can be accomplished by the 
withdrawal of aid from China and 
an end to the sanctuary provided 
by Thailand. In return, we will 
agree to pull our forces out of Kam- 
puchea simultaneously. We do not 

ask that Pol Pot be killed. He can 
be exiled in Beijing or Bangkok or 
in Spandau jaH" 

Mr. Thach said that Vietnam 
would agree to an accommodation 
between the Vietnamese-backed 
government is Cambodia and 
Prince Sihanouk. 


A. Tsatsos, 80, 
Greek Magnate, 
Dies in London 


ILK, Paper Charged With Corruption 


bodian border, where fighting has 
disrupted their lives. 

He said at the signing that Wash- 
ington regarded Hanoi's recent de- 
cision to return the remains of 26 
U S. servicemen as a “separate hu- 
manitarian issue" and would not 


The Aaodoied Press 

LONDON — The Observer, the 
Sunday newspaper, has been 
charged with corruption for alleg- 
edly paying a Defense Ministry of- 
ficial £1400 (then worth $2,100) 
for information on money wasted 
on defense contracts. 

“We categorically deny the 
charges made against us and wiD 
contest them rigorously,” the 
newspaper’s editor, Donald Trel- 


ford, said in a statement Sunday. 

“We find it astonishing that the 
government should now decide — 
20 months after oar revelations ap- 
peared — to take actioa against the 
newspaper rather than those re- 
sponsible for this waste of public 
funds.” 

The official. Raymond W iTTigma , 
was sent to prison in January for 
six m o n t hs for corruptly receiving 
money. 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Alexandras Tsat- 
sos, 80, a Greek cement magnate 
died Saturday in London, where he 
had fled after being indicted on 
criminal fraud charges in Greece, 
his lawyer said. 

Alexander Katsandonis said 
Sunday that Mr. Tsatsos, founder 
of Grace’s biggest cement compa- 
ny, Hercules General Cement, died 
of heart failure in ltis London 
apartmenL 

“I'm sure it was the strain,” the 
lawyer said. 

Mr. Tsatsos’s son, George, for- 
mer managing director of Hercules, 
was with him when he died, Mr. 
Katsandonis said. 

George A Tsatsos, the lawyer 
added, planned to return to Greece 
“to continue to fight to prove that 
they are innocent?" 

He said no date had been fixed 
for the younger Mr. Tsatsos to re- 
turn home. 

Mr. Tsatsos and his son -were 
among 12 former directors of Her- 
cules indicted Friday by as Athens 
court for the second niqp on crimi- 
nal fraud charges that can carry the 
death penalty. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Managua Foreign Minister Starts Fast 

st, \ t? IC.Inw Mioiial H’Ccivilo Smm L . 


MANAGUA (Reuters) — Foreign Minister Migud d'Escoto Bredr- 
mann has left his post to begin a fast in protest US apposition to 
Manag ua's leftist government. 

Father d’Escoto, who is a Catholic priest, was suspended by the 
Vatican last year for refusing to give up his government position. After 
a ttending an evening Mass Sunday, Father d'Escoto installed himself in 
an auditorium n**** to a church and cal l ed a press conference at^ which be 
sqiH he would fast and pray for an “indefinite period of time." 

He issued a statement saying: “I will continue in prayer and fasting 
u ntil evangelical insurrection is ignited in Nicaragua and until this spare 
is multiplied in a ctions of solidarity by women and men oi good wiD in 
North America, Latin America. Europe and the Third World." He said 
President Daniel Ortega Saavedra had given him permission to leave his 
post to cany out the fasL Deputy Foreign Minister Victor Tinoco win 
take over in his absence. 


Meeting Set on U.S. Budget Deadlock 


WASHINGTON (UPI) — President Ronald Reagan will meet 
Wednesday with Senate and House conferees in an attempt to break a 
deadlock over the 1986 budget, but he will resist any move 10 increase 
taxes, a spokesman said Monday. 

The congressional negotiators have suspended their talks. The budget 
plan passed by the Senate rails for a freeze on cost-oF-living increases for 
Sodai Security retirement and disability benefits next year while the 
militar y is given an inflation adjustment; the House plan seek s the 
opposite. 


The spokesman. Larry Speakes. said Mr. Reagan would not go along 
ith a proposal by Senator Lawton Chiles. Democrat of Florida, fora tax 


with a proposal by Senator Lawton Chiles. Democrat of Florida, fora tax 
on corporations and individuals who pay no taxes. Mr. Speakes did noi 
rnfiynwnt directly on a suggestion by Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., a Massachu- 
setts Democrat who is speaker of the House, to more heavily tax Social 
Security benefits paid to affluent retirees. But be said. “I just don't see us 
accepting any taxes." 


There is no common military pro- 
gram among the group, although 
«n but Ireland belong to the Atlan- 
tic alliance; there is no transnation- 
al industrial policy; and differences 
arising from national pride and lo- 
cal laws have prevented the elimi- 
nation of ah economic barriers. 

“In fact, the European revolu- 
tion never took place.” said Lind- 
say Armstrong, the editor of 30 
Days of Europe, a monthly publi- 
cation on EC affairs. 


Britain lifts Ban on Argentine Trade 


LONDON (AP) — In an attempt to normalize relations, Britain 
announced Monday it was lifting a ban on imports from Argentina 
imposed at the start of the 1982 Falklands war. 

Britain called on Argentina to lift a similar ban on British products and 


m 3 v» trade “a two-way street,” but reiterated its refusal to discuss the 
issue of sovereignty of the Falklands. a British colony 300 miles (486 


kilometers) off the coast of Argentina. The islands are known in Argenti- 
na as the Malvinas. 

The British announcement was made in both houses of Parliament as 
Britain’s foreign secretary. Sir Geoffrey Howe, flew to Brazil. The baa 
was to be lifted as of midnight Monday. Argentine exports to Britain were 
worth more than 5180 million in 1981. 


Perhaps the entry of Spain and 
Portugal inrf io M c? above all that 
despite the forces against it, the 
concept of a united Enrroe remains 
an important goal, one that the two 
countries felt was worth working 
for.' 


U.K. Accepts EC Auto Emission Pact 


BRUSSELS (AP) — Britain will join an agreement by eight of the 10 
European Community nations to curb pollution from automobiles, a 
British spokesman said Monday. 

The spokesman, who attended a meeting of EC finance and economy, 
ministers, said Britain has lifted its reservations on the agreement, which' 
limits emissions from car exhausts and will gradually come into force 
starting in 1988. 

Denmark is now the only member state that dissented from the June 28 
agreement It argued that the anti-pollution criteria for nitrogen oxide 
emissions of medium-sized cars were insufficient- Medium-sized cars, the 
most numerous in Europe, are considered the mam source of auto 
pollution. The restrictions are to be introduced on cars with 
bigger than 122 cubic indies (2,000 cubic centimeters) starting in 198$, on 
small cars in 1990 and medium cars in 1991. 


Ulster Police Criticized Over Parade* 


LONDON (NYT) — The police in Northern Ireland, who bowed to 
pressure from Loyalists on Sunday and allowed a Protestant march 
• through a Catholic area of Portadown in County Armagh, were faring 
criticism from Loyalists and Catholics alike on Monday. 

The police, who originally did not want to allow marchers from the 
Orange Order to parade down Ob ins Street changed their mind and 
allowed the parade to proceed but said the route would be changed for 
traditional parades this Friday and Saturday. 

Peter Barry, the Irish foreign minister, called the dedsion to let 
Sunday's march proceed “a mistake of judgment" and said that it 
“demonstrates an incapacity on the pan pf the Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary to understand nationalist feeling.” Seamus Mallon, the deputy leader 
of the Social Democratic and Labor Party, a nationalist party that 
opposes the Irish Republican Army, said the derision was “another 
absolute victory" for Orangeism and Unionism over the British govern- 
ment. 


(Con tinned from Page 1) 
publishing house did not care 
about the notebooks’ authenticity 
and wanted a circulation- boosting 
sensation at any cost 
Without openly embracing the 


defense lawyer’s thesis. Judge 
Schroeder chastised Gruner & Janr 


Schroeder chastised Grnner A Janr 
and Stem. He said that the organi- 
zations’ negligence had perauaded 
him to soften the sentences against 
the two main defendants. 

The judge denounced “the bun- 
ker or plot mentality" at Stem that 
prevented its editors from making 
even elementary checks of the dia- 
ries. 

One of the mysteries left unre- 
solved by the trial was the division 
of the money between Mr. Hdde- 
mann and Mr. Kujau. The judge 
said that Mr. Kujau had pocketed 
5900,000, while Mr. Heidemann 
could not account for 5700,000. 

After the two men were attested. 
Stem initiated a separate proceed- 
ing in Hamburg to try to recover 
the lost money. A spokesman for 
the magazine said that he did not 
know what would happen to the 
case. 


Alan Wright, a local Orange Order leader and the son of a policeman 
lolled by the IRA. said after the march that Loyalists would not accept 
any rerouting later this week. “It will be resisted, and I can guarantee that, 
if need be, we wiD have lOOjOOO Orangemen on Portadown on Friday” 


For the Record 


Yuri Bafawknkor said Monday in Moscow that he has ended a 100-day 
hunger strike — interrupted for two weeks of forced hospitalization — for 
an exit visa to join his wife and two daughters in Baltimore. Denied a visa 
for six years. Mr. Balovknkov, 36. saidhe had been promised one within 
two months but added that “they have made such promises and broken 
them before.” (UPI) 


Libya mH ban Egyp&ms from working in the country in retaliation for 
simil a r treatment of Libyans in Egypt, the Libyan press agency JANA 
said Monday. (Reuters} 

Lebanese Scran, Shiite and Druze leaders met Syrian officials Monday 
in Damascus for talks on stopping fighting among Moslems in West 
Beirut and on reviving a political dialogue. ( Reuters } 

Jobs C Whitehead was confirmed Monday by the U.S. Senate as 
deputy secretary of state, the second-ranking position at the State 
Department. • ^ 




Reagan Says 5 Governments 
Aid Terrorists Against U.S. 


(Co nti nu ed from Page 1) 
k illing of Tour U.S. Marines in El 
Salvador on June 19. 

“There can be no place on Earth 
left where it is safe for these mon- 
sters to rest, or train or practice 
their cruel and deadly drills, " he 
declared. “We mast act together, or 
unilaterally if necessary, to insure 
that terrorists have no sanctuary, 
anywhere." 

Similar warnings that the United 
States reserves the right to take 
unilateral action have been voiced 
by Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz. But Mr. Reagan called, for 
no specific action Tuesday other 
than repeating a U.S. de mand that 
Beirut’s international airport “be 
made safe” or closed down. 


Administration sources said that 
after the El Salvador killings, Mr. 
Reagan ruled out retaliatory action 
recommended by some of his aides 
on the ground that such action 
would imperil innocent civilians. 

In ins speech, Mr. Reagan noted 
that the Soviet Union has “a close 
relationship with almost all of the 
terrorist states I have mentioned.” 
He was shajpty critical of Soviet 
statements during the hostage cri- 
sis, particularly statements that the 
United States had been in the grip 
of “hysteria” and had sought to use 
the crisis as a pretext for military 
invasion of Lebanon. 

"Now, ladies and gentlemen of 
the American bar, there is a non- 
Soviet word for that kind of talk, an 


extremely useful time-tested origi- 
nal American word, one with deep 
roots in our rich agricultural and 
farming tradition.” Mr. Reagan 
said to laughter and applause from 
the delegates. 

In dung examples of how the 
nations he named sponsored ter- 
rorism, Mr. Reagan said the leftist 
Sandinist government of Nicara- 
gua was involved in the attack in H 
Salvador. But he did not say how he 
knew that Nicaragua was involved 
in this episode. 

The president also said that “we 
have evidence" that “vicious terror- 
ists” from Italy. West Germany, 
Ireland, Spain and the Palestine 
Liberation Organization “have 
found a haven in Nicaragua and 
support from that country's cbm- 

rmmis t dictatorship” 

Speaking of other nations, Mr. 
Reagan said, “In 1983 alone, the 
Central Intelligence Agency either 
confirmed or found strong evi- 
dence of Iranian involvement in 57 
terrorist attacks.” 

Most of these attacks occurred in 
Lebanon, be said. But terrorist ac- 


tivity by those “sympathetic to 
Iran” has increased throughout £o- 


. ' _ 

.rr ' > ~ 


rape, he added. 

“We have evidence that links 




Libyan Manta or surrogates to at 
least 25 incidents last year," Mr. 


dhafi^s ' “outrages * g*in*i dvihzcd 
conduct are, of course, as infamous 
as those of the Ayatollah Kbomo- - 
ra," Iran’s leader. 











page 3 




-'"^Sgifrin lilriir^ Bi -. 1 - • 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


U.S Supreme Court, After Conservative Trend, Turns Back to the Center 


*«s t -S. 


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In Elections 


Cani^tfOir.Sti^FnmUsp^Ma 

MEXICO CITY — Tbe long- 
nftiqg Institutional Revolutionary 
Party has d aimed victory in gober- 
i atonal elections in two states 
where It had -faced strong chal- 
lenges, hot the- main opposition 
partyaBeged that there had been 
widespread vote tampering and 
band.- . 

■Mariana voted Sunday for gov- 

Srtfxtes? far 400 -seafc in*tLl 
dumber of Depnties, and a hand- 
fill of state and municipal posts. 
The official results are to be an- 
nounced Sunday. 

Tbc government party dahned 
anwerwhdmmg victory. 

“We can affirm that we obtained 
dear triumphs,” a party spokes- 
man, Jnan Saldana Rosdl, said in a 
statement He raid the claim was 
based-on polling results from 
around the country and included 
aD seven gubernatorial races. 

Earlier, in heavily industrialized 
Necvo Ledc, along the Texas bor- 
der, add the rich agricultural stale 
of Sonora, just south of Arizona, it 
was thought - that the opposition 
National Action Party might be- 
come the first opposition party to 
win a governorship in more than 50 

years. 

Shortly after the poUs dosed 
Sunday evening, President Miguel 
de la Madrid’s Institutional Revo- 
lutionary Party, which has been in 
power since 1910, claimed victory 
for the its candidates in Sonora, 
Rodolfo Fdix Valdes, and in Nue- 
vo Le 6 n, Jorge Trevino^ although it 
acknowledged not having die full 
results. 

Supporters of the opposition 
rightist party alleged even before 
the voting ended that the niKr 

party had engaged in vote fraud. 

In Monterrey, capital of Nuevo 
Le 6 n, citizens in one neighborhood 
raid they had forcibly opened 
ballot box before voting began a 
found it staffed with ballots for the 
ruling party. 

The editor in chief of the state’s 
sidon newspaper, El 
ais journalists reported 
12 cases of polling stations being 
held up by armed men who stole 
ballot boxes. 

Opposition party officials 
claimed that the heavy turnout fa- 
vored their candidates in both 
slates. 

“The vote was clear,” Adalberto 
Rosas Ldpez, the opposition guber- 
natorial candidate m Sonora, said 
Sunday night- “There was no doubt 
of it, I won, but they com mi tt e d 
fraud and cheated us.- The people 
voted for a change but the official 
party did not allow it” 

“This removes the democratic 
mask of this government," he said. 

Fernando Canales Qariond, the 
party’s gubernatorial candidate in 
Nuevo Ledn, echoed the alkga- 
rions of fraud, and said, “We won't 
let the maximum authorities wadi 
their hands of this." 

The ruling party was not consid- 
ered in danger of losing its tight 
grip on the political system. But 
three years or economic crisis and 
austerity have eroded some of the 
party’s popularity amo ng the mid- 
dle and working classes, bolstering 
support for the conservative oppo- 
sition. 

(AP, Reuters) 


Ai Kamen 

Wash i ngto n Pea Sente* 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court, which last year 
seemed to take a sharp turn to the 
right, this yew retaraed to a mote 
centrist position, deciding almost 
half of its civil liberties cases- in 
favor, of individual rights and 
pointedly reaffirming the separa- 
tion of church and state. 

AlihoOgh the court generally np-^ 

hdd the police powers of thestates 

and the federal gove rnment, the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 


cases granting rights to 
criminal suspects. 

During the 1 984-85 term, that 
ended last week, the moderate cen- 
ter that has dominated the court for 
most of the last 16 years eased the 
coon back to its traditional moder- 
ate position. 

Civil libertarians expressed ela- 
tion, while the Reagan Justice De- 
partment puzzled over. what went 
wrong in its effort to push a conser- 
vative agenda. 

U.S. Solicitor General Rex E 
Lee said the jutniiii^ i iitfiw Had 
some “major disappoint m e nts this 
term,” especially m its effort to 
lower constitutional barriers be- 
tween church and state. 

In four major cases, a narrow 
majority voted to draw a solid line 
between the government and 
church-tun schools. A 5-to-4 ma- 
jority ruled not only that a.Mkhi- 
gan program of qpeMaded aid to 
parochial schools was unconstitu- 
tional. but also that New YodtGty 
could not use federal funds to send 
public school twdiwt nun reli- 
gious schools nndw 3 n m gram to 

The legal director of the Ameri- 
can Gvu liberties Union, Burt 
Nenbame, who called last year’s 
court record “truly appalling.” said 


dial the court had “returned to the 
itdeithast^edhistiMally as a 
defender of the hufividuaL" 

The difference between the two 
taros was the court’s key swing 
vote,. Justice Lems F. Powdi Jr. 
JustutePowdttskkdwithccmcrva- 
tives consisten tly during last year’s 
tom, hut this year palled in the 
opposite direction. 

When Justice Powdi voted on 
almost any case, he tended to tip 
tho scale. He was on the losing side 
only six times in 89 derisions in 
which he participated this term. In 
18 cases where the court split 54, 
he was in the majority 14 times. 

Mr. Nenbome raid Justice Pow- 
ell was now “the most powerful 
individual in America." Mr. Pow- 
efl, 78, a moderate Bom Virginia 
appointed by Prescient Richard M. 
Noon, sided with the liberals this 

year more than he has in any of his 
14 years on the court. 

Conservatives such as Bruce £ 

Fein, who analyzes the court for the 
American Enterprise Institute, said 
last week that he was surprised 
when thft - sriministratkm “suffered 
severe defeats" in several areas in 
whai he called a term of “pause and 
irresolution." 

Mr. Fein said he was optimistic 
last fall that die court would lower 
the barriers to church-state separa- 
tion. The Supreme Court in recent 
terms had approved a dty govern- 
ment-sponsored Christmas nativity 
ovfif rtite tax deduction s f Of idl- 

gjons <ehnn 1 tuition tad a state- 
paid chaplain for the Nebraska leg- 
islature. 

“Everything that, seemed to have 
been won,” Mr. Fean said, “west 
out very quickly," as die court, in 
addj ffrn to the parochial « 4 whl 
cases, reaffirmed its disapproval of 
teacher-led prayer in pntuic schools 
and strode down a law that gave 
enmloyeeswboare religious greater 
rights than nonrefigjous workers. 

“State officials misread the court 


Burger Calls Some lawyer Ads ' Shysterism’ 


Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Chief Justice Warren E 
Burger, long an opponent of advertising by law- 
yers, has told an American Bar Association com- 
mission flat some of the ads are *sheer shyster- 
ism." . 

“1 will never— my advice to tbepuidic is gever, 
never, never, under any rircumstances, engage the 
services of a lawyer who advertiso." Justice Bmgcr 
told the Conumssicm. on professionalism meet i ng 
Sunday. 

“I am not ready to say thaL publicly yet, but 
someday I wiE" Justice Binger told about 30 
persons at the unpubhdzed session that was was 


part of the bar association's weeklcmg convention 
in Washington. 

No association material listed him as the speak- 
er, but the meeting was open to anyone who wished 
to attend. 

The chief justice said he approved of bar associ- 
ations publicizing their lawyer referral services as a 
way Lo teach the public. But, he said, “Any idea we 
need the load of advertising I am addressing . . . 
the kind that I rail sheer shysterism, is nonsense." 
If he were a private lawyer again, he said, he would 
“dig ditcher before resorting to advertising. 

The bar association generally supports advertis- 
ing by lawyers if it is not false or misleading. 



Warren E. Burger 


as having moved all the way toward 
the authoritarian end of the spec- 
trum," said Laurence H. Tribe, a 
Harvard Law School professor and 
consthntuxud scholar. 

“It was teetering” last year, Mr. 
Tribe gnA f “bat it nad not gone all 
the way." Conservatives were push- 
ing the justices “so far so fast thaL 
they may have recoaled from an 
invitation to join the new right It 
was an offer the court could readily 
refuse.” 

The Reagan administration, 
however, did win a substantial 
number of «»«*= in which the jus- 
tices backed executive branch pre- 
rogatives, and the administration 
generally bad hs way in rrimingl 


If two in which the court 
upheld individual free speech 
rfurmc font not on consti tutional 
grounds, and four tie cases are 
counted, individuals with civil lib- 
erties claims won nearly half the 
time before the Supreme Court, a 
record not seen since the days of 
Chief Justice Ead Warren. 

The court continued to favor 
law-and-oider views, but individ- 
uals won a number of significant 
cases as the states, although not the 
Justice Department, seemed to 
misread how far the justices were 
prepared toga 

In several cases, the court ex- 
tended Warren court precedents 


Justice Department figures show 
the government wan 80 percent of 
its cases overall, down from an ex- 
traordinary 87 percent a year ago. 
But the cases it lost this year often 
were the most important cases, a 
reversal of last yen’s record. 

Overall, the justices this tarn 
gave much g re a ter weight to indi- 
vidual rights as oppo^to govern- 
ment power. 


and expanded suspects rights. It 

ruled that iwtigHi tu pl anting iman - 



ap- 
.10 

a court-appointed lawyer, that po- 
lice could not use deadly force to 
stop a fleeing Teton except where 
there was a danger to the public, 
and that prosecutors could not 
force a suspect to undergo major 
surgery to remove a ballet sought 
as evidence. 


On the other Hand, the justices 
continued to uphold prison offi- 
cials* prerogatives, to give police 
greater freedom to act without war- 
rants and to chip away at the 20- 
year-old Miranda rule requiring 
police to read suspects their rights. 

Last year the court created a 
“public safety” exception to Mir- 
mda. This year, it said a confession 
indu c e d before Miranda warnings 
were given was not usable in court, 
but a second rate obtained after the 
warnings were issued conld be used 
against a suspect. 

The court was sympathetic to 
individual plains of cBsctiminatioa 
by state governments. In the most 
significant of them, the court 
struck down zoning laws that 
barred a group home far the men- 
tally retarded, but not fra: anyone 
else. 

While the court masted it was 
dung nothing new, Mr. Tribe; Mr. 
Fein and Mr. Neubome were ada- 
mant that the case, in Mr. Tribe’s 
words, “remvigoraled equal pro- 
tection.” The case, they said, would 
probably mate it tougher for gov- 
ernment to justify laws that treat 


certain groups, such as the retard- 
ed, differently from anyone else. 

In a major case involving the 
balance of power between the 
states and the federal government. 
Justice Harry A. Blactanun. a cen- 
trist, changed his mind this year 
and the court decided that the lOtfa 
Amendment did not protect states 
from federal laws regulating the 
wages and hours of state or local 
employees. The case overturned a 
ruling nine years ago. in which Jus- 
tice Blackmun voted the other way. 

The court, according to former 
deputy solicitor-general Philip A. 
Lacovara, generally struck down 
state laws that discriminated 
among their own residents or set up 
distinctions between state and out- 
of-state residents. It overturned 
residency requirements for a tax 
break for veterans, residency re- 
quirements for lawyers and breaks 
for local, as opposed to out-of- 
state, insurance oompanies. 

Bat while the justices several 
years ago exposed local and state 
governments to a barrage of anti- 


trust suits, this term the justices 
heightened protections 
such suits in two cases that touch 
more directly affected pocket* 
books," Mr. Lacovara said. 

“Where there is elbow room to 
interpret federal statutes in favor w 
state autonomy, .the Supreme 
Court gives states the benefit of the 
doubt." 

The last term seemed quieter 
than recent terms. There were few- 
er signed opinions — 140 as op- 
posed to 151 in each of the preced- 
ing two terms — and a number of 
important cases were decided by tie 
votes because of Justice Powells 
absence. 

He missed 56 cases because of 
surgery for a cancerous prostate. _ 

The justices si«i ducked consti- 
tutional questions whenever possi- 
ble, deciding several major cases on 
narrow grounds that resolved the 
individual (?yp but did not touch 
on broader questions. 

The term has already sparked 
debate among law professors oyer 
whether last year was an aberration 
or this year was the calm before a 
conservative storm. 

Mr. Tribe said that a year ago the 
court was “on the precipice and no 
one could say whether it was going 
to leap or sup back." He said tins 
term was a source of relief to civil 
libertarians because the court 
stepped back. 

But he called the most repent 
term a “dicey situation,'' with the 
court makin g decisions on a case- 
by-case basis and in close voles. 

Conservatives said they hope 
that one or two key Reagan ap- 
pointments would make the differ- 
ence. 

Although the justices, including 
Justice Powdi, appear to be in good 
health and seem bent on staying on 

the court as long as they can, five of 
them are over 76. 


3F U.S. Hospital Chains Sell Insurance 
l In Challenge lo Nonprofit Companies 


% Martin Tolchin 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Several 
large private hospital drams have 
expanded mtn health rnnirann* ft 
move that many experts predict 
will significantly alter the health 
' care industry. 

The Horertal Corporation of 
America, Humana, American 
Medical International and Nation- 
al Medical Enterprises are 
the private, profit-seeking 
chains that are mounting a direct 
challenge to Bine Cross-Blue Shield 
and other nonprofit health insur- 
ance companies. . - 

Bardy a year old, hospital chain 
insurance already has about a mil- 
lion subscribers, according to com- 
pany officials. 

“what we are seeing is a major 
structural change in the health care 
delivery system in the United 
Stales," said Royce Diener, chair- 
man of American Medical Interna- 
tional of Beverty Hilly California, 
a drain of 129 hospitals. The 
chain’s year-old Ag ric are health in- 
surance plan has 400JXX) sub- 
scribers. 

Insurance costs less with these 
companies when subscribers use 
their hospitals, clinics and physi- 
cians. Company nffiriak say this 
gives patients rather than doctors 
control over where they get care. 
But critics see less flexibility in 


U.S. Park Service Preserving 
Mementos at Vietnam 'WalP 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ter her son’s death in a helicopter 
crash in Vietnam, in which she de- 
scribed finding her son’s name fear 
the first rime on the wall: 

“We had been looking far about 



touching! die Made until, I saw your 
name, William R. Stock. 

“My heart seemed to slop. I frit 
as though I couldn’t breathe. It was 
file a bad dream. I fdt as though I 
was freezing. My teeth chattered. 

God, how it hurt" 

Greg Vaughan, a Park Service 
Mrimtrian mKn works at the WOK- 

house where the items are stored, 
said he periodically gets “a little 
misty”'aboui some of the hems. 

“You read the letters and you’re 
right there, up front with the people 

wIk) were than, the people who lost 

friend and family," he said. “It’s 
pot Bke history. There's sttil an 
immediacy about it." 

Mr. Kittleman of the Park Ser- 
vice agreed, saying: “This is one 
vny special monument I don't 
think anybody anticipated the pop- 
ularity of it &j many veterans have on/ 


been there and consider it their 
monument, their memorial, their 
place for reconciliation. The tears, 
the emotion — it’s all happened 
there.” 

The memorial has become 
Washington's most-visited monu- 
ment, with 2.1 million tourists from 
January through May of tins year. 
The next most popular rite, the 
Lincoln Manorial had 1.9 million 
visitors. 

Legally, aD items left at the me- 
morial are considered abandoned 
property after 30 days, Mr. Kittle- 
man raid. At the end of that time, if 
they have not been claimed, the 
Para Service must decide what to 
do with them. 

Mr. Scruggs, of the memorial 
fund, is glad the items are being 
preserved.- 

“1 mean, 100 yeare from now, n 
will be Hite reading a Civil War 
infantryman’s diary or something. 

This is part of the historical legate 

of (he Vietnam War." 

Mis. Wimbish agreed. “I think 
it’s a great idea," rite said, "espe- 
cially for my children and grand- 
children. I drink it means part of 
the love I still feel for Billy will live 


health care and ray the companies 
are trying to fill their hospital beds. 
In many hospitals in the United 
States, iess than half die beds are 
occupied. 

The nonprofit stiH 

donmrale the fidd, but Blue Cross- 
Blue Shield has begun to provide 
discounts, rebates and alternative 
insurance plans at lower prices. 

There are major differences be- 
tween chain and nonprofit insur- 
ance operations. 

Unlike the locally based Blue 

tal cfarin insarana^Cnrti^?ty 
oriented. Uwe £ Reinhardt, pro- 
fessor- of political economy' at 
Princeton Univasity, said, “All 
these years Americans have wanted 
local centred of health care, hut 

watirtnai mains, rittine in Louis- 
ville, Nashville and Beverty HHls 
and making health poficy for the 
entire nation.” 

Whole Blue Cross-Bine Shield 
takes “high risk" patients and does 
not caned coverage because of high 
use of benffits, most hospital chain 
jnsnyttwee plans have a cwling on 
lifetime benefits. For example, 
PriMed provides* a lifetime maxi- 
mum benefit of $250,000 for those 
who do not use the drain’s hospi- 
tals, and $500,000 for those who 
da PriMed is the health insurance 
program of the Hospital Corpora- 
tion of America, which owns and 
operates 360 hospitals. 

While hospital drams seek to 
steer insurance subscribers into 
their hospitals by offering substan- 
tial discounts, said Michael Brom- 
berg, executive director of the Fed- 
eration of American Hospitals, an 
organization of hospital chains and 
other private hospitals, “Blue Cross 
has been historically committed to 
total freedom of choice." 

■ The varied nature of insurance 
plans it itiffiraiit to compare 
costs, Mr. Bromberg said Bat oth- 
er experts estimated that the 
chaiira insurance policies cost 10 to 
15 percent less titan Bine Cross and 
Blue Shield premiums, if patients 
used the dram hospitals. 

Henry Werronen, preadent of 
Humana Care Phis, the insurance 
program provided by the 84-hospi- 
tal H umana Corp^ said: “Sixty 
percent of health insurance costs go 
for the hospitals. Because we own 


and operate hospitals, we are in a 
much better position to initiate cost 

ea vingf d *** 1 * w wtirinfuiliiwiMnM 

company that offers freedom of 
choice.” Hmnana Care Plus, barely 
a year old, has 250,000 subscribers 
and anticipates 600,000 by 1986. 

Americal Medical International 
was the Gist hospital chain to pur- 
chase an insurance company. Fir 
delily Interstate, so as to qualify to 
sefl health insurance in various 
states. Insurance companies also 
have been purchased by Humana,; 
which set up Humana Care Plus;'. 
Hospital Corporation dt America,! 
which set up PriMed; and National 
Medical* Enterprise, .which set up. > 
HeahhPaoe. 

Many experts ray the hospital 
chains sre reshaping the health in- 
surance industry. 

“Conventional health insurance 
is dead," said Dr. Paul EQwood, a 
health specialist who concaved 
and named both Health Mainte- 
nance Organizations, insurance 
plons that require subscr i bers to 
choose tbar doctors from a specific 
list, and Preferred Provider Organi- 
zations, in which subscribers get a 
discount on tbdr health care fees if 
they choose from fined physicians. 

The American Medical Associa- 
tion has initiated a study of the 
effects the hospital chains are hav- 
ing cm the practice of methane, 
according to Jean Bravogel, a 
spokesman. She said the findings 
would probably be completed and 
made pubfic in December. 

Marty experts view the new trend 
as a direct result of the change in 
federal health reimbursement paH- 
aes under the Medicare and Med- 
icaid programs,, which provide 
health care and health insurance 
for the dderiy and the poor. The 
federal government is repbumg its 
practice of ramburamg hospitals 
for health care costs, which many 
considered an incentive to spend, 
with a system of predetermined 
payments for various diseases. 

■ Metficare Cot Again 

The Reagan administration has 

annminry ft mnra than PM millio n 

in additional cuts in Metficare 
spending, to be achieved through 
new limns on payments for medical 
education ana name health care. 
The Associated Press reported 
from Washington. 


U.S. Reports Income Gap 
Widens Between Rich, Poor 

By Spencer Rich 

Washington Pou Service 

WASHINGTON — The gap between income groups widened from 
1980 to 1983, as the wealthiest f amili es in the United States boosted 
their share of after-tax income at the expense of other households, a 
congressional report shows. 

The report, released Sunday by Reprerantative W illiam H. Gray 
3d, a Democrat of Pennsylvania wio is chairman of the House Budget 
Committee; and Representative David R. Obey, a Democrat of 
Wisconsin who is chairman of the Joint Economic Committee, was 
based on a Census Bureau study of after-tax income of households in 
1983. 

It said that the one-fifth rtf II S households making up the top 
income bracket, or those with after-tax income above S2$j63 in 1983, 
received 42 percent rtf all -after-tax income in 1983, compared with 
40.6peroentinl98£.- 

The report said all other groups of households had a lower share of 
’ national income after t«a*y in 1983 than in 1980. 

''The lowest fifth of households received 4.7 percent of after-tax 
income in 1983 co mpa re d with 4.9 percent in 1980, the report said. 
The next-to-lowesi fifth fell from 11.6 percent to 11.1 percent. 

The middle fifth fell from 17.9 percent to 17J percent 
The fourth group fell from 25.1 percent of all after-tax income to 
24.8 percent 

The report said the increase for the top fifth represented a shift of 
$25 bilUan in income, or about $1,480 per household more than if the 
income distribution had not changed since 1980. 

For those at the top — the 5 percent with household income above 
$46,288 after taxes — the shift meant $3,320 more income per 
household. 

The report said 1980 tax changes that reduced income taxes for the 
well-to-do were responsible for about half the increase in their share 
of after-tax income, while economic conditions were responsible for 
the rest. 

r household, in constant 
to 1983 for the the top 
fifth of households, from $39,890 per household to $42,043. However, 
it dropped 1.5 percent to 25 percent for the lowest three-fifths. 


The report said that the average income 
dollars, increased by 5.4 percent from 19 
' from $39,890 



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Page 4 


TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


Ucral 



(tribune. 


Pnblwhtd With Th* Hew Yock Time* and TTjc Wasttn^ton PoH 


To Avert a Crash Landing 


Economic policy-makers are chilling the 
northern summer by not facing facts. As it 
escapes the high inflation syndrome, the 
industrial world onuses into another high- 
risk area. Some spotters see a crash landing. 

One risk is that slow growth in America, 
coupled with the overvalued dollar, will lead 
the White House to give in to pressures for 
protection that would bring back the ’30s, A 
second risk is that decline of the dollar will 
be so abrupt as to set off a world financial 
crisis, shattering such business confidence as 
has been rebuilt after the tribulations of the 
early '80s. A third is that even if American 
policy takes a turn toward sanity, the benefi- 
cial effects will be blocked by unresponsive 
attitudes from other countries. 

Gathering crisis for the rich may nurture a 
further risk: debt default by the poor. Debt- 
ors have so far eschewed this option, but 
Fidel Castro — not the best economist — 
urges them (o take it Mistakes by the rich 
could encourage them to do so. 

A crash landing starting in America, as 
opposed to a gradual downward adjustment 
of the dollar and balanced growth of world 
trade and employment, is not inevitable. But 
when Karl Otto PBU, president of West 
Germany's central bank, warns of it in pub- 
lic. the risk must be taken seriously. Central 
bankers do not indulge in scare stories. 

Events in America are dispiriting Con- 
flicting plans for reducing the budget .deficit 
have produced deadlock between the House 
and the Senate, and leadership from the 


president has been lacking The size of the 
deficit means heavy borrowing abroad, 
which keeps the dollar high — one informed 
es tima te suggests that it is 40-percaU over- 
valued. Spending by Americans is increas- 
ingly concentrated on imports, with many 
domestic industries facing depression. 

More determined budget action in Wash- 
ington is a necessary condition for avoiding 
a crash landing from which (he whole world 
would suffer. But it is not a sufficient condi- 
tion. The imm ediate effect of budgetaiy 
stringency will be depressive, and this needs 
to be offset by contrary policies abroad. 
Bonn and Tokyo have major responsibilities 
here, but their respouses are poor. Rejecting 
the advice-- which even their own cautious 
economists have offered — to have slightly 
more expansionary budgets, they continue 
to rely on foreign trade surpluses for stimu- 
lus. These surpluses will drop if Washington 
gets its deficit under control. 

In all three countries, politicians ignore a 
simple economic fact: Public borrowing 
should match private spending. America's 
future is in pawn because public borrowing 
greatly exceeds what the private sector 
saves. West Germany and Japan, on the 
contrary, are robbing themselves — and the 
world — of benefits by borrowing less than 
their citizens want to save. If we are to land 
softly, leading governments need to rethink 
their policies — before their constituencies 
come back from the summer beaches. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


What Policy at the Fed? 


Two seats on the Federal Reserve Board will 
fall vacant in the next six months. When he 
fills them. President Reagan will have chosen a 
majority or the board's seven members. That 
requires him to decide what kind of a mone- 
tary policy he wants. The administration, like 
economic conservatism in general, is split. 

Monetarists stand for tight restraint on the 
money supply to hold down inflation. Supply- 
siders push for faster growth, with less concern 
for inflation. So far the administration has 
been in the comfortable position or being able 
to stand on both sides of the argument- ft has 
been able to blame high interest rates on the 
Federal Reserve, while simultaneously taking 
credit for the low inflation that those rates 
have enforced. Why? Because the Federal Re- 
serve is led by a strong chairman, Paul 
Volcker, whom Mr. Reagan inherited from the 
previous adminis tration, and because Mr. 
Volcker has had the support of a majority of 
the board’s other six members. 

Now one strong and reliable member of that 
majority, Lyle E Gramley, has announced Ms 
resignation. The term of another, J. Charles 
Partee, will expire in January. 

The question Is whether President Reagan, 
in replacing them, will try to create a new and 
different majority pulling in another direction 
against Mr. Volcker. Mr. Reagan’s first ap- 
pointment to the board, in 1982, was Vice 
Chairman Preston Martin. The second, Mar- 


tha R- Seger, has only recently been con- 
firmed. The votes of Fed members are hardly 
more predictable than those of Supreme Court 
justices, but both of these Reagan appointees 
have occasionally seemed to suggest that they 
favor more emphasis on growth than the pre- 
sent majority does. That would mean less em- 
phasis on policing inflation. 

The Fed has become a kind of hobgoblin to 
some in Mr. Reagan's administration and his 
party, particularly among the supply-siders. 
To them, it has emerged as the single all- 
purpose explanation for the failures of Mr. 
Reagan's economic strategy. This accusation is 
particularly strong in the wing of the Republi- 
can Party that is gathering around Representa- 
tive Jack Kemp and his campaign for the 
presidency. It is Mr. Reagan's most foveni 
supporters who will press Mm hardest to use 
these appointments to seize control of the 
Federal Reserve and turn its coarse. 

But Mr. Voider has come to embody the 
country’s commitment to low inflation. Any 
attempt by the White House to undercut his 
policies at the Fed is going to be interpreted 
widely throughout this country and the world 
as an intentional swing to easy money and, 
inevitably, rising prices. An administration 
running budget deficits of S200 billion a year is 
not in a safe position to risk raising further 
fears of high inflation ahead. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Big Loophole to dose 


General Dynamics, America’s biggest de- 
fense contractor, has owed no federal income 
taxes since 1972. Any fair tax reform ought to 
dose that large a loophole, but president Rea- 
gan proposes only to narrow it and then won- 
ders why anyone calls Ms plan unfair. 

The issue here is “completed-eontract" ac- 
counting. It allows corporations to delay pay- 
ing taxes on profit from a long-term contract 
until the job is completed, but lets them deduct 
the costs of that project on a current basis each 
year. If XYZ Inc. is building 25 jet fighters, it 
can write off some of the costs against profits 
Trom other projects each year even though it 
receives periodic payments for the planes from 
the Pentagon. The tax on the profit from the 
planes is not due until all 25 have been deliv- 
ered. For a major defense contractor working 
many projects simultaneously, these deferrals 
can go on and on. By the time the jet fighter 
contract is fulfilled and the profit becomes 
taxable, it can be offset by the heavy start-up 
costs of a missile contract 

This accounting method is not an inadious 
contrivance of profiteers. It works for other 
businesses and for private as well as govern- 
ment contracts. The rationale is that a compa- 
ny cannot compute in advance what its taxable 
profit will be. Some deferral may thus be 


essential Tor smaller enterprises with limited 
cash. But surely General Dynamics and other 
giants know they will come out whole on their 
defense business. General Electric, Boeing, 
Grumman and loci heed have also owed no 
taxes in one or more of the last few years. 

Congress put some limits on (Ms free ridein 
1982, but lhqy are not yet fully effective. The 
Reagan administration dow proposes further 
limits, by reducing the list of currently deduct- 
ible expenses. Yet at the same time the Reagan 
plan would increase the benefit by reducing 
the corporate tax rate. The eventual taxes 
would be figured at a lower rale than the one in 
effect when the profits were accumulated. 

The tax reform plan of Senator Bill Bradley 
and Representative Richard Gephardt would 
permit a modified deferral bnt collect interest 
retroactively on the amounts postponed. Rep- 
resentative Fortney Stark proposes banning 
“comp leted-con tract" accounting outright for 
federal contracts of two years or longer. 

The newest recruit to the cause of reform is 
Defease Secretary Caspar Weinberger, who 
testified the other day that he was “all for 
eliminating" this special advantage- His em- 
barrassment over $640 toilet seats is com- 
pounded when the manufacturer owes no tax. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR JULY 9 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

L0: Cost of U.S. Government Rises 1935: Depression Threatens Japan 


1910; Cost of LIS. Government Rises 
NEW YORK — Theories attributing the ad- 
vance in the cost of living to increased produc- 
tion of gold or to the tariff are well enough, but 
there's no denying the one important dement 
in the advance Is the enormously increased 
cost of government — national, state and mu- 
nicipal. The first “billion dollar Congress" 
gave the country a shock and led to a clamor 
for economy. Now we have single sessions of 
Congress that authorize the expenditure of a 
billion without exciting special attention. The 
record of thirty States shows that their expen- 
ditures from 1900 to 1909 increased more than 
ninety percent The money for all this extrava- 
gance comes out of the pockets of the people. 
It is a heavy burden and constitutes a most 
important element in the greater cost of living 
of which the masses so bitterly complain. 


PARIS — The old adage about a silver lining 
to every cloud apparently applies to the new 
business depression with which Japan is 
threatened. Should the new depression go far it 
might well have serious consequences. But 
these are in part offset by the probable effect 
of the depression on Japan's aggressive foreign 
policy. It has long been apparent that Japan’s 
lack of raw materials of modern industrialism 
might act as a brake on her expansionist ten- 
dencies. This poverty has been one of the 
motivating forces behind this policy. But there 
comes a time when the cost of waging war 
abroad becomes unbearable. Two things are 
dear: the policy of expansion in China will , 
require more, not less, money; and the govern- 
ment cannot indefinitely support the army and 
navy by what amounts to forced loans. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PaLEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, hddaker 

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SAMUEL ABT DmmEdnor RICHARD H. MORGAN Amman Publisher 

ROBERT K. McCABE Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Durxior of Qpertmcns 

CARL GEWIRTZ Assocude EAtor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Dinaor Oradaoui 

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® 1985. Intmunanol Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. BCSsftt 





VffiY! '6or/r- 

’uit warn 

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Now Gomes a Chance to Redefine Strategic Balance 


N ICE — Now that Ronald Rea- 
gan and Mikhail Gorbachev 
have made a date in Geneva, plan- 
ning can begin in earnest 
Clearly, this cannot be the “care- 
fully prepared" summit that both 
sides nave sometimes demanded, in 
the sense that there is not enough 
time for the precise and intricate ne- 
gotiations needed to draft a major 
treaty. And it is true that a poorly 
written treaty creates sedans risks. 

Americans experienced in bargain- 
ing with Moscow point out that its 
usual approach to applying agree- 
ments is to make full use of loopholes 
and ambiguities. The result, if defini- 
tions are less than exact and perfectly 
lucid, is to increase suspicion ana 
recrimination ttisteari of fulfilling the 
purpose of easing tensions. 

That certainly developed from the 
1972 Nixon-Brezhnev accord, which 
was the heart of dfetente. Instead of 
establishing general rules of super- 
power conduct as was supposed at 
the time, its loose terms were inter- 
preted in flatly contradictory ways. 
There are other reasons for the col- 
lapse of dfetente, but invoking expec- 
tations doomed to disappointment 
makes an inevitably difficult rela- 
tionship much harder to manage. 


By Flora Lewis 


lineal, economic, even psychological 
That was not only far beyond Ameri- 
can intentions, it was beyond Ameri- 
ca’s capacity to assure. The United 
States thought Moscow had accepted 
constraints on its ambitions to bring 
Communists to power in other parts 
of the world. That would imply a 
change in Soviet ideology ana the 
fundamentals of its regime, which 
may or may not come some day but 
obviously will not derive from a mere 
declaratory agreement. 

To work effectively, accords must 
reflect currently perceived mutual in- 
terest They do not create trust out of 
primeval mire They can only express 
shared need, essentially to reduce the 
dangers of superpower war. 

Bnt the fact that there is no pro- 
spect of a dramatic reversal in East- 
west relations at the summit does not 
mean it would be a mere courtesy call 
where two men meet to show their 
amiability. It cannot avoid being a 
milestone after six years of deteriora- 
tion. The mere fact of the summit 
meeting engages the apparatus of 
each government and m«iVs a new 
departure to define what is tolerable, 
what should be considered “normal” 


Moscow thought U.S.- acceptance in Soviet-U.S. relations. 


jc “panty” meant recogni- 
at quality in aB senses: po- 


Mr. Reagan bad already planned 
to launch lumsdf on a special cram 


course of Soviet studies, and that now 
becomes an urgent priority. No mat- 
ter how affable the partners, it is 
evident in every official Soviet- Amer- 
ican exchange that minds work dif- 
ferently. The Russians have just as 
much trouble grasping the assump- 
tions that underlie American ways of 
thought as Americans have figuring 
out the mechanisms that move the 
Russians’ secretive society. 

It is better to be aware of that and 
not leap to conclusions about basic 
understanding, whether of friendli- 
ness or hostility, because of words 
and images. Here Mr. Reagan's skill 
in image-making and modern Ameri- 
ca’s audiovisual obsession can be a 
handicap, not an advantage. 

What is needed is not just smiling 
spectacle but a seme of architecture 
of design for the long term so that not 
only the two giants but the whole 
wond can get on with the problems of 
the age in a certain sense of security. 

Both sides have already said tire y 
seek strategic stability. Neither quite 
believes that the other doesn’t really 
nw»n militar y domination. This is 
not a matter of some devious master 
plan. The lessons that the Soviet mili- 
tary establishment drew from World 
War EL, still the source of its basic 
doctrine, were “never again to be 


At Milan , Europe Pul the Cart Before 1 0 Horses 


B RUSSELS— The wreckage of the Eurobean 
Community's June 28-2y summit in Milan 
gives rise to two basic questions. If the EC cannot 
move forward, must it begin to go backward? 
And were the European leaders not being asked 
to address the wrong issue in tire wrong way? 

The row at Milan — the EC Commission's 
president, Jacques Ddors, has bluntly called it 
a “rupture” — was essentially over tire degree 
of political integration and eventual federalism 
that the member states can accept. The way in 
which tempers flared across tire conference table 
showed that, almost 30 years after tire Rome 
Treaty, Europeans are still deeply divided on the 
question of political and economic muon. 

All the founder members — the six who wrote 
tire treaty — say it now needs some rewriting if 
Europe is to achieve greater strength through 
unity. But latecomers lire Britain, Denmark and 
Greece object that they already concede enough 
of their sovereign powers to Brussels. 

The Milan meeting had been billed as the 
occasion for the 10 beads of government to 
relaunch a common market that has lost momen- 
tum and direction. With old bones of contention 
Hire Britain’s disproportionate budget coutribu- 
■ tkm and Spain and Portugal’s entry terms safety 
out of the way, it was hoped that the summit 
would agree on a new decision-making system 
capable of unblocking tire Community's logjam 
of stalled internal negotiations. 

One of the main reasons why the Community 
is nowadays in disarray is the snail's pace at 
which many joint decisions are reached. A num- 
ber of proposals have been frozen inside the 
machinery of the council of ministers for over 10 


By. Giles Merritt 

years. At the same time, more and mare of 
Europe’s political and legislative business winds 
up in Brussels. Last year ministers had to troop 
hoe or down to Luxembourg to attend more 
than 80 sessions of the council, whereas in 1976 
there were 55 such meetings. 

The major bugbear, though, is that unanimity 
has become the practice when the ministers vote 
on a proposal so one dissenting voice can hold 
up an agreement indefinitely. And when the 
ministers at each council meeting start to number 
12, after Spanish and Portuguese accession next 
Jan. 1, tire chances of swift and efficient decision- 
making will dwindle further. 

It was for precisely that reason that Milan was 
due to have settled etn a formula acceptable to all 
in which majority voting could be practiced. 

The breakdown at Milan was over whether or 
not member states should keep their right to veto 
any mmority vote decisions they regard as un- 
acceptable. That has been the situation for the 
last 20 years or so, ever since Charles de Gaulle 
boycotted the Community with his “empty 
chair” policy in defense of France's sovereignty, 
with the read! that although maority voting is 
theoretically the system for all nut innovative 
matters, the ‘reality is that it is never used. 

To try to resolve tins impasse, the EC countries 
are to take pan in a special “inter-govermneniaT 
conference, probably to be held in Luxembourg 
in October. Unpropitiously, the idea of the con- 
ference had to be bulldozed through at Mian in a 
7-3 vote. The British, Danes and Greeks have 


made painfully dear that they do not think there 
will be much to talk about in Luxembourg. 

The likelihood of the Luxembourg conference 
coming up with something worth submitting to 
the Community’s year-end summit is slim. The 
risk is that the conference will drag on inconclu- 
sively for several months, robbing salt in En- 

pahticafiy (he come to a halt. 

In Brussels at present there seem to be no 
optimists, only pessimists and extreme pessi- 
mists. The former say that Europe is being made 
to confront “the moment of truth” in which 
either all member states must accept majority 
voting or they must resign themselves to a two- 
speed Europe as the original six forge ahead on 
their own. The less optimistic, some of whom 
wonder if Milan has not revealed the Community 
as the political hoax it always was, warn of a 
stalemate stretching years ahead. 

Perhaps the gloom would be dispelled if Euro- 
peans realized that Milan failed unnecessarily. 
The summit was asked to agree on concessions of 
sovereignty as a precondition for economic re- 
covery through a freer market Yet governments 
are more likdy to make concessions to safeguard 
what has already been accomplished. 

Milan rather casualty adopted the Commis- 
sion’s master plan for a genuine common market 
by 1992. But that, not majority voting, should 
have been the centerpiece; For those liberaliza- 
tions will create what Walter HaUslein, one of 
the Community’s founding fathers, used to call 
“Sachzwang" — tire economic momentum that 
should make majority voting palatable to afi. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Soviet Foreign Policy: Restoring a Tough Image 


N EW YORK — With the election 
of former Foreign Minister An- 
drei Gromyko to the presidency of 
tire Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorba- 
chev has consolidated his leadership. 
By placing his own man, Eduard She- 
vardnadze, in charge of the Foreign 
Ministry, Mr. Gorbachev has taken 
control of foreign policy. The period 
of relative Soviet passivity ana ream- 
ing to American initiatives in the in- 
ternational arena is probably over. 
We can now expect the Soviet Union 
to begin looking for opportunities to 
exploit American vulnerabilities. 

The general outline and directions 
of Mr. Gorbachev’s foreign policy arc 
becoming increasingly dear. The new 


By Seweryn Butler 

This is the first of three articles. 


taken by surprise, never again on our 
territory." But, as West European an- 
alysts point out, acceptance of this 
would mean that “if war were to 
come, we would be the ones to be 
surprised, and on our territory." By 
such a definition, the goals of strate- 
gic stability are incompatible. 

The task has to be an attempt to 
work out what stability means in a 
way both can accept- So far the focus 
has been on missile counting, and the 
results have been disappointing, to 
say dre least. An agreement in princi- 
ple that arsenals are much too high 
for anyone's safety could be a start 
toward a new search for balance. 

Farther, it is evident that balance 
must include defense as wdl as of- 
fense. That principle should be re- 
affirmed. It does not mean abandon- 
ing Mr. Reagan’s wish to rely more 
on defense than on offense, which 
may or may not be feasible. It does 
mean full acceptance of the linkage. 

Removal of the Soviet Union's vet- 
eran foreign minister, Andrei Gro- 
myko. from direct negotiating re- 
sponsibility may signal greater 
willingness to explore new approach- 
es on Moscow’s side. In any case, the 
pJianrtts for making Geneva turn 'out 
to be a watershed depend on trying to 
look well beyond the moment, with 
hope but without illusions. 

The New York Times. 


Isn’t Told 
In Pictures 

Bv David S. Broder 

¥ 

W ASHINGTON — On the same 
day that President Reagan 
welcomed home the American hos- 
tages of TWA 847. the date was set 
for his first meeting with the leader of 
the Soviet Union. The Irak may not 
seem obvious, but there is one: Both 
events wiU surely be on the highlight 
reel of the biggest picture stories of 
1985. In tire era ctf ' ‘up-dose- and- 
personal" camera journalism, the 
Beirut hostage story and the Geneva 
summit are sure winners. 

The television networks took the 
TWA 847 story and ran with it. Now 
they are reeling the backlash of criti- 
cism from the printed press and some 
politicians for the “excesses" they 
permitted or encouraged. 

NBCs John Chancellor, one of the 
sanest and most honorable people in 
that business, is justifiably enraged at 
suggestions that (he networks were 
scripting and programming the hos- 
tage drama as if it were a mini -series 
designed to boost ratings. Yet there is 
no question that television moved in 
on the story with a competitive feroc- 
ity that knew no bounds. 

At some point, many of us watch- 
ing fdu television crossed the line 
between covering the story and hyp- 
ing iL The incessant interviews made 
uo distinction between the words and 


subordinated afi questions to the im- 
perative of a quick release. 

It is tempting to spcailate that 
Mikhail Gorbachev' was impelled to 
accept Mr. Reagan's invitation to a 
summit meeting after seeing the way 
in which Shiite and Syrian critics 
of the United States were able to use 
the American television networks to 
make their propaganda points. 

There is of course no evidence that 
this was the case. In any event. Mr. 
Gorbachev has demonstrated such a 
mastery of electronic public relations 
that he does not have to take his cues 
from the likes of Nabih Bern or Ha- 
fez al-Assad. His visit to Britain last 
year, before be formally assumed 
power in the Kremlin, was a tour de 
force that left Margaret Thatcher, no 
mean scene-stealer herself, agog. 

There is a warning signal none for 
Ronald Reagan. One of the sources 
of his strength has been his domina- 
tion of television, nor just on the 
national scenebut on the internation- 
al scale as welL Thai mastery is now 
bring challenged by Third World 
tough guys ana by the self-confident 
master of Communist Russia. 

. But there is more at stake than Mi. 
Reagan's standing. It involves Amer- 
icans' ability to think clearly about 
their position in the world. 

What television does superbly is to 
focus tightly on a story. It shows the 
scene and the players in a way that 
truly does transform a generalized 
problem like terrorism into a person- 
al drama of overwhelming impact. 
Bnt the very tightness of its focus — 
its need for those “up-dose-and-per- 
sonal" pictures — makes it exceed- 
ingly difficult for television to keep 
things in perspective. 

If you doubt that, ask yourself 
what happened during the 18 days of 
the TWA 847 story; to the issue of 
Communist subversion in the West- 
ern Hemisphere — the con c er n that 
had caused the Reagan administra- 
tion so recently to order an embargo 
of Nicaragua and to lobby furiously 
in Congress for a revival of aid to 
the ann-Sandinist "contras" That 
issue just disappeared. 

The crash at sea of an .Air- India 
plane, which took right times as 
many lives as were at risk in Beirut, 
was not nearly as big a television 
story — because after the first two 
days there were no more pictures. 
Famine in Africa, fighting in Afghan- 
istan and the impasse cm the U.S. 
federal budget suffered similar fates. 

When Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorba- 
chev meet in Geneva, chances are 
they will be accompanied by the net- 
work anchormen and a horde of cam- 
eras. Every smile or frown will be 
magnified by endless repetition on 
the television screens into a metaphor 
for U.S.-Soviet relations. 

But we cannot reduce international 
relations to the close-up pictures cm 
which television thrives. The prob- 
lems are more complex than footage 
of a pistol-wielding hijacker or a 
freed hostage's farewell embrace of 
his jailer can communicate. We can- 


or by U.S. determination to pursue revitalization of America’s world role 
the Strategic Defense Initiative. and esptejalty the arms control nego- 
MeanwnUe, by virtue of his own tuitions in Geneva do not leave Mr. 


Meanwhile, by virtue of his own tuitions in i 
moves and the situation he inherits, Gorbachev 
Mr. Gorbachev is in an extraordinary tionist choi 
position to direct Soviet foreign and in the inter 
security policies. Mr. Gromyko's de- He xnheri 
panure from a postion of real power er from his 
is a giant step m the damnation of intematioa 
the old guard from the inner circle of byapassiw 
Soviet decision-makers. policy. His 

During the interregnum under take into i 
Konstantin Chernenko, the 1 making Union’s do 


Gorbachev the luxury of a senri-isola- 
tionist choice. He must play actively 
in the international arena. 

He inherits awesome military pow- 
er from his predecessors, bat also an 


This is a hard-line policy that does up and down by the zoom lenses 
not respond favorably to the desires focusing on a family's grief at an 
of the leadership of most of th es e Arlington grave or the grin on the 
countries for closer ties with the face of a Kremlin operative: 

West; a jxdicj 
contribution f 


s for closer ties with the face of a Kremlin operative: 
poUcythat demands greater What the critics of television haw 
tion from E a st er n Europe to been saying is not that the networks 


• To re-establish the Soviet inter- 
national image as a superpower that 
is strong, decisive and determined to 
pursue a global role of “equality" 
with the United States. 

• TO damag w si gnifican tly the im- 
age of America in the international 
arena. This second goal suggests that 
Moscow will be looking for opportu- 
nities to embarrass Washington and 
aggravate its problems abroad what- 
ever posable — most likely in Nica- 
ragua but also possibly in Pakistan, 
the Philippines, Korea and Egypt. 

• To obtain an arms control 
agreement that wiU permit him to 
concentrate on more pressing domes- 
tic economic and social problems. 

It is likely that these goals, espe- 
cially the second and third, will prove 
contradictory and impossible to pur- 
sue simultaneously, and that Mr. 
Gorbachev will need to choose which 
is more important Or be may find 
the third goal foreclosed by US. ac- 
tion in response to Soviet initiatives, 


of foreign policy was fra: all practical 
purposes concentrated in toe hands 
of Mr. Gromyko and his deputies. 

Mr. Shevardnadze is little known 
even in the Soviet Union. His power 
base is in Georgia. In Moscow he will 
be entirety dependent on Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s support He wiU be a minister 
of foreign affairs for whom the policy 
will be made by Mr. Gorbachev ana 
his closest associates. 

Similarly, in formulating security 
policy for the Soviet Union Mr. Gor- 
bachev is in a strong position. Dmitri 


international situation long typified 
by a passive or reactive Soviet foreign 
policy. His three foreign policy goals 
take into account both the Soviet 
Union’s domestic situation and the 
diminished international role it has 
been playing in the last several years. 

The Soviet image has been tar- 
nished by several years of leadership 
paralysis jn the Kremlin. In pursuing 
nis first goal — improving that imay 
— Mr. Gorbachev seems determined 
to maintain Soviet control over tradi- 
tional or relatively oew areas of in- 
fluence or dominance. The Soviet 
Union, in Mr. Gorbachev’s eyes, may 
be too weak to show weakness. 

A Irey example of this policy goal is 
the emerging Soviet hard line toward 


cuatnouuun irom eastern Europe to been saying is not that the networks 
the development of Soviet natural did their job badly but that they did it 
resources while trying to force on aB too welL Americans’ senses were 
East Europeans higher prices for So- overwhelmed, and their mfnHs w we 
viet exports; apohey directed against drowned in the coverage. The Geneva 
political and economic innovations, summit threatens a similar surfeit, 
unless there are some serious second 


this comment to Vie Washington Past 


communications mechanisms 
The Washington Pan. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Pakistan ami die Sikhs whom Pakistan is in tbe i 


whom Pakistan is in tbe process of 
normalizing its relations. 

Regarding “ Gandhi aid the Sikhs: RAANA MUMTAZ. 

fop** Q Raacr Embassy of Pakistan. 

(June 29) by Pratuzy Gupte: . 

The Air- India crash has indeed 

grieved the world for the loss of hu- An] Infnrtmtton NnvJ 
man life. But Mr. Gupte’s reference M Uniorgotten Hovel 

to “Pakistan-based Sikh separatists" In his June 26 review of Gunter 
was unwarranted and factually incor- Grass’s “On Writing and Politics: 
rect Pakistan’s poaiionon the evraits 1967 -1983," Christopher Lehmann- 
in India’s Puqab and on the Sikh Haupt refers to a “nearly forgotten” 
movement has dearly been one of novel by Alfred DSblin. But “Berlin 
noninterference in the affairs of its Alexandeiplatz” is regarded as a 
neighbor, and the question of Skh modem masteiwork in West Gerraa- 
bases in Pakistan does not arise. Mis- ny. It was filmed by the late Rainer f 
statements of facts like these result m Fassbinder and has recently been is- j 
creating misunderstanding, not only sued is a Penguin paperback as a | 
about Pakistan’s policy of strict ad- modem classic. “Bolin Alexander- '• f 


Ustinov, whose authority as defense Eastern Europe — which is as hard- 
minister was unchallenged, died last pressed economically as the Soviet 
December not long after he dismissed Union but cannot expect si gnificant. 
Nikolai Qgarkov as military chief of Soviet help. Favorable economic per- 


staff. Neither man's replacement has foramce in Eastern Europe, funda- 
the authority of his predecessor. mental to the region's social stability, 

□ depends primarily an dose economic 

As Mr. Gwbachey puts his own randans with the West 
imprint on Soviet policy, he is acutely But pursuing doser relations with 

aware that the Soviet Union is in the 'the West to gam social stability coor 
throesofadeqtdoim^aiststhaiis Diets with the political orthodoxy 
not ooty economic but also social and that Mr. Gorbachev has chosen to 
political. His priorities are tuques- demonstrate Soviet strength. Thepo- 
tionably domestic. But the Soviet htical orthodoxy and the crackdown 
Union's international situation, the mi liberals in Eastern Europe is 


In Ms June 26 review of Gonter 
Grass’s “On Writing and Politics; 
1967-1983," Christopher Leiunann- 
Haupt refers to a “nearly forgotten" 
novel by Alfred DSblin. Bui “Berlin 


creating misunderstanding, not only 
about Pakistan’s policy of strict ad- 
herence to the principles of nonmter- 
vention but also about Pakistan’s 
policy toward India, a neighbor with 


!es of nometer- platz" has hardly been forgotten. ' 
uut Pakistan's MITCH SNYDER., 

neighbor with - Frankfurt 






l? 


ZW.-.r-i 






C^ousin 







-- 


HSTERNATIONA3L HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


Page 5 


iijr. 


■■'■fecit 

e, -sri* 

suj 

'• ijicfchs 
:** hrr\ irfe 
hrUzw 
" -v.S2 

1 : 


Egypt? Worried by Rising Religious Tension, 9 Acts to Curb Moslem Zealots 


. : MQler 

- ' NinrTwA Tones Service . 

CAIRO— The Egyptian govern- 
’mfiot'in a dgtmct shift oT policy, 
has started a campaign to stem toe 
gposAfa-rf Islamic fundamentalist 
faces.: - 

Uto3 recently, the government 
of- President Hosni. Mubarak 





with the_ fundamentalist Moslems. - 
Signs ofwhatone official caTluri 
^ govenmient’s new “firmness" 
reported!? reflect Egyptian con- 
cern about thcgrowtfa of cxlr emkm 
pra only m Egypt but also in Leba- 
non sod dWP&hout die region. 

. ^A dear message is bang sent to 
faadamentalists,a senior official 
. ssdd.. 1f €gypt will continue t& pur- 
sue dbnocxacy, to foster freer ex- 
ppisiWT?ii ;fl^^ debate, but (here are 
limrts 'beyond which no one will be 

■ permitted to go.** 






- permitted to go. 

In a speech last week, President 
Mubarak issued his toughest warn- 
ing since assuming power and he 
vowed to crash any group that fo- 
mented unrest under ^evil slo- 


•- - -s» *~-v- - 



■■■■ -■ 
% • 


. ** 

■ K. • V . 

* • 



Tha AoocfcMd Piwb 


Islamic fathU, with police lookingon, praying in a Cairo street to back (hear demand for a return to Moslem law. 


Although be did not refer to fun- 
damentalists by name, the larged of 
his remarks was dear, officials said. 
“I warn and I warn and I warn 
again!” be declared. 

Beginning this week, drivers of 
vdndes that display Islamic or oth- 
er religious .decals and bumper 


stickers win. be subject to ft"** of 
unspecified amounts and risk hav- 
ing their licenses confiscated fa a 
year, the Ministry of Interior. de- 
creed last week. 

For the last two weeks, the gov- 
ernment has «ng«g«fi in an intense 


Murdoch Syndicate to Create 
f Column’ of Pope’s Writings 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — Pope John Paul 
D will not write a weekly newspa- 
per cobmm, but his writings and 
sermon* will be offered in con- 
densed form through syndicates 
owned by Rupert Murdoch, a 
spokesman for the publisher said 


A Vatican spokesman Sunday 
denied reports that the pope had 
agreed to become a columnist fa 
the syndicates, disputing headlines 
such as “Cohmms by Pope to Ap- 
pear in Son-Times” on the front 
page of Mr. Murdoch’s Chicago 
Sun-Times newspaper. 

Richard Newcontbe, president 
of the News America syndicate and 
The Times of London syndicate, 
said there was no formal agreement 
between Mr. Murdoch and the Vat- 
ican. 

Instead, he said, an agreement 
had been reached between the syn- 
dicates and a Catholic scholar, Al- 
fred Bloch, under which he would 
provide a weekly 700- word column 
drawn from the pope's “messages, 
writings, speeches, sermons and the 
like.” 

Mr. Koch said Ire had cleared 
the idea withfriends in the Vatican 


but said he did not know if the 
pope was aware of it 
Mr. Newcombe said: “What our 
intent was, based an tire writings, 
the sermons, the speeches Of Pope 
John Paul H, was to be able to take 
his words and apply (ban to con- 
temporary issues. A 

“If there is a major news event, 
like the hijacking recently of the 
TWA jet, we would like to offer to 
newspapers around the world what 
it was that tire pope had said about 
terrorism,” Mr. Newcombe said. 

Mr. Bloch said: “A .certain num- 
ber of cardinals are friends of mine, 
and they said go ahead and do it. 
Whether they cleared this through 
the pope is not my concern.” 

Mr. Bloch identified his contacts 
in the Vatican as Car dinal Alfons 
Stickler, librarian of tire Catholic 
Chinch, «md Cardinal Fdnnar d 
Gagnon, president of the Pontifical 
Commission fa tire Family. 

Mr. Koch said Mir. Murdoch's 
organization would pay him and 
his partners, and a portion of this 
money would be given to Vatican 
scholarship funds. 

“Ibis is a very delicate sulg cct," 
he said. "Ibe Vatican does not ac- 
cept royalties.” 


test of will over demands by Islam- 
ic fundamentalists that Egypt im- 
mediately adopt the Sharia, Islam’s 
1 ^OO-year-old legal code. 

The government has banned 
mar ch es and demonstrations de- 
manding the Sharia, has tried to 


wrest control of the nation’s largest 
fundamentalist mosque from its 
leadership and has issued stem 
warnings about forms of protest 
that wifi, not be tolerated. 

A week ago, the govonment's 
ruling National Democratic Party 


introduced in Parliament a wom- 
en’s rights law that the Supreme 
Court bad ruled iigconst indionat 
two months ago, citing procedural 
grounds. 

Ibe measure was quickly ap- 
proved. Leading Islamic funda- 


mentalists opposed both the origi- 
nal 1979 law and the new verson, 
which restored most, but not all, 
the rights of women in divorce 
cases. 

Ibe government's edict banning 
bumpa stickera was aimed at stop- 
ping tire so-called “bumper-sticker 
war” between Moslems and Chris- 
tians. which has risked setting off 
tension and strife, officials said. 

Although most of Egypt’s 48 mil- 
lion people are Moslems, the coun- 
try hk 4 million to 6 mflh’oa Coptic 
Christians. Sectarian cMi« were 
frequent before Islamic militants 
assassinated President Anwar Sa- 
dat in October 1981, and President 
Mubarak has taken steps to pre- 
vent a renewal of tenainn. 

The Islamic stickers, the most, 
popular of which proclaim, “There 1 
Is No God but Allah, and Moham- 
med Is His Prophet" — one of the 
five pillars of Islam — have recent- 
ly flooded shops and sidewalk 
stands, selling at the equivalent of 
25 cats each. 

Copts have responded by affix- 
ing to their cars pictures of their 
spiritual leader, Pope Shmnria in, 
freed by Mr. Mubarak lost January 
after 40 months of banishment at a 
desert monastenr. Crucifixes have 
also proliferated, as have stickers 
proclaimmg, in Arabic. *The Lord 
Is My Shepherd.” j 

In another move to curb refr- , 


gious extremism, the Ministry of 
Religious Affairs tried to lake con- 
trol of the Noor Mosque, Cairo's 
largest fundamentalist mosque, last 
week by naming its own sheikh to 
preach in the place of Sheikh Hafez 
Salama, the most vocal advocate of 

Islamic law. 

On Friday, about 4,000 support- : 
ers of the fundamentalist sheikh 
defied the government by prevent- 
ing Sheikh Ismail Adawy from de- 
livering his sermon. Sheikh Salama 
refrained, however, from giving the 
main sermon. It was delivered in- 
stead by an aide. 

After the' sermon, the sheikh 1 
vowed 10 pOSe a Court riiaTlanga to 
the takeover of his mosque. “Islam 
will triumph in the end,” he said. 


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a CsechPOot Italy to Seek Extradition of Celenk 


AmdsedbySm 
And 2 Who Flee 

The Associated Pros 

VIENNA — The son of a 
pilot in the Czechoslovak Air 
Force, aided by two friends, 
forcibly tod: over a light plane 
from Ins father and Hewn 105 
mitec to Austria to seek asyhnn, 
the Interior Ministry said to- 
day. 

Andreas Radas, a spokes- 
man, said (he son; 19, his 
friends, both 22 , dosed tire fa- 
ther with chlarofonn during a 
pleasure flight Sunday out of 


Reuters 

ROME — The court i 


mean a) 
Paul n 


The Bulgarian press agency BTA 
court investigat- said he had been allowed to leave 
L to loll Pope John Sofia because tire authorities did 
Monday to ask not find any proof that he had 


Turkey to extradite Bddr Celenk, participated m the attempt on the 
who is being tried in absentia. He pore. 

was unexpectedly released from de~ Italy has no formal treaty with 
tendon in Bulgaria and sent home Ttakcylor the extradition of defen- 


to Turkey last weekend. 


darns, but Turkey has ratified a 


Pardubice, about 60 miles 000 
kilometers) east of Prague: The 
names of the four were not 
made public. 

The youths tied up the fatber 
and took over the controls of 


Mr. CdeoL SO. who is alleged to European convention agreeing to 
have helped funnel money and aid- international cooperation at ter- 
to Mehme t Ali Agca to shoot the: rorist offenses. 

pope, was d ^ taincd , Sunday by B Xurk»h Smtffigfing Cfcarees 
Turkish security authorities after , 7 ^* *T® 

arriving front Sofia. 

SS™53fta 1^ S 


fom other Tmks and three Bulgari- “JC 

had been under bouse arrest in So- 

instead of Italy. He and three of the other eight 

Exercising his right under Italian acaiSeA <* .conspinng to kfil the 
law notto attend he told Judge pope a« b«ang tried m absentia in 
Severino Santiapidii in a note: “I Ronift - 

am not coming to tbe trial because Turkish officials said Mr. Cdenk 


man added. The son, not a 
trained pilot, managed to fly to 
Austria at low altitude to evade 
radar detection. The father was 
revived and untied in time to 
tanrf the plane. He fadd the po- 
lice he wanted to return home. 

The son and his friends were 
dunged with 'air piracy and 
were taken toa refugee campi 


sion to send Mr. Celenk to Turkey 
instead of Italy. 

Exenasing his right under Italian 
law not to attend, he told lodge 
Severino Santiapodii in a note: “I 


Severino Santiapidii in a note: “I KorneL 

am not commg to tbe trial because Turkish officials said Mr. Cdenk 

I protest against and condemn die would be questioned and possibly 
Rnt garian action. It is all part of a charged with smugging minerals 
potiticalplot between the Bnlgari- and other goods. Otmg penal stat- 
an mud ludtish govemmenis.” utes that prohibit the transfer erf 

Italy, tried twiceto extradite Mr. Turkish nationals, to foreign na- 
Cdenk from Bulgaria fa this trial 9 tions for trial, they said it was un- 
and an charges of trafficking in 1 certain whether he could be extra- 
aims and drugs. . edited to Italy fa triaL 


Among the riches of Beverly Hills, 
a little gem of a hotel. 


The Beverly Pavilion Is one of rwo 
small, fashionable Beverly Hills hotels . l b ■'* W- 
that are run in the European style. A 5.7 JS. 
under the direct supervision of the 

proprietor himself. And we offer our * . 

guests the ultimate Beverly Hills dKu SjB 

experience: free llmo service to TaPf 
glorio us Ro deo Drive. 

El Beverly Pavilion 

a Max Basil Haul 

9360WlkiilreNviL,BcveflyHlllf,CA90ZI2.Tcla:Ncx69l 366. 


But they said there did not seem 
to be any obstacles to keep Italian 
officials from questioning him in 
Turkey. 

Mr. Cdenk, a mysterious figure 
with broad business interests rang- 
ing from Turkey and Bulgaria to 
Switzerland and Britain, has been 
described by Mr. Agca as having 
served as a go-between fa Bulgan- 
an officials and members of the 
Gray Wolves, a rightist Turkish 
group, in supplying money and lo- 
gistical support to kill the pope. 


Jartaddd^ Verts Yugoslavia 

The Associated Press 

BELGRADE — The Polish 
leader, General Wojdech Jam 
arrived Monday fa a state 
visit, his second to a country out- 
ride the Soviet bloc since he took 
power in 1981. He visited India in 
February. 

DEATH NOTICE 

Karen CbcvaKer and bear daoahter 
Marion, regret to announce the death of 
Mr. KAAKON CHEVALIER, 
writer and inter pr eter, died In Fans 

00 July 4, 1985 at the age of 83. 

The burial wiD take place-at .4:00 pm . 
on Jnly 10, 1985, Mksttmaruc cemetery. 

19, roe dn Mont-Cems, Paris IF 



Summer Exhibition Of 
Rare Jewels Of THe World 


(■ft 

Unmistakably 


Vi BaownoN Rtvuj- K wchiswipge • London SW? ■TtiXPNOWioi 8wi -TttES autun 
ANDWOmxmnDE BtAprawwtM 


1984- A year's work. 


Deutsche Bank 


IZI 


Development of business volume 
1974-1984 

DM bn. 250- 


TTrtiK 

,5 » '- 


EZ23 Deutsche Bank Group 
■i Deutsche Bank AG 


; Stabilization at level attained 
: and further strengthening 
of capital base. 

The development of the Group 
- was decisively influenced in the 
year under review by the economic 
recovery at home and abroad. Busi- 
ness volumes increased more 
strongly than in the previous year. 

Overall, the good operating result 

* achieved in 1983 was repeated. 

f At year's end. Deutsche Bank 
Group had capital and reserves 
. totalling DM 7.7 bn. including the 

• capital increase of a nominal DM 
■ 113 m. carried out in spring 1984 at 
. the parent company. 


-,.„SSr0 


International business: 

; market position strengthened. 

7 ;- ^ Commercial foreign business, i.e. 
> the financial settlement of exports 
and imports, profited in 1984 from 
-- ' ‘. the strong growth in German for- 


eign trade. The financial side.of one 
quarter of the Federal Republic of 
Germany's exports is settled via 
Deutsche Bank. 

We improved our market position 
through intensive efforts to obtain 
new business and through the use 
of new settlement systems. 

Improvement of range of 
services. 

To strengthen our position on the 
markets, our business policy aimed 
at 

- expanding and improving our 
range of services for customers by 
means of new financing techniques 
and investment possibilities, 

- using computer andtelecommu^ 
nications technology so as to offer 
conventional banking services more 
quickly, more efficiently and at lower 
costand 

- intensifying our service to inter- 
nationally operating, customers 
through our foreign branches, sub- 
sidiaries and representative offices. 

Successful foreign branches. 

The business volume of our for- 
eign branches expanded markedly 
in 1984, partly owing to exchange 
rate changes. 

In lending business, our for- 
eign branches not only served the 
branch establishments of German 
clients, but also to an increasing 
extent local firms. On the funding 
side, they used the opportunities 
available on international and local 
financial markets. 

Here, rt is our aim to make use of 



The financial side of one quarter of the 
Federal Republic of Germany’s exports is 
settled via Deutsche Bank. 


the specific advantages of each 
centre. 

Bases, subsidiaries and 
associated companies abroad. 

At year's end our foreign network 
comprised 15 branches, 9 wholly- 
owned subsidiaries and 14 
branches of European Asian 
Bank AG. In addition there were 
19 representative offices abroad. 

In the period under review we 
expanded our presence in Japan by 
opening a new sub-branch in Tokyo 
(Shinjuku district). 

To strengthen our range of ser- 
vices in the new issue and place- 
ment business, we have set up an 
international investment banking 
subsidiary In London. It operates 
under the name Deutsche Bank 
Capital Markets Limited and 
engages chiefly in. new issue busi- 
ness in foreign currencies and in 
Eurobond dealing and placement 


In particular the company coope- 
rates closely with our New York, 
investment bank Deutsche Bank 
Capital Corporation (until 31.12.84: 
Atlantic Capital Corporation). With 
this change of name, we 1 wish to 
underline the integration of this 
company into the overall range of 
services offered by Deutsche Bank 
Group. 

In autumn we acquired 4.99% of 
the voting capital of Morgan Grenfell 
Holdings Ltd., the parent company 
of the London merchant bank 
Morgan Grenfell and Co. Ltd. We 
expect this to lead to a further inten- 
sification of the good cooperation 
between our two companies, par- 
ticularly in securities business on 
the London market, in corporate 
financing and in export and project 
financing. 

Deutsche Bank (Canada) can look 
back on a year in which balance 
sheet total and earnings increased 
and a good number of new rela- 
tionships were established. 

The same applies to Deutsche 
Credit Corporation, which operates 
in the U.S.A. in the sales financing 
sector. Its range of financings is also 
particularly interesting for small and 
medium-sized German exporting 
firms. 


Project financings. 

We further intensified our activi- 
ties in the financing of large projects 
in the raw materials and energy 
production fields. We participated in 
a management capacity in several 
important projects. 


Euro-issue business 
1984 


A3tn 

mi 




Deutsche Bank AG acted in a management 
or co-management capacity for 51% of total 
Euro-issue volume. 


issuing business: 
successful new listings... 

On the German share market we‘ 
introduced the shares of 13 com-, 
panies to the stock exchange in - 
the year under review. We managed 
the placement of shares worth a 
total of DM 1.6 bn. 

...and strong growth and 
diversification in international ' 
bond issues. 

In the international new issue; 
business we participated in 366;: 
bond issues in a management" 
capacity in 1984 (previous year? 
275). Thus the number of issues? 
where we have acted in a manage-- 
ment or co-management position? 
has almost trebled in the last five- 
years (1980: 128). : 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 

ARTS / LEISURE 


Publicist Eleanor Lambert: Altering Fashion Map ’s Geography 


! me motional Herald Tribune 

XT EW YORK — The fashion 
IN publicist Eleanor Lambert has 
been around a long time and has 
done quite a few memorable things, 
including creating the Coty awards 
(the fashion industry’s Oscars) and 
the international best-dressed 
polls. Sbe has also been a moving 


force in putting American design- 
ers on die map, a fact readily ad- 
mitted by such New York fashion 
stars as Bill Blass, who sad recmit- 
ly: “Let's be honest, darling. Sbe 
started it all.” 

Lambert's assessment is more 
modest “I didn't invent American 
fashion," she said. “But I was first 


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in believing that American design- 
ers had reached the point where 
they measured as equals with oth- 
ers in the world. I felt that geogra- 
phy had been destroyed by inters 
change of knowledge and com- 
munications. It did not scan fair to 

Hebe Dorsey 

me to say all Paris was good or 
everything from Paris was superior. 
1 fdt it was time that each designer 
be judged on his own merit" 
Lambert traced her first efforts 
to push American fashions to 1916. 
By 1941 die had joined the New 
York Dress Institute; which she de- 
scribed as the first joint promotion- 
al effort ever made by American 
unions and management 
'The reason for that is that 
unions and management were 
frightened at the prospect of war 
coming to America. They were 
afraid people wouldn’t boy clothes 
any more. They were totally wrong. 
During the war. there was a freeze 
on hard goods and people bought 
even more clothes." 

By the time the institute was cre- 
ated, Lambert, who had her own 
publicity company, was well- 
known for promoting American 
fashion and was asked by the insti- 
tute to direct its new campaign. 
Her first move was to make the 
American press aware of American 
designers. She created “Press 
Week,” an event held twice a year 
with group showings from New 
York designers for out-of-town edi- 


“The idea of concentrating 

shows in one place, 3s is now being 
done in Paris and Milan, started 
here," Lambert said. The formal 
was designed to make it possible 
for the press to see a maximum of 
collections in five days." 

The Press Weeks lasted from 
1942 till 1982, a period during 
which the American fashion press 
was also born. Lambert educated 
the press with abundant fashion 
photographs and pres releases. 

While Lambert insists that “we 
never bought their tickets or paid 
for their hotel rooms,” she made 
sure the journalists were lionized. 
Industry leaders helped by wining 
and dining the fashion writers and 
raking them to Broadway shows. ■ 

Lambert, who studied at the Chi- 
cago Art Institute, began her pro- 
fessional career as press director of 
the Whitney Museum of American 
Art when it was founded in 1930. 
Her conviction that fashion was an 
art form led her to represent such 
designers as Claire McCardeU, 
Charles James, Norman Norefl and 
Adrian. 

In 1939, she was commissioned 
by the U. S. government to produce 
and take American fashion shows 
to Japan, Germany, Switzerland, 
Italy. Australia and the Soviet 
Union (she visited the last twice). 
She organized a highly successful 
American fashion show at Ver- 
sailles, the first time American 
fashions were shown in conjunc- 
tion with French couture. 

Last spring, Lambert received 
the Matrix Award from the New 





Eleanor Lambert 

York chapter of Women in Com- 
munications, together with the 
New York Times columnist Flora 
Lends and Helen Gurley Brown, 
editor of Cosmopolitan m agaz i ne . 
Lambert was honered recently by 
the Washington Fashion Group at 
a luncheon attended by a number 
of “Best-Dressed” women, includ- 
ing Evangeline Bruce and Deeda 
Blair. 

An elegant woman with ash- 
blonde hair, who regularly wears a 
bat or a turban, Lambert is the 


widow of Seymour Berkson, who 
was president of International 
News Service and publisher of the 
New York Journal American. In 
her Fifth Avenue apartment she 
entertains a lively mixture of peo- 
ple from society, fashion and the 
arts. Town and Country magazine 
plans to indnde her in its bst of 
Quintessential New Yorkers. 

Lambert said she still bdieved in 
American fashion, but with reser- 
vations. “I ihmk a lot of great tal- 
ents have become so egotistic that 
they’ve stopped being nervous 
about creating,” she said. “A few 
have become too greedy and bent 
on making money. 

“But by and large,” she added, 
“the staying power of the good de- 
signers ts a mazing . Think of Bill 
Blass, whose first collection was in 
1962 and here he is, in 1983, still 
recognized and totaly unspoilt. Os- 
car [de la Renta] has also grown 
and grown but he has remained 
very creative. Halston was one of 
the greatest. He was the creator of 
the American uniform — wonder- 
ful, simple dresses, uncluttered 
suits. Galanos is the one who 
stayed the most faithful to his ideas 


Celebrating a f Good, Most Particular’ Bordeaux 


By Frank J. Prial 

New York Tones Service 

N EW YORK — This month 
Chateau Haut-Brion. one of 
the five Tim growths” of Bor- 
deaux, is marking the 50th anniver- 
sary of its purchase by the Dillon 
family of the United States. On 
July 27, a gala party at the ch&teau 
will celebrate this period in Haut- 
Brioo’s long and distinguished his- 
tory. 

The great chateaux have lives of 
their own. Successive owners, 
though they may keep control for 
generations, are acmafiy caretakers 


or guardians — and not always 
conscientious — Of famous 
reputations. The Poatac family and 
its descendants, the first recorded 
owners of Haut-Brion, held the 
chateau from 1325 until the end of 
the 18th century. Talleyrand . on 
the other hand, bought it in 1801 
and sold it a few years later. 

It was sold again in 1824, and, in 
1836, to the Laxrien family, which 
held it until 1920, when a hank 
foreclosed on a mortgage. Two 
yean lata it became the pr operly 
of Andrt Gibert, a Bordeaux busi- 
nessman. In 1935, in the depths of 
the Depression, the American G- 


IF THE LADY 
SITTING NEXT TO YOU 
KNOWS 

RUE DE PARADIS, 
MARRY HER! 


ip! 


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The Rue de Paradis is the 
most famous street in die world 
for tableware. 30 shops display 
the world's finest crystal, porce- 
lain and silverware. That's Paris 
CHIC! 


RUE DE PARADIS 

PARIS 

THE STREET OF FRENCH 
“SAVOIR VIYRE” 


nander Clarence Dillon bought it 
for 23 millio n f rancs 

In 1 835 Haut-Brion was declared 
one of the roar “first growths” of 
the Mhdoc in a haphazard classifi- 
cation thAt, with one change, exists 
to this day. The change was the 
elevation in 1973 of Chateau Mou- 
ton- Rothschild from second- 
growth status to first. The J855 
selection, made by the Bordeaux 
wine broken, stuck Haut-Brion in 
among the M&doc wines even 
rtinugh it is in Graves, 20 miles (32 
kilometers) away. 

No octe is sure when Haut-Brion 
first b ecame pro minen t, but it ap- 
pears to have been well known, 
although not necessarily for wine, 
when. Jean de S6gur owned it in 
1309. The Pontacs made it a fam- 
ous wine property in the 16th cen- 
tury, at a time when swamp still 
covered many of the Mhdoc vine- 
yards that later became prominent 

According to Edmund Fennihg- 
Rowsefl, a historian of Bordeaux, 
rhatf-nirt Lafite, La tour and Mar- 
gaux started as estate wines — that 
is, wineries that used their own 
grapes — around 1670. Seven years 
before that Sanmd Pepys recorded 
in his diary that at the Royal Oak 
Tavern in London he “drank a sort 
of French wine called Ho-Bryan 
which hath aj*ood and most partic- 
ular taste which I have never en- 
countered.” 

In spite of persistent legends, 
Haut-Brion seems to have had 
nothing to do with Ireland. Pepys’s 
spelling lends to support the theory 
that the property was named for 
some long-forgotten Irish land- 
owner, ana in 1705 and 1707 Lon- 
don newspapers advertised for 
hogs h eads of “Neat, Choice, New, 
Red Obrian” and “New Obriaa.” 
The fact that Bordeaux was part of 
England from 1154 to 1433 makes 
the idea even more plausible, but it 


261 144 m 

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298 166 I 


765 423 I 

7 asp 4 an m 

1,500 6J0O I 

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2331 129 I 

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238 1 130 1 | 




The Director & English speaking staff of 

Mappin & Webb 

INTERNATIONAL 

warmly invite you to their salon to view 
their prestigious collection of fine jewelry and watches. 

Our CANNES showroom is at 32-33, La Croisettc. TeL (93)39.8191 

# . _ (D 

Maturing: ROLEX Mappin & Webb rlAGET Baume & Mercier 
VmxWXIRD corum €B€L 


l 

CORUM 


VACHERON i 
CONSTANTIN 


Highest Export Discount. 

We are the # 1 of the rue de la ftux. 73002 PARIS . Tet:26L?0J3 

By Appointment to Her Majesty The Queen. 

PARIS . CANNES . LONDON . DOSSELDORF . TOKYO . NEW 1 YORK 


is not true. Scholars say that Haut- 
Brion means small hUL or rise. 

centuri^^F^ut- Brion shrank in 
grew, then shrank and grew 
again. It was split into two parts in 
1749 and returned in 1840. to 1920. 
while it was under bank control, a 
piece was diced off. During his 
ownership. Gibert sold off still 
more land. When Dillon bought 
the property there were 120 acres 
(48 hectares), 90 in vines. Today 
there are 132 acres, about 114 in 
vines. 

The ori ginal size of the estate is 
lost in history. At one paint, a doz- 
en chateaux in the surrounding re- 
gion were adding Haut-Brion to 
their names. Gibert, who seems to 
have cared little for the wine, cared, 
greatly for the name*, he spent 
many years suing his neighbors for 
unauthorized use of it There are 
six such names left: Chateaux La 
Mission-Haut-Brion, La Tour- 
Haut-Brion, Lavfllo-Haut-Brion, 
Les Cannes Haut-Brion, Laxrivet- 
Haut-Brion and Bahans Haut- 
Brion. 

Once. Chateau La Mission- 
Haut-Brion, which lies across the 
Bordeaux-Arcadian road, was a 
part of Haut-Brion. In recent years, 
under the Wdtner-DeWavrin fam- 
ily, its wines have come to rival — 
and. in the opinion of some, to 
surpass — those of Haut-Brion. In 

Mission, but there is no plan to 
merge the estates. 

The wines of Chilean Haut- 
Brion are what made its name and, 
competition from La Mission 
aside, they continue to rank among 
that handful of superstars that in- 
cludes the other first growths in the 
1855 group and the select few that 
should be in that groap: Chateaux 
Atuoae and Qreval Blanc in St- 
EmiHon and Chateau Pfctrus in Po- 
meroL 

AD good wines of the Graves 
district are distinctly Afferent from 
those of the Medoc or of Pomerol 
and Sl-EhuHou to the east. When 
it comes to fine Bordeaux wines, 
Haut-Brion is one geographic ex- 
treme and Pomerol the other. SL- 
Enriiion hovers dose in Pomerol, 
and the Mfedocs are somewhere in 
the middle. The Graves wines are 
drier and more austere, their 
charms decidedly more subtle than 
those of tiie SL-JuBens or Marganx. 

The wines are certainly not un- 
approachable, but same experience 
with lesser wines of the Graves wjB 
make it much easier to appreciate 
the greatness of Haut-Boon. 

The Graves region is noted for its 
production of white wine more 
than for its red. A peculiarity is that 
ChAtean Haut-Bnon makes a white 
wine that is even rarer, and usually 
more expensive, than its red. Only 
about 1,000 cases of Haut-Brion 
Uanc are produced each year, 
abou t a tenth of the red wine pro- 
duction. It is made from sairvignon 
blanc and senriDoa grapes. 

Haut-Brion red is made from 
about 55 percent cabernet ssuvig- 
non. The rest is cabernet franc and 
meriot 


AUTHORS WANTED 
BY N.Y. PUBLISHER 

LwSnfl subsidy beak pubfaher seeks- man*. 
Kripli of at types, fretav oonfidioa -podry, 
Howie, xfolnty and nBmous works, etc. New 
authors wel co med. Send for free booklet H3 
yme Press, 516 W. 34th St, New York. N.Y. 
10001 UiA 



Dizzy Gillespie: The glass is half full. 

Unpredictable Gillespie, 
Bebop’s Founder Gown 


and never compromised, just like 
Norman NorelL” 

■ One thfrig that has diminished in 


Amrican fashion, according to 
Lambert, “is the great f eminini ty 
which bas not disappeared in Paris. 
1 think Amiri ran designers got car- 
ried away with the youth kick of the 
'60s and the 70s, and aggressive, 
tough chic. Some of them have not 
gotten over that." 


% Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

F ) ARJS — The Nice Jazz Festi- 
val runs in the Gmiez Gardens 
July 10-20. and on most of those 
days John Bilks (Dizzy) Gillespie, a 
sort of resident elder statesman, 
will be seen wandering among the 
three outdoor bandstands with his 
trademark goatee, his hair laced 
with gray now, his stomach shaking 
with frequent glass-shattering 

S s, slapping old friends on the 
and making new ones. 
Occasionally — less often now; 
be is 68 and taking it easier this 
year — the only surviving founding 
Tather of bebop will raise his trum- 
pet, bell bent up toward the sky like- 

cbeekstothe breaking point and let 
Qy the diff-hangxng drama of his 
honed, humorous and still unpre- 
dictable improvisations. 

He and Charlie Parker arrived 
after World War II with the speedy 
polyton al flurries called bebop 
(Gillespie’s autobiography is titled 
“To Be or Not to Bop j to revolu- 
tionize the musical world with 
“Night in Tunisia,” “Salt Peanuts" 
and “Groovin' High" But while 
Parker wasted away at 35 quelling 
his angnicti CHflespic lamed the 
financ ial and aesthetic pr e ssur es of 
creating what is basically a pover- 
ty-stricken art form by playing the 
down. 

The Nice festival promoter. 
George Won, who seriously com- 
pares Dizzy- thc-down to Charlie 
Chaplin, odcc said: “Dizzy was be- 
ing criticized by our more pedantic 
and 'serious' and, 1*11 use the wind, 
stupid jazz critics for being too 
comic on stage. . . . And sol said 
to Dizzy in the infinite wisdom of 
nay young years, “Dizzy, please 
don’t down too much an stage/ 
and Dizzy looked at me like I was 
insane, which I must have been." 

Gillespie's trumpet playing is a 
perfect reflection of his character. 
There is a serious artist behind the 
silliness. “Yon can't fool the horn," 
is the way he puts iL “Your true self 
comes out through your instru- 
ment-” 

Is it possible, be was asked, for 
an aggressive person to play ten- 


“I don’t think so.” He was sitting 
in his hotel suite trying to keep a 
large cigar lighted. Every so often 
die phone rang; twice promotes 
confirmed tours, one of them six 
months off. When he hung up he 
was thoughtful: “Take K, for ex- 
ample. There's a guy everybody 
thinks is nasty and yet he plays so 
sweet You know I told his wife, 
*You might to talk to K. People are 
saying such negative things about 
hist' And she said to me, *Why 

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don’t vou speak up for him? You’re 
his friend.’ So I said. ‘Okay, tell me 
something nice to say about the son 
of a bitch.’ But you know, he can 
play such sweet melodies, there 
must be some tenderness hr him 
somewhere.” 

Gillespie has resolved the old 
hatf-full/half-empty puzzle to the 
positive ride: He’d rather look for a 
hidden sweet streak than find a 
reason to justify nastiness. 

No soloist has been more of a 
victim of the death of lag bands 
than Gillespie, who never sounded 
better than when he led one of the 
best of them in the '50s. His horn 
somehow seems incomplete with- 
out eight brasses and five saxo- 
phones behind it. 

He and his big band were seat 
around the world by the U. S. State 
Depnrtmem as ambassadors of 
good wifl. He remembers that the 
pianist and bandleader Peter Du- 
chin, son of Eddie, “came to hear 
mein Washington a couple of yeus 
ago. and who did he bring with him 
but Ambassador Averefl Ham- 
man. who was wearing a hearing 
aid. He probably turned it off when 
1 was on the stand.” Pause for bel- 
ly-shaking laugh. “So when I go to 
their table Peter introduces me to 
Mr. Harriman. 'Dizzy, meet my 
mentor.’ And Harriman said tome; 
‘It’s a pleasure to meet yoo. Ml 
A mbassador.’ He called me ‘Am- 
bassador.’ " 

Respect. Money can’t buy that, 
but as Stevie Wonder sings about 
being blade; “Yon might have the 
cash but yon can’t (ash is yoar 
face.” 

“America is still a racist society,” 
Gfliespie said. “I'll give yon an ex- 
ample. I was inducted into the 
South Carolina HaU of Fame. The 
other candidates were a general 
and a cardinal. I beat than out 
When I go to Columbia my address 
is the governor’s mansion, that’s 
where I stay in Columbia, South 
Carolina. In Myrtle Beach I'm put 
np in the Strom Thurmond suite. 
That's saying something. But wait, 

I haven’t got to the end of the story 
yeL 

“Okay, so I beat out religion and 
the military, and on my way to gel 
the award I stop in my home tows 
of Gheraw. There's a street named 
after me in Cheraw. Now I needed 
a haircut Both colored barber ’ 
shops in Cheraw were full, so I 
walked into the white barber shop. 
Tire barber tells me, “Sony, sir, we 
don't cut colored hair.’ Then he 
recognized me: ‘Oh. Mr. Gillespie, 
the last tune I seat you — ' lent 
him off: 1 only want a haircut.’ I 
figured I'd better get oat of there 
because be has razors and Tve only 
got a knife.” 


I HAV& MANAGE? T0S6CURB 
A PRNRIE MEETING WITH 
CHAIRMAN MENGeWAWOU 
HMREQU&m 1UMU.BG „ 
'MRMBRPRETER. /T 


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TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


."k-'-S- ■’ 


futures and options 


Municipal Bond Contract 
Draws Support of *3*108’ 


H half full. v 

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- . : He» 7w* nmrStoifee 

■ EW YORK — Scarcely a mowth after it wi t r rvfafyd 
|VJ the oonnoversial futures ccm tract on an index of 40 
t - numkapal bonds, the Chicago Board of Trade Ppdy it 

has a nother winner on its hmds. The new contract has 
attracted support not only foam dealers in tar-^Tempt i y m* * hnt 
abo from 1 the public. Many doubters had said «!»»♦ individual 
investors wbula prefer to use the Tieasuiy-bond futures to 
spectate on long-term interest r ate*. 

Bat the doubters apparently did not count on the “MOB,” a 
term nsed to describe what has now become a popular spread: 
snnttcquh over bands.' Oddly,- it was the flow traders on die. 
giant futures exchange who - 


first seized on the MOB q* - 

spread, accord in g to Norman IBS SpT68Cl 01 

E Mains, chief economist in tor^nwa 

the financifll-f atuies unit at to-CMU^ltS OVCT 

R m^B urnham Lambert, in the longT4xmd 

“The ability to easily spread haw proved popular. 

die new nmnicipal-index fu- j_ r * 

tores agains t the long Trea- 

suzy-bemd futures lrfllpd the laadiwg argument agsdnst the con- 
tract,” -Mr. Mains said. “It was that the contract would fad 
becausefloor traders would not be able to trade off an underlying 
cash instrament and, thus, would not be able to lay offpositknis7 r 
But from the day the new futmes began trading, June 1 L, two 
devdOTments in the bond market served to encourage the MOB 
spread. One was that dm municipal market fearCd that the 
Reagan administration's tax-revision proposals would restrict the 
tax-exempt feature of many of these state and local issues. The 
other was the sharp drop in interest rates that sent the prices off 
Treasury bands soaring. 


A a result, many issuers of tax-exempt bauds rushed to 
mariaU thrm before the ax fell, creating a ghit off municipal 
paper and depressing prices of existing tax-exempts. 
Meanwhile, the drop in interest rates since the municipal index 
futures began trading caused juices of Treasury bands to soar. 

“This created a bonanza far floor traders, who from the first 
day sold the tax-exempt index futures, went long the^ T-bonds and 
thus created the MOB spread,” Mr. Mains explained. 

The ranks of the MOB spreaders soon included dealers and, 
most recently, the public. Small wonder, then, that an June 11 the 
spot, or nearest, tax-exempt index future, the September con- 
tract, was 87, while the same Treasury-band delivery was 77 
20/32, a spread of 300/32 in favor of municipals over Treasury 
bonds. Last Friday, the spread had narrowed to 237/32 as the 
spot tax-exempt index futures closed at 86 13/32 and the Trea- 
sury bands at 79. 

Each fufipomt in bonds u equivalent to 32/32. In dollar terms, 
1/32 represents S31.25 on a contract with a face value of 
$100,000, as is the case with both futures. 

Assuming that an June 1 1 a trader had put on the MOB spread, 
that is, sold the spot September tax-exempt index futures and 
bought the same^ Treasury-bond contract, he would have made 19 
points on the short sale and 44 points on the long kg of the 
spread, for a gross profit as of last Friday’s dose of 63 points, or 
$1,968.75. 

Normally, roreaders do not omect to make mcmey on both legs 
of a spread. Nor do they^care whetl^rpr^rise OT f^ fUd^ 

“That bojjh^legs of ..a 

Treasury-bond prices, is alio visible rartbe December and mare 
distant contracts is no sure indicator that the jattem will contin- 
ue. The reason is that prices of all futures contracts have built-in 

mtei^ rate carrying charges. Thus, the values reflect the theoret- 
ical cost of financing the underlying commodity, in this case tax- 
exempt and Treasury bomb, as well as their perceived values in 
the future. 

For example, the December tax-exempt index futures dosed 
(CoxtinneJ on Fagp 9, CoL S) 

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ISDR). fkdaa OPPlIoMe to IrdtrnonkOePOSirsetfl minion minimum (ortqutvatonti. 

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Soura: MsnUI Lmch, AP 


New Talks Set 
Over Pasta, Nuts 

ConvMhrfcSutfFfaDbpattha 
BRU SSELS' — The European 
Community and the United States 
have agreed to a one-week truce in 
that trade dispute over pasta, nuts 
and lemons, sources at the commu- 
nity's executive comnusson said 
Monday. 

The' sources said die ECs cater - 
nal rdarious iwwmii " ,A, irr; Willy 
deOocq, and theUiL trade repre- 
sentative, QaytCHi K. Yentter, had 
agreed to plmw^j i m p or t 

restrictions to allow further discus- 
sion tt> take place: 

The community announced 
plans last nwmth for highw tariffs 
on nuts, and lemons imported from 
the United States is retaliation for 
a UJL decision to raise tariffs cm 
pasta firom EC countries. . 

The supplementary tariffs, 
winch would have increased the 
price in the United States of im- 
ported pasta by up to 40 percent, 
were lo have come into force last 
Saturday. 

Hie Reagan . administration 
planned the increase because it ob- 
jected to special arrangements fa- 
voring die entr y i^ifA the T0-nati0u 
European Community of citrus 
fruit from non-EC states in the 
Mediterranean basin. 

The retaliatory measures ap- 
proved by EC mnristera provided 
tor increases in im post duties on 
UJL lemons to 20 percent and on 
walnuts to 30 percent. These were 
u> have been effective Monday. 
The present rate on both products 
is8pereenL 

Pasta exported from the EC to 
the United States, most of it from 
Italy, is worth about $36 million a 
year. Annual US. sales off wihznts 
and lemons, to the community 
amount to about $34 nnDioa. 

The commission sources said 
Mr. de Gercq and Mr. Yeutter 
mig ht continue tH«r taiirf when 
day attend a meeting off trade tw- 
fcseutativEs of the community, tne 
United Panada and Japan 
at Sanlt Samii- Marie in Ontario, 
Canaria, on July^ 11 and J2, . .. 

.The; c rtmirinnil ty mOT 
the qti^pf rfg epce far its bfedi- 
lemnedq - tfed^M rtijBd 'tt de- 
signedtb^asSist deveJbjxrient 


and is conyarabk \o the. Reagan 

adminiittraiifln 'x Caribbean ttflwn 
Initiative that provides 'tariff 
breaks to Caribbean countries. 

John R_ Block, the UA secretary 
off agriculture, said Monday that 
the dispute with the EC was unfor- 
tunate and that he hoped for a 
satisfactory solution- 

Mr. Block, interviewed on West 
Germany's T VwmrhlumWiint ra- 
dio, aim predicted growing rivalry 
among many countries for export 
markets, but not a trade war. 

He said any Euro pean move to 
keep out imports of UJS. cereal 
substitutes would c onsi de rab l y de- 
crease the UB- trade deficit with 
Europe. ' (Reuters, UPJ) 


Dollar Tumbles 
biEuropeWhile 
Pound Soars 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON — The dollar fefl 
late Monday in Europe as mar- 
ket participants switched into 
the British pound and drove it 
to its highest levtd in more fha ” 
a year. 

“Somebody put in some ma- 
jor orders to buy sterling 
a gain si dnJIars, ” mid aairrency 

trader in Frankfurt “That’s put 
everybody in a panic and put 
pressure on the oollar” 

The pound ros e to $13448, 
compared with $13273 late Fri- 
day. It was the tushes levd far 
the pound since July 2, 1984, 
i when it was selling far 13515. 

It was not dear why the dot 
iarfelLBm British interest rales 
are relatively high compared 
with those in the United States 
and thus attract bank deposits 
to London. 

Other late dollar rates, com- 
pared with levels late Friday, 
included: 3.0063 Deutsche 
marks, down from 3.0352; 
Z5228 Swiss francs, down from 
2J265; 9.155 French francs, 
down from 9.240; 3.3885 Dutch 
guilders, down from 3.4190, 
and 1,919.00 Italian lire, down 
fran 1,934.60. 


W 

43% 


■ ' • f fttBSSii T *** > ***^ 

Bwvfcra; 

jWto al 'mmmmt' 

ttoioci oi" w 

-Uapra- •• . m 4SSm c 

- 20 % 

. H B Mu iip tt i u xa.xxiftBto 

W iflon w i ftWlr i ri .-. • -■& 

a. r-jrNd&u' 





Oil Markets 
Stay Calm After 
OPEC Meeting 




m 


By Robert Bums 

The Associated Press 
VIENNA — World oil markets 
appeared calm Monday after an 
OPEC meeting broke up without 
agreement on a defense of prices 
and analysis said that there was 
tittle the Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries could do 
lo prevent continued steady price 


oD for August delivery was quoted 
at $27.05 a barrel compared with 
die official price of S28, according 
to Telerate Energy Service, a pri- 
vate market-information firm. 

On the New York Mercantile 
Exchange, prices of contracts for 
future detivoy of oil and refined 
petroleum products slumped: 
sharply at the opening, but then 


TH* Up* YoA Tn 


A foHwrirhm at Blood Products Laboratory loads a plasma storage container into a 
processing machine. The containers were developed by Baxter Travenol Laboratories. 

Cutbacks Revive Baxter Laboratories 

U.S. Hospital Supplier Has Injected Itself in Takeover 


By Jeffrey A. Leib 

’Nets Pork Tima Senice 

CHICAGO— For nearly three decades, Baxter 
Traveool Laboratories Inc. rode a wave of health 
care spending to become a major U5. supplier of 
horoital products. 

Then, a the last two years, the U.S. government, 
private corporations and health insurers changed 
their reimbursement policies to encourage shorter 
stays in the hospital Baxter Travenol reefed as 

^faxia* winch*had grown used to annual com- 
pound growth greater titan 20 percent, has been 
forced to develop new strategies to cope with the 
cost-oonsciots envi r on m ent. 

P aytw has excess capacity and is trying 
to adapt some major homhal products for hone 
use. It is expanding its efforts in supplying man- 
agement and information services to hospitals. 
And, in its boldest move yeti two weeks ago, the 
c om pan y announced a S3.7-bfllion bid to acquire 
American Hospital Supply Corp.. the industry 
leader, which already had agreed to merge with 
Hospital Carp, of America. 


healtb care institutions, reported 1984 revenue 
$3A5 bOHoa — almost twice dme of Bader. 


Baxter’s gamble on acquiring a key competitor is 
far from a sure bet In fact, sane analysts question 
Mother Baxter really wants a merger or just wants 
to scowl* the other arrangement. 

Vernon R. Loucks Jr., president and chief execu- 
tive officer of Baxter, which is based in Deerfield, 
minnift, rymten d s that the Tnergprhid is a valid one. 

He is among those who see consolidation in the 
heal th care mdustiy as inevitable. 

“As containm ent off health C8TC COStS bOCcmCS 
the area of intense new focus, only conmauies of 
substantial resources and technological breadth 
will be able to produce the required economies.*’ 
Mr. Loocks raid in one of a flurry of letters to 
American’s management 
Moreover, be contended in a recent interview 
that the acquisition of American would enhance 
the {ranpanwE * a bi titfes to “control our destiny.” 
“The two companies are almost perfectly com- 
plementary," Mr. Loucks said. “American has tre- 
mendous strengths in distribution; we are voy 
strong in manufacturing.” 

He said that 95 parent of Baxter's revenues 
come from products it manufactures, compared 
with 47 percent for American. Baxter has said that 
about 15 percent of its businesses mirror those of 
American. To satisfy antitrust concerns, it said 
(Gonttaned oa Page 9, CoL 5) 


S tirifch Ahnwt Tatci V amatii, the 

oil minister of Saudi Arabia, said 
bis country would not immediately 
boost its production, despite 
OPEC’s inabflfry to agree on a 
strategy for limiting output at a 
three-day meeting that ended Sun- 
day in Vienna. 

Nigeria’s oil minister, Tam Da- 
vid-West, when asked if he thought 
a price-cutting war was about to 
break out among oil -exporting na- 
tions. replied: “No, at feast not in 
the immediate future.” 

At the inconclusive OPEC talks, 
oH minis ten agreed only on a pub- 
lic pledge to stop cheating on pric- 
ing rules and to meet again July 22 
in Geneva. 

“The market will interpret this as 
meaning OPEC is reaBy behind the 
eight ball," said Dillard Spriggs, 
president of Petroleum Analysis 
LuL, a New York consulting ser- 
vice. “This tune next year they’ll 
still be faced with the same situa- 
tion. They’ve got no way ro go.” 

But pending the resumption of 
the talks, there was little activity in 
oil markets. 

“The market reaction has been 
noncommittal, " said Joseph S tflnis - 
law. director of international eco- 
nomics at the Paris office of Cam- 
bridge Energy Research 
Associates, a private consulting 
service. 

OH prices in the spot, or noncon- 
tract market, were barely changed 
from Friday’s levels. Arabian Light 


, By .Agis, Salpukas 

. * .Hew. Vint Tbrvs. Senice 

NEW YORJt — Six huge air- 
hnes will) ihe jjowot to control 
fares and grata .cpuld eme r y from 
turbulent forces that are reshaping 
the mdustzy-iq.tbe United States, 


lyats andahrime executives. 

Such a concentration in. a busi- 
ness that now has a dozen os so 
major participants could severely 
curb the competitive farces that 
legislators sought to unleash when 
they approved deregulation of the 
an£ne indnstiy in 1978. 

Many top airline executives have 
asked than staffs to investigate 
pqssibfemergm with otha compa- 
nies or acquisition of mtemational 
rentes. Others, such as American 
Airlines, ilihiV mergers can b ring 
more problems than they solve ana 
plan to rely on internal expansion 
to keep up with the competition. 

If a trend to fewer and bigger 
US. airfines develops, the fare wars 
off the past few years could dimm- 
ish, some analysts believe: Others, 
however, say that higher fares 
would once again present an op- 
portunity foe low-price carriers 'to 
challenge the majors. 

“The bargains are not going to 


: disappear. I doubt it,” said John V. 
Pmcavage, airline analystfor Paine 
• Webber Inc.- •' ■. J 
j Bri the ffitfy of new camera un- 
> da deregulation has bad only mi- 
‘ nor effect so far on the market 
shares of the large carriers. Even 
People Express, largest off the new 
carriers, handles onfy2J percent of 
the UJS. industry’s traffic. Large 
carriers, have been able to put 
enough pricing preraure on some 

npaf i i i tO hdp drive iwtn 

bankruptcy. 

The calalyrt far industry restruc- 
turing has come from United Air- 
lines’ agreement to acqtnre the Pa- 
cific routes of Pan Axnmcan World 
Airways and Texas Air’s plan to 
boy Trans World Airlines. 

If United’s plan is app roved, it 
woold make the largest U.S- earner 
into a major international player 
and xdidifY its control in the do- 
mestic market. 

If Texas Air’s $925-mQlion bid 
for TWA is successful, it would 
result in an at rihtc that would be 
the second-hugest domestic ra cier 
and the largest airline on the inter- 
national rentes in the North Atlan- 
tic. 

Anthony Low Beer, who special- ■ 
izes in airlines at N. Kimdman &. 


Col, a New York securities firm, 
said the move by CartC. I calm, the 
New Yoik investor, to win control 
of TWA prompted Texas Air’s bid 
and has cansed investors to look at 
airlines as takeover targets. 

As a result, major airline execu- 
tives are pondering some new is- 
sues. 

“You can’t continue very long 
being a minority player in any large 
market when that marketplace 
seems to be signaling that market 
domination will increasingly be- 
come a powerful force;” said Mar- 
ton Ehrlich, senior vice president of 
planning at Eastern Airlines. 

From Mr. Ehrlich’s perspective, 
the turmoil is part of the industry’s 
adjustment to deregulation. 

The first romuC he said, was 
marked by existing airlines adding 
routes that they had coveted for 
years under regulation. The second 
was the emergence of camere such 
as People Express, Midway, Ameri- 
ca West and New York Air, which 
forced the large carriers to seek 
concessions from their labor 
onions to lower their costs. Now, 
Mr. Ehrlich said, large carriers are 
seeking new fits with other carriers 


to strengthen their route systems 
and keep as many travelers as pos- 
sible onone airline until they reach 
their final destination. 

A number of analysts believe 
that such consolidation will remit 
in the emergence of six roega-cani- 
ers: United, American, Delta Air 
lines, Easton, Northwest Airlines 
and Texas Air. Stronger regional 
carriers, such as USAir, Southwest 
Airlines and Piedmont Aviation, 
could also survive the shakeout, the 
analysts believe. However, weaker 
regional carriers such as Republic 
Airlines, Western Airlines and 
Frontier Airlines could be vulnera- 
ble to takeovers. 

Robert L Crandall, chairman 
and chief executive of American 
Airlines, recently told a group of 
analysts that acquisitions can often 
disrupt the harmony of a company, 
particularly its labor relations. 

Fa* example, be said, if Ameri- 
can were to acquire another airline, 
“a guy who is flying captain for 
that airline does not want to come 
to American as a flight engineer. 
But that’s what he would have todo 
because our cockpit crews want 
those captain jobs.** 


sharply at the opening, but then 
quickly regained tee lost ground in 
lackluster trading. 

Attention focused on indepen- 
dent oil producers, such as Mexico, 
who could cut prices. 

Saudi Arabia’s frustrations with- 
widespread price discounts being 
offered by colleagues and with ex- 
cess production in other member 
countries —and a resulting drop in 
its own output to a 20-year low of. 
slightly more than 2 mifiioa barrels 
a day — had prompted OPEC to 
convene the special meeting in Vi- 
enna. 

One of OPECs greatest prob- 
lems has been that while prices are 
falling production has dropped to 
20 year lows. Petroleum InteHi- 
grace Weekly, an industry newslet- 
ter, said Monday that OPEC out-; 
put fell last month to 13.67 million' 
barrels per day, more than 2 mil-, 
lion bands below the cartel's eat- 
ing, from 14.18 milli on bands in 
May. 

Since March 1983. Saudi Arabia- 
has held the role of OPECs “swing: 
producer," meaning it would raise 
or lower its output to balance. 
OPEC supply with demand. ; 

But during the latest meeting. 
Sheikh Yamanj declared that ins 
country no longer fdl obliged ta 
play that role, which had cost it 
billions of dollars in oil revenues. 

Nigeria’s oil minister said his 
country would abide by the no- 
cheating pledge only if all the other 
member nations did the same. 


Marcos Orders 
Integration 
Of 3 Banks 

Reuters 

MANILA — President Fer- 
dinand Marcos of the Philip- 
pines on Monday ordered the 
integration of the country's 
three stale-owned banks into a 
single unit as pan of the nation- 
al recovery program. 

The banks are the Philippine 
National Bank, (he country’s 
largest commercial bank, the 
Land Bank of the Philippines 
and the Development Bank of 
the Philippines. A spokesman 
at the presidential palace said 
the merged bank would retain 
the name Philippine National 
Bank and finance agricultural 
and commercial activities. 

Mr. Marcos told an economic 
recovery council beaded by 
Prime Minister Cesar Virata to 
study how the three banks, 
could be merged. The three re- 
portedly have acquired many 
nonperforwang loons and have 1 
run up deficits running into bO- . 
lions of pesos. 


Montedison SpA Confirms 
Purchase of Bi-Invest Control 


Reuters 

MILAN — Montedison SpA, It- 
aly’s largest chemicals concern, on 
Monday confirmed press reports 
that it had acquired control of one 
of the country’s most powerful fi- 
nance groups, Bi-Invest. 

A Montedison spokesman said 
the company's chan-man, Mario 
Schimbenu, had informed the Ital- 
ian stock exchange authority that it 
now held 36.8 million shares, or 37 
percent, of Bi-Invest, a group with 
interest* in insurance, properly and 
industry. 

The value of the stake was not 
disclosed, but Italian newspapers 
said last week that it was acquired 
lot about 200 billion lira, ctr about 
$103 million. 


Montedison retained its ano- 
nymity as it built up the stake in 
Reinvest through one of its subsid- 
iaries in one of the most spectacu- 
lar raids in the history of the Milan 
bourse. 

Prior to the takeover, the Bono- 
nros , a wealthy Milanese family, 
controlled Bi-Invest through a 30- 
percent stake in the company. They 

have so far refused to concede de- 
feat 

Bi-Invest’s chairman. Carlo Bon- 
omi, odd through a spokesman 
. Monday that it was still ms inten- 
tion to a& shareholders at a meet- 
ing later this month for authoriza- 
tion to enable Bi-Invest to buy up 
its own shares in a bid to repulse 
the takeover. 


**» MiM 


JufyS 

AM- PM Oft 
Koto KAM 31115 3T2Jt +1J 

UMtat 31275 — +US 

ports (1U Us) 31235 311* +u* 

Zurich 31230 38MB -32* 

Loirtm 3029 3W25 —235 

How York — 31520 +&» 

LuKktabom. Paris and Londo n offkip* hx- 
bmv Hone «« on d Zur l ch apen Me md 
dash* Prices: Now, York Camosafmd 
canmet. Ah pneok M u A 5 oer ounca. 
So u rco: I teuton. 


AR 
REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL UJL $ BONDS 

AM) 

BONOS NOM1NAT1VOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

Enquiries UK 

CH-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Koe de la Paix. 

Teles 25869. 

TeLi 021/20 1741. 


The Establishment Trust 
Sicav 

Luxembourg. 43. boulevard Royal 
R.t Luxembourg B 21743 

Notice of Meeting 

Messrs. Shareholders are hereby convened to attend the Annual 
General Meennj* which is going to be bdd on July 18th. 19S5 at 11.00 o'clock 
at the head office, with the following agenda: 

1. Attendance 

2. Chairman 
X Quorum 

4. Directors Report 

5. Auditors Report 

6 . Financial Statements 

7. Dividend approval , 

8. Discharge to Directors and Srammry Auditor 

9. Statutory Appointments 

10. Any other business 

11 . Termination. 

There is no quorum requirement for the Annual General Meeting 
and the resolu lions will be pased at n sjmpie majority of the shares present 
or represented- . -7 * 


The Board of Directors- 







Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 




NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Mondays 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most Actives 


VM. HIM Law Unt CM. 


25791 St* 
13135 M 
10371 «ft 
8901 35ft 
8 MO 70ft 
8070 44% 
8030 1« 
7724 134ft 
7839 4*ft 
7781 Wft 
7718 tfft 
7419 67% 
7705 10 
1003 355* 
6943 30U 


Oum HIM low Lad 


34ft - * 
70ft —ft 
Oft — 1 ft 
15ft + ft 
123ft —1 
4*ft + ft 
33 Vi -ft 
88ft + ft 
if* - 1 ft 
30 

35ft -ft 
30ft 


Indui 1JD.C 1336X7 131888 1328X1 — 58* 

Trans 57895 681X1 87287 477 JO— L76 

UHI 16839 147X2 16501 1*4X5 + 035 

Camp 554-29 55585 549 JZ 553X8— IX* 


Previous Today 

him low dm 3 PM. 
Cam pcs 11* 111.73 1112 111X7 11187 

mSKis 11539 126.1 8 126J9 12557 

Trmffia 11 CLSi 11033 11055 11031 
Ut Sites 60X5 6058 60X6 6059 

RMnS 1=1X3 131.14 121X3 12085 


NVSE 


Ooiiii 


Advanced 

DKUned 

UlKtimed 

Total Issues 
New Hiatts 

NOW LOWS 


232 310 

306 173 

213 249 

771 732 

» 36 

n 5 


Carnpasift 

industrials 

Flnonee 

Insurant* 

utilities 

Banks 

Trow- 


Yaw 

Noon am *M 

29181 20520 23572 
30U3 303X2 24549 


HIM LOW USt Ck» 


37786 2588* 

mu m2 


MOM »XB ' 
39985 20070 
395X9 NL72 
26179 204.15 ■ 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Cfc* • Prer- 


W"|mm BAWM 

Prw.JPJtt.tnrt. 5WJM00 

PtWcanolMoMdoso 74A47JM 


worts B 

EcftoBO 

Carnap 

BAT in 

ttevPts 

HouOT 

NVTlme 

OsorkH 

Amdahl 

ambm 

GrtUtC 
AM Inti 
Rykoff 
TIE 
ToxAir 


22*4 IBft 
1585 lift 
155* 9ft 
1145 4ft 
1038 Wft 
990 4 

935 <7ft 
019 lift 
BO! 13ft 
734 3ft 
#92 3*ft 
*00 4ft 
678 25ft 
618 S 
531 16*. 


lift —ft 
lift + W 
7ft 
4ft 

I Oft + ft 

47ft ♦ ft 
lift - ft 
13 -ft 

3 vi + ft 

39% ♦!» 

4 - ft 

25ft - ft 

4ft 

14% 


Standard & Poor’s index 


AMEX Soles 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New HUM 
New LOWS 


659 1118 

915 400 

451 463 

2025 1901 

124 167 

16 5 


‘Included In the sate Havre* 


228.56* 297818 956 

ISOM) 382X45 1,971 

195,944 442883 1861 

196840 4548*3 10838 

2V4J5S 429X42 1.154 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to tbs dosing on Wall Street and 
do not retted late trades elsewhere. 

I'M The Associated Press 


Preview Today 

Men law Close 3 P.M. 
industrials 212X1 21U2 21227 2U86 

Tram »iJ6 174.97 17689 T»X1 

utfimes nx o ^ 

Run =3X9 23X9 2358 2148 

CmteiO 192X7 191X5 192X2 191X6 


3 PM. volume 
Prav. 3 PM, volume 
Prev. convvphifM 


AMEX Stock Index 


Preview w 

HIM low Ctee IPX 

rn 7a 291X3 232X9 23181 


IMltem 
hWilov sms 


Wv. YM. PE IDb HteUn* 


Oos# 

QuOt.Chba 


AAR X8 2X 15 
) AGS 14 

I A MCA 

i AMF JO 17 56 
i AMR II 

I AMR pi 2.1B 9 J 
AN RDt 2.12 10.9 
i APL 

■ ASA =80 48 
: AVX 0 U 11 
AZP 272 98 0 
. AbILob 1X0 25 16 

AccaWdS JO 2J I? 

; AcnwC 40 ZS 
i AcmeE -32a 4.1 10 
AdaEx 1.9ZP10X 
I AomMI X2 18 t 
i AffvSy# J3I 4J 19 
1 AMD 11 

i AUvcSl .12 IX 
Aortles 13 

AelnU 2X4 57 34 
i AelLpf 5X9*10-5 
i Ahmns 1X0 3X 14 
' Aiiaen 

i AlrPrd 1X0 22 12 
AlruFrt X0 11 11 
AiMoas 

i AloPDt 2.92*103 
i AuPptA3JI 111 
AiaPdPf 87 17.1 
AlaPpt 980 1IJ 
AlaPpf 8.16 11J 
: AlaPpt 828 11.7 
Alaaxs 184 68 9 

AlskAlr .16 .7 10 

i Aiartos X8 18 2* 
AlbfpU 74 2X 13 
Alcan 120 4.9 12 
A rats W L20 3.1 13 
AIrKALx 180 3X 
i Alexdr 21 

AIWCP 2861 15 25 
Alfllnt 1X0 SX 
Alain pt 119 108 
Atgi pfCllXS IU 
AlftPw 270 0.1 10 
AllanG -60b 29 15 
AlbfCn 180 47 9 
AlttCopf *74 103 
AldCppnlOO 10.9 


10B 20ft 
148 17 
1 10 ft 
3038 18ft 
2044 49ft 
7 22ft 
1 19ft 
7ft 
50ft 
13ft 
669 28 
122* 57ft 
34 * 7S'<t 
» lift 
32 71t, 

77 IB 
72 18ft 
63 lift 
1Z74 25ft 

180 HVr 
178 14ft 


Trading Is Moderate on NYSE 


17 Month 
High Low Stack 


Div. YW. PE TOU HJobLCW QaBlOTao 


DHMrih 
HteLow Stock 


Div. YU PE Mb Mob Low 


United Press httematwnal 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Fxchang e were lower in moderate trading 
late Monday, hurl by uncertainty about the 
course of the U.S. economy and monetary po- 
licy. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 
9.08 to 1.325.37 an hour before the dose. De- 
clines led advances by a 9-5 ratio. Volume 


Mr. Ackerman said an Interview with Mary- 
ann Keller, an auto analyst, in Barron's detail- 
ing the “rough road ahead” for UK. auto com- 
panies also pressured the market 


Charles Comer of Oppenheimer & Co. said 
:don in the bond market was “first and fore- 


I Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
I the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at J P.M. 


AlldStr 112 IX 9 

AiiteCn 

AlteC pf 

ALLTL IN 65 9 
Alcoa 1X0 3J 17 
Arrau .101 

I 380 8.7 
l.ia 19 20 


amounted to about 67 J milli on shares, up from 
52.1 milli on in the same period Friday. 

Analysts said investors had moved to the 
sidelines before the meeting Tuesday and 
Wednesday of the Federal Open Market Com- 
mittee, the policy-making arm of the Federal 
Reserve Board, and before reports Friday on 
June retail sales and producer prices. 

Those events, combined with uncertainty on 
how Congress will resolve the federal deficit 
issue and concern about the economy's manu- 
facturing sector, have contributed to investor 
apathy, said Thomas Ryan 2d of Kidder Pea- 
body. “There are a heck of a lot of reasons to 
bold your fire,'’ he said. 

The market is also suffering from disappoint- 
ment over the 52.6-billion rise reported Friday 


action in the bond market was “first and fore- 
most” among several factors contributing to 
weakness in the stock market He noted that 
prices fell' and interest rates rose in the bond 
market after the release of the money supply 
report late Friday. 

Creating uncertainty is the FOMC meeting 
scheduled this week, a “mixed bag” of evidence 
on the economy, and upcoming second-quarter 
earnings reports, which will provide room for 
disappointment. Mr. Comer said. 

AT&T was near the top of the active list and 
slightly lower. NBD Bancorp was also lower in 
active trading. 

General Motors, Ford and Chrysler all lost 
ground. 


22ft 15ft 
5 3ft 
5ft 4 
9ft 7 
ft 

22*. 22 ft 
39ft lift 
19ft 9ft 
29ft 17ft 
54ft 51ft 
lfi2ft 91ft 
91ft 19ft 
3ft !ft 

B » 9ft 
15ft 


EmpOs 174 8.1 
Emu M 47 M 


32ft T7% 
6W 2ft 
IBft lift 
4?ft 28 Ki 
17 9ft 
14ft 9ft 
23% 13ft 
22*. 18ft 
31ft 15ft 
2Sft 10ft 
240 no 
4ft 1ft 
9ft 2ft 
13ft 3ft 
41ft 30ft 
17ft 13ft 
54ft SB 


Emspf JO 10 J 
Eim pi 51 108 
EnExc 

EnoiCp 72 28 9 
EnliBv 84 IX 14 
EnlsB ml 

Enocrcti 1XB *J 17 
EnsCtief 4.15*11 X 
EraMpniJDallJ 
EraEvn XOe 38 
Enwee 24 

Eitera 

entxEn 2JOtlO 
Enrnin 1X0 7.1 10 
evutxi 1.14 38 17 
ERulmk 

Eamk pf 131 138 
EofReS 1.72 35 9 
E am ten .13 J 11 
Erbmnt 70 28 14 
EuBin X4 28 13 
EssexC 80b 38 14 
Estrfne 72 19 11 
Eltivli 86 2Xi13 
Etnvlpf 2X0 18 
viEvcnP 
viEvanpt 
vie vn pfB 

ExOio 172 44 10 
Exes 1 st 1849118 
Exxon 3X0 54 8 


if 21ft 21ft Wa — ft 
4Q0z 5 5 5 

60s 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
17901 9ft Bft 8ft— ft 
225 ft + 

225 35ft 25ft 2Sft + ft 
70 3fft 39ft 39ft— ft 
1 30 X 20 
51*7 2S 24ft 24% — ft 
lOOviOft Sift 53ft— ft 
4141XM100 100 

111 20 19ft 19ft 
84 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
782 lift 11 lift— ft 

42 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 

94* lift lift IP* + ft 
143 30ft xk 30ft + ft 
5*2 4 3« 4 

17 19ft 19ft 19ft 
717 49ft 4Bft 49ft +lft 

43 1«ft l*ft 14ft 
*185 12 lift lift— ft 

147 S2ft 21ft 22 — ft 
27 26ft 26ft 25ft + ft 
IBS IBft 17ft lift 
312 24 23ft 24 — ft 

3 345 241 2*5 +5ft 

29 1ft 1ft 1ft 

185 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
1 3ft » 3ft 
225 40 39ft 39ft— H 

4 lift lift 14ft 
25251 57ft 52 52ft 


HarltCpflJB 48 

Herman 

Htnhv 1X0 2.9 

HetMWl 

Hactnof 

HawiPk 72 x 
Hanoi X0 2.1 
HlSbtor JO 24 
.17 1J 
J4 2.1 
180 27 
J> 1.1 
180 18 
180 IX 


XZVs- ft 
> 20ft — ft 
48ft + ft 
7 — ft 
12 

35ft- ft 
20ft + ft 
i 2154 + H 
11ft + ft 
26 

65ft— ft 
29ft + ft 
S5ft + ft 
73ft— 1 
lift— ft 
25ft— ft 
9 

34ft + ft 
IS + ft 
*0 + ft 

41ft 

31ft— ft 
27ft 

4ft— ft 
47ft— ft 
28ft— ft 
41ft— ft 
14ft— ft 
36ft + ft 
79ft + ft 
29 + ft 

49ft— ft 
9ft— ft 
17ft— ft 
24ft 

10 — ft 
13ft + ft 
20ft— ft 
33ft 
Z7ft 

33ft— lft 
29ft— ft 


DISCOUNT BROKERS INTERNATIONAL INC. 


:-f -nfflUGf V m ami/ ~~ ■. <uv .V 


RB)U€E YOUR COMMISSIONS 
IN THE US. 

CALLUS IN THE U.K. 


17 bwcours am mss. umm wn, mm 

ToUphone: (441 ) 242-2305 Totou 23842 


ne ar be mw iw sm aam k 
mm of msm ky&tb PBsrsnn asmm 


Coca-Cola Ca was up slightly. 

Federated Department Stores fell Merrill 
Lynch also lost ground. 

Technologies were backtracking on some of 
Friday’s gains. IBM. Digital Equipment, Sper- 


Dlv. VIA PE mhHMiLnw OaoLdmi 


in M-l , the money-supply measure of cash and 
demand deposits, said Alan Ackerman of Herz- 


1» U t 
275 9X 
1X0 IX 17 
8 * 37 14 
84 ZS 14 
7.90 4.9 12 


feld & Stern. Some investors fear the unexpect- 
edly strong money growth win increase the 
Fed's cautiousness about adding more reserves 
to the banking system to bring interest rates 
down. 


120 10X 
2Jle B.4 

219 

1.90 17 12 
.92 14 24 
2X60 9X 9 
17B 27 16 
X8 28 16 
180 2.9 10 



2 Wi 17!« Avon 
16ft Avam 


18ft 10 BMC .121 128 10ft 10ft 10ft — ft 

Kft 21ft Bafrncs JO 17 12 294 29ft 39ft 37ft 

IV. 15 BArlnlt .93 SJ 15 21B1 17ft 17ft l^A— ft 

24ft 18ft Baldar 84 L8 13 13 20ft 20ft 2DVi— ft 


24ft 18ft Baldar 86 LB 13 

2ft ft vIBaldU 

54ft 29ft BollCP 1X8 28 14 

23ft lift BalfvMf 20 I.I 

12ft 7ft BallrPk 11 


44ft 31ft BoHGE 3X0 7X 8 1351 46ft 4* 46ft— ft 


47ft 37V. Bolt pfB 4 JO «X 


5*5 3 BanTo* 99 3 

67 43*. BorxJco 1JO £8 12 BS W 

55ft 29 BkBas 2X0 *J t 117 SS 

44ft 26ft BkNY 284 4J 7 234 45 

lift IT-ft BanLVa LIZ JJ 10 154 12 

22ft 14ft BnkArn TJ2 7X 11 7205 20 


47 40 BkAm Pi 5.13912,1 

7*v, 65ft BkAm pf BX7el28 

I4ft lift BkAm Pf 280 

32’ j 24ft BkARty 2X0 88 12 

75ft 30 BankTr 270 37 7 

27 19ft BkTTpf 2J0 97 

13 7ft B aimer 83c J 15 


19 Bard X4 IJ II 391 35ft 35ft IS'.I 


24ft 18 OornGo 80 lx 10 6 23ft 23ft 23ft— V» 

41ft 22 Bamat& 184 28 11 394 38 37ft 37ft— >4 

33*4 17 BaryWr X0 37 13 33 19ft 19 19 

13ft 8ft BASIX ,12b 18 13 644 12ft lift 12ft + ft 

34ft 191* Bouxn 78 28 20 1174 l*ft 33ft 34 

lB'i 11J. BaxfTr 77 lx 64 2759 15V: lift 15V.— V. 

2oft 19ft BovFIn JO 8147 7 26ft 34W 26ft 

34ft 33ft BovSfC 2x0 7X ID 
33ft 79ft Boarlna 180 2.9 II 


34'» BrtlCo 180 57 *1344 31ft 3lft 31ft- W 


44ft Beat Pi 381 58 


54ft 30ft BocInD IJO 12 15 273 53ft 53 53V1« + ft 


Bft 7ft Baker 

11 6 Bckcrsl 170 248 

17ft 1 2ft BcUJAH X0 27 9 

35ft 22 J* BelNwl Jd IX IT 

35 32 BclHwpf X7 28 

74’. 69ft BcllAli 480 78 9 

33 33U.BCEO 278 
27’- 19ft BHIInd J2 IX 15 


189 3ft Jft 3ft + lb 

19 716 7 7 —.ft 

15 15ft 15 IS — ft 

76 34% WA 34ft— ft 

3 33ft 33ft 33ft- >4 

797 93% 93ft 93ft 4 ft 

99 32ft 32ft 32ft— ft 


27ft 19ft Bdllnd 82 IX 15 198 33ft Eft 23ft + ft 

47ft 28ft B«l!5w 250 U n 1933 43ft 42ft 42ft + ft 

57 41ft BekjAH 80 IJ 27 112 54ft 54% 54ft— ft 

20ft 31ft Bemte 180 U II Si 31 30ft 30ft 


45ft MU, BentCp 280 4J ]> 574 44 42ft 44—15 


« sou. Bona* of 4X0 109 

« 33 Benofpf *2 I1J 

201 113V: Bancfpl 5J0 28 

22": 17 BcnetPf 2J0 llx 
19"+ 172. Bencatn 
6V= 3% BrniatB 871 
9 3ft Sctkcv 
IS 10ft BxsTPX X4 18 
II 'V 14U Bemsil .40 15 
«' l 4 371* BetftSt of 5X0 113 
34'-* 18ft BoftlSI PI2J0 138 
Mi? 23'? Bcvcrlv 82 8 

24ft 19ft BloThr 80 3.1 
33'i 13v, Bioefi n 
•6ft J7’-4 BlDCkD 84 81 


1X0 109 1 19ft 39ft 39ft + to 

L50 HJ I Oh 39ft 39ft 39ft — % 

UO 18 50*195% 195*. 19S%— lft 

LSD 1IX X30z 22VJ 21V, Jllrj— | 

, 3 IBifc 18V4 18Hi 
871 149 4H 4ft 4W — ft 

72 24 5ft 6ft 6ft— ft 

X4 18 34 721! 13ft 13 13ft + ft 

.40 15 2*1 Wft 151b lift + ft 

1X0 113 380 40ft 40ft 40ft + ft 

L50 113 587 20ft 20ft 20ft 

J2 8 21 29* 37ft 37ft 37% — ft 
80 3.1 19 £5 S* ft 

38 261 23 27ft 22ft— ft 


•6ft 17ft BlDCkD X4 3-1 H 1179 2» >9% + ft 

331, 21ft BIcVHF 1,92 50 9 39 31ft 33 33ft + ft 

Mft 14ft Blnlrjn J* 17 102 396 20ft 20Ui 20ft 

Mv. BI«HR 140 « 15 J?0 57ft 57 57 “ 

47 Ml, Boeing * 188 2J 16 2729 47ft 46ft 46ft + ft 

49 32t? Bo«eC 1.90 48 20 779 48ft 47 * + J. 

41 4* SoiitrC pli.00 ex 25 £55 58ft Wft + *. 

Wft 15% BflllBer .10 X S 39 27ft 2«9 £ 

S?.-- a ac men 5 ij7un3ia«3?2® + Jr 
7* x 141# BoiftWa J2 4J ID 2703 2Tft 22 — ^ 

Sft 4ft Bormns >3 S3 JH* ** ,»■— * 

44V, 2* BmEU 3X4 78 8 311 42 41 JUb — ft 

es 43 BoiEpf 088 108 9*01 8* *2Vi 82ft 

li' 5 L 1J7 I OX 18 lift ll» 1'ft— w 

W B«e pr 1X6 I0X 22 14 13ft M 

35»« IS*. Bowrotr .71 38 9 969 2gV 73ft + J 

)':• 7SJ* BrigSI 1X0 5.9 11 183 27ft 27ft 2J* — ™ 

nr. 4JH BrtetM -180 38 10 21H 62ft 61ft 62ft + ft 










































































HEB ATn TBlBIjflE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


Page 9 


bummsskounmip 


.VI 



ToRise 20% in 1984-85 


Room 

BERUK — fSemena AG ex- 
pects worid group net profit to rise 
by more Sum 20 peroent in the year 
ending Sept 30 compared with 
1983-84, the chairman of the maa- 


subsidiaiy. Without the plants, 
' overall group sales would have ris- 
en lOperceot, Mr. Kadce said. 

He said no more codecs for 


dear-plants would enter the books 
the res) 




HTMEUa 
WSWTHEU jt. 


SfEUS 

W1W7-ZJ05 




Mr. fcaskesaid at a news confer- 
cocc that volume was expected to 
die just undo; 20 percent and the 
profit margin to widen.. 

In 1983-84, Semens raised its 
diridend to 10 Deutsche maiV« 
frwh .8 DM as‘Wodd group net 
profit Wie to. L07 bflfian DM 
(S3S7.I njflteonat current MpJnwip* 
rates) . .from 802 million DM m 

1982- 4G on a 16-percent rise in 
Saks to 45.8 billion DM. - 

Tn the first eight months of the 
1984=85 fiscal year, Siemens's 
woridwide volume stood at 36.7 
bflBon DM, op 37 pexceal from tbe 

1 983- 84 jjenod. 

Ot this, domestic turnover rose' 
67 peroent to 21 billion DM as 
three, orders for nuclear power 
laats entered the books for 
Union AG, a Siemens 


for the nest of the year, which 
means that by the. end of the fiscal 
year the 37-perceau rate of growth 
m yobxme seen in the first e * ' 
months should lost about 
halved • ’ 


In 1985-86, Kraftwrak Union is 
not expected to have any 
power plants enter the books, Mr. 
Kashc said. ; 



Hanson Reports 
Results of Issue 


i- , 


* * 


U «.« 


*• — » A T 
*■ t * fc C,’’ 

■ ■: • i: - 

■* in £r 
>: t - S" 


• n,. 


v m 
» j* 


i '*» 

t • » 


g'f- 

-■» i*-. jC 

• *: c-.c. 


4 e, 

- a. 


* A . . 

1 * a 

t he *•-• 

* »jh ;i 
4 il # • 

* 


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“! ;> s s, 

• 3»< . 


■ •• • * o,. 

»■ 

j 

* >1 U 


Reuters ' 

LONDON — . Hanson Trust 
PLC said Monday that its offer of 
148.69 million £1 convertible pref- 
erenoe shares, part of a rights issue, 
attracted applications for 11.93 
trillion shares or about 8 percent of 
tye issue. Dealings in tne shares 
were to start Tuesday. 

A spokesman for the lead under- 
writers, NJML Rothschild & Sens, 
said none of the unsubscribed 
shares had been placed with insti- 
tutions or other investors. 

Hanson also said Monday that 
hs rights issue of 200.18 nrflHon 
new ordinary shares at 185 pence 
each (51.38) had drawn appVica- 
tkms for 99.82 milli on dunes, or 
49.86 p ercen t . The ren rn i nin ff cwdi- 

uuy shares have beat sold. 

shares on tbe market were at 187 
pence, down 2 pence horn late Fri- 
day. 


World volume should -therefore 
remain around the SO-bOhon-DM 
level expected for rim year 

In tbe first eight months of thi s 
year, Siemens 7 profit margin was 
2.4 percent slightly high er man the 
23 percent achieved in 1983-84. 

Orders increased 12 peroent in 
the eight-month period of 1984-85 
compared with the same 1983-84 
period, with foreign orders up 18 
1 percent and domestic orders up 6 
patent; 

For the fall year, the rise in or- 
das w31 probably slow to under 10 
peroent because the right-month 
■ figures were nrfl»it nl by particular- 
ly large single orders, Mr. Kaske 
said. 

, The volume of new orders this 
year should .be considerably twyw 
than 50 billion DM, he said Last 
year, new order volume was 48.1 
Dflhou DM. 

Mr. Rash* said Semens pi»wnM 
to invest substantially more than 4 
billion DM in 1984-85, an 
over his forecast in Fefannny that 
investment would total between 33 
btfiioh and 4 bOEon DM after 2.4 
bQlian last year. 

Of this year's investment, 13 bO- 
hon to 1.6bflfion DM will be spent 
abroad compared with 1 bflfion last 
year, with more bring spent in the 
United Stales than in all other 
countries outside West Germany 
combined. 

Nearly half of this year’s invest- 
ment vm be concentrated in semi- 
conductors, automation, office 
technology and public communica- 
tion systons, Mr. lftudre said 


Small Corf or 


TOKYO — Mazda Motor 
Gasp. jaktMonday that it plans 
to design :a smaflcar’with a 
1,000-ccio 130Ckrengine and 

to fodofttiU « 

SouthKofca. . 

cxpeclJ^ tosIPtiie canuo 

Ford. Motor' Co. A Mazda 

j pilfwinwi ' aiM that 

Tiey astompkahri no plans to 
mqxrtJBw^mtp Japan, bhtj 
would co&Kidri it in the frutae- 


in Kia and analyris said thafit 
would,, increase that share 'to 
bdp finance the new phal. * 
They sa&Foid, which owns 25 
percent-** Mazda, also may 


^ the Mazda spokes- 
man said-no agreement on 6- 
nandri'hdp' to. Kit bad bceri. 
readiedl' ■ “ 


Refco Purchases 
DUFnfnres Unit 


for 


terms. 


DU retd the sale, which did not 
indude its London-based ACLJ 
Metals and Waxdley-ACLI Com- 


modhies Lid units, wi» at a price 
* - mvta- 


in excess of book value. The i 
riture will allow it to oonoemrate on 

t nvft tn wni hanlriii^ frnimrtat *er- 

wksaadeaaitai^m^k^ 

DU said 


r;« 

»■- -m 

i n 


•• r,-u 


S - u 


■ 4 1 .h • 

- . ,B I 1 

;< a- 

4 I •. *1 ii- 
-» •« .1- 

i: . . j» : • 

. 1 ' 't»m 


i*- •- v, »• » 

J t C* <■ 


r. -4 5 


Chsfle A Cooke be. said it is 
cooridering a $50-mifiion modern- 
ization of ltspineappk processing 
facilities in Hawaii. The processed - 
food comp an y said it must mod- 
errize die plants or move abroad to 
remain competitive. 

Cowpaifia Tekffirica National' 
Spain’s telephone cpm? 
pany; srid, i£ plans.ito sign -a ^98^- ; 
mdhqnjeria; of intent :wai wok. 
for the moddinzatksi and ej^an- 
skm of TBCuadOT’s tdaphrme sys-- 
tem. No financial details 1 
dosed but a 
agreement 


4 . , 

. ■’* r 


i wearedb- 
said the 
provide switch- 
boaxxis, data transmission and opti- 
caJ-fibaequipznent 

First Pacffic Intenntiona] Ltd. of 
Hong Kongsaid it is bedding talks 
with Sears Wodd Trade fnti, a sub- 
sidiary of Sears Roebuck & Co^ cm 
the sale of a minority stake in First 
Pacific's Dutch-based trading unit, 
Hagemeyec NV. 

Home of Fraser PLC said it had 
increased its stake in Debentures 
PLC to 10.09 percent, or 14.15 mil- 
lion ordinary shares, by Monday. 
Fraser has been increasmg its Do- 


benhams stake while Burton Group 
PLC has been bidding for die 
group, a bid Debenhams has 
strongly resisted. 

Howard Machinery PLC said it 
has agreed to sell most of its Euro- 
pean businesses loThrigp-TitanAS 
of Denmark for £2.65 
^.49: raiBiob)- The safe jododes 
‘-Howard’s, unils - m -Fradcq West 
aritfSpam imd 4he 
--right to use Howard’s name. . V 
i- litmBtcwcriesljMrif Wdbaig- 
. ton. New Zealand, smdlwo^direo- 
tois had acquired the 73 miMon 
shares of Lion they sou^it at 3.70 
New Zealand drilars (51.75) each. 
Tbe directors, through a joint hold- 
ing company, Tarragon Invest- 
ments LtiL, sought to increase thrir 
share of Lion’s issued cental to 32 
percent from 22 percenL 

Mesa Petrofe w M Cocp. said its 
board has approved a plgn to re- 
purchase abort 10 percent of its 
common stock for up to 5100 mil- 
lion, enough to buy about 63 mil- 
liofl of its 67 nriTKon shares out- 
standing at SI 430 each, Mesa’s 
dosing price Friday on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 


PWBps Petreleom Co. said it is 
seeking a buyer for its 35-percent 
interest in British North Sea block 
16/17, known as the “T block.” A 
spokesman would not place a value 
‘an die bolding, but analysts said 
Phillips cofdd lObtain/at least-J] 00 
minion fqri^, . ■ ’/■ *■„ 1 

Pbnear.-j^c^e §gd cw Ui 

with 

Pedriney /aribafisf to rngpiP 

fadureriHimm^ 

Pioocer smarts fu^cqpatiqn will 
be 60 perixat and Pednney’s u 40 
percenL 

S aifl u u l ew Bcfl Corp. has ac- 
quired Mast Advertising ft Pub- 
hsfamg Inc, a Kansas-based oom- 

S^hone ^retaks, for $120 mil- 
lion- The sale must pass UJv anti- 
trust scrutiny before it is complet- 
ed. 

. Wymao-Godon Ccl, of WOTces- 
ter. Massachussrits, said it plans to 
sell its three U3. plants that manu- 
facture farm and land-dealing 
equipment and diesel- engine 
cr ankshaft s and will concentrate 
-on high-technology forgings. 


‘i;i; Bombay Exchange 
Moves to Restrain 

4 ■* V 

Forward Trading 


t-W ?• 




Roam 

BOMBAY — The Bombay 
-• “» Stock Exchange may ask brokers to 
;; '••.I cut outstanding business vrinme in 
• t " V ■ forward trading by lOjmcent in an 
'* ^ effort to end speoilatiou and soar- 
.. • - ing share prices, the exchange’s ex- 

- ecutive directcff, MJR. Mayya, said 
Monday. 

The proposed step follows a 
meeting of stock-exchange leaders 
■" •'T’in New DriM last week that dis- 
cussed various alternatives to curb 

- ‘- . peculation, he said without elabo- 
rating 

turn on the ex- 






i pushed up the prices of 
many shares by more than 100 per- 
cent in the last five months. 

Mr. Mayya said the exchange 
wifi continue a 25-percenl margin 
impored last week on several highly 
shares. The shares are 
Automobiles LtiL, Rdi- 


aue Textile Industries, Tala Engi- 
5ootb- 


j ft Locomotive Ox, Soul 
em Petrochemicals Industries 
Carp, and Associated Cement Cos. 


1 :*■ 1 

■ * *r 


FOR0GN & COLONIAL 
RKOYE ASSET FUND 

races at 17 J 8 & 

A* Ui DOHA* CASH $102/ 

*> «aocuBB«nroisH 
o DQUAI BONDS $1U2 

fc MJLTOJHENOf BCN3S SIUH 
E> StBUNG ASSET £1070 

FORBGN&CXXONWL 
MANAGB^tr UBSBfJ UMfTH) 

W MUCASIH SnST^TifiJBUBSETjCii 
ia-0$UV35l TEflt4W2J63 

KXOTHBIF&C FUNDS, SS 

Nta*ixnoaiAL funds usr 


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Tg 



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wnua 

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in » 

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untsoo 

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nnun 

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jE-pffljNE OFHCE: — a-^j. - ^ ^ | 



I 


^ i Baxter Labs Has Injected Itself Into Hospital Supply Takeover 





ExcotoSe 

TUI ..ft sowioraosea 

Telerate for^ 


(Coatmoed Iran Page 7) 
some 
2. sold or 

mcome 
„ 87penau,to529.I 
million from . $218.1 imTBnn in 
it took a one-time, 
milli on after-tax chance for 


, NEW YORK — Dow Jones 


QpL and OHahnnin Publishing ! 
Monday that they will . 
Exco International FLCs 
cent share of Tekxate Inc. 
S459.8 mflHcm. 

•• Teferate provides 
{nee miotimons and other 
.dal inmrnuwirin 'tn ffnmrner rial i 
investment banks, brokerage 

other financial institutions 


[Friday! 

few Yoi 


For the six months ended! 

31, Tderate had net income 
SI 6.8 Tmtlirai on revenues of S71 
milK on. Its shares dosed 

518.625 each as the New 
Stock Exchange, up!23 cents 1 
Thursday. 

Under die Terms of the sale, ' 
Janes will acquire 14.1 
duns, or 32 parent, for 

rrrillirm 

Oklahoma Publidring, a 
hdd Oklahoma CStyR»sed i 


to 51.80 ballioa from 5134 

Industry analysts echo Baxter's 
contention that there wiD be oon- 
solidation in the industry. Joel D. 
Liffmann, a health care indostiy 
analyst with Dimed Burnham Lam- 
ben hit, called the proposed Bax- 
ter-Amerkan combmadon “con- 
c^tuaDy ronqjelliQg” although he 
said the merger could initially be 
“very dflutive” to Baxter's earnings 
per share. He also said that it could 
lead to “the largest reduction in 
mamrfacturing capacity to dale in 
the industry. 

Even if it does not win the battle 
for American Hospital Supply, 
Baxter executives said ibdr compa- 
ny could remain competitive. 

Nevertheless, Baxter is pressing 


jected the bid in favor Of the merger 
with Hospital Corp„ Baxter an- 
nounced that it had lined up S23 
bffioa in credit from 22 banks to 
pursue the bkL 

American said that Baxter, in 
publicly tenting its own bid for 
Ameritan, was conducting a de fac- 
to solicitation of proxy votes 
against the Hospital Coip.-Ameri- 
can combination. Thai would be a 
violation of Securities and Ex- 
change Commission regulations 
prohibiting apes solicitation of 
shareholders’ votes without 
proxy; material with the S 
American said. 

However, a Baxter spokesman 



Reuters reported. The company, 
based in Nashville. Tennessee, saul 
that Baxters bid for American “has 
caused us to have serious questions 


Wednesday when the New York 
Stock Exchange threatened to de- 
list American and Hospital Corp. if. 
they go ahead with the stock swap. 


said that all of the company's com- 
munication had been directed by 
letter to American's management 
He said that oocc American publi- 
cized (he fim letter, the issue “was 
in the public domain.” 

On June 27, Baxter said that it 
would counter a proposed defen- 
sive stock swap by American and 
Hospital Crap, by simply exdud- 
ius 39 nuHkffl newly is^ied Ameri- 


can shares from eligibility to re- 

ite'Wdlor American HraphaTAi aave 550 a share in cash and Baxter 
fieri, Baxter insisted that its offer 


hdd Oklahoma City-based cc 
ny that publishes the Daily 
homah md owns radio and 1 


! was friendly and contingent on ap- 
1 proval by American's board. How- 
' ever, when American’s board re- 


i radio 

SUm %nnc ti j(S 

UrrtarirtHrttng subriSary, 

8J m3fioa shares, or 
far$]773miIliaiL 


The Market 


NEW- YORK — Donaldson, 
Lufkin & Jenrette Securities Corp., 
a subsidiary of Equitable Life As-. 
sutance Society, said Monday that 
it hjtd sold most of its commodities 


Dow Jones pn KH natirm s likes r MOB’ 

the Wall Street Journal and Bar--| 

(CoRtimied from Page 7) 


ton’s. It also operates several 
ness and financial newswires and 
computerized information 
service. 



securties. 

Hospital Corp. whose three- 
month-old “nonprennum” merger 
proposal was to be voted cm by its 
shareholders pnd American’s early 
this month, has threatened to sue 
Baxter if its offer “discriminates” 
against any shareholders. 

The dispute involves an agree- 
ment by American to exchange its 
39 milHnn new shares for about 
293 milli on shares of Hospital 
Corp. stock. The def eusve maoeu- 


UJL Producer Prices 
Increased 0.1% in June 


Sjcuter* 

LONDON — Producer prices k 
Britain n»e 0.1 percent m Junr 
while manufacturers’ cost 


*5,000. 


Ref co, winch is privately held, is 
oneaf thewcrid’slaigestaeakrein 
commodities futures. It has assets 
in «»«« of 51 bfflinn, not indud- 
ing its affiliated primary in 
U3. gov e rnm e n t securities and its 
large cattfe feeding and agricohural 
interests. . . 




year-to-year increase in ] 


dnoer prices was S3 parent, a 
ehwiffri bran May. the year-t 


year rise in manufacturers’ 
slowed to 11 percent in June i 
32 percent in May. 


Friday at 84 18/32, while the 
Treasury-band delivery ended 
77 29/32. In all, trading volume 
in the sew index futures has aver- 
aged 4300 contracts a day, while 
die open interest — in effect, the 
iber of contracts available for 
— has grown to nearly 
are considered to bode 
well for the new contract. 

In fact, the initial ihmuonih 
itume of tbe Chicago Board’s 
reasmy-bond futures, by far the 
-most actively traded of all futures, 
' only 24,700 contracts. Un- 
the Treasury-bond futures, the 
^tax-exempt index contracts are set- 
' tlcd in cash, as it would be difficult 
|to deliver a corresponding basket 
V bauds. Treasury-band f u t ur es 
are settled by tbe actual delivery of 
long-term bands. 


ver would give Hospital Corp. a 
rican that would be 


tfAa in American 
large exiouj^i to fed a takeover by a 
third party. 

[Hospital Crap, said Monday 


SWISS INSIDER’S 
24-HOUR 

INVESTMENT FORECAST 
HOTLINE 


“From The World’s Most Informed 
Financial Intelligence Sauna” 


mon ey . Anb tboMp. Smut 
no«v. BS| aney. ft il cbbui iB S^ocrtwL 
Ai nadi a xml httom ddkii per diyl 


Why? The nun ■ limplc. Swl unhul ft 
legcndvy ^ ■> hakim money, far ulna- 


hfttiBMliiRk II it tbe 

w«*ri m Ubaad hmft cour. 


B»i mw fa ud eftoha»BCPartiofhi|Mbniftad 


tkha *ho an, one «Wy bob, pdvy to ^dfad 


■MW ihg nirl Bi m 1/ IfiBOt the Snmcfal 
Butafahwc... udjaarbvHfeetfihmlaib. 
US. At tMt way maam*, they wnqoivoafaiy 
□icdia nacmd USL money ad prfoe Wfa ii ne 
ad ■BaporUXlwHmoBhtMc beady IMd. 
They iho (nd whh neuny unnEy) pmefia 
Whuff ibcad far aotf Md Ata, ndi, ml 
■tstt, a u me ftw nd cuqftki Tmca * 

week, amntoKiBbcaefthftDctworfcTda tbdr 
npofti u oar 
[ ended uMea nd 


nd neefded aery Mood«y udHowfay. Md 
more qftrn whoa wide nwU cowddBn 


Thu, ftddca who haw Ufa private asmber 
cm caBMboanatfqr.ldayiawMbud BUIba 
nT T oai Tro i ihuiit netnirf 

— liBn— —M,«Bft— tywului^ 

m world BnmcialrieMlioa.’nitcoa of ddiav- 
k«T A feefly »99 (SP 9M, C 99) pu jew. 


Wba wwli pay Ufa kud of l 
phone namfacy? ! ' 


Snopcumaad Ai 
the " 


ay farad* 
, dud who. 
haaadtbu 


an who Ian fail ablet ft the ipufay of hie iafar- 
eUM.Aad.iigKd.p 


pripa wfcb ooe of Bfd marc eo dma if Bath*. 
Nwariyi Yoa ga wbu yoa pay far. 


Awywrimdeffawwu)ooly l »bu iji« ybody 
etae taowi. ike uytb* the own uafie whu yoa 
to MoepO Am yoa ready tojtn itu bi|lc««na^ 
UwMwd yoaSc nfaidaddduiMwili 
bow to aodar this ce dl d n d i d ecrdec. Shudy 


Mr. Uu*( 

BiiM.ua 12 P JO. Box M2d 
QH023 Zorich Sn u nfand 


Now At noa ■> year order ft nerived. yoa wB 
be at, ria ur tad, tbe prime HOTLINE 


- -- -- -I 


* 

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1 

■ 

■ 

>1 


PROBABLY THE BEST PRIVATE 
RESIDENTIAL ESTATE IN THE WORLD 

(certainly the best in Australia} 


76 ha. (190 acres) of beautiful, elevated, exclusive half- 
developed residential property In MID Coastal Queensland. 


5CW PARTNER REQUIRED - A$1Zm investment 


Write for Brochure:- "PARC EXCLUSIF* P.O. Box 103, 

__ _ AIRLIE BEACH, Queensland 4802, Australia. 

SAFE, 


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■ LOCATION - WARM CLIMATE • BARRIER REEF ■ ENGLISH LANGUAGE 


I 


I 


I 


* :i . i t* 




'it 



i- 


Britoifs 


L 


workforce 


generated over 




£230000 


pre-tax profits 


per head. 


Britoil’s pre-tax profit for 1984 was £688,000,000. 
And its sales were over £1^00,000,000. 

Rtl in the coupon and discover the rest of 
Britoil’s figures. 

You’ll find they’re all on the large size. 


I™ Please send me more information about Briroiland reserve my copy 
1 1 of the Offer For Sale document, without obligation. g 


I 


Name 


I 


| Address 

I — 


I 


| Postcode 


HT 9/7 


I 


I 


U Send ox Britoll pk, P.O. Box 5000, 

^^Brlstol r BS99 1GB. England. auswil j 


Britoil 


X 


SOON, THE REGAINING 49% OF BRITOIL SHARES ARE TO BE OFFERED FOR SALE 

' : Issued by Lazard Brothers &G)., Limited cm behalf of H,M. Government. 























Monday s 

NISE 


Tables include me nattaiwtd e pric es 
up to the dostiw on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 Man In 
Ktoti Low Stock 


j, pj», yulpe HBswwiLiw Qimtorw 
(Coated from Page 8) 


2* 14% RuaiBr .. __ >3 

19% I5*i RusTm J« W * 

28% 19 RvOnM 100 17 14 
wu im Rvflers 00 2.1 10 

2*% 129b Rvtand M U 17 

18 5% Rvmef 6 

13 11 VS Rymerpfl.17 M 


iu 20% 20% 

IB 19* IS* \9* + % 

108 26% 24% 2g 

779 299b 28 'b 289b—* 
246 »% 26% M 

14J 1W lffl w- +108 

97 13% T2% IT* + % 


11 
17 
M 
14 
02 
54 
7 A 

7J 500 

1 A St 

U 12 701 
28 


56 

IX 

1.94 

7X 

1X0 

3X 

1X4 

3X 

140 

AA 

JO 

1J 

140 

7X 

1X4 

40 

ixa iu 


LIS. Futures 


Season Season 
HW LOW 


Oran MWl Low 


—.14 
—.17 
—.12 
—.15 

3% 

—.13 20M. 

ink 
34% 
23 
• 34 

—,.14 n 

-.15 451* 

— .14 39 

—14 5*8 


■1M 5.9 
ISO 109 
Ut U » 
4J4 72 
U2*13J 
2019 Tricnpf 2X0 BJ 

AO 1.1 27 
1X0 15 9 
M IX 17 
49B 9.1 7 
20 32 15 
JO 15 
.100 A 42 
1.10 8.1 
100 72 10 
At 11 13 
40 42 10 
20 20 10 
79 U 1 


Get now More Gold 
for Your Money. 

Krugerrand gold bullion coins 
combine the age-old security of 
gold with instant liquidity. Because 
they are !eg£d tender they are 
traded 24 hours around the globe 
at an advantageously low premium. 

Gold gives you the security. 
The Krugerrand gives you now 
more gold for your money. 

Ask your bank or broker. 

Or write for a free copy of the 
European Gold Guide tot 

International Gold C orporation 

Coin Division 

1, rue de la Rotisserie 

CH- 1204 Geneva 

Switzerland * 2 


KRUGERRAND 

Money you can trust 

Plrasp note that iniaiMiniml , "mp , iiaini«i 
daica nnt piunde a hu>inp »r ■.■lllnc service 


2X8 

82 

B.90 

9X 

7.75 

9X 

284 

8.9 

2X8 

48 

1X8 

81 

J4 

21 

m 

XT 

2X0 

4 X 


ecu Ti i.v xerox 1Q0 S-5 23 2438 SAi SAb 

«£ 2SS xSSol M5 .00 ” » g gS 

39 19 XT HA M IS 10 3 25% 2S% 25% 


VUi 34 a* ZoIrCl 1X2 4X 9 426 271* 27% 27b*— I* 

S{B 2 ?IAP£fc=C 

is BBt n £ g & £> ss s»'st3fi 


■ 474 
■Ext. Salas 
■Pnrv.OavC 
■SOYBEAN 
100 k 


Industrials 


21% Vl= Carp 
59* Valero 
i '14 Valor, oi 
! ■ Z% Valeria 
i 19 Vanom 
i' rt> Varco ■ 
59b Varco Pi 
i 26% Vartan 

■ 9% Vraa 

i 17*4 veeca 
i 30* VOMto 

■ Bfh Vests* 

i 28 Viacom 
34% vaeppf 
i 54 VoEP pf 
> 89 VaEPPf 
54*4 VaE pfi 
31 VOEPpf 
i S3 VaEPpf 
HI* vuhovs 
I 28 % vomod 
i 81b* VirtenPA 


2* S 14 
-40 15 32 
AO 2.1 13 
235 

1XO0HX 
M IX 21 
3JB0 I0J9 
7J2 10J 
9X3 I OX 
7X2 10JI 
7X8 107 

12 

2X0 14 12 


258 37%. : 
1878 im 
89 249* 
40 2b* 

4x22% 

51 2b* 

4 8H 
402 30% 
33 11 % 
49 19 
484 12 
13 11% 
14* 47% 

lOOz 44 

100z 71% 
830x91 
100x71% 
70x87 
1000X M% 
130 28 
1 42% 
10 77% 


37% + % 
13% + % 
24% + % 

£*& 
2% — % 
Bb* 

38%— % 
11% 

10 %— % 
11 % +1 
11% „ 

47% — % 
48 

71%— 1 
90 - % 
71%— % 
87 
80% 

23% +1% 
42% — % 
77% 


N\5E Highs-Laws 


144 
117 

34 13 551 
73 9 30 

4X 8 233 

M 1 1» 
14 21 1003 
14 11 52 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICME1 

40X00 Bik- conn DOT lb. ___ 

47*7 5*»w AOO 59X0 59X0 

S?55 Ort 59.95 6021 

67XS 60X0 DOC 8240 8240 

S5I 6095 Feb 4195 6293 

87J7 *2.15 APT 8X85 83X5 

46X5 63X0 Jun 64X5 805 

EsI Jaka Prev.Sato 14.177 

prov. Dov Ooon Int 47X1 1 oH 2.102 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMC) 

44X00 lb*, cents nor lb. 

7X70 8X65 Avn 4SXS 45*5 

7X00 6175 SOP 85X0 *5X0 

7132 44X5 Ocl *820 48X0 

73X0 *5X5 NOV *7.15 015 

KAO *840 Jen *827 ttS 

• 7DJS 66.10 Mar 6*JW 6JJM 

7R8S 87X0 APT 4045 JUS 

, ESI. Solos _ Prev. Sato *86 
Pretf. Day Open inf. M58 ofl 198 
HOGS (CME) 

30000 lb*.- cents per Uk 
55.77 47X5 Jul 5050 5050 

■ 54J7 4857 Aua 4885 4885 

51J5 .13.00 Oct 44.40 4440 

50X5 44X0 DCC *6X0 *6X0 

, 5047 46X5 Feb 47X5 47X5 

4735 44J0 APT 44X0 44X0 

49.05 4870 JUfl 

' 49X5 47X0 Jul 4735 4735 

■ 51X0 4800 AUO, 45X5 *845 

■ EsI. Solos Prov.Sato 4X99 

. PrevTDoY Open 1 rrt. 23X85 off 24 
•PORK BELLIES (CME) 

.30X00 ibx.- conti per lb. 

. 8287 57.92 Jul 5940 59X0 

. 0085 5835 Aua 8005 60X5 

■ 76X0 *115 Feb 89X5 *9X5 

* 75.40 64JD Mar 6780 &7.m 

■ «U0 MOV *810 6810 

. 7883 6? M Jol 89 JO 49 JO 


Coimnotiities 


Gomramiities 


London 

Gomniodities 


Cash Prices 


73.15 47JM AM, _ 

Est. Soles ? re r-^2 , S4^ X448 

Prev.Dov Open let. *365 o« 4 


5065 59.12 

5980 5985 
61A5 82X7 

8230 42.77 
6125 8380 

84X5 84.10 


85X0 85.17 

85X5 8585 

*582 4162 

6050 88XS 
8025 6015 


4935 49.97 
47.75 4032 
43X7 43J0 
45.10 45.47 
44X5 4687 

4430 44X0 

47X0 
48X5 47X0 
45X5 4885 


5880 5a*0 

5857 50X7 

6757 67X7 

87.10 8730 
80X0 *180 

80X2 81X0 

4*04 


MIX 614X 9915 

6I3X 424X 4O5J0 

616X 6185 610X 

6285 83SX 417X 

6340 8343 8310 

883X *703 4403 

6883 4*80 MOO 


4023 +46 

8048 +9X 

609X +9X I 7875 

*208 +95 1 70X0 

6243 +95 

832X +9X 

841.1 +95 

6503 +95 

480X +95 

4745 +93 

4797 +9X 

M03 +9.1 

7008 +93 


Currency Options 


HM Low HU Ask Cb-BS 

SUGAR 

Prmd* francs par metric lea 
Aua 1.100 UTS 1.178 T.17I —12 

Od 1.104 U70 1.170 1, 74 -12 

Ijad 1XU 1XM 1310 —10 

xsr mjmWMZk 

Est. uaL: 048 tat* of 50 tone Prev. actual 
sales: 784 lots. Open merest: 20584 

French francs per »• kn 

Sea S1S|| + 

MCT 23M 2385 2X75 7W +15 

E ft ft ■ E «■ 

*B. ML- w Uu j 10 lan 8_Preu. actual 
sales: 870 lots. Open merest: 123 

Franck francs per 100 tm I Nm 

sS> 2 XZS UN UU ^ -» [iSSr 

7340 23« 2^0 b -"Imoy 

Nto- Ml6 2310 IK — -S 

S?' ffi? 

J &LvoL:2Dltrtsol5toi!*jftwv.octuolsalaA: lux. 

125 lots. Open Interest: 387 Jt» 

Sovrcm: Bourse tiv Commerce- j ?2J 


Hie* Lew BM Aik 

SUGAR 

start Im per metric tea 
AH 04X0 83X0 83X0 84X0 

Oct B8 B7.4D 8830 8980 

DOC 92X0 91X0 9150 9240 

Mar 103X0 101X0 101X0 10230 

May 108X0 108X0 105X0 10450 

Aoo 111X0 11 1X0 111X0 11240 

act 11840 118X0 115X0 11840 

Voturn: 8M Ms at 50 ton*. 
COCOA 


92X0 9330 
102X0 102X0 
108X0 107.00 
112X0 11X00 
118X0 117X0 


Stock Indexes 


Treasury 


Financial 


30 X4S 

£ 33 

33 S 

34 0X8 

35 8J® 

iFruees-lol 
100 r 

,M IS 

aa-H 
t 


VALU E LINE IKCBT) 

^ande«» ggp 208.90 2S77J0 204.90 20 555 — 1J5 

2I1M 2MX0 Dec 211X0 211X0 209X0 20931 -2X0 

Est.Sales Prev.Sales 4X84 

Pr*w. Dav Open Int. 9438 up 1383 
NYSE COMP. INDEX OIYPEJ 

ertngandcertli 11115 llia# niM -35 

lOlS DM 115X0 1I&00 114.10 114X0 -X0 

!33 109X0 Mar 11*45 11*45 11830 11820 —.95 

Est. Sates Pre*. Sales 5385 

DavOacnlnt. 9X05 


Commodity Indexes 


83-10 

-41 

82-17 

-33 

78-10 

-32 

77-7 

—22 

n* 

—22 

75-7 

-22 

74-10 

—21 

7>14 

-41 

7230 

-30 

71-27 

-0D 

71-4 

—2D 

70-15 

—30 

89*27 

—20 


Close 

Moody'S , 

Reuters \J7}M 

Dj. Futures™ na. 

Com. RMOorch Bureau- MA. 

Moody's : bose 100 : Dec. 31# 1931. 

p - preliminary; f - final 

Reuters : bose 100 : Sep. IB# 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Previous 
914.10 f 
1J27.30 
117.70 
226X0 


Market Guide 


» UU * Ml 
ia< Mi im * 
IM vt bt i 
L 1W 1 17/ 


oner BM Yield Yield 
J+norrtfl 4J6 874 8» 721 

iKTVtm 8X2 8X0 7.14 J3i 

One rear 895 892 732 7J1 

Sewof: SataaMBmtnm 


Earnings 

Heveoue and profits. In m lilbns, art In 
fpcai<vrrwi<^KUttW5sefiierwtw 
Indicated. 


Neikerluds 

Oce-Von der GrhrtMi 

Id Hett 1WB 1«« 

BWS5* — : W47 ««J 

Pronto : 381 J9J 

Per Share— DLSB 11J5 

United Stales 

Rorido Mori Bksof Florida 


Net ItKoatt- 
Per Share _ 


London Metals 


DM Futures 
Options 

W. Gtnm UoTK- UUM maria, cents tm * 


JofyS 

SMu* , CdbSeme PeMOMIe. 

Price SCP DK Mar See Dk Mar 

32 1X9 251 274 021 058 Uf 

» 1X9 1X8 230 051 052 — 

34 078 1J3 1X9 HA !J5 — 

S U 1U IX 1X3 I XI 315 - 

3* 0X0 08* — 240 258 2JB 

UMd*WnLlX3 
CMb: Frt. v* [. X77J 0PM let 21351 
Pols : Frt «oL 2X89 epee leL n#m 
Saareyt; CME. 


Malaysia Relaxes 
Ownership Rules 

Reuters 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia. 
— Malaysia has relaxed iu equity 
ownership rules to allow certain 
foreign manufacturing companies 
to retain a majority stake, Finance 
Minister Daun Zainuddin said 
Monday. 

Under the new rules, foreign in* 
vestors can retain as much as 80- 
percent equity in manufacturing 
companies that export 80 percent 
or more of their goods, he said. Tbe 
minister said the government may 
also grant certain companies 100- 
percent equity on merit. 

Previously* only companies ex- 
porting their enure output could 
retain majority foreign ownership. 
Other companies bad to follow a 
policy that aims to transfer 70 per- 
cent of corporate equity in Malay- 
sia to Malaysians by 1990. 


To Our Readers 

Dividends werenot srrailabkif 
the edition because of commit*. 





































































































JfcUiW. fei' AfatfAv , vJ, ^ - 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


Monday^ 



Notice of Mandatory Redemption 

The Rural and Industries Bank of Western Australia 

("the Bank") 

A$30,000,000 6% per cent Guaranteed A$/DM Bonds due 1987 

1. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the provisions of theTrust Deed dated 10th August 1972 constituting the above 
Bonds, that A$3,000 r 00Q nominal of the Bonds Is due for mandatory redemption on 15th August 1985. 

2. The serial numbers of the Bonds drawn for redemption are as follows: — 


4 1360 

5 1381 

S 1367 

a iso 

a 

a 1379 
74 1386 

77 1399 

M 
80 
R6 
90 
W 
IK 


224 
236 
240 
250 1S2S 
263 1543 

265 1548 

2BS 7557 
269 1570 

274 T3t 
278 1MB 
283 W01 

29G 1601 

313 1810 

316 1613 

324 1632 

326 1641 

327 1649 

329 1855 

341 1885 

3*3 1699 

348 1702 

351 1704 

352 1707 

353 1713 
381 

an 

373 
378 

3M 

390 


443 1775 

444 1786 

454 1806 

626 1812 
631 1818 

835 
837 
Ml 
850 


2909 4213 S316 7882 83S 8420 11133 12315 17661 1920 20371 21352 2Z433 3M» 24892 25775 26861 27968 29025 

2S11 4214 5328 7083 8304 9433 11136 12317 17684 19264 20372 21361 22437 23636 24695 2S783 26885 27990 29027 

2917 4225 5327 70B7 8374 9837 17137 12320 17SS6 1S288 2D374 21374 22W Z3649 24838 2085 28*70 27W 29033 

2931 4228 8337 7082 8382 9444 11171 12338 17876 

2932 4238 5384 7BK 8391 8445 11175 12340 17682 

2940 4240 6388 7IBB B3M 9461 11196 1230 17683 18250 20386 21427 22483 23888 24762 25196 

2942 4244 5315 7108 EH B4SZ 112D7 12* 17684 19305 2MM 2143D 22170 23695 24780 25805 

2849 4253 5825 7122 8405 9471 11215 12382 17683 10312 20422 21431 22482 23688 24784 25806 

9481 



703 
KB 1909 
715 1920 

717 1923 

720 1931 

724 1936 

727 1982 

787 1958 

780 1982 

783 1965 

788 1969 

791 1870 

«n i97i 

818 18R 

814 1961 

819 1692 

«M 1898 
835 1989 

942 1998 

946 
988 
1001 
1801 
ion 




6481 7840 91D2 10010 .11834 14181 18245 19837 20988 21987 23097 24258 28366 28439 Z7511 28572 29673 

6505 7944 . 9104 10013 c -.11938 14188 18255 19847. 20993 21991 23125 24Z76 25371 28441 27522 38S75 29674 

5HJ7 7MB 9110 UM5 11851 14188 18258 19863 21015 22004 23134 24279 ' 25374 284S8 27528 285» 29677 


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3. Interest in respect of the Bonds to be redeemed shall cease to accrue on the redemption date and will be payable to that 
date in accordance with the Terms and Conditions Applicable to the Bonds: 

4. Payment of principal will be made at the rate of AS1.000 or, at the option of the bearer, DM3783.10 for each Bond. 

5. Paym ent of Bonds to be redeemed in Australian Dollars will be madeupon presentation and surrender thereof, together 
with all Coupons appertaining thereto maturing subsequent to the redemption date, at the main office of the National 
Australia Bank Limited in London or, at the option of the bearer, at the main office of The Chase Manhattan Bank NA in 
London ("the Principal Paying Agent") or at its other offices, or at the other banks, set out below. 

6. Payment of Bonds to be redeemed in Deutsche Marks at the option of the bearer will be made upon presentation and 
surrender thereof, together wfth all Coupons appertaining thereto maturing subsequent to the redemption date, at the 
main office of the Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale in DOsseldorf or, at the option of the bearer, at the main office of 
the Principal Paying Agent or at its other offices, or at the other banks, set out below. 

7. FOR PAYMENT IN DEUTSCHE MARKS, THE BONDS AND COUPONS APPERTAINING THERETO MUST BE DEPOSITED 
WITH THE PAYING AGENT FROM WHOM PAYMENT IS REQUIRED (TOGETHER WfTH WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS, WHICH 
SHALL BE DEEMED TO BE IRREVOCABLE, THAT SUCH PAYMENT SHALL BE MADE IN DEUTSCHE MARKS) NOT LESS 
THAN FOURTEEN DAYS PRIOR TO THE DATE OF MANDATORY REDEMPTION. 

8. Bonds and Coupons shall be surrendered at the following offices:— 


1W. 5* 21n* r .18 1 S 


n sw 5 * sw— w 


AMEX Highs-Lcms 



NEW HIBHS 9 


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National Australia Bank Limited, 
678 Tokenhouse Yard, 

London EC2R7AJ. 


The Chase Manhattan Bank NA, 
One New York Plaza. 

14th Floor, 

New York, N.Y. 10081. 

Credfto Italia no S.p A, 

Piazza Cordusio, 

Milan. 


Dated 9th July 1985 


The Chase Manhattan Bank N A, 
Woolgate House, 

Coleman Street, 

London EC2P2HD. 

The Chase Manhattan 
Bank N A, 

41 Rue Cam bon. 

Paris 75001. 

KredietbankSA, 

Luxembourgeoise, 

43 Boulevard Royal, 
Luxembourg. 


Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale, 
56 Friedrichstrasse, 

4000 Dusseldorf 1. 


Banque de Commerce S A, 
51/53 Avenue des Arts, 
Brussels 1040. 


Nederiandse Credietbank N.V. 
Herengracht458, 

Amsterdam 1002. 


THE RURAL AND INDUSTRIES BANK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA 

By the National Westminster Bank PLC n Trustee 




























































(Ker-die-Counler 

NASDAQ National Market Prices 


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BSOERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
8 July 1985 






5555 


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APPEL D'OFFRES INTERNATIONAL DE PRENALfFICATION 
POOR LA CONSTRUCTION DE LECOLE SUPERIEURE 
OES INDUSTRIES TEXTILES (ESITEX) A SE60U, 
REPUBUQUE DO MAU 


AVIS DE PRESELECTION DCS ENTREPRISES 
La CemmwNwfi tconomique 

La Commumntfe fecoooanqae de FAfrique do FOaefi ( CEAO) e nvisage la 
constractun de TScoIe superieuie des Industrie) t ext i l es (ESITEX) 1 Sesoa 
(Rfepablkme du Mali) ea entreprise gfenferale. Cetie cmstnicdoo loot Foojel 
d" tm oppd vTofircs iestzemt panm lea entzepreneure de tnvauz antto par le 
maltre de TonrragE, aprts la prtstiectian dont i'objetet !es conmdoas toot 
exposes d-denoun: 

FA^que de l*Oue>t lance on afpel de ranklirfanra’^pwg la 
pr&^kdioa des enttepdses en me de ret enti on des traranx de 
coostnictioB i Segon Rfe pddiqn e dn Mali, de FCcolc sapirieure 
des Industries textiles (ESITEX); 

IL — Description sommaurc dn projo : 

Leprajet coadste ea Is constiucdaa de Mtinnntn de destination 
(fiKenerrte pour one surface approximative utile de 5 000 m* et des 
VJLD. j afiteot : 

Adminntxatka Ensdpw»cnt Gtntmb 
AtcBen do lonnation pratique; 

Blb su— n 

R wiiipnitk g et detente; 

Conaeofeiie, Infinoerie, vestiaires. 

HL — FinaneemeDt : 

Lefinancemoa dea tmvanx estBoOidt£ auprts dn Foods d 1'OPEP 
poor le D^vdoppement International de a Basque Iskmique de 
bftvdoppemeni (BED) et de la Communantfe Economimie de 
FAfrique de FOoest (CEAO); 

IV. — til gi MU lA dea entreprises : 

Penrent laire art* de cantiidalnre les enliepriaes ou gronpem enta 

Jr^griaeg^dn^ato Mmb ra^^la^^^^ ai ^Ecoooc^qne 

V. — Date et lkm de i+ceptkm des iifii8M*rinfn | nartieipation 

ilanrfatieetlim: 

Les dossiers de candidature r6dig& en deux esempbim (un 
original, one copie) devmnt die re^oa boob envelope csnhetfe au 
pins tard le 28 aoQt 1985 & 17 bones 1 l’adrease smvante : 
Secretariat G^xrinl de U CEAO 
Monsiear le S c c rfttrii e General, 

BJ*. 634, Ougadoogon (Burkina Faso). 

La candidate devzmt joindre i Icor ifannande ka dossiers et 
inferences satiskoant sox conditions exigees; 

VI. — Dossier de candidature : 

Le dossier de candidature comprendm toules imficatioca utiles 
notammanl les pkea auivanies : une dftdaiatkm imfiquant Fintan- 
tioc de sommssiooner et iaiauit connsltre ks doub, prinoms et 
onliti, domicile et natiooalitS du sommsskmiuire; une attestation 

A* igrifliaB lf fdrm ]f rfgimytilntirm u akhle en |g mtfmAiw |j> 

pays du aoiunisrioncaiie; ks rnmp l »t ; fm wnaia 

U statut de Fentrepriae ou de m nsocks; de patees dOmeot 
ootifiees; la raison socials Fadiesse compe te du ȣge la date de 
cristion de Fartr^uise; u frame juridknis sou capital sorial et sa 
repartition; mi ceztificat de not failme; U line des efJectifu 
(salaries pensasems) de Fentreprus la lisle da £mnpemente 
kwrds toules justifications nfeceomres pioav aul que fc camfidal 
eat Eecbniquement et fmanckreniail en me sure d’akiSu u* 
tmvux en question, notamment In references teduriques et 
finandfem dea uavaux analogues menfes i bonne lin au coon des 
dnq denMres arnees OU actuolement «n coon avee les indkatioos 
(ouvaotes: intituife et localisation des tnvaox, kur nature et 
inqiuEtanee, l’imponance de la participation du rmufidat & [’execu- 
tion des tnvaux. les doub et adieaMS des maltres de Fotmage 
ajant attribufe les marchfes; 

VIL — Tiigrimmit ilrn raniffiliilurrn fadtidw I o— Womw i 
Les candidatures serom eiuminfas par use comnnarion. Les 
dfeouous de cede conmnarinn ne aenint aasceptifaks (Taucun 
recoors de la part des camfidats. 

II sen adressfe «n candidate retenu* une lettre d'iuvilatin] i 
partidper & rappel d’oCrra restremt prfevu. Cetic invitation con- 
finne h recevanlite de la caadidataie et doit mdigner les condi- 
tions d’attxibatiai du dossier d’appel d’offras. La CEAO a'interdit 
de revenir ititferiquonent sir une acceptation on de justifier son 
cbmx; 

Vm. — Inscription definitive : 

La invites devraut, a*ik maintimnent kur intention de 

psxtidpei; ennfinne r ieur candidatnre parnB nxmnimtnd fe adneae 
a la CEAO, BP 643, Oaagad<x«oo, ckne les amditians prescritea 
d™ k Iritze (Tinvitation de forgani«teur. Seals la candidate 
invites ayam cooGimfe kur intoition de peitidper i Fappel iFoffra 
hcatrrinf aeraot corsidferfes comae dauntivezueot ioscrite poor 
partidper i Fippci cfoflres restreiaL 

DRISSAKEITA, secretaire genebal 


t, 

89k— ta 

llta 


FMI 

FobWh I 

FalrLn .14 27 
FalrFIn 
FamHIS 
And. 

FnnHm 

FannF 

PirnHo t 

AmC l Jt V 

FcOGos 

Farvflu 

Flbron* 

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FlOBl* 48 1J 
FUnrtac 


8V 84* 
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13 12 - 

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Si 34 - 

151* 15V* • 

39* 34* ■ 
*S*k 664* 
21 21ta ■ 

« S 

14 lita ■ 
3Jta 34 

» 55V 

36 36 

Zita 21ta 


STOCK USS USS 

DeVoe-Hdbein 

International bv . 59k 6% 

Qty-Qock 

International uv 294 VA 

Quota db at July &, 1965 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simplv write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent Free and without • 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)5 120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firconl 




The European Banking 
Traded Currency Fund Limited 

NOTICE of the FRST ANNUAL G0BUU. MEETING o* 
SharehoMars to tata place on the 31 st duy.of July; 1985 aft tl am. 

NOTICE Is hereby given pursuant to the Articles of Association of 
The European Banking Traded Currency Fund Limited ("the 
Company") that the First Annual General Meeting of the Company 
wy take place on the 31 st day of *My, 1985 at 11 am elEBC House, 
1-3 Seale areet,SL Heller, Jersey. Channel Islands for the purposes 
of considering and If thought fit, passing the toflowing Ottflnary 
Resolutions; 

ReeofuHons 

1 That the Faianda] Statements tex the period ended 31st March,- 

1985 together with the Report of the Directors and the Auditors 
thereon be received, approved and adopted. 

2. Thai Messrs. Coopers & Lybrand who have signified their 
wfflngness to continue In office be and are hereby appointed tiie 
Auditors of the Company unta the conclusion of fte Second 
Annuel General Meeting of the Company and thatthe fee payable 
to them in respect of the year to 31 st Match, 1986 be determined 
by the Directots. 

By order of the Board 

EBCTrust Company (Jersey) Limited 

Secretary 

Dated the 9th day of July, 1985. 

NOTES 

l The holder of a ConOnontalDBposttsry Receipt (“COrn m^snercise his 
wring finite by depttfeig 9 b CDR atffwoffice of AmstSRtam Dopostary 
Co*ppanyN.V.. 172 Sputetraat, 1012 VT Amsterdam. TheNoti eriand »(fte 
■Doposttttjr) and by instructing the DepotftBy as to the exercise o» the 
wring rtgtits attached to toe Shores evidenced bysuchCDR-hthe absence 
of such awtrucricm the Deposksry *■ awteiseaueh wring rfgh»orretatn 
imm dotag so. as it trunks fh In riw interesis of the holder. 

2. There ere no service contacts witti tfia Krectora. 



if* 



Lloyds Bank PXc. 

( fn c o r p orefrid in Engfand wrtfi butted fiofaffly) 


In ocBord on ce with the terms end re n di t io ns of rf ie Note* am/ the 
provitiors of the Agent Bank Agreemerri between Boyds E u refttoncti 
N.V., Lloyds Brmk Ptc, and Otibcxik, NA, dated July % 1980, notice is 
iiereby given that the Rote of Interest has been fixed al The 

rekvant Interest Payment Dcrfe is January B, 1986 (mdting ai interest 
period of 1 84 day^, and payment will be nude against Coupon No. \ V. 
The vdue of Coupon No. 10 payable on July 8, 19K b US$7075. 


Juf/9. 1985, London 

By: Qtfconk. NA (CS51 Depr), Agent Bonk . CUlBAN\*0 







































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


Page 13 


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9 % 9 ft— ft 
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lift lift— ft 
25 25 

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20 % 20 %— ft 
34 Ml 24 ft— % 
fft 9 %+ % 
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18 ft lift— ft 
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28 ft 29 — % 
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13 % 13 ft 
»% 4 ft +.% 

tS 17 ft + ft 
11 % 11 %—% 
35 % S 5 %— ft 
16 - - 10 -+ % 
6 % 4 % 


Solaa 

1 


IfBa Hftti LOW SPJH.dl’Ot 

U Freed 15413 12 % T 2 %— % 

US Ant ■ - - . 98 3 ft 3 %. M — ft 

USSCO }JK M 44931 % 31 ft 3 UJ- % 
US Cop 89 3 % Sft 3 % + % 

Biteun . 21 3 % 3 3 

US EAT '152 5 4 % 4 ft— ft 

USMCa 168231 % 29 % 29% -1 

usHiii rjim raft io%- % 

USPfCB 11 7 ft 2 ft 714 + ft 

US SMI .12 27 .73 4 ft 4 % 4 ft + ft 

USSvr 706 LO 6519 % 19 ft 19 ft- % 
USTrk 170 107 2911 * 11 % 11 % 

USTra UO U 71535 % 35 3 S 
UStOtn 3 17 14482016 20 20 %- %: 

UTatO - 14 6 % 6 % 4 % 

UnTrtev. . 2023 ft 23 ft aft 

UflTotB 5 7 % 7 % 7 % + ft 

UflVIBn 76 18 S» M M +% 

UVoBs 144 14 2941 47 % 47 % 

UnvFm 26621 20 ft 20 ft— % 

UlwHIt 137720 ft 19 ft >S* + ft 

UnvHM M JV. 5 ft Sft 

Unv 5 a£ 18 3 3 3 — ft 

UPSBK 5511 % lift lift- ft 

UbRsW 17 39 5 4 % J + % 

UPtJlP 200 9.1 IB a, 22 

UrnCr • . Bi 4 % 4 ft 4 % — ft 

Uacoh Tie 19 312 5 ft SH 5 %- ft 
UsSpo MO 47 ’ 136 36 36 + ft 


Floating-Rate Notes 


Jufya 


Dollar 


| 7 



V 



3 




10 8 % 

8 % 

8 % — 

% 

vu . 



IM Bft 

7 ft 

1 





5619 

12 % 

12 ft— 

% 




101 6 ft 

6 % 

Aft 



J 4 e 1 J 

11 8 % 

0 % 


Vow LB- 



490 Bft 

8 % 

Eft — 

lb 




15 U 

14 % 

15 



we. 


1029 




VaJRSL 


9618 % 

18 ft 

18 % + ft 

WalFro 

.12 

18 

5 Aft 

Aft 

6 ft 


V 1 NBCS 

150 a A 4 

)** 

44 



ValfJtl 

lja 

2 S 

2547 

4 Oft 

41 



MO 

33 

828 






A 9 

1015 % 



Vattek 

J 4 

23 

6 6 % 

Aft 

Aft- 


VoOil 

JB 

TJ 

1823 % 

23 % 

23 ft 





14414 % 




2223 



t tft 
67 8 

Vft 

7 ft 

Vft— % 1 

8 + % j 




3 7 ft 

6 % 

7 ft 



JB 

47 

BSD 

n 

12 % + % 




62 % 







24 8 % 







130 Sft 

3 % 

J% 





SD 

Uft 

17 + ft 




55 Sft 

3 % 




Jfe 

A 

185124 ft. ZMk 



VlctroS 



167 3 ft 

3 % 










Vtede+r 

32* Al 

19910 ft 

10 % 

10 ft 





412 % 







117 

17 



WoBoch 

J 4 

A 0 

* 3 *% Tt 



T 


14 6 


* — 


Vodovi 



24010 ft 

10 ft 

10 ft — 

ft 




4 4 % 

4 % 

4 % — 

% 

Vbttinf 



9115 

Uft 

14 % — 

% 


SOT L 9 

7624 % 

26 

26 % + ft 



3 

155 tft 

Eft 


ft 

Vvaust 



1 6 ft 

Aft 

Aft 


I 



w 



3 


WD 40 

WtalbCS 

WIKrTal 

WOiE 

WFSLs 

WMSB 

Woirfet 

wbusPp' 


ftaxms 

wabbs 

Wotfota 

w»a>tts 


Weanc 2 

WAmBc 

WeftFfl 

WSfCOP 

WBtFSL 

WMICTC 

WMicr 

WStLta 

WS fear 

WlUAa 

wmorC 

WstwbO 

WlfeCl 


76 4 J 
74 17 

378 77 
M 27 

.11 17 
- 70 27 
74 27 

78 7 

70 37 
17*163 

74 a 77 
70 107 
70 19 


74 27 
70 2.1 


Wlcot 

WWcom 

Wllond 

Wlllmt 

W 1 IIAL 

«Vms 5 n 

WlmeTr 

iWIbnF 

WMtoci 

Window 

WlmEn 

WlaarO 

woUbn 


wrifer 

Wymoo 

iwvse 


70 17 
.14 24 
AO 47 
74 27 
, 15 a 17 
JO 13 


4120 % 19 * 
ISM 14 
• Of 7 ft 7 
462 24 % 23 % 
36 25 % 25 ft 
414 16 11 % 

2 7 6ft 
17 MU M 
120 % 20 % 

137 7 fi% 
15715 % IS 
2113 % 13 % 
29 8 % 7 * 

531 29 ft 
1770 «% 

39 7 % 7 % 
UK 17 ft 
19 M lift 
1914 ft M% 
49015 ft 15 ft 
B 7 % 7 ft 
8 7 7 

312 ft 12 ft 

3 fft fft 

914 13 * 

2816 ft 14 
331 ft lift 
5515 % 14 ft 
94330 % 29 * 
13 4 ft 4 
340510 % 9 % 
• 6ft 6* 
29940 % 39 ft 
304015 % 14 
116 % 16 % 
36 53 ft Sift 
26 7 * 7 % 
M 2ft 2 
S 87 5 % 5 % 
136 7 % 7 % 
23 18 17 * 

92 6 ft 6 * 
2913 ft 13 % 
18820 * 27 % 
11 1 % 8 % 
4524 23 % 

136 9 Bft 


20 — % 
M 

7 — % 
24 ft + % 
25 % 

16 + ft 

7 + % 

14 ft + ft 
20 % 

6%— ft 
15 ft— % 
13 % — ft 
7 ft— * 
31 +1 

9 % — % 
7 H— * 
17 * + ft 
M 

M%— ft 
15 % + % 
7 ft + % 
7 —ft 
12 ft 

9 ft— * 
Uft— % 
16 ft 

31 ft— % 
IS + ft 
30 — ft 
4 — ft 
Hlft— % 
6 *— % 
40 + ft 

14 * + % 
16 %— ft 
53 % + 1 % 
7 * + ft 
2ft + ft 


17 *— % 
6*— ft 
13 ft 

27 % — * 

1 % 

24 + ft 

Ift- ft 


Xlcor 

XMM 


6313 % 12 % 
130 3 * 3 ft 
3 S 3 8 % 7 * 
■ 9413 ft 12 * 


12*— ft 
3 %— ft 
8% 

12 *— % 


YtowFt 

MO 24 

9530ft 

38ft 

SSft + ft 

YarkFd 

40b 3J 

7621 

lift 

19% + ft 

I 


Z 


1 

Zehntol 


16 3% 

3ft 

Sft 



152536 

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48 AS 

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2% 

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ZkfTQlfT r ‘ 

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L24 AS 

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ntel 


51.2ft 

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Tft— ft 

ZWod 


164 5 

+% 

5 

Zandvn - 

J® J 

4018% 

10ft 

10ft + ft 



209:13' 


1S%— % 



. .10 J% 

7% 

7% 


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WJ> 

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tut j 


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a— ■ 1 ^ * 

■ - ■* 

lani. 



Five succinct reasens 
why the^O^klorf -Astoria 
is NewY^ks 
finest luxury hotel. 


Comfort. 

The kind of comfort that comes from 
investing $110 million in our hotel over three 
years, including our Park Avenue lobby, all 
public and private function rooms, our restau- 
rants, and our new, luxury guest rooms 

Entertainment 

The choice of entertainment you get 
from three of New York's finest restaurants, 
offering haute cuisine and live grand piano music 
nightly at Peacock Alley, hearty steaks and 
fresh seafood at the Bull & Bear, or gourmet 
Japanese fare at Inagiku, Sir Harry's unique 
safari lounge, the Terrace Lounge, the popular 
Oscar's restaurant, and more. 

Innovation. 

The kind of innovation regarding our 
guests' unique needs that makes us the only 
hotel in the world which hosts a nation s 
embassy, and enables us to offer privacy and 


security to visiting heads of state, as well as 
helping each of our daily guests who need the 
impossible done immediately. 

Elegance 

The unparalleled elegance of a priceless 
collection of Art Deco treasures which adorns 
our hoteL And the Waldorf Towers, which has 
been the celebrated residence of a former 
president of the United States, the leaders of 
our corporate industry, a great national hero, 
and those most prominent in society and 
international diplomacy. 

Value. 

The value that comes from staying in 
New York's finest hotel, but not New York's 
most expensive hoteL You can spend rhore, but 
you can't <|rf more. 

•When business or pleasure brings you to 
New York, stay at New York's finest luxury 
hoteL 



Without theWUorf it isntNewYjrk. 


Park Avenue at 50 th Street, New York City 10022 *( 212 ) 355-3000 Tejex: 666747 
Or call your local Hilton Reservation Service. 

A Hilton Hotel 



/MOL 
ABMlrlOlM 
A/Bed Irfab 91 
MM Utah 87 
ABMIrMitav 

Mb BkoComfint 

AflontkRnB/M 
Aufeotafe895 
Sco Coom 18496 
BCONsLowof! 
BcaM Remo mm 
BconRomon 
Bee Santa Srtrtfe 91 

Bangui HMBbna 

Boo Coro 97 
NGmctflW 
Bk. Greece *1/97 
Bfc Ireunos* 

B* I retort 92 
Bk Montreal 90 
Bk Montreal M 
BtMMnam 
Bk New Tort « 

Bk Nova Samoa/93 
BkNe*a5cetia94 
8k Tokyo 72 
Bk Tokyo 8! 
BfcTofcvet? 

Bfc Tokyo MM9I 
Bk Tokyo Decani 
BanhsnerfaiG/SK 
Bankers Truia 
Bonkers Trial 94 
BU Capital 96 
BaS Pin 87/91 
BMM95 
BMhri* 

Muon 

Bqimaana* 

Bn Irtesuez99 

BurS 

BtoS7 

Bfce97 

BtaOdM 

Bice Jon (8 

Bta9» 

Be Indasuri 97 
BMP «S 
HP 97 
SflpCS/tS 
Baoie/* 

MS 99 
Bees 
BH 88/91 
MJut96 
Bnp05 - 
Ba Paribas Pap 
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BordovsBkPtre 
Banian (VS 95 
BardOvtO/SH 

BonkmQ/SPerp 
BerdonO/SM 
BefekmPeni 
Bafehim Det»/M 

BWsAimOC 

BertumataS 
Borneo BUS 
BPrPMBkS/91 
BotahmeuM 
Bofebon Odf9AW 
Lean 

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Cncn 90/95 

cm« 

CM 60 
Obc 95/85 


CaepopHez) BID Askd 
7* 19-12 99J0 1HJB 

M. IMflmSlM 
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I* S>U 968B 9788 
Wft 1M9W36 HUB 
9 274* 99i*n|W9 

98. 8M1S5B99AI 
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7% »■ H 9913 99.73 
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8 IU 1 B *45 9816 
7 * BH 9 9948 9 V Jt 
9 ft IUI 9 U 8 9 MS 
9 ft 088989*0 
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9 KJCniD H8E 
7% 20-01083416044 
8% 2M7U0iNfL71 
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9ft 1M7 99J4 1BUM 
9ft JH8 188JOWOS5 
9H. iM7 taunaa 
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tft 2947 18000 
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7ft 2549T08301M 

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9ft 1587 00001029 
10ft 2349 101290030 
7% 2049 MttIHIOBJB 

Oft 2+67 imsnooto 

1+1 V 1KL0BU0.U 

9% 30-umewis 

9ft 2207 1681710022 
10ft 1309 lflOJ9M849 
1+11 1007JM8E 
9% 0646 1089316103 
1HI9935 Wifi 
■ft 3147 108001 08 IS 
Ift b-n 188571080 
7ft 95-12 WJ5 10885 
Bft 13-11 H&M1085B 
10ft 0449 SLnm JO 
9ft 2247 H8H1087O 
7ft 17-10 9960 9970 
7ft 1148 UQ47U857 
fft (Ml *8871(817 
Sft 02819932 9942 
fft 11-07 T88W18UM 

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9% 01-11 1083910649 
IK. 0449 total 08% 
9 ft 12481080811)811 
Ift 13-12 1081S10625 
6ft 2840 9957 10867 
7ft 2241 »JB 9931 
Ift 3+OB MU01KUS 
9 1647 U8IBN815 

Ift - 108121*2! 

fft 11-10 U8MU8S0 
1ft IMS 1086018871 
Bft 1548 1955 KAOS 
0 09-12 100.5210862 

9ft 2+» 100J7W047 
7725 0M9 99.63 9972 
■ft 314*9967 9927 


UOHfJIM. 

ctbc n nniyt 

CBXM 

Corltre15ti.94 
Cnhptlnt 97/00 
OmMaO/tfl 
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One Mon Corn Oo 
Own tab 94 
Chemkoi K (Wklyl 
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OyfcftaDo Bk M 
OkorpfesMMhrl 
onwvsceM 
Citicorp DON 

CtilcerpM 

OltorpPerp 

OH u ir p Pfe e *7 

Comerico97 

Comm*RBkr«bS 

ComnMnbkNova 

Comm Ur b Montreal 91 

Comp Flo CJ.C.97 

Council CM EMM* 

Cdli/W 

CdW»S 

Cd FMM 

Ccf 97 

CepmaS/92 

CepraoS 

Cr Do Sard 19/91 

Cr Fonder a/93 

Cr For Export 97 

CrLvonnabti/ta 

CrLYOSStaS 

CrLivueHtom 

CrLnmtntoS/94 

CrLyorxmto 91/95 

CrLvonoata99 
Cr Lreenota JortVW 
C/Lvoonai»97 
CrLyaanabOO 
CrLyeanobJurtime 
C/taflonedB 
Cr NnttBoal 90/94 
Cr MoikmolCO 
CnOtaMIH 
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CrHalkme92 
Dc+ctri KenpyeM 
Dane/I Nafeas9A99 
Den Hcrske Mm* 

Den ftsrska DocSO 

Denmark JanKl/19 

DwvnarkOdS/91 

Denmark 9«/M 

Denmark Pirp 

DttEnfeOnPVTAU 

Dreamer Bk 93 

DretdnerFInS 

DranmerFfe* 

EMarodoNucS 

EM* 

EtUfOrtS 
EO( 97 
EnMOt 
Enel Oe 
Enb* 

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exterior IM 91/94 
FVIWfefS 
Ferrovia 92/99 
FMtoMfO 
Final Pi Paper M/9S 
First BosU 91/M 
Flril Bk Svsl 96 
FlrW Q*ta>9097 
RrC O6C000 9] 

First OilcagnN 
RrsiCtty TmosK 
First infer 95 


CmpmNpM Bid Askd 

7% 30a*90SjlS 
Vft IM7 100221083} 
Bft 29-11 9926 tab* 
UI9S1M1 WJB 99150 
1% 3147 UXU5U8S 
7* 8W9 9934 99.H 
Bft DMI 99J5 9965 
8ft 2749 108341*41 
7ft 2+01 H5S *79 
Bft 1306 H8121E86! 
IK) 0W9TO25MBJ3 

7 * uaaa nos 
7ft 1081*61*20 
Bft 3U7W90HD80 
tft T2491BU0Kl.il 
Bft 1587*581019 
■ft 3987*9 10800 
I 9499860 9885 
Ift 2148 99.9C 1SUB 
8* 20-11 U83B1B40 
16ft 1M910U5180JB 
7ft 12-11*50*60 
8ft n-K 9953 10805 
fft 35*108491889 
fft 60-18 K82S1BBJB 
fft 22-01 108010121 
7* 22499953 5961 
■% 0-12 1086J1C87J 
7ft 06491081510025 
10806 

Ift 09-10 10D4SH8B 
8ft IM1 99.93 10082 
tft IV10 M6671D0J7 
10% 2609 <003010855 
I* 087BS672108I2 
8% - 1084210022 

8* 3MI 1885510105 

i* 27 -a mjnoui 

9 1U7 1082310828 

07-11 9967 9977 
7ft 1041 99J8 10806 
8ft 1+U 1085710867 
9 IM7 168.016823 
18* 1149 180481689 
9J3 2040 99 JU 10812 

9 1+07 1003010840 

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7ft »-n 9964 99.94 
•ft 13-11 *0321080 
Bft 09-U 1S8S710817 
Sft IM8*J51889 
7ft 1949*55 18858 
Bft • 10027*837 

9ft 15-16 1086510875 
9M 1948 10068*871 
9% K41 108021080 
Ift 2047 9969 1*09 

9% 2 +nuusiDi.a 
Sft 2840 *58 UOM 
U 27-01 10841 10051 
fft 3041 *81018025 
M 27-01 1089216UQ 
»V> n-» 1080410814 
Tft 1349 I960 *880 
7640623-11 9893 9962 
U 0149 1002210032 
Sft 17-0 9925 WUB 

10 3649 taano&a 

7ft *41 9961 992] 
Tft 23-0 99.93 10801 
8ft 2549 9925 WLB 
10ft 3048 1082SM825 
8H 25-10 IMS 9925 
Ift JM7 9920 99JI 
IV, 29-11 99 JB 99 JD 
■ft 13**68*55 
■ft 87**58 9928 
8412S1+* 9860 *.* 
K, 2140 9964 9950 
9 22-879100 9KB 

7% 06-49 99.78 9950 


Imuer/eeat. 

Fort 91 

Fari«MS4-L92 
Full lid M/M 
Gonflnona 81/92 
Gwuinma 92/M 
GAS 
Gib 92 
Gib Pm 
GAM 
Girt 91 

GlWasfecp 92/93 
Grinokm* 
Gripofeyoti 
Gl Vfesferasm 
HW Samuel 94 
HID Samuel P«rp 
Hhpamfl/15 
Hydro Quebec 62 
Hydro Quebec M 
Hydra ObOkB 
Id 91 

IcMort 95 * 7/60 
lnoonedoS/93 
ibis 

lrelaad94/n 
I re load 97 
IrSartM 
Italy* 

Ikdvn/M 
Italy 65 
Italy* 

Cl ton c 

Jp Maroon* 

KoPFeb* 

KemiraOvis 

KlebMoriBanfl 

RldiraartBanM 

KtaimartBaiPere 

Karan Dev Bk 84*9 

Korea Exd)BD85« 

UncntaVK.* 

Lloyds BkPero 

LtaT0693 

uordfet? 

LtavdsM 
Uc&JuSf 
LftbB 
Ltd) June 
LkBM 
Ltcb 9? 

MntantaM/* 
Mokmfaie/U 
MofoysloAprlMI 
IMtaySta DecS/92 
MokrrsloB/n 
Man Hon 94 
6ltanHanM(Wfclvl 
MarMldM 
Mar MM 09 
MarMIdM 
MeMenBkM 
MMondBkParp 
Mid laid lid 93 
Midland MS 
Midland uk 92 
Midland Int 91 
MUM lid* 

Mitsui Fin 9? 

Mitsui Fin 96 
MGR Granted M 
MNBkDen* 

Mat Bk Detroit 96 
Not Caenm Bk S/94 
Nn) Wat Perp SerA 
NaWestPerpSwB 

MUM Fin 91 

Not West Fin SS 

NalWnst* 

NatWOUM 

Net Wesi Fin 92 

Nat Wal Fin Pcip 

Nate Ov 9e 

NewZeatandD 

Mi Steel Dev* 

tkaeenCMO 

NbevnCr* 

NbennCrie 

Nordic lid 91 

Ok* 16 

OMM 


Coupea Next Bid Askd 

Ift 15-11 166.I51DUS 
61-10*45*25 
Hk &47 100.1010020 
tt» 31-12 tuoaitn* 
fft 238/ HUJOIdUS 
•ft 1346 HDJSU817 
Tft H4M0U4HQJ4 
9 1+11 9150 *J0 

tft 29-11 UB62HU2 
K 77-09 M0.911D1J1 
Tft DUt* JO Rtf 
16ft 3+S 108S71B067 
■% bi* moHinaso 
lift 23**62*23 
lift 27* HJ7 U8C 
8ft 29-11 US 9450 
fft 3+14*24 *84 
1 W 1 *65 ns 

4K. »47 HOJOWJ.10 
7% BT-ll WJ5 16805 
fft 1547*25 10825 
1141 *23 *J3 
fft aUHOJBMUS 
Oft 29-11 HB2S1D025 
11 U* *8*10856 
10ft 20*H8Zn08T 
Ift - I88.UWL24 

16ft 0** K6J41PW4 
Ift 13-11*8.17*022 
Tft 2+47*30 

25«*65 9MJ 
16% ZM9 508151080 
8H> 30* *05816868 

sft ova nuinoji 

16ft K*lllfi*5m» 
8ft 20* 1O8101OQJO 
16ft 27* W46CTBCL5I 
tft 29-11 HAS *J8 
8% 4S-»H«MU6 
fft 09-H tBUB*85D 
Sft 13-QNJ7NU7 

8 *12*90 *880 
7% H-H *01510855 
■ft »i; Musioan 
9% 1+10*82310832 
9% 23-07 * JO 

1% M-11HU6 
16880 

n -12 108.101003 

29-11 10856 10066 
TV. 1+12*26*56 
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fft *16 10335*058 
Sft 05-12 M.98 HOC 
18ft 28* 1082510855 
6 3041 *.77 10807 

TV. 3* 98* *55 
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0 09-01487710017 
fft 31-10 WljmaLO 
109. 6+09 1683010060 

2+16 *.75 *55 
lift 0+09 MUJ10853 
9 1W7W.90 1D8B 

■ft 19-17 1*1016825 
■Ml 3049 99.10 10810 
7% 2+UWJSWJE 
Sft 0+61 91.34 KM 

1 Of* *21 *61 
9ft 1+67 1084310853 
fft tt-ID 1BB221B022 
II - loom 

fft 1+10 10831 1 DOM 
9 25-10 lOt-atOLSS 

fft 1+11 10650 rat* 
18 2740 1 00231 K63 

9% 09-111085510865 
8ft 2+0 1 DUO 14360 
fft 1HI 108151*25 
tft 2+n *50 11065 
fft 1647 1D8HKB.1I 
9 1+11 »JS HO* 

Oft 3-11 1D8C1G850 
Dft 29-11 10060UU5 


■ft 


■lb 

8 

7 % 


Inxii/MaL 

CaotaeNerf Bid Atod 

Oft nm 

9% 

n -18 lot is ram 

Petrol Coro to 84 

fib 

2M7 M0.131MII 


8 ft 

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pmui vital 

io% 97*** non 

Pl Batten *tal 

■% 

1+Q lOAUUULB 

OMPtokmUiBetlN 

9 

12-11 HA5310LA3 

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10% 

27* 1005710367 

RtpSk Danai97 

Bfc 

30* 9857 99 J? 

Rvl Bk Canada £ 

Tft 

8HB99JI994I 

RM 84/94 


1+07 NQ.I0MU0 

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8 

C&-1? HDJD11XUQ 

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9ft 

26* 1*08 

SOM ini FlnM/BI 

Ift 

fft 

SS^SSS 

Seoul Fin ur93 

9% 

1+B*JS 10058 


7% 

23-17 9970 99 JO 

Scrttandlntn 

Vft 34* 100.731*83 

SKP+dHe* 

7ft 

71* *41 9951 

Shewmirf Carat? 

•ft 

87* 9V.D 99 JB 

Slid* 

tft 

JM7 9997 100* 

scat nm 

Ift 

7+179951 10UF 

Stairt* 

(ft 

bah mmous 

SIC lot 91 

■h 

19-12 *J5 10+25 

SecGeaWfS 

lift t+ffl I0MS18L2S 

SocGrtiMarM 

lift 

1+09 1005210077 

SacGen Nov94 


87-1 1 IDdJSIOUS 

SKGcn* 

10% 

10* 1004510055 

500)91 

n 

»ll HB5B18B50 

5aairi 92/97 

ID 

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30*1884718177 

Sonia* 

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9ft 

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PEANUTS 

f l‘M 60IN6T0BE 
V IN A DEBATE.. v 


THESE ARE SOME 
NOTES l*M PREPARING 
SO I LL BE REAPy 


* SO? WHO CARE5? 
WHY NOT? FORGET IT.'. 1 
OH ( YEAH?PROP DEAD!" 


BOOKS 


1 THINK 
YOU'RE REAPYL 


amaiiiaaiHii 



BLONPIE 

[hcMGOUEJB I ADDED 
THE YENTBSrrANMB' 


aniiaiiiHaa 


M 4 


HgS W*L«||f YOU'RE , 
SWBLE/J /LUCKY... | 


‘HI IF HE WAS GOO O, L 
( THE PRICES WOULD 
V— - f 0E HIGHER 





ACROSS 

1 “Mary — 
little lamb" 

5 Hwy. 

8 Swiftly 

13 “Maria “ 

1933 song 

15 Demeanor 

16 Kind of eclipse 

17 American 
snake 

18 Activity on a 
boardwalk 

20 “The Birds'* 
playwright 

22 over 

(upset! 

23 Plead 

26 Tutelary god 

29 Hot time in 
Paris 

31 Rottweiler, for 
one 

32 Half a bray 

34 Ancient town 

near Salerno 

36 Suffix with 
manor 

38 That is: Lat. 

40 Vow for a 
physician 

44 PBSVReilJy: 
Spies’* 

45 Trojan or Civil 
follower 

46 Leopard's perch 

47 Estuary 

48 Exhaust 

51 Twilled fabric 

53 Aviv 

54 Peck’s role in 
“To Kill a 
Mockingbird” 


T 9/85 

57 Styron’s Mr. 19 Hip 

Turner 21 Of the eye 

59 Vulnerable point 24 “ and 





64 “1 Angel.” 

1942 film 

67 “The Gin 
Game" Tony 
winner 

68 Greek 
marketplace 

69 Abbr. at 
O'Hare 

70 Lawyer's 
catchall combo 

71 Loren- 
Newman 
film: 1955 

72 D.D.S. or 
M.FJV. 

73 Voluminous 
volume 

DOWN 

1 Zeus's wife 

2 Winged 

3 Tenth part: 
Comb, form 

4 “ . . . of 

singing 
birds": S. 
Johnson 

5 Coarse file 

6 Church 
contribution 

7 Junior's mission 

8 Sensitive, as to 
ragweed 

9 Throb 

10 Black bird 

11 Tin 

(destroyer) 

12 Work unit 

14 Bandleader 

Shaw 


of lead": Pope 

25 Exam taker 

26 “Paganini" 
composer 

27 Actress on 
“Falcon 
Crest" 

28 iterate 

30 Pinna 

33 Lucy's TV 
friend 

35 Away from: 
Prefix 

37 Solon's forte 

39 Punctum 

41 Authorized 

42 Seaman 

43 Goddess of peace 

49 Have (he 
misery 

50 Led 

52Ziti,e.g. 

55 Linger 

56 List of 
candidates 

58 U , former 

U.N. official 

60 Level pt. of a 
staircase 

61 Within: Comb, 
form 

62 Biblical 
country 

63 Apollo's 
instrument 

64 demer 

(seasickness) 

65 Eastern title 

66 Stewart or 
Seriing 


BEETLE BAILEY 

15 THAT ALL 1 
YOU'RE GOING ] 
TO GIVE Qcu / 
MET >£^6 


ORDINARILY, 
I POM' T UKE 
SARCASM 


fkxa 

o&itez 


1L> 


ANDY CAPP 

*. m ( IT’S NO use.'' 
Ss \ PET I JUST J 

II/cantuve < 


WIZARD of ID 


TELQCSV; 
ON THE ^ 
f SUNK j'yt 


THE CENTAUR IN THE GARDEN 

By Moacyr Scliar. Translated from the Por- 
tuguese by Margaret A . Neves. 216 pages. 
Paperback, S5.95 . 

Ballaiuine, 201 East 50th Street, New 
York, N.Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Jack Dann 

P I ERHAPS more a Zeitgeist than a move- 
menu Jewish consciousness seems to be 
emerging as a force in Latin Ameri can fiction. 
Writers such as M&rio Srichman in Argentina. 
i^tac Goldenberg in Peru (author of “The 
Fragmented Life of Don Jacobo Lerner” and 
probably the best-known Latin American writ- 
er dealing with Jewish themes), the dramatist 
I saac Cbocron in Venezuela, and Mexico's 
Margo Glantz and Sabina Berman ere actively 
exploring the rich heritage and special textures 
that make up Jewish life. 

In Brazil we have Moacyr Scliar, who has 
published 10 novels and seven short-story col- 
lections that have won numerous literary 
awards. He is all but unknown in the United 
Stales. 

The publication of “The Centaur in the 
Carden** is something of an event: It is Sdiar’s 
first bode to see print in English and should 
eve him the recognition and larger audience he 
deserves. BaUantine's Bob Wyatt is launching a 
new line. Available Press, with this book. It is 
an a us pici o us be ginning He has two more of 
Sellar's books in production. “One-Man 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


[5555 alona Sans 

□DDE HH3DC3 QS11EI 
be ran nnaso anna 
oQQnaaaHoaaaaa 
BOB 3 DOB 
EEaaaa anaaaana 
hbde anaaoa ama 
deqb ana aasn 
□cn aranaso anna 
acaaoHaa saQaan 
Baa E3Hna 
aEnaaQaanoanan 
□□oh aasao aaaa 
aonn naasa aana 
bdbb sagas agog 


Army." a novel, and "The Carnival of rhe 
Animals.* 1 a short-story collection. 

It is difficult even for a seasoned reader of 
fantasy to suspend disbelief when confronted 
with a story about a centaur born to Russian 
immigrants and brought up as a Jew — circum- 
cised and bar-mitzvahed — with devastating 
and hilarious consequences. Bui die ftrsi-per- 
son nayrailon of Guedali the Centaur’s coming 
of age and maturity is so down to earth aim 
en g a g in g and universai that the reader must 
believe in him. 

Guedali is. as perhaps all Jews are, our 
symbols and metaphors made reaL Albert 
Goldman has said that “Jewishness itself has 
become a metaphor for modem life. The indi- 
vidual Jew — the ahoi in search of identity — 
has become a symbolic protagonist." 

And so Guedali the Centaur becomes the 
personification of alienation: the Jew. the out- 
sider. Desperately lonely and frustrated, he 
runs away from hk family’s protection lo seek 
his destiny. After a series of adventures in a 
circus and on the mn. he finds safety, falls in 
love, has an operation that turns him into a 
man and settles down in the city lo a life of 
style and money and minor infidefuies. Only 
then does he confront himself, and be makes 
the most dangerous journey — as we all must 
— to find his own meaning. 

Sdiar’s technique, like that of 1. B. Singer, is 
to integrate the magical and the fantastical into 
the real world, writers as diverse as Mo 
Cortazar. Jorge Luis Borges. Alejo Carpeniier. 
Gabriel Ganna Marquez. Muriio Rubiao and 
Moacyr Scliar use reolismo magico to explore 
the numinous mystery that pervades reality. 
But for Scliar the mystery and the reality aw 
the Judaic condition. It infuses bis work with ‘ 
humor, fantasy, authenticity and ethical safe-' 
stance: 

“The Centaur in the Garden" is a brilliant 
debuL It is a comedic novel a regionahst novel, 
a bawdy erotic novel a realistic novel of bour- 
geois alienation, a metaphorical novel a fan- 
tastical phantasmagoria] novel — a wearing 
of the common and the mythic, a mating of 
contrasts and opposites. It is a simply mid 
story that turns itself into an ontological loop, 
that questions reality and makes fun of itself. 
Most of all it is a Jewish novel. 


Jack Dann's most recent novel is “The Man 
Who Melted. ** He wrote this review for The 
Washington Post. 


© New York Times, edited bjr Eugene Mtdeska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 





REX MORGAN 

OR- MORGAN GIVE 

I ^VOU A RETURN APPOlM T AtEMT, CL AUDI A? 

WHY StiOULO~^S^^E^s v PKISiiHfi 

HE* 1 PASSED 

the PHYSICAL Mpfl 1 m§m 


GARFIELD 


Wbrld StockMarkeis 

Via Agence France-Presse July 8 

Closing prices in local amende* antes* otherwise indicated. 




YOU'RE A TERRIBLE 
WORRY WART. BRADY f 


ONLY BECAUSE 
I LOVE YOU. 

P ABLIKiG fj S 

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Mg dETmute- 



By Roberr Byrne 

T HE game between Jozsef 
Pinter, a 31 -year-old Hun- 
garian grandmaster and Nick 
DeFirnuan. a 27-year-old inter- 
national master, from Oakland, 
California, in the Copenhagen 
International Tournament, was 
an example of Black’s incisively 
repulsing the attack. 

On 8 0-0, it is modi too dan- 
gerous to seize a pawn with 
8 . . .. P-N5;9N-R4, NxP be- 
cause 10 R-Kl defies defen- 
se. Thus. 10 . . . N-KB3 (10 
. . . N-B4?; 11 NxN. PxN; 
12 B-R4ch. B-Q2; 13 NxP!. 
PxN; 14 RxPCfa, K-B2; 15 Q- 
Q5 is annihilating); 1 1B-N5, B- 
K2;I2 N-KB51.0-0 (12 . 

. . PxN; 13 BxN, PxB; 14 Q- 
Q5 wins for While); 13 NxBcb, 
QxN; 14 N-N6, R-R2; 15 N- 
Q5LQ-Q1; 16 BxN, PxB; 17 Q- 
Q4> pms Black out of business. 

The main alternative to 13 P- 
B5 is 13 PxP, 0-0; I4Q^Q2.Q- 
B2; 15 QR-Q1, as in. the game 
between DragoJjnb Vehnurovic 
and Ulf Andersson, Moscow 
Interzonal Tournament, 1982. 
but if Black had now played 
15 . . . P-Q4, it is hard to see 
bow White could scare up an 
attack to compensate for his 
inferior pawn formation. 

After 13 P-B5, P-K4, the 
game between A, Kazmin and 
Alexey . Shnaider, U.S.S.R. 
1982, saw 14 B-R4ch, N-Q2; 15 
N-K6, PXN; 16 PxKP, 0-0; 17 


CHESS 


BxN. Q-B2; 18 PxP. B-B3; 19 
BxB, QxB; 20 R-Nl, P-Q4; 21 
Q-N4; and now 21 . . . QR-K1; 

22 R-N6, QxBP would have 
given Black the advantage. De- 
Fl rmian diverged by sacrificing 
a pawn with 14 N-K2, PxP. 

It had previously been as- 
sumed that after 15 R-Nl, 0-0; 
16 RxP. White's gambit could 
be refuted by 16 . . .P-Q4. but 
then, on 17 P-B3!, how could 
the threat of 18 R-Q2, be met 
by Black? With 16...Q-B2, 
Pinter sidestepped the prob- 
lem. 

After 18... N-B3.il would 
have been worse than useless to 
play 19 R-Ql, which allows 

19.. .N-K2! Moreover, 19 R- 
N6 could be blunted by 

19 . . . KR-B1, which would 
threaten 20 . . . N-K2. 

DeFinnian’s 19 B-N6, Q- 
Q2; 20 N-N3 created a threat 
of 21 N-R5, but Pinter fended 
off White's projected attack in- 
cisivdy by 20 . . .QR-NIJ; 21 
N-R5. B-Ql! One point was 
that 22 R/l-Nl? would have 
been smashed by 22 ... BxBch; 

23 RxB. RxR; 24 RxR, Q-R2!; 
25 QxN, R-NI, winning the ex- 
change. 

Also, 22 P-B6? would not 
have had the desired effect af- 
ter 22 ... RxB!; 23 PxP, RxR; 

24 PxR/Qch, KxQ. 

The American gave up the 
exchange with 22 BxB, RxR, 
but the tricky moves be needed 
just weren’t there. Thus, 23 B- 
B6 would have failed against 



tattoo after 21 BMtt 

23 . . . Q-R2ch; 24 K-Rh.Q- 
B7!; 25 Q-Ql. QxP; 26 QW, 
QxPchl. which forces anqrfifi- 
cation into an winning etuhog 
for Blade. Moreover, 23 N- 
Bfieh. PxN; 24BxP, P-R3!; 25 
Q-Q2, K-R2; 26 R-B3, threat- 
ening 27 QxPchl KxQ; 28 R- 
R3dr followed by mate, could 
have been thwarted by 

26.. .Q-R7cft; 27 K-Bl, R- 
N8ch; 28K-KZ N-Q5ch. 

After 27...N-Q5!, Defir- 
mian could not play 28 R-KN3 
because of 28 . . . N-K7dL Far 
behind in material, he was 
obliged to give up. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


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That Promise and AU Kinds of Time 


By Tony Komhetser 

Washington Post Service 

LONDON — Where does he 
go from here? 

What does be do for an encore 
now that, at 17, he's won the most 
prestigious title in tennis? 

BjBm Borg had just turned 20 
whoa he won his first Wimble- 
don. Lew Hoad, Pancho Gon- 
zales and Jimmy Connors were 
21. John McEnroe was 21 If they 
were pfamoms, what does that 
make Bom Becker? Gives him a 
real chance to be a player some- 
day , doesn’t it? 

Eight other unseeded players 
—one of them Rod Laver w 1939 
— went to the final at Wimble- 
don before Becker. None won 
even a set 

There axe nits to pick in 
Becker’s great vault upward. He 


didn’t have to play any of the top But even if there are, on rcflec- 

Four seeds. He beat four seeded don, fingering doubts as to the 
players, but he had to go five pedigree of this championship, 
tough sets with No. 16, Tim Becker seems to have all* the right 
Mayotte; and beating the Swedes stuff to be a 1 champion. 

— No. 7 Joakim Nystrom and Strength, as in stamina. Speed, 
No. 5 Andos Jarryd — is mm* as in quickness. Wifi, as in the 
easier on grass than on clay. kind of confidence that hints at 
His opponent in the final, arrogance, 
eighth-seeded Kevin Curran, is At 6-fooi-2 and 175 (1.88 un- 
essentially a one-dimensional ten, 79.4 kilograms). Becker al- 
player. Not only did that dimen- ready is bagger than most tennis 
sion desert him (he put just 46 players, bigger than Borg, McEn- 
percent of Us first serves in {day roe and Connors. At 17, he is 
Sunday), but he’d declared a likely to get bigger and certainly 
preference for Jarryd. a far less will get stronger. Right now he 
powerful player, as a final copo- bite hts groandstrakes as hard as 
naaL Curren seemed mtmriaatcd anyone m the game, 
by the West Goman. BBC tdevi- Becker roots around the court 
sion conimentaiore frequently as- like a hedgehog, going down and 
sessed Outgo's play in terms of getting dirty. He seems he enjoys 
timidity. *Tm quite sure he's bleeding. And if you let him, he 

wifi get in your face and melt 
set your bones with his frosty, blne- 


q n a ki n g made, was a i 
offered] late in the third 



1 i VostyJAie eyes, a aMAte«» hading at aiTogan^BeckCT afta-wiin^ a point agamstOuren. 


eyed glare. In. a sport where bul- 
lies often are the most saccesrful, 
he seems a naturaL He is a truly 
aggressive jjtaycr. At 17, on the 
hallowed Centre Court in the fi- 
nal erf Wimbledon, Becker saw 
his moments, seized them and 
choked Urn life out of them until 
they were his forever. 

Curren, playing what he called 
a “horrific game,” handed Becker 
the <mly break of the first set in 
Game 1 But in the third set 
Becker reversed die momentum 
by answering Curran's break in 
Game 7 with a breaks his own in. 
Game 8. And in the first game of 
the fourth set, when Curren des- 
perately needed (after losing a tie 
breaker) to re-establish position 
by holding bis serve, Becker 
broke him again. 

It says a lot about what kind erf 
will Becker has that he identified 
the turning point of the match 
not as the break in the fourth set, 
but in the third. “When I broke 
him back to 4-4,” Becker said. 
“Now, I thought. I'm going to 
win.” 

One set each, 4-4 in the third: 
To know the match was dead 
even then is to have the inner 
conceit a champion needs. 

It says a lot about Becker’s fi- 
nancial plan for the future that he 
has. already — even before be 
broke hank in the third — relo- 
cated in Monte Carlo. 

Baseball's Bob Feller was a 
phenom at 17, as fast a pitcher as 
anyone had ever seen, in time it 
came to pass that he made good 
on his promise. But for evay 
Feller there is a Von McDaniel a 
comet blazing past us so quickly 
it’s as if we never even saw him. 
For every Lee Trevino who comes 
out of nowhere to win the US. 
Open and goes on to long and 
worthy golf stardom, there is an 
Orville Moody who does the 
same;, but quietly sinks back into 
the common pooL 

Dwigbt Gooden. Boris Becker. 
The promise is there, but it's still 
way loo soon to keep. 

Cur 


men said, not 

of Becker, “He’s beatable. H 
weakness is around the net He’s 
a bit oat at sea op there. He isn't 
No. 1 now. . . . But be can be one 
day. He's 17. He has a lot of rime 
to improve and a lot of room for 
improvement." 

The last question Becker was 
asked Sunday night was about iris 
ambition. “Tm playing in a tour- 
nament in Indianapolis in two 
weeks,” said the new Wimbledon 
champion, “and Vd like to win 
the first round.” 

Even if you're gouig to be the 
new Mozart, you have to play the 
recitals one at a time. 



Juantorena, Double Olympic Hero, 
Moving Up in the Cuban Hierarchy 


Alberto Juantorena in 1983 


By Joseph B. Treasrer 

New York Tima Service 

HAVANA — Alberto Juantorena; the track star 
who in the 1976 Montreal Olympics became the first 
runner ever to win gold medals in both the 400- and 
800-meter events, has quietly become an executive in 
Cuba’s sporting world. 

A few weeks ago the 34-year-old Juantorena, who 
retired from run ning last summer, was named a vice 
president of Cuba's National Institute erf Sports, Phys- 
ical Education and Recreation, the body that governs 
all athletic competition in the country and selects 
athletes for nati onal and international teams. 

Government officials say be will have special re- 
sponsibility for track and field events and gymnastics. 

Juantorma has not been much in the public eye 
since his retirement, but be remains one of Cuba's 
most revered personalities and one of the most demon- 
strative supporters of its political system. 

In late May, when the united States started Radio 
Marti, the broadcast service aimed at Cuba, Juantor- 
ena was one of the people called upon by the govern- 
ment to appear on national television to denounce it 

“Juanioreoa is not only a very good athlete,” a 
senior government official said recently, “but be is the 
role model for a generation of Cubans. He’s a serious 
guy and a very good citizen and patriot." 

Juantorena’s athletic potential was s 
and he was sent from his hometown of Santiago 
Cuba on the south coast to the Higher School of 
Athletic Improvement in Havana. 

Later (and through much of his international ca- 
reer) Juantorena, like other top-ranked Cuban ath- 
letes, was enrolled at the University of Havana’s 
Institute for Physical Culture. He was also assigned a 
job, to which he did not have to report, and was paid a 
monthly salary, Ire said. 

Juantorena said be did not regard hims elf as a 
professional. “The socialist system gives a person the 
full possibility, all tire essential conditions to dedicate 
himself to sports,” he said. 

Juantorena, who is 6-foot-3 and 187 pounds (1.90 
meters, 84.8 kilograms), had been sent to Havana as a 
basketball player. One day a track coach saw him 


ted eari^ 


running laps with other players. Shortly thereafter, 
Juantorena recalled, “they told me my future did not 
lie in basketball.” 

“I loved basketball” he remembers, “but the coach 
said I had no further dunces in basketball and the 
track coach wanted me to join him.” Juantorena had 
flat feet and a back problem, bat even so hardly 
anyone could catch him in the 400 meters. 

A few months before the Montreal Olympics, he 
said, his coach told him be was also going to represent 
Cuba in the 800 meters. “They are very different 
races,” Juantorena said. “I had a great deaf of trust in 
ray coach and I said, ‘Don't say it again.' He con- 
vinced me I could do it." 

Noting his galloping stride, some commentators 
began calling Juantorena “tire horse." 

“I’ve never seen myself run," he said, “but I think 1 

look more like an ostrich than a horse. I think I seem 
to be floating, but Tm actually gome fast” 

After tire last race or his career, tire 800 meters at 
London's Crystal Palace last summer (he finished last 
in a field of eight). Juantorena said he was “happy to 
retire running and not through injury.” The troth was 
that be never wanted to leave the track, but there were 
no options. 

“I had begun to lose speed,” he said. “I couldn't do 
what I used to da I used (o let other runners go ahead 
five to 10 ureters and I could easily catch them. Now I 
found it was very difficult to catch them, to keep in 
stride with young runners attire top of their form.” 

“I realized ," he continued. “I must take care of my 
image. One must understand when is the correct time 
to say ‘goodbye’ in sports. I was losing ground and this 
was the moment." 

Juantorena looks fit these days in a blazer and 
slacks. He is only about three pounds heavier than 
when he was performing at his best. He still runs about 
five miles a day and he says he’ll probably continue 
“practicing sports all my life.” 

Although basketball brought him his first recogni- 
tion and he had been reluctant to make a change, 
Juantorena said running had always come naturally. 
“Since I was a boy. I liked to see if 1 could go faster 
than the other boys,” he said, “and they could never 
catch me." 


Weather , Yanks Combine to Swamp Twins 


Conytiedty Our Stuff From Dispmdta 

NEW YORK — Saturday night 
it rained on the Minnesota TWms. 
possibly costing them a victory. On 
Sunday, it poured base hits as the 
New York Yankees swept a dou- 
ble-header, 3-2 and 14-1 
It all amounted to a lost weekend 
for the Twins, fortunately their last 


er Ray Miller, who had tittle to be of tire year. Rick Reuschel lost for 
pleased about on Sunday. The the first time in his last five ded- 
Yankees won the opener on Dave sons. 

Winfield's llth-inning leadoff Reds 3, PUBtes 2: In Philadel- 
home run and belted four more phia, Cesar Cedeno hit Kent Te- 
homers in the nightcap, including a kulve’s first pitch over the left-field 
pair of three-run snots by Ken fence for his third borne run of the 
Griffey, whose six runs batted in season with one out in tire 10th to 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP f£ 


equaled his career high. 

After Griffey’s first home run 
ive New York a 4-2 lead, Don 


in New York: this season. It was 
had 


Baylor added a two-run shot and 
Mute Pagtiarulo followed with a 



g ive Cincinnati its vistaty. 

Meta 4-8, Braves 0-& In Atlanta. 
New York swept a doublebeader, 
pushing its winning streak to six 
gamM and extending the Braves’ 
dad to five straight The Mets 
scored four times in the fifth inning 


of the opener on a double by Roan 
Reynolds, three singles and two er- 
rors. In tire nightcap, New York 
parlayed four walks and three hits 
off three pitchers for a six-run 
sixth. 

Cantinak 7, Dodgers 1: In St 
Louis, Willie McGa, Terry Pen- 
dleton and Ozzie Smith all had 
three hits to help John Tudor coast 
to his seventh consecutive victory. 
Los Angeles committed five errors, 
two by starting pitcher Orel Her- 
shiser, and leads tire league with 87 
do the season. (AP, UPJ) 


6-2 lead in the second inning be- 
hind Frank Viola whqi the rains 
came; after a two-hour wail, the 
game was postponed and . forced 
Sm day’s doubteheader. 

■ “You lose your best starter with 
a four-nm lead ‘ — that doesn’t 
make you too happy.” said Manag- 


Qriffey ended a 3-for-33 batting 
slump, while Baylor, who had been 
6-for-53, contributed a key double 
in tire opener and drove in four 
nightcap. Winfield, de~ 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Transition 


Baseball 


BASEBALL 



LEAGUE— No mfld Botov Con, Otck 
Howwr, AIM Gramma*, DIcL Trocawtfcl and 
Tom KMh> csadiM far tlw AlLStar tsam, and 
Dtck Martin and Pta DlSahra co-tralnaf* Of 

t <*• Alt-stor taam. 

- California— P laced Gary PetttL oirt- 
flahtar.on mo ISrtay disabled list. Raadtvat- 
, ad Darrell MHIer, artcher-Hret bowman. 
CLEVELAND — Acquired Scott Bo Hew 
pflOwr, bom Plttaburah to annpMe a May 2* 
•rode tar Jatamta LoMmtar. Assigned Ballet 


Cycling 


5 Tour de France 


*’« 


: r**- "i-Av 


MEN 
Tentti : 

SPtaol to Pontafler 
(300 Kilometers / 127 Miles] 

L Joroen Pedersen. Denmark. S hours. 6 
•dnuteL 27 seconds 

l Johan Lommerts, Netherlands. Same 
Time 

i InaU Gaston, Spain, at 3 seconds behind 


to waterberv of lha Eastern League. Placed 
Ray Thomas, tocher, on lStovdieaMadllsL 
Mowed Rick Betonwo. Pitcher, from lSdoy 
dtaobtadlbt to 21-dav disabled llsL Recoiled 
Dave Ven Oh iso, pitcher, tram Maine of the 
International Lsaoue- 

DETRO IT— Placed John GrublLOUtflelcler, 
an the 15-dav disabled list. Called up Scam 
Mud hoifc l wt l e Me r oMtflaMer.fniri Nashville 
of the America n Association. 

MILWAUKEE— Coned up Rick Waltz. 
pH cher, tram Vancouver of the Pacific Coast 
League. Optioned Dave Huppert, catcher, to 

Vancouver. 

TEXAS— P lead Lorry Pnrrtah, outfielder, 
on Jhe iSstordlsBlilBdJbt Recoiled ovMelder 
George Wrtatit tram Oklahoma City of the 
American AandaUan. Stated Elite Valeo- 
line. outf i elder, to a minor -Jeooue a m ti oc l 
and aaetawdli bn to Oklahoma CRy.Sonf Nick 
CapnuKitfieicter. to Oklahoma City. Cal lid up 
G ena Petralll, catcher, from Oklahoma City. 
Mowed am Johnson, deilanafed hitter from 
the U-dav to the 21-dov disabled list. 

TORONTO— Opttoned Luis LNl.pttcher, to 
Syracuse of It* internotfamd Leaeue. 

lintlennl 1 v — 

ATLANTA— Recalled MHf Thompson, out- 
fielder. tram Richmond ei me international 


w 

XT. .*1 


ih.: 


-If 

iicl 


X Cfamlniaue Amaud. France. S.T. 

1 Dents Roux. France, at 41 
L Joel Poller, France, at 47 
7. Jeon-Ctaude Baaat, Franca, at LOO 
L Pedro Detaoda, Spain, at 1:11 
9. Adrte van der PooL Nelhertand*. ot 1 :27 
ta. Marc Madlat. France, at 1:X 
II. Seen Kelly. Ireland, 5.T. 
x ,12. Grea Lemond, United Stotts. 5.T. 
WU Luclen van Inwe. Betaum. S.T. 

• 14. Pascal Simon. Franca, S.T. 
is Bernard Hlnaull. France. S.T. 

Overall stnwSoos 

L Bernard Hinault, Franca, at SI hours. S 
ndnutea. 57 second* 

1 Greg LeMond. U.S- ot 2: U behind leader 
1 Sean Kelly. Ireland, at 2:42 
4 Steve Bauer. Canada, at 3:21 
& PM! Anderson. Australia ol 3:31 
4 Stephen Rocha Ireland, of 3:44 
7. Charles Mattel. France, ert 4:11 
L Pascal Simon, France, at 4;20 

9. Niki Ruttlmam, Switzerland, at 4:53 

10. Paul HoahedPoren, Betatam, at S:T2 

11. Gerard veidschaltan. Netherlands, at 
S:22 

12. Jooo Zoetetnelk, Netherlands, at 5:23 

13. Pierre Baxza, France, at 5-.4B 
H. Robert Forest, France, at 5:49 
IS. Marc Madlot, Franc*, ot 4:05 


CHICAGO — Activated Bab Dander, out- 
flakier. Sent Chico Walber.autflefder, to Iowa 
of ihe American AssodaHon. 

LOS ANGELE S R ele as ed Steve Howe, 
pitcher. 

FOOTBALL 

Canadian Football League 

WINNIPEG He leased Demis Allen and 
Michael Miller. «fdr naihmrs; David Block, 
offensive lineman; David Dan tote, David 
Ploughman, and Doue Ptoea, defensive 
backs; Dennis Edvards and Joe Masonkria 
defensive lineman; Denny Ferdinand. Don 
Hue lock, ana James Sykes, running backs; 
Todd Hons, auarlerback; Jae Jackson and 
John Pitts linebackers, and Rob Prodonavle, 
defensive lineman. Placed Randy Fob I. run- 
nine back, Norman Gfebs. Quarterback; Pah 
rick Lanedon. offensive lineman, and James 
Hood, wide receiver. on re s erve list. Sant Ron- 
ald Howard, defensive back, to Toronto, and 
Donovan Rase, defensive back. Hamilton. 

National Football Leaese 

CINCINNATI— Wahmd Isaac Curtis, wide 

DALLAS — Stoned Kart Powe. wide receiv- 
er. 

DENVER— Stoned KMI McGregor, tight 
end. to a series of one-veer contracts. 

MIAMI— Stated Mike Jones, running bock, 
la a mum-year contract. 


Major League Leaders 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

G AS R H Pet 
R-Hendson NY 45 2S4 S7 91 J5B 

Bran Kan 73 742 47 W J44 

Boobs Ben . 7* 313 44 IBS J3S 

P. Bradley Sen 79 314 45 W1 J3D 

Mol Bar Mil 7S 2M 54 94 J15 

COapcr MU 73 235 3* 71 JOB 

Lacy Bit m 314 31 U JOB 

WWItaer Del 74 2M 58 91 J07 

Mattmolv NY 7* 310 38 94 JOB 

Bolter Cla 79 318 51 94 JB3 

Rons: R. Henderson New York. 47; R taker. 
Baltimore. S»; WWteker. Detroit. 58; Mol Bor, 
Milwaukee. 55; NLOavIs. OaktaKL 54 
RBIs: Mattingly, New York, 58; Baylor. 
New York. 54; K-Gfasoa Detroit, 54; Bnm- 
ansfcy.Mkin e» ot n . 5 3; Klnamaa Oakland. 53; 
Rlce. Baetav 53; Ripken. Baltimore. 52. 

HBk Bobos. Boston, 105; P. Biwfley, Seat- 
lle.101; Puckett, Ml mesota. 97; Butler. Cleve- 
land. M; Garda Toronto. M; Wilson. Kautn 
atv.N. 

Doubles: Matnngty, New York. 23; Gaeffl. 
Mlonoso t a. 22: Boool Boston 21; Buckner, 
Boston, 21; Cooper, Milwaukee. 21. 

Triples: Wilson, Kama aiy, a; Puckett. 
Minnesota. 9: Cooper, Milwaukee, 8; Butter, 
Oevslcnd.7; Fernanda, Taranto, 5; P. Brad- 
ley. Seattle, i 

Home Rons: Kingman. Oakland, 21; Fisk, 
aUcooo, T9; Brunanskv. Minnesota. 18; Pres- 
ley, Seuttok 18; Evans, Detroit. 17; K. Gibson. 
Detroit. 17. 

HMea Bases: R.HendersoaNewYerfc.37; 
Pettis, California 30; Butler. Cleveland. 25; 
Collins, Ooktaid, 25; Mssebyr Tononfa 21 
PITCHING 

Woo-Last / Winning pet/ BRA: Guidry. 
New^ YortLIOa J49.2J73; JLHowM.OaManLG 


1 J27. 1 JS; Acker. Toronto, S-2, 714,275; Com 
lev. New York. 7-3. .700. 142; Key, Toronto, 7^1 

mass. 

Sfrttaeut*: Mo rtf* Detroit 700; BWnm. 
Clevetona w; F.Bonntator, QWcoea W; 
Bento. Boston. 87; Sflch, Taranto, 87. 

Saves: H ernandos. Detroit, u; B. James, 
Chicago. 17; J. Howell, Oaktond.17; D. Maara. 
Cal Korn la. 14; Qubenberry, Kansas CHV. 14 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pet 

McGoe SIL 

72 

279 

49 

« 

J51 

Morr SSL 

77 

296 

49 

98 

338 

Cruz Htn 

to 

26* 

28 

S3 

jn 

Guorrora LA 

n 

2*2 

53 

8* 

J12 

Gwynn SO 

78 

322 

48 

100 

an 

Porker Cin 

78 

304 

41 

95 

JIB 

Temptotn SD 

77 

275 

34 

83 

J02 

Montond Oil 

77 

274 

34 

11 

m 

Ralnos Mon 

74 

292 

57 

M 

MS 

Virgil Phi 

49 

22} 

27 

45 

J91 


Runs: Rafnes. Montreal, 57; Coteman. 
St. Louis, 54; Morohv. Atlanta. 54; Guerrara 
Los Anetoes, 53; SamueL PhUadetphta, 51; 
Smdbera CWcaoa 51. 

RBIs; Herr, St Louis. 43; Murahv. Atlanta 
J. dark. SI. Louis. 57; Parker. ClndnnaH. 
57; G. Wilson, Philadelphia 5k 


Nils: Gwyna San Dleaa 100; Herr, 
SI. Louis. (8; McGee. St. Louis. «■; Parker. 
Cincinnati. 95; Garvey, San Dleaa 91. 

Doubles: ModtoctoPlttsburatoTl; Wallocti, 
Montreal, 21; Gwyna Son Dleaa 20; Herr. 
St Louts. 20; Parker. OndnnatL 20. 

Triple*: McGee. 5 L Louts. 18; Raines, Mon- 
treat 8; SamueL PMladelnhta, 4; Coleman. 
SL Louis, 5; G. WUsorv PhTtatotahta. 5; Gar- 
nor, Haustoa 5; Gladden, San Francteca S. 

Haae Rues: Guerrara. Los Angeles, 20; 
Murahv. Atlanta. 20; J. Ctark. SL Loate. 15; 
Parker. OndnnatL 14; 4 ora Ned with 12. 

Stolen Baas: Cotomon. 5L Louis. 55; 
McGee, st. Loub 33; Lopes, dilcaaa 32; Rp- 
dus. CtnclmaTi. 29; SamueL PfiUadelpMa 27. 

PITCHING 

Wnn i net f wimilne Pet./ ERA: Hawkins. 
Sail Diego, 11-2, ML 335: Andulor. ». Louis. 
u-3, MU. TM; Dartlna New York. 8-2, am. 
255; Gooden. New York, 11-0, J84 1J5; Reus- 
cheL Ptttshurah. 7-2, 778, 240. 

Strikeout s ; Gooden. New York, 137; Rraa 
Houston. 119; Vntanzueta, Los Anoetoi. lit; 
Sdo, QnetmsiH. 108; J. DeLeon, Plttsburah. 
104 

Saves; Reantoa MonrreaL 27; La Smith. 
ctiknoQ, is; Gosuoa San Diega 17; Power. 
OndnnatL 15; Sutter. Atlanta U. 


rons m 

spite a .286 average, had gone only ~ -_ rs * n • n «■ 

4-for-i7 over previous four StTMise Victor bv 2 m. Canadian Open 

games. His shot off Curt Wardle ™ J _ 1 , 

easily cleared the 379-foot mark in OAKVILLE, Ontario (AP) — Curtis Strange struggled to a 73 here 
left fidd. Sunday but held on to win the Canadian Open golf tournament by two 

The Yankees won aD six 1985 strokes. His 72-hole total was 9-under-par 279. Jade Nicklaus, with a 
home meetings against Minnesota dosing 72, and defending champion Greg Norman (73) tied for second, 
and are 18-2 at borne against the Strange’s tirird victory of the year, worth $86^06. pushed his money- 
American League West winning total to 1520,081 and put him in ^position to break the PGA tour's 

Indians 10, White Sox 3: In aD-time single-season record of 5530.808, set by Tom Watson in 1980. 
Cleveland, Brett Butlers bases- The front-running triumph assured Strange of a place on the UK Ryder 
loaded single triggered an right-run Cup team tiwl win play Europe's best in England this fati. 
seventh .hat aDowedlbe Indians to ^ ^ ^ 

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Undefeated Julio Cesar Chavez of Mexico 

. l » *— :■ — — ushing right 

ad round to 

Boxing Council super-featherweight booting title. 
Mayweather was down four times in the round (two of them were dips) as 
he tried to dude tire onrushing Chavez. 

Defending his title for the second time, Chavez ran his record to 45-0 
with 41 knockouts. Mayweather, who lost the WBA crown in February 
1984 on a first-round knockout by Rocky Lockridge, fell to 21-3. 


Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


Golf 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

■88 M2 OI8 — ISO 
181 BM «»— M 11 1 
Lollar, S ton too (71. FlraovM (7] and Ftek. 
HIU C7J; Remora, Waddell (4). Eoaterly (B> 
and Banda-W WoddelL 3-5. L — Lollar, » 
Pint Game 

MtaMHta 888 2W 888 8*-2 n 8 

New York 188 818 M 81-3 II 3 

5mithmiL wordto 18] and Salas. Lauctoer 
19): Whitsoa Flstar (71. RtohetU 19) and Hae- 
3*y, Wyneeor (91. W— RlBtwtfl. 44 L— War- 
(fla 1-3. HR— New York, WinfMd 110). 



-J. *<= 

«- »’* ■" 

■V-: 


W** 


Jrf4> 




European Soccer Draws 

- • Draws tar Mm first roeod of the 19854400- 
" rtate of the three EnraMOfldtthtoocer esm- 
• 'iEMMms (first Iras StoN. 14 second tern 

■''*00.2); 

CHAMPIONS’ CUP 
j. Jcwnse (TEsctL Luo. vs. JuverHus 
,p K Cofebora vk Trakta Ptotfy, Buto- 
1 Omwano Berlin n. Austria Vlenra 
Btodeauk vs. ronerbaheo 
p* Gof n9i Ztarsa PoL. vs. Bowen Munich 
.' ftvfa va A lax, the Netherlands 
SM rto Praewa vs. Barcstona 
Akranea Iceland, vs. Aterdeen 
. tloflekt, Na Ira, vs Servette. 5wta 
/. Lontoorad vs. itaieranaen. Nor. 

V **fc Denmark, vs Stoaua Bucharest 
AU*, Malta v*. Oman la Cyprus 
£***1 LafiH. Finland vs. Saralove 
^ Budapest va. Shamrock (touors. Ira 

■.v w *rana «. PAOK Satonlca Greece 


zurrtea Mona vs. Bover Uenitoaen. w. got. 
Gtentoraa Naira* vs. From Reyklovlc 
LYtwbv, Denmark, vs. Gahmy Uni tod 


V-^ 


-c*-1 




•i* 


CUP WINNERS' CUP 

vs. u ni versltoten Craiova Rom. 
iL Hungary, vs. Rapid Vienna 
Turkey, vs. wumw lutz. POL 
•» Hetelnkj, vs. Fiamurlnrl vetora Albonto 

: _ rAtteilea Madrid vs. Celtic. 5coL 
1 .VWrsajL Hek, v*. Ovnutu KJ«V 
i s. y K Stockholm, n Red Bow MHantaW* 

: - r Greece, vs. Samadorta 

2**® Praowe. vs UmonoL Cvorus 
^naeniunoa Nor. vs. Barnar Ctrr, Wales 
Bruges vs Dynamo Dresden 
fed Star Itoto ra d s vs Aaraa Swift 


UEFA CUP 

SporHnp Lbtan vs Feyonaand 
Glaaow Ranaers vs Osasuna Spain 
Valur, Iceland vs Manta* 

Coleraine, Naira, vs. Lok Leireto, E.Ger. 
Cologne vs sporltna Qiion. Soata 
Raba Viuas Gveer. Hung, vs Bab Prague 
Baarlsta Port, vs BntoM 
Avenir Begaea Libl, vs PSV Elndhovm, Hot. 
Vktoatan, Hungary, vs Makna 5wt 
Amarra Franca vs AC Milan 
Slavic Prague vs St. Mima Soot 
Cham. Odessa USSR vs LV. Bremen 
Bottom Ions, Dublin vs Dundee United 
Spartak Moscow vs Tulun Polla»ura Fla 
Bor. MArtcte w.Ger. vs Lech Paraaa Pol 
R tr BtawoftL Buis, vs Haimnartnr. Sm. 
Sparta Roftordam vs Hamburg 
Ugki Wanaw vs Viking Stavanaor, Nor. 
wisnwl Aua E, Gw. vs Dntaor Dnep. USSR 
Aarhus Denmark, vs Wangem, Beta 
St Gal km, Swttz, vs Intarnaxtonole. Itutv 
AEK Attwns vs Real Madrid 

Otamw nranaAtavsHamfunSaarCMaifo 
PortUnonenM, Port, vs Pgrtm Belgrade 

Dinamo Bucharest vs Vonfer, Yug. 

Torino vs PanatMnalkas, Greece 
Unrar. Austria vs Baulk Ostrava Czech. 
Anoel Nlcooia Cvnns. vs Lokomotive Sofia 
Haiduk Split. Yug, vs Metz. France 
fMuch. Xamaz. Switz. vs Saerrm Stu. Rom. 
Ahwttte BIRtoo vs Btaiktas Turkov 
Uom vs Wacker Innsbrvck, Austria 


Ten flnbtara In toe Canadian Own Golf 
TeurnameaL which ended Santfar on IM 
7,M2eariL par-72 GKn AOdev Gaff dab 
eaerse In OoSnrtB*, Ontario: 

Curtte Strangs S8S5M 6949-48-73-879 

Jack Nicklaus. 542.144 70-7345-72-381 

Greg Normaa 542.144 47-46-73-73— OT 

Johnny MU tor. 5142*2 *6-75-72-67—282 

Tommy VOtontlna s 14262 7349-70-70-282 

Peter Jocohsen, SUJ42 70-7t70-74-2S2 

EUd Solder. *14262 754649-70-30 

Fuzzy ZoaUer, S142K2 7346-71-73-282 

Corey Pavla SI2 47> 76-7W8-7U-38* 

Jim Cbibertr S1Z477 70-7*47-73—284 

Bruce Ltetzfca SI 1477 49-734A-74-2M 

Lorry Mtza *10477 724442-14-484 

Jeff Slumcn, SKV144 - 7346-71 -73-285 

Gil Morgan, 5X945 75-7148-72-286 

Lorry R biker, SU45 737347-73— 2M 

David Gratwa *7456 7446-7649-2*3 

Mflte Donald. 87.856 73737049—2*7 

Mdnrd ZokoL I4J4 7 74-71-70-73-288 

Dan Halktaraoa SSM7 77-7371775—238 

Alton MUtor. 55.174 . 4975-7373-2# 

Sorry Jaeekel, 55,174 757370-73-389 

Bob Twav. 55.176 69-76-72-72— 3*S 

LanoeTen Braeck, *5.176 7374-70-73-W 



CFL Standings 


Montreal 

Hamilton 

Ottawa 

Taranto 


EASTERN DIVISION 

W L T PF PA 
1 0 0 34 U 

0 1 0 8 42 

Q 1 0 32 46 

o i o as as 

WESTERN DIVISION 
Brit CHnb 1 0 0 42 I 

Edmonton 1 0 0 25 23 

Sn sfc at dtwn 1 6 0 44 33 

cutoarr 0 0 J B ® 

Winnipeg • 1 0 M 

ThurMayte Remit 
Montnat 34. Wlaotaeg 18 

Friday's Ratat 
Edmonton 2 & Toronto 23 

S atu rdays Reso" 

Britten CotamMa 4% Hemiltai B 
Seedavto Result 
Saskatchewan 46. Ottawa 22 


Pts 

2 

0 

0 

D 

2 

2 

2 


•11 *0* 080— 2 7 2 
Mew York 184 in He— 14 u 1 

Lysender. FHmo (3), Brawn (5). Davis IB) 
and Laudner; SMriev. Bordi (3). Armstrong 
IB) and Wynegar. W— BordL M. L — Lvsarv 
aer.0-2. HRs-New York. GrHfev2 14). Baylor 
(U). pagllaruto (4). 

110 IBB 110—4 7 1 
atr Ml Hi Hz— I M 8 

Davfi. SntU (3), TJHartlnaz (6), Paso (II 
and Dempsey; Lefbrandt, Qubenbarry (7) 
and Wothan. W— Lefl>rondt.8i L— Davis 44. 

S v Qu lM ntwmflW.HRe-aaMlmnraRor- 
ford (31. Ripken (13). 

Toronto M2 230 DM 22 2 

OaKkmd IM 810-2 4 8 

Key, Lavetle |9) mid VWiHt; McCottv. Young 
(4), Mura (7) teid Heath, Tetttoton (7). w- 
Kev,7-3L L — McCntty,44LH Rs— Toronto. Bod 
114), Whitt (to). Ooktaid, Kingman 121 L 
Boston 8*1 088 IBB-O 9 3 

CoBforato *U m 86Z-4 W 8 

Doraey. McCarthy (41, Clear (47 and Ged- 
man; McCasklllood Boone. W— McCaskin,4- 
& L— Dorsov, 0-L HRs — California. Jonas 2 
(14), Jacksm (UL 

B H wgetae i« me eoe— 2 w 1 

Seattle WlMW-l 5 1 

Htauera. Fingers (91 and Moore; Swift, 
Vonde Berg (7>, R. Thomas (|) end Keornrv. 
W-Htguera ML L— Swift, 31 Sv—Rnoer* 
(11). HR-seoltle, Presley n«. 

Detroit 2M IM BM— 5 4 I 

Tens ttt« l*-J 7 • 

TanmUtamandez (8] mw Parrish; Setara 
HarrU 17], Stewart (91 aw Brummer. W— 
Tonana, 6-7. L— Harris, 3-2. Sv— Hernandez 
(111. HRs — Detroit, Whitaker OS). Evans 
1171. 


Bedrattn. Dedmon (61. Forster (61, SMekto 
171, Gorher 19) ond Benedict. W— OartJng, 6-1 
L— Dedmon. 4-1. Sv — Ormca (7). HR— Atlan- 
ta Cham bite* (IL 

Cta d mit l 088 Ml IH 1—3 11 1 

PMtadatpMa M0 BW IM 8-1 7 3 

Pastor*. Hume 171. Franco (7), Power (10] 
ond KiUcelv. BHartHIo (7); Rawiov, Carman 
W. Tefculve (10) ond Diaz. W— Franco, 5-1. 
L— 1 Tefcutveri-4. Sv— Power (151. H R— Ondn- 
natL Cedeno (3). 

Leo Angeles IN ON M8— 1 8 5 

SL Lotto IM 201 81 X— 7 U 1 

Herahieer, Castillo (4). Diaz U). Powell (71 
and Yeager; Tudor and Nieto. 99— 1 Tudor. 9-7. 

L— Herthber, 8-S. 

Sew Pranctecn 110 8» 860-5 8 1 

i-gimge m itj tow l ■ 2 

BoH. tLDavb <4), Jetfcoat 14). Minton (7) 
«t Brrxiiv; SgidHte. Bnsrtr (4), Frazier 
<71. Smith (8> ond Davta Lake Ml. W— Bras- 
sier. 2-1. L— MJtovta. 34. Sv — Smith (18). 
H Rs— Sm Froncteea. Trlllo (Sl.Chkngo. Dur- 
hom 2 no}. 

MoMreoi am m m m on m 2 

Houston 101 Ml IM 8M MM Ml M M 4 

Palmer. Burke (8). St. CMre ( 111, O’Connor 
(Ml. Yoomau (17) and Fltzawiild; Nlfkra 
Smith (91, QaBiaun (12), DiPftw (14), Madden 
(17). Maeita (19) and Ashby. Boltov (9). W— 
Youmam. m. l— M ottos, 34. 


34 


MATtOMAL LEAGUE 
SaeDteae NO im M0— 1 I I 

PHMUrtW 060 IM 088—1 4 • 

Hovt and KeriMdv; RouseheL Holkmd (91 
and Peno. W-Hovt, 11-4. L— RtuscheL 7-2, 
First Game 

S Mem York 8M 040 H6-4 7 • 

8 AltoBto IM 9M 466—4 3 1 

FernoWtez. McDowell (7) and Reynolds; 
3mittaCaiTK>I4j,Gartier(S)andC*ron».W— 
Fetto«toLJiV-Smtta5^Sv-Mr©omHI 

Second Game 

New Yack MB 464 BM 18 1 

Atlanta 801 fll 801—4 14 1 

Darting. Sisk (61. Orosco (9) and Carter; 


Cecil Cooper drove in tire game- 
winner to end Milwaukee’s four- 
game losing streak. The victory was 
the Brewers’ third in (heir last IS 
games at the Kingdom e. 

Angels 8, Red Sox 3: In Ana- 
heim, CaWonria, Riropert Jones hit 
two borne runs and Reggie Jackson 
chalked up his 516th career homer 
to mark tire Angels. Rookie Kurt 
McCaskill went tire route to win for 
the fourth rime in his last five deci- 
sions. 

Tigers 5, Rangers 3: In Arling- 
ton, Texas, Darrdl Evans, hitless in 
his previous 16 al-bats, hit a three- 
nm homer in tire eighth to lift the 
Tigers. Evans hit his 17th homer of 
tire season after reliever Greg Har- 
ris had walked Kirk Gibson and hit 
Lance Parrish with a pitch. Frank 
Tanana, traded from Texas to tire 
Tigers last month, raised his record 
to 4-7. Wiffie Hernando: earned his 
league-leading 18th save. 

Expos 6» Astros 3: In the Nation- 
al League, in Houston, first base- 
Major League Standhkge tean Enos Cabell's error with two 
~ “I® , ^ oats in tire 19th allowed the tie- 

American LEAGUE breaking run to score, and Mike 

Fitzgerald's angle provided two 
more runs as Montreal outlasted 
the Astros. Singles by Vance Law 
and Andre Dawson and a fly ball 
put runners on first and third in tire 
19th. With two outs, A1 Newman 
bunted to third baseman Denny 
Walling who threw to first in time, 
but Cabell dropped the ball and 
Law-scored. A walk to Mhchetl 
_ __ Webster loaded the bases before 
m iin Fitzgerald lined a single to righL 
Cubs 6, Giants 5: In Chicago, 
Leon Durham Mt two home runs, 
including a bases-empty shot in a 
three-nm sixth, to power the Cobs 
past San Francisco. 

• Padres 3, Pirates Ot In Pitts- 
burgh, LaMarr Hoyt pitched a six- 
hitter for his ninth consecutive vie- 
tory and Tim Flannery hit a 
two-run double to lead San Diego. 
Hoyt walked none and struck otu 
two in registering his third shutout 


(weak a five-game losing screak. 

Royals 8, Orioles 4: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, Frank White, Jorge 
Orta and Georae Brett drove in two 
runs apiece to help the Royals avert 
a four-game sweep. 

Bine Jays 8, A^ V. In Oakland, 

California. George Bell hit a two- 
run homer and Ernie Whitt added a 
tiuue-runsbottapowerToronio.lt 
was BdTs first game after sitting 

Dane Wins Stage; Hinault Keeps Lead 

1 5 ance ( 3^i“ ^ 

his eight iiminpq stage of the Tour de France bicycle race, a 2043-kiloineter (127-mile) run 

Rrenmni i Morinm 1- In Seal- from Epinal to Pontartier, in 5 hours, 6 minutes and 27 seconds. Pedersen 
tie; rookie left-hander Ted Higuera, mpped Jdm LamtnCTg of the NethaJands in the final sprinL 
with mntb-hminK heto from Roffie Bcraard Hmault of France, the tour’s Tour-unre champion, roamed the 

Fingers, pi a five-hitter and leader's y^ow jersey, arriving just over a minute behind Peder- 

- - ■ ~ son. Hinault had taken over the lead Saturday from La Vie Claire 

teammate Kim Andersen of Denmark, who had led for four days straight. 


Taranto 

Datrait 

►tow York 

BaHifnora 

BoEton 

MHwaukH 

Ctanland 

Carttarnla 

oaktaio 

Soattta 

Chtoaoa 

Kamos aiy 

Mlnaeuto 

Tons 


East Division 
W L 
49 32 

45 33 
43 35 

41 37 

40 40 
36 41 
25 54 

DM DtvMan 

46 34 

42 30 

41 39 

39 38 

40 39 
35 43 

si a 


Pci. GB 
MS — 
377 2VS 
-SSI 4fe 
J» 4V9 
JB6 IK 
446 II . 
-314 23 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Wvtstaa 



W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

SL Loots 

46 

32 

JBO 

— 

Montreal 

44 

35 

448 

IM 

Haw Yam 

44 

35 

457 

2M 

China* 

41 

37 

-526 

5 

PMtaMohla 

35 

44 

Mt 

lift 

Plttsbargll 

27 51 

met mvtstaa 

J46 

» 

San Diego 

47 

33 

408 

_ 

Lac AnoMes 

42 

34 

430 

4 

ClndnnaH 

41 

37 

426 

5 

Houston 

41 

40 

404 

6M 

AHanto 

34 

45 

M0 

12Vk 

Ban Frandsco 

31 

50 

403 

lift 



BULLISH — Kefvm 




Bry®t above, bad 217 yards in total 
offense and scored twice Sunday to lead Battonore to a 28-14 
victory orcrBimrogham and a berth against Oakland toned: 


.•tori*--*' 


-s 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. JULY 9, 1985 


Page 16 


ART BUCHWALD 

Nearly AU for the Good 


W ashington “it says here 
in The Wall Street Journal 
that nearly all the nation's top. de- 
fense contractors are under crimi- 
nal investigation by the Pentagon-" 
My wife was aghast “Nearly all 
of them?' 1 

“Yup, according to the Inspector 
General nearly 
all of them are 
being checked 
out for making 
false claims on 
costs and labor, 
kickbacks, and 
bribing govern- 
ment officials. 

Of course we 
have to use cau- 
tion here. Just . 
because they’re Buctowald 
accused of wrongdoing doesn't 
necessarily mean they did il” 

“I could see one company, possi- 
bly two, but nearly all of them? 
That's a lot of companies.” 

“Not really. When it comes to 
the big boys we’re only talking 
about possibly two dozen or so 
contractors that were involved.” 



“I don’t get it You sound as 
though you don’t mind if they over- 
charged us and engaged in kick- 
backs, bribes sad wrongdoing." 

“Most of the companies are 
guilty of nothing more man sloppy 
bookkeeping. When you're build- 
ing billion-dollar weapons, some* 
money has to fall through the 
cracks.” 

“Whose cracks?” 

“The ones caused by using cheap 
cement.” I said. “It’s easy for the 
two of us to sit in this comfortable 
living room criticizing people who 
make submarines. It's another 
thing to actually build them.” 

a 


“Why did it take so long to catch 
them?” 

“They haven’t caught them yet,” 
I told her. “And with any luck they 
never wQL But in answer to your 
question, the Pentagon has gone 
soft on whistle-blowers. There was 
a time when, if anyone blew the 
whistle on a defense contractor, the 
country would hang him from the 
flagpole in front of the Secretary of 
Defense's office. Now we coddle 
them, play up to them and even let 
them talk to congressmen. Is it any 
wonder there is a scandal in the 
military establishment when they 
can’t even keep a lid on their ac- 
countants?" 


Etruscan Ship Brought 
To Surface Off Tuscany 

The Associated Press 

ISOLA DEL GIGLIO, Italy — 
The hull of a 2,600-year-old Etrus- 
can ship has been pulled from the 
water nearly intact off the west 
coast of Tuscany, archaeologists 
said. 

The hull was put into fresh wa- 
ter. where it will remain for a 
month before being treated it with 
chemicals. 


“I don’t see what building a sub- 
marine has to do with whether 
someone is honest or not If those 
people can’t make money the old- 
fashioned way like Smith Barney 
does, they shouldn’t be in busi- 
ness.” 

“They were making it the old- 
fashioned way. That’s why they’re 
being investigated. It was par in the 
old days to pile on extra costs for 
defense work, and everyone accept- 
ed kickbacks and bribes as part of 
doing business. The reason it’s a 
big deal now is a few guys overdid 
it and Weinberger is boiling mad 
because he can't get the money he 
asked for. We’re making far too 
much of illegitimate overruns. 
Whatever the gumshoes come up 
with will be peanuts compared to 
what the weapons cost us. Besides, 
there's always one bad apple in 
every band." 

“Suppose nearly all the apples 
are bad?" 

“Would you rather have lots of 
weapons and a little hanky-panky 
— or no weapons and honest book- 
keeping?” 

“Are those my only choices?” 

“If the top defense contractors 
can’t have a little fun while they’re 
budding weapons systems, they 
just might go OUt Of the b usiness ” 

□ 


Karl Menninger: Near 92, Still Worried 


By Lew Ferguson 

The Associated a ress 

T OPEKA, Kansas — Karl 
Augustus Menninger, gener- 
ally recognized as the father of 
American psychiatry , will be 92 
on July 22 and is still writing, 
consulting and deeply concerned 
about the problems of the human 
race. 

“Just say we’re in terrible, terri- 
ble trouble. We’re on the verge of 
blowing ourselves up," said the 
man known to friends and asso- 
ciates as Dr. Karl. “God gave us 
this Earth to take care of, and 
what have we done with it? We’ve 
taken it to the brink of destruc- 
tion. 

“President Reagan says we 
must have a strong defense to 
protect ourselves. What we have 
is power, with all those nudear 
bombs, but it's not strength. 
We’re more vulnerable than 
ever." 

Sixty years ago. with his father 
and brouter, Karl Menninger co- 
founded the M enning er Clinic for 
the mentally ill, today the Men- 
ninger Foundation in Topeka. 

His pet subjects have not 
changed much in recent years. 
Child abuse; the plight of prison 
inmates and world peace still 
bead the list. He says the ills be- 
setting humankind must be con- 
fronted daily. 

Freud discovered child abuse 
and “was absolutely shocked 
with what he found,” Menninger 
said. “But he couldn't «hinlt it 



Jon*, A. ftwrf/TlM WMhogWn Po» 

*Dr. KariT Metmmgen Plans for prisoners, peace. 


through. He didn’t tdl us what to 
do about it” 

One of Meniungef’s dreams 
came true when The Villages, 
homes for wayward and unwant- 
ed youths, were established in To- 
peka a few years ago. They are 
cottages vritb family settings for 
youths who, be says, “don’t have 
a chance if nobody will help 
them." 

Tm worried about the educa- 
tion of youth,” he said. “I’ve had 
so many good teachers — great 
teachers — you know. But my 
mother and my father were my 
best teachers, and parents should 
be for these kids, too. 


“My mother taught me to read 
before I went to school She never 
said, ’Learn this. ’ She just showed 
me what to do." 

One of Menninger’s best- 
known books, “The Crime of 
Punishment." was published 17 
years ago. The subject matter, 
prison inmates, remains much on 

his min d 

“We still don’t treat those fel- 
lows very well.” he said. “If I 
could rise out of the human atmo- 
sphere, r could probably look at 
how dirty, miserable and color- 
less those men's lives are. I might 
be able to judge better what could 
be done” 


In recent years Menninger has 
testified frequently at Kansas leg- 
islative hearings against reimpo- 
sition of the death penalty. He 
said he thought some people sup- 
ported capital punishment be- 
cause “it’s cheaper — just kin 
them and get them out of the way. 
I don’t think they kill them out of 
mercy. They kill them out of ven- 
geance.” 

He recalled bring summoned 
to Fort Leavenworth some years 
ago to examine an inmate at the 
disciplinary barracks. 

“They said this guy was tried, 
convicted and sentenced to death 
six, eight or ten years before,” he 
said. nTben he was found to have 

a mental illnesK- 

“They said you shouldn't kin a 
man while he was side. I told 
them he’d never be wdL They 
said, *Wdl, thanks,- that relieves 
our mind. But well have to check 
him from rime to time to see if 
he’s well.’ 

“If he got writ, they wanted to 
kill him. That’s the most absurd 
case I ever heard of. They thought 
it was absurd, too. but that was 
the rule.” 


To reduce international ten- 
sions Menninger proposes per- 
son-to-person contact between 
American and Soviet citizens. 

“We’re scared of them, and 
they're scared of us,” he said, 
“we need to get to know them. 
We have to get over some of our 
paranoia. Maybe they're more 
afraid of us than we are of them.” 


people 


Springsteen Tour Ends 


Brace Springsteen wound up a 
12-city European concert tour Sun- 
day in a park in Leeds. England, 
before 80.000 fans. “I may have 
bom in the U.S.A.," the rock smg- 
er-songwriLer yelled in a reference 
to the title of his theme song. “But 
Europe has become my home town 
today." The tour began May 30 in 
the Irish village of Slane. 


A Dallas millionaire. Ward 
Hunt denied in British newspaper 
reports Monday that he and Prin- 
cess Michael of Kent had had secret 

trysts and that her marriage to 
Prince Michael, a cousin of Queen 
Elizabeth B, was on the rocks be- 
cause of HtmL “There is no ques- 
tion of any impropriety between 
the princess and myself. These alle- 
gations are absolute nonsense,” the 
Daily Express quoted Hunt as say- 
ing at his London apartment. 
Buckingham Palace, disdainfully 
rfiemitsing the reports as “sewage 
journalism,” refused comment on 
the story. Alter a rash of rumors 
late last’ week, the report surfaced 
in detail Sunday in Britain’s big- 
gest-selling newspaper, the weekly 
News of the World. The Austrian- 
born princess and her husband ap- 
peared arm-in-arm Sunday at the 
Wimbledon tennis tournament. 
. . . Diana, Princess of Wales, says 
sire and Prince Charles will attend 
the London part of the Live Aid 
rock concert, which will be linked 
by satellite Saturday to an equally 
star-studded show in Philadelphia. 
Organizers hope the concerts will 
raise $13 mini on to feed the starv- 
ing in Africa. 


Fihnr Festival Fever, Ticket Woes Overtake Moscow 


“1 think you’re putting me in an 
impossible position. You're saying 
that just because they make things 
that kill people they should get 
away with murder.” 

“I'm not saying anything until all 
the facts are in. It wouldn't surprise 
me if when the inspector-general 
gets finished nearly all of them will 
have a very good reason for doing 
what they did.” 

“Nearly all of them?” 


By Alison Smalc 

The Associated Press 

M OSCOW — Muscovites ea- 
ger for almost any imported 
culture have succumbed to a bien- 
nial film fever as the 14th Moscow 
film festival brings a rare selection 
of foreign movies to local cinemas 
and film dubs. 


Attracted by such rarities as 
films by Ingmar Bergman. Francis 
Coppola, Luchino Visconti and Fe- 
denco Fellini, swarms of fans gath- 
er outride central movie houses bo- 
fore each performance. 

Getting a ticket is a major feat. 


Top col rural events in Moscow are 
generally announced only after 
most tickets are sold or allocated, 
and other tickets are often avail- 
able only through connections. The 
festival ends Fnday. 

Uteratnrnaya Crazeta, the lead- 
ing Soviet cultural publication, 
printed what it said was one of 
many letters expressing outrage 
with the festival organization. 

The writer, signing himself S. Sn- 
dakov, said that on June 7 he re- 
ceived a slip to be traded in for 
festival tickets. It expired that day. 

He rushed to the box office that 
evening, to find about 3,000 people 


in line. The box office dosed, leav- 
ing dozens of lnmatitfied custom- 
ers. They asked to see the manager, 
but she nad gone to the ballet. 

Despite the apparent confusion, 
even 7 A.M. showings of foreign 
films are reportedly full Forty- 
three feature fflaa are being shown 
in competition, in addition to 47 
children's films and a host of docu- 
mentaries in separate categories. 

The festival’s official motto is 
“For H umanis m of Film Art, For 
Peace and Friendship Among Na- 
tions," Another lively part of the 
event is the commercial film mar- 


ket set up in Moscow's modern 
international trade center. Films 
from more than 100 countries can 
be viewed, the Soviet organizers 
said. Radio Moscow said Soviet 
films were in hot demand. 

The first week of competitive 
showings reportedlyjiroduced little 
sensation. Some critics liked Po- 
land's entry. Stanislaw Rocowicz's 
“A Woman Wearing a Hat," which 
tells of the difficulties of a young 
actress. Soviet reviewers have laud- 
ed their national entry, “Go and 
See," set during World War II in 
fielorussia, one-fourth of whose in- 
habitants died during the war. 


Penthouse magazine's publisher, 
Bob Gocrione, says he will publish 
nude photos of the rock singer Ma- 
donna that were taken in 1979 when 
Madonna, now 24, was living in 
New York and working as a model. 

. . . Mayor Edward L Koch of 
New York says he’s thrilled with a 
Penthouse illustration showing him 
nearly naked in a monkey-like 
crouch atop the Empire State 
Building, “i never looked so good.” 
Koch said of the “King Koch" 
drawing. “It makes me into the No. 
1 hunk in the United States. I'm 
hoping the artist will give it to me.” 
Koch was not so happy with the 
same artist, Ori Hobnekter, when 
he did a similar drawing of Walter 
Moudale during last autumn’s pres- 


idential campaign: the mayor tried 
to have Penthouse ads featuring the 
illustration taken down in the city 
subway system. 

□ 

A plaster death mask of the Irish 
writer James Joyce and five of his 
last letters have turned up in Loo- 
don. Sotheby's auction house, 
which will include them in a sale of 
English literature and history items 
July 22-23. would not say where 
they came from. Joyce died in Zu- 
rich on Jan. 13. 194 f The mask was 
made the next day by Paul Speck, a 
sculptor. Joyce lived in Zuridi dur- 
ing World War I. then went to 
Paris. After the Germans invaded 
France in 1940 he went back to 
Switzerland with his family and 
died soon after, 

D 

The Las Vegas entertainer 
Wayne Newton and bis wife, 
Elaine, who had been separated, 
have been granted a divorce after 
17 years of marriage. 

□ 

Taylor Wang, the Chinese- 
Amencan astronaut, on his first 
trip to China since his family fled 
35 years ago. told how he peered 
down from Spacelab 3 in search of 
his native land. The physicist, boro 
in Shanghai 44 years ago. was met 
at Beijing's airport by two cousins 
he had never seen. Astronautics 
Ministry officials and a throng of 
reporters also greeted him. Wang, 
in China at the invitation of the 
government, planned meetings 
with Chinese leaders and scientists, 
a family reunion in Shanghai awl 
sightseeing with his wife and two 
sons. 



jtpr 

]>• BM- 

r 

ft 'nh* 


Nobuo Fajita, the only Japanese 
pilot to bomb the U. S. mainland 
during World War 1L is sponsoring 
a trip to Japan for three high school 
juniors, fulfilling a promise dating 
from 1962 when ne was the guest of 
honor at the Azalea Festival in 
Brookings. Oregon. Fujita, now 73, 
was a warrant flying officer on a 
mission launched from a subma- 
rine in 1942 to drop bombs to start 
forest fires that would quad to 
dues and panic the West Coast. 
The bombs failed to set off fires. 
The students. Robyn Sobeth, Sarah 
Coded and Lisa Phelps, who start- 
ed their trip Sunday, have studied a 
Japanese culture. Ml 



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Bradiurm Ccrporate Manoaemetd Ltd, 
Wertern Houm, Victoria 5treqL 
. Ue of MolUM ZJ3Q5/4. 
Telw 627389 CCWWN C 


CCM. LTD 

Gnrexnei formed UJC & worldwide 
todixfng Ue of Man, Turk & Cam, 
Angu'Ba, ftertamo tsia L'beria. 


For Further Wornwtian, pleene contort 
us cm - 5 Upper ChnhS v Dmolas, Ue 
of M gr, via Great Britain, tek Douglas 
C624] 23^ Ik 6Z9TO CW fOM& 


OFFSHORE SERVICES 


UX non rosUant asmpaMS. 
Nonenee drectan & better shores. 
Carrfidenbd bemk occault 
Fril support services. 

Panama & libman condones. 
Offshore bonk. 




D7HP. 


INVESTMENTS 
SS OUR AD ON PAGE 
PAGE 9 

TRANS CONTAINER 
MARKEJMGAG 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BROKRS 

INVESTMENT ADVISORS 

Ycwr cSerto can iwesi in one of Ameri. 

ihrouahsin'b^Ss^&Sai^Stuxtusfry. 
30,000 tree* d re u dy Ptoeited t 
DMdende Paid. Hgh tmud eoraigs 
ensured tor mrmy, many years. Cener 
ouu com.-rnrians taxi Somrt Materi. 
al awroUe in Engfah, French, German. 
Contort 

GLOBE PLAN SJL 
Av Mor^epos 24. 

04-1005 Lauroirie, Ssvitoiand 
Tel: (21)2235 12-Th: 25 185 MSJSCH 


WANIH) 

agents Far new fnrta fc: chess gone 
apposing Kart Mars & VDOArmJa 
LJrtoe San & Nato-Anny . Write: AHt 
PO Box 9, 1961 BagAB. SwitzBm 


PANAMA LB8BA. CORPORATIONS 
from USW» awiabie now. Tel 
(0624) 20240. Teles 628352 ISLAND 
gTmo ja 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Ml 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 


UM1MITD OK. 

u ja a worldwide 


A complete penond & business servix 
prpvntng a uniaue csBedion of 
kdented versertte 4 muftingud 
KdrvxijGB far dl sedd £ 
p romotional txasoro. 
212-766-7793 
212-766-7794 
330 W. Stiffs Sf„ NY£ 10019 




PANAMAMAN corporations porafa 

the tthantogm cf wnpfcta corrfkfcn- 
hcAy. zero ter ioblty & US d^cr 
currency enwronment. We offer com- 
pany formation senaea on a W 
reSaUe wxt eompatwe bees. We 
are pmtio M nteracmd m inUng 
op wm oFtshore business asrauhn 
” Comae; H. I. Dw- 


maTfc 3121 K&iXA PG.Tefe & 
0834 or 23^19 lew 2367791 


9WBI X WSS ft Better Heafck 
rwm narammg rrcofom nov/. 

npennon. Vat Erton AMcol Cen- 




(042)8792231 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


HOW TO OB A 2nd PASSPORT, 


regret. -.12 eewrties jndyxed. De- 


WMA, 45 Lrndhurst Terrace, 

State 503, Gwtlrol, Hong Kong, 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


PRINCIPALITY 
OF MON ACO 

Ftx oil coovnerod and Msirid 
pvenMt or tnvestovtf^ pleasa contact 

AGEDI 

2S bo Bd Mnceae Otariolts 

Manta Cmta, MC 98000 Monaco 

Tel: (^50^00 


TOP LOCATION 


Quests , For i 


SB 


lain 




FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HAVE US. DOilAfS TO 
far SF a any currency. W* « o 
borrow Irage sums of SF, 5 or 10 
won. Hove Prarrscnr now. Tel 
Switzerland, Zurich 361 6500 or 
056/491 3&. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS FROM AMSTERDAM 


jj^ttdqwfljj^kwreit print. Cane 


iDtomond E x ch ang e 

ask far Bab H ewHae n in ro om 12A. 
Weetparplein 4. 1jd» 257238. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOURBEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN ZURICH 


FULLY INTEGRATE* 
8USNESS SSVKES 
CLOSE TO FNANQAL 
Rjnshed OffitES / Conference Rooms 
Tdeabjne ! Tate* i Moil Senrau 
Word Pi o eeswnn / Trowlotior 
Compary Fonortion 
MIBNM10NAL OFHCE 
32 Rcttwm, CK800I Zurich 
Tek 01 / 214 61)1. Tbt B126S6 MOP 
MEMBER WORUJ-VHTD6 
BUSR65 CSflRB 


your area w pahs: thex 
ANSW dSNG SSMCE, xaretay. 


impctus * zueat * 252 76 21. 

Phone / telex / medbax. 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SBARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

CHAMP 0E MARS 

Loroty 5 rooms, arasnd Boor rath 
gaden, F11500 + charges. 22564 54 

7TH: VfrlWR 80 sqm. kroiry fry- 
ftrttecf fivtag, (fang, boaoom, 
FKL500 per mtrth ol dwrges tadud 
ad, ovaSahle July 15th for maximum 2 
yoars- TeL 550 41 55 between 9 tun. 
& 6J0 pm 

1 ;■'? >Ry. ! T 

METRO VUJERS 

Agraabe 2 rooms. F3800. 
Tab 225 64 54 








P /.i 1 np*^. nr 1 



17TH PORTE 04AIWBBET. 3 room 
opcetaartL August Tal 766 2D 49 doy 
/ 227 90 15 avacT 


gV'y] M [% 


^9— «L,fT" ; 

Ir-V - \ -.i'S-i 






brrrg ri'irt:! ? ! 

[PARIS AREA UNPUKNISHEDl 


VAUCRESSON 

6raon bouse with gertfan, dntn, 
newfy redone. F90OGL 5S3 6838 

7TH US tff Uil£. 2 roomtof can- 
fc^qui^ltoOq^jMttfejOO + 




1 ^ 1 



EMPLOYMENT 


CXNEBAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


AMBUCAN COMPANY, in Stra- 
boorg, aeeta ogimme indvidud, 
nurt tpvk GemiorL trench helpfuL 
out be lib to IraveL Please trrite to: 
Bae 2435. herald Tribune, 92521 
NeriBy Cndex. Fnmce 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


26, Ungual, ty esara, versatile, 
mrio a Porii boeo position a ieprt- 
nfatna ar tethnicxei. frae to naraL 
Eric Elondeau, 4 Rue ?. Bocrd, 94120 
Fdfttenoy efifaiL Tdk lH 875 1408. 


Doctor, fkient French, propose nr- 
rioB Or tawafa tor F refKr'sSa En^eh, 
i tafa d ue defence u tMkrt or rald- 
ed field. Short term or pert lime. Tek 
Porii 551 1931 


HBIOI OnZSI of Mouttan origfa, 
buta^rar seeking port io n ta dye eei . 
wil conoder dl ptopo rifo re. prefera- 
bly Middkt Eastern employers. W9 
travel WSh drivtog Bcenoe. Tek Pots 
3782242 


RB4CH HKH fiASMON MODS, 
24, free to Iraud, looks Tor opening. 
London 225-036 8 3pn-11pni 


BBMQUAL AMBBCAN seeks work 
as transfator/jnterpreter, ob o far 
French letters. Pent 341 9398. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


UROBQ. seeks fix r eptoa ne m July 
August quaKed gorantttt for cH- 


rfcen 3 and 8 years old. Free id travel 

■ ‘ -etraso 


ht Greece. Tek (93} 50 35 28. Monaco. 
Except Sat. & Sunday. 


AUTOMOBILES 


MBKSJE5 280 IE 1 9B4 IH), beat 
rifri yr^>/ green. 6000 nries. Autpniat 


« pu we ri ng steering bn*e Bectric 
wkidows, sunroof. Iwfi stereo cassette 


player. Automatic lodes end every 
conce-vable extra, hducfatg hidden 
3rd seat, kienocufaie awsi SC 
. £1 9.500. Pim 261 55 77 office 


FSRARI400 

Bttasd n ew d ee bis air BesHeang 
maro on , beige frderier 
D (nflN) 4567564 


FERRARI BB 512 

BRAND hCW 

dee u eKJk grirdo, rad mflevt 
MADRID (SPAIN) 4567564 


PORSCHE 924 Da lu xx rogofrg rion 
conditioned & 


July 52. block, ar 
maty more exam. UR). 55JD0 tens. 
UC nvort lac pair}, inti documents & 
r*Vprirt*orL TetLondoo (01) 759 2400 
Jane W3wn between 9ato-5cm 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

11C CAR : 


PARS 

pi 

225 64 44 

^AhWES/MCE 


139 43 44 

FJJANKFURT 

ja. 

07)80 51 

*ONN i COLOGNE 

W 

I 

S1UTTGABT 

L"i 

K|T| i 1 

WUNK34 



HSMBiHAVBV 

ft 

171) 43063 

'tfW YORK 

71' 

695 7061 

■HOUSTON 

/ 1 . 

931 7605 


21, 

568 9286 


sw 

8666681 


0> 

raw . 


r*' ;v 


Leave it to to to bring it to yw 


Spain and 
ECBrincjit 


AUTO RENTALS 


RENT A CJkR IN PARS wsh/wrtiori 
rtivrf . urfmited Inn. Snxd 200 F/dtry, 
me(fiuni300F/day,big400F/day.Ho' 
tel & airport deSvery TeL 265 w t7. 
Telex 290527. 


Wv. 


; PAGE 13 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmQNS AVAILABLE 


IMPORTERS OF 
CLOTHES 
FAR EAST 


. B8JNGUAL 

SHORTHAND/TYPIST 


B4GU5H or HD4CH 

try experienced, BuertbrfAshort- 
xtd a most Free rmmerSrtely . Must be 
finable. Very intered in g rotary. 


GtUOT 


SECRETARIES 

Arejreu looking far a 
mnuo, WOHIY QUAIffS) 
MUtniDwIIAL JOB M PARS? 


PLUS 

NTERNATIONAL 


The nr speefafaed temporay 
in Pens 
! 01 79. 


PKARMACBmCAL LABORATORY, 
(fa the Lou^, EngUi ottoorte ommu- 
ny, seeks, BKUTWE SECRETARY^ 
ooncid (nd adnabritton, perfadly bi- 
Kngud JFrandyEn(6fli HgNy 
quarfied (degree in secretarial studes] 
sense of co nttw ni uiiun . Syi dhe ris 
tywR be on odvaYage. Knowledge of 
law& aaourtna wil be eppreoaed. 
Send CV + photo & sakxy nqmd 
to: Bax 2470. Herdd Tribune, 9^21 
NeuSy Cedes, France 


SEOETARY, PATO BNAMOALcav 

sutfanL A tour^aont garden gpari- 
rttent, farrished, goes with (free Quar- 
ter* time secreterd jab too faayof 
good ed u arion & cheerful dapo»- 
Sai. Able to k£e dtajge of fcgc 
center* London residence for trorat 
bn ample during ohsrntTs. Wortd 
site penai requiring fan to pursue 
personal interests. Driving Bcanse,t» 
3k 50. H andwr i tten reply please bn 
Box 41323,1X7, 63 Long fcnTUxt- 
don. WOfe 9JH, UX 


MNKNNI SHVKE R4IBHM 

immedwte operina 
far — 


G* ftsrk 233 17 54 


FRENCH INTL LAW RIM fa Pas, 
Bo* area seefa, Uhr bSngual, re- 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


lUinVF SfflCS far AMBBCAN 
i »« p<ck FF e F«MS ta PASSi 


Engfish, Betoon, Dutch a German 
secretaries, knowledge of Hu nch re- 
I^irad, Engfah shcxiiaid. Bingud 
tetedsh. Write or phonfc 138 Avenue 
Vtaor Hum, 751 !i Pais. France. TeL- 
727 61 69. 


Mn. I P AID name Ocuksfan 
Oepartmart tookitig far blnoiol 
{Frendi/EngEshl tywt/tetewdrt £t- 
tng August 1. Gmodoto must be En- 
gfah mother tongue. Ftnse phene 
Vais 747 12 65 «*4303. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


RANDSTAD hJK'SLS 

BIMQUAL AGBiCYrSfir Bdnaid 

^75B12 40 T “ mJWO SS 


SECRETARIES AVAEABU 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, fundt/fag- 
■ fab rfxxthandrtyjfatidmr sarisp*^ 
fane |oh/reploaxntttt. 651 9513n»* 


OR - IA CREME K LA OH 


rory Mp people in PbriL75BR3 


ATTRACTIVE AMBBCAN 

floerr French, Brush I 
eduertad in Switzerland, . 

German, Spatah. Rotary sorts » 
boa os perranol ensfaanl/exaame 
secjDtay to irtemabanal exmro* 
Able to travel war ted/fawd *> &>• 

ck East. Africa J 

Drector. Experienae mdudttjrtam^f 

find eontMwm admnittratxxL e» ■ 


V-R'i i^i-te.11 




it,;. 


ecutira tegntaty in corparte. op* 
me be. pofitwrt A social 
Reply to Bar 2479, Herald Tribmt 
9S21 Noj5y Cedx*. France 


HAVE YOt« WOK done 
trome/office by txSngud Engfahf 
French trandcXor/typar, BeoW* ™' 
m Day- 72D 29 88 Home: 533 75 W- 


If 


WIPO 

(Geneva) . . 

The World Intellectual Property 
Organization 

(a specialized agency of the United 
Nations) invites applications from 


EXPERIENCED 
BILINGUAL SECRETARIES 


Complete secondary education (in En- 
glish language), good working knowl- 
edge of French; secretarial training in- 
cluding English shorthand and typing 
(minimum 90 and 50 w.p.m. respective- 
ly), French typing (45 w.p.m.) and, if 
possible, shorthand (75. w.p.m,); consid- 
erable secretarial experience including 
use of text processing equipment, prefer- 
ably wang. 

Detailed curriculum vitae with recent 
photograph should be addressed to per- 
sonnel section: 


Wlflft 34 chorruntbs Ce/ombattts, 
1211 Gtneva 20, Swftndcnd, 

. by July 24, 1985, 



Printed by gdz In Zurich (Switzerland)