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CiKip^jj. . _'•- •• 7 '-— '• 

!.-." Ql*\ No; 31,845 

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"^ej&lobal Newspaper 
■ 'Edited in Paris 
• Printed Simnhaneousiv 
.in Paris. London, Zurich. ^ 
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■■. The Hague and Btoreeille^ „ Y\j 

^mfiATA AiVEMt ON PAgIJV J? 


INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With Hie New York Tunes and The Washington Posl 

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CtiBtpUed by Ow Staff From Dispatches 

' WASHINGTON — David A. 
Stockman is reigning after more 


involved in corporate and govern- 
mental rwance. 

Mr. Speakes said Mr. Stock- 


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^rfow years as director of tbc man’s successor at OMB had not 
Office ^Management and Budget been chosen, and that there was no 
io join the New York investment timetable for making the choice, 
tentogfirat of Salomon Brothers, Among those viewed as possible 
the White House announced Tues- candidates are Commerce Secre- 


A spokesman, Larry Speakes, 
said Ml Stockman’s resignation 
would take effect Aug. L 


wry Malcolm Baldrige and John A. 
Svahn. the president’s chief domes- 
tic policy adyiser. 

Mr. Stockman, 38, has been di- 


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The OMB, among other duties, rf **“ b «*Wt office smee 

prepares the administration's bud- JJ;- *«W» took office m January 
get requests, and Mr. Stockman ,vs ‘- 

came to symbolize the administra-. Before that, he was a two-term 
dim’s quest to scale back the size of Republican member of the US. 
the federal government. House of Representatives from 

* David Stockman has served Michigan, 
with dedication and distinction, ” From almost the beginning of his 

president Ronald Reagan said in a tenure at the budget office, Mr. 


a-:- ,-7 statement “His tireless effort lo Stockman has warned that large 
.' ‘;."5 bring fiscal discipline to the federal federal budget deficits threaten to 
: •; v'v't government and ensure economic undermine the UJL economy and 
- . . Vn /V stability for the country are deeply has urged strong action to reduce 
-u nnorwiatfid” them. 


appreciated.” 

• In New York, John H. Gut- 


them. 

In recent weeks, with congressio- 


freund, chair man and chief ex ecu- nal efforts to reach a compromise 
live officer of Salomon Brothers, on the fiscal 1986 budget at a 
said Mr. Stockman would join the standstill, Mr. Stockman has raised 
finn Nov. 1 as a m a n ag ing director {Continued on Page 3, Col 1) 


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Felipe Gonz&ez 


M&rio Soares 


Spain and Portugal See 
EC Bringing Basic Shift 


By Edward Schumacher 

— New York Tunes Service 

MADRID — The entry of Spain 

" and PortogaJ into the European 

Community is eapected by Iberian 

- leaders to change the two nations 

- fundamentally, giving rise to both 
f\ hopes and concerns. 


7 ; 31 U EC IbqjaiKioii 

r O“- Hope and Division 

— • * ;c : fiJDi 

Second o f two articles 

— Spanish and Portuguese officials 
say the driving force in lie years of 
i • 1 : ■ ■ : ' negotiations over their entry was 
noi economics, but rather politics 
. , . . - and a yearning to belong to an ideal 

’ . \ they call Europe. They see mem- 

1 "■ bership as a way of reaching across 

.jjS the Pyrenees to strengthen their 
j ^ ■“ • •' ■ young democracies and modernize 
. -•,«> *dr societies. 

<i-» ■ " ’ ; “It means the culmination of a 

r . . ;. straggle of milli ons of Spaniards 

■ who nave identified freedom and 
", democracy with im^ration into 
Western Europe,” Prime Minister 
' , Felipe Gonzakz of Spain said re- 

“ Everything will change," Portu- 
gal’s prime minister, Mario Soares, 
said in a separate interview. “Por- 
cugal will be a completely different 
country in five years, and it will be 

..... r ‘ better for all Portuguese.” 

' ' The treaty admitting the two 

' . - countries to the European Commu- 
^^*-**^ “9 was signed in Madrid on June 
— — — ^ ' 12. After ratification by Spain, Por- 


tugal and the 10 current members, 
it is to take effect Jan. 1. 

The political fallout is already 
being felt. According to recent 
polls, the treaty has improved Mr. 
Gonzalez’s prospects in national 
elections that are likely to be called 
in the next 16 months. 

Mr. Gonz&lez is hoping it has 
also helped to persuade Spaniards 
to stay in the North Atlantic T reaty 
Organization. 

Mr. Soares, also a Socialist, has 
suffered greater problems. The 
treaty helped him politically, but 
not enough to stave off divisions in 
his ruling coalition. Because of the 
divisions, Parliament will be dis- 
solved after it ratifies the European 
Community treaty this week, and 
elections wul be held. 

But it is the historic significance 
of the countries' new role in West- 
ern Europe that is most powerful in 
the Iberian mind. 

"Without doubt,” Mr. Gooz&lez 
said, “the greatest benefit of Com- 
munity membership will be the po- 
litical transition, in the most noble 
ftwiee, toward ending more than 
150 years of isolation.” 

Mr. Soares was more blunt. “To 
go forward,” he said, “there is no 
other choice.” 

Spain and Portugal dominated 
Europe in the 15th and 16th centu- 
ries, when their explorers built em- 
pires that circled the globe.- But 
spent by wars and resisting the so- 
cial movements that swept Europe, 
they were left behind. 

In the democracies that emerged 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 6) 


7 Blacks 
Killed in 
S. Africa 

Police Fire 
On Rioters as 
Unrest Spreads 

By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service ’ 

KWATHEMA, South Africa — 
At least seven blades were shot to 
death by police early Tuesday in 
this blade township near Johannes- 
burg. 

Police and residents of Kwath- 
ema township gave differing ac- 
counts of the circumstances sur- 
rounding the killings, which were 
followed by more snooting later in 
the day at a funeral for four men 
killed last month. 

The violence was evidence that, 
10 months after unrest took root in 
South Africa’s black townships, 
black revolt is now focused on dif- 
ferent targets — the perceived em- 
blems of white authority, rather 
than the disaffections over rents 
and educational standards that 
first fueled dissent last year. Since 
September 1984, more than 400 
blades have been killed in unrest 

Police said they opened fire with 
shotguns and pistols in Kwathema 
and killed five persons early Tues- 
day morning after a group of 
blacks threw firebombs at the 
home of a policeman in the town- 
ship. 

Two other persons were killed in 
a separate incident when police dis- 
posed rioters, a police spokesman 
said. 

Residents of the township told 
black reporters, however, that the 
kilting began when police lobbed 
tear-gas canisters into a cinema 
where a vigil was being held for 
persons who were to be buried later 
in the day. 

As those holding the vigil fled 
the cinema, residents were quoted 
as saying, the police opened fire on 
them and six were killed. Black 
reporters wbo visited the cinema 
said they saw bloodstains on the 
floor and bullel marks on the walls. 

Police said, however, that there 
had been no vigil in the cinema. A 
spokesman said blades , who fire- 
bombed a policeman's house had 
fled there after police intervened. 

Hundreds of people attended the 
funeral in Kwathema on Tuesday 
as scores of police and army units 
In anDored.vdrides stood by at the 
entrance to the area. 

A vehicle belonging to the South 
African Broadcasting Corp^ the 
state— run radio and television 
company, was burned. 




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By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Post Service 

CAIRO — In a move that could 
further damag e its once-dose alli- 
ance with Egypt and its strategic 
links to the United States, Sudan 
has announced a military pact for 
logistical support and training with 
the revolutionary government of 
Libya. 

The move was announced Mon- 
day in Khartoum after Defense 
Minister Brigadier Osman Abdul- 
lah Mohammed of Sudan spent 
more than a wefek meeting with 
Colonel Moamer Qadhafi, Libya’s 
leader, and lop Libyan military of- 
ficials in Tripoli 

The protocol signed there, ac- 
cording to the A3 Sahafa. the state- 
run newspaper, and Sudanese dip- 
lomats in Cairo, provides for 
Libyan help with logistics, trans- 
port, equipment, training programs 
and “aspects of navy ana air de- 
fense.” 

Farther details on its scope were ■ 
not available. 

Since a coup on April 6 ended 
the W-year rule of President Gaa- 
far Nimeiri in Sudan, there has 
been concern in Cairo and Wash- 
ington that the new regime could 
come under Colonel Qadhafi’s in- 
fluence. 

[The White House voiced con- 
cern Wednesday over Sudan’s mili- 
tary pact with Libya, Reuters re- 
ported from Washington. “We are 
talking to the appropriate authori- 


ties in Khartoum about our grave 
concern about the prospects of a 
military relationship between the 
Sudan and Libya.” said Larry 
Speakes, the White House spokes- 
man.] 

Egyptians also fear the possibili- 
ty or virtual encirclement by hostile 
neighbors, with Libya to the west, 
Sudan to the south and Israel, with 
whom relations have been cool, to 
the east. 

Sudan is the largest country in 
Africa and of major strategic im- 
portance. It borders right nations, 
as well as the Red Sea. It also 
effectively controls the upper 
reaches of the Nile, which is central 
to Egypt's survival. 

Traditionally, Egypt has had 
strong, often derisive impact on 
events in Sudan. Under General 
Nimeiri, Sudan broke relations 
with Libya and signed integration 
and mutual defense pacts with 
Egypt. General Nimein, who has 
taken refuge in Egypt and whose 
extradition Sudan is demanding, 
also was the only Arab leader to 
have supported Egypt’s signing of 
the 1978 Camp David accords with 
Israel .. 

Reacting to popular discontent 
with the alleged abuses of the Ni- 
mriri government and the pres- 
sures of a growing rebellion in the 
non-Moslem south led by Colonel 
John Paran g, a former Sudanese 
Army colonel, top military com- 
manders seized power promising to 
open the country to democracy. 


10 Years of U.S. Bilingual Education: 
Much Bitterness and Little Progress 


By Cynthia Gomey 

Washington Pan Service 

REDWOOD CITY, California — They were a 
mystery to Barbara Rnel, these exuberant Spanish- 
speaking children whose faces went empty every time 

she opened a reader and began to write English vocab- 
ulary on the blackboard. 

AD of the Central American immigrants understood 
some English, and Ms. Rud was a veteran reading 
teacher, but every word she gave them seemed to be 
gone by the next week. 

Then in 1976, intrigued by a controversial idea that 
was acceptance among a few teachers, Ms. 

Rud decided to try something that she was not certain 
the school administration would allow. Working in 
secret, she and her Spanish- speaking aide wrotea first- 
grade reading primer in Spanish. 

Ms. Ruel ran the pages off on the school mimeo- 
graph while the aide watched to make sure no one was 
coming. And when she presented her Spanish-speak- 
ing first-graders with the small stapled volume, Ms. 
Ruel says, she bad a roomful of voracious readers. 

As Ms. Rud sat in the deserted lunchroom at 
Hoover Elementary School recently and remembered 
those children, a glimpse through the open classroom 
doors nearby revealed the breadth of the change in the 
decade since she stapled together her primers. 

Hie school district’s hard-bound Spanish readers 
lay in stacks on the bookshelves, alphabet charts in 
English and Spanish ran the length of the classroom 
wall, and a bright construction-paper leprechaun 


smoked a pipe under the large bulletin board letters 
that identified him: El Duende. 

Ten yearn ago, spurred by a U.S. Supreme Court 
decision, the federal Office of Education began a 
nationwide effort whose premise was unprecedented 
in U.S. education. 

Wielding educational research and the new man- 
date of the Supreme Court, officials declared that in 
the U.S. pubbe school system, every non-English- 
speaking child below high school age had a right to 
learn basic subjects in his own language from a bilin- 
gual teacher so be might develop self-confidence, 
sharpen his thinking skills and keep from falling 
behind in school while he was mastering English. 

The clamor it raised was tremendous, from the 
legislative battles to the heated school board meetings 
to the teachers who stopped speaking to each other in 
faculty lunchrooms, Io the modern history of VS. 
public schools, nothing except racial desegregation 
has so thoroughly entangled the classroom with in- 
tense feelings about ethnicity, politics and the mean- 
ing of becoming an American. 

Today, half a million children are enrolled in what 
their schools call bilingual education, an effort that is 
costing local school boards and the federal govern- 
ment about $500 mUlkm a year. 

Young Haitians in Boston are learning in Creole, 
Mississippi Indians are learning in Choctaw, and 
children of Michigan immigrants are learning in Alba- 
nian and Arabic. 

There are math workbooks in Spanish, Italian read- 
ing primers, Chinese vocabulary cards, Navajo story- 


tpB. Says Soviet 
Might Accept 
SDI Research 


Residents of Kwathema township in Sooth Africa helped a man Injured in rioting Tuesday. 

Sudan Signs Military Pact With Libya; 
Washington Expresses e Grave Concern 9 


General Abdul Rahman Swarre- 
dahab, the leader or the coup, has 
said he would maintain close ties lo 
Egypt but would normalize rela- 
tions with all of Sudan's neighbors, 
including Libya and the Marxist 
government in Ethiopia. 

By doing so, Sudanese officials 
have said Lhey hoped to end the 
cnirial support those two countries 
j>ave to Colonel Garang's growing 
insurrection. 

Defense Minister Mohammed, a 
key member of Sudan’s Transition- 
al Military Coondl told the Suda- 
nese press that Libya would be Hy- 
ing to arrange peace talks with the 
southern Sudanese rebels. 

Brigadier Mohammed said Lib- 
ya had "no intention of forming 
any strategic ullianw. with Sudan or 
of interfering in Sudan’s domestic 
and foreign policies.” 

■ Mubarak Refuses Envoy 

President Hosni Mubarak has 
refused to receive an envoy of Col- 
onel Qadhafi in protest of anti- 
Egyptian remarks made by the Lib- 
yan leader, Cairo newspapers 
reported .Tuesday, according lo 
United Press International 

The envoy, Ahmed Qazaf el- 
Dam, a cousin of Colonel Qadhafi 
who heads the Libyan intelligence 
service, was planning to leave Paris 
for Cairo on Tuesday morning but 
apparently canceled the trip after 
Mr. Mubarak’s refusal the reports 
said. 


By Leslie H. GeJb 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON - Soviet ne- 
gotiators in Geneva have indicated 
for the first time that they would be 
willing to accept an arms treaty 
allowing research on strategic de- 
fense, according to high-ranking 
Reagan administration officials. 

Until now, the Soviet Union has 
insisted on prohibiting all such re- 
search. The United States has re- 
fused to discu&s the possibility of 
placing any limitations on Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s Strategic 
Defense Initiative, a program to 
develop a space shield against nu- 
clear missiles. The disagreement 
has been at the core of the deadlock 
in the arms talks in Geneva. 

The administra lion officials said 
Monday that members or the Sovi- 
et team informally approached 
U.S. negotiators two weeks ago to 
say that Moscow was no longer 
seeking to ban all research, but 
wanted to draw a line between lab- 
oratory and scientific research, 
which would be allowed, and devel- 
opment and testing, which would 
be banned. 

[The Soviet Union has given no 
indication of relaxing its opposi- 
tion to the U.S. research, the State 
Department said Tuesday, Reuters 
reported from Washington. 

[Robert Smalley, a spokesman 
for the department, said reports 
that the negotiators had indicated 
willingness to accept a treaty allow- 
ing such research “appears to be 
based more on wishful thinking 
than reality.” 

[“Apart from one early Soviet 
acknowledgement that a ban on 
research cannot be verified, there 
has been no further sign from the 
Soviets giving effect to this point of 
view,” Mr. Smalley said.] 

If the Soviet Union does make a 
formal proposal along those lines, 
as has usually been the case after 
informal discussions, administra- 
tion officials said it would put new 
pressure on Mr. Reagan to loosen 
his position. 

The Soviet appro at* reportedly 
came at about the same time as Mr. 
Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
the Soviet leader, were agreeing to a 
summit meeting in November. 

Two weeks before, the two sides 
also reached significant under- 
standings in Geneva lo ban simul- 
taneous testing of air-defense and 
ami-ballistic missile systems, a 
longstanding U.S. goal and to use 
the Soviet- Am erican hot line to ex- 
change information on nuclear 


threats by third nations or terror- 
ists. 

These were the product of nego- 
tiations in the Soviet-American 
Standing Consultative Commis- 
sion. a group established by a 1972 
treaty on anti-ballistic missiles. 

A senior administration official 
called the new Soviet approach on 
distinguishing between research 
and testing of strategic defensive 
systems “evolutionary.” 

He said that the Soviet ideas 
would still be unacceptable to the 
administration, but that they 

A Vatican study criticizes Presi- 
dent Reagan’s Strategic De- 
fense Initiative. Page Z 

showed “more refinement” on the 
pan of the Soviet Union. 

Several high-ranking administra- 
tion officials said the formal Soviet 
position was that research should 
be limited to ground-based missiles 
designed to shoot down incoming 
missiles, which was approved in the 
1972 arms treaty. 

By the treaty' the parties under- 
took “not to develop, test or deploy 
.ABM system or components which 
are sea-based, air-based, space- 
based or mobile land-based.” 

It did not preclude research m 
these areas, nor did it make airtight 
distinctions between research and 
development or between compo- 
nents and subcomponents. 

This was the Soviet stance until 
two weeks ago, when members of 
the Soviet delegation held informal 
one-on-one talks with their oppo- 
site American delegation members. 

In these exchanges, according to 

the a dminis tration officials, Soviet 
delegates said all kinds of laborato- 
ry research, or “inside” research, 
that could not be observed and 
monitored would be permitted. 

But, the Soviet delegates said, 
specified tests would be banned. 
The two examples they gave were 
American pro^ams such as Talon 
Goid. which is a space-based point- 
ing and tracking system to guide 
laser beams, and die new air- 
launched U A rocket to be fired at 
satellites. 

The administration officials said 
that the Soviet delegates did not 
provide a definition of types of 
tests to be banned; they merely 
listed scheduled U.S. testing pro- 
grams. 

The United States response to 
the Soviet ideasVas to say that the 

(C o n ti n u ed on Page 2, CoL 1) 



A pops studies 
Spanish at an 
elementary school 
in California. 


books, an Earth sciences text in Laotian, a U.S. history 
text in Vietnamese, and color and shape charts written 
in the Filipino dialect Tagalog. 

And although the outcry has quieted since the 
public debates of the early 1980s, the dilemmas of 
bilingual education have not. 


‘ n * WgiwiQiao Ppg | 

Attorneys and school administrators are grappling 
with lawsuits seeking to establish, improve or overturn 
bilingual programs. Some immigrant parents insist on 
improved bilingual classes, ana others demand im- 
proved English-only classes. While many bilingual 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


IEK- 

per.? 


INSIDE 

■ Grand Duchess Charlotte of 

. ■: . Luxembourg is dead. Page 3. 

■ Brazilians are braced for vio- 

lence over the new land reform 
program. Page 3. 

]f ■Spain and France signed a 
. a j? ) * “friendship and cooperation” 
agreement. Page 4. 


UN’s Decade for Women: In Africa, the Yoke of Pregnancy Prevails 


:* ® Vice President George Bush 
„• promoted both U.S. policy and 
' , ms private political plans on his 
f . *our of Western Europe. Page 4. 

> BUSINESS/FINANCE 

; ■ Japan announced plans to 

.-}* change government rules that 
foreign companies say impede 
' j their sales in Japan. Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

?-■ i North Korea is a nation cen- 
. ■ tered on one family, that of 
Kim l\ Sung, who took power 
40 years ago. 


r* 


-.7 fi 


By 'BJaine Harden 

Washington tost Service 

EBULAKAYL Kenya — As delegates from 
around the world gather in Nairobi this month to 
open the United Nations Women’s Decade Con- 
ference, Dora Ayonga will be boring weeds for ax 
hours in a cornfield. With her day’s pay, 48 cents, 
she will walk to the village market here and buy the 
beans and com that keep her husband and chil- 
dren alive. 

As the UN’s Decade Tor Women, launched 10 
years ago in Mexico City to foster equality, peace 

looking for* a way not to have another baby.^fhe 
23-year-old woman has been pregnant five times 
in the past five years. Her four children (one baby 
died j are malnourished. Her husband, Silas, who ts 
out of work, wants another child. 

The cost of not getting pregnant— the price of a 
round-trip bus ticket to a family-planning clinic in 
Kakamega. 25 miles (40 kilometers) away, where 
contraceptives are handed out free — is S2J5D. 
That is the equivalent of more than five days of 
hoeing weeds or a week’s food for Mrs. Ayonga’s 
family, it is an impossible amount to spend on 


paraphernalia that make her husband suspicious. 

After thousands of women from around the 
world have come to Nairobi for the July 15 confer- 
enceopening, assessed the progress of womankind 
and gone home, Mrs. Ayonga will probably get 
pregnant again. And the growing family she wish- 
es would slop growing wul be hers to support for 
another decade or two of 1 5-hour days. Such is the 
status of the rural African woman, of whom Dora 
Ayonga is typical, at the end of the Decade for 
Women. 

To come to Africa to assess the progress of the 
world’s women is akin lo going to Beirut to assess 
the progress of world peace, ror African women, 
to an extent greater than anywhere else in the 
world, are yoked to a traditional culture that keeps 
than pregnant and powerless and uses them and 
their children as draft animals to power the conti- 
nent’s faltering major industry, subsistence farm- 
ing. 

African women lead the world in producing 
babies. According to UN population figures, the 
birthrate on the continent is three times higher 
than in Europe and 18 times higher than in North 
America. Africa’s population growth rate oT 3 
percent, which will double its population of 500 


million in only 23 years, is about 50 percent higher 
than that of the rest of the Third World. 

Tbe African women also do between 60 percent 
and 80 percent of the continent’s farm work, a 
greater proportion than women anywhere else in 
the world, according to a 1985 “State of the 
World’s Women” report, which was released re- 
cently in Nairobi. 

In Kenya, a country typical of sub-Saharan 
Africa in iis overwhelming reliance on subsistence 
farming, a government study says that women do 
three-quarters of the nation’s farm work while 
men either supervise or go off to cities in search of 
salaried jobs. 

Behind the exploding birthrate and the expand- 
ing female workload in Africa, there is a patch- 
work of traditional beliefs and practices that com- 
bine to deny many African women the right to 
own property, to obtain education, to prevent 
unwonted pregnancy and even to enjoy sexual 

intercourse. 

According to a recent survey of anthropological 
research across Africa, women are brought up to 
believe that bearing children —and continuing lo 
bear children as long as they are able — should be 
the justification of their existence. 


Infertile or childless women are pitied. Many 
are thought to have an “evil eye” ana are Warned 
for illness and death in their villages, according to 
the survey, compiled by John C. Caldwell, an 
Australian demographer. 

About half the women in western Africa are in 
polygamous marriages. In eastern Africa the pro- 
portion is somewhat lower. It is 30 percent in 
Kenya, 

It is no accident that the UN Women's Confer- 
ence is being held in Africa. The conference hopes 
to draw attention to pervasive sexual inequality on 
the continent. During a meeting of nongovern- 
mental organizations, held in Nairobi before the 
UN conference, scores of seminars and workshops 
are scheduled to explain and discuss the problems 
of African women. 

But in a world gathering expected to be domi- 
nated by polemics over global political issues, such 
as the so-called New International Economic Or- 
der seeking better trade terms for developing no- 
tions, apartheid in South Africa, the independence 
of South-West Africa, also called Namibia, and 
the creation of a Palestinian state, the subjugation 
or rural African women is likely to be upstaged. 

The imperious reign of African men, die work- 


load of their women and the astonishing African 
birthrate can best be understood not in Nairobi's 
high-rise Kenyzita Conference Center but in small 
farm villages such as Ebulakayi, Dora Ayopga’s 
village, 250 miles northwest of Nairobi. 

On a Thursday afternoon near the village mar- 
ket, in a meadow shaded by gum trees, the eldm 
of the village — all men— lounge in the tall gram, 
arguing about land boundaries. 

Men do not have much else to do in Ebulakayi, 
Studies cited in a World Bank report on Kenya's 
population problem found that in Kakamega dis- 
trict, where the village is located, only 15 percent 
of husbands did any farm work. So these Ion* 
leisurely meetings occur every Thursday, and the 
subject is nearly always the same — la nd . 

There i= not enough land to go around in Ebula- 
kayi. Jt is situaied amid the most crowded farm 
country in Africa. The size of the average farm is 
two-fifths of an acre, according to William K. 
Arap Side, a program officer of the Family Plan- 
ning Association of Kenya. The average famflv in 
the village has 12 children. 

Kenya’s population growth rate is 4 percent; its 
fertility rate (average number of children bom 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 



Page2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


Report to Pope Criticizes SDI; Disclosure Embarrasses Vatican WORLD BRIEFS 


By E, J. Dionne Jr. 

Stw M Twits Serrkv 

ROME — A Vatican study 


opposition to communism and the 
Soviet Union on the other. 
Western diplomats and Vatican 


Throughout this year, the pope 
has received a series of high-level 

y t u American delegations whose tasks 

grouo h£ produced a* mort’oiti- officials said "that the pontiff has - have included an explanation or 
cal of President Ronald Reagan's not wanted to lake a firm stand on the U.S. government s position on 
Strategic Defense Initiative. But the proposal since he would prefer space weapons.’, 
the Vatican said the report is still » avoid a controversy that is at the In February Andrei A. Gromy- 
under study and Pope John Paul II center of East-West arms talks. ko. who was ; then the Soviet 
has so far sought to avoid taking a In particular. Western diplomats Union's foreign minister, met with 
firm public stand on the question, believe that the pope does not want the pope and reportedly urged him 
- — • - *■- - : -- 1 to oppose the space defense plan. 


The report is Tram the Pontifical to come out against the missile sys- 
Academy of Sciences, which was tern if this might be interpreted as 
asked by John Paul to study the being a pro-Soviet stance, or arid 
question of arms in space. Some be used by the Soviet Union in its. 
elements of the report were leaked rhetorical jousting with the United 
to a Catholic news agency here last States. 


The Pontifical Academy's re- 


port . elements of which were con- 
firmed by Vatican officials and 
diplomats, concludes that the space 
weapons system could lake 10 to IS 
years to complete, that it could not 
be 100 percent effective against in- 
coming missiles and that it would 
be exceedingly expensive. 

The study also reportedly con- 
cludes that it could exacerbate the 
arms race and lead to the produc- 


tion of “super missiles'' that could 
penetrate such a shield. 

The Pontifical Academy advises 
the pope cm scientific matters and 
was charged by John Paul with ex- 
amining the space defense ques- 
tion. The group of 27 scientists in- 
cluded consultants from the United 
States, the Soviet Union and eight 
other countries. 

When word of the repeal first 


Sciences has examined this prob- 
lem. which is still under study. 


spread on Saturday, a Vatican /v ii n wr ___ « , * # w • • 

spokesman issued a statement that (JastTO txlilS R632311 I CITOriSt^ LiUtt* 
said: “The Pontifical Academy of fReu im) PrJdait Fidel Castro retorted Tuesday to 

President Ronald Reagan's accusation that Cuba was aiding internation- 
al terrorism by calling Mr. Reagan "a liar” and ‘‘the worst terrorist in the 
While declining to confirm any history of mankind." Libya and Nicarapa, among other countries 
details in the report, the spokesman . named by Mr. Reagan, also reacted critically, 
emphasized Monday that the re- In a speech Monday. Mr. Reagan said those three countries, as wdl as 
port represented the opinion of the 11311 311(1 North Korca - comprised a confederation “engaged in acts of 
scientists involved and dial the ^'/gams! the govmmmt and peopk of thc Umied Slap.- 


pope was still considering the issue. 


Mr Castro said of Mr. Reagan; “He is the biggest liar of all flte 
American presidents." He called Mr. Reagan “a madman, an imbecile 
and a bum." 


weekend, to the embarrassment of 
the Vatican. 

The issue has been sensitive for 
the Vatican and the pope because it 
involves a clash between two sets of 
ideas that are often central to John 
Paul's message: Peace and disar- 
mament on the one hand and firm 


“On the other hand, he can't ex- 
actly plump for a U.S. program, 
either." a Western diplomat here 
said. 

The Vatican’s stand on space 
weapons has been a matter of in- 
tense lobbying by both the United 
States and’ the Soviet Union. 


Bilingual Education in U.S.: Much Bitterness, Little Progress Signals From Air-lndia Hulk Are Lost 

dass children and children taught CORK. Ireland (UP1) — Recovery experts said Tuesday that they had 

in traditional *■!»«*; or that they lost a homing signal from the flight recorder of an Air-lndia jet that 
bdieved the bilingual Havre were crashed in the Atlantic on June 23. killing 329 people. 

some students from learn- The first signals from the “black box,** which is believed to be in the lad 


U.S. Sees Soviet Shift on SDI 


(Continued from Page 1) 
activities cited by the Soviet side to 
be banned were not “tests" but 
“demonstrations of physical prin- 
ciples." the officials said. 

The officials acknowledged, 
however, that the .American dele- 
gates offered no definitions to dis- 
tinguish between “tests" and “dem- 
onstrations." 

Two high-ranking administra- 
tion officials said that if and when 
the bargaining on these issues be- 
came serious, the distinction be- 
tween tests and demonstrations 
would turn on the differences the 
U.S. draws between a component 
and a subcomponent of an anti- 
ballistic missile system. 

As the U.S. administration offi- 
cials see it, Moscow is unwilling to 
accept the distinction between 
components and subcomponents, 
and therefore seeks to ban any test- 
ing that would contribute to devel- 
oping a prototype of a new anti- 
ballistic missile defense system. 

“But this is only our inference of 
the Soviet position," a high admin- 


istration official said. “They 
haven't spelled it out on their own, 
and our delegates are not empow- 
ered to show any flexibility on the 
president's Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative in order to get them to spell 
it out further." 

■ Shevardnadze Blames U.S. 

MOSCOW — Foreign Minister 
Eduard A. Shevardnadze of the So- 
viet Union issued a statement 
Monday blaming world tension on 
“U.S. imperialism.'’ United Press 
International reported from Mos- 
cow. 

The statement, issued jointly' 
with a visiting foreign minister, Pe- 
ter Varkonyi of Hungary, charged 
that Washington was '‘aggravating 
confrontation in ail planes." 

The statement, the first since Mr. 
Shevardnadze was promoted to 
foreign minister July 1, reiterated 
Soviet condemnations of U.S. Stra- 
tegic Defease Initiative research 
and U.S. policy in Central Ameri- 
ca, the Middle East, and southern 
Africa. 


(Continued from Page ]) 
teachers cite remarkable success 
stories, a U-S. Education Depart- 
ment study published in 19S3 
found “no consistent evidence" 
that dual-language instruction im- 
proved students’ academic pro- 
gress. 

And one major goaf has clearly 
not been achieved. Ten years ago, 
the high -school dropout rate for 
Hispanics was far higher than those 
for while students, and federal offi- 
cials argued that it would fall be- 
cause students who learned at least 
part-time in their native language 
would gain academically and ui 
self-esteem. But the Hispanic high 
school dropout rate appears to be 
as high as ever, just under 40 per- 
cent. 

In some ways, the story of bilin- 
gual education in the United Stales 
starts with Kinney Kinmon l i» 
He was 6 years old. the son of an 
immigrant carpenter in San Fran- 
cisco’s Chinatown who grew up 
speaking Cantonese. In 1970, a 
young lawyer happened to find 
Kinney “(anguishing.” as the law- 
yer puts it, in a first-grade class that 
treated him like any other San 
Francisco first-grader. The class 
was all in English. 

“Sink or swim" is the bilingual 
teachers' nickname for classes in 
which students either master En- 
glish in the traditional manner or 
they pass beneath die waves. 

In Lau vs. Nichols, the Supreme 
Court ruled for the first time that 


“sink or swim" violated the Civil 
Rights Act, which prohibits dis- 
crimination by racial or national 
origin in any program receiving 
federal financial help. 

“There is no equality of treat- 
ment inertly by providing students 
with the same facilities, textbooks, 
teachers, and curriculum for stu- 
dents who do not understand En- 
glish are effectively foreclosed from 
any meaningful education,” Justice 
William O. Douglas wrote in Janu- 
ary 1974. 

The court did not mandate bilin- 
gual education: it simply mandated 
that students receive some special 
help. But when the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare's 
Office of Education convened a 
panel to draw up guidelines for 
federal enforcement of the Lau rul- 
ing. the panel members in 1973 
decided that the government’s pre- 
ferred approach was dual-language 
teaching in the schools. 

Teachers under this approach 
find their task complicated and de- 
manding. At Hoover Elementary, 
Patty Swanson leads different 
reading groups, one in English, one 
in Spanish and two (hat recently 
switched from Spanish to English 
and are working through lower-lev- 
el bpoks. 

She assigns and writes composi- 
tions in whatever language the stu- 
dent is currently reading. She 
teaches English as a second lan- 
guage every morning, sends the 
class out to a special bilingual sci- 


ence workshop, sprinkles Spanish 
into her arithmetic lessons when 
the children seem to have trouble 
understanding, and works in En- 
glish teaching between tutoring ses- 
sions with children who need the 
ideas explained in Spanish. 

“You just son of look at your 
class and fed it out,” Ms. Swanson 
said. 

She is part of a new generation of 
Redwood Gty teachers, women 
and men hired under a 1981 board 
resolution to accept oily teachers 
trained to wot in two language 
School districts across the country 
re ac ted in many ways to the bilin- 
gual mandates forced on them by 
federal guidelines and state laws. 

Some ignored them, some turned 
over the responsibility to bilingual 
but otherwise ill-qualified teaching 
aides, and some, like Redwood 
City, scrambled to hire the few bi- 
lingual teachers who were emerging 
with at least some theoretical train- 
ing in dual-language teaching. 

On paper, two years after (be full 
complement of bilingual teachers 
finally settled in at Hoover, there is 
not a great deal to show for their 
efforts. Scores on achievement tests 
are mixed, with some showing 
slight improvement and some 
showing none. 

And there is little enthusiasm at 
the two junior high schools that 
take Hoover students. A dozen 
teachers, interviewed at random, 
said either that they could see no 
difference between the bilingual- 


“There’s more to Lufthansa 
than just nice smiles.” 


This is an authentic passenger statement 




Lufthansa 


keeping some : 
ing English 

Ms. Swanson and Ms. Rud 
countered that test scores are low 
because in many cases students in 
bilingual programs entered school 
late, and are being compared with 
children who have enjoyed middle- 
class advantages. 

But the complaints illustrate the 
strong resistance to bilingual edu- 
cation among many educators and 
parents. 

“I don't think people realized” 
how controversial the govern- 
ment’s 1975 decision would oe, said 
Edward de Avila, an Oakland- 
based educational consultant who 
helped prepare the government 
guidelines. “I know I didn’t” 

The controvery takes many 
forms. In Oakland, California, this 
March, a state judge ordered the 
city’s schools into compliance with 
the stale guidelines that require a 
bilingual if an elementary 
school has one grade with at least 
10 limited- English students from a 
par ticular langnag e group. 

At Franklin Elementary School, 
which sits amid inexpensive rental 
housing that attracts new immi- 
grants, 14 languages are spoken in 
the course of a normal school day. 
According to state regulations, the 
school was supposed to offer bilin- 
gual rfflgys in Cantonese, Spanish, 
Vietnamese, lantian. the Cambo- 
dian inngpngg Khmer and the Ethi- 
opian language Tigrinya. 

“Now that we’re in compliance, 
it’s just as ridiculous as when we 
were out of compliance;” said Mi- 
chad Fhilltps, who teaches his com- 
bined fourth- and fifth-grade dass 
in both English and Vietnamese. 
“So all my English-speaking kids 
have to sit there and wait while I'm 


section of the Boeing 747. 6.500 feet (2,000 meters) below the surface, 
were picked up last week by a robot submarine. The searchers said the 
signals had ban growing weaker over the last few days. 

■Investigators were hopeful that the signals could be picked up again by 
(he more sensitive equipment aboard the John Cabot, a Canadian Coast 
Guard vessel equipped with sophisticated sonar equipment, which joined 
the search Tuesday. 

18 Countries Sign Acid Rain Accord 

HELSINKI (A?) — Representatives of 18 European countries and 
Canada committed themselves Tuesday to a 30 percent reduction within 
eight years of sulphur dioxide emissions — a chief cause of the add rain 
blamed for ruining forests, killing aquatic life and eroding buildings and 
monuments. 

The United States, Britain and Poland, officially listed among the 
biggest air polluters, abstained from signing at the meeting of the UN 
Economic Commission for Europe. The UJS. and British delegates said 
they had already substantially reduced emissions and that further reduc- 
tions would be immensely expensive. 

Statistics based on 1980 figures list the United States as the world's 
second-biggest source of sulphur dioxide emissions at 24.1 million tons 
annually. Only the Soviet Union, which signed the agreement on Tues- 
day, emits more: 25 million ions. 

Agca and Accused Turk Meet at Trial 

ROMEfAP) — Mehmet Ali Agca and a Turk charged with helping him 
shoot Pope John Paul n were brought face to face Tuesday Tor a 
courtroom confrontation over differences in their testimony. 

Musa Serdar Cdebi was brought out of his defendant’s cage and put in 
a chair next to Mr. Agca. Mr. Celebi. 33, is charged with providing 
support to Mr. Agca, 27, and with splitting 512 million with him and 
another Turk, Oral Gslik. 

The prosecutor, Antonio Marini asked Mr. Agca to co nfirm to Mr. 
Cejebi’s face earlier testimony about two meetings he had with him to 
plan the shooting. Mr. Agca testified that both meetings were for 
planning the attack. Mr. Cdebi said he did meet with Mr. Agca but 
masted that the encounters were casual. 

Turkish Tanker Hit by Iraqi Missfle . 

MANAMA. Bahrain (AF) — A Turkish-registered supertanker carry- 
ing 380,000 tons of crude oil from Iran was ablaze and spiffing ofl into the 
Gulf on Tuesday after it was struck by an Iraqi missile, shipping sources 
said. It was the largest ship damaged in the Iran-Iraq war. Iraq confirmed 
translating for the Vietnamese, the attack. 

Now who's being served there?” The 33 manbers of the crew of the M. 'Vatan abandoned ship 


This complaint is frequently ech- unharmed after the vessel radioed a distress signal early in the morning, 
d by parents. In Fillmore, a the sources said. Hours later, the fire was out of control and die tanker 
, . ~ was reported to be in danger of exploding. 

Shipping executives in Bahrain. Dubai, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia said 
the incident was “the worst of its land" since Iran and Iraq began 
attacking Gulf shipping in 1984. 

Israelis Strike Over Austerity Plan 

JERUSALEM (WF) — Industrial strikes and a three-hour walkout by 
civil servants disrupted the Israeli economy Tuesday as leaders of ire 
government and labor unions continued negotiations on an economic 
austerity program. . 

The strikes, by electrical and telephone workers as well as seamen an 
ships in port, were the first since the Histadrut, the trade union federa- 
tion, called a 24-hour general strike last week to protest the new economic 
measures, which include price increases and wage freezes. 

Many national and local government offices closed at 10 AJvI. for three 
hours to protest plans for dismissal of 10,000 employes. There were signs 
that the labor unrest could grow more serious in craning days as officials 
of several other unions met to consider strikes. 


oed 

heavily Hispanic southern Califor- 
nia farming community where the 
wpwwinn of bilingual set 

off a protest this spring, English- 
speaking parents say their chudren 
waste time in a dass taught partly 
in another language. 

Bilingual advocates say that 
many schools do not conduct dual- 
language classes properly. They 
also say that because some states 
do not require bilingual education 
and some schools ignore their own 
state requirements, more than 
three-quarters of the children in the 
United States with limited English 
skills in the United States are re- 
ceiving no dual-language instruc- 
tion at ail 


1! 


“What’s going on in 90 percent 
of the classrooms in tins country is 

For the Record 

Campbell, a Spanish- English, bitin- Deputy Prime Minister Yao Yifin of China arrived Tuesday in Moscow 

gual teacher who works in the bflin- on an eight-day visit to the Soviet Union, during which he is expected to 
gual teacber training program at sign a 1986-1990 trade pact and discuss expanding relations. (AP) t 
California State University at Sac- King Hussein of Jordan and King Fabd of Saudi Arabia 


ramento. 

The national shortage of quali- 
fied teachers has for some years 
been one of bilingual education's 
major problems. 

And the proceedings inride the 
dual-language are only as ef- 
fective as the teacher who runs it 
In visits this spring to more than 20 
bilingual classrooms, a reporter 
watched a bilingual teacher review 
di virion in English scarcely 
mtcuigfble through his Spanish ac- 
cent, and another teacher who 
spoke no Spanish and left all th6 
*■ — lish business to an aide she 
ly distrusted: “I don’t even 
think she's graduated from high 
school,” the teacher confided. 


Tuesday in Taef. Saudi Arabia, on Middle East peace efforts, the Gtilf 
war and efforts to convene an Arab summit conference. fUPJ) 

New floods in Bangladesh have marooned more than 100,000 


and three major rivers have burst their banks, officials said Tuesday. Ten 
people were killed in a landslide caused by the rain. (Realm) 

Lewis F. Powell Jr_ 77, a U.S. Supreme Court justice, underwent, 
“highly successful” hernia surgery at a Minnesota hospital on Monday, it 
was reported Tuesday. (AF) 

Joe M. Rodgers, 51, a T enn essee construction magnate, has. been 
nominated as the next US ambassador to France, President Ranald 
Reagan announced Tuesday, and Thomas Michael Toliver Niles, 46, a 
career diplomat, has been nominated as ambassador to Canada. (UP1) 

Suspected Basque s e pa rati sts shot and killed two dvO guards Tuesday 
in San Sebastian. Spain, police said (AP) 

Ammtore FanfsmL, 77, a former Christian Democratic prime minister, 
was elected president of (he Italian Senate cm Tuesday. He repfeas 
Francesco Cosriga. who was elected president of the republic last month 

(AP) 


In Africa,the Yoke of Pregnancy Prevails ' 

(Co n tinue d from Page I) Nairobi “you are nothing in my percratincnaseovwasim2arsnr' 
to a woman) ts 8.0. Both figures are village. You cannot be recognized veyinl978. 

the hiehest in recorded history. UK it rp«mnndW,> nmnn " -RTh.i .. 


as a responsible person.’ - 
Women, who usually do not in- 
herit property, create long-term se- 
curity by creating children, who 
one day can take care of them. 
Deprived of job opportunities and 
averaging about half the formal 


the highest in recorded history. 

Half the country’s 19 million peo- 
ple are under 14 years of age. If the 
fertility rale does not decline, in 45 
years Kenya's population will ex- 
ceed 130 million. 

Rccmt .studies by the World u,« U6 i U6 mvui iuu me mnnai 
Bank, the U5. Agency for Interna- education of men, a Kenyan wom- 
tional Development and the UN an’s one major route to respeaabfl- 
Children’s Fund, as wril as inter- iry is to be a fecund mother, ac- 
views with local family planning cording to several studies. 

SBtswaasje 

Ki jsasra ssekbsss 

ESVte'liSri'** Sbe is a lecher and a 
through fathering children. founder of a local women’s group. 

For men, a* «e0 as women, to She is also the village's foremost 
have no chtidrat m this village i$ to advocate of family planning, de- 
have no identity. As anthropoid spite her 11 children. 


What you must understand 
about the African man is (hat be 
must continue to father children to 
prove that he is still on the go, thri 
he is still potent, that he can do it," 
said a Kenya-born, American-edu- 
cated professor of economics at the 
University of NairobL “Making a 
woman pregnant is his way tf 
showing mastery.” 

Dora Ayonga wakes up at dawn 
in the bea she shares with her four 
children in the family’s grass- 
roofed huL 

If there is commeai left ovff 
from the previous day, she builds t 
fire b a smoke-stained comer of 
the (rat and cooks porridge for her 
children and her nusband,. By ”! . 
A.M_ if she can find the work, shb,? 
is oat boebg weeds for aneignbOC*^ 
Her husband, 28, who is looking 


f 

I 


:>S 


moral rectitude. ~ ‘ Y? iW ““ «W for work, waits at home (his mbihef 

“If you haven’t got children," JV r ^ oam 8 namb€r of babies, raking care of the children) ratal 
saidckpus^K^X^v a A b ° Ul 1:30 ?' M - Mrs, 

up in the village and now lives in Ay ?*T COm S hc T ******* 

^ on Kenyan women, uie moderniza- and- beans that her hoeing- " 

lion of rural villages, with extra- earned. She fetches the ft 
sion officers and medical personnel and water needed to cook 
demanding better sanitation in feeds him and the children 
food preparation and child care, 
has actually increased the work- 
load of rural mothers. 

In Ebulakayi. Mrs. Epiche says 
many young mothers are rebelline 
against Ihrir growing workload and 
do not want any more children. 

An AlD-funded survey ter year 
found that 40 p e r c e n t of Kenyan 
women aged 15 to 49 did not want 
any more children. This was a 10 


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cleans up. For the rest of the af te£ 
noon, she combs the village Rf;j 
greens or other vegetables Tor 
oct, which she cooks and 
before dark. 

Before Mrs. Ayonga goes W 
sleep in the bed with' her chiktad 
she washes the one dress she own? 
■and hangs it -to dry abov&the fi^ 
where at dawn rite win cook ox** 
poridgft 




.\v.k 

ts? 

05 






INTEKNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


Page 3 


‘■•PCL-Bsc 


• jpcrtialacr , 

■* iK^r z :. 1 oi! us* J 

-!‘_r?ua«E j 
shir. '.r-;. */ Ir^wwa ; 

! tf M. ’• -rjRU».aea: \ 

*•> ^gr.L- .;.:»aee j 

\ C%lJ » "■' ' -'C itt !H, | 
** 5T 

. Kwi j:*. bj xl VSk , 
j’’ -.r..-.- :r. jr.J !rst te i 


p Financed by the state unem-. 
ptoyincnt'fund, the panel pays 
- companies to .retrain their em- 
■ptovees.' -The employer has 'to 
ipsKe a commitment to hire the 
^ trainees and is reimbursed only if 
the tninesi actually go to work 
r ' foratfcast 90 days. 

■ XhfpfPgram is not a cnre-alL 
’hdo« not deal with hard-core 

jSk2g!Kftheir fusi j‘<S»s!bw it 

has retrained 38,000 people so 
far. Jerome Rosow, president of 
theWorkio America Institute, a 
think tiuxk based in Scarsdale, 
, New Yqdb said the upheavals in 
..American Offices are just as pro- 

• found asihose in the factories. 

I,. Roy Aaeroff, project adminis- 
' trator for. employment tr aining 
,-at California State University, 
'Norihridge, said of the program, 
'“The -companies are getting 

funds for training. The employ- 
ees are getting training for mod- 
i era technology. The slate wins 

■ because these people don't go 
out on unemployment.” 

-Short Takes 

The Village Voice, the often 
: radical New York weekly, will be 
30years old in October. Recently 
sold for more than 555 milli on by 

■ Rupert Murdoch, the Australian 
'publisher, to Leonard Stem, 

owner of Hartz Mountain Indus- 
trim, a pet-product company, the 

■ Voice is making money but read- 
ership is stagnant anwng people 
under 25. David Schnriderman, 

' editor and publisher, says his 

first priority is to “make sure we 
don't lose our younger readers." 

The U.S. Congress has autho- 

• rizsd the striking of half a million 
_ $5 gold pieces that will sell for 30 
. rimes face value, or S 150 each, 10 
million silver dollars to be sold 
for $20 each and 25 million cop- 

■ per-nickel 50-cem pieces costing 

• $6 each. Part of the proceeds, not 
exceeding SI 37.5 million, would 
help pay for the restoration of 

‘the Statue of Liberty and the 
former immigration center on 
Ellis Island. 


1C - 

: lrt J tt ...... 


were reported in The New York 
Tunes, Mr. Reagan denied Mr. 
... w Stockman had made the statements 
on taxes. He said at the time he 
s *l- r intended to keep Mr. Stockman as 


prevail 



8 carat floid 

quartz 

water-resistant 



l UntadPTM^WMieMl 

ELECTION HOPES DASHED — Bridgette Poi, SO, a 
transsexual who served eight years in the air force as a 
male sergeant, lost her campaign Monday to be elected 
commander of an American Legion Post in New Lon- 
don, Connecticut. The incumbent won in a 23-13 vote. 


The dashing colors of corn- 
operated newspaper boxes in 
Palm Beach, Florida, have been 
deemed an eyesore by members 
of the city council, who are ex- 
pected to enact an ordinance re- 
quiring that all the boxes be 
painted the same color, a pink- 
day shade called “terra cotta.” 

The color blends weQ with the 
Meditaranean-Moroccan archi- 
tecture of many of Palm Beach's 

manrinnc - 


Wrecking Landscape 
In Four-Wheel Drive 

Before cigarette , advertising 
was banned from American tele- 
vision, the ragged landscape of 
the Far West served as a back- 
drop for cowboys lighting up 
their favorite smoke. Now, The 
New York Times reports, Madi- 


son Avenue has found a new use 
for the region's natural beauty: 
as a battleground for high-fiyin 1 , 
dirt-chewin', mud-splasnin’ 
four-wheel-drive pickup trucks, 
which have become the rage of 
the off-road driving public. 

“Television commercials show 
those trucks Lopping the ridge, 
all four wheels in the air and then 
flying on down the other ride in & 
cloud of dust,” said Jim Paxon, 
chief ranger for the Taylor Na- 
tional Forest in Colorado. So 
people go out and do this them- 
selves “and pretty soon you've 
got a road cut right through vir- 
gin territory where no read is 
supposed to be." 

The Times remarked that the 
U.S. Forest Service “would 
probably prefer to see the ret u r n 
of the Maiiboro man and bis 
horse:” 

AimnnSi^E 


.... (Continued from Page 1) 
the issue more frequently and in 
stronger terms. 

In an off-the-record speech June 
S to directors of the New York 
Stock Exchange, be suggested that 
large tax increases might be neces- 
sary if Congress did not agree to 
new spending reductions. 

After the contents of this speech 
were reported in The New York 
Tunes, Mr. Reagan denied Mr. 
Stockman had made the statements 


Mr. Stockman’s departure has 
been a matter of speculation for 
many months, particularly after 
Donald T. Regan left his job as 
Treasury secretary to become 
White House chief of staff. 

Mr. Stockman had disagreed 
with Mr. Regan over tax policy, 


budget director. 

*•. But the biggest furor occurred in 
November 1981 when, in an article 
in The Atlantic magazine. Mr. 
Stockman was quoted as saying 
that Mr. Reagan’s economic pro- 
gram was “a Trqjan horse” to help 
the rich by cutting their tax rates. 

, He told the author, William 
Grader of The Washington Post, 
.that that the president’s “supply- 
ride” economic formula was noth- 
ing more than the old Republican 
“trickle-down" philosophy of deal- 
ing with the economy. 

“ Mr. Stockman was summoned to 
the White House for a dressing- 
down by the president Although 
he offered his resignation, Mr. Rea- 
gan refused it 


PiageT 


and with Defense Secretary Caspar 
W. Weinberger over the Pentagon 
budgeij 

Earlier this year, Mr. Stockman 
touched off an uproar in Congress 
with his assertion during a congres- 
sional hearing that military pen- 
sions should be reduced and that 
many of the nation’s farmers have 
brought economic troubles upon 
themselves. 

“From time lo lime we have bad 
scene things to say about Dave and 
things he said,” Mr. Speakes ac- 
knowledged. However, he stressed 
Mr. Stockman was not asked to 
leave. 

IN THE HEART OF TOKTO== 


But Mr. Stockman's mastery of 
the complexities of the budget out- 
weighed the temporary anger over 
his remarks. 

Tuesday's announcement came 
as the White House was involved in 
a new effort to break the congres- 
sional deadlock over bow the fiscal 
1986 budget. 

Robert J. Dole of Kansas, the 
leader of the majority Republicans 
in the Senate, said the position of 
OMB director is “going to be a 
hard spot to GIL” 

Donald W. Riegle Jr, a Demo- 
crat erf Michigan who is a member 
of the Senate Budget Committee, 
said of his departure, “While David 
Stockman and 1 disagree on many 
issues, I think his resignation at tins 
time will make it more difficult to 
achieve significant' deficit- reduc- 
tion and that’s unfortunate.” 

(AP, UPI) 


Brazilians Braced for Violence Over Land Reform 

By MarEse Simons ‘ ■ in the soggy lowlands and fo 

New York Times Service \ • * lb* ■' ‘ . clearings behind Silo Luis, the 


By MarEse Simons 

New York Times Service 

. SAO LUIS, Brazil — A jeep 
pulled up 'outride, the local land- 
owners’ society and a stout figure 
climbed out shifting the two pis- 
tols in his belt. 

“Who’s ever heard of a peaceful 
land reform?” he said in a tone not 
open to argument “If the politi- 
cians stick ip this mad idea, a lot of 
blood is going to flow " 

Inside -the colonial budding, in 
this city on Brazil's north coast 
men who run cattle ranches and 
rice and soybean farms nervously 
- cast about for information, solidar- 
ity and fuel for their rage. In low- 
ered voices, scone talked of a war in 
the making, of people arming 
-themselves. 

Barely three months after the re- 
lum of civilian rule to Brazil, the 
government's abrupt announce- 
ment that it wifi distribute millions 
of- acres of unfarmed private land 
to the poor has created a mood or 
confrontation throughout the vast 
hinterlands. 

Those who have backed the plan, 
including the peasant unions and 
the Roman Catholic Church, have 
at the same time criticized it as too 
timid to affect enormous soda! in- 
equities. 

■ Landowners, on the ether hand, 
have denounced it as Communist- 
inspired and irrational. They are 
organizing a nationwide movement 
to fight the plan, mobilizing state 
governors and members of Con- 
gress, who often themselves have 
vast holdings. 

Sales of guns. and ammunition 
are reported to havejumped in sev- 
eral regions, where people fear 
peasants will invade their prop e rty. 

Land distribution has come late 
to Brazil, where space and opportu- 
nity long seemed boundless. But 
pressures erf the poor on the cities, 
severe shortages of foods and a rise 
in conflicts over land have led the 
government to acL 






J- In J49* 


** . 



The Vail Tma 


Brazilian peasants who have invaded an estate brandish machetes and refuse orders to leave. 


Disclosing the new agrarian po- 
' Ucy in May, President Josi Sarney 
sara that the concentration erf own- 
ership had become dangerous. Just 
1 percent of the landowners, he 
said, have 45 percent of the land. 

According to a government re- 
port, in the last two decades of 
military rule so much land was 
amassed by cattle barons, compa- 
nies and speculators, “with official 
connivance," that just 342 proper- 
ties totaled 1 18 mi ll inn acres (47.5 
million hectares). 

That was equal to the total land 
owned by 2j million peasants. 

The same report said that estates 
larger than 2J00 acres jumped 
from 46.9 percent of the total in 
1967, to 58 J percent in 1984. 

Under the new plan, the govern- 
ment intends over the next 15 years 
-to takeover unused estates of more 
than 2J00 acres, paying what it 
terms fair com pensa tion, and then 


distribute 1.2 billion acres to 7.1 
million peasants. 

The state of Maranhao, Presi- 
dent Sarney’s home state, which he 
represented as a senator, is a hot 
and humid area just below the 
Equator, endowed with dean riv- 
ers, vast territory and few inhabit- 
ants. 

Bloody conflicts would seem to 
have no place here, yet the state, 
stretching south or SSo Luis, has 
become one of the most disputed of 
Brazil's regions. 

“We live a constant drama,”' said 
the Reverend Luis Pirotta, an Ital- 
ian missionary working in Arame, a 
town 20 hours by bus into the inte- 
rior. “Peasant families occupy state 
lands because that's the only way 
Tor them. They have no money to 
eat, let alone buy property. 

“When the land brokers appear 
with false titles, they send pisto- 
leros to threaten the peasants,” Fa- 


Grand Duchess Charlotte Dies at 89 


The Aaoeuaed Prea 

~ LUXEMBOURG — Grand- 
Duchess Charlotte, 89, who ruled 
this nation for almost 46 years until 
1964, died Tuesday. 

The former sovereign, mother of 
reigning Grand Duke Jean, had 
beat Of lor several weeks, but the 
court only officially reported her 
illness two weeks ago. It announced 
at the «me time that her state had 
worsened. 

Grand Duchess Charlotte came 
to the throne in 1919 after her elder 
sister, Maria Addbeid, stepped 
down because her pro-German 
sympathies during World War I 
stirred a wave of repubEcanism. 

After- she look the throne, she 
made a point of proclaiming Allied 
sympathies and stood vrith General 
John J. Pershing at a parade of U.S. 
troops. 

When the Nazis invaded her 
country in 1940, she and her family 
and government fled to London. 
She eventually moved to Canada 
from where she frequently broad- 
cast to her occupied duchy. 

She returned after the war to an 
accolade of affection and ruled un- 
til 1964 when she abdicated in fa- 
vor of son. Grand Duke Jean. ' 

Gardner Cowles Jr., 

Founder of Look Magazine 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Gardner 
Cowles Jr., 82, founder and pub- 
lisher of Look magazine and bead i 
of one branch of a family commu- 
nications empire that included 
newspapers, magazines, book pub- 

of cardiac arrest Monday in South- 
ampton, New York, after a long 
bout with cancer. 

A liberal Republican and inter- 
nationalist, Mr. Cowles was for 


many years an influential voice in 
urging the United Slates to move 
away from isolationism and toward 
a more active role in world affairs. 

It was through his publications 
that he exertedhis greatest influ- 
ence,' especially through Look, a 
mass-circulation, general-interest 
magazine, that he founded in 1937. 
Haakon Chevalier, 83, 
American Writer, Translator 

PARIS— Haakon Chevalier, 83, 
an American writer and translator 
who left the United States in 1950 
after being accused of “anti-Ameri- 
can activities,” died Thursday in 
Paris. 

Mr. Chevalier was a professor of 
French literature at the University 


of California at Berkeley. He left , 
the United States in 1950 and set- , 
tied in Paris after political pressure 
prevented him from continuing his 
academic career in the United 
States. 

■ Other deaths: 

Roger Seydoux de Qansonne, 
77, former French ambassador to 
the United Nations and the Soviet 
Union, last Wednesday in Paris. 

Edna R. MacDonough, 84, who 
in 1936 founded and became exec- 
utive secretary of the International 
Friendship League to foster under- 
standing between American chil- 
dren and children around the 
world, Saturday in Boston. 


ther Pirotta said. Often families are 
tied up and their huts are burned. 
Sometimes people are killed.” 

According to the government. 
180 people were killed in land dis- 
putes in 1984. In mid-June, in the 
neighboring state of Pariu 13 peas- 
ants accused of being squatters 
were shot and killed by gunmen 
hired by landowners, according to 
local officials. 

Church workers acting as advis- 
ers to peasant groups — and there- 
fore perceived as “dangerous” — 
have also been threatened In April, 
a Roman Catholic nun working 
with peasants was killed in the 
nearby Araguaia region. 

The interview with Father Pir- 
otta took place in a monastery 
where he had been in hiding for 10 
days. He said he had fled Arame 
because a group of local landown- 
ers had hired three gunmen to kill 
him and six peasant leaders. 


The Dafty Source for 
International Investec 


In the soggy lowlands and forest 
clearings behind Silo Luis, the dif- 
ferent faces of Brazilian agriculture 
can be seen. Modem mechanized 
farms produce soybean and other 
export crops. Poor families, tilling 
the red earth with wooden plows, 
grow beans and manioc to feed 
their families. 

On the large estates, which have 
changed little since the plantation 
days of the Portuguese colonizers, 
laborers are bom. subsist os virtual 
serfs and die in the houses where 
they were bom. 

According to the Confederation 
of Rural Workers. 10.5 million 
peasant families in Brazil are look- 
ing for land. The redistribution 
program, it says, is loo slow and 
not sufficiently far-reaching be- 
cause it leaves’ intact the vast es- 
tates where the land is being 
worked. 

But Francisco Sales, who leads 
the workers federation in this slate, 
remarked: 

“Frankly, if just the unused land 
is expropriated here, it win be good 
enough for Maranhio. It wifi al- 
most be revolutionary." 


© 

CERRUTI 1881 


Sales 

Until July 13 



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26 th May 1985 


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Bush in Europe: 


By Leslie H. Ge lb 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — It look a 
traveling parly of 120, four aircraft 
and seven advance groups working 
with scores of embassy officials to 
plan a virtually minute-by-minute 
schedule lo get Vice President 
George Bush around seven West 
European countries from June 23 
to July 4. 

The anatomy of the trip, how it 
was conceived and carried out, tells 
a lot about George Bush the man, 
his possible strategy in seeking the 
presidency, and not incidentally, 
how the government works. 

His entourage was small poia- 
• toes compared with the party of 
600 officials and 600 journalists 
that President Ronald Reagan took 
with him to Europe two months 
ago for the economic summit con- 
! Terence in Bonn. But it was. none- 
theless. a major undertaking for 
which Bush aides said there was no 


way of knowing the cost, given the 
number of embassy and military 
personnel involved in the trip. 

There was little way of judging 
the results either. From interviews 
with West European officials at 
each stop, it seems they all liked 
Mr. Bush, were pleased that he was 
meeting with their bosses, but they 
were somewhat perplexed at the 
necessity for the conversations so 
soon after the Bonn meeting and 
skeptical about how candid the 
high-level exchanges actually were. 

The Bush party was not unaware 
of these reactions. Yet they were 
dubious that diplomats by them- 
selves would accomplish Mr. Rea- 
gan's goals. They also had their 
own agenda and Mr. Bush's wishes 
in mind, with maximum attention 
to substantive detail and minimum 
intention of making news. 

It was no accident that Mr. 
Bush's statement in Frankfurt, 
greeting the hijacked TWA passen- 


gers returning from Beirut, took 
only three minutes to read and that 
he then moved quickly out of cam- 
era sight. 

An aide explained: “He did not 
want to steal the limelight from the 
hostages or from President Rea- 
gan's role in freeing them.” 

The vice president’s trip was 
concaved with politics in mind in 
the broadest sense of the word. It 
was Mr. Bush running for the presi- 
dency not by trying to snatch a few 
headlines, but by doing Mr. Rea- 
gan's work: pushing die R e agan 
programs and policies and doing 
wbat a statesman is supposed to do, 
advance the interests of the United 
Stales. 

Last February, before Mr. Bush 
or his staff blew what might make 
news or what foreign policy aims 
might be served. Bush aides began 
planning the trip. Their thinking 
was that 1 98S would be the year for 
foreign travel and for statesman- 


ship. and that 1986 would be the 
year for helping Republicans nut 
for Congress and state offices. 

As originally sketched oat, 1985 
called for Mr. Bush to go to Eu- 
rope, perhaps China where he once 
served as ambassador, and one oth- 
er area. Then in early May, it was 
agreed that Western Europe would 
come firsL, as a follow-up to the 
Bonn conference. 

At this point, the vast machinery 
of government went into operation. 
Secret Service plus embassy per- 
sonnel in Rome. Bonn, Brussels. 
The Hague, Geneva, Paris and 
London began to sketch out each 
day’s meetings with planners from 
the Bush staff. 

Mr. Bush would need Air Force 
Two, a backup aircraft and two 
cargo planes for his staff of 20, plus 
a handful of journalists, Secret Ser- 
vice g»arHian< and communica- 
tions specialists. 

Then, about 10 days before de- 


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pan ore, advance teams of four or 
five people were sent to each stop 
to design in detail the daily sched- 
ule. 

By the time Mr. Bush arrived at 
each city, he had a minute-by-min- 
ute schedule waiting for him. 

In London, for example, (he 
booklet read: “At 11:25 A.M- the 
vice president arrives at the en- 
trance of No. 10 Downing Street. 
The Prime Minister will greet the 
vice president at the front door," 
then escort him “to the foyer just 
inside the front door, where a press 
pool will lake pictures of tbc prime 
minis ter and the vice president 
shaking bands in front of the fire* 
place.” Then, a private meeting for 
20 minutes, that joined by others at 
12:4)0 P.M.. then lunch concludes 
at 2:50 P.M, and so forth. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Bush and his 
staff were trying to figure out what 
the trip was all about precisely, 
whom he should talk to and about 
what, 

“Many on the staff drought the 
trip was no good politically or at 
least would not be helpful,’' said 
one aide. But. lie said, Mr. Reagan 
and his senior foreign policy advis- 
ers argued that, important things 
could be accomplished after me 
Bonn meeting. 


The list of subjects for discussion 
was winnowed down to the space- 
based defense proposal and trade. 
At the last moment, the hostage 
crisis unfolded and Mr. Reagan 
asked Mr. Bush to undertake a 
long-range study on combating ter- 
rorism. As a result, terrorism got 
central billing. 

On missile defense, the White 
House was concerned that foreign 
leaders, hearing conflicting voices 
from the Pentagon and State De- 
partment, would be confused about 
Mr. Reagan's real purpose. Mr. 
Bush could tell them that the Unit- 
ed States simply wanted a space 
defense research program, that ev- 
erything was flexible and that Eu- 
ropeans could join in planning and 
research. 

On trade, the message was to be 
get on with a new round of free 

trade talks or face the prospect of a 

tough American response to Euro- 
pean protectionism. 

Ou terrorism, the emphasis 
would be on coordinating laws and 
police work, as the Europeans de- 
sired, not on military force, as they 
feared. 

Thus Mr. Bush’s purposes for the 
trip were to make these points and 
“to listen and to learn 1 ' from for- 
eign presidents, prime ministers 
and foreign ministers. 



1 


Vice President George Bush 


Spain, France Sign Pact to Increase Cooperation 


A genet FnmcfPras* 

PARIS — Spain and France 
signed a “friendship and' coopera- 
tion" agreement, Tuesday, schedul- 
ing annual meetings between their 
heads of government and increas- 
ing contact on military questions 
and fighting terrorism. 

The a gree ment, the culmination 
of long negotiations between the 
two countries’ Socialist govern- 
ments, resembles a 1963 treat)’ un- 
der which the leaders of West Ger- 
many and France hold regular 
meetings. France also holds such 
meetings with Britain and Italy. 

It was sigiwd by the foreign min- 
isters of Spain, Francisco Ferndn- 
dez Orddnez, who was appointed in 
a cabinet reshuffle last week, and of 


France, Roland Dumas. The cere- 
mony at the presidential palace was 
attended by iCing Juan Carlos I of 
Spain, who arrived Monday, and 
President Francois Mitterrand and 
Prime Minister Laurent Fabhis. 

Under the agreement, the 
French president and the Spanish 
prime minister will meet once a 
year. 

Foreign ministers from both 
countries will meet annually to re- 
view diplomatic questions, and 
their efforts will be supported by 
working groups, consisting of se- 
nior ctvfl servants, that will con- 
vene every six months. 

The two countries trill maintain 
“frequent contacts to develop and 
intensify*’ moves to combat terror- 


ism , drug smuggling and other 
forms of cross-border crime, the 
agreement said. 

On military matters, it said 
France and Spain will set up a joint 
group for strategic studies, com- 
posed of Foreign Ministry and De- 
fense Ministry officials, and the de- 
fense ministers will meet once a 
year. Cooperation in weapons pro- 
duction will also be strengthened. 

In recent years, bilateral rela- 
tions have been hurt by disputes 
over Spanish fishing in French wa- 
ters, and over dealing with violence 
in the Basque region straddling the 
border. 

Mr. Fernhndez said of the agree- 
ment: “Spain and France were 
neighboring countries, but distant 


— they are now neighbors and 
brothers.** 

Spain, and Portugal, completed 
negotiations last month to beemar 
members of the European Commu- 
nity in January. 

■ Gonzdlez Cancels Trip 

Mr. Gonzalez canceled on Tues- 
day a visit to Latin America after 
the cabinet realignment, a govern- 
ment spokesman said, Reuters re- 
ported from Madrid. 

He said Mr. Gonzilez called off 
his trip to Cuba. Peru and Ecuador, 
scheduled for July 19, to prepare 
for a debate in the parliament oo 
the reshuffle and work on next 
year's budget, which has to be com- 
pleted this month. 


Ulster Police Say Noraid May Disrupt Parades 


United Pres International 

BELFAST — Members of Nor- 
aid, a U.S- group suspected of rais- 
ing funds for the Irish Republican 
Army, have arrived in Ireland and 
may try to disrupt Protestant pa- 
rades in Northern Ireland, police 
said Tuesday. 

A Belfast police spokesman 
warned that both extremist Catho- 
lic and Protestant groups would try 
to create “mayhem" during mas- 
si ve parades planned by 100.000 
Protestants across Northern Ire- 
land on Friday. 

“It's known that there is a group 
from Noraid that came to Ireland, 
but we don't know their exact num- 
ber," he said. “It is not known if 
they are in Northern Ireland, but 
one would anticipate if there was 
any movement they would not 
come through as a party as such but 
as individuals." 

Sinn Fein, the political wing of 
the outlawed IRA, denied there 
were any members of Noraid, 
whose full name is the Irish North- 
ern Aid Committee, in the prov- 
ince. 

U.S. and British officials have 
accused Nontid of raising money 
for ihe IRA. but Noraid spokesmen 
contend that the money goes to 
help the families of imprisoned 
Irish nationalists. 

A Noraid official, Martin Gal- 
vin, who is banned from entering 


Northern Ireland, entered the 
province illegally last year. When 
police tried to arrest him during a 
rally, fighting brake out and a man 
was killed by a robber bullet fired 
by police. 

Police have forbidden Protes- 
tants to march in Catholic areas in 
the province. Sixty percent of its 
1. 5-million people are ProtestanL 

Oo Sunday, police made an ex- 
ception to the ban and allowed 
about 5,000 Protestants — dad in 


bowler hats and orange sashes — to 
march across Portadown and 
. through a Catholic housing project. 

At lost seven persons were in- 
jured and three arrested as 300 ba- 
ron-widding police dispersed a hu- 
man chain of Catholic protesters 
trying to block the march. It was 
the fourth Loyalist march in two 
weeks that had resulted in violence. 

On Friday, more than 100,000 
Protestants plan to march in 26 
separate parades marking the vic- 


tory of W illiam of Orange in the 
Battle of the Boyne in 16W. 

■ Bomb Explodes in Belfast 
An explosion shook a Protestant 
stronghold in central Belfast on-* 
Tuesday, damaging several build- 
ings. The Associated Press report- 
ed. No one was hurt 
A police spokesman said the 
blast was believed to have been 
caused by a bomb. No groop b& 
claimed responsibility. 


Spain, Portugal Expect Basic Changes 


Cypriot Leader Visfe Greece 

United Prea International 

ATHENS — President Spyros 
Kyprianou of Cyprus arrived Mon- 
day for tulles with Prime Minister 
Andreas Papaodneou aimed at bol- 
stering the Cypriot leader’s domes- 
tic position, officials said. 


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(Continued from Page 1) 
after Portugal's revolution in 1974 
and Franco s death in 1975, almost 
every major economic and political 
decision m both countries has been 
tied to the issue of EC membership. 

Both countries have moved to 
streamline their outdated and inef- 
ficient national industries to com- 
pete once inside the European 
Community. Spain’s program, 
which maans dirniiKjpg or retrain- 
ing employees, is estimated to be 
costing more than $5 billion and 
affecting as many as 50,000 jobs. 
Among the results have been vio- 
lent strikes is shipyards and steel 
plants that are bong dosed. The 
cutbacks helped to provoke a na- 
tional strike last month. 

The economic challenge to come 

remains daimring Although Spain 

will have the European Communi- 
ty's fifth largest gross national 
product and with 38 minion people 
be its fifth most populous country, 
its per capita annual income is less 
than 53,800, compared with an av- 
erage of more than 57,100 for the 
current 10-member European 
Community. Portugal, with a pop- 
ulation of only 10 milli on and a per 
capita income of less thaa $1,900. 
wUl be one of the smallest and 
poorest EC countries. 

The dear consensus among offi- 
cials and economists, moreover, is 
that one of die most immediate 
effects of EC membership win be a 
rise in inflation and unemployment 

in both countries. 

In Spain, unemployment stands 


at more than 21 percent, the highest 
in Western Europe, while inflation 
is about 9 percent, according to the 
government. The Portuguese gov- 
ernment reports that its unemploy- 
ment is around 13 percent and in- 
flation more than 20 percent. 

The inflation rates are expected 
to rise by 1 and 6 percentage points 
because of the introduction of the 
EC's value-added tax, the setting of 
minimum farm price levels and the 
elimination of industrial subsidies. 

Some factories are expected to 
dose, adding to unemployment, in 
the face of a barrage of imports as 
tariff barriers are eliminated. A 
trend of European investments to 
take advantage of cheap Iberian 
labor is under way and is expected 
over several years to create many 
more jobs than are lost But the 
precise effect is one of the many 
uncertainties of the 10-year transi- 
tion period that has been set for 
Iberian integration into the Euro- 
pean Community. 

Industrial tariffs wQI fall faster 
than agricultural ones, which will 
benefit the community s current 
moubers. To help, the co mmuni ty 
has promised to balance Spain's 
payments to and benefits from the 
community's budget wi thin six 
years. It has also agreed to give 
Portugal more than 5700 million in 
development loans and $500 mil- 
lion in agricultural support. 

The Portuguese are still particu- 
larly worried. Although every par- 
liamentary party but the Commu- 
nists backs entry, Pedro Ferraz da 





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Costa, head of the Confederation 
of Portuguese Industries, reflected 
business concerns when he said, 
“The Common Market signifies the 
holocaust and destruction oTPortn- 
guese indusoy." 

Industries such as textiles and 
chemicals have yet to complete a 
transition from their former ides 
as suppliers to Portuguese colonies 
such as Mozambique and Angola, 
which won independence in IheV 
1970s. 

Farmers, meanwhile, are begin- 
ning to question the conventional 
wisdom mat they will be better off 
in the EC Sevinatc Pinro, a fans 
engineer and former treaty negotia- 
tor, said that despite a good tftoaie 
and many workers, Portuguese 
farmers are only one-fifth to one- 
third as productive as the West 
European average and they, too, 
may rounder. 

And then there is (Ik Portuguese 
fear of the Spaniards themselves. 
An agreement between the wo 
countries in May provides for 
Spanish access to Portuguese mar- 
kets and to fishing grounds that 
many Portuguese charge the hard- 
fishing Spaniards w31 deplete. 

Spanish entry into the Comma- 
nity is more complex. It is m ore 
industrialized than Portugal, and 
under the high tariff walls erected 
by Franco it became largely sdl-4 
reliant It also sends more than hri* 
its exports to the EC wito wiki 
Spain had a trade surplus of 5173 
million last year. 

The treaty is expected to hot 
such protected Spanish industries 
as automobiles, though Spanish in- 
dustrialists say much will depend 
on the still undecided terms o» the 
co mmuni ty^ compensation. 

Nearly a half milli on dairy fB® - 
era on Spain’s northern coast, 
meanwhile, are likely to fare poorly 
in the face of better and cheaptf 
dairy imparts. Spain's firoil ' airo 
v^etable industry is expected lobe 
the big gainer. 

Spanish and Portuguese officials 
have appealed to i hri r businessm® 
and union leaders to be more coifr 
petitive with other countries-as* 
basic solution. Mr. Gonzilez, has j 
been instituting more rigid wA'c 
hours and loosening laws that pro - “ 
ted workers from bring dismissed 

And both governments, although 
led by Socialists, have been cutti# 

back state industries. 

The changes are part of as al* 
tempt to break with social habits iff 
which wade is Often secondary' w 
family and taxation, and b usines s 
is protected by a paternalistic sfcB 

“1 don't think a Little more liber- 
aHzation, a Utile more competition, 
would be bad motor counoy,” said 
Manuel Marin, Spain’s secretary d 
state for European Community af- 
faire, . .4 

Portugjf s economy minister, 
nitri Lopes, said, “Subcess orfl 
ure depends mainly ca os.” -V 




















































































DNTERNATIONAX HERALD TRIBUNE, "WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 



% * 




u.s. 


j:v r.mtii 

SCTv 


Mr. Shultz visiting die refugee center Tuesday in Thailand. 

Shultz Deflects Aid Plea 
Byfambodian Fighters 


. By Bernard Gwertzman 

New Yak Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 

ad/nmiK liatinn, in ffn effort to head 

off a posable Arab boycott of US 
airliners and ships, has said that its 
plan to isolate Beirut airport was 
.not meant to punish Lebanon. 

The U.S. plan to isolate the air- 
port was announced a week ago 
following the bracking of a Trans 

World Airways plane and the ensu- 
ing hostage crisis in Bonn. 

Washington’s plan indnded a 
ban on Ldhaneseplanes landing at 
U.S. airports and a prohibition on 
U.S. airlines landing in Beirut 
Both of these remain m effect. 

The United Slates also urged 
other countries to bar Lebanese 
planes, and it- sought an interna- 
tional agreement to deny landing 
rights to any country, that allowed 
LebanesepJanes to land. 

But the United States went out 
of its way Monday to say that its 
plan was not aimed at Lebanon or 
at its national carrier, Middle East 
Airlines. Rather, the United States 
. said, it was intended to ensure 
greater security at Beirut Interna- 
tional Airport 

Larry Speak es, the White Hbuse 
spokesman, said: 


. By Don Obcrdorfcr . 

H-'ashmgicm Paa.Service 
BANGKOK . — Secretary of 
" State George P. Shultz received a 
hero's welcome Tuesday from dis- 
‘ placed Cambodians near the Tbai- 
Cambodian border but avoided a 


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dear response to an emotional plea 
for greater U.S. support in their 
battle against Vietnamese occupa- 


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■tion forces. 

Mr. Shultz received the plea in a 
bamboo-and-thatch hut mx miles 
(10 kilometers) inside T hailand in a 
.camp that serves as administrative 
headquarters for 55,000 Cambodi- 
ans driven out of a border camp by 
-Vietnamese attackers Dec. 2S. 

■ Thousands of Cambodians lined 
'(he paths and roadways of the 
camp chanting “USA Number 
One* on cue from cheerleaders and 
holding si gns in En glish appealing 
for guns, education and other U.S. 
aid. 

ThonTbon, administrative chief 
of the camp, known as Evacuation 
Site 7, appealed to Mr. Shultz to 
approve 55 milli on in proposed aid 
to the non-C ammunis t Cambodian 
resistance that is pending in 
amendmen ts before Congress. Site 
7 is organized and led by the 
Khmer People's National libera- 
tion Front, a non-Communist 
group headed by former Prime 
-Minuter Son Sann. 

Mr. Shultz replied that the Unit- 
ed States has been and will contin- 
ue to supply “tangible financial as- 
sistance” to -the Cambodians but 
avoided any mention of UJS. mili- 
tary assistance that has been advo- 
cated. 

In Bangkok, Mr. Shnhz en- 
dorsed economic and humanitarian 
support for the Cambodians but 
agon sidestepped the question of 
mOitaiy aid. If the $5 minion is 
provided by Congress, Mr. Shultz 
added, the funds could be spent to 
meet “economic needs.” 


Thais driven out of border area 
homes and a processing camp for 
Cambodian, Vietnamese and Lao- 
tian refugees hoping to emigrate to 
the United States and other coun- 
tries. 

A total of about 230,000 Cambo- 
dians were driven out of border 
camps and pushed back into Thai- 
land by- a Vietnamese military of- 
fensive late last year and early in 
1985. About 60,000 are organized 
by the Communist Khmer Rouge 
faction headed by Pol Pot, accord- 
ing to a U.S. Embassy nffirial , but 
the rest of the evacuees are led by 
non-Communist groups. 

The Communist Khmer Rouge, 
which is held responsible for more 
than two millions deaths by execu- 
tion and starvation during its dom- 
ination of Camb odia horn 1975 to 
early 1979, led the largest guerrilla 
force attackin g the Vietnamese oc- 
cupation. Hie Khmer Rouge, sup- 
ported mainly by China, has been 
rhetorically condemned by the 
United States but continues to be 
tolerated by Washington as a mem- 
ber of the anti-Vietnamese coali- 
tion and supported by Washington 
as occupant of the Cambodian seat 
in the United Nations. 

China, in addition to supporting 
the Khmer Rouge, provides about 
two-thirds of the military support 
received by the non-Conmranist in- 
surgent groups led by Son S ann 
and Prince Norodom Sihanouk, 

former chief of State of Camhndia, 
according to a Western diplomat 

Thailand and other Asian, na- 
tions haelriwg the npn- Oimfrumis t 
resistance have been urging U.S. 
aid as a means of broadening the 
support base of those groups and 
increasing their strength in relation 
to the Khmer Rouge. 

■ UJS.-Vktoam Pact Urged 

The six-member Association of 
Southeast Asian Nations urged 
Tuesday a normalization ofrek- 
between the United States 


problem of Beirut airport to the 
attention of the international com- 
munity is not to try to punish Leba- 
non or Middle East Airlines. It is, 
rather, an urgent appeal to all who 
have a stake in the safely of inter- 
national civil aviation to find an 
effective way to deal with a severe 
and persistent security problem at 
Beirut airport.” 

The new language on the Beirut 
sanctions was presented because of 
negative reaction both from West- 
ern allies, which have refused to 
join the U.S. sanctions, and from 
friendly Arab . countries, which 
have talked of a countermove to 
boycott U.S. planes and ships. . 

“It is a typical Middle East sna- 
fu," an official said. “Instead of 
getting everyone to crack down on 
the terrorists, the Arabs are blam- 
ing us for the trouble." 

To deal with this criticism, the 
United States recalled that there 
had been six recent hq actings in- 
volving Beirut airport, of which 


five wore of non-U.S. airliners, in- 
cluding some Arab planes. 

■ : “Beirut airport is not a problem 
just for the United States,” said ;he 
Reagan administration. “It is a 
problem for the rest of the world. 
The Beirut airport problem is 
unique in that nowhere else have 
air (mates enjoyed such a permis- 
sive attitude, allowing them to 
come and go and get reinforce- 
ments as they' wish.” 

U.S officials seemed embar- 
rassed by the lack of support for 
the boycott plan. No Western lead- 
er except Prone Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain has endorsed it, 
and she qualified her action by say- 
ing that Britain would not move- 
before consulting its European al- 
lies.' 

A Slate Department official said 
of the allies: “They are discussing it 
' among themselves, and maybe we 
■,'will get seme support” 

But he acknowledged that 
France, Switzerland and Austria 
had already told Lebanon that they 
would not join in the U5. plan. The 
Europeans view the Middle East as 
an important market and do not 
want to cause problems for them- 
selves, the official said. 

Another official said that the 
United Stales was sensitive to Eu- 
ropean reluctance to go along with 
the plan and would not try to com- 
pel their participation. 

“There is no intention to allow 
the Beirut crisis to be transformed 
into an «nieri crisis,” he said. 

The decision to isolate Beirut air- 
port was hmriedly made and an- 
nounced on July 1 at the reported 
insistence of White House officials 
who wanted to show that the Unit- 
ed States was doing something in 
the aftermath of the hostage crisis. 

The Lebanese government, 
which appeared paralyzed during 
the hostage crisis because it did not 
control Beirut airport, appears to 
have been stirred into action by the 
U.S. moves. It instituted new secu- 
rity measures and called cm other 
Arab countries to oppose the U.S. 
sanctions. 

v Syria Called Hostage Key 

A senior Lebanese official said 
Tuesday that Syria was m a posi- 
tion to find and obtain the immedi- 
ate release of 13 foreigners abduct- 
ed in Lebanon, but was bolding 


back until “the right moment,” ac- 
cording to a Reuters dispatch from 

Beirut. 

Any attempt to force the abduc- 
tors to free the hostages “might 
require far more involvement" than 
the Syrians believe appropriate at 
present, the Lebanese added. 

Briefing foreign reporters on the 
condition that his name not be 
used, the official said that he be- 
lieved Syria was ensuring that the 
abductors did not harm their vic- 
tims — seven Americans, four 
French citizens, a Briton and an 
banian. Some of them have been 
held as long as 15 months. 

It was the first time a senior 
Lebanese government figure had 
spoken of the fate of the victims, 
most of whose abductions have 
been claimed in the name of the 
Islamic Jihad, a pro-Iranian, anti- 
Weston group. 

In Damascus, Lebanese Moslem 


leaders announced plans, after 
talks mediated by Syria, to ti gh ten 1 
security at Beirut airport. They 
called for all private militia forces 
to disband and hand over their 
weapons to the Lebanese Army. 

Prime Minister Rashid Karami 
said after the 11-hour meeting, in- 
volving S unni, Shiite and Druze 
leaders, that a plan had been 
agreed upon for a nationwide plan 
to “restore law and order, collect all 
weapons and dissolve all organiza- 
tions possessing weapons.” 

In another development Tues- 
day, a Romanian airliner became 
the first foreign airliner to land in 
Lebanon since the U-S. effort to 
dose Beirut airport. 

Lebanese Foreign Ministry and 
Romanian Embassy officials greet- 
ed the 55 passengers and crew 
members of the Tarom plane as 
they came down the ramp, airport 
sources said. 




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North Korea h Reported to Increase 
Troops in Angola Under Secret Accord 


The Associated Press 

KINSHASA, Zaire — More 
than 3,000 North Korean regular 
troops and 1,000 military advisers 
are now stationed in Angola, West- 
ern military experts said Tuesday. 

The experts, staff members of 
Western embassies in Kinshasa, 
declined to be identified. They said 
that there had been a steady in- 
crease in the number of North Ko- 
rean soldiers in Angola following 
the conclusion of a still secret 
agreement between the two govern- 
ments two years ago. 

For several years, about 25.000 
Cuban troops have helped the An- 


golan government fight Jonas Sa- 
vimbi's National Union for the To- 
tal Independence of Angola, 
known as UNITA. The informants 
did not indicate whether the North 
Koreans were also in action against 
UNITA. 

They said that the North Kore- 
ans were stationed in spatial camps 
north of the Angolan capitalof Lu- 
anda, where the advisers were giv- 
ing training to guerrillas of the 
South-West African People's Orga- 
nization from South-West Africa, 
the African National Congress 
from South Africa and the sons of 
former Katanga gendarmes from 
Zaire. 


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17 Die in Car Bombings 
In Southern Lebanon 


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The Associated Press 

TEL AVTV — Two suicide car- 
bombers killed 15 f/tharnw mili - 
tiamea and civilians and wounded 
two Israeli soldiers Tuesday in 
southern l-ab^no", the Israeli mili- 
tary command and other sources 
said. ' 

The attacks came within about 
15 minutes ct each other at check- 
points linking the Israeli security 
zone in southern Lebanon with the . 
rest of the country. Both drivers 
were also IdBed in the attacks. 

These attacks were the worst in- 
cidents against Israel and its Leba- 
nese alHes since Israeli forces com- 
pleted their pullout from southern 
Lebanon on June 10. 

Israeli military sources said 13 
Lebanese civilians and two mem- 


The military command said two 
Israeli soldiers attached to the Is- 
raeli Army liaison unit in southern 
Lebanon were slightly wounded 
when a second Lebanese car ex- 
ploded at Ras al-Biyada, on the 
coastal road about four miles (6j4 
kilometers) north of the Israeli bor- 
der. 

The soldiers were evacuated for 
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northern Israeli town of Naliar- 
iyya, mxhtaxy sources said. 

- Military officials say no more 
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Nkomo Says Mugabe Backers Killed 2 Party Foes 


Reuters 

HARARE, Zimbabwe — - The 
chief opposition leader in Zimba- 
bwe, Joshua Nkomo, said Tuesday 
that two nffiriala of his party in 
Harare were killed Monday night 


-.p .Prime Minister Robert Mugabe. 

’.-inf He said by telephone that both 
•'r.‘ .iwere cflnriiriaipy in last week’s Kn- 
. era! elections that returned Mr. 

Mugabe to power with a landslide 
victory. 

Mr. Nkomo said he had no de- 
- tails about how the two men, Si- 
mon Chahuruka and William 
' Gudu, had been killed. 


But he charged that those re- 
sponsible were followers of Mr. 
Mugabe’s ruling Zimbabwe Afri- 
can National Union-Patriotic 
Front who have been ransacking 
houses of opposition members in 
black townships in the capital since 
' Saturday when the poll r«ults were 
announced. 

There was no immediate govern- 
ment comment an the alleged kill- 
ings. 

At least one person has been re- 
ported killed and scores of others 
injured in the violence, the worst 
since campaigning for the poll 
started a month ago. 


Mr. Nkomo said another official 
of his party, the Zimbabwe African 
People’s Union, Kenneth Mano, 
the treasurer, was in a critical con- 
dition in hospital here after being 
stabbed by supporters of Mr. Mu- 
gabe’s party. 

“It is plain official killing of peo- 
ple, burning and looting of their 
property,” Mr. Nkomo said. "The 
ruling party is punishing people” 
for not supporting it 

Thousands of Mr. Mugabe's fol- 
lowers patrolled Harare's tense 
black townships Tuesday, warning 
opposition members whom they 
evicted from their houses over the 


weekend to stay outside car face 
tough action. 

Gangs of several hundred sup- 
porters of the ruling party chanted 
slogans and sang as they moved 
front house to house, halting traffic 
in some instances. 

The ruling party captured 63 of 
the 79 contested seats in the elec- 
tions. the first since Zimbabwe’s 
independence in 1980. 

The opposition group won 15, all 
from its stronghold of southern 
Matabddand province, and one 
was taken by the Reverend Nda- 
Hflningi Si thole’s minori ty opposi- 
tion party. 


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Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


Hcralb 


international 


PuUnhed WWi The Hew York Time* md TV W«WngifflaPoM 


Sfrthitnp Dramatic Retaliation Is Not a Real Option 

vJ'llvUUV* r>„ W3i: , , ROM 


By William Pfaff 


Stronger Action on Deficit 


Real progress against the U.S. deficit re- 
quires action both stronger and more even- 
handed than either President Ronald R eagan 
or Congress has endorsed so far. That means 
(be president must give some ground on taxes. 

Budget conferees have been deadlocked by 
Senate insistence on a certain level of defense 
spending and by House insistence on keeping 
Social Security benefits even with the cost of 
living. But even if those differences could be 
resolved, neither of the budget plans on which 
the conferees have been working would do 
much to narrow future deficits. Both plans rely 
substantially on accounting devices and on 
questionable promises of congressional action 
two or three years hence. 

To overcome the impasse a bipartisan group 
of Senate budget committee members has put 
together a plan lo reduce next year’s deficit by 
S70 billion. With economic good luck, the plan 
could come close to balancing the budget in 
five years. It is not an airtight solution, but it 
does not rely on unrealistic promises. 

The plan asks the House to agree to a one- 
year omission of cost-of-Kving adjustments for 
Social Security and all other government pen- 
sions except those restricted to the needy. Bui 
this pause does not set a precedent for further 
cuts in the cost-of-living adjustments, as the 


original Senate plan would. Moreover, roughly 
S2 billion is set aside to offset benefit losses to 
lower-income people — not an easy idea to 
administer but an important protection. Other 
safeguards for the needy, including job train- 
ing and housing programs, are maintained. 

The Senate would be asked to give more on 
defense spending. Defense spending authority 
would grow next year by wbat the Pentagon 
says would be needed to keep up with price 
increases and in years after that by inflation 
plus 3 percent. The defense spending base 
would be reduced to reflect at least part of past 
over-estimates of inflation. Actual military 
spending would rise substantially because of 
unused past spending authority. 

In return for these compromises, the presi- 
dent would be asked to go along with revenue 
increases of about $60 billion over three years. 
Although fairness would suggest that tax bikes 
be focused on higher-income taxpayers, the 
gpal could be met by alternatives such as an 
energy tax and retention of the cigarette tax. 
The president may note that the plan is incon- 
sistent with his proposed tax reforms. But tax 
reform does not seem to be going anywhere 
with either Congress or the public, while the 
deficit remains out of control 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Nemesis: A Monstrous Idea? 


No one has yet figured out the long-standing 
mystery of who murdered the dinosaurs, but 
the plot recently thickened when a new batch 
of suspects were added to the usual EsL They 
were various extraterrestrial mechanisms, 
headed by a mysterious death star named 
Nemesis, which supposedly dispatches squads 
of meteorites to crash into Earth at regular 
intervals of 26 mtffi on years. Disappointingly, 
Nemesis and fellow colorful characters have 
now virtually beat ruled out of existence by 
new evidence published in Nature magazine. 

The idea of regular extinctions of life on 
Earth came from two scientists who claimed to 
have found a pattern in the disappearance of 
fossils from the geological record. Instead of 
just the dinosaur extinction of 65 minion years 
ago. this gave multiple mysteries to solve, and 
induced a flurry of ingenious speculation from 
astronomers as to how Earth might run into a 
rain of meteorites every 26 million years. 

The basis of these theories may have crum- 


bled into statistical dust. Antoni Hoffman, of 
the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory 
in Palisades, New York, argues that the appar- 
ent periodicity of extinctions in the fossil re- 
cord is probably an accidental byproduct of 
the method used to count them. In essence, a 
high extinction rate was assumed to have oc- 
curred during any geological stage with more 
extinctions than the stages before or after it. 
But that definition biases the counting toward 
periodicity, indeed makes likely that one stage 
in four will at random seem to be a peak of 
extinction. Since the average geological stage 
lasts 6J2 million years, the alleged 26- million- 
year periodicity “does not significantly deviate 
from expectation.’' Mr. Hoffman concludes. 

If that analysis bolds up, all candidates for 
periodic extinctions expire. A meteorite might 
have polished off the dinosaurs. But until its 
place of impact is discovered, why rule out 
terrestrial suspects — like change of climate? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Opinion 


Hie Fight Against Marxism 


With the encouragement of President Ron- 
ald Reagan, some members of the Congress 
are working to dear the way for a second 
“contras” front, extending the battle against 
Marxist rulers from Nicaragua to Angola. This 
is a reckless and unwise move, and it is certain 
to do more harm than good. 

The Senate already has approved legislation 
that would lift the legislative prohibition on 
US. aid to the National Union for the Total 
Independence of Angola, or UNITA, the guer- 
rilla force battling the Marxist government of 
Angola. Some Republicans in the House, fear- 
ful that the Senate initiative may not survive a 
conference committee, plan a similar action as 
an amendment to the foreign aid bOL 

This mischievous move is bong encouraged 
by the administration just as Mr. Reagan per- 


Tbe legislative ini native follows the president’s 
message last month to Lewis E. Lehrmaa, the 
New York Republican who was an organizer 
of the meeting of leaders of UNITA as well as 
guerrillas from Nicaragua, Afghanistan and 
Laos. Mr. Reagan praised them for straggling 
“to free their nations from outside domination 
and an alien ideology,” and added: “Their 
goals are our goals." 

That was a threat. It was a call to arms on 
three continents. It was a marshaling of CIA 
intervention around the world. If the president 
was serious, he needs to explain the details to 
Congress. If be was posturing. Congress would 
be wise to keep the legislative restrictions on 
guerrilla aid in Angola, as it has maintained 
the ban on arms for Nicaraguan rebels. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


sonally encouraged a conclave last month of 
anti-Conununisl guerrillas meeting at a rebel 
encampment in Angola. Both initiatives are 
serving once again to divert the nations erf 
southern Africa from the priorities of getting 
on with independence for Namibia and bring- 
ing concerted pressure on South Africa to end 
its apartheid policy. And they are serving to 
cloud the American commitment against ter- 
rorism and the rule of violence. 

The congressional sponsors’ motivation is 
ideological. They seem to see any Marxist 
government as an instrument of Sown policy, 
as the enemy of America. And they see Ango- 
la. tike Nicaragua, as particularly menacing 
because both are hosts to Cuban forces. They 
ignore the fact that the U-S.-supported contras 
in Nicaragua, tike the South African-spon- 
sored UNITA guerrillas in Angola, are the 
principal justification used by the Marxist rul- 
ers of Nicaragua and Angola for maintaining 
Cuban forces. And they risk weakening re- 
gional peace efforts already underway. 

Administration officials defend their sup- 


Thtrd World and Abortion 


port of lifting restrictions on coven aid w 
UNITA in Angola as a matter of principle, 
saying that they support all legislative action 
that eliminates restrictions on the ability of the 
president to pursue foreign policy objectives. 


FROM OUR JULY 10 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Appraising Britain's Monarchy 
LONDON — The cost of the Crown is com- 
mented upon in The News of the World: “The 
cost of the crown to this wealthy nation is a 
sum less than £1,000,000. For this we enjoy all 
the stability of the monarchical system; all the 
dignity attaching to a history of Kingship 
extending back to the misty beginnings of our 
chronicles; ail the power and prestige, too, 
attaching to the possession erf a world-wide 
Empire, the component parts of which could 
perhaps be held together by no other bond 
than the sentiment of loyalty to our ancient 
crown.” Lloyd’s Weekly News adds: “One 
may fed assured that the public, as well as the 
Houses of Parliament wDI prefer that the occu- 
pant of the throne shall be in position to serve 
the nation unhampered by any feeling that his 
reward has been grudgingly bestowed.” 


1935: Settlers Flee Alaskan F^rms 
SEATTLE — Picturing the Matanuska Valley 
of Alaska as a dusty, mosquito-infested coun- 
try. instead of as a promised land, thirty-one 
members of the 400 California Transient 
Camp workers who went north to prepare 
homestead sites for mid-western settlers have 
returned to Seattle disillusioned. All but three 
of the returning party had asked to leave, one 
of the men said He added that 178 more of the 
workers' group had begged to come with them, 
but were told there was no room more aboard 
the southbound ship. There are now. some 200 
families quartered near Palmer, where the gov- 
ernment is aiding them to get settled on forty 
acres each. “Three women begged me to give 
them my identification tag so they could snip 
their hair, put ou men’s clothing and get back 
to the States.” said raw returned worker. 


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U.h suhsenpnat: S32. yearly. Sccernd-dax postage paid at Long Island Cin. N. Y. /HOI. 
1985, haemamel Herald Tribune. All rigfas reserved. 


SR' 



P ARIS — William J. Casey of the 
CIA has asked for more money 


After strong bipartisan support for 20 years, 
and the endorsement of five administrations, a 


major battle is shaping up in the U.S. Congress 
to eliminate voluntary family planning pro- 


L CIA has asked for more money 
for “human intelligence” to help the 
United States strike back at terror- 
ism, as President Ronald Reagan has 
promised. This responds to the frus- 
tration /eli by Americans ai the ap- 
parent lack of anything very effective 
10 do about terrorism. One can try to 
find the hijackers of the TWA airliner 
seized June 14. as Mr, Reagan is 
doing. One can pressure such politi- 
cal authorities as have an influence 
on the situation, as Mr. Reagan is 
doing who) be accuses five nations of 
“acts of war" against the United 
States. One can improve airport and 
aircraft security, which is dull and 
defensive. People want dramatic, ca- 
thartic action. They are unlikely to 
get it . 

“Human intelligence," in Mr. Ca- 
sey's useof that banusing term, is the 
reliable and most difficult kind 
of intelligence to obtain, supremely 


Arms Pact 
Future Is 
Now at Risk 


m, 



By William Epstein 


N EW YORK — Last week 
marked the 17th anniversary of 


flSPrtW 


(MlfflflCOODDP 


* V|H 

m 


so when one is dealing with a society, 
as in the Eastern Mediterranean, 
whose norms and frame of reference 
differ radically from one’s own. 

The wartime and immediate post- 
war experience of Allied intelligence 
is instructive. The successes were 
nearly all scientific — breaking ene- 
my codes, reading German and Japa- 
nese communications, turning Ger- 
man radio direction, photo and 
satellite reconnaissance, seismic and 
other means for monitoring nuclear 
experiments and so forth. 

“Human” effort was successful 
during the war mainly in deceiving 


this was chiefly by means of counter- 
intelligence. the manipulation of 
German and Italian spies. Offensive 
intelligence, except for that obtained 
through national resistance groups, 
was generally unsatisfactory. 

Tim penetration of religiously mo- 
tivated Islamic activist groups in the 
Middle East is far more diffiotlt than 


gathering intelligence in German-oc- 
cupied Europe, or even in the Soviet 


Union, where spies have sometimes 
been bought, and where a decadent 
ideology sometimes works against 
the regime. The risks of attempting to 
work through local groups in the 
Middle East — whose inevitable in- 


terest is to manipulate the United 
States to their own ends — was made 
dear by the recent affair of the Beirut 
car bomb, placed on their own initia- 
tive by a group in touch with the CIA. 
Eighty people died in the blast. 

It is indispensable that public ex- 
pectations be lowered, not raised, 
about what can be done about terror- 
ism. There are people in the White 
House who understand this. Two ex- 
tremely interesting interviews were 
given the press just after the TWA 
hostages’ release by the national se- 
curity adviser, Robert MdFarlane, 
and a long briefing was distributed 
by the U.S. Information Service by a 
“senior U.S. official” — probably 
Mr. McFatlane again. Reiterated 
themes in these were that blind retri- 
bution and “impulsive violence” are 
senseless and useless, and that there 
are severe limits on what can be done 
about terrorism as a general problem. 
“Vengeance is not a satisfactory basis 
for policy," the senior official says. . 

In striking contrast to this has been 
a press damor for cathartic violence, 
expressing considerable indifference 


to who actually may be responsible 
fra- a given terrorist action, and at- 
tributing. instead, something that 
looks very much like collective guilt 


invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. 
In the Beirut hostage affair be would 
have destroyed Beirut airport and at- 
tacked Iran as wriL Shiite terrorist 


The “nuke Beirut” attitude is wide- bases in Beirut and the Bckaa valley 
Iv expressed, and in some ^uprising would have been bombed. 

• * ^ mem ** Tf fTtl* f H,. XT^i V neb 


quarters. David S. Broder of The 
Washington Post proposed that 
henceforth the United Sates attack 


ashington Post 


sed that 


within 72 hours any nation at all 
“that allows terrorists to hold Ameri- 
cans hostage on its territory.” He 
argued, “If any nation is so heedless 
of the wanting as to tolerate the ter- 
rorists then that nation and its people 
will have involved themselves in the 
crime — and win suffer the punish- 
ment.” How this could possibly be 
useful in the case of Lebanon, were 
government scarcely exists, and the 
nation has been at war with itself for 
years, is not evident. 

Another writer in the same news- 
paper, Charles Krauthammer, wants 
r ‘disprqportionate response" (IHT, 
June 22 J He rates, as examples of 
how these matters ought to be han- 
dled, the crushing of the Solidarity 
movement in Poland and Russia’s 


William Satire of The New York 
Times (IHT, July 5) also wantedBd- 
rut airport and “terrorist centers” de- 
stroyed. and Greece punished as well 
— probably thrown out of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

One is terribly struck not only by 
the ignorance revealed in these com- 
ments of the actual circumstances in 
the Eastern Mediterranean, but by 
the arrogance. Was Iran really re- 
sponsible for the hijacking, or the 
Sbiites at Bonn airport and in the 
ifrfraq valley, or Smites as arch, or 


friarn — Moslems in general — or the 
three men who actually set out to do 


the job? It does, after all, make a 
difference. Even more, one is struck 
by the apparent hatred being ex- 
pressed, an indiscriminate hatred. Is 
this what we have come to? If so, a Jot 
erf killing lies ahead of us. 

© 1985 William Pfaff. 


the signing of the Nuclear Nonprolif- 
eration Treaty, one of the most im- 
portant documents of the nuclear 
age. The treaty comes up for review 
in August with its future in peril. 

In simplest terms, the treaty is a 
bargain between the major nuclear 
powers, the United States, the Soviet 
Union and Britain, and the non-nu- 
clear countries to prevent the further 
proliferation of nuclear weapons. 
The non-nuclear nations agreed not 
to acquire the weapons. In exchange, 
the nuclear powers pledged to negoti- 
ate an early halt in the nuclear arms 
race and then nuclear disarmament. 

At the first review, in 1975, the 
non-nuclear parties said that they 
had lived up to their pan of the 
bargain but the nuclear powers had 
not. In a compromise final declara- 
tion. the nudear powers promised to 
try harder to carry out their treaty- 
obligations, and the conference was a 
partial success. The second review, in 
1980. ended in failure without any 
final declaration or even a reaffirma- 
tion of support for the treaty, because 
the nudear powers would not budge 
on the issue of a nudear lest ban. 

At both conferences, the main de- 
mand of the neutral and noualigned 
countries was that the nuclear powers 
comply with their treaty obligation 
“to pursue negotiations in good faith 
on effective measures relating to ces^ 
sation of the nuclear arms race at an 
early date and to nudear disarma- 
ment,” What this means, they said, 
was that the major powers must place 
a moratorium on underground nucle- 
ar tests, then follow with substantial 
reductions in nudear weapons, which 
is the reverse of the order advocated: 
by the United Stales. The non-nucle- 
ar countries regard an end to under- 
ground testing as the most important 


and feasible single step toward halt- 
ing further proliferation of nuclear 
weapons by both the nudear and 
non-nuclear countries alike. 

In the last five years, unlike the 
periods before the first and second 
review conferences, there has beeano 
progress whatever on anymeasure of 
nudear arms control The nudear 
race is proceeding at the fastest pace 
ever the promising negotiations by 
the three nudear powers for an un- 
derground test ban were suspended 
in 1980 and the United States refuses 
to resume them; there is the posable 
new threat of “star wars” and a race 
in both offensive and defensive wrap- j 

ons in outer space; the renewed | 
American-Soviet talks in Geneva on 
outer space, intermediate-range and 
strategic nudear weapons seem stale- 
mated; global military expenditures 





The Innocent Will Suffer 
From Call for Reprisals 


By Richard Cohen 


< > ' * . 


INTERNATIONAL 

AIRPORT 

NEXT 4 EXITS 


BS j 'j J I BOMB 1 g j SWAT } ; (ameu^ 

|l* j- { j j ; UH 4 ;S j aty 

" " iir 



to eliminate voluntary family planning pro- 
grams in the developing world. 

Lawmakers such as Senator Jesse Helms, a 
Repnblican of North Carolina, Representative 
Jack Kemp, a Republican of New York and 
Representative Christopher Smith, a Republi- 
can of New Jersey, are attaching amendments 
to the foreign aid bilL If the amendments are 
approved, they will cut off major funding for 
overseas family planning assistance. The pre- 
text for their actions are allegations of coerced 
abortions and infanticide in China, which no- 
body condones. In fact, abortion and coercive 
programs are expressly prohibited by the Mex- 
ico City Recommendations, the World Popu- 
lation Plan of Action and the Universal Decla- 
ration of Human Rights, all of which cover tire 
types of projects supported by the United 
Nations Fund for Population Activities. 

As no U.S. funds are used directly or indi- 
rectly for abortion or coercion programs, in 
China or elsewhere, the proposed amendments 
are unnecessary and irrelevant. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 



W ASHINGTON — A newspaper 
prints a cartoon in which Pres- 
ident Ronald Reagan is shown stand- 
ing at a lectern, nuking a speech 
about “Moslem terrorism.” The car- 
toon is supposed to be about the 
president’s inaction in dealing with 
such terrorism. But what it is really 
about is Arab bashing. 

It is another example of how some 
people have used the TWA hijacking 
to declare open season on all Arabs. 
Fra- instance, a cartoonist thinks it is 
permissible to talk of “Moslem ter- 
rorism” when be would never use the 
term “Christian terrorism” to de- 
scribe events in El Salvador, Chile or, 
even, the bombings, kiHiMS and oth- 
er outrages of the Irish Republican 
Amy. And few speak of “Christian 
terrorism” in Lebanon. 

Similarty, others have not heatated 
to recommend some sort of retalia- 
tion for the TWA hijacking in which 
the innocent would suffer along with 
— or even more than — the guilty. 
AH that seems to matter is that Arabs 
get punished for the crimes erf other 
Arabs. It is as if all Arabs are guilty 
for the acts of a few — a conspiracy 
of several hundred million people, 


depending whether you think all 
Moslems or just Arabs should suffer. 

Even the Reagan administration 
has joined the bandwagon of Arab 
bashing. It has, for instance, asked 
the cmazed world to join it in saving 
away from the Beirut airport and has 
turned that sorry strip into a symbol 


of terrorism and lawlessness. It seems have risen to SI trillion a year, and 


that no one in the administration there are new fears of a “nudear 


remembers that TWA flight 847 took winter” that could make our phnd 


off from Athens, landed trace is Al- 
giers and was, on its second trip to 
Beirut, refused permission to land. 

Of course, it is true that Beirut 
itself is a mess of warring factions 
and that the area around the airport 
is controlled by Amal and not whai is 


uninhabitable. The non-nuclear 
countries are more than frustrated: 
They fed they have been duped by 
the nudear powers. 

Worse, the number of countries 
that now have or will soon have thfl 
capability to conduct a nudear ex- 


left of th e central government But if plosion is growing. Two nudear poffc 
TWA 847 was coming into John F. ers, China and France, and India, 
Kennedy in New York and the hi- which has exploded a “peaceful" bu- 
jackershadthreatenedtoblowupthe dear devioe, are not parties to the 


plane with a hand grenade, it would treaty. But India is not such an im- 
nave been given permission to land, portant “near-nuclear” power as Ar- 


il is probably true that the admin- 
istration had to do something after 
die hijacking and maybe, given (he 
bomb-’em-kul-’em suggestions puls- 


gentina, Brazil, Israel, Pakistan, 
South Africa and Spain. Some esti- 
mates suggest that 15 countries could , 
acquire a nudear capability in one or * 


fiv » 1.-.. 


in g from journalists’ typewriters, a two years, a dozen more could do so 
boycott of the airport was the most in five or six years, and perhaps a 


boycott of the airport was the most in five or six years, and perhaps a 
reasonable act suggested. But i( is further 20 by the end of the century- 


Gorbachev: Exploiting U.S. Weak Spots 

N EW YORK — A first goal of By Sewcrvn Bialer to lose in Central America. Its 

Mikhail S. Gorbachev's ■ ' aidtothe revolutionary forces b 

This u the second of three ankles. 


also true that the airport itself had 
almost nothing to do with the track- 
ing and that boycotting it and huddle 
East Airlines amounts to punishing 


the innocent just because they hap- have no new plans that could avert a 
pen to be in the same neighborhood repeat failure at the forthcoming re- 


emerging foreign policy is to hard- 
en the Soviet image abroad after & 
time of relative passivity. 

Evidence of Soviet pressure on 
Eastern Europe comes from sources 
who attended the meeting of the 
Council for Mutual Economic As- 


Union can. and increasingly mil, 
aggravate and exploit them. 

One example is Pakistan, which 
may become the most likely area of 
Soviet-American confrontation. 


sistance, or Comecon, earlier this The confluence of a number of Eac- 


year. At these talks, the Russians 
wco-e partially successful in raising 
prices for Soviet goods and lower- 
ing prices and improving the quali- 
ty of goods imported from coun- 
tries in Eastern Europe. 

Another example of the current 
hard line can be seen in Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s policy on Afghanistan. Sovi- 
et military pressure in the dvil war 
in Afghanistan has increased, while 
rfforts to dose the lifeline of anti- 
Communist guerrillas from Paki- 
stan has dramatically intensified. 
The scorched earth policy lo de- 
stroy the guerrillas’ infrastructure 
has become even more ruthless. 

Whatever the frustrations of the 
Russians in their prolonged Afghan 
adventure, there is no sign that un- 
der the new leadership they win 
settle for less than a secure Commu- 
nis! government in Kabul 

In Angola and Ethiopia, the ar- 
eas of especially active Soviet inter- 
vention in the 1970s, the Soviets 
seem determined to continue com- 
mitments involving their prestige. 

The second basic goal is to dam- 
age significantly the current image 
of the United Stales in the interna- 
tional arena. In the last several 
years, while the Russians have ei- 
ther been passive or reactive in their 
foreign policy, the image of Ameri- 
ca as a strong and decisive global 
power was revived. It is imperative 
for Mr. Gorbachev to undermine 
the impression of American ascen- 
dancy by, exposing and expiating 
areas of American weakness. 

There are a number of trouble 
spots in the world today where, by 
choice or necessity, the interests of 
the United States are engaged. Al- 
though the roots of these troubles 
are domestic and regional and wore 
not created by Moscow, the Soviet 


tors leads to such a conclusion. The 
internal stability of Pakistan is 
questionable. Soviet help to those 
who oppose the present regime in- 
side Pakistan may be effective. 

Pakistan may soon be able to 
produce nuclear weapons, which 


tittle to lore in Central America. Its 
aid to the revolutionary forces is 
indirect and on a scale that pre- 
cludes a Soviet-U-S. confrontation 
era the scale of the Cuban missile 
crisis. What Moscow wants is to pot 
America in a no-win situation. 

Even if the U.S. Congress relaxes 
its stringent restraints era aid to the 
N i ca r ag u a n “contras,” Soviet and 


pen to be in the same neighborhood 
as the guilty. When it comes to satis- view. A second failure would serious- 
fybag the demand for a lynching, it ly damage the treaty itsdf, which re- 
does not matter who gets kinged mains the main bulwark against 
But it matters to the hanged and nuclear proliferation, 
their relatives. Arabs are already The Soviet Union has offered to 
troubled by an atmosphere in Amen- resume negotiations for a compre- 
ca where it seems reasonable to pro- hentive test han and to institute ? 
pose p u n i s h i ng people whore only moratorium on nuclear tasting on 
“guilt* is their religion or their lan- Aug. 6, the 40th anniversary ofHiro- 


Almost one-third erf these are not 
parties to the treaty. The nuckar 
powers seem unwilling or unabk to 
race up to the danger. They appear to 
have qo new plans that could avert s 


does not matter who gets hanged. 
But it matters to the hanged and 


their relatives. Arabs are already 
troubled by an atmosphere in Ameri- 
ca where it seems reasonable to pro- 


Cuban help is sufficient to assure 
the survival of the Sandimst regime 


Moscow wants America 


m a no-icm situation. 


might well invite a pre-emptive In- 
dian fltiarJc against Pakistan’s nu- 
clear facilities. Pakistan is under 
much increased Soviet pressure to 
end its role as a haven for Afghan 
refugees and a training base for 
Afghan marinas. Sennet attacks 
against Pakistani territory border- 


uiicantrv in 1985. The ability of the 
United States lo provide defective 
military support to the Pakistani 
regime is limited. All these factors 
make (he regional situation in 
South Asia potentially explosive. 

Another example of a trouble 
spot ripe for Soviet exploitation is 
Central America, particularly Nica- 
ragua. The Russians seem to be 


happy with the extraordinary U.S. 
preoccupation with Central Ameri- 
ca. They maybe particularly grati- 
fied that the Reagan administration 
made of Nicaragua a cause c£I£bre, 
guaranteeing that the survival of 
the Sandinist government will be 
widely seen as a major U.S. defeat 
President Daniel Ortega Saave- 
dra of Nicaragua met with Mr. 
Gorbachev this spring in Moscow. 
The talks signified an increased So- 
viet interest in Central America and 
an upgrading of the Soviet commit- 
ment to provide military and eco- 
nomic aid. The Soviet union has 


the survival of the Sandimst regime 
— short of a U.S. invasion. After all 
the Reagan administration ’s rheto- 
ric about the strategic significance 
of Nicaragua, the Sandimsts will be 
a glaring example of U3. impo- 
tence. On the other hand, an inva- 
sion of Nica r agua would brand the 
United States as an imperialist 
power in the Third World and also 
among U.S. allies in Europe. 

Another key example cf Ameri- 
can vulnerability is the PhflippiMS, 
a time bomb dose to exploding. 
The unfortunate situation in the 
Philippines resembles the Iranian 
situation of (he late 1970s. The key 
difference is that the major anti- 
regime forces are not Moslem fun- 
damentalists but primarily leftist 
revolutionaries sympathetic to fee 
Soviet Union. Soviet hdp for the 
FiKpino rebels would appear to of- 
fer too «X)d an opportunity to di- - 
mimsh U.S. international stature 
for the Russians to pass irnp. 

The United States seems to have 
ho attractive options to counter the 
approaching disaster. A policy of 
total support for President Ferdi- 
nand E Marcofi is doomed to faiL 
The military forces in the Philip- 
pines are too dosety connected with. 
Mr. Marcos to provide an alterna- 
tive; The democratic forces in the 
Philippines are disjointed. 

There are many other areas 
where the Soviet Union can try to 
harass the United States — the po- 
lentially unstable situation on the 
Korean peninsula, or the Middle 
East, particularly Egypt, where 
there are severe domestic problems. 


wtucu toe value ot Human tile seems respon 
to be diminiri ied by color of sltin, the The 

manner of worship or the language robes 
spoken. It is as if Arab life is not the can be 
equal of non-Arab life, as if the con- 
stant killing of the innocent in the The 
Middle East gives us the right to take the UN 
the same sort of action. Our defau- search, 
maturing rhetoric, in which deaths do tionsle 


rehen- shima. America has brushed off bo& 
rere in proposals, but it is important that k 
seems respond with some positive proposal 
in, fee The nonproliferation treaty needs 


The nonproliferation treaty neats 
to be strengthened, not weakowd. U 

can be— u America takes the Iea<L 


The writer, a senior spcddJfetio* & 
the UN Institute for Tra ining and Re- 
search, represented the UN in negotia- 
tions leading to the Nudear Not wroty 


not matter, says nothing about Arabs erosion Treaty and attended die 1975 


but a lot about us. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


and 1980 review conferences. J Is W 
tributed this to The New York Tantar 


LETTER^ TO THE EDITOR 
Hie Cyprus Question ^ cypn»repubUc 


lne Cyprus Question the Cyprus republic. “Butchery” is* 

; r x strong word. Even though it coda 

The “LcUere to the Editor” column not be used in respect erf me Hnfona-. 
on June 21 was taken up almost com- nate interconunuoal incidents in Cy- 
pletely .by two letters expres si ng the prus in 1964. which, in any casCsVRSC 
Turkish views on the Cyprus prob- started by extremist Turkish Cypriot 
iem, and on Turkey's designs u the dements to further Turkey's tartf* 


Turkish views on the Cyprus prob- 
lem, and on Turkey's designs m the 
Aegean. The lettos contain several 
misleading statements. > 

“Equal partnership between the 
two communities in Cyprus” is the 
slogan used to Justify, fee arbitrary 
demand feat fee Turkish Cynriot 


tiomst aims, it COtlld VQTy 


applied to the abominable actions ef 
fee Turkish troops in 1974 for which 


the Turkish troops in 1974 for which 
Turkey has been ctmdeixined by fee. 
Human Rights Commission of ih^ 
Council of Europe. ' *- 


slogan used to Justify, fee arbitrary Human Rights Ccramdsson of ti*/.-: 
demand feat fee Turkish Cypriot Councfl of Europe. *- 

community, which is 18 percent of Turkey’s dram to a “fair share" of 

the population, should have an equal fee Aegean is dulling reminder of tM £ 
say wife fee ofeer 82 percent of fee “fair share” sbe t±rimc in Cyprus; 37 ij 
population. This is contrary not only percent of. fee territory, from-whiefc «<■'■ 
to any concept of democracy but also «bout 82 percent of the popuhtkrarf V 
to the letter and spirit of the 1960 that' area has been forcibly expdksf 
Cyprus constitution of which Turkey by the Turkish army, for 18 nercerit C 


to any concept of democracy but also 
to the letter and spirit of the 1960 


Cyprus constitution of which Turkey by the Turkish army, for 18 percent 
claims to be a guarantor. We are erf" of fee population. - 


uomic aid. The Soviet Union has 


The writer, professor cf poMcol sd- 
enceatCohorfoaUmvenaty, contribut- 
ed this to The Washington Post 


course prepared to accept reasonable Fumy, allow me to concede that 1 « 

(feeds and balances to ensure fee tbse is indeed controversy and poht' % i ' f '- • 
legitimate rights and interests of our ical. argument in Cyprus. Cyprus fe jV;' \ 
Turkish Cypriot compatriots in a fu> after au & democracy. It most be 
lure agreed federal system. noted, however, that the oppositioB i: - . 

A threat cannot be dismissed as a parties in Cyprus also blame Tur- '£■ 
mere “smoke screen” particularly key’s intranagence for the continuing :■ r 
when one has in mind that in the case deadlock: in the Cyprus problem. ■. 
of Cyprus this has already material- ; PETROS MICHAEIJDES.3 \ r 
ized rn fee form of an mvation, viqla- Ambassador.^ ^ ; ' -- 

tions of h um a n rights and contouring- The Republic of Cyprus Embassy^ ” :rv 
occupation of part of fee territory trf -pans.;'' ^-1. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


Page7 


INSIGHTS 


Weapons Buying: A Better Way? 

U.S., Shaken by Scandals, Finds Allies Do It Differently 


By Rick Atkinson 
and Fred Hiatt 

Washington Past Serricr 

1 0ND0N — When, more than a decade 
ago, the sun threatened to set on the 
J British arms industry, the government 
turned to a man who knew more about textiles 
than he did about missiles, planes, ships or guns. 

As one British officer put it, Derek Rayner 
was at first looked upon by the military as a 
“ladies panties man." He was a shrewd manag- 
er of Marks & Spencer department stores, bnt 
an ignoramus when it came to weapons. 

Unperturbed, the store manager pounced on 
Britain’s arms makers in 1971 with missionary 
zeaL For his gospel, he brandished a command- 
ment from the prime minister: Shove the gpner - 
als aside and drum some business sense into Her 
Majesty’s government’s weapons buying — at 
the time burdened with cost overruns and ineffi- 
ciency. For his efforts, he is now Lord Rayner. 

*7 always remember the general who said, *It 
doesn’t matter what it costs, as long as we get 
what we want,* ” Lord Rayner recalled with a 
chuckle. “And I said, *0h, ho, it matters now. 7 " 
' As the United States wrestles with its own 
cost and quality problems, many would-be re- 
formers of US. habits are casting abroad for 
solutions. It is becoming accepted wisdom that, 
in addition to the kind of common sense dis- 
played by Lord Rayner, the Europeans are 
worth emulating for their civilian control of 
arms buying and tight ran on military contrac- 
tors. 

Congressional experts and even President 
Ronald Reagan’s Grace Commission, studying 
ways to make government more efficient, have 
endorsed the idea of an independent arms-buy- 
ing agency similar to that began by Lord 
Rayner. Other studies laud the ranch system, 
dabbed by a recent report of the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency as “perhaps the world’s most 
efficient. The U.S. General Accounting Office 
has investigators traveling from Tel Aviv to 
Bonn looking for more clever ways to buy arms. 
‘ In. fact, the Europeans do some things better 
than the United States, but they also do some 
thin gs worse. Above all, they do most things 
very differently. As seen from Europe’s defease 
ministries, the U.S. war machine is clearly one 
of akind. 

The different nature of US. defense and 
democracy raises questions about the extent to 
which European iotas could take root in Wash- 
ington. For one tiring, there is nothing in the ra 
of the West remotely approaching the U^. mili- 
tary in ipyg- The Pentagon spends mare in an 
afternoon than the British armed farces spend 
maweek. 

‘ Furthermore, regardless of how Congress and 


stalled in a U.SL wBitaiy plant "Wdl it “goldplating 1 
wouldn’t come to light iu the first place. We’re ___ “The annj 
less open.” 

The Europeans also marvel at the huge US. 
bureaucracies, in both government and indus- 
try, and the duplicatio n among the military 
services. 

“You’re really wasting enormous amounts of 
money,” said Sir Raymond Lygo, chief execu- 
tive of British Aerospace. “It’s quite unbeliev- 
able." 

Gerhard M. Braner, a West German anus 
specialist interviewed in his Washington office, 
said. “I had the worst opinion of our procure- 
ment system while I was in Germany. Then 1 
came here.” 

Last month, on the plains of Bergen. West 
Germany, the US. $2.4-nriHiOQ M-l Abrams 
tank was finally going to prove itself. 

Busloads of U.S. soldiers rode into Bergen 
from north and south, determined to show in a 
spectacle of smoke and gunfire that their M-l 
was the finest tank in the West Even General 
Dynamics Corp- the maker of M-l, seal a pit 
crew to the Canadian Cup, the Olympics of tank 
gunnery, to make sure nothing went wrong. 

But something did. After a week of shooting 
and scooting before international judges, a West 
German tank won the gold. 

The Germans, of course, have always been 
skilled tank makers, and their triumph in Bergen 
in no way undercut the M-l. which also scored 
well But the story o! their Leopard-2, which the 
U.S. Army rejected several years ago as not 
quite good enough, says much about what the 
Europeans do righL 

The M-l was 20 years in the making, with its 
revolutionary engine, fire control and night 
sights. The Germans, whose arms industry be- 
gan to rise from the ashes of World War if only 
in the late 1930s, built their Leopard-1 in five 
years, .the Leopard-2 in six. and emerged with a 
tank as good as the Abrams if not better. 

“We don’t have as much money, and there- 
fore we have to settle for something less,” a 
British official said of the Europeans. “Some- 
times that’s the best thing, because your weap- 
ons are sometimes too sophisticated.” 

Turning a shortage of money into a virtue, 
many fordgn defease ministries excel at refining 
weapons, constantly improving them. As a CIA 
study concluded, relatively meager resources in 
Israel and Europe have “forced those systems to 
do the most with whar they have." 

Among European arms buyers, it is the 
French who usually draw the most praise, a 
tribute to the reforms of de Gaulle. In 1961. 
hearing the familiar refrain of rising costs, the 
French president suppressed the objections of 
his officers and created an armaments director- 
ate. 

T HIS fourth branch of military service, 
outfitted with special uniforms to distin- 
guish its engineering officers, buys the 
weapons without being subject to the whims or 
wishes of any general or admira l. Hie arma- 
ments directorate is a formidable force in 
France, answerable only to the defense minister 
and skilled enough to take on the nation s mo- 
nopolistic arms manufacturers. 

“You control monopolies with smart buyers," 

Pierre Marais, a retired general said in Paris. 

“The engineers have training and qualifications , 
as good as anyone in the company. They can. 
say, T am at least as competent as you are.' " 

By restraining soldiers from asking too much 
of a weapon and by pressing manufacturers to 
deliver as promised, the armaments directorate 
is seen as an effective brake on the kind of 


* industry, no nation comes dose to the U.S. 
” effort at injecting free enterprise and competi- 
tion into the arms business. 

And no other nation subjects its industry to 
die kind of relentless spotlreht turned on US. 


contractors by the public, press and Congress, 
an inquisition that astnni«hfts the Europeans. 

-. Tn the States, you have a much more brutal 
much more violent relationship,” said a senior 
French official contrasting that to the “conviy- 
iaT ties between European military, companies 
and their governments. 

. A British official added, “I don't think it’s as 
fashionable to knock the industry here. If the 
$600 toilet seat happened in Britain, there 
wouldn't be the same to-do," he said, referring 
to a scandal over the cost of a toilet seat in- 


“goldplating" >hat afflicts many U.S. weapons. 

“The army will say, This is what I want,' " 
General Marais said, adding in reference to the 
armaments directorate, “The DGA will say. 
This is what technology can offer you.’ But the 
important thing is, it’s not the industry saying 
this — it’s another branch of the military." 

While France's system of officer buyers may 
be the only one of its kind, the idea of a 
centralized weapons-buying agency is not. 

Britain, West Germany, Sweden and Canada 
have mow! toward central and civilian control. 
Only Norway. Turkey and the United States 
have resisted the tread permitting their armies, 
navies and air forces to buy their own equip- 
ment, according to a recent study by the Con- 
gressional Research Service. 

Not everyone in Europe endorses centralized 
control. Even in Britain, the services retain a 
prominent role in purchasing, setting weapons 
requirements and cultivating informal contacts 
with industry. 

But the European model has proved attrac- 
tive to many critics of the US. system. 

“Adopting the French system would free at 
least 50.000 people in the Washington area to 
look for honest work, and would greatly im- 
prove the procurement process," wrote an air 
force analyst, Thomas S. Amlie. “However, il 
would devastate the local economy, particularly 
the real estate market, so it's not about to 
happen." . 

I N military warehouses, huge bags of sugar 
were found congealed “under the weight of 
tattered tarpaulins and the pigeon drop- 
pings that have come through gaping roofs," 
according to a newspaper account 
The culprit was not the U.S. Defense Logis- 
tics Agency but the British supply system, as 
described by The Financial Times. The Europe- 
ans, in other words, have troubles, too, many of 
which give pause to anyone looking for lessons 
overseas. 

The West Germans, for example, decided not 
to buy the US. Apache attack helicopter, vow- 
ing instead to bund one at home for half the 
cost, according to a US. officer in Bonn. “Now 
they find themselves with a helicopter that looks 
like it will cost twice what the Apache does." the 
officer added, “and have half the capability." 

The West Germans are not alone. The Bntish 
opted to build Nimrod as a competitor to 
Boeing’s Airborne Warning and Control System 
planes, or AWACS. Years later, Nimrod is mil- 
lions of pounds over budget and still not air- ' 
borne. 

“One t^ing can be said right away," said a 
West German procurement official Georg A. 
KOnhold, “Cost overruns and complicated pro- 
cedures are everywhere." 

But from a US. vantage point, there are traits 
beyond the occasional overrun that may be less 
attractive to those hired by the- European sys- 
tems. 

For example^parliaments in Western Europe 
rarely intrude. They approve or refect proposed 
budgets bnt they lack authority to comb 
through proposals line by line, the kind of 
sifting that lends power to congressional staff 
members in Washington. 

Sr Frank Coop a, for five years Britain’s 
permanent undersecretary of defense, said be 
appeared before parliamentary committees 
about five times a year. In France, military 
officials can refuse to answer queries from the 
National Assembly. 

By contrast, Lawrence J. Korb, an assistant 
US. defense secretary, spent 36 hours testifying 
at 18 hearings in just the first half of 1983. 



ByTobeyfor TtaWnftntftn ftaJ 


Nor is the European press much of a watch- 
dog, despite occasional reports such as the one 
in The Financial Times about military waste of 
sugar. Like members of Parliament, journalists 
tend to focus on strategic Issues, such as how 
much of tire military budget should go toward 
nuclear weapons, rather than on problems of 
cost or management. 

“The ashtray would have never been in the 
press," General Marais said, referring to a re- 
cent uproar in the United States about a navy 
order for ashtrays costing nearly $600 each. “A 
French reporter, even if he knew, wouldn’t print 
it." 

That relaxed scrutiny means less haggling 
over minute details, bnt it also obscures ineffi- 
ciency and corruption. Excerpts surfaced in 
1976 from a French Finance Ministry secret 
report alleging overseas bribes and an “extraor- 
dinary waste of money" in the amis industry; 
but the full report was never released and pubtic 
interest quickly ebbed. 

“Having no information about scandals 
doesn't mean there are no scandals," said a US. 
Embassy official in Paris. 

In many ways, parliaments and the press 
represent European public opinion in their atti- 
tude of benign neglect. 

T would think you’d have to hunt very hard 
in this country to find people ovmvorried about 
the influence of the defense industry," Sir Frank 
said. “It's not like the States." 

O NE British Aerospace official recalled 
the behavior of US. offices at the 
Farnsborough Air Show of 1976, when 
Washington cracked down on generals accept- 
ing entertainment from contractors. British 
Aerospace had to indulge American officers 
with a box in front of its hospitality chalet for 
“voluntary contributions" and an improvised 
receipt system using coat-check stubs. “We 
thought it was the craziest thmg we'd ever seen," 
the Briton said. 

Furthermore, with jet fighters costing S50 
million each and tactical missil es SI miTTT nn and 
up, no European budget can support more than 
one major aircraft, missil e or helicopter maker. 
Despite the Pentagon’s much-berated tendency 
to stifle competition at times, Europeans envy 
the freedom that exists in the U.S. arms busi- 
ness. 

As the number of manufacturers dwindles, 
European nations tend to protect their militaiy 
industries as national assets, whether they are 
government owned, as in France; owned partly 
by the government, as in West Germany, or 
formerly owned by the gov ernment and recently 
returned to the private sector, as in Britain. 
“There's no choice for us," said Mr. Kflnhold 


DEFENSE SPENDING PER CAPITA 

IN FISCAL 1983; IN 1983 EXCHANGE RATES 





FRANCE 


SO 250 

SOURCE: US. Department of Defense 


of West Germany. “We need these companies." 

So the Europeans aid and subsidize their 
contractors more freely than the Pentagon, com- 
plicating cost comparisons. US. officials con- 
tend, for example, that the true cost of the 
European-built Tornado jet fighter is $40 mil- 
lion to $30 million, as much as the US. Air 
Force’s F-L5. Europeans say fce prioe is less. * 
U.S. officials also c onte nd that their militaiy 
technology is superior to Europe's. 

“The F-15 is by far a better aircraft than 
anything the French could hope to produce;” 
said an American in Paris. 




lrfXXJ 


By Totajr and J«i Kdrioff far Th* WbAngkx, P m 

The vast difference in size between the- US. 
: weapons effortand any country apart from the 
Soviet Union makes all comparisons dubious. 

John F. Lehman Jr, the US. secretary of the 
navy, said: “Trying to draw-lessons from armed 
forces that are the size of our Coast ' Guard is 
more likely tolead to error thaninsighL We buy, 
just in- the navy departmen t five to IQ times as 
many kinds of things as any country except the 
Soviet Union." 

General Marais said that comparing the US. 
system with the French would he “comparing 
peanuts and truffles.” 


Behind Scenes in Beirut: U.S. TV Networks Wage Truly Ruthless War 


By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Post Service 

B EIRUT — “Cocaine! Hates of cocaine! 
Hundreds of thousands of dollars!" a 
drunken CBS employee shouted, a vein 
throbbing in his f orehead and his fists clenched 
as he glowered at an ABC producer. WHd accu- 
sations. Unprovable allegations. But in Beirut it 
is easy to coqure nefarious alibis when you have 
been defeated. It is a national pastime. 

The ABC producer, without stooping to deni- 
al needled CBS from across the Commodore 
Hotel bar. “Think about tomorrow,” he said, 
pinning ear to ear. “Don’t talk about the past 
Think about tomorrow." 

Was Beirut corrupting the networks or were 
■the networks corrupting Beirut? 

On this day, ABC had had another scoop on 
the hostage crisis. It had been a lunch with three 
of the American hostages, a relaxed affair with 
• iq correspondent Charles Glass by the sea 
somewhere in the Shiites’ southern suburbs. A 
few days before, it had been a walk out onto the 
tarmac for a chat with the TWA phot, a gun to 
head, an uneasy smile on his face. 

“ r That image made the covers of both Time and 
Newsweek magazines. 


. • v.v.r 

•• : 'ij • ... * ni «. 


Bern, the mediator and leader of the Amal 
movement — brought out the envy of nearly 
■ every journalist here. Every scoop evoked cries 
of outrage and veiled accusations, but never any 
evidence to bade up the innuendo. The accusa- 
tions about providing drugs, heatedly denied by 
ABC, woe even more unseemly because of 
allegations that the kidnappers mid murderers 
of Americans were being paid for access to the 



known con 
one in the 


[indents from New York. But no 
ddle East knows a New York 


heavy hitter. It’s relationships — not ratings — 
that count for a reporter in Lebanon. 


, v m 




Fas the other networks hoe, the worst part 
was that whatever ABC was doing to get the 
story, it was doing it successfully. 

. -ABC’s monopoly, moreover, was one it care- 
fully enforced. It had been designed that way 
from the start. While other networks stayed at 
the traditional journalists* haunt, the Cotnmo- 
iore in central West Beirut, ABC checked into 
!he S ummedand on the Beirut seacoast in the 
heart of Shiite territory. ABCs staff gained not 
only comfort but secrecy. 

- According to ABCs producers, it had mare 
than 20 people with American passports work- 
ing in Beirut when other networks were wary of 
committing four of five to one of die world’s 
most dangerous cities for Americans. If this was 
turned out to be irresponsible, if things had 
gone wrong, it might have added 20 new hos- 
tages to the lists. Jut ABC got there first with 
he biggest staff* and seized a beachhead no one 
dse was able tfcdballenge. 

■ ABC also ha&$een consistent in its coverage 
if Lebanon, particularly die war in the south, 
* ud had thus made a fit of contacts based on 
jyalfy. Its local stringer, Jnhe Flym, had never 
;ft Lebanon, even during the worst months. 
Personal contacts are everything in the Middle 
tst, and this Hud of continued presence is Jong 
ptembered. 


rtMff 


On AmdeM Prea 

John L. Testrake, pilot of the hijacked TWA flight? and an unidentified gunman on television during the hostage crisis. 


T HEN there was the local talent. ABC had 
local crotract reporters and drivers who 
were dose to Amal This is not unusual 
overseas. Networks do not pay their sources, but 
they frequently hire employees who have good 
access to sources through family or social ties. 

But ABC also had die fieredy loyal friendship 
of Ali Hamdan, the official spokesman for 
Amal and it was Mr. Hamdan ’s role- that caused 
the greatest controversy. An ABC produce' de- 
scribed him as “the Amal guy in our pocket" 

According to ABC producers and correspon- 
dents, Mr. Hamdan was central to setting up the 
initial interview with the pilot, John L. Testrake, 
on the tarmac, but was not particularly impor- 
tant in their later coops. 

The ferocity of Mr. namdan’s ABC bias con- 
tinued, however, to raise problems, even whm 
another network had gotten the scoop. 

For instance, a videotape of the hostages 
sitting around a room being asked simple, bnef 
questions by an anonymous voice was filmed at 
Amal’s invitation by a local Visnews crew nor- 
mally affilia ted with NBC Bui the tape was 
(hen taken by Amal who offered it to CBS for 
certain considerations in return. CBS officials in 


Beirut say no cash changed hands, but they said 
Amal demanded cassettes of some CBS cover- 
age from earlier years —apparently to be shown 
to the hostages. 

“What they wanted was videotape of the *82 
Israeli invasion." said a senior CBS official here. 
“So we said, ‘Sure, we’ll give you videotape.’ ” 

Ann Morfogen, director of cn mmimir^tirmc 
for CBS News, told Eleanor Randolph, a Wash- 
ington Post reporter, on Sunday that while a 
CBS official in Beirut believed there would be 
“no problem" in handing over the cassettes, no 
videotape was ever released from the network 
files in New York. 

“1 can’t believe a three-year-old tape would 
have been provided by the facilities we had in 
Beirut," she said. “It would have had to come 
From New York. Nobody in New York remem- 
bers his asking, and the bottom line is CBS 
News here did not provide the footage." 

Amal also wanted to edit the hostage tape 
before handing it over. “We said, ‘We'll haveto 
take what you give us,’ ” this CBS official said. 

But Amal is a large and diverse organization, 
and these negotiations were not held with Mr! 


Hamdan, but with Akram Balawi, another 
spokesman. 

When Ali Hamdan heard that CBS had the 
tape, he telephoned he called a CBS correspon- 
dent and warned him that if the tape were not 
immediately spooled” — made available to all 
news media — CBS could forget about covering 
the hostage story in Beirut. 

Other accounts of his language are rather 
more dramatic, on the order of: “Pod that taupe 
or go with it when you ship it to Cyprus” for 
transmission. 

W ~ HEN asked about all this, Mr. Ham- 
dan was less than good-humored. He 
confirmed making the phone call to 
CBS but wanted to know how the news had 
leaked out, and started naming people he 
thought migh t have done iL 

Asked if he had been paid off, he equivocated, 
“ft’s already well known, baksheesh," 1 he said 
first Pressed, he said, ominously, “You are 
dealing with Amal" Finally: "There was noth- 
ing, no money at all" he said. 

Other networks cried to compensate for their 
relatively poor showings by bringing in well- 


the story — the hostages’ “farewell party,”Toni 
Brokaw of NBC was left waiting for Ali Ham- 
dan to meet him in the Commodore lobby. 
When Mr. Hamdan showed up, he said nothing 
was happening at the moment, maybe tomor- . 
row. 

A CBS vice president, David Buksbaum, 
found himself even more frustrated when he 
flew from Beirut to Syria and was informed 
there was no way be could get into the country 
without a visa. He sat for 10 hours in the 
Damascus airport before flying bade out again. 
At one point, according to & CBS. staff member, 
he started shouting. Did they know he was a vice 
president of CBS? “So what?" said the Syrian 
immigration man. 

All this, of coarse, had been discussed and 
debated, whispered about and shouted over for 
two weeks during the run of America Held 
Hostage H Yet when die final ABC scoop came, 
no one — some staffers say not even ABC — 
was ready for its scope or its surreal imagery, a 
farewell dinner with 32 hostages overioblang the 
moonlit sea from the pool at the Summenand 
hotel 

While a few print reporters stood around the 
Commodore bar, Cbns Harps, an ABC pro- 
ducer, was reading off a roll call of the hostages 
present at the Summexiand. A farewdl cake was 
saved, the hostages were interviewed oue by 
one, and Amal Tnilitiam«n — r aise d on the 
margins of survival in the southern suburbs — 
stared aghast at the opulence of their surround- 
ings. 

Word leaked to the other networks at the end, 
around 2 AJL, and thqr were able to get a few 
interview before Amal took the hostages bad: 
to the suburbs and, everyone thought, to Da- 
mascus. 

NBCs Tom Brokaw, who kept his composure 
and his humor throughout, said wearily at 
dawn, “We’re the Tommy Hearns of network 
television tonight. Third round.” (Tommy 
Hearns lost an attempt to win the world middle- 
weight boxing championship in April when 
Marvin Hagler defeated him by a, technical 
knockout after three hard-fought rounds.) 

Ihe next night, when the hostages did not 
arrive in Damascus as expected, speculation was 
raised that Mr. Beni haa lost control that there 
were many new demands, that everything hai} 
fallen apart. 

This was a time when instant communica- 
tions were needed to dear the ak, if possible. 
But when Mr. Bern’s spokesman was inter- 
viewed by NBC, NBC cut the line on Him after 
20 seconds, then could not get back to him. New 
York said they could not find anyone to talk to 
Mr. Beni’s spokesman. New York said the line 
was not good enough. Finally the network’s 
Roger Mudd came on the line, but by then his 
show was over. 

Later, Mr. Beni's spokesman went oyer to the 
Summerland. He walked up to AJBCsloffice,. 
They put him on the 3ir with Peter Jennings. 


. When it was all ovcr, ABC protested that its 
credibility had been harmed, its integrity called 
into question. RichardWald, senior vice presi- 
dent of ABC News, told Eleanor Randolph in a 
telephone interview Sunday that the network 
staff members bad “had their work tainted by 
the envy of others,” ' 

Mr. Widd added that “because we were the 
tallest tree, we attracted the lightning, and we 
found it very unfair. AD the rumor and innuenr 
do — unfounded and untrue — ; it was directed a 
little bit against tiie other folks, but mostly was 
directed against us." 

ABC was “annoyed and a little bit startled at 
the reaction” to its first scoop, he said Mr. 
Glass had gotten the interview with the captain 
and crew, -Mr. Wald said, by convincing Mr. . 
Bern that the American people would not be- 
lieve they were safe until they saw them. “I don’t 
know whether anybody else paid for anything," 
Mr: Wald said. “But I do know that ABiC never 
paid for an interview." 

T HROUGH most of the crisis, what news 
ABC did not gpt, the other networks did. 
Not a single newspaper ^ reporter is 
known to have gotten an exclusive interview 
with Mr.Beni or any hostage between the first : 
airport press conference ana the final 24 hours. - 
of the ardeaL ... .. 

Yet now that the event is over, it should be 
said that it was not just the resources, notjnst 
the staffing, and not a matter of payments that 
gave the networks — and particularly ABC — 
dominance over the story. lt was time, the very 
short time needed to communicate to the Unfc 
ed States whatever the people in Beirut had to 
say about developments in the crisis. . 

TV gave Nabih Bern, for butanes -a direct 
phonefine to a majority of the American public. 
Newspapers.allowed him nothingmore man an 
overnight letter to a select group of readers. 
Someone in Mr. Bern’s position, did not need to 
be sophisticated or medifeconscious to make 
that decision. And for the hostages, television 
was an onmatchable way to reassure their fam- 
ilies of their wefl-being. 

In any hostage timation it is essential to keep 
the Iddnapoers. or the hgackers talking. The 
media did mat — not only as a vehicle but as a 
lure to make them talk Whai was an essential 
part of thefinal deal that finally got die hostages 
out? A press conference for tire original hijack- 
ers themselves: Reporters, meanwmk, had ac- 
cess that no American official could have imag- 
ined or hoped for. 

At the same time, as the United States was 
brought to the point of blind, aimless anger, the 
presence of thk hostages— unhanned and indi- 
vidually interviewed on television — and 7 the 
face of Nabih Bern, who scarcely looked like a 
terrorist, could not help but dissipate some of 
the fury. 

itecoverage, and erarycrae knows it. 
But ivBefrut, where sudden death is so com- 
mon, keeping a few.people among the living is . 
no easy thing. 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Black-Death Comedy by RSC: Dying for a Laugh 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — If you can imagine 
j a vaudeville parody or "Moth- 
er Courage” by a group of medieval 
entertainers whose lack of discern- 
ible talent is matched only by their 
desperate enthusiasm, you will 

THE LONDON STAGE 

have some idea what is going on in 
Peter Barnes’s “Red Noses" at the 
Barbican. 

It would appear that some Lime 
around 1350, when one-third of the 
world population had been wiped 
out by the Black Death, a French 
monk called Marcel Role decided 
the survivors might like a bit of a 
laugh. Accordingly, he formed a 
bedraggled and diseased troupe 
consisting of blind jugglers, one- 

Dfeney Florida Addition 

The AurcraieJ Press 

TALLAHASSEE, Florida — 
Walt Disney Productions will build 
a S300-tnillion film studio/amuse- 
ment park near Disney World and 
the Epcot center. Metro- Goldwyn- 
Mayer’s name and film library will 
be used in what will be called the 
Disney-MGM Studio Tour. 

DOONESBURY 


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legged tap dancers, stammering 
comics and rampant nuns, and 
loured than around the graveyards 
of Avignon, winch were at the lime 
ihe town's main streets. 

Dying for a laugh is not, admit- 
tedly, an original show-biz notion. 
Peter Nichols explored it in “Pri- 
vates on Parade/ and Barnes's last 
new play in London, 17 years ago, 
“Laughter” was at least partly con- 
cerned with the jokes that could be 
got out of concentration camps, 
where laughter and slaughter are 
separated only by an “s. 

What is good about Terry 
Hands's new production at the Bar- 
bican is the way a classical Royal 
Shakespeare Company croupe led 
by Antony Sizer (off his Richard 111 
crutches but surrounded by those 
in need of them; approaches with 
energy and inventiveness a vast, 
sprawling pageant of remarkable 
untidiness. Barnes has never been a 
man to write two hours where four 
would do, but in this foUy some- 
where are marvelous notions, not 
least (he idea that Rote and his 
Roues are in constant show-biz 
rivalry with a troupe of strolling 
flagellants who, while regretting 
that there's no demand for serious 
entertainment during a plague, are 
nonetheless willing to remove 
hunks of their flesh to improve the 
box-office returns. 


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By viewing a time and place of 
unspeakable horror through the 
eyes of people who in later lives 
would doubtless have provided the 
ramp concerts at Dachau. Barnes 
has achieved his usual thesis about 
a stand-up comic being a lot more 
useful than a pope in a real crisis. 
He also has a nicety cynical turn of 
phrase (“The continued existence 
of Christianity proves that almost 
anything can be made to work in 
the end”) and a deep love for old 
jokes (“I've had to suffer for my 
art, new it's your turn,” says the 
blind juggler to his moribund audi- 
ence). What he lacks is the disci- 
pline to turn a great idea into a 
coherent play. 

The Roties consist chiefly of 
Polly James as a manic nun, Rich- 
ard Easton as the traitor who final- 
ly puts the knife in before going on 
to become, surprisingly, not a dra- 
ma critic but a papal assistant, Pete 
Postleth waite whose act really does 
die the death, and Bernard Horsfall 
as the blhuyuggler threatening a 
knife acL Then we get a pope 
(Christopher Benjamin) on a rope 
and a final blackout admission 
thaL having got than all into this 
mess, Barnes has no real idea how 
to get them out of it. 

□ 

At the Croydon Warehouse, Ted 
Craig marks the start of his new 
management with the British pre- 
miere of David Allen's “Cheap- 
side," another historical joke, albeit 
of rather more manageable propor- 
tions. The author of “Gone with 
Hardy” has always been intrigued 
with the backstage lives of the fu- 
ture famous. Having dealt with 
Stan Laurel in his earlier play, he 
turns his attention to a dour Mid- 
lander called Shakespeare and a 


gay Cambridge graduate setting up 
an espionage network some 400 
years ahead of Burgess and Mac- 
Lean. He is Christopher Marlowe, 
soon dead, thereby allowing the ac- 
tor who plays him (John Moreno) 
to double as the Bard. 

The central figure is Robert 
Greene (wearily weB-played by 
James Bolam), who fanned hims elf 
a playwright of world renown but 


ended up a hack journalist and 
bankrupt among the lice and fleas 
of a London already beset by the 
plague and soon to be engulfed in 
flames. Through Greene's eyes we 
see not only Marlowe and Shake- 
peare as a couple of stage-door 
likely lads on the make, but a vastly 
more sinister network of political 
intrigue and sudden death. 
Greene's hatred for the Bard of 
Avon, or Shagnasty as he calls him. 
is equaled only by his rage at being 
forever in the wings at political 
events he cannot quite grasp. There 
are strong echoes of Stoppard's 
“Rosencrantz and Gufldenstem" 
and of Shaffer's “Amadeus,” but 
Allen manage to reass emble the 
jigsaw into a backstage thriller of 
considerable fascination, and 
Craig's immensely agile production 
augurs well for the future of this 
Warehouse production. 

□ 

At Hampstead, Billy Hainan's 
“Grafters” is about a group of in- 
stant stereotypes assembled in an 
enclosed space. Twenty years ago it 
would have been a British wartime: 
submarine adventure. Ten years 
ago it would have been “Airport 
75.” Here it is a car factory, where 
we get to meet the bully, the stud, 
the coward, the veteran and the 
mental defective, only it's no longer 
a question of which of them will 
survive the crash, merely vague cu- 


Mostly Mozart Festival Opens 
With Work Found in 1982 




The Associated Press 

N EW YORK — The 19th 
Mostly Mozart Festival began 
its seven-week run with the first 
U. S. performance of a symphony 
that scholars believe the composer 
wrote when he was 12. 

About 2,500 people gathered in 
Lincoln Center's north plaza Mon- 
day to hear the Symphony in A 
minor, K 1 6a. Gerard Schwarz con- 
ducted the Mostly Mozart Festival 
Orchestra. The free, 45-minute 
concert, billed as an “open-air re- 
hearsal" also included one move- 
ment from Salieri's “Concerto for 
Oboe and Flute” and Mozart's 
“Hafner Symphony” 

Schwarz, the festival’s music di- 


rector, said the 12-minute Sympho- 
ny in A minor was discovered in 
Denmark in 1982. 

“It was written down by a pro- 
fessional copyist and said Mozart 
on it,” he said. 

“No one is positive this sympho- 
ny is by Mozart,” Schwarz said. “I 
think it is, and uacomcted by his 
father. I think his father would 
have corrected some sequences that 
go on too long, and some uncom- 
fortable modulations.” 

This year’s festival includes 44 
concerts. Once a week there are 
“Mostly Mozart Meet- the- Artist 
Suppers.” in which one may buy a 
ticket for a preconcert m eal with 
festival soloists. 


riosity about which will opt for 
early retirement. 

Hamon, who based this play on 
the experiences of his father-in-law, 
would seem to be idling us that it is 
not a terribly good idea to take a lot 
of skilled men and throw them to- 
gether in the living death of a tool- 
room from which all the tools lave 
been removed, because nobody 
seems to want what they can manu- 
facture. A strong cast of character 
men under Roland Oliver as the 
foreman do their best to -make us 
believe that there is something so- 
cially significant going on, but it's 
nothing that hasn't been done bet- 
ter In scores of tdevirion documen- 
taries abut unemployment. 


At the Donmar Warehouse in 
Gwent Garden. David Keraan's 
late-night cabaret season is pre- 
senting a loving tribute to Ethyl 
Merman. The star is Libby Morris, 
who wonderfully evokes the golden 
foghorn that was Merman’s voice 
through 40 of the greatest songs 
ever written by Porter, Berlin, 
Sondheim and the Gershwins. 
Who, as Merman used to enquire, 
could ask for anything more? 


M 





V 






Disembodied arm beats secretary to the phone in “Funny People II.** 



Uys’s Candid Camera Enlivens "Funny People II” 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 

F I ARIS — The South African cmeaste Jamie 
Uys rose to international renown three years 
ago when his “The Gods Must Be Crazy” was 
sneaked by its cautions distributors into a small 
Parisian cinema. Attendance jumped, more 
prints of the film were prepared and soon it was 
playing to capacity in the big cinemas of the 
Champs-Bysles and the boulevards. Its initial 
success in France has been repeated everywhere 
it has been shown. 

“The Gods Must Be Crazy” was shot in 
Botswana with an amateur cast and at low cost. 
Its en gaging simp licity and happy realization of 
hilarious conceits — it tells how the tranquility 
of a Bushman settlement is disturbed when an 
empty Coca-Cola bottle is tossed from a passing 
airplane — were the elements that transformed 
it into a hit 

That Uys is an expert at providing comic 


That Uys ts an expert at providing comic 
absurdity is demonstrated again in his new 
movie, “Fumy People D,” a spoof of human 
credulity set in an African metropolis (playing 
in Paris as “Les Anges se fendani la gueule”). 

With hidden cameras, Uys records the victims 
of practical jokes. A fat woman makes a habit of 
feigning faints and falling heavily into the arms 
of male passers-by. A rookie secretary sees a 
statue of an arm on her desk and thinks no more 
of iL The telephone rings and she would answer 
it, but the aim gets hold of the receiver before 
her. The muscle-builders in a gym are unable to 
execute their feats of strength because their 
weights have been tampered with. Shoppers 


return to parking lots just in time to prevent 
their cars from going on auction. Dogs have 
their paws fitted into carpet slippers and must 
learning to walk a g ain , but a wise cat strips off 
the footwear and scampers away. 

The incidents bear no relation to one another, 
the form being that of a revue. The players, 
being untrained, perform straight- Joe Steward- 
son as commentator introduces the gag sessions 
and in an epilogue warns the spectator to be 
wary of concealed cameras and con artists. 


. Clean humor is not the only sort that sells, as 
the success of the French film “Gros Digueu- 
lasse” attests. This repellent nonesuch — the 
title, very roughly, means “Big Slob” — is as 
gross as it can be. Its sole purpose appears to be 
the employment in monologues of (he obese 
Maurice Risch, the use of all words that are 
excluded from polite conversation and the repe- 
tition of them ad nauseam. 

Inspired by the drawings of the cartoonist 
Reiser, the venture is a sort of sequel to “Vive les 
Femmes,” a theater revue, and later Him. in 
which Risch created the monster of the title. 
Before he took to' walking around in soiled 
underwear, exposing his swollen belly and with 
a cigarette bull dangling from his Bps, Risch 
was a stage comedian of singular talent The 
prosperity of his recent vehicles has converted 
nun into an offensive down. It is reported that 
this sniggering burlesque show by Bruno Zin- 
cone, luce its forerunner, is favored by young 
audiences, but one wonders how young. Risch 


making his wax into the ladies room and insult- 
ing a woman might evoke giggling from nasty 
and slightly imbecilic S-y ear-olds. 


The better films from the Soviet Union re- 
cently have come from Georgia. “Bine Moun- 
tains’’ by Eld3r Chengudaia was screened in the 
Directors' Fortnight section of the Cannes festi- 
val and is due for Continental release soon. 
Among other things, it refutes the idea that 
Russian drama and movies are as grim as an 
undertaker's parlor. There is salty satire in this 
account of an author's adven tures placing his 
manuscript with a state publisher. The publish- 
ing house is a gigantic joke — the building falls 
down before the film has finished. Many of the 
sequences had the Cannes spectators rocking 
with glee. 

Chengueiaia stated his code in a recent maga- 
zine article that other directors might read to 
their profit: 

“I always try to make the most conventional 
characters who behave in unrealistic ways die 
most believable and sincere. Whatever it is. 
every detail should be realistic and beDevabfe 1 
have the feeling that at any moment an abrupt 
change could take place in my career and that L 
could make a film that would be different front 
all I have done, i would moke the change with- 
out hesitation. I would not be betraying my 


style, for there is only one style: mist toHftto 
one’s eyes, to one’s feelings.” 

“Blue Mountains” has true style, an indepen- 
dent viewpoint and a sense erf humor that is 
impossible to resist. 


NYSE Most Actives 

vm. High low Last ct*. 


Arsr 

I721J 

34 

raw 

raw 

— % 

AH0S> 

1781* 

40* 

37* 

40% 

— ft 

IBM 

11795 

123% 

120 % 

121 % 

-2% 

RctiVck 

11856 

27* 

35* 

36% 

+lft 

Baxfrr 

IOB 73 


15* 

TJft 

+ 66 

DlamS 

7754 

38 

18% 

18* 

+ ft 

FPL Go 

7636 

26% 

27* 

+ ft 

AMR 

B217 

49* 

48* 

48ft 

— ft 

CBS _ 

seji 

116% 

115ft 

116 

+ ft 

CoaiCI 

7876 

2E 

687* 

70 

+Tft 

FiaPra 

7682 

28% 

28* 

— * 

Coapvls 

7475 

24% 

23% 

34 

— ft 

PWloEl 

7248 

16* 

16 

16% 

— * 

FordM 

7039 

43ft 

43% 

43ft 

— % 

Exxon 

7006 

53ft 

Mft 

53ft 

+ ft 


I Dow Jones Averages | , 

Open Htati Low Last Chg. 

Indus 133440 133X67 1313.40 1331 Jl — 450 

Trims 674 M 67884 444-30 44*54— 444 

UNI 14403 147JJ 16553 14470 + 0.05 

COmo SSI -85 S5S54 S44.97 550.13 — 147 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


[Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 
U lint las 
industrials 


ck» di*M 

8032 —0.13 

7013 -tUD 

8231 —0-14 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
TolQI I&SU63 
NOW H lBt« 
New Lows 
Volume up 
volume down 


S 458 

PI7 

4<q 450 

3026 2035 

111 125 

7 17 


HMi LOW Oese CUT* 
Composite 11133 1103 US* ~ Ml 

industrials 1255B 125L23 2U2 — 0J2 

Transp. 11045 10*3 10954 — 1.01 

Utilities 40J71 4053 6042— OD7 

Finance 171-09 13063 13052—044 


Odd- Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Bor sales •Sim 

Juft- 8 190348 411571 VU7 

July 5 228566 277518 756 

Juft- 3 180540 382445 1591 

July 2 195.944 40081 1JJ61 

July 1 mjjai 456ml 10038 

"included In tfte sales floures 


Tuesdays 

MSE 

Closing 


VoLuMP M 9900000 

prev.4PJM.voL sworn : 

Pre» raoso Booted Ctae IttLflMQQ 


Totee* Include tfte nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
uneftmed 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume vp 
volume down 


228 233 

Z75- 305 

277 234 

TBS Tin 
TO 29 

8 13 

2511935 
2404540 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Bonks 

Tramp. 


Week 

Close Ckfte Ago 
277.15—045 296.71 
302.32 — 158 30400 
38550—007 38050 
35450 +023 35152 
29*04— U4 294.78 
27465 +155 27144 
263.16 — 052 2*455 


Standard & Poor's Index 


High Low Close OTge 
Industrials 21158 28758 21029 — 159 

Tramp. I75J7 17457 174.13 — 151 

UffHftes 8078 8046 8865+05? 

Finance 215* 2143 2143—011 

Composite 17159 19051 17155—058 


AMEX Sales 


4P5LvMimN 
Prev. 4 PJA. volume 
Prev. cam. volume 


vm. 

Hlgt» Low 

Usd 

aw. 

4576 

«** 

S’m 

4% 

_ 

ft 

3374 

17ft 

16ft 

17* 

+ 

ft 

2373 

lit* 

lift 

11* 

•+ 

16 

2030 

IB 

17% 

17% 


ft 

1511 

13% 

IJ 

13% 

♦ 

ft 

1432 

?■« 

7 4 

7* 



1276 

10% 

I6ft 

10* 

* 

% 

1177 

Wft 


13ft 

♦ 

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721 

11* 

10* 

M* 

— 

ft 

876 

Sft 

4ft 

5 


M 

853 

4 

3ft 

3ft 


ft 

804 

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J* 

3 


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772 

15 

IS 

15 



766 

36ft 

36 

36ft 

♦ 

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745 

745 

11 

3 

« 

W» 

25* 

— 

ft 


fr ^ns lint.. 


AMEX Stock Index 


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I ‘Th- 

orne | J-L- 

-032 I *«■ 


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high Lc* She* 


Sis. Qass 

Dfv. m pe mnwuw outftomt 


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35V* 193* 
153* 61m 

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94H 163* 
4136 31 
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AAR 
AGS 
AMCA 
AAAF SO XS 43 
AMR 11 

AMR pt 2.11 9.7 
ANRPI 2.12 10.9 
API. 

ASA 250 45 
AVX J2 1A 11 
AZP 2.72 95 8 

AbtLotl 1 M IS 14 
AcCOWd s JM 2J 17 
AcmeC M XS 
AcmeE 37b 4.1 10 
Ado Ex 1.73a 10,7 

AdmMI J2 1J 7 

Adw&vs 531 45 18 
11 


Advpil .12 M 

Acniex 14 

AetnLI 244 S.7 34 
AetLPt S.796ID5 
Ahmns UO 13 IS 
Aileen 

AlrPrd 150 22 12 
AlrbFrt 60 12 II 
A i Moo a 

AUPPIA172 12J 
AioPdM 57 115 
AIOPPI 9.00 11.1 
AloPpf 858 115 
A loose 1 154 65 9 
AISLAIr .16 5 10 

AlOrtOl 58 15 24 
AltihUU .76 24 13 
A Icon 150 61 12 
AlcoSId 150 35 13 
AlexAlx 150 U 
Alexdr 20 

Allots 2501 ZS 25 
Algtet 150 55 
Alain ol 2.19 105 
AIPIPK115S IU 
AlloPw Z70 85 10 
AllenG ADD ZS 16 
AlMCo ua 45 9 
AfdCPSt 4.74 107 
AldCp M1250 105 
AlOCpt 12510125 
AlldPd 15 

Alkttfr 2.12 15 « 
AlilsCh 
AllsCPf 

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Alcoa 150 17 ttf 
Aim. .101 
Ama.Pt 350 85 
AiYIHe* 1.10 17 20 
AHnPf ISO 19 
AmAgr 

ABrtr 8 

A Brano 3.90 5.7 * 
ABrdPf 25S 75 
ABOCSt 150 15 17 
ABIOM 56 12 U 
ABusFr 54 25 14 
AmCan 190 4.7 12 
AConpf 250 115 
A Const 350 55 
ACaoBa 250 105 
ACopCv 151*85 
ACcntC 217 

ACyon i.™ 17 13 
ADT .92 15 26 
AGIPw 2J60 85 7 
AmEsP 158 37 ]« 
AFamK A» 10 1* 
AGnCo 150 2.9 10 
AGnl M 

AGnlPfA654ell5 
AGnlnfB jJTc 45 
ACnpfD 254-18 
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a ho let _ , 

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a How 1.12 25 >3 
Aitwtcn 450 4.7 7 
AlnGra 54 S S3 
AIGPpf 3 AS 45 . 
AMI 72 36 13 
Ant MM 

APresds .121 5 4 
ASLFlo 6 

A5LFIpl2.ll 15.9 
ASftlp M AO 10 
AmStd 150 57 10 
AmSIor 54 15 12 
A5trplA4Ja 57 
AStrplB 650 11.7 
AT8.T 170 5.1 17 
AT&T p< 354 97 
ATLTpl 3.74 7J 
AWoirs 150 47 8 


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414 2JU, 22 22 

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1512 44Sfe 46 46W ■ 

1624 55*9 54*6 55 
72 3516 35V* 35!* - 
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626 ITS* 183k 17 - 
458 IT* IS. IT* 
65 32H 3IJ. 32 - 
■I L 73* 7X-- 

Kfer 81 BO 81 ' 

30* 7031 7034 7031 
15 ISVi IS*. 1SV* ■ 
227x 2334 233* Z3S6- 
822 21 Vi 20»6 21ft. ■ 

973 32ft. 31 <6 31** - 
1056 24V. 23V* 233*- 

145 38 V. 1736 373m- 

586 29 283* 2834- 

10 22T* 2234 221ft- 

23 81*. 8U* 8136 ■ 
157 25 2436 24ft- 

6 20 'm JO 20V. ■ 
BO »7Vi 97 97S* ■ 

331 333i 33ft, 3331 - 
103 21S* 21 21W ■ 

2369 439* 431ft 43Vl 
115x631* 621ft 63 - 

3 110*. 1101*11014 - 
480 1U 102*1103 ■ 

38 16ft 16*6 16ft- 
480 50*. 57*6 57ft- 
330 5ft 4ft 5 
25 31ft- 30 30 - 

62 28V* 20U TflVi ■ 
2726 33ft XHi 32ft- 
873 MW 14W 14*6 ■ 

1 34ft 34 34ft- 

1787 28ft 2>ft 2Bft ■ 

2 x 121 121 121 - 

255 1*6 IS* 1*6 

15 20ft 20ft 20ft- 
384 66ft 44 46ft ■ 

4 29V4 27V* 29ft - 
474 114ft 113*4 114 - 

16* 27ft 27ft 27ft ■ 
4 aft ZS 25 - 
539 59*4 59ft 59ft - 
9 25ft 25 25 

13 52ft 52 52ft ■ 
134 20*1 2046 20ft 
17 27*6 29V* 27ft 

11 8ft 8*6 8*6 

1372 51ft 50*4 51 
683 26ft 25ft 26 - 

2254 2416 24 24ft 
2710 47W 464* 46ft- 
304 74% 23ft 23ft- 
812 35 344* 34ft- 

612 MW 13ft 13*6- 

2 55V. 55V6 55ft ■ 

i raw raw raw- 

67 69ft 69ft 69*6 
3.34*6 34*6 344* 

146 12 lift 12 ' 

4TT2 63 42ft 63 

17819 404* 39** 40W - 
726 7S1* 94W 95*4 ■ 
167 B4ft 84 S4W 

3 MO 140 140 

5907 27ft 26ft 27ft ■ 

974 3*4 314 3ft- 

1147 2iy» 20ft 2034- 

45 7 6ft 7 

45 14 13*6 13*4- 

210 13** 13 13*6 ■ 

333 31ft 30V4 30ft- 
352 67*6 46ft 64ft- 
9*0 77ft 76ft 7*ft- 

12 57". 57 57*. 

19307 24 23ft 23ft- 

20 39*6 37ft 39ft- 
517 40ft 40ft 40ft- 
140 23ft 22ft 23*4 ' 


Dow Average Down 6.50 Points 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange finished lower Tuesday. Ana- 
lysts attributed the decline to uncertainty about 
the U.S. economic outlook.' 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 6.50 to 
1J21 .91 and declining stocks outnumbered ad- 
vancing ones by a 4-3 ratio. Volume increased 
to 99.1 million shares from 83.7 million Mon- 
day. 

Analysts said the market took some encour- 
agement from a late morning report that Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan is willing to accept some 
cuts in military spending to break the impasse 
on the federal budget 

But stock prices headed back down later in 
the afternoon when reports spread that a Mer- 
rill Lynch analyst had lowered his earnings 
estimates for IBM. IBM was one of the session's 
biggest losers, down 2M to 121%. 

The resignation of David A. Stockman from 
the Office of Management and Budget had little 
discernible impact on the stock market, al- 
though the bond market weakened slightly on 
the news. 

Monte Gordon, economist at Dreyfus Corp^ 
said despite news (hat President Reagan appar- 
ently is wining to accept some cuts m military 
spending, the market is saying, “Show me." 

Even if a budget compromise occurs, the 
market is suspicious because of the economic 
assumptions on which the package is based, Mr. 
Gordon said. 

“A lot of those fairly optimistic assumptions 
on the economy's growth rate are now being 
questioned,” Mr. Gordon said. 

Mr. Gordon said the Federal Open Market 


17 Man* „ 

H Ml Low Stock 


12*4 10 
28ft 19ft 
72*b 56ft 
17 5ft 
88V. 61ft 
36 26ft 
50 34ft 
29ft 22ft 
28ft 18ft 
14 4ft 
69 50** 

38ft 26V* 
24 lift 
20ft 12ft 
35ft Sift 
43ft 25** 

4ft 14* 
24V* 10ft 
30ft 17ft 
42ft 27*4 
12ft 9ft 
25ft 17 
33ft 20*6 
68ft 48 
17*6 13ft 
16ft 8ft 
15k. 10ft 
13 9ft 

2 ft 

19ft 1516 
47. sa 
34*6 27V, 


AWat Ql 1.25 1IL2 
Am Hot I 240 1W 9 
ATrPr 5A4 7J 
ATrSC 

ATrUn 544 &4 
44WWI 260 JJ 8 
AmmDs— 20 A 22 
Amato* JO 32 13 
Am toe 

AmfOsc S 

Aiwa 1306 s.l 9 
AMP 72 2J 19 
Amptt JO ZS 16 
Amraa i 10 

AmStti 140 19 10 
Aimttd UO 42 13 
Anocmp 

Antes a 18 

Ancnor 148 54 
ArtOov 1J2 JJ 34 
AiidrGr JO U 16 
AfKWilC 40 u 13 
Anhcvil 13 

AiWOUpfSAO 5J 
Arthur J8 17 18 
An mem m j is 
A nltwiy 446 12 7 
Ana cm? 28 2J 10 
ApcftPwt 
APChPurfLlO 112 
Aprwpf 748 1U 
ApPw p| 418 122 


BOx 12*6 
124 22ft 
37 72*6 
167 15ft 
19 Uft 
4 35 
738 46*4 
211 24ft 
101 28ft 
45 7Vt 
4028 64ft 
3363 30*4 

16 12ft 
29 19 

184 35ft 
216 39 

251 aft 

Itov 29ft 
48 26*4 
577 40ft 
4 lift 
213 23ft 
2303 33 

17 68ft 
5tP 1646 
HW 13 

3V 13ft 
353 10ft 
70 1 
268 18*4 
mtu 
6 33ft 


Committee, the policy-making arm of the Fed- 
eral Reserve, which met Tuesday and will meet 
again Wednesday, probably win “stay neutral” 
and not take overt actions to push interest rates 
down from current levels. 

Some analysts remained optimistic, however. 

“The market is gearing up to take out 1,400 
on the Dow Jones industrial average and win do 
so shortly," said Harry Vfllec of Sutro & Co„ 
Palo Alto, California. “We could have one very 
smart summer rally,” he said. 

AT&T was the most active issue, losing to 
23%. Richardson Vicks followed, adding ltt to 

m 

American Hospital Supply was third, off Hi to 
4014. Baxter Travenol Laboratories reportedly 
is trying to mitigate antitrust concerns of Amer- 
ican Hospital's board about Baxter’s S3. 6-bil- 
lion bid for the company. Baxter Travenol add- 
ed K to 15ft. 

In addition to IBM, oLher technology stocks 
also weakened. Digital Equipment lost 1ft to 
92ft, Sperry slid Ift to 5114, Burroughs lost ! to 


CHS* 

Lea OWBf.cWw I 

12 ft 12to 
21*6 22 + ft 
72 72V4 - ft 1 

15ft 15ft + ft ! 
88 88 — ft 1 

35 35 , 

45ft 4Sft-l 
24VS 244* 

27ft 20 
4ft 7 
63 64ft +1 
30 30ft + ft 
lift 12ft— Vi 
18ft 19 4. ft 

25 V. 35ft + ft 
38V* 38ft— ft 
2ft 2*4 — ft 
20ft 20ft— 'A 
26*6 26ft 
40 40 — ft 

1}V4 12*4 
23ft 23*4 + 'u 

8 ft 32ft + ft 
ft 48ft— ft 
1 * 1 * 16 ft f ft 
12ft 13**— ft 
13ft 13ft + ft 

*5 ,o 5 +w 

18ft 18ft + ft 
45ft 45ft +lft 
33ft 33ft + ft 


l)M 
KUtfiUm ted 

31ft 26 AOPW Dt 
39ft 18 AolDta 
15 8 AopUlAB 

24ft 15ft ArctiDn 
30ft 23ft ArIP Bf 
23% M ArttBSt 
24V 16 Ark la 
TW V. AiinRt 
12*4 lift Armada 
I5ft 4ft Armoa 
23*6 15ft Arateat 
24ft 15ft ArmiRb 
39ft Oft ArmWIn 
34ft 19 AroCn 
2516 12ft ArawE 
30‘6 16 Arlra 
23*6 14* Arvhl 
37ft 1716 Asorce 
34V* 30*4 AWION 
43ft 31ft AstlKJof 
69 47 AsdDC 

110ft 79 AsdODf 
24*4 1B*6 Amiane 
27ft 30ft AlCvEI 
64ft son Attach 
41 32ft AIlRe pt 
153 77 At i Rent 

18ft 10V* AltasCa 
32ft 18ft Auoat 
54ft 34ft AuloOl 
5 4ft Avotort a 
27ft 16ft AVEMC 


Dtr.no.PE MBS Waft LOW QuatOilH 


3JD 128 
1761 At 16 

-14B 8 16 
3JB 118 
80 U 7 
180 58 18 


3.10 1Q.1 
48 U 1 
UO 3A 631 
170 4.1 7 

a un 

72 8142 

80 38 B 

180 48 
198 98 
2*0 3.9 11 
4.75 4J 
160 77 10 
158 9.1 9 
480 67 n 
175 107 
180 28 

M 18 19 
80 U 22 

a 

60 2.1 14 


2 30 
2708 28ft 
ISO 13ft 
4370 23ft 

11 30ft 
86 22*6 

4732 18jb 

553 Jft 

14 te 411 
2734 39ft 
38 29W 
*7 14ft 
6 TSVi 
477 21V* 
154 21*4 
507 33ft 
.43 41ft 
843 67 
I 106ft 

12 22ft 
83 28ft 

JW7 59*4 
SOB* 36ft 
t MU* 
34 12 
133 22 
853 51*4 
SO 4*4 
12 20*4 


27*4 29*4— V. 
27ft 28ft— Oft 
13ft 13*6 
23ft 23ft + ft 
30ft 30**— V* 
22ft 32% + ft 
10ft 18ft + ft 

12ft 17ft— ft 
8ft 8*6— lb 
20ft 10*4— ft 

15ft 15%— ft 

37ft 37ft— 1ft 

29*6 2916- ft 
Mft 14ft + ft 
28** 28% 

20ft 21 + ft 

21*6 21ft— 14 
33_ 33 — W 
41ft 41ft + ft 
66*9 67 + ft 

10616 106ft — ft 
33ft 22ft + V* 
28ft 28ft— ft 
38ft 57U + ft 


36ft 36ft 
141ft 141ft +1 
11% 12 
Zlft 22 + ft 

50*4 51 -ft 
4ft 4ft + ft 
28ft 30*4 


12 Month S*. dost 

ft * Law Mode Mr. YU. PE WfcWatlLow QuotOrtN 

39*9 24ft Avery 80 18 13 385 31% 32ft 32ft— ft 

16W 10 Avion n 7 M3 16ft 15% 16ft + ft 

41 77 Atom JO 18 77 696 31 30% 30% — ft 

25ft 17% Avan 280 87 II 2140 22% 22% 22% 

309* 16ft AVdln 12 137 19% 19% 17*6—16 


57ft and Cray Research eased ft to 84%, Sony 
Carp, decimal ft to 16. 

CBS added ft to H6. It reported its second- 
quaner final net income was S69J3 million, or 
S2J3 a share, vs. $88.6 million, or $198 a share. 

International Paper lost % to 48 after report- 
ing its second-quarter net earnings fell to 57 
cents a share vs. SI -21 a share. 

Eastman Kodak dropped ft to 45ft. It an- 
nounced plans to enter the fiber-optics market 
through a newly formed division. 

RCA fell 1ft to 45ft and MCA rose 1ft to 64 
on news the companies halted merger talks late 
last week. MCA was a big loser Monday. 


18% 

35ft 
1714 

2 » in* 

2ft % 
56*6 27*4 

46% 31% 

35 2116 
5% 3 

62 <1*4 

SID 27 
5216 43 
44% ailo 

S. I 7 * 

22% M*4 
47 40 

76% 65% 
16ft lift 

75% 38* 
44 35 

13 7ft 

36 19 

24ft 18 
41% 22 
33% 17 
13% 8% 

34ft 17% 
18% 11*4 
26% 17% 

33 24% 

60% 46ft 
15% 12 
54% m 
8% 2% 

17% 19ft 
35% 22% 
94ft 69*6 
33 23% 

2716 17% 
42% 2916 
57 41% 

31 21% 

45ft 24ft 
17% 17% 
6V* 316 

b m 
is ie% 

21% 14% 
49ft 37% 
24% 18% 
38ft 23ft 
26% 17ft 
23% 13ft 
26% 17% 
33ft 2116 
38*6 14% 
58ft 38% 
47V* 29ft 

61 46 

39% 15*4 
42ft 28 
16% 
4% 
26 
63 
9 

10% 
W4 
25% 


BMC .121 62 

Baimeo Jo 17 12 te 

Skrlntf J! W 1 5 2353 

Bolder 31 IJ 11 78 

vIBaidU 46 

BallCt> 138 23 13 56 

Huffy Mf JO 7.1 MSI 

BoltyPk 11 64 

BaltGB 140 741 I 277 

BncOfW 1.10 3.1 12 238 

BanTex 78 

Bandog 170 2 JO 12 188 

BfcBo* 3M *A 4 1106 

BkBal Ft 4.710 9A 50 

Bkfttr £04 65 7 527 

BonkVb 1.12 16 10 4*7 

BnkAm 102 1± 11 4294 

BkArnpl 5.13B 1 IO 13CO 

BtAm pt UToIZ.1 398 

BkAmpf 188 68 

BkARtv UO 77 U 36 

BankTr 270 17 7 422 

BkTrpt <22 76 10 

Banner .tOe 7 IS 232 

Bard .44 17 15 202 

BornGo M U it 21 

Darnel 1 UJ4 Z8 TI 494 

BaryWr JO 12 13 309 

BASIX ,12b Id 13 IK 
Bousdl 78 27 20 1117 

BaWTr 77 13 6610666 

BovFIn 30 7147 39 

BavSfG 240 70 10 15 

Bearing 1JM 19 11 166 

Beat Co UO 57 I 1523 

Boat pt 378 57 7 

Bccsr AS 11 55 1M 
BoctnO 170 27 15 110 
Befcor 218 

BMeirPt 170 247 74 

BcUnH 40 U I 2 
DdHwi a U 11 465 
BotlAtl 670 77 9 900 

BCCg 278 157 

Bolllnd JH M 15 702 
Bdl5w m U ID 1839 
Beta AH M 17 26 147 

Botnls 1J» 37 11 11 

BBBfCp ZOO 44 11 299 
Bdoaorn 15 

B«ng*B 071 57 

Bortey 76 m 

BWP6 74 17 33 686 
Hamsn .40 Z4 2002 
BottlSIpfSJW 127 44 

Bomstpizn in 4i7 

Bworlv 72 7 21 633 
SftThr j» 33U1W 
Bteettn 37 137 

BhidcO j64 3.1 12 1141 

BICkHP ITS M 9 15 

Blair Jn 51 U F IU 
BIckHR 140 47 15 51 

Booings UW 23 14 2636 
Same 1.90 34 31 2244 
BotseC pfSJIO 87 383 

BoltBer .U A 28 318 
BORtens 172 3JB 11 1302 

BorgWo .« <2 TO 1557 

Mntm 13 17 

BasEd 174 78 8 46 

aosEpf am iOB 3002 

BosEPi- 1.17 115 11 

BO&Epr 146 107 13 

Bmrair 72 30 9 440 
BrlpSt t M 57 II 77 
BrtstM 178 30 10 3030 
BrstMpf ZOO VS 2 
BritPt 170a 63 7 300 

BrtTtop JOeU 5 

BiWfc . 251 

Brdcwv 172 57 25 1213 
BkvUG 3.12 73 8 75 

BkUGpt 247 100 7 

BkUGpf 375 na 0 

BwnSB 70 10 9 25 

BrwnGp lja <7 19 iS2 
BrwnF W Zl 18 597 
Brnstfk 100 17 8 881 
BrshWI 72 17 14 1311 
BwilcrH ZI4 1U 15 
BgrtnCt 12 26 

Burilnd 1+4 <2 74 427 

BrlNttl 140 12 9 4475 
BrINaat AS SO 3 
BUN t* 5740139 33 

Burndy M 17 12 63 

Burr on 270 <5 10 1129 
Buttrin 72 20 91 7 


39 139 
74 11 12 1141 
172 M 9 15 

76 U 94 161 
« 15 ,.51 
108 IS 14 2636 


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lft 

56% — ft 
17% — % | 
9ft— Ik! 
46 — ft 
35 

3 — ft i 
»% + %: 
55 - % 
Sl%— ft 
45 — 46 | 
31%—%. 
19% — 1* 
44% +1% 
68ft +1 I 
15% + ft 
30% + % 
73% — V* 
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11*6 

35%— ft 

23*6 

37% 

10ft— ft , 
12% 

34% + % 
15% + % | 
26**— ft 1 
84 — ft , 
34% 

3T% l 

57*6— % 
14**— Ik ! 
53% + ft 
3ft + ft I 
7 I 

15 

34 — ft 1 
94 + % 

31*6 

33 — % 
42ft— % 

30ft 

43ft- U 
teft 
4ft 

4% +% 
13 - % 
16% + % 
41 +-% 

20ft + % 
38% + % 
25 —ft 
23ft + ft 
20ft + ft 
33% + ft 
17ft— ft 
57 

44ft— % 
50 +1*4 

*0%+% 
26%— % 
40 

21% — ft 
7ft . 
41% + % 
tt - ft 
lift— ft 
13% — ft 
23*6 

27% + ft 
62% + ft 
130 +1 

2«ft + *6 
22% 

2*6— % 
25ft + % 
40ft + If, 
24*6 

35% — ft 
21 

29ft 

Sift— lft 
37% — ft 
30%— %■ 
lift + ft 
17ft— ft 
26ft— *6 
64ft— 1 
6ft 

51ft + ft 
11% + ft 
57ft— 1 
10ft 







‘X)kw, let's get out there and win 
one for the Awlgnpperr 


fe , 1 





Awlpip* is the world’s Finest yacht ctiarinj* system 
far* pleasure and racing crafts. For our WK4 .Annual 
Report, write: Grow Chemical Hu rope N.V., 
Oudestraat 8 Aanselaar, Belgium. Dept. G 


'i«. "te- i. 


. J 

!v^ 


Grow Group 

Awlgrip. Treewax, Devoe, tftroe of our well-known I bn 


brand names. 


Mi CJOtt 

Dh.YU.PE WteHMlLow OuBLC 


7 1% Butte* 

15 3ft Butttof 1051 


13 1% 1%. 1% 

9 4 3ft 3f% + ft I 


31ft Sift CBIln 1400 A3 11 629 22% 23- 22ft— % 

'S SES!-. 300 2d 20 8teltW61WftlW +ft 
JOB IJ - 9 79 79 77 

8ft 4% CCX 8 55 5% 5 5» 

59* g CIGNA 240 44 71 712. 50ft 58 58% + ft 

32*6 23ft Cl Got 2.75 8 3 181 31ft 31 31ft + ft 

BMf 50% CIGdf 4.10 70 - 287 S2ft J2 S2ft + ft 


Sgruw Modi . ■■ Pft VU.J»E fmHMiliW SSotl 

7% 2% CLC 40 3% 3ft VA 

99ft 23ft CNAFn 17 371 57ft 56% 50i%— V 

lift m* cnai 104 -no . a 11 % if* nS -y i 

30% 16ft CNW 53 ra 20ft 30* 20ft- j 

46ft WttCFCIBt 2J0 48 12 849 46 45ft Sft-? 

2ft 14ft CP NH 140 -M 10 SO 23ft 23% 23* ** 

ffl* j?ft CRIIMI 74 111 !»% 31^ Silt 




40 3% 3ft 3% I- s. 

17 371 57ft 54% 56*— l 1 ..’ 

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P.« Oner manim p‘ * 


^WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


: • 


international manager 


Firms See Fit Executives 
Helping Financial Health 




By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

' " Imentononal Herald Tribune 

ObUX)N — Executive iitaess is slowly coming to Europe. 
: : *? sucb H.S. companies as Rank Xerox 

\j London-based European headquarters of Xe- 

_J^° X t ^ or P-- and ITT Europe Lpc^ in Brussels, have in- 





'^Fitness programs 
help combat the 31- 
. effects of the 
executive lifestyle.” 


in.'oi' j 
'•7 ^'‘fnnii 


Blue \\ (e 

• '‘Kw 

• : iJo x 

- inn*: 

-jllIClDt 
r'j-ML 
:: i v Djfe 
"liiijari 


*71,...-- r-._ Jr-. »* * uuuk m oiusscis, nave m- 

S^boose fitness centers. 

^ mcb ** Marts & Spencer PIC STC 

A bbey Life Assurance Co. and United Biscuits T *d . are 

^^fimSsTadS 1 ” 5 f0r ** ™ pl ° ye “ by *"■ 

a 8 row >ng awareness in Britain that executives and 
, rce ne ®d to be looked after if only to get more miiwigp 
ps-tfrV-.tf them," says Jack ^ 

SSBm a director of Fitness ' 
r>^F«r.lndustry Ltd., a London- fitness programs 

3041 Ctoess con- i 1 _-l ' a. m 

^ShJtancy and management Help combat the lll- 

' Companies are starting to • e ® ec * s *be 
■^• -recognize that more relaxed, executive lifestyle.” 
fitter ana happier executives J 

work better. “Fitness pro- . 

grams help combat the ill -effects of the executive lifestyle,” said 
■ G^J^kards, who runs the Rank Xerox fitness program He 
described the executive lifestyle as one of deadlines, frequent 
travel and working weekends and extra hours. Companies pro- 
vide perks such as free vending machines , subsidized restaurants 
j and generous expense accounts, which, he noted, could l«id to 
. Overeating and alcohol abuse. 

“Nice companies are providing all this, but what are the costs 

- in terms of health?” Mr. Rickards said. “What companies provide 

leads to high blood pressure and possibly heart What 

they demand leads to stress and possibly neart disease. 

“If large companies subject their executives to this type of 
.lifestyle,” he said. “then, they owe it to their employees to help 
diem combat these ill-effects.” 

.’■••• Company fitness programs usually consist of a mwtirai screen- 

• „ ing and a physical assessment, followed by an individually 
_•« tailored exercise program. 

.> • Atypical fitness program demands three weekly sessions of 25 
minutes to one hour of muscle strengthening and aerobic exer- 
rises, such as skipping, hitting a punching ha g rowing, cy cling 
. and jogging. 

‘ ORPORATE fitness centers vary widely from small gyms 
I with an exercise cycle to large facilities equipped with the 
■ . ;V-4 latest equipment ITT Europe's fitness center in its Brus- 

- sds office building has a treadmill, s tationar y bikes, rowing 
machines and a multi-station where six people can exercise at the 
same time pulling or pushing weights. Rank Xerox also has 

. * : squash courts and a «»m» 

; 1 Most corporate fitness programs are available to all employees. 

Rank Xerox has a special fitness program designed for executives 

- whose “positions subject them to high levels of stress.” United 
V - Biscuits started its fitness program for managers but is now 

opening it to all employees. 

' According to some companies, the-drop-out rare is high. But 
/ there are several ways to help you keep up with what is good for 
you. The first are out-and-out bribes. Some U.S. comp anies give 
special incentives to make sure their executives keep fit ITT gives 

- awards. At Mesa Petroleum Carp, in Amarillo. Texas, if you 
' exercise, you get a free breakfast or lunch. 

Rank Xerox takes a more psychological approach. “There are 

• "three motivating factors: fear. Guanas and vanity,” says Mr. 

RiSards. **Fear, because if you don’t do something, you will have" 
areal health problem; finance, because if you’re sick the compa- 
ny will replace you with somebody else, and vanity. Remember 
what you looked like when you were 21?” 

Two-thirds of Rank Xerox employees work out regularly in the 

(Continued on Plage 11, CoL 1) 


United 
is now 


OrMsBMeN J«ty9 

f c DM. Ff. IU_ OWr. BJ. SJ=. Y«n 

Amsterdam UU 4 SB I1KW ■ J7JB* 0.TO* SSI" 1X37* UUMV 

BnSMta(a) JMOS OUSTS XUSS 4421 115*5* 17JB MM5 1U7- 

Frankfurt zm *JC1 3USM* 15435* 8U5- *J41 • 119J4* 1J085* 

‘ -nlim till 1.345 *31*25 122B7 UUJ» A54H 8UI 1* BUS 

Mlta 1JB2AS 2J74W 639 JO 2UU0 54730 31 J4 TOM 7JU7 

1tawY«rV(C] 0731 » IMIS 9-015 1J1JJ0 3335 JUS 2419 8*05 

Porta - 9335 11247 JO** *J61 X 2701 8 11M9* 14295 MR* 

TafcTfr US.H 33045 KL*4 2709 12M3* 7120 *09.15* «32 

ZorlcB 2X7*5 3J7B2 KU9* 27^85* 11309* 7C8* *.1*95- 14131* 

1 ECU 03(03 0559 2JS&2' 4047* 1/G7.72 25*U *5^05 15834 U45W 

1 1DR 151057 0.74829 3501*1 WMS lAK S57W 40M01 2S3M MS 

Omna* In London and Zi/rletl flrftw* In other European centers. Now Ytirt rates at 4 PM. 
faj CtaMiwraM franc lb) Amounts needed la buy one nouM tel Amounts iwaUafto buy one 
flWtar f *3 Units of 100 (x) Units of 1-000 (y) units of 1QM0N.Q.: not Quoted; HA.: notavaHatHo. 
W To tar one poontfr IUS.\JU 

Other Pallar Yalnw 

comney Mr 1155 fttrww per U5J Comae* nr W Ouromet pa- USX 

An*4.c«tivl 080 Rn. morkka *52*. Mcknr.rtno. 2^ S-Kor-.wo, W*40 

AuttroLS 15734 GiWkSrac. 134.10 Uax.0000 31*50 5 Km. peseta 17010 

Antr.tdA. 2091 Hobo Kano S 7J418 tan . .Me 8543 ft-Qlo yeo 

8taa.tta.tr. 4028 iw6pa rupee 1135 PWLpeeo 10*4 Wwl •JWJ 

Bozflcnz. 594000 IndorupWi 1,11950 Port Marie 17151 TgriM J H.l« 

Ondnt 1J53* IrlstI 0951 Soodlrtaol 1451 Torftttt Rro 5 3X50 

' Doris* krone 1048 terutal iM. 1^9850 Slue. S 2226 UAE ftSee 34725 

MptaOd 07782 Kuwolti (Jlnar 03071 OAfr.npri 12SJ1 VMttMIta. 1420 

< sterttaa: 12*9S Kish £ 

Sources: Bonmto Ou Benelux t Brussels): Banco ComrrwrckOe itaHono (Milan); Borne Mo- 
toaOe to Parts (Ports!; Bank of Tokvo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAH (dinar, rival, dkhaml. 
Ottioraato from Reuters andAP. 


Currency Rates 


CW9MCT P or U55 
AraM.«Bstnrt 080 
Awtraus 1J734 
Antr.tcU. 2091 
8taa.lta.tr. 4028 
Brediem. 5.9*050 
CmdktaS 1253* 
DoUHilortioe 1048 
Bentpoead 07782 


C u r r —ey per IIU 
S-Kor.won 87*40 
Spun. Peseta 17010 
Sataktwa 099 
TBtaanS *000 
TM britf 27.1*5 
TurfttaDRra 53150 
UAEdhiwm 1472 
VoeetboHv. 1420 


Interest Rates 


taracBmary Depostm 


Dollar D-Mark Franc SlerllBg Fraoe ECU SDR 

In***, Tta-77- 5*w5»u 5 4* 12 ^17 lfl^HJW 9WA 75* 

2 moan. 7H-7*. 5Vk-5U 5-5Mi 12!thl2ta lOlh-lRik 91taW 75* 

laiMta 74V7* 5V*-S*. S-M 12ta-17«i 10ta-109fc 9W4U. 75* 

4 nmatkl 7 5b-75h F*I'5M 55*-5Vi 12(*-12l* 101b-lD5k 9ta^5* 7 9* 

I nor 7*7*, SVSVfi 5ta-5»k 1WMZ 1UM1H »«r0>W S** 

Sources; Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FF): Lloyds Bank (ECU): Reuters 
(SORj. Rates to interbank deoaslts of SI million mMnwn tor mootvafenty. 


y fey IMtooey Rates July 9 

L WM Uutas. Close pri*. 

1 ■ HschM Rota 7W 7V, 


7VS 7V, 
71k Tli'li 
PflneRan *W 9vs 

■"MriemlWe 0 on BMW 

^ Paper 90-177 Aow 7*0 7*5 

HmriTRwserv BIBS 420 4.90 

Treesarr BlBt 4.97 4.M 

caiiOAdeyi 72S 7a 


OrttHBden 




I2S 72S 
725 72S 


SiSw *** 

**•*» tattrtao* 


450 450 

SJ5 5*0 
S3) 555 

550 &S 
550 540 


IIP* W* 
10't W1/M 
18ta 101714 

10ta iota 

101/14 Ml '14 


Aslan Dollar Deposits 

Mr 9 

1 meota 75*-7<k. 

2 monte* 7«.-75* 

3RMltU 751,-75* 

4 monte * 75*-7ta 

Imr M-Sta 

Source: Reuters. 


IJ^. Money Market Fuds 

July 9 

ItoTtB Lynch RcoOf Assets 
3i dav anran »te«: » & 

Telmta Intaresl Rota index: OA. 

Source: Merrill Ltrtch, AP 


Gold 


Btak Bow Rata 

tita lift 


AJH. 

PAL 


13 U 

Hon* Kona 

31455 

JUS) 

i\ fltaovTrMtarrBn 

11 »/32 11 Urt* 

Luxcndwuru 

31*50 

— 

*— ua iBtamak 

1 is.' 14 It 15/14 

Part* (1Z5 kilo) 

31*4* 

317AS 

-,isa 


zmdi 

JU45 

JlifiO 


London 

3USD 

3K8S 

: •? ******* 

5 5 

HnrTgit 

— 

31330 


\ •Merletarteric 


4 3/1* 63/14 
4 5/14 6 S/1* 


****»-■ RfMn Commerzbank, C/tdft 

tmWl Uards Book, Bank of Tokyo 


July 9 . 

am. PM. Clive 
Hone Kang 31*55 3U5D +1A 

LnxenAaura 314JD — +175 

Paris (115 kUo) 314** 31 7 AS +*J0 

toiidl 3U45 31550 +550 

London 3M50 3M85 +540 

HiwYaift — 31320 - 250 

LwcnmOoura. Parts and London official fix- 
ings; Hong Kang and ZurtcD opening and 
dosing prices: New York Comet r current 

contract. Alt prices In US Suer ounce. 

Source: Routers, 


MmUiSSSribunc. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 




U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

Page 9 


German The Comforts of Home 

Steel Plan Four Seasons 

ri ii. 1 Hotels Pamper 

(Jailed Off RireinAccFlitP 


and More 


3-Way Merger 
Met Resistance 


' DUSSELDORF. West Germany 
— A plan that .would have created 
West Germany’s second largest 
steelmaker, by merging Krupp 
Stahl AG, Australia’s CRA Ltd. 
and the stedmaking activities of 
Klfickner-Werke AG has col- 
lapsed, (he three companies an- 
nounced Tuesday. 

The companies said in a joint 
statement that they agreed to indef- 
initely postpone me plan, first an- 
nounced last October, because the 
“general dimate” surrounding the 
proposal indicated that they could 
not wm the all-rotmd support need- 
ed for the prqect to succeed. 

It added that Krupp and 
Kldckner were unable to deity 
their own- reorganization programs 
any longer because of the sched- 
uled expiration at the end of this 
year of European Community-ap- 
proved steel subsidies. 

The failure was widely expected. 
Union nffiriak tain ihg merger, 
due to have been completed by the 
mA of June, foundered on dis- 
agreements over the value of 
raodener's assets and on political 
resistance that blocked agreement 
on state aid needed by the m«g ed 


Through the merger, widely seen, 
as an important move towards 
streamlining the German steel in- 
dustry and reducing overcapacity, 
Krupp and Klfickner expected to 
save 250 wwlKon Deutsche marks 
(about $84 mOlioo) a year. 

The merged company, which was 
to be been called Stahlwerke 
Kropp-KlGckner GmbH, would 
have been the second largest steel- 
maker in West Germany, with an- 
nual crude steed production of 
around 9 miltion tons and a work 
force of 43,000. Krupp and CRA 
would have taken 35-percent stakes 
and Klbckner the remaining 30 
percent 

Opposition from the state gov- 
ernment of Lower Saxony to the 
planned closure of a Klfickner mill 
there, with the loss of 2,000 jobs, 
was cine of the mam stumbling 
Modes to the merger. Approval by 
both Bonn and regional state gov- 
ernments was a precondition for 
-payment of public aid. . - . 

Klfickner and Krupp wanted 350 
million DM in subsidies to cover 
half the cost of-the merger, saying 
they could not set up the new com- 
pany without state help. Senior of- 
ficials of both companies met 
Chancenor Helmut Ktml last week. 


Hotels Pamper 
Business Elite 

By Douglas A. Martin 

New York Timet Service 

TORONTO— It is early on a 
weekday morning at the Pierre 
Hotel in Manhattan. Surrounded 
by superb flower displays, busi- 
ness executives in fine suits talk 
in subdual voices about the 
coming day’s activity. 

• “I fed as comfortable in this 
hotel as 1 would fed in my own 
home,? says Barton G. Herman, 
president of H & H Associates, a 
Boston textile and apparel mak- 
er. And well he might. When be 
is not at home with his family or 
traveling in Europe or Asia’ on 
business, be spends more than 
100 rights a year in the Pierre. 

Geniu Meyer, a German shoe 
executive, likes the Pierre enough 
uoi to care what it costs, “some- 
thing like $245 a night,” he 
guesses. He appreciates the way 
be can leave his bag with a bell- 
man, leave for a business meet- 
ing and then return to find his 
dothing neatly hung. 

The Pime, one of 19 hotels 
run by tbe privately held Four 
Seasons Hotels Ltd. of Toronto, 
is ritaMfjiMd for only the most 
discriminating business travd- 
ers. those who might request 
feather pillows and Irish linen 
towels or be accustomed to such 
routine Four Seasons courtesies 
as having a limousine dispatched 
to the airport with a forgotten 
artide. 

Such attention to luxurious 
detail has provided the 24-year- 
old coomany with a coveted 
niche within the industry. Charg- 
ing rates that are about a fifth 
higher than those of its competi- 
tors, Four Seasons believes that 



Japan Planning 
Some Relaxation 
Of Trade Rules 


FburSeasons Hotel 


Isadora Sharp, chairman, at Toronto's Four Seasons. 


it can best indulge Its guests at 
holds that generally nave no 
more than 200 or 300 rooms. 

Already, five of its hotels are 
rated among the world’s top 50 
in the most recent poll of leading 
bankets conducted by Institu- 
tional Investor magazine. The 
magazine deemed Four Seasons’ 
Ritz Carlton in Chicago the na- 
tion’s best, and the Four Seasons 
Hotel in Toronto was judged 
Canada's besL Its other three ho- 
tels on the list are the Pierre, the 
Four Seasons in Washington and 
London’s Inn on tbe Park. 

Building on its reputation, the 
company is in the midst of an 
ambitious expansion. It recently 
opened a hotel in Boston and 
now has 1 1 in the United States. 
By 1990 tbe company plans to be 
manag in g 25 hotels at presti- 
gious locations ranging from 


Paris to Beverly Hills to Tokyo. 

But despite its best efforts the 
company’s profits hare fallen in 
tbe last several years, and it has 
watched the general outlook for 
the luxury market become 
douded. Classy foreign chains, 
such as Air France’s Meridien 
Hotels and Aer Lingus's Dunfey 
Hotels, are entering the Ameri- 
can market and heating up the 
competition. And Hyatt, ml (on, 
Sheraton. Ramada, Wes tin and 
Holiday Inns are increasingly 
targeting — and often winning 
— tbe top-echelon business trav- 
eler. dtner through new luxury 
lodgings or with special floors of 
existing hotels. 

“Were starting to see a top- 
ping out of the luxury market.” 
said David Arnold, a national 
partner of Laventbd ft Hor- 
(Co n t in n ed on Page 11, CoL 4) 


Dollar Continues in Broad Decline 


The Axsodated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar con- 
tinued its broad droKne Tuesday, 
dropping to levds last seen in 1984, 
but wound np above its lows of the 
day as some traders bought dollars 
late in the session to take profits 
from its earlier steep slide. 

In Frankfurt, the U.S. currency 
plunged to as low as 23485 Deut- 
sche marks before ending at 2.9570, 
down more than fire pfennigs from 
Monday’s late rates of around 
3-0100: In later New York trading. • 
the dollar closed at 2.9615, op from 
its day’s lows but still down from 
Z9710 on Mondty. 

In Paris, the dollar fell to 9.0350 
French francs from 9.1550 Mon- 
day. its lowest level since Nov. 8, 
1984. In later trading in New York, 


the dollar briefly slipped below 9 
francs before recovering slightly to 
9.0150 francs against 9.0450 late 
Monday. 

The overall drop in tbe dollar 
was attributed to a growing percep- 
tion that “the U.S. economy is not 
in that good shape” said Jeffrey 
Brummeite, a corporate currency 
trader at living Trust Co. in New 
York. 

Intensive speculation that the 
Fed would cut its discount rate on 
loans to member banks by a half 
point, to 7 percent, also pressured 
the dollar, dealers said. 

Contributing to the selling senti- 
ment was the dollar’s drop Monday 
below 3 DM, a level viewed as a-key 
barrier. 

The British pound, underpinned 


by high interest rates, was the prin- 
cipal beneficiary of the dollar’s 
weakness and has Himiwl to levels 
last seen more than a year ago. 

In London, the British currency 
traded as high as 51.3700 before 
endhm tbe day at SI J650, up mare 
trim 2 cents from $1.3448 on Mon- 
day. In later trading in New York, 
the pound was quoted at $13680. 
up from $13505 Monday. 

Other late dollar rates in New 
York, compared with late rates 
Monday, included: 2.4790 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.4920; 33350 
Dutch guilders, down from 33500; 
1,913.00 Italian lire, up from 
1,896.00; and 1 3536 Canadian dol- 
lars, down from 13587. Against the 
Japanese yen, the dollar slipped to 
24435 from 245.88 on Monday. 


Bv John Burgess 

U tufungion Post Service 

TOKYO — Japan, seeking to 
blunt criticism of its trade prac- 
tices. announced plans Tuesday for 
reforms of government rules that 
foreign companies say impede their 
sales in Japan. 

The announcement came as 
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
sone and two of his cabinet minis- 
ters were about to make trips 
abroad to countries that are among 
Japan's strongest critics. 

The measures, approved Tues- 
day at a meeting of cabinet mem- 
bers and leaders of the ruling Lib- 
eral Democratic Party, were 
presented as goals and principles, 
rather than in specific form. Many 
will require acts of the Diet, or 
parliament, although that appears 
to be assured. 

U.S. trade experts here expressed 
hope that the measures would im- 
prove market access. Herbert F. 
Hayde, president of the American 
Chamber of Commerce in Japan, 
called it “a good set of objectives” 
but said *Tm really going to look to 
see what the details are going to 
be.” 

Many Japanese officials, howev- 
er, contending their country is al- 
ready an essentially free market, 
say that such measures can have 
only superficial effect on Japan's 
trade surpluses. 

The announcement was timed to 
smooth the way for a visit to 
France. Italy and Belgium that Mr. 
Nakasone will begin later this 
week, according to Makoto Kur- 
oda. chief or the foreign trade po- 
lity bureau of the Ministry of Inter- 
nationa] Trade and Industry. 

The announcement also is keyed 
to foreign tours by the minister of 
international trade and industty, 
Keijiro Murata, and Foreign Min- 
ister Shin taro Abe. Mr. Murata al- 
ready has departed on a tour to 
France, Canada and the United 
States, and Mr. Abe is scheduled to 
leave Wednesday for Malaysia to 
attend a meeting of foreign minis- 
ters of member nations of the Asso- 
ciation of Southeast Asian Nations 
and their allies. 

Japan is under mounting pres- 
sure from trading partners around 
the world to rein in its surpluses 
and open its market further. Last 
year’s surplus with the United 
Slates alone came to $37 billion. 

But imbalances continue to 
grow. Figures released Tuesday by 
the Ministry of Finance showed a 
record surplus in Japan’s overall 
trade accounts of $17.7 billion in 
tbe first six months of this year. 


based on preliminary figures. That 
compared with S 1 3.5 billion in the 
like period last year. 

Tuesday's measures are meant to 
give added form to an “action pro- 
gram” that Mr. Nakasone prom- 
ised last April to devise. His gov- 
ernment announced in June its 
intention to cut tariffs on more 
than 1,800 product categories as 
pan of that program. 

Many of Tuesday's measures 
touch on technical siandards that 
products must meet to be sold here 
Foreign companies complain that 
Japan's system is too strict and 
time-consuming and tends to dis- 
courage introduction of their 
goods. They also chafe under rules 
that in many cases require that test- 
ing already done in their home 
countries be repeated in Japan. 

The government pledged to re- 
duce tbe number of items that arc 
covered by various certification 
systems and to simplify standards 
that are to remain in puce. 


Lloyd's Expels 
4 Members After 
Investigation 


LONDON — Lloyd’s of 
London said Tuesday that it 
had expelled four members, in- 
cluding three former officials of 
Alexander Howden Group, fol- 
lowing findings by Lloyd's dis- 
ciplinary committees. 

Tbe committee found evi- 
dence of conspiracy, misappro- 
priation of funds and falsifica- 
tion of accounts in attempt to 
secretly acquire stakes in Bas- 
que du Rhone el de la Tamise, 


Lloyd’s said. 
Expelled 


Expelled were Kenneth 
Grab, Ronald Comery. Jack 
Carpenter and Mario Benbas- 
sat, Lloyd's said. Mr. Grub was 
chairman and Mr. Comery and 
Mr. Carpenter deputy chairmen 
at Howden. an insurance bro- 
ker that now is a subsidiary of 
Alexander ft Alexander Ser- 
vices Inc. Mr. Benbassat was 
managing director of the Ban- 
que du Rhone. Lloyd’s said. 

The Lloyd's investigation fol- 
lowed AAA’s discovery of al- 
leged irregularities al Howden, 
which manages underwriting 
syndicates at Lloyd’s, involving 
asset shortfalls of up to S55 mil- 
lion. A&A acquired Howden in 


Enthusiasm for High-Tech Industries Is Waning in Malaysia ® TAPMAN 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 

PENANG, Malaysia' — K^i- 
technology industries, once praised 
as the answer to many of Malay- 
aa’s development needs, are turn- 
ing out to be something of a disap- 
pointment, officials say. 

Lured by the establishment of 
free-trade zones, plentiful skilled 
labor, good transportation and 
communications that were better 
than in neighboring Thailand and 
Indonesia, companies from the 
United States, Europe and Japan 
opened plants at a rapid pace dnr- 
ingthepast 10 years. 

The foreign companies created 
jobs and diversified an economy 
that had been dependent cm rubber 
plantations and tin mines. 

Dozens of electronic companies 
— among them Hewlett-Packard 
Co„ Advanced Micro Devices Inc., 


Mitsubishi Net 
Up 20% in Year 

Return 

TOKYO — Mitsubishi Corp. 
said Tuesday that its group net 
income in the year ended 
March 31 rose 19.8 percent, to 
311 billion yen ($130 million), 
from 26.8 mffiou yen a year 
earlier. Sales rose 9 percent, to 
17,221 billion yen, from 15.815 
billion. 

The company said its exports 
rose to 2.834 billion yen In the 
year from 2,695 bi&ton a year 
earlier, while rales of imported 
goods rose to 5,314 billion yen 
from 5328 billion a year earlier. 

Tbe company predicted that 
its consolidated net income for 
the year ending next March 31 
would rise to between 34 billion 
and 35 bifiioa yen. Sales axe 
expected to rise by 3 to 4 per- 
cent, to about 17,800 bdlion 
yen, the company said. It added 
that exports to China are likely 
to continue active this year 
while shipments to the United 
States are expected to remain at 
current levels. 


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TeL: 3236494. Tbu mm 


National Semiconductor Corp., 
Motorola Inc, ITT Corp. and Intel 
Corp. — made Penang Island the 
carter of Malaysian high-technol- 
ogy development and helped the 
country become the leading export- 
er of integrated circuits to tbe Unit- 
ed States. 

But Malaysians, from Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 
to local officials, say that what the 
foreign companies did not do was 
transfer technology or stimulate 
the growth of local support indus- 
tries. 

“They import the plans, make 
the pieces and send the finished 
product back home,” Qian Boon 
Liang, deputy director of the elec- 
tronics division of Malaysia’s In- 
dustrial Development Authority, 
said recently in Kuala Lumpur. 

“This is mainly an assembly op- 
eration. and (he degree of integra- 
tion in Malaysian industry is very 
shallow. Research and develop- 
ment facilities are not established 
hoe,” he added. 

American and other foreign 
companies say that this is not en- 
tirely true, citing training pro- 
grams, promotions to management 
positions and steady increases in 
workers’ salaries. As a result, Ma- 
laysian workers are now the highest 
paid in the region after these in 
Singapore. 

But it is tine, they concede, that 
over the last year Malaysia and 
other Asian countries have suffered 
from the slump in personal com- 
puters and the overstocking of in- 
ventories. 

Herein Penang, where the Bayan 
Lepas Free Trade Zone could be 
mistaken for an industrial park in 
the United States, workers are on 



Mahathir bin Mohatnad 

four-day weeks or involuntary holi- 
days. 

Last month National Semicon- 
ductor announced that it was clos- 
ing its Seremban plant, outside erf 
Kuala Lumpur, because it had ex- 
panded ana modernized plants in 


Penang, Malacca, Bangkok and 
Manila. 

National Semiconductor said 
that it had invested about $30 mB- 


would spend $20 million more this 
year but that the Seremban plant 
could not expand because of insuf- 
ficient space and the lade of certain 
testing equipment The shutdown 
is expected to result in layoffs for 
most of the 1,000 employees at tbe 
plant 

There have been cutbacks in Sin- 
gapore, too. There, General Elec- 
tric Co., the country’s biggest pri- 
vate employer, recently laid off 950 
employees. Its work force has been 
shrinking during the past year. 

But the decline in personal com- 
puter sales is not the only problem. 
There have been charges from 
Washington that advanced elec- 
tronic components stolen in South- ' 
east Asa and sold on the black 
market are finding their way to tbe 
Soviet Union. 

Diplomats, plant managers and 
Malaysian government officials 
deny the assertion, with some say- 
ing that they are more concerned 
that there is nothing in the country 
worth Moscow's effort to steaL 

“We don’t even talk to our com- 
petitors," a company official said. , 
“So we certainly don’t talk to Rus- 
sians.” 

A coomany official said that al- 
though there had been some theft 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTREND II 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yeWed the foHowng 
*ter afl cfiwges: 

IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: — 24% 

B4 1984: --34% 

4*0 1 

JULY 3, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U3. $89,999.94 


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• the suppK and demand focea that pushed 
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problems in Penang, these ap- 
peared to be strictly criminal activi- 
ties, which have now been curtailed 
by improved police work, and that 
the oversupply of electronic com- 
ponents on the world market had 
reduced the motivation for steal- 
ing. 

Company security at tbe Bayan 
Lepas zone is intense, and some 
American companies have had se- 
curity briefings by Washington of- 
ficials. 

Still, of more concern to the Ma- 
laysians is tbe future of their high- 
teat industry. Mr. Chan of the In- 
dustrial Development Authority 
said the government was stepping 
up its efforts to get foreign compa- 
nies to invest in research in Malay- 
sia so that local people could gel 
advanced training in the laborato- 
ry, if not on the job. 

At the same time, the prime min- 
ister’s office has opened a Malay- 
sian Institute of Micro Electronic 
Systems in Kuala Lumpur. Prime 
Minister Mahathir rays be wants to 
see the country begin to design its 
own microchips, as other Asian na- 
tions are doing. 


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I7«tanffi 
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Sis. caw 

Dm. YU. PE Wte HlflhLfm QyaLCh’Be 


(Continued from Page 8) 


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1AJ 


9B0Z53W 

52 

52 

55 

25% CnPpfE 7.72 

1A2 


B00Z 55 

54* 

54 W— * 

55* 

25 CnPptG 7J6 



700Z 56 

54% 

56 +1 

31 

,1* CnPprV 4J0 

IAS 


2M 

3, 

39ft 

30ft— ft 

35% 

tto OPprU 3J0 

US 


93 

25% 

34ft 

24% — to 


IQto CnPorT 3.78 



6i 

26* 

35% 

25ft + * 

54 

25ft CnP PfH 7JS 

14.4 


600Z S3* 

53to 

53W + W 

27V 

,,to CnP prP 4JQ0 

14.7 


59 

27ft 

27to 

27to— ft 

27W 

10’, OPprP X98 

14J 


26 

27ft 

27 to 

27to 

36* 

10% CnP prN 3J5 

MO 


BU 

27* 

26V 

27* +,* 


77 . CnP pr/W 2 JO 

,U 


,1 

,aw 

IB 

,8ft + ft 

16% 

7 CnPprL X23 

1X9 


35 

,4* 

,A 

14 — ft 

27ft 

I, CnPprS 43B 

(A4 


,22 

28* 

27* 

2B + ft 

17 '■« 

7to CnP prK 7A3 

1X9 


15 

17% 

,7% 

17* 

474. 

23') CnlfCo 2J0 

59 


1413 

44* 

43% 

44 — to 


10' ■ 4*. Coni III 

4to V Coni II rl 
49 12 CnilllPt 

4W V CM I HO n 
12 4W Cnflnfo 
J4V lBto ConlTel 
38*. 34V CtDofa 
34'o 26V Ccmwa 
3V 1 vICMkU 
3SV 27 Cooar 


» Coool p< 2.90 


34 17 
4.9 It 


30V 12V CowTr 40 

27 15 Cooevls 40 

19to 10 V CoPwld 44 

27V 17' s Corauro J4 

IS'- low carein J* 

44'* JO 4 * Como s 148 

48 2$W Csrsik 1.00 

77 to 44' T Co. Cm J* 

10 4to Crolo 

38") 32 Crane l-40b 44 11 

86’. 41 CravRs 18 

I9to MW CrnN.1 2.11 11 J 

514* 49 .; CrckN af IJ9e 13 

23’ j 18V CrmaK 140 Si 11 

68'. J*W CrwnC* IS 

44’* 27T, CrwZel 110 

50'* 43V CrZei af 443 

65'. 50V CrZot PIC440 74 

JO 20V Cu’bro 40 24 

33V 17W Cullneu 

88W SB'4 CumEn 240 3.4 

IQto Of* Cumnc l.lOalO.* 

38 to 30'. Currw 140 IS M 

52'. 271: CVCIOPS MO 24 10 

23': 

15V 


76 
23 
12 V. 


4S'f 

. 

*3 to 45 DPL Of 
40V 231. OeanFd 
331. 34H Deere 
Z*W Mto DdmP 
52V 27 OellaAr 
7V 4to Doltono 
441* MV Ol»CH S _ . 

MW 18 DenMis ljfl 4j I] 


110 7to 7 1 * TV* — W 

364 IV IV IV 

30 4*V 48 4BV 4- V 

897 to V 9k 

9 84 114* IIW life 

74 9 1116 Mto 23V 23V— V 

2.7 1039 2*W M'i Mto — V 

34 13 901 Jfto J4V 34V 

91 IV Ito lto— V. 
44 M 1558 34V 34 Mto 6 to 

74 74 38'<> 37W 38 + V 

24 4 IS 15V ISto 15V + to 

1.7 17 7495 ?4to 23V M — V 

11 10V 10V low 

SO 26V 2*V 26V— V 

30 liw lito llto 

2.9 IB 1002 44V 43V 43V— V 

24 2*3 46W 46V 4*W — V 

J 23 25 7J 74V 74V 

9 8 V BV 8to — to 

316 37 V 37to 37W— to 

361 14V BJV Mto— V* 

2 IVto 19to 19U 

I1J9 5fW 51 51V + fe 

29 21V 21 W 21V— W 

207 67V 67V 47V— W 

2J M 1103 39V 38V 39V *■ V 

9J 112 SO 49V SO ♦ to 
32 S9*j 596. S9W + ti 
9 60 30to 29W 30V +1W 

31 3383 25V 24 W 24V — V 
3 684 4AV 65V 45V— V 
15 lOto 10W 101* 

5 34V 34W 34V 

19 49 V 49'to 49 'A — 


15% Dallas 

.44 

X7 

9 

94 

18 

,7ft 

17V + * 

9% DairaonC 

21) 

2J 


144 

in 

9ft 

9ft 

3, 'a DonoCo 

128 

At 

S 

633 


» 

34*— ft 

5ft Oananr 





BW 


8* Daniel 

Mb ,J 


296 

10% 

,0* 

70* — * 

73% Danru-s 



12 

2056 

36ft 

35* 

35V— V 




11 

2119 

36ft 

35* 

as*— lw 

II', Da fan, 




S02 

17(1 

12% 

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.24 

Z7 

9 

45 

9 

a* 

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IJ 

9 

145 

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74 

IJ 

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62 

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40V— lto 

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100 

10J 

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231 

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34 IJ 18 524 37 

33 29 M12 ' 
73 10 30* 

1* a 


w» 

r .*2 

sa 


M32 S3 
SV 


62 63 +114 

36V 36V— to 
30V Mto * to 
25V 2SV* 

50'A SOW— IV 
51, 5to 


.92 24 M 485 40V 39V 40 + to 


37ft 

37* DrSgJe 

1.40 

4.) n 

301 35 

34* 

34*— W 

17% 

12'.. 

DeiEd 

UB 

?J 1 

1394 17% 

17 

17* + ft 

80 

59 

DclE ol 

9J2 

11.9 

20to 78 

AJ 

7S 

67% 

4H 

DelE ol 

u a 

iu 

7,0z 65 

65 

45 

*5% 

46* 

D«1E of 


11.7 

670Z 63ft 

62 

UV +,ft 

64% 


DOTE of 

/M 

iu 

320x 43 


63 

a* 

19’# DE pfF 

2.75 

iu 

1 25 

25 

25 


38V 201* DE orP J.24 11.9 

777. it)* DE ofO 3.13 11.9 

27-5 19"; OE pIP 3.12 I2fi 

»') » DE ofB 2 75 10.8 

Mto 21'. DEpfO 340 12.1 

29V Mto DE ptM HI 124 

33 * 24'. DE orL *J» 116 

34V 24',j DE OIK 4 12 117 

114' Y 781-: DEpU 15*8 139 

70', 13’. OelE or 240 11.4 

7« 17V Gc.ier 40 34 II 

15V . 9V OiCiar m *1 
25W 17 DIQlaal M 1A 


51 24 W Mto Mto— to 

45 76V 25V » — W 

2 25V 2Jl« 25V + V 

38 28 "a 27V 28 

52 38 W. 28 38V + V 

5 31V Jlto 31V + V 

36 37V 32V 32V + V 

lllto 113 113 — to 
0 20 19V 20 

48 22 21 W 21W— W 

61 1JV Jito 15V + V 

U»x 26 26 » +1W 

" 3»V 28V 28V 


21* 

IS’. DkjmS 

, 76 

9.6 

10 

9757 

18ft 

lBto 

,8H 

JBH 


420 

IOJ 


122 

38', 


38 

W 

37 Dienias 

UK 

Z6 

9 

545 

38* 

37* 

38% 

26% 

77% Digital 



11 

3U6 

93* 

gift 

91V 

« 


l.M 

,J 

SB 

1974 

B9V 

BBto 

Hft 

27'. 

IS OEM 



7 

68 

26ft 

Hft 

34% 





J 

83 

5* 

5* 

iW 

11% 

6% Dome n 

.12 



4852 

7ft 

7* 

7* 

lift 


2.72 


<0 


33% 

33ft 

33% 

21', 

16 Donald 

66 

U 

9 

61 

18V 

IBft 

l*% 

61', 

IB Don Icy 


XO 

16 


52ft 

S'ft 

57ft 

JJ't 

Sto Dort«v 

170 

Iff 

14 

76 

37 

Jf% 


42* 

32*. Dover 

J2 

X, 

M 

379 

39ft 

Wft 

39* 

36% 

15% Dg-Ch 

■ JO 

SJ 

13 

3,86 

]»■ 

Mfe 


51ft 

Mto Dow J n 

78 

1.7 

H 

1161 



47% 

,3‘ ) 

11 Drava 

JO 

16 


7B 

lift 

13* 



IS'. Drosr 

JU 

37 

16 

1.170 

21% 

21* 



,4ft Drg.p 

300 

9+ 


,0 


Mft 



2S’« Drevlus 


ID 






6r • 

)3to duPgni 

JOO 

SJ 


1741 





11 duPnlcI 

X5B 

• 2 


4 





39 duPnl pf 

A SO 

0J 


63 

48’. 

48* 

49* 


35W 23*o DvkeP 348 1.1 
85 44I-.- Duke pf 170 HM 

BO 1 . *1 Duke Pf 840 104 
75V 53 Duke of 710 104 
27 21V DukeBl 249 110 

35 28'. Duke PI 315 111 

*04; Duke Of 848 104 


1974 34V MV 34V 

JOz B3W 83W 83W— V 

50z 7B 78 78 

100* 741, 74W 7<w + W 

1 Mto MV Mto t to 

8 MV 34V 34V 

150* 79to 78 18 —2 


ni« <774! nunBrd 2.70 id fllj 97 B5Vb ^ ^ 

?T fT> D«u 2» «? 3 8 2*19 »> 16V MV + - 


14 21 
1.1 

14 f* 
41 8 


(« i 13to DiU PI 210 123 

llto 13to Dun one 110 11.9 

621: 43W DvOPf 740 124 

16V) 8' : DyCOPI 40 54 

26W 17’> DvnAm 40 

42 28V EGG -48 

17V M EQkn 146 

33V 22W E S?5l JO 

28to 70 EoBltP 104 

20V 12 Eo«» 44 24 

vv 3to EoalAlr 
+V IV EAL WIO 
IV to EALwiA 
37 6V EsAlr pl 1.18k 
24to 6V EAlr RtB l^» 

77V 9V EAlrMC _ _ 

78V 21 to EastGF 140 Si 77 

Mto llto EOSlUH 2JV 94 B 

52 41 to EsKoas 240 4.9 12 2S68 45V 45 

60V 41 Eaton 1 40 IS 7 1402 S6W 55 

30V 2CW Ecfiftn M 

32V 20 Eckwo 1JW 

38'- 31 Edlsfir 140 

1SV 13V EDO 48 

Jfto 1*H Eli* art 10 

24V 19V EPGOpf 245 


sa« .i 17 
46 34 


39 to 26V EPGat 345 117 
29to 75V EPGW 
t9fe 9fe EITcro 
II V BV Clear 
Sto 2V ElecAs 
28to 17V EltttO 5 
17 UV EVIa 
12V 4>* Elselnt 
7Bto 59 Em WE I 240 JJ> 14 


TOO: Mto Mto ltfto 

22 17V 17V 12V + V 

50* 59 W S9 

SO low to*. 10V + V 

84 23*» 23V 23H + V 

271 41*. 40V 40 V,— V 

62 MW Mto 1*V 

297 3T\ 31V 3|V — to 

222 21V 21V* 31V 

80 30 19V 19V 

3189 BV BV! 8V— Mi 

10 3V 3to 3ft 

59 IV IV «V) 

<7 21V 21V 21V 

82 34W 23V 23V- to 

41 MV» 26'A Mto- to 

448 22W 22to W*— to 

32 23V 22V 22V— to 

45 — V 

_ . _ Sato tiv. 
JJ 13 718 ZSV 2SW 2Jto— V 
15 14 2178 30V 29V 29V— V 

4.9 12 243 32to 31V 37VS + V 

14 12 1026 loV 16 1*V 

23 15 310 32to 31V 32to— to 

100 24 2* 24 

43 2»to »to 29V + to 

6 79*. 29U, 29V 

AM 17*W 16V 16V— V 

B tOW 10W Iflto + to 

40 4V 4V 4V 

37 24 M 24 — to 

M leV Mto Mto— to 

3» 4to 416 4V 

897 73to 7JV 72V— to 


93 


J 25 
5.7 IS 


14V 6V EmRoa .941 &4 13 2197 11V 11 J1V ♦ to 

20W life EmrvA 30 IB 13 411 17V 17V) 17V + to 

22*. 24W Emhart lAOb 43 10 S174 »V 30W 30to 

331, ISto EfPBOs 14* DjO 8 10 21V 21V 2tV + to 

'9.4 


-47 


30 98 


20 9 

1-4 14 


S 3W Emo Df 
5to 4 Emopf 
W EnExc 
27V 22V EnpICe TI 
39V 10V. EnlsBu 34 
20 9to EntoB wi 
29V I7n Enserai 130 64 17 
54V 51W Envdi pf 6.15611-4 
I02V 91V EnscfipniJVelTJI 
21V 19V EnsE.n Me 33 
2V IV E force M 

16V* 9to Enlera 
20 15V EntoEn 230elA4 

21V Is Enlaxin 1J0 69 II 
32V 17V EauikS 1.14 34 17 
AW 2*. Eaulmk 
70 <3 llto Eamkpf 231 11J 
49V 28W EalRe* 142 05 9 
17 9v> Eaulttn 

14V «M. ErbmrvT 

23V 12V EttBsn 
28V 18V ESSOXC 
31V 73V E striae 
25 W 10V ElltVls 
AV IV wIEvtmP 
9to 2to vl Ewan Pl 
I7W JV vIEvn ptB 
41V J0V ExCelo 1.72 44 If 
17V 13W ExCMsr lAAellil 
54V 38 Exxon 340 64 8 
II 6V FH Ind .I5e 15 3 

70 SOW FMC 740 02 42 

26V 18 FPLGP 1.96 74 9 
13V 9V FabCir 48 24 23 

14V 9V Facet 7 

20V 13W Folrchd 40 IJ 

39V 33V Fafrcpf 1A0 104 

16V 10W Falrfd .18 14 9 

27 13V FomDIs 40 0 27 

19V 13V Faiwlel M 33 13 

MW 23 FrWsIF 

7SG 1M Faran 

13 8V FovDrg 

64* 4V Fadew 

40 29V FedlCO 

45V 31V FedExo 

39 79 W FdMoe 

22V* 10V FedMM 


J 11 
U 15 
1.9 14 
XI 13 
4J} II 
24 13 


77 

,6% FedPBS 

JO 

X7 

7 

?9 

25% FPappf 

7J, 

85 



14 FedRM 

1J4 

67 

13 

19ft 

13ft FdSgnl 

JO 

46 

15 

65ft 

2J4 

A2 




1.20 

4, 


35ft 

25% Fldcsf 

100 

JJ 

,3 

71% 

4 FfnCpA 

2SI 



41% 

Mto FlnCppf 6J,e20J 


4 





77ft 

16ft Flresm 

JO 

XB 


77to 

17V FIAtt s 

+8 

7J 

>0 

40* 

2, to FtBkSv 

MO 

40 


31 

21 to FBkFli 

UK 

13 


88% 

37V FBosI 

XOOo X3 


44W 

18ft FBasIwl 





27 IBM FstChlc 142 

S4W 44W FChl DPI 5-730122 
18W 11 FIBTex IJQ 114 8 
54 35 FIBTx Pf 5.96c 155 

49 32V FlSTx pf &48el65 

31 • F fair 10 

MV low FFedA) 406 14 8 
60 ISV) FFB 288 XI 8 
55V 31V Flnwe 250 
34V 21V Flntit pf 237 
I IV TV Fr/uuss 44 
MV 16 FiMatnn 
7V 4to FsiPa 
30V 20'4 FstPo pf 262 
31V MV FlUnRI 1.9* 

27V 15 FtVoBk JM II II 
31V 17V FlWUe 140 4.1 * 

53to 29 FlsOto 1.00 23 427 
114 SW FIMlFd OSe A 

41 to 31V FIIFOGSIJS 3L4 10 
20V Mto Fleet En -44 2J0 10 
39V 2SW FleaiDB W» 2* 14 
13V 10V Flexlpf 131 125 
29V 14V FIMiKfS .1* J 23 
31V 14V FtOatPt M 

45W 29V Fk.EC .160 A 13 
2BV 19 Fk> Fro 


IB* 11 V HOW 


XI* 

40 


1001 5 S i . 
240z 5V* 5 5to + to 

144 to to — 

179 26 2SW 25V— V 
171 3*W 39W 39W— to 

2 20 20 a 

564 25*. 24V 25 + V 

HOOz 54 54 54 + to 

■os inito ioiw ioiw +ito 

*46 19W 19V 19W 

52 2V 2to 2V* 

202 lift 11 llto — to 
63 17V 17V 17V— to 

32? isv lev lev + v 

141 30V 30W 30V + V 
585 4 3V 4 

4 19to 19V 19W + to 

704 50 49 49V 4- to 

201 14W 16V 16W + to 

152 12to llto 1ZW + to 

277 23V 22 22V + V 

59 36V 2* 26 — W 

40 18V Mki 18to — V 

542 MV 23V 23V— to 

73 IV IV IV— to 

74 2to 2V 2to + V* 

14 3to 3to 3to— to 

224 40 Mto 39V + to 

17 Mto 16% 16* 

7005 S3W 52W 53V * to 
4 10 9V 10 
155 69fe 46W 48W— 1 
963* 27V 24V 27to * H 
6 104* 10V 10W— to 
119 13*. 12V 17V— to 
118 14 15V ISto + to 

3D J5W 35V 35V— V 
200 13V 13V 13V 
324 25V 24V Mto— to 
34 ISto 1SW ISto— to 
2 29V 29to 29W 
192 75V 7 Sto ISV— to 
101 9to 9V 9to 

79 Sto FW SV 

1037 38W 37V 38 V* + W 

835 44V* 43V* 44 
BS 36 V* 35to 3* — to 

2569 21V 21to 21V 
401 20V 18V 189* — IV 
101 28to 77 27to— Ito 

80 Tito 21W 2IH + to 

15 llto 17V 17V— V* 

1487 41* 40V 61V— to 

M 29W 29V 29 to— to 

22 28V: 2fV 28V 
583 TV 7 7V»— V 

44 33V 33 33 — to 

45 $to 5W 5V 

489 21V 21 21*— * 

635 24to 24 26to + to 

752 40W 399* 4 0V* + V 

27 30V SOW 30W 
531 B8V B7V* 87V— to 

243 44V 44 44 

X3 29 2889 2SW MW 259* +1 

124 47 46to 469* 

1027 11V* llto UU + * 

2 38W 38W 38W + V 

56 35 34W 34ft + V 

60 we low low — w 

Ml 24* 23V 24 ♦ to 

86 57 56V 57 + V 

625 55* 54VA 54W— V 

213 33to 32W 32W — 1 
609 ffe 9 fto— * 

122 2SW 2«V 2SU» + V 

651 7Vz TV IV— to 

170 30V 30 30V + V 

115 29 28V 28V— to 

168 26V 26V 26V— Hi 

122 31V 31V 31V + to 

19 34* 33* 24V 

43 llto 11 llto 

4!fe 60* Mto 

22 — V 

13 12V ,2V Sto*'* 

"Jrsss*-* 

16 42* 42V 42W 


48 U I 
TO 11 16 
-03* A 7 
134 44 9 
33 

1.52 43 11 
.16 J 


44 9 
75 

24 9 
17 

BJ 

68 IS 


1135 22to 22 
926 38 37 


74 10 7682 MV 28V 


Z20 


A3 23 18 
AO 1A 
— X9 13 


34 13 


17 
12 

13 * 

* 13 

U0 41 13 

9 

180 U II 


JIM 


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21 I2to Ffawrs 

20* 14V* Fluor 

5BV* 47V FoMeC 

51V 36* FordM 

13V 10* FIDeor 

74V S3to FIHowd 156 

IS* 10 FasfWh -46 

11V 6V FoxSIP 48 „ 
33V 24V Foxbro 184 4.1 

S? 34 Foamy r 

22V 20V FMEPn -55c 17 

10* 9to FMVGCn 
10V 7* FMOG 24IS24J 

22* 13* FrpfMC 40 XI 14 

34V 21V Frtefm AO 23 It 

28V 20 FruePf 6 40 27 s 

32V* 25V Fruhfpf 2JM 

36V 22V Fimuo 40 

359. 17V GAF 

37* 25* GAT X 

34V 15* GCA 

78V 48* GElCO 

7 3* GEO 

13* 5 V GFCP 

44* 37 GTE 
39V 31V GTE p# 

M* 19V GTE pf 

9 3W GalKou 

63* 38* Gannett 148 24 22 

30 18V Gap Inc 50 13 23 

17V 9to Ccarfrt 

21 13* Gokzi 

13V 9V GemliC 

12V ID Gemin 
51* 31V Gocorp 1 JOO X2 51 
17V 14V GAlnv 143s 9J 

46V 31V GnBcSh 160 U I 

39* 22* GOrnns .40 III 12 

38 21* GOlPf* AO 13 

21 10* GnData 

84 50V GflDvn 

65V 48V GeriEI 

S3V 53 GflFda 

7* SV GGftin 

9V SV GnHme 

17 10* GMest* 

Mto BV* GnHouS 

27V MV Gtilml _ ... 

66 47V GnMIllS 224 3J 36 

85 64V GMot 5J»r 72 6 

42 16* GMEI .051 .1 


28 ,6 28 14V* 14V 14V“ 

73 


S 41* 5 + to 

325 ICto I8V 18V— V 
985 17V 16V 16V— V 

_. _ 28 56* 56* 56V + to 

240 53 3 7039 43to 43V 43*— V 

1-36 104 99 13* 13 13* 

23 16 146 71* 70V 71V + * 

' " 817 13to 13* ISto— V 

51 10 99* 9to— * 

M a 25V 25*—* 
329 25* 24% 25 + V 

£ r ^ 

TO 19* 19* IV*— V 
29 24V 26* 24V— to 
131 23V 229* 22V— * 
52x 27V 27* Z7V 
873 32V 32* 32V 
■15 34* 3S* 36 + V 

90 2« 2Bto 29 
215 17* 17* 17V—* 
117 75V 74V 74to— V 
58 3V 3* 3V 
5 6* 6* 69* 

I 3194 40V 40 40*— * 


X0B 73 
230 7.1 
2M 102 


40 

-56 


120 


40 18 
X9 14 


1.7 


13 
U 9 


40O9.1 

13 

JO 12 3 
34 24 
14 


43V 34 V GMM pf 3175 9.1 


58'a 44V GMOtPt 500 92 


.16 

1-54 


120 


30 16 
7 

12 54 

7 

40 12 
92 


3* GNC 
14V BV GPU 
BOV 44V GenRe 
14V 5 GnRefr 

53* 40* GnSIgnl 
13 70 GTFIpf 1J5 

12V 10W GTFIpf 130 104 
8* 3* Genscp 13 

7JW GnHod .10 4 34 

25 15 Ganne loo 

24* lfrH Get pf 148 6J 

36 24* Genu PI 1.18 34 15 
27V 18 GoPoc 20 13 25 
37* 33V Go Pc pf 224 4.1 

37 32V GoPpfB 224 43 
30 V 23V GoPwol 244 1X1 
31* 25V GoPwpf 3.76 123 
23 ’A 17V GoPwpf 224 113 
23V 17 GePw pf 223 112 
26V 21V GoPwpf 2.75 102 
67* S1V QePwPl 7.72 11.9 
36* 20* GertPd 132 32 13 
21W ,3fe GertoSt .12 J 12 
12* BV GlontG 


17 


12* 

5% GlbrFn 


27 

lift GltfHIII 

JJ 

63to 

44 

Gillette 

160 

,4* 

IT* 

Gfeasc 


,4 

6% 

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7* 

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23% 

5* GlobAA pf 1JS4 

13V ; 

8* 

GldNuo 


4 

1% 

SldN mt 


39 

11* 

5IUWF 

JO 

36 

24V 

id rich 

IJ6 

9ft 

8% 

Idrdi ai 

.97 


140 U 1 
S3 X, ,8 
48 17 48 
220 62 11 


120 20 M 
I05etl.t 7 21 

132 40 10 1371 
Ofl XO 77 774 
122 90 


40 32 11 
1.00 33 


MV 23 Goodvr 
IB* 13V GoronJ 
32* 19 Geuia 
44* M* Groce 

MW 24* Granges 
21* 8* GtAFsl 

18* 14V GtAIPc 
56V 27’a GlLkln 
21* 15 GNirn 
40* 31 GtNNk 
>7% GfWF/rt 
19* 12V GAAP 
M 22V Green T 
JOW 18* Grevh .„ _. 

48* 37* Grevfiof 4.75 111 
ito 2to Groller n 

13J* 9 GrowGi 30 24 15 

12* 6V GnmEI .06 2 15 

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30 MV 19% 20V + V 

2655 BV 22 22V 

Mr 769, 76% 76% + V 

653 21* 21% 21 to— * 

10X102 10} 102 

16 HU 22* a 

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140 02185 

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JO IJ 82 
73 

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8* 6'h PSInpf 

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16 7* PNHpfB 

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32* 21% PSvEG 2J4 9.1 I 

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49to 36 PSEGPt X28 UJ 
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21V 10* PUfVHRI .12 J 74 
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39* 29V RCA pf 
112 7] RCA p< 

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19 ISV IS ISV— V 

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744 2* 28* 29 + % 

1159 31% 31 31V- * 

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«0z 39 » 39 

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1 19% 19% 19% 
1000x61% 61% 61% + % 

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1050x 67* 66V 67* 

550x 86* 84V B4V— IV 

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15 13* 13 13V + V 

16 6V 6U ito — * 

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327 16% 14% 16* — % 

8M a% 23% a — % 

290 8* 8% 8* + V 

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32V 22W Revco 
14V 9ft ulRever 


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141 34V 33V 33fe — V 

3 37ft 37V 37ft 

49 7V 7to 7V 

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10 210 13% 13V 13V + to 
22 16 7794 45V 44V 45 + W 

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33 16 1638 49% 48ft 49V — V 


498 


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90 aw a* 53*— v 

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17 11% Rexnrd A4 12 9 246 14 13V 13V— % 

32* 29* Reynlns 4B90 30% 29ft 30 —to 

50 46V Revlnpf A10 14 42 49* 49 49 — ft 

41% 26V RCVAAff TAW X8 6 70? 35% 35*6 3S*t— to 

87 59% ReyMpf 4-50 60 2 75 75 73 +1V 

36* 25ft ROiVCfc 1-48 4JJ 12 11 859 37V Bk 36V +1V 

29 17to RfeoelT 1J0 8J 2 22 22 23 

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— - - - 10 57 4% 4* 4* 

1.12 33 8 
140 6J 14 


7ft 3V RvrOkn 
36V 27ft Robehw 
44* 36 Robten 
24V 12 Robins 
24V 13ft RocbG 
40% 27W RodlTI 
39V 27* Rodnnl — 
71* 48V RotmH 2JS 
56* 33V Row in 
25% ,2ft RofnCm 


RollnEs -07e J JO 

12V $W Rodins At A1 17 

4W 2 Koran 

It 12ft Roper +4 44 17 

37V M Rorer 1.12 XI 17 

13 7* Rowan .12 IJ 43 

60V 41V Roy tO X07e 53 

17 9 Roylrits 17 

53% JSft RubnM 36 l.« 18 

26 14% Russ BT 13 

19% 15V RusTog 36 40 9 

28* 19 RvanH 130 A7 15 

29% 19V Rvdert 60 XI 10 

26% 72ft RW and 66 2J 17 

ifto 8* Rvmer 4 

13% 11M Rvmer pfl.17 93 

50V 35V 5CAA 230 43 13 

12* 8ft SL Ind 22 IJ 10 

31% 19W SPSTrc JO U IS 

20 15 Sabine AM J V 

21V 14 SoonRy X59e14J 

.... M u J7 


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34ft 23* Safewy 

2298 14* SUoCP 
lift 9 SPoul 
9W 3ft vlSotant 
34W 34V SoMVAA 

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51 a Sorulr 
25% 18V SAnltRt 


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41 3tft 26V 26% 

496 17* 17% 17V + V 
XX> 9.1 7 454 MV 23V »W + V 

X44 6A> 10 266X41 40* 40V +1 

1.12 XO 70 BOS 37* 37% 07% — % 

33 11 41 67 MU 66% ~ % 

10 203 57 ato a* +1 

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421 37to 26V 26ft + W 

29 11V II 11V + % 
36 2to 2W 2ft + V 
SI 14ft 14% 14V— to 
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656 8% 8V 8% 

3869 59ft Uft »%— 1 

6 13ft 13% 13ft— V 
21 52% 51% 51ft— V 
756 20V 19% 19ft —1% 
76 19% 18ft 19V — V 

510 27V 27 27to + V 
596 79 28V 2SW— * 

a* at* av 34% + v 
232 a* 18ft 18ft— V 
169x13V 12% 12V— % 
179 47V 46V 46V— to 

7 12 lift 12 + V 

1BO 31V 31 31 — V 

45 15% IS* 15* 
176x17V 17ft 17V + W 
563 18* 17V 18% + ft 
435 17 9ft II +1V 
735 2* 1% 2V + V 

JO 1.1 a 329 37 34* 34*— % 

1 60 4S 10 783 33W32V33 — ft 

J2 X0 11 48 26V 26V 26V— to 

132 7J f 47 27* 22V 22* + * 
130 115 43 11* UV lift— * 

19 4* 4% 4ft — V 


4* 4% 

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234 13 9 1077 26V 26V 2£ft + V 
JOe 9J 11 219 9* 9V 9* + to 

20 2 10V 10ft 10ft 

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_ . ^ 1.94 7J 11 38 24ft 24* ’ 

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44 aw Sara Lee 1J4 X3 12 717 44 

54* 50V SoroLpf X91e 76 

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18 SCANA 114 7.9 V 


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49% M* Sdilmb 130 

13% 7ft SdAtl 

33 22* Scznlnd 

61% 48% ScWFet 

42V 26V ScoflP 

16V IIV Scottys 

43ft 20V SCOVIM 

45 21V SeoCnl ... 

72ft 9ft SaaCtPf 166 113 

16ft 12V SeoCpfBXlO 1X8 

16ft 12V SeaCpfCXIO 1X9 

27* 15* SeaLnd J8 XI 7 

5* 3* SeaCo 

44ft 30 Seagrm JO XO 12 

21* 12* Seooul 17 

28% 20 Sea [Air AO IJ 16 

37% 21% SealPw 1 JO 4J I 

M* 40% SeprleO ijo IJ 76 

39* 29V Sears 1.74 48 9 

106* 97 Sears pf 9 J2e 9 J 

Wi 19V SecPac»1J4 44 7 

19% 11% Seigu 

33ft 26V SrcCps 

16V lift Shaklee 

26% 11 Show in 

38% 28* ShellT 

30% 17% Shota to 

39ft 74 Sftrwin 

8% 4* Shoetwn 
16ft 12 Show&t 


19* 13ft SferPi 
signo 


ac 


43* 24% 

M* 48% Slant pf 4.12 
JWi 25% Singer JO ... 
32ft 26% Slngrpf 3J0 11.1 
II 12% Skyline J8 17 18 
26% 2DV Starttry Jft 
16 B Smllhln 32 
70* 50V SmkB 2J0 
72% M* Smuckr UB 
41ft 29V SnoPOn 1.14 
«V 12ft Snyder 
43* 27 sonot 


m, IN SonyCP 
30ft 22% SooLfn 
40V 27V SourcC 330 ... 
7JV. 18 STCCPPf 2J0 115 
29V 22V SoJerln 2JB 16 11 
49W M* Soudwn 1A» 24 10 
35 2Mh SoetBk 130 33 10 
10 5ft 5oe,PS Z73)37J 40 
27ft 18* SCalE 3 X16 X) 8 
22W 14ft SouthCO 192 
26% 17 SotnGSS 1 JO 
44 29 SNETI 232 

3S% 37% SaMEpI 322 
49% 41ft SOME Pf 462 
Tift Mft SoRypf 2J0 
31 23 SoUnCB 1.72 

39* a SOuttnd 1AK 
76ft lift 5oRgy .72 
J* 6% Soumrk 30 


200 51% aft 51% -1 

4 31% 31% 31V 

IS 16% M* 16* 

31 *1% 21 31 — V 

2 UW UW 11W + * 

53 7W TV, 7ft 

II 12ft 12 % 12ft + % 

48* 27% 27ft 27*— % 

X7 13 1563 46V 45% 45ft— ft 

33 9 5174 38V 37% 38 — to 

IJ 79 3H 12% 12* 12ft— * 
24 14 1,21 32% 32* 32V— V 
11 99 41V 61 4, — V 

X0 10 6M 41V 40W 40% — * 
68 13V 13% lift 

5 41% 41% 41V 

166 41ft 39ft 41 +1V 

a 72% ,7% 72ft + to 
39 16V 16* 18ft + V 
JO 16to 16V 16% + ft 
244 23V 22* 22ft— ft 
98 4% 4% 4ft 

960 41% 40% 40ft— ft 
» lift 16% 16% 

170 28% 28V 28ft— V 
111 25ft 25Vi 25%— ft 
581 55% 54% 54% — ft 
6658 37% 36* 36% — IU 
1 103ft 103ft 103ft 
2216 30ft 29% 30V + % 
279 18% 17% 18 + * 

97 38% 47% 38V— V 
127 14 13% 13% — V 

HO 26ft 26V 24V— V 
911 37% 97 37 — % 

151 » 27* 27ft— * 

313 37ft 37ft 37ft + V 

72 6ft 6ft 6%— to 

266 <2to 12 12V— to 

113 19* 19% 19% — to 

797 43ft 43* 43 + ft 

6x62V 62V 63% 

698 39ft 39* 39 W— * 
11 32V 31* 31*— * 
133 13* 13V 13V— ft 

t0 25 35 25 — % 

.. 240 BW B B* + V 

4.1 11 1014 69 68* 68% — to 

13 17 M 71 TO* 70*— * 
- . 23 13 269 40% 39* 39*— ft 
320 132 IS 85 IS 14% IS 
1J5 SJ 7 2084 34V Mto 34*— % 


At IJ 18 
32 S3 M 
JO 72 9 
2J7e 66 
JD 79 6 
76 13 
7 

43 13 
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23 17 


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.160 ,3 13 3072 16V 15V 16 — V 
130 44 13 21 2Sft 2SW 25V— ft 

83 40 39% 39 39% — * 

20 O 22W 22% 

25 29V 28V 28ft— V 

5 41% 41% 41% + % 
6M 32% 31ft 32V. + % 

38 6ft 6% 6V 
606? 26% MW 26% 

4288 22Vt 2ZV 22ft— V 
52 26V 25V 25V— ft 
239 41 W 41V 41ft + to 

6 38% 38ft 38% + fe 

70x 47 47 47 — 1* 

2 26V 26ft 26ft— to 
“ 30 29W 29ft— V 

39% 37% 38ft— 1 
T3to 13 [3* + V 

6* 6% 6% 

50* 50* 50W + * 
19 1652 29 aft 28% — V 
28 147 13% 13 13 — to 

190 17% ITV 17ft— ft 
M 83V 83ft— V 
27V 27W 27 V— V 
a V 25V 26 
14% 14* 14ft— V 
„ 147 18* 18V 18V— V 

X7 10 4182 52ft 51to 51% — 1% 
" 33* 33% 33* + to 
37% 37% — * 




68V 67ft 68 —ft 


2BV 14% SwAIrt 

20 11% swtPor 

18 TOft SwtGas 
Bto 56 SwBell 
2* lift SwEnr 
26* 11% SfetPS 
17ft 11* Spartan 
Z7% 15k spectP 
59 33% Sperry 

38 30* Spring* 

43V 31V SauarD 
68*6 41ft Squibb 
24V 17% StoW 
5* 16* StBPnt 
20% 11 5tMatr 
50V 39ft StdOOb 

22 TV SrPeerC* 

H% 11% Stand** 32 
31 10* Sfanwk ,96 

3SW 23V SfarreM 1A» ._ 

11 8ft StoAASe IJOallJ 
3ft 2ft Steego .12 42 

20% 14% sterdil 76 3 9 10 

lift 9ft SfrIBcp 35 67 10 .. 

M% 24 Start Da 130 X» 13 1590 31V 30* 30% + W 

23 1516 StevnJ 7 JO 56 73 346 22* 22* 22V— ft 

34 26% Shawm ]JB 13 16 

U I 

Z2 10 
2J 10 
19 15 



22 22% 

23ft 22% 22ft— ft 
... 12ft 12% 12* + to 
3973 47V 46 46% + % 

130 2? 2!ft 27ft— * 
14% M 14 — V 
29W 29*— * 
33 33 — V 

11 10ft 10V 
3 3 3 

1»ft 19ft 19ft— % 
90 lift 11% 17ft + V 


JO j 
JOo XI 
JD 42 S3 

M 13 10 

XM <6 11 
2JS X2 


45ft 34ft stonew 130 
39 76 StaneC JO 

av 36ft SiDPSnn 1.10 
21% 15V StorEn 134 
72ft 2 .vision- 
B2 36V Store r 
2ift ,8V srr,AA,n 
,9* MV StrlORt 
7% 3ft SuovSh 
39 2S*5unCh 
14 6ft Sun El 

32ft Oft SunCo 
709 90% aunCPl 

49* 34ft Sundctr 

UV 6W SunMn 
37V 36 SunTnt 
4ift 76 suprV) 

48V 23ft 5UPAAM 
17% 14 Swank 
21* ,7ft Svbron 
16* lift SymeCp 
65 39V Svnlex 

38% 29ft Sysco 
50% 34ft TDK 
35* av TECO 
72% 7ft TGIF 
20ft 11* TNP 
25V 17* TRE 
81* «* TRW 
7* 2ft TacBPOt 
77% 52* TottBrB 1.12 IJ 14 
19ft 12* Tallev .lie 6 13 
21ft 15 TaltevpflJO S3 

49% Tamtjro 330 4JD 15 


1J0 


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1.06 

1.97 

36 

266 

X36 

135 

UK 

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55 U13 


1.9 ,7 

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17 

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32 
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15 
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42 16 
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36 23% Tandy 

15* 12ft TndVCft 
MU 51V Taktmx UK 

SU 2* Tefcom 
*DV 721 TeJtfyn 
a 13* Teirote 
48% 24% Telex 
39* 25* Templn 

45to 3ZV Tenrxaa 

10<to 89* TnKpr TTAK 10L7 
83% 66 TeitCPT 7 JO &8 
35% 20 TerdWi 


60 26ft 26ft 36ft + * 
9 41V 41% 41% — ft 

88 Z7W 26% 26V— ft 

938 44* 43W 43*— ft 
M2 31 20V 20*— V 

496 7 Vs 2ft 2W + * 

1S3S 81* 80ft Rft- * 

99 19% 19V 19V — V 

89 19% 19 ,9 — % 

19 4* 4% 4ft 

6 36 35ft 36 + ft 

20 11 10% 10V— V 

663 50* 49ft 50V— ft 

3 103% mto 103% — * 
44V 44 44ft + % 
6% 4* 6ft— V 

88 37* 37 37V— % 

3S9 40ft 39Tb 48 — ft 
128x 47V 47 47 —V 

32 ,6 15% 16 

83 10ft 18 lift + V 

29 14V 15% 1 

095 ^8 62% ' 

98 37ft 37* 

22 36% 36V 36V— to 
06 35ft 35* 35V— V 
34 70ft 70ft 70% + ft 
46 20% 20M 20ft + to 
128 24% MV 24% + % 
M0 75 74 74ft — ft 

ITS 2ft 2to 3U»— V 
52 7» 73% 73*— ft 

30 17% 17ft 17ft— V 
5 20% 20* 20 V— V 

105 79ft 78ft 79ft + ft 


low -r W 

CIS 


74 20*0 3(* 30% 30*— ft 


14 8 14V 14ft 14V + V 

9 S56 42% 61* 61% — % 

.6 2 3W 3* 3* 

ID 167 25*98253 25} to —lto 
26 760 !8» 18% 10% + V 
,1 698 30ft 38% 39V 
_ 9 678 36* 35% 36* + V 

192 72 12 2865 42 41* 41%- V 

its nn toa 103 

250 BCV 84 MV + ft 
10 1413 22% 21* 21% — % 


U 


32 IJ 
IJ 


15% 0V Tesoro JO 19 ’27 10% id 1Q% + v, 

27ft 20ft Teaorpf 2.16 96 B 22ft 22 . 22 

40% 31* Twee XOO 11 a 3827 37* 36% 37* + ft 

38% 31% TxABc 132 47 B 49 32* 32 3 2* + ft 

46V 31* TcxCm 134 49 » 74* 32* 31% ai%— * 


230 65 
JODJ-0 tj 


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147% 86', Terind XOO 2 1 ’0 
3* 1 Tgx ini 

74V IS*. TerOG* 

29 ISto TxPoc 

31V 21U Te.Uld 

(k 7 Te*li in 
5S 57 Tfc«imn I JO 

60 793. Textrpf X08 

10V S'.| Thack 
29V 14* Thc+mE 
43to a>. ThmBis ,36 . 

18* ITV Thorn, n 606*2 W 
U't ITA. ThriAAed ea Z6 11 

H* 14to Thrill, *2 

2xV 13% Tldwlr 

WJs 5* Tiger In 
60V 33% Time 
23 to 12V Tlmpl« 

SB's 34'- Tim*** 

W, *6 Tlmien ijflo X7 I, 

9 to 4* TltfXl 

11 7% Tllnnpf 1J0 9 a _ 

39"S 26V TooSnp t J2 4J 7 

21 to l£% Tatmms jo 2J 10 

21 to 13* Toiedrt 152 7X6 5 

28* 24V TolEdPf X72 119 

29% 37 TglEOOl i75 U» 

27% 70 tolEdpf 3J7 7X6 

37V 25V TotEdPt 435 1X0 
19ft 14 TolEd pf 236 1X3 
18* 13% TolEd pl 231 123 
50* 13V Tonkas jo J 9 
23% 6% TokO wi 

53% 23ft ToolRol 460 IJ f* 
S3* 2D* Trcnmk 1.00 X, M 
IT 1 , 10 TaroO « X7 9 

4V) I TD4CD 

19V 6to Tpwlf 

41 to Sto TgyRUS 29 

28% 1M Trocrs 32 U 

20* 8V TWA . « 

ISto 15 TWA a, 235 14» 

30ft ,8 TWA PfB 726 IS 

32* 2ff* Tronsm 1J< LS 13 

21* 16% Tranmc 7X1 ,0-J 

13to 10ft TARttV Ito 1*N 
71't IS* rmCdOrtl.72 H > 

S7to 45(i Transco X16b 46 9 

66“s SO'- TmsCPf 337 7 0 

25% 19’3 TranEx 236 11° 

ID', 7% Tran sen 5 

9b 77ft TrGPPl 164 93 

2SW 20 TrCPPf XS0 102 

13ft b'fs TrmOh n 

36% 2f': Tronwv UO W ' 
40V 25V TmwIH 46 12 ,3 
SV 9 V TwIdwtA 
34% 24 TwIdPf XM 51 

17% 15W TwIdPf 1.90 10.9 

48% 2SW Trovtor XO* 4J 

fflto saw Trov pf am 72 

Z7to 19% TrtCon 3J2C132 

30 20V Tricnpt XSO 8.B 
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72* 21ft 2, ft 2,*- * 

170 BV: tto 8ft * - 

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76 Hft Hft lift * 

41 32'i 32 32 — 5 

9J2 39% 39'- >>fe- 
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1877 46V *6to 44ft— * 
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193 76*. 26* 2fr% + 

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67 38* 37'. 38ft t ft 
3fl 29 28* 28* + V 

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128 23'- 22ft 23 — 

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484 41* 4, to 41ft— ft 
474 14ft 14 ,4* 

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3756 34% 33ft 33 ft— ft 
385 , 5V ,5 ,5 — * 

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684 10* ,0to ,0'- 

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956 34ft 35ft 35ft — ft 
599 44 «jw CV— 1ft 
24 Iff* 13V ,3ft * ft 
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58V 49% USSII Pt 6Jle12J 
135ft 115% USStl or 1X75 111 
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82W 57ft USWes, 532 
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46* 26% Vartan 
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51ft 28 Viacom J8 IJ 21 

46 36 V) VoEPpf SAW 109 

72W 54 VOEP pf 7.72 ,08 
81V 62to VoEPpf LM 10.9 
87% 67% VaEI «t B40 94 
91% 69 VoEPpf 935 10J 
68 51 VoEPpf 730 107 

7DW 53 VoEPpf 7J5 103 

26 lift vHnay t .r' 17 

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78% 61% VulCHAA 2J0 Xt 12 
30ft 23% WICOR 230 7.7 8 
49 34W Wo&Rpf 4 JO 107 

38V 22% WBOlvs U» 2J ,1 
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28 26* 26'. 26* + V. 
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144 9 «8 »- ■ 

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2889 64V 62* 6JW— , 

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820 77* in I7H - 
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110: 42* 43* 41W + ft 
296 39V 39fe 39% + ft 
120 14 13* 13ft 

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38 11 10ft 11 + ft 

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32 12 11V lift . .. 

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54 S 4% 4%— ft 

21 4V 6W 4* . „ 

241 « 28 37W STV + ft 

521 UV 11% UV— ft 

50 ito 6 • 6* ♦ V 

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777 J9V 39% 39ft — ft 

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44* 72% 73* 73* _ 

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2865 54% 53* 53ft 

409 -54% 54V 540, + ft 
072 26 25to 76 +W 
176 27% 27* 2706 + * 

257 10* TV 10* + ft 
1144 57% 51* 51* —3ft 
1832 IB* 17ft 18 + ft 

46 19* 19 19* 

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INTERNATIONAL BdERAUD TOJBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


Non t% 

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-" - • J 


ASEA Appoints 
Official to Promote 
RM) Workings. 

! By Colin Chapman ; 

' • '• International Herald Tribune 

. LONDON ASEA AB, the Swedish electrical- 
affiiiiecraig group, has created tte hew post of sden- 
tific.represemative in the United States, and appomt- 
; ed : Gupoar Hdmdahl to it ASEA. said it took the 
’ action (o strengthen “the company’s surveillance and 
technical research and development in North America 
in areas of strategic importance." 

Mr. Jiftodahl is. at present, general manager of 
. ASEAMonomon Systems in Vasteras, Sweden. He 
wffl move to New York Sept 1. 

.. ASEA his’ also announced sane other senior ap- 
pOumnents, Goran Holmquist president of ASEA 
Svcoska Forealjinj' AB, is to become executive vice 
presideiitof Gadelius KJC, based m Tokyo- Gadelius. 
hart ofASEA’s Flaki subsidiary, has more than half 
its S26G nrillicm in annual sales in Japan. He is to be 
suooredfid by RJdl Gunnarsson. 

• Tbeeompany has also promoted HahsPetren to be 
uneral manager of its regional office for the Middle 
East,' in Kuwait. Mr. Pctren, previously president of 
AGEM-ASEA Contracting Co. and general manage r 
of ASEA"s Elemac-ASEA division, has been succeed- 
ed ih both jobs by. Lave Undberg. 

' GcDeral Motors France has appointed a new presi- 
dent and director-general- He is Daniel P. Sallee;, at 37 
the youngest chief executive that the unit of General 
Motors Crap, of the United States has ever had. He 
succeeds Thomas V. Chambers, who is returning to 
DetrdLTdr. Sallee was previously head of CM'S plant 

l Hanover Trust Co. has named C 

WSharn Schroth as head of its worldwide mar chan t- 
banlmg empire, based in New York. He succeeds the 
London-rbased Tony Constance, who also doubled as 
duel executive of the British subsidiary, Manuf&ctur- ' 
ers Hanover Ltd, which has beat the most important 
office m the group. Mr. Constance has resigned, and 
has yet to disclose his own plans. He said the parting 
was amicable. 

Mr. Constance’s London job is to be taken by 
Michael J.G. Ndlson, currently an assistant manag in g 
director of Manufacturers Hanover LltL, and he will 
.be assisted by an executive committee of John L. 
Suffiyan, named as deputy managing director, and 
Paul J. Maloy, assistant managing director. 

Mr. Schroth previously headed Manufacturers 
Hanover’s U.S. merchant-banking activities. 

British Airways has appointed a London, merchant 
banker as part-lime deputy chairman succeeding Alex 


Chief Operating ^ 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — ITT Coflx Tuesday named 
Edmund M. Carpenter, 4$, presidait and chief 
operating officer anda. director of the corporation. 
DdoyC Thomas, ITTs senior line manger in the 
services area, and M. Cabell Woodward Jr, chief 
financial officer, were both nam ed vice ch air men. 

The three will report to Rand V: Araskog, chair- 
man and chief executive, who- relinquished the 
posts of president and dnef operating officer. 

Mr. Carpenter, whojoined the company in 1981, 
will continue as president and chief executive offi- 
cer of ITT Industrial' Technology Corp. He will 
also succeed John W. Guflfoyk as president and 
chief executive of ITT TdecomimmKatidfls. 


Dibbs, who has retired. He is Robert A Henderson, 
who is chairman of Klemwurt BensonLonsdale PLC, 
and dqputy<chainnaD of Cadbury Schweppes PLC 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. of New York has ap- 
pointed Georg F. Baur as general mpnaopy of its 
subsidiary, Morgan Guaranty GmbH in Frankfurt. 
Mr. Bout’s subsidiary will be expanding to take over 
the entire West German bond-trading operation of 
Morgan, now handled by the bank’s Frankfurt office. 

Morgan Grenfell £ Co., the London merchant 
bank, has hired Alastair Rn chnnan »s managing Hirra- 
tor of its new primary-dealer subsidiary. Morgan 
Grenfell Government Securities. Mr. Buchanan, a 
former director of the London In ternational Financial 
Futures Exchange, comes from the London discount 
house of Cater Allen Holdings, where be has been 
chairman since 1981. . 

Safrea, the South African shipping, freight and 
tourism group, has appointed Alastair MaamDao, a 
man with more than 20 directorships, as chief execu- 
tive. Mr. Macmillan succeeds the late Mazmipn 
Marsh, and said that he win be giving pp a number of 
his directorships to concentrate cm the job of running 
Safrcns mjgor operations. Saf marine, Kersaf and 
RenfreighL But he expects to retain his nonexecutive 
chairmanship of Rio Tmto, a post be held for a 
decade, while he was also chief executive. 

Australia & New Zealand Banking , Group has 
opened an office in Jakarta to represent Both the ANZ 
and its British subsidiary, Grindlays Bank PLC Mor- 

Esso Australian Ltti^ a subsidiary aflxxon Coip„ 
has appointed a new management team to take over 
from Jim Kirk, who retires as managing director Sept. 
30. Picked as the new managing director is Stuart 
McGilL John Schubert mil be his deputy. Both men 
are 42, and both joined the company in 1969. 


Four Seasons Hotels Aim to Pamper Business Elite Confidence 

(Continued from Page 9) But the key strategy is to main- built in what then amounted to a lives it was seeking to cultivate. It YL- 1 ?/*atiatv1v 

watb, a New York accounting and ^ ^ quality. The charm of a cow pasture north of Toronto, fol- bailed out in 1976. All JuwllUlIl V 

*.«_ Four Seasons Hold is its combina- lowins the trend of suhmbaniza- ». r j _„l J 


Executh^FUn^Bdatedto(MrpomtjeHeatih 

JL 


(Continued from Page 9) 
company’s fitness center in Lon- 
don. One hundred and fifty Rank 
Xerox employees use the facilities a 
day. 

ITT Europe Inc, which started 
its health-enhancement program in 
March, still is counting on employ- 
ee enthusiasm. “We don’t have 
awards enthusiasm is so 

great,” says Dr. Ulrich Wagen- 
mflnn, the co mpan y's medical di- 
rector. Out of ITTs 600 employees, 
371 have enrolled in HEP. 

. Some companies!, such as ITT 
Europe, do not ntind executives 
taking off from work to keep fit 
But employees at Marks* Spencer, 
can only use the facilities outride 
working hours, unless they are on a 
high-risk factor list. 

British companies have not spent 
money for corporate fitness the 
way that some of their U.S. coun- 
terparts have. Maries £ Spencer, 
for. instance, invested £10,000 
($13,400) to buy training equip- 
ment when it started its fimessjpro- 
gram right years a$o, one of the 
first British companies to do so. 

Fitness For Industry es timates 
that on average, British companies 
will invest a maximum of £100/100 
in a fitness center. By contrast, 
Houston-based Conoco Inc. spent 
S3 mfllinn for a fitness center and 
Termeco Inc. invested $11 million 
in a facility. 

U.S. companies argue that fit- 
ness programs decrease their health 
insurance costs because of a de- 
creased number of claims. Accord- 
ing to Tenneco, the average yearly 
health-insurance daim for women 
enrolled in the fitness program is 
$639.07, more than half the yearly 
claim of SL535.83 a year for those 
who do not exercise. For men. the 
average daim for non-exercisers 

Bonn, East Berlin 
Agree to Raise 
Trade Credits 

i 

Reutert 

BERLIN — East and West Ger- 
many have signed an interest-free 
trade credit agreement, and West- 
ern diplomats described it as a sign 
of stability in the relations between 
the two countries. 

The arrangement allows each 
country a trade deficit of up to the 
equivalent of 850 million Deutsche 
marks ($285 million) a year over 
the next five years without interest. 

The present “swing," 600 million 
marks, which expires this year, was 
used mostly by East Germany to 
purchase consumer goods and ma- 
chinery. But last year, as East Ger- 
man purchases stagnated and sales 
increased, East Berlin's drawn 
credit averaged less than a third of 
its option. 

West German officials. hopuiR . 


was $1,003.87; compared with 
$561.68 for those who exercise. 

There is less financial incentive 
for British companies to provide 
fitness programs because, unlike in 
the United Stales, they do not pay 
their employees’ health bills,, the 
government does. "Why should 
governments pay the bill for the 
stress companies inflic t on their 
empIoyeesT says Cary Cooper, a 
professor at the University of Man- 
chester Institute of Technology 
(UMIST) and the author of several 
books on executive stress. 




i Wm i literal 



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capital goods, said the signing of! 
the agreement on Friday in East 
Berlin was a good omen lor trade. 


a PDinnCU) 
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I $1 «2j 


(Continued from Page 9) 
wath, a New York accounting and 
consulting firm specializing in ho- 
tels. Some markets — such as 
Houston, where Four Seasons has 
two hotels — are dogged. 

The easing of inflation is the 
United States is at best a mixed 
blessing for hotel operators, who 
mice counted on using, property 
values to recoup an investment in 
two or three years, Mr- Arnold said 
this could be a problem for Four 
Seasons because of its high costs. 

“Their philosophy is that you 
don’t cut corneiv he said. “How 
do they maintain their image while 
being more efficient in their invest- 
ments?” 

Indeed, profits have been a prob- 
lem. According to the company, 
they fell to $4mDioii last year front 
$6.8 miltirm m 1983. For Ins pan, 
Isadora Sharp, the chairman and 
principal owner, maintains that the 
income slide- is principally the re- 
soli of some hard-headed financial 

restructuring, basically buying 
dawn a previously heavy debt load, 
which was incurred during a period 
of rapid expansion in the late 
1970s. 

The company is adhering to a 
coroorate strateev that it hopes will 


lain top qu 


The charm of a 


shore up its bottom line. Rather 
than putting baric, as many hold 
companies did earlier in this de- 
cade, it spent $25 million to bring 
the consistency of its hotels to one 
level It cut its heavy debt load by 
more than 25 percent and sharply 
increased its fixed-rate financing. 

It also now carefully limi ts us - 
share of investment in a angle pro- 
ject to 25 percent. The idea is to sdl 
hotel management expertise rather 
than playing the real estate game 
that benefited it greatly years ago. 
Its partners in the hold agreements 
are generally big real estate devel- 
opers, such as Canada's f’adfflar 
iWview. 

Financial nimbleness has be- 
come something of a watchword.' 
WeQ before a properly becomes 
economically unattractive, the 
company sells off its (hunk of the 
hotel, generally at a profit, and 
then con ^'mwt to run it under a 
lucrative management contract. 


turn of polished luxury and North 
American informality. It is evident 
in the airy, plant-filled lobby of its 
Vancouver Four Seasons Hold, in 
the expansive rooms in its Inn on 
the Park in London, and in the fine 
Oriental carpeting in the elevators 
of the Montreal hotel Standard 
Four Seasons features include com- 
plimentary limousine service, 24- 
hour room service and a system 
whereby returning jpjesis are greet- 
ed by name on arrival and dried 
out favors, such as fruit, wine and 
chocolates. 

The public's growing interest in 
health has been noted. Almost all 
Four Seasons hotels have pools and 
health clubs. Jogging maps are pro- 
vided in each room and a low- 
calorie gourmet cuisine is now 
available, offering such things as 
linguinc with lobster and saffron 
sauce, at 315 calories. Small dark 
bars have been removed in favor of 
light, airy lounges where tea flows 
more freely than gin. . 

The company’s oft-stated goal is 
to operate Uie finest hotel wherever 
it operates. “We want Four Sea- 
sons to become the brand name for 
quality,” said Mr. Shaip- 

So do many others companies, 
however, sometimes achieving ele- 
gance comparable to — or exceed- 
ing — Four Seasons*. The Manda- 
rin Oriental Hotel Group of Hong 
Kane has three hotels m Institu- 
tional Investor's top 50, mctutting 
the two best in the world, the Ori- 
ental in Bangkok and the Manda- 
rin in Hong Kong. Inter-Continen- 
tal has three, and Hong Kong’s 
Regent Group, two. 

Such tongh competition notwith- 
standing, rbur Seasons has come a 
long wav since its modest begin- 
nings. Mr. Sharp decided almost 25 
years ago to build a lodging that 
had the comfort and canvemence 
of a motel in the city. The first Four 
Seasons, long since sold, was a two- 
story, 125-room motor lodge. 

The chain's second hotel, built in 
1963, was quite different. Toron- 
to’s Inn on the Park was a luxury 
hotel aimed at business travelers, 


built in what then amounted to a 
cow pasture north of Toronto, fol- 
lowing the trend of suburbaniza- 
tion. But it paid off: Planners of 
business meetings appreciated hav- 
ing a first-class hotel far from the 
distractions of downtown. 

In the mid-1960s Four Seasons 
was offered the opportunity to in- 
vest in, and manage, a new hotel 
beside London’s Hyde Park. Mr. 
Sharp snapped up the chance, ar- 
guing that the apparent glut of 
London luxury hotels (fid not sup- 
ply North American-style infor- 
mality. What be wanted to do was 
eliminate old-style, heavy Europe- 
an grandeur — without cutting lux- 
ury. Today, he says, occupancy at 
the hotel. Inn on the Park, ls almost 
always above 90 percent. 

Toe emphasis on quality contin- 
ued. But there were also missteps. 
In the 1960s Four Seasons became 
involved with ITT Corp.’s Sheraton 
in building a hotel complex in To- 
ronto. It was too big for Four Sea- 
sons to fed comfortable with — 
swelling to 1,450 rooms — and con- 
ventioneers were not the top execu- 


tives it was seeking to cultivate. It 
bailed out in 1976. 

U faced other problems over the 
years. A fire at the Toronto Inn on 
the Park in 1981 killed six persons. 
And in late May the Four Seasons 
was one of six hotels in Ottawa 
charged by the Canadian govern- 
ment with colluding to fix prices 
charged to pubtic servants. 

The company's emphasis onW- 
ury has been the cornerstone of its 
strategy, but that luxury is not for 
everybody. These are among the 
most expensive hotel lodgings in 
the world, and most companies 
limi t such accommodations to their 
top brass. Second, some executives 
prefer a shade less poshness and 
pampering. 

On the same recent nwrmng that 
executives were conversing in the 
Pierre, James Robb, a leading 
Montreal lawyer, was having 
breakfast across Fifth Avenue at 
the Plaza, not exactly a shabby ad- 
dress. “My secretary was going to 
put me in the Pierre, but 1 asked to 
be switched to the Plaza,” he says. 


Phillips Reorganizes Management 

Untied Prca International 

BARTLESVILLE, Oklahoma — Phillips Petroleum Co. an- 
nounced plans Tuesday lo reorganize its top management, cutting the 
number of officers and combining some operations to make the 
company “a more efficient operation.” 

“This reorganization will make us a more efficient operation by 
shortening the distance benveen company leadership and the operat- 
ing units where the work gets done,” CJ. Silas, chairman and chief 
executive officer, said. 

The changes at Phillips, which earlier this year underwent an S8- 
billion reorganization to ward off two hostile takeover attempts, 
include a reduction in upper-level executives and the transfer of 
several officers to new positions. 


Phillips also will combine the company’s petroleum products and 
chemicals operations into a single unit, consolidate some support staff 
services and place research ana high-technology activities under one 


executive. 

Mr. Silas said the stre amlining , which will include the merging of 
Phniips' engjneerma and corporate staffs, will “ eliminate duplicate 
staffing in support functions, such as accounting and administrative 
services.” 

“By reducing the number of officers from 26 to 21 and consolidat- 
ing many of our activities, we will be putting more accountability on 
our senior officers and putting them in dose touch with the people 
and activities they manage,” he said. . 


Falls in U.S. 


NEW YORK — American busi- 
ness leaders are substantially less 
confident about economic condi- 
tions now than they were in the 
first quarter, according to a study 
by the Conference Board, a re- 
search organization. 

The Conference Board said 
Monday that its business confi- 
dence index, which reflects both 
expectations about the future and 
appraisals of current conditions, 
fell to 52, nine points below ils level 
three months ago and its lowest 
level since the second quarter of 
1982. 

The study found that one-ihinl 
of those surveyed believed that the 
U.S. economy was in worse shape 
now than six months ago, com- 
pared with only one-tenth in the 
first quarter. 

One-third of the respondents ex- 
pected bus ness condi tions to im- 
prove in the next six months, and 
one-quarter expected them to wors- 
en. 

The survey suggested that eco- 
nomic weakness was widespread, 
with only the sectors of construc- 
tion ana financial services, which 
are sensitive to interest rates, show- 
ing strength. 


International Paper 
Cuts 1,000 Workers 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — International 
Paper Co. said Tuesday that it had 
cut its salaried work force by 1,000 
employees, 80 percent of whom ac- 
cepted voluntary retirement as of 
July i. 

The company said its earnings 
fen 67 percent m the second quar- 
ter to 535.2 milli on from $67 mil- 
lion. Sales remained at $1.2 trillion. 
International Paper blamed the de- 
cline on weak pricing levels in most 
product lines. 


■ According to Fitness For Indus- 
try, fitness programs in the British 
corporate market are just starting 
to take off. Out of 24 fitness carters 


For Indns&y, six are m-house com- 
pany projects and the other 18 are 
m hotels. 

“When we started in 1981, we 
thought companies would- leap at 
the idea. Instead, holds were the 
ones that were first interested,” 
said the group’s director, -Mr. 
Thorpe. “Only now co m panies are 
beginning to be more interested.” 


Some 

strikes 

are good 

for the 
country 


W\ To the people who work at Britoil a strike means 
Just one thing. Success. 

gpL Last year Britoil was involved in drilling more 
new wells offshore UK than anyone dse and 
HI produced over 2^X)0 million gallons of oil. 

* "lb find out more about Bri toil's success at 
home and abroad simply fill in the coupon. 


■ Please send me more information about Britoil and reserve my copy 
. . of the Offer For Sale document, without obligation. 


51 












US. Futures 


Season Season 
High Lott 


open Mian Low Clew Ow. 


swwi Season 
Mten um> 


Open High Low CH» Cm. 


GNMA (CBT) 

siotUKioprin-pnB.nncnof IDOoct 


Seojon 

Scoson 

Jul 1 V 

Hi* 

Low 

Open Hlgn Low Close Ow- 


WHEAT (CBT) 


5000 Ou minimum- dollar] par butiwt 


0.1044 -031* 

3.90 



112'a 3 . 1 5 '<; 

llOto 

3X*to 

X15 


11* 

0.19V} 

llSto 

X15V.--01V 

3*3>'j 

-VIE 


123V} 

137 

323 

12JVs —Stth. 

aXJVi 

122 

Mar 

124 

12* 

X33U 

0.24 -00V. 

4.02 

111 


111* 

ll4to 

llito 

112 

172to 

2.95 

Jul 

198 

2.99 

2.97to 

19741. — 00'v 


Esl. Sales Prev.SaltK 7JBB 

Prev, Dor Quintal. 3BJ» oll3M 
CORN tCBT) 

5000 Ou mlnimim-aol Ian per oosticl 
3X1 IhTH Jul 2.70U 2.71 

JXllT 2514k sea 253V. 15TU 

W5 246VJ Dec 248V. I48to 

3.10 ISSto Mor 257 157 

121 >'. U9’4 Mav 2*0to ZMVt 

206 150 Jul 1(0 U0 

lotto 1-Sto Sap SM 1MJ* 

Est. Soles Prev. Sales 2*071 

prey. Day Open ini.103,09? up 17* 

SOYBEANS (CBT) 

IQOOBu minimum* dollars per bushel 
7.99 551 Jul 5.70 SJ0'6 

75a SMt Aug 546 540 

4.71 SM sea i*5to 504 

*48 54TW Nov 5.72 5.72 

*79 552V. Jan S0Oto £001-2 

742 543 Mar £90to S.90to 

7X9 5.71 May £971* 5.97to 

458 £74 Jul *01’* 401to 

*74 57* AUP 

E si. Solos Prev. Soles 39000 

Prev. Day Open lm. 15M oHB 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT> 

100 tans- dollars par ton 


149U 249V. — .01 

2JJVi 252V: —,01V; 
246 206to —.03 

25**i 155 — JS3 

158to 3584k —.02^ 
258 258 — J02V. 

245 145 —.CO 


S44VS —05* 
540’* — JJ54. 
MTV. —MVi 
543 —48 

5.73t —.08 

5« -47VS 

£90 -JN 

£92Va —.llto 
549 -.11 VJ 


19*50 11740 Jul 12£50 12*40 

1BCUW 11*40 Aup 12*40 12900 

17940 12250 Son 13140 13240 

1 00 SO 125LO0 Oct 1300 1300 

18440 130-80 DK 14040 14030 

1*340 13280 Jan 14340 14340 

20*50 13750 War 14*50 14*50 

16250 14300 May 75140 I51J0 

1*740 147.90 Jul 

EsI.Sales Prev. Sales 25580 

Prev. Dav Open int. *0AM off 1492 
SOYBEAN OIL [CBT] 

40400 lbs- Hollars per 1 00 lb*. 

3272 2270 Jul 29.10 2920 

31.95 2250 Aug 2740 2840 

31.10 2250 SOP 7740 27.25 

3057 22.90 Ocl 24.20 2*50 

2955 22*0 Dec 2555 2540 

2947 2340 Jan 2555 2545 

2*40 2440 Mar 25JK 2555 

2745 2420 Mav 2545 2545 

2£2S 23.95 Jul 

2£I5 24.01 Aua 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 11X91 

Prev. Dav Open int. 40471 off 543 
OATS (CBT) 

5400 bu minimum- doitaraper bushel 
l.TBto I45to Jul 148 to I4*to 

1.79 141V: Sea I43to 144 

1J82V1 145 Dec 144 146to 

147V. 148 Mar 

1-63 149to MOV 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 2*1 

Prev, Day Onen mi. 3420 up 39 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40400 lb*- cents per lb. 

6747 5*45 Aug 58.95 5945 

•S.90 57.70 Ota S0-5S 6042 

4745 40L0D Dec 61X0 *230 

*745 60-95 Feb *245 *290 

6747 621S Apr &24Q 6255 

6*25 6340 Jim 6*40 6440 

Est. Sates 20438 Prev. Soles 19.231 
Prev. Day Open Int. 4*431 uni 420 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMei 
44JW0 lbs., cents per lb. 

7X70 *345 Aug *545 <5*5 

7X00 6X75 See 6X35 6X71} 

7242 6445 Od 65X0 *545 

73.20 *£25 NOV **» 67.00 

79.60 MM Jan *7.90 6805 

70X5 **10 Mar *B40 *840 

7045 *740 Apr 

Eat. Sants Prev. Sales 7X99 

Prev. Dav Open inr. 844* off* 

HOOS (CME) 

30400 ib*. cants per lb. 

5577 4745 Jul 49 JO 49XS 

5*37 4*57 Aug 4840 4030 

51X5 4X00 DO 4345 4X00 

5045 4*80 Dec 4&30 4£3S 

5047 4*25 Feb 4*25 4*45 

4735 4*30 Apr 4A45 4*47 

4945 4*70 Jim 4*75 4*75 

4945 4*85 Jul 4*75 4*75 

51.90 45X5 Aug 

Est. Sales *342 Prev. Sales *704 
Prev. Day Open int. 23J25 off 40 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38400 lbs.- cento per lb. 

82-47 57.92 Jul 5740 58.10 

0045 5*35 Aup 5740 58X5 

7*20 6X15 Feb *7.15 *745 

7540 MJSe Mar 6*K 67X0 

7540 <800 May 68X5 *8X5 

7640 6740 Jul 6800 M0O 

7X15 67X0 Aug 6*00 6*90 

Est. Sales *0(0 Prev. Sales 2X99 
Prev. Day Onan Int. 10X17 un iTZ 


12450 I2£10 
12*tO 127X0 
12«40 130.10 
132.10 13240 
137X0 13*10 
14040 14040 
144X0 144X0 
15000 15050 
15440 


2941 —39 

27X3 —22 

2**8 —.14 

2*32 —43 

vii AT 

2SX7 +47 
25.15 +47 

2545 +45 

2*75 +.14 

2*45 -7.10 


148 14* +40to 

143 143'« —400. 

145VI I45W. — £1*. 

147 —411* 

148 —41 


avj an 

59X5 59X2 
*1X0 61X3 
*245 *2X0 
*340 *150 
*440 6*00 


64.95 *4X7 

6X10 65X2 

65X5 6X30 
6*50 6*50 
67.90 4X05 
*8X0 *8X0 
*048 


4940 4947 

47 JO 47.97 
43X7 4X55 

4*10 4*37 

44X0 4440 
4*SJ 4*95 
4*75 4*95 
4*32 


5**0 57JS0 
57.15 5*07 

66X0 *445 
«*XS 6*05 
*£85 47X0 
47JD 67J0O 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37X00 ibs.- cents per lb. 

149.40 »2100 Jul 1J8XS 138.75 

I5tXD 127X0 SCP 101.90 140X0 

15040 129X5 Dec 1«10S iJl.W 

149.75 12X50 Mar 140X0 140X5 

148 JO >3100 Mav 

1483X1 13X50 Jut 

147X0 132-75 Sep 

Dec 

Esl. Soles prev. Sates 2.01 5 

Prev. Dav Open int. 11X30 up 140 
SUCARWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 
n2JOO lbs.- cents Per ib. 

9J5 2jM Sep 1M VS 

9JJ5 2.74 Oct 182 2.90 

7.75 3M Jen 305 110 

« 33 134 Mar 345 14* 

715 158 MOV 343 3X0 

£*9 3X9 Jul 184 187 

4 9* 4X5 OCI *10 4.15 

E6t. Sales Prev. Sale* _4J13 

Prev. Da* Open int. 81X45 iip96 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

lOmelrlc tons- Sper ton „ 

7400 19*3 Jul 212S 2125 

2415 79*3 Sep 2183 3182 

SJ3J 1W5 Dec 21*5 2169 

2190 1955 Mor 21*7 2167 

21» 1940 Mav 2171 2171 

2110 I 960 Jul 

3330 lira Sep 

2060 2055 Dec 

EM. Soles Prev. Sales £006 

prev. Dav Open ini. 22X35 up 230 
ORANOC JUICE (NYCE) 

15,9011 Ibx- emits per lb. 

18X85 138.70 Jul 141X5 141X5 

18X00 13400 Sep 137.10 137.15 

181.00 132X0 NOV 134.7S 134XS 

78000 JJ2JB Jan JXL75 132 .75 

17750 13200 Mar 133X5 132X5 

16250 13645 MOV 

15750 142XD Jul 

100X0 179.75 Sep 

Nov 

E9l.5ales 500 Prev. Sales 339 

Prov. Dav Open Int. £288 otf4S 


Metals _ 


COPPER (COMEX) 

2SJHQ lbs.- cents Per lb. 

B8X5 57.00 Jul 5950 5950 

5950 5845 AUO __ 

82.10 5750 5*0 6050 *050 

84X5 5850 Dec *140 6155 

8*20 5940 Jan 

00.00 5940 Mar 6240 *245 

74.00 *1.10 MOV 63JM 63.00 

7440 *1X0 Jul *145 *145 

70.90 6250 Sea *400 6X00 

7050 *3X5 DOC 

70X0 6550 Jan 

67JK *£45 Mor 

May 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 7.154 

Prev. Dav Open inL 03430 up233 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

40,000 lbs.- cents ner lb. 

5940 43.15 Jul 4450 4450 

Aug 

74X0 43.90 Sep 4**5 45.15 

7040 4X90 Dec 4505 4*20 

7650 51.75 Jpn 

7340 4*35 Mor 47X5 47X5 

**7S 53.95 MOV 

*345 4745 Jul 

52.10 5140 Sea 

Dec 

Jan 

Mar 

MOV 

Est. sales Prev. Salas 247 

Prev. Day Open int. 1X95 uD4 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5400 frevaL- cents per trovae. 


13755 13745 
139J» 139.12 
14000 140.11 
13940 13945 
IJV50 
13115 
13740 
139X5 


77-24 

59-13 

Sep 

77-1 

7723 

7+38 

W-4 

Dec 

JO* 

76-2* 

7*8 

58-20 

Mar 

75-14 

74-S 

75-1* 

58-23 

Jurt 

75-13 

75-12 

75-2 

65 

Sep 

74-18 

74-31 

Esi. Sain 


Prev. Sale* 

80 


Currency Option 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option 4 StrlM 

underlying Pries Call* — Lett Puts— Last 

Sep Dec Mar Sep Dec Mar 
nxoo BrttUli paands-cents per unit. 
b Pound 105 31x0 »0O r r r r 

13*73 IIP 2*20 3*10 2*00 0.05 r 

13*73 IIS 21 JO 2140 r 0. 13 T 

13*73 120 16X0 1*70 1*40 030 1.7D 

13*73 125 1145 1241 r 0-50 190 

13*73 130 7X5 940 1045 3J5 400 

136X3 13J 445 *80 08 *tfl 7X5 

smbo Canadian OaHarvcnts pot unit 
CDoiir 71 r 245 r r r 

7347 72 1X5 r r 022 t 

730 7 73 1JJS r t t t 

7347 74 0J8 r r r r 

7347 75 &3S 040 r r r 

<3400 West German Martu-cents Per unit. 

□Mark 28 r r r r 0JJ3 r 


0.90 190 

105 440 


33X4 29 r r r 002 

3174 3B 347 *15 *43 r 

. 33X4 11 W 133 r B.I3 

33X4 32 MS 2*2 r U 

43J4 33 1X8 100 2.43 OSt 

33X4 34 MS 1.48 1.95 £97 

33X4 35 0-49 I0B 147 T 

mow French Frona-iottii or a cent per unit. 
FFronc 105 *55 r r r 

LlSWloa Japanese Yen-1t0ttis of a caul per and. 
JYen 39 110 r r an 

4092 40 1X5 r r 0X7 

.40.92 41 0X4 1X0 144 044 

4092 42 0X4 0X5 r r 

40XJ 43 0.14 r r r 

<2X00 Swiss Frana-cents oar unit. 

SFranc 35 r r r OJI 

40X1 3e *34 r r r 

40X1 37 1*1 r r r 

4*31 38 173 r r 0X4 

4031 39 1IM r r 043 

4031 40 1-42 21® r 084 

«U1 41 U8 £02 r r 

Total call vol 1*787 Coll ops 

Total put vat. (418 Pul ops 

r— Not troaed. s — No option a Hared, a— Old. 
Last Is premium (purchaie price). 

Source: AP. 


143 r 0X0 

r 0,13 ox* 

r 0X6 058 OX 

IQ OSt 0X4 

.95 0.97 1X5 


r 0X4 r 
0X4 058 r 

043 OJB r 
0X4 r r 

Cell open int. 1 «*m» 
Pul open Int. 102X78 


Sep 

2X5 

2X4 

2X1 

2J5 

+45 

Oct 

202 

190 

202 

18* 

4-03 

Jon 

105 

110 

10 5 

101 

MM 

Mar 

145 

149 

143 

1« 

+01 

Mav 

1*3 

3X0 

303 

30* 

+03 

Jut 

304 

307 

302 

303 

—02 

OCI 

*10 

4.15 

407 

408 

—04 


Prev. Day Open Irtf. 3065 up 2 
CERT. DEPOSIT ( IMM) 

SI mlll'nn> ptsof 100 Pdf 
9178 05X0 Sea 915* 9161 

9U7 85X4 Dec 

91X5 8*56 Mar 

9140 0*43 Jim 

91.15 87X6 Sea 

*m 84X4 Dec 

Est.Sates Prev. Sales l<7 
Prev. Dav Open InL USB off It 
EURODOLLARS (IMM j 


77 77-12 

7*4 7*1* 

75-1* 75-28 
75-12 75-13 
74-T0 74-Jt 


9150 915* 
911* 
91 JO 
91X0 

90.96 

WAS 


Ow-the-Counier 

NASDAQ National Market Price* 


2095 2105 
7140 2143 

2134 213* 

2133 213* 

2153 21 S3 

2162 
2173 
3183 


MOJO 140*0 
13455 134X0 
133JPJ 13180 
13100 131-25 
13150 131JS 
13125 
13125 
121X5 
131 XS 


81 minion-ptigf 1Q0 pci. 


92X9 

92.18 

9123 

—.03 

9205 

8403 

Seo 

9121 

9200 

0400 

Dec 

9U1 

9106 

91X7 

9101 

—03 

910* 

8*18 

MOT 

91X8 

9102 

91 XS 

9U7 

—04 

91.15 

86X3 

Jun 

90.97 

91 JB 

90X4 

90X8 

—05 

9004 

8708 

Sea 

9005 

9007 

9003 

9004 

— 0* 

*053 

B7J2S 

Dec 

90X4 

9034 

90X3 

90J2 

—07 

9044 

8704 

Mar 

9005 

9007 

9005 

9002 

—08 

89.95 

8*X4 

Jun 

8900 

•900 

89X9 

89XS 

-09 

Esl. Sales 


Prev. Sales 24X45 





14*10 

6215 

11KLH 

72300 
121*0 
11930 
10400 
9430 
940 JO 
799 jQ 
789 D 
T70S! 
*95.0 

Est. Sales 


mo Jul 608JI 6145 
6835 Aug 

5735 Sep *14jQ *180 

S90j0 Dec *260 *290 
5954 J<*i 

mo Mar *395 639J 
6214 May 64*0 64*5 

63X0 Jul S503 *502 
*414 Sen 6644 6*40 
6605 Dec 680X 6805 
68*3 Jan 
*770 Mar 
<930 May 

Prev. Sales 19451 


5925 5925 
£945 

*0.10 *0.10 
*1.10 *1.10 
*145 
*225 6110 

4180 6X60 

fins 

6400 6355 

6425 
*450 

64.95 

65JB 


4*30 *155 
44X5 
4*80 4505 

*550 46jOO 
46X0 
4705 4*95 
4745 
*8X5 
4905 
50.10 
5045 
51.18 
5105 


5970 *030 
6050 
*030 *100 
*150 *214 
4252 
*270 *330 

6460 641) 

*500 4512 
*6*0 6610 
6800 6750 


Prev. Dav Open lnt.1 13X28 off 1*9 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sper (Ur- 1 pobii eauahSOJOOl 
X3S X02S Sep -736J 7375 

XSM X006 Dec 2340 .7340 

X304 4P8I MOT .1315 -7323 

.ma Juki Jun X303 xm 

Est. Sales e?9 Prev. sales 098 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 8X85 otf 38 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Sper franc- 1 point eaualsSOJXnoi 
-10940 09*80 Sep 

.10710 091570 Dec .10990 .70990 

Est. Sales t Prev. Sales 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 397 
GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

SPermorvi point envois SOOOOI 
XS45 0930 Sep J388 X40* 

J610 2971 Dec J4I2 2*27 

jm Mar X**8 X*50 

X33S X33S Jun 

Est. Sales 362*7 Prev. Sales 33435 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 59099 up 3X93 


Prev. Day Oaen Ini. 72.184 aHlM 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 troy ol- dollars per trovaz. 

44900 24100 Jul 2*700 2*900 

39100 25000 Od 2*800 2*900 

37300 237.50 Jan 27300 27400 

32900 26*50 Apr 27700 27*50 

30X00 27X00 JUl 

Est. Sales 1X0* Prev. sates 2004 
Prev. Dav Open int. 11074 oW 123 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 troy ax- dollars per ox 
141X5 9105 Sep 9500 9125 

14100 91.10 Dec 9508 9500 

12700 9150 Mar 9*00 9*00 

11400 9100 Jim 

Est.Sales Prev. Sales 4*4 

Prev. Dav Open int. 6420 otf 45 
GOLD (COMEX) 

100 tray ax.- doiiars per travax. 

32800 30900 Jul 11*70 31420 

485.00 29100 Aug 31700 31800 

31000 31500 Sep 31700 31700 

49300 297.00 Oct 32100 32100 

48900 30100 D*c 325X0 32*00 

48500 30400 Fab 32900 32900 

49600 J 14.70 Apr 33100 33100 

435X0 3X100 Jun 33700 337X0 

42*40 33100 AUO 3*100 34140 

3®5JS 33500 DC t 

snm 3*200 Dee 

moo 35500 Apr 

Est.Sales Prey. Sales 39,1*3 

Prev. Dav Open tnf. 730.997 off 7,178 


2*500 26400 
3150 
2*400 2*5X0 
2*900 270X0 
27700 275.10 
28140 


314X0 313X0 
314X0 31400 
31700 318X0 
31700 31700 
32100 321X0 
32740 32340 
33100 32900 
33*00 33300 
34100 338.10 
34245 
347X0 
357X0 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

*1 million ■ ptsof lodger. 

“3X3 8*94 S«p 93.13 93.15 

9X07 85X7 Dee 9285 9285 

U2J3? 8*60 Mar 9245 924* 

9128 87.AS Jun 92.10 9X12 

9201 BO0O SOP 9103 9108 

91.78 B»05 Dec 

91X9 8908 Mar 

Jun 

e«. Sales Prev. Sales 7X69 

Prev. Day Open InL 3*111 aH79 
10 YH. TREASURY (CBT) 
si num arm- ats & 32nd8 of IDOpO 
88-21 75-18 Sep 86-20 87-14 

87-13 75-13 Dee 8S-2S 86-13 

S4-2 75-14 Mar 84-29 85-13 

35-7 74-30 JWI 

84-4 82-11 Sen 

83-11 80-19 Dee 

Est.Sales Prev. Sales 706* 

Prev. Dov Onen int 53478 up«13 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
a Pct.JiaMi>0g» AXzndeof lOOptfj 
79-12 57-10 Sea 77-28 79-Z3 


78-13 57-8 Dec 7*-23 77-ZI 

77-29 57-2 Mar 75-23 74-20 

764 5*29 Jun 7+27 70-19 

75-38 5*29 Sap 7J-28 7+02 

7+24 56-25 Dec 730 7J-26 

7+15 56-27 Mar 72-20 72-21 

7+24 <3-12 Jun 

72-27 *34 Sep 70-29 71-1* 

72-16 «-3* Dec 70-15 70-1* 

*9-1* 484 Mar 

Est.Sales Prev. Sales! 32004 

Prev. Day Onen IntXOMAl up 2X86 



Cash Prices 


Commodity and Unit 

Cotfee 4 Santo* ig - 

Prtaldotn 64/30 38 to, vd 

Shut billet* If iff.), tan 

iron 2 Fdrv. PMHou. Ion 
Sieel scrao No I hw pm. _ 

Lead Seal, lb 

Coooer elect, lb - — 

Tin (Slralls). lb — 

Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb 

Poiioaium.ai - — , 

Silver n.Y. ox 

Source: AP. 



S&P100 
index Opdons 


Slrttf Colb-LaU Psts+mt 

Price JK 4M SB 0d Jtr W SO 0d 

l« Wi- - - »• - - - 

110 U'i 15 - 17 1.26 1/16 1/M '* 

ITS T'i Mu lit, m 1/14 ’• 7/16 M 

111 A 9. A II, 11-16 1’, l(w 

as I1/16A 4'. Sh Id lb A A 

HO I 21/MT.v 6'^ 6'i 7 7 

IN ItM U T| K/M/iL II 

Tofol am mhme HUH 

Total can odhi tat.Ki'-a 

r arm eat totenw llftitj 
Total pul inee iaL4*UH2 
Index* 

HMlliN Low 1IU] Ckw 1B3J1 r 1.P 
Source: CBOE. 


IjOiidon Metals 


July 9 
Year 
Tuo Ago 
145 101 

■Ud 0X6 
47300 45300 

21300 21101 

70-71 94-95 

18-21 32-3* 

*548 44-69 

6X747 *2924 

8A+A7 008 

9TL-V4 149-151 
NJL 750 


OdM P 

BM Ask B 

ALUMINUM 

Starting per metric ton 

spot . 735OT 73*00 745 

forward 75700 75700 7S7, 


JnlrO 

szrru 


.... . 73500 73*00 74509 74*00 

tarward 75700 75700 76700 7*800 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Sterling per metric ton 
»Of 1051-00 1 05200 10*1100 106100 

tarward 10*100 10*200 10720O 107200 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Star ling per metric lop 
soot 103200 103400 104300 104*00 

tarward 105000 105200 1 0CT0O 106000 

LEAD 

Starting per metric tan 


VOI J92J0 293X5 29700 29H0O 

forward 29*00 29600 30000 30100 

NICKEL 

Sterling ear metric ton 
WO! 1*9000 3^ro.OO 3X5500 3.76000 

forward 3X2000 3X2300 300500 301000 

SILVER 

Pence per troy ounce 

woi 44100 4*200 44800 45000 

tarward 45400 45*00 46200 4*300 

TIN (Standard) 

Starling per metric Ian 
wot (X9£00 9X00.00 909000 900000 

torworo “J8S0O 90WJO 9X8000 9X9000 

ZINC 

Starling per metric tan 
wot 52700 52400 54400 54*00 

tarward S22M 52100 S390O S390S 

Source: AP. 


DM Futures 

Options 

19. GermoB Mari ItSJM twrti talk per mark 


Dividends 



Price Sep pac Mar San Oac 


July 9 

PutWenie 


37 US 
31 1X5 


Ml 0X1 a$t 0X1 

IK W 067 - 


34 0,79 )A4 105 0.9] 1XJ - 

33 0A3 £95 Ia2 103 104 206 

It 0X1 007 1.04 2X1 M9 1*2 

EsHnnrted total wl. 8089 
Colli: Man Mi.txAapon InL 28X91 
PUN : Mon. ml. 2093 onen III]. 17,170 
Source: CMS. 


Industrial Production 
Rises 7.04% in Brazil 

Reuters 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Industri- 
al output in Brazil rose 7.04 percent 
during the five-month period end- 
ing May 31. down slightly from the 
S-22-percent increase pasted dur- 
ing the like period last year, gov- 
ernment figures show. 

Regis Bonelli. director general or 
the geography and statistics insti- 
tute, said Monday that the growth 
rate fell in April and May. largely 
because of strikes in the mechani- 
cal and transport industries. 
Growth in the Hrst quarter of the 
year was 9.62 percent, he said 



























































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■ADVERTISEMENT- 


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Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
9 July 1985 

TtMMt amt value auoMtoas ifeawa below are mNM by lt» Fonts flttadwfffafte 
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Zj“) cS*3 sffir ^IwlRBCj.dl OadM gta *23X2 


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CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) -«d > RBC MoaCumocv Rt. 

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StorUna Bead SatacNoa C 10437 

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UnNsnal Fund. 5F 124A5 


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1521% 

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RBAutD 

.1* 

20 

17 7ft 

7% 

7ft + ft 

RnHtth 



42419 

18% 

18% 

RacPan 

2534 9 A 

30Z7% 

27 

27 + ft 

RscPna 

1530 65 

719ft 

19ft 

19ft— 1 

RosOM 



1 3 

3 

3 +14 

RaiExp 



241 tft 

-19* 

1%+ ft 

RosPeos 



1 19ft 

19ft 

19ft +1 

RoxfMo 

JM 

4 

2010% 

18ft 

UU— ft 

RoatrSv 



70 15ft 

fc r ^ 

14% - — % 


.158 1 A 

210ft 

ETTj 

10% 


,2* 

.9 

8034% 

l 

24ft — ft 


[14 

4413ft 

13 

13ft + ft 

Raran 



43 4ft 

4 

6ft + ft 

RovRov 

1514 

IX 

32442ft 

41% 

42 — ft 


54 

14 

3413% 


12% 

Rlbllm a 



40 0 


Tft— ft 

RlchEls 



318% 


18% + ft 

RknnN 

2X0 

35 

1456ft 


54ft + ft 

Rflzya 



19 Zft 

u 

2% + ft 

Rival 

JO 

14 

796X5 

Pr ' 4 

14ft— ft 

RoadSv 

1X0 

14 

84SX9 

78% 

29 

BIT — ZZM 



2112% 

t' r ^ f ^ 

13 V.— % 


t 


S3 4% 

pr (‘ ■ 

6% + ft 


X6 

4- 

17813 


12ft— ft 

RobVsn 



25513 

| r J 

1Z%— % 

RckwH 

.141 


19 8% 

tft 

Bft— V* 

RMUnd 


34 M 

8% 

8ft + ft 

RkMfG 

XB 

53 

1712 

in* 

2 +vt 

RooosSt 

58a U 

721 

21 

ROM SB 

58a 15 

11222ft 

yZr ^ 

22ft— ft 


XO 

X6 

1947% 

s r . n 

lfi%— ft 


44 

25 

55 24ft 

Pyi 

24ft + ft 




4911ft 

lift 

11%— ft 

RoyIR* 



84 5 

4ft 

5 - ft 

■iigai 



314ft 

14*14% 

16ft 

14ft 

16ft 

Uft— ft 

■ 



s 


1 

SABHaa 

.T3 

14 

49T0 

9ft 

9ft 

SAY Ind 



26716 

15ft 

15ft— ft 

SCI Sy 




lift 

lift— % 

5EI 



114181* 

18 

18ft 

SFe 

-18T 

1.1 

If 9ft 

8ft 

Bft 

SPDru) 

t 

1 17% 

17% 

179*— % 

SRI 

X8 

33 

20530ft 

19% 

20ft + % 

51V 



73 9ft 



Safcftf* 

541 

3 

IVft 

26ft 

26ft + % 

Safacds 

50 

tl 

8318% 

17ft 

18 + lb 

Safoco 

1X8 

u 

131541% 

41% 

41% 

SafHttfi 





21 — ft 

SUoo 

4B> 2X 

11 31ft 

281* 

28ft +■! 

StJude 



12513% 

13ft 

Wft + ft 

SI Paul 

xoe 

43 

19371ft 

70% 

7049 — ft 

SalCpt 



61 5ft 

4ft 

5ft + ft 

San Bar 

JBr 


43 8% 

Ilk 

81* 

SondOtf 


6 3% 

89* 

89* 

SataiSv 

.12 

17 

34 7 

7 

7 - 

5avnF 

148a X8 

3742ft 

n* 

42ft +lft 




33ft 

23 ft 

SvBkPS 

JM 

23 

3931 

38ft 

"B=* 




790 ft 

ft 

Samoa 



313 7% 

4% 

6ft— ft 




7714 

lift 

15% + ft 


52 

23 

711ft 

II 

lift 

If ■ 



3519ft 

19 

19ft 


A0 

.W 

38922ft 

21ft 

21ft— ft 



13 Bft 

Bft 

Bft— ft 




10 Bft 

Bft 

Bft + ft 







SCWUC 



3 5 

S 

5 

scun 



16 7ft 

7ft 

Tft 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Ppunty HIIL EC4. 81-4ZHM0 

m AHOfulC 


' — (w) FSiCl 
-lw) F&CEurotMan. 
-Iw) FBCOrleatat. 


11X50 

S 11.57 
*2626 


FI DEU TY POB 470, Hamilton Bsnnuda 
— Ira) Aaiatlcmi Voww Common- *78X5 
— (m) Amr Values CuntPraf * 10242 


FMofltv Amor. Assate-U 
Fldehlv Australia Fund. 


*71211 

ItU 


riwuirwiwiiuiiHrwiMjii rmw 

Fidelity Discovery Fund *1027 

Fidelity Dir. Svos.Tr C 12475 

FKMIlv Far East Fund— S2027* 

Fidelity l OTL Fund — *4423 

FkMIfV Ortant Fund *2724 

FldNltv Fraattar Fund—, — *1X83 

Fidelity Pacific Fund — *135X7 

Fidelity SocL Growth F«L *14X7 

Fidelity World Fund *33X7 

FORBES PO B0B7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 81 -8392013 
—he) Dollar Income— _____ 5820 

-lw) Fortes High Inc. Gilt Fd E.76 

— Iw) Gold Inaxnr S 75S 

— (wl GoW Appreciation — ■ 5 3X? 
—Ira) strategic Tradlna 51.16 


m) Cleveland Ottshore Fd IX11XO 

w) CoJwnbta Socurl ttes FL 1)7.19 

b ) COMETE — SWB 

wl Convert. Fd. Inn A Certs — _ *9.77 
y>( Convert Fd. IntlB Ceils *28.16 

W) nn.l~ 5 SABO 

d ) D. Witter wkl WMe Ivt T» *11X2 

» 

Id 
Id 


GEFIHOR FUNDS. 

— (w) East inve s taienl . 

— lw! ScattMi World Fund, 
—M State St American 


*339X8 
(1135V 

S 170X5 

CoPtlTngt.l td.t onJigenLOT -471 4230 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB1N. St Peter Port. Gwrnsev. 0481-2X715 

Ira) FutortJAM SA *111^ 

(mjGAM ArbHraaa Inc *1242* 

w) GAMertm Inc *14X18 

?wl GAM Boston Inc S11477 

| GAM ErmltaeB % 15X5 


IS 


Gam Francvat- 


IdlGAMIntarnatlonal me — _ 

(W) GAM North America Inc— 

(wl GAM N. America Unit Trust. 

w) GAM Padflc Inc— — 

» GAMrtM Cam 


Iwl GAM 5terL & InK Unfl TOW 
{ml BAM Svstams Inc 


lw) oaM Wor ldwi de Inc, 


fait GAM TVdie EA. Clam A 

G.T. MANAGEMENT IUK) LW. 
“(•I Barry Poe. Fd. Lid.. 


5F1taS2 

*11422 

*10657 

was 

*10723 

132X8*0 

*10427 

*151X0 

*121X8 


“W ) G.T. Apetled Sdenco — 
-<d I G.T. Asm HJL GwttLFd 

-twi G.T.ASI0 Fund — a 

— W)G.T_AuetroHa Fund— 
-« ) G.T. Europe Fund. 


*9X1 
$1451 Jd 
r2JI7 J" 
*352 tw, 
*22X5 
*1020 


— (W) G.T.Etea. Small Cos. Fund 51X08 

— U G-r. Data- Fund *1558 

— 0 j G.T. Bold Fund S 10.74* 

— 8 } G.T. Gtobol TactmtaY Fd $T1^ 

1 d ) GbT. Hgnstw Poltauxtor S24M 


Other Funds 

'wl Actloonds Investments Fund. *2151 

w) Actives) Inti *11-58 

m) Allied Ltd *3X0 

AauHo I nternanonal Fund _ S 13S25 

Arab Finance lj=. . *878.77 

/Wane *1X77.33 

Tnntcor InVI Fd. IAEIF) *1032 

BNP Intarbond Fund s 11351 

... Bon dn oh m riinue Pr__— SF UVJJ 

m) Canada Gtd-Mortoaae Fd *925 

‘ ' Capital Praserv. Fd. I nil *11X3 
S U2 
*074 
*1040 


w) Citadel Fund, 
d 


(w, 


CJ-R. Australia Fund . 
CJ.R. Japan Fund. 


Drakkar invesLFund N.V- >1.144X8 

Dreyfus America Fund J 18.17 

Dreyfus Fund InVL S 39JS 

Dreyfus I ntorcoaUntnl— *35X4 
The EataWbhment Trust—. S1.J7 
Europe Ohilaations _61 24 


■MH^Hoatiena 

First Eagle. Fu nd— 
Fifty Stars Ltd^H 


*1557X32 

. SB9623 

Fixed income Trans * wg 

Fonsoiwc Issue Pr SF ZMM 

Fnrexfund — — — *7J0 

Farmuia Selection Pd. . 5F 72X4 

Fondflalla— — — — IRE 

Gavernm. Sec. Fund* S 

Frank! -Trust Inter/ Ins — DM4341 
Houssmm Hldas. N.V— JCOXJ 

HestlanmdA — . Sjgxj 

Horizon Fund S I.WZffl 

IBEX HokHnos Ltd SF1U4D 

I LA InH Gold Bond SW.14 

Intertund SA . *JS25 

I nw nwork e l Fund____— - 
InfermhilnoMut Fd. CL1T_ 556521 

inn securities Fund * WOO 

invasta DWS__ DM5 J“ 

Invest AHonll mes .— *7X4 
liaNortune Inti Fund. SA— . S13X3 


Japan Selection Fund . 


. S 112X8 
. *10129 

joffer Ptns. inn. Lta— _ *1L»28 
Kletnwort Benson ImThL_ » 

Kletnwort 04ns.JW.RJ 5/1-J7 

Korea Growth Trust 5922 

. Lekxni Fund — S127JB4 

Iwj L e veiagu Cop Hold “--fJSJSn 

dJUfluteoer, - — . 

wi Lin** 1 * 1 S71R9 

m) Mwnofwta 51^2* 

d ) MedMonum SsL Fd. * 1659 

b)Metawe_ Y 111X12 

wi NAAT — * WX4 


-id a?; JwSsSS ICaFuSH, m 5S Id 1 Nlkko Growth Package Fd”~ tJrDUA 

3- ISS twi Hjmgsd, 

-G G.T.*Sh»aFuno * 1418 5® 


HJU.SAMUELINVEST.MG6ATiINTL.SA. 
Sta. PA Box AVTel 6534 76027 
Betpe. PA Bax »2J, Tel 4131 234851 

— Jd I Craadnw (For East) SF 1072 

-MiCSF I Balanced) SF 2664 

-« Mm. Bond Fund *«V* 

—Jd j lot Currency UX. S26.W 

— W ) ITF Fd ITtchnolooy I 51350 


. . » 


Porfort Sw. R Est Geneva SF1JV7X8 

1 Pyrmal VoIim N.V *VgMS 

i PMcdes VS54S 

' PSCQ Fund M w 513222 

-id I O-SMtfrOl. AMERICA)— *2920 (w) PS00 tali N.V— * 

Id 1 Putnam Infl Fund. 

(B)Prt— Yedi. 
lw) ’ 


EBC TRUST CO. (JERSEY) LTD. 
tJSetne si JL Heder; 0534^6371 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND: 

f dime.- BW »X4 otter 30.17* 

gidKoa.: BW 11 1X8 Offer .511.537 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND _ 

-id ) Short Term 'A 1 1 Accom) $14837 

— Jd j sort Term ’A 1 IDMr) $1X264* fl _, 

— Id) Short Term B' IAccum)_^ $1.1720 

— jd ) Mori Term *8' (Dletr) JMW4- 

Me) Long Term $2159 j*' 

"&*s Isa 

—lb ) J.F Hang Kong Trust $34X7 (W, 

-JJjlF JarnTru) . Y4616 lw 

-jB I J.F Japan TeSmolOBV _ 

1 Growth Trust. 


Quantum Fund N.V.. 

Renta Fund — 

Rentmvoai. 


- Si 

LF 1X5551 

Reserve insured Deposits- *1091-05 

Satnoral Perttoflo — 

SCI/Tech. SA Ljamboin — , 

Seven Arrow* Fund. N .V— ,. .5 T3T53 
Stale St Bo nk EruWV JMbbNV * 
Strataov iny est meirf Fund— *«X9 

***®Sf^ slS 

»sa«t r.W 

TrameodlW fund **.«« 

Turquoise Fund—-— — * jgS34 
Tweedy JSrowne luv^taNA *2.]5* 

— - TwoedyXM’dwne a-tHSb 

-I») J2= Poctflc SecAIAccl. — . T569 jm) TweffljBrp wne (U.m n.v. ItTOg 

LuiYOS BANK INTL. POB 43E Geneva II R j uhi bmhJ Rr^ — *1X0641 

~Hw) UuTdsItrtT Dollar — _ * 11450 (Sj UNI CaanoA Fund— $1127X4 

Hards tail E urope — SF 11L» ( W ) Vanderbilt Assets — ' J S 

— +fw) Llovds infl Growth — SF 1*4X8 M 1 WvM Fund c » *11X6 

—flwMJonfc inn income— SFffilS) 1 _ 

OH.-. Deutsche Mark; BF - Betolum FmOlFL- DvU* Ftorin. UF - 
J^dtantaurs Francs.' SF — Swiss Francs; a - QS fcfd; + Priori— wa 

cla WP/VIUtonBt' , * ,>,,UA «im AuaHahle: N.C.— NatCommurHCDtadW— 

J*®*: 5, - suspended; 

yVg.Pert or mancB li 

*5rtJwWeFoodUd.- _ 

nrlc t«on Amsterdam Stock Exchonae 


— tw) JF Korea Growth ’ 


NAM.F, 


NSP F.l.T 

Padflc Horton tavt. Fd. 
PANCURRl Inc. 1 


$168X6 

*16740 
1JM05S 
IS 1648 


$55X3 
S 89430 



SeWySv 

SxiH'H 


$401 Inc 

SeawFd 

5cNISW 

secAFs 

SecBap 

SecTag 

SEEQ 

selfaff 

Select 

semlcn 

Seraor 

Srvmat 

SvcMer 

Svmtl* 

Service 

5evOafc 

ShrMed 

SfMMItl 

aieUws 

SbeWli 

Stwnevs 

ShoaSos 

StpamA 

Ham ci 

stomaR 

smoon 

silicons 


48 32 
XO 52 


1.14 44 


X0 41 


StUCftX 

5lttac 

SlvStMn 

SimAIr 

simp in 

5tpplns 

SSr 

&5fS 

SlaanTe 

SmtthL 

Smith F 

5nttSnl 

Society 

Sooty Sy 

Soflerti 

SottwA 

SftwPb 

5onocPs 

torn 

SoMlcG 

SaBcSC 

SGatWt 

SoHoep 

SlhdFn 

Soutrei 

Sovran 

Sovran 

SDCMlc 

SpanA 

Speedy 

Spctran 

Speed) 
SoertlD 
Spire 
StarSrs 
StafBW 
Standv s 
StdMlc 
StRHS 
Stondun 
SfanfdT 
Stanhas 
Staitoy 
SlaSta 
StoteG 
SMloar 
SternrL 
StowStv 
StewSn 
SNfel 
StckYle 
Uocksy 
51 


118s HMl LOW IPM-CMBS 

36 59k 59* Sta • . 
153 IS UUi 141li 
305 71ti 714 TV.— 14 

2475 66* 6W 6M + » 

1N59. SR M 
2 Wi 1BW IBM + lb 
3015V. tot, 15U + *k 
6420U 19M Jfllft— U 
42544 25V. 25V. 

*7 3 24* 3 — V% 

171 18k 194 19k + lb 

421996 t«k 19M 

4 th th m 

86 49h 6Vk 444 * 14 

1344 79k 79k 7Vb 

163 * kk 4k— ta 
1535149k M M — Vb 
1529319* 31 21M 4> V. 

502314 22M 22ft— lb 
29*159* ISM 159k— Vk 
221127% Ml 269k— ft 
19131% 31% 389k— ft 
8417M 1Mb ltM-Vi 
4911 IBM 16ft— M 
29828% 28ft 28ft 
3312M 12V. 12V.— 14 
UWA 65W 66V. + M 

5 6 6 4 

7 4% 4% 4% 

in 49k 49k 49k + Vk 

95013 1194 12 —94 

321S14 1494 15 — M 
1511794 17M 17% 

m 

14314% lift 14ft 
3214ft 14ft 149k 
915% IS IS —14 

1 4 4 4 — % 

16526 23M 29)4— ft 

IBS 10 
41 3M 
104 8ft 
77 3ft 
49U 

1 JM 


.16 IX 
M IX 
148 4J 
M X 

.15 S 

M S 


ita Not 

* High lw SPJkLCMm 


Trradcr 

Trasnt 

TrkWSv 

TrWMe 

TrlbCm 
Tr logy 
Trlon 
Tnruo 
TrstNY 
Tuck Dr 
TwnClh 
TVtan 
Tyson s 


JQr 

5 

4 6 

6 

6 — ft 



59 3% 

2ft 

2*9 



103 7% 

7% 

7% 



102 6ft 

6% 

6ft + % 



J 2 3 i? 

XI lib 

3% 

2% 



lft 

lft — 

.10 

15 

4 8 

7% 

a + % 

40 

15 

2»<u 

XU 

24ft— ft 

140 

X6 

1238ft 

37 

38ft + ft 



in’* 

5% 

ft 

** . 
ft— h 



1217ft 

17 

17% + ft 

08 

J 

36723 ft 

22% 

23 -99 


JM X 385 


St* » 


J0e J.7 

1 x 6 aj 


J0o 14 
lJBb 7J 
Mb 32 
1X0 7J 

32 11 
IJM 55 
.18 LS 
148 34 


ja as 

1X8 34 


1X0 IX 
.ISb 3X 


.15 52 
J6 X 

J6 22 


148 1.1 
•OS Jj8 
M2 XI 


i$ 

SutXHli 
hitoAlrl 
SubrB 
StfdlMV 

luma .»• s 

Sumlto X14 73 
5ununa 

SumlBs M 4L3 
SumBAp<220 44 
5umttU .10 3 

SunCSi 

Swwtr 24 1 f 
SunMnd 
SunSL r 
SunstFd 

Sunwct 140 XI 
SupRto .18 3 

5upSIcv 

5uwrEI ixotnu 

50Prtax 

SuorEa 

SureAf 

SurvTc 

Syke* 

Svrnbln 

SymbT 

Symbtlc 

Syncor 

Synted) 

Svntrex 

Syscon 28 12 

SvAsoc 

Systln 

Syslnls 

SyxtGn 

Svatmt X4 2 


2% 

7V* B + ft 
3 3ft 
9% 18 + ft 

8ft 8ft + ft 

39950ft 6914 50ft +1 
317% 17% 17% 

78 89k 814 114 — ft 

36314 15ft 15ft— 9b 

71 UVb 13% 13% 

84738% 2714 27ft— 114 
71821ft 31 31 —ft 

71794 17ft 179* + ft 

18737ft 25% 27ft +1 

25634 23 23ft— % 

204 5ft S 5 — ft 
17525% 24% 25ft— ft 
353 MM lift 18ft— ft 
125 4% 4ft 6% 

's 4 ft 4 nc 4 sr + * 

177 lift 11% lift— ft 
48717 lift 18ft— ft 
14721 21% 2194— 1ft 

286 7ft 69* 7ft + ft 
5 ZM 2M 2Vk 
191494 14ft 14ft 
14 4ft 4ft 49k— ft 
64 5ft 5% 5% 

728% and 28ft + ft 
44414 12ft 13%—% 
4B35U. 34V. 35 + % 

2S 7% 7% 7ft— ft 
313ft 13ft 13ft 
2422% 22ft 22»— ft 
ID 1ft 1ft 1ft 
47744 63ft 63% — ft 
301 4ft 4ft 4% 

317 49k 4ft 4V&— ft 

14 7% 79* 794— Ik 

81394 139k 13% + ft 

20 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft 

4 6% 69k 4ft— ft 
31 17ft 16% 17 — ft 
86 99k f 9ft 4- ft 
17714% 13% 1394— M 
41134 33Vb 3»* + ft 
38034% 33% 33% 

4824 2294 24 +lft 

7*54 151ft 1S1W-SM 
IS 5 5 + ft 

23163% 42ft 639b— % 
109 ■% {ft 8M— 9k 
21421ft 209* 20% 

415 15 15 — W 

230 394 3ft 3ft— ft 
10622% 22 22% 

247M 49M 47M 
70213% 19ft 139k + ft 
*1 19k tft 1ft— K 
30 4ft Aft 61k + ft 
51 8% BM B9 m— ft 
2382 4ft 3 3ft— 1U 

5 4% 4% 4ft 

34S 45 45 +ft 

5523 22% 22%—% 

46 8% 8U 8ft — ft 
43 7ft 79k 7% 

122 39k 3% 3ft 
20 7ft 7ft 714— ft 
610 9% 7% + M 

iS"% ,0 2 "VT» 

15 3M 3ft 3ft— ft 

131 wft ioft line— ft 

IffSlIlfc 10ft lift + ft 
91 4ft 4ft 4ft— U 
7512ft 11% 11%—% 
120 3ft 3ft 3ft 4- K 
6314ft 14 16 

8223ft 21% 2194— I ft 
•4 4ft 4 4 — % 

2 1 a a — ft 

42 9M 7ft Tft— ft 
23021ft 22ft 22ft — ft 


M X 


TBC 
TSClnc 
TSI 
TSRS 
Tocvivs 
Tandem 
Tandon 
Tcfmal* 

TcCora 

T chine* jn A 
Tecum 320OX11 
Telco 

TIcmA t 
Tel Plus 
Tel aft 

Tatacn) 22 12 

Tetedct 

Tehrld 

T slobs 

Teums 

Tarnco 

tmpfS 

Terntax. 

TMrLv 

Tennanl St 40 
TeraCp 
TarmDt I 
Tesdato 
Tenon 

Trxtna 35m 1 A 

TherPr 

Thrmas 


TlmeE* 

TmtFRi 

Tlprarv 


2811ft 11 
107129* IZM 

1810% 9% 

168101% 9% 
221 6 5% 

268117ft 16ft 
960 5 4% 

711% lift 
20 9ft 9ft 
4 7ft 49* 

5SW US 
6813% 13% 
70730% 30ft 
437 8ft 01k 
7712ft W 
5221*9* 16 
44421% 27 
126 39* Zft 
775159* 15ft 
96717ft 16% 
139 6ft 6% 
64 Zft 2ft 
.12 79* 7% 
37 4ft 4 
1023ft 22ft 
128 39k 3 
34 4% 49k 
30 1ft 1% 
15 ft ft 
7018ft 17% 
12510% Wft 
23214ft 14ft 
20 7M Tft 
12479k 47ft 
51822 19% 

ISIZft 12ft 
117 7ft 7 
137149* 14ft 
155 7ft 7% 

11 8ft 

12 6ft 
18 Tft 

5^ 
48422ft 22ft 
2744ft 46 
2129 27 

61617ft 14M 
6112% 12% 
116 16 


lift 
12% + ft 
10 — ft 
T%— ft 
6 + ft 
14ft— ft 
4ft 
lift 
9M + ft 
~‘i.+ ft 


— ft 

+ M 


12ft 

16% + 9* 


% 


89* 

4M 

Tft 

12 

ft 


+ ft 
15ft— ft 
149k— ft 
6%— % 
2Vk 
7ft 
4 - ft 
23 + ft 

3ft + ft 
4%— ft 

1»— ft 
17%— ft 

1=1 
47ft— ft 
211k +1% 
12V5 
7 — ft 
14ft 
7«k 
89*— ft 
*M— ft 
7ft + ft 
12ft - 
ft 

22% + ft 
46ft 
27 —a 
14% + ft 
12ft— % 
16 + ft 


MANUFACTURE FRANCHISE 
DES PNEUMATIQUES MICHEUN 


with a capital oil FJr. 700,000,000 
Bead Offieet Flaw dee reueuu Duubam 
CLEBHOIVr-FEBHAND (PopdoXMma) 

R.CS. i CLEHMOrTT-FERRAND B 855 200 507 


10 % bonds 1979 - 1994 of UA $1,000 each 


For die redemption of the tranche of U.S. 85,000,000 due 17 August, 1965, 
MANUFACTURE FRAN£A£5E DES PNEUMATIQUES MI CHEUN com. 
peny has need Us redemption right reserved al the time of the issue, 
therefore the 5,000 re pur c has ed hoods have been cancelled. 

There wiD not be any drawing by lot for this second r edemptio n. 
Outstanding amount: U-S- (1151,000X001 
BANQUE NA.T10NA1B DE PABlSt Ffeenl AgenL 


INTEKNATIONAL 
BUSINBSS OPPOflTCNTlIES 



TcL 01/219 81 11 


The folly integrated business services in die center 
of Zurich 

offers 

Officcs/Confcrc^icc Rooms, Scaetaiial/Translatioii, 
oompL Tdecom-Systems, Company fomiarion/Fidudary 
Transactions 

Executive Business Services ag 

Ustcristjrassc 23 (Lowenplatz) CH-8001 Zurich 


I€ - Duty Pres Shops 

Ahport FrBnWurt/MahvGflnnany 
Specials In Jo()f *85 
mtSXYWMs Hum ixo Ur. 

0rtyapCft»S4X0 
WtfSKEYJm Boom 1,00 Lir. 
only approx S 4,70 

BftArtOTSchar ta dibera Mti otarfa retid 
IJM Ur. only acproxS 3.70 
KEtSCHWABSER ScWactarer 0.70 Ur. 
orty appro* s 7X0 

UOlfeun ThtarraR EcMe Kroatzbeara 
aTOLX.onlyapproxSd*- 
VBWXRHMeitM BtanoatEtfra Diyf 
Roooo/Itoail.OOlfr. 

only appro* SZ- 
SEKTH8nWTh>cftm0.7SUr. 
only approx S 2.- 

i Htema aton a l Dapaum A/upslafre 

. . . Ml you read to Duty Rise 


| A»bH»l»» l » l9 » 9% b m>m 

wtowahonal 
nr— urn otiir$i 

MSTTTVTE 

CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED AND 
RECOGNIZED AU. OVER THE WORLD 


ANTWERP 



NEW YORK 


ONE WEEK INTENSIVE 
DIAMOND AND COLORED 
STONES COURSES. 

For more intorraatien 
Sdi ufU k uta 1/7 ■ 2018 Antwerp 
Tal,: 08/ 731.07 J8 Mpm 


USPCti 

U5T 

UTL 

UitrBcp 

umrw 

Unsrrm 

UnVKP 

Untacpt 

Until 

U nitre* 

UnlmM 

UnBcp 

UnFodl 

UnNotl s 

UnPMr 

UnTrBc 

unworn 

UACms 

UBATZt 

UBAtsk 

UBkSF 

UBWNl 

unBkre 

UBCol 

BS® 

UnDom 

UnEdS 

UFnGrp 

UFktFO 

UGrdn 

UMoBn 

UPraed 

US Ant 

USBcp 

US Cop 

US Dsen 

US Enr 

US HC 1 

USHR1 

USPrco 

USStifl 

ITS Sur 

USTrk 

USTr* 

UStOtn 

UTetci 

UnTehrv 

UnTeta 

UnVtBn 

UVuBa 

UnvFm 

UnvHIt 

UnvHId 

UnvSec 


128 U 
X48 X 


1X0 22 

UD 6j0 
1XW 17 
240 XT 

X4 X 
M 2 A 
■Ur IX 


JOB IX 
1X8 42 
1J» 24 
1-50 73 
.72 6-7 


1X6M4X 
1X8B 2X 


1X0 32 


.12 2X 
20a IX 
120 10.1 
120 3 A 
20 IX 


4014% 
729 
29722 
1136 
316 3 
161013% 
1516M 
217 

104 Tft 
35 7% 
4714ft 
243% 
40812 
3725ft 
485 28M 
27 84 
175119* 
140924 
12624% 
11 Tft 
41 3M 
6018% 
2211ft 
4736 
1520% 
23«M 
118139* 

1 4 
217 8 
17918% 

311% 
1636 
17812% 
7 3% 
27731% 

82 4ft 
67130ft 
5111 
184 2ft 

2 4% 
4417ft 
3011ft 

153359* 
3720% 
37 6% 
29239k 

21 7% 
419 

37748ft 
14321 
34617ft 
18 5ft 

22 3 


14% 14% + M 

28% 27 + ft 

21M 21ft + ft 
35ft 36 + % 
7% Tft 
12ft U -ft 
16M 16M + M 
T7 17 + ft 
V% Tft 
7M 79* — ft 
14 14 

4]ft 43ft 
lift lift— ft 
24% 25ft + ft 
23 28 

B3 B3%— ft 
lift 11% + ft 
20M 229k +2 
24ft 24% + ft 
7M 9M — ft 
3ft 3M— M 
18 U — ft 
10% 11 4- ft 

25ft 24 + ft 

28% 29 
17ft 179b + M 
13% 139* + % 
4 4 — Ik 

7M 79* 4- ft 
U 18ft + ft 
11% 11% 

35 35ft + ft 

’SJ’gr-ar 

31ft 31ft 

3% 39k— ft 

2ft 2ft— ft 
4ft 4ft 4- % 
27% 30 + ft 

* we 

4ft 4%— ft 
19ft 17ft 
11% lift + ft 
35 35% + % 

30 20ft + % 
4% 694 — M 
23ft 23ft 
79* 7% 

I* 19 —1 
42% 429* 

38ft 21 
Wft 1*%— % 
51k 5ft 
2ft 3 


SriMta Wf 

188t HU Uw SPJftQl** 
UFSBk 3111% lift 11% 

UpROflf 15 13 5 4% 4%— ft 

UPcnP 2X0 9.1 2222ft 22 22 - ft 
UmCr 253 4ft 3% 3%— % 

Uacota 51* X9 168 5ft 5ft .5%— Vb 
USBcPa 1X0 44 1836ft 16 U 

II Mi 

■■ 

■■ 



HI 

v Band 



X 9 

8ft 

8ft + ft 

VLl 



444 a 

7% 

8 + % 

VLSI 



6273 

1296 

12%— ft 

VMX 



230 6ft 

6ft 

6ft- Vb 

VSE 

.164 

IJ 

19 9 

8% 

8% 

valid to 



*41 Bft 

8ft 

Bft 

ii'rm 



1315 

Uft 

Uft— ft 

lei, 1 ! 

158 

xa 

1328ft 

28ft 

»ft 

VcHFSL 



■IILlj 

1899 

18ft 

KQiihlfl 

.12 

IX 

4 6 % 

6*. 

4% + ft 

KHcm 

150 

X9 

66741V* 

40% 

40ft— ft 

ElPMI 

1X8 

18 

1428ft 

X 

28'* 

Valin nt 

40 

XT 

27 Uft 

15 

UVb + Vb 

vertta* 

.14 

25 

142 6ft 

*ft 

*Vb + ft 

Vaiui 

40 

15 

8 23% 

Wft 

aw 

Van Dub 

48 

U 

77Mft 

14 

Uft — ft 

VanShk 



1 9% 

«ft 

9ft 

Vanzetl 



21 Bft 

B 

a + ft 

VariCra 



7 Tft 

4% 

7ft 

Vartan 

40 

is 

583 

13 

13 + ft 







VriaCM* 



6 8% 

8ft 

8% 

Venire* 



321 3% 

3ft 

3ft 

VarsaT 

50 

15 

516ft 

14ft 

16ft— ft 

v*tq 



60 ft 

ft 

% 

VleanF 



13 3ft 

3ft 

39»— ft 


Xte 

4 

Y*re7M 

73% 

24 

VtatraS 



47 3ft 

Zft 

2ft— ft 

VMDISP 



IX 5% 

5ft 

5% 

VtedeFr 

52e 

ll 


II'JI 

18% + ft 

VtoaleK 




17 

17 

vo Been 

3A 

25 

151 8ft 

Bft 

Bft + J* 

VbTecti 



102 ft 

% 

ft + ft 

VUrtnW 

1 


■ 6 

6 

6 





14ft 


VOIICO 



17 49* 

■ryi 

4ft— ft 

Voltlnf 



3041SV, 

Id 

15 


5Dr 






XB 

J 

17 9 

Bft 

9 + ft 

Vvausl 



93 7 

6% 

7 + ft 

r 



W 


| 

WD 40 

-94 



30 


Wane* 

54 

IX 

4714 

13ft 

13ft— ft 

winrTti 



67 7ft 

7 

7ft + ft 

WsliE 

1.76 

75 

33324ft 

24 

24ft + ft 

WFSLS 

XO 

24 

33623% 

25 

35 — ft 




58314 

15ft 

15ft— % 







Watrlsl 

.11 


12 4ft 



WOusPa 

40 

29 

XMft 

14 

14 — ft 

Wavmk 



1054 7 

4ft 

6ft— ft 

Waxms 

53 

5 

7415 ft 

14% 

15ft 

Writas 

M 

35 

2013% 

13ft 

13% 


158*155 

15 8ft 

Bft 

8% + % 

Watefld 

XO 

xa 

4 13ft 

13% 

13% + % 








3k 8J 

» 9% 

VM 

99* 

WMOC3 

00 185 

125 7ft 

7% 

7% + ft 







west Fn 



1214 

14 

14 


Page 13 


WllCoa 

WnCmc 

WUFSL 

WMIcr 

WSILfa 

WSIaar 

WITIAb 

WmorC 

WkhKtO 

WatwCs 


Wlcol 

wweom 

wiiond 

Wlllml 

W1IIAL 

WmsSn 

WlmpTr 

WllsnF 

Wlllon 

Wind mr 


sotacin Mf 

!••• HKrt L*w IPJULCh'O* 

15014% 14ft 14% 4- ft 
1 3 3 3 — ft 

16015% 15% 15% 4- % 
208 7ft 7 7ft + ft 
1512 11% 11%-% 

39 10ft 9ft 9ft + ft 
18213ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
1 16ft I* 14 — % 
3233 31% 33 41 

7*15% » 15 + ft 

X8 19 55131ft 30ft 309- * ft 
388 4ft 4 4ft + ft 
<52518% 18 10%- ft 

IB 4% 4% tft + ft 

1X5 AO 24141 40ft 41 + % 

<60215% 14% 15'k + ft 
<5 17ft 169- 17ft + V) 
2X0 X» 18553% 52ft 53% + ft 
•1 7ft 7 7ft — ft 
20 2ft 2 2ft 
27 IX 44! 59* 5% 5% + ft 


■34 Z9 

30 XI 


A0 33 

-Uta X 


E. Germany Gets 
New Eurocredit 

The Auonand Press 

FRANKFURT — An 85-mem- 
ber international banking consor- 
tium has extended to Bast Germa- 
ny a new, eight-year Eurocredit of 
$600 milli on, Dresdner Bank said 
Tuesday. 

The eight-year loan will be re- 
tired in nine installments at six- 
momh intervals starling after the 
fourth year. A first installment of 
$80 million is already available at a 
fixed rate %-perccmage points over 
the U.S. prime rate. The rest will 
yield fc-perceniage points over the 
London interbank rate. 

Japanese banks are backing 
$190 J million of the new Eurocre- 
dit, followed by Europeans with 
$174 million, Arabs with 5145 mil- 
lion and U.S. banks with 576.5 mil- 
lion. 


WlimEn 

wiiSG* 

WlMXO 

Wslohn 

WoodM 

Won ha 

WrafttW 

Writer 

Wyman 

WVS* 


Sale* to 
t*Di HW 


20 36 231 179k 
.14 2x 134 7 


60 4 j 

X4 U 

28 XI 

.ISe IX 

xo u 


B4I3M 
2*28 
37 IZM 
18 8ft 
13 MM 
IS4 9 


Net 

m IPAACbto 

79k rtk + »k 

32 32 

14% 16% — ^ 
4% 4% — ft 

IJft 13ft — ft 
27ft 27ft 
12% »ft 
■ft 8ft 
23ft 23% 
f% B%- ft 


Xatmc 

Xlcar 

XkMr 


381 3% 
391 89k 
87813ft 


3 3 — ft 

8% 8% 

12ft 12ft— ft 


YIOWFI 

1X0 

IX 

5338% 

38ft 

38ft — ft 

YOTkFO 

X0B 15 

3489ft 

189* 

189. 

■ 



z 


| 

Zafrahrl 



212 3ft 

3 ft 

3% 

Zen LB * 



1038 26% 

25% 

24ft +1 

Zenrufl 

xs 

17 

mot 

18ft 

18ft— 

Zantec 



128 2% 

2ft 

2ft 

zie«i«r 

Ma 4.0 

1 12 

12 

12 

Zionui 

154 

3X 

3ZJ3S9. 

aft 

aft 

Zllel 



190 39. 

34* 

2ft- ft 

Ztvod 



254 5ft 

4ft 

5ft + ■« 

Zondvn 

X8I 

X 

166 TO'-. 

10 

18 — ft 

Zrcod 



34312% 

12ft 

12ft- 'T 

Zvoo 



H 8ft 

n» 

Bft + •; 


5MKE W WQ9D5 AND nC1UKE5 
DOOBESBUKY 

DkHVINTHFMT 


Gold Options (pfcntn S/cu.). 


ft — 

*Hl 

SrwS 

fm 

310 

11751355 




320 

45D- BOO 

15501705 

22252175 

330 

125 475 

11001250 

1750.1900 

3® 

iso am 

775 955 

135)1500 

350 

050. 150 

555 475 

K2511J5 

3ffl 

— . — 

1 3S 500 

775 9» 


Gokt 314J25- 31475 

Vatem White WcMSJL 

L Qai da Maal-Bbrac 
1211 Cam I. Swtauriiad 
TcL J1B2SI - Trin »3RS 


THE GOLD HILL GROUP 

CURRENCIES, COMMODmES AND SECURITIES PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 
LAUSANNE, LONDON. BUENOS AIRES. NASSAU, 

HAVE YOU FOUND AN EFFICIENT. RELIABLE 
AND PROFESSIONAL MONEY MANAGER? 

THE GOLD jHILL EXPERTISE IS PROVEN BY 
OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER, 

WHICH IS A PERMANENT AND PUBLIC TRACK RECORD. 

THE GOLD HILL RELIABILITY IS GUARANTEED BY OUR MEMBERSHIPS 
OF THE LONDON INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL FUTURES EXCHANGE 
AND THE NEW YORK FUTURES EXCHANGE. 

THE GOLD HILL EFFICIENCY IS BOUND BY 
SPECIALLY-DESIGNED INVESTMENT PROGRAMS OFFERED TO OUR CLIENTS. 

AND BY THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR INTERNATIONAL NETWORK TO SERVE THEM. 

II “ p 7- OLD HILL GROUP BROCHURES. 

i ^ I 

» jhjs COUPON SHOULD BE SEN 24467 GOLD CH -roN OR AN OFFER TO BUY 


A 


New Is*ue 


These Bonds with Warrants having been sold, this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


July 1985 


BHF BANK Finance (Jersey) Limited 

St Helier/Jersey 

DM 150,000,000 
7 % Bearer Blonds of 1985/1 995 

with Warrants to subscribe for 450,000 Bearer Shares of 

BERLINER HANDELS- UND FRANKFURTER BANK 

irrevocably and unconditionally guaranteed by 
BERLINER HANDELS- UND FRANKFURTER BANK 
Frankfurt (Main) and Berlin 

Issue Price: 115% 

Subscription Price: DM 323.- per share of DM 50.- 


Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 


Bayerische Vereinsbank 
Aktiengesellschaft 

Deutsche Bank 
Aktiengesellschaft 

Swiss Bank Corporation 
International Limited 

Amro International 
Limited 

Bayerische Hypotheken- und 

Wechsel-Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

CISC 

Limited 

Daiwa Europe (Deutschland) 
GmbH 

The Industrial Bank 
of Japan (Germany) 


Commerzbank CSFB-Effectenbank AG 

Aktiengesellschaft 

DG BANK Dresdner Bank 

Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank Aktiengesellschaft 

Union Bank of Switzerland 
(Securities) Limited 


Westdeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Bank Mees & Hope NV 


Bayerische Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Citibank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Genossenschaftliche 
Zentralbank AG - Vienna 

Kredietbank International 
Group 


Morgan Guaranty GmbH Morgan Stanley International 


The Nikko Securities Co., 
(Deutschland) GmbH 

Orion Royal Bank 
limited 

Salomon Brothers 
International Limited . 

S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 


Nippon Kangyo Kakumaru 
(Europe) Limited 

PK Christiania Bank (UK) 
Limited 

Sumitomo Trust 
International limited 

Wood Gundy Inc 


Banque Indosuez 
Chase Bank AG 

Credit Commercial de France 

Goldman Sachs International 
Corp. 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 

Nederlandsche 
Middenstandsbank nv 

Nomura International Limited 

Privatbanken A/S 

Svenska Handelsbanken 
Group 

Yamaichi International (Europe) 
limited 


»yi‘ 


















































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 



Tuesdays 

AMEX 


Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to ttw dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


— — - 

38b 

14 

24 

2Sb 

31% S( 
9b BK 
19% Bk 
14 Bk 

29 

13% Bk 

2* 

b B1 

19b 

12* 81 

19* 

12* Bl 

45b 

22* B< 

IB* 

10% B< 

5 

2% Bl 

19 

12% Bt 

26% 

19% Br 

18 

lib Bf 

3 

4* 

21* Br 
25% Br 
3* Br 

3 

2% Bl 

5% 

3% Bl 

34% 

23b Bl 

13b 

9 BU 


dew 

fluotflte 


UMMtfit 
HteiLo* Start 


- St _ OSH 

Ote’TM.PE IBBitWl Lpw Bub t( 


.72 M 9 
M 29 9* 
TOO <4 IT 
95 
25 

XO 12 TO 


10 

TOO U 11 
lJDO U 11 
AD 100 


t xa mo 

XO 11 | 


42 avi am 
5 m 1ft 

is a an* 

1 JM 24b 
< WMI 

12 27* J7% 
*5 1% 1 
so is* is 

15 ISM 15 
106 04 42tk 

2 i»t 11% 

?3> 5 M 
112 lMt IMt 
1Z7 21V| 20% 
m 1714 17* 
9 1M U4 
245 30* MM 

a 4M 4 

3 3* 3% 

SI 1 Ok 

3 28% 28* 

is w m 


37% +• * 
13*— * 
21 *- % 

n rT'i 

2 4%-% 

Z7%— * 

1 

is* 

15 

43* +1% 
11 *— % 
5 

14% 

21% 

17* 

3*14 + * 

r-s 

r + % 

28% + V. 
9b + % 


10b 5* 
TO 5% 

a* m 

4b 1* 
7*14 23* 
414 314 
9% t 


34 W 
32 24 

; a m 


’ft m 


2* I * 
Ik 1* 
14* II 
2Slfe Ht 
3* HO 


7 19 

11 2 
-10a IX ID 141 
1432 


n* 7* 

7* 7 

29* 2014 
2 2 
7m 71* 
JVi 3* 
7 7 

km u 

2Vk 2* 


39 23Vk 
1 * 
34% 2X4 
H 119k 
ITVt 13 
10% 9* 


. 31 
JO- 3.1 10 


X0*Z5 1* 


37* 14. 12 345 


1414 13* 
2SVt 24 Vi 
1 % 1 * 
II* 11* 
27 »* 
* * 
35* 35* 
17* 17* 
15% 15* 
ISM 14* 


7% + * 

74* * VJ 

21% + V* 
2 + V* 

7214 
314 

7 — * 

10 

M 

+ 

1414 + Vi 
2414 — % 
lit— % 
11 * 

ait-nt 

* 

33* + * 
17* 

15* + '4> 

14*— * 


12 Month 
H ten Law Stock 


5b. Cieu 

(Nv. YHLP6 WQs Wall Law QuatOW 


314 AO I n 
S% ALLan 
1? AMCn 
2* AM Inll 
*1* ATT Fd 

2% AanoPr 

5* AcmtU 
9b Action 

1* Acton 
IW AdmRs 
IS AdRua 
15 Adahe 
4>« Aeronc 
Mb Alims 
5* Air Exp 
5% AlrCal 
4* ArCalaf 
14 AlOtnCO 
45V: Almllon 
5* Aloha 

Wi AtPhoin 

V; Alte* 
JSft Alcoa d 
11 auqCp 
9* Amdahl 
4% Amedeo 
4* AmBllt 
4 Am Cop 
Mb AConrrl 
i 12% AExPwt 
Sft AFrucA 
5% AFrvC B 
TV. AHIttiM 
4 Alsrael 
i 1244 AMzeA 
* AMBId 
3 AmOll 
53 'i APtl! 
12b APrecs 
6b AmRIlY 
11* ARovI n 
3 ASclE 
I* Ampai 
4% An dal 
2% AndJcts 
9 Andrea 
5* Angles 

14 vlArtalv 

3*4 AwPf 
5*4 Arievn 
4b Armtm 
7* Armais 
7*4 ArrawA 
13* Arundl 
4*4 Asmro 
SVi Astras 

1 Atfretc 
It AtltCM 

2V3 Alias wt 

2 Audio tr 
131b Avondl 


34 

JO J 31 

.12 A IS 


32 33 19 
34 


.14 5 19 

2 “ U 

JO U 2) 


30 14 14 
xe iJ 
.15 12 7 
19 

1X0 23 13 


13 

12 

11 

S2 15 32 


99 4* 4V4 494 

273 24% 23* 24 + * 

S3 J9V* 1944 19% — b 

*53 4 3* 3*— * 

84x 87% *7 *7 - * 

10 2* 314 2*4 — * 

12 10 % 10 10 

32 II* 11ft 11V* — % 

52 3*4 2* 2* 

17 244 2b 2b 

1 a 20 20 + % 

57 14* 14* 16* 

41 4* 444 4* 

17 47*4 46* 47* 

21 6*4 4*4 6% 

*7 10W 9% 10 — * 

244 12*1 12 12*- % 

130 ft ft % „ 

13 104 1B3 104 + * 

14 5*4 8 8 — *4 

S V 

69* 13 12% 1214—* 

33 4* 4* «i 

50 12* 12VS 12* 

22 6*3 614 6*— % | 

13 44 44 44 

103 40* 39* 39*— 1* 

BSHtt 6* 6* A*— * 

11002 4b 6* 6*— b 

74 9ta 894 9 — * 

12 AW 4* 4* + * 

2 14* 14* 14*—* 


2l 

120 SA 21 

J4b 1.7 15 


2 14* 14* 14*—* 
553 3* 3* 3*— ft 


40944 a 

«■ 10 7 


13 4*4 4b 4*— * 

5 S9 S9 59 
4 13* 13* 13* 

4 7* 7* 7* 

527 13* 13* 13* + W 
89 5b 5* 5* 


137 5* 5* 5ft + % 
4] 3* 3 3* 

10 12* 12b 12* + W 

H o 7* a 

10 lb lb lb 


4 

11 

14 

M 23 12 
13 

.15 2.1 

12 


299 3* 3b 3ft + % 


11 6* 6* A* 

7 6b 4 6b — * 
6 B% ■* 8*— * 

5 9 9 9 

2 30* 20* 20* 

42 7* 4* 7* + * 

1 11* 11* 11*— * 


*3 '55 '£ '!&=« 


3* 3* 3* 

3* 3 3 — % 


14* 15 + % 


2b BAT In .I3e 10 
12* BDMs 
lb BRT 
10b BSN wri 
7 b BotWer AO 17 
7% BOOKS 42a 14 
2b BalyMwt 
21 BonFd 2.289104 
4b Bonstrg 
Alt BnkBId AO 4 A 
3* Bar co 
2* BamEn 
6b Bamwi 40 19 
4 Bar>RG 
10b Baruch J7t 10 
4b Beard 

11* BcldBIk 1X0 15J 
b Bclim v 

19* BeroBr 42 1J 


4* 4b 
22* 22b 
2* 2* 
12* 12* 
10b 10b 
9* 9* 
4* 4 
25* 25* 
7* 7* 

Ob 8* 
3b 3* 
3b 3b 
7 6b 
4* 4* 

12b 12b 
7* 7* 
11 * 11 * 
* * 
30* 30* 


4*- * 
22* + b 
2*— * 
13*— b 
10b 
9* 


44 IX 15 
17 
4 

U9 94 11 
40 2A 31 


25b— * 
9 

1* 

18% + * 
lib-* 
5* + * 
13*-* 
25* 4- * 


JOt 94 5 
42 1J 11 



20 

115 

Site 117 


60z 

MtW 

2J0a 7X 

10 

9 

10 

7 

6 



to 


38 

4 

ixoaill 


5 

JB 3J 

8 

ia 

19 

HI 


32 SB 43 
-It 4 22 
.16 4 22 

35 11.1 
140a 44 10 
.17 J 30 
10 

1 Mb 34 9 
140 44 10 
1.93s SJ 
1.00s ZA 10 
.14 .9 II 

49 24 I 


‘sr * 

A “ + S 

14* 14b 

30* sent—* 
0* 8* 

2 2 

12b 12* 

42* 42*— 1* 
4* 4* + * 
14* 16*— * 
31* 31*— b 
3b 3b 
1* 1* 

13* 13U 
6* 4*— * 
2* 3* 

14* 14* 

28* 28b— * 
28* 28* 

4b 4b— b 
19 t9 
31b 32 + * 

32b 32b 
31 31 — * 

S£S2-% 

rs 

Bb ffb 
8* «* + * 
19* 19*—* 


9* 4* 
14* 12* 
7* 2* 
4* 2* 

23b 17* 
40 31b 

12b 4* 

J 1H 
23* u* 
5* 2b 
Sb 5* 
13* 10b 
5b 2* 
* b 
17* 10b 
12 * 5 * 

32* 18* 
5* 1* 
9b A 

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17* 12* 
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14*— * 
12*— * 
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5 b-* 

22b— * 
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17 Mb 
15 18* 
40 2 

•9 5 

1 Tib 
■134 14* 

2 13* 

72 9* 
12 V 
31 7* 

14 40* 
|41 25* 
57 12 

■ 11 I* 

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275 29* 
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11 4* 

Jo 21b 
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at 'll* 

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43 Mb 

22 i 
745 11 


10* 10*- 
18* II* 
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5 5 ■ 

lib lib 
13* 14*3 
13b 13* 
I* 8* 
24b 27 
7* 7*- 
40 40 - 

25* 25* 
11* 12 ■ 
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104 104 ■ 

23* 22* 
29 29b- 

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4 4 - 

71* 2Tb 
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lib 11*- 

26 as 

14b 14b 
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10b 10% - 


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6b— * 

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* 

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lb DWG 
20 DOlsEn . 
12* DamEA 
12* DamEB 
3* Damson 
18 Damspf 
IV* Damspf 
10* Data Pd 
3* Datorm 
3* Dsaxrts 
11* OstVal 
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4* Dwitm 
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140 11J 9 


X3t 5.1 10 
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129 1J* 
164 13* 
134 3* 

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43 4* 

35 4* 
39 15* 
264 » 

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34* 24*— * 
13* 13 — * 
12* 13 — * 
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17* 18* 

20 20 
13 12b 4- * 

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13* 9b 
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14* 12* 

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37 23* 

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19* IS* 

27b 17* 

31b 28 

11 4* 

24% 16* 

12 8* 

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35* 8b, 

12* 4% 

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2* 1% 2b 


2% 2b 
15* 14* 
2 2 
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3* 3% 
14* 14% 

4* 4% 

17 14% 

414 4b 
13 lib 
13* 13% 
4b 4 
12b 12 
21* 20* 
11* TO* 
31* 31% 
32* 31* 
3% 3% 

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17b 17* 
27b 24* 
31% 31% 
7 6b 


2b— H 

15 

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8% + * 
11b— % 
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16* 

4* 

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4b + * 

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12* 4-% 
21 + % 
10* + % 
21* 

32 + * 


12b 12* 
40 39b 

35 34V, 

11 * 11 % 
n* iib 
13b 13 
33b 32% 


nu% 

17*— % 
26b— * 
31* 

Sb— b 
20* + % 
I*— * 
12b 

40 + b 

34b 4- * 
11b 

11b— * 

13b + * 
33b + * 


A National Westminster Bank PLC 

thuurptitiHTil m Etift/anJ xvh limited lidiHiryl 

18609 of l '.S. Si. 000.000.000 PRIMARY CAPITAL PRNs 

l FUmM mx Hi Hr Xirtn I 

CompWoR 

11^^500X00.008 PRIMARY CAPITAL HU* (SERIES "A”) 

L'-S .5500.900.000 PRIMARY CAPITAL HU* (SERIES -Tl 


In accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notion is 
hereby given that for the six months interest period from 9 
July. 1985to9 January, 1986 the Series "A* Notes will cany 
an Interest Rate of 8'/4% per annum. The Interest payable on 
the relevant interest payment date, 9 January. 1986 against 
Coupon No. 1 will be U.S.S4216.67 and U.S.S421 .67 respec- 
tively for Notes in denonwlatlons of U.S.S1 00.000 and 
U.S.510,000. 



Kingdom of Sweden 


The Series “B" Notes will carry an Interest Rate of 8% per 
annum for the interest period from 9 July, 1985 to 9 August, 
1985. The Interest payable on the relevant interest payment 
date. 9 August, 1985 will be U.S.S68.89 per U.S£1 0,000 prin- 
cipal amount and wffl be paid only through Cedel S A and 
Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York, Brussels 
Office, as operator of the Eurodear System, In accordance 
with the terms of the Temporary Global Note, subject to the 
provisions of the Trust Deed. 


By The Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A., London Agent Bank 
10 July, 1985 


up to 

U.S. $750,000,000 
Four Year Floating Rate Notes 

In accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notice is 
hereby given that for the six months interest period from 
9th July. 1985 to 9th January, 1986 the Notes will 
cany an Interest Rate of 8% per annum. 

Interest payable on 9th January. 1986 will amount to 
U.S.S408-89 per U.S.S10.000 Note. 

Morgan Guaranty Tinst Company of New York 
London 
Agent Bank 



flora lEsutMad IBIS 


Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. 

PRIVATE BANKERS 


NEW YORE BOSTON PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 
ST LOUS LOS ANGELES DALLAS NAPLES 


LONDON PARS ZURICH TOKYO GRAND CAYMAN GUERNSEY 



STATEMENT OF CONDITION, JUNE 30, 1985 


ASSETS 

Cash and Due from BanVa 
US Government Secunnes. 

Drect ana Guaranteed 
State and Mmooal Secumes. 
Federal Funtjs 5c4d 
Loans and Dscouus . . 

Customers' uabKy on Acceotanoes 
interest Other Rocowattes 
Prwnaus and Etwxnent. not 
Other Assets 


8248. B94 .378 


Kingdom of Sweden 

U.S. $750,000,000 


81334.199 
147.581393 
42.600.000 
2B 1353.197 
17.856.763 
30339183 
18991.677 
0384,905 
SBS 1.93a 404 


Undated Floating Rate Notes 


In accordance with the provisions of the Notes., notice is 
hereby given that for the slx months interest period from 
9th July, 1985 to 9th January, 1986 the Undated Notes will 
cany an Interest Rate of 85 »% per annum. 

Interest payable on 9th January. 1986 will amount to 
U.S.S434-86 per U.S.S10.000 Undated Note. 


LtABH-ITIES 

Deoosns 

Faderal Funds Pirchased 

acceptances Lass Arnouresi PnWa 

Accrued E/pensos 

Other Uabtosa 

Capul. 

Sin*js .... 


*738.760.733 

22550000 

18.406,782 

11,317.130 

12.273.772 


Morgan Guaranty Thist Company of New York 
London 
Agent Bank 


sssmxooo 


*051535.404 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


PARTNERS 

J Eugene Banks 
.Peter B. Bartlett 
WbImjtH Brown 
Granger Cosokyan 
Alan Crawford. Jr. 
WflfcamR Driver. Jr 
Anthony T Endors 
Alexander T. Ercklew 
T M Faney 
Bbndge T Gerry 
BO ridge T. Garry. Jr 
LIMITED PARTNERS 


JoftnC. Henson 
NoahT. Herndon 
Landon HJEerd III 
Frank W Hocfi 
R L- Ireland 111 
F. H. Kingsbury, Jr. 
Michael Krsynak. Jr. 

T Michael Long 
John B Madden 
Michael W McConnefl 


VWton H. Moore 111 
Donald B Murphy 
EugeneC Ranis 
WrSam F. Ray 
Robert V. Roosa 
L Parks SNpiey 
Stokloy P Towto 
Lawrence C. Tucker 
Maarten van Hengal 
JdmC.Ufest 
Laurence f Whttemore 


COUNCIL 

FOR DEVELOPMENT 
AND RECONSTRUCTION 


W. Avoreli Hamman 
Kate Ireland 
Gerry Brothers & Co 


Robert E Hunter, Jr. 
Robert A. Linen 
MflrChantStartng Corporadnn 


LEBANON 


COMPLETE BANKING FACILITIES AND INVESTMENT SERVICES 

□ccxdt Accounts * Carmami Leans on} Oscounts 

Ccmirwaal Letters a! 0«K and Aceepcaneas • Forwpi Eicharos 

Qnmtnoc and Irterruoanal Coreoren FWtano* CounsAig 

Lfenw and Act u a t ion Serwcas 

'Cusuilv of ScGurax, 

kvwsbixn Adureary Senntso 

irmtuioviJ IrvcUmont SerwceS 

Pcrwnel Finanwi Services 

RreKra for Purchase and Sola of Saanoes 

Members of Phnaaaf Stack Etcha^es 


Fiduoary oerveos to tndnnduaH and erngloiee beneht dans are prmndad dnaifp 
Brawn Brattiere Harnrrnn Trust Company a whetfy owned stedere 




In reference to the announcement 
relating to the semi-automatic 
message relay center (AFTN) which 
appeared in the Herald Tribune on 
June 17, 1985, the due date for 
submission of bids has been extended 
to July 12, 1985. 



12 Month 
Hte UW Stock 


Sts. C18» 

DW. ¥14 PE ltBiHWiLflw Quat-OTta 


12 Month 
HtshLow Sfad, 


a. Clou n Month 

iSnbbld* Oka.Cnm now 


SH CW8i_ - ; 

a. viaPE ;38iHr»L»r Jov 1 CMw 


12 -r 5irrM5n 


Siertr"! 771 Z0 


igw Bb 
14* 10% 
IB* 

29% 28 
70b 16* 
2* * 
IB'k 17% 
42% 22* 
46% 28* 
2t 15% 
I Ob j* 
17* 8% 
15% 10* 
t% 4* 


17* * 

4% 2% 


14% 3% 

7b % 


16% fb 

.5% 2b 


14* 6* 

34% 34% 
14* 0% 
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17* 12% 
6* 1* 
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43% 31% 
43% 24% 
21* 17% 

ID 6% 


HAL 

HMG 

HUftC 

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Hanfrdi 

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Ho ton 

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HhmR 

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Hlnfrort 

Hahnan 

HolIvCo 

Horml 

HmHar 

HrnHwi 

HaflPIV 

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HowOT 

HovnE 

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11 8 % 
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113 »% 
5 CTi 
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11 43 
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67 10* 
45 10b 
ID II* 
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44 1J 12 
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X7112X 
1X0 94 13 


410224 

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30* 14 7 
1X2 IS 12 
1X2 15 12 
-40 23 14 
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17 4* 

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9 2% 

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29 36* 
93 ? 

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114 19b 
42 5% 
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5 15* 
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79 7b 


B* 8* 

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28 21 — % 
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I 1 — * 

36 36* + h 

39b 40 
3D* 30*— % 
ZlTh 23* + 16 
ID 10 — * 
10* W* + Vk 
11 * 11 *—* 
|b Bb + Ti 
15% 14* 

2% 3 
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% ft- * 
4* 4* + * 
1% l* + * 
15% 16% 

2% 7% 

14* 14*- * 
36% 36% 

9 9 

2b 2b 
im t9b + % 
5% 5% + % 
3% 4 + W 
14% 14*— * 
II 11 

43U 43b + U 
43% 43* 

18% 13% f * 
7* 7b + * 


24b 16b 
22% 14% 
12 4 

J6* 4% 
18% 11 
23* 10% 
7* 3* 


25* IS* 
12% 6% 


OCA 

Oakwfl 

oaeiAn 

Octets* 

OftArf 

omens 

00W6P 

Ooennn 

Or WIN A 

OeMHB 

Ormond 

osultms 

Okl«F 

OrarkH 


12 

X8U 4 J2 
45 

3* V 
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XSe X 61 
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30 JJ175 


42 1.9 15 
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30 l.f 10 


6 20 % 
18 18% 
« 4% 

5 r* 

7 14 
239 23* 

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5 61k 
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3 Sb 
l 1* 
66 22% 
425 12% 
93 11% 


a X 
18% 16% - * 
4* 6*— * 

9 9 — % 

13* 14 +% 


30 36 

.20 1 6 ‘-3 
AO 31 
AS 3 A 


33% 23% + % 

4% 4% + b 

6* 4% 

5% S* * % 
Sb 3b 
1* 1* + Vk 
21 * 22 — * 
11* 12% +1* 
10% 10*- % 


6 ICEEn 
31% ICH 
45% ICHrrt 
2% ICO 
2* IPM 


10 

35 3 10 


6% iRTCpn 
1% IrnpGfl 
lb Implnfl 
23% impoiko 
4* Intieht 
11 instms 
1% inatSv 
4% mtCty 9 
lib tirnnk 
n imBkm 
% Intak wt 
8% IIP 
3* intPwr 
1* intProt 
4 intTM-n 
6 inThrpI 
. % IntOto 
17% Ionics 3 
18% iroqBrd 
2* Isalv 


140 

14 

X IX 52 
7 

A0 

.13 X 


12 

19 

X8 J4 24 


B 6 

237 101* 

13 50* 

31 3 

14 2% 
J9 14* 

15 2!* 
27 1% 
138 37 
199 U 

75 20% 

115 1* 
493 12b 
35 14% 
2» 3% 

4 % 

48 9% 

32' 4* 
207 4V. 

174 6* 

41 6% 

13 1 

25 20% 
18 17b 
65 3 


6 6 

99* 100%—!% 
50 50*— b 

3 3 

3% 2% 

14% Mb — % 

2% 2% 

1* 1b— * 
34* 36* 

12% 13 + % 

20 20 % + * 
1% !%- % 
12 12 - % 
14* 14% + * 

3 % TL-h. 

9% 9% 

5* 5% 

3* 4b + * 
4* 4* 

6* 4% + * 
1 1 

30 20 — % 

37 J7b + b 

2% 2% 


33k 14b 13* 
27* 13 12% 

38k 11% 11V, 
IUkUN lib 
35x11* 11 
32x 35 34b 

43x32* 31% 
69x28* 20% 
19x23* 23 

B6 21% 21b 

353* 24 23b 

21*24 23b 

33*10% 10 
39X21* 21* 
57*18% II* 
97*18% 18% 
318*18* 18 
13x20% 30 
144x19% 18* 

232x10% 10 
22 21 * 21 % 
200x 38* »* 
ife 40% 40% 


17% 12b Jodm 
7% 5% Jacobs 
5* 2b J«tAm 
2 * Jet Awl 

9% 4* Jefrtxt 

4* 2% John PC 


*x 13 12% 13 + * 

10 6* 4% 6* + b 

185 3% 3% 3% _ 

id * * % + W 

2 8% 8% 8%—* 

SI 3% 1% 3% + * 


15* 
H 
17* 

nt 

33 
11 
9% 
2* 
% b 
»0b 6* 

11% 7% 
17b 11% 
2% 1% 
8 2% 
6 2* 
9b 3b 
5% 4% 

14% 10* 
73% 61* 


A8 U20 

X00 2X 10 
21 
a 

J2t BX 
120 50 12 
■25T2QJ 
1X0 6.9 18 
20 U I 


754 48* 48* 

2i a. % 


13*— % 
13 + * 

11% + % 
II* * b 
lib * % 
34% 4- * 
22* + * 
21*— b 
23* 

21b— % 
34 + % 

23*— * 
10* + % 
31%— % 
18* 

18% — % 
18% * % 
20* + Vj 
11% 

K 

lift- % 
31*— * 
40* 

„ 


5% SJtca 
8 SHiosA 
10* SmrtiA 
9b SmmB 
5>k Solltron 5 

SaTn 

7*k5CEapt l.K 99 
r» SCE0P» 'X4 10X 
8 SCE8P* 100 *9 
ic~k SCE3 pt 1 45 10.: 

17 SCEflo* ?X I.U 
16* SCEdP* 3.71 10.1 
61 SCEOPl 6.7C 185 
S% Sprhmn 
6 SorkPf l» 154 
4% SpodOP 

6 Saencer z* t 37 
6U, spnamn 4> 

1 Spnai Wl 

4% SIHovP XS 1 4 33 
1 3* 5ldPrfl XJ 4J a 
ll’l SlorrlH 70 

6* state* 

21‘- sutxpl 2X5 tl l 
IS* SMean M 34 13 


iri 

■J'S 5T- A b 

5* 5% 

I?* 12**.- V, 

1« . 1%* -ifc 

17^ :j% 


«■: 15%*’, 
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10% ITe 
M . Mb 


Tin :i% 


63 : 83 - % 
S% 5* - 
ti s'i-'-j 

4* 4*— ’ 
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0% 6* A •* 


586 37b 26% 
7 6 5% 

3 23b 23* 
73 8* 6% 

65 4* 3* 

14001 9* 9b 


104 24 23* 

13 *. V, 


1% 1* 

27% 77% 


IftS 224 
238 24M 
U3 23J 
X6el2X 3 


3 12* 12* 
34 12% 12* 
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sa % b 

16 7* 7% 

37 9* 9* 

14 14% 14% 
19 2b 2* 
39 3* 3* 


12 % 4 % 

38* 13* 


11% 7b JohnAm -30 X0 13 176 in’* 10 10 — b 


11% 4b Joftnlnd 
7b 3* jmpjkn 


7% 7%— * 
7* 3% 


39* 30* 

4 1% 

lib 10 
17% 10% 


34 )4b 

23* 10* 
17* I 
9 5 

2* 1b 
!>* 5% 

4% 2b 

5b 3% 

sb 2% 

5% 3% 
3% 2 
15% 9% 
16 10b 

30* 21 


KnGiPt <50 115 

KopekC 5 

KayCp X0 IX 17 
KavJ n .10e X 
Kenwin xoa 34 TO 
KFtcnm XBI 17 44 
KevPft X 1.9 17 
KevCa 7 

KevCawt 

KevCa un 


Klhark 

Kirby 

KilMtB IS 

Kteerv J>3r X 
Knooa 14 

Knoll 18 

KoaerC 132 IX 95 


240x 38 37% 

24B 4 3* 

10 .13% 13% 
21 11 % 11 % 
5 22% 32% 
10 22 Z1H 
1274 10% 10% 

3 4% 4% 

101 1% lb 

2 5% 5% 

55 4* 4b 

12 4% 4% 

70 3% 3 

4 4% 4% 

33 2% 2b 

56 13% 13% 
247 13% 15* 

84 28* 28% 


X ft * 
3% + * 
13% 

11%— * 
22% — * 
21*4— * 
10% ft b 
4%— * 
1b— b 
5* + * 
4* + % 
4% 

3* 


U* II 
3% 2* 
3* 2b 
7* 3b 
12% 7% 
17* 12b 
28* 13* 
7% 5* 
24% 15% 
8% 4* 
1% * 
12 4* 

6 3% 

22% 17* 
34% 20* 
34% 27 
23V. 15% 
9 2% 


X6 104 10 

X I 

1X0 15 11 

4» .9 » 

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7 

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Pr 
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1 5% 5% 

20 11% II 
5 73% 73% 
7 1% 5% 

3 17% 17* 
344 16* 15% 
16 3* 3b 
12 3* 3% 
74 3% 3* 
310 10% 10b 
7 13% 13* 
IX Mi Mb 
14 6* A* 

77 22b 31% 
12 7* 7 
45 % % 

40 12 11% 
20 4 4 


n + U 
36% + ft 
4 

21* ft- * 

e%— % 

4* ft * 

9* 

“ft 

26ft + * 

9* 

1% 

27% ft * 
12* 

12b ft * 
3% 
b 

7%— * 
9* — * 
14% — % 
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3*— * 
5% ft- * 
3% 

if*-* 

73% + b 
sw 
17% 

16* + * 
3b— * 
3% 

3* 

10*— M 
13* — % 
34b— % 
6b ft- b 
21H — % 
7*— * 
%- * 
ll%— * 


4b stucco 
1% StertEl 
|% StrtExt 
5% SterlStt iee 19 3< 
1% Strut* 

11* SvmtEfftlXO >3X 
4 SonSLn 

11* Sunjr 48 2ft 13 

17* SoPfFd 44b 1 4 M 

is SvPCre 

!% SuPinos '5 

lib SuorSf J* 11 i: 

4b Susoueh 6 

19Va SwtfUn 1JO Sft 13 
3% SvnotP 

6ft SvstEns .13 IX 10 


5* *- - 

TO* 19% 

18% !|V ft % 

+ k * 

19% M 
5* 

le‘.» 16% 

13 10V 

j* y- * % 
13 :3 - * 

>'» 5-k- b 
ie% m— * 
31* 37% ft % 

Ii 1* * 
12> 12*-. % 
17 < 17% ft ft 
ft ft 
71 i 71* ft •» 
3b 4 

8 a 


24 21% 21% 
33 34% 34% 
31 33% 33* 
100 23* 23* 
1 3b 3b 


21% 

Ma- b 

33*— * 

a* + * 

3b— * 


4% T Bar J3t 54 >8 

7* TEC .16 1.6 IB 

4* TIE 

6'b Til 37 

13b TooPrd X M 13 

4b Tonasr 

«k TostY .40 2.9 12 

Ti Team 
1 ft TCtlAui 

>3* Tensvm 13 

33* TeenOo 14 

3% TecnTp u 

7* Techtrt X U 1 
1* Tecnnd 

8V- TeiooR JOe -797 
J Telecon 

21b Tattle* 44 IX M 
8b TotOto 360 3X 14 
6% TelKi 25 

2*- TaieiPh 

3% Tennev 12 

27% TenCae ’SO 
AVj TexAIr J 

4% TexAE J91 7.1 70 
16* TexAE DT2J7 \3A 
Stj Txtcan 48 

2 ThorEn 

3* TtirD B M \A 7 
3% ThrOA .10 7.4 13 
2 Tidwell 
24% TolEOPl 4X5 12X 
57b TotEdPdOftO 13J 
4* Tartet J9t IX 95 
7ft TallPt 9 34 

ft TatPt wl 
22 TotPtPf 2X8 lift 
8% Tm*L« OSr A 13 
lib TmsTec HUH 
13b Trenton 44 2.9 7 

7ft TrlSM AO* 37 
6ft TrtoCp A9 t 4J 
3% Trktex >5 

2* TubMex 

21* TumB n 45 

Tin TarrtrC 1 3D *0 70 
i*x Tylr wt i 


U 

30 

s-y 

5t| 


18 

9 

10' i 

1C 

10 



5 

4ft 


37 

54 

0 

8% 

8b- ft 


63 


18b 

19 + ^ 


A 


7ft 

7ft 

13 

16 

lire 

w» 

13ft— ft 


7< 


3% 

1% 


50 

2% 

2"i 

7% ft 


773 *S 15 15 

2 6T^ 4T". 4T s 
27 4'.. A 4 

39 IJft IJ-3 |]ft. 

12 l'e 1% llx 

7050:189ft 18< 184%. 

27 7ft 2ft 2ft- 
25 29ft 29*. 

M ip. lift lift 
71 8 7ft 7ft- 

185 4ft 4 4*. 

17 4ft 4 't 4ft 

13 24- 74ft 24',- 
2394 17ft 16b 17% 

87 5* 5* 5ft- 

25 70ft » 70ft 
91 J*« 3ft 7'»- 

34 3ft ?k 3ft 


I!!!- 

Pi' r 


37 2’* 2ft 3%- 

575: 34ft 34 34* 

501 74 ’5 76 

a 4*0 4*. 4b- 

84 13ft 12 ’3ft 
355 !"» 1ft 1ft ■ 

I 54ft 24-. Wl 

II 13 13 13 ■ 


Trenton 44 2.9 
. TrlSM AO* 33 


92 15% !7ft T! 


TarrtrC MB AD 70 
Tvlr wl i 


18 IS'i 15 IS - 
2 IV’. 10b 10% 

2 II 1) II - 

2 5% 5% 5% ■ 

71 31. 2% 2% ■ 

57 21% 21ft 21* - 
16 36% 3C* 30% 
92 2% 2b 2b - 


2% 

13% + % 
IPX + * 
28% — b 


3ib ID* Ouebes X6 
10% 3* Quehwl 


67 31* 31 31b 

14 10* >0% 10* 9- % 


t% I* 
3ft 2% 
7% 2% 
42 23% 

17ft 11 
14% 9* 
27b 21* 
9% 2* 
6% 3% 
27% 7* 
3* lb 
3* 1b 
39% 24* 
16* 8% 
14* 6* 

M 9* 
14% 18 
is* 10b 
10* 8% 


L5B 
La Boro 

LaPnt 6 

LahaS 0 -15e 
Ldmka JO 25 16 
Loser 43 

LoorPP 3X0 1X3 


L&iFPts JO 1 A 12 
UfeRst 


LmehC 30 U 16 


T%— * 
2% 

4* 

56% — % 
16 

11%— * 
22*— b 
5% — * 

5* 4- % 

a +2* 
2* 
lb 

38%— * 
IS — * 
12% 

11%— * 
13% -f * 
16b— % 
9% + Vk 


13% + b 

1% + * 


9% 5 
5% 3% 
7% 1% 

18b 15*8 
a 13* 
3b b 
MH 10* 
8b 6 
19% 17% 
4* 1% 

15ft 10* 
50b 27% 
Sft 5% 
4ft 3W 
14 9% 

4 * 

5* V 

34% 16 
30b 20* 
7 1b 
6* 3% 
36 22% 

7% 4 
17* 11% 
26 13% 


JS» 5.1 13 12 6% 

56 1% 
.11 7 45 2 14% 

77 <4 41 195 16% 


■ 17 

,10e 2X 13 
X 2X 19 


51 17 8 
.12 X 12 


18 IBb 

5 .3 

ia 42* 

2 BM 

7 4 

15 10% 

6 I 

197 2% 

10 % 

7 32% 

24x 25* 
392 2% 

16 6 

8 24% 
14 6b 


6% 6% + » 
3% 3b 
1* 1%— * 
14% Mb + * 

,5 R 

u% n% 

ab Sb + % 
18* 18b 
3* 3% 

12 % 12 * 

41% 42 + * 

8b 8% 

4 4 — * 

10% 10W 
1 I + ft 


2 uSR Ind 

8% Ultmle 9 

ft unlcorp 7 

11 * unlcppf 35 5 X 
8 b Unlnu- n ,91c 9X 
15* UAtrPd 54b 2A 12 
1% U Food A .10 S.7 
1% U FoodB 

10 * UlMed la 

10VU USAGwt 
»* U BAG Of 3X0 29 


14* umiiln 1X0 X6 


8% UnvCffl 
5% UnlvRa 


15% UntvRu X0e 43 13 
9% Liny Pet 


6 r.s 

105 lib 

348 % 

30 14* 
35 10W 

24 22% 
93 IX. 
16 I* 
M 15% 
6 TO'1 
1 105 
43 7* 

1 18% 
10 Hb 
112 t*. 

73 17 
22 13' i 


Zii X«V + ft 
11% 11% + ft 
ft b 

13b 13b— % 
10 10 % 

22W a-. 

1 % lb 

1% 1% 

14ft 15 — * 
19* 19*— ft 
105 105 —3 ft 

7% 7% 

18* 18% — ft 
11 lift 
4% 6%— b 
ir l? 

13% 13% - W 


2* 2* + * 

% % + 9* 


JO 1J 72 Ml 17% 
X0 20 14 111 25% 


32* 32%— * 
25% 25% — % 
2* 2ft 4- * 
Sft 6 + % 

23b 23b 
6% fb 
17* 17% 

25* 25*— % 


13 

.16 i.i a 


ZJ5 TCLf 

7 

19 

J0OU 
.12 IX 10 
22 


7b— b 

12% 

lS-A— ft 
1 

15ft 

9ft + ft 
16ft— * 
4ft— ft 
13b + ft 
21b + ft 
16 — ft 


2X0 13X 15 
00,24 1, 

J -10e 24 106 

1.16 M 16 


JM 1.0 18 

1.16 17 12 


35% +1% 
16ft— b 


-541 «U 13 
.15 A»1 

T 
x 
17 

/44 <0 14 

5xo mi 

7_jd m3 
8.90 10.4 
J4e 28 14 
24 IX 23 
X 11 I 
4^0 11J 
4X0 IIJ 
-20 !J 16 
X IX 16 


44 20* 19b 
3 31b 31* 


.. .... 16ft— % 

1 6b 6% Ab 

a 12% 13% 12%—% 
139 lift 17% 18 
72 24* 24b 24* 

M 14% 14% 14*— % 
167 34 23b 23% + ft 

2 4b 4b 4b + * 

68 4% 3b 4% + % 

17 3b 3% 3% 

0 83% B3% 83% + % 
44 20* 10b 19b— b 

3 31b 31* 31b 4- % 

ii 1% a* «*— ft 

130 23% 21% 23% +1% 

6 11* 11% ll%— b 
10 19* 19* 19* 

139 5 4% 4%— ft 

2 10ft 10b 10ft 
300: 49* 48 49* +1* 

Z70flz71% 71% 7794—7% 
25001 83b 85b 85% + % 
14 8* Bb 8* ♦ b 

79 13b 13* 13% + ft 
6 12 iib lib— ft 
100v 39 39 39 — 1% 

180y39b 39b 39b— % 

4 15% 15% 15ft 

M 15b 15ft 15ft— ft , 
4 17% 17% 17b— ft 1 
6 3% 3% 3% 

IB 18% 18* 18% 

390 10 9b ID j 


5b 2% 
ii* 6b 
9 6* 

9% 7% 
74% 53* 
45b 49* 
34 17b 

r 31% 
18* 
45* 34 
30% 23 
5% 3* 
II 9% 
14b 11% 
5% 3b 

23 17b 

14% 10% 
7% 3% 
35 12b 

17 II 
82 34 

6% 5 
15% 10% 
3% % 

8* 3% 
5ft 3% 
4b 2b 
15ft 9% 
lift 7% 
18b 10% 


' pf JO 10.1 
IP! 1X0 10.1 
I pt 7X0 10X 
I pi 7JU IQI 
ipf 247 104 
Pi 4X5 123 
Pf TM 105 
290 48 9 
X0 25 7 
«43t BA 12 
US 1U4 


-56 23 12 
A8 4X 17 


14* 8ft 

2% K 

19% 9* 


a ia a 

30 

.12 J 11 

IjODeBJ 6 


33 8ft 
10 3 

19 7ft 
io aft 

5 9ft 
3SDz72ft 
200: 66* 

2 23b 
45 9b 
2 25% 

9 60* 

2 73 

87 5% 

29 10* 
25 14% 
43 3% 
160 2<% 

10 12 
69 6% 
47 17% 
41 17% 
1 57ft 
100a 5b 
10 13b 
4 1ft 
15 Sb 
10 5% 

10 3ft 
15 15ft 

3 10 

6 16% 
10 lift 
58 b 
24 18b 


8 8ft 
2% 3 4- b 

7ft 7ft 
■ft 6%— ft 
9ft 9ft + ft 
71 72ft— I 

64 66* +1 

23b 23% 

37% 37% — ft 
25% 25* + % 
60* 40* + * 
23 32 — b 

5% Sft 
10% 10*— * 
14 14% -f % 

3b 3%— * 
23% 24% +1% 
12 12 
6% 6b— ft 
17% 17%— % 
16% 17* +1 
57% 57% 

5b Sb — ft 


9% V5T n 

JOe 

2.9 


75 

10 ft 

10 ft 

15% vtAmC 

X0h 

22 

9 

11 

13 

17ft 

3% Vtftsh 




31 

4ft 

4ft 

% Varna 




10 

% 

ft 

9b Vernir 

JO 

2.1 

10 

41 

9b 

9ft 

2 % V triple 




12 

4 

3ft 

5* Vlcon 



11 

84 


7% 

7b Vintoe 




ia 

3 

1 

12 Vlrco 

X4r 

J 

17 

10 

14'k 

14ft 

53* Valntl 




1 

43* 

63ft 

6 * VliuolG 

JO 

3X 

to 

50 

Fe 

e* 

B von lex 

J4 

3J 

13 

6 

11 % 

11% 

13* VuicCp 

XO 

45 

10 

3 

17b 

17b 


Fre 


6 WTC 

18% Walbor 

10* Warn 

15 WoobB 
14% WonoC 
Ik write wt 
3% WshHft 
74b WWlPW 
18* WRIT 
6b Wane A 
2% wirttfC 
13% wtnfauf 
1% Wtrticor 
3* Weoco 
11% Wrote n 


17 

AO IX 14 
JOt 1.9 9 
.16 .9 13 

.11 X 13 


105 6% 6 4* — S, 

3 25* 35* H* + % 


71 16* 16* 16ft 
030 18 17b 17b— ft 


7 

.94 X 17 
1J4 6J 18 
-70 7-0 6 


5 18 17b 18 - 'A 

55 b 'hr k + k 


35 I0-- 10 10% ♦ ft 

24 121*171 121 

35 28% 28* 78% — ft 

8 to* in’* 10% — 

12 3% 3ft 3ft— ft 


3% Welman 
7* weiatrn 
T5 wttCrd 
Mb Wasco 
b 
6* 

8% 

5% 

7b 
15 
17 
11% 

2b 
10ft 
7* 

19b 

a* 

2b 

a 

11 
2b 
12 % 

14% 

12 
3* 


13% 13b + b 
1 % 1 % 

5% 5% 

5b Sb— % 
2% 3% + % 

MT5k 10b 
10 10 
16% 16b + % 
11% lib — % 
b b 

18 18 — b 


lb 

6 ft 2ft 
9% 4b 

IS J S 

13% 7ft 

Mortm 
MfMed - 
MavteL 
Murvin 

Mueewt 
Myerln JS 

9.7 

13 

9 

5 
W 

A 

6 
4 
2 

1 * 

4% 

8 b 

8 b 

* 

10 * 

1 * 

4* 

8 b 

2 b 

* 

10 * 

»% 

4b— % 
8 b— % 
2 % 

% 

10 * 


« ■ ■ — i 

17 

14* 

NRMn X5o 4J 


121 

15% 

15* 

15% 

m 

5* 

Name* 


It 

78 

9- 

8 % 

Sft— % 

37 

12 ft 

NtPohrl .10 

J 42 

346 

14% 

14% 

w%— * 

23ft 

lift 

NMxAr .791 

3X 

13 

A 


20 ft 

»b— ft 

16ft 

11 * 

NPlnRI 1X2 

XI 

16 

15 

i6b 

16ft 

14%— % 

20 * 

13 

NProc 1 JOe 6J 

10 

209 

19 

19 

19 — * 

19b 

29 

NYTIme XO 

U 

17 

298 

4/ft 

47b 

47%—% 

6 b 

4b 

Newt>E JSe <5 

7 

54 


>b 

S% 

17ft 

10 ft 


2X133 

79x13% 

13% 

13% + * 

16* 

14ft 

NwLwn 



J74 

15b 

15* 

15% 

IT* 

12 

NwpEI 1X0 

8 X 

11 

17 

17% 

16% 

17* + % 



Nlchlnn 



30 

6 b 

Aft 

6 % 4- % 

13ft 

5* 

NlChaM 


10 

16 

13% 

13% 

13% 

3* 

Ift 

woefind 



40 

lb 

14* 

lb + % 

3* 

2 b 

Nclex 


16 


2 b 

2 % 

2 ft— * 

13ft 

10 

NcraRs 


/ 

31 

lift 

11 % 

11 % 

17ft 

13ft 

MoCdOa 



22 

is* 

15% 

15* . 

37 

29ft 

NIPS pf <25 12J 


850( 34* 

34* 

34*— % 

5% 

2 * 

NuHrtn 


8 

10 

3 

3 

3 

lift 

6 ft 

NuclDt 


7 

27 

6 % 

6 * 

6 *— % 

12 % 

8 * 

Nutnoc 



25 

9* 

9b 




X2a .1 17 


10 

ii 

1X4 7 J 16 
Atm IJ 17 
73 


224 ft 
4.50 107 _ 

.10e xi a 

40 40 11 
X M I 
188 

1X0 UX 
■251 
X2 

056 33 


8 10* ID* TO*— ft 
13 3% 3ft Sft— ft 

3 lK 17* 17% 

44 l«s l* 1% + ft 
60 J 3M 4 4 Vk 

42 14 13% 14 

2 4b 4b 4b + ft 
a 9% t* 9*- * 

6 3T, 7*4 7ft 

1 27b 27b 27b ♦ % 

35 1 1 1 - V» 

115 7 6% »%-••* 

31 10 9* 9%~* 

650 14* 139k lJft— % 
68 32’i 21b 21b— * 
86 21 20 38*- 5 

31 38ft M 38b ♦ ft 

180 a* a* afft-fft 
12 2* 2* m 

3 lib lift Ub + ft 

29 lift lift lift— ft 
24 33 Sb 22b— ft 
107- 44 44 44 

2 3* 3* 3%— ft 

7 10* 10% Wft + ft 
18 15* IS ■ 13* 

62 3% 3b 3b 

10 IS* 15% u% . 

11 19% 19 If* + % 

181 21 20% 20* + % 
7* 91k 9b »b + ft 




voivti;. 


•- • *. ” 5, 

' * 


Tib S% YonkCo 


8 * 7ft 7ft— ft 


10 b 5* amer 


S% 5% 5%—*' 


AMEX Highs-Lcms 


VOUR GUIDE TO DIWNGWHl 
PATRICIA WHiS 
IN FRHMlfSWfflCB® SECTION 
OFTHEtHT 



NEW HIGHS 28 

• 

AL Labs 

DtamndBatn 

Hanoafrfl i 

UWyFtdPWI 

NlntPro 

Ouebecor wt 

TexasAlrCp 

BrewnFor A 

FSIVHyaBCP 

HormelG 

MarttnPrec 

OxtordFst 
SOfB 720pf 
ToiEd 42Spl 

ClladHHId 
Geo Res wt 
■ntllsht Svc 
McRoeA 
PivmRuh A 
Sctwib Eorf 
TrlStMat 

ConnoHy 
GeetMtePf 
Int Prateku 
McRae B 

Quabcorv* 

SCUtTVftl 

UnAirPrt 


NEW 

LOWS 8 


Armalmintf 

oratwnOG 

Damson 2S0 p 
K evstnCam 

FlanonEm 

NwdoarDto 

DnC ELmw 
RTC TroidP 


BM 


Hoatin^flaie Notes 


CoepooNea BW 


GCPtlnanc* 19/72 
GkndnwKeWM 


Dollar 


Central lid mm 
QKB9ManO/S73 
ChoM Men Gore 09 
QxmManCerpOo 
OwmlcOfM • 


ANtdlrMifS 
ABltdirMiR 
AUftdlilshP 
AXlrd IrWi Ptrp 
Area Dkg Core 91/9* 
AttaltteFln 89/94 
AutaM9ta*95 
Ben Comm 1X496 
BtaNetUmroTl 
BcoDI Roma 19/91 
BcoDI Romo 92 
Bco Santa SoIrttoTT 
Bangkok Bk (BUI 00 

Boa Core 97 _ 

Bk Gtgect 91/94 
BkOreae«9JTO7 
Bk Ireland 19 
Bk Intend 97 

BkMonroora 

B*MontrnP96 
BKManfroaffl 
Bk Hew York 94 
Bk Now Santte 81/83 
Bk Row Sadia 94 
Bk Tokyo 93 
Bk Tokyo 89 
BkTokyoD 
Bi Tokyo Feb8L*9l 
Bk Tokyo D6CB/91 
BarttomwIcaO/SK 
BookofiTrutta 
Banker* Trial W 


COUPOO Rot Bid 

7% u-n 
lb 17-10 
1% 0801 
ift 

10 b 1809 
9 27X8 

9ft 07-11 
■ 86-12 
9* wg 
7b so-n 
7XJ752407 
■b ail 
■ ivw 
7ft 98« 

9b 18-11 
9b 1308 






attareSreO* 
OieoreOtsTA 
OticoreN 
OHeorplftre 
emcore Ptoo»7 
Corner tea 97 
comment* FA* 


Ceram urt Mootnwl 91 

Comp Fin CJ£ 97 

CowdlOfEeraP991 

Ceftt/98 

CdtertS 

CcfFoWi 

Ccf 97 

CepmoP/92 
C9pm*88 ... 


BtlCraltCdM 
BoBFoi 87/91 
BHIM9S 
BM Inf 99 
BMlirifi 
Bq mpOMtit 
BalndoMzff 
Boo 89 
B*e»07 
Bice 97 

Bttxoam 

Bke Jena 


Bolndoswf? 

Bnp95 

BOP 97 

B'wSV* 

Bnplt/% 

Bnp* 

B6P»_ 

B iteWri 
enpjum 
Bflp95 


BaPortfiosPerp 
Ba Worms Bf/M 
Bardovi Bk Pore 
BardanO/SB 
Borders 0/391 
BordawO/SPerp 
BardanO/SM 
B*WumPwp 
BMskpn D0C99/H 

Betefumeo/BS 
Bergen Bk8t_ 
Bergen Bkte/91 
BeWumM/04 _ 
Betelum 0cf9f/U 
cere VS 
CcceOS 
Cneo 96/95 

cm 90 

CM 80 

CtecWO* 

Cikewiwviy) 


Essssm 

Cr For Export 92 I 
CrLvwndsWWl 


CrLvwetehWM 
CrUvntetD 
Or LvanMti 98/97 


Cruwnab »/% 
CrLvomiQH 91/85 


crLrmK6«<9 

CrLrom0bJan92/W 

crLyematef; 

Cr Lvonnati BB 

CrLrgnnatsJuRTt/M 

CrNoHenMH 

O-HntlonolTO/M 

Cr Motional 00 

cnonmtcefte 

Creditanstalt N 
Cr Hortons 92 
DOHail KDH090% 


DaneHtfafea49X59 
DenNertcf Nw98 
Den Narsko Dado 
OermwrtJoBfia/lO 
DemvkOd 91/90 
Denmark WflM 
DenmorkPere 
Me ErsteOeer 92/94 m 3H7 98JB1 

DresdnerBkfS 9* 7M0W971 

DretarterFlnW 
Drtjdom FVi 92 . 

EUeredoMucai 
Edf99 
Edf 90/95 
Edt97 
Enel 05 
EnetOo 
EflbUJ 
E4190 
Eac90 


Ozfan 
CAP ere 
cate 
tare 91 

Gt Western 92/95 

SBRaar 

HM Samuel Pare 
Mmno 91/95 
HvOroOnMiec*! 


Hydra Quebec IS 
Id 91 

Iceland 95/00 
iMMeetalBm 
JW n 

1 raiood 96/79 
lrekmd97 
tretoid 94 
Holy 19 
rkdy 89/94 

iwves 

Mr 97 
Cited <7 
Jp Moron 77 
K0PFed92 

ReailraOvte 


Ptrelfl 91/9« 

Pk Bonker EE/91 
ftmnetend (Bat) 96 
000*91 

Rep Bk Dulia>97 


VMBkttnqdOB 

Softoma 91/90 

Samm Hit Phi 88 

SotmaMFhtWO* 

Somea Ini Fin 92 

Sams FJnAor73 

Sa»MinnDec»J 

5CDt%odlntf2 

SePBCMcte 

ShaammtCoren 

Sad« 

leotte/vi 

SteintSt . 

Sleimfl 


See Gen 90/96 
SocGmiAtorW 
SocGenNoWi 
Sec Cep 97 
5ncb91 
Sooio 91/97 
spohies 
Stejn 88/98 
Spate 99 

stand Own AeeOO 
Stole Chart 94 
Stand aarifl 
Stand Chart Mar90 
Stout OnriMlsmatdi 
Stm Chart Pore 
Steti Bk India 17 
Sumitomo Tsf 92/94 
SrrecraOO 
Sweden 90/05 
SPOOW9JAB 

StoQen 93/03 
Sweden Pere 

Totyo Kobe77 
ran 92/04 
Takwta9W_ 

TbkOI AMa*l/99 
TardomB 
Tovg Tit 92/99 
Tw 94/84 
[AHor-my 99 


s&siSsx 


Ktehwrt Ben Pa re 

Korea Dev Bk 84/19 

Korea ExekBkK/te 

Unrein StLff 

UowbBkPere 

Lloyds 91 

LleydSfS 

UavdiM 

UdjJoW 

deb *5 

UdJJwdV 

LM» 

Lttbf2 

MatotfoW/Qt . 

Motor*! OVU 

BteMM 89/92 


MotonlaN/R 

ManHonM 




UMWSBklf 

«MitePareaf7 

VfcS1acc97 

wragtynn 
HUrtdBkPere 
World Bk 94 


9b 0M1 
m S409 
9ft IMS 
Bb l>12 

f* 1BX7 

Bb . 

9ft 11-t» 

9* 1MI 
8ft 1508 
8, 89-12 
9ft 24-10 
7.725 0*49 99X0 99 Jo 
(ft 26XPWX7 99J7 
7b 3838 9820 98.95 


'Mar MUM 
Mar Mid 89 
Mar Mid 94 
MeUMBkte 
MUkmdBkPere 
Midland bit 93 
Mdtandhngf 
MWandmt92 


MWondhrttl 
MMtendlm99 
MfWFkiT7 
IWHdFteN 
MdCtmUN 
MteBADentt 

Hat West PerpStrA 
HafVMPerplarB 
Nat Wed Fin 91 
Hal DM Fla 85 ' 
Hal West to 
Hot Wert 94 
Hot Warn Pu 92 
Naf Waft Fti Pent 
Haste Oy 9« 

New Zealand 17 


Eteeriarinfft/K 
Fenwle*5_ 
Feaovle 92/99 
Ftakmd90 _ 
PkWST Paper 90/95 
Fim Boston 91/94 
FktfBkS93i96 
nretCMcaoate 

FlndCMcote92 


FMOitateo94 
PlrwCttr Taxes 95 


Plrjl Inter 95 
Fart 91 

Fortune StL 92 
Full lot MM 


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CBS Profit Fell 32.4% in First Hall 


£■ • 
„ 1 


:• The Assarted Press 

. NEW' YORK — CBS Inc. said 
Tuesday , thatiis second-quaner 
prefit fell 217 percent from a year 
ago bna_3,3»percem gain in reve- 
nue. • - . 

■ The coinjfflny. currently the tar- 
get of a hostile takeover bid by Ted 
.Turner, said dm its net income for 
tbe . three nKmtbs ended June 30 

■_ totaled 4693. million, or $133 a 
ghare. conmared with $ 88.6 mil- 
lion, or $198 a share, in the like 
period a year ago.' 

■ .-^Revenue came to $123 JWllion, 
1 compared with $1.19 billion for the 
. second quarter of 1984. 

. . For t&first six months of 1985, 
net "income .fell 314 percent to 
$ 8 &l : mIlron, or S2.89 a share, 
frotn $127,5 million, or $429 a 
; share. Revenue for the six months 
edged up to S235 billion from 

$234. bfllioa 

The company blamed its poor 
profit performance on costs associ- 
ated with the disposal of its musical 
instruments operations, which were 
discontinued .in 1984. CBS did not 


disclose the amount of those costs 
in its earnings statement. 

The company also cited continu- 
ing softness in the recorded music 
business, interest expenses and the 
anticipated adverse effect of its ac- 
quisition earlier this year of Ziff- 
Davis Publishing Co.’s consumer 
magazines bn the results of CBS’s 
publishing group. 

In addition, CBS noted disap- 
pointing toy sales and costs assoa- 
3 ted with a continuing restructur- 
ing of CBS toys. 

CBS chairman, Thomas H. Wy- 
man, said in a prepared statement, 
“More than, half of the jjj 
second-quarter net income reflect- 
ed one-time-only charges. On the 
plus side, we are particularly 
pleased with the performance of 
the CBS Broadcast Group, which 
not only set a record in operating 
profits for any quarter in its history 
but also reported the largest quar- 
terly operating profit of any broad- 
casting entity ever.” 

In the three-month period! the 
broadcast group’s profit rose 14 


percent to $181.1 million and reve- 
nue rose 10 percent to $7372 mil- 
lion, CBS said. 

Last week; CBS. in a bid to 
thwart Mr. Turner’s takeover ef- 
fort, offered to buy .21 percent of its 
stock from shareholder for $150 a 
share in cash and notes. The offer 
expires July 31. 

In response, Mr. Tomer asked 
the U.S. government to approve his 
license-transfer application by July 
15 so CBS shareholders can conskf- 
er his bid for their stock at the same 
time they consider the stock-buy- 
back offer made by. CBS. 

Mr. Turner on Friday also asked 
the Federal Communications Com- 
mission to declare that CBS's offer 
“will constitute a transfer of con- 
trol of CBS,” and to delay the offer 
by forcing CBS to go through a 
lengthy approval process. 

Mr. Turner is offering securities, 
but no cash, that he values at $175 
for each CBS share. Some WaU 
Street analysts, however, have val- 
ued the Turner offer closer to $150 
asfaaze. 


m France Said Thom’s Semiconductor Unit 
To FUm Cutback To Shed at Least 500 Jobs 


Reuters 

PARIS - 7 - International Har- 
vester France, a subsidiary of 
Tenneco Inc., is p lannin g a 
plant closure and layoffs in- 
volving about a quarter of its 
staff, trade union sources said 
Tuesday. 

The company will propose to 
its worker-management com- 
mittee on Friday the closure of 
its combine harvester plant at 
.Angers and cutting the staffs at 
bout its other plants, the 
sources said. Altogether, 700 of 
a total of 3,100 jobs would be 

rfiminmwi 

The board also is considering 
nearly doubting the company’s 
capital, the sources said. 


LONDON — lnmos Interna- 
tional PLC. the semi conductor- 
manufacturing subsidiary of Thom 
JEMI PLC, will reduce its payroll of 
2.000 by at least 25 percent in the 
next three months, a Thom spokes- 
man said Tuesday. 

The spokesman added that up to 
half of Inmos’s payroll in Britain 
and the United States could be ulti- 
mately affected if semiconductor 
markets fail to improve. Final deri- 
sions cm immediate job cuts will be 
made within the next two weeks, he 
said. 

are parfoPuf attempt to reduce 

■nirniil COStS by ^ millio n (about 


$27 million) and restore the busi- 
ness to breakeven by the end of the 
year. The lnmos unit has been in- 
curring operating losses of some $2 
mmi«n a month m recent months. 

About 20 lnmos executives have 
left the company since Thorn's 

chairman, Peter Laistcr, was re- 
placed by the company's deputy 
chairman, G raham W ilkins, at the 
beginning of this hkrath. 

Mr. Wfllrins said last week that 
Thom is seeking to determine if h 
has a potential warranty daim 
against the British government 
over the problems at lnmos. Tbom 
bought control of lnm os from the 
government last year for £95 mil- 
lion. 


G.J. Coles 
Makes Bid 
ForMyer 


\ MELBOURNE — GJ. Cotes & 
;Co. announced on Tuesday a bid 
for Myer Emporium LfaL, another 
retail group, worth 84036 million 
Australian dollars ($567.94 mil- 
lion). . 

■" Coles directors told the stock ex- 
change that the company holds 
18.4 percent of Myer, which has 
been ihesubject of takeover rumors 
and heavy buying in recent weeks. 

Cedes is offering either three dol- 
lars in cash for each Myer's ordi-' 
nary share or one Giles ordinary 
share and 230 dollars cash For two 
Mwris shares. 

. The bid values Myers at about 
84036 million dollars, based on its- 
total of 280.15 million issued 
shares. Coles, a major food and 
general merchandise retailer, is 
seeking the portion of the shares it 
does not already own. 

Myers shares finished at 2.80 
dollars on the Melbourne Stock Ex- 
change, up two cents from Mon- 
day, with more than 5.6 million 
shares traded. G>le shares closed at 
3.88 dollars, an increase of three 
cents. 

Coles said that part of its Myer 
stake is subject to foreign invest- 
ment regulations because about 20 
percent of Coles is held by K mart 
Corp. of Troy, Michigan. 

Coles said it had proposed on 
Tuesday to Myer repnsentatives a 
total takeover by an undesignaied 
Coles associate company. 

Myer said its directors made no 
commitment to Cole a dd*A 

that they already had held acquisi- 
tion talks with other companies, 

including WoohvOTth Ltd. 

“These discussions, if successful, 
could lead to closer links between 
Woolworth and Myer, and/or an 
offer by either one for the other," 
Myer said in a prepared statement 


Consafe Predicts 1985 Loss; Talks With Creditors 


By Juris Kaza 

Intemanmal Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Consafe AB, 
the Swedish company specializing 
in offshore housing and special- 
services platforms, opened talks 
Tuesday with its largest, creditors 
after revising its 1985 loss forecast 
sharply higher. 

The Gothenburg-based compa- 
ny said Monday that it expects a 
loss of 300 million to 400 million 
kroner {534.64 million to $46.18 
million) m 1985 compared with an 
earlier forecast that it would break 
even. Consafe had a profit of 98 
million kroner in 1984. 

Trading m Consafe shares was 
suspended for one day Monday 
pending the earnings announce- 
ment, and share prices plummeted 
50 percent when trading resumed 
Tuesday. They finished at 53 kro- 
ner Tuesday on the Stockholm 
Stock Exchange, down from 124 
kroner on Friday. 

Analysts, however, said , the 
sharp drop did not nyam the mar- 
ket expected the company to seek 

Kodak Entering 
Fiber Optic Field 

Reuters 

ROCHESTER, New York — 
Eastman Kodak Co. said Tues- 
day that it was entering the fi- 
ber optics market and bad 
formed a new division. Lamdek 
Fiber Optics. 

It said Lamdek would initial- 
ly offer a connector for single- 
mode optica] fibers. The con- 
nector uses glass lenses to 
expand the light beam (hat is 
transmitted through the thin fi- 
ber, it said. 

The company said the new 
connector would be available in 
the United States and Canada 
by the end of the year and in 
some international markets by 
late 1986. 


legal protection from its creditors. 

As a resuh of the expected higho - 
losses. Consafe apparently will 
have difficulty servicing its heavy 
debt load, including about 2 billion 
kroner in bank loans guaranteed by 
GOtaverken Arendal AB, the gov- 
ernment-owned shipyard that has 
built seven Consafe platforms and 
vessels since 1981. 

Founded by Christer Ericsson, a 
former naval officer and sea cap- 
tain who still is the company’s larg- 
est stockholder, Consafe owns 18 
movable platforms and vessels for 
leasing to oil producers and explo- 
ration teams. 

One analyst at a major Stock- 
holm bank said that, in contrast to 
last December’s decision by Salcn- 
invest AB shipping group to sedr 
protection from its creditors, the 
Swedish government and other 
creditors have a strong interest in 
helping the offshore services gram 
survive its apparent cash-flow diffi- 
culties. 

Saleninvest sought protection 
from creditors after efforts to nego- 


Burton Group PLCs bid for De- 
benhams PLC and Collier Hold- 
ings PLC will not be referred to the 
British Monopolies Commission, 
the Trade and Industry Depart- 
ment said. 

General Motors South African 
Ltd. said it would suspend produc- 
tion from July 15 to 19 because of 
poor demand for vehicles. Some 
2,400 hourly paid workers will be 
laid off, it said. 

Hoesch AG said it bad agreed to 
sell its 49.6-percent stake m PHB 
WeserhQue AG, an ^ngriwring 
company, to Otto Wolff AG for 60 
million Deutsche marks (about $20 
million). The sale win give Otto 
Wolff almost 100 percent of the 
concern. 

Hongkong & Kowloon Wharf & 
Godown Co. is expected to report 
higher profits Wednesday for the 


date a rescue package with banks 
and the Swedish government 
failed. 

“This is the perfect case for a 
Chrysler-type bailout," he said. “It 
would be something tike a reason- 
ably long soft loan with a govern- 
ment guarantee." 

The Detroit automaker was in 
serious financial trouble in 1980 
Mien it began a turnaround using 
contract concessions and SI2 bil- 
lion in loans backed by the UJS. 

government. 

The analyst noted that Consafe 
is a unique company offering a 
range of offshore equipment and 
services, with potential Swedish 
markets in the North Sea and 
Southeast Asia. 

Analysts linked Consafe’ s crisis 
to falling oil prices and the result- 
ing weakness of the market for off- 
shore equipment and services. 

But they said that in the long 
run, the company's skills in provid- 
ing offshore equipment and ser- 
vices would prove profitable as 
Norway's development of North 


year ended March 31, securities an- 
alysts said. The company earned an 
estimated 429 million Hong Kong 
dollars ($55.7 million) for the 12 
months ended March 31, 1984. 

Matra- Harris Semiconductors 
SA said it signed a cooperation 
accord with Italy’s SGS Microelet- 
trooica SpA on research and devel- 
opment of advanced microelec- 
tronics. The two companies are to 
study the feasibility of setting up a 
fully automatic unit to assemble 
inte grat ed circuits, Matra said. 

MEPC PLC said it has agreed to 
acquire Olympia & York Develop- 
ments’ U.K. unit, the bolding com- 
pany of English Property Corp. 
MEPC said the acquisition was val- 
ued at £1 123 millio n ($152 million) 
in cash and shares. 

Mitsubishi Singapore Heavy In- 
Autries said it vnll dose its ship- 


Sea oil fields enters a new phase 
and when worldwide exploration 
revives once oil prices steady. 

Cdnsafe indicated Monday that 
it would seek fresh capital through 
a new share issue that would be 
subscribed and guaranteed by 
"outside interests" if an agreement 
was reached with major creditors. 

Mr. Ericsson met Tuesday with 
representatives of the Swedish De- 
partment of Industry, Gfiiaverkcn 
Arendal and its government-owned 
parent company, Swedyards Corp. 
A Consafe spokeswoman declined 
comment on the meeting’s out- 
come, but said another session had 
been set for Friday and indicated 
that talks would continue into next 
week. 

Mr. Ericsson began Consafe as a 
supplier as offshore housing plat- 
forms during the 1970s and made a 
public offering of Consafe shares 
only in 1983. 

In London, analysis said Con- 
safe’s difficulties were not the 
source of great concern since it is 
not iradedon foreign markets. 


repair yard m Singapore because br 
fewer job orders and heavy price 
undercutting The company, which 
is partly owned by the Singapore 
government, has posted losses of 
25.9 million Singapore dollars 
($11.3 million) since 1983. 

Nissan Motors said it was con- 
tidering introducing larger models 
in the U3. market. A company 
official said Nissan had more than 
one new model under consider- 
ation, but gave no details. 

Sun Hung Kai Co. said it and a 
group of Cmna-backed companies 
have set up a joint-venture trading 
concern in China. The joint venture 
plans to develop holds on the 
mainland, company of ficials m id, 

Taylor Woodrow PLC said that 
92.4 percent, or 10.92 million 
shares., of its June 13 rights issue 
have been purchased by investors. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


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. 

4t- W ■ • 

*.•?* 

KID ’* 

UlKi- * 


Free Annual Reports 


European Companies 


The latest annual reports from the distinguished companies listed in this 
section are available to you at no charge. 

Simply circle the appropriate number on the coupon at the bottom of this 
page before August 30 and the report(s) will be mailed to you by the. companies in- 
volved. 




BMW AG 

Business at BMW developed favorably again in 1984 as a whole. 
The essential economic figures of the previous year were exceed- 
ed. Production, domestic registrations ond exports readied new 
record levels. Development ogam contrasted dearly with the 
general market data. AH the BMW series of automobiles contribut- 
ed to this, demand for 3 series even surpassed that of the previous 
year. The motorcycle business has dearly review since the intro- 
duction of the new K series, it was excellent overall. 

The expansion of business and the continuation of projects with 

good prospects for the fu- 
ture entailed a further in- 
crease in the number of em- 
ployees to some 52,000 
worldwide. Sales of BMW 
AG rose by 12.6% to 
DM12.9 billion, sales of the 
BMW group reached 
DM163 bilHon, 173% up on 
the previous .year. 

BMW offers a brood range 
of automobiles ond motorcy- 
cles of top quafity, sporty 
character and high perfor- 
mance. Thus, the company 
can be expected to perma- 
nently expand its market po- 
sitron. 3 




Hoechst AG 


Hoechst is one of the leasing chemical companies in the world and 
operates in afl important fields of the diemksi industry. 

Hoechst was particularly successful 1984. Profit before tax of the 
Hoechst Group increased by DM 897 miflion to DM 2,852 mi Boa. 
Sales reached DM 41 ,457 million, 113 percent more than in the 
previous year; 75 percent of Group sales wav achieved abroad. 
Considerable expansion of sales took place in the agriculture, 
plashes film, fibres, organic chemicals and technical information 

systems divisions. Accounting 
for 16 percent of sales* phar- 
maceuticals continues to be 
the largest division. 

For. Hoechst, broody based 
resecxch is the most impor- 
tant investment for the future. 
In 1984 DM T >81 8 million was 
spent on research and devel- 
opment, which is 12 percent 
more than in the previous 
year. Some 13,500 pools in 
14 countries work in the re- 
search lab or atories. Hoechst 
has around 178,000 employ- 
ees worldwide. a 





AEGON 

Insurance Group 


Formed in 1 983 by the merger of AGO and Ennia, AEGON is 
the second largest insurance company in The Netherlands 
and one of the European Community’s top ten. 1984 gross 
receipts amounted to DEI. 10.1 billion, 54% from infemation- 
.. . d operations. A major 

*" proportion come from 

* - . our American subsidiar- 

m - .! ies: National CXI Line 

'* ” Insurance Company, 

= ' I- J. v..* anti Life Investors, as 

», , .. well as our 25% interest 

.•7." . . in Crownx, Canada. 

T_ 7 , ’ . AEGON is □ major 

•s» \ force in Life Assurance, 

m ■ \ Accident and Health, 

y * • and is active in General 

\ Insurance. 

o AEGON Insurance 

= Group. International 

C32 1 growth from Dutch 

roots. 1 


IKB 


Industriekreditbank AG — Deutsche Industriebank (IKB) 
makes medium and long-term loans to businesses at fixed 
rates. Funds are provided for investments in plant and 
equipment, takeovers, conversion of short to long-term 
borrowing, and capital goods exports. Its refinancing is 

done entirely by issu- 

ing its own bonds and 

by other long-term 

Indnstriekreditbsuik AG borrowing. 

Deutsche Indnstrietank within the bank s 

#T¥ DM 14 billion bal- 

LLi a nee sheet total loan 

periods have been 
progressively length- 
ening. IKB, directly or 
through subsidiaries, 
also operates in the 
Euromarket, hire-pur- 
chase credit, leasing 
and business consul- 

Financial Year 1984/85 Jp"** ^ 

Annual Report will be 

published in August.) 

5 


n 


Annual Report 
Financial Year 1984/85 


BAYER 


1984 was a successful year for Boyar. Boyar World totes ran by lS3%'lo DM434) 
bSon. Income before taw increased by 34.1% to DM 2,901 raSSon and after-tax 
income by 557% to DM 1,174 million. 

Boyar AG maeaaod * salto by 1 107% to DM 167 Uhon. Income before kmM rate 
by 19.1% to DM 1,365 mfian end after-tax mconw by 314)% to DM 660 triton. 
On the bow of then strong e ar ning m 1984, we eve ple ate d to recommend loyou 
the pa y ment of a dnridend of DM9430. The told dvidend would then amount to 
DM 460 mlion. the highest Bayer has ewer pad far any fiscal yea. 

Inaccor d enee with our long-term policy, we again wish to st ren g the n ow diaohold- 
ers' equity. We howe therefore increased Bayer AG's free reserve by DM 200 mfflwn. 
DM 879 nSan has been oBoeafad to Bayer Worlds retemed earnings. 

■. . a. _ ■ . - - — - Both external and iniernd factors 

eortribiAed to the positive trend 
ons QocnB rtijnh r 2964 \L/ iainu 


contributed to the positive trend 
in 1 984. More favorable econom- 
ic oon de io n s in ma i y co u ntries 
led to o strong demand for chem- 
ical products. Based on its broad. 
cSversfied product spectrum and 
its worldwide presence, our Coro- 
pony pa tio paled fufly in the up- 
turn. Our i mnm o fi o n al competi- 
tiveness was strengthened by the 
Ixgh exchange value of the U4L 
dab and (the yen and by the 
low roe of inflation in the Feder- 
al Republ ic of Germany. Goad 
capacity utilization a! our pro- 
duction facilities resulted in sub- 
d andgf y lower ixut costs. We 
continued the expensive stabS- 
zotion poficy indituted in the pre- 
vnayear. 2 


NIXDORF 


Nbcdorf offers a diverse product spectrum, ranging from micros to 
mainfromes, word processors ond future-oriented systems, such as 
digital PAHX's and digital telephones, addressed to new markets 
arising from the intermix of computer ond telecommunications 
technology. The company owes its strength to its ability to focus on 
market needs, and convert new technology into innovative products 
serving user requirements. It offers system solutions tailored for 
Specific industries like banking, the retail area, hotels and restaurants. 
In a year of renewed growth in fiscal 1984, net income was up by 29 

percent to DM121 mflBon. 
Total revenue rose 21 percent 
to DM 3^7 biJBon. 49 percent 
come from the German 
market and 51 percent from 
international activities. 
55 percent of revenue was 
generated by soles of 
computer systems, and 
45 percent by income from 
rentals ond services. Higher 
employment levels in 1984 
raised the Nbcdorf workforce 
worldwide by 2,672 to 
20,193. 

In its global network, Nbcdorf 
is represented by more than 
500 sales and service bases in 
41 countries around the 
work). 6 


i .* 

" VM- 

. 1 . V ,JI 
. - ' 


SKANSKA 


Skareka is one of Europe's leading civil engineering and 
building contractors, and a full-service corporation offering 
a .complete range of resources for projects of all types and 
sizes. Within the Skanska Group there are* a number of 
divisions and subsidiaries specializing in every phase of 

construction: design, engi- 


Aimuti Report 




I SKANSKA 


neering, component fabri- 
cation, erection, manage- 
ment, administration and 
finance. Outside Sweden 
Skanska specializes in 
large, technically complex 
ond advanced projects, 
often on a design-con- 
struct or turnkey basis. 
Consolidated invoiced 
sales for the Skanska 
Group in 1984 amounted 
to SEK 14,765 million 
(about U.S. $1,640 mil- 
lion). The number of em- 
ployees is about 29,500. 


Spie Batignolles 


SPIE &ATK3NOLLE5 ■ one of Frances toprenl 
Engineering concerns, organized around ihe 
acSvity: 

• &ECTJKAL <md NUCLEAR - 

• CM. ENGtNfBBNG and BUILDING 


construction and dvS- 
awinQ main fields of 



• OIL ond GAS 

• ENGINBBNGand 
GBW. CONTRACTING. 

Working throughout the 
world in more than 60 
countries, 60% of the com- 
pany's sdes are mode 
abroad. 

- 1984 SALES; 

Fir. 15,000 mMon. 
Human Resource s 33,000 
employ induing 3,500 
ei^ineen and 8500 techri- 
dans. 

Tour Anjou 

33 Qua de DtarvBouton, 
92814 Puteaux. 

TeL: 776 43 64. 

Tefeto PARS. 620634 P. 

8 


CARL ZEISS, West Germany: 

Strong stimulus from abroad resufis in aff-time record - 
turnover for 83/ 84 business year tops the biifion imrk 

The retted an Ihe world economy, the coraaderohio effort* invaded in r and d aid die 
Crenel of the dolor bovadl ployed Iheir port in omuring Dm plBOUngcowta steered by 
Ihe company in Ihoboanete year erttfng September 3P. 84. 

Orders received, tafoSng DM 1,066 mJScxv showed esi moeran of 20 percent the 
percentage of foreign orders rose to 56 percent (S2 percert), wilh Ihe USA, Japan, the 
UK end France beira the mea astomen. 

For the firs lime ewer, turnover topped the bSon mat, reading a told of DM 1 4X2 
mSon ad tfu repre se nt in g on improvement of 9 percent an the preview year. 

The tatd n d fc n employed by Cod Zebw Wad Germany, d the end of the busmess 
yea numbered 7,891 (7732), expendhire on wages ond salaries, sodd insurance ad 
Bwcampaiy pennon sdiemeotnounted to DM 4647 itefaiaiinaeate of operate 

— . , _ . r\i-n on the fxoviaw year.Thcruroveraf 

Car^Zetss-Sbftung 


r~Stm 


ottah DM 1.87 bSon. 

« to dose of fa btsneo yecr the 
number of parsons employed by the 
Zeas Group worldwide Mailed 
15£U1 (15^293). 

Conditions were good for ihe 
fcvdeng of die new busines yea. 
Good uh&zaiion of production 
enpatity is awed by Ihe hedrtiy 
idlow of orders in she mind months 
□nd byedAed order books. New 
teorhding panfcities wl Ex opened 
up by new products which are die 
resuh of the c o neen t r u e d effort pa 
iteo r + d. Provided the economy 
doa not tdm a tom far the wane, 
CaiZeis^ West Germany, sees every 
chance of continuing with the 
moderate growth recorded for Ihe 
business yea 83/B4. q 


Mai! this coupon to: 

Anne Watt/ Annual Reports 
International Herald Tribune 
181 Avenue Charles-de-Gaulle 
92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 

Please send me the annual reports of 
the companies circled, at no cost or 
obligation. 


Name _ 
Address 


Country 









history of ihs universe from beginning to radii 
spread along this time line. Hie past soli exists 
and so does the future. Our human perception 


aiHIHHIIBHIIB 




By Nick Herbert. 268 pages. SI 6.95. 
Anchor-Doubleday, 245 Park Avenue, Nev 
York, N. Y. 10167. 


of an eternal present which seems to travel 
along in the future direction is an illusions 
Thai’s not the was the world t? as all." 


1 Hi’M 



lllH HIIIHHHH 

HiiiiaHiiiii!!! 



ACROSS 

1 Wading bird 

5 Entwines 

1® Smell 

(suspect 

something! 

14 Comer 

15 Rose essence 

16 Get one's goat 

17 Stan of a 
typing exercise 

20 Purse 

(street thief) 

21 Aquatic 
mammal 

22 Former 
Mideast org. 

23 Biblical word 
on a wall 

25 Faddish 

29 Stick on again 

32 Wine: Comb, 
form 

33 Kind of boom 

34 Exercise: Part 
II 

36 Exercise: Part 

Ul 

40 Sicken 

41 Ancient Greek 
dialect 

42 Keyed up 

43 Girls 

45 Industrial 
town on the 
Oise 

47 Russian rule r 

48 Exercise: Part 
IV 


49 Agnew 

52 Advertises 

57 End or 
exercise 

60 Require 

61 Van Dine 
sleuth 

62 Decays 

63 Gaelic 

64 Llama's 
habitat 

65 Galley word 


1 Caravansaries 

2 Benefit 

3 Des Moines is 
here 

4 Comic bit 

5 China, in 
literature 

6 Turn the 

cheek 

7 Roman road 

8 Seminary subj 

9 Lanka 

( Ceylon) 

10 Sharp ridges 

11 Schism 

12 Medicinal 
plant 

13 Atlas abbr. 

18 Sail before the 
wind 

19 Rainier's land 

23 "Three a 

Horse" 


24 Majestic 

25 Roman robe 

26 Lubricate 
again 

27 Gay. 

historic plane 

28 Doze 

29 Registers; 
rosters 

30 Important city 
inS. Korea 

31 John. 

singer 

33 Express 
disdain 

35 Sluggish 

37". .Tfora 

potage" 

38 Famed pen 
name 

39 Pasture sound 

44 Took long steps 

45 Tasks 

46 Rope fiber 

48 Instant 

49 Of sound mind 

50 Harbor sight 

51 "Beware the 
of March" 

52 Await decision 

53 Sculls 

54 Pleasant pace 

55 Feminine 
suffix 

56 Melh. 

58 Pride of Sen. 
Norris 

59 Solo of "Star 
Wars" 


O New York Times, edited by Eugene Males k a . 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



vQ 7 rv 

j&k /+ 


’ SUJRflS ARE FIRST COUSINS TO BURPS-' 


THAT SCRAMBLED WOftD QAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one toner 10 each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


TIHHC 


DICAR 


MIENER 


RUJITS 


WHAT THE 
VIOLINIST 
WAS UP TO. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: AISLE BUSHY FLAUNT PICKET 
Answer Those cars never run as smoothly as this — 
HE TALK5 


WEATHER 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Amem 

Barcelona 

Beta rods 

Berlin 

BruiieJi 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Cmmtoufl 


HIGH LOW Clin 

C F C F 

24 79 17 6J lr Bangkok 


11 44 14 57 o Belling 

28 B2 IB 44 lr Hang Kang 


28 82 If 66 lr Manila 

22 73 15 5? r Now Delhi 


18 44 12 S4 a Seoul 

21 73 li 54 lr Shanghai 


27 81 14 57 h- Singapore 

21 70 13 55 lr Taipei 


Copenlwosn 14 41 10 so sh Tokyo 

cotta Del Sal 37 Of 20 48 lr . — n.r - a 

Dublin 18 44 13 55 0 AFRICA 

Edinburgh 17 43 11 52 0 Alnirrt 

Florence 30 14 18 44 cl Cairo 

» 48 f 48 a auTM, 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

— — — — na 

27 81 21 70 Si 

29 84 27 II 0 

32 90 25 77 a 

34 97 24 79 d 

29 84 23 73 cl 

33 91 24 79 lr 

27 81 23 73 0 

— — — — na 

39 88 23 73 d 


Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Nice 

OUo 

Ports 

Prague 

Revfclavtk 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


•/ U M □ Algiers 

30 14 IB 64 Cl 

20 48 9 48 o cane Town 

« » \l M >r Casablam» 


to 44 12 54 o Harara 

“21?” E Lagos 


34 93 21 70 fr 

» *5 21 M lr 

13 55 5 41 cl 

54 75 21 70 CJ 

— — — — no 

— — — — no 

— — — — na 

34 93 19 64 fr 


S 2 ij S Z Nairobi — — na 

21 70 14 57 a rMH 34 93 19 64 fr 

21 SB 16 41 lr LATIN AMERICA 

30 B6 30 48 Ci 

30 48 10 50 cl Bunos Aires 17 43 4 39 fr 

30 6i 17 54 cl CorpCM 24 79 19 46 r 

34 75 21 70 a Lima IB 44 14 57 a 

10 44 IS 59 Cl Mexico Clly 23 73 ID 50 BC 

27 81 IS 59 fr Rlode Janeiro 25 77 19 44 ct 


« £ l £ * NORTH AMERICA 


2 & 2 « Aochorooo 

20 60 10 50 sn Atlanta 

? 2 !9 “ r ST 


24 79 IB 44 ir Chicago 
» « !i ff 0 Denver 


14 61 10 SO 


*3 73 H Si d Honolulu 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tei Aviv 


(ST Houston 

— „ Lai Angolas 

22 n 8 46 lr Miami 

28 82 21 70 Ir Mlaoeopolis 


3J TO 14 57 ir Montreal 

27 81 U 55 lr Nassau 


30 84 >9 46 fr New York 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Sydney 


Seattle 

13 55 10 S3 sh Taranto 
It 41 13 55 sn Washington 


Anchorage 17 43 10 50 ac 

Atlanta 33 91 20 48 fr 

Boston 29 B4 IB 44 pc 

Chicago 32 90 20 48 pc 

Denver 34 93 IS 59 fr 

Detroit 31 BS 18 44 pc 

Honolulu 31 B8 24 75 fr 

Houston 23 91 22 72 ac 

LM Angela* 3S 95 30 48 fr 

Miami 33 91 25 77 fr 

Mlaoeopolis 31 88 19 64 lr 

Montreal 24 79 18 44 cl 

Nassau 31 88 24 79 fr 

New Yarn 77 81 20 48 DC 

San Francisco 32 90 15 59 fr 

Seattle 30 84 12 54 Tr 

Toronto 23 73 15 59 el 

Washington 33 90 23 73 lr 


cl-claudvi fo raggy. lr lair; h hall: no-nai available; a-avercasl; 
pc-pgrlly douOv: Main. stWiawers. sw-snow; st-stormv 


BLONDIE 


I BOUGHT 500 
. WATCHES FOt? 
[ $20 APIECE 


AW I SOLD EACH HOW DO YOU 
ONE FOR $20 MAKE MONEY 


Ilike THAT 7 


I ALSO DO 
- OEPfK IRS 









BEETLE BAILEY 

we HAVE am appoimtmewt 
With ©en. Halftrack 


VES, HEfe 1 
EX PECTINS I 
YOU I 


I THINK HE'S ALSO 
EXPECTING US 
TO KNOCK > 



Does v 


ANDY CAPP 


j). 


COME CN.M 1 LAD- VOU'b BETTERODOLOFF 
IN THEC^US OVERNIGHT. rr*S TOR >OtK 
. - CWNGCXJD, -- 


' IFNOU > 

SW9D, f 111 

V ALAN J 


HOLD IT/ IM 'OWTW 
RJGHTSu IVESEEN 
> rt ON TELLY - I'M ^ 
' ENTITLED TO ONE 1 
l TELEPHONE CALL J 


r HELUO?»«NEY?] 
ANDY — WHAT i 
S.WON1HE 
f FIFTH AT 
I NEWMARKET? jfl 


’all Right, 

ms there 

tttW 


WIZARD of ID 


mi 

CO rrf 


op acm wzos 


A 


REX MORGAN 


ITS BEEN A LONG 
YOU KNOW, I ALMOST ) TIME -SINCE WE'VE 
FORGOT WHAT A jL BEEN ON A DANCE 
BEAUTIFUL DANCER TL. FLOOR, CLA UDIA L 
7 YOU ARE. BRADY / JSXBSm 



GARFIELD 


WELCOMETOVOUR 
FIRST STEP ON 
earth* EP* what 

I VO MOO THINK? 


'jw PWV?S — U- 



WHATARE 

YOOPOfNG? 


• I'VE NEVER 
WALKEP 
SIPEWAVS . 
BEFORE J 


Wirld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse July 9 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indi c ated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 


Ahold 

AMEV 

aykoti Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

Buetirmonn T 

Cal and HkJo 

Elsevler-MDli 

Fokker 

Gfat 8 racoon 

Ho lneken 

Hoog ovens 

KLM 

N aarden 

Nat N odder 

NMIIovd 

Oce vander G 

Paknoed 

Philips 

n ntl ■ rn 

"WBva 

Rodamco 

Rallnco 

Rorenio 
Royal Dutch 
linl lover 
vanOmmeren 
VMF Stork 
VMU 


Hoachst 

Hottsch 

Horten 

Huseel 

IWKA 

Kail + Salt 

Karstadl 

Kaufhol 

Kiaeckner H-O 

Klaeckner werke 

Krupp Siahl 

Linde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mannas mom 

Muench Rmdc 

Nlxdori 

PKI 

Porsche 

Praussog 

PWA 

RWE 

Rndnmeiali 
Schorl ng 
SEL 

Siemens 

Thyssen 

Veto 

vofkswaganwark 

Walla 


23480 24450 
Ul JO 11* 

184 184 

305 307 

28* 302 

31050 322 

246 254 

260 240 JO 
285 298 

48 49 JO 
11711650 
53050 5*2JQ 
21050 218 

178 179 JO 
198 20550 
2000 3000 
M4 57U0 
409 618 

1445 1465 
277 284 

157 JO 144 

180 18450 
294 301 

493 502 

355 im pi 
572 582 

11250 119 

217.50 227 

318 33080 
578 585 


Hlvetd Steel 
Kloat 
Nedbanfc 
Pres Sleyn 
RusPlat 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
So sal 

West Holding 


500 500 

*000 B02S 
1540 1550 
5100 5150 
1590 1410 
850 825 

3350 3375 
498 485 

4000 4000 


STC 

Sid Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tate and Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
T.i. Group 

T rata Ivor Hse 

THF 

Ultra mor 

Unlleverc 11 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Wootworth 


102 104 

497 499 

448 470 

440 445 

243 244 

309 312 

234 244 

338 339 

129 131 

193 301 

13/4411 27/44 

175 174 

273 285 

383 384 


P.T.SI Index : «U» 
Previous : 951 M 
F.T.&E.1W index : 123940 
Previous : 125820 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Heave 
How Por 
Indica pa 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

oue 

ShongrWa 
SI mo Dortry 
snare Land 
S'oore Press 
S Steamship 

SI Trading 

unl led Overseas 

UOB 


£45 £47 
5.40 5J5 

5 4.94 

?.U3 2 

£24 226 

5J5 5-35 

845 840 
282 282 
£54 £54 
£17 £18 
1.89 IJ4 
£48 £58 

190 5J5 

089 0.99 
334 £24 

1J8 IJ4 
£84 380 


Composite Stock index : 1M18 
Previous : 111580 


Strolls Times lad Index : 74745 
Previous : 74444 


AACl 

JCP 

Anglo 

Am G 

Am B 
AMD 
Bard 
Bass 

BJX.T 

Seed 

rltHH 

alrflos 

avs 

wrn 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 


Commerzbank index ; >449 JN 
Previous : 147170 


anp.cbs Gem index : 21888 
Previous: »9» 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL; Sllahllr cnoaov. FRANKFURT; 
Gvercusl Tettib. 37— 12 172 — 54 1 LONDON: Fair. Temp. 24— 12 f7S — 541. 
MADRID: Foir Toma 33 — 17 191—031 NEW YORK: Fair Tema 29—21 
184— 70). PARIS: Partly CMxiav. Temp 25 — 14 (77 — 571. ROME: Sformv. 
Temp 77— 70 i4i — oBi. TEL Aviv: Hal available ZURICH: Portly ctogCv 
Temp. 34 — 13 in -SSI. BANGKOK: Showers Temp. 37 — 25 (Rl — 77;. HONG 
KONG: Fair Temo. 30 - 77 (BA — 81 1. MANILA: Fair. Tema. 33 — 24 191 — 731. 
SEOUL: Showers. Temp 29 - 23 184 - 731. SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms, 
Ternn 78 — 23 182 - 721 TOKYO: F090V. Temp. 30— 21 (84—701. 



Bancs Comm 
Contrafe 
Cloa holeto 
Crad Hal 
Erhkmla 

Familial la 

Flat 
F Insider 
Generali 
IFI 

ilaloementl 

I taigas 

italmotuilorl 

Medtoaonea 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnaacente 

SIP 

SME 

SnJo 

Sionda 

Slat 


21770 21500 
3404 3305 

10250 10390 
2285 2294 
10950 11000 
12850 12750 
3950 3971 



AGA 

Alfa Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

Allas Capco 
Bonded 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 

E Welle 

■ ■ ■-»—«- . -■ 

I IWUCIUMIK6TI 

Phormaclo 

3aab-Scan)o 

Sandvtk 

Skanska 

SKF 

SmdbhMatdi 

Volvo 


113 ns 

180 IBS 
280 290 

385 NJ3. 
102 102 
180 180 
258 258 

240 255 

NjQ. 372 
153 122 

180 113 

400 N.a 

N.Q. 365 

81 8140 
209 209 

182 ISO 
204 204 


1MIB Correot Index : 1510 
previous j 1507 


Aflaersvaetlden Index : 358JD 
Previous : 34181 


ACI 
AMI 
BMP 
Bor at 

BaugaJnvIlla 

costtemoine 

Coles 

Comolco , 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunkw 

Elders ixi 

ICi Australia. 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Nat Ausi Bent) 
News Carp 
N Broken Hill 
Pasefdon 
Old coal Trust 
StXllUB 

Thomas Nation 
Westorn Mining 
Westpoc Banking 
WoadsJda 


2J6 £45 
<90 485 
480 484 

148 347 

£04 £02 
.652 450 
IBB 385 
157 155 

484 686 

302 304 

£50 £48 
305 £98 
£08 £05 

£20 £25 
288 285 
£80 £78 
4^0 488 
480 A76 
£25 £33 
£40 385 
153 150 
552 550 
£10 £12 
£97 352 

485 482 

142 141 


AH ora fuartns Index • 90280 
Pravlous: 69780 




Reviewed b>' 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupc 


A S NICK Herbert explains it in this com- 
pact survey of modem physics, ever since 
quantum theory supplanted Newton's clock- 


work universe, “physicists have lost their grip 
on reality" and have found themselves unable 


an reality" and have found themselves unable 
to propose a metaphor of the way the world 
really works. 


Along the wav to hi* conclusion. Herbert 
succeeds in teaching us a thing or two about 
the fundamentals of quantum physics. 

Most usefully of all. he lucidly describes 
some of the experiments on which modem 
physics is based — for example, how the an- 
cient hypothesis of the atom was finally vqjf 
fied by Einstein and the French physicist Jeau- 
Baptiste Perrin, or precisely how it can be sera 
in the laboratory that an electron behaves both, 
os a particle and as a wave, which is the’ 
paradox that underlies modern phvsics. 


Christopher Lehmann- Haupl is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 


ics and the experimental facts. As Richard P. 
Feynman, the Nobel laureate at the California 
Institute of Technology, has advised: “Do not 


keep saying to yourself, if you can possibly 
avoid iL ‘But how can it be like thatT because 


BEST SELLERS 


you will go ‘down the drain' into a blind alley 
from which nobody has yet escaped. Nobody 
knows how it can be like thaL" 


The Non lark Toon 

nuvluiufewd «*> ktw ftrtniw-re :Ssn :.<Ykif»nt*wn3 
ihnughoui die L mml SlJlc' W i-tLs en Ls I are bd; necewnh 

tfmxxun-.e 


Still, physicists persist in trying to imagiDe 
something behind the surface that quantum 
measurements reveal. Ever since the theory 
was bom in 1925. it has been variously pro- 
posed that there is no “deep reality" at all. or 
that reality is created by observation, or that as 
many worlds exist as there are possibilities, or 
that, just like the classical world, the quantum 
world is composed of ordinary objects. 

Then in 1964 an Irish physicist, John Stew- 
art Bell, made a discovery that profoundly 
affected all versions of quantum reality. Bell 
offered a mathematical theorem that “the at- 
om's measured attributes are determined not 
just by events happening at the actual measure- 
ment site but by events arbitrarily distant" 

“According to John Bell,” Herbert contin- 
ues, “the act of measurement is not a private 


Imt Woks 
WkJlmUT 


1 SKELETON CREW, by Stephen Kjik; . 

2 THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER. b> 


Tom iriaivr. ... - .• • 

} THE aDcR HOUSE RULES. b> John 
Inina • 

4 JUBAL SACKETT. h* Loub L Amour . 

5 HOLD THE DREAM, by B-ubjM Tayl.ir 

Bradford • — - 

6 A CATSKJLL EAGLE. b> Robert B 

7 CHAPfERHOUSE: DUNE. b>“ Frank 

Herbert .. — — • -• - 

S IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney 

Sheldon - . — — 

9 THINNER, bv Richard Bachman 


10 INSIDE. OUTSIDE, by Herman Wouk ... 


H THE CLASS. b> Erich Segal 

12 LONESOME DOVE, by Larry McMunry 


ues, “the act of measurement is not a private 
act. but a public event in whose details large 
portions of the universe instantly participate.” 


13 FAMILY ALBUM, bv 'Danielle Sled 
| j FOOTFALL, by Larry Nn.cn and lory 

p.-rfimcllc — ........ 

15 CONFESSIONAL, by Jack 


portions of the universe instantly participate.” 

If this sounds a little crazy, then the reader 
may be relieved to know that Herbert, a teach- 
er and professional populizer of quantum the- 
ory. makes Bell’s discovery seem accessible, at 
least His wildest explanation for the universe 
is simply that time is an illusion. 

As he concludes: “If time is just another 
dimension,” as Einstein’s “special" theory of 
relativity teaches us it is. then the entire 


NONFICTION 

1 AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY, by Lee laoocca 

with William Novak 

2 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Pei en and Nancy Austin .. . 

3 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES, 
bv Connell Co*an and Melwn Kinder .. . 

4 CON FE55JONS OF A HOOKER, by Bob 

Hope with Dw3\tic Neiland 

5 LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Bi**a«- 

« Leaki ng w ith Moscow .' by at- 

kadv N. Shevchenko 


K.W V 4 ^. ... . 

7 MO'UNTBATTEN. bv Philip Zicfler 
S A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Shd Siher- 


Solntian to Previous Puzzle 


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□ nunn ana nnnain 
cddhbci anaBDiHacia 
□BiiEaHtaaaciaEi 
□□□ annciiana 
ana ana aaa aaa 
onan nan naaan 
BnanaHaannaHaan 
□BHEa □□□ naaa 
□na aaa □□□ naa 
DnnnHaa^gao^^^ 
□saanaQaaaao 
□□□□□□□□a aaaaa 
□□ana ana naasa 
DDQDBjit n anal 


stein — 15 I3 l 

9 MV MOTHER'S KEEPER, by B_D. Hy- ^ ^ 

10 THE BRiDG E ACR C^SS FOREVER.” Irr 

RicBxid Bach — 13 44. 

11 THE HEART OF THE DRAGON, by 

Alawiair Clawe ,10 5 

12 THE SOONG DYN.ASTY. by Sicrling _ 

Sograve — — 9 12 

13 SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 

Evan S. Connell - 11 24, 

14 NUTCRACKER. bv Shana Alexander ... — I 

15 “SURELY YOU'RE JOKING. MR. 

FEYNMAN, bv Richard P. Fevnman ... — 1 


ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 


DR- BERGER S IMMUNE POWER • • 

DIE T. bv S mart M. Berger ■■ 1 4 

WEBSTER’S NINTH NEW COLLE- 

GlATE DICTIONARY — 2 3* 

THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jell • 

Santh 3 14- 

NOTHING DOWN, by Robert G. Allca 4 3F 
WHAT THEY DONYTEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL by 
Mark H. McCormack 5 ». 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscoct 


/^\N the diagramed deal, the 
KJ evenmal winners seemed 
headed for a bad result when 
they bid as shown to a hopeless 
lour-spade contract. But 
North came to their rescue 
with a phantom save of five 
dubs. 


couraging. The actual play was 
the five, which was a suit pref- 
erence signal suggesting a shift 
to diamonds. 


The defenders exacted the 
maximum penalty after West 
led the club king. East-West 
use “upside down” signals, so 
the deuce would have been en- 


When West duly led a low 
diamond the declarer played 
low from the dummy m the 
hope of escaping for down one. 
But (he defense now collected 
two diamond tricks and a dia- 
mond ruff, for a penalty erf 500 
and a top score on the board. 


NORTH 

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Fame 
Full Bonk 


Full Ptwlo 

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Hltodii 

HllocM CoMe 
Honda 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


Nehemiah 


via** 


wmmmw - hi 


Cards’ Andujar Battles to Victory No. 15 


T&Hurdles 


ilPSP, 


;.'; v . By Mai Florence 

‘ - 'Lot Angela* Times Senior 

ANGELES — When the 
worths hot high hurdler became a 
wide receiver /or the Sen Francisco 
49crs, Renaldo -Ttfdhemiah was a 
novefty. Bat novelties wear thin. 

Nefianiah didn't play much last 
jear v and reporters stepped around 
him in National Football League 
dresOT^ rooms. 

In a afferent unifonn — a track 
athlete's — Nehemiah wouldn't 
have been ignored. So, it appeared, 
be had given up acclaim and recog- 
nition in one sport for journeyman 
siatns in another. 

But soon Nchemiah and other 
track start playing pro football will 
probably have the best of two 
worlds:.'. 

A three-member panel of the In- 
ternational Amateur Athletic Fed- Hurdler R 

oration, 'the governing body for 

trade and field, has voted to return . , ... .... 

amateur status to pro football play- back and look at it now, I think my 




Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches we couldn't put him away.” said ninth complete game of the year in 
ST. LOUIS — Someday. Joa- San Francisco Manager Jim Dav^ leading Los Angeles past the Pi- 
quin Andujar may be the equal of export- “He just kept battling." rates. 

Larry Cheney and Milt Gaston. In Andujar helped himself with a run- PMfies 7, Astros 4: In Houston, 
the numni imf. he'll have to settle scoring single in thesixLh. one of 14 Glenn Wilson had three run-scor- 
for being the top winner in the hits for Sl Louis. ing singles and Von Hayes, Ozzie 

major leagues. Cubs 7-4, Padres 3-8: In Chica- Virgil and Rick Schu had three hits 

“1 wanted the shutout," Andujar 6°- Kevin McReyndds broke out apiece in leading Philadelphia's 
said Monday night, after leading of a 9-for-52 slump with three hits winning attack, 
the St Lotus Cardinals past San 011(1 four runs batted in to lead San White Sox 9, Tigers 4: In the 
Francisco, 6-1. “You know I want- Diego: the game followed the com- American League, in Detroit, Girl- 
ed iL" Andujar bad given up 12 hits p' cuon of a suspended contest, ton Fisk homered twice, including 
■ ■ -- which the Cubs won. Me Reynolds his fourth career grand slam, to 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP *“1 3 t 'y 0_run home run in the sec- highlight Chicago's pasting of the 

— and, tripled and scored in the sixth Tigers. Fisk tied Dave Kingman 

but sml had his shutout intact be- and added a two-run double in the and Dale Murphy for the major 
fore issuing pinch-hitter Rob Deer seventh. The earlier game had been league home run lead with 21. 
a two-out, bases-Ioaded walk in the halted because of darkness after six lmfians 4. Raneers 0: In Cleve- 


nt£Q..areha...r*i 







Francisco, 6-1. “You know I want- Diego: the game followed the corn- 
ed iL" Andujar bad given tip 12 hits P leaon of a siupended contest 
- - -- - which the Cubs won. Me Reynolds 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP hil 3 ^ ^ “ the sec- 

. ond, tripled and scored m the sixth 

but still had his shutout intact be- and added a two-run double in the 
fore issu in g pinch- hit ter Rob Deer seventh. The earlier game had been 
a two-out, bases-Ioaded walk in the halted because of darkness after six 
eighth inning. He struck out Ron inning s on May 5 with Chicago 
Roenicke to end the threat, and leading, 4-3. Leon Durham iced the 
then pitched a failless ninth, decision with a two-run homer in 
Larry Cheney and Milt Gaston? the eighth. 

With the 1913 Chicago Cubs, Che- Mels 7, Reds Si In Cincinnati, 
ney set the nugor league record for Keith Hernandez went 4-for-5, in- 
tbe most hits ever given up while eluding a two-nm borne run and an 

miehins a shutout — — Id* ihf* m.irlr dot i- .. . r 


halted because or darkness after six Indians 4, Rangers 0: In Qeve- 
innings on May 5 with Chicago land, Neal Heaton snapped a per- 
leading, 4-3. Leon Durham iced the sonal six-game losing streak by 
decision with a two-run homer in pitching his first shutout in more 


than a year and Carmen Castillo hit 



Mels 7, Reds Si In Cincinnati, a bases-empty home run to pace 
Keith Hernandez went 4-for-5, in- the Indians. 


tauten Unitori Pi«u ku m otoat 

Hurdler Renaldo Nehemiah; 1 can't wait to get back.’ 


pitching a shutout — 14; die mark 
was tied by Gaston, with Washing- 
ton, in 1928. 


eluding a two-nm home run and an Royals 5, Yankees 2i In New 
RBI single; to spark a four-homer York, George Brett went 3-for-4 


Joaquin Andujar 

*. . . / had bus\ ! stuff. / was ftxcfcy.' 


i powered New York to with two 


and Lonnie Smith bined on a seven-bitter, leading To- 


erswho competed in track. 


impact or value to a particular 


The IAAFcan declare eligible an sport is far more greatly needed in The woidamaiem is in question- 
athlete who competes professional- and fidd. liberalized inks now allow track 

Win one sport, provided the mao Nehemuhism the final year of a athletes to accept appearance mon- 
ticeof that sport is of no direct help fo^-year contract with tire 49er^ cy and make commercial endorse- 
to anv track and field athlete. The H e said be will pursue both football ment* as long as thor earnings are 
nand concluded that football does and track for one year and then will channeled into a trust fund, from 
noTand its findings are expected to concentrate on one sport “Com- which the athletes can draw train- 
mhbcr-ctamocd hv thelAAF 1X1011 sease >0“ realize that mg and living expenses. 

Snndl whmkconvmes Friday in **“ «"©“■«»* overlap," be said. Coach Bill Walsh of the 49ers 
Athens. ^ There is no way 1 could be equally noted that Nchemiah probably 


,, .... .. , . ,, . . decades. Andujar (15-3) hopes his 

1982, presumably forfeiting his am- faster than 13.11 smee Nehemiah patuan doesn't hold. “I had 

atom status. stopped. ct,,fr 1 mss inci lwlrv " h. 


1928. ... its seventh straight victory. The las- homered and scored three times as ronto to victory. In his seven 

On target to become baseballs ers* Pete Rose went l-for-5 and Kansas Gty ended a four-game innin gs of work, Stieb struck out 
ursl 30-game winner m nearly two needs 36 hits to break Ty Cobb's Yankee winning streak. five, walked one and allowed five 


v - ' . , . f krasy stuff. I was just lucky," he 

has five of toe six fastest ^ aftgj pitching his ninth com- 


Athens. 


the two seasons overlap," be said. 
There is no way 1 could be equally 
proficient at both. The body can 
take only one season. I know that at 


ed by thedeasum wide ^ ^ ^ januajy j don’t want to 

recayert Wfllie Gauh ^ Chicago take another stim for two or three 

months. Soil_wm befoolhall only. 


Liberalized inks now allow track times in the high hurdles, and now game j n 19 § Lans ^ year 
athletes to accept appearance mot- it is just a question of whether the A n T” \aa 

ey and make commercial endorse- ban! knocks of football have Mune-' 

ments as long as tbor earnings are ed some of his ability. “If anything. h552 

rtan^intoatnist^d,&om il t total a trad .athktC tfeberre mana^^e“^S 

wtachthe athletes can draw tram- ah said. Hesaidthat he hadn’t done agaSfXy histtS 

mg and living expenses. any hurdling since he became a ,r/Tii J J 

Coach Bill Walsh of the 49ers fufl-time^i& receiver. 
noted that Nehemiah probably But hurdling “changed so drasti- We 31111 00 lfte ropes * 3111 

took a pay cm when he signed with cally within the year after I left that 

the 49ers. He wasn't bong face- I would have a totally different 
tious. Considering today’s six-fig- outlook.” he said. “1 was uying 10 
ure incomes for trade and field su- be the best in every way possible. I 


all-time record of 4,191. Angels 3, Brewers 2: In Ana- hits in lowering his league-leading 

Braves 7, Expos 1: In Atlanta, ham, California, Doug DeCinces’s earned- run average 10 1.84. In his 
Dale Murphy mt a two-nm first- single with one out m the 11th past II starts (in which Ik has won 
inning homer to start the Braves scored Brian Downing from second six of eight decisions), St rib has 
toward their first victory in six base to give California its triumph, compiled a 1.04 ERA. 
itched 144 innings games. Shut out in its previous 27 Twins 7, Orioles 4: In Baltimore, Red Sox 2, A*s 1: In Oakland, 
!e should be able to innings against Montreal. Atlanta Mark Salas singled home Gary California, Dwight Evans drove in 
tallied four times in the first. Gaetti to trigger a three-run 10th as the tie-breaking run in the fifth. 
Dodgers 4, Pirates 3: In Pitts- Minnesota ended a four-game las- and the seven-time Gold Glove 
burgh, Dave Anderson singled ing streak. winner threw out the potential ty- 

home two runs in the fourth and Blue Jays 4, Mariners 0: Tn Seal- ing run in the ninth as Boston got 
Fernando Valenzuela recorded his tie, Dave Stieb and Tim Acker com- past the A’s. (AP.UPl) 


Red Sox 2, A’s 1: In Oakland, 


^ Bay, M^Du^ of Miami, * 

n 00 Neh emiah was in the vanguard 

Rams and DrtoWIlhams °f the of pro football players whofwight 
Los Angeles Raders, along wtth w amaii^ ^ statuT^ 
nmnmg bock Herechel Wafter of “^Tissue of amateurism vs. 

‘k-JS ^ professionalism has never thor- 

zuard Michael Carter of the 49ers 


~~ Neh emiah was in the van guar d 
“5 of pro football players who fought 
otit 10 regain amaieur trade, status. 

°* “The issue of amateurism vs. 


perstais, that cat gets 
bigger for Nehemtah, 


r and don't think I have to 
earns now. If I monitor my a 


approximately 5200,000 a year set op a certain amount of meets 
with the 49ers. Runners World and stick by it, TO appreciate the 


_ , magazine reported that- Cat! Lewis q»rt and what it has to offer. 

3a ? £ Her ^ ieI walker or “The issue of amateurism vs. earned 5783,000 in 1984. Other re- “Fortunately, my competition 
professionalism has never thor- ported incomes were $617,000 for hasn’t improved that much." 
guard Michael Cmtttof the 49ers omghfy been addressed, and there Edwin Moses and $420,000 for Nehemiah had had minimal 
andderenszve bade Darrell Green ^ probably no one who had my Joan Benoit football experience when he joined 

of Washington. qualifications capable of taking It is believed that if Nehemiah is the 49ers, who brought him along 

Nehemiah is the world record- that issue on," Neh emiah said. “We anywhere near his pre-NFL form, slowly, nang him as a spot player, 
bolder in the 110-meter high hui- figured that the IAAF would defi- be could earn $400,000 to $500,000 His 3-year totals are 43 receptions 
dies at 1233 seconds. He left trade nrtdy have to take a look at me a year as a hurdler. for 754 yards and four touchdowns, 

in 1982 because he “was at the because it would be a precedent When he left track for the NFL “Ax times I was disilhisioned," he 
stage where I was my only competi- Even if il look me to age 35, it could after the 1982 indoor season, he said. “Considering what I could do 
dchl” be said that I was the pioneer of it dearly dominated bis event He as an athlete and bow 1 perceived 

He now has a different perspec- all and [reinstatement] happened was tbe best in the world from 1978 the49ers’ interest in me, I thought I 
rive on track, the change probably because of me." through 1981. No other human has would have blossomed a lot sooner, 

influenced by the uncertainty of his Bui he and his attorney ran into run the 1 10-meter hurdles in less If I had to do it all over again, I 


oughly been addressed, and there Edwin Moses and $420,000 for 
was probably no one who bad my Joan Benoit 


med $783,000 in 1984. Other re- “Fortunately, my competition 
irted incomes were $617,000 for hasn't improved that much.” 

Iwin Moses and $420,000 for Nehemiah had had minim al 
an Bench. football experience when he joined 

It is believed that if Nehemiah is the 49ers, who brought him along 


: near his pre-NFL form, slowly, nang him as a spot player, 
sun $400,000 to $500,000 His 3-year totals are 43 receptions 
a hurdler. for 754 yards and fonr touchdowns. 


be could earn $400,000 to $500,000 
a year as a hurdler. 

When he left track for the NFL 


for 754 yards and fonr touchdowns. 
“Ax times I was disillusioned," he 


after the 1982 indoor season, he said. “Considering what I could do 
dearly dominated his event He as an athlete and bow 1 perceived 


influenced by the uncertainty of his Bui he and his attorney ran into 

football career. “I can’t wait to get one roadblock after another after 


was the best in the world from 1978 the49ers’ interest in me, I thought 1 
through 1981. No other h uman has would hove blossomed a lot sooner. 


than 13 seconds, and there is no would. ... 1 was playing behind 


bad;" Nehemiah said. “When I sit Nehemiah had joined the 49ers in one now competing who has run great receivers. I don't think it’s 

. ; ■■■ ■ i reflective of my ability” 

* If the council approves the pan- 

TT _ m* • ¥F7 * - ■ ,1 _ nrr d's recommendation, as expected. 

Hot lip Brings W oxter a tot lip asaffiA 

-M. K-S J. maranch, the IOC president “has 

fiuentarionai Herald Tribune * 1 if been quoted that he wants profes- 

LONDON — The latest Ang- \ \ 1 / / / sionals in the sport and thinks it’s 

In-I talian soccer trading r ank* as \ \ I / / / ironic that track and Grid -is an 

the sport’s most audacious Wt of \ \ / / / amateur sport, anyway," Nehemi- 

privaie enterprise since, writ since . >s. \ ' / / ■ - ah-stid. “William , Smw w^whQ.is 

a Dutch schoolmaster penuaded a s' (&. jUf prerident of our Olympic Commit- 

top Netheriands chib that he bad ^ ■■ ■ tee, has always backed me. So we 


tnientarianoi Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The latest Ang- 
lo-Italian soccer trading ranks as 
the sport’s most audacious bit of 
private enterprise since, wdL since 
a Dutch schoolmaster persuaded a 
top Ne therlan ds dob that he had 
seen the next Johan Cruyff in Sin- 
gapore. 

I don’t wish to be unkind to 
Fandi Ahmad. Many of us will long 
remember the jeweled goal be 
struck from 25 meters (82 feet) — 
beyond the range and imagination 
of ordinary players — during his 
aborted spell with FC Groningen. 

StilL I suspect that Jaap Reinders, always a higher aul 
the scholarly scout who discovered man Douglas Hits, 





The Auoooicd Pr«w 


ihinVr oor case is pretty strong to ^ pr *“ 

dear the way for the 1988 Olym- DOWN BUT OUT: Minnesota first baseman Kent Hrtodk was sitting pretty after diving to his right to stop Larry Sheets’s 
pics." first-innmg shot Monday night in Baltimore. Hrbek relayed the ball to pitcher John Botcher, covering at first, to get the out. 



’ll 


m 


dub ddrts exceeding a million 
o n AD UlTriTPC pounds ($134 million), had not 

r? IVUd iiXJ Lr-Tl-CiO only agrml to the journey but ao 

cep ted Bari's money with alacrity. 

tins first Kampong boy to attempt All of which leaves Turner buen- 
a sporting life in Europe, is back in jog wirier the Mediterranean sun, 
another guise. predsely vdicre he and his family 

The new Reinders answers to tbe were this time lastyear when EQis 
name of Gianni Paladini. a small- appointed him. Villa had abruptly 
rime restaurateur who took out sacked tbe previous manager, and 
from waiting tables to set up the Turner, r eading that the Chairman 

£850,000 move of Gordon Cowans wanted a yes ma n to coach his 
and Paul Rideout from Aston Villa team, was surprised when his stipu- 
in the F-nglish midlands to Bari on lation of a five-year term guaran- 
Iialy’s southern Adriatic coast. teeing full team control was written 
No matter what you've heard into the contract 
about I talian waiters setting the ta- It hadn't been so hard for Ellis to 
ble one day and singing at La Seals do. In November 1982, when EQis 
the next (or Italian Walter Mi ttys, regained control after three years 
ditto one day and scoring in the of acrimonious boardroom wren- 




Tennis 

Pro Tour Leaders 


Transition 


Baseball 


BASEBALL 
AmH a w League 

M cy OAKLAND Agreed !o terms wttti Tommv AMERICAN LCACUE uonmira (iu>. ujviixvw mj ana Boone, w— , - , 

. Earnlnw ’ lfcrtlnnnl ■■ T««u Boo DM bo »— 1 4 0 **“*■?• *^ L-C0wm.^S. HRs— MUwoukee. McRavnoh 

I, Jatm McEnna*. StTMC. a, Ivon Lendl, L£AGUE-»t5J^n^S!ln«i Bob Lilli* Ctevatawf 1M 3N l#*-4 M B tSl^Callfarnta. Jones Mi. Moatrral 

1S57.531 1 jimmy Connors. SM&M2. 4 , Man M™on.vwW« M>.MofTl*J« and Brumniw; „ . Anaa,n 

W)kmdar,S3M337.5> Borl»B*cKer.S262J3T. 4, ^StTsIwt Bonda 5-ia L-«o- S 2J 12 1 \ 

Hear™ MB BBS BIO— S S 1 m. Uem art UBI 

cnM-PriaFSSr sobertwww end SutdMra; Ntokra and and 9?™?* {1Q> - w -° ovl »- ^ «— Lot AwmU. 

LJatm McEnraa, 131X2. Ivan LwidLUWi 3, Wvna*ar.W--W»1^^l^lrtfw7^ Am^SA Pimnurah 

Mats WHander, XML 4, Jimmy Connors, 1.35S. HR.-KOeKffi atv. Smim 13). BaUxvil IM). 22 22 5 J VoMmiue 

5. Boris Bnciiar, 1 JM. &, MUoskiv MecJr. X1AL Cl MC INWAT l-Announcrfl mol Mmw BIB lit BID— B » I ***** ! 7 _ » (Tl.Ouonlo 

7, Andars Jarryd.1 JI72. X Kevin Curran, I *!!?. DrtroH 111 MB BBI-4 13 0 “ , . 1 whl 7' Mow ®* Von ‘ l * U-OtUm 

*, Yannick Noah. 777. IB, Tim iMk 973. me l 1 ^ t6am Nation. AshId (71. Slrntan II). James (»l ?*■ “"r ,Mand Ie “ mw - Nr» YorU 


Monday’s Major League Line Scores 


■ ft WM no, Stoddard (JI.GoGMW) (B) and K»v 

ine scores ™«ly,- Sororam. Brwtor <41, Mortdim (S), 

_ .... „ Rumvcn III and Lake, Davis 19). W— StaO- 

Oammts (10). DAAaaro 111) and Boone. «— 1JL L^5or»ns«a 1-X HR*— San Dtaoa 


eoorto* for Tuoadoy^sAli-Stor Game ond Jeft 
y gf 1 * 8 ***^- cooper and Lorry SIwt trainers. 

CHICAGO-Ptooed Rick Sul el Hie. pttctier, 
8 ? M I and Gary Matmeru, avffleWer, an ttie JKtav 


Moore, M, L—GHHen, 4-S. h Rs— Milwaukee. McReynolds (9). CMcaoa. Bosley 12). 
oalivte Hi.Coopor (S)^allfbrala Jones (IS), UMtrml MB 

Mltmranln » »X-7 15 I 
2-2EI2. 22 2f 12 1 l GuJltckK>n - "nt»n» (Sl. Roardon (7). Lo- 

T n !? or> _ . . “ *~* r * 1 ens (I) and Nkssia; Mahler and BenmUd. 

i BU - >Clll r -*---^7 ta (7 !' °°^ W— Mahler. 12-7. L — CuQlcluon. 7-4. HR— Al- 

Lou dner (W); Ota i to. (7). Sfewart 1101 Murphy (211. 

and Pvdp. Dempsey (10). w— Davl*. 2-s. L— u>t Aoeele. 020 200 BID— 4 I 1 

***■*+ ■ im-MlnneiolB. MM PllWwroli »T2 BOB M»-3 > 1 

‘ Hz !2 * • VMenzueto ond Selosclo; DeLeoa Hoi land 

Acker IB] ona < 71 - GuoB, « «* «*> ptma - W-Volenju^aV-B. 

sins Acker id) ana wnirt; Moore, vande l— O eLaan. 2-11 

Bera IB), Thomas IB). Lona |9) and Keamev. Hew York BOB 121 308— 7 12 B 


Medr. Sl 9X475. IX Kevin Cumn, SI 9X422. 
Grand Prte Ririate 


dtaabtad Uet. Reed led Ron MerHUth. Pilcher, 
from Iowa ef me American Association. 


' CINCINNATI— Announced fhal Marpe 

Ymmk*NoSLm' IXTIm to S'* 0 "- «*»urae me title ol team 

. 9. Yannick Noofv977. IX TTiP Mayotta. 97X oreeldeolond BID Bcrpeodi. oeneral mooop- 

at r LMWHier kouoi «■_ hu mb m executive vbz oresldent orw r “ 

1, John Me Enroe.l49J)0 points. X> von Lendl BASKETBALL Bwer 19: 

iSMaa Mots W1 lander. 1D9JCT, 4, Jimmy Can- NaUoaal Bnskrtholl AssodMioB S-3.L— I 

W-W-fcAnctHT CHICAGO— Named Fred Winter, asslstont 


and Fisk; Perry, Loom (4). Bair (S), Beren- |9> - * SUeh. 9-S. I — Moore, 7-5. 

suer 19) ond Porrfsh, Melvin |4). w— NeHon. BOB DIB 001— 3 ID • 

S-l L — Pelry, 10-7. HRs — CMcoea, Ftek 7 (21). . BOO IBB Ml— I II 1 


Jarrvd. 49 M. 7, Kevin Curran, 4&3X H. Boris coach, 
Becker, SL39. 9, JoaUm Nvstrom. 9U3. IX san t 
Yannick Noah, 45JO. 


WOMEN 
Bara ties 

T. Martina Navrwilova. smsn. X Orb 


World Cup the next), this one I gfing, the real boss at Villa was at dream Wembley hat trick — right 
swear — I think — is true. pains to stress: “1 shall be working foot, lefi foot, header — for En- 


u_ l j _ •• mamna navnnnova. j. wiria 

pmg ix- looter ne nan notched a Evef1 udvo. ui oaw. x Hono Mamtiikova 


One’s imagination hits over- seven days a week to reduce the 
drive. The first call from Signor debts of £1.6 million. The manager 
Paladini, possibly from the pbone will be in complete control of the 
booth in Boogies Brasserie, Bir- teams and will have the say on 
gin gham, could have gone some- which players come and go. I will 
Wng like this: take over only when we start talk- 


gland's schoolboys against Scot- jordwLtMjMa.t.Eibabett 
land. At 16, he scored regular Kon* Rmoxn, mojis. 


SZ9US7X 4. Helena Suhova. 0*1.512. 5, Pam 
Snrtvar, CHUM 4. Claudia KotKkMCllKii. 
(181995. 7. Zina Garrison, 514X732 X Kattiy 
Jordan. BMBJMLV.EIbabatti Smvlle, 5128,133. 


Fourth Division gpals for Swindon 
and dominated England youth's 
aerial power. At 18, as Sourness 
said, he actually rejected Livetpool. 


Graed Prb Paints 

LMonina Navraiitovc. ijoax Chris Evert 
Ltavd. laSL X Monuela Maleeva 73& 4. Zhw 
Garrison, 4J5L& doodle KohckMOIsCh. <124. 


SAN ANTON 10-^tonedMlkeBriltCrtn.Cen- ^ “ 

1^, Dorm 1 

FOOTBALL 

ftottond FmMmB IfftOift 

^ATLANTA-Slaned John Ayres, dekmstve Major 

CHICAGO — 5 toned Ken Maroerum. wide 
receiver. 

CINCINNATI — Announced the retirement 
ol Isaac Curtis, wide receiver. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Stoned Ricky Nichols. Toronto 
wide receiver. D ** n 7l _ 

COLLEGE New York 

BENTLEY— Announced the resJsnallon ol Baltimore 
Mark Canovan, hockey coacti, ™ on . 

BUFFALO STATE— Named Prod Hartrtak MJtwouhee 


Hemdaa (7). 

Milwaukee oei Mo DD1 SB— 3 » O 

California MS BN IBS 11-1 7 B 

Darwin. Gibson (11). ana CMoare; Win, 


New York BOB 131 308—7 13 B 

Clntfnaafl 111 ub Old— 5 n 1 

Lvnch. Garmon (7). Leach (B), Orosco (9) 
and Carter; Price. Tibbs 17), Franca (7), 


Hurti.Cimvfortl 1M and Cedman; Codlrall. siuaer (9) ond Knicelv. W— Lynch, 4 - 5 . 


oei tea an 00—2 « 0 Howell <»> and Tetilekm. W— Hursi, 5-7. 
898 BIB IBB tl — I 7 S Codlrall, U. 5v— CrawfonJ (2). 


Major League Standings 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
(Com pterion of Gome Semeaded May 5) 
San Neva BB1 BM BOX— I t B 

Chlcoaa BOB 283 82*— 4 7 1 


nnta.4-11. Sv— Omen (8). HRs— New York. 
Strawberry (7), Hernandez (4), Johnson (4). 
Faster (131. 

Ban Frond sea M» 860 018—1 13 B 

SLLawb in on Wjc— 4 14 1 

La Point. Minton (4), Jaffcoal (7). Garretts 
(B)ondBrentvi Andular and Nieto. W— Andu- 


AME RICAN LEAGUE 
East CUvIDaa 


Hoyt.DeLeon (6) and Booty; Trout Frazier lQr , 15A L-toPalnt. 3* 
(4), Smith (9) and Davis. W— Frazier. 4.2 L— pmiodeWdo U 

DeLeon. 0-3. HRs-Chlcopo, Moreland (2). bc 


W Hke this: take over only when we start talk- said, he actually rejected Liverpool. 

“Is Bari Assodazione Sportiva? ing finances." Except, perhaps. Too impatient to go through the dra coed** 457. 

Listen, I am big fan of Bari. Give when tbe manager is on vacation champion’s renowned reapprenti- 

me il presidents I have business to and an Italian makes offers too ceship, Rideout opted for a 
"is cuss. Signor Presideme? good to refuse. £200,000 transfer to villa. 


Pam Shrtvar. 3KL 7, GabrMa Sabah nL 5i0L B. athletic aradar, effective Seal. 1. 


Steffi GraL 340. 9. Kafhv REnokU, 490. IX San- 


FULLERTON ST AT E— Named Morval wo 
Jeremiah women's basketball coach. 


discuss. . . - Signor Presideme? good to refuse. 


There, behind England’s old 


Congratulations, now Bari is win- Time will tell who gets the better There, behind England’s old 
iiing tire promotion to First Divi-. of tire bargain struck on the initia- war-bone center forward, Peter 
: sion you. are going to need two tive of a soccer Tan who knew tire Withe, progress slowed. Goals 
' foreign stars,- like Juventus. Milano right time and the right place to pni came intenmttentiy; so did clashes 
and the others, I have two players, his finger in tire pie. with opponents and authority and, 

very young, -almost internationals Down in Italy, other prominent in time,' lectures froth senior First 
in England. You see bow tire Brit- British exiles were being canvassed Division jaros about his “too-mueb- 


Cycling 


ish succeed in the cup for Milan about Cowans and Rideout. 


and Sam 
you, and 
“Yes, 3 


ria? I have better for 
the price. 


“Cowans will be a real coup if he 
is back to the form of two years 
ago," commented Milan’s Ray W2- 


only 20 bnt big. strong, better than kins, who briefly shared 
Hatdey. And remember Cowans? midfield with Ban's new 

v,_ 1. J 1.|_ l I Uric UMfllW 


. Napoh wanted him when be was tor. “Rideout was wanted by Liver- 
ihe most creative player on the En- pool al 18.” pointed out Graone 
• giidi side, but he didn’t go. And Souness, the Sampdoria and fot- 
. 'now, for you, is a better price- w* Liverpool captain. “And that 
■ What? Oh sure, sure we have speaks for itself.” 

- .7 be disco** I know the feelings Both observations bear dated 
a Italy after Brussels. No one but grains of truth. Cowans, an elusive 

- you and 1 will know they are in and imaginative creator, was on the 


too-5ooo attitude. 

> if he But at the end of last season, 
years Withe waspensioned off to Second 
fWfl- Division Sheffield United, Turner 
an d’s went cruising in Lhe Medand Ri- 
estra- deout expected to assume tire man- 
liver-' tie, 

■acme It is not to, be. But don’t panic, 
1 for- chaps. Chairman Ellis, once a high- 
! that flying travel agent, has been sight- 
ed in Portugal where Andy Gray, 
dated in latter days Villa’s rampaging 
usive center forward, is relaxing. Ever- 
in the ion, for whom Gray proved an in- 


Tour de France 

MEN 

Ekveatti Skm 
Peotarller la A vortex 
IT9S KltomeTWS/WU Miles) 
l. Luis Herrera. Colombia. 5 noun, 19 min- 
utes. 4 seconds 

X Bernard KhiauH, France, a! 7 seconds 
behind leader 

X Pedro Defaado, Spain M 1:23 

4. Fable Parra, Colombta. at 1:41 

5. Gree LeMond. Ui- at 1:41 

«. Stephen Radio, inland, of 2:05 

7. Peter Wlrmeiw NeiberititHfe at 2:05 

8. Robert Millar. Britain, 04 3:39 
*. CetesHno Prieto, Saaln, al 3:02 

10. Paul Wdlonx BetaiDnvSanw Time 
IT. Phil Anderson. Aushtdta, S.T. 

IX Jaap ZoetoataUc. NeOwtentto, S.T. 

IX Jesus Radrtouaz^4oara. Spain, S.T. 


8. Damlntaue Damiard. France, at 4:39 

9. Phyllis Hines. Ui. at 4:43 
ia Cecils Odin, France, cm 7:05 

SL Louis 

overall Standees New Yon 

l.Marta Cantos. Italy. Hhourt. 23 minutes. Montreal 
34 seconds Otlcaaa 

2 JeanrUe Lanaa, France, al 1:52 behind PMIadelF 
X Manay Jams, Britain, at 6:05 Pittsburg 

4. Roberta Bananomlt Italy. at -7:Q& 

5. I me tan Oilanaa Italy, at 8:04 San Dies' 

6. Janellc Parks, U&. at B:3S Los Ansc 

7. Phyllis Hines, UJ- at B:53 Ctactnrrol 

X Cecils Odin. France, at 1:34 Houston 

9. Domtaktae DamtanL France, at 8:S7 • Attoita 

10. TutdDckl jatire, Sweden, al 9:58 Ban Fran 



w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Toranlo 

58 

32 

■414 

— 

Detroit 

45 

34 

.570 

m 

Now York 

43 

34 

.544 

5Vi 

Baltimore 

41 

31 

■519 

7V> 

Boston 

41 

40 

JOS 

Sfe 

MUwaukee 

34 

42 

M2 

12 

develimd 

24 

54 

jm 

22 


West Division 



Callfernta 

47 

34 

JR 

— 

Oakland 

42 

39 

31« 

5 

Kansas CJ)V 

41 

39 

J13 

5Va 

diloopa 

« 

38 

J13 

5Vj 

Seattle 

41 

40 

JDS 

4 

Minnesota 

34 

43 

.456 

10 

Texas 

31 

51 

-378 

1SV7 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 




Bast Division 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

SL Louis 

47 

32 

-595 

— 

NSW York 

45 

35 

Jd3 

2Vj 

Montreal 

44 

34 

J41 

7Vt 

Oitaaaa 

« 

38 

J2S 

SVl 

PMtaMMita 

34 

44 

AS0 

nta 

Pinsburgti 

27 

52 

J42 

20 


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San Diego 

48 

34 

J85 

— 

Las Angeles 

43 

34 

J44 

3ta 

Cincinnati 

41 

38 

J19 

5VS 

Houston 

41 

41 

J00 

7 

B 

1 

35 

45 

43B 

T2 

San Francisco 

31 

51 

on 

17 


(Repo larty scheduled Game) 
sea 820 381 208—8 14 8 

> B13 108 000-4 9 I 


PUtodetaMa 183 03f 704-7 31 2 

Hoestea BOB BOB 183—4 ID • 

Hudson. Carman (8), Tekutve (91 and Vlr- 
Bfl; Knudsan. Madden (8) caul Etallev. W— 
Hudson, 4-7. Lr-Kmidson. O-l. Sv— Tekulve 
(71. 


BlancpaiN 


Golf 


I be discrea. I know the feelings Both observations bear dated in latter days Villa’s rampaging _ 

I Italy after Brussels. No onebut grains of troth. Cowans, an elusive center forward, is reiaring. Ever- JIJEStSF ' 
you and 1 will know they are m and imaj^native creator, was on the ton, for whom Gray proved an m- a Gres teMond, united states, oi * mm- 
Bari... " threshold of international recogni- spired rough diamond, has a new 

However much that “call" dif- tion in 1983. Then his world col- £900,000 goakcorer in Gary Line- L Sean Kelly, iretand. at un 

rers rrom reality Paladini was on lapsed. Naples had almost sealed a kar. So Gray is up for grabs. a pwi AntemiL Ajattwia. at ub 

tond to tntrodnee Cowans and Ri- deal that would have enriched him Pre-planning by Villa’s wily J 

ieout the night Bari clinched pro- by £250,000, but pulled out after chairman? Maybe, maybe ooL Am- & wu Runtmann. swttownnd, at xu 

-motion. They apparently watched dismissing the general manager — bitious Portsmouth and well- 9. ^ ftath#r^otiL25 

> victory overF«ra ^disguised the same administrator, Franco -heeled PSV Eindhoven are on 13 p ° acal a man ' tTO,ca ' 150 


PGA Leaders 


s vacationers. Janich. who now runs Bari. uray s irau. oiuruu vuia miss out, 

y The Jialian press was slow to Weeks later, when Cowans was 1 hear there is an Italian waiter, a 
' dieve iL So was Graham Turner, on tour with Villa, his right leg was fan of the Claret and Blues as well 
:;.t«on Villa’s team manager. fractured in two places by a Mexi- as of Bari, who may know of a 
* Turner, genuinely on holiday re- can’s wicked foul. It was 12 months decent striker. ... 

^tging his batteries in Greece, before he resumed play, and even But it’s not Gianni Paladini. He 
. lied his playere had been given into the second year his old sparkle has a new role. His tip from Ban 
; ./mission to go to Bari. Since was so unreliable that his place was £50.000, and noil year be will 
: 'imer is the bossio the Villa play- with Villa was in doubt. serve as agent and imorpreter Tor 

;• g staff, that seemed to be that- So was Rideout’s. True, the lad Cowans and Rideout. The waiter 
r-:N« quite. There is. at Villa Park, had always stood out As a strap- has joined the jet set. 


Gray’s trail. Should Villa miss out, women 

1 bear there is an Italian waiter, a eum sto* 

fan of the Clarei and Blues as well iaww to awIb BI KHomatar*) 
as of Bari, wlo may know of a 

decent Striker. ... x joanula Longa. France 1:49:33 (IGcec- 

But it’s not Gianni Paladini. He ^ , „„ 

* a new role. His lip from Bari * 


Ltadcti wtae P i efonlBM U GcHcfiAMoei- 
oMM tour ttaowob the Conodka Ooeo. otdeh 
mbd Smdoy: 

EARNINGS 

1 . Curtis Straw 5520031 

X Loony WodfclRS 5X0332 

X Roy Floyd S32XS2S 

4. Corey Pnvln 530X385 

5. Mark OMsara 5291815 

& Calvin Paste sstijus 

7. Craig Stadtar - I27W1 

8. Bernhard Longer S237A35 

9. Hal Sultan 5244,983 

ML Fuizv Zoeller 530UM8 

II. Larry Min S19L9SB 

IX Tam Watson J179J83 

Il Roger MaHb ia 5179^9) 

14. Halt Irwin S1744C 

u. Tom Kile 517X244 

SCORING - 


l. Dan Pooler, nLKLX Corey Pavla. 7854. X 28.97. 


Grea Norman and Frad Couples, 2784. S. Greg 
Tiriggx 2717. 8 Sandy Lvle, mo. 7, Bill Gks- 
■ amri B0837X4.8TBM Purtxar r 372j£. 9, joey SlKW- 
lor, 27X1. 18 Two Had with Z71A 
DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1, Colvin Peete, *21. X Davta Edwards, m 
BWftmn ILornr Notaon, ,747. 4, Hale Irwin, J44.5.Dova 
ym?37 Tuwvlland Tim Ncrrl 1.754. 7, Mike RekLTK. 
muw 8 Jack Rennar. JSL 9. Wayne LovL 748 18 
guw,»w Torn Kit#, .741. 

5291815 BREENS IN REGULATION 

529X445 i, Bive* Ltataka, 731.x Jot* Nlcktaui,Jl9. 

S274J01 X Al GeBMran 1 , J97. 4. Corey Pavliw M. 5, 
5247,435 Colvin Prato. J01.4.JoftnMahaffeyand Rog- 
5344,983 er Malftrie, JOC. fl, Oous TewelL M9. 9, Mac 
5701 MS O'Grottv, ML 18 Dan PohL M. 

S1989SB AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 

5179J83 1. Frank Conner. 2858 X Babbv C teu tB Oi l. 

1179,550 2841. X Craig Stabler, 2844. 4, Morris Ho- 
5178402 tabkv.288X8CMOilRadrtguaz.28N.8Ken 
5178244 Green. 289X 7, Rav Flavd, 3894. 8 Mike Dan- 
aid. 2894. 9. Don Foramen and . Don Poo lev. 



Larry Mize. 7841. A Rav Flavd, 78488 Umv 


A Roberta BonanamI,ltalv,at 4:54 btflind wadkliw. 70JB. A Crete S«*fler. Tan 7, Tom 


;er Tor tattarr 

8 Many Janu. Britain, at 4-J7 
Wiula 8 itneMa CMaPoa. Italy, Of 5:43 
7. Janetta Peris. Ui, at 4:22 


PERCENTAGE OP SUB. PAR HOLES 
1. Grata siodtar, JI9. X Tam Watson. JJ1 X 




WDHan,789X8MarfcO*MMra.70.989,Ke(rti T»Oiung Oien and Lnnny wadklra, J07. 8 


Fergus, 71J8 18 Curtis Strange. 71.01. 
AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 


Larry mIm and Larrv Nelson, m 7.. Philip 
Btaekmar, SOL 8 Dan Pootav, Bernhard 


L Anav Bean, 277S.X Mac CGrady. 2754 X Longer and Fred Couples, JOT. 


HOROLOGISTS 

16 few Bond Sms Mayfair London Wl 
01-493 5916 






Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Spying for the Big Rubles 


By Russell Baker 
XT £W YORK — Tireless Red 
IN spy masters are toiling day and 
nig ht to ferret out Americans who 
want to make big bucks by ferret- 
ing out the United States’s most 
precious secrets for the Soviet 
Union. 

What is the one secret these Red 
spy masters mil pay top dollar to 
get their hands on? 1 made discreet 
inquiries in the treacherous world 
of high spy finance that put me in 
contact with a Soviet secrets broker 
known as “Big Buck the Buyer." 

“So you warn the big bucks," he 
said. 

“The very biggest" I replied. 
“Tell me what you consider top of 
the line, secretwise, and if the price 
is right Fll ferret it out." 

I was lying of course, but lying is 
all right when you deal with Red 
spy masters. 

“Why do you try to deceive Big 
Buck the Buyer with your childish 
little lies?" 

□ 

He was a winnin g devil all right. 
But nevertheless, polite. Even 
charming. 

“You know," he said, “a nice, 
decent fellow like you — I can tell 
right away that you're not ready yet 
for the big bucks. And you mow 
how 1 can tell?" 

Of course I didn't know. 

“You don't even have an agent," 
he said. 

Aha! He didn't know everything 
after all 

1 laid my cards on the table. 

“This is the card of my literary 
agent who gets 10 percent," I said. 
“This one is my lecture agent who 
gets 33Vj percent This one here is 
my insurance agent who gets — " 

“Bah! You waste my time," he 
said. “1 will do business only with 
your secrets agent" 

Yes, believe it or not there really 
are secrets agents, not to be con- 
fused with secret agents. Secret 
agents have numbers — X-9 and 
007, for example — while secrets 
agents are named Harry and take 
SO percent of everything their cli- 
ents get from Red spy masters. 

□ 

The 50 percent figure was shock- 
ing. I had refused to become a great 

painter after learning that gallery 
owners regularly cut themselves li- 
ons' shares of artists’ ea m ings.1 
certainly was not going to start sell- 


ing out the United States to keep 
some secrets agent eating high off 
the hog. 

“Suit yourself, tightwad," said 
Big Buck. “Now clear out of here. 
I’ve got a consortium of business- 
men due any minute to sell me the 
room numbers of the secret Capitol 
hideaways of the United Stales's 20 
most unscrupulous senators." 

“OK. Buck." I said, playing a 
hunch. Tm walking out and I'm 
taking the secret formula of the old 
Coca-Cola with me." 

His greedy eyes glinted. So this 
was the big-ticket item Moscow 
most desperately wanted, was it? 
The secret formula for the old 
Coca-Cola. "My price is 10 million 
rubles,” I said. Not that I knew 
what the ruble was worth, but later 
1 could look it up. 

Buck the Buyer was too canny, 
though, to talk money Immediate- 
ly. “Of course you don't have the 
formula on your person.” be 
mused. 

“Sure I have," I said. “I always 
tuck multimillion-ruble secrets m 
my suit so I can be tortured until 
Tm forced to tell which pocket Tm 
carrying them in. I'm also carrying 
a bottle of the secret fluid that 
Rambo uses for oiling his pector- 
als." 


From Big Buck's stunned expres- 
sion I could tell that my little 
Rambo joke was no joke at all to 
the Rus&kies. 

“The oil," said the spy master. 
“We have reason to suspect that 
some ingredient in the oil with 
which Rambo bathes his pectorals 
accounts for his curious indestruc- 
tibility. It is nonsense, of course — 
a human rendered indestructible 
by a secret oil applied to his pecto- 
ral muscles, and yet — " 

I knew what he wanted. Given a 
sample of Rambo's seem pectoral 
oil evil Soviet science could no 
doubt concoct a spray that would 
wash the oil from Rambo's bared 
chest if he dropped into Russia in 
midwinter to destroy the Red 
Army, and leave him to die of expo- 
sure. 

“You think Td really betray my 
country by helping you .to save die 
Red Army from Rambo?" I cried. 

“Ah, come off it,” said Big Buck. 
“It's just business, like everything 
else." 

New York Times Service 


Mono Kita 


'When One Is Defeated, He May Become Wiser,' 
Says Japanese Author of f House ofNire’Saga 


By Christine Chapman 


of Nire," owes us inspiration to Thomas 
Mann and its genius to its writer. Mono 
Kita. Fully translated into English last 
spring, 21 years after its 1964 publication, 
The House of Nire" is a modem social 
history of Japan from 1918 to 1946, from 
the end of World War I to the Allied 
occupation of the defeated nation after 
World War II. 

“Nire," which was praised by the writer 
Yukio Mishima as "one of the most impor- 
tant novels of the postwar period,” is a 
comedy on the grand scale, probing Japa- 
nese society through a variety of characters 
whose spirits parallel the fortunes of the 
country. 

The house of Nire is both a Tokyo family 
of three generations, with roots going back 
to a poor farmer in the Mdji era, and the 
mental hospital that they nm. Until it is 


destroyed during the war, the Imperial 
Mental Hospital with its bizarre assort- 
ment of patients and staff, serves as a 
metaphor for Japan. 

Kita, laughing, denies this: “My family 
was crazy, not the whole country!” 

His theory of chancier revolves around 
history. As a medical doctor who special- 
ized in psychiatry, be does not go so far as 
to say that history creates a character. But 
be believes that men are so strongly influ- 
enced by events that this influence shapes 
their nature. 

“There's a similar idea in Mann 's ‘Bud- 
denbrooks.’ ” said Kita, 58, a life-long ad- 
mirer of Mann. 

“The family weakens in time," he said 
during an interview at his hone in the 
neighborhood where ihe family hospital 
once stood. “Vigorous people were prod- 
ucts of the Meyi era, when Japan was 
developing rapidly. Today, in the Shows 
period, most people are ordinary. I wanted 
to describe the change from big to smalL I 
made my father, Tetsukichi in the novel a 
smaller personality than he was in life.” 

The two- volume “House of Nire,” exu- 
berantly translated by Dennis Keene, is 
based loosely cm the family of Mokichi 
Saito, Kita's father, who was a psychiatrist 
and a well-known traditional poet Kita 
was bom Sokichi Saito, the second son, in 
1927; in “Nire" be appears as Shujl a 
spiritless, postwar youth. 

His mother, Teruko Saito, who appears 
in the novel as the strong, unyielding 
Ryuko, was a world traveler who went to 
Antarctica and hoped to go to the moon. 
She died early this year at 90. 

The first son. a doctor who rebuilt the 
hospital after the war, appears in the book 
as Shun'ichl a survivor of Wake Island, fat 


from overeating American candy after al- 
most starring in the Pacific. 

“Thomas Maim believed that art is de- 
scribing the world through characteriza- 
tion,” said Kita. “When I thought about 
my family, starting with my grandfather, 
Kiichiro, the founder of Nire, there were so 
many strange people that I fdt I was de- 
scribing pan of Japan. 

“The characters are somewhat exagger- 
ated,” he admitted. “But Kiichiro was a 
typical Meiji man who loved things from 
abroad, like his German ‘Deleter Medicine' 
degree and a new Model T Ford. Shuji and 
Shun’iclu, his grandsons, represent the pe- ' 
riod immediately after the war when every- 
body was depressed. Each character is typi- 
cal of an era." 

The style of the 764-page novel also 
reflects the changing national mood as Ja- 
pan moved from its indifference to World 
War 1 toward great hopes for the future, to 
the patriotism of the 1930s, and, finally, 
the pathos of the postwar period. Kota 
juxtaposes the Nire family history with 
modem events, such as the devastating 
1923 Tokyo earthquake, the rising of To- 
kyo from its ashes to become a major world 
city, the growth of militarism, the forays 
into China and the subsequent war there, 
and the bombing of Pearl Harbor, which 
ends Volume L 

In Volume II the style shifts from bur- 
lesque and satire to black humor with poi- 
gnant overtones of tragedy. Between the 
Battle of the Coral Sea to the atomic bomb 
and the Russian invasion of Manchuria 
and Sakhalin in August 1945, the Nire 
family mirrors the psychological and phys- 
ical burdens of a defeated people. 

The selfish, second-generation hospital 
director, Tetsuldchl at 61 collects cann ed 
food and hoards it in a trunk that used to 
contain books; his teen-age daughter 
changes from an animated to a browing 
girl who loses half her face when she stum- 
bles on an un exploded bomb. 

The contrast of horror with dark humor 
is relentless in the second volume as Kita 
writes of ordinary matters in an extraordi- 
nary time. 


On Aug. 15, 1945, the day the emperor is 
to broadcast to the people, many flunk he 
win call for the final sacrifice of the Japa- 
nese in hand-to-hand combat with the ene- 
my on home sofl. What remains of the Nire 
family in Japan is working on the ancestral 
farm when the broadcast is announced. 
The hospital-director husband orders his 
wife to “dress yourself a bit smarter” for 
the historic broadcast She retorts: “You 
know I don't have a kimono left” 
Mono Kita entered medical school at 
Tohoku University in 1948 without much 
interest and passed the national qualifying 


examinations in 1953, the year his father 
died. In 1960 he received an M.D. for 
study of schizophrenia. Although he 
worked as a physician in his brother's hos- 
pital writing always came first While he 
was in his 30s Kita gave up medicine as a 
career in order to write roll-time. 

His sensitive exploration of the minds of 
characters in wartime is not the work of a 
psychiatrist, he insists, but of a writer. "I 
had no intention of doing it from a scientif- 
ic viewpoint, but it is possible that my 
stutfy of psychiatry was useful in exagger- 
ating character.” 

Since the English translation appealed. . 
Volume I last year and Volume II last 
spring, the creative imagination that in- 
vented a lively gallery of comic characters 
has earned Kita critical comparisons with 
Charles Dickens and Mark Twain — which 
pleases him. 

“The world thinks of the Japanese as 
people who don't understand humor,” 
Kita said, smiling. 

“1 long to be like Thomas Mann, but my 
humor may be more like Dickens's or 
Twain's: Thomas Mann, my teacher, wrote 
from intellect. I wrote from madness. 

“I am now not a doctor, but a patient.” 

Kita is notorious in Japan as a self- 
proclaimed manic-depressive. Kita has 
made the Japanese porase for “I am a 
manic-depressive" a sort of trademark by 
frequent public repetition. 

“In Japan.” he said with a grin, “nobody 
believes that Tm normal I go on television 
and sing badly and ten people I'm manic. I 
was raised in a hospital and so I know 
patients well I believe one shouldn't be 
afraid or ashamed of those people. So I 
told everyone I was a patient to take the 
prejudice off.” 

Although his behavior suggests that Kita 
is as sane as anyone, Japanese are con- 
vinced that he is abnormal. He recounts 
incidents from his life that sound amusing 
to an American but odd to Japanese. At 
one time Ik called his house and grounds 
“independent” from Japan so he would not 
have to pay taxes. He drew up obviously 
false currency with his picture on one side 
and a comic thief's on the other. He has 
written a lot about travel but seldom leaves 
Tokyo, though he has climbed a mountain 
in Pakistan and gone twice to the United 
States; on one trip he lost all his money in 
Las Vegas and the other he tried to cover 
an Apollo moon shot from Cape Canaver- 
al: “A Japanese paper sent me to report on 
it, but so many reporters were there that I 
called myself a ‘moon-beggar’ and tried to 
sell a pamphlet. BeforeNASA ran me off, I 
earned 75 cents;” he remembered gleefully. 

Of the 60 books he has written, Kita 
claimed, “90 percent are useless. Japanese 
writers write too many books.” 



OntM Chowan 

Mono Kita 

“The House of Nire," never out of prim, 
is in its 56th hardcover edition and 31st 
paperback. Total sales number more than 
1.5 million copies. Kita is also admired for 
his series of “Dr. Manbo" books, the half- 
fictional adventures of a young ship's doc- 
tor during a cruise to Europe. Based on 
Kita's seagoing intern experiences. “Dr. 
Manbo's Voyage" and “Dr. Manbo’ s Re- 
cord of Youth and Love” became best- 
sellers in the 1960s. 

“Mono Kita was my idol in high 
school" said Hiroshi Ishikawa, a 31 -year- 
old press relations official of the Foreign 
Press Center! “To my generation, ‘Dr. 
Manbo’ was a must We were the genera- 
tion after the student riots. We had no 
major causes. Maybe we were like the 
manbo, a lazy fish that sleeps on the waves 
and doesn’t wake.” 

Kita considers the 1954 “Ghosts" his 
“most sensitive” book since it deals with 
the deaths of his father, sister and friends. 
His only book other than “Nire” to have 
been translated into English is a children's 
story. 

He recently completed a novel about the 
first Japanese immigrants to Brazfl. “Un- 
der the Shining Blue Sky” contrasts their 
slave-like conditions to the beauty of their 
new country. like “The House of Nire,” 
die new novel begins in the Mdji period 
and ends after the war. It will be published 
this autumn by Sbinchosa. the Tokyo com- 
pany that brought out “Nire." 

futa regards the coming end-of-the-war 
anniversary with equanimity. “It’s worth 
celebrating," he said. ‘Tfs the longest 
peace period since Meyi. 

“When one is defeated, he may become 


PEOPLE 


Tax-Exile Borg Plans 
To Return to Siveden 

Bjorn Borg. 29. says he «il! leave 
the tax haven of Monaco this an? 
luirn: and move bock to his home- 
land and its heavy tax burden be- 
cause "my heart beats for Sweden." 
Borg's fiancee. Jaisnke Bjatfing, 
18. who is from Stockholm, is rt- 
pecting a child in the fall The re- 
tired teams pro. whose fortune has 
been estimated at more than S6Q 
million, moved to Monte Carlo in 
the mid 1970s. He and Bjorling are 
vacationing on the Baltic blond of 
Gotland. 


Frank Sinatra Jr. says the 
“Doonesbury" comic strips about 
his father weren't funny, but didn't 
deserve censorship. The episode bv 
the cartoonist Garry Trudeau ques- 
tioned the elder Sinatra's receipt of 
die Medal of Freedom and made 
references to organized crime. “Tm 
very sorry Mr. Trudeau did some* 
thing so cruel, and it wasn't funny, 
either the younger Sinatra said 
during a stop "in the Detroit area far 
concerts Monday and Tuesday. 
“At the same time; I don’t believe 
the strip should be squelched. We 
don't wont to sun burning books 
in this country.” 


Billy Joel who says that as a kid 
he considered killing himself, plans 
to donate profits from his new sin- 
gle to help suicidal teen-agers, The 
song, “You're Only Human (Sec- 
ond Wind).” Is about teen suicide. 
Profits will go to the National 
Committee for Youth Suicide Pre- 


A Texas photographer who says 
he took nude shots of Madonna 
before the rock singer became a 
household name has woo a court 
order temporarily restraining Pent- 
house magazine from publishing 
the photos. The photographer. 
Herman Knfkens, and his wife, Su- 
san. said in federal court in New 
York that they were negotiating 
with Penthouse and its chief rival 
Playboy, when Penthouse sent Kul- 
kens a check for S 25.000 even 
though they had reached no formal 
agreement. Kulkens said Playboy 
had offered to pay at least double 
any Penthouse offer. When Pent- 
house learned of Playboy's interest 
it sent a back-dated check and let- 
ter claiming it had an agreement 
with them, the couple said. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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from about USS50.00Q. Mortgages at 
6Wfc iidereti. Rease wit or phone 

H. SEBOID SJl 

Tour Grim 6. 0+1007 Lausanne. 
Tol 21/25 26 It. Lugano 91/68 76 48 



CHAMPS BYSKS 

STUDIOS. Comfortable 
Beta, telephone, color TV. riwrt term 
leme ct redly by owner; F4^00/moi* 
ehcegw inducted. Visit 33 rye Martouf. 
Ptari* a Td 3» 65 81. 


81 AVEFOCH 

Unariowi Stolen 

Phone, color TV, ktehaa *prt term 
leoae. No aoency f^RSOCVVnorth. 
Veit today. Tet 574 82 57. 


74 CHAMPS-aYSffS 8th 

Slutfa, 2 or 3*ooffl optrtnenL 
One month or more. 

IE CLAMDGE 359 67 97. 


SHOUT TBIM STAY. Advantages dl a 
hotel mahout mconwniencm, leal at 
home in nice shadow one bedroom 
and mare in Para. SQRBJM 80 run 
de lUnivet^ flora 78*544 3940 



NEUMY SB.' 

townhouse, 2 raaritom. 4 bedroom, bedroom, Evmg, beta, Idtchan. Tet 
2 benhw garden, I 5 *, 000. 5hort term. 6345525 

Tet 380 4033 &E ST. LOUIS. Magrafkeni duplex on . 


SHOUT -LONG TOM 
OATS KM SAVE 


MOVING 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 

Offices Worldwide 

PAHS 131 036 63 11 
LONDON (01) 578 66 IT 

HAST CLASS SERVICE 





International Business Message Center 




BUSINESS BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES OPPORTUNITIES | OPPORTUNITIES 





JULY 15th ISSUE 
ON SALE JULY 8fh 


t BUSINESS WEEK 

BUSINESS I 

OPPORTUNITIES | INTERNATIONAL 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

bioorporatiofi and imuuuvmf in UK, 
Me of Man, Turt Angufln, Chamd 


_____ _ OFFSHORE SERVICES 

MONEY TREES ? UK- non random companies. 

Nominee dj redon & be arer shore*. 

TEH Invest in one af Americas most 

Ptnamo & Utorian companies. 
Oflshoe ba*. 


blonds. Pan 
map other 


81 (near Opera). 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 



KALGARY 

(BrMah Colombia) 

2 APAKTMMTS (good income) 
the lot: Ccrodcni S190.000. 
MGLATZFBDER 

BP 103, MOUTfER (274)) Switzerland. 


CARIBBEAN 



17 % - 20 % 
FIXED INCOME 
PER ANNUM 

m DON'T HAVE TO BECAUSE 
WE BEUEVE WE CAN OFFER 

MORE! 

We tare a major container leasing com- 
pany (founded 1973) unth an eio etem 
rccod of return & service far our rf- 
ents. We are currently mona an g a^r 
17.000 containers far over ZQ0Q clients. 
WE HAVE OVER 

$36 MILLION 


AND AN ANNUAL TURNOVER 
M EXOSS OF 

$15 MILLION 

If you are considering at investment n 
contai n er s mm suggeo you contact h 
before mdung your dsasoti 

WE PAY OUR CLIENTS 

QUARTERLY 

A GROSS DOLLAR MCOME 

SHIRLSTAR 


• Living With 
Disinflation 

• Can Citicorp 
Challenge European 
Banks on Their 
Own Turf? 

• A Shakeup In Moscow 
As Gorbachev Grids 
For The Geneva Summit 

NOW ON SALE 

AT ALL INTERNATIONAL 


• Confidential advice 

• Iraratfiate avteVjbtty 

• Noumea services 

• Bearer shares 

• Aoccxmtang & adtiBraSrcSion 

• Med, tel ep hon e & telex 
boaldet front 



London Bucsenbte 
2 S Old Bond SL. London W1 
Tel 01-493 4244, Tbc 28247 SCSLDN G 


£l : 


GREAT BRITAIN 








y.CJL. 17 WUegate St, London 
E17HP7TeL01 3771474.Tbul93911 G 


LONDON 

CITY 

1 Year Lease Available 
PRIME LOCATION 


MAJOB ILS. TEXTHE COMPANY 
Seeks agenh/tfctrSwSori to id woven 
fibergfag for ete dtied pnd 

msine inBib&M. Aha, inrsd screening 
and (Dated yams, scrims far antra 
and jaminaling. Send ful delated quat- 
fa di otH on your letterhead to Bax 
2438, Herrfd Tribune, 92521 NeuBy 
Cedw. France 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 

Rntme tein en l Temporary & permanent 
raadmavaas; «t up bmm in USA 
Iramrar key pnomei, npatd yqur ex- 
Wing bunas. Write for free info to 
Alterney David Hrsvn, 14795 Jeffrey 
irvme^CA 92714 USA. 
7T4/651-805ft tfao ?J90I94. 


Al Am en Wee, Ftf 
Attractive Price 
Tefc 01-628 


Furnished 



$100 MJLUON to 10 b*on raed a*- 
Ideroi from world prime bank guar- 
antees. Sand adtnE etc. to rack 
Griegp, Karl Jaharagr IX Roam 60S, 
OdoT Norway. TKWtttt - N. M 
02 - 421718 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 
INSURANCE 

Maing • Telephone - Teles 
•• Full seaefcnd services 
Wo of Man, Jersey, Gvemesy, 
Grbctor, Panama. Liberia. 


KOMOnON SERVICES 

Publdty - Advertising.- M drt e ting • 
Tedimari fitting for tomp oti atteafana 
■to do business inlfiA. Oor Tfth war 3 
fast, ratable service. Contact; Robert S. 
Vtant, Preridert, Wbat Pubtshiog Qtate 
gan ^ l fl t K 5L. N.W, Wadengtqn . 

(202} 783-1887, Waafabnlan DX. 
J212J 925-1997 NYC 
Teh* 3725487 Afl IB ‘ 


COMPtm UX. OfHCE 
. W1ASI8NBTON, D.C . 

• Fufl support swicn mdudng 

• Umowine tanpartotiaa - 

• Corporate n ep r cemlafta ri mrvix. 

OembmUneeCater 
1025 Itean Jefhnan St., N.W. 
WtaWnahm. D.C 20007 
TEL 202/444-3600 
- TlX -289S63 JCWA4JR - 


Fm «piancta»y 63 £l 
float ra^ttratians 
London mprewnranue 

Asian Company farmariom 

“SS'MrfetSsW’ 

BIO Or Man, 10: 0624 26Sn 

Trie* 627691 5 FIVA G 





CONSULTANT - THAJLATO 
EwtoM" w*" U yean (mines expen- 
enee m lhaiand undonahn: 

* Atartatstorfai + etentifioation of 
netdble nrparfm / distributors 



OFFICES FOR RENT 


nm?? 


• Buying agent 

* pro ject mxfas. ipedcfam g 
w cioOtrongs 

f* RoWtJltoia