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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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Dutch 
Protest to 
S. Africa 

Pretoria Police 
Arrest Man at 
Embassy Entry 

Cmpihrdfa 0w Stuff Fnw Dispatches 

PRETORIA —The government 
of the Netherlands has formally 
protested to South Africa over the 
recapture of a Dutch citizen by 
armed South African police at the 
Dutch Embassy in Pretoria, the 
embassy said Thursday. 

The South African government 
acknowledged that an incident 
took place Tuesday but said that 
there were “conflicting accounts of 
what exactly happened" and de- 
fended the police action as consis- 
tent with international law. 

The Netherlands said three 
South African policemen had en- 
tered the embassy in violation of 
principles of diplomatic immunity 
to recapture Kiaas de Jonge. who 
was trying to escape from their cus- 
tody. He has been held without 
charges since June 23 under South 
Africa's Internal Security Act. 
which allows indefinite detention 
without trial. 

The South African foreign minis- 
ter. R.F. Botha, said Thursday that 
Mr. de Jong was suspected of help- 
ing set up arms caches for the Afri- 
can National Congress, which is 
banned in South Africa and is 
pledged to overthrow white-minor- 
ity rule. 

"There certainly was no inten- 
tion on the pan of the South Afri- 
can police to violate the inviolabil- 
ity of the Netherlands Embassy," 
Mr. Botha said. “South Africa fuHy 
respects the applicable principles 
of international law governing the 
inviolability of diplomatic pre- 
mises." 

The South African ambassador 
in The Hague. David Louw. was 
summoned by the Dutch foreign 
minister. Haris van den Broek. on 
Wednesday to receive a sluing pro- 
test. a Netherlands Embassy 
tp>-kesman in Pretoria said. West- 
ern diplomats in South Africa de- 
scribed the violation of embassy 
immunity as very serious. 

The embassy spokesman. Jaco- 
bus van der Velden. said that Mr. 
de Jonge had rushed into the em- 
bassy in handcuffs after escaping 
from the police. 

"Three policemen entered the 
embassy and they grabbed him." 
Mr. Van der Velden said. As the 
man was taken away he shouted. 
"I’m KJaas de Jonge.’* the spokes- 
man said. 

Mr. de Jonge. 47. an amhropolo- 



J uni us R_ Jayawardene 

Sri Lanka 
Foils Effort 
To Murder 
Jayawardene 

By Stuart Auerbach 

U'as/ungian Pan Service 

NEW DELHI — The Sri Lan- 
kan authorities said Thursday that 
they bad foiled an attempt by Tam- 
il separatists to assassinate Presi- 
dent Junius R. Jayawardene in Co- 
lombo. 

The potential assassins had 
planted explosives near the presi- 
dent's office, the officials saia, but 
the attempt would have failed any- 
way because Mr. Jayawardene was 
ill and did not show up for work 
Thursday. 

The aborted assassination at- 
tempt was seen here as an effort to 
sabotage conciliation talks between 
the government and the Tamils, 
who are seeking their own nation. 
Edam. 

Separatist violence has increased 
over the past two years and has 
brought Sri Lanka to the brink of 
civil war. 

The Sri Lankan authorities 
blamed (he assassination attempt 
on the Eelam Revolutionary Orga- 
nization of ‘Students, one of five 
Tamil separatist organizations 
meeting with government officials 
in Bhutan The group was formerly 
known as the Eelam Revolutionary 
Organizes 

In the southern Indian city of 
Madras, where separatist organiza- 
tions maintain their headquarters, 
a spokesman for the Eelam Revolu- 
tionary Organization of. Students 
denied that his group had anything 
to do with the assassination at- 
tempt. 

“This is a trick by the Sri Lankan 


FAS SAT 


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(Continued on Page 2, Col 2) (Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


U.S. Vote Would Allow 
Aid to Rebels in Angola 


U ^ : v . 


Washington Post Serine 

WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives has voted to end 
a nine-year prohibition on U.S. 
military assistance to guerrillas 
righting the Marxist government of 
Angola. The Senate took simiiar 
action last month. 

Wednesday's vote in the House 
was 236- 185." with 176 Republicans 
and 60 Democrats in favor of lift- 
ing the ban on aid. and 6 Republi- 
cans and 179 Democrats opposed. 

As recently as 1981 the House 
IV opposed repealing the ban. known 
as the Clark amendment, and 
opening the door to possible new 
U.S. involvement in Angola. Legis- 
lators now appear to be in a sterner 
mood on military and foreign-po- 
licy issues and more eager to assist 
anii-Communisi insurgency groups 
around the world. 

The House voted earlier this 
week to provide overt assistance for 


^ INSIDE 

n v ■ Israeli officials are deeply di- 
:;i ^ vided over if, and how. ihey 
should maintain the security 
• •’ zone in south Lebanon. Page 1 

I The U.S. Army has been 
urged to cancel its plans for five 
v new light divisions as a budget- 

*- V ;fI trimming step. Page 3. 


Page 3. 


■ Secretary of State Shultz ex- 
pressed U.S. support for an 

| Asian proposal for indirect 
talks on Cambodia. Page 5. 

■ North Korea ix a workers' 

! state with little time for lovers, 
hut a visitor caught glimpses of 
a lighter side. Page 5. 

WEEKEND 

■ Akvin Nikolais his dances, 
dancers' and disciples, were 
spotlighted at At v-en-Pro- 
tence’s dance festival. Page “!• 

BUSINESS/ FINANCE 

■ Mexico has sharply cut crude 


^ * Mexico has sharply cut crude 

$Qtl p* -jjj; oil prices in reaction to OPEC's 
failure to shore up sagging oil 
y prices worldwide. Page 1 1. 


the first tune to non-Communist 
groups fighting Vietnamese forces 
in Cambodia. The House reversed 
itself last month and agreed to pro- 
vide aid to insurgents fighting the 
leftist government in Nicaragua. 

The new amendment on Angola 
was sponsored by Representative 
Samuel S. Stratton. Democrat of 
New York, and is attached to the 
1986 U.S. foreign aid bill. It does 
not provide military aid to any 
group, but gives the Reagan admin- 
istration the authority to request it. 

Four years ago when the admin- 
istration mounted a drive to repeal 
the Clark amendment, adopted in 
1976. a number of African nations 
spoke against such a move. They 
said it would harm U.S. relations 
with black'Africa and hamper U.S. 
efforts to bring about the indepen- 
dence of South-West -Africa, also 
known as Namibia, because the 
government of neighboring Angola 
was a key element in the negotia- 
tions. 

The Clark amendment named 
after Dick Clark, who was a Demo- 
cratic senator from Iowa, was 
adopted after the Vietnam War in 
response to revelations that the 
CIA had provided covert military 
aid to pro-Western groups fighting 
Marxist nationalist forces during 
1 975 and 1976 in the midst of a civil 
war in Angola. 

Die administration favors repeal 
of theOark amendment, but White 
House officials have said there 
were no immediate plans to request 
military or other aid for ihe Na- 
tional Union for the Total Inde- 
pendence of Angola, or UNITA. 
Led by Jonas Savimbi. the group is 
fighting Angola's Cuban-backed 
government. 

Meanwhile, the Senate voted, 88- 
S. Wednesday to limit a potential 
filibuster by conservatives over leg- 
islation imposing sanctions on 
South Africa. 

■ Aid fo Mozambique Limited 

The House of Representatives 
voted. 247-177. Thursday to limit 
aid to Mozambique pending re- 
moval of Soviet military advisers 
rmm the southern African country. 
The Associated Press reported 
fmm Washington. 



(tribune 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


PARIS, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


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Uranium 
For Israel 
Is Blocked 

Atomic Agencies 
Uncover Transfer 
Via Luxembourg 

By Sreven J. Dryden 

Washington Post Service 

BRUSSELS — A Luxembourg 
metals company, acting in viola- 
tion of international safeguards, 
sold Israel close to 47 tons of urani- 
um last year that could be used for 
nuclear weapons production, Euro- 
pean Community officials said 
Thursday. 

Luxembourg has since pledged 
to block further sales. 

Israel allowed inspectors from 
the Vienna-based International 
Atomic Energy Agency to examine 
a major pan of ine uranium ship- 
ment and agency officials said they 
were satisfied that the material ob- 
tained through Luxembourg was 
not used to make nuclear weapons, 
the EC officials said. 

Israel is believed to haw the ca- 
pability to make nuclear weapons, 
but it has '□ever acknowledged pos- 
sessing the devices. 

Die shipment to Israel was dis- 
covered in May 1984 by officials of 
Euratom, the European Communi- 
ty agency that directs the EC atom- 
ic energy program and monitors 
trade in nuclear materials among 
the 10 member states, according to 
an EC spokesman. Fabio Cola- 
santi. 

The Euratom officials found that 
a private Luxembourg metals trad- 
ing company imported about 40 
tons of depleted uranium from 
Britain and about seven tons or 
depleted uranium from France, 
and resold the material to Israel 
without notifying Euratom. Mr. 
Colasanti said. 

Officials would not identify the 
company. 

The depicted uranium can be 
used to make weapons- grade mate- 
rial. but only through a difficult 
costly process, Mr. Cofasami said. 
The Luxembourg authorities took 
the position that since the depleted 
uranium is not normally used for 
making nuclear weapims. they were 
not obligated under international 
agreements to notify Euratom. he 
said. 

Euratom officials said, however, 
that international rules on the trade 
of such material were unambigu- 
ous. The Luxembourg officials 
"understand now that they have 
made a mistake and they won't 
repeat it," Mr. Colasanti said. 

The shipment first came to light 
in the 1984 annual report of the 

(Continued on Page Z CoL 8) 




Russian Asserts 
Arms-Cut Offer 
Means Warheads 




5&- 





TESTIMONY — Sergei 1. Antonov, a Bulgarian on trial in Rome on charges of 
dotting to kill Pope John Paul U, talking to lawyers from his courtroom cage. On 
Thursday, he denied the allegations in a face-to-face confrontation with Mehmet All 
Agca. the Turk already serving a life sentence for shooting the pope in 1981. Page 2. 

Airliner’s Undamaged Flight Recorder 
Is Retrieved From Atlantic by Robot 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

.Vrti- York Times Service 

LON DON — An underwater ro- 
bot Thursday retrieved the flight 
data recorder of an Air-lndia jum- 
bo jet from the seabed off Ireland, 
giving investigators an improved 
chance of discovering wny the 
plane crashed with the loss of 329 
lives last month. 

Commander Sunil Kulknari. the 
leader or the Indian investigating 
team, said that both the recorder, 
which contains information on the 
aircraft > speed, altitude and head- 
ing. and the cockpit voice recorder, 
brought up Wednesday, were un- 
damaged. He said they would be 
flown to Bombay within two days 
for study there. 

The chief investigator for the Ca- 
nadian Civil Aviation Safety 
Board, Pierre de Niverville, said it 
could take several weeks before the 
recorders were decoded, depending 
on the condition of the Uifws. 

Mr. de Niverville. who is taking 
part in the investigation because 
the Boeing 747 was en route Trom 
Canada to India when it plunged 
into the Atlantic on June 23 with- 


out warning, said the tapes might 
not show anything. Speaking to re- 
porters in Cork. Ireland, where the 
search was coordinated, the Cana- 
dian expert said: 

“If there was a sudden electrical 
failure, they would give us nothing, 
since they operate off the plane's 
power system. But if the plane look 

The robot that retrieved record- 
ers from the Air-lndia jet has 
many talents. Page 3. 

.•kime time to break un. then we 
should get quite* a hit of informa- 
tion. such as the reactions of the 
crew members, the sounds of ihe 
engines and any communications 
with ground control personnel." 

No real clues have emerged as to 
the cause of the disaster, the worst 
to lake place at sea in the history of 
civil aviation. Some officials be- 
lieve that a bomb was planted 
aboard the plane, possibly by a 
Sikh opponent of the Indian gov- 
ernment but others suggest that 
the aircraft was disabled by a struc- 
tural failure or some human error. 

The recorders were brought up 


by the American-built submersible 
Scarab, which is operated by a Brit- 
ish company. Cable and Wireless 
Ltd. It was launched from ihe 
French cable-laying ship Leon 
Thevenin and opera led in water a 
mile and a quarter (two kilometers) 
deep, a record depth for a salvage 
operation of this son. 

Using hydraulically operated 
Steel claws at the ends of extend- 
able arms, the robot picked up the 
flight recorder, known as a “black 
box." from a spot a quarter of a 
mile front where the voice recorder 
had been found 24 hours earlier. 

According to Commander Kul- 
kami. a detailed sonar and photo- 
graphic survey or the wreckage on 
the floor of the Afbniic will contin- 
ue for some time. Evidence pro- 
duced in thus way. together with 
forensic tests on bodies already re- 
covered and examination of bits of 
wreckage, could also help in solv- 
ing the mystery or the crash. 

The investigation, in which spe- 
cialists from a number or countries 
have cooperated, already is be- 
lieved to have cost S5 miliion. 


By Leslie H. Gelb 

viw York Times Seri n e 

WASHINGTON — A senior 
Soviet general has told a U.S. legis- 
lator that Moscow’s offer to reduce 
strategic nuclear forces by 25 per- 
cent or more applies to missile war- 
heads as well as to missiles. 

The significance of such an offer 
is that a reduction in missiles alone 
could leave each side free to in- 
crease its warheads by adding more 
warheads to each permitted missile. 

Representative Stephen J. So- 
larz, a Democrat of New York, said 
Wednesday that this position was 
stated to mm and an aide in Mos- 
cow on July 3 by Colonel General 
Nikolai F.‘ Chefvov. the head of 
arms control for the Soviet general 
staff. 

The statement to Mr. Solarz was 
the first indication that the propos- 
al made by Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
the Soviet leader, two months ago 
was intended to cover reductions 
not just in missiles but also in war- 
heads. 

Administration officials said 
Wednesday that nothing of the 
kind had been conveyed officially 
by the SovieL side. They said that 
the Soviet Union had yet to make a 
formal presentation in Geneva of 
Mr. Gorbachev's offer for a 25- 
percent reduction in nuclear forces. 

The officials added that since 
President Ronald Reagan had also 
been calling for reductions in war- 
heads and missiles, such a Soviet 
proposal would be a step forward. 

Mr. Sol arz also said that General 
Chervov took a more flexible line 
than the official Soviet position on 
insp^rtions to enforce a ban on 
chemical weapons and on allowing 
research on a space-based missile 
defense system, which the Reagan 
administration calls the Strategic 
Defense Initiative. 

To U.S. analysts, the Solarz- 
C'hcrvov conversation seems to be 
pan of an emerging pattern of So- 
viet diplomatic feelers and sound- 
ings. well short of official changes 
in position, as both sides prepare 
for a meeting in November be- 
tween Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorba- 
chev. Soviet strategy, as these ana- 
lysts see it. is to see what the United 
Stales might be prepared to offer in 
return before making new propos- 
als formally. 

According to Mr. Solarz's ac- 
count , General Chervov said the 
Soviet Union was not seeking to 
ban all research on a defense sys- 
tem in space. He quoted (he general 
as having said: 

"There are two stages to research 
and development: drawing of a 




w 


m . * 



: 




Csnr'a P-«n 

General Nikolai F. Chervov 

plan and building of prototypes." 

The ban the Russians arc report- 
edly seeking would apply "just to 
prototypes," Mr. Solarz said. 

Senate sources who were in Ge- 
neva last week fora briefing on the 
arms talks said that U.S. negotia- 
tors had told them of similar mes- 
sages conveyed informally by the 
Soviet negotiators two weeks ago. 

One Senate source said the U.S. 
negotiators “told us about it but 
said they did not take it seriously 
because it was made on a second- 
ary level." 

'Wednesday, a Soviet spokesman 
in Geneva labeled as ‘‘incorrect" a 
report in The New York Times and 
other newspapers that Soviet nego- 
tiators had informally sought to 
draw a distinction between labora- 
tory research, which would be ac- 
ceptable. and development and 
testing, which would be banned. 

Administration officials who 
know or the informal Geneva con- 
versations speculated that the Sox i- 
« statement reflected an unwilling- 
ness to give anything away without 
first gening ar. informal response 
from the United States. 

The officials said a Suite Depart- 
ment denial of the report reflected 
the fact that U.S. negotiators had 
not yet officially reported to Wash- 
ington on the conversations. 

Mr. Solarz said General Chervov 
had attached several conditions to 
his statement about the proposed 
force reductions. They were that 
each side would be free to make 
cuts in missiles, bombers and sub- 
marines as each saw fit: that the 
new ceilings would include U.S. 

(Continued on Page 2, Col. 4) 



U.S. Woman Confined 42 Years Gets $235,000 


mac 

7t» tacoMd Pres 


Gladys Burr with her attorney, Richard Altschuler, won 
compensation because her civil rights had been violated. 


By James Brooke 

New York Time* Service 

STAMFORD. Connecticut — Gladys 
Burr never knew why she had been.commil- 
led. and she never knew why she Ijiati been 
released 

Miss Burr was committed in January 1936, 
when she was 29 and living with her family in 
Connecticut. She was first diagnosed as psy- 
chotic and then declared mentally retarded. 

For 42 years she remained in the custody of 
the slate, at the Mansfield Training School 
for the retarded and in a succession of state- 
controlled boarding homes. 

Several times she w-rote neatly penned let- 
ters, according to her attorney, to state offi- 
cials asking for freedom. “I am not happy 
here," one letter said in the 1940s. “and don’t 
get along too well with the kids here." Some- 
times. she charges, she was beaten and sub- 
jected to other cnielty. 

In 1978, convinced that she had never been 
retarded. Connecticut officials gave Miss 
Butt her freedom. .And on Wednesday, a 
federal judge approved a settlement awarding 
Miss Burr, now 78 years old. 5235.000 in 
compensation. 

“1 won because God is on my side — He 
got me out of tbene." said Miss Burr, a dimin- 
utive woman who lives now in a convalescent 
home. "I asked lo gel out of there so many 


times, but they didn’t respond, they didn't 
seem lo care." 

In 1979 her lawyer. Richard Altschuler, 
filed a suit against a group of state mental- 
health officials asking $125 million and con- 
tending that they had deprived her of her civil 
rights and bad' subjected her to slavery. 

“It was obvious they forgot about her." 
Mr. Altschuler said. “'You can’t give back 
those .42 yeans. She could have married, had 
children.” 

Under the settlement, approved by Chief 
Judge T. Emmet Clairie or federal district 
court in Hartford, the state will pay Miss 
BurT $ 160.000 and will waive $75.GuO in med- 
ical costs incurred for the treatment of a 
broken hip that she suffered in 1983. 

Most of the officials responsible for Miss 
Butt’s confinement have died or retired. 
None was in court Wednesday. 

Miss Burr was first committed on the rec- 
ommendation of her mother and her family 
doctor, a cousin. Thar could not happen to- 
day. state officials say. because involuntary 
commitment would have to be approved by 
the probate court. 

In the years that followed, a succession of 
mental tests, some now outdated, gave con- 
tradictory results. 

State officials say Miss Burr had never 
made it clear before" 1%8 that she wanted to 
leave. “She only asked to get out once, and 


that was when she was in a boarding house, 
but she changed her mind the next day." said 
Francis MacGregor, an assistant attorney 
general, who represented the officials. 

“None of the defendants had actual knowl- 
edge that she wanted to get out." Mr. Mac- 
Gregor said. 

But Mr. Altschuler said she made requests 
in at least three letters during the 1940s. 

“I don’t want to live if things don’t change 
for me." she wtoic in one. her attorney said. 
“Please let me know" 

For Miss Bun. four decades of confine- 
ment began in January 1936. when she was 
committed to Norwich HospitaL 

Tests at the hospital indicated that she was 
psychotic and mildly retarded, with an intelli- 
gence quotient of 57. Little note was taken of 
the fact that she had completed two years of 
high school and a three-month business 
course. 

Six months later, doctors at Norwich pro- 
nounced her cured and said her IQ was 82. 

But on July 10. 1936. Miss Burr was trans- 
ferred to the Mansfield Training School, a 
residential center for the mentally retarded in 
Mansfield Depot. 

At Mansfield, she scored 20 points higher 
on IQ tests — a rare occurrence. Tested even 
five years from 1946 to 1961. her scores 
ranged from 99 lo 104. 

Mansfield, which now has 674 patients. 

(Continued on Page 2, Col. 6) 


Experts Deny Tokyo Curbs Cause U.S. Gap in Trade 


By Hobart Rowcn 

Wu'/ruigfiD finf %nir 

WASHINGTON — A study of U.S.-Japa- 
nese economic problems, conducted by the 
Institute of International Economics, asserts 
that each country has roughly equivalent 
barriers to trade. 

It attributes trade tension between the two 
countries to policies distorting the relation- 
ship between the dollar and the yen. 

This was the first time that a respceled 
economic research organization such as the 
institute had suggested that the levels of 
protectionism in the United States and Ja- 
pan were approximately equal. 

The report was prepared by C. Fred Berg- 
xten, the institute’s director, who was a Trea- 
sure Department official under President 
Jifrimy Carter, and William R. Cline, a senior ' 
fellow. 

It called on the United Stales to cut the 
federal budget deficit by at least SI 50 billion 
annually by 1988 and to work, actively for 
lower exchange rates for the dollar. 

The institute is a privately funded, inde- 


pendent organization. Its director is known 
as an advocate of free trade. 

To reinforce the effort to bring the dollar 
down, the report urged Japan to lake supply- 
side measures to boost us own economy, 
thereby strengthening the yen. 

The report, outlined al a seminar held 
Wednesday for government and industry of- 
ficials. was immediately challenged by a 
spokesman for (he Reagan administration. 

Gaza Fekeiekuly. senior assistant U.S. 
trade representative, said the assertion “that 
the Untied States and Japanese economies 
are about equally protected jdst doesn't 
wash." 

He said the report “could reduce the in- 
centive for the Japanese to make reforms and 
get rid of protectionism." 

Mr. Fekelekuty's remarks were endorsed 
hy the Commerce Department's trade nego- 
tiator. Clyde Prenowitz. who said that the 
U5. and Japanese concepts of market 
“openness" did not match. 

A farmer Commerce Department under 
secretary. Lionel Olmer. saia the report was 
a “magnificent treatise." But he added that 


its suggestion that U.S. and Japanese mar- 
kets were equally protected “would be 
laughed out or court." 

“Japan has the responsibility to take ex- 
traordinary measures to reduce its surplus- 
es," Mr. dimer said. He called on Tokyo to 
take “some visible action" that might head 
off protectionist responses. 

Japan had the biggest surplus of any na- 
tion trading with the United Stales last year 
— $36.8 billion. But when ranked according 
to the percentage of the total trade, the 
report said, it was only the fifth largest, 
exceeded by Romania. Taiwan. Brazil and 
Hong Kong. 

The study costs doubts on the effective- 
ness — in terms of reducing the trade deficit 
— of efforts to get Japan to lake more 
import!^ or to change the structure of its 
industrial and distribution system. 

“There are no grounds for blunderbuss 
retaliation steps, by Europe or the United 
States, against Japan for supposedly grossly 
unfair trade practices." Mr. Bergsten said. ’ 

He specifically said that there was “no 
basis" for a proposed 2(J-percent import sur- 


charge. which is gaining support in Congress 
among both Democrats and Republicans. 

Nonetheless. Senator Max Baucus. a 
Democrat of Montana, predicted: 

“Congress is gening close ro that critical 
point where we are going lo start enacting 
retaliatory measures, and T fear they won’t be 
as constructive as they should be." 

Mr. Bcrgslen and Mr. Cline said that even 
if Japan dropped "all overt and intangible" 
barriers to trade, its trade surplus with the 
U.S. — which may hit J50 billion — would 
be trimmed by no more than $5 to $6 billion. 

Commenting on the call by Mr. Olmer. the 
former pommerce Department official, for 
“visible uction." Peter Sato, economies min- 
ister at the Japanese Embassy in Washing- 
ton. responded that the perception in Japan 
was that the government’s efforts to stimu- 
late imports and drop nontariff barriers were 
regarded as revolutionary. 

“When we are asked by our American 
friends to do something ’visible.' we are not 
quite sure." he s^id. “It put us in a dangerous 
situation because one can be accused of not 
doing enough." 


FAA Advocates 
Stricter Controls 
On Carry-On Bags 

The Issviimcd Press 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Aviation Administration proposed 
regulations Thursday to limit the 
size and amount of canyon bag- 
gage for airline traveler. 

Donald Encen. administrator of 
the FAA. told a group of airline 
representatives that “my instincts 
arc to control excessive amounts of 
carry-on baggage." 

The agency's plan would require 
cam'-on bags to fit into an area 
equal to the space beneath an aver- 
age airliner seat with ail baggage 
together measuring no more than 9 
inches (23 centimeters 1 by 16 inch- 
es by 2fl inches. 

An additional lightly packed 
hanging garment bag would be al- 
lowed on certain flights, but it 
could weigh no more than 20 
pounds (9 kilograms’) and contain 
no hard objects. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


Israelis Split on Security Zone pgl 

r * mSSSSj 


LEBANON 


Some Favor South Lebanon Army, Others Support Anud 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Tunes Service 

MARJAYOUN, Lebanon — 
Since the Israeli Army completed 
the withdrawal of most of its troops 
from Lebanon last month an in- 
tense debate has taken place inside 
the Israeli defease establishment 
over whether Israel should contin- 
ue to maintain a “security zone” in 
southern Lebanon. 

Suicide car-bombings Tuesday 


have declared war on the South possible for Amal to come to any 


Lebanon Army. 


kind of understanding with Israel 


The security zone consists of a that could be sold to the cabinet 
string of villages running through and be worth dumping the South 


the bills of south Lebanon, from Lebanon Army for. 

five to 1 2 miles (eight to 19 kQome- On the other side stand several 

members of the Israeli military in- 
NFWS ANALYSIS teUigpnce services, reportedly in- 

.... eluding the chief of military inteili- 

ters) north of the Israeli -border, gence. Brigadier General Ehud 

Roughly 200,000 people live in the Barak. 

belt and 60 percent are Shiites. Alongwith them are a number of 




Syria’s Role Pleases U.S. 
In Efforts to Improve 
Beirut Airport Security 


WORLD BRIEFS 

5 Killed, 9 Hurt in Blasts in Kuwait 


' OOLW 
teams 


By Bernard Gwertzman agreement with Syria on long-term 

ton- York Times Service strategy in the Middle East, with 

WASHINGTON — Reagan ad- Damascus opposed to American 
ministration officials say they are diplomatic efforts to promote di- 
encouraged by Syria’s fWiqVw to «« talks between Israel and a Jor- 
play a role in tightening security at d^' Palestinian group. 

n - w ^ i i ■ . . TTiav rni/I 


KUWAIT (Reuters) — Two explosions Thursday at separate scafoom 
X X utX/UI XX V cafes in Kuwait killed at least five persons and injured nine, the Kuwait 

• press agency Kuna reponed. 

agreement with Syria on long-term Police cordoned off the areas to evacuate wounded, the agency report- 
strategy in the Middle East, with ed. Security sources said it was feared the death toll would rise. Witnesses 
Damascus opposed to American said the cafes were crowded with families when the explosions went off, 
diplomatic efforts to promote di- almost simultaneously. 

net talks between Israel and a Jor- The security authorities earlier received a hoax call that a bomb was set 

dan- P alestini an group. to explode at the chambers of the National .Assembly. Police sea rc h e d die 


* lYt\ jrlOi 


Suicide car-bombings Tuesday belt and 60 percent are States. Alongwith them area number of 

that killed 17 persons msouth Leb- They arc und* the unmoliaie con- Middle Baa experts, themostout- 
anon, coming m the heds of the of the 1,700-mcmber South spoken bemg Ckton Bailey of Td 
Trans World Airlines hijacking, Lebanon Army, which docs not Aviv University, as well as some 
can be expected to sharpen that make important moves without key advises, none of whom would 
debate evenfurther. consultag tad. allow tbon^vis to be named, to 

Israeli analysts say it will proba- The debate over Lebanon policy Pnme Mirustex Shimon Rues, 
bly give even more ammunition to involves basically two different This side argues that the Israeli 


involves basically two 


those Israeli defense officials, now groups within the Israeli establish- invasion of 


allow themselves to be named, to 
Prime Minis ter Shimon Peres. 

This side argues that the Israeli 


Beaut International Airport, ap- i ney said Syria strongly opposed 
paremly in reaction to the moves “e American efforts to close the 
by the United States to close the Beirut airport in effect, until secu- 


They said Syria strongly opposed building, but no bombs were found. 


wt by the united states to close tne ""tT ti i; » i i n .*r* « 

Car-bombmgs in Hasbeya fatality after the hijacking of TWA my *w unproved. But they said PortUgaTS Assembly itatiueS EAj raCt 

and Ras ai-Biyada may Flight 847 on June ! A vfcSVSf AedOTMSwd^uSng LISBON (Reuters) —The National Assembly approved Thursday the 

sharpen the debate m Israel A senior official said Wedriesday action in Lete? ratification of the treaty of accession to the European Community fcjr an 

about keeping a security thai recent activity, mdudmg the ^ ov^teltitae imioritv. 

zone In southern Lebanon. 


groups wiuim me isracu csiaoiisu- invasion oi ixoauuu set off a diain »« ^ Heshallah is believed re- The Socialists and Social Democrats, wnose two-year goveromg coaa- 

menL Their fields of battle have of events that resulted in the Shiite One. according to a senior roan- indicated that the Syrians recog- , f . —y. hi : ackin „ tion under Prime Minister Mirio Soares collapsed the davafterthe treaty 

been the cabinet room, the meet- community taking over south Leb- ber of the supporters of the South nize the problem and that they ^ Ir - nia „ was signed in Lisbon a month ago. were joined by the opposition 

Snoc rtf tlv o rrmr ompffll Rtaff fllld anon I ^Vmnnn Armv ic that thp hiiarr- WQUiQ ilVg tO I12VC It ClC3Ia HD. ■ . . m ■ n Mtrv* a-i»h Cn'iin mtn 


non by members of the Hezbollah, cwerwhelming majority. 
SmjSS or Party of God. which is financed Only the Communists voted 
andSnai by Iranians. 


against the move at the end of a two-day 


. who argue that it is taen 1 - Their fields of battle have of events that resulted in the Shiite 


in the majority, who argue that it is 
impossible to work out a deal with 
the Shiites of south Lebanon to 
keep the area quiet. 

This conclusion is probably just 
what the Beirut Shiite hijackers, as 
well as those who planned Tues- 
days suicide attacks, wanted to 
achieve, especially since it ap- 
peared in the past few months that 
the more-moderate Shiite Amal mi- 
litia and Israel were heading for an 
understanding on keeping south 
Lebanon peaceful 

The result, Israeli sources say, is 
that Israel now appears destined to 
throw its full weight behind the 
Christian-led South Lebanon 
Army to maintain the security 
zone, even though this probably 
means a constant source of conflict 
with both the Amal militia and its 
arch rival, the pro-Iranian Hezbal- 
lah. or Party of God, both of which 


Qians debate, the assembly's last major act before dissolution Friday, 

is believed re- The Socialists and Social Democrats, whose two-year governing coali- 
TWA hi jackin g tion under Prime Minister Mirio Soares collapsed the day after the treaty 

__ " ... CP i ■ r “I ■■ intnaA Wli fk# /VflfwiliAa 


mgs of the army general staff and anon- P ,_- _ • . - . 

the Israeli media, where both sides The part of Lebanon closest to ing demonstrated to Israel in the These actions follow Syria’s help 

have regularly given interviews or Israel tneycontend, will be a Shiite starkest terms possible that the in freeing the 39 Americans aboard 
leaked information that would region, far into the future. If Israel Amal leader, Naofli Beni, is not u a the hijacked TWA plane. They 


have regularly given interviews or Israel 
leaked information that would region 
draw the public to their position, wants 


Lebanon Army, is that the hijack- would like to have it cleared up.” 

j - . . j . , ■ _ -n ui^.. c..:.', k.l 


draw the public to their position, wants to be on the right side of free agent.” 

On one side stand Defense Min- history, they say, it will abandon ... 

5 6 OmE our doubtswhether Amal can de- " .«*“»* wmiki *»- appeared in Lebanon, and the se- 

staff. Mosbe Levy; the commander of Lebanon s pre-invasion Urns- w ““ termmed to do what it could to c offic ki said that Svria “is died when his Su-15 jet fighter crash© 

of the northern front, Bngadiw tian past, and let Amal control the avoid giving the United States an Swedish fighter plie Monitoring a 

. . ^de^oflSS^o?4i but&foSffto^T^S Swedish miliary spokesman said Thi 

die coordinator for Lebanon af- Amal an only unpose its author- M ^ hijacking. What it tells ^ch Damascus rcg^ds as hiStori- |ariy complicated and sensitive is- A Foreign Ministry spokesman sa! 

fairs - ity on the extremist groups once . ebestof cally part of greater Syria. tional waters off Gotland island, was a 

These officials contend that Isra- Israri yaxaies Lebanon and stops intentions but wfara the Syrians tdl In a related tnatt^. State De- He said the Syrians feared that if diplomatic issue." 

el’s only realistic option msouth providing the fanatics with a target ^ t0 junm, he has tojimrn " partmmi offioa^ said that in re- they pressed too hard, “they wtil be Tbcmihtapi s^kesman said two Su 

Lebanon is to maintain a security they can use to justify theamflitary cent weeks the Soviet Union had jgygjj b od ia." identify the Swedish fighter after it a 

strip along the border run by the recruitment and attacks. The official continued: “We withdrawn 3.000 of the 5.000 mili- President Ronald Reagan has Soviet fighters positioned themselves, i 


imaiifiauui. a the hijacked TWA plane. They . A ^ 

^ Wd bos^ge for 17 by Soviet Jet Pilot Is Presumed KiUed 

A official said Syria seemed do- 00^3°!^ LeSS STOCKHOLM (AP)— A Soviet miUtaiy pilot was presumed to have 

ft cEw— lerminssi to do what it could to SuS offi^SdtiStSy^ “S ^ed when his Su-15 jet fighter crashed m the BalucSea after pursuing a 
>banon?sdd a avoid ^ving the United Stales an workin on g< . fr ?n g the sevenout, Swcdish Fghter plane monitoring a Warsaw Pact naval exercise, a 
excure to intervene m Lebanon, h... it h»c rnimHiTm V » m rtin b Swedish military spokesman said Thursday. __ _ . . . 


who sometimes act in the name of a Christian Democrats in endorsing Portuguese entry with Spain into the 
group called Islamic Jihad said enlarged 12-nation community on Jan. 1. 
they were responsible for kidnap- 


riy complicated and sensitive is- , A Foreign Mix 
£» tional waters off < 

He said the Syrians feared that if diplomatic issue.’ 
ev m>cwi tnn hsmi u thev «n iv» The military sp 


spokesman said the incident Sunday, in imerna- 
d island, was apparently an accident and “is not a 


South Lebanon Army. Since the TWA hijacking, bow- 

They argue that even though the ever, the proponents of the South 
Shiites mak e up 80 percent of south Lebanon Army side have added 
Lebanon, ana even though the arguments to their arsenal, which 
Amal militia represents the vast have carried the day for now, senior 
majority of those Shiites, it is im- officials said. 


partmem offidaht said that in re- they pressed too hard, “they wfll be 
cent weeks the Soviet Union had dead bodiK." 

The official continued: “We withdrawn 3.000 of the 5.000 rnlli- p^dem Ronald Reagan has 


Since the TWA hijacking, bow- could find that if we were to give up tary personnel it had sent to Syria telephoned President Hafez al-As- theS 1 
the ever, the proponents of the South the security zone, this power strug- in late 1 982 and early 1983 tooper- to Thanl . him for his said. 


The military spokesman said two Su-15s apparently were dispatched to 
identify the Swedish fighter after it approached the naval exercise. The 
Soviet fighters positioned themselves, one to the left and ontfin the rear of 
the Swedish plane, in accordance with international rules, the spokesman 


on the border. Then where are we?” The officials said there was no 


Ban on English Soccer 
Lifted Outside Europe 


- ZURICH — The Federation of eration decision. 


dais expressed relief at the the fed- 


tntema tional Football Associa- 
tions (FIFA) relaxed on Thursday 
the worldwide ban on English soc- 
cer clubs imposed after rioting at 
the European Cup final in Brussels 
hi May. It said En glis h teams could 
now play outside Europe. 

» The federation imposed the ban 
June 6. eight days after 38 Ital- 
ian and Belgian spectators were 
crushed and trampled to death 
Jjvhen a stadium wall collapsed dur- 
ing fighting between supporters of 
tile Liverpool and Juventus teams. 
The English fans were blamed for 
the worst of the violence. 

■ “Outside Europe, the suspension 


Bert Millichip, the English Foot- 
ball Association’s chairman, said 
he was “thrilled to bits.” 

He said his organization, which 
governs soccer in England, agreed 
with the federation that the suspen- 
sion of English dubs from Europe- 
an competitions should remain in 
force. 

“Wherever we play on the conti- 
nent we are followed by this gang 
of hooligans,” he said. “Weneed to 
sit down and say, ’What are we 
going to do to put our house in 
ordeiT ” 

The federation said that elimi- 
nating soccer violence required not 


* “Uuistae Europe, the suspension nairng soccer violence requaea not 
pf English professional club teams jost efforts by soccer associations, 
is immediately lifted/’ the federa- dubs and fans but also the cooper- 


lion said in a statement. 

The European Football Union 
has also banned English teams 
from competing in its three dub 
competitions. But Thursday's 
statement from the international 
federation will allow dubs to play 
lucrative matches in other parts of 
the world. 

A federation official said soccer 
associations outside Europe had 
sought a relaxing of the ban. 

Explaining the initially harsher 
sanctions on English dubs, the fed- 
eration said: “The facts of Brussels 
were so grave that FIFA in its ca- 
pacity of supervisory body of inter- 
national football was compelled to 
put in force urgent measures with a 
provisional character.” 

It added it had taken note of the 
efforts made by the English Foot- 
ball Association to prevent ex- 
cesses. 

The federation's ban on dubs 
playing in Europe also applies to 
friendly games against Scottish, 
Irish and Welsh teams. 

The federation spokesman said 
officials outside Europe had main- 
tained that they had not had trou- 
ble with English soccer fans and 
saw no danger in English teams’ 
playing on their continents. 

In Britain, English soccer offi- 

WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 


Since the Brussels riot, the Con- 
servative government of Britain has 
proposed legislation to ban alcohol 
at soccer grounds and on trains and 
buses taking fans to matches. Of- 
fenders would face up to three 
months’ imprisonment and a fine 
of £1,000 ($1385). 

The government has said that it 
is determined to do everything pos- 
sible to remove the “stain” of hooli- 
ganism from “a great British 
game.” 

With opposition parties support- 
ing the government’s measures, 
swift passage through Parliament is 
expected, so that the bill can be- 
come law before the new soccer 
season starts in mid-August. 



Argentina Spurns British Trade Offer 

bons," even though in the past BUENOS AIRES (AP) — The government declined Wednesday to 
Was h i ngt o n has accused Syria of respond in kind to the lifting of trade restrictions by Britain and 
U r~ • supporting cotam i terrorist groups, reiterated its demand for talks on sovereignty over the disputed Falkland 

Bulgarian t^ hKnal Syrian Social S?, ^S^communique issued by the Foreign Ministry, hovrever, Argentina 
r\ • •¥- t 00 * responsibility Tuesday for ^ f or the first time that it was prepared to declare a formal end to 

UmiRS (riujt two sukkk car-bombings m south- host iiitjes with Britain if the British government agreed to talks. The 

^anoa, in winch 17 people invited the British government to negotiations within 60 

T n m • 1 ^ at riieckpomts leading days on restoring relations. It said the talks could be held through the 

Iff Pnnp Irv/Yj t0 I? rae !. s *9?°® zo ? c - , , United Nations or mutually friendly nations but would have to inctade 
M.M J. 1/pU JL f MW The bombing underscored the ^ palklands issue. 

mnfrnHirtinnc in cifnntinn n w .1 i:r^ t- * ^ 


t JL T«,u„c ^“ tra ^ c H 0 ? 5 m toe situation. Britain announced on Monday that it was lifti 
iaaijenlons While Sj^hasopposedsome ac- ^ 35 a good faith measure and said that it h 

r,n%*V* f ??? rnee lions of theHezballah, which wants re^d by efiminating similar restrictions. It maj 

^DME—Sergo I. Antonov, one to establish an Islamic republic m thcWninty qu^tion was not open to debate, 
of three Bulgarians accused of plot- Lebanon, it has been sympathetic 


Britain announced on Monday that it was lifting a ban on Argenfae 
ports as a good faith measure and said that it hoped Argentina would 
:pond by efiminaiing similar restrictions. It maintained.^ however that 


ting the attempted assassination of to guerrillas operating against Isra- 

Pope John Panl D in 1981, told a d and its Lebanese supporters. A l ran TLvfh floim Viotnn; in flnflli 

Rome court Thursday that he was State Department official said it Frail, ITaq UOUl Uaim Y IClOiy Dl URSR 

an “innocent man.” was impossible to know whether BEIRUT (UPI) — Iran said Thursday its troops kflled or wounded 850 


an “innocent man.” was impossible to know whether BEIRUT (UPI) — Iran said Thursday its troops kflled or wounded 850 

Mr. Antonov, the former Bulgar- the bombings were at Syria’s direc- Iraqi soldiers in an attack across the border. Iraq said its forces beat back 
ian airline station manager in tion. the attack, kflling 400 Iranian troops. dl 

Rome, denied involvement m the In Beirut, Syrian officials have The fighting took place Wednesday ni ght in the southern part of the 
papal shooting. been dis c ussing ways of improving battle zone between tne two countries. There was no way of independent- 

He chimed never to have known security in Moslem West Beirut iy c onf ir ming either side's report. Neither side gave casualty reports for 
Mehmei Ali Agca, the Turk who and at the airport south of the city, its own forces. 


has already been convicted of A commnniqub issued Tuesday 
shooting the Pope in SL Peter’s said a special committee to coortb- 


Square on May 13, 1981. nate tins euort was to be made up 

It is on the baas of Mr. Agca's of seven Lebanese representing dii- 
testimony that Mr. Antonov, two ferent Modem factions and two 
Bulgarian diplomats and four other Syrian observers. 

Turks are on trial on charges of 
plotting and participating in the 

assassination attempt. u.„ j tt** 

Mr. Antonov, 37, is the only Bui- IrmlftT raim rlillfa 

garinn in Italian custody. The two 

diplomats left Italy for Bulgaria At^ * Cohabitation’ 

before they could be arrested. They 

have since refused to return to Wlfli flta PirAit 
Rome to stand trial claiming dip- W 1UI UM5 lUgOl 
lomatic immunity. Rouen 

pe two Bulgarian diplomats PARIS— President Francois 

and two of the Turks are bang Mitterrand, whose Socialist 
tned m absentia. Party faces probable defeat in a 

“I want to say that you have in par f[ ai nentary election in 
front of you an innocent man, Mr. March, has hinted pubUdy for 
Antonov said through an interpret- the first time that he might con- 
er as be sat before the two judges ^ ^ce with a rightist 

and six jurists. govemmenL 

He spoke after leawng the caw Mr. Mitterrand broke his si- 
from where he has been qmeriy jencc Wednesday on what has 
watching the proceedings smcc the become known as cohabitation 
trial began May 27. ..... and said he might continue in 

His testimony was solicited by office with a rightist orime min- 


nate this effort was to be made 1 


LEAVING BEUING — President Li XIannian and his 
wife left for Vancouver on Thursday to spend 10 days 
each in Canada and the United States. Earlier, he 
condemned a UjS. move to withhold funds from a UN 
population program, calling reports of infanticide and 
forced abortion In China “fabrication and distortion.” 


Wine Scandal Splits Bonn, Vienna 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 


scare throughout the country, with 


7 Judge Severino Samiapachi to try 

>h.< ♦« m to establish the veracity of claims 

™d? fcj Mr, Agra, who bra. 


supermarket chains removing Aos- might be implicated in lacing cheap 

trian wines from their shelves and wine with antifreeze w ; makeit brfare “* ^ for 17 

vnaHno In nenlarp. thmn nulv when mwipr a rut mnn> imitwoWp ,c an . . 


qnww Xli. nfjr. r.r.,u.i 11. niui uiuuiw lu uu&G 11 

vowing to replace them only when sweeter and more marketable as an 
th on ties said Thursday that they th „ Hj ,n«™us brands are Lsolaied. oqxsmtive dessert selection. 


were confiscating thousands of 
bottles of Austrian wine after 


the dangerous brands are isolated. 
West Germany accounts for 


Mr. Agca has claimed that Mr. 
pensi essertsel on. Antonov and the other two Bulgar- 

West German officials said the ians, Tod or S. Aivazov and Zfelin 


learning that vast supplies were three-quarters of Austria’s sales of additive, diethylene-glycol was a K- Vasilev, drove him aiul a Turk- 


tainted by a chemical used as anti- foreign wine, and Austrian export- dangerous neaJtn Hazard. They said isn accomplice, urai uelik, to SL 
freeze in automobiles. ers fear a rash of canceled orders anything above 0.1 grams (.0035 Peter’s Square for the attack and 

The Health Ministry in Bonn is- “ >uld soon ruin their business, ounces) per liter could cause nau- that Mr. Antonov was supposed to 
sued a warning to the public to Some of have drmn a getaway car for the 

avoid Austrian wines until the n^on bottles destined lor west die bottles impounded have been two Turkish assailants after the 
scandal was resolved. A ministry Germany have been dropped m re- found to contain as much as 10 shooting. 



sptfltesman said that, while Vienna cent da ^ s ‘ grams of the substance. “l never saw, I never met with 

claimed that 300,000 liters (about Bonn’s Health Ministry accused In Vienna, the Agriculture Min- the person who accuses me,” Mr. 

of the tainted wine Austria of failing to promptly warn istry insisted that it had informed Antonov said, 
to West Germany, West Germans about the wine ex- the West German state of Rhine- Mr. Aeea. attme nearhv. tried to 


T never saw, I never met with 


livered to West Germany, West Germans about the wine ex- 


Bonn was convinced that up to five pons after Viennese authorities un- land Pfalz, where most of the wine intemiptby c 
times that amount crossed the bor- covered the doctoring scheme three was apparently sent, about the doc- speak/^untfl 
de L_ months ago. toring scandal when it was discov- hmihe wouli 


Mr. Agca, sitting nearby, tried to 


by crying out “I must also 
mtil Mr. Santiapachi told 


The revelations have triggered a Austrian investigators believe ered in ApriL 

Dutch Protest Pretoria Arrest Soviet Offer 

(Co ntinued from Page 1) and partially entered what turned 

gist, had been working as a history out to be the embassy entrance. V/-LL TT driRyfl fln 


toring scandal when it was discov- huu he would have a chance after 
ered in ApriL Mr. Antonov's testimony. 

Mr. Antonov said: “For two 
years and six months 1 have been 
of Affnit away .from my country, my family. 


Mhterrand Hints 
At 'Cohabitation’ 
With the Right 

Reuters 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand, whose Socialist 
Party faces probable defeat in a 
parliamentary election in 
March, has hinted publidy for 
the first tune that he might con- 
tinue in office with a rightist 
govemmenL 

Mr. Mitterrand broke his si- 
lence Wednesday on what has 
become known as cohabitation 
and said he ought continue in 
office with a rightist prime min- 
ister under certain conditions. 

Party officials from across 
the political spectrum believe 
that tbe right will win control 
from the Socialists and form a 
govemmenL 

Mr. Mitterrand, asked about 
that prospect, said: “If cohabit- 
ing means bring in the same 
type of republic as we do now, 
then I say yes to iL But if there 
was political coafusion, I would 
say no. 

“We cohabit when we are ad- 
versaries, but if we consider 
ouradyes as enemies, then there 
is nothing left but to bring out 
the rifles.” 

Settlement 
For Inmate 


Iran's Islamic Republic News Agency said: “One full battalion of the 
805th brigade of tne Iraqi Army was annihilated and 850 Iraqi troops 
were either kflled or wounded while at least 50 of them were takes 
prisoners Ity tbe Iranian forces." 

But an Iraqi military spokesman in Baghdad said. "Iraqi troops wiped 
out and tore up an attempt by Iranian soldiers to cross the international 
border at tbe4tb Battalion operation field, killing more than 400 troops 
and wounding more than 400 ” 

For the Record 

The Basque separatist group ETA, Basque Homeland and Liberty, 
claimed responsibility Thursday for the killing of two civil guardsmen 
who were shot Tuesday in San Sebastita, Spain. (AFP) 

An imder£omd Solidarity activist, S tarns law Sakwa, was sentenced 
Thursday to 18 months in prison in the southwestern Polish city of 
Legnica on charges of attempting to foment unrest, the official press 
agpncy, PAP, reported. (Hesters) 

President Jos£ Napoletin Duarte of El Salvador met Wednesday in ^ 
Tegucigalpa with President Roberto Suazo Cbrdova of Honduras in an / , 
effort to resolve a long-standing border dispute. (AP) ' 

Maoist rebels set off about 20 bombs Thursday in Tima, and a 
two-hour electrical blackout may have been caused by tbe bombings, 
Peruvian police said. One man was reported to be slightly injured. 

(Ratios) 


Sri Lanka Foils Murder Effort 

(Continued from Page 1) tidpants since India, tbe main 
government to damage tbe negotia- sponsor, made it dear that it would 
tions,” said tbe spokesman, Velu- not accept a separate Tamil state. 
pQLad. Balakumarau. The Indian government put pres- 

The Sri Lankan authorities in sure on tbe separatists first to agree 
Colombo said they arrested two to a cease-fire three weeks ago and 


members of the group as they were .then to go to the bargaining table, 
running away from a parked van Mr. Gandhi’s government also 
containing more than 50 pounds P°t pressure on Mr. Jayawardene 
(22 kilograms) of explosives. A to offer the Tamils enough autono- 
third youth escaped, Sri Lankan my to give them security in the 
police said. largely Sinhalese nation. 


third youth escaped, Sri Lankan my to give them security 
police said. largely Sinhalese nation. 

The Sri Lankan information i “ 

minister, Anandatissa de Alwis, __ 
said thai one of tbe men told police T TMoviLivn 
that the explosives were set to go IJIT Ullll Til 
off at the president's secretariat ax 

would have been driving to ItiTcS- Is Blocked 

fice. Mr. Jayawardenp, fll with the 

flu, has not gone to his office since (Continued from Pane 


tm, has not gone to his office since (Continued from Page 1) 

“s £r ic t 

bosaid. Agency, which briefly mentis 


Agency, which briefly men; 


mu HORSE 

“ far and away 
the bast nude revue 
in the world “ 


. joyi th* pun 


(Continued from Page 1) 
gist, had been working as a history 
teacher in Harare, Zimbabwe. 
Dutch officials said he had come to 
South Africa for a job interview. 
Mr. de Jonge’s former wife, Helena 
Pastoors, who lives in Johannes- 
burg, has also been detained. 

Mr. Botha, tbe foreign minister, 
said that Mr. de Jonge had duped 
security police into taking him to 
the Dutch Embassy. The minister 
said the detained man had been 


and partially entered what turned 
out to be the embassy entrance, 

“As he was all the time legally in 
custody and as he was ostensibly in 
the process of pointing out another 


u (C— from Page I) W ^ gownimeot ^ which «* vitiation 
oF the absurd! slandercS accusa- l &° ** has been pushing the Tamils and compames OT counmes evolved. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
long-range bombers and nudear- 


tions of a person I have never met" BarT dcscn " bcd 11 35 

The Bulgarian testified tiiat on charged that she had been 
the day of the shootm he was beaten, fed bread and water and 
working m his Rome office. forced to work night shifts in the 


irw^tinn r»iAmi m tli- noiirf in. uuuiuas an u nuciear- This alibi previously was called laundry room. She said she had 

urefiiigrinn hi« nn!i«. nnllfri capable bombers based in and into question by the investigating also been forced to lift patients 
r&WSlS 1 ^ b**™ than She 


and British nudear forces be a part led to the triaL 
of any overall agreemenL „ nder 


Botha said. IU1TO 

. . of any overall agreemenL 

Speaking amid a display of arms 
allegedly captured on the basis of ■ Vienna Talks Recess 
evidence given by Mr. de Jonge, ^ ^ 


led to the triaL pounds when she was committed. 

Under questioning by Judge ^^ s L J^ l ^ rr w ?? s ^L to • 

Saatiapiclli Mr. ?'J^'^ r S ^™^, boardmg 

oied be had ever used [be codr a 


at th« bar only Z^Ofrj 
.♦ 15 % sarvicc charge 


Discover 
the charms 
of the city 

YabYum 

if 


“■**-. — wmi u . t The East-West talks on cutting name “Bajramic” as Mr. Agca had — . * - 

leading police to places in Pretoria. conventional forces in Europe went claimed aid said that he tadnever , do ? or ' “ J* 

relevant to the investigation of his 1x110 recess for 1 1 weeks Thursday been a member of the Bulgarian fuU-rcafclQ of 100 


case. 

During the tour, Mr. Botha said, 
Mr. de Jonge undertook to take the 
policemen to a place ostensibly on 
the first floor of an office building 
where, in fact the Dutch Embassy 
is located. 

Mr. Botha said that Mr. De 
Jonge broke away from his escort 


^ into recess tor 1 1 weeks Thursday been a member of the Bulgarian 
H?d K^typolicsorreaivedgS 


The Netherlands has requested gotiations for nearly 12 years, Reu- 
that Mr. de Jonge be returned to ters reported from Vienna, 
the embassy and that measures be A spokesman for the North Al- 
takenaMmsi the police. Mr. Botha lantic Treaty Oraanization said it 
declined to comment on what w4s unlikdy that the 19-nation 
would happen next to Mr. de talks could readi any agreement in 
Jonge. (Reuters. UPI) advance of tbe U-S.-Soviet summit 


Polish Police Arrest 200 
In Raid on Black Market 


Singe! 295, Amsterdam 
All major c redit cards accepted. 


16<my&Jfa3Jcnk. &w ® 

Est. 1911 

Just tell the taxi driver "sank roo <kx noo" 
•5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Rdkenmun Sir. 9, MUNICH 

• M/S ASTOR at sea 


issues that have deadlocked the ne- training. That year. Miss Burr requested 

gotiations for nearly 12 years, Reu- to be released from tbe boarding- 

ter$ reported from Vienna, home program. 

A spokesman for the North At- Polish Police AmSt 200 Ten yeara later, m January 1978, 

ianticTreaty Organization said it _ TT, ™ ^ r ? av * a W»- 

was unlikdy that the 19-nation 111 Raid Oil Black Market F®P“ £1^ school that 
talks could readi any agreement in Otaiys; I know you 

advance of the U5.-Soviet summit ^ wjl be pleastd to hear that you 

meeting. He said he hoped that rite , - ~, T ^ C P 0 ^, «*e- have been officially discharged 

two^ides would move toward ^ peop i e m a raid on from the care of Mansfield Train- 
agreement by then, “but the time bla ?k-™rkct. trad«* at the Ro- mg School as of January 24, 1978 ” 
available for that end is extremely 2** 1 b ^f ar J n Warsaw and seized No reasrai was To this 
short.” tw0 truckloads of goods, an official day. Miss Burr says, she does not 

n . . . , aewspspes reported Thursday. know the reasons for her original 


Driers and peculators aban- commitment or for her rdasl smted'^onday and may lastln- also Has a number of industrial 
round of talks had been mariring doned meat fruit, chocolates, alco- BflL MUL a spokesman for the other week. One reason thev are «*-' 

KSSJSS w^l^jy'hiirad yyDqwnnjlrfM^RM,. bemg hdd in Hump* ifcHm- bad has to 

=SS.W£5=- 5Sag=C ESSS* 


^j^aper reported ihuisday. know the reasons for. her ori ginal 
Dealers and sp e c ulator s aban- co mmitment nr for brr rrieas?, 
ned meaL frui^chocolates, alco- BflL Mill, a spokesman for the 


Mr. Jayawardene to end tbe vio- The uncovering of the shipment 
lence, condemned the assassination was the first time that inspectors of 
attempt and said: “India was in no the agency have found stab a viola- 
way involved.” lion of inter national rules goveni- 

^Terrorisn does not solve any ing the transfer of nudear material 
problem,” a spokesman for the In- since the agoing of the ™»ckar 
dias Ministry of External Affairs nonproliferation pact in 1968, Mr. 
said Thursday. Colasantj said. Israd did not ago 

India, which has been accused by the agreement, tat in this case i- 
Sri Lanka of aiding the separatist lowed inspectimi of part of tbe ma- 
movemenL has in the past two teriaL - t 

months taken an active role in ay- K „ , 

ing to settle the ethnic dispute "hf^bas * 

rijL, p smaller percentage of the fissile iso- 

Sri Lanka's TamD minority is itathatfouiid 

southern InC ^dT^^^ n ‘ Pr0C te 

pgygjaaa 

of weapons^rade matenaL Mr. 
Toe two groups are seeking a Colasantisaii 
formula thai preserves Tamil rights •• 

within Sri Lanka in the Bhutan Whde assurin ? inspectors that 
talks, the Cist ever between the the depleted uramum would not be 
government and separatists in nse ^,' . ihe Isradi au- 

neariy 10 years of sporadic vio- ^hes did not reveal for what 
lence, purpose the uranium was imparted, i 

There are no reliable reports on Colasanti sairL Because of its * 

the progress of the talks, which “8“- wc W rt > orannan 



tor Ream 

c7 

Ojwratin 


\\ \i 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


PageS 


Army Urged to Gut Back Robot Diverted From Cable Job to Find Recorders 


finKuw. 

fhU r Sj;l V ,, *Ut 
”*^Jcd the . ^ 

Ratifies ECp^ 

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-= J'w.ed h-.' [hc ^a 


turned Killed 

r a ^ 

*meiteiSua ( U. Bfc 
' -a.hc J die ?.j\ai e .LT* 


5 Divisions, Officials Ssrf 


. ; By George C Wilson 

y<g &i «g fo n'J > <Bt Service :. 

■. .WASHINGTON.— An internal 
Excuse Department memoran- 
dum recommends that the army 
efcoed itsptized plan for five light- 
jfl/anny m visions in under (o hdp 
cii^ the military budget, Pentagon 


fish Trade 06 b 

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fc.s. - 'isvr- 
Wd. K:.::. ? a. 


' Leaders in each branch of tbe 
anhedsdrvices are taMizinglheir 
defenses as they are fenced to cut 
pirns’ they developed when 
Prescient Ronald Reagan’s mfti - 

tmy bmldnp had overw helming po- 

Jitical support. - 

■ “We've dug in our beds, and 
^'regoing to win, ~ one army lead- 
er said Wednesday after noting 
‘ that the ligBt divisions — four ao- 
five aad one reserve — had been 
recommended for axing by the 
Fentamm’s manpower office, head- 
ed by Lawrence J. Korb. 

General John A. Wickham Jr., 
the army chief of staff, has person- 
ally championed tbe light divisions. 

7 Whether to forgo spending mil- 
Hoos of dollars to build fatalities 
for light divisions composed of 
people already in uniform is one of 
many issues to be thrashed out 
soon within the Pentagon and in 
Congress as the budget for fiscal 
1986 is revised in light of congres- 
sional cuts and as the new five-year 
military plan is desi g n e d. 

" Tbe Defense Resources Board, 

composed of civilian and military 

leaders in the Pentagon, is expected 
to address the future of light divi- 
sions in a budget meeting late this 
month. Neither Defense Secretary 

uty^defense secretary^ WflKanf^ 
Taft 4th, has addressed tbe propos- 
al to forgo the divisions, Pentagon 
officials said. 

« Although it is too early to know 
precisely how much money the 
Pentagon could lose through con- 
gressional budget cuts, one internal 
projection, puts the potential loss at 
S250 billion lor fiscal years 1986 
through 1990 and S300 billion 
through fiscal 1991. 

.Tins year, Mr. Reagan sought a 
6-percent increase in his fiscal- 1986 
military budget, but the Senate has 
voted for only enough extra money 
to cover inflation, and the House 
has approved an outright freeze at 
tbe fiscal-1985 level 
Senator Sam Nunn, Democrat of 


Georgia, has inserted into the mili- 
taiy-authorizalion bin a require- 
ment that the Pentagon show Con- 
gress how it would apportion the 
money over the next five years .un- 
der a -budget allowing for no 
growth, and a second one allowing 
3-percent annual increases above 
inflation. 

The army’s light divisions i re V p 
an inviting target for budget cutters 
because facilities needed for ««» 
of them have not been buih: But 
tbe two most expensive complexes 
would be built in the states of pow- 
erful lawmakers expected to tight 
hard to protect them. ■ 

The army has estimated that it 
would cost $395 million to put a 
fight division in Alaska, the home 
state of Ted Stevens, a Republican 
who is chairman of the Senate ap- 
propriations subcommittee on de- 
fense, and $1.2 billion for one at 
Fort Drum, New York, home 
ground of Samuel S. Stratton, a 
Democrat and a senior member of 
tbe House Armed Services Com- 
mittee. 

Army officials say, however, that 
much of that money would have to 
be spent even if the light divisions 
were not formed, because of need- 
ed improvements at both sites. 
That would lower the net cost to 
about $70 minion in operational 
costs for Alaska and about $400 
million for Fort Drum, they said. 

The two other active light divi- 
sions would use existing fariKties at 
Fort Ord, California, and in Ha- 
waii, while the reserve division 
would be al Fort Bdvoir, Virginia, 
also an existing complex. 

Besides the cost issue, some mli- 
taiy professionals have questioned 
the. value of fight divisions pitted 
against heavily armored Soviet 
forces. General Wickham and his 
allies contend that a 10 , 000 -mem- 
ber light division’s mobility ami 
firepower, compared with the 
16,000 troops in a regular division, 
make it ideal in confronting threats 
in distant trouble spots. 

Budget cutbacks will force the 
other services to forgo new pro- 
grams and stretch oat or cancel 
existing ones. Some Pentagon exec- 
utives struggling with ways to make 


big savings said that the navy’s new 
shipbuilding budget aright have to 


be trimmed and that the future of 
the air force’s Stealth bomber 
might be readdressed. - 


By John Noble Wiliord " 

. . ., New Vo* Tims Senior ‘ 

: NEW YORK The deep-div- 
jng unmanned -submarine that re- 
trieved the two jicoordm from 
wreckage bf the Air-Itidia -jumbo 
jet that crashed June 23 off Ireland 
is a robot of many talents. 

It i&bnsy most of the .time repair- 
ing and maintaining Undersea tele- 
phone cables, but also has . sub- 
merged to photograph a Clashed 
helicopter off Norfolk, Virginia,, 
and to locate and gamine rockets , 
that sank off Cape Canaveral, Flor- 
ida. - . 

Now thcreioote^oiitrolled craft, 
known as Snrab, has plunged 
deeper than it ever has gone before, 
u> 6,700 feet (2,041 metasX and 
scored the most Impressive 
achievement in its five years of op- 
eration. 

James Barrett,- deputy director 
for international engineering at 
AT&T Commmricarions, said m an 
interview that two identical Scar- 
abs were available at the crash site 
in the North Atlantic to continue 
the search for debris that could 
help investigators determine 
whether the plane, in which aQ 329 
people aboard were killed, was de- 
stroyed by a bomb. 

Although many mudi specialized 
submarines are used rcamlariy in 




scientific exploration, and offshore 
ml operations, they normally have 
crews and thus cannot stay sub- 
merged for long. Few of than can 
go to depths of more than one mile 
(1.6 kilometers). 

Scarab, which stands for Sub- 



was little doubt that the Scarab 
could withstand the pressures of 
6,700 feet, where the plane wreck- 
age lay. 

The Scarab that recovered the 
recorders was ojxraied from a con- 
trol room on its mother vessel, 
Lton Thevenin, a French cable 
ship. A 10.000-foot umbilical cable 
linked the two. carrying electrical 
power and commands to Scarab 
and feeding data and television sig- 
nals back to the ship. 

According to a description of 
Scarab operations published in the 
September 1981 issue of Bdl Lab- 
oratories Record, three people 
monitor and control Scarab's every 
move. One person operates the pro- 
pulsion controls, firing electrical 
and hydraulic thrusters to maneu- 
ver the craft. Another operates the 
craft's television cameras and Joint- 
ed mechanical arms. A third person 
tends the craft's small computer. 

In this manner, one of doe craft 
Iasi week began searching a corri- 
dor 10 miles by one mile where 
investigators believed the plane 
wreckage would be. 

For several days. Mr. Barrett 
said. Scarab's sonar "ear" failed to 
pick up any of the pinging signals 
that should have been emanating, 


PiageT 



18 carat fjoid 


Scarab, a submersible robot, retrieved tbe recorders 


and Burial, was developed by Bdl 
Telephone Laboratories at Hohn- 


del, New Jersey, to overcame these 

The tdecommunicatioiis indus- 
try wanted a durable and versatile 
craft to deal with the costly prob- 
lem of damage to undersea cables, 


primarily from the trawling lines of 
fishing vessels on the continental 
shelves. Once the cables wens bur- 
ied, there was the problem of find- 
ing them and retrieving them for 
repairs. 


UMI} nUUV k UV> kkoOMVW uivui^u 

would beat Fort Bdvoir, Virginia, 11 1 m /i . \T 1 1 • 

Keafian Called 1 ax-Cut Nonbeliever 

tary professionals have qnestiraed ° 

Moynihan Reports Stockman Confidences on Budget 

forces. Genoa! Wickham and his • _ _ _ ... _ _ 


in 6,700 feet of water. 

The two craft, 6,300 pounds 
(2.865 kilograms) and the size of a 
small truck, were introduced in 
1980. One is owned by Transpacific 
Communications Ini, an AT&T 
subsidiary. Tbe other is owned by a 
consortium of British, French, Ca- 
nadian and American 

The craft were designed to oper- 
ate normally down to depths of 
6,d00 feeL Bat Mr. Barrett said 
engineers had allowed for a "com- 
fortable margin of safety.” so there 


from the plane's two flight data and 
voice recorders. 

Only after engineers made a fine , 
adjustment in the sonar, permitting I 
it to detect signals at a slightly i 
higher frequency, did the robot be- 
gin hearing signals. Then it moved 
in closer and saw the recorder with 
its television eyes. | 


r PiafleL) 

ZMonUrCaAo u 
3, avenue des Beaux-Arts 
MONTE-CARLO S 


FOR THE LATEST WORD ON 
EUROBONDS 
READ CARL GEWIRTZ 
EACH MONDAY IN THE IHT 


By Stephen Engelbert? The argument tha 
York Times Server rates result in higher 


For Reagan, a Standard 


'r By LawTcnce K. Akman 

New York Tunes tower 

NEW YORK — In removing a 
painless benign growth tom Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s colon Fri- 
„..i, day, his doctors wul be treating the 

» ji ” r: -‘ r 7 president in a way that has beoome 

•• • r ~7 standard in recent years. 

Utl >:x-: ^ ^ . Even benign,. or noncancerous, 

? " NEWS ANALYSIS 

? 

polyps are removed, because some 
. y. z have the potential of becoming ma- 
t i -.-S- . ■ lignanL At the same time,, by 

searching for other polyps, doctors 
... may find some that are already 


' . i . .--- 

- .fc 


Murder Efi 


lftc ir — j 

tAen • 

Mi 

,'/j» ■ * 

•"-i -• 

lir^' ■ s 


traniuni 
Is Blocked 


; The discovoy of additicmal pol- 
yps could turn out to be more im- 


Rotman Leader Agrees 
To Proceed With Election 

The Associated Press 

LA PAZ — A spokesman for 
President Heroin Sties Zuazo^s 
government has announced that it 
will go ahead with tbe presidential 
election set for Sunday. Mr. Sties 
Zuazo asked the Congress on Mon- 
day to delay the balloting until 
Bept. 15 so voter registration could 
be expanded. 

The government announcement 
Tuesday came after an emergency 
session of the armed forces high 
command had created fear that the 
military might intervene. Mr. Sties 
Znazo’s coalition, weakened by 
strikes and inflation, agreed last 
year to cal] an election a year early 
and leave office Aug. 6. 


portani titan finding the first one. 
Even if such an additional polyp is 
not cancerous, it could be of a type 

— a villous adenoma, for example 

— that has a greater chance of 
becoming malignant than some 
othertypes. 

The uncertainty surrounding the 
medical search of tbe colon in these 
procedures, however, means that 
there is always some small dement 
of risk. 

If a new polyp is discovered and 
turns out to be cancerous, the risk 
to life is small- Doctors would grow 
greatly more concerned if they 
found evidence that such a cancer 
had invaded deeply into the polyp 
itself or that there was a large com- 
ponent of cancer in the. polyp. In 
such an event the doctors might 
recommend surgical removal of the 
affected portion of the boweL 

Moreover, in a patient who is 74 
years old, as tbe president is. there 
ls a greater risk of a complication in 
tbe surgery than in a younger pa- 
tient. 

It takes a combination of medi- 
cal techniques to detect polyps. The 
chirfinstnmieniisacok)naKqpe,a 
long, flexible fiber-optic instru- 
ment that enables physicians to 
look at the inside of the intestinal 
walL It can be equipped with a tiny 
wire snare that can exrise polyps as 
they are discovered. Such a proce- 
dure is known as a polypectomy. 

It was by using such a tube in 
routine checkups last year and this 
March that doctors detected two 
tiny polyps in Mr. Reagan’s colon. 
Urey were both benign, and one 
was removed in March. The other 
is being removed now. 


WASHINGTON — Senator 
Daniel Patrick Moynihan of New 
York has asserted that in 1981 Da- 
vid A. Stockman, the federal bud- 
get director, confided to him that 
President Ronald Reagan did not 
believe in the supply-side economic 
principles on which the administra- 
tion's tax cut was based. 

According to Mr. Moynihan, 
who is a Democrat, Mr. Stockman 
said then that tire administration 
knew tax cuts meant a loss of reve- 
nue and accepted the ensuing rise 
in the budget deficits as a means of 
bringing pressure on Congress to 
cut spending. 

“The plan was to have a strategic 
deficit that would give you an argu- 
ment fojr cutting bade the programs 
that .weren't desired,” tire senator 
said in a news conference Wednes- 
day. **11 got out of control” 

Through, a spokesman Mr. 
Stockman, who is to step dciwn 
from the budget director’s post 
Aug. I said: “I can’t remember any 
such conversation. I say only that I 
have a reputation for candor, and 
Pax has a talent for embellish- 
ment." . 


The argument that lower tax 
rales result in higher revenue, by 
stimulating the economy and in- 
creasing the incomes that are taxed, 
has been a cornerstone of the presi- 
dent’s economic policies, and be 
reiterated that bdref to members of 
Congress on Wednesday. 

“You can't show me a time in 
history when a major tax cut did 
not result in greater revenue,'* Mr. 
Reagan said, according to notes 
mken by Representative Thomas J. 


GJenn Backs Memorial 
Ftwr Korea War Veterans 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Drawing an 
personal memories, Senator John 
H. Glenn Jr. delivered an emotion- 
al appeal to a House pand to ap- 
prove construction of a memorial 
for Americans who fought in the 
Korean War.. 

“They gave tinar lives,” said Mr. 
Glam, an Ohio Democrat who was 
a Marine pilot during the war. 
“They answered the caL Indeed, 
they were personal heroes and their 
heroics were magnificent-” 


Downey, a Democrat of New York. 
“Not one phase of our program 
caused the recession. Tbe '81 tax 
program was tbe greatest factor in 
gating the economy back to a re- 
covery" 

Mr. Moynihan said his recollec- 
tions were an “amalgam" of dozens 
of discussions between himself and 
Mr. Stockman over drinks and af- 
ter committee meetings. Mr. Stock- 
man was a student under Mr. Moy- 
rrihan at Harvard, and the two 
developed a friendship that has 
continued. 

The senator said the thrust of 
Mr.. Stockman’s comments was 
that “the principal purpose of the 
tax cut was to provide a basis upon 
which to shrink government.” He 
added: "The clear impression con- 
veyed was that the president's eco- 
nomics were quite conventional — 
if you cut taxes, you lose revenues.” 


An Indian island of adventure 
t moored on the Seine. 


HE DE - 
KASHMIR 

s 

Le . jjtnKn 
Lotm J Bullnw 


Quai Debilly, en face du 32 Avenue de New- York, 75016 Paris. 
Telephone: 723.77.78/723.50.97. 

Your gourmet experience of India at. 

UE LOTUS', where ddigfadtd mysteries of a 'thalT unfold, 
or ‘JARDIN DE SHALIMAR 1 , the garden of romance, 
where you an feast on a buffet at hutch and dine a la arm. 

The restauancs are open 7 days of cbe week for lunch and dinner. 
There is ample parking space available. 


GA Clerk, Ghanaian Man 
Are Charged With Spying 


Cwrpifaf by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — An employ- 
ee of the Central Intelligence Agen- 
cy and her contact, a Ghanaian 
man who said be is related to the 
leader of Ghana, were charged 
Thursday with espionage. 

The woman, who worked in the 
U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana, as 
an operations support assistant for 
the CIA; admitted to the FBI that 
she had revealed the names of CIA 
agents in Ghana, including the sta- 
tion chief, to the Ghanaian, accord- 
ing to court documents. 

She said she also identified Gha- 
naian agents who reported to tbe 
CIA, passed along a CIA intelli- 
gence report involving Libyan mili- 
tary equipment, and revealed CIA 
plans for spying in Ghana. 

The FBI identified the two as 
Sharon M. Scranage, 29, and Mi- 
chael Agbotui Soussoudis, 39. It 
said they had been charged with 
conspiracy to commit espionage 
and could face life in prison. 

The Justice Department sources 
said Mr. Soussoudis was other the 


nephew or cousin of Jory J. Rawl- 
ings, who took over Ghana in a 
mili t a ry coup and is now chairman 
of its provisional national defense 
councaL 

Miss Scranage. the fourth CIA 
employee ever to be charged with 
spymg against the United States, 
was arrested by FBI agents in 
northern Virginia, near Washing- 
ton, D.C„ early Thursday. Mr. 
Soussoudis was taken into custody 
Wednesday nigh t in Springfield. 
Virginia, a Washington suburb. 

In separate hearings in Alexan- 
dria, Vngjnia, U.S. Magistrate W. 
Harris Grimsley ordered both held 
without bail pending formal deten- 
tion bearings. 

The government complaint said 
Miss Scranage had worked for the 
CIA for seven years. It said she was 
questioned from Monday through 
Wednesday and had admitted giv- 
ing classified information to Mr. 
Soussoudis from December 1983 ! 
until May 1985, when she left the I 
Ghanaian post (UPI, AP) 




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Page 4 


FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


Published With The New York lunee and The Washington Post 



Eribune. 


A Wishful Framework 


■ President Reagan's “framework" budget 
ijeal with Speaker Up O'Neill is a Flight from 
reality. The simultaneous news that Budget 
Director David Stockman is leaving makes the 
outlook for deficit reduction even bleaker. The 
deficit crisis — and it is nothing less — is being 
blithely ignored, and the man who knows most 
about budget truths and consequences will no 
Longer be around to goad us all 
There are only three ways to bring down 
deficits of $200 billion because only three 
budget elements can yield enough revenue to 
close such a gap. The realistic options are: Cut 
back defense, reduce some Social Security 
benefits or raise taxes. The practical choice 
would be some of each. Mr. Reagan's deal with 
Mr. O’Neill opts for the least effective combi- 
nation: the most modest defense cutback, 
nothing from Social Security, no tax increase. 

; Being negotiated are differences between 
ihe Senate and House budget resolutions, each 
of which would supposedly reduce next year’s 
prospective deficit by $56 billion and save 
S300 billion over three years. The Senate fa- 
vored cuts in Social Security, the House deeper 
cuts in defense. To break the impasse. Mr. 
Reagan let Ntr. O'Neill stand as the protector 
of Social Security and had his way on defense. 
Since he vows to veto any tax increase, that 
unpleasant topic continues to be ignored. 


A very bad situation is thus made worse. Mr. 
Stockman and other analysts found even the 
originally promised savings exaggerated In- 
stead of settling for lesser cuts. President Rea- 
gan and Speaker O'Neill should have wanted 
more. Their compromise suggests that neither 
the administration nor the Democrats care 
enough about deficits. And without Mr. Stock- 
man to keep them honest, both parties will 
indulge their worst pretenses. 

The budget director has earned a rest and a 
high Wall Street salary. But his mastery of the 
budget will not be easily replaced. The appar- 
ent collapse of resolve to slash the deficit 
leaves his successor an even bigger headache. 

The continuing 5200 - billion deficits are the 
product of exuberant lax-cutting in 1981 and 
indulgence of Mr. Reagan’s inflated military 
buildup. Even within those parameters, Mr. 
Stockman has done the best he could — some- 
times too well — to fmd savings in non- 
defense programs. Above all be has dared to 
defy the president by sounding the alarm 
about Pentagon spending and by warning of 
the inevitability of tax increases. 

That Mr. Stockman's candor about budgets 
and deficits came to be regarded as heroic is 
the sorriest possible coalmen t about the public 
servants he leaves behind. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Disarmament Shot Down 


; Let’s hear it for the Grass National Arsenal 
— and to hell with the pleadings of thousands 
of America's lop law enforcement officials and 
ihe recommendation of a Reagan administra- 
tion task force on crime. The U.S. Senate has 
Voted to gut what minimal protections have 
existed against interstate and quickie sales of 
handguns. The senators swallowed the arm- 
America philosophy of the National Rifle As- 
sociation. The result is a dangerous bill that 
deserves prompt burial in the House. 

‘ Why all this support for abetting what is 
already the worst record of any country in the 
world for annual handgun deaths? One big line 
of the gun lobby is that present attempts to 
maintain and approve minimal public safety 
protections —-such as a 14-day waiting period 
for handgun purchases — are too much of a 
puisance for dealers, sportsmen and others 
with legitimate interests in prompt trans- 
actions. But the proposals would have applied 
only to handguns and would have addressed 
other paperwork concerns try lifting controls 
from rifles and other long guns. 


Another excuse given for stripping away 
safety protections is that criminals can always 
find handguns anyway. This neatly ignores 
efforts to stop quick sales to mentally de- 
ranged impulse buyers and killers and to crim- 
inals in a hurry, who now won’t even have to 
go to a black market. Any comer store will do. 

There is also an NRA favorite myth that 
goes something like this: If you let the govern- 
ment do anything serious about monitoring 
the flow of handguns, then Uncle Sam will 
make a great big inventory of who has any- 
thing around that fires. Dictators then can 
seize every weapon from under every rooftop 
and rake over the counliy in no time flat. Sane 
people actually seem to believe that 
The majority of Americans apparently do 
not buy that line. In response to polls over the 
years, they have supported more, not fewer, 
controls on handguns. Until similar reason 
reaches the Senate, law enforcement officials 
and the rest of us will have to hope that good 
sense prevails in the House. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Times at Its Palaces 


| The Times was celebrating its 200th anni- 
versary last night at Hampton Court palace in 
Richmond. That’s our cousin. The Times of 
jLondon, a newspaper that won its indepen- 
dence under George IQ and has been a pillar 
of English public fife ever since. Its history is 
ihe history of the newspaper, and we owe it 
much, even — since it invented both the edito- 
rial and the editorial “we” —our voice. 

> Newspapers before and since have been 
means for governments to influence people. 
Under its great editors. The Times became 
a way for people to influence government, 
ri created public opinion. 

, “What you read in the morning in The 
Times, you shall hear in the evening in all 
society," noted a viator to England, Ralph 
Waldo Emerson. During Britain's Crimean 
]War against the Russians the paper roused the 
nation with descriptions of the neglect of 
troops and mismanagement of campaigns. 
Florence Nightingale was dispatched, and the 
government resigned. “If England is ever to 
be England again." fumed Lord John Russell 
a former Prime Minister, “this vile tyranny 
of The Times must be cut off." 


The Times later became an institution, as 
solidly established as the House of Lords or 
the Church of England. “It even regarded the 
monarchy as not much above it in importance 
and authority writes Henry Fairlie, a former 
editorial writer. Its editors neglected its role as 
a newspaper, believing they were writing for 
the governing elite "instead of a wider reader- 
ship. Circulation steadily shrank, and the 
Thunderer had to be rescued from whimpering 
into bankruptcy, first by Roy Thomson, the 
Canadian newspaper magnate, and then by 
Rupert Murdoch, its present owner. Mr. Mur- 
doch lost his first editor, the distinguished 
Harold Evans, but has gained rirculalion. 

A glittering list of dignitaries were invited 
to Hampton Court palace to celebrate The 
Times’s bicentenary. Reporters of The Tunes, 
who were not invitoi, were bolding their own 
celebration in a working-class London bar 
called the Hampton Court Palace. They invit- 
ed a rival list of dignitaries. 

The Times's present times may be turbulent 
but it bas survived worse. England would have 
been worse if governed without its tyranny. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Interest Rates Boost Sterling Party Realignment in Britain? 


The pound's value against the dollar has 
risen by over a quarter since its .February low 
tide. This represents a welcome correction of 
ihe gross overvaluation of the American cur- 
rency, now suffering a succession of blows 
tanging from economic recession to the vale- 
dictory warnings of President Reagan’s resign- 
ing budget director. But sterling has also risen 
15 percent, since February, against the curren- 
cy of our main European competitor. It has 
reached levels against the German mark as 
high as we have seen since 1982. The pound 
has been boosted by [high] interest rates. We 
are losing competitiveness in the biggest Euro- 
pean market dangerously fast. 

— The Times (London). 


British political experts believe that the pub- 
lic is turning against the prime minister’s tough 
economic policies and the prospect or continu- 
ing high unemployment. If Lhe trend contin- 
ues, the most likely result of a general ejection 
would be a hung Parliament — with Labor 
holding the most seats but short of a majority, 
and a strengthened Alliance holding the bal- 
ance of power. For the United States and- 
Britain's other allies, this would be an unset- 
tling development, although preferable to a 
Labor government with a clear majority. The 
Alliance is in fundamental support of the At- 
lantic alliance and a responsible British role in 
Europe. The same cannot be said of Labor. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 




» \ < 






M/ri 




GUMS PEOPLE* 

PESLE WITH EAST ACCESS 

to firearms due id weak 

AND INSUFFICIENT GUN ^ 
CONTROL LAMIS KILL PEOPLE 


/ . : IW 


A Bipartisan Plan to Get Rid of the Budget Deficit 


W ASHINGTON — Budgets 
come in so many disguises that 
it is hard to find the real McCoy 
among the impostors. But as House 
and Senate conferees resume work 
this week on the budget, the real 
McCoy is on the table. 

Our budget plan is supported by 
three Republicans and three Demo- 
crats. a majority of the Senate confer- 
ees. It gets the job done with hammer 
and nails , not smoke and mirrors. By 
fiscal 1988, if it is passed, the deficit 
will be down to $71.9 billion: By 
fiscal 1990 the deficit will be gone. 
We win not have to come back next 
year for further “adjustments." 

This plan hits the deficit in each of 
its four pressure points. 

• It cuts federal spending. Reve- 
nue sharing ends after 1986. Medi- 
care savings total more than $18 bil- 
lion in three years, with no extra 
burden to beneficiaries. Agriculture 
cuts reach $12 billion by 1988. Do- 
mestic savings will total $1 17 billion. 

• Military spending is frozen in 
1986 but allowed to grow by 3 per- 
cent in 1987 and 1988. America has 
bought itself a powerhouse defense, 
and it is on delivery. Under the plan 
now before the conferees, it will still 
buy $300 billion worth of protection 
in each of the next three years. 

• Cost of living adjustments for 
Social Security and other retirement 
programs are suspended for one year. 
A 20-percent plow back of savings 


By Slade Gorton and Lawton Chiles 


Senator Gorton is a 
Democrat from Florida. 


Washington and Senator Chiles a 
are members of the Senate Budget Committee. 


will protect the low-income elderly. 
Full adjustments will resume in 1987. 

• Between 1986 and 1988 the plan 
calls for $59 billion in new revenues. 
None will be used to fund new spend- 
ing programs. Instead they will all be 
used to reduce the federal deficit. 

The plan can be passed. And here 
is what makes it necessary. 

It rests on one, blunt assumption: 
Unless we use all the budget tools 
available, we will have 5200-billion 
deficits indefinitely. Budget Director 
David Stockman told the New York 
Slock Exchange that last month. By 
1990 the interest on the national debt 
will nearly equal what we now spend 
on national defense. Our foreign 
trade deficit will be running neck and 
neck with the federal deficit. 

From the long list of negatives, 
select any one — from high interest 
rates to lost jobs — and the conclu- 
sion is the same. We either reverse the 
deficit trend this time, or it will never 
be reversed. This is the last chance to 
act while we still have some measure 
of control. And this is the one chance 
we have between last year’s election 
and next years election to deal with 
economic facts as we find them rather 
than as we wish they were. 

Ever since the budget conference 


it has been marked by politi- 
jirion. When sessions were 
led on June 25 it was because 
house would move from the 
comer into which it had painted it- 
self. Conferees were seen as either 
anti-defense or against Social Securi- 
ty, depending on whether they sup- 
ported the House or the Senate bud- 
get. As long as those remain the only 
two choices, the suspicion and dead- 
lock mil continue. 

The budgets separately approved 
in the House and m the Senate each 
put two of the three deficit-reduction 
elements off limits. The house ex- 
empted revenues and Social Security. 
The Senate protected revenues and 
the military. The only way the deficit 
can really be riHninatwi is if all the 
big-ticket items are part of a fair 
package. What is needed now is a 
decisive step to demonstrate that no 
one is getting the upper hand at the 
expense of someone else. 

The question is whether the admin- 
istration will go along, with the Sen- 
ate’s budget oner. Precedent suggests 
that the White House could check in 
at the “last resort” without embar- 
rassment. It has happened before. 

Twice President Reagan has made 
tax increases possible when the eco- 


nomic Tacts made them essential. The 
White House and members of both 
parties in both Houses are still skit- 
tish about asking for more revenues, 
but when it was dear in the past that 
everything short of revenues simply 
would not keep the defidt from 
clim bin g, we did what was necessary. 

The same situation exists now. We 
cannot cure the defidt with spending 
cuts alone. We cannot grow our way 
out of the problem while annual in- 
terest on the national debt chews up 
the growth and then some. And we 
will not be able to do anything at all 
unless the conference deadlock is 
broken with a bipartisan agreement 

Our budget alternative gives the 
president nearly everything he asked 
in spending cuts. It leaves the mili- 
tary buildup' intact while unifying 
both the public and the private sec- 
tors in the most serious effort ever 
made to cut federal deficits. 

We represent a majority of Repub- 
lican ana Democratic conferees from 
the Senate who have been working 
for a month, trying to negotiate defi- 
cit reduction within narrow bounds. 

It has not worked. We have become 
convinced that only a dramatic effort 
that opens all doors and gels the job 
done completely can move the con- or -on corruption -—all non-idedogi- 
ference and Congress. It is time for .cal sins, ana all prevalent but not at 


The System 
Is Overdue 
For a Purge 

By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON — A quiet con- 
volution is going cm in the So- 
viet Union. No >ho» trials with pub- 
lic “confessions": no Zis limousines 
streaking across Red Square at mid- 
night: no Khnishchevesquc secret de- 
nunciations or exile of latter-day 
Troiskys. The coils of change twist in 
an un drama tic way to produce a re- 
markably unremarked purge. 

Andrei Gromyko has been eased 
upstairs jo a ceremonial post, his 
place at the head of foreign policy 
taken not by Anatoli Dobrynin hut 
by on unknown Georgian party boss. 
That cannot be explained as the re- 
placement of the gerontocracy by a 
new generation of Russian leaden. 

Grigori Romanov, fired last week, 
was not one of the Brezhnev -Cher- 
nenko old guard. Like Mikhail Gor- 
bachev. he was one of the new crop 
pul onto the fast track by die enforcer 
of change. Yuri Andropov. Mr. Gor- 
bachev has forced Mr. Romanov out 
for the oldest of reasons: The new 
man at the top did not want his chief 
rival looking over his shoulder. 

Nor was Marshal Nikolai Ogarkov 
an old fogy. When he tried to redirect 
money from land forces into high- 
technology weaponry last year, a 
combination of old soldier* and party 
stalwarts forced him out as chief of 
staff. Now Marshal Ogarkov's new 
book. “History Teaches Vigilance." is 
officially noticed His return to the 
Defense Ministry would mean that 
those who opposed his strategy 
would be on the list for removal. 

This is no mere shake-up. A purge’ 
is under way. none the less systematic 
and far-reaching for being bloodless. 

Much more than the torch is being 
passed. This Moscow circus has three 
rings: (1) Among the "young" men. 
in their 50s and 60s. the human ele- 
ment of clashing ambitions is ai 
work. (21 Among the competing insti- 
tutions — the party, the military, the 
K.GB — a power’ struggle is under 
way. (3) Most important, among the 
economic ideologies, a decision is be- 
ing made that wil] profoundly affect 
the way the Soviet Union is run. 

It is news to nobody that the Soviet 
system does not work. After nearly 70 
years of communism it is hard to 
keep blaming the weather for a na- 
tion's inability to feed its people. The 
Andropovites now in charge aL the 
Kremlin know that the ignoble ex- 
periment of central direction has 
failed, and that great chunks of the 
party apparat and its present leaders 
must follow yesterday's Mensheviks 
to history's ash heap. 

Mr. Gorbachev cannot admit that. 
He must blame the systemic failure 
on lack of discipline, on drunkenness 


Republicans and Democrats, repre- 
sentatives, senators and the president 
to face the economic facts and act. 
The Washington Pan. 


Reagan’s Bark Has Been Worse Than His Bite 


W ASHINGTON — Judging from the polls, 
there are increasing doubts that President 
Ronald Reagan has the toughness that effective 
leadership requires in these times. 

As terrorist incidents in Lebanon and El Sal- 
vador slip into the history books, conservatives 
are questioning what happened to Mr. Reagan’s 
1 98 1 promise of “swift and effective retribution” 
for attacks on American citizens. 

The sad truth is that hundreds of American 
lives have been taken by terrorists in the last five 
years, and no one has been punished. After 
picking up a cheap win on Grenada in 1983 and 
lobbing a few naval shells into Lebanon in 19S4 
to cover the withdrawal of the marines from that 
misguided deployment, Mr. Reagan has appar- 
ently forsaken the threat of force. 

Now the conservative Heritage Foundation, a 
source of people and ideas for the Reagan ad- 
ministration, has raised the embarrassing ques- 
tion of Mr. Reagan’s unilateral disarmament in 
domestic politics. It asks bow deficits have 
reached record levels under him without his 
systematic use of one of the great constitutional 
powers any president enjoys: the veto. 

In a policy paper last week, James Gattuso and 
Stephen Moore of the Heritage Foundation staff 
put the issue in two succinct paragraphs: 
“Seldom has a president adopted a tougher 


By David S. Broder 

stance with a Congress than Ronald Reagan in 
the first months of Ids second term. He vowed to 
veto congressional efforts to raise taxes or 
budget-busting spending bills. He taunted ' 
gress to ‘make my day* by passing a tax increase. 
The message is dear and welcome: Reagan 
would appear to relish vetoing the actions of an 
irresponsible Congress. He seems to recognize 
that the veto is a president’s trump, card. 

“The problem is that, despite the tough talk, 
Reagan actually has been very timid in playing 
this trump thus far in his presidency. This ; 
eat aversion to vetoing may serious! 
ability to prod Congress to act 
ticularly m slashing federal sp 
few major victories have been won since 1981.” 

Mr. Reagan has not shunned the veto. Early 
this year he vetoed an emergency farm credit 
measure; support for him was so evident that the 
House Democratic leadership did not even at- 
tempt an override. Bui in his first term he used 
the veto only 39 times — barely half the annual 
average of all presidents in this century. 

The Heritage study asserts that “Congress has 
presented Mr. Reagan plenty of bills Of dubious 
merii which be chose to sign rather than veto.” 


The examples it cites range from farm subsidies 
to education and grant-in-aid programs. Cumu- 
latively they explain part of the climb in federal 
spending above the levels Mr. Reagan sought 
The Heritage authors <k> not admit that much 
of the deficit they deplore results from the tax 
reductions Mr. Reagan pushed through at the 
start of his presidency. Nor do they examine the 
point made by congressional Democrats: that 
Congress has rearranged spending priorities but 
not increased overall appropriations beyond 
budgeted levels. Still the thrust of their criticism 
is valid. In domestic policy as much as in foreign 
affairs, Mr. Reagan has tended to huff and puff 
but has rardy blown the bouse down. 

He is observing the limits of the arms control 
treaties be once denounced and moving toward a 
summit with Mikhail Gorbachev — a sign that 
detente is once again back in fashion. 

He would rather threaten retaliation against 
terrorists than take concrete actions to punish 
those who kill Americans. And he would rather 
avoid using his veto power. 

So far Mr. -Reagan’s rhetoric has convinced 
people that he is a man with the strength of his 
own convictions. But, as time goes on, more than 
the conservative ideologues will begin to suggest 
that this man is something of a paper tiger. 

The Washington Post 


35 Years Later: The Korean War Started in Kansas 


FROM OUR JULY 12 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Alleged Plotters Held in Cuba 
HAVANA — The Chief of the Rural Guard 
has arrested Colonel Jorge Valera Mealatto. 
Six other men were arrested [on July 1 1J and 
charged with conspiracy to start an insurrec- 
tion against the government. It is alleged that 
the conspirators were en route to Vieja Ber- 
meja, in the Province of Matanzas, where a 
trunk containing arms, ammunition and dyna- 
mite had been shipped from Havana. Letters 
and documents were found on the prisoners, 
who have been brought to Havana. It is be- 
lieved that they will implicate many others 
in the conspiracy. It is stated that their plan 
was to dynamite property belonging to the 
Americans and provoke intervention. 


1935: Italy Is Warned on Abyssinia 

WASHINGTON — The United States has 
informed Rome that it would view with ex- 
treme misgiving any steps taken by Italy in 
Abyssinia which would lead to actual war. 
Secretary of State Cordell Hull expressed (he 
U.S. views to Ambassador Augusio Rosso 
when the envoy visited the Department erf 
State [on July IQ], It is understood that Mr. 
Hull repeated to Signor Rosso virtually the 
same sentiments that he expressed in his recent 
note to Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, to 
the effect that the two countries should again 
refer their dispute to the League of Nations. 
Meanwhile, a number of Americans left Abys- 
sinia recently on the advice of their Legation. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

■JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n IVS-M2 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Pubhsher 

Lieartve Editor REN£ BONDY Dtpm Publisher 

Liter ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

De/mh’ Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director id Ontramms 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DE5MAISONS Director of Ctmdatwn 

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International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charles-de-Gaulle. 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine. 

France Td: (I) 747-1265. Trie*: 6I27I8 (Heralds Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8051 
Directeur de la publication; Water N. Thayer. 


PHILIP M. FOIS1E 
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SAMUEL AST 
ROBERT K McCABE 
carl gewirtz 



ir.X subscript, on: S322 yearly. Second-doss postage paid at Long Island City, N.Y. I H01. 
^ 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 



— June 25 
came and went without much 
notice, even by the middle-aged 
males who constitute America’s Ko- 
rean War generation, and none of us 
made enough noise to disturb any- 
one’s reverie. That is too bad. Al- 
though limited in its goals, Korea 
was, by any definition, a major war. 
In three years and one month nearly 

34.000 Americans were killed in ac- 
tion or died in captivity, and more 
than 20.000 others died of noncom- 
bat causes. By comparison, about 

56.000 Americans died in Vietnam. 

The North Korean and Chinese 

Communist forces suffered an esti- 
mated 1.6 million combat casualties, 
about 60 percent Chinese, plus an- 
other 400,000 deaths from disease. 
An estimated 3 million North Korean 
civilians and 500,000 South Korean 
civilians died as a result of the war. 

However obscure the Korean War 
may seem now, it was vivid enough to 
those involved at the time. My first 
inkling of it came on that sunny Sun- 
day 35 years ago when I was an 18- 
year-old in western Kansas, sleeping 
the sleep of, if not the just and inno- 
cent, at least the uncaught 

My grandmother was making her 
usual preparations for church and 
Sunday dinner (fried chicken) when 
she heard early reports on the radio 
that North Korean infantry and 
tanks had invaded South Korea. 

There was the usual comment 
that such a conflict carried the : 
of possible conflict between the Unit- 
ed States and the Soviet Union. 
Grandmother gave me the wake-up 


By James R. Dickenson 

Wake up, Jimmie D, 


call of my life: 

World War m is about to break out." 

I headed for the drugstore to get 
the Sunday papers with, for once, 
more than the sports and comics in 
mind. Because of the papers' early 
dosing times — we got the boon- 
docks editions — none had a word 
about the invasion.' 

I made my bemused way back 
home speculating gloomily on where 
in Russia I might be at that time the 
next year. When I passed the bench in 
front of the People's State Bank on 
Main Street the usual half-dozen el- 
derly loafers, including a Spanish- 
American War veteran, were taking 
the morning sun, chewing and spit- 
ting, whittling and telling each outer 
lies. They, too, had heard the radio. 

“Hee, hee, hee, boy, get .your 
rightin' clothes on," the Spanish- 
American War vet called out Trust 
me that this quotation is exact: “We 
done whomped up a war for you.” 
My response, in tribute to my 
training in respecting my elders, was 
inaudible. Later, ‘in my first days at 
the Marine Corps recruit depot at 
San Diego, I had reason to recall it 
No one was gung-ho about the war 
in Korea, although there was no op- 
position to it as with Vietnam. There 
was little question of its necessity. 
And, unlike the guerrilla war in Viet- 
nam, it was a conven tional war with 
armies opposing each other. 

Conditioned by the Depre ss ion 
and World War U, we accepted our 
lot as just another of life's random 


deals of the cards. With the memory 
of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany 
still vivid, it was generally accepted 
that we had to stand up to aggression, 
although the fact that the war ended 
in effect as a tie, after aH that stiff er- 
frusmmon. 
of the draft was enor- 
mous, because the draft-eligible man- 
power pool was relatively small: the 
birthrate in the first years of the De- 
pression had been the lowest in the 
nation’s history. There were college 
student deferments, but a lot of gays 
whose grades were below a certain 
level, or who let their class load slip 
belOW the 12-hOUr minimum, found . 
themselves snatched unceremonious- 
ly off campus. But there was a re- 
markably liberal deferment policy for 
fathers, even for those who got mar- 
ried for that reason. 

Mary opted for foar-year enlist- 
ments m the Air Force or Navy, fig- 
uring the extra two years’ obligation 
was worth the guarantee of not wind- 
ing up in the infantry. There was no 
question at the time that it was a real 
and lethal war. And it featured some 
of America’s finest feats of arms. 

MacArthur’s landing at Inchon 

1 st Marine t Di^i(tt?s S ^Sful and 
courageous fight out of the Chosin 
Reservoir under the most horrendous 
winter conditions imaginable is a per- 
formance unexcelled By any fighting 
force. The campaigns of maneuver by 
Matthew Ridgway and James Van 
Fleet in. the months after, ihe with- 


drawal from the north are general- 
ship any nation can be proudof: 

But the last two years saw trench 
warfare reminiscent of World War L 
with bloody fights by small units for 
the hilly outposts in front of the mam 
line of resistance. And then the war 
ended after millions, of ca«a»aUh-t 
with the boundary between North 
and South essentially unchanged, as 
America concentrated on keeping the 
war on the peninsula from spreading 
into a global confUcL 
There is not much glory in limited 
wars. As a child excited by World 
War IL I had wondered what n would 
be like to be a veteran of the Spanish- 
American War. 1 was to find out. 

The Washington Post. 


the heart of the problem. 

That problem was laid out for all 
to see m the “Novosibirsk paper,” 
leaked by the Andropov -Gorbachev 
faction two years ago. What is needed 
is not mere decentralization, or mild 
reform toward market responsive- 
ness, but a rooting out of “class 
groups" that have taken over in the 
theoretically classless society. Worst 
of these is the group that occupies 
“numerous cozy niches with ilWe- 
fined responsibilities" — the party 
bureaucrats who are the economy’s 
mast anti-productive middlemen. 

That heretical paper was written 
by Professor Tatyana Zaslavskaya, a 
full member of the Academy of Sci- 
ences, who promptly dropped out of 
sight. Now. in the Gorbachev ascen- 
dancy, she is back, haranguing col- 
leagues in Novosibirsk and being re- 
spectfully interviewed in Izvestia. 

Today her protected heresy is even 
more brazen: She predicts that at- 
tempts to reform the economy, with 
managerial autonomy and bonuses to 
productive workers, will encounter 
strong internal opposition. 

What makes bo 1 prediction of re- 
sistance such hot stuff? In communist 
ideology, “contradictions" — com- 
peting interests — are not supposed 
to be “antagonistic.” In reality, 
of coarse, they are — and if they 
become so recognized, you have laid 
the groundwork for a top-to-boliom 
purge throughout the Soviet Union.. . 

According to Elizabeth Teague, 
the crack Kremlinologist and Ta- 
tyana- tracker for Radio Free Europe, 
the word favored by the Russian 
economist to describe bureaucratic 
bloat is translated as “hypertrophy,” 
the unhealthy enlargement of organs. 
Mr. Gorbachev, while slicking to the 
“ non- an tagonis tic" orthodoxy in his 
speeches, has picked up that word to 
lash out at "the hypertrophy and de- 
generation of personal interests." 

The purge is gaming speed. Histo- 
ry, as Marshal Ogarkov says, teaches 
vigilance. If a purge is not complete, 
the purgers are purged. 

The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “‘Letters to the 
Editor* and must contain the write 
er T s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


UHTERTOra 

France, Germany, SDI 


I was baffled by William PfhfFs 
statement — in his col umn "The 
French See Danger in Germany” 
(Jufy 2) — about French fears that 
Soviet proposals for neutralization 
and unification might draw West 
Germany out of the West Since the 
famous offers of Stalin in 1952-53, 
there has been no attempt by the 
Soviet Union to trade German unity 
—that is, abandonment erf the Com- 
imaginable is a per- “vinist regime in East Garaany — 
led by any fighting for a West-German withdrawal from 
ens erf maneuver by NATO. Nor is such an attempt likdv 


lion of the Grecos, continue to utter- 
ly ignore; such an option. 

New Frroch fears are motivated by 
the possibflivy, as Claude Cheysson, 
the former French foreign minister, 
put- it in an interview in the -Paris * 
drily Liberation last May 3, that 
America’s Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive will erode the deterrent value of 
nuclear weapons, thus encouraging 
the WesrGerman pacifist movement 
and those who want to get rid of 
nuclear weapons altogether. This is 
one of the major reasons why tire 

w __ - — French government voiced its strong 

na lu. Nor is such an attempt likely opposition to the SDI concept . 
tor as long as all pbfitical parties Walter schutze^ ' 

m Bonn, including' the'“reatist“ fac- WALTER SCHuTjffi.^, , 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


Page 5 


Kim U Sung Molds a Workers 9 State With little Time for Lovers or Strollers 


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To Pakistan 


. : By David B. .Ottawa? 

. -■ - -H'lnJI Ongtaa fibsi Service 

WASHINGTON — Tbe Umted 
Slates, is expediting, delivery of 
Sdewmder'aid Stinger missifesto 
Pakistan as jxsri of its effort to 
bolster defeases there against Sovi- 
et W Afghan air incursions. 

A State Department statement 
saiL Wednesday that “a number” 
of Sdewindcrs, air-to-air missiles 
pjxvioas}y on order for. Pakistan’s 
.fteeraf T-W fighters, were being 
shipped, “as welTas otter apprepri 
ate.air-defease equqjmenL” 

tte , statement said explicitly 
thaL the decision to expedite the 
shipment was made “in response to 
repeated violations of Pakistan’s 
• airspace and territory by Commit- 
just aircraft operating from Af- 
ghanistan,” and it called the mis- 
siles “an appropriate response” to 
theca: 

- No other details were made pub- 
lic But US. officials said privately 
that :100 Sidewinders were being 
rushed to Pakistan and that the 
“other appropriate air-defense 
equipment” involved an unspeci- 
fied number of shoulder-fired, sur- 
face-to-air Stinger missiles, worth 
S8 5 million. 

A Pakistani request for ground 
or airborne radar for improved de- 
tection and interception of Afghan 
aircraft remains under study, one 
official said. 

Tbe increasing air incursions, 
some reportedly by Soviet-piloted 
planes, are viewed as an attempt by 
ibe Soviet Union to increase pres- 
sure. on the Pakistani government 
to curtail support for Afghan rebels 
fighting tbe Soviet-backed govern- 
ment in Kabul 

On March S the administration 
formally notified Congress of its 
intent to provide Pakistan with a 
530-million package of air-defense 
equipment, including 500 Side- 
winders. The 100 Sidewinders be- 
ing rushed there are part of this 
package, but the Stingers are an 
extra, a U.S. official said. 

The United States has ear- 
marked 5325 milli on for military 
ay sigtanee to Pakistan this fiscal 
year. Pakistan must pay interest at 
the going market rate, which has 
placed financial constraints on 
what Pakistan can afford to buy in 
addition to 40 F-16s already pur- 
chased from the United States. . 


By John F. Bums 

. Ne* York Times Service ■ 

, PYONGYANG, North Korea ™ 
— One of the most' striking things 
about daily life in North Korea ls 
the routine -that Kim II Sung ap- 
pears to have imposed on tbe al- 
most 2Q million inhabitants cif this 
“woite’s state." 

Behind tbe stream , of propagan- 
da about mutual love between* 
President Kim and the people is a 

. North Korea 

One Man’s Conn try 

Second of three articles ■ . . 

system of authority and discipline 
that has thrust iisxtf mtn every cor- 
ner of Kfe. Basing itself on the 
claim of Mr. Kim's “universal ge- 
nius,” Ihe. government has set out 
to organize as many hours in 'the 
citizen’s day as posable. 

When 


are asked why 
there are so few people In Pyong- 
yang’s streets, they say that it is 
beca u se nearly everyone, from the 
youngest to the oldest, is bnsy. 

' Diplomats who watch the cpmr 
ings and goings in ibor neighbor- 
hoods say many set out at dawn, 
finish past dusk and spend much of 
their non working Hmg studying 
President Kim's teachings or tak- 
ing pan in compulsory labor such 
as clearing snow, which keeps 
many workmg until midnighL 

In this setting, it comes as a sur- 
prise to see young couples in a 
grassy park beside thePotong Riv- 
er at nhdmommg, whiling away 
time beneath weeping willow trees. 

“A good place for lovers, I 
think/ * an .official commented as 
the black government limousine 
swept along a parkway, heading for 
a tour of the m/s maternity hospi- 
taL There, the official lapsed back 
into ritual praise of Mr. Kim. 

After a weddong tour, the lovers 
in tbe park seem like a symbol of a 
spontaneity and privacy that has to 
snuggle to survive. In conversa- 
tions about what Mr. Kim has 
achieved, officials say individual 
ambitions have faded away in the 
face of economic and social 
achievements since 1953. - 

Much material progress has been 
achieved. Pyongyang, in ruins 
when the war ended m 1953, has 
been rebuilt in a style evocative of 
Moscow, Wide avenues with center 
lanes reserved for VIT traffic are 
flanked with huge buildings and 
monuments, most of them dedicat- 
ed to Mr. Kim or his doctrines. 

The city, which officially has 
800,000 people Nit which some 
Westerners believe has twice that 



a.-.:-. 

Tba Naw Yo* Taw 

A view of central Pyongyang, a city that lay in nans in 1953 when tbe Korean War ended. 


number, is immaculately dean, the 
streets . swept daily by -women. - 
Much attention has been given to 
parks and flower beds. 

Mon residents of the capital live 
in apartment braidings, travel to 
work on a subway- in which the 
stations are decorated with marble 
and mosaics, and shop in stores 
that are impressively stocked with 
basic consumer goods, though 
short of meat and fresh foods. 

Compared with China, che cloth- 
ing is varied, with women in attrac- 
tive summer dresses and children in 
smart school uniforms. Despite in- 
dustries in tbe suburbs, .the air is 
clean. 

But anybody traveling outside . 
the capital is left with the feeling 
that Pyongyang itself is a monu- 
ment Kaesong, a dty of at least 
200,000 people 80 mUes (129 Mo- 
meters) to the south, provides a 
stark contrast, with dilapidated 
buil ding s, peasants in patchwork 

j arlfft t^ji mbrngbandrar tufliid diy 

running free in the streets. 

In tbe capital, there not only are 
no handcarts or dogs but also no 
heavy vehicles during much of the. 
day, when they are-banned. * 

- Rural areas, where about 40 per- 
cent of the people live, are equally 
neat 

Despite the intensity of the food 
growing, the government has trou- 
ble-providing people with a bal- 
anced diet. Diplomats taking leave 
in Beging return with baskets load- 
ed with pork, beef and fresh vegeta- 


bles, as well as turned fruit. Offi- 
cials described a food' distribution 
system under which most urban 
dwellers are provided with rations 
of rice and meat at their workplace. 

Diplomats say they believe one 
reason for the food scarcities is that 
the government's extravagance in 
other areas has drained away the 
capital needed to modernize farm- 
ing. Travelers see little mechaniza- 
tion in the fields, and labor intensi- 
ty is such that all urban dwellers 
have to spend a week each year 
helping with the harvest. 

A factor in economic develop- 
ment has been Mr. Kim’s bailie to 
keep pace with South Korea, which 
has boasted one of the worid's fast- 
est growth rates in the.last decade. 
Diplomats say that ihfa, as well as 
ego, may explain the enormous 
money poured into showcase pro- 
jects, m particular the development 
of Pyongyang. 

“I think Kim figured that most 
people coming here would base 
their judgments on what they, saw 
in the capital and decided to spend 
his money here,” a diplomat said. 

Thera are serious credit prob- 
lems. Three Western countries that 
maintain missions here — Austria, 
Roland and Sweden — spend 
much of their time uyiug to obtain 
payment for goods delivered years 
ago. Sweden is owed $80 million 
for Volvo cars and heavy mining 
equipment from the -1970s. The 
brother ot Sweden's prime minis- 


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By Don Oberdorfer 

WasMagsan Pan Service 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia 
— Secretary rtf Slate George P. 
Shultz, in a notable shift of view, 
expressed; general U.S. backing 
Thursday for indirect talks On 
Cambodia as proposed by the non- 
Communist nations of Southeast 
Asia. 

Mr. Shultz's remarks in a closed 
meeting, as reported by a senior 
aide, fell short of a definitive U.S. 
endorsement of the negotiating ini- 
tiative. But the secretary of state's 
h comments appeared far more sym- 
’ pathetic, and much less critical, 
than statements he was malting on 
the subject less than a week ago. 

Foreign ministers of the Associa- 
tion of South East Asian Nations 
(ASEAN) formally urged Vietnam 
on Monday to agree to indirect 
talks aimed a political settlement of 
the war in Cambodia. The pro- 
posed talks would be between the 
three groups of anti- Vietna m ese 
Cambodian guerrillas, on the one 
hand, and a Vietnamese delegation 
including representatives erf the 
Vietnamese-installed Cambodian 
government, on the other. 

The two groups would talk to 
each other through an intermetfi- 
. ary. . 

Mr. Shultz, in Malaysia for a 
of foreign ministers from 
I, its Western partners and 
Japan, had earlier expressed oppo- 
. si tion to “anything that has m it 
implicit recognition of the puppet 
arrangement the Vietnamese nave 
in Cambodia." 

A senior aide said that Mr. 
Shultz had mentioned this concern 
in a closed meeting with ASEAN 
foreign ministers but had then ex- 
pressed the view that the final de- 
sign of the proposal “had taken 
care of that.” 

“He is in general very support- 
ive” of the ASEAN proposal now, 
the State Department official said. 
He said Mr. Shultz understood 



George P. Shultz, the U.S. secretary of state, left, talked 
with Joe Clark, Canada’s foreign minister, Thursday at a 
meeting in Malaysia of the ASEAN nations and their allies. 

ASEAN’s desire to have a media- ASEAN were “completely out of 
Tiigm for maintaining a political ini- ' fc “ ” 

dative to seek Vietnamese willing- 
ness to negotiate seriously. 

Vietnam has been sharply criti- 
cal of the proposal in recent press 
accounts. A Japanese Foreign Min- 
istry official who was in Hanoi re- 
cently quoted Foreign Minister 
Nguyen Co Thach as having said 
that indirect talks as proposed by 


the question. 

Malaysia's foreign minister, 
Tengku Ahmad Rithanddeen, who 
originated the idea in somewhat 
different form several months 


said at a news conference that 
did not accept the Vietnamese 
comments to date as a formal rejec- 
tion and that “we must never say 
die" to a political solution in Cam- 
bodia. 


,v ■- - 


Philippines to Investigate Allegations 
That Officials Shipped Money Abroad 




ELHTOH 


U" 


Ream 

• ! MANILA — President Fendi- 
f j naijd E Marcos ordered an investi- 
gfltion Thursday into allegations 
that Philippine government offi- 
cials and businessmen had sent 
money abroad UlegaDy Tor U.S. 
property and other investments. 

. The order Mowed disclosure by 
a California newspaper that several 
prominent Filipinos, including Mr. 
Marcos; his wife, Imelda, and some 
of their closest associates, had 


Hussein Meets With Arafal 

The Associated Pres 

■\\ AMMAN, Jordan — Yasser 
*, ! Arafat, leader of the Palestine Lib- 
era don Organization, met Thnrs- 
day with King Hussein of Jordan to 
■ discuss plans for an Arab summit, 
' i v D idio Jordan announced. It said 
“ the meeting had been attended by 
Prime Minister Zaid Rifai and For- 
. ! tign Minister Taher al-Masri 


property in the United States worth 
milli ons of dollars. 


The report by the San Jose Mer- 
uy News, which appeared in i 




a 

iition 


CUXy . 

number or Philippine oppos 
publications, said many of the in- 
vestments and purchases were han- 
dled by lawyers, holding corpora- 
tions or business associates. 

The newspaper did not question 
the legality of the deals wit said 
they were complex and sometimes 
marfg ownership difficult to trace. 

A Philippine government state- 
ment made no mention of invest- 
ments that the Mercury News said 
were held by Mr. Marcos and his 
wife and the dozen or so others 
namwl by the newspaper or wheth- 
er they would be included in the 
inquiry. 

The statement said allegations in 
Manila that activities violated Phil- 
ippine law were “apparently based 
on innuendoes, rumors and gos- 
.sip." 


■ Response to Hanoi on MIAs 

Barbara Cross# te of The New 
York Times reported earlier firm 
Kuala Lumpur: 

Mr. Shultz has declared that the 
United States is ready to work 
romptly and derisively” with 
ictnam to resolve the- issue of . 
missing UA servicemen. 

Tbe comment Wednesday was 


bis first public response to a re- 
quest for “high-level” talks on the 
issue that was passed from Hanoi 
to Washington last week by For- 
eign Minster Mochtar Kusnmaat- 
madja of Indonesia. 

At a news conference at the U5. 
Embassy in Kuala Lumpur, Mr. 
Shultz said: 

-*I drink the next step for us is — 
as we will be doing — to organize 
die kind of group we dunk would 
be best able to respond and to let 
them know in Hanoi that we'd like 
to start to work on this problem. 
We want to work at it as promptly 
and decisively as possible?” 

Vietnam decided last week to 
tnm over the remains of 26 Ameri- 
cans thought to have died in^ Indo- 
china. This was the largest repatriar 
tion . of remains of MIAs 
announced since 1975, when South 
Vietnam fell to the armies of the 
North. Miore than 2,400 Americans 
are stall listed as missing in Indo- 
china, over half of them in Viet- 
nam. 

Mr. Shultz indicated that the 
United States was prepared to deal 
with Vietnam directly at a 
level Officials traveling in 
Shultz party have suggested that 
Paul D. Wolfowitz. assistant secre- 
tary of state for East Asian and 
Pacific affairs, might be among of- 
ficials likely to visit Hanoi 

■ Vietnam Assails Secretary 

Vietnam asserted Thursday tnai 
Mr. Shultz's visit to Cambodian 
refugee ramps on Tuesday revealed 
U.S. support for what Hanoi al- 
leges is a Thai plan to send armed 
Cambodians to sabotage the gov- 
ernment in Phnom Penh, Tbe Asso- 
ciated Press reported from Bang- 
kok. 

The Co mmunis t Party newspa- 
per, Nhan Dan, quoted by the Viet- 
nam News Agency, said the visit 
showed Washington's “ambitious 
strategy lo come back and secure a 
foothold in this vital region of Asia 
after being booted out 10 years 
ago.” 


ter, a businessman, was promised 
by Mr. Kim earlier this year that 
the bill would be paid. It was not. 

Tbe showcase approach is most 
evident in two Pyongyang institu- 
tions regularly shown to foreigners, 
the No. 1 Senior Middle School 
and the maternity hospital. Both 
display millions ot dollars of equip- 
ment bought from the West, appar- 
ently with rash. The sense that both 
institutions are exhibitions first 
and workplaces second is height- 
ened by the unused look of much of 
the equipment, the quiet in the cor- 
ridors and the array of red plastic 
plaques attesting to inspection 
tours made by Mr. Kim and his 
son, Kim Jong 11 

At the school, room after room is 
filled with videotape recorders 
from Japan and digital laboratory 
equipment from West Germany, 
and the music room has 25 electric 
organs from Japan. Tbe 2,000-bed 
maternity hospital is stuffed with 
equipment that would make many 
western hospitals envious — a 
dental surgery set-up from West 
Germany, ultrasound equipment 
from Japan, radio-isotope ma- 
chines from Hungary and a Japa- 
nese two-way television system that 
allows visitors on tbe ground floor 
to talk to patients in every ward. 

The attempt to project an ideal- 
ized view of life confronts a major 
obstacle in the forbidding reputa- 
tion the country has earned over 
the years with its dulling propagan- 
da, its self-imposed isolation and 
allegations that have linked it to the 
training and financing of terrorists, 
drag dealing through its embassies 
and other activities both violent 
and bizarre. 

As in Stafinist Russia; there are 


disturbing glimpses of another 
force, something that marshals 
opinion and penalizes those step- 
ping out of line. Partly, it is a mat- 
in' of silence and darting eyes in 
reaction to questions. 

On the train to Pyongyang from 
the border town or Sinuiju. across 
the YoJu River from China, a mid- 
dle-aged Korean in the dining car. 
inhibitions loosened by the local 
beer, offered a toast to the visitors 
and later visited them in their com- 
partment Thirty seconds after he 
entered, an attendant yanked him 
away to a compartment several 
doors down and closed the door, 
after which muffled voices and pro- 
tests were heard for two hours. 

As ihe week progresses, it be- 
comes clear that no unsupervised 
contacts with the people will be 
tolerated. Making impromptu 
stops to take photographs in 
Pyongyang proves nearly impossi- 
ble. and hotel waiters are sum- 
moned away the moment ex- 
changes go beyond the menu. 

The caution extends to arranging 
visits to institutions that are eerily 
quiet. Visits to Pyongyang's show- 
case No. 1 Senior Middle School 
are scheduled after most classes 
have ended for the day. At the 
maternity hospital, deliveiy rooms 
are deserted, many of the laborato- 
ries idle and corridors oddly devoid 
of activity, all ar midmoming on a 
weekday. 

Yei between visits to institu- 
tions, where guides speak tirelessly 
of the leadership of Mr. Kim and 
present an image of their society as 
one that has no place for individ- 
uality, there are moments when hu- 
man nature peeps through. 

Now and then, enjoyment shows 
up on the official program. Visitors 
to Mangyongdae, Mr. Kim's offi- 
cial birthplace, are surprised to find 
their guides leading them directly 
from the hallowed precincts of the 
cottage to a fair close by. There, 
adults and children fresh from gaz- 
ing reverentially at the sandpit 
where Mr. Kim played as a child 
can be seen laughing, scrapping 
and behaving as everywhere. 

But the sense of a highly regi- 
mented society with penalties for 
unlicensed behavior is never far 
away. A woman walking toward 
the roller coaster with a small boy 
appeared seized by panic when a 
foreigner tried to take her picture, 
turning on her heels and running 
away. Moments later, children jos- 
tling at an ice cream stall dispersed 
rapidly after spying the camera, 
some of them gesturing angrily. 

A camera is regarded with suspi- 
cion in many countries, but in 
North Korea, officials seem to con- 
sider it le thal. After this correspon- 
dent wandered 50 yards from his 
hotel and snapped a picture of a 
young woman with a wheelbarrow 
doing some gardening, an inter- 
preter was overcome with anxiety. 


After 15 minutes huddled with a 
group of drivers who had witnessed 
the incident, the interpreter re- 
turned and said he hoped there 
would be no repercussions. 

Only once in seven days was 
there an opportunity to talk to any- 
body outside a chain of official, 
guides and administrators, and that 
occasion, at a workers' residential 
complex a few miles from the cen- 
ter of Pyongyang, was arranged at a 
time when the place was deserted- 

The woman whose apartment 
was opened for inspection, Mrs. 
Ryong. said an array of pictures of 
Mr. Kim in the four rooms — at 
least three in each — were there 
because she and her husband want- 
ed them, not because they were 
required. 

In the spotless kitchen, a loud- 


speaker hooked into a public-ad- 
dress system was attached to the 
wail. Officials said this was for an- 
nouncements. Defectors to the 
South in recent years have said 
such systems are used to direct a 
stream of propaganda into people's 
homes. ' 

Similar accounts say that most 
North Koreans have only “fixed 
dial” radios, capable of receiving 
broadcasts from Pyongyang but 
not those from the South. Televi- 
sion sets have a choice of three 
stations, closing about 9 P.M. 

To a Westerner, the image that 
emerged was one of a land of 
numbing tedium, a perception 
strengthened by the blank looks on 
the faces of people along the way. 

NEXT: Imges of the United 
States. 






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Taiwan Cuts Tie^ With Bolivia 

The Associated Press 

TAIPEI — Taiwan has broken 
diplomatic relations with Bolivia 
because the Latin Ameri can nation 
established lies with the People'; 
Republic of China, the Ft 
Ministry announced Thursday. 


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— Richard £ Butler, Secretary General, 


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— Sir Eric Sharp, Chairman, Cable & 

Wireless, pic 

— Mi mi Weyfbrth Dawson, Commissioner, 
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Addresses and panel discussions are struc- 
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747 1265. ext j 4568. Telex: 613 595 F. 


12-7-85 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 



NYSE Most Actives 

Vol. Htvh LOW Lost Chg. 


4*857 57 % 
254 'I 21% 
15277 42% 
14348 48% 

13738 55% 
13717 23% 
13443 27% 
13155 74% 
15490 3% 

I1S7U 55% 
11155 31% 
10439 Wi 
10257 52% 
9934 910 

9793 35% 


54% + % 

2lVt> +1 
42 4 % 

48% +1% 

55% + 12 
23% 

Z7% 

74% 42% 
3% + % 
54% — 1 % 
31% 4 Va 
123% 4 % 
4 4, 
9 

35% +1% 


Dow Jones Averases 


OPM HIM Lew Lost CM. 

Indus 1333.22 134164 1324.14 1337 JO 4 LSI 

Tran* 4*9.71 (79.54 66735 474.97 4 735 

Ulll 167.32 16&65 16455 1*7.78 4 036 

Como 55X39 55676 55037 55633 + 110 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE index 


Composite 
industrials 
Tronic. 
Utilities 
FI nonce 


Htan Lew dose Chtae 
111.95 111/5 11135 *035 
126/7 126JJ9 12547 40J6 
111.01 110 C 6 null 4 1.18 
6176 61.19 6176 41)6 
721.93 121.57 121.93 40J0 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bomb 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close Ch*M 

8045 4004 

7836 4 00* 

0155 4005 


I Advanced 
i Declined 

I unctanead 

Total Issues 
New Hlotts 
New Lows 
vohinie up 
V olume down 


dose Prev. 

969 993 

6Z7 58* 

429 432 

2025 2009 

1B9 150 

n in 

72.947090 

36021070 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Boy Solo •SBVt 

July 10 195784 407758 1.158 

July 9 230774 422057 1,199 

July 8 190268 411471 US7 

July 5 228366 297018 *S* 

July 3 180640 38X445 1791 

-included bi the sates figures 


Thursdays 


Closing 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX MOST Actives 


Vtf.vMP.JN mj%8M 

Prtv.4PJA.v0l 1M.1BDM 

Pm consolidated don 127435/80 


Tables include the nation wWe prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Advanced 
DeClinoa 
unchanged 
Total Issue* 
New Htahs 
Mew Laws 
Volume us 
Volume dawn 


29S 277 

245 34 

245 263 

785 781 

36 37 

9 IS 

22164.939 
1 33X300 


ComoooHB 

Industrials 

Flnana 

Insurance 

Utmtlos 

Banks 

Transp. 


Week 

Close cn-ee AVP 
30052 4 261 298JB 
305.93 4X31 304.91 
3*958 +XI2 38501 
356J79 4105 25181 
29954 4132 29658 
296-25 4<U» 29X14 
265*2 4X11 263-19 


Standard & Poor's Index 


High tow Oost CUV 
Industrials 21230 21152 21222 4053 

Tronso. 17651 17405 17451 + J6 

UIHJHvs 8938 89/9 89.77 4 038 

Finance 2X69 2XSS 2X69 4009 

Camoaaiie . 19X94 19128 19X94 4057 


AMEX Soles 


Htgn Lew Last CM. 


BAT in 

GitCda 

imclnd 

TeitAIr 

DctneP 

Amdahl 

tcey°" 

impOH g 

Warms 

LrePn 

Toll Pig 

EchoBg 

CmpCn 

COelns 

MacGrg 


9158 4'. 

3871 13'« 

:io ih 

:X4 18% 
1757 2’ a 

1484 IJ% 
IKS 13% 
ll« JTs 

ii3o ir« 

Iflta 6% 
1053 73, 
983 11% 
83! S'a 
786 17% 
TJA 13-.* 


4 PA*, vgfume 
Pr#v, 4 PM. vttuBM 
Prev. cons, volume 


AMEX Stock index j 

htgn Low ctose Ck-gs 

23332 23X49 23131 4062 


17 Month 
High Low 3 loci 


Sit. Close 

Dm. YU PE 10QS High Low Sint. OlW 


73% 16 AAR 48 23 16 242 21 70% 70% 4 % 

17% 0% AG5 14 337 16% 16% 16% 4 % 

It' * 9% AMCA 230 11 II 11 4 Mi 

21% 11% OMF JO 18 40 1766 13% 13 IT*— % 
13% 12% AMP ad 906 13% 13% 13'A 

*9% 24'. AMR 11 4046 49 48% UV* 4 % 

22% 18% AMR pi 218 9J 12 22% 22% 23V* 

23 19 ANRpf 212 107 100 19% 19% 19% 4 U 

14% 7% APL 21 S 7% 7%— % 

61% 44% ASA 200 4.1 TIB 49% 49 49 — % 

77 ir-i AVX 32 U II 9* 1315 ?J% IJH 4 % 

3% 16 AZP 272 95 8 610 27% 27% 27% 4 % 

59 36% AOILOP 1/0 24 17 2594 60 S 8 % 59 

25% 19 ACCOWO S JX 22 17 153 23% 22% 33% 4 % 

24% ir.j AcrneC AO 25 6 * 15% 15% 15% — V* 

10 % 7% AcmflE 32b 42 10 4 7% 7% 7% 

IB 15 AdaEx 1.92C10J 14 II 17% 17% 

30 11 % A dm Ml 32 1.9 7 20 17% 17% 17% 4 % 

19V: 8 % AdvSvs J31 43 IB 54 11 % 11 % 11%— % 


NYSE Prices Hit Record Hig h 


12 Month 

WaS Low Slock ’ 


5 k. Close. 

DtV. m PE 1D0S HWLW Ouot.Ctrgo 


24% 12 *. j AcrneC .40 25 6 * 15% 15% 15% — V* 

10 % 7% AcmflE 32b 42 10 4 7% 7% 7% 

IB 15 AdaEx 1.92rlOJ 14 IB 17% 17% 

30 11 % A dm Ml 32 1.9 7 20 17% 17% 17% 4 % 

19V; g** AdvSv* 531 47 18 54 11 % 11 % ll%— % 

41% 23% AMD 12 3970 27 26 36% 4 % 

13% 6 % AdWM .12 1A 83 8 % 8 % 8 % 4 % 

15% 9 Aerllet 14 229 15% 15 15% — % 

47 77% AcinLf 2*4 54 34 9465 47% 46% 47% 4 % 

57% 57% AflfLPl 5J9C10J 385 54% 54% 55 

37% 18% Afimrts 120 A4 14 £74 35% 35% 15% — % 

3% 2% Allcen 276 2% 2% 2% 4 V* 

56% 38% AlrPrd 120 22 12 1079 54% 53% 54% 4 % 


24% 13 AlroFrt A 0 XI I 
2 I AlMoa i 
33% 27% AlaPpfA192 123 
8 % 6 % AlaPdpf 37 10.9 

82 61% AlaPpl 9.00 113 

85% »3% AlaPpf 9/4 11 J 

74 57% AlaPpl L16 113 

~n 56% AlaPpl 838 113 

25 1 . 9% AIsfcAIr .16 2 li 

27 10 % Albrlos 38 1.7 2 

33% 74% Albtsns 36 2 A I: 

31% 23% Alcan 130 S3 II 


A0 XI II 9*0 19% 18% 19% 4 % 
1661 3% 1% 2 

X92 123 25 31% 31% 31% 

J? 10.9 6 8 7% I 4 % 

9.00 1U 2100: B0 80 80 —1 

9/4 113 U40z 84 87 82 — % 

X16 113 1002 72 72 72 

838 113 2210x73% 70% 73% 41% 

.16 2 10 1866 25 24 % 74% — V* 

38 1.7 76 131 23% 21% 22% 4 % 

-76 2A 12 610 29% 28% 29% — % 

130 SO 12 1902 24% 14 24V* 


38% 27% AleoSId 130 13 13 192 37% 36% 36%— Va 


32 17 AlexAlx 1 D 0 XS 1616 28% 28% 28% 4 % 

26% 20 % Alexdr 21 198 23% 23 23% 4 % 

89% 72% AllgCP 1051 2J 26 40 84 83% 84 4% 

26% 13% AlgCn Pi 2A6 10A 23 26% 26% 26% — V* 

28% 18% Alginl 1-50 5-4 78 25% 25% 25% 4 % 

30% 15% Alain pi X19 11D A 20% 20 20 — % 

98 81% Ale I pfC1135 11 A 42 97% 97 97% 4 % 

34% 24% AlloPw 2J0 8 D 10 176 33% 33% 33% — % 

21% 15% AltenG -60b 28 16 240 21% 21% 21% 4 % 
46% 2B'lt AlltJCo IDO 4.1 9 2224 44 43% 43% 

66 53% AldCppt 674 1X7 56 63 62% 6 Z%— % 

113% 09 AlOCepHUX 703 J 111% 711% J1IW 4 % 

106% 100% AldC pf lX31ellT 416 103% 102% 103% 4 % 

23% IS'. AlldPd 17 67 18% 17% 18% 4 % 

60% 42% AlldStr 111 17 8 691 57% 57 57% 4 % 

12% 4% AIIHCh 309 4% 44* 4% — % 

34% 24 AlIsC pt 16 30% 29 30% 41% 

28". 20 ALLTL 184 65 » 85 28% 28% 28% — % 

39% 29% Alcoa 1-20 34 17 2759 34% 33% 33% 4 % 

27% 13% Aimi .101 702 14'A 14 14% 

40 32% Amor pt 3-00 8.9 4 33% 33% 33% — % 

34 27% AfflHn 1.10 4.1 19 2149 27% 26% 26% — 1 % 


140% 98% AHespf X50 X9 2 119% 1191+119% — 1% 

2% 1 % AmAgr 285 1% 1% 1% 

21 % 15% ABakr 8 36 20 % 20 % 20% 4 % 

70 55% ABrand XW 6Jt 9 414 65% 65 6S7A— U 

29% 24% ASr-d of 175 95 2 29 29 29 — % 

IIS 56% ABdCSl 1A0 1A 17 798 114% 114 114% 4 % 

27% 19% ABJdM 86 XI is 18 27% 27% 27% 4 V* 

27% 20% ABinPr A4 X5 14 13 25W 25V* 25% 4 % 

60 40% Am Can 250 4.9 12 287 59% 58% 59% 

52% 37 ACanpl 100 5J 9 51% 51% 51% — v* 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on ihe New York 
Stock Exchange broke into record territory 
Thursday with the Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closing at an all-lime high of 1.337.70. 
Trading was heavy. 

The Dow was only slightly higher during 
most of the session. It gained 4.81 on the day, 
partly on late buying. 

Advancing stocks led declining ones by 3-2 
ratio. Volume picked up. totaling 1218 milli on 
shares compared with 1081 mil lion Wednes- 
day. 

Analysts said the market moved higher on the 
view that lower oil prices and a weaker dollar 
would help produce better corporate earnings in 
the second half of the year. Mexico cut its oil 
prices and anlysts believe this will put more 
pressure on the price of OPEC oQ. A weaker 
dollar should benefit companies with large 
overseas markets because it will make their 
products less expensive for foreigners to buy. 

In addition, efforts the Federal Reserve al- 
ready has made to push U.S. interest rates lower 
will improve corporate earnings in the second 
half of year.- said Joseph Broder of Stuart, 
Coleman & Co. He said money that is flowing 
out of money market funds and fixed-income 
securities will move into equities and bolster 
stock prices. 

Noting that the multinational co mpani es led 
the market higher Wednesday, Hugh Johnson 
of First Albany said the “dollar-drrven earning s 
problems of the multinational market leaders, 
such as IBM. could be reversing themselves.” 

But in order for this movement to develop 


U.S.M-1 Up $4 Billion 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The basic U.S. money-sup- 
ply measurement, M-l, rose $4 billion m late 
June, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York 
reported Thursday. 

The Fed said the closely watched M-l mea- 
sure rose to a seasonally adjusted average of 
$596 billion in the week ended July 1 from S592 
billion the previous week. M-l includes cash in 
circulation, deposits in checking accounts and 
nonbank travelers checks. 

For the latest 13 weeks, M-l averaged $582.8 
billion, a 10.4-percent seasonally adjusted an- 
nual rate of gain from the previous 13 weeks. 
The Fed has a target for M-l growth of between 
4 percent and 7 percent from the fourth quarter 
of J9S4 through the fourth quarter of 1 985. 


into a trend, the dollar will have to continue 
weakening, Mr. Johnson said. For that to occur, 
U.S. interest rates will have to fall further, he 
said. 

CNA F inan cial Corp. was the most active 
NYSE- listed issue, up ft to 56ft. 

TWA was second, advancing 1 to 21 ft. Other 
transportation issues responded to news that 
Mexico had lowered its oil prices. UAL In cl, tile 
parent company of United Airlines, added ft to 
55ft. AMR Corp., the parent of American Air- 
lines. rose ft to 48ft. Santa Fe Southern Pad/ic 
rose lft to 35ft. 


6 % Em Roc .941 SJ 
11 % EmrvA JO U 
24% Emhort 1/00 * A 
15% EmpOx 1.76 8 D 
3% Emppf /7 9.9 
4 Emppf JO 108 

EitExc 

22% ErrjICe J7 U 

18 % EnisSu -56 1.4 
17% En*»reh 1 -fiO 6 / 
91% EnsaiPflt-TOtil.l 
19% EmExn JOe XI 
1% Emrcfl 
9% Enlero 

15% EntxEn X50el4J 
16 Enfexln 1D0 o_7 
17% Edufx* l.)4 X6 

2% Efluimk 
11V* Eamkpf 131 11J 
28% Eat Res 1-72 15 
9% E quite n .12 J 
9% Erbmnt JO 2 A 
12% Essai n M 1.9 
l«% EssrxC JOB 3D 
15% E 6 tnne J1 18 
10% Ettlyts J 6 13 
3% vtEvtmP 
2 % vIEvaflP* 

3 % vjEvnpfB 
30% ExCefP 172 4,2 
13% Excalflr 1J6elflJ 
38 Exxon 140 6J 


13 631 11% 

12 1821 17% 
II 366 31% 

8 20 S3 
20Bz 4% 

■ 5002 5 
64 

9 102 26% 

14 39 39ii 
17 298 25% 

135 102 
139 19% 
24 141 2% 

107 11% 
73 17% 
11 186 19% 

17 53 31% 

1955 4 

5 19% 
9 1380 S0% 
II 259 16% 

15 167 12% 

14 177 23% 

14 51 27 

11 258 18% 

13 196 24% 

5 * 1 % 

5 2% 

5 3% 

11 316 41% 
11 17 

a 4612 53% 


11 % 11 % + % 
17% 17% 4- M 
31 31% + % 

21 % 21 % - % 
4% 414 — V. 
4% 4%— % 

2» 26 + !A 

39 79% — % 

25 25 — U 

101 181*. + % 
19% 19% — % 
2% 2% 

!TH 11 % + % 
17% 17% 

19% 19% 

30% 31% + % 
3*i 3%— % 

19% 19% + V* 
48% 49% — % 
16% 16% — % 
12 12 % 

22% 23%— % 
26% 27 + % 

IB Vi 18% + % 
24% 24%— % 
1% 1% 9- % 

2 % 21 * 

3% 3% + % 
40% 40% + W 
16% 17 
52% 52% — % 


,15a 1J 3 

2.20 3J 41 
196 72 9 

3S 17 23 
7 

JO IJ 
XM 10D 
.18 1/ 9 
JO J 27 
4 

at 4j s 

DO 2D 17 
JJ2B A 8 
IJ4 4J 9 
33 

1-52 4J 10 
.16 J 
.70 16 9 
231 83 
1/4 67 13 
30 45 IS 
2J4 4J 9 

1.20 14 
1D0 33 13 

D5J 538 

6/1 Cl 9/ 26 

M 

JO XS 10 1300 
41 25 ID 1957 

1/0 4D 9 1292 
1D0 33 13 97 

XOOo 23 14 246 
721 
1634 


1U 103 ACan pl 1375 122 
30% l<Ai ACODHd 2-20 107 
»% 25% ACopCv 2Jle 83 
11 6% ACentC 216 

56% 43% ACvan 1.90 X6 13 
27V. 18% ADT .92 3/ 26 


X 00 53 9 51 % 51 % 51 % — V* 

375 1 X 2 24 113 % 113 % 113 %— % 

25 ® 107 63 30 % 20 % 20 % — U 

2-51 c 83 47 29 % 29 29 % — v. 

216 30 1 % 8 % 8 % — V* 

1.90 X 6 13 2004 52 % 52 52 % + 1 % 

.92 3 / 26 244 26 % 25 % 25 % 


24 % U% AElPw 2260 92 9 1782 24 % 24 % 34 % 

49 % 25 ArnExP 128 27 16 5591 48 47 % 47 % + % 

25 9 % A Forms /8 X 0 16 1228 24 23 % 33 li— % 

35 % 19 % AGnCp 1 D 0 27 10 832 35 % 34 % 35 

15 % 6 V, ACnlwf 350 14 % 13 % 14 % + Vi 

55 % 51 % AGal PfA 624 ellJ 48 55 % 55 % 55 V. — U, 

%% 58 % ACnlpf 8547 fl 63 15 93 % 93 % 92 % + % 

76 45 AGn I pi 325 43 3 76 76 76 

71 % 40 V, AGnpfD X 64 3 3 238 70 69 % 69 % 

12 TVz AHcmt 41 12 11 % 11 %_ W 

66 % 46 % A Home 190 A 3 13 2174 . 64 % 63 % 64 % + 1 % 

42 26 % AHOSP 1.12 27 131 SZ 77 42 % 41 42 + % 

» 6 % 65 % Amrtcfl 640 « 9 1262 96 % 95 % 95 % + % 

8 T 6 52 AlnGfP /4 3 24 2937 86 % 84 % 86 + 1 % 

’if. 1 « % * aiGRpf SJS Al 7 144 142 144 «% 


144 112 % AIGppf SJS Al 7 144 142 144 

28 % 18 % AMI 72 Z 6 1313443 27 % 27 % 27 % 

5 % 2 % Am Mot 607 3 % 3 % 3 %— % 

29 I*'* APntMJ .13 / 4 1124 21 % 20 % 21 % + % j 

13 % 5 ASLFla 6 l w 6 % 6 % 6 % 

18 % 12 % ASLFl pf XI 9 15 / 59 14 M 14 1414 

16 10 % AShlp JO 5 / 11 907 14 % 14 14 % 

35% 24% Amsta 1/0 S3 10 179 30% 30 30V* 


AStr flIB 6 J 0 11.9 


24 % 16 % ATLT 170 £.1 1713716 

41 % 31 AT&T pf X 64 97 1377 

43 31 % AT&T pf 374 9 J 28 

£% 15 % AWSIfj UP 4 J 

2 % 10 AWatal 175 107 

12 % 10 A Wo Sot 133 9 J 

781 * 19 % AmHOII 2/0 1 CV 9 

72 % 56 % ATrPr 5/4 7 J 

17 5 % AT rSc 

88 Vi 61 % AT run 5/4 6 4 
36 26 % Amcran 1/0 4 / 


27% 15 % 

!:% !o . 


460 7 S 
25 5714 


1414 + 14 1 

5S:r{£; 

57 V*— % 
23 % 

J9%~ % 
40% — % 

I 


24 % Amsta 1/0 53 10 179 30 % 30 30 % - % 

* 7 % 31 % AmSTor .64 ID 12 1202 6714 66 66 % + % 

» 44 % ASIrplA 438 57 460 78 77 77 % 4 - % 

57 % 51 AStr PlB 6 J 0 11.9 25 57 V 4 57 V* 57 V,— V* 

24 % 16 % AT&T 170 s .1 1713716 23 % 33 U 23 % 

41 % 31 AT&T Pf 3/4 97 1377 39 % 39 % 39 % — V. 

42 31 % AT&T pf 374 93 28 40 % 40% 40%— U 

mi 15 % AWOlr* UP 43 « 123 34 27 % 2 J%— 1 % 

2 % 10 AWatal ITS 107 13 Sz 12 % l 2 Vi 12 % 

12 % 10 A Wo Sot its 9 j 20 : 12 % 12 % 12 % + VT 

78 % 19 % AmHOII 7/0 11 X 9 9 145 22 IA 72 72 — % 

77 % 56 % ATrPr 5/4 7 J 39 72 % 72 % 72 %—% 

17 5 % ATrSc 454 17 % 16 % 17 4 - % 

88 V. 61 V. ATrUn 5/4 6 / 1 88 % 88 % 88 % + V* 

36 26 % Amcran 1/0 4 / 8 76 36 % 35 % 36 % 4 - 1 % 

50 24 V, AmfllDs JO / 23 2280 46 % 45 % 46 % + 1 % 

29 % 72 Vi AmalSfc JO 37 13 306 25 % 24 % 25 

78 % 18 % Am foe 27 77 % 27 % 27 % 

16 6 % Amfesc 4 45 6 % 6 % 6 % 

6 » 50 V. Amoco 330 b 5 J 0 2160 64 63 V* 63 % — % 

38 VJ 26 >* AMP 72 27 20 4830 37 V* 31 % 32 % + 1 % 

Z 4 11 % Am pcd 30 2 / 17 584 12 % 12 % 12 % + % 

12 % Amreos ID 5 19 19 19 

35 % 21 % AmStti 1/0 X 9 10 37 35 % 35 % 35 % 

43 % 25 % Amslod 1/0 4.1 13 370 38 % 38 V. 38 % + % 

4 >A 1 % Anoonp 292 2 % 2 % 2 % + % 

24 % 16 W Anloo i IB 827 2 DH 20 % 20 % + % 

30 % 19 % Anchor 1/8 53 134 27 26 % 27 + % 

47 % 77 % AnCkJv 1 J 2 12 36 425 41 % 40 % 41 % + % 

12 % 9 % AnarGr 20 U 16 5 12 % 12 % 12 %— % 

25 % 17 Anaollc /O X 4 14 287 25 % 23 % 25 + 1 % 

33 % 20 % Anneuss 13 3112 33 % 33 33 — % 



WALL STREET MYTHS and 
KING RICHARD HI 

The "Street’ is not alone in cultivating myths, fantasies dished out by "Elitists’ to 
the "Public". Other milieus caress irrational beliefs. After live hundred years, scholars 
are trying to modify the image of King Richard III, Shakespeare’s villian. "Misshapen 

Dick", valiant crookback prodigy— indigested and deformed lump bottled spider" 

Richard's reign (two years and two months) was one of the shortest in England's 
history. His character, writes an historian, “was nowhere so complex as that of other 
English monarchs like the psychopathic Henry VIII. or the profligate Charles II. 

Yet, it is Richard III, who has a 3.000 member society named after him, working 
indefatigably to put up plaques in his name, and win him a fair hearing for their hero. 
One of the few things that seem reasonably certain about Richard is that he was not 
deformed. The hunchback the withered arm. the malignant face, were inventions of 
Tudor propagandists. The Richardians of the world are rallying in a campaign against 
500 years of calumny. 

Who will organize a dub to hype the image of professional pessimists, fiscal 
mythmakers, whose errant, universally publicized, "predictions', decimated multi- 
tudes of investors? When our analysts were urging clients to “defy pariahs of doom,' 
the DOW was drooping arond 800. We insisted that the DJI'S would “touch 1,000 
before hitting 750;” a forecast which contradicted the bieatings of highfy-voca) 
"bears." * 

How many readers recall when Granville, scuttled rationality, divining that the 
DJI'S would collapse under 650, an hallucination consistent with crisis-oriented 
pundits who still await the Apocalypse. When Kaufman, one of America’s most 
quoted oracles, claimed that the Prime Rate, then 19%. would escalate, we balked, 
stating that the "Prime", would plunge under 13%. And now? Our forthcoming letter 
discusses why the DJI'S will catapult over 2,000, with sympathetic upswings in 
secondary and emerging equities; in addition, we highlight a low-priced, natural 
resource stock, that is selling at less than twice, annual cash flow; cash flow that may 
spiral geometrically. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to, or telephone.... 


CAPITAL 

GAINS 

RESEARCH 


49 % 48 AnlMu Of 3/0 57 439 69 % 68 % 69 % + % 

19 % 13 % Anlmr 78 1.7 18 149 17 16 % 16 % 

16 % 8 % Aflltum .04 3 1 J 274 13 % 12 % 12 %—% 

15 % J 0 -d Anlhnv / 4 D XI 9 84 14 % 14 14 % + % I 

13 9 % Aoache 78 2 / 10 159 10 % 70 % 10 % 4 - % 

3 ’iAbcWwI 132 1 % 1 + IS 

19 ’* IS' i ApcnPunXlO H .7 191 1 B% 18 % 11 % + V* 

341 * 77 % ApPw or 4,18 12 / 20 33 % 33 % 33 % + V* 

11 % 76 ApPwof 3 JO 127 20 30 59 % 30 

39 '.T 18 AolDIa 1761 5.9 16 450 30 % 29 % 29 % 4 - % 

15 B ApplMg 70 73 % 13 'S 13 %— % 

74 % 15 % Aren Do , 14 b A 16 2560 23 % 23 % 23 % — % 


30 % 23 ' i ArlPpf 338 117 

23 % 14 Ark BN .« 1.7 

24 % 16 Anla IDS 5-9 

Tb % ArlnRI 
15 U »U Armen 
23 % 15 1 .- Armc of 2.10 9 J 

24 % 15 % ArmsRb 48 XO 


338 117 19 30 % 30 % 30 % 

.« 1.7 9 128 23 % 23 23 % + Vi 

IDS 5.9 18 7431 18 % 18 % 18 % — % 

ISM Hi % + 

1119 8 % SV* 8 ’r— % i 
7.10 9 J » 21 % 21 21 V, 4 - >* 

-48 XO 7 147 16 % 15 % 15 %— % 


39 % 231 . ArmWIn I JO 35 621 385 37 % 37 37 % -- % 

34 % 14 AroCp 1 TO 4.1 7 6 29 % 29 % 29 % — i* 

25 % 12 % AronE TO 1 J 11 539 16 15 V* 15 % 4 - W 

30 % 16 Arlra T 2 J 141 21 28 % 28 % 78 % 

73 % 14 % Arvln * .80 33 9 1714 23 % 31 % 27 % +1 


54 % 3 SV, Arvln pf ZOO IT 4 54 53 % 53 % +1 

27 % 17 % Aurca 255 22 V, 22 22 % * % 

34 '* 20 % AsnlOll 1/0 4 / 1177 34 % 33 % 34 % 4 - 1 % 

44 % 33 % AShIO Pf 430 10.4 5 439 } 43 % 43 % 

43 '* 31 ’ J AshIO pf X 96 9 / 34 43 41 % 42 4 - 1 * 

69 49 AidDG 3/0 X 9 II 1392 67 % 67 % 67 % 

I 10 H 79 AMD at 475 4 / 287 108 107 % 107 % + % 

24 % 18 % Alntonc \j& 73 10 a 22 ** 23 22 — % 

29 % 70 % AtCvEI 238 9.1 v 425 20 % 28 'A 28 % + Vi 

64 '. 40 % AtlRICfl 4.00 6.9 27 5473 59 58 % 58 % — ** 

153 97 AlIRcpf 2 J 0 2 D 9 147 P. 13 »% I 39 %— 2 V* 

IB": ID 1 * AllOSCp 10 12 11 % 11 % 

33 % 18 % Auoat /0 13 19 50 22 % 21 % 23 % + % 

54 % 34 ■> AunDI J 8 13 22 352 52 V, 51 V* 52 V* + v* 

5 4 % Avalon n 0 41 4 % 4 % 4 % 


IB'* 10'* AllasCp 
32 % 18 % Ausat 
54 % 34 ■> AunDI 

5 4% Avalon n 


29% I*'* AVEMC JO XI 15 


39 % 34 % Avery 
lo'A 10 Avlalln 
41 37 Avnel 

X*% 17 ** Avon 
30 % 14 ’» AvaM 


Zfl 17 IJ 676 35% 34% 35% + % 
8 70 15% 15% 15% — V* 

30 1/ 17 2206 31% 31% 31% + % 
2DQ X9 II 3106 22% 22% 22% — % 
IJ 73 20 19% 19% + % 


2JS 


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INTERNATIONAL 


Julyl2,1985 


WEEKEND 


A Festival for and by Alwin Nikolais 


by David Stevens 

A DC-EN-PROVENCK France -- Al- 
/% win Nikolais, choreographer, de- 
flgner, composer, lighting techni- 
JL ■M.c'ma, teacher ana all-around 
theatrical magician. brought his genius for 

for the last two weeks he has been the focal 
point of Danse h Aix. the annual contempo- 
rary dance festival 

The idea of this year’s festival was that it 
would be "with and around" Nikolais, who 
at 72 and with a flowing white mane now 
cuts a patriarchal figure without being any 
the less ebullient Nikolais concocted a street 
entertainment, which is one of the features 
of the Aix festival and the Nikolais Dance 
Theater came with two programs that in- 
cluded a new work, “Contact,” commis- 
sioned for the occasion. In addition, be and 
Murray Louis, his longtime collaborator at 
New York’s H«uy Street Playhouse, took 


daily classes with young dancers in the festi- 
vaPs training program. 

In addition there were programs choreo- 
graphed or danced, or both, by Louis and 
two European-based former members of Ni- 
kdais’s company — Carolyn Carlson, who 
/or several years headed her own modem 
dance troupe at the Paris Opera and is now 
based in Venice, and Susan Buirge, who has 
been prime mover in the French contempo- 
rary dance scene for more than a decade and, 
as artistic adviser of Danse a Aix, is the 
person who brought this year's program into 
bang. 

And there was might be called a third 
generation of Nikolais disciples. They in- 
clude the young French companies, Beau 
Geste and Lolita, whose ranks include grad- 
uates of the Centre National de Danse Con- 
temporaine at Angers, which Nikolais head- 
ed for several years after it was created in 
1978 by the French Cultural Ministry. And 
other programs included choreographers 


and dancers who have worked or studied 
with Bunge. 

The most fun at the festival seems to have 
been the street project, choreographed by 
Nikolais for gymnasts and staged w Coins 
Mirabeau, Aix’s short but grandiose princi- 
pal street, wide and shaded by majestic rows 
of plane trees. 

“The theme was that man seems to want 
to fly,” Nikolais said. "Western man at least, 
not Eastern — Eastern dancers don't extend, 
they don’t jump. So for this occasion I decid- 
ed to join the Western world, be part of the 
nxQieu that wants to escape.” 

For his “School for Bird People,” about 
half the length of Cours Mirabeau was 
closed off and the gynmast-dancers were 
brought on "nesting” in a wagon of hay 
towed by a tractor: One by one they tumbled 
off and went into action on ropes dangled 
down from high in the trees. 

One of Nikolais s early jobs was playing 
the piano accompaniment in a silent movie 


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Nikolais' s gymnasts in Aix’s Cours Mirabeau. 




house, and he did not really settle on dance 
umil, as a young man in the early 1930s, he 
was bowled over by the experience of seeing 
a performance by Mary wigman, the Ger- 
man modem dance pioneer. But he had 
always been interested in the technical as- 
pects of production, and beginning in 1953 
with his own company he began to build up a 
body of works of dance theater in which his 
own choreography, sets, costumes, lighting, 
and ad hoc electronic sound vied for audi- 
ence attention and combined in st unning 
theatricality. 

The titles of some of best known ones are a 
program in themselves: “Masks, Props and 
Mobiles,” “Kaleidoscope,” “Totem," “Ima- 
go,” “Tower," “Tensile Involvement,” “Vid- 
eo Games," “Mechanical Organ,” “Schema” 
(his 1980 creation for the Paris Opera) and. 
his new work for Aix. “Contact." 


I N the beginning, Nikolais’s works often 
disconcerted the dance audience and he 
was sometimes accused of dehumaniz- 
ing the dancer. Yet he says that “1 always 
motivated everything 1 did by dance,” and 
that while many of his works present the 
dancer as pan of an environment, there are 
as many pieces that are not oriented that 
way. 

Nikolais says he is trying to raise funds to 
do a retrospective of his work, “i want to go 
over all the videos and find the things I think 
bold up. We won't need everything; 1 ex- 
plore the same idea in different pieces and 
some of them have similar subject matter. 

“What interests me in the early pieces is 
the minimalism. How did I have the guts to 
have a dancer just stand there and swing a 
leg back and forth thirty limes?” 

Nikolais praised the young European 
dancers that he has been teaming at Aix. 
“They take their classes much more seriously 
than Americans,” he said. “They are much 
more focused.” Americans tend to spread 
themselves too thin these days, he added, 
“they take everything, classical modem, Ar- 
gentine tangos, baton throwing . . ” 

He spoke with regret about a couple of 
opportunities lost through the deaths of po- 
tential collaborators. One was a project he 
was discussing with Buckminster Fuller be- 
fore the architect-engineer died in 1983. 
“And about a year before he died, George 
Balanchine asked me to do something for Ins 
New York City Ballet. I would have loved to 
do that.” 

Hie idea of Balanchine’s neoclassical 
troupe doing a work by Nikolais is an in- 
triguing one, but when Nikolais speaks of his 
idea of dance it is one that Balanchine easily 
could have subscribed to. 

“Dance,” says Nikolais, “is motion that 
contains its own intelligence -—it is not mere 
decoration.” ■ 



Nikolais, on truck , surveys scene; below, with Susan Buirge. 




mm 



•MSI 


Searching for the Real Picodon I Remembering John Gilbert 


S AOU, France — This is a nigged, 
mountainous and captivating comer 
of the world, a rather lost little patch 
of the Midi It’s a land where, on 
most summer days, the weatherman pro- 
nounces that the day will be beau a chaud, 
and where purple plots of lavender and hys- 
sop emellish toe Kodachrome landscape of 
blue skies, green fields, and terra cotta roofs. 

As you drive along the steep and winding 
departmental roads, crossing the streams the 
French like to mil rivers, you are likely to be 
detained by a passing band of goats roaming 
in search of the tasty herbs and mountain 
wildflowers that will make fragrant and rich 
their highly prized milk. 

For this is ch&vre land, a region where, 
historically, every fanner had at least one 

Patricia Wells 

“poor man 's cow.” The locals talk of days 
not so long ago when children were raised on 
goat's mQk and when breakfast consisted of 
pain de campagne spread with fresh-churned 
goat's butter, and cafe au lait was made, 
necessarily, with steaming goat’s milk. 

When the goats stopped producing milk 
during the cooler months, families dug into 
terra cotta pots in search of picodon, tiny 
discs of ch&vre washed several times in 
homemade gnole, or eau-de-vie, then air- 
dried and put away to age and harden, to last 
through the long days of winter. 

Today, this traditional mountain cheese Qf 
the DrSme and ArdSebe departments is en- 
joying a solid rebirth. Picodon is one of the 
latest cheeses to obtain its Appellation d’Or- 
igine Controls (AOC), meaning that its his- 
tory and tradition is being protected and its 
method and region of fabrication strictly 
defined and limited. 

Ideally, the AOC should make for better 
cheese. But in the minds of Solange and 
Emile Magnet, cheesemakers who cam- 
paigned for 23 years to obtain the AOC 
granted to picodon in 1983, the fight may 
not have been worth iL 
“We had to make a lot of concessions,” 
Magnet said with a shrug, sipping a bottle of 
beer on the front porch of his farm, a porch 
properly decorated with a colorful poster 
depicting France’s 27 AOC cheeses. 

To obtain the AOC, the cheesemakers bad 
to agree to expand the geographic limits 
beyond their little comer of the Drome, and 
gave in to a shorter aging time. 

While the picodon of autrefois was aged 
for months, the picodon of the 1980s can go 
to market at the tender age of 12 days. In 
other words, the hard, piquant, pungent disc 
the locals consider the authentic picodon 
resembles not ar all the fresh, mild, faintly 
fragrant little goat cheese that looks much 
like any young chfevre found in all parts of 
France. Now, instead of a single authentic 
picodon there are indeed, many. 

’“I’m afraid what’s happened is that the 
tasted - our local cheese is being Battened. At 
12 days, the cheese hasn't had a chance to 
develop any character.” Magnet complains. 

He insists that a minimum of a month’s 
aging, what be likes to call an petit mots, is 
accessary to give the cheese character and 
flavor. 

T HP. situation is not unique to picodon 
cheesemakers. for today the same sto- 
ry is being replayed all over France. 


Everywhere, locals want their cheese to taste 
as it always has, and local palates usually 
prefer the stronger, rather than milder. 

At the same tune, the merchants in Paris 
try to convince farmers to produce a cheese 
that will please their own clientele, whose 
tastes are leaning more and more toward 
cheeses that are lighter, blander, aged for 
hours or days, sot weeks or months. 

To make matters even more complicated, 
today “local” tastes change drastically from 
village to village. 

According to Michtie Tariot, a Saofi 
cbeesemakcr who sells her picodon at the 
markets in nearby Crest and Safllans, local 
tastes change by the kilometer. 

“When 1 go to Crest, I know PU sell more 
creamy cheese, while in SaiHans, 15 kilome- 
ters away, the older the cheese, the better 
they love it,” she says. 

Lake many of their neighbors in the 
Drdme, Mich&le and Guy Tariot gave up 


raising pigs for goats several years ago, as a 
national appetite for goat cheese grew, and 
local banks decided that the future of the 
department was in goat cheese and the spar- 
kling white wine known as Qairette de Die. 

“But if you see people making goat cheese, 
it’s not necessarily out- of a love of cheese- 
making,” explained one fanner. “It’s be- 
cause people can’t make a living selling goat 
milk to a co-op, but they can by making their 
own goat cheese and selling it at markets.” 

To appeal to local and national tastes, 
most farmers, like the Tariots and the Mag- 
nets, go to market with several varieties of 
picodon. Young cheese, one to two days old, 
is sold as tommedechiyre, while those 8 to 10 
days old are called tomme frakhe. The older 
picodon. made by what is now known as the 
mithode Dieulefit, is aged in the traditional 

mann er. 

Mrs. Tariot, a buxom young blonde with a 

Continued on page 9 


by Tbomas Quinn Curtiss 


T HE Hollywood of the 1920s still 
fascinates mfllions and- books on 
the subject tumble from the presses 
to rival in sales those on dieting, 
health and cuisine. 

In the late '20s Horace liveright, an ad- 
venturous publisher who had on his list 
Freud, O’Neill, Dreiser, Sherwood Ander- 
son and Faulkner, was approached by a 
young film buff who proposed a book on 
filming flnrf film folk. 

“Are you insane?” the publisher said. 
“People who go to the movies don’t read and 
people who read don’t go to the movies.” 

In 1925 it was estimated that more than 50 
million Americans went to the movies every 
week. The number of those who attend regu- 
larly these days has sunk to five million. The 
j absentees apparently stay home to read of 
I Hollywood’s quondam glory, of the flam- 
: boyant personalities that peopled it six de- 
; cades ago and of the scandals that once were 
front-page news. 

In large measure what they read is un- 
truthful trash, culled and rehashed from fan 
magazines and yellowed tabloids. Recently 
there have been some exceptions. Among 
these are Gloria Swanson’s candid “Swan- 
son on Swanson,” David Robinson’s exhaus- 
tive biography of Charlie Chaplin (contain- 
ing valuable information missing from 
Chaplin’s autobiography), Leonard Mos- 
ley’s account of Danyl F. Zanuclds ups and 
downs, and now Lea trice Gil ben Fountain’s 
“Dark Star,” the story of her father, John 
Gilbert, whose celluloid shadow set women 
to dreaming of wild amorous abandon. 

Gilbert was a dazzler in his day. His films 
played to capacity in the cinema palaces, but 
bis private life received more coverage than 
his movies. 

Actresses found him irresistible. Laurette 
Taylor never got over their affair and took to 
drink. His romance with Greta Garbo was 
avidly followed in the press. Lillian Gish, the 
Duse of the screen, selected him to be her 
leading man, but she alone seems to have 
remained aloof, <lwliHng their kissing scenes 
and rejecting his marriage proposal To the 
disappointment of Garbo he wed Ina Claire, 
the American theater’s foremost comedi- 
enne. 

“How does it feel to be married to a star?,” 
a reporter asked Miss Claire. 

“Ask Mr. Gilbert,” she replied, but the 
headlines read: “Gilbert Marries Stage Ac- 
tress." 

That marriage ended in divorce and he 
married a film beauty, Virginia Bruce, At the 
end of his life Marlene Dietrich was his great 
and good friend. 

When he challenged Jim Tully, the hobo 
author, to fisticuffs in a Hollywood restau- 
rant because the latter had insulted him in a 
magazine article, Tully knocked him ouL 



She has affectionate memories of him, but 
sbe was only 1 1 when he died in 1936 at age 
37, and her mother, the late Lea trice Joy, 
then a young actress in de Milk productions, 
divorced Gilbert shortly before their child 
was bom. Her parents remained on cordial 
terms and he was often a guest in his former 
wife's house and adored ms little daughter. 

She has set the scene of movi eland in its 
hectic heyday and sketched a whole gallery 


of its prominent figures at that period, but 
her main purpose is to refute the legend that 
Gilbert, tne highest-salaried silent screen ac- 


tor, was defeated by the talkie test. 

Gilbert made his vocal debut in “The 
Hollywood Revue.” doing the balcony scene 




of all the tabloids, but editorially Gilbert was 
praised for defending his honor. 


souvenir de la fete du p/codon-^fet 1977-s/Ou-dfc^e 

A poster for the Fite du Picodon. 


H IS dutiful daughter has spent years 
collecting information about her 
once-famous father. She has inter- 
viewed his surviving associates, his friends 
and lady friends, plowed through newspaper 
morgues to read all that has been primed 
about him and has sf oritfri his old films. 


Gilbert, photographed 
by Edward Steichen. 

from “Romeo and Juliet” with Norma 
Shearer as his Juliet. In this skit it was played 
first straight and then as a spoof of what 
might happen to it were it rewritten by a 
Hollywood hack. Even the drama critic 
Brooks Atidnson found no fault wiLh Gil- 
bert’s delivery. 

A short time later Gilbert starred in a 
terrible talkie. Audiences tittered at the 
sound of Gilbert’s high voice uttering love 
declarations. His daughter implies that on 
this occasion the microphone had been 
rigged to register him Talselto. Why? Because 
Louis B. Mayer was bent on driving him 
from the screen or at least forcing him to 
break his lucrative contract. 

Gilbert was boro in a tiny Utah town, the 
child of theatrical parents, members of a 
roving stock company. His father deserted 
his wife and son and the boy grew up imagin- 
ing that he had been born out of wedlock THe 
delighted in that delusion for it marked him 
as an exception. Years later he learned that 
he was painfully legitimate when his way- 
ward father showed up as an extra in one of 
his son’s films. He was deeply resentful for 
his fatherless childhood. He lent his returned 
parent money, but stipulated that he must 
not appear in any of his movies and must 
avoid seeing him again. 

Drifting to Los Angeles when he was in his 


teens, the future star found work as a script- 
writer and as an actor. The French director, 
Maurice Tourneur, took him on as an assis- 
tant and the youngster, a quick study, mas- 
tered the technical side of his trade suffi- 
ciently to direct some forgotten minor 
movies himself, but he settled for acting. 

Of tall, athletic build, he moved gracefully 
and his intense dark eyes threw longing 
dances that inflamed lovelorn females. His 
flashing smile disclosed a set of gleaming 
teeth beneath the mustache of Dumas mus- 
keteer. He was photogenic despite a long, 
pointed nose. 

Under John Ford’s direction he imperson- 
ated a Mississippi riverboat gambler in 
“Cameo Kirby. Irving Thalberg, recently 
appointed production chief at the newly 
formed MGM. realized his potential and 
signed him to a long-term contract. 

T O a marked degree the Gilbert screen 
image was Thai berg’s creation. He 
tested his discovery in supporting 
roles and in program features and, judging 
audience reaction from Gilbert’s mounting 
fan mail, carried the campaign forward. 
Against the protests of Mayer, the studio 
manager, chose him to be Mae Murray’s 
partner in Erich von Stroheim's exotic ver- 
sion of “The Merry Widow." The shooting 
of that film was troubled with temperamen- 
tal conflicts, but when released it .'njoyed 
wide success. 

Gilbert’s status was further secured when 
he played the hero in King Vidor’s epic of 
World War L “The Big Parade." which 
broke all box-office records, running two 
years on Broadway. 

A Swedish starlet had been imported by 
MGM and showed promise in her two initial 
American vehicles. She was to appear in a 
strong sex drama. “Flesh and the Devil.” 
and its director, Clarence Brown, was 
searching for the leading man. Gilbert, who 
bad seen and admired her work, volunteered. 
He had not met her and they were only 
introduced when tie came to the set to enact 
some torrid love scenes. Their romance be- 
fore the cameras blossomed into a reality 
and she moved to his hilltop chateau and 
stayed for three years. 

There were constant rumors that they 
were to be married and a marriage ceremony 
was arranged. It was to be a double wedding 
— Vidor and Eleanor Boardman being the 
other couple — but Garbo, while the Holly- 
wood elite waited, failed to arrive. Mayer 
was among the guests when it became appar- 
ent that Gilbert's prospective bride had run 
out on him. Mayer slapped the deserted 
bridegroom on the back and made a lewd 
comment. Gilbert wheeled on him and. 
knocked him down. As Maver was helped to 
his feet be hissed through his teeth, “I'll 
destroy you if tl costs me a million dollars." 

The daughter’s biography suggests that 
Mayer made good his threat. 

Despite her absence at the altar on the 
announced wedding day Garbo and Gilbert 
were co-starred in two more silent films. One 
of these films exploited their private rela- 
tions in its title. “Love,” though its scenario 
was derived from Tolstoy's “Anna Karen- . 
ina.” It was released with the choice of two 
different endings. In the larger cities the 
tragic conclusion of Tolstoy’s novel was fol- 

Continued on page 9 


t ■ 







TRAVEL 


Jr 


Stockholm’s Short Summer 


by Richard Soderhmd 


and 1923 in a mixture of styles: Venetian, 
.Renaissance and Byzantine. Its tower, 


S TOCKHOLM — Stockholm is a 
“city that floats on water,” a Swedish 
writer once observed, and ideally 
one should approach this 700-year- 
old capital by sea. Situated on 14 islands 
where Lake Malaren connects to the Baltic, 
the city seems to shimmer against the sky. 

But even travelers who arrive at Arlanda 
Airport 30 miles away, have plenty of op- 
portunity to enjoy Stockholm's many water- 
ways and bays. They can stay aboard a big 
steam yacht once owned by Barbara Hutton 
or sail on restored old steamers. There is 
even a youth hostel on an old windjammer 
moored across from the Royal Palace. 

The brief summer season from June 


topped with three golden crowns (a national 
symbol), offers a (me vie 


i view, accessible, how- 
ever, only by stairs. 

Sightseeing boats depart from dockside 
under the railway bridge dose to City HalL 
offering cruises of one or two hours. Fares 
range foam $3 for one hour to $4.50 for two 
hours; children half price. Others go to 


Drottningbolm Palace, the present home of 
the royal family, with its elaborate garden 


Offering a view across Nybroviken Bay is 
the recently renovated Strand Hotel 
(223.00), in the same price range, with 
period furniture, a first-class restaurant and 
a piazza. 

Also central are the Sheraton, near the 
airport bus and the railroad stations, and 
two new first-class holds. They are the Ser- 
gei Plaza, in the former Parliament Hotel 
adjoining the former parliament bgilding, 
which now houses the European Security 


through August, when migrating birds have 
nd St 


returned ana Stockholm’s 650,000 residents 
turn their attention to the sun to make up for 
the long winter, is the best time to visit 
The Gamla Stan (Old Town) section is a 
reminder of the time when Sweden’s warrior 
kings, buried in Rjddarholm Church, con- 
quered portions of Germany, Russia and 
Poland. The central area of Stockholm, dom- 
inated by the 600-room, gray stone palace 
and the 15tb-centuiy cathedral, is relatively 
s mall. Since cars are banned from much of it 
it is best seen on foot 
For a view that on clear days extends 


halfway to F inlan d, go to the 500-foot Kak- 
nas Tv Tower, which is open from 9 A.M. to 


midnight; entry fee: the equivalent of about 
$1 JO. Some other vantage points: the ter- 
race outside Solliden Restaurant at Skansen, 
the outdoor museum: Katarina Elevator 


and 17th-century theater (fare $3.25), or into 
Lake Malaren for tours of Btrka Island and 
to the Baroque-style Gripsholm Castle (fare 
$7.75). A combined bus-boat tour lasting 
about three hours costs $8, including admis- 
sion to City Hall. It may be booked at 
various hotels. 

Some boats depart from Nybroviken. near 
the Royal Drama Theater, and from the 
quay outside the Grand Hotel They go out 
to some of the thousands of islands in the 
archipelago that stretches 50 miles into the 
Baltic (fare: about $8). Hie boats include 
white steamers, some of them coal burners. 
The food, especially steaks, herring, and 
plaice, on such boats as the Bjorkfjarden and 
the Gustafsberg is considered quite good. 

One 90-minute tour (fare: $4) goes to 
Vaxholm. an island fortress, and a four-hour 
tour (fare: $9) goes south to Uto, an island 
with an inn offering such Swedish delicacies 
as herring with sour cream ($5). pike mousse 
or quenelles ($8) and rainbow trout ($8.50). 


Conference, and the 400-room Royal Viking, 
with a glass-roof atrium lobby and a crystal- 


I HE Grand Hotel at 8 Blasiebolmham- 


near the Old Town and Fjallgatan on the 
southern cliffs overlooking the Bart 


nen (22.10.20) dates from 1 874. U has 
352 rooms, the best in front with a 


rbor oppo- 
site Skansen. 

The red brick City Hall, where Nobel 
Prize banquets are held in a ball with walls of 
gilded mosaic tiles, was built between 1911 


view of the harbor and the Royal Palace, 
ranging in price from 570 to $100 for two. 
The Grand's smorgasbord, served in the 
Cafe Veranda, is a bargain ($7) compared to 
the more famous one at Operakallaren ($13). 



sided staircase. These luxury hotels often 
offer summer weekend rates at about half 
the ordinary $150 for a split-level suite with 
private sauna. 

The boaiel Maiardrottningen (2436.00), 
once owned by Miss Hatton, has 59 cabins 
and rates ranging from 566 to $105 for two. 

As for the winc^ammer, it is the former 
naval tr aining ship G. D. Kennedy, now the 
Af Chapman, run as a youth hostel Rates 
for hostel members: $4:50 to S6.75, non- 
members: $5 JO to $7.75. 

For night life try the newly opened Bda- 
get with a restaurant-bar, piano bar, live 
music and a night club. It is less snobbish 
than most other disco-type places. 

Though most resuiduons on alcohol are 

C , except for the Saturday dosing of 
r stores, wine and liquor in restaurants 
is both overtaxed and overpriced. Visitors 
are advised to take their' aperitifs in their 
hotel rooms. 

Stockholm has finally been placed on the 
Michelin map with five restaurants that have 
earned a star: Gourmet, Cog Blanc, Eriks, 
Ulriksdals Inn and TEscargot. 

Gourmet (31.43.98), at 10 Tegnergatan, 
probably offers the city's best classical and 
nouvelle French cuisine as well as some 
Swedish specialties like meatballs and salm- 
on pudding. A la carte items range from $ 10 
to SIS. A three-course dinner is SIS. Closed 
Sundays; reservations suggested. 

Coq Blanc (11.61.53) m a former theater 
at 1 11 Regeringsgatan offers good service in 
what might be called sober elegance. Special- 
ties include lamb, game and fowl A la carte: 
$10 to $13. Moderately priced luncheons are 
also a feature: 

Eriks (60.60.60) in a converted barge 
alongside Slrandvagen at No. 17 specializes 
in seafood on both upper and lower decks 
and has an oyster bar on the bridge. Entrees 
range from $11 to $18. Fjord salmon with 
crayfish sauce and morris is S15J0. 

Ulriksdals Inn (85.08.15), one of several 
inns on the outskirts of the city, is in the park, 
of Ulriksdals Palace. It offers a fine smorgas- 
bord as well as French and international fare 
with entrees from $10 to $17. 

L'Escargot (53.05.77) at 8 Scheelegatan is 
relatively ejq>ensive ($13 to $18 for entrees). 
A specialty is snails with Roquefort sauce. A 
four-course dinn er is $30, but lunch at under 
$7 is a bargain. Reservations advised. 

Swedish fare is available at prices ranging 
from S3J0 to S6J0 at such smaller restau- 
rants as Prinsen, God them and Stnrehof or 
at stalls in the large food markets like Kung- 
shallen (near the Concert Hall). 

Among several restaurants housed in me- 
dieval cellars is Diana on Bninhsgrand, 
which offers a marine smorgasbord served 
from a rowboat. Another good bet for fish is 
Glada Laxen in the roofed-in Gallerian dose 
to the Sergelstorg plaza. 






N r 


X 


> .21-^ 

7 ~ -• 1 

View of the Old Town and the Royal Palace {center). 


Ice Stadium (tickets 58 to 517). Mozart’s 
“Don Giovanni” will be given in the court- 


yard of Hallwylska Palace from July 20 to 
Aug. 20, and the 10th annual Vaxbolm Song 


Festival is scheduled from July 1 1 to 14 at 
the fortress. The opening concert of Stock- 
holm Music Weeks win take place at the 
Grand Hotel on Aug. 3, and the festival ends 
on Aug. 24 with the tenor Nicolai Gedda as 
soloist at a Viennese ball At Drottningholm 
Court Theater, two Mozart operas, “Abduc- 
tion From the Seraglio” and “Cod fan tutte” 
alternate through Aug. 2. 

One of the leading attractions of northern 
Europe since its opening in 1891 is Skansen 
on Djurgarden Island, an outdoor museum 
with restored buddings, a glassblower s hut 
and a zoo. Open daily through August; entry 
fee 51.75. 

Near Skansen is the Wasa Museum, con- 


Gallery (10-25.95), also a leading auction 22.18.40. Some hotels also offer videotaped 
house, at S Wahrendorffsgalan, or Magaliff information programs. ■ 

(20.00.74) at 16 Gustaf Adolfs Torg. 

For recorded information (in English) Richard Soderhmd is a journalist based in 
about events, including free concert and Stockholm. This article was written for The 
stage performances in various parks, phone Meti- York Times. 


raining the restored ship Wasa, a 17-century 
man n* war that foundered in the harbor on 


its maiden voyage in 1628 and was raised in 
1961. Open daily; entry fee SI. 

The Museum of Modem Art on Skepp- 
sholmen Island, designed by Pontus Hoi ten, 
has created controversy, but it remains an 
unusal art experience. Closed Mondays; ad- 
mission fee SI. 

A special Japanese exhibition runs 
through September at the Ethnographic Mu- 
seum on Djurgarden Island. 

The subway network, opened in 1950, has 
a new line, called the blue line, starting at 
opened in 1950, has a new line, called the 
blue line, starting at Kungstradgarden. The 
stations are fancifully painted and decorated 
like caves. 


Visitors seeking Swedish crystal china, 
knitwear and other handcrafts can obtain a 
rebate of the 20 percent value added tax. 
Among places to go are the basement of NK, 
Svenskt Term and Malms ten on Strandva- 
gen and at Kristallmagasinet and Dua on 
Knngsgatan. 


In Stockholm's Old Town. 


C LASSICAL music is performed at the 
Royal Palace through Aug. 28, and 
Verdi's “Aida" will be offered on 
Aug. 7 and 9 at the 6, 000-seat Johanneshov 


You can combine sightseeing with shop- 
ping by taking an hour's boat trip to the 
Gustavsberg porcelain plant Phone 2333.75 


for reservations. Small porcelain spoons or a 
coffee cup in blue-flower pattern costs about 
54 JO, plates about $10. 

For arts and antiques, try Bukowslris Art 



Th« Nr-Yod Tnu 


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INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


VIENNA, Bosendorfer-Saal (td: 
65.66J1). 

RECITALS — July 15: Johanna 
Picker cello, Martha Picker piano 
(Bach, Debussy). 

July 18: Margarita Ansdmi piano 
(Schumann, Brahms). 

•Runs tier haus (tri:57.96.63). 
EXHIBITION — To Oct. 6: “Vi- 
enna 1870-1930 Dream and Reali- 
ty: The greatest names of the Vien- 
nese fin-de-siide." 


July 18-20: “A Midsummer Night's 
Dream” (Shakespeare). 

•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734.90J2). 


EXHIBITION — To Aug. 25: 
“217th Summer Exhibition.^ 


Hall (tel: 


BIRMINGHAM. Town Hall (tel: 
236.38.89). 

CONCERT— July 13: City of Bir- 
mingham Symphony Orchestra, 
Christopher Seaman conductor 
(Elgar, Arnold). 

CHICHESTER, Theater Festival 
(td: 78.13.12). 

July 13, 16, 17: “Anthony and Cle- 
opatra" ( Shakespeare). 

July 13, 15, 18, 19: The Philan- 
thropist” (Hampton). 
GLYNDEBOURNE. Opera Festi- 
val (tel: 8134.11). 

July 13 and IS: “Arabella” (R. 
Strauss). 

July 14 and 16: “Albert Herring” 
(Britten). 

July 19: “Idomeneo” (Mozart). 
LONDON, Barbican Centre (td: 
62837.95). 

CONCERT — July 13: Royal Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra, Yehudi Me- 
nuhin conductor, Julian Lloyd 
Webber cello (Elgar). 

THEATER — July 13: “Red 
Noses” (Barnes). 

July 15 and 16: “Richard IIP 
(Shakespeare). 

July 17-20: “Hamlet” (Shake- 
speare). 

•London Coliseum (tel: 
836.31.61). 

BALLET — London Festival Bal- 
let — July 13: “Onegin” (Cranko, 
Tchaikovsky). 

July 15-18: “Night Creature” (Al- 
ley, Ellington), “Don Quixote" (Pe- 
tipa. Minins). “L’Arlesienne" (Pe- 
tit, Bizet), “Eludes" (Lander. 
Riisager). 

July 19-20: “Don Quixote” (Petipa, 
Minkusi “Song of a Wayfarer” 
(Bfijan, Mahler), “Etudes" (Land- 
er. Riisager). 

•National Portrait Gallery (tel: 
930. 15J2). 

EXHIBITIONS — To SepL 8: 
“Howard Coster.” 

IToOcl 13: “Charlie Chaplin 1889- 
1977.” 

•Regent's Park Open Air Theatre 
(id: 4862431). 

[THEATER — July 13, 15-17: 
“Twelfth Night" (Shakespeare). 


•Roya 
589.82.12). 

CONCERT — July 19: BBC Sym- 
phony Orchestra and Singers, Sir 
John Pritchard conductor (Hin- 
dd). 

•Royal Opera (td: 240.10.66). 
BALLET — July 15 and 16: u La 
Fille mal gardfce” (Ashton, H&r- 
ofd). 

OPERA — July 13: “La donna dd 
lago" (Rossini). 

•Tate Gallery (td: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITION — To August 18: 
“Paintings by Frauds Bacon: 1944 
to Present." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS —To October 22: 
“Textiles from the Wellcome Col- 
lection: ancient and modem tex- 
tiles from the Near East and Peru." 


July 16: Kid Creole and the Coco- 
nuts. 

July 17: Fats Domino. ' 

July 1 9: Ray Charles. 
MONTPELIER, International 
Dance Festival (td: 6635.00). 

July 10-13: Merce Cunningham 
Dance Company “Events.” 

NICE, Galerie cfArt Cantempor- 
ain (td: 6237.11). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 22: 
“Tout Ben.” 

•Galerie des Ponchettes (tel: 
623134). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: 
“Claude and Franoois-Xavier La- 
lanne." 


STUTTGART, National Theater 
(td: 203.24.44). 

Stuttgart Ballet — July 16 and 18: 
“Don Giovanni" (B6jart, Chopin). 
OPERA — July 14: “Falstafr 
(Verdi). 


EXHIBITION — To Sept. 8: 
•Imagination Seizes Power a brief 


survey of European protest move- 
' the 60’s." 


meats in the 
•Art Theater (td: 25.94.95). 
THEATER — To July 28: “PiaT 
(Gems), American Repertory The- 
ater. 


•Jazz festival (td: 71.93.22£ 


July 13: Jay Leonard, Jon Faddis. 
July 14: Shorty Rodgers, B. B. 
King. 

July 15: Miles Davis. 

July 16: Johnny Otis Show, Jimmy 
Owens. 


ATHENS, Festival (td: 322.1439). 
BALLET — July 10-13: Grands 
Ballets Canadiens. 

July 16 and 17: Athens Experimen- 
tal Ballet 

CONCERT — July 15: Athens 
State Orchestra, Dmitri Chorafas 
conductor, Leonidas Kavakos vio- 
lin. 

OPERA — July 18: “Macbeth” 
(Verdi). 

July 19: “King Priam" (Tippett). 


•Koninklijk Paleis op de Dan (tel: 
24.86.98). 

EXHIBITION — To Sept. 8: 
“French Bibliographic History in 
The Netherlands.” 

»Maisou Descartes (td: 22.61.54). 


•Palacio de Vd&zquez y Crislal 
(td: 274.77.75). 

EXHIBITION — To July 22: 
“Spanish Sculpture 1930-1936." 
•Teatro de la Zarzuela (td: 
429.12.8 6). 

OPERA — Julv 16: “OteHo" (Ver- 
di), with Plarido Domingo. 

SAN SEBASTIAN, Jazz Festival 
(td: 4231.80) — July 17-21: Joe 
W illiams and The Count Basie Or- 
chestra. Scott Hamilton, Sun Ra 
Arkestra, Johnny Winter, Kenny 
Drew, Woody Shaw, Slide Hamp- 


S • :! 


A * 

■c.k: 




rt 


ton. 


EXHIBITION — To SepL 27: 
Netherlands.” 


SCOTLAND 


ITALY 


To September 1: “English Carica- 
e 162" ’ " 


ture i620 to the Present" 

To September 15: “Louis Vuitton: 
A Journey through Tune.” 


PARIS, Centre Georges Pompidou 
(td: 277.1233). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Aug. 19: 
“Jean-Pie rre Bertrand,” “Paler- 
mo,” “David' Tremlett.” 

■Galerie Alain Blondel (tel: 


GENOA. International Ballet Fes- 


tival (td: 59.16.97). 

BALLET — July 15-17: Ballet 


“Descartes and The 
•Nieuwe Kerk (td: 23.6432). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Aug. 20: 
“Out and About in Amsterdam: 
From die Fairgrounds to the The- 
ater, 1780-1813." « 

To Aug. 20: “Anarchism in France 
and The Netherlands." 
•Rijksinuseum (td: 732121). 
EXHIBITION — To Sept 29: 
“Rembrandt" drawings. 

•Van Gogh Museum (tel: 


EDINBURGH. National Gallery 
of Modern Art (td: 556.8921 )l 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 8: “SJ. 

n lcni ** 


Pepsoe, 1871-1935.” 
•Nation 


rational Portrait G allay (let 
556. 8921). 

EXHIBITON — To Sept. 29: 
“Treasures of Fyvie" 




278.66.67). 

1ITION — 
’Emile Chambon.” 


EXHIBlI 


To July 27: 


AIX-EN-PROVENCE, Festival de 
L'Art Lyrique et de Musique (tel: 
2337.81). 

OPERA — July 19: “Ariadne auf 
Naxos” (Strauss), 


EXHIBITION — To July 20: “De 
Corot a Picasso.” 

•Mus&e d’Art Moderne (id: 
723.6127). 

EXHIBITION — To Sept. 8: 
“Robert and Sonia Ddaimav." 
•Musfe des Arts D&x*ratifs (td: 


ARLES, International Photogra- 


phy Festival (td: 96.76.06), 
EXH11 


26031141 

EXHIBITION — To July 13: 


LBIDONS — To July 31; 
"Powers of Photography.” 

To Aug, 30: “David Hockney,” ret- 
rospective. 

To Sept 15: “Disciples or Ansd 
Adams.” 

To SepL 30: “F. Fontana, S. Bow- 
n. Herve." 


man. 


AVIGNON. Festival (tel: 
86.24.43). 

DANCE - July 16-19: Meree 
Cunningham Dance Company 
“Roaraiorio”. 

July 18-22: “Les Ballets Armiiage” 
(Annitage). 

July 28: Geoffrey Marshall. 


“Jean Amado.' 

•Musie du Grand Palais (td: 
26134.10). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 2: “Re- 
noir." 

•Musfee du Petit Palais (tel: 
265.12.73). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: 
“Gustave Doe." 

SCEAUX, Festival de TOrangerie 
(td: 660.07.79). 

RECITALS— July 13: G. Pluder- 
tnacher piano (Brahms, Schumann, 
Liszt, Chopin). 

July 14: Una Ramos (Latin Ameri- 
can music). 


Theatre de L’ Arche “Babel Babel 
(Mahler, Marin). " 

July 18-21 : Ballet National de Mar- 
seilles, “A Zizi Con Amore" (Petit). 
MILAN, Teatro alia Scala (td: 
80.9126). 

OPERA — July 13: “Andrea 06- 
nier” (Giordano), “Don Pasquak” 
(Donizetti). 

VENICE, Museo Correr (tel: 
25625). 

EXHIBITION — To July 28: “Le 
Venizie Posabfli." 

•Palazzo Fortuny (tel: 70.0935). 
EXHIBITION — To July 28: 
“Horst, Photography. 1931-1984." 
VERONA, Arena di Verona (td: 
23520) 

BALLET — July 14: “Giselle" 
(Adolphe Adam). 

OPERA — July 13 and 19: 
Trovatore" (Verdi). • 


76.48.81). 

EXHIBITION —To Aug. 11 : “Les 


SWITZERLAND 


• 1TA 


John Gil 


■/- B 




G 


- 




flairs du mal" Felicien Rops and 
Charles Beaudelaire. 

•Westerkerk (tel: 24.77.66). 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 15: 
“The World of Anne Frank, 1929- 
1945.” . 


THE HAGUE, North Sea Jazz Fes- 
tival (tel: 542938). 

July 14: Ray Charles, Johnny Otis, 
Ray Barrctto, Fats Domino, Joe 
Williams and the Count Basie Or- 
chestra. 


ROTTERDAM, Boymans-van 
Beumngen Museum (td: 36.14.05). 


GENEVA, Musee de l’Athenee 
(id: 29.75.6 6). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: 
“Chagall. Picasso, Ernst, Klee, Le- 
ger and Calder: Tapestries and En- 
gravings.” 

•ParcLuilin (td: 74.10.16), 
EXHIBITION — To Sept. 8: 
“Promenades.” 

•Petit Palais (id: 46.1433). : 
EXHIBITION — To Sept 30: 
“Montparnasse ‘Belle EpOque’: 
From Chagall to Buffet" 


EXHIBITION — To July 14: 
“Masterpieces from the Hermitage 
Museum in Leningrad.” 


UNITED STATES 


11 


PORTUGAL 


NEW YORK, American Museum 
of Natural History (td: 873.13.00). 
EXHIBITION — To Aug.' 31: 


" hr * 

a; 

— R..< 


-. i ft,' Si 










i- » 


1 > r . 

C, 


- 

•- i:f Serf • 




i „ 


“Maya: Treasures of an Ancient .* -V... :r r r- 

Chrifizatjon.” _ .. 7 ' ” ? >cr 

•Metropolitan Museum at Art (at I f 1 , ?v ' ' v 


JAPAN 


COMMINGES, Festival (tel: 
883100). 

CONCERT — July 18: Orchestra 
du Capitole de Toulouse, Michel 
Plasson conductor, Gabrid Tae- 
chiao piano (Saint-SaSns, Debus- 
sy)- 


GERMANY 


LYON, Fourviere Roman Theater 
(td: 841.81.11). 

JAZZ — July 15: Keith Jarretiwiib 
Gary Peacock. 


MUNICH, National Theater 
(td:2185I). 

OPERA — July 13 and 17: “Lulu” 
(Berg). 

July 14: “Der Rosenkavalier” (R. 
Strauss). 

July 16: “the Zauberfldte” (Mo- 
zart). 

July 18 : “La Traviata” (Verdi). 


TOKYO, Goto Museum (tel: 
703.06.61). 

EXHIBITION — To July 28: 
“Chinese Pottery from Han to 
Ming dynasties 

•Kokuritsu Noh-gakudo\(tel: 
423.1331). 

EXHIBITION — To Aug. 18: 
“Noh Masks." 

•Zdt Photo Salon (id: 246.13.70). 
EXHIBITON — To Sept. 16: 
“Tsukuba City" 


SINTRA, Festival (td: 92339.19). 
EXHIBITION — To July 30: 
“Liszt in Lisbon (1845)." 
CONCERT — July 13: Endeltion 
Suing Quartet (Beethoven, Sme- 
tanana). 

RECITALS — . July 14: Trio Eu- 
fonia (Schubert). 

July _• 15: Jennifer Smith soprano, 
Gary Peacock piano (Britten, Schu-. 
maim ). 

■Regional Museum (tel: 
92339.18) - 

EXHIBITION — July 15-28: 
“Christine H 61 cue.” 


1: 


EXHIBITIONS — To SepL 
“Man and the Horse." 

To SepL 5: “Revivals and Explora- 
tions in European decorative arts.” 
♦Museum of Modern Art 


EXHIBITON —To Oct 1 : “Kuri 
Schwitters.".. , 


WALES 



SPAIN 


NETHERLANDS 


AMSTERDAM. Amsterdam Mu- 
seum of History (td: 25.58.22). 


MADRID, Museo Espanol de Arte 
Comemporineo (id: 449.2433). . 
EXHIBITION — To July 31: 
“Luis Tomaseflo.” 


CARDIFF, SL David’s Hall (tel: 
37.1236). . k 

CONCERTS — July 17: HaKOr- 
chestra, Owain Arwd Hughes con- 
ductor (Elgar, Wood). 

July 19: BBC-Concert OrtheSA 
Lam Sutherland conductor, "hdare 
lyn Hill Smhh.soprano. 









Page 9 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 



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EELIE SMIT-KROES, Dutch 
ministci of transport and 1,1 


capacity to 25 to 30 million passengers. Ii 
induces the addition of a fifth pier. im- 
proved fadKties for regional carriers, a new 
business center, a fully automated baggage 


gime. Ait 
tike (full i 




works, ' no-nonsense liberal _and 
the doy enne of the airline deregu- 
lation movement in Europe makes the Issue 
brea&lakingly simple: “To fly is just a prod- 
.iict Else clothes; it’s nothing exceptional- We 


iare living in a community, so leffs give con- 
sumers the opportunity, of flying to as many 
places as passible at a good pace. Govern- 
ments axe looking to me survival of their' 
'iiatipnal carriers rather than what they can . 

’L _ J ' • JI _ a. •. ««r. _ * . ' 


For smn-KToes, tms is more man a policy, 
or even an article of faith; this is a crusade. 
She is fighting bard for- liberalization not 
only of Tares, but capacity, and new air 
routes opened up between small as well as 
large airports. (A measure erf the task is the 
recent refusal of AiitaHa to. allow KLM to 
open a new route between Amsterdam and 
Venice, and to stop three KLM flights to 
Rome so as to redress Alitalia’s 48.7 percent 
share of the traffic between the two countries 
to 50 percent.) 

Srmt-Kroes and. Nicholas Ridley, her op- 
-posite number in Britain, are two of the 
principal movers and shakers in the battle 
against airline protectionism in Europe. The 
liberal Anglo-Dutch bilateral agreement 
signed in June 1984 has now been extended 
into what amounts to an “open skies’’ re- 
Airhnes can file whatever fares 
: (full economy and YMKin^w class as 
as discount, or “promoti anal” fares, subject 
only to disapproval by both governments, 
f'flropte must recognize that aQ tariffs are 
| lower than before,” says Smit-Kroes.) 

This power of double veto is to prevent 
.. “predatory”pricmg that “breaks up the mar- 
ket.” One measure is consistency. Smi t- 
- Kroes recalls oneU. S. airline in 1978 offer- 
ing a promotional fare of one guilder from 
Amstadam to New York. “I said Fd allow it 
if they kept the fare for at least <me year. But 
• of course they couldn’t They came to me-os 
their knees after two weeks and asked to 
-withdraw it. Tins kind of thing rust deludes 
'the public. The government has the right and 
duty to intervene,” she says. 

The Anglo-Dutch agreement has turned 
-out to be a huge success. Traffic on the 
Amsterdam-Loodon route has grown almost 
twice as fast as traffic between these; dries 
. and other points in Europe. Some fares have 
come down and restrictions on others have 
. been eased. Eleven airlines axe currently 
serving four different airports in the Nether- 
lands and 23 in Britain. There are now more 
its in Britain with a direct service to 
bol than there are to Heathrow, 
reflects the importance of Sdriphol as 
an international gateway. (There is a popula- 
tion erf 180 million within a radius of 250 
' miles.) One- third of SduphoTs nine million 
passengers , cm scheduled airlines last year 
were transferring to other destinations. The 
.'airport has about 65 schednlecTdtuiers scry-, 
mg 185 destinations in 90 countries. ' : 

Scbiphol is consistently popular with trav- 
elers. in a poll last April members of the 
International Air TravtteK Association vot- 
ed Sdriphol their favorite airport for comfort 
and convenience. It is a single terminal air- 
port with an average connecting time of 40 to 
50 minutes. Maximum walking time from an 
aircraft to another is 10 minntrs It is re- 
markably free of congestion, it has a capaci- 
ty far in excess of its current traffic, there is a 
hotel in the transit area, an abundance of 
restaurants and services and duty-free shops 
said to be the most reasonable in Europe. 

The Dutch have an expansion plan, to cost 
$400 mini mi over the next 10 years, to boost 


by road and improving the already 
ra3 smvicesfram the station underncalhtbe 
; temwnal h ^i?l<Wrtp Tbs .so-called 

line connects with the international 
network to destinations in Belgium, West 
Germany and beyond. 

What this all means, is that Sdriphol 
many ways a showcase anporu soalcgicafly 
in aliberal corner 'of Europe — - win hasten 
the domino effect that Anglo-Dutch deregu- 
lation is having on neighboring countries, 
especially West Gennanyand Belgium, by 
siphoning off traffic. It was mainly fear of 


Dutch minister 
sees flying as 
'just a product’ 


losing traffic that forced West Germany to 
j o ' g n a liberal bilateral agreement (although 
not as liberal as that with the Dutch) with 
Britain at the end erf last year. This was 
followed by a similar agreement between 
Britain ana Luxembourg. Belgium has also 
liberalized its bilateral agreement with Brit- 
ain. Many fares between Britain and the 
Continent have come down as a result. And 
there is heightened awareness among travel- 
ers, especially American, to alternate rout- 
ings to Europe via Heathrow and SdriphoL 

Smit-Kroes main tains that “if s not only a 
question of tariffs; you have first to have free 
competition, which means access to the mar- 
ket and being able to mount the capacity you 
want” This has been a major obstacle,. she 
says, to crafting new bilateral agreements. 
“My sorrow is dealing with people who hare 
a completely different philosophy an trans- 
port. For example, what I asked the French 
for more access to their market, they said: 
Start with lowering the tariffs. That’s com- 
pletely the wroog way. It’s so hard to discuss. 
If we ask for a flight to Le Havre, it’s asking 
for something out of this world. We can get it 
only if we give up a flight to Paris.” 

Within the European Community, there is 
a split between the protectionist south mid 
the more liberal north; Portugal, Spain, Italy 
and France are the most recalcitrant A 
country like Belgium is somewhere in be- 
tween. It seems that the Germans might soon 
be prepared to do a deal with the Dutch. 

Meanwhile the British and Dutch, plan to 
exot pressure for multilateral liberalization 
at the European Transport Council, which 
the Dutch will chair for the first six months 
of next year, followed by the British. “Ridley 

and I made a deal that we would handle it 
together to give us a full year of the chair- 
manship,” Smit-Kroes says. Onejtempothe 
agenda wfll ber th&cxtcnsum of toe JEumter- 
regjboal directive, which allows free entry 
fen- aircraft carrying up to 70 passengers on 
routes between “category two* airports, to 
indude major hubs. 1ms would open up 
more routes and provide consumers with a 
greater choice. 

“We are fighting for a market-oriented 
for air transport. We are trying it at 
! conference table and by -example. But we 
need pressure from consumers who say to 
their parliaments that they don’t accept this 
situation any more,” Smit-Kroes says. 

And the ideal situation? “Tbe one we have 
with Britain. Nothing is ideal but this is 
deregulation and- it’s working quite wdL 
That’s, the system we need in Europe,” ■ 


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John Gilbert 

lowed, wlule in tbe provinces it had a happy 
ending. Later, in the 1930s, when his popu- 
larity had declined, Garbo generously 
sought to restore Gilbert’s, fortunes with a 
comeback attempt. She insisted that be — 
jns tp- iH of Laurence Olivier — play her lover 
in the talkie “Queen Christina.” He was 
given the role, but his reappearance stirred 
little interest and brought no offers for his 
services. 

G ILBERT rose to movie eminence on 
the wings of the Latin lover craze 
inaugurated by Rudolph Valentino. 
When Valentino died suddenly in 1926 Gil- 
bert replaced him, though he was certainly a 
less glamorous performer. Already several ■ 
non-Latin screen stars — Ronald Caiman, 
Ricardo Cortez and to a lesser degree John 
Barrymore and the elder Douglas Fairbanks 
— took on a Latin look. When the talkies 
arrived it was the WASP types — Gary 
.Cooper, Spencer Tracy, Robert Montgom- 
ery and Clar k Gable — who were favored. 
Two roles promised by Thalberg to Gilbert 
went to Gable. 

It was Gilbert's dashing style and verve 
..that made him a darting of tbe '20s, and that 
decade was his true realm. An effective slept 
screen lover, schooled and publicized by 
Thalberg, he fell below Valentino in that 
capacity. Hiat he was a gifted artist-actor is 
open to question. He was a headliner and not 
an intuitive interpreter. Whatever uniform 
or hairdo he sported, whether posing 35 * 
Russian, a Prussian, a Latin or an Amcn- 
■ cano, be was John Gilbert doing and somc- 
, rinwe overdoing his number. 

Possibly in happier dreomstanoes be 
brigh t have developed. There is a qftms 
hone of his talkies. “Downstairs, whichhe 
' wrote himself. As a callous bounder of a 
• chauffeur employed in a Viennese household 


Continued from page 7 

— a character obviously borrowed from 
Strindberg’s “Miss Jobe” — he delivered one 
of his best performances. 

It may be that had he left the cinema for 
the stage he would have matured into tbe 
actor he wanted to be. He had had cmly stock 
company training as a child and moviemak- 
ing nad transformed him into a trickster, 
repeating his routine over and over in plots 
brewed at studio conferences. He was m 
need of higher theatrical education and his 
fantastic success in films blinded him. In- 
stead of meeting a new challenge and going 
forward, he. retreated into heavy d rinking 
and dreams of murdering Louis B. Mayer. 
He sat out his long$10,000-a-week-craitract, 
consigned new and then to a third-rate mov- 
ie, sank into a despondent state and died 
prematurely. 

Gilbert, his friends have 
inglv mocked the heated ballyhoo 
of Thalbeig, who billed his star as “The 
Great Lover of the Silver Screen,” but, natu- 
rally enough, bis missed the idiotic mob 
adoration when it disappeared. 

His daughter has not sentimentalized her 
portrait of him, aware that he contributed to 
his own downfall, but there is a stab of 
paihos in the story of a onetime idol and his 
bewilderment when yesterday’s magic no 
longer cast its spell 

Recently, revivals erf two of his better 
films — “Flesh and tbe Devil” and “A Wom- 
an of Affairs,” a censor-cautious adaptation 
of Michael Aden’s sensational sex novel, 
“Tbe Green Hat,” a best-seller of 1924, with 
Garbo as the lady of frafl virtue — have 
found enthusiastic audiences. An event of 
the autumn London season is to be a resbow- 
ing of "The Big Parade,” with symphony 
orchestra accompaniment. 

It appears after all, though he is gone he 
has not been forgotten. ■ ■ 


TRAVEL 


Waters and Memories of a Spanish Spa 


by Mary Peirson Kennedy 

C ARRATRACA, Spain — Billing it- 
self as the Switzerland of Andahi- ■ 
sza, this tiny mountain village is 
hoping to bring back some of its 
lost days of glory when EiapressEug&iie rtf 
France, Alexandre Dumas, Lord Byron and 
several kings erf Spain were among the thour 
sands who poured into town to take the 
waters. 

The sulfur waters — claimed to be benefi- 
cial for rheumatism, nervous disorders, in- 
fertility and skin ailments — still gush forth, 
ai 700 liters (185 gallons) & minute into, the 
elegant marble and stone building, that once 
belonged to the Countess of Teba, as Eug6- 
nie was before becoming Napoleon Ill’s con- 
sort. The marble bath she used still stands at 
one end of the building as does a commode 
fora chamberpot that perhaps she also used. 

The baths are open every year from July 1 
to Sept. 30, and for 8,000 pesetas (about $45) 
for ] $ days trie can daily drink, bathe, show- 
er or inhale the vapors of sulfur water (the 
sulfurous odor is faint) under the care of a 
resident doctor. 

In front of the baths is the Hostal del 
Principe, built in 1830 as a residence for the 
Ferdinand VII when he came to hunt the 
aqtra fdspanica in the days when this goat, 
indigenous to the area, was plentifuL Today 
the mountainous area behind Cauatraca is 
about the last reftigp of tins handsome ani- 
mal, and it is about to be declared a national 
refuge offering very and expensive 

hunting until the herds can be built up 

a gain. ) 

Tbe hostal remains one of the nicest budd- 
ings in town, with a beautiful patio, spacious 
but sparsely furnished rooms and simple but 
well prepared meals. 

A hundred years ago the town abounded 
with gambling casinos, elegant carriages and 
nightly parties in the spacious summer resi- 
dences of the wealthy. 

Except for a few Victorian villas, all this 
has vanished (ftirhirirnp the mare than 7,000 
people who crowded into town durum tbe 
season); but what remains is a small lwt 
dedicated group of people who spend their 
vacations hae,.some taking the waters and 
some not It is a group that would just as 
soon that the rest of the world not know 
aboat this peaceful little retreat, its cool 
summer days, its friendly people and its 
serene atmoqihera. 



town there is a bull ring built during the 
heyday of the baths (again due to the lar- 
gesse of Doha Trinidad} and according lo 
Don Miguel, some of the stones used in its 
construction go back to Roman times. 
"There is no doubt that Romans and Greeks 
used the waters here.” he says. 

“Castles and museums are everywhere, 
but good people are bard to find." says 
Sylvia North, a journalist who has written 
extensively about her adopted home and one 
of a handful of foreigners who live here full 
time. She and her husband. Frank, a sculp- 
tor, bought an abandoned mill 12 years ago 
and have slowly renovated it. “You can't 
imagine how wonderful a place this is, I 
slopped feeling like a foreigner almost im- 
mediately,” she recalls. 

Matareo Benavides. 24. who works at the 
baths (bis family owns them) says that young 
people come from all over to Saturday night 
music sessions in the bars in the central 
plaza, that the town holds poetry contests 
and an shows and that because' so many 
people have land to work the unemployment 
is not as severe here as in other parts of the 
province. Francisco Gutierrez. 27. left the 
dress-designing business in Madrid and 
came home to form his own small business of 
making very modern clothes for the young. 
His frequent fashion shows at the Hostal del 
Principe are major social events. 


HE annual village fair is held Aug. 13- 
‘ “ 1 bulls 


S 


ETrn the northern part of the] 
of Milaga, the area surround 
rarraca is a nature lover’s para 


zarabic and Christian ruins, mountain lakes 
for swimming, and the cave of Doda Trini- 
dad. ll kilometers (seven mflesV from town. 

. This cave is not for the timid. To getinride 
one most pa« through an obstacle course of 
rocks, but in the interior steps have been 
built. Anyone can go there and there is no ' 
charge, but it is more interesting to go with 
Don Miguel Guerrero, a genial man who is 
secretaiy of tbedty hall an amateur histori- 
fc and abovc ajl a promotor of his home-. 


In Carratraca’s sulfur baths. 

town. He can be found most weekday morn- 
ings in his office in the huge Arabic-style 
wood and stone palaa'o that serves as city 
hall now, but was once the summer residence 
of Doha Trinidad Grand , Carratraca’s one- 
time patroness. The daughter of a noted 
inventor and industrialist, Ddna Trinidad 
had great faith in the curative powers of the 
waters. 

D 
own 

some veay precarious : 
magnificent stalagmite formations. The cave 
has some interesting prehistoric drawings. 
To make an appointment with Don Miguel 
for seeing thecaves cafl 45.80.ML There is no 
set price for the trip but a group of up to 
eight might offer him 2,000 pesetas (about 
* 12 ). ......... 



Jurat Mmdd 


Twenty kilometers (12 miles) from Carra- 
traca is a area known as El Chorro, a series of 
emerald-green man-made lakes set in the 
midst of sloping pine forests where one can 
picnic and swim. Beyond El Chorro, on the 
road to Alora, are the remains of a stone 
church of the Mozarabs, Spanish Christians 
under Moslem rule who adopted the Arabic 
lan g na gp and culture. In the next 
from Carratraca, Ardales, there are 
sixth-century castle ruins that dominate the 
hill overlooking the town. 

As a village, Carratraca is relatively new. 
Founded in 1820, itspopulation has always 
been about 1,100. The town is filled with 
whitewashed houses and verdant patios. 
Most of the residents own plots of land 
outside of town where they cultivate al- 
monds, olives and lemons. At tbe top erf tbe 


T 15 and there are unusually good' 

and well-known bullfighters for the 
fights, thanks to the generosity of a foreigner 
who has good reason lo be grateful to Carra- 
traca. Wolfram Theuemeisier, a German, 
crashed his iwo-engine plane into the side of 
the mountain behind the town on a foggy 
day in 1981. A quickly organized rescue 
team from the village got him and his six 
passengers out safely. 

The popularity of the baths is coming 
back. The villagers proudly tell you that the 
heir to the Norwegian throne was bom just 
one year after Pnncess Sonia visited the 
baths of Carratraca. Eighty people can be 
served in the marble baths and upstairs 
rooms. During the season, there are other 
small pensions, but tbe Hostal del Principe is 
the only one open year round. It offers full 
pension at 1.800 pesetas a person or 700 
pesetas for lodging alone. The hotel has 34 
rooms, single and double, but there are no 
private baths. In the summer it is best to 
reserve (tel: Carratraca 45-8020). 

At the entrance of the town there is a small 
restaurant, El Trillo, that has become popu- 
lar with people from all over the province. 
Juan Sanchez, the owner, keqps the menu 
small. His specialties are an excellent path, 
tender beef and pork, and fresh fish. In 
season game can be ordered ahead of time. 
For reservations call 45.81.99. 

Carratraca is 58 kilometers (about 35 
miles) from Milaga. Take route 044 from 
M&laga to Pizzarra and then route G337 for 
Alora and from there to Carratraca. ■ 


Mary Peirson Kennedy is a journalist who 
writes on Spanish cultural affairs. 


Searching for the Real Picodon 


Continued from page 7 


winning smile and hearty laugh, also sells 
another regional specialty, known asfout^ou. 
For foudjou, rite combines leftover cheese — 
usually what remains ax the bottom of the 
previous batch of foudjou — with roquefort, 
tromagp blanc, hot peppers and gnerfe. It is a 
wonderful, spreadable cheese, pungent 
enough to make your eyes water: 

Cheese made mi the Tariot and Magnet 
farms can be purchased at the farm or at tbe 
several outdoor food markets listed below. 

What does one look far in buying pico- 
- don? There is no surefire indicator, but after 
sampling dozens of farm-made goat cheese 
all over France, I have found one consistent 
theme: The best young chfcvre is usually the 
purest white, dran and fresh looking, and 
firm ewnigh to stand up on its own. On tbe 
contrary, some of the best aged chfcvre Tve 
ever tasted looked like shriveled little rocks, 
with a gray or orangish rind, and a fine 
covering of bhieish mold. 

To simple excellent picodon in the area’s 
restaurants, I have two spots to recommend 
highly, both modest local establishments, 
where one should eat well for around 100 
francs a person. 

N OT far from the village of Saoil (pro- 
nounced soo), which will bola it’s 
annual Picodon festival on July 21, 
there is Restaurant MaiDe, where, along with 
a truly piquant picodon on the cheese plat- 
ter, there are two items one cannot miss: the 
tender, creamy truffle omelet filled with 
honest, fragrant chunks of the region’s black 
truffles, and superbly fresh tntite meurtidre, 
trout fresh from a nearby hatchery cooked 
simply and quickly in butter. Wit h th e med- 

saLd a^^S^ecrf one of the local (§tes- 
du-Khdne — the red from the cooperative in 
Vmsobres is just fine. 

This is a ample, no-frills village restau- 
rant, fall of blue-collar workers and French 
couples on vacation with then dogs- There is 
only one copy of the handwritten menu — I 
guess the regulars know it by. heart — so if 
you need to consult it, the waitress will have 
topullit out of the glass case in the window. 

L’Oustah d’Anals, north of Carpentras, is 
a fait lander, a modem Provencal mas with 
pink stucco walls and a well-kept garden of 
dive trees, rosemary and thyme. Tnedecor is 
a bit on the cute tide, but ignore it and 
prepare yoursdf for some supetb, original 
food prepared by the restaurant’s owner, 
Yanmck DauberL 


Her goal is to offer regional dishes you 
won’t find on every menu, and she has suc- 
ceeded royally. Who could complain about a 
steaming hot terrine if aubergine, prepared 
with the loveliest, fresh eggplant ana lopped 
by a classic Mcfaamd sauce? file only prob- 
lem is that the dish arrived a bit too hot, and 
it took a good 15 nannies for it cool down 
enough to sample.) * 

Another specialty, a must for those who 
love picodon at its most piqoant, is her 
original main de picodon au pebre d’aL The 
gratia, which is light enough to sample as a 
first course, hearty enough to stand on its 
own as a main course, is a piping hot blend 
of wdl-aged picodon covered lightly with 
cream ana summer savory, the roscraary-like 
herb that goes by many names, including 
sarriette, pdvre d’ain and poebre d’ain. 

The dish could really be considered a 
Provencal fondue, for it is eaten by dipping 
dices of bread into the creamy mass. U 
you're lucky that day, tbe bread will come 
from the viuage bakery at nearby Criflon-le- 
Brave, where Didier Suran recently rebuilt 
an ancient wood-fired oven, making a mar- 
velous pain de campagne. A visit to the 
newly restored, once-abandoned perched 
village is worth tbe minor detour. 

Other excellent dishes to sample at l'Ous- 


ta& d’Anals include the superb saute <Tag- 
with stalks of i 


neau au romarin, infused wit 
rosemary, and the hearty nan depieds deporc 
aux tmffes, a sumptuous, fragrant dish pre- 
pared with exceptional care. With all of this, 
sample the house wine, a local red from the 
village of Bfcdoin. 

The roQiog cheese and dessert trays are 
hard to resist: A little wicker basket of fresh 
saniette rests amid its regional cheese assort- 
ment, and desserts include a series of home- 
made sherbets served from stoneware 
crocks. Service is friendly, chatty and impec- 
cable. 

markets for good picodon: Crest: 
morning. MontiHmar: Wednesday 
Saturday mornings. Sailians: Sunday 
morning. Valrdas: Wednesday and Saturday 
mornings. 

La Fite du Picodon, July 21. At SaoQ, 14 



kilometers north of Dieulefit. For additional 
te annual fair, 

es of picodon farmers, contact Marcel Va- 


infomuztian on the annual fair, or for address- 


y, Svndicat ifJnUiative of SaoQ, tel: (75) 
76.OJ.71 

CHEESEMAKERS: 

Picodon de FloriaL Guy and Michelle Tar- 


ioL From SaoQ, take highway D538 east for l 
kilometer, look for the Ferme de Flortaf sign 
on the left. 

Picodon de Roche Colombe, Emile andSo- 
lange Magnet. From SaoQ, idee D538 west to 
D1B6. Continue along D1S6 for 300 meters in 
the direction of Soyuans. Turn left off D1 36 at 
the farm, at the base of the Roche Colombe 
mountain. 

RESTAURANTS: 

Restaurant Mielle, at La Paillette, five kilo- 
meters southeast of Dieulefit. 26220 Mont - 
foux; tel: (75) 46.40.09. Closed October and 
November. No credit cards. Menus at 65 and 
85 francs, including service but not wine. A la 
carte, about 100 francs a person, including 
wine and service. 

L'Oustaii d’Anats, 15 kilometers northeast 
of Carpenrras on route D974, 84410 Bidoin ; 
tek (90) 65.67.43. Closed Monday evening 
Tuesday and October. Credit cards: American 
Express, Visa. Menus at 85 and 116 francs, 
including service but not wine A la carte, 
about 100 francs a person, including wine and 
service. 

ie Viennoiserie. Crillon-le-Brave, 


B 

84410 

A.M. to noon and 3:30 to 7:30 P. 
Monday. 


in ; tek (90) 65.68.30. Open 7:30 
' KM. Closed 


DOONESRURY 


cmmfiN 
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CORRECTION: PLEASE DISREGARD INCORRECT TEXT PUBLISHED JUNE 5, 1985. 

Nissan Unscrambles Teeming Tokyo With 
New, Fact-Packed Guidebook For Visitors 


. Streets 
.panese, hopes of asking 


TOKYO: This sprawling metropolis of 12 million scurrying inhabitants Ls, without question, the world’s most 
run in rings around die Imperial Palace. Building numbers are erratic and if a visitor doesn't read or speak 
understandable directions or deciphering road signs are nil 

But new help is ai hand: the just-published, distinctively orange-covered 132 page NISSAN GUIDE TO TOKYO AND 
ENVIRONS. A lucidly written, fact-packed English language compendium of every significant place, feature, address and telephone 
number that visiting tourists or executives need at their fingertips to lake all the confusion out of a Tokyo tour. 

Nissan, like tbe other giants in tbe automotive field, Michdin and Shell, has sow gone into the guidebook business with a 
remarkable, and impressive paperback which fits snugly and conveniently in a pocket, attache case or pocketbook. Illustrating the well- 
written, thoroughly researched text are 25 easy-to-decipber street maps of various Tokyo locations. Little spac* has been wasted on pretty 
pictures; this is an informative hard-working guidebook for people in a hurry who badly need swift help. 

The giant Japanese automotive linn obviously spared no expense in producing this detail-crammed hook. Expert foreign 
correspondents from die U.S. Au, UJL and Switzerland, based in Tokyo and knowledgeable about the city, from its broad boulevards to its 
teeming back alleys, were hired to write the guide, and their insights give tbe volume an extra dimension not found in the usual tourist 
guide to monuments and nightspots. 


7)1)67 drop in such interesting tidbits as Thursday is the only day of tbe week that the Horyuji treasures are on open display in 
Tokyo’s national muaenm; or that 6.00 a.m. is auction time at the Tsuxiji Fish Market when the best tuna are put on the block to be 


ificanl new addition to every Asia-bound traveller’s bookshelf. 

15 new guide books on other areas of Japan in the near future. The next book in 


snapped up by the Sushi and Sashimi trade. 

All of which makes this new Nissan Guide a 
Plans are to revise it every two years and to dev el 
the series, on Kyoto/Osaka, ib due out in October. 

A copy of this new NISSAN GUIDE TO TOKYO AND ENVIRONS can be obtained by writing to: 

Nissan Guide Clerk 
- Standard Advertising Inc. 

Sumitomo Higashi Shimbashi Building 

1-11 Hamamatsucho 

1-Chome, Minato-Ka 

Tokyo 105 Japan 

Tel: (03) 434 8131 

Price 1,000 yen, plus cost of packing and shipping. 





■r. 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


TlHirsdays 


i: worth SH C/OW 

HiqhL?*. SlhCK D-V 1 10 PE IQOiHuHl L OW QlWl O ljjj 


13 Month 

HiMlLO* Stock 


„ SIX Owe 

Chv. Vld. PE lDteHiOhLo* Oow.ChW 


NISE 


Ckwnjj 


Tables include Hie nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


tf Month 
HfliLn* Stock 


Sit Clow 

DI*. Vld. PE IDOi High Low Qwri.QVw 


(Continued from Page 6j 

rLvn 80 )A 14 6383 3k 33to 

laOl JXU 3'.* 

yjPI J 1387 15'. 14’S 

uR 1.7oe 50 17 334 33W 

sob .74*1 10 S 71 0»* 64 

Met » 3’.-: 34 

: PIC J.«0 120 200z 33 32'* 

:plFX12M0 5101#:'. 62- 

= PIG 768 126 Z*Oz 61 S» , ‘l 

: BlJ 132 714 300707 <7" 1 65 

■ pll 8.12 13.1 tOz 62 dlls 

= B*M 8J3 133) 2701 64 634 

>Fd 71o 361 3'« 2V, 

Cnpl 205 9J 31 71to 21’“ 

HER I AO 85 10 S 144 I6VJ 

klov .06 12 27 16 S'* 5 

Icon 206 s.1 8 671 46** 4S*i 

ISUI 1.78 11.0 S 7910 IS 14*. 

|R0> 1.00 S.7 15 17V.- 174 

IE 3.74 &8 II 65 31*. 31V. 

TnR 61 U IS 33 13’* 17 

IM JJO 44 IJ 4J03 90 79to 

iPL 2.74 »0 • 757 Mto I »*■ 

nlnt *4 6V. *6* 

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loblH 30 to » 

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PSInpf 038 156 
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PSEG Pi 4.18 116 
P5EGPI 430 113 
P5EGPI 565 11.0 
PSEG Pi 538 10.9 
PSEG Pi 1364 116 
PSEG Pi 117 119 
PSEGol 263 106 
PSEG Pi 730 116 
PSEG Pi 762 116 
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171 33’* 33b 33b + ’, 

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300 314, 30** 21 - b 

1638 57*, Sob S7b + V, 
116 15”, 15b 15b— V, 
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720: 40 47*, 47b * V, 

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100* S7V j 574* S7*i 
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779 64, 6'* 61* + to 

9701 14to 13 141* + to 

30 15 14b 14b 

120 21b 20to 20b -1 

9 I fib iBb iBto + ** 

30 19b 19 19b + to 

3 It 16 It 

34 17 1 , 17 174, + to 

B08 294* 2Bto 29 - to 

A13S 3lb 31 llto— v, 
13 13b 13b 13b 
1002 39 39 39 

BStb 38 37to 38 
700, 38 38 38 —IV, 

ltOl 47 4ft 4ft —I 
27401 4Bto 47 to 484* + ** 
100 111b 113b 113b —lb 

35 19b 19b 194* + to 
40 23 22to 22b +IH 

I400Z 70b 79b nib + to 
B20z ftSto t6to 68to +1 
2501 k It It +1** 

7 2b 2*fe 2b 

331 llto I3*t 13*, + to 
9 ftb. 6b 6** + to 

045 16’j» 16 I6to— b 
1291 ltb itv* Itto + to 
500 24 23to 23b — to 
202 8to BV-, 8to— 4* 


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104b BOto Tone pr 1160 10.7 

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11 937 75** 74t* 75** 

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25'* 14 QkRftll 24a 1.0 15 102 23 22to 23 + b 


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25b TovRU a 28 2866 37b 

17V: Tracts 62 15 722 22 

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Twlno* 50 46 ID 24 174* 17 17b 

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Tvlers 60 Zft 8 97 ISb 15b 159*- 


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I 9V* QcclP wt 

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r 17V* OraiPaf 212 *.+ 
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l 25V; OnPpfH 3.75 11.9 
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194, Oran Pit Z14 7 ft 

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i 6"; Orion di JO X9 

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13 OvShlo 50 3 0 
2S'« OwenC 160 45 
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IBto PHH 1.00 28 
77b PPG 160 37 

15 »SA 60 25 
13b PSA dal 1.90 15 
lib POCAS 154 10.7 
13b PocGE 154 7J 
30'. PdCLig 332 7 1 
21** PCLum 1.30 46 

5’* PocRcs 05 r 6 
13’1 PQCPiPlZOO 10J 
12b PocSO 40 76 
55’* Paelele 5.72 76 
Jib PoCHCB 2J2 76 
Mb Pacllpl A07 12J 

25 PalnWb 60 1.7 
2»‘? PolnWolZU 7 4 
37 PalrnBc IJO 3J 
20b PanABk 70 2.1 

4 PanAm 
|ia Pq/iA wl 

13’; Pondckn .20 1.2 
31 PonnEC 2J0 6 4 
3-« PoniPr 

13*o Paprcff 50 4J 
9 1 ■ Pd'Oyn 
IV, Por.E 1 
4to ParkDrl It 13 
J5-. ParkM 1.12 3 3 
14 Pork Pn J21 25 
IV; PolPIrl 
II'; PaiNP .04 45 
IJ’s PavCsh 16 .? 

f- Pcabd, 20 ZO 
Penoa 

43*. PwiCen 

44*, Penney 136 45 

21 PoPL 250 9.4 

30 PDPLDf 4 JO 11.1 
57*. PdPLDl 860 II ? 
2T : PaPL dprl42 115 
20 PoPLdpr2.90 II J 
W: PdPL or X40 115 
2?b PoPLdPrt.75 11.7 
2Sb PoPLdPrt.7S 173 
81b PoPL or 1 1.00 11.2 
94’; PgPL prllOO IZ4 
S5 PoPL pr XOO 1 1.9 
58’; PoPL or X70 119 
llto Pennll 2.20 56 

20 Penw ol I aO a 7 
JOb Pcnn;ol 2.20 4.2 

9’ .- PeftpEn 1 70 4 9 

26 PCDDO, 40 • 

13 PcoBrwi 

39-, PetKlCd I 7B 35 
llto Port 61 36 !J 

7to Prmxpi 1.2 lei 4.7 

14 P«r.Dr .78 13 

31 Peine 1 40 36 

74V. p„!»* 2.73«I45 

14 PftlPfiDl 1JI 9J 
7b Plrin, ,9ici4J 
39V" p|i-er 14B 28 
I7'« PneloD 
34 Pholppr 1.00 105 
30 ‘j PhiBiS J4 U 
1 PuiioEl 2 70 13 6 

77 Pn.iE el J50 111 

:5b PhiiEol 4 30 130 

21 PmlE pi 460 176 
75b PhiiEol 4 68 134 
Mto PhllE di 8. 73 I2J 

9b PhilE el 1 41 13 0 
ft ; PmfE DI 1 33 13 1 

43 Ph.IE pi 753 115 

6’r PnllEel IJB 131 

9? Pnilpl 171? 14] 

33 PnnB PF *J? U8 

44 Pn.iE ol ?B0 132 

«’! PnilE Dl 7 73 133 

IV 4 PMISuO in 62 
*7', PhilMr 4 00 4 7 
!0>. Philpin 4B 30 
76 Phi Mm pi 1Q0 17 
IV" PhilPis 1 00 84 
??’- Pm**i pi 

16 i Philbn 40 16 


289 I'/* 

II 3 35 

10 19*2 339* 

16 139* 
5 23** 
J 211* 
4 219* 

422 55b 
270 109V, 
12 108b 
1S 34 2Wa 
15 105 30b 

ft 4149 I5to 
310: 36 
28001 58 
200: 62 
1350: 65 
11 28to 

39 31V. 

17 16b 
10* 67 

Ift 30* 13b 
4001 *7 
4 Jlto 

40 219* 
190:109 
200: 68 

11 1 55 25*, 
130: * 

10 23* 32V: 

1123 7 

9 48 12’. 

11 230 32 b 

ID 276 28b 
|9 59 ID*, 

36 Itto 
41 1828 12b 
25 9 

334 32'.* 
9 199 22to 

13 98 32*. 

II 315 16b 
8 3«6 l4to 

10 K4£ 4Bb 

13 14B 14 


19, IV* 
35 35 

32 32b- 

13 13 - 

23to 23** 
219, 21*1 
21b 21fe- 
55 55V, - 

1089. 109*, - 

lOSto 108*,- 
20to 20**- 
30b 309* 
IS 1 * 15’*- 
35 35 

56b 57 
62 62 
65 AS 
27’* 28b 
30to 31to ■ 
16 16b 

67 67 - 

12b 12b 
47 67 - 

llto llto 

20b 20b- 

109 109 

68 68 - 

259* 25 to 

8V* Sto - 
31to 33 - 
6** 7 

12b 12*, 
31»* 32 
SB 28 

10 109* - 

2ftb 2«7, 
iito m*. 
8to Sto - 
31b 32b- 
22b 22to 
32 32**- 

16V, lib 

34b 34b 
<8*4 48b 
13to 14 ■ 


14 24ft 3ft 

10 1334 43b 
65 218 30b 

119 22*, 

7 149, 

8 23*6 20 

1] IO 46*. 
16 413 27b 
78 31 8'. 

4 1ft 

12 26 15b 

10 1240 92' i 

9 7145 30', 

109 12+1 
4ft 710 34 ', 
29 30b 

15 231 34', 

10 26 12*b 

1404 7to 
107 39, 

S3 1004 17*, 

10 1855 35 to 

30 517 ftto 

15 1303 Wb 
30 583 lib 

10 IS 13b 

248 4T, 

11 270 34 

4ft 71 19 

5 220 "to 

IS 294 Mto 

15 1404 I *’■« 

24 399 10', 

ffll to 
II 2158 52 
9 J95 49b 

9 768 27b 
3001 40' i 
440: 73** 
82 29 
3 26 
760: 71 

8 27 to 
12 30** 
IDl 98 
80:105 
SOI *7*, 

?TO£ 73 

13 849 39", 

77 74V* 

24 1789 51*1 
7 MO 179. 

19 189 44b 

1 Z!’* 

25 5744 S9b 
13 782 Iito 

7 60S 8'" 

It 81 Jlto 
li 502 JB'-; 

31 Zft"; 
10 Iftto 
I4« 3 

16 10257 SVto 

1576 70 
89 50 

27 9409 44b 

6 5872 I6to 

SOI 29 
170: Jib 
W: J5 
1002 35 
200: 65 
29 10b 
l rr 10-. ; 
300: 58 
181 9b 
IMrIJO 
Ml 74to 
BOO: 59b 
40! SB': 
IJ »ft 2V-: 
II &506 84 , 
IJ 467 25 
25 62 

8 9166 17 
57*1 73to 

17 77 ?S . 


35** 35b 
42b 43to 
29b 30 
21”, 22b 

14 b 14%, 

19** 1 9b - 

4ftb 4ft%, 

77 b J7V* 
8b 8to- 
Iflto 19 
15". 15to- 
80b 81W 
JO*, 30b 
12b 22*, 
14** 34*1- 
Mb 30b 
34 34 ■ 

32'-, J7b 

7 r, 

3b 3b - 
1613 !«- 
35to 3Sb 
•to **, 
19V, 19V, 
10*, 11 - 
12to 12", - 
4b 4** 
33*, 33b 
ISto lit, ■ 
Zto Tto 
14V, T4to 
iftto iftto 
•to 10b • 

50b 51 * - 
48b 48to- 
26to 27V« ' 
40V* 40V* ' 
73** 73** ■ 
28to 29 ■ 
25b 25b- 
70 71 

27*, 27b 
30 303* - 

98 98 

IDS 105 

ft?*, 67*; 

72 73 

J$», JO** - 
23b 23b- 
50”. 52 - 

17 17** . 

44 44b 

22'. a 22V: - 
S7'i SJ'.H - 
25** 25** 

8 lb • 
21". 21*, - 
38 Jfi' U - 

2*' , 26"i ■ 

l»*j Itto 
2to 2b- 
SOto 52". 
19'., 70 
49'., » . 

41*, 431,- 
1ft 1ft'., - 
29 39 

33 13 - 

15 K - 
J5 )S - 

45 65 

lOto 10', 
10'. 10b - 
58 £0 

9*. 9b - 
120 130 

7«- . 74', ■ 
S?'t 59' » 
58' ? Mto 
21b 21b 
84b 64' ;- 
74 to 74*. - 
60 60", < 
Tib llto- 
?3to 23b - 
74 b 25b ■ 


aoNE pi 
SoRvpl 
SoUnCo 
Souiino 
li'. So Rev 
ft'. Soumrfi 

47 Somk pf 
14b SwAlrl 
lib SwIFur 
ICTto SwIGm 
56 SwBftll 
l*to SwEnr 
IS". SwIPS 
llto Soanon 

1 Sto Seecrp 
33b finer rv 
30': Spring* 
31’, SquorD 
41 S SaulbO 
17b 5 
14"; S 
■ I S 
39** S 

r. s 
11b s 

19’., S 
2»* S 
Sto 5 
r* 5 
14'. S 
•to 5 
Z4 5 
15b S 
76b S 
8' j S 
Mto S 
24 S 
34to S 
lS’o S 

2 v 

Mto 5 

18". SfrfMfi 
14', SlrtdRT 
J'* SuavSh 
25b SunCn 
Ato SunEi 
4]*, fiunCo 
34 b Si 


A0 30 
A0 21 

10001X5 
AS 10 
1 500 1X6 
1 804 103 
732 1X9 

34 

13 

715 

21 

19S 

296 

346 

16 

649 

20a 

100: 

30a 

121* 
19to 
111* 
11* 
47to 
1 47 
1 83 
t 71 

700 110 


50z 65to 



17 

136 

26*6 



17 

3 

43(* 

2B0 

35 

12 

23 

78** 

200 

75 

8 

27 

DOW 

1 4 JO 

10.7 


5ta <2 

i 100 

20 

10 

47B 

36 to 

50 

27 


49 

22W 




106 

9 

08 

J 

26 

5999 

51W 

f 



2 110 

I A4 

15 

18 

1527 

27V* 

a 1 ao 



100 

24V, 

AS 

10 

18 

B7 

37to 

IA0 

1* 

7 

328 

36 V, 

150 

30 


1 

48 

58 

33 

13 

586 

24 to 




1985 

325* 

1A8 

30 

16 

1641 

451+ 

l 156 

7J 

9 

87 

229* 

100 

40 

8 

130 

26W 

2A8 

1X4 

8 

269 

24 

.92 

1A 

21 

1241 

64W 

06 

IA 

11 

664 

25W 

00 

20 

* 

15 

9 

1 150 

70 


20 

20H 




13 

Sto 

Me 9 

16 

177 

23 Hi 

35 

13 

17 

57 

455* 

240 

39 

B 

313 

6lft* 

457alXl 


23 

48to 

250 *0 

13 

85 

28W 

.21 

10 

18 

1771 

17V0 

54 

10 

14 

19 

24to 

3ILS0 

100 


130: 45Vi 

200 

50 

IS 

836 

4?V| 

1 104 


33 

5 

13H 



94 

2399 

75, 

1 



716 

2W 

200 

A7 


233 

23 

214 

90 


*1 

23W 




512 

3to 

1705 220 


5 

38 



10 

2 I27W 




1491 

12W 




3 

33 




1 

36 




105 

ft 1 * 




•2 

llto 

A 



79 

13 

100 

15 

11 

2294 

34to 

102 

14 

9 

291 

SOto 

100 

4A 

19 

2815 

29W 

280 

43 


379 

<2 

450 

80 


15 

507* 




IJO 

8 

tB 



BOOz 21 to 

200 

40 

10 

625 

46V. 

IJO 

5A 


16] 

28 

7800 

AJ 


1 

48 



■1 

<74 

33W 

50 

2a 

12 

34J*24to 


4.1 


J8 

11 



12 

224 

17to 

IaO 

40 

7 

J59 

29W 




87 

4to 

.10 

■ 5 

14 

61 

ftto 

1.74 

45 

14 

194 

38 

00 

13 

10 

760 

iito 



38 

118 

ftto 




11 

7W 

248 

60 

* 

1139 

39to 

8.90 100 


StU fif 

255 

100 


1 

2Sto 

?A4 

60 

9 

86 

39 

25* 

*5 

9 

71 7 

38to 

158 

40 

9 

93 

37 

04 

20 

4 

766 

12W 

50 

30 

■6 

3137 

2I'» 

200 

4A 

10 

1TM 

45W 




1 

Jto 

100a 2} 

13 

40 

73to 

03 

25 

14 

18* 13 

50 

DJ 

7 

II 

17*-? 

XOO 

5-5 

23 

2994 

54W 

5A5 1 

100 


55 

54W 

54 

24 

10 

59 

765* 

102 

40 

9 

103 

27W 

04 

80 

20 

731 

into 

.48 

.9 

17 ' 


S4to 



r 

2*82 

18'-* 

.12 

15 

17 

151 

Mto 

132 

38 

12 

IJO 

34 to 


USl Futures 


Season Seaton 
High Low 


Open Hiytt low Clove 


Season Season 
Hion Low 


Open High Low Close Cng. 


Grains 


wheat {Cat j 

XQOO bu minimum- aeiier* pat busiw l 
A90 J.I0V? Jul XIDto XI2to 

3 76', IIS Sea XlSto 117b 

3J3to 1)8 Dec 123 b 124b 

174 to 122 Mar 124 JJ4b 

4 02 111 Mav H2to 113 

3.22 to 195 Jul' 197to 198*7 

Es*. Soles Prev. Sales VO. 178 

Prou. Day Oaen ini. J7JT76 oft 1.115 
CORN (CBT) 

1000 Ixj miaimwn- ool Ian per bushel 

131 Z67to jul Z70 Z7lb 

121 to 2Jlto Sep 2Jlb ZS3 

Z9S 146 Dec Z48to ZftTb 

3.10 Z54'., Mar Z54to Z$ft 

121 b Z58to May ZS8V. 2J0 

286 Z58 Jul ISO Z59b 

ZMVi Z44VT Sep 24Jto 2L48 

Esl. Sales P rev. Soles 22.197 

Prev.Dov Open int. 105^91 up 257 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 


109 109b —Jib 

114 to 114b -J)1b 
122 JJ2b —A\ 
uib 122 —into 
3.10U lioto -.01 to 
iv$b Z95b —Jib 


Zftfib 2.71V: +J)lb 
Z51 ZS2to +3)0 V. 
Z45b ZiAto 
Z53b Z55 +.OOb 
157b Z58V: 

Z58 ZSBW +J»to 
244'.: 148 +JBto 


5000 bu minimum- dollars par bushal 


S09 

—01 to 

7.99 

Ml 

Jul 

507 

SJDto 

506 


X 4* 




XftOto 


—M 

X7I 

5.40 

Sep 

5J9 

508 

5J9 

503 'i 

—01 

<58 

5A2to 


iM 

SJ4to 

X65 

X70to —0Oto 

6.79 

SJ3to 




X75 

5 SOto 

—00V, 

752 

503 

Mar 

50753 

X94 

VM 

5.91 to 

7.79 

S.71 



601 to 

194 

X98 

—01 


504 





603 


6.74 

X76 


600 

600 

556 

in 


Esl. Sales 


Prev. Sale* 13655 





COFFEE CCNTCSCE) 

J7J00IKV-C«filSDOr MJ. 

149JD 12100 Jul 14243 14905 

IJO JO 127 JO Sep 142.70 143 /X 

150.40 179.75 Dec 14125 WM 

149 75 I7BJ0 Mar 14Z7S LUJ5 

14X80 13100 May 143.45 UKS 

1000 135 JO Jul 143.15 14315 

147J0 IJZ75 5ep 14145 14225 

Dec 

Esi. Sales Prev. Sales MW 

Prrv. Dav Oaen mi. n J96 oHiJ 
SUGAR WORLD U (NVCSCE1 
I1ZOO0 Ibx-cenls aer lb. 

9.75 2M Sep 184 28* 

9M 174 OCl 296 299 

7.75 IK! Jan 113 119 

QJ3 134 Mar ]A 153 

7.15 358 May Jj68 3J2 

489 179 Jul 187 191 

4.96 <85 OO 410 4.U 

Est. Soles Prev. Sales iMt 

Prev. Dav Open Ini 814174 wd78 
COCOA (NYC5CE) 

10 me me tons- * per Ian 

2400 1963 Jul 2100 3100 

3415 <963 S«P 3138 2154 

5337 1945 Dec 7130 2160 

2190 1955 Mar 2136 2165 

1171 l«0 MOV 

2110 I960 Jul 

2330 7023 Sep 

2060 2855 Dec 

Ell. Salts Prev. Sales 4J5B 

Prev. Dav Open ini. 21,456 of) 200 

ORANGE JUICE (NYeE) 

1X000 Iks.- cents oer lb. 

184 85 13630 Jul 13700 139-25 


13X90 13X95 
14130 1*107 
UIA) 14189 
141.40 14143 
1045 14130 
14195 14108 
14145 1OU0 
14X07 


Season Seascn 
HUh LOW Oten I 

S'DOJOa prlrv o' ".6 JTnasot 'CO pc; 

TT.Jft 59-13 ■>» 76-30 I 

t,.-* jb- 4 Orr 75-78 

74- 0 50-75 Mai 

75- 17 58-a dun ?*?1 ' 

75-2 64 , 

esi. Sale* Prirj Soles 

Prev Dor Coc-: inf 3J85 gtlli 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- BtoOl 1D0 DC' 


59-13 

■jep 

76-30 

7 ft- 30 

fft-iS 

76-16 

—15 

59-4 

Hr* 

75-78 

'X?9 

nr. 

rs-2! 

— 14 

»» 

Mai 




75-3 

—14 

58-75 

Jun 

7*?1 

7 All 

7417 

M18 

-U 

65 

5*« 




74 1 

—IS 

Pri r. 5df(ri 

280 






92 78 

85 SO 

Sr» 

92 A4 

92 44 

VZ 19 

7132 

-06 

95 J7 

8534 

Dot 

91.98 

9199 

•IJO 

9T0O 


917$ 

8656 

MOT 




91,32 

-09 

91A0 

66.43 

Jun 




90.92 

—JO 

91.15 

6706 

Seo 




9058 

-Jl 

70 JJ 

83-34 

Dec 




90 M 

- 31 


264 

5ep 

204 

286 

201 

285 

-.01 

274 

OCl 

296 

299 

292 

2*7 

->01 

300 

Jan 

111 

119 

113 

118 

+03 

3J4 

Mar 

349 

153 

148 

352 


358 

May 

308 

372 

308 

371 


179 

Jul 

307 

191 

306 

189 

-01 

405 

OO 

410 

XU 

409 

4.10 

—.04 


B4J5 

Xea 

9211 

9212 

9108 

61.90 

— to 

8400 

Dec 

9U7 

9108 

91AJ 

mas 

—37 

8X16 

Mor 

9104 

7104 

90.79 

7100 

-07 

86. 7} 

Jun 

9036 

9086 

9961 

90 JC 

— JO 

8708 

&QO 

9X46 

9ft4? 

9236 

7ft38 

— Jl 

B72S 

Ofc 

90 1} 

*017 

89 93 

B9.94 

— Ji 

S704 

.var 

8905 

8905 

89.f? 

8964 

-01 

89 74 

Jun 

8*53 

B9J8 

8*54 

89 Jt 

-02 


1963 

Jul 

2100 

3100 

3085 

2099 

-7 

1763 

S*P 

2138 

2154 

2176 

2147 

-10 

1945 

Dec 

2130 

2160 

2130 

2151 

—3 

1955 

Mar 

2136 

2165 

2136 

2164 

+4 

I960 

BBOV 




3171 

-2 

I960 

Jul 




2181 

—2 

3023 

Scp 




2192 

—2 

2055 

Dec 




2302 

—7 


21b— to 
14*6 — V, 

7to 

57to 

17Vi + '., 
57th + V, 
49** + to 


Prev. Day Open Int. 62528 eH2U3 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT> 

100 fnnv dollars per ton 
196 JO 1 17J0 Jul 13X00 13030 

18000 119.80 Aug 12000 I3IA0 

1 79 JO 13250 Sep 130.10 13420 

150-50 12X00 Oct 133J0 136-50 

1B4JOO 130.00 Dec m.49 UZOO 

16X00 13280 Jan 14100 14420 

206.50 13 7 JO MOT 14X00 I47JQ 

162-50 14X00 May 152-00 15300 

14700 147.90 Jul 755-00 1SX50 

EW. So>n Prev. Sales 1X877 

Prev. Oav Qpon Int. 48270 do 10 
SOYBEAN OIL ICBTJ 
60000 lbs- dollars per 100 lbs. 

3Z72 2170 Jul 2X01 2X90 

31.95 2Z50 Aug 27J2 27 JO 

31.10 2Z50 Sep 26.90 26.95 

3037 2290 OCl 2X25 3X35 

29-55 22+0 Dec 2X70 25.8(1 

3907 ZLeO Jan 2X40 2X45 

2X60 HAS M or 2520 25325 

. 2745 2420 MOV 2X05 2X05 

2X25 23.95 Jul 2460 24 JO 

2X15 24.01 Aug 24.70 24J>0 

E sl. Salas Prev. Soles 17,785 

Prev. Dery Open ini. oOJTJ up 1366 

OATS (CBT) 

SJHObu minimum- dollars per bushel 
1.781, IAS', Jul 1,4 71, 1A7W 

1,79 1.41 to Sep 1A2to I A3 

1JOV: IA5 Dec lA5b lA5b 

IA7b lAftV; Mar 1A4 I Aft 

VJJ 1.47, Mav 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 475 

Prev. Day Ooen int. 3,160 up 143 


12X80 13X10 
127 JO 13120 
13010 moo 

13X10 13650 
13X30 Ml.h) 
14050 14400 
144320 14700 
15100 15150 
15X00 15X50 


134-50 

Jul 

13700 

139,25 

17700 

17800 

+120 

13200 

Sep 

134,30 

115.95 

13450 

US 05 

+70 

13105 

Nov 

13260 

13350 

13240 

13200 

+ 0$ 

17900 

Jan 

13X7$ 

I3L70 

13X75 

130.75 

+.15 

129 JO 

Mar 

13X50 

13X90 

13650 

130 75 

♦JO 

136AS 

May 




130-75 

+J0 

14220 

Jul 




130.75 

+50 

179.75 

5M> 




13X7S 

♦JO 


NOV 




13X75 

+50 


2X17 —.92 

27 JR —06 
265J —.76 

26.00 -JB 
2X45 — w 60 

2X00 —AO 
24.97 —53 

24.93 — A7 

2455 —JO 
24J0 —JO 


1A5to 145b —.02*, 
1A1 I Alb — J»1 
1.44b IA4b — OOto 
145*1 !A5Vi — Ol 
1A6 —01 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 lbs.- cen Is per lb. 


6707 

56.85 

Aug 

5700 

58.17 

56.92 

5705 

65.90 

57 JO 

Oct 

5900 

97-57 

58.40 

5905 

6785 

•000 

Dec 

6170 

61.90 

6000 

61X5 

<745 

60.95 

Fab 

6245 

6307 

61 JO 

a js 

67-57 

6215 

Aar 

6305 

63A0 

6205 

6300 

64-25 

ftioa 

Jun 


6300 

63.25 

63.40 


EH. Sales 450 Prev. Sales 1.171 
Prev. Dav Open int. SJoJ off si 


| Metals 

COPPER (COMEX I 
254W0 lbs.- rants per lb. 

8X25 57.00 Jul S9A5 60.10 59 JO 60.10 

5900 <*« Auo 60L35 

0210 57J0 Sea 40.10 61.10 eOJO 6000 

I 0X25 5X50 Dec 61A5 6200 61.40 61X5 

BUM 59 JO Jan £220 

8000 59.60 Mor 6255 62A5 *250 ftZ85 

74.00 61.10 May 63. W 63.45 63.10 *1.35 

74<0 61 JO Jul AXS5 63J5 6355 6X85 

7X90 62J0 Sea 64J5 

70 JO 63.75 Dec 4X05 

7X20 6X30 Jan (AM 

6700 A5A5 Mar 45-75 

MOV 66J0 

Esi. Sain Prev. Sales 4.950 

Prev. Dav Open mi. 82 946 up 384 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

40000 Ibx-cenls per 1b. 

5940 43.15 Jul 4445 

Aug 44-65 

74M 4190 Sea 4X05 4X10 449$ 44.95 

7060 4A90 Dec 4595 4X9S 4X95 4X90 

76-50 51,75 Jan 46-20 

7160 46J5 Mar 46A5 

66J75 5195 MPV 47-55 

6145 <7,85 Jut 4X25 

5Z10 51-00 Sen 4095 

Dec 5000 

Jan 5035 

MOW 51X5 

Mav 51 JS 

Esl. Sales Prev. Salas 271 

Prev. Day Oaen Ini. IJU7 up 11 
SILVER (COMEX) 
xooo irav az.- cents per fray az. 


Eli Sam Prev. Soles 136 

Prev Oar Ooen inf- 1795 oil J7 

EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI miiiicm-prs oi 100 act 
9Z4S B4JS Sep 9211 9215 

V2JK S4J0 Dec 91J7 91 M 

91 So B&lO Mor 91-24 7U4 

91 15 86.7} Jun DC 36 9086 

9084 E7J8 Sop TOA6 9Q.4? 

90J3 8738 Dec 70 15 W17 

9X74 S7J4 .Mar 8985 8985 

89 95 89 74 Jun B9J3 89 JB 

Esi. Sates Pre*. Seles 74.781 

Prey Dav Oaen irt.USJOl up 531 
BRITISH POUND(IMM) 
f per pound' 1 ocim eauan U 0001 
1.4450 1.0300 Sea 1.3620 1J770 

13*50 10200 Dec I -1550 1J6S0 

1J450 10600 Ma> 13425 IJ5C0 

IJ4&0 1.1905 Jun 1.3330 1J3X 

Esl. Sales 17,145 Prev. Sale* 17015 
Prev. Dav Oaen Int 47J39 up 77 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

I per cur- 1 point eaualssoocoi 

750$ JTO Sea .7375 7376 

.7566 7006 Dec 7365 .7355 

7504 6981 MAT J329 .7330 

.7350 -7070 Jun .7306 J314 

Est. Sales l AM Prrv. Sales >68 
prev. bav Oaen mi XT <5 of 1 53 
FRENCH FRANC IIMICI 
Soertronc- I palnl eaaals SXQmi 
.11180 .<)•«« Sen 

.10990 09670 Dec .11300 .11700 

Esi. Sales 3 Prev. Sales « 
Prrv. Dor Open ini «03 ud< 
GERMAN MARK (VMM1 
S per mark- 1 peril actuals 10 0001 


I 3550 1J64S 
I J405 1J535 
1.3340 1J45C 
1J330 U385 


7358 J3t 2 
.7323 J33B 
7134 7318 
7306 J298 


.II2«D 
.11700 .H3M 


0545 

0*30 

fi«o 

J«13 

0454 

0408 

0444 

♦14 

.3810 

0971 

Occ 

-3,-ID 

J4M 

JOt 

0(71 

+H 

04 SO 

0340 

Mor 

0475 

0500 

0475 

0SCO 

+21 

0335 

3J35 

Jun 




0535 

+25 


ESI Sams 33.714 Prev. Sole* 32J« 
Prev. Dav Coon int. 67.851 uc i JX5 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S per yen- 1 doIiu rauals SOOOOOCi 
004150 DOJB^I Sea 004117 004135; 

004350 003905 Dec 004133 004151 J 

004170 .004035 Mor 004158 0041*3 J 

Esi. Sales ?A<5 Prev. Sales liAti 
Prev. Dav Oaen ml. 33-714 up 607 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S per I rone- 1 point oauals 5X0001 
.4830 J480 Sea <089 4140 

.4360 J531 DOC A121 4175 

.4175 J835 Mar 4180 A1S0 

Esi. Sales 22.707 Prev. Sales 1 x 545 
Prev. Dav Open Ini 33J06 0H73ft 


004113 .00413* 
.004132 00*145 
004156 004170 


.4383 A131 
A112 A163 
AIN A190 


industrials 


Est. Sales 24,741 Prev. Sale, 14.953 
Prev. Dav Oomini. 49J23 pH 117 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44000 ibx- cents per lb. 


7X70 

8rt AS 


/a on 

6X47 

<445 

6500 

73.00 

63.75 


6X40 

6540 

64J0 


72J2 

6405 

Del 

6X45 

6X60 

6400 


7300 

6505 

Nov 

6605 

M0O 

45X7 

6680 

7900 

6600 


6802 

6X10 

67 JO 


70JS 

66.10 

Mor 

6X35 

6X50 

6780 


7X65 

6700 

Apr 

6X30 

6X30 

6805 

68.40 


Est. Sales IA23 Prev. Sales 1.188 
Prev. Dav Open im. 8A22 up 74 


14410 

5420 

Jul 

40X0 

411 J 

59XO 

4000 

—72 

<31J 


Aug 




A02J 

—75 

■ 1830 

5730 

Scp 

4060 

6I7J 

<025 

6055 

-75 

12300 

5*00 

Dec 

61*0 

62X0 

<140 

61B4 

—73 

12150 

5*50 

Jam 

Ann 

A<nn 

<220 

6226 

—7.1 

11930 

<070 

Mar 

6270 

<370 

6270 

ftjxa 

—70 

10480 

6210 

Mav 




6394 

-67 

9450 


Jul 

<510 

<520 

<510 

6488 

—64 

94X0 

<410 

Sea 

MXO 

<638 


6588 

—52 

7990 

MXO 

Dec 

<740 

<790 

67X5 

6738 

—S3 

7890 

6365 

Jan 

6780 

<780 

6780 

6790 

—55 

7700 

<770 

Mar 


*910 

6910 

69X0 

—50 

<950 

6930 

May 




70X9 

—4.7 


LUMBER (CME) 

130000 ba. H - Seer IOOObd.it. 

23X50 1 2V JO Jul 15500 15500 1SZ«0 I54JS 

W SO 135 JO Sen 15X00 15X00 15X60 15190 

186.10 137 JfO Nov 153A0 153.70 15100 153.10 

18700 U460 Jan 1604N 16000 159DD 159 JO 

19500 15000 Mar I AS JO I65JO I6X5D I65JO 

176A0 15100 May 17020 17X30 17X7G 169 70 

18300 171 DO Jul 17X00 17300 I74J0 17700 

Esl. Soles 1*92 Prev. Sam 2J41 
Prev. Dav Ooen Int. 9J30 ut>240 
COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

50000 ibs- cents per lb. 


77 J0 

6007 

Oct 

<1.15 

61.15 

6040 

6X45 

-.71 

7300 

60.48 

Dec 

A1J2 

A1A3 

6X70 

•074 

—.72 

7575 

6140 

Mor 

6217 

622D 

6156 

61 Jft 

-J* 

70.00 

<186 

Mar 

6239 

6239 

61.98 

61.92 

—84 

7X05 

*205 

Jul 

6235 

6235 

<200 

<1.72 

—.73 

6X50 

58 JO 

00 




5855 

—52 

5905 

57.90 

Dec 

5X65 

5885 

5820 

5800 

-AS 


Esl. Sain 1.900 Prev. Sale, 543 
Prev. Dav Oaen I m 1&056 ua <3 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

<2000 gal- ccnrs per gal 


5X77 

4705 


5055 

5055 

4945 

5X15 

—32 





4X35 

4700 

4780 


51.75 

4300 


4300 

4300 

4215 

4205 

—37 


4400 



4X70 

44.10 

44 JO 


5047 

46.10 

Feb 

4605 

UK 

ASl30 

4505 

—SO 


4400 


4402 

4450 

4110 

4305 

—85 

4905 

4*55 


46J0 

46.70 

4X50 

45.95 

—05 

4905 

4X70 


4670 

4X70 

4600 

4*75 

—.12 

5100 

4X55 

AUB 







Esf.Soles 7026 Prev. Sales 4J27 
FYev. Dav Ooen Ini, 22J34 oH297 
PORK BELLI EStCME) 

JXOn lbs.- ranis per lb. 


E it. Sales 13000 Prev. 5am 1ILS74 
Prev, DavOnen int. 72A49 up 78* 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

SOtrov az.- dollars per frovoz. 

449 JO 24100 Jul 26X50 26700 

39300 25000 Oct 264JO 26800 

37X50 25750 Jan 27X00 27X00 

379 JO 2*450 Apr 27400 27600 

302-00 27300 JUI 

Est. Sales 960 Prev. Sales 772 
Prev. Dav Oaen Ini. 11A57 up 4079 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

IN irav oc- dollars per az 


26X50 264-70 
26100 264-20 
26050 269.10 
274.00 27400 
279 JO 


7550 

66-35 

Aug 

69.70 

7X10 

4940 

M.9S 

-JO 

7645 




7X75 

<900 

7080 

—13 

77.10 

<785 

Oct 


71 JO 

7080 

7L3G 

—09 

74JS 

<8 JO 

Nov 




71 JS 

-.15 

7805 

69 15 

Dec 

7280 

7260 

7T.77 

72J0 

—M 

76.90 

6900 

Jan 

727$ 

7275 

7230 

7230 

-» 

7193 

7000 

Feb 

7200 

72 HI 

7L90 

7200 

-JB 

Eat. Sales 


Prev. Sales X91S 





Prev. Dav Open Int. 20792 Up 511 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 
lOOObbl.-dollarsDer bbl. 


8247 

56.90 

Jul 

8085 

57.15 

Aug 

7830 

<115 

Feb 

7540 

6400 

Mar 

7580 

<605 

Mav 

7x00 

67J0 

Jul 

7X15 

6*00 

Aug 


Esl. Safes 7JI11 Prev. Sales 5J60 
Prev. Day Ooen i m. eois oHXl 


5600 58.22 

57.10 5X20 
6X35 6620 

44.75 6X65 

4650 6465 

6705 6X40 
6450 


14105 

9105 

Sen 

9235 

9X50 

90 JO 

9205 

I4IJ0 

91.10 

Dec 

9300 

93-50- 

9100 

9X35 

12700 

9250 

Mar 

91.70 

93 JO 

91.70 

9410 

11400 

91 JO 

Jun 




9405 


Currency Options 








■ Jul, II 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE . 





Option A 

stmt* 







Underlying 

Price 

Calls— Leri 

Puts — Loll 



Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

SAP 

Dec 

Mar 

115B0 Brilish PMNftCHli per unit. 




B Pound 

115 

r 

2295 

r 

r 

r 

r 

13784 

120 

r 

1700 

1X60 

ajs 

180 

305 

13784 

125 

1280 

1X90 

000 

2« 

475 

13784 

130 

X90 

10J0 

r 

100 

485 

6.90 

137.64 

135 

505 

780 

flA5 

188 

r 

r 

13784 

140 

300 

50S 

r 

600 

r 

r 

9UW Canadian Douars-rantt per niHl. 


X17 


■CDoilr 

70 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

7X86 

71 

r 

r 

r 

0.12 

r 

r 

7106 

72 

105 

r 

203 

0.12 

r 

002 

7X86 

73 

105 

101 

r 

005 

r 

r 

7306 

74 

0-52 

008 

1.10 

r 

105 

r 

62800 West German Marks-emti per gait. 



DMarh 

29 

r 

r 

r 

001 

r 

r 

34.26 

JO 

4J3 

408 

486 

r 

XI7 

r 

3406 

31 

X41 

386 

r 

r 

007 

r 

3406 

32 

254 

277 

3.16 

XI7 

0X2 

088 

3406 

33 

175 

23S 

178 

0-36 

071 

r 

3426 

3« 

1.17 

1.70 

r 

076 

r 

r 

3406 

35 

070 

1J3 

r 

107 

1.75 

r 

<05X000 Jopcnefte Yen-I ootlic ot a 

cut w «MMf 



JVen 

38 

r 

r 

r 

n m 

r 

r 

41.15 

39 

226 

257 

r 

r 

r 

r 

41.15 

40 

1A7 

105 

r 

004 

050 

r 

41.15 

41 

006 

102 

r 

056 

r 

r 

41.15 

42 

0A2 

006 

r 

r 

180 

r 

41.15 

43 

000 

054 

r 

r 

r 

r 

<2000 Swim Francvrant* per unit 





■Franc 

37 

r 

r 

r 

008 

r 

r 

41.08 

38 

136 

r 

r 

0.17 

0A9 

r 

4100 

39 

251 

117 

381 

034 

073 

r 

4100 

40 

104 

252 

r 

BM 

r 

r 

4100 

41 

109 

201 

r 

100 

r 

r 

4100 

42 

005 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

TOMI can VOL 10899 




Call open int. HUM 

Total pat voL 4062 




Put open bit. 1BMM 

r— Not traded, s— No option ottered. 0— Old. 



Loll 11 premium I purchase price). 




Source: AP. 









Esi. Sales Prev. Sales 573 

Prev. Dav Onen mi. £654 oH 10119 
GOLD (COMEX) 

1 00 troy ol- dal leas per troy oz. 

320 JO 30900 Jul 

4B5J0 29100 Aug 31460 31420 

31050 JUJO Sep 

49100 29700 DO 31850 31950 

48950 30150 Dec 33200 37X70 

40550 306J0 Feb 32X00 327 AO 

49650 31X70 Apr 33100 33100 

435J70 32X50 Jun 

42X40 33100 Aug 

395-70 31X00 Oct 

39300 34200 Dee 347.90 34900 

37200 355-DO Apr 

ESI. Sales 17000 Prev. Sates 17,912 
Prrv. DaVOnen Ini. 132071 UP 1532 


Financial 


US T. BILLS 1 1 MM I 
SI million- ptsoflOO Pci. 

9X33 8694 5«P 9904 9304 

*307 8X77 Dec 92-72 9Z72 

9259 0640 Mar *232 92J4 

9228 8701 Jun 9202 9202 

9201 8800 Sep 9140 9150 

91.78 8905 Dec 9138 9138 

91J9 0958 Mor 

Jun 

Esl. Salas Prev. Soles 4390 

Prev. Dav Ooen int. 33072 off 6S3 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
sioxom arm- Pts X 33nds o( IN PCI 


31400 
313.70 11X10 
31680 
31730 31840 
32100 32250 

324.90 32640 
33100 330-70 

33X20 

33900 

34430 

347.90 349.70 
36030 


9285 9208 
9254 9258 

9234 9218 
9107 9104 
9140 9156 
9138 9131 

9109 
. 9058 


3957 

74 25 

Aug 

2705 

2770 

77.3* 

7707 

-.11 

29 JO 

2406 

5eo 

3670 

2X90 

2631 

26,67 

—01 

2950 

7465 

od 


2X37 

2X10 

2X15 

—01 

29-50 

7440 

Nov 

1580 

25.90 

25-73 

2X73 

—03 

29 JO 

23.90 

Dee 

25 -SO 

2X62 

2X40 

ZSA< 

—.17 

29 JO 

2408 

Jan 

2X25 

25 JO 

2X10 

2X19 

—Jft 

2986 

2405 

Feb 

2490 

2495 

3490 

2489 

—.14 

2* AS 

3413 

Mar 

24JI 

3451 

2451 

2480 

— JB 

29A5 

24.10 

Apr 

2407 

3437 

2430 

2480 

— 70 

27.96 

2410 

MOV 




243S 

— JO 

26.7D 

24.70 

Jun 




7420 

—08 

2700 

2X75 

Sep 




2380 

—08 

Est. 5am 


Prev. Sam 18055 





Prev. Dav Oiwnini. 6339$ upioi2 


Stock indexes 


5P COMP. INDEX (CME) 
palnl, and cent, 

19X60 1(000 Sen 19195 1*405 

199.10 17X70 D«C 1*695 197.90 

20225 19X10 MOT 20X20 20035 

20230 20000 Jun 20270 20270 

ESI. Salas 52040 Prev. Sam 52*11 
Prev. Dav Open in(. 41.739 up Hi 
VALUE LINE IKCBT3 
■ratals and rants 

21230 18X25 See 20700 70005 

21X00 30WO Dee 21100 211.90 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sates 4A7? 

Prev. Day Oaen Ini. 10489 up 337 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
port Is and ran is 

I13J0 9145 Sep 11295 113A0 

11540 10130 Dec 11405 11530 

11730 10950 Mar 11705 11705 

11905 11650 Jun 

Est. Sales 9358 Prev. Sam 8020 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 10033 upll 


19340 19430 
19670 197 JO 
20020 20X25 
30270 30335 


206J0 207.70 
210.90 31140 


11270 11XH 
11455 11X00 
11600 11685 
11030 . 


88-21 

75-18 

Sea 

06-23 

86-23 

86-2 

06-4 

—25 

87-13 

75-13 

Dec 

05-17 

85-18 

85-2 

BS-4 

—24 

86-2 

75-14 

Mar 

84-11 

B4-11 

84-3 

84-5 

—24 

85-7 

74-30 

Jun 




8X9 

—23 

8+4 

82-11 

Sep 




02-14 

—23 

80-11 


Doc 

82 

82 

81-20 

87-20 

—24 


Esl. Sales Prev. Sam 64+9 

Prev. Day Open int. 53363 off922 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
(8pct-S100000-p|sX32ndsof IN pet) 

79-12 57-10 Sep 77-24 77-27 77-3 77-0 

70-13 57-0 DOC 76-21 76-24 76 7*0 

77-29 57-2 Mar 75-20 75-20 75-1 75-2 

76-6 5609 Jun 74-20 74-20 74-3 74-4 

7501 56-29 Sen 73-22 73-23 73-7 73-7 

7404 5*35 Dee 73-26 72-27 72-11 72-12 

74-15 56-27 Mar 71-22 71-22 71-18 71-18 

74-26 63-12 Jun 70-28 70-28 70-26 70-26 

7237 63-4 Sea 70-7 70-7 TOO 70-4 

72-18 62-24 Dec 69-18 69-18 69-14 69-16 

69-16 654 Mar *8-29 

Est. Sales Prev. Salnl 24A01 

Prev. Dav Oaen Ini ,199.1 JO off 1334 
GNMA (CBT) 


Commodity indexes 


Close 

Moody’S 916J0I 

Reuters 109800 

DJ. Futures 117J3 

Com. Research Bur ecu. 226.40 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 ; Dec 31, 1974. 


Cash Prices 




Ijondon Metals 


■j 


Commodity and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santa*, lb 

Print doth 64/30 38 to. vd - 

Steel billets I Pin.), ton 

Iron 3 Fdrv. Phltav ton 

steel scrap No 1 hvy Pitt, . 
Lead Spot, lb 

Oxwer elect. (0 _____ 
Tin (Straits), lb -- 

Zinc E. St. L Basis, lb 

Palladium, az 

Sliver N.Y, az 

Source: AP. 


Mr It 
Ysar 
Thu Ago 
IAS 150 
XU DJt 
<7200 47300 

21300 21350 

70-71 94-95 

10-21 20-34 

<5-48 64-47 

60273 <3942 

004-07 050 

9246-94 149-151 
NJL 7J5S 


Close 

BM Aik 


Prev Ion 

Bid Ask 


limsurv Bilk 


Mr II 

Prev 

Otter Bid YleM Yield 
Hnonttl 7.10 708 753 7.1ft 

4-monlh 703 751 7.60 7J2 

One vear 7j* 7_U 7.91 7*8 

Source; Solomon Brothers 


Beijing Is Seen Easing 
Foreign-Exchange Rules 

Reuters 

. BEIJING — China will relax 
rules governing the availability of 
foreign exchange to foreigners, 
overseas Chinese and joint ven- 
tures that sell goods in China, the 
China News Service Reported 
Thursday. 

The agency quoted a senior offi- 
cial of the National Foreign Ex- 
change Management Bureau as 
saying ihe move is aimed ai auraci- 
ing foreign capital and continuing 
China's open-door policy. 


ALUMINUM 
Sterlbra par mfttrlc ton 
Spot 72X60 72600 72850 72950 

Forward 74800 74850 75X50 75100 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grodft) 

sterling par metric ton _ • ; 

spot 104800 104900 104X50 1048X0 

forward 105750 105800 105600 105650 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

SterUng per metric Ion „ „ 

■oat 101X80 102000 101500 102000 

forward 103X00 104C0U 104100 104200 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric tea 

MWl 29200 29400 28900 28950 

forward 29600 29700 2*300 29350 

NICKEL 

SterUng per metric tan 

spot 30*500 355X00 264000 2650 00 

forward 3*8X00 340800 168X00 309000 


toot 43400 43500 *3500 43650 

toward 44750 44000 44900 44950 

T IN (Sta ndard) 

*** xSSo'zflSl JO 9,20900 901000 

forward 905000 905100 9,10X00 9.11000 

ZINC 

Sterling per maMe toe 

soot 52X00 52700 S2900 53100 

forward 52100 52200 52500 52600 

Source; AP. 


GommmJhies 


Aug 
Oct 
Dm: 
tear 
Mav 
Auo 
Esi. > 
sates: 

COCOA 

French francs per HO In 
Jlv N.T. N.T. 2020 2120 UhdL 

5«P 2103 M90 2093 2095 — 13 

Dee 2060 2060 2050 2057 — 12 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 2070 — 10 

May N.T. N.T. — 2075 —10 

Jly N.T. N.T. . — 2080 — 10 

See N.T. N.T. — 2065 —10 

Est. woL: 23 tats of 10 tone. Prev. actual 
sales: 540 lots. Open bitereef: 017 
COFFEE 

French francs per IM kg 
Jlv N.T. N.T. 2100 2150 +65 

sap 2ZH5 215B 2180 Z17S +7 

Nov 2050 2245 — 2238 +25 

Jan N.T. N.T. — 90*n +30 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2000 — — 15 

May N.T. N.T. 2000 — —25 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2215 — —30 

E*l voL: 48 lots of 5 tan*. Prev. actual sales: 
220 lots. Open Interest: 333 
Source 1 ; Bourse du Commerce. 


DM Futures 
Options 

W. German Mart-1280 marts tats ter mart 


Mi II 

Strike caHs-Seme PetsEettie 

Pilot Sep Dec Mar See. Bee Mgr 

32 . 155 XOS 13* X13 m 04.1 

33 1.76 134 269 X32 -087 — 

34 UO m 214 Old 106 118 

IS 064 111 166 MB 15ft 1J4 

36 L34 050 139 158 118 130 

BNlmattd total voL 7032 
Calb: w«d. wL <09 apee let, 2>0» 

Puts: wed. MLU57 onen htf. 1BJ76 , 

Source.' CME 




l-ondon 

CofturiiocJities 



Bankruptcies Drop in Japan 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Japanese corporate 
bankruptcies fell in June to 1.517 
from 1,753 in May compared with 
1.619 a year eirlTcr. ihe Tokyo 
Commerce & industry Research 
Co. said Thursday. However, total 
debt rose lo 325.47 billion yen 
(about SI. 3 billion) in June from 
284 billion yen in May, as com- 
pared with 318 billion yen a year 
earlier. 


m 


S&P100 
Index Options 


MJtiml Pm-Lost 

MaJN Ao* Sen Oct Jtr fioo 5w Oa 

Ml 2K — — 

118 -IS* — — — in* VH 1716 3/u 
!2 'l? 1 irS 3 /h S* FTu 

n in a h n vim i ij. 

m 17/163*. A j), n i il n 

m a/4 no 2vun n a S sS 

I9S IO* VII I l/MU. Ufa n llli T1 

ratal cod whom uuu 
Trial call ami bit. *020 
Mai nut «akxm (UO 

Trial Bri eon kit. 48(01 

HM 4562" lorn 11(0 (3ftaMUI+|2| 
Source; CBOe. 


Mr II 

Out Prey lout 
SUCAR MWl ^ ^ BM Aik 

Sterling pftr metric fox 
Aug ttj» 87 JB 8750 M0S 1800 8900 

05* 9200 9000 9050 5l0O 9100 9200 

Dec MAO 9300 9350 <400 9500 9500 

Mar 10400 10240 10200 10300 10350 10300 

May 10750 10700 10600 10730 10600 UX20 

Aug 1123011230 11050 11200 1110011300 
Oct 11500)140011400 11500 1155011x00 

Velunra: 756 lata of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Starting per imtrlc Ion 
Jlv 1380 1063 1361 1352 1370 1373 

Sap 1350 13® 1331 1332 1.734 1335 

OK 1J73 1303 1303 1384 1,704 1305 

Mar 1325 1308 1307 1310 1308 1389 

May 1330 1319 1321 1324 1318 1371 

Jly 1335 1330 1330 1340 U30 1,731 

0*p 1352 1352 1330 1350 1340 1345 

Vriitato: wwiatiot TOKHB. 

COFFEE 

StarHag par metric Ian 
Jly 1381 1303 1310 1334 1328 1343 

Sep 1050 1348 1350 1355 1381 1384 

Nov 1075 1385 1002 1004 1025 1029 

JOB 1.900 1020 1030.1040 1057 1060 
Mar 1.908 1035 1032 1035. 1060 1084 

MOV 1,905 1040 1040 1050 107$ 108$ 

JIV 1326 1025 1040 1000 1070 1.920 

Volume: 6583 lots of 5 ions. 

GASOIL -- - 

UX AHlars per metric ton 
Aov 21900 21600 21605 21500 21700 217JS 
SCP 2)735 21X56 21600 21X25 91535 21600 
Oct 21900 717-25 21700 21735 21735 21800 
N9V 2000 21933 7IB3S 32000 21835 SO0Q 
Dae N.T. N.T. 22000 22X00 21900 E2J0 

Jan 221.00 22100 22035 22200 31900 22000 

Feb N.T. N.T. 21600 22500 71900 SOU 

K? K .-I- “ I- 21000 2200) 21 100 21600 

*04 N.T. N.T. 50700 21000 Now - 

Vriuma: 2243 Iris of 300 lanx 
Source s- Reuters ant/ London Petroleum £*. 
cnongo laosoUl. 



































v+ttoMmw in 


Statistics Index 


AMEX ftrkB* . PM ■ 
AMEX*HbAmP72 
,«YSEnrioea ' P.6 
NYSE Wafatflnn P.TO- 
pmdtaftstocte P.W 
Curroncv ratot P.11 
CammodHiM P.10 
Ot*M*Mfc ; P.10 


Earnings rewte P.13 
fftng rate -notes p.u 

GoUigrtats p.n 
tntarnO rats p.n 
Market summary p. * 
OuHtos ‘ p.w 
OTC stock P.14 
OttarnerKgfe p.u 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


** 


TECHNOLOGY 


Ckw ^ 
=303/ ** 


Interest in Picturephones 
Revives After Poor Start 


U.S. Bank 
lilts Net 


and 


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Consultants 


The Nettiertanjh 
Telex 18 S 36 ! 


By ERIC N. BERG 

New York Times Serrice 

N EW YORK — Wall Street analysts wrote off the 
technology long ago, and telecommunications consul- 
tants are not much more hopeful. But picturephones — 
telephones with cameras and monitors attached so 
callers can see each other —may soon establish themselves in the 
market following some favorable scientific developments, propo- 
nents of ihetechnology say. 

It has been more than 20 /years since visitors to the 1964 
- World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows, New Yoric, marveled at the 
first picturephone. Despite the initial fascination with the con- 
cept, however, the picturephone never took bold. Transmitting 

pictures required high-speed — — 

phone lines that most house- rwi . 

holds could not afford. And I/Hty tne most 

using picturephones for long- —^1 mrte 0 f 
distance business meetings Lruu111 P 311 ® UI 
meant either traveling to “te- ^ Imacre need to 
leconf creating^ centers out- ° a 

side, one’s office or equipping be Ir piumwite d, 
conference rooms with costly • ■ 

monitors, cameras and micro- 
phones. 

“It could cost you $1 million just to install the room,” said 
Charles W. Smith, a specialist m new services for American 
'Telephone & Telegraph Co., which showed the 1964 picture- 
phone and has since scrapped it “The costs were prohibitive.” 


Only die most 
crucial parts of 
an image need to 
be transmitted* 


OW, however, a number of small companies, r 


. . _ ji. 
is ■J* 1 

. N 

... a: *• 


j \ Widcom Inc. of Campbell, CaHfonna; Pictel Corn, of 
J- v Peabody, Massachusetts, ami Avdex of I an ham, Mary- 
land, are trying to revive picturephone technolo gy by 'addressing 
its principal drawbacks: inconvenience and cost 

Instead of offering public teleconferencing rooms as AT&T 
did when it set up 1 1 tdeconferendng centers around the United 
States a few years ago. virtually all the small companies are 
focusing on providing picturephone- type service inside corpora- 
tions because they believe managers will not travel to make a 
phone call. 

The companies’ researchers have also devised a way to sharply 
reduce the price by transmitting pictures over low-speed phone 
lines costing far less than their high-speed predecessors. 

I- At the heart of all their work is the same basic concept: 
Converting pictures to digital form, compressing the digital 
information so it can flow more rapidly over phone lines, and 
transmitting only the most crucial parts'of an image. 

Scientists are quickly discovering that by stripping away unim- 
portant background information from a picture, and by contin- 
ually transmitting only that part of a picture that is moving, such 
as a caller’s head, an image can still be displayed on the other end. 
(Fixed images do not have to be repeatedly sent.) Hie result is a 
picture of fair of quality — similar to that of television pictures 
sent from astronauts in space. The approach has come to be 
called “picture squeezing. 

“In cases like these, most of the time on the plume is spent 
looking at documents or the subject of a b usiness meeting” said 
Robert D. Widergren, president of Widcom. “Those are mostly 
still images." 

Picture squeezing, in fact, has enabled Widcom to develop a 
desktop picturephone that transmits images at the rate of 56,000 
bits a second. That may sound fast, .fiat itis a fraction of the 1-5 
million bits a second normally required for video transmission. 
The slower speed has cut transnussian costs to $45 an hour, 
compared with $700 an hour using the faster speed. Avdex and 
Pictel should be able to offer service at similar or even lower 
prices when they come out with their own 56-kflobit-a-second 
picturephones early in 1986. 

“If picturephone technology were to remain inconvenient and 
considerably expensive, it would remain unpopular said G. 
W illiam Meeker, Avelex’s technical manager. “Our thrust is to 
(Contmned on Page 13, CoL 5) 


(iirraky Rates 


CrtMiutea JafylJ 

* ( DM. F.F. ILL. CMr. BP. SJ=. YM 

Aratordm UUS *40 11241 ■ 17.023 ■ 0.1751 • SSD2- 1MSQS* 13412* 

Btweb(al 59705 4JJ0J5 24139 £425 77300 • J 7M MOMS MX’ 

Frankfort 2«S UB9 31*9 • ITS* OB' ***** 11M0* »■ 

Uwtalb] 12805 *0778 teas* 15*548 *435 BUM UM me 

mm IM» 140234 MUB 21145 47240 31482 77071 7J» 

Nnt Yortclel 07173 * 243 tin U4*5> UUS 5840 2434 24143 

Porta 84575 1230 204B3 47235 * 27012 1530* 144 16735* 

TMnro 24X40 33*43 *378 27-23 1243* 7145 41171 * 99*2 

Zortak 24575 33*4 82585- 77 • 0.T2W* 7*18- *W- 140*5* 

1 BCU 87*58 04584 235*5 *8539 1/0041 253M *5400* 14821 18*4*4 

1 SDR UU5I 8743*5 29*498 948792 143B44 33MB 80J9M 24979 24749* 

QoBfrwsM London and Zurich. fixings In oltiar European centers. Mew York rotas at 4 PM. 
to) Commercial franc (b) Amounts needed to buy one pound (c! Amounts needed* buy one 
dollar f-j Units of WO Ik) Units of 1JXM ty) Units of ICOOO H.H: not Quoted: HA.: naf available. 
(*> TobHYOMPOOOd.- SUSAZK 

Mer Dollar Values 

Cmtmcv per US4 C r rancr par WJ Corrency par U3J Carmor par UAs 

ArMo-wntrai ojw Rn. markka *.101 Motor, rtog. 24*5 VKo-.wa 17*40 

AariroLS 14501 Greek droc. 13130 mhlmo 328M S pa a, n e rm 1*800 

Aadr.KAR. 284* Horn Moots 77585 Morw.krnM 841 SwecL kroon 8 SIT 

Oete-fin.tr. 5940 indtanrnpee 1249 PM.P0W IMS TeOwoa* *04* 

BnnScTKE. 5JM0M lado. nn*a* 13M40 Pe ncrado 14240 7)vlto*f 27025 

firtaklBT 1354* Irtiti I 09372 Saudi rtyal 14*06 TWkMtRm 529JS 

Doatokraat 105725 Kraefllhok. 149i00 Sin*.* 1212 (ME Altera X472S 

EarPLpaaad 07782 KnolH Met* 03815 S. Air. rend 1.90** Vanez-MN. U95 

■StorSng: 1396 Irish t 

Sevrtm: Borne du Bmehix (BruaetU; Bonn Commerc i al* Itotfana (Muon); town* Ate- 
, »mam tie Ports (Paris); Bonk oi Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SOP); BAH itOnar. rtyaL dbltam). 
\ptner data (nm Reuters end AP. 


Securities Yield 

$69-SSttimGain 

The Associated Pros 
' NEW YORK —Chemical New 
York Corp^ the axtWargest UK 
hanlrhnlfbng cQ mpany , said Thars- 
day (hat hs second-quarter profit 
rose 39.7 percait from a year ago. 
while its first-half earnings were op 
24.6 percent 

The New York-based patera of 
Chemical Bank said its net was 
S107J mffli rm, or $2.03 a share, for 
the three months ended June 30, 
compared with $76.8 million, or 
SL45 a share, a year eaiher. Frrst- 
h«lf earnings totaled $197 million, 
or $3.71 a share, conmared with 
S158.I million, or $3.03 a share, a 
year earlier. . - 

Chemical's net interest income 
rose to S4S7.6 milli on for the sec- 
ond quarter, up 6.9 percent from 
$428.1 million a year ago. The com- 
pany benefited from the dra-Hnn in 
interest rates because the rates it 
had to pay to obtain funds “closely 
followed the downward trend in 
rates." 

It also had a gain, of $69.6 million 
in the quarter mom the sale of in- 
vestment securities, up from a $3.0- 
mfliinn gain in rbi* field a year 
earlier. & adj itign, the company 
trad a gain from trading account 
activities of $13.7 miLOon com- 
pared with a S9.4-jn3Ha& loss last 
year. 

Also reporting an advance was 
Bank of New York Co, winch said 
strong growth in net interest earn- 
ings helped to raise second-quarter 
net income 18.6 percent to a record 
$31.1 mil firm, or $1.51 a share, 
from $263 million, or $132, a 
share a year earlier. First-half net 
rose 22.7 percent to S64 million 
from $52.1 million in the same peri- 
od last year. 

Other large banks reporting sec- 
ond-quarter results Thursday in- 
cluded: 

- • Irving Bank Corp n with earn- 
ings up 19 percent at $3136 tril- 
lion, or $1.66 a share, from $2631 
million, or $138 a share. 

• Rarnett Banks of Florida Inc, 
with net up 22 percent at $31 mil- 
lion, or 98 cents a share, from $253 
rriffion, or 90 cents. . . . .. 



A worker tests personal computers at OfivettTs Scarmagno, Italy, plant. 

Olivetti, Amid Computer Slump , 
Faces Problems at Home, Abroad 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribane 

ROME — Two years ago. Olivetti SpA, Western 
Europe’s largest office-automation group, was 
poised for major expansion in the United States 
and Europe. Plans included listing the company’s 
slock on the New York Stock Exchange. Company 
executives and industry analysts said the sales 
outlook for Olivetti products, including data pro- 
cessing, office and private telecommunications 
equipment, appeared premising, although the Eu- 
ropean sales of Internatio nal Ttirebies* Machines 
Crip, were about 10 times higher. 

Today, amid a worsening dump in the world 
computer industry and Dace competition, Olivetti 
is dying to solve serious problems of its ailing 
affilia tes in the United States and B ritain The 
company has dropped the plans to fist its stock in 
New York. It is preparing to drop a proposed 
venture to build electronic typewriters in France 
with government-owned CSe. Gtofcrale d'ELectri- 
ait, a move that the French company says violates 
thrir 1983 agreement Olivetti is also playing down 
the importance of its recent accord with Toshiba, 
Japan's second-largest industrial group. 

Meanwhile, Carlo de Benedetd, the company’s 
ebullient chairman, is embroiled in a political 
controversy over a proposed acquisition of a 64- 
percenl sham in a statocontiolled food company 
in Italy. Mr. de Benedetti has been directing the 
takeover hid as head of a syndicate that is the 
second-largest shareholder in Olivetti after Ameri- 
can Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

However, Mr. de Beaedetti's bid turned into a 
political controversy last month when he told re- 
porters that he had been offered a bribe to clinch 
the dea l The highly publicized affair, winch Oli- 
vetti executives mast is muelated to the company 
itself, was immediately denounced by Prime Min- 
ister Bettino Craxi and key members of the ruling 
Socialist party, who alleged the government had 
not been adequately consulted. 

But Mr, de Benedetti reflected determined opti- 
mism about Olivetti’s future during a recent inter- 


view in Rome, and played down the importance of 
his current problems. “We cannot produce a mir- 
acle a day, nor change our environment," be said, 
emphasizing that Olivetti has “a fantastic advan- 
tage" over its European and U.S. competitors: a 
finandal-maiketing-technolopcal agreement with 
AT&T signed in 1983 but which only began taking 
concrete form last year. 

The agreement allowed AT&T to become Oli- 
vetti’s largest single shareholder, with a 25-percent 
interest that the U_S. company can — and proba- 
bly will — increase to 40 percent in 1988. The 
accord also specified that Olivetti would supply 


AT&T with a range of its products, mainly peraon- 
a) computers; and that the U3. company would 
supply Olivetti its line of products, including dam- 


processing and voice t ransmissi on equipment and 
software packages. 

Last year, Olivetti supplied AT&T personal 
computers and other electronic products worth 
288 bDfion lire for sale in the United States, a 
figure Mr. de Benedetti said would increase to 500 
billion lire (about $265 million at current rates) in 
1985. AT&T supplied Olivetti 9 billion lire of 
equipment in 1984, which will rise to 40 billion fire 
in 1985. 

Mir. de Benedetti said that Olivetti’s consolidat- 
ed sales this year will increase to a record 6 trillion 
lire from 437 trillion lire in 1984, while 1985 net 
profits woe expected to rise at the same rate as in 
1984. Net profit last year rose 20.6 percent from 
1983 to a record 356 billion lire. The company’s 
stock remains a favorite on the Milan stock ex- 
change. 

Products introduced last year, such as a new line 
of persona] computers currently accounting for 
about 30 percent of group sales, are selling well, 
particularly in Western Europe, where they ac- 
count for 72 percent of total sates. “Europe pre- 
sents a far more optimistic picture than the United 
Stales," said Elsenno Piol Olivetti’s executive vice 
president for strategy and development “But this 
(Co nt in u ed on Page 15, CoL 5) 


N.Y. Stock Exchange, 
Amex Extend Trading 


Interest Rates 


• farociwwty Deposits 

. ■ * ■ Swiss 


Franc* 

Jufyll 

. : 

Donor 

P Mar* 

Franc 

Starting 

Prone 

ECU 

SDH 

tBMafti 

7Wr-7*W 

4 Ik.- 5 *. 


12*U12nb 

imt-iau 

9-9V* 

7** 

. y 2 matte 

7%-7*v 

6-5K 


17V12K. 

tote-un* 

Wtfc 

7 Y. 

t, imoothi 

7V7» 

55W 

iWrSlk 


lOHrlO* 

MV* 

71* 

* ~nltiT 

7te4 

54* 

ShrJth 

ls-tn* 

10 Mil* 

9h4* 

7* 

" 1 wnr 

8*MU 

5te-5Ui 

5V5N 

11 *rll 

ttte-llte 

99^9 Wi 

B 


By Eric N. Bag 

New York Times Serrice 

NEW YORK — In an inmortant 
step toward creation of & 24-hour 
trading system, the New York 
Stock Exchange and the American 
Stock Exchange will begin trading 
at 9:30 AJML, a half-hour earlier 
than at present, starting Sept. 30. 

If the changes, announced 
Wednesday by the Big Board and 
Thursday cry die Amex, receive the 
approval of the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission, it will mari e 
the first time in mare than a decade 
that the exchanges have extended 
their hours. The exchanges now 
open at 1 0 AM. and dose at 4 PM. 

The actions pot pressure on the 
other m$or domestic exchanges 
such as Philadelphia to extend their 
hours, since all compete to list com- 
panies' shares. 

It was not 'immediately, known 
whether the National Association 
of Securities Dealers’ over-the- 
counter market would be extending 
its hours.. 

In Canada, the Toronto Stock 
Exchange said it would consider 
mat ching the earlier openings. 

In its statement, the New York 
Stock Exchange said directors had 
voted to ten|Uies the trading ses- 
sion to permit increased partidpa- 
tion by foreigners in U3. equity 
markets. It said overseas investors 
bought a record number of securi- 


ties in 1984 and that their pur- 
chases continued at a heavy dip in 
1985. ’ 

“We see this as a trend, and we 
want to be part of it," said Richard | 
Tonenzano, vice president and, 
spokesman for the stock exchange. 
"I don’t think it’s a question of 
whether 24-hour trading will come, 
bat when." 

He cautioned, however,- that! 
around-tbe-clock trading need not 1 
involve keeping the exchange open 
day and night, and could involve 
Knks whh other exchanges, or fur- 
ther extending trading hours. | 

But tbe proposed 9:30 AM start 
also reflects the heightened conroo- 
tition the Big Board has been fac- 
ing. Many of its shares are traded 
cm exchanges in other time 7 Qn« 
and independent brokerages such 
as the Los Angeles-based Jefferies 
& Ca act as a stock exchange by 
making markets after tbe dose erf 
the major exchanges. 

In recent months, the Big Board 
has been in talks with, the Lem don 
Stock Exchange to develop a com- 
mon data-proccssing system. 

Such a move would make ft eaa- ' 
er for shares traded in London to 
trade as well in New York. The Big 
Board has also asked its members 
to consider a proposal under winch 
the Pacific Stock Exchange would 
become a subsidiary. 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 6 


Pag* 1 j 


Mexico Lowers 
CHI Price, Sets Up 
Zone Discounts 


The AisinuieJ Pm\ 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico, the 
world’s fourth largest oil producer 
and exporter, has sharply reduced 
its crude oil prices in reaction to 
OPECs failure to shore up sagging 
oil prices worldwide. 

The cut by as much as S134 a 
barrel, announced Wednesday 
night is expected to put further 
pressure on an already saturated 
world oil market. Saudi Arabia re- 
portedly threatened this week to 
quadruple its production if other 
members of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries in- 
sist on undercutting each other’s 
prices. 

Mexico is not a member erf the 
cartel but had followed the group’s 
pricing policies until several 
months ago. The announcement of 
the price cut implied that after the 
1 3-member OPEC failed at a mee^ 
ing in Vienna this week to agree on 
defending prices, Mexico was now 
acting on its own. 

A spokesman at the OPEC secre- 
tariat in Vienna declined to com- 
ment on Mexico's move. 

Before the OPEC mice on Sun- 
day, Mexico’s oil minister, Francis- 
co Labastida Ochoa, warned that 
Mexico would have to “fully de- 
fend its national interests'' if OPEC 
did not reach an accord on prices. 
He did not specify, but analysts 
said at the time it was clear that he 
meant Mexico would reduce its 
prices. 

OPECs benchmark price for 
crude is $28 a barrel but cartel 
members have been selling their oil 
at discounts. 

U.S. oil companies, which pur- 
chase half of Mexico's exports, wifi 
now pay $26.75 for Mexico's fight 
oil and $2330 for its heavy crude, 
down from the last posted prices erf 
$27.75 and $24 respectively. In 
Asia, light oil will be sold for $2630 
and heavy, for $23 a band. Simi- 
larly, Mexico's prices for European 
clients win drop to $2635 for light 
oil and $2230 for heavy crude. 

“1 wouldn’t be loolong for an 
impact of tins at the [gas] pump, 
but it is another significant pres- 
sure on world oil markets,” Paul 
Miotok, an oil industry analyst for 
the New York securities firm, Salo- 


mon Brothers Inc., said of the Mex- 
ican move. 

Mr. Miotok said Mexico's price 
cut brings Venezuela, also jij 
OPEC member, a step clo.vrr to 
cutting prices. 

In addition tv cutting the price of 
crude by up to S 1 .24 a barrel Mexi- 
co announced a new pricing si stem 
that discriminates among geo- 
graphical areas. The coicmmcni 
said it hoped that this step would 
help Mexico regain its markets. 

The new price cuts are retroac- 
tive to July I. 

Leri Strauss 
Considers Buyout 
For $ 1 . 85 Billion 

hucmnti<tial Utrr^iJ Tnb mu 

NEW YORK -The head of 
Levi Strauss & Co., the San 
Francisco-based apparel mak- 
er. said Thursday that he was 
considering a proposal to take 
the company private in a trans- 
action valued al about Si. 85 
billion. 

A spokesman for Robert 
Haas, president and chief exec- 
utive officer, said the S50-a- 
share proposal would have the 
effect of reluming ownership of 
the company to the descendants 
of Levi Strauss, (he company's 
founder. Those families control 
about 40 percent of the compa- 
ny’s stock and would give sup- 
port to the proposed buyout, 
the spokesman said. 

Brenda GalL a Merrill Lynch 
analyst, said, “This is a gener- 
ous offer," amounting to'a -J0- 
percent premium over tlte cur- 
rent price of the stock. She saw 
tittle likelihood that tbe pro- 
posed buyout would not be 
achieved, given the offering 
price and the families’ control- 
ling interests. 

Thanks to improving sales of 
jeans and some cosl-cuuing. 
Mr. Haas has turned around the 
fortunes of the S2.5-biIIion-a- 
year company, which saw profit 
fall nearly 75 percent in 1984. 






Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FFll LJovdS Bank (ECU); Raders 
(SDR). Rales opp (/ coble to interbank deposits of St million minimum (te- eoutvafentl. 


Dollar, After Rise in Europe, 
Turns Sharply Loicer in IV. Y. 


Eor private banking in Switzerland, 
an exceptional bank. 


fcsy Money Rates Jafy n 


I Hthdatetw - 09** 

- w» a — Htato 7i* 7v> 

* PWrtFwta 7* 751 

; CrfawBote 9V* Vte 

-tenter Loan Rato 0*4* 

; .[Com paper n-m ctor* 1JS 7-to 

l Jtt***rffcTraonn'Mte 7.10 ist 

'-LHteafcTranrrBMs 771 7JB 

• n>Md«a 775 775 

' on (»«t dm 775 775 

i WWBfmcm 

lABtenRato iflfl 4» 

OocndgURate HA 575 

ttef Mrato latorfenk 525 US 

TwttWvtak 54S US 

: tetakuHtod US US 

- 

’ tetouraugimate 9te “te 

■. CM**** « «te 


400 48# 

HA 575 
STS 5X5 
i*S SAS 
US US 


Asian MDar Deports 

Jafy 11 

1 monto 7¥»-7V> 

2manRs 7V79I 

ImoaMK 7W-7W 

tnoottc 7te-79k 

Irw m-Wi 

Source: Rooters. 


UJ.MiaeyMntelFw* 

joh-n 

Merrill Uvnch Raodv Anets 
jOdsvmemerteM: 777 

Tetorate Interest Raid Index: »4A- 
Source: Merrill Lynch. AP 


f ntertnaft 

SSSs 

; tetiwiab 

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| n ^TTreoHrv M 
i T^teoto tofeftjQfl* 


fctowrfRoM 

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terno. Ream Com me rzbank. Cfhdf 
Irannot* Uords Son*, flank e/7hfcm 


AJL PM. CJlto* 
Haas ten 31465 3UJ0 +<UQ 

Liueiubuara JW* — +435 

Porta nZJkJlPJ 31363 3051 +13 

ZariCft 3UA5 31175 —170 

LendM 313J0 31X55 -130 

New Vary — «*» -1.1* 

LwtemOaura. Paris and London official ftr- 
krusi urn Kona and Zoned mantes raxf 
dmJno prices: Hew York Cemex torrent 
contract. AHprieeeki US. sear ounce. 
Soured: Routers. 


CaapUal by Ora Staff Irm Dispauha 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
turned mostly lower in New York 
Thursday after scoring modest 
gams in Europe. 

Hie British pound, which has 
soared more than 10 cents against 
the dollar since last week, fell back 
sharply on prospects of tower inter- 
est rates and on news of asharp cul 
in oil prices by Mexico. Britain's 
currency has bees buoyed by rela- 
tively high interest rales and by oi! 
revenues. 

The dollar had risen in European 
trading as opeaiors began to take 
profits cm dollar positions ahead of 
tbe release of US. money-supply 
data late Thursday and the release 
on Friday of two key U.S. econom- 
ic reports. 

In Frankfurt, the U.S. currency 
was fixed at 19520. up more than 2 
pfennigs from 2.9345 W e dn e sd ay , 
and in Paris, the French- franc 
.slipped to 8.9575 against the dollar 
from 8.9430- 

But in later New York trading, 
the dollar fell back on prevailing 
market sentiment that Friday's 
scheduled reports on retail sates 
and producer prices for June wifi 


confirm sluggish growth prospects 
for the U.S. economy. 

Against the Deutsche mark, the 
U3. currency slid to a low of 
• 2.9100 before recovering stighdy to 
2.9230, down 1 pfennig from 
Wednesday's dose of -24335. 

“If traders are comfortable to go 
home short, they are looking for 
bad numbers tomorrow," said one 
London dealer. 

In London, tbe pound fell frac- 
tionally after gaining 10 cents over 
tire last two weeks. The, currency, 
hurt by predictions of falling Brit- 
ish interest rates, eased to $13805 
. from $12865 late Wednesday. It 
slipped further in New York, to 
‘ $13750 from $13855-. 

Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with late Wednesday: 
2.4575 Swiss fronts, up from 
24435; 33165 Dutch. guilders, up 
from 33090. and 1393.75 Italian 
lire, up from 1,880.10. 

Other dollar rates in New York 
at 4:30 PM, compared with late 
rates Wednesday, included: 14340 
Swiss francs, down from 2.4460; 
33135 Dutch guilders, up from 
33050, and 1,88430 Italian lira, op 
from 1,878100. (UPI, Reuters) 


T hrough our offices in Switzer- 
land we offer a full range of 
sophisticated banking services, 
from foreign exchange and pre- 
cious metals - to private banking. 

And now that we are part of 
American Express Bank Ltd., our 
private banking has taken on a 
whole new dimension. Through 
this global link, we provide access 
to the unique investment oppor- 
tunities aha asset management ser- 
vices offered by the American 
Express family of companies. 
Moreover; for certain dienes, we 
also provide such valuable “extras” 


as Gold Card® privileges and the * 
exdusive Premier Services, 5 * for 
round-theclock personal and travel 
assistance. 

While we move with the 
times, our traditional polities do 
not change. At the heart of our 
business is the maintenance of a 
strong and diversified deposit 
base. Our portfolio of assets is also 
well-diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a conser- 
vative ratio of capital to deposits 
and a high degree of liquidity - 
sensible strategies in these uncer- 
tain times. 


If TDB sounds like the sort of 
bank that meets your require- 
ments, visit us on your next trip 
to Switzerland. Or telephone : in 
Geneva, 022/37 21 11, in Chiasso, 
091/441991. 

TDB offices in Gemra, Lumfnt?. Paris, 
Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte Carlo. 
Nassau, Zurich. Buenos Airts. S. 7» 
Paulo. 

TDB, the 6th largest (onmurtial lunl 
in Switzerland, is a member of the 
American Express Company, which 
has assets of US$64.5 billion and 
shareholders' equity of US$4. S billion. 



Trade Development Bank 


jj/ The Trade Development Bank building in Geneva, 
at 96~98 , rue du Rhone . 

An American Express company 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 






Thursday 

AVIEX 


■2 Merit) 
Misnum Stock 


*'5 2% Alins *1 

4% 3 Audiolr 


II J<» J% J't 
1 3 3 3 - 


tiTlT 


Tables induflo the nrtfonwidB prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not rolled late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
HttlLOW STXk 


SI-.. Close 

Ci tv. Y14 PE 100s High Low Quot.Ofpe 




■C* 

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How to get More Gold 
for Your Money. 


Esoril K 7 « » 7* 

EliLfl* 39 3 30’, 33-, 30'-* — [* 

EvrJ A JO 23 73 o7« 7', 6% T« + a 

Excel .40b 13 8 & T's »V| 7 1 


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14% FabtnO AO 23 7 

U, FnJrmC 
B< FMata 

99j PtCann 1.00a U B 


II FWvmB JO 12 13 
W« FUcrcn J8 10 9 
11% FljenP XSi 5£ 9 
b% FltcGE < 

234k FIIGE Pi 4X0 H.7 
7k FianEn 

259) FlaRck JO TJ I 
22% Ftuxe 1.381 S3 M 
4'A Foodon 4 

73b F»WM ' 

28^ Foote ut 

5*0 FIWIIG 19 

71 FordOitfAlMu 
IS ForCtCA .IS J 0 9 

11'* ForestL 4t 

Vi Fafwnl 

4% FrdHIv 

14 FreaEl 17 

5 FrlesEn 
9 FrntHd 
4tj FitA «*f .J7t ZB 
5% FtirVII » 22 


5 10i s 1CT r 
« in is' - 
10 2 II* 
127 4% 4<u 

7 in? n% 
45 15U 15 
7 25% 3S>. 
10 13% 139: 
15 9 8% 

| TP i 27>. 
89 B 74* 
IB 40% 40 
23 25% 2S6- 
42 131k 1T-- 

2 »• th 

7 32V. 33 
ID Ilk 8'. 
200Z133 T02'to 
4 2ZI-. 22W 

154 m 291k 
159 Hi Ha 

12 4 6 

62 22 1 4 21*. 

155 12U. 12 
140 14% 14% 

34 A‘« A 

49 11 10% 


13% — ’k 
IBVs — '■* 
2 ■*■9. 

4-h 
ink + 
15V + 
25*» + *» 
13** f V 


17k 4- V 
B +i< 
*09, + U 
25% % 

13% 4-1 

s%- v* 

32 f '» 
BW — 'k 
102") —Hi 
22V 

X'. + % 
1%- «■ 
6 

21% 

l?* + Ik 
14*. 

AM. + •* 

II + V. 


Krugerrand ptk! bullion nuns 
combine the atje-iilrt security of 
fjnlfJ ivith instant liipiiriitY. Hcruu.sc 
they art* lejstl render they are 
traded 'J4 hours around the glnlie 
at an iuivanta$$*ous|y low premium. 

Gold gives* you the security. 
The Krugerraml give* you now 
more gold for your money. 

Ask vour bank or broker. 


I tr write fora fire ropy of the 
European Gold Guide to: 


International Gold (’orjHiniiion 

Coin Division 

1. rue de la R<'»{ isserii* 

CH - 1204 Geneva 

Switzerland 1 29 


18% 

20% 

17% 

41* 

3% 

4V« 

33% 

1516 

18% 

am 

12V. 

4% 

3% 

4*4 + 
336k 
15*4 + 

2% 

2% 

4W 

*6k + 

8% 

8% % 

136* 

13% 

7% 

79b — 

7% 

71k 

27% 

38% + 

70% 

71% + 

3% 

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4*6 

4% + 

10 

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10 

21to 

141a 

246* 

15 "+ 
27 + 


9% AM EAC 
16% 12% EEGO 
71k 3<b ERC 

AID Vh ESI 
3V) 2% EoriCl 


40 U A 71. 7D W-14 

32 U 39 SA 14 1J% 13% + Vb 

17 30 SL 5>t ill 

11 34 SM SVto 5% 

1A 207 3 2D n-U 


43 31V Eston 4.9AA1 9 J A 15 3A% 34V MV— 4k 



KRUGERRAND 

Money you can trust 


lli-.w iinia-ilt.i: iiiifnu*.. I »*rj- -r:ii ■■ 
■I.,-.n>ii i.n.i i'!* 1 .. Imij me M41mi!-«'r\Ha- 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 




l -me most beautiful 

MONTE CARLO 

sold through 


fJ. de BWJJT* m Princess 

■ssSSek S»S> 


eft afi.00 Tew* 

TolA9 3)50.66.W _^ efor 


idocumei 


Lai your WS Dollar buv more in Canada 

170 Apartment Complex 


• Very watt maintained complex 

• Price: $3,310,000. CDN or $2.41 2,000. US 

• Excellent low. long term financing until 2007 

• True 12% return on Investment 


Office Building 

12.000 eq. ft modern office building, 5 year lease with a triple 
A tenant 11% return Price $850,000.00 CDN or $474,000 US. 


For further Information and brochures please contact 


WINZEN REAL ESTATE LIMITED W1NZEN CORPORATION: 

Altn. Marketing Manager A Leading Devetopmenf 

87 Yongs Street Suite 700 SatoJ. Property Management 

Toronto. Ontario. Canada M5E 1J8 and Marketing 
Tot (416) 863-0071 - Telex 06524301 Organization. 



37 

10% Queues JA 

30 

32 

32 32 

10% 

JVj Queb wl 

13 

10% 

10% 10% 1 


'b 




8 

323* 

1 4 





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5J 


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.9 le 9.1 


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12 

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23 


V 

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2*6 

1% UFooOA 

.10 

S3 


35 

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2% 





3 

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i% 


16% 

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15 

227 

14% 

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!9*k 

19» 



S% UnllolV 



it 

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BJ 


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14% 

B*k UnvOn 



13 

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1VJ. 4- Va 

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18 

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XOa 47 

13 

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17 

16% 

17 

15% 

9% UnvPot 




so 

14 

13% 

13*6 -9 W 


EAST HAMPTON, N.Y. USA 
SECLUDED 8 ACRE 
COUNTRY ESTATES .S 


vwvmxi HiNiu <■; 

■*f> Y. 

An East Ha^&ton town on the Eosterti : .jp«wa of Long 
Island. Nevi? : #$ijL... Seven beautlfui^- wobded un- 
deveioped ^sibt^itiiSglng WatfeSotri 5 Vj t» 8% acres. 
Fudy protddited ]• 1^ ■ ; parklands 

assuring 

50ur)cl|!^^ 

Special Places For Special People 

Loima RUBENSTEIN INC. 

82 Park Place. East Hampton. NY 11937 (516)324-8200 

Subiect to East Hanpton Town Approval 


»# 


UNIQUE! 

IN HISTORIC XVIth CENTURY MANSION 
OVERLOOKING THE BAY OF NICE, 

TWO GARDEN-APARTMENTS 
FULLY RENOVATED ARE STILL FOR SALE. 

Swimming-pool, private gardens, luxurious fittings, a quiet 
place on the French Riviera, 20 minutes from Nice interna- 
tional carport and 10 minutes from Nice conveniences. 

For further information contact OWNBb 

(93) 96.27.28 






SANTA BARBARA - CAEJFOROTA 

ART TREASURE — Special classic designed residence on 3.97 
private Montecito acres. Two reflection pooh, swimming pool, sleep- 
tag lower and guest house. Coruacr Mrs. Bern or Mrs. Simpson, 
$1,150,000. 

CONTEMPORARY CLASSIC — Dramatic Momecito resi- 
dence. Walls of glass, high ceilings, large master suite, library, guest 
suite, pool, all like new. Estate area. Contact: Mr. Alexander vdto. 


1 lAJk IT ALA L. Ci — One ol the greal estates m America. 
Palace-like with more than 17.000eq.fi., 40 rooms and Formal 
gardens in Montecilo. An architectural wonderi Showcased recently in 
'Architect uiai Digest". Contact: Mr. ITUliam Capp. 


Alexander Velio Real Estate 

1 101 Coast Village Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. 805-969-6895. 


If Yow Hove Done Evwylhing But 

PRODUCE 

FILMS 


R nonong a -eody la mote a beautiful ne— 

featin pKtweo uraque lave ffwi. 

BochesiBt, Nn. YdL a bleaed Miti uccfieon. 
aBy bxMMpuhle phaa^aighc & musaal 
people -»Ha Srawr the know-how >o help 'fov 
p>oduu hctuU profewanl Wmv. 


Bu4d a gknaroui Pucka home atop Ihe leghat 
land rwwloalmg RodieMr to onroa toletited 
ntodvdt Thtfi a only ano-28 acres ol the 


hgheP&movprc«iitoe»*wootaandiniheoiy. 
and you are Only a *5 rn>We Sghi no Ihe 7>XY 


Phon«, (USA) 716-288-5494 
ROCHESTER SKY TOP INC 
22 Harvey PV, Sodwlet NY 14*10 


— --= SWITZERLAND = 
CRANS4HO.NTAl\'A 
RIGHT ON THE 
BEST EliROPEAN 
MOIHSTAEV GOLF COURSE 

Wcacll NiperbauanmenU 2 to (i twnu 
from ST r. 205.000. 

NEAR FAMOUS CR.AWS PLATEAU 
AT TSARAT HAMLET 


Charming Swim Chalet 
S.Fr. 595.000. 


ExctlkM opportunities fur tunipKn 
60 *« mortgage available at til/2 ^ inu 


Agrnor Romaodr ImmofaOifrc S.A. 
Cal. Benjamin Constant I 
1003 LoMtuit - Switzerland 
11. (02 1)20.70.1 1. 1x25873 aril cfa 


CALIFORNIA, U^.A. 

43 acre* mature high yield vine- 
yard. Approved for subdivision. 
Located in Rancho Californio in 
Riverside County, fastest growth 
area m Southern Californio. Ex- 
cellent investment for appprecia- 
tfon & foxes. Necr golf course 
and expensive homes. $753,000. 
Cash or terms. All or part. 
Owner/ Agent 

ADSJW REAL ESTATE 
P.O, BOX 3501 
Santa Monica, Ca. 90403 
(213) 393-4599 



Caribbean homes, 
land, businesses 


■fogex of IWings wHti photo* in our 
mmMy ulmd-by-tdand Report PUJS 
wj^chve, current newi an bland pair. 
No, sconomy, tax laws, qualify of Hq- 
who to contact when lo be tray. 

Our wfatsihen also enjoy savings 
on travel, hotels/ resorts, car rentals 
«id mate. Send $3.00 far Sample Re- 
port PLUS now bulletin: “3 islands. 

We Pick for Inveshnenl in *65." 


Island Properties Report 

Box 58 HT-L2 Route 4, 


Woodstock, Vermont 05091 


BEDFORD - NEW YORK 

Estate - Horse Country 

Exquisite-. . . 22 acres. In Bedford, the heart of hone country. Brilliantly 
designed hone farm with 2 bams, 13 box stalls, diamond wire fencing 
and mare. Top construction. You will fafl in Jove with this farm and its 
beautiful views from original cottage, 

Ram opportunity at $875,000. 



bgder 


BIXLER REAL ESTATE 

Routes 35 and 22, 

P.O. Bax J, 

Kotanah, N.Y. 10536. 
(914) 232-7000 


3 

17Vk 

176k 

17% 

+ 

VI 

A 

7% 

766 

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«— 

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7 

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as 

28 



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+ 

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3016 


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JOe JO 


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10 

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A ICEEn 
319k ICH 
454k ICH wt 
29k ICO 
49k IRTCpn 


1% rmpGp Ilt( 
(U imDlnd 
259k imcoua \M 

4<k mnent 
11 insmis 20 
19k imfSv 
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1114 Intmk .12 

m> IntBknt 
% intBfc wt 
69k IntHvd 
ffw up .m 

39a IntPwr 
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4 InfThrn 
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9k inlDte 
1296 ionics S 
2* isotv JM 


10 29 

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8 

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12 42 

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69k 49k 
99*. 98*. 
50 « 

3 29k 

1*Vk MVS 

£ $ 
Hk Ilk 
37VS 3?Vk 
13 12k. 

209k 20W 
194 14k 
12V. 12 
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74k TVS 
99k 

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41k 69k 
696. 6k. 


64k + Ik 
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49 — W 
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199k 1W96 
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174. 1796 Joelyn 
7k. 5W Jccotw 
5W t<u jaiAin 
7 Vk JetAwt 
96k 4Vk Jelron 
61k 29k JohnPd 


50) 34 8 
0 

Jll BJQ 17 


IS* 13lk 1316 4- <6 
61k 6Vk 6«k 


o-a - >■ jwuiru 14 

11*h 716 JohnAm JO 21 13 1A2 


116k 4k. John I rut 
7W 3V» jmpJkn 


evt Uk 
1616 10 
126k 106% 
1«4k 996 
24 1416 

236% 10VS 
9VS 5V 
171% B 
9 46k 

21k 1V6 

9Vk 56k 
4«i 2U 
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56k 26k 

596 39* 

36k 2 
159k 96* 
166k 10M 
301k 21 


KapnkC 
KavCo JO 
KavJn .10a 
ReorNn M 
Kcnwln JOo 
Ketchm JBt 

KivCo JOe 
KeyPti JO 
KevCo 

Key Cowl 

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KlrlW 
Kit Mlg 
Klonrv JOr 
KOOOO 
Knoll 

KOOOfC 232 ! 


19Q 4H 
5 131k 
25 12 
3 1216 
2A 22VS 
27 211k 

3 L 

1355 106k 
. 4 466 

54 14k 

25 59k 

46 46% 

7 ,44k 
137 3Vk 
1 «9h 

34 216 

41 U9k 
337 Tito 
100 294k 


4 4to + Ik 
136k 13Vk + Ik 
Uk. 1166— to 
1216 1216 
221k 224k + to 
2W6 21 Vk — 6k 

IWk I OH + to 
44b 446 + Vk 

S 14k + Vk 
59k + Hi 
4Vk 41k 

S’* 3 

44k 49b 
216 216 
1366 1346 — Ik 
1566 1596— 46 
2916 294k — to 



3H 29k 
79* 296 

A2 239* 
15to 119k 
17H 11 
146k 91k 
13 846 

2796 211k 
94b 2to 
46k 316 

Blk S 
29 71k 

3to 146 
3to 14k 
394% 24 to 
lAto 16% 
Ml* AVS 
16 99* 

W*b 10 
SAW 1066 
10to 8% 


La Bara 

LoPnt A 

LakeS e .15* 
LnflBrtB 54 3J * 
LnUtnk 40 24 li 
Laser 43 

Loom n 22 

LearPP 3JJ0 13.1 
LeePti IS. 

LeburT a 

Levitt . 7 

LOtFPh M 1A 12 
LltFHSt 
Lodao 

Lorlmr 19 

Lumex M J 2V 
LundyE IA 

Lurta 10 

Lvdal 4 

LvnCSs 8 

LvnchC JO 2J IS 


21 21k 

4 49k 
5A SAW 

22 M16 
IT TASfc 

105 111% 
13 996 

29 229k 
1070 59k 

1 59k 

3J 644 

2 274k 

42 2 

3 146 
354 30 
69 15U 
II Wk 
44 1116 

5 13to. 
305 1566 

11 9M 


29k 21k + Vk 
41k <6k + to 
56to 5496 
l4Vk 14to— Vk 
1W% 166k — to 
llto 11*6— 16 
96k *4k — 4k 
22VS 22to + to 
A 446 + » 
5*b 59k— to 

46* A66 + to 
276k 274fc— to 


J 2 — 1k 
166 196 


37V6 3716 — 4* 
149k 1516 — to 
126k T2tk 
11 llto 
I3VS 131k 
13 . 13 —29k 

9to 9*k— to 



INVEST IN U.S.A. 

11% RETURN 

— Shopping Centers 
— Office Buildings 
— Apartment Complexes 
FOR SALE 
$1 million phis, 

U.S. cash required 

Call or write* 

I.CA Realty Carp. 

29-28 41 st Avenue 
Long Island City, NY USA 11101 
(718) 937-8484 


The Leonori 
has the last thing you'd 
expect to find on 
Madison Ave, & 63rd St 
in the Fall of 1985. 


Classic pre-war condo- 
miniums for your pleasure 
or investment portfolio. 
These are the kind of 
residences that made 
Madison Avenue so desirable 
in the first place. 

From $340,000. 

Limited availability. 





11M 446 

TVk 
1466 4Vk 
1946 1316 
15U 99k 

49k 266 

4to 19k 
229b I3Vk 
MV. 33Vk 
74% 346 

2016 7VS 
26% IVk 
Sto 2 
314k 2116 
llto Bto 
169» 666 

466 316 

49% Mr 
31Va ZHk 
llto Ato 

into 46 % 
2216 161k 
121k 21k 

SVS 2 
361k 2466 
76 57Vk 
*46 -41* 

\ It 

1*6% liu. 
1816 13Vk 
1M4 79b 
64b 3% 
1416 346 

4 2Vk 
224* 27% 
314% 21to 
Wt 14% 


Tsar J3t 56 IB 
TEC .16 LA 18 
TIE 

TabPra jo IX 15 
Tariv M 29 13 
Team 
TctiAm 

TchSvm 13 

TecttOa 15 

TdCtlTp 11 

Techtrl JO U 7 
Tacfind 
Tetocon 

Tel flex m IX 14 
TriDIa MaSS. 15 
Tend 25 

Tefesitt 

Tenon 12 

TexCdB 1J0 

TexAir S 

TmcAE J9t 1A 19 
ToxAE af2J7 121 
Txxcan 48 

T (dwell 

Toiedpf 4JS 127 
Toted DfllLOO 112 
T0J1W J9t 7A 103 
Tart PI 9 J4 
ToIPJwt 

TotPtpf 288 II J 
Tim Lx X5r A 13 
TrnsToC 64 45 10 
Treraon M 23 7 
TriSM AOe U 
TrlHme 9 

TrWex 15 

YuOMbx 

TorttBn 45 

TumrC ixo 4.1 io 
Tylrwts 


15 A 
1 10 
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71 2046 
4 14 

15 

49. 2*6 
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3 A3Vk 

123 4|h 

43 136k 

4 196 

16 29b 
25 30 

12D 116% 
40 76k 

58 4to 
12 4to 

1 24 

2005 109k 
51 59k 

20 2016 
S3 Zto 
«J 3 
507 34 
TMl 76 
33 5to 
1QS8 I3to 
406 lS 
9 2596 
3 1346 
91 IBVh 
23 15to 
8 109k 
37 ■ 4% 
40 5H. 

IIS 244 

17 219% 
M 30Vk 
80 216 


59k Sto— to 
10 IB 
466 4 to— it 
1996 2066 +T 
139b 13to 
39* Sto + Vk 
2*k 2Vk 
146k 146% 

639* AM + I* 
4 4 — Vk 

12H 129b— Ik 
146 164 

26b 29k 

299b 299k— Vk 
llto 114k 
716 794 + to 

4 4M 
41k 4fk 

24 24 

ISto 184k— I* 
Sto 5W— to 
20 20to— Ik 

246 294 

29b 3 - to to 
33 Vj 331k— 1 
76 76 

5 . Sto to to 

m+-fc 

2S6k 2596 + to 
126% 1266 
17W 181* to to 
15 1M to to 
104k 109k- Vk 
4* 496— Vf 
Sto 566 to h 
21k 294 + V. 
21 K 219t 
29V6 296k— 1 

216 2to + to 


416 

16k 

UNA 

-. 2 

1% 

IK 

IK— M 

4*6 

2 

USR Ind 

46 

2% 

m 

2% + M 

24% 

8% 

Ultlfll* 

9 130 

11% 

up 

11% - 


U.S. 


Residences shown by appointment only. 

Please call Reba Miller at 
(212) 685-6200 or write her at 

Ilf 3 WALTERS SAMUELS, INC. 

419 Park Avenue South, NY, NY 10016, USA 

Offering by Prospectus only 


17 Mi* 
9Vk ilk 
i<9b in* 
27 129k 

l*b 95 
23*4 irv* 
Itt* llto 
20to U 
4*to 29 
596 4to 
179. 1064 
16VJ 141% 
I7W 12 
7 6 

139. Sto 
Sto ito 
3to 2to 
139k 10 
179% 1396 
37 299k 

R “ft 

111* 49* 

12to Sto 


jet is is 
1X2 6.1 1A 
I JOe L2 10 
80 IX 18 
J5e«x 7 
J2 13140 


29 15% 
33 9 
3 17% 
214 1416 
29 9* 

19 -20* 
35 1494 
44 19% 
171 476% 
3 59% 

61 144b 
230 lltk 
60 17V. 
99 646 
262 1216 

5 1% 
8 2% 

155 11% 

2 ISto 
430T.35 

ID 2% 

3 96 

53 69k 

6 91% 


1516 15% 

8% 9 + V. 

J2to 139k— to 
13% 14 —to 


20U, 204b— to 
14% 1496 + 16 
1? 1916 + to 

47to 47% + to 
Sto, Sto— i% 
i3to w + to 
1516 159k— to 
17 17 — to 

A4k 4*k 
11% llto — % 

1% m 

296 244 
llto 11% + to 
15V6 1516 
349h 34%— to 
2% 29% — Ik 

%- 94 
4 to 49k — to 
9to 9to— to 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK. — Major UlS. retailers on 
Thursday reported disappointing sales in June 
compared with a year earlier, a performance 
analysts attributed to sluggish consumer de- 
mand and unseasonably cod weather . 


maud and unseasonably cod weather . 

The industry leader, Sears, Roebuck & Co., 
and die third largest company, J.C- Penney Ox, 
each posted sales dedines of U percents: the 

five weeks ended July 6, . 

K mart Cmp n ranked second, reported an 
increase of 8.4 percent But sales for stores that 
were open more than a year — called same-store 
sales — fell 1 J percent it-said. 

No. 4 Federated Department Stores In& said 
its sales rose 4.7 percent and fiflitranked Day- 


7*to 16V. OEA 
22% 146k CJokwo 
]2 * CXWAn 

}*to 49k ooetB s 

mb ll OhAn 
law oiieina 


2SV% 10% OI»en & J4 IX 22 


12 7 201k 20to 301k + to 

3*0 A 13 228 19V. 18% 19 + %. 

32 15 4% 49k 49k— to 

45 4 9to 9 9 — Ik 

.2* i a j- isto 15%. ISto + to 

-« 2-1 14 -L 11% 18% 189k 

34 ix 22 84 25% 2*1b 25V. + Vb 


ton Hudson Coip.-was np 10.(5 percent, but 
sixth-ranked Montgomery Ward & Co. report- 
ed a 5.6-percent decline-. 

Seventh-ranked Wal-Mart Stores Inc. posted 
a 21 -percent sales jump, although same-store 
sales were iip 1 percent “ 


F.W. Woolwortb Co, righlb-largest. said its 
sales gained a slim 1.4 percent; ninth-ranked 
May Department Stores Co. was up percent; 

and No. 10 R.H. Macy & Co. edgeo up 0.1 
percent, with same-store sales down IJjpercenl 

"It was disappointing.^ said Jeffrey Femcr, a 
retail analyst with the investment firm of -Mer- 
rill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Inc. in New 
York. He said consumer demand was genera lly 
sluggish. 

Jeffrey Edebnan of Dean Witter Reynolds 
Inc. in New York, said, “I think vay cleariy the. 
economy is softening.” 

There were several other factors contributing 
to the sales results, the analysts and companies,* 
said. 

Mr. Eddman said retailers had heavy inven- 
tories last year and were cutting prices aggfe% 
siveiy to move them. “This year, witb mWh 
tones more aHgned with saks. they are 
promoting as aggressively," be said. r ’ ? . , 



















































1 







J 



**/ 


I INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


Page 13 


ESS* 

:!m r. 

{iiajj 1 * ' M| 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


BUSINESSPEOPLE 




rroup Pretax Profit 
Rose 6.1% in First 6 Months 


rrand 

u can trust. 




Ream 

LONDON — Impend Group 
pLC the British tobacco and lei- 
sure-activity concern, said Thurs- 
day that pretax earnings in the first 
mlf ended April 30 rose 6.1 per- 
tenL to £96 J million (about $130 
million), from- £90.7 million a year 
earlier. 

Sales rose 12 percent, to £2.44 
sTHon. from £2. 18 billion, the com- 
>ysud. • 

■ The overall profit increase, 
which also reflected an exiraordi- 
eary credit of £4.6 million, would 
haw been signfficawly higher ex- 
cept fora British brewery strike in 
November and for continuing 
losses at its Howard Johnson Co. 
unit in the United States. Imperial 
said. - . 

Howard Johnson's operating 
loss in the six-month period wid- 
ened to £8.6 milljon from £2.8 mil- 
lion a year earlier, it said. 

Howard Johnson's restaurant 
operations continued to be the ma- 
jor drag on the unit's results. Impe- 
rial said, while its lodges and holds 
improved their market position in a 
seasonally slow period. 

Imperial said that discussions 
with interested parties over the po- 


tential sale of Howard Johnson are 
proceeding. 

An Imperial spokesman said the 
company had hoped to be in a 
position by now to announce a de- 
cision on a sale, but that negotia- 
tions have taken longer than. ex- 
pected. The board's decision mil be 
made known “as soon as possible." 
he said. 

The tobacco division had an ex- 
tremely strong first half, including 
heavy trade buying, the company 
said. 

It predicted that second-half to- 
bacco profits wfll be hurt by a com- 
bination of high trade stocks at the 
start of the period, some reduction 
in cigarette volumes in the wake of 
tax increases and growing competi- 
tion from the lowest priced seg- 
ment of the market. 

Results of the brewing and Id- 
sure division were only slightly : 
ahead of the previous year because 
of a brewery strike that reduced: 
earnings by £5 million. Second-half 
results are expected to show sub- 
stantial improvement. Imperial 
said. 

The food division had an excel- 
lent first half, though a strike at 
four Golden Wonder factories wffl 
seriously affect results in the sec- 
ond half, it said. 


GE Reports 
2%fRvfkBise 9 
3% Sales Gain 

If/ritpJ Press Internal! owl 

n£w YORK — General 
Bedric Co. repotted Thursday 
a2-percem increase in net earn- 
ings for the second quarter and 
a 3-percent roe in sales. 

The company, based in Fair- 
field, Connecticut, said its net 
earnings totaled 5590 million, 
oe SI - 30 a sharo compared with 
$579 million, or $1.28 a share, 
in the comparable period of the 
□nor year. Saks for the quarter 
increased to $6.84 billion, up 
from $6.66 hiHon in the year- 
eariier quarter. \ 

Earnings were considerably 
below those of the prior year m 
.its consumer products segment, 
the company said, because of 
severe price competition in col- 
or televisions and video cassette 
recorders and weak results in 
lighting products. 

The company said its indus- 
trial systems and aircraft engine 
segments saw significant im- 
provements in earnings. The 
manufacturing sector of the 
U.S. economy continues to be 
buffeted from all directions,’' 
tbe company said. 


Analysts Split on Wisdom of Coke’s Revival 





lliyjlr-! 


:(s n. 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

- f/etr York Tima Scnicc 

NEW YORK — When Coca- 
Cola Co. locked away its fabled 
., formula 7X in an Atlanta bank 
_ ' vault in late April and introduced a 
. sew. sweeter version of the world's 
best-selling soft drink, it took one 
•- ! cl tbe great marketing gambles of 
• jB time. 

On Wednesday, the company 
'■ conceded that perhaps it should 
~~~j not have bet all of its chips on 
• <- . reformulated Coke. 

Its announcement that it will 
: . ‘ bring back the original formulation 
• ; I mder the name "Coca-Cola Clas- 
: > i ; ! :k" was seen by industry analysis 
■’i'jis an acknowledgement that the 
.l;!CQmpany had miscalculated the 
- - | consumer reaction to a change in 

' - • . one of the world's best-known 
. '■* ‘products. 

‘ “Americans are much more tra- 
dition-oriented than Coca-Cola 
"•id^ghvand they didn't realize 
’ ■" ; tow sacred the tradition of Coke 
. . . was," said Alan Kaplan, a beverage 

analyst at Merrill Lyui-li.- Pierce. 
!-! Fenner & Smith. 

• [Coca-Cola officials admitted 
Thursday that they had misjudged 
- " America's passion for Coke when 
'.‘I! they changed the taste and said that 
..' their decision to reintroduce old 
-.■-.■Coke was a "humbling experi- 
mce,” United Press International 
eported from Atlanta. 

[“The simplefaa is that all of the 
dme and money and skill poured 
into consumer research on the new 
Coca-Cola could not measure or 
—reveal the deep and abiding emo- 
tional attachment to original Coca- 
Cola fdt by so many people." said 
Donald Kequgh. Coca-Cola presi- 
dent and chief operating officer.] 


Analysts and marketing experts But Donald E Sexton, a profes- 
agreed Wednesday that the compa- sor of marketing at Columbia Uni- 
t—* I—' r— — ~r ■ verity’s Graduate School of Busi- 


ness. said that a dual-Coke strategy 
was the one that the company 
should have pursued from the be- 
ginning. They’ve got one to deal 
with the Pepsi challenge and one to 
deal with the satisfied Coke drink- 
er," he said. 


ay bad lost face because of its deci- 
sion. Most analysts, however, fdt 
that the company would come out 
of an embarrassing situation with a 
higher overall market share, al- 
though a few noted that the rever- 
sal would provide Pepsico Inc., the 
maker of rival Pepsi- Cola, and oth- 
er competitors with an excellent 
opportunity to gain against the in- 
dustry leader. Coke was changed 
largely to head off inroads bong 
made by Pepsi ANT NaduKhtentedmik GmbH 

The primary task new lacing said it has agreed with the official 
Coca-Cola will be supporting two New China News Agency to jointly 
major brands — Classic Coke and develop a word-process ng system 
new Coke — that are very similar, with both Chinese and Roman 
in a highly competitive market characters. Value of the accord was 

"Brand Pepsi now has a good not disclosed, 
shot at becoming the No. 1 single 


Goldsmith 
Renews Battle 
With Crown 

Compiled hr Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

NEW YORK— Sir James Gold- 
smith vowed Thursday to use his 
“best efforts" to defeat a restruc- 
turing plan proposed by Crown 
Zdlerbach Corp_ the forest -prod- 
ucts company in which he holds a 
36-percent stoke. 

In a filing with the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, Sir James, 
the company’s biggest shareholder, 
also disclosed that he may resume 
buying shares in the company, an 
activity that was suspended under a 
May 25 agreement. 

Under that accord, Sir James 
agreed to cooperate in the restruc- 
turing, which is intended to in- 
crease the value of Crown’s shares. 
He was also made a board member 
then. 

Sir James said in his SEC filing 
that be came close to an agreement 
with management on changes in 
the restructuring plan that would 
have satisfied him. However, at a 
crucial time in the negotiations, he 
said. Zeller bach "unilaterally ter- 
minated discussions." 

Under its previously announced 
plan filed with the SEC Wednes- 
day. Crown would restructure into 
three parts. 

The company said it would form 
Landcq. a limited partnership 
holding 1.65 million umber acres 
(660,000 hectares), and Cosyn. a 
new corporation to carry out 
Crown's specialty packaging busi- 
ness. Crown Zelierbach would fo- 
cus on paper and containers. 

In its filing, the company said 
that on July 1. during negotiations 
over the restructuring. Sir James 
rejected a management proposal 
that he acquire Crown at $50 a 
share. (Reuters, SYTi 


Prutec’s Chief Executive 
Is to Resign After Merger 


By Colin Chapman 

Inirmauonat Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Derek Allen, chief 
executive or Pro tec, Prudential As- 
surance Co.’s high-risk venture- 
capital company, is to resign. The 
resignation, effective in September, 
follows the British insurance 
group's merger of Protec with its 
own in-house venture-capital divi- 
sion. 

The combined operation wiD 

now come under the control of 

Richard Gawthoroe. 

Prutec was set up by Prudential 
four years ago to seek out new high- 
technology companies. It currently 
has investments in 25 companies 
totaling £40 milljon ($55 J. million) 
The new group's investments will 
be worth £100 million. 

Lazard Freres & Co- Lbe interna- 
tional bank, has appointed Arthur 
F. Burns as senior adviser to the 
group. Mr. Burns, president of the 
US. Federal Reserve from 1970 to 
1978. recently retired as U.S. am- 
bassador io West Germany. 

Hertz Cocp. of the United Stoles 
has appointed David Voss as divi- 
sional vice president of Hertz Eu- 
rope. He will head the company's 
rteec leasing and contract-rental 
operations throughout Europe, Af- 
rica and the Middle EasL 

Lloyd's of London, the insurance 
market has appointed David M.L 
McWUliam as the head of regula- 
tory services. He takes over from 
Philip Brown. Mr. McWilliamioins 
Lloyd's from R.P. Martin PLC the 
British foreign-exchange and mon- 
ey broker, where he was managing 
director. . 

Ocean Transport &' Trading PLC 
has dec led David Peretz to its 
board. Mr. Peretz is a senior Trea- 
sury official advising the British 


government on monetary policy, 
and is only the second full-time 
Treasury official to serve on the 
board of a public company. The 
first. Tun Lankester. was also on 
the Ocean board, but has just re- 
signed to become an executive di- 
rector of the International Mone- 
tary Fund in Washington. 

Axtadmot Latham Bank Ltd-, a 
London merchant bank, has hired 
Michael Hamer to head the corpo- 
rate finance department. He was 
previously a director of Wardlcy 
London Holdings Ltd. and of Bar- 
clays Merchant Bank Ltd. 

Foster Wheeler Corp. of tbe 
United States has named Roy L 
McConnell as chairman of Foster 
Wheeler World Services Corp.. its 
international construction subsid- 
iary. Peter T. Murray has been ap- 
pointed president and chief execu- 
tive officer. Mr. McConnell has 
been promoted from executive 
vice-president after 19 years with 
the group in a number of senior 
appointments in Britain and the 
United States. Mr. Murray joined 
in 1958. and rose to vice president 
of Foster Wheeler Energy Corp. 

Systems Designers PLC the 
British computer consultancy, has 
named one of its rounders, Geof- 
frey Holmes as deputy chairman. 
He has been its technical director 
for the last eight years. Hie compa- 
ny is also opening an office in 
Frankfurt this fall, trading as SPL 
Systems Programming GmbH, 
with Dietrich Bonboffer as manag- 
er. Mr. Bonhoffer joined the com- 
pany from Tandem Computers of 
the United States. 

Pantry Pride Inc. of the United 
Stales has named Bruce Slovin as 
president of the supermarket and 
retail corporation. 


COMPANY N0VES 


best-selling soft drink product in 
the United Slates." said Jesse Mey- 
ers, publisher of Beverage Digest, 
an industry newsletter that an- 
nounced Coke’s reversal Wednes- 
day. "That's because Coke is split- 
ting its troops into two sections. 
But the corporate share of Coke for 
all of its products has a terrific shot 
at going through the roof." 

Mr. Meyers said the trend in the 
industry was toward segmentation 
of the consumer market into cver- 
finer slices and that Coke was pur- 
suing that .strategy. 

Coca-Coto'x various soft drinks 
had a 32_5-perceni share of the 
overall market at the end of 1984. 
with Pepsico Inc.'s products taking 


Charterhouse Petroleum PLC 
and Saxon Oil PLC said their 
boards had agreed to merge the 
companies into Saxon Petroleum 
Corp. a newly formed holding 
company. Saxon Petroleum will of- 
fer one new ordinary share for each 
Charterhouse ordinary share, and 
22 new ordinary /shares for every 
five Saxon Ofl shares. 

Japan Air Linn and All Nippon 
Airways said they each plan to buy 
two Boeing 747 jetliners. The 
planes arc valued at about $100 
million apiece. 

General Efeqtrir Co. PIC said it 
has acquired an additional I mil- 
lion of its own shares at 162 pence 
(about S2.I5) apiece as part of a 


fail to about £39 million from £42 
million in the same period last year, 
the chairman. John Clark, told the 
annual meeting. First-quarter de- 
tails will be published Aug. 15. 

Sidle PLC said it would acquire 
Imperial Continental Gas Associa- 
tion's Compair Lid. unit for £58 
million in cash. The company said 
it would also seek io raise £74.9 
million by way of a one-for-one 
rights issue ai 400 pence per ordi- 
nary share. 

Siemens AG said it and a consor- 
tium of subsidiaries have won an 
order valued at 160 million Deut- 
sche marks (about $55 million) 
rrom the Kuwaiti energy ministry 
to build Tour transformer power 
stations. The transformers will go 
into, operation in lhe spring of 
1987. 

Tata Engineering & Locomotive 
Co. said it signed an agreement 
with Japan's Honda Motor Co. to 
make Honda's Accord car in India. 
It said Honda will gain a 10-per- 


Interest in Picturephone Idea 
Is Revived by Some Firms 


(Continued from Page 11) 

make il convenient and inexpen- 
sive. and our belief is that in the 
near term it will become an impor- 
tant business tool." 

Picturephone supporters are also 
buoyed by the fact that, by using 
56-kilobit-a-second transmission 
speeds, their devices can use regu- 
lar phone lines. In the past, parties 
on each end of a picturephone con- 
versation needed high-speed ca- 
bles. 

Even industry executives, how- 
ever. concede that bugs in their 
systems must he worked out. 


Although Pictel says its picture- 
phone will produce images that will 
"knock your socks off." telecom- 
munications consultants say quali- 
ty declines dramatically with trans- 
mission speed. Some images are not 
crisp, they say, and some move- 
ment appears as a blur. Analysis 
say the quality has to be better if 
picturephones are to succeed. 

Equipment prices also remain 
high. Widcom s picture squeezer 
costs $50,000. and while it can be 
shared among a group of employ 
ees. each person still needs a Wid 
com phone and monitor. That 
alone costs $20,000. 


a 26.7-percent share, according to continuing program to buy back its cent slake in Tdco under terms of 


Beverage Digest. Brand Coke had a 
2 1.7-percent share and brand Pepsi 
had an 18.8-percent share. 

Other analysts were less optimis- 
tic about Coke’s prospects. 




Earnings 


Revenue and profits, in millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


it 4 L-*’- 


Britain 

Granada Group 


Mitsubishi Heavy Ind. 
Year 19 M 190 


frdow Ntt_ 


ins 

394,78 

psr 

0054 


1984 

30704 

24J) 

0JW 


Revenue 

Profits 

Per Stare — 
T- toss 


144 T 133 T 
40.3*0. 27.3*0. 
1577 1083 


Client. New York 
Mower. 1911 1999 


llstrfs— ! «*"“ 


imperial Group 
&H0K I9U 1984 

fewnue 2440. 1180. 

'hifenNet— *6J n.7 

V Share 049 0484 

Rank Organisation 
tatwr 1985 1984 

: '5yM 315.9 3216 

- N*t— 624 474 

V snare— 0.149 0.125 

V Rothmans lnt*1 
,.w 1994 1993 

..-Jyw 1600 1.510. 

: - ‘Wto* N*t_ 171.9 151- 

Snare — 0.142 0J4* 


Noranda 
go«r. 198S 

9472 

. <0)14.4 


Taisel 

Year 1984 1983 

Revenue 1.15 T 148 T 

Prollls 12210. 11540- 

Per Share— . ISL 77 17.48 
T: loss, 

TMiln 

Year 1984 1983 

Revenue 58940 . 580.320 

Prolltv 16600. 14100 

Per Shore — 206* 18.18 

Tonnr Ind. 

Year 1984 1983 

Revenue 793470. 7SJ.740. 

Prafils— 1165a 11640- 

Per snore — 11.44 1041 

1 tailed Stale* 
Abbott Laborat. 

2 nd Ouar. 1985 1984 


Net Inc 
Per Shore — 
1 st Halt 

Net inc 

Per Shore — 


1072 * 

1.97 

1985 

19697 

341 


Colt ind. 

2MQWOT. IMS 


Revenue . 

NM Inc 

Per Shore — 
lit Halt 

Revenue 

hel Inc- 

Per Share— 


47*2 

4581 

220 

1985 

9*44 

7742 

190 


76.79 

1.40 

1984 

158.13 

192 


1984 

5013 

37-36 

U1 

1984 

9*5.7 

41943 

MS 


ins Quarter and hat I net a- 
etude 3 credit of S9J million 
tor adlustment. 


CansoL Papers 


own shares for cancellation. 

Granada Group PLC said its pre- 
tax profit in the 28 weeks ended 
April 13 rose to £27.97 million 
from £24.0 milium a year earlier. It 
said results would have been more 
than £30 million except for costs 
related to Belgian operations. 

HJ. Heinz Co. directors voted to 
recommend to shareholders a 2- 
for-1 split of the company’s com- 
mon shares. The proposal will' be 
acted upon at tbe annual meeting 
onSepill. 

Occidental Petroleum Corp. said 
its second-quarter earnings, which 
are duel' out later this month, will 
show a "significant increase" over a 
year ago. In the second quaner of 
1984. Occidental earned 5125 mil- 
lion, or 62 cents per share, on sales 
of S3JS billion. 

Plessey Co. expects pretax profit 
in the first quarter ended June 30 to 


the accord, but did not elaborate. 



Revenue 
Nat Inc. 

Per snare — 
1 st Hall 

Revenue 

Net Inc. 

Per Snare — 


827.0 

11542 

0.94 

1985 

1.5*. 

21721 

141 


BOM 

10027 

043 

1984 

1.520. 

18847 

146 


M Ouar. 

1985 

1984 

Revenue 

1873 

1764 

Net me 

2936 

2066 

Per Shore— 

135 

0.95 

1 st Half 

1985 

19 M 

Revenue 

3726 

3473 

Net me 

5633 

4 ai: 

Per Share— 

261 

144 


SMontla Occident. 




1984 

37948 


1983 

370.17 


Hanna Malar 

■.225> 1985 1984 

■ ; !5w tol*™. 6*9210 

«280. 64470. 

W40H — 471 301 

Kubota 

19M 1983 

• . 4454«0. 638241. 

..."ft-—, 15470. 14.150. 
."Am? 2 U 311 


ins net Includes Mae* at 
SCSI million vs 5*45 1 st Halt 

In Quarter and SISS million vs Net I nc. 
S’JIS million In hall. 


Barnett Bks Ftar. 
tad floor. INS 1984 

Net Inc. 3B4 3SJ 

Per Shore — 0.98 0J0 

1 ft Holt ms 1984 

Net inc. *0.1 49J 

Prr Share — l.*l 1-75 

Caterpillar Tract. 
tad Quar. 194 $ 1944 

Revenue ii*a 1430. 

Ne I Inc 504 244 

Per Snore — 05 1 025 

1 st Mat* 1985 19 W 

Revenue — 3 . 110 . 3210 . 

Net LuM 304 454 


Continental Bncp 
2 nd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Net inc. 11-9 102 

Per Share— 1.14 147 

1945 1984 

234 194 

Per Share 228 1.78 

IMS net includes loss d SO* 
million vs S7.9 million In 
Quarter and S8.18 million vs ' 
tSoJ million to halt Results, 
restated lor pooled acoulse 
non. Per snare results out ust- 
ed for S% stock dividend. 

Daw Jones a Co 
2nd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 26545 247*3 

NCI Inc. 3847 37 J 

Per Share 029 058 

1st Half l«5 WM 

Revenue 510 J 7 47609 

Net inc 7027 * 4.15 

Per .Share — 1.10 1.0* 


Kodak Scraps Data Han 

The Associated Press 

ROCHESTER. New York — 
Eastman Kodak Co. said Thursday 
that it has scrapped plans to sell 
other companies excess capacity on 
its long-distance commumcauons 
network. Kodak's voice and data 
network js leased mainly from 
American Telephone & Telegraph 
Co. and links about 225 company 
locations worldwide. 


(Gold Options (fries in S/O*). 


torn 


no* 

7 E 

300 

1875-2025 




310 

11751335 

2075-2225 

• 

320 

655 (LOO 

1535-1675 

72402330 

330 

12 S- 475 

11401250 

1735-1875 

340 

130 . 275 

730 *40 

1335-1475 

ISO 

040 130 

540 630 

10401130 

360 

— 

- 3 Z£J» 

73 S- 875 


Oddi 31350-31440 

[VfltanWkkeWcMSJL 

I. Quof do Ho»BbK 
1211 Gewvm L Swkzeriu* 

I Tel 310251 - Trim 20305 


STOCK US$ USS 

DeVoe-HoIbein 

International bv 5% 6% 

Gty-Gock 

International nv 234 3\4 

Quotes as of: July J 1, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 48* 

1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)8120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firconl 


WORIDINVEST INCOME FUND 

DIVIDEND ANNOUNCEMENT 
DECLARATION OF DIVIDEND No. 17 

'I'nNn*. uf l hi- WnrliliuuM Imumi- fund * IIV jdwMil 1° annoumr a 

■war 


hW ll i 


I o Rp'TnMn*- uf ihi- WnrliliuuM Imumr fund an* In announr 

* ‘ ' S - So-Wl p'r -W (linlriliutuiii 1<- Shan-hoWi-w in rtNpni ..r lb»- half-v 

ill J ' •- J*rkid fnnjl Hwmlav 2B>h, 198-1 l«i Jun»'27lh. 1985. 


; Iflupno \u. 17 and al-” -u» |»nuinush unrirrsental rtMWh mat be 
Inxiiiivi for jut im-nl <m ur after Nujrtiril InL l9B5liiain uf ihr fnlkminp 
’s fillip \prnh: 

* ■ ’ . Bank uf America NT & SA, 

Roa* Kane Branch, 

Sl utorwi- Building. 

, .% I In- H«n*r Stirrl, 

■■'J.-- Hone Kong, B.C.C. 

• v BankAmcrira Truri and Bnnking Corporation 

(Bnhamnwl Limited, 

50 Sbirln Street, 

Vb^tu, Bahama-. 

Bank of America tniernaibmal SA, 

- : SS Boulevard RvyaL 

litwnliwrp 

\ BankAmerira Tnml Ownpanj Limlird. 

* I I nlun IIoum-. 

_ ■? l nlon Street. 

’ ■ ' St. llelier. Jemey, 

Chaanrl IxlamU. 

. . ail) In- lru fc- I l» ju»* jjij4halili- liial '»r "ihrr npuLiliun- tiillnn 

An- ,4 -«■ )■ 

BoikAmariaa Tnirf Company ( J onuf) IhntncL 


REfCD -ANTWERP 
BEN&UX TRADING OFFICE 

has openings for: 

EXPERIENCED 
COMMODITY ACCOUNT 
EXECUTIVES 

with established clientele and solid production. 


Our service area is in principal unlimited as we have 
dienfs all over the world. If you are a successful producer 
we am offer you the highest remuneration in the industry. 


Please contact: 

REjGO- ANTWERP 

Vestingstraat, 59/63, 2018 ANTWERP, Belgium. 
Tel: 00-32.3-234.33.51. Telex: 35146. 


llcralb 



2 FORI 

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Hwm aide «Pieduadpibur(pmpxaidpNd. For ntwpfaulpnaf,. 

CburhY Currency 

lyeor 

6 moe 

3 moL 

Audna 

A.Seh. 

4020 

2,170 

1.1* 

Britgxn 

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9420 

4476 

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Danmark 

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town 

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765 

423 

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11900 

745 D 

4090 

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21200 

11,500 

6300 

Sweden 

SJCr. 

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795 

434 

Swterknf 

S Ft. 

4 ifi 

233 

)29 

aexof&jrape, Norit Africa fcxtna Ftendt 

Atrn^ USA, F>endiiUyT»aMKtoe East 

| S| 3221 1 »| 95 

^afAhkAOxtadcUMAnwicaMMiies 

Asa ] Si 44 ?) 239 | >30 


Card expry date. 


Sgnetue. 


I CardocOTurt 
number 


Name. 


Address. 


I 

l_ 

| o* 

I Td 


.Country. 
.Trie* — 


Banque Nationalede Paris 



U.S. $75,000,000 

Floating Rate Notes 1987/1990/1994 

In accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notice is 
hereby given that for the six months 11th July, 1985 to 13th 
January, 1986 the Notes will bear an interest rate of per 

cent per annum and the coupon amount per U.S. S 100,000 
will be U.s.$4,230.21 . 

Agent Bank 

Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited 


CAISSE CENTRA!! OE COOPERATION ECONOMISE 

U.S. $50,000,000 - Variable rate 1978-1998 
Unconditionally guaranteed by the French Stale 


Wc hrrrisy inform holdrn. of LiornL that the nrHnnption of Aupbl 12. 1985. 
for which an instalmeni LSS 3330.000 is projected. w%- earned out by the 
drawing of lots in I hr pira-nti- of Mr. Housse. Puhlic Officer. Luxembourg. 

In romequeniY. ilv- 3^30 bontK. each of LSS 1.000 and bearing the 
numbent: 

6955 to 10284- 

inrluftive. will be nHmburxaUe at par with coupon* No. 15 and following 
coupons attached apart from August 12 . 1985 . date at which they will cease 
to accrue interest. 

Tbe reiiuhuncniefU oj these bonds and lhe payment of interest will he done 
at the following hanks: 

CRCDIT LYONNAIS, Luxembourg. BANKERS TRUST COM- 
PANY. New York, BANQUE BRUXELLES LAMBERT 
Bnuwels, BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS, Paris. COMMERZ- 
BANK AKT1EN GES ELLSCHAFT. Frankfurt. CREDIT LYON- 
NAIS, London. CREDIT SUISSE, Zorich. 

The amount n-maining in circulation following this second redemption is: 
USS 43,340.000. 

Tha Hsccd Agent 
CREDIT LYONNAIS, Luxembourg. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied bv Funds Listed 
11 July 1985 

n« Mt ouet value ooomiIom shown bet bw ore *u polled by me Fond* llstotf wlih the 
exception M tome funds wftote a ootes are bated an Issue prices. Tbe tallow Vno 
moniael srmbots Indicate f re w e we y of naalaflens supplied for me IHT: 

• Id) dalle; (w) weekly; (b) . bformitahr; ID -repolorte; |i> - trreaukiriy. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
<wl Al-Mol Trust. SA 


St*1AS 


BANK JULIUS BAER S CO. Ltd. 


Mw) Llavds Inn N. America— S 10755 

Hw) UOVdS mil POCtflC SF 1300 

H wl Llavds tni’L Smaller Cos. . 114JB 


— Id I BoerWond- 

— fd)i 


—Id ) Eautooor America. 
—Id l E out Boer Europe— 
—Id ) Eatoboer Pacific— 

— id I Grobor 

—id » Slpcbbar 


BANOUE INDOSUEZ 
—Id > Aslan Growth Fund- 
l»l Dlverbor 


SF 94X40 NIMARBEN 

SF 125X00 —Id I Class A 

. % 120440 — (w I Clan B - US. — 

SF 12*540 — Iw) Class C-Joaan. 

SF 10*400 OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

SF -lv»l Mu tu currency 

sf i*27j» _ jw| Term- 

— twt Dollar Long Term— 
S1ILS* — (wl Japanese Yen. 


— Iw) Fi r America 

— Iw) FIF — Europe 

— (wl FIF — PocHlC— 

—Id ) tnOBeun MuUttxmds A. 
— Id I Indosuei Mullllionds B 
—Id) 


SF 8470 — (w) Pound StorUnp . 
. 11X41 — ( w) Deutsche Mark. 

. S 125* — (wl Dutch Florin 

. 11749 — iwl SwlM Franc 

. $9637 
I158J9 


_S 1063 
.S 10.7V 

-Sian 

11067 


-FL 1030 
— SF 9.92 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 


IndOSUMUSDIMJIAF)— S 101638 


BRITANNI AJ>OB 371. SI. Haller. Jersey 

— (wt OrltOanar Income S 04SS 

— Iw) BTlta Monoo.CtKT St34 

=5S!gS:!!;iSKSSS^ , .= m =j:!8gti^S2g 

’-Iwl BrtL Am. lnc.O Fd Ltd *1472 SSiP 11 

—Iwl Bril.GoV) Fund 


PARI5BAS— GROUP 
—Id I Cornea im 
-Iwl OBLI47M— 


—Iwl BiiiAtanoaXurrencv 

-Id ) Brit. Jeaan Dir Pert. Fd . 

— Iw) Bril Jersey Gill Fund 

-Id ) Bril. World Leh. Fund— 
—Id I Bril. World Tertm. Fund. 
CAPITAL INTERNA TIOMAL 
— Iw) CopIlM inn Fund — 
—Iwl Ceattal Italia 5A 


SOMO — Iwl OBLl-YEN 

C11H -l«l OBU-GULOEH 
SOM — Wl PAROlL-FUNO. 

sss i raws*™ 


DM 1.19960 
— SF 94.15 
S 1.17*47 


Y 10071140 
FL 10*2.94 

„ FUNO IT 5*11243 

SljS 1 PA* US Treasury Bond I11UNI 

50730 ROYAL B. OF CANAOA^OB 246JSUERNSEY 

^■Iw) BBC Canadian Find LkL 11)41’ 

StaJl -+lw) RBC Far EasUPodllc Fd— 510*4 


m 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES! 
— Id ) Actions Sul-jes 
—Id) Bond Valor Surf 


-*iw) RBC Inn Capital Fd.. 
-* Iwl RBC Inn Income Fd- 
MoaCurn 


-♦Id ) RBC bunXurrencv FO 
SF 405 50 -Hwl RBC Norm Amcr. FO 

OM mjo SKAND1FOND IMTL FUND ( 4*. B- 2343701 
1 1 i-*o unmtar un 


S 2207 
S 11.11- 
S2365 
S*47’ 


— (w)lnc-: Bid SS380ttrr- 

— (w)Acc.: Bid SSAI QHer_ 


1530 


—(a I Bond Valor Denarii 

— Idl Bono Vatar US-DOLLAR I HOIS 

—III) Bond Valor Yen Yen lomoo 

—Id) Convert Valor Swf _ SF 117.50 SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

—Idl Convert Valor US-OOLLAR. S mM 17 DevomMre SaJ-ondorvOI -3 77-8040 

— Id I Conner SF 780«I — (0 ) SHB Sana Fund S 22.78 

—Id I C5 FomW— Bonds SF 77_a -Hw) SHB Inll Growth Fund S 21.97 

=(d ! cl nSSh^Ui Fund— s ionro swiss b^kcorp_i issue pricesi 


— Id ) CS Moncv Mntri Fund 

—Id ) Enerale— Valor— 

—Idl msec 


Dm 104300 — * d I America- Valor. 


SF SS17S 
DM11946 


5F 15430 — id > D-Mark said Selection 

SF 94*40 —id I Dollar Bond Selection S 1373* 

SF 15940 — W I Florin Bend Selection _ FL 12343 
SF 16175 —Id I Inlervolor SF 8735 

- _ —I Id I Japan Porttaita SF see so 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC —id ) Sterling Bond Selection 1 10477 

Wlncnealer House . 77 Lon don Wall -Id I Swiss Foreign Bond SeL SF 10761 

LONDON EC7 (81 9209797) —idl Swtssvplor New 5ertes- SF 32835 


—to ) Eurono— valor. 
— Id) PociHc— Valor 


(w> Finsbury Group Ltd- 


Im) Winchester DtversHledee. 
(ml Winchester Flrxmctal L1d_ 
|w) Winchester Holdings 


*123-73 —id i Universal Bond Select — SF BSJO 

- *19X7 —|d ) unlvmai Fund SF 12064 

- S 1040 —[d I Yen Band Selection Y 1 0.1 *540 

FF 10121 


S 1228 UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 


Iwl Worldwide SecurtllesS«3V,-_ 14554 — W I Amcp Ufj h. 

(w) Worldwide Snrctal S/S 3V, . S 163466- — J KSl'JSH 
OIT INVESTMENT FFM 
— Md I Concentre. 


—Id) Foma Swiss Sts. 
— Id I Jepan-mvesi. 


Hd) infl Renlenfond. 


OMM68 — IdlSofHSoultiAtr.Sh.. 
DM 95.14 — (a j sima (stack prior) - 


SF3V40 
SF 4835 
SF 15240 
SF 90240 
SF 46148 
SF 21040 


UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

Id > Unlrenta DM 45*0 

— Id 1 Uniforms, DM 25*0 

— Id I Urrirok DM7VJ5 

— Id) UNIONS DM11345 


Dunn & Kargin 6 Lloyd George, Brussels 
— Im) D&H Commodity Pool- S 377.19 — 

— Im) Currency 4 Gold Pool — S 1826* — 

— Iml Winch. Life Ful. Pool— SS92J1 — 

— Im) Trans world FuL Pool— $829.16--* 

FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. AOVISEftS 

I, Laurence Pounty HUL EC*. 01623-4*80 

— Iw) FAC Atlantic — — - S12J0 {»*} Agtoonra Invesiments Fund. Sn.18 

— Iw) FAC European 1 1147 ’ nn ■ 

— (w) FAC Orients 12*36 (ml Allied LW.. 


Other Funds 


S 1160 
S340 


Iw) Aqulto Inlemohonol Fund— 5 13*35 

FIDELITY POB 470. Hamilton Bermudo lr ) Arab Finance IJ= S 87847 

— (ml American Value* Common- S9S45 io ) Artone S 167933 

—1ml Amer Votuos CumJVel — SV02.C (wl Truslcor Infl Fd. IAE1F) $1039 

— Id I Fidelity Amer, Aueti 57244 iw) BNP Inierbond Fund S 11151 

-Id I Fidelity Austro llo Fund S9J8 fw) Bondselex-lMue Pr... 5F 13835 

—Id ) Fidelity Discovery ’Fund S 1864 |m) Canodo GuFMortooge Fd S 935 

— Id) FWeUtvDlr.Svgs.Tr, s 17440 id 1 CapHM Preserv. FdL mil S1164 

—Id ) Fidelity For East Fund. 52064- |») Citadel Fund 1 142 

—id » Fidelity Intt. Fund SM.16 (d I C-I.R. Australia Fund SBJO 

— Id) Fldelilv Orient Fund 17731 (d I CJ-R- Japgn Fund s 105* 


—Id 1 Fidelity Frontier Fund- 
• — Id ) Fidelity PocHtc T 


— Id I Fidelity Sod. Growth Fd 11543 (b 

— Id l FldeHiy world Find $3346 <w 

FORBES PO BSS7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 81 439-3813 

— (w) Dollar Income 

— (wl Fames High Inc. GUI Fd, 

— (wl Gold Incom e . 


*1*44 Cm) Clevtoond Ottshnre Fd. — S 111257 
S 136.17 |w) Columbia Securilles FL1I263 


._ I COMETE 

Iwl Convert. Fd. inn A Cer 
iw) Convert. Fd. mn B r 

(w) D.G.C. 


— (wl Gold Appreoollon . 
— Im) Strategic Trading. 


(d 1 D. Winer WW Wide IvtTU SI142 

tM (o I Drakkgr invest.Fund N.V_ S 1.14660 

«vK (d l Drevtue America Fund S 10-17 

fd ) Drgylus Fund inti 


tfi* (wl Dreyfus Intercanllnenl — 
(w) The Esraelistunent Trusl- 

<d 1 Europe Obi (oat torn 

S 33948 (w) Flra Eagle Fund 

£11349 (b ) FlttY Slurs Lid.. 


GEFINOR FUNDS. 

—twt Eoel I nves tm ent Fund, 

— Iw) Scomsb Worm Fund . , _ 

— Iw) Stalest American— — — 517045 In) Fixed Income Trans 
CopN.TrusM.td.LenAgeni41.4f 14230 (wl Fonsele x Issue Pr. 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. - n ™ ra 

PB 119. St Peter Pori. Guernsey. 0481-78715 
<m) FulurGAM S' 
imIGAMAr " 


tw) Formula Selection Fd.. 
Id) Fond Italia. 


53943 
_ $3566 

S 1.16 

61.18 

*15.97732 

- 589633 

— X 1867 
SF 71A9S 

5 737 


Iw) GAMertco Inc- 
(w) GAM Boston in 


Iwl GAM Emilia 

(w) GAM Frenc-val- 


td 1 GAM Irrternabenol Inc. 
Iwt GAM North America Inc. 


Iwl GAM N. America Unit Trust. 

Iwl GAM Pacific me 

(ml GAMrtat Corp.. 


' lr * ,nrt Securities Fund - 

«t I Investa DWS 

iISMn tr ) Invest Allanttaues. 


SF 7241 

. . . i M IM 8 riP MIIU HU w mm S2B36 

(d I Gaventm. Sec Fund* — 191.93 

* Id ) Frankt-Trust mterzlns DM 4368 

Iw) Houseman* Hides. N.V .512)44 

*,'355 (w) Hestta Funds 110736 

(w) Horizon Fund S 130963 

(ml IBEX Holdings LM SF 11360 

JlirS I») I LA inti Gold Bend 5 10.16 

*1°%% td ) inlertund SA S15J9 

Iw) intarmorhet Fund 531062 

5 iAHS td ) Interm Inlng Mat. Fd. CI.'B'— 557X93 

_ *1040 
DM5143 
— 5 766 
_ *1437 
. S 11248 

. . . . S 10139 

S 944 lm> Jeffer Ptns. Intt Ltd 5 11357 JD 

* 1441 f tf f KMmuort BpnsontnlT Fd-—. *2X32 

1. sin 

sair? td i Lelcom Fund S 139044 

5 10,70 to Leverage Cap Hold..— — s 18341 

111M Id 1 Uquibcer 1132640 

51548 (w) Luihind 5 7149 

110.99- Im) Magnaheid N.V S 18526 

—Id I G.T. Global Technlgv Fd 511.70 Jtf J Medlolanimi Sul. Fd SltS« 

—Id I G.T. Honshu Pat Minder 5 73.91 lb > if* 1 *?™ Y 

(d ) g.T. in vestment Fund-— 5 1 BJO Iw) naat . ■ S 1062 

s«43 IdJNttWGrowJhPdCkwFd S8JQ5S6 

-Idl G.T. Technotogy Fund- *1533 clxmn 

— (d ) G.T. South Chine Fund _ 5 1433 S’ 

HILL SAMUEL (NVESTJWGMt. INTL SA (w) NJUVI4 S 16046 

Jersey. PA Box 61. Tel 05347609 (m) H5P fit 516960 

Berne, PA Bex 3602, Tel 4131 274051 (d I Pacific Horiasn invt. Fd 1148531 

— Id I Crossbow (Far East I— SF 1033 (w) PANCURRI Inc 51866 

-Id I CSF (Botanced) SF 2635 (, ) Parian 5w. R Eel Geneva SF 149740 

—Id ) InlnL Bond Fund 59.71- [r ) Per mol value N.V . S 138466 

—Id ) Ini. Currency U3 - S26.19 (blPleloctes S 1044.96 

— WIITFFfl (Technology) 5 7X39 (Wj PSCO Fund N.V. 5 732,72 

— (d ) CSm Fd (N. AMERICA! — 57932 (wl PSCO IML N.V S 10566 

Id I Puinam mn Fund 5 6546 

lb) Prsw-Tech. .... 1BW.7D 


Iw) GAM SterL & Inti Unit Trust 

lip) GAM Systems Inc - - . 

IwI G^WorMwjdy me— *'S-iS |r ) Italtartuna Infl Fund l 

(m) GAM TytheSA-ChnsA— S 12)48 (w) Japan Selection Funa. 
G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. <"* PodHc Fund. 

—Iwl Berry Poc Fd. Ltd. — 

1 GT AsSnH. k! M h-'f 4 Si 248 Fd 

— (wl AT. AUa Fund S 193 !*! Korea Growth Trust . 

—id I G.T. Australia Frxid 

—Id ) G.T. Europe Fund— 

—lit) At. Cura Small Cos. Fund 
— Id I G.T. Dgllar Fitod 
—Id ) G.T. Band F ~ 


EBC TRUST C0.IJERSEY) LTD. 

M Seale 5 LSI. HeUer:1K34-J6331 i - __ 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. "> 

8 [(f) inc: Std 51046 Oiler- — SNU82 * S!m?n»ilt ’ 

§ia)Ca>.:BM 511.11 Oiler SI 1663 !2!S!S1S?S^ 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 


5 4325.94 
LF 233840 
LF 145548 


id I Reserve Insured Deposits- 5 109264 

"V-1 rKrt r w " "t 1 nun (w) Samurai PerHollo SF 10430 

lid i short Term A’ dStT , ~' 5*1 a2er ' I> 1 SCi/Tech. SA Luxembourg 5 9.78 

lid 5*Srt 7^ -0‘ AcSwnT - *51 1845 iw) Seven Arrows Fund N.V S 731.93 

OHdri — Amo: Iwl State St. Bank Eouirv Hdo6NV 1945 

z i ^22?' ,DW 1 (W) sirotegy Investment Fund— 5214? 

-Iwi Long Term 5 2246 ) Svn ia* LhLTCIo» AV S*45 

JARD1N6 Fleming. POO 70 GPOHB KB (w) Toenne Growth Fund— _ SFS463 

— <b) J.F Australia 1 185 (w) Takvo Pac Hold. (Sea) $91.13 

- - 53447 [ml Tokvg Poc HeML N.V.—— $ 12*49 

Y 4614 (w) Transpoeifle Fund 57943 

Y 19413 Id t Turauolse Fund 5 10635 


— (b ) j.F Hong Kong Trust, 
— (b ) J.F Jason Trust, 


—lb | J.F Japan Technology — 
— Iw) J.F Korea Growth Trust _ 


— lb) J-F Pacific SOCS.IACCI. 


KW twt TmedvArawn* n.v£lassA 123234? 
$ (w) Tweaw Arowne n.v£ta»8 5146642 


1569 (ml Tweeay^rawne (U.K.I rtv. s 140840 
■ ■ nvnva.wv Id 1 UN1CO Fund DM 8140 

LL .? Y P? . B/> l < K *”* Ge »? l .° U id I UNI Band Fund 5141661 

» Hgwta n]T Dollar- * IIS* {D j uni Capilal Fund— — — 5 112734 

— f » !"!!* i u l“S£ — Si 3 If® (»*i vond««H ashib su» 

— f-lw) Ltoyas Ini I Growth SF 18630 m » wnrix c,«iH c a 51163 

—Mw) Lloyds inn Income — SF 32450 i-unu^* * ha, 

DM — Deutsche Mark; BF - Belgium Francs: FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs: SF — Swiss Francs: a — ashed; + — ■ Otter Prices ;b — old 
change p/v STD to 51 oer unit: NA — Noi Available; N.C— NotCommun1calod;a— 
now; S — suspended; S/S — Slock Split; ■ — Ex- Dividend; ■■ — En-Rts; •“ — 
Grass Performance index May; • — Redempt-Pricp- Ex-Coupon; •• — Formerly 
Worldwide Fund Lid; £ — OHer Price ineL 3% nruim. charge. M- — Baity stack 
price a* On Amslerdom Stock Exchange 


— xv.x-id.uxj. iii ts mn idisi? 4 j i uisfi i »i8 id m is ii u u if is m i«u i? iir.li il r l* l + U I? Id li II i;.M IS I* Is II IIeM |j< ISsIS 





Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 







































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 





T 


m 





SWITZERLAND 

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OR AHOLISB 

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(Continued From Back Page) 


USA 

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Amid Computer Slump, Olivetti Faces Problems 




(Continued from ftige 11) 
does not mean our U.S. situation is 
that bad," he said, adding that 
largely because of the agreement 
with AT&T and a similar market- 
ing deal with Xerox Corp, tbe 
United Stales last year emerged as 
the company’s largest market out- 
side Italy, accounting for about 10 
percent of group sales. 

But some financial analysis are 
puzzled about Olivetti’s strategy. 
“It is difficult to figure out which 
way the company is going, and 
whether basically it is trying to be 
in consumer electronics or in the 
technology business." said John B. 
Abbink, an analyst with Merrill 
Lynch Pierce Tenner & Smith Inc. 
in New York. 

Analysts cite the fad that in Ja- 
pan, OD vein's sixth-largest foreign 
market, annual sales have stagnat- 
ed at about 160 billion lire during 
the past several years, mainly be- 
cause of intense competition from 
Japanese producers and because 
Olivettfs products were not de- 
signed for the Japanese market, la 
May, Olivetti and Toshiba, which 
generates one-third of its $! U bil- 
lion in sales from electronics, an- 
nounced a “strategic alliance” 
which some industry analysts said 
would indude AT&T. 

In the end it did not. and on July 
3 the U.5. company announced 
that it was joining Japanese compa- 
nies on its own to compete with 
other companies in the £7- billion 
Japanese lelecomimi nications mar- 
ket. “Many of ns thought that Oli- 
vetti would be there with AT&T, 
and we now axe wondering what 
the Olivetti-AT&T deal really adds 
up to" said Philip de MaroIIac, a 
London-based analyst with 1DC 
Europa Ltd. 

Mr. de Benedetti played down 
the importance of the Toshiba pact, 
saying that h was aimed at' helping 
Olivetti increase its credibility and 




penetration in the Japanese mar- 
ket. Thai is bong achieved through 
the 20-percent shareholding To- 

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shiba has bought in Olivetti's Japa- 
nese subsidiary, whose S80 nufijon 
in sales last year were generated by 
office automation equipment. Sev- 
eral joint projects are being stud- 
ied. 

The following are some prob- 
lems facing Olivetti: 

•In the United Slates, Docu- 
td/Olivetti Corp^ a Dallas-based 
manufacturer of automated cash 
dispensers in which Olivetti has a 
46-percent interest, has reported 
increased losses and declining sales 
for over a year. The company re- 
ported that its first-quarter net loss 
rose to S9.9 minion on sales of 
$24.8 million, from $8.2 million on 
sales of $36.9 million a year ago. 
Mr. Piol blamed the banking envi- 
ronment in the United States, "the 
fact that we did not handle the 


Carlo de Benedetti. 

merger in the right way initially," 
and mismanagement. 

Conceding (hat “we have disap- 
pointed our shareholders.” Mr. 
Benedetti said that be was hopeful 
that Docu lei’s other shareholders, 
who control 34 percent of the com- 
pany, will approve a merger agree- 
ment signed April 30 under which 
Olivetti will acquire the remaining 
outstanding shares for $5.50 a 
share. There currently are about 
6,800 shares outstanding. Assum- 
ing shareholders approve the plan 
at a meeting on July 17, Mr. de 
Benedetti was optimistic that Oli- 
vetti would “turn the situation 
around." He added that he could 
not be more specific until the plan 
bad been approved. 

•In Britain, a decision is expect- 
ed within about a week cm whether 
or not to rescue Acorn Computer 
Group PLC, in which Olivetti ac- 
quired a 49 L3-perenl imeresi with 
an option to buy the majority. 
Acorn. Britain's leading micro- 
computer company specialized in 
education, needs at least £13 mil- 
lion in fresh financing, and Olivetti 
is prepared to provide one- third. 
But Mr. de Benedetti, brushing off 
widespread rumors in London that 
he intended to puQ out of Acorn, 
said that “similar sacrifices" should 
be made by the company’s British 
creditors, notably AB Electronics, 
a components maker. 

Assuming that the financing is 
arranged through Acorn’s bank. 
Close Brothers, Ohvetti is prepared 
to organize a corporate rescue plan 
for Acorn. Meantime, a former 
IBM executive has been'picked to 
become managing director of the 


Olivetti's chairman. 

company to implement the plan. 
Mr. de Benedetti said- “Acorn rep- 
resents about 1 percent of our sales, 
whereas Doculel is a real problem." 

•In France, Olivetti's second- 
largest market outside Italy, a dis- 
pute has emerged over a June 19 
letter that CGE's chairman, 
Georges Pebereau. sent to Mr. de 
Benedetti regarding the building of 
a plant to build new-generaiion 
electronic typewriters. The joint 
project was established in late 19S3 
as part of an agreement in which 
ClT-AlcateL CGE’s telecommuni- 
cations subsidiary, acquired the 
French-controlled interest in Oli- 
vetti of 10 percent The French gov- 
ernment approved the deal related 
to the shareholding, but linked it to 
the building of the plant, which 
would involve on investment of 
about 200 million francs (currently 
about $22 million), creating badly 
needed jobs. 

“We were notified recently that 
they were not prepared to go 
through with the project," Mr. de 
Benedetti said, referring to CGE. 
As a result, Olivetti plans to drop 
the project, Mr. de Benedetti ana 
Mr. Piol said. They indicated that 
CGE had riled as the main reason 
“oversaturation" of (he European 
typewriter market 

However, CGE executives in 
Paris, speaking on the condition 
they not be identified, described 
Olivetti's version of events as 
“false." The June 19 letter, they 
said, was the last of several unsuc- 
cessful efforts by Mr. P&bereau to 
move the project forward. “Mr. de 
Benedetti had refused all our pro- 
posals, and the last letter was to 


remind him that he had obligations 
to us under the 1983 agreement 
with us and the French govern- 
ment" an executive said. “It is 
false to say we are abandoning the 
project." lie added. 

•In Italy, Mr. de Benedetti, de- 
spite powerful political opposition, 
is confident that he will succeed in 
implementing his agreement to ac- 
quire control of a stale-owned food 
company. Soricta Meridionafe Fin- 
anziari Sp A. The accord was signed 
April 29 with lstituto per la Ricos- 
truzione Industrials. Italy’s large, 
government-owned holding com- 
pany. with the full backing of its 
chairman. Romano Prodi. He is en- 
couraging privatization of IRI’s 
vast holdings, which include the 
nation's radio and television net- 
work and Alitalia, the national air- 
line. But Mr. Craxi recently over- 
ruled Mr. Prodi. stating he was 
opposed to the plan because the 
govern mem had not been ade- 
quately consulted, and called for 
new bids, which are currently being 
evaluated. 

Mr. de Benedetti emphasized 
that he was acting in the S\1E mai- 
ler as head or the syndicate erf 
bonks and family members, includ- 
ing the Olivetti and his own family, 
which controls a 22-perceni share 
of Olivetti, and that it was not di- 
rectly related to his strategy for (he 
company. “He. Carlo, is the only 
connection between us and SME" 
said Mr. PioL “and he has not re- 
duced the amount of time he 
spends on us." 

However, political observers in 
Italy predict that he is likely to 
become more embroiled in the af- 
fair, particularly following his alle- 
gations last month thai he bad been 
offered a bribe in connection with 
die SME bid. He declined to pro- 
vide further details, but Italian jus- 
tice officials have begun an investi- 
gation into his charges. 

“It is true that de Benedetti has 
won the support of the liberal pa- 
pers here, such as Corriere della 
Sera and La Stamp a. and even of 
the Communist Party, which op- 
poses Craxi." said an editor for one 
of the newspapers. “But he also is 
caught up m opposing powerful 
people, like Craxi, which may make 
political sense, but it may not help 
Olivetti." he added, noting that Mr. 
de Benedetti has long beeri a sup- 
porter of the Christian Democratic 
Party. 

Emphasizing that he was not 
changing his initial offer, to pay 
497 billion lire for the 64-percent 
interest in SME. Mr. de Benedetti 
said “the real scandal was that 1 did 
not pay" tangents, the bribe, and 
that In the end he would succeed in 
winning control of the company. 
“You will see," he said, adding 
“I’m really at my best when I'm 
solving problems." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 



PEANUTS 


T ^ V 

(WHrtyWt Cawfaft. 



BOOKS 


ARROGANT, PtDN'T I ? a THE ASSAULT 


Ml 


BLONDIE 

THE GUV IN THE CIRCUS 
COSTUME (S MY UNCLE ' 
RURs, THE HUMAN 
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l THE POOR GUV 
NEVS2 MARRIED 


HECCULQN'T PINP A «5|l , I'LL PRETEND ) VOU'RE , 
WOMAN OF THE RIGHT) ] I DiDNT -/aGOOD ! 
CAU0RE _ J \ HEAR THAT ] V WIPE r* 


7 W i 


ACROSS 


1 Jewish month 
5 With 30 Down. 

Sixth Sister 
9 Sirens of the 
silents 

14 Juan’s baby 
sister 

15 Long, long 
time 

16 Russian co-op 

17 A light 
portmanteau 

19 Shy. in 
Stuttgart 

20 Female felines 

21 "All that’s 

going... 1" 

22 Comic-strip 
toiler 

23 Knightly quest 

24 Otiose 

26 Ending for 
cash or 
bombard 

27 Kippur 

30 Seat of 

Presidio 
County, Texas 

33 Zola heroine 

35 Fugue ending 

36 Hebrew letters 

37 A first name in 
dogdom 

38 Contest game 
in Las Vegas 

39 Car-wash 
finale 

40 Hearth 
warmer 

41 Sluggish 


42 Asia ire- Rogers 
destination: 
1933 

43 Son of a Scot 

44 Distaff deer 
46 Third Sister 
48 Magician's 

word 

52 Second-hand 
deal 

54 Seventh Sister 

55 Mountain crest 

56 Fourth Sister 

58 Scrooge, for 
one 

59 Jai 

69 Of grapes 

61 Tender around 
Tampico 

62 Gam or 
Moreno 

63 Tennis 
sessions 


1 Feeling of 
doom and 
gloom 

2 J umna River 
city 

3 Father of 
Ahikar 

4 Fifth Sister 

5 Oxford 
student's 
expense 
account 

6 Olds’s 
namesakes 

7 Hither’s 
partner 

8 Ship's dir. 


7/ 12 '85 
9 Second Sister 
19 Chief: Prefix 

11 First Sister 

12 Jury type 

13 Swing around 
18 "That’s as well 

if I had 

...”: Swift 
21 Region 
23 Snared 
25 Make wealthy 

28 European 
boundary river 

29 Agora 

30 See 5 Across 

31 Partofetal. 

32 Take back 
property 

34 Melody 

35 General 
agreement 

38 Coyote State 
capital 
40 Lot 

43 Ovett and Coe 
45 Roman 
harvest 
festival 

47 San .city 

near San 
Francisco 

49 Healing 
substance 

50 Host's offering 

51 Alleged 
natural forces 

52 Interchange 
feature 

53 One of five 
great ones 

54 Talk harshly 

56 Ares’ forte 

57 Actor Wallach 




BEETLE BAILEY 


I hearp the 

GENERAL GOT 
A LETTER FROM 
THE PENTAGON j 
TOW V 


> YES, HiS 
SUBSCRIPTION 
TO SOL PIERS 
. MAGAZINE 
V RAN OUT 




ANDY CAPP 


BYE, MUM. 
„SEEV0U , 
*AT BINGO \ 
TONIGHT J 


NOUWONT, 
FLO. I'M 
CUTTING > 

EXPENSIVE I 


GOOD FOR \OU. 
MISSUS. MOD . 
HANG ON TO < 
MOUR MONEY ) 


WIZARD of IP 

T it> toaAyz an a wiur 1 


*0 Nab York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



t uetH&r miner 

WF £ 
TAY&i CA$& Or 


HE!S A GREAT BELIEVER IN THRIFT. 
NOLI NEVER KN3WH»ei HEM8SMT 
NEED THEIR SAVW3S - ■ w 

TO HELP HIM OUT 


mpi 


mipway noose m 


R]EX MORGAN 


DON T GET UP, BRADY' 
I FORGOT AY PURSE ' 
I'LL B E RIGHT BACK 


n S 3 '- 



r A NO I'LL 
I BE RIGHT 
HERE, 

. DARLING/ 


I HOPE I CAN REACH 
JACK IN THE MORNING/ 
I'M ALMOST OUT / 


EPamOM 


By Harry Mulisch. Translated from the 
Dutch bv Claire Nicolas White. 1 85 pages. 
SI 3.95. 

Pantheon Books Inc. , 201 East 50th Street, 
New York, N. Y. 10022. 

By John Gross 

L IFE is complicated, but a few things seem 
7 straightforward enough. One winter night 
in 1945. a Dutch police inspector called Fake 
Ploeg is riding home on his-bicyde through the 
outskirts of Haarlem. Much of Europe has 
been libera tai, but the Netherlands is still 
occupied, and Ploeg is as vicious a collaborator 
as the country can show, a man infamous for 
his cruelty. Suddenly, six shots ring out — the 
Resist anti has settled accounts with him. Here 
is a case of simple justice being done. 

But life is complicated, and in no time at all 
the shooting has began to have unlooked-for 
repercussions. Ploeg falls dead outside a house 
on the quayside — one of a group of four, the 
home of a sailor called Koneweg and his 
daughter. Their neighbors, a family called the 
Steenwijks, peer out of the window, and to 
their horror they see the Kortewegs dragging 
the. body in from of the Sceenwgk house. 

Peter, the elder of the Steenwijk sons, thinks 
they should either return the unwanted gift to 
the Kortewegs or shift it in front of the house 
on the other side, which belongs to the 
Beumers, an inoffensive retired lawyer and his 
wife. By a perverse logic, he reasons that if 
Ploeg had oeen bit a Tew seconds later, he 
would be lying outside the Beumers’ anyway. 
When his parents try to stop him, he breaks out 
of the bouse, grabs the body by the boots and 
then hesitates, »mnertain in which direction to 
move it; before be can decide, a detachment of 
Nad troops shows up, and he runs off. 

After a brutal search, the house is burned 
down as a reprisal and Mr. and Mrs. Steenwijk 
are taken, away — as it turns out, to their 
deaths. Peter’s younger brother, a 12-year-old 
called Anton, watches helplessly; then he is 
driven off to the police station. Subsequently 
he is released and sent to stay with his unde 
and aunt in Amsterdam, but not before he has 
undergone two more searing experiences. He 
spends the night in a darkened ceD with a 
member of the Resistance who has been in- 
jured — she lalks to him about her life and her 
ideals in a wav he can barely understand: and 
he sees a middle-aged German soldier who has 


Sotohm to Prev i ous Puzzle 


□□□no 0000 naaa 
□□ana 0000 010013 
□Edna aasananna 
EEOEjaaa^ninniHa 
000O00 000 000 

□□□ □□00 mannaa 

□0D0Q0 0HD0 

□□□□□□□ansa 
□Eon Hannan 
□Goans □□□□ □□□ 
000 000 000D0Q 

0000QD000Qa00 
□□□□□□□□0 GJ0EHDD 

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tried to protect him from bring killed when it- 
convoy in which they are tramline is attacked 
from the air. 

This is how "The Assault" opens. The rot c 
Harm Mulisch $ remarkable novel is dr-otw 
to unraveling the consequences of tiui uw 
fateful nighL Anton grows up determine io 
put the past behind him. He become*' a 
cessfu) anesthesiologist (a symbolic choice c\ 
career, but the symbolism is handled lts.-t-> l 
he marries, has a child, remarries, has 
child, lives a quiet life, adopts a stance ■- : j 
mildly ironic detachment. But in a sen* e- 
episodes spaced over 35 years, the experience? 
that he warns to forget reassert themselves 

Not only are there pent-up emotions ih.tt 
have to be unlocked ana memories that hav-' !•' 
be confronted before they can be exorcise-- 
There are also nagging riddles. Why did the 
Kortewegs, decent people, act in the way :he> 
did? Even if they were in a panic, what made 
them choose to endanger the Steenw ijk ■> ~ 

family with children, with w hom the Kortcwcg 
daughter, at least, was on friendly terms — 
rather than dumping the body in front of their- 
other neighbors, the Aartses. a childless couple 
who had always held themselves aloof? W hat 
exactly happened to Peter after he disap- 
peared? There are other puzzles, too. about the 
original shooting as well as its aftermath. 

Anton does not actively pursue these ques- 
tions: on the contrary, most of the time he tries 
to keep them at bay. But they force themselves 
on him. piecemeal and the urge to get at the 
truth about them is what gives “The Assault" 
its narrative thrust. At one level the book can 
be read as a detective story, of the superior 
Simenon variety, with intriguing twists and 
turns and a definite solution. 

It is also a morality tale (though one that 
does not point out any easy moral), a dark 
fable about design and accident, strength and 
weakness, and the ways in which guilt and 
innocence can overlap and intermingle. There 
are multiple ironies in the drama that binds- 
together Steenwijks. Kortewegs. Beumers.. 

• Aartses. Resistance fighters — and the Pioegs. 
too (for Fake Ploeg has a son). Tragic ironics.- 
with nothing facile or contrived about them: 
and ironies, it should perhaps be added, that 
are never allowed to diminish our sense of the 
pure evil of the regime against which the initial 
violence in the story is directed. 

For a book to have deeply serious intention;., 
as this one does, is of course no guarantee of 
artistic success. But Mulisch also brings excep- 
tional skill and imagination to his task. Town- ( 
scapes and interiors are firmly delineated — 1 
diene or not, you can hardly help being re- 
minded of the clarity of Dutch painting; char- ; 
acters are established with a deft economy: inJ 
the opening pages. Anton’s small-boy reac- 
tions, the stolid humanism of his father, the 
adolescent impatience of his brother are all 
equally convincing, and as the storv develops, a 
hundred small touches sustain the effect of 
psychological truthfulness. There is a particu- 
larly strong feeling for the way the past- 
changes as each new layer accrues. 

While there is nothing 10 suggest that “The ' 
Assault" is in any way autobiographical. Mu-- 
lisch’s family background has obvious relc- ‘ 
vance to a stoty of jpersonal conflict and uocer-.» ■ 
tainty with a wartime setting. He was born in * 
1927, and (hough his mother was Jewish — her 
family was murdered by the Nazis — his father- 
was jailed for being a collaborator. 

John Gross is on the staff of The Nerv York 
Times. 


By Alan Truscott 


"Did TtXJ ASK FOR A BOY WHEMTDU 6OTME,0RUfD 
"rOU LET THE -DOCTOR SURPRISE YOU ?* 




GARFIELD 

SINCE VOtTVE BEEN RAISE? BV 
SQUIRRELS, £P, WOO HAVE A LOT 
TO LEARN ABOUT ^ 
BEING A CAT _ 


.WHAT IS y /THAT ISA J 
l THAT? fi POG. CAT5< 
(ARE AFRAID i 


Unscramble them taw Jumbles. 

one loner to each square, to tom) 
tour ordinary words. 




NAPOR 


DRENER 


NAMMAD 




Print answer here: 


i 




J?M 04V95 


v-A four-spade opening in 
third seat ended the auction, 
and West guessed well by lead- 
ing a dub: A heart opening 
would have given away a cau- 
dal trick. 

The defense took the first 
three tricks, and West not un- 
naturally tried to cash his dia- 
mond ace. This might have 
been right, but proved fatal 

Sooth ruffed and did some 
card-reading. West would not 
have led a dub if he had an A- 
K combination in diamonds, 
so East had to have the the 
diamond long. That gave him 
10 points in the minor suits 
ana he had failed to open the 


BRIDGE 


bidding. It was clear that West 
held aD. or nearly &Q of the 
missing red-suit honors: the Q- 
J of hearts and the jack of 
diamonds. 

A squeeze against West for 
the 10th trick was therefore 
more plausible than a squeeze 
against East, but it needed 
some preparation. Dummy 
was entered with a trump lead 
to the queen, and the diamond 
queen was led. This was the 


ferine to West the duty of 
guarding diamon d^ 

Once the diamond king hpd 
been removed by ruffing. 
South ran aBhis trumps. West 


and South made a heart trick 
at the finish to bring home his 
game. 


NORTH (D) 

V K IQ 7 4 
O Q 10 5 5 

* J87 

uni sir 

111,11 OK87B2 
* A K 10 5 

SOUTH 

4AKI 20 9 74 
VAt) 

O — 

• 90S 


WEST 

*05 

?q862 

«AJI3 
-• Q 4 2 


Nc&bcr ride was vntnanlde. The 

tiiAidl 

P lHuflt g. 


Pws Pass 4* Pan 


tion to save the diamond jack, west led u* dob two. 


Now arrange the circled letters lo 
term the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Wirld Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse July 11 

doting prion in load aimnria unless otherwise indicated. 


(Answers tomorrow) 

JumtHeK TWEAK JOKER TURTLE DAMPEN 
Answer What a bureaucrat Is— A RED TAPE WORM 


WEATHER 


17 

63 

It 

64 

30 

06 

20 

68 

22 

73 

25 

77 

28 

02 

25 

77 

21 

70 

19 

66 

32 

90 

2* 

79 


HIGH 

L 

e 

P 

e 

30 

84 

22 

29 

84 

24 

32 

to 

26 

29 

84 

25 

31 

88 

24 

28 

82 

22 

35 

95 

27 

30 

86 

25 

34 

93 

27 

30 

<6 

24 

32 

90 

17 

34 

93 

20 


72 

St 

75 

r 

TV 

fr 

77 

Stl 

75 

0 

72 

r 

81 

Ir 

77 

St 

>1 

cl 

75 

0 

63 

fr 

68 

fr 

— 

no 

70 

0 

50 

rr 

75 

0 

53 

d 

66 

Ir 


Hoechst 

HOMCtl 

Horten 

Hussel 

IWKA 

Kali + Sale 

Karstodt 

KOuftKrf 

Kloockner H-O 


Kkmckiw Work* 44J0 dSJQ 
KruppSh*l 114 108 

Linde 53LS0 51Z80 


mSO 23150 Hhrsjd Steel 
112 I1CLS0 Kioerf 
105 179 JO Nodbank 
308 305 Pres Stem 
324S0 276J0 Rusntal 
293 288 SA Brews 

245 239 SI Helena 

267 25750 Sami 
S3 200 West Holding 


505 510 

F.T.3S index : nMS 
1S2 IS Prertous : T23.il 
fSS F-TAE-T0S Index ! 123US 

'SS ’SS Prcvioas : 121MS 
870 870 

3225 3300- 
MS Ml 


114 108 S” 1 

9m <n 512J0 I 
211 2O3J0 
188 172 I 

198 192 

7000 1950 


Comp osite Stock ladox : NA 
Previous : NA. 


Lufthansa 211 2O3J0 

MAN US 172 

Monnesmonn 198 192 

MUCTJCtl Ruecfc 7000 1950 

Nlxdorl 548 5to 

PKI 618 60S 

Porsche 14M 1395 

Preussae 277 278 

PWA 158J0 153 

RWE 183 176 

Rfieftimstall 290 l50 293 

Sdarlns 496 476 

SEL 356J0 34220 

Slenums 564 542 

Thyssen lUJfliWJB 

Vsbo 223 215 

VqlkswogemnerK 31950 304J0 


CeainterzMnk index : 142U0 

Previous : 131740 


an p, CBS Geal index : 21X50 
previous : 115.10 


BmumelH 


50 

Cl 

70 

fr 

66 

PC 

59 

PC 

57 

PC 

55 

fr 

73 

fr 

73 

oc 

72 

PC 

75 

St 

61 

fr 

64 

r 

75 

cl 

68 

fr 

57 

fr 

55 

fr 

43 

tr 

64 

PC 

r-raln; 

r. 

enn 

64- 

-52 




Rmfcfart 


m 


Ml B Current index : 1513 
Preview : 1505 


AGA 

Alto Laval 
Atea 

Astra 

Atlas Copco 
B oiWen 
Electro hue 
Ericsson 
Esselfe 

Handetsbanfcan 

Phamwcio 

5006-Sctmia 

Sandvlk 

Skonslw 

SKF 

SwedlsfiAVitrJi 

Volvo 

Af firm s im man | 
Pre v i ou s : 36L48 


AC I 
ANZ 

BMP 

Boroi 

Bougainville 

CosnemoHw 

Coles 

ComoiCB 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunloe 

eiders Ixi 

ICI Austral kt 

Mogwhjn 

MIM 

Myer 

Nor Awt Book 
News Caro 
N Broken Hill 
Poseidon 
OMCoolTrusT 
Sonia 

Thomas Nation 
Western Mining 
WestPoe Boridiw 
Woodside 


All Ontleories Index : nun 
Preview ifftSJI 


JJS 

7B7 183 

si m 

% % 
HJQ. 370 
162 IS 

jg 

400 4W 
NJX 370 
S1JD 81J0 
227 216 

TS9 IKS 
213 207 


2J6 276 

I trackei/DJ. tadex : 128SS.W 
AS W0 Pievlogs : 12012J7 
148 US Hew index : 1MU? . . . 
]S9 2M | Prevfaos : 195755 
6X2 656 
152 3J0 
1X8 157 

Ul SS9 

394 34)4 


U7 147 
107 104 

IDS 106 
220 220 
277 278 
3 110 
4M 442 

(£6 6J0 

226 226 
155 162 

172 174 

540 546 
210 210 
195 195 
471 445 
.142 1X3 


Afcai 

Asofil Chcm 

Asehl Glass 

Bank at Tokyo • 

Biidseslcne 

Canon 

Casio 

ciron 

Dal Nlpoon Print 
Dofwa House 
Dai** Securities 
Ponuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 


39* 400 

865 « 

870 875 

VS. 887 

$43 550 

1010 - 1100 
1540 1580 
468- 463 

nio mo 

713 722 

1000 1040 
7400 7540 
■ 1800 1840 
1870 1910 


Mealrea! // 



l 




































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 


Pagel' 


SPORTS 


:V 


■i 

,? n ?■ ft. 

??: !V -I- *.>/ 

;.r .. . 

■* :. 

*£u-. "] -. 2i ri"^ ^ i, r 

•js». *- !«>. 




Baseball’s 'Tight Night’ P ains Many 


-y 

1 •*: :[‘i 


ALPINE HIGH —Riders in the Tour de France got a scenic if firing view of die Alps during Wednesday’s competition, 
between Morzine and Lans-en-Vercors. Thursday, Eric Vanderaerden of Belgium was the surprise winner of the 13th 
stage, a 31 -8-kilometer (19.7-mfle) individual time trial, although Bernard Hinault of France increased Ins overall lead. 

Indianapolis: Bigger Games Than Pan Am’s 


;S '• 4 '. 

A" " 

ftr - > 1 , 

A‘wji 
A fr>- 


A *p-.> 
AiU'i 

A- J» • 
A. - 
m.lrr 


By Frank Litsky 

Mew Tor* Times Sendee 

INDIANAPOLIS — The 1987 py » w 
i. Indiana! 


homeless, the 36-nation Pan Amt- international sports events to Indi- 
ican Sports Organization was bap- anapolis. In tom, the Indiana 


Pan American Games were sched 
nkd for Santiago, Chile, until polit- 
ical unrest ana a lack of money led 
the organizers to relinquish them. 
They were transferred to Quito and 
Guayaquil, Ecuador, until Ecuador 
derided last November it could not 
afford fhwn 

Enter Indianapolis, a once- 
skepy city of 725,000 thatisquieily 
trying to become the amateur 
spots capital of the United States. 
Indianapolis really wanted the 


to award them last December to 
ipolis. 

• Now everything is 
well for this Western Hemisphere 
version of the Olympics, mainly 
because of an effective formal and 
informal chain of rwmmand and 
finance. The games will be orga- 
nized by a group known as 
PAX / L which stands for the 10th 
Pan American Games ! Indiana- 


tiern,. conceived in 

1979, is 

Endowment. Much of the endow- 
ment’s money comes from the fam- 
ily that founded Eli Lilly and Co., 
the drug manufacturer with head- 
quarters in Indianapolis. 

The organizers' only immediate 
cm was cash flow. The United 


Guerrero Hamm, 
Goes to Hospital 

Compiled br Our Staff From Dtspmthes 

PITTSBURGH — It was “tight 
night” in major league baseball 

Nine of the 13 games played 
Wednesday evening were decided 
by one run, and the four one-run 
games in the National League 
tightened both divisional races. 
Tightest of all however, was Pedro 
Guerrero's back. 

The Los Angeles Dodgers' out- 
fielder had to be helped from the 
field in Three Rivers Stadium when 
muscle spasms rendered him un- 
able to even walk. Thursday, after 
his team had flown to Chicago, be 
was taken to a hospital for exami- 
nation. 

Guerrero first injured his back 
while c h a s i ng Johnny Ray’s double 
in the fourth mning of the Dodgers' 
5-4 victory over the Pirates. Be- 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

tween innings, Guerrero adjourned 
to the locker room for emergency 
treatment. 

When he emerged in the fifth, the 
Dodgers had closed to 4-3, with 
Mariano Duncan on third base and 
two oul Having hit 15 home runs 
since June 1, Guerrero wanted to 
try to bat despite the pain. 

“I just wanted to go out there 
and try one swing to see if 1 could 
tut,” he said. “That's what I did — I 
took one swing." 

The ball landed over the left- 
center Grid wall for Guerrero’s 21st 
homer this season and his 11th 
game-winning RBI. 

“When I tut the ball I dropped 
my head becanse I was in terrible 
pain," he said. “I knew I hit it good. 
All I was thinking was that I had to 
get to first base. Then the tying ran 
would score." • 

He managed an agonizingly 
slow, limping jog around the bares, 
barely making it to borne plate. 

“Man, I was hurting," Guerrero 
said. Team doctors said he will be 


ei- 


polis and is pronounced “paxee.” 

PAX /I is an offshoot of the 

■ Indiana Sports Corporation, a pri- ing here, the USOC executive com- 

American Games. But vately funded nonprofit organiza- imttee voted a $2 million line of 
= — “Wien the 1987 games became tion that brings many national and credit. 


SCOREBOARD 


Fiat anti Fob 
! Sign F.rediiPi 
For s30 Ml 


Cycling 


Baseball 


Tour de France 


MEN 

iMrtawrtti Slaw 


Wednesday’s Major League line Scores 


\\ \ 


r--. 


:L'.> 


V... 


f»iJ kilometer individual llm* trial) 

L EricVondaraentoa. M*taiNV41 mins 4 
€3 

2. Barnard Hinault. Prone*. 1:07 behind 
X TWwtt Marl*. Prance, at 1:00 
4, GUbert Ductao-Lanaito. France at 1:17 
X Marc Sergewit. Belgium, at 1:23 
4. BW n Rotate. Ireland. at 103 
--•l 7. Ja*i Petler. France, at 1:27 

V". . ft WMi Anderson, Australia, at 1:31 
' - 9. inaW Gaston. Strata. at 1:39 

C ' » Soon Kelly. Ireland, at 1:42 

11 . Khn Andersen. D ni wwrt. at lg 
’■ IX G*rrlt Solleveld, HalkaKL at 1:57 
tx Jen* Nlldam. Holland. at 2:01 
14. Steve Bauer. Canada, at 2:13 
’-’T*#* Sean Yates, Britain. at 2:14 
* \V?I*. Maarten DucraL Holland, at 2:19 
17. Czeslaw Lana, Poland, at 2:21 
-j lft Laurent BlondL From*, at 2m 
19. Oraa Lemond. ux. at 2:30 
EL Jaxef Uoduns. Belfltum. at 2:39 
. V-; OvafnH Leaders 

1. Bernard Hinault, France. 43:32; 19. 

■ ‘ x Gr*o Lemond, ux. at 5:39 bablnd 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Kansas CM* 4M Ml «M-S 4 7 

New Yerfc ISO M0 1*1-4 12 ■ 

GuMczn, OulsanbeiTv 171 and woman. 
Sundbani |9)s Rasmussen. RlaMMl C*1 and 
wmegor. W-fibhcttL 7-4. L-OafsenOerrv. 
4* HRs— Kansas City. While (101, Brett 031. 
Hasten M* M* I9N-4 11 7 

OaUand eu 001 H»-5 9 1 

ONda. Clear (3), Stanley (71 and Sax. God- 
man «*); Krueger. Atherton (71. Hewed (B) 
and Tetttctan. W-Krueaer.X8. b-Oleda.+S. 
Sv — Howell (18). HRs— Boston, Nichols (11. 
Oakland, Baker (HI. 

Texas M* Ml MM 7 2 

Cleveland 1W DOS 801-1 2 2 

Hough and Brummer : Reed. Easterly (01 
art WUIordL W— Hough. HI b— Reod. 0-X 
HRs— Texas. O- Orton (101. McDbmnII (41. 
CMaaaa M M MM 5 0 

Detroll 0M MS tl»-l 4 1 

Major League Sta ndin g s 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. 


OB 


1 t’ 1 

1 Stonftan Roche. Ireland, at 4:08 

Taranto 

52 

32 

J19 

— 

17), Maretand 17). 


4.-5oan Rally. Ireland, at 4:35 

Detroit 

47 

34 

JN 

3VX 

New Yerk MO no aso-g 8 0 

i* 1 % NS 

• 1 Stove Bauer. Canada at 8:23 

New York 

45 

34 

.554 

Sib 

Ctadnootl 0M 1*0 880—1 4 0 

^ . ‘« ■ « ■ ‘ 
11 . ' .. 

4. Pftll Anderson. Australia ol 8:31 

Baltimore 

42 

39 

JI9 

Wi 

Aoullero and Carter; Browning. Franco (1) 
old Krtcofv. w— Aguilera. M. lr- Browning. 

i 7. Nil[| Rutttmona Switzerland, at 10131 

Boston 

42 

41 

-5D6 

9VS 


. . X Pascal Simon. Franco, at 11:11 

Milwaukee 

34 

44 

-450 ■ 

14 

7-7. HO-CIncInnatL Porker (15). 

'\ m .. 

9. Jaap ZHrtemctk, Hollcnd. at 11:14 
lft Pierre Basso, Franca at 12:39 

Cleveland 

27 55 

West DMtfcM 

339 

M 

LotAggetos wo » mo- 4 i * 

PUtsbuniti BM 440-0*0—4 14 2 

1 - 

WOMEN 

California 

49 

34 

sn 

— 

Reuse. Howell <H and Sdosda; Turned, 

‘■IT • 

Tenth Stage 

Oakland 

43 

40 

.511 

6 

Holland (5). Coidetarla (8) and Pena W— 

.r 

Around VHtont-an-Lnns. 

Chicago 

40 

40 

-500 

m 

Reusx 7-6. L— Tunnel L 0A Sv Howell (8). 


(446 kl tome tort.) 

Kansas CHv 

41 

41 

JW 

7W 

HR — Los Angelas, Guerrero U1L 

•* ‘ -'** ' 

1. VtMerto STirmwneL France, 7 hour. 43 

Seattle 

47 

42 

-4W 

• 

PMtaMFftta ON Mi MX— 0 4 2 

:r t J . . 

mtaatn. SB socondfc at on avoraae speed of 

Minnesota 

37 

44 

-457 

n 

Houston SM 1 a Mx — 10 14 1 


• TUN kM ns seconds bonus) 

Texas 

32 

52 

J81 

nvi 

Kooatnon. Childress (l),Rucker(5).Andfr- 


'. 1 Fouta Wnslher, Sweden. 1 :43J4 (10 tec- 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



sen (8) and VirgH ; Sam and Ashby, w— Scott. 



«d* bonus) 

X Marta Blower. Britain, Same Time (S 
stamds bonus] 

4- JMmk Lenaa. Prance. 1:4X37 
-X Petra Stooherr, West Germany. *J- 
\ k Marta Canlns. Italy, U. 

V 7. Chantal Broca, France, sJ. 

X Janette Parks, UA- 1:4343 
Wans LL China U- 
imeUa CWopaa llotv. sJ. 

Overall leaders 
7 L Marla Canlns, Italy. 20:5141 
2. Jeoi e tl e Lanas, France. U minutes, 14 
*Kond» Behind Nader 
. X Dominique SaailanL France, at 17:20 
' *• Codle Odin. Prance, at 17:3S 
X I itn I da Chlappa, Italy, of 17:34 
4. PhvUta Hines. UA. at 18:37 
' 1. Chordal Broca. France, at 19 : 29 
X Hetaen Haan Holland, at 20:Z7 
' 9. Janeae Parks, UX. at 20:51 
■. IX Pascaie Ranucd. Franco, ed 21:07 


5L Louis 
Now York 

Montreal 

CMcoao 

PWkxtelpWo 

pmsburah 

San Dtaaa 

Los Angeles 

Cincinnati 

Houston 

Atlanta 

5an FroncNco 


East Dhrisioa 

W L Pet Gfi 
it 32 JOS - 
<7 35 573 SW 

48 34 J71 3Vi 

44 38 .543 SVS 

37 45 451 T3*i 

27 54 J03 22 

West Dhrisioa 

48 36 .571 — 

45 34 554 1W 

41 40 504 Ste 

42 42 5M 6 

35 47 427 12 

31 S3 549 17 


The organizers expect to proride 
their own cash from four main 
sources: television, commercial 
sponsorships, licensing and ticket 
sales. 

“The intent is to break even." 
said Sandy Knapp, the executive 
director of the sports corporation. 

“We think we wul succeed.” 

Ordinarily, that would be a large 

task because of the vastness of 

lates Olympic Committee's ad- there quadrennial games. The 36 m a day-to-day basis. 

Guerrero s home run sent Pitts- 
burgh to its fourth straight defeat, 
and handed Lee TutmelL, 0-6, his 
11th straight loss. Tunnril has not 
won since June 2, 1984, when be 
beat Montreal. 

Expos 6, Braves 5: In Atlanta, 
Mike Fitz^rakf s homer off Bruce 
Sutter, on the first pitch in the 1 Ith 
inning, won the game for Montreal. 
Bob Hornet's 12th homer for At- 
lanta. a two-run shot off Jeff Rear- 
don. had tied the score at 5 in the 
eighth. 

Cnbs 4, Padres 3: Davey Lopes 
hit a iwo-run homer and Keith 
Moreland followed with a solo shot 
in the seventh to beat San Diego in 
Chicago. Lopes went 3-for-3 with 
three RBI and threw out a runner 
at the plate from left fidd. 

Mets 2, Reds 1: Keith Hernan- 
dez doubled in the wanning run mid 
rookie Rick Aguilera pitched a six- 
hilter in Cincinnati as New York 
extended its winning streak to nine, 
its longest in nine yean and two 
short of the chib record. 

Astros 10, Phffies <k Mike Scott 
pitched a four-hitter in Houston 
and Jose Crnz and BOl Doran each 
. — r t- got three of the 14 hits against 
\ex.l to tiiat, the Q1 J-miDion phdadelphia. Jeny Koosmanfrilod 
Indiana Umversiiy Nataionum [q j-ftire a batter in the first inning 
wth its two 50-meter swimming Cudmals 7, Giants 3: Ozae 

pools and an 18-foot-deep diving ^ each hit two- 

s<m Dioea, MettoynoMs on), aiicoiia. loom weD. Ejqiem say there is no better nmhomere in Sl Louis to help beat 

f »~—4 c — San Francisco. Rookie Vince Cole- 
man stole two more bases for Sl 
L ouis, raising his major league- 
leading total to 59. 

Bine Jays U, Mariners 1: hi the 
American League, A1 Oliver, in his 
first game for Toronto since his 
trade Tuesday by the Dodgers, ho- 
mered, singled and drove in three 
runs in Seattle. He said it “frit very 
good to step right in, especially 
since I haven't played a game since 



hMmUmod Pros IrtamaMMl 

Ken Griffey went up the left field frail in Yankee Stadium, 
but not as high as Frank White’s grand slam home run for 
Royals in first inning Wednesday nighL Yankees won, 6-5. 


imnistrative committee alleviated member nations from North, South 
that with temporary loans of and Central America and the Ca- 
$142,000. Last month, ai its men- ribbeanwQl send 5,000 athletes and 

1,000 coaches and subport staff. 
From Ang. 7 to 23, 1987. they will 
compete m 26 sports. 

The budget will be smaller than 
might be expected because all the 
competition venues are in place: In 
a construction renaissance, mostly 
over the last decade. Indianapolis 
‘ has built the following outstanding 
facilities: 

• The $77.5 million, 61,000*eai 
dowaterwn Hoosier Dome, where 
the Indianapolis Colls sold out ev- 
ery' National Football League 
home game last year, their first sea- 
son out of Baltimore. 

• Adjoining the Hoarier Dome, 
. the huge, $I4-mfllion Convention 

Center. 

• A few blocks away, ibe $16.4- 
miUion, 17,000-seat Market Square 
Arena, home of the Indiana Pacers 
of the National Basketball Associa- 
tion. 

• A mile from downtown, the 
$7-mi]lioo Indianapolis Sports 
Center and its 24 tennis courts, 
borne of the annual U.S. day-court 


Soovar and Hill: Morris and Parrish. W— 
Morns. 1*4. L — Stayer. 8-7. 

MtaoHMa *04 000 00—7 4 1 

Baltimore BM ON 008—1 7 1 

viola, Davis (9) and Galas. Laudner (9): 
Badtflc Mr and Dempsey. W— Viata, IB-4. L— 
BodCDcfcar.94.Sv — Davis (10). HR—Mbmoxo- 
ta. Brunamfcv (19). 

MHutaOkO* *80 888 41*— 1 5 * 

Cantortaa W 841 10M— 2 1 0 

Burris and Moors; Romanlcfc and Boon*. 
W— Ranonlck. llM. Lr— Burr Li. 47. HRs— Cal- 
ifornia, Jackson |15), SdwftoM (4). AMlwau- 
In HooMhuldar (3). 

TOranta 141 454 211—11 13 ■ 

Saattta 414 444 44*— 1 5 1 

Ooncy.Coudir (0) and WMtt; wills. Snyihr 
(5) and Koonwy. Scott 15). W— CJoncy. 4-4. 
L— Wilts, 4-2. HRs— Toronto. Mutltalks (4). 
Masebv (4). Barflold CUU.CHIver (1 ), Botl (IS). 
Saattto. Tnomoa 113). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Stal Mato 420 144 044-1 4_ 1 

CMcoao 444 410 3SX—4 n 4 

Dravsckv. LsHorts (8) and Kannodv: San- 
dorsorvSmltMB) and Davis. W— 5and*rsan. 
5-4. u— Oravocfcv, Si Sv— Smith rril.HR*- 


the ninth to beat Kansas City in 
New York. Henderson — on base 
five straight times — had singled 
off Dan Quisenberry and stolen 
second for his third steal of the 
game, 41st this season. 

A's 5, Red Sox 4: In Oakland, 
California, Dusty Baker hit a 
bases-empiy homer and Mike 
Heath threw out Boston's potential 
tying ran at home plate in the 
ninth. 

Rangers 4, Indians 1: Charlie 
Hough pitched a two-hitter, both 
singles by Brett Butler, and Pete 
O'Brien hit a. two-run homer in 
Cleveland as Texas ended ..a four- 
game losing streak. The Indians 


scored on Hough's wild pitch in the 
ninth. 

Twins 2, Orioles I: Tom Brun- 
ansky's two-run homer in the top of 
the rfmth in Baltimore helped Min- 
nesota's Frank Viola ouiduel Mike 
Bod dicker. Bninansky's bit was 
only the fourth off Boddicken Vio- 
la allowed seven in eight innings. 

Angels % Brewers 1: Reggie 
Jackson and Dick Schofield ho- 
mered to back Ron Romanick's 
five-hitter against Milwaukee in 
Anaheim. California. Jackson's 
518th homer left him three shy of 
Ted Williams and Willie McCovey, 
who share eighth place in the re- 
cord book. (UPI.AP) 


Starters Are Set 
In All-Star Game 

The Assonuied Press 

NEW YORK — Tommy Herr of 
the Sl Louis Cardinals has over- 
taken the Chicago Cubs’ Ryne 
Sandberg in the final vote tabula- 
tion to win the starting job at sec- 
ond base for the National League 
All-Star team. 

In die American League, Rickey 
Henderson of the New York Yan- 
kees and Eddie Murray of ibe Bal- 
timore Orioles surged ahead in the 
final week to claim starting spots 
Thursday on that team. (See Score- 
board for the complete voting.) 

Herr, leading the major leagues 
in runs baited in and second in the 
NL in hitting, overcame a nearly 
32,000-voie deficit to beat Sand- 
berg by 58,629 ballots in the tight- 
est NL race. He becomes the fourth 
NL starter at the position in the last 
four years, following Davey Lopes. 
Steve Sax and Sandberg. 

Henderson, the leading hitter in 
the. major leagues, finished second 
among AL outfielders behind 
teammate Dave Winfield after 
pushing past the California Anj 
Reggie Jackson. Henderson 
been fourth in the balloting a week 
ago, 15,000 votes short of the top 
three. 

Boston’s Jim Rice got the third 
starting spot in the AL outfield, 
just ahead of Jackson, who was 
bidding for a 12th All-Star starL 
Rice win be starting in the game for 
the fourth time, but the first time 
since 1980. 

Murray made up a 30.000-vote 
gap to overtake California's Rod 
Carew at first base. Carew had his 
streak of 15 straight All-Star starts 
ended; he had been named every 
year since 1970, when the balloting 
was returned to the fans, winning 
election at second base from 1970- 
75 and at first from 1976-84. 

Graig Nettles, 40, of the San Die- 
go Padres won the NL's third base 
assignment and will start for the 
first time for that league, breaking 
a siring of six straight selections for 
Philadelphia's Mike Schmidt, 
whom the Phillies switched to fust 
base earlier this year. Nettles was 
an AL starter in 1975 and a 1980 
replacement for the injured George 
BretL 

The pitchers and remaining 
members of both teams will be se- 
lected later. 

The 56th All-Star Game will be 
played the night of July 16 in Min- 
neapolis. The NL holds a 35-19 
lead with one tie in the series that 
began in 1933, having wot J2of the 
last 13 games. 20 of the last 22 and 
25 of the last 28. 


Owners’ Storied Books Tell Many Tales 

Each Side Sums Up Different Figures in Contract Talks 


B-4. L— Koosmon, XX 

Montreal 013 418 440 01—4 U • 

Atlanta in OH 020 IM 9 3 

M5Aahtar.8t.Ckdr* IS). Roordan (S).BarU 
(9) ond Fitzgerald; Barkar.Canw ISl.Gariw 
(■), Sutter (101 vta Caron*. W— Buriufa 5* L— ■ 
Suttar,4-L HRs— Montreal, Fitzgerald IS). AT- 
lanta. Hamer (121. 

Son Francisco 204 000 010-3 0 1 

SL Louis «2S 000 02X-7 I 1 

BUM. iaflcaot (4), Doris (61, Gorrelis (8) 
aatd Trevino; Kepriilia, Campbell (6). Lahti 
ft) one Nieto, w— Kmahlra, 64. L— Blue. 5-1 
Sv— LOhtl (71. HRs— SL Louts. Smith (4L 
Oartt (141. 


facility in the United States. 

• Across the street, the S5. 9-mil- 
lion Indiana University Trade and 
Held Stadium with a fast, nine- 
lane rubberized track, the site of 
the USA/Mobil national outdoes 1 
championships Iasi spring. 

• Four miles away, the $2Jj-mil- 
lion Mqjor Taylor Velodrome, a 
333 J-meter inlernational-dass cy- 
cling facility. 

In the last decade, $136 million 
has been spent to bund athletic 
facilities in this city, previously 
known in sports only for the annu al 




un Clancy and Bin CaudSl hdd 
(he Mariners, who have lost four 


500-mile amo race. As a result, no straight, to five hits; the Blue Jays, 
major venue construction wul be a dub record with five 

required for the Pan Am Games, homers, have won four in a row. 

Indianapolis is also the home of Tigers L White Sox 0: In De- 
the national governing bodies of troiL Lon Whitaker’s two-out 


Balloting for the All-Star Game's Starting Teams 


1 1 




Transition 


&.* 
i. V 



BA5GBALL 
AmtrlcoH Ltmo* 

i Toronto— pjncid Buck Morttnet ratch- 
> tr. an Thjbv dhabtad IM. RacaUM aitctier 
■vfw* Alianton ham Syracuse at I ntcnwttanal 

I *U»*NESOTA-Ftaeed MJcfcev HaKMr. 
•. jWft ktaf.on 15-dav dhabtod list. Called up 
L ambardozzl, Irrftokief. frum TaMo ol 
Hnkrnottarw) Laosue. 

Notional LmM 

r lanta— A ctivated Lett Bariar, pueiwr, 
1 disabled tat Oottanad Slew Shields. 
af.toRtotMTytndaflnkYTtattonol LooguB- 
[HOUSTON— Trodad Enos Cabell, first 
»to Lob AoboIm Dodg*rs lor Ratari 
t pUch*r. and ptarw to bo named 

FOOTBALL 
NoHoari Football League 
:;CHlCAGO-StonedTom Samtoo. running 
“■J*. Acauired OIH Thrift, linebacker, from 
■1® Dtooo Characre on tuolwri. 

' vlHOUSTON— Signed John ScnuhtTtariier,of> 
lineman to series ol a n*-vwv am- 
-tocts. • 

. ' JJ*OlANAPOLiS— Signed Troev Porter. 

IM r(Ceh ' er - 

■'tf PHILADELPHIA— SkinM Gene GH4& 
>' .'** receiver; Dwelt Carter, cnmeriwdu 
Otto Keiiv, running bode 
. .IS**** CM ECO— waived Chuck L*wen. of- 
W4 ilaaman. Signed Dan Rems&erg, of- 
- ■ -*»t tackle; David Kbw. drieaMve bad: : 
' y v Simmons, wu tackle, and Brel P*or- 
- ; I- Wfcto ana 
•F HOCKEY 

t,. National HoOtav Laogue 
. -OftTRo it— signed warren Young, tor- 
-P*- <4 faur-vw contract. 

Islanders— S toned Arl EerikHaat- 
. . [P- torward, to multhear confrOd. 

.'••T COLLEGE 

' . WJOHA STATE— Aaneunnd that con- 
' ' *0 Bob wrintauer.basfcetbaU coach. *111 
• 0 * . 


FRM tan voting tor Hie 
Nat tonal Leagu* All-Star team: 
Catcher 

1, Gary Carter, New York 1.12951X X Terry 
Kennedy. San Dread 777,485. X Jedy Davis, 
Chicago 430021. 4. Tony Pena. Pittsburgh 
41X170 X Darrell Porter, St. Louis 332510 A 
Otzfe virgH, Ptiitodelphla 22X449. 7. Mike 
Sdasda. Los Angeles 22850LUMIIW Fltzwr. 
aid. Montreal 171727. 

First Bom 

1, Stave Garvev,Son Diego 1510I11.X Keith 
.Hernandez. New York 141.951. X P*M Rase. 
Cincinnati 748.121. 4. Lean Dunam, Chlcaaa 
362740 s, Dan Drieuen Montreal 19X030. t, 
GreaBracfc.L*eAno*tosl47J9SL7.EnaiCub- 
ell, Houston 144454. XJasan Tttampsoa PlHs- 
Durah 9X081. 

Second Base 

I. Tommy Herr. SI. Louis 1.109,171 2. Rvne 
Sandberg, Chicago 1550549. X Steve Sax, Las 
Aimtos 379^4. 4, Manny Trillo. 5mi Francis- 
co 22X149. 5. Juan Samuel, PHiloMtohla 
190042 X BID Doran. Houston 1 BU3L 7. Glenn 
HubbafUAitaftta 14X891 LJatwnv Ray ,P itls- 
burgh 85,987. 

Third Boh 

I, Grata Nettles, Son Dkg* 1032035. XMrke 
Sctmtldt.Pftilad4tolila739J91XRgnCfty.CM- 
coga 44308XX Tim WQllach. Montreal 384080 
X Terry Pendle ton , St. Louis 287341 4. Bab 
Horner. Atlanta 195535. 7, BlilMadtodLPItlS- 
buraft 17759X X PhU Gamer, Houston 14M2L 

Shortstop 

l. Onto Smith, SL Louis 1549542. X Garry 
Templeton. San D two 82<U*9.1 DaveConcm- 
cton.CtoclMiatl34»5M. 4. Hubto Brooks. Mon- 
treal 31 0H3XX Larry Bow, ChlCB002J9524.t 

Craig Itavnotas, Hotaton 2HJ9L7, Bill Rus* 
selL Los Angeles 182507. X RatoH Romlrat. 
Atlanta 127510 . 

Outflrid 

1. Dale Murphy, All an I a 1525,952. X Tony 
Cwvnn.SanDJMe96Xat2.X Darryl Strawber- 
ry, New York 947,197. 4. Kouln McRtVMldS. 
San Dtoge 444588. 5. Willie McGee. Si. Louis 


Plani tan voting tor to* 
American League AILS tar team: 
catcher 

1, Lance Parrish, Detroit 1537383; X Corl- 
ton Ffcrtc. Chicago, 7B7J13; X JIM Suwfcerg, 
Kansas City. 3KJ06; X Bob Boon*. CalHomla. 
355508; S. Ernie whlH. Toronto. 345548; 4. 
Rick Dempsey, Baltimore, 219,928: 7, Buicb 
Wvnegar.New York, 179583; X Rich Gedmoit 
Boston. 110537. 

First Base 

. 1. Eddie Murray, BoHimare. 771477: X Rod 
Carew, California 72X870; X Don Mat liitatv, 
New Yn-fc, 50X008; 4,wuile UPChaw.383544; X 
Kent Hruek. Minnesota. 351504: 4, Bill Buck- 
ner. Boston. 341,914; 7, cedi Cooper, Milwau- 
kee, 29X427; X Ahrin Davis, Seam*, 159544. 


trade and field, gymnastics, diving, 
synchronized swimming and, as of 
June 1, rowing. AH have received 
foundation or other private aid and 
inducements, such as free or re- 
duced-rate office space. 

The major prize would be to get 
the U.S. Olympic Committee. But 
it seems firmly ensconced in Colo- 
rado Springs, where 18 national 
governing bodies share office space 
atiis complex. 


bloop single in the eighth scored 
Tom Brookens. beating Chicago. 
Tom Seaver, seeking his 297th vic- 
lory in the majors, had given up 
only two hits and allowed three 


base runners until Brookens dou- 
bled sharply to left with two out in 
the eighth. The Tigers' Jack. Morris 
held the White Sox to five bits. 

Yankees 6, Royals 5: Dave Win- 
field's bloop angle to center scored 
Rickey Henderson with one oat in 


l, LOU WN taker. Detroit 1470731; X Da- 
man Garcia, Toronto, 53X807; X Babbv 
Grit*. Callfariiia 41X550: 4. Frank White, 
Kansas atY, 354474; S , Willie RaAdMPtV New 
York, 300533; X Jufto£niz,GiIcaga,2NyM); 7, 
Jim Gantntr.Mlwa'Aee. 23X496; XTfm Teu- 
f*L MlnaesoM. 219541. 

Tftlnj BOH 

L Georgs Brstt Kansas City. 1594534; X 
Wad* Bam Boston. 395534; X Douft De- 
Cl noBLCalllornto. 35X237:4. nonn MullIallK, 
Toronto, 339584; & Pam MalRor. MUwaukoa, 
271.173; X Darrell Evens, OetrolL 23X928; 7. 
Buddy BeU Tesas, 219593; X Gary GaettL 
Minnesota. 211504. 

Shortstop 

1. Cal Rtoken. BoUKnore. 159X901:2, Alan 
Trammell, Den-on. 449457; 3. Tony Feman- 

stor. Toronto, 3474S; 4. Rebta Yount, Ml ftpou- 

tee, 3*0450; 5. Onto Concweton, KomwCHv. 
32245S; X AUrede Griffin, Oakland. 1S9544; 7. 
juita Franca Cleveland, II 8474; X Spike 
Owen. Seama WX545. 

Oollleki 

1, Dav* winfleta. New York, 929416; 2 Rldt- 
ey Hewtertoa Now Yof*, 820518; X Jim Rica 
Boston, R34S2; X ReflMe JodesoaCantornla 
78X154; & Fred Lnri. Colltomto.-*72558: X 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

NFL Steders’ Star Lambert Retires 

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Middle linebacker Jack Lambert, a leader of 
the “Sted Curtain” defense that helped the Pittsburgh Steelers win four 
Super Bowls, retired Thursday after 1 1 seasons in the National Football 
League. 

Lambert, 33, dislocated the big toe on his left foot on the second play of 
last year's opening game and was used only sparingly the rest of the 
season. He was voted to the Pro Bowl for nine years in a row through 

— .. . • " that time. 

‘Kent State 



Boston Marathon Ponders Prize Money 

BOSTON (UPI) — The Boston Marathon may break an 
tradition and offer prize money in 1986. but probably only 
$292^500 purse proposed by Boston Mayor Raymond L Flynn. 

The administrator of the Boston Athletic Association, Guy Morse, said 
Wednesday the BAA. which has administered the race since its begin- 

ring, is ‘hnovmg closer than ever before” to awarding prize money. In 

rjaSTiS mt£to ' ^ recent y® 115 race to* “creasing difficulty attracting top runners. 

For the Record 

China, in Hs first positne indication of intwest in the 1988 Olympics in 
Seoul has applied to use the Games' official mascot and emblem on 
trademarked products. (Aft 


Porker.cmdiuwtl 509444. X P*l« Guerrero, 
Los Angeles 44X985. 9, Jose Cruz. Houston 
45X915. lft Tim Raines, Montreal 44XI4X 11, 
Andre Daman, Manlfflol 43X249. it KeHti 
More land. CMcoao 37854*. U Bob Dernier, 
Chicago 34A404. u. Gary Matttuvn. Ouoogo 
9*4571. UL Terry Puftl. Houston 245585- 14, 
Jerry Mumohrey, Houston 237,135. . 


ongkv. Minnesota. 554445; X Tony Armas. 
Boston, 44X221: 9. George Belt. Taranto. 
409464; ia jesso BarfleJit Toronta 4*1130; 11, 
LtayB Mo*ebv.Toronia40l545; lXCtwl Lam- 
m. Detrpn, 399573; IX Willie Wilson. Kansas 
Cliv, 35X883; H Horata Bakun. CMcaga 
Bt.423; lft Kirtrr Pvdf«»L*Monooi»ta.27X448; 
IX Lorry ParrWi. Texas, 24X579. 


By Ira Berkow 

New Tori Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — For nearly two 
decades, the Major League Base- 
ball Players Association has beep 
dogging the owners to open their 
financial ledgers. The association 
wanted the owners to prove that 
the facts backed up their conten- 
tion that if they paid the players a 
farthing more, they would go Busl 

The owners have finally relented. 
A highly respected accounting firm 
hired by the players is going over- 
books submitted by 24 of the 26 big 
league dubs. The results presum- 
ably will be known at the end of 
this week. 

The results, that is. according to 
the players' firm. The owners have 
their own highly respected ac- 
counting firm, add that highbrow 
bunch of numbers nabobs said that 
the 24 dubs that had submitted 
their books lost $36 million last 
year. The digit detectives hired by 
the players, in a preliminary perus- 
al, found otherwise. 

Those worthy statement sleuths 
determined that the baseball indus- 
try might have made a $9.3 million 
profit The players association has 
reason to believe that with added 
gumshoeing through the ledgers, 
profits as high as $50 million might 
be uncovered. 

Such a discrepancy is what sepa- 
rates the two factions, now into the 
eighth month of negotiations over a 
collective bargaining agreement 
the previous agreement haying ex- 
pired Dec. 3L It is such a " 
ancy that could result in a sl 
mate and, eventually, a strike. 

Cries of “voodoo economics" 
have been heard in regard to the 
owners' financial contention. But it 
seems more scientific than that It 
appears to be a case of eminent 
finanda] surgeons bring called in 
to perform fiduciary transplants. 

None of it illegal to be sure. Just 
good, sound pecuniary surgery. It 
is firing in the form of such items 
as tax shelters, player depreciation 
and shifting of revenues from a 
magnate's other businesses. 

Neither side is disputing the bard 
facts and figures being presented. 
They are disputing something else: 
what to make of what they got. 

“It is all a matter of interpreta- 
tion," said Lee MacPhail chief ne- 
gotiator for the owners. 

“It is all a matter of interpreta- 
tion,” said Don Fehr. acting execu- 
tive director of the players associa- 
tion. 

“What’s hard for me to under- 
stand," said Pete Rose, who wears 
two hats now, one as management, 
the other as player, “is that the 
owners cry poverty and then go oul 
andpay a player $2 million a year.” 

The Cincinnati Reds’ estimable 
player-manager is not alone in his 
confusion. Few doubt that some 
teams, as many as seven, might be 
in some serious financial bind. But 


the industry as a whole appears to 
be thriving. In 1983, attendance 
reached an all-time high, at 
44,742^63. Last year it was only 
slightly off, with division races not 
as dose as those the season before. 
This year, crowds are streaming 
through the turnstiles at a rate 12 
percent higher than in 1983. 

What is also difficult to compre- 
hend is that one of the reding 
teams, the Pittsburgh Pirates, is on 
ihe block for an asking price of 
about $40 million. This hardly ap- 
pears the posture of someone about 
to suffer economic hardship. 

Last year, two teams were sold, 
the Detroit Tigers for about $50 
million and the Minnesota Twins 
for about $40 million. In both in- 
stances, the sellers walked away 
with a tidy profiL 

But the owners say that they can- 
not continue to absorb losses, and 
that their figure physicians say 
that, by 1 988, Tosses will total about 
$155 million. Much of it has to do 
with player salaries, which are up 
to a yearly average of $360,000, 
compared with about $45,000 in 
1975, before free agency. What to 


do? The owners have pr 
what the union perceives as i 
cute into the hard-earned free- 
ageni system that has been in exis- 
tence for about 10 years. 

It is nou as commonly believed, 
that the players want more than 
what they have had in the previous 
agreement. Essentially, they want 
the status quo, though even what is 
considered the status quo, especial- 
ly with the new $180 million televi- ; 
sion package, is in dispute. 

Foremost, the players want to 
retain rights to something they nev- 
er had until 1975. and that is true„ 
access to the free marketing of their ■ 
talents. The end of the reserve* 
clause marked the start of their 
economic freedom. A compromise 
on that, the/ fear, would lead to- 
erosion of what has been the basis 
for their higher salaries. 

The question comes back to the_ 
one suggested by Rose. If iJje own- 
ers cannot afford the salaries, how 
can they continue to pay them? It 
seems that if they cannot, or will 
not. they can still sell the dub and 
walk away with a nice bit of black 
in their personal ledger. 



BENOIT 

DEGORSK1 

8ft RUE DU RHONE 1204GENCVE TEL 28M30 
CHESERV PLAfZ GSTAAD TEl 030-41165 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1985 



OBSERVER 


Blessings and Nightmares 


Worldwide Telethon for Famine Relief 


PEOPLE 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — A lot of the 
fretting and fuming about ter- 
rorism is based on the naive belief 
that it will go away if only a few 
disagreeable men are disposed of. 

The Ayatollah Khomeini. Lib- 
ya's Colonel Qadhafi and Fidel 
Castro, for example, were listed by 
Plesident Reagan the other day as 
men whose absence would make 
the world a nicer place. For good 
measure he threw in the Nicara- 
guan Sandinists, one of his favorite 
pin y of villains, and the North 
Koreans, who previously hadn't 
enjoyed much denunciation from 
the White House. 

Possibly for political reasons, the 
president didn't mention Northern 
Ireland's Provisional IRA bomb- 
ers, India's Sikhs or Central Ameri- 
ca's rightist death squads. 

The net could have been cast 
even wider by including Italy's Red 
Brigades, West Germany’s Baader- 
Meinhof gang. Spain's Basque na- 
tionalists. What of South Africa's 
border raiders, the Philippine in- 
surrectionists and the United Sla- 
tes's own madcap bombers and as- 
sassins who have succeeded in 
sealing off so much of Washing- 
ton's once-public life from the pub- 
lic? 


Far from being the work of a few 
beastly men, terrorism is a natural 
product or modern life, like air 
pollution, family breakdown, ex- 
cessively casual sexual promiscuity, 
traffic paralysis and the exaltation 
of greed, terrorism is one of the 
many embarrassing byproducts of 
our blessings. 

Everyone says, for instance, that 
terrorism flourishes by exploiting 
the media, by which is meant televi- 
sion. Of course it does. Terrorism 
gives us melodramas that are irre- 
sistible to television audiences! 
marinated daily in hokum in which 
screeching engines, gunfire and ca- 
sual violent death pass for enter- 
tainment. 

With television's ability to bring 
real-life melodrama of this son im- 
mediately into parlors around the 
world, the modem terrorist receives 
a boon from the miracle of elec- 
tronics and satellite technology 
such as his primitive predecessor 
never dreamed of in the early days 
of radio static, cable press dis- 
patches and slow mail from over- 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


seas. U is not surprising that mal- 
contents all over the world who 
believe thev have just causes should 
spend their lives scheming to get a 
piece of the camera action. 

□ 

The inevitable relationship be- 
tween TV and terrorists now seems 
to embarrass some of the television 
news people. During the TWA Bei- 
rut hijacking there was a good bit 
of stewing among them about 
whether they were being abused by 
the terrorists or whether they were 
rightly doingjournalism's unpleas- 
ant duty. 

The silliness of this becomes ap- 
parent when you ask the obvious 
question: Given a competitive 
news industry in a nation devoted 
to the principle of maximizing 
profits, should the kidnapping or 
Americans by murderous thugs be 
treated by television as though it 
were not of much interest? 

This would doubtless be the So- 
viet solution. Such events might get 
no TV attention whatever in the 
Soviet Union. Knowing this, ter- 
rorists do not devote their talents to 
abusing the Russians. But do 
Americans want the news reported 
by Soviet rules? 

Some doubtless do. If you, how- 
ever, were one of the kidnapped 
hostages, would you really like to 
have the news of your predicament 
held privately by a handful of 
Washington insiders? 


The airplane is another modem 
miracle without which terrorism 
could not be so commonplace. Its 
dramatic speed, permitting terror- 
ists to travel entertainingly im- 
mense distances, adds adventurous 
spice to the televised melodrama. 
So does the ease with which this 
symbol of wide-ranging freedom 
can be instantly converted into a 
tubular metal prison. 

Then, of course, there is the easy 
availability oi guns, which is so 
characteristic of the modem age 
and, in the view of many Ameri- 
cans, absolutely vital to the preser- 
vation of democratic freedoms. 

Anns for the striving masses, air- 
planes. television — ihese are bless- 
ings of the modem age, and few of 
us would give them up if we could. 
Still, we may as well realize that our 
nightmares are the result of our 
blessings. 

New York Tima Service 


MOVING 


Compiled by Our Stuff From DiipuKha 

IVE AID.” the pair of 

L mammo th rock concerts 
scheduled Saturday in Britain 
and the United States, may be 
heard by more than one billion 
people in an effort that organizers 
hope will raise $50 million for 
famin e relief work in Africa. 

Only 162.000 people will see 
the concert in person — 90,000 in 
Philadelphia's John F. Kennedy 
Stadium and 72,000 in London's 
Wembley Stadium. It begins in 
England at noon London time — 
1 P_M. Central European Time 
(CET), 7 A.M. Philadelphia time 
( EDT). $ P.M. Tokyo time — and 
winds up in Philadelphia 16 
hours later. The London concert 
is 10 hours long and Philadel- 
phia's is 14. 

Conceived by Bob Geldof, 
leader of the rock group Boom- 
town Rats, the concert will fea- 
ture some of the biggest stars in 
pop music, performing free. 

“We have without a doubt the 
most important people over the 
past 25 years in pop music." Gel- 
dof said. 

Last year Geldof brought to- 
gether a group of top British re- 
cording stars as a group dubbed 
“Band-Aid” to make the hit re- 
cord “Do They Know It's Christ- 
mas?" for African famine relief. 
It was the forerunner of “We Are 
ihe World.” a song composed by 


Michael Jackson and Lionel Ri- 
chie, by USA for Africa, a similar 
effort in the United Slates. Soles 
of the (wo groups' records and 
related merchandise have raised 
more than S30 million. 

Or ganize rs hope more than 140 
countries will pick up parts of the 
dual concert on television and ra- 
dio. The American cable channel 
MTV is planning to run the whole 
event. In Britain. BBC radio and 
TV will carry the London concert 
and much of the U. S. show. 

The use of JFK Stadium is be- 
ing provided free by Philadelphia 
authorities. Between acts on the 
specially built 100-foot, two-tier 
stage, the crowd will turn to huge 
television screens around the sta- 
dium to watch satellite relays of 
Lhe London show. 

The show will go on rain or 
shine, but so far the only cloud on 
the horizon comes from a coun 
case: The Westwood Agency of 
Los Angeles says it has exclusive 
rights to nine artists, including 
Tina Turner and Eton John, and 
is seeking S10 million from the 
organizers and the ABC-TV net- 
work. which plans a three-hour 
prime-time broadcast combining 
live relays and tape. 

Thousands of police will be 
mobilized, though more traffic 
problems than crowd difficulties 
are anticipated. In Philadelphia, 
alcohol beer, drugs and weapons 


Here’s the Tentative lineup 

United Pros International 

H ERE is the tentative lineup for Saturday’s Live Aid concerts at" 
Wembley Stadium in London and JFK Stadium in Philadel- 
phia The artists are not necessarily listed in the order in which they 
will appear. 

LONDON: Boom town Rats, David Bowie. Phil Collins, Evis 
Costello. Dire Straits, Bryan Ferry, Eton John, Howard Jones, Nik 
Kershaw. Paul McCarthy, Alison Moyet Queen, Sade, Spandau 
Ballet Status Quo, Sting, The Style Council The Who. U2, Ultra- 
vox, Wham!. Paul Young. 

PHILADELPHIA: (9 AM. to noon, local EDT time) Joan Baez, 
the Hooters, Four Tiros, Billy Ocean, Black SabbaLh with Ozzy 
Osborne, Run DMC, Rick Springfield. REQ Speedwagon. Crosby 
Stills and Nash, Judas Priest 

(Noon to 5 P.M.j Bryan Adams, Beach Boys, Tears for Fears, 
Simple Minds, the Pretenders, Santana with Pat Metheny. Ashford 
and Simpson, Teddy Pendergrass, the Thompson Twins. 

(5 to 8 PM.) Tom Petty, Kenny Logons, the Cars. Neil Young. 
Power Station, Eric Clapton. Phil Collins, Robert Plant J imm y 
Page. 

(8 to II P.M.) Duran Duran, Madonna, Rod Stewart, Patti 
LaBelle, Hall and Oates with David Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks. 
Mick J agger, Tina Turner. Bob Dylan. 


will be barred, as will anyone who 
appears intoxicated. 

The actor Jack Nicholson will 
introduce Joan Baez to start the 
Philadelphia show. The Prince 
and Princess of Wales will open 
the concert in London. Hosts for 
U. S. and overseas TV broadcasts 
will include Sheena Easton. Ken- 
ny Loggins. Melissa Manchester, 
Bene Midler, Randy Newman 
and Grace Slick. 

Personalities such as former 
U.S. President Jimmy Carter, 
Bishop Desmond Tutu of South 
Africa, the astronomer Carl Sa- 
gan and former vice-presidential 
candidate Geraldine Ferraro will 
broadcast messages urging peo- 
ple to make donations, and tele- 
phone lines for contributions will 
be provided. There may also be 
taped messages from President 
Ronald Reagan, Pope John Paul 
II and Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain. 

Each act is to perform about 10 
to 20 minutes. Only Phil Collins 
will appear on born stages, per- 
forming first in London, then fly- 
ing by Concorde to the United 
Slates. 

The Philadelphia tickets at S35 
each, with several thousand S50 
reserved seats, sold out in less 
than four hours. The British tick- 
ets were £25 (about S34) each. 
The official target of Live Aid is a 
minimum of SI2 milli on from 
broadcast rights, corporate spon- 
sorship, ticket sales, telephone 
contributions and souvenir sales. 

Broadcast rights alone will cov- 
er the S4- million cost of putting 
on the concerts. More than 100 
U. S. radio stations and 105 tele- 
vision stations have arranged to 
cany all or most of the Philadel- 
phia concert. 

Worldwide Sports and Enter- 
tainment Loil, producer of Live 
Aid, said as many as 350 milli on 
households around the world 
might tune in to the concerts, 
which would lie the 1.5-billion- 
person record viewership for the 
1982 World Cup soccer match. 

“We broadcast the Olympics 
and we only used three satellites,” 
said Michael C. Mitchell presi- 
dent of Worldwide. “For this 
we’re using 16.” 

Geldof said some countries 
without satellite receivers would 
get videotapes of the concerts 
Sunday by diplomatic pouch. 


Afoot Across America 



A 16-minute lead is a real photo 
finish when you've just wound up a 
3.500-mi Je (5.700-kilometer) foot- 
race across the United States, the 
winner says. Marvin Ska&erberg of 
New York raced Malcolm Camp- 
bell of Grantham. England. Tor 92 
days through blazing heat in Cali- 
fornia. freezing temperatures in 
Utah and high altitudes in Colora- 
do, ending up in New York barely 
ahead. The men rested only six 
days during the race — the first of 
itsbind since 1929. Both said they 
would be ready to do it again in a 
few weeks. “I challenged him to a 
race across .America two yean ago 
and it has taken that long to set it 
up.” said Campbell. “I feel ready 
for another race. I just want to beat 
him." Skagerberg beat Campbell in 
a six-day race in 1982. and Camp- 
bell has been plotting revenge ever 
since. The two averaged 40 miles a 
day during the “1985 Lou Gehrig 
Race For Life,” coordinated by the 
National ALS Foundation Inc. The 
effort has raised S 500.000 for re- 
search into the progressive ailment 
known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. 


Bob Geldof 

Money raised from Live Aid 
will provide shelter, clothing and 
“long-term solutions" in Africa. 
Geldof said. Funds from Band 
Aid and USA for Africa have 
primarily been used for food and 
medical supplies so far. 

Scenes from smaller concerts 
in Australia. Japan, the Nether- 
lands and West Germany will be 
televised in conjunction with the 
London and Philadelphia shows. 

Even a Soviet rock group will 
join in via satellite from Moscow. 
Autograph, described as a hard 
rock group. wiQ be the first Soviet 
rock musicians seen live by. a 
worldwide television audience, 
said Brian Bedel a partner in 
Dalrymple and Bedoi Communi- 
cations of New York, which will 
produce the Moscow concert in a 
television studio before an audi- 
ence of about 1,000. 

The Soviet Union has agreed to 
take the live satellite feed of the 
concerts for rebroadcast. China, 
however, will not broadcast the 
event, according to a spokesman 
for Chinese television. He gave 
no reason. 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Earl Spencer, father of Diana, 
Princess of Wales, has parted with 
five more p aintin gs io help pay for 
repairs to his ancestral home. The 
works brought almost £170,000 at 
Sotheby's in London. Last week, 
the Spencers sold a 15th-century 
painting. “Sl Christopher with the 
Infant Christ and Sl Peter.” by the 
Venetian artist Cima for more than 
£250.000. The earl has expressed 
regret at having to sell the works 
but says it is the only way to keep 
up his' palatial residence. Althorp. 
in central England. 


Neighbors of Mary Kay Ash, Lhe 
Dallas cosmetics queen whose pas- 
, sion for pink ranges from a fleet of 
' company Cadillacs to a new S5- 
miliion pink mansion, are seeing 
red over her plan to build a march- 
ing pink guardhouse. Ash, founder 
and chairwoman of Mary Kay Cos- 
metics Inc., says she needs the 24- 
hour security post in a glass and 
stucco booth, at the entry to her 
north D allas estate to protect her 
properly and keep a steady flow of 
curiosity seekers on the move. The 
Dallas Board of Adjustments, how- 
ever. having received letters of op- 
position from 1 1 neighbors, turned 
down her request to build the struc- 


ture 14 feet (4 meicrsi from the j. 
street. A local ordinance requires 
that all structures be at least 40 Teei ' 
from the road. The board relented 
slightly, saying Ash could build the . 
guardhouse 53 feet from the street. K i ! 
Neighbors argued that the guard- v 
house would call alien lion to the 
area. .Ash said she might appeal the in- 
decision. ? ,'" 1 


Valeri Kubasov and Alexei j v - 
Leonov. the two cosmonauts who** 

10 years ago linked up their Soyuz? ■ 
spacecraftVith a ll S. Apollo ship, 
will be in Washington on the anni- 
versary of that event Tuesdai And 
will meet again with Thomas P, 
Stafford. Donald & [Deke] Sayton 
and Vance D. Brand, the astronauts 
with whom they rode 140 miles 
above the earth. It will be the first 
time the five have been together 
since they completed the mission. 

The meeting wifi be at the National 
Academy of Science during a con- 
ference on Mars exploration. 

□ 

When Tony Bennett testified an 
Capitol Hill he did it the way he 
knows best: He sang a coupk of 
songs. Bennett went before the 
House Banking Committee's coin- 
age panel to promote passage of a 
congressional resolution that 
would award congressional gold 
medals to the American songwrit- 
ing team George and Ira Gershwin. 

After Bennett sang the Gershwin^ 
numbers “Our Love Is Here to ' 
Stay” and “Who's Got the Last 
Laugh Now.” the subcommittee 
passed the resolution unanimously, 
forwarding it to the full Ifantni; 
Committee. 


Nancy Reagan announced the 
appointment Thursday of Lfatfr 
Faulkner, a Dallas public relations 
executive, to succeed Gahl Hodges 
as White House social secretary. 
Faulkner. 35. was deputy social 
secretary for the first three years of 
the Reagan administration before 
returning to Dallas to start a public 
relations firm. She is a former pub- 
lic relations officer for the Netmao 
Marcus department stores. Hodg- 
es. in charge of the office that han- 
dles White House social functions 
since April 1983. plans to leave 
because her husband. Assistant 
Secretary of Slate Richard Bnrt, has 
been Dominated to be U. S. ambas- 
sador to West Germany. / 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




FRENCH RIVIERA 

WXT TO MONTE CARLO 
Luxury townhouwe Living room, 2 bed- 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PROVINCES 


US INCOME TAX. Wy 23rd is the 
moratorium dead me lor 1982 & 1983 
US rrtumv. US. lax t p apofajt will 
asset you la preerv* 
p mmp lioa Mr 


fun* A tntmmatkmd Moving 
Fully profnsonal - RwEarabty priced 

PARIS (1) 867 42 46 


REAL ESTATE 
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REAL ESTATE 
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FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
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GREAT BRITAIN 


COTE D'AZUR 

S MINS. MONTE CARLO. Urxque. Sail- 
ing mnyificert 10.000 jq.ni land. 
Open view foana sea, aioenl Raman 
ate. would suit luxurious viSa, pool 
tenrfa. pari. F6.000D00. 

Write No. 1167, Anna Haras, 
4 Rm dm Ira. M.C 98000 Menaco 





REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONA 


MONTE-CARLO 

PENTHOUSE 

fn luxurious residence 293 sq.nv, 
mojfxficert view - Amble twig-room, 
cSnng room. 4 bedrooms, 4 bu m ro on e. 
fafr fa tter*. 3 {W^ngs, 3 

mkn, 293 kuil terrace 

UMVBBALOFHCZ 
6 Av. Dei Gtromen 
M.C 98000 Monaco Tel (93) 30 52 28 


PRINCIPALITY OF 
MONACO 

For flhedth, owner safe to private, 
unique & excepfarai bunness 
(auth orized <£ rxdnt) 

bar-kstaurant-bSewery 

u*ge cefcxs (the whote according to 
norms] + 21 -room HOTEL to be ren- 
ovated (nuneraws potobirtwsj. Price 
justified for the location. Write 
Aqenee HAVAS 4 modes km 
MC 98000 Monaco, feb U7B. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREECE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


PORTO ERCOLE stone butt fcndy 
how (faded at two «tf conkxmd 
u p u rt m qit, 4 baths, deeps 7, 210 
sqjn. with large terrace located in 
kjvety vafley overlooking forts & sea. 
AB00 sun. garden & land. let 


MONTE CARLO 

Private mansion, near Monaco Prince 
Palace, panoramic sea view. 

Tef (93) 30 46 54 


i. pananxuc sea v 
ef|93)3»46 54 


kwejv vcSey overioddnp 
4JS00 sqm. garden & 
0564/833317. 



to a subfime decor 
of terraces 

awerioatnng sea ond port, 
18th century riotoe 
in Gnoah 

8 room. 300-1- sq.ro. 

character, beams. 
$170,000. No Agents. 
Write Mr. Aubrey, 

22 rue de Oodre St. Mem, 
Paris A 

606 69 08 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


AVENUE MATIGNON 

URGENT 

Large Curio or 2 rooms 
to be rerwmted, 50 sqjn. sun. 

A. 13 296 59 59 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SP4IN 


MAKE MONEY in SUNNY ALMEHA 
buying about 60.003 sqm. (fas We 
into rOhOO tqjn. tab. Water. On 
mm road TVs tans amort to City, 
next university, beodias. Ideal yea 
round geu&cnan framing retreat 
53/sqjn. Wnte Mrs De ~ 




UMBRIA - TUSCANY, 15 mins. Lake 
Trasmeno, main roiroad + autostra- 
da, fufty renown e d farmhouse, 220 
iqjR + terraces, ocrages, 4,000 
sqm garden, possibCty more land 
Ccd 578/294294 or 294 0(3. 


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SALMON CAPITAL 
| CAJAP88I RIVH, BC CANADA 
Entire 6 ha island with spats ' 1 
fealties. Located across from 
famous Footer s Lodge. 5290,000 Cdn. 
Write B. Bake. Cheek fedty Ltd- 1- 
1 180 Ironwoad Sl.. Compbel Aver, 8.C. 
V9W 5P7. Tet 604-Mfrllffi'. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


SOUTH WKT OF FRANCE Beautiful 
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5145.000 negceabfe TeL- (65) 36 65 10 


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CLASSIFIEDS 


DIAMONDS 


S 36 muon rss 

seeks patnett tor the development af a 


UFO® MANAGEMENT 
AM) AN ANNUAL TURNOVER 
IN EXCESS OF 

$15 MUON 

U you ae considering on nveslment n 
c o ntamers we suggest you contact us 
before moling your deamon. 

WE PAY OUR CLIENTS 

QUARTERLY 

A GROSS DOUAR INCOME 

SHIRLSTAR 

NTERNAHONAL SALES 


Wity study & approval from authorities 
concerned in hand. 

Apply GLT.CLE. 12 Kaneadou Str. 
Athens 10675, Greece. TeL 01-7215849, 
7216498. Tlx 214137 UIW Gfi. 


immigration TO USA 
MADE EASY 

Bus in essm en! Temporary & permanent 
residence vises; se* up business m USA. 
traqfer key peflomel, expand your ex- 
isting business. Wnte for free Ho to 
Attorney Dowd Htrcwi, 14795 Jeffrey 
ltd, —208. Irvine, CA 92714 USA. 
714/651-fflm the 590194. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


- INTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNJMITED INC 
U.5JL. I WORLDWIDE 

A aamplete penaH & busineis serwae 
providng a unique co&cSan of 

totented, *ttv& & muhlingud 
Hfaduak fa all u6al £ 
aanOHOnd Measure. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St., N.Y.C. T0019 
Senwte Representatives 
Needed Worldwide. 



Estajfched 1928 

Pefikaanslraat 62, 8-2018 Antwerp 
BeUxn ■ Tet (32 3) 234 07 51 
Tl*i 7T779 syl b. At the Diamond Qub, 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond imtatry 


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EXCLUSIVE JEWELS & WATCHES 

LONDON 

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MONEY TREES? 

YES) Invest in on of Americas mast 
OKOtmg tochncfogcal breakthroughs in 
a bikm dollar industry We have plant- 
ed mare nut tree* in 1984 than any 
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High omsd earnings mured Gw 
mam, maty years and. wegwrai- 
tee to repurdim investment 

bhoxbkt auautRffis invited. 

Maenal availabh m Engtsh, Frendv 
German. Box 2358. Harold Tribune, 
92521 NeuDy Cede*. France 



RiTER-fiNANCE MC 
Lage pa tf oio of North American 
compancs seeking equity investments. 
patnett^s. We abo offer tftradive 
irafaig did companies & brokerage 
services. 

Prmeipqk travel Europe & Fa fast. 
Tele* Da* 

Or write P.O. Box 10344 
Vateouwtr, B.C V7Y 1G5 Canto 


OFFICE SERVICES 


BIRO BUSBOSS CENTER 
99 K ea e n g rn d g , 1015 Ot Amsterdam 
Tet 31-2026 57 49 Telex 16183. 
Warkt-Wkk Burma Centres 


Tins, Sicily, Corfu, DubravnA. 

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Ocean Islander 


on Zed®. Koraati 


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ACCESS USA 

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axt mae desfinctaK _ 

15% dwount on 1st doss 
PARS tab 111 221 46 94 
(Cor. lie. 1502) 




FRANCHISE PARTNBB WANTS 
Throughout the wwld fa o new prod- 
uct, (Mteaed, frat-seflng item with 
epek tumouer and repeat order*. 
Reply to . 

Kurt Kraeget. AmoWHeise-Str. 10. 
2000 Hamburg 20. Tel (0J 4046 72 75. 




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