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INTERNATIONAL 



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WEAlHBt DATA APPEAR ON PACE 14 


No. 31,848 


Published With Ibe New York Times and Tlte Washington Post 

*R PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


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To Use of 

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¥ Force on Terrorists 


By Lou Cannoa :. 

Wahingnm Pen. Service 

WASHINGTON — A wide- 


nisceatof the debate late in 1983 
after the suicide bombing of a Ma- 
rine Corps headquarters in Bdmt 


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rtnfeing fiscusaon is under way in, ^ ISSSi 

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rides, benefit? and lining of .repri- ’ 
sal against -international terrorism. L 
Infonhed officials said Thursday - 81 
that the. , president now believed v 
miStarv force should be a oompo- j 1 
nent of the response. . •• , . 


Lebanon triggered an inconclusive 
s tm^ e in the administration in 
which George P. Shultz, the secre- 


taj^force^wtiM^ a compo- 

tofihe response. lane, the oatiomil security affairs 

~ - - adviser, argued for icons* 1 ' -* n “ 


In a related matter, the adrnmis- ^viser, argued fOTiepmals^wMe 
nation is backing away from its ^fenM Secret^ Ca^rW. 
camoatim to dose the Beaut Inter- Wraberger and tbe Jomt Oief* erf 


national Airport and shifting its 
efforts to negotiating improve- 
ments in airport security with the 
Lebanese government. (Page 2). 


Staff stressed the risks involved in 
retaliation. 

-An official said Thursday that, 
^riiSecthe lines of debate remained 


ltd Maid ‘ Informed officials who described'- basicallythe same, there was now a. 

Us . »he t the talks within the administration crucial difference. “Now everyone 

team i'ivutZ ' said that many options were bring recognizes we’re going to have to 
« Ben- ; r -' J 1° Cai considered, mduding the bombing hit back ai the terrorists," the offi- 

nncrT ; - !h : of terrorist training sites. Military cial said. “The questions are how 

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pointed prospective targets. 

"There can be no effective iong- 


,lest effectiveness and in a way 
has the fnllest'possible support 


term strategy tbatj doesn’t include a of world oprnxon. 

wffin gness to use force." a senior . A senior adminis tration official 

administ ration official said. “The acknowledged that a . U^. strike 


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force be in keeping with American ranking military officials contend, 
mines and that it be effective in But the official said the hijacking of 
achieving what you want to do." TWA Fbght 847 and thekilfing of a 

■ [Larry Speakes, the White House Navy diver aboard the plane dem- 
spokesman, confirmed that the ad- onstraied that Americans were al- 
nrinistration was considering repri- ready at risk, 
sals and that the president “now “The possibility of further acts 


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bdieves mflitary force should be a of terrorism exists iiukpendently 
component of that response,” of any action the United States 
■United Press International report- might take,” the official said, “but 


}nse,” of any action the United States 


ed Friday from Washington.] 

The current discussion is remi- 


1 . 

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_ . - . One of the Beirut hijackers 

wKE s£Ng v fc | reporters on June 30. 

3 Suspects Named 
— -'S In TWA Hijacking 


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7 Tie Associated Press Officials Said t] 

BEIRUT — The state radio said emerging from the <3 
Friday that the government had criterion for anti-t 
ordered three men prosecuted in that would require 
the hqaeking of TWA Flight 847. strike be “surgical” 

It namwl The suspects as Ali to a terrorist act. I 
Aiwa, Ali Yunes and Ahmed Khar- would like to take 
bria but it said it had qo further just before a strike 
information about them or about target or just after 5 
an unsp ecified number of accom- They also said th 
piices. The radio said nothing tivity would requir 
about the three being in custody facL justification tiu 
and did not say whether warrants ported by aerial pb< 
tor them had been issued in the B j . Force Lea 
June 14 hijacking. „ . ... 

In its 11 AJVL news broadcast, „”i et,rc d Admn 
the radio said that the names of the Holloway, former 
jhreemeo had been “referred to the operations and a v 


competent judicial authorities" in 
the Mount Lebanon part of Beirut, 
which includes the international 
airport. The news item was 


putting terrorists cm notice that 
they face risks will dimmish the 
number of incidents against our 
citizens over time.” 

The previous debate oa terror- 
ism led to a decision in late 1984, a 
year after the U.S. withdrawal from 
Lebanon, 16 approve a covert oper- 
ation Hirpfjing the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency 10 train and support 
counterterrorist units. Four 
months later, foreign members of 
one of the units, acting without 
CIA knowledge or authorization, 
launched a car bombing in Beirut 
that killed 80 persons lmt missed 
the radical Modem leader who was 
the apparent targets ••/ 

-Preadept ■ Rdagarr add lhc?QA. 
subseqoentlycantieled the program 
of support fm the coon terterrorists. 

In a speech Monday. Mr. Rea- 
gan linked Iran. Libya. North Ko- 
rea, Cuba and Nicaragua as mem- 
bers of an internationalist terrorist 
confederation with ties to the Pal- 
estine Liberation Organization and 
other terrorist groups. An official 
said that Mr. Reagan was trying 
“to develop a base of public sup- 
port for action” and that he would 
continue to make terrorism a major 
theme because it “wall be on our 
agenda publicly for a long time.” 

Backing up that speech, a new. 
State Department report has been 
developed charging that Nicaragua 
has developed strategic ties with 
Iran. Libya and the Palestinian 
Liberation Organization, officials 
said. 

Officials said that what was 
emerging from the discussion was & 
critenoo for anti-terrorist action 
that would require that any US. 
strike be “surgical’’ and clearly tied 
to a terrorist act. Ideally, officials 
would like to take military action 
just before a strike against a U.S. 
target or just after such an attack. 

They also said that the U.S. ac- 
tivity would require an after-the- 
fact justification that could be sup- 
ported by aerial photographs. 

■ Task Force Leader Chosen 

Retired Admiral James L. 
Holloway, former chief of naval 
operations and a veteran or three 
wars, has been named to head a 
task force charged with examining 
how the United States can combat 
terrorism. The Associated Press re- 



U.S. Senators Approve 
South African Sanctions 


Fires Rage On in Caltfornia 

A firefighter is doused in Los Gatos, California, near San Jose, to dean off soot accumulated 
while fighting a 14JXX>-acre brnshfire. Twenty houses have been destroyed and dozens of people 
evacuated. Fires burned elsewhere in the state, with riwrc than 300,000 acres destroyed this week. 

U.S± EC ’ 

Abandon Plans for Trade Sanctions 


; Hv 5 *-.-! 


dropped without explanation from P°rted from Washington, 
further broadcast Government Plans to set imihe Pjnd were 
sources, who insisted on anonym- annouxiced bjM ™dmt Reagn 
ity, said tins was done because of during the TWA hijacking last 
instructions “from above.” month. 

Reagan to Hare 2d Operation 
For Tbecancerous’ Growth 


Compiled bp Our Staff From Dispatches 

Washington — President 
Ronald Reagan will undergo sur- 
gery Saturday for a lafge, potential- 
ly cancerous polyp in his colon, a 
jWhire House spokesman an- 
nounced Friday. 


removal of a benign “pseudopo- 
lyp” from his colon, found a laigr 
polyp. 

They said' it could not be re- 
moved by instruments they were 
1 King to probe his intestines and 
recommended surgery other imme- 


• Reuten 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Community and the United Stales 
have reached a compromise in their 
trade dispute over pasta only hours 
before the end of a one- week trace, 
a European Commission official 
said Friday. ^ 

She declined to give derails of the 
accord, readied “somewhere on the 
North American continent,” be- 
tweea External Relations Commis- 
sioner WiDy De Clercq and the 
U.S. trade representative. Qayton 
K. Yeutter. 

The agreement means that 
Washington will not impose penal- 
ty duties on imports of European 
pasta that would have increased 
prices ftirTLSw-consumers by up to 
40 percent, she said. 

In exchange, the EC will not re- 
taliate with higher tariffs on lemons 
and nuts from lire United Stats. 
The planned retaliation provided 
for increasing import duties from 8 
pe rc e nt to 20 penrent for U.S. lem- 


INSIPE 

■ Belgium's interior miiuster 

was disowned by a coalition 
partner in a debate on the Brus- 
sels soccer rioL P*ge 2. 

■ Southeast Asian diplomats 

expressed satisfaction at U.S. 
acceptance of their Cambodia 
peace proposal. Page 5. 

ARTS-/ LEISURE 

■ Heard a good book lately? 

Listening to nooks on cassettes 
is catching on in the United 
States. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ UJS. inflation slowed in June 

as energy and food costs 
dropped. Page 9. 

■ Kranss-Maffci AG of West 

Germany pray betaken over for 
$50.8 million by a group led by 
MBB. . Page 9. 


oos and to 30 percent for walnuts. 

The penalties were originally 
scheduled to come into force at 
midnight on July 5, but both sides 
agreed on a one-week trace for fur- 
ther negotiations to lake place. 

The k ey element of the accord, 
which wifi be ratified by EC agri- 
culture ministers on Monday, in- 
cluded a cut in the export subsidies 
that tire groop gave to its pasta 
traders to offset the difference in 
high European prices and lower 
pnees in the United States, the offi- 
cial said. 

Diplomats said the export subsi- 
dy would drop to 8 European Cur- 
rency Units ($6) per 100 kilograms 
of^asta from the previous 14 

In exchange. Washington will 
withdraw a complaint challenging 
the EC subsidy that was lodged last 
year at- GATT, the Geneva-based 
General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade, which monitors world trade. 

The two sides will also look for 


solutions to a dispute over special 
concessions favoring the entry of 
aims fruit that the EC grants coun- 
tries in the Mediterranean region 
under preferential trade and rid 
agreements, the official said. 

The UJS. administration planned 
the pasta tariff penalties because it 
objected to these special arrange- 
ments which, it said, were illegal 
and harmed U.S. citrus growers. 

Officials said that the EC move 
to cm export subsidies, a corner- 
stone of the group’s controversial 
agricultural policy, was tire first 
such concession to be made in 
trade talks with disgruntled part- 
ners and could set a precedent 

They said they feared that other 
trading partners could now ask for 
similar cuts in export subsidies, ex- 
posing EC agricultural policy to 
continuous attacks. 

The EC has often argued that its 
export subsidies are in line with 
international regulations on agri- 
cultural trade and are, therefore, 
not negotiable. 


'Angry 9 House 
Widens Aidto 
AntirMarxists 


By Scevcn V. Roberts 

AW' Vent Tima Senice 

WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives has approved a 
5116-billion foreign aid bill that 
appears to reflect a growing deter- 
mination on Capitol HW to con- 
front Communist and other leftist 
governments around the world. 

The legislation authorizes new 
rid far guerrillas battling the Marx- 
ist governments in Cambodia and 
Afghanistan, and it lifts a nine-year 
ban on help to insurgent forces in 
Angola. 

Last month, the House reversed 
earlier 'votes and supported re- 
newed aid to forces seeking to top- 
ple the leftist government of Nica- 
ragua. 

Via Weber, Republican of Min- 
nesota, summed up the mood: 
“Members of Congress don't want 
10 look weak right now.” 

Michael D. Barnes. Democrat of 
Maryland, added: “It’s sort of an 
angry mood around here. Who can 
we stick it to next?” 

The bill was approved in a voice 
vote as lawmakers sought to avoid 
a recorded vote that could prove 
politically troublesome in the fu- 
ture. 

The Senate has approved a 
5 1 Z. 8-billion foreign aid bill and a 
conference will be needed to recon- 
cile the two versions. 

The action Thursday means that 
Congress is now likely 10 approve 
its first foreign rid bill since 1981. 
In recent years, such legislation was 
swamped by a 'number of highly 
emotional issues and Congress 
found it easier to finance foreign 
aid programs through catchall 
spending bills that avoided contro- 
versy. 

However, the Reagan adminis- 
tration opposed the bill offered 
Thursday, raising the possibility 
• that tire president might veto what- 
ever compromise emerged from a 
conference. «. . 

Tbe'White House said ihe mea^ 
sure placed too much emphasis on 
economic assistance and not 
enough on military aid. In addi- 
tion, the administration is upset by 
a provision that would "bar Jordan 
from receiving advanced weapons 
unless the president certified that 
the Jordanian government was 
ready 10 recognize Israel and enter 
into peace talks with iL 

The bill adopted Thursday out- 
lines 8126 billion in foreign aid 
programs for the fiscal years 1986 
and 1987. Appropriations in a later 
biD would be needed to finance 
those programs. 

Many conservatives swung be- 
hind Thursday’s bill after several 
amendments that moved the legis- 
lation toward the right. 

Mr. Weber, a leading conserva- 
tive in tire House, said: “It’s a 
change in policy in the right direc- 
tion. We’re really enunciating a 
Reagan doctrine in the Congress — 
that we will support resistance 
movements around the world." 

He added that, with President 
Ronald Reagan in the White 
House, Republicans bad a greater 
responsibility to support foreign 



Senator Richard G. Lugar, 
the Indiana Republican who 
helped engineer Senate 
passage of a sanctions bilL 

aid. “A majority party." he said, 
“cannot be an isolationist party.” 

Conservatives said the most' im- 
portant provision lifted the ban on 
aid to the Angolan rebels. Known 
as the Clark Amendment, the ban 
was adopted in 1976 and inaugu- 
rated a series of efforts by Congress 
to restrict the administration’s for- 
eign policy flexibility. 

Henry J. Hyde, Republican of 
Illinois, said that canceling the 
amendment was “like taking a cast 
off a broken leg.” He added: “It 
shows we’re no longer paralyzed by 
Vietnam-guill legislation.” 

Many liberals were deeply dis- 
tressed by tbe lifting of the amend- 
ment; which is named for former 
Senator Dick Clark, Democrat of 
Iowa. 

They saw it as part of a “danger- 
ous trend,” in the words of Thomas 
J. Downey, Democrat of New 
York, leading toward a more ag- 
gressive foreign policy. 

“What this Nil says is that the 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Economic 
Moves Aim 
At Apartheid 

By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

Sew York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
has approved legislation imposing 
economic sanctions on the govern- 
ment of South Africa. The vote was 
SO- 12 

The action Thursday evening 
means that it is likdy that Con- 
gress. for the first time, will ap- 
prove sanctions aimed at forcing 
the South African government to 
ease apartheid. 

Such a move would be a major 
rebuff for the Reagan administra- 
tion. which has followed a policy 
that it calls constructive engage- 
mem. Tbe policy intends to seek 
change in South Africa's racial pol- 
icies by diplomatic persuasion, not 
by confrontation. 

The Senate bill would ban new 
bank loans to the government; the 
sale of computers to agencies, such 
as the police, that enforce apart- 
heid; and the sale of goods used in 
nuclear production. 

The bill also requires American 
companies with 25 or more em- 
ployees to follow the Sullivan prin- 
ciples, a set of guidelines named for 
the Reverend Lera H. Sullivan or 
Philadelphia, that would require 
them to offer blacks the same treat- 
ment as whites in housing and em- 
ployment 

The House has already approved 
a package of tougher sanctions, in- 
cluding bans on new investment by 
American companies, in South Af- 
rica. on U.S. loans to the South 
African government on the impor- 
tation of South African gold coins, 
on the sale of computers to the 
South African government and on 
the sale of goods used in nuclear 
production. 

Tbe administration strongly op- 

(Coutmaed on Page 2, CoL S) 


Boy Scouts vs. the IRS 

Councfl Is at War WMi Computer 


By Sue Anne Pressley 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
leaders of the BudctaO Council 
of Boy Scouts in DuBois, Penn- 
sylvania, are learning patience, 
above ail. 

For a year, the scouting ad- 
ministrative organization has 
been forced into an inexplicable 
relationship with the Internal 
Revenue Service. 

“I don’t even flinch anymore 
when we get registered letters 
from them.” said Doug Kro- 
fina, scout executive. 

The Buck tail Council’s prob- 
lem has to do with the payments 
of wage taxes (about $7,900 
quarterly) for the council’s 
eight employees. The Buckt ails 
coordinate scouting activities 
for about 3.500 youngsters in 
north-central Pennsylvania. 

Tbe group’s accountant has 


records that, he said, show the 
payments have been made on 
time and accurately. He has the 
canceled checks to prove it, he 
srid. 

The IRS computer says oth- 
erwise. 

Four days after Mr. Krofina 
went to work with the Bucktail 
Council in June 1984, he re- 
ceived four statements from the 
IRS, notifying him that tbe 
council was delinquent, and bad 
overpaid or underpaid thou- 
sands of dollars. Mr. Krofina 
srid he immediately sent docu- 
ments to straighten out tbe mix- 
up and forgot about it. 

In July, however, he received 
a check for S 2662 made out to 
the Buck tails. Mr. Krofina re- 
turned the check. 

fn August came a bill for 
back raxes of 2 cents, with an 
added penalty of $153. Mr. 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


Panel’s Report Card: Japan Schools Need Reform 


, The spokesman. Larry Speakes, diately or in several weeks. 

C ° said that the fleshy intestinal' Mr. Reagan, in consul canon with 

growth was believed to be “precan- his wife, Nancy, chose to undergo 
cerous” but was still bang studied the three-hour operation on Satur : 




? by doctors, it was discovered dur- day Mr. Speakes said. 
s ing on examination of Mr. Rea- He said doctors found a larger 

- 1 - i r^i Mo inline nrfonrmnsilnuc-sinneannR noi- 


doctors had planned to remove 


glandular pot- 


during the procedure was taken out ypdescnboiasprecanccrous, Mr. 
■ without incident, Mr. Speakes said, Speakes said. 

,*t ij-but the new growth requires more Asked if there would be a tempo- 

surgery. tracer of power to VzceP^- 

If the operation goes as expected, ident George Bush, Mr. Speakes 


president will remain in the would say only that, u We are pre- 
^ V 'T.V^’><ospital for a week to 10 days, the pared for any contingency. 

j rpoksman said. The cabinet and congressional 

v.- N ' £ Doctors at rhe naval hospital leaders have been informed, of the 
'rwhere Mr. Reagan. 74. had gone president’s condition, the spokes- 


what was described as a routine man said. 


(AP. UP1) 


Soviet Ship Returns 37 
To Vietnam. After Rescue 

Sew Yprk Tunes Senice 

GENEVA — ’narty-seven Viet- 
namese believed to be refugees 
have been returned to Vietnam by a 
Soviet freighter that picked them 
up in the South China Sea, the 
office of. the UN High Commis- 
sioner for Refugees said Friday. 

Officials of the United Nations 
agency said that it would be Ihe 
first time, to their knowledge, that 
Vietnamese refugees had been re- 
turned home since die Vietnam 
War ended 10 years ago. The agen- 
cy official said it. was unclear what 
fate awaited the Vietnamese. 


. By Gyde Haberman 

• New York Tima Senice 

TOKYO — Nearly a year ago, 
Japan's prime minister appointed a 
commission to reassess a national 
school system that he had de-- 
scribed repeatedly as outmoded, 
uncreative, rigid and inhibiting. 

Now tbe 25-member panel has 
reported .back, with a- conclusion 
that the system Is every bit as bad 
. as Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka 1 
sone said it was.'- In fact, the Ad 
Hoc Advisory Council on Educa- 
tion seemed to suggest, it may well 
bewotst . 

“Despite its merit," the panel 
said, “the main’ thrust' of this coun- 
try's education has been to have 
students memorize information 
and facts. The development of the 
ability to think and judge on one’s 
own and the development of cre- 
ativity has been hampered. Too 
many stereotyped peraoos without 
marked individuality have been 
produced. Some people lack identi- 
ty as Japanese." 

The report surprised almost no 
.one when it was issued recently. 
Fra- one thing, most people expect- 
ed a reaffinnatimrof 'Mr. Naka- 
sone’s basic position since he had 
selected the panel members. For 
another, the study’s complaints 
formed a long litany that has been 
echoed drily by millions of Japa- 
nese for several years. 

Nevertheless, . the report meam 
that a government body had put a 
stamp- of- official rejection on Ja- 
pan’s educational system, signaling 
ihat the formal process of change 
had 'begun. It is likdy to take years 
to complete, assuming, skeptics 



Students and teacher? exchanging bows after an llth-grade math class in Hiroshima. 


tha fW York r« 


add, that it even gets udder way in 
earned. ' 

Few domestic matters raise more 
passions than the debate over how 
Japan should educate the 27.8 mil- 
lion. people who attend its 58,150 
schools, from kindergartens to uni- 
versities. 

Some politicians believe that Mr. 
Nakasonohas maintained a consis- 
tently high popularity level in pan, 
by his dose identification with this 
issue. Conversely, his political op- 
ponents have attacked him steadily 
fra wanting to alter the school sys- 
tem, whose basic structure was im- 
posed on Japan after World War II 
by occupying U.S. forces. 


Even before the report came out 
in late June, the Japan Teachers 
Union and its mainstays, the So- 
cialist and Communist parties, op- 
posed the education council as be- 
ing little more than a political 
“hatchet man" for the prime minis- 
ter. 

The teachers accused the panel 
of trying to put the blame on them. 
The Socialists and Communists, 
and also others who do not fall on 
the political left, reacted strongly to 
the counerTs references to “moral 
education” and to tbe need for stu- 
dent “understanding of Japanese 
culture and traditions.” Although 
seemingly vague, such phrases are 


regarded in some quarters as code 
words for returning Japan to its 
aggressive prewar nationalism. 

Even within the panel a few 
members expressed disappoint- 
ment criticizing the reprat anony- 
mously in thepress. “It is drawivup 
to make ends meet after being 
pushed by a political schedule.” 
one person was quoted as having 
said. 

Michio Okamoto. the council’s 
chairman, rejected suggestions of a 
political agenda. “There is a deep- 
rooted demand for change." he said 
in an interview. “For too long the 
educational system has been at- 
tacked for inhibiting creativity ” 


According to the panel Japan 
needs schools that emphasize stu- 
dent individuality, that foster di- 
versity and that provide for a more 
flexible curriculum than the one 
now enforced with steel-like firm- 
ness by ihe Ministry of Education. 

Fra the most pan. specific re- 
forms were avoided, a point noted 
disapprovingly by the report's crit- 
ics. Tbe few suggested changes in- 
cluded proposals that would enable 
vocational school graduates to en- 
ter colleges and that would elimi- 
nate one level of test-taking by 
merging the present system of a 

(Continued on Page 3, Col 1) 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-S UNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


Belgian Gills 
For Minister 
To Resign in 
Soccer Riot 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Interior Minister 
Charles-Ferdinand Nothomb was 
disowned Friday by a key coalition 
partner in a parliamentary debate 
on the May 29 European Cup Final 
soccer rioi in which 38 fans died. 

' The minister, under mounting 
pressure to resign over security fail- 
ures at the Heysel Stadium, criti- 
cized British society, which he said 
condoned hooliganism and was re- 
sponsible for “this calamity for the 
victims and our country.’' 

But the floor leader of the 
French-speaking Liberals, Robert 
Henrion. said he would vote to 
adopt a committee of inquiry re- 
port critical of Mr. Nothomb and 
urged the minister “to do the hon- 
orable thing.” 

He was particularly critical of 
Mr. Nothorab's personal aides, 
who he said had colluded in a co- 
ver-up with gendarmerie chiefs a 
week after the rioting to lie to par- 
liament as lo exactly when an emer- 
gency command was set up. 

Mr. Henrion was applauded by 
Prime Minister Wilfned Martens, 
who has so far not made any at- 
tempt to defend Mr. Nothomb, a 
Social Christian and one of four 
deputy prime ministers in the rul- 
ing four-party coalition. 

Mr. Martens's office said that 
there were no plans at present for 
him to speak in the parliamentary 
debate, which was likely to last 
most of Saturday. 

The atmosphere in parliament 
was tense. Political sources said 
Mr. Nothomb was apparently still 
hoping that the threat of a govern- 
ment crisis caused by the with- 
drawal of the Social Christian Par- 



U.S. Plays Down Beirut Airport Boycott WORLD BRIEFS 


mkk 


Charies-Fenfinand Nothomb 


By David B. Occaway 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration is backing away 
from its campaign to dose the Bei- 
rut International Airport and shift- 
ing its efforts to negotiating im- 
provements in airport security with 
the Lebanese government. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, said Thursday that 
the administration had discussed 
specific security steps with the Leb- 
anese government, incl uding a ban 
on all militias at the airport, a ban 
on all weapons and an “effective" 
security force to mam tain control 
there. 

“We're indicating to them what 
want, and they're claiming 


wor 


t had not decid- 
body for such 


said his 
ed to 
help. 

Mr. Bouhabibalsosaid that U.S. 
officials had initially told him that 
the U.S. sanctions on the airport 
and on Lebanon's Middle East Air- 
lines were temporary and would be 
lifted once security measures were 
improved. 

This seemed to suggest that the 
administration had never intended 
to push its allies hard to join in the 


ing rights for Middle East Airlines. 

Speaking at a National Press 

Gub luncheon, Mr. Bush said that 
he would prefer to see the various 
Lebanese militias acting together 
to safeguard the airport “and thus 
not have ns have to go forward on 
our own." He added that the Unit- 


Friday. but explosions killed two 
persons, including a Syrian, and 
wounded eight. United Press Inter- 
national reported from Beirut. 


Lebanese government sources 
said two ranking Syrian Army offi- 


ed States was ready to work with its cere would later join the security 
European allies “although there's committee. Official reports from 



ty from the cabinet would ensure 

his survival. 

The prime minis ter and Mr. 
Nothomb 
Flemish and 
Social Christian Party’ 
lion also includes the Liberal Party 
and the Freedom and Progress Par- 
ty. 

Earlier. Mr. Nothomb launched 
a stinging aLtack on British society. 
“Today I win speak out severely 
about the collective responsibility 
of English society, which tolerates 
this violence, which accepts it. 
which tries to channel it without 
wanting to eliminate it.” he said. 

He added, “A certain number of 
dubs accept this violence as a part 
of the sporting spectacle, and even 
of their club's trademark." 

A report by a parliamentary in- 
quiry said that British fans caused 
the deaths when they charged Ital- 
ian Juventus supporters. 

But it also said that serious er- 
rors by the Belgian and European 
soccer authorities and tbepararmli- 
tary gendarmerie contributed to 
the tragedy, and concluded that 
Mr. Nothomb must be considered 


they’re taking some steps." Mr. 
Speakes said. 

The adminis tration had previ- 
ously focused on ways to dose the 


Thursday and indicated that ade- 
quate security measures would sat- 
isfy the United States. 

The Beirut press reported Thurs- 
day that among the steps the Unit- 
ed States had suggested was the 
stationing of several hundred Unit- 
ed Nations troops at the airport 
But the Lebanese ambassador in 
Washington, Abdullah Bonhabib, 


it to pressure Lebanon. 

Mr. Speakes added that the 
United States welcomed the plan 
announced Tuesday by Lebanese 
leaders to improve security but said 
that “they have not done enough 
yet." 

The plan, worked out under Syri- 
an guidance in Damascus, calls for 
disarming the nriUtia forces, setting 
up a security coordinating commit- 
tee of their leaders with Syrian ob- 
servers and establishing a 5.000- to 
10,000-man Moslem-Ghxistian 
army unit to assure security in 


a division stm there as to bow far 
they want to go to take action." 

A senior administration official 
said the Untied States was getting 
far more private support than pub- 
lic support from its European al- 
lies. “xhe reason that the Lebanese 
are being responsive is that we are 
getting this private support." he 
said. 

The periodic shutdown of the 
Beirut airport, where 30 foreign air- 
lines mice operated regularly and 
which provides a livelihood for an 
estimated 20,000 Lebanese fam- 
ilies, has jarred the country eco- 


Engines Shat; Shuttle Launch Aborted * 

CAPE CANAVERAL Florida {API — The engines on the space 
shuttle Challenger ignited, then shut down three seconds before % 
scheduled liftoff Friday. The National Aeronautics and Space Adnhns- 
tration launch control said the ship and crew were safe. 

“We don't know what the anomaly was." Jim Ball, of the launch 
control staff, said. The seven-day mission w as carrying $72 million wonh 
of scientific instruments, including a West Goman-built system to point 
sensitive equipment in astronomical experiments with accuracy never 
achieved before. 

It was not known immediately whether all three of the shuttle's 
engines, which are fired 120 milliseconds apart, had ignited. The ship’s 
two big solid rocket boosters did not ignite. It was the second time in W 
launches that a shuttle liftoff had been stopped after the engines were 
ignited. The first time was on June 26. 19M. when (he maiden launch of 
the shuttle Discovery was a boned four seconds before liftoff. 


Damascus said the two officers 
were heading for Beirut to super- 


vise the carrying out of apian to 
end a decade of fighting. Tne plan 


plan 

was agreed to by Moslem leaders in 
the Syrian capital on Monday. 

In its first working session the 


nSdy V1 MQriS Vienna Urges Bonn to Lift Wine Ban; 

into five security zones under the - ° — •* - • - - * ■ • 


direct supervision of five Syrian ob- 
Lebanese field officers and 


servers, Lebanese field i 
representatives of the main Mos- 
lem militias. 

The meeting agreed to order all 
militia offices apart from the head- 


nomically and politically. It also quarters to close and all armed mi 


West Beirut and at the airport. 
The administration's public shift 


hological toll on 


from hs announced objective came 
as Vice President George Bosh in- 
dicated that there was “a division" 
among the United States’ Europe- 
an allies over whether to follow the 
American lead in boycotting the 
Beirut airport and canceling Tand- 


has InVwn a 
individual 
“When the airport is closed, 1 
feel I am suffocating, even if I don't 
want to travel anywhere," Lamia 
Suleiman, a secretary, told The 
Washington Post in BieruL 


VIENNA (Reuters) — Chancellor Fred Sinowalz or Austria has 
appealed to Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West Germany to lift a boycott 
of Austrian wines, a spokesman said Friday. 

Bonn said Thursday it had impounded thousands of bottles in a hunt 
for wine mixed with an anti-freeze chemical for taste and strength. The 
spokesman said the Austrian leader assured Mr. Kohl by telephone arid 
letter that all exported wine had undergone special checks since April, 
when it was learned that some had been mixed with diethyl ere glycoi, 
which can cause paralysis. 

In the Netherlands, the government advised anyone who drank at least 
half a bottle of Austrian wine this week to consult a doctor. 


I Security Committee Meets 
A Syrian-backed security com- 


li tiam en to withdraw from the 
streets starting Saturday, said a 
source at the session. 

plan, the Beiro^ajrpon win tre^nc Dutch Give Ultimatum to South Africa 

of the mam security zones and will 
be under the control of a 500-man 
strike force of Lebanese police, sol- 
diers and Syrian observers to be set 
up Saturday, the source said. 


THE HAGUE (Reuters) — The Netherlands will withdraw its ambas- 
sador in Pretoria if it does not get satisfaction from South .Africa over the 
recapture of a Dutch detainee from its embassy, Foreign Minister Hans 


van den Brock said Friday 

The Netherlands has demanded an apology and disciplinary action 


House, in 'Angry Mood,’ Acts 
To Expand Anti-Marxist Aid 


(Continued from Page 1) 
threat to use force is part and par- 
cel of our diplomacy, and I think 
that’s a mistake,” he said. 

A number of liberals supported 
the bill, however, because it con- 
responsible for shortcomings in se- tamed $43 billion for Israel which 
curity. Howard L Berman, Democrat of 


Britain Protests Sale of Uranium to Israel 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Britain said Fri- 
day that it had protested to Luxem- 
bourg for selling British-made de- 
pleted uranium to Israd. 

European Community officials 
said this week that the ur anium had 
nuclear weapons potential, but 
British authorities said that this 
was unlikely. 

Luxembourg said the Interna- 
tional Atomic Energy Agency in 
Vienna had sent experts to Israel 
who ascertained that the material 
was not being used in weapons. 


A spokeswoman for the depart- 
ment of energy in Britain said tht 


40 tons of depleted uranium were 
sold last fall by the state-owned 
British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. to Lux- 


embourg, which said it was to be 
used in steelmaking. 

She said: “When it was ship 
from Britain, it was under the < 
understanding that it would be 
used for special steelmaking in 
Luxembourg. It was shipped under 
safeguards, and we did not know it 
was meant far transshipment to Is- 
rael." 

She said the transshipment was 
discovered by Euratom. the ECs 
atomic agency, during routine 
monitoring of British sales of de- 
pleted uranium. 

In Luxembourg, Foreign Minis- 
ter Jacques Poos said that authori- 
ties had informed the EC and the 
International Atomic Energy 


Agency that the material was to be 
used in the Israeli non-nuclear in- 
dustry. He added that the agency 
had sent two experts to Israel who 
checked that the material had been 
used for metal alloy-making experi- 
ments. 

The British spokeswoman said it 
was extremely unlikely that the ma- 
terial would be used for weapons, 
while Bob Phillips, a spokesman 
for British Nuclear Fuds, said it 
could not be used “with any great 
degree of practicality" for bombs. 

He said depleted uranium is a 
byproduct of the specially prepared 
uranium used in nudear power sta- 
tions and is usually used as a heavy 
metal for special kinds of steel in- 
dustrial^ shielding and yacht keels. 


California, described as “critical 
assistance." 

Mr. Barnes noted (hat the bill 
would renew restrictions on aid to 
El Salvador by requiring regular 
reports on its willingness to negoti- 
ate with guerrilla forces and protect 
human rights. 

The biflwould provide about S6 
billion in military assistance, al- 
most $500 million less than the ad- 
ministration requested. Economic 
aid would be almost $4 billion, with 
the rest going for development pro- 
jects and international organiza- 
tions. The bill indudes these provi- 
sions: 

• Israel would receive $4.5 bil- 


lion, including an emergency infu- 
sion of $13 billion to help it survj\ 


lp it survive 
its financial crisis; Egypt is in line 
for $2.1 bQlion. 

• A ban on recognition of (he 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
until it recognizes Israd would be 
reaffirmed. 

• Anti-Communisi rebels in 
Cambodia would get $5 million, 
and $15 million would aid Afghans 
resisting Soviet forces. 

• U.S. aid for international fam- 
ily planning programs that pro- 
mote abortion would be barred. 



against the three South African policemen involved as well as assurances 
that such incidents will nol recur. Mr. van den Broek has also insisted that 
the detainee, Klaas de Jonge. 47, be returned to the Dutch Embassy, 
according to the Foreign Ministry. 

After South Africa's ambassador to The Hague. David Louw, bandedj 
note to the Foreign Ministry responding to the demands, Mr. van den 
Broek said in a television interview: “So far. we have received only s' 
unsatisfactory answers to the questions we asked. If the answers remain ’ 
the same, I shall be forced to lake diplomatic measures in the farm of 
recalling the ambassador." 


Suspects Held in Kuwaiti Bombings 


KUWAIT (AP) — Several suspects have been arrested in the bombing 
of two seaside cafes in which at least eight persons died and 89 were 


injured, Kuwait officials said Friday. Earlier reports had put the death 
'S Agency said the corirusior 
condition of the mutilated bodies. 


toll at 11: the Kuwait News Ac 


ion resulted from the 


In a call to the Paris headquarters of the French news agency Agenoe 
France- Presse, a caller claiming to represent (he Organization of Arab 
Revolutionary Brigades said that the organization carried out Thursday’s 
bombings. 

A Kuwaiti official said that the two time bombs, each 55 {mends (25 
kilograms) of TNT. were left under chairs on grass near the cafes. Otha 
offiaals said an unspecified number of Shiite Moslem suspects had been 
rounded up. There are about 200,000 Shiites in Kuwait, including about 
140,000 workers From Iran, Iraq and Lebanon. 


. t * • 

. * *w X# , f V " 


The Asodaod Ran 

Senator Jesse Helms, left, conferred with the majority 
leader, Robert J. Dole, ova* die anti-apartheid ML 


SAVE THE WHALES! 



Sperm Whales 


Outlaw Nations Defy Moratorium 


The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meets 
in Bournemouth, England next week (15-19 July) to 
debate the fate of the great whales. An indefinite 
moratorium on all commercial whaling is scheduled 
to begin at the end of 1985, but a handful of defiant 
whaling nations have declared they will continue to 
harpoon thousands of the endangered marine 
mammals. 


Please help save these extraordinary animals from 
extinction. The ruthless, greedy fishing industries of 
Japan, the Soviet Union, Norway and Iceland must 
be stopped. Says Sir Peter Scott, the great naturalist: 
"In light of our present knowledge of these magnifi- 
cent mammals, no civilized person can contemplate 
whaling without revulsion and shame at the insensi- 
tivity of our own species. Whaling is an affront to 
human dignity, a debasement of human values and 
sensibility." 


Please Help 

Here’s what you can rib to help 
save the whales: 

1) Write to your prime minister or president asking 
that your nation bring political and economic pres- 
sure against the outlaw whaling nations. The United 
States has already invoked its laws to impose severe 
sanctions against the Soviet Union — loss of fishing 
quotas within the U.S. 200-mile zone. Japan is 
bitterly resisting similar sanctions. 


2) Boycott the fish and airlines of Japan, the Soviet 
Union, Norway and Iceland. Ask your local markets 
and restaurants to stop purchasing fish from the 
industries that are wiping out the whales. Ask your 
travel agent not to book on their airlines. 


JAPAN has already violated a ban on all sperm 
whaling, voted 25 to 1 by the IWC. Japan is the larg- 
est whaling nation and imports virtually ail whale 
products from around the world — in violation of a ban 
on such trade by the 80-nation Convention on 
international Trade in Endangered Species. 


3) Make a contribution to the Save-the-Whales Cam- 
paign. It is tax-deductible in the U.S. For a contribu- 
tion of US $20 or more, you will receive a beautiful 
four-color print of the sperm whales (above), measur- 
ing 20"x26", by renowned marine life artist Richard 
Elis. 


THE SOVIET UNION violated its quota of minke 
whales this year and says it will send its whaling fleet 
to Antarctica, along with Japan’s, later this year in 
defiance of the IWC moratorium. 


The Animal Welfare Institute is a non-profit, educational 
organization established In 1951 to reduce animal 
suffering and to protect endangered species. 

Animal Welfare Institute 
P.O. Box 3650 

Washington, D.C. 20007 U.SJL 


NORWAY has declared it will not halt the whale-kill- 
ing along its coast, defiantly condemning the morato- 
rium, which was adopted by the IWC in a vote of 25 
to 7. 


ICELAND recently announced it would continue 
large-scale whaling under the pretext of "scientific 
research.” Not only will its whalers massacre 
hundreds of fin, sei and minke whaies. but the Ice- 
landic government says it is authorizing kills of doz- 
ens of critically-endangered blue and humpback 
whales. The "scientific research" will net Iceland as 
much as $10 million annually in whale-meat sales to 
Japan. 


/ want to help SAVE THE WHALES 


□ Pleasa send me more information about bow I can betp save 
the whales. 

□ Enclosed is my tax-deductible contribution of S . 


(Make check payable iq Animal Welfare Institute) 
□ Please send me a color print of the sperm whales 
(U.S. 520 or more) 


Nanw ........ a 

addfpffc i 

City 

. -7m 


Count rv ! 

Animal Welfare Institute. P.O. Box 3650. 


I 

Washington. D.C. 20007 U.SA. 


IHT | 


Sanctions on South Africa 
Are Passed by U.S. Senate 


Iraqi Missile Hits Turkish Tanker 

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraqi planes fired an Exocet missile into the 
Turkish supertanker M. Ceyhan on Friday, setting it ablaze in the Gulf 
near Iran's Kharg Island oO terminal marine salvage experts reported 

Bahrain-based maritime salvage sources said the 226, 145-ton Turkish 
ship was abandoned by its crew “after the missile blast ignited a huge fire 
in the stem section." The sources said the M. Ceyhan was raided at dawn 
about 1 00 miles (160 kilometers) south of Kharg very near the spot where 
another Turkish supertanker, the M. Vatan, was raided on Tuesday. 

Both tankers belong to the Turkish shipping company Cerrahogullari 
TAB. of Istanbul and were on lease to Tran to shuttle crude df bom 
Kharg to the makeshift Sirri Island terminal, out of range of Iraqi planes. 
The Imp military command said the planes inflicted an “accurate and 
effective hit" and returned safely to base. 

.... . , 

For the Record 


(Continued from Page 1) 
poses the House bill because of the 
ban on new investment, arguing 
that it would result in a loss of jobs 
for many blacks in South Africa 
who now work for American com- 
panies. 

State Department officials, while 
formally opposing the Senate bill 
have indicated that the administra- 
tion would agree to the Senate 
sanctions as a strategy intended to 
dissuade the House from insisting 
on its stronger sanctions. 


Spanish air traffic controller have called off plans to stage work 
slowdowns during busy summer weekends, their association president 
said in Madrid on Friday. (AP) 

Venetian officials signed an agreement Friday with a consortium of 


raqor Italian companies for the first phase of a project costing 234 hdlkn 
lirctaboutSJ23 mfflion) to protect Venice from flooding. (AP) 


administration's policy on that 
country. The sentiment has grown 
in the last six months, prompted by 
the wave of unrest in black town- 
ships, the killing of blacks by the _ __ _ . , . . . „ 

South African police and demon- * Bernard Tap*, a French businessman who heads, more than 40 compa- 
strations againstapartbeid in the charged wjanren^ control violation* Pam ; cam 

- - officials said. He was accused of illegally transferring 1 5 mflhon French 

francs ($170,000) to Switzerland from 1978 to 1980. (Reuters) 

Admiral Hyman G. Rkkorer, 85, who directed the 113. Navy's program 
for nuclear vessels, suffered a stroke July 4 but is in stable condition at , 
Bethcsda Naval Hospital outside Washington, a spokesman for the US. , 
Navy said Thursday. (AP) 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the British foreign secretary, i 


Arnold Mi 
During Re 


United States. 

The Senate bill threatens to im- 
pose a ban on new investment in 18 
months if there is no progress to- 
ward ending apartheid. 

Approval of tbe bill followed an 
effort by several conservatives, led 


The biU is designed to “distance by Senator Jesse Helms, a North 

Carolina Reput 
tion with a filibuster. 


this country from the evil of apart 
held," said Senator Richard G. Lu- 
gar, an Indiana Republican and 
chairman of the Foreign Relations 
Committee. 

Opponents of the bill who also 
condemn apartheid, said that 
South Africa was an ally and a 
bulwark against Co mmunism in 
Africa. They said it was unfair to 
impose sanctions on Smith Africa 
and not on the Soviet Union or 
China. 

Senator Barry Gold water, an Ar- 
izona Republican, said that it was a 
“blight against the United States to 
lake this action a gainst an ally a 
friend in every war." 

Tbe support for the biU among 
Republicans reflects the growing 
dissatisfaction in Congress with the 


iblican. to block ac- 



On Wednesday, the Senate vot- 
ed, 88-8, to limit debate and shut 
off the filibuster. Mr. Helms prom- 
ised nevertheless that he would use 
other procedures to block approv- 


provok 
discussion. 

President Antonio Ramalho Eanes of Forts 
Friday and called general elections for Oct. 1 


1982, 


subject 
(Reuters) 
dissolved parliament on 
(Rotten) 


Bul^Thursday. Senator Lugar Ulster Protestant Marches 

End Without Serious Clashes 


-r'r~ 


■v\T 


7 .— 


•tr’ 


h 

’ % 


was able to convince the Demo- 
crats in the Senate, who wanted to 
propose amendments to make tbe 
biU stronger, not to offer them. He 
said that such an action would 
force a veto by President Ronald 
Reagan. With the Democrats will- 


ing to accept the bill as it was, Mr. 
Helms and other sena 


senators opposing 
the bill were wining to let it come to 
a final vote. 

It is expected that a final bfll will 


The Arsodated Press 

BELFAST — Sporadic violence 
broke out across Northern Ireland 

— an annual cwtpouring of ^Protes- 
tant favor to celebrate a 295-year- 
old defeat over a Catholic king 


South African government and the get through the Scnate only if the 

_. House drops its ban on new invest- P^^ons arrested in 


CHURCH SERVICES 


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ment 

■ Pretoria Withholds Comment 
The South African government 
will not comment on the Senate 
vote until Congress completes ac- 
tion, United Press International 

n xl tbe foreign minister, RJF. 

a. as saying Friday in Cape 
Town. 

Mr. Botha said that the vote was 
“port of a lengthy and complex 
legislative process" and that com- 
ment from South Africa would be 
“premature." 

“We would hope nonetheless 
that good sense will prevail in the 
time still available, and the ongoing 
debate on this issue wDJ serve to 
better inform the United States leg- 
islature of the mutually disadvan- 
tageous consequences which their 
actions could bring about." he said 
in a statement. 


to 


dashes linked to the 
marie the Battle of the 

The worn violence occurred in 
Portadown, 25 miles (40 kilome- 
ters) southwest of Belfast, where, 
for the first time in 150 years, po- 
lice barred Protestants from 
marching through a sensitive Ro- 
man Catholic district known as 
“TheTuuneL" 

More than 600 police, backed by 
soldiers, came under repeated bar- 
rages of rocks, bricks and bottles as 
they guarded either end' of the 
Ohms Street neighborhood, where 
about 70 Catholic families live. 

Police fired plastic bullets to dis- 
perse gangs of Protestant youths. 
At least three policemen were in- 
jured in the dashes, and two per- 
sons were arrested. 

Fighting flared in about 20 dries 
and towns earlier in the day. 

A Belfast police spokesman said 


that, with the exception of Porta- 
down, the parades passed off 
peacefully. 

The Orange Dax parades com- 

IT's Catholic army by WiHiain of 
Orange's Protestant forces in the . 
Battle of tbe Boyne on July 
1690. 

Numerous celebrations 




z t 




ir! * 

i syi 

■»eu< 




v. 





with the big Orange Day parades 


J ui^I2. 



ithobcs. outnumbered: 2-1 by 
Protestants, have long complained 
that the' parades are provocative, 

. and there is growing sealimail in 
British and Irish' government cir- 
cles to curb them. 

But in London, Lord fitl a Jedd- 
ing moderate Catholic, argued la 
the House of Lords on Friday 
against rerouting or b anning - the 
Orange Order marches. 

"Every terrible crisis we ha* 
seen or witnessed over these past 21 
years has been preceded by danofr 
Strattons or banning, of some fo. 
scription," said Lord Fitt. a forma 1 , p^ 1 ’ - • 
member of the House of Commons 
for Belfast. 



P 315 Comm 


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Boy Scouts at War Wilt an IRS Computer 


(Continued from Page l) Jan. 29, the IRS abruptly froze the 
Krofina churned out the paper- council’s assets. Through tbe inter- 
work again. vention of a banker mend. Mr. 

On Oct. 17, he received two Krofina said, tbe Bnck tatls 
checks, in separate envelopes, from their money rel e ased, 
the IRS for 5237 and $2.62. Nothing further hs 

Five pieces of correspondence Man* II, wbea Mr. 


•; ft 


got 


arrived from the agency in Novem- 
ber, including notices that the 
Bucktails owed 1982 taxes of 
$14343. $12,323 and 510,697. Mr. 
Krofina contacted the IRS and sent 
more documentation. 

December passed quietly. On 


until 
firm re- 
ceived a statement that the council 
had overpaid $162 and that the 
money would be applied to hack 
debts from 1982. A week later. -the 
couhdi'recdved a request for 1982 
in the amount of $12,624. 

“At that point, I went r unning to 


Senator Heinz, screaming, 
‘Help!’ " Mr. Krofina said. He was 
referring to Senator John Heinz, ja 
Republican of Pennsyl vania iubo 
is head of a subcommittee investi* 
gating the IRS's problems. 

At Mr. Heinz's urging, the IRS 
promised to look into the case. 

“I'm not familiar with the detaBjJf 
of the case," Jim Davie, a spokfF-' 1 * 
man for the Philadelphia meyip? 
center, said last week. “But .Do 
sure well do everything we qariTb 
straighten it ont.” ... C_ 


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Page 3 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


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AMERICAN TOPICS 


'JZjsro Complacency 5 


The ops and downs of recent 
.years have so shaken American 
businessmen that there is now 
“amcomptocency" compared 
to the- 1946-1973 boom period 
that ended with the world oil 
crisis,' according to. Thomas J. 
Peters. He is co-author of two 
best sellers on business, “In 
Search of Excellence" and “A 
Passion for Excellence." 

In an interview with U.1 
News&World Report maga- 
zine, however, Mr. Peters la- 
ments that “everybody talks 
quality, but most of that is lip 
service.” He adds that, “the 
staffs of the Fortune 500 com- 

eddesjrite cnJoftffto 50 per- 
cent” and there is “still too 
much of a tendency to look to 
the government for solutions as 
opposed to looking to the work 
force.” 

'The major failure of Ameri- 
can business is seeing the em- 
ployee as part of the problem 
Instead of as part of the solu- 
tion,” Mr. Peters says: In most 
speeches by corporate chiefs, 
“you still pick up automation 1 
rather than ret raining and rede- 
ployment of the wok force as 
the salvation of business.” 


Short Takes 

One of the most popular dis- 
plays at the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution in Washington, is “TV 
Trivia,” which includes Archie 
Bunker’s chair, JJL’s ll 
hat from “Dallas” and 
Rogers's sweater. The new head 
of me museum complex, Robert 
McCormick Adams, says, how- 
ever, that the ideal nrn«mu ar- 
tifact should be chosen “not be- 
cause it is instantly recog- 
nizable, but because it will 
continue to evoke rich images 
and associations when no one is 
left who recognizes it” TV 
Trivia accordingly will “grow 

only slowly.” 

Shorter Takes: Pittsburgh 
has opened a 1.1-mile (1 ^-kilo- 
meter) subway, apparently the 
shortest in the country, consist- 
ing of three downtown stations. 
An additional nine miles of sur- 
face tracks are planned, . . . San 
Diego, Chicago, Miami and At- 
lanta already are contending to 
play host to the 1988 Republi- 
can national convention. San 
Diego, which could stage a fare- 
well tribute to President Ronald 
Reagan in his home state, is an 
eariy favorite. . . . Americans 
bought $2.8 billion worth of 
electronic anti-buxglar alarm 
systems last year: the figure is 
expected to climb to $3 5 


this year and $8.8 binion by 
1990, industry experts say.. 

The United States has a .na- 
tional' anthem but DO national 
march. Representative James 
HiQuiflen, a Tennessee RejwlK 
tican, is sponsoring a bill to so 



John Philip Sousa 


designate John Philip Sousa's 
“The Stars and Stripes Forev- 
er.’' Sousa first played bis 
march before Preside t William ■ 
McKinley in- Philadelphia on 
May- 14, 1897, at the unveiling 
of a statue of George Washing- 
ton. 


On the 'BuRy Pulpit’ •’ 

For Theodore Roosevelt,- the 
American presidency was a 
“bully pulpit.” And Ronald 
Reagan may be the best preach- 
er yet to occupy it, in tne opin- 
ion of Representative Rfimam 
H. Gray m of Pennsylvania, 
chairman of the House Budget 
C ommittee and hhmrif a Bap- 
tist minister. 

Mr. Gray, a Democrat, says 
that the Republican' president 
“may be a lousy administrator, 
it terrible pastor." But, be says, 
“the quesuon is, ‘Can he preach 
at 11 o'clock on a Sunday 
morning?’ And if he can preach 
for that 20 minutes, people 
withstand a whole lot of gar- 
bage mi the rest of the issues.” 

Mr. Gray goes on to say of 
Mr. Reagan, “He does preach 
tire word. The word is the valoe$ 
of America, things that all of. us 
can agree to, whether you’re 
Democrat or Republican." 
Therefore, “If you’ve been liv- 
ing over the lak ] 5 years and 
looking at what’s been in the 
White House, you say. ‘Praise 
the Lord! Finally we've got a 
preacher who can preach/” 


ARTHUR HIGBEE 




Biles Senate 





By Helen Dewar 

WashotgiM Post Service 

p WASHINGTON — Republi- 
cans in the US. Senate are com- 
plaining that President Ronald 
Reagan has- abandoned a major 
weapon in. the fight against soaring 
budget dc&dts by .chasing his 
mind on freezing Soda] Security 
benefits. ' 

Mr. Reagan and congressional 
leaders reached an a gr eem en t earli- 
er this week to tty ID write a defitit- 
redoctioa {dap that provides infla- 
tion increases for berth the military 
and Social Security, without any 
tax increases.- . / . 

The criticism by Senate RepubG- 

cans was especially strong during a 
closed-door -session dnnng winch 
many of the 22 Republicans who 
are up for re-election next year 
vented their anger to party leaders 
and White Bouse officials. 

The senators object to a “frame- 
work” agreement reached Wednes- 
day between the White House and 
congressional budget negotiators in 
an effort to settle differences on the 
key issues of taxes, militaiy tend- 
ing and Social Security, which pro- 
vides for retirement benefits and 
disability payments. 

“People fed they flew a .kamika- 
ze mtsaon and ended up in flames 
and got nothing for iv said Sena- 
tor Warren Rudman, Republican 



feftn-un 


CHARGED IN SPYING — Sharon Scranage, a QA 
employee at the U-S. Embassy in Ghana, after arraign- 
ment in Virginia, on charges of espionage conspiracy. 
She is charged with giving secrets to Michael Agbotori 
Sonssoodfc, a nephew of Jerry J. Rawlings, Ghana's 
military leader. Both suspects were held without baH. 


Nitze Sees Soviet Space Focus 

Adviser Says Moscow Could Deploy New Weapons by 1990 


By Hedrick Smith 

Mw York Times Service 

WASHINGTON— The Reagan 
administration, answering Soviet 
criticism of U.S. research into a 
space-based missile defense, has 
amplified charges that Moscow has 
conducted similar research for 
years. 

A spokesman said Thursday that 
by the end of the decade the Soviet 
Union could be in a position to 
deploy technologies that would vi- 
olate the 1972 anti-ballistic missile 
treaty. 

The spokesman, Paul H. Nitze, 
who is arras adviser to Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz, said in an 
interview Out the technologies, 
which are being studied in the 
United States, included high-ener- 
gy lasers and panicle-beam, radio- 
frequency and kinetic energy weap- 
ons. 

These new missile-defense tech- 
nologies have been grouped under 
what is officially known in the 
United States as the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative, or SDL which is 
widely called “star wars.” 

“We are concerned," Mr. Nitze 
said, “that, in the aggregate, Soviet 
ABM-related activities could pro- 
vide them the basis for deployment 
of an ABM defense of their nation- 



Paul H. Nitze 

something which we could not 
overwhelm." 

Another administration special- 
ist in arms control said that, by 
U.S. estimates, the Soviet Union 
will spend $26 billion on these tech- 
nologies from 1985 to 1989 — 


al territory, which would violate the . 1 

^Tii^^cShavc aboui whai PTOdeni Ronaid Rea- 


partial defense of their national ter- 
ritory, though it would not be 


“If the {mwd mt^cm ’t^s^TpOTt Nicaraguans Say U.S. Trade Boycott 

ley. Republican of Iowa, “he ought t t • 1 , mr m jnr 

tfAW " Inconvenience but No Great Harm 

can of Kansas and the Senate ma- 
jority leader,' said, “A lot of sena- 
tors are pretty upset about what 
they perceive to be a House- White 
House combine.” 

Pete V. Domcnici, Republican of 


By William R. Long 

Los Angela Times Service 

MANAGUA — When the Unit- 
ed States announced a trade em- 


baigD against Nicaragna at the be- pawnmitom* . 
gnSig of May, some Sandinist , U-S. diplomats mb 
mtore e h a utnan, said, loeres a ^Bdafc were alanned from the ouiset,mjjn 


lot of negative comment among 
senators about what happened, 
with a great deal of justification, 
that’s for sure." 

Senate negotiators are demand- 
ing equivalent cuts in other domes- 
tic programs to offset the loss of 
savings from Social Security; 
House bwgamers say they will pro- 
pose additional cuts but are resist- 
ing the demand for equivalent sav- 
ings, which would amount to about 
$28 billion over three years. 

Mr. Domem'ci called for a first- 
year reduction of $6 bflhoa to $8 
trillion toward ' the $28 bQHon, but 
the House Budget Committee 
chahman, William H. Gray 3d, 
Democrat of Fennsyivsnia, said 
that rady,$3 bplion to . $6- billion 
was posable.’ * J - 


* -satied 




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; \?S 


Arnold Miller, Leader of U.S. Miners 
During Reforms of 197 Os, Dies at 62 


But now, government officials, 
businessmen and some foreign dip- 
lomats say that the embargo has 
not caused any important new 
damage to the economy, which was 
already in a state of deterioration. 

While the embargo has caused 
some inconveniences, it has also 
provided some benefits, officials of 
the leftist government contend. 

■ Alejandro Martinez Cuenca, 
minister of foreign trade, said in an 
interview that everything Nicara- 
gua was selling in the United States 
before the embargo, mainly bar 
nanas, shellfish ana beef, had been, 
redirected to otha markets. 

Bananas that were being sent to 
California, for example, now go to 
Western, Europe in six chartered 
cargo ships, he said. The minister 
added that the ships were also car- 
rying avocados, mangos and other 
products that had not been export- 
ed before becanse of alack of trans- 
port. 


without excessive freight costs, Mr. 
Martinez said. And because of the 
embargo, he said, European coun- 
tries are giving Nicaragua easier 
t terms. 

Managua 
private, that (he 
administration did not in- 
to barm the Nicaraguan econ- 
omy. 

The main purpose, they said, was 
to make a dramatic public gesture, 
showing that the administration 
would not conduct business as usu- 
al with the Saudi nia s while asking 
Congress for money to rid anti- 
Sandinist guerrillas. 

One diplomat said that the worst 
damage done by the embargo 
might nave been the cancellation of 
the Managna-Miami route of Aer- 
onica, the government airline. 

“That was their only profit-mak- 
ing route,” he saxL 

One of the worst aspects of the 
embargo was expected to be a 
shortage of parts- for UJL-made ve- - 
bides and machinery. 

But the foreign trade minister 
said the country was finding many 
sources for such parts outside the 
United States, including subsidiar- 
ies of U.S. companies in Latin 


States will take time and cost 10 
percent to 15 percent more, he said. 

But he said he has found a way to 
get the parts from Panama. 

Even before the embargo, Nica- 
ragua’s trade with the united 
Stales was dwindling. The U5. 
share of Nicaragua's total trade 
had declined from 30 percent in 
1980 to 17 percent in 1984. 

Mr. Martinez said that half of 
the 17 percent would be taken up 
by Co mmunis t countries and the 
remainder by others. 

trade in 198^was^rith Q ammrnL t N.Y. Panel Fmds 

countries, he said, adding that the j . . n /i i 

figure would rise to about 25 per- A^QinSf JlOy LO/ZIl 


missile defense program. 

Mr. Nitze said Moscow was 
ahead of the United Slates in high- 
energy laser weapons and would be 
ready to test an airborne laser be- 
fore the United States, even assum- 
ing that the Reagan program is 
fully funded by Congress. 

Mr. Nit2e, in the interview and 
earlier in a speech at Chautauqua, 
New York, made these points: 

• The Soviet Union, with more 
than 10,000 people working on la- 
ser weapons, already has ground- 
based lasers at its Saryshagan test 
site; at the western aid of Lake 
Balkhash. Such lasers are said to be 
able to interfere with low-altitude 
satellites. An airborne laser under 
development could be used against 
cruise missiles. 

• Soviet prototypes for ground- 
based lasers could be available “by 


the late 1980s” and if some testing 
steps are skipped, the Soviet Union 
could technically “be ready to de- 
ploy a ground-based laser ballistics 
missile defense system by the earlv 
to mid-1990s." However, the U.S. 
estimate is that operational deploy- 
ment “is not likely in this century." 

• In kinetic energy weapons, us- 
ing an electromagnetic rail gun to 
accelerate small projectiles to col- 
lide with targets such as incoming 
warheads, the Soviet research pro- 
grams “could result in the near 
term in a short-range, space-based 
system useful for satellite or space 
station defense and for close-in at- 
tack by a maneuvering satellite.” 

• Soviet research in the fields of 
panicle-beam weapons and high- 
frequency radio weapons is moving 
more slowly, by u.S. estimates, 
with prototype testing unlikely be- 
fore the mid- 19%s. 

On both panicle and kinetic en- 
ergy weapons. Mr. Nitze said. Sovi- 
et programs are believed to be in 
roughly “the same time frame” as 
U.S. programs, but in (he field of 
lasers, Soviet research is ahead. 

Mr. Nitze noied (hat Marshal 
Andrei A Grechko, then (he Soviet 
defense minister, said in 1972, dur- 
ing ratification or the ABM treaty, 
that research into strategic defense 
programs was permissible. 

■ Soviet Denies Shift on SDI 

The Soviet newspaper Pravda 
has dismissed as a “sleazy strata- 
gem” reports (hat Moscow had 
eased its opposition to U.S. re- 
search for space missile defense. 
Reuters reported from Moscow. 

The official newspaper respond- 
ed Friday to a New York Tunes 
repon quoting U.S. officials as say- 
ing Soviet negotiators in Geneva 
had indicated they would accept an 
aims treaty allowing research. 

“It is rumored in Washington 
that the Soviet Union departs from 
its position on the unconditional 
ban of strike space arms,” Pravda 
said. “AQ this is nothing hut anoth- 
er sleazy stratagem of Washington 
propaganda.” 


“The impact of the embargo on America, 
exports has been redneed to a mim- A foreign economist confirmed 


v v 



enous 


u»'*: 






t*.-- i 

V. - M- 


The Associated Press 

CHARLESTON, West Virginia 
— Arnold Miller, 62, who beaded 
the United Mine Workers from 
^ -1972 to 1979, after his ejection on a 
- reform ticket, died eariy Friday at 
theChariesion Area Medical Cen- 
ter after a long illness, the hospital 
announced. 

: During his seven yean as muon 
head, bar. Miller presided over 
in the structure of the 
which for yean bad been 
the personal domain of such strong 
-leaders as John L Lewis and WA 
(Tony) Boyle. 

The changes began in 1969, 
when an insurgent, Joseph (Jock) 
Yabtaosid, challeng ed Mr. Boyle 
for the presidency. Mr. Boyle won 
but Mr. Yablonslri planned to chal- 
lenge the election in court Mr. 
Yablcmsld, his wife and da u ghter 
were murdered in their western 
Pennsylvania home in December 
' 1969. 

; • A federal judge ordered new 
elections and also ordered a new 
democratic structure for the union. 

Mr. Miller, who first became po- 
,7* lilicaDy active in the black-lung 
movement of the late 1960s, was 
.the candidate of a movement caD- 
,4 tog itself the Miners for Democracy 

' 'and defeated Mr. Boyle. 


a M I,,** when an insurgent, 

ni \hirClW Yablonslri, chrilens 

fW for the DreadencvT] 



«VW5 


. Arnold MDier 

Mr. Boyle died earlier this year 
in a hospital while saving a sen- 
tence for murder in Mr. Yablons- 
jd’s toth- 

Mr. Miller was re-elected in 1977 
with a different date of officers, 
inrinfHng Sam Qoxrch Jr. as vice 
president 

Mr. Miller soon began suffering 
from' problems associated with 
heart attacks and strokes, however, 
and- stepped down in November 


1979, turning the job over to Mr. 
Church. 

Mr. Miller suffered a stroke and 
heart attack in 1978, after an 111- 
day strike. 

Sfinoa Kuznets, 84 , 

Harvard Economist 
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts 
(UP!) — Simon. Kuznets, 84, a pro- 
fessor emeritus of economics at 
Harvard University, who was a pk>- 
neer in national economics mea- 
surements and the 1971 Nobel 
Prize laureate in economics, died 
Tuesday at his borne here. 

Professor Kuznets devised 
means by which nations could mea- 
sure their economic performance, 
involving the use of national in- 
come accounts as a tool to study 
prosperity, depression and growth. 

He devoted his career to the 
quantitative characteristics of the 
long-term growth of nations. 

■ Other Deaths: 

Raphael Campos, 49, film and 
television actor who played in 
“Blackboard Jungle” and “Rho- 
da,” Tuesday in Los Angeles of 


mum, to the point that Nicaragua 
today has opened a new market in 
Enrobe,” he said. The net result, be 
added, is more exports than before 
the embargo. 

Also, the ships that cany Nicara- 
guan prodocts to Europe make it 
! to import European goods 


that the embargo has not caused 
any notable shortages. 

Aron Guerrero, general manager 
of a Nabisco cracker subsidiary in 
Nicaragua, said that about 80 per- 
cent of the machinery in his plant 
was made in the United States. 
Getting parts outside the United 


cent this year. 

Nicaragua win have a trade defi- 
cit of about $400 million this year, 
more than its total income from 
exports, he said. The deficit will be 
offset by credits, donations and re- 
negotiation of the country’s $4-b0- 
lion foreign debt. 

Np other country has joined in 
the' U5. embargo, the minister of 
foreign trade sard. 

He asserted that the embargo 
had been a “boomerang,” and add- 
ed, “It hasn’t hurt us politically. On 
the contrary, it helps us, because it 
is clearly evident that the aggressor 
is the United States.” 

Despite what was described as 
the embargo’s light impact, the 
pro-Sandrmst press continues to 
describe it as economic aggression 
against the Nicaraguan people. 

Opposition politicians say that it 
deflects attention from problems 
caused by Sandinist poticks. 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A disciplinary 
panel of the New York slate court 
system has found wrongdoing by 
Roy M. Cohn involving the alleged 
misuse of fees on accounts of two 
of his law firm’s clients. 

- Mr. Odin, 58, who was counsel 
for Senator Joseph R. McCarthy' 
during the Wisconsin Republican's 
anu-Communist crusade in the 
1950s, said Tuesday that the Man- 
hanan-Bronx judicial disciplinary 
committee notified him last month 
of its prdimtoary findings. 

Panel officials declined to com- 
ment publicly on the proceedings 
on grounds of confidentiality. Mr. 
Cohn himself said, “They’re just 
out to smear me up.” 




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U.S, Diplomatic Nominees Approved 


Japan Commis sion Concurs : 
In Criticism of School System 


j-.-" • 


, 7 T- 






•r*:> 


(Continued from Page 1) 

,p' ; .thro-year junior high school and a 
•ihree-year senior high into a um- 
. Ged six-year program. 

Mr. Otamoto acknowledged 
■ „ -. that these ideas did not go to the 

• heart of the schools’ perceived 
' shortcomings, but be insisted that 
•j - .-..-v details- would come in future re- 
ports. 

. -t.. . ; • . Most of alL'thecoondlsad,Ja- 
pan must somehow suppress its 
• - Jendency to place .extraordinary 
j emphasis cm a person's school 
background. 

Fran an early age, children have 
h drammed into them that true 
counts far Iks than scor- 


tbexr seniors for purposes of re- 
cruitment.” 

That system is showing signs of 
erosion, but it remains powerful 
Earlier this year; an organization 
called the Japan Recruit Center 
surveyed nearly 100,000 managers 
at large corporations who had 
graduated from both pobBc and 


Jean-Paul Le Cbmois, 75, direc- 
tor who hflwnwft famous in, the 
1 950s for films depicting dramas of 
everyday life, in Sanchellemoz, 
southern France. His best-known 
film was “Les Mis&rables," in 1957. 

Nicholas P. Thhnmesch, 57, far- 
mer syndicated columnist, Wash- 
ington bureau chief for Newsday 
and author of books including 
“Robert Kennedy at 40 ” Thursday 
in Chevy Chase, Maryland, of can- 
cer. 


By Joanne Omang 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Senate gave swift and unanimous 
approval to 24 of 28 officials nomi- 
nated for State Department posts, 
ending a monthlong “hold” im- 
posed by Senator Jesse Helms, Re- 
publican of North Carolina, and 
other conservative senators. 

The bloc vote on Thursday will 
. allow several key nominees to take 
office. They include Thomas R. 
Pickering, as ambassador to Israel, 
and EUiottJW. Abrams, as assistant 
secretary for inter-American af- 
fairs. 

The remaining four nominees, 
who will be voted on next week, are 
Richard R. Burt, as ambassador to 
West Germany; Rozanne Ridgway 


conservatives bad wanted “taken 
care of" before they consented to 
release the new nominations for 
debate. 

Both sides declined to reveal de- 
tails of the agreement, saying the 
State Department world make the 
announcements soon. 

“Tm very satisfied," Mr. Helms 
said. “This has been a good week." 

Other ambassadorial nomina- 
tions approved were: 

Peter K Bridges, Somalia; Fer- 
nando E. Rondon, Ecuador; 
Charies A. Gillespie, Colombia; 


Sheldon J. Krys, Trinidad and To- 
bago; Lowell C. Kilday, Domini- 
can Republic, Harry G. Barnes, 
Chile; Robert L Pugh, Mauritania. 

Edward J. Perkins, Liberia; Lew- 
is A. Tambs, Costa Rica; Edward 
M. Rowell, Bolivia; Paul J. Hare, 
Zambia; John D. Scanlan, Yugo- 
slavia; David G. Newton, Iraq; 
Lannon Walker, Senegal; Thomas 
A Nassif, Morocco; Richard T. 
McCormack, Organization of 
American States; J. William Mid- 
dendorf 2d, European Communi- 
ty; L. Craig Johnstone, Algeria, 
and Nicholas Ruwe, Iceland 


of state for European affairs; 
win Corr to replace Mr. Pickering, 
as ambassador to El Salvador, and 
John A. Fetch, as ambassador to 
Honduras. 

The action reflected an agree- 
ment between Mr. Helms ana-lhe 
State Department on the fate at six 
conservative officeholders that 


iitf' 


RS (rtiir . 

* *-*’■-- -for the 1 


come from only four of Japan’s 
460 four-year schools. Not coinci- 
dentally, they were die most illus- 
trious — Tokyo, Kyoto, Waseda 
and Keto Umvecsitksi . 

Knowing the importance of the 
righ t diploma, youngsters work 

long and hard from an eariy age, 

mg well on entrance examinations attending after-school cram 
Tor the better universities. If they courses late into the night, to pre- 
"faE to get into those universities, pare For make-or-break exains. 
have meager employment Many of them snap. 

. * Tn tfio locf UM 




prospects at prestigious companies 
..and government ministries. 

One member of the advisory 


In the last few years 


• •* f.|councfl, Naohiro Amaya, coni; 


plained at a 

symposium (hat c ol lege* “have be-. 
;come to effect subcontractors for 
the major companies. 1 * 

“It’s got to the point," he said, 
“where one of their duties is to rank 


a surge of sdiool violence, most 

recently by a growing phoioscnon 

known as yime, or severe bullying 
by students. 

“This violence and juvenile de- 
linquency is the immediate reason 
we must have reform," Mr. Oka- 
EDorosaid. 


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Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUND A * , J U LY 13-14, 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc, 


PuUtfbctl With Hk New York Time* and The Washington Port 


A Chance to Stand Firm 


President Ronald Reagan is backing out of 
'the saloon with his rhetorical guns blazing, but 
the fireworks cannot hide the fact that he is 
hacking away from dealing with airline safety 
just when he should be standing firm. 

There is every reason for dignifi ed anger. An 
American sailor was beaten and murdered 
aboard the hijacked TWA plane last month 
and his murderers are at liberty near Beirut 
Four other Shiite hijackers who killed two 
Americans aboard a Kuwaiti airliner last De- 
cember were ostentatiously seized by authori- 
ties in Iran but were never tried or extradited. 
Besides the 39 Americans who were held hos- 
tage in Lebanon, seven kidnapped Americans 
have been held there for up to 16 months. Yet 
instead of mobilizing opinion and action to 
deal with these offenses, Mr. Reagan confuses 
the subject by inveighing broadly against “a 
confederation of terrorist states." 

You do not have Lo deny U-S. grievances 
against Cuba, Nicaragua, North Korea and 
Libya to see that their governments, although 
sometimes allied, each present different chal- 
lenges that are also distinct from those of Iran, 
Lebanon and Syria. Nor need you deny their 
attacks on America lo preserve distinctions 
that Mr. Reagan blurs: between terrorism and 
civil war, guerilla war and aggression. 

If Cuba is to be indicted for encouraging 
terror against the United States, it needs at 
least to be remembered that the United States 
sponsored an invasion of Cuba and many plots 
to assassinate its leader. If Nicaragua is guilty 
of terror against its neighbors and deserves, in 
Mi. Reagan's words, “the full weight of the 
law." why has he refused the invitation to 


make that case before the World Court? And if 
Libya’s indisputable outrages against many 
nations so deeply perturb the United States, 
where is the cam paig n to dose its gun-laden 
embassies or to boycott its oil-drum war chest? 

The sad truth is that instead of exploiting 
the universal interest in airline safety and 
hijacking, Mr. Reagan has yielded to allied 
and Arab protests, quietly softened his sanc- 
tions against the Beirut airport and loudly 
tried to change the subject 

All violence is deplorable; all terrorism is 
unacceptable. But all offenders do not have a 
single inspiration, and all offenses do not have 
a single remedy. Six hijacker-murderers of 
Americans are at large, many airports are lax 
on security and many governments are insuffi- 
ciently aroused by hijackings to erect an effec- 
tive defense. These problems should transcend 
most nations’ politics. What a chance to satisfy 
Mr. Reagan's desire for collective and unilat- 
eral action, justified in law. 

Hijacking and harboring hijackers are out- 
lawed. by international air conventions. Na- 
tions that shelter hijackers disqualify them- 
selves for air traffic. Governments that let 
their planes fly to such nations subvert agree- 
ments they solemnly signed, and put all travel- 
ers at risk. As Mr. Reagan proved with Greece, 
one word from the White House that a nation’s 
airport or policy jeopardizes travelers and it 
will soon feel the economic sting. 

An America that wants hijacking resisted 
has a rare chance to separate air travd from all 
other political calculations. Mr. Reagan now 
has a chance to be smartly tough. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Bishop Tutu to the Rescue 


It was an extraordinary scene, even for 
South Africa: an angry black crowd sensing 
betrayal, a car turned upside down and set 
afire, and Bishop Desmond Tutu, in purple 
clerical robes, moving through the people to 
wave them away from a gasoline-doused black 
man who. were it not for the bishop's inter- 
vention, would surely now be dead. 

- The crowd in Duduza accused its victim of 
■' being a police informant. For this he would be 
' dealt with as have been many township coun- 
cillors. deputy mayors and the like: hacked to 

; death or set afire — fates seen as fit punish- 

- mem for turning against one's own. In tde- 

- vised film you could see Bishop Tutu and 
Bishop Simeon Nkoane moving in the crowd, 
gesturing urgently without laying on a hand. 

| “This undermines the struggle," Bishop Tutu 
■ cried, acting out his philosophy of nonviolent 
resistance at extraordinary personal risk. 

This is (he same Bishop Tutu who, three 
years ago, confronted a huge, white policeman 
j.beating an elderly black man with a stick and 
■- held a cross aloft until the beating stopped. In 
r, 1981. when a black crowd at a funeral attacked 
.a suspected police informant, Bishop Tutu 
flung himself across the victim, persuaded the 
' attackers to back off and gave a service wear- 
ing clerical robes soaked with the man’s blood. 

More than 400 blacks have been killed in 


political violence in South Africa in the past 10 
months. A few days ago it was the police who 
committed the violence, in Kwathema. Wit- 
nesses said the police fired tear gas and rubber 
bullets indiccriVninatri y into a movie boose 
where frightened mourners had fled from po- 
lice after an all-night service for still other 
black youths killed in a hand-grenade explo- 
sion weeks before. Seven died. 

Violence a gains t blacks, whoever commits 
it, is the infection of apartheid. “Many in the 
black community, incensed at the injustice of 
apartheid, believe that anyone who collabo- 
rates in [the] apartheid system is a co-oppres- 
sor,” Bishop Tutu said after the Duduza at- 
tack. “You will recall that collaborators were 
dealt with very, very harshly, with summary 
justice, during World War II in the resistance 
. . . This is not to condone what is done to 
diem. but it is to say that it is a phenomenon 
that is universal And our own effort, as the 
church, is to try and say any form of violence is 
unacceptable and will not in the end solve the 
problems of our country amicably.'' 

What might do that is, of course, the exam- 
ple of Bishop Tutu’s nobility of spirit and a 
decision by the current white inlets to reach 
out to people like Mm who have the capacity 
to save South Africa. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Some Americans Will Stay Pot 

• “So you weren’t -hijacked.” After my wife 
i and I returned recently from a 10-day vacation 

in Spain, we soon lost count of the people who 
; gave us that greeting. The hijackers of the 
! flight out or Athens seem to have done more 
1 damage to the American psyche than they 
; could have expected. They may well have dealt 

■ the travel industry serious injury. 

Americans want to believe that a trip to 
. another continent is no more dangerous than 
an evening in an expensive restaurant. The 
travel industry carefully nurtures that belief. 
Go overseas and a guide will meet your tour 
party in the airport, leaving you only as you 
i pass through security and prepare to board 

■ your plane home. The airlines advertise com- 
; petent crews who fly statistically safe jumbo 
! jets around turbulence instead of through it 

In reality, travel has always been a danger- 
; ous enterprise. Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims 

• banded together to repel highwaymen. Centu- 
; ries of pirate forays caused the great Mediier- 
‘ ranean powers to invent Lhe naval convoy. My 

ancestors went west in groups and carried 
loaded guns. The uniquely civilized aspect of 
ancient Hebraic culture was its protection of 
strangers within the city gales. 

The media will now move to other stories, to 
new- horrors and disasters with which to excite 


viewer* and readers. The public will forget the 
details of the TWA hijacking. But a haunting 
memory will remain as a lesson that the inno- 
cent wayfarer is forever prey to the determined 
brigand. Remembering, a lot of people will 
stay in their own country. That is a huge favor 
to those of us who intend to continue traveling. 
— H.H. Morris in the Baltimore Evening Sun. 

Television Did Well to Inform 

During the 1960s and 70s, when Americans 
were fighting the Vietnamese, I was increas- 
ingly pained by the shrill complaint that televi- 
sion was the Vietcong's ultimate weapon. 
American policy wasn't bad, the argument 
went, but news coverage of that policy was 
bad. Now I hear that television has become the 
terrorists’ ultimate tooL This is a daffy and 
irresponsible charge. The competitive zeal 
with which the networks chased alter the story 
of the hostages should be celebrated as an 
example of what is right about the democratic 
system, not what is wrong with it. There were, 
lo be sure, some unruly and odious accesses. 
But such indiscretions are a worthwhile price 
to pay for a precious freedom that more than 
80 percent of the world’s citizens lack. 

— Morton Dean a veteran correspondent 
for CBS News now with Independent Network 
News, writing in The New York Times. 


FROM OUR JULY 1 3 PAGES , 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Streetcar Horses to Be Retired 
NEW YORK — Horses are to disappear from 
the street railroads of New York City. Old 
fairy tale? Yes. but it's really- Lruly this lime. It 
is hoped that the final labored trundle of the 
old gee-gee on (he Third Avenue system will 
take place on September 30. Electric storage 
battery cars will replace the old ones. They will 
cost 55,000 apiece. In experiments begun last 
November gasoline-driven cars were tried, but 
they cost SS.500 apiece, and it was decided that 
their operating cost was higher than that of 
electric cars. The new cars will go on the 
Avenue B-Canal SLreet and Sl Nicholas Ave- 
nue-1 10th Street lines. They will not be furi- 
ously speedy, but their average pace of six and 
a half miles an hour will be double the present 
rate and may seem almost dangerous to old 
travellers till they gel used to iL 


1935: Dreyfus Dies in Paris at 75 
PARIS — Colonel Alfred Dreyfus, central 
figure of the treason case which caused agreat 
political upheaval thirty-five year* ago, died in 
Paris [on July 12] at the age of 75. He was in 
poor health. In April 1894, the “bordereau,” a 
list of French military documents, was discov- 
ered in a waste-basket at the German Embassy 
in Paris. Dreyfus was accused convicted of 
delivering secret documents to a foreign power 
and sentenced to Devil's Island But it was 
Ferdinand-Walsin Ester hazy, according to 
facts since come to light, who laid the plot. He 
is believed to have wanted to demoralize the 
French army. In June 1899. Dreyfus was 
brought back from Devil’s Island again con- 
victed but later pardoned In July 1906, the 
Cassation Court reversed the conviction. Evi- 
dence indicates that he was an innocent victim. 


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A Blow to the Credibility 
Of Presidential Discourse 


By Philip Geyelin 




W ASHINGTON — A recent 
headline in The Washington 
Post asked “What Happened to 
Reagan the Gunslinger? 1 The short 
answer is that he got elected presi- 
dent Fiction, which is all the gun- 
slinging role was. gave wav to fact 
campaign image yielded to reality. 
In the thick of the recent hostage 
crisis, the president of the United 
States worked out his frustrations 
“a few walls." 

it is par for most presidents. 
The solutions to the world's prob- 
lems look a lot simpler on the oust- 
ings than they do on the job. But 
one of the most important ways in 
which Ronald Reagan is distinctive- 
ly different from most presidents is 
that his adjustment to the realities 
of office lasts only as long as the 
challenge at hand Just when you 
think you are beginning to see a 
new, eyes- wide-open Reagan, the 
old role-playing Reagan is back. 

President Reagan's extraordinary 
address to the American Bar Asso- 
ciation last Monday was a perfect 
case in point — yet another of the 
familiar flashbacks that have con- 
sistently made it difficult for ad- 
versaries as well as allies to find 
coherence and credibility in his con- 
duct of foreign policy. 

It was the old, p re-presidential 


Sounding Off Doesn’t Hurt Terrorism 


P ARIS — President Reagan’s di- 
atribe against “a confederation 
of terrorist states” that he said were 
engaged in “acts of war against the 
government and people of the Unit- 
ed States" may have relieved his 
penL-up emotions, but it stained his 
statesmanlike management of the 
Beirut hostage crisis. 

His speech on Monday before the 
American Bar Association did just 
what he warned should not be done. 
It served to magnify terrorists into 
crusaders for a world cause, giants 
instead of gnats stinging solid na- 
tions peevishly and ineffectually. 

“Freedom itself is the issue,” 
President Reagan said. The attacks 
“form a pattern of terrorism that 
has strategic implications and polit- 
ical goals." He blamed “totalitarian 
states” and a “confederation of 
c riminal governments." And “all of 
these states are united by one sim- 
ple, criminal phenomenon — their 
fanatical hatred of the United 
States, our people, our way of life, 
our international stature.” 

This is intoxicating stuff for hi- 
jackers, supporters and would-be 
imitators — and a far greater re- 
ward than the release of prisoners 
detained in Israel who were to be 
sent home anyway. It must surprise 
America's adversaries that driving a 
superpower into frenzy can be so 
easy, as it puzzles and worries 
friends who do not consider opposi- 
tion to U.S. policies necessarily 
“criminal” or “tanaticaL" 

Mr. Reagan listed Iran, Libya, 
Cuba, Nicaragua and North Korea, 
pointedly omitting Syria, which has 
indeed harbored and aided terror- 
ists but which helped resolve the 
Beirut incident and is being asked 
to help free remaining hostages. 
Such a broadside can encourage 
foes by defining a cheap, relatively 
safe way to mobilize anti-American 
urges, rather than constraining 
them lo recognize their own interest 
in suppressing terrorism so as to 
keep the advantages of membership 
in the inte rnati onal co mmuni ty 
Above all, such talk impedes any 
real chance of coming to grips with 
the specific problem. It ernes not 
clarify anything, as Mr. Reagan 
claimed. Instead it p^tidzes the 


By Flora Lewis 

issue, befuddles people and drives 
them to ever wilder notions of what 
can and should be done. 

Letters from readers show a 
sharp division of opinion, with both 
sides equally unrealistic. Some, in- 
flamed and bloodthirsty in rhetoric 
if not in intent, demand: “Wipe 
terrorism out, once and for alL” 
Some, provoked and empalhetic 
with all malcontents, rail against the 
“hypocrisy” of denouncing terror- 
ism when the country doing the de- 
nouncing mines Nicaraguan har- 
bors, lobs 2,700-pound shells on 
Lebanon from the battleship New 
Jersey and supplies states around 
the world with the engines of war. 

As if a few bombs would rid the 
world of suicidal maniacs, or even 
pinpoint them. As if “understand- 
ing,” “willingness to listen” and re- 
straint in using force would end 
conflict and relieve all grievances. 

These all-or-nothing altitudes are 
two sides of the same false coin, 
intensified by an understandable 
but unthinking response to frustra- 
tion. Indulging the yen for the im- 
possible only heightens the feeling 
of impotence, when the task of lead- 
ership should be to find effective 
action and explain it 

Curing international ills is not 
easy but it is possible, if the subject 
is well defined and the measures are 
appropriate. Mr. Reagan gave the 
example of piracy on the high seas 
— not totally eradicated, as Viet- 
namese boat people can testify, but 
removed as a general menace. 

In another Geld, wiping out the 
ancient scourges of plague and 
smallpox was an example of fruitful 
international cooperation. The 
striking successes of the World 
Health Organization are too often 
overlooked when the United Na- 
tions system is attacked for failures. 


j piracy did not end war or 
other forms of international vio- 
lence. Preventing plague and small- 
pox did not prevent all disease. But 
those were good campaigns that 
spared lives and made the world 
safer in a useful way. Targeting ter- 
rorism could bring results, too, but 


not if the attempt is made in terms 
of “wreckage” of “outlaw states” or 
of “addressing the root causes.” 
Human perversity can be com- 
pounded by vengeful ire; it cannot 
be eliminated. The way to get at 
terrorism is to enlist the sdf-imerest 
of nations in the pursuit of common 
criminals, removing the political 
impact of the deed and reinforcing 
the will of the diary to cooperate. 

Mr. Reagan's response has been a 
big bark. This risks stoking the fur- 
ies of American impatience and 
scaring away allies and friends 
whose help is criticaL It is unlikely 
to scare terrorists; it enhances them. 
Mr. Reagan has rightly said that 
indiscriminate retaliation would be 
a form of terrorism, too. His nation- 
al security adviser, Robert McFar- 
lane, said, “Revenge is not a pol- 
icy." Neither is sounding off. 

The New York Times. 

The President Has 
A List of His Own 

W ASHINGTON — President 
Reagan Douted the State De- 
partment with bis personal list of 
the top five terrorist nations — Iran, 
Libya, North Korea, Cuba and Nic- 
aragua. Slates official list omits 
Nicaragua and North Korea but in- 
cludes Syria and South Yemen. 

Mr. Reagan asserted that Nicara- 
gua now plays host to Italy’s Red 
Brigades, west Germany's Baader- 
Meinhoff gang, Basque terrorists, 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion, the Irish Republican Army 
and Uruguay’s Tupamaros. One 
wonders why this international all- 
star terrorist cast is whiling away its 
time in Managua, but that should 
make Europe safer this summer. 

Asked about the oraissian of Syr- 
ia and South Yemen, a White House 
spokesman said that there is “no 
definite connection” between the 
president's list and the official list 
I suspect that there is even less of a 
connection between the president's 
speech and doing something specif- 
ic to counter terrorism. 

— Lou Cannon, commenting 
in The Washington Post 


Reagan acting as if he had already 
forgotten the lines — not to men- 
tion the plot — of the nonfiction 
role he had just played as president 
in the saga of the TWA hijacking. 

At his press conference a little 
more than three weeks ago. be was 
peering through blurred lenses at 
the problem of the still missing sev- 
en American hostages. “It is on ex- 
tremely difficult, seemingly impos- 
sible task . . . with all the factions 
there, to know ... what we can 
do,” he had to admit. When the 
questioning came around to retalia- 
tion. he talked gunslinger talk, but 
he wasn't ready lo draw. “You can’t 
just start shooting without having 
someone in your gunsighis." he cau- 
tioned. The problem was “to know 
who is perpetrating these deeds." 

The whole thing about terrorism 
was “the very fact that the terrorists 
are not all 'from one source.” It 
would be one thing if “they could all 
be linked to a country, if you knew 
the source and wfaat they were try- 
ing to do. But we have got a variety 
of terrorist organizations." 

That was in mid-crisis, on June 
18. Last Monday the seven remain- 
ing American hostages were still be- 
yond reach, but toe survivors of 
TWA 847 were home and the media 
storm had broken. Ronald Reagan 
could see clearly now. 

No longer was there anything dif- 
fuse about the threat of terrorism. 
No longer was there any question 
about who was “perpetrating these 
deeds.” Still less was there any 
“variety” among terrorist groups 
or any difficulty in establishing the 
ties that bind what Mr. Reagan 
called a “confederation of terrorist 
states" — Iran, Libya, North Ko- 
rea, Cuba and Nicaragua. 

Mr. Reagan professed not even to 
know the “sources” of terrorism 
three weeks ago. or “what they were 
trying to do." On Monday the 
“goals and objectives” of this new 
“international version of Murder, 
Incorporated” were all the same . 

As one, they share a “simple, 
c rimin al phenomenon — their fa- 
natical hatred of the United States, 
oar people, our way of life, our 
international stature.” And their 
objective — whether their dirty 
work is done in Burma, Spain, West 
Germany. Fiance, Italy. Kuwait, 
Central America or Beirut — is 
aimed in almost every instance at 
the worldwide interests of .America. 

At the root of a lot of this, of 
course, is the “Soviet Union’s dose 
relationship with almost all of the 
terrorist states.” The Soviet Union, 
that, is an accomplice to a global 
campaig n whose real goal is “to 


America from the world." 
This overwrought analysis is 
shared by few experts on terrorism. 
It is accepted by none of America's 
principal allies who have had to 
deal with terrorism cm their own 
territory. It was not shared by Ron- 
ald Reagan, under the gun of terror- 
ism three weeks ago. 

For him to frame the problem in 
such grossly oversimplified terms 
now is to trivialize it, the more so 
when be declares that Americans 
are “not going to tolerate" attacks 
from “outlaw stales run by the 
strangest collection of misfits, Loo- 
ney Tunes and squalid criminals 
since the advent of the Third 
Reich.” (Laughter and applause.) 

Fidel Castro replied by calling 
President Reagan “a madman, an 
imbecile, a bum.” This is the wodd 
of the White House communica- 
tions directin', Pat Buchanan. Ron- 
ald Reagan cannot expect to be tak- 
en seriously in the real world until 
he raises presidential discourse a 
notch or two above this leveL 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


After 40 Years, Some Americans Still Hate Japan 


W ASHINGTON — The letter 
was tucked away in a comer of 
the editorial page. I could hardly be- 
lieve my eyes. Chi a visit to Washing- 
ton the writer had gone to Arlington 
Cemetery and had been “shocked to 
discover that the graves of our miK - 
uuy heroes arc being mowed with 
Japanese-built Ford tractors. This 
should not be tolerated.” 

1 have been associated with Ameri- 
ca and Americans for most of the 
past two decades, first as a student, 
then. as a jou rnalis t. I now call the 
United Slates my home: I live here 
with my American husband and a 


By Ayako Doi 

The writer, formerly of the Tokyo bureau of Newsweek, reports firm 
Washington far The Japan Times and Japanese television. 


mmds of some Americans, and that it 
was suddenly resurfacing as frustra- 
tions over the snowballing trade defi- 
cit began to mount The bombs-over- 
Tokyo remark, of course, also carried 
a resonance of the 40th anniversary 
of Japan’s unconditional surrender 
after Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

Recently 1 took on an assignment 
from a Japanese television network to 
help with a piece on the 40th anniver- 


For many, the tear memories are stUl too 
painful to discuss with a Japanese. 


young son. I feel comfortable here, 
and 1 have never been made to feel 
uneasy because I am Japanese — un- 
til these last few months. 

Every Japanese history student 
learns about American public hyste- 
ria in the 1920s and ’30s over what 
was called the “yellow peril” Many 
more of us know about the passionate 
hatred of “the Japs” that swept 
America after Pearl Harbor. But 
those things happened before I was 
bom. Until recently, to me they had 
always belonged to the history books. 

Most of the Americans I Have met 
have been lrindhearted and have 
showed me no hostility. Even when 
people on Capitol Hill' started refer- 
ring to the possibility of a “trade 
war” earlier this year, I refused to 
believe that they really meant it — 
until 1 saw a quote attributed to a 
White House staffer in The Washing- 
ton Post on April 7. After Tokyo's 
announcement of a 25-peroent" in- 
crease in its “voluntary” quotas on 
auto exports to the United states, the 
official told a group of congressmen 
and business people, according to the 
article, that he thought, “The next 
time B-52s fiy over Tokyo, we better 
make sure they cany bombs.” 

I realized then that long-repressed 
resentment had remained in the 


sary of the end of the war. I was toj 
in touch with American fa 
whose fathers, husbands orsons were 
killed in the Pacific (beater. 

Some were pilots shot down by 
Zeros; others were sailors who went 
down aboard ships sunk by Japanese 
torpedoes, gunfire or kamikaze pi- 
lots. A number had been captured 
and had perished in Japanese prison 
camps from exhaustion or starvation. 

Wheal try to imagine tire pain and 
sorrow those mothers and wrves have 
lived with for 40 years, I can almost 
understand their resentment against 
everything Japanese. Still, it came as 
a shock when on several occasions, as 
I tried to explain the television pro- 
ject on the phone, the person on the 
other end hung up the instant I pro- 
nounced the word “Japanese.” 

Some of the families softened a bit 
after I explained that the aim of the 
program is to illustrate bow much 
agemy and suffering a war imposes on 
individuals and famili es no matw 
which side they are on. Bui for many, 
the memories are still too painful to 
discuss with a Japanese. 

Because I love America dearly, it 
pained me to discover that the pas- 
sage of 40 years had done so little to 
heal the wounds Inflicted upon its 
people by my country. Ana it has 


made me wonder whether I haven't 
been overly optimistic right along 
in assuming that our two countries 
have formed an unbreakable bond of 
friendship across the Pacific. 

No observer of the U.S.- Japanese 
relationship today thinks that tire ties 
are anywhere near as fragile as they 
were in the years that led up to Pearl 
Harbor. But it is disturbing to reflect 
on how quickly the post- World War I 
friendship between the two countries 
turned sour in the 1930s. 

What worries me, as much as the 
American expressions of irritation 
and hostility toward Japan, is a feel- 
ing of persecution and even paranoia 
that seems to be developing m Japan, 
especially among youngs- people. 

By tire time these Japanese reached 
(he age of reason, the country was 
well on its way to becoming a world 
economic power. They see economic 
success largely as a result of hard 
work and sacrifice by their fathers 
and themselves. They resent being 
Warned for the big US. trade deficit 
with Japan. In their eyes it derives 
from America’s mismanagement of 
its own economy — indudmg a very 
poor overseas marketing effort. * 

Their attitudes are a far ay from 
the feelings 'of the current generation 
of Japanese leaders, most of whom 
remember all too wdl the struggle 
and sacrifice it took to recover from 
devastation. At a particularly thorny 
moment of trade dispute a few years 
ago, Masunri Esaki, tire chairman of 
the governing Liberal Democratic 
Party's external trade forum, told me 
frankly that be thought Japan ought 
to accommodate American demands 
for opening of tire Japanese market as 
a debt of honor, if nothing else. “We 
must not forget the generous help 
that tire U-S- provided us during our 
difficult years after the war,” he said. 
“Now it's our turn to hdp tire U.S.” 

In just a few years the Esakis of 
Japan will be replaced by more self- 


carries it, not the target of his 
hatred.” 1 hope this will be tire spirit 
of America’s relationship with Japan. 
The Washington Past. 


confident, and sometimes more arro- 
gant, Japanese who have'no memory 
of their country's obligations to 
America. I hope that their reaction to 
what they perceive as unreasonable 
U.S. pressure for trade concessions 
will not take the country on a danger- 
mis course. I recall a remark a few 
years ago by a senior Japanese offi- 
cial to an American correspondent in 
Tokyo: “If you keep pressing too 
much, we can always switch sides.” 

1 am still optimistic about the fu- 
ture. Many of the families of mm 
killed in the Pacific showed no reser- 
vations about, discussing the war on 
Japanese television. Some veterans of 
the battle of Leyte Gulf, one of the 
bitterest in the Pacific, went out of 
their way to bdp me with the project. 

Even more encouraging is that for 
younger generations of Americans, 
Pearl Harbor is ancient history. They 
see the Japanese as competitors, not 
as enemies. I was relieved, and ; 
fill, to hear a UJS. Marine 
whose father never returned from the 
air battle over Guadalcanal in 1942. 


Gorbachev 
Stalemated 
In Poland 

By Chalmers ML Roberts 

W ASHINGTON — Poland rep- 
resents rebellion — yesterday 
open rebellion, today sullen rebel- 
lion. Solidarity, the amazing labor 
movement, is pretty wdl smashed, 
with some of the reforms it advocated 
being carried out by the sew official 
trade unions. But the spirit behind 
Solidarity is very much alive. 

The Roman Catholic Church, with 
which Solidarity is entwined, seems 
both more powerful and more defiant 
titan ever. Today's Communist re- 
gime in Warsaw is a military junta, 
but it nos less control over the popu- 
lation than that exercised by many a 
junta In the Third WorldL 
The church used to worry about 
“capuve minds” among the young, 
but no longer. Now. says a former 
Solidarity activist who reflects the 
views of Cardinal Josef Glemp. the 
problem is what to tell tire public 
about the future, because people have 
no sense of having any influence on 
things beyond their private sphere. 

Despair has brought an increase in 
alcoholism and. most recently, in 
drug addiction to a substance made 
from local poppies. Church sources 
estimate that already some 50,000 
young people have been “lost" to 
such drugs, with another 2G0.0G0 to 
300,000 also using them. 

The economy is described by many 
as in ruins. Corruption is rampant 
The American dollar bill is openly a 
key currency on the streets of War- 
saw and other cities. Cab drivers ac- 
cept dollars willingly, and waiters in 
the official tourist hotels openly sug- 
gest that you pay your bill m dollars, 
not zlotys, a transaction by which 
they make a fine profit. The official 
rate when we were there was around 
1 34 zlotys to the dollar, but the street 
rate varied from 500 to 800 or more. 

The government condones all this, 
seemingly helpless to fight iu besides, 
the bills help meet Poland’s desperate 
need for hard currency. These bind: 
marketeers, we beard, use their big 
profits to buy such scarce items as 
autos or apartments for their chil- 
dren. the latter costing as nmch as a 
million zlotys. Traffic cops have a 
reputation for taking payoffs on the 
spot for minor infractions. 

But all this pales in significance 
next to the dynamism, vibrancy and 
influence of the church. Pope John 
Paul n may seem conservative, but to 
the Russians he is a radical threat, 
while in bis native Poland he is the 
supreme symbol of hope. 

To go on a Sunday moraine to 
Mass at Sl John's Cathedral in War- 
saw is lo sense this. To stand outside 
in the jammed street, listening to the 
service in Polish over loudspeakers, is 
unforgettable. To see a few blocks 
away the waiting militia, their water- 
cannon vehicles and paddy wagons at 
the ready, adds to the tension. 

To know thar the priest this day is 
using the 50th anniversary of tire 
death of Marshal Josef Pilsudski, the 
Polish patriot who fought both the 
czar's troops and the Rod Arcay, as a 
vehicle for a sermon on patriotism is 
to realize bow effectively religion can 
be used for political purposes. 

To hear the Mass end with the 
solemn singing of the ancient vases 
of “God, give us back our homeland" 
as every man. woman and child 
thrusts forward the fingers of their 
right hands in the V for victory sign is 
a spine-tingling experience. 

Then to cross the city to a crowded 
Mass at the modest church of Father - 
Jerzy Popteluszko, the young priest 
murdered by security agents and 
whose grave in his riurcbyaid has 
become a hallowed shrine, is to fed 
again the resistance, the PoKsh defi- 
ance of the Soviet wilL 
From the train windows all across 
Poland, from the East Goman bor- 
der to the Soviet border, you ace a 
nearly continuous panorama of smafl 
privately owned farms. The fanner 
holds the plow, the wife handles the 
reins of the family horse and dnldnn 
walk behind dropping seed after 
seed. There are few tractors for these 
fanners, and more for the small 
amount of acreage that is collectiv- 
ized. But the private land, like the 
church, is fiercely defended, and ef- 
forts to change the system, so often 
urged by Moscow, get nowhere. 

Wqjoech Jaruzdski is lb&ed in a 
Caich-22 situation with the Rnsaans, 
the church and the public. v 

Diplomats say he sees himself as a 
Polish gentleman and a patriot. At 
this spring's Warsaw Pact meeting in 
his capital, which brought Miknafl 
Gorbachev there for the first time as 
head man, the ramrod-straight gener- 
al insisted on a one-on-one meeting 
rather than, as the Russians were said 
to have suggested, a Gorbachev meet- 
ing with the entire Polish Politburo. 
To show that he got his way. General 
Jamzelski later announced thai be 
bad “reported" to the Politburo on 
his talk with Mr. Gorbachev. 

Stalemate perhaps best describes 
the current stale at Soviet-Polish re- 
lations. Changing that certainly 
be one of Mr. Gorbachev's toughest 
tasks, should he dedde to try. , . 

The writer, who recauty visited Po- 
land. is a reared diplomatic carrespm- 
dent for The Washington Post Y 


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IJETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Greeks Managed Alone 

Regarding*S6me Ways for Ameri- 
ca to Fight Back” (July 5): 

Mr. Safire’s opinion column con- 
tains biting criticism of the Greek 

istiiat Greece anJusgov^^ent are 
not afraid to “go it alone,” as the 
writer suggests they should be mad* 
to do. As a matter of fact we did gp it 
alone, both in 1940 against fascism 
and in 1941 against Nazism and rac- 
ism. We were not intimidated by the the disprove*! myth that alcoholism is^ 
Axis, and we protected thousands of a character defect rather than an ill: ’-i 
Jews during toe German occupation, tress, and does a disservice to both 

Mr. Same is ill-advised to try practicing and recovered alcoholksi; 
to blackmail us with the threat of CAROL EASTON.* 7 

economic warfare. Greece knows a Lootkmr 


deal about fighting alone for 
and democracy. . 
MICHAEL J. PALAIOCOSTAS. 

- Athens. '■ 

Reformed or Recovered? 

In an “American Topics” 
about alcohol abuse (July 3 ) 

in the science report “Treated. 
Unable to Drink Moder- 
atdy”7/u$> 4), you use the term “re- 
formed alcoholics" This perpetuates 







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Asian States 
Are Satisfied 
Alter Sfiultz 
Backs Plan 

. ' By Don Oberdotfcr 

, Washington Past Server •. 

• KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia 
— ‘ Southeast Asian diplomats ex- 
pressed satisfaction Friday after 
tbor peace proposal for Cambodia 
was formally approved by the 
United States. 

. But the main target of the plan, 
Vietnam, issued a strongly negitive 

statement. 

The U.S. secretary of state, 
George P. Shultz, informed the for- 
eign ministers of the Association of 
Southeast Asian Nations on Friday 
that Washington would endorse 
their proposal for indirect talks. 

- The plan calk for talks, through 
a mediator, between three Cambo- 
dian guerrilla factions, one of 
which is Communist,, on the one 
hand, and Vietnam and the Viet- 
namese-installed Cambodian gov- 
ernment, on the other. 

ASEAN, which includes Malay- 
sia, Thailand. Singapore, Indone- 
sia, Brunei and the Pmlipmmes, did 
not formally respond lo Mr. 
Shultz’s, announcement. However, 
several Asian diplomats said they 
took satisfaction from the U.S. 
backing, especially because Mr. 
Shultz had artier criticized the 
proposal. 

The Malaysian foreign minister. 
Ten glut Anmad Rithauddeen, 
raised .hopes that the proposal 
might bring about early negotia- 
tions over Cambodia by revealing 
that the Vietnamese ambassador 
here, Nguyen Can, had called at the 
Foreign Ministry late Thursday to 
ask for details of the proposaL 

Mr. Rithauddeen quoted the 
Vietnamese envoy as saying that 
Hanoi had not rejected the propos- 
af despite its harsh attacks in public 
statements. 

. The Vietnamese Embassy, how- 
ever, issued a statement here Fri- 
day with a quite different version. 
The embassy said that Mr. Can had 
gone to the Malaysian to ask for an 
explanation of why ASEAN had 
formally endorsed a proposal that 
was “already rejected" by Vietnam. 

A senior U.S. official expressed 
doubt that Hanoi would accept the 
proposal but said this did not ne- 
gate its validity. 

■ “Every sign is that Vietnam is 
pressing a military solution, not a 
political settlement." the official 
Hid. He added: ”ust because IS 
Vietnamese torn it down this year 
doesn’t mean they’ll continue to 
turn it down next year." . 

Vietnam has been critical of the 
ASEAN proposal in part because it 
would give a negotiating role to the 
Communist Khmer Rogue enecril- 
la sfoices headed by Pof Pol A 
Japanese diplomat who recently 
visited Hanoi quoted the Vietnam- 
ese foreign minister, Nguyen Co 
Th& ch , as saying that the talks pro- 
posed by ASEAN were “complete- 
ly out of the question." 

In announcing U.S. support for 
(he ASEAN proposaL Mr. Shultz 
said the United States would not 
remove its economic and diplomat- 
ic pressures against Vietnam until 
negotiations achieved regionally 
acceptable results. 

Mr. Shultz, who had criticized 
- the plan an grounds that it ought 
tend to give legitimacy to what he 
called toe puppet government in 
Phnom Penh, a ted this Friday as a 
. risk of the ASEAN proposaL 

He said, however, dial he has 
been reassured by statements about 
(he plan made by minister s here. 


North Korea Seeking to Erase Its Image as Invader Military Strength in Korea 


By John F. Bums 

W(H' tart Tima Soviet 

PYONGYANG, North Korea 

; Few of the sights that officials 
show visitors to mis nation are in- 
vested with greater symbolic im- 
portance than a huge wall that 
snakes across the Korean peninsula 
from the YriJow S® to the Sea of 
Japan. 

After peering at the wall through 
a telescope from his observation - 
post in the hilly terrain east of Pan- 
mtmjqm, the trace villa g e in the 
demilitarized zone, Mger Kang' 
Myong Su of the North Korean 
Army stepped back and said: “This 
is our tragedy. Nobody has the 
right to build a barrier across our 
counity, io try to divide bur people 
forever" 

In Major Kang's briefing, the 
v illain is the United States. The 
wall he inspects — more titan 15 
feet high and 30 feet wide ni its 
base (4.5 by 9 meters), with con- 
crete rides and filled with earth — 
was completed in 1979. ha concep- 
tion, it is at least partly an Ameri-:. 
can wall, running 150 mDes (240 
kilometers) along the entire length' 
of the demilitarized zone. 

From the viewpoint of the Unit- 
ed States and its allies in South 
Korea, the wall's purpose is to 
block a North Korean invasion. To 
Major Kang and his- superiors in 


the North. Korean cap- 
ital, all talk of an attack by tne 
North is an American rase to justi- 
fy the division of Korea and ensure 
a permanent US. military pres- 
ence. 

“The so-called slogan of south- 
ward invasion is a total invention 
and a phantom!" said Jon Gum 

NorihKjOrea 

OneManVCoontiy 

Third o f three qrtidtt 

ChoL an official of the Committee 
for the Peaceful Reunification of 
the Fatheriand. “We have given as- 
surances on many ‘ occasions that 
we wffl not invade the South, that 
our policy is entirely one of reunit- 
ing our country by peaceful 
means." 

Me. Jon’s committee has been 
lwfltrmg such s tatemen ts for ytffiS 
and getting little credence where it 
matters, in Washington and. the 
South Korean capital, Seoul Al- 
though Pyongyang has -talked 
peace, it has bunt a powerful army 
and deployed it in a manner ibai 
Western analysts regard as threat- 
ening. 

In recent months, led by Kim n 
Song, North -Korean, authorities 
have renewed efforts to allay such 
fear*. There has been a welter of 


new “peace" initiatives from the 
North, adding to the more than 200 
such offers that, Mr. Jon said, have 
been made by Pyongyang since the 
Soviet and American armies divid- 
ed Korea into two zones in 1945. 

The moves have been xcompa- 
nied by other initiatives designed to 
pecuade the South and its allies in 
Washington that North Korea is 
evolving into a more tolerant, out- 
ward-looking nation. For one 
thing, more Western reporters are 
bong invited to come to North Ko- 
rea. For another, the authorities 
adopted a new. foreign investment 
law in September, a sharp depar- 


preached about its policy of 
reliance. 

So far, the tad for foreign capital 
has made tittle headway in the face 
of a credit rating that places the 
country dose ro the bottom of most 
jwtwnari/wial l isting s of credit-wor- 
thy countries. 

Some diplomalshave mterpreied 
the new law mud) as the North 
Koreans present it — as a symbol 
of a broader policy shift that is 
dosefy associated with tbef 



this country for 40 -years. Others, 
less sanguine, say they believe that 
the legi slatio n could be little more 
than a “tip of the hat” toward Chi- 


na, which has made a bid for for- 
eign capital a major part of its own 
program of economic-change. 

For a quarter of a century, since 
China and the Soviet Union grew 
apart, Mr. Kim has been one of the 
few Communist leaders who has 
managed to balance his relations 
with Beijing and Moscow. Diplo- 
mats say that both the Chinese and 
the Russians have sought to keep 
the North Korean leader from 
launching another war but have not 
dared to press him too hard fra- fear 
erf pushing him into the arms of the 
rival Communist power. 

. The word that North Korean of- 
ficials use more than any other in 
explaining their efforts is “sincere," 
as rf in tacit acknowledgment of the 
distrust of the Co mmunis ts that 
has built up in the South. Yet the 
presentations made by men like 
Mr. Jon continue, as before, to put 
all blame for the hostility between 
the two Koreas on the other side, 
particularly on the United States. 

In discussions about ways of 
breaking the political impasse on 
the peninsula, officials insist that 
U-Sl troops are the central obstacle 
to a reconciliation between North 
and South and that they must be 
removed if there is to be progress 
toward reunification. 

Mr. Jem said that by withdraw- 
ing its troops Washington would 


earn the gratitude of mdiions of 
Koreans on both sides of the de- 
militarized zone. 

“It is a fact that we Fought the 
-United Slates," he said, “but it 
surely doesn't mean that we have to 
remain sworn enemies forever." 

Mr. Jon was asked why people in 
the South should believe in the 
North's peaceful intentions in the 
light of the North’s large military 
force, the discovery not long ago of 
tunnels beneath the demilitarized 
zone large enough to accommodate 
tanks, and a 1983 bomb explosion 
in Rangoon, the Burmese capital, 
that killed four South Korean cabi- 
net members and narrowly missed 
killing the South Korean president, 
Chun Doo Hwan. Burma said that 
North Korean saboteurs were re- 
sponsible for the blasL 
As the question was translated, 
Mr. Jon laughed. He said it was the 
South, not the North, that went in 

for tunneling. 

If further proof of the North’s 
paceful intentions were needed, he 
said, it lay in Pyongyang’s restraint 
in May 1980, when South Korean 
authorities were faced with a stu- 
dent uprising in the city of Kwang- 
ju. 

The redeployment of South Ko- 
rean troops to deal with the trouble 
was one of many “golden chances" 
for invasion that the North has 



North Korea 


Total artnad forces: 784.S00 
Anw 700,000 

Navy: 33,500 troops, witlt 21 submarines and 

4 fnoares 

Air Fores: 51 .000 tmopG and 740 combat 
aircraft including MIG-21 'a 


Population: 1 9,600,000 


Sooth Korea 

Total armed fores*: 622,000 

Army: 540,000 

Navy: 49,000 troops, 1 1 destroyers 

and S frigates 

Air Fores: 33,000 troops and 440 combat 
aircraft inchninfl F-4’s 

PopuUrttofc 41 ,600,000 


ULS. Forces in Korea 
Total aimsd Anmc 39.600 
Army: 29.200 

iUr Force 1 0,400 troops and 84 combat aircraft inc&Kftng F-18‘s 

Sourt^frwofnaA»T«<k««uf<»l(3r50g»<i*:5aitfl«» 
ns Nm tok Tam 


had, he said. “We could have capi- 
talized on the situation," Mr. Jon 
said, "but we did dol" 

On the Rangoon bombing, the 
official was silent. 

No effort was made to disguise 
the purpose in admitting U.S. re- 
porters — barely 150 Americans, 


not just reporters, have been invit- 
ed here in 30 years. Mr. Jon said it 
was to be hoped that “the Ameri- 
can people wul make a loud voice" 
for the withdrawal of the troops 
and the ending of the “suffering" 
that their presence had brought to 
the country. 


Israel Hesitated to Seize Mengele, Ex-Agent Says 


By Ralph Blumcn thfll deudy 

New York Times Service Dr..M< _ 

NEW YORK — Israeli mteffi-' had several hairbreadth escapes. 


ndy diligent in tracking down 
-..Mengele, Who appears to have 


gence agents tracked Josef Mengele 
from Argentina to Asunddn, Para- 
guay, and that to a Brazilian farm 
in the early 1960s bat chose not to 
move in to capture him, according 
to a retired chief of Mossad, Israel’s 
secret service. 

The former official, Isser Hard, 
said the hideouts of the former SS 
doctor were too well guarded for an 
abduction without a shootout. 

Others have suggested that Isra- 
el, stung by criticism over its 1960 
seizure of Adolf Eichmann in Ar- 
gentina, was reluctant tO nnilwtato 
the political risk erf another abduc- 
tion. 

Experts determined last month 
that a body found in a grave in 
Embu, Brazil, near SBo Paolo, was 
that of Dr. Mengde. He was said lo 
have drowned in 1979 at Bertioga. 

Since the identification of the 
body, questions have been raised 
whether West Germany was suffi- 

“ji 1 •w»r?a' ' 


Accordin: 
tions, he 


ing to official accusa- 
sdected 400,000 people 
for- gas chambers in 1943-1944 as 
they arrived by train at Auschwitz; 
in Nazi-occupied Poland. Further, 
he was accused of personally shoot- 
ing Jews and Gypsies and of haring 
performed bizarre experiments in 
quest for secrets of racial purify. 

The inquify in Brazil dete rmin ed 
that Dr. Mengele lived in and 
around Sio Paulo in tire 1960s and 
1970s and drowned at 67 while 
swimming at an Atlantic beach. 

Investigations in West Germany 
and materials made public by the 
Mengde family have focused atten- 
tion on the family’s role in. his 1949 
«ai[w to I -*rin America and 30 
years in hiding there. 

Officials who have interviewed 
Dr. Mengddsson. Rolf, say he has 
yet to give a full account of family 
contacts with him. 

- The account by Mr. Hard, the 



GStta Stammer, in Brazil, tells of sheltering Josef Meagete- 


former Israeli intelligence officer, 
given in a telephone interview from 
Te] Aviv, called into question the 
testimony of a woman who admit- 
ted sheltering Dr. Mengde in Bra- 
zil for 13 years. 

Mr. Hard, who masterminded 
the abduction <rf Eichmann in Bue- 
nos Aires in I960, has said previ- 
ously tiiai Kit a gmre imwd Of. 
Mengele, who had also been living 
in tire Argentine capital but, appre- 
hensive, left for Paraguay a few 
months before the Wwiirwinn ab- 
duction. 

Eichmann, an officer in the SS, 
was later tried in Israel, convicted 
and hanged for having supervised 
the roundup and transport of mQ- 
Jions of Jews to death camps. 

In tire early 1960s, Mr. Hard 
said, his agents tried to pick up Dr. 
Mengele 1 s trafl. In late 1962, he 
said, they tracked him to Paraguay 
and then to what Mr. Hard de- 
scribed as a heavfly guarded, se- 
cluded farm 25 miles (40 kilome- 
ters) from Sfio Paulo. 

The Israeli said that he and his 
agents never actually spotted Dr. 
Mengde, but that information 
from “Nazis working with us" had 
persnaded him that Dr. Mengele 
was indeed spending time at the 
three places. 

• He described his Nazi infor- 
mants as “small fish" who served 
Israd for money orom of -fear they 
might become targets themselves. 

The account conflicts with testi- 
mony of Gina Stammer, a postwar 
Hungarian immigrant to Braz i l 
who told the authorities that she 
and her family sheltered Dr. Men- 
gele — first, she said, because (hey 
tSd cot know his identity and later 
ont of fear — at their bums around 
S5o Paulo from 1961 to 1974. 

She las said that Dr. Mengele 
never left the Stammer properties 
for more than a day or two. 

The Brazilian federal police chief 
in Sac Paulo, Romeo Toma, has 
cast doubt on Mrs. Stammer’s ac- 
count. 

Mr. Hard acknowledged that he 
made no attempt to seize Dr. Men- 
gde. 

“We could not find tire proper 


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conditions," he said. "Of course, 
we could have stormed these places 
but you have to use arms. We could 
pot do it, of course. After I found 
out I was not able to cope with this 
problem by a professional opera- 
tion because there 1 weren’t the con- 
ditions, I decided on another strat- 
egy-” 

This, he said, was “to penetrate 
Mengde’s inner curie in Europe 
and South America," including 
people like Hans Rudel a much- 
decorated World War 11 German 
pilot, who was said to have helped 
arrange refuge in Paraguay for Dr. 
Mengele. 

He said that he did not know 
about the role of Hans Sedlmeier. 
an employee of the Mengele fam- ; 
tty’s farm machine company ini 
GQnzburg, West Germany, who. 
has beat identified as a courier who ; 
took mail and money to Dr. Men- : 
grie. 

Mr. Hard said he resigned his 
intelligence post in March 1963 in a, 
dispute with Prime Minister David; 
Ben-Gurion and thereafter had no ; 
role in the search for Dr. Mengele. : 

He added that he favored giving 
priority to action against Gmnan 
specialists working on rocket pro- 
jects in EgypL 

A former Israeli ambassador to 
Paraguay. Benno Weiser Varon, 



BBC Program Says Israel and Egypt 
Deployed Nuclear Arms in 1973 War 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Nuclear weapons 
were deployed in both Israel and 
Egypt daring the 1973 Middle East 
War, the British Broadcasting 
Corp- has reported. 

The BBC-TV program News- 
night made the claim in a report 
about allegations, denied by Israel, 
that it possesses nuclear weapons. 

It said that on the second day of 
the war, Israel's defense minister, 
Moshe Dayan, phoned Prime Min- 
ister Golds Meir to ask permission 
to arm Jericho I missiles at Di- 


mona, and said be received it It 
described Dimona as “Israel's nu- 
clear facility" in the Negev desert. 

Newsnight said that on Oct 12, 
1973. General George Keenan, 
bead of US. Air Force intelligence, 
listened in to a telephone conversa- 
tion in which President Anwar Sa- 
dat of Egypt asked the Soviet lead- 
er, Leonid I. Brezhnev, for help. It 
said that a Soviet freighter had left 
the Black Sea port of Odessa, and 
that radar in Istanbul identified it 
as carrying nuclear weapons to the 
port of Alexandria. EgypL 


has said that it was not the task of 
the Israeli government, but rather 
that of West Germany, to bunt 
down Dr. Mengele. 

Mr. Varon said that once when 
be passed on a tip about Dr. Men- 
gele to the Israeli authorities, they 
did not even reply. 


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The International Herald Tribune invites you 
to attend the 80th Anniversary of the . 

GORDON BENNETT 
AUTOMOBILE CUP 

Sunday, July 21, in the Auvergne countryside 
near Clermont-Ferrand, France. 



In 1900, James Gordon Bennett, 
Jr., founder of the International Herald 
Tribune, created the first International 
Automobile Cup. The winner averaged 
38.4 mph (61 .9 kph) — despite a collision 
with a large Saint Bernard. 

On Sunday, July 21, 1985, sixty 
cars built between 1903 and 1945 will 
participate in a Gordon Bennett Memorial 
Rally commemorating the 80th anniversary 
of tne last Gordon Bwnett Automobile Cup, 
held in 1905 in the Auvergne countryside 
near Clermont-Ferrand, France. 

Participating cars from seven 
countries will drive tfie same 137 km route 
designated by the Michelin brothers for the 
1 905 race. Departure will be at 8 am 


from the Plaine de Laschamp, 14 km west 
of Gennont-Ferrand, on route 941 A. 

Regularity trials will start at 3 pm 
at the Grcuit de Cnarade, a 4 km moun- 
tain racecourse just west of Clermont- 
Ferrand where several French Grand Prix 
have been held. 

An exhibition on the 1905 
Gordon Bennett Race will be open from 
July 15 to 25 at the Maison des Congres in 
Germont-Ferrand. 

All events are organized by the 
Automobile Gub d’ Auvergne and will be 
free to the public For additional 
information contact the International 
Herald Tribune in Paris, tel. 747 12 65, 
ext. 4566. 


Noteworthy Participants in the 
1 985 Gordon Bennett Memorial Rally 

1903 de Dion-Bouton — Partiapant in the 1903 Paris-Madrid race. 

1907 Rat Mephistopheies — Set a world speed record in 1924: 146 mph (234.9 kph). 
• 1908 Hutton — Winner of the Tourist Trophy in England in 1908, 

1932 Peugeot XI — Set a 24-hour speed record in 1932 
1932 Alfa Romeo LL 33 — Winner at Le Mans in 1932 




Page 6 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


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ARTS /LEISURE 


Neglect of British Painting Means Bargains for Museums 


Iniemaltona I Herald Tribune 

L ONDON— British painting has 
/ long suffered from the preju- 
dice that affects all forms of British 
an save silver. Despite a dramatic 
turnabout in the early 1970s. it still 
has not caught up with the other 
great schools of European pain ting, 
except for Turner. This was dem- 
onstrated Wednesday at Sotheby's. 

In no other category of Old Mas- 
ter paintings would it be possible 
for leading national institutions to 


SOUREN MEUK1AN 


buy significant works for less than 
525,000. which happened twice 
Wednesday. The auction included 
a forceful portrait of a man in a red 
coat and waistcoat shown half 
length facing the viewer. The pierc- 
ing look, only slightly toned down 
by a smile suggestive of good 
breeding rather than mirth, makes 
it a remarkable psychological 
study. Signed with die initials of 
tbe artist, Nathaniel Dance, it rep- 
resents Thomas Mudge (1715- 
] 794), one of the great clockmakers 
of the Georgian age; he invented 
the lever escapement ad gave the 
first detached-lever watch to King 


George HI in 1769. The portrait 
st ba 


must have been completed shortly 
after, for its mezzotint engraving 
by C. Townley is dated 1772. Soth- 
eby’s expert, James Miller, gave it 
an' estimate of £10,000 to £15,000. 
It was knocked down at £14,000 to 
the Science Museum of London. 

A few minutes later the Tate 
Gallery made a bargain on a por- 
trait in oil on panel representing an 
unidentified sitter in the guise of a 
muse. Brilliantly done, with the cu- 
rious tendency’ toward elongation 
so characteristic of English portrait 
painting in the 1770s, it is attribut- 
ed to Richard Cosway. Tbe artist 
exhibited a number of semi-alle- 


nal carved gilt frame. Commis- 
sioned by the Duchess of Marlbor- 
ough, it show a spaniel and a 
foxhound in Windsor Great Park, 
with the castle faintly visible on the 
horizon. It had hung at Althorp 
since 1746 and did not leave the 
Spencer family until its transfer to 
Sotheby's paintings department 
this year. 

film all paintings that have vir- 
tually never been moved since they 
were executed, this has intact a sub- 
tlety in the color balance, with its 
original sfumari under Lhe light 
varnish of early times, that seems 
miraculous. The painting, made 
glamorous by its provenance and 
historical documentation — the 
duchess refers to the dogs in her 
correspondence — is one of the 
more extraordinary animal por- 
traits of its time. It could have been 
conventional or twee, but is nei- 
ther. There is an air of knowing 
expectation about the two animals 
and a sense of mystery about the 
deep, receding foresL 

The picture was knocked down 
at £143,000. within the expected 
bracket yet far below the price of a 
major painring of comparable im- 
portance from 17th-century Neth- 
erlands or 1 Sth-centuiy France. 

Turning away from such major 
landmarks, there were other desir- 
able pieces with the same glamor- 
ous and historic provenance — the 
collection of the Spencer family at 



Althorp. A portrait of Mary Mus- 
; 1635-1717), wife of Sir Rich- 


gorical portraits at this period, such 
as "A Portrait in the Character of 


Minerva," shown at the Royal 
Academy in 1770. The work 
bought by the Tate, a figure of a 
woman dad in tunic and flowing 
drapery, lightly stepping forward 
between two pillars, is arresting. At 
£4.250 it would be difficult to gel a 
better deal. 


ters (I 

ard Spencer of Orfley, and her child 
John, painted in 1683 by John Ril- 
ey, is recorded in the diary of Lady 
Spencer. Despite its formality it is 
an excellent portrait. It sol'd For 
£5.280 — peanuts, though close to 
Sotheby's high estimate. 

A good portrait of Sir W illiam 
Waller done about 1648 by Corne- 
lius Johnson was not overpriced at 
£5,280, paid by the National Por- 
trait Gallery. The figure in armor 
may not be unforgettable, but Wal- 
ler was an important political char- 
acter. Having retired as a military 
commander in 1645 he became a 
leader of tbe Presbyterian party, 
and in 1659 he actively supported 
Charles H. 

So little store is set by English 
iodthat 


Charily, a figure from the gold baptismal font, sold Thursday. 


auction that he had falsely reported 
the number of paintings sold. 

David Bathurst, president of the 
New York branch of Christie's at 
the rime of the auction, said Floyd 
took no action in the matter. 

Tbe deposition tame to light 
Thursday when attorneys for the 
owner of the paintings, who had 
sued Christie's, called attention to 
it in response to 3 statement 
Wednesday by Floyd saying Bathr 
uni took “fuD responsibility" for 
the false report. 

Christie’s said Thursday that it 
would have no immediate com- 
ment on the deposition. 

Shortly after the 1981 auction, 
Bathurst announced that three Im- 
pressionist paintings bad been sold 
for a total of S5.6 million, while in 
fan one pain tin “ had been sold for 
p ? million and the others did not 
attract large enough bids. 

In sworn statements made as 
part of tbe suit, brought against 
Christie's in 1982, Bathurst, now 
chairman of Christie’s London and 
New York operations, said he had 
told Floyd about the results of the 
auction shortly after the sale. He 
was answering questions from 
Robert Werner, an attorney for Di- 
mitry Jodidio, the consignor of the 

bll^- offered ^auction in 1981. 

In another part of his deposition, 
Bathurst indicated that shortly af- 
ter tbe auction be also make about 
the false reports to Christopher 


Doubt Cast on Attribution 


Of 'Helmet’ to Rembrandt 


The AbkmIcJ Frei i 


B ERLIN — One of West Berlin’s most famous paintings. “The 
Man with the Golden Helmet,'' Ireig attributed to Rembrandt, 
may have been painted by an unknown artist, according to an art 


expert. 

Rein 


anald Grosshans, spokesman for the Prussian institute of Cultur- 
al Property, said Thursday that Jan Keich. an expert on Dutch 
painting, had examined the signature on the work and found convinc- 
ing evidence “voiding further attribution of the painting to Rem- 
brandt." More tests were being conducted, he said. 

Grosshans said the initial tests indicated that the painting, which is 
in the Dahlem Museums, was the work of an unknown artist from 
about 1650. Experts are also examining other paintings thought to be 
by Rembrandt, he said. The Dutch master lived from 1606 to 1669. 

The painting is brine restored and the results of the tests will 
probably not be released before the autumn, Grosshans said. “It is too 
early to lay all the cards oq the table." he said. 

Doubts about the origin of “The Man with the Golden Helmet" 
were voiced last spring by a Dutch curators' commission. 


i 

* 


isrjtt'- -TP- m 


Kasdan’s 'Silverado’ 


Is a Tribute to Westerns 


By Janet Maslin 

New York Times Senne 


N EW YORK — “Sflverado" is 
a sweeping, glorious- looking 
western that's at least a full genera- 
tion removed from the classic films 


Thursday, for gold. True, the object 
was unique: Tbe gold baptismal 
font, carrying the mark of the cele- 
brated Paul Storr dating it to 1797- 
1798, is surrounded by an aura of 
mystery, though it had never left 


the Portland family until its sale at 
Christie’s by Lady Anne Caven- 


The true masterpiece in tbe sale, 
however, was of a very different 
order. It belongs in a category that 
might be called animal portraiture, 
in which the English surpassed all 
other European schools. John 
Wootton (1682-1764), one of the 
leaders in this art. is well known for 
his horse portraits and hunting 
scenes. He also did dogs, such as 
the work in Sotheby’s sale, two ani- 
mals standing out against the back- 
ground of a wooded landscape. 
Signed in full, dated 1736, the large 


portrait painting of this period tk 
a few eood pieces failed to find 
buyer despite a noticeable effort b 


dish- Ben tinck, daughter of the sev- 
enth Duke of Portland. It was com- 
missioned for the christening of 
William Henry Cavendish Caven- 
disb-Stoclc-Benunck, grandson of 
the third duke. The very idea of a 
font made of solid gold rather than 
silver or silver gill is extraordinary. 
Charles Truman, who wrote the 
text for the hardbound, one-item 
catalog printed by Christie's, 
quotes the remark of E Alfred 
Jones that “what is doubtless the 


part in its execution. The 
was conceived by, of all people, i 
landscape designer Humphrey 
Rep ton. This was discovered after 
Christie's catalog had been print- 
ed; on seeing a picture of the font, 
the English art historian Kednm 
Laurie, who did her university the- 
sis on Rep ton as a gardener and 


architect, remembered that Repton 
in 1803, 


in his diary, published 


claimed to have designed it, and 
described it in detaiL Mrs. Laurie 


sketch. The identity of the sculptor 
who made the wax models that 
would have been usedfor the su- 
perb figures remains a puzzle. The 
figures have an Italianate fed and 
strongly suggest the hand of a 
bronze-maker. At £880.000 — 
£950,400 with the 8 percent premi- 
um — the Portland font stands as 
perhaps the most expensive riddle 
ever in art-market annals. 


wrote about it to The Times. The 
resulting front-page article a few 
days before the auction gave a wel- 
come boost to the piece. 

Truman, quoting Mrs. Laurie. 


said Repton could not draw figures 
jiuy a 


and probably produced or 


■ Deposition on Christie's 
Douglas C. McGill of The New 
York Times reported Thursday from 
New York: 

A top offidal of Christie’s said in 
a deposition three years ago that he 
told the company’s chairman, John 

A. Floyd, “shortly after” a 1981 


Burge, then a senior vice president 
and director of the fine arts depart- 
ment of Christie's and now the 
president of Christie’s New York. 

Last Wednesday, Jodidio’s suit 
was dismissed in New York State 
Supreme Coon in Manhattan by 
Judge Eugene R_ Wotin. Weiner 
said he planned to submit new evi- 
dence in an effort to have the case 
reopened. 

Angelo J. Aponte, the commis- 
sioner of the Department of Con- 
sumer Affairs in New York City, 
which licenses auctioneers, said 
that bis department was looking at 
the Christie's case “very seriously.*' 
He added that for tbe past several 
mnnrhc the department had been 
investi gating auction-house prac- 
tices and was considering revising 
auction-house regulations. 


it brings to mind. Lawrence Kas- 
dan, whe 


10 produced, directed and 

co-wrote the film, doesn't seem to 
be commenting ironically on the 
western form. Nor is he determined 
to update it. He simply approaches 
it from a present-day standpoint. 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


buyer despite a noticeable effort by 
Sotheby’s at giving realistic esti- 
mates. A portrait of W illiam Soth- 
eby (1757-1833) (probably no rela- 
tion. the auction bouse said) by Sir 
Thomas Lawrence was bought in at 
£6,000, slightly below the reserve. 
The preparatory study is full of life 
and deserved a better fate. 


only surviving example of an old 



painting (65 by 70.5 inches, 166 by 
180 centimet 


centimeters) retained its origi- 


There could be no neater con- 
trast to the lack of fervor with 
which English painting of this peri- 
od is received than the extraordi- 
nary prices occasionally paid for 
silver, silver gilt or, as happened 


possession of the 
at Wdbeck Abbey." 

Even more surprising than the 
duke's choice of gold is the sculp- 
tural quality of the four figures, 
three seated and one standing, that 
surround the hemispherical bowl 
all supported by a low rectangular 
base on short Iks. Storr, a talented 
silversmith, had become manager 
of his business by the time the piece 
was made and probably look no 


Festival at Newport Marks Opening of Japan 


United Press International 

N EWPORT, Rhode Island — 
A former Japanese foreign 
minis ter will lead a delegation of 30 
officials who will attend the Second 
Annual Black Ships Festival which 
marks tbe 1854 treaty between the 
United States and Japan that 
opened the way for trade between 
the two countries. 

The festivaL which begins Satur- 


day in Newport and tuns through 
July 28, is similar to one that has 
been held since the 1930s in Shimo- 
da. Newport's sister dry in Japan. 

Yoshio Sakuraudri, the former 
Japanese foreign minister, is ex- 
pected to bead a delegation of Jap- 
anese representatives who will take 
part in the two-week event. 

Commodore Matthew Perry, a 
native of Newport, forged the trea- 


ty, which ended more than two cen- 
turies of self-imposed exDe by Ja- 
pan. The treaty also permitted 
American ships to enter the ports 
of Hakodate and Shimoda to seek 
assistance and supplies- 
The festival received its name 
born the black-hulled ships Perry 
sailed into Tokoyo Bay in July 
1853. In March 1854, the Japanese 
acceded to the American request. 


and the result is an energetic revival 
with some significant differences in 
scale. “Silverado” is sufficiently 
modern to make its landscapes big- 
ger. its people smaller and its moral 
polarities less powerfully distinct 
than those of simpler, more starkly 
beautiful westerns gone by. 

“Silverado" reflects and encap- 
sulates other movies, something 
Kasdan is fast refining into an art. 
With an eye to the modem audi- 
ence and its fleeting attention span, 
he makes the film big and tireless. 
There are vast panoramas, frequent 
guniights and a large assortment of 
handsome, loner-type heroes who 
manage, for the convenience and 
sheer photogenrity of it, to join up 
and travel together. 

There are also just about all the 
stock characters — the crooked 
sheriff, the wise barmaid, the im- 
pressionable boy — associated with 
the genre. Kasdan pays no appar- 
ent heed to the danger of overload- 
ing the fijm in this way, or to the 
chance that sbootouts at 15-minute 
intervals will diminish the impact 


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of a final. “High NootT-siyle con- 
frontation. Nor does he do much lo 
develop an emotional link between 
the audience and the characters: 
the film is half over before its first 
genuinely hackle-raising confron- 
tation comes along. Instead, he cre- 
ates the film’s most satisfying mo- 
ments by communicating his sheer 
enjoyment in revitalizing scenes 
and images that are so well- loved. 

"Silverado" has four heroes, and 
it travels to several different towns, 
one of which gives the film its 
name. Thus it has a large cast and a 
plot that cannot always be followed 
effortlessly. However, the stars at 
very likable, and they work well 
together. 

They include Paden (Kevin 
Kline), the drifter, first seen alone 
on a vast expanse of desert, sleep- 
ing in his long Johns; Mai (Danny 
Glover), a black man who battles 
frontier racism and displays a 
touching love for his family: Jake 
(Kevin Costner), a classic rake and 
daredevil; and Jake's brother Em- 
mett (Scott Glenn), a solemn cow- 
boy. 

Among the other principals ate 
Brian Dennehy. who plays a cor- 
rupt sheriff and whose crafty', 
opaque gaze (here and in “Co- 
coon'*) is the wicked look of the 
season, and Linda Hunt, who 
brings, immense reserves of grace 
and intelligence to the barmaid's 
role. Less well used, through no 
evident fault of their own. are John 
Geese as another sheriff and Jeff 
Goldblum as a traveling gambler. 
And Rosanna Arquette, who puts 
in a brief and uncomfortable ap- 
pearance. has the hopeless job of 
answering a compliment with a 
stern “After a white' I won’t be so 


An Imp* 


Picasso s 


M - • 


pretty. But this land will be.” The 


rest of the screenplay, by Kasdan 
and his brother Mark, is a good 


deal sprightlier. 


Capsule reviews of other films 
recently released in the United 
States: 


Janet Maslin on “Mad Max: Be- 
yondThunderdome”: 

Mad Max, the hero of George 
Miller's posi-nudear fantasy films, 
assumes greater and greater mythic 
dimensions in the third film in tbe . 
series. This is the most visually 
spectacular installment by far, with 
a few innovations far more elabo- 
rate than anything Miller (here co- 
directing with George OgDvie) has 
auempted. It has showier stunts 
than its predecessors, and a better 
sense of humor. It also has Tina 
Turner, in chain-mail stockings; as 
Aunty Entity, whose machinations 
lead Max into a beehive-shaped 
arena where he must engage in a 
battle to the death while suwaided 
by wires. Later, when the fum pots 
Max in the wilds of Australia Tor an 
encounter with a tribe of primitive 
children who take him fen - their 
savior, the story loses much of its 
momentum. As played by Md Gib- 
son, with the stately world-weari- 
ness that has made him irresistible. 
Max seems even more recklessly 
nihilistic than he did in the seated 
film. 

(Paul Attanasio of The Washing 1 „ 
ton Post however, finds the film 
all costumes and cute monikers 
and no story.**) 

□ 


Kevin Thomas of the Los Ange- 
les Times on “Explorers": 

Y oungsters may forever be blow* 
teg bubbles, but there has never, 
been one like the translucent- 
sphere that the three young heroes! 
unexpectedly generate from thefr- 
homemadc computer. This bubble; 
can tear through walls and expand! 
to contain a spacecraft assembled- 
from junk, “Explorers" itself is^ 
bubble-lhin, but n glides by grace-? 
fully on the charm of Ethani 
Hawke, River Phoenix and Jason! 
Pres&on. and their vividly, envti 
sioned adventure in on outers® 
populated by aliens who ,, 
grown up on generations of TV-., 
reruns from Earth. It is also a gen-j 7 
tie film, actually suitable for ctifly 
dren. It is written by Eric Luke and* 
directed by Joe Dante of ‘^Orem-j 
Bns,“ with whiz-bang visual effects! 
by Industrial Light and Magic. < 



I . “T'-* 1 *=•. 



m 


:^7 / /t .z-:f 



Tbe Associated Press 

LONDON — * The British Lti 
brary said Thursday that h fiafl' 
received a gift of £1 mfflion ($i 
million) from the Wolfson Found*- 
don, a business trust, that would* J 
enable it to restore cuts planned fori a 
coosavation and catawBng.prtti"* 


3l. *** fS ** ** SflLsfe, 


















ENTEKNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


Page 7 


ABTS/LEISUBE 



By James Brooke classics read by well-known per- 

Ntw Yeri-Tima Service SOnaliticS, but these tOO OTC IDOStty 

N EW YORK — As John de- for educational purposes, a spokes- 
Csepd,-a stockbroker, pulled ■° UU1 In Britain, W. H. Smith 
weeds from his gardai in Connecti- sdls a series called "Listening for 
cut one recent weekend, he Pleasure," recordings of books by 

-J L'_ .. . H. .. “ 


switched on his portable cassette 
player and listened to a chapter of 
“Walden” by Henry David Tho- 
reau. 

When Alan Goldfarb set out to 
drive his sales territory, he put a 
tape in his car stereo and embarked 
on the saga of “The War of the - 
Worlds” by H.G. Wells. 

Discovering a new use for the 
universal tape cassette player, more 
and more readers in the United 
States are fining empty hours by 
hsteuisg to books: Seeing opportu- 
nhy in technological rrfmng p.. pub- 
lishers are rnshing to market books 

on cassettes, 

[The trend does not see m to be 
t akin g hold in Europe. A spokes- 
man for the French publisher Ha- 
chette said sales of cassette books 
were mostly confined to classical 
.leans intended Tor educational pur- 
poses. Another publisher. Editions 
des Femmes, has issued a series of 


classic and contemporary writers, 
■which a spokesman said was selling 
steadily but.not taking off.] 

‘"Audio tapes play to the Ameri- 
can way of life. People want to do 
two things at once — driving and 
listening, jogging and listening, do- 
ing the laundry and listening. - said 
Valeri Cade, president of Simon & 
Schuster’s audio-video publishing 
division, which plans to introduce 
its “Sound Ideas” cassette line in 
September. 

Joining the rush of mass-marker 
publishers. Random House plans 
to start its “AudioBooks” line in 
September and Bantam Books 
plans to follow with Bantam Audio 
Publishing in early 1986. Warner 
Audio Publishing has 250 cassette 
tides in bookstores, Largdy because 
of its purchase in January of Net- 
work for Learning, a publisher of 
recorded books, said Jeffrey A. 


HoUender. publisher of Warner “People tried to do what we are Condensed versions generally 
Audio. doing 10 years ago and failed,” said ran two hours and cost about 58 in 

Some experts counsel caution in Warner Audio’s HoUender. “The the United States. Full-length ver- 
any large-scale shift to tapes. “We difference is that there are now 140 sons can nm 20 hemr* or more and 
will lose something -very stirring in million cassette players out there.” cost about 575. A growing network 

Hal Newman, president of New- 0 f public and private lending li- 
man Co mmu nica t ions, a rapidly braries supplies unabridged ver- 
expanding recorded book company “ ’ ’ - 


“tig very 
the American tradition when we 
walk upstairs to find our kids lis- 
tening to Mark Twain on bead- 
sets,” said Jonathan KozoL, whose 
book “Illiterate America” was pub- 
lished last spring. 

Most of what is called “audio 
publishing” lies in the marketing of 
highly abridged versions of books. 
For example, one company offers 
an “artfully abridged” version of 
Dickens’s “A Tale of Two Ones” 
on two cassettes. 

“Condensation leaves me very 
much aghast,” said the writer John 
Hersey, who has several books re- 
corded on full-length tapes. “The 
minute you start subtracting, bias 
sets in.” 

The U. S. tape boom comes at a 
time when marketing surveys indi- 
cate that 85 percent of American 
households have at least one cas- 
sette player. 60 percent have car 
players and 50 percent have porta- 
bleplayers. 


based in Albuquerque, New Mexi- 
co, added: “There are now more 
■ cassette players in American 
households than television sets.” 
The Walden books chain has 
started installing “Audio Centos” 
in all of its nearly 1,000 stores. 
Displacing space devoted to con- 
ventional books, the centers dis- 


sions. Rentals from commercial li- 
braries can cost up to SI5. 

*‘We have 200 titles.” said 
Charles P. Coldwell. fine arts li- 


ihat full-blown radio plays such as 
the 1930s dramas or the son still 
made in Britain by the BBC. would 
not return on the wings of tape 
decks. 

“Today's audiences are too so- 
phisticated for the old-style radio 
plays.” said Miles T. Sicgd. a con- 
tract producer for Warner. Hoi- 
lender said a radio drama could 
easily cost S50.000 to produce. 


brarian for the Greenwich Library while a book usually costs Warner 
in Connecticut. “But at any one about S 15.000. 


time, 90 percent are going 'to be 
checked oul” 

Most of the books on tape are 
fiction, although there is a growing 


play 248 taped books, largely demand for self-help and how-to 
abridged versions. frx r ks 

American Express recently political columnist George 
mailed two million customers a F - Will says be accomplishes half 
brochure offering “The Casse tte his annua] reading by listening to 
Library of the Hundred Greatest full-length books rented from 


Books." These two-hour condensed 
versions include Sir John Gielgud 
reading “Hamlet,” Paul Scofield 
reading “Dr. Zhivago,” Dame 
Wendy Hiller doing “Jane Eyre,” 
Derek Jacoby with “1984" and 
Stewart Granger on “Call of the 
Wild.” 


By Max Wykes-Joyce 

L ONDON — Penny PQkington 
t and Wendy Olsoff run a gal- 
lery in New York’s East Village 
with a name drawn from fhwr ini- 
tials, P. P.O. W. “Out of Context” 
is a selection of small works by, 10 
of the gallery’s artists, at the Picca- 
dilly Gallery in Code Street They 
include the English-bom Paul Ben- 
ney and Sue Coe, both living and 
working in New York; the sculp- 
tors Christy Rupp, Walter Martin 
and Kathy Grove: a fantasist, Tom 
Dillon; and the daddy realist Joan 
Nelson. Altogether, tins is an im- 
pressive London debut. 

“Our of Context," P. P. O.W.at 
Piccadilly Gattay, 16 Cork Street, 
Wl, through Jufy 20. 

□ 

Ever since The New Yorker mag- 
azine’s foundation, in February 
1925, its cartoons have been a 
source of great pleasure. Fifty orig- 
inal New Yorker cartoons and cov- 


er drawings are on view at the 
Langton Gallery. Tbc 13 artists 
represented inemde such famous 
olds Lera as Peter Arno and Chari rs 
Addams, as well as comparative 
newoomeis to the magazine, such 
as the New Yorker lames Steven- 
son and the Frenchman J. J. 
Scraps 


k 50 ' Cartoons and Cams from 
_ Gallery, 

3 Langti 
July 19. 


The New Yorker” Lanpon \ 

ion Street, SW1, through 


Ceri Richards (1903-1971). bora 
in a Welsh mining village; friend of 
the poets John Tessimond and Ver- 
non Watkins, and most sensitive 
visual interpreter of the poetry of 
Dylan Thomas, may be considered 
the most talented of Celtic roman- 
tic painters. IBs deep involvement 
with music and poetry is empha- 
sized in a show at the Gillian Jason 
Gallery. He was renowned , as a 
draftsman, and one of the most 
significant drawings here is “The 


force that through the green fuse,” 
inspired by a fine in a Thomas 
poem, which sparked off in Rich- 
ards a great sequence of drawings, 
paintings and prints. 

"Ceri Richards: The Lyrical Vi- 
sion Gillian Jason Galley, 42 In- 
verness Street, Camden Town, 
NWI, through Jufy 26. 

□ 

The dealer Nigel Greenwood has 
moved to a spacious new gafieiy in 
the West. End and opened with 
“Recent Paintings by Christopher 
Le Bran.” Le Brun is a slow work- 
er; this show represents all his ma- 
jor pieces since nis New York exhi- 
bition in 1983. Near-abstracts, the 
new works nevertheless have figu- 
rative and romantic undertones 
handled on a lug scale in a most 
accomplished manner. 

“ Recent Paintings by Christopher 
Le Bran,” Nigel Greenwood Inc, 4 
New Burlington Street, Wl, through 
July 27. 

□ 


a Wide Range of Exhibitions 

Browse and Darby, in their an- enchanting Impressionist land- anniversary celebration. Included 
nual summer exhibition, show a scapes by Monet and Pissarro. 


field: “British & French Paini 
Drawings and Sculpture 
1950.” Especially fine are an 


In the great range of image: are 

r- and 20th-Cen- 
tury Works of Art," Lefevre Gallery, branch, etchings, 


Books on Tape, a mail-order lend- 
ing library with 1.500 titles, based 
in Newport Beach. California. 

“I jogged through all of World 
War 1 1 with Chur chill," Will said of 
Sir Winston Churchill's six-volume 
history, “The Second World War." 

“I go through a book a week 
using time otherwise wasted in tax- 
is. shaving or walking,” Will said. 

There is a difference of opinion 
in the recorded book industry over 
whether to get famous actors to 
read. Some publishers try to get 
well-known actors for dramatic 
readings while others prefer more 


range of 60 works in their specialist “Important 19th- and 20th-Cen- some rare specimens of early Rem- straightforward readings by un- 

n/ — _/■ — r--n — i j. .._v- — ] K qj known actors. 


1 870- 30 Bruton Street. Wl, through Jufy rer, and two etchings from the se- 
ll hik 27. ■ quence “La Tanromaquia” by 

and wash drawing erf “Two Lec^- q Goya. An added attraction is a sc- 




Picasso and Tut Sequels in Montreal 


By William Wilson 

Las Angela Tima Service 

M ONTREAL — The cultural 
imperatives here this sum- 
mer are two art exhibitions that are 
both less and more than they seem. 

Tte -Montreal Museum tf Fine 
Arts is showing “Picasso — Meet- 
ing in Montreal” through Ocl 10. 
Meanwhile, an He Notre-Dame, 
“Ramses IT holds forth through 
SepL 29 at the Palais dels Qviliza- 
tion. Hie crowds are thick and en- 
thusiastic. Local newspapers have 
cany fervent letters to the editor 
Evidently the sprat of denounce 
Picasso as a charlatan or avatar 
dangerous modem subjectivity has 
lost none of its charm a dozen years 
after bis death. 

The Picasso show indudes about 
80 paintings bdonging to bis wid- 
ow, Jacqueline. The other show, 
also of 80 objects, celebrates Pha- 
raoh Ramses n, whose colossal 
statues to himself are part of many 
people’s mental baggage, if not part 
of this show. Objects an view range 
in character from occult magnifi- 
cence to exquisite intimacy. 

The Ramses exhibit is the weaker 
of the pair. It began with two 
strikes against it, because it is such 
a transparent attempt to repeat the 
bkxkbutter success of the “Trea- 
sures erf Tutankhamun” phenome- 
non. 

Things slump further as one real- 
izes that the ate of the exhibition is 
what is left of “Expo ’67” the fi- 
nancially disastrous World’s Fair 
that nearly bankrupted Montreal 
What could create worse karma 
than p utting the T rims nf an ancient 

civilization inside the ruins erf a 
modem one with its skeletal globu- 
lar buildings and deserted pavilions 
erf the future? 

The Palais de la Grifization is in 
a cavernous wedding cake style 
about as hospitable to art as a 747 


hangar. Its spaces gobble up two- 
ton Egyptian granite statues like a 
dragon eating after-dinner mints. 

However, the exhibition is a 
worthwhile, medium-size treasure 
trove with a few very good lane 
picces. sudi as the m a gi sterial Ho- 
rus guarding the child pharaoh, 
four very fresh painted sarcopha- 
gus lids and a pink granite mono- 
nth of Ramses with wonderfully 
liquid volumes. Small objects on 
hand are even better. A simple 
plumb-bob level in the form erf a 
square has the magic of the best 
modem art. A pair of immense ear- 
rings is a reminder of the boggling 
grandiosity (and discomfort) of an- 
cient ceremonial adornment. A 
carved box handle in the farm of a 
sw i mm ing nude gid is as elegant a 
of innocent lyric eroticism as 
ever concocted. 

Picasso exhibition, by con- 
trast, is hung in sensible £If chrono- 
logically eccentric) fashion -at the 
museum. Il is possible to view the 
works thoroughly even on the busi- 
est Sunday afternoons by a clever 
combination of persistence, peek- 
ing between elbows, tip-toeing 
above shoulders and pretending to 
drop your free folder to take in the 
lower bits between 

Performance 
dance reveals a group 
of remarkable freshness, me sensa- 
tion balances between a hope that 
they represent a taste for crispness 
on Madame Picasso’s part and a 
suspicion that the maestro may 
have been, inclined to palm off un- 
finished pictures on her. A signifi- 
cant number — such as represen- 
tions of a dog and a rooster — are 
little more than gray, monochrome, 
line-aud-wash renderings that look 
like the opening moves on 
than never got any further, 
the choice of finding them interest- 
ing insights into a great Parmer’s 
attack or disappointingly thin. 


If the latter conclusion is 
readied, there are compensations. 
There are nice fittie : oddities, such 
as a dove painted by Picasso’s 
teacher-father, and one of his own 
precodons demonstrations, a very 
JoGd academic oil. study, of !Tbe 
Flight Into Egypt" done, when he 
was 14 years old. There's a hlue- 


ards" by David Jones (1895-197 . 
a quartet of small pastels by Paul 
Maze (1887-1979), a small early 
seascape and trees by Maurice De- 
nis (1ST70-1943), three major mis by 
Sir Wfifiam Nicholson (1872-1948) 
— a master artist still woefully un- 
derestimated — a Picasso ink 
drawing of artist and model, and a 
group of Rodin bronzes. 

"British and French Paintings. 
Drawings and Sculpture, 1870- 
1950," Browse and Darby, 19 Cork 
Street, Wl, through Jufy 27. 

O 

The Lefevre Gallery is showing 
its latest exhibition to even greater 
advantage than usual, having ac- 
quired two spacious upstairsaraw- 
iug rooms. Among the 19 works are 
the splendidly theatrical “La Chan- 
teuse en Rose” by Jean -Louis For- 
ain (1852-1931); a delectable still 
life, “Nature Morte sur fond 
jaune”(1953), by Nicolas de Sta£l 
(1914-1955); a near-edible still fife 
of fnrit by Gustave Courbet (1819- 
1877); a tremendous Cubist still 
life, “La Nappe Rouge,” by 
Georges Braque (1882-1963); and 


uence of prints, “Les Belles 
emmes,” by Albert de BeBer- 


Gafl Garnett, a Canadian actress 
who recently recorded Isaac Asi- 
mov’s “The Gods Themselves" for 
Warner, said she believed she was 
chosen in part because erf her “non- 
regjonal” accent “1 love it because 


The successors to the French Im- 
pressjooists are featured in the oche_ 

opening show at a new jptikiy, “ Four Centuries of Printmaking you gel to play an essence of all the 

EdiaiJ v di- Wybml WayM Fl % M I7 old Jhataers* she aid. 

^&y^fld P! ?SS, by < rf Bmd S,rea - J * n - ■“ ““ ta *‘ “ 

Madame Hessel in her Garden 


(c. 

1926); a pastel “Vase of Flowers” 
(c. 1906). a lovdy small Nabis 
work: and an intimist “Portrait of 
Madame Fried” playing the violin, 
painted in 1924. Among the less 
celebrated but extremely able art- 
ists are Vilhelm Theodor Fischer 
(1857-1928) chiefly known as 
porcelain decorator, with “Wading 
Birds in an Estuary"; Theodore 
Roussel (1847-1926) with three ma- 
rine watercolors; and the Danish 
painter Peter Vilhelm Elsted (1861- 
.1933), with an interior and an ar- 
chitectural piece, both displa 1 
extraordinary command of light. 

“Aspects of Post-Irmressionism, 
Connaught Brawn. 3 Albemarle 
Street, Wl, through Jufy 30. 


Fme printmaking is to be seen in 
Wybna Wayne Rue Art’s fourth 


Max 
fyinthe 
dons. 


b&ckgroun 

Wykes-Joyce writes regular- snatches of 
’ IHT on London an exhibi- transitions. 


ound sound effects or 
music to denote scene 
But most people inter- 
viewed in the business predicted 


Since 1978, the percentage of 
Americans reading books has de- 
clined 5 percent, according to a 
study released last month by the 
Book Industry Study Group, a 
nonprofit organization in Manhat- 
tan. While librarians and literacy 
expens do not blame recorded 
books for the drop, they June 
mixed feelings about the effect of 
tapes in the future. 

"Tapes are one more disincen- 
tive to literacy “ said Kozol. “In the 
case of senolis works of art. there is 
something precious about the si- 
lence that surrounds reading. In the 
case of hooks of opinion, it is far 
more difficult to maintain a fine, 
critical edge when exposed to the 
quick-fix. toil-free process of listen- 
ing." 

On the other hand. Dr. John Y. 
Cole, who recently directed a 
studs. “Books and Our Future," 
for the Library of Congress, said, 
“in some ways reading books and 
listening to tapes sene the same 
purpose — they stimulate imagina- 
tion and thought." 

A pioneer in the field. Dr. .Arthur 
Luce Klein, president of Spoken 
Arts of New Rochelle, New York, 
recently reviewed changes in audio 
publishing since the I9 m]s. when he 
made one of his first tapes, with the 
poet John Betjeman. 

“John kept saying. ‘Who’s going 
to be interested in this? You're not 
going to make any money,* " Klein 
recalled. “Today, the future 
couldn't be brighter.” 


-tbemepctnres] 
force 1 964 “jacqudm 


C IUIUC1 LU laic U1 LUC 

tween people’s legs. 
x of this polite rain 
i a group of paintings 


andatour-de- 
: Sealed With 
Her Cat” In it, fie moves effortless- 
ly from a Ciibfet body to a classical 
bead and throws in an Expression- 
ist kitty for laughs. 

.Umayjnstbeinqjossibletodoa 
bad Picasso exhibition. The man 
was such a phenomenon, apictori 
genius with more moods than a 
Colette heroine. Looking, you can't 
decide whether to be more amazed 
at bis technical command or his 
temperamental range. 

All that nvtm, the closest thing 
tins show otters to a new insight is 
the whiff erf a hint that Picasso may 
have done something he is never 
suspected of doing; It looks as 
though, just maybe, he occasio n ally 
worried about other artists even 
after he was the undisputed King of 
the HilL Some late pictures suggest 
he couldn't resist the urge t 
be could beat Willem de fi 
and Francis Bacon at their own 
games. For good measure, he 
tossed some Bronx cheers in the 
direction of the Minimalist and 
Pop artists. Maybe^ 

But truth to tell, these Picassos 
inspire nothing beyond routine (if 
scarcely insig nificant) admiration. 
The museum world is now spawn- 
ing sequels, just like Hollywood. 


DOONESBURY 



AUCTION SALES 


PUBLIC AUCTION! 

Ml Bufcfing Produ* 

5300 TdmjaBoukji, New Oftecra, LA. 
Two da* .My 25 «. 26 
Impedion /IhgMrcfion 
weak of Mt, from ftOO - 

IHic b al «D 111* Mil, wMi «*r 3,^00 
piaac he ftt y rty bos ban «oM mi 
MMyUns mMtgolfl 

Forte Efts, 2000 - BOOOJbWaombly 
ooltden/baferc/gala vakm/axnpMaffo- 
dira ihopfaoitvwoidjhmfbittotf 
happen, bhrdm, & mrarct dry & wet/wn- 
dws/pwnpt/gong aws/ownt/panr Ira/ 
d ofik* and lab «quipmBrt & fi»lurot/dcx»- 
/ wcSt/ piuntirg/igWrxy' al removing in- 
ventory, ttmHb abattc/oomjgpfed. ft*, 
roofing, sdhg imulaiim'eic/- 
ftr MoiwBon: 

SENCORE AUCTION SERVICE 

"THE PRODUCERS" 

(504) 241-9395 

Tim Mute, Audionwr 
IA. LXL- 347-8586 

8220 OU> GBXTlLr U, Nw Odsm w 7BI26 


"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SALES” 
appear 

on Saturday 

Write tor 

Franpoisc C££MENT, 

. Inte rnational 

, Herald Tribune, 

181 Ave. Cbarks-de-GauUe, 
92521 Noddy Codex, France. 



2FOR1 

Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 
we'll give you an extra month ofTribs free with a one-year 
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price in most European countries! 

r To: Subscription Manoger, Intemalkxxal Herald Tribune, I 

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Please enter my subsaipiion fan 


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SpaodMcduavyltei. 


J P&BM«oU#YOughMordi31.196bj 

Gu*y 

Gmay 

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6 mot 

3mot 

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1^30 

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570 

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760 

414 

FfCrftft 

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1200 

644 

359 

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144 

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101 

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1&600 

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550 

298 

166 

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149.040 

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UIMilUCUP 

LFr. 

9XC20 

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fast of Europe, r'bfthAfrico, fomw French 



Africa Eos! 





J 

322 

174 

•95 

ItalofAtneaGonodftiajiiAireno^a** 

loos 


Ass 

s 

442 

238 

IX 


INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 


250 




reasons 
to visit 
LE LOUVRE 
DES 
ANTIQUAERES 

250 ART DEALERS OPEN 
FROM TUESDAY 
THRU SATURDAY 
11a.m. to 7 p.m. 

2. PLACE DU PALAIS-ROYAL 
75001 PARIS-TEL (1)29727 00 


Present Exhibition 
- AUTOUR DU PARFUM . 

duxvtauxdcsiEcle 


r GALERJE LOUISE IBRJS 

47, rue de Monceau, 75008. 
TeL- 563 28 85/37 14 

HENRI 

LAURENS 

60 works — 197 5-1 954 
June 12- July 20 

■— Dotty axeapt Sunday and Monday— A 


j- ROBOT FOUR TAPESTRIES -i 
MOIC, KLEE PICASSO, FOkOty 
LEGO, UJRCAT, CARZOLL. 
AUBUSSON 
hand-woven TAPESTRIES 
Origaid prestigious hand-knotted 
SAVONNBUE CARPETS 

28 Rue Bonaparte, Peril 6th 
TeU 329 30 60 


= MUS£E RODIN = 

77, rue de Vareme (7*J 
Mftro Varenne 

KIRILI 

Sculptures exhibited 
in the museum gardens 
Daily, except Thuesday,' 
from 10 a.m. to 5.45 p.m. 
=Jum 26-Soptamber 76= 


PARES /MW YORK 


ZABRISKIE 

BRIGGS, KERN, 
POIVRET 

724 Rfth Ave, New York 

WILLIAM KLEIN 

37 rue Quincampoix, Paris 


LONDON 


Gtxd expry dcCe. 


. Sgnoture- 


Qvdoccounr| 
number 


Name. 


Addrea. 


I Qy - 

I 


.Country. 


Tel — : 

VACATION tdkUCnONS 

I imI be traveEngtham . 


.Telex. 


1 

13-7-85 | 

I 


1 

I O Hease fixperd rry suboiprkxi cLHng my * exprotiai ■ 

bedordin^y. □ l would tike to have the paper sent to my vacation address. I 

^fffeneendMirHlnjcfia^ J 



= Date My 16, ewt 530 pm. venue: Wefi- s 
S inrot« GitifcW Confsrwice Cgrtre, VdoriG E 


= SL, London SW 1 . Prim £ 15 . 00 . = 

= Mi. Uoyd 01-937 0230 . = 

mnrainnimiiiiiiiiiuittimiinuiiHiuuBE 



MODERN BIASTER 
GRAPHICS 


Kxhibition until July 20Lb of works 
by Moore, Mire. Picasso. Chagall 
Hockney and Braque. New Modern 
Masters catalogue avatlabk. 
9.30*30 mon-frt; 10 JW.OO sat. 

nuusnETS coyitmporaby art 
8 Dover Street, London Wl «9 6701 


PARIS 


WALU FINDLAY 


New York Paris Chicago Palm Beach Beverly HHI 

EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY 
ARTISTS 

represented exclusively 

Yolande ARDISSONE Andrt HAMBOURG 

Constantin KLUGE 


iAUGE 
Louis tABIEN 
Francois GALL 
Bernard GANTNER 


LEPHO 
Gaston SEBIRE 
Andre VIGNOLES 


FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS 
POST-IMPRESSIONISTS AND MODERN MASTERS 

Avenue Matfgnon, Paris 8th - 225.70.74 
ton.-Fii, 10 aja-1 pm. - 2:30 pm-7 pm 
Hotel George-V, 31, Avenue Georro-V. Paris 8th - 723J4.00 
Mon.-SaL, 10:30 am-l pm; 2:£M) pjn; Sun, 7-9 pm 


GAJLERIE Ren6 DROUET 


104 Fg Saint-Honor^, Paris 8' - Tel. 266.67^5 

James 

ENSOR 


paintings 

until July- 31 * 1933 


GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


, 6, Rue Jean-Mem»z, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.82.44 , 


OBOEVA 

— MUSEE DE V ATHENEE 

Rue de I’Athence 2, Geneva (Switzerland). 

TeL: (022) 29 75 66. 

Tapestries - Originals - Engravings 

CHAGALL, PICASSO, ERNST, 
KLEE, LEGER AND CALDER. 

July 12 through September 29 


VIENNA 


OSKAR KOKOSCHKA 

REVISED EDITION OF THE CATALOGUE 
RAISONNE OF THE OIL PAINTINGS 
BY HANS MARLA WINGLER 

I would be grateful if any owners of oil paintings bv OSKAR 
KOKOSCHKA who have not completed and returned 
questionnaires from me should contact me immediately as I 
am about to complete my manuscript. ■ 

Heim Johann Winkler 

A- 1080 Vienna • Tigergasse 12. Austria. Tel.: (222) 42 96 183. 


LONDON 


MARTYN GREGORY GALLERY 

LONDON 

China Trade Pictures 
Early Botanical Watercolours 
Early English Watercolours 

34 Bury Street, St James’s 
LONDON SWL (01-839-3731) 


MARLBOROUGH FINE ART 
(LONDON] LTD. 

6 Albemarle 5t., Wl. 01-629 5161 

FRANCIS 

BACON 

Juty 31. 1985 

Mon-fri. 10-5)30. SoO. 10-1130. 


WILDENSTEIN 

A Retrospective ExinLidoa of 
Fainting and Drawing by 

ALBERT MARQUET 

19 June through July 

147 New Bond Sl, London, WL 
MotL-Fii, 10*30; Sats. lO- l^XQ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


N VS E Most Actives | 

vol rtton low Lost crm. 


33S64 Mb 
24048 IPl 
23380 12% 
11978 23 
T40tt 43% 
12007 23b 
124OT 33 
1 1460 TVs 
mss* 7% 
10450 21V 
10128 

10002 69% 
9008 114% 
9833 2? 

9SJ7 23b 


36V — % 

13h 4- m 

1*to + % 
Jib + v 
Q'b + to 
33b — % 
34«a + '•* 

9% + V 
7h + to 
Ub + to 
34% — V 
68V —1 
174% + to 

24b + * 
23% — V% 


Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 1334.13 134199 132139 133310 + 0.90 

Trans 477X1 49153 47134 66757 + 11 JO 

UNI 14733 169J7 147.16 16191 + 1.13 

Comp 55109 56253 55251 55951 + X* 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE index 


Hist) LOW CtOM cm 
Composite 11213 11150 11213 4-118 

Industrials 13143 13143 19143 +0.14 

Tram. U221 11159 11251 +150 

Utilities 6153 4153 4143 +0.17 

Finance 12212 12159 121.90— 0JU 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

industrials 


Advanced 

Declined 
unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Hlgtts 
New Lows 

Volume ua 
Volume down 


Ctow Prev. 

870 971 

448 427 

503 427 

2041 2029 

IBs 189 

11 10 

42771X20 
42972120 


Bos sales 

196541 420073 

192384 407558 
200X74 mOS\ 

22X566 397518 


Sales *ShTt 

30073 1.177 


’included In the sales figures 


Fridays 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


N1SE 


Dosing 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
volume up 
V olume down 


294 297 

243 346 

201 2*4 

786 7B7 

14 34 

It « 


: composite 
industrials 
, Finance 
insurance 
! Utilities 
Banks 
TnntSP. 


Ckne cam 
30239 + 157 
307X1 9 148 
39223 +245 
34051 + 353 
30252 + 248 
277X8 + l-VJ 
SXT4 +252 


C-.KB9 .: 

• ■&'* •• ‘ 


M<on Law uni CM. 


4 -. - 

■•1 

i+V I’A 
2 -, - 7 . 
•1-* + * . 
»2V - * 
m ■ 
l"» + * 
S» + % 



VoLBt4PJW, 120340*0 

Prrr.4PJW.vol HUMAN 

Prev OHMiMoted dote 14M&H0 


Tobies include me nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's Index 


High Low Dose CMm 
industrials 71248 TILT* 212*8 +055 

Transs. 17759 17458 17198 +257 

Utilities 905S 37.7? TO34 +0X7 

Finance 2273 2141 2345— 004 

Composite 19353 19264 19359 +053 


•\~i 

iKs -r.-» -7 ; + 

nil i- * 

:c» <v J b 

s r. r *'• 

iu it. »% 


•O'* + w 
IU * % 

n. 

4i<l + h 

* - ■» 


AMEX Sales 


AMEX Stock index 


4PJA.U0tUTW 
Prev, 4 PA volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


Oom CM* 

rtiit — U3 


1.20 15 17 
.101 


I? Month 
High low !te* 


:jv.. 16 AAF .48 22 16 
oi* A(J5 14 

I A*; ?»■; AAAC« 

71’: i: A.1AF 50 18 40 

UV 1"n AAVA wo 

4°’z Vt AMR 12 

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ii', 22*4 AUK pt 267 1 IX 

.!■ 7V, A PL 

. «’» ASA 200 44 

T Ilto *V\ J2 25 10 

.7 .1 la 6ZP 1.72 95 8 

Ctr J/.V AfrlLPO 1X0 24 17 

19 AcccWd i 50 23 17 

?<V IT- AcnnC 40 1* 

1J’. : TV) AcmeE J2b 4J 10 

19 15 AdoEi 1.92el0L7 

ro Il'S AdmMI J2 14 7 

flVj AdvSvs 531 46 14 

■IP* TT'a AMD 11 

12V 673 Advnl .17 14 

ISb 9 Aerlie, 14 

47VB 27' V AetnLf 264 55 35 

m, }3% AolL Pf SJbltLS 

IB'. Ahmn, 150 3x 14 

7Vj : All pen 

15V, A.rPrd 150 22 12 

?-•% IJ AlrbFri 60 3.1 11 

1', 1 AiMoos 

:t-. 21'. AMjPdI 2920 1 05 

im 37 V AI0PPIA292 123 
8' > 4'i AWPcJpt 47 11.1 

82 el'.-: AJOPM 940 11.1 

I0: - M'v AkJF Pt 1140 10.9 
luVs llh Alaescs 154 6.7 9 
2 J'm f'i AlikAIr .16 4 10 

23' j 10b Albrto s Jt li 77 

33'. 24* a Albluu .76 26 12 

31'. JJ' . Alcan 1220 A? 12 

a 27 3 AlcoSId 12BJ 13 13 

32 17 AlevAlx 100 3X 

26' i 20b AI6«dr 21 

r' 72 h AdeCp 2 j06I 2X 26 

Tdi. 18A. Afelnl 1-40 5_5 

6S 817. AI0IPICI155 116 

34b 24b All-aPw 7-70 4.1 10 

21 h If. AllenG 600 27 14 

46». 2B'i> AllaCP 140 4.1 9 

6c 53'D AldCppt 6J4 10.7 

113% +7 AldCoonZOO 10.7 

106b laov. Alacpi iuieii5 
23 1 ; 16% AiidPd 17 

»nb 42U AlldSIr 212 3.7 I 

17b 4b flillscn 
34% 24 AllsCaf 

2S% 20 ALLTL 144 65 « 

J97* 29% AlCOC 150 15 17 

a% 1J% Amo» .101 

40 32% Aina.pl 340 64 

34 22% AmHn 1.10 44 19 

IW)'.. 9C% Aries Pf 350 10 

7% 1% AmAST 

21'": 15b ABakr 8 

70 5Sh ABrand 3.90 60 9 

TPb 56b ABrdpt 267 44 

115 56% ABUcSt 160 IX 17 

27b |9'i ABIdM 46 21 15 

27% 20b ABusPr M 7X IS 

60 40b Am Con 290 44 12 

25% 2l".'AConp| 240 114 
52% 37 ACanal 340 5-7 

114 103 ACanpM175 121 

-X’i lt% ACapBd 220 10.7 

30^ 75% ACdbCv 261 1 8X 

II 6b A CenIC 219 

S6b 43b ACvan 160 16 13 

27% 18% ADT .92 34 24 
24% 16-% AElPw 234a 9.1 9 

J9% 25 AmErp 148 27 14 

25 9% AFoml i 4 70 16 

35b 19% A On Co 140 2-9 10 
15b 6'. AGnlwt 

55% Sib AGr.l ptA644ell4 
96 -i 58% AGnl ufB547e *4 
71% 40% AGn pfD 264 34 
12 7% AHohJ 

66b 4*% AHome 290 4X 14 
41b 26 h A Hasp 1.12 27 13 
9»b 65b ftmndi 460 4.9 9 
£7% 52 AlnGrp M 6 24 
144 HJVj AIGPPf 545 44 
an lBb AMI Ji 24 13 
Sb 2»« AmMoi 
» 16b APresds .121 a 4 

13b 5 ASLFki 6 

16b 12' '* ASLFIP1219 1SX 
14 10+1 AStllo 40 56 II 

35b 24b AmSId 140 SJ 10 

4’b 31b Amstor 64 14 1? 

:■ 46'/a Asrr dIA 4JB s.7 

Sb SI ASh-PfB 640 11.9 

I4b 16b ATJ.T 140 M 17 

41b 31 AT&T pf 364 9J 

42 31-'a AT&T pf 3J4 9J 

77% ISVi AWolrs 1.00 46 8 

i?% io awoi pi 165 mo 

124. 10 AWOSPt 1-25 96 

-TB'x 19's AmHalf 2X0 127 9 

?;%• 56b ATrPr 564 7.9 

ITVj. TV, ATcSc 

88% ol% ATrUn 564 4.4 

2*»i -26b Anwron 140 4j a 

50 24"a AmciOs 40 X 23 

191? 72*a Am*ir* J» 3.1 13 

28b 18b Amfac 

ip 6b Amine 4 

6° 50V. Amoco 3-301) 54 8 

3*vj MVn AMP .72 13 19 
24 m, Amoco 30 24 16 

3014 123* Amreps 10 

35% 21b Amstn 1X0 19 10 

43b 25b Amstod 160 4J 13 

4% lb Anocmp 

16% Anlops IB 

19% Anchor 1X8 55 

27% AnClov IJ2 11 37 

9b AndrGr 30 15 16 

Angelic 40 34 14 

Anhews 13 

pf 


StL Close 

HOs Hion Low Ouol 01*84 


SIW + % 
14b— % 
11 

J3U + Vb 
I3b + b 
50b +1> 
h 
b 
% 
« 
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15b + b 
25 + b 

24 +lb 
29 — b 
34b + b 
34b— b 
29b + % 
33% + h 
84b + M 
25b— Vu 
97% 

33b— % 
72 * b 

64b + b 
63 + b 

b 




mGo 50 Jx 
mol s 164 27 
rvWr 60 36 
SIX .12B 16 
usch .78 3J 
JI 23 
JO 6 
2X0 75 
160 19 
150 55 
138 55 
X4 11 
150 21 


pt 1.70 24J 
40 27 
5* 16 
650 73 
228 
J2 IX 
280 65 
.80 |j 
160 13 
200 4.7 
4J0 115 


NYSE Prices Reach New Highs 


V ruled Pros huaiuutanal 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange edged up to new highs in active 
trading Friday but analysts said investors re- 
mained cautious as they assessed the implica- 
tions of falling oil prices, a sharply lower dollar 
and economic reports showing the economy still 
weak. 

Responding to Mexico's recent oil price cuts, 
transportation and utility issues displayed 
strength. 

The Dow Jones industrial, utility and trans- 
portation averages all set new highs. The Dow 
Jones industrial average inched up 0.90 to a 
record 1,338.60. For the week, the Dow gained 
4.15. 

Advances outpaced declines 832-706 among 
the 2,028 issues traded. 

Volume totaled 120,900,000, compared with 
122,790,000 on Thursday. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported U.S. retail sales fell 0.8 
percent in June while producer prices r emain ed 
unchanged. 

Transportation issues continued to post good 
gains alter .Mexico's announcement late 
Wednesday that it is cutting its oO prices. Ana- 
lysts said the broader market drew support 
from the view that lower dl prices and a weaker 
U.S. dollar would help produce better corporate 
earnings in the second half of the year. 

On the other hand, a larger- than -expected 54- 
billion rise in the nation's basic money supply 
reported by the Federal Reserve on Thursday 
after the market closed has made some investors 
conclude that the Fed will be in no fanny to 
posh interest rates lower. 


“The market is up but not dramatically, ex- 
cept in the transportation sector,” noted Hide- 


everyday 

down.” 


i of Prudential-Bache. “It seems to 

r " she said. “We make new highs 
yet no one is jumping up and 


12 Month 
HMiLM Slack 


39% 31b 
35b 22 
Sb lb 
27 15% 

40b 28% 
37% 29 
26% 13 
29b 22% 
53% 30% 
«% 27b 
40b 27% 
19b 13b 
20 15b 

71b 14% 

» 23 

65% 35 
7b 6b 
22% 19 
51% 46b 
ia% n 
66b 40% 
30b 12b 
7 1% 

15 3b 


150* *5 
• 60c 26 


29b 28b 
23b 23b 
2% 2b 
26b 26 
40% 40% 
35b 34b 
2ib 2ib 
29b 29b 
51% 51b 
31b 38 
31b 11b 
18b 18% 
19 Ub 
17b 17b 
2Bb 27b 
67b 64% 
7b 7% 
22b 22b 
51b 51b 
lib lib 
57b 56b 
18b 17% 
1 % 1 % 
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29 + b 

23b + % 
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29b— b 
51% + b 
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18b + b 
19 — b 
17b 

28 va — b 
46b +1% 
7b 

22b— b 
nb 

lib + b 
56b— % 

17% — b 

1% 

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In !X0o 55 11 
loe 26 20 
Pf 160 15 

» « " 

Pf 4.10 7J 

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154 116 

53 

2.20 49 11 
1X0 5.7 10 
267e 96 
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160 25 

101 

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17% 
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26b + b 
30 + M 

20% — b 
29 + b 

35% —1 
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20b— b 
2b— b 
lib 
20b 

24b— lb 
23% 

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25b + b 

sib— b 

«%— b 

* + 

2b 

42% —lb 
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47b + b 
55 + b 

55 + b 
2ib + b 
29% — b 
43%— b 
43b— % 
55% + b 
5414 + b 
35 +1 

34b + b 

J7%— % 
142%— 1% 
64 — b 
28% — b 


50% sib— 1% 
I 10b 10% + b 

■ 10b 10% 

49% 49% + b 

■ 34b 34% + b 

73b 74 + b 

i 61% 42% +1% 
l 17b 18b— b 
26b 27 

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I 18% 18b 

37 37 —1 

i 72b 72b— 1 
i 57b 57V3 
i 73b 73b 
« SS f» 

i 20b mi — % 
34% 34% — b 

I ZPA 70* 

I 27b 27b + b 
50b— I 
II + » 
Kb— w 
6b- b 

39b— % 
13% — b 
30b— b 
ZM— % 
63 + b 

63 

98 +*V2 

1Tb— b 
12b— % 
I3W— b 
39b + 14 
34b + b 
36b— to 
23 

13H— b 
33 -to 
ss +tb 

73% -I 
18b 

aib- % 

27to + to 
23% + v* 
24b + b 
26b + b 
41% -lb 
32% 33 — b 
48b 48b + to 

06% 106% -I 

491* 49b + b 
31% 32 + to 

14 14b— % 

16% 16% — % 
Bb 9 — % 
32 32b + % 

17 17 

18 18 

73b 73b— b 
23% 23% + % 
63 63b 

29b 29b 
91 96 +lb 

36% 36% — % 


Ms. Zagorskd said one reason for the “very 
quiet bull market" is that the technology stocks 
“Just are not doing too well Investors won’t get 
enthusiastic until they see a 3- or 4-poini rise in 
IBM, Digital Equipment and Texas Instru- 
ments,” she said. 

“Investors are taking time to reevaluate the 
situation,” said Peter Furoiss of Drexel Burn- 
ham Lambert. 

“The decline in retail sales shows we still have 
a faltering economy and the S4-biQion rise in 
M-l eliminates the need for the Fed to pump 
more money into the banking system to push 
interest rates down,” be said. “As a result, any 
discount rate cut will come later rather than 
sooner.” 

While the falling dollar will aid companies 
with large overseas operations and markets, 
such a trend would also have an inflationary 
potential Mr. Fumiss noted. One reason do- 
mestic inflation has stayed low is that Ameri- 
cans have been able to buy imported goods 
relatively cheaply. To compete with the import- 
ed goods, American producers have also had to 
keep prices for their products relatively low. 

City Investing Co. was the most active 
NYSErlisted issue, down \k to 36ft. AMF fol- 
lowed. up ft to 13ft. 

Northern Indiana Public Service was third, 
up ft to 12ft. 


Dlv.Vld.PE Wb WflULo* QuotOiV 


13 Month 
HMILO* Slack 


Sbk f ift m 

Olv. YK. PH MfeWgh Low (tootOlVt 


58 6 25 

60 2.1 10 
10 
53 

67 25 14 
160 85 10 

ixo u t 
X0 26 6 
M U 1 
465 10.1 
5-00 105 
1.10 3J 10 
252 55 9 


358 145 
7X8 144 
440 I4X 
35B 145 
185 145 
250 1X7 
253 136 
462 146 
2X3 135 
260 65 21 


A §5 u 

152 45 16 
2.90 75 
-40 26 6 
X0 16 17 
64 AS 
2X8 115 
54 35 17 
54 46 It 
158 25 18 
160 22 
54 5 23 

160b 45 II 

18 

2.1B 115 
129* 25 
150 55 


149 % 

125 tlto 
670 24b 


34% — b 
28% — % 
i«b + b 
i4b— * 
J7b + to 
19% + % 

29 — b 

13% — % 
37to — b 
46 + b 

69 + to 

30 —lb 
43b + b 

8% — b 
32 

55 +lb 
55 — to 
30b— to 
25b + % 
36 

53 —1 
27% +1% 
27% 

27V, + % 
18% 

16b + to 
27H— b 
T7to + % 
43b + b 
7b + b 
lb + to 

4,^+% 

b 

34b + % 
27b + b 
34% + b 



xs 

IJ 

22 

228 

1J6 

75 


29 

50 

15 

16 

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167 

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25 




11431 

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274 




186 

1.18k 



22 

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S3 




S9 

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55 

78 

336 

206 

92 

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53 

2J0 

45 

12 

4033 

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7 

543 

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14 

12 

955 

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14 

2063 

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SJ) 

12 

34 

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13 

217 

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57 

175 

1X7 


9 




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35 

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33 




48 

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5.9 

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1272 

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12 

513 

50 

XT 

13 

2700 

lXSb 

4X 

11 

102 

U6 

M 

0 

20 


II Month 
HjBhLgw Stock 

33% 22% 

39% 16% 

29b 17b 
56to 51b 
31b 19b 
7b lb 
16b 9 to 
20 15b 

21b 16 
32b 17% 

6b 2% 

20% 11b 
50b 28b 
17 9b 
14b 9b 
23% 12to 
28% 18% 

31b 15b 
25b 10b 
6% 1% 

9b 2b 
41% 30% 

17% 13b 
54% 38 


Sb, Oat* 

Civ. Ytd. PE KBs High Low OwAChTBc 


12 Moan 

H Mi Low Stock 


PiV.TM.PE TMimoBLow 


10 229 36b 

14 65 39b 

17 676 2S» 

nsfessb 

343 19b 
24 6S7 2% 
132 lib 
51 17b 

11 500 20% 

18 39 32b 

1739 3b 

12 19% 
9 936 49b 
II 118 Mb 
16 152 12% 
14 38 23to 

14 6 27% 

11 573 19b 
13 106 24b 
85 lb 

7 3% 
II S3 41b 

8 17 

8 7701 52b 


25% 26b + to 
38b 38b— b 
24b 25 
53b 53% + to 
IBb 1*%— % 
Zb Zb 
11% 11b + to 
17 17 — % 

19b 20to + % 
31b 32b +1 
3% 3b 
19b 19% + % 
47b 49b— % 

16b lab 
12b 12% + to 
23% 23b + % 
27% 27% + % 
18b 19 + b 

24b 34b 
1% lb 
2 % 2 % 

40% 41 + b 

16b 17 
51b 52b— b 


27% + b 
ioto 

13 — % 
16b + b 
36b + to 
13 

24 — b 

29b 

iBb 

10M + b 
5b 



132 SX 28 
I JO 10X 9 

5l96c15J 
56801SX 

10 

JOB IJ ■ 
268 5.1 I 
2.S0 46 9 

2J7 7J 
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17 

262 87 
1.96 66 15 
68 11 11 
160 3-9 10 
675 116 
160 10419 
65a A 
132 XI 10 
4608 86 
64 XI 9 

160 26 14 

161 123 

.14 6 23 

16 

.1*0 6 13 
X16 75 10 
XO 27 16 

42 12 15 
X0 23 
270 35 13 
2X0 56 3 
136 185 
164 27 17 
64 3X 13 
68 66 12 
164 4.1 87 

550 27 

2X10247 
60 XI 14 
60 11 17 
60 26 5 
260 71 
XO 17 9" 


70e 6 12 
170 4.1 13 
4250 63 t 

160 IX II 


260 76 8 
260 75 
268 Wl3 


168 23 22 1084 

50 17 23 53 

60 4.1 II 71 

56 25 14 62 



4SH +lb 
34% 

3Sb 

20% — to 
19 — to 
47 —4 
27b + b 
21b + % 
17b 

61 + V. 

29b— to 
28b 

7%— to 
33b— to 
5b + % 
2Tb— b 
27b + to 
41b +1 
31b +lto 
B7b + % 
44 

24b— b 
12b + to 
39 — b 
3Ab + to 
10% + b 
24 + b 

5Mk — % 
54b 
32% 

9b 

25% — % 
7% 

30% — to 
28% 

28 — b 

33 +1 

55 +1 

33b— to 
lib 

42% + % 
49 4- to 

21 — b 

2Bto 

13b 

29 — % 
28% + b 
42b + to 


SS-b 

10%— b 
25% + b 
23b— b 

li* 

3*7* 

23% + % 
28b + to 
32b— b 


12 482 
115 
109 644 

18) 
14 
126 
7 4 

10 3732 
5 



260 S3 16 
235 66 
54 4.1 24 
50 21 
475 106 
160b 57 11 


363 116 
653aT42 
475 127 

13 

XlOalOJ 
368 46 13 
60 55 6 

360 53 7 

75 18 9 

460 35 12 
XO 15 II 
1.12 XX II 


260 65 11 
460 11J 
176 5. 1 19 
2X0 46 g 

2X8 56 0 
160 26 14 

1.90 85 9 
160 96 TO 
274 XI I 
231 103 
360 KA 9 
364 75 9 
54 27 13 
168 56 8 


Close 

Own. Cirw 
12 

254, — 

31 to — 'i 
21% + 'l 
11% 

25b — i| 
Mb + * 
28% 

54V* + Vr 

79to— u - 

73to— 

13% 

25% 

9 4- 'l 

74% f + 
15b— '1 
40% * * 
62b + "1 
33 + h 

26b— 'i 
4% 

SO + M 

42 

14% 

37 + to 

78b + '. 
29 — Vi 
*9% 
94.— 
16V— ^ 
26% + to 
10b + % 
13 — to 
22% — to 
34b + '« 
28to— '* 
3ib— ii j 
29% + % 


16% + % 
10% 

29b + to 
IBb + to 
26 — to 
191V 

31% — b 
60 

59b + to 
43 

63b +1 
11% — % 
24% + to 
12V + V 
26% + % 
19 
20% 

28 — % 
37b 

43b +ib 
32% 

39 — % 
11b— % 
13V + to 
62b +3 
IBb 

19% — b 
29% — % 
2Sb— V 
5% 

26b 

49V + b 
34b 

13% — to 
23% + % 
44% + b 
19V, 

4% + to 
19V 

26b + % 
46 — b 

33% + to 
13% — b 
19b— % 
66% + V 
10% + % 
49b— % 
9% 

18V 

134% + to 
8b 

48V — to 
31V + V 
26%— V 
40to + to 
35b— W 
34% 

49% + b 

13 + % 

42b— Ml 
43 + % 

18% 

22V— b 
Zlb + % 

14 +% 
22b 

36 + b 
38% + b 
13V 

39b- b 


IJ Month 
High L ow Sire* 

32V TTb LOU.Cs 
S3 la Lo«*l 
31's 14'- Lo*n 
25% l»i L-eni 
34 ?4 LuD.»5 

2J 16. t Lit* -5 

I* 1C i Lrtm 


SM. OOM 

E,v V.4 " xStSSE 

70 9 145 35T3 35V, 30V * to 

ZX 43 7 r* 46% 46*i 44% + % 

5a u 6i] rev »% m « % 

ito 4.» u 75i :i 2ib aii — % 

54 15 7? J'4 J6to 15 * 25to- % 

:ia si <7 «i« W* »-* »V * £ 
3 4 11 16 14'1 13b 14b 6 $ 


33b :sto .WACOM -N 
69to 38*. MCA 88 14 
24% 19% MCorp I A- 6_, 
14% 7% MOC 7? Xc 

37b 3» V.DU 756 68 
42 ]4 MEI 50 IJ 

10 9to V.G.V’Gr X4 -5 
1)'t 9% MGACrf El<4 34 

15% 10 WC+'W 30c U 


to t.J 21 97° 73V 2H» 70V + % 

BR >4 U 3073 64V. ol . fc] _ ^ 

| A- 47 ' -b 77% 31V 2% + at 

J7 Xc 9 7? 17to 1? 13% — % 

jj, 68 9 *7 38 37% ink 

50 1 J >5 227 ]»’* 38% Jtb *!0» 

M 25 43 -IJS ITT. 17V 1711. +. % 

;L«4 3 4 S Uto IT • 13to 

JOv U W’ 16 ISto 1 b * I* 


4% 2d f.'Ob «1 
— IS MB LI 3 731 


IS 1 2% 3 * to 

' 15V 15% 15V * tj 


4?'. 22‘: Mir Hon I7C 5.J o 

Jib 42V MlrHPl 

51 b 40 ; MlrHPl 587*114 

9% 5b viMon.l J 

24b 18b wlMnvIpi 
J5\a 21 7.1APCO I 00 2J * 

5 3 Moral: 

2b '* Msreo* 

38’ ! 197. MOTMW 1-30 4 2 9 

39V It' i MO'iv; 78 5 43 

12b BV MorkC JI 3.0 

IBb 13V Wot of 1JO 77 

97 44b Marriot 54 A 17 

73% 40 MrsnM 2*0 12 21 

40% 22b WORM % 1.00 2.4 

14 8% MorvK .13 * 20 

36 Kb MCSCO 56 I* H 

15b 8 MossMr 70 15 IT 

3t«j lb rjuctr F 

39to 20b MoaCo 148 «*> 

12b u’j /JlOSlnc IJ2 105 

66 SI V MOtioG J*r .7 9 

irk 7V mow B 

13V 4V Matvl wi 

15% 9*T Mlaxcan * 


!7f JJ o 140! 40V 40 40% — to 

50*12.3 . 991 54 Ub 54 4 « 

:i,'(iii 35 51': 51 51% + to 

J 27- Ft r-, 5% + b 

19 19‘r i*b 19V» 

00 13 9 *43 25'. 35 Kto + to 

20 4% 4 „ 4to— % 
;«-*%% 

D i! ) 16 IT'-i 17 V» 37V: — % 

22 S 43 503 25b 25% 3SV— % 

JI 10 33 10“, 10% 10% 4- % 

JO 77 3 15V 15% 15b— n 

_J4 J 17 188 Veto *»i 9fl4—% 

L40 12 21 72* 74 71 74 43% 

00 14 2*» 41% 40% 4P*+1to 

.13 .° 20 *236 13% 13't 13% 

£6 14 18 7079 25V 35% 35% 6 % 

JO 15 IT 31 13b 11% 13b- % 

1779 r+ 2 Jto 

as >’ 9 36% 29% 39%—% 

J3 10J 25 Uto 12V I3to 

jar .7 « 447 54 SJb 53b— to 

B 7223 1SV 15% 15b— % 

64 ttv ij% n%— to 

4 47 14b 14V 14V, * % 


58% 36b MovDS 1J0 3x 10 9'0 57% 51V 51t«— to 


55V; lAitting 2X0Q4 7 
31b 2514 AW Dr pf 2J0 8J 


12 102 55 54 55 +to 

16 76V 36% 76*— to 


23% AAcDerl IOC ’X 43 1J*S 24b 24 


11b 5b MeDrl wl 10 5b 5*4 S*— to 

10b 6 VS MCDM 70 12 21 14 9b 9 9% + % 

70 45b McDnl s .90 IJ 15 815 47V 47% 67-3—4 

B4% 55% McDnD 104 2J 10 1514 83V B7S 83% + V 

53 37% AAcGrH 1X0 20 17 1291 50b 49V 50% — to 

39% 19V AAcint g 6 2T. i 27* 27* + to 


53 37% AAcGrH 1X0 20 

39% lev AAcint g 


34% Me Keel 2X3 s.1 13 205 47b 47V 471a — V 


15% 99a MC Leon 

6b 2*1 AACLWwf 


43% 31% AAeod 


24% I3U Moinu 74 
34V 34b AAedtrn 00 
56to 33V Mellon 2X8 


10 16 10% 10V 10V — to 

rt 112 3to 3 to 3V 

1 JO 20 10 447 43% 41>« 43* +lto 


28V 23b AAeHon pf ZOO 9.7 _ 

48b 35V Mstvlll 1X4 XI U 871 44% 45% 45*—* 

70 50 Merest I JO 20 11 9 »S% 65% 64* 

116% 78*6 Merck 170 20 17 1648 115*114 IIS —to 
00 43V AAerdm l.OO IX 16 31 71V to 71V 4*1 

36% 22 AA*b.vn JO 2J 24 12:19 35 33* J4to + to 


74 1.1 13 63 23% 22* 22b— to 

30 13 14 187 34% 3* 34*4% 

2X8 4JJ 10 1916 56% 55V 56% 


21* 29 + * 


3* 2 AAeeoOf 

2? 12V, AAeeoPi 3 

34b 23V AAeeaft uu sj 
7V 5b AAeeab .7wiix 7 

4* 2V AAestek 
33 22b MIE pfC X9Q 12X 

63 46b MtE «HF 8.12 120 
61 AS>v MIE PfG 7X8 120 

64 4Tb MIE PfH 8J2 UO 

3% 2 MerFd 71* 9.9 

21% 17 AAhCnpl X05 »X 

18 12% McftER 1X0 85 18 


729 2V Th 2% 

3 3751 15V 14% 15*— % 
4 33b 33V. 33% — to 
7 131 6% 6b 6b— to 

73 3b 3* 3b 
eat 3ib 3»b 3lto— l 
HKtt 631> 63 1 . : 63V, +IV 
871b 60 60 69 —1 

130= 63% 63% 63* 

276 2b 2* 2* 

47 21% Jib 31V + to 
0 7 16V Ub Ub 


20 JWTs 1.12 X3 
23* J River 56 1 7 
14 Jamswy .12 J 
10* JannF 1X461X0 
26% JeffPH 152 X6 
54* JerC pf 9J6 125 
46b Jure pf 8L12 120 
47 JerCpf 800 120 
45b JerCpf 758 125 
90 JerCpf 1350 133 
80 JerCpf 1150 11X 
13 JerCof XiB ixi 
6 Jawicr 

28 JahnJn 1J0 27 
37b JohnCn 1560 4X 
2191 jorgen LOO 45 
15* Josten s 50 XI 
21% JOVMfg 1X0 63 


11 1266 34 

12 352 26 
484 12 

6 3057 42% 
90c 75 
20k 63 
lOOr 62b 
230= 63% 
10=102% 
30= 96% 
31 18% 
20 54 12 

17 9074 49b 
9 100 43 

17 7 24* 

15 271 26% 

13 846 22* 


34 34* 

32% 33b 
2S% 26 
11* 12 
42 42b- 

75 75 

63 63 - 

62b 62b 
63% 63% ■ 
102* 102* 
96% 96% 
18* 18b- 
II* 11* 
47* 49 • 

42b 42% ■ 
24% 24% • 
25* 26 - 
22b 2Zb- 


7% 4b MtCklbV M U 27 10 Sb 5* 5% 

55b 34V AAlOcon Ut S.1 1 1681 46 45V: 45* 

15% IDto AAUSUt 1.70 11.9 S 7671 15 14% 15 

22% 15% MldRos LOO 5.7 11 17V 17% 17* 4 * 

32% 22* AAWE X76 87 12 43 31* 31*- 31* + * 

15% 11% Ml ItnP A4 16 15 112 131* 12 12* 

86 73* MAAM 350 45 IJ SZ7S 79% 78b 70*— IH 

39% 25% AAlnPL 176 JI 1 87 38b 38% 38* 

IS* 6M AAlmlrra 66 6* 6* 6b — *, 

8 4 Ml let 1659 7b 6* 7 4 *1 

34% 23b AAoWI 220 7 A 10 2927 295* 29b 29V 4. to 

3% b VIAAOWH «S * 'a to 

9V 5* IWodCPt 10 TO 7 6* 1 

33% 16b AAonasc XO IJ 13 12S JI 31 31 

15 2 MohkDI 564 3% 2% 2* 4 to 

50* 28* MOOCo 1JBI II 270 48* 47% 48* 4 * 
MonCapfXOO 65 39 46b 44% 46b 

19b 14% Manrcti 50 51 33 5 15% 1SV ts% + W 

51 40* AAeaspn 250 +9 12 1879 50* SO 50% 4 b 

29b 16* AAonFw 2JW 65 II 570 39* 39 29% 

19V 15 AAon5T 1500 9X 40 19* l*U 19% — * 
10% 6* AAONY J» 9J 10 96 9% 9b 9b— % 

21* 13b Moores .73 35 14 450 70V Wb 20 V 4 to 

36* 18* MfiarM ID* 4.1 14 21 25V 25* 25*—* 

31 24 AAorM Pf 250 82 5 30* 30V 30*—% 

54V 28% Morans m « g 3254 54b 52V 52*— 1% 

43% 26* Mo DOW 1X8 35 10 40 42 41* 41* 

24 IBb AA0TM5 50 35 14 16 22b 22b 27b . 

21 13 MWRtV 1J6* 85 11 93 70V 19* 20 

37b 23* Morions 54 IJ 9 1269 37% 36* 37b—* 

44% 29b AAoforla 54 15 II 3451 33* 33* 31* — % 

26* 19b AAunfnf 54 X3 13 9523* 23V23b4to 

14* 7b Munsg * 8 u is* m. 

33% 33b AAurpO 150 35 11 179 28 27* 37b— to 

23* 16b MurrvO 50 83 10 42 18% 18V 18* 4 to 

14V lib MufOm 1X4 95 27 UV 14b 14b— * 

ur* lb MverL 40 2b 3% z%— to 


5 30* 30V 30*—% 
3254 54b 52 V 52*— 1% 
40 42 41* 41* 

16 22b 22b 2Jb_ 

93 20V 19* 20 


1J0O9X 
M 9J 10 


10* Ito Mreru 


2b 2% Zto— to 


MAFCO 150 5 2 18 
NBDs 1X0 45 
NBI 
NCH 
NCNI 
NCR 
NLIl 
NUI 



5 717 

X3 21 195 22* 

45 12 1683 62 
25 13b 

6 445 14 

975 

80 

17 641 






24% — to 
5* 

26 + * 

39b 

14* 

14* 

37b + b 


1J» 

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150 

6X 

58 

SJ 

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1J4 

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1X701X1 

1540 85 

56 

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15 

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154 

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150 

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15 

150 

541 

43 

150 

45 

1X0 

25 


30 % 30 *— 1 * 
28 * 28 %—* 
1 * lb + b 

10 * in*— to 
34 * 35 * +* 
14 % 14 * + to 
21 % Zlb + % 
25 * 24 b— b 
18 b 18 * + % 
18* 18* + * 
44 * 65 * +lb 
34 * 34 %—. to 
ii* Ub 
2 S* 25 * 

38 % 28 b 
31 % 31 * 

27 * 28 + * 
13 * 14 
28 * 28 b 
37 b 37 * +* 
17 b 17 % 

24 b 24 b— * 
10 b 10 % 

27 27 % + b 

12* 12* + to 
a 20* 

22 * 32 * 

11 18* + % 
13 13 * + b 
vm is* + u 

19 b 19 %-* 
29 b 39 b + b 
Sb 56 % +* 
18 18 + b 

19 % 19 % — * 
37 * 37 * + * 
U* 18 *— b 
33 b 33 b + b 
30 * 20 *— to 
48 48 *—* 


35* 185 
STS 172 
125 105 

n 

1 J 0 75 7 
JO 25 
254 1 U 
26 IS 11 
194 

M 45 W 
2ft IS 10 
XB7 1X1 
250 X 7 ID 
.« 22 13 
150 47 13 
52 25 20 
JO 1.1 25 
58 15 11 


150*102 

JO 15 13 

155 45 25 
152 25 fl 
423 65 
J2 25 16 
3J0 16 13 
‘.M 5 32 

154 O U 
22(0 94 
1501 12 

55e IJ 10 
50 £5 13 
150 35 12 
JO 5 21 
L16 3J 13 
2X4 8J 12 

ISO 75 ( 

557 104 

3 


J 3 25 15 
58 14 19 
- 56 b 44 10 
150 XI 10 
50 b 35 42 
450 15.1 
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34 29 
539 13b 

0 I* 

7 9 

5331 7* 

3 11* 
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288 17 
2 43 

44 IT* 
120? 14* 

17 .27% 
97 7* 

35 24b 
7S9 9 

51 4 
525 11* 
227 13b 

37 23* 
23? 54b 
78 17* 
241 32% 

36 41* 
114 17* 
116 25% 

57 3 

1 29 
145 14* 

45 13% 

52 19* 
6663 46 

129 46* 

2 72b 
■ 30* 

908 89b 
2577 27* 
708 44* 

3 23* 
443 82* 

3184 55b 
548 33 
5070 SO 
298 38* 
767 35* 
144 28 
708 3* 
1387 27Vk 
307 51 to 
1749 9b 
30(30 
I 64% 
200S46b 
86 23b 
10 21* 
40 2! 

53 26b 
157 2D* 

32 16* 
9 18* 
300 28b 
574 35 
99 12% 
587 33* 
312 22V 
22 31* 
1S2 BK 
















































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i- •* •“ 


SAOTRDA Y-SUND AY, JULY 13*144 1985 


KOHOMK SCENE 

Sjodsman’s Hasty Exit 
indicates Political Rift 

: By LEONARD SH£ ‘ 

Me* York Tima Service 

TkJ T 77 A. Stockman’s departure from 

Uu icc of Management and Budget comes at a time 
.. f when the White House, the Republican-led Senate and 

“® Democratio-led House of Representatives are still 
’■ straggling to put together a budget for the fare d year 1986. Was 
■ f t“s r ^“ t “nic for the acknowledged master of budget detail 

_ to leave the government for a job on Wall Street? Did he jump or 
fc _was he pushed? 

;, ‘ TTte official answer from Mr. Stockman’s office is that he had 
made clear before the 1984 election that he intended to leave 
before the next bndget cycle began. That happens in September. 

when the budget office sub- 

tails its guidelines for the fis- « « , . _ 

cal year 1987 budget to the Mr. bWckman felt 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

Page 9 


MBB Sets Citicorp Widens Investment Role U.S. Inflation 


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zoits its guidelines for the fis- mo* , , 

cal year 1987 budget to the Mr. btOCKman felt 

.' departments and agencies, " M i • . 

’ \rtucb then go back and forth at Odds With 1118 

; - * 7 th ibe president and the conscience in 80X06 
budget office over their pro- ui ouwc 

; grams mid spending figures official tasks , 
well into December. 

'■ The administration's bud- 

. get is then put to bed over the Christmas vacation and published 
1 shortly after the start of the new year. But, with the aaministra- 
; lion and Congress in the throes of carpentering a framework for 
>- the 1986 budget, there was no obviously urgent reason for Mr. 
■ - Stockman to pack his bags by the end of July. 

N OR WAS there urgency on the side of hii new employer, 
Salomon Brothers, the investment bankers. Henry Kauf- 
man, a Salomon Brothers’ director and its chief eoono- 
>_ mist, said in an interview this week that Mr. Stockman would be 
, “helpful in two areas — corporation and government finance.” 
He described the budget director as a “quick and disciplined 
- ■ Jeamer and an intensive worker” who was very good on details. 
- Mr. Kaufman said Mr. Stockman, who has not bad previous 
- experience in investment banking, would be expected to mend a 
while familiarizing himself with Salomon Bremers, and, he was 
. confident, “would soon get to know our routines.” 

In any case, Mr. Stockman is not rushing to start his new woric. 
The White House said he would take three months off to write a 
* book about his experience in the «rimmi«tr»tTrtn 

But there are two factors in his recent White House experience 
that may explain Mr. Stockman’s early departure: One was the 
; flap about ms speech before the board of the New York Stock 
' Exchange, in which Mr.' Stockman declared, other thing* 

. that “we have increasingly resorted to squaring the drde wxth 
. ' accounting gimmicks, evasions, half-truths ana downright dis- 
honesty in our budget numbers, debate and advocacy.” 

This was not the first time that he had given semi-public voice 
to his disquiet about the budget process and (he administration’s 
fiscal policy: He said after a report in The Atlantic of December, 
" 1981 that he thought he would not be quoted until after he left 
office. The president simply took him “to the woodshed” over bis 
confessions. 

That no new budget director was in place to take Mr. Stock- 
man's place further suggests that his departure was a hasty one, 
despite the president's warm words of appreciation. 

Indeed, the second factor that may explain Mr. Stockman’s 
hasty departure is the presence in the White House of a different 
chief of staff, Donald T. Regan, a tough disciplinarian who is 
taking hold of the budget negotiations for the president and does 
not appreciate rivalrous and public or semi-public voices coming 
■ from within the administration. 

‘ 'Edwin ’tl I)ale Jr^ the spokesman for the fiudget office, when 
" asked who the new budget director was likely to be, replied that 
■ he did not know but said, “Don Regan will constitute a search 
committee of one” and would want “someone who wiB keep a 
lower profile than Dave Stockman.” 

Mr. Stockman’s departure rgxresaits a key change in the 
character of the Reagan administration. “An era has ended,” 
(Continued on Page 13, Col 3) 


Currency Rales 


M 

'2 

- M ■ 

T •• J 

Crass Bates 
s 

* 

DM. 

F.F. 

IU. 

OkW. 

OF. 

JnfyVt 
IF. Yon 


6-' 


Anwordam 

127 

ksa 

11240" 

3M05* 

0.1739- 

— 

sm m 

US. 17" 

TS5.ur 


T P 


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■ranelataj 

sum 

WJ2 

mm 

44175 

tin* 

1744 

— 

34.17 

34.149" 


X2 

4 

. • l- 1 

” . '• . r. 

FranKfart 

7X0 

AW) 

— 

3U7" 

1JM5* 

HUBS" 

*448 ■ 

12040* 

1.111 " 

ft 


* |f- — 

UMm Cb) 

1JM 

__ 

AjOOI 

12.105 

2401 no 

4404 

8043 

13265 

331575 


• 1 


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•Alton 

1X77 JS 

XSM2S 

MSB 

2U53 



57541 

3ms 

77440 

7J45 

u 

z_n 



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OJWJ * 

UTS 

S745 

144100 

3417 

5B.M 

2J0I 

24040 

■dm 

m ^ 

*4- * 



Port* 

B«3 

TZU7 

KM05 

— 

44945 X 

12019 

15.12" 

3411 

14*43" 

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Tokyo 

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SUM 

27JI 

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73J0 

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be 

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13315 

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— 

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0JH1 

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12512 

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1455.13 

15347 

454225 

14777 

H7415 

i » 

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- • •' ‘ . 

IMMt 

1J05D9S 

«J3S» 

15431 

5X04S 

NA 

12385 

994024 

24722 

30489 


■V, 

> j tr. a 


Other Dollar 

Cuntncv Mr USa 
Atom. oaUnii ISO 
AMtniLS 1X2M 
Awtr.KMl 70A7 
BaJtt.flB.fr. 58JW 
Brazil era. 4,14000 
CmHfion S 1-352 
Da*Mi krona lCMOJ 
EttVpt. POOBd 0.7782 


Values 

cummcv per UJU 
FIil markka &JB 8 
OfMfcttrtC 131^0 
HeaaKonaS 7.7S8 
HMaantPte 1220 
■ Inda. ruaiafi T.11U0 
Irttl HV387 

IxrncU shale. l^WJD 
•Onmili dinar 03013 


Currancr par U5J 
Motor. (Inn. 2447 
Max. peas 33UI0 
Narw.krana 03477 
PHLpttta 1745 
Pori etcudo 14050 
SomB rival 14525 
ami 22093 
S. Mr. road 1.9240 


Interest Rates 



•L. 



Franc* 

Franc 

July 12 

h -I-- f 



Donor 

D-440TK 

Swim 

Franc 

Stamm 

ECU 

SDR 

* -• " 


1 month 


S-Sft 

4%w4lfc 

I2I4-I3H 

10 ft- 10 ft 


7 ’ft 

f ■ ' .T r j . 

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■ 2 mast fix 

7iw7tob 

40W4 H, 

5- 5ft 

12 Hr 12 ft 

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7ft 

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7 ft -a 

Sv5N 

5- 5ft 

12 Hr 12 ft 

IDft-lOft 

8ftr9ft 

7ft 


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MV, 

5VW’A 

5to-5ft 

lift-lift 

ID ft- 10 ■». 

VvVh 

7ft 

- r m 

__ , ',U» • • 

} j y 

twor 

PWft 

5^5ft . 


lift. lift 

Ilft-lTft 

9ft-9ft 

Oft 


Key Money Rales July 12 




1 « *■* •. - 


omtmstpta* dose pm. 

Otacaont Rata 7h 7V5 

^•dtTtttFMd* Vk Tlk 

■ Prim Rote 9ft W 

Anter Loan Ron Sft-ff'i IftW 

Com PooarWVTTt dart Ufl 745 

: Ttttaoffe Traomry Mis 7JJ4 7.10 

Trtetary Bin* 7.19 731 

CU'* SM9 days 735 735 

CDS4M9AVS 735 735 


tamhonJIMe M UK 

OverMM Rote S3 H.Q. 

DM MoaUUaJartiaak 5« S35 

7—iam IMMMk 540 545 

*« 0 tBl imcrtwpk 545 145 


Aslan IMlar B cpwto 

JUy 12 

IIMUitl 7M-7II 

3 monTtt* 7% ■ 79k 

jmontttt 7*-B 

4 month* 8- Oft 

lyaor Blfc-Bft 

Source: Reuter* 

V-S. Money Market VumO* 

July 12 

MarTtti LrocB Raatfv Miett 
aOdavtrrtfORe vatu: 7J0 

Tateratc tMerart HotR lodn: NA 

Source: Merrill Lynch. AP 


•wwventtaa «att 
CoRMaaar 

WB Htk Intarta 
^niortk latertaak 
tHnoan iBtcrtxnik 

onota 

OaokBpii qp«e 
«Maaw 
73-ttot Treosarv Bffi 
. T^Motb iBtcrtmit 


l at arto nt 


n »* 

9ft 10 
9 15714 »ft 
10 915714 
9ft 9 1571* 


17 17ft 
IHn 12 -J 
11971* lift 
lift Ul< 


5 5 

Oft kill 

A 5/lb 45/14 


Gold 


S*rt*s; Reum commeatmk. Ov<& 
Lranioit. L lord! Bon*. Bon* 0/ ToAyo. 


Juh 12 

AM. P4*. Orta 

Han KanO J1170 31440 +J« 

LapcmBaar* H*4S — 

Port* (123 kOa) 31431 3UI3 +139 

Zurich 31405 31575 +M 

LoadoB 11445 31405 +1» 

Mew York - «&10 +*W 

Luxembourg. Ports ana London omdai lie- 
loot; Hone Kona anti Zurich mtenkta oner 
doting pnees: Mew York comeit amnt 
contract. Alt ericas In US. S Oer ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 


Sights on 
Kranss 

Leads Bidders 
For Tank Maker 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — West Germa- 
ny's antitrust office is expected to 
approve nan wed a takeover of 
Kranss-Maffd AG, the nation's 
leading tank maker, by a consor- 
tium led by Messerschirii tt-BOl- 
kow-Bkthm GmbH, . government 
sources said Friday. 

Messerscinnitt, which is based in 
Munich, is West Germany’s lead- 
ing aerospace. concern and one of 
its largest defense contractors. 

The price of ihe consortium’s 
proposed purchase, which involves 
an 81 -percent stake in Kranss-Maf- 
fei, is estimated at just under ISO 
million DM (S50.8 million), indus- 
. try sources said. - 

A 1 5-percent stake would remain 
. with the current owners, the Frie- 
drich Flick Industrieverwalnme 
KGaA, while some 4 percent would 
be retamed by other shareholders. 

Approval of the takeover would 
follow a series of bids by groups 
involving MBB that failed to win 
approval from the Federal Cartel 
Office, the antitrust unit- 
industry sources said a takeover 
by MBB would significantly in- 
crease the competitiveness of West 
German arms makers in winning 
defense con tracts. 

Krauss-Maffei, which is also 
based. in Munich, posted 1984 
group sales of 1.9 billion Deutsche 
maria, with some l.S billion DM 
related to defense. It transferred a 
profit of 4.4 million DM to its par- 
ent company, the Flick group, in 
1984, down 37 percent from 7 mil- 
lion DM in 1983. In addition to 
tanks, tbe group produces locomo- 
tives, traffic systems and plastic- 


Clos/rvs in London and Zurich, fbthtos In other European centers. New Ybrtc rates at * PM. 
fol Commercial franc lb) Amounts noeaed to buy one pound (c) Amounts neodeti fa buv one 
dattar (‘I Units of 100 Ui Units ot urn (*t Units ol taaoo na: not auoteti: ftAj net available. 
. (*> To bar one pound: M/A1J9B5 


CarTMev par IKU 
i Kor. won 87440 
Span, potato 14730 
SttMUtrwM U5 
Toftoal 4002 

TMbafaf 24.975 

TarfeWiUni 52935 
UAEdhUara X4725 
VttMz. boUK. 1432 


ISterflaa: 13748 Irish t 

Sources: Banauo do Benelux (Brussels); Banco Commerdale iMknm (Milan); Banova Me 
denote do Ports (Ports!: Bank of Tokvo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAD t dinar. : rtroL tDrhamJ. 
other data from Reuters ond AP. 


Sources: Maroon Guaranty ( dollar ; DM. SF. Pound. FF); Lloyds Bank (ECU); Reuters 
(SDR). Rales aoaticable to Interbank deposits at St million minimum (or eeuhmlenr/. 


Bank Succeeds 
By Looking to 
Ollier Markets 

By Fred R. BleaJcley 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Running the 
world’s largest commercial bank 
has never slopped Ou'coro exec- 
utives from dreaming or other 
profitable frontiers to conquer. 

Despite federal law prohibit- 
ing commercial banks from un- 
derwriting corporate securities, 
the bank has tried for years to 
become an investment hanking 
powerhouse. Now, after a sput- 
tering start, it believes it has hit 
■ upon the right strategy, 
i . Instead of primarily compet- 
ing with the established merger 
kings of WaB Street or the deep- 
pocketed merchant bankers in 
the gjant Eurobond market, Citi- 
corp is seeking its biggest growth 
from countries whose financial 
markets are growing quickly or 
are bong radically restructured, 
such as Britain, Japan, Australia 
and Spain. 

Gticorp underwrites stocks 
I and bonds, trades government 
securities and sets as & stockbro- 
ker and private banker for 
I wealthy foreigners, as well as 
conducting other traditional in- 
vestment banking activities. 

The company's selective ap- 
proach has r roved lucrative. &l- 


Eamfegs 

Nd mr-tHTM 1 m nrfbiid:- nl ilnRiua 


1984 Revenues: 
ST29 million 



Utli*icJ levormi >, 

Wl 

■— — V Fixaaml 
/ Commiuiuis 
/ 37-V 


Slows as Energy, 
Food Costs Drop 


The a ssonuini Prm peciedl y large S4-billion increase in 

WASHINGTON — Wholesale late June in the nation's basic mon- 
prices were unchanged in June, ey supply, 
halting a siring of four straight The increase fueled expectations 
months of increases as the inflation that the central bank, worried that 
rale was held down by a steep drop the rapid money growth would lead 
in energy prices and another de- to higher inflation, would not en- 
cline in food prices, the Labor De- courage lower interest rates soon. 


pan meat said Friday. credit anal 

The increase in inflation for the Sears. R 
firat six months of the year was a ed States’ 
modest annual rate of 1.4 percent, and third-; 


credit analysts said. 

Sears. Roebuck & Co„ the Unit- 
ed States’ largest general retailer, 
and third-ranked J.C. Penney Co. 


against 2.8 percent in the some each reported sales declines of l.S 
1984 period. In all of last year, percent for the five weeks ended 
wholesale prices were trp uTper- July 6. k man Corp_ ranked sec- 


cenL 

The Commerce Department, 
meanwhile, reported that sales by 
the nation's retailers — a report 
covering a broad range of mer- 
chants from gas stations to restau- 
rants — fell 0.8 percent last month, 
Lhe steepest slide in 1 1 months. 

Those figures were in line with 
industry reports Thursday of weak 


ond, reported a gain of 8.4 percent. 
But soles for stores that were open 
more than a year — called same- 
store soles — fell 1.3 percent, it 
said. 

Jeffrey Edelman. a retail analyst 
with Dein Witter Reynolds Intx, 
said that a year ago stores had 
heavy inventories and were cutting 
price aggressively to move mer- 


merchandise sales Iasi month Tor chandise, which helped bolster 
US. retailers, reflecting sluggish sales. But this year, “with inven- 


Hm Nh YoA 7m 


Paul J. Collins, the head of Gticorp Investment Bank. 


preach has proved lucrative, al- 
though it does not .always bring it ^at raised S500 million in 
the same recognition as handling French francs in the French SC- 
SI 0-billion mergers. Its annual ^ market for a government 
return on investment has been financing agency. It was the larg- 
more than 30 1 percent for the last io date of a French 

two years, the highest for any accord that was not managed 
activity m the bank, according to strictly by French banks. 

oMuwamMsktmtm 

year accounted for about 20 per- lead undownter for the tm- 

ceor ofOricorp’s 5890 mflEai ^ of 

net income. ^mthree Bnush conmmes. 

Paul J. Collins, the 48-year-old M* - - C° Ums _ it was the first 
chief of the Gticorp Investment time that a foreign-based tnshtu- 
Bank. dies the^SLpIes of G- T J r m T eS Sf ' 1 ^ ^ 
ticorp’s new investment banking P^y®^ a rt ^ e * 
prowess: • In May. Gticorp arranged 

• Gticorp was a lead manager the sale of a Brazilian food pro- 
last month for a bond offering cessing concern to McCormick & 


- MBB had 1984 sales of 5.7 bfl- 
hon DM, over half of which were 
from sales of military products, in- 
cluding guided rmssues, the Torna- 
do jet program and helictmtas. 
MBB's 1983 profits were 91.7 mil- 
lion DM. Profit figures for last year 
are due later this month. 

Earlier this month. Cartel Office 
officials stud they viewed the take- 
over bid lodged May 9 by MBB, 
Diehl GMBH of Nurenbog and a 

tiVety tha^^^tivdy.” Diehlfacft- 
other arms maker, had 1984 sales of . 
about 1 .8 billion DM. On. Friday, a 
well-placed government source 
said the cartel office’s assessment 
“had not changed." 

The antitrust unit had rejected 
previous takeover efforts by MBB, 
beginning more than a year ago, on 
the grounds that MBB could exer- 
cise management control over the 
company and thereby create a kind 
of arms giant with near-monopoly 
power. 

In an effort to win approval, 
MBB has since then sought to keep 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 8 ) 


Dollar Plunges ' 
In New York 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
plummeted (oils lowest level in 
almost a year Friday in a selling 
wave sparked by an 0 . 8 -percent 
drop in retail sales. 

Dealers said the market tiad 
begun to bid the dollar higher 
when s dealer wire erroneously 
reported retail sales rising in- 
stead of falling. “When the cor- 
rect figures came out everyone 
began to dump dollars, " one 
said. 

In New York, the pound rose 
to 51.3905 from Thursday’s 
$1.3750. Other New York 
prices for the dollar included: 
2.8730 Deutsche marks, down 
from 2.9230; 2.3910 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.4340; 
8.7450 French francs, down 
from 8.8750; 1,868 Italian lire, 
down from 1,884.50; and 
240.40 Japanese yen, down 
from 242.93. 


cent of Gticarp’s 5890 rmflion 
net income. 

Paul J. Coffins, the 48-year-old 
chief of the Gticorp Investment 
Bank, dies these examples of Ci- 
ticorp’s new investment banking 
prowess: 

• Citicorp was a lead manager 


Co. lnc_ the American spice 
maker. Several months earlier, it 
served as adviser to National In- 
tergroup Inc. when it sold a Bra- 

cst offering to date of a french zilun subsidiary to a Brazilian troieum Exporting i ounines an- ing summer apparel 

accord that was not managed conglomerate. other step closer to reducing its McxictJ . s decision l0 cut ^ 

strictly by French banks. Gticmp’s investment banking ? fic, fJ c < ?J ,nc ? for ,i^ prices indicated it does not expect 

• In recent months it has been thrust comes at a time when olh- U ? e , l ^!^L and P“J down ‘ that OPEC will be able to bolsrer 

the lead underwriter for the ini- er major banking companies, in- 7 ,ar “ pI ^ sure on pnces ° r peuo ’ prices at its next meeting, sched- 

tial public offerings of public eluding Morgan Guaranty Trust uled for July 22, said Paul Mlotok, 

stock in three British companies. Co. and Bankers Trust Co„ also e m ?f‘ e an analyst at Salomon Brothers 

Mr. Collins said it was the first are expanding their operations. S tac - 

time that a foreign-based institu- Security fttdfic National Bank The Mexican oil monopoly, Po- 

tion or investment bank had recently formed a global mer- Jones average rose to an all- said Wednesday it cut the 
played such a role. chant banking group that com- of ^ light Isthmus grade of 

• In May. Gticorp arranged bined its domestic and interna- i ffiraSl oU b ¥ M avera S c of S 1 - 24 4 b® 0161 - 

the sale of a BnS fodpS- tional securities underwriting tutted ?urSre Ster^ T^/ony price, wasH7.75 al bar- 

cessing concern to McCormick* (Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) federal ReSre ^orted^nS! ^ 

last month, was lowered a gain, by 

. an average 77 cents a barrel. The 

fates Japan’s Trade in Microchips 'TS3IA& £& 

“ J. m. er cuts by Britain, Norway and the 

portrayal of the semiconductor in- has up to a year to investigate the ket in semiconductors and Europe- Soviet Union, shows the“mukei is 
dustry and market structure in the charges and could recommend that ans have about 8 percent. UJS. P^ n ? P r^- t ? 5 
US. and Japan skews reality to the president impose restrictions manufacturer command the resL ocen menectiyc m s tuping the 

enw tlv» inlurKtt rtf hill ruu> rtn taiun'c ^mrtrf* frt ihrt 1 1nitivl Tk, Irulu.im Ac_ CTOSIOQ, Sfllfl LaWrCDCC GOfuStOn, 


consumer demand and unseason- tones more aligned with sales, they 
ably cool weather. are not promoting as aggressively. 

Energy prices, which had surged he said 
up 5.8 percent in April and in- Sears's chairman. Edward Tdl- 
creased 3.4 percent in May, in® 5 ^ cooler weather in many 
dropped 2 percent in June, the re- slales m j^e adversely affected 
port said. sales of air conditioning and other 

Analysts said Thursday that weather-rdated merchandise. The 
Mexico s decision to cut oil pnces relatively low temperatures also 
has pushed the Organization of Pe- discouraged consumers from buy- 


iroJeum Exporting Countries an- 
other step closer to reducing its 
official ml prices for the second 
time this year and would put down- 
ward pressure on prices of petro- 
leum products. 

Meanwhile, the stock market 
used a moderate gain to reach re- 
cord highs Thursday. The Dow 
Jones average rose 4.81 to an all- 
time high of 1,337.70, surpassing 
the peak of 1.337.14 it reached July 
I. (Details, Page 8 ). But bond 
prices tumbled further after the 
Federal Reserve reported an unex- 


Bv Sarah Oates 

tYmUngtat Past Service dustry and market structure in the charges and could recommend that ans have about 8 percent. UA P ^ L n ^ ff? 

WASHINGTON — Clayton K. UA wd, Japan skews reality to the president impose restrictions manufacturers command the rest. ^ 

Yeutter, the VS. trade represent- serve the interests of but one seg- on Japan s exports to the United The Semiconductor Industry As- ,vTr^ 

tive.Jias-lfluncfaed an investigation fjATr mimittera m-rE n Stales - - sodation says U.S. companies have jmieum Indusuv Research Foun- 

ln«r possible trade violations by “ We have . !>*“ victimized by only hdd about 10 percent of what a NewYork study itroim 

Japan's microchip manufacturers. dmring predatoiy pridng and we seem to I n-Stat calls an 58-billion market in ^ uy group. 

The action was taken in response taBts m Uutada - PaBe u have now gotten the attention of Japan, but Japanese officials con - 1 


U.S. Investigates Japan’s Trade in Microchips 


JUimu o uuuuuufi mumuw.iuii.ia. „ ■ mm - ■“ 

The action was taken m response m CMM>da - ^ have^now gotten the attention of 

to formal charges by the Semicon- meat of semiconductor manufac- 

duct or Industry Association that turing in the United States." Mr. Euiott Sopkin, vice president 
the Japanese shut American manu- Morita is the head of the Electronic °onmiunicauons at Advanced 

facturers out of their market while industries Association of Japan. 


the higher levels of government,” tend the United States actually 
said Elliott Sopltin, vice president bolds a little over 19 percent 
of communications at Advanced Some of the most intense compe- 

Micro Devices Inc. in Sunnyvale, tition has come in the field of mem- 


selling microchips in the United He said the U.S. lack of market V aUfortu ^ OQC . lar S e ^ t P 1 ® - ory products. According to SIA 
Stales at low prices designed to share in Japan stems from the veiti- duc ?? “ semiconductors in me Dataquest, a market research 
close out American competitors. cal integration of Japanese compa- w ortd. firm based in San Jose, California, 

*Tbe industry’s petition raises nics, which choose to buy semicon- **R wc l°se semiconductors the prices for a 256- K programmable 
serious questions about possible ductors from their own concerns way we lost steel and automobiles, microchip have plummeted from 
Japanese market barriers in micro- rather than from abroad. Low per- we’re going to lose high technol- 5158 a chip to a few dollars each in 


On the French Riviera 

THE ONLY FRENCH 
CASINO WITH A FULL 
COMPLEMENT OF 
FEMALE DEALERS 


electronics that deserve a thorough formance of American 
investigation," Mr. Yeuner said seas has also been lii 


5 over- ogy," Mr. Sopkin said. 

to the According to In-Stat, a Scotts- 


some cases. 

In-Stai reports that a lower-ca- 


Thursdav. performance of a strong dollar dale, Arizona, market-research pacity memory chip, a 64-K 

Aifiri Morita, chair man of the against a weaker yen. company, Japan holds 15 percent DRAM, can be boughi in bulk for 

Sony Corpn said, “The petition's The trade representative's office of the 51 1. 6-billion American mar- as little as 40 cents a chip. 

$48-Million Setdement Is Cited in Laker Suit 



Compiled by Our Staff Frm Dispatches Sir Freddie Laker, a major share- finns accepted an offer of $8 mil- percent of those creditors already 
WASHINGTON — An oul-of- bolder in now-bankrupt airline, lion for attorneys’ fees, he added, have been paid. Mr. Rosdritcher 
court settlement said to total 548 “ot yet accepted the defen- According to the terms of the said. 

million has been reached in the Hants' offer of 58 million in return agreement, creditors whose claims The largest creditors, including 
5117-billion antitrust suit bv 1,-ilrrr for a release from aD claims, Mr. total less than. £50,000 (about major financing and manufactur- 
Aiiwavs aoainst British Airwavs Rosdeitcher told U.S. District 536,000), mainly ticket holders and ing companies, have agreed to ac- 


SL7-biIlion antitrust suit by l aker for a release from aD claims, Mr. Lotal less than. £50,000 (about major financial 
Airways against British Airwavs Rosdeitcher told U.S. District 536,000), mainly ticket holders and ing companies, 
and It othCTddfendants. - 3 Judge Harold H. Greoie. ex-employees, will be paid ±e full cepi $250,000 for an assignment of 

nf the soroorrwnt rail agreement also calls for amount of their debt. their claims with an acknowledge 

me terms off tne agreement can . cnnnn n? v_ _. :j .. w_ . Creditors whose claims exceed mem that the U.S. lawsuit may be 


and 11 other defendants. - 

The terms of the agreement call 
for the settlement to proceed even 
though some issues have not been 
resolved, said Sidney S. Ros- 
dd idler, an attorney for the defen- 
dants, in U.S. District Court.' 

The total of lhe settlement was 
not named in court But John 
Lampl, a British Airways spokes- 
man, said it was 548 milllion. 

Laker Airways charged in the 
suit that nine U.S. and European 
airlines and related companies con- 
spired to put its cheap, no-frills air 
service between the United States 
and Europe out of business. The 
airline went bankrupt in February, 
1982, owing £260 miffion, then the 
equivalent of 5480 million. 


550,000 to be paid to Mr. Laker’s Creditors whose claims exceed mean that the U.S, lawsuit may be 
wife. Joan, for her 500.000 shares in £50,000, except for the largest discontinued. They also will be 
the airline, but she has not accepted claimants, will receive £50,000 plus paid interest that was due as or 
the offer, be said. Nor have two law 20 percent of their claim. Eighty Feb. 5, 1982. (AP, UPIl 


Loews 

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from downtown Cannes, 
on the beach 

FOR INFORMATION: 
PLEASE CALL 

( 93 ) 49 . 90.00 


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THE VALUE LINE INVESTMENT SURVEY continually reviews more 
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the weekly Index. And about 130 new full-page reports are issued 
every week, so that each company is the subject of a complete report 
every 13 weeks. The full-page reports Include operating and finan- 
cial statistics going back 1 5 years ond estimated 3 to 5 years ahead. 

As a special .introductory offer, you can receive 12 weeks of Value 
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THE VALUE LINE 

711 THIRD AVENUE, NEW YORK. N.Y. 10017. U.S.A. 

Payment m local eurranctaa RJritfcn CEa .Frand i 1r 73B. S«4 m Ir205. DM 2*2] 
and requests tor Mlormaiten thOoUi bo directed to: value Lhe.AU.: Alexandre 
d« Semt-PhaHe. 2 Ave. de VHiers, 75007 Ports. (Tel. 55i.63.S9) 

OatntMtad b* KIM ftoyai Dutch AiiUtws Puwuauon DKlruwuon Service 
Holland. Allow 4 to 6 weeks tor dettvwy. 


Notice of Redemption 

KINGDOM OF DENMARK 

6 %% 1972/1987 
Lax.Fr. 800,000,000. — 

Bondholders are hereby informed that the annual redemption instalment of 
Lux.Fr. 80.000.000.— due on August 14, 1985 has been effected by 
drawing by lot 

The following bond numbent have been drawn by lot in ihe presence of a 
notary public and become redeemable at par on and alter August 14> 1985 
with all nnmatumd coupons attached thereto: 

6144-6149; 6156-6165; 6178-6187; 6213-6215; 6248- 

6249; 6311-6329; 6348-6354; 6367-6413; 6416-6417; 

6423-6444; 6444-6445; 6448-6452; 6161-6462; 6165- 

6470; 6474-6476; 6481-6483; 6493-6514* 6537-6540; 

6547-6556; 6565-6567; 6573-6582; 6603-6610; 6641- 

6733; 6737; 6758-6774* 6787-6826; 6842; 6852- 

6871; 68866891; 6901-6912; 6917-6919; 69276929; 

69346940; 69466972; 6975-6984* 6991-6995; 7000- 

7101; 7107-7108; ’ 7111-7122; 7124-7133; 7154-7166; 

7172-7182; 7187-7193; 7214-7240; 7261-7265; 7272- 

7278* 7567; 7607-7628; 7998-8026; 8401; 8404; 

8584-8593; 9170-9199; 9233-9258; 9275-9326; 9445- 

9462; 9466-9468; 9736-9744* ‘ 9752-9775; 10210- 

10223; 10272-10317; 10403-10418; 10429-10430; 

10435-10442; 10446-10448; 10453-10455; 10472- 

10473; 10543-11020; 11051-11092; 11109-11225. 
Furthermore il k recalled lital the roliowing bonds drawn in previous yean, 
have not yet been presented Tor payment: ' 

5271-5298; 1319-1320; 1346-1348; 1378-1379; 1500- 

1503; 1509-1510; 1761; 1780-1781; 1958-1964* 

2201-2300; 2322; 2427-2428; 2784^804* 2831-2840; 

2901-3000; 3052-3053; 3066-3069; 31068115; 3151- 

3152; 3173-3174* 3281-3306; 3399-3403; 3449-3453; 

3595-3602; 3619-3627; 3629-3635; 3646; 3656-3651; 

3711-3712; 371M716; 3725^726; 3854-3873; 3894- 

3899; 4004-4005; 4012-4015; 4032-4040; 4064-4065; 

4111. 

The nominal uniounl of bonds ouldtandifu: on and after Autfast 14, 1985 will 
bn law. Fra. 160000.000.-. 

BANQUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG 
Society Anonyme 

, Principal Paying; Agent 

JLuxiuniioiua, Juh 13. 1985. 


TRANSPACIFIC FUND 

satire anonymo 

14. Sue Aldringen - Luxembourg 
Befdatered olGcr Section B No 8576 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL 
MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 


The Annual Genera] Meciin- of shareholders of TKANSfAQUC fUNU 
will be held al its rrpislered office. 14, rue Aldringen. Luxembourg on 
Tuesday. July 30th. 1985 at 11.00 a.m. in discuss and role upon the 
following agenda: 

1. The report of the Board of Directors lor the financial 
period ended 3 1st of March 1985. 

2. The report of the auditor 

3. The accounts for the financial period ended 31st March 
1985. 

4. Hie. allocation of the net profits, and the determination 
of amrumi and date of payment of the dividend. 

5. Quitiu of the directors and the auditor for the finan- 
cial period ended 31st March 1985. 

6. Election of a new director. 

7. Other nutters. 

The resolution* ruj the aprnda ol the Annual Genera) Shareholders 
Mtvtinj* do not rcmiire a specific quorum and will be adopted if approved 
b\ a majority ol tni* shares prcMfiil or represented. 

To attend lhe Annual General Shareholders Meeting of July 30th. 1985 


lhe names of owners ol registered shares should he recorded in the 
rompariyV register of id ocL holders live working days prior to the Meeting 
a nd owners of Uarer sAnws f'Jwuki depre-ii their shares Jl feast fire 
working dais prior to the nweiing with one of the following banka: 

— Banqne de Neuflize, SeMumberger, Mallet 
3, Avenue Hoebe. Paris 8* 1 

— Afernene Bank Nederland N.V. 

32, VijzekitraaL Amsterdam 

— knil Meet & Hope N.V. 

548, Ilrrengmcht, Amsterdam C 
— - Banqne Cenerale du Luxembourg S-A. 

14, Hue Aldriageu, Luxembourg 

— Soeiet* Baneaire Barclays (Suisse) S JL 
2. Boulevard du TheStre, Geneve. 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


■ '. !«• 




/ 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUISPAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


Fridays 

mse 

dosing 

Tables include ttie nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 




13*b 7X. 

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12 w Btt 
9)1 69| 
33W 24 
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U’.i lflft 
19 13 

17 25ft 
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AS 39* Syrrttx 1.92 10 TA 2633 65ft 'A4W tf +H[ H 
3B"« 294b SYSCO JA- J 17 2A1 38W 38tt 38W +1 72 




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33 2 WC3*»t 13! 3.4 
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34V. JVP.ro! ZJK or 
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8 164 306b 

11 583 3415 

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30'i 24*6 ZnleCp 1J2 42 • 59 2T-. I^» 28'-. *■ 9b 

21'4 9lb Zapata 24 82 31 293 10*6 K)'» 10") 

57)s 25 Zavrp* 43 9 18 1000 54)6 54*. -M 

30 171b ZenlrtiE 7 773 18 IT^b 171.— V. 

217, 15V. Zcrol 22 IS 17 B> 20": 23-. 2316 + ‘b 

35'. 22V. Zurnin 1J2 16 >2 145 34-~b H'-i J4V, * 


MSE Higlis-Low 


Sola Rsuras ora unotHctoL Yeortv Mohs and lows reflect 
ttw previous 32 weeks plus me current mk. But >«•?* 
tram no day. Wlwro a split or stock dlvtaend ptnou ntlng 1 0 25 
parcenl or more has been pm«L ltle veart htah-low range and 
dtvMend ora shown lor the new stock onlv. Unless owwrwlse 
00M. rates of dividends are annual disbursements hosed on 
Itie latest dedaratton. 

O— dividend also extradl. . „ , 

fi —annual rate of dividend plus stock dividend, 
c — Uauldattno dhrkfqnd. 
dd — called. 

e—mvkdend declared or paid In precedbis 12 months, 
a-— dividend in Canadian (undo. piMect to 15% nonresidence 

l^divldend dedarad afler epIltHro or stock dividend. 

1 —dividend paid itifs year, omitted, deterred, or no action 
taken at latest dividend meetlnk . 

It— dividend declared or paid tilts year, an accumulative 
issue wttn dividends In arrears. 

n— new Issue In the oast 52 weeks. The hlo Mow ranoe bealns 
wllti Itie start oi Iradlns. 
nd — next day dedverv. 

P/E — pri ce s m - n lnot ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paM In preceding 12 monms. plus 
ll nrt dtvJdond. 

s — stock split. Dividend bealns with date of sum. 
sis-* sales. 

t— dividend paid In stack In prececflns 12 months, estimated 
cash value an ex-dfvkfend or es-OMrMiutlan dale, 
u — new yearly hleh. 
v — trod [no halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or betna neoraenl ted on- 
Her (he Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by seen com- 
panies. 

wd— when tfUrlbutmL 
wt — when Issued, 
wv — with w arm its. 
e —ex-dividend or ex-rtahts. 
adts— ex-dlslrlbutlon. 

*w — without warren be 
v — nx-divtdcnd and coles hi fuD. 
yld — yield, 
z— sales In full. 


Iriday^ 

AMEX 


Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up tottie dosing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated. Press 




law 896 Lumen 
MW AW LundvE 

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MW 10 Lydol 
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7ft 

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2496 169b ' 
2296 149* ' 
12 4 i 

169* 49* i 

MW- 11 I 
259k 10W ' 
TV* 3W f 
7W . 396 I 

a si* i 

2594 1596 I 
139* 69* I 

119* 796 l 


13 56 

88b A 12 ASA 
31 IS 
46 2 

34 13 10 

34 3 22 47 

25 

JSe 8 60 7 

.15 2.9171 20 

42 1i IS 49 
82t 6.1 12 309 
30 13 11 1036 


7)6 5W Jacobs 8 AW AW AW 

5W 296 JelAm 9 423 49* 49* 4W + 9* 

1 WJOtAwl 77 ft 96 ft+A 

94* 4W Jbfran .71 1 83 16 19 896 09* B9b— ■* 

AW 2W John Pd 33 4 396 396— W 

11W 71ft JOMAm JO 38 13 BA *W 996 9W + W 

119* 4% John I no 4 74 OW 896 BW 

796 3W JmpJk n 5 4 4V* 4 4 



6'ft IW CNC En 
AW 4W SRI 
4V4 2V, CTl 

1S’6 ov. Galore 


OH 1BW + W 
2 2 

4H 4H — 1ft 
14* 116* + tt 
44* MW — 9* 
3W 139* 

bw n* + w 

A 96 2A96 — W 
796 8 

41 + W 

2596 — 9* 
141b + 41 
Btt + 9* 
101W— 1 
309*— W 
196 + V* 
22VS + 9u 
129* + W 
259* — 9* 
144* + ’b 
A - V* 
II 


20 2W 39* 2W + tt 
3A 5H 5W SW + W 
2* 4 aw 2W 2fc + w 

10 23 14H Mlb MU— W 


399* -sn* 
49* 19* 

lAtt 10 
179* 109* 
169* 99* 
34 Mlb 
27W 109* 

171* a 
9 4H 
2» 11b 

99* 59* 
4H 21b 
5tt 3H 
54* 29* 
596 aw 
39* 2 

159* 99* 
IAW 1016 
30W 21 


KnGSPf 450 11.9 
KnookC 

KoyCp 30 13 17 
Kayjn .lDe 3 
KeOTNrt 8 UI1 
Ksnwki 80a 38 10 
Ketchm 881 28 43 
KevPh 30 13 17 
KevCo 7 


KevPh 30 1J 17 

KerCa 7 

KevCawt 
KeirCoun 

Kklde <vt 

Klnork 

Klrbv 

Kit Mia 15 

Kleerv 82r .9 
Knoaa 16 

Kneu IB 

KaaerC 233 88 97 


lOOz 37% 
170 496 

1 139* 

n iiw 

1 12 

5 229* 
21 31 - 
506 I OH 
35 59* 

2 19* 

A A 
47 4W 
42 4H 
60 3V* 

1 41* 
25 21b 
203 MW 
135 16 
120 201b 


37)6 ]7% 

4 496 

13W 139* 

11% 11)6 
12 12 - 
22 22 - 
30W 21 - W 

109* 10W— tt 
4)6 39* + 9b 
1W 19* 

A A + V* 
4W 49* + V* 
49* 4W 

3. 3 


I3H 14V. + W 
1596 16 + tt 

289* 29 — 


m 


19* LSB 
2W La Bars 

296 LaPnt 7 

23W Lakes a ,l5e 
11W LndBnn 3 11 B 
11 LMmk 40 24 16 
ow Laser 42 

B96 Laura n 22 

2TW LearPP 380 133 
7W LeePh iA 

13 LeMghs .101 J 11 

M LelsurT . a 

7W LbfPPh 40 14 10 
Dm LHoRsI 
2W UIIM 
196 Lodge 

74W Lorlnir 19 


D* 19* 

2W 2W 

+9* 4% + 9* 

57 5716 + 9* 

14 14 — W 

iaw m 

10W 10W— 9* 
9W 71* + 96 
229* 22W — 9* 

7» + 6. 

28H 281* 

SW 596— W 

37W 279* + 9b 

L 2 

J3* 29* + V* 
D6 116 
3716 37W + 1m 


48 U 20 
35 

80O2A 10 
28 
30 

.12* 1J 3 
48b 48 17 
1300X1 10 
130 S3 12 
35T333 
L60 6.9 10 
3D U 7 


1-65 228 
238 248 
3L33 233 
3AC123 3 


JA 104 10 
1J0 2 S 11 
88 18 27 


18 1896 
14 I8W 
30 18 
.1 209* 
21 19W 
33 1016 
9 21W 
50z 45 
33 ft 
240 37W 
3 A 

1 234k 

35 BW 
5B 4H 
68 9 

2 10 

2 38W 

20 saw 

42 tt 
30 26 
72 8ft 
37 TW 
8 28W 

3 .129* 
IB 12tt 

S -t 

18 7W 
17 9W 
2 MW 
A 2\6 
7 3W 

56 SW 
•a stt 
16 59* 

4 73 

57 BW 


20)6 211b 
181b IBtt- 
AW A9fc- 
91b 996 . 

1596 IA ■ 
251b 25W ■ 
49* 49*- 

6 A ■ 
3W SW- 

2296 2296 • 
13 139* 

low 10W ■ 


1396 14 +9* 

124* 129* — 9* 
11)6 1196 
11W 119* + W 

iiw in* 

11V* 1196 + W 
34ft 34W— V. 
211* 32 + ft 
2& 20—96 

JOWs 239* 

2116 21ft + 9* 
239* 231ft + ft 
2316 2396 — ft 
109* 10W 
21W 22 +9* 

UW 18)6— ft 
1816 I8W 
T7W IS — 96 
an HR* + 9* 
109* 19 —ft 
low 1096— ft 
3196 21W 
45 . 45. + 16 

» f» 

3716 37V*— V* 
SI* Stt— lb 
23H 23W + 9ft 
Stt .89* + ft 
4ft 4ft 

aw » . + w 
18 10—1* 
3BW 38ft 
231b 231ft— 9b 
96 96— ft 

2596 26 
8W 8W- 96 
1W 1W 
2SW 2SW + 9m 
1216 1296— 1* 
T2ft 12ft— tt 

^ V 

7(6 79b— ft 

9W Oft 
14W MW 
2W 2W— 9* 
39* 3W + 9* 
SW 596 + 9* 
316 Stt + 9* 
SW Stt 
73 73 — W 

8ft 8W— H 


88 10.1 
80 108 
180 10J 
984 114 
780 107 
730 10.7 
247 10J 
US 12.1 
in U I 
80 15 7 
rk 43t 84 12 
IA JO 16 7 
Sound Pf 180 118 



-56 2.1 13 
.48 +0 17 
.10 14 

> 

M 18 10 


20 

861 <L7 16 
.12 J 11 
180e 9.1 6 

-74b 8 

S3 

87t 28 34 
.40 ca 1 
80 16 20 
20 U 14 


180 15l1 
861 22 
• AO 
88 1J 33 
.84 « 6 
H0eM8 12 
304 
19 


48 25 14 
44018 M 

15 

86 28 12 
6 
11 

180. SA 23 


1 AM AW AW + W 
ID 7W 7W 7W + ft 

2 21b 2W 2W 

53 7ft 7W 7ft 

9 A*. AW Att + lb 

12 IV. Itt lib + ft 
IA Btt. SW 8)6 + ft 

10 f 8tt 9 

S 9)6 9W 9W + ft 
208 a: SAW 85 BAtt + M 
4900Z 73 73 73 — 96 

ZOOCz 67W AAV. 67ft +1W 

4 23W 23W 23W + ft 
37 38W 30 M. 389* + ft 

13 61 4096 409b — ft 

3 23 23 23 

34 Stt 5ft SW— 9* 
8 5H 5H 5H 
99 UR* 109* 10W + V* 
60 1596 IS 159* 

15 3% 3W 3W 
210 27W 2AW 27 —1 

12 12 12 12+9* 

175 79b 7 79b + W 

0 17ft 17 17 — ft 

3 359* 35W S5W + ft 

7 17ft 17 17 

178 139* 13 1396 + 96 

8 1W 1ft 1ft 

5 59* 596 59b + ft 

3 Stt Stt 596 — W 

5 3 3 3 

2 10 10 10 + ft 

5 R m n 

11 16W 1 Aft- I6W + 9* 
2 11 II 11 

30 96 % lb- I* 

63 189* IB 18 — tt 

11 15ft IS 15 + ft 

57 13ft 139* 13W 

10 10 10 10 — tt 

1 5W SW SM 

8 139* 131* 131*- 9* 
M 4ft 39* 4ft + tt 

16 Ittt 1? Wb + ft 

11 179* 1796 177* + W 

481 896 796 8 + tt 

24 14% M9*t 14ft — tt 
84 tt ft 

25 I0W 109b 10W + ft 
57 10W 10ft 10W 

20 18ft 10W I0W- tt 

24 lift IIW 1TW 

25 14W 149* MW + l j 
41 109)6 10996 19996 + % 

9 23 22H 22M 

13 219*. 21W 21W 

54 72ft 72tt 72W + ft 

5 84 03(6 B4 +1 

20 5% 596 SW 

5 6* Att AW + tt 

15 79* 7ft 7W 

H fit + We 

SO 69* 5{* 696 + 9* 

109 19H 19W 19W— tt 
11 71M 71tt 719* 

1 9ft 9V* 99* 

43 IStt 189b IBtt — ft 

* n* 596 8W + tt 

4 2ft. 2 2ft + ft 

10 IAW 16tt 16W + tt 
377 10 4ft 9M— W 

17 29*. Stt 2ft + ft 

11 4W 4ft 4Va 

2 139* 13W WW + tt 

2.8 8 B + ft 

14 Stt 5ft 5tt 

17 I9W I9tt 1916—96 
52 33ft 33tt 33tt — ft 
IM 1W 19k IW 
17 12ft 129* 12ft— ft 
73 1896 17W 18 + W 

16 5M SW 5ft + ft 

4 iw n* iw + w 

jl 22tt 22 . 22tt— W 
4 4 3W 4 

4 8)6 SW IW 


496 It* 
27W 13ft 
63ft 33ft 
7W 3% 
20tt 7ft 
SW 2 
31M 21 tt 
111 * 0(6 
IAW AW 
4W 2tt 
AW 3M 
31ft 22ft 
18W Aft 
I0W 4W 
Stt 16ft 
12ft 2Vb 
3ft 2 
Sft 2 
50ft 43W 
76 STft 
9W Aft 
13(6 7ft 
IW W 
2696 23 
13tt »* 
19W lltt 
1896 I3tt 
1I7W 7ft 
AW 396 
14tt 396 

JL ** 

2ZW 31tt 
31W 21W 
39* 1ft 


TchAm 

Tcnsvm 13 

TectlOp IS 

TecnTp 11 

TecMri JO ZJ 7 
Tetecon 

Telllex M IS 14 
TblDta J6a 12 M 
Tetscl 24 

Teleten 

Tenney 12 

TexCdd 1J0 

Tex Air s 

TexAE Jft IA T9 
TexAE Df2_57 717 
Thscob 46 

ThorEn 
T towed 

TolEdpf 7M 12J 
TolEdamoo 112 
Tortel JOT 7 A 103 
TatlPtg 3A 
Tarpiwrt 

Tot PI pi 188 11J 
TmsLx JKr A 13 
TrraTec 44 U ID 
Trwuan M U> 7 
TriSM A0e 15 
TrlHme 9 

Trtotx 14 

TuCUUex 

TurnB n 43 

TumrC 1 JO 4.1 10 
Tvirwte 


'Z I& 

iST* 

61 13ft 

d* 

ST Tltt 
8 7ft 
96 41* 

a jw 

2 2396 
2B5A 20 
53 Sft 
14 ao9b 
53 2ft 
16 2ft 
50 3 

Mi 61 
1201 7A 
10 Sft 
346 13. 
310 lib 


2ft Sft + U.. 
Utt Mft— ft.- ; 
63ft 64ft +1 — 

4 4 

12tt 13ft + ft 
2*b 2t* 

29W 30 + Ml -. 

lift lift— tt. 
7ft 7ft— W 
1 4 49* 

4ft 4W +.9* 
23% 2396— tt 
18W 1996 +1W 
Sft Sft - 

20 aw. + 1 * 

2W 294— 96... 
2ft 2ft 
3 3 

60 61 «W . 

76 74 

5ft Sft 
12W 13 

IW IW ■, • 
25W 25W — ■ J* -. . 
I2W Utt + tt 
17W 1794— 96 .. 
15 IS 

low tow - 
4W 4W 
5ft Stt— tt' 

• SW 296 
20)6 2096— W 
299* 2996 + ft 
2ft 2ft 


ni Unicorn 
lift UMCPPf 

bw Unimrn 

1SW UAIrPd 
IAW UnCoePe 
IW UFoodA 
11b UFoodB 
IOft UtlMd. 
IOVj USAG wt 
Stt UnllefV 
BW unvCm 
SW UnlvRs 
159b LfnlvRv 
9W UnvPot 


IS 

9 A4 
B 1245 
J5 11 102 

Jle 9-2 172 

•SttlS 12 I 
JO 17 11 A 
.10 17 20 

41 

IS IX 

41 

25 24 

13 21 

19 82 

■BOe 4J 13 S 
M 


26* 2W 

"55 "£ 

14W 14ft 
10ft 9W 
21V* 21ft 
181b 18ft 
IW 1)6 
IW IW 
149* 14ft 

20W m* 
796 7tt 
lift WW 
AW Aft 
179* 17ft 
13)4 139* 


2W 

M Jr.V 

1496 + 96 1 

A=t- 

18ft-.-- 

1W_ .. 

iw . 

M*6 + 1* - 
28* +HH 

5w— ft 

it j+w 

Aft + lfc 
17ft + ft . 
I3W-W 


99* VST n JOe 
IIW VallyR 1 1.40 
17ft VoiSPTS M 
2W Verlt 

>5* VtAmC Mb 
39* VtRsh 
9tt VemJI JO : 
2W Vertpte 
5ft vicon 
2W Vlntge 
12 Vlraj Mr 

Aft VHvalG JO : 

8 VaptaK J» ; 

13ft VuKCp JO 


BO lOtt 

4 IBtt 
18 27 
14 AW 
33 IBtt 

5 4W 
23 T.t 

5 4W 
104 7ft 
21 39b 

10 15 
21 Btt 
2 II 
2 18ft 


10 M96+W: 
TO 11 

27 rr 

aw « ; 

18 1894 + ft 

4W 49*.-'-. 
9ft 9ft+* 
4ft 4ft— ft 
AW 7ft + tt_ 

IS 15 , + ft.L 

■tt Btt'.-'- ) 

11 11 — tt.- 
18 18+1* 



5ft- 5^ 



I 'ft « TBar JJI i4 19 71 Aft 6ft -Aft + 9fa 

35S JS I, E 5 - 14 U 14 Wft t»W + V. 

UW 5SIP , WU 4* 4W 496 

Til u 17 to 

* UK TPfl SK-m Wfc— S 

15ft 9* Tasiv M 19 H 9 M 13* -13* 


ft 2W Team. 


» ft M 


ATT Fd 
Bid Rod A 
vlccntAir nf 
Faadrama 

Healthcve 

Inflight Svc 
PUN9G 
RvfcoM 
TabPrad 


Armotmlntl 
Handyman n 
Murphy I nd 

TurngrBrdn 


AJrCal 
Brown For A 
Damlerr a 
Giotflir 
Hally Carp 
MEMCo 
Per Ini invpf 
MMenOpt 
Teaooa* 


AirCalef . 
BrownFpr 

DvpftxPrde 
GrtLkChm 
HarmaKi 
Olsten * 
Rockamy - 
5CE 120pf_ 
TevasAirCer 


BlofiadLab B-r 
.-VlCBOtAlr-V 
Bnwlr»cwr:. 
HannofrtJbLLt.- 

TalEd 7740+ J 


New lows m ' . \"~y br ; 

Conou gos GokmMdCo . Or omtadV* -— 
Heratevoo intseowrTr tnwnsmitt^r- 
Wevw irkLtw n QrleMHmeA • Pn*u Rgte. - _ 
WTClnfl . - WftbcortBr T- -ZbnWidtod- 






























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


Page 11 


tEMires 


smoa. Season 
Htoh - Urn 


OMi Hh>fc low Oau cite. 


I Shmi Season 
High Low 


ooen HW> Low Clot . CM 


High Low Close eta... 

Grains " 1 


T JL 

ftSfSjB? * 

‘"*^2 


do' 


sterns 

h . N, ^'-*leiS 

Il ™ Mis® 

* LT ^’"icmrn 
>rj , 1Mr ^ c "ntr». 
t In.icjd.hca,. 

'••i mj, 

■’’■''■-Hug his sheer 
■•Ujliane swDfi ; 

”C M" «ell-|iMtl JJ 

’.•->ur hcTi«s.^ * 

' ^‘JfCTCni UR£ 

■* 'he him m 
» liigr Cisi a*!, 
follow 
’ :r ihonrsa, 

, in*> »i»t ^ 

?‘jiicn iKki; 
i:r>i (cen aka 
•! Ja.cn. sW 
' MdiDai; 
who tanit 
Ji:fihvs I 

• I'jmiii }£ 

•i:-.k rile a 

• n .nhc: fc 
"kmr.ii* 

- ••'-ipaLs 

r'j'-sio 
''•••< >.rto 
nd in ■£ 

! '-.'i. .¥ £ 
Hum sr 

. •* : hj-airf " 

- dl-Jt 

... ■'ijftiK 

* . ::rar* 

v In' pc 

■njlii: 5 


-iOWbu minimum* doiiera pot bushel 
. wo M* Jui tn m 

326% 324W Sen 116 . XT7 ■ 

, 163% ■. 3.18 D*e 3ZM 125 

. UfVa ‘ ■ 12H6 : Mar 124 U4 

AB2- aim* May U3 a.13 

• 3721* - -2.9S Jut 2*9 199 

-Htt.solea: ^rev. Sotos 11 jm 
prav. DOV Open mt. 36771 oH»5 
-comMcsn -- • 

MM bo mMtnilm- dal tars per bushel 
’U»- Jol 22S 1M 
321 IS 1 25]. SOP lHh 25*W . 
.US ■ . 2*5* Dec im. Z3DV2 
■ iW.;. .:um Mar 258 is* 
-121* asm May 2xii# usu 
2J&- ' .£5S - Jul 2X1« 14J . . 

. 1BW» - - 2*4* - Sep ISB 1ST 

Est.Sales Prov. sates 31*85 

ptprJJar.Dpanint.lOvtn off ixn 
SOYBEANS (C BT) 

UBO Du mlntonum* donors par buHiei 
J3f - SSI: Jul S.19 541 

7*6 -.'Site - • . Aua 5L74 541 .. . 

471- 3*0 Sap 177 5*3 

'441. . £42*. Nov 5L87 SSI 

47* '• ' 5S» JOn 52610 6*0 
7*1,. • 543 Mar MB 4.11 
.77*' - 5J1 May 4.13 6.18 

.431 174 . Jul 4.1* 421 

£*L Sates Prow. Sales 38*13 

. Pnnr.DavOaan InL 43*83 up 1*55 
SOYBEAN MEAL (COT} 

. UOfoM-dOUarsperton 

1*440 TTTjSO Jul 1 3240 uuo 

180*0- m» Aue 13400 U7J0 

179.50 . "12258 Sap 139-00 139-00 
MOO 12SJJ0 OCt U2M 143*0 

IMffl ,.mS3 Dec 14**8 149*0 
16350- - 1318* Jan 151*0 15150 
30450 l! 137 JO Mar 151*0 154*0 
14250 143*0 MOV 158*0 150*0 

147 JO Jill 14150 141J0 

HIM ' . Prev-Sjlas 2SJ1B 

Frau. Day Open lot- 49*78 uaSQO 
so to ban -oil icon 
40*00 Hu- denars par 100 ifas. 

3272 . 217# Jul taXO 20*5 

.31*5 . 22-50 Aua 27*5 Z752 

31.10 2250 SOP 24*5 27*0 

30J7- 22*0 OCt 26X5 26X5 

ZtJS 21*0 Dec 25*0 25*0 

29*7 ■ 2X40. Jan 2558 2&50 

28*0 - . 3440 MOT 25*0 2140 

2755 200 May 2530 2550 

.2125 .. -23J8 Jill 25.10 25.10 

25.15 2411 Aug 2475 24*0 

EsL Soles-- . Prav. Soles 20*24 ■ 
Prev.DayOacfllDi 59*94 oHI.17* 
OATS (CBT3 

5*00 bu mtalmum-dal lars par bushti 
IJBVfr T-459. Jol 1*7 1^47 

1J» Mt Sep IMV. 1*3 

U» ' 1444* Dec 1-45V. 146 Ki 

l*m l*5tt. Mar 1*4*2 1.4M*t 
1*5 L47V5 May 1*7 1*7 

EH Salt -■ Prav. Sole* 378 
Pnw. Day Open Inf. 3,164 up 4 

i LivestociT 

CATTUE(C«IUU . 

40000 lb*.- cents per lb. 

67*7 : 54*5 Alia 57*0 57*0 

4X50— 57-70 OCt SV*0 99*5 
67*5 60*0 Dec 61*0 61J0 

BAS . 40J5 Feb ' 6220 4230 
67*7 4115 Apr 43*0 43.10 

642S 63*0 Jun 63*0 63*0 

EsLfiates 15*22 Prav. soles 20J90 
Prey. Dav Open Inf. SOASO up 52? 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44*00 tte.- cents per lb. 

7X70 63*5 Aua 45*0 65*0 

7100 6375 Sep 6530 6530 

7232 64*5 Ocl 65*5 6535 

7330 6535 MOV 4635 66J5 

79M SAM J©T> 48.15 <8.15 
7031 66JD Mar 68.10 68.10 

70*5 67*0 APT 6835 6825 

EsL Sales 1*44 Prav.Scdas 1*28 
-Pray, pay Open Ml. 831* up *7 
HOGS(CME) 

38*00 lbs.- oanti pot lb. 

5577 47*6 Jul 58.15 SOM 

5437 4637 Aua 4770 47 JK 

51.75 4X15 Oct 4295 43.15 

58*5 44.10 D4C 4*45 44-75 

30*7 4323 Feb ASM '46.10 

4735 43-10 APT 4335 4330 

ev.es 4530 Jun 45.95 45.95 
4**5 4*00 Jul 44*0 4430 

5139 4535 AUO 

Est.Soies 5344 Prav. Sales -8,151 
Prev. Day Onan Int. 21*42 ofl«92 
PORK BELLI BS ICME) 

38*00 lbs.- conn par lb. 
sun 54*0 Jul 5830 5830 


UOU +*1 

115* +*1 

igw +« 

12255 -film 

iiOft 

MOfe +.MH 


80*5 57.10 Aua 5830- 5830 . 57.13 S732. —a 

7630 . 4X15 POD - .4485 66.95 4185 6432 +.12 

■7*48 64*0 -Mar . .4535 +J0 

75*0 4*50 MOV *730 4730 4630 57*7 +jd 

78*0 ' 67*5 JM 6630 64*0 4430 <7^0 +J0 

.7113 44*0 Auft - <4*0 +138 

Ext. Sates 5343 Prav. Salem 7*24 
pray. Day Open IM. 10*06 upw 


149*0 121*0 Jul 13*05 135.19 13X05 13X0S 

1«30 127*0 Sap 137*7 13730- 137*7 137*7 

150*9 129*5 Dec 137*3 137*0 137*3 137JQ 

149.75 13X50 Mur 13751 13830 137*3 137*3 

1A80 131*0 May 137 JO 138.10 137 JO 137 JO 

148*0 13150 Jul 13111 HUB 138*8 138*8 

DOC 130*0 138*0 138*0 138*0 

EH. Sales Prev. Sales 4*03 

Prav. DavOaan Int 11*31 up 362 
SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCEI - - 

. T 12*00 ftsrcems BOTH*. 


EmLSalas 1 Prtv.Sa1as -210 
Prev. Oav Open ml. X*57 up 72 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) - 
Si ml lilen. pit of 100 act 

*2J8 15*0 See 72*0 7133 

72*7 85*4 - Dec *1*0 TLH0 

*1 J5 84J6- Mar *1*0 . 91A4 

71A0 SMS JUil *0*2 *0*2 

91.15 87*4 S«P *0*5 «US 

*0*3 58*4 Dec 

EH SalH 153 prav.Salai 2*2 

Prav. Day Open InL 3*33 wp3B 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 


72.12 72*1 
* 1*0 * 1*1 
71*0 *1*7 
90*2 9897 
90X5 90X2 
9029 


si nHufo+afoorioopcL 

*845 *4*3 Sot 

91*4 

92*7 

9121 

91*1 

9200 

•4*0 

Dec 

91*6 

91X2 

9125 

91X8 

91*0 

86,10 

Mar 

91,1,9 

91.16 

98M 

9145 

9LU 

8^3 

JW) 

WA4 

9X7S 

90*5 

90X6 


Sep 

9020 

9020 

9020 

9023 

(qS 

8728 

Dec 

8MV 

89.93 

8949 

9808 


87X4 

Mar 

89X3 

89X3 

•925 

0920 

89*5 

89*4 

Jim 

192* 

8926 

0926 

89X2 


27M +*4U> 

925 

2X4 

Sot 

U3 

245 

277 

28$ 


155 

+*2M 

945 

224 

oa 

2*9 

2*6 

2*7 

.2*4 

—43 

2X9V, +JOT. 

725 

3*0 

Jan 

214 

215 

211 

a 

—45 

2*0 

+43 

923 

134 

Mar 

250 

3*0 

3X1 

— *6 

2X2 

+JBVi 

7.15 

3*8 

MOV 

3X8 

320 

3X3 

266 

— *5 

2X1 VB 

+43 

. 6X9 

329 

Jut 

346 

346 

3X3 

214 

—45 . 

2X8W +*M' 

696 

445 

OCt 

609 

-4S» 

443 

60S 

—42 


OH. Salat 46*47. Prev. Safes 472SI 
Prev. Day flam IATJ14J11 ofFTVO 


5J7 +*B 

SJ7K +.M 
5*2 +.1IM 

5*8 +.1704 

559 +.18V4 

on +.i9*i 
6.17 +.19 

6*0 +.18 


135*0 +450 
136*0 +4*0 
136*0 +SL00 
14LS0 -feSJSO 
147*0 +5JB 

14**0 +5*0 

152*0 +5*0 
157*0 +5*0 
160*0 +3J0 


2830 +.13 

27.19 +.17 

26X5 +.« 

36*5 +J5 

25X5 +JB 
25L35 +*5 

25*5 +.2B 

25.15 +*2 

24JS +X0 
2450 +*0 


lXSVi —*0*4 
1X2* +.01 

1X6 +*116 

1X4V, .+*1 

1X7 +J0T 


COCOA (MYCSGE) 

10 metric ions- s per ion 

2400 190 Jut 2099 2099 2050 2033 . 

2419 190 .Sep 2130 .2143 2078 2088 

2337 . 1945 OK 2146 Z156 2100 - 2100 

7190 1*55 Mar 214* 2161 2120 2110 

2171 1960 May 2128 

211 B 1968 J,ji 2130 

JZ330 20® Sea 214* 

EstSatas 3*02 Prev. Sates 1904 
Prov. DavOPOR Ini. 21*73 UP Ilf 


13**0 13825 137*0 +1*0 
13X75 134*5 13450 —AS 
13X30 13X50 13X50 —30 

uuo uuM nun +*s 
131*5 mso DOL50 —AS 
450 



Metals 


COPPER CCOMETO 
25JK9 IbSr cents nor lb. 


Mr*; 

39 . 80 

57*0 

5BXS 

Jul 

Aua 

6815 

4830 

5920 


8210 

57*0 

SOT 



6045 

■ r vETj 

MJS 

8620 

50*0 

59X0 

Dec 

60*9 

6210 

6L2S 

DM 

8800 

59X0 

Mar 



62*5 








■ v I 

7640 

61*0 

Jul 

63*5 

6295 

63XS 

■ t 

70*0 

70*0 

62*0 

6275 

Sen 

OK 

M45 

6618 

6605 


70*0 6U0 Jon 

67*0 65X9 MOT 

Est.Sales Prov. Sales - 4*0 

Prev. Day Open Inf. (2262 oft 104 


g 



1*720 1*790 +145 

1*610 1*670 +MS 
1*990 1*400 +U9 


7372 .7378 +12 

.7351 .7X51 +13 

3X0 3337 +19 

7329. *320 +22 


.11370 .TUN +1N 
.1123$ .11320 +130 


*457 *489 +45 

*496 *518 +47 

*540 *551 +51 


*04145*04171 +45 

*04141*04191 +46 

*04193 *04300 +30 


X146 XS3 +72 

X175 X241 +78 

AXOS .OSS +65 


Industrials 


57*0 57*2 
51X5 5872 
40*5 60*2 

61X0 61*5 
62X5 6X75 

6X40 6X10 


64X0 6450 

64X0 64*5 

66.15 66.15 

67X0 <7X5 


4KJD 49X0 
47*7 47*2 
4X20 42X0 
44*0 44*2 
45*5 45*5 
4X30 4X70 
45.90 45X5 
45*0 46*0 

46*0 


ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

40000 lbs.- cants per Ul - 
59X0 4X15 Jul 

Aua 

74*0 4X90 Sep 45.15 45X0 

70X0 4450 Dec 46*5 46*5 

76X0 505 Jan 

73X0 46*5 Mar 

66*5 5X95 May 

63X5 47*5 Jul 

5110 51*0 Sea 


May 

Cat. Sales Prev. Sales 78 

Prev. Day Open InL 1*90 oft27 
SILVER (COMEX} 


4490 +AS 
4X10 +X1 

4495 45X0 +X3 

46*5 46*3 +XS 
46X9 +X5 

47*0 +XS 
48*0 +XS 

35 «S 

3S ins 

51X0 +XS 
5220 +X5 



15X30 15370 —JO 
i4*xo isiua — lja 
15000 151*0 —1.90 
157*0 157*0 —170 
16XS0 168X0 —1X0 
168X0 1MX0 —1.10 
T74JS 17X90 —1.10 


60X5 6178 +1*5 
6885 61*9 +1.15 
61.15 62*0 +1*4 
61.90 6X90 +78 

61*0 41.95 +23 

5820 50X0 +X0 


T461i> 

500 

■Mil 

‘606 ja 

6114 

6034 

609.9 

49* 

621* 

<03* 


606* 

6M0 

6064 

611* 

+9* 

1183* 

573* 


611* 

617J 

608* 

616* 

49* 

1238* 

590* 

Dec 

6265 

629* 

620* 

6281 

492 

12154 

595* 

Jon 

629* 

6294 

6294 

632X 

49* 

11910 

607* 

Mar 

635* 

640* 

615* 

6487 

492 

1048* 

6214 

May 

646 X 

649* 

646X 

649X 

+104 

945* 


Jol 

656* 

650* 

6560 

6589 

+181 

UtOX 

641* 


6665 

6665 

6665 

669 * 

+182 

799* 

660 * 

Doc 




6862 

+10X 

709* 

£78* 

Jan 




6892 

+10* 

7780 

677* 

Mar 

7088 

7000 

7004 


+186 

6954 

693* 

May 




711X 

+107 

Est.Sales 


Previ Safes 15X95 





Prev. Day Open int. TIJQS off 1,144 


HBATINS OIL (KYME} 

4XOOO aal- cants per pal 

7X50 66*5 Aua 68X5 69J0 A8X5 6870 

76X5 6670 Sea 70*D 70*0 69*5 69*5 

77.10 67X5 Oct 71-10 71.10 70.10 70.10 

7455 6850 Nov 71X0 71X0 70.90 7890 

7825 69.15 Dec 72.15 72*5 71.48 71X5 

7490 49*0 Jan 72*5 7Z52 7U5 72.1D 

73*0 70*8 Ftb 71*6 71*6 71*6 71*6 

73*0 69*0 Mar 70*0 70*0 70*0 70*0 

EsL Salas _ Prav. Safes 9*97 
Prev. Day Open ml 20X20 off 372 
CRUDE OIL (NYMB) 

1*00 bbfedoHam per bbL 



26858 265*0 218*0 
27638 26450 269*8 
273*0 269*0 273*0 
27850 275X0 278X0 
946 


Gumncy Options 


Jmhr 12 

PHILA DELPHIA EXCHANGE 

Underimu PTVra Calls— Lost Puts— Last 

Sop Dec Mar Sap Dec Mar 
n*M BrftlsB Ptmods-ceels par «nfl. 

BPound no r r 2870 r r r 

ims? 115 2X50 2X58 2X60 0.10 070 r 

138*7 120 1855 18*5 f US f t 

138*7 T25 14*8 14X8 r 0X5 158 r 

138*7 iaa 9XO 11.18 r ixo r r 

138*7 135 6.10 1*0 , • r 1*5 tM 8*5 

138*7 148 3JO 170 7*5 f 8*0 r 

ua*7 145 IJ0 r r r r r 

SLIW Cnnadlaa 8Ssi?ars-ceafs per wdL 
coour -7X t t r — ■ r . t 

73*2 73 1.15 t r . r 0*3 1*0 

73*2 ?« bxs mo r M0 r r 

73.92 75 0*3 0X1 0.95 r T r 

osu KfHt Oermee Marts-otetc per oolL 

DMerk 20 6*5 r t r r r 

34*2 29 5*7 r r r r IB 

34*2 X 477 5.10 r 0*1 r _ r 

34*2 31 X77 Alt r 0*4 0*4 0X0 

34*2 .*2 2X9 *29 r 8.17 0X0 . r 

3472 33 2.12 2X8 r 027 0J2 . r 

34*2 34 1* Ml 152 l» Ul r 

3472 3S IB W M I* T f 

3472 _ 3* CL53 1.12 1JJ J T r 


PALLADIUM (NYMB) 
lOGIrov 01- dollars per on 
14173 90X0 s«s 94*0 95*0 

14150 91JH1 Dec 94*5 96*0 

127 JO 91*0 Mar 9450 *5*5 

114*0 91 JO Jun 94*5 9425 

Ext. Safes Prav. safes 273 . 

Prev.DavOoenlnL 6X29 oH2S 
SOLD (COMEX) 

100 irav aL- dollers penrovoz. 


29*7 

2625 


27*1 

27*5 


27.15 

— *2 

29 JO 

24*8 

SOT 

26X0 

2662 

26*9 

— *8 

285 0 

3665 

Oct 

2641 

26*6 

25*1. 

2186 

-49 

29 JB 

24X0 


25X5 

2664 

25X0 

25X0 

— *3 

29*0' 

23*0 

Dec 

25*5 

25*6 

2SM 

25*8 

-08 

29*0 

2630 

Jan 

23*0 

25*0 

24416 

24*6 

—03 

29X6 

« 

Fab 

2668 

2428 

2660 

24X4 

— *5 

29X5 

Mur 

2652 

2653 

24*5 

2630 

— *0 

29X5 

2610 

Anr 

24*0 

2600 

24*0 

2600 

— xo 

2620 

2420 

Jun 

2328 

2328 

2321 

2328 

— X2 

Est. Salas 


Prev. Sates U2S3 





93*0 94*5 
9X50 94*5 . 
9450 95*5 

94*5 9150 


m*H French Fraiicp-ioibs of a coat per enlL 
FFranc 100 r r r r 

11420 110 r r r 160 

USMH Japanese Yen-llNtM of a cent per wiM. 


r r r 0.12 
r 0*1 r r 
r 0*4 o*< 0X0 

r an mj . r 
r ffl w , r 
2J2 QJ6 0JI r 
2*0 1*0 r r 

1J3 r r r 



309*8 

Jul 

. 



IL5[ 

+610 

485*0 

291*0 

Au# 

316*0 

320*0 

314*8 

llA • 

+610 

31850 

315*0 

Sep 




'^Y 

4620 


297*0 

Ort 

319.90 326*0 

318*0 

■ 77T*i 

+630 


381*8 

Dec 


327*0 

332*0 

.TTI 

+630 

40850 

38640 

Feb 

33340 

333*0 328X0 


+640 


31420 






43570 

320*0 

Jun 





+660 

428X0 

32140 





+680 


335*0 

Oct 





+690 


342*0 


35850 350*0 

350*0 

+5.10 

372*0 

35548 

Apr 




■*vrr 

+5X8 


Ett Safes Pnev.5ales 2RI53 

Prev. Day Open ML134379 up 2308 


Financial 


US T-BILLS (IMM)- 


SI mllltoi>-ptsb(180pcL 

9245 

92*9 

9279 

92*0 

+42 



Dec 

92*4 

92*5 

92X8 

92*8 

+*3 


*6X0 


max 

92*3 

9213 

92*1 

+*3 




91*2 

91*2 

9140 


+JD 

92*1 


Sot 

91x1 

91X1 

91*6 


+43 




JYen 37 4J6 r r r r r 

41J7 38 157 r r r r r 

41 J7 39 2J6 r r r r r 

41J7 40 1*3 118 r 0.19 0X8 r 

4157 41 1.11 1-55 r 0X2 r r 

4L57 42 0X2 1*6 r 0*0 T r 

ns? 43 OJI 065 r r r r 

61580 Safes Ff«s+*ni* per uul 

SFronc JS 6X4 r r r r r 

. 41*9 36 r fcffl r r r r 

' 41*9 17 4X4 r r r r r 

41*9 38 3*0 4X0 r 113 OX7 r 

41*9 39 X12 16J r 0*2 0X0 r 

41*9 40 2J0 2*4 r 0.41 0J4 T 

41*9 41 1X7 2J8 3*0 0JB r r 

41*9 42 1.18 1*8 r L14 r r 

41*9 43 0*1 1X8 r r r r 

Tolu call voL UJ03 CPI open. teLlHlM 

Total nut VOL 4*57 PM open IbL M9J39 

n-Nof traded, a— No option offered. o-Old- 
Lost is premium (purchase prleel. 

Sevres: At*. 


r 813 ffl-47 

r 0*2 0X0 

r ®.4 s 0*4 

3*0 0*0 r 

r L16 r 


Est.Sales 10*00 Prev. Sales WU64 
I Prev. Dav Open Int. 34*99 up 227 
18 YR- TREASURY tCBTl 

SlOOJUOprln-atsRSamtaoriOOPCt ' 

8841 75-18 Sop SC-4 86-13 85-11 85-28 

87-13 75-13 Dec 65-11 05-11 *+17 8+» 

8+2 75-14 Aha- 84 84 83-23 83-39 

85-7 7+38 Jun 83-10 

84-4 82-11 Sep 82-16 

83-11 80-19 Dec 81-13 >1-14 81-10 81-14 

Eat. Salem" - Prav.Satos 10X24 

Prev. Dayopan InL 54*62 UP1J99 
US TREASURY BONDSICBT) 

7+23 77-3 

78-13 57-8 Dec 7+5 7+16 75-29 75-31 

77-29 -.57-2 Mar 73+ 75-15 J+« 7510 

7+6 5+29 JiMl 7+9 7+15 73-» 7+1 

75-31 5+29 Sep 73-12 73-17 73-28 73+ 

7+24 5+25 Dec 73-11 72-11 72-1 72-9 

7+15 5+27 Mar 71-18 71-15 71-4 71-15 

7+2* 63-12 JWI 70-20 70-33 7^20 7D23 

72-27 63-4 Sea I® 70-1 69*0 70-1 

Est.Sales Prev. So) M.161X00 

Prev. DavOaan lnt300*8* up 1*14 
GNMA (CBT) __ 
Bl8tUHMprM-Pl»S32ndsofl00PC» 

77-26 59-13 Sep 7+19 7+2 9 7+9 7+14 

7+28 59+ Dec 7+17 75-18 75-15 75-18 

75-17 58-25 Jun 7+13 7+14 7+11 7+14 

75-2 46 Sen 7+9 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 61*11 off 684 

I Stock Indexes 

OoenHlghljewSefaeClm. 

SAP COMP. INDEX 
eaiatf and ceati 

Sep 194*0 195.15 193X5 104X0 

Dec 197 J)0 790*0 1%35 197X5 

• ' Mar 280*5 288135 200*5 208X0 

JUD 203*5 203*5 203*0 20X25 
LOCI Index 19X29, UP JL 
EH oulus 47X25. Prev- safes 49X42. 

Prbv day's epee ini 61*15. of* CM. 

VALUE UNE 

pom b ow wm 

Sea 207X0 20890 207.15 208X0 

Dec 21150 212*5 21 UD 20*0 

Last tadn 20X79. up XL 
Prav. >da 4*75. 

Prav dmrt open ml 152, off MJX7. 

NYSE COMP. INDEX 
aetata , and cants 

See 11X05 1040 112*5 113*0 

DOC 115*0 115X5 11490 115.15 

Mar 116X6 117*0 116X5 1I7J® 

, -• . Jun . 118*5 

Last Index tan up JL __ 

EH sate* UR Prav. Sales UR 
Prav aaira open Int 1UR up *7S. 

MAJOR MKT INDEX 
paints and efabts 

Jul 262 262M 2NH4 M0H 

Aua 263 263 26146 36116 

S#P 2631k 2639k 26016 21016 

Dec 266VU264VJ 26416 26416 

Last Index 2*1*1 off JR 
Prav. uia mu ■ 

Prav days epee w 9,178, up STL 

1 Commodity Indexes 

'Close Pr 

Moody'S- B16509 VI 

Reuters 1X87J0 IjM 

DJ. Futures 11754 ■ 11 

Com. Research Bureau - 227.10 23 

Moody's *. base 100 i Dec. 31# 1931. 
p- preliminary; f- final 
Reuters ; base 100 : Sea. I& TP3I. 

Dow Jones j base 100 : Dec. 31. 1874. . 

I Market Guide 


Previous 

?16J0f 

1XMJ» 

17753 

226X0 


NY CSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

KYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 



Cash Prices 


Commodity and (Jolt 

Cohae 4 Sanies, lb — 

Mwctolti 64/30 38 Vi. vd — 

■tael billets (Pin.), Ian 

Iran 2 Fury. Philo. Ion 

Steal scrap Mo I hvv Pitt — 

Jxad Spot, lb 

Cooper elect- lb 

Tfe l&tnui&l. lb - — 

ZfeC.E-Sf.l_ Basis, lb 

Poliodk»m, ca . . 

Silver N.Y. ea 

Source: AP. 


JefylS 

Year 
Ffl ADD 
LAS 1 JO 
BXS 8*4 
473*8 47X80 

71100 71X88 

-70-71 9+95 

1+2) BMW 
tSrm 4+67 
4*334 NJL 
0-44-X7 BJ0 
9716-94 18+151 
LOSS MX. 



Dt\l Futures 
Options 

R Cameo Mrt-nsM marts cma atr mat 





Mr 12 

COK-Setfle 


Pat+SeMi 

Occ 

Mar 

See 

Dec 

Mot 

270 

3*7 

022 

DL56 

— 

2*1 

2X4 

8X9 

0*4 

L19 

1J0 

1.92 

0.91 

126 

1*1 

1.13 

1*0 

1*5 

1*2 

241 

026 

l.U 

— 

— 

— 


tafewted total *oL MM 

fek: Hairs. voL IM open lot. 3QJ42 
FHs : Han. vuL2*n epee tat »J2* 
Stamce.'CME. 


Seoul May Lower Goal 
Of 7.5% Growth in GNP 

Return 

SEOUL — South Korea may 
lower its goal of increasing the 
■ gross national product by 7.5 per- 
•, cent tins year, economic planning 
[ officials said Friday. GNP mea- 
sures the total output'of goods and 
^sendees including income from for- 
ft “go invcstmcuLs. 

( But officials termed premature a 


Conmimtities 


HONG-KOHC GOLD FUTURES 
UAS par ounce 

Clot* 

KMl Low EM- Ask 
Jty— N.T N.T. 31A*0 316*0 
AUO - 316*0 316*0 315*0 317.00 
5aP — N.T. N.T. 317*0 319*0 
Dd _ N.T. N.T. 319*0 321*0 
Dec- N.T. N.T. 32X00 325*0 
Fob - N.T. N.T. 327*0 329*0 
API — N.T. N.T. 331*0 333*0 
Jun _ 335*0 335*0 335*0 337*0 
volume: 27 lots of 100 ax. 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJX perouace 


Htoh Lew Settle SjHtto 

Aua N.T. N.T. 316*0 3MJ0 

Sep — — _ H.T. N.T. 317*0 316X0 

Oct M.T. N-T. 319*0 31X10 

Dec N-T. N.T. 322*0 32190 

Volume: 100 lots of 100 oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mafavskm canft per hflo 

dose Previous 

BM A«fc Bid Ask 

Aua 192*0 193*0 19275 19150 

SCP 191*0 91250 19LS1 19250 

OCt 19250 194-50 194*0 195*0 

NOV 195J0 19650 196*0 197*B 

Dec 198*0 199*0 IRIS 19950 

volume: 24 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Staatmara ceats per kfla 


Bid Ask 
RSSlAua- 170.00 17050 
RSS 1 Sep— 168.75 169*5 

RSS2AUO- 164*0 165*0 

RSS3AU0- U2Mi 163*0 
R5S4AU9- 158*0 160*0 
RSS 5 Aua — 153*0 155*0 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


Jly WO 1*3 

AUO 960 1*1 

Sen m 95 

od — — MO « 

NOV 930 95 

Dec 920 « 

Jan 9)0 « 

Mar 910 9S 

May - »00 W 

Volume: 0 tots of 15 tons. 
Source: Reuters. 


Previous 
Eld Ask 
171*0 17150 

170*0 17050 

165*0 166.0C 

163*0 164*0 

159*0 161*8 
154*0 15+00 


Gmnmlities 


HMi Lour BM Ask 

SUGAR 

Rreacft Amucs per metric too 
AUO 1.175 L17D L140 1,140 

Ocr L165 1.135 1.135 1.140 

DSC 1.140 1,150 1.145 1,145 

Mar 1.185 L1S3 1.153 1,155 

May N.T. N.T. UBS I,1H 

Aua 1*70 1J7D ljaO 1*37. 

Eat. vut.- 2882 toff of 50 tons Prev. i 
soles: 2377 tots. Often Interest: 20X41 

COCOA 

Fretrefi francs per M( kg 

Jly K.T. N.T. 2020 2120 

Sen 2095 2*40 2060 2063 

DOC 2055 2*20 2033 2*37 

Mer N.T. N.T. — 2*55 

MOV N.T. N.T. — -2*65 

Jly N.T. N.T. — 2*70 

SOP N.T. N.T. — 8*75 

EsL voL: 114 lots of 10 Ions. Prav. i 
safes: 360 lots. Open Interest: 819 
COFFEE 

Franck francs per 10( kg 
Jly N.T. N.T. — 2050 

Sea 2130 1,195 — 2*85 

NOV N.T. N.T. — 2100 

Jan N.T. N.T. — 2130 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 2140. 

May 2142 2142 — 2140 

Jly N.T. N.T. — 2110 

Eif. voL: 122 fats of 5 forts. Prav. < 
series.- 285 tots. Ooen Interest: 355 
Source: Bourse db Commer ce . 


Close 


Previous 

BM 

Ask 

BM 

A*k 

m 

1*2B 

990 

1440 

960 

1410 

980 

1*30 

940 

990 

950 

1400 

MO 

980 

940 

990 

990 

mn 

930 

9H 

920 

960 

V2B 

TO 

910 

950 

910 

960 

910 

900 

958 

960 

?o8 

M0 

950 


out on iczais termed premature a j rr , D h> , 

p eport by the Yonhap News Agen- | InCUSUT}’ BUIS 
*at the fim'crnment is consider- 




pfelhe government ^st^ revie^ 
* n 6 the economic situation. 


India’s Inflation Falls to 5.6 % 

Reuters 

. NEW DELHI — India's infla- 
tion fell to an annuali2ed 5.6 per- 
wnt in June from 6.8 percent in 


Offer 

W 

July 12 
Pre* 
YMM TWa 

746 

746 

728 

723 

MO 

7.18 

7*7 

7X0 

7*2 

7J0 

748 

W 


Dhwlends 


Jofyl2 

Company Per And Pay Rcc 

USUAL 

QJ2M 9-1 8-15 
O .15 M 7.M 
Q .10 +9 7-23 

Q *TR 9-1 7-26 
S .19 ta M2 8-12 
S * H 8-20 

8 .151 9-7 7-25 

J5 +9 7-25 
Q .19 +1 7-12 

H M 

AJUtoeetl M Mfletb fy ; D-Oaartarty; S-Sem+ 


S&P10P 

IndeTOpbc 


London 

Gmmoclhies 


JefylS 

Close pravtom 
Mob Lew BM Aik BM Ask 
SUGAR _ . 

SttrtlPi per metric fee 
AM 88*0 B6JZ0 87 JO 87*0 87X0 88*0 
OCt 91*0 89*0 90X0 9fL60 90X0 91*0 
DPC 9100 9230 9200 92X0 9X60 94*0 
Mar 1DX20 100X0 102JHI 10220 102*0 103*0 
MOV 107*0 106X0 105*0 107*0 104*0 M7J0 
AM N.T. N-T. 110*0 11 IXO lltXO 112*0 
Oct 1)3*0 moo 113*0 11X80 lM*a 115*0 
Volume: 1*41 lots ol SMom. 

COCOA ' 

Sterling per metric Ion 
Jly 1J7C7 1*41 1J40 L741 1761 U42 

Sot 1J35 1X98 lj.93 1X96 L731 L732 

Dec 1^12 1X85 1X88 1X90 L703 I,7W 

Mar 1,714 1X91 1X91 1X95 1J07 1J10 

May L722 1JW 1J10 1.712 IJ21 1J» 

JtV 1J» L225 1J2S 1J26 L730 1 J40 , 

SOT N.T. N-T. \JX L740 1,730 USB 

Volume: 4.1B9 tots of lO Tma. 

COFFEE ^ _ 

SterHaa eer metric tan 
Jty 1X58 1X14 1XZS 1X40 1J10 1J24 

Sot 1.730 1X40 1X70 1X72 1J50 L755 

Nov 1J70 1X88 1J11 1.715 1*K 1*04 

Jan 1*90 L73Q 1J51 1JM 1*38 1*40 

Mar 1780 IjS 1J42 1J65 1*32 1*35 

May L790 U55 1.780 1J» 1*40 1*50 

Jly 1*10 1*75 1J80 1*10 1*40 1*00 

Volume: 4Jnkris of S Ians. 

CASOIL w , 

U*. MIM oar metric tan 
AM 217X0 317*0 217*0 217X0 21635 31650 
SOT 21735 216*0 216J0 216.75 216*0 21625 
OCt 2TB25 217J» 21740 218*0 217*0 2173S 
NO* 219*0 218/-' 218X0 219*0 21X75 220*0 
HC N.T. N.T. 220*0 721X0 220*0 223*0 
JOB N.T. N.T. 219X0 222X0 220J5 222*0 
Feb N.T. N.T. 219*0 223» 214*0 22$*0 
MV N.T. N.T. 210*0 21 &88 210*0 220*0 

API N-T. N.T. 205*0 217*0 207*0 218*0 

VOUime: 332 lots o( 100 tons. 

Sources: Reuters end Louden Petroleum Ex- 
ehonpe teoaotl). 


Ixmlon Mdab 


72550 724*0 

748*0 74840 


Options 


; ■. . % UUIIW likflll w.v ■■■ 

. .j l May and 8.7 percent in June 1984, 
;. Vhe Finance Ministiy said Friday. 
» added thai the country’s large 
- ' ,i‘l- ^°odgrain stocks and sales of im- 
perial sugar and vegetable oils at 
^bsidizea prices have helped curb 
. j* '°od price rises. 


Source: Sokuton Brvttwrs 


UJL Inflation Remains at 7% 

Reuters . 

LONDON — Retail prices in 
Britain rase 0.2 perceni in June, 
leaving the year-lo-year inflation 
: rate stable at 7 percent, the govem- 
! ment reported Friday. 


ttrfti 

OflMtat 


Psh-Unl 

0d 

Pile* Jlv tat 5** Od 

XT 

tag 

See 



torn 



mm 

m 

iste — 178 it 


mi 

Hi 

vu 

ns 

m ilk or - 

1/16 16 

VI* 

16 

IK 

5M 6fe K wt 

in* it 

1 

17/1* 

IK 


l 


2W 

3 

in 

im m 25/1I3U 

4* 

sit 

58 

5* 

195 

1/14 504 1 IK 

— • 

98 

T 

— . 

TgWcaHmlane fflJB 
THNnH «>«• tot S92U . 
Total PN wksot 74JD 
79M89I s»nM.4N«9 






NMitm LMttcn ao*u5xs+ti7 
Source: CBOE. • 


Clow PravloiK 

BM AH BM Aik 

ALUMINUM 

storltaa dot metric ton 

spot 723*0 734*0 725X0 724*0 

forward . 74440. 745*0 748*0 74840 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grata) 

Sttrilag-pcr iMtrie Hb 

Spot 1*46*0 1*47*0 UM8JD0 1*49*0 

forward 1*050 1*51*0 1*57*0 1*5XH 

COPPER CATHODES (StapdanU . 

SteiUng per mebjclmi__ 

spat - 1*1X00 IAE 1*15*0 1*20*0 

forward • 1*34*0 1*34*0 1*25*0 1*40*0 

LEAD 

SKfflna pot manic fop 

wot 07*0 n*0 292*0 294*0 

forward 291*0 292*0 29600 297*0 

NICKEL 

Starling per metric too 
cool 3X05*0 3X15*0 3X45*0 3X50*0 

forward 1605*0 3X40*0 X485*0 3X8X00 

SILVER 

Popco per tray wot 

■per 437*3 43X00 434*0 43500 

forward 449*0 450*0 447X0 44X00 

tin (Standard) 

SterilM per metrician^ . 

»ot 9*15*0 9*65*0 9*50*0 9*51*0 

forworn 9*55*0 «*9M0 9*50*0 9*51*0 

ZINC 

Sterling pormalric tea 
spot SHOO 515*0 535*0 527*0 

forward 504*0 505*0 521*0 522*0 

Source: AP. 


Johnson Motthey Reports [7 ~ 

45% Decline in Pretax Profit c&^cLSI 


Roam 

LONDON — Johnson Matthey 
PLC reported Friday that pretax 
profit for the year ended March 31, 
including discontinued operations, 
(dl 45 percent to £20.1 million 
(J25.1 million) from £36.6 million 
in the previous year. 

Extraordinary losses climbed to 
£1763 million from £26.1 million. 

The group said operating profits 
is the year dropped 5 percent to 
£45.3 million from £47.7 million a 
year earlier. 

Progress since the disposal of 
Johnson Matthey Bankers Ltd, to 
the Bank of England last October is 
continuing in the current financial 
year, the company said. 

New financing arrangements 
nil] enable it to progress from a 
secure base. But some problem ar- 
eas remain, particularly in precious 
metal refining and the North 
American jewelry business. 

Further reorganization may be 
necessary, but the board believes 
the group has turned around from 
the past and is well placed to main- 
tain its position in the forefront of 
precious-metals technology. 

The group's present financing re- 
quirements are mainly provided 
under the interim refinancing 
agreement, including an institu- 
tional standby facility of £250 mil- 
lien. 

All drawings from the facility 
were repaid by March 31 and no 
funds have been drawn since then, 
the statement said. 

Discussions with the group's 
bankers are at an advanced stage 
and new medium-term facilities 
wiD soon be in place. The interim 


refinancing agreement is due to ex- 
pire on Juy 30. Substantially re- 
duced facilities will suffice in view 
of the company’s improved posi- 
tion, Johnson Matthey said. 

Net tangible assets at March 31 
were £305 million, excluding £46 
million for the excess of metal 
stocks at market value compared 
with book value. 

Johnson Matthey said agreement 
has been reached in principle, sub- 
ject to the banking talks being fi- 
nalized, for a private placement 
with instituiioiis of £25 minio n of 
floating rate medium-term subor- 
dinated debt with detachable war- 
rants. 

The warrants will be exercisable 
over five years into five million 
Johnson Matthey ordinary shares 
at prices ranging from 1 10 pence to 
120 pence a share. 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — The Singa- 
pore Monitor, Singapore’s only 
afternoon English-language 
newspaper, said Friday it would 
cease publication by July 14 be- 
cause of heavy losses. 

The newspaper's chairman, 
Chua Kim z eow, told staff the 
closure did not stem from last 
year’s merger of major newspa- 
pers in Singapore. 

The Monitor's parent compa- 
ny, the Singapore News and 
Publications Ui, merged with 
the Straits Tunes Group late 
last year in a govemment- 
- backed move. Mr. Yeow said 
the Monitor had exhausted its 
capital of 20 million Singapore 
dollars (S9 million) and owed 
the parent company six million 
dollars. 


Phillips Backs China Project 


United Press Inf emotional 

BARTLESVILLE Oklahoma — 
Phillips Petroleum Corp. said Fri- 
day a subsidiary has signed a letter 
of intent for tire construction of a 
single cell protein plant to produce 
high-quality protein to feed ani- 
mals and people in China. 

Provesta reached tire tentative 
pact with C hina Huanqui Chemical 
Engineering Co., which is part of 
China's ministry for tire chemical 
industry. 

John NoreU, Provesta president, 
said the adviser to tire China Na- 
tional Food Industry Association 
of Beijing “estimates that in the 
next 10 years tire potential for fo- 


Congressman Accuses Hutton 
Of Withholding Documents 


By Nathaniel C Nash 

Nnr York Timer Serrice 

WASHINGTON — The chair- 
man of the House subcommittee 
that is investigating EF. Hutton & 
Co.’s check overdraft scheme has 
accused the New York brokerage 
firm of refusing to comply with tire 
subcommittee’s subpoena of inter- 
nal Hutton documents and of pos- 
sible obstruction of justice. 

Representative William J. 
Hughes, Democrat of New Jersey, 
who is head of the Judidaiy Com- 
mittee's Subcommittee on Crime, 
accused Hutton on Thursday of 
“attempting to frustrate our inves- 
tigation,” first by refusing to ap- 
pear before the subcommittee, then 
by tire “indiscriminate dumping” 
on the subcommittee “of a quarter 
of a million largely irrelevant docu- 
ments." - 

Mr. Hughes's criticism came de- 
spite Hutton's disclosure Wednes- 
day that it had turned over to the 
subcommittee a set of recently dxs- 

COMP ANY NOTES 

BSN of France said its Krone n- 
bourg beer would be made in China 
under a joint venture involving an 
investment of 300 million francs 
($33.5 million). A new brewery is 
expected to be opened in early 

Electronic Data Systems CoqL, a 
subsidiary of General Motors, said 
it expected its earnings for tire sec- 
ond quarter ending June 30 to in- 
crease 10 to 15 percent from the 
first quarter, when profits totaled 
$38 milli on. 

Casdemarne Tooheys Ltd. said 
its shareholders agreed to a share 
swap with Allied- Lyons PLC that 
would give Castlemaine 50 percent 
of Britvic Lid, the British sort- 
drink maker, in return for 6.15 mil- 
lion new Castlemaine shares worth 
.6.10 Australian dollars ($4.20) 
ea ch. 

Matsushita Electric Industrial 
Co. said it would build a micro- 
wave oven assembly plant in Brit- 
ain to meet growing demand there 
and in the rest of Europe. A spokes- 
man said European demand in 
1985 is estimated at two million 
units. 

Merrill Lynch & Co. has set up 
with Cazeuove & Co, a British con- 
cern, a $30-million fund as a vehi- 
cle for non-resident investment in 
stocks listed on the securities ex- 
change in T hailan d. 


covered documents relating to the 
firm's overdraft practices. He said 
Hutton's release of relevant materi- 
al re mains sporadic and incomplete 
and that the subcommittee had yet 
to receive many of the documents it 
had requested. 

“Now the tactic scans to be an 
outward posture of full coopera- 
tion, but performance which comes 
in spits and dribbles which smack 
or obstruction of justice,” Mr. 
Hughes said. 

In a statement, Robert Fomon, 
Hutton's chairman, $aid: “We have 
done everything humanly possible 
to cooperate with tire subcommit- 
tee's investigation. Regrettably, the 
chairman 's statement contains seri- 
ous mischaraaerizalions. We have 
never suppressed a single docu- 
ment We nave never attempted to 
frustrate any investigation, nor did 
we ever refuse to appear voluntari- 
ly. We were negotiating appearance 
dates when we received a subpoc- 

.. *t 

Dl 


Mitsubishi Corp. joined Mitsubi- 
shi Trust & Banking Corp. and a 
group of private investors to set up 
a joint financial services concern in 1 
New York called Specuum Capital 
Ltd, industry sources said . 

Olivetti SpA of Italy said it had | 
signed a distribution agreement 
with Computerland Europe, a sub- 
sidiary of the U.S. computer chain 
store, to market Olivetti’s M-24 
and M-21 personal computers. 

People Express AirBnes Inc. said 
it would raise fares in a number of 
markets starting ScpL 5. The in- 
creases range from SI to S50 but 
the airline said it would keep flights 
to major cities, including London, 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, Den- 
ver and Houston, mostly un- 
changed. 

United Technologies Corp- of 
Hanford, Connecticut, said its net 
income for the second quarter skid- 
ded 68 percent to $54.8 million 
from $169 million in the year-earli- 
er period It said sales fell 10 per- 
cent to $4.08 billion from $4.18 
billion. 

Warner-Lambert Co. said it had 
agreed to a joist venture with the 
State Pharmaceutical Administra- 
tion of China to make up to three 
billion gelatin capsules a year for 
the Chinese market at a $1 4-million 
factory scheduled to open in 1987. 


Earnings 


Revenue and profits. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


Britain 

Britoll 

IN Half 19SS 1984 

Revenue 96X1 645.9 

Pratoc Net— 3667 28X0 

Per Stars D.1019 X1266 

Johnson Matthey 

Year 1984 1983 

Revenue lXW. 1338. 

Pretax Met 20.1 36* 

i Psr Stars MB6 X156 


Shorn 

Ysar 1984 1983 

Revenue—. 1.17 T 1*2 T 


ProljtL. .. 39*60. 3X070. 

Pw Stars _ SS6 St 79 
Y: Milton. 

Tairedo cbem. litf. 

Year 1984 1983 

*svein»_ 541120, 53M30. 

■tailed S4au« 

Allied Bncstirs 
and Guar. 1985 1984 

Nel Inc. 30* 29* 

P*rStaf* X74 0J2 

WHaH 1985 1984 

Net int 61* 57* 

Per Stare 1*0 1*0 

Artier. Hospital Sup. 
MQfer. 1985 1984 

Revenue 8367 8667 

Net int 5W 59* 

Per Stare X7J 0*2 

1st HaH MBS 1984 

Revenue IX6X IJX 

Net int IBM »19* 

Per Star*— C5 UI 

AmsouNi Boeorp. 
mdOwr. 1985 1984 

Net int 10*6 9*3 

Per Stara tj» 0*5 


IN Moll 1985 198* 

N«1 int _L. 2X8 1X37 

Pet-Stare— a® 1*4 
Bk of N England Grp 
2nd Goar. 1985 1984 

Net int — 27X 21* 

Per Stare— L» 1*3 
IN HaH 1915 1JM 

Nfe Int — 561 *7 

Per Share 2.96 2J4 

Bkof New York 
ttdOaar. 19BS 1984 

Ne) Int 3M 763 

Per Stare IJ1 1*7 

tt* HaH 1985 19M 

Net int 64* 52.1 

Per Stare 3*9 2X4 

certalittBBd 

MOnar. WK «« 

Revenue 7JM4 310*S 

Net int — 14*7 169 

Per Stare 0*4 0*5 

1st HaH J9B5 198J 

Revenue 543*6 58X74 

Net <nt 267 25*7 

Per Stare— US 1J0 

cpc in n 

tadOow. 1985 1984 

Revenue — UMA MIX 

Net int <253 5XU 

Per Stare 0*7 1*3 

in HaH 1985 1984 

Revenue— 2*70. 3,172 

Net int- 75*8 15.13 

Per snore— 1*5 L75 

Eastern Airlines 

2nd Osar. 1985 1984 

Revanus— 13ML 1,100. 

NOI Int 25* (0)261 

Per Stare— 0*7 — 

tsr HaH 3985 1984 

Revenue— - 2XHL 2*0& 

Net Int 49* (o)SU 

Per snare— X72 — 

a: less. IfBSauorter and holt 
eet MvOtf reserve of UU 
fruition and S72S million from 
emeforee a n dl tstiorkutPlan. 


2nd Quar. 

ms 

19H 

Net Inc. ' 

1862 

1127 

Pet* Share— 

UI 

871 

HI Halt 

Y9B5 

1984 

Net inc 

2927 

2115 

Per Stare— 

1*2 

1X7 


our protein production in China is 
promising.” 


“ Provesta and Phillips are hop- 
ing to be a major supplier of tech- 
nology to achieve this goal,” he 


said 

The Chinese government plans 
to build a demonstration plan with 
the capacity to produce 10,000 tons 
of single cell protein a year from a 
feedstock of either molasses or 
meihanoL 

Single cell protein roducts are 
made from the cells of microscopic 
yeast organisms grown in continu- 
ous cultures on a variety of feed- 
stocks, such a methanol, alcohol 
and sugar. 


Britoil Reports 
29% Increase in 
Pretax Profits 

Reuters 

LONDON — BritoD PLC said 
Friday its pretax profit rose 29 per- 
cent to £364.7 million (5503 mil- 
lion) in the first half of 1985 from 
£280 milli on in the same period a 
year earlier. 

It said net profit was up 44 per- 
cent in the half, at £91.4 million 
compared to £63.4 million. A 
spokesman said the company 
planned a final dividend of 9 pence. 

Britail said first-half crude oil 
production totaled 32 million bar- 
rels, up from 29 million in 1984. 

Meanwhile, the company an- 
nounced that current shareholders, 
as well as employees, would be giv- 
en special allocations on the basis 
of one share for each five held in 
the government's sale of its 48.8- 
pcrcenl slake in the concern. The 
sale is scheduled for late this 
month. 


EXECUTIVES 

AVAILABLE 

- — M.B.A. - — 

Dynamic professional (42] is 
looking for a new position in 
the field of 

MARKETING 

COMMUNICATIONS 

12 yean of experience m pr ,, mar- 
kefing and advertising (computer & 
machine industry). Languages: Ger- 
man, English & French. Zurich area 
preferred. 

Pleasa write It fc 

Cipher Nr. 1022, 
PFANDLER ANNONCSN AG, 
LuthenhaSa 2, CH-8004 Zurkh. 


Fed. Nat' I Mori, 
tad Quar. 1985 1984 

Net Inc. 11.1 X* 

Per Stare X16 0*4 

1st HaH 1985 1984 

N*t Inc 10)62 169 

Per Short — 026 

o: lass. Full name of campcp 
nr Is Federal national Mart- 
cage Assoc i ation. 

Fire* Atlanta 
tad floor. 1985 1984 

Net me. — 1723 1452 

Per Shore — 0X4 X54 

Id Holt 1985 1984 

Net me «*6 3X57 

Per Stare— 1*7 1*5 

JSVS avorter net Includes ooln 
of fIJ million from safe rd 

sisssar. s» 

haH net bavdos oato of S9 
mutton from sale. 

First Bk Systems 

andQtmr. 1985 1984 

Net Inc 4121 3154 

Per Star* - LC 099 

1st HaH 1985 1984 

Net Inc 7X96 6618 

Per Shore 169 1*5 

t=st Nationwide Fin, 


Genera! Electric 
tad Quar. 1985 1984 
Revenue— j jun, 

Net inc 590* 579* 

Per Shore 1*0 m 

IN HaH 1985 1984 

Revenue— UML U24X 1 

Net inc 1.108 UU8 

Per Snore— 2*2 235 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
12 July 1985 




AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w) AMMI Trutt. «» 

BANK JULIUS BAER k CO. Ltd. 


— (d I ConMr_ 
—in I Equtboe 


SF 942*0 

. SF 1252JM 

— id) Eaulboer America S120UW 

—id I Eautbaer Europe— SF 1213*0 

—Id ) Eaulbaer Pacific SF 120x00 

— Id 1 Gratae SF 105+00 

— (0 I StocVbor SF 1628*0 

BANOUE IN DO SUEZ 

— (d) Aston Grawtti Fund S10X« 

— (hi) Dhivrband, SFB670 

—iwt FIF— America S 1X41 

— <w> FIF— Europe S1258 

— (w) FIF— PocHK S 17*9 

— Id | indrauPE Mutlfoonds A— Hi* 

— (d) indasuezMuitfoondsB 615X59 

— Id ) Indosuez USD (MJM.F) — 610163* 
BRITANNIAJ’OB 271, SL Heder, Janev 
— («) BrHDaHor Incsme— S8BB9* 

— r«) Belli Monos.Curr 6929* 

— (dlBrll.lntLSMamopertt— *1*09 
— (dl Bril. iniUMmaaPorH— 1 1-130 

— (wl Brit. Am. Inc X Fd Ltd *1*72 

— M Brtt-Gdd Fund— 60*44 

— iwl BriUMonmCurrancv. CU.91 

— (d) Brit. Japan Dir Perl. Fd *1*00 

— (w! BrlUerastr Gilt Fund—— t VIA 
— (d i Bril, world Let*. Fund— si.ws 
— (d)Brtt. World Techn. Fund— 68725 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-(w) Capital inn Fund *3847 

— (wXaoltol IttHta 5A : 61697 

CREDIT SUI5SE (ISSUE PRICES) 

— (dl Adlan* S«rts**3— SF 41025 

— (dl Band valor Swf SF 10625 

—(d) Bond VOtor Draark DM 11121 

— (d) Bond Voter USOOLLAR — 612020 

— <d) Bond voter Tot Yen 1093+00 

—(d) Convert valor Swt SF 114*0 

— (dl Convert Voter US-DOLLAR. SI28M 

— (dICOmaeC SF 777*0 

— (d I C5 Foods— Bands SF 7725 

— (d ) CS Fend*— tnt-i SF 115*0 

—(d>CS Money Market Fund— 6107600 
—id i CS Money Mamet Fund DM 1043*0 

—Id I Enerafe— valor SF 154*0 

-Id Unc SF 94800 

— Id) Europo— Valor SF 162*0 

— (dl PacHIc— Voter SF 16125 

1C 


<12323 
* 19*7 

S 1880 
10321 

61228 

(w) Worldwide Securities S/S US— 645*4 
(wl Worldwide Special S/S 2*». *1X3444- 
DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

—HC ) Conccnlra__ DM2827 

— Hd > mn Rentanfond DM 94*3 

Dunn X Horoltt 4 Lloyd Georoa. Brussels 
— (ml D&H CenuBOOlty PooC- 1327.19*— 
—(ml Currency X Gold Pool— 6 1B2X4 — 
— (in) Wtoch. Life FuL Pool— 6 592*1 — 
— (m) Trane world Fut. PooL. 1829.14 — 

FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
I. Laurence Pounfy Win. ECA. OI-azmM) 

— <w) FAC Alton* k: 6 12*2 

— (w) F&C European 112.12 

— (w) F&C Oriental— *34*9 

FIDELITY POB atL Horn II ton Bermuda 
— (m American Va)u«s Common. S9&05 
— In Amor VofoosCunuPral— 1102X2 
—id FldWUvAmer.AeeetB— *72X1 

— Id FMelHv Australia Fund S923 

—Id FKMItv Dhcovarv Fund 61850 

—Id Fidelity Dir. 3vna.Tr— — s 1*482 

—Id Fidelity For Coil Fund 120.14- 

— (d Fldeiltv mn. Fund *4447 

—Id FbMitv Orienr Fund 52623 

Frontier Fund— 613*4 

Pacific Fund S 135X6 

Sod. Growth Fd. 11101 

World Fund — *3608 

FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Apont Dl-639-3013 

—(w) Dollar Income *820 

— («l Fortas Hlah Inc Gilt Fd t*4 

— rw) Gold Income—, 60*6 

— (w) Gold Appreciation *421 

— <m} Strataolc Trad*np_ 11.16 

GEFINOR FUNDS 

— <w) East Investment Fund^— 6333X3 

— (wl Scaltteh wortj Fund — 1 113*9 

— <w) State St American 5170*5 

OcpftTnaLLM LPltAaentXl^mMB 


— +(w) Ltovds Inn Padtic SF 13420 

— 6(«e) LHVds InTL Smatler Cas._ *1678 
NIMARBEN 

—Hd I Class A 892*4 

— (w)CkwB-U*. 6102*5 

— (*») Close C- Japan *101)7 



ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB 15578 TIM Haoue (DTD) 44W70 

— CdiBeverBetong U ioen+4 131 JO 

PARlSBAS— GROUP 

— (d)CerteMintemaNanal— SBXMU 

— (w)OBU-OM — DM 120X77 

— (w)OBLIGESTION SF *415 

— Iw) OBLI-DOLLAR— 61.1*677 

— (w)OBU-YEN T 110X53*0 

— IwlOBLI-GULDEN in. .... FL 1092*4 

—It) ) PAROIL-FUMD 1*4*4 

— Id f p.n.irrcp cnun S 1)3X8 

— (d | PAR US Treasury BomL— » *111*4 

ROYAL B. OF CANADAPOS 346GUERNSEY 

-Hw) RBC Canodton Fund Ltd *11X4* 

-+(w) RBCFar Eost&Pocinc Fd— S 11.14 

■+twl RBC lonCdPttalFX- 122*2 

-Hwj RBC inn Income Fd 1112** 

-HO I RBC Mon.Currencv Fd. 624** 

-+(w) RBC Norm Amtr. Fd 69*8- 

SKANDIFOND INTL FUND, (4++234270) 

— (w)lnc: Bid S5J0 Otter *678 

— (w)Ac&: Bi d * 5 X 1 Offer *5*0 


5VEN5KA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 
17 Devonshire 5«Jjondorrtn-37HMMO 

— (b)SHB Band Fund 61 

— (w» SHB Inti Growth Fund 6: 



UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

— Id ) Amca U*. Sa SF 39*0 

—Id) Bond- Invest SF 6825 

—10 ) Form Swiss Sd-. SF ISU0 

—(d) Japan- invesi SF 189*0 

—(d ) Sant Soutn Air. Sli. SF 455*0 

— (d ) Sima (stock price) SF 21800 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

— Id 1 unlnentQ DM 4640 

—Id I Uniforms DM2560 

—Id | unlrak DM 7925 

— (d)UNIZINS DM 1 1X55 

Other Funds 



DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Franc*: FL — Dutch Ftartn; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs: SF — Swiss Franc*: a — asked: + — Otter Prl ce*:b — bid 
change P/M $10 fo$l per unii ; ha — N ot Awadaoie; NXL — tifotCommyntcoteg.-e— 


price tu on Amsterdam Slack Exehonge 


l 





Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


■-* 


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T 

7%— % 


J»e 

A 

4323b 

2?% a% + % 

AdvCIr 



409 1 TV* 

nr* 

10% 

AOCpI 



1 3V* 

3% 

3 V*— to 




10 V* 

% 

% — 





3% 


AdvS«m 



23911V* 

10% 

11 + to 

AdwTei 



17 tto 

6 

ft 




5ft9 4% 

4% 

4% + V* 

AerSvsi 



73 2% 

JW 

2% + % 




219 

19 

19 




754 17% 

17 

17% + % 


i 


£535 

35 

35 - to 

AirCara 



110 5% 

5 

Sto + % 

AlrMd 

.1U 

.7 

58513% 


13% + % 




141216% 

1 *pu 

14% +1 

AMkBc 



1 5% 

flh 

5% — to 

AKkMI 

J5e 15 

14 14% 

Mb 

14% — V* 


| 


21 ISto 

VS 

ISto ft- to 


140 

4.) 

54 ato 

a 

a — *• 




1818 

18 

18 — V* 




IS 5 

«% 

s + to 


Wfl 

J 

4720% 

20b 

20% + to 



XI 

44 1PV* 

19V, 

l*to — to 



./ 

132 V* 

32% 

32W— Ito 

AiktBn 

06 

37 

1021 23% 

23% 

23% — % 


J8 

M 

1.12 


AlldCao 
AiidRsh 
Allnet 
AllvCar 
AleMIc 
AIpnGo 
Altmcr 
Altos 
Allron 
Amoasl 
Amrtrd 
AWAIrl 
ArnAdv 
ABusc 
ABnhr 
AmCorr 
A Conti 
AmEcol 
AEjcpI 
AFdSL 
AFIelcs 
AFum 
A Greet 
AmlnLt 
AlndF 
Alntoa s 
AmLlst 
Am Lock 
AAWxmi 
AMS 
AMdSv 
AMU I 
ANtHW 
an tins 
APtrvG 
Am P Ion 
AQua&h 
ASecCp 
AmSIls 
ASolor 
ASura 

AWsICp I 

Amrltrs I AO 

Amrwst 

Amnn 

Amijtar 

AmskB IJO 

Amoad s M 

Ana cute .10 

Anioolc 

Analvt 

Anaren 

AndrGr 

Andovr 

Andrew 

Andros 

Anltneds 

Aoeco 

Apoeaa .12 

AooloC 

AppleC 

ApIBIOS 

Ac IdCm 

ApWDt 

AOMMI 

ArobSh 

Arctilvo 

AroaSy 
ArlzB JRK 

Artel 
Ashton 


1.00a AJ 521b 31% 2I% — b 
48 Sb Sto 5% + IN 
31 34 b 3b Jb 
A lib 11 lib 
to » n « tit 
3d 3% 34k 3b 

IBB 7b 3b 7b 
239 10b I Ob 10% + to 

210b 13 10b + b 

MU 3814b 14 16b— b 

I A 2 4b 4b 4b + b 
8981044 10b 10b 
I 42711 944 10b +1 

21 8b 8 B 

JO 3 J 4813*4 13 13 — % 

13912b 12b 12b— ft* 
113 8b 7b 8b + b 
530 30 30 +1 

30 4b 4b 4b— b 
M IS 41 17b 17 17 + b 

j® 2 J 102829b 29b 29b + b 

28 Z2 249 134b lib 13 +1% 

17 752 3544 35b 35% 4- ft* 

XZ 69 1244 12b 12b— to 
5.1 21 22 21b 22 — b 

249 20b 1914 20 

4 9b 9V» 9b 

JJ7e J 1110b 9b 944 

146 8 7b 7b— b 
137181 k I8K 18b 
.16 .» 27 1741 17b 1744 + to 

246ft b S b + V» 

1.16 88 6 24b 23b 24b + 44 

1J8 XI 1 344ft 34b 34b 

190 4b 4b 4b 

5 9b 9b 9b 

34 to b to 

1.02 XA 24428b 274ft 28b + 44 

413 13 13 

85 2b 24* 2b + ft* 

7TO % to 41 + v» 

I 95 7b 7b 7b— b 

X7 166744b 40b 424. +2b 

1921b 21 211ft + b 

125 7*« 4% 7 + to 

630 6b Sb 6 

X8 14226b 26b 26b— b 

X4 16 1614 IA lft46 + 4 k 

2j0 15 5 5 


AaJBCD 

AsCmA 

AsCmB 

AsdHst 

A slroM 

Astrcm 

Astron-J 

Aslrosv 

At cor 

Attwvs 

AtlcoFn 

AtIGsLt 

All Am 

AtlntBC 

AJInFd 

AIIFIn 

AilPrm 

All Res i 

AISOATS 

AudVds 

AtwdOc 

AutTrT 

Autoctv 

AutMed 

AutaSv 

Aulrtrtx 

AtrtoCp 

Ainton 

Avne re 

AimtGr 

Avnlek 

Avatar 

AvtatGo 

AzrcM 

Artefi 


JO 25 


M 2J0 


L52 7J0 
-40b IJ 
.90 X2 


4166 J 


t 

.16 1J 


6271716 12b 124ft 
292 10b 10 10 — 1ft 

142 lSVft 14b 14b + 4ft 
3112b 12 12 — b 

22 7 6b 6b— b 

25420 19b 19b + to 

26 544 5b 5b— to 

356 1144 114, lib 4- to 
263 «> “ft <4— V. 
12510b 9b 10 +■ to 

3053 18b 18 18 

188418 17% 18 

4662544 25b 254ft + W 
2914b 14b 14b + b 

200 4b 4 4b— to 

6472244 22b 22b— W 
I 5b 5b 5b— b 
73 5b 5b 5b + b 
13519b Tffta 19b + b 
24031b 31 31b + b 

14 8 744* 744 

B28104ft 10b 1046- b 
1 31b 31b 31b +1 

sr^s*** 
t 7 , £ % ■ss+a 

23 4 34b 4 + b 

3 7b 9b 9b— b 

104 6b 646 6b— b 
2322b 2144 2144— b 
26 13b 13 13b 

5 OH B4ft 84ft + b 
31636 3444 3544 + 44 

725b 25b 25b + U 
21241b 41 41b + W 

1913b 1244 13ft* + % 
51213b 12b 13 + to 

10 7b 7b 7b — 46 
9932644 2544 2644 4*1 

!23*S !! w* + * 

19214b 14b 1446 
11544 15b 1544 
218 7 6b 7 + to 

41044 1044 1844 
176 4b 4 4b 4- b 
710% 10b 10b 
29 7 6b 64 k 
9 8*6 816 59ft— to 

356 7 6b 644 
l 5b 5b 5b 
3 844 8% B44 + b 
28221b 21b 21b— M 
252 1946 181ft 19b 4- 4ft 
19417b 17b 1744 
18 4b 4b 4b 

27 2b 2 2 


B 


BBDO 

BGS 

BlWCh 

BPlSy 

BRCwn 

BalrdC 

BakrFn 

BaldLy 

Bailees 

BalIBcp 

Bn Penc 

BancPs 

BancokJ 

BcpHw 

Banctec 

BaneH 

Elk Dels 

BKNES 

BkSous 

Bnkosts 

Bklowo 


120 4 A 


IJOOa 27 
JO 12 

.10e A 
ISA AO 
78a 17 
.90 47 
174 38 

JO BA 
170 3J 
1-B0a X5 
At 2 A 
M 47 
. - , -S* X4 

BkMAm IJ0 10J 
Bankvt 

Ban las 
BaranD 
Barlcfca 
Burris 
Barton 
BsTnA 
BasAm 
BsetF 
BavPac 
BayBka 
Bavlv 
BlPines 


1741 7J 
JOa 27 


7249b 49b 49b 
64 914* B4 k 8b 
19 8 8 B 

27 2b 2b 2b + b 
2 9 9 9 

2 7b 7b 7b— b 

1 37% 37b 37b 

2 Aft 66 66 +1 

3 9b 9b 9b + b 

7492744 27 2744 + b 

756b 54b 56b +9b 
35 234 k 2344 234k 
51 19b 19. 19 — b 
1934b 34b 34b— b 
117 9b Bb 9b 
18 9b 9b 9b 
30 31b 30b 31b 4- b 
49051b 51 51 — b 

104 26b 26b 26b + b 
2071544 15 1544 4-1 

1346b 46 47 — % 

310 9b B*ft 9b — b 
78124ft 124ft 1246 — b 
6516 I54h 16 + b 

11 Bb Bb Bb 

238 US. I'm lift + b 
lei 26b 264ft 26b + 16 
70 3b 3b 3b — b 

4 9!6 94ft 9b— b 
18014b 13b 13b 

12 35b 35 35b 

417 Bb 8b Bb 4- b 
18564ft 5644 56b 4- b 
100 7W 7% 7b 
34 8b Bb Bb 


||Go!d Options ipnor. % vum. 

II 


r-*oii 

fra. 

II m 

1BJG2000 





II 3W 

H.2512J5 

207' 72 75 

— . 

II 32) 

4.00 7 50 

tSCAIam 

21 5X230Q 

II XX 

27* 4 3 

10- "51225 

1> 001850 

II VO 

1 » 2J0 

7 50 9.00 

13 50-1500 

II ^ 

0» ISO 

STO 45C 

10 2511 75 

II 2* 


3SO. 5M 

»25 875 


Gcfct lUOCi -31*50 

Vilens White WeU S-A. 

1. CM 0ft Mom- B lanc 
1211 Gtam 1. S«Kmi1u 4 
TeL 310251 • Trie* 28305 


BollW 

BncftCI 

BertMn 

Berkley 

Berkine 

Berk Ho 

BMiCP 

Betz Lb 

Bibbs 

Bi?S 

Bio Bear 

Billinas 

BirtdlYS 

BloRBS 

Blooen 

Blomei 

BlotcR 

Bird Inc 

Blrtfvw 

Blrtdvr 

BtttiGr 

Blcklnd 

BkssiuE 

BlissAT 

Bool Bn 

BobEvn 

BOlTTc 

BooteB 

Boon El 

Boottiin 

Booth Fn 

Bust Be 

BstnDIg 

BstnFC 

B rod RE 

Brody W 

BraeCp 
BmciiC 
Bren co 
BrilLee 
BrwnRb 

BrwTorn 

Brunos 

Birffton 

BulldTr 

Bmhtn 

Bumps 

Burr 1 1 

BMAS 

BusJnld 

ButlrJ 

ButtrMI 


Sales In Mel 

H0S High Low 3P-M.COTW 

■ KB U 33 10 9 b 9b 

33 Bb Sb 8b + b 
Z3Z0b 20V. 20b 
72 1.9 74217b 16 1644 + b 

JO 47 612 17 12 


172 

70 


70 % 

% 

% 

DNAPI 



S3 0% 

Bto 

6% + to 


Tito 

33ft* + to 

DSC 



23*19% 

19 

19H + Vs 


24to 

24 to— to 




I9i nv. 


llto 

5116% 

16V* 

16% 


um 

77 

65 MV* 

13% 



IP6 

17V* + % 




144326% 

25% 

2ft 

22ft 3% 

J% 

Jto— VS 







15513% 

12% 

13% + % 




S55 Ato 

*H 

5b— to 


7 

7% +1 


JO 

IJ 

1 IS 

15 

15 +1 

92 7% 

TVj 

7% 




10 5% 

5% 


£7 19to 

18% 

19V. + % 




23020% 

20% 

20H— to 

17 7 

6% 

6% 




50311% 

llto 


12011 

10% 

10% 

DISwteh 



02 av, 

4% 

4b * Mi 

735 4% 

4to 

4 to— b 




398 21V* 



SO 4 

3% 

3% 

Olasm 



24 4% 

4 

4 

ij Sto 

5to 

Sto + to 




11 5% 

5% 

5to- to 


9to 

9 v.— % 


1 96 

48 

2240% 

40% 

40% +1 

12 4V* 

AVl 

4to 


J»l 

J 

13 17 

17 

17 + to 


I JO 
70 
.16 


10 

8737 


3ft 36U> 


JO U 
Ma 14 


170 

.12 


XMe 

172 


24222b 22b 22b 
33 B 7b 7b + b 
58 5b 5b 5b 
2 5b 5% 5b 
27 4b 4b 4b— b 
818b 17b 17b 
142444 24b 24b + b 
9 6b 5b 5b — b 
55022b 22 22b 4* b 

11713b 13b 13b 4- b 
3184 33b 34 

332 14 lib 13b 
96 38b 37b 38 + '4 

131 4b 4b 4b 4- b 
45312b 1176 12 4- b 

1013b 13b 13b 
259 lb Ih lb 
33015b 15b 13ft 4- W 
227 lift IK. lb— b 
20527b 27b 27b 
25217b 16b 16b— b 
41 8b 7b 8b 4- b 
39 19b 19 19 
6736* 26 26b 4- 16 

1401 9b 8b irtft 4- b 
50 20b 20<6 20b 
4627"4 2716 Z7 1 4 


CCBs 
C COR 
CP Rhb 
CBT B S 
CCXNt 
CML 
CPI 
CPT 
CSP 
Coche 
CACI 

CbrvSc 

Cadmus 
CalAmp 
CalPBk 
CaUky 
CaiMIc 
CalStvo 
Caiwtrs 270 
CailonP 
Calny .16 
Calumt .!« 
CanonG 
Canon I 
CapFSL 
CapTm 
CapCrb 
Card DU 
Cordis 

Carer rC 

Caremk 

Corolla 
Carter! 

Casevss 
Cencars 
CnlrBc 


751 XI 

76 1 3 


I7B 57 
SSe 27 


.10r J 
70 17 
TSe 47 


2933b 33b 33b + b 
143 Bb 8 Bb + Vi 
133 5b 5b 5b 4- b 
1531 29b 29b— b 

1218b 17b 17b — b 
143 1116 11 II — M 
135518b I5V6 18b 
241 6b 6b 6b 
38101* 10 lOUk * b 
58 2b 2b 2b 4- b 
46 4b 4b 4b— b 
38821b 21b 3116 
12096 20b 20b— 1* 
45 2b 2b 2b + 1ft 
518b lBb IBb— to 
137 37 37 « 

75 raj r 

*fb +\ 

1213b 13«6 13b 
4 8 8 8 — 1ft 

230122 21b 21b + to 

66 20*6 20b 20*6 
37211b 11b 11b 4- b 
Sto 5to 
lb lb- 
173 1|U 18 18 4- to 

10 7b 7b 7b— b 
101 4b 416 4b 
162212b 12Vft 12b 
147 2 lb lb . . 

657 15b 15b 15b 4- to 
14617b 17b 17b 
14 9Vft 9to 9b 
33034b 33b 34b +1 


CradTr 

CrmEd 

Cronus 

Crostr 

CnAuis 

CwnBk 

Crump 

CulInFr 

Cutlvm 

Cyc ore 
Cvprtv 
Cyprus 


Sales In net 

180s High Low 3 PM.Ch'94 

i U 62i6b 15b lab — b 
516725b 24b 24b -1 
11 14 'jK I«to 14b— b 




33725% 

24% 

24% — to 



14 4% 

4 

4% 



IBI 111* 

11 

llto- % 


13 

TO 33to 

33 

a 

.94 

4,9 

33019% 

19 


Jft 

23 


Uto Sflft + to 

8820% 

19ft* 

20% + to 

JOe 22 

30 9 

9 




1628141* 

T3to 

I4to * to 


DBA 
DCNVs 
DDI 
OH Tdi 


7217 16 

58 Alto 40 
2S 3to 3b 
12 3b 3b 
15210b 10 


17 + H 

48b 
Jto 

3b 4- to 
10b + to 


109 4b 

24 46b 

25 2b 


1 5% 

93 lb 


Cent cm 



10017% 


171* 

EorlCat 



B0£Uft* 

10V* 

11% + to 

CenBca 

2JKb 33 

152 55% 

fjM 

551* + V 

EotnF 



30 14% 

14 

Uto— to 





| * 

36% 

EcanLb 

1JM 

XI 

1U33U 

»to 

33% + % 


06 

79 

9828% 

281* 

28V*— U 

EdCmp 

,12ft IJ 

14610% 

10 

10% + % 

CJerBc 

130 

66 

132 Uto 

2ft 

24 +B 




81 Uto 

12% 

12% — to 

CnPoSu 

30 

3 A 

35141* 

141* 

14V* -f to 



U 

232415V* 

15% 

15% 

CRsLFi 



T 4712V* 

12% 

12V* 4- U 




4810V* 

10Vk 

lOto 

CWI&Bn 

060 20 

430 

a 

30 — to 

EtbH B 



3 Sto 

Bto 

8% + % 

Cent ran 

JO 

U 

8244 

44 

44 






18 — % 

Centurl 



65 1% 

Ito 

ito 

EldorB 

J» Ml 

24 71 

19% 

21 + to 

Cerdyn 



131ft 

15% 

16 

Ektons- 

.16 

1.1 

21141* 

MV* 

14V* + to 


.12 1J 


ChrtPdl 

Oiorvoz 

ChottlM 

Chottm 

ChkPnt 

ChkTeh 

ChLwn 

Ctnnyn 

iFab 

crake 

rvE 

*7 


.10 1.9 


JO 17 






4J 


78 27 
.100 1J 
174 2J 

J2e J 


r 

176 5J 


174 


270 107 


M» X3 


Qiranr 
hrDws 
hvms 
;HmFs 

LJnTca 
Cipher 

CtzSau 
ClzSGa 
- “id 

HP 

CtzUIA 
ClzUtB 
atyFed 
CtvNCP 
City BCD 
CiorkJ 
OasIcC 
dearth 
CtovtRt 

CIIMme 
Coast F 
Coast R 
Csfllnt 
CslSaw 
CabRsc 
CobeLb 
CocaBtl 
Cosur 
CoDonlc 
Cohmts 
CO Into R 
Calagen 
ColFdl 
Collins 

CalABn ASt> 2J 
CBCBPA A0e X5 
CainGas 1J6 87 
ColLIAc 170 27 
CoIrTle 
ColoNI .74 
ColuFd 
ColSav 
Comori 

Comarc 72 .1 

Contest S .12 A 
Corneal 

Comdta .16 1J 
Comdloi 

Comerc X10 4.9 
Cam BC J0r 2 A 
ComBPf 

CotnBslt 278 X4 
Comar X12 27 


+ to 


5to— to 
44 — b 

22*6 4- 1% 
34b 4- to 

18 

39b 4- b 
35b 4- b 


CmceU 

CmBCoi 

CmdBn 

CmdFd 

ComINt 

CmlShr 


50 8 to 7b Bb 
4 2b 2b 2b 
156711b lib lib 4- b 
8 1 b to 
w 5-4 Sto 516 + to 
IBB 416 6 616 

II lb 1b Ib— to 
49 4b 4b 4b 4- to 
8 8b 8b 8b 
19 Bb Bb 8b 
65621b 20b 21 
9311b 1016 lib 4-lto 
2016 15b 15b + b 

100216ft 21b 21b— b 
1018 18 18 

19b 1916 19b 4- to 

748 23U JS2“ 

171 Sto 4b 4b— to 
10 5b Sto Sb + b 
2320 19b 30 4- to 

57 10b lOto lOto 
1426 2Sto 26 4- b 

4071 13b 13b 131* 

1630 29b 2916 

1042816 » 2Bto + to 
123b 23to 23b— to 
15731b 31b 31b- Mi 
137 9 Sb Bb + to 
27018b 18'A 18b 4- to 
ISO 7 6b tl 
2550 49b 50 

18513b !3to 13b 
. 238b 38*6 38*6 + to 

“ib a 

1944b 44 
61922b 22b 
23834b 3416 
418 18 

4839b 39 

__ _ 1635b 35 

.40 XI 1976 13b 12b 13 — b 
— 37 1127b 2716 2716 

23 73ab 38 38 — to 

3J 7923b 2316 23b + to 
3 6to 6V6 61ft 4- V!i 
llTto 1916 1916 
219b 19b 19b 4- to 
35127 2816 26b 4- to 

229 17b 16b 16b 4- H 
52 6b 6b 6b 4- to 
2 6 6 6 — b 

437 16to 16 16b + to 

14 3 2b 2b + b 
a 19 1BH 18K. 

55 44 to 44 4416— Vft 

761316 12b 12b + to 
221 2to 2M 2b— to 
921 16to 16 16b 4- to 

54 4to 3b 4to 
18213 12b 12b 

56927 » Vl 26b 

68 4b 4b 4to 
191916 19 19 

16817b 16b 17 — to 
301Bto 17b ISto 
1134b 34b 34b— to 
03018b lBto 1816 
X5 327620b 20 'ft 20b 4- b 
147 9b Bb 8b 4- to 
39014b 13b 14b— to 
636 16b 15b 16to 4-1 
31ft 15b 16 4- to 

19820*k Mb 20*6 + to 
a ib 3b 3b 4- a 
293 12la 12 11 — to 

142 216 2b 2b 4- to 
3143 42b 42b— III 

70 ms 18b 19to 4- *6 
1320b a 20b 4- to 
460*6 60*6 iOto + to 
191 77 76 76 —1 

25 42 ft. 42b 42*4 — to 
1513ft. 13ft. 13*6 
4454 52b 54 -Mb 


1J 


2 A 
27 
X7 


RESERVE 

■v INSURED DEPOSITS TRUST 


RESIN DEP 

An Account for the Cautious InvasSor 
to Protect and Increase Capital 


U.S. Daflar Denominated 
Insured by U.S. Gavt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate liquidity 
Absolute Confidentiality 


CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 


RES IN DEP 

Case Past ate 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 


Please send 
account 


and 


Name. 


Address. 


Npd*aU6> m8ni *t USA. 


CptAut 

CmoDt 

CntEnl 

CmptH 

Cmpldn 

CmpLR 

CmplM 

CmpNct 

CmpPd s 

CmpPs 

CmTsk 5 

Cmputn 

Cptdl 

Cmptrc 

Cmsrv« 

Coimhr 

Camstk 

Comte n 

ConcDv 

Concern 

Contfri 

Connwt 

CnCap 

CnCopI 

CCodR 

CCopS 

ConFbr 

CnPoos 

Cons Pd 

ConsllB 

Consul 

ComFn 

Conwts 


170 X4 
148 7S 
X00al27 
170a 87 
1780107 
370 127 


5010 

1622 5b 
1410b 
69 Sto 
34 ftb 

1262 5b 
14 7V< 
19 8M 
21 4to 


128 Sto 
4 Vto 
a 3b 
74 9to 
26 12J4 
79 IH 
712 
» 6b 


148 

78 

IJ2 


75t l.l 
- _ 140 5J 
CtlllBee 274D 5.1 
CIIF5L 
CtIGen 
CtIHIts 

CIHIIC 

ContSII 

Conlln s 78 4 

Cl L ost 
C onvPd 
Canvgl 
convrw 
CeprSlo 
CoorLsr 
Coots s 
Capytftt 
Cordis 
Corp51 

Corvus 
Cosmo 
Caurcrs 
CourDls 
CowsPr 
Covnal 
CrkBrl 


J7c 3J 


104 X3 


108 6b 6to 6b— to 

1347 »b 8 fb + to 

144 3b Sto 3b 4- to 

66 916 9 9H 

726*6 26b 26*4 
147 6b Sto 6b— to 
IQ 10—16 
5b 5b— Vft 
9b lOMi 
B'ft B’ft— to 
6to ftb 

516 5b 4* to 

7to 71ft 

7b 7b— 16 
4 Vft 4Vft 

472171* 16b 1*44— to 
147 sb sb sb— Vi 
316 3*6—16 

8b 8b — V6 
3 Vft 3b 
9 9b + to 
12to ITto— to 
1». lift 
lib 1146— ft. 
ftb 6b 
3 29to 79 29 — A. 

33 30 19b 19b 

203 » 23V. 23b + to 

» 19 18b 18b— b 

1216b 1 4 9j 16b 
19624 23b 23b 4- to 

24 7b 7to 7b 
37249 J6 X7b 49 4-116 

133 4k. 41* 4*W + Vft 

733 33 33 4- to 

st 4b 4b 4b + b 

1 4b 4b 4b 

10 27b 27b 27b 
3A40M J9b 39b 
12Mb Mb 14b— b 
1 13b 13b 13b + b 
H4Uto 14b Mto— to 
89 Sto Sb 5 1 * 

b to— to 
1716 18 + to 
4b 4b— to 
7b 7b— to 
6b 7 + to 

« Ub 15to 15b + to 
685 2b lb 2to— to 

329 5ft. 5 Sb 

524 19b 18b W 
43325V. 22 23b— lb 

77310b 9b 10b 4- to 
04 60b 59b 60 — b 
144 lb lb lb 

340 4b 4 4ft. + to 

825 24b Mb 

41 6to 6 6b + b 

«■: 

2713b 13 13to— to 


108 
lais 
25 4b 
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1425 7ta 


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Dawson 
Donor 
D*b5hs 
DecbO 
Deenm 
DeklbA 
Deltfim 

DrltaOt 
DollNG 
Doltak 
Daltaus 
Dorn ter 
DentMd 
Desgnti 
DrfecEt 
DotrxC 
DoiNitt 
Davry 
Dowry 

DlaoPr 
DtaCrvS 
Dlaunc 
□Ibrels 
Dlcoon 
Dlcmod 
Dig log 
DlgtCm 
Dtonek 
Dkmlc 
DlElLoa 
Dvfooa 
DocuOl 
OlrGnl 

DomB 
Donovn 

DrctiH 

DglLom 
DoyIDB 
Dran tz 
Dreshr s 
Dr mb 5 
Ortwin 
Drtxlr 
DroyGr 
DuckAI J2 
DunkDs J4 
DuoSvb 
D vrakn 
Durum s 1JB 
Durlran J6 
DurFlls 
Dvcom 
DvnRs 
Dvraon 
DvntchC 


17* 97 


ib 

6*6 

7Vj — to 
Sto 

31 Vi— b 
8*6 + to 
9b 4- to 
3b 4- to 


3* XI 


JO 7 
JO 3J 
IJ6 57 
a u 
AO 2J 
78 X4 
JOa 17 


ID t 6 A 
57 Sb SVft 5b 4- Vft 
1.1 6518*6 lBto 18*6 4- ft. 

506 13to 13 13to + to 
10 2b 2b Zb 
X2 127122b 22% 22*6 
17 171BK 17b 18 

57 1U Ito lb 
42 11 to lib llto + to 
50 5*6 5% 5% 

1 1 1 
296 lb Ito 
248 7 6% 

1 70 70 
17 Sto 5 
14 31b 31 

854 8*6 B» 

2 9b 9b 
10 3b 3b 

44 Ub 13% 14b— b 
1828b 27b a — Vft 

2095 3b 3 3 Mi— IV. 

92 23*6 22Vft 23Vft 4-1 
37 llto lib lib 
82 7 6b 7 
110 4to 4 4 — Vft 

1230 27to 26b 27to 4- to 
4033b. 32U. 33ft. -t-lVft 
10 4 3b 3b— to 
191 3b 3b 3to— b 
7iito iito llto— to 
54 5b 5b 5b 
213 3ft Vi a a — b 
1936b a 36b 4- to 
2224b ZJb 24b 4- to 
1617 16b 17 

53 15b 15 15 

311 a 25*6 a 4- to 
612b 12b 12b 
10211b lib llto— to 
31926*6 25 26b +IVft 

148 to to b 
5217 16to lAVft— to 
17118b 18b 18b 
1X7 14b 16b 76b 4- to 
128 24*4 Mb 24Vft + b 
1026b MW 24b + *6 

3 ISto 13b 13b 

340 39b 39b— b 

2610C* 1046 10*6 
1415 14*6 15 + b 

45 lOto 10b lOto * 16 
5 7to 7V4 7V4 

122 Sto 5 5to + to 
305 26 to 25to a + to 


ECI Tel 
EH Int 
ElLinsi 
EIP 

EMC Ira 

EMF 

EMPI 

EZEM 

EaolCct 


1 13b 12b 12b + to 
76 lb Ito lb 
15 6to 5b 5b— to 
57 9 8 9 4-1 

11111b llto 11*6 
33 3 3 3 

35 6V> Sto SVft 
1111*6 lib 11b 
318 ft. b b— ft* 
611 lb lb Ito — 



Sto Sto Sto— to 
197 7to 6b 6b— to 
147 16 Vft 15to 15b— to 
274 16to 16Vl 16b + Ml 
40214b U 14*ft + b 
1716to 16b 16b— b 
I Sto Sto sto 4- to 
97 llto 12 12b— b 

112391* 39 39b 4- b 

E's ns xtt 

87 Bb 8b 8*V 
157 6b 6b *to 4- Mi 
6 4 3b 3b 
58811V* 11 llto 4- 1* 
18314b 14 14 — b 

20 21 21 21 — *6 
58 ISto 17to 17b— to 
12*6 12 12b 4- to 


214 


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216% 

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21 16% 

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232 9% 

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EqlwaB ia 5L6 

EqtOII JO X0 

Erien 75c 19 

ErtaLoc 

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EvnSul 

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80 4b 4 • 4b + to 
24628*6 a at* * to 
17511b 10b 11 — b 
2210b 10b 10b + to 
66314V* 14b 14b— to 
21 5to 4b S 4- to 
8430 »b 29b 4- Vft 
5022b 22b 22b— b 
95 6to 6b 646 
17129b a* 29 
204 101 104 4-3 

a 3b 3b 2% 4- to 
a 17 16b 16*6— b 

238 3to 3b 3b— to 
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95 Bto 
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FMI 

FohWhs 

FolrLn 

FdlrFln 

FamHIs 

FgrodL 

FrmHm 

FormF 

FrmHo 

FrmG 

FatrCo 

FdScrw 

FedGo* 

Fnroflu 
F Drone 
Fldlcrc 
FklFtll 
FtfttiTi 

Figght 

Fllmtec 

Flltrtk 


505 8b 
13 8 
42 6to 


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1J6 26 
J4 27 
AOe 37 


170 

78 


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322 12to llto 12b * b 
564 to Vft to 
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9734 23b 234ft— to 

19161* 16 16b 

21 3b 3b 3b 
30768b 57 60b +1«* 

7 12b 12b 12b + to 
1010V* lOto 101*— b 
103621 » 20b— to 

37 S 4b 5 + to 

15414*6 Mb 14b— b 
11333*6 33Vft 33V*— b 
1916 15 15b— I* 

5551* 55 55 

16Mb a 36 — to 
2321b 21b 21b 
216b 16b 16b 4- b 


F tOn cl 

FtCOnn 

FtCont 

FDotuR 

FEstC* 

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548b 40b 48b + *6 
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91 30*6 a 30 *k +1 
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45 ISM 15 15 






Uto ft- to 

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1727 19 

18% 

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50a LS 



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3427% 


27% + % 






FFQiar 

1-821 

93 

10 2D 

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53 




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Tab 17 

104 25% 

1* , M 

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FIFKal 



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11% 

11% 


17 




FFdtVO 

J8e IJ 

416V* 

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FtFdSC 



20 9% 

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FFAfton 

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13% 




FIFnCO 

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23 

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FtFnMs 



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924 9V* 

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17 

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FKyNI 6 170 33 
FMdB 170 02 
FIMich JAb <0 
FIMMB 1J0 57 
FIMttSv 

F Ml Ga3 76 17 
FNICIns 170 3J 
FNISuP sm 
FNHB 70b 27 
FNttlSL 70 22 
FOh Bn s 
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Flaxstl 

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FfaFdi 

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Flaws 3 

Flurocb 

Fanor 

FUonA 

FUanB 

Far Am 

ForesfO 

FortnF 

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Foster 

FrnkCn 

FrnkEl 

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79 7 

77 7 

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760 7 
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72 27 


31 Ob 22V* Ob 4- *6 
32 16b 15*6 16 4- to 

44 31* 3to 3b — to 
23033b 33b 33b + to 
63301* K 30V* 
6049*6 49 49b 4- to 

61 Mb 14 14 — Vft 

622 21b 2Vb— b 

a 30V* MV* 30b 
9 33 33 O 

0 42b 42 42 — 

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7*20*6 19V* 20*6 4- to 
BIBb 17*6 I Bto 
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117 7to 7b 7» 

11839 38 Vft 38V*— V* 

5925b 25 2SV9— to 

225 IDto 10 10b + to 

43824b 23V* 23b + to 
4025V* MV* 25V* + V* 
6161* 16 161* 

353 13b 13b 13b + to 
4141b 41V* 41V* 
37242*6 41 to 42 + to 

3236b 35b Mb 

»av* a 2BV2— Vi 
256 6to 4M M — b 
217 5*6 5Vh 5b + Vft 
44 13V* 13 13 

18 3V* 3b 3b— V* 
3 4b 4b 4b— b 
1291* »VS 29VS +1V* 
16920V* Mb 20*6— to 
ISM 17b 17 17 — to 

19541*6 41b 414ft + to 
58219 IBVft 1 8*6— to 
204 iSto ISto ISto— to 
197 4*k 4to 4to — to 
79 17b 17 17V* — Vft 

652 IB 17to 17*6— b 
6034b 33b 36b + I* 
23 171* 17 17b + Vft 

30029*. 19*i 19*- to 
74 2 1*8 2 + to 

I486 10 9V* ID + V* 

137 SVft 4b 4*ft + to 
4 14 13b 14 

74 15*6 15b 15*. + b 
6335V* 34 351* +1 

1 10V* 101* 10V* 
6910b 9b fb— to 

23526*6 26*6 264ft— Vft 
373 8*6 Bb Bb— to 
8516 15*6 16 + b 


GKSvs 

GTS 

Galileo 

GaiohA 

Gotaob 

GamaB 

Go mill g 


413 13 13 — b 

2DB SVft 41* 4to— to 
94 lib 101* 11b + *. 
541b 41b 41b 
700 13V* H 13b +lb 
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57 5*6 » ” 


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711 

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72 7% 

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Genets 



426 7% 

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3 6 

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MTS 5 

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319 17% 

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131 Uto 

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GacHrys 

52 

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4817 

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1001 High LAW 3PM,OfO<e 


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98 WA 

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7616% 

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IJOa 4.4 

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36 

415 

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17613*4 

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100 

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130 9to 

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51 5% 

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119240% 

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49 m* 

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17 3% 

3% 

3% * <6 

MarlnT 



1 6% 

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240 1X1 

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23 

23 




357 6% 

6% 

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15110% 

10'* 

101* + * 



521% 

21% 

21% 




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J6C IJ 

182 21 ft j 

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70ft 89 

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31 7% 

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Morshll 

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105 2 

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Mr 27 

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710% 

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691 47^, 

41% 

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JOe 77 

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Msec In 



48 Sto 

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197 Uto 

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51 6to 

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178 6% 

6% 

4% 




113% 

13% 

13% 

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3? Jto 

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90 8 

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24 5% 

5% 

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Mawtra 



3*19 2<H 

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44 5b 

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14212% 12% 

12% 

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28 14 to 

13% 

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2317 

161* 

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122 9% 

9 

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MOVPt 



331 Sft* 

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JO 

IJ 

37 1736 

17b 

17% — to 

GuorNt 



71 5% 

5% 

5% + to 

MavSuA 

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2624% 

S4S* 

34% + * 




10615% 

Uto 

14ft* — ft* 


74 

23 

517 

Uto 

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MavnCH 



10 4ft* 

4% 


OttrTP 

176 

BJ 

7134% 

33% 

34% + % 




50 Mb 

14V* 


McCrm 

JS 

23 

173 35 

34% 







llto + % 




94 16% 

165* 

Uto- to 

Me Farl 



1311V* 

10% 

10% — % 





23% 

23% — fti 

GlfBdc 



224 UH 

1S% 

15% 

McGill 

1J0 

6A 

2031% 

31% 

lift* +1 




454 

% 

■»- 




1 1% 

1% 


McGriti 



22 8ft* 

evs 

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JM 

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6415 

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915 

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828% 

28 

28 — to 

PACE 



1351 15V* 

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«« 

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JS 



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17 4to 

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205 5% 

5% 

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.12 

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J0 

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218* 

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31 7V. 

7b 

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348131% 


31V* 4- to 

r 

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24 

1 5 

5 

5 

MedctSt 



61 10U 

mv. 

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PTCotn 

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J 

380 12% 

12% 

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13810V* 

10% 

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1225% 

26% 

29% 


1JDO 23 

444 

SB 

44 

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50614% 

14 

14% 

Media 



45 5 

4% 

4% 

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385 U 

13% 

13% 

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34 



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24 —1 





31 

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29 30 

19% 

20 tto 




252191* 

18% 

19V* + 'ft 





4% 

4b— b 




21 Mb 

14ft* 

14% 




22 4V. 

3% 

4V* 

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74013 

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PockSr 

1 


9 8% 

8% 

8% 

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174 2% 

2% 

2% + W 

MentrG 



101820% 

20% 

20% + to 

Poewsi 

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6 

34 20 

19*-% 

20 +9: 

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4 % 

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MercBc 

1.92 

4.9 

6339% 

38% 

38% 




8014% 

Uto 

14% — b 

Halifax 

sm 

4 

jLsfr 

5 

5 

M6«Bk 

IJ8 

17 

*4 £1 Vi 

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61% +lb 




39 1% 

1^ 

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4U 2b 

Jto 

2% . 




3 6% 

6% 

6% 





3b 

TV. + to 

HcmOII 

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7116V* 

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1JD 

33 

20 Sto 

S2to 

S2V*— to 

PancMn 

.13 

17 

67B Sb 


BVb 




S3 Uto 

131* 

14ft* 

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4102 

01 

01 -1 




494 23 

22% 

23 + % 


5ft 

1? 

545% 

41% 

45% 

AArehNs 



13045 

43to 

45 +2 

ParPhs 



100923 

22 

23 + % 


34 

U 

2919 

18% 

19 

MrdBcs 



7536 

35% 

35%— % 

PorTeh 



171 17% 

17 

17% t % 

HrttNt 

170 

A9 

57132% 

32V* 

32% 

MrtfBpI 

250 

65 

4 36b 

36b 





616% 

15% 

15% — to 

HrtfSIS 

170 

37 

4947 

46% 

47 +91 

MertB 3 

36 

4.1 

3318% 

10b 

18% + to 

Park Oh 

70 

47 

4513% 

13ft* 

13% 




3320V* 

211 

20Vi- to 

Morimc 



9 Ml* 

MB 

141* 




S21to 21V* 

21 to 

Haihwi 



163 9% 

9% 

9V* ft- % 

MervG 



13119 






1 12 

12 

12 —lb 

Haut*r 

70C 13 

415V* 

14% 

14% — % 

MrvLds 

f 


3311V* 




JSe 

3 

18 1A 

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Hcrvrty 

32 

27 

1521 to 

21 to 

211* 

MesbAv 



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PatnlM 



336 7to 

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HawkB 

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JO 

X3 

11 15 






9 4 

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4 

HlthCSs 



3813 

13% 

12% — ftt 

MelAIrs 



43817 

16to 

16% + ft* 




U 10% 

10% 

ink— to 




4 10 

9% 

9%— to 


70b 35 

1115V* 

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UK) 

23 

3137 

36 

36b— b 




95 3 


2ft*— to 




139 19V* 

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19% 




27 46 

45 

« +1 




162 3 


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MfehStr 



192 5% 

5V* 

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t 


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9b 

10% + to 


.16 

9 

64 19% 

18% 

18% 

MtctiNti 

■lOe 

J 

1492 29 to 

2Bto 


Paid PI 



18413% 

12% 

13b + b 


JH 

A 

2219% 

I» 

19% 

Miami 



876 19% 




Jua 

17 

1125% 

25% 


H elite 



1 Bi* 

8V* 

SVft— % 

MicrD 



36 3% 




J0 

2J 

517% 






161 41* 

3% 

4% + to 

AftlerMk 



52 7% 






28* Uto 

H-t ■ 





12927 

26 b 

26% — to 


J6 

IJ 

20 6% 

6 





221b 






25 3% 

3to 

3ft*— 46 

MterTc 



1402 9b 

9% 





29217- 

fcv'i 1 



.92 

27 

3 35% 


35 




279 7 

6% 

7 + b 




22024% 

24b 

24b— % 

Her It Fd 



100030 

20 

20 + !* 




226 2ft* 

2 

2 — to 

PeaGW 

J6 

3 

129 0% 

■to 

8% + to 




405 6% 

5% 

6% + % 




79 3% 

3U 



1700 37 

346% 

46V* 




1124 


24 + to 


* 



5b 

5% 



3J 

27 60ft* 

60V, 

40V* + V* 

HiahtSu 



77720% 

19% 

199k— % 

NUcrFit 



126 5% 

4% 

5b + % 


X20 

67 

29034% 

34b 

34% + % 




311 3% 

Sto 

3% + to 


36 

22 

23 25ft* 

35 

25V* + % 


78 

2J 

15730b 

30 





1185 4% 

3% 

4% + % 

MdANII 

lJOe 63 

1725 

25 

25 +1 




11 9% 

9% 



JS 

30 

1129 

29 

29 




169 3to 

3b 

3% ft- b 




307310V* 

10 


HmFAtl 

t 


21* 

14 

14 

MdStFd 

AO 

IJ 

1322V* 

222* 

22b— b 

PeoE Pt 

274 1X5 

1519 V* 

19 


HmFFI 



15015% 

15 

15 — to 


130 

65 

14 22V* 

22b 


PeoE pJBXSO 

K3 

530 



HmFRk 

_50r 39 

512% 

12% 

12% 


1.12 

25 

218 39% 

38% 

39% + b 

PeoBnC 

IJO 

27 

1541b 


41b „ 

HmFAz 



67522V* 

Tito 

22 + to 





6b 

6% + to 




119 ** 

to 


Hmecfl 



22 7% 

71* 

7V»— V* 





16 - 

17 +1 




275 8% 



HmoSL 



5533% 

30% 

33to +2% 





361* 

37% + to 




5722b 

22 

22b + to 

Han Ind 

36 

73 

16322V* *21% 

22ft* + ft* 

Milltem 



97 5% 

4ft* 

5% + % 

PersCpi 



90 8b 

7% 

8b + b 


130 

43 

6/927 

26% 

am + % 





40% 

40% ft- H 




85 3K 

3b 


HrznAfr 



103 6% 

6% 

*%— % 




1217 

16b 

Uto — b 

PETCO 



7 Jto 

2V* 

2b 

Horxlnd 



17 3% 

3% 

3to ft- to 




1Z73 2% 

2b 


Petrlte 

1.12 

X9 

2829 

2BV* 


HwBNJ 



3623% 

23to 

23% — to 

Minefn* 



1328 9% 

9b 


Petmin 



83 no 

2to 

2% + to 


KwrdB 

HungTg 

HuntJB 

Hntoln 

HuntaB 

Hurco 

Hybrltc 

Hyde At 

Hyponx 


31ZPVK 23b 23*6 
25 41ft 4*6 4b + to 

7a a a +i 

5712V* llto 12V* + to 

32249*6 47V* 49V* -Mb 
a 4V* 4b 4 Vft 
44925b 25 25b 

IB 5*. Sto 5*6— Vft 

7710 9to 10 + to 


IBI 
115 
IMS! 
IPL Sy 
ISC 

IVB Fn 
l col 


172 

JIM 


170 XI 


JBe l.l 
.16 A 


imtmwt 
imuiMx 
im uno 
Imogen 
Inocmp 
IndBcp 
IndHkJe 
IndnaF 
IndIN 
IndINpf 
IdnIWat X66 87 
indnHB 170 X9 
InAcous JSe 4J 
IndEi 
InerlDs 

IrUolfiH jo IJ 
InfoSc 
IWoRsc 
Inttm 
InmedC 
IraltuB 
lnattr 
Inlrm wt 
IrntMtw 
Intech t 

■mean 


573 6 

id 5b 
27 4b 
a 2b 
13 5b 


intgDv 
intuGon 
ISSCO 
InlwFn 
Intel 
InhH wt 
Inlelll 
Irtft Sy 
IntrTel . 

Intmd 

Intdynh 

IntrlFIr 

Irtfrfoc 

IDMll 


.16 IJ 
UEH117 


I ntme c 

Intrmet 

inBWsh 

! 

mtcim 
I Game 
Int Kina 
IntLse 
InMobll 
IntRcsh 
IRIS 


1 2« 2*6 2*4 + to 

5 41* 4Vft 41* 

45228b 2B'A 3B*k + b 
132 2b 2b 2te + *6 
71612b 12 12Vft — Vft 

3440V* 40 40 — V* 

~~ 5b 6 
ZV* 24ft 
to to— b 
5*6 5*6 + to 

4to 4 to— Hi 
2to 26ft 
, . _ lift 3lk 
6341 to 41to 41*6 + to 
1113b 13b 13b 
TO 4Tft 4;® 45s 
34S6ft 45b 4Sto + b 

6 34V* 341* 341* -f b 
631*6 31*6 31to 

6 34 32b 34 +lb 

10 6 5b 6 
59 JV* 3*6 3to— to 
6 4V* 4V* 4 V*— *ft 

a 16 15*6 15to— b 

20 1*6 lb Ito— Vft 
637271* 27 27V* + to 

204 16V* 18b lBto 

9B12V* 12b 12b— 1* 
W’L. lov* mv* 

347 7% 7% 7b 
22 Sto 3b 3b 
7727 25b a — <* 

4 4b 4to 4b + to 
535 4b 41* 4b 

8011b 11 11 — u 

45 3to 3*K 3b— b 

517%* 17V* 17V*— to 
13S 76fc 7V* 79ft + W 
397736b ab 26b + to 
213 5*6 Sb Sto + to 
4012b 121* 121* + Vft 
877 5b 46b Sto + to 
29 lb Ito HU— Vft 
4812 llto 111*— to 
251 7%ft 6b 7Vft + b 
10613b 13b 13*6 + to 

nSj'JS&.y, 

336 *4 V* 16*6 MV* 

33 0b 0 
1 12 12 
11012 11 
160 46| 4b 
^«ft15to 


36 S3 


Ob + 

R*=* 

isto + to 
_ 9b— b 
249 18V* 17b 18V* + to 
91 189k 18*6 189ft— to 
119 71* 7*6 7V* 

29 7b 6b 6*6— to 
579 1 to 9.- 5ft 


tntaup 



1622b 

Zto 

22to— b 

1TCP1 



143023b 

22b 

23 + to 

InITotnl 



71 8b 

■ 

Bb 




37 3b 

2% 

ftP* — to 




2610b 

10% 

10b 


ji* 





tnvstSL 

Me 

J 

205 7b 

/to 

7% + to 



7J 

150710% 

lOto 

10b 

lr, . 1 

3L6D 

7850 

48b 

SO +11* 





lOto 

lOto— b 




1503 7% 

/to 

7%— to 




300 4% 

4VS 

4V* — to 




8636b 

36% 

36b 


JBRSts .16 l.l 
JPInd 
Jackpot 

JockLfc 

Joctan 
JamWtr 
jeffrGp 

JeffBWl 170 37 
JefSmrt too 27 


70 17 


4714b 14b 14b 
88 19V* if 19V* + b 
182 61ft 6V* 6V* — b 

71 Mb a 39b +1 
428H 38V* 28to— V* 
411 19V* 17b 19V* +2b 
531 17b 16b 17b + b 
2044b 44V* 44b— b 


Final co 

JO 

50 

17 4b 

4 

4 

JefMort 



89 5b 



Ftnymx 

Fbitaan 



117 7b 

7 

7to— to 

J erica 

.12 

A 

31721 





8 12V* 

11% 

12b 

JhranE 



16 6b 



FAIaBk 

1.12 


4132% 

32b 

32b 

JoncVs 

•10e 23 

4 4% 

4b 


FstAms 

1J0 

33 

13937b 

37 

37 —to 

JonlcM 

l 


104 7% 

6% 


FABPB A JO 

Zl 

180 9% 

9b 

•% + to 

Jonei A 

1 


231 6% 

6b 


FtAFed 



1916b 

16b 

16b + to 

Jasehsn 



233 8% 



FtAFln 

Jl 

XS 

1329b 

29 

29b— to 

Juaya 

.12 

20 

1 6 



FtATn 

IJ8 

37 

20235% 

35 

35% + to 

Juno 5 



1617b 



FtBnOti 

180 

4J 

2159 

58 

58 

Justin 

AO 

XI 

3019b 


I9ftsi 












FComB 


42 

5 5b 
528% 

5b 

28V* 

5b + b 
28% — b 

1 ^ 1 


KLA I 
KTron 
KVPlir 
Komon 76 
Komnst 
Karchr 
Rosier jot 
K ovdon 
Koynro 
K«>ne J0 
Kellys A 74 
Kemp 170 
Kencop 
Kenotn 
KyCnU 70 
Kevex 
Keviin 

KewnSs 74 
KoyTm 
KeysFn 170 
Klmtmt 74 
Klmbrk 
Kinder b 76 
KngWId 
Kiosvd 
Krov 76 
Kruger J2 

Kukke .16 
KuStEI 


a 18 18 18 

21 49* 4b 4V* 

5 6b 6b 6b 

239Mb 31 32b +lb 

3 2b 2b 2b 
Ml 164ft 15b 16V* + b 
5615b 154ft ISto— b 
308 95* * 9 

211 2b ZVft 2b + to 
218b IBb 18b 
2246 44V* 46 — b 

59960V* 60b 60V* + 68 
61 Sto 3b 3b — b 

6 9b 9b 9b 

2040 39b 39b— b 

73 7 6b 6*6— to 

9 Sto 5b Sto 

213b 13b 13b 
133 7b 7to 7b 

17 24 23 23 — 

2531b Mb 31*6 

22 34* IV* 34ft— to 
266am 20b 20to + Vft 

7641b 40b 40b— 1 
ID S 5 5 

44 6b 614 6V* 

561 14to 14 14 

472 15*4 15V* ISto 
164 7b 7 7b + b 


LCS s 14 81* Bb 8b + to 

LDBmk 72 61* 6b 6to + to 

LJN 27 14 Vft | 4 14 — Vft 

LSI LIS 151 21 to 21 Vft 21to + b 

LSI Log 11314V* |4 14 — V* 

LTX 15912%* 12b 12V* 

La Petes 9115V* Uto 14b— b 

LaZBy L40 37 36647b 46b 47Vb + M 

Locust 35c 1A 4 1BV* 18V* 18V*— I* 

LodFm ,12a 7 8419%ft 19 19%ft—%* 

Lakdlw JO 1.1 1033 18b 1714 IB + b 

LdITBs .10 17 56711b llto Ub 


LomRs 



tins 9 

Bto 

8%— to 

LamaT 

JO 

SJ 

3515 

Mb 

15 + b 

Loncasi 

78 

4J 

IM 15b 

15 

IS — % 

Lances 

97 

Zl 

8739% 

29 

29% + % 

LdLnSL 

39 

29 

13911b 

11 

11 

LndBF 

JO 

10 

169120% 

20ft* 

20b + V* 

LdmkS 



21618% 

18% 

18% — V* 

LsneCd 

92 

13 

33553% 

S3 

sa% + % 

Lonely 

JSe 12 

S3 7% 

7% 

7% 

Larsens 



2920 

19b 

20 tto 

Lawsns 

38 

9 

24 30b 

Mb 

30% + V* 

LeeOlu 



436 6V. 

6b 

6b— to 

Lctnor 



2010b 

9% 

10% + to 

Lesca 

Jle 

11 16 

16 

16 

LOwtlP 

J8& X3 

13 8b 

8b 

Bb + % 

Lexicon 



1273 3% 

3% 

3*- Ji. 

Lexldta 



175 2ft* 

2% 

2%— ft* 

LbtFGa 



220 

31) 

20 

LbtyH A 



21611b 

11 

11 — % 


LbtyHB 

LIDUBs 

Urtrs 

Uettrt 

Lllnvs 

LfeCam 

Ullv A 3 

LlIVTuI 

UnBrd 

LineTel 

UnerCa 

Us Box 

LlqdAIr 

UttiAiT 

UzCtaB 

Loco IF 

LondnH 

LaneShr 

LanoF 

LOTUS 

LaBrttfi 

Lvnden 

Lyahas 


J» 27 
JO IJ 

2J0 XI 

.72 IJ 
170 77 
.70 27 
JS 7 
.156 9 


70 37 


110b 10b 10b 
435%* 35V* 351* + V* 
239174ft Veto 17b t b 

1521 20V* 201*- 1* 

4245b 451* 451* 
16,3V* 5to 54S 
II 15b 15 15 — b 

73520b Mb 20b + to 
32»30to 29V* 30b + to 
5336b 351* a + If. 
3 4to 4to 44ft— Ift 
356 56 56 — 1 

18022* 22 22b 

14a 25 3Sb + to 

96746b 45b 46V* +1 
8017b 17b 17b— to 
6 7b 7b 7b— to 
1012 71ft 74ft Tto— to 
0224M 23b 24b + V* 
1427271* 26V* 27 
K 17 16b 16to — to 

12Sb 25b 25b— b 
814 Ml* 23 24 +1 


71c .1 


Minster 
MGosk 
MobICA 
MoblCB 
MobGes 170 7J 
MOCON 72e J 
Modlnes 76 37 
Molectr 
Molex 73 
Moncor 

MonfO JM 17 

Manltr 

MonlLb 

ManAnt 

Monodt 

Mom/C 1J0 4J 
MoareF uau 45 
Mar Flo 7i 
MorKg .16 IJ 
MCSB 

Mamin 78 2J 
Masalev 

Maslnee 36 27 
MotC lb JO 17 
MultDkS 74 XI 
Mullmd 76 
Mylar s .10 


118231* 23 Vi 23b— to 
35 9» 9 9Vft 

5810b 10b 10b 
15511 urn 10b— to 
713b 13b 13b 
17x7to 7M 7Vft— V. 
157 IflVft 17b IBVft + to 
17 6V* Bto 6V* 
1632b 32 M 
196 lb lift Ito 
35191* 19 19 — to 

15 8 7V* 7to 

30 3V* Jto 3V4 
120 9V5 9b 91* 
960131* 13 13 

130%* 30to 30M + to 
27 ab 964ft 26H 
1419 1B1b 19 
9413b 13to 131* 
3731b 31to 31b + to 
58421V* 21 to 21b + to 
219 Aft 41* 4 Vft— to 

3714 OH U + to 

1514b 13b 14b + b 

37»v* a sab + to 

1.1 294762H 60b 61b +14ft 

7 116225V* 25to 25V* + to 


N 


NBSC 

NCACp 

NEC 

NMS 

NOPCOl 

NOPCOS 

NashFn 

NatftF 

NBnTex 

NlCaPlt 

NCtyBn 

NtICty 

NlOypf 

NCBcs 

NCmNJ 

NtCPtrt 

NData 

NHards 

MHItCs 

NIHMO 

NtLumb 

WMlcm 

NttPxa 

NtProp 

NtWnLt 

NtnwdP 

NotrBtv 

Mauple 

NelsnT 

Nalson 

NwkSec 

NtmtcSs 

Niwtcei 

n^nbI 

H" 

N! 

Nv 
NHmpS 
NJNatl 
NYAIfl 
NwClry 
NwWBk 
Nawpt 
NewpEt 
NwpPh 
NiCalg 
NlekOG 
Nlco 
Nilce B 
Nodwav 
Noland 
Nordstr 
NrskBs 
Norstan 
tfaANat 
NAlllrt 
NCar&i 
NoFrkS 
NttVHIII 
NWsfTl 
Nest Be 
NestSv 
NoAIr 
Nlhvws 
NwNG 
NwtFns 
NwNLs 
N WHIPS 
Narwse 
Novmtx 
Navar 
Novell 
NovaCp 
Noxeil 
NucMet 
-NudPti 
NOClSpt 
Numrax 
Numeric 
NutrIF 
NuMeds 


76 37 
,13r 7 
.101 

170 } XS 

74 37 
J0« 87 
1701 87 
2JM 47 
370 77 

270 37 
JO 17 
74 3J 


JO 29 


72 L9 


70 27 
1.12b 39 


1.10 65 
76 J 


70 37 
t 

76 27 
74 9 


174 77 
170 37 


174 7J 
78 12 

70 27 
X1B 07 
. J4 27 

71 


.12 7 

78 37 


44ft 

w 

n 

4ta 


2201 * 201 * 
3 514 5 
319H 19to 
122 51* 5H 
32 15b Uto 
291416 M 
177V 28b 

14 34ft 3to 
33724b Mb 

5 3b ' 3b 
8164ft 16H 
1176494k 49U 
18749b 491* 
1429 20b 

171V* 711* 
388201* 19b 
343 13b 13 
54 7b 7V. 
15718b 17 

15 6 6 

71 6 Sto 

704 31* 2b 
1113b 13 
11 8b 8b 
57 Vito Mb 
636 5b 5 
15 3%ft 3Vft 

162 4H 
14 7 

1» 7b 
132 SM 
205522b 

23 41* 

21 351* 34 Vi 

1 Sto Sto 
514 114* |1 

wav. 27i* 

a* _v* 

JVOTft 29V* 
53 28V* 2Bto 
132 6b 6to 
39 17V* 17 
9214!* 14b 
486 25b 24 
9 3<* 3b 
102711V* 104ft 

n» »> 

31 H to 
61217b 16V* 
1448 Mb llto 
43 8to Bto 
6124b 24to 
51448b 471* 
16040b 4016 

5 7b 7b 
28011b llto 

163 81* 7b 

2024 23V* 

ra* 

a i9b ipb 
457b 57 
99415b 14b 
68 44ft 41* 

6 13V* 131* 

85 » 191ft 

11831b 30H 
34330b 29to 
95 24 to 241* 

2 -Sto Sto 
6 4b 4b 
1319%* 19b 

.52 8V* SVft 
41 3 2b 
72 17 33450b 49b 
313b. 13b 

ai 6b 6b 

510to 171* 

24 -7V* 71* 
24729b 28b 

SB 94ft 9Vk 
47713b 12b 


201* + to 
5b + Vft 
19b 
Sto + to 
15to + to 
14b 
28b— to 
JV* — to 
24b + to 
3b 
164ft + to 
49b + b 
49%*— b 
2!b + to 
71to 
20 Vft + to 
T3to + to 
7b 

18b +ib 
6 — b 

6 + b 
Sto + to 

12b + to 
8b 
14V* 

5%fe 
Sto 
4b + to 

7 
7b 
8b— to 

22to+l 
4V* + to 
34to— 1* 
Sto— H 
llto 

“to- to 
2?to 
28b— to 
6b + to 
17 — to 

mv* 

25V. + b 
3V. 
104ft— b 
Zb + to 

b + ift 
it + v* 
11b + to 
8b— b 
241* + to 
.471*— 1* 
40 V. — to 
7to— VS 
Ub + to 
> +to 
23%*— 1* 

ra? 

19b— ib 
57b + b 
Mb— U 
4b 
13V* 

19b 
3ito + to 

ato + b 

24b + to 
Sto 
6b 

19V* + to 
Bto + to 
3 + to 

50b +1 
13b— to 
6to— b 
18b 

71*— to 
29to + b 
9to— b 
13to + to 


OCGTe 

ORS 

OakHIII 

Oceoner 

ocinas 

OtfsLog 

OuTlGc 178 


129 lb IV* Ito— to 

158 4to 4 . 4b + to 

120 3!* 3b 3ra + ra 

194 2to 2%ft 2%ft 

79 17b 17 17b + to 

57 lb II* lb 

21945b 44b 45 + to 


Ptirmct 
Phrmcia 
Pnrmkt 
pttrm wt 
PSFS 
PhllGI 
PhnxAm 
PtWlAG 
PhotoC s 
Ptivsln 
Plcsov 
PicCatc 
PlonFdl 
PlonGp 
PlonHl 
PlonSB 
PlonSts 
PlantrC 
PlzCBc 
Plenum 
PoFolk 
PIcvJMb 
P oneeF 
PodBth 
Porex 
Powell 
Powrtcs 
PwCotw 
Pratts 
PrecCit 
PWRsk 
PrpdLp ' 
PrwLf s 
PrstnCp 
Preway 
Priam 
PricCms 
PrtceCa 
PrkwD 

Prtronx 

Prodlev 
Prollnv 
Profits A0 
PraaSys 
Proves 
Progrp 
Prpinv 
PrppITr 1J0 
- 

Pravln 
PrvLIS J76 

KSSS 

PbSNC 
PgSdBc 
PulasF 
Pullirm 
Puimwt 
PurtBn 


435 7b 7b 7Vj— to 
2169 18H ISto 18b + H 
SM 2to 2H 2b + to 
5 lb lb ib 
123912b Ub 12 
JOe 3J 405715*5 15V. 15*k + to 
70 2b 2b 2b + to 
loe 4b 4to 4b + to 
17 7-7 — to 

a 4b 4to 4to 
39525b 251ft 25b 
3422b 22to 22V*— to 
IB 18b IBM 18b + to 
Z120V* 20 20V* 

986 35b 35 351* + W 

1517 7H 7to 7b 
141 8b 8 8 V. + to 

131V* 3lto 3IW 
43 6U 6to 6 1 - — Vft 
14542b AOVt 42 + Vft 

17313b 12b 12b— to 

»19ZI 19b Mb + to 

B110U 10 lOto 

21 3b 3V* 3%*— to 


77e A 


TSe A 


761 

70 27 
TSe 24 
JO 17 
72 27 

.12 IJ 
74 20 
-I Or 17 
96 23 


JS r X4 


.16 27 


170 7.9 

a 


Man 26b an + to 
195 3 ZVft z%ft — h 
168111* llto liu 
162 9b 9V* 9b 
iv Zto 2 2to — to 
45437b 36b 36b— Vs 
823Dto 30V* 30b 
170 tfb 6 6to + b 
3aajb a 20 - b 

11416% 16 16% 

82 5 4b 5 
312 3b JV* 3b 
112 lib lib lib 
64763b *1% « « 

9b— to 

5b Sb + to 

as sa— w 

40 40b + Vft 

Si 

M13V* ISto 131* + to 
14121% 21 Zl 
3 lb lb IH + to 
1 17b 17b 17b 


288 Ito Ito Ito 


Sotesla Net 

108s High Lew 3P76 Ch*go 


Rival 

RaadSy 

RoDMtt 

Rtftnn 

RabNug 

Rabvsn 

RckwH 

Buund 

RkMtG 

Pda (A 

RoseSB 

Rosptdi 

Rouses 

RoweFr 

RovPIm 

POYlBS 

RovlAir 

Rulelnd 

RuslPel 

RvanFs 


70 

LCD 


.161 

78 SO 

36a u 
70 U 
74 23 
.120 }A 


US IS U'm 15 
B7$a 29A 79U + to 

22 13 13 IJ 

79 6M 6'ft 6to— 

19 13 12b 17b — to 

iBJIZb TTH V2H-M 
a a % Bto a 1 *— ** 

U B'ft 9b 8H 

II llto lib lib 
a j*. 7-., r* + b 
0022% 51% l Jib— 
a 17% 17V. 1 Tto 
64M'* 24 to ift 'ft 
2? Bto B%a B*V — 'i 
lib mi-u 
4H 4 r « — ‘.ft 
9% 9H + 

. . 5 'ft 5H + to 

4 16 to 16H lfcto 9 to 
8016b 16'.* 16'- >- to 


411. 
MS S 
156 Wl 

311 Sb 


SAY Ind 

SCI Sv 

5EI 

SFE 

SP Drug 

&PI 

STV 

50 lent s 
Sofecds 
Safeco 

SafHttti 

srjgc 

51 Jude 
SlPcnd 
Sat Cat 
San Bar 
SandGhf 
SateJSy 
SOvtVF 
SavBcn 
SvBkPS 
SaxanO 
ScqoOp 
S amTr 
Scherer 
Sctiotos 

Sett 1mA 

Stinted 

SdDvn 

ScVOnp 

Selincs 

SclMIc 

5CIS91 

ScISySv 

Set'ex 

ScrtpH 

Sea Gal 

Seapate 

Stall rtc 

SeawFd 

SCNtBM 

SecNti 

SecAFs 

SecBco 

SeeTag 

SEEQ 


•10r 1.1 
I 

78 U 


J4I 

JO 

170 


1316 16 T6 * 

318 U% >2 '■2’ft 

22 18'* ISto ISto — to 
98 9 8% Sto + '* 

» 181* 18!* IfT'i 4 X. 
3M 21 Mb 21 + n 

75 10 9to 9to + Vt 
9 626b »b a’ft + "» 

l.l 190191^ 19 n 

X7 1654 421ft 4Tb 42b + to 
1031 31 21 

J8& XI 1023% 27% Mto + to 
59139ft ISto I Jto 
100 42 1460711ft 7SH 71to +!%« 
127 5b Sto S : ft-b 
10 fl%* 8H 8H— H 

4 Bb 8H Bb + H 

i9 7% 7% m 

1444 Ub 43b — 1‘. 
923to 23b ZJto— te 
23838b SBb HTY 

442 H Vft to 
101 7b 7 7 — >; 

65 15to Mb MH - \ 
IM l lb 111* 111* 

319M I9to I9%* 
372% 21b 22 
22 9% 8b 8b 
IS 7% 


JUr A 

.13 17 
1T»3 17 

70e 25 
M 3J 


32 27 
M 17 


M**h . Hff.. 

Wte HM* Lew SPAloth 


.93 X* 


30 4.7 


1 6 
14 6 


7b 

6 


7b— to 
6 — to 


19 5Vm 
10 7H 
42 
4915 


76 

70 

120 


4 Vft 5H + ■* 

7H m + % 

r« pv 

14%* 14V*— H 
1538b 38b fflb + 'A 
250 8H OH Bto 
inn 6H 6** 6M— to 
3 SV» 57ft 5H + to 
8 IBM 18 18 — V> 

9315% 141* IS — to 

2B a a — % 

1219V* 19 1 * I9 1 * 

525V* 25'i 2 Sto— to 
104 3Vk 7* Zto— to 
3844 2H IH 2H 4 to 


Set bet 

JO 

4.1 5619% 

19b 

19b 

Select 


4210 

9b 

9b. 

Sent ten 


21 7 

6% 

7 

Sensor 

JS 

3 417 7% 

7% 

7to— 

Srvmat 


589 to 

“te 

to + 


JM 


19310 
1 3% 
100 5H 
8 9to 

10 5H 
7. a* 


Ito 



6Vft 

2ft ^ + % 


QMS a 
Ouodrx 
QuakC s 
QualSy 
Quantm 
Quants 
IM 


Quintet 

Quixote 

Quotm 


252 9H 9M 95* ■+ I* 
1064-0%* 81* 8%ft+H 
1211b Ub lib 
15 lb 1%* lb + V* 
23b 23b— % 
5% 5% + VS 

31* 4 
Bb 8b 
6to 7% + VS 
7012% 11b 12% + to 
895 12V* 12 12% 


11324 
a S%* 
378 4% 
2 Bb 
4 7% 


JlC .1 
248 4.1 
-I0e IJ 
76 XI 
76 37 


1J0 32 


RAX 
RIHT 
RJ Fin 
RLICp 
RPM* 

RadS vft 
RodtnT 
Rodion 
Rouen 
Rolnra 
Ramtek 
Ransair J4 XI 
Rauch I 

Roymnd JO X2 
RovEn J4 14 
Reodnu 

REITs IJ8 BJ 
Recoin 

RcdknL 74 ZJ 
Reeves 
Refac t 

RgcvEI JO 37 
Reels a .13 7 

RWdASh 

ROW Lb J3o J 
Rrttab 


.16 17 


RniCntr 
RpAutp 
RpHIHt 
RaCPsn 2736-94 
RscPn2 173o 67 
RosExp 
RasPera 

RmNIM J9e J 
ReslrSy 

Reutcrl -ISe 14 
ReverA 144 -li.i 
Rexon 

RavRey 1M XO 
J* 17 

RJbllms 
RlciiEI i 

TJX 37 


RlBOSN 

Rl&vft 


94 8% 8 8 

11 40V* 60 60V* + b 

1310% 10% 10% + % 
2127 96b 26b— % 

40515% ISto 15%*— % 
102111% 10b 11% + H 
5112% 111* llto— V* 
ira 7 7% — u> 

12 5b SVft 5to— to 
183 311* 31% 31V* + Vft 
82* 3to .3 3ft* + % 

83 7b 7H 7b + to 
S 4 4 4 — to 

1222V* 21% 21b 
917% 17% 17% — to 
1121 21 21 
55 15V* 15% 15H— V* 
44 9% 9 9%*— to 

2027V* Z7% 27% — % 
32ST2M 12 12% + to 

2210% 10V6 10% — to 
91 Sb 5% 5M 
315% 15b 
97 7 ftb 
438 <Vft 6 
24 5% Sto 
76 3% 5% 

11522% 22 
44 91* 8% 

87919V* 19 
■ 2228% 27 
1920% 19%* 

5 T9* 1% 19* 

. 919 18% 18% — fk 

a 19V* 18% 19% + to 
2515b 15% 15V* + 1* 
6310% 10% 10% 

18 13 to 13 13 

13 6b 6V* 6%*— Vft 

66649% 41to 41V* — V* 

21 13 129* 13 + V* 

313 Sto 7b 81* + V* 
7 19 19 19 + «b 

6956 55%* 55b + % 

66 2% 2 2to— to 


SvcMer 
Svmati 
Service i 
SvcFret 
SevOott .16 
ShrMod 48 
Stiwmta 178 
snows .u 
Shrldll 
Shonevs .15 
StwtSes 
Shpsmt 
StemoA 70 
SlgmeC 
SlemoR 
Silicon 
silicons 
snicvol 
Slllcnx 
Siitec 
SIvSIMn 
SlnlAIr 
Slmpln 70 
5 IppIii> 

SixCP 
S teller 

Shipper Jt 
Sky Exp 
SkwnTc 
SmllbL 
SmlihF 
5nel5nl 
Society 
SoctvSv 
Sottocti 

SoffwA 
SttwPb 

Sonoata 
SonocPs 
SanrFd 
SaMicG 
SoBcSC 
SCalWt 
SaHasp 
SthdFn 
Soutrst 
Sovran 
Sovran 
SpeMIC 
SpanA 
Speedy 

1SSI 

Soert ID 
Spire 
SlorSr s 
StafBId 


174 


737 T3b 13to 13>* 
137322V* 22to 22W + b 
423% 22b + to 

2 5b Sb Sb— to 
61914% 15% to% + to 
82029% 28% 29% + b 
550 39V. 39 39% + % 

1819% |9%b Tf% 

1X12% 12 12 

85329 2SH 29 + % 

512% 12% 12% + to 
24 5 5 5 

2766W 66 66'* 

6 6 6 6 

7 5% 5% 5% 4- to 

245 7 ftb 7 -9 to 

54312% 12% 12<* 9 to 

23515% 15 15 — to 

3219 IBb 18b 
76 5% 5% Sto— to 
38* 4* H + 
157 15 V* 14b 15V* + b 
8 15H IS IS — Vft 
30 IS 15 15 — % 

4 4b + b 

23% 23b 
9b 9b 

3 3 — I* 

8 8 

Sto 3to 

14610b 10% 10b + % 
2 Bto 8% Bto — % 
325 53b 53 S3U. 

1*7 18% 17b IBV. + to 
625 5% Sto Sto 
■416 15% 16 + to 

3812b 13% 12%— to 


25 4b 
30724 
271 lOto 
U 3to 
131 8% 
290 3% 


76 9 



712% 12 12% + ’.* 

50418b 18V* IBV* — to 
11024 23 23b + b 

55 7VS 7 7 

58 2% 2Va 2% + to 
5515 14V* 15 4- V* 

2M 6V* 5b 4to + V* 
6 59* 5b 5% + kh 
4SJ7to Z7to 27 to — b 
21 21 
13b 14% + V* 


15 


96 44 
.10 3 

36 39 


STuortH 
Subaru 
SubAin 
soars 
Sudbry 
SuHSB 
Swnma 
SumfBs 
SumtHl 
SwnOO 
Sunolr 
SunMed 
SunSL 
SwfttFd 
5anwst 
SunRte 
SunSkv 
Super El 1J0MXB 
Suortex 
SuprEa 
SvrgAJ 
Svke* — 
SymTk 
SvmWn 
SvmbT 

Symbllc . 

Syncor 
Syntecti 
Synlre x - 
Syscon Ja 
SYAioc 


179714% ...... 

isa a a + %* 

12 TV* 7% /to 
1014V* 14 14 — to 

R 22% 22b 

9k Ito + •• 
21364% 63b 64 + V* 

4b 4% 4H- to 
4% 4% 4H * % 
8% 8 8 4 to 

WH 14% 14% f % 
1024% Mb Mb 
50 2% 2b 2% 

13 6% 6% AH— V. 
2818 17% 18 + b 

6 9% 9 9to 
251 MV* 14% 14V* + to 

18735% 34V. 35% + b 

4% 4% 

D 152 +2 

4% 5 


8 4% 

52% 150 
21 5% 4’.. . 

0064b 63V* 64% + to 
» 8% 8% Bb 
.18# 7 15722b 22% 22 V* 


140 

JO 


3% + % 
22 + b 

I4M ♦ % 
IV* + i* 
6to 4- % 
Bb + Vft 
39* + to 
41* 

47 


17 


74 3'A 3 
7122% 22 
1314 14% 14, 

266 II* TV. 

49 Ato 61* 

1 8M Bb 
276 ]V* 3% 

20 41* 4% 

3547 46% .. 

40*21* Zlb 22V* + b 
6 9 8% 9 + b 

U 9b *b 9% 

332 39* 3%' 3% 

5 79k 7b 7b 
20 10 9Vk 9H— % 
64 % 9* H + fc 

1 13b 12b 12b — to 
109 3% 3% 3% 

36013 11% "to + to 

61512V* 12 I2to— to 

20 4V* 41* 4V* + % 

24112 IH* llto— to 
63 31* 3% 3V* + V* 

516V* 16 16V* + Vft 

6223% 23 23 



SysMn 



78 4b 

4b 

4to + to 

6b — 14 

SvstGn 



56810b 

9% 

ioto + b 

Sto— M 
5% + b 

Svstml 



622% 

22b 

22% 

TBC . 



310% 

10% 



TCACb 


5 

824 

23% 



TLS 



6 5 




TSCInc 



10012% 



19b 

T3I 

JO 

J 

-5JL. 

11 

11 + % 


TSR ■ 

TuCVIVS 

Tandem 

Tandon 

Tcftnais 

Tdtlnce 

Tecum 

Telco 

TicmA 

TelPlus 

Totem 

Telecrd 

Teleplct 


73 A 
ft TOn IJ 


22410% 10 10 — to 

,164 6% 5% Sto 
1838 16% 16 16% + Vk 

1341 5 4to 4to 
1311V* lOto 10b— % 
.17% 7% 7% + V* 

1812% 111 111 —11* 
2513V* 13% ISto— % 
1228 32 to 32% 32% + to 
200110 9% 9to + V* 

a ub iito iito— v* 
394 18 17% 171* 

3727% 27% 27% 


TcWM 
Tetgbi 
Teuonj 
Tcmce 
TrnnlE 
TnQTLv 
Tfnnonl 
lerrrDt i 
T e*3oi e 
Te.cn 
TherPr 
Thrirtfli 
ThcVW 

ittrmi us u 
TCBT0S 

Thprln 

TltOrUtC 

TtiouTr 

3Com 

Tlmbrld i 

TimeEn 

TmeFVb 

Tiprory 

Tolu 5 

TotedTf l.ftfl 4.3 
TatlSn 
ToyftPIft 
TrakAu 

TfrryXf 32r J 

Tmwt 

IrwIBc 

TrredSy 
Trl.Vltc 
TnfiCm 
Trilogy 

Trnftrt 

Trwjo 
Try NY 
TucftDr 
TwnCllt 
Tylcn 
T.son t 


.10 

40 

140 


M :«a it* -k 

48415-1 IS IS-*— % 
M614b V6 16 
74 6% 4H 6% + 4 
53 2-6 Ito 2 » 

3 Ab i'a Ab 
4C* SVft 23'w ft V, 
MS 4% Ato — % 

is »•■* s’i in + !* 

74 *. % 

2310% 1C% 10% 
3314% Uto 14’.*— ■■ 

f 10 u w 

169 47b 47% 47b ' 

2457 1 to 20b 21b- % 
JL 12b l?'i lib 4 % 

09 7% I 7% * to 

892 lAto 13b Uto- ift 
43 7b r-v Tb 
M *'* ftb Ato * Vi - 

5M10 r* io . + to 
If IS'.* is. IS -V* 
700 . a. + (ft 

113717% 16% lib + *i 

7548 47 47V* 4V ‘ 

10038 28 » 41 

TSU-J. 15b 15b 
15512b ISto Uto— to 
19 ftVf 5b ftb + 

6% 

7b 
4'* 

4% 

V.* 


ta 2b 
43 6b 
II 7V. 

5 6% 

22J 3--1 
3W Ito 

3 7to 
13 26b 26* 
3939 38 

54 6% 5~a 
54 to 

1 17 17 


6 % » 
7% •• 

6'* 4 H 
3to 4 to 
l'!» . 
7%— * 
26b— 'la 
n f vi 


•- % 
17 


06 3 172026 Mb 76 + V 


J 10 14 
240e2U 


.94 29 


128 X5 
Me 3 


VJSLIC t 
LISP R! 

USPCI 3 
U5T 
UTL 
UltrBcn 
unrjy 

Unamn 

UnlHco 

Until 

Unlfrcs 

Un.med 

UnFedl 

UnNottl UH 60 
UnPinlr Urn ai 
U nTrBc X40 27 
unworn 


UACms 

UBAas 

UBAlsk 

UBkSF 

UBWlh 

UnBkrs 

UBCot 

UCorSc 

UCWGa 

UnDam 

UnEdS 

UFnGrp 

UFstFd 

UGrdn 

UNiaBn 

UnNM. 

UrtOkW 

UPreto 

US Ant 

USBCP 

US Cap 

USDson 

USEnr 

US HC ft 

USPrce 

US SMI 

US 5ur 

USTrk 

USTrs 

USiatn 

uTeict 

UnTelev 

UnTole 

UVaBs 

UnwFm 

UrwHIl 

UnvHId 

UnvSec 

UFSSh 

UnwBTr 

UP Roh t 

UPwlP 

UroeCr 

u-xofc 

V Band 

VLI 

VLSI 

VMX 

VSE 

ValldLo 

Vallen 


06 3 

M 2A 
.15 r 16 


JOO 17 
1JJ8 3.9 
170 15 
V70 73 
.92 67 


1741144 
1.006 U 
256 27 
24 X? 


923b 23% 23b +* 
a iito iito iito + % 
1016% 16% 16% +% 
2917% 31 32 — to 

7372<d 77% 72% 4 ft 
Itab 36to 36% 

893 5% r* 8% + 1* 
19617b IP* 121*— % 
2 16b Mto 16b + to 
424 lOto 9% 10% A 1* 
10 ?to fa 9% — % 
169 Mb 14 T49* +,9j 

446 13 17b 13 +% 

91 25b 7A-* 25% * V 
13926b 24% 26% — % 
13387 65b 86% + % 

224 12b 12 12% + 1* 

84925'* 24% 24b— i* 
4324 % 24% 74V. ->V. 
a 9b 9% 9ft* + 1% 
120 3% 3% 3% 

317% 17b 17% 

27 11 10b 11 6 u 

19427% 25** 27% 

40 29 28Va 281* 

15 191* 19V/ 19"* + v 
54 Mb 1?% 14% + % 
20 3b 3% 3% + .to 
339 9% Bb 8% 


1618b 

IBb 

IBV* — to 

5 11% 

11% 

11% 

7 76b 

3Sto 

36b 

8 9% 

«to 

9% 

is are 

6'k 

6to— to 


1913 12b 13 

M 3 r . 3’ft 31*9.1* 
15031% 31 31V* 

23 3% 3% JH 
30 J=t» 2H 2b— Jk 




41 5b 

4% 

S’: + % 



1D8232 

31b 

31% + v> 



11 ?'.■ 

!■» 

2r. _ 4 


28 

35 4b 

tb 




38 19% 

19% 

19% — b 

1.70 

1X7 

II 11% 

11% 

11% ■ 

IJO 

13 

16237b 

J4‘* 

36V*— fc 

JO 

tj0 

54 20 

19b 

19b— 1 



7 6% 

4% 

*%— -to 



10723% 

23to 

23b + X 



16 7% 

7'.* 

71*— to 

174 

X4 

36 48 

47% 

48 


.10* A 
IJ 

270 97 


M 

IJ 

222b 

22b 

22b 

vo/vBc 

1J8 

3J 

128b 

28b 



29028 

271* 

28 + ft* 

ValFSL 



631 IBV* 


JOe 17 

1331b 

91 

21 — % 

VINBcs 

IJOa 35 

243 

43 

1J2& 79 

15 19% 

19b 

19b — ft* 

VaINtt 

ITO 

7.9 

32941% 

41!* 

J8b 13 




ValUtah 

1J8 


S3'i 

28 

IJO 

13 

1123% 

23ft* 

23% + ’A 

Valmnl 

TO 

4.0 

9015b 

15 



340 4to 

4b 

4b 

v/allek 

.14 

2J 

13 6% 

6% 

32. 

70 

85 25b 

2Sb 

25b 

VoILn 

TO 

1.7 

2 23b 

23b 

1J0 

53 

98018% 

18 

18b— b 

Van Dus 

TO 

ZB 

20 14b 

14 

.10 


291 6% 

Ato 

ato 

VanShK 



& 


178 

33 

19645 

44% 

45 +> 

Vonzeli 



23 B'-a 




50 Ito 

ito 

11. + to 

VortCrs 



IS 

7 


JJVe A 


36 XB 


J0r 17 
78 7 


76 

J4 

936 

AO 

.10 

.11 

70 

JM 

.78 


Varied 70 Aft 
VeefrG 
Vetoed s 
Ventrex 

VIFncI iJOa X» 
VenwT JO IJ 
Vela 
viconF 
VI corp 
vidOisp 
VledeFr J2e X0 
vikhig 
Virol etc 
VaBcch 
VIsTech 
Vodavl 
Vouinl 
Volvo 
Vortee 
WD40 
vwji&Cs 

BSf" 

S’ 

WsJiSci 
W otrl« 

WBwiPp 
Wovettc 
Wovms 

VS& 

WetoT r 
Wettjiii 
Wespoc 
WWPC2 
WAmBc 
WniFn 
V/sICop 
W ltFSL 
WAUCTC 
vrstLIe 
WSIeer 
W1TIA* 

WmarC 
WfttwdO 
wstv^* 

Weltra 
Wteat 
WMcam 
Wlland 
VWUlmt 
W1IIAL 
WlmoTr 270 
WllsnF 
wlndmr m U 
WirmEn 

WbSGs 15t 52 
WteerO 70 0.4 
.14 Z3 
Woodhd 70 47 
Wort ho 74 2J 
WrohlW J8 11 
Writer .15e 17 
Wyman 70 12 
Wyse 
XL Data 
Xeaec 


26321 20b 21 

117419% 19% 19% 4-V* 

5 71. S’- PA + fk 

75 27* 2% 2%- to 
1911b 11'* 11!*— to 
11 17 17 17 + ft 

6 Pft 3% S’* 

35 22% 2 22% * L 

78 4% 4 4V*, 

234 5% Ito 5% + to 
22 9 8% 8%-J'Ki 

394 8'to 7% Tft — to 
130912% 12b 12b 6% 
13a6 6% 6'* AH— .to 
22 9V* 9.» 9b— to 

644 8% Bto 8% + to 
a 14b 14b l4%— to 
28Vi— to 
UH— 1 
43 

4I%- % 

Mb- to 
91* . 

Sto 9% 
7U.+ to 
12b 13 + n 


8813 
391 % 

9 9 
338 3% 


-if 


T %* 


17 
27 

7 
ao 

IJM157 
AO XI 

7a 87 
70 »J 
.70 47 


36 

JO 


A0 27 
AOe J 


JO 27 


ITS 19 


17 


0W Bb 4 a, 

3 3 -% 

86 31% 30% 30%—' V 
7 17 MV> 17 9 I* 

JM h *W Vk- * 

31 3% 3% SVk— I* 
1286 241* 74Vft 24% 4-to 
12 6V| Sb 61k 9 •& 
telOb ID 1 * 

a i2 ii% 

14718* J 17% 

9 8 “2 8% 

K % »- 

ai > 0% iok> n% . 
18016b 15b Ub + to 
28928% 271* 3r<.4> 

249 •% 9!* 9V* + 

7520% » HU 
713b IJ'ft uu— 

39 1 nil 7 ■ . 

17925V. 74% J4% 

9325 24H J4b— -Ift^ 

124 ISb IS‘* 15% — %.'■ 
268 17% 16 17b +1 

3 ftb ftb 

21 14V* 14% 

33 7b 7 
120 14% 14*4 
25 13V* Ub 
93 8% Bb _ 

3312% 17% 12% 4. to' 
1931 31 31 +-% 

198 •% 9% 9% . 

m 7% 7% r.k + to 
2618 17V* 17Vt — V* 

57141* 14 14V* +■!* 

391714'* 14'* 14% 9.1ft 
88017VJ 17% 17% 

2 7V* 71* Tl 

4712% 11% 12 + to 

IS 11 Vft 10v* Tift* ■%%.*. 
25313% 12V* 12b — . 1ft -Y 
3716 Ift Ift — {* *■ 
2132b 32b 32b 
2715V* IS 15V* 1 ‘ 

32931% 30% 31V* + b 
823 PA 4Tk 5% + % • 
MHlIb 10% llto + Vi ' 
70 ft% 6% 6%— % : 

163 42 41V* 42 +>, . 

79315H 15% 15b J 
84 55% 54 M 1 *— fti— H 

167 7b 6% 71ft 9-fT 
241 51k SH S5*-% 

249 BV. 7% 71*— J if- 


e'« 

14V. 1 

TL Mt f 
14% , rrj 

13V* " f; 
r*— b J . 


Xfc 
XkJex 

Y tow FI 1JM 27 
YorkFd 70b 3J 
Zetmtel 
Zen Lbs 

ZenNII 78 37 
Zontec 

ZlonUt 1J4 14 

ZIW 

Zlroa 

2cmdvn 781 7 

Zycod 

ZVOO 


6 30V, 30 30 _ 

151 17% 17V* 17% + * 
30 7 6% 7 +1* 

61 I3IA 13 13b 

243 271* 27V* 27b — * 
26 12% 12to 12% +S. 
21 Sto 8% 8%— % 

223 25 24 25 94% 

156 8% BV* Bftk -h* 

313% 12b 12% me 1 ' 
362 3 2% 

818 9 8% . 

24512?* 12% 12% 
95839% 39% 39V* 
3218% 18% 18% 

224 3% Jto 3% . 

227528% Mb 27%-, 

192 Uto 18% 19to + 

19 2% 2% 2to 
1037b 37 37 

5 2b 2% 2% 

72 PA fk 5% 
12810b 10% 10% 

25713% 13 13b 

108 7% 7V* 7M 


| Floatingfiate Notes 


July 12 


Dollar 


KHuor/MaL 
ADMIrWlK 
AIO«nrWi92 
Anted Irid) 87 
Anted irWiPerp 
Arab Bkg Core 9UN 
AiiemteFtnBvm 
AutentetosK 
BcoCamnlMM 
Bco Haz unmyfl 
BcsDI Rama 89/91 
BcoDl Roma 92 

sSplrtiOfl 

BkiBMIBB 

Boo Carp 97 
Bk Greece fl/M 
BkGmet 93/97 
Ireland 89 
_..lratad12 
Bk Montreal 90 
BkMortnrtM 
BkMontraaltl 
Bk New York 96 
Bk Now Scotia 88/93 
8k Non Sadia 9$ 

Bk Tokyo 93 
B* Tokyo 89 
Bk Tokyo 87 
Bk Tokyo FMN91 
Bk Tokyo Dedt/91 
Bankamoiica 0/5 H 

Trial 00 

Bankers Trust 96 
BK Capitol 96 
Bail Fin 87/91 
Btrilnt95 
HM Int9t 

iimn 

Hi 

Bq In 
Bue89 
Bie.87 
. ..97 

Bto Oct 68 
Bite Jen 88 
Bto 99 

BetndoMczff 
' 98 

97 

BnelS/B 
Bra 86/96 
BraW 

19 

18/91 
BraJutM 
Bra 65 

BaPDrioosPenr 
Be Warms 19/M 
Bor Derrs Bk Pem 
BorctoysO/S IS 

BordovsO/SIO 
8aretovsO/s Pent 
BarchmO/SM 


CoepopNexl Bid ASkd 
7% 10. t] 9M3 9973 
91k 1MB 10031CC.H 
Bto 8801 1000610X16 
8% SO- 11 9670 1770 
Mtk IMfWOSWTS 
9 27-ra mnnaoro 

9h 07-11 9950 9970 
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INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


i ‘5*^.'"' .B^ jant Scabccry 

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" Sat}** ' 

SAULT SAINTE MARIE, Can- 
ada— Iht trade minister of the 


,y i'i S ConpOTirity ai^Canada began 

. ,rt fomriaysofmeetoro Friday to' 

*vj% * ' . *» h bdp dewsei united Western front 
in a -new round' of global trade 

ulk£'." : . ' : 

Bui. the" United Slates may have 
complicated die discussions, de- 
signed tobeinfoQnalnodrdaiivdy 
problenhfree.by acting earlier than 
expected an a trade dispute.over 
Japanese high- technology prod- 
p s l . % nets. T3w action involves an invesd- 

'* -> ’ ; ‘ >\x gatiou of- UJS.- sates of Japanese 
,? 7 :4 v"' T gemkonrinctors. It .is being con- 

n-. ^ S ducted bv-the UA trade teDresen- 



s5V- ?. 


? # “ 
i -« ?» 


[■ r * !?• 

;--r- : kh 

^ e:,. 
If;:’ 


Iby the U.S. trade represen- 
dayton KL Yeutter, who is 


trade minister, 


James Kefleher, who is host of the 
meeting, said Friday that be would 
not comment on -actions of other 
officials. 

- Although trade problems will be 
d i scussed, the main propose nf thjs 
meeting is to find a consensus on 
proposals for discussion at the new 
round of talks for the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

- Progress on setting up the GATT 
talks has been marred by the «fus- 
al oT..the French, at the seven-na- 
tion economic nrmnm this spring, 
to agree to set a date for the new 
round Several Third World coun- 
tries are opposed to the new round 
because it threatens to open up 
trade in industries they want to 
protect 

The developing countries do not 
warn to see trade opened in -ser- 
vices, high technology or intdlectn- 


al property, Mr. Rdteher said The 
four xmmstexs now holding talks 
are scheduled to discuss how they 
can make those trade topics more 
palatable to the Third World, he 


Movement toward a new round 
of trade talks is important in help- 
ing to defuse pressures mCongrcss 
that could result in toe passage of 
protectionist legislation this fall, 
trade experts said 
The ministers have divided eight 


raiSrifnV during riirir sCStiOl l. 

Mr. Kdldur said the discussions 
mi tariffs and services would be 
conducted by the European Com- 
munity; subsidies and investment 
by the United States; intellectual 
property and high technology by 
the Japanese; and dispute settle- 
ments and safeguards by 


SignChinaLoan 

Reuters 

TOKYO — ThcBank of Chi- 
na has signed for a S2-bfllion, 
10-year loon from a syndicate 
of 67 Japanese banks, the Back 
of Tokyo Ltd. announced Fri- 
day. 

The loan, repayable after a 
fiye-year grace period, wiD car- 
ry an interest rate W point over 
London Interbank Offered 
Rates in the first six years, ris- 
ing to ft point over Libor in the 
last four years, a bank spokes- 
man said. 

Management fees woe not 
disclosed by the Bank of Tokyo, 
which is the sole lead manager. 
The Japanese banks range from 
major chy banks to mutual 
banks making their first foreign 
currency loans. 


By Dinah Lee 

International Herald Tribune 

m HONG KONG —Taiwan is be- 
gin n in g to crack down on the flour- 
ishing illegal trade between the is- 
land and the Chinese mainland 
most of winch is channeled through 
Hong Kong. 

The increasing traffic led to in- 
vestigations in May by one of the 
most powerful arms of Taiwan's 
military intelligence network, the 
Taiwan Garrison Command, ac- 
cording to sources in Taipei. 


newspapers m nong itong re- 
ported toe detention of Lhree misi- 
ncssmen by the command, and toe 
sentencing of one Taiwanese by a 
nriEtary court to eight years in pris- 
on lor bartering directly with main- 
land Chinese. 


A Hong Kong woman who acted 
as an agent for Taiwan traders has 
been denied an entry visa to Tai- 
wan, according to these repons. 

These moves mark toe first ex- 
tensive investigation into toe trade, 
which has grown in only three years 
to reach last year’s official total of 
£560 million. Diplomats in Hoag 
Kong and Taipei say these statis- 
tics probably do not reflect toe 
whole picture, and that last year’s 
total might be set more accurately 
at $600 million to $700 million. 

Hong Kong government statis- 
tics , which do not include Taiwan’s 
indirect trade with China via To- 
kyo or Singapore, registered $540 
million worth of goods sold via 
Hong Kong in toe first four months 
of this year alone; that is an in- 


crease of 46 percent over the some 
period in 1984. The lots] for this 
year, for all China-Taiwan trade, is 
expected to reach SI billion. 

The Taiwan government is afraid 

that toe island^ businesses will be- 
come overly dependent on main- 
bud orders and increase the econo- 
my’s vulnerability to overtures by 

the r pmmmiia^ 

Although Taiwan's 10.6 percent 
economic growth rale put it at toe 
top of Asian nations last year, its 
export-led economy has suffered 
tins spring from a drop in demand 
from Its primary market, toe Unit- 
ed States. Economists in Taipei re- 
port that demand by mainland Chi- 
nese for Taiwanese goods is 
keeping some manufacturers' order 
books fulL 


Page 13 

MBB Sets Sights 
On Tank Maker 


(Continued from Page 9) 

its participation in a takeover as 
indirect and limited as possible, at 
least on taper. Under the current 
plan. RTG Raketentechnik 
GmbH, a 50-50 joint venture be- 
tween MBB and Diehl, would ac- 
quire a 24 .95-percent stake, giving 
MBB 115 percent of Krauss-Maf- 
feL 

The largest stake, 25.5 percent, 
would be held by Baverische Lan- 
desamtalt fner'Au/haufinanzier- 
ung, the Bavarian regional finance 
agency, while toe remaining shares 
would be divided nearly evenly be- 
tween three commons! banks; 
Dresdner Bank. Deutsche Bank 
and Baverische Veremsbank. 


Citicorp Bison New Strategy for Investment Bank 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Bade Page) 


AUTO CONVERSION 


HOTELS 


■ 


. (Cootiaoed from Page 9) 
and trading activities with its com- 
mertifll knifing. 

Sudi V setup is similar to the 
;operatiou£ of overseas banks, par- 
ticnlariyin Britain, where corpo- 
rate underwriting and knifing ac- 
tivities are permitted under one 
roof. 

“Thsisthefimyrarthataloiof 
commercial banks are going out of 
their way to say they are in the 
investment banking business," said 
Richard Fredericks, a bank analyst 
with Montgomery Securities. 

, Analysis say toe U.S. Supreme 
Court’s recent decision to exdbde 
money colter "banks from regional 
htmlnng comb inatio ns, thereby 
Omiting seme avenues of expan- 
se®, has made investment b anting 
eves more appealing. 

- Gttewp already is bdieved to be 
the l «tding i nve s tment banker in 
several South American countries, 
including Venezuela, Chile and 
Brazil, where it helped pioneer cor- 
porate bonds. In recent years, the 
‘.number of countries in which Gti- 
bank does agnificant investment 
business has doubted to 36. 

Gtibarik’s latest target is Britain, 
where it has taken advantage of 
regulatoiy changes by uuking a se- 
ra of acqmritions of mqor securi- 
ties trading and brokerage Anns. 
Three weeks ago, Gticorp Interna- 
tional Bank, based in London, ' 
rhangM its name to CiticcHp In- 
vestment Bank. 

The new name is in line with a 
jpten to triple the London group’s 
Capital to about $300 million over 
the next year and to become a mar 
jor player in gilt-edged securities, 
venture capital, financial futures, 
brokerage and international bond 
fiimiwang . Citibank would then be 
in toe same league as London's 
largest merchant banks, such as 
Kleinwort, Benson Ltd. 


According to Lawrence Cohn, a 
banking analyst with Dean Witter 
Reynolds I nc . , Citicorp “has a his- 
tory of fits and starts in investment 
banking.” Its easier forays, winch 
were concentrated in the United 
States, were somewhat unsuccess- 
ful in several key areas. 

The bank holding company tried 
for years, for example, to become a 
major force in private placements. 
Private placements are the sales of 
coiporate debt and prefened stock 
to a small group of mstitutbnal 
investors, and corporate mergers 
and acquisitions. Despite Citi- 
corp's vast network of corporate 
contacts, however, it has yet to be- 
come a firm leader in earner field. 

One problem that has plagued 
the company is its fafime to 
Wall Street’s top salaries. In addi- 
tion, the bank’s exclusion from cor- 
porate underwriting in die United 
States has kept it from becoming 
expert at priczsg such securities, a 
factor that has damaged it in the 
private placement area. \ 

Even m an area where Citibank 
is a recognized leader, arrangement 
of mterest-raie swap transactions 
for corporations, trouble has devel- 
oped lately. Several key members 
of its team have been recruited 
away from the bank. Stephanie 
Warren, for atanyle, who had su- 
pervised tl* New York swaps oper- 
ation, has joined Security Pacific 
National Bank. 

Nonetheless, “Citicorp deariy 
believes investment banking wifi 
pay off big in future years* Mr.. 
Conn said.. 

One way to determine where G- 
tioorp is placing its bets, he said, is 
to see which area of the hank has 
been allowed the biggest increase in 

Expenses at Gttcoip’s Trisritn- - 
tional Bank, its corporate and gov- 
emment tending aim, grew by 10 


percent in the Gist quarter. By con- 
trast, expenses' at the Individual 
Bank, its consumer operation, in- 
creased 21 percent, and expenses at 
the Investment Bank 28 perce n t. 

It war Citicorp's former chair- 
man, Walts 1 B. Wriston, who be- 
gan the push into investment bank- 
ing, and the effort has been 
combined muter John S. Reed, who 
replaced him last ornimer Bat at 
Citicorp the term “investment 
bankmo” embraces far more than 
the traditional activities of Wall 
Street firms. 

Citicorp's operation includes a 
multibilhon-dollar pension fond 
management operation as wdl as 
an international private bunking 


operation for individuals with high 
net worths. 

Some 1,200 of the Investment 
Bank’s 6400 employees work for 
the private banking operation. In 
addition, a big chunk of the invest- 
ment bankmg group’s capital is 
linked to government securities 
trading, where Citicorp is one of 
the major participants in the U.S. 
market. 

About half of the Investment 
Bank's earnings stem from its US- 
based activities. Aside from gov- 
ernment securities trading, Citi- 
corp has a large venture capital 
operation where it stakes its own 
money and is a major underwriter 
of municipal securities. 


Stockman’s More Was Hasty 


(Gratamerf from Page?) - 
Henry Aaron of the bookings In- 
stitution, who served in the Carter 
administration, said in an inter- 
view. ‘David Stodcman deariy un- 
derstood not tmly the budget but 
econ omic realities. Yet tins has 
ben toe mort devastating episode 
in budgetary history. Stockman 
served Die administration unto a 
combination of technical 

skill and moral vacuity. 

The problem that Mr. Sto ckman 
faced is one that other exceptional 
technicians and prof essi rook have 
met in government: How to do a 
professional job and satisfy both 
one’s political masters and one’s 
conscience. Mr. Stockman deariy 
felt in conflict with his conscience; 
and sought to appease it with off- 
the-record or not-yet-for-publica- 
tion remarks. 

Martin S. Fddstrin, as chairman 
of the ComtcB of EcoaomteArivis- 
era, took- the more dangerous 


course of going public with his dis- 
agreements over budget and fiscal 
matters. He partiadady angered 
Mr! Regan, then seonetaiy of the 
Treasury, and not only was pushed 
out but saw the council his t ori c ally 
a source of strong and independent 
professional influence, as ham- 
strung. An issue for toe future is 
whether the budget office will suf- 
fer a like fate. 

The same issue exists at the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board, where Lyle E 
Gramley has announced Ins resig- 
nation effective Sept 1, and the 
term of L Charles Partee expires 
next January. Both are profession- 
al, middle-of-the-road economists 
with strang loyalties to the chair- 
man, Paul A VoJdcer. 

■ Mr. Reagan, who has already 
made two appointments to the 
Fed’s of governors, Preston Martin 
and Martha R. Seger, tons can de- 
lermzne the char acter of the board 
by the appointments soon to come. 



Swbarland, Yfail Gammy A Eaglend 

Tot fm - LHD • Broom dafeonr - 
USB'A/oSt- 
Shipping by Iho nparfe. 

N STOCK. 500 SEA- Bo*, Gray. 

3B0 SEC- Hock Slw 
280 S£/L Blue 


Tubed London ltd. 
6S67 Port Looo. London Wl. 
Tel: 01-S3V 7779 
Telex B9560B2 TEAS G. 


MOTORS GmbH 

Since 1772. experienced cor trader for 
Mercedes, Panda, BMW. Immedote 
deSuery. FuS service enporV export, 
US. DOT 5 ffA. shipping for hull 
midoaier. OeeciMrieMotorc GrcbH, 
Twsteeaeratr. & 4 DweMeMaf, W. 
Germany |0| 2lT434d46. dx BS87374. 


MBtCBS SPEOALBTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

■nee 20 yam. 

LAitoc stock or rew 
MHKEDtS CMS 

MO SL 280 S3, MO 38, 500 SEU 
900 SCO with both, vdoun & 
leather interior. Shanenl & 
deBvetY worldwide. C*A or tids 
as n cwr new showrooeti 


NASSAU EXPORT GMBH, 


The inlernationcl Herald Tribune's daily paid circulation continues to break records, up 5% in the 
past year and 24% in the past four years. More than a third of a million people in 164 countries 
around the world now see each issue. And latest figures indicate that this rapid growth continues. 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTL DELIVERY 

We beep a ta rge doc k of 

mott oar bnns 

Teh 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 me Lem, 

TOGO Bruaefe. 


NEW IMW5 OH Stoat 
745 Exndn Sher or Nh 
735 Ifcw ria n dy/Bo j BQ UMher 

939 RMMrtfe Bhw-WMto 
Some preowned BfcWtcrioovotobta 
Munch. Wed Gen«*w. 
TribRUM65041 or & 

Tta S2851 10 am. - 10 pje. 
Americm Owned and O p eiW d 


DOMMCAN HVOBCES. Bax 20002, 
Santo Domingo. Dominican RepabSc 


Placw Your Oossified Ad Chriddy and EasHy 
WTStNATlONAL HERALD TRBUNE 

By Mbanee OM your load 1HT npemmeotivo with your tmo. You 
win be informed of the cost in xnetfady, end once prepayment it 
mode your od will appear written 48 hours. 

Cotoi Thebaic rata Bi9aQ per Ene per day + toed toxot There are 
25 tattorvripK and tpacaxintheEitfSne and 36 in the Mowing fines. 
Minimum space it 2 fetes- No afatxmrioliQni 
Cradfe Cardw American Express, Diner'i dub, Eureaxd, Matter 
Cord, Access and Vila. 


International Herald Tribune circulation 
figure prepared fer OJD audit for period 
from January 1, to December 31, 1934. 














































































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


Ah 

All 

Atl 

Be 


Be 

Br 

Bn 

Bu 

Co. 

Co 

Du 


Flc 

Fr. 

Ge 

He 

l&ti 

U 

Us 

Lw 


Mil 

MO 

MU 

NiC 

Oil 

Pm 

Prr 

Rei 

Rm 

Sis 

Sin 

VOI 

Vie 

wo 

Zur 

Mi 


Am 

Bel 

Dei 

Jer 

Td 


OC 


Am 

5ve 

d 

v 


FR 
»- 
.. A 


31- 

fE 

Ten 


•* 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


1 Electric unit 
6 Boor John 

11 Musician 
Miller 

16 Make 
effervescent 

17 Archon's 
Poman cousin 

18 Some 
Nebraskans 

20 Insect always 
caught? 

22 Haaa main 
course 

24 East, in Essen 

25 Single* 
handed! y 

26 Bike for Daisy 

28 King Kong's 
captive in 1933 

29 Bah$' kin 

31 Peculiarity 

33 Solicitude, in 

Savoie 

34 Biblical place 
north of 
Damascus 

35 Crams for 
exams 

37 Inward 

30 Material for 
having a blast 

40 Pulled 

41 Sharpens 

43 Emulates 

Harriet 

Tubman 

45 Certain 
Syrians 


46 Breather 

48 “Take 

leave- . . !” 

49 Look pleased 

50 Parasites 
found on a 
church mouse? 

54 Food fish that 
beats time? 

58 Kind of 
discussion 

59 Term of 
affection 

60 Pays 

62 Cash’s "Ballad 
of — Hayes" 

63 French 
magazine 

64 Make 

66 Monoskis 

67 Insult 

68 Words before 
kingor reine 

69 Arrogant 

71 Scottish unit 

72 Overwhelms 
with 

amusement 

73 Quadruped 
that never 
runs? 

75 Mammals that 
dig up 
seaports? 

78 Sailing 
direction 

79 Viaud'spen 
name 

80 Put out 


81 Dipped cut 

84 Elects again 

87 Admiral — - 
Inn of 
"Treasure 
Island" 

91 Hebrew letters 

92 Aussie hopper 

93 Power 

95 Keen 

96 Transgres- 
sions 

97 Photos 

99 Coal City in 
Iowa 

101 Auspices 

102 Oz dog 

103" 

Farewell": 
Wagner aria 

105 This makes 
Rover no rover 

L07 Gray area: 
Abbr. 

108 Calmed 

110 Rays that 

shine on rinks? 

113 N.Y. silver- 
ware center 

114 Laundry 
component 

115 Tops of altars 

116 Opera's Simon 


Buffoon’s Bestiary by berth, kruse 


PEANUTS 


117 Long 
transports, for 
short 

118 Summer 



LOOK AT TH$T LICENSE 
PLATE.. 1 * HAPPINESS 
IS BEING SINGLE " 

ix: 




‘HAPPINESS \ 
is rf.iwa A 



, IP LICENSE PLATES 
ICANT A6K8E, H0U1 CAN . 
{THE REST OF US AGREE 7 

TT 



BLONDIE 






n ,L r r. 

ffc* * 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Malabo. 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1 boa 

(lightweight 

serpent?) 

2 Kind of light 

3 avis 

4 Not upright 

5 Actor in TV’s 
“Hazel" 

6 Misrepresen- 
tations 

7 Dutch 
commune 

8 Break 

9 Greece, to 
Greeks 

10 Convention 
bigwig 


11 Trice 

12 Moslem holy 

men 

13 Dervish’s cap 

14 Dog-faced 
glutton? 

15 Farm 
implements 

16 Classify 

19 His motto is 
"Can Do” 

21 Vacuous 

23 Couples 

24 Antonyms: 
Abbr. 

27Tintamarres 


30 Metrical foot 
32 Unspoken 
36 Reel part 
38 Passe 
40 Capers 
42 Verooa-to-Pisa 
dir. 

44 Propounds 

45 Squirrels’ 
nests 

47 Back 

49 Teachers, at 
times 

50 Double this for 
an Indian 
people 


51 Patty Duke, to 
theAstins 

52 Join 

53 Yen 

54 Rapido. e.g. 

55 Moon feature 

56U.S.S.R. high - 
spots 

57 Atlas display 

58 Thimblerig 
units 

61 Diet cause 

64 Ate 

65 Society's spirit 
87 It’s golden 

69 Dora! features 


70 Eucalyptuses 
72 Land nice call- 
ed the Hermit 
Kingdom 
74 Skimpy food 
fish? 

76 Cisco Kid’s 
rope 

77 Kind of rule 


83 Tooth tissue 

84 Source 


85 People to bank 
on 


94 Noxious influ- 
ence 

97 Hasso, for one 


86 Kind of saw 
88 Tiny relative 
ofagri2zly? 


98 Occasional 
sermon obbli- 
gato 

100 Seta price for 


79 Acrobatic 
wear 

81 Shoe forms 

82 Former San 
Francisco 
mayor 


89 Idle 

90 Spengler’s 
"Decline of the 


104 Pickens of 

filing 


106 Crewman 
109 Plastered 


92 V. Harper role 
and G. Mere- 
dith heroine 


111 Garland 

112 Part of Mao’s 

n»rm> 


By Robert Gittings and Jo Manton. 318 pages. 
Illustrated. $17.95. 

Oxford University Press, 200 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10016. 


BOOKS 


By John Gross 


Witness the summing-up of W illiam and Dorothy’s 
brother Christopher, for instance: “He was a lonely 

man. ■ 


D OROTHY WORDSWORTH worshiped her 
brother Wiliam. “Fraternal affection.'* $he 
once wrote, “has been the building up of my being, 
the light of my path!" She was also a writer who 
deserves to be remembered on her own account. Her 
journals, published long after her death, have a 
lasting interest quite apart from their documentary 



daughter. Her mother’s death, shortly after her 6th 
birthday, was an even more severe blow for her than 


importance. But it is easy enough to see why she has 
generally been treated as a subordinate figur 


mere satellite in the Romantic constellation. 


ire, a 


it was for her brothers: she was sent to live with 
cousins in Yorkshire, a long way away — by the 
standards of these days — from her home in the 
Lake District and her father, who died when she 
was 12, unaccountably failed to have her back for 
even the briefest visit If William's feeling for nature 
often reads like an attempt to reconstitute a lost 


was more than a brother, he was “my earliest and 
my dearest Male Friend.” 

Gittings and Manton will have no truck with the 
theory that brother and sister were involved in an 
incestuous relationship. They point out that the 
story was bemg put about in the Wordsworths’ time 
and that De Qumccy, a witness who carries weight 
(not least because he had his own reasons Tor 
resenting their censorious ness in sexual matters), 
dismissed it as base and baseless gossip. 

Much of William and Dorothy's life together was 
thoroughly prosaic. Dorothy ran the household, and 
took pnde in doing so. Nor did she show any trace 
of resentment when Wordsworth married; continu- 
ing to live under the same roof, she remained on 
almos t pretema rurally good terms with his wife, and 
when children came, she slipped easily into the 
traditional role of maiden aunt. 


The new biography by Robert Gittings and his 
wife. Jo Manton, is the first in more than 50 years. 


bond with his mother, Dorothy’s din ging to him can 
surely be seen in part — Gittings and Manton 


But if that were all her story would hardly be 

amni-> 


and one that rises admirably to the occasion. Both 
authors are experienced biographers — Gittings is 
known for his excellent lives of Keats and Thomas 
Hardy — and their account of Dorothy is lively, 
thoughtful, soaked in the spirit of its subject without 
being blind to her limitations. It also has the merit 
of bong written in a plain, terse style that usually 
manages to pack a good deal into a few words. 


suggest as much — as an attempt to compensate for 
her father's neglect. 

Not that her childhood was outwardly unhappy. 
Her cousins were kind, and she did not lack for 
congenial company — all this part of the story is 
unfamiliar, and attractively described. But the great 
resolution of her life, formed when she was If 


William, then an undergraduate at Cambridge, 
came to visit her, was to set up bouse with him. lie 


worth recounting at any length. The deepest i 
ties between brother and sister were those of sensi- 
bility and imaginative sympathy. Wordsworth him- 
self felt that she was in some ways a finer spirit than 
he was, and Coleridge paid tribute to her qualities in 
an eloquent passage: “Her information various — 
her eye watcnful in minutest observation of nature 
— and her taste a perfect electrometer — it bends, 
protrudes, and draws in at subtlest beauties and 
most recondite faults." 

This might sound excessive if it were not for the 


evidence of the journals — the early ones in particu- 
lar. the ones she kept while living in Alfoxton in 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 

S\ 



Somerset (where her brother and Coleridge pnt 
together “Lyrical Ballads") and during her 


years in Grasmere. Her writing in them has a 
singular purity, and a depth of feeling that goes far 
beyond mere meticulous description; for aD her 


restraint, and her self-effacing domestic role, there 
is plenty of evidence that Dorothy was prey to 


nervous agitation, and her absorption in nature 
served as a form of therapy. 

make less 


Her later years make Iras encouraging reading. 
She became as narrow and conventional in her 
outlook as William. Then, in her nrid-60s, came the 


onset of 20 painful years of senility. Gittings and 
• fairlycc 


Manton are fairly confident that she had a form of 
Alzheimer's disease. There is some consolation in 


the loving care she received from her brother and bis 
family until the end. 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York Times. 





Krconi 

... . 

— 1 •: fir- aft 
■ • 


“YOU MUST LEARN TO SHAKE HANDS PROPERLY, Wifi WAK' 
LDON'T THINK HE APPRECIATES HIGH FIVES.' 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 
C P 

LOW 
C F 


Atoa nre 

» 

79 

18 

64 

Ir 

.Amsterdam 

22 

72 

13 

55 

<1 

Athens 

30 

86 

21 

to 

tr 

Barcelona 

26 

W 

19 

66 

tr 


36 

79 

13 

55 

Ir 

Berlin 


77 

15 

59 

ci 

Brussels 

24 

75 

11 

52 

cl 

Bucharest 

22 

72 

li 

59 

Cl 

Badanst 

26 

79 

13 

55 

d 

C0P®i4MSE*O 

21 

70 

13 

2 

d 

Costa D«l Sol 

V 

Ul 

19 

66 

Ir 

Dahlia 

19 

66 

16 

61 

0 

Edtoburah 

20 

AS 

14 

57 

D 

Florence 

32 

9U 

18 

64 

fr 

Prank fart 

22 

72 

10 

50 

Cl 



79 

12 

54 

tr 

Helsinki 

22 

72 

12 

54 

h 

Istanbul 

25 

77 

IS 

u 

Ir 

LOS Palmas 

27 

B1 

21 

ID 

If 

Lisbon 

23 

73 

16 

61 

tr 

London 

24 

75 

15 

59 

0 

Wsrdrld 

12 

90 

17 

63 

Ir 

Milan 

28 

82 

19 

74 

fr 

MOSCOW 

21 

70 

11 

52 

d 

Munich 

24 

75 

f 

48 

d 

Nice 

29 

84 

Jt 

70 

(r 

Oslo 

22 

72 

15 

59 

cl 

peris 

37 

81 

13 

41 

Ir 

Prague 

23 

72 

11 

52 

el 

Bevklovlk 

12 

54 

4 

43 

Ir 

Rome 

X 

86 

19 

64 

fr 

Stockholm 

21 

70 

15 

59 


Strasbourg 

25 

77 

11 

52 

If 

Venice 

28 

B2 

ta 

61 

Ir 

Vi Hina 

» 

79 

13 

55 

el 

Warsaw 

23 

73 

» 

54 

Cl 

Zurich 

MIDDLE 

24 7S 

EAST 

12 

54 

fr 


ASIA 


HIGH LOW 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Do mount 
jwowiem 
Tel Airt* 


99 te 11 52 
38 D 91 70 
37 99 16 61 
30 86 ta 61 
51 W 19 64 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Sydney 


IS 5* 11 S3 
19 66 « 48 



C 

F 

C 

F 


Bangkok 

X 

te 

23 

73 

ST 

Benina 

X 

14 

21 

70 

0 

Hoag Kona 

33 

91 

25 

77 

fr 

Mauie 

29 

94 

24 

75 

d 

New Delhi 

32 

90 

2$ 

77 

st 

Seoul 

34 

75 

21 

70 

r 

Ci>i*iflh^l 

36 

97 

27 

•1 

cl 

5in-»tn»ore 

X 

86 

27 

81 

fr 

Tatacl 

X 

91 

IS 

71 

o 

Tokyo 

30 

U 

23 

73 

Sh 

AFRICA 






Algiers 

33 

90 

17 

63 

fr 

Cairo 

to 

95 

20 

46 

fr 

Cap® Town 

M 

57 

4 

39 

d 

Casablanca 

35 

77 

21 

70 

a 

Harare 

22 

72 

10 

56 

w 

Loom 

29 

84 

24 

75 

cl 

Nairobi 

25 

77 

8 

46 

cl 

Tunis 

32 

90 

18 

64 

fr 

LATIN AMERICA 



Bute as Aires 

12 

54 

5 

41 

tr 

Caracas 

39 

92 

X 

U 

Cl 

Lima 

19 

M 

14 

97 

Ct 

Me* Ice City 

25 

77 

8 

46 

fr 

Rto da Janeiro 

21 

70 

15 

59 

r 

NORTH AMERICA 



Artcfcgreae 

18 

64 

11 

52 

d 

Allan to 

33 

91 

K 

68 


Boston 

27 

81 

18 

64 

fr 

Chicago 

31 

BB 

15 

59 

pc 

Dearer 

35 

95 

16 

61 

fr 

Detroit 

28 

82 

13 

55 

fr 

HtTistalo 

37 

9(1 

23 

73 

ir 

HOtMfffll 

32 

90 

21 

70 

DC 

Los Angelas 

34 

93 

22 

72 

ir 

Miami 

32 

90 

23 

73 

S» 

Minneapolis 

32 

90 

IT 

63 


Montreal 

32 

73 

■ 1 

52 

fr 

Nassau 

31 

88 

23 

73 

fr 

New York 

X 

82 

X 

68 

IT 

Son Francisco 

23 

73 

13 

55 

fr 

Seattle 

26 

79 

13 

« 


Toronto 

23 

73 

11 

52 

Ir 

Washington 

32 

9S 

31 

70 

PC 


pc uoitiy claudy. r-rom. uWnwers; sw-snew; st-Storcny. 


Wfa MS* W 

!H Nr *9Lj. E o* vlV: wtfPWUttl* ZURICH: Poir. Temp. M— ll(7«— »). 
Bangkok: Shflwvrs Temp. 29— 33 1*4 731 hong komc- r«iV 


Wbrld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse July 12 

Oosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 



aete 

Prwy. 

ABN 

476 

<79 

ACF Holding 

241 

240 

Aegon 

«8JD 

9780 

AKZO 

11680 

117J0 

ATtoid 

23480 

237 

AMEV 

27130 

269 


820 

&15 

Amro Bank 

8640 

8&26 




1 7k « 

92 

9270 


36 

12B 

.itS 

Fokker 

71 JO 

72J0 

Gist Brocades 

ZOl 

20170 

Heine ken 

148 

mzjj 

Hoooovans 

63 

d2JB 

KLM 

42.10 


Noarden 

90 


Nal Ned dor 

7540 

7540 

Nodi lord 

17150 

1*980 

Oee Vender G 

345 

344 

Pakhoed 

sun 

Aim 

Philip* 

49.90 



7640 

l.trl 

Redo mao 

131-70 


Roitneo 

6980 

7070 

Ruranto 

46 

4*70 

RevolDuMi 

193J0 

196 

Unilever 

3*4 

35870 

Van Onwrwran 

2930 

30.10 

VMF Stork 

240 

225 

VNU 

215 

215 

ANPXBS Gael index : 717.80 

Previous : 2IU* 




BrmNeh 


Arbed 

Btkoerl 

Cocfcerilf 

COMpp 

EBE5 

CB-lnoo-BM 

CBL 

Gevoert 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

Kredletbonk 

Pefreflna 

Soe Generate 

Safina 

SMw»y 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unero 

Vlellle Montogne 


1745 1750 
5700 S5W 
2T5 316 

3240 3240 
3965 3975 
3730 3720 
1910 1915 
3950 3935 
5620 5610 

WM TWI 

9040 9000 
5650 5680 
IMS IKS 
7370 7330 
<325 4330 
3795 3775 
5100 5230 
1735 1740 
4940 «940 


Currant stock index : 233741 
Previous : ZZKIS 


Frankfurt 


AEG-Tetefunken 

Allianz Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Boyer 

Bov Hypo Bank 
Bay Ve r etmOc n k 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commentank 
Cant Cumml 
Dataiier-Banx 
Orauuo 

Deutsche Babcock 

Deutsche Bank 

Dimmer Bank 

GHH 

Homelier 

MttMlel 

Hoechst 


127.50 13249 
1348 UW 
357 361 

=*50 » 

22S 331 

» Mg 

430 429 

338 230 

333 340 

431 444 

31250 214 

14750 149.20 

•43 873 

37LSO 370 

l59ao lea 
£4550 57850 
257 26250 
163 167 

308 306 

363 559 

224 23350 





















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1*1 

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1 » 1 . | . r 

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m - ir l 



Hive Id Steel 
Kloof 


Pros Stem 
Ruselat 
SA Brow* 

SI Helena 
Sasol 

West Hokflno 


505 505 

7730 7825 
1565 1575 
4650 «W0 
1590 1580 
275 570 

3230 3225 

5900 5923 


i Index : 1I43A* 


AA Core 
Ail lea- Lyons 
Anglo Am Gold 
Ail Brit F 
- Dolrin 


STSft *15* 

ssS 230 


s 


ELA.T. 

Beeatam 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group* 
Boots 

Bawotor Indus 

Brit Home St 
Brit- 
Brin _ 

Briton 
BTR 
Bwrmoh 
ewe Wrote* 
Cadbury Schw 
Owrtrr Cora 
CommarckMU 
Cons Gold 
Cour+Dulds 
Daiaety 
Do Boers > 
Distillers 
Drietontein 
Fl sons 
Free Si God 
GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 
Glare £ 

Grand Met 

GR6 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Kavricor 

ICI 

Imperial Group 
joauar 

Lend Securities 

Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lonrho 
Luca 

Marks ond So 

Metal Bax 

Midland Bank 

Rat Wen Bank 

PsndO 

Pllklngton 

Piessey 

Prudential 

Roeoi Elect . 

Rondtafttein 

Rank 

Reed IMI 

Reuters 

Rural Dutch i 

RTZ 

Sam dil 

Soim&ury 

Sears HotdMus 

Shell 

STC 


544 

301 

303 

201 

STB 

182 


T7l 

331 

2oe 

3* 

H 

SO 

151 

178 

210 

497 


318 

138 

407 

544 

363 

311 

200 

34 

520 

342 

183 

255 

534 

272 

170 

333 
216 

334 


Sid QMrierPd 
Sun Ailltmc* 
Tate and Lyle 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
T.l. Group 
Trafalgar Hee 
THF 
Ulfromar 
unl lever £ 


Uni led Biscuits 

Vickers 

W o ol e m it l 


454 

451 

240 

319 

248 

344 
123 
193 
10 29/33 


174 

275 


497 

461 

453 

245 

221 

944 

* 3S! 

125 

194 

113/44 

174 

273 

383 


f.t.: 

Prevloas : 9S448 
F.TABJB index : 123188 
Previous : UB48 


Banco Gomm 
Cent rale 
CJgahotort 
Cred rial 
Erl Sonia 
Farmlfaiki 
Rat 

Flnslder 

General 


I FI 


Itodcamentl 

Ifoloas 

llalrnafcllkn-t 

Mediobanca 

Mon I od ban 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS- 

Rinascente 

SIP 

SMS 

Snla 
S rondo 
Stet 


32850 21730 
3310 3379 
1 0500 10500 
23*0 2275 
10920 10800 
1302D 13710 
4051 3890 

Susp. _ 

54790 54500 
S4M 8540 
53000 51800 
1520 1510 
110050112525 
113900112480 
2109 1975 
9950 5971 
3075 2905 
84000 85000 
B74JB 868 

1380 1389 

.3429 3340 

wax 165M 
3185 3250 


MIB Currant lw 
Previ o us : 1573 


[SUM 


136 

132 

Air Liquids 

600 

603 

393 

396 


295 29200 

545 

545 

Eli 1 ’ .JM 

1190 

1189 

NA 

287 

Bonatira 

627 

616 

¥24 

*24 ft 

BIC 

528 

529 

321 

333 

Bonsraiii 

1870 

1875 

S24ft 

¥24 V* 


769 

761 

166 

164 

ESN-GD 

2415 


615 

691 

Cerretour 

2100 

2098 

220 

224 


650 

651 

12 

125/32 

Club Med 

545 


2B3 

291 

DcrtY 

1470 

1400 

70* 

713 

Ovm« 

70S 

715 

250 

246 

Ell-Ac uttolne 

192 

194 

820 

S» 

Europe 1 

BOO 

BIS 

184 

186 

Gen Eoux 

665 

MS 

W 

387 


149S 

1490 

699 

712 

Lafarge COp 

521- 

518 

166 

170 

Leo rend 

2210 


M 

254 

Lestavr 

640 

64B 

M7 

261 

POraoi 

2415 


679 

Mortell 

1670 


414 

417 

Moira 

1745 

1640 

160 

170 

Merlin 

Sons 

200 

288 

29S 

Michel In 

1232 

1575 

136 

177 

Meet HenpBssv 

1W5 

1953 

446 

448 

Moulinex 

87 

8680 

392 

392 

Ocddentota 

730 

723 

697 

704 

Pernod Ric 

730 

3 

35a 

353 

Perrier 

520 

263 

266 

Peweot 

399 JD 359 JO 

134 

IS 

Prlnfemps 

275 


639 

649 

Rodtotechn 

300 

136 

134 



1375 

5103 ft 

5102ft 

Roussel Udoi 


1A15 

353 

340 

Sonofl 

70S 


637 

632 

Skis Roeslgnol 

1360 

1330 

795 

38 

Telemeean 

2510 

7500 

43ft 435764 

Thomson CSP 

. s» 

518 

549 

554 

Total 

*19.50 

218 

302 

9SW4 

304 

95 

Aeefi index : jltjt 
Prevloas : 2I2J9 



6/3 

103 


AC Index : 2TTJB 
••ravlaes : 31U8 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neove 
How Par 


Mai BonkJno 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

Shanorl-la 
Si me Darby 
5‘DOre Land 
snore Press 
SSteomOMp 
St Trwflno 
United - 
UOB 


240 140 
^5 “ 5 

2 2/n 

136 227 

525 5J0 

8J5 8A0 

172 278 

IS IS 

127 IA2 
2J0 244 

MS S2S 
823 053 

?55 « 

324 3J0 


Straits Turns Ind 
Piivleos 1 73828 


Index: 72527 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 


Astra 

Alta* Copco 

BafKfan 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Essette 

Handel s banken 

Pnormoda 

SoaO-Scanki 

SancMk 

Skoiwica 

SKP 

SwedtshMatch 

Volvo 


iM ns 

193 187 

320 375 

410 405 

107 188 

HAL — 
277 270 

244 244 

378 ICQ- 
144 162 

206 — 


BZH 81 £0 
224 231 

190 789 

313 m 




1 - 


AC I 

ANZ 

BHP 

Boro I , 

Bouuabivtlle 

CosHerTTolne 

Coles 

Comalco 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlap 

Elders Ixl 

ICI Australia 

Maaelkxi 

mim 

Myer 

Nat Aust Bank 
NewsCorp 
N Broken Hill 
Poseidon 
Ow Coal Trust 
San Us 

Thomas Ration 
WBWm Minina 
Westmc Banking 
woadstde. 


3X2 226 
<58 <55 
<54 451 
348 348 
1JS 159 
774 AJ2 
188 393 

1 At 158 
5J4 Ut 

3.12 3M 

2J0 l£ 
U9 257 
3J05 2X8 

120 126 
328 177 

3.13 3 


224 224 

% 
550 540 

2.11 110 
355 355 
454 <51 

1JS 142 


MfMNrtHMaiimii 
Previous : 98648 


I T «fcyp 


Aka! 

AsahrChem 
ASOhl Glass 
Bank ot Tokyo 
Bridges] one 
Conan . 

Cltgfl 

Dai Nippon Print 
Dotua House 
Dal wa Securities 
Fanue 
Full Bank 


381 394 

K M 

938 928 

544 512 

WOO 1018 
1488 15® 

463 448 

To ’J8 

WOO 1080 
730 7400 
1800 1800 


Full Photo 
Fulltsu- 
Hitochi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Unas 

Kallma 
Kartsal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Klrki Br e w e ry 
Komatsu 


Kvacora 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Mabw EiecWUrks 
AVtaubWiI Bank 

MSViubisM Q%»m 

/WtsuMsMElec 

Mitsubishi Heavy 

Mitsubishi Carp 

Mitsui and Co 

Mitsubishi 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK Insufatara 
NlkkaSec 
Nippon Konaku 
Nippon OH 
Nippon Steel 

Nomura Sec 
Olympus 


Ricoh 
Sharp 
Shlmazu 

Sklnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum jtomo Marins 
Sumitomo Metal 
To bet Carp 
Tatsho Marino 
Takodadwm 
TDK 
Twin 

Touo Marine 
Tokyo Elec. Power 
Toopan Printing 
Toray Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yameichl *ec 


1850 1870 
095 917 

*90 TOO 

401 600 

1450 1430 
71*0 7300 
409 384 

1930 1920 
12 150 

675 
530 687 

351 M2 
3750 3836 
1386 1300 
7*0 768 

7750 T75D 
45* 4*0 

327 . 328 
497 703 

427 435 

610 615 

731 731 

S2 

75 5 775 

895 900 

1016 1010 
948 954 

157 1*0 

299 302 

626 628 
1350 1390 
1120 1080 
1730 1730 
909 915 

810 . 846 
470 681 

£ i 

32 3 

1SJ 151 
312 284 

688 685 

.15 » 

4300 4400 

447 450 

wa woo 

2130 2150 
*50 359 

448 6S3 

338 350 

1230 1330 
510 915- 


NOdM/DU. Index : HD49 
Praries* : 12*58. n 
!*—> I ndex : 104824 
nnevRxis : MM«89 


AdU. 

AhlCUlSM 
Autophon 
Bonk Leu 
Brown Sown 
COM Geigy 
Cra^f Suisse - ■ 
EieUiuwatl 
Hotderbank 
interdlsraunt 
Jacob Sutlxird 
Jelmall 
Landis Gwr 
Moev c m d ck 
Neon* 

Oertlkon-B. 

RoriwBaby 

CapdAa 

vWwZ 

Scwnater 

Svtzor 

Surveii twice 

Swtssfllr 

SBC 

r^5sssssr 

wSrtS? 

Zurich us- — - 


3J70 3240 
.81.5 785 

5775 5770 
3840 3830 
1780 1780 
3400 3530 
2965 2930 

3200 3180 

MOO 2450 

%% ^ 
l«5 

4600 *650 

1445 1*35 
4825 45*0 
420 410 


aa-.Tos 


3090 W0 
1790 17W 
4380 


SB 

im am 


SBC ind ex: 499 J0 
Previous :4MJ0 


auMed; NA; nor 
aualtaWei xd: ex-dlvkund. 


Mr 


Gmadian stocks via dP 


aoMAbtlPrce 
1200 Ackiands 
1900 Aon ICO E 
1400 Aero IndA 
25555 Alt Energy 
5300 AIM Not 
214 AiaamoSt 
lOOAndrsWAf 
677Arpcen 
U2D0 Aten I f 
2240 SP Canada 
14073 BaA BC 
199191 Bank N S 
200400 Barrlcko 
708 Baton At 
15937 Bonanza R 
73100 Bra Lome 
17020 Bramalea 
79381 BCFP 
35390 BCR« 
11894 BC Phone 
5023 Brunsvrk 
T265 Budd Can 
17550 CAE 
1050 CCLA 
HKCodFrv 
5*00 Campeau f 
7177C Nor West 
l*50CPndcrs 
22446 Con Trust 
SOOCTunp 
300 CGE 
54733 Cl Bk Com 
5300 Ct>i Nat Ras 
155380 Cn re A f 

200 c uiii a 

3690 Coro 
2941 CeUnese 
21300 C*nM Tr 
S700Cbwplex 
15O50CDlstbA 
37600 CDIstb B f ' 
6072 CTL Bonk 
aooC u nw est A 
26500 CosekoR 
2580 Conran A 
8700 Crown* 
74050 Czar Res 
2054* Dean Dev 
1008 DCKH1 A 
3343 Denison A |p 
KTO Denison m 
17600 Oevetam 
7300Dk*nsrrAf 
l5D0DtcKnsnB 
36188 DotlBCO 
5310 Daman A 
56300 Donahue 
400 Ou ponl A 
2ll90Dytex A 
5l0Eleft»m?c 
TOO Emeu 
21000 equity SW 
7090 FCA Inti. 

- 2505CFoVcxnC 
W785 Fknbrdoc 
7936 Fad IndA 
101 Fed Plan 

sogratvFin 

15450 Geae Camp 
1Q2B2 Geocrade 
AW Gibraltar 
loom Goi doora f 

.• 504 Goodyear 
125 Graft G 
1000 Grandma 
1900 GL Forest 
too GreVhna 
1460 Hrdlng A f 
950 Hawker 
26807 Howto 
5000 Hee* Inti 
*559 H Bay Co 
60915 Imasca 
2909 tndal 


967 inland Gib 
nil Thom 


51460 Inti 1 

<765 inter Plpa 
B3DIPSC0 
8600 JPAMCk 
. 300 KeisevH 
2931 Kerr Add 
9326 Labatl 
94819 Lac Mnm 
1 1500 LOnl Cam 
I3//4 Loeana - 
7546 LL LUC 


HWi Low Ctase Chat 
518 179. 171b 

817 17 17 

State i6ta tate + it 
S9V* 9 9 

note ISte TSH 
S14te 14H 14te+ te 
121 30>s 21 .+ te 

S26 26 26 — U 

SIB* 18te 184b+ I* 
SlOte ID 10 — Vi 
S31te 31te 31te+* 
55V. Ste 5V. + Vh 
S13ta 13te 131* 

160 143 155 +13 

519V. 19 19 — te 

355 345 355 +5 

450 *50 450 + 5 

*1844 1814 1844+ U> 
S9te 914 9te + te 
247 241 243 —2 

S24 ZIA 23te— M 
n7te 1216 124*+ te 
530 29V, 30 + «. 

*W% 16te 16te— Vi 
8171* 164* 17—1* 
.. 515 1444 147V— Ik 

S3446 24 244* + 14 

mV 22V. 274* + te 
S35 34te 34te 
5364* 36te 36 te — 14 
51144 llte 114* 
8484* 68V 681* — te 
S3M* 3*Vi 364fc 
26 36 26 

siote lute iote+4* 
naw. lav. i8te + te 

State 16 16*. +4* 

884k Bte Bte+ te 
State 1444 IS + 4k 
S9te 94* 9te+ te 
S6*k 64k 644— te 

861* 6 Vi 6te— te 

Sllte llte 11te+ te 
SS4k 8VV 8te— te 
295 290 290 —9 

State 134* 134*— te 
5239s 2344 23 Vi 
173 171 173 —1 

475 465-470 

445 445 445 + 5 

8124* 121V 13V. + te 

Sllte llte llte— V* 
864* 644 64k- Vi 

8614 6 t ~'u 

■ we 6ta ate 

n6te 26 U. 2644 
Z70 260 265 +10 

81814 18 IBte+te 
S22te 22te 22 te — V. 
51546 1514 151A— te 
87te 7ft 7% 

518V. 1814 1814+ V. 
*644 6te «*+ n 
$20 20 20 
516 15Vi 1544 
*184. 184* 1844+14 
S25ft 34ft 24te— V< 
S33te 23te 23te 
S179* 1244 1244 
*9Vk 9U «*+te 
264 260 262 + 1 

SM Ste 84*— to 
574* 74* 7ft+ Ik 

838 38 38 +te 

11244 1244 1244— te 
60 60 60 —3 

52lte ZIte 2IVi+ te 
S2 SVj 25to -25V.+ to 
160 IS 160 
*21 te 2lft 71 te — te 

Sllte llte 1144— 1* 

821 to 2llk 2114+ to 
82341. 2214 044 — 1 
527VS 27te 374*+ to 
817 17 17+ to 

8201* 20V* 20S4— ft 
8* Ste 9 -+.1V 
sov> 42to err. 

5144* 1444 Ute+ te 
816ft Ute.Uft+ft 
SO 42 42 — 44 

816ft 16 ta — ft 
S27V* 2644- 27 + to 
S2Bft 2S«h 2Sft+te 
■State 13te M +lto 
*11 104* n 

865 6414 6144 


30460 LobWw CO 
3939Lamamcs 
IOO MOS H A 
3700 MICC 
4710 Melon H X 
6409 Maritime I 
15000 MeriondE 
T9279 MoIionAf 
213 Motion B 
500 Nabisco L 
108004 Noranda 
378425 Nercen 
60467 NvaARAf 
5000 HOW9CD W 
8S740NuWStlpA 
2MOOakwoad 
4645 0*hawaAf 
12075 PacWAIrtn 
31 Pomaur 
24564 PanCanP 
125 PemMno 
MOOPhoniK Oil 
5260 Pine Paint 
34450 Plocor . 
7300 Pravieo 
2200 Out Store o 
400 Rem Pet 
2100 Rayrockf 
4916 ReOaatti 
35936 Rd SLPnhi A 
2675 Roper* A 
900 Roman 
1450 Rothman 
7225 Sceptre 
I 15600 Scottt ( 

9241 Sears Can 
2*sn Shell Can 
97062 Sherrttt 
21650 sauiixn 
23500 Spar Aero I 
COO St Brodcst 
38458 StelcoA 
18077 sutptro 
3055 Steep R 
3ooo5rdncro. 
200 Torn 
1035 Tedt Cor A 
15768 TecfcBt 
1203 Tax Cixi 
5025 Than HA 
80023 Tor Dm Bk 
U441S Torsrar 8 f 
43739 Traders A I 
IWDTrmMl 
3500 TrMtv Res 
M«0TrnAItaUA 
25087 TrCan PL 
40222 Trtmac 
M935 Triton A 
SOOTrlxecAF 
120406 Turbo f 
300 Unicorp A f 
50 l/n Corbid 

ICOU Entwine 

HBOUKena 


Hteh LswCMeeCfepI 

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si7to i7to rru— to 

400 400 400 +S 

81446 14ft 1446 , ^ 
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S1SV . 1646 1646— « 
S2746 Z74k 2746+h 
81*46 15ft 15te 
8144* 14ft 14ft— ft 
S6Hr 6ft 6ft— M 
820ft 20 » —to 

40 39 39 

87ft 7ft 7ft— Ik 
X» 32ft 32ft+ft 
81 4ft Uft Mft+ft 
S7Vj 7ft 
S3? 31 Vi 

S16to 16V. 

894* 9 

S2Sft 25to 
S2346 234* 

5211* 21 
390 370 

S6ft Oft 
*74* 74* 

813ft 13U 
S30V OTte 
812ft 12 
SVV* 9ft 
838ft 38 
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89ft tot 
S26V. Hft 
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225 220 225 +« 

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SDte 5* 

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894* 94* 

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800 Weston 
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2S0 - BombrdrA 
3730 BomtXdrB 
75200 CBPok 
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10200 CH 
3400 ConBtfth 
90S OamTxtA 
9033 GttMetra 
7500 MMTrSt 
18138 HatBkCda 
16J15 Power Cora 
9<26i Revel Bank 
7290 . StetitbroA 


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11645 





















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


Page 15 


SgfUTEs' 





SPORTS 



oom in 

ions of Growing Athletic Success 


player and Hist non-seed to 
nnbledon men’s suedes -tide last. 

‘est Germany 


- -j.^'Gcorec Bochmcr 

[ - The Associated Press J . 

rFRAj^RT -After years of being .Sunday. By doing so, he sent 
b«tdialowed:byE3St GcnnanyYsiate-nm patriotic eapboda. 
gfOgriCB, West ■ Germany has gained the 
^pffltwpotfight, eawirgingasaiiationof top 


, . The latest success: Wimbledon champion 
Bc&JMa?: .. 

/ Aiways 1 recognized as a powerhouse in 

■ soccer, tract and field and sluing. West Ger- 
iBtuy .now has two champions in interaar 
ticaral sports it never really excelled in previ- 
ioosiy: tennis and golf. 

■ Bector ^nd Bemhanl Langer, the 1985 
jflasters-.wiimer, are the country's newest 

sjxfcts-heroesL . . 

* i Becker, .ai.age 17, became the first Ger- 


think th is will change ti-nnk in frW mn- 

ny now. Maybe now they have an idd,” he 
said after bearing Kevin Cnrren for the title. 
West Germans devotedly followed 


Becker’s march through the prestigious practice. 


teams from the boycotting Soviet-bloc coun- 
tries. 

- West Germany started competing in the 
Olympics as a separate nation in 196& UntD 
then, it and East Germany sent joint teams 
to the Games. The dominance of thc state- 
sponsored East German athletes in Olympic 
trials prompted West Germany to stop the 


grass-coart tournament. On the day of the 
final, streets woe entity as fans stayed home 
to watch the match on television. 

The victory brought congratulatory cables 
from Chancellor Helmut Kohl and President 


tographs of the .grinning, red-haired teen- 
ager kissing his trophy. 

The mayor of Becker’s hometown of Lei- 
men, near Hdddbog, said he had answered 


riARp oh 
f OPLE IkJTo 
VOLUWTEFR 

Saturday K 



telephone calls aroimd the dock from people players ranked amo ng the world’s top 

Claudia Kohdo-Kilscb and Steffi GrafT 


— -Boris Bedcer: Wimbledon champ 


( Hfc# GEKfut,! 

& L ce*TfUL> 

AM&XA 




wanting to know more about the new star. 

“This is something we needed," said Dict- 
er Klein, 39, a tool and die salesman from 
. Frankfurt, on his way to pick np his 13-year- 
old son at tennis practice. 

|The D.C. National Bank Tennis Classic 
in Washington, D.C, announced Thursday 
that Becker had withdrawn from that tour- 
nament because of an ankle injury. 

[Becker has been vacationing in Monaco, 
.where a doctor told him to stay off his 
swollen left ankle for 5 to 10 days, said 
Henry Brehm, director of the tournament] 
Friday, more than 25,000 cheering people 
gave Becker a hero's welcome in Xxxmen, 
population 17,000, as he rode in. a motorcade 
through streets festooned with Dowers, flags 
and welcome-home «i gm 
Langer made it two in a row after the 
Masters by winning the Heritage C3 «pc at 
Hilton Head bland. South Carolina. Those 
triumphs, in events usually dominated by 
Tjt* US. stars, took even West Germans by sur- 
prise. 

After the Masters, Langer said he hoped 
“thousands and thousands of youngsters see 
this and take np golf so tint we can produce 
some more champions from that part of the 
world.” 

West Germany's rise in sports was sig- 
naled at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. It 
won 59 medals, second to the United States, 
although in the absence of the powerful 


One of the stars in Los Angeles was West 
German swimmer Michael Gross, 21, who 
won two golds and a silver medal and set two 
world records. 

“The Albatross” splashed his way into the 
headlines again when he broke two more 
world records in late June, Gross now holds 
four world records and is recognized as the 
world’s top freestyle and butterfly swimmer. 

In women’s tennis. West Germany has two 

10: 


Graf, 15, has been touted by some experts 
as a possible successor to Martina Navrati- 
lova or Chris Evert Lloyd, who have long 
dominated the sport 

With a population of 60 znflHan, West 



Ryan Passes 4,000 Mark 
By Striking Out 11 Mets 


Bernhard Langer: Masters winner. 


But. Pdzer said, European basketball offi- 
cials are sedans to stop the drain of their 
most talented players. 

. “We invest money in these gays, send 
them there to develop, and they are being 

he 


istered in 7,787 chibs. That figure is 
three times more than it was 10 years ago. 

“Becker's success is historicaL We 

couldn’t have done more for advertisng len- grabbed off to play for the Americans,’ 
nls with the- most expensive publicity cam- said, 
paign,” said Christian Thiemann, spokes- Part of the rise in West Germany’s sport 
man for the German Tennis Federation. slams can be traced to the West German 
West Germany’s national soccer team is Institute for Sports Assistance, which pro- 

trial support to promising ama- 


double 
farth, now 


one of the favorites to win next year’s World vides 
Cup in Mexico, probably the most cherished tears, 
trophy in intonations! sports. West Germa- 
ny won the 1954 and 1974 tournaments. 

The country also is beginning to make a 
mark jn basketbalL 

Detkf Schrempf, who played for the Uni- 
versity of Washington, and Uwe Blab, who 
played ax Indiana univereity, recently were 
takrai by the Dallas Mavericks in the Nation- 
al Basketball Association draft. 

Manfred Pdzer, a spokesman for the West 
German Basketball Association, said there 
are at least 50 other German basketball play- 
ers scattered throughout the United States. 

He said 15 specifically were sent there to 
sharpen their game and return home to play may in the future 
on west Germany’s national team. sport,” he said. 


and 

lie gold medalist Ulrike Mey- 
from women's high jump- 
ing, were among those benefiting from the 
program, said the institute's spokesman, 
Gflnter Pdshenke. 

“Some young tennis players have received 
assistance in the past, but not Becker because 
be turned professional so young,” Pdshenke 
said. 

He said it was individual effort and private 
from their families that took Becker 
Langer to the top. 

were sent there to “We've never supported golfers, but we 

il n becomes an Olympic 


Compiled Our Saif From Dispatches 

. HOUSTON — Nolan Ryan, 
who has struck out more batters, 
pitched more no-hitters and struck 
out 10 or more in a game more 
times than anybody dse in baseball 
history, established another mile- 
stone Thursday night. And the 
New York Mets almost stepped 
over il 

Ryan struck out Danny Heep for 
his 4,000th career strikeout, but it 
was Bill Doran's 12th-inmng bit, 
ins fifth of the game, (hat enabled 
Houston to pull out a 4-3 victory 
that ended the Mets' nine-game 
winning streak. 

Ryan became the first pitcher in 
history to record 4,000 strikeouts, 
leaving the game after seven in- 
nings with 4,004, having fanned 1 1 
batters. 

*T wanted to do it at borne in 
front of the home crowd,’* Ryan 
said. “I knew if I didn’t do it to- 
night. I was going to do it on the 
road. That was definitely a motiva- 
tion to do it tonight” 

“I was glad he got his 4,000 
strikeouts and glad to be part of the 
game,” said the Mets' starter, Sid 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

Fernandez. “It’s something m al- 
ways remember and tell my kids 
about 1 don’t have any kick But 
when 1 do. I'll tell them.” 

Ryan might also have gotten the 
victory had New York not come up 
with two unearned runs in the sev- 
enth to tie at 3, after Ty Gainey 
dropped Len Dykstra’s fly ball for 
a two-base error and Dykstra took 
third, beating a run-down on Wally 
Backman’s fielder’s choice. 

Dickie Thon. leading off (he boi- 



Betmn-Unfed Pica im wio a ond 


Nolan Ryan's aim was true in Houston as DannyHeep of 
the Mets became his record 4,000th strikeout Tharsday. 


tom of the 12th, slapped a single to « , ■- m- ^ ^ v ^ 

Coleman, McGee Steal Game 





SPO RTS BRIEFS 

Hinault’s Team Loses Suit to Rival 

PARIS (UPI) — Four- time Tour de France champion Bernard Hin- 
ault, his agent and the La Vie Claire health food company were jointly 
. entered Friday to pay 700,000 francs ($75,000) in damages to a rival, 
health food concern mat ured to sponsor the French cyclist. 

■ A Paris court ruled in favor of the Vfragermme company, which 
claimed Hinault broke an endorsement contract when he left the Renault 
team in 1984 to join the La Vie Claire team. The vodict was appealed. 

Baseball Talks Canceled, Until July 25 

; NEW YORK (AP) — Representatives of baseball management and 
the, players association, who have been negotiating a new collective 
b argain ing ag reement since November, met for on e hou r Th ursday and 
taa&reTasession that had”been scheduled for Friday ~ 

; They will meet again July 25, after tbe All-Star break and after tbe 
union meets Monday in Chicago to set a strike dale. 

■U.S. Women Take Right to Exercise 

HARTSDALE, New York (UPI) — Women have become a mjgority 
of. new participants in running, weight training, physical conditioning 
and fitness bicycling in the United States, according to a survey. 

■ Some of Che findings by American Sports Data Inc: Three out of five 
new physical conditioning and weight training participants and seven out 
of every 10 new fitness bicyclists were women; of the adults who have 
taken up running or jogging in the past year, 57 percent are female. 

Tor the Record 

Chris Ntehofl, former Northern Ireland international soccer defender, 
signed a three-year contract to manage first division Southampton. (UPI) 
San Diego Padres officials, saying they want to maintain a family 
atmosphere at the team’s home games, have asked the stadium conces- 
sionaire to halt beer sales during the late innings. (AP) 



Doran singled. 

“That ball barely was hit hard 
enough to get out of the infield,” 
said Doran. 

Dodgers 3, Cubs 1: In Chicago, 
Steve Yeager’s two-ran single end- 
ed a scoreless tie in the seventh 
inning and Los Angdcs won its 
fourth straight, moving to within a 
half-game of the lead in the Na- 
tional League West Division. 

Reds 2, Expos (k In Cincinnati 
Dan Bilardello singled in the 
game's firat run in the seventh in- 
ning against Montreal. Rookie Ron 
Robinson won his fifth straight 
without a loss, while the Reds end- 
ed a three-game slide. 

Pirates 6, Giants 4: Johnny Ray 
bit a two-run homer in Pittsburgh, 
rookie Joe Orsulak went 4-for-4 
and Cedlio Guante pitched 5 2/3 
innings of two-hit against San 
Francisco. That ended the Pirates’ 
four-game losing streak but length- 
ened the Giants’ to five in a row. 
^ ■ Braves 3, PtdKes 2: Rafael Ra- 


Stephenson 
Dime Short 
Of Open Lead 

Washington Past Service 

SPRINGFIELD. New Jersey — 
One thin dime deprived Jan Ste- 
phenson of a tie for the lead with 
Nancy Lopez, Kathy Baker and Ja- 
net Anderson in Thursday’s first 
round of the U.S. Women's Open 
golf tournamenL 

Lopez, Baker and Anderson, the 
1982 Open winner, shot two-under- 
par 70 on the hiDy course at Baltus- 
rol Golf Club. 

Stephenson provided most of the 
day’s drama when she was assessed 
a one-stroke penalty on the 11th 


Nancy Lopez urged putt to go into the hole en route to 
shooting 70 and a tie for lead m U.S. Women’s Open golf. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Football 








C« war «•■* 



aj.%* »«*■■■/ . 

m" :r* 9 :i i 

it . i. 

KL’.J - 'J • 

.I-JI - 

J” 

'• V; .. . 
: 

:• 

• •• > r . . 

v-T'-T: 


Thursday’s Line Scores 

r NATIONAL LEAGUE 

LMAaMtM WW]0M 7 • 

Chicago 000 ON BT*-1 S 0 

WMch, Ht mm m ana Yeagsr: Fontsnol. 
Fiwter O) and Oavto. W— woteh, 3-1. L— 
Fortenat, 34. Sv— Hawaii (*). 

>11 BOB BOO-4 10 1 

220 eio 00 k— 4 U • 

- Krukow, jaHcoat (AI. HWntao 18] ond Brwv 
hr; McWIUtotm. Gvanlo I4> and Pona. W- 
Ubomk. 3.1, L — Krukow. 5-7. HRs— Son Pran- 
. Branfv I1TI. PIltflbwWL Ray <1». 

7 B 
7 1 

. ukos «) and FRzseraM; Rabln- 
.K Power <B) o«J BlltardaUo. W— RoWnsoa 
S*- L— hnwo, 54. Sv— Power (14). 

>Ba Mom on ON MO— • 5 5 

nxmfls 210 2 M l»*—* IX • 

Thurmond. Jackson (5). LeHaris (8) and 
KtflAadv; Tudor and NJeto. W— Tudor. 13-7. 
J— TrvirmonttW. HR— Sf. Louis. Clark (17). 
rw nnd o m tii a mi om oi*— a 7 i 

Adnata OH MB 111—1 » 1 

■«Dmnv, carman (BLAndenea i*l and vir- 
.9)1; SinlflvDcdnian (8). Softer (*) and Corona. 
W-Suttir, 54 L— Andersen. 31 HP — Pnilo- 
'•fatila, Samuel (8). 

•ftW YOft 810 8M JM 083—3 10 0 

K>«fM > OM 111 MO Ml— 4 1> 2 

' P fW imi ea.imcOawell (7). Orosco (Utl.Cor- 
"wn (m and Carter. Reynolds (12); Rran. 
®® n k**ft),Sin|th (10) and BaHov. W— Smith. 
S-Z L— Garmon, 44. HR— Houston, Bau (10). 

-AMERICAN LEAGUE 

M0 002 010-8 10 2 
Oakland 133 am llx— » ra l 

VaabeteteCpeonower (3). Wolfs (3), Ladd 


17) and Moore; Sutton, Ontiveros IB) and Tstf ■ 
Man. W— Sutton. 9-5. L — VuekOvlCh.3-7.HR — 
Oakland. Tetfletan (21. 

Kansas Cllv IM OM 000-1 5 1 

Cleveland M0 IM 088-0 4 ! 

Jackson and Swxlbero: Ruhle and Banda, 
Willard (?). W— Jackson, 74. L— Rutile, 24. 
HR— Kansas Dty, Brett (12). 

Minnesota 8T 0SI 8TS-5 I • 

Detroit MO IN 010—1 4 2 

Smithson. Davts (9) and Salas; O'Neal. Lo- 
om (4), Schaerer {*) and Castilla. Melvin (f). 
W— Smithson. H-7. L — O'Neal. M. Sv— Davis 
(HI. 

Oflcnao IM DM 380—4 13 0 

Baltimore 188 BOB 884-7 18 8 

Bannister. SpI liner (7), Aaosta (7), James 
(», Stanton 19) and Fisk; McGreoor. Stewart 
(7) and Dempsey. W— Stewart, 34. L— Stan- 
ton, l-l HRS— ChicoDO. Fisk (321. Boll I more, 
Lynn (15). 

Texas BM'BM Ol— 7 » i 

New York 218 808 MX— 17 IT 1 

Cook. Welsh (4). Rcnema (4). Schmldi (I) 
and Pelralll; Cowley. Bardl (3). Shirley (3), 
Armstrona (■). Fisher 19) and Horsey, Wyne- 
oar (5). W— Shirley. 33. L— Cook, 31. HRs— 
Texas. McDowell (5). New York, Winfield 
<T1). Randolph 12). Savior (15). 

Boston IM 281 818—7 » 8 

Seattle mb D81 048—1 i l 

N fewer, Crawford (4) end Gedmani Swift. 
Thomas (41. Lone (*l and SeotL W-N toaer. 5- 
4. L^-SwHL54. Sv — Crawford (3). HRs - -floe- 
ton, Lyons (3). Hoffman 13). 

Taranto 081 031 MM 11 1 

California 8H 308 MM II 1 

Alexander, Acker (7). Lovefle (7) and 
Whitt; Staton, aements (51. Sandies (8) and 
BoomL W— Alexander, 34. L— Slaton. W. Sv— 
Lavene w). 


CFL Standings 


EASTERN DIVISION 



W 

L 

T 

PF 

PA 

Pto 

Mmtrmil 

2 

e 

0 . 

54 

34 

4 

Ottawa 

8 

i 

D 

23 

44 

9 

Toronto 

0 

i 

0 

23 

25 

0 

Hamilton 

0 

2 

0 

19 

58 

0 


western Division 


Brtt Q mb 

i 

0 

8 

42 

8 

2 

Edmonton 

i 

a 

0 

25 

23 

2 

SasfcutclMffl 1 

a 

8 

44 

22 

2 

Winn low 

l 

l 

0 

34 

45 

2 

Orisary 

8 

i 

8 

>8 

22 

0 


Tlwnday'ft Reran 



Winning It, Hamilton 11 





Transition 


I-; •; I -f 

z 4 ; 

>- .■ * ■ 
L ' T 


jor League Standings Nolan Ryan 


-z* 

1.^7' 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Eos* DtoHJen 


; • Toril 
Owefemd 

west Dhrtikm 

49 3J £S3 — 

44 40 £34 5 

42 41 30t> 6V> 

40 41 ,494 7W 

41 43 488 * 

38 44 443 W 

12 S3 374 ITVi 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Rest DtvHOM 

W L Pet. GB 

50 32 .410 — 

47 34 M M 

48 37 S6S 3V2 

44 39 330 4W 

37 44 444 I3W 

38 M 341 22 
WM» DivtSiM 

48 3? 345 — 
44 34 341 M 

42 40 312 4T 

43 42 304 5 

36 47 434 11 

5?tFronctoCO 31 H 345 17 


NOLAN RYAN'S STRIKEOUT RECORD 
944 N.Y. Mf4 9 4 



W 

L 

PcL 

GB 

1968 N.Y. Melt 

133 

53 

32 

<U* 

— 

1969 N.Y. Mats . 

92 

47 

35 

sn 

41b 

W70 N.Y. Mats 

125 

46 

38 

.561 

5Vi 

(971 N.Y. Mats 

137 

43 

39 

524 

8Vj 

1972 CalMomto 

329 

43 

41 

512 

9VS 

1973 CaHfemla 

383 

34 

45 

JUA 

IS 

1974 California 

387 

27 

58 

J25 

25 

1975 California 

186 


BASEBALL 
American Leaeae . 

CHICAGO— Traded Tim Loltar, Pitcher, to 
Boston for Reid Nichols, outfielder, and a 
player to be named later. 

NEW YORK— Optioned Scott Bradley, out- 
Holder-catcher, to Q) (umbos of the Interna- 
tional Lsooua. Readied Dan Pasnuo, outfield- 
er. from cotumbus- 

BASKETBALL 
NoOkwal Basketball League 
l—A. LAKERS— Announced Itwt-fhe team 
would not exercise the option en Bab Me* 
Adoot crmiriKt for the 198386 season. .. 

SAN ANTONIO— Signed Aifredrlck 

Huettex forward, to a contract. 

- FOOTBALL 
nan seal Football Leases 
INDIANAPOLIS— Started Devs Burnett*, 
offensive tackle. 

HOCKEY 

MattowX Hadley 1 — 

N.Y. ISLANDERS— Anders Kaltur, o slxttv 
year right wins from Sweden, mi Oven his 
unaanm Hanoi reieese- 
HARTFORD — Nomod Bob CntH»r assto- 
Iml general monager. 


Romania Bars 
Pnica From Race 


Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — Maridca 
Puica, the Romanian who won the 
1984 Olympic 3,000-meier race in 
which Maty Decker Slaney and 
Zola Budd collided, will not rud in 
an “Olympic Replay” race July 20 
in London because her government 
will not permit it 
The invitation was 'telexed to the 
Romanian Athletic Federation on 
July 3. A British official said Thurs- 
day by telephone from London 
that the federation had replied that 
“it was too short notice lo include it 
in her schedule.” 

The Ro manian national champi- 
onships will be held this weekend, 
yet Puica said earlier in Lhe week 
that she wanted to run in London 
but had not been invited. That was 
why the invitation was senL 


to her puuer and the penally gave 
her a bogey six. Angry and appar- 
ently dose lotean, she finished ao. a 
one-under 71, tied with six others. 

Tm usually so careful," she 
said. “It upset me and I couldn’t 
put it out of my mind. It was a 
disappointing round because I was 
playing well, I fdl confident and 
then, all of a sudden, I was shaken 
up. At first, I thought il was unfair, 
bin we have rules. 

Also at 71 were Betsy King, the 
1984 player of the year; Lori Gar- 
baez, who finished tied for third in 
last year’s Open; amateur Dotti 
Pepper, 19, a Furman University 
sophomore who was low amateur 
last year, Kathleen McCarthy; 
Judy Clark and Jackie Bertsch. 

The 10 sub-par first rounds 
broke the record erf nine set in the 
1981 Open. 

But Hollis Stacy, the defending 
champion and three- time winne r of 
the Open, shot a six-over-par 78 
with a triple bogey at 13. ABce 
Miller, win has broken the record 
for single-season earnings with 
$319,172, bogeyed the second bote 
and double bogeyed the third on 
the way to a 75. 

■ Hinkle Leads ty 2 Shots 

Lon Hinkle, seeking his first vic- 
tory on the PGA Tour since 1979, 
shot a 7-under-par 64 for a 2-stroke 
lead Thursday after one round of 
the Anheuser-Busch Golf Classic 
in Williamsburg, Virginia, the As- 
sociated Press reported. 

Jay Haas and two first-year play- 
ers, Mike Hulbert and Steve rate, 
were ai 66.. 


the bottom of the ninth and beat 
Philadelphia in Atlanta. 

The Phillies’ manager, John 
Felske, decided to put Von Hayes 
behind second bare and go with 
only two outfielders with 
tied, nobody out and the 
loaded. 

Orioles 7, White Sox 6: In the 
American League, Chicago relief 
ace Bob James was me out away 
from nailing down a save in Balti- 
more, but then was striken by an 
attack of condelmaria — inflam- 
mation of the kneecap. Mike Stan- 
ton relieved with the bases empty 
and four tatters later left with a 
stunning loss, Fred Lynn having hit 
another game winning homer. 

After an RBI single by Eddie 
Murray, Lynn cleared the bases 
with a three-run shot that gave him 
his fourth ninth-inning game-win- 
ning RBI this season, three of 
which have come via the home run. 

Lee Lacy, who increased his frit- 
ting streak to 14 games, got ' his 
fourth hit of the game to start the 
winning rally. Cal Ripken walked, 
and Murray singled in Lacy before 
Lynn drilled a 3-1 pitch over the 
360-foot mark. 

Twins 5, Tigers 1: Rookie Marie 
Salas hit a tie-breaking two-run 
double during a three-run fifth that 
gave Minnesota its victory in De- 
troit. Mike Smithson and Ron Da- 
vis pitched a six-hitter as the Twins 
beat the Tigers for the fifth time 
without a loss this year. 

A’s 9, Brewers 3: In Oakland, 
California, Mickey Tettieton ho- 
mered against Milwaukee and Don 


Las Angetes Tima Service 

ST. LOUIS — Vince Coleman was on the Busch Stadium video 
screen between innings Thursday night, saying to the fans: “Please, 
while you're here at the game, be considerate to your fellow man.” 

Coleman then proceeded to treat the San Diego Padres and pitcher 
Mark Thurmond with complete disrespect, stealing three bases and 
scoring twice in the Sl Lotus Cardinals' easy, 6-0 vtctoiy. 

And Coleman, who has a league-leading 62 stolen bases, just began 
the track meet. After be gets on base, up comes Willie McGee. Since 
McGee runs a 4.45-second 40-yard (365-meter) dash — a tittle off 
Coleman's 4 J pace — he will steal, too. Thursday night, the Willie 
and Vince tag team was successful on two double steals, which led to 
four runs, which led to the Padres 1 third straight loss, which led to 
pitcher John Thdor’s 10th straight victory. 

Overall the Cardinals stole eight bases, their season high, and the 
Padres commuted five errors. 

The Cardinals never hit the ball very hard. But they would hit it 
somewhere on the ground, and, with them, that is enough, considering 
how they almost always beat out the throw. Coleman singled by third 
baseman Kurt Bevacqua in the first inning, and McGee singled to 
center. The first heat was on. 

Immediately, the Cardinals* manager, Whitey Herzog, ordered a 
double steaL Thurmond, who has a very slow delivery to the plate, was 
bopdess. So was catcher Terry Kennedy. Kennedy did not even throw 
the ball, and base runners stood on second and third. Two outs later, 
Tito Landrum singled for two runs. 

In the fourth, Coleman bunted. Bevacqua fielded tbe ball and threw 
it eight feet over Steve Garvey’s head, but Coleman had to hold at first 
since the ball bounced back to Garvey. Coleman stole second, McGee 
walked on four pitches and the second heat was on. 

Again, Herzog ordered a double steaL This time, Kennedy threw to 
third, where the ball bounced in front of Bevacqua and on into lefL 
Coleman scored. McGee then stole third, uncontested. Jack Clark 
followed with a base hit and it was 5-0. 


Simon won his sixth straight — 
and his 289th in the majors. 

Royals 1, Indians 0: Danny Jack- 
son pitched a six-hitter in Cleve- 
land and George Bren hit a first- 
innrng homer for Kansas City, 
which was held to five hits by Vera 
Ruhle. 

Brett got three hius, the 15th time 
be has accomplished that this sea- 
son, and raised Iris batting average 
to 559, best in the AL. 

Yankees IL Rangers 7: Pinch- 
hitter Don Baylor got his 10th 
grand slam in the majors during an 
eight-run fourth inning that beat 
Texas in New York. The Yankees’ 
starting pitcher, Joe Cowley, left in 
the third when his nose was broken 
by a collision with the 
Toby Harrah near (he fust- 

line. 

Don Mattingly narrowly missed 
getting a grand slam in the fourth 


when his upper-deck smash went 
just outside the right-field foul 
pole. He then doubled in three 
runs. 

Blue Jays 5, Angels 3: Ranee 
MuDmiks got two doubles and a 
single; scored twice and drove in a 
run to help Toronto win in Ana- 
heim. Cam oral a. George Bell had 
two RBI singles as the Blue Jays 
won their fifth straight game. 

Jesse Barfield shon-arcuited an 
Angels* rally in (he seventh when 
be cut down Rod Carew with a 320- 
foot throw from right Grid, the ball 
reaching third base on the fly. 

Red Sox 7, Mariners 1: Al Nip- 
per and Steve Crawford pitfcbed a 


one-hitter in Seattle, allowing only 
a sixth-inning angle by Ivan Calde- 
ron, and Steve Lyons pared Bos- 
ton's 10-hit attack by driving in 
three runs to ensure the Mariners 
lost their fifth straight. (UPI, AP) 


AUrStar Pitchers 9 Reserves Selected 


Cycling 


1974 Co! I fomln 

1977 California 

1978 CalHomtO 

1979 CaUtooifa 

1980 Houston 

1981 Houston 

1982 Houston 

1983 Houston 

1984 Houston 
198$ Houston 
TOTAL 


3Z7 

341 

340 

223 

200 

140 

24S 

183 

197 

130 

4AM 


jiii ste 

?" l-i J btanm 


all-time strikeout leaders 
1. Nolan Rron AMt 

1 St ova Carlton 

3. Gov lord Parry X534 

4. wotfer Johnson . 3 J° 8 

S Tom’ Stover W™ 

4. Don Sutton 3370 

7. Foramen tonkins 

8. Boh Gttuon M17 

9. Phil NrekfO 

10. Jim Sunning MSS 


Tear de France 

WOMEN 

ELEVENTH STAGE 
Emm Corranoon-En-Varasn 
[215 kjyi/M ffllia Individual time trU) 
i. Mario Car**, IWW 31 mlnutos, 3 seconds 
1 Joannle Lam Prance, 33:37 
1 Cadle Odin, Franco. 34:04 
i. Petra Steanarr, West Germany, 34:09 
S. Henry Tow Holland. 34:12 
A Vgierie jJmmone), France, 34:Z) 

7. Judith Painter. Britain. 34:48 

Overall stone [nut 

l. Maria Cantm. I tolv, ?1 ttoun, 24ml miles. 44 
seconds 

1 Jcannie Longa. Prone* UHI behind load- 
er 

X cectto Odin. France, at W‘J6 
4. DamMaue Domlanl,. France, at 19:43 
5. 1 mo Ida Cfctam. Italy, at 19:59 

8. Phyffl* Hints, US. 30:47 

7. Chanlal BroCa. France, «t rt:34 
& Heteeri Hoge, Holland, 22:37 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK - Fifteen-game 
winner Joaquin Andujar of the Sl 
L ouis Cardinals and strikeout lead- 
er Dwight Gooden of the New 
York Mas head the eight-man Na- 
tional League All-Star pitching 
staff selected Thursday by the 
team's manager, Dick Williams. 

Detroit's two 10-game winners, 
Jack Monis and Dan Perry, and 
the Tigers' relief ace, W3He Her- 
nandez, form the nucleus of the 
American League staff picked by 
its manager, Sparky Anderson. 

Besides Gooden, whose 142 
strikeouts ami 1.78 earned run av- 
erage lead the NL, and Andujar, 
Williams picked three other start- 
ing pitchers: Nolan Ryan of tbe 
Houston Astros, Fernando Valen- 
zuela of the Los Angeles Dodgers 
and LaMarr Hoyt of tbe San. Diego 
Padres. For relievers he chose Rich 
Gossage of the Padres, Jeff Rear- 
don <rf Montreal, who leads the 
majors with 22 saves, and Scott 
Gamelts of. San Francisco. 

The AL staff also win. have as 
starters Bert Blyleven of Oevdand- 


and Dave Stieb and Jamie Key of the fans picked some deserving fd- 
Toronto, phis relievers Donnie lows,” Jackson said. 

Moore of California and Jay How- wHKams’ other reserves were 
dl of Oakland. • outfielders Jose Cruz of Houston, 

Missing from the AL team was Dave Parker of Cincinnati and Tim 
Ron Gmdry of New York, who Raines of Montreal; infidders Jack 
leads the league with 11 victories ^ Rose of 

and has won 10 straight. He asked 

Sunday for the Yankees. Tbe^N^ 
team does not include San Diego's 
Andy Hawkins, who wen his first 
1 1 decisions this season. 

Williams rectified two fan over- 
sights by including Willie McGee 
of the St. Louis Caiditub and Pe- 
dro Guerrero of tbe Los Angeles 
Dodgers among the NL team’s re- 
serves. Two perennial AL AD- 
Stars, Rod Carew and Reggie Jack- 
son of the California Angds, will 
not be playing in Tuesday night's 
game. 

Carew failed to make the squad 
for the first time in his 19 major 
league seasons. Jackson, who has 
15 homers and 44 RBL has been 
selected to 14 AU-Star teams since 
1969, including the past eight. 

*Td loved to have made it, but 


liman, jwae banaoer 
cago, Garry Templeton of San Die- 
go and Tim Wailach of Montreal, 
and catchers Tony Pena of Pitts- 
burgh and Ozzie Virgil of Philadel- 
phia. 

Rose, who has played first, sec- 
ond and third bases and right and 
left fields previously, will be mak- 
ing his I7th All-Star appearance. 

Anderson's reserves were out- 
fielders Harold Baines of Chicago. 
Tom Bntnansky of Minnesota, Phil 
Bradley erf Seattle and Gary Ward 
of Texas; infidders Cecil Coopa of 
Milwaukee, Don Mattingjy of New 
York, D amas o Garcia of Toronto. 
Wade Boggs of Boston, Paul Moli- 
ror of Milwaukee and Alan Tram- 
mell of Detroit: and catchers Carl- 
ton Fisk of Chicago and Ernie 
Whitt of Toronto. 





Joaifficr-HociogCLMMaak dJAijoat 4a I* Ville de Pam. 

35, boulevard des Capucmes, 75002 ParixTeL 261 .66.74 et 261 J5J5 













Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUISDAY, JULY 13-14, 1985 


an 

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ART BUCHWALD 


Building Up Flight Miles 


W ASHINGTON —1 see where 
several airline companies are 
being taken over. Frankly. I don't 
know why anyone would want to 
buy an airline nowadays. The way 
they're banding out free tickets I 
predict in two years everyone will 
be flying for nothing anyway. 

What happened was that some 
sales promouon genius thought up 
the idea of awarding '‘frequent fly- 
er" mileage 
credits equal to 
the number of 
miles the pas- 
senger flew. 

These credits, 
when built up, 
could then be 
exchanged ei- 
ther for free 
flights or up- 
grading to a bet- 

ter class of irav- Buctiwald 
eL For example, if you earn a credit 
of 60,000 miles you can fly coach to 
any destination in the United 
States; for 100.000 miles you can 
fly first class. And for 1 50,000 
miles you get to take your entire 
family, including the dog, any- 
where in the world. 

If the airlines had just stuck to 
the original idea it would have 
made some sense. But they started 
giving out “bonus'' miles, not jusL 
for flying but for renting a car, 
staying in a certain hotel or eating a 
particular kind of pizza 30 days in a 
row. 



Then she gave me another cou- 
pon for 5.000 bonus miles. 

“This is Tor wearing a tie. Are 
you an American?" she asked. 

“Of course I am," I said hotly. 

“Then I can credit you with 
10,000 more bonus miles. Do you 
have a hotel room in Paris?" 

“Yes, here is my confirmation." 

“People with confirmed Paris 
hold rooms are entitled to 7,500 
miles.” 

“Listen, can we forget all this 
mileage stuff? I want to buy a tick- 
et.” 

“Are you going to pay by check 
or credit card?" 

“What’s the difference?” 

“If you pay by check you will 
recdve 10,000 extra miles, while a 
credit card onlv entitles you to 
9,000” 

“Okay, I'll pay by check. Are 
there any seats available?” 

“Smoking or nonsmoking?” 

“Nonsmoking.” 

She gave me a bonus coupon for 
13,500 mQes. 

□ 


I hadn't realized how easy it was 
to build up bonus mileage until I 
went into an airline office on Fifth 
Avenue in New York last week. 

I told the lady behind the 
counter, “I'd like to ask about a trip 
to Paris.” 

The lady handed me a coupon. 

“What’s this?” 1 asked. 

“You’re entitled to 5,000 bonus 
mfies for coming in and inquiring 
about our flight to Paris.” 

“ThaL’s wonderful" I declared 


Tintm Memorial 


Agence France- Press* 

BRUSSELS — Funds are being 
collected for a 10- meter-high (33- 
feet) statue of the Belgian cartoon 
character Tintin and his dog Milou 
between Brussels and the interna- 
tional airport at Zaventem by die 
Friends of Hergi. the pen name of 
Tintin's creator, Georges Remi. 


I was getting embarrassed “I 
don’t want to look a gift horse in 
the mouth, but I haven’t even taken 
off yet and you’re crediting me with 
thousands of flying miles. I fed like 
a fraud.” 

“It’s not out of my pocket,” she 
said “I'm just following instruc- 
tions. The airline business is very 
competitive, and if we didn't issue 
extra bonus miles you would buy 
your flight from one of our compet- 
itors." 

“Well as long as you put it that 
way I guess I'll accept. I'll be re- 
turning on Aug. 6." 

Damned if she didn't give me 
another coupon. 

Fifteen minutes later she handed 
me my ticket 

I got out my checkbook. “How 
much do I owe you?” 

She hit the keys on her computer 
several times and then said. 
“There’s no charge. You have 
enough, credited miles now to enti- 
tle you to a free round-trip ticket to 
Paris." 

I took the ticket and shoved it in 
my pockeL “Can I ask you one 
question? How’s business?” 

“Wonderful” she said “Before 
our frequent flyer bonus program 
we were carrying less than 25 per- 
cent passenger loads. Now that 
we're offering free flights you can’t 
get a seat on our planes.” 


AKibbutznik 

In the Rockies 


By Herbert Mitgang 

New York Times Serttue 

N EW YORK — Amos Oz. 

the Israeli novelist and es- 
sayist, dropped off some apho- 
risms and observations the other 
day while passing through New 
York on the way to Colorado, 
where he has been teaching and 
absorbing the American scene 
through the keen vision of a kib- 
butznlk in the Rockies. 

In carefully chosen, fluent sen- 
tences. as if mentally translating 
from Hebrew into English, he 
talked about the six years of 
word-sculpting that went into his 
new novel. “A Perfect Peace” (a 
Helen and Kurt Wolff Book-Har- 
court Brace Jovanovich). He also 
discussed writers and students in 
the Middle East and Middle 
West, and a surprising personal 
influence — Sherwood Anderson. 

“A Perfect Peace,” the story of 
a family living on a kibbutz in the 
early days of Israel, is concerned 
with the clash of immigrants and 
their native-born children. “The 
crux of the novel” Oz said, “is 
the marvelous dr eam of the ideal- 
istic pioneers, those old tyrants 
who wanted to revolutionize the 
human psyche and the nature of 
love. Somehow, their dream still 
hovers in the air.” The title de- 
rives from a prayer said at grave- 
side. “It’s not sunply a nostalgic 
novel about fathers and sons,” he 
said, “but about yearnings.” 

Oz said there was a subtext to 


“A Perfect Peace” that he hoped 
readers would discern. “I re- 
solved to convey a certain biblical 
sioty — about* King Saul Jona- 
than his son, and David. Saul, the 
magnetic, fading father. Jona- 
than. the tragic, rejected son. Da- 
vid the crazy, poetic adopted 
stranger. All this secretly feeds 
the plot of the novel." 

“Writing a novel is like recon- 
structing the Rocky Mountains 
out of Lego blocks," he said “It's 
comparable to a sculptor chisel- 
ing away. I see some clumsy 
heavy rock out there in the moun- 
tains I drag it into my studio and 
chip away for the next two years. 
When it is over, I put a magnify- 
ing glass to my eye and then, with 
small pincers, start removing the 
particles and smoothing it ouL” 

Of novel writing, he said: 
“There is no word in Hebrew for 
fiction — I boycott that word. It 
means the opposite of truth. 
Prose, yes, but not fiction. I write 
prose. 'I aim at truth, not facts, 
;mH I am old enough to know the 
difference between facts and 
truth." 

Oz is old enough lo have 
fought in the Sinai Desen and on 
the Golan Heights in two wars. 
He was bom in Jerusalem in 1939 
and since age 15 has lived and 
worked on Kibbutz H ul da, tak- 
ing his turn as a waiter, a teacher 
or guard in a separate studio, he 
writes at a standup desk on a 
typewriter with Hebrew key- 



M*S3*s/Tn« New Vert Trees 

Amos Oz: Chipping away. 


board He and his family live in a 
small house that overlooks culti- 
vated fields and a line of sentinel 
trees on the horizon of the Judean 

hills 

“Writing a poem is like a short 
love affair, writing a short story 
like a long love affair, writing a 
novel is like a marriage," Oz said. 
“In a novel you have to make a 
half-million decisions, from the 
choice of an adverb to where to 
place a comma. [ can have a pang 
of self-indulgence over a single 
comma. I write my drafts in long- 
hand — I na#d the sensual con- 
tact of paper, pen, ink and my 
fingers. Then I fight it out on the 
typewriter." 

Oz said he found an affinity 
between his writing, which is 
rooted in Israel no matter where 
he writes, and that of Central and 
South American novelists with 
their emotional tales about the 


extrwrdinariness of ordinary life. 
“The name of the game for me is 
shameless, gutsy storytelling," he 
said. “The Latin American novel- 
ists have the courage to tell a 
story as if nobody had ever told a 
story 1 before and never had a sto- 
ry before.” 

The true riches for him as a 
writer, he said arc his neighbors 
on the kibbutz. “I know three or 
four hundred very different peo- 
ple intimately.” he said. “I know 
their secrets.' The penalty is that 
they know a lot more about me 
than I’d like them to know — but 
that’s only fair. After dinner, I sit 
down with these successful old 
revolutionaries who have out- 
lived their revolutions and their 
success. They tell me Lheir life 
stories, making me vow- that I will 
not use them and secretly hoping, 
of course, that I wilL I have a 
neighbor who combs his hair 
whenever he passes my studio. He 
tells me that in case I see him and 
use him as a character, be wants 
his hair combed.” 

For the past two semesters. Oz 
has taught writing at Colorado 
College in Colorado Springs. He 
said be and his wife would return 
to Israel with warm feelings 
about the region. 

“It’s still a little too early for 
me to write about Colorado,” Oz 
said “I need to get away from 
Israel to write about IsraeL I need 
to get away from Colorado to 
write about Colorado. When I do 
journalistic writing it’s for rage, 
and nothing outraged me in Colo- 
rado. Colorado Springs is a beau- 
tiful place. ! taught a couple of 
courses in literature and a brief 
course in politics called ‘Israelis 
and Palestinians.’ I tried to con- 
vey to my students that the situa- 
tion resembles a Greek tragedy 
rather than a Wild West film.” 


PEOPLE 


Steaming Over the Savoy 


The owners of some of she 
world’s best-known hold? have 
been lashing out at one other in J 
long-running struggle for the Ss' o\ 
in London. The Savoy directors, 
headed hy the banker Sir .Anthony 
Tukc. put an Advertisement in The 
Times and Financial Times news- 
papers accusing a trial tycoon. 
Lord Forte, had of the Trust house 
Forte group, of publicly denigrat- 
ing the Savoy group » hilc privately 
trying lo buy 'control of it on the 
stock market. The directors ac- 
cused Lord Forte and hi> son and 
chief aide. Rocco Forte, of private- 
ly paying more than the market 
price for Savoy stock while saving 
in public that the market price was 
“ridiculously inflated." The adver- 
tisement charged that Forte’s 
“campaign against the Savoy” 
stemmed from a frustrated ambi- 
tion to control ihe Savoy and other 
hotels owned by the group: C br- 
idge's. the Berkeley, the Con- 
naught. and the Lancaster Hotel in 
Paris. Forte, whose London flag- 
ship hotel is the Grosvenor House 
in Park Lane, responded. “I just 
ignore that kind of thins. These 
people like spending shareholders] 
money. It is a lot of rubbish.” 
Rocco Forte said it was "quite out- 
rageous” to suggest that he and his 
father had “any personal interest in 
this battle” In 19S1 the Savoy di- 
rectors rejected a Forte takeover 
bid of £67 million (then about SI 2 1 
million). That effort gave Forte a 
large block of Savoy stock, but 
without voting rights' He now has 
70J percent of the shares but 40.3 
percent of the votes, and is refused 
board representation by Tuke and 
the other directors. 

□ 


win. "Go ano Sec." directed by 
□cm Klimov, tells of the Nazi occu- 
pation of a Belorussian village. 
Christos Sriopachas' “Dcweni ef 
the Nine" is about a band of goer- 
rilla* from the Democratic Army 
before their annihilation duri.ig the 
last dais of the Greek civil war. 


Tlie Arab world’s fir .si astronaut. 
Prince Sultan Salman Abdel Aziz 
id-Saud, a nephew of Kinc Fabd. 
returned to Saudi Arabia or. Thurs- 
day evening to a rapturous wel- 
come in his native city. Riyadh. 
Crowds lined the route from the 
airport to the Riyadh sports stadi- 
um to cheer the prince. Riyadh offi- 
cials have decided ro name a city 

■ mdfCiN'iuin Pl’irv ** and I km 




intersection “Space Place.” and the 
Saudi post office has issued a 
stamp bearing the princes effigy. 
□ 


Pope John Paul li w ill meet with 
Moslem youths'in Morocco, beati- 
fy a nun in Zaire and visit one of 
Kenya's most popular wildlife 
viewing areas during his 12-day 
tour of seven African countries, 
starting Aug ?. The itinerary re- 
leased Friday by the Vatican 
showed that the pontiff would also 
consecrate the Ivory Coast’s new 
Roman Catholic cathedral in Abi- 
djan. attend an African eucharistic 
congress, visit United Nations of- 
fices in Nairobi and ordain priests 
in Togo. It will be Lhe pope's 27th 
trip abroad, and his third to .Africa. 
□ 


y n 


Rome Judge Bans Use of Monuments for Big Cultural Events 


By Victor L Simpson 

The Associated Press 

R OME — A judge has banned 
the use of Rome's ancient 
monuments for cultural extrava- 
ganzas, undermining a cornerstone 
of the effort by the outgoing Com- 
munist-run city administration to 
bring culture to the masses. 

The decision, made public 
Thursday, cited “improper use” of 
the Circus Maximus for a film festi- 
val and of the Colosseum for an 
exhibition on the economy under 
the Fascist regime. 


Judge Adalberto Albamonte said 
he would not bring criminal 
charges against city officials but he 
hinted in newspaper interviews 
that he would seek to halt the out- 
door opera at the Ca racaDa Baths, 
and even refreshment stands at 
tourist sites. 

The ruling comes as the Chris- 
tian Democrats, Socialists and 
three small centrist parties are ne- 
gotiating the formation of a new 
city government following Com- 
munist losses in municipal voting 
in May. The Communists have held 


the mayoralty and other key posts 
since 1976. 

The fight over the cultural com- 
missioner's job has been as fierce as 
the battle for mayor. 

“After the mayor, the cultural 
post is the most important,” said 
former Mayor Giulio Carlo Argon, 
a noted an historian who had de- 
scribed a city-sponsored circus at 
Piazza Navona as a “sign of a fallen, 
civilization." 

In recent years, Romans have 
expressed outrage at some events 
organized by the flamboyant Com- 


munist cultural administrator, 
Renato NicolinL 


The judge, who was advised by a 
panel of experts, said that the “cul- 
tural values of history, an and ar- 
chaeology cannot be sacrificed 
without the loss to the community 
of its own historical and cultural 
background.” 

Albamonte died sections of the 
penal code and an article in the 
constitution safeguarding “the nat- 
ural beauties and the historical and 
artistic wealth of Italy." 


The American film “A Soldier's 
Story” shared first place with Sovi- 
et and Greek films depicting the 
inhumanity of war at the 14th in- 
ternational film festival in Mos- 
cow, which ended Friday. Tass said 
that the festival was attended by 
filmmakers from 107 countries ana 
that the winners were chosen from 
42 feature entries. Sharing the gold 
prize with Norman Jewison's stark 
drama of murder in a black U. S. 
Army unit during World War II 
were the Soviet film “Go and See" 
and “The Descent of the Nine” 
from Greece. “A Soldier's Story” 
was nominated for four Academy 
Awards, including best picture and 
best supporting actor, but did not 


A spokeswoman for Frank Shu- 1 
tra. on the singer's ninth wedding 
anniversary, denied repons in two 
New York newspapers that Sinatra 
and his fourth wife. Barbara, were 
on the verge of breaking up. Liz 
Smith, a columnist for ihe Daily 
News. said simply that the mar- 
riage was unraveling. Tlie New 
York Post said that when Barbara 
Sinatra returned from the Wimble- 
don tennis tournament, which she ' 
attended without Sinatra, she con- 
tacted .Arthur Crowley, the lawyer 
who represented Joanna Carson in 
her lengthy divorce suit against the 
entertainer Jotmny Canon. Bui 
Sinatra's spokeswoman. Susan 
Reynolds, said. “There is no truth 
to the irresponsible press reports 
about the Barbara and Frank Sina- 
tra marital status. This eve ning 
July 1 1 , the day of their ninth anni- 
versary, the Sinatras will celebrate 
with friends at their home." 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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FRENCH PROVINCES 

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(93) 80 90 20. Ira 461904 

GREAT BRITAIN 


GREECE 1 


ITALY J 


MONACO 

MONTE CARLO 
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Far Information: Please c cA 
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Between the datec 
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REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


u Open view. Aputmeru. view 
on lee/mourtmns, 5 mns shoes, 
beach, living, 2 rooms, kitchen, bath, 
terrace,! cenitort, parking F3500, Jufy 
1S3V 800/weST Pars: 916 SIM. 


200 sq.fr. terrace, teethed, mads 
service. Sleeps 5. July: $230/week, 
Aug : $244/weefc. Brodc 7 rue du 
Deque, 75013 Pan. Tefc583 II 72. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

AUSTRIA 


VIENNA'S HOUSMG AG&NCY. 
0222-527964, Hpdon, Groben 31. 
fontab: defcm flats ft houses. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

COUNTRY HOUSE 
IN LONDON 

Arrive in London and experience lhe 
Iranquby of a aowtfry housa 

Situated in London's most presbgaus 
area, we offer the ukunae in koainaus 
farnlshod aprttments. Al services are 
provided. 

For further mforrnation please wnte to 
or telephone PJAA. Ud, 46 Upper 
Growcnor Street, Mayfar. London 
W1X 9PG. Tefc Of-629 6280 





HOLLAND 

Renthouse International 
020-448751 (4 lines) 

Nederhoten 19-21, Axmlerdan 

DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 
Deluxe rentals. Vderiussti. 174, 
Amsterdam. CCD671234 or 623222. 



REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


PETS MUM MAKHAARDU 
b*F1 Heaima Service-Rentals 
Amsterdam. Tel: 020-768022. 


nd house. 


Mi" 


ITALY 


Whd in Florence 
SEsraNCTTORTA AL PRATO 
Segxnt uporfment house with fun idled 
flats, avafoUe for 1 week and mare 


Phone: 055/354951 
Wnte: Via forte AJle Mane 16 
50144 r 


TUSCANY AREZ7Q. rent in beautiful 
vila at the price of Itofist Lee 
400,000/ week, Art, 6 bads. Alconv 
forts. unde pane, 50 km from Florence, 
Stena. Perugia. Tefc 0575/843123 or 
wnte kfc Ln Straoa SSL Via Ccppuo- 
gni 5, 52100 Atozzol holy. 


TUSCANY. 1 5th century country home. 
Easyj dgy tetp s to Sienp, Asm, Pen t- 
n Ftonenoe. Red anud vineyards & 
crAtfjes. Low dody/weeWy/mcrthly 
rotes. Cortona, everingi (0575) 
677736 


PHBJGtA SmcJer fumehed flat. $600 
montWy. Cal Rome 782 7374 evening 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMfSaYSSS 8th 


Studo, 2 or 3-room opubuent. 
One month or more. 

LE OAMDGE 359 67 97. 


SHORT TSIM STAY. Advantages of a 
hotel vrthout in c onveniences, feel at 
home in mce SixSat one bedroom 
end mare ei Pans. SORHJJA 80 rue 
de rUniversite. Paris 7Wto 544 39 40 


141H PARC MONT50UWS. Sraom 
a p ortme nt , 3 bedrooua, Icrge double 
hang. 2 baths eajfaped btchen, al 
conrfortL CSI 45 86 T4/ {46|23 1402. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


j PARIS AREA FURNISHED 






AUGUST. MONTPARNASSE, artist 
stadia, 2 boctoxxw. ftrihr emspped. 
FBOOa Trt: 236 4456 or 32038aK 



T fV'fcatj 

1 

h'| -Vf 


USA | 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

BEVBELY HTUS AREA n sunny Coi- 
fontia Exchange kswry 1 bedroom 
condo, pool etc. in prestigous loeo- 
tion far snal flat in LondorvWest fod. 
71327B«6& 614 N. Bn Dr„ Beverty 
«s.CAOTla 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBUnON EXECUTIVES 

Pu&khyoorb, 


in dmt n^i aS anJ nSSd^L 
buna, wtewrartAuneMd 
of a m Rfo n rwriert warid- 
mw most a/ wham an in 
basinots and industry, t riff 
nad k. Just West us (Pads 
613595) baton 10tun\, en- 
suring that tMe can telex you 
back, and your message ant 
tgtpaar within 48 hours. The 
rate it US. f 9.80 or lead 
oq u hadent per One. You amt 
indude comp l et e and rerX- 
edde bXng ad+en. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


d mofable in Erdrth, French, Centra. 
Cortodfc 

GLOBE PLAN S A 

Av Mon-fopos 24, 

Oil 005 Lausama. Switzerted 
Tefc (21) 22 35 12 - Thu 25 1B5 MBJS CH 


IH US SOLVE 
YOUR PROBLEMS: 

Expert contdforts are avdfafala 
in o wide rtnge of fields 
from ognedtige to zoology. 


EXPBmSE 

INTERNATIONAL 
459 Sw w ten Street 
Vic 300a Austn 
Tel: (03) 663 6061. 


If Weuid |pwk W3h Ue 
7Hz (0)40/44 41 55 
7UC: 2164654 E5ID 
LSA, Owiw Vengtan 
Urd Antegeba ra luna GwH. 
r. 36, 2000 ffa rab uro 20 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BROKERS 
INVESTMENT ADVISORS 

[Your eSertt can invest in one of Ameri- 


ka'i mart exatmg terfvxilogicd braci- 
throughi in a btan dolar nut mdurtry. 


^.000 frees afcreo dy Pi tted A 
[Drviderxk Paid- ffigh anruxti ecemgi 
poured for maty, moy ^eare. '*' 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 


T-SMKT FOTOS 
NOW M FULL COCOS 
andkwh busness that am earn you 


6000 Frankfurt AV. Gernwiy. 
Tel, 069-747808 Tbs 412713 K£MA 


tujump 1 nnunnnic 
SLVBWAKE MANtffACTUSB 


prewoudy port pf nahow fawi French 
tedudry now private ertwpriie 
| seeks cSstobutori in Mklde fogt. for 
East, parr of Europe, Africa etc. 
Write to: CHAIRMAN 
BOUIllEf BOUBDH1E 
BJ*. 64, 03300 OUSSET (Vichy) Franca 


CYPRUS -VIDEO -EfCntaraC lab- 
oratory far outnghl sale or anrafeng 
mvartmert by new managnem. Stro- 
tegkoly kxded n Umwol Al E- 
oences mdudng bonded fodvy, tape 
Sbrwy now operating with active 
d o nt efa . for detodc Georges Erato- 


ciTteu, P.O. 8CK 3012, ImiasHl, Cy- 
gru^Tefe* 4219 BART. Tel: Ml. 


ALCOHOL FOR SAiS 4 rri&engaore 
293056 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNTITES 


BKABJ HUM - PROffiSSIONAlS in 

m v c jtiyu l i ons jccrwnsrdd & pezson- 


d). in ajexxbvg E, se curity o F nrto9o- 
bons ft nfividudi Contao: G + 


Co, 13 Sfrml Si. Tel Aviv Israel. Yrii 
3-716646. The 342184 CSMC I Alh 
Guznoi. 


BUYB WANIH) FOR ONNAMON 
leaf oil - mortWy. for detofe, coittad 
CREATIVE CORPORATION SJN 
BHD, 5E Jdort Mini 5cfu, Bahi Kom- 
Tudo Lumpur, Molaysa ■ Tdex 
MA 


21® PASSPORT 35 COUNTMES. 
GMC 26 Heomenac St, 106 76 
Athens, Greece. 


WE OFFS SWISS WATOCS sMar 
to Swatrik. PWae )riu «23D70 Swti- 

zerlsnd. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


R4TL 

BEAUnHJl PEOPLE 

UNUMfTHJ MC 


UiA- A WOBDWDG 


A camplrte persond & busnes service 
providng a unique cofierton of 
talented, vetidite & muflAnquol 
indrviduds far al laod & 
or orKbona flfCPW M. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St.. N.YXL 10019 
Sendee fopresenUMi 
NeededWorldwicfc. 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
report - 13 courtries anofned. De- 


I fang 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


EARN 30% - 35%. WVBT in tteirt 
term eoranerad paper notes. Afej 
Ud, PO Ban 422, Horrwfcuro, Vs- 
dria 2380!. USA 


HAVE U-S. DOUARS TO meehenge 
far tw antency. Lam amounts 
wanted. Tel Switzerland. Zimdt 361 
6500 or 056/491 361 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Your bed buy. 

fine dkjionds in any price range 
at lowest whokade prices 
dreei from Antwerp 
center of the i&m ond world. 
Ful guarantee. 

For free pnoe fat write 
Joachim GaJdmtein 


fotoUrihed 1928 

Petkxretraat 62. fl-20)8 Ariwwp 
Brinum - Tefc (32 31 234 07 51 
Thu 71779 syt h. At the Dianond Oub. 
Heart al Antwerp Dun Raid industry 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DI AMONDLAND 

The largest showroom in 

Antwerp, Dkanonti Gty 

Appebnaratr 33A. Teh 323/23436)2. 


Sidiam Diamonds, Jewelry 

Eepan prices tfrad from factory. 
Centre faterndiond Rogier, Hemet 
Entrance, PO Bax 266, Side 1507, 
1210 Breads. Tel: 322/ 218 21 S3, 
open weekdays ftendpn. Sat 2 -4pm. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ZURKH-ZURK»-ZURICH 


BAmHORSTRASS 52 
YOUR oma AWAY FROM HOME 

• Offiee/Manogwrent Services 

• Company Formd to nss 

■ Haw to do Busness tn /or/ 

FROM SWnZHLAhaj 
SenricH Const* Carp, 
adwho fa rage 510^8022 Zurig. 
Tefc 01/21! 92 07. Tim 813 062 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


tearing CaB or write 617-468-1816 
Doodd L Burnett. 5B Mtple St. Wen- 
Kom. MASS 01984 USA. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


OVBtSEAS POHTIONS. Hundreds of 
tap poymg posHiani ovdldile. Toe 
free monies. Attractive benefits. Op- 
portunities for ol occ u pation s , free 
dek*. Overseas Enrnloytneni Ser- 
ripss. Dept- HT. P-O. fe *60. Town 
□J Mount Soyd, Quebec, draiada 
H3P3C7. 


SBC OB AMBDCAN or Firms 

Sets 

ror new Ancnccn 
rastu u rurt in Pans 8th. Send resume 
tor Box 2487, Herdd Tribune, 92571 
Neuily Cedek. France 


FBWALE PA iraa, attractive ida- 
ty. T5T PQ Box 913T7. Hong Kong 


GENERAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


rope, tr&gid French / Sped* / 
foflfeh. qudified teocher/ professor 
(AMJ’WDj seeks Sv»-ui Tutor/Gcwer- 
nen post writ toad security id USA 
(sur brir state preferred) or Franca 
wi dw consider correspondence 
■xratory import/export or rrioted 


grt^LSA or Franca 283. 


1 8 . Madrid & 


nunnw senous any, 
At rrttradivB, refiable. long inti hgh 
level seocreto rid experience, (for- 
mat, Fre n ch. Engfch, some %xwisb. 
Oners Bcence, free to trawl, seeks 
part or hA tone chdlen^g position 
or eventually os gride or assarts* 
cfcjring your trip to Europe. Mn Wie- 
dtmonrL 12 rim Mazogran, 75010 
Paris. (1) 2465607. 


adrartotrcrtivB 
Write Bax 

92K1 Neuily 


with imumomeint posrnon. 
' & rtaponable non- 


at fogh Imnl. 
Herdd Trfcurte. 
fiance 


gtsh reedSortat. fkwrt French, refer- 
Able to od as guda seaelery. 




MIL/domestic/cDm- 

merwjl/RT fraud ogert seeks Ameri- 
can firm in Paris r need of Mma 
travel ment. Jim Watkins 212-719- 
550Q ; a r W.135t,NYC100mjSA. 


BIUNOUAL AMBBCAN neb wartc 
as franslotor/ interpreter; French les- 
sons, forisr 341 9398k 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


■flBWATJONAl LAW RRM dfrrs 
tap scrianr ft responribBas to eacu- 

wwsasras; 

partner, narae address resume & ca- 
iev goals to Personnel Manger, 
P.O Jot 2B0T1. Central 
WasKrcAnDC &038 USA. 


BOX FBtAID TRRHJNE Grcutobon 
Deportment looking far biSngud 
PrerKfu'&dbM typtf/telewt start- 
«ig Augurt 1. Canukiule must be En- 
gten matner tongue. Please phase 

Pafa74n2«f3r«Jl 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


BGGANIBIGUSHIADY, 30, WITH 
neUwt represwtatipn, speaks 
frw**, e^eoencBd m towim, reel a 
PA position, traveling wdcome, 

tow t^J^jnergagareeA 
Enrngan, isfambut Turtay. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSTTIONS AVAILABLE 


AMBBCAN SpKWL OF MILAN, 
needs ILL el emen tal ? at teadter 
160% port-tine}. Staring Sept. 1st. 
frfcflettum 2 yeas, expanencs re- 
quired. PboreoeD Mr. Deny after 
Aflustlrttfta/5241546. 


LUXEMBOURG 
EXECUTIVE 5ffiVm 

Pfane, tdex ard h£ bness services. 


fimanut. 29, Rue Phfcpe 9. 
lucerabourg Tefc 352-21581. 
Teto C$1 DFHGSAfcU. 



DOMESTIC 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


COUPIE to core far penthause, ccn ft 
Handy af 4 (2 odute, 2 out of town 
ojfoge student^ in Boukler. CO USA. 
■Uvteouf-frfart qrorid e codmg, jam- 
dry. dealing, hcnrfyman A drivina 
snrvioei. B« irhyencCT required. Saf 
ary to mdeh cHKrience & sUk. Gan- 
te) P.O. Bon ST Boulder, CO 80306 
USA. 


au pair/ Moners mm. o»» 

ooarea CUdcn far 5 & 8 yea dd. 
Private suite. Maeh free two. Engfih 
|pwkiag l*®» preferred. 
fa?d p&ja resume ft tatter to Mu. 

ONT^St tawfnw *' “■ 



DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

Pppji 

AU PAIR 

To help mother with chwnxng 2 veer 
aid boy ft vrth apartment. i/2 hoar 
from NYC Ftexflfo houriif mtorested m 
tiding caunes. titeeded inmaduteiy. 
Write toe Bcrankon. 250 Gorge fat, 
CHTside fori, NJ €7010 USA. 

AU PAR for 11 ft 13 yr. old Light 
hauuAoepina. South Banda pool 
hone. Sept. Juna Non-smoking, neat, 
serious tended ted. References ftov 
K Roberts, P.O. Box 8644. Coral 
Springs. H.330&5USA. 









DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 

YOUNG SWISS FAMILY (1 cMd 5 
years) saela interesting job in house- 
hold wfch smell thkfrea in CaHwitio 
or Tens. Pletae write to: Mn. Asia 
.Goueh. Joh.-HrWms» 1ft 8804 
AU/ZH, SwtaertaxL 


OOVB9CSS/NANNY resporaafate 

oeoaioi, au Dm roaus or runs, tram 
October, long /short term. Exrafont 

• refarencHs. Ti 766 92 29 weekdays 




^Knn7!?wnTin*l 

MERCEDES from EUROPE 
WE FEDERAUZE CABS TO MSI US. 
SAFETY STANDASJS 

D.O.T. *EJA‘ 

5 YENS BCPB9R4CE 
1 HtAfflCINC. 

Indenapofa, Imfiana 317-291-4)08 H 

gjj§| 



Exchange MOATS copy afleeiion i 
+ enn far lap car France K5391294 j 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHARC sarr A CAR. Presftge core 

with phono: Rafa Spirit. M ercedes, 
Jopua. BMW. kmourews. smei cm 
46 r Pierre Ooron. 75008 Peris. Tefc 
72030.40. Tdex 63 &97 F CHAR OC 


AUSTRIA ft CAST ajROK USS15JJ0 
per day. Aotohanso. Frentambrueck- 
entr ft A-1030 Vienna. Tefc 241694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPOST A BAOPEAN 
CAR MTO DC U-S-A. 


and legally. It includes new ft 
' jpean cajsopri ' 

PA conversion 


cbj» prices, buymg tips; 
wn addresses, an- 


P.L Sdmdt, fostfadi 313T 
7000 5iut«gart I. Wat Ganaiy 


MAT1NA SHtPPWO 
Sh i p p ing to/ from U. S .A 


234 3S Tit? 
Spnad CondKon aMfre taafag 
Antwerp SwM Eurotel 


VIA ANTWBtP AMJ SAVE. Free fa 
•eL Regular ratings. Airport drihay. 
AMKCO. Knbbesfraar I Artvjra 
Befawm. tefc 231 42 39. Tbu 71469. 


bermarei GmbH. Tel: . 

Pkh-up di over Europe *ro/n>dtea 


ah ATX. NV, Anforreii U 2000 A* 
werp. Belpfon. 03/231 Iffl31 


IT, 3 1 535 


7SG06 

Fans. Tel 2256444. Me* 8^9533. 
Antwerp-. 233 99 85. Coma 39 43 4J 



AUTO CONVERSION 


EMISSION 


MOOtFICAnON OF 9EW MODE 
CARS H GOOD BUHNBiG 
CONDITION. MOSTi 


Sudanese 
Should N 


Hooo 

How 

How 

$5^00 

HOW 


SHOP 


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K‘;.:r 

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- 




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tit-- ■ 
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lV S j, 

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. * i 1 *}’ • e 

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■ r "~ Njtufdjji 
fricul* 

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?f; --T '’-"J? is 

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203 - 325 - 0550 
STAMFORD, g. OS . - 
CtRMAN OFRCL 
_„TBL ip}7031 223059 . . 
TlX: 286963 US FARGO US* 


! YOUR BMW, . 

SO€j JAGUAR oonwted 
f LG-Ssfaty ft erosion sfordo? 


pxi a® 


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UtaU- 1 ' -2.--l L “ Ccrn “ 1 

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PAGE 13 : 
FOR Md^ 
CLASSIFIES: 






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