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No. 31,849 


i* 


ZURICH, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 





Rkk Sfxingfield perfonned Saturday mormng at the live Aid concert at John F. Kennedy Stadram in FWIadelphia. 

Concert Raises $50 Million in Famine Aid 


Compiled hr Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

LONDON — The Live Aid- rock music 
extravaganza, beld befeffe audiences in Lon- 
don aim Philadelphia and broadcast to an 
estimated U bQfion people in more than 100 
countries, has raised about $50 million to aid 
fammcNTCtuusin Africa, organiza-s said Sun- 
day. 

A spokesman for the London, 
said the money raised far exceedc 
turns. Advance estimates suggested $15 mo- 
tion from sales of tickets, revision rights, 
cash donations and telephone pledges. 

The show began at -London’s Wembley 
stadium under ablazmg noonday sun before 
72,000 spectators, fnriiidmg Prince Charles 
and Diana, Princess of Wales. It ended at the 
John F. Kennedy Stadium in Philadelphia 16 
bouts later with Lionel Richie and Harry 
Bdafonte leading 90,000 sweltering fans in 
cfaxirus after chorus erf “We Are The World.” 

During breaks in the London show, live 
performances by rock stars in the Soviet 
Union, Yugoslavia, Austria, West Germany 
and Australia were shown ou giant video 
screens. ■ 

No breakdown of the collection was avail- 
able, but the spokesman said: “Everyone who 
contributed snouldbe assured that the money 
wiD be used to btty food,' grain and crops and 


to build wells for starving Africans in Ethio- 
pia and Sudan.** 

The chief accountant for the Live Aid op- 
eration, Philip Rusted, said be planned a tnp 
to the famine zone later this month. 

“Aid could arrive there within three to four 
weeks later," he said. The money is still 
flooding in." He said a budget would be 
drawn up relating to the denandR of relief 
agencies in the zone, which inclndes Ethiopia, 
S udan and sub-Saharan regions. 

Kevin Jeaden, project director for the 
Band Aid Trust, which win decide how the 
funds are spent, said: “It was a day of super- 
latives, and a lot of superlatives we could be 
proud of, but unfortunately there’s one su- 
perlative that we can’t be proud of and that's 
the shame of the famine in Africa." 

The concerts were likened to the 1969 
Woodstock festivaL The linmpinduded such 
Woodstock veterans as Joan Baez, Santana, 
the Who and Crosby, Stills and Nash. 

While the concert evoked the size and good 
feeling of Woodstock, it was closer in spirit to 
the “Concert for Bangladesh" organized by 
the former Bealle George Harrison in 1971 to 
raise money for starving children. 

Tbe live Aid concert was inqjired by Bob 
Gddof, the Irish lead ringer of the Boom 


Town Rats, who spent four months enlisting 
stars to perform without fees. Among them 
were Paul McCartney, Mick Jagger, Eton 
John and Bob Dylan. 

Mr. Gddof said that £1 million ($1-38 
Bullion) been pledged by Sh«M» Ham- 
dan al- 

Maktoum, a son of the ruler of DubaL 

Mr. Geklof said in a radio interview: ‘The 
concerts woe trying to keep the starving 
alive. Now let’s give mem a life. Governments 
must be pushed into doing something." 

Mr. Gddof has been nammated for the 
1985 Nobel Peace Prize by a Norwegian 
mem ber of parliament. British legislators 
have- also recommended the award. 

David Bowie, among the performers, said: 
T knew it would be great, and it was. The 
world is absolutely wonderful." 

Mr. Bowie expressed hope that Live Aid 
would become an M-mnal event “until famine 
not just in Ethiopia but in many countries is 
brought under some controL” 

- .The singer Phil Collins sang in London and 
then crosred the Atlantic in a Concorde to 
perform again in Philadelphia, where he 
played drums behind the gmtarist Eric Clap- 
ton. 

- One Live Aid official said credit card do- 

(Contimed on Page 2, CoL 3) 



ffaK 


Paid McCartney, left, and E3ton John onstage in London, and Una Tomer and Mkfc Jagger in Piiiladdplri a. 


Reagan’s Tumor Removed; 
Cancer Test Results Awaited 


By Bernard Wemraub 
New York Times Sendee 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan underwent major 
abdo minal surgery Saturday for re- 
moval of a Pom>, and his doctors 
said he had withstood the opera- 
tion very wdl. 

The chief surgeon said no visual 
evidence of cancer had been found 
but that physicians would not 
know for sure if there was any ma- 
lignancy in the intestinal tumor 
that was removed until pathology 
tests were completed Monday. 

The surgeon. Captain Dale Oiler 
of the U.S. Navy, said the 74-year- 
old president was “doing beautiful- 
ly" after the operation at the Be- 
tties da Naval Medical Center 
outside Washington. The operation 
lasted 2 hours and 53 minutes. 

[Dr. Oiler said Sunday that the 
president was on "a spectacular 
postoperative course," United 
Press International reported. Mr. 
Reagan told senior aides, Tm 
amazed at how good I fed” 

[Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said the president was 
reading briefing papers and would 
be walking and sitting in a chair for 
brief periods daring the day. His 
first visitor Sunday was Donald 
Regan, the White House chief of 
staff, who briefed the president for 
10 minutes, foDawed by a visit by 
Mrs. Reagan.] 

•' Before the surgery Mr. Reagan 
signed letters that temporarily 
transferred presidential power to 
Vice President George Bush, who 
returned to Washington from 
Maine on Saturday. The president 
reclaimed his authority, after about 
eight hours, with new letters Satur- 
day evening. 

- Dr. ODer said the growth in the 
colon was estimated at five centi- 
meters (two inches) in diameter. 
“We do not know if there was can- 
cer in the polyp," he said, noting 
that the surgical team's visual ex- 
amination had revealed “no sign of 
cancer whatsoever” elsewhere in 
the president's body. 

Another of the president's doc- 
tors, Dr. Steven Rosenberg, chief of 
surgery at the National Cancer In- 
stitute, said die chances that a pol- 
yp of the size removed from Mr. 

would be -cancerous, were 
“somewhat over half.” But he and 
tbeolher surgeons expressed confi- 
dence that any malig na ncy in the 
polyp would have bem removed by 
the surgery, and the physicians ap- 
peared optimistic about the presi- 
dent’s general outlook. 

“AH of the findings during the 
surgery were normal. Dr. Rosen- 
berg said. There were no indica- 
tions of the spread of the tumor.” 
Since the surgeons did not know 
was malignant or be- 
was a 
not 

only the polyp but also about a 
two-foot-long piece of Mr. Rea- 
gan’s bowcL The missing section of 
bawd is not expected to interfere 
with Mr. Reagan’s bowel function. 
Dr. ODer said. 

During the operation, the sur- 
geons felt for hard areas known as 
nodules that often are cancerous, 
Dr. Oiler said. They also looked at 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 



DmAmoomFibi 


Dr. Steven Rosenberg of the National Cancer Institute indicates the size of the growth 
removed from President Reagan's intestine. Dr. Dale Oiler, left, led the team of surgeons. 

Growth Was Found Needlessly Late, 
Experts Say ; Reagan Doctors Disagree 


aince uik surgcom uiu uui ili 
if the polyp was malignant or 
nign, they proceeded as if it w 
cancer. Tuns they removed 


By Susan Okie 
and Cristine Russell 

Washington Pm Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan’s intestinal tumor 
would have been found and re- 
moved 14 months ago if his entire 
colon had been examined when a 
first small growth was detected, ac- 
cording to some medical experts. 

The probability of the tumor’s 
being cancerous is said to be great- 
er than, 50 pereenL 

Doctors who removed it de- 
fended the treatment Mr. Reagan 
received, saying he had been given 
standard care for the two small 
polyps found on his two most re- 
cent physical examinations. They 
added that there was no reason to 
check the entire large intestine for 
additional abnormalities. 

Commander Edward Cattau, 
head of gastroenterology at Bethes- 
da Naval Hospital in Bethesda, 
Maryland, who found and treated 
the first polyp in May of last year, 


said the small polyps found at that 
time and then m March of this year 
were not the type that would indi- 
cate cancerous growth elsewhere in 
the bowcL So the e xaminatio n that 
found the tumor was not done until 
Friday. ■ 

However, some experts in the 
diagnosis and treatment of intesti- 
nal tract growths, who were not 
involved in the president's care, 


questioned the timing of his treat- 
ment. In particular, they were puz- 
zled at the delays in conducting 
some common, but crucial, follow- 
up tests to X-ray and examine the 
entire colon to make sure that other 
potentially dangerous growths 
were not hidden there. 

“There's no question in my mind 
that the sequence of events was not 
in his best medical interest," said 
Dr. Donald A. OTCkffc, a Wash- 
ington gastroenterologist affiliated 
with George Washington Universi- 
ty- 

“Nothing wasgained by wait- 
ing,” he said. “There is no real 
defense for the tuning.” 

Dr. Cattau, who attended Mr. 
Reagan, said that “there certainly 
was a lot of consideration given to 
colonoscopy then," when the small 
polyps woe found. But, he said, 
doctors decided against the proce- 
dure “because of the histological 
findings," which indicated a type of 
growth not expected to develop 
into cancer. 

He said the care recommended 
for people of Mr. Reagan’s age, 74, 
and without known propensity to 
colon cancer included yearly ex- 
amination of the stool for blood 
and an examination every three to 
five years with a sigmoidoscope. 
This is a flexible instrument that 
can probe about two feet (70 centi- 
meters) of the intestine from the 
rectum upward. 


“Only if one of those two tests is 
positive is there on indication to 
look at the total colon," Dr. Cattau 
said. 

Dr. Steven Rosenberg chief of 
surgery at the National Cancer In- 
stitute, who was caQed in to help 
with Mr. Reagan's operation Satur- 
day, endorsed Dr. Ca turn's treat- 
ment plan. Standard practices were 
followed in the president’s case, 
and there were no indications of a 
need for more frequent follow-up 
than he had. Dr. Rosenberg said. 

Other experts in the fickT of gas- 
trointestinal cancer surgery who 
were interviewed Saturday ques- 
tioned that assessment 

“I would guess any kind of polyp 
would indicate a look at the colon," 
said Dr. John S. Najarian, chief of 
surgery at the University of Minne- 
sota. 

“He's at the age of peak inci- 
dence for colon cancer, which is 
between 70 and 80 years," Dr. Na- 
jarian said. 

He said that when Mr. Reagan’s 
first polyp was found, in May 1984, 
“you'd think that might have been 
a good time" to do tests — a bari- 
um enema and colonoscopy — to 
search the* remainder of the six- 
fooi-long intestine for other 
growths. 

A biopsy was made of the small 
polyp discovered during a routine 

(C ontin u ed on Page 2, CoL 1) 


Sudanese Leader Says Libyan Pact 
Should Not Hamper Ties With U.S. 









. ’- By Cliff ord D. May 

New York Tima Sendee . 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — While 
acknowledging that “a doser rda- _ 
tkmship” is developing between^ 
Sudan .and Libya, the Sudanese 
leader,' G ener al Abdul Rahman 
Swareddahab. has declared that he 
sees no reason why this should 
weaken ties with the United States. 

“I am not at all worried that our 
relations wish Libya might affect 
oar relations with Amoica," he 
said in an interview Saturday. “Be- 
cause you become friends with 
somebody, that does not mean you 
are giving away your friendship 
with someone else.” 

Commenting for the first time on 
the Sudanese- Libyan military 
agreement announced here last 
work. General Swareddahab. who 
came to power in a coup in April 
whDe President Gaafar Nimdri 
was retnrnmg from a visit to the 
United States, said: “There is noth- 
ing that our friends in the West 
should be worried about This is 
not a military pact or treaty.*’ 

He instead described the agree- 
ment as “a memorandum of imder- 
standing" that mainly pledges Lib- 
ya to provide Sudan with military 
equipment Government spokes- 
men have previously described the 
agreement as “ militar y protocols." 

President Ronald Reagan ex- 
pressed “grave concern” last wed: 
about the agreement, saying that it 
“could only impact adversely on 
United. States-Sudanese ties.” 

. Asked about the section regard- 
ing the training of Sudanese sd- 
dicis in Libya, the general said Lib- 
ya had offered vacancies in its 
military schools hat added: That 
doesn’t mean that whatever we are 
offered we will cate.” 



Abdul Rahman Swareddahab 

General Swareddahab gave no 
, jar explanation of why Sudan’s 
civilian CouncD of Ministers and 
political party leados had not been 
given an opportunity to review die 



“It will be published is the press 
very soon," he said. There is noth- 
ing to hide.” 

The general spoke in his office at 
the People’s Palace, the ornate 
white bunding tm the Nile that first 
saved as government beadquaners 
in the 19m century, when the Su- 
dan was ruled j candy by Britain 
and Egypt. 

A compact, soft-spoken man 
wit h gray hair and a trim mustache, 
the general said he was “absolutely 


to turn the country .over to 
rule and return to life as an 
army officer. 

“Now, afl of a sudden, when you 
find yourself faced by the unlimit- 
ed problems of this vast Sudan," he 
said, “with the worst calamity we 
have ever faced, the question of the 
famine, so many dying every day, 
you can’t sleep. 

He said he remained det er mined 
to hold elections “as scheduled" 
eariy next spring. “We have chosen 
democracy as our way of life in 
Sudan," He said. 

Free ejections and open political 
activity were not permitted during 
General Nimriri’s 16-year tenure. 
Nevertheless, he had been among 
Washington's closest allies in A£h- . 
ca and a staunch opponent of Ethi- 
opia and ljbya. 

For the last several years, Sudan 
has been the largest recipient of 
US. economic aid on the African 
continent after Egypt General Ni- 
rnerri is now living in Egypt as a 
political refugee. 

Sudan recently asked 6 
that General Nimeiri be 
to the Sudan to stand triaL On 
more than one previous occasion, 
however, President Hosni Mu- 
barak of Egypt has said that the 
extradition of a political refugee is 
prohibited by the Egyptian consti- 
tution. 

General Swareddahab indicated 
for the first time that he accepted 
that refusal T respeci thtir law;,” 
he said. He added that he did not 
ihink General Nimeiri wos&dvhe 
tried iriabseatia, . 

The general said Sudan in the 
post-Nimeiri era should be viewed 
as a nonahgned country seeking 
good relations with all its neigb- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


AngolaQuits 
Peace Talks, 
Blames U.S. 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Angola, re- 
acting angrily to recent votes by the 
U.S. Congress, has suspended ralks 
with the United Stales on a settle- 
ment between Angola and South 
Africa. 

The imnn imrew mi matte Rnhir . 
day by the Angolan Foreign Minis- 
try, represented a further setback 

A Reagan veto on the foreign aid 
bUJ is a strong possibility, offi- 
cials say. Page 3. 

to the American mediation efforts, 
which had been faltering in recent 
months. . 

Angola said it was breaking off 
talks because of votes (o end a nine- 
year ban on American aid to rebels 
m Angola. The ban if known for its 
sponsor, Dick Gaik, a former 
Democratic senator from Iowa. 

The repeal of the Garic amend- 
ment will leave the U.S. adminis- 
tration international imr 
ism free to openly and 
intervene in AngcUa and exercise 
military and political pressures on 
the Angolan state,” the Angolan 


Navy Spy Loss Found More Serious 

Whitworth Is Alleged to Have Revealed Most to Soviet 


By Stephen Engclberg 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Senior in- 
telligence officials and congressio- 
nal sources say they believe that a 
spy ring gave the Soviet Union 
years of access to the U.S. Navy’s 
satellite communications network, 
which since the mid-1970s has 
transmitted virtually all of the ser- 
vice’s sensitive messages. . 

The initial focus of the investiga- 
tion was John A. Walker Jr., a re- 
tired Navy warrant officer from 
Norfolk, Vi rginia. But officials 
now believe that material they 
think was passed on by Jerry A. 
Whitworth, a navy communica- 
tions medalist until 1983, consti- 
tuted a more damaging security 
breach. 


The officials said that with (he 
material, called “key lists,” the So- 
viet Union was able to make use of 
encryption machines taken from 
the ILS. spy ship Pueblo, captured 
by North Korea in 1968, to read 
coded traffic. The officials said the 
navy continued to use the same 
type of coding machines taken 

Officials say at least one CIA 
informant in Ghana is dead be- 
cause of an accused spy. Page Z 

from the Pueblo wdl into the 
1970s, on the assumption that the 
Soviet Union could not obtain the 
key lists necessary to use them. 

The officials also provided new 
details about the extent to which 
the navy’s communications are 
thought to have been compromised 


by the purported espionage opera- 
tion. The assessment is bared on an 
analysis of documents seized from 
the homes of Mr. Walker and Mr. 
Whitworth. 

“What they got from Whitworth 


tani than the military has been will- 
ing to admit," said a member of 
Congress who has attended classi- 
fied briefings on the case, A senior 
intelligence official involved in the 
investigation confirmed that as- 
sessment" 

Mr. Whitworth's 'attorney, Louis 
Hiken, said Saturday that his dient 
had not stolen secret information 
such as key lists and that the FBI 
had made a number of false state- 
ments about him. Mr. Whitworth 
and Mr. Walker have pleaded not 
guilty to espionage charges. 



Jerry A. Whitworth 


Die material, officials said, gave 
(he Soviet Union an opportunity ic 
decipher coded communication* 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


The State Department said the 
United States had no plans to aid 
the rebels or to relax its diplomatic 
efforts. A State Department 
spokesman said, *Tt is our view that 
the Angolan statement does not 
close the door to a negotiated set- 
tlement." 

The United States has no diplo- 
matic relations with Angola, but 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) .. 


INSIDE 

■NASA befieves a derice that 
regulates a valve malfunctioned 
in the aborted launch of the 
shuttle Challenger. Plage 3. 

■Die Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization reportedly approved 
'with the 
Pages. 


a list of 
United 



to 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■Ted Turner, owner of Turner 
Broadcasting System, has pro- 
posed a complex transaction to 
aid his CBS Ina bid. Page 9, 

SPORTS 

■ A New Zealand court has 
granted a temporary iinuDction 
stopping the national rugby 
team from tearing on a tour of 
South Africa. Page 15. 


Rebels Free 149 Salvadoran Inmates 


The Associated Press 

SAN SALVADOR— One hun- 
dred forty-nine prisoners have es- 
caped from B Salvador's lamest 
prison dorm what an official 
called a “wdEplanaed, wefl-coar- 
dinated" guerrilla attack. 

Francisco Alfonso Tones, direc- 
tor of La Mariona Prison on the 
outskirts of the capital, said the 
attack fry leftist rebels Friday eve- 
ning had been coordinated both 
’inside and the prison.” 

Mr. Torres said rate guerrilla had 
been killed and three guards had 
been wounded in the attack, which 
lasted for neatly half an hour. De- 
spite a nationwide manhunt, there 
was oo indication on Saturday that 


any of the prisoners had been cap- 
tured. 

The escapees included 136 crimi- 
nals and 13 political detainees, 
three of whom were members of the 
Committee of Political Posoneraof 
El Salvador. The committee lobbies 
for human rights for political de- 
tainees. 

The director said the attacking 
rebels and the escaped prisoners 
had Bed in three trucks and a bus 
that bad been packed near the pris- 
on before the assault. 

Mr. Torres said a hole in the 
prison's south wall through which 
most of rite prisoners were thought 
to have flea had apparently been 
Masted open fry dynamite from in- 
side the institution. 


About 100 guerrillas attacked 
with mortars, grenades and rifles 
shortly before nightfall Mr. Torres 
said, white most prisoners were 
outside their cells, many of them in 
the exercise yard. 

“A half-hour bter and we would 
have had them locked up for the 
ni^ht," b® s^d, citing the timing of 
the assault as an indication that it 
was planned with information from 
within the prison. 

La Mariana bouses about 1,270 
prisoners, including 420 poGtical 
detainees. Mr. Torres said. The 
prison is in a sparsely populated 
area between two wouing>dass 
neighborhoods about two miles 
(three kilometers) north of San Sal- 
vador. 



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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


Chief of Propaganda 
Is Replaced in Beijing 
By Younger Official 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Pm Soviet 
BELTING — The Chinese Com- 
munist Party has replaced i is pro- 
paganda chief, Deng Lixtm, 70, an 
orthodox Marxist accused by many 
Chinese writers and artists of push- 
ing to excess a 1983 campaign 
against Weston ideas and influ- 
ences. 

A Foreign Ministry announce- 
ment issued Saturday died age as 
the reason for Mr. Deng's removal 
and said that most other party Cen- 
■ tral Committee department heads 
over the age of 60 would be re- 
placed soon as pan of the cam- 
paign to promote younger officials. 


As one of China’s leading “left- 
ists,” Mr. Deng is watched by Chi- 
nese intellectuals and foreigners in 
Bdjing as an indicator of the rela- 
tive openness or restrictiveness of 
the press and the arts in China. 

Mr. Deng is a longtime associate 
of Deng Xiaoping, but some diplo- 
mats say that he is regarded as 
having given bad advice to the Chi- 
nese leader at the outset of a short- 
lived campaign against “spiritual 
pollution,” or “decadent” western 
influences, in late 1983. 

The campaign, designed to curb 
harmful influences such as pornog- 
raphy, widened to include condem- 
nations of Western-style clothing 



U.S. Blames 
Alleged Spy 
For Death of 
Informant 

By Stephen Engelberg 

Nm York Times Service 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Afgha n Sol<KeriPrfecJni Helicopters 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) —Two Afghan Air Force hdicop- 
ien» 1 andwt Saturday in the Pakistani border town of Miianshao and liter 
seven crew members asked for asvlum, Pakistani officials announced 

Pakistani authorities b egan debriefing the defectors on Sunday after 
moving them and ihrir Soviet-built Mi-24 assault helicopters to an 
nn.ti<rin«rf location, the officials said. 

They could not say whether foreign military experts would be allowed 
to the helicopters, probably the first Mi-24s to land in a country 

with Western mflilaiy tie s. Western analysts consider the Mi-24 to be 
Moscow’s single most effective weapon against guerrillas fighting in 
Afghanistan. 


The princess and prince of Wales and Bob Gekhrf, right, at Wembley Stadium in London. 


LU JJILTLUUlfc yUUXlgtJ UlllUaU. U2LUUUO Ui TV GSlCTU-SiyiC UUUUUg « -w-» f u P* 1 flTf | % g A B 1 

Concert Raises $50 Muuon m Famine Aid 

drive created such concern that 
some Chinese leaders apparently 


na s paramount leader, Deng Xiao- 
ping. The announcement said he 
was replaced by Zhu Houze, 54, 
former party secretary in the south- 
eastern province of Guizhou. 

The announcement said that as 
one of nine members of the Central 
Committee’s Secretariat, Deng 
Uxun would remain in overall 
charge of propaganda work. His 
replacement as head of the propa- 
. ganWfl department removed him 
from day-to-day direction of pro- 
paganda. 


(Continued from Page 1) 


began to fear that the campaign 
could damage the country’s eco- 
nomic- modernization plans. 

Some observers said that Mr. 
Deng’s removal from day-to-day 
responsibility for propaganda 
could mean that he was bang eased 
toward full retirement, perhaps at a 
special party conference in Septem- 
ber, when many younger officials 
are to be promoted. 


nations cash pledges in Britain 
had exceeded £3 mfflkm. 

in Tokyo, a television station 
said Japanese viewers had contrib- 
uted the equivalent of 5700,000. 
More donations were expected by 
die end. of next month. 

Australians pledged more than 
2J5 mflHon Australian dollars (51.7 
million), the organizers said. In 


New Zealand, viewers pledged 3.75 
million New Zealand dollars (Sl.S 
million). 

The U.S. broadcasts indnded 
commercials about conquering 
world hunger and taped metxap« 
from former President Jimmy Ou- 
ter, Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
of India and Coretta Scott King, 
widow of the civil rights leader 
Martin T.mh er King Jr. 

Mr. Rusted. 33, said Live Aid 


had already put in a bid for a com- 


plete trucking ope rati on in Sudan agency’s operations in Ghana to 
in conj unction with the Save the representatives of the country’s 


WASHINGTON — Officials in 
the Reagan administration say they 
believe at least one CIA informant 
in Ghana was murdered after bis n „ , . r . n . 

identitywas disclosed by an agency UollYlR 5 foreign Minister iteSIgllS 

nrmlnvNi rhsnml niilh Kninntio* . . W O, 

LA PAZ (UP!) — Bolivia s foreign minister resigned Saturday, on the 
eve of general elections, in a dispute with the mtiiiaiy over diplomatic 
relations with China- 

Interior Minister Gustavo Sanchez attributed the resignation of Edgar 
Camacho Omiste to the “inability of (he military high command to 
comprehend government foreign policy," a reference to Bolivia's estab- 
lishment of diplomatic relations with China during tire week and its 
corresponding creak with Taiwan. 

The move was widely criticized because it came shortly before Presi- 
dent Herman Siles Zuazo must band over power to a successor. Mr. Stks 
Zuazo cannot run for re-election in voting Sunday for president, tire 
congress and municipal authorities. 


employee chaiged wi 

The officials said Frida' 
there were fears in the in: 
community that reprisals would be 
taken against several other Ghana- 
ians who assisted covert operations 
by the Central Intelligence Agency 
in the country. 

Sharon M. Scranage, an enploy- 
ee of the agency for seven years, 
was aarestm Thursday and charged 
with giving information about the 


Children charity organization. 

He said Live Aid was appealing 
for he lp from quiKfied mwtumirs 
to assist in the transport operation. 

“We would seek their bdp on a 
voluntary basis or on a paid baas 
later when the operation is 
moving,” he said. (Reuters, LA 


Discovery 
Of Growth 
Held Tardy 

(Continued from Page 1) 
physical E xaminati on in March, 
and the growth was termed an “in- 
flammatory pseudopolyp," a type 
not considered to have the poten- 
tial of becoming malignant. 

Outside doctors said Saturday 
that regardless of what had been 
done with the polyp found in 1984, 
their level of concern would, have 
been heightened by the March 
findings of another polyp as well as 
hidden blood in the stool FoDow- 
up blood-stool tests were reported 
last week as negative by Larry 
Speak es, tire White House spokes- 
man. 

Nonetheless, the outside experts 
said they might have acted more 
vigorously after the March exam. 

"I personally am puzzled,” said 
Dr. Marshall Bedine of Johns Hop- 
kins University Medial School. 

. In terms of the growth of the 
tumor, be said, “a year could have 
made a fantastic difference. Four 
months still could have node a dif- 
ference." 

Dr. Bedine said he felt it would 
have been routine to use a barium 
enema X-ray and perhaps a colon- 
oscopy after the first polyp was 
discovered. 

Dr. Bergein Overtoil, a gastroin- 
testinal expert in Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee, who is past president of the 
American Society for Gastrointes- 
tinal Endoscopy, said he did not 
want to “second-guess advisers, 
both medical and political, of tire 
president Time may not have al- 
lowed him to have a colonoscopy.” 

Dr. Overholt a developer of the 
cokmosoope, said that tire decision 
whether to use the instrument 
would have depended on what kind 
of polyp was found, since some 
types may be considered innocu- 
ous. 

He said that “in tire ideal situa- 
tion, colonoscopy should have been 
done much earlier. 

“But the circumstances sur- 
rounding the president are so com- 
plex, 1 would not criticize the care 
he received," Dr. Overboil said. 

Doctors unconnected with the 
case and other expens said that the 
growth removed Saturday, because 
of its size, undoubtedly had been 
present for years, and would have 
been discovered last year if the tests 
had been done then. 


Reagan Undergoes Successful Surgery for Tumor 


government while she worked there Mitterrand Won’t Quit if Socialists Lose 

The authorities said Miss Scran- , PAWS (Reuters)— President Frames Mitterrand male clear Sunday 

that he intended to serve his full term even if the rightist opposition won 
legislative elections next March and was able to form a government. 

Mr. Mitterrand, a Socialist elected to a seven-year term in 1981, said in 
an interview on French television to mark Bastille Day that it was the 
president s job to respect the people s wishes. 

Mr. Mitterrand stressed his belief that a So cialis t president could live 
side by side with a rightist cabinet and prime minis ter- There has been 
growing speculation over what Mr. Mitterrand would do in the case of an 
expected victory by the right next March. Political commentators said 
Sunday’s comments were a signal that Mr. Mitterrand had no intention of 
stepping down before his term ended 


(Continued from Page 1) 
and felt lymph nodes in the area for 

agos of swelling, which might also 
be evidence of cancer. 

Dr. Oiler described it as “a no- 
touch” cancer procedure, one in 
which the surgeons avoid touching 
the polyp for fear of spreading can- 
cer cells, if they were present, m tire 
body. 

Mr. Speak es said at a briefing 
Saturday evening that Mr. Reagan 
was receiving morphine as a local 
painkill er and would continue get- 
tin ginjeclioiis for “two days or so.” 

The polyp was first discovered 
Friday during an examination after 
the removal of another benign 
growth. 

The president’s teem of 

seven military and civ ilian sur- 
geons included two cancer special- 
ists. 

Saturday morning Mr. Reagan 
signed letters to the preadent pro 
ton of the Senwte J Strom Thur- 


age turned over sensitive docu- 
ments and tire names of virtually 
everyone working for the CIA in 
the country to a Ghanaian with 
whom she had a personal relation- 
ship. 

‘There were some serious conse- 
quences,” an official Mild, “They 
had somebody caught and we be- 
lieve it’s likely they died as a result 
of this " 

Michael Agbottxi Soossoudis, 


Micnaei /vgoorai aoussouois, j C « i 

mood. Republican of South Caroli- White House was setting up com- Oiler, head of tire team, is chief of iriwiHfiwt by a federal complaint as AlMTl flia UCCOrflCrS jCnt tO DOHlDBy 
^ ^ d *' be ??* er ‘*f he Hov ^ mrmications and national security g«en»l surgery at the naval hospi- Miss Serfage’s contact in Ghana, NEW DELHI (NYT) — The flight recorders of the Air-India jetUner 

that went down off Ireland were flown Saturday to Bombay. 

An Air-India official and a senior government aviation official in 
Bombay said the decoding and processing of si gnals and conversations cm 


of Representatives, Thomas P.‘ 
O'Neill Jr., Democrat of Massa- 
chusetts. temporarily transferring 
power to Mr. Bush. 

The identical letters said in part: 
“I am about to undergo surgery 
(hiring which time I wfllbe briefly 
and temporarily incapable of dis- 
charging tire constitutional powers 
and duties of the office of the presi- 
dent of the United States.” 

When Mr. Reagan resumed his 
constitutional authority, Mr. 
Speakes said the president told 
«iHeg, “I feel fit as a fiddle.” 

In transferring power to Mr. 
Bush, Mr. 
tire 25th 

ration, which specifies the process 
of transfer of presidential power. ” 
Mr. Reagan was expected to re- 
main in Ms 5452-a-day hospital 
suite for seven to 10 days. The 


offices so that the preadent could 
run the government from the hospi- 
tal during his recovery. The Naval 
meriiral facility is about 10 miles 
(15 kilometers) from the White 
House. 

Dr. Rosenberg said total recov- 
ery should take six to eight weeks. 

The medical team included two 
cancer specialists. Dr. Bimal 
Ghosh, a naval commander who is 
head of surgical oncology at the 
naval hospital, and Dr. Rosenberg, 
chief of surgery at tire National 
Cancer Institute in Betiresda. Also 
ou the team were Dr. Lee E Smith, 


laL 


■ Same Surgery for Brother 
Mr. Reagan’s older brother, J. 
Neil Reagan, underwent the same 
type of intestinal surgery as the 
president July 3 and was home in 
health five days later, his wife, 
said Saturday, The Associat- 
ed Press reported from Rancho 
Santa Fe, California. 

One of the surgeons who operat- 
ed an the president, Edward Cat- 
tail, said Neil Reagan was diag- 
nosed for cancer of the cokm. 


was arrested Wednesday and 
charged with espionage. He is a 



assistant White House physician; 
Dr. T. Burton Smith, the White 
House physician, and Commander 
Edward Cattail, head of gastroen- 
terology at the naval hospi taL Dr. 


relative of Ghana’s leader, Jerry J. 
Rawlings. 

Mr. Rawlings, who came to pow- 
er in a coup in 1981, has been 
seeking a rapprochement with the 
West. The State Department issued 
a statement Friday that said rela- 
tions with Ghana were good and 
added, “We assume they will con- 
tinue to be.” 

Senator Patrick J. Leahy, Demo- 
crat of Vermont, who is rice chair- 
man of the Senate Intelligence 
. Committee, said the case/aised se- 
Dr. Cattail told reporters after riou* questions about the security 
the presjdmt s operation that the precautions taken by the OA. He 
dent “would statistically have said he was particularly disturbed 
that the agency had not inves: 
ed tire relationship between 
Scranage and Mr. 

According lo a complaint filed in 
federal court here. Miss Scranage 


at slightly higher increased 
risk” of cancer because “patients 
who have a family history of colon 
cancer are at somewhat increased 
risk of developing colon cancer.” 


the flight recorders could take several weeks. 

A bomb is suspected as the cause of the June 23 crash, which killed all 
329 passengers and crew members, although other explanations have 
been suggested Tire Press Trust of India reported that tire recorders were 
likely to be opened Monday. 

For the Record 

Police backed by British troops fired plastic bullets and u sfl ri dubs 
Saturday against noting Protestants who attacked them with gas bombs 
and brides m an attempt to force their way into a Catholic neighborhood. 
Police said 28 persons were injured (UP I) 

The commander of the Soviet Union's 400,000 troops in East Germany 
Genera] M ik h ail Zaitsev, has been replaced the East German press 
agency, ADN, said Saturday. There was no indication of why General 
Zaitsev was leaving or who his successor would be. ( Reuters! 

Richard F. LeFevour, the presiding judge in Chicago's court system 
since 1981, has been found gouty of taking thousands of dollars in Dribei 
and other illegal payments throughout most of his judicial career. (NYT) 
Donald B. Nichols, 54, who abducted Kari Swenson, an Olympic 
athlete, and killed her would-be rescuer, has been found 


Sudan’s Ties 
With the U.S. 

(Continued from Page 1) 
bors. Since coming to office, the 
general has also been trying to im- 
prove ties with Ethiopia, and he 
said Saturday that he expected to 
meet with the Ethiopian leader, 
lieutenant Colonel Mengjstu Hai- 
le Mariam, while attending a meet- 
ing of tire Organization of African 
Unity in Addis Ab 
this week. 


U.S. Spy Losses Found More Serious 


. ____ ... . ... of 

passed documents and information homicide, kidnapping and assault in Virginia Gty, Montana. His sou, 
to Mr. Soussoudis an a number of Dan, was found guilty of kidnap ping and assault in May. ( NYT) 

Pakistan Intemstioaa] Asfioes resumed flights to Moscow ou Sunday 
after 14 years, an airline spokesman said. (Roam) 


(Continued from Page I) 
arriving at ships and bases where 
Mr. Whitworth was stationed. 

An intelligence source said the 
messages would provide insights 
into all aspects of the Navy, from 
mu n d an e maintenance whednley 


Ababa, Ethiopia, 


to sensitive reports on the perfor- 
mance of weapons and ships in 
training exercises. 

The officials said the informs- a code mariimr and the crypto- 
tkm they assert that Mr. Walker graphic key list, which is changed 


cations from high-frequency radio 
t ransmissi ons to transmissions via 
satellite. " V - 

Radio communications by satel- 
lite are protected in several ways, 
they said. The frequencies used to 
broadcast are kept secret and can- 
not be easily discenied. The broad- 
casts are transmitted in code and 
cannot be deciphered without both 


But on some occasions the mate- 
rial believed to have been provided 
-by Mr. Whitworth was so impor- 
tant to the SonrietUnion that it sent 
agents to the Far East to 
immediately from Mr. 
authorities said. 


occasions over 18 months. Some of 
these meetings took place “at her 
residence,” the complaint said. 

Me. Leahy said: “They should 
have been more concerned about 
this type of relationship going on. I 
have treen saying for years that our 
r . people in the military, the CIA and 
afleer, the the State Depart m ent are just not 
security conscious.” 


Correction 

Because of a technical error, tire name of the book reviewed in tire 
International Herald Tribune of July 13-14 did not appear in the 
headline. It was “Dorothy Wordsworth,” by Robert Gittings and Jo 
Mauton (Oxford University Press). 


“That will undoubtedly lead to 
closer relations,” he said, “and if 
there are any outstanding prob- 
lems, I'm sure we wiH overcome 
them.” 

He said that there had “so far 
been no positive response” to re- 
peated requests to Sudanese rebel 
leaders to enter into negotiations 
with the Khartoum government 
and that he did not know if thejr 
Ethiopian sponsors were advising 
against such talks. 

He also spoke for tire first time 
about recent negotiations in Khar- 
toum between Sudan and the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund. 

He said that no new agreements 
had been worked out but that talks, 
would continue on the rescheduling 
of Sudan's debts and on the possi- 
bility of additional aid. 


and his associates provided the So- 
viet Union would not allow Soviet 



Angola Walks Out of Talks, 
Blames Votes in U.S. Congress 


(Continued from Page 1) 
officials have visited each other's 
capitals in the course of the media- 
tion effort 

The United States has been try- 
ing to work out an arrangement by 
which South Africa would allow 
United Nations-supervised inde- 
pendence of South-West Africa, 
also known as Namibia, while the 
25,000 Cuban combat troops in 
Angola would be withdrawn. Earli- 
er this year an agreement was be- 
lieved near, but recent military 
moves by South Africa and the An- 
golan statement Saturday have 
raised obstacles. 

Despite the An golan announce- 
ment, the American negotiator, 
Chester A. Crocker, who is assis- 
tant secretary of state for African 
affairs, said the efforts would con- 
tinue. He said that if the Angolans 
believed the United States was re- 
versing course, “they win be losing 
an opportunity and evading key 
decisions.” 

The Angplan action (allowed 
passage Thursday by the House of 



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Representatives of a foreign aid biB 
that induded repeal of the 1976 
Clark amendment. The amend- 
ment blocked American assistance 
to the rebel National Union for the 
Total Independence of Angola, or 
UNITA. 

In 1975 and 1976, after Portugal 
granted Angola independence, the 
United Slates and South Africa 
aided the UNITA movement 
against rival Marxist forces sup- 
ported by the Soviet Union and 
Cuba. The Marxists eventually pre- 
vailed and established a govern- 
ment. 

The American aid, provided co- 
vertly through the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency, provoked criticism 
in Congress, ana the Clark amend- 
ment was passed. UNITA contin- 
ued to receive support from South 
Africa, however, and still controls 
southeast Angola. 

The Senate earlier, this year re- 
pealed the dark amendmen t as 
part of a State Department funding 
bilL The House and Senate ver- 
sions must be reconciled and 
signed by the president before the 
repeal becomes law. 1 

Mr. Crocker said, however, that 
even if the repeal became law, 
“there are no plans” to aid UN- 
ITA 

■ Continue Talks, Botha Urges 

Foreign Minister R.F. Botha of 
South Africa appealed Saturday to 
Angola to negotiate directly with 
South Africa if necessary, without 
the mediation of Washington, Reu- 
ters reported from Pretoria. 


changed 

because the key lists for each of its 
facilities chance each day. 

Neither Mr. Walker nor Mr. 
Whitworth has cooperated with 
prosecutors, frustrating efforts to 
assess fully the damagp caimari- 

The government lias charged 
that Mr. Whitworth, who served in 
the navy for 23 years, was recruited 
into the spy ring by Mr. Walker as 
early as 1975 and was paid at least 
5328,000 for secret information. 

He was trained in satellite com- 
munications at the Army Commu- 
nications School in Fort Mom- 
mouth, New Jersey, according lo 
the federal indictment hi 1975 he 
became a chief petty officer in 
charge of the satellite communica- 
tions division at the navy’s base in 
Diego Garcia. A year later he was 
transferred to the carrier Constella- 
tion and was responsible for aQ 
fln nwnnniw>ti«n < sys tems. 

From 1979 to 1982 he was sta- 
tioned at the Alameda Naval Air 
Station as Message Center chief. 

Officials said Mr. Whitworth be- 
gan passing information to Soviet 
agents in the mid-1970s, when the 
navy was converting its communi- 


regulaiiy 

When the Puebla a navy spy 
ship, was captured in 1968, some of 
its encryption machines were 
passed to the Soviet Union, intelli- 
gence officials said. 

The service chose not to replace 
these because they could not be 
used to decipher codes without 
both the frequencies over which 
commxmicaticns are transmitted 
and the key lists, the officials said. 

An intel l igence source said an- 
other reason far not immediately 
replacing the machines was the cost 
of changing them throughout the 
navy. He said that a new generation' 
of equipment was being phased in 
through the 1 970s, but it was decid- 
ed that some risks could be taken, 
deferring the costs, as key fists were 
so carefully guarded 

The officials say that if the Soviet 
Union knew the frequencies over 
which coded comnmnications were 
being broadcast from sate l lites, it 
could station a trawler nearby and 
record the coded traffic. Later, with 
the key fists and machines, the code 
could be broken. 

The federal indictment said that 
Mr. Whitworth accumulated key 
lists and key cards for some time 
before giving them over to Mr. 
Walker. 


DOONESBllRY 




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AMERICAN TOPICS 


<tedy9iorn Look 

” \The U.S. Marine Corps has 
cabled its 1,250 guards at 127 
. UfL embssaes, consulates and 
jnjsskMs abroad to forgo their 
-'mpirahort haircuts, warning 
that the dose crop mates off- 
dttfy marines potential targets 
■ far terrorists. 

■ A- spokesman said the step 
wastaMmamfyinrespcmseto 
the Jtme 19 killing of four off- 
dwy marines at a sidewalk caffc 
in ferr' Salvador. Regulations 
^ cootmue to require “neatly 

trimmed” hair. 

Notes About People 

.defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Wd uberger brushes aside ru- 
: xndra that he win leave his post, 
saying the tune to go is “when 
votfre tired," and he’s not tired. 
But the speculation persists, 
Ihe Was h in g ton Post reports. 
Most frequently mentioned as 
fikdy successors are John G. 
Tome, former Texas senator 
and currently chief U.S. negoti- 
ator on strategic weapons at the 
Genera arms talks, and Drew 
Lewis, transportation secretary 
from 1981 to 1983 and now 
■Aawnwn of Warner Amex. a 
cable television company. 



I^wGroop Honors 
Book CafledTJaast’ 

One of the American Bar As* 
sotiztticm’s Silver Gavel awards 
at its annual convention last 
week wait to “The Burden of 
Brown — Thirty Years of 
School Desegregation,” by 
Raymond Wolters, a history 
professor at the University of 
Delaware. David Garrow, an 
associate professor of political 
science at the City College of 
New York, has called the bode 
“dearly racist in tone and sen- 
timent.” Other renews have 
been favorable. 

A bar association spokes- 
woman said that “any winning 
entry is not necessarily the 
poim of view of the ABA.” 

Mr. Wolters writes that the 
U & Supreme Court ecred, in its 
landmark 1934 ruling in Brown 
vs. Board of Education of Tope- 
ka that public schools could not 
be segregated, by engaging m 
“sociological theorizing that 
suggested that actual racial 
muring was called for, not just 
an end to state-enforced segre- 
gation.” 

Short Takes 

New Haven, Connecticut, has 
spent $250,000 in nine years in 
a thns-far successful effort to 
stop neighboring North Haven 
from budding a shopping malL 
Hundreds of American down- 
towns have fallen mm rifling 
as shopping mans rose nearby. 
Frank Spink of the Urban Land 
Institute, a Washington re- 
search group, says, “Lois of dl- 






tes would like u 
their suburbs, b 
has set a record. 


to stop malls in 
but New Haven 


Jody Powefl 

Jody Powell, former presi- 
dential press secretary to Ins fel- 
low Georgian, Jimmy Carter, 
was pleased when NBC broad- 
cast a Wimbledon sidelight fea- 
ture on Mr. Carter playing ten- 
nis. But he was Iras pleased an 
noticing that the background 
music was “Marching Through 
Georgia,” celebrating Sher- 
man's destructive mans across 
the stale during the Civil War. 
Mr. Powefl said. “Some idiot 
who probably knew three Geor- 
gia songs ' — ‘Sweet Georgia 
Brawn,' ‘Georgia on My MhuT 
my? 'Marching Through Geor- 
gia,’ had one chance in three 
and blew it”* 


Northeast Forests 
Show Regeneration 

The woodlands of the north- 
eastern United Stales, once al- 
most destroyed by farmen and 
loggers, have gradually and nat- 
urally regenerated and expand- 
ed until they cover two-thrrds of 
the region's land area. The New 
York Times reports. 

Today, they constitute what 
some authorities believe to be 
the richest forestland in the 
country, rivaled only by the co- 
nifer stands of the Southeast 
and the Pacific Northwest.. 
James R. Grace, an assistant 
professor of forestry at Feun- 
sylvama Stare University and a 
recognized authority, says the 
Northeast “probably. has the. 
highest concentration of forests 
In the United States,” 


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Senator Robert J. Dole 

Dole Protests 
* Surrender 
To Deficit 9 

By Jonathan Fuerbringcr 

New York Tana Service 

WASHINGTON — The crack 
in Republican unity has widened 
with Senator Robert J. Dole, the. 
majority leader, President 

Ronald n« pn «mt both parties in 
the House of Representatives of 
“surrendering to the deficit’' 

Hie sharp remark Friday by the 
senator from Kansas reflects the 
an gpr in Senate Republican ranks 
that developed when the president 
dropped support for the Senate’s 
plan to freeze Social Security cost-' 

of— Hving adjustments HwKnwt 

to must on tpwifa gyrating CUtS 
in return. 


er Thomas P. O'NeiU Jr. of Massa- 
chusetts, and House Republicans 
hral inridwt . that no prumgp be 
made in the cost-of-living, adjust- 
ment 

“They’re saying they’ve got a 
deal,” Senator Dole said. “1 don't 
know if it’s a deal I think it’s sur- 
rendering to the deficit.” 

White House officials said Fri- 
day that some Senate Republicans 
were so angry about the budget 
developments that they said they 
world not help the preadeat on his 
proposed tax ovemauL 

The unhappiness could affect the 
chances for a com pr o mi se, espe- 
cially if the Republicans cannot get 
•enough additional domestic spend- 
ing cuts from the House to satisfy 

tfwm 

“I think it’s pretty mu ch up in 
the are.” Senator Dole said, “lone 
are lot of mad Republicans." 

In taking aim at members of 
both pt»rti*x f Senator Dole said: 
“Democrats and a few runty House 
Republicans want to play politics. 
They never made a hard choice in 
their lives.” 

The “noisy Republicans" was a 
pointed reference to Representa- 
tive Jade F. Kemp of New York, 
who has been playing up his role in 
getting the president to drop the 
freeze on Social Security and other 
pension programs. 

A senior While House official 
said Friday that administration of- 
fogfa had underestimated what the 
reaction from Senate Republicans 
would be over the dedaon to drop 
the Social Security freeze. 


y *: ,*••** 
> . . • * % 

y i f 

P 



0 : 

w 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD T$9BtJNE, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


’ **|l 

Reagan Veto 1 ' 
On Aid Bill 
Is a Strong - 

Possibility 

By Bernard Gwertzman 

• New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — There is a 
strong possibility that President 
Ronald Reagan will veto the for- 
eign aid authorization bill passed 
Thursday by tire House of Repre- 
sentatives if it is not changed dras- 
tically in a conference co mp ro m ise, 

hi gh Jr mitrfng n ffyiaU fp the adSUDr 

istratiem have said. 

A State D epartmen t official said 
Friday that both the House bill and 
die Senate version, approved in 
May, provided about $1 billion less 
than the president wanted. The 
Home bin authorized $ 116 billion; 
the Senate version allocated $118 
Irinioa. 

The officials made ft dear that 

the a d fn it i iK f rn rj rm c onsider ed the 

House bill particularly objection- 
able because of several amend- 
ments Hirnfing the president’s pow- 
er in foreign affairs. 

The a mepdiTimtc include a ban 
on the sale of advanced military 
arms to Jordan until it recognizes 
and negotiates with Israel; a ban on 
mQjtary and economic aid to Mo- 
zambique unto it expels most of its 
foreign advisers; a sharp reduction 

in mili tary aid to the Philippines; a 
ban on bolding even indirect talks 
with the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization; and the withholding of 
aid to Lebanon until seven lid- 
nB pp<vi of missmg Americans are 
returned. 

The administration also repeated 
its concern about congressional 
moves to impose sanctions on 
South Africa until it takes steps to 
end apartheid. 

The Senate cm Thursday ap- 
proved a less sweeping set of mea- 
sures than whs passed earlier by the 
House: The administration ap- 
plauded the Swintft leadership’s 
ability to avoid the more drastic 
House vereion but still criticized 
anfffiq n ; as being the wrong ap- 
proach toward Sooth Africa. 

Under the procedures followed 
in Congress in recent years, funds 
for foreign aid can be allocated 
even if there is no foreign aid au- 
thorization bilL 

In the *hrenr»» of an authoriza- 
tion bill, money for foreign aid has 
been allocated in what are called 
continuing resolutions or catchall 
q>eridtogralls, which include funds, 
for other federal agencies. Such res- 
olutions have generally contained, 
fewer restrictive measures of the 
type included in the House aid hilL 

Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said of the House mea- 
sure: “There are a number of fea- 
tures in this bfl] to which we have 
serious objections. There is a near •' 
bflKon-doQar shortfall in the total 
funding." 

He added: “Also, we believe the 
mix of economic and security aid is 
not in keeping with the real needs 
and the threat that we face in a 
number of countries. They have 
fallen more into the economic area 
and less into the security area in 
many instances. Also, there are cer- 
tain restrictions on executive au- 
thority that we object to. We will 
seek improvements in conference." 

A State Department official said 
that if a House-Senate conference 
did not produce an aid authoriza- 
tion greater than the SL2.6 billion 
passed by the House, the adminis- 
tration would seek a supplemental 
aid bilL 


Page 3 





Th* AwxxAed fra 

The main engines of Challenger were sprayed with water Friday after they shut down. 

Actuator Suspected in Shuttle Abort 

Device Is linked to Failure of an Engine Valve to Close 


By Thomas O'Toole 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The space 
shuttle Challenger probably abort- 
ed its launch Friday because a me- 
chanical device called an actuator 
failed to move a valve that allows 
coding fluid into an « gjn> dum- 
ber, NASA has announced. 

James BaD of the National Aero- 
nautics and Sp ay Administration 
said Saturday from the Kennedy 
Space Center in Cape Canaveral, 
Florida, that “we won’t know we 
have the culprit" Until t<yhnin'nn« 
“get into the engine and remove 
suspect components." 

But, he added, “engineers feel 
strongty enough that they want to 
get their hands on that actuator to 
verify that it was the problem.” 

The actuator moves a valve to 
regulate the amo unt of supercold 
liquid hydrogen that chirk the en- 
gine chamber before hydrogen fnd 
floods the chamber- and the engine 
bums at full throttle. 

• The valve on the No. 2 engine 
failed to dose Friday, and Chal- 
lenger's computers sensed the 
-problem immediately and ordered 


the three shuttle engines to shut 
down three seconds before liftoff. 

Launch pad workers were due to 
strip down parts of the engine Sun- 
day and remove at least four com- 
ponents that could have triggered 
the launch abort, including the sus- 
pected actuator. 

“A second launch attempt is at 
least seven to 10 days off, or even 
longer,” Mr. Ball said. “We'll know 
a great deal more on Monday when 
launch directors have a full-scale 


2 Senior Soviet Officers 
Killed on Active Doty 

The Assodoud Press 

MOSCOW — Two senior Soviet 
officers with the naval air force 
were killed recently while on active 
duty, the military newspaper Kras- 
naya Zvezda reported Sunday. 

Death notices in the newspaper 
said that Major General Alexei M. 
Sidorov, a deputy commander, and 
Colonel Viktor P. Kokorev died 
“while performing service duties” 
and gave no further details. Major 
General Sidorov was said to have 
been a veteran of World Warn. 


management meeting about what 
to do next” 

Adding to lire uncertainty about 
a new launch date is the scheduled 
arrival in Florida on Sunday of the 
space shuttle Columbia, which has 
just completed an 18-month over- 
haul at the Rockwell International 
plant in California. 

When Columbia arrives at Ken- 
nedy Space Center. aQ four shuttles 
will be at the Florida space center 
for (he first time. 

Atlantis, the only one of the four 
that has not flown, is due to be 
moved Monday to the Vehicle As- 
sembly Building to be joined to its 
two solid rocket boosters and its 
huge external fuel tank. 

Jt was scheduled for an engine 
firing on July 30. but that test may 
be postponed, depending on how 
long Challenger’s flight is delayed 


Agency Calls 

W&: Mid S etman 

jfcfcikr* Too Small 
For Loads 


By Michael Wcisskopf 

HiuAingiiui Poll Service 

WASHINGTON — The mobile 
Midgetman missile will be too 
small to cany some of its planned 
payloads to military targets in ibe 
Soviet Union, according (o the 
General Accounting Office. 

For the Midgetman to lift both a 
i, 000-pound (450-kilogram) nucle- 
ar warhead and the "penetration 
devices" needed to hefp the war- 
head gel through Soviet defenses, a 
GAO report said Friday, the Air 
Force would have to modify its 
design or base the missiles in the 
Northwestern states, abandoning 
plans to locate Lbem in the South- 
west. 

The agency questioned the Mid- 
geunan’s range among a number of 
technical and operational problems 
that it said could delay the weap- 
on’s scheduled deployment in the 
early 1990s. 

The findings of the congressional 
watchdog agency are expected to 
be cited by members of Congress 
de mandin g a fresh appraisal of the 
Midgetman. which is backed by 
proponents as the land-based inter- 
continental ballistic missile of the 
future and a possible alternative to 
the controversial, much larger MX 
missile. 

The report also set the first offi- 
cial price tag for the system, esti- 
mating a cost of S44 billion for a 
force of 500 missiles that woukl be 
towed by armored vehicles de- 
signed to withstand nuclear blasts. 
The GAO added, however, that 
many factors affecting the Midget- 
man’s final cost had yet to be deter- 
mined. For example, the Pentagon 
has not set a number of Midgeunen 
to be deployed, so the Air Force 
has had to plan on a force of “from 
250 to over 1.000,” it said. 

The agency, citing the practical 
problems of lowing a 46-foot (14- 
meter), single-warhead rocket 
around military bases, estimated 
that 20X100 workers would be need- 
ed to operate, maintain and guard 
500 missiles. Access lo 4,000 square 
miles (10,400 square kilometers) of 
land would be required for daily 
operations, and this would rise to 
8,000 square miles in periods of 
increased alert, it said 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


Turk Accused by Agca 
Describes Arms Traffic, 
Denies Knowing Accuser 


Nr 


U.S. Considers Louder Voice of America in Europe 


By John Tagliabue an or Middle Eastern governments, 
.v<w York Times Senict except to say that the operation was 

ISTANBUL — A Turk who overseen by the Bulgarian govem- 
Mehmel Ali Agca says was a key meat through its state-owned trad- 
figure in a plot to shoot Pope John in g company. Kin lex. 

Paul II has given the Turkish police The record of Mr. Cdenk’s inter- 

a detailed account of his involve- rogation contrasted sharply with 
roenl in arms and drug smuggling public testimony be gave wedoes- 
ope rations that he says were based day to a mar tial-law court in Istan- 



By John M. Goshko tion that younger West Europeans. 
Washington Post Semce unlike the generation that remem- 
WASHINGTON —The Reagan bers WoridWar II, have Utile ap- 
administration, concerned that the predation of American security, 
United States and its policy gnai; trade and cultural ties with Europe, 
are frequently portrayed inaccu- As a result, U.S. officials fear, there 


lion (bat younger West Europeans, position. The principal objection is director of the agency, has sought 
unlike the generation that remem- expected to be the argument that to impose a hard-line conservative 
bers WoridWar II, have little ap- the effort would be discredited cast on the agency and make the 
predation of American security, from the outset as an American Voice a more overt propaganda in- 


valid be discredited cast on the agency and make the 
itset as an American Voice a more overt propaganda in- 
campaign and would sirumeni in the mold of broadcasi- 
Ity attracting rignifi- ing operations like Radio Free Eu- 


mine whether a potential audience 
does exist in Western Europe ami, 
if so. what kind of programming 
would be required to lure it away 
from competing European media. 

The other concerns the technical 


aiC JICULiOlUY puruavcu lmccu* » W «• iwwh vuiuou IWJ, wuifc. — ^ v 70 '"O r .» ( . ... - _ ,f w-.,- tr\ /lotii.a. «L a 

lately by the European media, is isa growing risk that understand- cant audiences in countries that al- rope and Radio Liberty, which are question of how to aemer toe 

weighing plans for the Voice of ing of these relationships will be ready possess an abundance of so- intended as "surrogate counters to product. Vojcc Mj inat tne 

America to resume intensive distorted by Soviet propaganda or phisticaied radio, television and the state-controlled radios of East- pld short-wave trans^OM no 

hmarfrasrino tn Wntrem Fimw by neutralist sentiment or ami- print media. era Europe. ons er have , a . jnc€ " a “. flC “ n 8 


in Bulgaria, according to Iran- bul in which he maintained that his 
scripts of an interrogation here. only contact with the Bulgarian 
But according to use documents, government was as a supplier of 
the Turk, Bekir Cdenk, has consis- mineral water and fruit juice to 
tently denied that be knew Mr. Bulgarian trading companies. 

Agca. the convicted assailant of the Mr. Cdenk named several dozen 
pope. people — mainly Turks, but also 

Mr. Agca has said that Mr. Ce- Syrians. Armenians from Istanbul, 
lenk acted as intermediary for a ami a German — who he said were 
Soviet diplomat in Bulgaria and involved with him in the desk 


offered Mr. Agca $1.2 milli on to 
assassinate the pope. 

Mr. Agca is serving a life sen- 


Mr. Celenk said he was intro- 
duced to Kintex, the Bulgarian 


broadcasting to Western Europe by neutralist sentiment or ami- 
after almost 25 years. American bias in the West Europe- 

Administra tion sources aid the media, 
tentative' timetable called for be- Although the p lanning has been 
ginning this fall with limited, En- underway for more than two years, 
glish-language broadcasting of the administration's concern has 
news, current affairs and entertain- been heightened by continuing dif- 
ment programs geared to West Eu- ficulty in countering widespread 
rcpeaii audiences. Then, they add- West European hostility to such 
ed, a decision will be made early high-priority UJS. policies as de- 
next year about expanding into ploying American medium-range 
ap more comprehensive French, Ger- nuclear missiles and President 
Bekir Celenk man, Spanish and Italian broad- Ronald Reagan's Strategic Defense 

casting services, something that the Initiative for research on a defense 
Vcsce of America has not done in space against Soviet missiles. 
Since the eariy 1960s. iGToffidals acknowledge that 

The idea stems from the assump- the plan it is likely to provoke op- 


print media. 

Some critics also see a danger 
that the administration would be 
tempted to use a West European 


era Europe. 

When the Voice began in 1942. 
its first transmissions were Ger- 


V.. World War II it continuai'a num- 


established by Congress, of pie- “ 

seating an accuratepicture of the 
United States to foreign audiences 
and use it instead as 3 n instrument War era of the 1950s. 

to lobby for Mr. Reagan's anti- In trying to de 
Communist views. ahead, a special s 


age services to 
web the Cold 


In Hying to decide whether to go 

ahead, a special study group within 


The Voice of America is the the agency, with personnel working 
broadcasting arm of the United in Washington and Munich, is con- 
S tales Infor mation Agency. There centrating its research on two ar- 
havc been frequent controversies eas. 

about whether Charles Z- Wick, One involves the effort to deter- 


listeners. and they are investigating 
whether the agency can obtain sub- 
stantial coverage through various 
combinations of leasing lime on 
established medium-range frequen- 
cies. using FM and using such 
newer techniques as cable and sat- 
ellite. 

The Voice has already contract- 
ed with an English-language FM 
station in Paris to cany its initial 
news and documentary efforts. 

Bui. the sources note, a final de- 
rision will not be made on resump- 
tion erf broadcasts until early next 
year. 


trading company, by a Syrian arms he did not know why Mr. Agca 


tence in Italy for the shooting. He is dealer whom he identified as Tey- implicated him or the Bulgarian 
the key witness in the trial of three fik Debbes. and Soviet secret services in a okU 


secret services in a plot 


Bulgarians and four other Turks, He said his contact in the West to kill the pope, 

including Mr. Celenk, accused of German arms trade was Gunther Turkish military justice officials, 
being his fellow conspirators in an Ldhnauzer. He did not give any wbo are responsible for smuggling 
alleged plot to murder the pope. further details about him and said charges, said that Mr. Celenk 
Mr. Celenk, 50, had been under that arms deliveries from West would probably stand trial on 


Galbraith Urges Political Appointees for Embassies 


By Michael Dobbs bassy staff because of disparaging reported by The New York lunes administration, which said it feared 
Washington Part Senice remarks he is reported to have to have said that the Foreign Ser- their presence might jeopardize 

PARIS — Evan G.Galbiailh has mld ' ‘ bo " 1 ‘ ara diplom “ i W ““ nl *“’“*'*■ 

ended a controversial tour as U.S. The 57-year-old envoy made a Mr - Shultzsaid should have Mr. Galbraith said one of his 
ambassador with a call for major spirited defense of his “public di- first missions had been to look at 

reforms in the Foreign Service/in- plomacy” in the interview. He also braith later said ms views had been Mr. Mitterrand's decision to admit 


Turkish authorities on Friday, ap- Christian Democrats, 
parendy on smuggling charges, and Besides denying tl 
transferred from police headquar- Mr. Agca, Mr. CdenJ 
ters in Istanbul to a military prison knowing Oral relik, 
in Ankara. Mr. Agca says was en, 

The results of four days of inter- Celenk and took part 
rogation were made available for ing of the pope, 
examination Friday. They con- Mr. Cdenk said fa 
tamed extensive descriptions by Mersan, another Tur 
Mr. Celenk of shipments of weap- by Mr. Agca in the si 
ons from such countries as West briefly at the hospital bedsit 
Germany and Czechoslovakia mutual friend He said h 
through Bulgaria to Turkey and Musa Sedar Celebi, i 
Lebanon. The smuggled weapons, dan l in the Rome ui 
be said were exchanged for heroin furt in 1978. He descr 
from the Middle East. lebi as a casual acq uaintance. 

But be did not implicate Europe- Mr. Celenk told pc 


Christian Democrats. ing Mr. Cdenk's extradition to reforms m the Forrig 

Besides denying that he knew stand trial in the purported plot eluding nomination ol r . 

Mr. Agca, Mr. Celenk also denied against the pope and to face jwintees to all major U.S. exnbas- “«i 
knowing Oral Qlilr . a Turk who charges of involvement in an exten- ries and semen 1 positions in the ^ ni 
Mr. Agca says was m gaga d by Mr. sive international arms and drug State Department. 

Celenk and took part in the shoot- smuggling ring. a 5 ,—, was , 


looked back with satisfaction on distorted 


the Communists, analyze it and ex- 


mg of the pope. Antonio Marini, the prosecutor 

Mr. Celenk said be met Omer in the Rome trial left Istanbul on 
Mersan, another Turk implicated Sunday after talks over the week- 
by Mr. Agca in the shooting, once end with police officials about Mr. 
briefly at the hospital bedside of a Cdenk’s testimony, 
mutual friend He said he met The Turkish government, citing 
Musa Sedar Celebi also a defen- the nation's constitution and penal 
dant in the Rome trial in Frank- code, said it could not extradite a 
furt in 1978. He described Mr. Ce- Turkish national to another conn- 


the improvement of French- Am eri- Mr. Galbraith will be succeeded plain it to Washington, 

can relations thai has occurred over as ambassador by Joe M. Rodgers, “it wasn’t a true mslirinn " Mr 
the past four years despite sharply the head of a Nashville construe- Galbi^said^lSa ™UtiS 

iiwmg nug. such a step was necessary, he “"j 0 **- . ““jW P*® 0 ® of the kind you might find 

Antonio Marini, the prosecutor gq hl Ja? to corrrctwbat he He depicted the diplomatic rundraisen Unlike Mr. in al y hall in the U.S. I was able to 

the Rome trial left Istanbul on depicted as the Foreign Service’s £ >l S! of 1960s “ being caused GjpjggJ' oonvmce m ? ^eromail that the 

inday after talks over the week- b5]L-iii “liberal Democrat" bias. **- 5?““ s Fff 0 *™* 01 ? 115 P er ’ influence « “ c Comm unis is on 

d with nnlin* nffinaic atwi» Mr caved second-class status in a post- torviews in French, Mr. Rodgers Mr. Mitterrand was, for practical 

war world dominated by the unit- does 1101 si* 3 * French. purposes, zero." 

ed States and the Soviet Union. Some of the controversies w-.._ j u j 

Cr, Mr tnnrJi«t nff hv Mr fJaThmith dnr. Noting thal Mr. Mitterrand had 


caused Galbraith, who Hved in France in convince m 
ilc rvr. the 1960s and frecueadv save in- influpnr^i 


uuu ™ edved second-class status in a post- tcrviews m French. M 

Insisting that foreign policy war world dominated by the Unit- does not speak French, 
should be formulated by the presi- ed States and the Soviet Union. Some of the con 
dent and not the State Department, So m™!,, does Mr. Galbraith touched off bv Mr. Gal 


1 States and the Soviet Union. Some of the controversies M .. . .. ir 

So strongly does Mr. Galbraith touched off by Mr. Galbraith dnr- 

-I ino Wc Fmir vmk in Paris mUCD lUTUier titan UlS 



Mr. Celenk told police that Mr. Tense. 


try to stand trial on a c riminal of- 


Evan G. Galbraith 

redes to America in the past few 
years. He said that anti-American- 


Belgian Leader Wins Vote of Confidence 


r J°k rmd ^assadors who scribed the book as a plei for “pub- in President Francois Mitterrand's istt .had died along with Marasm 

shared his convictions from within Uc diplomacy" by politically Sim- Sodahst-kd government until July "^a^able change in French am- m France in the 1970s. 
the ranks of the professional For- mitted ambassador 1984. 


The Associated Pros 

BRUSSELS — The government 
of Prime Minis ter Wufriod Mar- 
tens has won a vote of confidence 
after a debate over allegations of 
lax security during a soccer riot in 
which 38 people were killed. 

Mr. Martens' center-right coali- 
tion won the vote Saturday night, 
109-3, with four abstentions, after 
most opposition legislators walked 
out of the 212-seat Pa rliamen t The 
governing coalition normally con- 
trols 1 13 seats. 

The opposition had called for the 


resignation of Interior Minister ror can be bla 
Charles- Ferdinand Nothomb, who minister nor o 
is in charge of police forces. A bi- meat member, 
partisan parliamentary committee Robert Hen 


issued an 18-page report a week 
ago dialing the police with failure 
to prevent the violence. 

Rioting erupted May 29 before a 


Robert Henrion, the leader of 


ens’ coalition, had joined the op- 
osition Friday in axtring for Mr. 
•lotbomb’s resignation. He said 


tlurmiksaf the professional For- 1984 ~ * 

Mr. Galbraith, a .former vice He was summoned in February C • T OT 1 U a 

“The facts are that most of the president of Morgan Guaranty 1984 for a dressing down by Pierre ^ I x l llKrf ^ X dlllllo fVtlJUUTIl X diRo 

people in the Foreign Service vote Trust, said that the ambassador- Mauroy, who then was prime min- .. , Prmrr , , .....* , 

Democrat,” be said. “I can’t voify ships in all major overseas posts ister, after he described the Com- _ , . proposals for limited local 

it. It’s just a feding I have. The should be reserved for political ap- munist minister of transport as “a **5^ P E t HI Taiks be,wee ° “Y for . 

conservative Ronald Reagan took pointces. He also called for the poor Freudunan gone bad." ir e zP ' ■ an * ‘ ? n government and bad raected last Decern 

that office without a great deal of president to appoint “his own tka , ran ™r, rvarw T 2 ™ 1 “P "? 11 * 1 ^ ad ’ Trust srnd. 

support or enthusiasm from the ben” to key pSns in the State FiSS^ShM^GdbSiS J 011 ™* 1 unul Aug. 12 to allow the “These did not satisfy. 
Foreign Service." DeuartmenL*^ government to prepare new pro- motely. their aspiratior 


I have. The should be reserved for political 
Reagan took pointees. He also called for 


1 18-page report a week the conservative wing of Mr. Mar- ^ offa* wilhout a great deal of president to appoint “his own 
ing the police with failure tens’ coalition, hadjoined the op- gtppprt or e n t h u siasm from the men” to key positions in the State 


Foreign Service." 

Mr. Galbraith, a banker by pro- 


Department 

“AD assistant secretaries should 


tight European Cup soccer match be- any cabinet minister “must know fession and a staunch conservative, be the president's men,” he said 
alter tween a British and an Italian team, he will be responsible for what is has attracted a mixture of admira- He said the State Departure: 


was “vulgar and stupid.” The am- posals on possible autonomy for agency reported, 
bassador was, however, applauded ^ population, the Press The Press Tn 


proposals for limited local autono- 
my for Tamils, which the Tamils 
bad rqected last December, the 
Press Trust said. 

“These did not satisfy, even re- 
motely. their aspirations." the 


38 persons killed and 454 


bassador was, however, applauded tf, e Tamil 
by rightist newspapers ana potiti- Tra^ of In 
dans for his forthright remarks. six davs 


11 st of India has reported. 

Six days of negotiations between 


The Press Trust said the last- 
minute intervention of Romesh 
Bhandari. the Indian foreign secre- 


After a two-day debate, Mr. dared he would assume all 
Martens took responsibility for the ability for the disaster, refc 
tragedy and said, “No political er~ day to resign. 


j J , . - w . _ , , u . mm ■ I , . “ VUIJ U1 UI.UAMUUUO UllilHU.lt la UU# UllUOll ll.nriKI[ >CUC“ 

tion, anger and ndictile here for his was too big a place to rdy on the Reflecting on the French politi- the government and leaders of six tary. prevented the talks from cd- 
Nothomb, who mitiaDy de- outspoken commons on Fwacb J cal scene over the past four years, organizations demanding a sepa- la^ng. 

Mr. Galbraith said that tl« a' 


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wo- political life. He also has provoked to enforce the political policy. It s 
Fri- protests from the Stale Depart- got to go down to the bureau levd 
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talking points are discussed.” 

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LEGAL SERVICES 



cal scene oyer the past four years, organizations demanding a sepa- lapsing. 

Mr. Galbraith said that the alnance rate state for the minority T amil Reporters have been barred from 

with the Communists served a tac- community made little progress. Thimpu, but the Press Trust has 
tical purpose for Mr. Mitterrand, the news agency said Saturday. apparently been given access to In- 
Tbe decision to admit four Com- The talks, bong held in T himp u, dian diplomatic reports on the 
mrmisL ministers into the govern- the capital of the Himalayan king- talks. The meetings were set up 
mem in June 1981 was initiahyait- dom of Bhutan, foundered when with the assistance of India’s mime 


The decision to adm i t four Com- 
munist minis ters into the govern- 
mem in June 1981 was initiallycrit- 
icized by . the Reagan 


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Reagan the Sri I-antaui delegation repeated minister, Rajiv Gandhi. 


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Mourner Shot at South African Funeral. 

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several violent dashes over the weekend in black townships near the Sooth African capital. 



White Home Debating Future Policy Toward Syria 


By Leslie H. Gelb 

New York Tlm^lStrrice 

WASHINGTON — Reagan feaiBf rrarion officials say 
that as long as Sy^inay benc^fw rQgaiomg_ the release cf 
seven American hostages in tiwhta, President Ronald 
Reagan is ready to be restraizi^/Jtbward the .Damascus 
government 

But beneath the surface, two aMiistradon debates are 
-underway,... 

A tactical debate centers on whether, as a price for Syrian 
help on the hostages, the United 'States should ignore and 
deny what it Easaesaibed and recently as a Syrian rdc in 
Usxorism. 

This issue was joined last weckvjhcn Mr. Reagan omitted 
Syria from a list of nations purport?^ sponsoring terrorism 
and the State Demnment sidekepptw tnc question of posa- 
ble Syrian involvement in two suicide ear bombings is 
southern Lebanon. 

A second debate, over basic policy, is whether the United 
States is willing b cooperate with Syria in some areas despite 
differences in fundamental interests. - 

. A U.S. diplomat put it this way? “Are we able to manage 
differences O wy the Ml'frfl* F»« peate pra res s »"ri igrmrigm 

TC^Je^overiapping interest^ Lebanese 

stability and in preventing a takeover of Lebanon by Islamic 
f undamentalists under Iranian influence?" 

But to pro-Israeli activists andjnme U.S. officials, the 
issue is not whether the United Stans is able to manage the 
differences, hm how this is to be done. They say they do pot 
want to foreclose tough public talk’and subsequent military 
action ■ 

jSmilar arguments have pervadpd^ U.S. policy toward 
Syria for more than a decade, beginning with the arranger 
meat by Hemy A. Kissinger, secretary of state at the lime, of 
a Syrian-Isradi troop separation agreement on the Golan 


Heights in 1974. For five years after that, SyriaiecavedUA 
aid. 

But a low period began in 1979, when Syria condemned 
the peace treaty between Israel and Egypt. Later, the Syrians 
were critical of U.S. efforts to broaden the peace process in 
tbe Middle East, and the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1 982 
kd to dashes with Syrian forces. The duos in Lebanon took 
the lives of almost 300 U.S. servicemen and diplomats. 

Once the marines left Lebanon, some U.S. diplomats said, 
Syria and tbe United States had something in common in 
Lebanon, namely a desire to keep Islamic radicals and 
Iranian influence from taking over. But these arguments did 

f Are we able to manage differences 
over the Middle East peace process 
and terrorism generally so that we can 
work in complementary ways where 
we have overlapping interests?’ 

—A U.S. Diplomat 

not get far in view of the U.S. position that Syria was playing 
a role in terrorism. 

Syria’s hdp in bringing about the release of the 39 hos- 
tages held in Lebanon gave the diplomats more room for 
thcar ideas. Their hand was strengthened when Syria said last 
week that ii would work, to improve security at Beirut airport 
and was maneuvering behind the scenes to obtain the release 
of the remaining seven American hostages. 

This opened the door for some officials in tbe Near East 
Asian Bureau and the Office of Counterterrorism in the 
State Department to raise questions about exactly what 
Syria's role has been in terrorism. 

They concede that Syria could have stopped much of the 


terrorist activity, that some terrorist groups were being 
supplied through Damascus airport and that terrorists were 
operating in territory held bv Syrian forces. Bui, as an 
official said: “There Is no evidence of Syrian control, guid- 
ance or encouragement/* 

Other officials, such as those in the State Department’s 
Policy P lannin g Staff, see evidence of Syrian participation at 
every stage, not least public statements by President Hafez 
al-Assad extolling the virtues of martyrdom through terror- 
ist suicide. Officials ai*n agree that there is evidence of 
Syrian direction in an attempt to assassinate King Hussein 
of Jordan. 

In any event, officials said the combination of skepticism 
about Syrian terrorism from parts of the State Department 
and Syrian hdp on the hostages proved sufficient to per* 
suade Mr. Reagan and Secretary of State George P. Shultz to 
show restrain l 

Officials in the Pentagon, the Stale Department and tbe 
White House who favor a harder line fear that a show of 
restrain t may be read by Mr. .Assad as a sign of weakness. 

These officials say that Mr. Assad may be wining to help 
on the hostage issue for his own reasons, even if the United 
States persists in accusing Syria of supporting terrorism. 

“If he gets them free, it will prove be runs Lebanon,” an 
official said. 

Those for and against a tough line agree on Syrian goals in 
Lebanon. These goals. ihey say. are Syrian predominance by 
maim wining a disproportionate political role for Lebanese 
Christians over Moslems, by limiting the power of Shiites 
whose primary loyalty is to Iran and by avoiding a military 
dash with Israel. Tbe officials agreed that all these interests 
overlapped with UJS. interests. 

Bui tbe weight of opinion in the State Department and on 
ihe National Security Council staff, according to officials, is 
that despite overlapping U.S.-Syrian interests in Lebanon, 
Mr. Assad would not cooperate to free tbe hostages if the 
United States were to continue its public criticism of Syria. 


PIX) Said to Pink TJst. of Pales tinians to Join Talks With U.S. 


% Judith Miller 

New York Timet Service \ 

AMMAN, Jordan — The Pales- 
tine Liberation- Organization has 
submitted to Jordan a list of 10 to 
IS Pales tinians whom it has ap- 
proved to take part in talks with the 
United States about ending the 
Arab-Isradi conflict, according to 
Palestinian and other sources. 

The sources said Saturday that 
the Kst of possible participants in a 
Jor tiaman- Palcs timan ■ daegatta u, 
or “ioinl group ” as it is. to' be 


called, would be given by Jordan to 
the Reagan administration as soon 
as Secretary of Stale George P. 
Shultz returns to Washington this 
week. Mr. Shultz is on a visit to 
Asia. 

The submission of the list could 
set tbe stage for a meeting later tins 
month between the joint group and 
Richard W. Murphy, assistant sec- 
retary (rf state for Near Eastern and 
Sooth Asian affairs, to discuss 
American recognition of the PLO 
and moves to revive Middle East 
peace talks. 

The Reagan administration has 
been reluctant to enter talks with a 
joint group if such negotiations 
would not lead eventually to broad-" 
er peace rafts including Israel. Isra- 
el nas repeatedly refnsed to negoti- 


ate under any conditions with 
known members of the PLO. 

The list would also remove whal 
has been a major barrier to efforts 
to revive the peace process: the 
reluctance of ihe PLO tononrihate, 
Palestinians who are not its leaders 
or activists as members of thejoiot 
delegation. ' • 

The rourpes said Jordan and the 
PLO beried the Palestinians on the 
Kst would be acceptable to the Rea- 
gan administration, because none 
is a member of tbe organization's 
leadership or is associated with its 
military groups. At tire same time, 
virtually all are said to be members 
of the Palestine National Coancfl, 
which serves as an unofficial Pales- 
tinian parliament Jordan and the 
PLO consider the council to be part 
of tire organization, but the United 
Stales does noL . 

Washington has refused to xeo- 
ognize or even talk to the PLO 
unless it explicitly endorses United 
Nations Security Cornual Resolu- 
tions 242 and 338, which recognize 
load’s right to cost. 

the sources said Yasser Arafat, 
rhwirmgn of the PLO, encountered 
considerable resistance More win- 
ning tire support of the organiza- 
tion’s Jeaderahip for nominating 


members of tire Palestine National 
Council to a joint delegation. 

King Hussein of Jordan, during 
an Apm visit to Washington, said 
that the PLO and Jordan had 
agreed to negotiate peace with Isra- 
el at an international conference on 
tire baas of Resolutions 242 and 
338 and that Mr. Arafat was pre- 
pared to endorse these resolutions 
explicitly. Mr. Arafat has not don* 
so, but he has not pubEdy dis- 
agreed with Hussein’s assertions.' 

Neither Jordanian nor PLO 
sources would identify the people 
named an the fist, dung concerns 
far the candidates" safety. Several 
live in the Israefi-ocomied West 
Bank and Gaz^ the officials said. 

Palestinian sources said that tire 
FLO’S .Executive Committee and 
the Central Co mmi t te e of d-Fatah, 

Mr .^A^af^^e 1 headf’ jpproved 
last-week in Turns deformation of 
a joint Jordanian-Palcstinian dele- 
gation for talks with tire Ameri- 
cans. 

Mohammed hfiDrem, a former 
West Bank mayor and- m ember of 
the PLO Executive Committee, dc- 
nied Saturday that the leadership 
had a pproved a list of names far 
presentation to Jordan. He said, 
however, that the group had agreed 


on tire principles for selection^ dais, the organization would give 
First, be p"d ( Palestinian members* - tire Rea gan adminis tration an en- 
of tire delegation should be Paks^ doxsement of UN Resolutions 242 
tine National Council members and 338. 
who “speak good English and tm- in exchange, by this scenario, tire 

demand the American mentality. Reaganadmmstration would rec> 
Second, he said, they have to- o^ize the PLO and endorse the 
agree to take pan He said some, p rin c i ple of setf-detennin&tion for 
council members' had refused be- Seraestiniami in a state federated 
cause <rf safety-concerns or ideology with Jordan. Then an international 
icri ejections. ^ peace conference, including all par- 

Thira, ho-arid, they have to be 'ties'm the conflict, would be con- 
f airly low-ranldna or not highly vis- venc<L 

ible members of the council, as well . , . 

as equal in rank and number U) the It is uncertain whetha this sce- 

Jordanian delegation members. He nano is possible, given the Reagan 
said no final list of names had been admmisuaunii’s opposition to So- 
presented to Jordan in his presence, vret participation ata^ a confer- 
But other Palestinians and! “« and Wels refusri to deal 
sonreesdoseto the talks said that with the PLO under any ctrcum- 
PLO leaders woe reluctant to aoi stances. 

knowledge publicly that the list had- ■ 

been submitted because they were __ „„ 

afraid that tire United States would.' Flees Uver Beam® Wall 

embarrass tire Organization and . The Associated Press 

damage its credibility by rejecting BERLIN — Under fire by bor- 
the nominees.' der guards, an 18-year-old East 

Jordanian. and PLO German man scaled the Berlin 

leaders have said .in recent inter- Wall on Saturday and jumped to 
views that they envision a peace the West. The West Benin police 
process that would beam with a said East German border guards 
meeting between Mr. Murphy and fired two shots at tire man but 
a krw4evd joint Jdrdanian-rales - 1 missed. The man, who was not 
tmim group nominated by the[{ideptified sprained las left ankle, < 
PLO. N«L acborifing to these offi-' polree sakL . . — _ • - - 


Syrian Observers 
Head far Beirut to 
AidmMUitUiPlan 

Reuters 

BEIRUT — Syrian observers 
beaded Sunday for Beirut with or- 
dera to speed efforts to end anarchy 

in the city. 

In an effort to halt friction be- 
tween Moslems in Btirut, five Syri- 
an officers were due in the capital 
to join a committee coordinating a 
plan to disarm West Beirut's mili- 
tias, official sources said. The Syri- 
ans will act as observers. 

The committee, headed by Prime 
Mmistw Rachiri Karami, bftlHt its 
first full session Monday, a week 
after Lebanese Moslem leaders 
agreed on a plan to ny to halt 
fighting between tire Shiites and 
StmniB, Druzeand Palestinians. 

Snipers sealed all roads finking 
Christian east and Moslem-con- 
trolled West Beirut after overnight 
artillery, rocket and machine-gun 
clashes on the Green Line battle- 
front and in nearby hill* , security 
sources said Sunday. 

WHATS HAPPENING 
ONTHEUONDON SWSB 
READ 

SHBQDANMORIEY 

WB»«SDAYIN 

' THE IHTS ARTS &tflSU®SKTON • 


CIOUSLY HYATT 


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It's only taken 25 years to get here 


O, 


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Wur 25th year as an international 
airline is a cause for celebration. 

1b commemorate the occasion, four 
postage stamps have been designed, 
featuring the aircraft that have played 
a major role in our development. 

The reliable DC- 6 Bs, that put us on 
the map in the Orient. 

And the technologically advanced 
DClOs, that helped us spread our 
wings in Europe and Australia. 

The remarkable A300s, ideal for an 
airline that serves more countries 
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And the magnificent 747Bs, that 
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Thai’s world now includes 41 cities in 
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Serving those destinations is one 
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So whether you are sipping Dom 
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in the quiet of Royal Executive Qass 
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The airline that’s definitely arrived. 


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Page 6 


MONDAY JULY 15, 1985 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc. 


PoMUml W!ih TThj Ne* Y«k Time* ud The W*Wng»ii PM 


Women’s Work in Nairobi 


Can the women of the world unite and find 
enough common ground to overcome, at least 
for the moment, the political, religious and 
economic differences that divide them? That is 
the test before the United Nations Women's 
Decade conference scheduled to open in Nai- 
robi today. Many signs are discouraging. Key 
issues in the draft conference document and 
even the rules of procedure have beat in dis- 
pute. Underlying these disagreements are the 
familiar political issues that disrupted two 
previous UN women's conferences. As half of 
the world's population, women are necessarily 
involved in these controversies. But discus- 
sions of them conducted under UN auspices 
almost inevitably produce sterile posturing. 

Leticia Shahani, the Filipino diplomat who 
mil preside over the conference, recognizes 
that some politicking is unavoidable. But, like 
many among the more than 10,000 delegates, 
she hopes that the delegates can still focus cm 
the dismal social and economic conditions that 
remain the common lot of most women. 

The Washington-based Population Refer- 
ence Bureau says: “Over half of the world’s 2.4 
billion women are Asian; another 20 percent 
live in the less developed countries of Africa 
and Latin America. Globally nearly SO percent 
of all women are of childbearing age and will 
probably have a total of three to four children. 
Thus, whatever additional roles women as- 


sume, that of motherhood remains the most 
basic throughout the world." Yet women are 
also a major part of the world labor force, 
primarily doing back-breaking work that pays 
little or nothing, even as they struggle to bear 
and rear children and run their households. 

These problems are nowhere more evident 
than on the continent where the conference is 
being held. In Kenya a woman can expect to 
bear right children while working longer houp 
than her husband. Her chances of dying in 
childbirth are 20 times greater than for women 
in the United States. Even in a country where 
famine is not rampant, almost 10 percent of 
children will die before the age of 1. 

As Blaine Harden has reported (IHT, July 
JO), many Kenyan women want desperately to 
avoid another pregnancy but cannot because 
their husbands demand more children as a 
proof of their virility and because contra- 
ceptives are not readily available. Many resort 
to crudely performed abortions; one of four 
admissions to a leading hospital in Nairobi is 
Tor a botched abortion attempt. And yet the 
U.S. government has cut off aid to Kenya’s 
major family planning agency and, through 
other policy Hianges, may soon terminate hop 
for other grass-roots and church-run projects. 

Delegates from all countries have something 
to contribute, and to account for, in Nairobi 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


In many parts of the world, death, not birth 
control, determines the size of a family. When 
a country has too many mouths to feed, its 
children are the first to die. That is why Ameri- 
ca has long been committed to family planning 
programs. One would assume that this com- 
mitment has been deepened by the famine in 
Ethiopia and the probability of many more 
famines elsewhere. It has, and it hasn’t 

Congress voted in the spring for the largest 
one-time increase in funding for overseas pop- 
ulation programs. But that commitment has 
now run afoul of legislators concerned about 
reports of forcible abortions in China.- Surely 
that concern can be acknowledged without 
sacrificing the commitment. 

But that is not the way of Senator Jesse 
Helms. His amendment to tire foreign aid 
authorization bill denies all American support 
to all population agencies that work in any 
country said to permit coerred abortions — 


even if none of the agencies use U.S- funds 
there Under that proposal the United Na- 
tions, which works in China, would lose Amer- 
ican money even though no UN funds have 
ever been spent for abortion-related activities. 

Much more sensible is the approach of Sen- 
ator Nancy Kassebaum. Her proposal, and 
that of Representative Olympia Sncrwe in the 
House, would direct that no U.S. money can 
go either directly or through other agencies to 
countries said to encourage coercive abortion. 

What is or is not happening in Hhirm re- 
mains a distressing question. But it also has 
become a handy excuse for legislators who 
oppose voluntary abortion and so metimes all 
artificial contraception, and who want to crip- 
ple American aid to family planning abroad. 

Coercive abortion is an atrocity. But ' 
atrocities may lie in store if the world . 
tion keeps growing at its present rate.' 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Wise Israeli Judgment 


Even as its air force again claimed an eye for 
an eye in Lebanon last week, Israel's judicial 
arm declared private vengeance by Jews 
against Arabs to be terrorism and murder. At 
considerable political cost, this hard-pressed 
democracy will jail some of its most dedicated 
pioneers and decorated soldiers to proclaim 
the sanctity of life and law. 

Such an assertion of legal limits even in the 
midst of a terror war deserves wide admira- 
tion. But for the right reason. Israel's concern 
for justice for the Arabs under its administra- 
tion is no mere magnanimity. It is a vital act of 
self-definition, an effort to add moral armor to 
Israel's military strength. 

After a 13-month trial three settlers were 
convicted of murder and 12 of crimes ranging 
from manslaughter to belonging to a terrorist 
organization. They were not from some mili- 
tant fringe. They included revered army offi- 


Only the PRI May Govern 


Mexico's electoral system, as again dis- 
played last week, is an undemocratic anomaly. 
Gtizens may vote Tor parties of their choice, 
but only one of them, the Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party, is allowed to win. This puts 


dustrial and complex society that should not 


have to suffer monopoly rule. The unofficial 
tn last 


Mexico in the uncomfortable company of 
Chile, Haiti, Paraguay, Cuba and Nicaragua 


— the other Latin governments that permit no 
significant opposition. That is odd company 
for a society long associated with the cause 
of Latin American democracy. 

Why Mexicans put up with this anomaly is 
something of a riddle. They have largely sur- 
rendered their political life to the electoral 
machine of the Institutional Revolutionary 
Party, or PRL For 56 years they have permit- 
ted it to elect every president, every state 
governor, most mayors and the overwhelming 
majority of each national Congress. 

The party used to boast, with some justice, 
that it repaid this trust by substituting stabil- 


ity, liberty and economic development for the 
pre-revolutionary upheaval and decline. But 


those gains have long since been absorbed. 
Modem Mexico is an increasingly urban, in- 


election results from last week’s balloting sug- 
gest a desire for change. But they also suggest 
that the desire will continue to be frustrated. 

The National Action Party was thought to 
have a shot at one or two state governorships 
in northern Mexico. To beat back the chal- 
lenge the PRI used all its weapons, from the 
open flaunting of patronage to instances of 
apparently outright fraud. Reports accumu- 
late about absent poB watchers, suspicious 
voter lists, missing ballot boxes, taxis full 
of uncounted ballots, subtotals reported in 
implausibly round numbers. Even so, the Na- 
tional Action Party may have captured an 
unprecedented number of congressional seats. 

The PRTs component units theoretically 
provide indirect representation for workers, 
peasants and other population groups. But it 
has* become mainly a permanent bureaucracy, 
governing through patronage and riddled with 
corruption clear to the top. Mexico preaches 
something better, and deserves it 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR JULY 15 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: ...'Nobody Seriously Hint’ 
WASHINGTON — In the Washington Star: 
When you read the headlines through 
Which tell about an accident. 

Your feelings are uncommon blue. 

And life seems full of discontent 
Until you read the tardy phrase 
Appended by the scribe alert: 
“Nobody seriously hurt." 

The auto and the streetcar meet — 
“Nobody seriously hurt" 

The fruit crop fails, the trusts grow strong, 
The comet flares across the sky. 

The voice of protest shows how wrong 
Are half the arts that people ply; 

The umpire holds the mob at bay, 

The summer girl is still a flirt. 

And yet the old world goes its way — 
“Nobody seriously hurt." 


1935: French March on Bastille Day 
PARIS — Paris was the scene of the most 
grandiose celebrations of the Quatorze JuQlet 
since the fall of the Bastille and of the greatest 
military display since the Victory March of 
1919. Ideal summer weather favored three 
mammoth demonstrations inspired, respec- 
tively, by the nation’s power, the old revolu- 
tionary spirit of France and the modern au- 
thoritarian tendencies. Fifty thousand 
soldiers, sailors and airmen marched down the 
Champs-Elysies, while 607 airplanes, flying 
overhead, drowned the cheering of the crowds. 
At the site of the old Bastille that fell before a 
people's fury, 150,000 people marched to revo- 
lutionary hymns, while at the other end of the 
city, 60,000 men also marched, but in silence, 
p repainting by their discipline that die Re- 
public tomorrow shall be united and orderly. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman I93E-I9S2 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chamm 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ART „ _ 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CaRLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 
Executive Editor RENE BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 


Deputy Publisher 
Aswdaif Publisher 
Amticuc Pubiisher 
Director i 


Amdate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director i. 

D. KRANEPUHL Dveavaf Adtenuty Sobs 


ROLF I 


International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chari es-de-Gaulk. 92300 NeoUy-sur-Seme. 
France. Tel: (1)747-1265. Idea: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Peris. ISSN: 0294-8051 
DirKteur de in publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Hennessy Rd, Hong Kong. Tel 5-285618. Telex 61 HO. 
MaaSmWuK?Rabtn MadGdun/63 lag Acre. London WCL TeL 83OA90L Telex 262009. 

71 m7M5i TJx. 416/21 


i m 



China Deserves Better Marks for Population Control 


W ASHINGTON — Todaythere is a ba- 
sic convergence of American and Chi- 
nese strategic interests in Asia, but current 
good relations cannot be taken for granted. 
The American debate over China’s filia- 
tion policy touches on a vay sauritive issue of 
national sovereignty and could undermine 
relations between the two nations. 

In China, home of one-fourth of the 
world’s people, population stresses are every- 
where evident, especially in overcrowding and 


By Marshall Green 


total fertility rate of 1.7. However, we do not 


talk about a 1.7 total fertility rate goal, for 
this would likewise be self-defeating. 


Even with a 1.7 fertility rate by the year 
2000, Gum's population would peak at 134 
billion by 2025, according to demographers in 
China ’s Stale Statistics Bureau. 

Economic incentives have been part of the 
government's efforts. Couples who pledge to 


by the United States cire also opposed by China- 


pollution. Per capita cropland is one-third the 
world average, fresh water one-fourth, grass- 
land one-half, forested land one-eighth. 

If China were to maintain a fertility rate as 


low as 23 children per family, its population 
he year 2080 at 1 1 3 billion 


would stabilize in toe year i 
— double its current size. Even if the country 
bad an average of only two children per 
family, iis population wcwld not stabilize un- 
til the year 2050, and then at over 1.5 billion. 
These alarming projections explain the great 
urgency of China’s efforts to slow its popula- 
tion growth, and why the government m 1979 
announced the goal of a one-child fa 


Dr. I -i*ng Timm of the State Family Plan- 
ling Commission explained: “If we publidy 
idvocated a two-chiW family (or total fertility 


rung 

advocated a two-child family (or toial'fertility 
rate of 2), we would end up with norms doser 
to three; and thus, when we advocate a one- 
child norm, we hope at best to end up with a 


have no more than one child receive a series 
of benefits including a small monthl y finan- 
cial grant from the government. Upon the 
birth of a second child these privileges are 
withdrawn, and for each succeeding birth 
escalating penalty taxes must be paid. 

Officials at all levels a ffirm that the govern- 
ment resolutely condemns infanticide and 
mistreatment of women, mdnduig coercive 
abortion and sterilization. These are termed 
“intolerable crimes .” But officials fredy ad- 
mit that government laws and policies on 
these matters are sometimes violated, as in- 
deed, they point out, laws are sometimes 
violated in all countries. Violations are inten- 
tionally publicized by the government, ac- 
cording to Chinese sources, m order to stress 
their illegality. In fact, repents by Western 
critics have relied heavDy on incidents widely 
reported by the government-controlled press. 


As to reports of frequent physical pressure 
on women to undergo abortion or steriliza- 
tion, my latest trip to China uncovered noth- 
ing to substantiate these charges. On the other 
hand, 1 am in no position to deny their veraci- 
ty. But I met no one, American or Chinese, 
who believed that there were more than iso- 
lated cases of physical forte applied to wom- 
en to undergo abortion or sterilization. 

It was my general impression, based on 
many conversations, that there are certainly 
psychological pressures on women with chil- 
dren to be staffized, but the same pressures 
apparently are not applied regarding abor- 
tions. Evidence in support of this distinction 
is the fact that the Cbmese abortion rate of 25 


per 100 live births is 40 percent lower than the. 


rate of 42 abortions per 100 live births. 

It most be re-emphasized that the coercive 
actions and incidents of infanticide opposed 
by the United States are also opposed by 
China, which is seeking to deal with the prob- 
lems of excessive preference for sons not only 
through law but also by long-term social and 
economic measures that will raise the status 
of women in their families and communities. 

In developing countries, a strong motiva- 
tion for having man y children is to ensure 
support for elderly parents in the absence of 
any other form of old-age security. Hie Chi- 
nese government has initiated care for its 
older citizens and now has a network of old 
people’s homes at the village level 


are substantial The model family depicted 
on posters and in the media is increasingly 
father, mother and daughter. 

China is -rion stressing better education and 
literacy for all. ThaL together with rising 
standards of living and higher income poten- 
tial of women, will probably, in the lone run. 
be the most effective step in coping with the 
mistreatment of women, girls and female in- 
fants that is so widely prevalent in traditional, 
societies throughout' the world. 

It is unfortunate that the .American press 
has provided little coverage of these broader 
social and economic measures, for they are 
important elements of China's total effort to 
stabilize population growth. It is doubly un- 
fortunate because press reports of China's 
population program have been seized upon 
by certain U.S. congressional and other 
groups opposed to family planning as an 
excuse to begin dismantling U.S. population 
assistance programs, including support for 
the UN Fund lor Population Activities. 

It was made dear to me by officials in 
Beijing that these U.S. moves are regarded by 
f*hina as a national affront- This turn erf 
events should be of concern to anyone inter- 
ested in Chinese- American relations as well 
as in the effects of rampant population 
growth in the developing world. China, far 
more than any other developing country, is 


earnestly wirin g to solve a population prob- 
lem that threatens the stability of 


of China and 
the interests of generations to come. 


Public education efforts in support of 
of the sexes 


cmatler famili es and equality 


The writer, a retired diplomat, contributed 
this comment to The Washington Post. 



A Dangerous Example 


By David S. Broder 


■yyASHINGTON — David A. 


cers and West Bank pioneers who justified 
their plots against Arab students, politicians 
and a Moslem holy ahrmr. as self-defense. 

Many Israelis think of them not as terrorists 
but as an underground that is necessary to 
avenge or deter Arab assaults on Jewish set- 
tlers. And now that the trial has ended, the 
clamor for clemency will become a potent 
political issue; dividing an already tense coali- 
tion cabinet. The government will be asked 
bow it dares to jail its sons so soon after 
releasing 1,150 convicted Palestinian terrorists 
in exchange for three Israeli prisoners. 

Even a light punishment would not obliter- 
ate the symbolic value of the verdict. All too 
often Israelis complain that they are judged by 
a double standard, held to higher norms than 
are their enemies. To their everlasting credit, 
that is also how they judge themselves. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Stockman, the retiring budget 
director, leaves government to a 
chorus of praise unrivaled for any 
cabinet-level official anr: Henry A 
Kissinger. The parallels between the 
two mm are deep and disturbing. 

Mr. Stockman, like Mr. Kissinger, 
is a favorite of the Washington estab- 
lishment, honored for his brilliance, 
a dmir ed for his technique and spared 
from accountability for the policy di- 
sasters in his area of responsibility. 

In the case of David Stockman, 
I write those words with great sad- 
ness, for I had a personal affection 
for and relationship with him which I 
certainly did not have with Mr. Kis- 
singer. I met Mr. Stockman when he 
was a student at Harvard, played a 

min nr middleman role in obtaining 

sionai staff aide ant/watefaed admir- 
ingly the flowering of Us career. 

In a book published five years ago, 
I focused on Mr. Stockman as an 
exemplar of the “best and brightest” 
of the younger generation of conser- 
vatives. He became the most power- 
fid and inflnwilial memb er of that 
generation in government — which 
makes his fate all the more important 
to understand and lament 

Mr. Stockman was corrupted by a 
particularly insidious pan of the 
Washington power game, a game that 
only Mr. Kissinger, in my memory, 
has played with comparable sltilL He 


r ie, rationalized, in both cases, on 
qnj 


: quite reasonable assumption that 
the cod product would be better with 
the participation of a Stockman or a 
Kissinger than without 
Mr. Stockman went a step beyond 
Mr. Kissinger by collaborating 
knowingly in journalist William 
Grader’s 1981 Atlantic Monthly 
magazine description of his role. The 
story made him a national figure and 
took him in for a “woodshed" treat- 
ment from President Reagan. 

In ‘that article he revealed his deep- 
seated doubts about both the num- 
bers and the policy rationale he sup- 
plied to Congress and the public 
during the historic budget and tax 
debates in the first eight months of 

the Reagan adminis tration 
Only the brilliance of his perfor- 
mance spared him from the accusa- 
tion of complete cynicism from tire 
critics of that program. Onlylhe val- 
ue of his intellect let him survive the 
desire for retribution from its genu- 
ine advocates. That was the time for a 
on principle, but Mr. 
,Iet it pass. 



He offered the president his resg- 


portrayed himself to the key figures 
m Congress, the. press and the other 
pans of the permanent Washington 


parts of the permanent Washington 
power structure as the “reasonable 
man,” striving to advance intelligent 
policy against the “crazies,” those 
he characterized as ideologues and 
ignoramuses who were bds colleagues 
in tire administr ation 
At the same time he portrayed 
hims elf to those colleagues as an in- 
valuable asset to than, because of bis 
influence and credibility with the 
Washington power structure. It was 
the classic Kissinger double-agent 


nation but (fid not press it when : 
Reagan demurred. It was another 
proof of Lord Acton’s aphorism, with 
a Washington variant: Power cor- 
rupts, and the prospect of losing pow- 
er corrupts absolutely. 

Restored to the bosom of the presi- 
dent and of the Washington power 
structure, Mr. Stockman saw no need 
to change his method of operations. 
In the last three and a half years he 
has continued to operate on the back 
channel of “guidance” to the insiders, 
while molding his public statements 
to the prevailing political winds. 

During tiie 1984 campaign season, 
when President Reagan was peddling 
blue-sky reassurances that America 
had found the key to perpetual eco- 
nomic growth that would shrink the 
budget deficits, Mr. Stockman was 
alenu Once the election was past 
he quickly resumed issuing dire pre- 


dictions of runaway deficits. But as 
the time for his resignation ap- 
proached he became more and more 
publidy outspoken about the draco- 
nian spending cuts that would be 
needed — probably along with tax 
increases — to stop the hemorrhage 
in the budget And for this belated 
candor he has been praised. 

The Kissinger parallels continue. 
The foreign policy maestro accepted 
a Nobd Peace Prize for bis work on 
Vietnam, a tragedy of historic scale. 


Mr. Stockman is graciously accepting 
praise from politicians and editorial- 


ists for preading over an unparal- 
leled disaster in U.S. fiscal policy. 


Both men are smart enough to be- 


lieve that if they just had their way, 
ix the pro! 


they could fix the problem they were 
supposed to fix. Both are arrogant 
enough to operate on the belief that 
deceiving the American people and 
their elected representatives is per- 
fectly justifiable on many occasions. 

Like Mr. Kissinger, Mr. Stockman 


Youth Should March on Washington 


By Caroline Fredrickson 

The -writer is a senior at Yale University, majoring in Russian studies. 


N EW HAVEN, Connecticut — 
The; 


• is 2025. We who were 
20 in 1985 are turning 60. Thanks to 
better health care, we will live longer 
than our parents. But we will not hve 
as well as our parents and grandpar- 
ents did as semor citizens. As a result 
of the snowballing effects of the defi- 
cit, we must put off retirement for 
s: wee 


many years: We can’t afford it 


What Has Happened to Conscience? 


g HERMAN OAKS. California 


When I read of the check- 
kiting scheme at E-F. Hutton & 
Company, I shrugged it off as a case 
of a few rotten apples in the band. 
But then came news of more bad 
apples in high places. 

The Pentagon disclosed improp- 
er billing by Genera] Dynamics, 
General Dearie and other defense 
contractors. A few days later came 
shocking charges of a respected 


By Charles Ansell 


for the Russians. In the same 1 
came news of six judges in Chicago 
charged with taking bribes from 
lawyers and clients. Thai Jake 
Butcher, a Kentucky financier and 
can d idate for governor, was impris- 
oned for fraud and tax evasion. 


Should we dismiss imwfhjml be- 
havior as theidiosyncrades of a few 
misguided people? Are these excep- 
tions? Or do the shocking exposures 
danand a doser look? It seems that 
the decay is more advanced than we 
would like to admit 
Why would a judge accept pay- 
offs? If the charges are true, what 
moves a navy family to spy for 
profit? What entered the mmds of 
the JELF. Hutton employees who 
manipulated the bank accounts? 
How do we understand the greed 


dais into criminal profiteering at 
the risk of losing respect of family 
and friends? was it only greed? 
These questions should disturb our 
sleep. We are talking about normal, 
run-of-the-mill citizens who now 
stand exposed in the police lineups. 

By any dtfroition, conscience in a 
prudent man is presumed to be at 
work in Ms daily life. Usually we do 
not knowingly give offense. That 
degree of conscience is as much a 
part of our lives as is our everyday 
common sense. We don’t laugh at 
funerals and we don't interrupt a 
symphony to dance in the aisle. 
Ridiculous? Of course. Why? Be- 
cause it is inappropriate. Is it an 
exaggeration to say that ennsrimne 
is — or should be — rooted in our 


that moved these highly pli 


sense* 

Our coustieoce is not innate, it is 
learned. We absorb it every day of 
our youth. If is taught not only by 
precept and instruction but by ex- 
ample. It becomes our road map to 
guide us through our lives. 

Murderers — like Charles Man- 
son, who killed the actress Sharon 
Tate and six others, and the Nazis 
— are tamed sociopaths because 
they are presumed to live without 



conscience: deaf, dumb and blind 
to pain in others. They are the ex- 
treme fauns of mental Alness. But 
than are degrees of sodopathy. 

A judge who encourages lawyers 
and clients to buy justice is a spe- 
cies of sociopath as much as spies 
who traffic with Moscow for profit, 
and as much as the executives at 
ILF. Hutton, General Dynamics 
and General Electric. Each of these 
offenders was clearly oblivious to 
the consequences of bis actions. 
Each of these normal men experi- 
enced a suspension of conscience 
that freed him to do as he willed. 
That is a dangerous prospect. 

I assume that each of these of- 
fenders would express outrage at 
violent crimes. But what of the still 
voice of conscience that stays our 
han d at an lrngHarHuri till? What 

should alarm us is the discovery 
that gouging the government, ma- 
nipulating bank accounts, taking 
bribes and embmling public funds 
may have been regarded as appro- 
priate behavior, and in no way a 
violation of conscience. 

Did the employees at ELF. Hut- 
ton, General Dynamics and Gener- 
al Electric think their actions- were 
Did any think, twice? 
r better, but they chose to 
violate common precepts. 

What should disturb the public 
voices of conscience — preachers, 
commentators, philosophers and 
psychologists —is tbejnBspect that 
th» by now appropriate behavior 
may have entered national mores. 

Rapists and other violent assn- , 
nals are not models for conscience, 
or for public behavior, but the elite 
of a country — industrial leaders, 
judges elected to the bench, finan- 
ciers and political leaders — are 
typical models for success. 

Something has crept into the na- 
tional ethos that has seriously adul- 
terated the view of constienoc. We 
are in danger of bec oming Nean- 
derthals in Brooks Brothers suits. 


The writer, a psychologist, contrib- 
uted this to The New York Times. 


Because most of us needed two 
incomes to maintain the standard of 

atioif had ?ewer <±§Lbil NoafSoe 
are not enough young adults to sup- 
port us in retirement. Social Security 
u a far worse bargain for us than it 
was for earlier generations. They paid 
low taxes and received big benefits. 
We got just the opposite. 

We were plagued not only by high 
payroll taxes but also by high un- 
employment Unlike our parents, 
most of us could not afford to buy 
homes. We could not afford mon- 


rates. We became the first generation 
in 20th century America to have suf- 
fered from downward mobility. 

We have grown old with the infra- 
structure of our country. As we aged, 
so did our roads and bridges, their 
potholes getting deeper and their 
cracks wider. Because of hi gh interest 
on the national debt, our power 
plants, dams and factories slowly 
lapsed into disrepair. The country 
had little money for pufilic works 
Our day’s priorities had to be pushed 
aside to pay for those of yesterday. 

□ 

The year is once again 1985. As 20- 
year-ofds, we ought to be paralyzed 
with the worry of an impoverished 
future. But does the generation to be 
most affected by America’s spi raling 
debt realize the true implications? As 
the batde rages over the comparative- 
ly trivial issue of tax reform, even the 
politicians seem to have forgotten the 
most serious problem. Meanwhile, 
our future is bong put into bode. 

Representative John E Porter of 


‘Illinois predicts thfli the nati/wuil 
debt (which could reach 52 trillion by 
the end of 1986), when added to un- 
funded liabilities in Social Security 
and government pensions, will sons- 
day burden America with a total debt 
of dose to S10 trillion. Our share will 
be wefl ova $100,000 pa person. 

Today’s adults never had to face 
this difficulty. Congressmen, "whose 
average age is 50, represent an era of 
opportunity that we, their children, 
are not likely to enjoy. Buying gov- 
ernment services on credit, they can 
afford to dabble in tax reform, when 
the day comes to pay their creditors, 
they won’t be around. We wQL 

If we are going to foot the bill —if 
it is our future that is at stake — why 
aren’t we out protesting, fallowing in 
the footsteps of our pofiticaLbig 
brothers and sisters who did so modi 
to change policy on civil rights, Viet- 
nam and the environment? Young 
people need to be concerned now. To 
guarantee a decern future for bur- . 
selves and our children, we must figte 
today to protect tomorrow. 

Our generation has often been ac- . 
cused of lacking a sense of histoty. 
but let us show that we have a fina 
sense of future. Maybe it’s time we 
learned from our eider sisters and 
brothers — to paim signs, to hammer 
them on pickets and to march with 
them. Thousands of 20-year-cJds de- 
scending cm Washington would cer- 
tainly command a little attention: 

The generation in power has the 
luxury to ignore the debt they are 
imposing on ns. They wfl] be gone 
when the bills come due. - 

The New York Times. - 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Metric Measure in Space 


In the report “Space Arms Critics 
t Failure as Omen” 


See Laser Test 

(June 21), we leant that the shuttle 
control system was confused tvyamsr 
distances were indicated in feet rath- 




-. c: 


- .; . "i. 
• *-r 


£3 


A M 


will now take up the role of a wealthy 
ent re p re neur and, assuredly, frequent 
commentator in the press, on televi- 
sion and on the lecture circuit, dis- 
cussing the failings of his successors. 

I am too old to worry about my 
own disappointment at the way this 
turned out. My concern is that Mr. 
Stockman’s contemporaries will see 
him as an example to emulate. As the 
first of his generation to achieve real 
power, he leaves a troubling legacy. 

The Washington Post. 




K 


Thebesj 

~lor 5 dav 


a than in nautical miles. Why on 
Earth — or in space — woe they 
using feet and miks? Evar the Penta- 
gon should know that scientific ex- 
periments use the metric system pre- 
cisely to avoid such errors. 

FL. GRGSSMANN. 


In Defense of Astoria 


A member of our board has calfcd 
our attention to “From Sonet Gray 
to Manhattan Glitter” (June 5) t in 
which David Remnick says of novel- 
ist Alexander Kaletski: “He wrote 
and lived in Astoria, Queens, a quick 
subway ride from Manhattan.’! liked 
.Queens,’ he said. ‘My ndghborhood 


was Mafia-controlled, so there was 
no crime. It was like socufimi,: defy 
an ideal verson.* " •. > 

Astoria, represented WtinsGtybf ' 
New York Community Board, $ 4 
community crfann mTimHrgh r 
inhabitants of varied ethmc {S' 
grounds. The statement that part of 
Astoria is or was Mafia-controlled is 
pure nonsense amt an food* to tb® 
residents of this community. 

Long Island Gty, of whk£ A$E»» : - 
is.a part, is the ISth largest mdmSnri 
jsiyof the United Stales. IttoSiJro 
become the home of tla: Ebs£G$ 3 
film and television industries and 
be the showroom center of fte £«*- 
Coast interior design trades.: 

Our vibrant comt mmi ty.grith.itS 



estat 
a ur 
ir: pr’s an* 


acted Rar 


i! • ■’■i'.r- £,'*-■ 


•Mir-:- 


rux Cnj 


,, ‘"Cwils 


i 

; Snd 

jv 

KhTfI 

15 % < 


lower .crime rate than Manlutfsn/lft- 
minutes away across the EasrRifav 
VINiao DONATO- 



Community Boanf Nb.%. i 
Astoria, New Y«fe' " r 


Ambers of \ 
jtor Fcd< 


•suds La 




advertisement 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIUNE, MONDAY, JULY IS, 1985 


advertisement 



' When a man is tired of London he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford Dr. Samuel Johnson. 20th September. 1 in 


L ondon is where many of the laws that now 
govern much of the work! were first en- 
acted. Here were bora some of die funda- 
mental freedoms that are the West’s democratic 
way of life. 

A walk round legal London is to cover a world 
that has hardly changed for four centuries, some- 
times longer. This is where history a nd heroes 
haye met to create a tableau that is as fascinating 
as it is significant. 

In England and Wales (Scot two of the inns — Middle 
land has its own, thou gh Temple and Tnngr Temple, 
si m ilar system) the legal profes where the Knight Templars, a 
sion is divided between barns- military order founded in 
ters, who have the sole right to Jerusalem in 1118 during the 
practice in the higher courts. Cr usades, ori g ina ll y lived 
and solicitors who can repre- until disbanded in the early 
sent thei r clients in the lower 1 300s when the buildings were 
courts. Barristers must belong given to their rivals, the 
to. one of the four Societies Knights of St John of Jem- 
known as Inns of Court, all of satem. 
which are secluded and pro- One of the oldest buildings 
vide havens from the roar of in the Temple is the Round 
London's traffic. It is here that Church, completed in 1185 
you should begin your iouruey and said to be modelled on the 
through legal London. Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. 

Lawns which rise from the This is one of London's 
Thames Embankment lead to many treasures which miracu- 


Looking at Legal London and its Inns 


by Moss Murray 


two of the Inns - Middle 
Temple and Inner Temple, 
where the Knight Templars, a 
military order founded in 
Jerusalem in 1118 during the 
Crusades, ori ginally lived 
unto disbanded in the early 
1300s when the buildings were 
given to their rivals, the 
Knights of St John of Jem- 


fsf Mappin &Webb 


65 Rrompton Road, London SW3 1DB. 
Tel: (01) 584 9361 

170 Regent Street, London WlR 6BQ. 
Tel: (01) 734 0906 

2 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4N 4TL. 
Tel: (01)2486661 ; . - 

125-6 Fenchurch Street, London EC3 SDL. 
Tel: (01) 626 3171 


The International Jewellers 
London • Paris • Cannes 


ously escaped the Great Fire 
in 1666 and then fell victim to 
Hitler’s bombs during the 
blitz of 1941. Zr has now 
been faithfully restored and 
the varying shapes of beQ 
turret, gable and round tower 
form a fascinating composi- 
tion softened at this time of 
year by the leaves and 
branches of the plane trees. 

At the entrance to the north 
aisle of the Round Church 
stands a 16th century altar 
tomb of Edmund Plowden 
who was Treasurer of Middle 
Temple for six years. It is of 
alabaster with a richly dec- 
rated canopy. Close to the 
choir is a penitential cell, its 
two sHt windows looking into 
the church. Here Knights who 
disobeyed the Master, or 
broke the rules of the Temple, 
were confined. Walter le 
Bachelor, Grand Preceptor of 
Ireland, is said 10 have starved 
to death in this grim chamber 
less than five feet long. 

The w arr en of courtyards, 
passage ways and inviting gar- 
ens of these Inns have not 
rh n nge rl iruifih during the 

years. There remains a Dick- 
ensian air about them all. 

Like the Round Church, 
Middle Temple Hall was deva- 
stated by German bombs dur- 
ug the last war, but enough 
was left to rebuild it with 

mnch nf the original pandlmg, 

as well as its tremendous 
double hasomerbeam roof and 
intricately carved oak screen, 
thanks to generous aid. from 
the American and rjMrfian 
Bar Associations, gifts ack- 
nowledged by plaques in the 
corridors. 

This is ihe dining hall of a 
mediaeval college of law. 
Twenty nine feet long, and 
made from four planks of a 
single oak, the bench table is 
believed to have been a present 


from Queen Elizabeth I. The 
queen probably dined here 
more often than she slept in 
half the houses she is supposed, 
to have visited. Although it is 
known that she frequently 
honoured Middle Temple 
Hall with her presence there 
is, oddly, no official record of 
any visits. The minu tes then 
kept by Benchers were not 
concerned with news or his- 
tory, but solely with items of 
discipline and expenditure. 

It was here on February 2, 
1601, that Twelfth Night was 
performed with, it is said, 
Shakespeare in the cast. 

During the following two 
centuries the Inns became 
famous for their entertain- 
ments and many were allowed 
into membership who had re- 
ceived DO l ega l Tr aining . 

Among them Sir Walter 
Raleigh, Inigo Jones, Con- 
greve, Fieldfog, Sheridan, de 
Quincey and Thackeray. 

During the 18th century 
many leading Americans sent 
their sons to join one of the 
four Inns, especially middle 
Temple. Out of a tool at that 
time of 236 American born 
barristers, 146 were members 
of Middle Temple. Two other 
members, Edmund Burke and 
John Dunning, who were also 
Members of foe British Parlia- 
ment, defended vigorously the 
rights of the American Col- . 
nit-c during debates in the 
House of Commons. 

• When the Declaration of 
Independence was drawn upr^ 
one of the’’ members of the'. 1 
Committee that settled it was ' 
John Dickinson, a Middle - 
Templar. Upon its adoption - 
no fewer than five Middle '. 
Temple men signed it, an 
event which gave rise to the 
saying, ‘Blood runs thicker 
than water, but the law runs 
thicker foyr? inks.’ 




fursmm 




MONDAY • TUESDAY \ WEDNESDAY 

JULY 15 JULY 16 ! JULY 17 
9.30-9 : 9.30-9 ; 9.30-9 


THURSDAY ! FRIDAY 

JULY 18 1 JULY 19 
9.30-9 I 9.30- 



RP 


1895 


4400 


1250 


5000 


12000 


2500 


1295 


SALE 


375 


695 


395 


Stranded Racoon Jackets 


Stranded Racoon Coats 


Red FOx Jackets 


Red Fas. Coats 


Silver Flax Coats 


Mink Coats 


Mink Jackets 


Large Designer Collection of Mink and Fox, in all 
shades and styles, at factory prices. 

. BNDON |ABEL- ym 

SAGA MINK • SAGA FOX TB 

Bbrl^iuMMBAK — 

DUTYlWoFO^^Cteiits 

1 g 0/- nwr all marked pnces^i 


Down Middle Temple Lane 
is located the American Law 
Library, the finest and most 
extensive collection of Ameri- 
an law books outside foe 
United States, with more than 
20,000 volumes. 

To arrive at foe third of foe 
Inns, visitors can cross busy 
Fleet Street, home of many of 
Britain’s newspapers, and 
walkthrough the Royal Courts 
of Justice, or Law Courts as 
they are better known, and out 
into Carey Street and into 
Lincoln's Inn. But stop at foe 
statue of Sir William Black- 
tone which was presented by 
the American Bar Association 
in 1924. Sir William, who 
became a judge in 1770, was 
the author of the classic Com- 
eniary on the Law of England. 

Alternatively, there is an 
interesting stroll up Chancery 
Lane with its solid Victorian 
atmosphere, past the offices of 
foe Law Society until you 
come to a gatehouse which 
dates from 1518, and still has 
the original oak doors. 
Through it lies Lincoln’s Inn, 
home of the Chancery bani- 
sters who specialise in the 
equity branch of English juris- 
prudence. Its history, too, 
goes back through the cen- 
uries. Lincoln’s Inn records 
are continuous from 1442. 

You leave Lincoln’s Inn by 
way of Lincoln’s Inn Fields, 
either along Great Turnstile, 
so named because, with its 
counterpart. Little Turnstile, 
it was one of the old turning 
styles that kept cattle in when 
the fields were pasture land, or 
by crossing busy Holbora and 
"walking through Fufwood 
Place or Warwick Court. Be- 
yond lies foe last of the great 
Inns of Law, Gray’s Inn. 

Here there was a school of 
law in the 14fo century and its 
list of members and benchers 
is at least as long as any of its 
brother Inns. First on t he list 
must be Henry V Ill’s best 
known bureaucrat, Thomas 
Cromwell, ««id Elizabeth’s 
Lord Burghley. Others were 
foe martyr Archbishop Laud, 
Sir Francis Bacon and, more 
recently. Lords Macaulay and 
Birkenhead, better known as 
F E Smith, Sir Winston Chur- 
chill, Franklin D Roosevelt 
and die present Prince of 
Wales. 

The Hall and Library of 
Grays, where the first perfor- 
mance of Shakespeare’s 
Comedy of Errors was held in 

CHARLES HAMMOND 

INTERIOR DESIGNERS AND DECORATORS 


ESTABLISHED 1907 

Exclusive fabrics, hand-made 
upholstery, objers d'art and 
18ch century antiques in 
conjunction with Arthur 
Brett of Norwich. 

Open weekdays, 9-5 
Saturdays 10-4 

165 Slone Street. London SW I X 9QE 
Telephone: 01-235 2151 Tdec 917976 


1S94, was mutilated by Ger- 
man bombs in 1941, but 
restored to its original mint 
condition largely through the 
generosity of American Bar 
Association members. 

No tour of legal London 
would be complete without a 
visit to the Central C riminal 
Court, or Old Bailey as most 
people know it. This is where 
some of foe most stirring, and 
gruesome, criminal cases have 
been heard. 

Built early this century, 
with a new extension as recent 
as 1972, it is on the site of the 
notorious Newgate prison, 
London’s principal prison 
from the 13 th century until 
1901. For more than 600 years 
condemned prisoners were 
taken from Newgate to Ty- 
burn, now Marble Arch, for 
their public executions. The 
last took place in 1783. 

Today the Old Bailey’s most 
famous court is No 1 where 
scores of the most famous 
criminal trials have been held,' 
yet only one of them is com- 
memorated by a memorial. It 
took place nearly three cen- 
turies ago, but was, most legal 
experts admit, one of the most 
significant in legal history. 
The wording reads: 

“Near this site William 
Penn and William Mead 
were tried in 1670 for 
reaching to an unlawful 
assembly in Gracechurch 
Street. This tablet com- 
memorates the courage and 
endurance of the J ury . . . 
who refused to give a ver- 
dict against them, although 
they were locked up with- 
out food for two nights and 
were fined for their final 
verdict of Not Guilty.” 
The case of these jurymen 
was reviewed by write of 
habeas corpus by Chief Justice 
Vaughan who delivered a 
judgment which esta b lished 
the light of juries to give their 
verdict according to their con- 
victions. Despite this, four of 
those jurors spent many 
months in prison, and all 
twelve suffered a verbal and 
public browbeating. 

But foe battle they fought in 
London was a fight for free- 
dom. And the people won. 

JilasBa&a &ntiquFS 

Do pop lik* antique Jmfleiy? 

We are defighled to welcome aB 
viators to Masseda Antiques al 45 
New Bond St. Wl.iowcwour 
Erne selection ol Victorian and 
period jewellery and silver. 

Td- 493 4792/5610 
Thursday, open to 630p m. 


D. L. LORD 

Knit wear. Cashmeres. 
Shirts. Tics. Scarves and 
Lcaiherguods. , 

Burlington Arcade 
London W.I. 

Tel: 01-493 5808 


It’s July 
. . .and 
time to 
think 
about 
Furs 



The time to buy furs is when the weather is warm. Prices 
are at their lowest, and furriers have more time to give 
personal attention. To coincide with the American Bar 
Association conference, Ross Furriers, one of the most 
famous names in fur in Britain, is holding a series of 
presentations of their 1985/86 collection of finest furs at 
the Hilton Hotel, in London's Park Lane, from July 
15/19. Their salon will remain open each day until 9.30 
p.m. 

Mink and fox coats and jackets, styled by top designers in 
Milan, Frankfurt, Paris, London and New York, dominate 
the collection, but pride of place is an exclusive mink coat 
made by Ross from a bundle purchased at the 1985 
Hudson Bay Company's auction in London and judged 
"supreme champion. ” 

Ross furriers is one of the oldest, and most respected, 
furriers in the UK. Founded in 1890, the firm has always 
concentrated upon top quality furs such as Black^ama 
and Emba mink and Saga fox. It has customers in a score 
of countries including foe United States, France, Italy. 
Japan and Germany. 


Fisher 


Specialists in designer and 
hand-knitted cashmeres. 

32/33 Burlington Arcade. Telephone: 

London. Wl. 014934180'6221 


<xs^y 



of London 


THE FIRES! 

CHINA Be GLASS SHOE 
If! THE WORLD- ' 
S1RCE 1827 


Customers from the U.5.A. will find 
excellent savings compared with U.5. 
retail prices on our unrivalled collection 
of china, glass, silver and cutlery 

Visit us when in London or apply 
for our new catalogue and price list. 
Orders despatched to any destination. 

Thomas Goode & Co. (London) Ltd. Dept ITT. 
19 South Audley Street. Grosvenor Square. 
London W1Y 6 Bn. England. Tel: 01-499 2823 



TRASCO 


Tax Fro* LHD Export 
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make* from stock 

US-EPAYDOT 

European DoIIvmy 


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CoxcMmmH 
Limouaina, and 
axotlciOOO SELS 
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KossEumere 


Members of the British 
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34 Lands Lane, Leeds 1 




Curdhu. 
i'2 year old 
/ iigbland 
Single 
Mali 
Whisky 
from ilye 
l louse of 
Johnnie 
Walker. 








































ICNAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


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S ido Hotiond Alrilnu Fla 

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5 'a ?iicn Ca.naa 
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6 36 Dcnmart 

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5 73S Denmark 

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1-ttAor 

4 15N<r, 
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IIYitoDec 1BJV, 11821887 IL23 


— HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS — 


Y 70- Si-xZ'i.-tn indjan Pub) 

s Vj Feme. PaKtict* vxalc 

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ir.it&Nav ns mi 
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28 See 
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14*. 28 5«p 
17% 83 Oct 
I TV, 29 Oci 
17k: -9 Oct 
18 27 Oct 


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10 27 Oct 


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35* 29 Mar 10714 1L93 
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81 V, I7JB2427 10.12 
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7*»Jan 94V. 1033 IL44 uo 


SUPRANATIONAL 


ocu 40 African Dtveiop Bonk 
ecu 35 African Develoa Scnk 
t 75 Alien Develop Bank 
y 15008 Allan DeveloD Bank 
V 1200 Allan Devriac Bank 
y 15000 Aslan Develop Bonk 
S M0 Asian Deveta, Bank 
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3SD Etc Euroo Ecnoom Com TT 27 Jiri 
ecu TO Eec Euroo Eaxwm Com 11* to Jul 
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17 10X911201006 

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180 CraSt SOlSH Fin X7W 
48 Pirelli Ind W/w 
2» Swjw Bank Cora O/i 
108 Swta Bank Cora W/m 
100 5*lw Bonk Carp X/w 
380 Urdm Bk Switzerland 
180 Union BkSwmrrinKl 
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103 941 

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>58 unnadKinedon 

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34 Alrttate Ira Finance 
15 AIHrt Breweries 
75 Allied Lvom 
30 BarrJovs Bank InH 
108 Baratov'S Dry livas* 

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65 Eec Eurtto Eemrom Com M* to Apr 110*12X811X811X2 
ecu 30 Eac EurflP Econom Com il Vito Jul 111 9X8 MX4 

ecu 71 Eec Eurap Econom Cam 11* to 5ep 1«* 964 U8 1014 

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3» Eec EwpeEcanum Com HWtoJrt W5V, 10JJ 1085 1014 
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75 Eec Euroo Econom Com ii toMcv HB* mx* ins mxs 
70 Eec Euroo Econom Com 11 VSAug 99 ll.Un2211.1l 

4 TOSrt 99V, 869 121 4JD 

8* 25 Jon 94* 9.18 98* 077 

VriTOMor K»ft 460 4X5 

PtWAor 991ft 1X0 9X5 429 

lift TO MOV |9 fra 073 421 

MftTOAuo 9»ft LS3 9X4 068 

I* 27 Apt 
lift 27 Jon 
9* 27 Jul 
7U27AUB 
76 27 Orf 
7 27 Dec 
IMTOJan 
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4 EbEaroa Invest Bank 
re Elb Edtop Inert Bank 
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(80 Effi Euroo Invest Bcnk 
17S Elb Eurae IrwesJBonk 
5# E» i Eoroo Invest Bulk 
75 EJb Euroo Inert Book 
1ID Elb Eurap Invest Bonk 
W Eft Eerop Inert Bank 


150 BrtttSTi Petrol Capttu 
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y 37100 BrirtiPetridOvofn 
50 Britim stoat Corn 
725 Briwi Finance 
2? Cortury Sc twMvm D/s 
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5 CourtauMs fnt> Fin 
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t SO EndFimmce 

a Finance For Industry 
I TO Finance For Industry 
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8*, to May _ „ . 

» TO Aug ee* » J8 18X* 0JH 
TOkTOOd 9SV. MX4 1122 416 
10* to Mar 98*1 1064 1473 1041 
11* to Feb MB IL5S lira 
I* 26 tec 971ft 101*71X1 146 
•1ft to Sep 18 11X5 9X8 

TlftTOAuo 91 *] 32X2 1*44 4M 
7V, 27 Nov 891ft 11*1 U82 4X8 
II 29 tec in 100* >06# 

mj- to Dee MO* 10X0 1174 

8* TO Feb 99 929 929 433 

7* 27 Feb 77 >66 1069 7.99 

9* 28 Jul 100 9X4 9X5 

914 42 Moy 9»ri 1130 1145 IIS 
8 27 NOV 95V, 10X4 1112 431 
HMtoJai 99Vft 1080 1051 

IMfctoNtay ItC* 11J0 11X4 

in.toJua mi lira 

711ft to Frt in 10X4 
W*toSrt 90>]1I84 
7 77 Mot 100* 485 
»2JW .gft M.13 1090 9JD 
lMbtoOd 105* 1058 lira 
M 1014 12X4 UI 
941] 11XN 1163 962 
97 W2I IV8I 9X9 
91*] 1184 1261 429 


1183 

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7*toOd 
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9V, 27 tec 
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9*2S0ct 
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9S¥i *rawx* S6J 


MC 492 0*2 IJJ 
97V] 1045 1057 I4JD 
I* *JI 10X1 

*5 1091 11X1 9X4 


TO APT 181 .9X1 1X9 


MB EB, Eurap 
50 ElbEuroP Inert Bonk 
100 ElbEuroP I rarest Bow 
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ecu TO Elb Eurap lirrrt Bonk 
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too Ekj Eurap invesi Bra* 
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1B0 Elb Eurap Invesi Bank 
20 E6 Eww l mad Bra* 
125 Eh Euro* Invrt Btnk 


9J32 0XS 

90 768 481 463 

Ml* 983 961 

925ft 1154 1380 7X4 
96 9X8 1021 723 

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11 W Jun «3>] ® NU3 

KTOSeo TOV, 1087 9X» 

16V, 21 Sen K3V, 1427 1524 

IVI26DK 94V] MXI 42? 

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17*2* APT im 1120 12X2 

g4 29Mav TOM 08* 11.10 

7* 2* Sftp 102* 389 JJ_ 

TV, to Frt mi 984 1092 420 
nritofipr im 9X1 iix2 

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9 toSrt re T0H 

H».toOa 180V, 165 

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lire to Dec 108 921 

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12 Flnonca For industry 
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era 

921 

437 

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lire 

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TO Finance For Inautlrv 
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15 Gnmd Hetreo Hauls 
H CrcukJ Mdrno Hotels 
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» G«n wrenxn tonal 
15 Gus rtlMM 
TO Horobraj 
» Mortana 

100 Ha mm ere m Property 
» Hawker SUdWev 
TO Hill Samuel Group 
TO Hrtden Altx RrmXrid 
We id FtaaneeX/w 
»00 IdWtl FMance 
TO Id Inti Finance 
re inmerW Chemical ind 
TO lira Inti HdMnas 
MB Tnvrtors In Industry 
ecu M invesian id irrtntnr 

1 50 InvsefcnlR Induslrv 

I TO I nvestenln industry 

S S KMnwertBansanAins 


9* 27 tec 90 14671083 925 

H to Frt 188 M» 11JN 

W2V, 1134 11.95 

H 29 Mor 97 118011.111031 

12}] 29 Jul TO 71X4 Iks nxs 

15*29 Jul 1 K) 1124 1136 

»]to*tay MOV, 10X5 10X5 

0* 27 Jul #6 10591091 829 

*7 1167 J 1037 

87 1124 12X1 1008 

98 11X3 (LA 11X2 

91 1UI 1L1I 

991ft 1013 1012 920 

« 1037 32X4 721 

*5 Vj 108* 11X1 438 

99* 961 961 426 
95 11.U 1280 1888 

MB 9X* 9X4 9X0 
Wlft M87T064 0T2 

>TO 11X6 11X6 


10* 27 tec 

BbtoAuo 
11 raster 

WAtoSeo 
9* 26 Jon 
Th 27 Dec 
8 27 Jul 
IM28*8ar 
91ft 29 Apr 
9V, 25 Dec 
7* 27 00 
19 29 teC 
U* to Seo 
Aft 24 Nov 
Jtetojun 
9* tojan 

I* 27 Jon 
TV] 92 Feb 
11* -95 Srt 
W> 28 Mar 


lira * na 
to list 1008 867 
88 lira 1324 1088 
*5 11.13 1U8 

77 HXT 1165 451 
*JVr U3 968 m 
1001ft 1U9 11X3 

MW 1167 


n VMor liflft MX* 

'to Aug 104 1.17 

“ns 12-ix 
irnttood to*- 1027 


I* 27 May 97 


1039 
11X8 
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11X3 

_ 1089 

1001 1069 851 


IS toJtf 

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to CbC 


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8 :I4 Juft 9Tf. 738 f« IR 

99 ft 913 *33 479 

998. TUa 1163 

11XB .1X9 1891 


L 6VA6 Euftl-norit* 

X L«C. Grnera* Aiiur 
ICO LlaDi EyrolPioflce 
*C L0*irftn .nil Finance 
15 *4atrppal EsteM 
3 tffreooi c tiaio 
75 V JurjJ mil FurtlCC 
7! Mjd«nd Wl -■TOO 
lie '.”'Crid Wl FpHriC# 

' M Mar.faeu PiKtmeu!; 

IOC Nsl.cnaiCoel SoaiD 
TO Nc'icnoT Cod Boors 
X ito’i-GMiilfevY Bank 
=5 wall VtfltSKXV Berk 
K No'l AesImiPsler Bgr-6 
!uC Nall Artm.n-.Ier Fin 
IU no" WeNTimier F.n 

IS ?i«W* Inti Finance 

25 3nw> CraoniiOliDri 
to Bonk 'Km F rant# 

2i 0«lkma T too * 

25 Seed i "edit lo«d l 

d Ated Inltmaimai 
3 Phm Inier nobonai 
40 PhroOwirti Finance 
190 P'a TintfrZ'X Fmonc 

13 PotMcnpaiTWHaUin 

14 powrdreeuackintovi 
TO Opwnir** fttaCkrtitTUi 
re flortsl in" Finance 
M sroliand imiFriancr 
50 Scotland i nn France 

15 SCCrYln-fr-^liOTdJ 
SO 5etectlon 7ra*i 
» Staion EWriei F.n 
i? sknrgi Esnues Uc 
IJ TownC:Ty NrOcftood 
25 UB Fmanee x 'w 
» mFraonu 
JO United Bjliinttlirti 
S United DomtfuanjTrus 
X wellcame Fcuadatlan 
IS wtklbreadCa 
2S lAf.lkimi Cl.ni Bonk 
IN William] Glv» Nederi 

UNITED STATES AMERICA 


9W8— 

•Wk Aue 

mo* °*<t Atet UbCwr 
1CT: 1244 lira 

»r- jui nre sit 

IX SL4T IU7 11 j] 

tsl lira na 
tr-s 964 053 ka 

K 1077 047 910 

* renra la 

a iix? nxs tn 
ua nn 

1167 HR 
939 *32 134 

!2» ran ta 
rarran tra 

09* 980 

42* 099 *38 

31.30 32X1 


BL96 MSI. 
ii *:A»r 
C-..- 'll MOT 03 
I68.87SW 331 
9 27.160* to 

I IMS n 

TTAiH 


U.M un 
KOI iu i.a 
10X1 30*7 IR 
:32i are Mu 


tit, to hcu cil lira lira 

14 ft to Art 13 1162 1162 ua 
to nimrett* 
-ft 13d I to 

lias lira 


ir.rarift 
r»recc: 

■ii to Ne. un 
MffatoMor 99 
14-^toJWt 111 
IDuBS'rt to 
|!81*AU0 93 

I 18 Fib “ 
9* 2ft Feb 

8 28J0h 
FftTOAor 

II *0 W* 

9 PMOY 
83. 28 Dec 
14.27 Jun 

13'ft to Aw 
8”i 27 Jim 
11 73 Jun 


US « 

n lire ua 

93 1997 lift! *41 

*5 1038 1163 1X3 

IDS 160 460 Ui 
9B-. 1056 1111 447 
92 1151 90S 

•9] ii ij ii.it ua 

Y4<ft 'DI0 1091 *51 
to *064)1X3 *31 
981] 1034 11X2 45} 
9) HA 5I.J4 1071 
98': reraiosi ua 

to 52X1 nv 1)68 


■ s . 



29 Acorn, 

150 Aelno UleCmualhr 
■Mi Alaska Homing Fm Co 
mono aim Ca 
n aim. :mi Comoi 
75 Anai Inll Finance 
« Amtcwta^esF** 

55 American Arrt.neY O'! 
100 Airier icon arewn 

40 Amercon Brandt 
150 Amer>canExercHCrcd 
100 American E (press Ctrt 
rj American e arrsO-i 
. 100 Alrier^xm EcareuO -S 

cnl 50 Americon ErsrraO/5 
TO America. Euvets 0's 

56 AmerAsn FdreMn Pwr 
58 American Fpmh Pwr 

cnl SO American Hswilol 
JO amenean Medicol IMI 
125 American Savinas Inll 
ioo Amerieon Swinos inn 

4)0 A m ericcn Tenon Ttteg 
25 Amoco Dll Hofcbooi 
100 Anhautar-Buscn Co 

IM Anbcu5rr-Buxh mil 
re Arizona P*Ca 
50 Aiimna Ps Firanca 
75 Arizona P» Franc* 

3 Arizona Ps Finance 
M3 Art zone Py Finance 
50 armceO ‘5 France 
2$ A;hM Oil France 
IM Astro 

SO aiIomic Riotfietd Ca 
200 Ailanilc RichfleldOY 
0 Atlantic Ralttield Ol 
40 AvCaO-YCZKital 
21000 Aran Caoilal Carp 
15 Borivor Puna (nn 
300 Bonk Of America 
2S0 Bank Ol America 
IM Ban kroner Kb 0 '5 
158 Bonkers TniH N* 

IN Bonkers Trust Ny 
60 Bear Steams Co 
IDO Beatrice Comoogniei 
290 Bed rice Finance W/w 
HO Beneficial O.'s Flnonc 
2C Ben#7<lo10« Franc 
20 Beneficial 0-1 Fimmc 
100 Beneddol 0(5 Ftnont 
90 Blue Bell lull 
5Q Bone Cascade Czna 
100 BonJW lira 
>00 Boston inn Finance 
22 Burlington D7s 
58 Burrougns Inti Fkranc 
50 Camobea Soup 0/s Fin 
63 Caiutiao Power UoM 
25 Carr Mr mu 
TO cwrt Hawley Hall Os 
Ho Q»inc 
48 Q» Inc 

IOO Chnetaraurt-Fands 
400 Chevron Connor 
ecu 40 Chrysler F.naidai Co 
ecu *s carter Flnondoi Co 
150 CTttrttr Flnondoi Co 
30 dgna O/sFTmmce 
uo aucars 

ITO Cliicarpa/Y Finance 
280 CltmraOrsFInancr 
>25 Citicorp D/s Finance 
M0 Citicorp ore France 
km Citicorp ore Financo 
IM CihCDrii ore Finance 
20 Citicorp Ore Finance 
too cmcarp ore France 
no CJijcan, ore Finance 
ISO cnmi Sarnies ore 
75 dry Federal lavras 
ire Coast Fed inll Flnonc 
M0 Cocn-Ceia Company X/w 
MO Coca-Cola Company 
MO Coca-Cola mil Finnic 
KM OxnXMo mil Flnonc 
100 Coca-Cola Inti Flnonc 
HO Coca-Cola MiPinmc 
100 Contmumcal Salem hi 

SB Cnwco Einttogmcn 
so CeiwaildMed Foods Os 


14 toteC 

131 

1179 

1XN 

IS -UAiff 

M*ft 

Ol* 

M3] 

lift-** Frt 

137 

B4snM3n« 

9ft *■ tec 

*9 

694 

481 

8ft I* Acr 

IB 

844 

86* 17} 

>4ft to Apr 

11? 

1129 

1451 

4ft H. M 

9ire 1182 ILU Ml 

li-fi An- 

rare 

•80 

Wl 

il 17 DK 

HU 

*0* 

MSI 

17 to Frt 

184<a 

lira 

1151 

!p,b80d 

MTft 

• 70 

11X2 

ICVtoMOV 

>03 

1005 

ms* 

l*ftl*Apr 

IHft 

128* 

1X4* 

10". to SOT 

KT- 

*61 

1083 

10ft to Jun 

»CI 

IS 40 

M64 

nre to Aw 

1W 

in4» 

MM 

4”87jcn 

93 

18.10 

SH 

S 22 itm 

41 

116* 

11X4 

12ft 94 Apr 

104 

11X8 

1167 

ill. to Frt 

nre 

1149 

1143 

Q W Aor 

rare 707? 

lira 

I2ft 99 vat 

lira H.7J 

nra 

lift 9»Mor 

MS 

1241 

725 'iS 

5ft 95 Od 

09*3 

728 

lire to mov 

rare 1061 

1885 

Ilia VO Jur 

raire 

107* 

118* 

12*! to Frt 

1C4 

IIJ7 

nn 

16ft 98 Ju> 

ICIft 1547 

1097 

laft-BfFrt 

ICIft 

UJ2 

1864 

16 9* Frt 

i«re 

>432 

KJl 

lift to Jon 

W2 

1117 

nra 

15ft »4 tec 

100--] 

14J4 

IS* 

8 97 Jun 

to 

9.1* 

W IN 

1 aft toFeb 

114 

1U8 

1460 

10ft 90 Jul 

fare 10x3 

nra 


ware na* 

nra 


twre 

ILB 

on 

rXtE'Ti 

IB 

JC2T 


4ft 91 Dec 

toft 

709 

F. 98 Jul 

08 

HI 13 

SB 

32 to Aor 

1011] 

n*s 

7751 

9 MMor 

93 

1; 17 

8J0 

MfttoSea 

9Bre 1075 

Rj} 

12ft 99 Oc' 

1C7 

1048 

njo 

lire *0 mot 

KO 

1853 

nn 

13 »Srt 

rare 

1025 

Till 

1? 9* Dec 

tax'] 

11X0 

nra 

HTre 94 Sac 

1871! 

9X4 

1X7 

9ft V Jul 

99 ft 1011 

& 

left to Mov 

VB.1 1X1* 

Lift to tec 

IM'-] 

1X9* 

116* 

17 to Frt 

10* 

N.to 

. 'Ui 


V- 


73.2700 
12 toJan 
17V, 27 Oct 
leu « Jun 
73. 27 Act 


M4 HL34 7.7t 

new lid iixi 

186 931 TIJf 

tost] lid nn 

97 967 UX3 3L99 

158* 

04* 

UJI 


rare to Frt 

105 

1452 

a to jun 

94 

ion ran 

9ft 94 Jul 

IDG 

9X4 

lift -92 tec 
ray 14 tec 

lam 1059 

9* 

11X3 

17 13 Jon 

U3 

11X5 

TTft 99 Del 

wsre 

KLS* 

M 11 Jul 

104 

9.11 

10V, 93 Apr 

IM 

*J7 

13 ft 14 Nov 

1071] IIX] 

17ft to Aw 

185ft 

11J4 

111] 98 Jun 

VI 

ran 

nrewAor 

M2 

9 u 

12 -8700 

101ft 1UH 


101ft 1067 


102V. 

*J5 

lift to Oci 

IDS 

HJ.43 

lift -92 Frt 

tan. 

lost 

la to Mar 

94V-. 1181 1158 

lift 97 Frt 

103 

nxs 

lift to Apr 

KH 

11X9 

17 fllPP 

183ft 

11*6 

rare 8* Dec 

M5 

10*6 

12ft UMOV 

ICIft 1862 

lift 98 Mov 

184 

9.19 

lift -91 OO 

tarn uh 

18ft 98 Jan 

104ft 

864 

12ft to Aw 

M8 

iora 


9X5 

MM 

*62 

tra 

32X1 

lira 

11.17 

i\» 

iu* 

3 

IM! 


11X1 


il* 


MB Continental Group O/s 
75 Continental Gruua Ore 


158 Canlrantoi (lunols 
108 ContinenW IBhKMS 
TO Centrantol TedPhono 
SO Com Products Cnc 
TO Contra Internal krai 
75 CroCkar National Bank 

’SaSSmnwra 

IS Culler ■Hammer 
250 tede Soetnac 4 Loan 
TO Dona iroemoHonol 
85 Dari & Krab Finance 

JiSaSs"”' 


113ft 29 Oct . Ml 10X0 
9ft 92 Aug IOTA 982 
113, -95 Frt 102 13X5 

IT- 91 MOT 105*. 1064 

9 26 Frt *93ft 4J1 4X1 483 

7ft 91 Jan 14 1158 1X97 453 

9ft 18 Jill ft*. 1446 9X8 

IlfttoAua to 1251 12J1 

9*. 26 Jul IM. HUH 9X7 

ISftWMor 10438 1191 


11X1 
1461 
I UO 
iin 
1473 

ts .- 


S*. 26 Fen 
14k. 26 Sea 




M2 


•Oft _ 
lift 9»Jan 
15ft -»1 Dec 
8 27 Jun 
lift 2* Sea 
I VMar 
73fttoHa, 


99ft 


is 


159 


Ira 


■ •M 


Ml MJS 11.17 

III na a*6 

toft M87MX2 439 

184*. ILU 12X5 

■ 


IlftPSMor 18^ 1141 1151 


IM pawpwTnicDlQre 


. Dcm Chemical Ore 
TO Dow Coming O'. 

35 Dresser Q/4 Finance 


113. 29 Mar 10K] 458 II.U 

7 9* Dec MOfc &d 855 

8 28 D8C 973ft 969 618 

9ft 94 Iter 97 U.U MJl *51 
8191* Jun 99V. 9X5 9X1 458 


12ft 2* Oci 104 1063 


75 Drenri Bumnom Lomoer lift. 90 Moy HDft HL74 
MQ Do Pont Oft Capllol U3,27«ay HN 483 

400 Ou Pari Ore Capitol UftlfDac 102ft 11X5 


200 Du Pont Oft Capital 
150 Oa Pan* 0/4 Capital 
80 Duke Potw O/s Financ 
150 Eartman Kodak Co 
50 EataiFunnce 
100 Enserdi FMance 
100 Eoultgttfa Ute Ftnanc 
20 EssoOre Finance 
50 Esio Ore Finance Mar 
50 Essa Oft France Nmr 
TO Fed tepl Stares 
no Fed Deal Starao 
ire Fir« Feo MkJuoaa 
UM Florida FedwSavinw 
IM Fluor Financo 
HO Fond Motor Craft Co 
IN Ford Motor Cr«S I Co 
W0 Ford Motor Credit O, 
W0 Ford Motor Credil Co 
MO Ford Motor Credil Co 
100 Fort Motor Credit Co 
TO General AmericTranro 
25 Ganeraf Cable O/i 
308 General Electric Czad 
TO General EJactrlcCrad 
TOO General EledrieC/wl 
TOO General Electric OM 
200 General EJeOric Cred 
MD Genernl Electric Cred 
TO General Electric Cred 
50 General Eftctrlc Ore 
84 General Foods Cop Co 
re General Foods Cop Co 
TO General Foods Co Inti 
TO Gwend Mills Finance 
HO General M*U* Inc 
700 General Motors Acted 

TO Generol Moron Accnui 

25000 General MotanAcceM 
TO Genera Motors D/s fi 
TO Genera Motors oren 
100 Genera Motors Oft Fi 
TO General ReCorp 
as Geonho-Pochtc FbKm 
ire Getty DU rim 
TO Gnra ore Flnonca 
3M Gmoc O/s Finance 
TO Gaioc O/s France 
TO Gmoc O/s Flnonca 
100 Gmoc Oft Finance 
150 Gmac O/s Finance 
120 Gmac O/i Ftaonce 
IB Gmoc Oft FTnonce 
TO Gmac o/s Finance 
TO Gmac O/s Finance 
108 GmoeO/sFteonce 
0580 Goodyear Tkt Rubber 
390Q Goodveer Tb* Rubber 
75 GaaM Inc 
TO Grtan Finance 
75 Gte FbKnce 
S Gle FkMFICO 
u 9 CteFtnance 
u Gte intamaltaml 
MO GuHOU Finance 
>00 GultOU France 
80 Gull SMM Oft Fbum 
60 GuH Stole, Oft FKUOT 

re GuH states unnitos 
TO Gull 8> Western I mere 
is Hoes Ore Cad an 
SO Marti Capitol Cora 
IS HU ton IBtan w lt— l 
IDO Hone /wen Inti Ftaone 
TO Houeetwld Ftaaaca w 
TO itanCradHCorn 
TO lbm CredU Coro 
1» ibm Credit Coro 
3H lbm Credit Cara 


nra 

lira 

IU1 

U.H 

038 

08) 

1461 

MXS 

IM 

1151 

1021 


MB 

136! 

nn 

1331 

lira 

9X9 

1155 

lira 

11X3 

lira 


1163 

NR 


MR 

9X3 


14ft2*Aag 104ft 1181 

lllft 95 JO. IN 1031 

15ft 29 Apr 1|5ft lid 

MtotoMar tom ms 
a*. 21 J on 1023ft 12.17 
lift 9] May Ml 11X1 

lift 92 Jul 90ft M64 

9 25 Sep TOft 5X1 591 IN 

8 2* Mar TO’i 751 751 75* 

8 -MNov TO 7.9* 755 180 

11 toFeb UO*. 9J0 

114* 95 Jul 993ft to. 17 
IX*. 99 JlX 108V] U.M 
133, 2* Mov 145k. 11.18 

U 29 Sea 1BSV. na 

113, to Frt 103 H4 

ffttoJN 97 UUP 

170.910(3 MTta 118* 

1134976809 IM 1057 

73 95 Feb Met] 1485 
lift 95 Mar uOft 1UI 

8U.27J«n 97 1885 M61 161 

MVMrn 97 ION 1061 151 

lift 17 Nov HE Ifl IU 

12 29 Od 105 HU4 

103, 90 Feb M7ft 965 

10 to Jut 101ft 968 

11 91 F« TO HUM 

M491A0O TOW. 969- 

M *.20 May toil] MJ6 wje 

4U-S5DK 97 1360 431 

D 20 Apr HBft 1414 9.1511X1 

11 ft to Act 1B5V, 9.11 NM 

14V] 95 Jon TO 10.14 1429 

6 24 Mar *9*. 9.12 4,32 414 

12 91 Dec 70734 11X4 UU 

H 21 Mar «2 987 U» 

10 *4 29 Jun Ml 34 Id HUB 

6ft to Feb 99V, 662 ASJ 

11 26 Apr 1001] mov KW5 

834 24 Aw TO 479 4J3 425 

113.270(3 100ft 11X2 11J3 

lift 92 Apr 105 1843 ~ 

143, 17 Aar 10*44 11X3 

14 29 Mov Ml Ol 

1ft 24 Jul TO 4X4 

13 28 Jul lPM 9X4 

15 27 May 105 11X7 

12 2/ Del 105ft 9J3 

]7ft a frt in nra 

U 24 Frt 114ft 9X4 

Mft 28 Aw 19034 lid 

15 *89 MOV 107ft IIJ6 

lDfttoFrt MTft 4X8 

I lft to Oa 10434 1814 

in, 77 Apr Ttnft 1184 

4ft 74 Oec 97ft 7X4 

7ft 75 May 973, 7X9 

1134 75 Mar in jlb 

13ft29Auo tat*, lira 

n 27 Apr mu. era 

9J5 2* Jut 97ft BLB HU1 H80 

raft to apt roev, j.n ns. 

81 m 26 Nov 9* 980 U* UI 

lift 2700 191ft HX4 B|j 

10ft to Dee mft rst 

17ft 2o Oa «»] a»7 

16 70 APT MOV] 041 

13 92 War MSI. 1167 

12ft29Mor 10434 10X4 

,|342» Jun *93. 981 911 177 

1534 29 APr 10534 063 HP 

7ft 17 NOV ISft 9X1 lid 412 

10ft to Mot 10234 ?J* TO* 

15 21 Dec TOft NM UA 

17342700 18534 

lift 29 Feb 102ft 

II 29 tec KB ._ 

9ft 20 MOT in 9d _ 99 


K 


MB 

1413 

nra 

935 

55 

nra 

3251 

nra 

nra 

UJI 

143* 

BH 

lira 

7J8 

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(ContiiHied oa Page 10) 


ZERO-COUPON BONDS 

July II 



WestLB 



Secnrtty 


.JTOA Ortotnaotveriwi Offend j 
Matarffr Am Ifttr Price Prtea 


Anwriom Inll Group 
Aston Develop Ba* 
MtOMcHcMiUOs 


11X4 

LfttoSep IB 11JI* IIJ* 

HA, vj Jan 105 I8A1 lied 31X1 

I H] 92 Jgn mil* A5* 11X1 

I3 1 ] 29 Jul KB 189* 

iftWMor Hft UI 

*22 «"Ak 07 11X3 

II Vito 101 1827 

Ii 27QCC )01 1045 

1 1'., tojan 96ft 11x5 
107 U2 

07ft 1134 
Ij^a Si 

90‘] 1069 

»> If. 7 1 

■UO : * 15 

115 1321 


re. to nor 
7ft to Apr 

r:2*Az» 

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1750 

7.98 

1089 

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1143, 


156 

ex*: 

na. 

*21 

n« 


Austria 

Baker IMIFbUart 
BenJrtar Foods D/5 
British Petra Capita 
CampbriJ Soup Ort Fin 
MnlBarFlnSenr 
CBMMor Fta Serv 
Caitrost Savtaas Bonk 
tewOwmlea 
Du Pont 0,'s Capital 
Ekwertflnans 
EledriettoFrana 
Dm* Cnotw 
Florida FftkrSaylnn 
Go, te France 
GazDeFrma 
Gansmt Eieetriecred 
Genera Electric Crad 
Ganensi eikwc cred 
Genenri Eteark aw 
GenernJ Electric Cred 
Genera MilU lac 
Grtenri Mills Inc 
Gmac Ore Finance 
Gmac O/s Finance 
Gmocore FtaBflae 
Gun on Finance 
NewEnotanaLHo 
ttaracinyrtmenSk 

rv* ion 

PwnevJc Gated f% 
Peastae Ceoftai 
Pspska cootta 
PM8p Morris CredH 
Prudent URaattv5ee 
RrttandFlwnce 
Psynoids RI Ore 
Sean Overseas 
Sears Over w oi 
Sears Overseas 
5wf«shE«pon Crash 
Sweeitti E snort Credil 
Sen. Bonk Coro 
Weih Far ao inn Fin 

Xhb Cred.1 0-4 Fi" 


UAwTO! STO H8* 

31 Aw 3084 5 M09 TOi 
4 Frt 1?92 5 SB 390 
V MOV 1575 dm UB 7985 
2* Moy TOO dm tfl2 MS 
EFrtWJ vsa 1982 
9 Frt 1993 539 Ht2 
30 Jun 1195 SM7 19Q 
31 Apr 1992 STO TW 
Ato]997 5300 190 

II Feb 1994 8)40 1982 
U Frt 2918 son MB 
31 Mov 1977 ITO NN 
11 Frt 1990 5309 1913 
3001994 5)80 1(84 
1! Sep 1794 3SN 1714 
Ut4av3DBI 5 TOO Mil 
15 Jul 1795 SMB I7B 
O frt 1992 5159 I9B 
I Mar 3994 un TO2 

>7 Frt 1772 5480 IK 
17 Frt 1993 5408 IK 
4MorWf4 STO IK 
4 Mar NTS 5500 in 
H Jul 1998 5(80 1984 
IS Aw aw sS W4 
IS Aug 3013 I TOO 1984 
IS Frt 1970 5158 170 

3 Frt 1992 S» TO 
lOdlTtt ITO NB2 
2810-19*2 5 TO TO 

3 Frt 5777 SB? I9K 
11 See 19*4 519 NW 

7 MOT 3992 IBB TO 
17 Frt 1701 539 H93 

4 Frt TO 5 IDG 1982 
a Merita* its ik 

8 Jon 1994 SZ4 TO 

15 Jan 1*97 5W t70l 
35 APT 1992 180 TO 

W Frt TO (do IK 
IB Frt 1993 340 TO 

27 MOV 1774 S408 TO 

Qjam 5 500 IK 
H Mar 1494 J2M IK .... 
llbepHto STO 1*84 33925 
|4Na, 1991 5480 196* 25 

4FM1M0 JUS l« 44-" 
II Feb 19*1 .5250 TO 25*] 


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Box. 1128,4000 Dussawort , 


■ T^ 859I88 S'^ anClS< ' leS:TelWh0neS263,i/826 37*1 


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WfestdeutKtie Landesbsnk. 41. Moorgate, London EC2R 6AEAJK 
Telephone 6386141 ■ 'Max 887 984 


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VVfestdeutsch© Landesbank, BATbwer. 36th Boot; 12 Harcourt Road, 
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MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


EUROBONDS 


Strength of American Issues 


By KENNETH N. GILPIN 
N*w York Tones Service 

N EW YORK — Recent, sharp dfrimes in the value of 
the dollar on fnfeigii»g Hji»iiy markets has further 
doude& the outlook for new American Fiirndripar 
issues, market participants on both sides of the Atlan- 
tic say. “The psychology of inter national investors has rfnwgM 
radically over the last thrfce to four months,” said w k Bri ttain, 
product manager for foreign exchange at Salomon Brothers in 
New York. “With the decline in the dollar, European *tiH other 


Market Turnover 

Far Waak EmM July 12 
(MUkra of UJL OoUanr} 

Total Dollar i 
CeM ’ t7am.l013J0SL60 

Euroctoar 34^8^50 31 ,409 JO 


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New Yodc “With the decline in the dollar, European *tiH other 
investors seem mote prepared to buy other, morc'esotcric issues.” 
The drop in the dollar, which Ml by as much as 4 percent 
against key European currencies last wedc, compounds the prob- 
lem fadng the Federal Reserve. The Fed, whose open m»Tir*!t 

committee met in Washing- ■— ■ ■ 

ton last week, has eased po- Eurobond Yields 
licy to such a degree in recent For Wook EmM m* 10 
mnn tKg that growth in basic u JJS Is tc TTiy tn tn Inst. — 1&S1 % 

XSSSiIS^isr:- !S5* 

way above meir target levd. coos medium term Tun% 

But depute those moves, eco- French Fr. short term 1243 % 

ySSSSSSniS ^5 

In order to provide turu^r ywi is term, tirfi inat. _ 6 J 3 % 

stunulus, the Fed might like ecu short term sat % 

to ease further. But with the ecu medium term 9J0 % 

dollar under pressure, such a ISSSKrZrZ 525 
move now seems i n c r e as i ng ly luxf mad term inti hist. 976 % 

unHkely. Luxf medium term . 948 % 

Tn the .Opinion of traders Caiat iBhKi ty the Luxembourg Stock Ex- 

and analysts, those oulstand- cfKTO0L 
ing questions combined with Market Turnover 
a more normal summer slow- ^ vVeek bided July 12 ' 
down are apt to put a break wuHan* at us. oouam ■ m ^ Bam 
on activity m doHar-denomi- t«mi d emr SSraSS 

nated issues in comina cedei T7jn.ui3jo&io 198450 
* Eurocteor 34484J031409J0 3J76JD 

“Professional market makers have tried to wind down their 
books as much as they can and to stay away from new issues,** 
said Cabot Henderson, assistant director and head of new Issues 
at Chemical Bank International Ltd. in London. 

“People are shifting their portfolios around to take adv antage 
of the decline in the dollar. And a lot of investors are just staying 
on the sidelines.” 

T NDEED, while a number of fixed-rale dollar issues were 
I priced last week, the issues eryoying the greatest success were 
denominat ed in a number of other currencies. 

“There has been a lot of activity in ECUs, Australian dollars 
and New Zealand dollars, and we are wondering when the dollar 
is going to crack,” Mr. Henderson said. 

.A key indi catio n of how the Fed views the economy and its 
own conduct of monetary policy may come an Wednesday, when 
the Fed rfmirman, Paul A. Volcker, is scheduled to begin two 
days of testimony before the House and Senate Banking Commit' 
tees in Washington. 

“Interest will center on what Mr. Volcker has to say about M-l 
and whether or not it will be dc-emphasized as a target,” said one 
analyst who asked not to be identified. 

Mir. Brittain in New York said: “If Mr. Volcker were to re- 
emphasize the importance of M-l, the value of the dollar in 
foreign exchange markets would Kkely rise. Bnl if be said it is now 
'less imp ortant as an aggregate; .then, the dollar would weaken 
further.” ; ~ 

Last Thursday the Fed reported a large, M-bflUon increase in 
M-l, the nation^ baric money supply. The latest surge in M-l, 
which led to a sell-off in both New York and London, put M-l 
about $15 billion above the Fed’s target of 4-percent to 7-perccnt 
growth for the four quartos ending next December. The rise 
tended to reinforce the view in New York and elsewhere that a cut 
in die Fed’s discount rate, currently at 7V& percent, is highly 
unlikely. 

For the moment, die dilemmas faring the Fed are not shared 
by other central banks. Last week, in what looked suspiciously 
hhe a coordinated step, monetary authorities in a number of 
countries, including Britain and France, took advantage of the 
decline in the dollar and took steps that should allow base lending 
rates to ease in those countries. 

With the dollar falling , widening interest rate differentials 
between Treasury and Eurodollar securities provided another 
disincentive for new fixed-rale bo rr o w er s to enter the Euromar- 
kets. Nevertheless, there was some activity in the “d ollar straight” 
Eurobond market last week, much of it on Monday and Tuesday, 
before conditions worsened. * 

Fixed-rate deals that were brought to market included a $150 

(Continued on Page 1L Cot 1) 

j L^tWfedt’sMaitete 

I Aff figures ore as of dose oftrodng Friday 


Stock Indexes 

Unfed States 

Lost Wk. Prav.Wk. cm 
DJ lndus_ UXU UJU3 +032% 

DJUtil. W&9I 16629 +1J9% 

DJ Trans.— 0092 67049 +142% 

S&P100 18545 18584 —026% 

SJ.PS00 19129 19152 +036% 

NYSE CP— 1TXI8 11147 +036% 

Sunx:PndmU/BocteSearaB. 

Britain 

FTSE MO— 1224.10 126020 —271 % 

FT 30 92280 957.20 —361% 

Hong Kong 

Hong Seng. 161580 157035 +289% 


NifckelDJ— 1283949 T296385 -096% 

WeaGenmog 

Comment* I397J0 148620 — 5JS% 

Snm:MmrCmllCe r Uakn. 


Money Rates 

Unfed States 


Unfed States imm 

Discount rata— Th 7% 

Federal funds rote — ~Pk 7Vi 

Prime rot e - 916 9V» 

*E5 

Discount 5 5 

Coll money ; . 6» .616 

604ay Interbank — 65/16 6% 


L o mb ard 680 600 

ovemtgftt 525 5% 

1-montti Interbank— 540 5% 

Brfefa 

Bonk base rat* -12 1»S 

Cat! money — — — 1214 12% 

3^nonmmt*rtKmk^. 1»» 12H? 

Dogg ImlWk. PrwJW. Cta 

BkEnol Index- 13890 M3.10 — 2M% 
Gold 

London pjn. fix. S HA 31280 NAS 

aetaxiaBtld^taaOaa^fmJmes<M 


If crath^^fcribunc. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


UAE Asks 


• Snn* U S eCOOOPMStl snH hank- 

ers had voiced concern that a drop 
in oil revenues, which amount for 
75 : percent of Mtirico’s exports, 
would endanger its ability to ser- 
vice its debt. 

Another official with- the Mexi- 
can government's oO minisoy told 
UP1 that the United States, Europe 
and Japan had reacted favorably to 
the once reductions. 

“if inquiries we have received are 
an indication, we soon will be back 
to exporting 1.5 million bands of 
oil a day,” said flic oil official, who 
declined to be named. 

Mexico, which currently exports 
about 800JXX) barrels* day, is not* 
member of OPEC but had followed 
the carteEs pricing policies until 
several months ago. Its decision to 
cut prices followed OPECs failure 
to agree on defending prices daring 
talk*. 

Mexico recently signed a multi- 
year refinancing agreement with its 
commercial bank lenders that in- 
cluded no new requests for funds. 
But the country is having difficulty 
reducing its budget deficit and in- 
flation. (Reuters, UPJ) 


AEG: Learning to Survive as No. 3 


OPEC Is Urged 
To Fight Cuts 

Coatpifed bf Our Staff Front DUpaiches 

ABU DHABI —The oil minister 
for, the United Arab Emirates. 
Mana Said al Oteiba, has called cm 
OPEC countries to maintain cdl 
prices in the face of “a passing 
mnnwr yiftnw“ of weak demand, it 
was reposted over the weekend. 

Members of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries 
should make every sacrifice possi- 
ble to prevent price reductions, Mr. 
Oteiba was (moled as saying in the 
newspaper at-Ittihad. 

An OPEC meeting in Vienna 
broke up last week without an 
agreement on defending prices. Oil 
ministers agreed only to stop cheat- 
ing on pricing rules and to meet 
again July 22 m Geneva. 

Mr. Oteiba also said he doubted 
that Mexico’s decision late 
Wednesday to cut its crude cal 
prices by as much as 51 iO a barrel 
would s gnifican riy Sffect the world 
market: 

“These prices are in line with 
those other non-OPEC countries 
have set,” he said. He stud Mexico 
had alerted OPEC ministers of its 
during the V ienna talks. 

The Emirates news agency 
WAM reported that the president 
of the UAE, Sheikh Zayea ben Sul- 
tan al-Nahyan, affirmed his coun- 
try’s “strong support to OPEC es- 
pecially at this critical stage” 
daring a meeting with Mr. Otema. 

Separately, Mexican officials as- 
serted over the weekend that their 
derision to cut oil prices would not 
seriously affect the country's abili- 
ty to service its $97-biDicn foreign 
debt 

“Of course this reduction will 
cause some shrinkage m central 
bank reserves,” a Mexican oil offi- 
cial, who was not identified, said 
over the weekend. “But it is not 
going to cause Mexico go to 


Group’s Focus 
Is on Raising 
Profit Figures 

By Warren Geder 

Inuntauaml Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Heinz 
Dfar, the chairman of AEG, is a 

survivor. 

Three years ago the company 
sought a court-supervised debt 
settlement to avoid what could 
have been Europe's biggest cor- - 
porate collapse. Today AEG is 
back on its feet as West Germa- 
ny's third largest electrical prod- 
ucts group and is earning steady, 
albeit modest, profits. 

But Mr. Dfirr, who was hired ' 
as chief executive in 1980 to pre- 
vent AES's demise, says the 
company now must prove that it 
can run with the best of the pack. 

“We no longw have image 
problems with customers 
abroad,” he said in an interview, 
“but our competitors certainly 
haven't forgotten our past trou- 
bles.” 

The key question facing AEG, 
analysts say, is how aggressive 
the company can be in a highly 
competitive field when H re- 
mains saddled with major finan- 
cial liabilities and the stigma of 
producing West Germany's larg- 
est corporate insolvency. 

Although it has recorded oper- 
ating profits since 1983, the com- 
pany seems to have trouble at- 
tracting major orders and 
concluding such agreements suc- 
cessfully, analysis say. 

“AEG is gang to hare to be 
more aggressive m bmdtng and 
carrying out large orders for cap- ' 
ital goods,” said an analyst at 
one of AEG’s house banks in 
Frankfurt The analyst who 
asked not to be named, said the 
group must double its efforts to 
win large orders from markets 
abroad such as the Middle East 



Heinz Durr, chairman of AEG. 


The analyst said AEG must 
also re-establish credibility at 
borne, where the group recently 
lost out to Messcrschmi tt-Boel- 
kow-Blohm, the country’s lead- 
ing aerospace group, on a 12 
billion- Deutsche mark ($400 
million) military contract to 
build mine-sweepers for the 
West German navy. 

Last year, AEG exceeded most 


from 40 million 


50-percent lur 
DM in 1983. 


Net profit , which was distort- 
ed by extraordinary items such 
as the sale of a subsidiary, soared 
to 398 million DM in J984 from 
37 million DM the previous year. 

Mr. DQrr said that he expected 
a steady growth in profits over 
the next several years, allowing 
for a possible return to dividend 
payments in 1988. The last divi- 
dend, at five DM, was declared 
in 1973. 

But AEG’s emphasis, he said, 
will remain on consolidation. 

(Continued on Page 11. CoL 1) 


Lower Dollar Is Welcomed in U.S. 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The strong dol- 
lar, blamed for damaging U.S. 
manufacturing industry but huilwt 
for helping to cut inflation, appears 
to be on the retreat after a historic 
five-year rally. 

* rariimg imrfiart ed heights . 

in February, the dollar has f alien 
more than 15 percent against other 
major world currencies, dropping 
to fevds last seen in the summer of 
1984. However it still about 65 per- 
cent higher than the depressed lev- 
els of fire years ago, according to 
the Federal Reserve. 

On Wall Street, the prospect of a 
lower dollar and hopes that such a 
development will improve profits 
for U.S. businesses that compete in 
world markets helped to ignite a 
rally that sent the Dow Jones aver- 
age of 30 industrials climbing to 
record heights last week. 

But analysts say that even if the 
decline continues, an event that is 
far from certain, there will be no 
quick fix for the damage to the 
economy attributed to the dollar — 
mainly the unprecedented U.S. 
trade deficits. 


“We are moving in the right di- 
rection. but there will not be a 
speedy change that will bring im- 
mediate relief to those sectors of 
the economy hammered in recent 
years,” said Lawrence Kiricher, an 
international economist at Irving 
Trust Gu, a large New York bank. 
-- Moreover, a Tailing dollar raises 
the risk of a resurgence of higher 
inflation because each dollar wfll 
buy less overseas. 

• . The dollar's earlier surge, which 
. contributed to the flood of relative- 
ly low-priced imports that has hurt 
US. manufacturers, did help re- 
duce the rise in U5. consumer 
prices from 13 J percent in 1979 to 
4 percent last year and an annual 
.rate of 5.9 percent so far lias year. 

“This fall brings the dollar out of 
the ionosphere and into the strato- 
sphere. I don't expect any major 
impacts yet,” said David Ernst, an 
international economist at the 
Washington consulting firm of Ev- 
ans Economics Inc. 

Mr. Ernst said that if the dollar 
falls further, the cost of financing 
huge federal budget deficits in the 
United States will increase. 


Currency traders said there is lit- 
tle mystery about the dollar’s fall 
blaming sluggish UK growth and 
lower American interest rates. One 
reason economic growth has 
slowed is the trade deficit, which 
reached a record $123 J billion last 
year. 

The Conference Board, a busi- 
ness-financed study group, said the 
strong dollar has been the main 
reason why 10 percent of the na- 
tion’s largo! manufacturing com- 
panies are operating at less than 
full capacity. Hit hardest were pro- 
ducers of nonelectrical machinery, 
iron and sled companies, and pa- 
per-products concerns. 

According to Mr. Krekheris cal- 
culations. it would take another 5 
percent to 10 percent drop in the 
dollar's value before the trade defi- 
cit stops growing, and that tire gap 
would hare to start shrinking be- 
fore there are any employment 
gains. 

“We believe the dollar is heading 
lower. Certainly the five-year up- 
ward trend is in the process of 
breaking down,” Mr. Kreicher 
said. 


Turner Proposes 
New Method to 
Take Over CBS 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — Turner 


a complex transaction to allow it to 
gain control of CBS Inc, without 
obtaining approval from the U.S. 
government to operate CBS's 
broadcast properties. 

Under the proposal made Fri- 


day, a trusteeship would hold the 
licenses of the regulated radio and 
TV stations now owned by CBS. 

The proposal also requires that 
Ted Turner, who is the owner of 
Turner Broadcasting, take control 
of the network, toy and music divi- 
sions in addition to other unregu- 
lated pans of the corporation. 

Mr. Turner began his hostile 
takeover bid, in which be seeks to 
buy CBS with S5.4-biHion worth of 
newly issued securities, in April 

On July 3, CBS offered to buy 
back 21 percent of its stock for 
$954.8 million in cash and securi- 
ties, in an attempt to thwart the 
takeover attempt by the Atlanta- 
based broadcaster. 

On Friday, Mr. Turner asked the 
Federal Communications Commis- 
sion to approve William D. Hatha- 
way, a former U j. senator from 
Maine, as a trustee who would play 
a key role in the arrangement- The 
FCC must approve all transfers of 
television broadcasting licenses, 
and the proposed arrangement was 
thought to be designed to allow Mr. 
Turner to forgo obtaining the ap- 
proval hims elf 

“TBS intends to acquire at least 
67 percent of (he issued and out- 
standing common stock” of CBS. 
the draft of the proposed voting 
trust agreement says. 

Mr. Turner's lawyers said in a 


letter to the FCC that he wanted lo 
buy CBS stock and hold it until a 
time “immediately prior to a meet- 
ing of the CBS shareholders at 
which a slate of new directors is to 
be elected.” 

Since CBS has rfiininntwt a pro- 
vision that allows 10 percent of the 
shareholders to call a special stock- 
holders’ meeting. Mr. Turner ar- 
gued that owning the stock would 
not give him control or the corpora- 
tion. 

At the shareholders meeting, un- 
der Mr. Turner's proposal Mr. 
Hathaway would vote tire trust's 
shares to elect new directors. Those 
directors would split the company 
in two, placing Mr. Hathaway in 
charge of the regulated half and 
Mr. Turner in charge of the unregu- 
lated. 

“It is envisioned that the first 
voting trust would exist only for a 
few hours,” said Charles D. Ferris, 
Mr. Turner's lawyer, in a letter to 
the c ommissi on. 

Mr. Turner himself would be in- 
sulated from the trust 

James C. McKinney, the head of 
the FCCs mass media bureau, said 
that CBS would have until 
Wednesday to respond to Mr. 
Turner's proposal and that the 
commission could act as soon as 
the next day, although there was no 
guarantee action would come be- 
fore tire end of the month. 

July 31 is the expiration date of 
tire competing stock-purchase offer 
by CBS. 

Also Friday, the commission 
told Mr. Turner that it could not 
grant his request to make a final 
decision on his application to lake 
control of CBS by Monday. 


Nakasone Urges GATT Talks 
To Curb U.S. Protectionism 


Reuters 

PARIS — Prime Minister Yasu- 
hiro Nakasone of Japan, whose 
country’s difficult trade relations 
with the European Community are 
a central issue of his current west 
European tour, called over the 
weekend for urgent world trade 
talks. 

Mr. Nakasone, who is also visit- 
ing Italy and Belgium, made the 
call for a new round of internation- 
al talks when meeting President 
Francois Mitterrand in Paris on 
Saturday. 

The Japanese leader said that 
unless a new round of talks was 
beid under the auspices of the Gen- 
eral Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade, U.S. protectionist pressures 
could become insurmountable. 

The French government, along 
with its EC partners, has agreed in 
principle to a new round of GATT 
talks but wants exhaustive prepara- 
tions to be made before agreeing on 
a dale. 

France, with an annual trade 
deficit with Japan of 14.9 billion 


NYSEPctcific Merger Bid Said to Fail 


By Robert E. Dallos 

Los Angeles Times Service 

NEW YORK — Talks on a 
merger between the New York 
Stock Exchange and the Pacific 
Stock Exchange, under way since 
last faB, have broken down, accord- 
ing to a member of the Big Board 
committee appointed to study the 
matter. 

“The two exchanges could not 
find a way to pm things together 
that mad* economic sense,” the 
committee member said last week, 
speaking on condition that he not 
Ire identified. 

He said the committee, appoint- 
ed by John J. Phelan Jr, chairman 


president, said: “TheNYSEiseval- Iu February, the NYSE pro- 

n a ring results of its discussions posed that, if the two markets 
with the Pacific Stock Exchange merged, it would infuse at least $10 


fSr-TT* 


witn me racinc Stock txenange magea^uwowomiuseaiieasi Jiu 
concerning a possible mer g er. The m3hon into the Pacific exchange 
evaluation is expected to be com- over four years. In return, the big- 

'.m «w 6...— ** opr mrbanw un a tn baw Hnmttiof. 


pleted in the autumn." 

Charles Rkkershauser, chair- 
man of the Pacific exchange, said: 


get exchange was to have dominat- 
ed tire Pacific’s board of directors. 
The NYSE is known to be con- 


response of the NYSE committee, 
according to the committee source. 

Any dreHnein jneome could also 
cause a drop in tire value of a seat 
oa either exchange. The last sale of 
a NYSE seal on June 12 was for 


New Issue 


CurrencyRates 


of the New York e xchang e, visited $400,000, up $10,000 from the pre- 
California during the last two vions sale two days earlier. On June 
months. It then took a vote in 21. a Pacific seat was sold for 
which its members, who number $31,000. 
more than 20, were nearly three to Floor members of the Pacific ex- 
oee against tire merger, be said. change, which operates trading 
Officially, the NYSE says a con- floors in Los Angeles and San 
solidatioa is still under consider- Francisco, have also expressed res- 
atioiL Richard Tarrenzano, a vice , ervatkms about a merger. 


FRIENDS OF THE 
AMERICAN CENTER 

Wbo are they? 

AMAX EUROPE SA. - APPLE COMPUTER - AUDIT CONTINENTAL SA. - 
BAN DUE OCCIDENTAL - B0UCHERDN SA. - FORD FRANCE - 6RIN60IRE- 
BROSSARD SA. • H J. HEINZ COMPANY - KNOLL INTERNATIONAL - MOR- 
GAN GUARANTY TRUST - PAN AM - PEUGEOT SA. - PHIUP MORRIS 
EUIQPE WHITE & CASE- Tha ^ yni| , 

Won't your comp any join us? 

AMBRCAN CENTER 261 BOULEVARD RASPA1L 75DI4 PARIS Tfc_ 335.21.50 


All the securities having been sold this advertisement 
appears as a matter of record only 


ICN Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 

Costa Mesa, California, USA 


Swiss Francs 50 000 000.- 


S 3 /4% Subordinated Convertible Bonds of 1985 due 1995 


francs ($1.67 billion), has joined 
other EC nations in demanding 
greater access to Japanese markets. 
But Japanese and European offi- 
cials said Sunday that no new eco- 
nomic agreements were due to be 
signed in France. 


d^futton 

MANAGED CURRENCIES 
PROGRAM 


PERFORMANCE RESULT 
FO R BCGINMNG EQUITY OF 

S 10.000 
JANUARY lit 1985 

HAS BECOME 

$ 10,734 
JULY 1st 1985 

AFTH ALL COMMISSIONS 


MXT K5UXM MIQUSY 1301 ISSUt 
1>CS S NO MANAGEMB4T FH5. 
fASTPBFCKMANCEtS 
NO GUARANIS 
Of FUTURE PSFC8MANCE 

Pham contact 
OByior P olafan 
A.Vk»ftmdM 


43, AMnua Monotau 
75116 MRS -FRANCE 
Tab 7 2361-51 
Tain: 630975. 

FOR NON FS&JCH &E5CENJ5 ONLY. 




J 


1 

c 

DM. 

F 9. 

IU. 

a Mr. 

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227 

4522 

11240* 

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01739* 

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UM* 1*17* 

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am 

64175 

1112* 

1781 

2617 

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3287* 

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UK 


4801 

121425 

260180 

6506 

1053 13365 

31X875 

U77J5 

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32715 776JP 

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ajm* 

2873 

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186800 

1417 

ah zw 

24040 

1822 

me 

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44M5X 

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597026 24722 

2090 


auakmainLatdon*#2t*KXn*lniKlneit>erEuraoeaacenlen.N ewre r*rr*aot*PM. 

■ (a> Comtrurctat fnmc lb) Amoutsts needed tottuyoMPauid lc) Amofcs/s needed m b uy one 
aaliorCt Units of IBB {*) Units of UBOfy) Units of 10000 MA: nataimtetli HAa not ovalaot*. 
tut ro bur m pound: SUJ3 JW 

Other Mln- Valies 

cumm per IfAS CurrtW w Conner per U St Conroe r me UAS 

AnMLouarat a» rta .awttff 6JW Mum-tum. Z467 

AkhoLI 14294 endUnta. 13140 um.vmsn mm 

Aatfr.KML 2047 ItalKHt Monn-lBraoB JU677 ■* 

■lit Ha fr. SU0 IMknniPR 1220 PNfcP** HJS T^tu an S 4M2 

bnimH 6.UU0 iHta-naW M1840 Patw«6* WBJ0 raalMe 26975 

Ktat T*2 Mil 0.9387 fodrhal 16525 TmtUMOro M 

Si, MMl dak. 149880 Stao.8 2»m UABMta 1673S 

Kmtpaand 0J782 KWmHlAmr S.Afi\n*ad , - raM - 1433 

tftarflpg: U3IS IfUti C 

Sarca*; smw «» Bervtu* t Bntssob )i Banco Commortfol* Itoltaia tMkm); Bnw No 
ftanpfe dr Ports (Paris); Bank at Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF tSDRtr BAtt {Mur. rival flrtomJ. 
Ohordoto Bom Revtors and AP. 


U.S. $75,000,000 

1C Industries 
Finance Corporation N.V. 

Guaranteed Floating Rate Notes 
Due 1991 

in accordance with the provisions ol the Notes, notice is 
hereby given that lor the interest period from July 15, 
1985 10 January 15, 1986 the Notes will carry an interest 
rale o! 8%% per annum. The Interest payable on the rele- 
vant interest payment date, January 15. 1985 against 
Coupon No. 13 wifl be US$42.81. 

By The Chase Manhattan Bank, Js%- 
Natiorial Association, New York IB 

Fiscal Agent . CHASE 


BANQUE GUTZW1LLER, KURZ. BUNGENER SA. 


BANKERS TRUST AG 

DAMCHI KANGYO BANK {SCHWEIZ} AG 

SAMUEL MONTAGU (SUISSE) SA 

BANK HEUSSER & CIE AG 
CHEMICAL BANK (SUISSE} 

COMPAGN1E DE BANQUE ET D'lNVESTlSSEMENTS, CB1 
DAIWA (SWITZERLAND) SA 

BANK OF LANGNAU 

BANQUE BRUXELLES LAMBERT (SUISSE) SA 
BANQUE PASCHE SA 
HOTTINGER & CIE 


NIPPON KANGYO KAKUMARU (SUISSE) S.A. 
J. HENRY SCHRODER BANK AG 


THE INbUSTTUAL BANK OF JAPAN (SWITZERLAND) LTD 
LTCB (SCHWEIZ} AG 

NEW JAPAN SECURITIES (SCHWEIZ) AG 


1NTERALUANZ BANK ZORICH AG 
R0EGG BANK LTD 

SUMITOMO TRUST FINANCE (SWITZERLAND) LTD 


. PRUDENTIAL BACHE SECURITIES INTERNATIONAL 

acted as Advisor to the Borrower in this transaction 


July 1985 





Wfeekly 

International Bond Prices 


Prices mar vary according to market conditions and other /actors. 



T# 


gB 




£ 




I 




« 19 

i a 

I ISD 

i n 
s u 
s no 
s no 
i in 
8 73 

I 75 
5 50 

* M 
1 19 

I US 
S HD 

FOREIGNTARGETED BONDS OF THE US 
TREASURY AND OF IT5 AGENCIES 
I ion UeTruury llftMSep 117ft |71 1U3 


«* UitGirr 
Si5 MS Ti 
611 696 780 
1SUU1 
7JI UJ 
7 ST 13t 119 

in vn us 

1M 7 St TTt 
t » 119 

U5 WW 
7-21 UK 
US 7 It 
7 a fji 
TM LM 
7ft?SMav m ISt 1SI 


am is> mraoi Hoence 4XWJOO 

dm ISO Meord Finance IV«ion 

dm 1B0 Nall Bank CM Hunocnr MTSHOV 
dm in Tr«n$ EumpNaftr Gag 1 UMw 

NETHERLANDS 


ft Med Frier Mol Lit* Cot 
iXWJon * 17? 7.D 49 


r.«w ®x la 7ji ?» 

MIS Nov 99Vj 132 453 

I 9]Nn Ml*. 79 7 J» 7J4 


FINLAND 


dm ISO Finland 

&1SB525 

am in Finland 
dm 19 Finland 
am is Finland 
dm 19 Finland 
dm 19 Finland 
am 2H Fin lent 
dm BHnhbiUeUv 
am 75 Imatnn Vouna 
am M md Mina Bank FHand 
dm to lad MtpeBaa* FHand 
dm 9 RoutaraekldOv 
dm in RautarwfcM Or 
dm H TwPawrCamoanv 
dm 9 Union Bank Of Finland 


KWFcb 

IMWNw 

0 34 Dae 
7 T 0Apr 

TVj-nuav 

9XWAnr 

1 SIMv 
mnitt 
7 WJon 
nsuw 

I 17 Jan 
I 16 Dec 
7 'fflJol 
ffe 28*07 
I IT Sip 
i a Fen 

iavdk 


W iU 

&sl 

in la 

TO 7 JO 

ns id 

WM bJI 
Wft iu 

11 S 
W 28 

ft 456 
99ft 457 



rAWFeo urn m 

TnTijao W* U5 


TUSBABO HU 
7**HJUI1 w 


7 JO 7.H 

US 7Z1 

477 SB 7 B 
752 IAS 


I 34 Dec Wlft *J9 43 79 

999 04 OK ID 7JB tin 

Bill Dec M5 lit W 

gftTCJUH H4 7J4 UI7 


7249400 HD 
4ft V Apr HI 
424 IT Feb HI 


TM S3 
7J4 US 
7.14 m 
US 541 144 
141 171 641 


NEW ZEALAND 


am » New Zealand 
am HO New Zealand 
am MBnwZMtad 
dm HB New Zealand 
dm 100 He* Zealand 
dm 100 Ntwr Zealand 
dm TO NewZeAtmd 
dm 200 Nm Zealand 
dm 19 NtwZeafcnd 
dm SO New Zealand 
An 79 New Zealand 
dm 79 New Zealand 


£416 Mar 
7ft 14 MOT 
IK 16 NOT 
6X37 Jon 
7 17Ffb 
9X37 Jul 

TftHTStP 

7ft 'll Jul 
Hi 9900 
MVDtC 
7491 Aar 
914 9100 


99ft 491 131 

HT IIS 115 7X1 
101 IN 140 749 
TO 6J7 63 

tail 1U 5J4 151 
HA 145 UO 
100ft 173 707 

262ft UJ 741 
HHn 457 7J5 

110 701 Ut 

W U1 7.1T 
192 4J4 7.11 


NORWAY 


I load UeTmonurr 11X325ap JFft |71 

s 1000 UiTraasKT ll wfS hxx Mj 

3 TO Fed Horae Una Banks ll ttDec WW M2 

1 300 FedNattonctMortAm lift 31 Dec Wj HM2 

y 50000 Fed National Mon Ate MTZFeb ftft iM 

v 25880 Student Loan Mat Ah 6ft 72 Jon Nil 1T6 





7JB 717 7JM 
111 74S 

441 141 157 
440 179 164 
706 140 

IN 711 
Z2t IM 
UT 73 7J1 
700 7J6 

471 745 

431 UO Ul 
IB ITS 457 
737 7 JO 

7.15 744 

3A 373 142 
SOI 42 
192 7J7 

744 19 

7.13 JM 
111 79 

7-71 733 

19 79 

7.13 79 

747 13 

551 S57 100 
7JJ 7J0 
1 35 105 

73 in 
73 79 

79 7 JO 171 
703 79 

59 H3 
79 771 

170 14T 744 
79 7.12 745 
751 73 114 
731 7,11 759 
73 732 777 



mm 

wig. 


PORTUGAL 


US 942 

134 HUT 

IM 444 7,14 
U7 151 173 
4X1 Ut 111 
479 441 72 
644 4J1 111 
IB 171 U 
337 ZB 112 
(31 434 435 
447 451 4X1 

701 472 72 
in 63 403 
417 429 405 
704 44i 751 
7 JO 752 UT 
730 447 79 
433 441 49 
657 49 72 
19 639 177 
LAS 439 441 
79 731 110 
79 79 14) 
450 474 744 
741 731 U2 
7.93 751 19 
151 43 49 
7.17 707 7J1 
43 44] 403 
154 49 152 
644 434 515 


f JT*r 


am 150 Fanweal 


7ft 12 May Nib 72 
SOUTH AFRICA 




Ul 7JJ 

19) 73 

32 MM 

537 151 

4J4 115 754 
45* 732 

101 309 

S3 432 

44 523 

7.17 79 

72* 731 

155 153 

654 03 

72 79 13 
9 231 

732 739 

51 29 

LB 471 

433 7JH 


7ft V Apr 106ft 740 79 731 
9ft 12 Jun HTft 79 IM 


441 111 144 
111 Ul 79 
731 79 705 
Ut 111 
Ul 79 
707 707 754 
13 7.17 431 
79 99 

73 79 70S 
751 119 

Ul 90S 
79 Ul 

an 
aa 

7J2 731 
157 456 79 
7.19 79 701 
744 Ut 
an 79 w 
130 mln iln 
Z73 99 

754 (47 441 
754 K43 

111 L29 

709 US 79 
KZ7 7 JO 

12 an 


V~ 


7-' 


SOUTH AMERICA 


dm IDO Ireland 
dm 100 Ireland 
dm TO Ireland 
am iso irennd 
An in rmand 
dm 19 Ireland 
dm 150 Ireland 


10X34 Dec 

rA 87 So- 
lti -MJul 
Oft 11 Sep 

•ft TT Dec 
Oft 31 MOV 
I -940c! 
Tie is Feb 
7ft 17 MOV 


IMft 444 
105ft 440 
105 72 

lBSft 7-51 
101ft 7 S3 
IBM 745 
101ft 747 
91ft 707 
Tift 754 




]"■ 1 - ^ 




dm MO Ailendo Natkn-Slznde 
dm TO CmnrdoDICrMDtn 
dm in CmflopCredUnanere 
dm 150 FemvieCMaStoM 
dm HO Ferrate Della Stale 
dm HO OBveKI inti duel 


MW Jan 104 63 753 

■Ml IT Jan 1C* 759 72 Ul 

0 II Jan 114 72 441 79 

FftWMOr HOft 72 147 

0 31 Apr m 733 737 

A11JU IB 7.M 79 


I Arnem|ne 
I Brad 
I Bran 
I Brail 
I Brail 
) Brail 
l Venezuela 
l Venezuela 
I Venezuela 
i Bud (anenltne) 
I Qnde [brazil I 
i Bode (brazil) 


6ft W Mow 
7ft 19 MOV 
MWOd 
7ft V Jozi 
0 17 Auo 
4ft170c2 
9ft w Jun 


4ft 10 Now 
9« IONOV 

7ft 16 MOT 
6ft 16 Mar 
OftWAm- 


dm 50 
An in . 
An 12 Fail 
dm M Full 
An TO 
An TO 
dm in 
dm in 
dm HO 
dm HI 
dm HO 
dm II 
dm TOO 
am no 
dm UO 

An in 

An 1H 
dm I9» 
dm 1H 
dm 12 
dm in 
An in 
An 150 
An 300 
An TO 
An hi 
dm vae 
An TO 
dm TO 
dm 150 
An TO 
dm 2 
dm 50 
An TO 
dm in 
dm in 


I Cam E nern lao Paulo 7 VNav 
iCompVote DoMa Dace MWDec 
I EMmbras MtWApr 

I EWrabra 7 T3 Feb 

I EMrabrm 7 l7Se» 

I UettvServlcas Brazil M16Mav 
! LMftServicM BnzzO OfteoJan 

l PMrabrai 7 u Oct 

! Pebtbra 1 woct 


759 9.H 639 
79 753 79 
US 751 531 
151 79 

12 KIM 
633 6J1 433 
vn 9 jo 
72 Ul 62 
741 U9 652 
K70 US 93 
7.16 7JS 
Ul U2 
752 79 K42 
K2 176 7.11 
737 42 A37 
US 42 
133 7.U 

7 JO U4 7.12 
7JD 477 
U4 521 144 
an i5i 72 
U3 U) 144 


I AlllapMni 
1 AoiouhteJ 

i EwwWes 
I E u rortete 

I Fenoza 

i Rente Red NadanaJ 
i Ren4e Red NacMnal 
i Rente Red Nadanid 


6 WMav 
Oft 12Aafl 
7ft IS May 
7H W Feb 
0 -84001 
4ft 17 Oct 
Oft 14 Feb 
a 17 Jan 
74612 Jan 
Mil MOT 
H UMOV 

7ft IS MOV 


479 412 

734 731 

79 751 

79 72 79 
755 751 Ul 
69 49 43 
49 49 0J7 
413 531 79 
72 79 

737 7J» 

747 tW 

79 72 


lit. 12 Nov 
7ft 11 Feb 
HftWJdl 
MU NOV 
M 14 Feb 
7ft 14 Dec 
7ft is MOV 
7ft 14 May 
7*14 Oct 
TftWJan 
tftWJal 
7 -NJan 

6ft W Apr 
« W NOT 
7ftWNOT 
TftWDec 
7ft 10 Jon 
5ft 10 Apt 

0 10 Auo 
M |n our 

7 11 Apr 
M 12 Jun 
7ft 12 Sep 
7 12 Dec 
7ft 13 Jen 
7ft 13 MOV 
9ft It Jan 

1 KNOT 
B 12 Jan 
MUJua 
HMUOci 
9ft 14 Aar 
7ft 14 NOT 
B 14 Nov 

7ft IS F«b 
7ft 16 NOV 
7u le Mar 
tft-esoa 
6ft 17 Mar 
4 17 Sea 
4ft IS Feb 
7 WJal 
10 1)F« 
7ft W Jon 
4 W Auo 
IftlTNDV 
SV.WMOT 
4 tooa 
Oft W Oct 
9ft 16 Dec 
oft 71 Jan 
HftTIApr 
HftNAag 
10ft H Nav 
0 11 Doc 
ID 12 Feb 

Eft 73 May 
9ft *92 Aug 
M120a 
M 72 Dec 
7ft 73 Feb 
7ft 72 Mar 
7ft 11 MOV 
0 73*410 
M 13 Sea 




a 


2 




j-H 


3 


t-H 


4. 



■ n Jun 

M-MAug 
71k 14 OCt 
714 14 DOC 
7ft 17 May 
5ft 17 Nov 
7ft 13 APT 
4ft 17 Sep 
SftWFeb 
OftWMA- 
0 WOd 
5ft 18 Nav 
4ft W Feb 
7ft 16 Jut 
Bft-noct 
7ft 11 Mar 
MftTINav 
9 12 Apr 
7ft 
7ft 


m 


Oft 
7 

4ft 
(ft 
4ft 
0 
6 

« 19 Jut 
Oft IT Feb 
U 11 Mar 
Tftll Aer 
Wft i) Not 






M12 Jul 
7ft 12 NOT 
M 13 Jan 
I -93 Mar 
7ft 13 APT 
01413 AM 
MUDOC 


7ft 14 Fen 
k=i 19 May 
(ft W Jun 
Mil Dec 
4ft HOC) 
Oft U Oct 
7ft 14 Mav 
ftr 19 jun 
7ft -M Dec 
an witov 
4ft 17 Jut 
6ft W HOT 

rnWDec 
4ft 17 MOV 
eft 12 Mot 

l 1) Nav 
7ft 12 Feb 
iftieoa 
1 NOd 
9ft 12 Jan 
7ft 13 Apr 
7ft WJon 
7 w Feb 
iftWJan 
6ft 1700 


141 

>a 

Ul 

(76 

Ml 

7a 

7a ioi 

7a ia 

779 

7*5 7JS 

7a 

774 

1 714 

IB 

■ 27 

6t7 

IP 

ia 

125 

us aa 

Oi 

629 (41 

7a 

an 

ia 

687 Z4e 

4.0 

550 Ut 

6-59 

664 453 

ia 

784 

764 

IJf 

771 

us 

743 

u 

U 

u 

651 

?a 

741 

484 771 

676 

640 6*7 

Ut 

651 

LM 

& 

7.0 635 

6.18 

681 


eat 

464 

740 

7X2 

7a 

773 

a 

657 

690 6B 

769 

an 

tM 

773 

UB 

Ul 

6M 

TM 

67* 

741 

U 

U7 

777 

648 

7.14 

774 


7D 

T J 

774 

m 

483 

4n 

664 

4J1 

724 

7ML 

655 

6ft 

7m 

IM 

657 

7.11 612 

666 

Lit 

7a 

an 

L90 

7JJ 

636 

9.14 

4J9 

7.X 

7.19 

19 

471 

TM 

638 

uo ?a 

737 

137 

474 

JJff 

67 2 

7j| 

1189 23*7 341 


LUXEMBOURG 


1057 MJ7 

USD 159 

1171 149 

HJ4 TL36 

HU4 Has 
HL42 

12351151 
99 
92 HOI 12 

IS is 

171 171 92 
631 071 KM 
951 H9 73 
72 72 

99 W 12 
122 1131 mi 
1051 119 


7ft 14 Feb 
7ft 17 MOT 
4ft 17 Dec 
4 10 Feb 
H 10 Mar 
7ft IS May 
4ft 19 Feb 
9ft 19 Mar 
7ft » Apr 
7ft 19 Nay 
9ft 16 May 
6ft 12 Feb 
lift 12 Mar 
6 73 May 
7ft 14 Apr 
7ft 14 Hot 
7ft -to Apr 
7ft W Dee 

4 KNOT 
Oft 14 Jan 
7ft is Feb 


001 I5D BM-Bank Finance W/w 
dm H6 JocCentrNudeatra 


dm HO SacCeMrNuchnlrax 

lam UB sac C aot N udeSira 


Irtr 7 15 Jul IN Ul 52 

I I NJA NA T9 79 

» 7ft 14 NDV IN ' 737 7 JO 

I 714 IS Jul 99 79 72 

MEXICO 


dm HO Meet co 
An TO Bates Nadanal Olxtn 
dm in ComManFM Electric 
dm UO CemlMan Fed Eledrk: 
dm ISO Kndaeal Ftnandera 
Am 1H Feme* PAngicoe Made 


7V.WJAI TO 732 731 735 

I WNov HI 7J2 444 752 


11 II Mar oh 13 
7 14 Jan ffft 72 
II WFtt 110 135 


UO Pwnex PetroMacMMlc 11 IQ Feb no 
MISCELLANEOUS 


Am HO AnA BanUap Carp 
An no IndMUn Dev Bfe Iran 
An Ml Mofaveta 
dm HI Malania 
An in Makmta 


I wsep Mift 72 72 

7ft 17 Jul 99 132 12 79 

«BSw 100ft 49 ub 

•ft 10 May 101ft 755 in 

7ft 15 Jan 97ft 79 72 


Chk^'Exdiange Options 


Option & price colls Pun 


Figures as of close of trading Friday. 


A lota 30 JZk 4ft 

34 35 VU 1ft 

34 40 r ft 

AT&T 20 3ft 3ft 

23ft 32ft ft 1ft 

23ft 23 1-14 ft 

Apoie 15 1 r 

17ft 17th 11-74 r 

17ft 9 1-14 11-16 

All R SS 3ft 4 

56ft 10 ft 1ft 

58ft 2 r 5-14 

Atom a 2ft 2ft 

aft 23ft ft ift 

22ft IS 1-14 5-14 

BdnkAm IS 4ft r 

19ft 17ft r r 

me a ft ft 

19ft 22ft r 3-16 

lift 25 r ft 

Belli S IS 3ft r 

17ft 17ft ft ft 

17ft H r ft 

Bun h 50 r r 

46ft 55 lift r 

44ft 40 4ft I 

46ft tS 3 4ft 

44ft 70 si 15-14 

C N W a 11-14 1 

30ft 25 r ft 

CIGNA 2 14ft r 

99ft 54 « r 

9ft S 4ft r 

59ft « r 2ft 

Cl It® 25 1454 r 

sot* 49 10ft r 

50ft «S Sft *ft 

SBft » ft 3 

50ft 55 S 1 

Cun in 27ft ft 1ft 

25ft a r r 

25ft IS Ift 2ft 

25ft M 1-14 ft 

D 5 C 17ft r r 

t?ft a ft ift 

Wft 22ft r 1S-14 

Della 40 12 r 

52ft 45 I 16 

52ft 50 2 4 

53ft U ft 1ft 

EKnao 40 5ft r 

45ft 43ft 21-14 2ft 

45ft 49ft ft 1 5-lA 


45ft 50 r 7-14 

45ft Sift 1-14 ft 

G Kodak 40 r 5ft 

45ft 45 ft Zft 

45ft SO r 714 

Ecura 25 4ft 5ft 
17ft H J-16 IK 


29ft 15 Mi 


EnoeOt 25 iv. 2ft 

36ft X r ft 

34ft TS r 1-16 


Eeun 45 7ft 


53ft 55 1-1* 


FedExa 3 16 r 

45ft B lift i: 
45ft 4t 5ft 76. 

45ft 2 116 3ft 

45ft 50 ft Ift 
Fit Oil a . • r r 
34ft 22ft 7 r 
34ft 25 ft Ift 
Fluor 17ft ft Ift 
17ft a r 5-14 
Ganich 45115-U r 

44ft 9 r 3ft 


r lb 
M6 H 
Mi 7ft 
4ft 4ft 
f ft 
3-16 ft 
ft 2 


44ft SO r 3ft 

Gi mi a m 5 

a*, a * ift 

Ho low a r M 

386, a Mi 11-16 

ax 35 r 3-16 

HlloctU a r r 

3ft 35 1-16 r 

MomsK a 4ft 56. 

74ft 22ft r 2*4 

24ft 25 X 17-14 

24ft a l-ii ft 

Intel 23ft r 

»ft » r 

aft a r 

intooh 22ft r 

30ft 75 r 

»ft 37ft r 

Wft a r 

30ft 3Tb r Ift 

30ft 35 r ift 


r 3-16 
r ft 

» IK 
5ft r 

r ft 
HI 17-16 
3ft r 

r n 
r X 
r 1ft 
r JVi 


Option & price Coils 

1 B M 

no 



I24X 

115 

9X 

i: 

I3<X 

ia 

4Vk 


twx 

IX 

u-u 


IVX 

n 


04X 




134X 

MO 



In Mb 




In Pm 

45 



49ft 

a 

5-U 


49ft 




Jolw J 

40 



4V 

46 

4 


49 

9 

X 


Kerr M 2S 



29X 

a 

1-U 

ift 


a 

1-U 

ft 

L S 1 

15 



LizCta 

40 



44X 

45 


4 

44X 

50 



Larol 

a 



34*1 

30 



Wft 

40 


11-14 

Lotus 

TS 

r 

3ft 

27ft 

a 



27X 

25 




TVS 



10ft 

11 



19V, 

12ft 



were* 

WO 




TO 

u«, 

13ft 


IW 

5X 

■X 


115 



115 

ia 

r 215-16 

DMi 

75 

4X 


7m* 

eo 

5-16 



ss 



TM 

90 



nonn 

45 

5ft 

Sft 

SOft 

a 

ft 

2ft 

SOX 

55 

I 

9-14 

I V* A 

a 

19ft 


Wft 

41 

U 

f 

am 

45 

9ft 


54 

a 

4ft 


Sift 

ss 

ft 

3ft 

Wft 

40 

1-U 



a 

Sft 


35ft 

35 

ft 

3ft 

•Sft 

40 


lu 

35ft 

43 

r 

7-16 

*amiz 

45 

9H 


53ft 

a 

4 

5Va 

53ft 

55 

ft 

Ift 

tool 

45 

15 


59X 

54 

9ft 


59X 

SS 

4ft 

Sft 

39ft 

40 

9-14 


59ft 

6f 

1-U 

IX 

hVw 

a 

13 


JM 

a 

7ft 

on 

32ft 

a 

2V, 

3ft 

32ft 

35 

1-16 1 3-14 

orn 




51K 

43 

4ft 


Sift 

a 

2 

4lh 

51ft 

ss 

ft 

Ift 

Sift 

61 

ft 

1ft 


a 

ax 

an 

72ft 

ss 

17 

ii 

77ft 

40 

12 

12ft 

7Zft 

63 

? 

IX 


10 

t 

5 

or Tec 

5 

r 

1 

nHlaiii 

IS 

r 17-14 

X 22» 

r 

ft 

ildyn 

ia 

It 

1 

am 

a 

» 


am 

340 

in 

23 

am 

250 

IX 

9X 

iti n 

340 

4 

2ft 

am 

771 



am 

3B8 

1-14 

3 

am 

390 

1-U 


* 3n 

as 

r 


19ft 

98 

9ft 

r 


ft 

s 

on 

Nft 

a 

Ift 

4ft 

Ifft 

105 

-14 

3 

w 

w 

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r 29ft a 

lift 29ft 15 

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» lift U 

r xerox 40 

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42ft a 
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r Ammo 10 
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r 4746 « 

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116ft N 
116ft 93 

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116ft 110 
fllft 115 
116ft IB 
116ft 135 
cozen uo 
232ft 2H 
222ft 2B 
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33X a 
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73K 48 

73*. 46 

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7» 75 

coiooi a 

aw as : 

77* a 
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37ft a 
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an * 

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Tift 20 
78*. 75 


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10ft r 3-14 

5ft r 11-11 

Ift ft 2V, 

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r ft 
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r 1-14 ft 

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r ft r 

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r ft 3ft 

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5ft 12 15 


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7IK B5 7-U 2 r 

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KK, 79 9 10ft ft 

IOV. V 5H 7ft 2 

sax « m 4M r 

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a a ft ift 2ft 

a 35 1-U r r 

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35ft 40 X Ift 3ft 

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5416 40 ft r r 

Honwfl SS 7ft Ift n 

03ft 40 3ft Sft 13-14 

03ft 45 15-16 3ft 3ft 

43ft 7* 3-14 I r 

Humane 25 9X r r 

34th a 4ft Oft H 

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27ft 37ft Ift r r 

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lift 45 7ft 7ft r 

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2 

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ft 

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7 

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IX 

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ift 

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ift 

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IS 


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r 

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r 


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hr 


rf 







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14941 Ul 
9425 2J0 
in- 341 
137- m 
5J4- SJ4 
741 - 174 
45- 174 
574 


TO fW 0 


Explanation of Symbols 


CN5 Conadmn OoUor 
ECU . Eurasean Currency Unil 
eua . Eurasean Un-i oi Account 
L . Pound Sien-rtB 
dm Oevuthe V oil 
HMD Nar»eaa5 k >ev 


SDR Soeceri Drowtno Rahtj 
• lei 

UFR tu.em&ojru Franc 
SFR U-l) Pro^c 
FP Fro-C* Fronc 


9 * 































































UNE, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


Page 11 


•I? 

*- ' W^/ 

4 *'Vi. 

&ST? 


I liT* 

g ^ § 

;s ; 

i- • ;;i In 

x.* s 

•5? • i*i 15 

*. pi jS 

•j : s ui :9 


New Eurobond Issues 


r ^ 

;P? 

1. 3 * 4 

;- • iK 
- 

a s 


7 . : X -_U i= 
* ' ' - i y it 


*- :'c 




tram f Amount 

(maiioraj 

ROAUNG RATE NOTES 

‘ Hongkong and $400 

Shanghai Banting 

Credit Fonder de Yl 5,000 

Franco 

: FIXED-COUPON ^ 

Bramdco $75 

Ford Motor $150 

■ too-. $75 

Minnesota Mining and $100 

Manufacturing 

hichi men Corp $50 

Norsk Hydro $100 

Sodetl GtinArafe $150 

Tribune Co $100 

Ycwido Trust .$100 

Zentrokparkasse und $50 

Korwnerzicilbank 

AEQ DM80 

European Ccd & DM230 

Steel Community 

ESCOM e40 

BfG; Luxembourg BZU20 

Bedriatfe de France EQJ150 

Eurofima Yl 5,000 

Fcbui CracEt Corp Yl 5,000 

Oesterokhische DFlOO 

Kontrottbank 

ANZ Banking AwSlOO 

Bayerische Au$60 

Vereinsbonk 

Overseas Finance 

CRA R nonce AutS80 

Genfinance AwSSO 

GJ. Cates Audi 00 

SBC Amtrafa Au»$50 . 

The Rural & industries Aik$50 

Bank of Western 

Australia 

Christiania Bonk NZ$50 

DFC FmancB NZ$40 

DG Bank NZ$75 

Mchiiinen Corp NZ$40 

Privathanken NZ$50 

Westpoc Banking NZ$50 

SNCF FF500 

EQUTTY-UNKH) 

Fuji Heavy Industries $50 

Mitsubishi Bank $100 

Sumitomo Bank $120 

Compagnie G&i&rale ffSOO 

des Etobfissements 

Mkhelin 


Comp iled by Nicole Baruch 

Oy— Wes 

Mat. Price end 


perpt 14 100 99.75 Oww ^nonrti Libor. Cofabte at per dim- 1990. Foes 0J5X. 

P»ritw W tt»iw $5,000 aid $100,000. 

1997 1/16 100 99.95 CW frmonlti Euroyen Libor. gt pgr after 1986. 

Fea 0-18%. Denananabons Yl .000,000 and Y1Q/XXUXXL 


im loo — 

10% 99% 96^ 
11 100% 967* 

916 100 - 9642 

10% 101,40 995C 
10 100 98.12 

lo m “ 

10 % loo mi 
10% 100% 9743 
10% 100 97.37 


CaBabfa at par afar 1991. 

Noominbin 

Noncalafaie. Holdv s option to retain in Bering lotoBng 
£715 ailSon wifii ihe mdxjrtot rote fixed at 1 .3605 Bering 
per dolor. 


Callable ar 100VS after 1990. Sinking fund to shxt ir 1992 to 
produce n 7%y mwmpn Be. 

Nonmfable. MKftaf price due Aug. 19, 1985, with bokoee 
«rf B5K due one year fater. 

CaUale at 10116 after 1993. 


1991 ' 8% 9914 — Cn fl rideal pa- in 1991. ftwote ptocemwt 

1995 7 99% — Noncoflobto. tt e d ee ni i dd ewfiwe«qgde«wwdiwtdbneniiof 

DM46 mficn in 1991. 

1990 12% 100 — Noncdfabto. 

1995 9% 100 99.12 GJribte ot 101K in 1990. 

1997 9 100% 9870 Cdteble^ lDOHofta- 1992. 

1995 6% 99% — Golnfelo a 102 ofter 1990. 

1990 8% 100 9775 Nonoalofcle. Playable in yon. but nodi Yl naSon band b 

redeemable far $4JXXfr a fin e d m d emne note of 290 yen per 

***. 

1990 7 100 — Nonea la ble private placement. 


1990 12% 100% 
1995 12% 100% 

1991 13% 100% 

1990 12% 100% 

1991 13% 100% 

1990 12% 100 

7988 13% 102 


I from Aus$7D rntfSon. 


Nw wmlnhb InriwweH.fmiw Amffn mBm 

— NoncnfaWo. 


— Nonealable. Increased from Au*$40 mSon. 


1988 16% 100 10150 Noncdbble. 

1988 16% 100 — btancdMtift. 

1990 16% 100% — N mn»eiihle. from N7$« elcg 

1990~*~ 16% 100 — Noncdbble. 

1988 16% 100% — NonoolaMa 

1988 16% 100 — Noncdbble. • 

1990 11 99% — Redeemable and aA£l*<* par m 1990 and 1995. ExJenfiiie 

to year 2000. 


2000 Open 100 99^X) Seniainud coupon eeiaded ot3%. GAdiie at 104 mlRA. 

Converftie cf on euqtacted SXpranatm Term to beset July 


2000 2% 100 — 


2000 2 % 100 — 


2000 7% 100 — 


Noncoflabie. Co nve mb te id 1/68 yen per- chore and at 
24650 ynn per dolar. . . . . - 

Cdtabie at 103 in 1990. Conuertible at 2.142 yen per share 
ad or 24460 yen per dolar. 

Re dognnhlei* par w 1990 for glOft-lOli yield. GeweriMo 
at 1/89 francs per share. 


Falling Dollar Undermines New U.S. Issues 


(Continued from Page 9) 

nrillioo, eight-year offering from 
Ford Motor Co. The bond s, which 
carry an attractive coupon of 10% 
percent, were priced at 99%. With 
the drop in the dollar, by week’s 
end the price had fallen, to a dose 
of 96J5. Investment bankers from 
Goldman, Sachs & Company acted 
as managers. 

A SlOO-milHon issue from Tri- 
bune Co. fared little better. The 10- 
year bonds, which carry a coupon 
of 10% percent and were priced at 
par last Monday, were very thinly 
traded by the end of the wett. “The 
market is overfull of quality UJ5. 
names,” said one trader, who asked 
not to be identified. “The Tribune 
Go. is quite a good name, but there 
is virtually no market for it right 
now." 

In the ECU market, one issue 
that attracted interest was a 150- 
miiKnn ECU offering from Etectxi- 
di£ de France, the utility. The 12- 


year issue, which carries a 
9-percent coupon, was priced at 
100%. It is callable at 100% after 
1992. 

Last week was also a slow one for 
issuers of new floating-rale. debt, 
winch has mushroomed in popular- 
ity in recent years. Only two deals 
of any signifirance were priced last 
week, but both were milestone 
events. 

On Thursday, the first-ever Eur- 
oyen floating-rate note was offered 
by Credit Fomper de France, a 
French govanment-^uaranteed fi- 
nancial agency. The issue, which is 
for 15 billion yen, carries a final 
maturity of August, 1997 and a 
coupon of 1-16 of a point over the 
6-month London Interbank of- 
fered rate for yen. The issue, which 
is callable at par after 1986, is being 
sold in denominations of 1 million 
yen and -10 million yen. 

Also on Thursday, for the first 
time in its 120 -year history the 


Hong Kong & Shanghai Banking 
Corp. lapped the mternatLonal cap- 
ital markets by offering $400 mil- 
lion worth of perpetual floating- 
rate notes. The notes, which are 
callable at par after 1990, cany a 
coupon of one-quarter point over 
six-month Libor. They are avail- 
able in denominations of $5,000 
and $100,000- 

As with the fixed-rate market, 
analysts attributed the slow-down 
in activity among floating-rate is- 
suers to a buying public that is, for 
the moment, mcapable of in gesting 
additional new issues. 

“On a weekly basis, this is the 
smallest issuance of floating rate 
debt all year,” said Steven licht, a 
managing director at Merrill Lynch 
Europe in London. “But the main, 
reason for the lack of activity is 
that investment banks active in the 
market had already bought as 
many floaters by July 1 as they did 
far all of 1984/ 


A Slimmer AEG Learns to Survive as No. 3 


Bond Prices ] 
Finish Mixed 
OnRevised 
SalesFigures 

By Phillip H. Wiggins 

Ntw York Tima Senice 

NEW YORK — Bond prices 
aided mixed on Friday, after nans? 
in the morning on buying spurred' 
by a UA government repon of a 
steep drop m June retail sales. 

But later in the day, analysts 
said, investors began to focus more 
on earlier numbers that were re- 
vised. While June sales were reput- 
ed to have dropped 0.8 percent. 
May was revised to show only a 
03-percent fall, instead of a previ- 

JJS CREDIT MARKETS 

ously reported drop of 0.8 percent 
April was revised from a 2.4- per- 


ously reported drop of 0.8 percent 
April was revised from a 2.4- per- 
cent increase up to a 3.1-percail 
jump. 

Bond prices started strong after 
Thursday’s late decline when mon- 
ey supply figures came in higher 
than anticipated The M-l, or basks 
money supply, grew by $44nllioa in 
the week ended July 1, to an esti- 
mated $15 bQlian above the Fed’s 
target range of 4-percent to 7-per- 
cent growth. 

Negative attention focused cm 
the slide in the value of the dollar, 
which dropped further on Friday’s 
retail sales news. 

“The fixed-income market has 
been battered since Tuesday be- 
cause of a combination of a signifi- 
cant weakening of the dollar and 
another surge in M-l, leading to 
major selling of U.S. bonds by for- 
eign investors,” said Wayne Nord- 
bcag, chair man of the investment 
policy committee at Prescott, Ball 
& Turben. He said that as a result, 
interest rates rose for the week even 
in the face of recent positive data 
released by (he government on in- 
flation and «n economic slowdown. 

Friday, prices of the long bond 

— the 11%-percent issue due 2015 

— dosed off 3/32 at 107 7/32, to 
yield about 10.44 p ercent, after 
dosing Thursday at 107 5/16, to 
yield about 10 A3 percent. 

Among intermediate-term secu- 
rities, prices for Treasury notes fefl, 
with the 83-percent, two-year issue 
dropping 2/32, to 49 14/32. 

Short-term Treasury bill rates 
were higher, with the three-month 
MU yield edging op to 7.09 percent, 
from 7.08 percent on Thursday. 
The six-month ball rose to 7.23 per- 
cent, from 7-20 percent. 

“Traders continue to ignore the 
good news on inflation, which they 
already have grown to expect,” said 
Gary Gomes o, senior vice presi- 
dent at Fleet Financial Group in 
Providence, Rhode Island. “Pro- 
ducer prices .were flat in June and 
prospects for further oil price re- 
ductions were gnhnnpwi by Mexi- 
co's price cuts on Thursday.” 


U.S. Consumer Rales 

far Wade Endad Jdy 12 

Ptmfaoalc Savlmw 3JD % 

Tax Exampt Bonds 

Bona Btiyw aa-flwiq Inrtm 8J1 * 

Money Market Funds 

Ponouhue's 7-Pay Average 7J4 % 

Bank Money Market Accounts 

Bonk Rata Monitor Index 6J1 * 

Home MorlBOOS. 

FHLB avraas , -13J0 * 

Europe May Help 
On Japan Rocket 

Revert 

TOKYO — Japan is considering 
purchasing electrical components 
and other parts from Europe for its 
project of Launching a new rocket 
m the early 1990s, an official of 
Japan's National Space Develop- 
ment Agency said over the week- 
end. 

. He said a survey team had been 
sent to France and West Germany 
to study buying of European parts 
such as connectors for the H-2 
rocket, which is capable of launch- 
ingsateQjtes. . 

The official said the agency con- 
sidered it important to reduce costs 
for the 200-oilIion yen ($S23-mil- 
Iion) project by using “excellent 
parts from aboard." 


(Continued from Page 9) 
Profits recorded from 1984 through 
1986 will be used to restructure the 
company and to further reduce its 
net fmanrial liabilities, now 849 
nwninw DM. liabilities totaled 1.8 
billion DM in 1983. 

Under the terms of the court- 
supervised debt settlement, AEG 
agreed to honor 40 percent of over 
5 billion DM in debt* if creditors 
agreed to release the canq»ny from 
the remainder of its financial liabil- 
ities. Mr. Dtirr said that an addi- 
tional 1.04 bQHon DM owed to a 
consortium of German banks has 
been transformed into a new credit 
fine, as yet untouched. 

■ By cutting its work force by 
nearly one-hajf since 1980 to 
72300 employees and selling sever- 
al major divisions — "v^»dmg its 
hmne-electroaics subsidiary, Tde- 
funken Rundfunk und Ferasch 
GmbH — AEG is considerably 
leaner than it was when it sought 
court protection from its creditors 
in August, 1981 


", 1 it I * * " iiii* 113 The disposal of major subodiar- 

”■ .. P* ies has reduced AEG s annual con- 




ies has reduced AEG *s annual con- 
solidated galas by about 4 billion 
■ : DM from neatly 15 billion DM in 
1981 and forced it to surrender its 
rank as Germany’s second largest 
electrical group to Robert Bosch 
; GmbH. 

\ AEG*s sales totaled il biffiou 
: 1 DM last year, compared to 18.4 
MKcai DM at Bosch and 4S.8 h3- 
y lion DM at Siem ens aG, which is 
No. 1. 

Analysts generally agree that 
AEG’s return to profitability is se- 
cure because it has moved away 


from ra maimer dfifjronics and has 
focused operations on capital 
goods, the fastest-growing sector of 
the West German economy. 

Such confidence in AEG’s future 
is reflected in the recovery of its 
share price on the Frankfurt Stock 
Exchange. It has climbed from a 
record low cf 23 DM in August, 
1982 to levels of about 120 DM in 
recent months, dosing Friday at 
127.50 DM. 

About three-fourths of AEG’s 
revenue is derived from investment 
goods such as turbines, cables, and 
communication systems, while 15 
percent of sales stem from domes- 
tic appliances. 

“Domestic appliance (trade) is 
not a growth market," Mr. Dtirr 
said, “but it a constant one with no 
new players expected. If you’ve got 
a good neme and a good distribu- 
tion network like we do, you stay in 

it.” 

An analyst at a leading West 
Ger man hank said that he expected 
AEG’s 1985 operating earmngs to 
show a 25-percent increase to 125 

million DM and ajumptolODMa 
share from 7 DM in 1984 

The analyst also predicted sub- 
stantial cuts in losses at AEG’s of- 
fice-equipment subsidiary, Olym- 
pia-Werfce AG, and at its Latin 
American operations as manage- 
ment is reoigarmed under Mr. 
Dtirr’s directioa. 

Mr. Dtirr is believed to be firmly 
committed to enlarging AEG’s 51- 
pocent stake in Olympia and mak- 
ing the subsidiary profitable mi the 
strength of the company’s success- 
ful typewriters. Company officials 


say privately that AEG wiO obtain 
fufi control of Olympia, which lost 
70 million DM in 1984, before the 
end of this year from Bosch and a 
group of West German banks. 

Mr. Dfitr, whose second five- 
year term as chairman, ends in 
1990, tends to take a long view cf 
AEG’s problems. 

“I recall reading press articles 
back in 1982 which said there was 
no hope for AEG,” he said. “Now 
people seem to have forgotten bow 
fjo ga to collapse we were and ask 
only about what sales and profit i 

growth we expect.” 

He said he sticks to the fine that 
the company must put profit before 
sales. 

The former owner of a medium- 
size engineering company, Mr. 
Dtirr said he and his management 
team have learned the pitfalls of 
pursuing huge but financially ques- 
tionable orders. 

“Do we fight for orders wbere we 
see a potential loss of money, ” be 
said, lust to get the prestige for 
hmriing a contract, as was the re- 
cent case with the Univeraty of 
Riyadh in Saudi Arabia? No. 

“What’s important is not wheth- 
er we make 11 or 12 bflhon in saks, 
but whether our operating profit is 
100 or 300 million DM,” he said. 

AEG reported a loss of HO mo- 
tion DM on a “miscalculated” con- 
tract for electrical installations at 
the Saudi university. Mr. Dtiir at- 
tributed the loss to “mismanage- 
ment.” 

For the moment, he said, AEG is 
satisfied' with its order intake. 


When mi 
W ohnytiin. DC 




( ffladae&, 

HosecfBerf®"* 

m the WaJuripfum M>rnw I 
— OUR»di YEAR. y 


Net Asset Value 
od July 4, 1985 

Pacific Median Fuul H.V. 
(LS.il .65 per 6.SJ1 mil 

Pacific Selection 

Fund N.V. 


SELECTED WJtU. QUTHIMS 


Apollo Comp. 18 18% 

Mr Gasket ‘9 9% 

Bitter Corp. 3% 3% 

Modukrire 8% 8% 

Rodim* 8 8% 

WflHCOMPUMWreOF 
CONTINENTAL AMERICAN 


to develop successfully 
your business in Italy 




a leader in corporate finance 


Consolidated Highlights at March 31, 1985 

(Dollars in millions*) 


Net income 


Total assets owned 


Assets under management 


Provisions 


Shareholders’ equity 


12,713 


5,626 


470 


1,127 


* 71 aloes expressed in US dollars adopting the lira -dollar 
exchangeraie^end March 1985 (Indian lira 1,97925— US$1.00) 


ISTnTJTO MOBIUAKE 1TAIIANO 
Public Law Credit Institute 
Head office in Rome 

Subsidiaries and representative offices abroad: 

Brussels, Frankfort, Jersey, London, Luxembourg, Mexico City, Rotterdam, 

Zurich, Washington. 

Offices in Italy: Milan, Turin, Genoa, Padua, Venice, Bologna, Florence, Rome, 

Naples, Bari, Catania. 



If your market is corporate America, 
Forbes will put you on the map. 


If you want to make your mark on corporate 
America, it helps to make an impression on its 
leaders. And in the 1984 study by a leading inde- 
pendent researcher, Market focts, Inc., Forbes 
was shown to be preferred reading by more cor- 
porate officers in 1,000 of America's largest ser- 
vice and industrial companies. In comparison 

M a gaz in es read regularly by corpo r a te officers 
in 1^000 of America^ largest companies." 

Forbes 

68.3% i— — n 


FORTUNE 

48.4% 


61.8% 


^Market Facts, Inc. 1984 

Cost per Thousand Circulation 


Forbes 

4Cfcge $46.89 


4C Page $52.79 


B#Ba8P$3ft® \WV&S3&71 


AC Page $5639 


BW Page $36^5 


with Fortune and Business Week, Forbes was 
judged to be overall favorite by 44%, versus 29% 
for Business Week and 19% for Fortune. 

When regular readers were asked which of 
the three reflects best the excitement of busi- 
ness, Forbes had twice the scores of the other 
two. And when asked which of the three stands 
for "free enterprise" 71% named Forbes, com- 
pared with 13% for Fortune and 7% for Business 
Week. 

These results confirm surveys done over the 
past fifteen years showing that more officers in 
big business read Forbes regularly than either 
Fortune or Business Week. 

As the graphs so eloquently show, Forbes is 
the most cost-effective business magazine for 
reaching America's most effec- 
tive executives. If you want to 
make an impression on this 
elite, not only is it good busi 
ness for you to put your 
advertising in Forbes, it's 
bound to be good for 
your business. 




For further information, please contact Peter M. Schoff, Director of 
International Advertising, Forbes Magazine, 50 Pall Mall, London 
SW I Y 5K2 England. Tel: (01 1 93M161 /2. 


Forbes Magazine— 60 Fifth Ave., N.Y., NY 10011 













Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


F 


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AlldBn 

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AltdCaP 

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AlpMJc 



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AFdSL 

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AFUtrn 

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37 10W 

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3710% 

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440 8 

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AMS 



4E1BV 

18 

18b + b 

AMdSv 

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AMUI 



7008 N 

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421 4V 

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1365 2BV 

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Amritrt 

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17 

3642*4% 

37 

43 +6 

Amnal 



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20% 

Zlb + V 

Anmwn 



824 7N 

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7E 6W 

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XB 

42126% 

26 

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Ampads 

DO 

74 

91 17 

14 

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Anodtle 

JO 

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71 SU 

5 

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12 

12ft + b 

Analy 1 




10 

10 — b 

Anaron 



u 

14ft + ft 

AndrGr 



6712% 

12 

12 — b 

Andovr 



IE 7 

6% 

6b — b 

Andrew 



1054 Ett 
594 AU 

19tt 

19V + b 

Andros 



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Apeco 



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871 l4Vz 

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AoklMt 



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44 6 

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ArgoSy 

ArtxB 

40b 24 

1089 19V 
12E31N 

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214 8 

7% 

7V + U 
10% + V 

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AkdBco 

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431% 

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36 

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14027 

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288813 

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9b 

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165 4 

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181 10U 

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AtIGfiLf 

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30 

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22 +2 

243 

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1631 E 33V 

I3tt + tt 
0% + b 
35% +1% 


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76 25b 

35 

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AtlntBc 

20 

22 


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12to talb 
7tt— tt 

AttPrm 

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177 7ft 

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AtSeAr* 



115418V 

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10% ta to 

AudVd s 



38E15U 


Auetron 

AtwdOc 



168 4% 
83316 

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15% 

3ft- tt 
15% 

AutTrT 

t 


279 7 

6b 

7 + U 
l«*i— «■ 

Autoctv 

.16 

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1111 

0b 

AotIMed 



443 4W 

a 


AutoSy 



270 11 

Ob— k. 

Aotmte 



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6% 

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AutoCO 

1 


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Auxten 



33S SN 

3^22^ 

166319% 

91118b 

6b 

cm 




Sb 

0%7b 

AvntGr 



8tt 

Avntek 

Avatar 




AvkrtCo 



17% 

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AztcM 


12 

257 4b 

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Aztch 



41 2b 

2 

2 

1 — 5 | 


"TTT^ 










1 ]I T i Tto-T 







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BoldLr 

Boltefci 

DaltHcp 

BnPune 

BonePe 

Btmcokl 

BcpHw 

Bonciec 

BonnH 

BkDei s 

BkGron 

BKNEs 

BkSous 


DO 1-2 


Bnko*f i it U 
BknfhG -Mta 2A 
Bfclowo IJ* 3D 
BkMAm I AO 1X0 
Bankvt 
Bon fo s 
BoronD 


366 66 66 +1 

114 9w BV ?v — b 
3MI Z7U 26N SH + Hi 

900 Sin 50*1 54*i +5V> 

17634 23V. 23 U. 

889 19b 18b T9b + b 
39995 34 34U — tt 

1380 m n 8%— to 
S74 9N Tto Tto 
389 33 3014 llto — N 

28X8*3 26 37 —1*1 

IJOo 3_5 4375 51 Vk 48 Sltt +144 

" 2A 118827 W* 2&*l— to 


■)0e 
2-34 40 
•28a ID 
so 44 
1-34 3D 


DO 84 
1-30 18 
44 ID 


319)16 13V 19% +lto 

1023Hi 22% 22% +1% 
2447 46 44 —1 

745 9% 8% 9W — Vi 

19412% 12% 1»- Mi 
196714% 15% 14 — % 
470 8% 8% 8% — % 


Borickg 

Harris 

Barton 

BaTnA 

BoaAm 

BsetF 

BavPoc 

BoyBta 

QqyW 

Bayou 

Bob toy 

BiFvses 

BallW 

BnchCI 

Ben llrai 

BerUev 

Benin* 

BerkHa 

BesICp 

Betz Lb 

Bibbs 

0fS B 

BiaBear 

Billinas 

Blndly s 
Bio Re, 

Btooefi 

Biarnet 

Binsrc 

BlotcR 

Bird Inc 

Blrdvw 

Blrlchr 

BIshGr 

Blchlnd 

©Insists 

BIISSAT 

BoaIBn 

BabEvn 

BottTc 

BoaleB 

BoonEI 

Booth In 

Booth Fn 

BostBc 

BntnDlo 

BstnFC 

Brad RE 

BrodvW 

BroeCa 

BmehC 

Bronco 

BrdoFd 

BrltLee 

BrwnRb 

BrwTom 

Brunos 

Buffton 

BulldTr 

Bmhrti 

Bumps 

BurrBr 

Burrtl 

BMA i 

BueinW 

ButlrJ 

ButlrMf 


Sales In Net 

1 00s High Law Close Ch'se 
149S l*k % IMi + % 
2434SM 25% Mto + V 
2S4 3% 3 3to— to 
17010% 9% «4 — % 
IJMt 74 1987 IS 13% 13V — Ito 
m 2J 6S33Sb 34% 35% — % 
1849 8% 7% 8% + % 
488*7% 56% Mto-1 
436 7% 6% 7V» + % 
10 5 5 S + to 


4.1 

ID 



4J 

7 16% 

16% 

16V 

— U 



685 8% 

7V 

Btt 


-IE 

ID 

7910 

9b 

10 



1)8 Bto 

8b 

8ft 

+ % 



622 20V 


Fin 

aj 

32 

1.9 

31921716 

IrTtl 

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+2 

40 


4212b 

12 

12 



1335 

m. 

205 

+32 



516 N 

to 

% 


133 

X9 

E5C321 

32 

33to 

+1 

DO 

X4 


MU 

Wto 




184 17b 

16b 

16V 

- to 


DOe 23 


6% 

3% 

4% 

v% 

4% 


17Vj 

3%— to 
T2V — to 
B + to 
7to— to 
19% +1 
ito— to 
7 + % 

4 

s + to 

.9%— to 
4to— to 


41 


36% -Ito 


202 17b 17 
760 4to 3% 

149113*. T2 
2911 8to Ml 
814 7to 7% 

113819% 11 
191 2to Ito 
128 7 
1234 11 
3278 5*i 
427 4 
138 Sto 
117 9% 

47 6» 

799 to 

- 60237% 34 „.. . 

__ IJ la»22to 21*1 2zto +1 

.14 2.1 1 12 8 7% 7to + U 

202 6*2. S% Sto — % 
-651 11-3 62 4to 5to Sto — % 

347 4to 4to 4to + to 
JO 1 J 142 lBto ITto |7% + to 

-40a 14 33824% 24 24% + % 

94 4% 5to S% — to 
J0e 1J 278922% 20% 22% +1% 
22414 13to 13% + % 
13204% 33*1 33V.— % 
101514% 13to I Sto 
754 39*, 37% 38 — % 

770 4to 4 4to + to 

1 4 4 4 + % 

182412*. HU 12% + to 
2514 13% 13% — '4 

1270 Ito ito Ito — to 
.9 544314 14% 15to—% 

173-0 Ito Ito Ito 

831 28% 26% 27% +lto 
JO 1J 259217% 14% 16% — to 
1123 8% 7% 8 + % 

47 18 17% 17% + U 

171 I9to 18% 19 — % 
276 24% 26 26% 

6874 9to 7% 9 + % 

13320% ITto 20% + % 
13427*1 27% 27% 


JO 


I JO 13 
.12 14 
■12e 3j0 


.14 


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1JM 42) 


MO 3 


1J2 48 


CCBs 
C COR 
CP Rhb 
CBTBs 
CCX Nt 
CML 
CPI 
CPT 
CSP 
CVBFn 
CdMTV 
Code 
CACI 
CbrvSc 
Cadmus 
Callbra 
CalAmp 
CalFBk 
CalJkv 
Cal MIc 
CMSIvg 
CalWtrs 140 
Col looP 
Caknv 
Caluml 
ConIRn 
CanonG 
Canon! 
Conrad 
COPSwt 
CapF5L 
CapTm 
CapCrb 
CardDls 
Cordis 


D8 Zi 


JO id 


1J0 9J 


CareorC 
Caremk 
CarUba 
Carotin 
Cartert t 
Cascade 140a 10 
Coney, a 
Cencor s 
CntrBc 
Centcar 
CenBcn 
CnBsns 
CFdBks 
CJorBc 
CnPaSv 
CRsLf, 

CWIsBn 

Centrun 

m 

CertirA 
Ik 


8033to 33 33to + to 
228 Bto 7% Bto + % 
1822 5% 5 Sto— to 
10031 26*3 29to +1 

10418% 17% 17%— to 

114111% 11 II — % 

7352 18% 17% 16*3 + % 

2288 4% 4% 4*1 

39810*1 Vto 10% 

! 3415*1 14% 14% + % 

77 4 3% Sto— to 

380 2% 2% 2% + Ml 

824 4to 4% 4to— % 

JS 3.1 343421% 20% 21% + to 

J4 IJ 110 21% 20*1 20% + % 

36 2to 2to 2*i— to 

277 2% 2*i 2to— to 

1316% llto into— to 

3237 35 34 —2 

232410*1 10 10% + to 

483 «N 4to 4to— )k 
11144*1 49 49 —Ito 

1054 Tto 2% 2to + to 
.14 1-2 1202 13% 13to 13*i + to 
.14e 18 58 Bto 8 8 

400c 12 4 5% 5% — % 

547722 2D 21% + to 

.10r J 738 23% 20to 20% —2% 
112 7 6% 4% 

.lie 9 1 18 18 18 — to 

JO IJ 1233 llto II llto + U 

JSo 40 1 5% 5% 5% „ 

1344 1% Ito Ito— to 
D8r J 42418% 17 18% +1% 

130 8 7*i 7to 


1DB 58 
956 24 


58 


AS! TJ 5451 5 4to 4to + to 
4881 12% llto llto + % 
3918*1 10 10 — % 

452 2 IN Ito + to 
1116 ISto 14*. 15% +1% 
41 47 44*1 47 + to 


57217% 17% 17to— U 
84 9to 8to 9to + N 


2DSb 3 J 1178 
1J2 41 509 

84 ZS 

I JO 44 
St U 


Mb 28 
80 18 


82734*, 32 34to +2% 
82*18% 17% 17% —Ito 
52% 59% +2* 

stains 
“IF* 

39444% 42% 44 


+IV 


1092 2 1% IN 

911% 10% 10% — to 


Chopra) 

ChapEn 

8K 

irmSs 

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75817% 15% 15% —2% 
.12 13 189 8% 7% 8% + to 

2 62 2% 2% 2% + to 

3875 llto 10% IlNtalto 

197 Sto Sto Sto— U 
4 4U.-H 

1% Ito + ft 


.10 Z0 


311 4% 
412 2 
784 4% 
143 9% 


0% 8% 


JO 13 


117 8% 8*1 Wt— % 

378121% 19to 21 +1% 

22611*. 9to llto +1*. 


80a 17 
48 V 


88 


iJ2 H 


180 48 


_ 28 
.108 13 


_ ittlM 

85US 
SJtr 
SSST 
g^ e 

Chm Lit 

email 
aiiPacs 
ChHta 
Ctiltend 
Oramer 
Clironr 
ChrOws 
Chyms 
ChWlFi 
ClnMIcs 
antt» 

Cipher 
Cl on ca 
□mm 
CtzSau 
CtzSGa 
CtlFId 
CtzGtP 
CtzUtA 
CfzUt B 
Cl tv Fed 
CtvNCO 
CltvBco 
ClartcJ 
CtaricC 
ClearCh 

ClevtRI 280 108 
Clthtme 
CoastF 
CoastR 
Citilni 
CotSav 
Cobanc 
CoDRsc 
CobeLb 
CocaSH 
Coeur 
Cooonlc 

Cohml b 
CotobR 
CokBtn 
ColFdl 
Calll ns 

CalABn 48b 23 
CBcpnA 40 b 34 
COinGas 134 83 
ColLIAc 188 28 
Cok-Tte 


101414 

11422 

2918 

291620 

27411 


IS 15*,— to 
am 2i% + to 
17to IB + to 
18% 19*. 

10 11 + % 

18 6781 23% 21 to 23% + to 
661 5% 4to 5 — % 
32 5N 5% Sto + % 
23220% !9K> 19%—% 
104 10% 10% 10% 

4326 ” - 

2097313% . 

23430 29V> 29% — % 

13*229 28 28%— to 

2424% 23V, 23*1— % 
59932% 31% }|% + % 
1047 9 B Bto + % 
575 18% 18% 18% + N 
990 7to 4% 4to— U 


12% 13% + % 


1J4 

24 

913 X 

48U 



94713% 

13 

■IE 

3 

43138% 

X 



566816b 

IS 

1 


162 7 

6U 



149 5b 

s 


33 61744% 43 

34 455323 21 


13*1— U 
38% + % 
16*1 + to 
6%— % 
5H— to 
44 — % 
22% + to 


200 38 


120 
36 ^ 

1-04 3D 127934*1 33N 34% + % 

46c 2.7 488 18 18 

I 34339*, 38% 39*i + % 

1J6 55 5535*, 35 35V, 

40 J.1 13007 13% 12to 13 + % 

886 32 22527V, 27 27% + % 

1-04 33 27038*, 37M 38 4-1 

88 38 1087Oto 23 23% — % 

81 6% 5% 6% — to 

247 19% \B% 19 + <A 

14719% 18% 19*, 
118727*. 2Sto 24% — % 
94017% 14 to 17% 44% 
197 6% 4% 4% 

141 4% 6 6 

111616% 15% 16% + to 
55 7% 4% 7% — % 

473 3 2% 2% + to 

BIS 19 17% 18% + % 

32344% 42 44V, 4-1% 

58713% 12% 13 + % 

2229 2% 2 2% — M 

587214% 14% 14% +! 
724 4% 3% 4 — % 
78313% 12% 13% — to 

1290 27 24% 24% — U 

444 4% 4% 4V, + to 

1D819U 18% 19 +1 

52717% 16% 17% + % 

261 1BU 17% IBM + % 

5BUSto 33% 35% +lto 

206818% 17% 18% 


J4e 58 


J6a 18 


m 

.12 


28 


184 

M 

280 


14 

28 

28 

U 

17 


180 18 
SOa 48 
184 48 


180 15 


-38 


CMoNI 
ColuFd 
ColSav 

CaluMil 180 2.9 
Camar s 
Coroar c 

Contests 

Co moro 
CtmxJlu 
Camdlal 
Camerc 
CmdAfr 
Cam Be 
ComBpf 
Coro Bah 28S 
ComCir 2.12 
CmcoU 
CmBCcri 
CmclBn 
CmciFd 
ComlNt 
CmlShr 
CwtlhB 
CmwSv 
CrowT! 

ComAm 

Corolnd 
ComSrs 
Com Stir 
CmpCds 
OnpUs 
Compaq 
CxnpoT 
CmpCr 
CmprsL 
CmnSvs 
Corrmn 
CCTC 

CmpAs 1 
CpIAuf 
CmpOt 
CPtEnt 
CrmaH 
Cmoldn 
CmpLR 
CmptM 
CmpNet 
CnioPds 
CmpRs 
CmTsfcs 
Cmoutn 
Cplctl 
empire 
CrrarvtJ 
Comshr 
Cocnstk 
Comic It 
CancDv 
Concptl 
ConSrP 
Cenlfrs 


36 15 5160 20% 20% + to 

377 9to 8% 9to + to 
297514% 12% NMi +1% 
1836 34 35 +lto 

1681 14% 14% I4to +1% 
83 16 1S12 16 + % 

363920% 20% 20% 

319 3% 3% 3% 

.% 18 19*1«> H% 

080 2% 2to ■ 2to — to 
2.10 A9 110543% 47% 42% 

30 4% 4to 4% 
11617*. 16% 19*. +1 
37620% 17 20% +1to 

1760% 60% 60% + % 
459 77 74 76 +lto 

16142% 42% 42% + W 
5013% Uto 17% - to 
35954 50 53*1 +3 

142714% 14% 14% — % 
3126to 36% 26% 

161 10% 10 10% + to 

421% 21U4 21V* — % 
7BB13% 11% I3U +1% 
5129% 29% 29to-% 
470 Ito 1% 1% + to 
14 3671 28% 27% 28 — to 
516 9% 9 9to 
M 58 340 T2to llto 17 + to 
144821 20% 20% — % 

20 8 -- - 
7121 9% 

JTlr 510 10U 
A U 181532 
509 6% 

3065 9N 
906 3% 

1182 9to 


7% 7% 

9 9%— % 

«u iou +i 


21to — 1 
6% + to 
9% +1% 
3% + % 
9% 


M * 


.12 18 


180 

IAS 


31 
6to 
7% 

2% 

Bto 

1I1S2BU 24% 24to— 1U 
637 A*z Sto 6to + U 
21510% 10 10 - % 

1965 6 5% Sto — to 

9to 10% + to 
8 BK 
6 4to + to 

su sto 
7M 7to— to 
7% 7%— U 
4to 4to 
291117% 16% 16% — U 
493 4% 5% 5% — to 

3% 3% 

8% Sto + U 
3% 3% + to 

8% 

12W 12% — to 
Ito Ito 
11% 12 — % 
.... 4to sto— to 
14 14V> 13% 13% + u 
91729% 28 29 +1 

86 20 19% 19% — U 


844 10to 
210 8 % 
336 6% 
4427 5to 
19 7U 
440 4U 
100 4V. 


255 3% 
126 9to 
331 3% 
304 9% 
33213. 
455 Ito 
118813 
140 4% 


88 


18 

1 J6 

182 48 


Cannwt . . _ 

CnCap 3800124 1173X4 23U 23% 

CnCapI 1.40a ,.6 826X0U 18% 18%— to 
CCapR 1.4S3il®.8 326A7V. 16% 14% + to 

CCnpS 380 128 97ttM 23U 23V, + U 

ConFbr 132 7% 7U 7to + to 

CnPaps IAS 38 128849% 47% 49. + to 

‘ 179 4% 4U 4% + It 

437 37 37 +2 

322 33 32 33 + % 

475 4% 4U 4% 

190 4% 4% 4*,— U 

61 27% Z7U 27% + U 
19640% 39% 39% — % 
8315 V. 14% 14W— U 
1114U 11U 13% — H 
99915% M 14% — % 
440 Sto 5 5V. + to 

1099 % to % + to 

421 18 16 18 +2 

128 5 ’ 4to 4to— N 

42 BU 7% 7%— to 

10224 7U 4to 7V, + to 

3776 5% 4% 4%— % 

2.1 4212 19W 10% 19 + to 

3241 25% 19% 23to +4 

67 7 4% 7 

234410% 9U 10% + % 

13 100060% 59U 59% + % 

3395 2 1% 1%— to 

1407 4% 3% 4to + % 

11 7325 23% 24U + % 

137 4U 6 4U + to 

15 #"*"»*%¥» 

1.1 HA14U 13 13 —I’m 

14 204014% WA 16% — % 

I3 9U f 9 — to 

915827% 34% 24% —2% 
12 5U SU 5% 
64114% 14% 14U— to 

12 430625% 23% 24% + % 

34 4U 4 4U— U 

57BI2U 11 llto— % 

44 18 713 XI V* 32 33 • + to 

84 4.9 158349U 18% 19U + to 

86 28 52924% 34 24% + % 

88 1.1 50W 7* 78 

113823V. 19% 20 —3 
20c 22 175 9V B% 9 — U 

14597 14% 12% 14% +1% 


ConsPd 
CnTom 
Const! B 
Consul 
ConsFn DSe 1.1 
CanWI 5 140 58 
CntIBcp 284b 5.1 
CttFSL 
CtiGen 
OIHII s 
CtIHIIC 
Cents tt 

Card tel S 88 4 

CJUnr 

Carry Fd J7e 15 

Convpt 
Convrse 
CoprBie 
CaarLar 

Coora D M 

COpyiet 

Cor com 
Corals 

CaniS I 288 

Carvin 
Copno 

Caurers 80 
CourDts 


40 


.14 

84 


80 


.19 4 


20317 
360 4 1U 
337 3U 


gmu 


1157130 


15% 16% + U 
40 40% + U 
3 3to + to 

9% 10 — U 
Jto 3V,— U 
9to UFA + to 
Sto Bto— % 
18% 19%— % 


1884 11 U 9U 11% +2 


18 

.1 


! + to 


112% 11% UN— % 
' 4*1 4% 4U 


. 3 % 


'■S, M 

88t 8 


184 


230 


1J0 


SS^6 

Dec HO 

gs a 

Dnlctun 

» 

Delta* 

Dettaus 
Denolcr 
DenlMd 
DePGty 
Deaonh 
DetecEl 
DctrxC 
Del Nth 
Devrv 

Dewey 
DtaaPr 
Did Cry t 
Dknonc 
Dftrola 
□Iceon 
Olcmed 
DMIod 
nxcm 

DinnrBI 48 
□fonax 
Dlonk: 
DIstLOB 
Dvfood 
DIwIH 
DIxnTI 
DOCWOI 
DbrGnl 
Dome 
Donoun 
DrchH 


1821 74 15914% 13% 13% — % 

134D524U 23% 24U *3 
14528% 27% 28% * to 
2274 7 5% 4% — % 

114 IS 14 15 +1% 

ldOQto 103 103 — to 

40) 5% Sto 5% + to 
42720% 19% 

II 

1. 

3% 2% 

21% 18% 2ito +2% 
4% 4 4 + % 

4% 5% 5% + to 

48% 39% 48% + % 
... 17 16% 14% 

21S 6to S% 6 

324 5% 5 SN + U 

X 1.1 143319% 18 18*2 — 1 

489113% 12U 13 

iu ito 

llto 11 

k * 

1% Ito 

7U 4% 

49% 49U 
7% 

4% 

2131% 31 
3443 8% SU 

39 9U 8% 

14 3% 3% ... . .. 

8914% 13% 14W + tt 
26428% 27% 28 +1 

4408 3U 2% 3U + K, 
34923% 22U 23*. +1 
24111% 10% HU— U 
427 7 4% 7 + % 

243 4U 4 4 — to 

454927% 23U 27U +3% 
94 U% 10 10% 

B0233U 31% 33U + U 



'k + % 

5%— U 

k — 

4% — to 
49U— U 
7% 

5U + to 
3IU— U 

3% + to 


80 2.9 


80 34 


33 


DoylDB 
Oi 01,1, 30, 

Dmhri 
DresBs 
Drewtn 
Drejtlr 
□royGr 
DuCkAI 82 

Dumas 
OunhDs 84 
DuaSvs 
Purahn 
Dunth 

Dorhme 188 
Durtron 84 

DvrFII a 

Dvcorn 

DmRs 

Dvnacn 

DvntOtC 

ECI Tel 

EH ini 

EiLinat 

EIP .12 

EMC ina as 

EMF 

EMPI 


35912% 12to 12% + U 
4HM2U 11% 11% — U 
417726% 24 26% — 2 ' 

45*4 TV % % 

19417 16% 17 + % 

67519 10 1BU— % 

434 16% 14% 14% 

187 3% 2% 3% 4- % 

88024% 23% 24% +1% 
40 24% 24 24% 

74T4U I3U T3U— % 
119% 19% 19% 

65540 39to 39U + U 
Bill 10% 10% — U 
864 15U 14% 15 — U 

53 10% 10U 10*, + U 
43 7to 6to 7V, + % 
399 Sto 4% 5% + U 
234726V. 24to 26 +1*1 

74l2to 12 12% — to 

341 1% Ito 1% + to 
IBS 4to 5% 5% + U 

.. 107 9 7to 9 +1U 

42 194511% llto 11% + U 
396 3to 2% 3to + U 
103 Sto a Bto + to 


1J 


EZEM 

EoolCtt 

EosITI 

EoriCai 

EotnF 

fcconLtJ 

:d5oult 


33711% M llj’+ u 


6930 >» to V 
1592 Ito 1% HA— VS 


433911% 10 T1U +3U 
222 UU 13% 14% 

184 XI 2059 33% 32% 33% + % 
1.40b 98 2315% 14% 15% 


Ed&np 

.IE U 

sat ion 

»to 

ElChlc 



13U12V 

11% 

Ei Pot 

1D6 

?J 


lift 

Eton 



236 10% 10 

Eibiio 



2984 9% 

8ft 

Efco 

33 

4D 

8318% 

Hit 

ElderB 

300 ID 

11721V 

18% 

Eldon 1 

.16 

LI 

S3 14b 

13V 


m* 

Bft-% 
18 - % 


188b 51 


EAlwoB 1J8 


14 5% 5% 5% 

44 4% 4% 4% 

1805 7U 6% *%— to 
218017U 14to 15 — to 
243316% 15% 1616 + to 
107914% 13% 14 + U 

61217 M 16 — IU 
6 SV. i% 5%- % 

93612% 10% 12to+1U 
1490 9 8 Bto— VS. 

4S4 to % % + to 

397 8% 6% >% + to 
6461 7% 5% ito— 1W 
191 4 3% 3% — to 

T72 6% 6to . _ 
519011% 10% 11% + to 
187314% 14 14 — U 

4221% 20% 21 + to 

60618*1 17% 18 
193712% 11U 12% +T 
87 8% 7% t% + % 
347 % % % 

8416% 16 16% 

436 16U 15 16 +1 

634 9% 9to 9% + U 

7(0 SU 4% 4%- to 
SV320U 17% 19to +1U 
6711% 10% 10% 

722 4U 3% 4U + U 
54728% 27 28*, + % 

94311% 10% 11 —to 
50011 9% 10U— U 

129 9% 8% 9 
984615V, 12% UN— Ito 
120 Sto 4% 5 + to 

84b 28 2B9 33 28to 30 +2% 

13423 27U 22% - % 

341 6% 6to (Ak— to 
127*, 22to 22*, 

85e 29 444329% 27U 29 — U 

2304 101 104 +lto 

142 4 3to 3% 
134417 15% 14H + N 

728 3% 3to 3% + to 
2 14to 14 14 

254 9 Bto B%— U 
168 llto ION 11 — to 


JO 1J 


80 


2J 


.16 23 


B25to 24U 24U— 1U 
17 Bto Bto Sto 
4342 Sto BU Bto + to 
141 B 7to 8 + U 

145 4% 5% 6 + to 

48712% H% 12 —to 
756 fc £ N— % 
7 4to 4 4 

121734U 23% 34 — U 

119916% 15% 16% + % 

t 247 3% 3% 3% 

80 XI 238 38 31 —1 

186 24 3154 4SV> 65% £8% +2% 
84 2D 2212U 17 12U 

808 38 8210% 10% 10*1 

637171V, 20 20%— to 

571 5U 4% 5 
158914% 14 14% + % 

1050834% 33to 33*,— to 
31 16 15 15to + U 

99056 SS 55 + to 

4T236U 36 36 

276421% Tito 21% + U 

5914*, 15% 16 

!5S 4U 4 4U + to 
m 7to 7U 7U 
54 6U 6 4U + U 
nnomu 612 7% 7 7to— to 

Fmiaan 1875 12% 11% 12to + U 

FAIaBk 1.17 34 2S61 33 32% 32% 

FtAmar 3H 45 14 13to 13to + to 

FstAffll 1J0 X2 84837*1 34% 37V, +3% 

PIAmpI .99 4 A 6 21 to 20 21to +lto 

FABPB A JO 11 1476 9% »to 9% + U 


t 


29 

1 9 


JO 18 
.3! 63 
.14o ID 


FtAFBd 
FtAFbl 
FtATn 
FtBnOfi 
FlColF 
FCamB 
FCamr 
FtCmd 
FtConn 
FtCont 
FDataR 
FEstC* 
FEmc 
FF wst 
FF0NUC 
FFdNH 
FFdBrk 
FFdCal 
FFChar 
FFRM 
FIFKal 
FFdlVa 
FtFdSC 
FFMrai 
RFnCp 
FtRlMs 
FtFIBk 
FHOws 
FIIICpi 
FjitkH 

FinstBk 1 
Flnctcp 180 
Flnlavia 
FjerNI 180 
FKvNts 180 
FMdB 140 


180 48 
L44 15 
182 33 
1.!2eI3j4 


185 34 


14 


1821 98 
40b 14 


J0e 28 

80 17 


140 


FIMkTl 

■MfdB 


fK 

RMHSw 


54 
38 

... 33 

86b 19 
180 55 


16716*1 15 T6to +lto 
ZS 5830 29 79U + U 

34 210535% 34% 35% + to 
43 6759*, 56*i 59to +!to 

37 17% 16% 17 — U 
69 5% 5 5U + to 

25629 28% 28% 

4941 3V 41 +lto 
4848U 47V, 48 U + % 
107 8% Bto 8% 
47930% 20*, 30% +2 
5939*, 38% 39U + % 
10038 13*, 12% 13*1 + to 
6515to 15 15 

3645 19to 17% 19 +1 

M19U ISto IHto— % 
7MI3to 17% 13to + % 
11527% 25 Z7U +2 
15*20 19 19K> 

89526*, 24*, 25 — 1U 
10(612 11U 11M, + U 

5616*1 15% 14*, + to 
406 9% 8% 9to + % 
1* 12U ITU 13U 
20529U 28U 29U + to 
77D18 16U 17 —1 

66429 9 29 +1 

14235 34 34U 

87 llto 18 18*i— % 

9723U 21% 23U +lto 
23614U 15U 14 +to 
41 31V. 30*i 30 to— % 
889 3% 3% 3*1- to 


33 


70833% 33 33%— to 

22630% 29*, 30% 




S 86 18 


38 


Die 


PHI 

FNtCIns 140 
FNlOh 
FNtSup 
FNHB 
FNthSL 
FOhBna 
FICJkJB 
FRflGa 
FISvFId 

m 

FtSlhn 
FTmNt 
FstUnC 
Ftl/Fn w) .72 
FlVotos 180 28 
FIVtFn 1880 48 


43449% 44*, 49% +5% 
268 14U U 14U +1U 
41 22 Zlto 21% + U 
47 5% 5 Sto— to 

41531% 39 30*i+2 

5333 37U 33 + to 

39 7U 4% 7U— U 

45442% 42 42 — *1 

11 1U 1U 1U 

23% 73*, + to 


9313 





FfWFn 
Firstar 
Final or 
Ftakov 
Fiend I 
Ffahtln 

Flarfx* 

FlaCam 

FlaFdl 

FlaGult 

Fla NR 

FlaPUl 

Flaws* 

Flurra* 


1.10 44 H 
J6D11 3 __ 

44r 33 351 4V9 .. 

1094)3% l: 

140 39 34941% « 

1.12 17 534542% 40 
38 6819- 18 

19036U 34% 35% + % 
3429 2S 28to 
JO X! 1056 6% «U 6to + U 
280 4.1 10154 51to 54 +1to 

J2e ID 1011% 11% 11%— % 
1564 5% 4% 5% + U 
48 3J 11813% 13 13 — to 

31 3% 3% 3U 

785 4V, 4U 4U 
86b 18 1 29V, 79to 29to +1% 

JO 18 218920% 20 H, 20to— % 

197217% 16% 17 +1 

80 1.9 50641% 41 U 41to + % 

180 68 4 17to ITto I7to + U 

278219% 17U 19 +2 

U 179545% 14 15% +lto 


J4 







Fonar 



3091 (V 

4b 

4ft + ft 


XI 




FLJfin A 

D9 

J 

26617V. 

16V 

17U + tt 


105 15% 

15 


FUonB 

D/ 

4 

1451 IB 

17b 

17V 



1114 



For Am 


XB 

1162MW 

31b 

34b +2W 





5ft + b 

FomtO 

IDO 

5J 

9017b 

ir 

I7U — tt 






Forsch 



3 7ft 

7b 

m 

IJ0 

3J 

94036V 

E 

EU + U 




142822b 

19% 

Eb— Zb 

IJfi 

U 

XEtt 

EU 

24U +1% 

Fortn5 



3064 2 

Ito 

2 

JO 


ai7u 

16V 


Forum 

Did 

D 

6799)18 

BN 

10 






Foster 

.10 

XI 

1033x5b 

ttt 


DB 

3D 

153626b 

25V 

Eb tab 

FrnKCp 

1J0* 8D 

1514 

13U 

14 + V 


FfflKEI 

FmkRs 

FreeFdl 

Fre est, 

Framnt 

FranFd 

Fudrck 

FulrHB 

Funfme 

GKSvs 

GTS 

Gall lea 

GaMhA 

Galoot, 

GarrtaB 

Gandlts 

Carem 

GonCer 

GtiMas 

GnPftys 
GnSnal 
Genet E 
Genet L 
Genets 


82 28 
8Sr ID 
JBb 28 


86 24 
-loe a 
DSe A 


121 16U 1SU 15*1 + W 
.7 250 36 32to 34 +3*1 

33110% 10% 10% 
68518% 9% 9%— to 
ID 254025% 26to 26% — to 
28 212% 12 12to— % 

3890 9% 7% Bto 
248 16% 15% 16 
59 5 4to 5 + to 

1015% 13 13 — U 

755 5*, (to (to— 1% 
402 11U 9% 10% + to 

516(1% 41% 41% 
133213% 10U 13% +2% 
119 8% BU 8% + % 
299 5% Sto » + to 
917 2V, 7% 2% 
195947 45*1 46% 

17815% 14% 14%— % 
426 25% 26 + to 

211% llto llto + to 
8312% 12 I2*i— U 

76418 16% 18 +1 

77 2% 1% 2% 

59 3% 3% 3% 

3978 7N 6% 7% + U 


American Exchange Oi 


Option a. price Calls 


Puts 


Jul 

Oct Ji* Oct 


Mb 

33 

+16 

1ft 

IMi 

IV 

Aetna 

3S 

12U r 

r 


3*b 

X 

t 

+lfi 

r 

r 

47% 

JO 

7b Btt 

r 

+U 

CmM 

75 

5 

r 

r 

r 

47% 

*521+16 3b 

T-16 

r 

29b 

X 

+16 

lb 

7-16 

ito 

47% 

50 

1-16 ltt 

r 

2V 

29b 

35 

r 

+14 

9* 

r 

Am Cva 

50 

2ft 4 

l-W 

1 

Kaudil 

35 

2 

3 

r 

ft 

52b 

55 

+16 1+14 

2 * 

r 

V 

40 

r 

11-14 


r 

Am Exs 

48 

7ft r 

r 

+]* 

Hutton 

a 

7ft 

Btt 

r 

+M 

47 

45 

2+14 4 

l-M 

n-u 

3ib 

X 

l+M 

3ft 

* 

2 

47 

SO 

b 17-16 

3Mp 

3ft 

31ft 

35 

+16 

ito 

3* 

4V 

Am Horn SS 

IBU 10U 

r 

r 

31ft 

60 

l-M 

+14 

n 

r 

*5% 

to 

6b fib 

r 

ft 

31b 

45 

r 

tt 

r 

r 

45% 

V 

IU 31+14 

r 

1ft 

Intel 

X 

r 

r 

r 

+16 


65% 

ABOUO 


3-M 1% 


17% 

17% 21 

Bauaun S 
Mto 30 
34% IS 
Bel ISO 38 
44% 35 

44to 46 
44% 45 

Bonuh » 
56% SS 
$6% 60 
m 65 
56% 78 

CWtar I7to 
16% 20 
CTal 2Jto 
Mto * 
Cooper 38 
35% 35 

CrZd 30 

43 35 

43 40. 

42 « 

DSC 15 
19% ITto 
llto 30 
19% M% 
DoftK 33% 
36% 36% 

mu a 

36% 48 

Dtt Be m 
MU tl 


70 
15 

17% % 2to 

38 +16 1% 

72% r 11-16 
U2 15-16 3% 

17% 11*16 31-14 
1-16 I 
8% 9% 

«to 
to 


1-16 »16 
S-16 17-14 
2 


1-14 +16 
3-16 17-16 
>to 


to 

7% 

2 

to 


1% 

Mto 

ito 

4% 

IN 


2 

Hi 

Sto 

% 


3% 

Ito 

to 

3-16 

1% 

% 


% 


6% 

2 

1-16 


1* 

7-U 


3% 

to 

! 

1-16 


3 

to 

(to 

3U 

1 % 

1 

3% 

IN 

Wl 

to 


n 


MU 

Mto 

MU 

94U 

Mto 

94U 

MU 

MU 
Water 
87% 
DU 
87% 
■7% 
Mto 
87% 
87% 
du pni 
57U 
57% 


90 


9% • 13 

(% 

« ,4 ^ 
wa u 

ns M6 2% 
no rum 

iu * 'to 
120 1-16 IM6 
uo r FIS 
45 Mto 
» llto 
75 iJ% 

IB IU 
1 
% 
to 


. 7-16 

7% 1 15-14 
n ito 


1-16 tl-M 

to z% 


Goodvr 

JS» 

Geutd 

24to 


as 

N 

95 

MU 

SB 

SS 

66 

65 

25 

30 

so 

22 % 


28ft 

r 

r 

r 

r 

ft 

Wto 

• r 

IN 

B 

W 3 1+14 


Hfa 

IU 

3 

6M 

ttt 

IV 

r 

t 

r 

r 

r 

ttt 

r 

to 

17-16 

2U 

m 

7-U 

r 

r 

3% 

r 

16 

IS-14 

t 

t 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 


Option & price Colls 


Puts 


36% 25 

96% 38 

IrtBPti 79% 
10% 73 

30% 27% 

30% 30 

38% 37% 
30% IS 

unv 7s 


in 


J-H 1M6 
JH 


Sto 

2 % 

% 


6 

4% 

3to 

1% 

ito 


1-16 

1*14 

% 

2to 

4% 


r 

r 

«9ta 

■ 

9ft 

r 


r 

Ito 

Bftt 

85 

4b 

Att 


r 

r 

8914 

91 

V 

3 


r 

r 

BV. 

91 

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4 
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GTai 

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open MsroM UO UD 

r— Not traded, e-done offered, o— old. 


Geneve 

Genes 

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GaFBk 

GerMdS 

GefnlF 

Gibson 

GttnGs 

GtoaTr 

GltbrtA 

Gad fry * 

GMCorr 

GaidEs 

GehNB 

Gdtl 

GOUMP 

Graco 

Graded 

Granlre 

Gnwhl 

GrphAW 

GrphSc 

Gray Co 

GIAroC 

GAPrt 

GtLKFd 

GWFSB 

GtSoFd 

G twash 

Grey Ad 

Grirrch 

Groman 

GwthFd 

Gtecti 

GuarFn 

GuarC 

GuarNt 

GwardP 

Guests 

GuIHrd 

GHAPld 

GHBde 

GtfNuc 

Gull 

HHOilT 

HBO 

HCC 

HCW 

HEITx 

HEt Mn 

HMOATO 

HodiCo 

Haber 






(Hb— ib 

LenaF 

ua 

LI 

323 24ft 

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3 + ft 




17137 28W 

25ft 




5%— ft 

La Brief, 

DO 

3D 

29917 

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17ft + N 

Lvnden 



9 Eft 

23% 




Aft 

10 talb 

Lyphaa 



423914 b 

22ft 

•20b ID 

12S 14 ft 

13% 

14ft + ft 

MARC 



30523ft & 

JO 

2D 

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14% 

14% — ft 

rn 



168 11V 

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34 


5743 22U 

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87637 ION 

9ft 



4517 

MU 





422 7H 

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378 28V 

a 

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MMl 



41 6 

5% 

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3.1 



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MPSI3 



384 (V 

ttt 

DM 5.1 

16713 

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MTS* 

J4 

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16620ft 

a 

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312 19U 

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107726ft 36 



682214ft 

12V 

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MOrods 

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23 

452 EU 

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127717 

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1393 Aft 

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36 

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£20 

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74527ft 

26ft 


22 


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n u 
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63118 

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11139 4to 6 
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9Hi + to 
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80s 7 J 
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80 

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DM D 


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Hadson 
HaleSvn 
Halifax 
Halrol 
Harriots 
Hamnd 
HanvCa 
Hanvln J6 
HarpGs 84 
HrtfNt IDO 
HTtfStS 140 
Marvins 
Hathwo 

Hauser ,40e 23 

Hnvrfy 62 24 

HawkB -.14( 

HHhCSl 

HIHtGP 

HI thin 

Hlthdyn 

HdSAs .16 9 

HctiaBb D8 A 

Heine 

HelenT 

HaUx 

Hem tec 

HenrdF .92 24 

HerttFd 

Hcrtiry 

Hetro 

HlberCp lDOfa 48 
Hkkom 
HnftPtO 
HtuhtSu 
HluttlNt 


1730% 90% 20% + to 
11 4b 4U 4to + to 
554 13U 17% 13U + to 
48531% 19% 19% - % 
57311 lDto 10N— N 
139 6N 6to 6to- to 
6XD9 200 203 +4 
89 7 Sto 6to 

1 13% 13% 13% 

153 A 6% 5% + U 

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37V TV, 8% 9 to + N 

122% 22% 22% 

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23217 U 17 

491 14% T4to 14to 
444 17 IAU 16*,— U 
13 7% 7 7 - to 

sm ISto 15U 1SN 

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23 4% 4% 4V, — U 

9 (5B122U 21% 21%- N 
j 9711% II 11 

2D 1264 Sto 5 5 

158311 Vto 10to— U 
56 SU 5 5 

ion mu 13% 14% + % 

ID TIM 24 2* -1 

535 19% 18% 19% + % 
155 4to 3% 4% 

558 3% 2% 2% + to 

425 N to % 


2799 ZN Ito + £ 


431 Mto 1SU 16 — U 

332 5to S S — U 

2221497 II 14to +3V, 

18 27246V. 45% 46% + % 
18 211 19 1BU 19 — U 

4.9 374533H 31% 32% + % 
14 47747 45% 46% + H 

43921 X TQU-% 
527 9% 8% 9% + to 

43UV, 14% 14% — % 
56822 21% 21 to— % 

535 BN 8U Bto 

86713% 12% 12% — to 
6710 9% 9% 

540 3 2 

1939 3 2% 

98219% 18% 

SIT 19% 19 

in % 

485 4U 3% 

482 27 26tt 
158 3% 3*i 3to— U 

170x7*, as as —ito 
1121 XU 19 - 
470 ito 5% 

27 3 2to 

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710M, 10 
1 3% 3% . 

318420% 19% 19% — % 

333 3% 3% 3N + U 


2ft— W 

MerNY 

1D0& ID 

31102 

96 

101 +7 

PrteeCp 



3 + ft 

MrchCo 



152E 

71ft 

32 + ft 

PrlnvD 

.16 

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18V— ft 

MrchNi 



100(45 

37V 

44ft +6V 

Prtronx 



19U + tt 

Mrs Be s 



1576 EU 

34ft 

35% +1% 

Prodlnv 



8ft 

MrdBpi 

X5B 

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4837 

35ft 

EU -f ft 

ProdOo 

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3D 

4U + N 

MerlBfi 

36 

63 

BSDBV 

18 

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Protlrv 



26V— U 

Mertmc 



4514ft 

14 

14ft + ft 

Proms 

DO 

63 


X +1 
6% + % 
2*i— to 
24 + % 

10 
3% 


84 

IX 


28 


DSe 8 


188 3 A 


nfratn 

nmedC 

IHlfuE 


HolmD 
Mm Ben 
HmFAII 
HmFR 
HmFRk 
KmFAl 
Hmecft 
HmoSL 
Hcnlnd 
Hoover 
HranAIr 
Hordnd 
HwBNJ 
HwrdB 
HunpTa 
HunUB 
Hntsln 
HuntsB 
Hurco 
Hvbrttc 
KydeAt 
Hyponx 
HytekM 
Bl 
EC 
IS 
LC 
MSS 
PLSy 
SC 

VB Fn 
ca! 

idleWM 
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mtmvyt 
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m ono 
mu non 
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indBcp 
ndHIda 
ndBrtc 
ndnaF 

rxUN 188 
mflN pf 
IdPlWar 246 84 
ndnHB IX 3D 
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2300 4b 

3% 

4 

+ tt 

MlcrO 

1D0 U 

7327 

26 

76 

— tt 

Ml or Mk 

JO 3D 

62X 

29 

29 


Mlcrdy 

> 

21 14ft 

14 

14 

— ft 



193515% 

15 

lift 

+ ft 

Ml crop 

JOr 3J 

111 Utt 

12V 

12V 


MJcrpra 


154422V, 20% 22*1 +!*» 
575 8% 7*1 7*>— % 

24533U Xto 33U + V, 
S5522to 21% 22U + U 
48 1 193271k 26% 24% — N 
267 6% 6% 6*1 — to 
IU 4to 3% 3% — 

76323to 22% 23U 
1.120 63 51 23% E 23% + % 

422 4% 4N 4% + % 
54024 35 35 

45112% 11U »U 4 M, 
82049% 45U 49% +4 
502 4% 4 4% + to 

341125% 24% 2SU 
343 * 5% SU — U 

131210% 9to 10 
133 8 7to 8 + % 

2S 2% 2% 2% + % 

33 4U 4 416— U 

DSe 1.1 349 4% 4% 4to— U 
45510% 10 10% 4 to 

152828% 27% 28% + U 
386 2% 2% 2% 
345912% 12 12% — N 

30140% 39to 40U 4 U 
1984 6% 5% 6 
11E 34 ,25 

* 

1588 5% 


.16 8 


220 58 


JO 38 


182 48 
DSO A 
80b 69 


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2U 

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su + u 
42to 41to 


XI 


nAcous 

ndEl 


nfalntt 

tdoSc 

SSf 


80 18 


1247 2% 

85 5% 

55447V, 81 
2113% 13% 

s a a ft 

1X31% 31 31N + U 

8234 32to ” 

5% 

c 

36 
3to 


IrSrmwt 

ssasr 

InTtCn 

vaZ 

nlpDv 

issro" 

InleoFn 
Intel . 
ntel wt 

ae 

ntrTet 

ntRod 


50 4 
438 3% 

14 5 
847X6% 

IU 1% 

3291 a 
61 2N 
43418*1 ]7to 
122 7V. 4% 

SS* 

970 3U 
105829 

72 6% 


” + % 

J4iB 

2to— U 
18% 

12U * 

Uto- 

25to— 2V, 
4U 

4% 4 to 
4% 4 U 




ntdyn b 
ntrlFIr 
i ntrlnc 
■■jw4 , 8 
Inlrmwi 
In ttnec 
ntmwt 
nBWsh 
BfcWaA 
nCopE 
main 
Game 
RtHM 
nf Kino 
ntLse 
nMotdl 
ntRoab 
RI5 
ntSMO 
TCPS 
ntTptq l 
rtfphse 
ntPlpo 


7U 
3U 

» 

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6N 

1018 11U 10% llVi 4 U 
41 4 » M 

36518% 17% 17% — to 
166 8 7% 746 + 1% 

T'-’SS + S 

1196 12% + N 
4N 5%— U 
1% Ito + to 

S 5% 4 N 

18 I1N 41% 
6U 7 4 U 


25326 27 


"".a 


nvere 

GNMA 

nwstSL 

Iomega 

umSali 


sso _ 

6346 FN 
477 1% 

103 5% 

28412 

771 7% ... 

.16 18 55913% 13 13% 

IJMt 1L4 1042 9U 8% 9 4 % 

175723096 28% '30% + N 
572 7% 7% 79* 
193216V, 15% Wto 41 
IX BU 8 BN 
18813% 11% 12 —I 
50313% II 1FN— 1% 
3S2 «N 4to 4% 
3245I6U 15% 159*— N 
532 10 9% TO — 16 

t 17714U 13% 13% 

t 677 MN 17% 18% 

900 19 18U 18% 4 N 

645 7% 7to 799 4 to 

3£V* % i-fe 

2322U 22% EM + % 
771823% 21 W 23*, +1% 
1217 8% B BU 4 U 
1S7 3U 2% 2% — % 

230% Mto 3B%— to 
741 11 10% 10% 4 N 

1893 4IA -3% 4U 4 N 
19728% 25% Z7U— % 
923 7% 7 7% 4 % 

4042109k 9% 10U— to 
32350 47% 49% +1% 

32110% 10 10% — N 


86 58 


180 


Die 8 
282*107 
J06e J 


160 78 


tet 

3ui a 

7ft 

7V— ft 

M wt 

1497 4N 

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tel pi 

31fEft 

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E 

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.16 LI 59914% 

Mtt 

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301 SN 

Sb 

5V + ft 


JP ind 
Jackpot 
lack Lie 

JO 

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JeHrGp 
JeffBOh 168 
JeflNLs 46 
JeiSmri 
JeMtari 
Jerico 
JhnonE 
JoneVo 

Jonlcbt 


16 
XI 
40a 2D 


.12 


1906 Wto 17 IW, +2% 
1301 4% ito 6to + to 
13053916 37 39U 41% 

150» 28% »%— % 

1481 19% 15% 19% +3U 
69318% 16% 17U —1% 
18645% 44U 44% +2U 
475*1 20% 20*,— to 

606 30U MU 28U 41U 
1926 6N 5N 5N— to 
20% 20% + N 
5% 6b + U 
4U 4% 4 to 
4% 6% — to 


237121 
160 4U 
60 4% 
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7to — 
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4%- 
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6 - 




Die 


100 

80 


MagmP 
MogBk 

MOSGP 

MokieN 
MoIRt 
Mairtti 

MalrllA 

MptSti 
ManUw 
MantHs 
MfrjN 
Marcus 
Moron 
MamCs W40 
Mortal T 
MTwan DO 
MktFct A 
Matwtf 
Mansi 
Ntanta M 
Montill Z» 

MrtdNs 1D0 
Moscmp 
Mmln 
Mosstor 
MatrxS .10 
Mavrck 
Maxcr 1 
Maxwet 
May PI 

MavSuA .IDa 

MaynOI 

AtavaJ 

McCrro 88 
McFod 

Me Fart 

McGill L40 

McGrth 

Mechtr 

fitteSafat 80 

MedcoC 

AAedex D5 

AAedCre 

MedGr 

MeddSt 

MadShp 

MedlGI 

Medpis 

Megdts 

Menlor 

MentrG 

MercBc 1.92 

MercBk 1D8 

MerB Co 

MerBPo IJfl 


to 


947 TIN 10% 11% 4 
110625% 23U 2SN+1N 
64 351 15% UN 14% + 

17 5944% 43 44to— 

505 BN Bto Ito 
65912% llto llto 41 
233 11 Vi 10 llto+lb 
263315% 13% Mto— 

14 07634 OH 23% — 

589 UU 12ft 13U + - 
1* 101769 6JU 69 45% 

ID 391 T9 18% 18% * 
USD 5N 4% 5 4 

44 18832 31 31 % — 

299 7% 6% 6%— 

4J I92DU 19% 19% — 

K 417% 17% ITto — 

2062 II 10% 10% 
315421 16% 17 —1 

38 40 MU 15% M 

3J 180 63% 62V, 43% + 

39 3734349k 31% 34% +2% 

988 5% 5% Sto— N 
£-42 6414 4116 61% +1% 
5363 216 1% ... 

8 S6930U 29 29 — 1 

122 3% 3% 3to- 
12942X4% 20% 34% 
6414b 13% Mb + ft 
1757 5% 5 5%+% 

A 123 25 23% 24% — 

IE 4U 4 4% + 

12 8% BM Bto — 

25 30033$% Mb 35% + 
82511 10% 10% + 

313 ITto TON 10% — 

4 A 25 31% X 31% + 

300 Bto I 8% + 

12115 13% IS +2 

271 1JU 12 13 — 

13128% 28 28%—" 

32511% 9% 10% +1 
577 5% 5% 5U — 

104 7U 6% 6% 
54710% 9% 10% + 
24225% 74% 25% + 

88 5 4% 4N — 

94731% 39 31% +2% 

31 5 4N 4N— ‘ 
523013 12 12% + 

BltJM. 19% 20% + 
46839% 37to X +1% 
24141% 5AU 61% +5U 
155 4% 5% 4% 

3M 53% 50% 52% +1U 


to 


% 


X5 


% 


% 


X2 


MeryG 

MrvLds 

MesbAv 

Metrbn 

MetAh-s 

MefrFn 

Metrml 

MlchStr 

AMchNH 

Mlcorn 


JO 38 


Mb 3-9 


D6 ID 


Micros 
MlcSras 
Mla-FIt 
MWABC 
MdANtl 
MdPCA 
MOSIFd A 
MdBXWS 1 JO 
MdldCO 
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MdwAlr 


JA 33 
180s 4D 


MdwCm 1D0 
MdwFn uo 
MIIIHr DO 
Miiitcm 
Mllltar At 
NUI tope 
WUnlscr 
Mlnetnk 
Mlnstor 
Mlschar 
MGmk Die 
AAablCA 
MOMCB 

MabGos IDO 78 
MOCON D2e J 
Moaines m 3J 
Moledr 

D3 


B0519U 18% 19—98 
74811% 11 11% + to 

106 4% 3N (5% + 
51X5 14U 15 + % 

HE 17 14% 16% +IU 

207X5% Mb 15% + to 
139119% 19 19% + _ 

1225 5% 5% 5% + 16 

4707 31% 27U 29U —IN 
576719% T7to 18% +1U 
957 4% IN 3N — % 
7 7to 
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8% 9% +1 

6% 6% + to 
1% 2to + to 
3U SU 
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... 4 5% +1% 

5625% Mb 25% +1% 
2923 25 25 +1 

714 3U 3% 3%— to 

241 23 27% 22% — % 

12222% 37 22% — U 

6614U 13% 13*i— % 
2D 151239% 38N 39Vk— to 
1312 6% 6 6% 


499 7to 
384 6M 
4418 Vto 
786 7% 
551 2% 
302 3% 
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63 


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MeoreF 180b 4J 
MooreP D8 U 
MgrFla D1 
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7.6 31417 15% 15% —1 

ID 287037% 36% 37% + % 
El SU 4 5U +1 
18 238341 38% 40% +1to 

894 17 15% 16% + % 

4012 2% IN 2 to— % 
4168 9% 9to 9% + % 
110723% 23U 23% — U 
X IS 14% 14% + U 
.1 3180 9% 8% 9 — N 

11011 10% ION— U 

175711% 10% 11 + to 

69 Mto 13% UN + U 
332x7% 7% 

57519 17% 18% — 9b 

304 6to Ato 6U— U 
470 XU 31% 32 —Ito 
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337 19% in. IV + Vk 
194 9 Tto 7% —1 
3% 

9 


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Marrsn At 
Moaeley 
Molnee 36 
MotC lb JO 
Mueller 180 
MuttbkS D4 
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r 


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20% — to 
5% +1U 


NoPCal JH 


INOPCDSI 

NashFri 

NihCBk 

NathFa 




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9to 
444813% 

15231% 

20226% 

1X34% 

8119U 
21313% 

41731% 

33 4174 71% 30 
618 4% 4*1 

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1H 14U 12% r 

LI 4905m S8U 
A 736325% 24 
21 20% 19 
150 5% 4% .. 

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210 MU 13% MU + U 
448 JO U 3SN 28% — to 
233*1 33% 31%— 1% 
NW IK, m 
NBnTex D4 34 24E24N 24% Mto 
NtCoolt 80* 88 386 4 3% 3%— to 

NCtvBn 1 AM ID 8*Wk 16U 16U 
NtlCty ZOO 4D 424249% 4891 49N +1U 
7-5 792 MS 49U 49% + U 
21022 19% 73 +2 

3D 2771% 78 71% + N 

ID 2124 28% 18% 20to +1N 
3 A 304313U 12% >3% + % 
304 7% 7% 7N— to 

114019V, 16% 19to 

83 6% 6 6 - to 

524 6 5 5% + N 

2772 3% TV 3 — M, 
238% 38% 38% +1 
291 12U I IN 17% + N 
17 8% 8% 8% 

114N 14N 14N+ U 
151 3% 3% 3% 


1D0_ 


ZB0 

3JS 


2D 


NtCfypt 170 
NCBcs 
NCfflNJ 
NtCptr j 
NOato 
NHardS 
NHItC S 
NtHMO 
NtLumb 
N Micro 
NHPeiwi 1 
NtlPJO 
MtProo 

KSocins 51b 24 

NTeeh t 

NtWnLf 

MtnwdP 

NafrBfy 

NfrSuns 

Nauglo 

Nmgwt 

NetsnT 80 2D 
Neman 
NwkSec 
NtwkSs 
NfwfcEl 
Neutras 
NevNBc 
N BrunS 

NE Bus 52 ID 
NwFRg 

NHmpB DO 28 
NJNoH 1.12b 3D 
NYAIrl 
NY A wl 

Ksa uo m 

NewpEI M 2 
NwpPh 
NlCalg t 


28014% M% 14U— to 
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4477 5N 4% 

246 3U 2% 3to— W 
26 S 5 5 

531 5 4N 4%— % 
374 1% % % 

307 7 6N 7 
767 7% 7 7N + % 
1239 9 Bto BN— U 
1139322% 20% 22% +1% 
67 4to 4U 4to + to 
213 Eto 34U Mto— T 

Itttltto if* 11U + u 

^ ss a «s 

33018 16 17 +1 

»lf« 14 14% + to 

1077 35V. 23% 25U +1U 
M 3% 3U 3U — % 
809411% ION ION— N 
1843 3 2% 2% 

TO N % N 
2831 17% 16*i 17U + to 
DO 3D 934811% 10% HU + % 
83B 2D 3051114 18 TON + % 
131 8% BN «N— N 
146X4% MW MV, 

5719 IBM, ISto— 1 
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133240% 38% 40% +IN 
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6« 8N 7% 8 + % 

S24 23*, 23% 

27941N 38% J9„ —TV. 
*73U 3 3% + S 

28X1 19 19 

1*658% 55 57N + N 

619415% 13% 14% +1 
393 4V tto 4N— to 
. 914 13% 73% — % 

51320 19N 19% 

17 SU 4V SU + Vi 
478 31b 30N 31U +1 


Nicole 
NIchOG 
Nlco 
Nike a 

Nobel 

Nadwov 

Noland 


I 

■56 28 
46 34 
Nordatr D4 9 
NrohB* 

Norstan 
NaANat Dir 
NAtltn 

NCarGs 1D4 7J 
NoFrtcB 180 XT 
NlhHIIl 


Komnst 

Kaeoa 

Karcbr 

JCmier 


285 2% 


2% 2% 

. 4% 5N + N 

1409 16N 15% 16N +1U 
40316 15N 15% — N 




3191 Ttt 

BN 

9 + ft 

NPMll 

92 

IJ 

1834 XV 

47V 



IBM ZN 

2ft 

2tt— % 

Nwavtet 



9714 



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ID 

32346ft 

43ft 

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3D 

271960% 

S9N 


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198 B 

7ft 

Kencop 


228 4 

3V 

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3D 

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26tt 



4910 

Ttt 

9V — ft 




889 9% 

9ft 

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56440U, 

39V 

39V— ft 

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371913V 

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Kevex 

Kevlln 

KewnSs 

KevTm 

KevsFn 

Klfflbal 

Klmbrk 

Kincaid 

Kinder* 

Kngwid 

Ktesvd 

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Wuger 

Kufcke 

KuatEl 

LCS5 

LDBrofc 

UN 

LSI Llg 

LSI Log 

LTX 

WPatB* 

LaZBy 

LoddSt 

LodFrn 

Lokflw 

LtfTB* 

LomR* 

Laroal 

Loncast 

Lancet 

LdLnSL 

LadBF 

LdnXeS 

LoneCa 

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Lamn* 

Liiwtnx 

LaeOta 

Lebtef 


A* 38 


898 7 6U 
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6713U U 
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3324 


6% + to 
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7N + to 
23 — N 


J06 


D6 D 




820 

80 

.16 


LewtaP 

Lexicon 

LcxkHa 

LbtPGv 

LbtVM A 

LbtyH 6 

LfflUPs 

Uebrs 

Uobrt 

Lttnva 

LteCam 

LillyAo 

UlrTul 

UnBrd 

UncTet 

UMbrg 

UnerCp 

Ua Box 

LMAIr 

UttiArr 

LicOao 

LOOM 

LOCOlF 

LDndnH 

Lene5tr 


32731% 38U 31N +lto 
95 4U 3% 3K— N 
IE 8% 8 8% 

«51«m 19N 20% + N 
152041% 36 40N +4W 

22 5 4% 5 + to 

414 AN 5N 6% + N 
32 28 166214% 13% 14 - to 
.14 ID 2399 15% 1SW 15*1 + to 
410 7% AN 7% + % 
51 8% 8% BU 
677 6to 6U 6N— to 
2686 Mto 13% 14 
1364 21N IK 21% +1% 
3383 MN 13% 14 — to 
4624 12% llto 12V, + to 
202&15U M% 14%— to 
501 47U 46U 47H + N 
, . 1919U llto IBM) 

A "3519N 18% 19to 
1.1 2029X816 17% 1BU 
U 721111N 11 llto— N 

2494 9 BN BN— to 

JO 58 B7 IS Mto 15 + % 

Dt 4J 35D15U 15 15 — U 

■92 XI 59529N 28% 29% + N 

J2 X9 31311% 11 11 — U 

DO 2D 935920% 19N 20N + N 
WB7T9N 17V 18% + % 
D2 ID 119753V 51 53N +BV 

DSe 3D IS 7% 7% 7V 

36438 lBV 20 +1% 
777 Mb 29b Mb + % 
3830 SU tto tto + U 
485 10W » W +% 
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.143 OW 8% Bto . 
12111 3% 2% JK -f N 
737 2to 2b 2N 
520 20 28 — % 

mix lb u n 

27X1 Wto IBN + W 
10136 Eto 35% + Vi 
913 17N T5N 17% +1% 
53821 20% 20% 

123 65% 45% 45% 

283 Sto 5b M 
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1 J 8071 20% 18% 20N +1% 
6JJ43BU 29% SOU 
379EU 34% 36% +1% 
196 5% 4N Sto + to 
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19522V 22 22N + *1 

41 EU 25 25% + b 

9743 46% 42b 46b +1% 
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Nevor 

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833 Bto Tto Ito + N 
396 3 2% 2N- U 


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TVS 4% 4 4to + to 

165 ip 3% 3*. 

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532 17V, 14% 17U + to 

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242 5 A 3140% 47 47 

208 44 4(164 62% 64 +4% 

1« T«V — N 
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OafcHin 
Oceoner 
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OffsLoo 
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OtdSPfC 2D0 CD 120Z2 21% 21N— U 

OIWnF 214 13% 14 

OnoBca 86e 1J 301121% 21% 21% + % 

63 7V 7b 7W 

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«.17to lf% l<to— to 

2W1 6% 6N 4N — b 

506 B 7V 8 

Ml 5W 4U 4V— b 

16617 16U 16*1 + U 

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125617 Mto Mto— ON 

236 BD 04 34N 33 34N +Hk 

29212% 10% Tito— to 

1J ,lS2 a4 SJ WK** 

13028 V b fc— K 

4M716N 14b 15 —1 
503 llto 9% .11 + N 

175 8b 7% 8b + N 

618431% 30U 31b + b 
186312% 12 12N 

69944*1 43 44% +1% 

338814 12% 13%.+ to 

11320 19V 20 

78314% 14b 14V + to 
0 711 A 1 + to 

WiSa^ta 

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U 2369 8*. 7% BW + to 

307324% TIN 22% —IN 
333823% 22 22% + U 

1586 IB 17 17V— U 

2U16b IS lSN + b 
13W 35% Eli + ft 

39713% 13% Uto— H 
SIZ1N 21% 21*t + to 


On Lino 

Onvx 

OPtloC 

OpHgR 

optrheB 

Orbonc 

Orbit 

OregMT 

OrfoCp 

OrlonR 

Oshmn 

Osnrncs 

OttrTP 

OvrExp 

OwanM 

Oxoco 

PACE 

PSA 

PLM 

PNC t 

PTOtm 

Paccar 

QuTjl 

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PcGaR 
PocTel 
PhcWB 
Padcsv 
Pocmt 
PaeoPb 
PaseA 
Pantch 
Pancnix 
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ParPhs 
ParTcft 
Parboil 
Park Cm 
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Partex 
PasadTc 
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Pat tax 


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309 3U 2% 3U- K 


241* MV IS + to 
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330 


Dae ID 
JO XB 


Pgtrhl 
Patriot 
Patrtat 
PoulHr 
POUlPt 
Po*ISv 
Paxton 
Povehx 
Pay cos 
PeakHC 
PearlH 

PoerMf 37 $8 
PegGM 06 .7 

PennVa TDOa 34 
Penbcp 2D0 3J 
PenaEn 2JD AD 
Pmtfars 40 38 
Pamrat 
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POOEPt 2D4 1X4 
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PoopBs J2 U 
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Pat Ind 
PETCO 
Pel rite 1.12 
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Phrmcia 
PhrmJrt 
Ptirrn wt 
PSFS 
P1UIGI 
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PtxiAG 
PhotoCs 
Pity* in DAI 
PIc3av 

PlCCate DO X7 
Plod Be 37 2D 
PMdMe JA 73 
PlonFdl DSe 2D 
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PlenHi .92 
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PlonSto .12 
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Pence F 85r X5 

PwXBati 

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794 4'- 43b 46 +1 

96* 111k 9 Ik ION— Ito 
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109 2SN 7JV »% +1% 

5SJ318 17% 17% 

4421 16b 14% 16b +1 
90S 21 to 20 2 Ito 

2186 17 15% 16% * % 

733025% 24b 24% —Ito 
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13047% 44 b 46 to 
39260% SOto Mb 63 
37034% EU 34% + N 
901 30U 28% 35U +1U 
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6143 19b 10 10W 

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157 Mb 29% 30 — b 
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8019U Mb 18% + to 
1193 % % to 

761 8% 7V. 8 — 

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2792 2% 1% 2«— b 
75 1% I 1%- to 
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job xsiTOsinw 

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266 4N *b 4N + N 
37 7U *% 7 — U 

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46523 22% 22V, — b 

1930% 29% 30*01 +1 
103 15N 15U 15N 
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20520% 20 20% 

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18S4 7N 6N 7N + N 


156 3% 
461 2N 
19 1050X9 

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3734 7% 



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79 IT, 

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ProgSys 

ProaCa 


Proinv 
PraatTr 180 
ProtUs Da 
Protcol 
Pravin 
PTVLI ■ D6 
PrudBc 
PutacoC 
PbSNC 1 J0 
PsSdBc 1.12 
PufOSF DO 
Pul iron 

Puiro wt 

PurMri A0 

QMS I 

Quodrx 

QuakC a JB 

QuaiSy 

Oatnn 

Ouantm 

Quarx s 

QuestM 

QUMtCh 

Quintal 

Qutxata 

Quotrn 

RAX Die 


LS 1974 BN 8 8 — U 

20 1932% 31% 31% — 1 

50 AN 6b 6U 

34743 40% 47 

88713% 12 13 

715521% 19 21 — % 
488 10W 9% 10 + to 
143 3b 3N 3% + to 
118727 Eto 27 + to 

884 3% 7b 2b— U 
46912% It lltt— U 
779 9N 9 9% + % 

1112 2to 2 2 — % 

195837% 34N 37b +ZN 

51 4U 5b fib 
11238b 2*W 30% +1% 

43 7% 7% 7% + b 

743 ito 5% 6W + % 
A 18121 19b 20 

XT 151316% 15N T6U 
303 5% 4% 5 

185$ 3V 3H 3% 

45712 TIN 11% — U 

446864U 59 63 — IU 

978 6b SN 5% — N 
61110b 9U 10 — U 
31 3U 3 3W + b 
316x4b 4% 4% — b 

233 SN 5% 5%— b 

347 10U «U 9*>— % 
123 5b 5% 5% + U 

88640% 38 40% +2% 

169 5b 5% 5N 
174 3N 3N 3N— U 
9.1 90313% 13U 13U— to 

XI 653 21 W 30% 21b 

54 IN lb IN 
340 18N I7N I7N— N 
38 203123% 23% 33Vi— U 
143 MW 9% I0W + W 
1456 lb IU IU 
79 5533 22% 22b + b 

T9 10739U Mb 38% 

2D 40E 23U 25b— % 

5B34 6 % 6 6 % + % 

(54 3% 3tt 3N + to 
403X2 V. 30 22 +114 

2196 10 9V 9b — b 
3537 8% 7% 8N + % 
135 12 W 11 11% + U 

00 IV 1% t% 

IE 9N »U *% + b 
347825V, 23U 23% —lb 
46 5% 4% SU + U 

J043 4b 3N 4 — to 

33 9 8% 8% 

299 7b 6 7% + b 

868 12U 10% 1!% +1 
20548 12N 12% 17% 

.1 234 8U I 8 — W 


D3 


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12 


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RIHT 2D8 XI 16660% 99% 60 +U 
RJ Fin .10e ID 11*10% 10 lOb— b 

RLI CP J6 XT 33927U 36 3TA +1 

RPMs 46 X6 1951X5% 15V, 15% + H 

RodSys 413711% «% 1IN+IU 

RodtnT El 12b 11% 12 

Rodion » 7% 7 7U 

Room 427 5N 5% 5N— W 

Rater* 1D0 38 222327U 31U 31%— b 
Ramtelc 1932 3b 3 3% + to 

Ransalr 84 XI 342 7% 7N 7b 

Roach i E 4% 4 4 

Raymnd DO 12 4322% 21% 21% — V 

1(8X7% 17 I7M + b 
1B521U 28% 21 + b 

533 16b I5U 15% — U 
687 9b 9 9N— N 

239X8 27 27% — % 

2437 13W 11% 12b + N 

in ion 10% 10% 

5M 5% 5% 5N 
45 16U 15% ISN — b 
378 7U 6% 6%— b 
2419 AN 
85 5b 
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179 SN 
271 22U 211 
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376419% IE6 

186 Ett 26% 27% + % 
S320W 19% 19% — % 


83 


RoyEn 
Raodna 
REITs 188 
Racotn 
RadknL M 23 

Romm 

KffiftJC t 

RscvEI 80 3D 

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RaldAOi 

RaltfLb Die J 

Rollon 

Ranal 


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5urvTc 

Sykes 
SymTk 
Svmbin 

SvmbT 
SrmMIc 
Syncor 
Syntech 
Synlrex 
5rK»P 
SvAsoc 
Svstln 
Syslntg 
SvVGn 
Svsimt 
T0C 
TCACb 
TL5 
TSC Inc 
TSI 
TSRs 
TocVI* a 
Tandem 

Tandon 
Tcfmql i 
TchCom 
TehEaC 
TcCom 
Ten Inc s 
Tecum 
Telco 
TlemA 
TelFlu* 

Telertt 

Telecra 

Teleml 

Teicnict 
TeivW 

Tuwtr. 
TelkOn 5 
Tern co 
TmnlE 
Temtex 

TndrLv 
Ten non! 
TeroCa 
TermDt 
Tewiato 
Tenon 
Textne 
TncrPr 
Thrmds 

Thettd 

Thro til 
TCBVa s 
TTxtrln 
Thortee 
ThouTr 
3Com 
TIarco 
TlntOr Id 
TimeEn 
TmeFib 
Horary 
Totals 
TalodTr 
TolTrol XW 
ToosyA 
TottSy S 
TovaPli 
TrakAu 
Tran Ind 
TrnLO S 
Trrtsdcr 
Trosnf 
TrwIBc 
TrteOSv 
TrlMIc 
TrtUCm 
Trllogv 
Trlco 
Tru+lo 
TrsINY 
Tuck Dr 
TwnCth 
Tykm 
Tyson* 

US L1C* 

USF Rl 
USPCI S 
UST 
UTL 
UltrBcP 
Ultra v 
Una mn 
Uniocp 
Llnlbc at 1J3 
Unlfl 
Uniircs 
Unimed 
UnBco 1D0 
UnFadl 
UnNalts 1D2 


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04 J 


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3Ea Z9 


850 1.4 


IE 23 


1.90 


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576 3% 

46 6b 
497 7% 
408 6% 
400 3% 




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ib 

Ib 

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a 


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59 39 

37 

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5% 

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743 r % 

% 

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2917b 

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17 

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587524 

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23V 

talto 

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167 33% 

23 

23U 

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2D0e31J 

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D6e 3 


451 16% 15% 16% +1 
94 33 28 b 33 T4V, 

63122% 21% 22to + V 
56 EH 35*i 36% +1% 
2152 IN 7% 8N 
6181 13‘* I7N 17V, — N 
40 16V, 15% 16U— H 


RntCnfr 
RpAuto 
RoHttti 
RscPwi 2J3e 98 
RSCPiG lJ3e 67 
^tec J203D 

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nf? 

geverA 
Rexon 
ReyRcY 


SN + % 


D9a J 


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ID4 11.1 


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RlchEls 

RtoaaN 

RUva 

Rtvnl 

RoodSv 

RobAAyr 

WSo 

RobVsn 

RckwH 

RMUnd 

RkMtG 

Roook 

Rcoes5t 


184 

84 


DO 

TD0 


386 1b IV lb 
6319b Mb 18b— H 
llOI9to 18W 19to + to 
168 1SK 14% ISto + V 
350 10N ION ION + ft 
482 Eft MN 2*%— % 
140)3% 13 13 

541 AV 6 6% + to 

OU 41% 41% — 2b 
12% 13 tab 
7% 8 

n% 1? +n 

569, 55%-% 


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2D0 XI 65187 81% 86% +5% 

130612% UU 12% +1W 
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481 3% 3 3*r— to 

167 MU 17% 17% — % 
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1D0 XS 2432*b Eto Eto- % 
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42 4b 3% 3N— N 


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13 

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106X7% 16% 17U + to 
83424% Mb 24% + W 
104 9 IN Sto — U 

4E12 11N 11V + % 

WW to *to — U 
232 9N 9U 9N 
540 5% 4N 5 tab 
6317b TAN 16b 
114216% 16 Mto— W 
IE 10 9 9U 

35716 ISto 15% — b 

134712% 11% 12% — to 
33518% 18 1BU + U 
1.1 193 9% 8% Bto— ft 

818% 17% 17V— N 
38 146521 19% 21 +1% 

21410 9 10 +V* 

9 5726b 25b 36b— U 

ID 6971 19U ITto 19b +1N 
X7 431542b 41 42b +1b 

511 21U 21 21 — U 

2D 9328% 27 28% 

48613% 13b 13W 
48 294472% 7DU 71to ta % 
1011 5% 4V 5b + to 


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RtnrtAlr 
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SmxiCht . 142 Bto BV BN— N 

Saterav .12 ID 143 7% 7 7% + U 

SavnF 1D0QX7 IE 44% 41 43% +2U 

Sovto DBe 2J 1291X4 Ob 23b + N 
gyBUPS 46 23 42631 30% 30N 

SmronO 1531 Yi V, ft— fc 

SeonOP 822 7W Ato 7 — b 

SaraTr 34616 14% 14% — 1 

Srterer J2 2D 313311V n lib + % 
37919% 19 19% + % 

659 22 W 70% 21V + % 
IE 9tt SU SU 
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ScfSvSv 

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SecBo, 1.13 44 

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1364 71 U JON 2IU + N 
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263 3 2b 3 — to 
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29915% 15 15 

232 AN AN SN— ' % 
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338X3 12 13 +1 

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670 15b 14% 15b + N 
164619 17% 18% + % 


.10 

.11 

DO 


.15 


SheWI* 
Shanevs 
ShonSot 
Stwsnf 
stomaA do 
S lgmaC 
SignwR 
SUicon 
Silicons 
SiilcVat 
Slllcfw 
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SHvStMn 
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Stans In 

SWd3 


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DA D 


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SfcvEKP 
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SmlttiL 
SmWiF 
SnatSru ■ joe 6.1 


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WWBfld. 
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*„ »» Sto + U WgCop 

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86815% M 15% taito WatFSL 

57015ft MN 14% — % - 

10915b 15 15 

59 4% 4 4% 

119524% 23% 24 
108710% 9V 9U— ft 
aw 3to + m 
7N 8% + % 

Tto 3b + % 

9% 11% +1b 
Jtt BW— b 
49U 53 +3% 

668 IBM 17% IB + ft 
l»M M fltt — % 

16716% 15U 16 — % 

.67713% 12N 17% - % 

322% 22% 23% 

204328% 36b X 
JOe ID 1264 21 V 21 21b— % 

152b 7J 55 WV 19% I9b— % 


1B 8 


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224716% 15% 15% — N 
468X7U 15U 17U ..._ 
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12914% M 14b ta to 
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TSOI 7W 4% 7 ♦ ft ' 

50815% life 14N— 1 
10013% U 13%-V 

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4312V 12% 12% ta lk 
11 13% I3U 13V + V. 
6631 29% 30% tab 

706X0 9V *N— » 
439 8 7% 71k— % " 

J5518 17b 17%— to 

234 14ft 13% 14% + to 

792114% 14 14U— tt- 

23 3 3 -« 

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9W 9% + % 
BJH'k 15% 10’.*, — b 
B3S “< '• N— H 

75 13% 12H ITU — V 
297 3% 3U 3% + ft 
1194 12 10'i 11N + V 

9J4I UU Wb 12b +»to 
350 a\, 4b 4b + U 
773 12 '- MH 12 
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2)316% 1SV 16 
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47 t’i 0 Bb + % 
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T17 m 27b 22+ + « 
610 1IU UU 10V 
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10 5** S 5 — % 
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16541 »H 11 tab 
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71 20% TOW 70% tal 
62 9% 9 9b + M 

33 7b 8% 6%— W 

5012% 100 HI tat 
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10610 37b Eft 37% +3to 
7812 TO 8% 10 talb 
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IJ 71 W I* 15% 17^-a talk, 

5 5% $b S% — to 

214727% 27 27N ta w 

1475 2V 7b 7N + tt 
22S3 16 15 IS — N 

3310 171$ 15% 16U — V 

411 7 fift 6% 

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7*8 3% 3 3N ta % 

286 S (ft 4%— % 
62 2 IV 1% ta ft 
318 to 

8118b 17 V 17V— ft 
794 10% 9% ION 

505 14% 14b 14b + tt 
11S 10 9% 10 +% 

5)4 (TV 47b 47% 

1966 Sb <9% 21ft talft 
$8 13 17% 12V + 16 

1446 7N 4% 7'.,— to 

276214% 13V Mb — ft 
1074 0 7% TV — 16 

46 B*k Bto 8ft— tt 
124 6% 6% Aft ta to 
133910 9 10 ta V 

57B12N IT. "? 

1930 ‘a •• + fc 

4505X7V 14% 17b 
1% *8 45% 47b +2% 

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6 4 )N 4 

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143417% ISto 15V + N 
458 IJ 12 12% — ft 

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ltt 3% + to 


89 

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17% tab 



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49710 

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1t% 

13 +1 


60 

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SCWW1 1J0 7D 34624 23 23ft— N 

S°H«» 10*0 5% 4% tft- % 

SihdFn J2 2D 827 E 24V 25*,— % 
jW dm 1D0 £5 260418% 18 lBto 
Soergn .10 IJ 983 69k AN 6N— % 

"nt * r * 

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52291916 11% Wto— N 
110124 Zlft 23V ta to 
S92 7b " - 

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19815 
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WSfLte 
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42EMN 13% 14% + % 
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3D 38 24% 24 ■ 24W 


.16 _ 
30 3D 
DO 4D 
■64 X3 

wramw Ji xi 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE; MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


■ ^PUROPBAN COMMUNITY 


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Some Steel Subsidies May Be Extended 

By Steven T. Dryden interests of the community that worked out shortly with food in* 

international Herald Tribute would be affected by the new d us try groups to drop the objcc- 


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120 27ft 27ft 
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17ft— ft 
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9ft 

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334— ft 
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43ft— 3* 
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23ft 

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4 ft ft 



102 534 5ft 5ft — 

*88 • 


Asean Makes 
Trade Plea to 
U.S., Japan 

United Press International 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia 
— The non-Cbmmunist nations, of 
Southeast Asia have called on the 
United Stales and Japan to allow 
greater access to their markets. * 

Ministers also told George P. 
Shultz, flic U.S. secretary of state, 
and Fareim Minister Shintaro Abe 
of Japan that a trade war between 
the two economic powers could 
have a negative effect an members 
of the Association of Southeast Na- 
bobs, which is holding its annual 
meeting here. 

Such a conflict, they argued, 
probably would criraJe Southeast 
Asian exports to both nations. 

The acting foreign minister of 
die Philippines, Parifico Castro, 
said Lhe ASEAN nations were con- 
cerned about legislation pending in 
the United States that would sharp- 
ly reduce textile and clothing im- 
ports from underdeveloped na- 
tions. 

Speaking for the association, he 
asked the R e ag a n administration 
to initiate a “major effort” to block 
the measure. Mr. Shultz and other 
cabinet secretaries abxady have op- 
posed the legislation in a letter to 


G'*t314j»-3MJ0 

VafcavsWMte W<dM SLA. 

L Quo! *i Moaf-Bbnc 
1211 Geneva U S W bm hW 
TcL 310251 - Tries 28385 


HIGH RETURNS MAXIMUM SE(XJRITY? 

A simple objective: to maximize income with minimum risk. The 
fjnKheati Basin Investment Trust invests in short-lean loans in 
Coda Rica and elsewhere, secured by Real Estate or other hard 
collateral. CHIT is a unit trust, formed in 1982 under U.K. lavra. 
Since inception, the trust has shown an average annualized rate of 
return of over 20% (and recently, over 24%). All earnings are paid 
in U.S. dollars. 

rail. t»»W or mail the coupon below to receive full information 

about CBIT. 

FIRST INTERNATIONAL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED. Atm. 
CBIT Fund Manager, Dept- 500, P-0. Box 302, 1005 San Jose, 
Costa Rica, Td7S06) 3&6114 Telex: 2851 GROUP CR- 







pul 


Tbe ASEAN ministers also 
asked Japan to remove tariffs and 
other trade barriers and to consider 
directing more investment to their 
region, rather than to the devel- 
oped nations. 

Mr. Abe told the ministers dur- 
ing a closed-door meeting that their 
requests wiO be considered as Ja- 
pan prepares a series of measures 
to open its markets to exports, a 
Japanese official said. 

ASEAN includes Brunei, Indo- 
nesia, Singapore, Malaysia, the 
Philippines and Thailand. 


Dart & Kraft, Inc., Northbrook/IL U.S.A. 

Notice to the Holden of the 
7%% DM -Convertible Bonds of 1970 of Kraft, toe. 
Due September 1, 1986 
- Securities Identification No. 454 338 - 

Dart & Kraft. Inc.. Northbrook. HGnois, U&A. offers to the bondholders 
who intend to convert their Bonds into Dart & Kraft, Inc. common stock 
and theraritar eel such Oharas to pay them in cash an amount equivalent 
to the price of the Dart & Kraft shares ctefwraWe upon conversion 
(19.48 shares for each Bond of DM 1.000,-). The price on the bests of 
which such payment wffl be calculated wffl be &te Frankfurt Stock Ex- 
change official price of Delta Kraft, Inc. shares on the day preceding the 
day on which the request described below Is received by Deutsche Bank 
AG. Frankfurt am Main. 

the bondholders who wish to mate use of this oftar must Re a rafawnt 
request accompanied by the Bonds with interest coupons as of Septem- 
ber 1. 1985 and bearer recasts prior lo August 3t. 1985 In the Federal 
Repubfic of Germany, kidutihg Berfn (West), hi 

Deutsche Bank AG, Frankfurt am Main, 

Deutsche Bank BerSn AG, Berlin. 

Deutsche Bank Sear AG, S aa rtwflcfc en . 
or their branch offices. 

Payment stiff! be made within one week star the request Is received by 
Deutsche Bank AG. Frankfurt am Main. The amount of missing 001430ns 
w# be deducted ham the cash payment As In the case of conversion 
there shai be no payment or adjustment in respect of accrued interest. 
Securities turnover tay, if any, w9 be boms by the comp an y. 

The Bonds rnehn an September 1, 1985, after which no interest on the 
Bonds wfl accrue. The Bonds may not be converted Mo Dart & Kraft, 
Inc. shares after August 31. 1985. 

The Bonds whh Interest coupons as of September 1. 1965 and bearer re- 
ceipts must be presented together with 2 Bst in three countetperts. A 
commission of 1% of the cash price will be paid by Dert & Kraft, Inc., lo 
the depositary banks far those oonvertfcto bonds presented by them In 
accor da nce with this offer In order to compensate the commlaaion cue- 
twnarSy charged to their dams. 

Northbrook.- flbnia, U.5A 

July 1985 Dart & Kratt, Inc. 


BRUSSELS — Hie executive 
Commission of the European Com- 
munity may extend subsidies to EC 
steelmakers beyond the rfpariim* 
set for the end of this year. 

The additional subsidies will be 
mainly aimed at encouraging fur- 
ther reductions in EC steel output 
through plant closures, officials 
said The money could be used to 
compensate workers and meet oth- 
er related expenses. 

At the same time, the commis- 
sion intends tO cHnunate n ry-rating 
and investment subsidies, which 
could affect prices, by the agreed 
deadline, the officials said. 

EC steel output needs to be re- 
duced by almost 25 million tons to 
balance supply with demand, ac- 
cording to commission figures. 

A commission proposal 10 ex- 
tend the subsidies will be consid- 
ered by industry ministers on July 
26. The proposal will probably be 
opposed by West Germany, whose 
steelmakers want a prompt end to 
subsidies. 

Task Force Envisaged 
For New GATT Talks 

The EC Commission is consider- 
ing (he creation of a task force to 
coordinate the negotiation of a new 
multilateral trade agreement, EC 
officials said. 

Among those who might be cho- 
sen to head the task force is Tran 
Van Thinh, a Frenchman who as 
chief EC representative in Geneva 
handles matters related to the Gen- 
eral Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade, the officials said. He has 
held the post since 1979 and is due 
for a change in assignment. 

The head of the task force would 
be in charge of cnnrdmaring the 


interests of the community that 
would be affected by the new 
GATT round, the officials said 

The post is not envisioned, how- 
ever, as a sort of “super-negotia- 
tor,” they said. Negotiating duties 
will be shared among such officials 
as Leslie Fielding, the director-gen- 
eral of the EC's external relations 
department, and two of Ms depu- 
ties, Jos Loeff and Paul Luyten. All 
three have extensive GATT experi- 
ence. 

ProdwfrUabiUty Rule 
Seen Nearing Approval 

Nine years after it was first pro- 
posed, community officials are 
hoping to get final approval this 
month of a comprehensive direc- 
tive on product liability that they 
say will increase consumer protec- 
tion. 

The directive would establish the 
concept of “strict liability,” elimi- 
nating the present need to show 
negligence cm the pan of the maker 
of the product 

The uew directive, however, 
would allow member states to ex- 
clude producer liability for what 
are known as “development risks.” 
These are risks present in the prod- 
uct when marketed, but not discov- 
erable because of scientific or tech- 
nical limitations. 

Other lands of defects, such as 
those of production or design, or 
products carrying inadequate 
warnings. wiH still be covered by 
the directive. 

The remainin g obstacle to the 
adoption of the directive is the ob- 
jection of Britain, which wants pro- 
cessed food products excluded 
from coverage. 

Officials at the British mission to 
the EC said they were optimistic 
that an agreement would be 


worked out shortly with food in- 
d us try groups to drop the objec- 
tion. The directive could then be 
approved at the meeting of the 
Council of Ministers on Jufy 22 and 
23. 


r 

Last Weeks 

| NISI 

E 


sales Hleb Lew test area 
AHmp 7,712. WO 43>* 39ft 43ft ft 2ft 

AT&T 7.1*5500 24 23 33V. —34 

TWA httLMO B >934 21*4 43ft 

IBM 5J10.100 1U 130 134 —ft 

CKA Fn SJD7J00 55ft 553 m STA-1K 
Exxon UMUOO 53ft 51ft 53ft — ft 

COCOd Si)01 1 60Q 74ft *7ft 733. 4- 6ft 

DlomS <71*700 19 17ft 18ft + ft 

PMIPt *57*600 13 lift lift Until 

NlndPs 4JKOJ0C 12ft 113ft 12ft +14 

Beal CO 1997,900 31ft lift 31ft —ft 

CKvInv 3499.200 3*3. 3* 36ft _ ft 

PtiftrS 167UD0 44ft 43 44 -ft 

UnCarb 3^45000 49ft 44ft 41ft +2ft 

CBS 3AT6400 117 1 14ft 116U. —ft 

GMot 151 9.700 7014 67V. 6834 — 3*4 

JohnJn 344*100 49ft 45ft 49 + 3ft 

MarLyn IWOSJOQ 35 33ft 34ft +34 

SFtSoP 3J87500 35K 32ft 34ft + lft 

AMP U875001BK 13 13ft — SK 

iuuh Traded In: 2£43 
Advances: 1.147 ; declines: B32 
uncMngod: 2M 
New Mens: 433 .- now lows: 33 

Vofwna 

TMiix— *— 517AOOXOO snares 

I nil west 510270000 shorn 

1984 some nM 4817203)00 Edam 

19*5 to dew - ... 1&471.903AS4 diares 

1984 ta dal* 11A61+SOJOO mores 

i983ie daft 11.1*1.1 10008 (hares 


Last Week's 

AMEX 


Soles High Lew Lest cm 
BAT In 2J41J00 (ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

Te, Air 1.222400 30 16ft 1934 +3 

Worn S 847.500 IBft 17ft 17ft —ft 

DomeP 770000 2 ft 3ft 2ft— ft 

EcTio G 749JN 12 1014 lift +3* 

WDtom 717,100 143i 17ft 13— IK 

GUCOq 49*900 1334 13ft IS —ft 

»C«yPh 516.100 10ft 10ft 10ft +K 

Amdahl 475J00 13ft 12ft 13—16 

HOVOT 3*1800 4V. 3ft 4'« +ft 

volume: 3*0503)00 mores 
Year to Dot* : 1,039.91 HOOD snores 
Issues traded In: 899 
Advances: 375 : declines: 344 
Unchanged: ISO 
New H lotos: n ; new lews: 43 


FranceExpects 
Slow Growth 

Return 

PARIS — The French econo- 
my should grow slow ly over the 
next five years, at a rate slightly 
behind that of the rest of the 
industrial world, the national 
statistics institute. INSEE. said. 

In a study released over the 
weekend, the institute predicted 
that France’s gross domestic 
product would rise bv 2-5 per- 
cent annually between 1984 and 
1990. In the same period, aver- 
age growth in GDPin industrial 
countries would be 2.6 percent, 
it said. GDP measures goods 
and services produced, exclud- 
ing foreign-investment income. 

The study said the unemploy- 
ment rate in France would rise 
by 1 990 lo nearly 3 million peo- 
ple, or 111 percent of the work 
force. The jobless rate was 9.8 
percent at the end of 1984. 

Ireasur) BiHs 

Fistirss as at close at InxBno Friday 


7.17 

7J8 

7J2 

7J4 

7.24 

tJt 

7M 

7J4 

722 

• Minu RsMivt 8 h 



818 Aak 
Global I 38.14 

Glob II 1245 13.17 

Grwth 11X42 1]J9 

world list MJ4 

Thomson McKinnon: 
Gwltl 110 NL 


Ouor 
Tudr Fd 
Trust 
EaGtfi 
Ealnc 
30th 
GHt r 
Grwtfi 
Solact 
Ultra r 
USGv 
Vista r 
USAA 
Corraln 
Gold 
Grwth 
Inca 
soft 
TxEH 
TxEII 


1030 NL 
T2J4 NL 
20J9 NL 
Portfolio: 
1035 Ni. 
1U7 NL 
Cmfurv: 
5.93 5.95 
1*63 NL 
27.12 NL 
781 7M 
99.75 NL 
*93 *95 
Grow: 
1L10 NL 
etti NL 
15.14 NL 
11A0 NL 
1*29 NL 
1254 NL 
1180 NL 


TxESto 1055 NL 
UnHftd Mantnf: 


Gonrl 022 NL 
Gwth 2011 NL 
I non 1058 NL 
InOI 013 NL 
Mull 15.12 NL 
Uni tad Funds: 

Aeon 845 9.23 
Bond 549 *22 
GvtSoc 539 5*1 
InfGfft in *44 
Con Inc 1079 1835 
HI Inc 1349 1476 
incom 144* ISM 
Muni *85 7.14 
NwCcpt *89534 

Ratlr* *02 458 
ScEno 93)6 9-90 
Vans 587 *42 
uta __ Swvlcm: ■ 

GldShr 533 NL 
GBT 1471 NL 
Growth 7J9 NL 
LoCoa 772 NL 
Pnpct 35 NL 
VMFra 1078 NL 
Vatu* Un* _ Fdi - 
Bond 1242 NL 
Fund 1338 NL 
Incom 688 NL 
Law Gl 2X22 NL 
MunBd 1049 NL ■ 
SM Sit 1X53 NL 
von Komoao: 

MsTxF 1544 1642 
TxFrHI 1441 liU 
US Gvt 1540 1*38 


Vunca Exchoraa; 
COPE I 49 JO NL 
DBall 4*05 NL 
Dwarf 75-90 NL- 
ExFtl f 1127* NL 
E*Bsf 95-BO NL 
FUE! *038 NL 
Sc Fid f *451 NL 
Vanguard Grnua: 
Expfr 3X14 NL 
Gam hi 7932 NL 
twatl 18.11 NL 
MW 1229 NL 

NcwiT 1870 NL 
QDhl 1 1882 NL- 

QOJv II 831 NL 
QDwIll 2X73 NL 
STAR 1X63 NL 
TC Int 29.13 NL 
TCUsa 3X94 NL 
GNMA 984 NL 
HIVH 073 NL 
IGSnd 019 NL 
ShrlTr M41 NL 
ind Tr 22*5 NL 
MuHY 971 NL 
Mulnf 11.19 NL 
Mu La 989 NL 
MlnLa 1071 NL 
NhlSM 1584 NL 
VSPGd 7M NL 
V5PHI1 13.98 NL 
VSPSv 1533 NL 


145 NL] VSPTc 1077 NL 


Dfls. 60,000,000.- 
9Vfe% bearer Notes of 1980 
due 1984/1987 
of 

NATIONALE-NEDERLANDEN N.V. 

SECOND ANNUAL REDEMPTION 
INSTALMENT 


Notes belonging to Redemption Group No. 3 
wffl be redeemed on and after 

AUGUST 15, 1985 

in accordance wBh drawing- effected on 
July 9, 1985 pursuant to the Terms 
and Conditions. 


Paying Agents: 

Afraffiraam-TOOTuara aanK ru. 
AJgemene Bank Nederland H31 
Bank Mees & Hope NV 
Pierson, HeMring & Pierson NIC 
Nederian ti scf w MkMangtandaewnk trv 
In Amsterdam 
Rabobank Nederland 
In Utrecht 

&G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 

In London 

Deutsche Bank AMtengeseBschaft 
in FranMurOMaki 
and 

BanqueGindraledu Luxembourg SJL 
In Luxembourg 


Mr 15 , 7985 


Walls! 1482 NL 

WMIfn 1389 NL 

Wndsr U48 NL 

Vantura Advisar,: 
NYVan 884 9*8 
RPF Bd 782 NL 

IncPI 1077 11.77 
WPG 22*4 NL 

Wo U5I 025 173 

Wahl En 17.W NL- 

WsMrd 1175 1230 

Wood Strulhors: 

devao 4081 NL. 

Naina 2130 NL' 

Pina 1335 NL • 

VasFd 821 883 

NL — NO load 
[solos chorea) 

I — Pravtaus doyft 
ouots. r- Radanwtion 
etwrqs may apply, 
x— Ex divtdBna. 


NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 
To the Holders of 

Comcast International Finance N.V. 

U.S. $22^00, 000 

8 per cent. Convertible Bonds due 1997 
Convertible into Class A Common Stock of 

Comcast Corporation 

No! iii 1 is hereby iriven that Cumeasi International Finance N.V. has elected to 
redeem all or ilsoulsiandinjrS percent Convertible Bonds due 1 997 (the "Bonds") un 
August 16. 19S5 ( the "Redemption Date"), at lhe redemption price of lWt percent 
of their principal amount lopBiher with interest accrued ihenon from December 
1. IiWH to the Redemption Date in the amount of US$56.44 per US$1. OOtl Bond (die 
“Redemption Price"). 

( in August 16. 1986. the Redemption Price will become due and payable upon 
ail Bonds, and interest on the Bonds shall cease to accrue on and after that date. ' 

All Bondi., together with all interest coupons appertaining thereto, maturing ■ 
after the Redemption Date, are lo be surrendered for payment of the Redemption 
Price al the Corporal** Trust Office of Bankers Trust Company, in the Borough of 
Manhattan. The City Df New York, or ai the specified office of any one of the 
following paying agents; (a) Bankers Trust Company in London. Dashwood 
House. 69 Old Broad Street London EC2P 2EE. (b) Banque du Benelux S.A. at 
rues dw Colonics 40. HIUO Brussels. Belgium, (cl Banque Indoiues Luxembourg. 
X9 Aliee Scheffer L-25a) Luxembourg, (d) Bankers Trust Company at 12-14 
Rond-Poinl des Champs Elyuces. 75386 Paris. France and le) Swiss Bank ' 
Corporation at Aeschenvorsladl 1. CH-4002. Basle. Switzerland. 

The Bonds are convertible into Class A Common Stock of Comcast Corporation 
(“Common Stock“l up to the close of business on August 15. 1985 at any of the above 
office*. Each US$1,000 principal amount of Bonds is convertible into 1 lfi.3795 
shares of Common Stock after giving effect to a three- for-two swek split effected in 
June. 1985. Based on Lhe dosing price qf the Common Stock on July 2. 1985 of 
USS20.75. each U S3 1.000 of Bonds would convert into approximately US$2,415 
worth of Common Stuck. The right of conversion will terminate at the close of 
business on August 15. 1986- No payment in respect of interest (except in respect 
of matured coupons! or dividends shall be made upon conversion of any Bond. 

Holders or Bonds who wish to convert their Bonds into Common Stock should 
lender the i r Bonds for conversion nut later than Lhe close or business on August 15. 
1985. together with ail interest couponnappcrtainingtlieroto maturing after such 
date. 

Comcast International Finance N.V.- 

Rw Bankers Trust Company 
iw 7 Wm I n- 

July 15. 19KT. 

























































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T«n 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD ixiiBVSE, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 




m 

m 

a 

a 

a 

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■ 

■ 

!a 

■ 

■ 

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m 






u 

B 

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ACROSS 


1 Schoolgoer in a 
nursery rhyme 
5 Brahman, e.g. 
• Shower 
alternative 
4 Aliform 

<15 Nurses in 
Peking 

)[fi She loved 

• Narcissus 

17 Sub 

(secretly) 

18 Incurred, as 

• debts 

W Dry 

20 Skimming- 
Stnoes-oo-water 
pastime 

23 Kett 

24 Before, to 
Byron 

25 Birthplace of 
Pythagoras 

27 Brief 

32 Cherub 

33 Baseball's 

' Slaughter 

34 Hyson, e.g. 

35 Former 

U .A.W. head 

39 Cash follower 

40 Alaskan 
statesman 

41 "Dallas” 

. character 

42 Ticket given to 
a bus rider 

45 Attachment to 
a fish line 


46 Gone by 

47 Attention 
getter 

48 American 
trailing plant 

55 Poker bolding 

56 Town near 
Harrisburg 

57 Negatives 

58 Kind of phobia 

59 Guide 

60 Publisher's 
ponderous 
product 

61 Dither 

62 Civil wrongs 

63 Slammer 


13 Mason's 
burden 

21 Garment for 
Calpumia 

22 Actor Carney 

25 Scoff 

26 Marketplace, 
in old Athens 


27 Sadat 

28 Blessing 

29 Coral reef 

30 Rhodes or De 
Mille 

31 Capture 

32 Landed 

33 Brink 


DOWN 


1 Dress for 
cooking 

2 Baseballer 
Matty 

3 Not fern, or 
neut. 

4 Railroad 
workers 

5 Weights of 
pearls 

6 Famous town 
SW of Cedar 
Rapids 

7 Tot's box-filler 

8 Dull sound 

9 Coffee, Italian 
style 

10 Pharmacist's 
vessel 

11 Farm unit 

12 " above all 

. . Shak. 


36 Plant new 
trees 

37 Star in Cygnus 

38 Fourteen 
Vatican 
leaders 


43 Short of 
breadth 

44 AnNCO 

45 Large scissors 

47 Ornamental 

tag 

48 Locarno : 

1925 


49 River at Leeds 

50 Division word 

51 Active one 

52 Type of beer 

53 Ancient Gauls - 

54 W.W. 1 battle 
site 

55 dedeux 

(duet) 

© New York Tima, edited by Eugene Moksha. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



* W STOMACH IS ON EMPTY 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
a by Hand Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one tetter looach square, to form 
lour cwfinary twnta. 


f RACCK 


s n n 

urn 


| 

r YADDD 

L 

in 



TIM LB 

G 

-m 

L 


a 


SHOIBY 


ZQZ 

□ 

□□ 


WHAT THE 
TAX COLLECTOR 
OK? FOR THE 
MAN WHO THOUGHT 
HE WAS SAVIN© UP 
FOR A RAINY PAY, 


Now arrange tna dieted loners to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 




Friday’s 


Jumbles: JUMPY 

Answer What the 

lather- "l»AR-PAft" 


(Answers tomorrow) 
APRON RENDER MADMAN 


§ddlcTs children called their 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Ataorrr 
Ami) ordain 
Atom 
Barcelona 
BMarade 
Berta 
■roue is 
Bucharest 


COMHtUBM 

Coda Ml Sol 
Du bile 
Edlnboro* 
Florence 
Fran Hurl 

Geneva 

Helsinki 


LHPommn 

Us&oa 


Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

MlNttft 

Wee 

Oita 

Parti 

Praona 

Reykjavik 


S tockhol m 
Strasbourg 
V outer 
Vienna 
Warsaw 
Zorich 

MIDDLE EAST 


HIGH LOW 
C N C F 
a d ii 64 

27 81 14 57 
3D 88 23 72 
2B 82 19 66 

29 U 14 51 

30 84 15 S9 

25 77 14 57 

26 79 13 55 

28 82 14 57 
34 70 IS 59 lr 

20 84 21 70 tr 
17 63 12 34 o 

17 62 7 45 

33 91 17 63 

31 88 II 52 
30 86 14 57 

25 77 12 34 

26 79 17 63 
26 79 20 <8 

26 79 11 64 
25 77 14 47 
33 91 17 63 

30 06 19 66 

21 70 13 5£ 

29 U 13 54 

28 82 22 72 

18 64 >6 61 

29 84 IT 63 

23 B2 II 52 
12 54 4 39 

31 88 18 64 

24 7S 14 57 

32 90 12 54 

30 86 2 36 

30 U 14 57 

27 81 12 54 
30 84 13 55 


ASIA 


Bangkok 

Banina 

HonvKon 

Manila 
New Delhi 
Saaal 
Shamlwl 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

30 II i M "a 

32 90 26 79 d 

30 84 23 73 Stl 

33 91 25 77 r 

30 86 20 66 Cl 

33 91 27 H a 

— — — — no 

36 97 26 79 d 

32 90 23 73 Stl 


AFRICA 


Atoten 
Cairo 
Cape Town 


Loom 

Nairobi 

Tools 


32 90 17 63 lr 

34 93 22 72 Cl 

13 55 4 39 fp 

25 77 20 68 e 

23 73 2 36 na 

28 82 31 70 

22 72 9 48 

39 90 20 68 


ft 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buanai AMee 18 64 10 50 

Ceram 29 84 21 10 

Lima 20 68 15 59 

Mexico aty 25 77 24 75 

Made Janeiro 26 79 is 64 


NORTH AMERICA 


Ankara 

Beirut 


Jermalata 
TM Aviv 


S 73 13 55 
29 84 22 72 
36 97 17 63 

29 B4 13 51 

30 86 20 68 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Cbtcam 

Denver 

Detroit 

HaaalotB 

Hoastea 

Um Amnios 

Miami 

Minneapolis 


OC OCEANIA 


17 63 W 50 
IS 59 5 41 


18 64 II 52 PC 

33 91 22 72 pc 

31 88 25 77 fr 

30 to 21 70 d 

* U 14 57 fr 

31 88 20 M 81 

32 90 23 73 fr 

33 91 22 77 DC 

11 SB 20 » lr 

to 14 23 73 st 

29 84 19 64 PC 

22 72 13 55 fr 

29 84 20 68 Cl 

33 91 22 72 pc 

Saa FroncHce 23 73 13 55 fr 

Seattle 26 79 12 54 fr 

Toronto 22 72 11 52 fr 

Wnhlurtoa 33 91 23 73 pc 


Nassau 

New York 


cl-claudv; fo-fooov: fr-folr; tviMII: na-nof available; e-avorcnsl; 
ne-parHy Ooudv; r-roln; ih-stumers: swanaw; st-ttormv. 


MONDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: SllOflllv gmPDV. FRANKFURT; 
S«W. Tem^ 3-11 177—01. LONDON; Cfceflv. Temp- 22-11 172-521. 
MADRID; Cta^. Temo.27 — tt tBl —til . hew YORK: TiwWertlofm#, Temp, 
29—23 184 — 731. 


7*~a «B4 — 731. PARIS: Showers. Temo. 25—14 (77—571. ROME: Fair. 
Ten*. 30-13 (to -64). TEL AVIV! Fair, Temo, 30-20 (to- 60). ZURICH: 
Poudy. TOmp. 26 —13 J 79 - to). BANGKOK: Thunderstorms Tamp. 31— 24 
1 3»— .T Hj.RORg KONG: Fair. Tempi. 33—26 (91 —79). Manila: showers. 


ife- 75), TOKYO: Rain. Tamp! 



50iVvETHIN6 , 5 BEEN 
, WORRYING ME... 



IF WE WERE MARRIED, 
WOULP YOU CARE IF 

I playep tennis 

EVER 1 / PAY? 





I UJOULPN'T CARE 
IF YOU PLAYEP 
ISHUFR^BOARP EVERY CAY! 




BOOKS 


BERNARD SHAW: 

Collected Letters 1911-1925 


ness of Britain's leader* and the fatuousness of 
war propaganda. In the wave of indignation 
over Gentian atrocities, he ironically suggested 


Edited by Dm H. Laurence. 989 pages. 
$45. 

Viking, 40 West 23d Street, New York, 
N. Y. 10010. 


BLOND1E 


MILLIE WENT TO A PAT 
FAF&A AND LOST 30 
POUNDS 



Reviewed by Richard Eder 

T HERE was no silence in George Bernard 
Shaw. This exuberant prodigy, who was so 
deeply devoted to common sense that he knew 
it could only ravish when expressed by extrava- 
gant paradox and exercmiry, was profoundly 
mukieal , and his music criticism was one of a 
number of things he did better than anyone 
else. He had every note and played >L The only 
thing be didn't play was the rests. 

Fifty of die 578 letters in this third volume of 
a projected four-volume collection are ad- 


dressed to Shaw’s grand opera buffa of a jpas- 
i Mrs. Patrick Campbell. They 


BEETLE BAILEY 


YOU REALLY 
LIKE THOSE 
U.S. SAVINGS 
VOHD6, PON'T, 
YOU, COStAOlt 


YEAH, X LIKE THE 
IDEA OF EARh/JN© 
MONEY WHILE X 


BEETLE SAYS THAT 
EVERY PAYDAY 



sion: the actress 

are a dazzlement of some self-concealment ana 
a great deal more self -revelation — Shaw was 
Thunder struck though not dumbfounded, of 
course, when she published them — but it 
would have been nice to have one of her lines 


as well: 

"When you were quite a little bay,” she once 
rote, "someone should have said 'Hush' just 


wrote, 
once." 

Shaw, according to Dan H. Laurence, editor 
of this collection, wrote several thousand let- 
ters a year for most of his 94-^year life, all the 


while producing plays, criticism, prefaces, 
pamphlets and journalistic i 


: essays. The volume 
of the writing is clearly related to its largeness 
of spirit, as Laurence points out. The roost 
extraordinary thing about the man was his 
faith in discourse as a way of attacking prime- 
val zrig&L 

Laurence has chosen letters to reflect just 
about every imaginable aspect of Shaw's inter- 
ests, entanglements and humors. Because of 
the tune covered by this volume — 1911 to 
1925 — the central portion is dominated by 
World War L Shaw’s rage over the stupidity of 

the conflict s timnlai es fim lo some of ms most 
trenchant political writing; later, the damage 
and the less of his friends' sons introduce a 
blacker note. But there was plenty of wit in the 
blackness. 

He antagonized many people and frightened 
his colleagues at the supposahy fearless New 
Statesman by his ridicule of the shortsighted- 


Sohitioo to Friday's Puzzle 


the only really effective atrocity: Shoot til 
women under 50, effectively ensuring that the 
country will be able to conduct no future wars, 
except by bringing in foreign wNes. a step that 
clearly would work to dilute nationalism. 

At the same time, be believed that, once it 
was be g u n , the only solution to the war was to 
win it. a German victory being worse. This led 
him to reject Irish nationalists who counseled 
neutralism or assistance to the Germans. He 
corresponded with them with the utmost sym- 
pathy. but argued for reform and wartime 
cooperation with Britain. 

He never hesitated to teU disagreeable truths 
even to those closest to him. though he told 
than most bewitchingly. He wrote a young 
singer friend that she would do belter singing 
“Annie Laurie” on the streets than taking 
endless voice lessons; but there was a point: 
Performance is the real instruction. He wrote 
Mrs. Campbell that her ladylike version of 
Eliza was minin g his "Pygmalion.” He wrote 
the widow of the iQ-fated explorer Score, point- 
ing out the justice of a book that parliy criti- 
cized Him . Her friends round this scandalously 
impertinent, but it is probably ibe kindest and 
most healing letter anyone has ever written to 
the victim-survivor of a Great Legend. 

Shaw would insist on every penny be could 
get for his plays, yet when a producer found 
himself on the point of bankruptcy, he wrote 
the man’s lawyers, postponing his claims — 
amounting to today's equivalent of perhaps 
$100,000 — indefinitely. When a nun asked 
him to buy a £10 raffle ticket, he objected that 
giving makes enemies. “Perhaps that is why 
God refused to give Jesus Christ anything, and 
made him buy what he wanted with his blood," 
Shaw wrote. But he sent a check, plus six 
pennyworth of stamps for the bank fee. 

He would instruct anybody about anything: 
on how to bea painter, oa the civilizing use of a 
university education (almost as good as joining 
the navy), on how to rehearse a play. His letters 
to actors reflect his extraordinary insight into 
what makes a great performance, and. like 
many other things he wrote, areas valid today 
as they .were then. 

There is an extraenrdinary series of letters to 
an eccentric would-be biographer who insisted 
that Shaw's mother was a villain. Shaw argues, 
jokes and turns alternately angry and compas- 
sionate. What he does not do is give up rm his 
correspondent. Perhaps that, more than any- 
thing else, is the quality that keeps his intelli- 
gence, his enthusiasm and his in transigeni par- 
adoxes so largely relevant to us. 


□on 

□no 

□□□ 

ana 


|B|R|Y|N| 


naan 


DSTO 


□ 

□ □□□□ 

□l 

□I 


M 


A L 


a 

□ 

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□ 

a 

□ 

n 

a 

a 

a 1 

□ 

□ 

a 

a 

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m 

a 

□ 

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s 

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a 

a 





a 

a 

□ 

i 

□ 

s 

a 

a 

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a 

□ 

a 

0 

n 

□ 

a 

a 

a 


Laurence’s editing is a major work When 
the series is complete, there will be about 2A00 


TE 


S E R 


rs os 


IS 

1 


□ 

a 

a 

a 

□ 

0 

i 


a 

n 

□ 

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□ 

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u 

23 

a 

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a 

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a 

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letters chosen out of the tens of thousands 
surviving. The selection might be different but 
could hardly be better. Sometimes I could have 
used, in the notes preceding each letter, an 
additional bit of information about the recipi- 
ent or the circumstances. 

An English reviewer notes that Laurence, 
prefacing a letter in which Shaw writes of a 
wearying day that featured two weddings and 
his sister’s death, writes: “The editor of these 
letters, by an intriguing coincidence, was bom 
early the following morning.” After years of 
gathering and editing Shaw's words, Laurence 
feels that he has become a figure in Shaw’s life. 
So, after a few days' reading, do we. 


7/18/85 


Richard Eder is on the staff of the Las Angeles 
Tones. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagramed deal, six 
diamonds is clearly an ex- 
cellent contract, and was 
reached efficiently. With nor-, 
mal breaks it is easy to make 12 
tricks, and on a good day one 
might make 13. But the trump 
break was not normal. 

South received a helpful 
club lead and won with the 
jack. He led to the diamond 


ace and inspected West’s dub 
i with some 


discard with some dismay. He 
resigned Himself to losing a 
trump trick, and made the 
slam ty taking a spade finesse. 
Oik heart loser was discarded 
eventually on the dub ace and 
the other on the spade ace. 


Later the; 

to South that he could and, 
should have made the slam 
more safely without relying on 
the spade finesse. Foreseeing 
the possibility of a bad trump 
break he should have led to the 
spade ace at the second trick 
and ruffed a spade. Then, 
when a tramp lead to the ace 
exposes the trump situation, he 
can niff another spade. 

The next move for the de- 
clarer is to cadi the dub long, 
cross to the diamond queen 
and throw a heart on the dub 
ace. Then another spade ruff 
reduces South to two tramps, 
and he can exit with a heart to 
score his two trump tricks at 
the finish. 


NORTH OB) 

♦ A Q 9 7 5 
9 1042 
0 AQ 
48 A42 

WEST 
+ CM43 
9 Q 083 
6 — 

46 Q 10 8 7 3 

SOUTH 

♦ J 

C A 8 7 

9 K 1098832 

♦ SI 

Bob oMoo wn Wto nM fc U» 
HUOF 


EAST 
*8 88 . 
5X15 
♦ J734"; 

*985 


1* 

2W.T. 

3* 

9* 

ro 

Watt 


Pass 


3 d 

3 O 

4 <? 
3 ♦ 


led tbadobi 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Bubka Becomes First to Pole Vanlt 6 Meters 


PARIS (UPI) — Sergei Bubka of the Soviet Union, competing in front of his 
chief rivals' home audience Saturday at the Paris International track a 


trackand field meet, 

became the first man to break the six-meter barrier in pole vaulting. 

D..LV I ' _ / * J J-j - f.* -fr.i 


Bubka, obviously going for a record, did not begin vaulting until the bar was at 
ted for it to be moved to 6.00 (19 feet 8 W inchest for his next 


5.70 and then wai 

attempt On his third try his chest brushed the bar, but it remained in place. 

Bubka, 22, bettered bis own world mark of 5.94 meters, set in Rome last Aug. 31, 
when he first lost the record to Frenchman Thierry Vigneron and then won it back 
in one of the most dramatic pole vaulting confrontations of the decade. 


Vigneron and Pierre Quinon, the Olympic gold medalist from France, chose not 
to compete in Paris. Vigneron has held the world record four times and Quinon 


once, but both have been overshadowed by Bubka in the past year. 

Bubka broke Vigneron's record of 5.83 meters on May 26, 1984, by clearing 5.85; 
be took it to 5.88 and 5.90 over the next two months. *T must like this date, because 1 
set the record at 5.90 last July 13 in London,” Bubka said. 


IAAF Refuses to Reinstate Nehemiah, Gault 

ATHENS (AP) — The International Amateur Athletic Federation cm Sunday 

iPrlwl nimlrMfirync Ku iJnhnnol Tt/iAftiotl T AniYiio totm n— D mhioMa 


rejected 
Willi 


. Jie Gault for reinstatement of their amatair track standings. 

Said IAAF President Primo Nebiolo: “We want to maintain the * matron - status.’ 
He said that Nehemiah. the world record-holder in the 1 10- meter hurdles and a 


i'fcueunau » i?oi recoin oi i£.» seconds sou stands; ne is tne only nurd 
break 13 seconds. He had said he wanted to compete again inte rnatio nally. 

Baker Leads U.S. Women’s Open Golf by 1 


SPRINGFIELD, New Jersey (AP) — Kathy Baker shot 4- under-par 68 Saturday -m 
and held a one-stroke lead over Nancy Lopez and Judy dark after three rounds of 
the U.S. Women's Open golf championship. 

Baker took the lead on the final hole, rolling ina 15-foot birdie puu from the right 
side of the green. She finished with an open record (rf 2 10 for 54 holes on the 6^74- 
yard upper course at the Baltusrol Golf Chib. The old mark was 209, set in 1980 by 
Amy AlcoU. Clark’s third-round 65 set an open low-round record on a par-72 
course. Lopez a carded 71 despite putting problems. 

On Friday, Lopez shot her second straight 70 for a one-stroke ova- Janet Coles 
and Vicki Alvarez (both had 69s). On Saturday, each shot 71 and w»e two strokes 
behind Baker. Baker had shared the first-round lead with Lopez and Janet 
Anderson, but Tell back Friday with a 72, while Anderson carded a 73. Jan' 
Stephenson, who opened with a 71, sided to a 74 the second round. 


Edwards Ahead by Stroke in PGA Tourney 


WILLIAMSBURG, Virginia (AP) — Danny Edwards shot 3-under-par 68 

ithiraiound 


■ M0 MMM V* “y 4AINWVU J-UI 

Saturday for a one-stroke lead over Mark Wiebe, who carded 64 inthe 
of the Busch Classic golf tournament on the PGA tour, * 

Lon Hinkle, who led the first two rounds, was still ahead when he made (he turn,. 



Garcia Ejected, Jays Dejected 


Complied by 0w Stuff From Dbpaufta 

ANAHEIM, California — Some 


nights, there is the feeling right 
n’t be 


from the start that things won' 
going your way. 

Toronto Manager Bobby Cox 
fell that way Friday night He filed 
a protest when his leadoff batter, 
Damaso Garda, was qected by. 


FRIDAY BASEBALL 


umpire Deny! Cousins for throw- 
ing his hdmet after making tbe first 
out of the game. 

Nothing got better for the Blue 
Jays, as Doug Deduces hit two 
home runs off All-Star pitcher Jim- 
my Key and drove in all the Angels’ 
runs in their 5-3 victory. 

Garda disputed a called strike, 
then. Cousins called another while 
Garda still was arguing. Garda 
was Reeled when he slammed his 


helmet down after grounding out 

“You throw your helmet, you're, 
supposed to be fined 5100," Cox 
said. Tve seen it 100 timer Pd 
rather talk about the game. They 
beat us." 

DeCSnces’s opposite-field homer 
to right in the second inning fol- 
lowed an infield single by Mike 
Brown, making the score 2-6. In the 
sixth. Deduces homered to left, 
after singles by Brian Downing and 
Brown, Tor a 5-0 lead. Key had 
entered the game with the league's 
second-lowest eamed-nm average. 
ZS9. 

Twins 3k Ttem Tx In Detroit, 
rookie Greg Gagne singled home 
Thu Teufel from second base with 
one out in the seventh to make 
Minnesota a winner. 

Yankees 6, Rangers 0: In New 
York, Dan Pasqua hit two bases- 


empty home runs and Don Mat- 
tingly homered with two on to back 
Ed Whitson’s four-hit pitching 
against Texas. Whitson has ‘given 
up j ust six earned runs over his 47K 
innings, for a 1.14 ERA. 

Orioles 10. White Sox 3: In Bal- 
timore, Mike Young hit a twxKim 
home run and Rick Dempsey drove 
in three inns with two doubles 
against Chicago. 

Indians 5, Royals 4: In Cleve- 
land, Brett Butler’s twoout single 


**hi 








ft 




nBbt 

VANTAGI 

4 P oor-\ 


off Dan Quiseiibeny in the 11th 
scored George Vukc 


Andujar Is in AUrStar Funk 


— .. n y , --mw m mm* mwmmw iv — «**w, OhU6 UUM1U "UVU 6U. UUKL\lV Ulb 1 III ||j- 

but took two double bogeys and two bogeys on the back nine, finishing with 76 and' Sergei Bubka 

tied for seventh. •* s Good fortune again on July I3tk 


Corrptied by Oar Staff From fXspaidm 

ST. LOUIS — The Sl Louis Car- 
dinals' 15-game winner, Joaquin 

Andujar. apparently will not pitch 

for the National League in the AO- 
Star Game because bis feelings are 
hurt 

There has been no word from the 
league on whether he would be re- 
placed on the team. 

Ik w^teing'snubbed hytiie Na- 
tional League manager, Dick Wil- 
liams of San Diego, because Wil- 
liams had intimated that whoever 
won Friday night — the Padres' 
I^MarrHoytor Andujar-— would 
start Tuesday night. 

Then Hoyt and reliever Goose 
Gossage went out -and pitched a 
three-fitter far a 2-0 triumph over 
the Car dinals and Andujar. 

Tve got 152 inning * and 9 com- 
plete games." said Andfiar, whose 
record is 15-4. “I don t have to 
prove anything to anybody. He' 


talked like LaMarr Hoyt is belter 
than I am against the American 
League. He treats me like a dum-- 
my." 

Asked later if hie might change 
his mind, Andujar replied, “When I 
talk, it comes from my heart When 
Lmake a derision, if s made." 

“What I said was there was a 
heck of a rivahy between two pitch- 
ers,” said Wilbams, explaining but 
not apologizing. “I really think the 
game will go on without him. 

Tmuot the guy thatsdected die 
pitchers. The 12 {league] managers 
each sent in a man, not voting for 
their own. There were some thing 
like right relievers and 16 starters. 
The only thing I have to do is name 
the starting pitcher, and IH be 
proud to do just that” 


Hoyt, 12-4, went seven fining s 

Jr Frid 


for Friday's victory. He gave up 
two hits, struck oat two, walked 
none and retired the last 15 batters 
tic faced. (AP, y Pi) 


ovich from 
third base to Seat Kansas Gty. - . 

Brewers 5, A’s 3: In Oakland, 
California, Robin Yount drove in 
three runs with two ringlge and a 
homer to support Ted Higuera’S 
five-hit pitdung for Milwaukee. - 
Red Sox 5, Mariners 4: In Seat- 
tle, Wade Boggs's two-out infield 
single capped a two- run ninth that 
gave Boston its victory. 

Dodgers 7, Cobs 4; In the Bar 
tional League, in Chicago, Greg 
Brock hit two two-run home rims 
far Los Angeles. New teammate 
Lea Mamszefc tripled in a run in 
the eighth to tie the game, 4-4, and 
. then scored on Terry Wfitefirid’s 
double. - - - 

Pirates 3, (Hants 1: In Pitts- 
burgh, Ridc-Reuschri smalefihome 
a ran and, with Joint Candelaria, 
held San Francisco to seven hits-* 
Reuschriwcmforthed^ith time in 
his last 10 derisions. 

Braves 7, FMBks 4 : In Atlanta, 
Dale Morphy, capped a five-run 
ninth with a two-out, three-run 
hdmer against Philadelphia. 

Reds 5, Expos 4; In Cincinnati, 
third baseman Tim Waflach of 
Montreal, named earlier Friday to 
the AD-Stirr team, made a throwing 
error with two out in the 11th to 
allow the winning nu to score, . 

Mets 3, Astros 2: In Houston. 
Rafael -Santana’s twoout single m 
.the 10th scored; New York tea# 
mate Howard Johnson.' fUFI, API ■ 

























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 15, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


; y. s ^ :ht f \ 
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lS *1lYs.v C- - ■ ^^Ocu^R 

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lilCC ft * JUn *L| 

SIS.T. w-,1* -v. rTha *tt.Jt 

«* okiirJJyiJ 


•v. ** •.•£**. ^ 

it r.sr :aj*.-.. . .. ^ 


Rugby Tour Halted by New Zealand Court 


» pwaar.; 
orv -.f »/.. 

jei'uiSf j >*8* 


ivl JBJ- i. 

•. « rr. •.-. u« iiujng ttv . J V 

tORM^f J; . HaSS 
:r uld „S 

Y* : pc.«»rs:i.r..s -aid. 

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klilvTir.J!-- •' 

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Complied by Ow Staff From Diipalcha 

WELLINGTON. New Zealand 
— A High Conn judge on Saturday 
granted a temporary injunction 
stopping the national All Blacks 
rugby team from leaving ou a tour 
of Sooth Africa. 

The court ruled that there was a 
strong prima fade case for the 
tour's not proceeding. The injunc- 
tion restramed. the team from leav- 
ing Wednesday for a 16-match tour 
that was to include three games 
against: the Springboks, the South 
African national team. 

An injunction was sought by two 
Auckland lawyers who amied that 
the tour was against the New Zea- 
land Rugby Uniat’s objectives of 

prompting, fostering and develop- 
ing the mart in the country. 

Initially, their case was ruled out 
by the thief justice, Sir Ronald 


Davison, who agreed with the 
union that the action was "frivo- 
lous.” But the lawyers then made a 
successful approach to the Appeal 
Court, which overruled Davison's 

finding that thoe was UO C856 10 

answer. 

That sent the matter to the High 
Court, but with no time for a full 
bearing before the team was due to 

depart, the lawyers sought an im- 
mediate res t ra ini ng injunction. 

Justice Casey of die High Court 
said he lmd to enmadw potential 
damage to the unioo as wefl as the 
public interest, especially since the 
tour was against the wishes of the 
government and parliament and 
was likdy to cause violence in both 
New Zealand and South Africa. 

The union's lawyers argued dot 
the tour was legal, was the union's 


prerogative and should go ahead as 
planned. 

Thft mghy ltnirm ’c rhaimwmj CeS 

Blazey, said he was ‘Very disap- 
pointed — the tour arrangements 
cannot proceed.” Another union 
official, Ron Don, said be was “ap- 
palled” at the decision. Still, Blazey 
was quoted as saying the union 
would appeal the ini unction on 
Monday. 

John Minted a spokesman for the 
organization Halt AIL Racial Tours, 
said he was “absolutely delighted” 
at the decision, saying it was a 
v indicati on of the protests by thou- 
sands of New Zealanders against 
the tour. 

Id Johannesburg, Dank Craven, 
president of the South African 
Rugby Board said: “If Ces Blazey 
says the tour is off, it is off. 


“The South African Rugby 
Board will have to wait for official 
confirmation from their New Zea- 
land counterparts,” Craven said. 
‘There have wen reports that the 
New 7/gfemd board might recon- 
sider, but officially I have no com- 
ment It is the New Zealand board 
who must deride." 

A 1976 AD Blades tour of South 
Africa was a major reason for Afri- 
can nations’ boycotting that year’s 
Olympic Games; violent protests 
accompanied the 1981 tour of New 
Zealand by a South African ream. 

This year, the tour’s opening 
match had been scheduled for July 
24. Critics of the tour have said U 

would lend rapport to the South 
African white- minority govern- 
ment’s apartheid policy of racial 
separation. (UP I, AP) 


Dodgers Win 6th in a Row , Lead Division 


Compiled by Our Stiff From Dupacha 

CHICAGO — “All of a sudden, hitting has 
become infectious," Los Angeles Manager 

ere won their third straight from Chicago!^?, 
and their sixth in a row overall 
With the triumph, the Dodgers moved into 
first place in the National League’s Western 
Division, a half-game ahead of the San Diego 
Padres. 

The Dodger offense came from some unlikely 
sources. Bob Bailor drove in three runs with a 

SATURDAY BASEBAIL 

suicide squeeze bunt and a bases-loaded single, 
and Bffl Russell batted in two runs. 

But left-hander Fernando Valenzuela needed 
little more than Dave Anderson's leadoff home 
r un as he limited the Cubs to just five hits in 
pi idling a complete game. 

“He's something,” Lasorda said. The Jod 
was pitching like he had a one-run lead and in 
this ballpark, with the wind blowing out, you’ve 
got to have great stuff to bold up against a good- 

hi tting twain 

“And he’s a tremendous closer.” Lasorda 


added- To the seventh, eight and when “How many outs per i 


pitches nke we didn’t have one.” 

The Dodgers wasted no time in jumping on 
Lany Gura. Anderson began the game with his 
homer, and Los Angeles scored three nms in the 
third and four in the fourth to chase Gura. 

Valenzuela held the Cubs hitless through 3Vs 
innin gs before Davey Lopes ended the shutout 
decisively by hitting a 1-2 pitch into the left- 
field seats. Keith Moreland followed with a 
single before Valenzuela settled down and re- 
tired Jody Davis and Leon Durham to end the 

inning , “ 

Valenzuela strode out eight and walked two in 
going the distance for the Tlth time this season. 

Bailor's sacrifice bunt scored the first Dodger 
nm in the third after Steve Sax extended his 
hitting streak to nine games with a leadoff 
single, stole second and look third an Ander- 
son's singled. Bailor then dropped an excellent 
bunt on the squeeze play to score Sax lex a 2-0 
l ea d pbO Russell raided home Anderson, and 
scared himself when Enos Cabell doubled. 

Later, in the locker room. Sax was ribbed for 
trying to complete a doable play after his put out 
at already had ended the eighth nmmg - 


SaxT asked a 


Cardinals 7, Padres 3: In Sl Loins, Tommy 
Herr drove in two nms against San Diego to 
rapport Danny Cox’s 1 1th victory of the year. 
The Padres, who had led the Western Division 
since May 7, made three errors leading to three 


hit a three-nm home nm for Montreal the drive 
to deco left in the third inning b rining send 
starterMario Soto (8-10) to his sevenuamsecu- 
tive defeat. 

Giants 4. Pirates L In Pittsburgh, Dave La- 
Point scattered right hits and Bob Brenly hit a 
two-run homer for San Francisco, which ended 
a six-game slide. Jose DeLeon (2-13) again was 
the loser. 

Braves 13, PtuBes 5: In Atlanta, Bob Horner 
got four of his team's 19 hits against Philadel- 
phia and Dale Murphy hit his league-leading 
23d home run, with two on during a five-run 
second. 

MetsJO, Astros 1: In Houston, George Foster 
got four hits for New York, one a bass-loaded 
double, and Ed Lynch held the Astros to six 








*V' 



White Sox 10, Orioles 8: In the American 
League, in Britimore, Britt Burns, staked to a 9- 
0 lead, survived a comeback by the Orioles that 
included two homers by Gary Roemdte, one a 
grand slam. Bnms gave op right hits, but recov- 
ered to retire the final 10 batters be faced. 

Roenkke’s bases-looded homer came in a 
five-run fifth that brought the Orioles to within 
9-8. Roemcke had hu a two-run home run in the 
fourth after Eddie Murray walked with two 
outs; Mike Young hit Burns's next pitch into the 
right-field bullpen to make the score 9-3. 

Yankees 3, Rangers 1: fit New York, Phil 
Niekro held Texas to seven hits over seven 
jnwing g for his first victory since June 3. The 
Yankees won fra the ninth time in their last 10 
games, but Don Mattingly went 0-fra-4 to end 
his 20-game hitting streak, the longest in either 


SCOREBOARD 

Cycling I [" 


The Auocottd free, 

BLOOD SPORT — Luis Herrera of Columbia, above, 
winner of the 14th stage of the Tour de France bicycle 
race, and Frenchman Bernard Hinault fell in separate 
spills near Saturday's finish at Saint- Etienne. Hinault 
went down 300 yards from the line as several riders 
sprinted for second. Herrera, who finished alone, had 
fallen shortly before on a steep downhill leading to the 
wire. Both men raced on Sunday, Hinault placing eighth 
and retaining his overall lead, while Herrera came in 52d. 


Baseball 


MT 

*il! 

AKX*- - 1,! 

•r <3 t 6 ■’ ■ -*■ 


6 • ' 

* ‘ 

^ » 

Marti V 

» 4 :’«*> ?» 

in? ■*“= . » 

** c * 

1C <■*— - 



league this season. 

Niekro, at 46 the oldest player in the majors, 
ended apersonal five-game losing streak an Old 
Timers Day at Yankee Stadium. Said he: “Some 
of the guys were asking me if I was going to start 
both games.” 

A’s 2, Brewers Ik In Oakland, California, 
rookies Tim Birtsas and Steve Ontiveros held 
Milwaukee to five hits. Binsas walked three and 
struck out two over his 6M innings. 

Royals 5, fnfians k In Cleveland, Bret Saber- 
hagea earned Ms 10th victory, striking out a 
career-high nine, and Frank White and Dane 
Iorg each drove in two nms fra Kansas City. 

Tuba 6, Tigers 4: In Detroit, Roy Smalley, 
Mike Slenhoose and Randy Bush hit bases- 
exnpty homers to help Minnesota raise its season 
record against the Tigers to 7-0. 

Angels 4, Bine Jays 3: In Anaheim, Califor- 
nia, Bob Boone, the third pinch hitter of the 
ninth inning, lined a two-out, two-run single to 
left to beat Toronto. 

Marinas 6, Red Sox 5: In Seattle, Ivan Cal- 
deron scored from second to beat Boston on 
first baseman Bill Buckner's throwing error in 
the ninth. The Red Sox tied at 5 with a three-run 
ninth, during which Wade Boggs tingled to 
extend his hitting streak to 19 games. The Mari- 
ners ended a six-game losing streak.' (AP, UP I) 


j* 

it, 


Despite a collision with left fielder Len Matuszek, Las Angeles center fielder 
Ken Landreaux, right, managed to hang on to Richie Hebner’s first-inning fly. 


VANTAGE POINT/ Shiriey Povicli 

A Poor-Man’s Racetrack (1914-1985), RIP 


vAr .: - '- 


. V s >* 

ijnw**’ I* 1 * " ; . 




Hul 


h-k'*’ >. 


~ ■ ■T- - 


& tw- — . ' .-r 

• '•* ' r 

r.u V . 

.'-V , 

^"'^4 i " 'I'-' ".. ' 

\ . 4 ••.4 ^' b ' -r* * s 

M- 




Washington Port Service 

WASHINGTON —A racetrack 
was laid to rest Saturday, and one 
couldn't say the deceased was not 
much of a draw. The folks came in 
steady numbers, from over the 
highways and from out of the back 
roads in Prince George's County to 
pay last respects, and perhaps with 
a mind to cash a bet or two, which 
is a correct attitude on such occa- 
sions. 

It was evident early that the 
track was getting decent homage rat 
the day of its demise. Eddie 
McMullen, who presides over the 
press box, was relating that “the 
mandownstain who prints the pro- 
grams says this has been the busiest 
day of the year — by thousands” 

This was Bowie Racetradc (1914- 
1985), just before being committed 
to dust, with the last ticket cashed 
or sent fluttering to the floor, its 
totalizator lights doused for eterni- 
ty. Bowie would be no more. 

The track itself wfll be around 
for a while, as a dust of itself, on 
the promise it will become a train- 
ing facility for its bny-oat liquida- 
tors at Pimlico and Laurel But that 
is a lame p romise ; already in the 
wings are the developers, calculat- 
ing and waiting to seize on Bowie’s 
476 acres, ripe for housing and 
mtils and suck and cash-flow cum 
write-offs and balano-sbeet happi- 
ness. 

Saturday's final rites were not 
mournful, mid a big crowd mured 
sentiment with the steady pursuit 
of winners at the betting wickets 
(with sentiment finishing a well 
beaten second). There was nothing 
weepy among those who held a $50 
oacla ticket on the first race. 

The track people did attempt to 
mark the day by presenting a me- 
mento to each customer, a small 
glass tube containing the inscrip- 


tion: “Dirt from Bowie's finish 
line.” Cynics might debate it, but 
that's what the trade said. And 
some people were said to be buying 
an extra program as a keepsake of 
the day Bowie died. But sentiment 
did not appear to be rampant 
□ 

The fans, bigger trades, the state 
racing commission and the legisla- 
ture were counting Bowie out at 
last Somehow, they always appear 
to have it in fra tire most rustic of 
Maryland’s racetracks, the poor- 
man's track — the one on the other 
side of the tracks. In 1972, Bowie 
escaped extinction by one vote in 
the state legislature when native 
Prince George’s delegates brought 
ihdr clout to bear. 

They gave Bowie the worst of the 
r aring dates. Yet Borne not only 
survived, but the hardy breed of 
bettors made those dates the stale's 
most valuable, and Pimlico and 
Laurel were antsy to get into the 
act. Bowie's loyal bettors braved 
t urn , sleet, train wrecks and bliz- 
zards among other diversions. Nor 
would they take snow fra an an- 
swer. 

Bowie could talk back to its de- 
tractors. Which track in the state 
had the absolute best racing strip, 
favored by horsemen over Pimlico 
and Laurel? Hirscfa Jacobs, ope of 
the country’s most famous trainers, 
always chose to winter his large 
stable at Bowie. He galloped his 


charges on Bowie’s loam, which ne- 
gated the risk of soreness and iigu- 
iy that affected other horses in 
training at other tracks. 

“Hirscfa Jacobs would send his 
horses from Bowie to the New 
York tracks a n4 kill ’em up there,” 
remembered Joe Kelly, the astute 
raring writer of the late Washing- 
ton Star. In 11 different _ years. Jar 
cobs was the leading trainer in the 
nation. 


The special texture of the Bowie 
racing strip is a stray in itself , .if not 
modi noted in the track’s history. 
There, b ehind the backstreidt,” 
said McMullen, “was the tobacco 
farm owned by Mr. Mack. I don’t 
know his first name. Mr. Mack 
wouldn't seD his land to the track 
for a long time, but when he did 
they knocked down what used to be 
a big hm and took the din fertilized 
by afl those years erf tobacco plant- 
ing. Whatever the dements were, 
they had a racetrack that was the 
envy of all the others in the state.” 

On Saturday they were dosing a 

facility that in 1914 was bom out of 
wedlock, so to speak. For five years 

Bowie was an ^outlaw” Irak, un- 
recognized by the hoity-toity New 
York Jockey Chib, which rules on 
«irii matters. In the absence of 
pari-mutuel machines, bookies 
took bets. Five years later, Bowie 
became legitimate, getting its hr 
cense from the state and accep- 
tance from the jockey rinb blneo- 
loods. • • 

Many a Bowie stray springs to 
mind. In 1958, the first year of 
winter racing, thousands were 
stranded overnight at the track in a 
blizzard that made snow-covered 
igloos of every car in the parking 
lot. One stranded bettor, fearful of 
disbelief at home, sought assis- 
tance. 

He asked The Washington Post 
writer, the late Walter Haight, who 
had access to a telephone, to call 
Ins wife and explain he wouldn’t be 
home that night. Generously, 
Haight did so, rally to be met with 
rite retort, "Are you the same bum 
who called in for him last Saturday 

flight?" 

A Bowie horseplayer once had 
his pocket picked, but it wasn’t a 
total loss. A week later, his wallet 
was returned to him in the mail 
until an extra S50 added to its con- 


tents and a note that said, “Thanks 
fra die use of the funds in ques- 
tion.” 

A shameless presence on Bowie’s 
last day was Andrew Beyer, The 
Washington Post racing writer, a 
good friend who has missed no 
chance to bestow scorn on less- 
thaa-fashionable Bowie. With his 
fancy notions of Hialeah's palms 
and Santa Anita's mountain back- 
drop vistas, and (he mossy blueb- 
lood traditions of Saratoga and 
Belmont Park. Beyer has always 
scoffed at Bowie’s unvarnished rac- 
ing plant amid the scrub pines of 
Pnnce George’s County. . 

Except an those days when he is 

Bov^ *^ack^?ch’ for Beyer takes 
on a beauty rivaling the Taj Ma- 
hal's. 

Beyer couM noi decently wait to 
dance on Bowie's grave. In an arti- 


ging away again. The usual com- 
plaints — agamst Bowie's plant its 
parking fees and the too-nanow 
new seats in the clubhouse (Beyer- 


a bad day at Garden State). 

□ 

But Bowie folks always have 
been content with their lot. On Sat- 
urday they mixed enthusiasm with 
final respects, and comprised a 
meet-record crowd of 12J012. The 
1985 meeting showed -a 22,7 per- 
cent increase in betting over 1984 
and record handle of $1,715,598. 

The last race at Bowie .was a 654- 
furioug contest fra 54,000 daimert 
— the usual Bowie fare — although 
the track was proud of its SI 13,000 
Governor's Cup ora race earlier. 

The ninth and final race was woo 
by something called Perfect Park, 
who helped produce a pleasant S34 
exacta. About 10 minutes later, aD 
the tote board lights. went out for 
good. 


Tour de France 

MEM 

FOURTEENTH STAGE 
AnittMM wwpuam la Satol-RttooM 
(17SA KUomatars / 111 Mites) 
l. Lute Herram. cotemMo.4 nours, 54 min- 
utes. 32 sacDnds 

1 Ludo Pasters, Bttoium. 47 seconds ba- 
Nnd 

X Grrv LnMond, UX. :47 behind 
4 Hobart Forest. Fronca. ;47 
5. Eddv Sdutr s. Be latum. :47 
4 Pawl Wallen*, Bdslum. :47 
7. Padre DaUaadn, Spain, :47 
‘ ■ «. Hobart Minor. Britain. :47 
V. FaMo Parra, Colombia, off 
TO. stave Bauer. Contidn. 1'B 

11. Mare ModVrt. Franco. Jfc32 

12. Jan Wllnanta. Bateiura. 2:32 

IX Domtniqua Arnaud. Franco, 2:32 
' 14 Claude CrtquMtan. Batolum. 2:33 

15. Beal Brsu. Switzerland. 2:32 

FIFTEENTH STAGE 
SL EManata AurlHoc 
mu KUomatars) 

I. Eduardo Ouzos. Spain. 7:08:42 1 30-sec - 
oad bonus) 

• - X Lado Footers, Btrlolum. 9 minutes. SI 
seconds bsMnd U O iaoid bonus) 

. X Soon Koilv. Ireland, at 9:54 UO-stcand 
beaus) 

4 Gras Le M ona. UA. Same Time 
5JaarH*tiinppa van don Brands, Batatum, 
XT. 

4 UO Van Vital. Motherlands. S.T. 

7. Adrta Van dor Pool. Komertands, XT. 

X Barnard Hinault, Franca, XT. 

*. Mo re SarBoont. Batotum. XT. 

IX Ludwto Wllnanti. Behrfum, XT. 

IX Guv GaHapin, Francs. XT. 

IX Pascal Pofctson. Franca, XT. 

ix Stephen Nadia. Ireland, XT. 

14 Steven RaoU. Nethrrtonas. XT. 

U, wan Frabart, Franca. XT. 

fltNuUms 
u, m m jwwnn 

X Bernard Hlnoult, France. 77 hours. 47 
minutes. W seconds 

X Gres Lomond. UJX. at 3:32 behind 
X Stephen Roche, Ireland, at t:14 
4 Sean Kelly. Ireland, at 7:26 
X Steve Bauer, Canada at 8:23 
4 Ptill Andiron, Australia at 8:31 
7. Eduardo Chorea Soabv at >:55 
X joop Zoetemelk, Noth sc lands, at 11:20 

9. Niki Ruttlmana Switzerland, at n-J2 

10. FdWo Porta Colombia at 11:38 
IX Robert Millar, Brtteln, at 11:56 
IX Pascal Simon, Franca at 12:12 
IX Luis Herrera, Colombia at 13:16 
14 Pedro Delsada Spain, at 12:23 
IX Peter Wlnnen, Holland, at 12:47 
14 Robert Forest Fnmco, at 13:110 
17. Mare Mod lot Franca at 13:02 

IX Eddy schepere. Seloium. at 13^2 
17. Pierre Bazza Franca at 13:40 

2X Paul Hoatwdsarea BeUdwn. at 13^1 

WOMEN 

TWELFTH STAGE 
Semens to Sate^EHeme 

165 Kilometers) 

X Jaarmie Lonoo, Franca 2 hours. 7 min- 
utes, s seconds 

X Marla Cortina Italy, 2:07:35 
X Coral Roam- Dunn tee, US- 2:87:37 
4 Petra Stagtwrr. W. Germany, 1 mteutaSS 
seconds behind 

X wane LL China, l-JB bshlnd 
4 Janetta Parka Ui. 1 J8 
7. Phvllta Hinas. US. 1:38 
X Roberta Benanami. Itntv. 3:22 
9. Dabble Jenson. Canada, 3:24 
IX Vaterfe Slmannet. Franca 3:43 
IX Imewa Chiappa Italy. 3:44 
IX Botev Kino, UA. 3:44 
IX Posccde Ronucci, Franca 3:44 
U. Hotoen Hose, Nettierkanas, 3:44 

IX CMtte Odin. From, 3M4 

Overall Strartnes 

l. Marta Oaiini, llolv, n hours. 32 mlnutas. 
9 secoreta 

x Jeomte Lonoo,- Franca 13 minutes. 14 
s e c o n ds bdbd 

X Phvllta Hines, ui, 22:86 behind 
4 Cacila Odkx Franca 23:81 

X Domtekwe DamkmL Franca 24:25 
4 iMekta Chiappa, Italy. 24:44 
7. Janet lo Parks, UJ- 34:44 
X Heteen Hose, Nemortands, 27:02 
7. Owntal Broca. Franco, 27:4? 

TO. Datable Jamen. Cmo*. 27:20 

11. Poecato Renvcd, Franca 37:21 
U Carol Roaers-Ounrtina UJJ- »iJ) 

IX Petra Stephen-. Wed Germany. 29SO 
M. Roberta Bonono ml , Italy, 27:33 
IX Wore LL China 30:18 


Friday’s and Saturday’s Major League line Scores 


Football 
CFL Standings 


EASTERN DIVISION 


‘ 

W 1 

L T 

PF 

PA 

PIS 

Moot real 

2 0 

0 

55 

35 

4 

Toronto 

7 7 

ff 

52 

50 

2 

Ottawa 

0 1 

0 

22 

46 

a 

Hamilton 

0 2 

0 

19 

SI 

0 

WESTERN DIVISION 


Brit a mb 

2 8 

0 

67 

18 

4 

Edmonton 

1 1 

9 

35 

48 

2 

Sastahhwn 

1 1 

0 

71 

51 

2 

whmtoeo. 

1 7 

8 

34 

45 

2 

Catoorv 

0 1 

8 

18 

n 

• 0 


. FRIDAY'S RESULT 
Tortmo 2«, Saskatchewan 25 
1 .V- SATURDAY'S RESULT 
British CMumblo 25. Edmonton 10 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Las Aoaetes 188 HD 822-7 11 1 

CMcnae 100 218 880-4 7 0 

Hsrahber. Powell 151. Diaz (6), Nledsntwr 
(7) and Sdoada: Ru1lTven.Metadl H i 16). Fra- 
zier (7),Smlth U1 and Davta. W— Ntadenhier. 
4-X L— Smith, 64 HRs— Los Anpetoa Brodt 2 
<141. 

Stei Francisco SOI 808 800-1 7 8 

Pllt staurah HO IN BDl-3 7 0 

Gatt. MLDavfs (71 Mid Brenhrs ReuschtX 
Condstarla (7) and Pona. w— Rausctwl. o-z 
L— GaH, 44 Sv— Candatarta (71. 
PMtadebeda 108 380 880-4 6 I 

Atlanta MO MS 80S— 7 8 1 

Rowley. Tsimlva (8), Gorman tn.Aridarsan 

(7) and VlreMi Bedraslan, Como (6). Forster 

(8) Mid BensdlcL w r orster. 1-2. L— Car- 
man. 2-X HR — Atlanta. MurahV 1221. 

San Otaeo 801 DM DU-2 8 0 

SX Louis 808880 808-0 3 8 

Hoyt, Ga ss oea 18) and Kanaodv: Andular. 
Oavlev (7) Met Nleta Hum UU. W— HOVL12S4 
t^-Andular, 154 li e Goas ooe (18). 
Montreal 880 818 IN 88—4 U T 

andnnatl Wl 2N ON 81—5 13 • 

Palmar. CTCoonor W. RWMrao (41. Burfce 
(8). St. Clo Ira (18) and Fitzgerald; Postora 
Hume 16), Power (8), Franco (11) and Bllar- 
della. W— Franca 6-1. 1 — St. dalra. 3-X 
New York Oil 818 ON 1— * M 1 

Houston 881 ON 881 0-3 7 • 

Darting. Me Dowell (ID) and Carter: Niekro. 
DIPtno (0). Mathis (10) and Ashby. W— Dar- 
ling. 7-X L— Mathis. 34 Sv— me Dowell 17). 
HRs— New Yert, Strawberry (■). Houston. 
Ashby 15). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Teres NO DM 008-0 4 ■ 

Hew York 183 801 Hz— * 7 1 

Sebra. Resema 13). Harris (71. Stewart (8) 
oad Patrol! J; Whitson Mid Haney- W—WWt- 
■en, 54 L— Sebra, XZ HRs— -New York, Mat- 
tins I V (7). Pasaua 3 (31. 

Minnesota 181 TOO 1SO—3 s 0 

Detroit ON 118 NO-2 10 • 

Butcher. WanSe (7), Eutemlo W. Davis IT) 
and Laudner; Tanana, Btdr (7). Sctwrrer (7) 
and Melvin. W— Butcher. 64 L— Tanana. *4 
Sv— Davis (12). HRs— Minnesota, Enato (3). 
Detroit. Gtaean (18). 

Chicago HI 140 MO— J « I 

Baltimore 820 222 lUe-W 15 8 

Nelson. Gtaalan 15), Flreovld (6) and Fbk; 
Dlxoa Aase 16) end Dempsey. W— Olson. SX 
L— Nation, 54 Sv—Aaso (3). HRs— Chlcaaa 
Fisk <23). Baltimore. Young (71. Rtekan 114), 
Lyrn (16). 

Kansas Cl tv OW IN on DO-4 t ) 

Cleveland 018 882 IN 01-5 M 8 

udbrond, Beckwith (n.Qultenbarrv (18) 
and Sundbere; Romano, Barktov (V). dark 
(V). Waddell (101 and Benao, Willard (7). w— 
WiaddelLAX L— (Msenbenv. *4 HRs— Kan- 
m City, White (ill. OevetantL T abler (3). 
Castillo 43). 

TOraate ON IN 3**— 3 7 I 

CalHaraki UO 881 Ms— 5 7 1 

Key, Lamp (6) and Whitt; McCosklU. Moore 
(7) and Boano. W— McCoskllLS-X L— Key, 74 
S v Moore (17). HRs— Toronto, Barfield (14L 
California, DaCteces 2 (ID). 


Transition 


CM i CAGO— Designated Tom Paderak,eut. 
Haidar, lor reassignment, caliad up Jenv Dan | 
G baton, pttchor. from BuffaTO of lh« Ameri- 
can Association. 

SEATTLE— Announced restoration ol Hal ! 
Ke< ter, genera Imanasar and vlrepresktentot , 
baseball optr oH ons. 

National Laoeoe 

5T.LQU IS— E*tandtd the enraroGol Whit- 
er Herzog, ma nag er , thrauoh 198X 

FOOTBALL 

Hatton ol Foottsdl League 

CINCINNATI— Announced the retirement 
el Bryan Hlcfcs. safety. 

DALLAS— Stoned Crawfon) Kir. ouanL , 
and Need MkHora ana Karl Jordan, lira- 
backer*. 

LA. RAMS — Slotted Dale Hatcher, punter, i 
and Kevin Greene, linebacker. j 

PITTSBURGH— Announced IMreftraiiwiit ; 
at Jock Lambert, linebacker. 

SAN DIEGO — Stoned Tremaine Johnson, j 
wide receiver. 

SEATTLE— Stoned John hhl center, and 
AMgta DilukL rmsa tockla. 

WASHINGTON— Wohtod MW k Murphy, 
safety. 

HOCKEY 

Nafleral Hodnv League 

BUFFALO— Named Don Luce director of 
United States scout too. Announced me retire- 
ment ef Dm Moloney, de ten s e man. 

N.Y. ISLANDERS— Gave Afldero Knilur, 
rtow wtna, his imcandH tonal retoose. 

COLLEGE 

BRADLEY— Named Tam MonUml no oesit- 
tani basketball coach. 

BUCKNELL — Named Dick Rolllv aselstMit 
football coartL 

HUNTER N amed Rente EsoniMson os- 
sloiant women "l basketball coach. 

MON TANA S TATE— Named Don Outm as- 
sistant football ow etc 

Tulane— N amed Joilne Mat su naml wom- 
en's basketball coach. 

WAKE FOREST— Mamed Joe Soncnez 
wem«vs Bask* men coach. 


MDamekoe 883 MB 011-5 9 3 

OMdred *02 SM 1SO—1 6 2 

Htguera Mid Mora: CodlrolL Howell and 
Tetttaton. w— Htouera, 6-5. L— CodlrolL XX 
MR — Milwaukee, Yount (71. 

Boston BM 881 022-5 8 8 

Saettto 836 IN 888—4 11 8 

Kisen. Tniilllo (7), Clear (71 and Gedmon: 
Moore, Nunez (81. R. Thomas 17). Vnnde Berg 
(71. Long (7) and Koarnev. W— Tniilllo. 2-X 
Lr-Nunez 4-x Sv— Clear (1). HRs— Boston, 
Rice (17), Buckner (7), Gedmon («). Seattle. 
Kearney 15). 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
LesAneotos 181 4N 108-9 18 8 

Chicago 8H IN 808—1 S 8 

Valenzuela and SdOKia.- Gura, Bnnstar 
(4), Sorensen IS) and Davis, Lake (7). w— 
VOtenzueta. 18X L— Gura. XZ HRs— Los An- 
Mtae. Anders o n 141. Chicago. Lopes (8). 
Sea Francisco 828 828 108-4 4 0 

Pittsburgh 818 BN 088-1 8 1 

LaPoint and Branlv: DeLeon. Roblnsan 18) 
and Pena w— LaPoint 44 L — Qe Leon, 2-13. 
H Ro— San Francisco. Branlv (12). Pittsburgh, 
Thompson net. 


Major League Standings 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 



W L 

Pet. 

GB 

SL Louis 

51 33 

407 

— 

New York 

49 36 

-57* 

3V» 

Montreal 

ff 38 

563 

3 V, 

Cnknoo 

44 41 

418 

m 

Philadelphia 

37 48 

-435 

mm 

Pittsburgh 

39 55 

West Division 

J45 

22 

Las Angeles 

48 36 

J71 

— 

San Dtoao 

47 38 

-563 

to 

Cincinnati 

43 41 

J13 

5 

Houston 

43 44 

-494 

6to 

Atlanta 

38 47 

447 

lOto 

San Francisco 

32 SS 

J68 

17to 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DMstoa 



W L 

Pet. 

GB 

Toronto 

53 34 

409 

— 

New York 

48 36 

-571 

3to 

Detroit 

47 37 

468 

4to 

Balllmore 

44 40 

-524 

Tto 

Boston 

44 42 

.512 

8to 

Milwaukee 

37 46 

446 

14 

Ctevetand 

2B 57 

west Dtvtsion 

J37 

24 

Content la 

51 35 

JV3 

— 

Oakland 

45 41 

-S23 

6 

Kansas City 

43 42 

JW 

7to 

Chicago 

41 42 

494 

8to 


Seattle 

Minnesota 

Texas 


42 64 AM 9 
40 44 476 10 

35 SS J68 19to 


PttitadelMda 800 Hi lift— 5 13 1 

Atlanta 450 3M 02z— 13 17 1 

Hudson. Childress (2). Rucker (7) and Dkn; 
Mohler and Corona. W— Mahler. 13-7. L-Hud- 
MIL 44 HRs— Philadelphia. Schmidt 111). At- 
tonhx Muraiiv 123). Horner (U). 

Montreal 183 NR 020-6 7 1 

Cincinnati ON 810 811—1 7 1 

Gulllcksen. Reardon (8), Lucas (8). Burks 
(7) and FUzoerekt. Butera (8): Seta Buchan- 
on (■) and BllanteOo. w— GulUcmn. 84 L— 
Sato, 6-10. Sv— Burke 14). HRs— Montreal. 
Breaks (6). Cincinnati. Porker (16). 

Sue Dtoue BM HO MO-3 8 3 

SL Louis 004 US OOZ— 7 8 0 

woina Stoddard 16). Loftoris (61 and Ken- 
nedy: Co*. Lahtt 18) and Nlelo. W— Co*. 114 
L— Woina, l-Z Sv— Lahti (8). 

NOW York 083 148 188-18 M 8 

tfoustoe IM NO 888- I 6 3 

Lynch and Carter, Remolds (71: Knutson. 
Madden (5), Mathis (SI. Calhoun (7) and 
Ashby. Baltov (51. W— Lynch. 74 L— Knut- 
son, o-Z 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Tams 000 000 818-1 7 8 

New Torn 118 818 00*— 3 7 D 

Mason, Schmidt (8) and PetraJil: Niekro. 
RlBhettl island Wynegar.W— Niekro, 84 L — 
Mason. 5-9. Sv— Rlghetll (16). 

Milwaukee ON ON 888-8 S 8 

DOkkmd 820 ON OOs-3 7 0 

Darwin and Moon: Birtsas. Ontiveros (7) 
and Tetttaton. W— Birtsas. 5-Z L— OarwinjW. 
5v— Ontiveros Cl). 

Kansas City 038 ON 828-5 11 8 

CtavataBd ON HI 008—1 7 8 

Saberhauen and Sundberg; Bivlovon and 
Willard, w— Saaerhogen. 184 L— Blyleven.8- 
f. HRs— Kansas City. White 112). Ctevetand, 
mormon id>. 

Minnesota HO Bit 180-6 IB 1 

Detroit OH 112 080-4 f I 

Sctirwn. Wardle (6). Eutetno [61 and Salas. 
Laudner 171: Petry, Berenauer (7). Keman- 
aez (71 and Melvin. CastlUo (8). W— Scfirom. 
ML L— Petry, 104 Sv— Eutemlo (2). HRs— 
MtmwHdx Smalley (6). Stenheuw (4). Bush 
(7). Detroit. Garaev (4). 

Chicago 822 580 188-18 12 • 

Baltimore BN ISO 888— I I 1 

Bums and Fisk. Hill (I): D-Martlnu, Huff- 
man 14 1. TManim 14). 5J»wort (8) ana 
Dempsey. W— Bums. 74 L— OMortlnex 7-6. 
HRs— Chtaaaa. Baines (81. Baltimore Roen- 
Icke 7 (81. Young (8). 

Toronto IN NO 181—3 6 1 

California DM 8)1 082-4 7 1 

Stleb. Lovoito (8), Ac* or (9) ona Whin; Wilt 
amt Natron. W— Witt, 74 L — LOvelle. 3-0. 
HRs— Toranto. Oliver (2). Calltamla, Down- 
tea (6), Grtch (4). 

Boston 800 118 OBI— 5 11 2 

Seattle Bit 600 121-6 I 1 

Hurst. Stanley 19) and Gedman. Sax (81: 
Yeung, R. Thomas (81. vanoe Bora (9). Nunei 
(9). Snyder (9) ond Kearney. W— Snyder, m 
L— S tanley, 4-5. HRs— Boston. Evans UO). Se- 
attle, Davis (7). Bradley ()3),G.Thomas 114). 


Blanc paiN 

V-'—T. 


V, f > 



HOROLOGI5TS 

IB Naw Band Srat Maytia London Wl 
01-493 5316 


rv3- 







lull iSUiS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, MONDAY, Jl ; LY IS, 1985 


LANGUAGE 


E. M. Goran’s Vision of 'Universal Doom’ Hamburgers Didn’t Invent Hamburgers 


By Steve Silkin 

International Herald Tribune 

P I ARJS — EM. Cioran writes 
Ihings like: ‘To have accom- 
plished nothing, and to die of the 
strain." And: “If. in the past, I 
were Faced with a corpse, 1 would 
ask myself: ‘What good did it do 
to him to have lived? 1 1 now ask 
myself the same question in front 
of any living person." And: “All 
morning long. I repeated to my- 
self, ‘Man is an abyss, man is an 
abyss.’ It was. alas, impossible to 
think of anything better” 

He is often thought of as a 
hopeless pessimist. Which is fine 
with him. “My vision of life is one 
of universal doom." the 74-year- 
old Romanian-bom philosopher 
said recently in his Paris apart- 
ment. He emphasizes this by com- 
paring himse lf with Hamlet: “I 
belong to a people obsessed with 
‘the quintessence of dust.’ " 
Goran is the author of about a 
dozen books, mostly composed of 
philosophical aphorisms. He 
writes in French. About half his 
books have been translated into 
English. Among them are 
“Drawn and Quartered," “The 
Trouble With Bang Born," “The 
New Gods” and “Temptation to 
Exist.” Some are published in the 
United Slates by Seaver Books, 
others by Viking. “A Short Histo- 
ry of Decomposition" has been 
published in Britain by BlacfcwdJ. 

Although he is considered a 
philosopher, he says he is more a 
moralist, in the French sense of 
the word: “A moralist is someone 
who reflects, with skepticism, on 
Lhe human condition.' 

“My books are for young peo- 
ple. Older people don’t take them 
seriously. Except those in poor 
health. More or less condemned. 
Damned. The people who are 
very interested in my books, 
something goes wrong for them. 
That's a medical diagnosis. It's 
not necessarily neurosis. Some- 
where there is a disequilibrium. ” 
Is that good or bad? 

“It means that the person has 
ceased to be an animal. 

“A friend rang me up last night 
at 11 o’clock. He was in great 
despair. He said he was reading 
‘SyUogismes de I’Amertunie’ [Syl- 
logisms of Bitterness] and be 
wanted to thank me because it 
had helped him — on to an even 
greater despair. Bui that was 
stimulating for him. 





“Better to be in the gutter than on a pedestal 


“My theory is that you can’t 
fight against an inner state by 
diminishing it, only by intensify- 
ing. If you Uy to diminish despair 
with rational argument, it doesn’t 
work." 

Some critics find his pessi- 
mism, if that is what it is, loo 
much. The French magazine Le 
Nouvel Observateur called his 
work “the dandyism of nothing- 
ness" and compared his literary 
and figurative excesses to the po- 
litical excesses of the Cambodian 
dictator Pol Pol 

Bat others have been deeply 
moved by his writings. Susan Son- 
tag, in her introduction to “Temp- 
tation to Exist" (which his Ameri- 
can publisher, Seaver, has 
scheduled for a new paperback 
edition) wrote: “Cioran is one of 
the most delicate minds of real 
power writing today. Nuance, iro- 
ny and refinement are the essence 
of his thinking.” The French es- 
sayist Jean-Francois Revel calls 
him “a writer who thinks” and 
likes to quote him when discuss- 
ing European Community farm 
policy (“Civilizations begin with 
agriculture and end in paradox.”) 
Professor John Weaghtman of 
London University, in The New 


York Tunes Book Review, wrote 
of Goran's “intense pessimism.” 
and attributed it to a “point of 
view of a non-believer, condition- 
ed by Christianity and strongly 
attracted by a faith he cannot ac- 
cept." 

Cioran agrees with that analy- 
sis. He was born in 1911. on the 
slopes of the Transylvanian Alps 
in the village of Rasinari, the son 
of an Eastern Orthodox priest As 
a philosophy student he was 
greatly influenced by the French 
humanist philosopher Henri 
Bergson, but later abandoned him 
in favor of Nietzsche because 
Bergson “hadn't seen the tragic 
aspect of life.” Cioran's first 
book, published in Bucharest in 
1933, was called “On the Peaks of 
Despair.” Explaining the title, he 
said: “Whenever someone com- 
mitted suicide, the daily papers 
would say that ‘he took hs own 
lifeon the peaks of despair.’ ” The 
book was awarded the Young Ro- 
manian Writers! prize. 

Cioran was granted a scholar-, 
ship to study philosophy in Paris 
in 1937. “On the Tears of the 
Saints” was published in Roma- 
nia upon his departure, so he re- 


ceived the reactions from home 
by maiL “My friends were flab- 
bergasted, horrified. And my 
mother — I should have pub- 
lished this book after tistteath of 
my parents. My father was disap- 1 
pointed — no. not disappointed, 
nrnrred Resigned. 

Tt is a profoundly religious 
book. All the same, there are some 
veiy anti-Christian things in it. Of 
course it had no success, and van- 
ished.” It has not been translated 
from Romanian. Writing it, 
Goran said, he realized that he 
had no religious destiny: T was 
interested in religion, but incapa- 
ble of faith.” 

After deciding not to return to 
Romania, Goran lived as a stu- 
dent in hotel rooms in the Latin 
Quarter for 25 years. (He now 
lives in a set of converted maid's 
rooms in the attic of a luxury 
apartment budding near the Place 
de I'Odton; though he is not very 
tall, he has to duck under the door 
frames as be walks from room to 
room. The toilet is outside, in the 
hallway.) 

His money came mostly from 
scholarships and partly from 
books be wrote. Except for the 
first literary prize he was awarded 
in Romania, he has refused all 
prizes and awards. He will not 
name the ones he has declined, 
saying that would be pretentions, 
but among them are the Austrian 


national literary prize, which he 
refused in 1982, and France’s 
Roger Nimier prize, which he re- 
fused in 1977. Both carried sub- 
stantial award money. 

Tt is absolutely h umiliating to 
have to go and be thankful in 
public," he said. “When some- 
body wants to give me money, 
they must do it unofficially, like 
they gjve money to prostitutes — 
without the cameras and the 
press. Here we can speak of liter- 
ary morals. A prize destroys all 
the other bodes that don't win 
prizes. If y?u accept a prize, yon 
are a conqueror. 

T can't say I like anonymity. 
But I don't like propaganda for 
myself." In any case, he said, “it's 
better to be in the gutter than on a 

pedestal.” 

He reads mostly biographies, 
and the correspondence of au- 
thors. Years ago he wrote a study 
of F. Scott Fitzgerald's “The 
Crack-up.” Fitzgerald’s autobio- 
graphical confession begins: “Of 


course, all life is a process of 
breaking down.” Thus it can be 
considered a companion piece, if 
not an inspiration, of Cioran's “A 
Short History of Decomposi- 
tion,” his only work published in 
Britain (where it was “a total 
flop,” he said). 

Cioran does not read much phi- 
losophy, either — because of his 
dislike for the style. “I tried, espe- 
cially in French, to eliminate all 
scientific expressions and philo- 
sophical style, the awful jargon of 
philosophy ” This led to the apho- 
risms — closer to poetry than to 
maxima or proverbs — of which 
most of his books are made up. 
(In “The Trouble With Being 
Born” he wrote: “The aphorism? 
Fire without flame. It’s under- 
standable that no one wants to 
wants to warm himself by iL”) 

Stylistically, his greatest influ- 
ence was Paul Valery, eves 
though Cioran’s “Valery Face & 
ses Idols” is a vigorous attack 
against the French symbolist 
poet. He wrote it in an “anti- 
French mood," he said. 

He is working on a book for his 
French publisher, Gallimard, that 
he said would probably be called 
“Aveux et Anathemcs” (Avowals 
and Anathema). 

Although he says be is incapa- 
ble of faith, be is always ready to 
discuss God. 

“Whether or not God exists is 
secondary. What is important is 
that he is the last possibility of 
dialogue. You can’t exist in a 
void Nobody can stand to be 
absolutely, metaphysically alone. 
God is a kind of partner.” 

Goran's ultimate statements 
concern his grand preoccupation, 
suicide. 

“Tm theoretically an apologist 
for suicide. Bm as long as one can 
resist, one should All is worth- 
less, all is nonsense, but one 
shouldn't give np. 

“My best formula is: ‘Without 
the idea of suicide, 1 would have 
killed myself from the start' Th'e 
idea has played an imm ense role 
in my fife. Because of this idea, l 
can tolerate anything. It’s the 
only positive thing I wrote in my 
life.” 

It is the theoiy of suicide that 
he praises, not its practice: He 
wrote in “The Trouble With Be- 
ing Bom”: “Suicide is pointless 
because one always does it too 
late." 


By Ernest Gill 

I HAVE been working as a journalist in Hamburg. 

West Germany, for almost two years, during which 
time friends and relatives in the United States never 
tire of askingjust how it is to “live over there with all 
those Hamburgers,” as the local inhabitants call them- 
selves. But it was not until Walter F. Mondale chal- 
lenged Gary Hart with “Where’s the beef?" that I was 
prompted to delve into the origins of the word 
“hamburger." 

Hamburgers insist the hamburger is strictly Ameri- 
can. They argue that Hamburg, a port city, is famous 
for anything but grilled ground beef on a sesame seed 
bun. They pome, for example, to an array of Ham- 
burger pickled herring. 

Hamburgers, however, forget that Germans tradi- 
tionally enjoy «tmg raw ground meat seasoned with 
salt, pepper and onion juice. A version of this dish, 
made from ground pork and served on a cold bun, is a 
favorite on German breakfast tables. 

No one rails that a hamburger. Yet William Sheik, 
In his book “500 Years of New Words," says it is, 
indeed, the original hamburger, introduced to Germa- 
ny through the Hanseatic port of Hamburg from the 
steppes of medieval Russia, where the Tartars had first 
eaten iL 

In the mid- 19th century, Hamburg was lire major 
gateway for German immigrants bound for the United 
States. They brought along their native dishes, includ- 
ing Steak Tartar, the Tartars’ raw meat dish, a broiled 
variation or which became known in the United States 
as “Hamburg steak.” 

The word hamburger, according to the Oxford En- 
glish Dictionaiy, made its debut in The Walla Walla 
(Washington) Onion on Jan. 5, 1889: “You are asked 

if you mQ have “porkdiopbeef steakhaman deggham- 
burgersteakorhverand bacon.’ " Sherk says that if 
“they talked that fast, it must have been a fast-food 
outlet.” He adds that “when a chef at the Sl Louis 
Exposition in 1904 began dapping beef patties be- 
tween buns, the modem hamburger was bora,” to 
make its sizzling return to Germany almost 70 years 
later with the opening of the first McDonald's 
restaurants. 

Hamburgers, like millions of other West Germans, 
do eat hamburgers at lunch. McDonald's is by far the 
biggest burger bastion in West Germany. Germans 
have traditionally had a penchant for fast food, and 
line up dbow-to-eibow by the millions daily at side- 
walk kiosks to eat bratwursts, bockwursts, 
conywursts, and franks and weenies by tbdr various 

namwi 


.A. WRITER in the West German weekly Die Zrit 
warned not long ago not only of the perils of American 
fast-food culture, but also of “non-food Kultur" His 
words demonstrate the degree to which English has 
infiltrated German. 

One way German creates new words is to take two 
or more existing root words, slam them together and 
pin on prefixes and suffixes. Thus, a video recorder is a 
“Fernsehsendungsaufnahmegerfit," which means 
“television-program recording devioe." Why don't the 
Germans just say video recorder mid be done with it? 
The answer is that they increasingly do. especially 


when it comes to imported products and ideas that 
have their origins in English. 

A German can go into a fast-food restaurant and 
order “Chicken McNuggets und Pommes-frites." Pav- 
TV. Quiz-Show. Bypass-Operation. N o-ft'ame-Praduia. 
Computer-Floppy -Disk, Fantasy -fi/m-Freak. fitness- 
center, Star-War (with no final “s") arc now all 
German. 

Occasionally, a kind of reverse effect takes place. 
Recently, a British colleague at the news agency where 
1 work sent a translated news story to the alitor, only 
to have it sent back with the comment: “It’s an 
excellent story, except for the fact that there's no such 
word as ‘effenirity. " 

“Of course there is,” said mv colleague, reaching for 
the Concise Oxford English Dictionary. “I use it all 
the time.” 

“You use it all the time in German, you mean," said 
the editor. “You’re thinking of German Effekliiitfi. 
The English word is effectiveness.” 

L West Germany, nowhere is the English influence 
stronger than in youth dang. Breakdamx, . Bodybuild- 
ing, Aerobik and Rapmusik hare taken their places in 
the vocabularies of the no-future, -recycling, windsurf- 
ing, computer-hacking generation of Punks, Peppers 
and Teds. A Pipper, incidentally, is not an under-the- 
counter heart stimulant employed as a drug of choice, 
but West Germany’s version of the preppie. Teds are 
young people who look and act the way James Dean 
and Natalie Wood did on the screen some 30 years 
ago. 

Hello or Hr are useful greetings that sometimes 
supplant the more traditional Gruss Dtch (which 
means “greetings to you") or Hallo among young 
Germans. Yuppies are an In-Group in the big cities, 
although most people who are described as bring 
young urban professionals don’t know what the acro- 
nym stands for in English. 

Yuppies put on Hot-Style (e.g.. Shocking- Pink- 
Sweatshirt) and become high (happy). They put on 
their College-Shoes (Yuppie loafers) and go to the 
Fit nessc enter for some Stretcher. They would never be 
caught Tramping (hitch-hiking). That is definitely out . 
It is important to have a Cool-Look, or even a Stfer- 
Cool-Look if you’re young. That also entails giving 
your parents or teachers a Shock from time to time ana 
geiting a Turn-On from the latest Soundtrack- LP on 
your Hi-Fi. 

The expression “turn-off" does not exist in German 
youth slang, although young people use the teem 
Horror-Trip to describe' all that is distasteful. It is 
possible to go to the Marie (but never “the movies") to 
see a Revival — or a Comeback — of a sophisticated 
film with plenty of Suspense and Action. It helps, too, 
if the film has a Hollywood Happyend, after which you 
part not with an aufWiedmehen, but with an OK. bye- 
bye, Baby. 

Not surprisingly, this is also the generation primari- 
ly responsible for making the hamburger a German 


Ernest GiB, an editor with DPA. the German press 
agency, and a freelance journalist based in Hamburg 
wrote this article for The Hew York Times. William 
Safire is on vacation. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By PhaMt Cal your load IHT representative with your text. You 
win be informed af lhe cost ■nmedrarety, and once prepayment a 
made your ad wilt appear wither 48 hoin. 

Coefe Th* bode rale ■ J980 per fine par day + load (asms. There are 
25 letters, signs end spaces in lhe first fine and 36 in the Mowing Ire*. 
Mrenum spots is 2 fates. No abbreviations accepted ' 

Credit Omh: American Express, Deter' s Chib, Eurocord, Master- 
Card, Access aid Visa 


SWITZERLAND 



USA RESIDENTIAL 


SAN DIEGO 
CALI FORMA 

Offarmg breatht aki n g Bay, *k)*te & 
mounter, vie ws, a riaoous residence 
surrounded by aw 2 kehiy landscaped 
acres it prmti^ow Lo Pfciya New En- 
gland style, 5 bedrooms with bash, 4 
staff bedroom^ tare court, swemwig 
pool 8. ho* tub. 

For further detail please contact 

AGED! 

26 bis Bd PrinsesM Charlotte 
Monto Goto -MC 98009 Monaco 
TeL i^mjAOO JErf. 155) 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


•- ■ - 
. . . - . ■ 


• vv- 



75008 Porta 
Trio 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
562-7899 
rats foe earr 

sHoer - LONG tmu 
HATSFOKSAU 


ii iili iKfrfii' 


ST. GBtMAM DE5 PRE5. Stack, chw- 
actor, l»flh cfaa, futiy equipped, dtdv 
en, with Shot, phono, color T.V. F6000 
irinfmum 1 month. Tdb 222 84 02 day/ 
397 13 17 eves. 


5TR by JcnSn des Plata. Cute oport- 
ment. F2000 weefc/F6000 month Trii 
261 77 49 or 563 22 11 6tf 4219 


Porta: (For dowfied only): 
747-464X1 

EUROPE 

Amsterdam 2636-15. 
Athene 361-8397/360-2421. 
Brueseis: 343-1899. 
Cop e nh a g en . (01)329440. 
Fratfafart: (069) 7267-55. 
In — ani m 29-SB-94. 

Lisboa: 67-2793/66-2544. 
London (01) 8364802. ' 
Ma drid . 455-2891 /455-3306. 
Mhm (02] 7531445. 
Norwapr (tt? 845545. 
Romm 679-3437. 

Sweden: (08) 7569229, 

Tel Aw: 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

UNITED STATES 


* tt r.'iV;.).*': 


Beanos Aires: 41 4031 
JDepi 312) 

Corecon 33 US4 
Cuoyamrib 51 4505 
IW 47 852 
INamiuu. W 05 11 
San Jams 22-1055 
Sa nti ago . 6961 555 
5ao Paolo: 352 1893 

MWOUEAST 

Bahrain: 246303. 
Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar. 416535. 

Saudi Arabs* 

Joddaht 667-1500. 
U.AJL: Dubai 224161. 

BAR EAST 
Bangkok: 390-06-57. 
HcngKon* 5-213671. 
M*d*BV707 49. 
Seoul: 735 87 73. 
Shwot* 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Toky* 504-1925. 


MeBsawn* 6908233. 
Sydney: 9295639. 957 4320. 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

Paddington, Quoa n stan d: 
369 34 33. 


[Ipjjli ,, 



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ri (Oh - 5 Upp» Church SL, Doti 
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BANKS 

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jreviousty port of nationefaed French 
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BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 
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BUSMBSei A REAL ESTATE 
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MW CHAMPS ELYSB5 

RENT 

your oma 

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UE SATHUrt, 8 rue Copemrc 
75116 Paris- Tri, [33 11 753T5 59. 
Trim le sotri 620 IB3F. 


YOUBOmCENPAnSOGHTON 
THE CHAMPS &Y5SS 

UflOimr SHOflCH) OFHOSS 
Telephone on muii ng, Tribe, ftm 
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ACTE. 66 Chomps Byrne s Pont 8th 
Teh 562 66 So. Thu 6491571= 


USA ( 714 ) 898-2182 

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_fl| 


daks corner 
'WELCOMES 
MEMBERS OF THE 
AMERICAN BAR 
ASSOCIATION 
TO LONDON 


JnN 'j k. Of nor 
:^r,yr. 

• cycler ^ vV •