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The Global Newspaper 
:*., -' Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
; . _in Paris, London, %ui&mT 1 
Hone Kong, Singapore!^#* 
The Hague and Marseille* 

WEATOK DATA AFPEAK ON PAGE 18 

No. 31,850 


INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

_ ZURICH, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 7 


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Coalition 

Eddy Elections 
Possible ; Martens 
Gtnsulis King 

' The Associated Prea 

BRUSSELS — Deputy Prime 
Minister lean Col and five other 
cabinet members from his party 
resigned Monday, a move that 

eminent of Prime Minister fvil- 
faed Martens. 

Louis Michel, chairman of the 
Liberal Reformed Party, Mr. GoFs 
French-speaking conservative par- 
ty, said after a meeting; to review 
Mr. Gd's surprise decision that the 
five had “expressed their solidari- 
ty." 

“The logical consequence of this 
solidarity is resignation," Mr. Mi- 
chel said 

Bdga, the Belgian national news 
agency, reported that Mr. Martens 
had gone to the Royal Palace Mon- 
day night for an emergency meet- 
ing with King Baudouin and that a 
cabinet meeting would be hdd 
Tuesday. 

The withdrawal of the six cate- 
net members from Mr. Martens’s 



Heavy Rains Hinder 
Sudan Famine Aid 

Higher Death Rate Belie^likely 
As Washed-Out Roads Block Food 


or 


By Clifford May 

New Yak Times Serna 


KHARTOUM, Sudan-Heavy 

rain^ anextraw^ pbimon^^ ^bSncS? r arc 

SliSSSS^SSSS^ nw'fractiMhig only sporadically. 
hmdCTing efforts to deliver food to ^ aix&A by &e 


along rivers and wadis, river beds 
dial are dry most of the year but fill 
rapidly during the rainy season. 

Several airstrips in western Su- 
dan have also been dosed or are 


fei 


UUluClUlg CU\H La IUUCUVH 1UUU LU . _ M . . ■ J„„S ‘ -ij U., .L- 

hnudreds of thousands of famine ^ “ rb 5?8P organized by the 

Jean Gol * E£2ffS322S£tt SSn U mjtS?.'i^3 

S KtuIom °f fewer than 40,000 people daily. 

A brief statement from the Royal 8111 worker say that an-- 

daoe said the king “holds this can_bd re l?rred and ntwmal uj. -igne ran be only pan of the 


Palace said the king “holds this WB , mK i mis tuonc am x mu* ion ui uic 

resignation in suspension. ” It did solution in a region with few land- 

“ “ ■ „ B ^ Feopte in 

Mr. Gol is one of three deputy maease sharply. ne ~- . . . . _ 

prune ministers. Sudanese officials say 450,000 , TTw drought m western Sidan 

His move came two days after a people are most seriously at risk in 

riiamentaiy debate on the gpv- Ihc Region, called Darfur. There have also b<^ S^d seasonal 

ament's handling of the May 29 Darfur, where three million peo- 


But relief workers say that air- 
lifts alone can be only pan of the 
solution in a region with few land- 
ing strips and so many people in . 
need. 

The drought in western Sudan 


But Doctors 
Doubt Spread 

Compiled h Our Staff From Dispatches ers at Beihesda Naval Medical 

BETTIES DA, Maryland — Can- ^' e ? ler - . , , , , . 

cer was found in the tumor re- Dr- Dale Oiler, who headed tire 
moved from President Ronald s«-person surgical leant, quoted 
Reagan’s colon last Saturday, his jP e president as saving of the ma- 

■ ^ « - . . ■ ■ — » **T’i*» .itn.i In'll In'll C 


• U1UI6WUI6 iwu uaj» tuiu a ueupic are uiu>l Bciimuiv ai iu& ui -r,~ . . ■ - j 

pariiamentaiy debate on the gpv- Ihc Region, called Darfur. There have also been good seasonal 

emmeni’s handling of the May 29 Darfur, where three million peo- 

riot at the Europlan Cup soccer pie live, has been in the gri^of S *3* 

final between Liverpool and Juven- drought for three years; some parts a ^?J^i a H5S 
tus of Turin. Mr. Gol and other have been without significant rain- 

members of his party called for.Mr. faU for as much as^ 5a yens. Zi^SSSS SSAS 
Noihomb to resign/ In the Iasi month, however, there ^ ^ 

Mr. Nothomb^ also a depuw nSlopmem experts stress, too. 

prune minister, refusedu) quit, and that ma^faSne is almost always 

Mr Martens won a. 109-3 vote of the resolt of several factors, of 

Sgaiss sa aaaaa scsis&s.'s 

j3Sfes“i“ tassssas 


riot at the European Cup soccer pie live; has been in the grip of 
final between Liverpool ana Juven- drought for three years; some pans 
tus of Turin. Mr. Gol and other have been without significant rain- 
members of his party called for, Mr. fall for as much as seven years. 
Noihomb to resign. In the Iasi month, however, there 

Mr. Nothomb, also a deputy has been more rain in Darfur than 
prime minister, refused to quit, and in all of last year, according to 
Mr. Manens won a. 109-3 vote of reports received by the European 
confidence in the parli ame nt. Most Co mm un i ty. And the relief workers 
opposition membera of the 212- say the most recent rains have been 


^ \ ’ -!Jf ' ’ 

\ • • •• ' ' .sjjt... 

bnn 

President Reagan and iris wife, following iris operation. 


doctor said Monday, but there was lisnamjwlyp. *Tm gl3d that that’s 
no evidence that the malignancy 0UI -. . . . 

had spread. President Reagan will have have 

Dr.' Steven Rosenberg of the Na- Cancer of the colon is a »ide- 
‘ “"J c “ CCT Wute. one of problem in industrialized 

Pastel _ 

that there was “every “pern Lion” to ^ -‘ r ^ ular ^imuuLioas 
that the cancer was restneted to die of ^ jj vcr 0l j,; f body 

“ d to Ss ure they’re in the same 


no spread will utc place. healthy condition ’they're in lo- 

“All of these findings are opti- day" Dr. Rosenberg said, 
mis tic to the future course of the Earlier Monday. Larn Speakcs, 
disease. There is every expectation- ihe White House "press spokesman, 
that ihe local problem has been reported that President Reagan 
cured," Dr. Rosenberg told report- had continued to make “superb 

progress" following the surgery. 

a » -m Dr. Oiler, the chiel surgeon at 

m lf gy\f Bethesda Naval Medical Center 

outside Washington, and other 
“ doctors saw Mr. Reagan on Mon- 

Q. n • - day morning before the president 

Strong rosinon conferred with members of his 

D staff. 

George Bush, the cabinet and him- Mr. Speakes said that Dr. Oiler 
self playing key roles. had reported that “the president 

Mr. Regan will be in charge of continues to progress superbly 


1IB. wiiuuiawm UI urc WHIP haiw mm in nl UUSUUUU KUVdlUUCm dgl IkUllUlIU 

net members from Mr. Martens’s In a report issued a week ago, a Jr®'; and pricing poliries. 

coalition of Christian Democrats bipartisan committee charged po- i? 81 The population of Darfur is 

and conservatives could force an bee with failure tojnwent the yio- nomadic “ the north and 


tarty general election. Regular elec- lence, in which British fans at- 
tions were scheduled for Dec. 8. tacked Italian rivals. 

The coalition took office in 1981. The riot was denounced around 
Mr. Gol. the most prominent (he world and English teams were 
French-speaking conservative in barred from playing in matches on 
the government, submitted bis res- the contmenL 
igoation to protest the refusal of Most conservatives wanted Mr. 
the interior minister, Charles- Fer- Nothomb to resign but Mr. Mar- 
dinand Nothomb, to resign after urns supported him 
the Brussels soccer stadium riot in “No political error can be 

_L!-L no j u... n , j r • - ■ 


, ro _ ^ w settled or seminomadic in the 
ugees. Relief operations are being ^ 

overtly hany ced. On.so me days bndaape of Daftr gram 

were at a near sta n dst i ll. 

In many parts of Darfur, flood- 

ine has made dirt tracks unusable ^ the Sahara. Norrnal- 
■"6 “*“> iy m n fj i of the area is and dunnp 

and prevented rood trucks from x’J Z? St,™. 

Raduag relief cangu and villages 

Some tr^c drivers have refused 
to make deliveries to remote areas 


During Recovery, Regan in Key Role 

President V Chief of Staff Fortifies His Strong Position 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President 


ate and then flies to Santa Barbara. George Bush, the cabinet and him- 
Califomia, in August for further self playing key roles. 


_ _ , „ Mr. Regan is working out of a which decisions and paperwork his sureerv ” 

Ronald Rragans chief or staff, spare ofGce at the Bethesda bospi- reach the president, a task he AH of Mr Reagan's vital signs 

£SH^ d i n T 'li^5?V£.Sf ISISfS ^ down from lhe 10 perform before Mr. Rea- wen. within normal ranges “and 

figure w White House plans for president s suite. Every day this gan s illness but one that has now die same as for a nerson who has 

operating the government while the Seek, following his daily 8 AM. been centralized under his control. 

president recovers from abdtmmal Wtete House “^eratkms meeting" Mr. Regan plans to select a new qU otS as hS'said 

surgery, according to White House with senior stiff members, he plans budget director for the president’s Earlier Mr. Reagan's doctors 


almost overnight. 
Nonetheless, officials sav 


which 38 pereons diedm May-The blamed on the interior minister ot fof fear of becoming stuck and , a 
m tenor nunister. a Chnstian Dem- any other government memberr stranded in deq> mudfln Geneina. 

ocrat, is in charge of the police. Mr. Martens said. jnuarc cf^it winino in uwnn>» because of destructive practices 


AH of Mr. Reagan's vital signs 
were within normal ranges “and 


ocrat, is in charge of the police. Mr. Martens said. track driver^ willing to venture i^^ 

Mr. Gol 43. who is also justice In Liverpool police said Mon- out have tripled their fees, aid offi- “JL tlS 8 ™ 

minister, offered a letter containing day that they had arrested 26 per- dais said. . 

his resignation Ur Mr. Martens, sons for questioning about alleged An unknown number of people ine organized movement 
who relayed it to King Baudouin. involvement in the riot. have been trilled in flash Hoods (Contmned oa Page 2, Col 


Mr. Regan plans to select a new quoted as hating said, 
budget director for lhe president’s Earlier. Mr. Reagan' 


Reagan's doctors 


An unknown number of people 
have been killed in flash floods 


M Quiddy end Essity 

Im 

HERALD TR'au&E 


The organized movement of ref- 
(Coatmned on Page 2, CoL 6) 


aKlefi - to dimb into his limousine for the approval shape a legislative com- had said the probability of the to- 

The aides said Mr. Regan was 20-minute trip to the hospital to promise in the effort to reduce the nuVs being cancerous was greater 
extending what had already be- review issues with the president budget deficit and oversee a resbuf- than 50 percent, 
come an increasingly powerful role, and deal with crucial paperwork, fie of key White House personnel, gut they said that, even if the 
Mr. Regan, who had been the After reluming to the White aides say. growth proved malignant, they be- 


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Suicide Blast 
Kills 10 Near 
Israeli Zone 

- The Associated Prat 

TEL AVIV — A suicide bomb- 
laden automobile bearing Red 
Cross markings was Mown op by 
its driver at the edge of the Israeli 
security zone in southern Lebanon 
on Monday, killing seven Lebanese 
civilians, two mOioamen of IsraeS- 
barked forces and the driver, Israe- 
li media and miliiaiy sources said. 

■ In Beirut, artillery and gun bal- 

0 ties killed four persons on Monday 
after Walid Jumblat, leader of the 
leftist Druze Moslems, vowed to 
“fight unto death” to remove Presi- 
dent Amin GemayeL 

The car carrying the bomb was a 
Peugeot 504 with one person in- 
side, sources said. It exploded near 
the village of Tib nit, five miles 
(eight kilometers) north of the Is- 
raeli border, at a checkpoint lead- 
ing into a buffer zone that is pa- 
trolled by Israeli-backed 
militiamen of the South Lebanon 
Army, the sources said. 

The explosion occurred on the 
road linking the headquarters- of 
the South Lebanon Army in the 
Christian town of Maijayoun with 
the Moslem Shiite town of Naba- 
tiyefa outside the security zone. 

After two suicide-bomb at t acks 
on July 9, the South Lebanon Army 
dosed off the four crossing points 
v linking the security zone with other 
Japans of Lebanon. But on Monday 
the pedestrian crossing at Ras al- 
Bayada on the Mediterranean 
coast was re-opened. Israel radio 
reported. 

Israel withdrew most its troops 
from Lebanon a month ago but left 

1 behind some soldiers, primarily to 



Mr. Regan, who had been the After reluming to the White aides say. growth proved malignant, they be- 

secretary of the Treasury, assumed House, he is expected to speak to Mr. Regan, for example, has al- litrved they had removed all the 

broad authority ova the opera- Mr. Reagan ova the phone several ready discussed the budget job with cancer, 

tions and staff of the White House times a day, the only presidential Commerce Secretary Malcolm A. ^ Speakes described the presi- 

whep he took over as chief of staff aide to have this continual contact. Baldrige and Drew Lewis, the for- 4^ ^ prepared for any 

^w;i&)QlhS ago. But now he will be Mr. Regan has already drawn up ma transportation secretary. A se- eventuality." 

saving as the key link between the plans with • his staff on how the tu'or White House offidal'said both “The president is pretty much of 


bite House and the president’s White House will operate duxing men had voiced reluctance about m optimist,” he said. “He's an up- 
suite at the Bethesda Naval "Medi- ihe recovery period, which is ex- taking the job. beat person." 

cal Center in a Maryland suburb of peeled to last six to eight weeks. ~ 


“The president is pretty much of 
a optimist,” he said. “He's an up- 


Washington. 


The chief of staff, a forma Wall 


White House aides said that Mr. 
Regan, 66, is emerging as one of the 


Mr. Reagan’s wife, Nancy. 1 
the hospital in order to be 



Beyond this, White House offi- Street executive, has said privately 11,051 powerful chiefs of ^ staff in ha husband when the doctors re- 
dais say, Mr. Regan plans to serve that he expects the president to the president’s illness ported their findings from the mi- 

35 the main channel between Mr. adopt a “light duty schedule” and oa ? pkjjCGd the chieT of staff square? croscopic examination of the tu- 
Reagan and the day-to-day opera- T ha t he views his own task as spar- ly in the center of decision making root. Mrs. Reagan’s press secretary, 
tions of the White House after the Lag Mr. Reagan as much wo 


as on domestic and foreign policy. At Jennefer Hirsh berg, quoted her as 


president returns there to trouper- possible, with Vice President (Cbmimied on Page 2, CoL 1) (Continued on Page 2, Col. 2) 

In Exile 22 Years, Militant Battles South Africa 


By Glenn FrankeJ 

Washington Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG — For most of his adult 


have been other voices urging the African Na- placed spark — a police murder in Soweto on a 
tional Congress lo change tactics and abandon hot weekend, for example — could set off the 


revolutionary violence. 

ujuai U* rnaouim Recently Mr. Slovo, an architect of the revo- Asked if he expected to mum in his lifetime 
hfe Joe Slovo, the white MmiuM. and hi lionary movement's sabotage campaign, de» as a free man to a black-ruled South Africa, Mr. 

Johannesburg lawyer who has been trying for a to break precedent and speak out public- Slovo replied, “Absolutely yes." 
generation 10 overthrow the wmre-mmomy goy- ^ ^ a three-hour interview at a clandestine Mr. Slovo’s story, along with that of his late 
eminent of South Africa, has been on the run. location he derided the present “reforms" advo- wife, is a long-running drama of resistance to 
As a militant protest organizer he endured a cated by the South African government and white rule. But it is also a story or a lost 
decade of legal harassment inside South Africa reaffirmed his movement's commitment to generation of white opponents of apartheid, of 
before fleeing in 1963. Since then be has con- armed straggle as the only way to compel real people who surrendered and scorned the many 
ducted a campaign of violent sabotage from change. privileges while society bestowed on them, 

euk as a top mfluaiy official of the outlaw*! ^ g ov0 ^ confined pu blicly for the first Miss First and Mr. Slovo were two of the 
African National Congress. He has survived ^ 0 f staff of the group's secret leading white intellectuals who seemed to domi- 

^SMsmation attempts, the murder of his wife, Umkhonto we Sizwe —“Spear of nate the freedom movement in the 1950s. Before 

the South African academic Ruth First, and his ^ Nation/Hn Zulu — he had been involved in she was prohibited from writing or speaking 
owm expufcion last year from Mozambique, planning various bombings of government publicly. Miss First was responsible for joumal- 
wbere he had operated for a half-dozen years, buildings and strategic installations that have islic exposes of some of the cruder aspects of the 
To the South African government Mr. Slovo, killed more than two dozen people and shaken spartheid system. Mr. Slovo was a co-author of 
58, is Public Enemy No. 1. the evil mastermind South Africa for five years. the Freedom Charter, the ringing 1955 docu- 

directing a crusade of terrorism and murder and Above all Mr. Slovo stressed that despite the 1X16111 that many hope may someday serve as 
manipulating blacks inside his movement with a African National Congress’s recent setbacks in South Africa's declaration of independence, 
script written in Moscow. To many of the gov- Mozambique and Swaziland, where the move- .Mr. Slovo says they worked hand in hand 
emment's foes he is a hero, and his late wife, a mem's operations have virtually been shut yriih black leaders such as Nelson Mandela, now 


hot weekend, for example — could set off the 
final conflagration. 

Asked if he expected to return in his lifetime 



Tin ABO*** Prea d pc ted a campaign of violent sabotage from change. 

American Bar Association Goes to Westminster 

Warren E Burger, chief justice of the United States, addressed the opening session of the „ ■ aIleropli ; . t S UI T e L military wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe — “Spear of 

American Bar Association on Monday at Westminster Hall in London. At right is Lord the Nationrin Zulu— he had been involved in 

Haflsham, Britain’s lord high chancellor. The 10,000 delegates attending a fivtxlay convention w^lKad^D^iedSr S-ES the , variou5 ^ government 

also heard ftirae h^iAara. Ttacber mm * Uhe ™id » “ SSSSSJJSSSfeSSlS 

adopt a voluntary code denying excessive publicity to airime hgackas and other terrorists. 5g> ^ Enemy No. 1. the evil mastermind South Africa for five years. 

— — directing a crusade of terrorism and murder and Above all Mr. Slovo stressed that despite the 

manipulating blades inside his movement with a African National Congress's recent setbacks in 
TT Y~t 7 ¥ ¥• TT |tr r script wri Uen in Moscow. To many of the gov- Mozambique and Swaziland, where the move- 

f / V f /¥lfi¥!># , 6 mM/ C#“ I 6 emment's foes he is a hero, and his late wife, a ment’s operations have virtually been shut 

KJ UofyW rr Cfffr UW IIUMW martyr. down, he viewed South Africa as moving slowly 

-*■ For years Mr. Slovo avoided puteidty. But but inexorably toward a major upheaval 

DolioAntPr HlllfitratAfi flasll nn fninniiinist Trjulp the last year has been one of ferment and re- !o “Burger’s Daughter," the South African 

Jtieiicopier oaie uiusirares Udhll on U )mmunib l iraoe evaluation, both inside South Africa’s white novelist Nadine Gordiroer writes that “Commu- 


For years Mr. Slovo avoided publicity. But but inexorably toward a major u| 


ring slowly jailed for life, and the late Albert Luthuli, presi- 
aval. dem of the African National Congress and a 
ih African Nobel Peace Prize winner. Bui others contend 
1 “Commu- titat communists like Mr. Slovo and Miss First 


4 

? l--et=p5 


act as liaison and back-up for the rens was 
2,000-member South Lebanon copter Ii 
Army. cessful f 

Mr. Jttmblai’s threat and the bat- when bt 
ties in and around Beirut came in gregarioi 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pan Service 

BONN — For years, Kurt Beh- 
rens was regarded by Hughes Heli- 
copter I nr. as one of its most suc- 
cessful foreign distributors. Even 
when buyers seemed scarce, the 
gregarious Dane and his West Ger- 


ban civilian aircraft sales lo North exported to potential adversaries. 
Korea. The most intractable disputes 

The Bonn government cleared have arisen ova products that car- 


him of any wrongdoing after con- ry U.S. restrictions but are not on 
eluding that the helicopters could the Cocom list or arc restricted in 
not serve military purposes. Mr. some European countries. In cases 
Behrens showed that they could be where Washington has tried to 
used only for such purposes as punish foreign distributors of U.S. 


r uling establishment and within the organiza- nists are the world’s last optimists” So it is with became obstacles, pushing the movement lo- 
tion that seeks its demise. There have been Mr. Slovo. He says be believes that the next five wa T < ? ? prearranged goal- 
voices urging the government toward fun da- years could mark the breaking point for white Although both Jewish. Mr. Slovo and his wife 
mental change before time runs out, and there rule, and he dings to the idea that a single, well- (Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 



spile of the arrival on Sunday of man firm, Delta-Avia FluggoSte 
Syrian military officers to oversee GmbH, was getting impressive or- 
ihe disarmament of Moslem mili- tiers around ihe world. 


transport or agricultural spraying 
and that any attempt to turn them 


odocts for selling to prohibited 
yerx, allied governments have 


uas in West Beirut and at Beirut 
International Airport. 

Prime Minister Rashid Kararni 


When a deep recession afflicted 
the aircraft industry in 1983, Mr. 
Behrens was stiS going strong. He 
received orders for neatly a hun- 


into gunships by adding missile objected vehemently to those ef- 
pods would prove stracmrally im- forts to apply U.S. law on an “ex- 
possible. tra territorial" basis. 

Five months later, the embargo 

remains in effecL It bas taken Mr. convnncoUfter a thoroudi mvesti- 


EVSIDE 

■ Voyager-2 is heading toward 

a close encounter with Uranus 
in January. Page 3. 

■ UN conference on women 
opened with appeals to avoid 
divisive political issues. Page 5. 


, when a newly formed elite army Hugha’s reduction nut at the ^ about the sale Tiad been ro- 

Jorce takes ‘positions assigned to it ume. He rrfused to disdese tte Th e 8 ndi a -Avia case is coasid because Bonn found that it 

' ■ H* capital" final destoanon of. the amuafl ] D^ja ^ ^ ova the sale; 

The force consists of 300 Leba- and Hughes executives did not ^ mti^i^ North Korea is not a forbidden 
nese Army soldiers who wiU ova- press the issue, according to Mr. fTT S™5L' client for West Goman firms, civil 

helicoptos are not on the Cocom 
list and Lhe helicopters never 


nese Army soldiers who will over- 
see the dosing of militia offices in 
the Moslem sector and end their 

admid^ation offidds^io^e- sion with his family 1 ^en the ^ 'l^^T^s^th^lHdiewd 

quested anonymity. ntng news announced tfaal the U.S. alecomroeraaJ and secunty neem. ^ f£ . ^ Md his 

Referring to President Gemayel government had placed his campa- Washington wants to listen the rinn intobankruptcy, as a stem 
and his Christian Phalange Party, ny on a blacklist for selling 87 heh- transfer of .tecmidogy to Commu- exam pi e yj other foreign distribu- 
Mr. JumWat tlte transport and copters to North Korea. Hugh® nistoHuitnes, while the Eurqperas tors who sell to outlets proscribed 
tourist minister in the unity govern- and other U-S. firms were banned are seeking greater hade through a hv U S. law seemed excessive and 
mem, said: “It’s either they kill us from selling any more helicopters more liberal definition of secpmy- ^usulied. ’ 
or we kill them." or spare pans 10 Delia-Ayta. related products. Through the Par- be no rational fear 

Speaking at his Chuf Mountain Mr. Behrens could hardly believe js-based Coordinati n g Committee about compromising security inter- 

fleadquarlers southeast of Beirul his eyes and ears. He was proud of for ^Multilateral pqtori Controls the technology in ques- 


mg between VS. and European P 1 ™ 1 ,or wcsl 

^Ona&turday night in February, goveromentst^tradewilh^ S^d^thf hScopters 
Mr. Behrens uws watching Eden- country, and it comes as 

™,b hie f*>mihr the eve- the Weston albes strive to recon- re !? ed . w ^!: 


These officials said they believed 
that forcing Mr. Behrens and his 


divisive political issues. Pages. 
BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ IBM reported that profit fell 
13 percent in the second quarter 
from a year earlier. Page 9. 

■ U.S. business inventories fell 
0.4 percent in May, the steepest 
decline in over two years, the 
government reported. Page 9. 

SPORTS 

■ The Baltimore Stars won the 
United States Football League 
title by beating the Oakland In- 
vaders, 28-24. Page 19. 


mem, said: “It’s either they kill us 
or we kin them." 

Speaking at his Chuf Mountain 
'headquarters southeast of Beirut, 
he sai4 "There shall be no solution 
as long as this tyrant and this party 
in office.” 


West German law. which, unlike Japan have agreed on a list of coo- 
that of rite United States, does not trolled items that should not be 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


TOMORROW 

Deaths attributed to a compa- 
ny's product cause a scandal 
that haunts not just the Grm but 
its workers. Lite at a company 
under fire. In Insights. 



Prime Minister Bob Hawke of Australia, left, greeting George P. Shultz, the U.S. 
secretary of state, at a breakfast meeting Monday in the Australian capital. Page 6. 


e 






Power While 
President Is 


(Continued from Page 1) 
i he same time the president's wife. 
Nancy, has come to rely increasing- 
ly on Mr. Regan, a factor that fur* 
(her solidifies his position. 

"Don has positioned himself to 
be an extremely powerful chief of 
staff who's in charge of the whole 
show." said one White House aide. 

The current situation has paral- 
lels to the period in 1981 after the 
attempt on the president's life. 
Then the chief of staff. James A. 
Baker 3d, who exchanged jobs with 
Mr. Regan last January, emerged 
as the dominant figure in the White 
House after the president. But Mr. 
Baker was part of a triumvirate and 
shared power with longtime Rea- 
gan aides who had access to the 
president and considerable lever- 
age within the White House. 

Mr. Regan, in contrast, faces no 
rivals for the president's ear. And 
even before the illness, be made it 
plain to the senior White House 
staff and administration officials 
that he largely controlled access to 
Mr. Reagan. 

(n cementing his power in the 
White House, Mr. Regan has 
brought in several aides from the 
Treasury Department They have 
assumed central roles and, to some 
degree, have rankled a number of 
key White House officials. 

One official brought in by Mr. 
Regan, Alfred H. Kingon, who is 
the cabinet secretary and a deputy 
assistant lo the president is now 
assuming more control over do- 
mestic policy matters, While House 
officials said. In the process, Mr. 
Kingon and John A. Svahn, a long- 
time aide to Mr. Reagan who is the 
assistant to the president for policy 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. JULY 16, 1985 


Colon Cancer a Problem in Rich Nations wo 


IRIEFS 


Donald T. Regan 

development are en gaged in a con- 
flict over responsibility. 

Several White House aides said 
that Mr. Svahn would probably 
leave his post at the end of the year. 
Mr. Regan will play a key role in 


finding their replacements, en- 
abling him to solidify his power 
even further. 


“Don is dearly in charge,” said 
one ranking White House aide. 
“He sees [be staff as his staff. He’s 
the one the president relies on." 


By Susan Okie 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Industrialized countries 
are experiencing what one expert terms a “pre- 
ventable epidemic" of colon cancer and Ameri- 
can specialists hope that President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s surgery will spur the public to learn more 
about how to prevent the oftenTatai disease. 

Colon cancer, which many experts link to 
diet, is second only to lung cancer in frequency 
and as a cause of cancer death in the United 
States. An estimated 138,000 new casts will be 
diagnosed during 1985, and 60,000 Americans 
will die of the disorder. 

In Europe, the incidence of colon cancer is 
similar to U.S. rates. The disease ranks second 
in cancer incidence among males in Europe and 
in some l^atin American countries, and between 
third and fourth in females. Incidence is much 
lower in Asia and Africa. 

A white male in the United States has a 6 3 
percent chance of developing colon or rectal 
cancer, and a white femal e a 6.8 percent chance. 
About half of those who get the disease die of it 

The large intestine is able to contain a slowly 
growing tumor within its walls for many years, 
making colon cancer one of the most curable of 
malignancies if it is detected before the growth 
breaches the intestinal wafl. Yet the intestine 
also hides tumors effectively. 

"The colon is kind of a dumb organ. All it 
knows how to do, essentially, is to take in water 
and to store wastes. It doesn't have nerve end- 
ings that teD the rest of the body what is happen- 


ing" when a tumor is growing within its walls, 
said Dr. Paul Sugar baker, chief of colorectal 
surgery at the National Cancer Institute. 

As a result, much research has centered on 
finding ways to reveal colon tumors early, when 
they are curable. Bui the perfect test still does 
not exist. 

Other studies center on why colon cancer 
rates are highest in certain affluent countries — 
the United States, Canada and Australia —and 
lowest in Africa. 

The cheapest screening for the disease, a 
chemical test for blood in the stool, is unreliable 
because so many other disorders produce bleed* 
mg. And the more accurate tests, barium enema 
and colonoscopy, are expensive and uncomfort- 
able. 

The American Cancer Society recommends a 
rectal examination be performed annually on 
everyone over age 40, and that chemical tests to 
detea blood in the stool be done annually after 
50. 

The society recommends an examination us- 
ing a sigmoidoscope — an optical device for 
peering into the last third of the 6-fom-long 
colon — every 3 to 5 years after age 50, after two 
initial exams. 

Cancer of the colon and rectum, perhaps 
more than any other malignancy besides lung 
cancer, appears to be an environmentally 
caused disease. It strikes city -dwellers more of- 
ten than people in rural areas, attacks the rich 
more than the poor and occurs most frequently 


within its walls. 


in societies where the diet is high in fat and low 
in fiber. 

A Washington gastroenterologist and expert 
in coionoscopy. Dr. Donald A. O'Kieffe, said 
that colon cancer has become a "preventable 
epidemic." 

Regina Ziegler, a cancer expert with the Na- 
tional Cancer Institute’s Environmental Epide- 
miology Branch, said there is strong evidence 
that fiber is protective, suggesting that people 
should eat more of the foods richest in fiber — 
vegetables including peas and beans, fruits, 
grains and nuts. 

Scientists theorize that fiber, which is simply 
indigestible material adds bulk to the stool ana 
speeds its passage through the large intestine. 
But Dr. Ziegler said research has since shown 
that speed of passage "wasn't that consistently 
related” to cancer nsk. 

Other evidence indicates that eating a diet 
high in fat raises risk of colon and rectal cancer, 
perhaps by stimulating the production or bile 
acids, important in digesting fat. These adds 
may be converted by colonic bacteria into can- 

i/bdeadds do contribute lo cancer forma- 
tion, fiber may counteract their influence by 
dunging the population of bacteria that live in 
the colon. Dr. Ziegler said. 

Protective substances in roods, those that 
may hinder the formation of cancer, indude 
beta carotene (a source of vitamin A), vitamin C 
and “cruciferous vegetables” — cabbage, broc- 
coli, cauliflower ana Brussels sprouts, she said. 


IATA Director Lauds Athens Airport 

ATHENS (UP1) —Athens airport i>“if ooi the best guarded airport of 
the world, definitely one of the best." Rodney illis. director of soauity 
and facilities of the International .Air Transport Assonance, wid Mon- 
day. 

His remarks, following an l.AT.A report lo Greek l.ivil Aviation 
authorities, came as Richard Noble, acting deputy director or aril 
aviation of the U.S. Federal Aviation .Agency, arrived with a four-cat 
delegation to inspect airport security. 

The Federal Aviation Agency will advise the l S. government on 
whether it should rescind an advisory lo Americans to avoid .Athens 
airport because of lax security. Last month, the Reagan adnucistratioc 
issued the advisory after the hijacking of a TWA airliner from the airport. 
Mr. Wallis said that I.AtA was not able to determine whether the 
hijackers had smuggled their weapons aboard the flight w Athens or in 
Cairo. 

Agca Says He Is Through Answering 

ROME(AP) — Thejudge and prosecutor m the papal plot trial pressed 
Mehmei Ali Agca on Monday about inconsistencies in lus lesiinwnv, but 
the slate’s star witness said he was through answering questions. 

Mr. Agca, convicted of the May 13. 1*81. shooting of Pope John Paul 


IL appeared exhausted during his 20th day on the witness stand m his 
trial along with four other Turks and three Bulgarians accused of 
complicity in the shooting. 


Tumor Is Cancerous , But Doctors Doubt Spread Rain Hinders 

-Cl n -n -WA 41 


(Continued from Page I) 
having said, “I can’t wait for today 
to be over." 

A preliminary biopsy report in- 
dicated Friday that the polyp was 
benign. 

Mr. Speakes said Monday that 
Mr. Reagan's temperature was 
slightly above normal and that the 
president had complained of ab- 
dominal discomfort. But be said 
this was normal for a person who 
had just undergone surgery. 

Mr. Speakes said the president 
was taking no pain medication, not 


even aspirin, and had not had any 
pain reliever since an injection of 
morphine after surgery that was a 
10th of the normal dose. 

He said the president took a 
60-foot walk in his hospital suite 
Sunday night. 

After staying up until after mid- 
night to finish Louis L’Amour’s lat- 
est Western novel, “Jubal Sackett," 
Mr. Reagan spent most of Monday 
morning napping between medical 
examinations, Mr. Speakes report- 
ed. He quoted the president as hav- 


ing said that he stayed up reading 
“to see if the butler did it" 

Later, Mr. Speakes said, the 
president asked for “Return to 
These Hills” by Calvin Coolidge, 
the former president, and was 

asleep with the book in his lap as he 
reclined in his hospital bed at mid- 
day. 

The White House chief of staff, 
Donald T. Regan, arrived at Mr. 
Reagan's suite Monday morning to 
find the president asleep and left 
some briefing papers for him to 
read later, the spokesman said. 


Mr. Reagan still planned to meet 
China’s president, LI Xiannian, 
next week as scheduled, although 
their conversation might be brio 1 , 
Mr. Speakes said. 

The meeting apparently will lake 
place in Mr. Reagan’s hospital 
suite. 

Mr. Speakes said the president, 
who tamed control of the govern- 
ment over to Vice President George 
Bush for about eight hours Satur- 
day, would probably meet Mr. 
Bush on Tuesday. 

(Reuters, AP) 



Sudan Relief 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ugees from isolated camps to more 
accessible areas has come to an 
abrupt halt, Mr. Garety said. 
“We’re now actually sending rub- 
ber boats to ferry food ana refu- 
gees." he said. The stricken people 
are believed also to include refu- 
gees from Chad. 

In Beda, a town of 20,000 south 
of Geueina. an average of 15 people 
a day are dying, according to a 
report from the local chief of po- 
lice. 

In many refugee camps 50 per- 
cent or more of the children are 
already malnourished, though not 
yet “severely malnourished," ac- 
cording to Richard C Copeland of 
the British relief agency Oxf am. 
The distinction is made by compar- 
ing the child's weight and height. 

Relief recipients in parts of Dar- 
fur are said to be receiving an aver- 
age of only 14 grams (half an 
ounce) of supplementary food a 
day. The normal minimum ration is 
500grams. 

“The rains are causing havoc to 
the relief operation," Mr. Copeland 

said. “But to be precise. I'd still call 
tins a food crisis caused by trans- 
port problems. It's not a starvation 
crisis yet. though that could easily 
become the result." 




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1 “1 don't have anything more to say," Mr. Agca said. Ignoring this, the 

judge and prosecutor continued to question him. As he has done repeat- 
edly when under pressure at the trial. Mr. Agca began rambling about 
1 being Jesus Christ. 

Bhopal Deformed Infants Reported 

NEW DELHI (Reuters) — At least 21 babies have been bom de- 
formed, and 36 women have suffered miscarriages in the central Indian 
city of Bhopal since the chemical leak last December that killed about 
L500 people, the Press Trust of India reported Monday. 

The news agency quoted Balendu Shukia. minister of health m the slate 
of Madhya Pradesh, as having said that three of the deformed babies had 
died. Mr. Shukia said that a further 27 babies were believed to have died 
in Bhopal because their mothers had inhaled the leaking gas whfle 
pregnane 

The leak, from a pesticide plant owned by the Indian subsidiary of 
Union Carbide, is estimated to have caused injury' to as many as 125.000 
people. The plant was officially closed last weekl 

Gandhi Trial Witness Tells of Torture 

NEW DELHI (UP!) — A prosecution witness in the Indira Gandhi 
assassination trial said Monday that police tenured and intimidated him 
into signing a statement against the three Sikhs accused of killing the 
prime minister. He was the second prosecution witness to say that police 
coerced him to make a false statement. 

Gurbax Singh, a Sikh businessman, petitioned the court to remove his 
name from the list of prosecution witnesses and appealed for court 
protection against the investigators. He said he was questioned for four 
days without food or sleep and then told he would be treated well if he 
signed a statement and promised to repeat it in court. 

Mr. Singh said the statement prepared for his signature by the 
investigating officer “is false and was never made by the petitioner." He 
said he was released after 17 days but was arrested again and made to 
stand before a firing squad until he promised to repeat the statement m 
court. 

U.S. Court Asked to Review Abortion 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Reagan administration asked the U.S. 
Supreme Court on Monday to overturn its landmark 1973 decision 
legalizing abortions. 

Tbe Justice Department argued in a friend-of-the-court brief filed in 
connection with two pending cases in Illinois and Pennsylvania that 
states must be allowed to place some restrictions on the performance of 
abortions. The brief noted that in the 1973 decision of Roe v. Wade, the 
court held that the right of privacy e manating from the due process clause 
of the constitution was “broad enough to encompass a woman's decision 
whether or not to terminate her pregnancy." But it also said that the 
. courts repeatedly failed to protect the life and health of tbe woman and 
the child subject to abortion. 


Ronald Reagan had approved the filing of the brief. 

Sudanese Troops Battle With Rebels 

KHARTOUM, Sudan (NYT) — Government troops and the Sudan 
People’s Li baa lion Army are fighting heavily around the southern town 
of Mongolia, according to Western diplomatic sources. 

The sources said Sunday that an estimated 4,000 government troops 
were fighting their way north to tbe town of Bor, 80 miles (130 kilometers) 
away, which has been under siege by the rebel group for almost two 
weeks. 

The sources said the road to Bor was hnpassable, apparently because of 
a crater left by land mines exploded by tbe rebels. A pilot who ferried 
troops wounded in action a few days ago said government troops were 
suffering heavy casualties. 

FortheRecord 

Zimbabwe’s agriculture minister, Denis Norman, one of two white 
ministers, was omitted from the cabinet formed Monday by Prime 
Munster Robert Mugabe. He termed the move a reaction to whites’ 
electoral support for Ian Smith, tbe former prime minister. ( Reuters ) 

In d i an aviation authorities said that a team of international safety 
experts was expected to begin Tuesday to analyze the flight and data 
recorders from tbe Air-In dia jet that crashed June 23 in the North Sea 
with the loss of 329 lives. (WP) 

ft™ *nd Cyprus established diplomatic relations effective Monday, 
the Burmese state radio announced. (AP) 

The Organization of African Unity’s Ministerial Council has sent 
m essages to both houses of the U.S. Congress thanking them for passing 
measures aimed at imposing economic sanctions on South Africa. (AFP) 


Correction 

A picture Friday with an article about life in North Korea was 
published in error. It showed Hong Kong, not Pyongyang. 


U.S. Enforcement of Its Rules 
On Trade Is Angering Allies 





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(Continued from Page 1) 
said. Moreover, the civilian heli- 
copter models could not be trans- 
formed into military gunships 
without being taken apart and radi- 
cally rebuilt, they said, because the 
vibrations from missies belatedly 
installed would shatter the craft 
The military verson of tbe Hughes 
Model 500 contains burin structur- 
al differences to withstand tbe 
backlash from fired weapons. 

Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger said at a news confer- 
enoein Washington in May that the 
diversion of the helicopters to 
North Korea was a “serious loss" 
and that the United Stares planned 
to press criminal charges against 
those responsible. A Commerce 
Department report held Hughes 
blameless in the transaction. 

South Korea, which uses similar 
Hughes helicopters for reconnais- 
sance and other military applica- 
tions, filed a strong protest to tbe 
US. government about the sale, 
which may have contributed to the 
early decision to blacklist Delta- 
Avia, West German sources said. 

Bonn officials suggested that the 
firm might have been singled out 
for harsn treatment because of a 
CIA report contending that West 
Germany is a leading transit sta- 
tion for nigh technology goods sent 
to Communist countries, childly 
Lhe Soviet Union and its East Euro- 
pean allies. 

In u lengthy interview at his 


firm’s headquarters near Coblenz. 
Mr. Behrens admitted that he sold 
Hughes helicopters to oLber “unde- 
sirable” destinations. “Hughes has 
used us in the past to do things they 
were not permitted," he said 
“They never told nie not to sell to 
certain countries, and Pm sure they 
knew where all their helicopters 
were going, and that includes 
North Korea," 

He asked; “How can they pre- 
tend not to know where 90 percent 
of their production in a given year 
was going?" Hughes spokesmen 
have denied repeatedly that com- 
pany executives knew- where the 87 
helicopters would end up. 

A Hughes radeesman readied by 
telephone in California said Satur- 
day that “investigations of our 
company by the Stale and Com- 
merce departments have exonerat- 
ed Hughes and would tend to sug- 
gest that statements" such as those 
by Mr. Behrens “are untrue." 

Mr. Behrens contended that he 
was “being made the scapegoat for 
this zealous, anti-Comtnunist trade 
policy” of the United States. He 
said his lawyer had sent letters to 
the Commerce Department, offer- 
ing to abide by all U.S. regulations 
on future sales of helicopters and ( 
spare parts to North Korea, or any 
other restricted country, in ex * \ 
change for the lifting of the ember*, 
go that threatens to ruin Delta- 
Avia. He said the Uwver -bad 
received no reply. 


: ^ * 



dnri-l «’«1 














Leads Bolivia 


1 • M 


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s?i2s»* 

* ^-55^ 


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jm>ic: of heuiih mu* «-. 

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ic\l the iejajng gjs ^ 

i> the Indian Mib^idiar; ri 

3jur> to is many ji iKjjjj , 

icck. C?' 


voting ior 

Prudent 


pf Lydia Chavez 

New York Tones Service 

la\PAZ— HngoBanzcrSuArcz, . 
a retired gcacralwhoruIedBdivia 
fctmostof the 1970s, has taken the . 
kad m the country's presidential 
deaic^aaxHriing to early results. 

With about 5percent of the bal- 
lots counted Irom Sunday’s voting, 
Mr. Banzer Sudrez, 59. the candi- 
date' of the rightist Natio n a lis t 
Democratic Alliance, had 453 per- 
c£ot» aoconfcg to Radio Hdes, an 
indcsendoa station. . 

• yfctdr Ptt Estennoro. the leader 
of: the' cmter-rigfrt Revolutionary 
Nationalist Historical Movement, 
was in second place with 20 penent 
of thevote. Mr. PazEstenssoro, 77. 
was president twice in the 1950s 
and 1960s and was as architect of 
the country's 1952 revolution and 
landrefonn program. 

Unless one candidate finishes 
with more than 50 percent of the 
vote, which appeared unlikely, the 
president is to be chosen by the 
newly elected National Congress in 
early August The inauguration is 
scheduled for Aug. 6. 

Votes encountered long tines 
and frwjpent mix-ups as they elect- 
ed a new Congress and local repre- 
sentatives and chose among 18 
presidential candidates. 

No major party challenged the 
elections, but government officials, 
political leaders and voters were 
attentive to any accusations of 
fraud. 

'Adding to the uncertainty was 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 


Voyager-2 Approaches Uranus 

Spacecraft Preparing lor Close Encounter in January 

• By John Noble Wilford cloudy Venus than the more spec- urn. That was 800 million miles 


Page 3 


ago. 

Two problems that arose at Sal- 


NewYoek Tima Sent* taodar Jupiter Or Saturn.” ago. 

PASADENA, California — The , are awaiti^ a more Two problems that arose at Sal- 

Voyager-2 spacecraft, now seven bailed look when Voyager-2 ^ stiilplaguc the craft. The main 
years and 13 bfflion miles away Jg|“J *“ *■■} mmoa^ to ^e re ^^is of scvice, and 
from Earth, is fast, approaching placet on Jan. 24. Flight engineers ^ haVk-np is so sensitive to tem- 
Uranus and already transmitting are pnspajingto make ureencoun- changes that it sometinies 

occasional television pictures. So ** as saamfitally productive as ^ troublewdung on to Earth 
far, however, the transmissions tell posable, given me condition of the Agnate in addition, the movable 
more about the hardy craft than the- sparecraTt and the great dis- ^ding the camera and 

distant planet * X 7 reaches 

They demonstrate that Voyager- • ,_By the^tnoe Voya%cr-2jeaches lend to stick as a result of a lubri- 


They demonstrate that Voyager- -By the time Voy, 
2 has survived its longjoumey, past Uranus, the spacecr 


jr platform holding the camera and 

■ rM<4iM several remote-sensing instruments 

iju kTr b lend to stick as a result of a lubri- 
cant failure. 


5F W * J- & A At that . . . 

1981 and is on courreto fly witirin ^stance, a radio signal takes two Btot Mr. Textor said J 
66JXX) miles (106,000 kflometere) houra and 45 minutes to wive at uotiera now tmderetmid 
of Uranus in Jannaiy, officials at tracking antennas, and it is a weak lems wid have learned h 


of Uranus in Jaxmaxy. officials at 
the Jet Propulsion Laboratoty here a 8 nai - 
have said. The spacecraft is 165 To j 
m ini nn miles from Uranus and the slq 
traveling toward it at 40,000 miles sod Sj 
an hour. veiopo 

In the pictures from Voyager-2, “ hea ™ 
Uranus smllooks more like a fuzzy “JJ? 1 


- - Tiw ABramdAw 

Hngo Banzer Snflrez of die rightist Nationalist Democratic 
Affiance voted in La Paz inrfng Sunday’s presidential 
eteetjon. The retired general, who ruled Bolivia for most of 
the 1970s, was far ahead In the early returns. 


tracking antennas, and it is a weak lems and have learned how to deal 
si g na l , with them. They know how to sta- 


To pick the faint signals out of radio temperatures and 

the sky, the National Aeronautics when not to try to send vital com- 
and Space Administra tion has de- mands. 
veloped a means of enhanciiig the Observations of Uranus are to 
“hearing’' of its deep-space an ten- begin in earnest on Nov. 4. Voyag- 
na network. or-2 wHl be commanded to take* a 


He will lead a heavily indebted ing places and a total 'of 24,278 a pale greenish-blue. No duui 
country that has had frequent voters in the area had similar prob- features, eith er surfa ce splotches 
strikes over wage demands, even Jems. It was unclear how many peo- anyl bands of differing hoes, are] 
with nomiufll pay increases, most pie had given up and left by the visible, 
workers’ earnings have fallen ' time the ballots and arrived. “We do not see any of the ban 


t-nnie ball than the third largest Flight controllers have also picture every five mmules over 36 
planet in the solar system. Uranus c h a nged the configuration of a hours and then repeal the picture- 
isapaseotis body roughly four computer on the spacecraft to com- taking sequence on a regular baas, 
times thesize of Earth. The color is press the data for each picture so From these pictures, scientists 
a pale smxnish-bluc. No distinct that about three tunes as many pip- hope to produce a movie of the 
feamresTeither surface splotches or tures can be transmitted m the ent- planet’s atmospheric dynamics, 
any bands of differing hues, are yet- ical hours of encounter. Bv tracking anv distinct features 

Thus, even at the slow transmis- 


any bands of dtftenng noes, are yet — Bv tracking any distinct features 

viable Thus, even at ihe slow transnus- in the atmosphere, Mr. Miner said, 

“We do not. see any of the band- “» rales over the distance from ^ Voyager-2 movies should an- 
ed detail we saw at Jupiter and Uranus, Voyager-- should be able a basj c question: How long is 


as the annual inflation rate Mr. Oblitas said he expected the ed detail we saw at Jupiter and uranu fj* voysgCT-v. snouio oe ante ^ a basic question: How li 
more than 15,000 percent electoral court to be aide to resolve Saturn,” said Fflis D. Miner, the 10 seI “ a ° out images a day. a Uranian day? Earth-based 
in recent months. anv chanrcs of fraud, whkh he said deputy project sdauisL in a recent George Textor. the mission di- suremesits indicate that it is 


question: How long is 
ay? Earth-based mea- 


George Textor. the mission di- suremmts indicate that it is either 


recent months. any charges of fraud, whkh he said deputy project scientist, in a recent George Textor. the mission di- suremenis mdicate that it is either 

Voters waited for hours Sunday were common in Bolivia. Later interview. “We should see it by rector, said that calibration of in- 16 or 24 hours, while theoretical 

some nd ghbrafaoods of La Paz Sunday he said most of Urn admin- now, if there is the same level ctf struments on Voyager-2 has re- models based on the planet's rota- 

r the polls to open. Ballot boxes istrative problems had been re- banding. Uranus may be very vealed no significant degradation tional properties set the day closer 

ten arrived late, without i~*«= solved. bland. It may look more like the in performance since it flew by Sat- to 16 hours. 



in some neighborhoods of La Paz Sunday he said most of the admin- 
for the polls to open. Ballot boxes istrative problems had been re- 


jnni the „i‘un k> removt^ 
and aprcjlea f., r t(W 

1 he \*-Ls que-j’.K'ocd t\<r !® 
! would be treated mellilk 
it m court 

d for his. sierjfjrc ^ 
made b*. the pc!:s*or.et."U! 
, arrested jej;r. end Trades 
ed to tepee', 'nr '’.jinTieffii 


lomats and politicians had ex- 
pressed fears m the last week that 
the mQitaxy would intercede again. 

When the last election, in 1980, 
failed to yield a dear winner, the 
aimed forces seized power. Two 
years later, as economic troubles 
grew, the military allowed the elect- 
ed Congress to take office and it, in 
turn, elected a left-of -center civil- 
ian president, HernAn Sfl«c 7nn>n 
He had won a plurality in the 1980 
election, partially prompting the 
military takeover. 

Mr. Siles Znazo’s term was to 


often arrived late, without locks solved, 
and with too few ballots. 

“It is evidcat that there are a lot 
of problems, but we will be able to 
resolve them,” said Edgar Oblitas, 
the president of the National Elec- 
torai Court 

About two milli on people, or 71 
percent of the potential electorate, 
were registered to vote, according 
to the electoral court The peasants 
union objected strongly to the dec- 
tion because only 61 pereent of 
those eligible in rural areas were 
registered. But moves in the last 
month to postpone the voting were 


The Only T* 


iTirra 


We Make 


In some poor and middle-class 
neighborhoods, people seaned sus- 
picious about the handling of the 
election. 

In Villa Bolivar, above La Paz, 
there were demands that voting be 


view Vhnrrinn Mr. Siles Znazo’s term was to 

YVZto ADOrUOn rununtill986. But last November. hal^ i bec^thebaIlotb^W 


id rtarjM:^: aArJihcV: 

iu Itzcr^r*. ; u “? itoaK 

end-of-i.!^* ur Sn:i Ka:-*, 
bruKs fr-tr^luncih: ■‘ l H 
ti:- "••-■rh-nrijitt? 

I dcuif->n *-i ■ '■la*: 2 

Dg iti.rr. '.Tx c -c ' r * ^ 

3BCtirepi5’ j 

icj ** Bu: - 
and hi2l:r. 

iij tli.it P r cj , z: 


in the face of increasing political 
opposition, be announced he would 
leave office a year early. 

The winner of this election will 
be the seventh president in less 
than six years. 


no locks. Inside the poDing place, 
election representatives awaited 
the arrival of 213 more ballots and 
three locks. 

Roberto Vega, a political repre- 
sentative for the area, said 21 poll- 


Mexico’s Ruling Party 


IsWhe 

■ ■ (i\\ 


\ou Feel Small 


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r 

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‘if, Ll.'BS 

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tea^i ' -*: • 

jed - ’ • 


United Pma international . have not been officially au- 
MEXICO CITY — The ruling nounced. 

Institutional Revolutionary Party About 200 supporters of PAN 
has woo a landslide victcny in con- blocked the Sonora boideraossing 
gressional dectkms across Mexico, from AguaPrieta into Douglas, Ar- 
according to results released Mon- izoua, for the third straight day. 
day. /twmm rfrngthat (h«r candidate for 

But the backers of opposition governor, Adalberto Rosas Ldpez, 
parties blocked border croKgs to > rauned the vnctor said a pS 
the United States to protest alleged ^tigaLor Manuel Duarte. In 
election fraud in northern states Naco, a PAN group of roughly 250 
where they had expected to win. took over lhe crossmg point mto 

»S£SS£S!=S MOSS 

PRL won 143 of 146 congressional . A lively demonstration by PAN 
districts for which results were an- ra Matamwos, -bordering Browns- 
nounced. The election was July 7. vflle, Texas, continued under heavy 

Officials were to release results P 0 ^ scrDtiny- 
for the rest of the nation’s 300 dis- PAN supporters contend that 
Diets later Monday, and PRI offi- - their party should have won easily 
riab predicted that their, candi- in the stales of Sonora, which bor- 
dates had won overwbelmiiigly. ders Arizona, and Nuevo L c6 n, 

The major opposition group, Na- ac ^ oss / ro “ 
tional Action Party, or PAN, won In the hotly, con tested bonorra 
only two of the fust 146 coogressio- capital of Hermosilio, 2,000 PAN 


'& 


nal districts tabulated. The only 
other district not given to the PRJ 
went to the leftist Authentic Party 
of the Mexican Revolution. 

The PRI has been saying since 
election night that it swept the 
country, inducting the seven guber- 
natorial races, for which resuits 


protesters set up tents late Sunday 
and promised to camp in the cen- 
tral plaza until officials declared 
Mr. Rosas the winner. 

The protesters, carrying placards 
denouncing electoral fraud, threat- 
ened to take over dty hall if Mr. 
Rosas did not win. 


K- 7 * ‘ 


i 


(J, CONCORD 

Hj MiMitse 






. Concord Mariner. 18 kt gold, black chromium 
stainless steel, quartz, water-resistant. 

An art carried to perfection in S wiss watches. 

The David Morris Exhibition of ihe mm. exclusive Concord W«eh Collection 
in The Conduit Street Showroom from July lAth lo SBih l!#*' 

' | l David Morris 

\ I II 38 Conduit Street, London W1 ______ 

• LJ Hamids, ^Cnigbcsbridge, London SWI 

Cariton Tower, Cau&m Mace, London SW! . 
Churchill Hotel, Pbrtmann Square, London Wl 
Inn on the Park, Hamilton Place, London Wl 



ive You A Seat 


Settle back in a Pan Am seat and 
there's so much room you'll think you've 
shrunk. 

Especially in First Class on a 
Sleeperette® seat, with its extending 
footrest 

You won't feel much bigger in the 
new Clipper® Class either, where there 
are new wider seats, only six across as 
well. 

But as well as all the room in your 
seat, there's all the room around it. 

Room to stretch out and relax. 

Room to enjoy the marvellous 
cuisine, fine wines, and the new in-flight 
entertainment system. 

You'll notice the sound's bigger 
. with new lightweight electronic 
\ headphones. And the picture's 
\ better, thanks to the latest Sony 
\ video system. 

\ For First and Clipper Class 
i \ passengers travelling to New York 
\ \ there's another bonus. A free 

A \ helicopter from JFK to Wall 

/A \ Street, East 61st Street, and 

JmA \ Newark airport. 

f/)la / In a Pan Am seat you may 

li ft U feel small,but we treat you big. 

I j Y No wonder then, in 1984, 

JJ / more people chose Pan Am First 
p-— Qass across the Atlantic than any 

other. It's a bigger experience. 

Call your Travel Agent or 
_ the nearest Pan Am office. 


■r-. 





enence 


j 





WHI* mmrHI 2 HIIIFEFEH?HHg: 


Page 4 


TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


PuUMied With The New lark ‘nnhunlTbe Washington Poet 


Oil Partners Should Talk 


The way of a cane! is hard when it no 
longer dominates the market and is short of 
cash. The OPEC cartel is currently trying to 
keep the price of oil higher than customers 
need to pay, but is unwilling to make the 
production cuts that this would require. Its 
July 5-7 meeting in Vienna did little except 
fix a date to meet again — a common out- 
come at intergovernmental conferences. 

The current weakness of OPEC is hardly 
surprising. Six years ago it was supplying 60 
percent of the non-Communist world's 
needs; now it is down to 30 percent. Supply 
from the North Sea has risen. And demand 
for oil has fallen because it is being replaced 
by other types of energy and the world is 
using energy more sparingly. . 

It is easy — and unprofitable — to laugh 
ai the disarray of a once powerful body. 
What is needed is better cooperation be- 
tween consumers and producers so that the 
energy market works more to the advantage 
of world prosperity than in the last 15 years 
when adversarial altitudes prevailed. Energy 
is one of the few areas in which the market, 
left to itself, may not produce optimal re- 
sults, so costly are the decisions that have to 
be made and so slow the arrival of profits. 

Unfortunately, the main consumers of oil, 
meeting at the International Energy Agency 
(1EA) only a couple of days after the OPEC 
debacle, dismissed the idea of negotiating 
with the ailing cartel. This refusal would be 
appropriate if developments in the oD mar- 
ket were destined indefinitely to favor the 
big importers. But are they? 

Falling oil prices will not bring unalloyed 
joy to the world, any more than the two 
brutal price increases did. The immediate 
effect, at best, would be to replace one set of 


extreme debtors — the non-ail developing 
countries — with another, as Nigeria, Mexi- 
co and Venezuela faced bankruptcy. And 
declining fortunes in the OPEC world would 
exacerbate rather than ease political prob- 
lems in the Middle East. 

Above all, the industrialized world has to 
look ahead to assess the probability of new 
oil shocks that would again force prices up 
and impede recovery across the world. 
Economists at the OECD estimate that the 
moderate recovery hoped for in the next 
three years will not force oil prices up faster 
than other prices. If anything, the real price 
of oil may even fall slightly. But this analysis 
intentionally slides over the possibility of 
new political interruptions in the flow of oil, 
which can neither be forecast nor ruled out. 

WhaL happens then? The world economy 
will hopefully, be expanding reasonably 
fast as we move into the 1990s. Energy 
demand will rise accordingly, but oil pro- 
duction outside OPEC may have peaked. 
Leading analysts see a fairly steady increase 
in Europe’s OPEC imports in the next 20 
years. The IEA itself has underlined the 
likelihood of a tighter energy market in the 
'90s. Can we be sure that in the immediately 
intervening years weak prices for OPEC oQ 
will not distract the world from its present 
efforts to solve its energy problems? 

The confusing fact is that too low an oil 
price today may increase the risk of another 
major rise tomorrow. The unfortunate fact is 
that neither OPEC nor the IEA seems pre- 
pared for talks, although the fortunes of 
both blocs are inextricably linked. It is time 
to break down the antagonisms of the last 15 
years and solve this enigma together. 

. INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Confusing Southern Africa 


The State Department Louts the idea that 
American policy In southern Africa should be 
based on consensus, but administration policy 
is being shredded in political debate. 

In the central challenge, the Republican 
Senate has now followed the Democratic 
House in approving economic sanctions. Con- 
gress did it as much to protest administration 
attempts to practice quiet persuasion on the 
Smith African government as to protest the 
while minority regime's practice of apartheid. 
There is much doubt in Congress that sanc- 
tions will do other than stiffen whites and 
inflict further hardship on blacks, but there is 
broad dislike for what is seen as administra- 
tion tiptoeing on apartheid.. The Pretoria re- 
gime's harsh and continuing reprisals against 
citizens and neighbors suggest that it is thumb- 
ing its nose at Ronald Reagan and at America. 
This is what Congress is voting against. 

Nor are sanctions the end of iL The other 
day the House followed the Senate in voting to 
lift the 10-year legislative bar on aiding insur- 
gents In Marxist-ruled Angola. 

A Congress traumatized by Vietnam had cut 
off, through the Clark amendment, covert aid 
to a favored Angolan faction vying to take 
over from the departing Portuguese. No presi- 
dent since has approved of this congressional 
shackle on executive discretion. The Reagan 
Slate Department has complained that the 
amendment enacted the Brezhnev doctrine — 
which holds that a Communist revolution is 
irreversible — into American law. But the 
main line of policy has assumed that the Clark 
amendment would stay on the books. 

Here again, however, congressional impa- 
tience made its mark. Conservatives have long 


had a fascination with Jonas Savimbi and his 
UN1TA insurgents, who are supported by 
South Africa. More recently some liberals have 
sought to show that they, too, are tough and 
an ti -Co mm unis L Unis has the administra- 
tion's policy of encouraging anti-Communisl 
resistance movements, in Nicaragua and Af- 
ghanistan, caught on in Congress for causes — 
in Cambodia and now Angola — for which the 
president has not been out in front 
Some parliamentary hurdles to repeal of the 
Clark amendment stiU stand. The administra- 
tion professes to have no plans to exploit a 
renewed legal opportunity to aid Savimbi in- 
surgents. But in this moment of passage in 
southern Africa it is extremely mischievous to 
revive even the possibility that Washington 
may get back into regional military interven- 
tion. Angola's immediate decision to break off 
talks with the United States an Cuban troop 
withdrawal underlines the pdnL 
There is yet another place in which Congress 
is irampling on the intended subtleties of the 
Reagan policy of “constructive engagement" 
with all of the different countries of southern 
Africa. The House voted limits on develop- 
ment aid to Mozambique, a country that the 
administration has been carefully trying to 
draw out of the Marxist fold. 

The White House objects strongly to intru- 
sions on its policy such as the congressional 
sanctions votes, ft would do better to object 
even more strongly to what goes on. in South 
Africa. In defending its policy it has too often 
seemed to be defending apartheid. That is the 
principal reason why its policy is losing ground 
in Washington and in southern Africa alike. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 

| Polling Out the Stops for Africa A Bird’s Eye on Public Figures 


For once the hyperbole of the pop music 
industry was justified. The 16-hour concert 
organized by pop stars to raise money for the 
victims of famine in Africa was truly rock's 
finest hour. An industry which has rarely set 
an example to its Tans, which in the past has 
displayed venality, greed and corruption, pul 
on a show at Wembley and Philadelphia on 
Saturday that was wholly admirable. 

— The Daily Telegraph ( London}. 

Famine in Africa retains all its magnitude, 
even after a grandiose show that has moved 
parishioners of the well-off world in a commu- 
nion service via satellite to the accompaniment 
of the great organ of show biz. The complaint 
of the Sahel's children tops the hit parade. 

— Le Monde l Paris). 


What's the story behind Punk, the Penguin? 

In Australia when 1 first started cartooning I 
worked for a very conservative paper. They 
didn’t give me much leeway. So I employed 
this little bird as an aside. He became popular, 
took over. Now I couldn't drop it if 1 wanted 
to. I've used him for about 30 years. Some- 
times he’s an alter ego and sometimes you 
want to say more in a cartoon. It's good for all 
sorts of things, sometimes just pantomime . . . 

People in the public eye are public figures. 
They're fair game. If you can see something 
bad happening — that's what cartooning is ail 
about. I do that job, I hope, that H.L. Menck- 
en used to do — throwing dead cats into 
sanctuaries, 1 believe be called iL 

— Political cartoonist Pat OliphanL, 
interviewed by The Washington Post 


FROM OUR JULY 16 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: A Call to Abolish U.S. FoolbaD 
BOSTON — Dr. David Slut Jordan, Presi- 
dent of Leland Stanford University, declared 
[on July 5] before the American Educational 
Association that football as played by the 
athletes of American universities is a combina- 
tion of Lhe elements of pure brutality and 
pugilism. “Some day," said Dr. Jordan, “the 
college presidents and school heads of this 
country will perhaps be called brutal because 
they did not put a stop to the dangers of 
football, a sport that destroys the best there is 
in American youth. No intelligence is required. 
Blacksmiths and boilermakers can -play the 
game as well as men of finer intellect, in fact 
blacksmiths and boilermakers are considered 
the best raw material for Lhe game.” Dr. Jor- 
dan favored the abolition of football as played 
and the substitution of the English gome. 


1935: Jews Targeted in Berim Riots 
BERLIN — Fifty detachments of special po- 
lice guarded several restaurants frequented by 
foreigners [on July 15] after violent anti-Jewish 
demonstrations bad broken out along the Kur- 
fflrstendamm, in the center of Berlin. Hie 
Bristol Cafe whs partly wrecked, all the win- 
dows being smashed and hundreds of tables 
and chairs being overturned. In another large 
cafe, the Jewish proprietor was caned and a 
young woman employee was knocked uncon- 
scious by a stone. The riots apparently started 
in front of a motion-picture theater where an 
anti-Jewish film was bong shown. A Nazi 
militiaman bumped into a Jew on the sidewalk 
and was arrested. An indignant crowd, rapidly 
growing to more than 2,000. quickly gathered 
outside the police station, yelling demands to 
free the Nazi, who was finally released. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Cha rmer, 19581982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRT2 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publaher 

Luvume Editor REN£BONDY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN L ECO UR dnorusM 1 Publisher 

Depm Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operatum 

.Caoaau Editor FRANCOIS DES MAI SONS Director of Cimdarion 

ROLF D. KR 


_ KRANEPUHL Director efAdunaug Sates 

International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Ouries-dc-Gaulle. 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, 

France. Tel.: 11)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: Q294-S052. 

Directeur de la publication : Walter ft. Timer. 

Asia Headquarters . 24.84 Htnnasy RJ., Hon g Kong Tel. 5-2856/8. Telex 61170. 
MmohOt UA.: Robot MacKidm. 65 Long Am. London WO. TeL 836A80H Tekx 262009. 

Gen .Mgr. Gtmumt W. Lautohach. FriMstr. 15. <W) Frankfurt/ M. Tl (0*9)726755. TU 416721. 

£4. u-ccgutal de ! 200.000 F RCS Naniem B 7 5202 II 26 Commission Panuirt No. 6 1337. 

0.5. subscnpth'n: $522 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island City. N. I HOI. 

*■' 1985. International Herald Tnhune. All rights reserved 



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Chile’s Bullied Democrats Ought to Be Supported 


XT EW YORK — ■ President Au- 
lN gusto Pinochet last month lifted 
the state of siege that be slapped on 
Chile in November, but he immedi- 
ately invoked emergency powers to 
reins Lite most restrictions on civil 
liberties. So the lifting of the state of 
siege — viewed by virtually all Chil- 
eans as a response to U.S. pressure — 
is a small step in the right direction, 
but hardly cause for rqoidng either 
in Chile dr in the United States. 

tents of the regime are so- 
‘but undaunted by the stepped 
up repression of recent months. For 
them this has been a period of suffer- 
ing and of stock-taking. The toll from 
the state of siege — including pre- 
dawn security sweeps, detention of 
some 40,000 suspected subversives, 
banishment of 600 political activists 
to remote districts mid closure of six 
opposition publications — has only 
strengthened their conviction that 
Chile must return to democracy. 

Chileans have learned some hard 
lessons from the Pinochet repression: 

• The general will not voluntarily 
negotiate a transition to democracy. 
Last year he undercut negotiations 
with Die moderate opposiUorL Then, 
with the pretext of fighting leftist 
terrorism, he launched a systematic 
drive to silence the entire opposition. 


By Peter D. Bell 


• Unity is essential to the eventual 
success of the opposition, which now 
includes the overwhelming majority 
of Chileans. Throughout much dr 
1983 and 1984 the opposition seemed 
to be gathering strength. It lost mo- 
mentum, however, in the petty rival- 
ries of political party chieftains. The 
opposition must reconstruct a broad 
civic front — composed not only of 
political parties but of the Roman 
Catholic Church and organizations 
of workers, women, students and 
professionals — Tor the overriding 
purpose of restoring democracy. 

- • The democratic movement must 
resolve the question of Communist 
Party participation — a question that 
arises primarily because of the parly’s 
endorsement of “all means,” includ- 
ing violence, to combat the dictator- 
ship. Despite General Pinochet's 
commitment “to extirpating the 
Marxist cancer” from Chile, the 
Communist Party remains second 
only to the centrist Christian Demo- 
cratic Party in size. Given the Com- 
munists’ long adherence to the rules 
of Chilean politics prior to the 1973 
military coup, their participation in a 
restored democracy is presumed even 
by conservative parties, but they 


must forswear violence to dose ranks 
with the rest of the opposition. 

• Elections are the cause around 
which Chileans are most likely to 
mobilize to restore democracy. Chile 
has a long history of deciding impor- 
tant political questions by open and 
fair elections. Despite the state of 
siege, the principal labor, student and 
professional organizations have held 
internal elections in recent months, 
and opposition groups almost always 
combined to elect their candidates, 
usually Christian Democrats. 

There is no question that General 
Pinochet would lose a plebiscite on 
whether to continue the dictatorship 
or restore democracy. It is up to the 
opposition to convince the military 
— by mass mobilization, nonviolent 
resistance and perhaps a national 
strike — that a popular referendum is 
preferable to endless repression. 

What can the United States do to 
support democratic change? The lift- 


quo for U.S. support erf S195 million 
in Chilean loans approved by the 
World Bank last month — approval 
crucial to a much larger package of 
commercial and multila teral loans. 
The Reagan administration thus ig- 


It’s Simple: Democracy Is Angels Electing Devils 


W ASHINGTON — President Reagan has 
seen “Ram bo” and admires the fifinls for- 
eign policy. According to the box office, audi- 
ences do. too. It is the critics who disapprove, 
appalled by the chauvinistic anti-communism 
But chauvinism is not a new phenomenon. 

It has been around throughout the 1980s. get- 
ting its start with ayatollah-bashing and a boost 
rrom the 1980 Olympic hockey victory. fThal 
was America's biggest win since Inchon, and was 

Terrorists, totalitarian* and 
others with not an inkling of 
what democracy is about 
declare themsehes friends of 
the American people and 
at war with the government, 

more riotously celebrated. It apparently made up 
for the Soviet acquisition of Afghanistan.) The 
wave of patriotic good feeling continued through 
such entertainments as the 1984 Summer Olym- 
pics, which gave America the chance to beat up 
on the whole world except for Communists. 

Anti-communism is fine. My concern about 
Ram bo is his domestic policy. It is his anti- 
Americanism I don't like. Oh, I admit, there is 
a lot about America he loves — guns, vets, 
Americans. It is just the corrupt, spineless, trai- 
torous government that he despises. 

This celebration of everything American ex- 
cept its most distinctive institution is by now a 
common theme. A charming version animates 


By Charles Krauthammer 


the last big patriotic movie, “The Right Stuff." 
The anti-institutionalism is handled endearingly: 
Seven brave and plucky men make it into space 
despite the politicians and the bureaucrats. 

That is of course nonsense. The space program 
is one of the greatest bureaucratic triumphs shoe 
the pyramids, and the pharaohs didn’t need to 
call for volunteers. Apollo made it to the moon 
on the back not of individuals but of an acro- 
nymed governmental beast called NASA 
We are in the midst of a severe outbreak of 
rugged individualism. It shows up in other popu- 
lar entertainments, too. The magazines proclaim 
this the age of the entrepreneur. On a larger scale, 
there has been a flood of books celebrating the 
cult of the chief executive officer — the one man, 
the bass man, who turns things around. Lee 
lacocca is the biggest cult hero of them all: 
Rambo in pinstripes, sent on a mission to bring 
“ Ter back alive. And so he does, 
rang again. As economist Robert Reich 
its out, Mr. lacocca was deft and able bat 
was saved by the coordinated action 
(and sacrifice) of vast and despised bureaucra- 
cies: unions, banks and feds. Chrysler was the 
triumph of institutional dinosaurs headquartered 
in New York, Detroit and Washington. 

Washington cooks in for particular abuse. It is 
a ready target for everypolitidan who makes his 
living there. President Reagan will no doabt still 
be running against it in 1989 and beyond. Holly- 
wood is simply fa trying up with the Zeitgeist 
Not that Rambo and Reagan invented the 
Washington-fcushmg. The current wave goes 
bade to Vietnam and Watergate and entered 
mainstream politics with Jimmy Carter’s 1976 


Chiyslc 

Wroi 


campaign, which was based on the premise of a 
vast moral gulf between American government 
and the good, decent, etc American people. 

In Washington, anti-Washington feeling is 
now standard. It goes by the name of populism 
and knows no party lines. Liberals and conserva- 
tives vie for its mantle Everyone is anti-institu- 
tional, anti-bureauc r atic No one talks anymore 
of government programs. But since everyone 
knows that government has to intervene in a 
complex society, new, disguised means have to be 
devised. Hence the 1980s’ angular obsession 
with taxes, the supreme instrument for interven- 
ing with a hidden hand. Invisible government — 
the next best thing to no government at alL 

It is not just Washington that plays the popu- 
list tune. Exploiting the distinction between peo- 
ple (good) and government (bad) has always 
been a favorite activity abroad. Robert Traut- 
raann, who was a TWA hostage, reported cm his 
jailers' view of America: “They tike the peo- 
ple ... It is the government they object- to.” 
Terrorists, totahtanans and others with not an 
inkling of what democracy is about invariably 
declare themsdves friends erf the American peo- 
ple and at war with the American government. 

This dichotomy denies the central premise of 
danocracy: that when people choose their gov- 
ernment the result is authentically representative 
erf the people. We should perhaps not expect 
from terrorists too deep a grasp of democratic 
theory. Rambo, too, an apparent aphasia victim, 
can be excused. The rest of us have no excuses. 

Hie appeal of mti-institutionaljsm, whether it 
takes the xonn of individualism or of populism, is 
no doubt strong. It can, however, take us only so 
far up to the point where we discover that, m a 
self-governing polity, we are our institutions. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


W ASHINGTON — An opportu- 
nity to strengthen one of the 
glories of the constitutional system — chose to 
that sense of stability that comes of his ~~ 
from, strict adherence to the law in 
times of peril — was botched by Fred 
Fielding, the White House counsel, 
and Attorney General Ed Meese. 

The 25th Amendment to the Con- 
stitution. dealing with a president's 
inability to function, was ratified by 
the states 20 years ago. The main 
purpose of its third section, setting 
forth the method a president should 


Plain Language, an Acting President 


By WUlia 

the transmission 
[ties and in the pro- 
cess confused everyone. 

He followed the law’s procedures 
but challenged its premises. In the 
letter to Congress prepared for him 
by bis uncertain legal trumpeters, he 
property declared His anticipated in- 
ability to discharge his powers and 
duties, but then wrote of “the uncer- 
tainties of [the law’s] application to 
such brief and temporary periods erf 


use to devolve his power temporarily incapacity,” and concluded: “I do 
upon the vice president, is plain: to not believe 
provide 


president, is p 

unbroken decision- making 

power, so that nobody will be templ- 
ed by the prospect of retaliatory pa- 
ralysis to launch a nuclear strike. 

Other decisions can be postponed 
a day or a week; no need exists for a 
formal transfer of power in an emer- 
gency. In practical terms, the main 
reason for that addition to America's 
fundamental law is lo advertise an 
ability to respond immediately. 

This section was tailor-made for 
the situation that confronted (he 
president and his legal advisers last 
week. A president, in full possession 
of mental and physical faculties, de- 
cided to go ahead with a major opera- 
tion. The whole world knew, as it 
should, the time of the operation and 
the approximate length of time the 
president would be unconscious. 
Thai was the time of danger that 
Section 3 was created to avert. 

What did this president do? In a 
moment calling for absolute clarity, 
be acted with deliberate fuzziness; 
rather than clothe the nation in the 
newest armor of the Constitution, he 


that the drafters of this 

amendment intended its application 
to situations such as the instant one.” 
Protesting that he was not setting a 
precedent (although be was), Mr. 
Reagan then obeyed the law. His 
spokesman, asked if the vice presi- 
dent had become acting president, 
the title used in the amendment, was 
left twisting in the wind. He would 
not answer, thus refusing on behalf of 
the president and his legal advisers to 
admit that the law was bring applied. 

Why this legalistic flimflam/ One 
reason that will be put forward is that 
he did not want to unduly alarm 
anyone— as if cutting out a third of 
your large intestine to avert cancer 
were not alarming , or that following 
the Constitution would be alarming. 
Another specious excuse for tins 
constitutional myopia is that any 
brief transfer of power during a ma- 
jor operation would lead to trivial 
demands for such transfers during 
dental work or afternoon naps. That 
is pure nonsense; the Kremlin need 
not be notified when the president 
plans to have a tooth pulled. 


m S afire 

Underlying President Reagan’s 
fear of admitting his requirement 
to obey Sections in an emergency, 
1 think, is the fear of having to 
deal with its pressure to declare in- 
ability for a longer period. Someday 
a president wiU be faced with a debili- 
tating physical or mental ailment, 

and wifi be tempted by an option that 

is short of resignation. 

. Digging one layer below that, in 
seeking the motive for last week’s 
curious refusal to admit precedent, 
we find the inherent threat to presi- 
dents of Section 4: the in voluntary 
removal of an iiKaparitflteri execu- 
tive by his cabinet possibly even over 


J yesterday’s 

executive prerogative with today’s 
constitutional requirement. 

_ Before undergoing a major opera- 
tion, a conscious president should 
declare his vice president to be the 
acting president. When the elected 
chief executive comes to, he can re- 
assume power by invoking the im- 
mortal words of the Reagan Prece- 
dent: “Gimme that pen.” 

The New York Times. 


nored U.S. law instructing directors 
of multilateral banks to oppose loans 
to gross violators of human rights. 

If Washington were serious about 
promoting a return to democracy, it 
would make lull use of economic le- 
verage to press for broader civil liber- 
ties. Chileans still resent the Nixon 
adminis tration’s commitment to res- 
cue than from their “irresponsibil- 
ity” after they elected a socialist pres- 
ident, Salvador Allende, in 1970. 
They are puzzled by the Reagan ad- 
ministration's insistence that the des- 
tiny of Chile is in “good hands.” 

The restoration of democracy may 
be months or even years away, but 
the opposition is now budding to- 
ward that day. The United States 
should unambiguously support these 
efforts. The longer General Pinochet 
remains in power, the greater will be 
the suffering of the Chilean people 
and the likelihood of polarization 
and civil strife. Bring soft on General 
Pinochet is not only morally indefen- 
sible, it is shortsighted politics. 

The writer, a senior associate ad the 
Carnegie Endowment for Internation- 
al Peace, visited Chile last month on a 
mission for Americas Watch, a human 
rights organization. He contributed 
this comment to The Hew York Tunes. 


Turbulence 
Coining Up 
For France 

Bv Flora Lewis 

P ARIS — There was a downpour 
in the middle of the traditional 
military parade this Bastille Day, a 
symbol perhaps of the muddle ahead 
for France's Fifth Republic. 

Before next year's national holiday 
there is almost sure to he a constitu- 
tional crisis. Politicians are doing all 
they can to foreclose available solu- 
tions . They don't want to make things 
worse, bui that is the effect of tnc 
maneuvering for next spring's parlia- 
mentary elections, with the 1988 
presidential vote in the background. 

There is greater underlying consen- 
sus in France on major policies than 
there has been in decades, hut the 
leaders and the parth.; !ia\e devel- 
oped such an intricate pattern of ri- 
valry that no figure is ; n a position to 
embody the basic national view. 

The ‘central problem is that the 
constitution. hand-taiWcd for the 
outsized Charles de Gaulle, draws no 
clear lice between the powers of the 
National Assembly ant those of the 
president, but gives them different 
terms, five years for the legislators 
and seven for the presidenL 
Until now the president's support- 
ers have always controlled the As- 
sembly. so the dilemma was never 
faced. No one doubts that President 
Francois Mitterrand's Socialists wifi 
lose their absolute majority next year. 
They will do well to win a quarter of 
the seats. Elsewhere that would make 
a coalition government inevitable 
and the big question would be about 
bow to cut the deal. 

There are people Mr. Mitterrand 
could choose as prime minister with 
whom he could probably work and 
who probably could have patched to- 
gether enough blocs to hold the legis- 
lature. That has been made far more 
difficult by a reform reintroducing 
proportional representation instead 
or the current two-round, single- 
member constituency system. Pro- 
portional representation enhances 
the power of the established party 
apparatuses that draw up the lists, 
leaving less room for mavericks. 

Mr. Mitterrand has made clear 
that he does not intend (o resign, as 
some in the opposition demand. But 
he has come down on the side of the 
Socialist Party’s tough-minded secre- 
tary. Lionel Jospin, in a recent quar- 
rel with Prime Minister Laurent Fa- 
bius about running the campaign. 
Mr. Fabius wanted a strategy of 
opening toward the center, which 
would make a future coalition easier. 
Mr. Jospin argued that this would 
weaken the party’s inner structure 
and that it would be better to be 
driven into opposition for a time. The 
Communists, who were the Socialists’ 
initial partners but are now their all- 
out detractors, say this is planning for 
defeat. For once they are righL 
It is hard to see how Mr. Mitter- 
rand intends to govern when his own 
party is in opposition to his ministers. 
He could, in de Gaulle's contemptu- 
ous phrase for a powerless chief of 
state, resign himself to “inaugurating 
chrysanthemums.” But that is not 
Mr. Mitterrand's style at all. 

He says now that trying to remove 
foreign policy from supreme presi- 
dential derisions would amount “to a . 
coup d’fetaL” Since most key issues, 
including economic and military pol- 
icy, involve foreign partners ana al- 
lies, that means insisting on about as 
much power as de Gaulle wielded. ’ 
The French have devised the pro- 
vocative term “cohabitation” for the 
prospect of power-sharing between a 
president and a prime minister from 
opposing parties. Two of the major- 
leaders against -Mr. Mitterrand, far? 
mer Preadent Valery Giscard <TEs- 
taing and former Prime Minister Jac- 
ques Chirac, say they would accept, 
but only on their terms, which pro- 
vide for dismantling much of Met 
the Socialists have done since 1981. 

The third and most popular oppo- 
sition leader, former Prime Minister , 
Raymond Baire, says he will ntAcq- 
habit. All three are positioning them- 
selves to run for presidenL so each b 
more concerned with highlighting his . 
own profile as an effective leader 
than in making government work. 

There is lot of fervent talk about' 
the ideal versus the mena n g of social- 
ism and the virtues versus the vices of 
capitalism. Bui that is not what the 
fight is abouL It is about (he govern- ? 
ment’s sorry economic record and 
about persona] ambitions. The first is ' 
obvious and Lhe second are boring ur 
the public, so there isn't an atmc 
al tension. The dee 

„„rked up yr 

Nonetheless, the crisis is cormof 
and it is going to make France even 
more than usually difficult to dad 
with. The Fifth Republic, founded bj 
de Gaulle in 1958. seemed to ban 
taken firm root and demonstrate!! 
stability when for the first tbnepowfi 
was. transferred smoothly to the oo- 
position in 1981. But the hidden Has 
was lurking. It is what comes of mak- 
ing a constitution to fit a man. ' •' 

The New York Times, 


his qbjwtions, with the matter of an- QamttSbnnnmeJmA 
thority left for Congress to decide. D^et-aponsored 1 error 

(I wrote a novel a few years ago about Alexander Haig, in “U.S. Force Is 


usurpation under the 25th Amend- 
ment, and suddenly lhe p ros pect 
seems less remote.) 

The Reagan staff had a brush with 
the need lo consider Section 4 after 
his shooting, and responded wrongly 
by not even considering the matter in 
fonnal cabinet session. One would 
think that previous failure in tbsr 
particular case would have readied 
than for proper response in “the in- 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ^ 

American Bar Association, Inn ghal 
My dictionary says that the time 
tested word comes from Old EngiisS 
Old German or even Old Norse. - 
Harry Truman, not given to sod 
cuteness. once used the term “hots 
manure” in a speech. A friend report 
edly said to Bess. “Can’t you get bin 
to say fertilizer?” The first lad 
shrugged: “If you knew how long 4 
took me to get him to say manured 
MORTON PUNER. 
Sl Tropez, France. ‘ 

Mixed-Up Tennis Singles 

I am all in favor of unisex, but 1 d( 
think your Wimbledon coverage 
(July 2) is a. bit much when.il identi- 
fies Britain's John Lloyd by his wife': 
maiden name,. as John Even. Wha 
are you. going to start calling the 
president Ronald Davis? ■ . ■ 
JOHN PARR Y;‘ : 
Geneva;. 


Part of the Answer” (July 5), does 
well to observe that the Soviet Union 
“bears a heavy responsibility” f or ter- 
rorism. A hah to Soviet sponsorship 
of international terrorism must be 
part of any disarmament accord. 

t.lamplough. 

London. 

BuR/Horse + Old Norse 

As quoted in “Reagan Asserts 5 
Nations, in ‘Acts of War,’ Aid Ter- 
rorists” (July 9), the president an- 
swered Soviet statements 3bout U.S. 
“hysteria” during the hostage crisis 
by saving “there is a.non-Soyiet word 
for that kind. of telk, an. extremely 
useful, time-tested original word, one 
with deep roots in our rich agricultur- 
al and farming tradition.” No wonder 
his audience, member.* of the learned 







France 

ora Lewis 

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— “■_ — ^7 7 •.“- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 


Page 5 


7te Assddaed Press 

NAIROBI — An international 
conference to appraise the progress 
of women dnxmg die United Na- 
tions: Becadefor Women opened 
Mrauiay in Nairobi with appeals to 
avoid divisive political issues that 
could threaten the success of the 
gathering: ' - ■ 

Janer^Pfflfa de Cufflar. the UN 
secretary-general, called for a 
“spirit of understanding and com- 
pronnseT. from more than 3,000 
ddegates representing 155 coun- 
tries, wfowere joined oy mcae than 
11,000. observers and participants 
for unofficial roeetimK.'Ap»oo!i- 
fg ence “Fonnn . ^S" began last 
Wednesday: 

Mr. Pfcrtz de Cufflar cautioned, 
tlx delegates, against trying to tack- 
le long-standing issues that are be- 
ing discossed in other UN forums. 

Preadtint Damd Arap Moi of 

' 1 s • , 

Bmqoe Kidnap Victim Freed 

.. Reuters 

SAN SEBASTIAN, Spain— Po- 
lice raided an apartment . Monday 
in die. nearby town of Levo and 
rescoed Angd Carasosan Madrazo, 
65, a landowner who was kid- 
napped last week. They arrested 
four persons. 


erence on Women Opens in Nairobi 


Kenya opened the conference by 
adfnpwta^ng flat “differences of 
opinion .-anj bound to arise? but 
eroressed hope that they wcaild not 
eenree more vital women's issues. 

■ The conference runs until July 
26. .It comes at the dose of the 
UN's Decade far -Women which 
was launched lflyeareagom MpTi . 
co Oty to foster equality, peace 
and development. ■ 

■ Confrontation Expected 

Blaine Barden of The Washing- 
ton Post reported earlier. r 

Tim stage has been set in Nairobi 
for a political eonfrf>ntati»n be- 
tween Third W orld countries, and 
the United States. 

The North-South,, rich-poor 
schism that q>peais likely to wad- 
ante, and posably derail, the 10- 
day gathering was pot in stark re- 
bel by two blunt speeches last 
week.- ■’ 

. Id WashtoetozL President Ron- 
ald Ragan ditched the U.S. 
delegation, headed Ire his daughter 
Maureen, to Nairom with these 
words; ‘The members erf your dele- 
gation firmly believe that the busi- 
ness of this conference is women, 
not propaganda. Should it prove 
necessary, you’ll be more than will- 
ing to fight to keep the conference 
on track. Take it from someone 


. who knows Maureen, -that’s the 
way it is going to be." 

By “propaganda/’ Mr. Reagan 

was referring to gtoboTpoliticalis- 
auesr such as the creation of a Pal- 
estinian state; apartheid in South 
Africa and' Third World condem- 
nation of Zionism. ' 

Mr. Reagan said timt “legitimate ' 
women's -concerns," were “all but 
ported off the agenda** by these 
political issues at pterions UN 
women’s conferences in Mexico, 
Gty in 1975 and Copenhagen in 
1980. ; 

In Nairobi on Friday, Margaret 
Papandreou, the American-born 
wife of Andreas Pqnmdreou, the 
Socialist prime mnnsta of Greece, 
spoke far many Third Wodd and 
Eastern bloc ddegations u*en tire 
said that the United States had no 
right to tell the world’s womoi 
what their concerns should be. ' 

Altboudi poGtica] issues qipear 
KVrtly ti> doonnate the conference 
again, there has been considerable 
movement over dm past 10 years on 
other issues highlighted fay UN 
women's conferences. 

To education, the gap is ‘ 
between boys and girls in school 
attendance, according to a 1985 
UN report. The improvement has 
-been greatest in developing coun- 
tries, where giris now are 41 percent 


of the secondary school pecula- 
tion,'^ Iran 37 percent in 1975. 

The wage gap between men and 
women, the report said, also has 
narrowed. Women in manufactur- 
ing now earn 73 percent of what 
meu earn, compared with 70 per- 
cent a decade ago. 

A fertility survey in 31 countries 
found that, within one generation, 
famfy-plamring campaigns have 
dramatically affected the number 
of children that women want. The 
average, number fell from six to 
four. 

.In Africa and in other Third 
World areas, awareness of the need 
Cor family planning and demand 
for contraceptives has increased 
sharply, accord i ng to f amity-plan- 
ning specialists. 

While noting these gains, the 
conference is also focusing os what 
has not changed in the past decade. 

The Copenhagen conference re- 
port concluded in 1980 that, “while 
women represent 50 percent of the 
world population, they perform 
nearly two-thirds of all working 
hours, receive only one-tenth of the 
world income ana own less than 1 
percent of world property " 

Last week, Letida R. Shahani, 

UN assistant secretary-general for 
the conference, said- that conclu- 
sion “remains appropriate:" 





‘ & 3 * 





DvAskxM hn 


Betty Friedan, right, an American writer and feminist, bolding a seminar on feminist issues at the University of Nairobi. 


White Militant, in Exile 22 Years, Retains His Hope for Black Victory in South Africa 


(Corfmaedfrom Page 1) 
came from far different back- 
grounds. She was the daughter of a 
prosperous fnmiture-mannfactnr- 
me family whose father and mother 


bers helped set up new groups and Mr. Sovo was one of the earliest 

publications. As the government leaders of the group, whose mem- 
oanned each, another came into bets met regularly at a farmhouse 


ed to force her to divulge secrets the country. It does not fool the goised in Mozambican uniforms tional 


ine family whose father and mother , uirougnom me oe- 

passed on their socialist beliefs to g“*fv 

her. He was the son of poor Li thus- . “ ve leftist jxriodicals, 

nian immigrants who came to cac b? ie » mtum * banned or dnven 

South Africa when he was 9. He - . f 

was forced to leave school after 

sixth grade to earn a living, and he 

later circumvented the roles to en- 

ter law school under a special pro- 

vision for veterans after serving in 

World War n When he eradnaied Vassal 81 the_meetmg at which it 


existence in a cat-and-mouse game in suburban Rivonia, outride of Jo- 
that continued throughout die de- hanne&urg. **I had b ffe n Vnrawwl 


about the movement. On her re- police, an 
lease she, too. left the country. breaking _ 

Ruth First was a prolific writer and eventually taking an overdose skirts of Maputo, where they as- sees her murder as a prelude to the 
ntmvng out books mi African nwli- of sWpmp puis in an attempt to saniti»d three erf the congress mem- nonaggression pact 
tary rulers, the Libyan revolution, commit smrade bers’ houses, killing 13 persons. “In the theoretical scheme of 

ith African novelist Olive Life in exile was not easy. Miss In 1983. after a car bomb planted things which Ruth tried to promote 

First moved from job to job and outside the headquarters of the there was no place for the expecta- 

to -«"«» studying revolu- South African Air Force in Pretoria tion that you could get any change 
urn as a free tionary movements. Mr. Slovo killed 19 persons, the South Afri- from a bargain with Pretoria, be 

helped reconstruct the under- cans retaliated with an air strike said m a recent talk in Maputo on 
frfra. . ground network and cement the against the Maputo suburb of Ma- the second anniversary of her 

dose ties between the African Na- tola. death. “In this sense she was in 

cxmdCongreu rad the Soviet bloc They also supplied rebels takfc 

that gradually brought the move- Mozambique with arms, training then i ordCTed the parcel to be pre- 
mem the weapons md trainiiig it SdSST. nda^gedl^ pared and went off to have his 


and she becomes deaerate, crossed the border and traveled 50 link to Fi 


cade. In 15 years Ruth First from a tten ding meetings since tary rulers, the Libyan revolution, 
worked for five leftist periodicals, 1955, but we were fining to four or the South African novelist Olive 
each one, in turn, banned or driven 


into hysterical 

natty taking an 


AUTHORS WANTED 
Ltrica BY N.Y. PUBLISHER 

Lradng subsidy boot puttshei mil mono- 
i’S most important wpR of of) «yp«. fiction, non-fiOion, poovy, 
. die Front for d* 


miles (80 kilometers) to the out- Liberation of Mozambique, and he vantage Pms. si6w 34]hs>..NB»>Vork l NY 
skirts of Modulo, where thev as- sees her murder as a prelude to the 10001 U - S - A - 


On whether he is likely to return as a free 


man to a black-ruled South Africa: 
'Absolutely yes.’ 


Wodd War IL When be graduated • “1 ™ “ ^ ^ 

ton law echool. he won «p hoo- : 

, away watching the proceedings five meetings a day and getting Schreiner and a two-volume study 

Ther passionate involvement through binoadars. away with h,” Mr. Sovo recalls. of migrant workers in Mozam- 

with the Communist Party became After a wave of protests follow- Then the govenmieat struck. Us- irfque. But the book that may out- 
the gjue that brought and held j™ ^ SharpcviOe Massacre in ing infonnants and confesrions, last the other* is “117 Days,” a 144- 
them together. One year after their the gover nment cracked some of them obtained by torture, page account of her time in 

wedding their names were near the down,dodanng a state erf emergen- according to documented cases, the detention, 
top or the list of 600 people pro- cy, outlawing the African Natianal^ ^security police quickly exposed and The self-image of the committed 
scribed from politics nnder one of and anesting 1 j 600 oeo- destroyed the nndapoand net - freedom fighter is there, but there 

the new South African regime s work. By late 1963 all of the major are glimpses of another, more reo- ™ 

earliest edicts, the Suppression of r Haying long been accustomed to leaders were either behind bars ogmzable person as wdl; con- WflKn ® 
Co mm u nism AcL operating illegally, the movement's serving life sentences, like Mr. cemed that her mother will not be 

The 1950s were beady time* leaders continued to do so without Mandela, or had fled the country, able to cope with Miss Fust’s three 
when each side, the government taking new precautions. The atmo- Mr. Sovo lad left an an “exter- children, and worried about her 
and its foes, sought new strategies sphere remained loose and noncoo- nal mission” in June 1963 one clothes and her lack <rf makeup, 
to defeat the other. For Mr. Slovo spiratorial even after the leadership month beforea police raid rounded Most of all, it is a portrait of a 

and Miss First it was a time of undo- Mr. Mandela decided in up key figures at Rivonia. His wife woman on the edge. She fears that 
intense activity, underground 1962 to organize a military wing to was arrested a month later and hrid shewfl] crack and feeds her in terro- 
mee tings, protests and conspira-- strike agamst n^w* targets to for nearly four mouths without gators a mixture of- lies and half- 


dinner.’’ 

South African officials have de- 
nied any role in her death. 


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lastthenthmis“117Davs.’* al44- lias pul an end to me movements 

Sir, SESIS nf he? rime in (oma cotaues, was a activities there. Mr. Sic 

ctemfr? 1 ■ • h boon both for their movement and V o’s expulsion from Maputo 


intense activity, underground 1962 to organize a military wing to 
meetings, protests and conspira- - strike agamst economic targets to 
cies. After it was outlawed, the par- “bring the government to its 
^ went underground, and mem- senses/* 


Mr. Sovo lad left an an “exter- children, and worried about her Z 

il mission” in June 1963 one clothes and her lack of makeup. ’ 5S.J rSLJSTSSt^of a 
ooth beforea police raid rounded Most of aD, it is a portrait of a fS!? r rank at Eduardo 

i key figures atRivoma. His wife w^man on S edge. She fears that VSStJ&iSe b ° mb - 

» i.tM- «wi .k. — lr Mondlane Umveraty. M 


set oi oases closer to aourn Amca wan t 

from which to plan operations. Pm in the end H was th e a cadem- 

Eventually Mr. Sovo and Miss not the warrior, who 3 

First moved to Maputo, Mozam- casualty. In August 1982 Miss First 
bique. He set up an operational was killed at her university office in 
center fra the movement, and she Maputo when she opened a pared 
became research director of a adaressed to her c ontained a 


Mfe’ve .captured the hair 
of Rodeo Drive. 


Mr. Sovo says he is certain that 


A Mux Baril Hul i'l 


charge or access to a lawyer while tr uths, mtpfi rating mly hersdf and * activities 


the police unsuccessfully attempt- those she knows have already fled January 1981 commandos dis- because she was the African Na- 


South Africa's response to his die was killed by someone in the t u c dci/cd t v D n n c n u r\ tc i 

tivities was swift and harsh. In South African security apparatus, *■ ^ .-A Y_C> L. Y KU LJ L y H U 1 CL 


360 N. Rodeo Dr- Bnvrlv Hilb. CA 90210 . Telex No. 691166 


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Plants have fed the world 
and cured its ills since life began. 

Now we’re destroying their principal habitat 
at the rate of 50 acres every minute. 


W e five on this planet by courtesy 
of the earthb gree n cover. Hants 


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protect fragile soils from erosion, 
regulate tire atmosphere, maintain 
water supplies for agriculture surd 
prevent formation of deserts. Without 
plants man could not survive. 

Yet, knowing this, we are destroying 
our own life-support system at such an 
alarming rate that it has already become 
a crisis - a crisis for ourselves and an 
even lugger one for our children. 

The figures akrne should tell the story 
- we destroy a tropical rain forest three 
times the size of Switzerland every year, 
within 25 years only fragments of me 
vast Malaysian ana Indonesian forests 
win remain. 







Fboto 1 . Courtesy ofRkhard Evua Scfaulles 


Botanical Museum at Harvard University, has 
spent Ryearsm the Ama&rt jungle eoUeaing 
ike 'magic 'plants of myth and legend and 
making diem available to Western medicine 
and science. 'The drugs efthejuture," he says, 
grot v in the primeval junpe? 

What we are destroying 
Much of the food, medicines and 
materials we use every day of our li ves 
is derived from the wild species which 
grow in the tropics. Yet only a tiny 
tractio n of the world’s flowering plants 
have been studied for possible use. 
Horrifyingly, some 25,000 of all 
flowering species are on the verge of 
extinction. 

Once the plants go, they axe gone ; 
forever. Once the forests go only 
wastelands remain. 


PbotttfFmcii) Bruce Cokm*a/Bria-t Coate* 


Photo: Mark. J. PkttJcin 
Catkananthusmseus. Many of the world's 
children vho have steered from leukaemia are 
ttom ahveduetothe properties discovered in 
the rosy penwoodde, tchuh originated in 
Madagascar where 90% of the forests are 
already destroyed. 

Who is the villain? 

There is no villain - except ignorance 
and short-sightedness. The desperately 
poor people who live in the forests have 
to dear areas for crops and fuel, but 
they are doing this in such a way that 
they are destroying their very livelihood. 

Add to this the way in which the 
heart is being rippedout of the forests 
to meet the demand for tropical 
timbers and we have a recipe for 
disaster 


What can be done about it? 
The problem seems so vast that there is 
a tendency to shrug and say “What can 
I do?” But there is an answer There is 
something that each and every one of 
us can do. 

The WWF Plant 
Conservation Programme 
The World Conservation Strategy, 
published in 1980, is a programme for 
: conserving the world's natural resources 
whilst managing them for human 
needs. A practical, international plant 
conservation programme has been pre- 
pared based on WCS principles and is 
nowweD underway alJ around the world. 





1 



The Vavilov Centres . Samtd after the Russian 
scientist toko identified them. Then are the 
regions in tchich our major crop plasm tcerv 
first domesticated. Many of these regions 
‘contain xeild’ar semi -domesticated nlatkes of ■ 
commercial species tchich can be cross-bred mth 
crop plants tu inert ase yield and resistance to ’ ' 
pests and diseases. 

j> 

Yon can become part of it 

The WWF Plant Conservation 
Programme is a plan for survival which ! 
you can help make a reality. Join the 
Wodd Wildlife Fund now. We need 
your voice and your financial support. -. 

Get in touch with your local WWF 
office for membership details, or send ‘ 
your contribution direct to the World > 
Wildlife Fund at: WWF International, ; 
Membership Secretary, Wodd Ccuiser- 
vation Centre, 1196 Gland, Switzerland.^ 


breedmgmld potatoes from die Andes toith 
domestic varieties, ensure that hdandtaHl 


taped out its entire crop, leaving a million 
■people to die of starvation. 


& 


Save the plants ’ 
that save us. ■ 


WWF FOR WORLD CONSERVATION 1 







Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 


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On Trek With Afghans: Rebels Slip by Soviet Posts 


By Arthur Bonner 

New York Times Service 

SHULGARA, Afghanistan — 
The trails leading north from Paki- 
stan into Afghanistan are alive with 
men, bedecked with Korans and 
cartridge belts, and with mules, 
donkeys and camels piled high with 
weapons and ammuni tion. 

They meet' other men, unarmed 
and in groups from 30 to 100 or 
more, moving south to receive 
t rainin g and pick up supplies for 
what the Afghans describe as a ji- 
had against the Soviet Union, 
which sent troops into Afghanistan 
in 1979. 

The insurgents refer to the Soviet 
troops as the “atheist invader.” 

“If you hear a MiG. guide your 
horse into the shade of some tree or 
rock. If you hear a helicopter, jump 
off, forget the horse and get under a 
rock,” a rebel leader tola a foreign 
reporter as he set out with 1 IS men, 
two horses, two mules, and six don- 
keys on a uek with newiy acquired 
weapons from P akis tan. The desti- 
nation was Shulgara, a district cen- 
ter just 60 miles (96 kilometers) 
south of the Soviet border. 

Not once during the 23-day uek 
to Shulgara, however, did the col- 
umn come under attack by Soviet 
planes or helicopters. 

The trek began on a sour note — 
a complaint about the quality of 
gun s that had been given to them. 


“We have belter weapons c^- 


guene of Abdul Sadiq. He pointed 
to the bolt-action World War I ri- 
fles distributed to some of his men. 

“They take our best weapons 
and give us these," be said, alluding 
to many allegations that the Paki- 
stanis keep a large share of the 
military supplies intended for the 
Afghan rebels. The Pakistanis are 
said to give obsolete weapons. 

It was early April when most of 
the snow had melted in the passes 
— at altitudes of 7,000 to 9,000 feet 
— through the mountains forming 
an east-west spine. 

About 700 men of the Jamiat-i- 
Islami, or Islamic Society, one of 
the seven major parties with head- 
quarters in the Pakistani border 
city of Peshawar, had spent the 
winter resting and bong trained. 

They were eager to return to 
their homes in what they call Ma- 
zar. Mazar-i-Shaiif, capital of the 
province of Balkb, once lent its 
name to the province, too. 

The rebels were divided into four 
groups to travel separately, with 
some distance between their routes 
to present less of a target to the 
Soviet and Afghan soldiers, and 
also to ease strains on villages 
where the insurgents would be fra 
and sheltered. 

The reporter traveled with the 
first group, which was to move 
quickly to test the safety of the 
route and to replenish ammunition 


lured from the Russians,” said 
man who would command the 
march and who gave a nom de 


expended by rebel units in the win- 
ter's fighting 


fighting. Many or the men 
were bearing Kalashnik ovs, shoul- 
der-fired anti- tank gnn.t, Chinese 


anti-vehicle mines or full packs of 
ammunition. 

The animals were loaded with 
more ammunition, light machine 
gims, and a 1 7. 7- millim eter ma- 
chine gun said to be useful against 
helicopters and low-flying MiGs. 
The group was prepared to defend 
itself against ambushes and other 
hazards along the way. 

Tbe later groups were to be 
spaced at intervals of days and 
weeks, using more animals to cany 
greater supplies, including more 
advanced missiles for use against 
ground forces and aircraft. 

As the march began, the men 
stood quietly under a full moon 
and listened to a mullah extol the 
jihad. 

He repeated the promises Of the 
Koran and the sayings of the 
Prophet Mohammed that those 
who die as martyrs would not feel 
pain or suffer in helL He said they 
should not place their trust in their 
weapons, because victory depends 
on God alone. 

It is a message the men said they 
had heard many times. Almost a 
third of them had small or regular 
Korans wrapped in doth or leather 
packets slung over their shoulders. 

The column traveled at night to 
cross the border region, where So- 
viet forces attack with MiGs and 
helicopters in efforts to cut supply 
routes. The column also traveled at 
night across an open plain where 
Soviet troops have a huge base, at 
the provincial capital of Gardez. 

Walking silently, showing no 


lights, the men moved swiftly along 
a dirt toad hardy half a mtie from 
tbe base. Tbe lights of Gardez 
shone dearly. Every now and then 
a flare was sent up from the Gardez 
garrison. 

The real challenge came not 
from the enemy but from the ter- 
rain. Soon after the march began, 
the insurgents had blisters and ach- 
ing muscles, yet they never seemed 
to quarrel ana were always ready to 
move. They did not groan or com- 
plain. 

The rebels were Uzbeks, Turk- 
men. T adzhiks and descendants of 
andem Arabs — the predominant 
ethnic and linguistic groups of 

northern Afghanistan. 

The column was divided into five 
groups of 20 to 25 men. 

Once the column entered the 
centra] mountainous area known as 
the Hazarajat, a new danger ap- 
peared. The region, vaguehr de- 
fined, covers all or parts of five or 
six provinces and is inhabited 
mainly by the Hazara, a Persian- 
speaking people who are said to 
descend from the Mongol armies of 
Genghis Khan. They are estimated 
to total 800,000 to 1.5 million. 

Their faith is one of the things 
that distinguishes them. While 
most Afghan Moslems adhere to 
tbe Sunni branch, the Hazara are 
Shiites, like most Iranians. 

Two groups, Nasr, meaning Vic- 
tory, and Sepah, meaning Soldiers, 
who espouse the revoluuonary Is- 
lamic politics of Ayatollah Ruhol- 
Iah Khomeini tbe Iranian leader. 


control almost all of the Hazarajat, 
the rebels said. A town or village 
controlled by them can be distin- 
guished by portraits of the ayatol- 
lah on walls, along with long no- 
tices and rules for dealings in tbe 
bazaar. 


Sometimes there are also posters 
with blood dripping from Soviet 
and U.S. flags, flowing over a map 
of Afghanistan. The two pro-Kho- 
meini groups assert that the Soviet 
Union and the United States are 
equally guilty of harm to the Islam- 
ic woricL ' 


At one point the men had been 
riding in a ramshackle bus and 
truck to rest their feet and backs. 
Throughout the day the vehicles 
hod beat stopped by Shiite groups 
entrenched in valleys and on 
ridges. They demanded guns and 
ammunition or money. 


Each time Abdul Sadiq, the com- 
mander, had to persuade them to 
drop their demands. Usually a 
dose lode at so many well-armed 
men in the bus was persuasion 
enough, but if a Hazara roadblock 
commander began a long ideologi- 
cal discussion the delay could ex- 
tend to more than an hour. 



£ 






£v ; .:7 : ~3! 

33*--* 


As the mountains of the Hazara- 
jat diminished, the men pointed to 
the swift waters of a river sweeping 
north through a wide valley, calling 
out “ Mazar i Mazar!” the *mmp of 
tbe area to which they were return- 
ing, near the Soviet border. 

The river flows into the Balkb 
River and fills the irrigation ditches 


€>- : >7*. 

Da Nsm Vo* Tmu. AiHu Bom* 

Afghan insurgents praying during a trek with guns, ammunition and supplies. 


for the rich rice 
orchards of their 
Rifle shots and bursts of Kalash- 
nikov fire sounded as they reached 
the first rebel base in Balkh. In two 
more days they were at Shulgara, 


lains and fruit where they left most of their sup- 
plies and went on in smaller groups 
to their home areas. 

Tbe rebel commanders were al- 
ready working on plans to gather a 
new group of veterans and raw re- 


cruits to journey south to rest, train 
and return with more supplies. 

There is, it seems, an endless re- 
serve of men eager to join the jihad 
and drive the Soviet invaders from 
their soil. 


Line Forms to the Left as Thatcher’s Popularity Slips in Polls 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Tima Service 


LONDON — As recently as six 
months ago they were saying at the 
Palace of Westminster that Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher was a 
sure thin g for a third consecutive 


at 30 percent and others with I 
percent. Translated into seats, that 
would mean a Parliament without a 
majority party. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


term, something none of her prede- 
cessors managed. 


But now the politicians and pun- 
dits are predicting that she proba- 
bly will not make it, even though 


she need not call a general election 
until June 1988 and will almost 


certainly wait at least until the au- 
tof 1987. 


It was the by-elecdon in a district 
in Wales on July 4, however, that 
persuaded doubters that Mrs. 
Thatcher was in real trouble. The 
Tory candidate finished third in a 
constituency that his party had 
won in the general election, only 
the fourth time that had ha ppen 
since 1918. The alliance candidate, 
Richard Livsey, won, and Labor’s 
man finished a dose second If ex- 
perience is any guide, the victory 
will help the alliance in the forth- 
coming polls. 


sale of public housing to tenants 
and begun to work out detailed 
'ideas on how a nonnuclear Britain 
could maintain an active role in the 
Western alliance. 

The Conservatives, meanwhile, 
are in turmoiL Having mllmrl tough 
for years and having won a reputa- 


claim that, whatever thdr past ora- 
tory, the Tories have, in fact, in- 
creased spending for welfare (part- 
ly because of high unemployment), 
health and, to a small degree, pri- 
mary and secondary education. 
Only universities and housing have 
been hard hiL 


The Conservatives’ problems and the 
opposition revival mean that, more than at 
any time since 1923, Britain faces a three- 
party race in the next elections. 


tunm i 


Gallup Poll surveys in March, 
April May and June showed Mrs. 
Thatcher's Conservatives with 30 


percent to 34 percent support, a 
considerable decline from the 42.4 


percent of the popular vote in their 
1983 landslide. 


the pop ular ' 

lide. The latest survey, 
lak month, showed the Tories and 
Labor tied with 34.5 percent, the 
Liberal-Social Democratic alliance 


Labor should also be looking 
stronger. Under Neil Kinnock it 
has won bade votes that drifted 
away between 1979, when it ran a 
respectable losing race, and 1983, 
when it did not. Mr. Kinnock has 
proven a deft tactician and has 
managed to modify many of La- 
bor’s unpopular positions. His par- 
ty has softened its nationalization 
policy, switched to support of the 


turn for slashing spending for pen- 
sions, schools and health, the gov- 
ernment has now begun to assert 
the opposite. Talk of “the true face 
of social Toryism,” of a caring, ser- 
vice-oriented government, is com- 
ing from Conservatives such as 
John Biffen, the leader of the 
House of Commons. 

Figures appear to support the 


Conservative members of Parlia- 
ment, reading the polls and the by- 
election results, clamor for even 
more spending. But Mrs. Thatcher 
and her supporters insist that in- 
creased spending would rekindle 
inflation and prevent politically 
meaningful preelection tax cuts 
What some backbenchers be- 


Mrs. Thatcher’s style has become a 
liability. The more moderate 
among them wish that rite would 
change her tone, the more extreme 
that she would step down. What is 
more likely is a reshuffling of the 
cabinet, gmerally regarded as lack- 
luster, possibly including the return 
of Cecil Parkinson, the former min- 
ister of trade and industry and a 
polished public advocate of gov- 
ernment policy. He left office two 
yean ago after it was disclosed that 
he had fathered a child out of wed- 
lock. 

The Conservatives’ problems 
and the opposition revival mean 
that, more than at any rime since 
1923, Britain faces a three-party 
race. But it is not an even fight 
Labor’s votes are concentrated in 
the cities, in Scotland and in the 
north of England, while alliance 
and Tory supporters are more 
evenly spread. 

Davia Butler of Nuffield Col- 



U.S., Australia Affirm 


►- 


Commitment to Treaty 


By Don Oberdorfcr 

Washington Post Service 

CANBERRA, Australia — The 
United States and Australia put on 
a display of solidarity Monday al- 
ius in the absence of New 


ter 


Margaret Thatcher 


lege, Oxford, an election analyst, 
calculates tha 


lieve, but dare not say aloud, is that 


that Labor needs 37.8 
percent of the popular vote for a 
parliamentary majority; the Con- 


servatives need 38 percent, and the 
alliance, 413. As things stand, 
none of the three parties seems 
within reach of its target, which 
makes a hung Parliamen t with the 
alliance holding the balance of 
power, a possibility to be taken 
seriously. 


HcralbSS^Eribune. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 



o ,j;i{ . 

ETIER. 


The Trib’s business section is now bigger and better than ever. Every day it’s packed with the 
business news you need. Gear, easy-to-read tables on currencies, interest rates and gold prices] Com- 
plete Wail Street stock listings (even on Saturday mornings). Company notes, industry overviews and 
corporate profiles. A special report on “Personal Investing” every month. And much, much more. 


fill 


Each day of the week a colui 

of special interest to the business community: 


MondayDurobonds 


Eurobonds. The authoritative column by Carl Gewirtz, complemented by his col umn on Syndicated Frans and 
by an exclusive weekly listing of 2,000 Eurobonds prices. 


Futures and Options, 
the danger signals. 


Tuesday/F utures and Options 

is, from commodities to financial futures. The trends. The probabilities. The 


“go” si gnals and 


Wednesdayintemational Manage] 


International Manager. Sherry Buchanan searches for creative solutions to far-ranging problems tha t cross 
national borders. 


Thursck/W all Steet Watch 

Wall Street Watch. Edward Rohr bach discusses how analysts on both sides of the Atlantic are siring up the 
markets. His incisive reporting of dominant trends brings order to the variety of stimulating opinions. 

FridaVTechnology 

Technology. The devices, the systems, the scientific breakthroughs that revitalize production and transform services. 

SaturdayEconomic Scene 

Economic Scene. Penetrating analysis of the forces that are constantly reshaping tbe world economy. 


And the latest financial figures 


The Trib’s extensive financial tables include daily closing prices from the New York Stock 
Exchange, the American Stock Exchange and a list erf over-the-counter stocks. And because the Trib 
publishes six days a week, you don’t have to wait until Monday to get Friday's cloang prices. 

Other dally listings include world currency rates, key money rates, commodity prices, futures and 
a round-up of world stock markets. And Monday brings the only comprehensive weekly listing of 
Eurobond prices available in any periodical, plus mutual fund prices and a complete OTC list 

The Trib keeps you up-to-date on business news and financial figures six days a week, Monday 
through Saturday. 


EC Farm Chiefs Meeting 
On Chain, Pasta Disputes 


Zealand, the missing ally in the 34- 
year-oid security pact between the 
three countries. 

After a daylong series of meet- 
ings on security, political and eco- 
nomic issues, the U.S. secretary nf 
state, George P. Shultz, and the 
Aust ralian foreign minister, Wil- 
liam G. Hayden, were full of 
smiles, fellowship and expressions 
of mutual satisfaction. 

Mr. Shultz had appealed to Aus- 
tralia on arriving hoe to maintain 
and develop its alliance with the 
United States in the face of “a 
steady and disturbing” Soviet mili- 
tary buildup in tbe Pacific. 

He also cited “escapism and iso- 
lationism” that he said “have been 
exploited continually by our adver- 
saries." This statement seemed 
dearly aimed at New Zealand, 
which early this year caused a seri- 
ous rupture in what had been a 


Hayden said that the absence of 
New Zealand from its workings 
had not affected the security of the 
region in any critical fashion. 

The Australian defense minister, 
Kim C. Beazley, said the absence of 
New Zealand had imposed addi- 
tional military requirements on 
Australia, including additional sur- 
veillance and military exercises in 
the Pacific. 


Mr. Beazley called these “costs 
we are prepared to carry" and said 
that because of U.S. and Australian 
actions the security of the region 
was “un diminished." 


Asked about the recent proposal 
by David Lange, the prime minister 
of New Zealand, that the ban on 
nuclear-armed ships be enacted 
into permanent law, Mr. Shultz 
said more clearly than before that 
such action “ought precipitate a 
review of the treaty by the United 
.States.” 


longstanding security pact among 
Australia, New Zealand and the 


United States. The treaty is known 
as ANZUSl 


Routers 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Community’s agriculture ministers 
met Monday to discuss a dispute 
with West Germany over grain 
prices and also to ratify a cut in 
subsidies for pasta exports to the 
United States. 

The ministers faced the possibili- 
ty of being taken to court by the 
European Commission, the eco- 
nomic group’s executive body, if 
they faded at the two-day meeting 
to fix grain prices. 

Last month. West Gomany ve- 
toed a European Commission pro- 
posal for a 1-8-percem price cm. 

The EC farm commissioner, 
Frans Andriessen, met over the 
weekend with the West German 
agriculture minister, Ignaz Kiechle, 
but the talks were described as in- 
conclusive. 

Pressure from farmers has put 
West Germany on a collision 
coarse with the rest of the EC 
Experts said that Bonn would ex- 
pect concessions for its grain grow- 
ers as part of any deal 

They said a price cut, as suggest- 
ed by tbe European Commission, 
would have to be offset by contin- 
ued export subsidies Tor wheat used 
in bread. 

Statistics just issued by the EC 
on farmers’ incomes are likely to 
increase opposition to any deal 
beneficial to West Germany, diplo- 
mats said. 


A four-month truce would fol- 
low, during which Washington 
would refrain from raising tariffs 
on pasta and the EC would not 
increase tariffs on UJ5. nuts and 
lemons. 


■ Bonn Is Warned of Anger 

A West German farm leader 
warned Monday that farmers, in 
desperation, would take to the 
streets if the government agreed to 
a cut in grain prices, Reuters re- 
ported from Bonn. 

Constantin Heereman, who 
heads the Goman Fanners Associ- 
ation, said in an interview with the 
newspaper Neue Osnabrucker Zri- 
tung that the members were in an 
explosive and desperate mood. 


Referring to New Zealand’s re- 
fusal to accept port calls by U.S. 
warships, Mr. Shultz said Monday: 
“We regret that the decision of 
New Zealand has altered their posi- 
tion in our alliance." 

New Zealand bars visits by nu- 
clear-powered or nud ear-armed 
vessels, and the United States has 
held to its policy of refusing to say 
whether specific vessels carry nu- 
clear weapons. 

The whole point of Monday’s 
lengthy sessions, which substituted 
for the annual ANZUS council 
mflrtinp traditionally involving all 
threeaSies, was to snow that U.S.- 
AustraUan ties remained strong 
and productive. 

Despite the rhetorical emphasis 
often given to tbe 1951 treaty, Mr. 


The U.S. position until now has 
been to consider tbe ANZUS treaty 
framework as intact even though 
New Zealand has been excluded 
from joint military exercises, U.S. 
intelligence sharing and other ac- 
tivities. But the remarks of Mr. 
Shultz and others suggest a more 
basic reconsideration of the treaty 
if New Zealand takes legal action 
as proposed by Mr. Lange. 

Mr. Shultz and other U.S. offi- 
cials steadfastly refused to com- 
ment on New Zealand’s internal 
politics, especially on the possibili- 
ty of the Labor Parry’s being voted 
out of office and the warship ban’s 
then being reversed. 


V 

r , 

Zt 




Kickover in Stable Condition 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Admiral 
Hyman G. Rickover, father of the 
U.S. nuclear submarine fleet, re- 
mained in stable condition Mon- 
day at the Betbesda Naval Medical 
Crater in Maryland. Admiral Rick- 
over, 85, suffered a stroke July 4. 


Hie statistics showed that the 
average real income of West Ger- 
man fanners’ would fall by only 1.9 
percent in 1985-86 if the price cut' 
was enacted. This would compare 
with a projected overall EC farm 
income decline of 3.7 percent 
The other big item on the agenda 
of tbe meeting is ratification of a 
deal announced last week, to cut 
pasta export subsidies and prevent 
what has been called a “war with 
the United States. 


The Italian pasta producers’ as- 
sociation, said the deal was a sell- 
out It would mean a cut in the 
subsidy to 8 
units ($6) pec 100 
pounds), fTOm 14 ECUs. 


Soviet General 


Says Stores flout 
Curb on Alcohol 


MOSCOW — General Vitaly 
V. Fedorchuk, the Soviet minis- 
ter of tbe interior, said Monday 
that 15,000 violations of the 
new controls on the sale of alco- 
hol have been recorded in dm 
month since they took effect. 

In an interview with the 


Communist Party newspaper 
a era! Fedorchuk 


Pravda, Gem 
said the main offenders were 
store desks who were continu- 
ing to seD alcohol outride au- 
thorized hours or in prohibited 
places to meet sales quotas. 

Undo 1 the laws, introduced 
to combat severe economic 
problems caused by a]cnhni?gm l 
sales were restricted to the peri- 
od from 2 PAL to 7 VM. on 
working days and were harmed 
altogether in public places such 
as parks or near factories. 

General Fedorchuk said that 
unless profits from alcohol were 
removed from the overall sales 
quotas, there woukl be 
ressin 
coholism. 


Khmer Rouge Hint Readiness 
To Stay Out of a Peace Regime 


Reuters 

BANGKOK — The Khmer 
Rouge, the Communist group in 
the three-faction Cambodian guer- 
rilla coalition, fainted for the first 
time Monday that it could 
being left out of a future Cam! 


an government if the war against 
the Vietnamese-backed govern- 
ment, now six and a half years old. 
could be ended peacefully. 

The strongest of the three guer- 
rilla groups, tbe Khmer Rouge, 
headed by Pol Pol proposed a na- 
tionalist coalition to oe led by 
Prince Norodom Sihanouk. It 
could include the pro-Hand Heng 
Samrin government now in Phnom 


Penh, according to a statement by 
the Khmer Rouge radio. 

Diplomats here said it was the 
first lime that the Khmer Rouge 
had called for inclusion of Heng 
Samrm officials in a coalition. 

“In the future we still have the »•- 
firm purpose to have the prince as - 
our president,” the radio said. “We 
welcome all nationalists to join 
with us, even if they have served 
Vietnam in the past — if they stop 
serving Vietnam. This will indude 
tbe Heng Samri n party.” 

The Khmer Rouge forces ruled 
Cambodia from 1975 to 1979, 
when they were deposed by the 
Vietnamese Army. 


y- . ~ -Si**.- 

fa - 


• - 




Kohl Opponents Demand Debate 
On Issue of Tainted Austrian Wine 


SKY 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE GOMMN1E5 
W EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


CHANNEL ’Europe’s Best View' 


PROGRAM TUESDAY IGlh JULY UK TIMES 


13.35 THE DOWN UNDER SHOW 
14.25 SWISS FAMB.Y ROBINSON 
15.00 SKY TRAX 1 
15.45 SKYTHAX 2 
1830 SKY TRAX3 
17 JO MR ED 


1BOO THE LUCY SHOW 
18.30 CHARLIES ANGELS 
19.20 SKYWAYS 
20 10 ROVING REPORT 

20.40 US COLLEGE BASKETBALL 

21.40 SKY TRAX 


SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SELLS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION. RATES. MARKETING A 
AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT SKY CHANNEL SALES. 
SWAN HOUSE, 17-19 STRATFORD PLACE. LONDON WIN 9AF 
TEL: LONDON (01) 493 1166 TELEX; 288395. 


United Press International 
BONN — A scandal over thou- 
sands of gallons of Austrian wine 
laced with a toxic antifreeze agent 
and marketed in West Germany 
turned into a political dispute 
Monday as the opposition Social 
Democrats demand a parliamen- 
tary debate. 

A spokesman for the party ac- 
cused the coalition government of 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of telling 
the public :too late about the danger 
of poisoning from the wine, which 


Fires Destroy Greek Forests 

Ag ence Fnmce-Fnsse 

ATHENS — Several thousand 
hectares of forests were destroyed 
by fires in several regions of Greece 


in tbe past 24 hours, police said 
Monday. Tbe biggest maze was in 
the Keratea region, 30 miles (48 
kilometers) southwest of Athens. 
No casualties were reported. 


was spiked with diethdj— 
to make it sweeter and eoableT&e 
producers to pass it off as a high- 
quality desert wine, 

“We want souk light thrown on Jr 
this darkness," said an opposition ■ 
spokesman, demanding that the 
Health Ministry fully disclose do* 
tails surrounding the issue. 

The Austrian Health Ministry 
has said that it told its West Ger- 
man counterpart in April that the 
tainted wine might have been 
shipped to West Germany. Boon 
officials admit it was July 8 before 
officials disclosed there migh t be a 
serious threat to health. 

Health officials have warned tire 
public not to drink some Austrian 
wines, especially the more expen- 
rive, sweet whites. At leasL once . 
case of kidney failure and more i 
than a dozen cases of milder poi- 7 
soning have been recorded in Vies 
Germany and the Netherlands 
among wine drinkers. 






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"When a man is tired of London he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford Dr. Samuel Johnson, 20th September. 1777 


Rubbing shoulders with Dukes and Duchesses does not come cheap 


P rices of houses and flats throughout London reflect the desirability of 
inner-city life with its cultural, leisure and shopping facilities. 
Pa rl i am ent, the law courts and the City. They are nevertheless 
constrained by the state of the British economy and the purchasing power of 
British incomes. Prime property, - like the Rhz - is a different world and 
i mm u n e to the economy, and, subject only to ever-increasing demand. 


byAlecSnobel 


The demarcation, although in- 
visible, is as teal as (he Berlin 
Wail, and its pale embraces 
Mayfair, Belgravia, Knights- 
bridge, Chelsea, Kensington, 
St John’s Wood and, on the 
fringe, Hampstead, and 
includes such citadels as the 
American Embassy, Harrods, 
the American School and the 
Harley Street medical enclave. 

Residential property here is 
tagged at between $200 and 
$300 per square foot. Some- 
thing comparable to a 
five-bedroomed New York 
“brownstone” costing, say, 
$1,875,000 would fetch from 
$1,250,000 dollars in Knights- 
bridge, although British sala- 
ries are 50 per cent lower than 
American. That is why the 
majority of buyers in prime 
London locations are from 
overseas, and many are 
corporate. 

A recent report by leading 
agents Savills shows that 


foreigners and expatriates 
account for S3 per cent of sales 
in central London rhis year. 
The sequence is European, 
Middle and Far Easterners, 
Americans and expatriates. 


the English property market, 
and, secondly, those wishing 
to spend in excess of £125,000 
who are overseas residents 
making an investment.’ 

At the very top end, real- 






The fact that these inter- tors almost boast of their sky- 
national buyers have no Lon- high prices. Lassman’s of Old 
don property to release back Bond Street cite as the most 
into the marketplace accounts expensive single apartment in 
for the extreme shortage of London a. five-bedroomed, 
well-presented accommoda- five-bathroomed penthouse 
don. Result? Family houses with landscaped roof garden 
and larger apartments com- in Grosvenor Square at 
monly break the mfllion-dollar $3,750,000; Aylesford quote 



barrier. $1,800,000 for a four-bed- 

George Knight & Partners, roomed apartment in the Grosvenor Square, London, 
9 Heath Street, Hampstead Mime prestigious garden known as 100 Piccadilly 
Village (01-794 1125) disclose square; Chestertons price at where 10 individually de- 
in a report just published that $2,400,000 a uniquely Inxuri- signed apartments focus on a 
’an increased supply of prop- ous eight-bedroom ed apart- tropical atrium. Created by 
erties being purchased by ex- ment at Hyde Park Square. Ladbroke Group Properties 
patriates are for in v est m ent Lassman’s are also seeking it is the first new residential 




patriates are for in v estment Lassman’s are also seeking 
and letting. Purchasers look- buyers for the imaginative 
ing to invest fall, financially, and luxurious development 

into two categories - first, 1 

those wishing to spend up to 9 

£125,000 to retain a footing in 


IS, Grosvenor. Square, London, W.I. Photo: Lsssnans 

known as 100 Piccadilly Another exciting project, 
where 10 individually de- which, will certainly interest 
signed apartments focus on a many Americans, is the opp- 
tropical atrium. Created by ortunity to own an apartment 
Ladbroke Group Properties at the Savoy Hotel and called 
it is the first new residential Savoy Apartments. This is 
development on Piccadilly another Ladbroke scheme 
for 25 years. with Lassmans as the agents. 


tropica] atrium. Created by 
Ladbroke Group Properties 
it is the first new residential 
development on Piccadilly 
for 25 years. 


Each apartment will have its 
own bouse telephone con- 
necting it to the hotel which 
will supply room service. 
Prices of the 120 year leases 
commence at £280,000. 

W.A. Ellis who specialise 
in residential property in Bel- 
gravia Knightsbridge, Ken- 
sington and Chelsea, com- 
mand a significant proportion 
of the market. 

Among the most interest- 
ing apartment block develop- 
ments is Mill bank Terraces, a 
reconstruction of seventeen 
period terrace houses behind 
their existing facades to pro- 
vide 57 apartments overlook- 
ing the Thames. W.A. Ellis is 
the joint Agent. 

Because location is the key 
factor, houses are not nece- 
ssarily dearer than flats. 
W.A.' Ellis are offering a 62- 
year lease on a brand new 
three- bedroomed house on 
the Duke of Westminster's 
Belgravia estate for $410,000. 
Chestertons invite offers in 
the region of $820,000 for 
Joan Collins’s former stucco- 
fronted period house over- 


looking the Regents Canal in 
Lillie Venice. The Chester- 
ton portfolio also includes 
one of the most imposing 
double- fronted mansions in 
Harley Street, occupying the 
site of Florence Nightingale’s 
original nursing home; the 
figure for the 20 years' un- 
expired lease is $475,000. 

Savills, agents who enjoy a 
high reputation for their 
market data, put average 
London prime prices at 
about $500,000 for a house; 
£285,000 for a flat. 

These figures do not deter 
buyers, because the yield in 
rental income and capital 
gains has proved to be equally 
stratospheric. Looking at 
their own actual sales, Savills 


report an increase now of 35 
per cent over the figures real- 
ised last year. 

Strongest demand is for 
four-bed roomed family hou- 
ses and three-bed, three- 
bath apartments with good 
reception rooms in ponered 
blocks. Being within walking 
distance of Harrods is a plus 
factor. All agents report bouy- 
ancy in such garden squares as 
Belgravia. Grosvenor, Caven- 
dish. Eaton, Lowndes, Port- 
man, Cadogan. Hanover and 
Montpelier, aristocratic not 
only in name, but in their 
share of dukes, marquises, 
earls, viscounts, barons and 
knights. Rubbing shoulders 
with the peerage apparently 
doesn't come cheap. 



A BERRY. A SEED AND A ROOT 
STEEPED IN HISTORY 


Mayfair’s Pomp and Circumstance 


f J pT'^ , T fr 0 I T1 Nor ^ XTl.nothingofwea 

from England and angelica rootfnom Flanders. , 7” f „ 

These are what impart such delicate characteristics to sucn s I sace DeIore * 

Beefeater gin. The earliest [dans show Old 

Macerated in puregrain alcohol and then distilled in s ? e ^ t “fcWwe ® l 

accordant* with the original redpe ofjames Burrougii, the 

com pany s founder. ; • tended into New Bond Street 

We haven t changed a thing. Not in 170 years. . as &r as Oxford Street. This 

B VWre a company steeped in history. \Afe like was Mayfiur’s axis. 

it that way. Quite different is Regent 

And every time you taste our London Dry Streec ; Ttofc London’s most 
f =1 Gin, with its fleeting essence ofjuniper, ^ 

coriander and angelica - you II .£»■ , y 3^5=, the essentia, line rf 
like rt that way too. Afc&t - the buildings has remained 


by Moss Murray 

M ayfair has a magnificence that is as real today as when Sydney Smith 
described it as “enclosing more Intelligence and ability, to say 
nothing of wealth and beauty, than the world has ever collected into 
such a space before.” 

The earliest plans show Old Queen Victoria, Edward VII, United States embassy and its 


Queen Victoria, Edward VII, United States embassy and its 
George V and the present gardens which are largely a 
Queen Elizabeth - have ber) qj^norial to Fr anklin Roose- 
stowed their warrants on the - velL ' ' 


Company. 

Although Park Lane has 
changed with the years and the 
rimes, the architects of the 
new hotels have mostly re- 


graceful thoroughfare- Al- 
though there have been 


Adjoining the Square are 
the offices of GT Vehicle 
Exports at 53 Upper Brook 
Street (01-493 4218) where 
visitors to Britain can buy the 


numbered the grace that once world’s luxury cars, including 


dominated .the street. The 


■.VI 




'e 2 ?/' 


changes, the essential fine of great ariscocra^c houses have 
the buildings has remained way, either to mam- 


db*ht7X*U 



THE GIN OF ENGLAND 


largely unaltered since Nash 
created this living compliment 
to the Prince Regent, later 
George IV. 

Mappin & Webb first came 
to Regent Street in 1862, al- 
though the company had been 
founded in Sheffield by Jona- 
than Mappin when he opened 
a small silver workshop in 
1774. It has been a story of 
continuing expansion serving 
royalty and ambassadors, in- 
ternational businessmen and 
members of the diplomatic 
corps. Monarchs - including 


By the riverside. In SWL 

Crown Reach is a riverside masterpiece - and only minutes from 
Belgravia, Knightsbridge and the West End. There are a few 
individually designed flats and houses remain in g. 

They are for sale on long Crown Leases. 

2/4 bedroom apartments available from 
£230,000. 5 bedroom show house £570,000. 

fog* Each has at least one terrace overlooking the river 

and landscaped gardens. Fully fitted and equipped 
kitchens; 24 hour porterage; lift; secure parking; 
video entrance phone. 

SMHg Open Mon-Fri 11 am - 5 pm at:- 

142 Grosvenor Road, London, SWL or contact 


math hotels or blocks of 
apartments. Visitors who 
prefer the latter to the former 
should head for Hamptons, 6 
Arlington Street, St James’s 
(01 493 8222) where they 
have an extensive rangeof 
luxury penthouses, family 
apartments, small and large 
houses and pied-a-terres. 

There are also several im 
pressive car showrooms with 
newcomers, Trasco, 65-67 
Park Lane, offering the finest 
value, and best bargains, for 
those who want the best at the 
best prices. 

Close by is, possibly, the 
most famous square in May- 
fair . . . Grosvenor Square, 
dominated by the modern 


Porsche, Mercedes, . BMW 
and Ferraris, for export to 
every country. 

The square remains im- 
pressive despite many 
changes. Apartments here 
have recently changed hands 
for more than £1 million. 

In South Audley Street 
there is the Grosvenor 
Chapel, that has been des- 
cribed as “American Colon- 
ial” in appearance, and which 
was adopted during the last 
war as the church of the US 
armed forces. 

Walking towards the fa- 
mous Circus, where the statue 
of Eros has watched over 
lovers for so king, you pass 
several of London’s most fa- 
mous clubs followed by the 
Ritz Hotel adjoining Green 
Park, and the delights of Fort- 


The Clients of American 
Legal Eagles 
Re-locate Successfully 
Through 


GEORGE KNIGHT 

& PARTNERS — 


num & Mason. 

Past the Ritz it is worth 
diverting a few yards into St. 
James’s Street where you will 
find the second finest tobacco 
shop in Europe, and a rival to 
its older brother in Geneva. 
This is Davidoff of London 
where they care for their pro- 
ducts like mothers nurse chil- 
dren. Nothing is left to chance 
to ensure that the tobacco leaf 
is maintained and sold in 
prime condition. In the world 
of Zino Davidoff additives and 
synthetics are unknown. 

CHARLES HAMMOND 

NTEWOR DEStiNEHS AMO DECORATORS 


ESTABLISHED S07 

Exclusive fabrics, hand-made 
upholstery, objets d’art and 
18th cenrury antiques in 
conjunction with Arthur 
Brerr of Norwich. 

Open weekdays, 9-5 
Saturdays I CM 

165 Slaanr'SbTCI, London SW IX 9QE 
Telephone: 01-235 2151 TcJeu 917976 


nqed&e 

Designer Clothes 
for the larger lady 


MARIMEKKO 
OF FINLAND 


AFTER LONDON 
WHAT NEXT? . . . 


Come down ro The South of France and visit the delightfully 
unspoilt region of the Var-Ouesi in Provence. GHITTIMAR 
CONSULTANTS will show you their selection of enchanting 
Properties for sale set in magnificent and unusual surroundings. 
Flights and accommodation arranged. 

Mme Luce Gkim Ghhtunnr Consultants ~ > \ , V\ I 

2256 Route de Bandol (Mf ^ 

83110 SANARY SUR MER m 

Tel (94) 29.86.64 Tlx 401 890 F ^ -gtif * 

London Office (01) 584 6045 


.jfer 54 Queens 
wM' Gatelerrace 

F Kensington 
r Bf fill ^ London SW7 

> H i H gM : c An exceptional conversion of a 
• nSf i°35E& ■ \ fine period house to provide 
. • 3 HaSIsl 1 8 interesting apartments for sale— 

fir mi iSSS STUDIO FLATS FROM £49.500 

SJSfflBL : ■ 2 BE ? /2 BATH flats from 

* 5 BfB ' 3BE^ B A THF L^FROM 

! H fi — tHEwwSV' equipped kdchens: gas-ford 

j a m 1 ~ ccntra ^ hMtW netr decorations Sr 

.-Jr (ff till lfffn iffl Delightful Show Flat by Mary Fox Linton 
|J Ezi 4 ■ lillllflffffflffjffl open daily 1 1 .00a.m. ■ 6.00p.m. 

--- i h i m a LEASES 125 YEARS FOR SALE 

WAELLIS STUART 

rMHro.vto.RMd WILSON 


rUBroaploaltiiad 
LMdoa5W31HP 
■lei 236*1 WAS 

01-581 7654 


IXSninoai LmukMi 

rrtrm 39? IM »ILSON«. 

01-7240241 





APARTMENTS 

London’s most exclusive new development of 
12 luxury fully air-conditioned apartments and 
a penthouse with landscaped roof garden. 

Full Savoy Hotel services. Magnificent marbled entrance foyer. 
Underground car parking. 24 hour porterage and security 
2 fully furnished 2 bedroom. 2 bathroom show apartments 
by David Hicks. 

120 year leases - Prices from £280.000. 

Vievwg Monday and Tundaj> 10 00 - fa 00 pm 
Wednesday to Fnday 10 00 - 700 pen 
Opening Tuesday, 23rd Juty 


XI 


Hampton & Sons 


T1m‘ LcttingA^vnU 


9 Heath St. Hampstead NW3. Tel: 92-794 2225. 
115-117 Knightsbridge. London SW1. Tel: 01-589 2133. 


Fab dons collections frua 
International fashion houses. 
Also Rngerie and tights. Big 
can be really beaotifal at 


6 Arlington Street, St- James’s, 

LONDON SW1A lRB. Tfelex: 254341 

01-493 8222 t 





^ - 3py.":„ 




Sanmer Sale now tn 

84 Maiyiebone High Street, 
London, wi. 

Tel: [ 01)4862133 


G.T. VEHICLE 
LTD 

“TAX FREE" 

Most makes of new ears for 
Immediate Or earfy delivery 
Europea rVU.S. spedfleotfon- 
Next to U.5. Embassy. 
Mayfair, S3 Upper Brook. 
Street WI. 

TeL London (01 (-493 421 8 
The. 299824 BANKCOG 



iT?i 1 1 im t.1 :■ : 4 -. ■ i/ ; i n 1 1 ;h i mii: tr. i :**< 1 1 :■ f full mn 


4M( 


Leases of 99years for sale from^ 

► Superbly presented Show Flat and reception ares designed by Kennedy Stmner 0*7^ OOO tf) P1RO OOO 

i Resident Fbrter / House Manager • Prwaie landscaped gardens i kj a- 

» Modern fittings and installations to a >«ry high slandard •New decorations & car pets iilllS 

W.A. ELLIS Chestetms _£KiMHEdM 


1 7*1 Brompton Road. London SW3 I HP 2 Cale St. Chelsea Green. London SW3 
Tel: 01 581 7654 Telex: 23661 WAE Tel: 01 589 5211 Telex: 8955820 


6 Arlington St St. James's. London SW I 
Tel: 01 493 8222 Telex: 25341 





















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 


AKTS/ LEISURE 




2 Producers Prove Jazz Can Be a Money-Maker 



Steve Backer 


By Michael Zwerin 

fnrenwrionaJ Herald Tribune 

F I ARB— Two record produces 
with different philosophies are 
proving that, withenough love and 
imagination, and a little patience, 
jazz can be a profitable operation. 

Hal Willner was recently in Paris . 
to record Sting singing “Made the 
Knife" as part of ins eclectic Kurt 


album "The Dream of the Blue 
Turtles" entered the 'Billboard 
chart unusually high last week, at 
41.) 

Willncr grew up listening to re- 
cords instead of doing his home- 
work. IBs family advised him to 
stop wasting his rime — until he 
became music coordinator for the 
NBC “Saturday Night Live" televi- 
sion show, a well-paying job that 
involves knowing about and bang 
able to find just the sort of obscure 
recoided tidbits he had been ob- 
sessed with for years. 

Now this hard-working 29-year- 
old rails hims elf “an independent 
record producer, or at least that's 


what I hope to make a living out of 
tme day." In 1982, he produced the 
album “Rota Amarcord," jazz ver- 
sions of music by Nino Rota, who 
composes music for Federico Fel- 
lini films. Last year, Winner's dou- 
ble album, “That's The Way 1 Feel 
Now," a collection of jazz and roc i 
musicians playing Thelonious 
Monk songs, made most critics' 10- 
best lists. 

Some producers impose their 
personalities directly on the music; 
others, like Winner, create a situa- 
tion in which the music can create 
itself. “I just allow things to hap- 
pen,” he said. 

When he asked rock musicians to 
play Monk, he accepted oaly those 
who agreed immediately. Any hesi- 
tation was taken for lack of motiva- 
tion. He recorded Donald Fagen, 
Peter Frampton and Joe Jackson at 
his own expense, before a distribu- 
tion deal bad been reached. “These 
rock musicians deserve respect," he 
said, “because they knew they were 
going to be judged severely for even 



We are pleased to announce our 

SUMMER SALE 

You are invited to 

take advantage of the appealing reductions 
on our collections of 

Polo for men and Ralph Lauren for women. ■ 

Starts Saturday 20th July 


The Polo Ralph. Lauren. Shop 

• 143 New Bond Street • London W1 
. (01)491-4967 


attempting to play^MouL They Barbieri. The success of those, two 
must love tire music." ac cess i bl e mdodidsts allowed me 

While keeping the NBC job 10 record abslracl experimentalists 
(“It's nice to work 20 weeks and' get M*™™ Brown ' 53111 Rivcrs 

paid for 37"), be “listened to every Redman. That's the 

Monk album 1 could lay my hands kind of balance Tve always looked 
on, over and over again, fhad to That’s what I m ean by ‘manip- 
malre sure that the rock ffliiririana illative.’ ” 
were playing the m a t erial correctly. Later, directing jazz for Arista, 


were playing tne material correctly. Later, directing jazz for Arista, 
In order to produce a record like he signed the Bredcer Brothers, 
this you have to u n derstan d the Mike Manieri and other crossova 
material better t han anyone.” artists who subsidized more “difir- 
The Kurt Weill project, which cull" musicians, such as Archie 
Wilber is mixing now, involved Shepp and Randy Weston. In the 
similar research. Scheduled for fall early 1980s he Drought Ornette 



f BCBG 9 : A Guidebook 
To French Preppydom 


Inumanmal Herald Tribune 

F I ARIS — BCBG. for "Bon Clac. 

Bon Genre," is the French equiv- 
alent of the British “SI Dane Rang- 
er" and. the American "Preppy." 


hunting, golf, bridge, tennis, using 
the formal “rata" to one's parents, 
speaking English with an Oxford 
accent and reading Lc Figaro news- 
papers Carnet du Jour (an account 


But despite strong faintly, fortune of happenings m French society.} 
and fashion similarities. BCBG is Speaking American and taft&g 


decidedly and delightfully Gallic, about money is not BCBG. Nattier 
Only the French could come up arc pastel-pink Cadillacs, the 


□ow, involved Shepp and Ram 
rednledforfaB early 1980s he 


withaBCBGconcic 
The expression as 


release, the album features Sting, Coleman and Anthony Braxton to 
Ma riann e Faithful, Van Dyke Island/Antilks under similar “ma- 


Hebe Dorsey 


new "BCBG: Le Guide du Bat 
Chic. Bon Genre," by Thierry 
Mantoux (Hcnn£). means: “Any- 


Champs-Elysto on a Saturday ai- 
med in the leraoon. spending one's vacation at 
— * a Club Med resort, or wearing jog- 
icrv ging suits and loud colors. 

Other key chapters deal with 

le du Bon sdlools ' weddings, receptions, bco- 
(V . Thierry eymoons, decoration, good man- 
L.. - Anv _ ners. professions, sports, vacations 


will receive the WiUner treatment: freedom to document the music i 
“Mingus is more difficult His mu- think deserves documentation." 
ac is so emotional. It win be hard Hc be sees a positive 

to capture thatemotion. Hn not ^ even for the more abstract 
sure I'm prepared yet I stifl dont jazc -Around the mm of the de- 
know how good I am. cade, recorded jazz went down 

□ along with the general slump in the Hal Wulnfir 

. recording industry. The first wave - — 

Stew Backa^ in Pans b pro- 0 f a rebirth took place with Is- 0 a rri 
mote European distribution for the hnd/Antflles and Hdctra Musi- SlMHetO lUTUOUt 
first releases of his new label. Mar chm. They both failed. This year 

gen ta. He has worked himself “into there are Blue Note and and Ma- ^ppn iw MpiiOttl 
positions of power m the recording gmta. We are the second wave." *V 1UCUUIU 

time&^Tm . Mas™* “ w »“d- As a Vindication 

and once’ played bass. His father Wmdham HflTs easy-listening pia- OPOLETO, Italy — More than 
was a saxophonist who supported Geo^ Winston, bastwo gold £ Iralf a rmUion people attended 
the family with, a day job. "The dav album* Backer believes that plac- the Festival of Two Worlds this 
job was making him old and the ^ borderime commercial year, despi te some of the worst 1 
music was keeping him young," music on the jazz charts might be ran critical notes m years. Gran 
Backer recallaL “Thai madesoch “ advantage rather tiran hypocri- Carlo Menotti, the Indian-Amen- 
an impression on me, I knew I had & more you can manipu- am composer who founded .the ifes- 
to gainvolved with mask some- late thc situation. Executives who hyal 28 yons ago, says he feels 
howTl was studying bass but I was don’t have the sophistication to vindicated by the results, 
only good enoughto be a journey- hear the difference think: Vh, Two w«xks ago, at the roemng erf 
t J ^ SI okav. iazz is selling apain. Puccini s La Fanriulla del West 


thing in good taste. It is in fan a ™ * ** 

eveiyihingthai differentiates those 

who know from those who don't: *S.k? C ?£. fl ™ namcs 
aristocracy and old ‘bouxgeoisie , 

from the others; ‘nouvea ux riches’ l ? W10 ^ 

from ‘old riches.' " Odette- Paulette. Armande 


industry with relative ease" several 
times. "I'm manipulative,” he ex- 
plained, with a proud smile. 

Backer, 47, has a business degree 
and once played bass. His father 
was a saxophonist who supported 


The author has no less than 17 
chapters to explain BCBG. The 
opening one; “Ce qui est moment 
important" (What's really impor- 
tant), is the clue One does not 
become BCBG, one is born so. 
BCBGs know what is important. 
They know that one cannot invent 
the past. They know what to say 


runs to Odette. Paulette. Armande 
and Gis&e. Children must be bap- 
tized before they are 3 months red 
so that they can fit into the heir- 
loom christening dress. 

BCBG children are high on 
sports and Scouting. This will pre- 
sumably save them from jeans, 
chewing gum and television. Piano 
lessons are recommended. So are 


and what not to say7 Forinstance; d^ngand^l^boc^ 
they would never say: “I bought ^ ^ Engirt 

this chateau 10 years ago." Instead. was “Mjunaner 

they drop negligently: This house «“*■ BCBGs nw prefer the 
hn henTin f rt r - tone Uiule d States, with California and 


has been in the fantily for a tong ” miea f 1 «“«• mu) r 

Texas at the top of the list. 

The house is invariably deep into BCBG tera-agprs* fives are also 


only good enoughto be a journey- hear ^ difference think: m Two woks ago, at the opening erf 
man Wst. so I came in on tte okay, jazz is selling again. 

business side." “Anyway, an upward cycle has rhi An«! 

During the three years he was definitely begun. There are favor- 

3 We - d S^ stan ^i°- jazz - T ^ SSritics^SSSatMSrihS 

be signed Keith Janett and Gate door is bemg cracked ajar again. beSunableT com up with new 

- ■■■ t ideas or attract outstanding talent 

^ w to the event The festival ended 

Sunday. 

- Menotti. who tamed 74 on July 

7,‘ is finishing an qreza about the 
Spanish painter Goya, intending 
the lead role for Pladdo Domingo. 

^ It is scheduled to premiere in 

Washington in -Octoba 1986. co- 
^9^ produced by the Paris Optra. 

X, His other commitments include 

a series of concerts in Scotland, 
Australia, and Connecticut before 
a inayor performance next fall at 

jj ffzs) si si UNKCO headquarters in Paris. 


the country, in a village with some- wrapped tip in_ so-called BoByes — 
thing Uke 543 inhabitants. The S™ps organized by. agpesswp 
BCBGs have been mayors for geh- mothers who w upta cEldreu s 
erations. They work in Paris but are so ^ 1 ™- s m highly remnented 
very much pan of their village, and uptight gatherings, such as tea- 
They own a hunting lodge, an old P 3 ™*® fln d d an c e s, 
abbey or a shooting preserve. No matter how late a BCBG goes 

The past inefi i d es old families, to bed on Saturday nighL, he hasrto 
old houses, old servants, old fumi- 8® lo church Sunday morning, 
ture, old fortunes and old family When wedding bells start ring- 
traditions. Every BCBG should be BCBGs must keep track oT all 
an aristocrat — “Tlwv’rf- so wmnli* kinds of musts, indudjnz fknwers. 


an aristocrat — “They’re so simple 


and so true,” — but, failing that, wedding lists and wedding rings, 
they must have a tie-up with sugar. Young BCBG couples decoraie 
banking or steel fortunes. their houses themselves — “Othcr- 

They have relatives in politics wise, one runs the risk of resan- 
(preferably in the opposition at the bling a theater set" Heirlooms 
moment), the clergy, wineries, the such as a Louis XV commode are 
publishing world, the Academic recommended So are fireplaces, 
Framjaise and international royal parquet floors and chintz curtains 
courts (what's left of them). — but these last should never 

To be BCBG, one must look match the settees. 


BCBG. Some people have The For those who have courageous- 
Look, others don’t. BCBG dothes ly read the book until the end, there 
— Herm&s scarves, Charvet shirts, is a test showing whether one is 




4? 


MONSIEUR 

ELYSEES 


Starts TtiAirsday 18th July 
173 New.Bond Street London W.l. Telephone: 01-493 6277 


— Hermte scarves, Charvet shirts. 
Cartier watches. Weston shoes. 
Burberry raincoats — are not 
enough. 

Distinguished as they are, 
BCBGs still have to learn a set of 
manners; hanrfki«ing and curtsey- 
ing are high prion ties and are 
might as soon as children can 
wtjfk. The .book includes lists at 
what is and what is not BCBG. The 
first includes understatement, 
pearls, loden' coats, French cars, 


DOONESBURY 


tQOK arm. ANOTHER. 

swmLNFGam.rrs 

Nor&njSHvmwB 

' ^\snmis7?e& 

* PEOPLE! 


BCBG. Among the questions: 
“What does the number 52 mean to 
you?" The answer A Paris an bus 
whose route goes through BCBG 
arrondissemems, such as the 16th. 

Even dogs are classified. Labra- 
dors became BCBG after they were 
known to be the favorite of Valfcry 
Giscard (TEstaing, without a doubt 
the most BCBG of ah French prest- 
dnns — a fact that did not, howev- 
er, endear him to his electorate. 


POORKg?. HEX NERE FEiElHEP' 
U&& OHASWmffmNTtE 
/PCHSK SOUTH. MEN6GIU IS 

mans* tmn&tomovbaml- 
im people outof 
teBEL-axnma? 
PPOmCEE 
THfSYE/K, 




Si Wt 


New winter 
coQection 

ESCACMk 

at European 
export prices 

Marie-Marilne 

8, Rne de Shvres, Paris titfa. 

. TeL; (I) 222 1844. 


Mill 


& 




fit? 


m :> , 


You feel good sharing your trip with the 
folks back home. They feel good 
knowing you’re okay. And everybody feels 
good because an international call 
costs less than anyone imagined. 


1985 AT&T Communicalions 


The Director & English sp eaking staff of 


V INTERNATIONAL 

: i * their salon to view 

. thdr prestigious collegion of fine jewdry and watches? 

Our CANNES showroom is at 32-33, La Ctoisette. 'M: r93t Wsioi 
Baturing: HOtEX Mapping, Webb PlAGET BaumeTmercier 

%m*)RD CORUM eBGL 

~ Highest Export Discount. . 

Xtfe are jefae # l of the rue de la ft^.TEOQg PARIS. Te1-9AT m^ 


By Appoinunem. teHerM^ThfeQurei; 

LONDON . ^JS^ELSORF . TO^ ^l&YORK 


















Statistics Index 


• ?!? Ewrtft ®s rmm P .17 
AMEX bteta/MwsP.M Fling rote nom P.16 
<**Jmortata . p.9 
HVSE hKMflM P.12 Interest rates P 9 
cwooiwi Stacks MB 'Mortal ummcrv p.« 
Currency rotas P, 9 Oottons P 12 

CommotBlta* p .12 OTC stock PU 
OW^idS Mi OTtar mortals M» 


HrralbSSeribunc. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


TOES DAT, JULY 16, 1985 


Page 9 


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unt 



FUTURES AMP OPTIONS 

F oreign-Currency Market 
Shows Big Price Increases 

By HJ. MAIDENBERG 

Hew York Tines Service 

N EW YORK — Rarely has a major trend in futures 
pnees been so clearly determined by fundamental, 
tech n ica l , and human factors as those in the foreign- 
. currency m a r kets. Because these three are the major 

influences m all futures markets, it came as no surprise Last week 
wnea.all key foreign-currency futures posted strong gains. 

Tne spot September British pound futures, for ta^tanra* 
jumped 6 cents last week, to 51.3795; West German nmti 07 
cents, to 34.90; Swiss francs, 1.92 cents, to 42.03; and it took 240 
Japanese yen, in currency unit terms, to buy a dollar, compared 
with 246.5 on July S. 

“The chief fundamental factor in .foreign-exchange and 
futures markets was the do- - 


Hie dollar’s fall 
also has restored 
some glitter to 
the gold market 


CrmRatM 


Jpfy IS 



s 

C 

DJM. 

FJ=. 

rtJL 

GMr. 

BJ% 

SJ> 

YM 

Amsterdam 

134 

4JU 

HUB* 

37,05 • 

0.1739 • 

. 

UM* 

me* 

nsj*v 

Brunets (a) 

57.«7S 

HU3 

30.1243 

U25 

110*5 • 

T7JJ7VS 

— 

34721 

MTS* 

Frankfort 

IS* 

LMS 



2231 * 

L542SX 

US' 

477 • 

rau4* 

1787* 

London (b) 

UW3 

— 

37*63 

12-147 

IUU3 

4J87 

U46 

UH 

338/425 

Ml km 

1J43JD 

MW JO 

64M0 

21131 

— 

57673 

31M5 

7BUX 

7J& 

Mm York(e) 
Port* 

■ — 

0711 n 

1877 

87455 

Closed 

3736 

».» 

UK 

WAS 

Tokyo 


tLA. 

MA. 

HA. 

HA* 

HA 

HA* 

MA 

— 

Sorter 

2JOOS 

U9t 

H.12S* 

VJS ■ 

0.1285 * 

7U6S* 

4.1288* 

— 

1JW4* 

I ECU 

Q.7E* 

03614 

12S11 

AffTW 

1ASK37 

25345 

4SJ044 

1-83*3 

1865*6 

I SDR 

1U2S73 

073488 

275308 

NjQ. 

LflOJI 

23334 

SM077 

14U 

HQ. 


Currency per USS 
Arven. OttSfroi 080 
AvttraLS 1^225 
tedr.sdUL 2IL34 
B0lg.fbl.lr. 5&M 
■rail crux. 4.140JX3 
Canadian i 1 3S09 
Danbb taine 1U« 
Eowt pound (L7783 


CBrrwKy ptr UJSS 
Pin. mandca ua 
Greek dree. 1381)3 
Hons Kona l 7J3 

12 sa 

1.1 IBM 
IrtaU t OSm 

UraeflOMk. 14SHM 
Kowaltl dinar CUOt 


Currency pgr USS 
Matey, ring. 14415 
MnL poo 37730 

NorwhkraM *347 
PhO. paso 1852 


Saudi rtvid 18488 
SM.! 23058 

S. Air. rand 1.901T 


CM I Bu n nr U5| 
S.Kar. wan 8W35 
10630 
UM 

Tatemns 4000 
TteibaM 2L77S 
TUrktataOra S39S5 
UAE (Bream 16725 
V«MX.baBv. 1410 


tsierflm: 1374ir1tfic 

Sources: Banaue du Benelux (Brussels!: Banco GammaneteAr Indiana (Milan); Owwntow 
Bank (New YtrkH Banoue Notional? de Porta (Ports): Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo): IMF (5DR1; 
BAU (dinar, rival, dirham !. Other data from RevtonandAP. 


Interest Rales 


Eurocurrency D cp ulte 

jWiBl 

Dollar D-Mark Franc 

I monttl Tlir-Tki S-Slk 4 >fc-S Ifc 

InwnttK 7^7-w. 54* 

SatanHis 7ta-8 5 ts-Sv* 55Mi 

« mantes MVb Sta-SW. SVS-SIA 

1 nor BH-8W F*5Vi S*-5* 


JuhlS 


5t*rHna 
I2U-12W 
13 SU-T2H. 
i 2 »w-n«k 
U«-11ta 
1150-11% 

Saorcss: Morgan Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound, FFI: Lloyds Bank (ECU): Renton 
(SDR}. Rates aoollcobie to interbank deposits of Si million minimum (oreoutvalent). 


ECU SDR 
10tap-iav> BW-7 7 *< 

lOVicTIM W>*-» 7 % 

10W-10P. 8 9V9E. 7% 

10»w.10«h. 0-«fc 7% 

UUhlltai MV» BVk 


Key Honey Rales juli is . 

Adlan Drilar Deposits 

UeBte Slate* 

clue 

Pre*. 

Jufy IS 

ffcawol Rote 




Federal Fgnds 

78/16 

7tt 


Prime Rai* 




Broker Loon Rate 



1 year Bkk-BM 

Ota Paper 78-177 non 

7JS 


1 —Hi Tremors BID* 

75s 

75b 



770 

7.19 


COM3K}don 

723 

775 


cn towikm 

7 JO 

7J5 

HA Money Market Fnds 

Wat German 



July IS 

taftbordftata 

OmMMRaft 

6J0 

NA 

(JO 

135 

£40 

Merrill Lvncti Ready Assets 
38 day amraw vteW: 7J7 

Imean loeerbeak 

— 

140 

Tetertrte interest Rate Index: NA 

mmett imert*!* 

- 

US 

Source: Merrill Lynch. AP 

Preen 




teSanreattan Beta 

fta 

OTll 1 

i Gold 

Call Money 
teHMMfc Interbank 
*■*•* Infcrboafc 

CM. 

9* 

915/16 

ID 

Vital* 



Jufy IS 

laek Boh Rata 

13 

rcvi 

am. PM arae 

DdlMaaev 

17V: 

T» 

HoaeKene 31725 31725 +m 

PHtar Treater am 

11 7/16 

119/M 

Luxembourg 31725 — +2» 

Jmaote tatarbent 

ir t/it 

ft« 

porta (U5 kite; CM. 

Zurich 317.00 31623 + 050 




Louden 317.15 3UJS +030 

Miami Rote 

s 

S 

New Yarn — 3T7J0 —050 

CaVMBaev 

Mb 

Mb 

Luxembourg. Ports and London official fix- 

tfetav letarbaak 

bint 

6 S/16 

mo at Hand Kong bad Zurich flpenirw «W 
ckntne prim : New York Cemex evrrmt 

Seurat- Reuttrt Commenbonk. Credit 

contract All prnxi in USS Rdf ounce. 

Lmnab, (.lords Bank. Sen* ot Tatra. 

Source: Reuters. 


Maritets Closed 

Financial markets were closed Monday in France because of a 
holiday. 


U.S. Gute 

Business 



FaU f 0.4% Is 
Most Since ’ 83 


dine in our short-term real in- 
terest rates," said Alan C. Le- 
venten, president of 
Twenty-First Futures, a divi- 
sion of Twenty-First Securi- 
ties Corp. “And this factor has 
been telegraphed to the mar- 
ket daily for the past month." 

Indeed, with Treasury bill 

rates down to about 7 percent on an annual basis and inflation at 
4.5 percent, the real return on short-term domestic instruments 
was 2.5 percent last week, compared with about 6-5 percent on 
similar British investments. 

B ECAUSE real returns on West German short-term instru- 
ments are similar to those on Treasury bills, investors there 
also moved into ste rling Meanwhile, other foreign-ex- 
change specialists noted that Ja panese financial instit utions. 
which had been major buyers of Treasury paper, alsn ’ Keg^n 
moving some of their huge dollar holdings into starling. 

“Another fundamental fact of the currency marlraf is that 
speculators as well as dealers are far less interested in economics 
than in the situation at the moment,” Mr. Leventen said. “Unlike 
other commodities, no one stores any currency in the hope of 
future appreciation. The dollar, for instance , is constantly mea- 
sured against other currency stores of value. Because foreign 
exchange transactions involve huge sums, even a tiny change m 
values can result in large losses.as wdl as gains." 

Although the dollar has been declining against major foreign 
currencies since late February, he continued, many dealers and 
speculators were extremely cautious about fating luge positions 
against it. They wailed until they w ere convinced that the Federal 
Reserve Board was dete rmined to stimulate the economy by 
depressing short-term interest rates, the only area of the money 
market where the central bank can effectively influence rates. 

This caution was wdl justified because foreign-exchange trad- 
ers have been burned repeatedly in recent years by what turned 
out to be temporary declines in the dollar’s value, he explained. 

“As for the technical factors that confirmed the dollars down- 
ward move during the last few weeks was the positive chart 
figures." Mr. Leventen said. “For example; by drawing a line 
touching the tops of the British pound since it began rising from 
its low of SI. 02 late last February and another touching the lows 
since then, the chartists determined that 51.33 would be the major 
break-out point. Thus, when the pound broke through $1.33, the 
tfrfwiirail signal was buy." 

When similar chan resistance points were broken early last 
week on the mark, yen, and Swiss franc, it further convinced 
traders who follow technical strategies that a major trend was 
finally taking place. “How long this view will dominate the 
market depends of course on real rates of re turn on sbort-tenn 
dollar instruments," the president of Twenty-First Futures said. 
“Those who were selling foreign currencies last week cannot all 
be described as havinglhe herd instinct, although nowhere is this 
basic human factor so pronounced as in the currencies market." 

Meanwhile, the decline in the dollar in recent weeks also served 
to restore some glitter to the gold market Normally, gold benefits 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL Q 

j Currency Rales 


WASHINGTON — U.S. busi- 
ness inventories fell 0.4 percent in 
May, the steepest decline in more 
dan two years, ihe government re- 
ported Monday. 

The Commerce Department said 
business stockpiles on shelves and 
inbacklots totaled $577.9 billion in 
Mat 
$5802 

It was the largest decline since a 
0.6-percent drop in March 1983. 

Toe May decline nmc as bad- 
nesses saw sales rise a slight 02 
percent far below the 1.4-pcrcent 
rise in ApriL 

The overall economy has been 
sluggish for the last year with part 
of the weak activity attributed to a 
buildup of unwanted inventories. 

The sharp decline in May could 
bean indication that businesses are 
getting their inventory levels under 
control finally. 

Analysts said the decli ne also 
could mean that industrial produc- 
tion and the unemployment rate, 
which have been stagnant in recent 
months, wffl start to show improve- 
ments. 

The Census Bureau said that the 
decline in business in ves tones was 
a positive sign for the industrial 
economy that has been starring for 
new orders. 

Increases in inventories in the 
past have discouraged new orders, 
especially when the gains occurred 
even when sales increased. 

When inventories are balanced 
with demand, the same amount 
moves in the bade door, on to 
shelves and into storage, as moves 
out the front door with customers. 
Now, during a period of weak sales, 
buyers are being especially careful 
not to buDd up excess inventories. 

Analysts tended to reject the idea 
that the May drop may be the start 
of an “inventory correction," a 
drastic cutback that can by itsdf 
precipitate a recession. 

The decline in inventories was 
at the retail level, where 
i fdl by 0.9 percent 
Inventories hdd by manufactur- 
ers dropped 0.4 percent while 
wholesale inventories rose a slight 
0.1 percent 

The weak sales performance in 
May stemmed from a 0.5-perceni 
drop in sales at the retail level 

The government reported last 
week in an advance report that re- 
tail sales fdl again in June, drop- 
ping an even steeper 0.8 percent 
last month. (AP, UPI) 


Soatchi on U.S. Shopping Spree 


U.K. Agency 
Acquires Wide 
Range of Firms 

By Sandra Salmans 

New York Tima Service 

LONDON — Its no-holds- 
baxicd advertising canroaign for 
Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher created a national fu- 
ror in Britain, in 1979. Its 90- 

second science- fiction spot for 

British Airways — showing the 
entire island of Manhattan com- 
ing in for a landing at Heathrow 
Airport — was rate of the most 
talked- about commercials of 
1983. 

nothing ftP ftiatrhi 

Co. has done for its clients has 
been as provocative as what it is 
doing on its own behalf. The big 
advertising agency has been on a 
trans-Atlantic shopping spree, 
buying up advertising and public 
relations agencies and even a 
management consulting firm in 
tbs United States. 

“They’re collectors," said Jer- 
emy BuHmore, chairman of J. 
Walter Thompson’s London 
agency, which Saatchi & Saatcfai 
overtook in billings in 1979. 
“They collect companies, cheats, 
money, pictures, everything. 
They vastly enjoy growth and 
acquisition.” 

Maurice Saatchi, the compa- 
ny's chairman and one of the two 
brothers who founded it 15 years 
ago, prefers a different analogy. 
On the admittedly more modest 
scale of the advertising industry, 
he said, “we don’t see why we 
should be any different than 
Reynolds and Nabisco" — a ref- 
erence to the merger earlier this 
year of the two consumer-goods 

panic 

Thanks to internal growth as 
well as the series of acquisitions, 


Fast Growth 

Saatchi & Saatchi 1 5 revenues in bHlionsj 
of dollars (translated from British 
pounds at current rate): 


—$1.2 



■75 '78 ’77 78 


61 ’82 '88 ’84 *85 


Saatchi & Saatchi has become 
the biggest advertising agency in 
Europe and the fifth largest 
worldwide. With international 
hillings of S2J billion last year, 
according to Advertising Age, it 
still trails Interpublic Group 
Cos., the holding company that 
includes McCann Erickson and 
had billings of about S42 billion. 
But Saatchi is gaining fast. “We 
expea to see Saatchi continuing 
its remorseless climb up the 
world hfflinw chart," Bill 
Seward of Phillips ft Drew, a 
London brokerage house. 

Some critics suggest that Saat- 
chi ft Saatchi is spreading itself 
too thin , but the company insists 
there is a method to its merger 
madness. In its annual reports, 
Saatchi for years has expounded 
the theory of global advertising: 
How the same advertising strate- 
gy and agency would ultimately 
-be used by a multinational con- 
cern to represent its products ev- 
erywhere. Recently die agency 
began extending that 'concept to 
all business services. Its idea: 
Multinationals would seek all 
passible economies of scale by 
using a tingle provider of not 


Tta New Vm* bw 

only advertising but also public 
relations, marketing, research 
and consulting. “It’s not theory, 
it's economics,” Mr. Saatchi 
said. 

Saalchi’s network of advertis- 
ing agencies has retained the flair 
for creativity that first put Saat- 
chi on the map. While there is ao 
distinctive Saatchi style, and 
while some of its campaigns are 
frankly hard-sell it continues to 
snap up creative awards. In 
1983-84, its British agency woo 
twice as many top awards in 
Britain as all the other major 
multinational put to- 

gether. 

But while they are proud of 
that record, Maurice Saatchi 39, 
and his brother Charles, 42, take 
pains to emphatize (hat advertis- 
ing is a business like any other, 
and should be managed accord- 
ingly. “It’s always been our goal 
to build a large multinational 
agency and Keep winning 
awards," said Maurice Saatchi. 
“You can’t do that with unpro- 
fessional managemen t" 

That Saatchi is run profession- 
ally is one of the agency's re- 
(Con tinned on Page 17, CoL 1) 


IBM Profit Fell 
13% in Quarter 
To $1.41 Billion 


By William McBride 

I mernanonal Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — International 
Business Machines Corp. reported 
Monday that profit fdl 13 percent 
in the second quarter from a year 
earlier, roughly in line with' the 
forecasts of securities analysts. 

The company's second-quarter 
earnings fell to S1.41 billion, or 
S2J0 a share, from 51.62 billion, or 
52.60 a share, a year earlier. Sales 
rose marginally to Sf 1.4 billion 
from 51 1.2 billion. 

For the half, profit was S2.4G 
billion, or 53.91 a share, down 
about 15 percent from the S2.S2 
bQlion, or 54.62 a share, a year 
earlier. There were slightly more 
shares outstanding this year. 

Despite the weak showing, ana- 
lysts found much reason Tor opti- 
mism in the latest results. They said 
the negative effect of the dollar’s 
strength on results will likely fade 
in the second half, boosting results. 
They also cheered IBM’s an- 
nouncement that it would speed up 
delivery of its new Siena main- 
frame computer. 

The results “ore consistent with a 
turnaround in the second half," 
said Michnd Gcran. an analyst 
with EF. Hutton. Ulric Wdl who 
follows IBM for Morgan Stanley, 
said, “I think we’ve seen the low 
point” 

IBM said its comings bad been 
depressed throughout the first half 
by the dollar’s strength and the 
weakness of the U.S. economy. 
Nearly all the growth in shipments 
in the first hall came from foreign 
customers, it said. 

The US. slowdown has particu- 
larly cut into sales of midsized 
computers, the company said. Late 
last month, the company an- 


nounced price reductions of 6 per- 
cent to 23 percent on large and 
midsized computers in what ana- 
lysts said was an effort to spur 
demand Tor those products. 

Many IBM customers had ap- 
parently deferred purchases of the 
company 5Q8-X mainframe com- 
puter in anticipation of the intro- 
duction the Siena series. 

Michael Easierbrook, j San 
Fraud sco- based analyst with Kid- . 
der Peabody, noted that the com- 
pany had said in February that it 
would noi start shipments of the 
Sierra before October or Novem- 
ber. Monday's announcement that 
deliveries would begin as soon as 
late August means that the new 
produci "will be a major factor" in 
the company's results in the final 
half, Mr. Easierbrook said. 

But analysts' main argument for 
improvements in the second half 
rested on the diminishing impact of 
the dollar on financial results. The 
company said its earning would 
have been S225 million higher in 
1985*5 first half if the dollar had 
remained unchanged from the 
comparable 1984 period. 

If the dollar stays at its current 
levels, currency translations nil] 
have no effect on profits for the rest 
of the year, the company said. 

“That will help immeasurably.” 
Mr. Weil of Morgan Stanley said. 

“IBM is on much firmer foot- 
ing.” Mr. Geran said he expects the 
company to earn about 510.90 a 
share titis year, up slightly from last 
year's S 10.77 a snare. 


Trading in Baxter, HCA, American Is Halted 


United Press International 

NASHVILLE — Trading of 
stock of American Hospital Supply 
Corp., Baxter Travenol Laborato- 


“There will be an announcement as 
soon as they are finished.” 

Baxter, one of American’s major 
competitors, this time agreed to 
pay 550 a share for half American's 


rieslnxx, and Hospital Corporation layssu a snare ior nail Americans 
of America was delayed Monday as shares and seainties of equal value 
shareholders, analysts and exccu- !“* res * °* *he company s 72.6 
lives of the companies waited for 
American's decision on merger 
moves. 

Directors of American, winch is 
based in Evanston, Illinois, met 
during the weekend to consider 
Baxter's latest offer. 


million shares. 

. American’s directors had ma d e 
’no ’comment on their decision by 
mid-morning Monday, and trading 
of shares of the three companies 
was postponed until a “material 
could be made. 


-announcement 

“The directors are still deliberal- probably later in the day, spokes- 
ing this monting,” a spokesman far men for the firms said. 

American said at about 9 AM. Baxter and HCA have been bat- 


■ Eckerd Thwarts Takeover 
Jack Eckerd Corp. said Monday 
it thwarted a hostile takeover at- 

Tte T8T . m J ■ p _ |T ' T) included a “poison pilT stock swap tempi by the Dart Group Corp. in 

Bonn INot Expected to Lut Key Kates 

»^_v. * v stock from Dart, United Press ta- 


iling for control of American since 
late June, when Baxter interrupted 
HCA's plan to merge with Ameri- 
can — an arrangement that was 
seemingly settled in March. 

HCA's original plan, proposed 
that American shareholders would 
receive stock in a new company, 
KURON Coip^ which would be 
the largest health care company in 
the world. The trade would be 
equal to about 536.50 per share. 

The initial merger proposal was 
designed to combat a situation like 
the one that developed when Bax- 
ter, the smallest of the three compa- 
nies, announced it intended a take- 
over of American. 

The HCA-American proposal 
included a “poison pflT stock swap 


knotty situation when a Wall Street 
speculator, Karl C. I calm, report- 
ecDy purchased as much as 5120 
million of American stock. 

Additi onall y, American's board 
of directors has been sued by two 
shareholders for turning down 
Baxter's offer. 

And American reported second 
quarter results were belter than an- 
ticipated, though still a loss. Sales 
were down three percent from 
5864.7 million in the same quarter 
last year, to 58347 million in the 
period ending last June 30. 


Ckutnos In London and Zurtch. tlxhtos In other Eurapaan centers. New York rates at 3 PM. 
(a) Commercial franc tb) Amounts needed to buy one pound (d Amounts needed to Out' on* 
dollar (•) units of 100 (xl Units of MOD (v) Units ot (OMO K.Q.: not Quoted; not available. 

(•) To bar one pound: SUJLlMa 

Other Dollar Value* 


By Warren Gcdcr 

International Herald Tribune 

^F RANKF URT — Despite mar- 

dicate that the West German 
central bank wifi not change its 
most important interest rates be- 
fore the Bundesbank board’s four- 
week summer recess, which begins 
Friday. 

Market analysts have said that a 
declining dollar and sof tening U.S. 

interest rates was likely to cause the 
central bank to cut its official lend- 
ing rates by one-half percentage 
point at Thursday’s planned 
Bundesbank council meeting. 

1 However, the Bundesbank presi- 
dent, Karl Otto Pdhl and his depu- 


ty, Helmut Schlesmger, have made 
dear in recent public statements 
that they see no immediate reason 
to alter the 43-percent discount 
rate or the 6-pcrccm Lombard rate. 

The Lombard rate is the level at 
which the Bundesbank supplies 
emergency, short-term credit to 
commercial banks that have 
pledged securities as collateral. The 
discount figure is the rale at for 
longer-term bank loans using trea- 
sury bills as collateral. 

Mr. Schlcanger told a group of 
economists in Augsburg on Mon- 
day that (he spread between the 
discount and Lorn bard rates pro- 
vides enough flexibility for money- 
market rates, currently around 5 
percent, to fluctuate smoothly. 


Four Major British Banks Announce 
Reductions in Base Lending Rates 

Reuters 

LONDON — The four leading British clearing banks announced 
Monday cuts in their base lending rates. 

National Westminster Bank PLC was the first to announce a 
reduction after the Bank of England cut its money-market rates by as 
much as !6 percent. 

The bank cut its bare rate to 12 percent from 12*i percent, effective 
Tuesday. Barclays Bank PLC and Midland Bank PLC quickly fol- 
lowed sail, but said the reduction to 12 percent from 12V& percent was 
effective as of Monday. Lloyds Bank PLC announced a similar 
reduction bat added that the new base rate would become operational 
from the dose of business on Tuesday. 

All interest rates in Britain are scaled up from the base rate. 
Usually, prime corporate borrowers pay a percentage point oar two 
above the base rate. 

NatWest said its net interest rate on seven-day deposits would fall 
to 6.625 percent from 7.125 percent. The bank’s chid executive, Philip 
Wilkinson, said the cuts were possible because of current economic 
conditions, and added that “we hope that this trend will continue for 
the next half of the year ” 

Barclays said the net interest rale on seven-day deposits would be 
cut to 6J5 percent from 7 percent, effective from Monday. Midland’s 
interest rate on seven-day deposits was cut to 6.25 percent from 6.75 
percent Lloyds’s net interest rate on such deposits will be cut to 6_50 
percent from 7 percent. 


“Of our so-called leading interest 
rates, only the discount rate, and 
not the Lombard rate, has an influ- 
ence at the moment, and this staods 
behind that of Switzerland on the 
lowest international level of 4.5 
percent," Mr. Schlesinger was 
quoted by Reuters as saying. - 

Earlier this month, Mr. Pflhl told 
the International Herald Tribune 
that the Bundesbank is not likely to 
change its key rates fra- some time , 
but rather foster declining rales in 
the money marker through offer ing 
security repurchase agreements at 
lower rates in the direction of 5.0 
percent from (he current 525 per- 
cent level 

He said, “I think it is completely 
consistent not to change official 
interest rales for the time being, as 
we’ve developed the tedmicaT ca- 
pability — through repurchase 
agreements — that allows market 
rates to fluctuate between the offi- 
cial 4.5 and 6 percent range.” 

There has been speculation that 
a Bundesbank cut in official rates is 
contingent on a prior move by the 
U.S. Federal Reserve Bank to low- 
er its key discount rate from its 
current 75 percent level appears 
misplaced. But senior Bundesbank 
officials have indicated privately 
that they do not expect an immi- 
nent cut in the U.S. discount rate 
on grounds that such a move could 
pixnpitateasharperfallmtiiedbl- 
lar and threaten what appears to be 
’ a gradual “soft landing 5 of the U5. 
currency that is under way. 

Norbert Walter, senior econo- 
mist at the Kid Institute for World 
Economy, said he expects the 
Bundesbank, in an effort to spur 
domestic demand, will lower both 
the Lombard and the discount rate 
by one-half percentage point short- 
ly after the central bank’s policy- 
making council reconvenes m mid- 
August. 


Stock Exchange said the arrange- 
ment is against its rules and, if 
executed, would mean both compa- 
nies would be removed from the 
Big Board 

HCA, in retaliation, has can- 
celed SI 00 million in orders for 
medical supplies from Baxter. 

American made a defensive 
move last wed: by raising a 53- 
biQion credit line. 

Another twist was added to the 


lemational reported from Gearwa- 
ler, Florida. 

The drug store chain said it re- 
purchased 1,884,000 shares at 
52930 per share, the closing price 
of its stock on Friday. 

“Simultaneously, Jack Eckerd 
Corp„ and Dan Group Coip-, 
agreed to terminate all pending liti- 
gation between them,” Eckerd said 
in a statement. 


Dollar Is Mixed 
In Europe Trade 
After Tokyo FaU 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON — The dollar 
turned in a mixed performance 
Monday in quiet, trendless Eu- 
ropean trading after falling 
sharply in Asian markets. 

Foreign-exchange dealers 
said the dollar fell sharply in the 
Far East before Europe's busi- 
ness day opened because of 
concern about the health of 
President Ronald Reagan, who 
underwent surgery Saturday. 

The dollar, which reached re- 
cord highs in February, has 
since fallen more than 15 per- 
cent against major world cur- 
rencies, depressed by lower 
US. interest rates and doubts 
about the strength of the Amer- 
ican economy. 

in London, the British pound 
ended at 51.3893, up from 
51286 on Friday. In Frankfurt, 
the dollar finished at 2.879 
Deutsche marks, down from 
2.9023 DM. The US. unit end- 
ed in Zurich at 2.4005 Swiss 
francs, up from 2.3995 francs. 
The Paris exchange was dosed 
for a national holiday. 

Earlier in Tokyo, the dollar 
finished trading at 238.60 Japa- 
nese yen. down from 243. 10 yen 
earlier. 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Ulillllrs 

industries 


Dow Jones Averages 


OPM HKtti LOW LOS) Cbg. 

Indus 133329 1347 07 fJ3*.93 M3S06- XU 

Trans «5J9 49X81 uiJd tsrj* + 12 ? 

UIII 1*800 14927 1*723 15445 — 0.26 

Coma 55776 5*188 554.79 559 JU— Oil 


NYSE Dfarles 


Mvoncad 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Toftl issues 
New h Iota 
New Lows 


Close Pro. 

175 m 

494 070 

4 u m 

2024 2D4I 

184 106 

12 II 


NYSE Index 


Prawiout Today 

HU Low Close 1PM. 
Commit* 11X13 111.B& 11X13 112J8 

Industrials 12*43 12*33 12*43 12XW 

T remap. 11221 11129 71221 UMJ 

Ullllllws 41X1 6123 6103 *1J7 

Finance 122.12 12129 121.90 121.99 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y 


Buy S0l« *Shrt 

July 13 1962S0 44U29 1107 

July 11 19*261 *20273 1,177 

July 10 19X289 907258 1.158 

July 9 201X874 42X051 1,199 

July 8 19Q26B 911 271 1257 

■Included In the sales lldurta 


Monday^ 

NYSE 

Closing 


V0Ldt3PJH S1«IU80 

Prev.3PJA.W3L 9&33M08 

Prev conwBdtrted dose 1JMHJII 


Tabled in dude the nationwide prices 
up to the dost no on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


AovancM 
Dec tinea 
Uncharntd 
Tore! issues 
New Him 
New Lows 


Close Frev. 

277 3 H 

233 242 

281 248 

791 m 

33 ' 36 

T9 16 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Previous TMOV 

HMi LOW Clase 3 P.M. 
industrials 21X48 27174 212.48 212.95 

Transit. 17929 17*28 17X98 160.79 

Utmilfi 9X25 B9J2 «L29 9090 

Finance 2323 2X69 2145 2147 

Comooslto 1WJ2 191*4 19129 19172 


NASDAQ index 


ConUKKtti 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Tramp. 


rear 

Noon An An 

30135 29X58 234*7 
307.92 309.91 5057 
_ 3*5 J I 257 W 

— 35331 23*79 

_ 29x56 2C5J6 

_ 293 14 I9S.70 

_ 263.19 19X21 


AMEX Sales 


3 PJIA. volume 
Prav.3 PJix volume 
Pm- eons, volume 



93 


AMEX stock index 

Prcvmui " 

HtuB Low Close 

rnri 3KJ0 



* 


I 


Trading on NYSE Is Moderate 


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9 

17 


92 


40 


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15 

14 

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X9 

12 

112 


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United Press International 

NEW YORK — Trading on the New York 
Stock Exchange was moderately active Monday 
as investors waited for news of President Ron- 
ald Reagan's laboratory reports following sur- 
gery. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was up 
3.92 to 1,342.52 an hour before the close. 

Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time reasons 1 , 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 

Advances led declines by an 8-7 ratio among 
the 1,977 issues traded during the period. 

Volume amounted to about 81,680,000 
shares, compared with 98,330,000 in the same 
period Friday. 

Analysts said the market's early sell-off was 
due to worry about President Reagan's condi- 
tion. They cited concern that the president's 
condition will turn out to be more serious than 
indicated by the press briefings. 

“Buyers are stepping aside until the situation 
is clarified,” said Michael Metz of Oppenhei- 
mcr & Co. 

Mr. Metz said the market rebounded after 
IBM reported a decline in second-quarter earn- 
ings that was nevertheless viewed by analysts as 
positive. The analysts said the IBM report con- 
tained no surprises. 

The market at this level *>31 fly short-term" 
if the news on the president is good, Mr. Metz 
said. 

Charles Jensen of MK1 Securities also cited 
some hesitancy to buy in front of the release of 
those lab reports. 


“If the reports show a malignancy, there 
could be an emotional sell-off, Mr. Jensen 
said. The market will show some restraint until 
the final news is out on the president, he said. 

As the market opened, the Commerce De- 
partment reported U.S. business inventories fell 
0.4 percent in May. 

Crown Zellerbach was near the top of the 
active list and lower. 

AT&T was lower. IBM was making strong 
gains and other technology stocks were moving 
in sympathy. Digital Equipment, Cray Re- 
search. Burroughs and Motorola were aD up. 

Chase Manhattan Bank was lower after re- 
porting its second quarter net earning rose 45 
percent. J.P. Morgan was also down after re- 
porting second-quarter earnings of Sl.75 a 
share compared with S 1.16 a share in the second 
quarter of 1984. Analysts attributed the lasses 
to profit-taking after the reports, which had 
been expected to be strong. 

Allied Corp. up slightly after it reported sec- 
ond-quarter earnings of Sl.75 a share compared 
withS1.16. 

Levi Strauss & Co. was ahead after descen- 
dants of Levi Strauss, the company's founder, 


3tr 


proposed taking the company private in a $50- 
a-share leveraged buyout. In a leveraged 
buyout, management of a company or an out- 


side group buy back publicly traded shares of 
ihe company with cash that largely comes from 
bans that will then be repaid out of fuiure cash 
flow or the sale of assets. 

General Motors was lower while Ford and 
Chrysler were up slightly. 

Merrill Lynch was ahead. 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 


Page 11 


Levi Strauss President 



Realm 

SAN FRANCISCO — Levi 
Strauss Co. announced- Monday 
that its president, Robert Haas, 
and other members of the family 
tint founded the famons maker of 
jeans would offer $50 dofkus a 
share in cash to retain the company 
to private onmership. 

Mr. Haas said the group was 
making the proposal “to better en- 
able management to focus atten- 
tion on the long-term interests of 
the company.” 


Seeking Unions’ 
AidihTWABid 

Reuters 

MIAMI — Eastern Airlines, 
which last month ruled out an 
acqirishion of Trans World Air- 
lines lot, now is seeking the 
help of TWa's labor unions in a 
revived bid to take over the car- 
rier. according to union sources. 

Over the weekend, a team of 
top Eastern executives met with. 
Eastern and TWA labor leaders 
in New York to discuss a possi- 
ble buyout offer, union officials 
dose to the negotiations said 
Sunday. There was no word on 

the outcome. 

An Eastern spokeswoman re- 
fused to confirm or deny that 
die meeting had taken place, 
and TWA officials were not 
available for comment. 

Eastern has renewed its study 
of a TWA takeover less than a 
month after TWA accepted a 
$793 3-million buyout offer 
from Texas Air Corp., the 
Houston-based parent of Con- 
tinental Antilles. A coalition of 
TWA’S unions, however, has 
vowed to fight the agreement, 
flaring cost-cutting measures 
directed against the mrinn 

Union sources said Eastern, 
with two union leaders on its 
board and workers holding 
more than 20 percent of the its 
stock, was regarded as a much a 
more attractive candidate. 


Themovefoilowsadcdmeintbe 
fortunes of die world's hugest 
clothing manufacturer, winch went 
publicm 1971 about 120 years after 
it was founded by Levi Strauss. 

Following a fashion swing away 
from its jeans and casual dotbes, 
Levi Strauss's net income left from 
a high of $224 rntDion in 1980 to 
$41 million last year. 

’ • Its share price slipped from its 
1983 high above $50 to $24 last 
year before recovering to the 30s. 
Reports of the buyout have sent the 
price into the mid-40s. 

A company statement said the 
family group had obtained com- 
mitments to more than £2 billion 
of financing in debt and equity to 
complete the transaction. 

The proposal was submitted by 
HHF Coip., a newly famed com- 
pany backed by family members 
who control about 36 percent of 
' outstanding shares. Remaining 
family members and trusts, who 
control an additional 4 percent of 
the shares, were expected to sup- 
port the proposal, the statement 
added. 

The company statement «id 
HHF is being advised by Friedman 
Heilman, a San Francisco invest- 
ment banking firm 

It said WeDs Fargo Bank NA has 
agreed to organize and participate 
in a bank syndication that will pro- 
vide $1.45 BQlion to finance the 
acquisition and an additi on”! $250 
million of working capital. 

Salomon Brothers Inc. has 
agreed to underwrite $300 milli on 
of subordinated debt which will be 
used to retire the mim amount of 
bank debt after completion erf the. 
financing. 

The balance of the financing will 
be supplied by the family group 
which has agreed to provide about 
7 million mares of their current 
beddings in the company, the an- 
nouncement added. 

Tbe family group also has a $300 
million line of credit available to 
enable it to purchase shares. It said 
while the group intends to purchase 
Levi's common stock under die 
terms of a merger agreement still to 
be negotiated, it has also reserved 
the right to take all action neces- 
sary to prevent a third party from 
gaining control of the company. 


Earning 


Revenue and profits. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


Britain 

Muff Westminster Bk 
MOW. ms 19M 

Pretax Net— MS 1753 


Bangkok Bank 
lif HaM 19*5 1VM 

Pretax MM— USBl 1,170. 

United States 
AUM 

MQmr. 1985 KM 

RMM 27SO. xm. 

MU Inc. 7525 1308 

Pm- S hare — 151 1J a 

MMN 1985 IN* 

RmOM 5530. £530. 

Mat Inc. 2855 

ParStara — US 273 

ttts Quarter and halt neto to- 
etudes pain of Ml nrittUm 
from ealm. 1WB quarter and 
tmtt nets tn rtudm { Starve a t 
SSH mutton from stmhtoen. 

Boise Cascade 
MQnr. IMS lfM 

Ravanua 9527 9907 

Mot me 31-18 3152 

Par Stare— 167 1.M 

MHoH INS ISM 

Ravanua lfltt UO 

Nat Inc 456 6«.l 

Par Stare 9.19 Oil 

Wkf Quarter not toctudeepre- 
Kk oaJn of SITS million. 

Chose Manhattan 
MOnar. INS INI 

Mat Inc 13082 ©Ml 

Par Stare US 121 

MM 1*85 IN* 

Mot Inc 26471 1917 

Per Stare— 568 47* 

E Systems 

MOW. 1985 ltM 

Ravanua — 23U 2117 

Mat Inc 1549 WJ5 

Par Stare oso o m 

MHU INS 19M 

Ravanua 4SL4 4047 

Mat Inc 3003 3071 

Pm stare US 1-01 

msaoarternetlntJudisnpp- 
nKumaooedno/tZl mUBoa 
turnsole. 

First CMcobo 
MQ aor. 11*5 IN* 

Mat Inc W.1 SIM 

Pat Stare 004 ON 

WHnlt 19*5 19*4 

Nat Inc 404 1077 

Par Stare 069 ITS 


Intel 

MOnor. INS 1*84 

Ravanua mo 4ioi 

Nat Inc 9JS 5469 

Par Stare MS 047 

MTHoH - INS ' 198# 
Rovaoue — ' ' 7353 7117 

Nat Inc »W 104.94 

Par Stare— 017 on 


INS IN* 

Mat Inc _— 16.1 1X4 

Par Stare 034 020 

lit Her INS 1*84 

Naf Inc 31.2 230 

Par Stare— 047 034 

IBM 

MONf. 1*05 INI 
Ravanua— 11,430 11JOO 

Nat Inc 1610 1,430 

Par Stare— UO 265 
in Halt 1905 1984 

Ravanua 21700 mm 

Nat Inc 2600 1820 

Par Stare — 191 462 

Irvine Bonk 

MONT. INS IN* 

No* Inc 31-36 2031 

Par Stare — 166 US 

lit Half INS WM 

Nat Inc 587 5U6 

par Stare — 019 279 


Kaiser AI & Chun. ■ 

MQmr 1985 1984 

Ravanua MU 7947 

Mat Inc (0)143 325 

Par Stare — 074 

1st Half T9SS 19*4 

Ravanua 1660 1690 

Nat Inc laliU 473 

Par Stare — 167 

a.' lass. MBiaet Includes paki 
of SZ 3 million and km of SUt 

mHBan to half from dtscon- 
ttoued operations. 


Marina Midland Dks 
MQaar. 1N5 WM 

Nat Inc 2052 2631 

Par Stare— US 164 
1st Half INS INI 

Natlnc— 5M 4M 


Motorola 

MQaar. 1965 IN* 
Ravanua— 1370 16T0 

Nat Inc 260 9&M 

Par Stare U2 on 

IN Half INS IN* 

Ravanua — . 1690 2670 

Not Inc 673 1760 

Par Stare— - 056 16* 

NCR 

MOw ar. MB WO* 
tavonua— - 1330 99*9 

Not Inc 667 M2 

Par Stare — 067 073 

1st Half 1985 WO* 

Revenue 1670 UMl 

Natlnc 1HU 12^7 


Per Stare— 


UO 


Oweas-Corii. Fibaralas 
MQaar. INS MM 

Ravanua 7*95 76U 

Net (nc 2*21 246* 

Par Stare — 068 MS 

1 st Half INS IN* 

ssr- » q 

Per Share — 163 165 

Mp haft not toduduc onto of 

SJf million from settlement. 

Owmis- I llinois 
MQuar. INS lfM 


953.1 nos 

Natlnc 654 4U 

Par Stare 169 160 

1st Holt 1*85 IN* 

Ravanua 1610 ia 

Hal Inc 666 596 

Par Stare 210 - 264 

me nut both periods Includes 
goto of SSS mUBon from m- 
chanae of common s tock jor 
debentures andsai* itSShalt 
net tnctudee charvm of SUS 
maaon gram overhead ante 
met oatn of Si* mOHon mm 


Ravanua 

II 


Pacific Unhttna 
ear. 19*5 IN* 

kioo 1.110 

47.1 593 

1.14 U7 

jgp jw 

1480, 7-Hn 
976 1027 

146 173 


Mar Stare — 
HtMMI 
Ravanua — 

Natlnc 

Per Stare — 


iCW.RO 
War. 1985 IN* 

nua 1610 1740 

lac 4164 5745 

Stare— OS) 1.11 

Ut 19*5 IN* 

nua 1500 lam. 

nc 769 10X4 

Stare 1-55 212 


MMUurtlc Banks 
2nd dear. INS 1*84 

Nat Inc. 2265 ija 

Par Stare — U1 099 
WHOM INS HM 

Not Inc 3*29 2*-2 

Par Stare— 212 169 

MonHU (JJO 

M Qanr. 1*** J-K 

Nat IIJC 1574 1017 

Par Stare — . US l- 14 
lit HaH INS INI 

JSStlnS 3220 2497 

Per Stare 360 182 

prior per shore resets mare 

restated tor 2-for-J stock eodt 
to Dec* IRM 


Pioneer m-Bred HtTI 
MQaar. IMS INI 

EnE"— lS§ £jf 

ParStara 322 138 

9 Moans HJ5 IN* 

Ravanua 7406 £22 

Net Inc. 11567 1047 

ParStara— 362 152 

PNC Financial 

sssr:_ ft ft 

Par Stare — 088 074 

lit HoH INS 1984 

Natlnc BOM 4*52 

Per Share — 174 161 

per share reeuNs restated for 
T-for -1 stock sal ft. 


A Tool for Bankers! 

PROFIT PLANNMG 

Theory and Implementation 
a book by Mutaz M. Murad 
TTtis book is out when you need it most 


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*reaiN.Mw,PWifrG6L MM> 



Chase Earnings Climb 45% ; 
J.P. Morgan Has 51.8% Rise 

United Frets haemaOand 

NEW YORK — Chase Manhattan Coap. reported on Monday that 
earnings rose 45 percent in the second quarter while JJP. Morgan & 
Ca said pn^t incareased 51.8-percent in the period. 

Chase earned $131 milium, or S2.88 a share in the quarter, up from 
$90 million, or $121 a dare in the year-earlier period. The pcr-sharc 
income reflects a preferred offering issued in connection with die 
purchase of First Banks and a higher number of common 
shares outstanding. 

Morgan earned $157.4 lAm, or $1,75 a share in the second 
quarter, up from $103.7 million, or $1.16 a year earlier. 

Chase, whose principal subsidiary is the third largest U.S. bank, 
said its $13-mQhan stare of $570 million in interest payments re- 
ceived from Argentina were included in interest income. But the 
company put the payment in its S105 -million provision to posable 
loan losses. The year-eariier provision was $75 miHkffl. 

Morgan, the holding company for Morgan Guaranty Trust, ranked 
No. 5 in sbe and one of the most conservative of laigs UA banks, said 
it deferred $18.6 million in Argentine interest payments. 

Morgan said tbe payments are listed as “other liabilities” until 
Argentina’s refinancing package has been completed. The bank said 
the dreiidnn mnf mnw! with guidelines issued by regulators on the 
Argentina payments. 

Morgan also took a S 35 -million loss from the d umpin g of $70- 
miTti on erf reduced-rate renegotiated loans. The bank did not disclose 
which loans were sold, but some market sources indicated they were 
not T-a*tn American ones . 

In addition, Morgan doubled its provision for loan losses to $90 
wiatinn from $45 last year reflecting “marra^ement'scoacem about 
the uneven economic recovery both in the Umtcd States and abroad.'* 

Both Hiase and Morgan nad good gams in trading profits, but 
haw h»TiVfng busness, wider interest spread and other fees, also 
coo tributed heavily to the results of both institution. 

Morgan’s $45.6-nriDicHi gain in foreign-exchange pro fits compared 
with losses of $119 mOBon a year ago. 

(Tiflttg raised its primary capital to 6.65 percent on June 30, 1985 
from 5.73 percent a year earlier. 

Morgan's primary capital stood at 7.63 pe rc e n t an tbe same date 
compared with 7A3 percent a year earlier. 

Primary capital is common stockholders’ equity, perpetual pre- 
ferred stock, mandatory convertible securities aim the reserve for 


Toshiba, Siemens to Exchange Technology Japan’s WIT 

Reports Flaws 
hU.S. Goods 


Xa tiers 

TOKYO — Toshiba Corp. of 
Japan and West Germany's Sie- 
mens AG have agreed to a program 
of technology exchange and coq>- 
eration in semrconductors, Toshiba 
announced Monday. 

Tbe program involves the two 
electronics concerns serving as sec- 
ond sources of supply to oth- 
er, cross-Ucensing of semiconduc- 
tor component patents and 
possible joint development of new 
products. 

Toshiba said it will first provide 


Siemens with technology and data 
io make a new type of high-capaci- 
tv memory dun. the one meeabit 
GMOS^RAM (which sian&to 
complementary metal oxide semi- 
conductor, dynamic random access 
memory), which Semens wiH make 
and self under its own name outside 
Japan. 

Tbe new chip can hold the equiv- 
alent of four pages of newspaper 
text, or 130,000 characters, four 
timM more than the 256* kilobit 
chips now being widely used. It is 
about 1.5 times as fast and uses 75 
percent of the electric power as the 


256-kQobit component, Toshiba 
said. 

The Japanese concern said it 


the prototype chip in 
February and sent its first samples 
to major computer and office- auto- 
mation-equipment makers last 
month, it plans to produce 100,000 
units a month starting next April. 

Toshiba said it entered tbe pro- 
gram with Siemens to enhance its 
presence m the European semicon- 
ductor market and declined to 
comment cm any financial aspect of 
the accord. 


EC Consumers 
Spending Less 

Remm 

BRUSSELS — Concern about 
unemployment has West Eu- 
ropeans reduce their spending 
while consumers in tbe United 
States continue with major pur- 
chases, the executive Commission 
of the European Community said 
in a report Monday. 

The report based its findings an 
a consumer survey showing, that a 
small majority of EC citizens 
(bought this a bad time to make 
huge purchases, with the French 
and the Dutch the most pessimistic. 
By contrast, 52 percent of Ameri- 
cans were eager to spend, and were 
gang increasingly into debt to do 
so, despite a slowdown in U.S. in- 
dustry, the report said. 

The EC report said worries 
about joblessness were frequent 
even among those in work. 


AMC2d Quarter Deficit Seen 
Exceeding First-Period Deficit 


5 ohn Bur{ 

ngrut Pat Service 

TOKYO — The president of Ja- 
pan’s national telephone company, 
Nippon Telegraph & Telephone 
Corp., said Monday that it had 
found defects in a variety of tele- 
communications equipment pur- 
chased from the United States. 

Hisashi Shinto said tbe equip- 
ment’s suppliers bad been highly 
cooperative in working to correct 
tbe faults, which he described as 


to affect 
e experience had 
ULS. con 


contracts. 


Rouen 

DETROIT — American Motors 
Corp. said Monday that it expects 
its loss in hs second quarter, which 
ended June 30, to exceed the $29- 
million loss it had in the first quar- 
ter. 

A spokesman said AMCs presi- 
dent, Jose J. Dedeurwacrder, re- 
gards the losses this year as consis- 
tent with what company executives 
have said about ute automaker’s 
five-year business plan to revive its 
financial position. AMCs major 
shareholder is the French car mak- 
er R ennnl i- 

The AMC chief executive also 
told a private meeting of dealers 
and top managers for AMC Re- 
nault and Jeep last week that tbe 
company is on the road to profit- 
ability, according to a report m this 
week's Automotive News. 


He said expectations about the 
company had been raised by the 
company’s SIS-miliion profit last 
year after 1983’s 5 146. 7-million 
loss. 

AMC executives said the compa- 
ny’s introduction of the Renault 
Alpine sports car in the United 
States has been delayed until the 
of 1987 from the original 
plan to import it around Christinas 

1986. 

AMC also plans to phase out the 
Renault Forgo and 18i cars from 
its import line-up by 1987 and in- 
tends to import from France a new 
compact car tine in the spring of 

1987. 

AMC (he spokesmen said, is still 
waiting to hear from Renault on 
whether it will authorize a $175- 
miOionloan through 1987 from the 
government- run French group. 


mxnor yet 
performance, 
not soured NTT on 
he said. 

But Mr. Shinto told foreign jour- 
nalists, “quality control mat we 
seek so strictly in Japan has not 
been fully implemented in the 
UA" He added, “I believe these 
are the result of sloppy work.** 

U.S. companies got only $130 
million of the roughly $3 billion in 
procurement purchases NTT made 
in the year ended March 31. Mr. 
Shinto said the main reason for 
their poor showing was not quality 
problems but tbe Strang dollar. 

In 1980, Japan and the United 
States signal an agreement guaran- 
teeing foreign suppliers equal 
standing in competing for con- 
tracts with NTT, which became a 
private corporation on April I. 

Many of the U.S. sales have been 
for state-of-the-art equipment in 
which the U.S. leads Japan, such as 
supercomputers. 



Arab Bank Limited 

bringing our worlds together 


For over fifty five years now the Arab 
Bank has been working to bring our 
worlds together. A truly international 
network with more than 80 worldwide 
branches and affiliates, the Arab Bank 
works literally around the clock to 
perform services for its clients, to 
strengthen economic relations between 
the Arab countries and the outside 
world and to provide an insight into the 
complex and lucrative Arab markets. 
Our branches and affiliates span four 
continents: Asia; Africa; Europe and 
America with key offices in all of the 
world’s major money centres.We offer 
a full range of international banking 
services. Demand and time deposit 
accounts. Trade and project finance. 
Medium and long term credit. Foreign 


exchange services. Corporate and 
merchant banking. Correspondent 
banking and important advisory 
services. 

Quite naturally, our main business is 
Arab business. The majority of our 
offices are concentrated in the Middle 
Eastern markets and our branch man- 
agers are experts in all markets and their 
distinctive differences .We are amongst 



the largest financial institutions in 
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decades of growth and contacts through- 
out the Arab world. 

As the world gets smaller and markets 
more competitive, the Arab Bank is 
always there to give you that edge in 
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If you are considering negotiating any 
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Paris 
Athens 
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(01) 606 7801 
(01) 359 3434 
(01) 3255401 
(212) 715 9700 
533 0055 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 198o 



Tobies inch me the nationwide prices 
up to the daring on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


(Continued from Page 1(1) 


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33% 24* PMOr M IX XT 191 2190 33 32% 32% 

21% 10* Pond re ,*0 J 27 418 12% 12 12 — % 

21% IS PobT a! X AT 10 19* 19* 1994 


346 11* 10% 11 — % 
X 14 IS 136 14% 14* 14* + % 
.16b 17 14 IX 9% 9* 9* 

8 146 10 9* 10 

54,47 13 18 21 20% 21 +* 


S % 15* 
% 32% 


33% X* PokirW IX 3.1191 2190 33 32% 32% 

8 21% 10* Pandrs M J 27 418 12% 12 12 — % 

% 15 PoPTat J® AT 10 19* 19* 19* 

% 14* Portec X 18 82 823 22% 22 22%+% 

21% 13% PortGE IX 85 8 1564 21* 20% 21* + * 

24* 18* Paropf 240 108 8 24* 24 , 24 

3S* 29* Pore Pi 4X 137 48 34% 33* ' 33*- * 


29* POTGpf 4 M 127 

» SS? tl ’2S ,3 



USt Futures 




July IS 

Season 

High 

Season 

Law 

Offcn High Law do** Ow. 


■nil 57.10 Aug 5770 SIM 5572 55.92 —200 

7620 (7.15 Feto 65.90 66.90 45.W W-7D —72 

7540 64X Mar 6570 45-70 45.70 6543 —70 

km 6*™ May 66X 6778 6620 *43S -“-Jjj 

7470 MX Jul 67 J9 67X 67.20 8680 —JO 

7115 467Q AuO 45J0 

EM. Sales 6418 PW.WM «« 

Prev. Day Open inf. 9,wi ott65 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

&000 bv minimum- daiianper bushel 
IX 379 JUl 37? 110 

176% 114* SCO 113% 3.15* 

161% 3,18 Dec 122 323 

174% 121* Mar 171% 132* 

A02 no* Mav 111 111 


3J2% IfS JUl 255* 255% 

E st. Solas Prev.Sale* 7.124 

Prev. Day Ooenrnf, 36J« off 523 
CORN tCBT) 

1000 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
Ui 277% Jul 234 ITS 

121% 271 Sop 253 253* 

195 145* DM 245* 247 

110 153* MW 274* 155% 

121* 277* Mov 279 279 

Z86 278 Jul 278 258* 

276% 244% Sen 246 246% 

Esi. Safes Prav.Sales 29.373 

prev. Day Open Int.lOSiMl w>SQ8 
50YBEAM5 (CBT) 

5700 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
7.99 571 Jul 549 572% 


375* 106* -73% 
110* 112 -73* 
1M 119 —74* 

117* in —74* 
375% 106 -44% 

277* 277% -78* 


173* — 71* 
371* —73% 
244* —75 

253 — JDS 

277% —74% 
276* —74* 
241* —77* 


AS 9 68 29* 28* 29% + % 

U 20 98 10* 10% 10* 

.9 18 610 56* 54 55* +1 

7 1057 17% 17% 17* 

14 17 42 20% X* 20% + * 
18 12 85 34% 34% 34% + Ml 


NYSE Highs-Lons 


776 Ml An US 502% 

671 140 sen 100 504 

648 543* Nov 177 580% 

679 572* Jan 196% 5.96% 

742 183 Mor 5.99 601% 

7J» 571 Mov 676% 6.10 

678 574 Jul 679% 6.13 

674 $76 Aug 677 679 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 45778 

Prev. Day Open Int. 61238 oil 345 
SOYBEAN MBALCCBT) 

100 ions- dollars per ion 
19650 117X Jul 11270 12270 

1X00 119 JO Alia 13150 134.00 

17950 12250 Sea 135.00 136 JO 

18050 12SX Oct 13650 13950 

IB4X 130.00 DOC 14350 145X 

I63JM rn« Jan 14650 14750 

20650 11750 Mar I SOX 151X 

16250 14100 Mav 15450 1553)0 

167.00 147.90 JlH 160X 16DX 

Ell. Sales Prev. Saha 21223 

Prev. Day Open inf. 47583 aM 14W 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60X0 ibs- dollars per lOOmv 
3272 22JD Jul 28X 3SJ0 

31.95 2250 Aufl 2772 27.25 

31.10 2250 Sea 26.43 2645 

3037 22X act XX 26.15 

2953 22.90 DOC 2555 2545 

2977 3340 Jon 25.15 2540 

2860 2440 MOT 2A90 2SX 

27.45 74 JO Mav 2AM 2S.15 

2525 2355 Jul 2A65 2480 

25.15 2471 Auo 

Esi. Sales Prev. Sales 16X3 

Prev. Day Open Int. 3X5 off 1709 
OATS (CBT) 

iOOO txi minimum- dollars per budief 
178% 145% Jul 144% 144% 

1.79 141 Sop 141* 141* 

172% 144* DOC 145 145% 

147* 145% Mar 146 146 

IX 147 MOV 147 147 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 44S 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 3,156 off 8 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME1 
40X0 Urn.- amis pot lb. 

6747 HM Auo 57X 57X 

S&SW 533 S Od. 57J5 58 20 

6785 60X Dec 6040 6045 

6745 60J5 FW 61-57 6157 

6757 62.15 Apr 6250 6259 

6625 63X Jun 63X 6100 

Est. Sales 19X4 Prrv.Sotas 1A270 
Pro* Day Onen Inf. 49429 off 31 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMEI 
44X0 lb*.- cents vac lb. 

7X70 6345 Aufl 63X 63X 

73.00 63.75 SOP 6A2B 6429 

7232 6405 Od 6450 6450 

73L28 6525 Nov 65.95 65.95 

7940 6640 J«n 67.10 67.10 

7055 6A10 Mar 6725 67X 

7045 «7Jffl Apr 6725 6725 

Est. Sales 1.820 Prev. Sales 954 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8406 up 87 
HOOS(CMR) 

30X0 lbs.- can hi per lb. 

5527 47.05 Jul 4945 4955 

5437 4657 Auo. 4650 <720 

5125 42.15 Oct 4225 4220 

mas 4410 DK 4420 4440 

£8.47 4520 Feb 4530 4525 

4735 4110 APT 433-3 4347 

4935 4530 Jun 4550 45X 

4945 4S53 Jul 4eX 46X 

51.90 4555 Aufl 

Est.Soles 5416 Prev. Sales 5343 
Prev. Day open IM. 21563 up IX 
PORK BELLIES (CMEI 
38X0 Ibek* cents per lb. 

8247 5680 Jul 57.10 SBX 


847* —m 
548* —X 
520* —.11* 
527* —.10* 
548% —.10% 

687* —X* 
M9% —.10% 
&M —.11 


COFFEE CrNYCSCE) 

37J00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

14940 121X Jul 13430 134 JO 

1SU0 127X SW 11457 irjO 

1S040 1S9JB DM 1JSX |»X 

14925 13*40 MOT T35X U9X 

USX 13 LOO May I36J6 I39X 

148X 13520 Jul 13M0 M 

147^0 13275 Sea 13S.CC 135X 

138-00 13800 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 2X5 

Prev. Day Open Int. 12804 UP *6 
SUCA EWORLD II (NT CSCE) 

113X0 IDs.- cents per Ha. 

925 244 S*P J-W 

OX 224 Od 2.J5 196 

7J5 100 Jan 3.13 3.13 

923 334 Mar 347 153 

7.15 isa Moy 189 3.70 

649 179 Jul IX 189 

A96 4X OCt AC9 4.L0 

Est.Soles 3450 Prev . »on 5M7 
Prev. Dov Onen un. 80412 off 87? 

COCOA (NYC5CB] 

10 metric rons- Spot ton 

2400 1963 Jul »55 

2415 1963 Sep 38g MB0 

2337 1945 DOC 2105 2112 

2190 19S5 MOT 2112 3115 

3171 I960 Mur 2124 2135 

2110 1960 Jul 

2330 2033 Sen 

3060 2053 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 3216 


13240 13325 
13457 13543 
135.90 11745 
135JK 13759 
13555 U7X 
138X 13720 
13657 13625 
13488 


7.50 389 

iM 2.95 
3 13 3.14 

343 3-51 

343 340 

343 389 

4 m ao® 


2020 no* 

2061 3075 

2088 2101 
21M 2112 

7134 212S 

2135 
2146 
3156 


12080 131X 
131.50 13290 
13440 135J0 
13650 13830 
14250 14390 
145-40 M&3» 
149X 15000 
154JD 15490 
I5VX 15990 


2805 2809 —31 

Z7X 2739 —.17 

2645 2655 —.15 

26.00 2405 — JO 

2545 2595 —.18 

25.15 2535 —.10 

24.90 25.18 — .12 

2400 25.15 
2A65 2A75 —IX 
2452 —SS 


142* 142* —02* 
140* 140* —02% 
144 144* —01* 

146 146% 

146% 147 


Prev. Day Open inf. 31925 0H6SO 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE1 
lSjno lbs.- cents per lb. 

18405 13650 Jul UOX 1«X 

18308 132X S«D 137-SQ 13735 

1B1X 13105 NOV UA20 UA30 

1B0.W 12950 Jon 131-75 132.10 

17750 17950 MOT 13145 3 50 

16250 13645 MOV 13150 13130 

15750 142.20 Jul 

18050 17v. 75 sep 

Nov 

Est. Sates 290 Prev. Sain 206 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 5J69oHW 


13950 140.10 
I36JS 137-10 
13350 13400 
13150 13105 
13140 13105 
13150 13105 
13 IX 
131 X 
1T1X 


33* 20* PotM EI 116 64 10 53* 33* 33* 33* + % 
46 36 PBtEI pf 450 9.9 700, 46% *5 45* + * 

31 PdElpf A04 95 60x41 41 41 - % , 

23% 18% Prtfflls X 15 18 ID 24* 24% 24%—% 

39% 25% Prim* 2X50 8 68 39% 39% 39% + % 

20* 12% PrlmeC 15 1289 19% 18% 18*— % 


13% PrlmMs M _ _ 

50* PTOCtG 200 40 14 1694x57* 56%. .... _ 

17 7* PrWRsSi 52 10 24 661 17* 17 17* + * 

47* 32% Prater 1.40 15 12 18 40* 39% 40* + % 

24* 17 PSVCol 2X 18 9 230! 23% 22* 22*— * 
66 S3 PSCalpf 7.15 110 lOQz 64% 64% 64% + % 

21* 16* PSCoipf 2.10 181 13 21 20* 20*— * 


15 1289 19% 18% IS*— % 
J 27 13S 30% 30% 30% + % 

16 14 1694x57% 56* «%— * 


25 ■# a io3 % "•% % % + s 

25 20 PSInpl 350 145 220X 24% 24% 24% + % 

0* 6 psinpf 1X 122 970X 8% 8% Wl + * 

6% 6* PSlnpt 1X127 lOtite 8% 8% BM— * 

48% 37 PSInpf 7.15 147 4202 48% 48% 48% 

66* 51 PSlnpt 904 1A2 6Qx 66% 66 66%+% 

57% 45 PSlnpt 857 145 110x59% 58 59% +1 

55% 4Q% PSlnpt BJS 140 2870x56% 56% 56% + H 

66 52* PSin Pf »X IAS 250r 66 66 66 

60* 47% PSInpf AM 1A9 TtHte SO 60 60 +% 

7* 3% PSvNH 2 2387 7% 6% 7 — % 

15* 6* PSNHpf 500x 14% 13* M% 

16 7% PNHdIB 13 15% 15* IS*— % 

21* 10% PNH pfC 2 21* 21* 21* + % 


19* 9 PNH ptE 

16* 7* PNH pfF 

17% 7% PNH MG 

»* 19% PSvNM 288 100 
22% 21% PSvEG 284 88 
15 1£% PSEGor 140 184 

39 2S* PSEQpf A18 110 

«* » PSEGnf A30 118 
« 33% PS EG pt IX 11.1 

49* 36 PSEGpf 520 11.1 
20* 15 P5EGpf 117 107 
«% 46% PSEGpf ABO 11.1 
I? S1 G P* ^*3 107 
107 96 PSEGPfl22S1M 

71 53% PSEGpf 770 100 

68* 51% PSEGpf 752 110 
68% 51% PSEGpf 7X 110 
.4% 2% PubUac 

14 9% Pueblo .16 12 


SOOz 14% 13* 14% 

13 15% 15* 15*— % 
2 21 * 21 * 21 * + % 
3S SUft 19% 3fl + * 

■66 29 28% 28* + * 

1245 32* 31* 32% + % 
5 14 13% 13% — % 

jOttx 39 38 38 

1000x 37 36% 36% —1% 

300x 45% 45% 45% — % 
900x48% 47% 47% + % 
83 20* 19* 20*. + % 
100x61* 61* 61*—% 
11 22* 22* 22* 
19904107 105% 107 +1% 

lOOx 71 71 71 + * 

24902 68 67 67 —1 

600X 67% 67% 67% + * 
24 2% 2% 2% + % 


.4% 2% Public* 24 I.. ... .. 

U 9% Pueblo .16 10 20 168 14 13* 13%— % 

9* 6 . PR Cem 5 A 6* 6* 6* — % 

If* o* PygelP 176 107 9 446 16% 16% 15% + % 

21* 10% PuH«Hm .12 7 29 976 17 

32 22* Pundat IX 58 37 409 24 

10* 5% PVTO 8 204 6 


976 17 16% 16% + % 
409 24 M 23*— % 
204 8% 8% 8% 







Industrials 


LUMBER (CMEI 

lX0OObd.ff.-lPerl0OObd.lt. 

23091 129-30 Jul IS3JBJ 15700 15 

19750 13550 Sec I49X 15000 14 

186.10 T37X Nov ISOSO IflJO 14 

1873)0 14400 Jan 15770 1SSX 15 

19500 1S8.SS* Mar 16350 16190 16 

174.40 15300 Mav 

18300 171X Jul 173.00 T73X 17 

Esl. 5aln 1.918 Prev. Sales 2J86 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8783 oil as 
COTTON 2(NYCE> 

50000 lbs.- cents per Ib. 

7750 6002 OCt AIM 6150 * 

73X 60.48 DOC AIM 6173 6 

7675 61.40 Mar ASX 6258 6 

7000 6106 Mav ASM 6202 * 

rax AIM Jul 62X 6255 6 

«*<« 5850 Ocr S90O 5! 

SVX 57.90 Dec 070 5853 5 

Est.Soles 2.100 Prev. 5ales 2500 
Prev. Day Open inx. 16X9 off 304 
KEATING OIL(NYME) 

<2X0 aal - cents per aal 
7550 44 34 Aus 6855 6*50 61 

76X 66.90 SCO 6935 69X 6 

77.10 67X OCt 7005 7050 6 

7A55 6850 NOV 7058 7105 71 

7825 69.15 Dec 7170 71 JK 7 

76.90 69 JB JOn 71X 72.10 T 

7190 TUX Feb 

73X 69X Mar 

74X 68X Apr 

Est.Soles prev. Sales 5M8 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 20X4 uo*4 
CRUDE OIL(NYME) 

1000 bW^ del kin aer bbl. 

2957 2405 Auo 77-11 2777 21 

2950 24X SOP 2605 265? 21 

2950 7405 Oct 257 S 25.94 2 ! 

2950 2440 Nov 2535 25JT7 X 

2950 2X90 Dec 25X 2528 21 

2950 2438 Jan 2476 24.95 2- 

29.44 2425 F«b 3450 2455 2- 

29.45 34.11 Mar 3A25 2428 2- 

29X 2400 Aar 2353 2400 Z 

27.96 2A10 May 2355 3305 Z 

Nov 

EH. Sales Prev. Sales 12047 

Prev. Day Onen inr. 61096 up 185 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- phi of 100 od. 

9133 8654 Sep 9286 9257 

• 9307 8557 Dec 9256 9208 

V2J5! 8640 Mar 9222 9231 

9228 87 JH Jun 

92JH 88X sep TIM 9100 

9158 89X Dec 

91J9 8958 Mar 

Jun 

Est. Sale* Prev. Sales 10666 

Prev. Day Open int. 34084 up 285 
18 YR. TREASURY (CBT? 
STOOJNUpr1n-pt8&32ndsaf TOBpd 
88-21 75-18 Sep 85-28 86-14 

87-13 73-13 Dec 84-27 85-12 

86-2 75-14 Mar 

85-7 74-38 Jun 839 83-17 

84-4 . 82-11 Sep 82-15 82-23 

83-11 80-19 Dec 

Esf. Sale* Prev. Sam 11916 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 51192 off 1.170 
I/S TREASURY BONOS (CBT) 

(8 pcJ-Sl 00008-Phi 1. 32nd* Of I DO pet) 
79-12 57-10 Sep 77-6 77-18 

78-13 57-8 Dec 74-2 76-16 

77-2* 57-2 Mar 7SO 73-15 

76-6 56-29 Jufl 74-1 7+15 

7H1 56-29 Sep 73-5 73-19 

7+24 56-25 Dec 73-16 72-24 

7+15 56-27 Mar 71-23 71-31 

74-24 63-12 Jun 

72-27 634 . Sap 70-10 78-17 

72-18 63-24 ‘ Dec 49-21 49-2f 

69-16 484 Mar 

EcL Sales Prw.Sami71400 

Prev. Dav Open I rtf .200570 uolB4 


Stock indexes 


(Indexes compiled short iv before market close) 

SP COMP. INDEX (CMC) 
points and cents 

19900 16000 Sen 19400 19500 1*300 19190 —TO 

199.10 17X70 Doe 19705 1P8J0 I97X 197 X —8* 

20205 190,10 Mar 20035 20005 20035 20005 —05 

Est. Sale* Prev. Sales 4SJ48 

Prev. OavOnen Inf. 63057 up 2.752 
VALUE LINE fKCBTl 

pobitx and cents _ 

212J0 185.75 Sen 20030 309.15 2U7J0 20750 —.90 

21100 30BX Dec 21100 21X70 211-50 21150 —TO 

Est.Soles Prov.Sales 3059 

Prev. Dav Onen Int 10088 up HU 36 

NYSE CO MP._ I NDEX (NYFE) 

cents ^ 11M# ,, lw mw ,12.90 —00 

11500 10120 Dec USX 115.75 11480 11498 —25 

11700 109X Mar 11700 11700 1T7X 11705 +05 

119JS 11650 Jun 11SX I180O 11*X 118X —X 

Est.Soles Prev. Sales 8X0 

Prev. Dav Ooen 1 nl. 11008 


Previous 

916501 

1587.70 

11754 

277.10 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Mood Vs N-A.1 

Reuters 158030 

DJ. Futures NA 

Com. Research Bureau. NA 

MaodVs : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p- preliminary; f- final 
Reuters : hose 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


Qiloouo Board at Trade 
Chicago Mercantile ExChanae 
International Monetary Market 
Of Chicago Mercantile Exchanee 
New York Cocoa Sugar. Coffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Bxcftatee. New York 
New York Mercantile exchange 
Karoos City Board at Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


(Other Earnings on Page 17) 


58% 12% UAL lXa 10 9 1934 57* 56% 56*— % 


36% 25 UAL pt 200 60 695 34* 34* 36* + % 

15% 7% UCCEL SO 609 15% 15 15% + % 

24% 16% UGI 204 8.7 10 U2 23% Z3U. 23% 


25V, 19% UGI pt X75 11.1 900x 25* 24* 94*— % 

11% *% UNCRea „ 276 18% 10* 10% + % 

14 . 10* URS 00 30 IS 50 12 11% 11% + * 

38* 17% USFG 200 60 <0 2206 37 36% 36% 

+H2 23% U5GS 108 A0 7 m <2% 41* 41* -1 
19% 12% UnIFrst X 10 12 68 14% 14% „% + % 

62 45 Unllvr 2.13a 30 10 3 61 61 61 —1 

l ??.. 2. UnlNW 506e A« II 138 10B% 107* 107* — 1* 

41* 31% UCamn 104 43 II 3462 38% 17% 38% + % 

S7% 32* UnCCrtr 300 70 T1 2393 48% 48% 4f%— % 

7% 4% UnlonC 65 5% 5% 5* 

19% 12 UnElec 1.72 80 7 1226 19% 19 19% + * 


14 10* URS 

38* 17% USFG 
44% 23% USGl 


40 29 UnElpf ASO 12.1 160y 37% jjVa 37%—* 

^ ?4% UnEIrtiWUX IM 38x03 K%M%-* 

H n l ft 2-H ,M 153X26% 26% 26% + % 

20% 13% UnElpf 2.13 11.1 34x19% 19* 19*— % 

26% 19% UnElpf 2T2 100 4x35* 25% 25% + % 

— n Hi? 1 ?. H£ ,1 * 4 10709 65% 64 65% +2* 

72 50. UEIPfH 000 1IJ lOv 70% 70% 70% +1% 

52% 34* UnPae IX 30 12 1409 50* 49* 49*- % 

114% 82 UnPcpf 705 60 3 110% 110 110 — 1 

21 11* Unlrovl .10 .9 13 947 21 70* 31 + % 

10 50 Unrvlpt BX IAI 480x 57% 56* 56* * 

5* 3* Unitor 6 3% » 

19* 10* UnBmd 13 535 19* 19% 19* + % 

16* 9% UBrdpf 95 15% TSV? lS5 

45* 23% UCMTV .14 J 70 29 45 44* 441k + % 

32% 22% UnEnrg 200 90 19 501 a% 2e% 26%- % 

T®% 9 UMIum 2X 10.1 4 322 19% 19% 19% + % 

30 19% UMIUDl 3J7 130 20 79% 29% 2*%— % 

10% II* Ulllunr 200 120 580x 17* 17* 17* 

14% 10 UIIIUPl IX 130 3 14* 14* 14% 

25 15 Unltlnd M 20 10 106 a 24* 24*— * 

43 35* Unltlnn 33 0 36 13 42* 42% 42* 


20 29% 29* 29%- M 
200 120 5Mx 17* 17* 17* 

1.90 132 3 14* 14* 14% 

M 20 10 106 25 24* 24*— * 

33 0 M 13 42* 42% 42* 


UJerBk IX 15 10 335 47 


16% 9* uidMM 11 

2* 2% UPkMn . I 

38% a UsoJrG .12 0 8 

8% 5% USHom 
42% 29% USLiOt X 11 9 


LS 10 335 47 44% 44% —2* 

>J 73 14 13* 14 + * 

1 65 2% 2% 2* 

0 8 1689 37% 36% 37% + % 
332 7% 7% 7% 

-1 ? 24 37* 37* 37* + % 


Raytheon 

2nd Qnar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1000. 1020 

Net Inc. 94X10)1105 

Per Share L14 — 

1st Half 19SS 1984 

Revenue 3,130. 2020. 

Nil Inc. 18104 67.72 

Per Share— 118 OX 

a: Ian. 

Rubbermaid 
2nd Qoar. 1985 1914 

Revenue 1410 1319 

Mel Inc. 11.9 mi 

Per Share 070 000 

Id Half 1985 1984 

Revenue 2900 2700 

Net Inc. 230 210 

Per Share IX 104 

Safeway Stores 
fedOear. 1985 19M 

R evenue 4X0. 4030. 

Net Inc. 49.9 470 

Per Share 083 081 

Id HaH 1985 1984 

Revenue — woo. am 

N« I IK. 750 690 

Par Shore 1 36 1.18 

Shawm ut 

2nd Quar. 1985 1984 

Net Inc. 1386 9X 

Per Share— 104 1JJ7 

1st HaH 1985 1984 

Net me. 26.1 190 

Per Share— 151 103 

1 064 net baHl period} inCtud*f 
extraordinary Item Of 
578AOOBI 

Texas Amer. Bncshrs 
Ml Qxor. 1985 1984 

Net Inc. 885 1203 

Per Shore— 081 1.15 

Id HaH 1985 1984 

Net Inc. 1408 Z1T4 

Per Shore 1J1 IX 

Tektronix 

♦mover. ins 19M 

Revenue 3717 3719 

Net Inc 2989 6403 

Per Share 105 308 

1985 1914 


Oper Net — 75T a 90 

Oper Shore— 101 102 

JMS not exckxSee securities 
oatn of SI.9 million vs SJ3 mil- 
lion. 

United Tech. 

2nd Goar. 1985 1984 

Revenue A! 00. 4000. - 

Nat Inc — 5483 168.99 

Per Share 004 103 

Id HUH 198S 1984 

Revenue suns. L069. 

Net Inc 19204 3015 

Per Share 106 121 

Walgreen 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 7916 6858 

Net Inc 2109 19.19 

Per Shore — 035 003 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 2JB0- 2860. 

Nat Inc 6BX 3143 

Per Share 1.T1 0.97 

Per More results oCiusted 
for 2- for - 1 sloe* split. 104 net 
tnetudes charge of SaiJ JOQ in 
auarferandpalnafSVKJJXntn 



July IS 

Comaiddffy and Unit 

Man 

Ago 

Ceftoa 4 Santo*, m 

145 

145 

Prlntctaiti 6tm 38 %. yd — 

808 

BJf 

Stool Ultota IPIltJ, Ian 

47188 

473X 

Iron 2 Fdry. Phllo» tan , — 

21 US 

TUX 

Stool scrap No 1 Itw Pitt. _ 

7*71 

99-95 

Load Spot, lb 

. 1UT 

3004 

Copper ctocUtb 

6548 

64-47 


NJL 

un 

Zinc. E. St. I_ Basis. IB 

U647 

ox 

Palladium, oz 

92*44 

139-142 

Silver N V nr 

Source: Ap. 

NJL 

7X5 


I 


Dhidends 


40* 33 usstioe X 15 13 1144 35% 34* 34*— I* 
29* a* USSIeel IX 3T 18 2®71 26% 26% 76* + % 

S8U) 49* U5SN pf 6016)1.9 44 54% 53% 54 — % 

135% 115* USStlprllTS 10.1 42 126% la 126* + % 

30 23% USS1I pf 205 88 453 28* 27% 28% + % 

39* XT* USTob 1.72 AJ 12 634 36% 35% 36% + % 

84* 57% U Sweat 5T2 68 * 6678 84% 83* 84% + % 

13 6% UnSIck 20 3 8* 8* I* 

45 32* UflTecn IX 30 9 5344 44% 43% 44% +1 

39* 30* UTdi pf 155 67 3e8 38%37%38 +% 

25 17% UnlTw 1.92 61 9 1221 a* a% 23* 

31 21* UiUT2pf IX 50 I 39% 29% 29%— % 

=< UWRi IX 60 12 V4 19% 19% 19% 

33% 21 umtrde X 8 16 1063 24% 24 24*— * 

20% 14* Unlvor X 4 1 7 24 19* 19% 19* 

28% 7% UnvDev 0Oe T 19 16 2fl% 28% 28% 

28 19* UnlvFd 1.12 40 12 82 26% 26% 26% + * 

23*. 15* UnLool IX 40 8 89 22% 21% 23% + * 

S3 27% Unocal IX 45 7 567S 27% 2** »%— * 

122% 45 UPlDtWi 204 21 33 2255 121* 120% 120% 

43 a* USLIFE 104 u II 279 39% 29* 39% - % 


Year 1985 198* 

Revenue 104ft. 1 JM. 

Net Inc vais 115S 

Per Share— 401 5T4 

Results for fiscal IM and 
first three quarters of fiscal 
l W restated la reflect acqui- 
sition of Coe Systems Inc- 

Torchmark 

2nd Oner. 1985 Wt 

Revenue 3340 2738 

Net Inc X.1S 32JS 

Per Share 106 0T8 

lit Half 1985 19*4 

Revenue 6500 5410 


WBstmahouse Elec. 
2 nd atmr. 1985 1984 

Revenue — 2060. m 

Net Inc 1X9 128.1 

Per Share— 081 0T2 

Id Half 1985 19*4 

Revenue—. 4870. 483d. 

Net Inc Z730 2447 

Per Share IX 1JS 

Wheeling-Pitta. Steel 

M Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2416 279.1 

Nel Inc (o)SDX 501 

Par snore — — ox 

id Half 19*5 1984 

Revenue 4860 537.9 

Net Inc la)7S15 g J7 

a: has. Per share results af- 
ter payment of preferred dlr- 
ktenfs. iw Quarter net tn- 
ctudes naarecurrlne loss of 
53847 m illion fr om estimated 
casts of closing of mine. 

Whirlpool 

2nd Quar. 1985 19*4 

Revenue — 9670 8680 

Net Inc — ~ 48.9 467 

Per snare — 104 107 

Id HaH 1985 1984 

Revenue — 1,750. 1030, 

Nel Inc 878 ejj 

Per Share— 2X ZJ2 
1VJ net hath per Ioffe Includes 
charae of SUJ million from 
ctesedoMi oi ekml, lt84 Quar- 
ter net Includes LHo credit of 

ss .1 million vs charae of jy 
million. 1965 nel both periods 
/nctoaes charge aisle cents 
per share. 





Job IS 

Comparer 

Per 

Amt 

Pay 

Rec 

INCREASED 



Ladd Furniture 

a 

JU 

B-15 

8-1 

INITIAL 




Travelers Really 

_ 

JO 

8-21 

7-26 

STOCK SPLIT 



MetflPlex Group — Wor-2 




USUAL 




Am Hospital Supply 

Q 

38 

9-?3 

BX 

Beneaulty HaMInga 


AS 

9-12 

7-31 

CP National 

Q 

M 

0-18 

8-23 

Church's Frd Chick 

Q 

.11 

8-19 

8-2 

Clark Equipment 

Q 27% 

9-4 

8-19 

Control Data 

a 

.U 

10-1 

9-13 

Cubic Carp 

s. 

19% 

9-13 

8-12 

Kaufman & Bread 


.ID 

B-12 

7-26 

MerkUan Bancorp 

6 

45 

10-1 

9-15 

pantalr Inc 

Q 

.17 

8-12 

7-24 

Pizza inn 

a 

J02 

8-2 

7-22 

Ponce Fed) Bank 

a 

.10 

8-9 

7-31 

psa Inc 


.15 

8-20 

7-26 

Stuart Hall 

S JD% 

8-15 

8-1 

US West 

a 

L43 

8-1 

7-22 

U Id Coral. Bncshra 

O 

05 

H 

7-31 

Xerox Core 

Q 

05 

ID-1 

9-6 

A- Annual; M-Moetflly; 
AnmaL 

O-Qeartoffy; S-5emi- 

Source: UPi. 







Commmlldes 


if 


Cormwllities 


SUGAR HW ^ BM Art aro. 

French francs per metric lee 
Aug 1,165 MX 1.162 1,165 +14 

Oct 1,145 1.130 1.130 1,133 —7 

EMC 1.155 1.155 1.135 1,140 —8 

Mar 1,165 1.145 1,138 1.143 — IJ 

Mny N.T. N.T. 1,181 1,183 —8 

Aug N.T. N.T. 1J1D 1020 —13 

voLs.1016 late of 50 Ions. Prev. actual 
solee: 115® lot*. Open Interest: 19.114 
COCOA 

French francs per 7*8 ko 
Jl9 N.T. N.T. — 2.1M undl. 

5~ 2X5 2X0 2015 2024 -44 

Dec 2010 1.995 3X6 2X0 — 33 

Mar 2/ne 2)810 2X0 2020 —41 

May N.T. N.T. 2010 2040 —40 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2015 2045 —40 

Sep N.T. N.T. MSI 2050 —X 

Ed. vol.: 48 M* of 10 tens. Prev. actual 
sates: 1020 lots. Open Interest: 808 
COFFEE 

Preach franc* per IPS ftp 

Jlv N.T. N.T. — 1090 —160 

l-'Jg }-g® W5 10H —75 1 KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2010 110 

May N.T. N.T. 2050 110 

Mr . M-T. N.T. — 2070 —110 

wU 69 M*g(S tons. Prev. odual aoles: 

S65 Infs. Omm Interest: 4)8 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


10% 8% USlfeFd lJMa V.7 


14 10* 10% 10* 


36% 30* UIBPL 2J2 80 14 426 26% 26* 26% 


27* 21* UtPLPf 200 100 
28% 21% UtPLPf 2.90 105 
20 15* UIPLpf 204 100 

26% IS* UllllCO 1720 50 
23 18 tiinrnof ?44 un 


2 27 26* 26* 

30 27* 37* 27* + % 

i If* 19* 19* + % 

54 36% 2fl'« 26* + % 

14 73 V) a* 22% 


THENIBtNAHONAi. 

MANAGER 

AWEEKLY GUIDE BY SHEfiPr BUCHANAN 
WEDNESDAY IN fHE IHT 


N. Y. Bank Buys 

Alaskan Firm 

United Press International 

AUBURN, New York — Bank 
executives from New York and 
Alaska completed Monday the Dm 
acquisition of an Alaska bank by a 
New York fmandai institution. 

The two banks involved are Key 
Banks Inc, a financial services 
company, of Albany, and Alaska 
Pacific Ban corporation of Anchor- 
age, Alaska. 

With the acquisition, Key Banks 
grows to a 1 3-bank bolding compa- 
ny with assets or $6.2 biflioa and 
offices in upstate New York, Long 
Island. Maine. Oregon and Alaska. 


DM Futures 
Options 

IP. ternm 6tv*-RMM mtrtt emh «r mor* 


July IS 

strike CofeUNe ' _ P^SeUle 

price Sw Dec Mar Sc* Dec Mar 

33 11! 2» 10 MO 156 — 

34 177 2JO 141 046 002 109 

35 w ui is ra ui i jo 

36 004 114 100 ISO 100 200 

37 121 10 18 - - - 

EdtaaMd total «aL&564 
Cans: Frt.vd.40Sl teas lot 30011 
Pet* jFrfcvd. WTO spat tot 19.109 
Source: CUE. 


London 

Commodities 



SUCAR Hfgl. Low Bid Art 

Starling per metric taa 

Aoe 8070 HIM 8800 8800 

oct tlx Sun tax nuo 

£K 9300 9080 9300 M 
Mar 1(000 10000 10200 18200 
MOP 10600 10500 10600 1D60O 
Aop N.T. N.T. 10900 11008 
Oct 11200 11208 11200 11040 
Volume: 799 tot* of SO tors. . 
COCOA 

Storltog per metric faa 
Jhr 1 JM 1098 1097 1098 

Up 1084 1067 1067 .1068 

Me 1080 1063 1064 1066 

M*- 1088 1072 1074 1075 

May 1T02 1085 1089 1090 

Jf* 1T14 1000 ITD0 VB2 

Sep 1J17 1JT7 1TT0 1J17 

Vaiuma: 3080 tats of 10 ton*. 
COFFEE 

Storttog per metric tan 
Tty 1005 1080 1090 1005 

9« I0SS SSL 1041 iSs 

to** 1090 1049 1077 I0BD 

Mn 1T30 1087 1,719 1TSB 

Mar 1760 1010 1046 1050 

May 1085 1040 1060 1000 

Jlv 1085 1070 1078 1020 

volume: $257 lefs of Stas. 
QASOIL 

U0. deum* per metric fan 
AMO 21 7X 31605 31605 9160$: 
TUX 21500 21500 216X ! 


July IS 
Pravlaac 
Bid. Art 


8700 8770 
9000 9000 
9240 9200 
102X 10220 
10500 107X 
110X11 IX 
moo nix 


1040 1041 
10^ 1098 
1088 UK 
1091 IMS 
1010 1012 
1025 1026 
1030 1040 


1025 1040 
107S 507^1 
1.711 1015 
1051 1054 
1062 1065 
1080 1.7B6 
1080 1010 


717X2T7JD 
2I65B 21405 


BERN — Wholesale prices in 
Switzerland fell 0.2 percent In June 
after a decline of OJ percent in 
May, the federal government said 
Monday. 



Index Options 


*m* GBBtfjtf bMUjd 

W** 2BI *• J,r Slip'oo 

tn - ifli % ' 5 lt 

w 5? II? S* “ ini to„ 

* SI S * & U 1 

a ska i* I b b 

JUffliwmi in Tn 
TririoBoptaw: 651156 
TMdMd «ehmt 74^*3 
TflW PSt opm M.49LQ9 
i Me*; 

Hb* 11544 UmBJJ? QMt RS45tWI7 

Source; CHOP. - • 


BBSSSJJil 































































Morgan sales and trading specialists meeting in London are, from left, Hans- 


-Uhich HftgU, Zurich; Jyonosuke Baba, Tbkyo; Ulrich Kiooenberg. Frankfurt; Mark Hausbcrg. head of Eurobond Sales. London; Nabil &wS!?Sori5. Treasury 


■.'V* 


»*#•*££* .. 


■*} » 


; P©«* 
<*** 




*'"y* 


*■‘4 

,n — 


Institutional investors actively managing port- 
folios of international securities expect a lot 
from a dealing counterparty. They get a lot at 
; The Morgan Bank. 

I Customized service. Morgan does more 
than just buy and sell securities. We’re inter- 
ested in developing and maintaining long- 
term client relationships. We listen to your 
particular objectives, and then we help you 
\ ^achieve them with new ideas, careful analysis, 
5 and customized service. 

Secondary market strength. Morgan is 
• known for successful Eurobond issues. But 
- , our strength in structuring issues that sell 

is based on a deep involvement in secondary 
markets. No bank knows more about the inter- 


•- 




*- ^ 


b*** - ! 


related elements that affect financial markets- 
interest rates, currency fluctuations, capital 
flows. Our dealers exchange vital information 
around the clock so we can give our clients « 
timely and accurate financial market updates. 

A wide range of products. Our clients look 
to Morgan for Eurodollar bonds and U.S. Trea- 
suries, but we also give them much more. We 
make markets in non-dollar-denominated 
Eurobonds and government securities, floating- 
rate and short-term notes, CDs, currency op- 
tions, and warrants. Through Morgan Futures 
Corporation we act as a broker for financial 
futures. And Morgan is active as a principal in 
. securities markets in Amsterdam, Frankfurt, 
Zurich, Paris, London, and New York. 


Morgan professionalism. When you work 
with Morgan you get over 100 years of interna- 
tional financial experience-and the strength 
of a bank with nearly $5 billion in primary' 
capital. You get a network of sales and trading 
specialists that stretches around die world. 
And you get the highest level of skill and pro- 
fessionalism. 

Talk to Morgan about how we can meet your 
international securities investment and trad- 
ing requirements. Contact Mark Hausberg 
for Eurobonds, or Nabil Sawabini for U.S. 
Treasuries. 


Morgan Guaranty Ltd, 30 Throgmorton Street, 
London EC2N 2NT. Phone (44-1) 600 7545. 








'WKl* 


Page 14- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 


Over-flie-C Counter 

NASDAQ National Market Prices 


July 13 

StriMln Net 

lSSs HHUi LOW SPJULCtiHfl 


■ ADVERTISEMENT — — — 

ARIS KARAYANNIDIS PROMOTED TO PRESIDENT 
OF PENNWALT CORPORATION’S AGRICHEMICALS DIVISION 

PHHAnF.l PHI A PA — Penn wait Corporation has named Dr. Aria 
Karayannidls President of its Agrichemicals Division. The Division manu- 
factures and markets worldwide a broad line of pre- and post-harvest 
pesticides and computerized electronic sizing and sorting equipment for 
trash fruit and vegetable packing bouses. 

Karavatmidu began his career with Penn wait in 1974 in Paris as assistant 
to the Managing Director of Penn wall France, part of the Corporation's 
I ntenutionaT Chemicals Division. Since then he has held several manage- 
ment positions in the European Chemical Specialties Division rodnding 
Manager of Chemical Specialties in West Germany and .Assistant to the 
Managing Director of European Chemical Specialties. 

Karayanniriw also served as Manager of the Ace hem Decco Division in 


Karayannuiu also nerved as Manager of the Agchem Decco Division in 
France and Deputy Managing Director of Pennwalt France-Cbemicals. His 
most recent assignment has been Managing Director of the Agrichemicals 
Division in Europe; 

Karayannidis received his Masters Degree in Electronic Engineering 
from the University of West Berlin and a Masters Degree in Business 
Administration from the University of Munich- He earned a Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree in Computer Science from the Univositv of West Berlin. 

Dr. Ksrayanoidia will manage worldwide operations or the Agrichemicals 
Division from his Pennwalt Fiance office in Plaisir, France. 

Pennwalt Corporation, with headquarters in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, 
is a worldwide manufacturer of chemicals, health products and precision 
equipment. 




1$! 


£3 

feai 




aft— ft 

ffft + ft 
am— ft 
10ft— 1 
13** + ft 

avtfc— ft 

liti 

ion— vs 

23 — Vi 




1 SAJIS 
57V.11 


—I 

d 

d 

d 

is 

itr 

tre 


U 

23-iASa 

-( 

d 

UNIZIN5 

Ot 


APPEL D’OFFRES INTERNATIONAL DE PREQUALIFICATION 
POUR LA CONSTRUCTION DE L’ECOLE SUPERIEURE 
DES INDUSTRIES TEXTILES (ESITEX) A SEGOU, 
REPQBUQUE DO MALI 


AVIS DE PRlS&JECTION DES ENTRB*RI5ES 
La CommunautA Iconondque 

La Cnmmumul t gconomiqne de I’Afrique de l'Ouest ( CEAO) e nvisage la 
construction de Pfccole supfaieure des Industries textiles (ESITEX) A Segoo 
(R£puUumedu Mali) en entreprisegfcnciale. Cette construction fera l'oujet 
d’un apod cT offres restreint parmi les entreprenems de travaux agrees par le 
. maftre « 1’ouvxage, aprite la pife&ectioo aont l'objet et les conditions soot . 
exposes d-deesous ; 


I’Afrique de l’Ouest lance an appd de candidatures pour la 
pr€sClection des entreprisea en vne de rexfeutkm des travaux de 
construction i Segou. R^hbliq ue du Mali, dc Pfcole Bupfaieure 
des Industries textiles (ESITEX}; 


II. — Description oommaire dn projet: 

Le projet conaistc en la construction de bStiments de destination 
differente pour mie surface approximative utile de 5 000 et des 
V JLD. y affere nt : 

A rimiro atrarioa K n acdgn emcnt General: 

Ateliers de fornmtfon pratique; 

Hebergement; 

Hestnaraiion et detente; 

Coocaergerie, infirmerie, vestiaira. 

HI. — Finaacement : 

Le finaoccment des travanx cat soUiciti aupriia du Fonda d I’OPEP 
pour le Ddrvdoppement Int e rn a ti o n al de la Banque Islamique de 
D6vek>ppenKnt (BID) et de la Coaimimautft Economique de 
FAfrique de l'Ouest (CEAO); 

IV. — filigih Qft h des entreprisea : 

Peuvent Mre ade de c an did atu re les eatnprises oe groupements 
tfe nt rep ri ses des £tste roemhres de la CommurBunf: Economique 


uuc uuoiuupc o 

et dn Foods de l'OPEP pour ie DEvefoppement International; 

V. — Dale et Ben de rtcepdon des candidatures, participation 
A la. prtoilectkn : 

Les dossiare de candidature r&hg&j ea deux exotiplairea (tm 
original, une copie) devranl ftre reqns sous envdoppe cachet ee au 
plus raid le 28 aoCt 1985 & 17 heures a 1'adresse suivantc : 
Secretariat Gteinl de la CEAO 
Monsieur le Secretaire Ghrind, 

ELP. 634, Ouagadougou (Bnridm Faso). 

Les candidate devront joindre fl leur demaode les dossiers et 

ri&nuceS MlwfaiMnt mn rnnrlilimw 

VI. — Dossier de cand ida t u re : 

Le doswiw de candidature compreodra Coates indieatirem util<^ 
notamment les pieces suhrantes : one declaration inBquant i'inten- 
tion de soumisBumner et faisant cannaltre les noma, prinoms et 
analhe, domicile et nationality du aouminwimaiie; use attestation 
oe natiomlite scion la rSgjetnaitstion valabie en la matifan dana le 
pays du soumisraanzaire; les rensdgaements complete caucausnt 
ie fltatut de I'entrepriee on de so anodes; de pieces dument 
certifiSa; 1a raison eodale; Tadresse complete du siege; la date de 
ei&alioa de rentreprbe; sa forme juridkxue; son capital soda] et sa 
repartition; un certiflcal de non failOte; la liste da rffectils 
(aalarifa permanents) de I’entfeprise; la liste des tonipenMiits 
kxuris; toutes justifications nfcca saire s prouvant que ie candidal 
est tedhmquement et financicroiwatt en mesure tfezecutar la 
Havana en question, notamment les references teduriquea et 
financiSres dea travaux analogues meats d bonne fin an corns des 
anq demiera arnica ou actueUement en corns arec la indications 
Burranles : intitule et localisation da travaux, leur nature et 
importance. F importance de la participation do Candida! 3 reten- 
tion da travaux, lea noma et adteaes da mitres de I'ouvrage 
ajrant adribuG les marehfe; 

VH. — Jngcroent dee oindiditiirea, inritation A eoaarienKBUier ; 
La candidatures seront examinees par one eanmiaKHL Lea 
derisions de ettte commission ne seront susceptibla d'aucim 
recoura de la pan des candidate. 

D sera adraseh aux ramdidats retains une lettre d'invitation 3 
uutiriper i 1'anpd d 'off res restreint pnfcvu. Cede inritation con- 
unne h recevandite de la candldaiun: et doit indhmer les condi- 



JA 

2A 

.me 

.4 

JW 

*A 


71* 17*. 
I3U. 13*. 
7% BK> 
*b V* 
1M 
A 15U 
TVS 9V> 
ta 
n* 


tiona d'attribution du dossier tT 'appd d’oflna. La CEAO slnterdh 
de revenir ultferieuremeot sur une acceptation ou de justzfier son 
choix; 

VIU. — Knecriptton definitive : 

La candidate invit£s devront. alls nmintiermrail leur intention de 
confirmer leur candidature par pli recotniMndftadteasy 










IBI 

ICC 

its ns* is 

ILC 

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ISC 

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lent 

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imum* 

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We are pleased to announce 
the opening of an office in Germany 

Neue Mainzer Strasse 75 
6000 Frankfurt 1 . 

West Germany 
Ttel: (069)28 08 91 
TTXr 699 7613 

and the appointment of 

B. Michael Lehmann 

as Managing Director 

RUSSELL REYNOLDS ASSOCIATES, INC 

Consultants to Management 

in Executive Selection 

245 Park Avenue, New 'fork, NY 10167 

New 1 brk Boston Chicago Cleveland Dallas Frankfurt Geneva 
Hong Kong Houston London Los Angeles Madrid Menlo Park 
Paris San Francisco Singapore Stanford Sydney Washington, D.C 


M 

13 

UD 

XI 

M 

4 A 

J0 1* 


M 

3A 

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1-A0 

4A 



STOCK USS USS 

DeVoe- Holbein 

International bv 6V4 7V4 

Gly-Oock 

Inlemational nv 2% 3 V* 

Quotes as of: July 15, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securitiesbv 
Herengrachl 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3 120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firm nl 


GLOBE 

G LOBE is the UK's laigest 
listed investment trust. 
Over the past ten years divi- 
dends have substantially 
outpaced the Retail Price Index, 
while the net asset value of 
shares has more than tripled. 

‘ Wfe believe', said David Hardv, 


shows small isn’t always beautiful 


Chairman, in his annual 
statement, ‘we can turn to 
shareholders’ advantage our 
ability to make good decisions 
swiftly, putting substantial 
sums to work . . I 
Why not send for a copy of 
our 1985 Annual Review? 



1985 was another 
good year for Globe 
shareholders. 

Dividends were up 10% 
to 9*90p per share. 

Net assets were up 
12.68% to £629.4m. 


Globe Investment I Name 
Trust PJLC | Address 

Britain’s hugest listed . 


lb: The Sucreturius. Globe Investment Trust ELC.. FREEPOST. 

Electru House. Temple Place. Victoria Embankment. London WC2R 3BR. | 

Please Send me ( tick hnxai appropriate.!: 

A copy of your 19H5 Anuud Review □ Detdh of the TvmhH products □ I 


investment trust 












































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Value of Output 
Up 23% in China 

Reuters 

BEIJING — The value of Chi- 
na’s industrial output rose 23. 1 per- 
cent in the first six months of 1985 
against 11.6 percent in the corre- 
sponding period of 1984, the state 
statistical bureau said. 

A spokesman quoted on Sunday 
by the official China News Service 
said the growth this year was too 
rapid ana could hann China’s pro- 
gram of economic reforms by lod- 
ing inflation. 


(lima R pginnfll AirKw ft 

Baying 4 Boeing 737s 

Reuters 

BEIJING — A regional Chinese 
airline has agreed to buy four 
Boeing 737-30&, worth S26 milli on 
each, for delivery between Novem- 
ber 1985 and June 1986, Boeing Co. 
announced Monday. 

It said China Southwest Airlines, 
based in Chengdu, Siehnan prov- 
ince, would sign a contract Tues- 
day for the aircraft. They will be 
powered by CFM-56-381 engines 
made by General Electric Co. of 
the United States and SNECMA of 
France. 


REWARDS FOR EXPATS 

Introducing two new investment opportunities specially 
designed for non-residents of the U.K. 

International Investment Expertise 
Premium Life have teamed up with leading international 
investment group GT Management to give the expatriate investor 
the opportunity to take advantage of proven international 
investment expertise for both regular savings and lump sum 
investment. 

The GT Group will provide the investment expertise for a range 
of 11 Funds including the new GT International Managed Fund. 

They are widely regarded as one of the most successful 
international management teams in the world with funds under 
management of £2 billion and fully staffed offices In London. 
Hong Kong, San Francisco and Tokyo. 

Favourable Ihx Situation 

The investment benefits are further enhanced by the favourable 
tax situation and political stability of Guernsey. 

Flexibility 

You can take out a contract in either sterling or dollars. Special 
features of these new contracts allow a high degree of flexibility in 
how the plans can be used and adapted to your changing financial 
needs. 

Financial Strength 

The assets of the shareholding groups of Premium Life at 
December 1984 exceed £3(1000 million. 

Free Tax Notes' 

To find out howyou can benefit from these new plans and to 
receive a copy of Tax Notes for Expatriates', simply complete the 
coupon or contact us by telephone or telex. 

Who can benefit? 

These contracts can be taken out by anybody except those who 
are resident, for tax purposes, in the U.K. or Guernsey. 


Ur GUca Mhidua LLB. Prrinitnn Li/r latrnutioaal Ltd., 

Bethdot House; 5 Benhekx Street, Sl tftn. Guanuty. 

Channel Islands. Telephone No. (0481} 26618 Mcr 4191129 ' 

Pl an t tall m mm About Piaml m n Lift Intanutfonal contract*, and how I 
cm benefit from tax fnt growth end prom international iavc rtm anf 
nptTtiw. PlcMa abo mil me a copy of "lax Note* for Expatriate*'. 
lam interested m: 

Capita] Investment for years. Amount to be invested 

Regular Savings tor ". years. Amount to be saved each year.. 

Name IMr/Mn/Mas) 

Atom 


Date of Birth Telephone 

Premium Life International 

ftMWuwUhtw«n«tio«atlj»aM»a4liwuia««* co mp any wtuchaoniimMiaiawi* 

juni— Im liDninrowiiimrpwiofiliTUiiocillCinidomb iu nwBl Hnclnai««h(1iilm 
i now a mim iflan Tim nn no il, n ilo ■muon— in mninliii m , ni ihrmn|un or 


rnmwninymnaiilMn Tliunnamilmili, hiiiiiiiimiii ni,nl,nii , ■»! iln lucnpin, in 
_ nniinr« n miUi| illniiirtlfi in iln i r ni < i iiitn « ri TT«in nim M Holder, Mrtwpobcm—w 

~ by Iftcpmpmy will amhrp,— end by iIk M^hdflfrTSwwnui' Ac [|Q75lil ihc 

L ramBooy ^onld bccamr uuMr to km uihabdOM 

h la Piwmlunn Ulr hanunomr, pohryioodoM — mUr MandudaM niiwmM mih— 
mpdnrd o* Pnmmim UrAworamr Company Imuud 


kiwm Holden in ilirpitocun u i m d 
Pmtnnt An 1I®751 d ihc 



Firs 


GoosoBclrted Profit and 

Loss Account 
(Unaudited) 


Six Months . Six months 

ended 30 AS* ended 30.6.84 
& million £ million 


cm* *■ 


Operating profit 

Net {merest (payabteyrecc-tvable 

Profit on Ofdinary pcttvides before 
txxadoo 

Uostion 

Petroleum Revenue Ux 

- exdudlqgsafii g Hntl 

- sato^iaid 
Corporation U»x 

Profit Sw d*e financial period 


Amount set aside to reserves 7U3 46J 

Earnings per share iai9p '^P 

DMdend per share 4Mp 3-S0p 

Funds gcnciaipd hum operations 

lessuxpaid 357^ 29aS 

Adtfitlons to fixed assets 530*9 269-9 

DIVIDENDS 

Tbe Directors lu«e decided to paj 1 an Interim $ridcnd of 
4.00p per share. Except in die case of die shares wttiefa wc 

dw subject of HMGcnernmeirfs proposed Ofler for Sale paj 7 ncnr 

will be made on 1st October 1985 rostarchokkw on the register 
at the dose ofbustaess on 2nd September 1985, 


THE SK MONTHS’ HMaffI itOTTS 

* Turnover increases to £96& I milfloQ. Revenue from equity 
peoduedou ar£775i6 adlUon (s up £143.7 mUHoa (23%) on the 
1984 first half year The miwtnricT of the tnacasc ja due m sales 
of purchased petroleum a £192.5 naffitxi(£l4J0 ndUan in 1964).- 

* Pre-tax profit increases ioi364.7 nrilHon, up £847 milBofi 
(3cr*)Oiilhe 1984 half yoi; and after-tax profit to £91.4 
million, up £28.0 million (44%). 

* M production ( inchxHng LPG and condcaisaK) aioragcs 
178300 barrels per day (1 57^00 bacreb per day In tibe 1964 half 
year) and gas production 256 mUUoa cubic feet per day (226 
inilfion cubic fcet per day In die 1984 half jear). 

* isactpriringh«rtrst3to23 LKbmdwardBcences.inchidlng 
the Hun*fy Grove oil field and the HonxJdtn and l ierr iar d oO 
discoveries, and 3 UKo&honr bcences, Induding the Gierm 
field, fhxn Hadson Penoletnu luttrnational ptc. 

* Farmed In with an inkial 16.5^. interest to Tfcxaco operated 
btock 3/4aand the option of a funher 33.5% interest in a 
devriopmaiL Imerests In other Modes also acquired by hrm-ln. 

* As opereux; commenc e d tire assembly of die Clyde jacket and 
ccvnplctcd water injewtioo drilling n the Beatrice - C sfDc Hrsi 
production achieved from the partner-op er ate d S taTfjo td *C 
phufinm 

* Maintained position as one oftbc most active UHC5 
cxpkxets, involved hi a total of 19 weOs spudded. Awarded, witfa 
partners, 19 blocks hi die Fflmfa Hound. 

* Further expansion in the US giving Briwfl dose involveincin 
with two more axnponks making four in total; an agreement 
signed with Frceport-McMoRan Inc lo aeqairc a 25% interest in 
mbccs recentiy aapiired by them foorn Mkfiands Enetgy Ctxi 9 >any, 
an agreement for a joint three jear exploration programme 
siKUCd with die WlUfzms E^>toratioo Ctompany 

* Other ouxseasactlriiks continue to expand - Bcences 
awarded fri^ Thailand (onshore near Bangkok), the Netherlands 
(offitore Mod* F/l 5a, K/-fb, K/5a and K/16) and Norway 
(ofehore block 25/7). Tte Thai Boence fa BrtooiTsfiisiftr 
Eastern operatorship. 

* Gas discovery made oo KAngcan bkxk in Indonesia. 


BrRoil 


r; i copr of the Interim Report pkaac nmpkic and return the coupon lo file Cwpxyj 

1 Secretary BrtuU pic, IW Si \1ncan Strcrr. Gbsptw G2 VJ. Exbtlnp ihauiwkin wBrocdw: I 

J the Report jhanly . 

I Name . 1 ■ 

1 (. ,i i >. , ^ 



r/Ti 



TZ i 

wy w 

1 L* 

Iff 







Note lliesedaysmyoiir calendar now! 


Fner gy at work for Britain 


i Vg The sixth annual International HeraM Tribune/Oil Daily Conference on 
V jW “Oil and Money in the Eighties” will take place on October 24 and 25 in London. 
Y'mJr The theme of this year’s conference is “Surviving in a Competitive Environment”. 

program, designed foranseniorexecutivesmenergyandrelal^field^wm address the 
fey issues affectmgthe current energy situation and assess future trends aiki strategies. Key 
leakers will indi&: HJE. Dr. Professor Subroto, Minister of Minesami Energy, Indonesia; 
file Honorable Johns. Herrington, United States Energy Secretary; Allen K Murray, 
IJei^ntjMobflC^rporatxon; Arve Johnsen, President, Staton and file Honorable John 
Moore M.P, FinancialSecretiy tolbe Treasury, United Kingdom. 

■-For full details, please contact the International Herald Tribune Conference Office, 
MAvemeCharles-de-Gaune, 92521 NeufllyCedex, France, 

Telephone: (33-1) 747-12-65, Ext 4568. Telex: 513595. 


INTERNATIONAL 



Published With TV New York Times and The Washington Pont 




















































INTERNATIONAL 


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HUNGER 

IN RAMA 


(POPULATION 40.000), 
TKRAI PROVOKE, ETHIOPIA, 
YOU CAN HELP. 

An international team of medical volunteers save the 
lives of hundreds of people suffering from disease and 
malnourishment 

Feed every day 1,000 children under five and their 
mothers, making the difference between starvation and 
survival. 

Provide rural families with seed and agricultural 
implements to help them produce their own food and 
regain their dignity. 


YESr I URGENTLY WANT TO HELP OUT AND SUPPORT TOUR RELIEF 
AMD DEVELOPMENT WORK DU BOBU, ETHIOPIA. 

HERE IS MY CHECK OR INTERNAITONAL MONEY OBDEB. 




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AMEX t%hs-Lo»s 



NEW HIGfiS 31 


AlrCat 
Bib Rod A 
Curtice Brn 
HomneiG 
1 CEE USA n 
Midland Co 
Phan Rub A 
SmlttiAO A 
T edrO 05 

AirCoiiH 
CaneCoA 
Dam tars 
Hubei ia 
mnurtirSvc 
Olsten 1 
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BervenBrun 
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KEEP UP TO DATE WITH 


Lll • KT Lw i i*: 


APPEARING EACH WEDNESDAY 
AND FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


Name 

Address 

City 

Postal Code. 


.Country. 


Please return to AICF 
Action Internationale Centre la Faim 
156, rue de Rivoli Paris 75001, France 
Telephone: (1) 2961676 -Telex: 240271 F 


AICF 




ACTION 

CONTRE LA FAIM. 



AiCF c a non- profit volunteer organiubcin set op under file French Lew ot 1901. 

AJCF currently working in 20 Third -Y/ortd enuntnes. prondinq personnel and fmancrol suK»ri Tor ret»T operation# and de*etopnvenl proiecta. 


BANQUE SUDAMERIS 

U.S*$ 30,000,000 Floating* Rate 
Notes due 1987 

For the six month period 
15th July, 1985 to 15th January, 1986 
the Notes will bear an 
interest rtte of 8M% per annum. 
Interest payable on 15th January, 1986. 

Bonlcen Truer Company. London 


d OptlOllS (prices In S/qz.). 


20-75-2225 

liOO-UiO 32JM375 
1SX 9 JO 165ft I &00 
15ft 5J0 1 ZOO-UK 
125-300 SOft 950 
Q50- 150 525- 675 


cw* 31700-31750 

¥akan WUleWdd S*A. 

L QmI * MpwiBht 
nil Centra I. SwMnriud 
T«L 314251 - Tdes 21305 



FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 
fWC2SATW£ 

A, US- DOUARCASH HO* 

B. MU.TKUI8ENCYCA9T S104T 

C DOLLAR BONDS $U4 

Di MULROMBUCY BONDS 

& STHUNG ASSET 

FORBGN & G 0 L 0 MAL ■ . ' 
MAN*GEf 4 BVTp 8 BEY]UMTK> _ 
wvuu>sra!STiSELSfJia®,»A 
TH.- 0 S 3427 H 1 7 HR- 4 T 9 ZW 

FOt omw F A c FUNDS, SB 

It^TBtNATtONAL FUNDS UST „■ 

































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD. TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 


Page 1 


Argentine Reforms’ Mixed Reviews 


Lot Angeles Timet Service 

BUENOS AIRES — One month 
after, the Argentine government 
lode Draconian measures to stem 
inflation running at 1,000 percent a 
year, officials say they are happy 
with the results so far. but some 
businessmen and bankers dispute 
the analysis. 

Interior Minister Antonio Troo- 
coli said, “In general terms, there is 
no fail in production, or any alarm’ 
ing increase in firings or unemploy- 
ment. Everything is going reason- 
ably well, except Tor some obstacles 
which we have to manage in the 
best possible way.” 

Last month the government of 
President Radi Alfonsfn froze 
wages and prices, created a new 
currency and vowed not to print 
new money for money-losing state 
enterprises in an austerity plan that 
has had strong popular support. 
The rale of inflation, which was 30 


percent in June, is predicted to be 
around 7 percent for July. 

Businessmen anti bankers, how- 
ever, report a marked slowing of an 
eeonony already deep in recession. 
The National Statistics Institute 
has reported a sharp decline in de- 
mand Tor workers. 

The most serious problem so far 
over the austerity program was an 
illegal occupation by workers of the 
Ford plant, triggered by the firing 
of 33 employees for chronic absen- 
teeism. Tbe 19-day occupation 
ended without any major incidents 
Sunday under pressure of a court 
order and after police, backed by 
helicopters and armored cars, 
ringed the plant 

The government is also faced 
with labor unrest among railway 
workers, bank employees, and 
workers at paper mills. Workers 
briefly seized a major appliance 
factory, and one of several qw»n 


banks closed by the government is 
being occupied by its workers. 

Convinced that the reform is 
working but needing also to pre- 
serve labor peace, the government 
is requiring all businesses to con- 
sult with the Labor Ministry before 
ordering layoffs or firings. 

Over the protests of some ex- 
porters hard-pressed to retain their 
markets, the central bank has 
maintained the new currency, 
called the austral at 0.80 to $1, 
while retaining exchange controls. 
One austral is worth roughly 1,000 
pesos, the old currency. 

On the free market, the austral 
has slipped over the last two weeks, 
closing at about 0.97 to the dollar 
Friday. 

Peronisi-coa trolled labor unions 
complain that real income has fall- 
en dramatically, with wages frozen 
and rates for staples and public 
services hiked sharply not long be- 
fore the reform was adopted. 


Foreign-Currency Contracts Rise in Price 


(Condoned from Page 9) 
from a decline in interest rates be- 
cause it makes short- and long-term 
investments hiss competitive and 
thus less attractive as a store of 
value. 

Based on the spot July gold Fu- 
tures cm the Commodity Exchange 
in New York, the price of bullion 
rose S8.20 an ounce last week, to 
S3 18. IQ, with the most active deliv- 
ery, August, up S7.S0, at S3 19.20. 
Many bullion traders were im- 
pressed that half the gains in both 
contracts occurred last Friday, nor- 


mally a day of preweekend book 
balancing m this market, Mr. Le- 
venten said. 

“But the gold market still larkc 
conviction," be said, “because bul- 
lion has been trading in a 520-range 
from its current level all year, and 
for most of the time since the dollar 
began to decline, it has moved in an 
even narrower range.” 

What convinces gold traders that 
a major trend is about to start is 
market volatility, he pointed ouL 
Not only does volatility lessen the 


chances of bring trapped in a mar- 
ket that is not liquid, but it also 
indicates that strong opinions are 
being formed by both the bulls and 
bears. 

“Gold has always been a form of 
currency and it traditionally has 
reacted to the changing values of 
paper money," Mr. Leventen said 
"Today, tbe currency and gold 
traders are only eyeing each other’s 
market, with bullion prices tending 
to support the foreign-exchange 
buyers more than the gold bugs." 


Swedish Group 
Hans to Issue 
Euroyen Bond 

Revlert 

TOKYO — AB Svensk Ex- 
portkredit, the Swedish export 
credit concern, plans to issue 
the first Euroyen zero-coupon 
bond later this mouth through a 
syndicate led by Nikko Securi- 
ties (Europe) Ltd, sccurities-in- 
dusuy sources said Monday. 

The Swedish concern plans 
to raise about 10 billion yen 
with five-year and two-month 
bond issues, but other details 
are not yet available, they said. 

Separately. China Interna- 
tional Trust & Investment 
C 0 fp„ China’s main nraihitnlf 
{trading agency, is planning to 
raise 300 million Hong Kong 
dollars with a five-year bond 
issue here, a CITIC spokesman 
said 

Chase Manhattan Asia Ltd. 
has been awarded the mandate 
lo arrange the fixed-rate issue, 
and the braids will be issued at 
99.90 percent with a coupon of 
9% percent. Denominations are 
in 500.000 dollars. 

Tbe issue, which matures on 
August 1, 1990, is the first Eur- 
o-Hong Kong dollar issue ever 
launched and is bring aimed at 
European investors, the spokes- 
man said 

A management group of 
some 12 to 14 managers is being 
formed, he added 

This is tbe third time the in- 
vestment corporation has 
tapped the international capital 
markets for funds. 


Saatchi on Spree of Trans-Atlantic Acquisitions 

igement cc 
.he said, "and in 


(Continued from Page 9) 

fraios. Witty as the advertising is 
that Saatchi produces for its cli- 
ents. its own self-promotion and its 
serious-minded annual reports are 
larded with bar charts and graphs, 
and weighted with phrases on the 
order of "price-cost-value struc- 
ture” and "consistent strategic fo- 
cus.” 

In private, the lifestyle of the 
Saatchis would be described in far 
more flamboyant terms. The broth- 
ers are rich men: Together they 
own 10 percent of the company, a 
stake valued at upwards of $55 mil- 
lion, and they pay themselves an- 
nual salaries of more than $200,000 
apiece. They can afford to indulge 
their tastes for expensive homes 
and flashy cars — Charles has a De 
Tomaso. Maurice a Jensen. Charles 
has opened a private museum to 
display his collection of con 
rary artists such as Julian 
Maurice, who lives in Mayfair, is 
producing a play. 

But when it comes to the busi- 
ness, the two are low-key. Charles 
Saatchi whose only official title is 
director, is tbe creative genius of 
the firm. He reportedly rarely sees 
clients, much less the press. Mau- 
rice grants infrequent interviews, 
and was the sole spokesman for this 
article. 

That kind of reticence is de- 
signed to present the company as 
iter than tbe two brothers. Mr. 
ti said, but the fact is that the 
Saatchis still rule the empire they 
rounded in 1970. From the first, 
diaries, who had been a copywrit- 
er and then had run his own cre- 
ative consulting firm, oversaw the 
creative side. Administration was 
handled by Maurice, a graduate of 
the London School of Economics 
who had worked for a trade maga- 
zine publisher. Even in their first 
year, they displayed an ambition — 
Charles, for example, sent takeover 
proposals to apenries substantially 
larger than his own — that was 
fortunately matched by ability. 
One of their earliest efforts, a 
"pregnant man” poster for a birth 
control campaign by the Health 
Education Council became a land- 
mark in British advertising. 

In 1979, Saatchi was selected as 
the agency for the Conservative 
Party and its candidate. Mrs. 
Thatcher. It was then that Saatchi 
became a household word, through 
a hard-hitting, slick campaign that 
opponents complained, sold Mrs. 
Thatcher “as if she were soap pow- 
der." The agency worked for the 
Tories again in the 1983 election. 

J Still Saatchi’s real growth came 
between election years, from clients 
like British Petroleum Co. and 
Cadbury Schweppes PLC. In 1975 
Saatchi acquired the London office 
of Compton Communications Inc., 
a US agency with a lackluster rep- 



Manrice Saatchi, top, and 

brother Charles Saatchi 

utaiion for creativity but a solid 
client lisL Tbe purchase gave Saat- 
chi the account in Britain of 
Procter & Gamble Co„ and shortly 
thereafter Saatchi was listed on the 
London Stock Exchange. By ac- 
quiring or opening new agencies in 
the provinces, Saatchi became Brit- 
ain's largest agency in 1979. Dor- 
land Advertising, one of its pur- 
chases, is the thud largest. 

Tbe brothers' acquisition frenzy 
in tbe United Slates began in ear- 
nest in 1982 when they bought the 
rest of Compton, which owned 20 
‘percent of Saatchi as a result of the 
1975 transaction. A year later they 
bought McCaffrey & McCall a 
smaller but more creative ages 
than Compton. In 1984 S wrn hi ac- 
quired YSW Group, parent of Yan- 
kdovich, Skelly & white research 
firm. 

A few weeks later Saatchi sur- 
prised most analysts with its pur- 
chase of Hay Group, a Philadel- 
phia-based management 
consulting firm. In March it an- 
nounced an agreement to acquire 
Rowland Co., the United States' 
fifth-largest independent public re- 
lations firm. And in May it said it 
would buy two more New York 
companies: Howard Marlboro 
Group, which is in sales promotion, 
and Siegel & Gale, a corporate 
communications company. 

Saatchi's spending spree in the 
United States has raised eyebrows 
within the advertising and financial 


communities. Neil Blackley, an an- 
alyst with James Capd & Co., a 
brokerage firm in London, says 
that he often hears criticism of 
Saatchi's strategy — although he 
adds that he does not share iL Some 
critics, he says, claim that Saatchi’s 
growth should properly come 
through new assignments and cli- 
ents rather than acquisition. Oth- 
ers, Mr. Blackley said, question 
whether Saatchi has overextended 
itself financially. 

But the most severe criticism is 
leveled against Saatchi's purchase 
of Hay, the management consul- 
tants, because it took the agency so 
far afield from advertising and re- 
lated areas such as marketing and 
design. “I imagine the Saatchis 
think it will get them enlrfe, that 
the managing director of a compa- 
ny will say, TB give you my adver- 
tising business, loo,' ” said William 
Kieiy, chairman of Foote, Cone &. 
Be [rung's European and Middle 
Eastern operations, with headquar- 
ters in London. But Ins agency had 


a fling with management consult- 
ing a few years ago, 
our view, the personnel side randy 
meets the marketing side.' 

Most financial analysts who fol- 
low Saatchi, however, remain 
strong supporters of the company. 
For one thing, they note, Saatchi is 
paying for many of its acquisitions 
on a deferred-performance basis, 
promising to make additional pay- 
ments if the acquired company’ s 
future earnings hit a predetermined 
level. That tactic, analysts say, 
should help to persuade valued 
owner-managers in those compa- 
nies to stay on. 

Furthermore, analysts note ap- 
provingly, many of the acquisitions 
have been financed through the is- 
sue of more highly rated Saatchi 
paper, resulting in an immedia te 
boost to total earnings. In the fiscal 
year ending last September, its 
profits doubled, to about $9 util 
lion, on revenues of about $12 bil- 
lion, which was up 42 percent from 
the previous year. 


The Global 
Newspaper. 





IferaihSljfcSfri bunc. 


The International 
Herald Tribune 
is looking for an 

Advertising Manager 
■/Pacific 


To motivate and coordinate the IHTs 
advertising sales operation throughout the Pacific 
basin. The position is based .in Hong Kong and 
reports directly to the Managing Director Asia/Padfic 
The successful candidate will have advertising sales 
experience, preferably area-wide, at a supervisory 
level. Salary/benefit package negotiable in 
accordcrice with experience. 

Write-. Mr. Rolf D. Krone puhl 
Director of Advertising Sales 
Internationa! Herald Tribune 
181 Avenue Charies<te-Gauile 
92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 


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End to U.S. Tax Fails to Hurt Eurobond Market 


Nancy L Ross 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — In the past 
year, the Eurobond market has 
doubled — despite a change in U-S. 
tax law that took away some of that 
market's advantage. 

When the 30-percem withhold- 
ing tax for foreigners receiving in- 
terest and dividends oa U.S. securi- 
ties was ended last s umme r, some 
U.S. investment bankers expected 
much of the interna tional bond 
market to move to Wall StreeL 
They thought that the investment 
bankers would abandon the foreign 
' capital markets once the tax advan- 
tage that had favored Eurobond 
markets was removed. Instead, 
business has been booming in both 
the U.S. and Eurobond mar k pis 

According to the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and De- 


velopment, Eurobond offerings 
during the first half of 1984 totaled 
$21 billion. In the Fourth quarter, 
they shot up to $27.9 billion and 
have continued to increase. In the 
first two quarters of this year, new 
issues totaled $66 billion. For 1984 
as a whole, Eurobonds raised S81.7 
billion in new cajpitaL This year 
offerings are running at an annual 
rate of $130 billion. That compares 
with just $50 billion in 1983. 

Meanwhile, foreign investors 
bought about a net of $12 billion in 
U.S. corporate bonds in 1984 — up 
from $91 8 million the previous year 
— and a net of $21 billion in Trea- 
sury debt, up from SS billion in 
1983. 

Eurobonds are issues placed si- 
multaneously on the markets of at 
least two countries through inter- 
national syndicates of financial in- 
stitutions dT several countries. The 


bonds are denominated in a curren- 
cy that is not necessarily that of 
cither country. 

Michael von CTemm. London- 
based chairman of Credit Suisse 
First Boston, observed recently: “It 
was said the removal of withhold- 
ing would be the death blow to the 
Eurobond market, but U.S. issuers 
operate with different practices 
abroad. We uy to sell bonds in 
small lots to many investors where- 
as institutional investors dominate 
in the United States." 

Moreover, the Treasury's refusal 
to allow bearer bonds, which pro- 
vide investors with an anonymity 
that some desire, assured the sur- 
vival of the Eurobond market, 
which is now the largest capital 
market outside the U.S. Treasury. 

Many blue chip American cor- 
porations, as well as government 
agencies, now routinely borrow 


abroad. Tbe center for multina- 
tional lending is London, but the 
top 10 underwriters are dominated 
by U.S. companies. 

The internationalization of mar- 
kets has narrowed spreads between 
U-S. and Euro issues, so that where 
there was once as much as three 
percentage points difference, the 
margin is now between 10 and 115 
basis points, according to Mr. von 
Gemm. A basis point is a hun- 
dredth of a percentage point. 

Most observers agree that mar- 
ket factors have been far more im- 
portant for the Euromarket. This 
year's bond boom was fueled pri- 
marily by increased demand for 
capital, the strong dollar, the 
change in interest rates. The recent 
slide in the dollar combined with a 
drop in interest rates could make 
dollor-denominated bonds less at- 
tractive. 


D Please suspend my subscription A* ng my dbsencs and extend the date at exprahon 
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TO RENT/SHARE 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


MONTPARNASSE. Large modern stu- 
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. REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1985 



PEANUTS 


WHY DO YOU KEEP 
TALKING. ABOUT US 
GETTING MARRIED? 




THERE ARE PROBABLY 
I A MILLION GIRLS IN t 
TH15 WORLD WHOM I D 
[RATHER MARRY THAN YOU! 


you'd get Tired ^ g 




BOOKS 


v\ 

u ■ 


I ! 


WORDS THAT MUST SOMEHOW 
BE SAID: Selected Essay's of Kay 
Boyle, 1927-1984 


iLit have earned iter critical praife and beners 
(Katherine Anne Parser 'Arete that B/iyfes 
“The Crazv Hunter" the s:«v "dosed to 


BLONDIE 


ACROSS 


1 Did work with 
6 Type of jazz 
singing 
10 Aperture 

14 Utah river 

15 Ranger 

16 Hyalite 

17 Thurmond of 
S.C. 

18 Shortly 

19 Comical one 

20 Trickery 
i2 Stimulate 

23 Left 

24 Spring holiday 
26 Kitchen device 
30 Peel 

32 Aleutian island 

33 Bristle 

35 Mentioned 
39 Electioneered 
41 School 

43 Rio dance 

44 Celebration 

46 River to the 
Caspian Sea 

47 Less than 
49 Cuddle 

51 Light-brown 
silken cloth 


57 Tricky action 

63“ leroi!" 

64 Far East, etc. 

65 Certain lest 

66 Constantly 

67 Shakespearean 
king 

68 "Wait 

Dark" 

69 Put trust in 

70 Portable 
shelter 

71 Soprano 
Mitchell 


DOWN 


54 Film dog 
56 Excited 


1 “ in Boots" 

2 Baltic nat. 

3 Concerning 

4 Jacket or 
collar 

5 Impair 

6 Done in 

7 Produce a jam 

8 Puzzler’s ox 

9 Sawbuck 

10 Trickery 

11 Museum 
display, at 
times 

12 Vast 

13 Presbyter. 

21 Scandinavian 


25 Japanese 
aborigine 

26 Heap 

27" boy!" 

28 Un fermented 
grape juice 

29 Trickery 

31 Chinese weight 
unit 

34 Border 

36 Fruit pie 

37 Lai. phrase 

38 Proofreader's 
"forget it" 

49 Window part 

42 "Divine 

Comedy" 

author 

45 Omani man 

48 Process sea 
water 

50 Dressing-down 

51 Road 
constructor 

52 Pointed arch 

53 Fresh 

55 Establish 

58 Plaintiff 

59 Select 

60“ the pure 

all things are 
pure": Paul 

61 Earn 

62 Cinders of 
comics 


New York Timet, edited by Eugme Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




Edited and with an Introduction by Eliza - 
beth S. Bell. 262 pages . SI6.50. 

North Point Press, 850 Talbot Avenue. 
Berkeley. Calif. 94706. 

Reviewed by Roben W. Smith 



S URELY no greater reward is offered to a 
writer than the knowledge that other 


men are reading the words that he has. by some 
miracle, retrieved from the depths of ms own 
silence; the knowledge that other men are 
actually listening for the sound of his voice to 
call out from the page to them. and. above ail. 
the knowledge that they believe the words the) 
hear." — Kay Boyle. 

Few Americans have written so beautifully 
of the human condition with love and courage 
as Kay Boyle. This collection of 25 essays, 
reviews and memoirs spanning more than 50 
years wonderfully catches her career as a writer 
and social aclivisL 

Boyle has written more than 30 volumes: the 
memoir “Being Geniuses Together" (1968). 
with Robert McAlmon, perhaps the best por- 
trait of Paris in the 1920s; superb short stories 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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and — her favonte form of anisic expression 
— the pocin of “Clad Da>" « 1938) and “Col- 
Iccted Poems” 1 1962). 

Now, happily. «c have essays, gathered 
across a lifetime, that show where Basic has 
lived and what she has loved in her life. She 
knew many of the world's important writers, a 
familiarity that produces evocative prose. She 
is exceptionally peed on down-ond-outers and 
misfits such as E_ Carnevaii. dying bravely of 
life and sleeping sickness, killing (he promise 
of a new literature that William Carlos Wil- 
liams saw in him: Katherine Mansfield, unable 
to connect with the life outside; and Edward 
Dahlbcrg. author of the miner classic “Because 
I Was Flesh,” for whom a book is “a hatlfc of 
the soul and not a w jr of words." 

In her praise for Williams's "fr, the Ameri- 
can Grain" (1927) for refusing to romanticize 
the American experience. Boyle evinces an 
abiding love for the vitality and grandeur of 
America — but a deeper love for truth. As a 
child she was lucky to have a mother “exactly 
my age” who offset a domineering grandfa- 
ther’s statements with revelations, one who 
championed literary causes ranging from 
Joyce's then controversial “Ulysses” to Boyle’s 
early writing. 

These selections show a heart and head at 
work. In the preface to “The Smoking Moun- 
tain" she writes of H. Baab. a smail-time Ekfa- 
monn indicted in 1950 for indirect involvement 
in 56 murders. In other selections, she writes at 
trying to block cops from a campus during the 
1968 disorders, telling them. “This campus 
belongs to the faculty and students, not to the 
police”: of spending 21 days in prison for 
sitting down in a doorway of the Oakland draft 
center: of joining the .American Indian en- 
campment on Alcatraz in 1970. 

Had Boyle truckled to the establishment and 
not made waves, her literary reputation doubt- 
less would have been enhanced. Bui she is loo 
busy to care about that- 


- V 

i-Ss 

ii x 


" I 




fit- 


fil 


t 


Roben W. Smith, a Washington writer, wrote 
this review for The Washington Post. 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


HJEX MORGAN 


Y OU have to be sure of 
yourself to contest a train- 
ing match before engaging in a 
world championship match. 
No matter what there is to be 
red, there is a lot more to be 
Iosl 

Losing to the practice oppo- 
nent would be an insurmount- 


able psychological obstacle for 
real struggle ahead. Never- 


I RAN INTO 
A WOMAN ---AND 
COULDNT GET AWAY 
FROM HER' SHE 
TALKED A BLUE 
TREAK— ABOUT 



AFTER ALL IT ISN'T POLITE TO ^ 
WALK AWAY FROM A GRANDMOTHER 
WHO'S GIVING YOU A BLOW-BY-BLOW 
STORY ABOUT HER GRANDCHILDREN, 
VITH PICTURES YET f 


WEIL PROBABLY BE THE 
SAME WAY WHEN WE 
HAVE GRANDCHILDREN 



GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
■ • by Hanrt Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
lour ordinary words. 


EX1DO 


□ 

□ 

□ 


GLUNE 


imz 

□ 

□ 


VERYUP 



urn 


CLARIA 



■ 

■ 







7-U> 


today is moneav cleverly } 

PI5GUISEP AS T0E5PAV 



theless, this consideration did 
noi deter Gary Kasparov of the 
Soviet Union, (he 22-year-old 
challenger for the world cham- 
pionship, from taking on Rob- 
ert Huebner of West Germany 
in a six-game tr aining series in 
Hamburg. 

The result could hartfly have 
beeen more satisfying for Ka- 
sparov. who will begin his title 
match with bis countryman 
Anatoly Karpov in Moscow on 
Sept 1 Kasparov won games 1, 
2, and 4 and drew 3. 5 and 6 
against Huebner, who is the 
llth-ranking player in the 
world on the International 
Chess Federation’s computer. 

In the second game, below, 
Kasparov gave yet another ex- 
ample of his virtuosity in a mat- 
ing attack 

Huebner used the Lasker 
method of playing 6... N-K5 
to exchange two minor pieces 
but without first interpola- 
ting . . . P-KR3, as Lasker did. 
No pawn sacrifice was in- 
volved, since 8 NxN, PxN; 9 
QxP allows 9 . . . Q-N5cb- 

Huebner prepared 15 ... P- 
QR4 by 14 . . . Q-Ql. He could 
not immediately play 14 ... P- 
QR4? because of 15 PxP, RxP; 
16 RxP! But perhaps 


e pawn couia sun not ue lax- 
. since 30 . . . QxQP; 31 Q- 
5, Q-Q3 (or 31 . . . R-Kl; 32 
tKBPI, KxN; 33 B-K6cfa. K- 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 




Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles CRACK DADDY GIMLET BOYISH 
Answer What the tax collector did tor the man who 
thought he was saving up for a rainy day— 
’’SOAKED" HIM 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Jtkwvt 

Amsterdam 

Aftm» 

Ba r celona 

Pu lp rode 

Berlin 

BrittMlt 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Coda Dm So/ 

Datum 

Edtaburati 


PmUort 
Geneva 
HelilnU 
UtanbuJ 
Lai Palmas 


Madrid 

Wm 

Moscow 

Munich 

Nice 


Ports 

Prog ue 

Royklovik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

iiraunwi 

Venice 

Wtonto 


Zurich 


Aeftsni 

Belral 

Damascn 
Jennalem 
Tel Aviv 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 

5nhiev 


hiok 

LOW 


c 

F 

C 

F 


32 

90 

20 

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Ir 

19 

66 

15 

39 

fr 

30 

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ASIA 


Baitekok 
Benin* 
Horn Kona 

Mo alia 

NewDeM 

Seool 

Shanghai 

StngmMre 

TMPti 

Tmvn 


AFRICA 


AloMn 
cam 
Cope Town 
CasaWnca 
Harare 


Nairobi 

Tunis 


BH 

LOW 


F 

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86 

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LATIN AMERICA 


BoanofAlnm 17 43 12 

Caracas 24 79 20 

Lima 17 U 16 

Mexico CHy 23 73 14 

made Janeiro 21 70 14 


54 o 

40 d 

41 e 
sr el 
61 d 


NORTH AMERICA 


Atlanta 

Boston 

ailcoM 


Detroit 

Heeotofu 

Haestea 

Los Anodes 

Miami 

Mloseaooiis 

Montreal 

Nassau 

Hew York 

saeFrancisce 

Seattle 

Teroato 

Washington 


WIT f nriuvuv« 11‘IUll . iwn 

sh-shouiens; sw-snow; ststormy. 


_ _ 90 11 

e-overcast! Pc-porily cloudy; 


44 11 
VI 21 


21 

M 20 
B4 14 


SZ PC 
79 PC 


7t 14 
49 22 


VI 22 

VI 20 


44 23 
82 14 


B2 13 
81 20 


70 dc 
r-ratn; 


r°- n A l?? FRANKFURT: Cloudy. Temo. 

'/ttv LONDON: Cloudy. Temp. 30—12 (68 — 54). MADRID: 
Thunder atamti. Temp. 21 — IB (88 — 641. NEW YORK: Thun^ Tamil 
*“ * w — ffl. PARIS; Clo^yTTsmp. 54 -14 1 75 — 571 ? HOME !°F glr" S' 

?»— ^li'eTivnieoK^ rin Tt^ 2U « ,C ti Thundersiorms. Temo. 7t2?lj 
CIOWl* Temp. J3 — 7d 1^1 — 751. NQMC KONfi* Fair 

?E* V * « - »meoul ; lom: 


14.. . QR-Bi, followed by 

15 . . . R-B2 eventually . . . P- 
QB4. would have been the best 
way to free the black game. 

Certainly the daw-consum- 
ing 14... Q-QL 18...Q-K2 
and 21 . . . Q-Ql did not breed 
confidence that Huebner had 
worked out a game plan. 

Kasparov's pawn sacrifice 
with 29 R-Kl! could not be 
accepted because 29 . . . QxQP: 

30 Q-N5. N-B4 (planning 

31 ...Q-R5 in response to 31 
QR-Q1); 31B-N4! is loo strong 
for white — 31 . . . R-Kl; 32 
PxP, RPxP; 33NxNP!. PxN; 
34BxN wins. 

On 29 . . . R.-B2; 30 B-N4, 
the pawn could still not be tak- 
en. since 30 

N5, 

NxKBJ 

Bl; 34 R-K4!) :32 NxBP!, 
KxN; 33 B-K6ch, QxB; 34 
RxQ, KxR; 35 R-Klch, K-B2; 
36 Q-B4ch will cost Black 
heavy material 
Huebner sadly had to ac- 
knowledge, with 30...N-Q4, 
that his attempts to put pres- 
sure on the isolated QP were a 
failure in the face of Kaspar- 
ov’s combinational ideas. 
Worse yet. While’s main att- 
tack was just getting started. 

With 32 R-N3, the mating 
theme of 33 R-KR3 and 34 Q- 
R6 made its appearance. 
Huebner rushed to play 

32 . . . P-KB4 so he could use 
his QR for defense along his 
second rank. But that was not 
enough to stop the briliant Ka- 
sparov, who sacrificed a pawn 
and then a rook with 34 R- 
KR31, Qxp: 35 Q-R6!, QxRch; 
36 K-R2 to ram his atta^ 
through- 


ni mhw oi 





After 37 NxPch, it would not 
have done any good to play 
37...K-B2, since 38 N-K5ch. 
K-Bl; 39 R-KN3 puts Black 
out of his pain. 

After 37...K-NI; 38 Q- 
R8ch. K-B2; 39 QxR, Huebner 
could play neither 39 . . . KxN, 
because of 40 B-R5ch, K-R2; 
41 B-B7mate. nor 39 . . . RxM. 
because of 40 R-R7ch, R-N2; 
41 B-R5mare. 

Moreover, there was no oth- 
er way to cope with the threat 
of 40 N-K5ch, K-K3; 41 R- 
R6ch or 40 Q-B8ch. Huebner 
gave up. 






1 • — 




guEEmcMiomnxxiNKD I .»• 

j™ • »*Kii ftoi’ 1 - 

m SC - L "'- 


HUB 

B+B 

PAS 

£2 

M 

a ihn 
a M 

sss 

iff 

MB 

S3 

szr 1 

a mi 

SE 


a an 

sr 

Eff* 

a pxp 

% 


SSL, 

M 

KP 

HtO 

SSS 

a toM 

as 

Iff 

own 

SET 


WjtM Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse July 15 

Oozing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 




ClPM 

Pntr. 

ABN 

47550 


ACF Holding 

236 

241 

Aooon 

AKZO 

98 

115.70 

9050 

11630 

Aitold 

23IJ0 

23431 

AMEV 

267 


A"Oom Rubber 

8.15 

&2D 




BVG 

195 


Buehrmom T 

92 


Co land Hilda 



Ebevier-NDU 

12650 

12 


6950 

71 Jt 

Gist Brocades 

200 

201 

Hetnefcen 

14750 

l« 

Hooaovans 

63 

63 




Naorden 

4950 


Nat Nedder 

7430 

7540 

Nedlluvd 

173-40 

17350 

Oce Vender G 

344 

345 

Pafehoad 

63 

6130 

PhUtaa 

4930 


Roooco 


b;:.i 

Radamco 

■ f 1EJ 

1 

Ra^Jncu 

69M 

6930 

ROTBfltO 

45.90 

46 

Royal Dutch 

19550 19538 


35150 



2950 

»J0 

VMP Stork 

24250 

740 

VNU 

212 

215 

ANP.CBS Seal index ; 2HJ0 

Prevloas : 217 jg 



I Braweltt | 

ArtMd 

1720 

n«* 

Wtoert 

5800 


Cackcrill 

212 

215 

Cobeoa 

3300 

376(1 

EBES 



OB-limo-BM 

3710 


GBL 

1885 

19191 

Guvoorl 


3950 

Haaakw 

5600 

5620 


2220 

1 1 


8950 

9040 

Petrafina 

5620 


Soc Genrrole 

1795 


SaflsM 

7330 

7320 

Soivav 

4295 

4325 

Traction Elec 

■4^1 

lyl 

UCB 



Unero 

VMItoWtontagns 


1735 

6940 

Currea siodt UMtx : 232M0 

Preview : 223741 



ft’Mfcfaft II 


AEG-Totofunfctn 

Allianz vara 

Altana 

BASF 

Bayar 

BOV Hypo Bail, 

BavVareinsisafik 

BBC 

BHFBonk 

BMW 

Commorzbank 
Coni Cumml 
Dalmlor-Benz 
Dooinsa 

Deuiiche Babcod 
Driiischo Bank 
Dresanef Bant 
GHH 
Hammer 
HOCIIIICt 

Hpethil 


vv 

21^ 321 A 
2TVJ0 225 
257 359 

»e m 
nt 228 
30 333 

400 421 

110 21X80 
I45JW 14730 
83V 8U 
J71J5B J71J8 
15V 159 JO 
557 54550 

SJ SI 

300 50 308 | 

5»5 543 l 

n a 774 . 


Clove Prey. 

Honch 107/40 11020 

Horten 1B4 10s 

HlWi 30420 303 

IWKA 280 303 

Kail + Salz 28&5D 7BBM 

Komadt irass SM 

Kputhol 264 266 

KIoKknerH-D 278 774 

ipoeckner work# 64 65 

Know Slaw 110 112 

Unde 51130 515 


LuKhania 
MAN 

Monneainatm 
Muendt Rueck 
Nlxdorf 
PKl 
Porsche 
Prousiao 
PWA 
RWE 

Rheliimetoll 
Schmino 
SEL 

«wn#tto 
Thvssm 
vebo 

Voujowooemwrk 30150 314 

Welle . 570 57V 


168 1 65 

1902019320 
1«M 1900 
5)3 

STB 

1349 1365 
364 

141 

17720 180 

286 


349 35450 
S34 547S0 
1M2D 110.10 

21440 71 UO 


Conwwrabanfc b«du ; USUfl 
Prevloas : 1397 j| 




Bk East Asia 
Owuns Kona 
China Uoht 
Green Island 
H«ro Sana Bonk 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HKLM 

HK 

HK Yaumatel 
HK Wharf 
Huich Whampoa 
Hyson 
Inn City 
Jardine 
JanUmsac 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New WorM 

USSST"" 

Stefcix 

Swire Roane a 
T mctMuno 
WatiKwano 
Wheeteck A 
wmeOn Co 
Wlmor 

World infi 


23jS0 2170 
17J20 16:90 

tMO 1M0 

BJ0 &20 
57J5 47J3 
UK 2.15 
10.90 KL80 
,U5 MO 
11 JO 11 JO 
37 JO 3650 
tm 6.15 
7 JO 7 JO 
92 VI 
MO 3L75 
640 635 

2630 26 

053 051 
0.90 0.90 
12J0 11 JO 
1X60 13 

855 0JD 
3758 
7^0 7j40 

215 215 
1290 1290 
200 275 
2670 2*20 
107 105 

Ml OJS 
7 JO 7 JO 
2 2 
4J0 4075 
207 TJ7 


H»0 Sma Index ; 164049 
Previous : 1 41671 


*=£- 


AECl 

830 

830 

Aneto American 

2990 

2975 

Anglo Am Gold 

16800 

fJ:-i 1 

Barlows 

1265 

1265 

Biwoar 

1240 

1240 

Buff els 

6750 

6775 

De Beers 

1040 

KM 

Dnetoniein 

4575 

4575 

Elands 

1700 

1725 

GFSA 

1300 

3325 

Harmony 

7575 

7575 

Hivutd steel 

510 

505 

KlOOl 

7735 

7TV1 


Nedbank 
PrevStevn 
Run mt 
SA Brews 

51 Helena 
Saul 

WestHaidlno 


Close Prey 
1546 1565 
4775 48S0 
M20 I5W 
875 075 

3225 3250 
697 495 

5800 5900 


Composite _ 
Previous:! 


Index : HA. 




BJLT. 


Boats 

Bowater Indus 
BP 

Brtt Home St 
Brit Telecom 

I JMP™“ 

BTR 

Burmati 
cable wireless 
Codhunr sctiw 
enactor Cam 
Commercial U 
Cone GoM 
Courtaulds 
DaMety 
De Deers t 
otstniera 
DriefonteJn 

Flsans 
Free St Qed 
GEC 

Gen Acddonl 

GKN 

Glaxo c 

Grand MM 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Imperial Groua 
Jaguar 

Laid Securities 
LOOM General 
UavdsBank 
Lanrna 
Lucas 

Mona and So 
Metal Bax 
Midland Bank 
Nat wrat Bank 

P and 0 

Piifclnaton 

Pl«sey 

Prudential 

Rocat Elect 

RandlOnteln 

Rantr 

ReedlnH 

Reuters 

Rovai Duictic 

RTZ 

Soorcni 

Salisbury 
Sears HaMinos 
Shed 
5TC 

510 Chartered 

'in' Alliance 
fate ana Lvic 


SIM S15V5 
230 223 

S88U mac 

216 214 

138 134 

4M 404 

201 201 

34 34 

518 518 

2M 261 

185 182 

256 2S 

523 523 

274 271 

173 171 

331 331 

208 208 


364 

535 

1S2 

in 

214 

302 

137 
395 
545 
287 
S24 
331 

S24* 

160 

620 

224 

123/64 

284 

713 

252 

8*5 

IBS 

385 

702 

169 

246 

248 

674 

417 

168 

291 

138 

450 

397 

704 
360 
245 
- 136 
644 
138xd 

sioavs 

360 

642 

295 

431. 

562 

647 

308 

97 

481 

10* 


257 

530 

151 

178 

Sir 

497 

136 

393 

545 

M.Q. 


S241* 

166 

615 

220 

12 


TIM 

250 

828 

184 

as 

699 

166 

248 

263 

667 

414 

168 


136 


4*0 

Jjc 


392 
*97 
353 
7*3 
134 
639 
. '3< 
*102'* 
30 
637 
295 
43 lw 
549 
630 
307 
95 VS 
675 
102 
487. 
464 
4»r . 


Tosco 
Thom EMI 
T.l. Group, 

Trololoar rise 
THF 


Unilever C 
Untied BMeutts 
Vkkan 


Clew .Prev. 
240 240 

332 319 

274 248 

345 344 

12S 123 

195 193 

10^l.10»/32 
174 174 

27B 275 

396 


P-T.se index : 937 jo 
Previous : 93U* 
F.TJEIN Index : 134240 


ftffln 


Banco Comm 

23550 22850 



Ctoahatels 



TUI 

Er Manta 

loeofl umc 

ParmltalkJ 

13310 13B2I 

Flai 

3980 40ST 

Generali 


IFI 


llalcemenll 

53060 53000 


1531 1520 


110025110050 


113000113900 

1 1 

2100 2101 

Olivetti 

5897 S9S0 

Plralll 

3010 3075 

RAS 

85000 86000 

RlnaiCQntv 

840 874J8 

SIP 

SSI 2350 

SME 

1400 13ID 

Soto 

M 1 ■ 

sronda 

16900 16000 

3 let 

3220 3185 

MIB Cm-rant Index ; MJL 

PrvYtow : 1SH 



Cold Storage 

Fraser Neave 


Incticape 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

ShaerUe 
State Darby 
5 'pare Land 
Spore Press 
S Steamship 
SI Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 


IS 

140 

5J0 

4.98 

5 

i.n 

2 

2M 

226 

535 

575 

O) 

as 

U4 

172 

1-50 

248 

HLQ. 

2-15 

K73 

177 


130 

545 

m 

M9 

334 

126 

iji 

174 

370 

376 


Strom Times led Index ; 717.95 
Prev W ai : 72SJ7 


Stockholm 


AGA 

A Ho Laval 

Asea 

Asira 

Atlas Copco 

Ballden 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esseite 

Handel sbanlcen 
Pharmacia 
SaaD-Seanlo 
Sandvlk 

Skanska 

SKP 

Swedish Match 
VOlvn 


114 

114 

190 

193 

325 

320 

410 

410 

186 

107 

N.Q. 


277 

377 

244 

244 

NA 

370 

163 

164 

201 

206 

N.Q. 


N.Q. 

— . 

81 

8250 

222 

324 

190 

190 

215 

213 


Atfoemowidea man : 3tejg 

Previous : 34858 


Mytfapv 


AC I 
ANZ 
BHP 
Borol 

Bouwin.ilie 


3.78 

2 in 

4 90 

49« 

0S7 

6.56 

140 

340 

185 

Iff) 


Castlemalne 

Coles 

Comaica 

CRA 

CSR 

Durdod 

EMerelxl 

ia Australia 

Magellan 

M1M 

Mver 

Nat Aust Bank 


AUStBi 
. rs Cora 
N Brawn HUI 
Pasetdon 
OMCboi Trust 
Santos 

Thomas Nation 
Western Minina 
Wesfpoc Banking 
Woodslde 


Cleee P»»». 
7-36 7J4 

US IBS 
IAS 1JK 
£22 £84 
104 112 
252 XS9 
111 109 

2 285 

2.15 230 

2.75 2J8 
386 112 
451 A46 

650 650 

2-20 224 

350 350 
158 159 

554 £9) 

110 111 
175 IBS 
4£0 454 

1-33 155 


All Ordinaries index : M3J0 


Tofcyo 


Akal 

Asotii Chem - 

« l Gtaas 
otTokyu 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Casio 
C-ltoti 

Dai Ntooon Print 

Dahva House 
Da two Securities 

Fanue 
Full dank 
Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
rttactil 
HHochl Cable 
Honda 

Jaoan Air Unas 
Kallma 


Kansoi power 
Xmmmti Steel 


Kir In Brewe r y 
Komatsu 
Krimta 
Kyocera 
Matsu El«c Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 


Mitsubishi Own 


MltsuMsWi 

Mitsubishi Hecnrv 

Mitsubishi Carp 

Mitsui and Ca 

MHsuiuWhl 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NlhitaSee 
Nippon Kpaaku 
Nippon Oil 
NtooanSieel 


819 
815 
935 
539 
; 999 
1370 
435 
HOT 

m 

980 

7300 

1740 

1850 

904 

685 

560 

1458 

6950 

428 

1910 

151 

646 

523 

361 

12B 

17DD 

£ 

330 

682 

421 


381 

840 

85H 

938 

546 

1000 

1480 

463 

1100 

719 

1800 

7320 

1800 

1850 


<01 

1450 

7180 

409 

1930 

149 

675 


691 

916 

738 

845 

990 

953 

166 


351 

3750 

1200 

760 

1730 

454 

377 

337 

m 

427 

610 

731 

930 

7SS 

.895 

1010 

940 

157 


Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Oiymous 
Pioneer . 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Shlmani 

SMnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Own 
Sumitomo Marin* 
Sumitomo Metal 
TaBet Coro 
TaMM Marine 
TonedaOieai 
TDIC 
Telljn 

Jo Marine 
Tokvo Elec Power 
Topmsi Printing 
Torpy Ind 
Tran too 
Toyota 

Yamalchl Sec 


298 299 
616 626 
IS 1350 

HOT 1120 
1680 1730 
£5 909 
830 BID 
610 670 


3780 3930 
2010 2080 
US 244 
77V 791 

154 152 

324 312 

688 
735 773 

4150 4300 
433 447 

985 102D 
2190 2180 
810 850 

455 468 

.22 *■ 
1228 1230 
STS VM 


NOtkel/DJ. )■■■ 
Previous ; 1343*491 
New index : itoi 
Preview :W4U6 


Index: 1259&77 


Adko . 

Alusulsee 
Aotophon 
Bank Leu 

Brown Boverl 

CtodGetov 

CreTOtSTOsM 

EiechtrwaH- 

KeMertHRK 

■nterdtscaunl 

Jacob Suchord 

Jelrrwfi 

Londis Gw 

Moevenpkk 

Nestle 

Oerilkon-B 

Roctie Bativ 

Satntok 

Schindler 

Sutar 

Surveillance 

Swissair 

SBC 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss VoUcsbaak 
Union Bank 
Wtatarthur 
Zurich Ins 


3380 1370 
®J5 815 

562S 577$ 

3830 3340 
1750 . 1780 
3510 MB 

2930 2965 
3190 320) 

■ TO 716 
2520 2500 
6650 6675 
2230 2310 
1920 1925 
4708 4725 
6510 ttMtt 
1545 1550 
9553 ms 
1400 1445 
4560 4525 
414 420 

4200 HQ. 
1320 1340 
467 460 

2050 2090 
T77B 1W0 
4270 4300 
5150 5400 
2360 3400 


SBC loan : 49CJ0 
Prevfmu : 49180 


N.Q.: not quoted; NJL; not 
aval table: xd: ex-dividend. 


thewoHd. 


The Iutematioaal Herald Tribune. 
Brir^ing the World’s Most 
Important News to the World’s 
Most Imponant Audience. 


Mr L? 


Canadian stocks ria AP 


2034 Abri Pres 
1200 Acfc lands 
1900 Arnica E 
1400 Aoro lad A 
2S555 Alt Energy 
5300 Alta Nat 
21* Atoomo SI 
100 Andrs WA f 
677Aracen 
l«00AtOOir 
,22*0 BP Canada 
14073 Bank BC 
159191 Bank N S 
200400 BarrlCkD 
TOO Baton A f 
15937 Bonanza R 
73100 Bmtomn 
Bramalea 
79381 BCFP 
35390 BC Res 
11894 BC Phone 
5025Braniwk 
1265 BuddCan 
17590 CAE 
1M0CCLA 

5535 Cod Frv 

5800 Campeont 
7177 c Nor weet 
1650 C Pacfcrs 
22446 Can Trust 
80# C Tung 

tecse 

S4733 C I BA Com 
5500 Cdn Nat Res 
159880 CTlreAf 
2S®CUttlB 

3690 Cara 
2941 Cetanes* 
31360 Cenh-lTr 
5700 Clneptex 

15050C DbttoA 
27600 CDIstb B I 
6072 CTL Bank 
306Lenvne> A 
agWCoeefcoR 
MJO Canror A 
BTDOCrawnx 
24050 Czar Res 
aragDaonpev 
1000 Doga A 


HM Low Clase Cage 
*18 17% 17VS 

517 17 17 

*1610 161b 16VS + « 
S9Hi 9 V 

siBSe is>. m 
*1490 ]£» 149V+ ta 
*21 2DW 21 + Vj 
*26 26 26 — «. 

S18H 18V, 1SH.+ M 

sim 10 if) — w 

S31V2 31 Hi 31ta+4* 
55*. 59k 5%+ to 

513* 13* 13* 

160 143 155 +13 

SlVtt 19 19 — * 


355 345 

450 450 

S1U6 Iff 
S9to f 
247 241 

524 93 

512* 

*30 


355 +5 
450 + f 
18* + * 
9*+ * 
243 —3 
Z P%— to 
12*+ to 


534* 

522* 

535 


ntt Denison A |p 


,“™gtoileooB 
17600 Develam 

2M Dlclcnsn A f 

lSODDtcknsnB 
361B8 Dotasca 
SJloOamanA 
56300 Donohue 
600 Pu Pont A 
2113DDVtexA 
910 EICttxHnX 
lBOEmco 

210m EauttvSvr 
2090 PC* Inti 
ZSOSCFaJCOflC 
86785 FtalbrdBi 
7936 Fed ind A 
101 Fed Plan 

500 F City Fin 


i02rooeocnide 
eoaoGibranar 
18000 GaUeorpf 
504 Goodyear 

■ 12S Grafts 

1000 Grandma 
1900 GL Forest 
600Greyhnd 
1680 Hrdln* A I 
950 Hawker 
26807 Hayes D 
6000 Hees mtL 
4559 H Bay Co 
60915 Imasca 
2900 indai 
?e7 inland Gas 
51400 Ifltl Ttuun 
6765 Intnr Pico 
830lpsca 
8e(U Jannock 
200 i'lelw* H 
2937 Kerr Add 
9326 Labatl. 
9*819 Lac Mnris 

HWLOnt Com 

II? /5 Lacano 
’■Hi LL Lac 


29* JO + to 
S16to 16to I6to— to 
*17* 16* 17 — to 
SIS 14* 14*— to 
34 . 24* + U 
22* 22*+ to 
34* 34to 
»6* 36* 36*— to 
*11* llto 11* 

£8* 68* 66* — to 

136* 36* 26* 

SJfS* 10* TO* + * 
•MW 18* 18to+ to 
516* 16 

«* 8* 

515* 14* 15 + * 

Kft M m+ * 
56to 6* .. 

.58* tto 8*— to 
295 290 290 — 9 

S13W 13* 13*- * 
5»to S* 23* 

13 171 173—1 

475 465 4» 

445 445 445 + S 
*12* 12* ‘ 1214 + * 

*215 n*- v». 

*6* 6* 6*— to 

56* 6 6 — to 

J6to fito 6* 

*26* 2614 26* 

270 260 265 +10 

*1814 18 1814 + * 

*22* 22* 22*- S 

*15* IS* 15to— * 
ST* 7* 7* 

■llto Uto I8to + to 

& «*+«> 
520 20 28 

SIS 15* IS* 

SIS* IS* 18*+ to 

525* 26* 24*— * 
S23* 23W 23* 

5T2* 12* 12* 

59* wt 9*+ to 
264 260 282 +1 

W* 8* 8*- to 

57* 7* 7*+ to 

*38 38 3S + ft 

*12* 13* 12*— to 
60 60 60 —3 

EL* 2tto 21*+ * 
SZS* 2Sto 25to + to 
160 IS 160 
521* 21 W 21*— l« 
111* 11* llto— to 
*21* 21* 21to .+ to 
523* 22V* 22*— 1 
527* 27* 27*+ to 
517 17 17 + * 

520* M* 20’*— * 
59 8* 9 + Vb 

5421] Wii 42’v. . . 
$14* 14* 14*+ to 


S16* U‘* 16V* + * 


va 4 : 
516* 16 

iTTi It’, 


43 — 3". 
U — 

3T T 


528 ; 78 * 23 : * 's 

14 +1 . 


20460 Lobtavr Co 
3935 Lumen ICS 
100 MOS H A 
3700 MICC 
OTOMdanH X 
6489 Marllime f 
15000 Mer fond E 
19279 Motoon A f 
213 Motion 8 
■SD0 Nahtsoo L 
10HM Noronda 
378425 Worcon 
60467 Nvn AHA 1 
5000NOWSCOW 
88740 NUWst SP A 
2400 oak wood 
4645 Oshawa A I 
12075 POCW Air In 
_ SlPomour 
34564 PanCan P 
125 Pembina 
4A00 PhontxOil 

5260 pine Pront 
34450 Placer 


HM LewdeeaChM 

520 19* 20 + to 

522* nv~. zn 

S17to 17to 17*— H 
400 400 400 +S 

516* 14* 14* .. 

515* IS* 15* + to 
360 350 369 ■ 

*17 U* 16* . 

*16* IS* 16*— to 
527* 27* 27*+ to 
SIS* 15to IS* ‘ 

*M* U* Uto- I* 

SM i* 6*— * 

520* 20 20 —to 

40 39 39 

S7to 7* 7*- to 

533 32* 32*+ to 

514* 14* Uta+.to 
S7to 7* 

532 31* 32 + 1* 

516'A MO I6V1 • _ .. .. 


—•-■1 
■-1 . 


' ' IT - ' V 




52SV» 25 Vi 2SVS + 


5553 One sturao 


400 Rom Pet 
2100Royrackf 


523* 23* 33*+ * t- OB.. 4 * 

S7i* n - st - to. l*<. t . 

W 3TO 390 • +25 | , y.V ->. t 


2675 Rogers A 
.900 Roman 

15600 scum f 

9241 Sean Can 
26550 Shell Can 
970*5 Sherri rt 
216S QSou1hm 
23500 Saar Aera I 
600St8rodcst 
3S4SBSMca A 
1B877 *utptra 
MS Sleep R 
Sydney 0 
zoo Tara 
,1015 Teck Cor A 
1948 Teck B I 
1203 Tex Con 
ssasThomNA 
80023 Tar Dm Bk 
144415 TarstarBf 
43739 Traders A f 
litWTrnsMt 
,3500 Trinity Rei 
19450 TmAltaUA 
2S087TrCanPL 
40Z23 Trtmoc 
14953 Triton A 
MOTrlzecAf 
x-MTurtof 
300 Unicom A f 
WUnCarhto 
140 U Emprise 
liOOUKeno 

1^' 


*13* ,3to * 


520* 20* 

512* 12 1»+* 

59* 8* 9**16 

538* 38 r 38*+ to 
55 5.. - S — * 

527 26* V .+ * 

IP* PH Pto - . 

526* 25* 25*- « 

*6* 6* 69*— to 

565 64 65 +3 

120* 77* 2**+* 

*19* 19* *95 - • 

523* 21* HV4+P 
3BS 200 200 —5 

22S 220 32S + S 

38 36 -M 

520* am .aw ■■ 

512* i2Hr 129*+ * 

512* 12* 12* • 

*32 li 31* • 3IJ6— Ito 

*2i* 21* ana., .. 

523 22* zm+£ 

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Pa«e 19 


SPORTS 


Fan 
Helps Beat 



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Compiled by Our Staff From DuptBeha 

ANAHEIM, California — The 
home team had a guardian angel in 
the stands, ready to commit a little 
larceny to make sore Brian Down- 
ing's home ran remained just that 

With the score tied at 3 and with 
a runner on base and two outs in 
the bottom of the ninth inning here 
Sunday, Downing lined a shot to- 
ward the left-field comer. Toron- 
to’s George Bell made the catch as 
he fell over a railing into the seats, 
but when he pulled himself back on 
the field, the .ball was missing 
Third-base umpire John Shulbck. 
who hustled down the line to make 
the call, signaled borne run and the 
Angels were 5-3 winners. 

Blue Jay Manager Bobby Cox 
and several players pleaded at 
length that a ran had grabbed the 
bafl out of BdTs glove, but Shulodc 
stood firm. “When Bell made the 
catch, he bad broken the plane of 
(he fence, which takes him out of 
the ballpark.” said Sbulock. “If he 
catches it cm the field and his mo- 
mentum takes him in the stands 
and someone takes the ball away 
from him , that’s a different situa- 
tion- My only concern was where 
be made the catch. He was in the 
fans’ area. The role says that he 
must come out with the balL Other- 
wise. it’s a homer.” 

“He sure as bell has to come out 
of the stands with the ball” said 
California Manager Gene Mauch. 
“He’s fair game when be goes into 
the stands.” 

Toronto and reliever Gary La- 
velle (who also was a ninth-inning 
loser Saturday night) had taken a >■ 
2 lead into the ninth, but Bobby 
Grich’s run-scoring single tied the 
game and set up its bizarre finish. 

Tigers ft, Twins th In Detroit, 
Walt Terrell pitched a no-hitter for 
SH inningt and wound up combin- 
ing on a one-hitter with Willie Her- 
nandez as the Tlgm buried Minne- 
sota. 

Yankees 7, Rangers 1: In New 
York, a four-hitter gave Ron 
Guidry his Hth straight victory 
and the Yankees a four-game 
sweep of Texas. 

White Sox 5, Orioles 3: In Balti- 
more, Tom Seaver struck out 11 
over his 8% innings en route to 
registering his 297th major league 
triumph. Chicago scored three of 






Cesar Cedeno stroug-anned Montreal's A1 Newman, above, to steal second base in fire 10th inning 
Smd^ in Qiaraafi.md moments I^Cedeooscxwd Am game-wnmer on Dave Pmke^ssmg^e. 


its runs oa suicide-squeeze bunts, 
two by Bryan Little and one by 
Ozzie Guflten. 

Royals 9, Indrans 5: In Cleve- 
land, Bud Blade ended a personal 
seven-game losing streak and Hal 
McRae and John Wathan drove in 
two runs apiece as Kansas City 
beat the Indians. 

Red Sox 6, Mariners 2; In Seat- 
tle, Wade Boggs extended bis hit- 
ting streak to20 games with two 
singles and a two-run homer as 
Boston handed the Mariners their 
seventh loss in eight games. 

A’s II, Brewers 2: In Oakland, 
California, Mike Davis hit a three- 
run home run and Carney Lunsford 

added one with the bases empty in 
a four-run first that started the A's 
on their rout of Milwaukee. 

Mete 1, Astros 0: In the National 
League, in Houston. Dwight Goo- 
den pitched an 11-strikeout five- 


hitter, and the game's only run 
ramp, on an eighth-inning throwing 
error by second baseman BiU 
Doran New York nipped the As- 
tras. 

Braves 12, Pblfics 3: In Atlanta, 
Bob Horner homered twice and 
drove in five runs, and Glenn Hub- 
bard had four RBIs as the Braves 
routed Philadelphia to sweep a 
four-game series. Pascual Perez (1- 
7) won for the first time since Sept 
30, the last day of the 1984 season. 

Reds 5, Expos 4: In Cincmnati, 
Dave Parker’s single with one out 
in the 10th scored Cesar Cedeno 
from second base with die game- 
winner. Cedeno had singled off 
Gary Lucas and stolen second be- 
fore Pete Rose drew a walk, bring- 
ing Parker to the plate. 

CanBuds 2, Padres 1: In St. 
Louis, pinch-hitter Tito Landrum 
angjed home Vince Coleman from 


SCOREBOARD 


* Cycling 

Tour de France 


Golf 


Baseball 


C. — .. ' ■ ■ 

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MEN 

SIXTEENTH STAGE 

ftnAUnf.Tsu Vww 

1347 KJloirntors / 15&4 MHOS) 

1. Frwterlc Vlrfwl, Fronea.4 houra.31 min- 
utes. 54 Mconds (JD-wconiJ bonus) 

2. Onrtes Moffat. Franco. 3 minutes. II 
Mconffs behind (28-eecond bonus) 

ftGukta Bontamti. ifcuv.or JilsOGsecond 
bonus) 

4. Joatf Ueckons. Batoium. name time 

5. Francis Castatns, Franco. S.T. 
ft. Soon Kelly# Ireland, S.T. 

7. Eric Vandoraorden. Belgium. S.T. 

> Mm Van der Pori, MetttortancN. S.T. 
V. Leo Van Vilri. Netherlands. S.T. 
id Stetan Mutter, Switzerland. 5.T. 
it. Bemy Von Brabant, Balslum. S.T. 

12. Rudy Dtaenm. Bctohim, S.T. 

U. Philippe Louroira. Franca. S.T. 
i M. Jeon -Ptminoe Von den aronde-Betdlum. 

Eric MdConrfe. New Zealand. S.T. 
overall Standbim 

1. Bernard Hteault.M hours, 2S mlnutea,? 

2. Gres LeMond. UJL. or 3 minutes, 38 see- 
onto behind 

3 Stephen Roche. Ireland, at *:14 

ft. Sean Kollr, Ireland, at 7:32 

1 Sieve Bauer. Canada, at B:2fi 

ft. PhD Anderson, Australia at *:» 

7. Eduardo cmkh. Spate, at 9:01 
ft Jaap ZoeteirwUc. Netherlancbk at 11:28 
ft Kikl Rutttmanrv Swttzer-tond. at 11:38 
ft FdHa Parra. Colombia, at 11:44 
H Robert MHkir. Britain, at 12:02 
ft Pascal Simon, Franca, at 12:1> 

Ul Luis Herrera. Cotamblo. at 13:22 

14 Pedro Detooda. Spain, at 12:9 

15 Peter women. Netherlands, at 12:53 

WOMEN 

THIRTEENTH STAGE 
Lu uu g pto - T oMtc w 

I1M Kilometers) 

1- VOIerte Shnonnet. France. 2 hours. 42 
marte* 7 seconds (15-second bonus). 

2. Vtotn PauilHz. West Germany, some 
•tme Ofrft e cond bonus) 
ft Marina Mompay. Betatum. 5.T. (5-sec- 
•M bonus) 

4 Jeannle Loam. France. S.T. 

ft Catharine Swtnnerton. Britain, S.T. 
f tflmaMa CMappa. Ilalv. S.T. 

\X Wong U, China. S.T. 

*■ L «*o Seenesl'iiolv. S.T. 

- 9. Manta* de Brute, Netherlands. S.T. 

111. Marta Slower, Britain. S.T. 

Overall St oa d le wi 
1. Maria Cental. Italy. 12420 Points 
ft Jeannle Loam. Franco. 12JKZ6 
1 PhHBl Hteos, UA. 11^94 

• 4 Cedis Odin. France. 11 M9 

‘ 1 Dominhwe OamlanL Franco. H3B 
4 Imetda CMappa, Italy. 1L3M 
' J- Mno«e Ports. UA, 1IJ34 

• t Httaein H**- Nethertands, HIM 
ft Otental Breen. France. 11.151 

Jft BHWe Jeneen. Canada. UJM 
pQ *o«» RanuceL Front*. Mj 059 
■ * tesore-Ounnlna. Ui, 11JM9 
,, 2** f t° BonanomL Italy. 1IJM7 

smtwnr. WAennanv, llJHJ 
«■ Wong u China 11602 


Tbp ftatabericted esralen In ■* «Nh OS. 
W M i n tOpoe tawraamei d . wbl cti cendeded 
S eadaygo the nppor ceorse 

at the BathMOi Qo« dub to SprtwfleM. Now 
Jem t u am a t eur): 

Kathv Baker, *41 m 70-7WS-7H— 2m 

Judy Clark, S21J00 71-7545-72-83 

Vicki AtvorBZ. SI 4800 72^9-JT-75-2B7 

Nancy Lopez. sUUWJSO 7S-7S71-77— 2M 

Janet Cotas. 51A71950 72^-71-74—388 

Sally Little. 57.497.50 73-70-74-72-289 

Penny Pub. 57^9758 75-74-70-70—2*9 

Sony Little. R4I7J0 73-70-74-73—209 

Avaka Okamoia, S&IH3J3 72-74-73-71—290 

Betiv Kina. SM9333 71-73-71-75—290 

Jane Gaddee. SM9U3 74-7545-73—290 

AmV’AisotLSS.m 72-72-74-74—392 

COthy Marco. 5434258 7374^9-77—293 

Jan Stephenson. S434250 71-7473-75-991 

Pat Bradley, 54J42J0 74757173-993 

Patty Sheehan, 5434250 7373.7473-293 

Alice Miller. >434250 75-75-71-73-293 

Chris Johnson, 5434250 77-7373-70—393 

M. Spencer -Devlin. 13350 7V72-75-74-7S4 

Barb Bunkowskv. 53425 7473-7375-395 

5. BertolaccUU. 5X229-14 74-72-74-74-994 

Marlene Floyd. 0229.14 74-70-7474-994 

Stephanie Fdrwla. OZ29.14 70-71-74-73-994 


Major League Leaders 


AMERICAN 

G 

Brett Kcte M 

R_ Henderson NY 71 
Boeoe Ben M 

LOCV Btt 55 

Coope r MU 00 

Mofl Inr Mil 02 

P. Brad lev Sea M 

Mafftnalv NY S3 

wwtuker Dot 81 

Buffer Clo M 


LEAGUE 
AB R 

288 a 

277 77 
342 48 

243 35 

324 41 
320 59 

345 40 

317 41 

327 89 

347 5* 


H Pet. 
ta JHB 
99 557 

117 J42 

79 J2S 
182 713 
102 J1I 
107 J1D 
104 J09 

101 309 

104 JB5 


Lari GortKKX 0229.14 
Janet Anderson, 0329.14 
Cathy Martaw. 0229.14 
Valerie Skinner, 0825 
mi Feraon. 0825 
a-KJMcCarthv 
o-DJVmmaecflpane 
Kathy Posttewalt, 0228 
Jaw Blalock. 0428 
□awn Coe. S4B 
Sue Bernteb, OA28 
Kathv Whiraartb. 0439 
Pat Mayen. SX428 
LeAnn Caesadav. 0438 
Jerflvn Brttz. 088758 
Becky Pt a ram. 008750 
□anna CapanL 5157757 
Cvnthla HHL SI 57757 
Dee Dee Lasker. 8157757 


71-74-74-73—294 

70- 73-75-78-994 
75-70-74-77—994 

73- 74-73-77—997 
75-75-73-74—297 

71- 79-73-74—397 

74- 71-73-79-997 

73- 77-71 -77—298 

74- 74-71-77— 2»B 

73- 77-73-74-098 
00-71-72-75-998 

74- 73-73-74—2*8 

75- 72-77-74-290 

74- 73-71- 78 — 29B 
78-7359-79-999 

75- 75-76-73—999 
75-73-72-00—300 
74-75-71-80—380 
73-78-75-74 — 30Q 


Mvra Blackwtdr. >157757 7575-74-74—300 


Sherri Turner. >157757 
Jackie Bertech. SI 57757 
Sandra Palmer, SI 57757 
Dale Emelins. SI 57757 
Marti BaKorlh, SI 577 57 
JoAime Comer. S1J2S 
Heather Farr. S142S 
Bali Thamas. SlJM 
Lenore Muronka, SU58 
Jody Rosenthal. SU50 
Rosie Janes, SUM 
Sherrln Galbraitn. >1,175 
Debbie Metaterlln, 51,159 
a-Dattle Pepper 
CMontaomeTY. >1,125 

Cathy Ravnrids. SI 587.50 

Julie Cota. >1 587 JO 


727283-74-300 

71-7574-77-300 

7774-7574-300 

77-7274-74-309 

74- 76-7476-300 
77-7275-76-301 

75- 727277—301 
727776-77-302 

76- 727277—302 
7675-76-75-002 
72R-76-76-383 

76- 71-7681 — 304 

77- 7275-00— 3DS 
71-7680-78— 305 
75-75-7977 — 304 

75- 76-77-79—307 

76- 7580-76-307. 


Reas: Hendermn. New York, 77; Ripken. 
Baltimore. 46; Whitaker, Detroit. 42; Malltar, 
Milwaukee. 59; Davis. Oakland. 5ft 
RBIs; Mafftnalv. Now York, 49; Gibson, De- 
troit, 62; Baylor, New York, 40; Ripken. Bam- 
mam m; Murray, Balttmare, 50; BelLTonm- 
ta. SB. 

HHs: Boons. Boston. 117; Bradley. Seattta. 
107; WUson. Kansas Otv. 107) Butler, Cleve- 
land. 105; Garda Toronto, 184; Matttaalv. 
New York, 104. 

Doubles: Martino [y. New York. 27; GarilL 
MJnnesata.Z3;Boaaa.Bostor\.22; Caoper.MII- 
waukee. 22; Buckner. Boston, 31; walker. CM- 
caea. 71; iwesebv. Toronto, 21. 

TTtatas: WUson, Kansas City, U; Puckett 
M in ne so ta. 9; Cooper. Milwaukee. 0; Butter. 
Cleveland. 7; Brookcna. Detroit. S; Fernery- 
dn. Toronto. 5 1 Brad by, Seattle. 5. 

Home R«e: Plsk. Chkna, 23; K teaman. 
Oakland. 21; Brwiansfcv. M inn es o ta. 19; Ev- 
ans. Detroit. U; Bell. Toronto. 18: Glbswi. 
Detroit. W; Presley, Seattle. It 
Staton 8 owe Henderson, New York. 41; 
Pettis, CBUfbmta. 30; Butler. Cleveland, 27; 
Collins. OcAtend. 25; Garcia Toronto. 23; Mn- 
seby, Toronto. 23; WHson. Kaasas aty. 23. 
PITCH I NO 

Won-Lost AVtasteo PcJJERA: GuMrv.Ncw 
York, n-2 JORUB; HewoU. Oakland. 84.727. 
3J»; Rotnanlck, California. UL4.914.3JK; 5a- 
bsrhaaen. Kansas Otv, 10-4. .714298; TorreU, 
Detroit, 124, JM, 3/9. 

strlksoots: Blylevea, Oevekmd. ill; Mor- 
ris. Detroit. 109; Bannister, ChlcoBa, 101; 
BavtL Boston. *7; Wttt. Gelttarata. 94. 


McGee 5tL 
Herr StL 
Guerrero LA 
Parker an 
Gwynn ED 
Crw Htn 
Moreland CM 
Rotees Mon 
TwnPteton SO 
Sandberg Chi 


BS 335 44 IIS JO* 

83 341 48 110 J02 

^5 291 31 87 999 

BS 204 38 91 .2*0 

■2 319 40 94 J9S 

U 01 B IS JR 

79 320 19 93 J91 


Sandberg CM 79 320 49 93 J9I 

Runs: Murphy. Atlanta. 45; Crieman. 
St Louts. 44; Rotacs. Montreal, 40; Samtaerg. 
Chicago, 40; Guerrem U» Angeles. 54. 

RBIs: Murahy. Atlanta. 49; Herr. St Louis. 
48; J. Clark, St. Louis. 43; Porker. Ondtanaff, 
«>; G. WUson. PhlladripMw <1. 

Hits: H«t,SL Louie. 104; McGee, 5L Louis. 
UM; Owym Sen Dtaaa. 183; Parker. Clntiry 
noa 182; R. Ramiro*. Atlanta W. 

Doubles: Herr, St. Louis, 23; waltativ Mon- 
treal. 23; J. Clark. St. Louis. 21; Modlock. 
Ptttsburotv It; Parker, Cincinnati. 21. 

-Mules: McGee, St. Louis, 10; RateeK Mon- 
treaLBi Coleman, 5L LouU.6; Samuel. Phlla- 
detaNla.4; o, WHsoroPhltodelPtila.S; Gamer, 
Houston, 3; Gkxktsn. Son Frontisca. £ 
Home Rms: Murahy. Atlanta, 23: Guerre- 
ro. Lee A n g e lo s . 71; J. Clark, St- Louts. 17; 
Pork or, Cincinnati, 14; Horner, Atlanta, 15. 

Staton Bases: Cotoman. 51 Louis, 44; 
McGee, St. Louis. 34; Lopes. CMcooo.33; Re- 
dus. Clntinnaft, 31; Samuel, Phi IgdeMiIa, 30. 
PITCHING 

MtoB-Lart/WtaBtaB Pti^ERA: HawklRs. 
San Dtaew lt-2. 844,235; Doriteu. New York. 
93. m 152; Gooden, Hew York, 153. JH3, 
168; Reustitri, Pittsburgh. 52, JOBL 233; An- 
nular, St Loris, 154. 799, 127. 

Strikeouts: Gooden, New York. 153; Ryan, 
Houston, 139; VoJenzueto, Loa Angeles, 171; 
Seta. OndnnaH. 129; J. DeLeon, Pittsburgh, 
114. 

Saves: Reardon, Moo treat 22; La. Smith. 
CMcxtao, 19; Gossaae, San Dieaa 10; Power. 
CtncfcmatL 14; Sutter. AHontu. IS. 


Sandals Major League line Scores 


Football 

JSFLThie Game 

.JAI East Ruthertom, New Jersey) 
ViC?* 714 D 5-31 

m 7 7u |.4| 

- Pfrtod: Bai— Flttkee u pom from 
. IT reut kick). 4;21; Oak-O reemvuod 
■ ^erteptiqn return ( Balov Ic kick), HA 
T® - PWW: firt-enrom r ran (Troul 
S' =*<1 Oak— williams T run {Batot/ie 
U' 4 :M; Bai— Bryant 17 run (Trout kick). 
If. 

'• !*? Ptrt «: Oofc-FG Botavlc 19, 5:32; 

.T™ 1 * 7 Pass tram Hebert (Bolovtc 
: -«.14;K 

Period: Bed— Bryant 7 run (Trout 
J, 7:«. 

Bathtnors.BrytmI33.ua, Riley 3- 
' r™* Ml. Hwvte 38. Purina 1-3. Oflk- 
- - wnoama 1596. Bentley KMft Hebert 1- 
•’•tan 1-i 

Bcmmors. Furina 1524-L15S. 
Hebert U-30-MJ7. 

«*tao: Sommoro. Bryant 5-54. Criller 
cft^ta^w.DeavtanSV.DunekWaRU- 
^Oaktona. Carter 5 74 Bmttey *41, 
wv 2-37, Banks M?. Beramann 1^. 
m R 9« Goat: Baltimore. Trout 5S- 

'**»«: 49J43 


Top flaistews and ca mines la the Busch 
Cknslc. sAlcb ceactoded 5eeday oa the 4J44- 
yard, per- 71 KtaosaUH Club course In WB- 
UannUurp, VI rotate Ot-p to yo B wtaoerj: 
x-Mark wstes. S9O000 75494*78-273 

John Mahattay. S54800 494*4789-273 

Joey Stedriar, S24JI00 71468948-274 

Scott Simpson. 824809 6W7-7W6-2M 

Danny Edwards. BUBO 704*48-73-274 

KriNt Fergus. (MB 494*71-71-275 

Donnie Hammnd. >14*4) 4*70-7048-276 

Ho) Sutton. S14JMI 4*49-7346-274 

wavne Gradv, SUM1 4747-7349—276 

Frank Conner, SHH41 474*7*71-274 

Joy Hocn. TMJMI 64-71-7148-274 

Roeer Mottbta. SU841 4*4*70-73-276 

Mark Hayes, Sl&OBO 67-7148-71—277 

Fuzzy Zoeller. SltLOOO 6*724848-277 

RiCk Fehr, ST JOB 734*4*73-271 

Curtis strange. I7J00 704571-73-278 

Stuart Smith. S7J» 714*4*48-271 

Andy North. 57 J00 754*75^7-270 

Jeff Staman, SfSOO 494*4*71—278 

Mike Reid, 57.500 S74849-74-27B 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
* triwi LwH 

TEXAS— Ad Noted Dickie Note* Pitcher. 
Optioned Bob Sebra, pttdier, to Oklahoma 
aty of the American Association. 

Hatteacd 1 — <■ 

ST. LOUIS — Activated Darrell Porter, 
catcher. Oettpned Randy Hunt, catcher, in 
Lsutovliie of the American Awodatlon. 

FOOTBALL 

Naftopal PooCtwiI L cogue 
DENVER— Announced that the family of 
Pat Bswten. flw feam-c matartiv owner, will 
purchase me remcrirriM 3U percent of IM 
chfh. 

SOCCER 

Em<Ui First Dfvteteo 
SOUTHAMPTON— Aimeunced that former 
Northern Ireland teier n a W onal 
ChrtsNidwii Honed a three-year manoBenat 
contract. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Minaesota 888 899 008-8 1 ■ 

Detroit M2M9 Mk-8 12 8 

viola Wartfle (B). Lvsander (9) and Safa* 
Engle 18); Terrel l, Hernandez (8) and MeMn. 
W— ■ TerraiV, 1*4. L-Vlota, 1*7. Sv— Hernan- 
dez (19). HR»— Oetroff. Herndon (9). Evans 
(181. Trammell (■). 

TUH Ml BN 891-1 4 8 

New York M N2 «»-2 9 1 

Haaton. Wririi (21. Harris (4), Stewart (71. 
Schmidt IB) and Brummer; Guidry and Hae- 
sev. v*— Guidry, 12a L— Motion, *4. HR- 
New York. Wtnflaid (121. 

city HI IN 283-9 IS I 

devriud an 1*0 BO-6 n i 

Block, LoCosi (7). Outaartwrrv (81 and 
WOthan i Heaton, Ruhlt (2). Reed (5J. Bnrfclov 
IS). Waddell (9) and Banda WUtart (I). W— 
Blocfc.4-10. L— Heaton, 5-11. Sw— Qulsonberry 
(17). HR — CtaveftHKL Frmeo (3). 

CMcaae HI ■■ Wl-5 18 1 

- Baltimore ON M8 818-3 7 1 

Seaver, SMUmt (9) and FM» Bodricker. 
McGregor (7), Aase (W and Rarford, Demp- 
sey (8). W— Soever. *7. L— Boddlcker. 94. 
Sv— spuiner III. HR — Satttmoro. Ripken 

MHenakflC M8 103 W— 2 M • 

NO *50 92»—11 11 ■ 
HaaaGtason C5J. MeCiura (4i. Ftnoere (8) 
and Mere; Krueoer, Atherton (4) and Tettte- 
tan. W— Krueger. 74. L-Haa*. 7-i Sv-AJher- 
tan (2L HRs — Oakland. Lunsford (T3L Davis 
(IS), Bactrte (51. 

TDTOMe BT 839 009—3 7 I 

Cw We raie 8N Ml HI— 5 5 9 

Clancy. Lama (4). Lavrile U) and Whitt; 
Lugo, Ctemants (7), album (7) and Boone. 
W^cnburti+a. L^-Lave(le,34. Hfc-Callfer- 
MaDownlna (71, 

Boston 9H8N321— 4 • I 

Seattle Hi Ml 128— 2 • • 

Boyd, crawtord (» and Gedman; Win* 
vtnle Bcra a). Lana (8)> Snvdff (9), iMoore 
(9) end Scan, w Bond. 11-7. U-WHB. M. 
HR — Boston, Boons (3). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Son FrantiKO ON 811 3N-7 U 8 

Ptttsbureh 2M M9 018-3 0 1 

Laskey, Muavls (6) and Brenty. 1 Rhoden, 
Winn (7), Holiand (9). Guante (« and Pena. 
W— UsskeV, 2-11- L— Rhoden. *1* Sv-MDa- 
vts I4I.HR*— San Frandseoi, Green ra.CDo- 
vto {■)- 

San Dtoae 981 m 109-1 5 l 

5& Leeli IN 9H Up— 2 « • 

show. DravKky (BS and Kennedy; Ku- 
sMre, Darter (?)« LnhH (9} and Nieto. W— 
Kenshlre, 74. l— D ravednr, 64. Sv— Lofttl 
(91. hr— SI. Louis, Pendleton (3). 

Montreal N1 291 M i-4 9 1 

Ctadenatl 919 IN <91 1—8 11 f 


Smith. Roberge (7). Burke (9), Lucas (Kt) 
and FTtzgeraid, Nicosia (71 : Brownlna. Fran- 
co 18). Power (19) and Bltardtiloi, Knlaely 
(10). W— Poww. 2-2. L— Luea*.3-i HR— Mon- 
treal, wtenlnohom (3). 

Uds Ametas 0HWN1-4H3 

CMtPM 1U IN 31k— 19 15 9 

Honeycutt, Castilio (31. Rsuss (4), Powsl 
(4), Diaz 111 and Yeoaer; Trout Frazier (41. 
Brassier (4) and Davis. 119— Frazier. *2. 1— 
Honeycutt, 64. Sv— BrasthF (2). HRs— Los 
Armeies, Maldonado (3). Chicago, Sandberg 2 
(14). Moreland m. 

PNladriphln in Ml dm- 3 6 9 

Atlanta OH m ***— « 15 l 

LOrap. Rucker (7) and Vfergfl; Perez, 
Camp (6) and BenedldL W— Perez. 1-7. L— 
iCGrm 84. sv— Camp (1). HRs— Atlonta, 
Ramirez (4). Horner 2 (15). 

New York IN «■> NB-l 5 » 

HowlOV MM MM MM— • 5 ft 

Gooden and Reynolds; Knemr, Scott (9) 
end Ashby, w — Ooodsn.13-3.L- Knepper, 64. 


M^or League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
■act Dl V iri on 


Stars Repeat as USFL Champions 

Baltimore Rallies Past Oakland , 28-24; Bryant Scores 3 TDs 


.By William N. Wallace 

New York Tima Serria 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New 
Jersey —Die Baltimore Stars came 
from behind in the final quarter 
Sunday night to defeat the Oakland 
Invaders, 28-24, and win the Unit-, 
ed States Football League champs 

onshrp for the second year in a row. 

Kelvin Bryant scored the deci- 
sive touchdown for the Stars on 37- 
yard nm in the ninth mi nin e of the 
last quarter. The Invaders then 
moved to the Baltimore 17-yard 
line, where the threat was stopped 


with two minutes to play. A thud- 
down pass from Bobby Hebert to 
Anthony Carter was incomplete at 
the right flag of the end zone. He- 
bert's fourth-down pass was also 
incomplete. 

season 'foMhe former Phfladd^na 
team that snuggled to reach the 
playoffs. Late in the regular season, 
the Stars* won-lost record was 5-6- 
Hin the seedings of the eight play- 
off teams, the Stars were ranked 
sixth an the basis of their final 
record, 10-7-1. 

Baltimore scored first and had 
led at halftime, 21-14; the Invaders 
took the lead at the end of the third 
period, 24-21, bat then came the 
winning rally. 

The Stars and quarterback 
Chock Fusina were almost perfect 
on their first series as they covered 
80 yards in 10 plays for a touch- 


down. Fusina completed all five of 
his pass attempts for 79 yards, and 
kepi the ball cn another play for a 
3-yard sneak and a first aowo. 

Fusina’s fifth pass went to Scott 
Fitzkce, Ids favorite receiver since 
their days at Peon Stale. Beating 
coma back Vito McKeever, Fltz- 
kee caught the 16-yardcr just in- 
bounds in the back of the end zone. 

On the next series, Fusina did 
not fare so wdL Rushed by Oak- 
land end Monte Bennett, Fusina let 
go a soft pass 10 Tran Donovan that 
strong safety David Greenwood in- 
tercepted — and ran back 44 yards 
for a touchdown. 

Another turnover, an intercep- 
tion of Bobby Hebert's pass by 
Scott Woerocr, followed immedi- 
ately. Woemer, trapped at the Oak- 
land 21, laureled to Jonathan Sut- 
ton, who gained 6 more yards. That 
came at the end of the first period 
and the Stars then scored to go 
ahead 14-7. Bryant ran outside for 
8 yards and then inside for 7 and 
the touchdown. 

The Invaders came back quickly 
with a 47-yard drive that ended 
when halfback John W illiams went 
in from the one. Novo Bqjovic's 
kick tied the score at 14-14. 

Baltimore took the lead back 
when Bryant, with Invader line- 
backers blitring, ran up the middle 
for a 17-yard TD in toe 14th min- 
ute of the second quarter. The 35 
points were the most scored in the 


first half of any USFL champion- 
ship game. 

The scoring continued in the 
third quarter when O ak land took 
the kickoff and went S2 yards in 13 
plays. The Invaders were stopped 
at the 1 Bojovic then kicked a 19-' 
yard field goal, and Oakland 
trailed. 21-177 

The Invaders came down the 
field again but to no avail. Hebert’s 
end-zone pass wem over Anthony 
Carter's bead and into the hands oT 
Woemer, the nickel back in the 


Stars’ defense, for his second inter- 
ception. Woemer was tackled in 
the end zone for a touchback, and 
Baltimore had the ball at il& 20. But 
fullback Allen Harvjn then fum- 
bled. and Oakland's David Shaw 
recovered. 

Four plays later. Hebert passed 
seven yards Tor a touchdown to 
Carter, who cut to the outside 
against one of the league’s best cor- 
nerbacks. Garcia Lane, and made 
tfaie catch in the end zone just be- 
fore the end of the third period. 


second in the eighth to lift the Car- 
dinals past San Diego. The win- 
ners' Tory Pendleton had homered 
in the seventh to de the game. 

Cobs 10, Dodgers 4: In Chicago, 
Keith Moreland drove in four runs, 
three on a home run, and Ryne 
Sandberg homered twice to lead a 
15-hit attack that ended a six-game 
Los Angeles winning streak. 

Suite 7, Pirates 3: In Pitts- 
burgh, Josfe Uribe and Brad Wefl- 
man had two RBIs apiece, and Da- 
vid Green and Chili Davis hit 
basewanpty home nms to help Bill 
Laskey end a personal two-month 
losing streak. Laskey (2-1 1) had not 
won since May 6, when he also beat 
Pittsburgh. Tm glad to be done 
with the streak and all the garbage 
that goes with it," he said. **So what 
if they both came against the Pi- 
rates? They’re wins, and Tm hap- 
py ” (AP, UPJ ) 


Baker U.S. Open Victor 


Satata: HamaHMz,btoron,19;HMi«l( l Oak- 
tooG U; Jaroo*. Oilcaao. 77; Moors, Colttar- 
nta, 17; Qu ta ontawry. Kama* aty. 17. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

G AB R H Pet 
79 304 55 104 J40 
M 317 51 104 J3* 
A 91 292 91 J13 


By Gordon S. White Jr. 

New York Tuna Service 

SPRINGFIELD. New Jersey 
— The final-round pressure of 
the U.S. Women’s Open proved 
too much for everyone but 
Kathy Baker, who achieved her 
first victory in two years as a 
professional by winning the 
40th open handily Sunday. 

The pressure obviously gpt to 
Nancy Lopez, the favorite, who 
fell far back in the early going 
after bogeying the first and sec- 
ond holes. She finished fourth 
in a de for fourth place. 

Baker shot a 2-under-par 70 
to win the most prestigious 
tournament in women’s golf by 
three shots over Judy dark. 
Baker fim'shad with an 8-under 
280 on Baltnsrol Golf Club’s 
Upper Course; Clark had a fi- 
nal-round 72. 

Baker, 24, clinched the title 
and the 540,000 first prize on 
the par-4 16th, where she 
gained two shots on dark. A' 
magnificent approach shot to 
the green on tire 390-yard hole 
left Baker an easy six-foot bird- 
ie putt. 

Clark, who was trailing, by 
two shots going into No. 16, hit 
her approach right at the stick, 
but the ball landed on the front 
slope of the green — and back- 
spin took it back down onto the 
fairway, 10 feet off the green. 
Clark chipped short and two- 
putted for a bogey, and Baker 
was given an easy walk up 
Nos. 17 and 18. 

Lopez, who was one shot be- 
hind Baker going into Sunday’s 
play, had five bogeys and no 
birdies in her final-round 77. 
She finished with an even-par 
2B& to tie Janet Cotes (76) for 
fourth place. Vicki Alvarez 
closed with 75/287 for third. 

Baker’s victory made her the 
10th woman ever to make the 
open her first professional vic- 
tory. The others were Betty 
Jameson in 1947, Louise Suggs 


in 1949, Betsy Rawls in 1951. 
Murle Breer in 1962, Mary 
Mills in 1963, Sandra Spozicn 
in 1966, Donna Caponi in 1969, 
Jerilyn Britt in 1979 and Janet 
Anderson in 1982. 

Lopez, who has 32 victories 
in her career, must wait untQ 
nest year for another chance at 
her first open. She was tied for 
the first- round lead Thursday, 
alone in the lead Friday and 
second by a shot Saturday. All 
along, she was the player every- 
one expected to win. 

But Baker wouldn’t give up. 
She handled well the 6274-yard 
course that was giving up re- 
cord numb ers of subpar rounds 
in the first three days. But after 
the last round, only three play- 
ers were under par — Baker, 
Clark and Alvarez. 

The six players who started 
with 54-hole semes under par 
totaled 16 bogeys and only five 
birdies over Sunday's first nine 
holes. And the four in the last 
two pairings had seven bogeys 
and one birdie total over the 
first six holes. 

Clark had the birdie 3 at the 
fourth hole when she dropped a 
20-foot putt. Baker had one of 
the bogeys over the first six 
fades when she pulled her ap- 
proach well to the left of the 
second green; she 3-pntied 
from 70 feet for a bogey 5. 

But Baker got the lead bade 
when riie sank a 10-footer on 
the par-3 seventh hole. That im- 
mediately was followed by an 
excellent pitch into the eighth 
green that left her a simple two- 
fool putt for a birdie 4. 

Baker was beginning to look 
like she might hold on, bat at 
the par-3 10th she failed to 
reach the men with her tee 
shot. She chipped up but two- 
putted a for a bogey. Neverthe- 
less, she was still a shot ahead of 
Clark. Then she took a two-shot 
stroke advantage by sinking a 
20-foot birdie putt on the par-5 
11th. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

N. Zealand Rugby Union Cancels Tour 

WELLINGTON. New Zealand (Combined Dispatches) — The New 
Zealand rugby union announced Monday that it would abandon a tour of 
South Africa by the national All Blacks team. The 16-maicb, nine-week 
tour was scheduled to begin Wednesday. The union's announcement 
came two days after Judge Maurice Casey ruled the team could not leave 
until a challenge to the tour's validity had been heard by the High Court. 

Union counsel Douglas While said the interim injunction would not be 
challenged “A major factor in not appealing was the scale of the security 
operation needed in New Zealand to facilitate a departure of the team to 
South Africa," White said on Monday. 

Opposition lawyers claimed the tour would violate the union's consti- 
tutional aim of promoting, fostering and developing rugby. The tour had 
been opposed by the government, the churches and a majority of New 
Zealanders, according to public-opinion polls, because it was viewed as 
being supportive or South Africa's ra rial-separation policies. Prime 
Minister David Lange bad said recently that the tour would make New 
Zealand ‘'part of the armory of apartheid." f AP. UP1> 

McCrory Keeps Tide on 3d-Round KO 

MONTE CARLO (AP) — Milton McCrory of the United Slates 
successfully defended his World Boxing Council welterweight title with a 
third-round knockout of Panamanian Carlos Trujillo in a scheduled 12- 
round fight here Sunday. 

McCrory dropped Trujillo once in each round, knocking him senseless 
in the third with a flurry of rights and lefts to the head while the 
challenger hung helplessly on the ropes. Trujillo was counted out at 1:59 
of the round. 

It was McCrary's fourth successful defense since he won the crown in 
AugusL 1983. His record is 27-0-1; Trujillo dropped to 19-3. 

Deadline for Baseball Strike to Be Set 

CHICAGO (UPI) — Major-league player representatives were to meet, 
here on Monday to set a strike deadline that could lead to a player 
walkout 

The 30-member executive board of the Major League Players Associa- 
tion was to be briefed on the status of the 9-month-old contract negotia- 
tions with dub owners. Players of all 26 major league teams have voted to 
authorize a strike. 

The players' contract expired Dec. 31, and although 31 bargaining 
sessions have been held, negotiations have stalled on the question 
whether owners are losing or making money. 

Monday's meeting fell on an off-day in the schedule; several of the 
players were to go on to Minneapolis for Tuesday's All-Star Game. 

Wiebe Wins PGA Tourney in Playoff 

WILLIAMSBURG, Virginina 
(AP) — Mark Wiebe birdied the 
first fade of a sudden-death playoff 
to win the Busch Classic golf tour- 
nament by one stroke over John 
Mahaffey. 

Wiebe, 27, collected $90,000 for 
his first victory on the PGA tour, 
which he joined on a full-time basis 
last year. 

Wiebe, with a final-round 70, 
and Mahaffey (69) finished regula- 
tion at 11-under-par 273 on the 
6,746-yard, par-71 Kingsmill Golf 
Gub course. Danny Edwards, who 
led Wiebe by one stroke going into 
Sunday’s round, dosed 72/274 to 
fall into a three-way tie for third 
with Scott Simpson (a 66) and Joey 
Sinddar (68). 

A stroke back, on a closing 71, 
was Keith Fergus. Tied for fifth at 
276 were Hal Sutton (66), Donnie 
Hammond (68), Jay Haas (68). 
$ Wayne Grady (69), Frank Conner 
n (71) and Roger Maltbie (72). 

\ Wiebe. wno by his count has 
been to qualifying school "seven or 
^ eight times," recalled his thoughts 
as he and Mahaffey started the 
playoff: “If I lose, the worst Lhat 

M rir w ko — — could happen is Tm not going to 

jyiarK Wiebe have to go io tour school next year. 

SchooTs out. I other win or win more.” 



'Legion’ Puts a Little English on Tour de France 



W 1 

„ 

Pd. 

GB 

Toronto 

53 

35 

jm 

— 

New York 

m 

34 

jsn 

2ta 

Detroit 

*t 

31 

StB 

3Vj 

Battlmora 

44 

41 

Jtt 

TMi 

Boston 

' 45 

42 

317 

7VS 

Milwaukee 

37 

47 

MB 

14 

Ctevefcm 

28 a 

wostUtototoa 

300 

U 

Comoro la 

52 

35 

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— 

Oakland 

44 

41 

J29 

6 

Komas Cite 

44 

42, 

512 

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JM 

8V. 

Seattle 

42 

45 

M3 

10 

Minnesota 

48 

45 

471 

11 

Ttm 

32 

54 

J44 

201b 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EON Division 


St LOUIS 

W L 
52 32 

Pet 

jsa 

GB 

New York 

50 

34 

481 

21* 

Mon! real 

49 

39 

4S7 

*Yi 

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45 

41 

423 

7*i 

PMtadotaMa 

17 

49 

AM 

15ft 

PtttUMTOff 

39 

54 

441 

23 

Lw AJW«ta» 

West Dl virion 
48 37 

445 



San Diooo 

49 

3» 

sa 

Vi 

Cincinnati 

44 

41 

410 

4 

Houston 

43 

45 

m 

4ft 

Atlanta 

39 

47 

A S3 

9ft 

ten Francisco 

33 

55 

478 

14ft 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Following a campaign of infiltra- 
tion with a frontal attack, the “Foreign Legion" 
is conquering the Tour de France. Or. as English 
rider Pan! Sherwen says, referring to Anglo- 
phones: “There used to be two of us, just myself 
and Sean Kelly in the old days, and now there's 
a big sed.*'- 

The French dubbed English speakers the For- 
eign Legion in 1 981, when five of them rode for 
different teams in the tour. That started a trend 
that has reached double figures for the first time 
since a 10-man British national team competed 
in the bicycle race a couple of decades ago. 

After the race shifted to sponsored teams, 
English speakers were rare until Sherwen and 
Kdly, an Irishman, became fixtures. Kelly is in 
his eighth tour, Sherwen his seventh. With three 
neophytes in the band this year, there are now a 
dozen riders putting a little English on the tour. 

At first the Anglophones were a curiosity in a 
sport long dominated by Europeans. Now, says 
Australian rider PhU Anderson, “We're getting 
a lot more general respect from the other riders 
and from the general public.” One reason is that 
English speakers rank second through sixth in 
the worlds most prestigious cycling race. 

“We’re some of the best riders in the world," 
Greg LeMond panted ouL An American with 
the Vie Claire team. LeMond is second in the 
race, which is decided on the least overall 
elapsed time. He trailed- Bernard Hinault, his 
French teammate, by 3 mrntnes and 38 seconds 
as the tour moved Monday through the !6th of 
its 22 stages, 247 kilometers (153.4 miles) from 

Auriilac to TouJoure on tl« way to the Pyrenees. 

Stephen Roche, an Irishman with the Re- 
douie team, ranked third; Kelly, who rides for 
SldL was fourth; Steve Bauer, a fam digit with 
La Vie Clftire, was fifth, and Anderson, who 
rides for Panasonic, was sixth. 

The rest of the contingent ranked lower in the 
standings of the 151 riders who remain of the 
180 who started the race June 28. It ends July 21 
in Paris after covering more than 4,000 kilome- 
ters clockwise through France. 

Robert Millar, a Scotsman with the Peugeot 
team, was 11th; Martin Earley, an Irishman 


with Fagor, was 63d; Doug Shapiro, an Ameri- 
can with Kwantum, was 71st; Allan Peiper, an 
Australian with Peugeot, was 93d; Eric McKen- 
zie, a New Zealander with Lotto, was 124th; 
Sean Yates, an Englishman with Peugeot, was 
130th. and Sherwen, who rides for La Redouts, 
was 149th. 

“If we were all Americans, racing on an 
American team, it might be tougher to win 
respect,” LeMond continued. “Bui we're from 
so many different countries and on so many 
teams. Plus many of us are leaders of those 
teams.” The leaders are Millar. Anderson, 
Roche, Kelly ami LeMond, who is the designat- 
ed bar to Hinault. 

□ 

“Everybody's really used to us now," Le- 
Mond added. “Every once in a while you hear 
sontebody say. They’re doing so well this is 
terrible for French cycling,' but not so much any 
more. Now people are saying that cycling is 
becoming more international and that's good 
for the sport." 

Anderson dated the start of respect to the 
1981 race when he wore the vellow jersey, the 
symbol of overall leadership, for 10 days. “That 
was really the beginning," he said. "That was a 
shock to the Europeans system. And now you 
have Sean doing weD year after year and Greg 
finishing third last year. We’re here to stay. It’s 
not just an accident. 

“it’s still harder for ns though,” Anderson 
continued. "If a French rider gpt the same 
results as Greg or Sean or me, they would get big 
headlines and all we get is a mention. We’re a 

i. M » 


Shapiro and Baud' also live near LeMond and 
Anderson. 

Bauer — like Shapiro and Earley a fire Mime 
starter in the tour — is one of the few who do 
not speak a foreign language fluently, although 
he said be is “getting there in French.” He said 
his Vie Claire teammates were all his friends, 
and added of his fellow Anglophones: "We're 
all competitors during the race but if it’s not too 
intense. I’ll talk with some of them." 

Sherwen amplified the general rules of the 
dub; "We won't do anything major against one 
of our own. If Roche tries to attack. KeQy won’t 
chase turn if it's an unimportant attack. Similar- 
ly, Anderson won’t go after LeMond cm a small 
breakaway. Basically we're trying not to hinder 
each other, rather than help each other." 

Anderson, Sberwen and LeMond all said lhat 
what binds the riders together is not only their 
language but also lheir outlook. "We've got 
more in common culturally than we haw with 
the others," Anderson said. "Greg and I are 
good friends because we understand each other, 
we know what the good life's about.” 

"Basically we have a different lifestyle than 
the French," Sherwen agreed. “We have a dif- 
ferent approach to things, more technically ad- 
vanced, and we relate to each other better than 
we do to the others.” 

"Everybody gets along pretty well," LeMond 
agreed. "It's nice to be able to talk with people 
in your own language while you're competing 
and afterward too.” 

LeMond who speaks French wed said that 


That fact, Sherwen said is what brings the 
Anglophones together and makes them friends. 
"We’re all away from home, no matter how far 
that may be. There's something that draws peo- 
ple together. And the fact that there's such a 
good relationship among our countries also 

"We do tend to break up into smaller dans, 
depending on where we live. Millar, Yates, 
Paper and 1 are dare friends because wc all five 
near each otho 1 in Lille, in the north of France. 
LeMond and Anderson are good friends be- 
cause they five near each other in Belgium.” 


English. “The Dutch all speak it and some 
Belgians.” In general, communication is not 
much of a problem, be continued because there. . 
is alwavs sign language- “It works,” he said. 
“Everybody speaks it. We all manage to get 
along.** 

Sberwen confirmed this. “I was talking the 
other day with Luis Herrera, the Colombian 
rider,” he said “and I don’t speak Spanish and 
Lord knows he doesn't speak English, Bnt I used 
the half dozen words I mow in Spanish, he used 
tbe half dozen be knows in English, we threw in 
a bit here and there in other languages and the 
rest was sign language. Nice chat we had too.” 






l\TKIfS \TKI1 \l. I IKK \l.ll TlilHI \h. Tl KSII . Jl l.\ l(>. I‘JK.1 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


Turn Off the Silence Morris Katz, Master of the Fast Draw $ 7 oMMionu> 'Lire Aid’ 



W ASHINGTON— "Is this ih* 
Noise Pollution Authority?" 
"Yes, it is." 

"This is RFD 141 Tm on vaca- 
tion at Tashmoo Pond and I 
haven't heard any noise all day 
long," 

“Just a minute, let cne check the 
book. You were supposed to have a 
crew cutting 
down a dead 
tree in the next 
yard at 6 o'clock 
this morning." 

"Well, they 
didn't show up. 
and I slept until 
8 o'clock. I’ve 
felt rotten all 
day." 

“Did a private 
jet fly over your BucnwaH 
house at dawn?" . 

“No. I haven't heard a plane all 
morning. Whai kind of an author- 
ity do you people run when a guy 
can't get sufficient noise to satisfy 
his basic vacation needs?" 

"We’re doing the best we can. 
We put you down for a bulldozer to 
dear the land behind your house, 
but we had to send it over to Les- 
ley's Pines because the couple there 
only rented a house for a week and 
claimed priority." 

□ 

"You people should have enough 
pollution devices to satisfy every- 
body. New York City does." 

“We're not New York. As matter 
of fact, our authority couldn't stay 
in business if we didn't have noise 
pollution volunteers available for a 
large percentage of our work." 

"I'm sorry. We city people are 
used to getting noise when we want 
iL Look, the silence is driving me 
crazy. I sit on my porch in my 
rocking chair and all I hear are the 
tweeting of binds and the occasion- 
al voice of the turtle in the land." 

"Did the boy show up with his 
electric hedge cutter at the Tiltons? 

Milwaukee Parade Returns 

The Associated Press 

MILWAUKEE — Cheered by 
an estimated 750,000 people, a cir- 
cus parade that sponsors called the 
world's biggest returned to Mil- 
waukee on Sunday after a 12-year 
absence. It included the actor Er- 
nest Borgnine, who was invited af- 
ter he said he had always wanted to 
appear as a clown. 


He was scheduled to be there from 
2 to 5, when you were taking your 
nap.” 

"He did not. I complained to 
Bob Tilton and he said it was none 
of my business when he has his 
hedges cut." 

"Bob's very much against noise. 
We've had complaints about him 
before." 


"It's 6 o'clock and Fm having 
guests for drinks. Why don’t you 
send over a garbage truck so we 
can't hear ourselves think?” 

"We don’t send out garbage 
truck crews after 5 o'clock. Would 
you consider three or four motorcy- 
cles rewing up in front of your 
house?" 

“At this stage Ym willing to take 
anything.” 

"Wait a minute, I misspoke. The 
dispatcher said we had an emergen- 
cy. There is an old lady in Oak 
Bluffs who just got home from the 
hospital and he sent the Hell's An- 
gels there.” 

“You must have someone who 
can disturb the peace.” 

“We have a bunch of beer-drink- 
ing college kids who will play hard 
rock outside your bedroom win- 
dow. But they’re booked up until 
Friday." 

"This is the worst summer I've 
ever had. I've been here 10 days 
and spent three of them in utter 
silence.” 

“Please don’t exaggerate. We 
sent out a road crew to dig up your 
street yesterday." 

"They used their pneumatic 
drills for Tour hours and then broke 
for lunch. I don't call that noise." 

“Tie authority is doing the best 
it can. Everybody wants noise pol- 
lution when they are on vacation. 
But no one is willing to pay for iL" 


“1 don't want you to tell me how 
lough your life is. AH I care to 
know is are you going to send 
someone to get on my nerves or 
aren’t you?" 

“If you don’t tell anyone, I be- 
lieve 1 have good news for you. 
They're going to start building a 
condominium across the sLreet 
from you nut week, and it should 
take two years. The noise from dig- 
ging a new foundation will be 
enough to drive you up the wall 
"Ill believe it when I hear it with 
ray own two ears." 


By William E. Gtisc 

.Ve* York Tima Soviet 

L OCH SHELDRAKE. New York — There 
/ is a legend in these hills of a man who 
can paint a landscape in less than two min- 
utes and frame it in eight seconds flat. 

"And the heck of it is, it’s true!” said 
Roberta IJebling, who made Lhe pilgrimage 
from New York to Brown's Hotel in the 
Catskills to witness the legendary Morris 
Katz performing the miracle. 

“1 nave heard?' chimed in her companion, 
Ruth Simons, “that he once painted a land- 
scape in the dark.” 

Also true. 

How did it look, Katz was asked. "A guy 
bought it," he answered. 

The women watched with about 100 others 
in the lobby as Katz “sdrareered." to use his 
expression, 3 landscape on a 20-by-24-inch 
(5 l-by-61 -centimeter) canvas in 1 minute 
46.5 seconds, shattering the 2-minule barrier, 
if not breaking his own world record of 90 
seconds. 

Katz invented “Instant Art" in 1956 and 
has gone on to become the most prolific 
painter alive, according to the Guinness Book 
of Records, with about 143,000 paintings to 

his crediL 

He said be perfected his technique by do- 
ing 6,000 paintings at something of an art 
Tactoiy in Mississippi. Katz does not use 
brushes because they axe "too slow and hard 
to dean.” He paints with a palette knife and 
lots of toilet paper. “What miracles I can do.” 
he said, "with a full roll of toilet paper and a 
good head of steam.” 

In the summer of 1985, Morris Katz is 
closing fast on Pablo Picasso's record of 
147,800 works of art. He could break it this 
year, barring injuries. 

Katz, 63. a Polish immigrant, rises at dawn 
at his home in New York City, in the Bronx, 
and does his daily exercises, which he says he 
needs to stay strong enough to cany loads of 
paints and frames and to keep up his 18-bom 
days. He is a burly man with an easy smile 
and with long, wiry salt-and-pepper hair, 
which be tucks under a green bereL He wears 
paint-splattered pants and T-shirts that read 
“Moms Katz — World’s Most Prolific Art- 
ist." 

In his Greenwich Village studio, with an 
electric fan behind him to hasten drying of 
the oil paint, he knocked off three landscapes, 
framed them and lied them together with a 
rope in 10 minutes, like some rodeo event. 

“There!" he exclaimed. “Put those on a 
gallery wall on Madison Avenue, under a 
spotlight, with a refined woman saying so- 
phisticated things about them, and they'd sell 
for $3,000 apiece.” 

The studio looks like an art-supply ware- 
house. He buys his oO and acrylic paints not 
by the tube but by the gallon, his frames by 
the hundreds and his canvases by the thou- 
sands. He spends 51,000 a year on staples to 


...yy'.rr " I 




,\y. f** .. 


W&'i. 


tfW-i 

i 



Wlm E Scuo/The Now Ttrk Tima 

Morris Ka<7 with one of his 143,000 paintings. 


affix canvas to frame. He wears out palette 
knives. He is thinking of coining out with 
longer, faster, tougher palette knives bearing 
his autograph. 

Also in the studio are videotapes of him on 
television and copies of his new book, “Paint 
Good & Fast." which tells busy people how 
to paint masterpieces in minutes, just as Katz 
contends Picasso and Monet did. 

“Life goes faster and faster." he writes. 
“The fine arts must keep pace. This art will 
one day be viewed as prophetic." His is the 
true modem art, he says: “fast, democratic 
and to the point." 

He recently loaded his tired van, with 
160,000 miles on it, and drove to work the 
Catskills resorts — the lobby of Brown's in 
the morning, the Pines in the afternoon and 
Kulsher's at night. He did not expect to be 
home until after 1 A.M. 

“Oh nry God!" said Bobby Brachman of 
New York as Katz executed two down paint- 
ings at the same time in Brown's lobby, then 
completed three seascapes in less than five 
minutes. He was asking up to $200 for his 
paintings but usually settled for less than $50. 

“The prices are low," said Katz, who keeps 
up a repartee in English and Yiddish with bis 
audiences while he paints, “because I want to 
sell my paintings now, not when I'm dead. 
Some painters waited 500 years to sell their 
work. Some are still waiting — on tables, in 
the dining room." 

“You’re beautiful Morris Katz," said 
Elaine Fmkelstdn of Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts. “You faring art to the lay people." 


In his studio, Katz, who said he trained in 
Europe and at the Art Students League of 
New York, has painted some portraits, each 
representing months of detailed brush work. 
He went broke doing this kind of work in 
1969, “so I put on a beret, came to the 
Catskills to ao these tittle shows, where I 
paint to order and play the fooL" His idea 
was to make enough to buy some time to do 
fine art work, “but I cannot seem to ever get 
enough ahead." 

He did not break his world record of 90 
seconds (98 seconds, framed) at Brown's on 
this day, but his 1 :46 5 for a landscape com- 
plete with mountains, a river, trees with 
leaves, a bouse, birds and not one but two 
human figures was a feat that stunned the 
audience. 

KatZ has a dgyrling finish , whipping the 
painting from easel to frame and holding it 
high over his head while stapling it with one 
of several loaded staple guns be keeps at the 
ready. 

Max Goldstein of Norfolk, Vir ginia, took a 
photograph of the panning and said, “Wait 
until they see this back home." 

“What's the title of that last one?" some- 
one yelled. 

“That’s entitled. ‘My Home in Poland,’ ” 
Katz answered. 

“IH bet it is," someone else yelled mock- 
ingly. “And I suppose that's you by the river 
holding hands with your daddy." 

“It is, yes," said Morris Katz, and he began 
packing up his paintings for the next resort 


Telephone pledges continued 
pouring in a day afler the Livy \,i 
benefit as organizer* reported : ba- 
the dual concert or gan i z ed b> the 
rock musician Bob Gddof h yd 
raised nearly $70 million world- 
wide to aid "the starving m Africa. 
The Live Aid shows in Philadelphia 
and London were beamed bv stel- 
lite to between 150 and 1 70 ra- 
tions. with a television and radio 
audience estimated at as high as 1 .5 
billion, organizers said. 

□ 

The Paris designer Andre Cour- 
reges will not participate in next 
week's fail-winter haute couture 
fashion shows ir. Paris, the haute- 
couture designers' association has 
announced, citing “technical im- 
possibilities." 

□ 

Br)an CowgflL managing direc- 
tor of Britain's independent 
Thames Television company who 
was accused of “poaching" she 
show “Dallas" from the BBC. has 
resigned. Cowgili. who outbid the 
BBC in January for rights to broad- 
cast Britain's top-rated program 
left "by mutual agreement.*' 
Thames announced. He had been 
expected to resign to protest 
Thames' decision last month to let 
the BBC try to repurchase “Dal- 
las." The BBC, which had paid 
$40,000 an episode for the “Dallas" 
season that ends next week and 
reportedly offered S42.500 each for 
the next 26 episodes, is negotiating 
with the distributor for the rights to 
broadcast it next fall. Cowgili had 
offered S60.000 an episode for the 
rights to broadcast “Dallas" start- 
ing in November, an offer accepted 
by the distributor but Thames 
then came under pressure from the 
Independent Broadcasting Author- 
ity to give the BBC another show-. 
Lord Thomson, chairman of the au- 
thority, and John Whitney. its di- 
rector general accused Thames of 
breaking a gentleman’s agreement 
not to filch shows from rival chan- 
nels. Cowgili 57, went to Thames 
as managing director in 1977 from 
the BBC. where he had been con- 
troller. 


Tne wed!* ijno’cd inends of 
Queen Elizabeth II zi saving the 
prince*, would "cj: lots of 
hutr.bL* t:c" before the moaarcjj 
invited her :o any functions within 
•he r.y,.ii farrn'y “She has ncmiakf. 
so disappear from the spc-lhgfal uj*. ' 
;*! the jururnn." the of the 
World slid. “iiiidfi” caj- 

ace sources. The paper said the 
prince*, and her hurluiul who is i; 
cousin r-f the queer,, were cruising . 
on a friend's yacht t» the Mediter- 
ranean "tryr.2 !u patch up thtir 
mamaic." 


Empemr Hirohito. the world's 
longesi-rcizniag monarch, has set a 
record for age among Jdpan’s 124- 

know.-: ru. : tr\ the imperial House- 
hold Agency wys. the frail, bt- 
speciaeied soserKcn. who turned 
S ir. Apn:. has now hied longer 
than Emperor Gonuzunoo, Japan’s 
luSth emperor, who was born in 
1596 and died at the atigtifl age of 
S4 ;.sar> and three months, the 
agency said. Next ir. longevity was 
the 57th emperor. Yazei 786^949). 
who lived years and 10 months. 
Hirohifo became emperor in 1926. 

r*i 

! — 

Kate Burton. 27, the oldest 
daughter of the actor Richard Bur- 
ton. has been married in Lhe ciupd 
in Celigr.y. Switzerland, where be 
father's funeral service was fadd 
nearly a year ago. Burton, tut ac- 
tress. married Michael Ritchie, 25, 
a theater producer, the French-lan- 
guage newspaper La Suisse report- 
ed. She is the daughter of Burton 
and his first wife. Sybil. The actor's 
other two daughters. Jessica and 
Maria, did not attend the ceretno- 
nv. 


The popular Sunday paper News 
of tire world says Princess Michael 
of Kent has been banished from 
royal duties for two months follow- 
ing rumors that she had been seeing 
a Dallas millionaire. Want HunL 


A day after being gored by a 
charging bull, an American ignored 
his doctors' advice and slipped out 
of his hospital 3t dawn io tempt 
fate again at the running of tire 
bulls in Pamplona. Spain. Jeffrey 
Rath, 32, an airline flight attendant 
from Santa Maria. California, said 
he was trying to steer a runaway 
bull away from the crowd when die 
beast suddenly gored him is the 
right buttock. Explaining his return 
to the festival despite bus wound, 
Rath said: “1 didn’t want the gor- 
ing to mak e me scared — I had to 
face the bulls again and I did The 
doctors wouldn't let me go. so 1 had 
to sneak oul" 


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JULY 10-20 

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Gads and Swrad Guest Bud Shu*. 
Bob James. The Johnny Otis Show. 
Dirty Dozen Brass Band tram New Or- 
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Stm. Jan Fadcfa Quintet. Woody Her- 
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Tickets purdned before July 10th 


me only F7U 
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Mai order: Grande Parade du Jazz 
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223 Promenade des Anglo*. 
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Tel; (93] 71 93 22 
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from July 10th an,^nce of hekets 


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FRENCH PROVINCES 


EXCEPTIONAL! CAMC5 Craoefte. 
Under value, 180 sqjn. up ur tinent , 
targe reception. 5 bedrooms, 3 bath- 
rooms, 70 sqjn. terrace, marvelous 
sea view, mod's roam, private go- 
rage. SSI; 47 la Craoette 06400 
Cannes. Tel: (93) 38 19 19. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PROVINCES 


. RARE 

Oi the banks oi the Love 
Ravishing 18th antury chateau, out- 
buildings, cowered pool. Magn i ficent 
view. 

A. 13. 296 59 59 


VBICt FEAR CBflHL Typcal oW 
provenqal house. Full a! charm, per- 
t«J condition, mam house 500 sgjn. 
very Icxae drawing room & dning 
room. 4 bedrooms, bathrooms, SflOO 
sj-fn.garifofi. swimnwig pool, pool 
house, bar. barbecue, watchmmis 
ewlO 0 e. Sold wider value F5.500.000. 
Agence Lcftour 20, Rue Lotour Mou- 
bourg. 06400 Cannes. (93) 94 4 Q 53 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


5AINT MUR, DE VB4CE scJandid vil- 
la, 6 rooms, superb par* 3500 sqm., 
sw immmg poof. F3h00,000. Promo- 
lion Mozalt hfcce Place Mozart. 
06000. TeL (93| B7 08 20. 


NKZ CENTER luxury flat, f u rnished. 
75 sq-m.. garage. SI 00X00. Ofiiar- 
P3J 80 90 SlTG- 461904 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


HISTORIC HAMPSTEAD 

. Simply the finest c pmtments 
ovadabie m London (Harroct > Hyde 
Park within 10 nunutes) at 


Mu 1 M I M >1 !•: *>; : 


indmdiurty intenor deagned homes, 
bom! o wealth of tradmand Engtah 
period looms. Mobs from £120,000 - 
£285,000 (586,956 - $206,520}. 

Joint Agents: I tanAx i & sans, 21 
Heath Street. Hampstead. London 
' ' sh 01-294 8222 and 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


NEUILLY ST. JAMB 

SMAU TOWNHOUSE 
LUXURIOUS, CALM 6 GBHNEKY 

6 ROOMS 200 SO JVL 

cutout, mod's room. 


NW3 1YB. Tefa 01-794 8222 ami 
Green & Co , 322 Wert End t raie, 
London NW6 UN. TeL 01-431 2323. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


350 SOM. ON SBIC. Facing Con- 
corde and TuBenes. 543 4394. 


IN GARDEN 

PRICE: F4 f 000,000 

Today 2XXtam - 5.30pm 
7 IHJE CHAMB-BEmARD 
METMAN or 723 96 05 


International Business Message Center 



role h US. f9.80 or local 
equivalent par fin*. You must 
otdodo c an vtl ele and m eriS- 
abhUSngaddrm* 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

Incnrporatiar and mc ui ogemenl ut UK, 
ble of Mai, Turtx. Angulo, Otannel 
(stands, Panama, Liberia, Gibraha and 
most other offshore or eta. 

• Confidential adnee 

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• Bearer shoes 

• Boat regjstianons 

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Free explanatory boafdel front: 

sfifci corporate 

SERVICE LID 
Head Offic* 

Ml FteaHml, Douglas, Ua of Mai 
Tel: Douglas (8624) 23718 
Tefa* 628554 ffifCT G 
London Represent™? 

2-5 OU Sami Si.. London WT 
Td 01-493 4244. Tlx J8247 SC5LDN G 


COMIC BOOK PtaU9« 

seels cfatnbutorv’ agents 
tar in Engleh language cones. 
Write OUW&1A SJV.. R. 902 Supreme 
House BUg. 2A Hart Ave. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JULY 22lh ISSUE 


ON SALE JULY 15th 


BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 

• The Race For 
Mirade Drugs 

• Japan: Why American 
Express Is Going From 
Banker To Banker 

• NATO's Chief 
Warns Europe 

NOW ON SALE AT 
ALL INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


Tiim Sha Tub 


.... Bpumrr boubdeule 

SILVERWARE MANUFACTURER 

in cues previously part of neftanataed French 

“IS®* "duitry now private enterprise 

agents seek distributors in Middle East, Far 

teoomtts. East, pan of Europe. Africa, ere. 
902 Supreme Write to CHAIRMAN 

2 Ave- „„ BOUI1ET BOURPaiE 
Hong Kong BP. 64. 03300 CUSSET (Wehy) France. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


INVESTMENT ADVISORS 

Your dients con invest n one of Amen- 
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Av MonJirpos *4. 

CH-1005 Lausanne, Swi t zerland 
Tel; (21) 22 35 12 ■ Tbt 25 1 85 MEUS CH 


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COMPANB 

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Free consultation' 

Roger Gnffin LLB., F.CA 

Brochure; Corporate Menogemem Ud, 
Western House. Victoria Street, 
Dough*. We of Mai. (06241 23303/4. 
Telex 62738? CCfiMAN G 


C.CM. LTD 

Compames formed UJC. & worldwide 
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Fa further information, please contact 
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UX nan reudent atnpum es. 
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USA 

„ BUSMIBSB 6 REAL ESTATE 
Business sofas; commercial, mdustnd & 
residenbd red eshee^afai & (eases. 
Property managemen t & business de- 
vetapment. Write witfr voor require- 
nwnls & financial specs to t*rson Realty 
& Busino-, . BrrAen. 14795 Jeffrey Rd, 
#210. Irvme, CA 92714 USA. 714-651- 
8030; Tlx: 590194. 


GENEVA 
INTL AIRPORT 

Ptrbfiaty Panels to let. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNTITES 


CHAMP DE MARS 

7th. Ideal ak) pwLo-tarre, hirfi dau, 
72 sqjn. 3 rooms. Toll M026 08 
AG84CE DE L'ETOILE 


DIAMONDS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


LOFT MARAIS 

ARCHITECT'S DUFtEX 
LUXUIBOUSLY DECORATH) 
SUN - TERRACE - PARKING 
Hah price 

EMBASSY 563 16 40 


76TH ON SBNE 

SixnpbmB 130 sqjn. u p m lmenr. 
reception, 2 bedrooms. 2 bath*. 2 park- 
ings. Facmg south. Tlh Hoar, Ef*. 
VAfCAU (1) S55 46 63 
25 rue Vaneau, PARIS 7ih 


AVE CHAMPS B.YSSS 

Beautiful ped a letTe, 2 roams. 

B7 sqjn. of which fivmg 50 sqjn. 
Freestone budding, calm, greenery, sun 
A12 Tel: 342 3oB4 


TROCADBKX Apvtment, love fy 
rec e ption + 3 bedroorm, posa b it ty 
parking, imr Hoar, sunny & edm, ex- 
cellent con te oft FXTOOJJOO. 

NOTAIRE 260 31 27 


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PARIS & SUBURBS 




‘ Vttfc. (17» CEMTUSY BURXHNG) 
chmocter, lit Hoar. 2 room dupf**, 
beautiful turnshmep. Tel. 742 60 03 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
PARK PALACE 

Moavficenf opo rt ment . lie 14 . meters 
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For Information- Please call; 

Tel No *1 Monte Carlo 306026 
Between the dales. 

22nd & 30th July, 1985 


REAL ESTATE 
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SWITZERLAND 


In the char mag mnu nt om res on of 

LEYSfN: 

RESIDENCE LE5 FRENES 

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. Finanonp o! taw 5F. -ates 
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Pfaaxe contoch 

Readenee fa s Frene x, 1854 leys* 
SWITZERLAND 

TeM 025 ) 34 11 55 TV 45 b 120 B 1 AIOI 


LAKE GB4EVA - MONTHBUC For 
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waud nnanang ovm table. CarAxL JB 


KBS 


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intenhanffjblr fraj in 
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WANTED-. AGENTS fat erode aJ & wl 
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VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 
has pleasure in 
inviting all those 
visiting London for 
the American Bar 
Association 
Conference to a 
unique exhibition 
of the latest 
jewellery & 
boutique collection 
from I 0 th- 25 tb July. 

153 New Bond St 
London, W.l 
Tel: 01-491 1405 
Tlx: 266265 VLCG 




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WINTER 4 SUMMK 
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PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AT HOME IN PAIS 

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Apcsrknenti, rangifig from studios 
to 4 roams. Avsdfabfa Fee Safa To 
Fera^mn. Hoh dees residential ar- 
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S 519 S .000 to 57635 , 000 . Lang term 
mort g ages « 6 . 5 % interest. 

For infonTWrarc 

GLOBE PIANSA 
red mats sprcatati 
Av. MacvRepoi J4. 

0+1005 LAUSANT 4 E. Switzerland 
Tel: ( 21 ) 22 35 1 Z Tb 25185 MEUS CH 
Ertobtahed Since 1970 


Page 17 


• International Secretarial Positions 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


PRINCIPALITY 
OF MONACO 

For oil commerdd and industrial 
ptemues or mwestments, please contact 

AGEDI 

26 be Sd Princwe Chartobs 
Monfo Carta. MC 98000 Monaco 
Td: TO) 50 66 00 text. 151 ) 

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FINANCIAL 

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EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY 


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far (xry cur enty. Large anouris , 

werted. Tel SwiBedandrZundi 361 WeiUS » ZURICH * 2S8 7* 21. 

Phona / telex 7 mmlbax. 


6500 or 0567491 362 . 


OFFICES FOR 


SECRETARIES 

OVERSEAS 

Tfooughow the wortd we introduce ch- 
erts to first-doss sea stones whose In- 
OJKttc and secretarial sWb have been 
thoroughly tested, if you are an em- 
ployer, contact us for the bm afrnce. 
Secretwies -cal ustaarroiige an inter- 
view in London. 

fatemAond Secretaries 
174 New Band Street. London W 1 
Teh 01-491 - 7 TOO 
ffacromnert Consuikxtts. 


LEAOMG COMPANY 
xt Parc spedoTn e d sn unporlng ga f- 
"torts requires to work diredty with 
McniMng Diredoc an experienced and 
very Fat flngfah shcrifaid tvpst/rutajr- 
a. Frerth net neeesMry. Very good 
sday for competent adphcocL Write 
or phone to- 

Sadeto CubI. Mme. Gdtat. . 
2b-28 roe de D'ebedar, 

75002 Pans. 508 46 00 


URGENT 
teek several 

BIUNGUAL SECRETARIES 

ENGU94 MOUSE TONGUE 
Good us e of w ord processors 
VGtOTEXTE 3 6 4 
Prartrons available now 
RAMJSTAD NBJII1Y - 758 12 40 



UIMCDVC SEEKS for AMERICAN 
MWHCV6 rrms m PARK 

Engfch, Belgian, Dutch or German 
neetams, fa o wfa dge of French ne- 
furred, Engtah jhonhand. Wnguol 
fafexuls. Write or phone 138 Avenue 
’'tear Huoa, 75110 Para, France. Teh 
727 61 69.