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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in ’am 
. Printed Simultan eo usly 
in Paris. London, Zurich, A 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 

The Hague and MareeillimJ 

.WEATHER DAT A APPEAR ON PAGE 22 

No. si, 851 


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Published With The New 


id He Washington Post 


PARIS, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 




Plans to Meet With Gorbachev 
Despite Surgery for Cancer 


Compiled b\< Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, continuing to re- 
cover from cancer surgery, autho- 
rized administration officials Tues- 
day to begjn preparations for his 
planned summit meeting with the 
Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, in November. 

The chief White House spokes- 
man, Larry Speakes, said a iO-per- 
son team would leave Thursday to 
make arrangements in Geneva, 
where the summit meeting is to be. 
held Nov. 19 and 20. 

It was the first official word that 
President Reagan intended to go 
ahead with the summit despite the 
major intestinal surgery be under- 
went Saturday for the removal of a 
tumor that was found Monday to 
be mali gnan t 

Mr. Speakes said President Rea- 

S n’s doctors described him Tues- 
y as recovering well from the 
surgery and displaying “excellent 
spirits." 

. “His condition is excellent," Mr. 
Speakes said, and his vital signs 
“are within normal ranges." 

Mr. Reagan's doctors told him 
Monday that the 2-inch (51-miIli- 
raeler) polyp removed from his in- 
testine Saturday was cancerous. 
But they said that there was no 
indication the cancer had spread 
and that it appeared unlikel y that 
any r emain ed. 

. They also said there was no ap- 
parent need for radiation treatment 
or chemotherapy. 

Mr. Speakes said Tuesday that 


Mr. Reagan had received a message 

of sympathy from Mr. Gorbachev. 

Nicaragua’s president, Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra, was also among 
leaders who sent messages of en- 
couragement, he said. 

Vice President George Bush, 
who had been scheduled to leave 
Washington cm Tuesday on a two- 
state political trip, instead stayed 
to serve as a stand-in for Mr. Rea- 
on at meetings Wednesday and 
Thursday with members erf Con- 
gress on the president's tax over- 
haul plan. 

Mr. Speakes said Mr. Reagan 
bad a 20-minute meeting on Tues- 
day rooming with White House 
chief of staff, Donald T. Regan. 

On Monday, the president 
signed an executive order creating a 
commission to review defense con- 
tracting practices, Mr. Speakes 
said. 

Mr. Reagan's doctors said Mon- 
day that he would probably be out 
of the hospital within seven or eight 
days and fully recovered in six to 
eight weeks. 

Dr. Steven Rosenberg, chief of 
surgery at the National Cancer In- 
stitute, said that the surgery had 
provided Mr. Reagan with the best 
chance of bring cured. 

“There is greater than a 50-per- 
cent chance that the president now 
has no cancer whatsoever, 1 * he said. 
“The president's recovery is pro- 
ceeding in a flawless fashion." 

He said that cancer is not an 
lmiKnal disease in men as old as 
Mr. Reagan, who is 74, and that he 



taMtun 

Dr. Steven Rosenberg 

always advises them to “resume 
their full and complete activity." 

White House officials say that 
Mr. Reagan’s schedule has bom cut 
bade but that he still plans to meet 
next week, at least briefly, with 
China's president, Li Xiann ian. 

President Reagan, the oldest 
serving U.S. president, has three 
and one-half years left in his sec- 
ond four-year term. 

Vice President Bush, who briefly 
was assigned Mr. Reagan's presi- 
dential powers Saturday when the 
president was under anesthesia, 
currently appears to be the front 
-runner for the 1988 Republican 
presidential n omina tion 

In transferring his powers, Mr. 
Reagan became the first president 
to follow procedures similar to 
those in Sam on 3 of the 25th 
Amendment of the-Constitution. 

(Reuters, UPf. NYT) 


Experts Shore 
Optimism on 
Rest of Term 

By Susan Okie 
and Gristine Russel] 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Medical ex- 
perts interviewed about President 
Ronald Reagan’s cancer agree with 
his doctors’ assessment that there is 
a better *^ nn 50-50 chance that his 
tumor is permanently cured, but 
they add tnat the cancer's penetra- 
tion into the muscle layer of the 
colon is a serious complication rais- 
ing concern about his future health. 

Some of the doctors interviewed 
expressed confidence that the pres- 
ident would finish his term without 
further evidence of cancer. 

“He has an excellent probability 
that he will do very well during the 
remainder of his term in office, 
said Dr. Donald A. O’ Kief fe, a 
Washington gastroenterologist af- 
filiated with George Washington 
University. “He is not likely to be 
disabled within the next three 
years." 

Others had a gloomier view. “It’s 
not such a great report," said one 
National Institutes of Health sur- 
geon familiar with the case. 

• “That’s a 50-percent chance that 
die president is going to do well, 


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Uncertainties Dampen Expectation 
„ About a Quick Return to Oval Office 


By Lou Cannon 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The disclosure that the tumor 
removed from Ronald Reagan was malignant has cast 
uncertainty over his presidency despite the assurances 
of doctors and administration officials that be is likely 
to resume a fuQ and normal schedule. 

“The strength, of this president has always been an 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

optimism and vigor that seems to overwhelm all obsta- 
cles." a Reagan associate said Monday. “If he crones 
out of this with the same qualities, he’s enhanced. If he 
doesn’t — well, that could be a different thing." 

Mr. Reagan's reaction to the diagnosis was charac- 
teristically optimistic. The chief White House spokes- 
man. Larry Speakes, said Monday that the president 
still expected to leave the hospital in seven to 10 days 
and resume his duties “without restrictions. " 

Michael K. Deaver, a longtime intimate of the 
Reagans and former deputy White House chief of 
staff, said that the president and Nancy Reagan both 
had been “calm and realistic" about the navs. “I don’t 


Bui administration officials acknowledge uncer- 


tainty about the public reaction to the symbolism of 
the statement made Monday by Dr. Steven Rosen- 
berg. chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, 
as be opened a news conference: The president has 
cancer.” 

Although Dr. Rosenberg quickly added that “there 
is agora ter than 5&pocau chance that the president 
now has no cancer whatsoever” and that the surgery 
bad “completely cured" him,: two questions preoccu- 
pied the administration after the diagnosis. 

The first was the day-to-day management of the 
presidency, in which the While House chief of staff, 
Donald T. Regan, has emerged as the central figure. 
The second was the functioning of what might be 
called the symbolic presidency, at which Mr. Reagan 
and his managers have usually excelled. 

As an example of the importance of presiden t ial 
symbolism, one administration official observed that 
Mr. Reagan’s planned August vacation at his ranch 
near Santa Barbara now assumed an unusual 
significance. 

Mr. Reagan customarily spends his time on these 
vacations riding and deanng brash, vigorous activity 
for anyone recovering from a major operation. The 
president is expected to be still recuperating when be 
leaves for the ranch on Aug. 14 and Ins activity, or lack 
of it, is likely to be a focus of commentary. The 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


but unfortunately a 50-percent 
chance that he is going to do poor- 
ly.” 

Several doctors said again Mon- 
day (hat Mr. Reagan’s prognosis 
might have been better if the tumor 
had been discovered and removed 
14 months ago, when the first polyp 
was discovered in his colon, borne 
experts had previously questioned 
why the president's physicians 
waited so long to give him a thor- 
ough bowel examination that 
would have detected the growth, 
which must have been in his colon 
for several years. 

Based on the pathological grad- 
ing of Mr. Reagan's tumor, which 
had invaded the muscular middle 
layer of the large intestine's wall, 
the president has about a 50- to 75- 
pereeat chance of surviving the 
next five years with no recurrence 
of his cancer. Dus would be consid- 
ered almost equivalent to a perma- 
nent cure, because only 5 percent of 
cancers recur after five disease-free 
years. 

Experts said that the most dis- - 
turbing aspect of the pathologists’ 
findings was that the tumor had 
breached the “basement" mem- 
brane — the barrier that dirides the 
inner lining of the large intestine 
from the middle layer. 

"It clearly has begun some 
phases of invasion," said a Nation- 
al Cancer Institute pathologist. 
When a cancer penetrates below 
the basement membrane into the 
muscle, he added, “if enters the 
realm where blood vessels and lym- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


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(•oMi-un 

Vice President George Bush and Nancy Reagan at a White House concert on the South 
Lawn for the diplomatic community. Mrs. Reagan was officially representing her husband. 

Fed Raises Its Money-Growth Target 
In Effort to Stimulate U.S. Economy 




By John M. Berry 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Reserve has sharply raised its mon- 
ey supply growth target this year as 
pan of a policy intended to inject 
fife into a sluggish economy. 

In a mid-year report to Congress 
made public Tuesday, the central 
bank said the higher money target 
would be consistent with “some- 
what more rapid economic growth 
than characterized the first half of 
the year, as long as inflationary 
pressures remain contained." 

The Fod policy-makers, in a 
grouping of individual economic 
forecasts, indicated they expect the 
gri&s national product to increase 
from between 2.75 percent to 3 per- 
cent, after adjustment for inflation, 
from the fourth quarter of 1984 to 
the fourth quarter of this year. Sim- 
ilarly, the “central tendency" of 
their forecasts for 1986 show real 
GNP rising at a rate of 2.5 percent 
to 3.25 percent rate. 

While the economy grew at less 
than a 2 -percent rate in the first 


half of this year, the most closely 
watched measure of money. M-l, 
shot up at a 10.5-percent rate, well 
above the 4- percent to 7-percent 
pace targeted by the Fed Tor this 
year. 

Technically, the Federal Reserve 
derided to incorporate most of the 
first half's money surge into the 
base from which its future growth 
will be measured. The new target 
range for M-l, which includes cur- 
rency in circulation and checking 
deposits at commercial banks, is 3- 
percent to 8 -percent growth, using 
its second quarter average of 
S582.5 billion as a base. Previously, - 
the base was the fourth quarter, 
1984, average. 

The Fed policymaking group, 
the Federal Open Market Commit- 
tee. set the new range at a meeting 
last week. The group also set a 
tentative target range fro 1986 of 4- 
percent to 7-percent growth. 

The policy group also reaffirmed 
its 1985 target of 6 -percent to 9- 
percent growth fro M-2. a broader 
measure of money [hat also in- 


cludes savings and small time de- 
posits, most money market mutual 
fund shares and other items, h sim- 
ilarly reaffirmed a 6 -pereent io 9„S. 
percent target for M-3, a still 
broader measure that also includes 
large time deposits and other items. 

Even the new higher range for 
M-l assumes that money growih in 
the second half of this year will run 
at only about half its’ pace in the 
first six months. If it does not slow 
down substantially, it will again 
rise above the target. 

“This range contemplates a sub- 
stantial slowing in growth from the 
pace of the first half." the report 
said, “and the lower pan of lhe 
range implies a willingness io see 
relatively slow growth should the 
recent velocri decline be reversed 
and economic growth be satisfac- 
tora." 

Federal Reserve Chairman Paul 
A. Volcker told reporters. “I am as 
concerned about inflation as I have 
ever been." The new targets do not 
represent a “ridding on inflation." 
he declared. 


U.S.-Soviet Arms Talks 
Recess, Still Deadlocked 


Reuters 

GENEVA — The United States 
and the Soviet Union ended the 
second round of new arms control 
lalirs Tuesday with the negotiations 
still deadlocked over the U.S. Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative. 

The .Reagan administration has 
instructed its representatives not to 
. negotiate on the Strategic Defense 
* Initiative, a $26-billion research 
program that is intended to devel- 
op an anti-missile shield in space. 

The chief Soviet negotiator, Vik- 
tor P. Karpov, said: “There has 
been no progress and it’s not our 
fault.” The talks are to resume in 
September. 

Max M. Kampelman, the chief 
U.S. negotiator, said later in a 
statement that "in a negotiation as 
complex as this one an agreement 
will not be easily or quickly arrived 
at." In contrast to Mr. Karpov’s 
comments, Mr. Kampelman said, 
“But we do note a greater emphasis 
on dialogue and a lesser emphasis 
on polemics." 

The Soviet Union has said that 
no progress can be expected on 
reducing the superpowers' arsenal 
of long- and medium-range nuclear 
missiles unless the United Slates 
abandons the research program. 

The final meeting of the second 
round of talks ended with a session 
al the Soviet mission in which three 
negotiating teams discussed long 
-range nuclear missiles, medium 
-range missiles and space weapons. 

■ No Breakthrough Seed 

William Drozdiak of The Wash- 
ington Pan reported earlier from 
Bonn : 

When the negotiations resume in 
September, there is scam expecta- 
tion that either side will offer a new 
gambit to end the stalemate before 
President Ronald Reagan and the 
Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. meet in Geneva on Nov. 19. 

Even then, senior Western offi- 
cials are skeptical of chances fro 1 a 


breakthrough, and Lord Carring- 
ton. the secretary-general of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion, has said that no real move- 
ment toward a pact should be ex- 
pected for at least another year. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s swift consoli- 
dation of power has brought specu- 
lation that he might soon reel confi- 
dent enough to begin an initiative 
to reach a quick accord, so that 
Soviet resources could be concen- 
trated on economic reforms rather 
than cm new weaponry. 

After two rounds. Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s imprint has not been detect- 
ed in the negotiations. Soviet posi- 
tions and tactics have reflected the 
intransigent style of Mr. Gromyko, 
whose 27-year reign as foreign min- 
ister ended two weeks ago when he 
was elevated to the post of presi- 
dent. 

Senior administration officials 
say it ispremature to assess wheth- 
er Mr. Gorbachev win aggressively 
pursue an arms control agreement, 
if only for economic reasons, or 
continue the huge investments in 
the military. But the analysts be- 
lieve that Mr. Gorbachev appears 
to have acquired the authority and 
political clout to reach an arms 
agreement early, if that is what he 
wants. 

U.S. negotiators are understood 
to be disappointed — but not sur- 
prised — at the refusal by their 
Soviet counterparts to pul forward 
ideas or suggestions that would in- 
dicate an early willingness to com- 
promise at (he arms talks, which 
opened in March, 

Only the atmosphere al the nego- 
tiations has improved, with the So- 
viet negotiators now much less stri- 
dent than during the first round, 
when they argued with the Ameri- 
cans about the risks of Mr. Rea- 
gan's Strategic Defense Initiative. 
Members from both delegations 
also are engaging in more frequent 
informal contacts outside the nego- 
tiating room. 



Viktor P. Karpov, left, greeting Max M. Kampehnan before Tuesday's talks in Geneva. 

Israel- Union Agreement Averts Strike 


By Edward Walsh 

Washington Past Serriiv 

JERUSALEM — After two 
weeks or high-level talks. Israel 
averted a general strike as the gov- 
ernment's latest economic austerity 
plan survived its initial test with the 
powerful trade unions. 

The strike, which had been 
threatened for Tuesday by the His- 
tadruL the Hade union federation, 
was called off at dawn after the 
negotiations between the labor fed- 
eration and senior officials readied 
a last-minute agreement. 

The agreement was an important 
rictoiy for Prime Minister Shimon 
Peres and his economic austerity 
plan, which he pushed through the 
cabinet during a 24-hour meeting 
that ended July 1. 

Mr. Peres said at the time that 
the Israeli economy faced “total 


collapse" without the austerity 
measures, which included a large 
currency devaluation, a sharp cut 
in government subsidies and a 
ihree-month wage and price freeze 
to reduce workers' real incomes. 

The accord Tuesday set the lev- 
els for the cost of living compensa- 
tion Israeli workers will receive in 
August and September, partly off- 
setting the income erosion that will 
result from austerity measures. 

The government also agreed to 
drop its planned use of emergency 
regulations to dismiss up to 10,000 
public employees. Instead, it will 
continue to negotiate with the His- 
tadrut over the numbers to be dis- 
missed and the process for this. 

The Histadrut responded by call- 
ing a 24-hour strike, and then be- 
gan negotiations with the govern- 
ment while threatening an 


open-ended strike if the talks 
failed. 

Had that happened, the eamoro- 
ic austerity plan -— the third de- 
vised by the national unity govern- 
ment here since it came to power io 
September — might have collapsed 
before it was enacted. 

Speaking al Kfar Tavor. Mr. 
Peres hailed the union agreement 
as an important step toward ending 
Israel's steady economic decline. 

“I felt that we were right on the 
verge of deterioration and that 
acute, painful decisions had to be 
taken immediately." he said in de- 
fense of his austerity plan. 

“But I will not conceal my satis- 
faction that this morning wc 
reached an agreement with the His- 
tadruL, and we are all working out 
of mutual understanding." he add- 
ed. 


Heinrich Boll 
Dead at 67; 
Nobel Winner 


By Eric Pace 

New York Times Semce 

NEW YORK — Heinrich Boll. 
67, whose bittersweet chronicling 
of German life in World War II 
and postwar West Germany won 
him the 1972 Nobel prize for litera- 
ture, died Tuesday in Cologne. 

Over the years, in the words of 
Ms Nobel prize citation, his novels 
and short stories “contributed to a 
renewal of German literature” 
through their "combination of a 
broad perspective on Ms time and a 
sensitive skill in characterization.” 

At the time Mr. Boll received the 
prize — he was the first German 
citizen to win it since Thomas 
Mann in 1929 — his popularity and 
prestige in Europe were phenome- 
nal. More than any other German 
writer be constituted a link be- 
tween capitalist West Germany, 
where he was a best-selling author, 
and Communist East Germany, 
where his works came to be (he 
most popular West German fic- 
tion. 

His work was praised by Marxist 
critics throughout the Communist 
bloc, despite the fact that he was a 
Roman Catholic. 

As both a writer and an activist, 
Mr. Boll was a perennial critic and 
foe of establishments, bureaucra- 
cies and inhumane rules of any 
kind of oppressive institutionalized 
power. 

“Life is contradictory to law and 
order" he said once.’ “Only the 
dead are in order and obey Ml the 
laws.” 

Much of Mr. Boll's literary out- 
put was set in the Rhineland, where 
he was bom and where he spent 
most of Ms life. Cologne was the 
setting for Ms 1971 novel. “Group 
Portrait With Lady," wMch the 
Nobel prize committee called his 
“most grandly conceived work." 

His sympathies lay with what Ik 
called (he "natural human inno- 





** 

f* 


Heinrich Boll 

eence" or ordinary people, and he 
lovingly celebrated its survival de- 
spite the horrors of World W'ar II 
and despite what he saw as the evils 
of the West German society that 
grew from its ashes. One such inno- 
cent was Leni Pfeiffer, the long- 
suffering protagonist of “Group 
Portrait With Lady." who re- 
mained indifferent to property and 
profit. 

Heinrich Theodore Boll was 
born Dec. 21. 1917. in Coloane. As 
a student he was one of the few 
boys in Ms class who did not join 
the Hiller Youth. 

“The Nazi period could have 
happened only in Germany." he 
said later, “because the German 
education of obedience to any (aw 
and order was the main prohlem. It 
wasn’t that people were worse than 
others. It also had to do with a 
certain exhaustion and inability to 
resist, not only physically bui men- 
tally." 

With the outbreak of World War 
II. he was assigned to a front-line 
infantry unit He served on Germa- 
ny’s Fjsi and West fronts, was 
wounded four times and. as he later 
recalled, “became convinced of the 
(Continued on Page Z Col. 2) 


Belgium 
To Hold 
Early Poll 

King Baudouin 
Rejects Cabinet 
Offer to Resign 

By Srevcn J. Drvdcn 

Imcnuitiorul lUruU Tntvne 

BRUSSELS — Prime Minister 
Wilfried Mar lens said Tuesday 
that Belgium will hold general elec- 
tions in October, two months earli- 
er than scheduled. 

The announcement came after 
King Baudouin refused to accept 
his govemmem’s resignation. 

Mr. Martens tendered ihe resig- 
nation after one of the four parties 
in his center-right cabinet withdrew 
over the refusal of ihe interior min- 
ister to take responsibility for the 
May 29 soccer riot in Brussels, in 
wMch 38 persons were killed. 

The king’s rejection came after 
be consulted with Mr. Martens and 
other political leaders. 

“The king has refused the resig- 
nation,” Mr. Martens said. “The 
government will go ahead for a 
restricted period of time with a 
minimum program." He said that 
elections scheduled for December 
would be held in October. 

The French-speaking Libera! 
Reform Party, m a move many ob- 
servers saw as a bid for votes in the 
elections, withdrew from the gov- 
ernment coalition on Monday. It 
said it could only remain in the 
government under “honorable con- 
ditions." This was taken to mean 
the resignation of Interior Minister 
Charles- Ferdinand Noihomb. 

Following the king's decision, 
the parly said it would slay in gov- 
ernment “because of the "superior 
interests of the state.” but warned 
that the continued backing of Mr. 
Noihomb by his party, the French 
Social Christians, could block the 
work of the coalition in its remain- 
ing months. 

The soccer riot occurred when 
fans of England’s Liverpool team 
attacked supporters of Juventus of 
Turin at the European Cup Final at 
Brussels's Heysci stadium. 

A parliamentary inquiry con- 
cluded that the British fans were 
primarily to blame for the violence, 
but said that there were serious 
security errors for which Mr. Noth- 
omb should bear responsibility. He 
rejected demands for his resigna- 
tion. 

Although the king has little say 
in ihe day-to-day running of the 
government, he plays a key role 
during the country’s frequent lead- 
ership crises by mediating between 
the numerous 'political pities. 

Mr. Mariens's spokesman said it 
would have been technically im- 
possible for the king to accept the 
resignation now, dissolve the par- 
liament and call elections. The elec- 
tions must be held within 40 days, 
which would mean they would 
come during August when much of 
the country is on vacation. 

Mr. Martens's current coalition, 
formed in - December 1981, has 
come close to setting a record for 
longevity among the 32 govern- 
ments dial have ruled Belgium 
since World War II. He led four 
other governments between 1979. 
and 1981 before putting together a 
more durable team. 

The frequency of change has led 
to the use of shorthand by Belgian 
newspapers, who refer to the gov- 
ernment by the name of the prime 
minister and a Roman numeral sig- 
nifying the number of coalitions be 
has led. The present government is 
known as “Martens V " 

In the view of some of his politi- 
cal aides, the durability of Mr. 
Martens's government had itself 
created (he conditions for political 
maneuvering by the coalition part- 
ners. each nervously jockeying for 
advantage in the pre-election peri- 
od. 

“This is the price we are paying 
for an unusual phenomenon in Bel- 
gium — the stability of the govern- 
ment," one aide said. 


INSIDE 

■ Italy's Fiat told l f .S. officials 
it wanted to compete for work 
in the SDl program. Page 2. 

■ Five members of an alleged I 
smuggling ring were aecusedof 1 
shipping equipment for Lf.S. I 
fighter jets to Iran. Page 3. 

■ The US. Army said an officer ! 

was injured in East Germany in 
a crash with a tailing Soviet 
vehicle. Page 3. ! 

BUSINESS/ FIN ANCE 

■ British industrial production j 

increased 1 percent m May, ac- 
cording to preliminary govern- I 
menl figures. Page 15 . I 

■ Gticorp reported its second- i 

quarter earnings rose 22 percent 

despite an increase in ns Jqjuj 
loss reserve. Page 15 . 

tomorrow 

Los Alamos. N.M„ where nu- 
clear weapons were bom, has 
learned m 40 years 10 live with 
and prosper from the bomb 





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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


** 


Fiat Says It Wants to Compete for Work on SDI 


By Axel Krause 

huemanunal Herald Tribune 

TURIN — Fiat SpA. Western Europe's 


ka. a French-sponsored program to develop 
high technology in Europe. 

. W4M1 . „^ IV1U ^ Ul 3 "I believe both SDI and Eureka can be 

largest automobile company, is ready to par- done, but we are going ahead with the U.S. 
ucipate in research for the U.S. Strategic program first : because it is ready with financ- 
Defense Initiative. Giovanni Agnelli, char- in % siaff Wl11 swn soon ’ ^ A & nelil 
man of the Italian company, said in an inter- saj ® 1 


view. 


Fiat officials said a company representa- 
tive would soon be based in Washington to 
help Fiat compete for contracts for (he 
space-based American defense program. 

A senior U.S. official on Tuesday termed 
the Fiat decision a “highly encouraging ' 1 
development in U.S. efforts u> enlist foreign 
participation in the space defense program. 

Fiat which generates half its annual sales 
24 trillion lire ($119 billion) outside auto- 
making has already outlined its potential for 
SDI research, primarily in the fields of rock- 
etry. robotics and laser weapons. Mr. Agnelli 


oology projects that might be stoned under program that does not relate predominantly 
Eureka and to seek ways of organizing and w strategic defense." 
financing the program. Eureka's budget has Mr. Mitterrand has repeatedly said that 
been estimated at 55 billion francs (S6.29 the French government would not partia- 
billion) over five years. pate in SDI, but that French companies were 

No commitments have been made by any fre * 1 10 . ..... 

government although the idea was endorsed . . {*- that participation in the 

He added that Fiat had the Italian govern- i; European summit meeting in Milan V* 5 - program could have colossal unpuca- 
mem’s approval “»■-* wiih STM , __. L i„ tions "*» •'"'v r„r r,.n.« 


said Monday. The proposals were recently 
U.S. officials in Washing- 


made available to 
ton. the company said. 

While Fiat is proceeding with plans to bid 
on SDI contracts. Mr. Agnelli said, the com- 
pany would also seek to partidpate in Eure- 


‘to go ahead with SDL 
while waiting for Eureka." 

A number of large West European compa- 
nies are studying a role in the UJS. program, 
and some have expressed interest directly to 
the Reagan administration. But Mr. Agnel- 
li's comments were believed to be the first 
public statement by the head of a leading 
European corporation pledging bis company 
to a direct role in both the U.S- program ana 
Eureka. 

Eureka was launched by France three 
months ago as a response to the Space De- 
fense Initiative. It will be the focal point of a 
meeting of high-ranking officials from 17 
European countries thaL begins in Paris on 
Wednesday. 

The purpose of Lhe meeting, French offi- 
cials said, is to define criteria of high-tech- 


last month and the upcoming meeting in != “L ?3 f " at . b “! for - tl ' c f "™ C 
Paris was scheduled dcvdopmmt c* high technology m Europe. 

Europe is out of most Pentagon programs 
but this represents a major opportunity." 


An aide to Roland Dumas, the French 


minister of external relations, said, “We 


. - . . . . . . . , Spending on the Strategic Defense Initia- 

bope to ante up with answers far industrial- ^ whieh *. t 0 ‘gL ijl b> ^ wd of 

wis. such as Mr. Agndh. who want to knew ^ ^ wta] m gsSed $26 biflion 

what Eureka * as well as for governments ^gj, m As much as a third of those 
attending the Eureka conference that nught be spent outside the United 

w-ant to paruapate. Mr. DumaswU post Suies> according l0 UiS , 50 ^ 
the Pans meeting dong with Hubert Cunen. ^ Agnelli emphasized that he did not 
minister of research and technology. share the fears expressed by Mr. Mitterrand, 


Mr. Agnelli's comments supported the 
conclusion drawn by Vice President George 
Bush during his European lour earlier this 
month that SDI and Eureka were compati- 
ble. Following a meeting with President 
Francois Mitterrand of France, Mr. Bush 
said he thought that Eureka was “a research 


among others, that participation 
Europe 


in theU.5. 
ropean industry 


program would relegate 
to an inferior, subcontracting ralel 
“I do not accept die allusions [to partici- 


pating in SDI] as a colonial relationship, and 

alto. 



WORLDBRIEFS 


Ex-U.S. General Gofiins Is Acquitted J 


WEST PALM BEACH. Florida (AP) — A retired two-star air raree 
general was acquitted Tuesday of six counts of embezzling 519.000 arid 
misusing 5445,000 from a secret military spy fund he managed in Swiss 
bank accounts. 

The jury deliberated two hours and 20 minutes before reaching ib 
verdict charing retired Major General Richard B. Collins. 55. a highly 
decorated former fighter pilot. 

Military witnesses testified that the cash account bankrolled top secret 
missions. But specific uses of the fund, opened in a Swiss hank in 1965, 
were never discussed in court. Federal prosecutors had charged that 


General Collins used trust buDt up in his 26 years of military service to 
. that he managed from 1975 until his retirement in 1978. 


misuse the fund 1 
when the account was dosed.’ 

General Collins, once an aide to former Secretary of State Alexander 
M. Haig, could have faced up to 60 years in prison if convicted. 



Dutch Give Pretoria 48 Hours to Act; 



would rather view it as a commonweal 
said. 


he 


Giovanni Agnelli 


UN Women’s Meeting 
Hears Softer U.S. Line 


By Blaine Harden 

iYas/nngion Past Service 

NAIROBI — In a surprisingly 
conciliatory speech before a United 
Nations conference on women's is- 
sues. Maureen Reagan said Tues- 
day that the United States has no 
in ten lion or denying Palestinian 
women or South African women 
the use of the conference as a plat- 
form to voice their grievances. 

- The speech, before the United 
1 Nations Decade for Women Con- 
ference. brought qualified praise 
from women representing the Pal- 
estinian Liberation Organization 
and the anti-apartheid African Na- 
tional Congress. However, the ad- 
dress was denounced by American 
feminists. 

They called Ms. Reagan's boasts 
about the advancement of Ameri- 
can women “total double-talk" and 
charged that women's rights have 
eroded under the Reagan adminis- 
tration. 

Ms. Reagan is President Ronald 
Reagan’s eldest daughter. 

[Other speakers Tuesday includ- 
ed Suzanne Mubarak, wife of 


The U.S. delegation to the con- 
ference. which Ms. Reagan heads, 
had come into the meeting vowing 
to keep “political issues" from 
dominating “the unique concerns 
of women." which it had main- 
tained were the only “legitimate" 
business of the conference. 

While Ms. Reagan did not ex- 
plicitly back awav from that posi- 
tion Tuesday, she said that the 
question of apartheid in South Af- 
rica “is of utmost importance" to 
the women's conference. She also 



Aides Will Keep President Informed 
So That He Can Make Major Decisions 


THE HAGUE (Reuters) — The Netherlands will (fadraw its ambas- 
sador in South Africa unless, within 45 hours. Pretoria returns a Dutch- 
man seized from the Dutch Embassy by South .African police, the foreign 

ministry said Tuesday. _ .■ 

Klaas de Jonge, 47, detained under South Afnca s Internal Security 
Act. escaped a week ago and tried to take refuge in the Dutch Embassy 
but was removed by South African police. ■ 

The Netherlands asked for an apology, disciplinary action against the 
police officers and an assurance that there would be no further such 
incidents. 


West Berlin Seizes Austrian Wine 


referred specifically to the prob- 
lems of “Palestinian women." 


r.fr ; . 

:••• ■ • 

■ ' •• :W -t 


Hotel Evictions 


Mary Battiata of The Washington 
rliei 


Post reported earlier from Nairobi: 

■ More than 100 delegates to a 
separate unofficial forum on wom- 
en's issues returned Monday to 
their Nairobi holds from weekend 
safaris into the Kenyan country- 
side to discover that they had been 
evicted to make room for official 
delegates to the conference. 

At one betel Americans arrived 


AP 

Suzanne Mubarak, wife of 
Egypt's president, defended 
the cause of Palestinian 
women at the UN meeting. 


Egypt’s president, Hosni Mubarak. , w rmd dothiia cameras and toi- 
who called for a “decisive stand" wrapped in bedspreads and 
against apartheid. The Associated P ded on l°bby floor- nibey u 
Press reported from Nairobi 6 0n F through the rooms and 
[Mrs. Mubarak also spoke of thrown everything together in the 
what she called the suffering of ^by." said Ravdean Acevedo, a 
Palestinian women in Israeli-occu- delegate from Washington. 


pied territories. She said that “it is 
unbelievable that women can effec- 
tively participate in developing 
their society under foreign occupa- 
tion and subjugation."] 


“One person looked through her 
bundle and said, 'I now have no 
underwear and no shoes.' 

The evictions came after the fo- 
rum delegates reported an agree- 


ment with the Kenyan government 
that would have allowed them to 
sleep two or three in a room to keep 
their rooms, which had been paid 
for before their arrival. 

The difficulties began more than 
a week ago when the more than 
10,000 delegates to the nongovern- 
mental forum, held one week be- 
fore the official Women’s Confer- 
ence. began arriving to find that 
long-confirmed hotel reservations 
were being shortened or not hon- 
ored- 

The Kenyan government has 
apologized for the confusion bnt 
blamed it on countries that dou- 
bled and tripled the size of their 
official delegations at the last min- 
ute. 


By Hedrick Smith 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — During 
President Ronald Reagan's conva- 
lescence his principal advisers will 
seek to take over some of his work 
load but still keep him sufficiently 
informed to make major decisions 
on foreign or domestic policy, ac- 
cording to White House officials. 

They said that the National Se- 
curity Council and cabinet would 
meet as usual despite Mr. Reagan's 
absence, and that congressional 
groups would come to the While 
House. The president wtil later be 
briefed by Donald T. Regan, the 
White House chief of staff, Vice 
President George Bush, and Robert 
C. McFarlane, Lhe national security 
adviser. 

Where possible and where there 
is a consensus among the presi- 
dent's key advisers, Mr. Regan and 
top cabinet officials will try to 
make some decisions on the presi- 
dent's behalf, one official saiaL But 
he emphasized that this would 
mean no transfer of ibe president's 
authority on key decisions. 

Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said: “I wouldn't think 
that the chief of staff would make 
any decisions that be doesn't know 
the president wishes him to make." 

He added. Tra sure that Don 
will be very thorough with the pres- 
ident. He has a good working rda- 


dedsioDS as we can without involv- This week, officials said, Mr. 
mg him, where we can get agree- - Bush, Mr. Regan, and Treasury 
Secretary James A. Baker 3d will sit 


BERLIN (Reuters) — West Berlin impounded all Austrian wine held 
bv imoorters after tests produced evidence of contamination with diethy- 
a spokesman for 


by importers after tests produced evidence or coniamina 
lene-glycol the chemical base of automobile antifreeze, 
health authorities said. 


ment" among his advisers. “And if 
there is a difference of opinion and 
it can’t be ironed out," he said, the 
advisers will “make it crisp, suc- 
cinct and take it to him for a deci- 
sion." 

At a luncheon strategy meeting 
with the senior White House staff, 
Mr. Regan decided to clear the 
president's schedule of public 
events until his planned departure 
for his California ranch on Aug. 14. 
Otherwise, the White House is to 
cany on normal operations, much 
as was done in 1981 after Mr. Rea- 
gan was wounded in an assasrina- 
uon attempt. 

This time, however, the Reagan 
entourage seems even more at 
pains to avoid any appearances 
that the president's illness is reduc- 
ing his power or any. actions that 
might seem to highlight Mr. Bush 
as his potential successor in 1988. 

“I think you'll see business as 
usual going on," said a presidential 
aide. ‘Tou'll see the National Secu- 
rity Council meeting and the cabi- 
net councils and the president giv- 


in for the president at a Wednesday 


breakfast and Thursday lunch wi 
Republicans and Democrats on the 
Senate Finance Committee. 

But a presidential aide said the 
Reagan inner circle would “just 
have to wait and see" whether the 
vice president would stand in for 


The antifreeze was found in two bottles of ordinary table wine from 
Austria, he said. Discovery of the toxic substance, which had previously 
appealed only in Austrian nines labeled as “superior." provoked .a 
threatening serious damage to the Austrian wine industry. 

- hTSwitzeriand, an official at the Food Control Office in Zurich said 
more than 1,000 bottles of Austrian nine had been seized. Last week. 
West Germany impounded thousands of bodies of Austrian wine in a 
hum for shipments that had been mixed with diethylene-glycol for tasje 
and st 


r\ 

- >r ni 


S 5, 


( T.li 


iron 


the president during the official vis- i n • t r i m • n p 

H of President u xiannian of chi- lighter Kern Urged on llima Keionai 

na on July 23. BEUTNG (Reuters) — Chinese leaders, facing difficulties brought on 

On political matters, it is Mr. hy the country’ s economic reforms, have called for tighter Communis 

Party control and have announced a shift in foreign investment priorities. 

Hu Qili, a senior member of the party’s Central Committee secretariat, 
said in a statement published Tuesday by the China Daily that the 
country's economic reform program would fail unless the party main- 
tained a tight grip. 

State Councillor Gu Mu was quoted by the Xinhua news agency 4s 
saying that foreign investment would be channeled into Shanghai. 
Guangzhou, Luda and Tianjin, with less emphasis on development of X) 
smaller coastal cities opened to outside investment last year. These have 
failed to attract much attention because of poor infrastructure. 


Regan who has emerged as the 
president’s principal link with the 
government. He would be ready, 
for example, to meet with congres- 
sional leaders if a new budget im- 
passe should develop, one official 
said. 


Mr. Regan and his aides have as 
a model the procedures followed in 
1981, and they went over them in 
some detail Monday at the staff 

luncheon. Some officials noted that n i i« a i tt th i . n 

the surgery in 1981 was more severe KepubllCailS ASK HoUSe Budget UlltS 

then in the present case, because of * ° 

a bullet wound and the need of 


en briefings and option papers by 
president and Regan and 


the vice _ 

McFarlane, depending on what the 
subject is." 

“All indications are that the boss 
is going to be in a good position to 
have those discussions right away," 


WASHINGTON (UPD — Sen- 
ate and House Republicans de- 
sutgeons to break some of Mr. Rea manH ^ Tuesday that House Dem- 
gan s nbs to gel at his lung canty to ^ ^ b^cutsTo 


tionship and knows what to do on .the official said. “We’d like to keep 
his own." But. be said, “I don't it to a minimum through theend erf 




ft. >•••• \ 

:• it.? £v 1 :A " " .. 




fjm-- 


think any constitutional decisions 
will be made by anybody other 
than" Mr. Reagan. 

A senior White House official 
said, “We will try to make as many 


the week. That means Don Regan - 
-is going to do a bit more than he 
would ordinarily, but he talks with 
the boss and would keep him in- 
formed." 


remove the bullet. 

Nonetheless, the president's 
work schedule is bong kept very 
light for now. His only business in 
the immediate future, said an offi- 
cial, is a national security briefing 
and a domestic briefing, which wQl 
be delivered in writing by Mr. Re- 
gan. Depending on the president's 
speed of recovery, an official said, 
“we will spare him as much of the 
detail as possible.” 


-i ■r 


* '> 
.ji. ■■■■. 





Uncertainty 
On Reagan 


Chances of Cure Above 50-50, 
Experts, Reagan Doctors Say 


Greenpeace Ships Message to Whaling Commission 

The International Whaling Commission began meeting in Bournemouth, England, as the ship Sirius, 
of the conservation group Greenpeace, rode at anchor with an inflatable whale on its stem. The 
Soviet Union announced Tuesday it would temporarily halt hunting whales in the Antarctic next 
winter in compliance with a worldwide ban on commercial whaling. Japan has agreed to stop in 
1988. leaving Norway the only nation that has given no indication it will comply with the ban. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

president is scheduled to remain in 
California through Labor Day, 
Sept 2. 


After Mr. Reagan was seriously 


wounded in an attempt on his 


(Continued from Page. 1) 
phatics are, and can spread fur- 
ther." 

He said the fact that pathologists 
who had examined slices of the 
growth saw no evidence of cancer 
cells within blood vessels or W 


point where it joins the small intes- 
tine. 


budget cuti 
make up for increases in Social Se- 
curity payments or face the pros- 
pect of no budget this year. 

The Senate’s original budget 
made more cuts in domestic spend- 
ing than did the House's, including 
freezing Soda! Security cost-of-liv- 
ing increases. In an agreement with 
the White House, leaders agreed to 
drop the Social Security provision 
but to seek other budget cuts to 
offset the increased spending. 

“We don't intend to give it all 
up," the Senate Republican leader, 
Robert J. Dole, said, after a meet- 
ing with House Republican leaders. 
“Whether we get a budget or not — 
that's problematical at this poinL” 
Mr. Dole said he was not yet ready 
to call off the budget talks. 



Robert J. Dole 


March 30, 1981, his quick recovery channels was a good si gn, buthe 
surprised many people, indu cting emphasized that the spread of tu- 
friends and physicians. He left ibe ^ by those routes might still 


hospital 12 days after his admis- 
sion, addressed' Congress a month 
after he was shot and soon 'there- 
after resumed a full work schedule. 


In the aftermath of the shooting, 
Reagan aides and physicians were 
deliberately low-key in their pre- 


EC Aides Fail to End Grain Dispute 


Reuters 


BRUSSELS — European Com- 
munity agriculture ministers failed 
Tuesday to resolve a dispute over 
grain prices. 

They empowered the European 
Commission to enforce price cuts 
until the end of the year, officials 
said. 

The ministers were unable to 
overcome West German opposi- 
tion to a proposed 1 . 8 -percem price 
cut after two days of talks. 

They asked (he commission to 
continue managing the grain mar- 
ket, adding that they hoped to 
reach agreement by the end of the 
year, the officials added. 

Bonn made unprecedented use 
of its veto to block the price cuts 
last month, saying tt had to protect 
the inieresis of aboui 600,000 West 
German grain farmers. 

The commission had proposed 
the cuts in an effort to reduce the 
group's surpluses. 

Before Tuesday's talks, there 
were hopes that ministers would 

'inally reach agreement, perhaps 
iv compensating West German 
'armers for loss of income. 

Earlier, the ministers approved a 


proposal to cut subsidies on pasta 
exports to tbe United States to 
avoid a irans- Atlantic trade war. 

Officials said the ministers em- 
powered the commission to vary 
pasta export subsidies by country 
of destination, without specifically 
mentioning Lhe United States. 

Italy, which provides almost all 
EC pasta exports, voted against the 
plan, which is pan of a four-month 
truce agreed by the commission 
and the United States. 

The agreement will enable the 
commission to almost halve subsi- 


dies of pasta to the United States 
and Canada in return Tor the with- 
drawal of a U.S. complaint to the 
world trade body, the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 
and of a threat to impose higher 
import tariffs on EC pasta. 

The EC had threatened to retali- 
ate with higher tariffs on U.S. nuts 
and lemons. 

Subsidies are expected to drop 
from the present 14 European cur- 
rency units ($10.50) per 100 kilo- 
grams (220 pounds) to 8 ECUs. 


dictions, but the present White 
House staff has been more upbeat 
in its predictions. 

Some administration officials 
and associates of the president said 
Monday that the White House and 
medical team had created such high 
expectations for Mr. Reagan's rap- 
id recovery from Saturday's sur- 
gery that it would be difficult for 
even the vigorous 74-year-old pres- 
ident to fulfill them. 

On Sunday, Dr. Dale Oiler, who 


headed the ■surgical team that oper- 
ud Mr. 


aied on the president, said 


Reagan was on a “spectacular post- 
1 that “sui 


Heinrich Boll Dies at 67 


UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 



BACHROtfS • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 
for Work, Academic, Ufa foptritnet. 


Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 


PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 


600 N. Sepulveda Blvd„ 
Los Angeles. California 
00049. Deal. n. UJSA. 


(Continued from Page !) 
almost total senselessness of the 
military life. 1 suffered the frightful 
fate of being a soldier and having to 
wish that the war might be lost.” 

After a few months as a French 
prisoner of war in 1945, he was 
released, returned to his home and> 
entered the University of Cologne. 
While working pan-lime in the 
family workshop and as a munici- 
pal clerk, he began writing. 

His first novel, “The Train Was 
on Time" appeared in 1949 and 
was widely praised. Written in a 
blunt style' that contrasted with lhe 
bombast of the Nazi era, it was 
about the last days of a sensitive 


young German soldier returning to 
the front. 


operative course" that “surpasses, 
by 99.9 percent, all patients who 
undergo this type of surgery." 

The physicians were somewhat 
more subdued Monday. But both 
they and administration officials 
remained optimistic in their fore- 
casts and at least outwardly confi- 
dent that Mr. Reagan will return in 
lull strength to his duties. Privately, 
however, there were a few notes of 
concern, if not apprehension. 

“The most important thing for 
the president is that he get back on 
the job as soon as possible and be 
perceived as functioning fully." an 
official said. 


Mr. BbU won particularly high 
“Billiards at Half- 


'BACH El OR, MASTER. DOCTORfiTE 
EARN A OFCftEE Use na nasi etpmacc as 
nau Qvnra m»i dogra Notfc*. sen bun 
a ta-ismia 4flOT0t*u Swaes MM upas 
raruMnCK* SeflwtM ■ ScMRKiM 
Hi Bn Cbsi Ealun 
2 I 3 -Z 7 B 1094 
9 ran 

WlffNfft BM 

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praise later for 
Past Nine” (1959). a panoramic 
work about three generations in a 
family of German architects, and 
“The Gown" (1963), a study of an 
outsider condemned to live in a 
sterile, hypocritical world. 

A perennial gadfly in West Ger- 
many’s public life, Mr. Boil cam- 
paigned for its Social Democratic 
Party in 1972 but later became dis- 
illusioned. As the years passed, he 
continued to criticize many aspects 
of West German society. His 1974 
“The Lost Honor of Katharina 
Blum" was about a young woman 
hounded by police and reporters 
after helping a wanted man. 

In 1942, Mr. Boll married Anne- 
marie Cedi, who collaborated with 
him in translating works of J.D. 
Salinger. Bernard Malamud and 


Soviet Warships 
Transit Baltic 


The Associated Press 

COPENHAGEN - Twenty- 
one Soviet warships, an unusually 
large number, have passed through 

Baltic waters off the Danish coast 

in the past week, presumably on detected. as weif as 


their way to exercises in the Atlan- 
tic Ocean, defense offidals said 
Tuesday. 

The 21 vessels included six sub- 
marines and the nud ear-missile 
cruiser Grozny, according to the 
Danish Naw. 

While calling the number excep- 
tionally large. Lieutenant Colonel 
R.K. Jacobsen of the defense intd- 


have occurred. The pathologists' 
findings reflect only what they 
could see on selected cross-sections 
of tbe tumor that woe preserved 
and stained right after surgery. 

Dr. Steven Rosenberg, chief of 
surgery at the National Cancer In- 
stitute, said at Monday's briefing 
for reporters that the individual 
cells making up the tumor were 
“moderately well differentiated." 

This description means that the 
cells in Mr. Reagan’s tumor were 
probably fairly uniform. The pa- 
thologist at the cancer institute 
who was interviewed said that this, 
too, was a favorable sign. 

“If tumor cells look all regular 
and the same and do not look bi- 
zarre, that’s less aggressive,” he 
said. “If they greatly vary in size 
and shape, there’s a poorer progno- 
sis. 

The estimate of a 50- to 75-per- 
cent chance of a cure for the presi- 
dent comes from studies based on 
the Dukes classification of colon 
cancer, a system devised in 1931 for 
grading malignancies according to 
how far they have spread beyond 
the innermost lining of the colon to 
involve other tissues. Tbe system is 
named for Dr. Cuthbert E Dukes, 
who was a pathologist at Sl Mark's 
Hospital in London. 

The Dukes classification has 
proven to be the most reliable way 
of predicting the recurrence of co- 
lon cancer. The president's tumor is 
graded Dukes-B — more danger- 
ous than a growth confined to the 
inner layer of the large intestine but 
not as ominous as one that is found 
to have spread lo lymph nodes out- 
side the colon. 

Questions have been raised 
about whether Mr. Reagan should 
have undergone more extensive 
tests of his colon after earlier pol- 
yps were detected. His first polyp, 
which was noncancerous. was 
found in May 1984. In March of 
this year a second benign polyp was 
dood 


none could say whether the testing 
would have caught the cancer be- 
fore it had entered the muscle layer 
of the president's boweL 

All of the doctors interviewed 
said that there was no way to esti- 
mate bow long ago the growth had 
spread into the muscle layer, am- 
verting itself from a highly curable 
tumor into one with a 25- to 50- 
percent chance of recurrence. 

Dr. O’Kieffc, Dr. John L. Cam- 
eron, chief of surgery at the Johns 
Hopkins University Hospital, and 
other experts agreed with the judg- 
ment of Mr. Reagan's physicians 
that no further therapy would be 
needed now, beyond tne surgery he 
underwent Saturday. 

“1/ he was a 34- or 44-year-old 


u, e T Sn^d i 5^ftt t Egypt Q^ges Sheikh With Sedition 

haw been seen earlier if the more CAIRO (NYT) — The government announced Tuesday that it has 
complete tests had been done. Bui charged Shiekh Hafez S alama . Egypt's leading advocate of Islamic law, 

with sedition for allegedly distributing pamphlets that “instigated the 
i t the regime and urged them to destabilize the government, 
aby, the state security prosecutor, said the government 
fy would file other charges against the sheikh and 13 of Ms 
'-'■s, who were arrested Friday in a major crackdown on Islamic 
talists. Since Sunday, the government has announced the arrest 
of at least 45 Moslem “extremists.” 

The Middle East News Agency reported Tuesday Lhat 11 persons had 
been arrested in Alexandria and that 22 “extremists" were arrested in 
Fayoum, a large village in an oasis about 60 miles (96 kilometers) 
southwest of Cairo. 


Biwr*. Hack 

pn” *V(*rr uir' *ll 


I • 


- V 


•• 


l.S. ( Mffi 


5 


For the Record 


man, we might suggest something," 
' sr, chief of 


Prime Minister Shimon Peres said Monday that Israel wanted to re- 
establish diplomatic relations with the Soviet 'Union. The relations woe 
broken by Moscow during the 1967 Arab- Israeli war. (NYT) 

Yao Yffin, one of CMna’s deputy prune ministers, concluded a visit to 
the Soviet Union on Tuesday, Tass reported. (AP) 

Forest fires in Greece have killed three persons and destroyed toou- 

Js said Tuesday. (Reuters) 


said Dr. Paul Sugarbaker, 
the colorectal surgery branch of the 
National Cancer Institute. “Maybe 
a combination of radiotherapy and 
chemotherapy. But in a 74-year-old 
man it would just sap his energy." 


Correction 

Idot the singer who inspired Saturday's Live Aid rock mus ic v 
help famine victims in Africa, has bam nominated for the 1986 
ice Prize, not the 1985 prize as reported Monday. 


Bob Gddof. the singer who i 

concert lo 

Nobel Peace 


! c i- 


■ ! nil 

v 


. • • r- 


- rr A 

ii 


in the president's stool. 

From May of last year to this 
past Friday, Mr. Reagan under- 
went tests that explored only the 
first two feet or so of his intestine 
(about 60 centimeters). Some doc- 
tons believe that he should have 
received a barium enema X-ray or a 
colonoscopy, an examination of the 
entire colon, after the earlier polyps 
were discovered. The large tumor 


. ligencc service said, “Our interpns- „ 

other English-language authors union is. however, that an ordinary was found Friday at the aid of tire 
into German. exercise activity is involved." six-foot-long huge intestine, at the 


■ View of Reagan Doctors . 

Lawrence K. Altman of The New 
York Times reported: 

Dr. Edward Cattau, a gastroen- 
terologist who participated in the 
detecuon of Mr. Reagan's first pol- 
yp in 1984, said considerable 
thought was given to performing a 
colortoscope test on the president 
at that time. But the doctors decid- 
ed against it for a number of rea- 
sons, including the benign charac- 
ter of the polyp and its lack of 
statistical association with colon 
cancer. 

Another reason that the colonos- 
copy was not .done in 1984, Mr. 
Reagan's doctors have said, is that 
it was not called for under the 
guidelines of the American Cancer 
Society. 

Moreover, there are risks, small 
though they may be. in a cokmos- 
copy. 

One medical text states: “Colon- 
oscopy is a difficult technique that 
requires experience with several 
hundred procedures for profiden- 

The final pathology report Mon- 
day dearly illustrates a rule among 
many specialists who treat patients 
with bowel polyps: A biopsy is 
worthwhile only if the polyp is 
completely removed. 

The biopsy of Mr. Reagan's jpol- 
yp taken in the colonoscopy Friday 
.showed no evidence erf a cancer. It 
was only the extensive tests on the 
polyp removed at surgery that 
showed it to be a malignant villous 
adenoma. 


Police Replace Militias , 
Keep West Beirut Calm 


United Press International 
BEIRUT — West Beirut had one 
of its most peaceful days in months 
Tuesday after a Syrian-backed se- 
curity plan went into effect and the 
police took over from militia gun- 
men in the mainly Moslem sector. 

The police said Lebanon’s am- 
bassador to Saudi Arabia, Zafer al- 
Hassan. was wounded in the hand 
by sniper fife as he was bang driv- 
en with a police escort across tiie 
Green Line from West Beirut to the 
Christian eastern sector for a meet- 
ing until President Amin Gemayel 
He was taken to tbe American 
University Hospital in West Beirut, 
where his minor injuty was treated. 
A spokesman for the Lebanese 


srve Socialist Party, issued orders to 
their gunmen Monday night not t o 
cany weapoas. -I 


■ Mideast Talks Delayed * 
Exploratory Middle East peace 
talks between a joint Jordanian- Pa- 
lestinian delegation and US offi- 
cials, which were to have'Tregufl 
before the end of July, have. beet)., 
postponed, Agpnce France-Prafce 
reported from Amman, quoting 
Palestinian sources. 

The sources said both Jordan 
and the PLO did not want the talks 
to start until after an Arab summit 
meeting cm July 28 in Morocco: T ; 
The Jordanian- Pales tinian drift- 


brief Tie 


-It. 

Li 




X 


ill- . * 

c<: : 

.t.w 




• - •• — 


Internal Security Forces, Captain ^ Uon wo ^ comprise memfasw 
Ashraf Riffi, said 20 police units, of die Palestine National CamcBmM 

r li -■ members of Jordan's National 

sembly. - .Jv>. 

The U.S. State Department 5 && 



four men each. 

streets at 6 A.M. with orders to 
arrest anybody carrying a weapon. 

Tbe size of the internal security 
force is “much smaller than its 
task." Captain Riffi said. 


Monday that King Hussein otlct- ' 
had listed about a dozen poK 


But he added that any poll' 
jld call 


ice 


patrols that had trouble cou 

for assistance from a 500-member 
task force of the Lebanese Army. 
West Beirut’s mam militia 
members of the 


le Dm 
ing Hu 

dan had listed about a doses 
pie from whom members of tfe 
delegation might be selected. It r£- ’4f 
fused to say who the Pakstmunjfr * 
might be. - 


.. " r ’—hni 


U.S. sources said Monday -d#' 
Wash in g to n would provide 

a.-. * , r n wib a copy of tbe fist tot 

bnute Amai and the Druze Progres- not give Israel veto rights. 




1 





• • •• 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


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AMERICAN TOPICS 



Blake Rossow is learning a new trade in 
Minnesota, one of the states developing ways to help i 


« ■ 
f\,\ n' ' 

IhNwMraw 

class at a vocational school in 
• hard-pressed former farmers. 


States Pitching In 
To Help Farmers 

After yean of inaction and of 
referring problems to Washing- 
ton, individual states are moving 
to help their ha rd-pressed fann- 
ers, Tne New York Times re- 
ports. 

State actions include morato- 
riums on mortgage foreclosures, 
debt forgiveness plans, legal aid, 
job training programs and 
rhangpa in rues that govern eli- 
gibility for aid. Though short of 
i»a»h, many farm f miSw own so 
much land and machinery that 
technically they do not qualify 
for help. 

Am Riordan, administrative 
assistant to Iowa’s lieutenant 
governor, Robert T. Anderson, 
says state aid works. Mr. Rior- 
dan, a failed fanner himself, add- 
ed, “We are closer to the people 
in their homes. We’re feeling it 
too." . 


Bipartisan Backing 
For Secretary of State 

A bipartisan group of foreign 
policy experts, headed by Ed- 
mond & Muskiu, a former sena- 
tor, secretary of state and Demo- 
cratic presidential contender, 
and Kenneth Rush, a former am- 
bassador to West Germany and 
France, has called for a reasser- 
tion of the authority of the secre- 
tary of stale as presidential 
spokesman on foreign 
over that of the White 


national security adviser. The 
New York Times reports. 

The group contended that the 
State Department’s traditional 
leadership role in foreign policy 
“has been at times severely dflut- 
ed by the National Security 
Council" and other parts of the 
government In recent years, 
such national security advisera as 
Henry A. Kissinger and Zbig- 
niew Brzezmski nave appeared 
to wield more influence than the 
secretary of state. 

The report was by the Joint 
Working Group of the Associa- 
tion of Former Membm of Con- 
gress and the Atlantic Council of 
the United Stales. Its SO partici- 
pants indmWi academics, diplo- 
mats and government officials. 


Short Takes 

Hie NaatihB, the world’s first 
nuclear-powered submarine, 
-launched in 1954, decommis- 
sioned in 1980 and designated by 
Congress the following year as a 
National Historic Landmark, 
will be the central attraction at 
the navy’s Nautilus Memorial 
Submarine Force library and 
Museum at Groton, Connecti- 
cut, when it opens in April. The 
navy operates two other such 
memorials, the battleship Arizo- 
na at Peari Harbor arid the frig- 
ate Constitution In Boston. 

- Like many another newly re- 
signed public figures before him, 
David A. Stockman, who is for- 
salting the federal budget direc- 


torship for Wall Street, is consid- 
ering writing a book. The New 
York Times quoted a friend of 
Mr. Stockman who insisted on 
anonymity: “He’ll talk about 
how to overcome the political 
hostility to budget-cutting. HeU 
show the hypocrisy of members 
of the Congress and members of 
the cabinet. HeU name names."' 


Where Should Rambo 
Head for Next? 

At the end of the Beirut hos- 
tage crisis. President Ronald 
Reagan wisecracked, “After see- 
ing “Rambo’ last night, I know 
what to do the next *mn» this 
happens.” The film is a fiction 
about a Vietnam veteran, John 
Rambo, who resents a group of 
Americans still bang held in 
prisoner in Vietnam years after 
the war. The Washington Post 
asked veterans and Marine 
Corps candidates at the Vietnam 
War memorial their opinion of 
the film, whose full title is 
“Rambo: Fust Blood, Part H." 
Both groups gave it mixed re- 
views. 

Two mating candidates were 
asked where Rambo should go 
next. “Beirut," said Yan Weal- 
ing. “Shake those people up a 
Utile ML” “Definitely Nicara- 
gua,” said Todd McMurtxy. “He 
should lead a special (ask force 
to rescue some nuns or some- 
thing" 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 




3d! \\ isii Seditta 


U.S. Officer Injured in East Germany 



i i 

LT,.J pi r. 

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By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

BONN — The commander of 
the U.S. military liaison mission in 
1 East Germany was injured last 
weekend when his car was rammed 
from behind by a Soviet military 
truck, U.S. Army officials said 
•Tuesday. 

The UJS. military command in 
Europe has protested to Soviet 
forces in East Germany over the 
collision, which occurred near Satz- 
kom, northeast of Berlin, just after 
mutnight Saturday. 

It was the first inridenl between 
.Soviet troops and the American 
military liaiso n unit since a Soviet 
sentry shot and killed, a member of 
the 14- man team. Major Arthur D. 
Nicholson Jr., last March. 

The 380.000 Soviet forces based 


in East Germany are carrying out a 
major military exercise called 
Soyuz-85. . 

Colonel Roland Lajoie, the head 
of the U.S. liaison group, suffered 
facial fractures in the accident, ac- 
cording to Pentagon officials. Col- 
onel Lajoie was one of three Ameri- 
can soldiers traveling in the 
American car. The driver, Sergeant 
Jessie G. Schatz, was also behind 
the wheel of the car on the mission 
when Major Nicholson was killed. 

On June 4, three officers belong- 
ing to the British liaison group were 
harassed for five hoars by Soviet 
soldiers, who burled bricks and 
waved cocked weapons at them af- 
ter ramming thar car with a truck 

A French officer was killed last 
year when bis vehicle was rammed 
by an East German erect. 


.Shortly after the Nicholson 
shooting the commanders of UJ5. 
and Soviet fames based in West 
and East Germany met and report- 
edly reached agreement not to per- 
mit “use of farce or weapons’ 5 by 
their soldiers in con trotting the 
movements of the liaison groups, 
who conduct what is tantamount to 
sanctioned espionage in the former 
occupation zones. 

Diplomats say the daily recon- 
naissance sorties by the Hinson mis- 
sions are generally conducted by 
two-man to four-man teams. 

They drive marked military vehi- 
cles, equipped with infrared cam- 
eras, listening devices and binocu- 
lars, and search of information on 
the nature and location of troops, 
missiles and armor. 


c, .j 


ace 

Beini ^ 


* 


Reuters 

MOSCOW —Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader, has decided 
to link the salaries of scientists, 
twhfHfaqnf; and industrial design- 
ers to creativity in production, in 
the hope that financial self-interest 
wiD help spark a technological rev- 


A decree by the Communist Far- 


i... h 




he Tuesday, authorized increases of 
up to SO percent for those who 
. make a significant contribution to- 
ward moderaiaag industry. 

.. “We have set the task of ensuring 
.a doser fink between the salaries of 
scientific workers, designers and 
.'technicians and their personal con- 
. tributian to the acceleration of 
'kientific-iecbmcal progress,” the 
decree said. 


Mr. Gorbachev has gone cm re- 
cord as saying that better manage- 
ment and the introduction of 
technology in indnstry are priority 
goals in his drive to put new Ere 
into the stagnating economy and to 
raise Irving standards. 

Because of the extreme central- 
ization of the Soviet economic 
structure, payment for all special- 
ists is guided by a complicated set 
of rules laid down in Moscow. The 
decree represents a relaxation, but 
it is not a radical change. 

Under the decree, which takes 
effect Jan. 1, enterprises will be 
given timitfid power? to raise or cut 
salaries of technical experts in ac- 
cordance with their penormance. 

AU scientific workers wifi have to 
undergo a thorough evaluation of 
their work at least once every five 


5 Accused of Smuggling F-14 Equipment to Iran 


Mathews 

Washington Post Service 

SAN DEEGO — Four 
immigrants, including a UJS. 
a ppd an Iranian living in England 
have been arrested and charged 
with, stealing and shipping navy F- 
14 fighter equipment to Iran. 


years and had been able to export 
untold amounts of parts before be- 
ing detected late lasl year. 

In the last seven months, investi- 
gators asserted, they intercepted 
“over a doy en cartons containing 
hundreds of pounds and over two 
dozen separate pans," inducting 


were charged with conspiracy, theft 
and interstate transportation of 
stolen property, exportation of war 
materiel and defense articles, and 
making false declarations. They 
were being held without bail. 

Arrested on similar charges were 
.45, of 


The eompmeatwas described as some valued al more than 550,000 Jamaica, New Yor 

- 1 i -1 ■ J OnioPP 'Amiphn’r 


navigation and missil e-guidance 
systems for the planes. A UJS. 
spokesman said that “some of the 
most sophisticated combat weap- 
onry known to the Free World” 
was involved. 

Officials from the Customs Ser- 
vice, the FBI, the navy and the 
Justice Department charged Mon- 
day that the international smug- 
gling ring had spanned several 


apece. 

Three San Diem residents, Pri- 
stitivo Bakiyat Cayabyab, 36, an 
aviation storekeeper assigned to 
the aircraft carrier Kilty Hawk; Pe- 
dro M anansala Quito, 60, acivilian 
navy warehouse worker; and 
F ranklin Pan gjlman AgUStin, 47, 
who runs an insurance business, 
were arraigned before UJS. Magis- 
trate Roger Curtis McKee. They 


Agustin’ s brother; and an unidenti- 
fied Iranian national in Britain. 
Gxut papers alleged that Saeid 
Asefi Inanlou, 36. of Middlesex, 
England, had communicated often 
with the San Diego residents who 
were arrested. 

Iran purchased several F-14s 
during the reign at the late Shah 
Mohammed Reza PahiavL But the 
United Stales cut off shipments of 


spare parts after the government of 
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini 
took over six years ago. 

Pans similar to those stolen ore 
Still available to governments 
friendly to the United Slates and 
have previously been in Iranian 
hands, so the thefts are not consid- 
ered a serious breach of national 
security, said the chid - of the FBI 
bureau in San Diego, Gary L Pen- 
rith. 

The Customs Service's regional 
commissioner. Quin tin Villanueva, 
said of the suspects: “Their motiva- 
tion was money." 

He said ihe'pans were shipped 
from California to New York to 
London to Iran in boxes labeled 
medical supplies or automobile 
pans. 


In Mexican Voting 9 Loser Was Electoral Reform 


By Richard J. M&slin 

Nen York Times Service 

MEXICO CITY —The official 
results of Mexico’s national elec- 
tions were announced this week, 
and they showed the governing In- 
stitutional Revolutionary Party 
winning all seven governorships 
that. were at stake, all but five oftbe 
300 elected seats in the Chamber of 
Deputies, and all but a handful of 
dozens of local and stare offices. 


“This was a celebration of democ- 
racy.” 

At face value, the results would 
indicate that after three years of 
high inflation and 
Hvmg standards, “not 


lowered 
has the 


iti ciarwi and foreign diplomats 
ray, was not done to the opposi- 
tion. There was more than a rea- 
sonable chance that most of its can- 
didates would have lost in any case. 

The big loser, many believe, was 
Mexico’s recently nurtured, and 
still-fragile image — particularly 
abroad — as a country trying to 
open up and dean up its political 
system and its society. 

Those who witnessed the process 
at work July 7 in the two most hotly 
contested stales, Sonora and Nue- 
vo Le6n, had little doubt that a 
sweeping victory by the governing 
party over hs main opposition, the 
conservative National Action Par- 
ty, would be the official outcome. 

Many opposition poDwatcheis 
were barred from the voting sites, 
particoiariy in areas of opposition 
strength. Reporters saw people 
leap from cars to stuff multiple 
ballots into ballot boxes and saw 
boxes with rnien»nteri ballots being 
taken from the polls. 

Checks of the voting rolls 
showed instances of fictitious 
names listed by the hundreds, while 
others — mdnding one opposition 
mayoral candidate — had been 
purged. In Nuevo Leta, the local 
congress did not even bother to 
wait for the official results before 
can- 


didate the winner. 

It was the type of election that, 
had it occurred in H Salvador in 
1983 or Nicaragua in 1984, would 
have produced worldwide head- 
lines declaiming fraud and would 
have led to grave questioning of the 
credibility of the elected govern- 
ments there- 
for Mexico, it was ejections as 
usual, and as such the public ou toy 
here has been muted. Official fig- 
ures indicate that half the voters 
did not cast ballots; a poll taken in 
the capital before the elections in- 
dicated that only 13 percent of the 
people expected honest results. 

The problem for Mexico is that 
these elections weresuppesed to be 
different. Foreign reporters seemed 
to take ax face value President KE- 
gud de la Madrid's pledges that the 
elections would he conducted 
cleanly and that the “moral renova- 
tion” r 

extend to the democratic 
-as it seemed to in the first few 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

■ruling party not lost any support, it 
has gamed support,” said a Mexi- 
can academic who studies politics 
here. 

“If that were the case,” be added, 
“Reagan and Thatcher and every- 
one and his mother would be com- 
ing here to see how it’s done.” They 
are not/In fact, public praise for 
the election has come from only a 


handful of countries, including the 
Soviet Union, Haiti, and South Ye- 
men. 

Representatives of other coun- 
tries nave expressed concern. One 
senior Western diplomat here, us- 
ing the initials for the ruling party’s 
name in Spanish^ said, “1 don’t 
think the PR1 has ever reacted so 
strongly against the opposition." 

The diplomat, who asked that his 
name not to be used, added that the 
governing party’s means of holding 
onto power were unquestionably 
successful during Mexico’s postwar 
period of 6 to 8 percent annual 
growth, when there were “goodies 
to hand out” to party members and 
the labor unions. But be said trying 


to maintain the same system during 
a prolonged recession could even- 
tually result in “a crisis.” 

Additional pressure, he said, 
could come from what he saw as 
the increasingly disenchanted mid- 
dle class. which is giving more sup- 
port to the National Action Party. 

Mexican officials note that, 
whatever dse may have happened, 
there was virtually no election- re- 
lated violence, which they view as a 
sign that the party and its ability to 
mam tain peace still have the hearts 
of the Mexican people. “1 think the 
people in this country are more 
mature than even we think." said a 
government official “They know 
what they want — social peace." 


Agents said they bad traced 
them back to naval facilities in Cal- 
ifornia. Virginia and the Philip- 
pines and to two other aircraft car- 
riers. the Carl Vinson and the 
Ranger, as well as the Kitty Hawk. 

■ More Arrests Expected 

Additional arrests of sailors and 
civilians are expected as the investi- 
gation continues, officials told the 
Los .Angeles Times. 

Although investigators said that 
no “critical" aircraft ports had 
reached Iran since the investigation 
began, they added that they had no 
idea how much equipment might 
been shipped before 1483. One in- 
vestigative source said that the ring 
might have been operating for as 
long as seven years. 

According to experts outside the 
government, the case marks the 
first known instance of a foreign 
government's penetrating the U.S. 
military supply system to obtain 
sensitive weapons' 

The disclosures raised new con- 
cerns in Washington about the se- 
curity of the navy’s procurement 
system. 

Secretary of the Navy John F. 
Lehman Jr. was described by an 
aide as “very much concerned” 
about the apparent vulnerability of 
the system. 

The arrests came on the heels of 
a series of procurement scandals 
that in recent weeks have afflicted 
the navy. Federal agents are inves- 
tigating the disappearance of more 
than Si million in equipment and 
supplies from the Kitty Hawk. In- 
vestigators said that case was unre- 
lated to the alleged theft of parts 
intended for Iran. 



1 h» Aaocnad Pran 


BOLIVIAN ELECTIONS — Polling place workers loaded ballots from presidential 
elections Sunday for delivery to counting place. Hugo Burner Su&rez, a rightist candidate, 
claimed a plurality. A center-right opponent, Victor Paz Estenssor. caDed the claim 
“audacious.” Jaime Paz Zamora, a leftist, was the third candidate. Official results are due 
July 31. The absence of a majority in the outcome win mean that the Congress will convene 
on Aug. 2 to elect one of the three candidates for the country's four-year term. 


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Soviet Ties Sdenti&’PaytoInnoixitions 

years and accept changes in their 
salaries according to the results. 

The size and frequency of poten- 
tial bonus payments will be calcu- 
lated in acraraancewiihtheimpor- 
tance of the job and the speed with 
which new inventions are applied. 

There are frequent complaints in 
Soviet iudnsfiy about technical in- 
novations that lie on ihe shelf foe 
years, if not decades, because of 
bureaucratic delays arid worker re- 
sistance to new processes or labor 
-saving devices. 

The decree stip u lates pay equali- 
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industry and those in mere presti- 
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There is an urgent need, it said, 
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production process rather than in 
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in office. 

The journalists did not pay as 
modi attention to his statements 
that Mexico did not need, and 
would not accept, lessons in de- 
mocracy from abroad. 

What the results indicated in- 
stead was that, at best, Mr. de la 
Madrid has beat unable to force 
those who manage elections at the 
state and local level to accept his 
message, or at worst, that his own 
people abandoned that theory in 
favor of a bog electoral victory. 

The Institutional Revolutionary 
, Party, which has controlled Mexi- 
co’s political life almost totally for 
56 years, showed that its first prior- 
ity remained keeping itsdf in pow- 
er. 

Aides to Mr. de la Madrid bad 
some trouble explaining what hap- 
pened. “The president rave very 
specific instructions that these elec- 
tions were to be clean," said a high- 
ranking government official. “I 
don’t know why they would com- 
mit such a coarse fraud.” He sug- 
gested that perhaps the election ir- 
regularities were committed by the 
opposition Lo try to embarrass the 
governing party, or that local offi- 
cials had amply ignored Mr. de la 
Madrid’s wishes. 

The answer from party leaders 
was more abrupt, “we can affirm 
categorically there was no fraud,” 
said Mmrinnhano SOerio Esparza, a 
national representative of the Insti- 
tutional Revolutionary Party to So- 
nora, when asked about some ot 
the irregularities seen by reporters. 


Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON —The United States once had a two-China policy. 
Now the District Of Columbia's government has a two-China-arcb 
policy. 

The District, bowing to the demands of vocal anti-Conuminists who 
live in the District's Chinatown area, has agreed that two arches can be 
built to span H Street Northwest 

The District government as pan of a sister -city relationship, earlier 
this year announced its intention to split with Beijing the cost of a Sl- 
mflKon, 47-foot-high (14-meter) arch to span the deteriorating area’s 
mam st r e e t. 

The announcement drew immediate protests from Chinatown’s pro- 
Taiwan residents, who dubbed the D.G-Beijmg 


arch.” 


span “the Co mmunist 


■ Reacting to the complaints, the District now has approved a second 
arch, to be financed with private donations. 


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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 17 


1985 


All 

An 

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INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


Pttfaliflbed Wilfc Tbe New YbA Tuao and The WwUi^tOB Port 


Proper Protection Hurts 


A certain amount of protectionist legislation 
is always pending m Congress. It is part of ibe 
background noise. But this year hurting indus- 
tries have spun the volume knob to LOUD. 
More than half the members of both houses — 
288 in. the House. 53 senators— have signed a 
bill to cut textile imports by a third. Bills have 
been introduced to keep out other foreign 
products ranging from bicydes and shoes to 
lumber and uranium. Other legislation would 
reduce tbe executive branch’s discretion to 
deny relid to petitioning industries in the 
future. The pressures are serious. 

The temptation is to dismiss these bills as 
symptoms not of a fundamental economic 
problem but of a character defect in Congress. 
Let any large wheel sq ueak, this minimizin g 
view of the matter goes, and members will rush 
to grease it, no matter what the long-term 
consequences. To buy votes in the next elec- 
tion they would risk a trade war. But that 
explanation does not wash this time. U.S. 
economic policy, not politics, is to blame. 

The U.S. merchandise trade deficit rose 
from $25.5 billion in 1980 to $107.4 billion last 
year, and this year it is expected to be higher 
still. A leading cause has been tbe strength of 
the dollar, which has risen in value more than 


40 percent since 1980 relative to other curren- 
cies. Die dollar has beep held up in part by 
high U.S. interest rates — and interest rates 
have been propped up by record federal bud- 
get deficits and government borrowing. The 
budget defirii — which has risen from $59.6 
billion in fiscal 1980 to more than $200 billion 
this fiscal year — has helped produce and 
sustain the trade deficit. The two deficits are 
different reflections of die same fact. America 
is consuming more than it produces; it has 
been living beyond its means. 

It is hard to speak of retrenchment — 
spending cuts, a tax increase — when unem- 
ployment is still over 7 percent. But that is 
what is needed. The textile bill is thought likely 
to pass; so may others. Die administration is 
correct to oppose them, but it is cot offering a 
strong alternative trade policy. Flaying on the 
surface of the trade issue, it has resisted admit- 
ting the relationship between the budget defi- 
cit, which is a direct reflection of policy, and 
the trade deficit, which it has suggested is not. 
The president should take the lead in pointing 
out that the budget and trade problems are 
interdependent. It would strengthen his hand 
in dealing with both of these problems. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



a» «& 7 


'Now, don’t take sides — ice don’t want to make it angry.’ 


Saying No to tbe Censors A f rica: of Dark Continent Can Be Cured 

» C/ vt rARHTIJnmN Cl trari- T> r n T J XT • T .1 trt fh* lwvhww* Nmu the* Africa 


Jeane Kirkpatrick, former U.S. ambassador 
to tbe United Nations, is not one to be pushed 
around. So no one will be surprised to leam 
how she responded to a request by the State 
Department that she sign a pre-publication 
clearance form covering all her future writ- 
ings: She simply said no. “It is an extraordi- 
nary document," she told The Quill magazine. 
“You could never write after signing it." 

Mrs. Kirkpatrick is right, of course. Her 
plans for a book and a newspaper column, 
among other things, would be severely disrupt- 
ed if every written word had to be submitted to 
a State Deparfinem censor before publication. 

In truth, it was not difficult for her to refuse 
to sign the waiver as she was walking out the 
door of government She could not be fired, 
demoted or transferred for insubordination. 
But career employees of government and fed- 
eral contractors who have special security 
clearances do not have her options. They are 
being pressured every day to sign this “volun- 
tary waiver" of their rights. 

No one wants former government officials 
to be able to divulge classified material in 
books and articles they write after retirement. 
That is not at issue. Nor are we concerned here 
about employees of tbe intelligence agencies. 


who have for years been subject to special 
restrictions. What the government is now re- 
quiring is more radical. In spite of a strong 
negative reaction in Congress when the policy 
was announced by the president in 1983, and 
in spite of a temporary suspension of that 
presidential directive last year, all major agen- 
cies, including Defense, State, Agriculture, 
Commerce, Justice, Energy, Treasury and, yes, 
Transportation, are now requiring certain em- 
ployees to sign Lifetime censorship agreements. 

Pre-publication clearance arrangements are 
a form of prior restraint enabling any adminis- 
tration to censor the books, articles, editorials 
and even the works of fiction written by for- 
mer government officials: These arrangements 
impede the free flow of information about the 
operation of the government and encourage 
the suppression of criticism and debate. What 
can be done to stop them? Representative Jack 
Brooks, the Texas Democrat who chairs the 
House Committee mi Government Opera- 
tions, has introduced a bill that would prohibit 
any agency other than the CLA and the Na- 
tional Security Agency from requiring pre- 
publication clearance agreements from its em- 
ployees. That bill should be passed. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Reagan Displays True Grit 

President Ronald Reagan's worst political 
enemies no less than his best friends wish him 
well in his recuperation from intestinal surgery 
and expect his recovery to be rapid and his 
return to the political wars sooner rather than 
later. He is a likeable man whose confidence 
and optimism are admirable. 

The type of surgery Mr. Reagan underwent 
should not keep him away from his White 
House duties much longer than an extended 
summer vacation. Undo- White House Chief 
of Staff Donald T. Reagan and Vice President 
George Bush, there has been no change in the 
daily handling of presidential affairs. 

No special post-operative treatment will be 
required by Ine president, and his physicians 
indicate that the cancer discovered in the sec- 
tion of colon removed on Saturday seems to 
have been contained. Mi. Reagan may even 
benefit politically from his bout with cancar. 

In 1981, after Mr. Reagan was shot, a mas- 
sive upsurge in support was translated into 
support for his controversial tax cuts and other 
policies. Certainly Mr. Reagan's admirable de- 
meanor in his current, difficult situation will 
help him politically. Some dements of his 
constituency were beginning to criticize him in 
recent days for not being tough enough in the 
hostage crisis and for his apparent willingness 
to compromise on both defense spending and 
Social Security issues. Those criticisms are 
likdy to be muted for quite some time. 

Since some of those critics are ambitious 
politicians who would like to be president 
themselves, this raises another topic for politi- 
cal speculation. Will the president's activities 
be changed in ways that give Mr. Bush more 
responsibilities and greater visibility? Would 
that work to his advantage vis- i- vis Represen- 
tative Jack Kemp, Senator Robert Dole, How- 
ard Baker and others interested in 1988? 

Discussion of this sort is inevitable, even 
when concern is focused on seeing that there is 


a full recovery by the president. Politics is 
politics and the president is the chief U.S. 
politician. But good presidents rise above poli- 
tics cm occasion. To be truly “presidential,'’ 
one must This is such 1 an occasion and this 
president is good at it He showed tbe nation 
bow to be a victim of an assassination attempt 
with courage. Now he is showing how to be a 
cancer victim, and to inspire Americans with 
his gritty determination and optimism. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 

An Embarrassing Aid Bfll 

The House of Representatives’ foreign-aid 
bill does justice neither to American responsi- 
bilities nor to international aid requirements. 

There are some positive dements — above 
all, the return to an emphasis on development 
assistance and a reduction of the militaiy-aid 
component But this may bethcbffl’s undoing. 
President Ronald Reagan's spokesman insist- 
ed that this neglect of arms “is not in keeping 
with the real need and threat we face." That 
statement was faithful to past policies that 
have tilted the balance of aid to favor bullets. 

Lest they be accused in next year’s dection 
of coddling Communism, however. Democrats 
have rushed in this legislation to join almost 
every anti-Marxist action in sight with a strong 
likelihood of doing more harm than good. The 
bill would authorize generous funding of guer- 
rillas fighting Marxist regimes in Nicaragua 
and Cambodia, lift restrictions on aid to the 
South AC ricanrsponsored guerrillas fi ghting in 
Angola, and escalate aid to Afghan rebels. 

There is bewildering inconsistency as the 
legislation darts from incredible intrusions 
into domestic affairs of some states to laissez- 
faire handouts. Jordan would be denied anus 
unless it accepted the congressional definition 
of Middle East good behavior, but Israel 
would be rewarded with $6 billion baric sup- 
port over two years — no strings attached. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


W ASHINGTON — Slave trad- 
era, missionaries, explorers, co- 
lonial officials, journalists and aid 
workers have sent back images of 
Africa for hundreds of years. But all 
we seem to have axe the negatives, 
opaque impressions of a dark conti- 
nent growing darker. Die prolonged 
drought that has affected most of 
Africa seems to confirm Western sus- 
picions that Africa is dying. 

Having accepted the gospel of Af- 
rica’s endemic political instability 
and economic incompetence, we now 
have physical evidence that the conti- 
nent Is doomed: denuded landscapes, 
abandoned villages, spreading de- 
serts, refugee camps and masses of 
starving, napless people. 

It is difficult to resist concluding 
that trying to save Africa from its fate 
is futile. But those of us who have 
spent many years working in Africa 
have ample reason to bdleve in its 
future. So do Africans. 

They inhabit some of the planet’s 
harshest livable environments. Yet, 
from Saharan nomads and rain-for- 
est pygmies to Kalahari bushmen and 
urban shanty dweQera, Africans have 
a long history of adapting effectively 
to their surroundings. Africans are 
survivors: They have to be. 

They have survived worse droughts 
than the latest one, in addition to the 
European and Arab slave trade and 
coknriahsm. And they will survive the 
apocalypse erf mounting foreign debt, 
burgeoning population growth and 
the greatest threat of all: a rapidly 
eroding natural-resource base. It may 
be a generation, or longer in coming, 
but Africa will rise above economic 
dependency and political disarray. 

Contrary to the patronizing and 
cynical Western consensus that Afri- 
cans have made a hash of their inde- 
pendence, they have achieved much 
m a very short time. Having received 
a meager colonial inheritance of in- 
frastructure, public services and 
trained manpower, they have vastly 
improved their people’s access to 
education and health care. 

As the last continent to modernize, 
however, Africa is rushing to catch 
up. Mistakes are inevitable. Because 
Africa is thinly reported by the me- 
dia, which focus on the “quick and 
dirty” stray, we are mesmoized by 
accounts of the coups, corruption 
and natural disasters compounded by 
man. We do not learn much about the 


By C. Payne Lucas and Kevin Lowther 


candidate for parliament or discuss 
for building a primary school. 


j is inherent in the consen- 
sual derision-malting process cus- 
tomary at the village level in Africa. 

If Africa offers numerous exam- 
ples of political instability, it also 
provides several sanguine case stud- 
ies. Senegal, Kenya and Botswana 


Grim as the situation is, Africa is 
too well endowed with natural and 
human resources to be written off. It 
has vast mineral reserves and food- 
producing potential. Although a rela- 
tively dry continent, Africa has more 
than enough water, if it is properly 
conserved, to support substantial ag- 
ricultural and industrial develop - 


Africahas more than enoughwater to support 
major agricultural and industrial development. 


have managed peaceful leadership 
changes. Many countries have en- 
joyed long periods of tranquility. 
Zimbabwe, where whites once 
scoffed at African political preten- 
sions, just conducted a fair and 
peaceful national election. 

Per-capila agricultural output in 
Africa has dedmed 20 percent in the 
past two decades. Debt service and 
oQ imports are consuming a large and 
growing share of scarce foreign ex- 
change. Development programs are 
being cut back or foreclosed Public 
services are deteriorating. 


meat It also has enormous hydro- 
electric and solar-energy capacity. 

Africans have learned two hard les- 
sons: First, national economies are 
built from tbe ground up, on a solid 
agricultural foundation; and second, 
farmers will grow surplus food if tbe 
market rewards them fairly. Most Af- 
rican governments have taken agri- 
culture and the peasant fanner for 
granted Many tended to rely on min- 
erals or a single cash crop to earn 
foreign exchange. They also subsi- 
dized food prices for urban consum- 
ers, at the expense of low prices paid 


C Payne Lucas is executive director 
and Kevin Lowther a regional opera- 
tions officer for African, a private, 
nonprofit development organization 
based in Washington. They contributed 
this comment to The Washington Post 


U.S. Could Ease ANZUS Pad Strains 


FROM OUR JULY 1 7 PAGES , 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: London Forecasts f Opera War' 
LONDON — The announcement that Mr. 
Oscar Hammostein will invade London with 
grand opera in a new opera house which he will 
build himself is the main topic in the musical 
world here. London newspapers wonder how 
he is going to make his project pay. That, 
however, is Mr. Hammers tein’s affair, and he 
is confident It will be a three-cornered operat- 
ic war here next year. Die Royal Opera at 
Covent Garden is so firmly established that its 
directors look on Mr. Hammers ton's scheme 
with pity and incredulity. The Beecbam Opera 
Company has been so successful that it has 
shaken up the dry bones of Covrat Garden till 
they rattle. "Between the three of them,” said a 
high authority in operatic affairs, “they will 
run the salaries of singers up so high that they 
will make grand opera practically impossible. 


1935: Jews Blamed in Berlin Riots 
BERLIN — In connection with the recent 
anti-Jewish rioting in Berlin, two official state- 
ments were published [on July 16] which throw 
an interesting light on the methods pursued by 
the Nazis in the anti-Semitic campaign. After 
Dr. Goebbels’s organ "Der AngrifFtoM its 
readers that “the Jews are in want of a hard 
fist” and that this hard fist meant that “the 
Jews will not dare again to demonstrate in 
Berlin,” the headquarters of tbe state police 
here ascribed the anti-Jewish riots to “irre- 
sponsible elements" desirous of harming the 
Nazi state, and credited Nazi members with 
cooperating with the police in restoring order. 
Similar statements were made by Ludwig Uh- 
land, leader of the Betiin Brown Shirt group, 
who issued a decree ordering his troopers to 
abstain in future from any demonstration. 


priate to African conditions, about 
the ability of African farmers to coax 
food from the soil, or about the 
“soul” of Africa — the understanding 
of Africans’ role in the cosmos. 

The late Kwame Nkrumah, who 
led Ghana to independence in 1957, 
raged Africa to seek the political 
kingdom. Expelling colonialism and 
creating African governments proved 
relatively straightforward. Mr. Nkru- 
mah was not alone; however, in fail- 
ing to realize that genuine African 
political systems and ideologies 
would have to develop through trial, 
error and dvfl conflict. 

Africans are reconciling their es- 
tablished political traditions to the 
needs of the contemporary nation- 
state. Western observers who lament 
the rise of pne-party systems 
throughout Africa ignore the healthy 
competition that often prevails with- 
in. They have not sat beneath a bao- 
bab tree, listening to people grill a 


L OS ANGELES — Close to six 
/ months have passed since New 
Zealand refused to allow a port visit 
by a U.S. warship on the baas that it 
might be carrying nuclear weapons, 
and Washington reacted by sharply 
curtailing military cooperation be- 
tween the two countries. 

Contrary to the impression nour- 
ished by New Zealand, Washington 
has hardly behaved as an insensitive 
bully. Bui it is time to give the New 
Zealanders a graceful way out of the 
situation if they want one. 

New Zealand enjoys a deep reser- 
voir of good will in America, and 
most New Zealanders have not for- 
gotten that, except for the U.S. role in 
the Pacific war, their country might 
now be a Japanese colony. Americans 
know that New Zealand fought in 
both world wars and since sent troops 
to Korea, Malaya and Vietnam. 

For 34 years New Zealand’s exter- 
nal security needs have beat met pri- 
marily through membership, with the 
United States and Australia, in the 
ANZUS defense pact for the South 
Pacific. New Zealand helps with aeri- 
al and maritime surveillance of Soviet 
naval movements. Before the recent 
agreement it participated in mtum! 
ANZUS naval exerases with Austra- 
lia and the United States, and U-S. 
warships made occasional rest-and- 
recreation. stops in New Zealand. 

However, the United States has no 
nuclear bases in New Zealand, and 
wants none. Anti-nudear sentiment 
has nonetheless become increasingly 
widespread. When the Labor Party 
entered office a year ago with a de- 
clared mandate to bar any vessels 
that were nud ear-armed or midear- 
powered, Washington was disturbed 
but did. not react angrily. 

Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
firmly said that there could be no 
alliance without port visits and that 
U.S. policy prohibited identification 


By Ernest Conine 

of which warships carried nuclear 
weapons and which did not Trying 
to give ouiel diplomacy a chance, 
however, be said that no port visits in 
New Zealand were planned soon. 

When the United States proposed 
a new ship visit six mouths later, it 
tactfully nominated the 25-year-old 
Buchanan, a conventionally powered 
destroyer. The ship may be capable 
of carrying nuclear weapons, but if 
Prime Minister David Lange had 
wanted to conclude that it did not, he 
could credibly have done so. 

A veteran Labor Party politician, 
commented the other day that he 
would have let the Buchanan in. But 
Mr. Lange, refusing to fudge the is- 
sue, banned the ship. Washington re- 
sponded by canceling a scheduled 
ANZUS naval exercise, arranging 
with Australia for bilateral exercises 
in their place, andjprogresavdy cut- 

^Sipl^^c^^tions^e still cour- 
teous, but Washington has imposed a 
virtual freeze on high-level contacts. 
Moreover, U.S. forces do not always 
now tell the New Zealanders when 
Soviet submarines are heading into 
their surveillance sector. 

The U.S. countermeasures, consid- 
ered harsh and uncalled-for by New 
Zealand, have been applauded by 
Bri tain and Australia. 

New Zealand's rationalization of 
the nuclear ten was . disingenuous. 
Mr. Lange said, for example, that 
New Zealand did not ask or “expect 
to be defended by nudear weapons.” 
In the red world, the only threat to 
New Zealand comes from the rapidly 
growing Soviet forces in the Pacific. 
And those forces are nodear-anned. 

If U.S. treaty guarantees mean 
anything at all, they mean that the 
Amerkan people are putting them- 


selves at nudear risk to protect New 
Zealand. It might be better for all 
concerned to tear up ANZUS, make 
a new bilateral arrangement with 
Australia and leave New Zealand free 
to lode after itself in whatever ways 
that it judges best. But opinion polls 
suggest that this idea does not sit well 
with most New Zealanders. Sugges- 
tions that the United States should 
veil Mr. Lange privately whether a 
visiting ship Is nudear-anned or, fail- 
ing that, not insist on port visits as a 
condition Of militar y atliapfy within 
ANZUS, are unrealistic. 

There are sane stirrings of desire 
on the New Zealand side to patch 
things up. Tbe Lang p government re- 
mains unbending in its public stance. 
But it has grown uncomfortably 
aware that defense spending wfll be 
higher outride the alliance than in. 
There is also concern that New Zea- 
land’s farm exports may grow more 
vulnerable to protectionist moves by 
Congress if it loses allied status. 

Reasonable people should be able 
to work out an accommodation. 

Washington could help by reopen- 
ing the dialogue and perhaps read- 
mitting New Zealanders to U.S. mili- 
tary-training facilities. If the 
response were positive, the United 
States could again propose a pot 
visit by a small warship, giving Mr. 
Lange another chance to say yes. 

It might turn out that the present 
New Zealand government amply 
lacks the wfll and political flexibility 
to make an accommodation on any- 
thing but its own terms. 

If that proved the case, America 
and New Zealand should remain 
friends, valued trading partners and 
fellow champions of democracy. But 
the basis for a military al1ian«» would 
be gone, and Australia and the Unit- 
ed States would be weO advised to 
dose the book on ANZUS. 

Los Angeles Times. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman / 918-1932 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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Editor ALAIN LECOUR Asmam MMer 

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Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISQNS Director of Clradotwa 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director cf.idmtumg Sales 
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France. Tel: (1)747-1265. Tdex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Dirateur de k publication: Walter If. Thayer. 

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Y;'-- capital de ,.*w.wv « ■ ® runtime no. oust. 

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® 1985. International Herald Tribune. AU rights named 


T-=r 


Cofee’s Move Gives Soda-Pop Politics a New Twist 


N EW YORK — With all the hoopla about 
the escalating cola war, one topic has been 
ignored: the political implications. 

As with the political [parties, there are only two 
mjgor players: Coca-Cola, the drink of Demo- 
crats, and Pepsi-Cola, the Republicans’ refresh- 
er. Sure, there are third-party colas, but as in 
politics not mnch is said about them. 

This soda-pop politics is not coincidence. 
Coca-Cola has been the undisputed majority cola 
since the New Dehl: The cola connection was 
formed in 1932. when the Democratic National 
Oiflirrtum Postmaster General James Farley, 
left the administration to become chairman of 
the Coca-Cola Ernst Corp. He had quarreled 
with Franklin D. Roosevelt over a third term. 

Die sugar rationing of World War II could 
have brought the entire cola industry to its knees, 
but Mr. Farley’s political connections helped 
Coke escape the rationing. Coke was declared a 
war priority item, and at the end of the war Coke 
had 64 bottling plants built around the world — 
all at the government's expense. 

Peps retaliated by forming a political alliance 
of its own, with a 
from ’ 
that I 

sade, “tbe Pepsi-Cola Kid” fought for an end to 
rationing. His usefulness came to an end, howev- 
er, when it was revealed that Pepsi’s Washington 
native had oven him 5x0.000. 
soon forged a more successful political 


By Kurt Eichenwald 


alliance, with Ridiard Nixon, who was then Vice 
President. Thanks to some posting by Pqpri’s 
chairman, Donald Kendall, Pepsi was the only 
soft drink represented at the American Interna- 
tional Exposition, the rite of Mr. Nixon's famous 
“Kitchen Debate” with Nikita Khrushchev. Mr. 
Nixon even got Mr. Khrushchev to drink some 
Pepsi — an event seen by millions. 

When Mr. Nixon's political career faltered in 
the early 1960's, Mr. Kendall hired him as an 
international ambassador for Pepsioo. Then, as 
Mr. Nixon gained momentum in the late 1960's, 
Pepsi sales went right along with him. In 1968, 
when the Democrats lost the presidency, Pepsi 
machines were installed in the White House 
cafeteria. In 1971, Mr. Nixonsent Mr. Kendall to 
Moscow, and Pepsi become the first U.S. con- 
sumer product sold in the Soviet Union. 

Meanwhile, Coca-Cola, based in Atlanta, was 
looking for another Democrat to support It 
found a hometown boy. During Jimmy Carter’s 
long march to the White House, he used Coca- 
Cola money, Coca-Cola -jets and Coca-Cola’s 
advertising company. When he was elected, the 
Pepsi machines in the White House were re- 
placed by Coke machines. Coke also used its 
Carter connections to lake China, just as Pepsi 
breezed into the Soviet Union with Mr. Nixon. 

In 1979, Peps finally overtook Coke in total 


of realignment Not long after, 

Dusenb^, the man in charge of Pqis advertis- 
ing, was recruited 1^ “the Tuesday Team," whidi 

devised Ronald Reagan’s advertising in the 1984 
campaign. Pepsifand Republicans developed a 
strategy for yuppies — tbe “New Generancm.” 

Coca-Cola did wfaai any Democrat in trouble 
does —hire political advisers. Pat CaddeD, Dem- 
ocratic pollster, and Scott Miller, media strate- 
gist for John Glenn’s presidential campaign, 
were brought in to study a new Coke. Bob 
Shrum, who wrote Ted Kennedy’s speech at the 
1980 Democratic convention, was hired to write 
speeches about the new Coke formula. 

■ But the 1980s brought problems for both Coke 
and die Democrats. New ideas alienated old. 
constituencies, and talk of realignment filled the 
air. The Democrats' answer was to reaffirm their 
commitment to the old New Deal constituencies 
bat also to encourage neo-Hberals to stay with 
the party. Coke has now tried the same ahizo- 
phrenic approach: Last week, it brought back the 
old Coke m a new cari.but will still seflnew Coke; 

Will tins two-track approach give the Demo- 
crats what it takes to push to recapture the White 
House? Ifs tough to say. The latest figures on 
cola sales aren’t in yfcu 

The miter wrote speeches far Walter F. Mm- 
dak during the 1984 presidential campaign. He 
i comment to The New YarfcTmie. 




to the producers. Now the African 
former is winning renewed respect. 

Two other important lessons are 
dawning in Africa. Governments are 
becoming aware that concerted ac- 
tion must be taken to arrest wide- 
spread deforestation and soil erosion. 
A related challenge is Africa's mush- 
rooming population, growing nearly 
3 percent annually, compared with a 
world average of 1.7 percenL 

President Kenneth D. Kaunda of 
Zambia once spoke of the gift of 
Africans in these terms: “They may 
be simple and unlettered people and 
their physical horizons limited, yet I 
believe that they inhabit a larger 
world than the sophisticated West- 
erner who has magnified his physical 
senses through invented gadgets ai 
the price, ail too often, of cutting out 
the dimension of the spiritual." 

If you believe in Mr. Kami da’s 
vision, as we do, then you know the 
gods were not crazy when they placed 
mankind in Africa. 


d 


Democracy 
In Israel: : 
A Bad Joke? 

t Bv Danny Rubinstein 

J ERUSALEM — The conviction! 

last week of 15 Israeli Jews — • 
three of them for murder and 12 for 
other violent crimes against Arabs— 
was deeply upsetting for Israelis.-' 
Whatever one thoughi of the convie-. 
rion. which was the first time the. 
Israeli judiciary had moved against 
Jewish terrorists, the episode fans 
Tears that Israeli democracy may be 
threatened by unstoppable currents 
of lawless prejudice and brutality. 

This summer, tbe first Israelis bora 
after 1967 when Israel occupied tbe 
West Bank and Gaza, will be drafted 
into the Israeli .Army. Meanwhile, 
opinion polls indicate that some 42 
percent of Israel’s youth “agree" at 
“agree completely” with Rabbi Mar 
Kahane's racist call for expelling the 
1 j million Arabs' in the territories. 

Since Rabbi Kahane's election to 
the Knesset last year, the Israeli es- 
tablishment has mobilized to coun- 
teract his influence with programs to 
"teach democracy" The state educa- 
tional system, several private re- 
search institutes, public foundations, 
the army, the Jewish Agency and the. . 
Knesset are all involved in inis effort. 
Nevertheless, it appears that Rabbi 
Kahane's popularity is increasing, 
particularly among youth. 

I myself participated in the cam- 
paign for democracy, meeting with 
high school students, soldiers and of- 
ficers, and my impression is that it 
has almost no chance of success. 

In one meeting with Jewish and 
Arab students, a youth from a lob- '• 
butz asked: “Do you think that the 
Arab citizens of the state of Israel 
deserve equal rights?" I was com- 
pletely taken aback and dismissed his 
question rather brutally: For me, it 
was like asking whether the sun 
should rise tomorrow morning. What 
I realized later was that most of the 
students probably did not even un- 
derstand why I was angry. 

The concern for democracy, and. 
for the pernicious influence of Rabbi. 
Kahanc. is shared by virtually all po- 
litical parties and ideological camps 
in Israel. Bitter rivals have come to- 
gether proudly in a “consensus,” con- 
demning tbe rabbi and his teachings. 
In reality, however, nothing has been 
achieved. What kind of accomplish- 
ment is it to reach a national under- 
standing that Nari-like raasm is bad? 

The truth is that there is no consen- 
sus on the fundamental question fac-„ 
ing Israel today: whether we are wip- 
ing to sacrifice democracy for the 
sake of bolding on to the territories. 
The national consensus for condemn- 
ing Rabbi Kahane and leaching dem- 
ocratic values merely allows us to 
evade this more difficult issue. 

Meanwhile, daily life in Israel 
teaches just the opposite of demo- 
cratic values. The 1.5 million Arabs 
in the territories have been living un- 
der Israeli occupation for 18 years — 
living alongside Israelis without shar- 
ing their rights. Our young people 
have grown up believing that nation- 
alist struggle, terrorism and lawful 
discrimination arc facts of life; Under 
such circumstances, bow can one 
hope to teach democracy? 

Several years ago, dining a crack- 
down on a dockers' strike, the leader 
of the striking onion appeared an 
television and criticized the pdfieev;- 
“How dare they treat us like this. Are 
we Arabs from the territories?" He 
articulated what many of us under- 
stand: that it is posable to divide . 
rights and democracy in brad today.' 

A dismissed Arab laborer from' the - 
territories receives none of the unem- 
ployment benefits that his isrteE’ 
counterpart gets. Israeli Arabs re- 
ceive only part of the child aflow* 
ances that the state pays to hr&E . 
Jews: Arabs from the west Bankatid 
Gaza receive none. The same tie* 
crimination runs through &D aspects 
of life, and it is justified as a response 
to Israel’s special security situation. 

Israelis often defend such ductus- ■ 
nation by arguing that Arabs do not 
serve in the army and that whoever 
does not fulfill all his duties cannot 
enjoy all his rights. But few Israelis 
are willing to draft Arabs, for they 
fear that they would not be loyal to 
the state. It is a circular, unprovabfe 
claim, a vicious Catch-22. 

Against this background^ what is 
the point of preaching equality and 
democracy? Without some basic , 
change in relations between Arabs 
and Jews, what can we Israelis expect 
but more terror, more fanatical un- 
dergrounds and more Meir Kahaaes? 
The campaign to teach democracy in 
Israelis no more than a bad joke.. 

The writer is on the staff af fix. 
Israeli newspaper, Davor. He coitirib? 
wed this view to The New_ Y&rkTn&z 


LETTER 

Science Fiction Weddno^ 

Regarding the report "IranandSyf:' 
ia Nurture an Uncertain Rdmaadnp”- 
(July 6 j: . ^ 

Your account of “tempormyjija&r 
riages” between poor Syrian mtf 
Iranian widows, in order 
forth future male martyrs 
lah Khomeini's war effort has * '■ 

h a llmar ks of a good sioty However 
it is almost certainly not trnxL. . 

Any Islamic scholar will MKJW. . 
that there is no special Shiite encore ; 
of “temporary marriages.” What its': 
common practice, in both Stra^gUr' ; 

Smte Islam, is for male guid& at 
Moslem shrines to be “wedded^. , 
their unaccompanied female viaR^ 
for the sake of propriety. .Of cotu#£ 
such “marriages.” which have ndUfi ; 
gal validity, are in no wav oMOBfe’,- 
mated. The bureau **■ &*+- fito yJmB l. 
mosque is probably just the gadkgfr. - 
hut and aay financial ananeemtsflfy 
are no more.strange nr an 
those which go on everyday 
the tourist and guide any 4 
The story drat the mafe 
these unions are to be 
Iran has tbe quality of SrienpBl 

NICHOLAS MASSHlpF: 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


Page 5 


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ARTS / LEISURE 



Bacall Soars in Pinter Production of ( Sweet Bird 9 


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_ By. Sheridan Morley 

•• buananmal Herald Tribune 

L OMX)N — "Not the least of the many 
/ achievements of Harold Pinter in his new 
Haymarket -production of “S»e« Bird of 
Yoatb” is to gwe us for the first time, live and in 
person, Alexandra Del lago, the Princess Kos- 
monopolis herself. In the gallery of Tennessee 
WQlianis’s great doomed and rava&sd heroines, 
hers has always been a rather shadowy figure: 
Geraldine Page played her on screen and Broad- 
way as a mated has-been, and in Britain the play 
has been memorably seen only once, at Wat- 

TOE LONDON STAGE 

ford, where, rotriguingly enough, the role was 
taken by the late Mrs. Pinter, Vivien Merchant. 

Now, m Lauren Bacall's memorably extrava- 
gant portrayal, we get an even mix' of Lady 
Macbeth and the Lady of the Camellias. To hear 
Bacall's throaty litany of exile cities suitable for 
a falling film star is alone worth the price of a 
ticket. There is. however, a lot more here than a 
blazingly good central performance. “Sweet 
Bird of Youth” was Williams's most outspoken 
attack on the Southern discomfort that had 
always been at the bean of Ins writing, and what 
Pinter has seen is a play about the castration not 
just of men but of careers and ideals and na- 
tions. 

It starts a little slowly, with Bacall and Mi- 
chael Beck, two visitors (to the London stage 
and to the small Gulf town where the play is 
sett, edging their way hesitantly into a duologue 
so foil of pauses that for a fearful moment we 
seem to be in Pinter rather than Williams terri- 
tory. h is, oddly enough, as English players take 
over (in above-average American accents) that 
the play races into life. James Grout’s Big- 
Daddy boss is a gargantuan villain surrounded 
by suitably seedy henchmen; with them, and 
Williams’s wonderfully prodigal use of two doz- 
en supporting players, we are off and r unning 
into a tale of political corruption and sexual 
agony, so that by the time the princess and her 
blond gigolo are bade, they are playing at twice 
the speed of their first encounter. 

Borrowing from Hart Crane, Williams once 
called his “‘Bird" “a relentless caper for aD those 
who step the legend of their youth into the 
noon” and that is precisely the mood Pinter and 
his company keep alive through this sprawling 
saga. Even tbe usual embarrassment of Chance 
Wayne’s final speech to the audience is avoided. 
The poisoned treacle of Williams's prose has 
seldom been better poured or more lovingly 
matured. 

□ 

A new “Duchess of MaBT marks the much- 


heralded arrival at the National Theatre of a 
new acting company led by lan McKellen and 
Edward Petherbridge, but is in fact mainly nota- 
ble for bringing to the South Bank (and high 
time) the considerable and often exotic talents 
of tbe Glasgow Citizens’ director and designer 
Philip Prowse. Indeed, one of the mam indict- 
ments of a dosed-sbop directing, odiev at the 


Royal Shakespeare Company and urtad ventur- 
ous recruiting by the National has been that 
Prowse is so seldom to be found in England. 1 
When he is, as last year at Greenwich or now at 
the National, the result is never less than mes- 
meric. He is so far ahead of his contemporaries 
in theatrical flamboyance and designer /W that 
one would probably have to go back to Orson 
Welles at the Mercury to find a young stage 
artist of comparable power. 

That does not mean, of course, that one has to 
like or agree with everything Prowse does. His 
cavernous decaying-church setting for this new 
“Malfi” leads to moments rtf startling inaudibil- 
ity, and his casting of some very strong stage 
figures (Shefla Hancock, Roy Kinneax, Hugh 
Lloyd and Selina CaddI) in relatively minor 
roles is apt to unbalance the central quartet 
Petherbridge is an increasingly camp cardinal 
and McfCeflen a darkly sneaky Bosola, but Jon- 
athan Hyde has yet to come to terms with the 
Duke in darkness, and Eleanor Bron, surround- 
ed by a rem-a-crowd mob of loonies for the toad 
scene, manages to make “1 am the Duchess of 
Mali! still” sound like a program note rather 
than a cry of survival under appalling pressure 

Hers too is a performance that has yet to 
come into its own, but in this rich, decadent, 
sinis ter, shadowy, ritual staging there is the 
constant sense of brooding, atmospheric evil 
and of religion in decay that essentially has to be 
what this political melodrama is abouL Tbe first 
night said a lot more about Prowse than about 
whatever plans McKellen and Petherbridge may 
have for their new team, but they are to be 
hugely congratulated for getting him there and 
allowing his unique rinsncal vision to pervade 
tbe Lyttleton for the first time. 


Since old musicals are playing at roughly one 
of every three mainstream theaters in London, it 
is perhaps not surprising that Broadway stocks' 
are becoming somewhat depicted. We therefore 
have no less than three old American sing- 
akmgs in the West End that were never meant to 
be stage shows at aH “42nd Street,” “Siegin’ in 
the Run” and “Seven Brides for Seven Brotb- 
ot” all set omto be films, and only the fin: has 
ever achieved a later and successful stage life in 
the United States. “Singin’ in the Ram” is at 


best a doubtful prospect on Broadway this sum- 
mer, and “Sewn Brides” died there several years 
ago after a couple of performances. 

The “Seven Brides” that we now have at the 
Old Vic is, however, an altogether English at- 
tempt to get that score in front of a stage 
audience. It started out at the Theatre Royal m 
York 15 months ago and now after a long tour is 
in London for the summer, presumably to catch 
nostalgic tourists with vague memories of beau- 
tiful hides being blessed m the great outdoors. 

The problem is that a film musical never 
comes together the way a stage musical does. 
“ Seven Brides” has a paiched-together score 
with the old movie hits and a few innocuous new 
numbers added, yet it never quite manages to 
overcome its camera origins. 

This was always meant to be an answer to the 
Broadway musical, not a replica thereof. After 
years in which all they had been required to do 
was photographic replicas of old stage shows, 
Hollywood cameramen and choreographers in 
the middle 1950s desperately wanted to show 
what the screen could do. while Fred Astaire 
and Judy Garland persevered with old stage 
shows, a new generation led by Gene Kelly and 
Stanley Donen created musicals purely for the 
camera. Their triumph was “Smgin in the 
Ron”; a few years later, Donen and the chore- 
ographer Michael Kidd devised “Seven Brides” 
as a great celebration of the wide screen and of 
the vast outdoors of 19th-century Oregon. 

The film’s dancers were a ream of consider- 
able distinction, led by Russ Tamblyn and Tom- 
my Rail and its climax was a huge number 
called “Raising the Bam,” which the Old Vic 
production wisely does not attempt even in 
miniature. Accordingly we are left with the 
Johnny Mercer songs, a token choreographic 
attempt to recreate one of the great screen 
dance-fights of all time, and an air of vague 
provincial jollity, which is not quite the same 
thing. “Seven Brides” never had much of a plot 
(what there is appears to be a parody of “The 
Sabine Women”) but it did have a soaring sense 
of what the wide screen and a great choreogra- 
pher could do for a camera. 

What we now have is an English rep company 
trying to remember how “Oklahoma” was done. 
It has an endearing and almost amateur quality, 
as of teen-agers at a camp concert determined to 
do the show right here. But when Garland and 
Mickey Rooney did that, they had the vast 
technical' and musical resources of MGM be- 
hind them, which brings us back to (he central 
problem; trying to do big-screen musicals on a 
small stage and an apparently even smaller 
budget. 



From left, Brigitte Fassbaender, Catherine Malfitano and Franz Mazura in “Lulu.* 


A Novel 'Lulu’ in Munich: Worth the Wait 

By David Stevens 

Inienutuonol Herald Tribune 

M UNICH — the Bavarian 
State Opera did not join in 
the general rash to stage tbe foil 
three-act verson of Alban Berg’s 
“Luhi” after the Paris premiere in 
1979. Bui, having waited, it played 
a handful of tramps in staging it for 
the opening of the Munich Opera 
Festival this year, the centenary of 
the composer's birth. 

This staging offered a number of 
novelties, not least the soprano 
Catherine Malfitano rnakfng her 
Munich debut — triumphantly — 
in her first appearance in the 
daunting title role. The production 
was staged and designed! by Jean- 
Pierre PonneQe, also approaching 
tbe work for the first time; and 
Friedrich Cerha, who completed 
the unfinished third act, was con- 
ducting tbe. opera for the first time 
in a major theater. 

The American soprano made a 
gaudy entrance, sliding down a 
rope from the flies to the stage with 
all the rep tilian seductiveness at- 
tributed to her in the prologue. The 
she pulled off 


aplomb with which 
that circus stum was just a foretaste 
of an impressive artistic accom- 
plishment She swept through the 
role as if it held no serious vocal 
problems, not only singing with se- 
cure and glowing tone (a couple of 
extreme-top squeaks aside), but 
communicating the text with ex- 
pressiveness and clarity. 

Ponne&e’s staging was brilliant 
and at times irritating. Everything 
took place in tbe same basic set a 
semicircular, four-story metallic 
structure, each level with a row of 
doors opening onto a gangway and 
the different levels linked by circu- 
lar stairways at' each side. This 
served more or less successfully as 
the menagerie of the prologue, a 
theater. Lulu’s various dwellings, 
the jail of the film Rpqnmr-f of the 
second act the Paris gaming estab- 
lishment and the hovd of the final 
scene, a kind of abandoned jaiL 

On the practical side, the differ- 
ent levels of the set helped clarify 
the action and the multiple doors 
speeded the farcical comings and 
goings of the first scene m Dr. 
Schdn’s house. On a symbolic levcL 
PonneQe filled tbe upper floors 
with silent onlookers all in white, 
witnesses of a social arcus or some- 
times participants — they threw 
shredded paper down on the set of 
the stock-market debacle in the 
Paris scene, and tbe succeeding fi- 
nal scene was played out in tbe 
resulting rubbish. 

The symbolism of Lulu's portrait 
ranged from a stage-filling face 
peering vqyeuristicafiy, to a small- 
er. Expressionist visage that, torn 
from its frame, .was used by Jack 
the Ripper as a hand towel and. 


finally, as tbe shroud of the tragic 
Countess Gescfawitz. 

Ponnelle’s direction of tbe actors 
ranged from realism to caricature, 
as if the blood-soaked farcicality of 
Frank Wedekind’s original Lulu 
plays were not far in the back- 
ground. Some additions were gra- 
uritous, such as a virtuoso stunt fall 
from the second level for tbe heart- 
attack death of Husband No. 1 ; or 
dramatically donating, such as the 
theater scene, in which Dr. SchOn’s 
socially respectable fiancee was not 
only made visible but engaged in an 
unrespectable sign-language slang- 
ing match with Lulu. The scene did 
not end in the sexual tension of 
Scbta's humiliation, marvelously 
buflt up by Malfitano and Franz 
Maznra, but in a pratfall by the 
Failed fianede. 

The touch of exaggeration was 
carried out also in Pet Halmen’s 
costumes, whether tbe bright red — 
from hair to glittering gowns — 
that was Lulu’s trademark, the gra- 
tuitous fantasy of the African-ex- 
plorer prince’s getup or the fez for 
the white-slave- tratung Marquis. 

Since the Paris performances, 
Mazura has made the dual role of 
Dr. ScbOn and Jack the Ripper his 
own. As Loin’s one real love and 
the instrument of her death. Ma- 
zura used his strong physique and 
opaque, almost raw-sounding bass- 
baritone to powerful effect at the 
third performance Saturday. Bri- 
gitte Fassbaender was an impoang 
itz, although her final lines 


were less sung than harshly de- 
claimed. Alfred Kuhn was a study 
in .heavyweight grossness as the 
Animal tamer and the Athlete, and 
tbe tenors Claes H. Ansjd as the 
Painter and Jacque Trussd as Aiwa 
gave good accounts. 

it is almost a tradition in Munich 
not to lei great singers retire, which 
results in some interesting and lux- 
urious casting. Hans Hotter, the 
greatest Wotan of the last four de- 
cades, turned up as the mysterious, 
wheezing Schigolch — a role usual- 
ly allotted to an Aiberich rype: the 
result was not the usual dim old 
man, but a fatherly and sympathet- 
ic figure. And, in a few seconds. 
Asirid Vamay, she of many Isoldes 
and Elektras,'made a tangible char- 
acter. tipsy and knowing, or the 
almost invisible part of the theater 
wardrobe woman. 

Cerha must know this score 
more intimately than anyone, and 
his musical direction showed iL He 
is as much composer and peda- 
gogue as he is conductor, and his 
way with the score was more ana- 
lytical than passionate — pulling 
back ihe veil of Berg's late romanti- 
cism to make the inner workings 
audible. 

□ 

Another festival highlight was a 
revival of Richard Strauss’ “Der 
RoseukavaBer” with a cast of the 
fust caliber. Lucia Popp, a former 
Sophie, has graduated gloriously to 
the rank of MarschaUin, ringing 


with creamy tone and acting with- 
charm and subtlety. She was sur- 
rounded Sunday by Fassbaender’s 
convincing Ociavian. Helen Don- 
ath’s gleamingly bright-toned So- 
phie and Hans So tin's richly sono- 
rous Ochs i stepping in for the 
scheduled Kurt Molt). Jin Kcui. 
succeeding Carlos Kleiber in the 
pit. proved a Straussian of the same 
authentic mold. The production is 
1 3 years old. but Jurgen Rose' s sets 
and costumes are still splendid and 
Otto Schenk's staging surprisingly 
fresh. 

The baritone Dietrich Fischer- 
Dieskau is in his MHh year, and his 
interpretations of Schubert's "Win- 
terrme” sons cycle go back more 
than half of that lime. Sunday 
morning he returned to this chal- 
lenge, ringing with an intense inti- 
macy and expressiveness that more 
than made up for any inroads time 
has made on the voice. Hartmut 
Holf was the splendid pianist and 
co- interpreter. 

.Another highlight of the festival 
which continues through July 31, 
has been an outdoor production in 
tbe .Alter Hof of Carl Orff’s “Die 
Bemauerin,” along with an exhibi- 
tion commemorating the late com- 
poser's 90th b>rrhdav. And on July 
22, Wolfgang SawafUsch will con- 
duct the world premiere of “Le Roi 
Berenper" by the Swiss composer 
Heinrich Sutcrmeisier. based on 
Eugene Ionesco’s "Le roi se 
meun." 





Results oi Tokyo Vote Seen as Boost for Nakasone 

By Clyde Haberman 

JVew York Times Service 


George P. Shultz, left, the U.S. secretary of state, met 
Tuesday in Canberra, Australia, with Andrew Peacock, an 
opposition leader. Mr. Shultz later stopped in the island 
nation of Fiji on his way back to the United States. 

Shultz Applauds Fiji 
For Decision on Ships 

The Associated up most of Mr. Shultz’s four-hour 

SUVA, Fiji — U.S. Secrelary of minutes for 


Mr. Shultz said direct U.S. aid to 
Fiji, at an initial rate of SI-5 million 
a year, would begin OcL 1. 

He said he hoped. Sir Karaises 
could visit Washington later this 
year for the opening of the new Fiji 
Embassy and to sign an aid agree- 
ment 



. - 
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: Xy 


State George P. Shuta told Hit on £r Kamises and other 

Tuesday that it bad taken a “bold F'J*® 11 officials, 
and wise” decision in reopening its Mr 
ports to American warships. 

Mr. Shultz, speaking during a 
stop on his return to the United 
States from Aria and Australia, 
said the United States was “partic- 
ularly grateful” to Fiji for tips ges- 
ture toward regional security. 

Fiji's decirioo Iasi year to lift a 
ban oa visits by U.S. nuclear war- 
ships had node “peace in the Pacif- 
ic more secure.” he said. 

Mr. Shultz's comments contrast- 
ed with those he made in Canberra, 

Australia, on Monday about New 
Zealand's affirmation of its policy 
to ban nuclear-powered or nuclear- 
armed warships from its ports. 

He said (hat New Zealand’s anti- 
nuclear stance could force the 
United States to review its obliga- 
tions to New Zealand under the 
ANZUS treaty, a defense pact be- 
tween Australia, New Zealand and 
the United States. 

! Fiji's prime minister. Sir Ka- 
m«es Mara, met Mr. Shultz at the 
airport and said the United States 
a “friend of all in Ihe South 
Pacific” 

Sir Kamises said Fiji and its al- 
lies would continue to depend on 
the United Stales to “help safe- 
guard the peace and stability of our 
region. The continued tranquillity 
the Pacific is important to us ail 
if we are to proceed unperturbed 
with our developinenL 
Tradiliona! Fijian welcome cere- 
monies. including the offering of 
the island brew called kava. took 


TOKYO — Although his name 
was not to be found on the ballot. 
Prime Minister Yasnhiro Naka- 
sone appears to have emerged as 
tbe big winner in Tokyo elections 
that were won by his Liberal Dem- 
ocratic Party. 

Tokyo’s voting pattern is regard- 
ed by many Japanese politicians as 
a guide to national trends. So Lib- 
eral Democrats woe heartened by 
the impressive gains they registered 
in the balloting hoe on Saturday. 

They hoped the results signaled 
that the time was ripe for them to 
call elections to the Diet, or parlia- 
ment, and reverse tbe sharp loss of 
seats they suffered in December 
1983. 

P oliticians and other analysts 
said the Tokyo campaign was a 
boon for Mr. Nakasone in particu- 
lar because he had a large personal 
stake in deciding if, and when, to 
declare a general election for the 
Diet's powerful House of Repre- 
sentatives. 

Many commentators said they 
beSeved a strong showing by the 
liberal Democrats might improve 
Mr. Nakasone’s slim chances of al- 
tering party rules that prevent him 
from continuing as leader when his 
present term expires in late 1986. 
Because the party, a coalition of 


referendum by the major parties. 
Their leaden, including Mr. Naka- 
sone. took to the streets to seek 
voter support. 

Tokyo has K5 million eligible 
votere, or 10 percent of tbe national 
loiaL Moreover, as the equivalent 
of Washington and New York 
rolled into one, the capital can set 
electoral moods for tbe entire com>- 

try- 

There were no big issues, and 
that left rquid i d"^ to campaign in 
time-tested Japanese style. They 
cruised the streets in sound tracks, 
blaring out their names in the hope 
that voters would remember them. 

In the end, tbe Liberal Demo- 
’ crats increased their strength in the 
127-member Tokyo Metropolitan 


Assembly from 51 seats to 56. Their 
share of tbe popular vote, 36 per- 
cent, was 1.5 percentage prams 
higher than in the last election, in 
1981. 

The party obviously commanded 
far less than a majority, but it re- 
tained a solid plurality and donn- 
nated a coalition under the conser- 
vative administration of Governor 
Shimichi S uzuki. Mr. Suzuki him- 
self was not op for rejection. 

One discouraging note for the 
Liberal Democrats was tbe record 
low turnout of 53.5 percent The 
low turnout continued a trend seen 
in national elections two years ago. 
The governing party usually fares 
less well when voters stay home. 

The results Sunday improved tbe 


Ex-Manila Minister Arrested 


Japan since 1955, its president is aD 
but assured of becoming prime 
minister. 

a local 
jro cam- 
paign was treated luce a national 


Although technically 
event, the nine-day Tokyc 
paten was treated like a a 


Reuters 

MANILA — A former Philip- 
pine information minister, Francis- 
co Tatad, was arrested Tuesday on 
graft and corruption charges. He 
was held for six hours before being 
freed on bail 

Mr. Tatad, who served in the 
government of President Ferdi- 
nand E Maroos for 10 years until 
1980, was arrested days after writ- 
ing an article sharply critical of Mr. 
Marcos and his wife, Imelda. He 
posted bail of 23,000 pesos ($ 1,250) 
and is to appear in court again 
Monday. 

Mr. Tatad, 45, said he would ask 


the court to 'dismiss the case, which 
he termed political persecution. 

The five charges against him say 
he committed irregularities when 
be was a cabinet member. These 
include receiving money for a 
printing contract be had awarded 
and failure to dedare his assets as a 
minis ter 

Mr. Tatad is now a columnist 
with tbe independent Business Day 
newspaper. He said after his arrest 
that il was tbe Marcoses, “whose 
enormous wealth at home and 
abroad cannot be explained, who 
should be criminally prosecuted.” 


chances that, if Mr. Nakasone docs 
can a House of Representatives 
election, he will wait until next 
June, when balloting must also be 
held for the Diet’s upper chamber, 
the House of Council] ors. In the 
past, so-called double elections 
have led to high turnouts and solid 
showings by the Liberal Demo- 
crats. . 

Other parties that did well were 
the Komeito. which is Buddhist- 
oriented, and the Japan Commu- 
nist Party. These parties ran tight 
organizations that tend to be par- 
ticulariy effective in local elections. 

Tbe Komeito gained two seats, 
to finish second in the overall dis- 
tribution with 29. The Communists 
gained three seats, finishing third 
with a total of 19. 

The Japan Socialist Party, tbe 
main opposition group nationally 
but a consistently poor performer 
in Tokyo, was tbe major loser, los- 
ing four seats and ending up with a 
total of 11. 

In the remaining contests, the 
New libera] Club won six seals, 
tbe Democratic Socialist Party won 
two, and independents four. 



hrin 

Yasuhiro Nakasone 


Japanese Probe 
Laser Device Sale 
To Communists 

The Assmarcd Pros 

TOKYO — The Japanese gov- 
ernment has started an inquiry into 
the reported export to a Commu- 
nist country of 3 special laser de- 
vice used to produce semiconduc- 
tors. an official said Tuesday. 

Hideo Setoya, of tbe Ministry’ of 
International Trade and Industry, 
said officials were investigating 
whether the Tokyo-based Kuri- 
inoto Trading had forwarded a la- 
ser-trimming system. 

A laser- trimming system is used 
lo imprint circuits on the surface of 
advanced hybrid semiconductors, 
used in missiles and laser weapons. 

Mr. Setoya refused 10 say where 
the device had come from and 
which counuy had purchased it, 
but local newspapers said the com- 
pany imported the device in 1983 
from a manufacturer in Oregon. 

Nakasone Is Visiting Italy 

The AsSiVtOleJ Prdi 

ROME — Prime Minister Yasu- 
hiro Nakasone of Japan began a 
three-day visit to Italy on Tuesday. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17. 1985 


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INSIGHTS 


Company Scandals: For Workers, Disbelief May Give Way to Defiance 


By N.R. Kleinfield 

New Tijrt Times Service 

N EW YORK — He cannot think about it 
without irritation. He is loath to go on at 
any length. Frankly, he is sick of iL 
“We talk about it all the time,’' he said 
“We're in the papers on a daily basis. How could 
you not talk about hr 
The man is an executive at ELF. Hutton. The 
‘“it" is the check-kiting scandal that has engulfed 
the brokerage firm recently. 

“Am I frustrated?,'' he asked “Oh yeah. I'm 
frustrated. There has to be frustration when you 
see the name of the firm you work for dragged 
over the coals day after day," 

The fear hovers over the employees of any 
company. One day, a nightmare comes true. 
Someone is exposed for cooking the books, an 
executive bribes a government official people 
die from something the company made — and 
all the years of nourishing an image as a corpo- 
rate citizen in good standing are destroyed It's 
like a shiny bowl rusting overaighL 
Much has been written about Hutton. Union 
Carbide, General Dynamics, General Electric 
and other companies that are operating under a 
cloud of scandal. About what the leaden are 
doing to shore up the businesses. About the 
vicissitudes of the stodcprice. About the extent 
of financ ial liability. The dry and impersonal 
mathemati cs of calami ty. 

Relatively little attention, though, has been 
drawn to the individual traumas of the people 
who go up and down the elevators each day, 
how those t raumas affect the companies, and 
what corporations try to do to counteract the 
negative effects. 

Yet it is hoe, inside these corporations, that 
the aftereffects of scandals often linger longest. 
The challenge for management is to keep the 
impact as brief and slight as posable. 

Many scandal-ridden companies are trying to 
do just that. The chairman’s soothing comments 
issue forth from loudspeakers, while his face 
appeals to workers from strategically placed 
video machines. Letters, memos, even newspa- 
per advertisements tell employees again and 
again that they work for a decent company, and 
that they, too, are decent people. 

But behind the conciliatory rhetoric often lies 
an iron dete rmina tion to make sure that no 
employee errs a g ain. GEL for one. followed its 
spate of internal memos by imposing a new 
regimen of more rigorous safeguards against 
employee wrongdoing. McDonnell Douglas, Al- 
lied and others started internal ethics courses 
after their names were dragged through the 
mud. Still other companies have called for the 
resignation of a top manager, or of a handful of 
managers, to prove to the world — and to their 
own employees — that they will quickly excise 
anyone who besmirches the company name. 

But while all of those moves help, none of 
them cures. And in general the result of a 
corporate scandal is that employee morale 
sinks. Productivity may decline. Too often, 
once-proud employees find themselves embar- 
rassed to admit to strangers where they work. 
One employee of EF. Hutton has stopped wear- 
ing his Hutton T-shirt when be goes out jogging. 

“The sense that a company is an impersonal 
entity is not so,*” said Boris Yaritz, a professor 
of public policy at the Columbia University 
Graduate School of Business. “People do have a 
feeling that their organization has egg on its 
face. People feel embarrassed. They may not go 
the extra mile for the company." 

Desertion is not uncommon. Scandal is a tip 



protection to stave off the swarm of suits claim- 
ing illness from asbestos. 

“I didn't believe it,” he remembered. “I 
thought it had to be wrong." 

But it was true. Mr. Lrmdell said he felt 
morose at first, jittery about his own future. 
“But then," be added, “them was a sort of 
feeling of. bey, maybe this is what the company 
needs to get back together." 

The initial impact on most employees is al- 
most always jarring. “People are certainly less 
proud of the company and want to divorce 
themselves somewhat from it," remarked Harry 


powers to prevent another such incident. It is no 
solace to say that errors can occur in any human 
system." 

Employees, according to GE, welcomed the 
communications. Some even asked if they could 
show the letters to customers and the press, and 
they were encouraged to do so. 

Beyond the preaching, more rigid policies 
were imposed A review board was created An 
ombudsman was appointed. A videotape of an 
interview conducted by Mr. Doyle with John 
Welch, the chairman, was sent to all plants. It 
showed a tired Mr. Welch giving pretty much 


Levinson, a psychologist who heads the Levin- the same message presented in the letters. 


son Institute. “This happened in the 1970s with 
OPEC and the employees of the oil companies." 

Mr. Levinson, who was a consultant to Sim 
Oil at the time, recalled the 
reacted: “Some would 
didn’t want to iden: 

There were allegations of oil companies ma- 
nipulating prices on tankers in the middle of 



A few years earlier, Man viile look a similar 
rack when it blanketed employees with messages 
from the top at a time when spirits were being 
battered by asbestos litigation and a sudden 
bankruptcy filing. 

Once Man villc decided to petition for protec- 
tion under bankruptcy laws, it bought advertise- 
ments in 6S newspapers around the country and 


laiis ts and regulators are telling them they wear 
black hats. TreyYe going to Wow- things up. So 
management has to keep explaining to 
why they've gotten black hats and why 
don't deserve black hats." 

Some ugly tragedies hang over a company for 
years, then virtually disappear Events started to 
beat down on the* Allied Corp. in 5975. when ■ 
workers a; the company producing the insecti- 
cide. Kepone, for Allied were reported to be 
suffering from tremors, headaches and sterility. 
Health officials felt that cancer in the area of. 
Virginia where the plant was located would rise, 
because Allied had illegally dumped Kepeite in 
the James River. 

Edwin Halkyand. Ailicd's senior rice presi- 
dent of human resources, recalls that the deba- 
cle had a jolting effect. Recruiters on college 
campuses, he said, found potential candidates 
spuming job offers. “We hved with that thing 
night and day for five years." he said. 

Allied invested heavily in anti-pollution 


Delaware Bay and gouging the public. So they inserted uplifting messages. At company head- equipment and safety controls, and the malaise 
would say they worked for Ship Building, died away. Nowadays, the^ episode rarely gets 

ibe ship building subsidiary of Sun, even though ~~~ 

thqr knew nothing about building ships.” Employee morale 
There is, though, a coded-spring force that F J 

rapscs emnlovees to raUv auicxlv in defense oF . _ _ 

their provider. “There is a we-ihey mentality fii nicfi . Productivity 
that develops after these sons of thing s hit," an * 

executive recruiter notes. “Employees really get J 1 * 

their backs up and defend the company, even if may Q0CJJ.H6. 
they’re not sure it’s blameless.” J 


After the disaster in Bhopal workers near a Tp l r- j 

Union Carbide plant in Institute West Virginia, ihlllplOy CCS may tlllCL 

themselves 


to the headhunters to pick up the phone. As one 
recruiter remarked, “Anything that's wounded 
gets attacked.” 

Companies, of course, have been getting 
wounded for years. And though there is no way 
to undo the pain and wrongdoing they may be 
responsible for. they sometimes discover that 
adversity instills better values for the future. 

F EW crimes have rocked blue-chip corpo- 
rations as deeply as the price-fixing and 
bid-rigging conspiracies in the electrical 
manufacturing industry in the early 1960s. GE, 
the most prominent of the conspirators, saw 
three of its executives trooped off to jail; eight 
others got suspended sentences. Though the 
chairman and president were not convicted — 
both said that they were ignorant of the miscon- 
duct — many employees remained dubious that 
the ultimate bosses could be unaware of such 
events. Some employees left; a lot of positions 
were shuffled. Employees faced mixtures of 
scorn and sympathy in their communities. 

“Life magazine had this big picture one week 
of one of the vice presidents m jail” recalled an 
executive no longer with GE “That had a very 
shocking effect on people. It made some people 



Godly Hufl/Tha Now York Times 

wonder whether this was where they wanted to 
work.”. 

Another GE employee who was with the 
company during the price-fixing days recalls 
reacting to the jailing of a GE rice president 
who had been a local fund-raiser for the Jesuits. 

“There was more compassion than anger," he 
said. “It was more a sense of what a tragedy this 
is." 

Even today, the sramHal is still haunting the 
company. “These thing s are substantially de- 
moralizing," said Thomas J. Peters, the co-au- 
thor of “In Search of Excellence," a book about 
America’s most successful corporations, “but 
also potentially substantially cleansing. At GE 
today, there is stffl fallout from that price-firing. 

The scar of that is still very much visible. There 
are topics of conversation that are out of bounds 
at GE — things like relative prices — that aren't 
out of bounds at other companies." 

When a crisis engulfs a company, its employ- 
ees pass through phases, not dissimilar to the 
experience of coping with a failing relative. At 
first, there is shock, even disbelief. Three years 
ago. Thomas LundeU, a controller at Manrille 
Crap., was rat vacation, when he heard on the 

radio that ManviHe had filed for bankruptcy facts of the mess, they adopted the tone that bad 
1 apples lie in any barrel. “In any large organiza- 
tion," one read, “people may make errors in 
judgment. These must be viewed in relation to 
the extremely good reputation of our company 
and its people. 

StiB, the letters had the tenor of a sermon, 
meant to dissuade the flock from future sins. 
One missive said: “Our integrity is at the core of 
our business reputation, and everything that 
affects it is a challenge to all of us. We must do 
everything within our individual and collective 


went on the offensive. A widow of (me employee 
had thousands of bumper stickers made up 
reading, “I Am a Carbide Supporter,” and she 
doled them out around town. 

H OW well have most corporations be- embarrassed to admit 

haved when caught in the web of scan- 

»'££££?' “ 01 where they work. 

“To my mind," said Tom Peters, “the poor - ■ - — 

handling bods down to why Nixon got toppled 
in 1974 and that can be summed up in one and 
only one word — ‘stonewalling.’ You’re a 
damned fool for not telling the truth. 

“I was around the Hooka - Chemical people as 
a consultant when Love Canal broke. One of the 
Hooker people I was around was a decent man. 

His instinct was to do at least the small thing s — 
spring for moving the people into the local 
Holiday Inn. Occidental Petroleum had bought 
Hooker before the incident and the Occidental 
people said no way, because that would be an 
admission of guilt. And that's pure rubbish. 

This man was quite angry." 

Frank Doyle is the vice president in charge of 
corporate relations at GE In that capacity, he 

contract scandal lmaSC swung of new contracts an™ of 4e com 

“The impact, I think , has been sobering bat 
not devastating," he said. “Concern, a feeling of 
loss of reputation by association but not by 
personal behavior.” 

Mr. Doyle said there has been anecdotal 
though no statistical evidence that it’s been a 
bit tougher to recruit engineers for raffitary 
work. “We've had a half-dozen incidents where 
someone said, ‘No, I don’t think m take that 
job, m go work for someone else,”’ he said. 

To minimiz e the effect on employees, GE set 
into motion some feverish activity. After every 
development in the case, anew letter went out to 
employees, signed by the chairman and the two 
rice-chairmen. Beyond chronicling the bate 


quarters in Denver, it installed video cameras 
and a sound system of rock concert quality so 
that the chief executive could speak to employ- 
ees. Some 2,000 attended the speech in person 
and the rest saw a videotape. 

The strategy appears lo have enabled a meat 
many ManviBe workers to make peace with the 
company’s travails. A Gallup survey taken in 
November found that 87 percent of employees 
would recommend Manrille as a place to work. 

When a company gets a black eye, consul- 
tants agree, the chief executive officer should 
step forth to pacify the work force. Or, in some 
cases, should step down, as happened at Gener- 
al Dynamics. David S. Lewis, the chairman, 
announced that he would retire at the end of the 

the 

g g mn g of new contracts at two of the compa- 
ny’s Ingest divisions. 

“We don't do enough of that in American 
business," said Abraham Zaleznik, professor of 
leadership at the Harvard Business School “In 
Japan, it's common for the head person in the 
face of a disaster to publicly apologize. In Amer- 
ica, there’s a tendency to pass the blame on.” 

“To alleviate anxiety, people have to identify 
with a strong figure or else they will become 
more . anxious and make worse decisions." Mr. 
Zalggnik adds. 


I HERE -are few better 


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ling lead 


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T , 

X make than the irrepressible Lee Iacocca. 
Outside wolves licked their 
don of feasting on a dead 
heaped on the automaker for acceptii 
outs from the government. But Mr. 
preached about the path to a new rainbow and 
kept the company together. 

When the issue is a protracted problem in a 
company or industry, thepreaching can become 
a long, tedious affair. “Employees of electric 
power companies used to fed good," said Mr. 
Levinson. *They were stringing lines and bring- 
ing people light. They wore white hats. Now, 
because of nuclear power, a lot of enrironmen- 


discussed. New workers do not know about 
Kepooe. “It’s in the corporate history books,". 
Mr. Halkyand said. 

Even when it is clear that a company is 
blameless for some tragedy, employees may feel 
ghastly. At Prudential -Sache Securities, the 
chief executive, George L Ball, recently sent out 
a to-all-staff memo in which he took issue with a 
recent newspaper story charging that be was 
party to the illegal check-kiting scheme at EF. 
Hutton while he was there. He feared that Pm- 
dential-Bache employees might feel tarred with 
the same brush that was tarring him, or might 
conclude that be did not care about staff integri- 
ty. "My primary concern.” he wrote, "is that lie 
gossip might taint our quest for qualitative, as 
well os quantitative, standards that are above 
anything in our industry. Please don't let that 
happen, nor will I .“ 

Employ ees at Johnson & Johnson also had to 
cope with indirect culpability. Sept. 30, 1982. is! 
a date deeply etched into the mind of eyety J&J 
employee. That is when the first horrid reports 
arrived that people were dying from cyanide- 
laced Tylenol capsules. Almost immediately, it- 
was established that Johnson & Johnson was 
not a culprit. Still, trauma pervaded the work 
force. 

“It was definitely a day of silence.” said Laura 
Kopczynski, who was working on the produc- 
tion hoe at the McNeil Consumer Products 
plant that was packaging Tylenol. “For the first 
three days, I couldn't eat or sleep. I couldn’t go- 
out and do anything. I couldn’t move. I'd sit at' 
home with the TV or the radio on. I'd have the 
radio playing low -all through the night. And 
another death. And another death." * 

Although Johnson immediately pulled tb& 
product off the market and sent production 
jjeople home, it reassured workers that it would 
fight the calamity. It passed on everything it 
knew to the press and employees. Waves of 
support came from unexpected sources. A but- . ' 
ton maker sent 2,000 buttons that said. “We’re 
Craning Back." Employees pinned them on. The 
company came together. 

Mammoth corporations, if nothing else, boast 
remarkable resiliency. No matter bow gloomy 
things get, there are always sunny days again. 
One way or another, it seems, employees man- 
age to recapture lost spiriL 

Which is not to suggest that terrible tragedies 
do not leave small sores that do not completely 
heal “It’s still tough when you’re sitting in tic 
backyard of a Saturday afternoon barbecue and 
somebody gets to talking about the asbestos' 
situation," said Chuck Hite, senior rice presi- 
dent of human resources at Manrille. “It's not- 
comfortable. I’m not comfortable. I'm sorry 
we're in bankruptcy. I'm sure that we’d all say. 
that if we had it to do over again, we’d do some 
thing s differentlv.’’ 

“We’re sorry,” said Curt Linke, Man vine’s- 
vice president of corporate relations. “We're all 
sorry. There’s a lot of blame that can be thrown 
around. It's a question now of how to deal with 
it.” . 


Shevardnadze: Different Kind of Official 




U.S. Legislators Who 
Met Him in 1979 Noted 
Independent Manner 

By Gary Lee 

Washington Poet Service 

\\ j ASHINGTON — The silver-haired 
\\f politician from the Republic of Georgia 
▼ Y in the Caucasus greeted ins American 
guests with a ioke and proceeded for two hours 
to impress them with his deep anti-Chinese 
sentiments, a firm stand against nuclear weap- 
ons and a surprisingly independent manner. 

Several erf lie visitors, who were from the U.S. 
Congress, recall that their host, then 51 and the 
Communist Party leader in the mountainous 
republic of the Soviet Union, opened by thank- 
ing them for getting the accompanying high- 
level politicians down from Moscow — a feat he 
had been unable to accomplish. 

Now. Eduard A. Shevardnadze, at 57, has 
moved from Tbilisi to Moscow as foreign minis- 
ter. That meetingwith a U.S congressional dele- 
gation in April 1979 has taken on special weight 
as apparently the only extended meeting he has 
had wi th American officials. 

During the talks, Mr. Shevardnadze “com- 
plained about the level of military spending,” 
recalls John Brademas, then House majority 
whip and head of the delegation, and now prea- 
dent of New York University. “And he came 
across as very patriotic." 

But the strongest and most memorable stance 
that Mr. Shevardnadze look was against the 
Chinese, Mr. Brademas and others who were 


present recaH 

“He launched into a fervent denunciation of 
China," said Mi. Brademas, “and wanted 
against supplying China with nuclear weapons.” 

Burt Hoffman,, then a congressional aide, 
added: “A fear of China really came through.” 

Representative Thomas J. Downey, Demo- 
crat of New York, said that Mr. Shevardnadze 
went out of his way to malm dear his fedings 
about China, displaying a “virtual hatred.” 

According to Mr. Bradonas’s notes, Mr. She- 
vardnadze said, “We are very much concerned 
about the problem of China. Today they are 
attacking Vietnam, tomorrow it will be India, 
then the Soviet Union, and maybe even the 
United States. China suppresses its own people, 
and suppresses any opposition to a new war." 

"it has a psychosis of war “ Mr. Shevard- 
nadze went on, according to Mr. Downey. “We 
helped them through the dark times and now 
they’re turning tbdr back on us.” ' 

In recent months, Soriet-Chinese relations 
seem to have entered a quiet thaw. 

Several of those at the meeting were surprised 



Eduard A. Shevardnadze at a parliament session. 




that Mr. Shevardnadze's presentation was “di- 
rect," “outspoken" and free of the rhetoric and 
dogma commonly associated with speeches by 
Soviet figures. 

NEof the debates, Charles A. Vanik, a 
former Democratic representative from 
Ohio, said, “I saw a man very much 
unl ik e the.other Russians. He was independent, 
open and unrestrained.” 

1 *Sure of his power base, he was unafraid to 

say bold things," Mr. Vanik added. 

Mr. Downey recalled: “He was very much a 
commanding person.” 

A member of the UJ5. Embassy staff had 


O 


The 1979 visit look place during the thicfccf . 
U.S.-Soriet discussion over theSALT-2 nnBS 
control agreement, and when theissuebf nucte: 
ar aims arose Mr. Shevnr rlnaffre earna j fawa 1 
hard against them, several of those unseat sai& 


. 

thing to do with the industrial capacity w?*- 
going for weapons production," Mr. BratiemaS 
quoted Mr. Shevaronadze as ha ring $ail\TCW' 
capacity could easily go to peaceful pmpeseiT 
According to Mr. Downey, rh* GavpxS, 
leader punctuated bis position on nudear^fflS- 
with a wave of the hand and wrifoim etfr . • 
"They're crazy." . 

“Shevardnadze gave us a real sense- tbsttT* * 1 




didn’t know too much.” So many of them were Mr. Downey said. He added that 


surprised by bow much be did know, Mr. Hoff- 
man said. 


nadze was proud that there were no ntM&* 
weapons in Georgia. • 












— 1 


lance * 

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AT>VF.itn^TT<fi fiTTPPF.TgMF.Vr TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


Page 7 






UHRH| 

^?TT! 






Tttfe hew Dubai JebelAli Free Zone ^ help boost the Emirate’s economy. Many ; ; F " ,a 

• foireign companies are already showing interest in setting up manufacturing, \^A *• W£k ; 

l^rehouse and distribution facilities m . this Middle East Tax Free Centre. .0- jg jj 

Aiitomakers and camera groups are amongst those now knocking at the gates of 
• ^ the free zone which is within one ofthe world’s largest harbor areas. 

Jebcl Ali Free Zone to Become Market Focus for 1 Billion People 


The Jebel Ali 
Pan Control Tcmcr 


The new Jebel Ali Free Zone Authority, which operates the 
largest mainpade harbor in the work! at Dubai is all set to 
become a massive cargo and manufacturing distribution 
center which will serve one quarter of the world’s population. 

“We reckon we have a catchment area of one tuition people 
representing the biggest market in the world,” says Charles 
Heatit marketing director for the Jebel Ah Free Zone Au- 
thority. Just bade from a tour of free zones and ports in 
South-East Asia and the Far East, Heath believes that Jebel 
Ah can offer anything, if not more, than other established 
free zones in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore or South Korea. 

At the beginning of this summer, new laws and regulations 
were bropgbt in to enhance the attractions of the port and its 
growing industrial complex. With a fast developing sea-air 
cargo link, Jebel Ah is well positioned to tranship goods 
throughout the Middle East, the southern Mediterranean, 
East and Southern Africa, and the Asian Sub-Continent 
‘That’s a quarter of. the world's population,” claims an 
exuberant Heath who has been sifting through hundreds of 
•applications from inte rnational and other companies now 
wanting a base in Jebel Ah, just half an hour's drive from 
Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. 

There is a complete package of incentive regulations 
which could turn Dubai into the most significant develop- 
ment area in the Middle East. One of the most important 
aspects of the new laws is that any company or organization 
operating ■ exclusively from Jebel Ah win be regarded as a 
company incorporated outside the United Arab Emirates. 
To ah intents and purposes it could be in Germany or 
: Japan;” says Heath. This means the company would not be 
subject to UAE ownership or existing labor restrictions. 


Dubai is the,drigjcoal entrepot center of the Gulf. For 
gen e ratio ns tt-g mgrrhants have traded far and wide with 
dhows from tlte sheltered natural creek. The city's prosperity 
was founded on trade and it became rich in its own right long 
before the days of the oh boom in Arabia. Today Dubai is a 
flourishing modern etty with one of the fastest growing and 
busiest airports in the Middle East. 

The Baler's Staren&wss 

The Ruler of Dubai and vice president of the United Arab 
Emirates is Shaikh Rashid bin Said A1 Maktoum who has 
been the driving force behind the development of this desert 
sheikhdom. 

Dubai has never been rich in natural oh or gas resources 

like some of its neighbors. It has always had to rely on a good 

nose far business. The Euler had always urged a policy of 
economic diversification as far as was practical. Sometimes 
his suggestions were looked on with scorn as “white elephant 
schemes.” But.his uncanny shrewdness and impulsive ded- 
rfATUYiaking often confounded his critics. One such example 

has been the creation of the original part at Jebel Ah. 

Eight years ago while out walking near a sandy knoll 
overlooking the sea at Jebel Ah, an ancient navigation mart 
and a favorite plane spat for the rater. Shaikh Rashid thrust 

Us walking stick into the desert and dedared to those around 

Mm: “I want a port Build It here and have itworidng in four 
years.”. 1 

• And- tens began the constraetton-of^he largest artificial 
harbor in the \florid, one of the’few man-made Objects said to 


be dearly visible on earth from outer space. Like a giant 
reversed.’^*’ blasted out of the desert, the port and industrial 
area now cover some 7,500 acres. There are 67 berths, 
container handling facilities, ro-ro berths, a 42,000 cubic 
meter capacity cold store, an aluminium smelter, de s alinisa- 
tion and power generating plants using natural gas, support- 
ed by all the necessary working Infrastructure. 

Tonnage up SO per cent 

Already more than 40 companies dealing with oilfield 
supplies to photographic film storage and distribution have 
established th emselv es in the port area and industrial com- 
plex. In 1984 the port itself had its most successful year since 
full operations began just over two years ago. Tonnage 
through the port increased by 50 per cent to 4J1 million tons 
compared to 1983. 

Because of the totally sheltered and virtually enclosed 
harbor area, vessel lay-ups also continued to play an active 
role in the ports activities. These totalled L5 million dead- 
weight tons and included nearly a dozen oil drilling rigs. 

Although overall business has been increasing at Jebel Ali, 
Dubai, in common with the rest of the Gulf countries has 
been suffering from the overall effects of the economic 
recession and the continuing Iran-Iraq con fl ic t 

Dubai felt it was necessary to do something which would 
hety boost its economy. In 1980 a limited free zone area with 
private, hooded warehouses was established. Earlier this 
year a decision was taken by the Government to upgrade the 
facilities at Jebel Ali and to continue the laissez-faire policy 


towards entrepreneurial activity which has always been the 
hallmark: of Dubai's commercial success. 

More Liberal Attitude 

There has been close cooperation between the Govern- 
ment of Dubai, the city’s Chamber of Commerce and Indus- 
try, and the Port Authority of Jebel Ali concerning the latest 
developments. In January this year a decree was drawn up 
defining the new Free Zone Authority but this was not signed 
until May. „ 

Abdul Rahman G. A1 Mutaiwee, director general of the 
Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry, says that it had 
always been in the Government’s mind to have an active free 
zone authority since Jebel AlTs inception. Mutaiwee, who is 
one of the members of the board of the new Jebel Ali Free 
Zone Authority, explains some of the moves behind the Free 
Zone. 

He says that because of the decline in the overall economic 
situation of the region, the days of the “golden age when the 
economic fortunes of Dubai were turning very fast in the 
early 1970’s, were over.” 

Dubai has grown rapidly. Its infrastructure was completed 
and “we had to search for another source of income— we 
have to diversify and create something new for our econo- 
my,” says Mutaiwee adding: “We have to give our country a 
big p ush, industrialize ourselves and create a new resource 
for Dubai” 

He believes that Dubai is very well equipped and can play 
an important role in utiijTing the facilities and income which 
will be created through the new Free Zone at Jebel Ali which 

Continued on following page 











Page 8 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17. 1935 


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for the same reason. 


The address, is the prestigious 
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And the reason is really quite 
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For full details, drop in on your 
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Continued from previous page 
he does not think will draw 
trade away from the city. “If 
anything, it will increase . . . 
we must adapt to local cir- 
cumstances and not stop the 
economic wheel of fortune 
from turning.” 

‘Apply Today, Start 
Tomorrow’ 

Keeping the wheels turn- 
ing at a rapid pace is Heath’s 
main task at the Free Zone’s 
head office in the port In the 
few weeks since the new 
plans were announced, appli- 
cations have been flooding in. 
More than 300 came in the 
first rush. These have now 
settled down to about ten a 
day as information about the 
Free Zone begins to circu- 
late. 

Already applications from 
the first two dozen compa- 
nies are being processed and 
another 60-100 are in the pipe- 
line. “If a company contacts 
us today, it could be operat- 
ing tomorrow in certain cir- 
cumstances/ 1 says Heath but 
admits that three to four 
weeks would be more reason- 
able. "It just depends on ex- 
actly what facilities the com- 
pany wants, whether or not it 
wants to build something, 
otherwise everything is 
here.” 

The Free Zone is trying to 
broaden its appeal to those 
who want to do business from 
a safe, secure base in thp re- 
gion. “We are trying to broad- 
en the benefits that we al- 
ready have here to the 
multi-national companies.” 

The Main Benefits 
What has Jebel Ah got to 
offer? According' to Heath 
just about everything— and it 
is an working. Heath sees this 
as a distinct advantage when 
comparing the facilities at 
Jebel Ah with those of other 
aspiring free zones. He reels 
off some of the main bene- 
fits: 

Power supplies available; 
Water available; 

Telecomm unications in op- 
eration; 

Easy access to the main 
highway linking Dubai and 
Abu Dhabi; 

Close to Dubai Internation- 
al Airport; 

Housing accommodation 
already in place; 

Labour already available. 

In addition there are to be 
no taxes and all capital and 
profits can be remitted freely 
for at least 15 years. 

But the most significant at- 
traction is in the interpreta- 
tion of the Decree establish- 
ing the Free Zone in relation 
to company ownership, em- 
ployment and immigration. 
In addition to a general li- 
cence to operate in the Free 
Zone, which win mainly be 
reissued to existing compa- 
nies already in operation, 
there is to be a “special H- . 
cence” 

A company operating from 
the Free Zone within the 
terms of the special licence 
will not require a local spon- 
sor or be subject to UAE 
partnership regulations. The 
Free Zone win itself. act as 
sponsor and nominal employ- 
er of any labour which the 
company may require for its 
operation. 

Most Uve Within Free Zone 
Manual and unskilled 
workers win have to live 
within the Free Zone provid- 


:SRI LANKAPtalombQE= 


ed accommodation but will 
be free to travel within the 
UAE; white collar workers 
and senior staff can live out- 
side the Free Zone. (For fur- 
ther details see story on 
page 3.) 

It is the sponsorship and 
labour regulations which 
have sparked off the major 
interest in the Free Zone as 
they provide a subtle method 
of gearing up greater eco- 
nomic activity without too 
many bureaucratic restric- 
tive measures. 

However, the Free Zone is 
at pains to point out that by 
being overall nominal spon- 
sor and employer it has no 
intention of becoming a 
source of cheap labour. As 
Heath himself points out, if 
anything the cost of labour in 
Dubai Is sometimes highe r 
than in other similar free 
trade zones in the world. Un- 
skilled workers get about 
Dhs. 1,000 (J277) a month 
compared to say, Dhs.750 
(¥208) in Taiwan. But Taiwan 
has withholding taxes— Jebel 
Ali has none. In fact there is 
no corporation or personal 
tax of any kind in Dubai and 
no currency restrictions. 

Possible 'Shelf Buildings 
“Every employer must 
sign an individual contract 
with his employee,” explains 
Heath who says that the Free 
Zone Intends to have fair, but 1 
stringent, labour legislation 
which will be internationally 
accepted by the new compa- 
nies coming into the Free 
Zone. 

Authorized recruiting of- 
fices will be allowed to oper- 
ate from within the Free 
Zone. Initially there will be 
accommodation for between 
three and four thousand un- 
skilled workers and further 
accommodation win be built 
as required. In addition a cer- 
tain amount of administra- 
tive and office space is being 
provided. The Free Zone is 
also considering providing 
ready-built warehousing and 
manufacturing “Shell” build- 
ings which can be adapted to 
customer requirements. 

Heath says that the Free 
Zone is putting together a 
commercial labour construc- 
tion team. “This wfll provide 
and build a0 the facilities 
which a company might re- 
quire as weU as supply the 
varying catering needs.” 

Staggering Response 
As the mercurial Heath 
fends off telephone calls and 
would-be interruptions from 
his colleagues, he admits to 
being a little surprised by the 
overwhelming response to 
the preliminary announce- 
ment of the enhanced Free 
Zone just two months ago. 

“We’re getting in replies 
much faster than we would 
normally have expected for 
what is really only phase one 
of our expansion,” says 
Heath. 

“It is much better than we 
expected,” says Sultan Bin 
Sulayenv chairman of the 
Free Zone who firmly be- 
lieves that the Free Zone is a 
step in the right direction. 

“It will make Dubai a 
much more attractive place 
for businessmen and the 
Free Zone is not only going to 
benefit Dubeu, but the whole 
of the Emirates as well,” re- 
affirms American educated 


Sulayem. In spite of some 
criticism from a few mer- 
chants, he is convinced that 
the Free Zone will bring new 
business to Dubai rather than 
attract existing companies 
from the city to Jebel Ali. 

Jim Scott, executive direc- 
tor of the Free Zone, agrees 
that so far things are looking 
pretty good. “We are getting 
interest from some very sub- 
stantial companies and they 
are asking us for the right 
kind of information, detailed 
requests, not just general 
questions.” 

One-Stop Service 

As Heath explains; “We 
think that between 40 and 50 
percent of the inquiries rep- 
resent new business for us.” 
Until final approval is given 
he is reluctant to name com- 
panies but says they include a 
major food processing group 


from New Zealand, one Euro- 
pean auto manufacturer, two 
automakers and truck suppli- 
er from the Far East, one of 
the world's largest optical 
manufacturers, and the sec- 
ond largest 35 mm camera 
manufacturer In the world. 

Scott says that what the 
Free Zone is really looking 
for are major International 
manufacturers with large 
product lines who want as- 
sembly or sub-assembly fa- 
cilities and a gateway to dis- 
tribution links. 

“We want to provide a one- 
stop service for these peo- 
ple,” he says. 

Jebel Ali is served by half a 
dozen major shipping freight 
lines. One area of rapid 
growth is in air-sea cargo 
links which Heath believes 
offers plenty of scope for de- 
velopment at Jebel Ali Often 
a manufacturer will ship his 


products from say the Far 
East to the Middle East and 
then fly the goods to their 
final destination in Europe, 
which works out cheaper and 
quicker by saving sailing and 
fuel costs. 

Dubai Airport i.fafc 
At present only about (me 
percent of all cargo in the 
world goes by a combination 
of sea and air. In the next 
eight years sea air cargo is 
expected to amount to a total 
of five percent and Heath be- 
lieves that one percent of all 
world sea-air cargo trade 
could come through Jebel All 
Cargo would be unloaded 
at the docks and then taken 
by special vehicles to Dubai 
International Airport where 
it would be stored in a special 
free trade zone or bonded 
area for onward shipment by 
air. This facility is expected 


to be available shortly and 
will both strengthen the links 
and improve the overall ser- 
vices available from Jebel 
Ali and Dubai It may be no 
coincidence that Dubai has 
also announced the forma- 
tion of a new airline. Emir- 
ates, to bring about a much 
needed improvement in re- 
gional communications. 

With the increasing pace of 
commercial and allied devel- 
opments, including the 
strengthening of the banking 
system within the UAE, Du- 
bai is well on the way to ex- 
tending its trade links 
through the improved facili- 
ties at the Jebel Ali Free 
Zone. Those running the Free 
Zone hope that Jebel Ali will 
become a golden spoke in Du- 
bai’s ceaselessly turning 
wheel of fortune, which may 
now be gathering further mo- 
mentum. 


Considering business 
in the Free Zone? 




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fe 


J. 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


Page 9 


ivaiiable shortly and 
•h strengthen the ln^ 
prove the overall sgj. 
available from Jebel 
I Dub;,;. U may be no 
ler.ct? that Dubai has 
BROiinc«*».i the forma- 
i new jiriir.e. Emir- 

0 brini atoiji a mucli 

1 jnTorv-.cmefii m re- 
ct>nrr.ur,:e;«tions. 

: the srcr.-Lsmt paceof 
ert-iai ;t*.J allied devel- 


ft ‘Ailru: 


a- w a> Up ex- 
links 


iSaJ Jv&‘: .All win 
■jviiiiv" sp-.-M' id [hi- 


ss 


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flEA.C *5, 
t JfN SWe-"*- 
n* ci/H 


Jebel Ali Free Zone 
Authority Facilities 


. The newly created Free 
Zone Authority has issued a 
■prelinmmry notice outtxmng 
the additional facilities which 
it- is now offering to those 
available from the previous 
Fort Authority of Jebel AIL 
The most significant points 
, are in the two types of li- 
cences winch win be issued. 
These consist of a “general 
licence" and .a “special li- 
cence.". 

Any foreign company 
wishing to do business in Du- 
bai has always had to have a 
local sponsor or business 
partner. The company also 
has had to apply to the feder- 
al authorities for work per- 
mits and immigr ation ap- 
proval on behalf of its staff if 
they are not UAE nationals. 
This has to be done through 
its local partner. 

From now on a company 
already operating or seeking 
to operate from within the 
' Free Zone, and who wishes to 
trade within the UAE must 
still use. the services of a local, 
agent and wflL he granted a 
"general licence.” 

However, a company may 
hire its own labour or staff 
within the Free Zone under a 
special agreement, if it oper- 
:ates rally within the Free 
Zone and does not export to 
• the UAE. Should the compa- 
ny want to export to the UAE 
or to any member of the Gulf 
Cooperation Council to which 
tile UAE belongs (tins has 
; still to be clarified )it still 
- needs a local agent But the 
agent . will not have to act as 
sponsor. 

In practice the Dubai au- 
thorities win treat the “spe- 
cial licence” holder as a for- 
eign company working 
“overseas” althou gh it hap- 
pens to be only 25 miles away 
at Jebel AH In the case of the 
“special licence” the Free 
Zone Authority wOl act as 
overall sponsor fra: the com- 
pany and its staff but without 
taking a shar e of the profits 
as in the case of a local part- 
nership. 

Many of the details and 
practicalities of the li censing 


agreements have stiD to be 
worked out and there are sev- 
eral “grey” areas particular- 
ly regarding the GCC which 
is seeking to introduce com- 
mon tariffs and customs 
agreements. 

Detailed rules and regula- 
tions for the operation of the 
Jebel Ah Free Zone Author- 
ity are still being drawn up. 
The official Decree No. 1 - 
1985 establishing the Free 
Zone in Jebel Ali was issued 
on January 9 and signed by 
Shaikh MaktOUm Bin Kashirt 
A1 Maktoum, Crown Prince 
and Deputy Ruler of Dubai It 
was published in the Official 
Gazette at the end of Aprs. 

Notice No. 001/85 from the 


(a) GENERAL LI- 
CENCES to those Users 
wishing to operate freely as 
at present, both within the 
Free Zone and outside it 

(b) SPECIAL LICENCES 
to Users wishing to operate 
within the Free Zone rally. 

The vaMly period of these 
licences to be negotiable. 

3. General Licences: 
General licences win remain, 
as at present, subject to all 
Municipal and Federal Li- 
censing requirements and 

the Federal labour laws. 

4 Special licences: 

(a) Companies and Organi- 
sations licensed to operate 
exclusively within the Free 
Zone Shall be deemed incor- 




mm 





Sultan Bin Sulayem, Chairman of the Jebel AE Free Zone 
Authority Board: I fid me are taking a stepm the rigfa direction... 
the response has bcenmuch better than we expected. 


Jebel Ah Free Zone Author- 
ity is reproduced below: 

L Control of Free Zone: 
AH existing users of the Free 
Zone will come under the 
control of the Free Zone Au- 
thority, but previous agree- 
ments (eg PBA arrange- 
ments) win remain in force 
until further notice. 

2. New appointments: An 
applications for Free Zone 
rights must he submitted to 
the Free Zone Authority. 
Two types of licences wfll be 
issued to accepted users of. 
the Free Zone. 


porated outside the UAE and 
therefore win not be subject 
to any national ownership re- 
strictions or partnership re- 
quirements: but they win 
consequently not be permit- 
ted to export goods or ser- 
vices to the UAE except 
through a Local Agent This 
Agent will not be required to 
sponsor the Licensee or Ms 
staff and win not be zesponsi- 

hte far any rights nr liabilities 

incurred by the Licensee or 
Ms staff. 

(b) Staff and labour re- 
quired by a Special Licensee 


for his operations within the 
Free- Zone wil be provided 
through the Free Zone Au- 
thority under a special Hiring 
Agreement by which the Li- 
censee retains practical con- 
trol of recruitment and em- 
ployment conditions, but the 
Free Zone Authority acts as 
sponsor and Nominal Em- 
ployer and will issue the nec- 
essary work permits which 
wm be valid for employment 
within the Free Zone only. 

5. Taxes and Charges: 
Neither class of Licensee will 
be liable to any Government 
or Municipal taxes or sunQiar 
imposts in respect of his op- 
erations or property within 
the Free Zone, but will pay 
normal rates of charges for 
any outside services utilised. 
PAJA and Free Zone charges 
and dues win be negotiated 
by separate agreement 

& Repatriation of Capital 
and Profits: AH imported 
capital and profits arising 
from Free Zone business win 
be freely transferable abroad 
for a minimum period of 15 
years. 

GENERAL CONDITIONS 

7. All services provided 
by or being the responsibility 
of the Municipality in the 
Emirate of Dubai win be pro- 
vided within the Free Zone 
by the Fort Authority of Je- 
bel Ali acting on behalf of the 
Jebel Ali Free Zone Author- 
ity. 

8. Existing Free Zone 
Customs Regulations wOl re- 
main unchanged eg. there 
wfll be no duty on Free Zone 
goods unless imported into 
the UAE. The Commercial 
Agencies law and Municipal- 
ity restrictions wfll not apply 
to goods transmitting the 
Free Zone. 

3. Dealings wfll be prohib- 
ited in the following goods: 
raw and prepared opium, 
coca leaves, cannabis resin 
and preparations whose basis 
is resin of cannabis and co- 
caine, fake or counterfeit 
money, or boycotted goods. 

14 Dealings in arms, am- 
munition and explosives wfll 
be restricted in accordance 
with existing regulations. 



Container Ships Make Greater 
Use of Port’s 67 Berths and 
9 Miles of Quays 


It takes about 20 minutes 
to drive from one side of Je- 
bel Ali Free Zone to the oth- 
er. The 7,500 acre site is only 
just being fenced and the 
eleven and a half mile wire 
link barrier around the port 
should be completed by the 
end of next month. 

As you approach from Du- 
bai City past the huge Trade 
Center tower block and the 
Hilton apartments, the Dubai 
Electricity Company’s power 
station and then the Dubai 
aluminium smelter works 
loom up out of the swirling 
afternoon heat which 
reaches more than 46 de- 
grees Centigrade in summer. 

The Jebel Ali bluff, now 
dotted by tree-shaded villas 
for expatriate workers at the 
Free Zone, is dominated by 
the twin dishes of the satellite 
earth station and the lattice- 
work microwave telecom- 
munications tower. It lies on 
the left of the main highway 
which leads to Abu Dhabi 
During the afternoon 
strong winds send the sand in 
stinging waves across the 
ground making it difficult to 
discern whether the grey 
ships * hulks are at anchor 
alongside the quays of the 
port or on some mysterious 
voyage through the desert 
The dozen or so vessels 
and 15 oil drilling rigs laid up 
in the port are dwarfed by the 
basins dug out of the desert 
Although virtually all of the 
basic infrastructure for the 
port has been completed 
some of the paved service 
link roads are still under con- 
struction. These wfll be fin- 
ished in the near future. 

Potanrid use store 
The main entrance to the 
port area is through the east 
gate near the Dugas turn-off. 
Just through the check point 
now constantly manned (afl 
vehicles leaving are 
searched), is a large blue 
green shed housing the cold 
store which is one of the larg- 
est in the Middle East It is 
also one of the Free Zone’s 
most important facilities. 


Apart from being used for 
chilled food products, Polar- 
oid and Kodak keep all their 
film stock there for distribu- 
tion throughout the Middle 
East 

Charles Heath, marketing 
director of the Free Zone, 
quotes their use of the cold 
store as a classic example of 
how Jebel Ali can serve as a 
strategic location for manu- 
facturers and distributors. 

Near to the cold store 
alongside the southern basin 
are a number of laid up ves- 
sels together with several 
jack-up oil drilling platforms. 
Opposite them are the main 
port administration offices 
and transport park. 

More container traffic 

Behind these facilities lies 
the entrance to the container 
and ro-ro ter minal which is 
approached through another 
check point and weighbridge. 
Last year a third gantry 
crane was installed to in- 
crease the efficiency of con- 
tainer handling. Total 
throughput in 1984 was 151,750 
twenty-foot equivalent units 
(TElPs) which was an in- 
crease of 23 percent Contain- 
er tonnage also rose by 28 
percent to just under 1 mil- 
lion tonnes. 


At the container freight 
station an average of 23 con- 
tainers are stripped or 
stuffed daily with a variety of 
cargoes. During the year 
more than 73,000 tonnes of 
aluminium ingots from the 
Dubai works were loaded 
into containers for export 
and nearly 90,000 cases of cig- 
arettes were received for 
storage in one of the air-con- 
ditioned warehouses before 
onward distribution. 

In line with increased ac- 
tivity throughout the port, 
bulk handling also rose by 34 
percent during the year. 
Nearly 900,000 tonnes of car- 
go were imported and 150,000 
tonnes exported. Most of the 
export cargo was handled by 
the International Bagging 
Corporation, which is the 
rally commercial bagging op- 
eration in the UAE. 

More than 9 miles of quays 

The backbone of tbe port is 
its marine activity but ship- 
ping movements showed only 
a slight overall gain during 
1984. Some 2,770 vessels 
called at the port. Although 
tbe total was only up by 2 
percent in numbers there has 
been a distinct change in the 
types of vessels serving the 


-£-4; 



Photo: Jebel Ali Pan Authority. 


During tbe summer Pan 
Gulf installed a new feeder 
service at the terminal to 
connect Abo Dhabi and Shar- 
jah every fortnight. Tran- 
shipment now accounts for 45 
percent of the ports total 
container movements. 


port. Hie most significant 
trend is in more, larger con- 
tainer and ro-ro vessels and a 
decline in the number of gen- 
eral cargo ships. 

The main facility which Je- 
bel Ah offers is its nine and a 
half miles of quays with 


space for 67 berths of all 
kinds, with dredged depths of 
up to 14 metres below low 
water leveL Just over a mile 
of wharfage is available for 
single users and there are 
special zones designated for 
different types of cargo— pe- 
troleum products, dry bulk 
and forest products, berths 
with refrigeration and ware- 
housing facilities and indus- 
trial user berths. 

A new fuel oil berth, pri- 
marily for the use of the Je- 
bel Ali power station was 
commissioned during the 
year along with two 300,000 
barrel condensate storage 
tanks to serve ARCO’s 
Margham gas field. As a re- 
sult the volume of petroleum 
products landed jumped by 
75 percent to 2.9 million 
tonnes in 19S4. 

Free Zone changes 

Until now there has been a 
designated “free trade zone” 
within the port area. Howev- 
er, with the publicaton of a 
new decree by the Govern- 
ment of Dubai tbe overall 
status of the Port of Jebel Ali 
has been enhanced to that of 
a complete “free zone” with 
its own administrative au- 
thority. Working terms and 
conditions remain much the 
same as before apart from 
the new kind of special li- 
cence (see adjacent story). 

In the past, minimum plot 
areas of land have been avail- 
able for leasing at preferen- 
tial rates depending on the 
proximity to the quayside. 
These plots have started at 
5,000 square meters but 
Heath believes that the new 
FZA may be offering smaller 
sized parcels of land. 

“The inquiries so far indi- 
cate that there is a need for 
more modest plots in some 
cases,” says Heath who is 
also examining the possibility 
of providing ready-made 
“shell buildings” as an opera- 
tional base for new compa- 
nies These would be in addi- 
tion to existing warehousing 
facilities which now exist in 
18 different areas of the Free 
Zone. 

Rents range from Dbs. 5.38 
($1.46) per square metre per 
year up to Dbs. 32.28 ($8.7) for 
plots adjacent and facing the 
quayside. Electricity, water 
and telecommunications 
links are provided to all 
points within the Free Zone. 





When you think of instant pictures you’ll in- 
! evitably think of Polaroid. 

Which is hardly surprising since we’ve beep 
leaders in the technology that produces them for over 
forty years. 

And, of course, it was our founder Dr Land who 
invented rite process in the first place. 

But did you know how broad the scope of instant 
imagery has become, or how fast it’s expanding? 

Today Polaroid is just as innovative as ever it 
was. Gearing revolutionary new products to meet 


the increasing demands .in amateur and professional 
photography, industry, commerce, science, medicine 
and education. 

Non film products are being developed too, allow- 
ing us tocreate magnetically or electronically generated 
images instantly. 

So it’s no wonder that, wherever you go in the 
world these days, Polaroid has become part of the 
language. 


Polaroid 


United Arab Emirates QulrihulofcGemff iJ.V)P.O. ^^Dub^Tdcphone 3W25TcItx4to487 
Polaroid UK Ltd (Export Division), Ashley Road. Sl Albans. Hertfordshire. ALI 5PR, England. Telex 2632-46. 


YOUR NEW BASE FOR MIDDLE EAST MARKETS 


Great news for earthlings, or 
indeed anyone, seeking a new 
trading or industrial base with 
direct access to Middle East 
markets. 

Dubai's Jebel Ali Free Trade 
Zone has now made it easy for 
international companies to set 
up operation in the region. 


Out of this world facilities 
include an extensive 
infrastructure, communications, 
energy, accommodation, hotels, 
hospitals, security, and every 
modern amenity. 

Find out more about the 
galaxy of benefits. Contact ' 
Charles S. Heath, at Jebel Ali. 


Or 


\ Jebel All Free 
* Zone Authority 

P.O. Box 3258, Du U.A.E 
Tel: Jebel Ali 56578-Telex: -17393 PAJA HM- 
Cable: PAJADUB-U.A.E 



"No space problems . 
So shuttle over fast! 













i 


Page 10 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL 



TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17. 1985 


PAULING 

•tAYAires 



r-.r\ri ___vj 

J- 


j 

PAULINGp.lc. 



Head Office 

100. Rochester Row. London SWl 



Telephone 01-828 4355 Telex 263131 
Cables Clamalores London SWl 

<7- • 

.. 

.. .. : • 


Dubai Airport Will 
Take Part In New 
Sea-Air Cargo Challenge 


Dry Excavation for Mina Jebel 
Ali by Dutco Pauling (Private) Ltd. 


Jjd, ctul 

..l.i A il ( I jjJ jj£ 3j <u » 


J ^LShoJI JUAaJ (CiAjljj) * I ^SjJ AS jiM 
p,$3 SJU ■ »** »■ -aujIj ^ouJI uaLa 1 

■ Jx Sj^JI ^aJolt.1 

Dutco Pauling (Private) Ltd wish every success 
to The Ruler of Dubai, H.H. Sheikh Rashid Bin 
Said Al Maktoum in h is new venture for the 
prosperity of Dubai, The Jebel Aii Free Zone. 


Dutco Pauling (Private) Limited 
PO Box 5240 Dubai United Arab Emirates 
Telephone Dubai 257175 
Telex Dubai 46906 DPPCO EM 


■*=^ (^jf) 

i4»fcA' L<yJl il,j .. «tt* w*. 

revive & :0>L- 
DPPCO EM tJ SiS 


Mohi-din Abdulkadir Bin- 
hendi, director general of Du- 
bai's Department of Civil 
Aviation is a man in a harry. 
“I like to get things done 
overnight,” he says rather 
mischievously, whenever 
faced with a challenging situ- 
ation. 

Certainly things are mov- 
ing at Dubai Airport, where a 
new arrivals terminal and 
other extensions are due to 
be completed next year. Zt is 
well on the way to becoming 
one of the busiest airports in 
the Middle East and principal 
gateway to the Gulf coun- 
tries. It also has one of the 
fastest growing and least ex- 
pensive duty free shopping 
complexes in the world, 
which is attracting global in- 
terest from travellers. 

Although new develop- 
ments are not quite complet- 
ed instantly, one of the latest 
is the decision by the Govern- 
ment of Dubai to form its 
own Emirates airline which 
it hopes will greatly improve 
regional services. This Is due 
to start operations in the fall 
The new developments at 
Jebel Ali also mean greater 
activity for Dubai Airport on 
the cargo side as part of the 
sea-air cargo service which 
the Free Zone Authority is 
promoting for the future. 

“Anything which brings in 
more business to Dubai is 
good for us as far as I am 
concerned,' 1 says the quietly 
aggressive US educated Bin- 
hendL 

New free zone terminal 

Final plans are being 
drawn up for a new sea-air 
cargo terminal to be built by 
the airport with special free 
zone or private bonded areas 
for the transhipment of car- 
goes from vessels railing at 
Jebel AIL 

"We are carrying out a spe- 
cial distribution study at the 
moment to see bow we can 
. best serve not only the region 
but further afield as wen,” 
explains Binhendi on a. fran- 
tic morning in his office, 


while trying to deal with half 
a dozen problems at once as 
members of his staff troop in 
and out 



RELIABLE AND 

ABUNDANT POWER 
AT JEBEL ALI 



Dubai Electricity Company decided 
way back in 1975 to locate its Central 
Power and Desalination Station at 
Jebel Ali in close proximity to the 
Jebel Ali Port. This Central Power 
and Desalination Station can 
produce, at present, 650 MW of 
Electricity and 32 million Imperial 
Gallons of water daily. The 
Company also established a bulk 
distribution point at Jebel Ali 


when it commissioned its 132kV 
Substation in 1984. Further if has 
a network of 33kV Substation 
around Jebel Ali. Thus Dubai 
Electricity Company can ensure 
immediate power supply availability 
to all Industries and Fatalities that 
will be established at the Free Zone 
at Jebel Ali. Electricity is never a 
problem if you are at Jebel Ali Free 
Zone. 





DUBAI ELECTRICITY 
COMPANY 

P.O. Box No. 564 
Dubai, United Arab Emirates 
Tel: 2221 1 1/5, 226216/5 
Telex: 45838 Kahrba EM 




Mohi-Din Ab d u l k a dir 

Binhendi, Director Gerund, 

Department of Civil Aviation. 

He hopes to construct an 
entirely new cargo hall with 
cold storage facilities. The 
airport and FZA will proba- 
bly operate a special fleet of 
trucks to shuttle cargo to and 
from the port as well as by 
road to other destinations in 
the Gulf. 

“It is going to be a great 
success and I can definitely 
see Dubai as a whole becom- 
ing the cargo centre for the 
region, when we can join to- 
gether the two facilities,” he 
adds exuberantly. 

At present there are about 
33 air cargo movements a 
week totalling 148 a month 
with a dozen “combis” (com- 
bined passenger-freight air- 
craft) serving Dubai. 

Total cargo throughput up 

Already Dubai has become 
the regional distribution cen- 
tre for most of the fruit and 
vegetables g-own in the Mid- 
dle East Produce is flown in 
regularly from countries as 
far apart as Jordan, Oman 
and Qatar for distribution lo- 
cally by air or land. 

Total cargo volume han- 
dled during 1984 amounted to 
87.9 million kg — an increase 
of 6 percent over the previous 
year. There was a 10 percent 
rise in export cargo which 
totalled ZL8 million kg wMe 
imports rose by 6 percent to 
62 million kg. 

One of the largest single 


pieces of air cargo was a 9 
metre long piece of machin- 
ery weighing 36 tonnes which 
was carried in an Air France 
Boeing 747 freighter. 

Dubai is now linked to 70 
airports worldwide and is 
served by some 45 airlines. 
Last year there were more 
than 48,000 traffic move- 
ments and 3.6 million passen- 
gers passed through the air- 
port averaging about 10,000 a 
day. 

New terminal being built 

During the year a second 
4,000 metre long runway was 
completed and work began 
on the new arrivals terminal 
which is being built by Dutco 
Balfour Beatty. Designed by 
Bechtel the new terminal wifi 
help the airport to achieve its 
target of handling 5 million 
passengers a year when it 
comes into service next year. 
This should allow for in- 
creased traffic and passen- 
ger needs up until the year 
2000. 

The new arrivals hall, 
which is to have a duty free 
shopping complex, in addilon 
to the existing one in the pre- 
sent departure b uilding, will 
have two customs handling 
areas. The same building will 
also house the offices of the 
Civil Aviation Department 
and airlines using the airport 

Making ‘fliers Into buyers’ 

December, 1984 saw the 
end of the first operational 
year for the newly opened 
duty free shopping complex 
which is now receiving inter- 
national acclaim. A major 
part of the lower floor level of 
the existing ter minal building 
was gutted and a thoroughly 
modern parade of attractive 
duty free boutiques was built 
in its place. 

There is a very wide range 
of goods on display from gold 
bars, the latest In electronic 
cameras, to fashions, leather- 
ware, spirits and sports 
goods. 

Colm McLoughlin, general 
manager of the duty free 
shopping complex, claims to 


have some of the cheapest 
drinks on sale compared to 
any other duty free shop in 
the world. It also sells some 
of the most expensive luxury 
watches encrusted with gold 
and diamonds. The jewelry 
shop probably offers one of 
the most comprehensive 
ranges of gold items to be 
found at any airport Total 
sales this year are expected 
to pass the budgeted target of 
$22 million by a comfortable 
margin. 

Binhendi is justly proud of 
the duty free complex which 
he sees fulfilling the needs of 
passengers. He believes that 
a duty free shopping complex 
should be an Integral part of 
the airport services and ev- 
ery effort is being made to 
turn “fliers into buyers.” 

One special feature of the 
complex is an attractive 
“Gifts from Dubai” section 
where local textiles, handi- 
crafts and other items can be 
bought by last-minute shop- 
pers or those in transit who 
want to pick up a Dubai sou- 
venir. 

McLoughlin, and his Irish 
team mates, who helped es- 
tablish and run the duty free 
shop at Shannon Airport in 
Ireland, is constantly adding 
to the 500 or more stock items 
and plans to offer a variety of 
services to passengers as 
well as mail order. It was 
while passing through Shan- 
non one day that Binhendi de- 
cided that Dubai had to have 
something similiar — only 
better. Naturally he wanted 
it to be operating overnight 

New airline proposed 

The major new aviation 
development which will have 
an important bearing on the 
Jebel Ali Free Zone as far as 
communications are con- 
cerned is Dubai’s decision to 
start its Emirates airline. 


This has come about as the 
result of frustration over ser- 
vices offered by Gulf Air 
which is jointly owned by 
four of the Gulf countries in- 
cluding the United Arab 
Emirates, of which Dubai is a 
member. 

Partly because of a dispute 
between Gulf .Air and Dubai 
over ticket ting rights, Gulf 
Air has drastically reduced 
its services to and from Du- 
bai. In the last two years the 
number of flights to Dubai 
have been reduced from 198 a 
week to 44. Dubai has always . 
been firmly committed to an 
“open skies” policy as far as 
airlines using its airport are 
concerned and it hopes that 
its new airline will act as a 
stabilising factor in the re- 
gion. 

The Dubai National Air 
Travel Agency (DNATA) 
which provides most of the 
professional -airport and 
ground services at Dubai is 
said to be taking over the 
operational side of the airline 
which will most likely be sub- 
contracted to a major inter- 
national carrier. 

Emirates Airways is al- 
ready in tbe market for new 
aircraft, which are likely to 
include two A300 Airbuses 
and two Boeing 737s. The gen- 
eral feeling in aviation cir- 
cles is that Emirates couM 
pay its way and there was 
ample justificaton for what it 
was setting out to achieve. 
Some revenue forecasts sug- 
gest that a figure of at least 
$125 million would not be un- 
realistic. 

Final details of the compo- 
sition of the new airline and 
its fleet are expected to be 
announced anytime. The new 
airline may also play an im- 
portant role in tbe new air- 
sea car-go link with Jebel Ali 
when it has consolidated its 
position in the region 



Dubai International Airport, note one of the busiest in the 
Middle. East 


Polaroid Use Cold Store in 
Distribution Link 


One of the most Important 
innovations in the free zone is 
the long low green shed hous- 
ing the cold store. This has a 
capacity of 42,000 square me- 
tres and is one of the largest 
in the Middle East Accord- 
ing to the FZA, last year’s use 
of the cold store exceeded all 
expectations. Thirty reefer 
ships called at the store and 
more than 50,000 tonnes of 
cargo, mainly food products, 
were handled. 

With the strategic geo- 
graphical location of tbe port 
the cold store offers signifi- 
cant oppor tunities to distrib- 
utors serving the Middle East 
or Asian sub-continent who 
need facilities for holding fro- 
zen, chilled or perishable 
products which need a strict- 
ly controlled environment 
One of the main customers 
to make use of the store is 
Polaroid which has chosen 
Jebel All as its main distribu- 
tion center for the Middle 
East, India and Pakistan. Its 
film stock needs a strictly 
controlled cool environment 
toprotectiL 

Lloyds approval 
Jebel Ali’s cold store car- 
ries Lloyds approval and 
classification. It consists of 
eight separate cold store 
rooms of different sizes with 
variable temperatures rang- 
ing from -29 deg. Centigrade 
to +13 deg. Centigrade. The 
relative humidity can also be 
controlled to suit individual 
product requirements. 

The sophisticated refrig- 
eration machinery is comput- 
er controlled and includes 
two emergency standby gen- 
erators. Electronically con- 
trolled temperature record- 
ers, as wen as giving minute 
by minute monitoring, pro- 
vide temperature readouts 
every 15 seconds. In addition 
a permanent record is pro- 
vided for the 24-bpur cycle. ■ 
The store is only 30 metres, 
from the quayside which 
helps to make rapid transfer 
of cargo even swifter. With 
summer peak temperatures 
soaring to more than 50 deg. 
C. speedy handling can be 
critical in some cases. The 
store can handle up to 9£00. 
pallet converters for rapid 
and direct tr ansit of cargo 
from ship to store. 


The port also has its own 
fleet of special vehicles and 
handling equipment Includ- 
ing forklift trucks and Atlet 
sit-on lifters. 

Temperature-centrolled 

warehouse 

In addition to the cold 
store, the port also has a 6,000 
cubic metre capacity ware- 
house with temperature con- 


trol facilities. This is located 
near the container te rminal 
and freight station. 

Temperature in the ware- 
bduse can be controlled to 21 
deg. Centigrade with a con- 
trolled humidity of between 
50-60 percent The warehouse 
is equipped with fourteen 25- 
ton air conditioning units 


system. Alternatively it is 
possible, if required, to lower 
the temperature of the whole 
building to below average re- 
quirements. 

It is fitted with all the nor- 
mal fire detection and pro- 
tection systems with direct 
links to the port’s fire station. 

Because of tbe extreme 
summer temperatures and 
high humidity the warehouse 
is ideal for storing delicate 
cargoes such as electronic 
and computer components, 


which have extra capa c ity in pharmaceuticals and dga- 
case of failure of part of the re ties. 



m 


m 



P.O. Box 9292. Dubai UJUL 
Tel 374555 Tbe 47884 DICTA EM 




” — "* -'-'rsvr* 


7 lo the Jebel Ail Free Traded 

«? ne 18 important to you. me Dubai HP 
tonand pi© Apartments otter you a : ‘ 
srateBic location between the cam-) 
S Sl ! 8 ,? 1 0111301 and the Airport-' 

wthresidenttal faemties that put thorn 

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h 343 room Du * 5oi Nttton oftewyotf > 
gehatea^mmodation. a chafawtf? 
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JwcJ you have The Apartments. Here;: 
wu have a choice of leases ranging; 
from a month to a year on onerlwcrof. 
mme bedroom, fully furnished abaft; 

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Telephone 470000. P.O. Box 927 
Tetex: 46570/71 EM. Cable: HILTElS 


















ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


Page 11 


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« Hir <. •■?.*• -udaied Ui 
Ul X l!:r :»• ■ i.i n 





First Emirates Gas Swap 

Will Help Boost Industrial 

Development 


Three prime examples of 
Dubai's efforts at economic 
diversification are to- be 
found in the Jebel All greater 
industrial area where natural 
gas, aluminium smelting and 
iteCTiinatkm plants are locat- 
ed. One ef the most signifi- 
cant developments is the new 
$S.. million gas pipeline link- 
ing Dubai’s tiny neighbouring 
emirate Sharjah with Jebel 
AH. - 

Following the settling of a 
long drawn out border dis- 
pute between, the two emir- 
ates, the new pipeline which 
wflL pro vide up to 70,000 BTUs 
of gas a day is the first ever 
emirates interchange of nat- 
ural resources. In return 
Sharjah is to get some terri- 
torial offshore hydrocarbon 
concessions from DubaL 

The Lebanese-owned Con- 
solidated Contractors Inter- 
natonal Company (CCC) is to 
build the 24-inch diameter 
pipeline which will run the 46 
miles from Sharjah's Sajaa 
gas field to the Dubai Elec- 
tricity Company's power 
plant at Jebel AIL Additional 
supplies will probably also go 
to the Dubai Natural Gas 
Company (Dugas) and the 
Dubai Aluminium Company 
(Dubai). 

Prime resource 

Cheap natural gas has 
been one of the prime re- 
sources which has enabled 
the rapid development of the 


industrial complex at Jebel 
AH, and the Free Zone Au- 
thority hopes that its avail- 
ability along with proximity 
of the port will attract fur- 
ther companies interested in 
some kind of manufacturing 
or processing. 

In addition there is an 
abundant supply of alumin- 
ium from the Dubai works 
which last year achieved a 
record output of 155,355 
tonnes during its third year of 
operation. This was 2.7 per- 
cent more than the previous 
year and 15 percent more 
than the smelter’s initial de- 
signed capacity of 135,000 
tonnes. 

Dubai has a highly auto- 
mated plant with a multi-na- 
tional workforce of just over 
L300.- It is almost certainly 
the most efficiently run plant 
in the Middle East and pro- 
duces aluminium with an av- 
erage metal purity of 99,87 
percent Aluminium is pro- 
duced by the electro chemi- 
cal reduction process from 
three potlines. 

The raw materials, alumi- 
na (mostly from Australia), 
petroleum coke and pitch are 
unloaded and stored on a spe- 
cial quayside facility at the 
port During an average year 
about 370,000 tonnes in total 
are handled. Hie plant works 
continuously around the 
clock with three eight-hour 
shifts. Hie whole operation is 
computer controlled and hu- 



As well as producing aborthmoH, Dubai also mokes J 8 million 
gallons a diy of sweetwauar by using the waste-heat from its gas 
Turbines. 


man workers are conspicu- 
ous only by their absence. 
Most of -the ^voices" heard 
are computer simulated. 

Sweet water production 

But apart from aluminium, 
which it exports to more than 
20 countries, most of it to Ja- 
pan, the US, and Iran the 
company also produces an 
average of 18£ million gal- 
lons a day of desalinated wa- 
ter for the dty of DubaL En- 
ergy constitutes about 40 
percent of the reduction pro- 
cess and Dubai’s power plant, 
which comprises five large 
and eight smaller gas-fired 
turbines, produces enough 
power equivalent, says their 
information department, to 4 
million boiling electric ketr' 
ties. 

What makes Dubai's plant 
unique is the combination of 
using surplus power and 
waste heat from the gas tur- 
bines to produce desalinated 
water. Where else can you 
find a plant that makes metal 
and freshwater? At the end 
of 1984 the Government of 
Dubai agreed to the construc- 
tion of extra evaporators, 
bringing the total to ntne. Ac- 
cording to Ian Livingstone, 
Dubai’S chairman and 
executive, the company is 
still waiting final go ahead 
for the evaporators which 
will increase the output of 
sweet water to some 45 mil- 
hoc gai tans a day. 

“We can produce more wa- 
ter less expensively than by 
any other method,” is Living- 
stone’s modest claim. “We 
also have plans to use more 
natural gas after we have 
modified some of our equip- 
ment”. 

He believes that the devel- 
opments at Jebel AH should 
help Dubai but it was too ear- 
ly to say whether any of tile 
new companies coming to the 
FZA would be interested in 
using aluminium as a raw 
material. 

“There are possibilities, 
but no active. discussions at 
present,” admits Livingstone. 
Zt is reaHy the overall world 


What They Have To Say About 
The New Free Zone Development: 


“I feel we have taken a 
step in the right direction and 
it is one way of reducing the 
trade barriers ( which will 
make Dubai more attractive 
to the businessman.” 

— Sultan Bin Sulayem, 
chairman of the Jebel AH 
Free Zone Authority board. 

“We want to offer a one- 


service stop here at the Jebel 
AH Free Zone.” 

— Charles Heath, market- 
ing director Jebel AH Free 
Zone Authority. 

“As far as I am concerned 
anything th at brings in more 
business to Dubai is going to 
be the best thing- but I want 
it overnight” 


Setting up 

in the Jebel Ali free zone? 


If you are a multinational planning to operate in 
Jebel Ali, consider talking first to Citibank about 
your international banking needs. 

We have a long association with Dubai. We know 
the entire Gulf region. And our global network is 
second- to- none. 

Thlk to us about trade finance. About electronic 
banking and cash management. Hus a score of other 
facilities. Citibank's expertise in the Emirates is just 
a phone call or a telex away. 


Branch TfeJ. 


Tfclcx 


Dubai 422100 45422 

Riqa 422100 45422 

Shaijah 22533 6N075 

Abu Dhabi 341410 22243 

AI Ain M 1 < )90 33506 


Mk 

Asp, 

ISfetsS 


CITICORP © CITIBANK 

Ocer 20 vectnf service in the Emirates 


market that determines 
these things". 

Power - and more water 

Apart from the sweet wa- 
ter manufactured by DubaL 


million more gallonsrof water 
daily. Waste heat from the 
gas turbines will be used in 
the desalination process in 
similar manner to the Dubai 
system. The new gas turbines 
should be r unnin g next year 
and the whole plant opera- 
tional by the end of 1987. 

According to a spokesman 
at the company the main 
problem is to be able to meet 
the peak load for power dur- 
ing the height of the summer 
months when everyone 
switches on their air condi- 
tioning equipment at 3 p.m. 




[>• . rr*- ■ . •/ • ^ fc ->. • 

■ • W-. ■ 

, • ' ■ • • •" " i 

L|— , 1 1 ■ ' 


The Dubai Aiumuaum l Forks has iu oam special quay at Jebel Ali 
for unloading alumina and other materials for us smelter. 


— Mohi-Din Abdulkadir 
Binhendi, director general. 
Department of Civil Aviation, 
DubaL 

“Now we have provided 
the means for foreign compa- 
nies to operate free from new 
restrictions.” 

— Bin Duff, financial ex- 
pert, and member of the Je- 


tbe other major source is 
from the Dubai Electricity 
Company’s power station and 
desalination plan t near Jebel 
AH The company has two 
power stations - the other is 
the Satwa gas turbine station 
at Port Rashid in Dubai city. 
Hie Jebel Ali plant has a ca- 
pacity to produce 650 MW and 
31 million gallons of water 
daily via its eight steam tur- 
bines and two gas turbines. 

The enormous growth in 
installed capacity from a 
mere 131 MW in 1975 to its 
present level of 650 MW and 
the rise in the number of con- 
sumers from just under 30,000 
to more than 91,000 today re- 
flects the overall economic 
development of DubaL 

The existing desalination 
plant at Jebel Ali produced 
about 5 million gallons a day 
last year, 53 percent more 
than in 1983. Because of the 
increasing demand for water 
and power a new gas turbine 
and desalination station is to 
be buill near the existing site. 

New station ready by 1987 

The new station will have 
three or four gas turbine and 
4 multistage dash desalina- 
tion plants. This will produce 
another 200 MW and up to 20 

bel AH Free Zone Authority. 

“We want to give a big 
push to our economy, but we 
do not want to destroy what 
we have built.” 

— Abdul Rahman G. Al 
Mutaiwee, director general 
Dnbai Chamber of Com- 
merce and Industry. 

“i am amazed at the 
amount of construction going 
on here, particularly accomo- 
dation so there must he plen- 
ty of confidence." • 

— Walter Annen, general 
manager Hilton Internation- 
al 

“We were cramped for 
space at Port Rashid and 
have had .to move some of 
our facilities to Jebel AIL. 
there’s a lot of potential busi- 
ness which might, come our 
way.” 

— S. Nemazie, marketing 
services manager. Caltex. ' 

“We moved to Jebel AH be- 
cause we needed the kind of 
facility which the cold store 
offered us ami as a centre for 
our Middle East distribu- 
tion.” 

— Polaroid Film corpora- 
tion spokesman. 

“If X knew what I know 
now and I was in Europe or 
the US I would jump at the 
opportunity to come here” 

— Majeed Khalil, general 
manager Dubai Metropolitan 
Hotel 

“Jebel All has become a 
very important operation for 
us; we were one of the few to 
take the {dace seriously In the 
beginning.” 

— Issa S. Baluch, manager. 
Gulf Express Freight 

“The Free Zone must help, 
but, on the other hand suc- 
cess is going to be strongly 
influenced by what happens 
in the Gulf.” 

— Ian D. Livingstone, dep- 
uty chairman and chief exec- 
utive, Dubai Aluminium 
Company. 

“It is located in a strategic 
position in the Middle East 
which is one of the main mar- 
kets in the world.” 

— Saeed Juma Al Naboo- 
dah, president Dubai Cham- 
ber of Commerce and Indus- 
try. 

“We’ve been here twenty 
years and are practically 
part of the local scene., and 

we see that Dubai has the 
resources to make Jebel All 

work.” 

- Arthur E. Deffaa, vice 

president. Citibank. DubaL 


after going home from work. 

“This is a major problem 
for us.” said the spokesman, 
“and we like to have a re- 
serve buffer of about 20 per- 
cent in our system to meet 
that kind of exceptional de- 
mand.” 

The existing gas turbines 
at Jebel AH can in fact run on 
fuel oil or gas and are nor- 
mally used to supplement 
peak demands for power. 

With adequate power and 
water supplies available at 
Jebel AH along with the pros- 
pects of additional cheap nat- 
ural gas from Sharjah, there 
should be more than enough 
to meet any future demand 
from companies moving into 
the area. 

As far as Charles Heath, 
marketing director of the 
FZA is concerned, these are 
priority benefits for any in- 
coming manufacturing con- 
cern. 

Other major industrial 
works at Jebel Ali already 
include an alumininium ex- 
trusion plant, liquified petro- 
leum gas which is processing 
natural gas from the offshore 
Fatah field, a gas bottling 
plant, cement works, steel 
fabrication works and an 
electric cable factory. 


I l 


Fuelling Dubai’s 
Industry & Business. 

Natural gas, a dynamic 
resource brought from the 
offshore oilfields to the heart 
of the Free Zone. 

An export to high technology 
nations, the power behind a 
progressive region. 

5 Jj) 1 I j UdJ iJO 

DUBAI NATURAL GAS COMPANY LIMITED 

P.0 Box 4311. Dubai. U. A E 
Telephone; 084/56234 Telex: 45741 DUGAS EM 
Managed and operated by Scimitar Oils Limited, S. A 

DUGAS ® 

Fuelling the future. 


Active General Trading Company 
Al Matroushi Drilling Co. 

Arabian Casting Industry 
Arco Dubai Incorporated 
Barytes International Company 
Caltex Alkhalij 

Cleveland Bridge & Engineering 
Coflexip Flexservice 

Costain Process Engineering and Construction 
Dubai Petroleum Company 
Dugas 

Emirates Bunkering & Bitumen Company 
Emirates Chemicals (Cormix) 

Emirates General Petroleum Co. 

Gulf Fleet Middle East 
Halliburton 
Imco 

International Bagging Corporation 
McConnell Dowell Middle East 
Middle East Oilfield Supplies Est. 

* Milehem International Limited 
Monnris Enterprises 
Mubarak Shipping Company 
Offshore International S.A. : 

Plastic Powder Coating 
- Protoots M.E. Limited 

Scientific Drilling Controls 
Shell Markets (M.E.) Ltd 
Trizac . ■ 

Unimud Budebs Trading Est. 

Union Carbide M.E. Ltd. 

Westburne International Drilling Ltd 
York International 


Jebel Ali Free 
a > Zone Authority 

P.O. Box 325$: Dubai, U A c 


i el: Jeoe! Aii 5557S Teie> 
Cable: PAJADUB-U.A.E. 


’398 PAJA EM 


Need / say more 












Page 12 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


YOUR SHIPPING LINE TO JEBEL ALI 

NORTH EUROPE 


MEDITER- 

RANEAN 



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ARABIAN 
GULF 


JEBEL ALI PORT 


YOUR TRADE LINK TO THE WORLD 


Morzario provides the most efficient trade Bnks between the Middle East and the 
rest of the world. Because, with us, you can send or receive your cargo by sea, 
land or air. Our service includes: 

* Comprehensive stifppkio services * Contatnerfsatiorv. 

Pan and the restof tto GUf. . ' . 


* Ro/Bo servicsc. 


' Clearing and lorwardng. 



Merzario are members of the 
North Europe Gulf 
Conference Agreement (SUNAG) 


yVlerzarlo 


^rz8' WW MuttMl 

Teqopilc WWW DtMlSTk W3B 



a os i 


to n sh sun 


Stronger Banking Sector has 


Key Role 



In the constant search for 
newer, more sophisticated ways 
to oil the wheels of progress, 
Caltex is upfront and moving ahead. 



to Play in New Development 




.'K v'iVa^.V;* 

" ■> • >*. ■ 
-V. 



The ground b reaking cere- 
mony for Jebel Ali in the 
summer of 1976 was a dra- 
matic occasion attended by 
the leading Shaikhs, senior 
diplomats, bankers and jour- 
nalists. Before the actual 
event, few of the foreigners 
present had known where Je-. 
bel Ali was on the map. In the 
evening the Ruler of Dubai, 
Sheikh Rashid bin Said Al- 
Maktoum entertained his 
guests to a dinner In the 
Beach Palace. 


Tbe scale of Jebel Ali as a 
satellite city of Dubai is 
much smaller than originally 
planned, since at one time 
Shaikh Rashid had in mind a 
whole new city, with a pro- 
jected population of 67,000 


first earth movers trundled 
onto the ate. 


Four mergers this year 
It was already clear before 
oil revenue of the Gulf co- 
operation Council (GCC) 




Upfront, with its modem automated lubricating oil 
manufacturing plant in Dubai, Caltex AlkhaJij is moving 
ahead with the production of a versatile and technically 
superior range of lubricants that consistentty match and 
exceed the most exacting standards demanded by the rapid 
technolog cat advances of our time. 

With a sophisticated and well-equipped laboratory to 
ensure strict maintenance ol the high international quality 
standards set for Caltex lubripating cris, the Dubai plant 
manufactures and supplies premium lubricants for use by 
industry, transport, construction and agriculture hi the 
Middle East, Africa and South Asia. 

An international team of lubricant specialists, provide 
unrivalled technical services to customers in the region. 

And this is just one way Caltex assists in lubricating the 
wheels of progress. 


It was tbe high water mark 
for expansion of the hanking 
industry in the UAE. Many of 
the bankers who chatted with 
Ahmed Baqr of Dotco, the 
main sponsor of the foreign 
contractors involved in build- 
ing Jebel All’s port, looked 
forward to the prospect of 
opening branches in Jebel Ali 
New Town, or at least in the 
39-storey Dubai International 
Trade Centre which marked 
the 1976 limit of Dubai on the 
long empty road to Abu 
Dhabi 



Lubricants to oil the wheels of progress. 


Cation Alttialq. P.O. Boa 2155. Outui. U.A.E Taleohone 470332 Abu Dhabi ADALCO. Tel 553662 
Doha Mannar Trading Co Tel 810111 Bahian- Carter Bahrain Tal 754387 Oman Omen Trading 
Industrial & Engineering Organisation Tel 705304 Kuwait Jesun Abdutwatiab&Panner Co. W L L 
PO Bo- 25248. Salou Kuwait. Tel. 903100503107 - TH 30H0JAPCOKT 


Today, several banks in- 
cluding Amsterdam Rotter- 
dam Bank which received an 
offshore licence in 1976 are 
housed in the plush and pres- 
tigious Trade Centre but lit- 
tle activity has taken place at 
Jebel Ah itself. The only 
widely publicised bank 
branch opening in the UAE in 
1985 has been a ceremony at 
the inland oasis dty of A1 Ain. 
Yet the ambitions expressed 
in the Free Zone legislation 
announced in April clearly 
envisage a role for local and 
foreign banks to service busi- 
ness brought to the UAE by 
tbe Jebel Ah project 



some other family owned 
banks in the UAE have come 
under close scrutiny by the 
Central Bank, with the result 
that since the beginning of 
1985 four bank mergers have 
taken place. Central Bank 
Governor Abdel Mahk al- Ha- 
mar said in May that there 
will be more mergers. 

Among the banks affected 
by the mergers policy have 
been the Emirates National 
Bank, now merged into Union 
Bank of the Middle East 
which itself is now owned by 
the Government of Dubai 
Another 1976 bank,- Federal 
Commercial Bank, has joined 
with Emirates Commercial 
Bank and Khaleej Commer- 
cial Bank to form Commer- 
cial Bank of Abu Dhabi 

The mergers news is a re- 
flection of the fact that the 
UAE with its population of 
just over 1 million has suf- 
fered from an imbalance in 
the industry which only now 
is being adjusted. 


took control and paved the 
way for the establishment of 
a fully fledged Central Bank 
in 1980. Al Tayer’s tough no- 
nonsense, or sentiment, ap- 
proach has helped to main- 
tain international confidence 
in the UAE as a trading part- 
ner. 


Al Tayer’s intention is to 
cut the number of UAE local 
banks from 23 to 12. In a re- 
cent interview, he explained 
the attitude of the Dubai au- 
thorities which are now very 
much in line with the federal 
government standpoint “The 
Government does not want to 
see any bank or business cot 
lapse here, so what we are 
doing is for the country's rep- 
utation and to help the pri- 
vate sector. We have to en- 
courage the banks to merge." 


Improved position 


The British Bank of the Middle Bast offices. Dam, Dubai 


people in four years. Dubai 
itself has had to face up to 
economic setbacks, since 
contractors began work in 
the summer of 1976, with such 
faith in the thinking of the 
Ruler, that contracts had not 
even been signed when the 


countries peaked in 1981 that 
the UAE was overbanked. 
Tbe last two to be licensed in 
Dubai as full commercial 
banks were Union Bank of 
the Middle East and Emir- 
ates National Bank, both in 
1977. Since 1983 these and 


International Banks 
The foreign banks have 
come under review by the 
Central Bank and branches 
have been cut, but they still 
bold a valuable segment of 
the. total banking scene. The 
National Bank of Dubai and 
British Bank of the Middle 
East handle part of the Dubai 
Aluminium account at Jebel 
All and the Toronto Dominion 
is in a similar privileged posi- 
tion with the Dubai Gas Com- 
pany in tbe Industrial zone. 
Lloyds Bank International, of 
tbe UK, is another bank with 
an entrenched position in the 
economy, having played an 
Important role in financing 
some of Dubai’s industrial 


The Al Habtoor Group makes the Free Zone as easy as ABC. 


•• 


ccoraodate your personnel in luxury al 
Dubai's most convenient five Star Hotel 


1 m fix the Free Zone. ‘The Metropolitan' 
combines conference facilities, business services 
and excellent communications to ensure an 
efficient working base. Recreation facilities 
include a pool, sauna and gym. Tbe ‘Red Lion' 
pub and the finest French restaurant in Didai 
'The Lafayette’ offer the best in evening 
entert ain ment. 


this year Al Habtoor Engineering 


astam cr preference is Al Habtoor Motora’ 


ccomodation, bmkfihg and cars. Time of 


Anj for anyone staying two nights or more 
we supply you with a car... no extra charge! 


“Internariaual Asia Award fix Construction” 
With its Maite Division and Construction 
Machinery Centre today H.EE employs some 
3 ,000 people and are agents fix ragor European, 
American and Japanese manufacturers. H.E.E. 
construct villas to dtyscrapers and have recently 
completed projects such as the New Dubai 
Hospital and the New Dubai Maternity Hospital. 


V-/ winners in the UAE, that's because, 
whatever the vehfcJe- 4 wheel drive, saioon, 
pkk-nporhavy dntyamme ma l- MItqiliKhi 
quality triumphs, Al Habtoor Mo tots are sole 
importers and distributors for Mitsubishi Motors 
and Rolls Royce Motors. 



XX devdopmg in tbe JfebdAfi Free Zone. 
Proven leaders in afi three fields tbe Al Habtoor 
Group have a history synoaymoiBwithgrowdi 
and deNtopmeot in Dubai and the region. 
faacompetithctminessenvircionKatAl 

Habtoor have achieved the highest standard of 

excefience through an understanding of the local 
market and efimatk conditions. 



THE DUBAI METROPOLITAN 


Tel: 445700 


HOTEL 

Teton 469WMTHTL EM 



Tel: 257551 Telex 45603 HEE EM 


Ah* 


For any company expanding into the Fret 

Zone and utilizing the tfareeservicesAownhenv 

special rates may be negotiated. 

With Al Habtofr-devdopmg in the fite 
Trade Zone is as easy as A,B,C 


projects, including the alu- 
minium smelter at Jebel AIL 
One of the longest estab- 
lished foreign banks is Citi- 
bank which has been in Dubai 
for more than 20 years. 

The leading figure, apart 
from Central Bank Governor 
Al-Hamar in disciplining the 
banking sector has been Min- 
ister of State for Finance, Ah- 
mad Huinaid al-Tayer. He 
first came to prominence in 
1977, when the then expatri- 
ate head of the UAE Curren- 
cy Board resigned, following 
the closure of two banks and 
'a run on the Dirham. Air 
Tayer was one of a triumvi- 
rate of UAE nationals who 


The Minister of State is 
highly critical of the family- 
owned banks, where the di- 
rectors imprudently bor- 
rowed from their own 
institutions. Foreign bankers 
point out, however, that the 
UAE authorities; in particu- 
lar the Government of Dubai, 
have acted in a highly respon- 
sible manner in underwriting 
the local banks. Some even 
go so far as to suggest that- 
the UAE is in a much stron- 
ger position to deal with fi- 
nancial accidents in the bank- 
ing community than in 
Bahrain, with its large -off- 
shore b anking enclave, but 
relatively weak regulatory 
monetary agency. 

In the current round . 
bank reporting on their 1984' 
results local hanks are re- 
vealing the level of their inv 


ner reserves. Foreign owned; 
banks must now publish foil 
figures. The disclosure re- 
quirements still fan far short 
of US requirements, where 
banks are required to aggre 1 
gate both non-performing 
loans (when interest is more 
than six months overdue) 
and loan loss reserves; as 
separate percentages of total 
loan portfolios. They are nsv--. 
erthdess considered a step in 
the right direction. 


What is emerging 'iir-flR-' 
UAE is a better regulated- 
banking system which wfllbe 
more able to act as a partners 
in developments, such as^the : 
Jebel Ali Free Zone. C 


Al Habtoor Group 


Head Office 

P.O. Bw 320, Dubai, UAE. 
Tlx 45603 HEE 



Citibank's striking offices in DuSaL 



71 


















Ik 


V 1^: 



ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


Page 13 


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Consultative Lead in Free 
Zone E xp a n s ion 


It is Dubai’s “open-door” 
policy towards commercial 
enterprise which has largely 
contributed to its economic 
-success and earned it the title 
of *city of merchants". Du- 
bai’s prosperity has been 
founded on its expanding 
commercial links between 
the Middle East, Europe, the 
Asian sub-continent and 
South-East Asia. Its imports 
and re-exports, the entrepot 
trade, have been the back- 
bone of its rapid expansion. 

The Dubai Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry, 
whose modern offices over- 
look the Dubai Creek, has 
been instrumental in main- 
taining and improving the 
overall business environment 
which makes the city so dif- 
ferent from others in the re- 
gion. The chamber has else 
played a leading role in the 


development of Jebel All 
which it sees as complimen- 
tary to the activities of Du- 



Abdul Rahman G. Al 
Mtaakoee, Director General, 
Dubai Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry, and a member of 
the FZA Board: Dubai can 
play on important role in 
utilizing ike FZA facilities. 


bai’s own merchants in the 
city. . 

Its director general, Abdul 
Rahman G. Al Mutaiwee, is 
one of the five board mem- 
bers of the newly created Je- 
bel Ah Free Zone Authority. 
Be has had the task of bring- 
ing together the hearts and 
minds of Dubai’s business 
community and those respon- 
sible for naming the port and 
industrial complexes at Jebel 

AIL 

Creating a “Mg push” 

“We are now preparing the 
final rules and regulations for 
the Free Zone,” says Mu-- 
taiwee. He sees Jebel Ah as a 
catalyst for further economic 
development in Dubai which 
bad suffered, not so much be- 
cause of the overall world re- 
cession and decline in trade, 
but more from the conflict 


« 


WHAT MAKES OUR 
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Quite the most unique in 
the Gulf, they include windsurfing, 
waterskiing, horseriding, swimming, 
fishing, tennis, squash and croquet, 
among others. We also have 
a superb health club and 
gymnasium, a well-equipped 
marina and vast grounds you ^ 
can stroll through. 



THE CUISINE 

Exquisite cuisine, unmistakably 
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THE PRICE 

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So snap up our offer! 
Contact- 


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P.0 Bo* 9255. Dubai. UA E- Tel. 084-35252 Telex: 48000 JEBEL EM 
A menu** oi 

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WERE (JREAT 
WITH FREIGHT 


When it comes to freight 
forwarding, take the Gulf Express 
way. To progress and profit. 

We’re ideally located 

We’re here, there and everywhere. 
More importantly, in the Jebel Ali 
Free Zone, where it matters most. 

We liaise with our associate 
companies and freight agents to 
/ offer you freight service on a 
worldwide scale. 

We freight three ways 

' Thanks to Dubai’s unique location 
and connections, we can freight 
your goods by land, sea and air. 

We offer you a competent and 
comprehensive packing, _ v ys 
warehousing, distribution and v 
trucking nerwork. To move your^-' 
freight all the way through. 

Wherever you freight - 
whatever you freight. 


We cut die red tape. 

We cut out the waiting from your 
freighting by doing all your 
documentation for you. We know 
the ropes. At every point. We have 
a reputation for on-time deliveries. 
Earned over a period of 25 years. 

We’re economical 

Because we’re big in the business, 
we’re in a position to offer you the 
best possible terms-as well as the 
most economical mode of handling 
and forwarding. 


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k GULF EXPRESS 
FREIGHT 

P.O. Box 2779 Dubai-U.A.E. 
Tel: 457725 Tlx: 4S939 GEF 

We lead where others lag 


between Iran and Iraq which 
had been important trading 
partners for Dubai. 

“We had to search for 
something new and create a 
'big push* for our economy,” 
adds Mutaiwee. “There has 
been an incredible interest in 
the Free Zone and it is prov- 
ing very fruitful so far". 

His Excellency S&eed 
Juma Al Naboodah, presi- 
dent of the Chamber and one 


He goes on to explain that 
the Free Zone, will now be 
different from others in the 
world because of four base 
reasons: 

L It is located in a strategic 
position In the Middle East 
which is one of the main mar- 
kets In the world. 

2 . Energy costs are inexpen- 
sive because of local hydro- 
carbon resources. 



Dubai's City Hall- a futuristic budding toukm a building by the 
creek. There is lobe close cooperation between the city and Jebel Ali. 


of the city’s leading business- 
men, is a firm believer in Du- 
bai’s traditional liberal atti- 
tude towards commercial 
development The city had 
established itself as the lead- 
ing regional trade centre tor 
the Gulf region and the Jebel 
Alt Free Zone would help to 
increase this activity. 

“There is no doubt that the 
formation of the Free Zone 
will boost the role of Dubai”, 
says Naboodah. He explains 
that the Chamber is acting in 
a consultative economic role 
between Dubai and the Free 
Zone which is why his col- 
league had been appointed to 
toe Free Zone Board. 

Free Zone idea 'always there* 

Although the limeUgbt is 
currently on the expansion 
and enhancement of the Free 
Zone at Jebel Ali, Naboodah 
says that it had always been 
the plan to have a Free Zone 
at the port which was one of 
the main reasons why Jebel 
Ah had been built in the first 
place. After its opening in 
1980 a limited FTZ had been 
established. 


Construction 

Company’s 

Growing 

Links 

Khalaf Al Habtoor Is a man 
with many interests in Dubai 
ranging from being a znaihle 
importer to acting as the sole 
local agent for Rolls Royce 
cars. In 15 years, 35-year-old 
Habtoor has built a highly 
diversified business empire 
which also includes one of the 
most progressive construc- 
tion companies ir. the UAE — 
Al Habtoor Engineering En- 
terprises (HEE). 


3. There are no taxes of any 

kind. 

A There are no restrictions 
on ca pfta i transfers. 

He thinks that these incen- 
tives are more than sufficient 
to attract companies to the 
Free Zone. In addition Na- 
boodah believes that an ex- 
tremely important additional 
factor is the “healthy and 
non-bureaucratic commer- 


cial and administrative sys- 
tem existing in Dubai." 

Finance available 

Also there were a number 
of local businessmen, with a 
lot of local experience, who 
would be prepared to help fi- 
nance further joint ventures 
if required. 

He thinks that there are 
opportunities for many kinds 
of projects at Jebel Ali. 
These could include those us- 
ing natural energy resources 
such as oil and gas: compa- 
nies wanting to finish or as- 
semble semi-manufactured 
goods which could be mar- 
keted in the region thus sav- 
ing freight costs: and compa- 
nies which would benefit 
from “no quota” restrictions. 

Ideally, Naboodah would 
.like to see more capital-inten- 
sive plants with low manpow- 
er needs at Jebel AIL It would 
be some years before Dubai 
felt the practical effects from 
the newly established compa- 
nies - thirty of which were 
already in the pipeline - at 
Jebel Ah. 

Both Naboodah and Mu- 
taiwee agree that the inter- 
ests of Dubai’s merchants 
must be safeguarded by fu- 
ture developments at Jebel 
Ali although they did not see 
any direct conflict of inter- 
ests. 

“We want to give the Dubai 
people even more business 
because it is the merchants 


who are Dubai ■ they are its 
livelihood, its economy, its 
commerce," says Mutaiwee. 
“The Free Zone’s expansion 
is the result of interest and 
constructive ideas from 
some of the most important 
businessmen in Dubai's in- 
dustrial and commercial cir- 
cles". 

Difficult lead to follow 

The news of tbe expanding 
activities of the Jebel Ali 
Free Zone has aroused a cer- 
tain amount of comment and 
criticism from the surround- 
ing region. Reports are circu- 
lating about other proposed 
free trade zones in order to 
help boost local economies 
along the lines that whatever 


Dubai does today must be 
good for someone else tomor- 
row. 

However, Naboodah is 
somewhat sceptical of others 
trying to emulate Dubai’s 
success and innovation. He 
says; 

“The commercial atmo- 
sphere and mentality of its 
businessmen are historical 
and traditional and thus hard 
to compete against. There- 
fore, since Dubai is so old 
established and well in the 
lead we don’t expect our inno- 
vations to be copied - the ex- 
pected success of Jebel All 
will be founded on other suc- 
cessful factors in Dubai 
which might be hard and haz- 
ardous for others to follow”. 





A Lauritsen Reefer discharging cargo at the Jebel Ali Cold Store 
which is one of the largest in the Middle East. More and more 
companies, such as Polaroid, are now using the store as a 
distribution point for their special products. 



Mr. Khalaf Al Habtoor. 

Already the company has 
built the new Dubai General 
Hospital and the maternity 
hospital in the city. Unusual- 
ly, HEE is also developing its 
interests abroad. It is now 
involved in Bahrain and Jor- 
dan. 

In Bahrain HEE is taking 
part in the multi-million dol- 
lar Arabian Gulf University 
project In Jordan HEE is 
buflding the Zarqa Ma’ In Spa 
complex and the Islamic 
Rank Housing contract 

One of its most prestigious 
operations is in the marble 
field. Al Habtoor Marble im- 
port some of the world’s fin- 
est marble from Italy, and 
elsewhere, which Is used in 
many of Dubai’s luxurious 
buildings. As the original 
HEE company expanded 
Habtoor decided to establish 
Construction Machinery Cen- 
tre (CMC) to provide ma- 
chinery and equipment tor 
the civil engineering and 
bunding industry. Recently 
HEE received the 1985 Inter- 
national Asia Award in recog- 
nition of its work. 

Al Habtooris Dubai Metro- 
politan Hotel has also recent- 
ly received two international 
awards for its contribution to 
trade and tourism develop- 
ment 


More Than a Hole in one for 
Local Contractors 


A major part of the Jebel 
Ali port works were earned 
out by a partnership between 
Dubai Transport aiKl Pauling 
in the name of Dutco Pauling 
(Private) Ltd which was 
awarded a subcontract for 
excavating the 3,7 km long 
800 metre wide inner basin. 
Hus was only slightly small- 
er than the adjoining outer- 
basin which together repre- 
sented two of the largest 
man-made holes In the world. 

The inner basin alone 
needed more than 33 mlllunL 
cubic metres of material re- 
moving from the virgin de- 
sert ground which had been 
chosen for the part area. In 
some cases it was necessary 


to excavate down to a depth 
of IS metres below the exist- 
ing ground level Two thirds 
of the material which had to 
be removed was solid rock 
which had to be drilled and 
blasted out before it could be 
taken away by an army of 
tracked excavators and 50 
tonne capacity dump trucks. 

Because of the very high 
temperatures which exceed 
50 degrees centigrade in the 
summer, tbe trucks which 
had to haul the excavated soil 
more than 5 fcms away had to 
keep their speed down to un- 
der 48 kmph to avoid over- 
heating their tyres Even so 
movement was forbidden 
during afternoon peak heat 


periods when blasting took 
place instead. 

The main harbor works be- 
gan in 1977 and were complet- 
ed (hiring 1981. The consult- 
ing engineers for the project 
were Halcrow International 
Partnership, Dubai. The 
main contractor for the 
dredging work was Gulf- 
Cobla with Dutco and Cos- 
tain-Blankevoort assisted by 
the Chicago company, Great 
Lakes Dredge and Dock 
Company. 

Civil engineering works 
were carried out by the Mina 
Jebel Ali Construction joint 
venture (MJAC) which con- 
sisted of Dutco, Balfour Beat- 
ty Construction and Stevin 


Middle East 

Although construction ac- 
tivity has passed its peak in 
Dubai because most of the 
infrastructure both in the city 
and at Jebel Ah is complete, 
companies like Paulings, 
Dutco, Balfour Beatty are 
still active. So to is Cleveland 
Bridge, which has been re- 
sponsible for most of the civil 
engineering prefabricated 
steelworks at the port and 
elsewhere Cleveland, which 
was one of the first compa- 
nies to move into Jebel Ah, 
and the other construction 
and engineering companies, 
are hoping that the develop- 
ments in the Free Zone will 
stimulate further works. 


o 


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Page 14- 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


Trade Centre Plays 
Complimentary Role With 
Exhibitions and Offices 


Today, Dubai’s dominating 
39-storey International Trade 
Centre building symbolises 
the “wider perspective” 
which the Emirate has 
gained. It offers a host of fa- 
cilities for companies includ- 
ing office space and accomo- 
dation in the Hilton 
apartments alongside. It also 
organises some of the most 
important conferences and 
exhibitions in the Middle 
East which are held in its 
own exhibition halls. Because 
of increased demand for larg- 


er capacity exhibitions a new 
$13 million hall is currently 
under construction and 
should be ready for the next 
season. 

Although the centre was 
greeted with some scepti- 
cism when it first opened in 
1978. office suites are now al- 
most at a premium with 
more than 90 percent occu- 
pancy which sometimes rises 
to nearly 100 percent 

The trade centre and its 
exhibitions, which include a 
number of major internation- 


al events, has become the 
shop window for the Gulf re- 
gion. 

•'The exhibition side of our 
business has been growing so 
fast that we have been forced 
to add another hall totalling 
45,000 sq. ft," says Guy Guflle- 
mard, general manager of 
the Trade Centre Manage- 
ment Company. 

When the trade centre 
opened provision was made 
for only one comparatively 
small exhibition haJL Three 
years ago a second ball was 


fa 

Hotels Prepare For Busier 
Times Ahead 


Looking at the glistening 
white yachts and motor 
cruisers gently rolling on the 
swell in the marina by the 
Jebel Ali Hotel, it is difficult 
to realise that just over the 
horizon is the largest man- 
made harbour in the world. 
Only the occasional smoky 
haze from the flared gas 
waste at Dugas gives a hint 
of the industrial activity. 

With its beautifully land- 
scaped gardens and greens, 
and its flock of peacocks 
strutting under the shady 
bushes, the hotel is a more 
than welcome oasis in the 
surrounding desert wilder- 
ness. Nestling in the envelop- 
ing facade of tbe four storey 
building is one of the most 
perfect pool settings to be 
found anywhere. Young palm 
trees scattered with meticu- ‘ 
lous care over the sloping 
ground which runs down to a 
pristine beach give cover 
from the scorching sun. 


regular tourism from Europe 
with regular groups coming 
from Italy, Austria and Swit- 
zerland. The hotel is also 
used by a number of airlines 
for tbeir flight staff. But it is 
at tbe weekends — Thurs- 
days and Fridays in the mos- 
Iem world — that the hotel 
comes to life as expatriates 
flood in with their families 
and friends. 

Tbe hotel can offer them 
unrivalled facilities with its 
squash and tennis courts, golf 
course, marine club surfing, 
sailing and diving And it is 
not expensive either. In fact 
there is a special offer under 
a “week away” scheme 
which works out at only 
about $300. The hotel also ca- 
ters for the top end of the 
market with its four presi- 
dential penthouse suites 
which can cost up to nearly 
$1,000 a night 

- Situated beyond the south- 
western end of tbe Free 




Jebel Ali Hotel: the luxurious pool and marina. 


Ten years ago such a set- 
ting would have been almost 
impossible to find in the Gulf. 
Today there are other hotels 
with facilities that would be 
the envy of any of the world’s 
better known resorts from 
Rio de Janeiro to Waikiki 
Few, however can compare 
with the beautiful surround- 
ings of the Jebel Ali Hotel 
where tbe standard of ser- 
vice is just as attentive and 
the cuisine equally matched. 

Unrivalled facilities 
Margaret Hennessy, who 
has been on tbe hotel man- 
agement staff for just over a 
year, says the hotel is now 
looking expectedly to a flour- 
ish of new business from 
companies coming to the 
Free Zone. During the week, 
the hotel is less than busy 
although major efforts are 
now being made to increase 


Zone, the Jebel Ali Hotel is 
surprisingly enough not quite 
the closest depending partly 
on which part of the port you 
are trying to reach. 

Princess Anne visits 

That distinction probably 
goes to the Dubai Metropoli- 
tan Hotel which lies on the 
main road out of Dubai city 
well past the International 
Trade Centre. Majeed Khalil, 
who is the general manager 
and one of the keenest pro- 
motional entrepreneurs in 
Dubai, also expects a surge in 
business from the Free Zone. 

The hotel, which is part of 
the widely diversified A1 
Habtoor group, is in an isolat- 
ed position chosen originally 
because it was to have been 
near the new airport In the 
end this was built closer to 
tbe city. 

“Well, anybody who comes 


DUBAI 

THE 

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London Representatives: 

Thabet International Ltd. 

7 Swallow Street, London W.i . 

Telex: 8952006 Phone: 01-439 4571 Cables: THABINT London 


to Dubai and wants to go to 
Jebel Ali has to come by our 
door, so why not stop here?” 
argues Khalil, in order to at- 
tract more business activity 
he has introduced a number 
of spectacular innovations 
from an auto show, the larg- 
est in the Emirates, to tbe 
extremely successful Dubai 
International Horse Show, 
the first of its kind in the Gulf. 
Last year Princess Anne, 
from Great Britain, took part 
in the three-day event This 
year’s event is to be held in 
December and an even larg- 
er entry is expected. 

Khalil also innovated tbe 
“room and drive” offer. Book 
a room for a certain number 
of nights and a hire car was 
thrown in free. In addtion tbe 
hotel, in common with all oth- 
ers in Dubai can now sponsor 
those visitors from abroad 
who need visas to enter tbe 
Emirate. Previously visitors 
could only be sponsored by a 
local business partner or cer- 
tain official or semi-official 
organisations. This rule no 
longer applies. If you let Kha- 
lil know when you are coming • 
a car will also meet you at 
the airport and bring you to 
the boteL Other hotels do of- 
fer similiar courtesy ser- 
vices, but usually with coach- 
es or minibuses. (The Hyatt 
Regency has liveried chauf- 
feurs). 

Awards for Metropolitan 

This year the Metropolitan 
received the Islamic Trade 
Award. In 1984, it gained the 
International Award for tbe 
Tourist and Hotel Industry 
for tbe United Arab Emir- 
ates. 

Nearer to the city is the 
Hilton International where 
Walter Annen, general man- 
ager, believes the Free Zone 
will create many more op- 
portunities. “Everyone 
should benefit — tbe hotels, 
real estate developers, tbe 
restaurants, car hire compa- 
nies and employment gener- 
ally" says a bullish Annen 
who sees Dubai entering 
what he describes as “a nor- 
malising period.” 

There will be no return to 
the old gold rush days," adds 
Annen who came to Dubai 
seven years ago at the tail 
end of the economic boom 
period. The hotel’s public ar- 
eas are being extensively re- 
modelled to provide more fa- 
cilities for functions and 
recreation including a stylish 
British tavern. 

At one time there was a 
drastic shortage of hotels and 
leisure facilities in Dubai. To- 
day the situation has 
changed. Alongside the creek 
are several large internation- 
ally managed chain hotels 
and some smaller locally run 
but acceptable hotels for the 
discerning visitor. 

These range from the dra- 
matic symbolic concrete ami 
glass dhow-shaped Sheraton, 
next to the McDermott Inter- 
national oil field supplies ser- 
vice depot shortly to be va- 
cated (it is moving to Jebel 
Ali), to the old established 
Carlton Tower. The Carlton 
.was one of the first modern 
hotels to be built in Dubai 
back in the seventies. Nearby 
is the Intercontinental conve- 
niently near the Dubai Cham- 
ber of Commerce and Indus- 
try. 

Because of tbe surfeit of 
rooms, prices are infinitely 
negotiable at the time of 
booking and vary considera- 
bly from one hotel to another. 
Normally a businessman can 
be expected to pay around a 
basic $85 a night for first 
class accommodation with 
colour TV, refrigerated milli- 
bar and other usual facilities. 


added doubling the total 
space to 74,900 sq. ft to meet 
the needs of exhibitions such 
as Arab Health, Motexha, 
Arab Water and Technology 
and tbe Gulf Computer Show. 

The addition of the new 
hall will enable even larger 
exhibitions to be staged. Ear- 
marked for later this year 
are tbe Middle East Agricul- 
ture Exhibition and Confer- 
ence, Hotel 85, Motexha and 
Childexpo and tbe 5th Gulf 
Computer Exhibition. 

Work started on the new 
hall in April and is well under- 
way. When completed by No- 
vember it will provide the 
largest sin gle air-conditioned 
exhibition space in tbe Mid- 
dle East when used in con- 
junction with the existing dis- 
play space. 

Clive Lowe, technical man- 
ager, describes the construc- 
tion and finish of the new 
hall: “Many design criteria 
have been derived directly 
from this twin-use objective. 


These include clear ceiling 
heights of five metres, under- 
floor services, largely col- 
umn-free rectilinear spacer 
tbe design of steelwork will 
have a visual impact inter- 
nally and externally... the 
partition between the two 
halls will offer total separa- 
tion on some occasions and 
completely free access on 
others”. 

Major international groups 
are among the 100 or so com- 
panies which have taken of- 
fice space in the central tow- 
er block which is the highest 
building in the Middle East 
They include IBM, Westing- 
house Electric, Kellog, John- 
son & Johnson, Philips Indus- 
tries, Den Norske 
Creditbank, Lloyds Bank In- 
ternational and many compa- 
nies associated with the oil 
and gas industries. 

The Jebel Ali Port Author- 
ity bas also had an office in 
the tower and the new Free 
Zone Authority will be work- 


ing closely with the trade 
center management in the fu- 
ture. The management sees 
the centre’s role as being 
complimentary in many 
ways to what will be going on 
at Jebel Ali which is almost 
visible from the top of the 
tower depending on the 
weather. 

Some of tbe companies 
which are presently in the 
tower may move to Jebel AIL 
If they are multi-national 
companies, according to the 
regulations some of which 
have yet to be finalised, they 
mil still be able to take ad- 
vantage of tbe Free Zone fa- 
cilities while maintaining a 
presence, perhaps for admin- 
istrative and communica- 
tions reasons, in the tower as 
welL 

Precisely how this is going 
to be done will depend partly 
under which licence sue* 
companies intend to operate 
in the future, (see story on 
pages). 


The trade centre manage- 
ment do not foresee any com- 
panies moving en masse 
from the tower as it would 
not necessarily be to their ad- 
vantage. On the other hand 
there is a strong feeling that 
many of the international 
companies which are being 
attracted to Jebel Ah may 
also want to have offices 
downtown in the tower. 

-This is what we are hop- 
ing and expect,” said a man- 
agement spokesman confi- 
dent that what is good for 
Jebel Ali is going to be good 
for the Trade Centre. 

Luxury apartments 

Apart from the office acco- 
modation another side to the 
complex are the three blocks 
of self-contained apartments 
alongside on the direct route 
to Jebel Ali There are 492 
apartments altogether of 
which about 85 percent are 
occupied There is a very 


hi gh standard of accomoda- 
tion which could prove ideal 
for executives whose compa- 
nies have moved into the new 
Free Zone at Jebel Ali which 
is less than 20 minutes drive 
away. 

Guiilemard says that last 
year they had about one doz- 
en families living in the 
apartments whose work was 
in Abu Dhabi as they found 
the rents to be so competi- 
tive. Taking into account the 
range of services and recre- 
ational facilities which tbe 
apartments can offer rents 
compare very favourably 
with individual private apart- 
ment blocks in Dubai, Deira, 
or Jumeira. 

The only accomodation at 
present available any nearer 
Jebel AIL apart from tbe Met- 
ropolitan Hotel, the Jebel Ali 
Hotel are the existing villas' 
in Jebel Ali village itself al- 
most all of which are con- 
stantly occupied. 




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WEDNESDAY, JULY 17,1985 


Page 15 


..•i .’...i 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


I ComrcJ Date’s EAR 


.iic'.-ivnjrju 


listens to Problems 


comodation 


i iron: Lne. Met - 

?| . Llje Jebel Mi 

ejusiujg xMlas 
“•NSP I’-ieif al- 


§^/ By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

'■■■'■ ' Interactional Herald Tribute 

r- Jg&|£W , ".ONDON — The last person from whom you would expect 

.j jgj aR '; ':;. to get some Tender Loving Care is a manager in your 
; j^ ^^^ -company. Yet four years ago,. Control Data I-fd, the 
•a & Tgfipj jf- r.Bnt xsh affiKatr, erf the UJS. computer company, began a 
^^S^rservice, the Employee Advisory Resource (EAR), to hdp 
^ 3 g^eniglQyees and their famihes-with personal proUass, mr^n/ting 
. If&nMW^el&ted to weak. 

.^^^eparMit Control Data Corp, has had an EAR in operation 
“£'-3 uk* ‘. 1974, and is. one of the. few UA companies to have 
' tins land of Service to its European subsidiaries, first 

■ /tatflXtam and more recently in France, the Netherlands and West 

! w ^Sernjaiiy. Johnson ft JohnsanLttL, the British unit of the U.S. 
; '?? heal th an d personal-care products company, has recently began a 
!.l&: similar service. • • 

i - ^^' V'Aeboofing to Control Data trw *9 - 

^ -?y: femff memb ers in Europe, the It 8 tnere heesnge Of 

the philosophy that 

a troubled employee 

doesn’t perform vdL” 


^£ 0M ^ tbe s^ceja Control a troubled employee 
Data France SA, showed that Ir v J 

: *.j9i percent of those who had doesn’t perform vdL” 

■•i- - used it were satisfied. r ■ , - 

^ In 'the London headquar- 

texs of Control Date Ltd, . EAR gets 500 calls' a year. Control 
| Batatas a staff of 350 at its headquarters and employs a total of 
/ 23QQ 1 . in Britain. 

| - _ ‘Tt’s there because of the philosophy that a troubled employee 

.. doesn’t perform well,” said John HaU, the nwwiagw of EAR in 
I ' London* % reports direedy to the mraaginK dSre^ogr. 

The service is free, voluntary and confidential. “One of the 
imperatives for such a astern to work' is that it be totally 
confidential; we cannot afford any leaks,” said Jacques Schmidt, 
•v manager of corporate communications at Control Data France, 
a- who set up the service there. To ensure confidentiality, Fiance’s 
EAR -manager does, not have to account for expcnse account 
■ r lunch partners by name. " 

EAR keeps records on employees 7 problems for statistical 
- purposes only .According to Mr. Hall, even if the records were 
\ broken into irwould be difficult tp decode the information and 
' associate an individnaFs name with a specific problem. 

T WO-THIRDS of the calls to EAR in London are forpurdy . 
personal problems. Yet it also provides advice on a wide 
variety of legal, financial and other practical services, soch 
I as probating a will or getting redress from a cleaner who has 
! turned your.best suit 

■ ‘ Critics of the service argue that a company has no business 
interfering in privaitaffaiis. Or, that it is not up to the company 
| to provide enqdoyees with psyeholopcal help. - 

“I was very anti,” said Brian Lawrence, manager of marketing 
^ and development at Control Data in London. "From a potitkal : 
“ point of view, we already have a country that throws too modi af 
; Sts people. Maybe this was just another form of that I couldn’t 
1 see the -’need for it and I didn’t want it.” He changed his mind 

after EAR had helped one of his salesman cope with a difficult 
situation. 

Because EARadvisesan all kin<to^of probtons,^toe is to 

.tbadfloar of the Lonjlrju QrfS'frraldnig, does not necessarily 
meaq that a marriag e is on thcxocks^or th&l someone is on the 
verge c^ a nervous breakdown. 

u EAR refers an employee to a psychiatrist, nobody will know 
whether the employee actually took the advice and went If the 
employee chooses to tell he is undergoing ^ psychiatric treatment, 
that Information will not appear on the employee’s company 
record. 

According to Control Data managers who have used EAR^ the . 
service helped them cope wilh some very difficult situations. ‘ 
One salesman asked bis manager for time off from work 
because the salesman’s schizophrenic daughter had run away 
from home. At a loss, the manager, who was not a fan of EAR, 

(Oaf -a d on Page 17, Cni 7) 


Currency Rates 


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Interest Rates 


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U.S. Expands Chip Sales to Korea 


5 Other Banks 

Report Gains 

Compiled bpOar Staff FrtrnDiipatcba 

N EW YOR K*- Six bank-hold- 

JJJg tTti J ■ »d | |^ 

the woriirs%gBt,'<»i Tuesday kk 
ported healthy earnings gains for 
the seaHid quarto 1 compared with 
the same penod last yett: 

Earnings for the three-month po* 
riod ended in June rose 22 percent 


S * DJ4 F.F. IU- OMr. BJF. %JF. Ton 

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MlN UMUI 1*0008 /MM 2U5J STUB SUM 77*52 7JC7 

Miw Yark(c) 473M * IBM 05 U0JOO 1W SMB tM BH.W 

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| SDR UBW7 BJS7U Z9E0B I5WB1 1510* SS2K 515511 245*1 34UBS 

CtaAws ki UmBr and Zurich, fbdnm m other European (motors. Now YorkrofteofJP-M. 
lei Commercial franc (b) Amount! nndrd to Our ant pound (cl Amounts nmdad la buy ant 
dodorC) Unaaonm (x) Units ot MW M Units of 10000 MA: natmndmd,- MA_* notavallatiM. 
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34507 TrirkMOUra 507.15 

2206 UAEdkfwn 34725 

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l a rt ni UMUMU 

Sotmtt Bt mw du Bm write fBrvssetsi; Banco Cenumrakda Itatlano (MUent; Baoaua *»- 
8bm(k dm Pais {Pais): Btmk a! Tokyo l Tokyo, I; IMF (SDR): BAil (dinar, rtyat Wrttam). 
omtr data tromRmutmrs and AP. 


facturezs Hanover Coro, 155 per- 
cent at Security Pacific Corp, 73 
percent at Muon Bank Cop, 16 

r xnt at WcQs Fargo A Co. and 
percent at Croaer National 
Corp. 

Lower mtarst rates helped them 
post big n KTEs scs from securities 
trading vnd from ma n- ament of 
their mvestmeot portfolios. But 
those gains wei epo t ial ly offset by 
higgler provisions for possible loan 
losses, winch reduce net income. 

Qtkxvp said its second-jnarter 
iwrmnfl B rose to 5251 mill i on Or 
51.81 a share, oonmaied with 5206 
miIGan,crS1.49aaure,ayearaga 
In die coosomer banking sector, 
net income rose 69 parent to 588 
wiiilmn, spurred fay “intensified 

con- 
sumer spending environment,” the 
company said. 

Manufacturers Hanover, No. 4 
among UR bankiiigconapaities, 
repeated earnings of $98A mittifi, 
nr $1.97 a share, c ompar ed with 
573.7 iwHlum, or 5M1 -a share, a 
year eaxher. 

Its net interest revenue nxe 183 
percent to 5564.6 saiSoa far the 
quarter, virile revenue from other 
activities inrinding Mnmti« and 
foreign atkmt trading and the 
sale inve stme nt securities rose 47 
percent to 527L8 nriffion. 

Security Pacific, die seventh- 
iargest in the United States, said 
earning rose to 5793 nriffion, or 
SU)8 a share, from 568.6 ntilhon, 
or'93 cents a share, a year ago. 

Mefion of K t ls b mgh . the na- 
tion’a llthhugest, saidits earnings 
jumped 73 percent to 568.1 nriffion, 
or $2.45 a shares compared with 
539.4 nriffion, or $140 a share, a 
year ago. 

Wdls Fargo of San Francisco, 
the 13th-largest, said its net income 
rose to 5473 nriffion, or 5235 a 
diare, from 5409 nriffion, or 51.63 
a diare, a year earlier. 

Crocker, based in San Francisco 
and ranked Not 15, reported earn- 
ings of 510 nriffion, up from 56 
xmffioaayearagp. (AP, UP1) ■ 


First Public Issue 
Of Dollar Bond 
QearedinTokyo 

Roam 

TOKYO — The way has 
been cleared for the first public 
placement of a doflar-bohd is- 

banks securities 
have agreed to cut fees for non- 
yea bond issues, banking and 
securities sources said Tuttdsty. 

The Worid Bank may be the 
first issuer, possibly next week, 
with a 10-year ballet bond for 
5200 ntiSxm to $300 nriffion, 
but details have not been 
worked out, they said. 

The tower fees will be offered 
by “commissioned banks,” 
which combine the ides of pay- 
ing agent and trustee. 

The trustee fee for non-yen 
bond issues by international or- 
ganizations mil be cut to 0.07 
percent of the issue volume 
from 0.1 percent tor Samurai 
bond issues, the princbal-pay- 
ing fee to 0.1 percent from QL2 
percent and the intearest-pajaug 
fee to 0.15 percentirmnuJ per- 
- cent, the sources said. 

Fees foe nonmteraatianal or- 
ganizations wffibe the same as 
on Samurai bond issues. 


Some Analysts 
Say Alliances 
Could Backfire 

By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — US., 
dectriuks oanpanies are selling 
and hccnsmg a growing amount 
of computer-chip technology to 
South Korean companies, allow- 
ing them to advance rapidly in 
the semiconductor industry, ex- 
ecutives and analysis say. 

.That practice, they note, re- 
flects a new affiance of UR and 
Korean companies against the 
Japanese, who dominate parts of 
the supply for the inte- 

grated aiatits ased in computers 
and other electronic equipment. 

But the transfer has prompted 
worry that one day the Korean 
industry will become a competi- 
tor capable of hurting the Ameri- 
can industry. The Japanese, ana- 
lysts point out, made major 
strides by itcensmg US. technol- 
ogy. 

‘Thar are people who view It 
as trading away our future,” said 
Lane Mason, a semiconductor 
industry analyst at Dataquest, a 
market research r *y nt * r x> in San 
Jose, CaEfontia. 


ll iwrit P rt wM US. ami Korean 
Sem i cm itii i t t o r Com pa nt fts 


NNKTbMVMUOTflU 

woMctaa«pMlfcra»< 


S+rUcQftductof Prnj*e» 

54X dynamic RAM 

Saml-cuatoro chips 

Bbil microprocessor 
SBKOynamicRAM 

04K dynamic RAM and 

2MK dynamic RAM 

S4K Static RAM 

IKCMOSEsprom 

B Mrt 16 EM microprocessors 

RAM'S ~ 

1CK Eeprocn 


Micron TechnotOgy 6<K and 2&6K dynamic RAM 
Irts) a bit mlcrocontrotiors and 

ntooprocessot* 

National Semi-custom cMpa 

SewHoooduaof 

Zytmx . CMOS process 

Mai— Wa WSr. *»«M»aa—.SMlWMca—aay !■!»■» 
iunxnn aownir in aUMrcaMattuKonun conway h 
MN MNSKtobsIb BuvtogVM MdMion *nd Dmdudno tte 
w i le, in owr» wrens MS leaiwor «Mjy o mon Sto 


Korean Corapapy UAPartnar 

■ Qnkktar AT4T. 

LSI Logic 

n<>8 

Texaa matnjoenta 

Advtnced Micro 
Pertoes 

f33S5Sm 

and tnatrumant 

Hyundai tmematlonalCMOS 

Tachnoiofly 

Woalarn Demipn 

.. . Center 

TaxsalratrumeKB 
Samaung Exai 


Industry Output 
In Britain Rose 
1 % for Month 


‘The industry risks repeating 
with the Koreans what happened 
with the Japanese,” said Michael 


-Bonus, deputy director of the 
Berkeley Roundtable on the In- 
ternational Economy at the Uni- 
VEirity of California, at Berkeley. 
‘There wouldn’t, have been a 
competitive Japanese semicon- 
dnetor industry without the 
transfer of technology.” 

On the other hand, he said, a 
properly formed affiance with 
the Knrwmr could be “rr nriaf 
to successfully competing with 
the Japanese. 

More than a dozen agreements 
have been signed in the past two 
years between UR senneondno- 


tor companies and South Korean 
companies, especially three large 
Korean conglomerates: Lucky- 
Goldstar Group, Hyundai and 
Samsung Semiconductor & Tele- 
communications Co. 

Goldstar Semiconductor, for 
instance, last month licensed the 
technology for an advanced 
computer memory drip, known 
as a 64K static RAM, man Fair- 
child Camera ft Instrument 
Corp. 

A RAM, or random access 
memory chip, allows informa- 
tion on the chip to be retrieved in 
any order. The term “static” in- 
dicates that the chip retains its 
contents as long as powa is such 
plied to the computer. A 64KL 
chip can store about 64,000 bits 
of information. 

Goldstar, of which 44 percent 
is owned by American Tele- 
phone ft Telegraph Co., will pay 


Tka Nm> fork Tim« 

royalties and sell some of its out- 
put to Fairdriki Goldstar also 
has licensed a slightly different 
type ctf technology known as dy- 
namic RAM from Advanced Mi- 
cro Devices Irnu as well as mi- 
croprocessors, the “brains” of 
the computer, from ZQog. and 
semi-custom chips from LSI 
Logic Corp. 

As companies sell technology 
for quick cash daring the current 
Jump in the semiconductor in- 
dustry, such transfers have be- 
come common. Zytrex Inc, for 
«ampto, a semiconductor com- 
pany that filed two months ago 
for protection from creditors un- 
der U.S. bankruptcy laws, has 
ngns-d to ttoense jts chip-making 
technology to Samsung. 

With the industry undergoing 
a shakeout, “a variety of compa- 
nies wifi get to the prant that they 
(Continued on P^ge 21, GoL 2) 


Reuters 

LONDON — British industrial 
production rose 1 percent in May, 
according to pre limin ary figures 
from the Central Statistical Office. 

The figure for April was revised 
to a 03-percent increase from the 
pr eliminar y estimate of a 0.6- per- 
cent rise, me office said. 

The index of industrial produc- 
tion in May was 6 percent higher 
than in May a year earlier. The 
April year-to-year increase was 3.9 
percent. 

Manufacturing output dropped 
03 percent in May, after April's 
fall was revised to 1.6 percent from 
13 percent The .year-to-year in- 
crease was 13 percent in May, 
against April’s 03-percent in- 
crease. 

Sources at the statistical office 
said Tuesday that the underlying 
trend in industrial output sliows 
modest growth, while that for man- 
ufacturing remains flat 

In the past three months, indus- 
trial production was 3 percent 
higher ihan in the previous three 
months, but 2 percent of that was 
due to recovery from the year’s coal 
miners' strike, which ended in 
March. The bulk of the remaining 
1-percent growth derived from the 
electricity, gas and oil industries. 

The coal and coke output index 
jumped in May to about 85 percent 
of its levels ot before the strike. 

The figures give no hint that 
North Sea ml output was about to 
peak. The index for output af lift 
mineral oil and natural gas extrac- 
tion industries rose slightly id* May 
from April and March. 

Motor vehicle output has contin- 
ued to increase after bang affected 
by industrial disputes near the end 
of last year. Output for the past 
three months is 6 percent above the 


Computer Industry Slump Evident at Trade Show 


By Michael Schrage 

Washington Ptmt Servlet 

CHICAGO — - The slump afflict- 
ing die UR computer industry is 
painfully apparent at this year’s 
National Co mputer Conference! -a 
trade show usually brimming with 
people and exhibits. 

NCG officials conceded that the 
nmnberof exhibitors had dropped 
from more than 700 last year to 
ilightiy more than 600 tins year. 
Several major companies, includ- 
ing Apple Camps ter Ca, Digital 
Equip me n t Coro, and Wang Lab- 
oratories Inc, skipped the show. 

Although the NCC expects this 


year’s attendance to top listyeai’s 
80,000 visitors, the aisles in Chica- 
go’s giant McCocmkk Place center 
staved more carpet than people. 

“Usually it’s packed an the first 
_d*jr” said Jerry Gossman, director 
of computer services at McDon- 
ald's Corp. 

NCCs rimmnMi, Kail E. Mar- 
tersteck. M«n*d “economic rea- 
sons” for the drop in the number of 
exhibitors. Tn the past, the indus- 
try has enjoyed 40-percent com- 
pounded growth; now if s growing 
about 20 percent a year," he said. 

Others at the stow commented 


on the almost total absence of per- 
sonal computer companies and 
software houses, while components 
companies fined the aisles. 

One of the nerw technologies that 
has «ner gpd at the show is the 
optical disk as a high-density stor- 
age device. Traditionally, comput- 
ers have relied on magnetic mafia 
such as tape to store computer 
data. Now, the cost performance of 
optical technology has made it the 
potential competitor in the multi- 
bOhon-ddlarmemOTy-didtrnaiket 

The best known optical disks to- 
day are the compact audio disks 
that store and play music. A special 


tight-sensitive material stores the 
digitally recorded sound, which can 
be encoded and “played” by a laser 
beam. 

The same disk, however, also can 
store computer data. One ride of a 
5V4-inch (14-centimeter) optical 
itislr ran stOIC Up to 500 million 
bytes of information. It would take 
more than 700 floppy disks to store 
that much computer data. 

One problem, however, is that 
once information is stored on a 
compact disk, altering the memory 
is virtually impossible. Compact 
disks are “read only” memory de- 
vices. 


previous three months and 4 per- 
cent higher than a year ago. 

Output in the chemical indus- 
tries in the past three months is 5 
percent higher than a year earlier, 
while that of electrical' and instru- 
ment engineering is up 8 percent, 
the figures show. 

The Office has revised some of its 
figures to take account of new data, 
new wmvial .adjustment factors 
and new estimating techniques. For 
example, industrial production last 
year has been revised upward 
about 03 percent 

In addition, the office is now 
only adding 03 percent to the in- 
dex for manufacturing output in 
the latest month, ins trad of I per- 
cent. as it was doing before. 


British Steel Has 
Smaller Loss 

Renters 

LONDON — State-owned 
British Steel Corp. on Tuesday 
reported its smallest loss in 
eight years. 

The company’s annual report 
showed an operating loss before 
interest of £70 million (597 mil- 
lion) for the financial year end- 
ing in March, down from a 
£105 -million deficit in the pre- 
vious year. But for the yearlong 
coal miners' strike, which cost 
the company £180 million. Brit- 
ish Steer would ha we had a prof- 
it of £104 million last year, 
Robert Haslam, the chairman, 
said at a news conference Tues- 
day. 

British Sled was losing al- 
most £2 million a day in 1980 
when the Conservative govern- 
ment called in Ian MacGregor, 
an American businessman, to 
turn it around. Mr. MacGregor, 
who now chairs the National 
Coal Board and who was a cen- 
tral figure in (he coal dispute, 
drew up a plan that has closed 
factories and rfadifri ihe work 
force to less than 70,000 from 
its peak of 228,000 a decade 
agp. 


= CHARTER =- 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE” 

125 Ft 12 persons go am-whnt. 
We air rbc tar in Greek Islands. 

Mediterranean Cndses Ltd. 

3 Stadkxi St, Athens. 

TeL: 3236494. Tlx.: 222288. 


Dollar Gains in New York 


United Pros International 
NEW YORK — The dollar ad- 
vanced Tuesday in New York on 
optimistic medical reports of Presi- 
Hgnt Ranald Reagan’s ilto e y s, but 
dealers said the dollar remains un- 
der a dood. 

“Trading was very quiet,” raid 
Carmine Rotoudo, chief trader at 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust 
“Nobody wants to do anything” 


until after testimony ter Paul A. 
Volcker, c hairm a n of the Federal 
Reserve, to Congress Wednesday 
and the grora national product re- 
pot Thmsday. “Everybody is ex- 
pecting 2 percent to 23 percent 
GNP growth and if that is so the 
dollar will go south. But no matter 
what happens people perceive the 


dollar as weaker and that could be 
a srif-fnlfiffing p h e n o m e n on.” 

. la (raffing in New York, the 
pound ended at 513882, down 
slightly from 513920 on Monday. 
The dollar ended atZ884 Deutsche 
marks, up from 2375; at 8.75 
French francs, up from 8.74, and at 
2388 Swiss francs, up from 2386. . 

The dollar was- under selling 
pressure Monday awaiting results 
of Mr. Reagsurs operation and 
notched down after the announce- 
ment that mnffr tiait been found. 

But Daniel Holland, vice presi- 
dent at Discount Coorp^ York, said 
concerns that had caused the sell- 
ing “were allayed ty subsequent 
more optimistic medical reports.” 


FBXENDS OF THE 


mnniM Bfefft 

’p tm rmr N4JI dan JJS MB 

MMTMumM 497 7JB 


i mom* m-m 

I month* 7*-7W 

Smnlta 74-74 

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I mar 

Source: Route rs. 


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T MnrlhwxHi 


' 109 7.H 

7J0 70S 

? JO 7JB 


UO 40B 

sas *25 

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S* SJB 
SM *45 


915716 9ft 
915716 91V» 
W 1716 M 
9ft 9ft 


II Bft- 
lift Hft 
lift 119/16 
lift T19/W 


5 5 

Bft ■ M 
65716 *SfU 


EgNMeyHtfketn 

July 16 

Mens Lnwj seasy Awk 
S tdavamragevtaM: 740 

Telerato Mferest Rata lodu; HA. 

Source: Merritt LwduAP 


Gold 



Smnmt /Meter*. Onuam***. Crtdtt 
i- mmi o h Ltords ffart. Book Tokyo. 


July 16 

AM. *’•**■ “W 
nma Koaf H7JS OT.IB • -W? 

5£2a SUJ0 BUS ' +*» 

NtwYork - MW".*** 

Lueembuurn, Paris *5- 

laao; Horn Kano opd Ztorfrt enealn o add 
daskiu Prices; rime York Camexafftnt 
anfroeLAB prices In US. S nor oimet. 
Source: Reuters. 


SIlTAPMAN 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
C0MPTRENDB 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded tie tolovring 
ataralchaqee: 

W 1980: +145% . 
M 1981b +137% 

IN 1882s +32% 

M 1983:— 24% 

IN 1984:— 34%. 

• met 

JULY 11. 1985 
EQUrTY 
STOOD AT 
U^. 577.008R4 


Who are they? . 

AMAX BIH0PE SA. - APPLE COMPUTES - AUDIT CONTBCfTAL SA. - 
BANQUE OCaDENTALE - B0UCUEB0N SA. - FDB0 FRANCE - 6R1NG0IRE- 
BR0SSABD SA.-HJ. H&NZ COMPANY - KNOU. WTBWATIONAL - MOR- 
GAN GUARANTY TRUST - PAN AM - PEUGEOT SA. - PHUJP MORRIS 
EUROPE -WHITE 5 CASE, e^^^ 

Won’t your company join us? 

AMEBKAN CHfTHl 261 ffiHlEVAKD RASMft. 75014 PAMS TH. 33531^1 


HARRY WINSTON 










Andrew Peck 
Associates Brings 
U.S. Discount Brokerage 
Across the Atlantic— 
to London. 

A SAMPLE OP OUR VERY LOW COMMISSION RATES 


500 shares of any price stock $ 80 

1.000 shares .* 110 

5.000 shares 300 

10,000 shares 450 

20 options @ 1/2 53 

50 options @3 180 

If you live in Europe or the U.K. and you make your own investment 
decisions, Andrew Peck Associates will charge you much less in 
commission when you trade or invest in U.S. securities’ markets. 

Our London office gives you the. convenience of a U.S. discount 
broker to contact during your business day. Your calls are answered 
promptly and executed orders are reported immediately. And you can 
make payments and deliveries to your account without sending 
securities or funds to the United States. 

Accurate record keeping. and custodial sendees are provided by 
Securities Settlement Corporation, one of The Travelers Companies. 
The Travelers is the third largest publicly owned insurance company 
in the U.S., and every account is protected for up to 10 million dollars. 

Our London office is ready to receive your inquiries. Please call us 
or return the coupon to receive our free brochure “SIMPLIFIED 
TRADING” We look forward to hearing from you. 



present . 

their latest creation as well as 
a selection of their rarest stones 

HOTEL CARLTON 

Cannes 

July 18 to July 22, 1985. 


'H0CSMG67173UW 


New York Genfcve 


Monte-Carlo 


ASSOCIATES, INC. # 1 ' 

39 Bedfoid Square. London WC1B3EG, England (01)580-1096 Tele* 8812130 (MCLEISG) 
3Z Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10004 (212)363-3770 Telex: 429097 (STOCKS) 
Licensed dealer in securities. 

D Please send me your SIMPLIFIED TRADING brochure. 


Country. 


MEMBERS NASD. SIPC. SlA 











Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 




NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


Hiflii low uht an. 


»V* 51ft 
15% 14 

46V* 45V* 
ID 9ft 
si% mt 


22 ft + % 
15 +1 

4 SH - ft 

51ft + ft 


l»i 125V, 128% +2% 

uto isi* isft — % 

41to 40V: 4lV* + Vj 

©% 31% 33 +i% 

36% 35 36% -Hft 

li% llto lift 

37V. 36% 37 — to 

27% 26to 27% +1 

171* 18 IBVh — % 

68% im +m 


Indus 1334.53 1351.93 133 1 XI 1347X9 + 1243 

Trans 689X2 7B387 485.98 700.14 + 1088 

Util 16470 16947 167 0b 160 '4 — 0 •>! 

Comp S59J7 5*447 5545* JMJ5 + 5.19 


Composllc 

industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Finance 


High Low 06*8 01*26 

11105 11205 1T20S +1.12 
12703 12461 12703 + 1X0 
11175 11200 1 13-75 +1.13 
61.55 £1^S 41-55 +£L31 
132,75 12177 12Z7S +1,15 


liesda^ 

MSE 

dosing 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Undianmd 
Total issues 
New HJphs 
New Laws 
Volume up 
Volume down 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Irworance 

OTINfies 

Banks 

Transo. 


Week Year 
Close Oi'se Ago Age 
305.17 + 213 377.15 23X30 
31042 +132 30033 26103 
39540 * 234 385 30 «US 
36474 +346 J54J0 23282 
30i.ll +1 SB 27406 20271 
30144 * 105 29405 1*455 
269.59 +005 263,14 19041 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


[Dow Jones Bond Averages! 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Himw 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


1206 

438 

391 

2035 

2)3 

14 

90J7DX50 

24211,770 


July 15 .. 244488 

July 13 ) 9»05D 

July II 1943b! 

1+5584 

July 9 300074 

'included In me sates figures 


Bay Sales *»*rt 

244488 483,958 7226 

!P*S5D 441029 2,187 

194361 420073 1,177 

16M84 407,752 U58 


Vol atAPM 


Prw.4PM.vol 

PrevconsoCtWcddoM 

lamoat 

nunz» 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 


BAT in 

VPl. 

1I51A 

Hfgfi Law 

4^4 Aft 

LOT* 

jft 

CM- 

* ft 

TIE 

716? 

S'4 

4% 

5'* 

+ to 

LwCSS 

2903 

IK 

Uto 

Hb 

Alb 

EanBO 

MM 

12ft 

17V» 

17ft 

+ m 

KeyPft 

2609 

lib 

10 

lib 

* to 

G»Cd 0 

2146 

13ft 

12 ft 

13** 

* to 

vrsnB 

2049 

IT.* 

IT 1 * 

IB4 

+ ft 

7e«Atr 

1783 

If 

18' 4 

18% 

+ '* 

WDrgill 

1744 

13% 

12ft 

13'* 

+ % 

□ameP 
TolPl wl 

TSS2 

1469 

2 to 
1% 

7 V » 

1ft 

v\ 

+ b 

TpfiRg 

1451 

13% 

17ft 

13% 

+ •!* 

BergBr 

I23C 

32b 

31ft 

32 

— *1 

H«W» 

1206 

39ft 

Mto 

Ph 

+1 

NfPalrrt 

1007 

15ft 

14'.* 

15% 

♦ ft 




< - 


A ! / 


Tables hi chide the nathMiwide'piiceo 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do nor reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Tio The Associated Press 


i ndustr ials 
Trans p. 
Utilities 
Finance 
Composite 


M)at> Low Close Oi'se 
27415 271.78 21474 +234 
181 37 179,10 18137 +227 
90X9 90.15 90*8 +031 
nn ]]ji 3X83 +039 
19472 19272 19477 + 280 


4 PM valuing 
Prgy. 4 P M uolume 
Prev. com. volume 


AMEX Stock index 


12 Month 
Mlgti Low Stock 


Sis. Close 7 

Dlv. Yld. PE lOOsHtatiLowOtiot.Chlwl 


239: 16 AAR .48 21 17 97 B% 21to 2J% + ft 

17% 9% AGS 14 218 14*6 14% 16%— % 

16% 9% AMCA 40 11% 11’* IT* + % 

21% 13 AMF JO 3.7 41 543 13V. 13% 13% + ft 

13% 12% AMF «d 125 13% 13% 13% 

50% 24% AMR 11 4271 50% 49% 50% + % 

23% 18% AMR ol 2.18 9.7 13 22% 22% 32% 

14' k 7% APL 8 8 8 8 

61% 44% ASA 200 40 450 50', W, 50 + % 

37 l? 1 * AVX Jt U II 160 13% 13% 13% + % 

28% 16 AZP 272 94 8 3172 27% 37% 37% 

60 36V. AUlLab 1X0 ZX 17 1703 PV 58 59% +1 

25% 19 AccoWd s JO 13 17 17 22% 22% 22% + % 

34V. 12% AcmeC 40 U 173 16b 15% 16'-. + % 

10% 7% AcmeE J2b 41 10 4 7% 7% 7% + % 

18 IS AdaEA 1.976105 82 ISb 17b 18% + % 

70 11% AdmMI 52 15 7 83 IB 17% 17b + % 

19"« 0% AdvSyS 531 45 18 36 11% 11% 11% 

41% 27% AMD 12 6096 38 34b 37% +1% 

12b 6% Aavesl .12 U 470 10% 9% 10% + % 

irs 9 AerHer 14 96 15 14% 14b— b 


NYSE Prices Reach New Highs 


HUB law Stock 


Sb riM 

Pt». TkL PE MBs HWl ton Quol.ai~ae 


i2Manm 
High Low Sock 


Plv. Yld. PE lOOSNIoti LgwQugl.Ch^e Hign Low Stack. 


Sis. 

Div. Yld. PE WOtMH 


■ 4s * l ™ ued />m ’. v , the Federal Reserve, for possible signs of the 
NEW YORK Pnces on the Not York f uture cqu^ 0 f th e Fed’s credit policy and 
Stock Exchange swept ahead to new highs in interest rales< 


active trading Tuesday after the market re- 
sponded calmly to the latest news oq President 


sponded calmly to the latest news on President 
Ronald Reagan's health. 


International Business Machines climbed 3 
to 128te:T)n Monday IBM reported lower sec- 


34b 12% AcmeC 50 35 

10% 7% AcmeE 52b 41 

18 IS AdaEA 1526105 

70 11% AdmMI 52 14 

19’, 8% AdvSys 531 45 

41% 22% AMD 
13b 6% Advesl .12 15 

15% 9 AerHe« 


The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials ond-quarter earnings, but the company had 


49b 27b AetnLf 254 55 34 2934 47% 48b 49b + b 

57% S2% AelLpf S-79O105 1411 55b 55 55% — b 

37% !Bb Ahmru 1JD 35 14 1694 34% 33 33% — % 

3% 3% Alleen 60 2% 2b 2% + % 


climbed 12.43 to 1347.89, temping the record 
closing high of 1.338.60 it set last Friday. 

Volume on the New York Stock Exchange 
stepped up to 132.30 million shares from 103.92 
million Monday. 


given advance warning of those circumstances, 
and analysis stud investors generally were re- 
lieved that the news was not worse. 

As they studied IBM's quarterly report in 
detail, some analysts concluded that the compa- 


54b 38% Air Prd 150 12 12 547 55 


24% 13 AlrbFrt 50 35 II 307 30 

7% 1 AIMooi 273 2 

38b 22 AloPel 2.92e1(L2 

33% 27b AIOPP1A3.92 125 

8% 4% AktPdnt 57 10.9 

82 61% AloP Pi 950 » 1.1 

184 88b AtdPpf 1150 105 

74 57% AktPpf &I6 IIJ 

14% 11% Alow 5 154 45 9 

25% 9b AlskAIr .14 5 II 

24 10ft Albrtoi 58 15 27 

33b 24% AlbtUK .74 25 13 

31b 33b Alcan 150 45 12 


542 55 54% 55 + % 

307 30 19V, 19% + % 

273 2 1% 1%— % 

3844 28b 78% 28% + % 
55 31% 30b 31 — % 


Advancing issues outnumbered declines by tiy's outlook for the second half of the year and 
almost 3 to T. The exchange’s composite index beyond was improving, 
jumped 1.12 to 1 13.05. Point-plus gains were common amoag other 


Wall Street passed a bull-market landmark computer and technology stocks. Digital Eqirip- 
ien Wilshire Associates' index of 5,000 stocks meni rose 3% to 9944; Texas Instruments 4 to 


55 31% aw 31 — % when Wilshire Associates' index of 5,000 stocks meni rose 374 to 9944; Texas Instruments 4 to 
s7fc8? 79% « +»% reached $2 trillion for the Cist time, rising S19J 9944; Hewlett-Packard IV4 to 36)4; Data Gener- 
SS ‘“b nv + b billion to S2D15 trillion. a! P4 to 3 SVt, and Burroughs 174 to 59J4. 

a? X % Just after the market closed on Monday, American Telephone & Telegraph led the 


150 105 700x104 104 104 

8-14 IIJ 387DX 73% 77b 77b + b 
154 65 9 48 15% 15% 15% + % 

.14 5 II 1579 75% 2511 75% + % 

58 15 27 74 23b 22 23b +lb 

.74 25 13 1021 30b 297s 30b +1 

150 45 12 3357 25 24% 25 + b 


38% 27% AfcoStd I JO JJ 13 142 37% 34% 37b + b 


32 17 A16* All 150 35 1357 39 28% 28b— % 

24% 20% Atoxdr 22 165 34% 24 24% + % 

W J 72b AIIqCo 25ot 14 26 77 «5b 84b 85 — % 

26b 34% AI»Cp pr 256 108 2 26% 26% 26% 

78b 19% Atom I 1.40 5.7 107 34% 24b 24%—% 

20b 15b Alglnpt 2.19 115 6 20 19% 20 

98 B2b Algl pic 1 IJS 1 15 4 97 97 97 

34% 25% AltoPw 2J0 85 10 455 33b 33% 33% + b 

22 ISb AllenG 50b 27 16 109 21% 21% 21% 

46b 2Bb AlldCn 150 45 9 2850 44% 44b 44% + % 


Just after the markeL closed on Monday, American Telephone & Telegraph led the 
doctors reported that a polyp they had removed active list, up W at 22 Vi on volume of more than 
from the president's colon was cancerous. 33 million shares. The stock fell early in the 
But they also said they found no evidence session after some analysts described it as over- 
that the malignancy had spread. They estimated valued, but it rallied toward the dose as the 
the chances of no recurrence of the cancer to be general market advance gathered speed. 


to U U 137 26% 25% 28% + b 

1X4 34 13 4993 27% 26% 27 + % 

150 55 12 39 32b 31% 32b + Vi 

to U U 295 16b 16b 16% - % 

50 25 16 852 34 33% 33% + % 

375 12.7 3S 29% 29% 29% 

36 29 29 29 

52c .1 17 244 17% 16% 17 — % 

■36 35 TOT 10% 9% 10% + % 

10 428 4V. 4% 

58 a 27 B1 2S% 24% 2S% +1 

50 5.9 15 61 13% 13% 13% 

864 4% 4% 4% + Vh 

250 35 13 3693 71% 70% 71b 

.941 85 13 444 11% 10% 11% + % 

JO 17 13 1290 18% 18b 18% + % 

IXMJ 4J ir 534 JSb 32W 22b + % 

178 75 8 54 22% 22\o 22% 

SO 105 5100* 4% 4% 4% — % 

47 % % to — 

72 25 18 421 27% 26% 27% +1% 

J6 1 5 14 244 39% 39 39— % 

2 19% 19% 19% 

150 65 17 1797 24% 24% 24b 

6.156115 10009Z 54b 54b 54b + % 

11706115 39 102 101% 101% + % 

506 13 770 18 17% 18 

24 9BB 2b 2% 2% 

59 11V 11% lib 

2506145 134 17% 17 17% + % 

1J0 45 11 327 20% 20% 20%— b 

1.14 23 If 149 25 33% 34% + to 

3324 3% 3% 3%— % 

2J1 115 4 19% 19% 19% + % 

173 35 I 1493 Ob 47 4Bb— % 

.12 7 11 347 16% 16b 14b — % 

50 25 16 206 12% 12% 12b — % 

54 15 IS 226 24% 23% 24 + % 

803 13 14 48 27% 27b Z7% + % 

72 17 12 105 19% 18% 19% + % 

54 22 14 601 25b 24% 25% + % 

104 1% lb 1% + Vk 

I 44 2b 2% 2Va— % 

172 45 11 574 43 41% 43 +1% 

156C11J) * 14% 16% 16% 


a Har 

rt s AS xo 

13 

1630 

29ft 

lOto Har 

ir n 

J 

J41D 

|4b 

20 Har 

sco >je 4x 

12 

366 

29% 

24% Hor 

mx 1J8 JX 

11 

529 

37ft 

14 HOI 

So 1X0 10J 

11 

19 

17ft 

ISto Kan 

El 1X4 6X 

11 

433 

24% 

a not 


8 

200 

lOto 

22ft HOT 

cm xo i.4 

17 

122 

2V 

9b Hot 

Lob X u 

19 

614 

I3b 


33 688 20b 
S* 23% 
*37 19% 
344 14 


28 25 344 14 

-20 1.2236 1200 1612 

58 24 13 1094 20% 

■40 15 15 140J 29% 

150 29 U Itof 54% 

18 74 18 

M 1.4 22 83S 19% 

140 45 12 2521 39% 

A4I 24 93 18% 

1 150 45 1 33b 

i 17 545 21 

<50 29 13 244 48b 

102 7b 

7 11% 

.22 5 17 4432 37b 

50 15 19 233 3319 

JO 22 14 212 23% 

.17 15 9 248 12 

54 2.1 14 156 26 

ISO 17 15 736 68 

53* 1.1 10 949 29% 

ISO IS U 550 55 

1701 2.1 I 79% 

150 15 17 30 73 

38 480-514 


2B*» +1 
Mto 

X'U + to 
37% + % 
16%— to 
24 V + % 
10 % + % 
29 + % 

11 % + % 
20 — to 
27 >— % 
19% + to 
14 + % ■ 

16% +1% I 
20 + % 
28b— % 
S5%— to 
IB + to 
17% — to 
39% +1% 
18 % 

33b + % 
20% 

47% — % 
7% + % 
11% — to 
37 +lb 
33% +2b 
23% + % 
11 % + % 
36 + % 

67% +2to 
29% + % 
3S +lb 
79% + to 
72% + % 
14 + b 

26 + to 


SIVs 44 L oneS el SJT 105 
9b 1% lilCo 
32 16 LILolB 

45% 21% L1LP1J 
22b 9 LILPfX 
22 9'A LILOIW 

22% 9% LILC4V 

2*to lib LILPfU 
21% Bto LUefT 
16% 7% LfLPfP 

19% 8<* lil pro 


1 JJ S0% SBVj 50V + to 
3 1926 9 lb 8% 

HOG; 31 3ttVs 31 +2 

528x 44% 44 44 —1% 

35 27b 72 22% + to 

49 22b 71 to 77% + to 
34 27b 22% 22U + % 
9 24 2Sto 26 + % 

242 21 20b 20% 

98 16b M 14% — % 
9 18% 18b 18% 


31% 18b LonoDl 77 24 IS 507 29 to 39 


36b 72b Loral 58 15 20 1289 35% 34% 35% + to 

13% 10% LaGanl J6b 45 10 76 12b 11% ITto + % 

38 22b LaLond 150 3.1 ID 418 32% 31V 32% + to 

£5% 17 LOPOC 50b 14 43 273 22% 22% 231k + % 

331* 78% LaPL tri 450 155 74 2T 31% 33 * % 

25% 14b LoPLtrf 116 115 23 23 % 23% 23% + W 

32b 22% LOW&S 2.44 7.9 0 <33 30b 30% 38b + to 

50 36 Lows: ZOO 45 7 17 46% 46% 46% + to 

31% 16b Lowes 54 15 17 2177 28b 37b 21% + to 


SO 36 Lows: 
31% 16b Lowes 
2S% 19% Lufirzl 
36% 24 Ltibys* 


1.16 4.9 13 6«2 23% 23% 23% — % 


.7 23 231 36% 35b 35% + % 


33b )6% LocfcvS 1.16 SI 12 <68 231. 22% 23b — % 


302 14% 13% 14% 


23% 15% MACOM 54 1.1 22 1518 21b 20b 3IVi + % 

69b 38b MCA 58 14 33 1031 63% 63b 43% + to 

24% 17b MCorp 1.40 45 7 1356 23% 22% 23% + % 

14% 7% MDC 52 24 9 223 12b 12 13b— % 

254 65 9 37 37% 37% 377* 


50 5 58 1389 25% 
40 25 5 45 16% 


66 53to AWCOP* 6.74 104 245 63% 

113b 99 AMCppfliOO 10J 26 113% 

106%100b AfdCpT 1251*11,9 1 103b 

23% ISto AlldPd 19 90 3l 

60’* 42% AUdSll* 212 35 9 936 59% 

12% 4% AlllfCh 266 4% 

34% 24 AlltC pf 4 30% 

28* 20 ALLTL 154 6J 9 229 29% 

37% 77% ALLTpl 206 54 7 98b 

39% 29% Alcoa 150 35 17 5745 34% 

22b 13% Amax .101 1992 13% 

40 32% Amax pf 350 BJ 9 34% 


245 63% 63 63% + % 

26 113% 112b 112% + to 
1 103b 103b 103b 
90 21 20% 21 +1b 

936 59% 58% 59 + % 

266 4% 4% 4% + % 

4 30% 30% 30% 

229 39% 28% 29b + b 
7 98b 38b 38b +lb 
5745 34% 33% 33to— % 
1*92 13% 13% 13% — % 
9 3<% 34b 34% + % 


better than 50 percent. On the downside. Schlumberger slipped ft to 

On Tuesday, Larry Speakes, the White House 37. The company posted second-quarter profits 
spokesman, said. “There are no complicaiions of 71 cents a share, down from SI.OI in the 
on the president’s road to recovery.*’ nnandal comparable period a year ago. 
analysts said investors were heartened by re- Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 
ports of Mr. Reagan’s rapid recovery from his including trades in those stocks on regional 
surgery. exchanges and in the over-the-counter market, 

However, they also observed that the situa- totaled 161L20 million shares. 


340 65 8 4556 52% 51% 53b 


40* 4 10 583 62% 

150 JJ> 12 3610 63b 
1.12 34 II 30 33 
1 254*11 5 4 26 


spokesman, said. “There are no complicaiions 
on the president's road to recovery.” nnandal 


22b AmHn 1.10 19 20 1830 28to 27% 27% + % 


lion raised some uncertainty about prospects 
for legislative action on measures being pushed 


Standard & Poor's index of 400 industrials 
rose 236 to 214.44. and S&Fs 500-stock com- 


2V lb AmAgr 103 1% 1% ]% 

21% 15% A Safer 8 1«5 20% 30% 30% + % 

70 55b ABrarxi 3.90 65 9 984 65% 64% 65% + % 

29b 24b ABrtipf 175 94 3 29% 29% 29% — to 

115 56% ABdal 140 14 17 10B3 lt4to 113to 113% — % 

lWx ABKJM 56 35 15 87 29b 28b 29% + % 


? jV; 19% ABKJM 
7% 3Pt ABtnPr 
40 40% AmCnn 


_ - „ ABmPr 44 13 16 95 28 77 28 +1% 

40 40% AmCan 190 4.9 13 623 59% 59b 59% + to 

25b 21% A Can of 180 11^ II 25 25 25 

52% 37 ACanpf 3.00 5.7 I 52b 52b 52b 

114 103 ACun Pi 13.75 112 2 113V* 113% II3%— % 

3J% (6b ACopBd 120 107 51 20% 20% 20% + b 

30% 25V* ACqbCv 151c 85 25 2*% 29b 29% + to 

11 4% ACttltC 


by the president to narrow the federal budget ■ posite index was up 2.00 at 194.72. 
deficit and overhaul the tax system. The NASDAQ composite index for the over- 

At the same time. Wall Streeters were looking th e-counter market gained 113 to 305.17. 
ahead to congressional testimony Wednesday At the American Stock Exchange, the market 
and Thursday by Chairman Paul A. Volcker of value index closed at 23556, up 1.84. 


17 Month 
High Low Slock 


0%. Yld. PE loos High Low Qool.Pitoe I HtatiLow Slade 


Sis. CAM 

Dlv. Yld- PE lOtoHtOh LowOuctOrtl* 


4% ACentC 231 01 9b Ob 9b + % 

ito 43% ACvan 1.90 14 13 5937 55b 54b 55% + % I 


27b 10b ADT .92 17 25 135 25% 25% 25% 

24% 17 AElPw 1760 95 9 3328 24V 24to 24b— b 

49% 25 AmExo 158 17 16 6376 47% 46b 47% +IU 

2S 9b AFamJs 4 26 II 570 24 23V 23% 

35% 19% ACnCp 150 18 10 2837 35% 34b 35V* + b 

ACnl wl 246 14b 14 14 — % 

AGnlplA 654*115 3 55 55 55 — % 

ADM DIB 557* 65 20 94 93% 93% — % 

AGnlaf 355 45 1 75 75 75 —1 

AGO [HD 264 35 150 70 69V 699*— % 

AHarir 150 U 11 40 36% 35% 36% +1 

AHolsl 211 12% 11V 12 

A Home 2-90 4 a 14 3192 66% 65% 65% 

A Hasp 1.12 15 1528202 46% 45% 45% — % 

Amrtcn 650 65 9 646 «6% 95% 96% +1 

AlnGrp M 5 25 7371 90 17% 89% +2V* 

AIGppf 555 19 6 ISO 149 149 +4 

AMI 53 16 13 7100 27% 27b 27V + % 


ASM pIB 557* 65 
AGnlaf 3.25 45 
AGO (HD 264 35 
AH (Hit 150 13 II 
AHolil 


Am Mot 74 3% 2% 3%— % 21 

APrtKrfs .1* 6 4 <31 21% 21% 21% 29 

ASLFla 6 14 7 6V 7 + to 67 

ASLF1 Pi 119 156 47 14% 14% 14% 7 

AShlo 50 55 11 210 14% 14 14b 2 

AmSId 160 49 11 B24 32% 31to 32% +1% 51 

AmSIor 64 15 12 753 67 66% 66V 18 

AStrpfA 458 5J 683 77% 77b 77%— b 66 

ASlTPfB 480 11.9 29 57% 57% 57b— to 20 

ATBT 150 55 17 33415 22% 21% 22% + to 7 

AT&T pi 164 95 718 39% 39% 39%—% 15 

AT&T Pf 354 96 9B3 40b 40 40 — to _. 

AWolrs 160 42 ■ 71 34 22% 24 + % | 

Am HoH 240 105 9 IBS 22% 21V 22% + b ■— 

ATrPr 564 7.9 32x 71 70V 71 + to ,31 

ATrSc 95 17% 17 17% + % 125 

ATrUn 564 64 6xB7% 879* 87%—% 85 

A moron 1-sO 41 9 91 Alto 37V 39% +2% * 

ArnesD .20 424 594«%48%4ffV+% 59= 

Arnetok 50 XI 14 361 25% 25% 25% + % 33; 

Amfoc 409 28% 27% 27% + % 5J 

Amfesc 4 28 6T* 6V 6% + % T 


85 41 

>1% 9 

14% 10V 
25% 15% 
31% 25% 
65V 43% 
4% 3b 
29% 21% 
25% 73 
5% 1% 

27 16 

40% 28% 
37b 29 
36V 13 
29% 23V 
52% 30V 
40V 27% 
40% 27V 
19% 13% 
20 15% 

21% 14b 
29 23 

67% 35 
7% 6% 


858 105 400x 83% U 83 

1.17 10J 34 11% 11% >1% + to 

146 105 15 13% 13V 13% 

.77 38 9 33« 24b 27% 24 

140 47 II “ 162 28 27 23 + % 

158 25 19 2122 66% *5 66b +lb 

14 47 4b 4b 4b 
150* 41 8 258 29% 29% 29% 

40* 24 21* 24% 24V. 24% + V 

88 2V 2% 2V + % 
152 56 25 12b 26% 26 26% + % 

112 75 8 155 40% «% 40% + % 

3.95 11.0 5 36 36 36 

50 .9 9 32 22% 21% 22% +1 


27b ComO In 116 44 9 246 
25V CmbEn 154 55 II 863 
8 Comdto 50 15 II 2097 


15% ComMtl 56 XI 16 


23b CmwE 360 95 7 2582 


55 74 

BrlNPt 212 95 


51V <6% BrlN of £56*108 
18b 11 Burnav .44 34 


112 75 8 155 40% «% 40% + % 

195 11.0 s 26 36 36 

50 .9 9 32 22% 21% 22% +1 . 

IJ* 44 19 423 29% 29b 29% + % 

TilB 20 19 561 53% SZ% 53% +lb 

160 25 9 1165 39% 38b 39% +1 

52 14 15 1067 32% 31% 32% + % 

50 4.1 9 62 19% 18% 19% + % 

216 114 10 19 19 19 

12 67 17% 17% 17V 4- % 

144 55 SI 83S 29% 28% 29% +1 

140 21 9 1684 67% 66V 67% + % 

55 74 9 7b 7% 7V ♦ % 

112 9 J 1 22V 22V 22V + % 

556*104 782 51V 51% 51% - % 

44 34 13 % 12% 11% 12% + % 


13 CwEpf 150 118 
13b CwE pr 260 11.1 
18% CwE P« 267 95 
TO 7 * CwE Pf 287 11.1 
54% CwE Pf 840 115 
47% CwEpf 764 11.1 
17% ComES 252 86 
21% Comsat 150 12 
71% CPsvc .28 4 

25 Coowgr 40 26 
11 ComnSc 
11% Calvin 
23 ConAo* 57 23 
13% CarmE 140 8.1 


36 13 1722 


57 23 14 
140 8.1 10 


20% CnnNG 240 7.9 


4 28 972 

E6 10 40 

53 28^2 

5 15 “ 


49b— % 
32% + % 
15% +1% 
17b + % 
9% + to 
22% 

17b 

15 

34 + % 

25%—% 
73 

16 +2 
30% + b 
37% +1% 
34% + to 
29% + to 
19% + % 

19% + to 


FMC 220 U 41 1224 
FPL Go 1.94 7.1 * 976 
FoOCtr 68 26 34 84 

Facet 7 48 

Fcrirehd 60 16 527 

FaU-cpf 340 97 211 

Foh-tt .18 14 10 147 
FamOls 60 4 25 <72 

FansTH 40 18 13 48 

FlfmtF s 37 

Fan* 48 44 0 547 
FayDf? 60 28 IB 373 
Fedora .02* 4 i tfl 

FcctiCo 144 44 9 71 

FtodExp 35 3328 

FdMoO 152 46 11 675B 
PstlXM .14 5 2715 

FefllPB .70 15 10 111 

FPappf 231 88 104 

FedRII 144 45 14 435 
FdSonl 40 44 IS 92 
FedDSI 244 46 9 730 

Ferro 180 -41 a 380 29% 
Fkfcat 180 34 13 59 29V 

FlnCpA .051 1641 7% 

FlnCapf 40 10.9 3) 5% 

FlnCn pf 441«rt9_7 34 33% 

FrtSBOT 105 5% 

Plreshi 40 34 10 488 21% 
FlAlll 48 25 ID 786 27% 
FtBkSy 1*0 18 9 290 42% 
FBKFH 160 11 14 58 32b 

FBOSf 260B 22 14 1292 
FBajJwl 579 

Fgicnic 162 84 27 3164 


470*— % 
27V + to 
10% + % 
13% + % 
16% + v 
37 

13% + % 
24% + % 
15V + to 
31b +1% 
If +■% 
10b— % 


40 +1 

46V + % 
36% + % 
21V + to 
20 + % 
:»% + v 

22% + to 
17% — % 
61 + % 


1.12 14 II 30 33 

12546116 4 26 

19 4% 

40 16 1517SS2 51V 

2-60 9J 13 5 28b 

56 23 17 53 42% 

48 13 18 356 14% 

1.75 44 9 150 37% 

237 28 2 84% 

250 45 I 55% 

665 74 9 79V 

244 V.l 7 3221 29 

2.12 10 81 TO'.* 

1.96*194 18 10 

J* 24 20 15 17% 

228 84 12 58 26% 

AO 35 9 111 10% 

88 37 1202 12% 

J2 14 12 81 23% 

48 24 16 4709 34% 

JO IjS 18 185 31% 

40 25 13 3881 32% 

260 44 9 41 29V 


2SV* + % 
16% + to 
62b + % 
62V +1% 
32% + % 
26 — % 
4V 

51% + % 
28 — b 
42% + % 

14% + % 
37V + Vs 
84% +2% 
S5J* + % 
79% + % 
28% — % 
70 + % 

10 + % 
16 % + % 
26% + % 
10 % 

12% + % 
23% + % 
34V 4- % 
30% +1% 
32% + Vi 
29%+ % 


t4% 7% MDC 

38 26 MDU 256 64 9 37 37% 37% 377* 

<2 34 MEI JO 13 16 142 41b 40% 41b +1 

18 9to MGMGr 44 ZJ 41 60 17% 17% 17% 6 % 

13% 9% MGMGFM44 K 2 13 13 13 

16 10 WGW.ua -20* 16 2560 16% 16 16% + V 

4% 2% MGMuwf 285 3 2% 3 

22b IS MILIf 78 28 16b 16 14b + to 

38V 14 MOCmJ S 55 15 21 TB3S J7V7 36 36% — % 

55b 38% Mocv 1.16 24 12 1542 48V <7% 48V +lto 

IB 11% ModRes 80 11% lib 11% + to 

46% 24V Magic: 140 23 9 341 46 45% 45% + % 

29% IV Mot All 1840c 6 2% 7% 2% + U 

23% 12% MoMlln JOb 23 82 14 13% 13% + % 

21% 14 ManltNf Jl 22 29 14% 14% 14% 

29% 12 ManrC 1 .16 5 25 1201 28V 28 28b + % 

42b 24% MfTHan UD U 1 1740 40 to 39V 40% + % 


56% 43V NUrHPf 450el2.Q 170 54 53% 54 

52% 41 MfrHpf 5.87*1 \A 78 52% 51% ST**— V 

9% 5% vIMonvf 3 862 6% 5% 6b + % 

24% 18% vIMnvl p f 15 17% 19% 19b 

35% 21 MAPCO 150 25 9 2710 35% OS’- 35% 

5*3 MamtZ 23 4b 4% 4b 

2% V. (Wared* 278 % % %— V 

38% 20% Mar MW 150 43 9 45 38 37% 38 + %' 

51% 41b MarM pf S24el03 102 51V 51 51% +1% 

39% 16% Marions J3 5 43 778 36% 35% 36b + V 

12% 8% MorfeC 32 19 S3 10% 10% io% + % 

18% 13V Market 130 7.7 12 15% 15% 15% 

98 64% Marrlof J4 J 17 223 97 96 97 +to 

74 40 MrdiM 240 13 21 1421 74V 73% 74% + V 

42% 22% Mart Ms 1_W 23 1901 44 42% 44 +1V 

14 8% MaryK .13 .9 19 1471 13% I3b 13to 


&* + £ 
7% + % 
5% + % 
33% + V* 
5% 

2tb + % 
26 % 

42% +1 
31%—% 
9| +2V 

45% +1% 

3*V + to 
37V + % 
10 % 

22 % — % 
57b + Mi 

9% + H 
26% + V 

3S-* 

27% + % 
3 +W 


PCMpfO047all3 
FtBTex 150 104 
FtBTx pf 5.96*110 
FfBTxpf 5480135 
FlCItV 

FFedAx JO* 15 
FFB 288 54 
FIFM afn 33*105 


Flnfste 2 50 43 8 1129 


48V Burrgh 2*0 O II 3834 60% 58% 59% +1% 
12V Bui lrln J2 19 89 266 17% 17% 17%— % 


AT&T Pf 334 94 
AWalrS 140 43 I 
Am Hall 240 103 9 
ATrPr 544 7.9 
ATrSc 

ATrUn 164 64 
Ameren 7 jo 4.1 9 

AmesD 30 4 24 

Amatak 50 11 14 
Amfac 

Amfesc 4 


IV Buffos 
3% Buies pi 1451 


1% IV IV 
4 JV 4 + to 


12% Conroe 46 ZB 7 
2S% ConsEd 240 64 I 
35 Cone Pf AA5 mi 
38% ConEpf 540 105 
22b CiMFrt 1.10 3J 12 
31 ClBNG 232 55 9 
4% CansPw 20 

13 CnPniA <16 134 


37b + % 
46 + % 


Pints! pf 257 74 
FtMJss 54 25 
FiNatnn 
F*lPe 

PxtPCPf 262 85 


5« 25 9 1047 

17 6 26% 

1036 7b 


13to CnP pfB 450 116 
23b CnPpfO 745 14.1 


33% +2% 
43% + to 
SV + *■ 
31 


75V CnP PfE 732 119 
25 CnP prG 736 119 
11% CnP WV 440 14.1 
9b CnPPrtl 160 14.1 
10b CnPprT 330 144 
25% CnPpfH 748 143 
llto ChParft 440 I4J 
10% CnPprP 19« 154 
10b CnPprN 145 1X3 
7b CnPprMXSO 115 
7 CnP pru 223 125 
II CflP orS 442 144 
7to CnPprK 243 118 


S Ti H 


31b 21% CBI In • 140a 19 11 311 23% 23% 23% + b 

125 68% CBS 100 24 20 427« 117%11»% 117b— b 

G* 53% CBS Pt 140 15 S 79V 79V 79V— lb 

8% 4to COi S 57 5% J 3 

SM4 27 CIGNA 240 45 73 1664 59% WV» 99% + V 

MV p% CIGof 275 46 222 32V* 31b 32 + V 

53b 50% CIGpf AI0 73 261 53 52% 53 + b 

7J 2b CLC 166 2% 2V 2V— % 

59% 24b CNA Fn IB 1198 58% 57% 57% + % 

11% 9% CNAI 134 11.1 34 llto 11% 11% — % 

!4I* ? NW »> 31 * 17V 19% 19**— % 

46b 3SVCPCIM 220 5.1 12 793 44 43% 43%—% 

26 14% CP Nil 140 55 10 163 25V 25 25%— b 

22% 19% CR1IMI 247*94 IV 21% 21% 21%—% 

27% 18% CSX 1.16 4.1 10 6153 28% 27% 28 + % 


Amoco 3J0b 5J 8 1814 69b 61% 62b 
AMP 32 22 20 4798 33% 32% 33b + % I 


AMP 32 22 
Amoco JO 23 
Am reps 

Arnsm 140 19 


32 22204798 3}%3M33b + % 
40 23 17 182 12% 12% 12% + V* 

11 129 20% 14% 20V* +1% 

40 19 9 17 36 35% 36 

38% — % 


A ms red 140 At 13 849 38% 38% 


703 Ito 2% 3% + % 


Anchor 1.48 55 702 27 26% 27 + % 

An C lev 152 11 37 478 43 42 43 + % 

AndrGr 20 14 16 169 12% 12 12% 

AntWl/C 40 24 14 103 25% 25 25% + % 

Anheuss 13 2017 33% 33 33*2 + % 

Anneupf U0 55 118 6«V tfl 69V + % 

Anlxlr 58 13 18 285 16% 16 16b 

Anthem XM 4 IB 299 13V 11% 12V + V 

Anthnv 44b 11 9 19 Hb ly* 14b + b 


IV 399 21% 20% 21b + V IA2b 117 CSXpf 740 45 


FtUnRI 1M 64 IJ 104 2PV 
FtVaBfe Ji 12 11 4U Z7% 
FlWbC 150 19 10 123 33 
PWtaCpf63S 114 1200x55 

FUchh 140 10420 IX 31% 

FHnFd 45* 4 230 11% 

FttFnG s 152 II 10 335 42% 

Fleet En 44 25 9 14K 21% 

Fiemng 146 25 14 848 >9% 

Flexlaf 141 122 27 13b 

FtohtSf * .16 4 23 162 29b 

FleafPt 19 1321 32V 

Pk.ec .16a 4 14 82 44% 

FWPrg 216 74 10 1523 29 . 

FlaSM 40 27 17 72 14% 

Iff! 5% 


23% Cnncp 240 44 21 2421 


54b +lto 

24% — lb 
28% +1% 

16% 

21 + to. 

17% + % 


65 46% 

21V 12V 
24to 16% 
19 % 11 
27% 17V 
21 14% 

20V 14% 
21V 15% 

an* 27b 

36b 22% 
40b 27V 
12 5% 

14% 8% 

20 14V 

30b 23% 

3TS2 

26V I3b 
51b ™- 


144 45 12 1015 34 
.22* IJ 64 16% 
71 282 10% 

230 94 5 20V 

1-92 W.7 47 II 

37e 29 58 26% 

1.70 84 7 9 19% 

1-00 11 10 3384 32 
400 64 11 60% 

550 84 9 59V 

225 55 • 2 43% 

4 JO 7.1 2 63 

1-20 9.1 1177 15% 

132 7.1 9 299 24% 

368 12% 
244 «.* 7 2279 26% 


33V— % 
16% — b 
10 % 


29230:30% 
lOte 20 

fssoxzu* 




32 25 13 *99 32b 
X09e 54 8 3933 39 
9 913 11% 


sa+5 




21% + % 

TBto- % 


Ptawrs 42 25 18 330 19% 


Foofec 220 35 13 


1042 17V 
21 57% 


FordM 240 55 s 83U 43b 


162b 117 CSXpf 750 4J 1 164 164 164 +1V 

40to 24 CTS 150 29 1*1 34% 33V 34% + V 

12% 7% C 3 Inc 103 107 9b IV 9b to 

33V 22% CoOOf .92 23 9 1576 27% 27% 27% 

16b 8b Corner 17 4510 15V 15 15% — to 

?S% 11% Cal Fed 48 1.9 9 2070 25% 24% 74V + to 


Anthem XM 
Anthnv 44 


2 V* ApctiP wl 
19% 15'* APChPunXlO 11.1 
26 21 AaPwpf 265 10.9 

34% 28 APPwpf 4.10 126 
31% 26 ApPwpf 180 127 


58 26 10 557 111* 10V 10V— % 


141 1 % % 

135 19 11V 19 + to 

3 24to 34b 24to — % 

9 33% 33% 33b- to 

2 30 30 30 


54b 37V ColFO pf 4JS 95 
20'^ 13v, Calthn 55b 14 

15V !J% Camml .12 5 

24to I5to CRLk g 40 

.71* 3 CmpRi ,1M 

14% 8V CpRpfg 250 


191 53% 52% 52% + b 
110 17% 17b 17% + to 
139 14% 13V 14% + V 
736x 22% 21% 22% + % 
23 Ito 3to 3% 

8 9 8% 9 


80% 595* CamSP 250 II 13 317 79% 79% 79% + H 


ISH 9% CdPacs 40 
—to I4to CanPEa 50 
228% 150b CaoCife 50 


483 14% 14 14% + to 

134 21 W 21 21V*— % 

21 213 222 221 221 — b 


APIDtO 1.761 5.9 16 165 29% 29b 2*to + to I _?7% 1SV Cop Hat J7 II II 656 24% 24% 24% ♦ b 


15 8 AptXMfi 155 13V 13% 13V 

I4V 15% ArChDn ,14b A IS 5288 23to 22V 23 

30V 23% ArlP Of 158 11.7 8 30% 3JP* 30% — % 

2*b 14 ArkBsl 40 IJ 9 97 23% 23% 23V,— ■* 


2fb 14 ArkBsl 40 17 
2<to 16 Arkla 1.08 65 17 I 

% to ArlnRt 
13% llto Armada 
14 to 6V Arm ca 
23% 15% Armeef 110 105 


24'* 15V ArmsRD 48 


[4*6 18% IB 18 — to 
66 \ 

60 14V 13 14V +1% 

626 > 8 V 8to— to 

6 28V 20% 20%— to 
215 1$V 15% 15%— to 


1(19% lOOv, CanH pf 10J7e 95 99 W7 % 187% 107% + V 

14% 10 Caring g 48 138 lib II 11 

J 9 i? ?! corlbl* 102 12 9 370 32% 31% 32% + % 

26V ISto CaraFI 40 17 II 370 24to 22% 23% +1% 

»V 19b CarPw 240 *.* • 2642 29% M 29%— b 


2S% 19% CorP pf 267 104 


II 25% 25% 25% + to 


M% CarTec 110 5.1 10 1J7 41 40% 40% + % 


39V 23', ArmWIn I JO 15623 1640 37% 36b J7% +1 


29 28% 28% 28% + b 


25to 12% ArowE JO 15 12 147 17b 16% 17b + to 


30b lb Arlra .22 5145 

2-ib 14% Arvins 80 3 a 9 

77V 17% Axarco 

37 MV asniOII 140 64 

44to 31% AShlOPt 19» 9.1 

69 49 AMOG 260 19 II 

110% 79 AsdDpf 475 4.4 

24 V 18% ABlaw 740 7J Id 


60 29 28b 29 + V 

473 24 23V 23% + '* 

32* 21 22% 23 + % 

1464 37 36% 3*V 

13 43% 43 to 43% 


37 371* 21% 27% 


29V 20% AlCvEI 258 8.9 10 160 29, « 28% 29to + % 

64b 40% AIIKIcn 4 JO 6.9 27 4144 58% SBto 58b 

41 32% All Pc Pi 175 iaa 10:37% 37% 17% —1 

153 97 ArlRcpI 250 20 2 129% 13*% 139%— % 

ia% 10% AIIosCd 62 IS 11V 12 + to 

32% 18V Augot .40 15 20 606 22% 22to 22V + b 

14V 14% AuioCH 58 U 23 1270 52to 511* IJ — to 

5 4 to Avalon n 8 168 5 4 % 5 + to 

ll’i 16'- AVEMC 50 1 9 16 3 31 to 31V 3lto 

391* 24V Averv 50 1.7 14 4*4 35V 34to 3SV +1% 

Itto 10 Avioll n 9 86 16b 16 16 

41 27 Avne! JO 1.4 19 1626 35 33 % 34V 4-1 V 

25% 17% Avan 2.00 &9 11 2865 2J% 22b 22% + l* 

30% I6'i Avain 


JIW 7% Carrol .07 5 12 260 8V 8% BV + b 

JV CarPIrs 9 138 23% 23% 239* + to 

30% 18V CarfHw 15B 45 11 217 30% 30% 30% + % 

43to 20% Carrwl J2 15 16 159 4«% 43b 44V* + % 

]8% JJ* CascNG 150 69 I 120 17% 17% 17% + to 

16% 9% CasllCk 1681 13% 13 13% — to 

22 2, CaFJCwl 463 11% 11% 11% + to 

29 15V CsllCpf 158k 50 25% 25 25b— b 

15 12 CshCof .90 47 454 13V 13 13%—% 

40to 3S% CalrpT JO IJ 2765x36% 35V 36% 

.2?* 'P* Ceeo M 11 13 »5 24 V 24% 24V + to 

129% 53 Cdonse 640 3J 12 453 126% ITS 126% + V* 

44b 34 Celanpf 4J0 104 )' «3b 43 to 43b— to 

IS .710 Conor n J3e J 2J 5 s S s 

45 34 Cmlel 238 S5 10 33) 43 to 42V 43b 

Sf? !— n 12 401 2*to 2SV 26b + % 

26% 17V CenSoW 102 7.6 B 2259 261* 26% 26V 

joy.- 17% CenHud 1% 95 7 184 30% 29to JO% +1 

26V 20% CHudPl 2J7elO/ 2 26V 26V %V + % 

21 ISto Cnl IPS 154 75 II 364 21% 20% 21% + % 

29% 18% CnLaEl 2-00 75 8 103 2* 23% 29 

37 2*V CLaElpf 4.18 II J 11 36% 35% 36% + V 

'3% ,BV CeMPw 150 105 7 365 136* 13b 13% 4- to 

21V 13to CVtPS 1.90 8.9 6 145 21b 20% 21b ♦ b 


4% Cam III 253 

to Oxilll rt 154 . 

12 CntlllPf 70 49% 

% CtllHdn ASZ Ito 

4% Cm Into I 53 11% 

18% CnntTBl 150 75 9 698 24% 

24% aDOta 77 2J 2772 29 

33% CnDtpf 650 115 3S0z 39% 
26% Canwd 1.10 32 13 347 34% 
1 vlCookU 123 

27 Cooor 152 6 2 14 1268 
30% Coool Of 290 73 146 

12to CopcTr 50 25 6 221 

15 Caopvto 50 15 18 696 

7% Capwld 54 19 1390 

19b COWtdPt 258 115 3 

17to Corduro 54 12 17 48 

lOto.CortHn 56 45 11 145 

30% Corn©* 1J8 27 19 1275 

25% CorSIk 150 21 167 

44% Con Cm J4 J 23 30 

31 Crane 150b 45 11 80 

41 CravRs 19 1492 

CrekN 0(218 115 4 

49% CrekN Pf 1-29* 29 12TB 
18% CrtnpK 1-20 U 11 158 
36% CrwnCk 15 348 

27% CrwZd 150 25 16 14365 
43% CrZafpf 453 9.7 98 

50% CrZet pfC4JB 7J 181 
20% Cutbra < 50 23 11 97 

I7to Cullnef 6 33 1116 

58b OimEn 228 32 4 175 

8% Curnne l.TOaHU 14 
30b CurtW 120 33 14 20 

27% Cvcfaps l.n 22 18 16 




1% + to 


llto— to 
24to + to 
28V + % 
39%+ % 
34% + Hi 
1%— to 
36 + % 

39% — 1* 
ISto — to 
25% + % 
lib +1 
21 — to' 

26% 

12% 

46% + % 
47b +1% 
74V + b 
371*— b 
92 +4% 

If 


Frttoor 1J6 105 51 IS 

Fmowd 154 21 1| 211 78 

Fa*W»h 54 35 12 171 13 

FOxStP 58 4.1 13 111 llto 

FoJchro Ut 4.1 H 378 261* 

Faxmrr 15 235 23b 

FMEPn -He 28 204 19V 

FMGCn 688 18% 

FMOG 251*C5 J> 554 TV 

FrptMC 50 3J 14 1096 20b 

Frlotm JO 11 17 60 29 

FrueWi 50 25 6 390 34 

FruhfPf 100 7.0 237 28V 

B uqua 50 12 9 386 33% 


44% +1V* 

j? k+to 

17% — V* 
57% +1 
43b + % 
12% 

78 +2to 
12 % — 1 * 
iito + v 
25** — % 
22 % — % 
19%—% 
lov* + % 
?%— % 
20b + % 
284* — % 
23% + to 
28V + V 
3Sto + to 


GAF 20* 5 12 102 35to 34% 35 — to 
GAT X 120 4J1. J3 84 29V 79 2W + V 
GCA 9 845 1SV IB 18% + to 

GE1CO 150 15 11 321 73% 72b 72V— V 

GEO 301 3% 3% 3% 


15% 11 
25% 19% 
48b 38% 
21V 14% 
7% 3% 

26% llto 
B IV 
35% 25b 

1 « .r 

70% 55 
13V* 9% 
53% 41 
Oto Bto 
24% 14V 
138b 104% 
2? 15b 

33 23% 

lib 5% 
7% 2% 
52 23% 

42 2tJV 
34% 17V 
43V 33 
34% 23b 
57V 46 
17% 9b 
54% 32V 
41V 28% 
»«■ TOto 
16 
15% 


9 913 11% 
58 15 3482 13% 

058 11J 150x 74 

ITS 11J 11 19 

225 11J II 20 
35S 123 4 29% 

158 72 7 71 261* 

571 142 5% 

1996 26% 
260 SO 17 479 51% 
235 65 IS 3S% 
54 17 27 70 15 

JO 21 221 24 

4 Ji Ift? 36 44V 
ljm&2 II 390 19% 


17V— % 
25%+ % 
19V 

31% + % 
60b + to 
5*to— u 
43% + H 
63 + b 

13to— to 

24% 

12% + b 

2*to— to 

isv-ito 

3« + b 

43 +1 

32 —to 
3V —to 


14 Bto MaryK .13 .9 IV 1471 13% 13b 13b 

36 24 MOSCD J6 15 18 1181 35V 35b 35V + to 

15% 8 Mas* Mr 50 15 17 703 13V 13% 13V + % 

3% Ito MasevF 388 2% 2 2% + to 

29% 20% MosCd 288 95 21 29% 29% 29% + % 

17% 10 Maslnc 1 J2 107 68 12% 12% 12% + to - 

66 5TV Matsu E Jat 7 10 009 351* 54 55% +1% 

171* 7V MaHei 8 2886 16% 15% 15% + to! 

U'i 4V Moral wt 242 I3V» liv 12% + % 

15% 9% MOtom 4 1*9 13% 13% 13V— to' 

58% 361* Mayo* 158 16 10 723 52% 51% 52% +1% 

55% 36V Mavta 250a 47 12 174 55b 54% 54V— to 

31% 25% Me Dr pf 230 21 9 27 27 37+% 

26% Mb McDrpf 250 111 1 2SV 2SV 25V— b‘ 

31 23% McDerl 1J0 7 A 48 1641 24% »to 24% + b . 

11% SbMcDrlwf 14 S3 Sli 9* 

10% 6% McDfd 50 21 22 35*%9to9% + % 
70 45% McDnts 50 IJ 15 1815 61% 67% 67V 
84% 551* McDnO 154 12 10 1162 85% 84V «Sto + to 

52 37% MCGTH 1,40 25 16 3604 491* 46% 47%—)% 

39% 19V MClntg 43 2* 28 28 


34% McKes* 2*0 5.1 13 154 471* 47b 


7eV 57 McKof 1J0 23 
15% 9% McLean 
6% 2% McLeawf 
79% 70 McNefl IjOO 34 

43% 321* Mead 1 JO 28 

24% 13b Mearux J4 1.1 

e % 24% Medtm 50 24 

to 33V Mellon 248 45 


<50 2J 1 77% 77% 77% +1% 

10 44 10% 10b 18b — to 

I 24 3b 3% 3b 

150 34 7 S2 2Sb27b3S+V 

1.20 ZB 10 593 431* 42V 49 — % 

24 1.1 13 94 22V 22% 22V 

50 24 14 599 34% 33% 34 — % 

248 45 10 474 56% S5V S6b + % 

XB0 95 15 2*b 28% 29b 


liu j. iL 4H, tvniian ui u id ,n m u* sal. + v* 

im + to »*% 23% Mel Ion pf 250 0,6 IS 2*b 28% 29b 

74 + % 48,14 ■ 3SV> MH ' HM 244 11 14 873 46% 45% 46% + V 

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11 286S 3% 23b 22% + l* 23% Cenvlfl 2J0 118 9 44 20% 20b 20% 

U 140 21V 30% 21V + to 28% 15V Crl-tevd 70 25 13 377 26% 26% 26V + to 

1 24% 16% CessAfr .40 15 19 120 22% 22% 22% + b 
MV If* Chme in .40 17 2856 24% 23V 241* + % 

27% 19 cnmlpf 170 47 5 26 2SV 25V 

80 11% 10% II + to 54% 4JV.. Oimlpf 480 87 Jl 52% S7% 53V— 1* 


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76 31 DataGn 

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577* 51 Chase pt!280e22J J4 551* 55 55 — to 

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11 V 7 to ChfeFulI J4I 28 71 j 135 8% 8 8% + V 

54 27% Ch rlsCr ASt 1.0 372 50V 50 50 — to 

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713 135 8% 8 8% + % 

372 50V 50 50 — % 

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103 51 49V 50V +1 


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33% 17 BarvWr 80 10 13 220 19% ift* m, 

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36 19b Bdusrh 78 27 20 >003 35% 34% 35% + V 

18% 11V BdXITr J7 IS 63 28379 ISb 14 15 +1 

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34V 23b BoyS»G 260 7J 10 47 Mto 33% Mto +1% 

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Marubeni MBB Consortium’s Takeover of Kraus$ Approved 


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In Income 


'. TOKYO —Marubeni Goip: re- 
ported. Tuesday that group net in- 
come rose 260 percent In; the year 
ended March- 31 to 262\~\nmon 
yen (SlOPmfflioQ) from 129 billion 
in the previous year. 

Sales rose to 13*706 billion yen. 
from 12J020 bfllioa.. Pretax profit 
was 3TJ21 bfllionagainst 19.14 bil- 
Uoil • 

The company said favorable in- 
terest rates contributed to the sluup 
rise in income. Revenues from im- 
ports and offshore trade increased 
significantly in 3984-85, the com- 
pany sakfcvrtuledpiiie^sales and 
exports showed steady gains. 

Interest receipts rose to 189.15 
biffioo -yen from 152.15 bUGcm 
while nonoperating revenue, main- 
ly from stock sates, increased to 
18.71 biBion from 9.90 bOfiou. 
Marubeni said. 

Imports totaled 2,909 billian 
yea, up 219 percent from a year 
earlier, whfle revame from trading 
between third countries was 2,661 


cent, and exports rose 5. 1 percent 
to 3,573 bfflwn. 

Revenue from machinery and 
construction rose to 3,961 billion 
yen. up 20J percent from a year 
earlier, and sales of energy-related 
and chemical products increased 
17.1 per c ent to 3.625 billion. These 
two categories accounted for about 
55 percent of total sales. 


By Warren Gedcr 

. International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT— West German 
ay’s Federal Cartel Office on Tue* : ■ 
day approved, .as expected, die' 
takeover of Kraoss-Manei AG, the ! ' 
nation's leading tank maker, by a 
group involving West Germany’s 
largest aerospace concern, Messetv 
schmti-BQIfcow-Blotan GmbH. > 

A cartel office spokesman in 
West Bolin, Hubertus Schoen, said 
tire bid was approved op condition, 
that Munich-based MBB, acquir- 
■ rag a J2J -percent stake undo the 
plan, would not seek to obtain a 
blocking 25-percent minority stake 
through informal agreements 
among consortium partners. 

The cartd office had rejected: 
MBB bids over the past 12 months 
to first obtain neatly lOO-percait 
control of Kraoss-Maffa, then a 
minority 49-percent stake provid- 
ing foe management control. 

company notes 

Afied Cofp. said it had an'af ter- 
taxgain of $241 million on the sale 
of 50 percent of Union Texas- Pe- 1 
trdemn Corp, its oil and gas sub- 
sidiary. The company also said sec- 
ond-quarter profit rose 17 percent, 
to $152 million, or $1.61 a share. - 

ConraiL, the U.S. government- : 
owned freight railroad, reported a 
second-quarter net income of 
$154,8 million, or $5.64 per share, 
down from a record $178.9 million, 
or $6.64 per share, in die- same 
period last year. Revenues for the 
quarter dropped to $838.4 minim 
from $886.7 mQUon. 

Continental Illinois Holding 


V'^Any future arrangement within 
She consortium that would proride 
'MBB with over 25 pactDl voting 
power at Krauss-Maffd would be 
viewed unfavorably "Mr. Schoen 


i : Messerschim'tt had 1984 revenue 
of. 5.7 billion Dehtsche marts 
{$1.97 Trillion as present rates), 
more than half craning from, sales 
of guided missies, fighter aircraft 
and helicopters. 

Krauss-Maffd, drief contractor 
fw the sncces^d^eopard I and H 
tanks, had 1984 mks of 13 hiHiofl 
DM, about libUIiba DM ndliiary 
Til wtrimm ta Tattle bnilre 


The cmsorthnn. undezstood to 
have offered abput .150 nuDion DM 
for 81 percent 'of Krauss-Maffd, 
frwjudx a smaller anus. 

Diehl GmbH of Nuremberg, as 


Cqrp. is the foens of attestimi of a 
group led by Brent Bmrd, an inves- 
tor from Buffalo,’ New York. The 
grocq> reported tlm H has acqured 
a 5.8-percem stake ia Continental 
BEdok Hiding's common stock as 
ah investment The group said it 
paid SLS mtOion for rts23 mfllioa 


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INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed - 
id July 1985 



Ddtec Systems Inc of Minneso- 
ta <u>TH Swedish-based Pharmacia 
Inc. is taking a 10-percent equity 
position in Ddtec as minority 

shareholder. 

Diamond Shamrock Corn, of 
Dallas has agreed to pay a $900,000 
fine, the laigm everlevied, for fail- 
ing to report the manufacture of 
new chemicals finder tire Tone 
Chemicals Act, die Environmental 
Protection Agency said. The EPA, 
in a amplaini filed in March, had 
jotsht 51.7 salliaiL - 
&idotrouks hre. of Minneapolis, 
seller of biomedical ^ bioteeb- 


weB as several leafing commercial 
banks and financial institutions 
concentrated in Bavaria. It is not 
yet dear, consortium executives 
said, who win have management 
control at Munich-based Krauss- 
Maffd. 

RTG Rakdenteduuk, a 50-50 
venture between MBB aod Diehl, 
would acquire 24.95 percent, giving 
MBB just under 12J percent. The 
largest stake, of 25.5 pocent, and 
the only cme by law requiring cand 
c^ce approval; ^is to be purchased 
by Bayenahe Landesanstalt filer 
Aufbaufinanzienmg, the Bavarian 
itgjonal finance agency. 

■ The DOssddorf-bascd F riedrich 
FSck Indusurevowaltung KGaA 
^keep 15^e r o eot, 4 percent by 

Messertdhmitt concerned about 
gt wMiting 'of Us civilian and 
nriStaiy aircraft, is eager to oom- 


nedogy ihstroments, said it is set- 
ting spawboDy owned subsidiary, 
Eqdofrmncs Far East Ltd, in To- 
kyo to provide sales, installation 
ariH iniiiniaiimw services to the 
Far East market. 

House of Fraser PLC of London 
said it had bought another 500,000 
ordinary shares of Debenhams 
PLC, raising its stake to 17.48 mil- 
lion shares, or 10J9 percent. 

Sdtftanberger Ltd. said second- 
quarter profits fell 27 percent, to 
$212.1. milfioii. or 71 cents & share, 
from $291.7 nuDion, or $1.01 a 
share, from the same period last 
year. Revenue rose 4 3 percent to 
$1.64 Ullioa from S157 billion. 

Wn— all Intenratioori Ltd’s di- 
rectors have recommended that 
shareholders in die Sydney compa- 
ny do not accart an increased par- 
tial takeover bid of 350 Australian 
dollars ($274) a share by Adelaide 
Steamship Ca 


bine technology with Krauss-Maf- 
fei in both civilian and nnlitaiy 
sectors. MBB executives have said 
they are interested in producing a 
new armored vehicle employing 
“intelligent weapons systems,** 
such as lasers, developed by MBB 
and combining Krauss-Maffd tank 
technology. 

Flick group officials have said 
privately that they were interested 
in disposing of Krauss-Maffd be- 
cause the erratic nature of the arms 
.industry was threatening the stabil- 
ity of its Larger operations, which 
include major divisions in paper, 
chemical and explosives produo- 
son. 

" Fueling that concern was the ap- 
' preaching end of a large contract 
awarded Kraoss-Maffa to assem- 
ble and supply 990 Leopard □ 
tanks to West Germany and 278 to 
the Netherlands through 1987. 


HostUeBidSet 

For Multimedia 

Washington Post Semet 

WASHINGTON - Jack 
Kent Cooke, owner of the 
Washington Redskins profes- 
sional football team, said Mon- 
day that be plans to make a 
hostile cash tender offer of 
$70.01 a share for control of 
Multimedia Corp- 

Mr. Cooke said he intends to 
bypass the company’s board by 
taking his bSuon-oblfor offer 
directly to stockholders once 
papers are fBed with the Seani- 
tres and E xch? n E g C ommissi on. 

Multimedia’s board, which 
has rejected at least three take- 
over bids recently, one a $65-a- 
share offer from Mr. Cooke, is 


trying to proceed with its own 
buyout of about $55 a share. 


Earnings 


Rrvtaun and profits. In millions, ore in local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


AbtllM-Prlce 
MdQaor. 1915 19M 

Ravmue uu wn, 

Over Net 21.31 23312 

Over Shore— 039 OM 
WHoH 1985 1984 

Uvmm lisa ixTp. 

Oder Net . J5E 3i34 

-Oper Share . 063 047 


Asahi Ctem. IimL 
Year 19H 1981 

Revenue 997^30 930980 

Pro«I» 1L420 13X40 

.Per Share— UJJ 1Z2S 


Cltoh 

Year 1984 1983 

Revenue KSST 1044 T 

PTOtltl 1X860 4430. 

Per Share— UX4 S. 3S 

T: trhHon. 


1984 1983 

Revenue 1X71 T 12X2 T 

Profit, 24X10 7XW. 

Per snare — 2074 um 

T." trillion. 


Umtteel Stales 
AmertttCh 


Revenue m 2X70 

Net Inc. mi 243X 

Per Shore z3* in 

lalMoH ' 19SS UM 

Bsfis?— as 

Per Stare 154 5X8 

Archer Daniels MML 
emoeor. ms mm 

Net Inc 51X1 3147 

Per Shore — OS3 0X5 

Year 1985 UM 

Met lac. 149X1 117X2 

Per snare 1X8 1X5 

1964 nrt both periods Includes 
profit of ST2J antucn from oU- 
tustment of deferred disc tax- 


Kleinwort 
Hires Team 
From Wedd 

By Colin Chapman 

lmenumara} Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Klein wort. Ben- 
son Lt<L. the British merchant 
banking group, has hired right se- 
nior staff members from Wedd 
Duriacher Mordaimt & Co., die 
London stockjobbers. 

Among the team joining KJ on- 
won are two of Wedd' s senior part- 
ners. diaries Hue Williams and 
William Mdlen, and partners Bar- 
rie Bennett, Keith Humfress and 
Martin Lupton. 

Wedd Durlachcr, one of Lon- 
don's major jobbing firms, is about 
to be absorbed into a new group. 

S De Zoete Wedd, formed 
an alliance with Barclays 
C and the stockbrokers De 
Zoete & Bcvan. 

Michael Hawkes, chairman of 
Kleinwort, said the new team 
would work with the hank and the 
stockbrokers Grieveson Grant “to 
build our eventual trading and 
market-making team in equities.” 


Both Barclays and Wedd said 
they had accepted the move as in- 
evitable at a tune of major changes 
in London financial circles. 

Standard Chartered Bank PLC 
has appointed Patrick Macdougall 
chief executive of its merchant 
banking arm, SC MB Holdings Lid. 
and Standard Chartered Merchant 
Bank Mr. Macdougall is currently 
a director of Jardise Matheson in 
Hong Kong, where his responsibil- 
ities include the company's finan- 
cial sendees activities. Mr. Mac- 
dougall is to succeed Robin Baillie, 
who has become an executive direc- 
tor of Standard Chartered PLC 
directing worldwide strategic plan- 
ning. 

MeOoo Bank has appointed Jim 
Burnham senior vice president and 
manager of international treasury , 
operations. Mr. Burnham has been 
the U.S. executive director of the 
World Bank since 1982, and before 
that he was special assistant to the 
chair man of the President's Coun- 
cil of Economic Advisers. He has 
worked for the Pittsburgh-based 
Mellon Bank before, as its financial 
economist. 

Datasene Inc., the IBM comput- 
er leasing and maintenance compa- 
ny, has appointed David P. Dono- 
van director and general manager, 
European operations. 


BottCorp 

MObot. 1985 UM 

Rovanua 30&5 29L2 

Net Inc. 1443 U4 

Per Star»_ 145 1X9 

MMH 1985 T9M 

RMM S41X 5302 

tat Inc. _ 24X4 21X8 

Per Shore 2.19 1X4 


Banc One Corp 

MOW. UM UM 

tat Inc. 30X1 34X4 

Par Star* — 080 0X1 

let HaM UM UM 

Nat inc- 4044 51-45 

Per Stare — 158 L40 

Baxter Travesol Lab. 

3M40V. 1IM UM 

Ravanua * 9tS 4715 

tat inc. 43X 47 A 

Par Star* — 0X0 0X4 

UtHatf IMS 19*4 

Ravanua 997.1 B74.1 

tat lac (24 0-9 

Per Shore 054 059 

Bor bantu 

SadQaar. UM UM 

Nat inc. 11X8 044 

Per Stare — 1X4 1X3 

ra Hoff 1985 UM 

NM Ita. 31X5 14-04 

Par Shora— 3.12 147 


Control Data Hears Problems 


Met Inc. 2S1J> 304JJ 

Par Shore — Ul 1X8 

in Half H85 1M4 

Net inc. S2LD 4393) 

Par Star* 3X3 OM 


(Contiraied from Page IS) 

nevertheless suggested that the 
salesman try it “That was Monday 
at lunch time," recalled the manag- 
er. “By 11 AM. on Tuesday, the 
police had found his daughter and 
EAR had found a place m a half- 
way house for her. Someone had 
taken the problem off of him and 
given him a direction logo in. After 
that I became an immediate con- 
vert.” 

Two other managers who were 
skeptics when the service was intro- 
duced went to EAR when each had 
a parent die. “I was one of the 


harshest critics at the time, ” said 
one executive, who manage* 100 
people. “Then my father died and I 
bad a hard time coping. I went to 
EAR and it worked very welL" 

EAR also provides personal ad- 
vice for wives and children. Four- 
teen percent of its calls in London 
axe from members of employees' 
families. 

One third of the calls are work- 
related. If coping with a manager's 
personal problems is an unusual 
service for a company to provide, 
there are even greater pitfalls to a 
service that potentially could med- 
dle in corporate politics. 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


DAIWA JAPAN FUND 


This open-ended investment company has been established 
for investors in Asia, Europe and the Middle East The shares of the Fund 
are listed on the Luxembourg Stock Exchange. 


Investment Adviser 

Daiwa International Capital Management 
(Singapore) Ltd 

Custodian 

Banque Internationale a Luxembourg 


DM — Deutsche Mark ; BP — BoWwn Francs; PL — Dutch Florin; LF — 


■ The Fund has been arranged and established by 

iwa Securities Co. Ltd 


Crass Pe rlorm on co tod ax Juta; •— Redeowt-Prln- E *-Cau«xi . “ ortntrjY 
Worldwide Fund UM; 9 — Otter Prtca tod. 3% wellm. dwrae; ++— daily stock 
artaa « an Amsterdam Stock Exchange ... 






















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY K. 1985 


Tuesdays 



Closing 


E 


Tobies include me nationwide prices 
up lo the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


i2MMiih 

HWh Low Stock 


SB. Oast | 

□lu. YiaPE lflosHlgfi Low Quoi. Ch'co 




L-. 








i3Msran 
HteflLDW sioek 


Dtv. Yld. PE IQfcHigh Low QuOL Pipe [ MighLDb Wcc» D.». YU P£ 13Bsvf 3P LO-* 3M*. CM* 


<h<+ 




13 7% 

60% 41b 

17 9 

S3‘i vr± 

24 1491 

X 15% 

2B ll s 1? 

2?k* *% 
26% T2% 
20% 8% 
13% 11% 


Rewon .12 1.4 
RovID 107 b SI 
Rovlnt i 

RuOrmfl .96 If 
RuuBr 

RusToo .76 St 
RvanH IJ» 14 
Ryders M 11 
Rrtond M IS 
Rvmer 

Rymer pf LIT 9J 


W< AM 
13% 13% 
ST.* 51% 
20*.'; 2M 
i?% m 
28 27% 

29* » 
24 V« S 
19% 14* 
12* 17% 


AO* 4 * 
13% + b 
SJ!m +1* 

2D*— VI 

m»— •- 
28 + % 
29* 4-1* 
24* 41* 
19 — * 
12*— ’» 


53 29* QuakOs 124 1 * 14 2961 52* 51* 51*— * 

23* 15 QuakSO JO 14 » 220 27*22*22*4* 

10* A* OuoneA 22 A2A B * 7* 8* 4 * 

34* 23 OwKtar lJO 49 10 354 32* 31* 32* 4 * 

25* 14 OkRell MID II 851 25* 24b 25 +1 


4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
S3*- * 
17* 

24 4 * 

» 4 * 

24* 41V. 
4 * 


ZOO 
no 22 
Tec 80 
I no JM 
nR* 259c 
JO 


31* 18* 

It* 14* 

7* 3% . 
3* 25* 

14 6* . 

52* 43* . 
49* 34* ; 
11* 6* 
37* M 
43V. 2A 

<W* 33* 

17V. 14 
31* 17* 
14% II* 
65* 39% 
39* 30* 


18b ITS 
t?4. 19 
S’* S 
36* 3F* 
18* 10V* 
47* <7* 
46'M 45% 
6* A* 
37* 37* 
41* 40* 
48 47*. 

14* 1SVJ 
18* IS 1 - 
15* IS* 
A6*a 44* 
39% 38* 


18* 

19* 4 * 
S'! 4 ’• 
36* + ‘4 
TO* ♦ ’4 
47*— ‘I 
46U 4 * 
A* * '» 
37* 4 * 
4l* + ’6 
48 * * 

16* + * 

18*— V» 

15*— * 
65 4 ■* 

3PH 4 * 




ry t? 








27* 
25* 
57* 
34 

04* 
30* 
38* 
13* 
3441 

38 
27* 
38* 
A* 
12 * 
19* It* 
43* 42* 
A3* A3* 
4DV, 39* 
33 B* 
13* 13* 
25* 24* 


53? 


+ w 20* 
+ % «* 


— * 34* 

+ * 23 


4 * I 12* 
4 * 


74 1 


237 
303 

944 

1774, 

25 
394* 

200 
1468 
54 
306 
37 20 
12S 28 
45 34* 
384 a* 
77V. 
20 *. 
39* 
IK 
24* 
27 
271m 
23 


S5’« 33* Xer 5 , zoo 4 4 :: »5^ w * » » 

55 4A j xer;. si 5.45 «t ■: ^ Sj." A 

29 19 X T RA 44 mA 13 474 .6 -. 25 . .6* 


35* 22b Zurtiln IJ2 18 73 381 25 »•-« J." * '• 


MSt 


43* 4 * 
16* 4 * 




TOUR GUIDE TO DINING WSU 
PATRICIA WELLS 
IN FRIDAYS WEEKEND SECTION 
OF THE MI 


Tuesdays 

mvx 


Closing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
UP to Hie closing on Wall Slreel 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I uz The Associated Press 


7* CareB 17 

7* CoreA .10 J 17 
5* CracEn 19 

36 CoroPpl 580 112 
3V» CnsOlon 641174 8 
25* Cased 2J0a 7JI 
3* CaMInd 

* Cenlanl 42 

20* CaiMpf 3 JO UJ 
9* CenlSe lAOolZT 
5* Cetec JO 11 8 
2 V. OimpH 19 

12* ChmaP 72 48 44 
15* ChtMAl .16 A 22 


15* ChIMBs .16 A 22 
S* Ctirt *4 of 75 11.1 
ISb CWRv 120a 62 10 
B CWDVfl 

12* Clllitn 1 .17 J 33 

11* Citadel 10 

16* CIIFst 1-00S 12 9 
27* CIIFst of 2J0 48 
17* C tv Gas 120 AA 10 
28* Clarmt 1 Me 43 
64b ClorkC JBe Z9 10 
21* ClarosJ 1806 2J 10 
ID* donors .16 l.i 9 
J* Coon Itr 

6* Cohu JO 11 9 
2* ColFwtS 
8 Coral ed 7 

8* Cocaine .14 
6% Com pa 
6b CoraoO 
4* CmoCn 

5* CmpFcl IS 

14* Cacti m 40 U II 
6* ConcflF 14 

A* Connly 9 

12 ConrCo ID 

5* Conast 42 

I* Cana wt 

A CansOG 3 

14* CnSlarn 
SV. wICnatA 4 

7* vICnIApf 
13* ConlMII 8 

»» Corad Ian 

2* CosCrn 14 

* CosCmrt 

S* CntCrd JOr 22 18 


2 14* 
8 14V. 
28 12* 

12ffc 44* 
69 2* 

4 31* 
11 3 * 

28 1* 
XU 29*. 
IS 13* 
61 4 * 

486 2* 

10 ISb 

23* » 

3 28* 

4 n 

5 19* 
106 8* 
118 35* 
116 32* 
29 31* 

1 5216 
1 27* 

6 39 

6 9* 

8 4016 
10 15 
13 5* 


14* + V, 
14% + V. 
12 


716 4* FrtA wt 

1216 59k ForVIt s 


.171 27 U 6* 6* 4* + * 
22 119 11 10* 10*—* 


31*— 16 

3* 

116— % 
2936— % 
1316 

4* + * 
2* 

15 — % 
29 +16 

28* + * 
4*— * 
1916 — * 
8* + * 
as* - 

XT* 

sm + * 

5216 + 36 
27*— * 
39 - * 

934— * 

4016 +1 
IS + * 
5 

9* + * 


IS 

40 U II 
14 


21 * + 1 * 
9* 

9—* 
7*— * 
6 + * 
6*— 14 
16* + * 
736 

14 — * 
23*— * 
■ — * 

4* 

6* + * 
1836 
IS* 

19* 

23* +1* 
* + V» 



M* 9* 
13 8* 

4* 4* 
27* 21* 


71 SH 

19 2* 

27 14* 
59 9 

2 28* 
282 9* 

58 >316 
16 3* 

2SD 16* 
2 4* 

5 15V. 

28 4* 
28 12* 
40 13V. 

53 4 
40 12* 

1 25 
290 21* 

132 im 

54 35* 

42 31 

55 3* 

20 19* 

72 3* 

137 * 

1 24* 

1 31* 

2 II 

384 4* 

22 31* 

59 B3fc 

21 * 
24 1316 

431 41* 
140 25* 
45 12 

43 11* 

144 13* 

145 34* 


516 516 + * 

2* 2*— V. 
14* 14*— % 
I* 2 — * 

78* 2ff* + 16 


S* 9* + * 
17* 13Vi + * 
3* 3* 

14* 16* + * 
4* 4* 

15% 15%— * 
3* 4 — * 
11* 11*— % 
12* 13% + 16 
3* 4 

12* 17* + % 
25 
31* 

11 * + % 
35* + * 
30*— * 


31* 13 
4* 3% 

8* 5 

29 7* 

3* I* 
3* 2* 
3* 1% 

39* 24* 
16* BH 
14* 6* 

16 9* 

14* 10 
28* 10* 


Loser 

Loumn 

UrzKop 

LQOTPP 380 13J 
LeePn 


Lettish s .101 J U 


19 

88 t 3 29 
' 17 

10 
4 
10 


23 11* 

f a 

24 22* 

J19 7 

90 29* 
2 5* 

1 6 * 

16 37* 

37 3 

11 2* 

5 I* 
84 37* 
89 15* 
9 13* 
152 11% 

17 13* 
2803 15% 


IT* 11*— % 
9* 9* 

4* 4* 

22* 22 % — * 

T&T&ZS 

5* 5*— * 
6* 6* 

26* 24*— * 
2 2 

» 2*—* 
1 * 1 * + * 
37* 37*— * 
14* 15% 

12 * 12 * 

II* 11% 

13* 13* + * 
13* 15% +1* 


S* CntCrd JOr 22 18 

1* Courrld JM« 17 

7' i CrstFo -15a 1 A 9 

24 Cron IJ2 08 16 

9v« CmCP 
7* CrCPB 
4* CrownC 

* CrutcR 2 

I* CrvsIO 

U% CuWc .39 lA 14 

71* Curtice .97 3.1 10 


9% + % 
19k + fm 
9* + * 
34*— * 
16* + * 
13* + * 


* + * 
2% 

23* + * 
29% + * 




2% BAT In 
13% BDM5 
1% BRT 
10% BSNwl 
71. Badger 
7* Baker 
7* BoldvrS 
?'. BalvMwl 
21 BanFd 
4* Banslro 

4* BnIBId 
3* Bares 
2'; BamEn 
4 Borv RG 
IQ*. Barucn 
4 J * Beoru 
II* BeldBIk 
19* BeroBr 
3% BemCn 
21* Bleep 
BlgV 

19»» BulkAAf 
14 BloR B 
14* BloR A 
13* Blnngj 
h BI0C6 E 
i2'T BiountA 
12* BMunlB 
32V, BolorP 
11% Batarwl 
10* BokVoI 
9* BOwlAS 
1' i Bowmr 
121k Bourne 
19% B'Tcno ' 
24': BmFA I 
»!; BrnFB 1 
2* Buckhn 
3* Buchtipl 
23". Buell 
8% Birenn 


I 4l* + III 

i 23 + % 

. 3 + * 

: 12* — * 
llit— * 
I 14*— V» 
> 9* 

. 3* 

26 

i 7 ’m 

i «* 
i 3% — * 

i 3* 

i A* + % 

i 12% 

8*1 + % 
n%— % 
i 32 — * 
3*— * 
29* +1* 
14* + % 
22 

27% — * 

27 - : , 

78* + 6. 
1* 

15* + * 

15% + % 
44* +1* 
22* + * 
11* + '6 
10% - * 
S* + % 
17* 

21* + 
36* + * 
39‘; + * 
3* 

4* + '* 
28'.-! + U 
8 — * 




10* SWQuebos 


! 11 

1 

129 

22** 

22* 

9m 

“31 

1 10 

39 

24 


34 + * 

7 

64 


8% + % 



l 1 * 

I'/k 

1% 

, 

45 

28% 

2Bb 

28% + % 

17 

4 

12b 

IK 

12% 


2 

129k 

12%— * 


206 

* 

3 i? ^rr^r 


1 

J 

7 

7 - * 


5 

9% 

9% 

9% 


5 

14% 

14% 

14% + Vb 

3 

115 

2* 

2 

2 

3 

14 

54% 

5% 

5% 

6 

A 

J% 

396 

3% + ’.k 

10 

15 

59k 

5b 

5% 

u 

15 

11* 

Tl% 

IT% + % 

67 

74% 

/4b 

74% + 9k 

27 

13 

8% 

■ 

B + * 


952 

ISta 

17* 

18V. + * 

14 

12 

16b 

16* 

16b 


10 

3* 

3% 

3% + * 


17 

39k 

3* 

3% — % 

6 

48 

3% 

3% 

3% 

52 

54 

10% 

10% 

10* + Vb 

13 

7 

14b 

14 

14b + % 

10 

42 

22% 

21% 

22% + % 


75 

7% 

7% 

7% 

4 

IB 

12% 

12* 

12% + * 

IS 


A 

4 

4 

14 

57 

21% 

21% 

21% 

/ 

3 

34% 

J«% 

34% — * 


11 

22* 

21% 

22 + % 


30 

J44k 

34% 

34% + * 


1 

23* 

23* 

23* + % 

Q 




1 


« 

10% 

109k 

10% 


ft* 




.12 J 47 
31 34 47 


17 

.10e 28 13 
JO 1.9 19 


J6 U Z7 
.12 S 11 


J40 2J 9 
JA ZJ 

8 

80 18 12 
50 18 16 


17 7* 

2 I* 
2 1* 

52 16* 
242 19 
1 * 

3 11* 
22 19% 

. 7 4 

1 12 * 
104 43 
100Z 44* 
7 B* 
7 4* 

24 10* 

1) 3* 

6 15* 
160 * 
27 34* 
43 24* 
43 2* 
184 4* 

10 25* 

25 23* 
3 6* 

188 17% 
299 28* 


7* 7V, - 

3* 3* - 
1* 1*- 
1616 14* ■ 
IB* 18* ■ 
* * 
11* 11* 
19 19'6 • 

3* 4 
17* 12*- 
42* 43 
44 46* 

BW 8* 

4 4* ■ 

10* 10* 

3 S%- 

15* 15*- 
* * 
34* 34* • 
24* 24* • 
2* 2W- 
6 * 6 * ■ 
24% 24% - 
23* 23* ■ 
6* 6* ■ 
16% 17 - 
27% 28* ■ 


10 r 18 8 
88 iai 
w iao 
00 1QJ 
BO 10J 
20 10,9 
47 10.4 
69 128 
90 48 10 
BO 38 7 
43» U 12 
15 28 7 
20 118 


SO 2 5 
16 1.1 9 

78 


17* 12* Jocrvn -50b 18 9 98 13* 13* 13* + * 

7* 5* Jacobs 176 6% A 6% + <V 

5* 2% Jot Am 9 J7U 4* 4* 4* 

7 * JelAvn .144 * * * + W 

9* 4* Jelron Jll 8.1 17 14 8* 8* IV. 

Wi 2* JoboPd 27 JV. 3* 3V. 


11* 7V6 JohaAm JO 38 13 49 10 


24* 

16b OEA 



13 

11 

31U 

21% 

21b 

22* 

15* OaKwd 

400 

A 

12 

49 

1Mb 

IB* 

1K+* 

12 

4 Ode) A n 



31 

9 

4% 

6* 

6% 

16* 

4% OdetB* 



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on Page 20) 



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in a day y 

you could fly 
3 Concordes 
to the Moon. 


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jg$ And back. 

It’s nearly a quarter of a million miles to the moon. 
But Britoil products over 5,800,000 gallons of oil a day 
And it has another 19 billion gallons in reserve. 

Fill in the coupon and discover the rest of Britoil’s figures. 
You’ll find them all on the large side. 



SOON, THE REMAINING 49% OF BRITOIL SHARES ARE TO BE OFFERED FOR SALE. 


Issued by Lazard Brothers & Co.. Limited on behalf of H.M. Government. 

































































Page 20 


Over-the-counter 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 




Sola In 


NX* I 



M0* 

Htafi Lew 3PJH.CITH 




I25M% 

11% 

1!%— % 

Svmbllc 



78211% 

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lift + ft 




19 A>, 

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140 Ufa 

lift 






3fa 

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28 

17 

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60 4ft 

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10% — ft 

TSRs 



20610 

9ft 

9ft 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


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3111 talk 10%— Vs 
7017 ftfa 16%— ft 
31234% 27V, 29 + % 

104 2% 7% 3H 

151 15% Mi. 15 — Vi 
7314% 15% 14%-lk 
333 7% 4ft 7ft + fa 
2B 2* 2ft 2ft 

5 4 4 4 

140 23% 23 23'* 

5 2% 7% 2ft — Ik 
401 5 4ft «- Ik 
■ 1% 1% IK— % 
145 ft h h 

4310% 10% 10% 

17 14% 14% 14% 

1510 »% 9ft — ft 

7347% 47% 47V, + % 
13821 % 20% 21% 

281 7ft 7ft 7fa — Ik 
157413% 72% 13% — fa 
2284 8 7% B + Ik 

64 6ft 6N 6ft 
mn h 9w— % 
40312% 12% 12% 

1 % % % 
18717% 17% 17% 
\S4T% 47% €7% — % 
335 35 35 —2% 

31 30% 28 30% + % 

9616 15% 15% 

41 12 11% lift — % 

» 7% 7% 7% 

4 16 )S% 16 

293 2% 2% 2% 

3 6% 6fa 6U 
31 10% 10% 10% + % 
381 7% 7% 7% + % 

47 4% 4% »%— fa 
103 3% 3% % 

584 Ilk 1% IS + % 
112 Sfa 7% Bfa + fa 
20 26% 24% 24% 

1 37 3» 39+1 

7 17 17 17 

786 25% 25 2S% 


V Bond 

VUI 

VLSI 

VMX 

VSE 

valid Lo 

Valton 

ValvBc 

VdIFSL 

voiFro 

VINBcs 

VdfNfl 

VdlUloh 

Valmnl 

volWt 

VoILn 

VonDus 

VanShk 

Vonzetl 

VorICr 3 

VectrG 

vefaBds 

ventrex 

VIFnel 

Versa T 

Veto 

VIcooF 

VIcttp 

VKtBn 

VlelroS 

VWDiXP 

viedeFr 

Viking 

V! raids 

Vafleeh 

VliTedi 

Vltram 

Vorfavl 

ve» ■ m 
Volvo 
Vortoc 
wmnt 


Sales In Mel 

100s HWb Lob 3P.iw.aroe 


■ 8% 0% + fa 

■ 7% 7ft — VS 

■ I2fa 12V, — fa 

4% 4% — fa 
J 0% 7% + % 

> 0% 7% + % 
IS IS + fa 

l 29 Jf , —2% 

■ 17 17 - 

l 4V) »% — fa 

i 44 47 —1 

> 41 fa 41% 

l 28 2873 

. 13 13fa 

i 4% 6% - % 
i 23 23% 

i M 14% — fa 
*» 11 +1% 
i 8 8% + fa 

7 7 

1% 9 ~+ % 
3% 2ft — fa 
r 30% 30% 

3ft 3% 

Sft 24fa— Ik 
23 23 — % 

20k 2% 

4% 6% 

10 % 10 % + % 
11% 11% + fa 
17% 17% 

IV, 8ft + % 
ft % + fa 
5% 5fa — % 
7% Rk- % 
15% 15% — VS 
28% 28% + fa 
,% 7% — fa 

*% 4% — fa 


r 


IS. Futures 


^hST **«!»* Oocn Hlgn low Ckna CUB 

711S 4&W Aug 4*40 -JO 

EM. Boles 7JO0 Prev. Soles Ml 
Prev. Dot Dorn im. 10.134 ub1«3 


Season Siam 
High low 


Open Higti Low Cine Chg, 


Groins 


wheat <c»n 

58m bu minimum- dal tors per bushel 


3, 0T*. — A4% 
109 -JH 
XJ4ft —MU 
1131, -«■«, 
3 j0* —JO* 
2LB3 -«'V 


170 385% Jd 106ft 106ft IK’i 10T* -04ft 

174V, 110% 5ep m% 113% 3J07ft 108 -JH 

153ft 118 Dec 118% 119% 114% 3J4% — 04U 

174'., ITT*. Mar HSU 117 113% 1131, — 4Hft 

402 XOSft NWU( W UB U1 -JO* 

3.72ft 187% Jul 187% 218 183 183 —04ft 

Es*. Sales Prev. Sales 10.784 

Prev. Day Open | M. 34,937 us 687 
CORN (CRT) 

&000 bu minimum, dollars per busnei 
131 147% Jul 174% 174% 171ft 172% —.01 

121ft 7JS1 Sep 282 252 247V; 247% —02 

1*5 144ft Dec 244% 244% 241% 141% —83 

110 153 Mgr 153 153 247ft 147ft —,33ft 

121% 157fa Men 257% 257ft 253ft 253% —83% 

256 156% Jul 257 257 253% 253ft — -03% 



l -■ 


p|E 








when in 

W'jfJiiry;i.*i. DC 



266ft 

ZAQ 

Sop 

ZM* 

Mlft 

Z3B 

UX% 

-83 

Est. sale. 

Prev.Sale* 25,992 




Prav. Day open Int. 106670 UP 1649 




SOYBEANS (C8TJ 






5800 Du mWmum- eoi lor* per Burtel 





SSI 



549% 

567 

561 

—84% 

764 

M 

Aug 

U! 

569% 

567 

560>4 

— 8Xft 

*71 

540 

Se« 

570 

570 

568 

561% 

— 09 





5L77ft 

561ft 

567ft 


*77 

562% 


587ft 

387ft 

5J4 

5J7ft 

— .11 

762 

543 

Mar 

598ft 

578ft 

585ft 

589ft 

-,10ft 




*87 

S93ft 

5.96% 

—.11 

*3 

5.74 

Jul 

*10 

*10 

5.94ft 

5.97ft 

—.12 

*74 

574 


*05 

*05 

5.91 

5.91 

—.15 



Prev.Sale, 2*90 




Prev. Day Open int. 62800 1238 




SOYBEAN MEAL tCBT) 





100 tons- donor, per ion 






19*50 

11760 

Jul 


13160 

12*00 

12*80 

-480 

18080 

11980 


13270 

13260 

129.10 

13010 

-280 

17760 

17250 

Sre 

13470 

135.40 

13200 

13240 

-070 


12580 

Oct 


13*20 

13*20 

13560 

—110 


13000 

Dec 


14360 

13960 

14050 

—140 






14280 



20460 

13760 

Mar 

15180 

15180 

14480 

14*30 

-170 

14260 

14380 



15*80 

19050 

15180 

-860 

14780 

147.90 

Jul 

15*50 

15980 

15480 

15580 

—460 


Jul 14048 
SOP 137.11 

1 14080 1 
1 13760 1 




I 13190 1 



1 1 

•non 

i 



Mar 1316! 

; i 

3145 

i 


nr. 

MOV 

Jul 

Sxe 

Nov 


t: 

1! 

i: 

i: 

1160 

))J0 

D60 

1160 


3413% 17% 13% 

ME 2*k 2% 7% 

914 8% Bft 8% + fa 
994 Ufa 13ft 13% + % 


YIOwFt 14» 24 42641ft *0% 41% + % 
York FO 40b 12 518% 18% I8%— ft 


^ Republic 
International 
Bank Ltd. (BWi) 

■ CDs at Competitive Rates 

i * Funds Management & Trusts 

■ Strict Confidentiality 
- Tax-Free Jurisdiction 

To inquire: 

Schmid Assoc. 1-212-475-4435 
Box D-1 14, Herald Tribute, 

92521 NeuiBy Cedra, France. 


Kingdom of Sweden 

U.S. $150^000,000 Wanting Hatr 
Notes Doc Jaamry 1995 
For (he six months Itidt July, 
1985 to 16th January, 1986 me . 
Notes inD cany an interest imu of 
8Hd% per annum with a Coupon 
Amount of U.S410621. 53 
Bankers Trust Company, 
London 
Fiacsi Agent 



3 Vi 3% 

24 347k— % 
19 19ft— ft 
2 ft 2% 

12 % 12 % — % 
37% 37% + ft 
2 % 2 % + % 
5% 5% 

iota io% 

12% T2%— ft 

8 % ■% + % 


EsI. sola* Prov. Soles 16491 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 46556 off 1524 
SOYBEAN OILtCSTI 
40000 lbs- dollars POT 100 lbs. 

3272 22.70 jul 28.18 28 M -27.95 207 

3155 2250 Aug 2750 27J0 24J5 27 J 5 

31.10 2250 Sep 2448 2450 2AJK 2645 

3057 2290 Oct ZOO 2600 2550 25.92 

2955 22.90 Dec 2550 2550 2505 2139 

29.07 2350 Jan 212) 2120 2485 2583 

2350 2440 MOT 2455 2100 2455 2500 

2745 2L20 May 2580 2100 2455 24.90 

2125 23.95 Jul 2475 2480 2445 2444 

2115 2481 -Abb 2427 

E st. solas Prev. Sales 7.783 

Prav. Day Doan Ini. SUM off 271 
OATS (CAT) 

SOOObu minimum- flol tars par bortiel 
1.78ft 142% Jul 141% 142% 141% 142% 

1.79 140% Sap 140% 140% 187% 187ft 

187ft 144 Dec 143% 144 143ft 143% 

157% 145ft Men- 144ft 144ft 144 144 

153 144ft jwoy 147ft 147ft 147ft 147 

EsI. Sales Prev. Sales 518 

Pr*v. Day Open I nL 1127 off 2* 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

4O000 lbs.- cent, oar ta. 

4747 5557 Aug 5545 54-90 v. m 

65.90 5780 Od 5742 5A2S 5650 38.17 

6785 5942 Drc 5950 6050 58.90 6055 

6743 6040 Feb MAS 6180 59J5 6187 

4757 6145 APT 6180 6200 6182 6200 

6685 6280 Jun 4280 62.15 4180 4240 

Est. Sales 28433 Prev. Sales 17.927 
Prev. Day Open Inr. 49802 off 427 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

**000 lbs.- cants Dor I b. 

7370 62.90 Aug *1K 6350 BU 4340 

7X00 6387 S«C 6280 6X60 6X60 MW 

7282 6340 .Oa 6X15 4420 4285 6*87 

73J0 4*77. Nov 4455 4547 4*25 6545 

7950 4*55 Jon 4650 6780 6680 6780 

7055 66.10 Mar 6680 6755 4445 £7.40 

7065 6680 Apr 46.95 445S 4485 6720 

EsI. Sales 1,998 Prev. Sale, 1825 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 85*6 off 40 
HOGS (CM El 
30800 ore.- cnis per tb. 

55.77 *785 Jul 6980 4940 4S60 4920 

507 4457 AuO 4685 4782 46.10 *485 

51.73 *2.10 Oct 4227 4170 4175 47*7 

5085 *480 Dec 4*15 4*40 4350 4482 

5047 4585 Feb 4585 45 l70 4*90 4543 

4785 4X10 Apr 4383 4X50 4280 *rvi 

4983 4550 Jun 4530 4350 4520 4585 

4985 4550 Jul 44.10 46.10 4575 4527 

5120 4555 Aug 4550 

Est. Sale, ««,1S7 Prev. Sale, 5241 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 20.982 off 981 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38800 1 bin osnrs per lb. 

8247 5682 Jul SS80 5580 5AM 5580 

8065 5522 Aug 5577 5580 5*87 55.12 

7620 63.15 Feb 6570 4520 4473 65.10 

7540 4480 Mar 6540 4580 4485 6*80 

7560 66-20 May «580 4*10 4530 6370 

7*00 4420 Jul 4*40 4*40 6*00 6*00 


Currency Options 


2827 +28 

27 J 5 +86 
2445 —.10 

25.92 —.13 

2389 —.16 

2583 —22 

2580 —.18 

2*90 —25 

2*46 —29 

2427 —25 


142% 

189ft —80% 
143% —80ft 

146 —80ft 

147 


Metals 


COPPER (COMEX) 

25800 Itttj cents per lb. 

8825 5780 Jul <060 *125 6060 40.95 

£980 5*65 Aug _ 61.10 

82.10 5730 Sep 6120 41.70 61.10 6185 

8*25 5830 Dec 6225 6280 4Z2S 4145 

8*20 5960 JOn _ 6100 

8080 5960 mot 4345 6375 6320 6370 

7400 61.10 MOV 6*25 6*25 4*00 4*20 

7440 6120 JW 6440 6*35 6440 6470 

70.90 6120 Sep 4525 6525 65.10 4520 

7080 6373 Dec 4570 

7020 f-«Tn jan 4*15 

4780 6545 Mar 6660 

Mar 4785 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 5293 

Prev. Day Open lnL 81498 off SB 1 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

*0800 lbs.- cents per lb. 

5940 4115 Jut 4560 

AuO 4580 

7*30 4190 Sep 4370 4*10 4570 4*10 

7060 4*90 Dec 4480 4485 4*70 47.10 

7630 5175 Jan 4740 

7360 46 V. Mar 4785 4780 4785 4X10 

4475 5335 May *880 

6X45 4785 Jul 4930 

5110 5180 HP 5020 

Dec 5125 

Jan 5160 

MOT 5130 

MOV 5100 

Est. Sales 300 prev. Sate, 90 
Prev. Day Open Int. 1757 off 41 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5800 troy ox- cents per troy ok. 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130800 be. ft.- S per 1800 bd. M. 

19730 13530 SCO 1492C 15060 14730 
186.10 13780 Nov 15080 151.10 14130 
18780 14460 Jan 1S780 15760 15530 

19580 15080 Altar 14360 163.55 H1.1G 

17480 15100 .MOV 16X10 MX 10 14*60 

18380 17180 Jul 

Sep 17480 17*90 174.00 
E a. Sales 3847 Prev. soles 1.92S 
Prev. Dav Open int. B338 ofH44 

COTTON 2(MYCE) 

50800 lbs.- cents oer lb. 


14418 

5428 

Jul 

4098 

4258 

4098 

4198 

4216 

6038 

Aua 




4216 

11X38 

5738 


6156 

4318 

4155 

4256 

12308 

5908 

Dec 

A9nn 

4428 

6276 

4376 



Jon 





11938 

4078 

Mar 

4418 

6648 

441.0 

A5D8 

10488 

42)8 

May 




45*7 

9458 

tj 1 

Jul 

4OT8 

4708 

6598 

66&2 

9400 

4418 

Sep 

4708 

4798 

6700 

6703 

7998 

4408 

Doc 

4948 

4948 

49*0 

4936 

7898 


Jan 




4998 

7708 

4778 

Mar 

7198 

7198 

7108 

709.9 

4958 

4938 

May 




7209 


7760 

40 02 

Oct 

41.45 

61.49 

Ait ac 

60.91 

—At 

7180 

4048 

Dec 

61.70 

61.74 

61. IS 

6MB 

-M 

7*75 

6140 

Mar 

6145 

5145 

6165 

4780 

—87. 

7080 

4184 

May 

42f0 

618) 

61.90 

6190 


7005 

41.60 

Jul 

6155 

6165 

61 JO 

6172 

4560 

5050 

OC1 

4*97 

5730 

5*90 

5492 

=a 

5925 

Est. Sotos 

57 JH 

Dec 576S 57 95 
Prev.Sale, .2633 

55.97 

5*25 


HEATING OIL (NYME) 
42800 oaf- cents per oa I 


EsL Sales 17800 Prw. Sales 17649 
Prev. Day Open int. 70.144 otf 97, 

PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 troy at- dollars per troy ax. 

44930 24180 Jul 24980 27230 26X30 27140 

39X00 25080 Oct 26X80 27580 24880 27X40 

37330 23730 Jan 27*70 27980 27420 27X00 

32930 - 24*50 APT 27X00 28350 27880 28190 

30280 27380 JUl 28880 

Ei r. Sales prev. Sales 1679 

Prev. Day Open InL II 352 off 66 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 troy qi- dollars per 02 

141J3 9030 SOP 9330 **73 9X25 9*10 

14130 9180 DOC 9*25 9330 9X75 9*60 

12730 91 JO Mar 9X75 95J7S 9X75 9585 

11*00 9180 jun 9540 

Esi. Sales Prev .Sales 215 

Prev.DayOewilnL *574 up if 
COLD (COMEX) 

100 troy m-- dollars per travel. 

32830 30980 Jul 32X80 


7560 

6*35 


69.45 

6 * JS 

&»ia 

6944 


7*45 

4*90 


6989 

70.10 

6 9 J8 

6983 

+.» 

77.10 

6765 

Oct 

70.25 

7*65 

6985 

7*41 

+.W 

7465 

4*50 

NOV 

70 95 

71.90 

7*60 

7183 

+81' 

7*25 

49.15 

Dec 

7145 

7195 

7125 

71.70 

+.M, 

7*90 

4980 

Jon 

71.90 

7285 

7180 

7285 

+81 

7190 

7000 

Feb 





+.18 

7X00 

4980 

Mar 




6980 

+-1(F 

7*00 

4*00 

Apr 





+.»- 



May 




6780 


Est. Sotos 


Prev.Sale, 5838 





Prev. DayOoen int. 2*7X2 voTTt 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 
1800 bur.- dollars oer MH. 


2987 

2*25 


27 JO 

2749 

2715 


29 JO 

2*03 

Sep 

2*42 

2*54 

2*36 


29 JO 

3*45 

Oct 

2588 

2482 



29 JO 

3440 

NOV 

25J0 

254= 


2545 

29 JO 

2X90 

Dec 

25.17 

2SJ0 



29 JO 

3*38 


2*95 




29.46 

2*25 

Feb 

2* JO 




2945 

2*12 

Mar 

2443 

3*43 

=*35 

24JJ 


2X65 

May 

2X90 

23 JO 



Esf. Sales 


Prev. Sales 17J24 




— ,11. 

+ 8 * : • 
-a r 
—Bl'Vt- 


Prev. Dav Oaen int. 6lU2 oo2*6 


July 15. 1985 



EUROPEAN 

COAL AND STEEL COMMUNITY 

DM 230,000,000 

7% Bond Issue 1985/1995 

- Stock Index No. 476160 - 
Offering Price: 99%% 


Dresdner Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Commerzbank 

Aktiengesellschaft 


Deutsche Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Westdeutsche Landes bank 
Girozentrafe 


Bank fUr Gemeinwirtschaft 
Aktiengesellschaft 


Bayerische Vereinsbank 
Aktiengesellschaft 

Deutsche Girozentrale 
- Deutsche Kommunafbank 

Sal. Oppenheim jr. & Cie. 

Vereins- und Westbank 
Aktiengesellschaft 


Amro International 
Limited 

Banque Paribas 
Capital Markets 

Hambnos Bank 
Limited 

Swiss Bank Corporation 
International Limited 


Bayerische Hypotheken- und 

Wechsel-Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Berliner Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

DG Bank 

Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank 
J. H. Stem 

M. M. Warburg-Brinckmann, 
Wirtz&Co. 


Banca Commerdale Italians 


Credit Suisse First Boston 
Limited 

Kuwait Investment Company 
(S.A.K.) 

Swiss Vclkbank 


Bayerische Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Be rimer Handels- 
und Frankfurter Bank 

Merck, Fmck & Ca 


Trinkaus & Burkhardt 

Westfalen bank 
Aktiengesellschaft 


Banque Internationale 
a Luxembourg S.A. 

Generate Bank 


Lloyds Bank International 
Limited 

Union Bank of Switzerland 
(Securities) Limited 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
.Opttoa A Sfrik# 

Undartyloo Prtca Con-Lost 


T23M BrttiUi 

;BPound 115 n 4*1 7iM r 

13X77 120 1X70 t' t 

13X77 125 1380 T t 

13X77 1 30 9 JO 11.1D T 

13X77 115 530 UO * 

13X77 140 230 5.70 760 

.13*77 145 IAS 480 r 

A0M CMrin Doim<oatspariMlL 
CDdir 70 r r 333 

7X96 72 381 2.14 r 

7X96 73 188 160 131 

7X96 74 030 035 X 

7X94 73 021 035 r 


, Pol*— Lost 
St» Dec Mar 

r r . r 

a.15 r 

^ ^ SMS 

SJQ 

r r 

r r 

R r 065 

X32 r 

070 1.17 

r r 


48580 

27180 

31X50 

31 5 JO 

49380 

29780 

4*980 

»1J0 

48X50 

30*00 

49680 

31*70 

435JD 

32050 

ATRtn 

33180 

37570 

33580 

37X00 

342JI0 

37280 

ypepp 

Esf.SataS 



Stock Indexes 


Ext. 3 d 1*0 FTOv.SalBS 25346 

Prev.DavOnenlnt.132654 oft 1854 


Financial 


US T. RILLS (I MM) 

SI million- pi* of lMPd. 


3*67 30 287 T T 082 

3*57 31 375 *14 r r 

3467 37 289 UC 174 0.10 

3467 33 287 263 385 X24 

3467 34 1J5 283 r 033 

3*67 35 0A2 165 158 180 

, >467 3* 066 187 158 C 

125800 FrwKfi Frana-ixtktof a cm# per unit. 
FFronc 100 1*10 r T t 

11*24 105 980 r r r 

11485 no r *x r r 

11*85 115 r *00 S85 r 

*2518X8 Jnpo wew Y— -town of b cent per untt- 
JYen J7 r r r r 

4189 31 4.10 r r 081 

4189 39 r 360 r r 

4189 40 282 154 r r 

41.99 41 164 184 r 028 

4m 42 086 L2i r r 

^ 41 (L» r T8 r 

SUXX Swtaa Frapo-caaH per ■* 

S Franc 34 r r r r 

4189 35 780 r r r 

4189 34 r 485 r r 

4189 37 494 r r r 

4189 38 384 r r 089 

2-2 » 2-2 171 r D - 15 

4189 40 260 r r 05 

41-89 41 T69 260 T 064 

41J9 42 1.13 180 260 1J56 

4189 43 074 163 288 ijb 

122 ° 2 , J 2 L iW ? 4 CoS open 

Total POtvoL *osi put spaa 

rretacd. v-No option offerucL o— Old. 
La*) is premium (purchaM price). 

Source: AP. 


084 r 

0.11 r 

022 r 

0 J7 r 

082 r 

r r 


7X31 

0*94 

Seo 

9X77 

9386 

72J4 

9X05 

7107 

85L77 

DOC 

9240 

72-75 

9X64 

9X74 

72J9 

8*40 

Mar 

7X27 

9230 

7229 

9X39 

9X20 

8781 

Jun 

91.96 

9281 

91.94 

•285 

9281 

8*00 

Sep 




9135 

71.70 

8788 

Dee 




9149 

9139 

87-58 

Mor 




91.23 



Jim 




9182 

EsL Sales 


Prev. Sato, 5409 




Prev. Doy Open im. 3*129 off 253 
IX YR. TREASURY (CRT) 
5WXUM0 prln-pti 4.32nd, of 100 oct 


SP COMP. INDEX(CMC) 
ooints and cents 

19560 16080 SCP 19*20 19*00 

199.10 1757D Dec 19785 199.90 

20223 19*10 Mar 20023 20380 

2O3J0 20080 JUII 

E^. Salts 5*058 Prav. Sales 49.9» 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 6 1 301 off 2666 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
polnr, and cents 

21130 1X5.75 Sen 20*40 21179 

21380 20*00 Dec 21280 21565 

Elf. sole* Prev. Sale* *102 
Prev. Oor open Int. 10654 up 266 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE1 
point* and cant, 

11XAS 9135 Sec 11385 114.70 

•115.90 10180 Dee 11525 11*55 

11780 10968 Mar 11485 11*15 

11985 11*50 Jun 12X00 12080 

Est. Sale, 10800 Prev.Sale, *844 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 11815 ue307 


19*20 19*85 
19785 19980 
20X25 20X70 
' 30570 


20*30 71140 
7)570 2154S 


11385 11485 
11585 11*50 
”6X5 11X30 
12080 120.10 


75-18 

Sen 

06* 

04-19 

0+4 

0+17 

75-13 

Dec 

85-7 

85-10 

B5-7 

85-18 

75-14 

Mar 

8+10 

0+19 

8+9 

8+19 

74-30 

Jun 

83-11 

03-24 

83-11 

03-24 

02-11 

80-1* 

S«p 

DOC 

■2-17 

8200 

82-17 

B2-30 

824 


tat 14*234 
UR. 11*297 


Est. Sales Prev.Sale, 4602 

Prev. Dav Oden Int. 5X305 up 113 
US TREASURY RONDS (CRT) 

18 PCI-* l OMQO-ot, ft said* of 1 00 PCI) 
79-12 57-10 SXP 77-12 77-25 

78-13 57-8 Doc 76-11 74-22 

77-29 57-2 Mar 75-14 75-21 

7** 56-29 jgn 7+17 7+24 

7501 54-29 SCP 73-22 73-27 

7+24 54-25 DOC 72-29 72-37 

7+15 54-27 Mar 

7+34 63-W Jim 

7237 6X4 SOP 

72-1* 62-34 Dec 

69-14 4 8-4 Mar 

Est. Sale, Prev.Safe*100J8« 

Prev.Dov OpfN taMX1JS7 up 18X7 
GNMA (CRT) 

*100800 Drift- pts&32ndsef 100 pc» 

77-26 39-13 S«P 77 77-2 

76-28 59-4 D«C 7*4 74* 

76-8 58-20 Mar 

75-17 SB-25 Jim 75-3 7S-7 


Prwtoos 

188020 
117.17 * 
225150 * 


Commodify Indexes 


Close 

Moody's. 915.18 f 

Reuters 187960 

DJ. Futures 117J53 

Com. Reseorcti Bureau- 22580 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f . final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. IS, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


CRT; ailcogg Board o> Trade 

CME: ailcogg Mercantile Exchange 

!***■ Intarrraltancd Monetary Marker 

• Of Cnlcooa Mercantile Exaianpcr 
NYCb£ E " Jjfi Cocoa, torn Coffee ExcftaOM 
New York Cotton Exchange 
COMEX. Commodity Eircnangx Now York 

Mercantile Exatonge - 
KCBT; Kan-im a tv Board of Trade . 

NYFE: New York Future, Exchange ’ 




Cash Prices 


S. G. Warburg & Co. Lid. 




J*fy 16 

commodity and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santas, m 

Tea 

131 

Ago 

1,45 

Prtdfctaln 44/30 38 ft, Vd_ 

Start blltoft (Pitt.). fan 

iron 2 Fdry. Ptriku ton 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pitt. _ 
Lead Spot, lb 

Cornu, i •tort- Hi 

L4X 

47X04 

2TXXX 

70-71 

18-21 

45-41 

*76 

(Txxa 

21 XXX 
7+95 
30-M 
64-47 

Tin (Strait*), lb 

gnc. E. Sf. L. Bests lb 

PutkxJlum.oz 

*2504 

•3*13 

*50 

139-142 

Sotrc e: AP. 

41BJ0 

IMS 


Commodities 


London 
Commodities 


Commmikies' 




DM Futures 
Options 


IC Cemm Mart-man mortx cents Mr work 


! 


My 16 

Strfloi ColWettk Put+Setn, 

Prk* See pec Meg- Sap Dec Mer 

33 285 X6! XW 029 039 — 

34 iji i.n ui ui tn U 2 

35 *76 167 1J1 190 ]JB 135 

H 8.41 L» 161 1J4 1.91 165 

37 020 0J6 189 - - - 

RNtaMtad total ml. *744 

Coll i: Mon. voL *3W open to* 3078* 

Pot, : Men. «xi I JX4 ooxx toL 19J76 
SOWCB.'bMF. 


B S&PtOO 
Index Options 


Strike CdBHtai PN+Latf 

Prla Jhr 4aX S*p 0d Mr' tit Sw 00 

IN — - — — 1/U — - — 

in 17% — - 19 -I/fafa % 

ra 12fa VPk W, 15 1/U 1/14 fa % 

» jj » ms i/u * * n, 

* alb » M STto 1ft 2 m 

190 fa M 1 4 M 4 4ft A 

195 1/U 7/M 15/14)% M 7% 9% - 

Tow oat Htame 2S2JB 
T«fel caB open W.47&SN 
TsMaul veNrnt 1I2XQ 
TofM put Don W. oum 
I nd i; 

HRhH785 UW1IU9 Oae1Djg+2il 
Source: CME. 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Metontan own Nr Idle 
Odm 

■ BM Art 

Ana 19*80 19580 

5*P 19280 19180 

Oct 19X50 19*50 

Nay, 19*sn i9tsi 

Dec 1*780 19*00 

volume: 39 tat* 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Melewtea rtngem per 25 tea, 

|1* trtr 

Jly 970 1810 

4410 950 1800 

5*P 930 990 

Oct JO 980 

Nov 930 970 

D*C 920 960 

Jon 920 960 

Mo r 910 950 

MOV. • 190 940 

Volume: 0 tots at 2S ton* 

Source: He ele rs. 


Prev ton. 
Bid Ask 
19280 19380 

19060 19280 

19280 19480 

19480 19580 

19*50 19760 


NA — 

900 1830 

960 1816 

950 1800 

22 22 

940 980 

930 970 

930 970 

920 940 


Gold Options 


3D 5075225 


(prices la S/ac.). 


Ixmdon Metals 


.9“* Prxvteax 

BM Art Bid Art 

ALUMINUM 

SterBng per motile ton 

2? — 73*50 72 LOO 72S80 

forward TS8J0 75080 74480 74780 

COPPER CATHODES (Ktah erode) 

Starting per ipetHe Ian 
jxot 184980 185080 183*80 UMUO 

forward 185780 785760 184760 184880 

COPPER CATHODES {Standard} 

Sferifox per metric tea 
y» ^ .UBMB 18UN 181080 181280 

toward 183780 .183980 182880 183080 

LEAD 

Starting par metric tan 

SSUra £8 StS M SS 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric too 
■POt 3M880 34*01,1 368580 159080 

forward 149080 389580 144580 385080 

SILVER 

Peacx per troy ensce 

amt 44*00 44580 43280 43*00 

forward 45780 45880 44*00 44780 

TIN (Stan damp 

Starting per metric ten 

■pet 9,12080 9,12580 98X080 9JB580 

towont 9,12080 9.1ZTS 98008O 986580 

ZINC 

Starling per metric too 

. gfXO RS80 51*00 51480 

fanvo rd 52*00 50980 

Source: ap. 



Dividends 


13801450 22233375 
780 *50 IL3S-1775 
350. 580 1125-1275 
175- 380 725 92S 
050 180 525 *75 


Gold 31700-31780 

Vakss WUteWcU &A. 

1. Qh< * Mok-Omc 
1211 Gem LSrinnU 
TeL 310251 - Tck* 28305 



Merger Creates " : 
Far-Flung U.& r i 
PipellneSystem 

United Press I nlemabo e n t 

HOUSTON — ImarNffifth Ik-’S 

$2J-biIlion acquiriuoa of HoustoOr 
Natural Gas Cup. was complac^ 
Tuesday faten SUXibdld ars 3p$ 
proved the merger, cTeaddi-a^ 
first coast-Uhcoost nainru.' &&■ 
pipeline system. in tbc -Uoftcc ' 
Slates. ' . - J /- < 

The new-company innnediat^- 
b^n doing bnsnuss as 
terNortfa Inc. Its 37,000 nriltf - 
(60,040 kUoroeters) of pipdiat? . 
stretching from Montana lo.Teus 
and California id Florida, wi& bo 
able to transport an S- 

billion cubic feet (143 nnOi<siadu^ 
meters) of natural gas a day. 
various markets. : ; 

The acquisuion b^an . in ’ 
when InterNonh, o£ Omaha, 
braska, launched a eash leader tfc. 
fer of S70 for HNG stock. 











































5fc*y ' a.-J.’- -VX -. -•*•-•;•■ • , .' i- - __ ^ ^ \ ^ _ ; 


BVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


Pa^e 21 


France ReportsItHad 
TradeSurpiusaiJune 

-ABonFrance-Prrsse 

PARIS'— France had a sea- j 
serially adjusted trade surplus l 
of 1*995 trillion francs (5230 1 
miHiOQ^inJane, compared with 
- a 3.77-billion franc deficit in the 
'same month last year, the For* 
tags Trade Ministry said Tues- 
day. 

It was the first trade surplus 
reported in 1 985. France's trade 
deficit in the first six months of 
this year totaled about .14 bfl-. 

. lion francs (51.55 billion). 


U.S. Companies Sell Chip Technology to Koreans to Counter Japanese Competition 


(Continued from Page 15) 

said Grirdon\loore! . 
chair m an and chid executive of 
Intel Corp. “They mi ght be willing 
to part with increasingjy valuable 
bits of technology that could come 
bade to compete with us directly.” 

The technology transfer can cake 
many forms, but in most cases a. 
U& company either sd^ the tech- 
nology directly to the Korean con- 
cern or has that company manufac- 
ture products. The U.& company 
sometimes restricts the Korean li- 


censee from selling the products 
outside of Korea or outside of Asia. 
' * Computer technology executives 
in die United Slates and Korea say 
such , alliances canhelp both na- 
tions industries. 

For the Koreans, the alliances 
are a means of developing technol- 
ogy rapidly. 

Korean companies accounted 
last .year for only a tiny fraction of 
wonawide semiconductor sales of 
529 billion, according to a Data* 
quest spokesman. Bat Korean 
manufacturers are nuking rapid 


progress and already are producing 
some advanced products, such as 
256K dynamic RAMs. 

In ibe past two years they have 
bttQt huge factories in Korea and 
established outposts in Silicon Val- 
ley. The licenses also give them 
products to fQl tip their new manu- 
facturing capacity. 

For UJ3. companies, the alli- 
ances means a foothold in the 
Asian market, particularly in Ko- 
rea, which is expected to grow rap- 
idly as il industrializes. 

-The ties also allow U.S. compa- 


nies to compete with the Japanese 
by taking advantage of low-cost 
manufacturing in Korea. WJ. 
Sanders 3d, chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive of Advanced Micro De- 
vices, says that semiconductor pro- 
duction will be moved increasingly 
to the Far East while research and 
design are left in the United Slates. 
Despite all of the advantages of 

alliances, however, the Japanese 

experience has led officials to wor- 
ry about the outflow of U.S. tech- 


‘Tbe Japanese, privately, think 


the Americans were nuts to license 
the Japanese,” said William F. 
Finau, an economic consultant and 
former Commerce Department of- 
ficial 

And the Japanese companies 
have not been quick to share their 
technology with the Koreans. 

Sungho Kang, vice president of 
the semiconductor division of 
United Microtek Inc., the Sunny- 
vale, Californio, arm of Goldstar 
Semiconductor, noted, “The Japa- 
nese do not give away their technol- 
ogy- They are too tough,” 


Still, some Korean and U.S. ex- 
ecutives play down the threat 
caused by the transfer of technol- 
ogy. "The whole role of the Korean 
industry has been overstated," said 
Hoon Michael Yang, senior vice 
president and chief operating offi- 
cer of Hyundai Electronics Ameri- 
ca. 

Korean companies, he said, are 
minuscule compared to those in 
Japan and in the United States. 

Donald W. Brooks, president 
and chief executive of Fairchild 
Camera & Instrument Corp., said 


that Korean companies could easi- 
ly obtain technology in other ways, 
such as by hiring American engi- 
neers. 

Industry experts say the licens- 
ing clearly has helped the Koreans, 
bringing them almost up to the lev- 
el of American companies in com- 
puter memory and other areas. 

Hyundai is a case in point. Two 
years ago. the S 10- billion Hyundai 
group had no semiconductor' activi- 
ties. This year, it is ready to enter 
the market with at least four prod- 
ucts. wo of them highly advanced. 


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Non Dollar 


INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


The Embassy of Costa Rica in France 
and C.I.N.D.E* 

(Cotta Rican Coalition for Development b ii liu ti vet) 

Announce the opening of a Regional Office for 
. Europe dealing with investment Opportunities 
in Costa Rica. 


Inquiries should be directed tee 

Mr. Leonard Kornfeld, C.LNJDJE-, Paris, 
74, Ave. Panl-Donmer, 75016 Farit, France. 
TeL* 504-16-37. - Telex: 648046 Ambrica. 


TeL 01/219 81 U . 

The folly integrated business services in the center 
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INVESIMENI 9 CONTAINER INVESTMENT • CONTAINER INVESTMENT 


Container Investment 

AN OPPORTUNITY THAT OPFERS A HIGH INCOME PIAN 


Contomewtaito Sorvtoas Umuec, based In Soujhomoton. 
manogo end operate a hu class wortdwkJe conlori6f leasing 
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,e A GUARANTEE OF REtUBN OF CAPITAL UNDB-HfDKD BY 

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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued! From Back Page) 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
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SOPHSTKATH) ESCORT SBUflCE. 
London (01) 961 01 54. 


HEATHROW LONDON ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 994 6682. 


ATHENS ESCORT AND GUDE Ser- 
vice. Tel: 8086194. 


MUWCH-E5CORT SERVICE C«* 
G89/33 50 20 or 099/35 94 31?. 


ZOE LONDON ESCORT Agency. Lon- 
don & Gaiwidt 01-579 7556. 


FRAMdUtT - EVA'S ESCORT & trav- 
el service- Teh 069/44 77 75 


5MGAP0RE biteinotona) Guide Sw- 
wee. TeL Snnowxe 734 9621 


ZURICH LORIN ESCORT Service Tel: 
01/68 56 71 


CHAHBS G84EVA Gride Service. 
Tet 283-397 


FRANKFURT SONIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 069-68 34 42 


LONDON EMMANUBiE Exon Ser- 
ve*. TeL 01-730 1840 


MACRO MALE ESCORT Service 
4561474. Cards 



G8CVA - AN1A BCORT SERVICE. ' 
Mute Errand. TeL 34 39 55. 


BRUSSELS. CHANTA1 BCORT Ser- - 
wc*-. TeL 02/520 23 65. 


MUNICH WELCOME ferori Scrvtre. 
Tet 91 84 59 


BRUSSaS MIOeUE ESCORT and. 
gwde leruce. TeL 733 07 9B 


BRUSSaS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

faeort Service. TeL 02/731.7641. 


FRANKFURT HRST CLASS Exon 
Serve*. 069/681740 


FRANKFURT/ MUMCH Main Escort 
Servce. 069/386441 & 089/3518226. 


FRANKFURT JB4NYE5CORT& travel . 
service. Tel: 069/5577- 10. 


FRANKFURT - PETRA Escort & Travel 
Serwre. W£W/6flM05 


GINA'S ESCORT SBtVKX. Ftmkfurt . 
069/55 88 2& 


MUNICH SUPREME ESCORT Service. 1 
Tet 089/4486038 


AMSTERDAM FOUR R0S& Escort 
Serves W 20-964376 


BIQTTA DAf>!BH ESCORT Senna - 6 
London 01-730 65)8 


domumque escort 

London Tel- 01-402 W3 


RUkNKRIRT “TOP TOT Ekott Sw- 
vmt.ft»/5MM2 


fRAMJFURT AREA. SIMONE'S it- 
cori& Travel Serves. {0169-628432 


HAMBURG. PUNCESS Escort & 
Geide Service. TeL 22 69 51 


SOVICE HAMBURG - SABRINA Start Ser- 
vice. M 040/55 65 35. 















































































































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Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


** 


■ 

a 

a 

a 

1 

■ 

a 

a 

H 

■ 

■ 

a 


H 

a 

a 



BOOKS 


THE ROOT: The Marines in Beirut, 

August 1982-Febrnary 1984 


By Eric HammeL 448 pages. SI9.95. 
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1250 Sixth A v- 
enue, San Diego, Calif. 9210L 


Reviewed by David B. Otraway 


2 Medicine 
man's choice 

5 Word on 3 bank 

1® Cryai Augusta 

14 Gemstone 

15 Snake River 
site 

16 What a 
medicine man 
might seek 

17 Determine 
duration 

18 Give back 
capital 

19 South African 
currency 

20 HiawaLha's 
transports 

22 Shields 

24 Crow's cousin 

25 Pan of a car or 
bike 

26 Settlers or 
Long Knives 

30 Marries 

33 Food additive 

34 and 

feather 

35 Bars from the 
gold rush 

37 Bunch of bucks 

38 Guardians of a 

son 

40 " , Andrew 

Marvell”: 

MacLeisb 

41 Lone Ranger’s 
horse 

43 Nigerian yam- 
eater 


44 Papoose, to 
Pontiac 

45 Approach 

46 Braves' ritual 
during a 
drought 

48 Car that won't 
go far 

50 Computer in 

" 2001 " 

51 Cooked meat, 
in a way 

54 Raid 

57 Nimbus 

58 Title for 
Pizarro 

60 Red-coated 
dairy product 

62 Use die dotted 
line 

63 Author Nin 

64 Rambler or 
sweetbrier 

65 Kind of bind 

66 Element in 
elegance 

67 Scads 

DOWN 


1 Like a T. 
Williams roof 

2 Heroic tale 

3 Hindu deity 

4 Kitchen device 

5 Liquor, to 
Geronimo 

6 Mid-month, to 
Caesar 

7 Denigrate 

8 Nuances 

9 Dallied 

10 Pan of a pinto 

11 Where to find 
Muscat 


j ir. 9£ 

12 Tear 

13 Goals 

21 Lout 

23 Cringes and 
flatters 

25 Kind of rug 

26 Parts of 
poodles 

27 Anew 

28 Soup scoop 

29 Supermarket 
item 

31 Group's senior 
member 

32 Calm during 
calamities 

35 Locomotive 

36 Positive 

38 Goddess of 
agriculture 

39 Kimono 
cincture 

42 Like a brave 
brave 

44 Nooses feared 
by rustlers 

46 Squirrel or 
paca 

47 Women's org. 

49 Navajo milieus 

51 Sit in the sun 

52 Bankrupt 

53 Jason’s vessel 

54 Whence maize 
comes 

55 Totem-pole 
image 

56 Moderate or 
mitigate 

59 Negative 
ballot 

61 Gull's sound 


T HE U. S. Marine Corps underwent what 
was probably its most traumatic post- Viet- 
nam experience when it was sent on a strange 
and ill -defined mission of maintaining a “pres- 
ence" in Lebanon stoning in the fall of I9S1 

Eric Hammers “The Root” (the marines' 
nickname for Beirut) is a detailed narrative of 
the life and death of the U. S. Marines during 
the roughly 18 months they were stationed at 
Beirut International Airport next to the Shiite 
and Palestinian slums on the southern out- 
skins of the capital 

It is based on 200 in-depth interviews with 
the participants, nude possible by the Marine 
Corps, which gave Hammel unrestricted access 
io die officers and soldiers who served there 
and survived the truck bomb explosion in Oc- 
tober 1983 that killed 241 of them. 


Similarly, be notes now the marines tunas.' 
ling! v became hogged downed in the quagnufe 
of Lebanon's bloody interna! politics as the 
United States turned to arming and iratnmg 
the Lebanese Army. How the marine caay 
mand saw and felt about this, whether il ns3*~ 
ized the implications of it* own and the U,$'- 
govemment's actions. are issues bey Pad tfc. 
scope of the book. 

Even the issue erf how the murines felt abo® 
ihdr mission is scarcely touched. On ibe teg: 
page. Hammel notes that there was no coasefe' 
suT among his 200 interviewees on this quo 
lion. Asked what they thought they had accom- 
plished. about half, he says, replied. “W? 
bought the Lebanese more time," white the JL 
other half responded. “Nothing." , . i* 

Hammers dosing words are. “.As dot 
passes, ‘nothing* looks more and more like 
correct assessmcnL" 



David B. Ottavay u on the staff of 

Washington Post. 


BEST SELLERS 


Hammel has put together an almost day-by- 
day — sometimes hour-by-hour — account of 
the evolution of their stay in Lebanon, from 
the start erf a generally friendly welcome 
through long months of boredom until the slow 
slip into hostilities with the nearby Shiite com- 
munity that c ulmina ted in the bombing. 


TV Nn York Tin* 

Thu Iisi if on iraciu from more dua 2.000 bookstores 
throughout the Urn icd Siaicv Week., m ii,i are imt nrccsaiQy 
continue 


fiction 


no 

WcA 


ANDY CAPP 


TRY AND OGTVVVUJNlCATE 
MORE WITH HIM, FLO. 
LAV ITOIM, USE'vOUR ■ 
G I FT cr THE GAB 


Specialists in Marine Corps history, Leba- 
non’s torturous contemporary history and the 
history of U. S. foreign policy will find Ham- 
mers work of particular interest because it 
presents the first detailed “foxhole viewpoint" 
of the episode. Others will probably find Ham- 
mers account too narrow in scope and 
swamped in Marine Corps acronyms. 

For all its value as an initial Marine Corps 
history of a gruesome experience. “The Root" 
devotes scam space to the larger issues of the 
policy-making that took the marines to Beirut 
and kept them there on what became an absurd 
mission as they turned into sitting ducks for 
Druze Moslem artillery in the hills overlooking 
their poorly defended bunkers. 


SKELETON CREW, bi Start*" King 
THE CIDER HOUSE RULES. b> /rtin 

Irving - - — 

THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, by 

Tom Clones 

LONSESOME DOVE. b\ Larry 
McMurirv ... 

HOLD THE DREAM. b;. Barbara Tnlor 

Bradford 


r ■: 

3 




...1 12 


Jfl£ 


Even the fasdnating issue of how the mis- 
sion of establishing a “presence" came to be 
Iwne 


defined, by whom and where, is not addressed, 
though Hamme! remarks early on that it was a 
phase “no Marine commander had ever before 
seen on an operations order." 



JUBAL SACKETT, bv Louis I." Amour 
IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney 

Sheldon "... 

THINNER, bv Richard Badunan 9 

THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS. b> Isabel 
Allende 


s- 


8 25 A I 






- 

.jr.":-. ■ 


V.- I 

sc #>•■.■ 






10 THE CLASS, by Endi Segal 

11 CHAPTERHOUSE- DUNE, hv Frank 


Herbert ....... 

12 A CATS KILL EAGLE by Robert B. 


£ 

■ft 


13 INSID£."6~UTSiDE by Herman Wouk V 


14 FAMILY ALBUM, by Danielle Stcd . „ 
THE THIRD MILLEN- 


li A CREED FOR 

IUM. by Colleen McCullough 

NONFICTION 


— 9 


AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY', by Lee Ixacu 

wilh William Novak 

YEAGER: An Autobiography, by Chuck 

Yeager and Leo Janos ' 

A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE by 

Tom Peters and Nancv Austin 1 

SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES, 
bv Connell Cowan and Melvyn Kinder ... 
CONFESSIONS OF A HOOKER, by Bob 

Hope with Dwavne Nelland 

LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Boscag- 

MOUNTBATTEN. bv Philip Ziegler 

BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
kady N. Shevchenko -. ... .* 

THE HEART OF THE DRAGON by 

Alnsdatr Clavre .. 

THE BRIDGE ACROSSS FOREVER, bv 
Richard Bach . 


i jt; 

- I 


10 

15 

9. 


11 MY MOTHER'S KEEPER, by B.D. Hy- 

12 THE SOONG DYNASTY. by^ Si erting 


13 .SON OF THE MORNING STAR. by- 

Evan S. CoaneQ , _ ... 

14 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Shd Silver- 

stein _ 

15 NUTCRACKER, by Sharia Alexander ... 

ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 
1 DR. BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER 


6 20 

11 6 

10 45 

9 9.j 

12 

13 2S 


r?Fi.i 


S 1 Vi 
14 J 


DIET, bv Staart M. Baser .. 

TOURSIET. by Jeff 


THE FRUGAL GO 

Smith 

WEBSTER’S NINTH 


COLLE- 


NEW 

GIATE DICTIONARY 

NOTHING DOWN. bv Robert G. Allen 
SMART COOKIES DON'T CRUMBLE, 
by Sonya Friedman 


5". 

IS 


2 39 
4 32 




BRIDGE 


Unscrambia thaae four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


O N the diagramed deal. 

North apparently thought 
that he was asking his partner 
to choose a major suit and 
landed South in a foolish con- 
tract of three spades. 


RODOP 


UL 

_U 


A defender who has length 


in trumps is usually right to 
the hope of 


DORE 

L 



p 

□ 

J 


lead a long suit in 
forcing the declarer to niff. U 
was not right here, however, as 
West discovered when he led 
the club jack from the closed 
band. The lead of any other 


suit would have defeated the 
contract 

South took two club tricks, 
throwing a bean from the 
dummy, and ruffed a dub. He 
led a bean to his ace, ruffed 
another dub and cashed the 
diamond ace. He then played 
hearts, and East ruffed the 
third round and led his re- 
maining trump. South took the 
trump ace and played his last 
heart scoring the trump ten, 
now unguarded in dummy, en 
passanL West had Tour trumps 
as his last four cards, but could 
do nothing. 


NORTH 

* M 9 7 « 

“ KQB7 
O A 9 79 
*9 

BAST 

043 On, 

9 EQMH 
*7154 
SOUTH (D) 

* AS 

O AJ 103 - 

OJS4 T 

* A Q 3 2 

Sotb sides wen vnlneralfe. Ha 


WEST 
* J5433 
O 865 

<■ 8 

*X J 189 




r i 


EUMMUS 


□ 

nrri 

J 


CELLOA 


~m~ 



HOW SOME SO- 
IC ,4 LLEP "MUSIC" THAT'S! 

BEING COMPOSED 
| THESE DAYS SOUNDS 

to Some people. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by ifn above cartoon. 


frwrTT M 1111 1117 


Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbtos; OXIDE LUNGE PURVEY RACIAL 

Answer VWiaf milk Is for a cal— 

THE -LAP" OF LUXURY 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 

Algarve 

37 

90 

IS 

64 

Amsterdam 

17 

*3 

13 

55 

Athens 

29 

84 

21 

70 

Barcelona 

3 

02 

a 

70 

B0 (grade 

31 

U 

17 

43 

Benin 

27 

ai 

14 

55 

Brin sets 

18 

M 

13 

55 

Bucharest 

29 

84 

17 

63 

Budapest 

30 

8* 

17 

43 

Copenhagen 

18 

w 

11 

57 

Costa Del Sol 

29 

44 

18 

U 

Dublin 

14 

*1 

10 

SO 

Edinburgh 

14 

*1 

71 

S3 

Florence 

34 


18 

64 

Frankfurt 

22 

72 

12 

54 

Geneva 

36 

79 

15 

59 

Helsinki 

IS 

M 

17 

*3 

Istanbul 

30 

06 

19 

*6 

LW Palmas 

27 

8) 

72 

72 

Lisbon 

25 

77 

17 

*3 

London 

21 

70 

12 

54 

Madrid 

12 

90 

17 

63 

Mlkm 

7? 

B4 

23 

73 

Moscow 

25 

77 

12 

54 

Munich 

2* 

79 

13 

55 

Nice 

27 

SI 

22 

73 

Oslo 

19 

A* 

17 

54 

Paris 

23 

71 

14 

57 

Prague 

27 

SI 

12 

54 

Reykjavik 

12 

M 

B 

44 

Rome 

31 

88 

19 

*6 

Stockholm 

21 

70 

13 

55 

Slrnstaeurg 

18 

64 

13 

55 

Venice 

30 

64 

22 

72 

Vienne 

29 

84 

IB 

*4 

Warsaw 

24 

75 

IB 

*4 

Zurich 

23 

73 

1* 

*1 

MIDDLE EAST 



Ankara 

25 

77 

14 

57 

Bemii 

a 

« 

22 

7? 

Damascus 

38 

100 

70 

*8 

Jerusalem 

a 

B3 

17 

*3 

Tel Aviv 

32 

90 

20 

48 

OCEANIA 





Auckland 

14 

57 

& 

46 

Sydney 

U 

67 

10 

so 


ASIA 


HIGH 


Bangkok 

Belling 

Hong Kong 

Manila 

New Delhi 

Saaol 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Totoel 

Tokrn 


LOW 
c F c F 

— — — — no 

79 B4 33 72 o 

33 9D 38 <3 cl 

29 U 25 77 e 

79 14 24 79 r 

28 83 22 73 o 

M 97 24 79 cl 

— — — rra 

II 91 27 81 o 

30 84 24 7S tr 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Conn Town 

CcHManca 

Hoist* 

Logo* 

NairMH 

Timii 


34 93 17 43 Ft 

34 93 22 72 fr 

IS ■» 6 43 tr 

2S 77 21 70 0 

IB 64 6 43 tr 

M SS 34 75 o 

14 41 12 54 a 

XI 91 16 41 f, 


LATIN AMERICA 



Buenos Aim 

15 

S* 





Corneas 

27 

81 

19 

*6 


d 

Lima 

» 

&a 

13 

55 

Cl 


Mexico City 

19 

*6 

13 

55 


Cl 

Rle de Janeiro 

a 

72 

1* 

61 

tr 

d 

NORTH AMERICA 



lr 

Cl 

Anchorage 

19 

** 

11 

52 


Atlanta 

33 

90 

21 

70 


lr 

lr 

Boston 

28 

B7 

21 

70 


Chicago 

77 

81 

19 

*6 

fr 

Denver 

32 

911 

IS 

59 


cr 

De trait 

25 

77 

13 

55 

lr 

Honolulu 

31 

68 

34 

75 



Mouiton 

34 

*4 

a 

73 



Los Angeles 

30 

86 

70 

<8 



Miami 

31 

H 

75 

77 



MinneawMii 

29 

84 

14 

57 

tr 


Mwitrecrt 

26 

79 

19 

» 



MS® BOO 

31 

88 

25 

77 



New York 

30 

A* 

M 

73 



San Franclfca 

20 

*1 

II 

53 



Seattle 

73 

73 

12 

54 


Cl 

Taranto 

7* 

n 

19 


tr 


Washington 

30 

86 

19 



h-hoti. no nor ouailobl«: o-ovti'caal; 


bidding; 

Sooth 

Wow 

Nona 

J N.T. 

Pass 

2 c 

1* 

Pass 

3 * 

Pass 

Pan 


Wealed the 

cttbtack.. 


W)rld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France ~Pr esse July 16 

Oasing prioa in local currencies unless otherwise indicated 


ABN 

ACP HnlflVng 

Aoann 

AKZO 

AhaU 

AMEV 

a ■Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buehrmonn T 
Colonel Hide 

Ebevier-NDU 

Fokkm- 

Cbr Brocades 

HtMakofl 

Hoogovem 

KLM 

Noordan 

NatNnddnr 

NtdUovd 

Oco VondcrC 

Paklioed 

pniiins 

Robeco 

Rada men 

Rollnco 

Rarenla 

Royal Dutch 

Unilever 

Von Ommeren 

vmf stork 

VNU 


One Pnev 


245 

8.15 

84.10 

191 

90JO 

3SJW 


49 


42 
4240 
49 JO 
74.10 


143 

42.70 

49 

7b30 


49 JO 


hinn 


ANPjCBS Coni Index : 2U.1I 
P rev lam : 214.74 


Bnuwelw 


Ar bod 
Be kauri 
Cocker II I 

Cobepo 

EBES 

GB-Inno-BW 

GBL 

Gevoeri 

Hoboken 

Inter asm 

Kredlefbank 

Pelroflno 

Sec Generale 

Satina 

Sol vat 

Traction Elec 

UC8 

Unerg 

vigiiie Mon Mane 


1690 1720 
5740 5800 
205 212 

3185 3300 
2910 3945 
2480 3710 
1840 1885 
3855 3920 
5S70 5400 
2190 2220 
8BS0 8950 
5580 5420 
1770 1795 
7300 7330 
4200 4295 
3440 3720 
4940 5090 
1705 1720 
4850 4900 


Current stack Index : 2294, 44 
Previous : 2339 JO 


Frankfort 


oc-oartiv cloudy; r-ro'in; ih -showers; sw-snaw; st-starmv. 



WEDNESDAY S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Slightly cheddr. FRANKFURT- 
M&noTn B — 4? 1 - LOHOQN: Portlv cloudy. Tama. 21 — 13 (70— SSL 

SMS^pSSisW.ft^aSWlJaiSS aas.SL i ss a-a 


- f JI. rAKi>: 8-w»r. i efTiB. a — l« 1/3 — 571. ROME: Pair. Tmid 

TEL AVIV: HOI a vail own. ZURICH: Mu clavrivT Temo uZ u 


AEG-TewfunYen 

Alllatu Vers 

Allana 

BASF 

Barer 

Bov Hvoo Bonk 
Bav Verelnsbank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Cammerauank 
Cent Gumml 
Dalmler-Beni 
Dcauesa 

DeuiaoM Baocock 
DnicMi Bonk 
Drevjncr Bank 
GHH 
Haroaner 
Hochtief 
Hoeehsi 
Harsch 


12530 125.70 
1337 1345 
354JS0 350 

71 2J0 71440 
2)4 21980 
358 357 

393 398 

223 224 

331 329 

389 400 

210 210 
MUD 14530 
833 839 

3M 37130 
15830 159 

£5330 $57 

25430 257 

140 1411 

30030 30030 
572 5451 

71230 720 1 
»«30 10*40- 


1 

Close Prey 

J Horten 

ID 

184 


305 3042) 

IWKA 

287 

780 

Kali + Sail 

278 285J0 1 


739 34150 

Kaufhof 

259 

3*4 

KtOeckner H-0 

277 

278 

Kloeckner Werke 

*250 

44 

Kruno Siam 

112 

110 

Linde 

502 51350 


211 

208 

MAN 

142 

148 



Muencn Ruack 

1900 

1900 




PlCI 

583 

57B 

Porsche 

1315 

1349 

Preussoo 


3*4 

PWA 

144.10 

14* 

RWE 

17X70 1 7721 

Rhelrwriefrall 

384 

286 

Schertng 



SEL 

346 

34 « 


530 

534 


111 11021 

Vflba 

21221440 

VolkswuHe rarer k 

29150 30X30 

Wei IO 

5*3 

S70 

Commerrtnnk Index : 1379J8 I 

j Previous : iuSjM 


1 

(I JI 

Bk EaslAslo 

232) 

7140 

Cheung Kang 

17J0 

172) 

China Light 

1S.90 

1540 

Grcwn Island 

Ml 


Hang Sena Bank 

47 

47.75 

Henderson 

£15 

221 

ChhmGas 

10.90 


hk Electric 



HK Realty A 

1140 

1140 

HK Hotels 

37 


kk Land 

U5 

440 

HK Shan: Bonk 

7.70 

7J0 

HK Telephone 

9150 

92 


1875 

3.90 

HK Wharf 

*JS 


Hutch Whampoa 

24J0 

MM 

Hyson 

(L42 

£42 

lnl'1 City 

(WO 

0.90 

Jordlnc 

122) 


JordlneSee 

U 


Kowloon Motor 

BAS 


Miramar Hotel 

37.75 

37.75 

New world 



Orient Overseas 

2.15 

Z15 

SHK Props 

I2A) 


Slelux 

£80 

£80 

Swire Pacific A 

2AB0 

24.70 

To, Cheung 

1J8 


Woh Kwong 

090 


When lock a 



Wing On Co 



Wlnsor 

485 


World mi l 

2175 

£07 

Hang seng Index ; 

143199 


Previous : 169849 



I ^msmeubtwn 1 1 


AECI 

Anglo American 

Anetg Am Gold 

Barlows 

Blwtxjr 

But Inis 

Dc Beers 

Driefonleln 

Elanas 

GFSA 

Har many 

HlvelO Sloet 

Klool 

Ncdtxmk 


3000 J990 
14850 1400a 

1770 1245 

1340 1»0 

67S0 4728 
1030 1040 
4575 4575 
1700 1700 
3300 3300 
2558 2525 
S3S 510 
7700 7725 
1550 1545 


Sun Alliance 
Tate and Lvln 
Tosco 
Thom EMI 
TJ. Group- 
Trafalgar Hu 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever C 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 


lOiw 

174 


Pres Siam 
Rush lot 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
Sasal 

West Holding 


4800 4775 
1*70 1*20 
080 075 
3730 3225 
498 4*7 
5700 5800 


Composite stock Index : MA. 
Previous: NJk. 


AA Cora 

AnutaA/T^Kc 
Ass Brit . 

Ass Dairies 
Barclars 


BAT. 

Isssss 

Hants 

Bowaler Indus 

Bril Home SI 
Brit Telecom 
Bril Aerospace 
Briioii 
BTR 
Burmah 
CaWe Wireless 
Codhurv Schw 
Charier Cons 
Commercial u 
Cons Geld 
Courtaultfc 
Dalgeh' 

De Beers* 
Distillers 
Driefonteln 
Fi sons 
Fme siGed 

Gen Accident 
GKN 

Glaxo C 

Grand Met 


SI5to 

S15to 

22S 

230 

SWft 

S8B1* 

21* 

216 

138 

138 

402 

414 

542 

447 

300 

303 

308 

305 

200 

301 

39 

3* 

531 

• 518 

2*8 

245 

18* 

183 

2S4 

25* 

52S 

525 

27B 

274 

177 

173 

33* 

331 

316 

208 

325 

333 

2*8 

2*4 

525 

535 

151 

152 

180 

■11 

215 

214 

507 

502 

135 

137 

394 

39S 

545 

545 

284 

2B7 

S24to 

S24 

323 

331 

BA 

84tt 

144 

MB 

431 

420 

212 

224 


123/33 123/M 
284 


714 

250 

850 

184 

373 

49! 

1*9 

244 

248 

477 


Prudential 
Racal Elect 

Ronthontein 

Rank 

Reed inn 

Reviers 

Royal Dl/tCh t 

RTi 

Saatchl 

Salnsburv 

Sears Holdings 

Shell 

ETC 

S>0 Char iwed 


474 
417 
148 
2*1 
138 
450 
397 
704 
340 
24S 
134 
444 
138 13Skd 
S103W siDIh 


1*7 
2*3 
138 
438 xd 
392 

s 

245 

134 


343 

3*0 

644 

642 

293 

295 

43K. 

43«k 

549 

552 

*44 

4*2 

308 

308 

93 

97 

483 

411 

100 

W 

in* 


F.T. M index :»28jn 
Prevhni* : 937.2B 
F.TAE.IM InjtaK : 1X79 JI 
Previous : issue 




Banco Comm 

Cant rata 

CJoaholMs 

Crad Hal 

Brldnn l a 

Farmliaiia 

Flat 

Flnslder 

Generali 

IFI 

Ihdcemenn 

I taigas 

Itahnobtlknl 

Metflebanca 

Matilnllsan 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

RJnoocanle 

SIP 

SnkJ 
S fends 
Shrt 


25050 23550 

IS iS 

2700 25D5 
11000 UNDO 
13*00 13310 
.3975 3980 


54990 53420 
8420 8225 
SI95B STOW 
1419 1533 
100400110025 
115*50113000 
2085 2100 
5775 58*7 
3084 3010 

8*500 05000 
SOS 840 
2428 2351 
1430 1400 
3400 3378 
14*10 1*900 
32*5 3220 


Ml 6 Commt Index : >549 
Prgvlggg ; |5u 


Ptarfa 


Air Llauide 
Alsmom All. 
Av Dassault 
Boncaire 
B1C 

Bangroln 

Bauvgues 

B5N«o 

Cprrcfour 

Chargaurs 

Club Mad 

Dorty 

Dumez 

Elf^lqullalrta 

Euraael 

Get Eavx 

Hachette 

Lattrge Con 

Leg raid 

Las! our 

l-Oreol 

Marten 

Matra 

Merlin 

Micfwiln 

Meet H enne i sv 

MAUHII4A 

Ocddenlale 

Pernod RJc 

Perrier 

Peugeot 

PrfniemiM 

RodkHechn 

Redoule 

Roussel Ueigt 

Sanari 

Skis Rasslgnet 
T ji emeonn 
Thomson CSF 
Two! 


400 

295 


397 

292 

12DQ U« 
*28 4Z7 

531 528 

1850 1870 

771 749 

2425 2415 
2115 2100 
445 450 

549 545 

1495 1470 

484 5* 

190.80 193 

(04 800 

,442 445 

1501 1495 
540 521 

2209 2210 
435 440 

2446 2415 

1470 1470 
1710 174$ 

2010 2005 

1229 1232 

1925 1942 
8AM 07 
723 730 

771 730 




3873) 

27120 
395 300 

1350 1310 
140! 1*05 

700 70S 

125 l3 *> 

3485 2510 
511 520 

214 21940 


AgeB index : 21157 
Prologs ! 21X92 
-AC index . n|, M 

Previous : JtfM 


Gold Storm 
DBS 

Fraser Heave 

Haw Par 

inchcaoc 

Mat Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

DUE 

3hangrWa 
Sima Dorav 
Share Land 
Share Press 
SSteamsMn 
St Trading 
united Ovgneas 



StaaHs Times lad 
Protons : 717JS 


Index :722i« 


AGA 

AHa Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Essette 

Handetslwntwn 

Pharmoda 

Soab^kxmta 

SandWk 

Skandui 

5KF 

SevdlshMatcIi 

Volvo 


115 114 

190 190 

325 325 

414 410 

nIS! * 

272 277 

& ^ 

U3 143 

.an 201 


US = 


N 

nj 3. n 
219 222 

190 190 

217 215 






KOwosokJ Steel 
Kirin Brew 


B r ewery 
.Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 

Mitsubishi Cham 
Mitsubishi Elec. 
Mitsubishi Heavy 


Mitsubishi On 

Mitsui a 


AC I 
ANZ 
BMP 
Boro | 

BauaalnvUto 

CasHemolne 

Cotes 

Camalco 

CRA 

CSR 

Duniaa 

Elders ixt 

ici Australia 

Maori Ian 

MIM 

Mver 

Nat Ausr Bank 
News Cora 
N Broken Hill 
Pasekton 
CW Coal Trust 
Santas 

Thomas Notion 
W*«wm Mining 
Westooc Banking 
Woodsiae 


£76 

£70 

5 

4.90 

6J4 

452 

3X2 

140 

180 

US 

7.16 

7M 

4 

355 

IAS 

IAS 

id 

5J2 

3 

104 

249 

252 

110 

111 

£01 

3 

£15 

£15 

£72 

£75 

3j0* 

m 

450 

451 

4l40 

450 

£16 

£20 

350 

350 

157 

150 

550 

£44 

£10 

£10 

172 

375 

454 

450 

155 

1J2 


All Ordinaries Index : 982A0 

Protons: 9OU0 


TetjB 


Akaf 

AsaMChem 

Asotil Glass 

Bank ol Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

Casio 

CltOh 

Dal Nleaen Print 
Dahao House 
Dotwa becurmes 
Fonuc 
Pull Bank 


3B 

SS5 


547 

1020 

1440 

442 

1U» 

708 

.978 

7400 

1740 


380 

819 

815 

925 

539 

999 

1370 

& 

700 


?sa§ 

T740 


and Co 
Mftsufcashl 
Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK 1 mutators 
NHckaSec 

Nippon Kogatai 
Nippon oil 
Nippon Sleet 
Nippon Yusen 

Nissan 

Nomura Sec 
Otympus 

Pioneer 

RICOh 

Sharp 

Shlmazu 

SWnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bonk 

Sumitomo awm 
Sum Hmiio Marine 
Sum Homo Metal 
Talsei Coro 
Tafeho Marine 

Tafceda Chem 

TDK 

Tellln 

TeMa Marine 
TekYOEteb Power 
Topaan Printing 
Tarnv Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

Yomalcfil Sec 


Terottte My 16 


Canadian stocks ria AP 


HttiuUbj. index : 12*912* 
Previous : 1259177 
New Index : Win 

Previous : itatAl 


Zurich 


AdlO , 

Akrtulsse 

Autoahan 

Bank Lou 

Brawn BoVerl 

Obd Getov 

Credit Suisse 

EteCtrawett 

Hoktorbank 

interdlsaxmt 

Jacob Swchara 

Jet moll 

LandtsGvr 

Meevenpkk 

Nestle 

Oertlkan-B 

RoeneBeny 

Sandai 

Schindler 

Salver 

Surveltlonce 

Swissair 

SBC 

Swbs Reinsurance 
SwfM VriMfeank 

Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich in* 


3320 3380 
800 80S 

sps 5425 
3750 3830 
1710 1750 
3390 3510 
2885 2920 
3140 3190 
700 710 
2500 2520 
MOD 4*50 
Z225 2250 
1890 1920 
4700 4700 
4380 4510 
1500 1545 
9450 9550 
1370 I4W 
4400 45*0 
405 4H 
MA. — 

1315 1320 

459 4*7 

3000 2050 
1725 1779 
4225 4270 
5100 5150 
3320 23*0 


sbc Index :48AM 
Previous : 4900 


N-a- not wWi NAi not 
available: xd: ex-dtadentf. 


2852 AMI Prce 
200 Ack lands 
4950 Aanlca E 
1*925 Agra Ind A 
54545 Alt Energy 
1200 Alto Nat 
15231 Algorna SI 
1*71 Aracen 
9*00 AtCP I f 
402 BP Canada 

2207 Bank BC 
97631 Bank NS 
24912 BOrricko 
1712 Bonanza R 
1700 Bralorne 
47*8 Brama lea 
500 Brenda M 

10944 BCFP 
21170 BC Res 
12900 BC Phone 
2*50 Bruniwk 
7225 Budd Can 
71180 CAE 
300CCLA 
80*92 Cod Frv 
3550 COmceau t 
37853 C Nor West 
1010 C Pockrs 
6750 Can Trust 
110CGE 

713*1 Cl BkCam 
15400 Cdn Nat Res 
*l315CTIreAt 
lOXCUfllB 
2000 Cara 
33S7 Cokmese 
100 COIan 175F 
&530Ccnfnrr 
100 CHUM 
10745 Oneptox 
44485 C Dtslb A 
MTMCDIStbBf 
14250 CTL Bank 
lMOCanventrs 
7208COseka R 
5010 Conran A 
>0081 Crawnx 
mo Czar Rn 
29*23 DdanDgy 
200 Odan a 
3781 DenhonAa 
2*30 D#nl*on B I 
24ODD0veleen 
*500 Dtduisn A f 
TOODtCknanB 
9533 Dofasco 
15897 DOmanA 
12430 Du Pont A 
31850 DVlex A 


Htoh LowCtosaCboa 
Sin* 17% 174, + E 

Sir*. 17k. 17»A + li 
S14*b 14H 14«t + kg 
89U 9 9k. + k, 

fiavj iBj. laiu— to 
514to 14to 1444— to 

szm jrn 22v* +m 

Sia> IBto IBM + to 
SlOto 10 10to-“- **• 

S31to Jlto 31to 
S5V Sto 5 to — ^ 
*13to .I3to 13V. + to 
159 154 157 +2 

J55 350 350 -5 

455 450 455 + 5 
tin. iBto in 
W 9 9 

SlOto 9to Wto+ to 
247 242 247 +4 

S23to 23V. 23to 
513 12to 13 + to 
note aoui 3ovi+to 

Sl*to 15to I4to 
*17 17 17 

515 Uto 14to 
Ofto 24to 241* 

523 22V, 23 

535to 34 35„ 

*3«. 3*to 3*to 
SMto 4*to 4* W— 2V, 
536to 3Ato 36to+U, 
24 2Sto 2Sto— to 
SlOto 10to 10to+ to 

Slav, lav. m 

s]4to 14 IA 16 Ui 
S 8to Sto Bto+ to 
siBto isto IBto— to 


_ + « 
35V»+ I 


Uto— to 
40 + Ik 
9to - 
7 + <A 
6to 


300 Ejcthom X 

> Emco 


3*101 

15550 EoultvSvr 
400 FCA Inti 
2202SCRd«gnC 
48850 Plcnbrdoe 
4945 Fed Ind A 
20W Fed Pfcm 
1700 F City Fin 
10344 GendlsA 
3200 Geoc Comp 


ns uto 

540 40 

S9to 9to 
S7 4to 
S4to 6 
S12 Uto t|to+ id 
t4to M 4to+ to 

2*0 m 280 -10 

11314 Uto 13to + to 
523 tb 23to Z3to— to 
174 170 170 — 3 

470 440-460 —10 

450 450 450 +5 

111k IZto I2to+ to 
512 Uto 12 +to 
fcto 6to 4th+ to 
uto 4 6to+ to 
JKJk *to 6k, + 1% 
M7V, 24k, Z7to + to 

m 2*1 200 +15 

«a 22to 22to+ to 
SISto 1514 1SV3+ to 
S7to 7to 7to+ to 

sin ioto IBto + to 

4to- to 

Mto+ to 

io + to 
19 + to 
2lto 


.3503 LL loc 
18500 Loblow Co 
2020 Lumanlce 
3500 M1CC 
318WMclanHX 
5185 Maritime f 
iSOOMertandE 
31MMolson At 
2400 Motion B 
900A*urPhy 
3090NOUSCOL 
73509 Naranda 
20*22 Narcen 
40272 N VO All At 
nOONowscaW 
12959 NuWst SPA 
1200 Oafcwood 
ASSDOShawoAl 
*735 POC W Alrin 
1300 P amour 
IS50PanCmP 
2929 Pembina 
400 Phonix Oil 
vat Pine Print 
70*40 Placer 
5B0 Proviso 


925 Qua Sturg < 

i Pel 


loo Rom 
1300 Royrock f 


8*18 Redpoth 
lSBURdStenhsA 
2750 Rogers A 
900 Roman 
i 2*00 Rothman 
301*00 Scari re 

wo sorts i 


10*88 Gcacrude 
900GtDraltar 
13580 Goldcarp f 
' - 10 Goodyear 
JOB Grott G 
109SOGL Forest 
IlSGtPocHIC 
SUGnevhnd 
71 !H Group A 
1200 Hr ding At 
1300 Hawker 
*90* Haves D 
28530 Hee* Inti 
8*11 H pov Co 
37470 Imasca 
31*50 Indal 
540 Inland Gas 
47200 inti Thom 
7T274 mtpr Pipe 

zmipsco 

IMIvacaB 
22400 JOrtaoek 
1400 Kerr Ada 
WSLatutl 
«482 Lac MWb 


lOjpoLOntCcm 

4200 Laeana 


JO 3 s 

*16 m 

sr e 

^ W4 lk+ to 
SWto Xto 30to+to 
Wto 9 to fto + to 
258 25S 255 — 7 

SBto Sto 8to+ to 
S7H Tto Tto— to 
wm 37to 37Vj— Ift 

sin m in 
Mn r ayj+2 
S32to 3214 3fj; 

5254. 25to 2Sto+ta 
_*9to 9to Tto + to 
155 150 150 -10 

S21CS 21l*» 21to + to 
Sllto Uto Uto 
KIM, Sto Wto-K, 
S23 23to 23 + to 
S27to m, 27to+ to 
MTto my 17to+ to 

tan an 20 % 

n Bto 9 
ijn 4 Jto 42V>+ to 

nsu. m i5to+to 

S2DV. 20to 30to+to 

si*to i*to - ioto— to 
n*to We m+to 

2W+ ; to 
Oft 28Ys »to+ to 
SMI* 14 1414 4 V, 

*11 U U 


25054 Sears Can 
99050 Shell Can 
lUTSnerrlft 
201? Slater a f 
ESSouthm 
9272 Spot Aero f 
TOO St Bradcst 
M^SIetCDA 
IMJSutotra 
3925 Sleep R 
gog Sy dney o 
TOO* Totaorn 
1375 Tara 
100 Teck Cor A 

SftoflTeekBt 
1IK78 Tex Can 
1M85 rtxjm H A 
24144 Tar Dm Bk 
B400Torstar Bt 
2371 Traders A t 
4M9TrnsMt 

*050 Trinity Res 
6722TmAlta UA 
127*1 Treat PL 
4 63M THmoc 

46800 Trilon A 
WOTrfccecAf 
35800 Turijof 
449 Unlcorp A f 
233 UnCarbid 
47S5U Entorlse 
lBOUKeno 

inoUSIaeoe 

2470 Venn a t 
*990 Vestoron 
i72Wridwad 
ITOOWestmln 
1173 Weston 
3129 woodwd A 


M4to> 44» U* +.J 

520 20 a 
S22to 22to XP6— * 

400 395 480\ 

S14H I4to 1416-5 

nsto isto isto+ J* 

355 350 350-18 

n*to m 1A . . 

S14to m Mto+S 

5 2 1 m .si +» 

S27to 271ft Z7*-n 
S15H 15W ISto-f J 
I14tft Ulft 14*-to; 
S4to 4to *#+ to 

ta m a ■ 

39 38 3» 

i7Vj 74 * Jto+S 
533 32V> 33 + to 

SI 4V, UK . Uto ‘ 

S7Vj Tto 71S . , 

S33 32 33 +1 

SlOto 1B4 Uto+V, 
J9to 9to -fS . 
S2Sto 25*6 JSft . . 

J23to 2Jto 2M6 _ 

*21 a 21 • 

395 375 395 +5 

S4V, ««, 6M 
S7to 78k 7to+ 5 
5131ft T3to nto-lf 
S2ito am. Bto+to 
513to TOft raft . 
•Tto 9% m 
son a 
im s 

527 ZSto 

WM 1 9to 

^ « 
m « 

*5 m 

28to 


; ; \ i j 

: -v 


XI 'J 


& 


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i,-,. 


rat;; 
t: . 
n 


1 

-.it 

. v. 


.y, 

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an+.to 
s - 

It;; 

il - '-'" 

U: 

29 


. + * 


S!9to 191ft" H«.. M 


715 




235 

28 _ _ 

94 94 IB 

sari vat, * 
SlZMi 12to Uto^T-S 

«Sto m 

527 21 to 32 + ” 

TOVte 7XH . 2m ' 

Sv. VbJbf* 
!T2to l?:_.T3t -i 
330 320 -33U'-» 

K7to. E H'/OTS+J' 
440 4» 

saw* 20 U 2»r 

san 28 - .Sto'J 

Sm. 

il?** m 

SBto 8to : 8to- J . 

SO » - -w .:+t 

m,vs . 1 : ■ 

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SES Uto 

now ' w.., 


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ter-.". 

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1 V 

’ 

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"■fil.y- 


Vt • . ’■ 
W , ' : 

"u " fi- r e« » 

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1000 Yic Bear . - 

Totat sates 1UQSJ49 jhara* 

dese PW* 

TSE 300 index: L77$^>' 


Whmtecl 


. ' 


••■ 41145 ! 
;* Sit 

jar 

. - •TKmrst 

' - ' ' 


YJI 


:n - ^ 


BBS Balk Mont 
4aoo aombrdrA 
50715 BombrdrB 
1430 CB Pok . 

2740 Cascades 


tlMCtl ' 

k Con Both 


1*436, 

1002 DomTxtA 

B3K Gar Metre ■ 

92SMntTrat 
44881 NatBfcCaa 
3757 Power Corp 
300 RcdlandA 
M0 RotlandB 

230 RoyTrstCO 

*W1 " ’ 

Total 


HKhWiial s index: 


5314* 31 
5 13% 13V, 

S 13 V, 13 ... 

aaito 213k Z1 

sin m .*u 

*3* 33RT 

sii m* 
snto 11 to 

niH iffi— iir* 

J2i a . v 
mi* gm» 

. -saoto asto 

'. S23to- 234* 
share*. - • 

Owe - 

„ .11871 



■■ :r f ejar l»s 

^ sfi 

' *r,u3T. nl 


•IL-flC L -y W 
“‘v 4mr.iQ0 

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T~ «»^u rark 

*■‘“8*111? ' 

biz-im 

i-tCics.. 

■ v - m7?G •; 

1 ^sf'3 




i 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 1985 


Page 23 


SPORTS 


"'Mines, ' 

■v 1 i^uS 


Aug. 6 Strike Deadline 


.1*!} 


c»iKj. , K n * J - On 


\-ompiM-by Oar Staff From Dupmdia Ravrtey, player representative of day’s All-Star Game in Mmneapo- months has been spent on disput- season before agreement was 

CHICAGO — The executive tbs Philadelphia Phillies. ‘‘And the lis commented, on the setting of the ing whether cm 1 not baseball, as an reached on the owners' comribu- 

!wut ' bew.^1 hoard of the Major League Players sooner we get this over with, the strike date: industry, has severe financial prob- lion to the players' pension and 

Association on MondS^esignatfid better. Hie date is set and if there’s • Atlanta center fielder Dale lems, as the owners contend. There benefit plan. Eighty-six games were 

‘ Cut 6 as the date the players no agreement by then, adios.” Morphy: “You hate to think about has been little discusaon of other lost that year. The I9SI strike 
wuld strike if they did not reach The 30-member board selected stuff like that at a time Eke this, but issues — minimum salary, salary forced cancellation of 712 games. 


is set and if there’s 


Aug. 6 as the date the players 00 agreement by then, adios. 


w°uld strike if they did not reach The 30-tnember board selected SujUI UMi UiUL 04 n UUH UK LUIO, 4>Ul 
agreanent with the dub owners on Aug. 6 primarily because a large it has crossed my mind." 
m a. new collective bargaining agree- number of contenders are sched- • New York Met pitcher Ron 
1-3- meat- uled to begin playing each other at Darling: “1 think Pm like anyone 


a. new collective bargaining agree- 
ment- 


d” - arbitration, free agency, pensions 
pitcher Ron and other benefits. 


Twenty-one team representa- 
tives voted for the Aug. 6 deadline. 


The players have studied the The San Diego Padres were the 


■"•'re and 




T SEILERS 


* V. VjtL 




Cirr, 

*-"■*-»* 7,*, 



Louis in two critical National «su Louis shortstop Ozzie bon profit, while the owners say 
League East series, and San Diego Smith: “It’s just like 1981. Only they lost from $27 million to S43 
plays Cincinnati in a National way yon can get your point across mflhon. 

League West matchup. is u> set a strike date. I wish we The next negotiating session is 

In the American League, BaW- didn't have to. but here we are." scheduled for New York on Thurs- 


. Lea g ue West matchup. 

In the American League, 
more plays Toronto, Mini 
meets Oakland and Detroit 
Kansas City. The following 


• Cincinnati player-manager day, Iks than three weeks before 
Pete Rose, who is 33 hits away from the strike date. 


■' matching Ty Cobb's career record 


end there are other matchups that f or base hits: ‘They’ll dicker and Me." said Donald Fefar, acting 
figure to be big attractions. The dicker before they realize that both ecutive director of MLPA- u 


T don’t feel a strike is inevita- dress Lhe 
e." said Donald Fehr, acting ex- us," he soi 


on his team favored a strike, if 
necessary, but would prefer a later 
date. 

Lee MacPhail, the owners' chief 
negotiator, was in Minneapolis for 
the All-Star Game. “We are and 
have been ready to collectively ad- 
dress Lhe problems confronting 
us." he 5ai a. “We do not want a 



players hope the owners will make sides are serious. That’s when pul our heads together, we can find 


we strike. It would be a failure on both 


a sen crus effort to reach an agree- they ’ll get down to business." 
mem to avoid taring the revenue • Chicago White Sox outfi 
those crowds wffl produce. HamldRnTnes- “Am I ornimls 


a way through this — unless a 


our pans and unfair to the fans. 
“We will make every reasonable 


Shane Rawley 

‘ . . . We mean business.’ 


• Chicago White Sox outfielder strike is what the owners want.” effort consistent with our obliga- 
aroidBames: “Am I optimistic? 1 A strike would be the third in six lions to the game and the problems 


An Aug. 6 strike would also give guess not. We’ve been trying since years and the fourth ever by the to reach an agreement before the 
the two sides rime to settle their November.” players association. * Aug. 6 deadline.” 

differences and return in time for • Oakland reliever Jay Howell: The players struck for 50 days In announcing the strike date, 
the postseason games, the league T really don't know much about iL during the 1981 season over the Fehr criticized the owners and 
championship series and the World You’re really talking to a guy who’s issue of compensation for free Commissioner Peter Ueberroth. 
Series, which generate SI 20 million awfully happy to be playing in his agents. In 1980, during negotia- On Sunday. Ueberroth had told a 
in television revenue for the own- first All-Star Game." dons for a new agreement, they national television audience that “a 


A Sept. IS deadline had been 
considered but was seen as coming 


Representatives of the players struck the last Tew 
and uk owners have been meeting bition season, 
sporadically for eight months in an The union stag* 


ruck the last Tew days of the exhi- strike is a failure. ... It’s not a 
tion season. strike date; it’s a failure date. Il 

The union staged its first strike means both sides have failed to 


1 1 'K. Union leader Donald FefaT 


dangerously dose to jeopardizing effort to reach an agreement to re- in 1972, walking oat three days came together.” 


the postseason games. 

Several players selected for Tues- 


place the one that expired on Dec. before the end of spri: 
31. Much of the time in recent and striking the first 10 


USFL Faces Another 14 Months in Limbo 


Ni }n\ 


5 r New York Times Service 

- NEW YORK — Well before the 
. s United States Football League's 

third championship game Sunday, 
ihe question was not what's the 
point spread; it was what’s the 
point? 

- i . Ever since the USFL intruded on 
. springtime sports, that issue has 

teen the story of its life. And Sun- 
j t day night's big question was not 
whether Oakland would dethrone 
i£e defendinz-champion Baltimore 


ested or somewhat interested in 
football, 33 percent didn’t even 
know that the USFL has been play- 
ing its games in the spring- Another 
four percent thought it was in the 
fall and winter. 

That prompts two questions not 
asked in the poD: How really inter- 
ested are those people in football? 
And how valid are their opinions? 

No poll is needed to know that 
the USFL finances are shaky. Over 
its three seasons, its chib owners 


:> Stars, hut rather, was that game the' have lost about $130 million. And 


USFL s death rattle? 

.Or would the USFL somehow 


with ABC withholding $7 mini on 
in television fees — wtuch has pro- 


survive and resume in the fafi of voked another USFL lawsuit — the 
1986 in direct competition with the league treasury is searching for $2.8 


National Football League? 
u ' The answer, like so many others 

‘ Vyl sports these days, will be provid- 

■ "■ L ; Ss in a courtroom — the verdict on 
‘ -f • “lhe USFL's $1.2 billion anti trust 
- riuiagainsttheNFLthatisexpect- 
' * ed to begin next February with a 
. .. .r federal jury trial. 
iv< in iNErt* Harry Usher, the USFL commis- 
. . . L ., sioner, talks bravely, about how the 
loss of the antitrust case “would 
not spell the end of the league." But 
without a favorable verdict, the 
_■ USFL would have even Jess reason 
■ than it does now to continue. 

- «*.£. Were the USFL to win its case 
(charging the NFL with preventing 

it from having obtained a 1986 net- 
— ' work television contract), it would 

be alive and well as never before. 
The jury could award damages 

worth nnHions. possibly a billion. 

Judge Peter Leisure also nri$ht or- 
v ?-r der the networks to negotiate a 

* J ’ s - USFL contract. Or the NFL might 
" • i be willing to absorb, say, four to 

* - eight USFL teams. 

Jf- , Until that case begins, the ‘L’ in 
• ; ; yJSFL stands for limbo, not league. 

iCi> hut for football even limbo is bet- 
*' i: ‘ ter than springtime. 
r ' ,: ” In a nationwide poll of 1,000 
V ■ . people commissioned by the 
USFL, the league received favor- 

* ■ ■ : ; -able responses on roost issues. But 

-- as with any poll its answers were 

w v only as vahd as the opinions of the 
* ffeaple polled. Of the 700 who ac- 
* • knowledged being either veiy inter- 



training Said Fehr “That's true only if 
Its of the both sides are doing everything 

they can. [The owners'] “position 

from the beginning has been. ‘We’ll 
L — talk to you tomorrow. If not then, 
JIJ maybe next week. Maybe.’ ” 

Ueberroth, he said, “doesn’t 
even bother to keep up to date on 
issues.” On Tuesday. Ueberroth 
said he was “kind of happy” a 
strike deadline had been seL The 
negotiators, he said, should “get 
this over with. It puts the pressure 
on everybody — I think thev'll gel 
it done.” (NTT, AP. WP) 



Ozzie Smith 
* . . . It’s Just like 1981. ’ 


million in postseason bonus money 
owed to the players on playoff 
teams. 

“We're trying,” Usher says, “to 
work h out* 

Four teams did not fulfill their 
player payrolls this season — San. . 

Antonio (the last four games), 

Houston (the last two games), 

Tampa Bay and Portland (each the 
final game). 

Although three franchises — 

Memphis, New Jersey and Oriaado 
— had increased attendance fig- 
ures, tire average announced atten- 
dance dropped to 24,494, down 
nearly 3.000 from last year. The 
league’s TV ratings also were down 
more than 30 percent 

Support for Usher by some chib 

Against Oakland m Sophy, Gay W wfty ot 
Simmons’s successor. Usher was gained some of tire USFL’s last yardage until the fall of 1986. 


■'*&>■* ,e >*>* 


Thn taodcM fast 


hailed for his administrative work 

on the Los An&dcs Olympic Orga- “Auababe" and “What’s that flag 


nizing Committee. But now some fox?" 


owners are disenchanted with him 
as a promoter. 


At halftime during a Los Angeles 
Express game this season, be had a 


Usher didn’t even attend the suggestion for Don Klosterman, 
semifinal playoff games in Mem- then the president and general 


phis and Birm ingham last week- manager 
end. \ coaches,’ 

When the co mmission er did at- beard to 


manager of lhe Express. “Tel your 
coaches,” the commissioner was 
beard to say, “to blhz your line- 


tend g ames, he sometimes sounded backers more." 
more like a fan than a neutral ad- T romp enthusiastically endorsed 
minis tra tor. During the first half of Usher's airing. Bat lately the Gen- 
New Jersey’s 20-17 playoff loss to ends’ owner has been touting Earl 
Baltimore, he was beard to exhort Foreman, the commissioner of the 
Donald Trump’s team by saying, Major Indoor Soccer League, to 


other dub owners. Usher's three- 
year contract extends through Feb. 
1, 1988. 

The next USFL game is 14 
months away. It is obvious that in 
the meantime a number of prob- 
lems must be resolved. Apart from 
the formidable litigation schedule, 
the league must hold onto its stars, 
but several are looking to the NFL 
Each of the 14 teams will retain 33 
of its 50 players, releasing the oth- 
ers as of Aug. 1; those left for 1986 
will not receive any paychecks until 
March. 


Two English Managers Put Their Images to Work 


... International Herald Tribune 

7 V. '• LONDON — “I get players that possibly 
t no one else will touch. They’ve bad AIDS, 
; >• ; herpes, shingles, knock-knees and flat feet 

■ • 7 But lget< them to play a bit extra for me, and 

; not cost the dub a lot of money." 

Those modest words amounted to the ac- 
V: ... ■ cep lance speech last week or an En g li shman 
: I; Whose terms For managing a soccer aub fall- 
.'■7 ' ® on hard times include half a million 
r- pounds in salary over three years, a seat on 
■ the board, a coaching job for his faithful 
back-up man and a post looking after the 
* ' youth team for his son. 

■ ’ : ■ All that in an area Lawrie McM enemy 

• should know, since the dub lies in his native 

county, suffering the highest unemployment 
j; . in the British Isles. Yet rather than resent- 
ment, the people of Sunderland — some of its 
l people — are welcoming McMcnemy as the 
7- V new messiah. 

. . y. ; “Tm very proud to have landed the best 
-1 ; manager in the United Kingdom,” breathed 
: ' Chai rman Tom Cowic, a millionaire car deal- 
: I. * ' er who has sacked three managers in his five 
y , years as Sunderland AFCs Mr. Big. “The 
; - man is magic Everybody loves him. He has 
V charisma, ability, great personal charm. He 
i. won’t just be manager, but a director too. 
4, And beTl wind up manag ing director. If the 
!•:: f ./.supporters back him, Sunderland will be- 
4'«me one of the best teams in the world." 

' ; ■ Image projection is paramount. McMen- 
any learned the rudiments as a Coldstream 
: -i Guardsman at Budcingbam Palace, where be 
r /■ drew himself lo his full 6-fooi-4 (1.93 meters) 
•• -L ^nd “preened myself like a peacock.” 

: • . Frank Worthington has a different style, 
: ; jlj. but image projection all the same. Worthmg- 
“ ' ion, whose only known physical defect was 
'' K low Wood pressure, was once a player ero- 
ployed by McMenemy at Southanmton. 

: Altiiough almost opp>»iie talents. Big Mac 

« “3 ■ ^ Big Frank are among soccefs best pro- 
jected personalities. McMenemy. who never 
collected a paycheck for kicking a ball, talks a 
: : - magnificent game and lalks others into per- 
■ ~ } forming. Worthington was endowed with 
‘ : ‘, r . tare finesse on the ball and a winning way 
; ! - r with nightclub ladies, 

British soccer is, and was, about runners 
: who cany out orders rather than follow their 
own instincts. This week Worthington also 


begins a new career — a gamble that, with 
luck, might bring him an eighth of McMen- 
emy’s windfall 

Worthington is moving to Tranmere 
Rovers, a crab in the shadows of Liverpool’s 
pants and, again, industrial depression. He 
wifi play for, and manage, a team whose an- 

Rob Hughes 

nual chore is to stay clear of both the liquida- 
tor and the bottom of the Fourth Division. 

Should Worthington ask McMenemy’s ad- 
vice, it might begin. “Don't do as I do, do as 1 
say." But where McMenemy must envy the 
skills of others, Worthington may never truly 
understand why full-time professionals can- 
not master the baH 

In their year together, McMenemy will 
have seen Worthington’s love for soccer and 
the deep mind beneath lhe player’s blas6 
image- Now, in changing circumstances. 
Worthington will come dosef to two things 
that annoy him: the manager as a cult figure 
and the need, as managers see it, to grind out 
results ahead of entertainment. 

To be sure, he will set out to win with style. 
All manag ers talk about that McMenemy, 
more than most, buys players to turn on the 
style, although his bold media front often 
camouflages blunter truths. 

One afternoon last November, for exam- 
ple, six of his men were booked, four for what 
were described as “softening-up tackles." 
McMenemy gathered in the press and said: 
“There were no back tackles, no one was 
carried off. My lads deserved the result be- 
cause of their resilience and balding.” 

Worthington, now 36, will run into plenty 
of that down among the hackers, I hope he 
doesn’t compromise his beliefs too quickly. 

On a good day, Tranmere pulls in 1,500 
spectators. Many will be there because they 
recall Worthington's flights of fantasy. 

My favorite was agamst Ipswich. Wor- 
thing ton had his back to the goal 20 meters 
out Once, twice, he flicked the ball up to 
knee height before arching his bade and loft- 
ing the ball overhead past an astonished goal- 
keeper. Graceful for anyone; for a man over 
six feet tall, quite unbelievable. 


The disbelievers included Sir Alf Ramsey. 
The England manager recoiled when Wor- 
thington, a lifelong Elvis Presley disciple, 
turned up for under-23 duty behind the Iron 
Curtain m cowboy bools, black satin trou- 
sers, red silk shin and green velvet jacket. A 
fellow like that couldn’t possibly play for 
England. But he did. 

Ramsey was axed; under Joe Mercer, Wor- 
thington’s haute couture mattered less than 
his goal-scoring contributions during the 
briefi unbeaten Eastern European tour. 

Mercer, alas, was temporary. His free-and- 
easy rule was followed by Don Revie, whose 
tackle-back, dose-down-space regimen was 
qo place for an entertainer. 

Consequently, WortJiingion believes, 

. “there was a percentage in me that never 
came out A couple of back-heels and the 
manager would pull me off, accusing me of 
- playing for mysdf. I felt able to try things a . 
little bit beyond what most others do, but 
that was thought arrogant" 

He is unlikely to encounter at Tranmere 
the dilemma or now much rein to allow such a 
player. Free spirits are there aplenty, bnt few 
talents to match. 

Why? The likely lads of Tranmere Rovers 
will hear their new boss admit be once 
“abused my body with birds and booze.” But 
they will also bear that his flair came Iron 12- 
hour daily practices as a youngster — “just 
trying to get to know the tall, to be master of 
that Little round thing. " 

Today’s society of fas kids too many alter- 
natives for that kind of obsession. Even 
McMenemy, for all Sunderland’s compara- 
tive wealth and all his persuasive tongue, will 
have no such player. 

StiQT Sunderland has new priorities. Rele- 
gated to Second Division, it sacked manager 
Len Ashurst and sold goalie Chris Turner to 
Manchester United. Using the profits on the 
one player who came close to saving a bad 
team, the chairman thus hired his messiah. 

1 wonder if McMenemy (or Worthington 
for that matter) has had time to reflect on the 
nun in 1983 who offered daily prayers to St. 
Jude on behalf of the Southampton manager. 

St, Jude? “Well, Mr. McMenemy," the 
. good lady replied, “he’s the champion of lost 
causes.” 






Tour de France 

MEN 

ifevHHTEEMTH STAGE 
Tosiowr 10 LuMUUUn 
(209J KUomntar / 130.1 NUlMl 

1. Padre DMortO. SM In. SU hours. 57 mlo- 
i/Ms. 2T seconds 

2. Luis HorToro.CohnTttla.2S seconds be. 
hind 

1 FoMo Parra Colombia, of 1:2* 

4. Sean Kelly, Ireland, at *52 
& Greo LeWond. U.S. el *52 
a Jesus Rodrfouex Nttonx Seata. at 2:M 
7. (Xestbio Prieto. Spain, same time 
a RUM Andemon. Australia si 

0. Eddy Sctiepers, Befcrium. S.I. 

IB. Peter wtnnen. Netherlands, s-t. 

11. Jooo Zoetemel h . Netherlands, il 
YL Stephen Roche. Ireland, si. 

.IX Robert Millar. Britain, si- 
ll Alvaro Pirns Spain, at 3:33 
is. Thierry Ctavovrotat, Pranas at 4:4* 
14. Steven Rooks. Nethorimds. at 4:01 
17. NIKI RuMmoiwv Switzerland, ot irttl 

IX Bernard Hinault. France, at 4-.as 
1*. Jerome Simon. France, at 4:0* 

30. Eduardo Chazas. Spain, at 4:25 

31. Robert Forest. France, at 4:35 
22. Fautino Rueerex. Spain, at 5:38 
21 inakl Gostan. Spain, si. 

34. Uition Van Imae, Bekdum. at 5:48 
25. Claude cnavbrihm. Belplum. at 4:04 

0 * 0 roll leaders 

1. Bernard Hinault, France. *1 hours. 3* 
minutes. 20 seconds 

Z Grao LeMonA UJ, 7:25 behind 
1 Stephen Radio. Iretand. at 5:00 
4. Sean Kelly, Ireland, at 4:1* 

& PMI Anderson, Australia, a t 7:28 

X Pedro Delaodo. Spahv at I:1B 
7. Luts herrero. Colombia, at 1:42 
X Fablo Parra. Colombia, at 9:00 
9. Eduardo Chazas. Spain, at tdl 

IX Jooo Znetemelk, Nettmriandx at 10:0* 
11. Robert Millar, Britain, at 10:51 
IX Nllci Ruttlmann. Switzerland, at 11:34 

IX Peter Wtnrna. Netherlands, at 11:42 
ia Stave Bauer. Canada, at 11:5* 

IX Eddy Sdnocrs. Belgium, at 12:27 

IX Robot! Forest. France, at 13:34 
17. Ceiatino Prieto, Spain, at 14:25 
IX Pascal Simon. France, at 15:51 

lv. Claude -CriquMlan. BMOhim. at 14:07 

20. Pierre B urra . France, at 14:18 

21. Alvaro Pinx Snaln, ot 18:51 

22. Dnmlnhue Arnaud. Franca, at 21 :02 

23- More MatUat. France, at 21:17 

24. Steven Rooks. Netherlands, at 22:21 

25. Laden Van imp*. Belplum, ot 22:57 

24- Jerome Simon. France, at 23:01 
27. Beat Breu. Swttzericnd. at 23:27 

2X Gerard Vetabdioliefl. Nether land* ot 
34:34 

WOMEN 

FOURTEENTH ST AWE 
SQdnte MorTo-de-Campae la LnpArcOdea 
{54.1 Kilometers} 

1. Maria Contra, Italy. 2 hourx Umlnulrs. 
30 seconds (15 second bonus) 

x Jeoveite Lamm. France. 9:13 behind {10 
second bonus) 

X Wong Ll, Chlnaal 9: 34 (Ssecatids bonus) 
4. Roberta Banonoml. Italy, at 9:34 

X Chantal Broca, France, at 11:00 

X Cache Odin. France, at 11:33 
7. Imeldo CMapaa, Italy, at 12:14 

X H» ten Hoar, Netherlands, at 13:34 
f. Judith Painter. Britain, at 14:58 
IX Jamil le Porks. UJL. at 15:03 
Overall Stoma so* 
l. Marla Canins. Italy. 4:5X22 
X Jecnde Lanaa. F ranee. 9:18 behind lead- 
er 

X Wans U, China, ai 9:44 
x Roberta BananomL Italy, at 10:25 
X Chantal bnxa. France, at 11:15 
X Ceclie affln. France, at ii:« 

7. imeMa Chlapaa. Italy, at 12:31 
X Hdtai Hose. Netherlands, at 13:51 
«. Judith Painter. Britain, at is:i3 
IX Jaaeile Porta, ux at 15:17 


1985 Teams 



G AB R 
Coiamr 

H HR RBI Pet 

Ketuidv. XD. 

1 1 0 
First Base 

0 0 0 DDO 

Garvey. ZD. 

9 25 7 

Second Base 

M 3 4JI» 

Herr, St-L 

00 0 

0 0 0 r- 

* 

Third Base 


Netties. SIX 

5 9 n 
Shortstop 

3 II 021 

asmffi. SU- 

4 S 1 

Oetdetd 

1 0 0 .200 

Gwynn. SU 

1 3 0 

•1 8 0 333 

Murphy, AtL 

4 9 2 

3 1 2 J33 

Strawtterrv. N.Y. 1 2 8 

1 0 a SOO 

Reserve loftekfers 


a AB ft 

H HR RBI Pa 

Clark. St. L 

2 2 0 

1 0 a -000 

Rose. On. 

IS 33 3 

7 1 2 319 

Sandberi* cm. 

1 4 0 

IDO JSO 

TemMetan. 5I>. 

1 1 1 

1 0 OlbOO 

Wauoeh. mil 

1 1 0 

0 0 0 m 

Rcierve OotfMders 

Crux Hou- 

DO 0 

0 0 0 e- 

McGee. SI. L 

1 2 a 

1 i 0500 

Parker, an. 

4 11 2 

3 1 320 

Raines. MIL 

4 5 0 

0 0 a me 

wjiion. PhL 

0 0 0 

D 0 0 .- 

Reserve Catcher* 

Pena Pit. 

2 1 8 

0 0 0 JWO 

VlraU, Pbl. 

8 0 0 

0 0 8 r- 


PITCHERS 

~ 

O 

WL 3 H 

BB SO ERA 

Dorflne. N.Y. 

0 11-0 0 

ODD — 

Garretts. S.F. 

0 M 0 

0 0 8 — 

Gooden, N Y. 

1 04 0 

1 0 3 WH5 

Goaage. 5.D. 

5 0-1 ) 

B 2 S 543 

Hovt.SU. 

0 00 0 

0 a 0 — 

Reardon. MfL 

0 0-0 D 

0 8 0 — 


Boston’s Marathon 
Will Turn Pro at 90 

Coej nM h Our Sulf turn bapjhixs 

BOSTON — The Boston Athletic Association voted late Monday to 
award prize money for the Boston Marathon, starting with its 90th 
running next April 21. The decision ends the race’s amateur stuius. 

Jn recent years, there had been a steady decline in world-class entrains 
in the nation's oldesi continually run marathon os lop contenders 
bypassed Boston to train for marathons offering prize money. 

The B.AA said the decision is intended to continue the event's tradition 
of excellence and 10 assure quality fields, “i don't think we ore gome away 
from tradition " said Robert Weiss, one of the association's 1 1 governors. 
“By adding prize money, we'll attract more world-class runners." 

“Thai's the delicate balance we have to watch out for over lhe next 
couple of months.” 

The announcement was hailed by former champion Bill Rodgers and 
1984-85 tiiUsi Geoff Smith of Britain. 

“I think it can be the best marathon in the world if they continue lo 
make these types of changes." said Rodgers, who won in 1975 and 1978- 
80. “Runners want io compete against iheir best competition. I think 
Boston's prestige will pull people back." 

Smith agreed. “I’d love to win Boston with a great field." he said. "The 
thought at running Boston again is exciting." 

Except for Smith, virtually all top marathoners bypassed the race in 
1985, when entries dropped below 6,000 (there were 6.S00 in 19S4) and 
the number of male runners with times below 2 hours. 20 minutes fell to 
20 from a high of 77 in 1982. Foreign entries also dropped, from 550 in 
1984 to 375 this year. 

Smith said the BAA “can't go half way” about the amount of prize 
money il offers. Marathons such as ihose in New York and Chicago offer 
more than 5270,000 in prizes. 

Weiss said no decision had been made on the size of the 1986 purse or 
how it will be structured. He said the total “will be determined on the 
basis of financial support from existing and potential sponsors.” 

The -board's announcement followed last week's release of a memoran- 
dum by the 'staff of Boston Mayor Raymond L. Flynn that proposed 
awarding total prizes of 5292.501). 

The memo was prepared after consultation with members of the 
running, business and political communities. Under the proposal, the 
prizes would indude S30.000 for winning. SI 0,000 for a course record. 
S 10.000 for a U.S. record and S75.000 for a world record. 

Winners have traditionally receiv ed a laurel wreath and — along with 
ev«y other finisher — a plate of beef stew. 

The dispute over awarding prize money began tour vears ago. 

“1 wanted to give prize money four years ago.” said Will CJoney. who 
was BAA president and race director at the time. "The other people in the 
BAA just wouldn't be realistic.” CJoney subsequently resigned both 
positions. 

“I'm sony they wasted four years.” he said Monday. “I hope the nice 
can be restored to the stature it enjoyed up to four years ago. We've lost 
an awful lot of ground and I just hope the race can make it up.” ( AP. VPli 


All-Star Baseball 


NATIONAL LBACUE 
Ufrttma All-Star statistics tar National 
lmm st ra t ar s awt rttcbsra in Tamlavl 
54tti All-Star Cams: 


Cooper. Mil. 

4 4 

1 

2 

0 

0 500 

1943— American. 3-1 

Garda. Tor. 

1 I 

a 

0 

a 

D JBO 

19*3— American. S-3 

Mattingly. N.Y. 

t t 

a 

0 

0 

0 MO 

1944— National, 7-1 

MoHtor, Mil. 

0 0 

0 

D 

a 

0 - 

1945— No OOmc 

Trammell. Del 

1 0 

0 

0 

0 

0 JBO 

1944— American, 12-0 

Reserve oufflefders 



1947— American. 3-1 

Baines, an. 

0 0 

0 

0 

D 

0 .- 

1840— American. S-2 

Bradley. Sea. 

a 0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1949— American. 11-7 

Bnjnanskv. Min. 

a a 

0 

0 

0 

a 

1*53— National. *-] (U (tyilnosl 

Ward. Tex. 

1 1 

0 

a 

0 

a jna 

1951— National. 03 

Reserve Catcher* 

- 


1*52— Notional, 3-2 iS inmnos. ratal 

Geaman, Bos. 

0 D 

0 

D 

D 

0 

1953— Nat lanol. 5-1 

Whin. Tor. 

0 0 

0 

0 

0 

a 

1954- American. 11-9 


PITCHERS 




1*55— Not tonoL 4-5 (12 tantae*) 

G 

WL S 

M 

BB SO ERA 

1950— National, 7-3 

Blvtoven. Cto- 

1 8-1 0 

2 

2 

0 

1 x 00 

1957— American. 6-5 

Hernandez, Dot. 1 00 0 

1 

0 

I 

900 

1958— American, 4-3 


Hawaii. Oak. 
Kav. Tar. 
moots. Col 
M orris. Dot. 

. Pstnr.OaL 
Sfieth Tor. 


o m o o o e — 

a om o ao o — 

o 04 o a a a — 

2 D-0 D 4 2 4 XOQ 

OMOOOO — 
4 1-t 0 5 4 1 1.17 


VoISflXUrtO, L-A. 3 04 0 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

UMttmc AO- Star statistics for Amsrlcm 


Individual Records 

BATTING 

Bum: 4 — Tsd Williams, Boston. AL. 1944 
HRs: 4 — Joe ModwICk. St. Louis. NL. 1*37; 
Tsd Williams. Boston. 1*46; Cart Yostr. 
zsrnjkl, Boston. AL. 1970 (12 Iwiinos) 

Total Baass: 10— Tsd Wllltanis.Basiiin.AL. 
1*«6 

HMntlbnu: 2— Ar*v Vouohoa Plttsburah. 
NL. 19(1; Tsd Wllltoira. Boston, AL. 194»: AI 
RUssyv a ova land. AL 19S«: WUlie McCavtor, 
Sm Francisco, ML. 19*9; Cary Carter. Mon- 
treal. NU 1911. 

Rum dotted In; 5 — Ted Williams. Baslan. 
AC, 1944; A I Rosmt. Cleveland. AL, J954 
Stutafi Basa: 2— Willie Mays. San Francis- 
co. NL. 1943 

PITCHING 

Runs: 7—Atisa Hommaksr.son Francisco, 
NL. 1983 

Earned Runt: 7 — Altos MommUer. San 
Francisco. NL 1983 

Hits: 7 — Tom mm y Brldaes. Defralf, AL. 
1*37 


League starter* and pitcher* la Tuesday* 

Wa*U; 5— Bill Hallahon. 5L Louis. NL 1933 

Stlb Aft-star Game: 

G AB R 

H HR RBI Pet 

Strikeout*: 4— Carl HuObell.New York.NL 
1*34: Johnny Vender Meer. Cincinnati, NL 

FMl. ChL 

Catcher 

8 la 2 

2 

0 

1 .125 

1*43: Lorrv Jansen. Nov. YorV.ALl»5fl; Fer- 
guson Jenkins. Chicago. NL ?9*7; Fernando 

Murray. BaL 

First Base ■ 
47 0 

1 

0 

0 .143 

Valenzuela. Lbs Aneeies. NL 1984; Dwieni 
Gooden. New York. NL 1984. 

Whitaker. Det. 

Second Bra* 
2 4 1 

3 

0 

2 JSO 

Consecutive Strikeouts: « — Fernando Va- 
lenzuela, Las Angelas. NL and Dwight Goo- 

Brett. ICC. 

Third Bate 
8 22 5 

7 

1 

4 JIB 

den. New York. NL 1984. 

Heme Rum: 3 — Jim Palmer. BoUlmore. 

Ripken, Bal. 

Shortstop 

2 3 0 

0 

0 

0 JDO 

AL 1977. 

Wlnffld, N.Y. 

OatftoU 

8 24 4 

9 

0 

5 375 

Series Results 

Henderson. N.Y. 

4 • 1 

3 

0 

1 375 

Rice. Bo*. 

5 14 1 

4 

1 

1 350 

1933— American, 4-2 


Ressnrs laflsMsrs 

O AB R H HR RBI Pet 
0 0 0 0 0 0 ,- 


secand bonus) /> i* 

XWanp Ll, dilnaal *:34 (Ssecands bonus) Unff 

4. Roberta Sanonomf. ItotY. at 9:34 

X ChanM Broca, Frame, at 1T:00 
X Cocfl* Oaln. France, at 11:33 pr* 

7. imtada CMapaa. Itatv. at 12:14 rW* lASaUVMV 

o ta n 134 Leoasnoo tta Praiesstaual Goiters Asiad- 

1 MMuSf IKoJ 4 ’® SUZIE* toBa&CHssiewUa 

, Marta cSStTSk , S J?*""** „ 

XJsanMeLonoa.Franoe.9: 18 behind lead- 

"'iWtelirhlnn.oll-K 1 ROY FlOVd S32XB7V 

x Ltatv at 10-25 4 Pmb ' aam 

t m 11-15 S-UrtO-Man S29181S 

X Ctaital bnxa, France, at 11 : 1 s r _ hJ ._ ssosjlm 

X Cecils odln. France, at 11:48 ?■ 

7. ImeMa Chlaaoa. Italy, at 12:31 S 

X Hetocn Haoe. Netlxrkindx at 13 J1 J 1 ®®Fiditad Urntte S4U35 

9. Judltti Painter. Britain, a* 15:13 *■ 

IX Janetta Porta, UJk. at 15:17 ,a - FuBV 

SCORING 

I, Don PoWev. 7X39. X Coray Povfn.7tL5xl 
rfr Larry mim, HL 41.4, Rov RovtL 704X5, Umnv i 

lranHiUOIi Wodkins. 7X77. x Crata Stadler. 7ILB1 7, Keith 

— i 1 FsrwSi 7CJO, X Tom Watun. 70J1 9. Curtis 

nA *rnAi l 5 tremor. 70.94. Id Mark O'Meara. 7X9X 

Nodoaal Lctwoc AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 

LOS ANGELES— Asstansd Itut cantraci at 1. Antfv Boon, 377A 2. Greo Norman aw) 

German Rivera, third baseman, to Houston. Fred Cauptos. 27X4. X Mac OVradv. 2752. X 
Announced toot Sieve H0*w. Pftefier, doored Sandy LvIA 27X4. 4, Bill Giassen and Greg 
wahtan and has been given titauncanditianoi T«Hw. 2724. X Tam PuMssr, 3J2A. *. Joov 
release. Stodsior, 27Z1. MV Don PohL 271b. 

FOOTBALL DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 

NoHoael Football Lcaette i,Caivln Peeta.421. 2. David Edwards. J05. 

CINCINNATI— Stoned Joe Walter, often- 1 Lorry NeHnrv747.XHoieiriBtn.JM. 5. Mike 
sM tackle, and Dave Strabal, llnabacker.- ReidandJatk Renner. J57.7, Tim NorrixJSX 
KANSAS CITY— Signed Bruce King, run- X Daua Teweil. 7SC. 9. Wavne Levi, J4t IX 
nliw back, and ins Hillary, wide radevw. Torn XJJe. Jil. 

MIAMI— Stoned jeft Oaltonbodi, tackle: GREENS IN REGULATION 

Ron Davenport, runrtno bock;. Dan Sham l.Jaefc NieUaus, ji9.2,BrucaUetzke, J17. 
right end. end Roy Noble defensive back. 3, Carey Ravin. JBX 4, Demo Tewafl. An. X 
PITTSBURGH— Signed Oliver Whits. UoW John MohaHey and Calvin Peeta,-M7. 7, Roo- 
■nd. Terry Marichak. safety. «r Mottbta. Don PoW. and Doug TewSlLiW. 


1934— American, 9-7 

1935— American. 4-1 
1934— NatlonM. 4-3 
W37— American, 8-1 
1908— Noikwoi. 4-1 
W39— Americon. 3-1 
1940— National. 4-0 
)M1 — American, 7-3 


1959— NatlanaL 54 

1959— American. S-3 

1940— NatlanaL 5-3 

1940— National. 40 

1*41— National. 54 (10 Inntaosi 

19*)— Tied 1-1, 9 linnJnas, rota) 

19*2— National. 3-1 

lve7_Amerkxm, 9-4 

19*3— NollonaL X 3 

19*4— National. 7-4 

1945— tWttanal. 6-5 

!»*— Naftonai, J.t {IB inntaes) 

19*7 — National. 2-1 (IS Irmlnosl 
10*8 — National. 1-0 
IMF-National. *3 

1970 — National, 5-1 (12 Innings) 

1971— American. 6-4 

1472— National. *3 <10 (nninasf 
1V73— National. 7-1 
19?*— Naftonai. 7-2 
1975 — national. 4-3 

197*— Notional, 7-1 
1977— National. 7-5 
197*— -National. 7-3 

1979— National, »-* 

1980— NO I tonal. XI 

1981 — National. 34 

1982— National. 4-1 

1983— American. 13-3 

1984— Nai tonal. 31 

{National Lsapee toads. 35-18-1); 

Most Valuable Players 

(MVP vottafl began in 19431 
19*3 — Game 1. Mourv wills. Los Angetos, 
NL; Game 2: Leon wanner. Las Anodes. AL 
1963 —wime Mays. San Francisco. NL 
1*44 — Jonn Caihsen. Philadelphia. NL 
IKS — Juan Marlchal. San Francisco. NL 
1944 — Brooks Robinson. Baltimore. AL 
1947 — Tony PercL Cincinnati. NL 19*1 — 
Willie May x S4Hi F randsco, N L 1949 — Wlllli 
McCavev. San Francisco. NL I97Q — Carl 
Yasmemski. Boston. Al 1971 — Frank Rob- 
inson- Baltimore, AL 1972— JoeMoraan, Cin- 
cinnati. NL 1973— Bobby Bonds. San Fran- 
cisco, NL 1974 — Steve Garvey, Los Angelos. 
NL 1975— BUI Modfeck, CnlCOOA. NL t JO n 
Maltock. New Yark.NL. 197* — George F os- 
ier. Cincinnati. NL 1977 — Don Sutton. LU 
Anoetos. NL 197* — Sieve Garvev, Los An»e- 
les.NL 1*79 — Dave Parker, pinsburah. NL 
1988- Ken Grittev. Cincinnati. NL 1981 — 
Gary Conor. Montreal. NL I tti — Dave Con- 
cope ton. Cincinnati, NL 1983 — Fred Lvnn. 
Calllomto. AL 198* — Gary Carier.MonlreaL 
NL 


BlancpaiN 



MIAMI— Stoned jeft Ddtonboch. tackle: GREENS 19 

Ron Davenport, running bock; . Dan Shara. l.Jgcfc Niefctaux 7 
right end. and Roy Noble defensive tuck. 1 Carer Ravin. M. 

PITTSBURGH— Signed Otataf White. tHd John MohaHey and C 
■nd. Terry Marichak. safety. er Matthta. Don PoW 

ST. LOUIS— Slaned Lonnie Young, defen- 11 Andy Boon. MO 




pif ; ; 

/Mr- j? mi 


&lvtt frdtt. 

SEATTLE— NWl SCOUl. 
HOCKEY 


AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
i. Prank Conner, 2M& Z Bobby dampen, 
2X5X3. Craig Siadtar,2&4X 4, Rpy Flovd and 


SWEDEN— National team named Thomas Mams Hatatskv, 2X82, X Mike Donato and 
Grwtta coach, effective whenthe Vancouver Ron Strock. 2X87. 4 Chi Cfil Rodriguez. 2S.90. 9. 



forward's NHL eentrad expires In 1*87. 
Nattaaai Hockey League 
TORONTO— Started Brad SmtHtrignt wing. 
COLLEGE 


Dan Pool iv, 2X93. ia Robert Luftr, 28,95. 
PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1. Craig Sladfer.miTom Watson, aiXX 
Lomy Wadklne. 2D7. 4. ptillta Blackman 


CLEVELAND STATE— Extended the can* Larry Mire and Lorry NetaOA, J201. 7, Hal 
tract of KeiihMackev. men's bWkettMklicea- Sutton. 002. IX Four lied wilt 301. { 


byhsnd, are Irawig ihe Bfencpan WaBHBasfflrii. 


etw tor lour veon. 

FOROHAM— Wamad Chris «ano*dt«HiW 
athtotic director. 


EAGLES 

1. Carey Puvbt and WUu Black mar. 10. X i 
Curtta5tranee. uarrv Rtakw and Joey Slnde- 


MeNEESE STATE— Named Ted Brevtita tar, *. x Given lied wllh X 


athletic director- 

MICHIGAN TECH — Announced me resig- 


BIRDIES I 

1. Hal Sutton, 2*9. 2. CurHs S front*. 775 1 


nation of Bill Gappy, itmt basketball coach. CraigSiaaier.feXL Jaw Stadetor,2*7. X Proa 


effective, Aufl. 23. 


CauptasandRav Floyd. 2SX 7. Larrv Mize and | 



JC/AILUIR 


WAKE FOREST ^Announced Itw reskmo- Buddy Gardner. 252. 9, Larry Rfnker and Wtl- 
Nen of Cart Toey. men's basketball coach- Ue Weed, U6 








Page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, .WEDNESDAY, JULY 17. 1985 


OBSERVER 

Service With a Snarl 


Women Wine Makers Corking More U. S. Vintages 


PEOPLE 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — The United 
States now has a service econ- 


JLN States now has a service econ- 
omy. 

This is why the service you gel is 


even worse than the service you got 
in the last economy we had, which 
was a throwaway economy. 

In a throwaway economy, service 
is So rotten that people with things 
that need service are jeered at if 
they try to obtain service instead of 
throwing the stuff away. 

The new service economy carries 
things one step further, in this type 
of economy, you, as the customer, 
are expected to double as the ser- 
vice department for the company 
that's taking your money. 

Almost everybody must now 
know about the telephone service. 
Those who don't are lucky. 

The exciting idea behind the new 
service is to make the customer 
install his own telephone. It used to 
be that when a customer ordered a 
phone the company paid somebody 
to install it. then charged the labor 
cost to the customer. Now the cus- 
tomer not only has to install it 
himself, he has to pay the company 
Tor doing its work for iL 

□ 


involved in the manufacturing 
business m (he United States. 

So American business goes 
abroad and hires cheap foreign la- 
bor to provide more and more of 
U. S. consumer goods and the raw 
materials that go into them. 

Very quickly, traditions that 
once created pnde in workmanship 
fade and die. Industrial .America 
becomes not so industrial anymore, 
but more and more just an import- 
er and marketer of foreign goods. 
Cynicism about the product as 
junk becomes widespread. 

Financial markets, with their 
skittish daily judgments of what is 
valuable, begin to dominate corpo- 
rate thought The need to improve 
the corporate stock performance 
each quarter lessens the long-range 
importance once assigned to plan- 
ning for growth and long-term im- 
provement. and intensifies man- 
agement’s urge to make money, 
more and more money, at whatever 
cost in everything else. 

□ 


By Howard G. Goldberg 

Aten- York Tima Semcc 


T HERE is at least one wine 
maker in each of the United 


increasingly, top management 
jobs go not to people who know 
how to run airlines, make cars or 


build better light bulbs, but to 
those who know how to manroulaie 


Obviously 1 am irrational on this 
subject 

You'd be irrational, too, if you 
had flunked out of MIT for failing 
Doorbell Installation 101 and then, 
late in life, had been charged exor- 
bitantly for the privilege of learn- 
ing to install your own dandy new 
Touch-Tone telephone and — de- 
spite a dozen puncture wounds — 
had finally got the thing hooked up 
only to discover that the wire in 
your house was incompatible with 
the Touch-Tone phones, with the 
result that — with the result that 
the dandy new phone had to be 
undone, sent back to the shop as 
useless, and replaced by a rotary- 
dial phone, which had to be rein- 
stalled at a cost in time, patience 
and life force that — 

Do I sound as though I am com- 
ing unhinged? This is what the ser- 
vice economy does to people. 

The explanation lies in the ser- 
vice economy's nature. In a service 
economy there is little interest in 
manufacturing. Making things, in 
fact, has become a nuisance to 
American business because of hi gh 


those who know how to manipulate 
Wall Street, play the tax game so 
they can show even more profit 
□ext quarter, or finagle big bucks 
out of the Pentagon. 

There are a lot of ways to make 
money that have nothing to do with 
producing a useful product or ser- 
vice. There is the Wail Street merg- 


er game. Or you can take advantage 
of the tax law's freakishness and 


labor costs and other costly social 
tax and economic complications 


of the tax law's freakishness and 
turn footling enterprises into hefty 
profits. Some companies even use 
bankruptcy for profit. 

So we get the service economy. It 
makes very little that's useful. 
Blockbuster movies, best-selling 
books, junk foods, TV mini-series, 
summer football exploitations — 
junk. And it provides no very use- 
ful services, unless you think it use- 
ful to have accountants to wrestle 
with the tax authorities and lawyers 
to sue your doctor and vour news- 
paper. 

If the business community views 
the market as a junk bazaar, it’s 
probably natural for service to dis- 
appear. Only fools want service for 
junk. Yet some services remain es- 
sential. That is why we have ended 
up with telephone companies that 
charge us for doing their work. 


1 maker in each of (he United 
Slates's 1.246 wineries. Only a 
handful of them are women. Thai 
picture, however, is changing. 

Nod V. Bourasaw, publisher of 
The Northwest Wine Almanac, a 
monthly newspaper, said: “I 
wouldn’t be surprised if in the 
1990s a third of die West Coast 
wine makers were women." 

At many wineries, especially 
larger ones, individuals with the 
title “wine maker" enjoy the pow- 
er and the glory. Theirs are the 
basic decisions that may make or 
break a business. They are served 
by assistant wine makers, enolo- 
gists and laboratory personnel 
whose ranks are increasingly be- 
ing filled by professionally edu- 
cated and trained women, espe- 
cially on the West Coast. Some 
women have quit wineries to run 
their own operations. 

Depending on the size of tire 
winery, wine makers may do some 
or all of the following: decide 
what lands of wines wm be pro- 
duced (for example, chardonnay, 
cabernet sauvignon. meriot, 
chenin blanc) and in what propor- 
tion, and what styles are preferred 
(dry, near-dry, delicate, hearty, 
complex, simple). 

They also determine the degree 
of fruitiness and alcohol in the 
wines. The wine maker oversees 
the cultivation of the grapes as 
well as the picking, crushing, fer- 
mentation, pressing, racking (sep- 
aration of solids from new wine). 


to be the fust modern American 
woman wine maker not to own a 
winery. 

Statistics are hard to find, but 
records of the Wine Institute, a 
California trade association, indi- 
cate that in its 496 member winer- 
ies perhaps fewer than 20 women 
who are not owners are employed 
as wine makers. A directory of 
wineries published by Wines and 
Vines, an industry monthly, sug- 
gests that in 1984 there were 
about three dozen nationwide. 
Leon Adams, author of The 
Wines of America," said that fig- 
ure was probably about right 

By most accounts the No.] suc- 
cess story is Zdma Long, 41, Si- 
mi’s wine maker and a vice presi- 
dent of the company. She entered 
the wine business in 1970, after 
two years at Davis — she was the 
second woman in the enology 
program — when Mike Grgich, 
the Robert Mondavi Winery’s 

enologist, offered her a perma- 
nent part-time job as a laboratory 
technician record-keeper. 

In New York stale, wines co- 
produced by 26-year-old Ann 
Raffetto at Wagner Vineyards in 
Lodi in tije Finger Lakes region, 
have been well received, .consis- 
tently scoring high marks in last- 



Jen Crape/ Ika Nw Yo* Times 

Ana Raffetto of Cafiforma found success in New York. 


mgs, especially in New York City, a sweet young thing like you do- 
Many women attracted to win- mg in a place like this?" What she 


snaking in the early 1970s ran 
head-on into discrimination in 
job interviews, said Merry Ed- 
wards, 38, wine maker and a part- 
ner at Merry Vintners in Sonoma. 

A 1973 Davis graduate, she re- 
called that an attitude at male- 
dominated wineries was: “What's 


was doing was seeking an oppor- 
tunity not to spend years as a 
laboratory assistant, analyzing 
wine samples from tanks. It ar- 
rived: She became sole wine mak- 
er at Mount Eden Vineyards for 
three years, then for seven at Ma- 
laccas Creek Winery. 

Ough, at Davis, when told 
about Edwards's job-seeking ex- 


filtermg, barrel a ging , blending 
and timing of bottling. 


and timing of bottling. 

Women are highly visible in 
wineiy and vineyard manage- 
ment. marketing, public relations, 
education, counter sales and as 
sommeliers. Why are so few of 
than wine makers? 

One explanation is discrimina- 
tion. Another, said Dr. Coradius 
S. Ough. chairman of the eaoiogy 
and viticulture department at the 
University of California at Davis, 
is that the American wine-indus- 
try boom is fairly new. 

In 1965 the first woman re- 
ceived a bachelor of science de- 
gree in enology at Davis, widely 
regarded as the finest U. S. pro- 
gram in that field. The graduate. 
Mary Ann Graf, was wine maker 
for six years at the Simi Winery in 
Sonoma County. She is believed - 



perience. said: “We post jobs on a 
board and 10 to 15 years ago a 
few wineries said ‘Don't send us a 
woman.' So we didn’t post the 
job, and we.told the wineries, *We 
can’t accept this.’ As time went 
on, employers discovered that 
women were strong enough to 
drag a heavy hose." 

Women constitute about 25 
percent of the 154 undergraduates 
m the Davis department, which 
has 14 faculty members, four of 
threw women. At California State ■ 
University at Fresno, which has 
the second largest U. S. enology 
program, 16 women are under- 
graduates. 

Zdma Long is reputed as an 
experimenter and innovator. Her 
wines, which steadily undergo 
style changes, have drawn praise. 
Chardonnay and nesting pro- 
duced at the smalt (3,000 cases) 
Long Vineyards, which she oper- 
ates with her former husband 
Robot, are so popular that there 
are waiting lists for them. 

“There are a lot of women as- 
sistants posed on the edge of be- 


New York Times Service 


Tam) McCvtby/TTw N*wYcrt Tiroes 

Zdma Long has made her reputation as an innovator. 


coming wine makers — if* just a 
matter of time.” she said. Long 
attributed her prominence partly 
to having been twice in expanding 
businesses at the right time — at 
the prestigious Mondavi winery 
when Mondavi was aggressively 
promoting wine, and at Simi. 
which in 1981 was bought by the 
French conglomerate Moel-Hen- 
nessy. Die former owner. Schief- 
fdin & Co., which Moct bought, 
had asked her to oversee a three- 
year, S5.5- million program of ex- 
pansion and renovation, and 
Most kept her in charge. In 19S4. 
Simi produced 150,000 case; of 
five varietal*. 

.Ana Raffetto felt ber destiny 
lay ir. the Finger Lakes rather 
than he: native California, where 
many fellow Davis students 
stayed creating heavy competi- 
tion for better jobs, in 19RI. aitir: 
graduation, she took a harvest job 
at Glecora Wine Cellars ir. Dun- 
dee. New York, as a “cellar rat" 
— a functionary who vjiouldeis 
hoses, cleans the grape press, 
monitors fermentation and sani- 
tizes tanks. 

In 1983. she and John L. Her- 
bert. 35, were hired as co-wine 
makers by the small, growing 
Wagner Vineyards. She said Bill 
Wagner, the’ proprietor, gave 
than full shared responsibility 
for every step of list' operation, 
from determining when :b harvest 
through deriding a hen wine w as 
to be released for sale. 

For Raffetto. “the fun is in de- 
fining and altering a style of wine, 
in desi gnin g methods of produc- 
tion — in not working by formu- 
la. as larger wineries are forced to 
do." In 1984. she and Herbert 
produced 18.000 cases invoking 
10 varietals and five blends. 

No woman has ever been presi- 
dent. vice president or secretary- 
treasurer of the 2JSQ0 member 
American Society for Enology 
and Viticulture, the wine makers' 
professional organization, ac- 
cording to Mike S! Nury, the enol- 
ogist who left as president last 
month. Susan Read quality con- 


Second Puerto Riccit- 

Earned Jfiss Vnivene. 


Deborah Carthy-Deu of Puerto 
Rico has been earned Miss Uts- 
vero !9$5. wiirreng $175,000 nj 
cash and prize* and a movie screen 
icsL Caxthy-Deu. 1 9. who majors is 
theater at the University of Puajo 








1r» *iKnAdA| 

Miss Universe 1985. 


troi manager at Canandaigua f 
Wine Co. in upstate -New York . is j 


Wine Co. in upstate -New York, is 
to become chairman of the soci- 
ety's eastern section. Women are 
board members of the society, 
Nuiy said — adding that "the 
board members run the society" 
— but none has ever won the 
group's annual merit award. 


Rico, is the second woman from 
Puerto Rjc' to wm the Miss Uni- 
,en>e title. Marisol Mabref won is 
1970. Mis* Spain. Teresa Sanchez, 
20. was second. Miss Zaire, Bcnfta 
Mureka. !£. came in third. 

□ 

UK Derickson. the purser aboard 
the TWA night hijacked to Beirut, 
used ber personal credit card to 
finance the jet’s flights between Al- 
geria and Lebanon, airline officials 
say Newsweek magazine quotes 
the TWA pilot. Captain John Ties- 
trake a* calling the incident ‘The 
most bizarre episode" of the hijack- 
ing. Testroke said when the hijack- 
ers demanded that the jet be refu- 
eled at Algiers, airport offiriab 
refused because TWA did nof have 
a charge account with them. When 
an airport crew member began 
shouting for a Shell oil company 
credit card. Derickson pulled one 
out of her purse and the Algerians 
used it to charge 6.000 gallons 
<22.720 liters; of fuel. The same 
thing happened when the piane re- 
turned to Algiers from Beirut, Tes- 
trake said. Derickson. who 
praised for her heroism during the 
hijacking, wound up with about 
Si 1,000 dollars in charges. A TWA 
spokeswoman confirmed the inci- 
dent and said the airline would pay 
Denckson’s bill. 


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Beautiful pied a terra, 2 rooms, 
87 Ktm. qf wfidi Sving 50 sun. 


• The Race For • 
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• Japan: Why American 
Express Is Going From 
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• NATO's Chief 

Warns Europe 




RUST CLASS SEWKE 
ASSURED eVBCYMOn 


CARRHOUR BE L*ODEQN. 2 roara, 
50 sqjiv. tedwn, bathroom, diesng 
room, comptalety rwovotodL FSOhOtt 
Cosh payment a mus. Ready July 
24*. trt 354 461a r 


NOW ON SALE AT 
Aa INTKNATIONAL 
NEW5STANDS. 



IH US SOLVE 
YOUR PROBLEMS: 

Expert careidtonb are avtdabte 
in a wide range of Reich 
from apiaftura la zoology. 
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4mm n propds end product counter- 
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MONEY TRKS? 


prevxxaty part of natioraioed French 


seats fetAutar s in M dcfe tan, For 
VESJ Irerost in one of A mede o's roast) ^ 


other deve l oper in out Stale, 

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Motet id aroUde in Engftsh. FrarcK 
(Jmnoi fin 2356, Horcfd Tribune. 
92521 Newly Cede*. Fnm 


lNTBtNATlONAL 


VAN CLEEF & ARPF.LS 


459 SyRrortDD Street 
frWbpgme, Vk. 300ft, AomAl 
T et (02) 663 6061. 




DIAMONDS 


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DI AMONDL AND 

The iagest stacroom n 

Antwerp, Mamond City 

Appetmaratr 33A. Teh 323^343611 


GENEVA 

SWITZaiAND 
Fufl Service 
is our Business 


• tnternanond law tores 

• MreExu. telephone and nfax - 


OFFICE SERVICES 


• Tiimdrewi and uarahnl nram 

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adaMAnon of Swat am fanip 


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BUSWSS CENTm 

fumUmd Executive Offices 
"redele «Mi Seu'etukd, TeteiC 


Rapreeeefcnlun l OteerFacgB 


BUSfhfiESS ADVISORY 
SBWICB SA 


7 Muzy, IZF G&^MT - 
Teb 36 05 40 Tetou 23342 - 


AJ8STBDAM Euro tames Center 
99 10 15 CH Amsterdam 
TeHffiffl 227035. Teta 161B3 
ATHHC i Executive Services, Athens 
Tower B Sutfe 50ft, AAleni 61ft 
Tafc Opjj 7796 23Z Trie* 216343 


'i fciiejo Chamber^ ?13 

Namocn 9art. Bomba)- 4CG 021. 
J* 244949. Telex: 01T6897. 
BRUSSSSs 4. Rue de la Prtsse 
1000 Bruneh. Trt 217 83 60 
TbIctt. 

DUBAb P.0 Bax 1515. ONATA 
Aefne Centra Oaha UAE 
Tet 214565 Te£T4§91! 
lOTOOFfc 110 The Srond, 


London WC2R OAA 
Tefe Bl) 636 891ft Tbr- 24973 
MADWi C/Or«w W 6S4. 


PRWOPAUTY 
OF MONACO 


MADRID: OOraree hf 6S4, 

78020 Madrid. Tet 270 56 03 or 
270 66 04. Tab* 46642 
MIAN; Wo 8ocmcao 1 

20123 Monja 86 7539/80 59 279 
3303/3 

ICW YORK 575 Macfccn Avenue 
New Yorit, NY 10022. Tet 012} 60S 
aZOft Mm 125864 f 2376W 
PARIS: EOS, 15 A*pob Victor ttno 
75116 Pro TeL 502 18 00 ^ 

T«btt 620892F, 

KWfc Via Sonia 7ft 00198 tare. 
Tet 85 32 41 . 844 3070. 

Telex: 61345B 

SMGAPORE; 111 North Bridge Rd. 
#11-04/06 Perennfa PW^Pora 
0617. Tel: 3366577. Hx: 36^3. 


Udnco Buriwete Sereicre Qatf 
LancaHaus amKaUnAs^xit 
jusanianrtraM 22 
6000 Frankfurt am MrinT 7 


T*6M9(fo61 
«a« 69-59 57 » - 


Telefax: 69-59 57 
Tetet 414561 


zurich-zurich-zwbch 


roan. For further detois please cortao 

AGHS 

26 bis Bd Princtfsa Q x rij tt u 
Mente Ccjjp, MC 98000 Mmeo 


rtMIOfr Rtarmqa 32, 8001 Zuridi 
Td: 01/214 61 n 
Telex, 812656/812981. 


L'iF/iHyl*'. 


Tht.813.fiH 




EXKUTWE SBtVKB 

Fham, telex andfJ business jerwas. 


INVESTMENTS 


fiftwtrud, 29, fWhw fl, 
taw^ourst TeL 3B-213B1. 
DFHCSAUJ. 


— WOR LB i ATJO IS JEWELI.ERS — 
EXCLUSDT JLW"ELS & B ATCHES 


Natoi lacol busmest agents are wait- 
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generate 


LONDON 

' , 133 NLTT BOND STREET. 

TEL.: 01-191 144:)3 OPEN SATURDAYS- 


SOUTH AMERICA WORMATON 
Oaaeel, refidjle oonsuteig far 
2nd kyefhood. re adenca penw, 
mduroSzohan in a stabte country. 
tacSvidud uridis can be careiderarf. 
Pleae write toe Bra 2173, IJLT, 




F ried ri dwtr. 1ft 6000 Frankfurt / Mam 
or tet WM21/551822 


ir~ll :l 





[M 771 702 Tel (I 
1 77424 Telex 


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1.- M 

iP/CyT. 


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