Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats



The Global Newspaper 
The HaguataiAlireeiile 




INTERNATIONAL 



^ ba ^iiS d k h f«^ 


WEAlHSt DATA < 


No. 31,856 


toHMoeie 


id 4 l1uj Jtfg 

^ I S Housed? rI**** 


3 Settlers 


^tive ctSfilW 

ualicir. of ruT^ W)ki 
«rodnwr.! !oa> ll ! niro £j 

r. ^ flfiS 

R-mu, and CuS fr”WrJ 

^■niv-fiSiSg* 

□ 


■'< ’ c- - lo »► 
^niT:c.i Th^rocl 0 ^ 1 *^ 
’8*:rri ir, ‘.he USV ati!^ * 
J ?vH ,.ve j:» singk «,v*V 

™V !> L wS& 

^Swev before. for f^; 

5 hKe- 4 ac-i. 1 aii.lwyr Ail 

:;np^-; in Ugg ^vj 
he pb^J 

V '’ vtt “' t,f “P lOO.OOrjpo^ 

D 

S>dw> BWdk Barron * 

!ht* \f .:*. L« -ucr Mab^- p 
! :.*!.:> 1 :. prtmkmwp 
!iil.»’!; ;:: r.-l .rrt f.T j «§ji 
an-i no r-r-HT. ^.lao. k 
u ,t> jr r- ■ »*j ;.t 0LTi4er^| C 
'T: ihc oft; 

-* r. a-. ■', V»Ybi 
•ra-.-r : .ra v h^diina betas! 

rot*". ;:.uvJ ’>rr jncsmsb 
«... .•:•!■. si u Anm- 

• *X Ma-.ii. 



gi ; xlTOST\XFE ,J 

™ - '. T R A SCO 

■ THE JA3C059ME 

'* "i ■■■•0 Vr*lj? 


I **-...• 

£..j: 


#►-> --a - 
m 

— "i 


i*QHM 

1 A 


, v ' -t 

v>«|M .'• 

; P .».#•- o 
*-*«W - ■'•' 

y!i* -, ‘ 
r 

‘Ai 

■»»..’-• a; 

t ' 


' '/••• 

«* “*• 


-•'■ : :i'4 :--»«i 

%f.*> :.‘.j. ! »fa“ 

.•:<■ Ij3> 
Irv J lab 

wbsci nw®& 


- . ■ r ~Srt 
■ T - i-.sitTTBc 

MERCEDES SPEC# 

FOR USA + Mg* 

rso s MCS.W*® 

NASSAS EtfOTf 


^Mrt'KSgB 


in Israel 

lllfcre Hcece 
lighter Terms for 
Aik¥^mAn^ 


By . William Ckibornc 

' Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM — An IsraeU 
codrt sentenced three Jewish set- 
ifersconvjc£ai of murdering Arabs 
io mandatcay life imprisonment 
Mmuiay. It banded down light sen- 
tences foe 12 other members of a 
Jewish underground organization 
dial operated in the Isradi-occu- 
p«ed west Bank for four years. 

'The crimes for which the settlers 
wen sentenced included the 1980 
attempt to assassinate three Pales- 
tinian west Bank mayors; the 1983 
murder of three Arab students in 
Hebron; the 1984 planting of 
bombs on five civilian Arab buses 
in East Jerusalem; the planting of 
bombs al mosaues in Hebron; and 
an unsuccessful consmracy to Mow 
up the Dome of the Rode Mosque 
on the Temple Moant m Jerusa- 
lem’s Old uty. 

The panel of three judges handed 
down saliences ranging from three 
to 'seven years for 1 1 of the settlers. 

They could have received terms 
of up to 20 years. One of those 
convicted of participating in the 
attack on the Arab mayors walked 
out of the courtroom when all of Ins 
three-year sentence was suspended 
except for time already served 
awaiting trial 

The defendants cheered and 
threw their arms around one anoth- 
er in the East Jerusalem District 
Court. The courtroom was packed 
with supporters from West Bank 
settlements who proclaimed the de- 
fendants “heroes of Israel.'* 

Supporters and attorneys for the 
settlers said they would press for a 
presidential pardon for all the de- 
fendants. ■ - 

President Chaim Herzog has said 
that he would consider no appeals 
for pardon until after the sentenc- 
ing, and then only on a case-by- 
case bass. 

Some of the defendants saim die 
judges' chairs at the bench and gave 
interviews before television cam- 
eras as Hannan Pcrat. a leader of 
the fundamentalist settler move- 
ment, Gush Emunim, passed 
around a box of peaches. 

The 13-month trial was deeply 
emotive for the Israeli pobfic as the 
defendants were vigorously sup- 
ported by leaders of the Jewish set- 
tlement movement in the West 
Bank and by many members of 
Israel's parliament from the Likud 
Moc and other rightist parties. 

There was sympathy for the set- 
tlers in May, when Israel released 
1,150 Arab prisoners, some of them 
convicted of terrorist murders, in 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6 ) 



Meaachem Livni, who was sentenced Monday in Jerusa- 
lem to Gfe imprisonment for attacks on West Bank Arabs. 


U.S. MUtury Opposes 
Changes in POW Accord 


By Leslie H. Gelb 

New York Tunes Service . 

WASHINGTON — The Joint 
Chiefs of Staff have recommended 
against LLSL ratification of interna- 
tionally agreed revisions of die 
1 949 Geneva Conventions on treat- 
ment of com batant* and war vic- 
tims, administration jrfffcinh say. 

The intent of the revisions is to 
wihatme humane treatment of com- 
batants and civilians dnring -war. 
But the mam conceal of the Joint 
Griefs is that the revisions, or pro- 
tocols, as they are known, would 
have the effect of legitimizing na- 
tional liberation movements and 
terrorists, granting them combat- 
ant and prisoner of war status. 

While the matter is still under 
review, the prevailing view is that 
President Ronald Reagan is unfike- 
ly to iecopmead .Sena^ra^ca- 
tLcm o£.-ih6.mhiidEAls-dea&g^^ 
‘warfare in the face of such objec- 
tions by the military. 

The Carter administration 
signed the two protocols in 1977 
with the tmHflrefanrftng that ratifi- 
cation would await a formal study 
by the Joint Chiefs. More than 100 
nations have signed the protocols 
and more than 40 have ratified 
them. Only formal ratification 
gives the treaty legal force. 

State Department o ffic ia ls said 
that Denmark and Norway had 
ratified the protocols and that Brit- 
ain, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, 
and the Netherlands were moving 
toward ratification. The officia ls 
said they did not expect France to 
ratify Protocol I and did not expect 
Israel to ratify either protocol 


Published 'With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

* ^ ZURICH, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


Foes Seek 
To Charge 
Marcos 

AHegeFamify 
Invested Abroad, 
l Biot Economy 

[' By 'William Branigan , 

Washington Pan Service 

MANILA — Opposition legjsla- i 
tors Bed an impeachment resolu- ) 
tion Monday against President 
Ferdinand t, Marcos, accusing -^ 
him of ‘‘penmiting'and abetting^ 
ffopnomir sabotage” through large • 
overseas investments by relatives, . 
friends and government officials. ■> 

The resouition, the first suefai 
hwbiw miriatrH wgartic t Ur M»t. * 

cos In his 20 years in power, was i 
filed by 35 opposition members of 1 
the National Assembly. Afterward, ; 
the president gave a speech on the , 
state of the netinw to open the sec- • 
ond regular sissioa of the 200 -scat ' 
legislature. . 

The impeachment move fot- t 
lowed press disclosures in the Unit- 
ed States that prommeni FQipmos - 
have channeled tens of millions of 
dollars intoAmerican investments 
through holding companies. 
Among those cited as maintaining 
large US. investments were Presi- , 
doit Marcos’s wife, Imdda, two 

qijwiigt wimbw* and cweril rinw ■' 



OPEC Shifts Focus From Output Cut 

Shaikh Ahme d Znlpi Vamani. the oil miniaer of gmfi Arabia, Mo nday at the meeting of 

oil producers in Vienna that he saw no need for a cutback in production now, but be stressed 
the importance of price differentials for heavy crude. There seemed to be some support. Page 9. 


Protocol I deals with interna- 
tional armed conflicts, and Proto- 
col fl with nfflijmerniRinMl con- 
flicts. The administration's 
problems are with Protocol I, 
winch would give regional political 
groups as -the Organization of 

African Unity the authority to 
judge whether liberation move- 
ments such as the African National 
Congress are legitimate parties to 
an <wrm»H confli ct, thn« granting 
their fighters the wme measure of 
protection as regular soldiers. 

Critics contend that other provi- 
acms in Protocol f are worded so 
vagndy that the distinctions be- 
tween guerrillas and soldiers would 
be binned. As a result, they say, 
guerrillas could claim the same pro- 


ffigs pottle Lines Harden in South Africa 

I™. Protocol I —Naijy ^ of pas- 

[jSS W OTCe ^ eems to Be Botha’s Only Way of Exerting Control 


mated bjr members of Mr. Marcos’s 
ruling New Society Movement. 

In his 40-minute speech before 


war and thus avoid prosecution un- 
der c riminal law for what might 
otherwise .be_ponridaed terrorist 

“%c Fenti^of^' State. Depart- 
ment, and otter agencies have yet 
to take positions on the protocols. 
But officials said that the adminis- 
tration had told the International 
Red Cross, under whose a uspi ces 
the conference to negotiate the pro- 
tocols was held from 1974 to 1977, 
dial the derision would be made 
“tn a matter of weeks” and that the 
administration had “grave prob- 
lems” with the documents. 

Perhaps the most powerful argu- 
ment against ratification on any 
terms comes from a commentary to 
be published soon by Douglas J. 
Frith, deputy assistant secretary of 
defense for negotiations policy. 

He wrote of Protoad L “It 

(Costumed os Pane 7, CoL 3) 


the Rata cang Parnhansg, or Na- 
tional Assembly, Mr. Marcos ap- 
pealed for unity to save the repub- 
lic. A Commnnist rebel insurgency, 
has growing in strength in the past 
year. 

Mr. Marcos said that “before we 

r 7 d about who is going to run 
country, let us make sure the 
country is saved by us. Otherwise; 
there may be no republic to quarrel 
about” 

Bat die president made scant ref- 
erence to two issues preoccupying 
the legislators^ the h\vestments- 
scandm 'aiiid a^move % Mr. Mar- 
cos’s own {tarty to abrogate a mili- 
tary bases pact with the ( Untied 
States. ' - • 

Mr. Marcos noted near the end 
of his' speech that he had ordered 
an investigation into allegations of 
“hidden wealth” held by Filipino 
officials and private individuals 
“irrespective of party." » 

Regarding (he dispute over US. 
compensation for nsetof two mili- 
tary bases in the Philippines, Mr. 
Marcos indicated that be would 
handle die matter personally as the 
country's “foreign policy formula- 
ror. n Defense Minister Juan Ponce 
Emile put forward a resolution in 
the assembly on Friday seeking to 
abrogate the bases treaty. 


By Alan Cowell 

*y New York Tunes Service 

^ JOHANNESBURG — A state 
of emergency came into force Sun- 
amid South Africa’s rising po- 
jfittcal turmoil and with h came a 
that bat ltb linm had huntenwi 

fiahd that any residual hope of dia- 
;jbgue had withered. 

' The proclamation, many South 
•^African academics and cammenta- 
. 'tors said, implied an acknowledg- 
ement by President Pieter W. Botha 
gthat the ootmtxy has failed to ex- 
atend ftritmi political dump s be- 
fyo nrifeeo ^e of Indian and mixed 
-raaSuGs&cnt to .what he tenuis the 
moderate leaders of the 23 million 
blacks.'. 

The message seemed to be that 
farce, which has been used by 
South Africa beyond its borders (o 
mold foreign policy, is now also 
accepted — welcomed by some 
whites — as the only vehicle of 
domestic control 

“It is an admission." said John 
Barnet of the South African Insti- 
tute of International Affairs, “that 
the situation has got out of con- 
trol" 

For some black activists that 
might seem a victory since the un- 
rest and defianoe in black town- 
ships have provoked the authori- 
ties, from this perspective, into 
admitting a lack of ideas or willing- 


ness to meet the demands of black 
protest. 

But the imnwAiatg odds are 
stacked against black defiance 
more heavily than before, while the 
months of protest have led to rival- 
ries and retribution within some 


The state of emergency involves a 


townships. 
As Mr. 


Botha announced the 


| jjjgg A-Bomb in War and Politics: At First, Just a Better Weapon 


w® gf By Walter Pincus 

- j- sf — Washington Poet Service 

■ ' - WASHINGTON — In the years 

; that fallowed the 1945 explosion of 

: L**** V atomrc bombs over Hiroshima and 

It ^T*ar _ XT- .u n:. nn . 


10 rtf* , 

transc® 


Na gasaki, military thinking was 
turned on its bead. 

The U-S. government repeatedly 

Hie Bomb 


;me>M -y* 

■f* ' •« ** 
*•- 

u • 

%_ ’s.' . 

r i 

1 , ' 






Secondoffour articles 


-ous-SSS 

RANGs ofJsjjc.'- 

NE# 


considered in the late 1940s and 
early 1950s nsmg nuclear weap- 
ons to deal with a crisis. 

The three branches of military 
service competed fiercely to come 
19 with ways to exploit the bomb. 

The postwar years also saw the 
suit of arms-control talks, which 
were unsuccessful and what was 
subsequently called “nudear diplo- 
macy” — the threat to use atomic 
weapons as a means of ending a 
UJJ.-Communist confrontation. 

Perhaps the greatest difference. 


at least in attitude, between thatoa 
and the present time was the as- 
sumption that the use of nuclear 
womens was virtually inevitable. 

The main enemy against which 
they would be used was, of course, 
the Soviet Union. Soviet scientists 
had begun a crash program to bmld 
nudear weapons. 

At the United Nations, the Unit- 
ed States made an effort to per- 
suade Moscow to get along without 
the bomb, but it got nowhere 

McGcorge Bundy, national secu- 
rity affairs adviser to President 
John F. Kennedy, said in a recent 
interview that ms research for a 
history of the atomic age showed 
that Stalin was “absolutely deter- 
mined" to get the bomb because he 
believed that “the Americans have 
upset the eqmUbriwn.” 

, in (be United States, some offi-. 
cm and scientists expected the 
next war to be nudear, and they set 
to work to prepare for it 

Hans A. Betoe, for example, said 
in an interview in 1979 that he and 
other physicists who had worked 
on the bomb at Los Alamos, New 


Mexico, thought atomic weapons 
would be used within 10 years. 

Like others, he disliked the 
atomic bomb, but he returned from 
private life in 1950 to hdp develop 
the far worse hydrogen bomb, fear- 
ful that a Soviet breakthrough on 


was one of ignorance about the 
potential devastation. Many politi- 
cal and military leaders did under- 
stand the jmpkmtinns- 
Even before the first bomb was 
dropped on Hiroshima, some peo- 
ple — Secretary of War Henry L 


If within fire years there is no international 
agreement, ... the world will head directly 
into an atomic weapons arms race. 

General Dwight D. Eisenhower 
In 1946 study for Pentagon 


such a weapon first would put the 
United States in peril 

The atomic bombs were based 
on fission, creating explosive ener- 
gy by spHuing atoms. In the more 
powerful hydrogen bomb, the ex- 
plorian is crcaicd by fusion, in 
which atoms are forced together, 
triggered by a fission explosion. 

It would be wrong to sngzesuhat 
the early period of the nudear era 


Stimscm, for example — forecast 
many of the diplomatic problems 
with the Soviet union that nudear 
weapons would create, and that we 
live with to this day. 

A striking example was a paper 
submitted m January 1946, five 

nvyithcaff*? Jfipot] iflifr wndqTgd by 

General Dwight D. Eisenhower. 
Buried until recently in the Nation- 
al Archives, the once “top secret" 


document outlined the army's 
views on the “effect of atomic 
weapons on national security.” It 
foresaw almost all that occurred in 
the next four decades. 

The Eisenhower report con- 
tained the following mam points: 

• If within five years there was 
no international agreement to pre- 
vent other nations from gening the 
bomb, an a gree ment that induded 
unlimi ted on-site inspections, “the 
world would head dmctly into an 
atomic weapons armaments race,” 
with assurance of world supremacy 
for the nation that won. 

• The United States, winch at 
that time had a nuclear monopoly, 
faced “true peril" in “a world of 
unrestricted atomic bombs.” 

• “With atomic weapons, a na- 
tion must be readyto strike the first 
blow if needed. The first Wow or 
series of first Wows may be the 
last” 

• An “atomic war will very likely 
be a war of surprise and surely one 
of national survival" 

• “Two d icc T ,itlft d nations each 

(Confined on Page 5, CoL I) 






<4 


.. •''■oscSS 0‘ v 




INSIDE 

■ Private negfigeace and inade- 
quate public preca ut i ons are 
mentioned in the Italian dam 
disaster. Page I 


Computer 'Bulletin Boards’ Are Thriving in U.S. 


ByT.R. Reid 


The Snes k Warsaw for visas 
are running longer than those 
for food Page* 

■ China and land are stepping 

up trade and technological co- 
operation. P*ge7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ British Telecom is to join a 
voiture with AT&T to provide 
communications between New 
York and Leaden. Page 9. 

■ US. corporate profits appear 

to have fallen moderately m the 
second quarter, according to 
economists. Page 9. 


WASHINGTON — At 5 PM. each after- 
noon, as soon as the long-distance .telephone 
rates go down, computer networks crane alive 
all over the United States. 

Americans of all agesc is every corner of the 
country, are connecting their personal comput- 
ers to telephones and talking to one another 
over electronic “bulletin boards,” a new form of 
mass communication that is cheaper, more ac- 
cessible and less regulated than almost any 
otter national medium. 

Until recently, these electronic networks were 
largely the preserve of youthful computer buffs, 
or “backers,” who at tunes use the networks for 
unlawful purposes. Last week seven New Jersey 
teen-agers were arrested and charged with using 
a bulletin board to plan computer crimes. 

Kit in the past year or so>, the bulletin board 
system has entered the American mainstream. 
There are now thousands of bulletin boards 


by ana profession. 

Religious fundamentalists exchange dectron- 
ic prayers over the “Computes Fra Christ" 
system. Wine snobs debate their favorites on 
“On-line Wine.” Pornography fans tap into 
“Micro-Smut-” 

liberal activists plan marches on “Voice of 
Peace,” while rightist extremists post bate mes- 
sages on the “Aryan Nations Liberty Net" 

There are bulletin boards providing legal, 
financial and psychiatric advice. Most big cities 
have at least one dating service bulletin board, 
and comp uterize d romance seems to be flour- 
ishing. Hundreds of computer owners phoned in 

Geoigp and Debbie Stickles of Grand Prairie, 
Texas, who met and courted on a bulletin board 
while living hundreds of miles apart. 

“This is an enormously important informa- 
tion resource; and it's available for anyone.” 
said Ralph Nader, who has poshed for creation 


of a national network of consumer bulletin 
boards. 

“Not many people can buy a big national 
magazine or a TV network," Mr. Nader said. 
“But anybody with a computer and a $100 
program can start one of three systems. It’s the 
lowest barrier to entry of any mass communica- 
tion medium.” - • 

David Hughes, a retired anny officer in Colo- 
rado Springs who is known as a pioneer and 
heavy user of bulletin boards, emphasizes the 
political use of the medium. 

“Tom Paine would have first published his 
‘Common Sense* on a local computer bulletin 
board," he saic^ referring to the pamphlet urg- 
ing American colonists to seek independence 
from En gland. 

Mr. Hughes asserted that the computer net- 
work could represent a new form of town meet- 
ing suited to a large country. 

“Penanal computers will be used as naturally 

(Confined 00 Page 3, Col I) 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

state of emergency Saturday, a 
young black woman in the town- 
ship of Dudpza, east of Johannes- 
burg was being burned to death by 
fellow blacks, -kicked- and -beaten 
even as she sought to put out the 
flames. She was accused of collabo- 
rating with the authorities. 

Such incidents, given coverage 
on South Africa's stale-con troBed 
television, make it easier for Mr. 
Botha to argue that his proclama- 
tion was designed to restore order 
rather than to sufyug&te those who 
win not accept bis notions of limit- 
ed political change, which is based 
on the ideas of racial and ethnic 
separation that inspired apart- 
heid's architects. 

Yet ccfi tonal writers and com- 
mentators said Sunday that the 
state of emergency alone would not 
solve the country’s problems, while 
its proclamation spreads damage 
beyond its evident blade targets. 


23 Are Hurt 
hi 2 Blasts in 
Copenhagen 

The Aetedaud Prerr 

COPENHAGEN — Bombs de- 
stroyed the office of an American 
airline company and damaged a 
synagogue and a Jewish home for 
the elderly Monday. Twenty-three 
persons were injured, at least three 
trf them seriously. 

Islamic Jihad, a terrorist group, 
claimed responsibility for tbe 
bombings. An anonymous caller to 
the Associated Press in Beirut said 
that the attacks were in retaliation 
for Israeli raids on villages in 
southern Lebanon on Sunday. The 
call could not be authenticated. 

Tbe caller added: *3f certain 
countries believe they are free from 
our strikes, Jet than know that 
sooner or later we shall reach the 
bean of the White House, tiie 
Kremlin, the Etysie, 10 Downing 
Street, Jerusalem and the head- 
quarters of all Western and Arab 
leaders who spin around the impe- 
rialist universe.” 

The first bomb destroyed the 
ticket office of Northwest Orient 
Airlines, tbe only office of an 
American airline m Copenhagen. 
The office is near the Tivoli amuse- 
ment park. 

At least one other device explod- 
ed in a passageway bordering the 
Copenhagen Synagogue and the 
neighboring Meyers Minne Nurs- 
ing Home, m a narrow street in the 
central city. The heavy wooden 
doors of the synagogue were blown 
down. 

Police said that the victims in- 
duded 10 Danes, three Americans, 
two Foies, a Briton, four Algerians, 
a German living in Denmark, 2 
Jordanian and a Swede. 

Hospital officials said that most- 
of the injured had shock and minor 
in juries ■ 

A worker at the home fra tbe 
elderly said that at least seven of its 
residents were injured but none 
was believed to have been seriously 
hurt. 


muzzling of the press and ihe be- 
stowing of near-absolute power on 
individual members of the security 
forces. 

The authorities, according to the 
Sunday Tunes of Johannesburg, a 
pro-government newspaper, now 
have (be power to impose “total 
censorship” in 36 magisterial dis- 
tricts in and around Johannesburg 
and in tbe restive eastern Cape: The 
police, an editorial asserted, win be 
shielded from proper scrutiny, and 
rumor will replace news. 

“Life under states of emeigency 
can never be normal," the editorial 
said. “They are temporary, desper- 


ate measures to save life and prop- 
erty. Lasting stability wffl only be 
achieved when the purposes of vio- 
lent radicals are defeated by the 


counterattraction of true social and 
economic justice for alL" 

The twice-weekly City Press, 
which has a black readership, ex- 
pressed its reaction differently. On 
the front page, under the headline 
“Comment," it left a blank space, 
then declared: 

“Since the state of emergency 
severely restricts our right to com- 
ment on events in the areas affected 
by the state of e m e r g e n c y, you Mil 
never know what we had to say 
about it. This comment column is 
(Continued on Ptege - !, CoL 5) 


l|rML LS 1,70000 Nmwj-teHlir. 

Nwrm JOS Uy 15101 m Obub — OTCQ U> 

Uw — USBOm jBHfan 4jofk Ana* .Wfe 

Mg— (M, s* iftM O*"- — ASOfc* 

tWh — cum vT:. miotMnd-Tor 

Cun* CCUO ..... asn j S*UAid»q_AO0t 

onrt-uobb. — ”Dfc* 

fep to* s-«*. 

Mwd 700 FM 5- u u»l . IJOS* 

fnma, fcflOF *“*“* 1056,1 Tm> UOOD* 

Onmr-]fllU( BO* T«»W_T£«1» 

GmtmUHP. Mnocec — S300*i UAL &SDM 

<**»_— J9Ck- NUmM-ITSU US 
hn its to* Nfm._ —^1701 Ycpafeaa — MU 

™ ESTABLISHED 1887 


Activists 
Seized in 
S. Africa 

Botha Defends 
Curbs, WiU Not 
Call Parliament 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — The po 
lice, acting Monday under South 
Africa’s newly imposed stale of 
emergency, detained four promi- 
nent black clerics and a number of 
other activists in ibe eastern Cape 
province, reporters and monitoring 
groups said. 

President Pieter W. Botha reject- 
ed a call from opposition leaders ic 
reconvene Parliament to discuss 
the unrest. 

Mr. Botha said in a statement 
that it was time for action, not 
debate, and added: “It is and re- 
mains tbe responsibility of the gov- 
ernment to ensure the safety of its 
people. My government will not 
shirk that responabihiy/’ 

Bishop Desmond Tutu, a black 
Anglican clergyman who won the 
1984 Nobel Peace Prize, criticized 
the emergency decree but offered 
to conduct negotiations between 
Macks and tbe white government. 

“In peacetime, only repressive 
governments, such as those is the 
Philippines and the banana repub- 
lics of South America, impose mar- 
tial law and states of emergency,” 
Bishop Tutu said. 

The head of the security police, 
Lieutenant General Johann P. 
Coetzee, suggested to South Afri- 
can editors that ail articles on tbe 
unrest be submitted to the police 
for advance clearance, but when 
editors protested he withdrew the 
suggestion, the South African Press 
Association said. 

“There is an exceptional need to 
scale down information connected 
to the unrest,” General Coetzee 
was quoted as having told the edi- 
tor*. 

Tbe police confirmed that they 
detained 113 people on thefirsi day 
of the state of emergency. 

The emergency powers allow the 
police and the army to arrest with- 
out warrants, detain and interro- 
gate suspects for up to 14 days, 
seize property, impose curfews and 
Emit urban press coverage in the 
affected areas. 

' The measures were imposed to 
queQ unrest in which more than 
500 blacks have been killed since 
September. They affect the eastern 
Cape region, black townships in 
industrial areas east of Johannes- 
burg. and Johannesburg itself. 

In Kwa-Thema, a black town- 
ship east of Johannesburg, the po- 
lice distributed pamphlets explain- 
ing why the emergency had been 
imposed. The pamphlets said: 
“Thugs are disrupting your life 
through inti mida tion, arson and 
murder. This must be stopped.” 

A spokesman for the Detainees 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 



Woodens doors blown from 


Copenhagen's chief rabbi. Bent 
Mdchior, called the bombing “a 
sinful act.” There were no activities 
in the synagogue at the time. A 
morning prayer service attended by 
about 20 persons had finished two 
horns earner. 

Justice Minister Erik Ninn- Han- 
sen said, “It is horrible and com- 
pletely meaningless that we should 
now experience terrorist acts in the 
middle of Copenhagen" 

Harald Ruetz, a Northwest Ori- 
ent Airlines worker, said that the 
explosion appeared to have come 
from a device outride the ticket 


U>* AMaatad PHm 

tbe Copenhagen synagogue. 

office. An employee and two cus- 
tomers were in the office when it 
exploded. 

Automobiles in a parking garage 
immediately above the amine of- 
fice appeared not to have been 
damaged but the force of the cxplo- 
rion ripped apart the office and 
scattered debris cm a busy intersec- 
tion near the Tivoli park. 

An employee of a hotel near the 
airHne office said. “Everything was 
blade and there were huge tongues 
of fire” at the instant of-the explo- 


CVA 55 


I 


3HSIIS WSS¥Si53JgSHiSFSesi»?sa»B8ff8?»WSSt lm I 

^iS5 W g|Bg^‘a|^ttSKg5^y-a^^^5g-y* KS { I ; t r i v { | JS3 , f . (iB5aattE _ sh!fc: . H!a 


Negligence, 
Inadequacies 
Are Cited in 
Dam’s Break 

By EJ. Dionne Jr. 

Ntv fork Tima Service 

STAVA, Italy — Private negli- 
gence and inadequate public pre- 
cautions were to blame for the 
flood disaster here in which at least 
195 persons died, according to Ital- 
ian officials. 

Geological inspectors and other 
officials looking into the causes of 
the accident were focusing increas- 
ingly on chemical deposits that had 
built up over the years at the bot- 
tom of the pond held back by the 
dam. The pond, and an auxiliary 
pond above it, were used to purify 
fluorite from a fluorite mine. 

An investigator called the depos- 
its “a geological tune bomb.” 

Colonel Fulvio Vezzalini, a mili- 
tary spokesman, said the deposits 
had built up, increasing the volume 
behind the Ham and possibly cor- 
roding the dam itself. 

In addition. Colonel Vezzalini 
said that trees had recently been 
cut behind the dam to make the 
pool of water bigger. 

“It is possible that this made the 
earth unstable,” he said. 

A worker for the regional water 
authority said that the dam itself 
had been built up over the years 
and may simply have been too 
high. 

“Earthen Hams work best when 
they are low ” he said. 

Italian liberals Elect Leader 

Agetict Frmce-Presse 

ROME — Alfredo Bioadi, 47, 
minis ter of the environment, has 
been elected leader erf the Italian 
Liberal Party, a minor member of 
the coalition government. Mr. 
Biondi, who will now leave his cab- 
inet position, said that he did not 
plan to change party policy. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 

Officer on Trial as Lisbon Terrorist 


WORLD BRIEFS 


jjgfeg.' 






Ridicules the Proceedings as a Farce IRS Deadline for Income Exclusion 




' -v^Sgll 













Two men in Ora, Italy, look at pictures of victims in an 
attempt to identify relatives lost in the collapse of the dam. 


Judicial warnings have been is- 
sued to officials of the company 
that owns the dam, the Preaim 
Mining Co, and to local officials 
who may bear responsibility for 


Giulio Rotta, president of the 
company, said that storms bad 
eroded the dam. 

“I have no responsibility for its 
structure,” he said. ‘That is up to 
the people who built it” 

The Montecatim Co. built the 
mtnf and Ham complex in the early 
1960s. It was taken over by the 
state energy company. End, in 


1979, and sold to Prealpi about two 
years later. 

■ Unexpioded Shells Found 

The discovery of five unexpioded 
artillery shells from World War II 
halted the search Monday for vic- 
tims, Renters reported from Te- 
sero, Italy. 

Italian Army officers said a 
bomb disposal expert would exam- 
ine the shells, which were found at 
two locations near the dam. They 
discounted the possibility that a 
bomb explosion bad caused the 
Ham to break. 


Ream 

LISBON —A trial of 73 suspect- 
ed guerillas opened Monday with 
the principal defendant, Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Otdo Saraiva de Car- 
valho, calling it a fame. 

Colonel Carvalho, 48, is charged 
with leading a leftist terrorist group 
called the April 25 Popular Forces. 
The colonel brown popularly as 
Otdo, was a leader of 1974 revela- 
tion that ended 48 years of rightist 
dictatorship. 

The trial started despite the ab- 
sence of a former member of the 
April 25 Popular Forces who was 
to have been a key prosecution wit- 
ness. 

He was shot Friday in an attack 
for which the guerrilla group 
claimed responsibility. Hospital 
sources said the attack left him par- 
alyzed. 

Heavily armed police ringed the 
courtroom as the trial got under 
way. 

Colonel Carvalho received a 
warning from the judge when he 
greeted fellow defendants in courL 

The others cheered and applaud- 
ed him, while relatives and mends 
in the public gallery chanted, 
“Otdo! Otdo!” 

Colonel Carvalho, isolated with 
the other defendants in a special 
enclosure of bulletproof glass, 
scribbled a note in the public gal- 
lay and displayed it against the 
glass. 

“The trial is a farce whose out- 


U.S. Submarine Call Dropped 

Ream 

BRUSSELS — A visit by a U^. 
nuclear-powered submarine to 
Zeebrogge to join, celebrations 
marking the expansion of that Bel- 
gian port has been called off fol- 
lowing anti-nuclear protests, the 
port authority said Monday. It was 
not dear whether the United States 
nr Rel gi rrm hjiH initiated th<* ranrrl. 

lation. 






TNi Aoocmtad 


Colonel Carvalho, front left, whit others accused in Lisbon. 


come will be the triumph of those 
now under arrest,” "the note said. 
“The accusers are the ones who 
should be in jafl.” 

Of the 73 persons accused, only 
52 appeared m conn. Three former 
gncmllas have turned stale's evi- 
dence, and the rest are being tried 
in absentia. 

The accused are charged with 
belonging to or assisting the April 


25 Popular Forces, which has 
ffhiiwH at least six inning s and 
dozens of bomb attacks and rob- 
beries since April 1980. 

Their lawyers protested Monday 
that the charges had not been suffi- 
ciently clarified and said that they 
had not been given sufficient access 
to all the evidence. 

The trial is expected to last at 
least six months. 


Emergency Rule Points Up 
A Hardening of Battle lines 

(Continued from Page 1) the protest has crystallized in an 

an indication of how press freedom i nc r e asingl y radical call for power, 
has been restricted by the regula- Blati activists assert that peace 
tkms.” would return if the government 

As ttwnship unresl has grown “S* 

into a daily ebropide of vijmec ^ i^LSTtbe 

I outlawed African National Ccm- 


WASHINGTON ( 1HT) - Oversea.- iaxpa>ers who have not filed their 
U.S. income tax returns for 1982 and l°83 must get their returns in by 
Tuesday or lose the earned income exclusion for those years, the Internal 
Revenue Service said. 

The returns will be considered to be filed in time if they carry a 
readable postmark for July 23 or if they are turned in at U.S. embassies or 
consulates with IRS offices before the dose of business on Tuesday. 
Taxpayers abroad can exclude up to 575.000 in foreign earned income— 
wages, salaries and self-employment income — for 1982 and up to 
$80,000 in 1983. 

Claries Bruce, a tax attorney , advised that some taxpayers may warn to 
file “protective returns” — usin g rough income numbers and churning the' 
exclusion —that amending these returns after use deadline to correct any 
mistakes. He said that this would probably be easier and more successful 
than trying to challenge the deadline in court. 

Reagan Back at Work in White House 

WASHINGTON (Reuters! — President Ronald Reagan conferred 
Monday with senior advisers as he resumed work in the White House nine, 
days after undergoing cancer surgery. 

Mr. Reagan did not go to the Oval Office but conducted business from 
the living room in bus White House living quarters , according toLa rry 

ofmeetines totaling aboufan^ hour with Donald T. Regan! his chief of 
staff; Robert C. McFarlane, his national security adviser, and Vice 
President George Bush. 

The president also studied briefing papers for talks Tuesday with 
President Li Xiannian of China, who is in Washington for a state visa, 
and telephoned several members of Congress in an effort to end the 
deadlock over the federal budget 

East German Nuclear Scientist Defects 

' BONN (DPI) — A leading East German nuclear scientist has defected 
to West Germany. West German newspapers said Monday. 

They said that the scientist. Peter Adler, 46. accompanied by his wife 
and 11-year-old son, arrived in West Germany last week from Vienna, 
where he worked for the International Atomic Energy Agency. The 
agency oversees the civ ilian use of nuclear technology to ensure that it is 
not diverted to military purposes. 

The newspaper Die Welt described Mr. Adler as one of the leafing 
East German nuclear scientists. It said he had held top jobs for the last six 
years. The Bild newspaper said the scientist defected because of dissatis- 
faction with political and ideological conditions in East Germany. 

Bern Calls for Removal of Gemayel 

BEIRUT (AP) —A Shiite Moslem leader. Nahih Bern, called Monday 
for the replacemoit of President Amin Gemayel's government and said a 
meeting of Islami c nations would be held next month, under Syrian 
sponsorship, to try to end inter-Moslem feuds. 

Mr. Bern, who returned here from Damascus after a two-week visit 
with his Syrian supporters, said the meeting would be in Damascus. The 
Syrians, the main power-broker in Lebanon, have been trying to resolve 
inter-Moslem fends in preparation for an. over all settlement for Leba- 
non’s civil war, which extends to Christians and Palestinian refugees. 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


Part-time courses for adults 

Your American Degree 
in Paris 


ICr: 


COLLEGE 

OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

IN PARIS 


pny-rery »i h i v.t i ; > 


Art History • Comparative 
Literature • Computer Science • 
European Cultural Studies • 
French Studies • International 
Affairs • Int. Economics • 

Int. Business Administration 


CYPRUS 

The newest TAStS campus, situated 
in tra hill cftstita of Nicosia, Cyprus, 
offers dose proximity to the Middle 
East American Cottage Preparatory 
and Gerard Studies curricula. 
Coed, grades 7-12 day: grades 
9-12 boaRling. Diverse sports, ac- 
tivities. and l/avd. 


all classes in English • credits fully transferable 


Fox information co n t a ct: Mrs. Pfeiffer, 

The American College in Paris, 

B.P. 104, 31 Ave. Bosquet, 75007 Paris. 
Telephone: (1)555.91.73. 


SWITZERLAND ENGLAND CYPRUS 

the oldest independent American 35-acre country campus only 10 The newest TAStS campus, aituated 

boanflng school m Europe, founded mites from central London and in the tufldtetria of Nicosia, Cyprus, 

In 1955. American CoOege nop. 6 miles from He e throw airport often dose proximity to the Middle 

General Studies and Inti Section Founded m 1978, offering American- East American Cottage Preparatory 

(ESL). Coed, boarding and day. Colege Prep, cumcuhim and ESL and General Studies curricula, 

grades 7-13. ActMtes. ’ sports. Coed, grades K-t2day; grades 7-12. Coed, grades 7-12 day. grades 

SLMontz ski term, and extensive boarding. Complete sports, acthri- 9-12 boarding. Diverse sports, bc- 

travet throughout Europe. tas. and travel program. uvittes, and travel. 

The American School in Smttzerfand. Ext. St , CH-6928 Montagnoia. Switzerland. Tel: Lugano (081) 54 84 71 Thu 79*17 
IASS England, Ext. 42. Coidbartwur Lara, Thorpe, 9unoy, Eng land TW208TE.Tfcl:CltertM7 (09323)68 252 Tlx: B291 72 

TASS Cyprus, Ext. 52, n Itameov Street, P, a Boa 2829, fflcceta- Cyprus. ThfcMcoaln <02t) 43T14 Tie 4801 

WStSK£LL®BCM?OeySc#iootpr»c#esK.»a,Bc*a7Q2*£»S4.f45J0»f!«sl*Graaca.lN:Athtjn*B<»f42«7Z)c2i0379 


INTENSIVE 

LANGUAGE TRAINING 




The most renowmed school for French 

INSTITUT DE FRAN^AIS 

Overlooking the Riviera's most beautiful bay 





LODGING IN PRIVATE APTS. AND 2 MEALS INCLUDED. 

For oduitL 6 levels from beprmer I to advanced B. 
tin nod Oftdrffe iw o a fc (May muf fo n program dor* Augur 5. Sap*. 2 and el year. 

ftanf ie—d l eg r l — i iiSi dhc h s mat t in g a/ Frmndi to nd ute . 
WSmUTDEFRANQWS-G. 23 

. 23 Ave. Gfcv-Uderc, 06230 VU1BSANCHE/MBL TeLs (93) 01.88.44. ■ 


SALZBURG INTERNATIONAL 
PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

A coeducational American boarding school in Europe's most 
beautiful aty. Grades 8 to 12 plus R G. Highest academic 
standards. College preparatory and advanced placement courses. 
Extensive travcL skiing and cultural programs 
For dialog write: SIPS. Moosstr. lOfrj. A-5(CT Salzburg. AUSTRIA 
TcL 1662)44485 & 46511 



PACIFIC SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY 

9301 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD 
LOS ANGELES, CA 90210 U.S.A. . 

EARN YOUR DEGREE THRU OUR 

OVERSEAS DIRECTED 
STUDY PROGRAM 

INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY. NO CLASS ATTEND- 
ANCE REQUIRED. ONE-ON-ONE STUDENT/FACULTY. EN- 
ROLL NOW FOR NEXT SEMESTER. COMPLETION IN ONE 
ACADEMIC YEAR PERMITTED. 

• Business Administration • Bachelors 

• Economics • Masters 

• Engineering • Doctoral Programs • 

• Education e Many other Reids 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND TUITON GRANTS- FINANCIAL AID 
Send a brief resume detailing your background and your 
goals. IMPROVE YOU R PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. 

•P.5.U. is Authorized by The California Department of Education 
*P S. U is a Member of N A.S.AC U. Washington. DC 


^ ENGLISH in London 
FRENCH in Strasbourg 
GERMAN in Heidelberg 
SPANISH in Madrid 

Foreign Lsncuacc In*;*..'-. 
SdulIiT lnltTiiutioii.il l imcr--i(' | 

: i - V V*. ;■::!<•<: K.v.ii. 

! v.J.'i M i !cl :;i«jO >-l'- 


grass. 

Bin far Mr. Botha, that is appar- 
ently not posable. South African 
commentators said, for such nego- 
tiations imply a readiness for pow- 
er-sharing that goes far beyond 
what his white constituency — or, 
seemingly, Ms own pnrijnimnn — 
wifipenmL 

That a crisis exists is not in dis- 
pute. According to political activ- 
ists here; only five of the 38 local 
black councils that were estab- 
lished by Mr. Botha as a nascent 
form of black democracy are still 
able to function. 

Last year 240 black officials, in- 
cluding 27 mayors, resigned aimd 
accusations that they served as a 
front for continued white domina- 
tion. Black local government, some 
activists say, has virtually col- 
lapsed. 

With the state of emergency, Mr. 
Botha’s response seems to have 
been to fall bade an a traditional 
reflex, hoping that force wiD offer a 
respite from violence and protest: 

“The crackdown must not side- 
track the government from attend- 
ing to the complex task of doling 
with the root causes of unrest,” The 

stateof emergency shouldtK^ised 
to give added impetus to tbe pro- 
cess of reform.” 


PREPARE FOR: 


ESL REVIEW -TOEFL 
FMGEMS-CGFNS 
FLEX 1.2.3 -MSKP 
NMB 1.2,3 -NOB 
NPBNCBI 
GMAT*LSAT*CPA 
MG AT- DAT- VAT 
OCAT-SAT-ACT 
EXEC. SPEEDREADING 


15 Jewish Settlers Sentenced For Attacks 


Tra rigor and enttunsm of youth are omi i iU a d to teaming 
unto- tfie Franciscans. Smafl classes. En^jhasts on self 
■ mot i v a t i on. 98% college acc ept a nce . Modem factious 

• on 70-acra campus near Gettysburg. 




Grades 9-12 
&PG 


on 70-acra campus near Gettysburg. 
ESL programs during summer and 
academic year. Exceflent sports 
Wonca k rirr flna tory. 



PRQ> flatter Reran IDeegaa Hdro. 

Sox UL Sorter Grove. Fa. 1736Z . 717-225-5715 


American School of Mallorca 


AN INTERNATIONAL ACADEMIC INSTITUTION 

■ Accredited by the M i dAa Stem Ann. • Certified by the D.O.D. Syitem for US 
Govt. perKxinel • Authorized by the Spanish MWitry of Education. • Boarding 7 - 
1 2 & day fc-12 • The arty school offering o p ie cwfl jra e rag ie q u ai M eofanpvrith 
top college prep. • Notable record of ooflege edminiom •Specific learning 
dhabAty and ESL programs that yield excellent result. 

CALLE OBATOKIO, 9 - POSTALS NOUS - MAllORCA - SPAM 
TH-: 675B50/51 -TELEX 69651 AM5CE 


OCIMANY 




Fur all information please apply to our Educational 
Adviser Mr. Paid A. Mayor. 

SCHOLASTIC satm ‘7RANSW0RUXA” - GENEVA 

2 Rue du Vlcai re-Savoyard. Phone 44 IS 65. 


YOU WANT 
TO SPEAK GERMAN? 
...SPEAK TO US FIRST 



Goethe-lnstitut 



Mo re than 3 million student! in 33 years 
146 institutes in 66 countriei 

e. g. MADRAS, TsL 83791 
GENUA, Tel. 58101 ! 

GLASGOW. Tel. 041-3322555 

15 institutes in the Federal Republic of Germany 

f <j 

For detailed information: 

OOETHWNSTHUT jf/ 

Xn tr u hrerweH u no / 

Lenbadiplatx 3 / 

D-8000 Mbsdien 2 X ' 

Tel. (0) 89-5999-200 / S- 

Tel mu 522940 / / 


International Herald Tribune's 

NEXT SPECIAL 
EDUCATION DIRECTORY 

will appear on September 7. 

For Information please contact your nearest IHT representative. 



Fat information reganfing 
programs authorized under 
Federal law to enrol] 
norvlmmigiani alien students 
In trie US A. please call: 

212 - 977-8200 

O Write: Dept HT 
Stanley H. Kaplan 
Educational -Center Ltd. 
131 West 56 Streel 
New Marti, N.Y 10019 
Permanent Centers in Mora 
Than 120 Mai or US Clues 
Puerto Rico & Toronto Canada 


(Continued from Page l) 
exchange for three captured Israeli 
soldiers. 

Court authorities pointed out 
that the defendants sentenced to 
three years imprisonment, eligible 
for & reduction of a third of then- 
sentences for good behavior, will 
have to remain in jafl only nine 
months since they have already 
served 15 months awaiting trial and 
sentencing. Two of 10 who were 
sentenced after plea bargaining al- 
ready have been reteasecL 

Aviva Nir, the mother of Shaul 
Nir, who was sentenced to life for 
murder in the 1983 grenade and 
machine-gun attack on students at 
(he Islamic College in Hebron, 
jumped up and down in joy imme- 
diately after the sentences were 


life term for murder in the Islamic 
College attack was Menachem 
Livni, 38, a former reserve engi- 
neering corns battalion command- 
er who led the underground organi- 
.zation. He was in the forefront of 
Jewish settlers who moved into the 
Arab city of Hebron after Israel 
captured the West Bank in 1967. 

The other life sentence was given 
to Uziahu Sharabaf, 25, alio of 
Hebron and a former Israeli Army 
soldier. Mr. Sharabaf is the son-in- 
law of the spiritual leader of the 
West Bank settler movement, Rab- 
in Moshe Levinger. 

Some of the West Bank Jewish 
settlers in the courtroom said that 
the trial had radicalized settlers 
throughout the occupied territory 
and that there would be further 
attacks rat Palestinian nationalists. 


The relatively light sentences of 
three years for defendants involved 
in the attack on the Arab mayors 
were attributed by the judges to the 
court’s belief that the settlers delib- 
erately planted light explosive 
charges in the mayors’ cars with the 
intent of maiming but not kiHim 
them beca u se, by the defendants 
own confessions, they did not want 
to create Palestinian martyrs. 4 

The sentences for causing griev- 
ous bodily barm were for the at- 
tacks os two mayors, Bassam. 
Shaka, then mayor of Nablus, who 
lost both las to a bomb placed m 
bis car, ana Karim Khalaf, of Ra- 
mallah, who lost a fooL 

An Israeli Druze bomb disposal, 
expert was blinded while attempt:, 
ing io defuse a third bomb. . 





l appar- EC Sets Conference on Treaty Reform 

African J 

hnego- BRUSSELS (Reuters) — European Community foreign monsters 
or pow_ decided Monday to call a special conference to discuss proposals that 
beyond could water down the authority of national governments, but Britain 

y oj- warned against solutions that were not acceptable to afl. 

[lion _1 The British foreign secretary. Sr Geoffrey Howe, whose government r . 

was among three that originally opposed such a conference, said the :• 
t in dis- meeting, set SepL 9 in Luxembourg, could succeed only by common 
d activ- accord. It wffl tadde proposals for a wider European union that split last '• - 
18 local month’s Milan summit meeting, 
estab- The ministers set up two groups of senior officials to prepare the 
nucrwit conference. One willmicuss manges in present treaties to expand the 
are still ECs competence to noneconomic matters and give wider powers to the 
European C ommis sion and tbe European Parliament. The second will 
iai s ia_ handle proposals for wider foreign policy coordination. 

•d amid . ■ ■ 

^ Britain, Spain Sign Extradition Treaty — 

it, some LONDON (AP) — Britain and Spain signed an extradition treaty p 

ly col- Monday, the first step in dosng a favorite refuge of British criminals. 

Leon Brittan. die British home secretary, and Fernando Ledesma 
icy, Mr. Bartert, the Spanish justice minister, signed the treaty in London. Ii is not 
0 have expected to become effective until eaoly next year after being approved by 
ditional the British Parliament and ratified by both governments. 

[offer a — — — 

rotest 

Corrections 

Hrwlmg Because of an editing error, an article Monday about vehicle exhaust 
a,” The standards in tbe European Community stated incorrectly that the sum^ 
mg. the dards are to take effect in March. They are to take effect be ginning in 
tie used 1989. • 

be pro- A headline in Monday’s business section misidentified the object of a 1 
$470-million takeover bid. Tbe target company was Multimedia Inc. 


ikmnnlfy pteparrtw y , grades 8-13, 
«M«l boon&ig, anal dmi 
ExcgOant mrnmntty c w p t i j i m . 

teaching 

te earwig, laraftr atmosphere. 
Afl^wrtiand 
airlaAnMlsMten, 

Write 1 854 (WJLeysin, 
SwHzariand. 

Tali 025/ 34 1361 
Tain: 456 1 66 TOIE CH 


Fangue, GcSSnsttafc, Can- 
bodgfrCst&raie|. CuuuiBtiri bmdn. 
AteGcpea] wtram awinimn. Ebtaa- 
hc e de ncc . 5s i nnw and vim mtt in 
escaflea dimxe. Our oaocca m fee eraite 
iag d atom and dttefcpna* d adfemfi- 
ra*e. Vaatiaaal yidawr 6wfln tria- 

SPBOALOOtTRSKS 
FOR FUTURE 

TOUWSN AND BOIEL CAREER 
Sdmbrtic year aadanraner 
terpage comsa ■> J Jy. 

Suxy Dtde, 

T d, 36722 17 18. 

Mem 92 31 73 



BACHROTS • MAS1BTS • DOCTORATE 

For We*, Academic, UhEnten. 


Swd detalM resume 
for free evaluation. 

PAORC WBTBN UMVBSnY 

MO N. Sepulveda Btvd* 

Los Angeles Cottfornla 
90049. Dept. 23. UAA. 



LAS 


Hello mother, 
hello father.., 


Coop Bcwmoec.MnrcfaaAlteia(a 
*«ra heWHr»*«r thetn^i. OcrIOO 
eaMrinagiaateirwa... mnyrarr 

whuwwWBi i in a ne fr laaigaBawora- 

Aop.n.«K. Otrangun band 
iteo^indMUKialarHtdMfaiAtecclew 
tetep!rtderf**a«te. ■ Aum «ietfi ioMhU 
omnteiaamteML (tainiit. Wte 
cfphcnefar teed — V teei Gtete. 

B 111 f. p i -J m I • I » . 

“ TVOKat^ t»T*nQjcsr»ft- 

MftWrt 54123 0*lrs> 


“Why am I happy?” she said.' 
“My two sons are two heroes of 
Israel God arranged everything. 
This will bring a lot of life. It may 
be life for my son, but God has 
other plans.” 

Her other son, Barak, received a 
six-year sentence for participation 
In the Islamic College and Arab 
bus attacks and the Dome of the 
Rock conspiracy. 

Also sentenced to a mandatory 


^ Visiting ^ 
New York City? 

Gramercy 
Park Hotel 

Distinguished 500 room 
hotel with excellent 
Restaurant, Cocktail Lounge, 
Room Service and Piano Bar. 
Overlooking Gramercy Park 
with newly decorated, 
comfortable rooms. 
Singles $8 5-95 
Doubles $90-100 
Suites $115-175 
Group rates and attractive 
monthly rates available. 
Call Gen. Mgr. Tom O’Brien 
(212)475-4320 
Telex 668-755 
Cable GRAMPARK 
. 21st St. and Lexington Aye. . 
New York. NY, USA 10010 


South Africa Seizes Activists 


(Coafinned-froai Page 1). 
Parents’ Support Committee, who 
spoke on the condition that he sol 
be identified, said that those de- 
tained in the Port Elizabeth area 
included the Reverod De VHKers 
Soga, president of the Interdenomi- 
natinnal African Ministers Associ- 
ation of South Africa. His group 
has worked to end fighting between 
rival black anti-government 
groups. . 

Other clerics reportedly held 
were the Reverend Samson Daba, 
an Anglican minister and conmui- 
mfy leader from Ifitenhagr, the 
Reverend Hamilton P anda 1* a 
Melhodlsi minister from Port Eliz- 
abeth; and the Reverend Ebenezer 
Maqina, a lead e r of the Azaman 
People’s Organization, a black- 
consdoosness group in Port Eliza- 
beth. 

Reporters in Port Elizabeth said 
that at least 10 other activists wae 
seized before dawn, induding lead- 
era of tiie Made Motor Assembly 
and Component Workera Union of 
South Africa. 

PcEce reported several scattered 
incidents of unrest in black town- 
ships late Sunday and early Mon- 
day. 

On Sunday, police diet and 
killed three blades in Tumahde 
township outride Parys, a town 75 
miles (120 kflomeieis) south of Jo- 
hannesburg, when a group of : 


Macks stoned and firebombed 
houses of policemen and Mack 
councilors, according tfegdioe 
headquarters. 

Parys is not anwng (H-Swms 
covered by the emergaugT nefeda-' 
tious. 

Among those arrested Saodsf 
were 22 mourners aboard- a fe ' 
that was commandeered on is*a? 
back to Johannesburg from-a ft- 
neraL the police said. They pric j 
few details of tire arrests. . 

The last state of emerrency ift- 
South Africa was in 19^ when ; 
vkdence followed ti« fatal shot** i- 
ings by die police trf 69 blffli pro- 
testers in Sharpeviflet southof Jb-' 
hannesbmg. The police' arrested 
marc than 11,000 people during 
that 156-day emergency, *. 

■ Btanies Apartbed 

The Reagan adininjstratkffl, 
blaming apartheid for the violence 
in South Africa, denounced, the 
new measures -and said that^hfc 
haders in Pretoria should moveft- 
ward “basic reforms." ' 

The White House spofesp#., 
Lany Speakes, 

One of me _ 

arimi nie imrira ag»fn<t 

ca, describing apartheid as i: 
ton considered tribe 
But 

still opposed to legislation, 
tag sanctions .against South 
far its policies. 





IV" ;- : 


^ H ■ ■- f .-.- 

"O' " : 




teoR 






















tR^Ps 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


^ssSgt 

a—..i Hfc if a 

fw I^N* 




-e 1,1 It*-* 

•^vi r ; ir ;;»nqw 

b u^, t 

«xuri.-. •fV’^iS 

v “*”' “■ - &'fc 

^ScientistDet, 

Xui n :</;?. r. — lr «ttV c 
-Clrur ■-••’ ‘T"' 4 ’ 

:a Mr ^: s - . . 

■dhefcjjr.^: 

. 7V-V. r ' c ^r*4 

Joval of l*emav(j 

71 v, ^ r ^ aikjfc 

.Htem leu:- ■ 

r>... , . 

“ J -'- - - S' ^ KM- 

. ... ju. u.. j-^suatiat 
£r:,r/4r.s jr... ■•. .■•..au^ 

eon Treaty Retm 

a?cirrt-- ..■ .. i. 

-f rji-i." — sb t 

: _ 

:T lisc!f:r. :: • - ■: 

•-• itsi* 

&1- "• - ; flOc 

4*'«fc: :r~ 

ips w-: : .._ .. :*2; 

3^C> 17, r. . :. •-■ 

; d4"c: __ , : •■ 

&rjpca;; 1 r .-.. 7:- ic* 

* ?»<*>• ‘ 

n Extra*. 0 Lion 5* 

tt.f5fJ.-r. = 

4 

sc 'Arc:.' -• 

Kr.^src*. : ■- ' - 

:«:>sn:.:. ■ 


“V-’ 


Affimiative Action Programs 


Dole-Kemp Feud: Behind the Barbs, a Deep Republican Rivalry 


BjrLccMa y • 

and Paul Houston : 

Lar Angeles Tana Service 

WASHINGTON — After years 
of bitter controversy, affirmative 
action in the workplace has 
achieved a grudging accep tance 
among Amencan workers and em- 
ployers alike. 

Despite continuing sharp end- 
asm from the Reagan administra- 
tion, the anxieties created when mi- 
norities and women first received 
preferential treatment in hiring to 
compensate for generations of dis- 
f rinrina tion have begun to ebb 
away. 

“The world didn't come to an 
end and the walls didn’t tumble 
down,” said James Burton, equal 
opportunity affairs manager at 
Monsanto Co. “As a result, we’re 
seeing a different attitude toward 
looking at people as individuals." 

Edvard Gaffcy, a young white 
police recruit in Boston, fears the 
department’s affirmative action 
program could hold back his ca- 
reer. Bui tike many other whites 
affected by such programs, be con- 
cedes that increasing the number of 
minority officers is a worthy goal 
and admits he “can’t think of any- 
thing else” to achieve it. 

The National Association of 
Manufacturers, which represents 
13.300 corporations, told a con- 
gressional committee this month 
that diversity in the work force re- 
sulting from affirmative action has 
“produced new ideas, opinions and 
perspectives in management, prod- 
uct development and marketing.” 

Peter Robertson, a Washington 
consultant on affirmative action to 
215 of the nation’s largest corpora- 
tions, said a survey snows 95 per- 
cent of the companies plan to con- 
tinue their efforts regardless of 
what the government does. ' 

But the battle over quotas and 
other tods of affirmative action is 
far from over. Sporadic charges 
persist of reverse discrimination 
against white males , and of incom- 
petence among minorities and 
women hired under affirmative ac- 
tion. 

And while the workplace has 
largely become reconciled to affir- 
mative action as a method for hir- 
ing, the next step — - progress in 
getting promotions for members of 
minority groups — has become a 
new source of tension. 

Affirmative action dates from 
the 1964 Gv3 Rights Act, which 
established the federal Equal Em- 
ployment Opportunity Commis- 
sion to investigate complaints of 
workplace discrimination and au- 
thorized federal courts to order em- 
ployers to take steps to overcome 



Wfltiam E. Brock 

the effects of past discrimination. 
Those steps could include quotas 
— requirements that, for example, 
one minority group member be 
hired for every new white worker 
added. 

A year later, President Lyndon 
B. Johnson ordered large federal 
contractors to demonstrate pro- 
gress toward diversifying their 
work forces, though strict manda- 
tory quotas were not part of his 
executive order. 

The result was a burst of cam- 
plaints about racial discrimination 
in the workplace and a burgeoning 
of affirmative action plans. 

Between 1974 and 1980. accord- 
ing to the Labor Department, the 
number of minority waken em- 
ployed by companies with federal 
contracts grew by 20 percent, com- 
pared with a ! 2-percent increase in 
companies not involved in govern- 
ment work and having no affirma- 
tive action plans in force. For wom- 
en, growth was 15 percent 
compared to 2 percent. 

At the same time; complaints 
about the effect of such plans on 
while males began to nse. The 
Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission received lp56 formal 
charges of reverse discrimination 
by public employers alone in 1979 
through 1983. for example. 

Paul Bearden, a 48-year-old 
white firefighter in St Louis, said 
affirmative action there has “creat- 
ed a lot of hard feelings.” Mr. Bear- 
den. still a private after 23 years as 
a firefighter, said hr once aspired to 
captain’s rank. But once affirma- 
tive action, he said, he has quit 
studying for the test 

Some affirmative action officers 


have been accused of ovazeakms- 
ness. William McCarthy, a white 
Boston police officer, charges that 
the force has hired criminals and 
OUieraies in its effort to boost mi- 
nority employees. “I think your 
professionalism and your stan- 
dards are bring dropped down,” he 
said. 

Larry Brown, a Wade officer and 
spokesman for die Massachusetts 
Association oT Minority Law En- 
forcement Officers, calk that view 
racist “ConadotinE some of the 
white male police officers we have 
on. this job, that's like -^excuse the 
pun — the pot calling the kettle 
black,” be sauL 

But opponents of affirmative ac- 
tion were given support by the Rea- 
gan administration, winch con- 
tends that hiring and p romo tional 
p r efere n ces based on race or sex are 
inherently unfair and dfcwimin*- 
tory. 

FaHjty this year the Justice De- 
partment asked 51 state and city 
gover nm ents to alter existing plans 
for hi ri " g and prompting women 
and minority members, usually in 
police and fire departments. 

The Justice Department based 
its action on a 1 984 Supreme Court 
derision bedding that the dty of 

Memphis had violated the Seniority 

retained junior friary firefighters 
and kid off more senior whites. 
What applies to layoffs, the depart- 
ment reasoned, should also apply 
to hiring and promotion. 

Mayor Tom Bradley of Los An- 
geles, one of the rides asked to alter 
its hiring and promotion plans, 
charged that the approach by the 
Justice Department “will result in 
expensive, tim^ufmo wnm g litiga- 
tion and wiQ reopen old wounds.” 

The U.S. Conference at Mayas, 
which represents 550 cities with 
populations of 30,000 or more, 
adopted a resolution last month in 
support of affirmative action pro- 
grams unless these is “a dear repu- 
diation by f* nn gro cg or the judicia- 
ry" 

No such repudiation is yet ap- 
parent. Five of the 13 federal ap- 
peals courts in the United States 
have held that the Memphis fire- 
fighters’ case; which involved lay- 
offs, does not apply to affirmative 
action plant involving hiring and 
promotions. 

There is disagreement eves with- 
in tfr e Reagan udminifluiim. Last 
month, LaEor Secretary William E 
Brock said at the unmml conven- 
tion of the National Association 
fa- the Advancement of Colored 
People in Dallas that the country 
would need “some form of affirma- 
tive action fa a considerable peri- 
od of rime into the future.” 


By Steven V. Roberts 

We w York Times Semce 

WASHINGTON — Senator 
Robert J. Dole of Kansas, tie 
majority leader, was speaking re- 
cently to a group of college Re- 
publicans about tax reform. Rep- 
resentative Jack F. Kemp of New 
York, he cracked, wants a busi- 
ness deduction tor hair spray. 

Mr. Kemp, who addressed the 
group later, shot back that during 
a recent fixe Mr. Dole's library 
had burned. Both books in it were 
lost, he said, and Mr. Dole had 
not finished coloring one of them. 

Mr. Dole and Mr. Kemp are 
two of the most dominant Repub- 
licans in W ashington , and die ri- 
valry between them has been 
smoldering fa years. But it recent 
weeks it has crackled into the 
open. 

On one level the battle is politi- 
cal: Both mm would like the Re- 
publican nomination fa presi- 
dent in 1988. But their 
antagonism also reflects a deep 
rift in Republican ranks that in- 
volves economic policy and the 
future course of the party itself. 

Many Republicans are alarmed 
at the rising animosity and would 
like to see it stop. 

Some Capitol watchers trace 



Robert J. Dole 

the rivalry to 1981 when the 
Kemp- Roth bill, cutting taxes by 
25 percent, became law. Mr. Dote 
was the new chairman of the Sen- 
ate Finance Committee, which 
handles tax legislation, and some 
Republicans say be considered 
Mr. Kemp an upstart and resent- 
ed his success. 

“Kemp is not a legislator, and 


Dole is, and that really grates on 
Dote,” said a Republican assis- 
tant. 

Beyond their personal rivalry, 
the two Republicans have a basic 
disagreement over economic pol- 
icy. As an advocate of supply-side 
economics, Mr. Kemp stresses the 
importance rtf reducing taxes as 
the key to growth and prosperity. 
Rising deficits and interest rates, 
be inssts, are caused by the tight 
money policies of the Federal Re- 
serve Board. 

As a more traditional conserva- 
tive. Mr. Dole focuses on (he dele- 
terious effects of budget deficits. 
Solving that problem is the key to 
economic revival, he says, and if 
popular programs have to be cut 
and taxes have to be raised, that is 
a necessary pries. 

This disagreement has a broad- 
er political implication. Mr. 
Kemp says that by focusing on 
economic growth, the Republican 
Party can become the party of 
optimism and progress. 

Mr. Dole retorts that if the Re- 
publicans bring down the deficit 
and thus revive the economy, the 
public will forget its temporary 
pain. If the party follows Mr. 
Kemp, be believes, toe country 
will not grow out the deficit prob- 



CoW5 P-'Ht 

Jack F. Kemp 

lem, and the voters will blame the 
Republicans fa the subsequent 
economic disaster. 

AD this came to a bead recent- 
ly. Mr. Kemp was appalled at the 
budget adopted by Senate Repub- 
licans, which contained a freeze 
on increases in Social Security 
benefits. 

Mr. Kemp was also alarmed 


that Senate Republicans were 
inching their way toward a tax 
increase. To make matters worse, 
he and other House Republicans 
were fuming over their bavinc 
been excluded when Mr. Dole put 
together his budget plan with the 
While House, 

Meanwhile, changes in the 
White House staff were working 
to the advantage of Mr. Kemp 
and his allies. 

James A. Baker 3d, a pragma- 
tist in the Dole mold, left as chief 
of staff and was replaced by Don- 
ald T. Regan, a more ideological 
conservative with close ties to Mr. 
Kemp. So the New Yorker, by hb 
own account, “called Dim Regan 
and said. ‘I think we can gel this 
budget back on track.' " 

The result was a meeting of Mr. 
Regan. Mr. Kemp and several 
others that produced a “frame- 
work” fa a new budget compro- 
mise. A Social Security freeze u .is 
dropped: new taxes 'were ruled 
out yet again; and Mr. Dole wa» 
apoplectic. 

One of the senator's aides 
called tbe Kemp-Regan meeting 
“a political cheap shot aimed at 
1988.” and added: “That’s why 
Dole is mi an cry. We were blind- 
sided." 


Computer Bulletin Boards 9 Thriving 


(Continued from Page 1) 
fa communication and free assem- 
bly as the telephone and meeting 
places are now. he said. 

There are no reliable figures on 
the number of Americans who now 
have access to computer bulletin 
boards. Computer industry ana- 
lysts say that somewhat less than 10 
percent of tbe nation’s 85 nullion 
households have personal comput- 
ers. A large majority of those home 
systems include a “modem,” the 
device that gives computer owners 
access to bulletin boards through 


ports and stock quotations to 
gardening tips and airiine sched- 
ules. These electronic mag a zin e s 
generally charge a fee starting at $6 
per hour. 

Finally, there are hundreds of 
private computer bulletin boards 
used by businesses, schools, gov- 
ernment agencies and professional 
organizations to keep in touch with 
a national roster of members a 


telephone bines. 

That would suggest that several 
million Americans can book up to 
buDetin boards from their homes, 
in addition to those who have ac- 
cess to a computer system at their 


It u equally difficult to state ac- 
curately now many different bulle- 
tin board systems there are. Indus- 
try estimates range upward from 
L000, but the number seems to be 
growing weekly, because computer 
owners can start a system with a 
minimal additional investment and 
operate it through their home tele- 
phones. 

There are three basic types of 
computer communication systems. 

The most numerous are the free 
bulletin board systems aD oyer the 
country, offering information to 
anyone who chooses to call. There 
generally is no fee for these ser- 
vices, although callers have to pay 
any long-distance charges fa their 
connection. 

There are also a few dozen com- 
QWdal bulletin boards that pro- 
vide services ranging from news re- 


Ruggian-by-Radio in China 

The AssadateJ Pros 
BELTING — A Chinese radio ; 
station wifi start broadcasting Rus- 
sian-language lessons Aug. 19, the j 
Fust suds program aired in China ' 
since the early 1960s, when ties | 
vath Moscow deteriorated, an offi- 
°al report said Monday. 


FOR THE BEST IN 
CHINA TRADE 
CONSULTANCY & 
EXECUTIVE 
RECRUITMENT 
YOU NEED 


4/F, Dominion Centre 
59A Queen's Rd. East 
Hong Kong 
Tlx: 74903 RIGGS HX 


AUTHORS WANTE_ 
BY N.Y. PUBLISHER 

iMctag H itody beck pubfelw M#Ju mm- 
of a* type, heflon. wnfewm, poetry, 
pvenfc. xtaiorty Old rebaOiA wpte, efc New 
arfurj w e lcom ed Send rw free teaUef H-3 
Vantage IW 516 W. 34th St., New York MY. 
10QO1 USA. 


One of the more common forms 
of computer crime — including the 
crimes charged against the New 
Jersey teen-agers — involves a per- 
soo who tries to penetrate ate of 
these private networks. 

NomaDy, a private network has 
its own telephone number and one 
or more passwords that a caller 
must type in to gain access to the 
system. Most private bulletin 
boards change these numbers and 
passwords frequently. 

But last year a group of comput- 
er users obtained a phone number 
and password fa a credit-rating 
company owned by TRW Inc. 
With that information, the users 
were able to call up and obtain the 
credit card numbers and financial 


Gb CONCORD 

\J MAEINEILSG 



Concord Mariner. 18 karat gold, 
stainless steel- Quartz. Water-resistant 
An art carried to perfection in Swiss watches. 


MELLERIO 

9. rue de la Pan 
75CXE PARIS 
2615753 

EXPOSITION DE LA COLLECTION 


I like to see it stop. ed his su c cess. Kemp, be believes, the country benefits. Dole is so jsm. We were bimd- 

Some Capitol watebera trace “Kemp is not a legislator, and will not grow out the deficit prob- Mr. Kemp was also alarmed tided.” 

Dole Urges Reagan Intervention on Budget iu?ro?gem r crf^ 1 »oteif ver ^ Hi,,s ’ 

Washington Poti Serrur seotatives that the Senate intends V. Domenia of New Mexico, ex- _ „ 
w a WTNirrmN w,.,. 10 off® this week, “then 1 think we pressed pessimism about the out- J**''* rav ’ , , io " ,s on * * 

mSSL should reach a showdown,” Mr. look, bottoms of an immediate H l ! l r s f otels fr ^ J 

majority leader, Robert J. Dole, has w . . -r; . that are run in the European style. .* ; - a f 

trt Pr»ci/W.i Rnn»id Dole said. If u s not gamg to hap- agreement and the long-term pro- und^r th» dirm-i uiwruKiinn m ih^ #,»• - i 


Washington Pen Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
majority leader, Robert J. Dole, has 
appealed to President Ronald Rea- 
gan to intervene to rescue tbe stale- 
mated deficit-reduction negotia- 
tions on Capitol Hill, saying Mr. 
Reagan could “put it together if he 
does it very quickly." 


seotatives that the Senate intends 
to offer this week, “then I think we 
should reach a showdown,” Mr. 
Dole said. “If it’s not going to hap- 
pen, then we should say so and g£t 
on with our work." 

Mr. Dole, speaking in a televi- 
sion interview Sunday, gave no de- 
tails of the proposed compromise. 


If the president supports a com- Both Mr. Dole and the Senate 
promise with the House of Repre- Budget Cammttee chairman. Pete 


V. Domenia of New Mexico, ex- 
pressed pessimism about tbe out- 
look, bom in terms of an immediate 
agreement and the long-term pros- 
pects fa w«Hng much of a dent in 
budget deficits. 

Even if the Senate gets its way 
with deeper cuts than tbe House 
has proposed for the next three 
years, “we're still going to have 
S200-billion deficits as far as the 
eye can see;” Mr. Dole said. 


The Beverly Pavilion Is one of two 
small, fashionable Beverly Hills hotels 
that are run in the European style, 
under the direct supervision of the 
proprietor himself. And we offer our 
guests the ultimate Beverly Hills 
experience: free limo service to 
glorious .Rodeo Drive. 



El Beverly Rwilion 

A Ifciili In ti'l 

9360 Wliifilre St v<L, Bevefty Hflft. CA 90212. Telex No. 69l 366. 


records of any of the millions of 
people listed by the coumany. 

Burl Mazdow of Garden Grove, 
CaKfocnia. whose credit card num- 
bers became public in the commu- 
nity of computer enthusiasts, has 
sued TRW tor failure to provide 
adequate security of its records. 

Last fall some bulletin boards 
listed a telephone number fa “Ar- 
panet," aDefense Department's re- 
search computer system. The nec- 
essary passwords were not Hsted, 
however, and the Pentagon said 
these was no evidence of unautho- 
rized calls to Arpanet 

Mr. Hughes dismisses such users 
as a small group of “keyboard va- 
grants pag in g through our dec- 
tronic neighborhood. 

And enthusiasts are beginning to 
emphasize the need to avoid fllegii- 
imaie use of computers. Even such 
youth-oriented buDetin boards as 
“Phreakesstein's Lair,” where 
teen-agers heatedly debate rode 
music and new computer equip- 
ment, Qash a wanting on the screen 
to all callers: “Anyone tearing any 
message dealing with breaking into 
computers, enx, will have their 
password ZAPPED!!!!!" 




WestLB. Bank of an industrious country. 






Germany is one of the most industri- 
ous nations. And WestLB one of its 
major banks. As a universal bank 
we offer made-to-measure financial 
services to all kinds of industries. 

This is just one example of our 
ability to provide solutions tailored 
to specific needs. Df course, sophis- 


ticated services depend on tangible 
assets: The vast resources of inter- 
national banking. Plus an imaginative 
and innovative approach to financing. 

That, in a nutshell, is WestLB's 
simple yet universal business con- 
cept. You can bank on it wherever you 
do business. 


WestLB 

The Westdeutsche Landesbank. 


Head Office Dusseldorf 







Page 4 


TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune. 


PUblttfaed WUi TV Pie * Yurt Timet and The WwMngiga Pew 


Cheap Dollar, Costly Deficit 


There’sNo Clean Way 
To Fight U.S. Enemies 


All v 


A dollar now buys about 17 percent less 
foreign currency than it did in February. Is 
that tin longed-for descent and “soft landing” 
for which economists have been hoping? 

Maybe. The dollar’s decline from overvalu- 
ation should let efficient American exporters 
redrim a share of world markets. It would also 
reduce pressure on Congress to protect ineffi- 
cient producers from impart competition. 

But the decline also reflects the opinion of 
some corporate money managers that the 
American economy is sagging toward reces- 
sion. If that is true, the fall erf the dollar may 
have come too lam to spare the United States 
the pain of higher unemployment. If no reces- 
sion beckons, a weaker dollar could again 
drive up interest rates. With (he dollar deefin- 
ing, the only sure way to widen the {nth 
between recession and credit squeeze is to 
reduce the federal budget deficit. 

No (me can be certain why foreign investors 
flocked to the dollar in the rally 1980s, raising 
its exchange value by 50 percent. What is dear, 
though, is that the overvalued dollar inf r * ****! 
the purchasing power of American consumers 
and helped bold down the U.S. inflation rate. 
In addition, foreign demand for dollar securi- 
ties made it possible for Washington to finance 
unprecedented federal budget deficits without 
driving up interest rates and crowding domes- 
tic borrowers out of the market. 

But the lunch bought with Japanese and 
European credit was not free. The high-priced 
dollar made h almost impossible for even 
efficient American producers of everything 
from bulldozers to cattle food to sdf their 
goods abroad. And it gave failing industries, 
from apparel to motorcycles and steel the 


excuse they needed to win more imprudent 

P The decGociai SedS^sralueSSid help 
to correct imbalances that brought misery to 
America's heartland and stffi threaten rela- 
tions with our Asian and European trading 
partners. The catch is that the huge surplus of 
dollars that foreigners earned from their ex- 
ports to America will no longer be available to 
finance federal budget deficits. 

And that leaves America's economic manag- 
ers very litUe room for maneuver. The Federal 
Reserve could stand firm with its credit re- 
straints, thus farcing the Treasury to compete 
with private borrowers for domestic savings. 
That would almost certainly result in a sharp 
increase in interest rales. Or the Fed coold 
create the extra money needed to replace for- 
eign loans, hoping the economy is slack 
enough to absorb it without raising inflation. 

The prudent response to a better interna- 
tional currency balance would be to provide 
for a healthier domestic fiscal balance. The 
smaller the coming federal deficits, the fewer 
the savings the Treasury will absorb to finance 
them — and the greater the amount of credit 
left for private investors. The less that is left 
for such investors, the more likely they will bid 
up the cost of money and everything else. 

For years, responsible analysts of the Amer- 
ican economy have argned that it cannot sup- 
port big budget deficits in good times. Foe 
years the economy has defied their predictions, 
niriring jn foreign ca pital to sustain the hin gf- 


ihe muddle. Bat it isfoedish to trust to lndc for 
prosperity. The buck stops in Washington 
— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Another Troubled Missile 


The conferees on the U.S. defense bill have a 
difficult and telling derision to make on the 
Future of AMRAAM. the advanced medium- 
range air-to-air missile that the Air Force and 
to a lesser extent the Navy have been banking 
on as a weapon of the future. The miaalg, 
which a pilot would fire when his target was 
still a radar blip, is in trouble. Some people 
think it is conceptually flawed. Technical 
problems continue to crop up as well; there 
have been long delays in designing and prepar- 
ing to build iL The projected cost has more 
than doubled in the past four years, to S10.8 
billion for the program, $400,000 per missile.. 
In January, Defense Secretary Caspar Wein- 
berger took the unusual step of putting the 
new weapon on probation, saying no missiles 
would be bought until the Air Force satisfied 
him tt had costs under control; a review is 
scheduled later tins year. 

The House responded by voting to kill the 
missile. The Senate, brushing aside the prob- 
lems, appropriated funds to begin production. 
The conferees must choose, but than is more is 
involved than just another weapon. 

The new missile represoxts a major commit- 
ment on the part of the Air Force, a leap of 
faith as to the nature of future .warfare. The 


service has come to the view that a lot of the 
serious fighting win be done at much greater 
distances than before, even over the horizon. 

Its critics have a more conventional — they 
would say more practical — view of the future. 
The new missile has this major problem: A 
pilot currently has no foolproof way of tdhng 
whether a blip cm his radar screen is friend or 
foe. Proponents are sure that a way win pre- 
sent itself; they say that, if one did not, in an 
all-out war pilots would simply be told to 
assume that planes in certain sectors were 
enemy, and to shoot without inquiring. Nor 
was it reassuring to learn from a leaked docu- 
ment last wed; that the project officer does not 
think the manufacturer, Hughes Aircraft, is 
able yet to produce the weapon. 

Congress should not appropriate produc- 
tion funds for a weapon erf this importance 
under circumstances as shaky as these A pro- 
duction vote would further undermine public 
confidence in both the military procurement 
system and congressional judgment. The con- 
ferees should either loll the project or keep it 
barely alive and give the Air Farce a last small 
dunce to justify iL No one can have much 
confidence in the weapon so far. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Not So Fast, Mr. Gorbachev 

Has Mikhail Gorbachev suffered his first 
setback as the Soviet Union’s new kaderi The 
suspicion is that at the meeting of the Soviet 
Communist Party’s central committee on July 
I, Mr. Gorbachev tried but failed to get rid of 
the prime minister, Nikolai Tikhonov. The 
supporting evidence is that on the night of the 
meeting an extended television news broad- 
cast, designed to cover the central committee 
session, was abruptly canceled. This led Krem- 
lin-watchers to argue that Mr. Gorbachev’s 
intention of replacing Mr. Tikhonov with cue 
of his own men, or perhaps even taking the job 
himself, may have gone awry. 

There are two men he would have been 
happy to see in Mr. Tikhonov’s chair. Vitaly 
Vorotnikov, the premier of the Russian repub- 
lic, and Nikolai Ryzhkov, the party man who 
oversees the economy. Another possibility is 
Geidar Aliev, a deputy prime minister. 

If Mr. Gorbachev did try to become prime 
minister himself, it may be that Us party 
colleagues applied the unwritten rule that the 
posts of prime minister and party leader can- 
not be held by the same man. Thai dares bade 
to 1964, when Nikita Khrushchev — who had 
combined the two jobs — was deposed. (In 
Poland, the rule is broken by General Wqj- 
dech Jaruzdski, who heads both party and 
government, but Mr. Gorbachev can hardly 
point to the general as an example erf success.) 
If. on the otter hand, Mr. Gorbachev tried to 


replace Mr. Tikhonov with one of Us own 
nominees, and faded, the rebuff would be even 
more serious. His colleagues would have been 
idling him that even this indirect control of 
the prime minster’s office would be endowing 
Mr. Gorbachev with too much power. 

— The Economist ( London, ) 

Naval Exercises Comforting 

To some analysts, combat between surface 
fleets seems irrelevant in the age of missiles 
and nuclear weapons. But the Russians obvi- 
ously do not share this view. Soviet warships 
from the Baltic to the Black Sea have gathered 
m the blustery waters of the North Auantic to 
conduct the largest naval war games in the 
history of Soviet sea power. 

These exerc ise s, with more than 100 surf ace 
ships and submarines, including the aircraft 
carrier Kirov, are designed to simulate and 
block any attempt by North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization naval forces to reinforce Norway 
in case of war. The Russians are not alone, 
however. NATO ships and aircraft are mom- 
toring their movements closely. 

The possibility of a dash is always possible, 
yet in a curious way, these operations are 
comforting: The notion of a naval war in 
which Norway or any other ally is to be resup- 
plied and reinforced means that someone be- 
lieves World War 1H can be held below the 
threshold of mass destruction. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 


FROM OUR JULY 23 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Guna Asks Return of Pirates 
PEKING — An interesting situation has aris- 
en out of the fighting between the Portuguese 
and Chinese pirates on the Island of Colowan, 
which resulted in the Portuguese gaining the 
upper band, the liberation of twenty Chinese 
who had been kidnapped by the pirates, and 
the capture of forty of the latter. China expects 
the pirates to be handed over on the ground 
that they were apprehended on Chinese terri- 
tory and that the kidnapping of the rescued 
Chinese which provoked the Portuguese to the 
conflict occurred in China. It appears that the 
Chinese gunboats which watched the bom- 
bardment of Colowan by the Portuguese of- 
fered to cooperate, but the Pom^uese refused 
in view of the possession of the island being in 
dispute with China. The situation, however, is 
being dealt with in a most friendly manner. 


1935: U.S.-Soviet Pact Is Critidzetf 
WASHINGTON — A bitter condemnation of 
the Rnsso-American trade pact as the “crown- 
ing blow of Corddl Hull’s ruinous, fantastic 
mama for free trade,” was ottered by Senator 
Pat McCarran, Democrat of Nevada, who said 
he would soon seek in the Senate a modifica- 
tion of the reciprocal tariff act, under which 
Secretary of Stare Hull has acted. He considers 
that Mr. Huff’s signature of the Russum- 
American trade pact and similar trade agree- 
ments was unconstitutional Under Secretary 
of State William Phillips, in reply, said that 
reciprocal trade agreements were not involved 
in the Soviet pact, which simply gave the 
Soviets the benefit of rates of other nations 
signing trade pacts. In return, be pointed out, 
the Soviets had promised to buy $30,00(1000 
worth of American goods within the year. 


international herald tribune 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chairma n 1958-1981 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M.FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEEW. HUEBNER, Pubiaktr 
Exeaam Editor 


Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Associate EtStor 


International Herald Tribune, IB! Avoue 
France Tel: (1)747-1265. Teton 612718 (Hi 


DepmEMOter 
Atudae Pidduher 
Associate Etdt&sher 
Director of Opemnms 
Director of Gradatm 
recur ofAdmPang Seder 
92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, 

1 Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 




Dirmew de la pubiuvtwn: Waiter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hmmasy RtL, Hong Kong. TeL 5-2856/8. Telex 61170. 



US. subscription: Sill yearly. Second-doss pasta\ 
0 1985. International Herald Trii 


id at Long Island City, N.Y. 1 1101. 
AB rig/as reserved. 


W ASHINGTON — Daring his 
recent visit to Southeast Asia, 
U.S. Secretary of Stale George P. 
Shultz met with many Cambodian 
refugees in Huiland, victims of the 
continuing dvil war and the Viet- 
namese occupation of their country. 

In scenes reminiscent of Western 
leaders’ pilgrimages to Afghan refu- 
gee camps in Pakistan, Mr. Shultz 
was warmly received by Cambodians 
who. like their Afghan counterparts, 
urged the United States to provide 
the means to liberate their country 
bom a foreign invader. 

Mr. Shultz’s response was warm 
but nrmgnmmirtal — jn spite of a 

rather extraordinary series of mea- 
sures taken by the House of Repre- 
sentatives while he was away. In vot- 
ing to approve the foreign aid b2L the 
House passed resolutions providing 
financial sod to Cambodian resis- 
tance groups who could be certified 
•^t uma^nTTmnig t," to the A fghan re- 
sistance movement, and to the forces 
of the National Union for the Total 
Independence of Angola, or UNITA, 
led by Jonas Savimbu who are fight- 
ing Cubans in Angola. The House 
remains hostile to mili iaiy aid for 
Nicaraguan “contras,” but on most 
foreign aid guestions the mood on 
Capital Hffl is now hawkish. 

Thai may explain Mr. Shultz’s neg- 
ative response to the Houseproposal 
to help the Cambndi«n&. Mr. Shultz 
does not want to provide milit ar y aid. 
to those resistance groups in part 
tetany he fears Crm grrys can be 
fickle on those types oHssues, deny- 
ing tomorrow what it approves today 
and thereby nnd«mining a carefully 
crafted pohey. Unfortunately, the re- 
cordof thepast 10 yean corroborates 
Mr. Shultzs pessimism. 

But are thin gs Hang in g ? To make. 
sense of tbebeSivcrent mood in Con- 


By Geoffrey Kemp 


* it [Rf 1 UUJsf / n 

BpCfc HPJS ftp THE — tt 


arena is more susceptible to confu- 
sion than the support of rebels. 

{fitting back at U.S. monies fay 
supporting their enemies has the ad- 
vantage of not involving the United 
States directly m combat; but the 
disadvantage is that we cannot con- 
trol our clients. How can the United 
States assure that nrihtaiy assistanc e 
provided to ntiOrCcinnainist Cambo- 
dians wiflimi trickle down to another 
member of ite resistance, namely Pol 
Pot and his Khmer Rouge? 

That raises the tricky problem that 
anti-Commumst • resistance groups 
are by no means monolithic. WMle 
they have some common, features, 
earn has its own identity and badge 
of respectability in the international 
community. Although, some Afghan 
resistance groins adhere to the tenets 
of Islamic nm damentaJgm, they fagyg 
become, as a whole, heroes m. the 
United States and Western Europe, 
eulogized by the same penile who 
fear and loathe Ayatollah Ruhoffah 
Khomeini and his SMa zealots. 

On the otter Hand, Mr. Savimbi’s 
fighters are highly controversial and 
fttcKlrpH in many q nartw > because of 

the material support they have re- 
ceived from South Africa and their 
effective disruption of Angolan econ- 
omy, which in turn causes disarray 

Slost isolated and despisedare. 
the contras, who have virtually no 
support in Europe and are regarded 
by many Americans as an artificial 
creation of the CIA. 

foroesumr^ aitici^frran these resist 
tance groups cover a wide spectrum, 
ran g in g from the wefi-lramed, well- 
equipped Soviet Union and Vietnam 
to the less prepared and relatively 
poorly equipped Cubans in Angola 


7. 1 





I LIBYA 


/cue$1 


It 


• /to! 

SlM«r A 


and the Sandimsts. To come up with 
any simple description of the condi- 
tions of combat and conflict in these 
regions is exceedingly difficult On 
the matter of values, ethics and the 
use erf force, it requires wild leaps of 
the imagination to believe that the 
Afghan resistance, or any other 
group receiving VS support, will ad- 
here to Queeasberry Rules when us- 
ing violence to defeat or intimate 
their enemies. How should we react 
to this givm US. outbursts about the 
evils or such terrorist acts? 

The unpleasant fact is that Ameri- 
cans are highly selective about who is 
called a terrorist and what is defined 
as a terrorist acL In popular usage; 
the term has come to be associated 
with radical, anti-Western groups 
who use violence against civilians. 

Yet terrorism is a form of warfare 
that can involve the regular armed 
force s of sovereign states. The Rns- 


gress and to understand U.S. prob- 
‘ terns in funding resistance groups, 
two questions most be answered. 
Fust, is the shift in congressional 
opinion permanent or transitory? 
Second, what criteria should the 
United States and otter democracies 
adopt when taking steps to support 
a«i fi-fVMiiinnm«tt resistance move- 
ments which differ widely in size, 
composition, ideology ana interna- 
tional support and who may them- 
selves use ‘Terrorist” actions. 

One explanation for the new hawk- 
ithneBi is that Congress has over- 
come the traumas erf Vietnam and 
Watergate that had such a divisive 
impact on the foreign policy consen- 
sus. It now seems prepared to return 
to a more traditional, bipartisan ap- 
proach on national security issues. If 
that is the case, we might see the day 
when funding the contras will be tie 
rigneur, even for liberal Democrats. 

A more political and therefore 
more transitory interpretation would 
point to three key issues that have 
recently influenced Congress.. First, 
the connng 1986 elections and the 
need for the Democrats not to be 
seen as “soft” on defense and Com- 
munism. Second, the skill of the ad- 
ministration in removing aims cen- 
tred and nndear war rhetoric from 
die national agenda by focusing on 
the Geneva arns talks and the com- 
ing summit between Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail Gorbachev. Third, and 


Reagan Is Outpaced by His Doctrine 


By Charles Krauthamm er 


W ASHINGTON —There are foot major anti-Com- 
munist insnracuoes in the world — in Angola, 
N icaragua, Cambodia, and Afghanistan — and within the 
last ax weeks the House of Representatives has endorsed 
them all It gave money to three, and repealed a 10-year 
ban on aid to Angola, m effect, the House, the last refuge 


no means bees swept away. A majority of House Demo- 
crats are stiff to be moved. Representative Tom Downey 
is one of the leaders of the opposition. He explained his 
objection to the foreign-aid bill tbns: “What this bill says 


While most observers would wel- 
come a more permanent return to 
consensus in foreign policy making, 
bipartisanship itself does not guaran- 
tee good policy, especially if UJS. 
goals and objectives are muddled. No 


ban on aid to Angola, m effect, the House, the last refuge 
for the American dove, adopted the Reagan Doctrine. 

Hus doctrine, enunciated in the 1985 State of the 
Union address, declares UJS. support for anti-Commu- 
nist revolution “on every continent from Afghanistan to 
Nicaragua ” It constitutes the third reformulation since 
Vietnam of the. policy of Mntainm«it_ First oum» the 
Nixon Doctrine, winch reted on regional proxies and 
Mnk with the Then g one the Carter Doctrine; 
which promised unilateral projection of UJS. power, and 
disappeared with the Rapid Deployment Force. 

Enter the Reagan Doctrine, which relies on indi^enoas 
revolutionaries to challenge the Soviet empire at its pe- 
riphery. It is thelLS. response to the Brerimev Doctime, 
wmch declared: Once a Soviet acquisition, always a 
Soviet acquisition. For many Democrats, ccszrinj^ around 
to Ibis idea has meant a reversal. And that has given the 
cynics a field day. After the TWA hijacking and the 
kxfting of marines m El Salvador, Congress seems cranky. 
America has been kicked around lately, and so have 
Democrats. Some are stiff smarting from President Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra’s trip to Moscow, hours after the House 
had voted to cat off aid to the “cottas,” last ApriL 

Now, it is true that the Reagan Doctrine costs little: 
less than 150 million a year. Politically, too, it is not very 
expensive. There are not many fans of, say, Indochmese 
Communism. And Congress is no island of stability. 

Stiff, Congress, like the two-ton gorilla, can be serious 
in spite of itself. Whenever it moves, the effects are 
serious. Democrats may indeed be acting from “political” 
motives. So what? However cynically conceived, the Rea- 
gan Doctrine amendments to the 1985 foreign aid biff 
have a serious effect. Thty amount to a significant, maybe 
historic, change in UJS. foreign-policy consensus. 

To be sure, opponents of the Reagan Doctrine have by 


Majority Leader Jim Wright voiced a different protest. 
Contra aid makes us, he said, “accessaries to an attempt 
to overthrow the government erf Nicaragua.” 

The Reagan Doctrine even gathered support from 
House liberals. The Angolan move was introduced by 
Representative Clande Pepper; Stephen Sdarz Hatrteri 
the Cambodia aid idea. Seventy-three House Democrats 
voted aid to die Nicaraguan contras. And everybody 
supports the Afghan rebels. The great irony is that aff 
these moves have left one man behind: Ranald Reagan. 

Mr. Reagan proclaimed his doctrine (and George 
Shultz elaborated it in a major address in San Francisco), 
then shied aw^y from taking any political rids on its 
behalf. On Angola, the a dm i nistra tion thought th&vofes 
were not there and exerted no pressure. On Cambodia, it 
had to be pushed fay the House. Cite State Department 
opposed the measure. Mr. Shultz wants overt aid to come 
from Cambodia’s neighbors, not the United States.) And 
on Nic ara gua, tbcprestdenl Indeed out. He refused to risk 
his prestige by erring on television to support contra aid. 
It lost in the House by two votes. The only thing that 
saved it in the end was Mr. Ortega’s travel agent 
The president obviously believes in the cause of anti- 
communist revolution. However, he is reluctant to ex- 
pend political capital for it He has other priorities. In the 
name of these priorities (for example, arms sales to 
Jordan and more military aid to the Philippines), the 
White House has even threatened to veto the foreign aid 
b3L Imagine: Congress, the Democratic House, adopts 
the Reagan Doctrine, and Mr. Reagan vetoes the mea- 
sure. That would be one irony too many. At that point, 
the Reagan Doctrine may have to be rechrisieaed. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


Mitterrand: An 'Unanointed King’ Studies Options 


P ARIS — The crisis that is not a 
crisis looms steadily larger and 
louder in France. Can the parties of 
left and right peacefully snare gov- 
ernment power, “cohabiter,” if, as 
expected, the right wins the legisla- 
tive elections scheduled for next 
March? AD of France purports to 
have an opinion. One feds, nonethe- 
less, that it is mainly an issue to 
occupy idle minds at the seashore. 

Tte obvious answaisyes, they can 
and will share power, if it comes to 
that First of all, it is not dear that the 
election remit wiff be as dear-cut as 
most think. A form of proportional 
representation will be introduced for 
tins vote. Both right and left are inter- 
nally divided over tte question of 
forming coalitions; The purpose of 
returning to proportional representa- 
tion is to recreate some of the coali- 
tion-making possibilities of past sys- 
tems, those of tte Third ana Fourth 
Republics, to which many a Socialist 
heart still belongs, and where Fran- 
cois Mitterrand proved himself a po- 
litical operator nonpareil 
Tte prime minister, Laurent Fabf 
us, wants tte Socialists to ca mp aign 
next year in a spirit of “republican” 
reconciliation with moderate forces 
of all parties. The Secretary General 
erf the Socialist Party, Lionel Jospin, a 
political puritan, wants the party to 
take a ram leftist fine, attack tte 
right, and by to recapture the Com- 
munist vote, even though the Com- 
munist leaders hi p continues to con- 
demn the idea of electoral 
cooperation with the Socialists. 

To further complicate matters for 
the Socialists, rival Socialist candi- 
dates for the presidency in 1988 al- 
ready are declaring themselves, there- 
by reopening both the old and 
scarcely healed wounds in the party. 

On tte right, there are some who 
make little secret of their willingness, 
indeed eagerness, to set up house- 
keeping with the Socialists, rfthejio- 
tided price is right. Tte major parties 
of the conservative opposition, have 
swan that they wiff stand together 
against compromise, but ambition 
may finally overpo w er solidarity. 

Coalition government, however, is 
an unlikely outcome. AH the polls 
and presort political evidence indi- 
cate a decisive victory by tte conser- 
vative parties, enabling them to con- 
trol Parliament. Mr. Mitterrand 
would then be obliged to nominate a 


By William Pfaff 


prime minister acceptable to tte new 
majority, ynd this prime minister and 
his cabinet would, according to tte 
constitution, “determine and con- 
duct" tte policy of tte nation. 

Tte president, however, partly by 
law ana partly by precedent, retains 
formidable powers, chiefly in foreign 
and military affairs. Narrowly con- 
strued, these amount to command of 
tte armed forces and treaty-making 


■’(! ■: 




wan^te said, “And the president has 
the duty to respect their choice.” Af- 
ter all, Parliament and president both 
have their roles. He spoke of the 
moral authority of the presidency. 

In short, if left and ri ght divide 
presidency and Parliament for two 
yeara following tte new elections, all 
will go on working well enough. Mr. 
Mitterrand will appoint a primeinin- 
ister from tte more moderate wing of 
die present opposition, or perhaps a 
oonpolitical figure There is prece- 
dent for this. Neither Georges Pam- 
pidoa hot Raymond Baire^ were poli- 
ticians when named as prime 
ministas. Mr. Pompidou was a bank- 
er and Mr. Barre a professor. 

Mr. Mitterrand may be expected 
then to retreat to tte high and serene 


ground of moral influence and over- 
sight of tte nation’s security, while 
using his still considerable political 
powers to prepare tte way for a So- 
cialist successor in tte presidency in 
1988. By that time a new conservative 
cabinet will have bad two years dur- 
ing which to do unpopular thhwf. 

Such would be a feasible andper- 
feetty reasonable course for Mr. Mit- 
terrand to follow. People will remem- 
ber, however, that when the 
“uncrowned, tmanointed, illegitimate 
king” was defeated in April 1969 — 
not in a parfiamentmy election, but a 
mere referendum on regional govern- 
ment reform — Oianes de Gaulle 
was gone from the presidential palace 
by dawn, in aleoce. It was an austere, 
regal acknowledgment that the sov- 
ereign people hadspokoL 
© 1985 William p/aff. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 
Bleak Outlook for Ofl Rejoicing Too Soon 


authority, plus the domestic political 
powers of referendum and dissolu- 
tion of Parliament. In practice, virtu^ 
ally the whole of France’s foreign 
relations, including its African po- 
licy, has since General de Gaulle 
be«i reserved to the president. 

Mr. Mitterrand said recently that if 
a new government tried to take for- 
eign affairs away from him, this 
would amount to a “carp d’etat” — 
an unfortunate phrase, sneeit was he 
who m 1964 described the Fifth Re- 
public as “a permanent coup d’feat” 
and caffedhs president, then Charles 
de Gaulle, “an uncrowned, unandnt- 
ed, illegitimate king/ 7 

He has since backed away from the 
coup (Tfeat remark, and said in a 
Bastille Day interview that he has 
always been against tte idea erf re- 
served powers for the president in 
foreign affairs. People have the right 
to elect tte legislative majority they 


Hobart Rowan’s oration column 
“Cheaper 00 Won’t Slow Explora- 
tion” (July IS) did not touch on the 
recent spate of major oil company 
mergers and “poison pill” defensive 
measures used by other majors to 
fight off hostile takeovers. Tte ensu- 
ing debt load thus assumed has al- 
most n egated any “normal" entiora- 
tion by these companies. Until stub - 
time that these debt loads can be 
mitigated, exploration by these ma- 
jors will be curtailed. 

Because of tbe present oversupply 
of oil and the above-mentioned fac- 
ias, exploration now is in tte dol- 
drums and will get worse. As a conse- 
quence of this very depressed state of 
affairs, the infrastructure of the drill- 
ing industry — the product manufac- 
tures, the service oriented compa- 
nies and the drilling contractors — 
are being financially tom apart and 
may will not must in sufficient num- 
bers when the “normal” exploration 
needs are again mandatory. 

Hard planting is now needed if we 
are to maintain a viable drilling in- 
dustry/. Otherwise, OPEC wifi be 
handed the opportunity for ai y u te r 
crisis . on a silver platter. They would 
prqbably win that one hands down. 
Or rather, because, of missing hands . 

• HARRY N.McDOW: 

• • London. • 


Like many Americans living in 
France, I felt a certain relief upon the 
departure of A mbassador Evan Gal- 
braith. I rejoiced too soon. 

With his interview in tte French 

braith continued to do^ violence to 
Franco- American relations after his 
departure from Paris. 

As a neophyte ambassador, Mr. 
Galbraith fell into an eiemcauaxy 
trap. He faffed to realize that the 
deference paid him by the French 
would have been accorded any Amer- 
iran am ba ssad or , and was not due to 
hispersonal brilliance and (term. 

■ The fact is that Mr. Galbraith's 
predecessor, Arthur Hartman, who 
was a professional, was much more 
highly regarded by the French of all 
political persuasions. 

WILLIAM MARVIN, 
Consul General, Retired. 

Taigon, France. 

Letters tnunded for yubBcaion 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor and must contain the writ- 
er's signature , name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing, We cannot 
be responsible for the mum of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


ahsn civilians in one afternoon than 
-all the Chilians killed by tte Leba- 
nese Shias in one year. And Ameri- 
cans should not forget that a corner- 
stone of Western strategy today is a 
doctrine that calls for the massive, 
systematic arniihilario p nf ffljffiom of 
innocent civilians — a potential act 
of terror unparalleled in history. 

What tte United Slates has to do is 
focus on tte real problem, namely 
that certain political groups are. for 
differed and. complex reasons, at war 
with the Western world. If America is 
in a state of war, rules of behavior 

gntt wipymqi t must be Hwviifigd 

just as they were in World War II. 

We neea to fight our enemies and if 
necessary use some erf their methods 
— with the exception of the deliber- 
ate murder of innocent civilians. That 
may mean the United Stales will sup- 
port groups who use unsavory meth- 
ods. But Americans have to realize 
that violent deeds conducted by sur- 




r - 


rogates are preferable not ooly to 
losing but also to direct UJ5. involve* 
menu tte massive use of American 
firepower and tte increased risks of 
confrontation with tbe Soviet Union. 

In theory, there is an alternative to 
surrender, direct escalation or sup- 
port for soch groups: namdy n^oti- 
atian. Yet tte diplomatic record is 
dismal especially in southern Africa 
and Central America. Tbe United 
States has to realize that there is no 
clean way to fight its enemies. And if 
Congress is senous about giving rid 
re anti-communist resistance groups, 
it must understand tte impfications 
of its actions and see tte unpleasant 
business through to tte end. 

The writer, a senior fellow at 
Georgetown University's Center for 
Strategic and International Studies 
and formerly special assistant on no- 
tional security to the president, contrib- 
uted this to the Los Angeles Times. 


System Traps 
Swedish Voters 
— And Parties 

By Carl Rudbeck 

S TOCKHOLM — It really will 
make no difference which party 
wins the election in Sweden in Sep- 
tember. many Swedes say. It seems 
the Swedish system, is more powerful 
than the politicians involved 
The system has just been re-exam- 
ined by Hans L. Zetterberg, a profes- 
sor of sociology, and tte head erf 
SlFO, the Swedish equivalent erf the 

GETTER FROM STO(Kffi)IM 

Gallup institute. Mr. Zettertezg’s 
conclusion is that real change is im- 
possible, whatever tte ruling party. 

One reason is that Sweden, unique 
among Western democracies, has a 
majority of voters who are paid by 
tte state. Twenty-six percent are gov- 
ernment employees. A further 28 per- 
cent receive their income from pen- 
sions, social security or various 
welfare agencies. Tte Sodal Demo- 
cratic Party is favored by these two 
sectors of the electorate. This 54 per- 
cent believe that their jobs and con- 
tinued well-being are dependent on 
tte continuation of a Social Demo- 
cratic welfare state. 

Paradoxically, tte Conservative 
Party is gaining votes among tbe 
working class who traditionally voted 
for leftist policies. Increasingly, blue- 
collar wooers fed they have more in 
common with tbe people who employ 
them than with toe people who tax 
item. But since tte private sector is at 
38 percent a minority in tte doctor- 
ate, its chances of chang in g the sys- 


tem are slim. Ironically, the ruling 
Social Democrats, once the party of 
progress, seems to be fighting, change. 

Whatever party wins m September, 
it will be handicapped by an increas- 



Aay ruling party will also be forced 
to extract taxes higher than those in 
any other Western democracy. And 
these taxes will have to be supple- 
mented by foreign borrowings. 

Tbe cost of the public sector, ac- 
cording to Mr. Zetterberg and otters, 
prevents any government from taper- . 
mg tax rates. “Since tte majority erf 
tbe people are financially dependent 
on them, there will never be a de- 
crease in taxes. We no longer have the 
necessary political conditions to low- 
er taxes as otter countries have 
done,” Mr. Zetterberg writes. . 

Thus while Swedes talk about 
change, they do not rcaHy warn it 
since that would imperil their jobs 
and their tryggha. or security. No 
party will carry out promised tax 
changes, since that would effectively 
alienate a large part of its own dec- 
torate, Mr. Zetterberg aaintaiBL 

More optimistic political analysts 
see two possibilities for change, how- 
ever. Thejusi is drat the ideological 
winds that brought Margaret Thatch- 
er and Ronald Reagan to power will 
change Sweden, ami pan economic 
issues into second place: Bat even so, ' 
any party wiff fipd its chances for 
action airtailed by laws that make rf 
virtually impossible to lay off public 
onplojiws w& by powerm urnoris. 

the second perspective is toast 
apocalyptic Things trill have to get 
much worse before itey can gel bet- 
ter. The welfare and the pohne mo- 
tots will eventually bebome so top- 
heavy that they roll crumble 
their own wognt and bring abettime 
total disnmtioQ of theecarauribi^- '■ 
tem. But uns js sot a gwmrwi any 
politician dares mention. In this case 
Sweden would na be governed by its 
own politicians, but by tte tattestt* 
doMl Monetary Fluid and ftueign 
hanks. We. will certainly hear nothing 
about this political apocalypse in the 
electoral campaign that promises 
Swedes more of ute good. mb. ewa 
though nobody has the tmtat idea 
"ho w going to pay for ft. . • ' f 
International Htrald Tribmt. : 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


Page 5 




‘Jt- r- ? • 

i \ 

w it-- isvef'HKt 



*«*- 


aj « PM-rjbV „ 

s 

j^srsrjS?^ 

• ...Co-, ih L -re isTn I 

•er\dst -• - , . “ n alicrn^ 

: (*.r 

L^.^5 


kvr.; •■ • 
pCK,-.^ - l - 
ti: C • : . . 
tr, : h : 'A: 

,»/• • • ' ■ 
K’cr: :?.%.■■ 

i'.rr- 

.. 

■ ' ' 
:er. : >: • 

~ «i.‘ 

:v -.•• 


*.’.».■• -■ * 
■ • - j* , . 

■■ •■ 

JTt. • 
i.'-.L-iJ ■:• • 

’. :c ■• 

_:c •• 

"... «. _. » L ' 

t ' ' 

V* 

a*.. " 

" ; 

'■ - 
R'.‘ n '■ 

Xn« - 

■•• ri:. - .. 


•*!■ JZQ> 
--• «. 

■ 1 


• *:'raf 

yc-i-‘ 
:: :•£=:' 


-i-'r 
• . >Ci« 


... i" r.fl *- 

s;-'- 

■ . .—■••£■ ■ 

■ r^v : ?- 
• - 
- 

■ 'A*’- 

.. t 

-i". 




;(?■ 


c" - 

.. -V' 

:;V 

> ! ;i: 


UJ-. iftEC*'... 

• k e?.iVi v 
:?b r.. 

*r. ;,. f,,'-: 

-^n 

cs.-Cfi-nn 1 - 


*■ * M *h« ^ ^ 

fki" r , * 

. . . “ »,it, 

. V "“Ham*. 

nw .... :• :..v prtIaoil ^ 

" -Mali* 

System Ti 
Swedish Jot® 
— And Park 

H> < !arJ Hudbed 
5 rr, j- - ii it** 

^ : • ■■-■■: ih.<0i 

'tr.-i [f-f 

SRS>” •■•-■ . ‘ :.T; rj; |;» 

. V; 

v 

rX' 

*►>' .. J- J "2: iif 

• v - .•: Cw^'icxn 

UEm3n»w*T(»aB 



Jn SakharovTrmtment 


H'asfdnglsa Past Soviet 

Washington - The • 

head the ;Sovi« Academy of 

Sciences has told a US. con- 
gressman . that the; dissident 
jjhysrast, Andrei D. ^akharov, 
eonW never leave -the Soviet 
Union because his 'emigration 
would violate die l969Nudear 
. Noiqjrolffcratida Treaty, 

. The State Department, in in- , 
te^nal ■ documents, character- ' 
ized the Soviet arguments, as 
‘ludicrous*’ and “bizarre.” 

According to documents pixy- 
vk led by dK office of Senator 
Paol'Simbn, Democrat of IHj- 
nois, the senator raised the Sa- 
khairov’ issue during a trip to 
Moscow this month to discuss 
cultural and scientific ex-. 

c fymg fc ; 

Mr.. Sakharov, one of the 
team of scientists that devd- 

a^winacar of UkM^™NoW 
Peace Prize for his human rights 
activities, has been confineato 
the aty of .Gorld, off-hmiis to 
foreigners, since 1980. 

Anatoli P. Alexandrov, presi- 
dent -of the Soviet academy, 
told Mr. Simon on July 9 that 
aUowing Mr. Sakharov to emi- 
grate would be a violation of the 
Nonproliferation Treaty, ac- 
cording to the documents. Mr. 
Sakharov is a member of the 
prestigious academy. 



• AP/i«n 

Andrei D. Sakharov' 

Mr. Alexandrov said that ML 
Sakharov had been privy to no- ■ 
dear secrets and knowledge of' 
how to construct nuclear -weap- 
ons, and he could transmit. this 
material to other countries or 
groups if allowed to emigrate. 
Another Soviet official present 
suggested that the knowledge 
could even land in the hands of. 
terrorists. 


Warsaw’s Longest lines Are No Longer for Food but for Visas 


By Michael T. Kaufman 

^ ; New York Tuaa Stnice . 

■V WARSAW — The longest and 
most tenseliiies forming here these 
days are not in front of meat stores 
or at the doQar simps idling im- 1 
ported goods, but in front of West- 
ern • consulates where visas are 
sought. ■ 

■ Each morning, hoars before the 
consulates open, applicants begin! 
lining bp, holding the passports 
they have been givoi by tbegoveni- 
ment' and? hoping fen: a stamp that 
will fet'tbem go to. the West for a 
holiday, a shopping trip, or for a 
chance to watk illegally fora while.. 
Some hope for an opportunity to 

leave forever. 

■ The stakes are so faqA'and' the 
nerves so taut that conflicts often 

>t On the lines. Not king ago, 
aids bad to clear the 
consulate in therOJS. Embassy after 
subduing battling visa applicants. 

The disputes reflect a paradox 
that has developed since martial 
law was offioaUy scrapped m 1983. 

Before, in the months that fol- 
lowed the suppression of (he Soli- 
darity labor movement, the govern- 
ment set up obstacles to departure 
by denying passports. Many West- 
ern governments cited Warsaw's 
passport policies as proof of repres- 
sion. : 

Bat last yen’, under more liberal- 
ized procedures, the govemmeni is- 
sued .700,000 passports. This -year, 
government sources said, they ex- 
pect the number to rise to 1.15 
million, or almost 4 percent of the 


total population, a figure that in 
the Eastenj bloc is matched wily by 
that of Hungary. 

For most of those who want to 
leave, the area of contention has 
drifted from the police stations 
where Poles apply for passports to 
the consulates where (hey seek vi- 
sas. 

Some of the same diplomats who 
complained (bat Poland was not 
issuing enough passports are now 
privately wondering if perhaps the 
government is dispensing them too 
freely, particularly to those who 
intend to work illegally abroad. 

The longest visa line is at lie 
West German Embassy, where all 
Poles with passports are automati- 
cally given visas. Some Poles say 
they believe that the practice is a 
form of war reparation. 

Unlike the representatives of 
other countries, the West Germans 
do not demand that applicants 
show invitations or prove that they 
have sponsors or demonstrate that 
they have sufficient funds. 

with a consular staff of 28, the 
West German Embassy is issuing 
3,000 visas daily. 

Most of the applicants, traveling 
by train or car, will go to West 
Germany to shop. At flea markets 
around Warsaw, some of these re- 
turned travelers can be seen ped- 
dling their purchases — radios, cos- 
metics, sweaters, jeans — at a 
profit. 

Some of the travelers have ex- 
tended their visits, either by just 
staying, on or by formally 


for asylum. Last winter, many pas- 
sengers on Bailie shopping cruises 
left ship in West German pons, 
declaring themselves refugees. 

Two weeks ago, Wladyslaw Ko> 
zakiewicz, the Polish pole vauher 
who won the gold medal at the 
1980 Olympic Games in Moscow, 
defected in West Germany. 

Warsaw says it has no way of 
knowing how many people are 
staying abroad after leaving as 
tourists. 

“Ask the governments where 
these people are staying." said 
Jerzy Urban, the government 
spdkesmm. 

Apart from the West German 
Embassy, the question of the intent 
of the applicant is critical at other 

embassies. 

A US. consular officer said: “if 
you have a young man or woman, 
traveling alone, with some distant 
relative in the States, you almost 
have to assume that he or she is 
going to at least try to get a job and 
earn some money. In that case, we 
are technically obliged to torn 
down the applicant, but visa-grant- 
ing is not an exact science, ana a lot 
depends on how people strike you." 

The U.S. consular staff here in- 
terviews 200 applicants a day, al- 
though the line outside sometimes 
grows to 500. At the UB. consulate 
in Krakow, there is a backlog of 
1,800 names. At the French, Ital- 
ian, Spanish and British Embassies 
the situation is much the same, and 
even the Turkish Embassy has long 
lines regularly. 



Sr* «oit Tire» 

Poles hoping to obtain a visa line up outside the U.S. Embassy in Warsaw. 


While there seems to be no doubt 
that the number of Poles being al- 
lowed to leave with passports is 
growing, there are categories of 
people who are finding it harder to 
go abroad. 

The most significant group in- 
cludes scientists and scholars want- 
ing to attend academic meetings. 
'Their passports fall into a slightly 
different category from those given 
passports for tourist reasons. Many 


of these people are being told that 
they should apply for official pass- 
ports. 

Under new regulations, to re- 
ceive an official passport an appli- 
cant must swear an oath of loyalty 
to the state and the Communist 
system. A number of scientists have 
chosen to stay home rather than do 
this. 

There are also political dissi- 
dents who are refused passports for 


temporary irasel on the grounds 
that they might “endanger the 
state." 

Some of these people, such as 
Ry.szjrd Buga] ski. has c at the same 
time been offered passports good 
only for emigration. After three 
years of such discussions. Mr. Bu- 
gajski, 42. finally accepted emigra- 
tion. With his »i/e and son. he u 
preparing to leave for a new life in 
Toronto. 


A-Bomb in War and Politics: At First, Just a Better Weapon 


(Continued front Page l) r - 

using the bomb can destroy 
other’s entire national life, yet nei- 
ther could invade the other with 
large aimed forces in the face of 
atomic bombs used on the convoys, 
beachheads or airheads. It makes 
war unendurable. Its very existence 
should make war unthinkable." 

• “Defense against the atomic 
bomb will always be inadequate" 

• “The only defense which we 
can yet foresee is to stop the carry- 
ing vehicle." 

• “If we were ruthlessly realis- 
tic,” wc would not permit any for- 
eign power, other than an ally, “to 
make or possess atomic weapons." 

• “If such a country started to 
make atomic weapons, we .would 
destroy its capacity to make them 


Nixon Says He Considered Using the Bomb 


Xattert 

• NEW YORK — Former President Richard' ML 
Nixon has disclosed that there were four occasions 
while he was president when he considered using 
nuclear weapons. 

In an interview with Time magazine, made public 
Sunday , he said the first tune was in 1 969, shortly after 
inking office, when be was seeking to end the Vietnam 
War. He said the absence . of appropriate targets and 
the harm such use would have had on his hopes of 

Jnion 

! oufouclear weapons. 


* The second occasion was during the Middle East 
war of 1973, he said, when the Soviet Union threat- 
ened to .go to the rescue of Egyptian troops trapped in 
the Shun Peninsula. 

The third occasion was in the early 1970s during 
border dashes between the Soviet Union and China, 
when itwaS|fdt in Washington that the Soviet Union 
might roson to nuclear weapons. 

Mr. Nixon said the fourth time was during the 
India-PaJristan War in 1971, when it was feared China 
might intervene 1 and that Moscow would use the inter- 
vention as as excuse to attack. 



Richard M. Nixon 


pen," Mr. Bundy said. “Bat he nev- 
er came anywhere near facing die 
beforeithad progressed far enough judgment in Korea, or indeed any- 


lo threaten us. 1 

The Eisenhower study ended 

“If there are to be atomic ; 
oos in the world, we must have 
best, the biggest and the most- All 
possible methods of ddiveiy of 
atomic weapons, including aircraft, 
guided misales, rockets and sub; 
marines should be studied and BqL 
veloped.” 

The first ventures into midear 
diplomacy were conducted by Pres- 
ident Harry S. Truman. 

In 1948, the Soviet Unkm barred 
land access , to West Berlin. Presi- 
dent Truman and UJ5. allies react- 
ed with an airlift of food and fuel 


where else, that this was something 
he was prepared to order." 


Nonetheless, hundreds 

develop' a Eghtwagbr^dd 
Qm be carried by one sofdibr. 
Artillerymen pushed 


were 
ns to 


bombers off the carrier Lake 


The Eisenhower years saw the mentiof a nuclear sfaefl andjthe so- 


biggest growth, ever m the nation’s 
stockpile of nudear weapons, from 
1,000 warheads when President Ei- 
senhower he arrived in the White 
House to 18,000 when he tinned 
over power to'Presideat Kennedy 
eight years later. 

; ft was a time when the three 
.branches of service fought each 
other for more of. the annual pro- 
duction of nudear materials and 
encouraged scientists to develop 
weapons for land,- sea or air usL 
It was also a period when the 


Faced with the prospect that airftift' United States skirted deploying 
planes, could be harassed. President nuclear-capable weapons and war- 


r.lr ’ 


Truman' briefly considered the use 
of nuclear weapons —although the 
United States then had fewer than 
five ready , for use. 

On July 15, 1948, the National 
Security Council derided to send 
60 B-29s to Britain. The decision on 
the “atomic bombers” was given 
wide publicity, creating an impres- 
sion that the U-S. was preparing to 
use nudear weapons. However, no 
nudear bombs were sent and it has 
since been disclosed that the B-29s 
were not even fitted to carry them. 

A year later, however, after the 
crisis eased, nuclear-capable bomb- 
ers were indeed sent to Britain. 
And in 1950, at the request of the 
Pentagon, President Truman 
agreed to send nonnuclear compo- 
nents for bombs to Britain, and 
later to bases in the Pacific, so they 
would be ready on short notice. 

The superpower situation 
changed abruptly in 1 949. On Sept. 
3 that year, a tJJS. RB-29, flying 
from Japan to Alaska on a regular 
intelligence mission, picked up ra- 
dioactive debris in the air off Kam- 
chatka. Peninsula. When matched 
with other samples, the debris con- 
firmed that the Soviet Union had 
detonated an atomic device. 

One immediate result was Presi- 
dent Truman’s decision to proceed 
with the hydrogen bomb. 

After the Korean War broke out 
on June 25, 1950, be again resorted 
to nuclear diplomacy. 

According to declassified- Na- 
tional Security Council papers, (he 
president agreed that nuclear 
weapons , would -be used only if to- 
tal defeat of the United States and 
other UN forces was imminent Al- 
though the Chinese almost drove 

U-Siti : * 

Slates 

One ream according to Paul H. 
Nike, who was on the State De* 
panmatfs polity planning staff 
then, was that few bombs were 
available for use. If nudear 
ms had been used in Korea, 

Niue said, the United States would 
have been left with too few to deter 
the Soviet' Union in Europe. 

Eariy in 1953 Eisenhower, 
inaugurated as president, was 
ing messages to North Korea, 
through Secretary of State John 
Foster Dalles, threataiing use of 
nuclear weapons to end the Korean 
War. former President RLdard M. 
Nixon saidinan interview. 

Mr. Nixon, who attended those 
sessions as vice president, contend- 
ed that the “nuclear diplomacy" 
helped bring an end to the Korean 
War satisfactory to Washington. 

Mr. Bundy said be- believed that 
Resident Eisenhower had led. his 
military commanders to think they 
would get approval to use nudear 
weapons. “He didnlt mind ttmwjy- 
ing the message that il.could bap-. 


heads around the worid — particu- 
larly in countries near the Soviet- 
Union — and undertook regular^ 
maneuvers of nuclear-capable 
farces, such as airboome bomber 
alerts, that wquMsCemfrightening 
and provocative today. ' .' 

Dr. Harold ML Agnew, a physi- 
dsi who worked on the first bomb 
and later headed the Los Alamos. 
National Laboratory, said recently 
that scientists and nnfitary plan- 
ners “were much more cavalier 
about the use of weapons then.' 


called atomic camion. When, sent 
to . Europe, these long- barreled 
weapons, were so awkward dial 
thrv got stuck in the narrow streets 
ana comers of old towns.- tacking 
treads to move over rough surfaces, 
they could not be used oft roads. 

a “nudear battlefield," ^h?axmy 
successfully pushed the Atomic En- 
ergy Conmnsaon to allow it to bold 
exercises at the Nevada nuclear test 
site in conjunction with weapons 
tests, when the long-term effects of 
radiation were not yet knowu.- 
. Soldiers who took jpait in at least 
one of these, the 1957 test celled 
Smokey, have suffered a highjrate 

of leukemia. ' f 

was intense 

. — . fall of 

1951,1* rRjtibert 
fanner diieCtbfof the 
Project, took part, in Project Vista, 
a top-secret stiidy : of tbetiefen^e of 
Wesiern Europe and possible, 
of nudear weapons there. Inttuti! 
role; be and others met for several 
days in France with General E$eo- 


With specially designed vaults 
for the bombs, the earner sailed 
across the Pacific and waited for 
the order that never came, accord- 
ing to one of the four pilots,' who 
recently retired. ' 

In 1958, when President Eisen- 
hower again asked about using 
atomic weapons in care the United 
Sates- had to defend the National- 


invasion, the three services devel- 
oped competing plans. Hie whole 
idea was killed when Secretary of 
Sure Duties got estimates that the 
military options could kill right 
million Chinese. 

During the mid-1950s, the 
NATO allies wanted more control 
over UJS. nuclear weapons de- 
ployed on their territories — only 
the -British had by then developed 
iKrir own weapons. The allies dis- 


serve on vessels carrying nudear 
weapons. 

By the end of the decade. West 
German fighter-bombers bearing 
LLS. nudear bombs were on alert 
on runways. Only a U.S. guard pre- 
vailed them from being used with- 
out authorization. 

In the late 1950s, the Eisenhower 
administration supplied Turkey 

missiles, with nudear warheads! 
Beginning in I960, the missiles 
were deployed near the Soviet bor- 
der, with UK troops guarding the 
warheads. 

Bromley Smith, who was on the 
staff of the National Security 
Council at the time, said recently, 
“They woe there for the porpose of 
reassuring the Tories that the Rus- 
sians would not come across then- 
border." He added he had been 
laid the Jtrpiters were deployed 
“because we had so many of them 
that they were coming out of our 
ears and this was a good place to 
get rid of them." 


ist Chinese islands of Quemoy and ' cussed, and eventually rejected, the 
Matsu from a possible Communist idea of haring multinational crews 


NEXT: Behind ike scenes of the 
Cuban missile crisis. 


Good business 
sense in 
any language! 


7VE 






TheWbrld's Favorite Address 
in Beverly Hills, California 

Convenient location, near airports, 
shopping and business. 
Award-winning restaurants. 

Deluxe rooms and suites with terraces. 
Personalized service and amenities. 
Extravagant bathrooms and meeting facilities. 

Contact Hilton Reservation Service, or your 
Travel Agent; in your city. 

Telex Direct 194683 


Interrersoce rivalry 

1950s. m the 



In his initial months in office ’ hpwer, the NATO command^ 


President Eisenhower believed that 
atomic bombs; were a major ad-, 
vance over earlier weapons and had 
to be integrated into tire. military' 
forces. He also frit that their tier, 
payment could save money. 

He translated Ms belief into a 
directive declaring that, for budget- 
ary and- contingency planning, the 
military services wen; to consider 
nudear weapons on aparwith con- 
ventional weapons; This led to the 
purchase of so-called dual-capable 
systems, such as artillery that could 
fire conventional and nuclear, 
shells. ... 

Thus, nudear versons of cone! 
vcntional weapons became avail- 
able for use in a crisis, but with a 
requirement of presidential ap- 
provaL -Some weapons, such as no- 
dear" warheads for anti-aircraft 
weapons, were deployed with “pre- 
ddegated authority." 

The Korean War sent, the army . 
rushing to develop tactical nudear . 
weapons — devices that troops 
could use on the battlefield. 

When the army engineers asked 
for a weapon, for example, Los 

Alamos scientists took a Hiroshi- 

into the sea, the United ma-type bomb and “put it in a 
not resort to the bomb, can," in the worths Of Dr. Agnew, 
titus producing the first atomic de- 
molition minp- The device, which 
could dose off the three invasion 
routes from Eastern Europe to the 
West, has never been accepted by 
West Europeans for use on their 
territory. 


‘anti- 
use 

to put out ;«nemy aHfidds."! He 
added that General Eisenhower 
urged the scientists “to make atonh 
ic weapons available.' 

, With the hdp of Dr. Oppenbri- 
mer. the army was able to wm Pen- 
tagon and congressional support 
for battlefield nuclear weapons. 

. Later, according to other testi- 
mony at hearings, airforce officials 
ware critical of Dr. Oppeahrimer’s 
assistance to the army: According 
to Dir. Herbert F. YgA. a physicist 
who' beaded the Lawrence Liver? 
math Laboratory in CaE/omkand 
later worked at the Pentagon; the 
air force told its civilian scientists 
not tri use Dr. Oppenhrimer jas a 
consultant and to keep classified 
information from him because of 
the help he had given the army. . 

The- air force also forced a re-. 
;of chaiges that Dr. Oppen- 
r s earlier associations with 

Amwiran Gn rnmimi5 ts.and! sympa- 
ihizers represented a “security 
risk.” , The Eisenhower, administra- 
tion ordered a hearing in ' 1954, 
which resulted in the withdrawal of 
the physicist's clearance. .. 

The navy, too, was eager. For 
exampkv mer teaming in 1953 that 
President Eisenhower was search- 
ing for a way to use nndear 'weap- 
ons in Korea should the trace hreak 
down, the navy trained fwirpflots 
to fly nuclear-eq nipped fighter 



THE BEST OF All POSSIBLE WORLDS 

. DOLDER GRAND HOTEL, 
ZURICH 

Raoul de Gendra, Dfr. Kurhaussiraue 65, CH-6Q32 Zurich 
Talapheiw 01/351 62 31. Trie* 53449;grbnd ! ch - 



Keep up with the Joneses. 

• When you keep up by phone . you stay close to the people you miss in the Stales. You 
trade your latest experiences and share your everyday lives But. best of ail. you hold on to 
that special bond that joins you in spite of the distance between you 


AT&T 


immp ~n$si2 3msii*mgm*3msnimiBmssB8mmtti imi i -c 


Page 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


If you dream of a German car, here’s the 
German dream car. Audi quattro. 




A dream car of a special 
kind: the Audi quattro. Not 
just because it has been 
world champion several 
times over. Rally World ' 
Champion in 1982 and 
1984. Winner of the Drivers' 
World Championship in 
1983 and 1984. And not 
only beca use of its convinc- 
ing victories in countless 







rallies under the toughest 
conditions. It is more. It is 
the fascination of a unique 
automobile concept. Audi 
has pioneered the techno- 
logy of permanent four- 
wheel drive to produce one 
of the most intelligent and 
versatile cars of our times. 
To drive an Audi quattro 
is to move towards a new 
automotive philosophy. 


. c ' 
ly* 






'thas^Ncn 

: two, 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


Page 7 


n -n 


**"**i$Z 

Sit? 



>C er 
"is ■: 
nat 
Jsse •; 

3e r ?r: 
'sve- *. . 
os: ■■ 

> ca\ 
an ~ 
r.e : . 


,0u 9hesi 
' _ n . Qre - lti S 
J ' a u niqi« 
- spt. Audi 
' ne techno. 
rP, t four- 
"oduceooe 
■"Qentanu 
° ,jr times. 
" 3'-cttro 
5 , rds a nev, 

5i, -'-0phy 




, ; r 


-i-fe 


■<:>V 


Behind the Scenes, China Warms to Israel in Trade and Technological Cooperation 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Times Strike 

JERUSALEM — White reports, 
surfaced last week aboot secret ex- 
chaoiKs between Israel and tbe So- 
viet Union, a far more intense and 
lucrative relationship has been qui- 
etly developing berwcoi Israel and 
CJfina, according to officials here. 

In the last seven months, the 
Chinese have shown increasing in- 
terest in Israeli achievements in ag- 
riculture, solar energy, manufac- 
turing, advanced technology, 
robotics, constrnctum, road budd- 


ing and weapons production, say 
■ officials famiHflr with ifre trarig. 

Sook deals have already been 
reached and many others are pend- 
ing, at one stage or another. 

China's interest in Israel, with 
which -it has not had diplomatic 
relations and whose policies it de- 
nounces in international forums, is 
seen by experts as one more sign of 
Beijing’s new economic policy, 
which is at rapid industrial 
developn^t ty^a dop t^ modem 

nation willing to sefl- 
The extent to which the Chinese 


have been willing io develop eco- 
nomic ties with Israel, despite the 
absence rtf diplomatic relations, 
was demonstrated just a few weeks 
ago, Israeli officials said. In the 
past, virtually all Israeli scholars or 
businessmen who wanted to vial 
China had to hold dual citizenship, 
so they could travel cat ihepassport 
of a country with which China had 
ties, such as the United States. 

However, according to Israeli 
go v e r nm ent sources, a delegation 
of nine representatives from vari- 
ous industries, most of them owned 
by collective farms, visited China 


by invitation at the end of May and 
in early June. 

The viators, government sources 
said, were given visas on official 
passports, and their delegation was 
led by Shmud Pohotyks, director 
of tbe Joint Agricultural Planning 
and Rural Development Authority 
of tbe Ministry or Agriculture 

“The fact that Israelis entered 
China without having to hide their 
identity is a mqjor step forward for 
us,** an official said. 

A spokesman for the Ministry of 
Agriculture said: “I never heard of 
the thing. I don't know anything 


about iL This fellow won't talk to 
you about it. You can interpret that 
any way you want" 

The Israeli Foreign Ministry has 
been equally tight-lipped. A report- 
er was rebuffed cm a routine re- 
quest to meet with the Foreign 
Ministry official who deals with 
Far East economic relations. 

However, a top Israeli official, 
speaking on condition that his 
name not be published, said: 

The Chinese know that we have 
developed systems, in agriculture 
and irrigation for instance, which 


they are very interested in acquir- 
ing Israeli businessmen are trying 
to expand relations. We were one 
of the first nations to recognize 
China and we are voy interested in 
reaching better relations, political- 
ly and economically " 

The Israeli Foreign Ministry has 
decided io reopen its consulate in 
Hong Kong wititin the next few 
weeks. It was closed in 1975 be- 
cause of budget cuts and the lack 
contacts with China- 
According to Israeli officials, the 
consulate nail be used as the main 
point for diplomatic and economic 


Israelis Fear Informal Contacts With Russians May Be Harmed by Leaks 


% William Claiborne 

Washington Peat S&tke 

JERUSALEM — Israel's infor- 
mal contacts with the Soviet Union 
may have been jeopardized by the 
leaked report of a meeting in Paris 
last week between the Israeli and 
Soviet a mb assadors there, senior 
Israeli cabinet sources say. 

While the officials were not pre- 
pared to go so far as to say that 
rapprochement and hopes for a re- 
laxation of Soviet controls on emi- 
gration of Jr vs to Israel had been 
irrevocably damaged, they said 
that the disclosure of the me eti ng 
clearly had embarrassed tbe new 
leadership of Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. 

Israeli officials have not pubtiefy 
challenged the Israeli radio report 


about the secret Paris meeting, but {Mr. Shamir told an Army Radio 
they have questi o ned privately the interviewer t h^t arrangements to 
veracity of the alleged mierpreta- miy»t Mr. Shevardnadze in New 
tion by Ovadia Sofer, Israel s am- Yak were made before the disdo- 
basrador to France, of his meeting .sure f ^ a < the lw*di Soviet am- 
with Yuli M. Vorontsov, his Soviet bassadois to France had met 
counterpart in Paris. There is no connection," he 

The officials criticized the has- “The luring was planned previ- 
tiling of the ambassador’s cabled oosly.”] 
account, which reportedly had not a senior official said after the 
been given a security classific at i on, weekly cabinet meeting Sunday: 
For the last two years, the Israeli “it is difficult to believe that this 
and Soviet foreign ministers have lea k was of any advantage to tbe 
met openly in New York at the cause" of improving relations with 
start of the United Nations Gencr- Moscow, 
al Assembly session. At tbe Paris meeting Mr. Safer 

[Foreign Minister Yitzhak Sha- and Mr. Voroaisov were reported 
nrir said Monday that he planned to have diwuwd a deal in which 
to meet tbe Soviet foreign minister, the Russians would allow increased 
E d uar d A. Shevardnadze, at the Jewish emig ratio n to Israel in ex- 
UN in October, Reuters reported riumgp for increased Israeli ftoti- 
from Tel Aviv. baity in negotiations on the occu- 


since the Jewish state's founding — 
that of emigration of Soviet Jews— 
and to have caused consternation 
Tbe Soviet press agency Tass is- in the prime minister's office and 
sued a denial in Moscow of the the Foreign Ministry. 


pied Golan Heights and for 
assurances that Israel would not 
: anti-Soviet propaganda. 


Israeli radio report that a relax- 
ation of emigration of Soviet Jews 
to Israel was part of any agreement 
Tass called the report "fabrications 
about a mythical proposal" and 
tamed The statements attributed to 
Mr. Vorontsov as “totally ground- 
less." 

A Soviet spokesman confirmed 
Friday that the mating had taken 
place, bm reiterated the long-held 
Soviet position that emigration was 
an internal issue and could not be 
part of an agreement such as re- 
ported by Israeli radio. 

Tbe Ink appeared to have dam- 
aged one of Israel's prime causes 


Details of the meeting were ob- 
tained al the minis try by an Israeli 
radio reporter, Shimon Suffer, ap- 
parently from an unclassified came 
from Israel's ambassador to France 
describing his secret meeting with 
tbe Russian. 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres 
was reported Sunday night to have 
sent a personal message to Mr. 
Gorbachev stressing that Israel 
held no animosity toward tbe Sovi- 
et Union and expressing the hope 
that agreement can be reached on a 
□umber of issues. The message re- 
portedly was coupled with expres- 


sions of regret to Soviet officials by 
Israeli diplomats in Paris. 

There was no official explana- 
tion of bow sudi a sensitive able 
could have been sent from Paris to 
Jerusalem without a “secret" classi- which has been confirmed by lsrae- 


contacts. Israeli officials have no 
illusions that Chino, which has 
thousands of workers in the Arab 
world, will recognize Israel soon. 

But they do bold out hope that 
Israd could have the kind of rela- 
tionship with China iba! it has with 
many African nations, which do 
not formally recognize Israel but 
have behind-the-scenes contacts 
and engage in trade. 

Israel has said its consul in Hong 
Kong wiD be Renven Merhav, for- 
mer bead of Israel's brief diplomat- 
ic mission in East Beirut, after the 
1982 invasion, and a man with ex- 
perience in sensitive assignments 
such as Iran. 

Chinese trade officials and Israe- 
li businessmen have had no prob- 
lem making contact even without 
the help of an Israeli consulate in 
Hong Kong. 

According to a report several 
weeks ago in a political weekly, 
Kourret Rashit, the essence of 


fication. 

■ Egyptian Reservations 
Prime Minister Kamal Hassan 
All of Egypt said Monday that the 
emigration of more Soviet Jews to 
Israel could hamper the Middle 
East peace process, Reuters report- 
ed from Cairo. 

Mr. Hassan Ali said that if a deal 
between the Sonet Union and Isra- 
el were to include more Jewish emi- 
gration, “this means that more set- 
tlements win be built in the West 

Rank pf the M?" anil this in mm 

is against the peace process." 


b officials, Chinese provinces and 
economic development enterprises 
have submitted more than 70 pro- 
posals to Israeli companies since 
December. They range from the 
construction of residential neigh- 
borhoods to the export of high- 
technology equipment. 

Initially. Jewish businessmen 
working out of Beijing, Hong 
Kong, Europe and Australia acted 
as go-betweens, but now the Chi- 
nese are often approaching Israeli 
companies directly. 


“The Chinese are hungry for 
know-how. ideas, and investments 
and are prepared to buy anything 
under the right economic terms," 
said the journal Koicret Rashit. 

"Information on such projects is 
transferred from China to Israel on 
facsimile machines. Among the 
contracts already signed: an agree- 
ment to build multistory holds, a 
project to build a big civilian air- 
port in southern China io partner- 
ship with some other Western com- 
panies, a contract to establish a 
chemical-products plant for agri- 
culture in southern China, a con- 
tract to provide know-how con- 
cerning fish processing and a joint 
advertising project with Chinese 
advertisers." 

The companies would not agree 
to use of their names for fear that 
the publicity would harm the deals. 

Israeli experts on China said 
there were several reasons why Chi- 
na had become interested in wider 

dealings with Israel 

"Israel has tbe image in China of 
a small country that has been very 
successful in technology, particu- 
larly in irrigation systems and the 
development of arid zones," said 
Professor Harold Z. Schiffrin, a 
specialist on C hina and director of 
the Harry S. Truman Research In- 
stitute at' the Hebrew’ University. 

Tbe expert, who has visited Chi- 
na three times since 1982 on his 
U.S. passport, added: "From Isra- 
el, they can get the best technology 
at the best price." 


Lange Says 
Ship Bomber 
Is Known 


TJu Associated Pros 

WELLINGTON, New Zealand 
— Prime Minister David Lange 
said Monday that he knew who 
bombed the Greenpeace ship Rain- 
bow Warrior, in which a crew 
member died He did not name 
anyone. 

“From the best information, l 
have a knowledge of who did it," 
Mr. Lange said. “And I know, from 
the best information I have, why it 
was done." 

He said that investigations into 
the July 10 bombing had estab- 
lished that it was welt-funded. He 
also said that there were dear polit- 
ical overtones but that there was no 
evidence to suggest that any gov- 
ernment or government intelli- 
gence agency was involved. 

U.S. Cancels Warning 
About Athens Airport 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The State 
Department canceled on Monday a 
warning against travel through the 
Athens airport. Tbe wanting was 
issued a month ago after a Trans 
World Airiinesjet was hijacked af- 
ter takeoff from Athens. 

The bracking was the first step 
in the hostage crisis in which 39 
Americans from TWA flight 847 
were held in Beirut for 17 days. 

A State Department spokesman 
said a Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration team inspected the airport 
last week and round it now met 
security requirements. 

He said tbe team also took ac- 
count of a repon by tbe Interna- 
tional Air Transport Association, 
which last week praised tbe air- 
port's security. 



U.S. Joint Chiefs Oppose War Convention Revisions 


Prime Minister David Lange 


(Continued bom Page 1) 
mounted to an endorsement, in 
the politically potent form of a le- 
gs! instrument, of both the rhetoric 
arwt the anti-civilian practices of 
terrorist organizations that fly tbe 
banner of saf-detenninatioc. 

He called it “a pro-terrorist trea- 
ty masquerading as humanitari an 
law." 

His commentary was not formal- 
ly approved as an o fficial atatemqnt 
of its position, bat Pentagon offi- 
cials said it did-represent the think- 
ing of senior policy makers. 

Other officials maintain that the 
talk of die protocols are worth 
salvaging because of provisions 
that would strengthen extradition 
and prosecution of terrorists, and 
attach legal teeth and consequences 
to taking hnelayt and »«ng force 
indiscriminately. 

The laws of war are generally 


Mr. Lange said that he had been 
briefed on the case. He empha- 
sized. however, that knowing who 

committed the crime did not neces- _ 

sarily amount to haring the evi- 1907, «Ski i feti£Sf'the seU-detennmation." Tbe proto- 


grouped under tbe Hagne Conven- 

‘ ' limited the 

means and methods of warfare 


such as weapons and targets, and 
tbe four Geneva Conventions of 
1949, which mandated humane 
treatment of the sick and wounded, 
for prisoners of war, and for rivti- 

ian<t. 

Delegates from almost all na- 
tions gathered in Geneva in 1974 
for what was called the Diplomatic 
Conference on the Reaffirmation 
and Development of International 
Humanitarian Law Applicable in 
Aimed Conflict. Several national 
liberation movements such as the 
African National Congress, which 
opposes the South African govern- 
ment, and the Palestine liberation 
Organization took part but did not 
vote. 

Article I of Protocol 1 rays that 
the provisions apply to nations and 
“peoples” who “are fighting 
awina colonial domination and 
alien occupation and against racist 
regimes in the exercise of their right 

ir ■— ------- -* tv. 


dence needed for a court case. 

“Let’s be quite dear, dial's dif- 

fereat from having proof which can 

££ , -ffi 0fUW " hl * B *“ Study Says Immigrants 
e£Srettk»iE Benefit U.S. Economy 

inquiry, declined comment an Mir. United Pita international 

Lange’s statement. He confirmed, WASHINGTON — A new 
however, that police were dose to study disputes the belief dial illegal 
having enough evidence to bring immigrants are flooding into the 

• ^ frggjj 

that the 


charges. 

The Rainbow Warrior sank in 
Auckland harbor after two bomb 
blasts. Fernando Pereira, 36, the 
ship’s photographer, was killed. 

Tbe vessel the flagship of die 
international Greenpeace environ- 
mental organization, was to have 
led a flotilla next month to protest 
French nuclear, testing at-tbe Mur- 
uroa/.toIL 

Police inquiries have centered at 
a French-speaking couple arrested 
with false passports and the French 
crew of a French-registered yacht 
that was berthed near the Rainbow 
Warrior at the tune of the explo- 
sions 


citizens, and says ii 
newcomers are raising the Ameri- 
can standard of living. 

The study, by Johan Simon of 
the University of Maryland, says 
most current immigrants, indndzng 
the 25 percent who arrive illegally, 
are rdativchr young and ambitions, 
“Through their spent earnings," he 
said, “they make as many jobs as 
they take. They also make addi- 
tional new jobs with the new busi- 
nesses that so many of them open." 
Citing US. Census Bureau figures, 
he said immigrants pay about 
Sl.SOOmorcin taxes each year than 
they receive in public services. 


cd also provides that regional po- 
litical . organizations, such as the 
Arab t^aguw mil the Organization 
of African Unity, will judge which 
“peoples" constitute a legitimate 
party to armed struggle. 

Mr. Fdth argues that this would 
ahnlish tbe traditional definition of 
international conflicts as being be- 
tween two or more sovereign na- 
tions by giving regional political 
groups the right to confer on na- 
tional liberation movements the 
trappings of sovereignty’. 

Some administration officials 
say that this defect can be over- 
come by a reservation slating that 
the Umted States reserves the right 
to apply or not to apply the provi- 
sions io any group of its choosing. 

Article 43 also represents a seri- 
ous problem for critics of Protocol 
I in that it could be read as confer- 
ring prisoner of war status on irre- 
gulars or terrorists. 

This could exempt terrorists 
from prosecution under c riminal 
law by a sovereign nation. The Ge- 
neva Conventions of 1949 confer 


Washington 



In London; a New Bond Street address commands instant respect. Now Washington offers 

you a new waterfront address of even greater significance. 

Washington Harbour. The most prestigious address in the world's most prestigious capital. 
")tbui office or residence provides an unsurpassed view of the Potomac River, Georgetown 
and the Kennedy Center. Minutes away are the White House and Capitol Hill 

Bold architecture surrounds you. Luxurious amenities pamper you. Wxld-dass restaurants 
and shops cater to your discerning raste. 

Washington Harbour. A landmark on the banks of the Potomac. 

For office leasing information, telephone Barnes, Morris and Fardoe, line., (202) 463-8200. 
For retail leasing information, telephone Western Development Corporation, (202) 965-3600. 
For residential safes information, telephone washihgTON" 

Washington Harbour Associates, (202) 342-7366. 


W 

HARBOUR 


A Hoa kwmt of Wotcm QnrbpmeM CmpMtan. CSX Reswta, far. and Km Am Rnhv. Inc TU» b m* in tMu of nk- Comply o&fing tern snSAIc lrom*ot»or. 


prisoner of war status ooly od regu- 
lar uniformed combatants. 

Article 44 recognizes that there 
are situations w here “owing to the 
nature of the hostilities an armed 
combatant cannot so distinguish 
himself." In these circumstances he 
can retain combatant status if he 
curies arms “openly." This is de- 
fined as “during e»rh militar y en- 
gagement," in other words during 
an actual attack, or during “mili- 
tary deployment," a vague phrase. 

In their 106-page study of the 


protocols delivered to Defense Sec- 
retary Caspar W. Weinberger two 
weeks ago, the Joint Chiefs also 
listed a number of other concerns. 

One section of Protocol 1 bars 
reprisals a pina civilians, and the 
Joint Chiefs were not sure they 
wanted to abandon this possibility 
in retaliation against attacks on 
American civilians. Another sec- 
tion would prohibit attacks on nu- 
clear power plants, dikes and dams, 
and here the chiefs hesitated 
to approve. 


SCf 

H A N N E L 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

“Europe's Best View" 


PROGRAM TUESDAY 23rd JULY UK TM£S 


1335 THE NATURE OF THINGS 
14J0 SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON 
1500 SKYTRAX 1 
15.46 SKYTRAX2 
1830 SKYTHAX3 
1730 MR ED 


1800 THE LUCY SHOW 

18 30 CHARLIE'S ANGELS 

19 30 LEARNED FRIENDS 

20 10 ROVING REPORT 

2040 US COLLEGE BASKETBALL 
2140 SKYTRAX 


SXV CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SELLS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION. RATES, MARKETING A 
AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT SKY CHANNEL SALES, 
SWAN HOUSE. 17-19 STRATFORD PLACE. LONDON WIN BAF 
TEL: LONDON (01) 493 1166 TELEX: 268395. 


EMPLOYMENT 


CKIWIUI. 

POSITIONS WANTED 


ANOBCAN Ottl. XL Looking far o 
jab ykMi an Amsnasi fan m northern 
Baly or loothertl Switzerland area. 
SpediRu^hofcaitighKhoclmd- 
uate, Plea*> coA Loaano, Swtoedand 

091 / 541038 BertirT 

MCE MIHUGEMT H05IB5, 24, 

looks for parWane axxrcnr*! m Loo- 


■ to 11 pm. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


CW 8 MAJOR-DOMO to cook For, 
cou pl e 8 H^iervd* care of large rts- 
dance in Boulder, CO- Em»a* 
quued re French oam & targe efrv 
iMr pevties. Experience of aptitude 
mured lor management of prff. 
Uerenoa MNned. Write PA Bat 
854. SouUer, CO 80306 USA 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WXNTT3) 


UNUSUAL 
Lndy high drss vceOenl eduataon 
«Mhm to .tola f egxMMt y of 
houo ad 
several moiL- _ . . - 

Complete trap end i . 

phone p| 32S U 25. 


YOUNG OJSH WOMAN, hamkeop- 
er /-cook. 26 fetti. neb position 
norkArtda. CV, an request. 7ef~£B2- 
67309 Ntntod, Ntonuoy . 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

THECAISfPRNG 

SOCIALISTS 

PANS , (11 225 64 44 

CANNES/MCE J93} 39 43 44 

F*Ah*RJ£T PJ61 ORBO 51 

80MV / COtOGNE IE2BZI29Z? 
STUTTGART 070311 68081 

MlfrKH |®S} 93 10 45 

br9aerhavb>j pirn *3oa 

NEW YO* (212605 7061 

HOUSTON 931 7605 

LOSANGBS fella 568 92® 

MONTREAL Bid 866 6681 

agents woho wide 

Leave i to w Io bring t to you 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTO CONVERSION 


B*A/ DOT 

CONVERSIONS 
• Curtone brokerage/ boning lervice 

e Professional work u»ng orfjr the 


EPA / 

IMPOSTS 

2394 Norih Pm M_ ^ 
M.IC944 USA Tot 2ISB22 6852 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

THE ME8CEX3 SKOAUSTS 
Swiberiml Wtef Gmerrf & tvffond 

Tas free - U€> - European deivery • 
ISPA/DCT- 
Sh^png by fo oportv. 

N STCXX 500 SE/L- Stack. Gray, Sue 
383 SlCr Sod, SiW 

2B0 SEA. fitadL Btae 

dhbct ROM soma 

Tras® LorxSon Ud. 

6S67 Port Low London Wl. 

Tnfc 01-629 7779 
Telex 8956022 TRAS G. 


e BUY YOUR TAX RS CAR • 
Dbed Iran Europe 

_ Dhpe Ur— SBJBCIION 
SBBC7JONI 


Germany. 


ck-Str. 13 2808 Syke. Wed 
. R4242-51B 1/2/3. Tt 24109 


BMW Ml IACNG OftiVa 

^suszttr 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


COOPER ST JAMES 

OFFICIAL AGENT 
Of BMW (G8) LTD 

Whieyou txe in Europe, we con oiler 
ccnMerabie sown on brand new 
BMW con to mod spoaficimm. FuB 
faddy warranty. 

Oi left hend 
at tours 


We oan aha . 
item tax free 
We da» 

proof 

range fax free. 


» nee BMWt at tourer anon. 
■> supply tadory left Met- 
BMmand the Alpna BMW 


(01| 629 66199. 


New BMW'S/ MERCEDES On Stock 
745 

735 B f un dr/ 

60S 

535 Xed-Arfic Blue-White 

500 SEC dork biue/grey leather 
380 SEL named bbe/gre, leader 
380 SEchenpOOne/brovra leather 
Pre-owned BMW i/ Porsche abo 
erasable Mmicfe. Wed Germany. 
7* 089465041 or 42 
He . 


10 run. - 10 pre. 

ned and Opend 


NEW MERCEDES 

POtSO*. (or nmedbte debrary 

FROM STOCK 


■n USA 

RUTEMC 

TAUNUSST*. 52,6000 RANHUBT 
W Germ, to) (0|«>-232351. Jh 4J1559 


TtANSMUMX BQfitUM, 21 Gedel- 
wboan, B-2241 ZoonaL Antwerp. Tr* 
03-384.1034 Ik 323® Tranan B. In 
stock Mercedes, BMW. ASO. 


MASBATL BMW. Wbridueds ides. 
Alamo. Teh Fore 229 79 79. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


10 YEARS 

We Ddhrer Can to the World 

TRANSCO 

Keepeg a eotatoni stock of more Item 
300 t»ond new cars, 
nedma 5000 happy cienh every yam. 
Send fur free multicolor aeabQ. 
Troruco SA. 95 Noordekm. 
2030 Antwerp, Sebum 
Tel 323/542 67 40. tie 35MT TRANS B 


ICW PEUGEOT, land Borer Eonpe 
Rover. ToyottL 4.4, trapecJ specs. 
Bntas. Zonnebaon 18. Mocruerv 
btoek Hotord HB304A5492. t» 47082 


CATERING 


TOP fWNOf oe AND WB£ wl 
rarer your anvme dnnen/oarties. 
T* Pore 504 11 46 otter 5 om. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US IMMIGRATION wso*. Altys SpAcs 
ft SorW T92S BncWAv. Mam) ft 
33129. Tel: 005) 6439600. tx 441469. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ACCESS USA 

Freet Keie One Way bmdTip 

New York USS149 

tas Angeles US 

Chcoao 

MamT USS275 ' 

Octal . USS329 

U5SIB9 

and more destintrtons ... 

15% dnmunf on 1st doss 
PARIS let (IJ 221 46 94 
ICor.lt 15021 



NEW— YORK 
FI 450 1 way 
LOS ANGELS 
0980 1 w 
PARS Wl® 

43 Bd Hausmann. 75009 Pore 
Tet 742 1580 • 548 9635 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


UM SUMMER SMQA15I lot Angela! 
from C199. New York from CtStntS. 
Artoun London 01-551 4451 


NY ONE WAY $150. Everyday NY. - 
West Coat 5145 Pas 225 9$ 90. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


CHARTS A YACHT tN GREECE. Di- 
rect from owner al largest ffaet. 
American management. Exceler* 
crews, govt, bonded. VaW Yadtt. 
Ath ThemntoUeoui 22C Pvoaus, 
Greece. Tel- 4S29S71, 4529486. Tin- 
21-2000. USA offices- fir food Are 
Met. PA 19002. T*L 215 64M&4 


HB94CH FARM VACATION. Eryoy 
horses, agonic garden, regetwion 
anno m grooous 1 7th cenbry coun- 
try manor. Surrounded by 15,000 
acre forest, neot Fontoinetfoau/ftire. 
041 t6j069474& 


SAILING TOUR HOOD 3> YACHT. 
Greek Aegean Sea. need 2 mot e Aug. 
11 - Sept. 1. STSa Pwo 522 69 4U 


HB1AS YAOmNG. YocM QtatorL 
Acodenwe 28. Adtere 10671 . Greece. 


HOTELS 


Ll_SuA. 


TUDOR HOTEL 304 : Ead 42nd St, 
New York Gty. In fathronohle, Ecw 
Sda Munh oHai, 1/2 block from UN. 
Smtfe from J70; doubles from SBS- 
Upan showing iho od- 20X ttaownt. 
7k 422W1. M 712- 986^800. 


SHOPPING 


SOON. 45 South Audtar Street. Lao- 
don Wl . TeL 01 -493 0403 near Amen- 
can Embassy. Endure* childrens 
were. Hand made hi England. 1-16 

fc*'. Bring Ka aArertwah you ft tee 
res ffre Q on any pwdiree near C20 


EDUCATION 


RB«CH COUBES taumg 10 rfays (8 
levels by native speaker an the 
West coast or France. Cohund VWB, 
nx>ol events, food ft lodging mduded 
«t the pnee tn a tofttOy French enron- 
irent. CoS anytime (461 87 62 31. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 


USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office to New York 
330 W. S6th Sr, NYjC 10019 L&A 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CRBNT CARDS AND 


We nwretl winning ■ 
been featured m Bie 


d-wf™ 


service Iw 


UM A i 


genera ay 


Indrefing rrafio cred TV. 


* USA 6 TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

scan service. 
EVOVWHBC YOU ABE OR GOL 

1-813-921-7946 

Cal free from LI.Su 1-WKQ7-0892 
Col free from Rondn 1-800^824)692. 
LoweS Eastern wbIoqow yew bad! 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT S&VIQ: 

M NEW YORK 
TBL 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

KENSNGYON 

E5COKT SBtVKE 

TO KMSMGTON CHURCH ST. Wl 
TR: 937 913* OR 9379133, 
Al racier oetft carcfa acapM. 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

hart Service. 

Td: 736 5877. 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

CUBE s awn* few; 5|W 
ROnBHMM 10} !CW5rt55 
THE HAGUE (0) 7MD 79 96 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LONDON 

PcMfmcNi Escort Agency 

67 OeBent Street, 
London Wl 

Tefa 48* 3724 re 48* 11S8 


★ LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SBMCE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


LONDON 

DAY/EVBONG ESCORT AGENCY 

TEL: 724 2972 


ARKTOCATS 

Innrfen Emarl Service 
138 Wigmore 5L London W.l. 
AB mqor Cr*5> Ccnfa Accepted 
Tefe 437 47 4! / 4742 
12 noon • midnght 


MADRID INTL 

BCORT SERVICE 
TS; 2«M4S. WML CARDS 


ZURICH 

ONOarS BCORT SBJVKE. 
TEL 01/3*3 08 *4 


★ JASMINE * 


AMSTERDAM 

THi 


savxz. 

5 


ZURICH 

AIEXK ESCORT SERVICE 
IBs 01-47 55 82 / 69 55 0* 




BAYSWATBt ESCORT SOVKE 
T&! 01-229 0776 


LONDON TOF BCQftt SSVIS 
Hemfrow. American &prere 3S2 8343 


VSMA ESCORT -A0BKY 
T& 37 52 39 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


PRESTIGE 

IONDON ESCORT SBVKE 
Tel: 988 31*3 / 08833 31*3 

AMSTERDAM 182197 

PRIVATE LADY ESCORT 
tori Travel + WMend Serve® 

CLASS ESCORT SBWICE 

IONDON, HEAIWOW/GAIWICK 
Tefe 01 890 0373 

ROME CUM EUROPE ESCORT 
ft Guide SetwctTefc 06/589 2c0*- 5B9 
1146 {from 4 pm to 10 pm) 

GENEVA * BEAUTY* 

ESCORT savxz. 022/29 51 30 

GEhEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tefe 46 09 28 

ROMS CU0 EUROPE SCORT 

& SmitceJet 06/589 2604- 589 

1146 ffnett 4 pm to 10 pn^ 

CHBSEA BODRT SOVKZ 
51 Beaudump Ftot, London SW3. 
Tet 01 5B4 6513/2749 (4-12 pm) 

MARItCLAIRE 
SCORT ft TRAVEL SKV1CE 
IQM70N 01-402 3B23 

PARK LANE ESCORT 

SatViCE LONDON 01-921 0293 

* AMSTERDAM SHE * 

ESCORT! GUDB. 020227337 

******gbsvabbt 

Boost SWKX. 022 / 8* 15 95 

AMSTSDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SSMCE. 020-954344 



HUNXWRT AREA KABBXFS fe- 
moto and male binged fceon aid 
T raeret Serwe. TAfflffl62 88 05 
CrecH COfQS O CMptRQ. 

lOWON OME BC0RT Sown. 
Teli 370 7151. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


GBCVA-HBBS ESCORT SBIVICE 
Teh 3* 29 32 




MADRD-MARBQ1A 

Ereort Service. Tel; 91/232 07 76 



i r iV. i^VTtS 



^ ^'-vv y-yayfakj 



LONDON ESCORT SBIVICX. TeL- 937 
6574. 

LOIDON TSUDE BCOBT Sera* 
Tet 01-373 8849. 






s 


Ii ' 'ii 


r v/r t 




01/69 58 71 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


RANXRJRT JBO«fBr5 barf 
Travel Servo. Teh 069/55-7710 


fwAnmm ntsr oass Escort 
Sov« 069/681740 


BBTTA DANISH BCOBT Service - 6 
jgtguagee London 01-730 6515 


AM5TBBAM JEANET Escort Seneca 
Tel: (070)336420 or 340110. 


RANXRJRT AREA. S1MQNFS fa- 

eon ftTrcrrel Service. 10)69 -62 W 32 


HONGKONG/ KOWLOON] 724 33 
01 Soattah Escort Serwea 


MUNCH - PRIVATE ESCORT 
Gude Service Tet 91 23 14 


COLOGNE / DU55BDORF/ BONN 

Enpfah Escort Senate 0221 -57*757 


MAMBD MALE ESCORT SERVICE 
4561474 Cods. 


GENEVA - AMA ESCORT SERVICE. 

MJttaquoL Tet 34 29 55. 


CKARUME G9CVA Guide Sen nee. 
Tet 283397 


LONDON SOMSTICATH) 

Service. Tel 01-555 2117. 


Escort 


MUNKH WELCOME Escort Scrvn. 
TH- PI W 59 


NEW YORK EUEGANCE Escort Ser- 
wce.p!2) <96-1053. 


NEW YORK: IWi Escort Service. 
Td. 212 581-1948. 


DOMNA AMSTERDAM ESCORT 
Gwde Service Teh BP0| 76280 


DUSSELDORF-COtOGNE, 


oart + hovel Semite 0211/ 


31 «! 


«AWMT + SURKXMBNGS Efr 

ovf Servtoe. Qtf/364656 Mm ft QC 


LONDON BRMANUB1E Ban Se- 
Tet 01-730 1840 


NEW YORK - ETMOHAN ESCORT 

Service, muttnfluoL [2121 777 55<3. 


AMSTSIDAM FOUR ROSE Escort 
Serve* fCfl 20-964376 


\6>- 


BRU5SHS. CHANTAL BECORT St» 
van Tet 112>g0 23 <5/^ 




& ta- 

*1 wrvoe. Tet 069/44 77 75 


vita. Tet 06968 34 43. 


wee. 069/5960-52 


Servha. Tet 01 821 0627. 


AADtJD. BIANCA Esrart SerWv 
ffrom 4 ptnl. Tet 2424761 . 

iiiiiinii iiimnuM 

[Tel: 069/44860M1 


hmrion |Dlf961 0154. 


. Tot 68 34 48. 


\ 















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 

ARTS / LEISURE 


Paris Couture Plays Its Strong Suit: Evening Wear 


International Herald Tribune 

E l ARIS — The strength of cou- 
ture lies in evening wear, an area 
in winch Paris couturiers are deliv- 
ering superbly in thdr Tall-winter 
collections. 

From Jean-Louis Scherrer’s gild- 
ed Florentine Renaissance look to 
Cardin's exquisitely draped crepe 
dresses, the story was all about 
dancing and the good life —■ a story 

Hebe Dorsey 

reinforced by a frenzy of balls all 
over Europe. 

There wore no less than 17 balls 
in Madrid this season,” said the 
socialite Isabelle d’Omano. Lynn 
Wyatt, the wife of the Houston oil 
tycoon Oscar Wyatt, mentioned a 
dinner-dance recently given in 
London by U. S. Ambassador 
Charles Price and his wife, Carol 
Ann, for the Prince and Princess of 
Wales. 

The strength of the dollar, even 
now that it is dropping some, keeps 
bringing chic American women 
with busy social schedules to Paris, 
where a couture dress is still infi- 
nitely more chic than any ready-to- 
wear. 

Professionals are also back in 
Paris. Kal Ruttenstein, vice presi- 
dent of Blootningdale’s for fashion 
direction, said he was attending the 
couture collections for the first 
time in 17 years because be felt that 
fashion was now coming from the 
top and not only from the streets. 

“Sublime," said Bernadette 
Chirac, wife of Mayor Jacques 
Chirac of Paris, amid deafening ap- 
plause after the Scherrer show, one 
of his best-received ever. Scherrer 
evidently feels that his boutique, 
which ranks with Ungaro’s as one 
of the best in Paris, can handle the 
bread-and-butter daytime clothes 
so he has turned his couture atten- 
tion to the carriage trade, women 
whose lives revolves around parties 
and resorts. 






SS&5 




■13 


* iBS 


Evening gowns by Jean-Louis Scherrer (left), Pierre Cantm. 




MONSIEUR 


For Gstaad or Saint-Mono, he 
offered Russian-influenced outfits, 
with lavishly fox-bordered coats 
over velvet ski pants and floor- 
length culottes. These were topped 
by jeweled sweaters: accessories in- 


cluded fox berets, fur capelos, ba- 
roque jewelry and kid booties. 

The opulent scene was just short 
of Borgia-esque, with an orgy c t 
gold embroidery, shimmering 
lamte and new, beautifully fluid 


book embroidery with fluttering, 
iridescent taffetas struck a lighter 
note. 

Al Kene ^ an ^ n ’ s > pbott^ra- 
lS3s3^ r 4>r!S^S phers w®** 1 mad over the nine mod- 
els whom the designer imparted 
■ . i #|$ ■!? t from Osina. Cardin, who hasafab- 

rics factory in China and a Max- 
teJSS"* : ™’ s restaurant is Beijing, showed 

a long and flat look, with skirls slit 
- 2 . up the sides and Chinese collars, 
Ssj* - . but mixed with familiar Cardin 
shapes, including kerchief hems, 

S *£■&*“ scalloped edges and complicated 
w Caidin’s partner, Andrfe 

V.i:: .^4 Oliver, who designs the evening 
: wear, did the prettiest draped 
#•? ^ dresses in Paris, ranging from 
/'.*?&£ draped necklines and swepMip sa- 
t >v rang hips to back-gathered bustles. 

\\ At Dior, Marc Bohan showed 
short and long without running 
fiS into trouble. He fared better than 
in former seasons with his daytime 
jyt?* wear, which alternated between 
jpf¥* very short, full-sleeved and vohuni- 
£?j&\ nous coats and snappy, long and 
ught-waisted redingotes. 

% His evening wear, however, 

* looked clumsy, especially the strap- 

l**® dresses of blade velvet over 
black jersey turtlenecks. The grill- 
work embroidery in garish color 
combinations was not exactly in- 
JRhjSfeSB spired, but the slim black velvet 
dresses, with rhinestone buttons 
I and coats in bright-colored linings, 
looked attractive. 

! * - ’ < B§ Color was important cvery- 

! _ V' where; Bohan combined purple,- 

L ' * H hot pink and poison green. Panne 

f ' - - ‘jggi velvet, soft and sensuous, was chi 

every deagm’s mind, as were rich 
7 ; . j| || brocades and lam&s. 

Hanafe Mot, who started the 
week of collections on Sunday, is 
opening a second boutique in a 
snuril new deluxe shopping center 
at the former Roger et Gam shop 
ows.G«f rj on the Faubourg Saint Honott, 

n. along with Kad Lagerfeld, Louis 

F6zand, Bernard Paris and the 
ang gowns with jeweler Poiray. She went for expen- ' 
bodices were worn sive effects, such as fur trimmings 
damask braided on coats and suits. Her evening 
t and embroidery gowns were frankly theatrical, big 
le heavy side, but velvet opera gowns, the kind one 
[nation of prayer- wears with a fan and a coronet 



rt t V~V-.£, • 

* • 


m:: «■ 



Scene from Peter Brook’s ‘Mahabharata,' adapted by Jean- Claude Carrie re. 

Brook’s f Mahabharata’ at Avignon 


QwS.G-f RJ 


cut-velvets. Long gowns with 
sharply pointed bodices were worn 
with gold and damask braided 
coifs. The velvet and embroidery 
were a bit on the heavy side, but 
Scherrer’s combination of prayer- 


Austrian Wine Scandal Draws Attention to Old Practices 




1U0, Champs-EIysies 
Paris 8* 

44, rue Francois t" 

Paris 8* 

237, rue $ainl-Honor6 
Paris 1” 

SALES 

BUNG WITH YOU 
THE LAST FRENCH LOOK 
HK3M THE BEST PLACE 
. INFAUS J 


By Nicholas Phythian 

Reuters 

L ONDON — The use of an anti- 
/ freeze chemical to sweeten a 
batch of Austrian wine has sent a 
shiver through the normally self-as- 
sured wine world, but the practice 
of doctoring wine is barmy new. 
The ancient Greeks and Romans 
used honey and spices to give na- 
ture a helping hand and improve a 
bad summer's product. 

The growth of the wide trade 
into a huge industry, however, has 
opened new doors for unscrupu- 
lous wine makers and merchants. 
Sometimes those who are willing to 
bend the rules have the edge, even 
though wine-producing countries. 


anxious to guard their reputations, 
exercise sttutcontrols. 

Wine experts say some produc- 
ers or shippers tamper with poor- 
quality wine to pass it off as some- 
thing better. In France in 1974, for 
example, some merchants were 
convicted of selling an inferior 
wine as Bordeaux. In West Germa- 
ny, the former president of the 
winegrowers' association is on trial 
for passing off wine doctored with 
sugar as top-quality wine. 

Bonn has issued a blacklist of 
Austrian wines shown by tests to 
contain the illegal sweetener dieth- 
yknerglycol, a toxic chemical used 
in vehicle anti-freeze. 

Other techniques for doctoring 
vary. Wines may be blended but 






The Director & English speaking staff of 

Mappin & Webb 

INTERNATIONAL - 

warmly invite you to their salon to view 
their prestigious collection of fine jewelry and watches. 

Our CANNES showroom is at 32-33, La Croisette. TeL (93)39.81.91 

# T a> 

Featuring: ROLEX Mappin & Webb rlAGEl Baume & Mercier 

VmJMWXIRD corum £B£L 

Highest Export Discount. 

'We are the $t 1 of the rue de la f^ix. 75002 PARIS .Teb 261.50.13 

By Appointment to Her Majesty Hie Queen. 

PARIS . CANNES . LONDON . DOSSELDORF . TOKYO . NEW- YORK 


bear a label exclusive to a famous 
chateau or area. Potash or caustic 
soda may be added to cut aridity, 
glycerine to add sweetness, coal or 
oil by-products for body. 

Producers have developed per- 
missible tricks that the trade deems 
permissible; most, for example, 
add sulphur dioridr to help .their 
wine keq>. Some, especiaHy-iBr- 
northern Europe, where grapes can- 
lack the sunshine to make them 
sweet and ripe, add concentrated - 
grape juice or sugar to sweeten the 
wine or boost alcoholic content. 

Traditionally, the producing 
countries or regions decide just 
bow far producers can go. The Eu- 
ropean Community has essentially 
made uniform the laws of its 10 
members, though there are varia- 
tions, with producers in sane re- 
gions having to conform to local 
requirements. Italy, for instance, 
bans sweeteners. In most countries, 
producers have to meet strict con- 
ditions to qualify for the presti- 
gious labels denoting origin. - 

West Germany, which has some 
of the northernmost vineyards in 
the world, allows producers to 
chaptafize, or add sugar to, all 
wines except the top category, Qua- 
liiatsweln mil Prmkat, which may 
be sugared only right limits 
specified by law. 


Officials sot the EC allows up to 
15 other additives for improving 
bouquet, alcoholic content or col- 
or. They include albumen, purified 
sulphur and small quantities of as- 
bestos. Industry sources say none 
of these substances appears in suf- 
ficient quantity to harm wine 
drinkers. 

. Spain allows producers to add 
some ingredients to keeps wine 
from spoiling, and citric arid to 
counteract sweetness. Officials in 
Spain say sane producers still use 
sugar, which was banned 15 years 
ago. and unauthorized additives 
such as benzoic acid to treat 
spoiled wine that should be used 
for vinegar. 

The EC allows blending of wines 
from member states but insists that 
the labels say the wine is a mixture. 

Fake top-quality wines, often ex- 
ported to the United States, mostly 
begin life in a bulk dripment of 
lesser-quality wine and receive 
their new label far from their place 
of origin. 

“Anybody who has been in the 
wine trade for some time knows 
that periodicall y something canes 
up,” said a British master of wine, 
Anthony Hanson. But he said he 
believed wine doctoring tended to 
be a fringe activity confined to 
mass-consumption wines. 





NOW ON 

173 New Bond Street, London W.l. Telephone: 01-493 6277 i 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 

A VIGNON — The main event 
of the 39th Avignon festival is 
the director Peter Brook’s latest 
creation, ''Mahabhanta/' which he 
has been working on for 10 years 
and which is having its initial per- 
formances in a quarry on the city's 
outskirts. 

A steep, craggy mountainside 
towers above a rock-dotted ex- 
panse of sand traversed by a 
stream. The audience is seated on 
tins of seats built to enclose the 
performing space. One reaches the 
improvised alfresco theater by a 
half-hour boat journey on tbe 
Rhdne. 

This mammoth dramatization of 
an epic Indian poem is in three 
parts: “The Game of Dice,” “Exile 
in the Forest” and “War.” Each of 
the trio of lengthy evenings com- 
mences at about sundown, 9:30 
P.M. In its entirety the presenta- 
tion runs more than nine hours — 
and “runs” is le mot Juste. It is never 
still Scene swiftly follows scene 
and the excited tempo of its action 
has the relentless, unswerving flow 
of a mighty river. Nothing hesi- 
tates. nothing tarries, nothing 
bores. 

“Mahabharata,” the Sanskrit 
classic on which Jean-Qaude Car- 
riftre has based his trilogy, covers 
12J100 pages — IS times as long as 
the Bible — and is believed to have 
been compiled as much as 2,500 
years ago. It is the Iliad of India, a 
gigantic poetic saga of the heroic 
age. Its rTTnrmrtnlTTflrinT) of myths 
and folk fables has influenced reli- 
gious and philosophical thought. 

Its central story relates the bitter 
conflict that arises between cousin 
dans, the Pandavas and the Kaura- 
vas. to rule a great kingdom. The 
violent power struggle that ensues 
brings on barbaric warfare in 
which the gods andjungle monsters 
participate, and it leads to such 
slaughter that humanity is endan- 
gered. Some may find a timely 
warning here, but this point is not 
stressed in the adaptation, which, 
like the original, contains no vil- 
lains. Dreadful crimes are commit- 
ted, exud deeds are done in both 
camps; man, the work intimates, is 
half god, half beast 
The {days that Carrifere has dis- 
tilled from “Mahabharata” are in a 
form far from that of classic San- 
fikiit drama. Their expansive range, 
their urgent drive and the 
wherein characters speak of their 
personalities and motives — some- 
times in the third person — hint of 
the Shakespearean approach. The 
exotic setting is evoked by the gor- 
geous costuming (Chlot Obo- 
lensky), the superb mood lighting 
(Jean Kalman) and the dance imer- 


New winter 
collection 

ESCADA 

at European 
export prices 

Maiie-Maitine 

&, Roe de Stores, Paris 6th. 
TeL: (1)222 18 44. 


ludes accompanied by Indian mu- 
sic. 

The chameleon nature of the sce- 
nario invites variety: It slips quick- 
ly from stark tragedy to joyous vic- 
tory celebrations and from robust 
comedy to pathos. There is Grand 
Guig&otism in the scene in which a 
man maime himcelf and that in 
which a fallen warrior's corpse is 
cut open. There is even a soupfoa 
of sex farce in the thwarted seduc- 
tion of an innocent maid in the 
second play. 

The text, in French, is spoken in 
a medley of accents by white, black 
and Oriental players. France is rep- 
resented by Maurice Benichou in 
the authoritative role of Krishna. 
Vittorio Mezzogiomo of Italy has 
striking dan as a leaping dancing 
master. Among other exceptionally 
effective and versatile players are, 
from Poland, Ryszard Geslak, for- 
merly of Jerzy Grotowski's troupe. 


Before “Mahabbaraia 1 * opens in 
Paris at the Bouffes du Nord in 
November, it will lour Madrid, 
Florence, Frankfurt and probably 
Athens, Copenhagen and Dublin. 


Alain Crombecque, recently ap- 
pointed director of the Avignon 
festival, intends to turn the festival 
into a center for new productions. 
On his program this year are pre- 
mieres of Antoine Vitez’s staging of 
Victor Hugo's “Lucrece Borgia." 
Tadeusz Kan tor’s “Revue.” Jac- 


and Andrzej Scweryn; from west 
Germany, Matthias Habkh; from 
Britain, Bruce Myers; from Japan, 
the incomparable Yoshi Oida, star 
of Brook's “Conversation of the 
Birds”; from Senegal, Mamadou 
Dioume and Douta Seek; from 
Burkina Faso, Sotigui Kouyatr, 
and, from Chad, Cttment Masdon- 
gar. 

MaOika Sarabhai, the only Indi- 
an artist in the cast, conveys the 
endurance of a Mother Courage 
with graceful dignity as the wife of 
five kings, and the Lebanese actress 
Mireille Maalouf, as the queen who 
covers her eyes with a tend to be 
ate with her blind husband, is a 
gifted tragedienne:. 

Brook has an uncommon skill at 
theatrical illusioa. His spectacle 
leaves the impression of enormous 
size, but it employs no herds of 
extras. He has the great outdoors as 
his scenery, but his company is rel- 
atively small: 22 adult players, four 
child actors and an orchestra of 
five. Yet his battle scenes appear 
full-scaled, so filled with thunder- 
ous violence and fury that they dis- 
close the naked face of war. 


DOONESBURY 


soawxxj 

C0M5TDMY 

1 INSULARITY 

2 CBtemrt, 

: ms? 


iumnrr 

MS&rTFOR. 

mump 

MARCIA. 


Victor Hugo's “Lucrece Borgia." 
Tadeusz Kan tor’s “Revue.” Jac- 

S ues Lassalle's production of 
iotthold Lessing's “Emilia Ga- 
lotiT by the national theater of 
Strasbourg, and Alain Cuny in 
“The Isle erf the Dead.” an adapta- 
tion of Strindberg fragments. 

The Comedie-Franqaise produc- 
tion of “Macbeth” had its preview 
showing in the court of honor of 
n wEw the popes' palace this week; it was 
° greeted with some applause and 
some booing. 

Directed by Jean-Pi erre Vincent, 
it was played in the open under a 
starless dry. for the most part in the 
dark. Though “Macbeth” is the 
shortest of Shakespeare's plays 
(there is a theory that an act was 
lost), this production, three hours 
without intermission, gave the im- 
pression of being one of the longest 
plays ever written by anyone. 

Philippe Oevenot ranted as the 
ignoble Scot, appearing to have 
mistaken the part for that of Rich- 
ard HI; he rendered Macbeth's 
meditative soliloquies in the same 
angry voice as his war cries. Cather- 
ine Term's Lady MiitSeth was 
similarly one-keyed. 

The costuming, by the avant- 
garde fashion designer Thierry 
Mugler, was lavish but extremely 
bizarre. The witches sported bald 
pates and raffled collars, looking 
like portraits of Montaigne, and 
Lady Macbeth in the banquet 
scene was dressed in the golden 
glory of Elizabeth I at a throne- 
room reception. 


GREAT. WUCANTlMfiMB 

mm n relief rr$ earn 
TO BSTO FINALLY CALLOFF 
KB SEARCH WRm PERFECT, 
HALS AW GET ON " 

WrmMYUFE! 


Ito A CHANGE? aiwm 

LASTf*m.i 
MADE MY LAST '' 

OFFICIAL RASE AT 
A MARKET? MAN. 


xuosm 

MMS LAST* OHfHEY, 
MW I'M VERY 
JERK. FLATTERS?. 

\ N 


sr "’ 1 


* ill T 



Delta Hies Nonstop From Fratikfwt Tn Atlanta 

id Nonstop From Frankfurt To Dallas/FcatWorth. 


. — ^ And On To 100 U^A. Cities. 

From New York to Texas, from Delta also has frequent daily 

Florida co California, Delta flies you service from die New York and ooston 
to just about anywhere in the U.S.A. gateways co dries across the South. 

Catch Delta s nonstops from You can also fly Delta nonstop 

Frankfurt to Atlanta ana Dallas/ from London to Atlanta, and from 

Paris to Atlanta. 


Ft.Worth, where you can make easy 
Delta-to-Delta connections to 100 
dries across the U.S. A. 


i to 100 Call your Travel Agent. Or call London W1R 6AT and 24 

Delta in Frankfurt on 069 23 30 24. Boulevard des Capudnes, F 

Delta Gets You There ^^ ^ar^ewi^wurn^tf° 


Or call Delta in London on 
(01) 668-0935. Or call Delta in 
Paris at 1-335-4080. 

Delta Ticket Offices are at 
Friedensstrasse 7, 6000 Frank- 
fun/Main, 140 Regent Street, 
London W1R 6AT and 24 
Boulevard des Capudnes, Paris. 


Wi. 







sa 


J- rr, A '_. 




S*iiittirWfiHfo*yfc& * 2fr r." V m 1A rfyj 


Statistics Index 


AMEX prim P.U 

amexiiwamu: 

KYSEprteM P.1D 
MY5» M l MI W JM3 
Gonodlaft MW** P.l« 
CuOWKV ratH P. 9 
CoramnWaa PM ‘ 
CMvMmh ' . PiM 


Eorntw reports .P.13 
Pftno rati notn P.tt 
Gold matati P.9 
Intone? Mm p. 9 

MMMHnmrv mb 
O ongn . p.m 

OTCltof* p.19 

(Ww nwrluti PM 


TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


HcralbS^Sribunc. 

BUSINESS'/FINANCE 


U.5. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


Page 9 



Claud 




^vignoa 

K3^Si 

&EK* 1 fsS 

^'YT' ■ 

;:. n v“ x ■ "Mi 4 

» r> the r.jiiorm ita*., 

ishcuvi. -r.c vija Cijh,, 

3 of Sir 

! htf Fr -vaisc WMt 

fli’f M-icbrti -atm J** 

'.*? hiinoi 5 

■ r-i.-vc :.V. wgJL || q 

<Sp " * 'Tre -PfllliSito 

Pc In '■ • 


rtr« ah. 
nc itrs •■. „• 

<v. 

Wlb p.vur. 

irle.v.4>k i i 

-t n 


■* ; r .Crn unde; 
■•■"•■: Rn oft 


irie--.-. • -iRnoa 

•t TV.' u.'.r. V^Au - ,' t. j 
‘ l ■•• V... 1 pis. 
Kfc .» ; I:: ; 1-rriB 
.it ,i. . «. s .. . 


lexe ^ i.t 
* l \ ih - "re--, 
thi'~! 

a-iiCT. ••: .%■ ;. 
**.s ner 

Phs!:p>- k ?. 


•-•' £ i.1«S. 

•• '• 73s 

'■ r^ a *> 

'•<■■■ JiTl 3 
i '.-'-i L-ae 


XtU.M.': . ■:. 

T>? *. 
ar«i? ?..■'■ -lT 

llnl cr k • - . . 


I: .7* 

■• IT' - TsEI 


ikr 

y.>f> fJ —•!.'•• 1 - 1 : D * r 

tx-.rv. j .v- 7 ’-! ‘ 


FUTURES AND OPTIOItS 


Failure of Brokerage Firm 
Raises Questions on Safely 

By HJ. MAIDENBERG 

New York Time* Service 

M EW YORK — How safe are the funds that futures 
trader* entrust ter their brokers? The question arose 
again last week when the Commodity Exchange in 
New York, the largest metals futures exchange, ap- 
proved a plan to compensate customers of a now-defunct mem- 
ber concern, the Volume Investors Carp. 

It will be raised again next Monday when the Federal Com- 
modity Futures Trading Commission examines the un ^xmi] 
events that caused the collapse of the member concern oh March 

The regulatory agency will want to know, amo n g other thing s , 

why customer funds were fro- - — 

zen, and still are, despite the « JS - 

fact that Volume Investors l™ 5 Condition 

had kept its customer funds _e . ^i 

segregated. Gold traders still t ¥™ n writers 

may have encouraged 

traordinary rise in bullion bold Speculators, 
prices the previous day and * 

the subsequent sharp declines 
that followed. 

What is known is that on March IS several customers of 
Volume Investors, who bad been profitably writing gold options 
calls for some time, reached their position limits — 4,000 con- 
tracts of 100 ounces each. Because writing an options call is the 
same as selling short, the writers, in effect, had sold short 12 
nriUion ounces of gold at various prices. 

The writers, woo had relatively modest financial resources, 
were counting on a further decline in gold, in which case the 
options buyers would not exercise or call away die underlying 
bullion, arid they would be able to continue to pocket the 
premiums they had received for selling the options. 

But on March 19, for reasons that still are not clear, gold prices 
opened higher and continued to rise, fueled by short covering, to 
dose up an extraordinary $39, to $339. It was the largest one-day 
percentage rise ever recorded in gold. Some traders believe the 
exposed condition of the options writers encouraged bold specu- 
lators to push up the price to force the shorts repay dearly re buy 
out of their positions. 


W * HATEVER the case, the writers apparently could not 
meet margin calls and their broker, Volume Investors, in 
turn, could not meet its obligations to the exchange's 

clearinghouse. An exchange’s clearing member, no tits customers, 
must make good on all contracts. The function of clearing houses 
is re transfer the gains and losses of member firms at Ac end of 
every trading day. 

“Whether it was unbridled greed on the part of the options 
writers, the lack of prudent supervision of their accounts by the 
broker, or whatever, the fact is that Volume Investors became 
insolvent,” said Alan J. Brody, Comex president “Normally, the 
unaffected accounts of a collapsed firm are transferred to other 
brokers. In this case, it was deckled to freeze; despite the uproar 
we knew would follow, in order to sort the mess out” 

Last Monday, the Comex and Volume Investors, now in 
receivership, came to an agreement. Mr. Brody said that his 
exchange's clearinghouse agreed to gjve the receivers $9.2 million 
and Volume Investors gave $2.6 millio n is cash and a note for 
$4.1 mfllinn, which Comex accepted, to settle the matter. 

“We expect that the receivers will start disbursing these funds 
re customers of Vohmap Investors within a few wedcs,'' Mr- 
Brody said, “buf 1 should like to pbmt out that insolvencies of 
brokerage houses are, unhappily, not rare and that such situa- 
tions are bound to crcrp up from time to time. But what should 
never happen is the questioning of the integrity of a dearing- 
hoose, and in our industry it srill hasn’t” 

Meanwhile, the two major principals in Volume Investors, 
Charles E Federbush and Owen J. Morrissey, said they had no 
intention of reviving their firm. “What happened to us,” Mr. 
Federbush said Friday, “is a broker's n igh t mare. Our biggest 
customers chose not to meet their obligations. As for Owen and I, 
we never questioned our responsibilities re our noodef suiting 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 5) 

j Currency Rates 


r '~’ 

V 

:v:v | 

CrmsBatm 

■ 

S 

DAL 

FJv 

IU_ 

Otor. 

N2y23 
toF. «=. VN 

ZScZ' 


Amtertain 

BramMal 

U515 

*s» 

112395 * 

37 JS * 

0LU92- 

dotod 


S3B* B7JT« 

n 530 f 


■rex I' 


2JBU 

4fyr\ 


2231 • 

U95» 

MJ0* 

*3*4 • 12131* 

L2B5* 


LMKtaN (M 

UK 

_ 

4JD25S 

12307 

239930 

43» 

N44 um 

3BJ0 


T 


191830 

101 J0 

«O30 

ZHJ5 

— 

59M0 

am 01430 

u* 


Mato Vorfctc) 


OJliia 

200 

S349 

imn 

23)9 

5445 13545 

ms s 


. k . 

Porto 

BZto 

not 

mm 

— — 

43155* 

270 

un * 17032 

1441 » 


sib 

Ttom 

«MS 

ms* 

1259 

27.13 

12.W 

7127 

487.19* WUS 

— 



Zorfc*r 

2375 

1X2 

S2J15* 

27JJ • 

iTzn ■ 

7103 • 

um* — 

MW* 

be- 

l/\ , 

1 ECU 

07771 

esse 

2JU9 

1017 

uou* 

237*4 

453001 HA. 

10MS 


1 SDR 

IBM78 

ansu 

235711 

1W552 

LMUR 

13331 

ha lam 

144311 


l M 

■-M 

--ifi 


CfttoMotf §n LmvIM and £uncn wbbom tn mr Eurapaon omnvrs. mvw rarv imvi rjv*. 
(a) Qmmtmoi fame lb) Amount* to buy aim pom* tc) Amounts imO* to buy one 

doHarC) unOrofMB M tMiaotTMPtvt Unmet ltUXP Ha.nct quoted; PUL; nor ova Maftfe 
to) To Borneo ootmt: SUM3H 


it.'*’ 

J: *>• 


m 


I Cummer Mr IMS Cmw rm- uss Crniwcv Mr uss cwtmcv mt uas 

Aram. Mlrai MO MB MUmr.itaa. MM &.Kor.<mm DU 0 

* AhMS WKJ Cntokdrac. 139J0 I h ttoW 317*0 DtoMto MUS 

^ Amlr.KML 20.1 S HongKWBl 7J43S Norw.ltraM U95 HMUfcra n a M7Z 

Bato.flH.fe-. 5830 todhnnWM 11.9617 PMLtoMO 18J9 TafenaS AM 

Mint faMMO htootifeetah 1.11MB Wrtawwto lMJN TMttoM 2SWS 

OmhnBooS im trMic BJMM Saadlrfml 3MM TWBHIre SZ7.1S 

batotiw 1IUJ MRMBtotok. UZUB SlHl MUB UAI Atom 3A% 

emfLNNd 0JOT KwaoWdUor axnv S. Afr. rand 1M39 wmaHM. 1MD 

iSferttHrt 1*HN i Ah f 

v Some*: Bonouo du Benelux (BnaseMl Banco Co/mmrctate itaHana (MRon); OmntaX 
■ ^ Bor* tmw York); Bantu* Natim* do Porn (PorW; Bonk of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMP (SDR); 
BAH (tarn-, rivoi. dirham). Otter data from Reattn ane/AP. 



ifi M 

M 




lotanestffertes 


' '-Q 



Donor 

D-Mark 

toto 

Fraac 

Starflaa 

Front* 

Franc 

ECU 

SDR 

iBto*n 


5-Jto 

fflt 


99to?H 

UM 

7 to ’ , 

1MK 

MWn 


SMrftfe 

12 M2 to 

10-10 to 

IW 

7to 

Inmufei 

■ MK. 


5tw3lta 

11 ■to-IJto 

WVWOto 

1W 

7to 

iwnalta 


5*-5V. 

SVta-SV. 

11 atoll to 

I0to-I0to 

■ OtoOto 

7 to 

lw 

M MU 

51Wte 

54M 

11 ttoll to 

ID atoll to 

OOtoOto 

tto 



Kay Munny Hutcm July 32 

tWMfHMi Cfon Pra». 

OtHMMtUH TW 719 

WnlM > 

PrtqKMfc 9Vi 919 

■ratar LMa Rod WWW AM* 

C*» Praer tM7» dots 7J8 W 

. towHTmavT IIBc 7.19 7.13 

i mutoBTr— nnrafld 7JC 7js 

QhMim 7M 735 

CVilHfAtot 730 7 JB 


Itofe rtm MS UB 

fto ira U M Ba d 5.U 5JS 

OMltaAlaUrttoA US SM 

y*mX*mtrBaok MS A» 

MHttotoi SJS UB 


Profits 
Declined 
In U S. 

Analysts Cite 
Slow 2d Period 

By Jonathan P. Hicks 

New York TbnaSerriu 

NEW YORK — Corporate prof- 
its appear to have fallen moderate- 
ly in the United Stales in the sec- 
ond quarter, according to 
economists. 

The weak earnings, (hey said, are 
the result of slow economic growth, 
the continued strength of the dol- 
lar, the widening trade deficit and a 
trend toward doing more business 
with foreign suppliers. 

Economists said a sufficient 
number of corporations had . re- 
ported by the weekend for them to 
draw coochisioQs. 

Data. Resources Intx, an econom- 
ic research concern, estimated the 
total of annualized, seasonally ad- 
justed, after-tax profits for the sec- 
ond quarter at S136J taQHon, down 
2.1 percent from a year eazfier. 
Profits in the first quarter were 
$141 biffion, the company noted. 

The profits of computer con- 
cerns slumped and those of con- 
sumer product companies were up 
slightly. Military contractors ami 
communications companies woe 
mixed and airlines were higher. 

“There are a combination of 
ihmgg that would have to happen 
in order for thi ng* to change,” said 
febc Schepder, a spokesman for 
International Business Machines 
Corp^ which reported a 123-per- 
cent decline in 

“A lot depends on reducing the 
budget deficit and bringing down 
interest rates further, which will 
lessen the burden of a strong U.S. 
dollar,” she «riH 

The mixed results reported hr 
companies that rdyheavdy an lim- 
itary contracts was a departure 
Cram recent years, when the Rear 
gan administration’s military 
buildup brought strong profits. 

“Companies in the defense area 
are still doing relatively well, but 
there are cydes that even that in- 
dustry is gang through,** said Rob- 
ert A. Gough, a semor vice presi- 
dent at Data Resources. 

In the communications industry, 
newspaper publishers reported 
higher results than broadcasters. 


Air War in the CaJifornia Corridor 


Aircal Polishes 
Image in Bid to 
Overtake PSA . 

By Pauline Yoshihashi 

New York Time* Service 

LOS ANGELES - la the 
“California Corridor" between 
Los Angeles and San Francisco, 
the boaesl air route in the Unit- 
ed States, Aircal Inc. is waging a 
slick, muhniaDi on- doflar mar- 
keting war against Pacific South- 
west Airlines Inc. far the top 
position. . 

Aircal Ino, a regional airline 
that draws about 70 percent of 
its revenue from the Los Ange- 
les-San Francisco market, hopes 
to win over a majority of the 6.6 
nriOioD travelers who each year 
fly between the Four Los Ange- 
les-area airports and the San. 
Francisco Bay area's three air- 
ports. The trip is 350 miles (564 
kilometeis) one way. 

After three strained years, ag- 
gravated by fare cutting, that 
threatened to bankrupt the New- 
port Beach-based carrier, Aircal 
returned to stable pores and 
profitability Jast year. ft 1 ** 1 

it has poured nuflions of dollars 
into new Boring 737-300 jets and 
a barrage of advertising aimed at 


British Telecom, AT&T 
Said to Plan Venture l 


Storaot: Menem Guaranty f dollar ; DM. SF. Pound FFii UoydX Bank (ECU); Reuters 
fstw. Rate* eovaeabto to dtoatm Of SI msutan mtotowm (oroovtvakmt). 


Aadam Bailiff P ep write 

Jufy22 

imonfti S-ttt 

Imontti B-nt 

IMtoHn 

t tomtits SVt-VM 

ivcor BH-W 

Source: Router*. 


O&MneyMarfcetM 

JofySS 

MflrrMLLndi ItMdVAms 
JSdnraMraKTMC Mt 

Tatmtelnhrat Rate Mat: 7J47 

Source: Merrill Lynco, AP 


fiance 

OtcnKrtecRato «k 9te 

CtoMnr *** 

OtotoMteMtarfank 

UtotoWl If uHtoA w 91VW 

teHUM f ll/M 9WU 


Gold 


MMmt 

fl-Ocrr Trcoarr BS 


lUtytottofeMh 


17 t2 
MA U 

- nso* 

— 11 MB 


I 5 

*3/16 63/16 
6* 6* 


How Km 

AM, 

JT7M 

PJKL 

21730 

Cfetoo 

-US 

UUMIltoBTp 

21770 

— 

— 13S 

tortOUUD 

3U.U 

JtfJI 

— IM 

Znrfcti 

317JD 

317 JS 

-130 

ijwdoo 

JT7M 

31735 

— US 

Him York 

— 

3ZU0 

+15D 


Sourer*: Arwtox CanmwraBonk CrkBt 
LrnnhiMrMAntUMn 


Lmtntom Pdht and London afRckd Bx- 
tooe; Horn Kona and Zurich aeentoa end 
peeing priest/ mm York Comex current 
contract AH prices kitlZ-Seor ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 


By Eric N. Berg 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — British Tele- 
communications PLC is expected 
to announce tins week a venture 
with American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. to provide rooftop- to- 
rooftop communications between 
New York and Loudon. 

Executives from both companies 
declined to discuss the project be- 
fore a news conference scheduled 
for Thursday in New York is held. 
Bui according to experts in interna- 
tional oomnnmicaiKxis, the new of- 
fering may be similar to Satstream, 
a service begun in February 1984 
by British Tetecom to provide roof- 
top-to-rooftop calling between 
Britain and Canada. 

Hie term rooftop- to- rooftop 
mffl nii that rail a 3 n> transmitted 
from a sareffite on a 

customer’s roof to a communica- 
tions satellite and then to another 
privately owned roof dish on the 
receiving tad. 

Such calls now are typically sent 
overland I raes from the American 
customer’s premises to one of four 
giant, shared dishes in the United 
States. They are then bounced off 
an international communications 
satellite to a shared dish on the 
receiving end before they travel 
over more land lines to reach their 

The current method works wcD, 
but it is costly. Communications 
professionals estimate that dose to 
50 percent of the cost of a'New 
Yock-to- London caQ, for example, 
is incurred carrying the signal the 

To Our Readers 

We are replacing the NAS- 
DAQ National Market list of 
US. over-the-counter stocks 
with a new. selected list of 
NASDAQ-quoted OTC issues. 

This list contains the 1,000 
OTC listings with the highest 
market value, as defined by per- 
share price multiplied by ihares 
outstanding. The list, from The 
Associated Press, is updated 
about every six months. The 
new list also contains addition- 
al information about each is- 
sue: high and low prices for the 
preceding 12 months. 

^Ttaenul, weekly NASDAQ 
National Market Hst and the 
NASDAQ National List, of 
smaller companies, trill contin- 
ue to be published every Mon- 
day. 

Also, we are beginning two 
sew. regular features. One is a 
daDy summary of activity in the ' 
Euromarket and the other a dai- 
ly foreign-exebange-market 
summary. In addition,' on 
Wednesdays and Fridays, we 
nil] expand space I or Business 
People and our daily earnings 
Gstings will also be expanded. 


relatively short durances! between 
Manhattan and Andover, Maine, 
the site of cue of the sau&te dishr 
es, and between British Telecom’s 
dish and central London. 

“As a customer, I can leapfrog 
those terrestrial charges entirely if I 
can put an earth station next to 
me,” said Roger J. Cochetti, a 
spokesman far the Coasmmica- 
trons SatriHle Corp., which earlier 
tins month started a service similar 
to tire one that British Telecom and 
AT&T are expected to announce. 
The Comsat service is a joint ven- 
tore with the TRT Teleco mmunica- 
tions Corp. of Washington. 

Whether British Telecom and 
AT&T mS actually propose to 
place dishes directly on customers’ 
roofs is not dear. Since a privately 
owned dish can cost about $3 mif- 
lion, it could result in companies 
instead erecting shared dishes near 
customers’ premises. 

The venture is important to Brit- 
ish Telecom’s image in North 
America. The company, which had 
been die government-owned phone 
monopoly in Britain, was sold to 
the pubbe last year and was eager 
to shed its image as a stodgy bu- 
reaucracy unable to participate in 
new crt m mirnicwtinffis tecfanologieS- 

About 25 companies have ap- 
plied for licenses to erect roof dish- 
es for international calling. More 
applications are expected. 

It remains to be seen whether the 
market can support dozens of play- 
era. For one thing, dose to one- 
third of all international calls are 
stfll carried by underwater cable. 
For another, rooftop- to-roof top 
calling is, hy definition, a private- 
wire service for talking or sending 
computer data between two num- 
bers only. Callers can only call 
where a dish has been installed. 

Industry experts estimate that 
the market for roofuro-ttMooftop 
calling' wQl be about $100 millkm 
for American carnets by 1990. The 
market for the current way of mak- 
ing international calls is about S2 
bubon for American carriers. 



EXTERNAL US. $ BONDS 

AND 

BONOS NQMfNATIVOS 

THE WESTON 


GR 


Enquiries to: ' 

CH -1003 LAUSANNE . 
2 Rue de la Paix. 
Telex; 25869 . 

TeL: 021/20 17 41 . ■ 


r. , J 


OPEC to Focus 
On Price Levels, 
Not Production 


'WWW¥rf?*\ 







By Bob Hagercy 

International HenJd Tribune 

GENEVA — Members of the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries agreed Monday at a 
foil meeting to defer haggling over 
production quotas and to concen- 
trate instead cm pricing. 

OPEC minister said they would 
discuss production at a later meet- 
ing perhaps in the autumn. Mean- 
while, a Saudi proposal to trim tbe 


TV, Nvw York T*« 

Aircal jets parked at a Los Angeles airport as a Pacific 
Southwest Airlines plane takes off in fire background. 


has signed a contract to lease 12 
jets vabed at 5300 million, and it 
has options for 11 more. 

PSA, recovering from its own 
financial slump, is fighting back 
with an advertiangnUiz and a 
new Si-billion fleet of planes 
that the company hopes will ex- 
pand its business in the Pacific 
Northwest. 

The San Diego-based line 
helped create the corridor’s com- 
petitive atmosphere in the l960s 
and 1970s by initiating low-fare, 
high-frequency flights nefore the 
industry was deregulated in 
1978. But PSA and Aircal. dis- 
covered that. fare wars were a. 
disastrous form of competition, 
and are now focusing on services 
and marketing strategies instead. 

Despite average load factors of 
55 percent and increased fre- 
quency of flights, the carriers' 
prices have remained untouched 
for a year and a half. A full-price 
fare is about $89 and the dis- 
count price is $69 for a one-way 
fligh t 

They have discovered the art 


of plugging air travd as a con- 
sumer product “What you see 
out there is a microcosm of the 
industry," an »irtin« ana- 
lyst who asked not to be identi- 
fied. “They’re learning to sell 
their service as if it were soap." 

Business commuters, the 
mainstay of the market seem to 
respond well to the new pitch. 
“When it comes to choosmg a 
sendee like this, it often comes 
down to tie breakers, such as the 
frequent -flier programs or 
snacks,” said Christopher K. 
Chapin, a consultant who flies 
more than ouce a week between 
his San Frandsco-area office 
and Los Angeles, where he has 
clients. He said he preferred PSA 
far its frequent-flier program 
and slightly more efficient 
boarding system. 

Ross Jamison, a salesman 
based in the Los Anodes area 
who also flies the corndor regu- 
larly. said he preferred Aircal 
‘They’re both pretty reliable, but 
I like AircaTs attendants," Mr. 
Jamison said. ‘They’re always 
friendly, and you don’t want to 
be hassled after a long day at 
work." : 

In recent months, Aircal 
Hh'htk to have raised its market 
share to 35 percent, from 30 per- 


cent, at PSA's expense. PSA de- 
nies that it has given up so mnch 
business to Aircal 

According to the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Transportation's statis- 
tics for 1 984. nwre passengers fly 
between the San Francisco Bay 
area and the Los Angeles area 
than between any other two 
points m the country. PSA had 
45 percent of that business and 
Aircal 30 percent, department 
figures show. United Airlines 
bad apnroximateiy 17 percent, 
with the rest being divided 
among Western Airlines, the Los 
Angeles-based carrier, and other 
lines. 

Most of the corridors growth 
has come from the satellite air- 
ports — in Long Beach. Ontario 
and Orange Comity to the south 
and San Jose and Oakland to the 
north — that have attracted a 
growing number of business 
travelers. 

Aircal, whose 1984 revenue of 
$303 rnflboc was slightly less 
than 60 percent of PSA’s $501 
million is airline revenue, has 
more than tripled its flights in 
the corridor once the beginning 
of 1983. “Ifs dear that Aircal is 
doing well at someone’s ex- 
pense," said David Sylvester, an 
(Continued on Page 1L CoL 3) 


reluctant approval from a majority 
of members, though several have 
rejected it. 

The ministers were scheduled to 
continue their meeting Tuesday 
morning. 

OPEC is groping for a way to 
stabilize oil prices, which have fall- 
en about 25percent over Lhe past 
five years. Tne price decline has 
reduced the 13 members* share of 
the non-Communist world ofl mar- 
ket from more than 60 percent to 
about a third. 

Subroto, Indonesia’s oil minister 
who is serving as president of the 
Conference, exhorted members to 
unite and to stop cheating on pric- 
ing and production agreements. He 
said OPECs critics were hoping 
that the organization would fan 
apart, and added, “We shall not 
give them that satisfaction." 

OPECs official prices are $1 to 
$3 a band above current market 
rates, bin most member countries 
sell their oil at a market-related 
price. Saudi Arabia, which has in- 
sisted on charging the official 
OPEC price, has seen its output fall 
to a 20-year-low of around 22 mil- 
lion bands a day. 

As major producers of heavy 
erode, the Saudis are hoping that a 
more competitive price win be set 
for that oil type to rap them boost 
sales. The current official price for 
heavy crude is $2630, compared to 
a market. price of around $25. 

Saudi Arabia has not publicly 
named the size of the cut it is seek- 
ing. But the kingdom is forecasting 
greater demand, and the reduction 
presumably would leave its price 
well above the market level 

The Saudi proposal is supported 


heavy erode. Most oifie^ members 
appear likely to agree to it in light 
of Saudi Arabia's power to flood 
the market and depress prices 
worldwide. 

Iran, Libya and Algeria oppose 
official price cuts on principle al- 
though they sell their oil at market 
prices. The three countries dissent- 
ed from OPECs decision last win- 
ter to cut the price of light crudes 
by 51 and to raise heavy crudes by 
50 cents. 

Mana Said al Otriha, the United 
Arab Emirates' oil minister, also 
expressed reluctance to accept any 
price cuts. In a poem he customari- 
ly delivers at OPEC conferences, he 
tailed price-cutting “the impotent's 
step to surrender." 

The production question is even 
more contentious, with several 
members, notably Iraq and Ecua- 
dor, pressing for higher quotas. 

Ecuador already is producing at 
a rate that exceeds" its daily quota of 
(Coatnmed on Plage 15, CoL 5) 

Unemployment 

IsDoiminEC 

Realm 

LUXEMBOURG — Unem- 
ployment in the European 
Community fdl from 12.3 mil- 
lion people" in May to 121 mil- 
lion m June, but (he June figure 
was 2.8 percent higher than a 
year ago and the rate was ex- 
pected to rise again soon, the 
community’s statistics office 
said Monday. 

Reductions in the jobless rate 
from June 1984 to June 1985 
were recorded in Denmark, Bel- 
gium and the Netherlands, with 
unemployment rising signifi- 
cantly in Britain, Ireland and 
Italy, according to the seasonal- 
ly unadjusted figures. 

The number of people regis- 
tered at unanploymem offices 
in community member coon- 
tries. excluding Greece, which 
does not keep complete figures, 
represented 10.7 potent of the 
working population. 


These Bonds having been sold, this announcement appears as a master of record only 


JULY l«W5 


US. $75,000,000 


J3ROUPE. 


BSN 

( Incorporated with lintiied liability in The Republic of France) 

6 %% Convertible Bonds Due 2000 
convertible into ordinary shares of BSN 


Lazard Freres et Cie 


Banque Paribas Capital Markets 


Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 


Banque Nationale de Paris 


Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft 


Lombard Odier International Underwriters S.A. 
Morgan Stanley International 


Credit Lyonnais 

Generate Bank 
Morgan Guaranty Ltd 


Nomura International Limited 


SociSte Generale 


Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited 
Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited 


Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 

Bank Gutzwiller, Kurz, Bungener (Overseas) 

MtoM 

Bank in Liechtenstein AG 


Julius Baer International 

IJnkrd 

Bank Heusscr & Co. Ltd. 
Banque Bruxelles Lambert S.A. 


Bank Cantrade Switzerland (C.L) 

IWM 

Bank Leu International Ltd. 
Banque de Depots et de Gestion 
; Banque Trarsaliantique 


Banque lndosuez Banque de Neufllze, Schlumberger, Mallet Banque Romande Banque Trarsaliantique 

Border et Cie Caisse Central* des Banques Populaires Oarfdcn Bank Compagnie de Banque et dTnvcstisseoents, CBI 


Credit Agricole Cnfdil 

Dahva Europe I 

Unfed Dean* 

Genossenschafllirhe Zentraibank AC 
VStoM 

Lazard Brothers & Co. 

LUM 

MerriD Lyndi Capital Markets 

Nippon Kangyo Kakumaru (Europe) 
Uarind 

Pictet International Ltd 

Sarasin International Securities 
UtoiM 

SodW FlnancKre Mirths S.A. 


Cnfdil Commercial de France 


DG BANK 

Pwortr U townwM W»to 


Henlsch & Cie 


Crtdil du Nord 
Dresdner Bank 

Ak&nre».thri1 

Hoarr Govett Ltd 


Lazard Freres & Company 
New Japan Securi ties Europe 
SaL Oppenheira jr. & Cie 
Pierson, Hddring & Pierson N.V. 


i Nord CSFB- Effect enbank AG 

Gefina International Limited 

(non) 

r Govett Ltd Ktetawort, Benson 

Unfed 

Lloyds Bank International 

IfeU 

The Nikko Securities Co., (Europe) Lid. 
Peterbroeck, van Campenhout & Cie. S.C.S. 


J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. 

ItoM 


Swiss Voflisbank 


Union Bank of Finland 


Verband Schwefaeriadwr Kantonatbanken 


s Westdeutsche Landesbattk 

MlM IHfc 

Financial Adviser id BSN: 

Lazard Brothers & Co., Limited 


Rothschild Bank AG 
SGS Finances. A. 
United Overseas Bank SA. 

Um 

Yamakhi International (Europe) 

United 











ff IP Jfr?Sei2 e3§S38?55JS?mSSEESi5SJ3!5*eSS?iS?S8*55* Iffl I 

$ s iif 5*S a “S s a £? a 3a 8 : SB? G55S 5 Wc t «aas2 taaa saats..sBt » 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


Indus lteut 130.13 1344J9 IWii- J^O 
THM 497.45 TOM 0*M 70L9C + 1.17 

uni \tsja i&m 14121 iu£- 

Cornu 564.17 54727 560.14 36U7 — W1 



AMEX DJanes 


NASDAQ Index 


P «o » h)iM ‘Tador 
HU Law CUM 3 PJM. 
Commit* 11326 1H7» 1026 11X4 

Indmtrtab 12U4 12X13 12U4 M A 

Tramp. IHJfl 113J1 114.10 HA. 

M1UIM ** MJ4 UM NA 

Ftnanc* 12121 12X90 12121 HA. 


ll^iagli g lSTKOMl 



Closing 


Advanced 
QttfMrt „ 
U i t el amp ul 
Total Iowa 
New rtleh* 
Mew LOW 


Cfcf* Pit*. 

261 317 

310 351 

244 233 

•17 401 

45 31 

7 13 


Canraastt* 

Industrials 


Wee* Yoar 

Ctoso New Aw Mo 
38724 30644 XOJ9 TB 37 
31324 3046 J07J1 256.11 
*9.12 — 39223 357.17 

367 JO — 34031 227.14 

SAAt — IBSt 1*7.53 
3B43 — 297/6 I*LH 

273.17 — 264.14 WSJi 


AMEX Most Actives 


VM. Mot) Law Lari as. 


Soy sates ■SflVr 

mm % 


21 XIX 457<506 
26X140 S4L3S6 




•indutied in Hie mes figures 


4BU5S 7j226 


Vat 8*3 PAL 71571X8 

Prer.3PJH.V0L 7U6UQ8 

PrtvauBBWotedCtee 137JM 


Tables Include th* natfaawlde prices 
up to the doting « wall Street and 
do not reflect lots trades etsswtwn. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's Index 


am in 

2*67 6% 

2306 M 
»*09 A 
U64 K 

im tr/% 
1S83 13H 
MI iM* 
MSS ttU 
V.K 3S-V 
835 1344 
759 3lY 
7SS 114* 
454 1446 
SB1 13U 


I7W — u, 
4*6 

5s - w 

Ml 

Wi + n 
IM 4. £ 

IS* +5 

2P — H 
27%. ♦ 14 
>3 - S 

TVj 

11*6 

MU, 

IK. 


AMEX Soles 


FmW Today 
Hlfh Low Oat* 3PJHL 
indwtrtais mg 21437 tisjs 3U» 

Troop. OlS UX3S ltlJD W142 

UtipfW KSO VM 0.15 87* 

Fftma 2XD 2X37 2X43 2121 

GoamsH* Hilt ftUfl 195.D 193J4 


3 PAL volume 
Pnv.l PA ndiRW 
Pmr. earn, watam* 


AMEX Slock index 


Mrevton Today 

Htpb Low daw 2 pm, 

234J3 33541 33U4 DU| 


Stocks Lower in Active Trading 


Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange were lower late Monday in 
moderately active trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was on 
5. 82 to U53.7I an boor before the dose. De- 
dining led advancing me by an 11-4 

Ahhoudi prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 PM close in New York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 PM. 

ratio. Volume amounted to about 715 million 
shares, down from 91.7 million in the same 
period Friday. 

Prices were lower in moderately active trad- 
ing on the American Stock Exchange. 

Analysts said the market was weakening pri- 
marily because of profit-taking after last week’s 
solid gains. 

The market’s Sliding was part of a consolida- 
tion rather than a cause for alarm, said Ricky 
Harrington, of Interstate Securities, Charlotte, 
North Carolina. 

“It’s stSl a good-looking market,” be said, 
pointing to the strength gained in some baric 
industry stock groups during last week’s ad- 
vances, incl uding chemicals, aluminums and 
technology issues. ■ 

“There’s going to be a broader advance be- 
fore the summe rs over,” he said, with the mar- 
ket pushing to new highs. 

“After those substantial advances, we were 
bound to get some profit-taking,” said Monte 
Gordon of Dreyfus Corp. 

On the trading floor, GJD. Seade was near 
the top of the actives, and up a bit. 


Phillips Petroteum, also active, was gaining. 
Other oils were lower, with Texaco, Chevron, 
Atlantic Richfield and Exxon all fractionally 
lower. 

AT&T was slightly lower. 

Department stores stocks were off, with K 
mart. Sears, J.C Penney and Federated Depart- 
ment Stores ail lower. 

Some technologies were softer, with IBM and 
Honeywell off slightly. Digital Equipment was 
up a bit and Cray Research was sharply higher. 

Crown Zeflobach was lower. British finan- 
cier James Goldsmith has raised his stake in the 
firm to over SO percent. 

Drag stocks were slipping, with Pfizer, 
Merck. Bristol-Myers Co. and Syntex all lower. 

Scorer Communications was hi gh er after in- 
vestor Ivan Boesky said be and a group of 
companies he controls hold a 9.6 percent stake 
in Storer. 

Taft Broadcasting was up sharply after an 
investment group including Robert Bass said it 
holds an 8 percent stake in the company. The 
group said it was holding that portion of the 
slock as an investment. 

■ Grain Ftatnres Gain 

The weather and fairly good buying interest 
boosted grain and soybean futures Monday on 
the Chicago Board of Trade, United Press Inter- 
national reported from Chicago. 

All July contracts went off the board at noon 
in rather laAinstgr trading other than soybean 
oil which tnrned sharply lower just before expi- 
ration. July oil was pressured by heavy deliver- 
ies «nri commercial selling. 



NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 
EUROPEAN COAL AND STEEL COMMUNITY 
(JE.C.S.C.) $ US 25.000.000 8% 1977-1986 

The Commission of European Communities informs herewith the 
bearers of bonds that a selection by lot for a principal amount of 
$ US 3.000.000 has been made for redemption in the presence of 
a Notary Public on July II, 1985 at the Luxembourg branch of the 
Societe Generate Alsacienne de Banque. 

Number of bonds selected by lot: 


1 to 3 
376 to 388 
1280 to 1302 
1420 to 1440 


7 to 8 
710 to 724 
1307 to 1332 
1448 


14 to 80 
868 to 871 
1336 to 1338 


166 to 180 
1205 to 1278 
1341 to 1406 


1450 to 1457 10488 io 10708 


12127 to 12181 12249 to 12250 12701 to 12720 12731 to 12732 
16022 to 16071 17253 to 17259 20384 to 21733 24059 to 25000 

The following bonds drawn in 1984 have not yet been presented 
for payment: 


2587 

3184 

3382 to 3395 
4598 to 4600 


35Q0 

3317 to 3318 
3452 to 3454 
5101 to 5200 


3172 to 3173 
3334 to 3372 
3504 to 3509 
5301 


Principal amount unamortised after 1st September 1985: 

S US 1.000.000,-. 

From 1st September 1985 the bonds selected by lot will no longer 
bear interest. The bonds presented for reimbursement should be 
accompanied by die coupons of 1st September 1986 and will be payable 
in accordance with the terms and conditions shown on the bonds. 

THE PRINCIPAL PAYING AGENT 
SOCIETE GENERALE ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
15, Avenue Emile Reuter LUXEMBOURG 































































































































.index 

5S M 


■N 

977-1986 

«ln aI11 0[ 

.. I ‘;^r c, ? ,cc «r 


?! ,;~ l ” iso 

S *1= 3 

.r; * 1:737 

■ - to 25fX« 

cl cv.cn prvwMcrf 


7:cr;;S.T ;vx4 

* I-”’ -w.; :..- i,-.r,ac 

f>enscrv. -rj..uWtt 

^ v,: ' ; r -- p-Nablt 

A’\ir. ;-r. t!;c *vnd„ 

CihN I 

C UK BWQtE 
•IBOLRC 




1 *■ 

rf.-l 



T *. . 

•- li-! 

» • » 

• i'i V,.l 


: t • a,.. 

- * e. 

Ih-r 

•>r - 

■* • m ; 

■?, -;’5 s :j 

- . J. * 

. ■ 

« - 

ft. ■ 4 « J !■ 

-a • 

•• ■; ;:-s 

r- 

.. .: ■ ;-.j 

X • 

a. ■ • 1H-- 

- 1 

a » S* « 

- .v : 

iCm i 2 m 
t* 



o ' %-l 


. -J . 1. . C-. 

y. ; :c ' i 

4 . r’f :• ro'l 

n i ••• ; 

hr c ■ 1 

»:■ * : 


at ~ 

, i V- ■ i * t 

jn 

; ! i • "" 

!*• ;*4 - • 

c' - j - i : 

.* ■ »• • 


**• 
*-• - 


-is 
'!• 
■A. 
.«. J 
V 


•J* 

_*%■ 


•!_ .?• '- 

ill .' 

- V- > -w 


I . A-* 
\ 


-•* I-V 

... »?■■ 

. r.’- Z"‘ j 


IT A 


»•. ■ 

». ir ■ 

r V.-' 
J-.'*’ »' 
; -I i. : s 




v-- • 

%■ 


; i 


, 

IW 


W*'«‘ 
. «* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


Page 11 



RiPUBUQUE TUNIHENNE 

MINISTfeRE DE UtCONOMIE NATIONALE 
COMPAGNIE DES PHOSPHATES DE GAFSA 

APPEL DDFFIKS IMTERIUTIMAL N P 2223 
HR8ASSEMENTS GENERAUX A KEF flfflOBR 

l^Compagnie dea Phosphates de Cafes se p ropose de lancer on sppei 
cFoftres international pour la realisation dea trevanx de .temssenmui 
generaux pour lea ouvrages nnvanta ; 

— Services genertnx et earrean mine 

— Uaamfntfan de Is csrridre A Is Isverie (cwmrywr) 

— Lawien expedition. 

Leo eatraprises specialises dans cc genre de tzavaux' peovent dSa la 
panition de cet avia retirer le dossier dappd cToErte, aujnfts de none 
service general au : 9. rue do Royamne de 1’Arabie Saoudite . Tania, contra 
le vcaeneni de la wwmtif de trente dinars. 

lea off re® etablies sons peine de miHiife, en langue fnutQaiae devront fttre 
addressees en deux parties fake datuxtes; 

— line enveloppe 'A* Jftnwjt fermte eomprenant lea spteific*- 
tiana techniques relatives A 1’offre ft savoir: 

• Uoyena maieridi ft mettre en oenvre 

■ References do personnel rfVnmmf 1 * *«»■»»- 

— Une enveloppe 'B' d flm ent fermfte, comprenant lee docu- 
ments suivanta : 

• Sotnnianon eufaUe canfonohnentao modtie joint u doader 
(Tappet d'oflren. 

• Bordereau de prix et devia eatimatif. 

Cea dens euveloppes smut placets dam one troisiSme enveloppe dQment 
tenner et acellee, & adresser par voie postale sots pli recommainje au non 
de Monsieur le Direr! ear dea achats 2130 medaoui flams*) avec la 
meotiofl suivanie au coin superieur gauche : “* 

'A.O. N P 2223 - Terrassemcnts Ghdma ft KEF EDDOUS no 
pea ouvrir avant le 21 Aont 1985 ft 10 henrea. 

L'ouvertuiv pnblique des plis aura lien le 21 aoQt 1985 ft 10 henries au skge 
de la DirecDoo Achats ft Metlaoui. 

Tome off re nous parvenant par telex ou aprte retie date on ne nspectam pas 
lea condidoos d-dessos sli pukes, sera automaliquement refoulfte 
reeoure. 



RiPUBUQUE TUNISIENNE 

MINIST&RE DE L'lCONOMIE nadonale 
COMPAGNIE DES PHOSPHATES DE GAFSA 

APPEL D’OFRES INTERNATIDNAL N P 2224 
CHARPEHTl METALUttE M PROJET KEF EDD8M 


de lancer un appd 
charpente mCtaBlque du 


La Gompsgnie des Phosphates de Gafaa se 
d'oHres international pour k rftsliaation de 
projet KEF EDDOUR ft savoir : 

— Atdren et hafl dVattreden 

— Dftpdt de gnaoB 

— Higasio de pihxs de rechuges 
— Carreaa miner 

— -Portfque ;■ - 

— dOtnrea des depftta. 

Lea entzeprises apfeiafeste dans a genre de tmvaux peuvent d& la 
panition de cet avis retirer le dewier d’appd d'oftrm; aiyres de notre 
service g&kral au : 9. me du Royamne de T Arahie Saoudiie ■ Tnnia, centre 
le vereemeat de la sorrum de trente dinars tunisiens. 

Lea offres ftiablies sow peine de rrallitfc, cm langue franpuae devront toe 
adressees en deux parties Men distinctea : 

- — Une enveloppe "A’ dftmeat fermfte comprenant lea apftclfiea^ 
tiuoH techniques relatives ft l'offre A aavoir : 

• Mofena nuiftrida ft mettre en oeuvre 

• References du penonnel d’encadrement. 

— line enveloppe T dflangnt fennfte, comprenant lea doen- 
meuts auivanls : 

• Soumiafdon ftfahlie eonformftment an modftle Joint an dossier 
cT sppei d’oHres. 

• Borderean da prix et devta ee lim a Hf . 

Cm dnn eovedoppes serooi placfies dana une trowiime enveloppe durneot 
fennee et 6cdl£e, ft adresfeo - par voie postale sous pli reco mnm i i dt an notn 
de Monsieur le Directeur des achats 2130 Medaoui (Tunisie) avec la 
mention suivanie au coin suphieur gauche : 

’A.O. N P 2224 - Charpente MfctaOique KEF EDDOUR, ne paa 
ouvrir avant le 23 Aoftl 1985 ft 10 henrea. 

L’ouverture pubtique des pits aina lieu lc23 aoflt 1985 ft 10 hours au siSge 
de la Directjon AcfaaJS ft Medaoui. 

Toute offre nous parvenant par telex ou aprts cede dale ou ne respectanl pas 
les conditions d-dessw stipules, sera an t o ntf i thp aemenl ndoulSe aans 



RiPUBUQUE TUNISIENNE 

MINISTERE DE L'lCONOMIE NATIONALE 
COMPAGNIE DES PHOSPHATES DE GAFSA 

APPEL D’DFFRES INTERNATIOKAL N P 2225 
KNIE • CML - PfflJET KEF EDOQUB 


U Compugnie des Phosphates de Gafaa sc propose de lancer un 
d'oHim international pour la realisation des tnvaux de Cenie<C3vil a 
EDpOUB ft savoir : 

— Services gen tranx 

Mimliui I lo w' 

— Laverie 



partition 

service general i 

le vereetnent de la somme de trente dinars timisems. 

Les offres etablies wus peine de online, en langue Iranfaise devront toe 
adreasees en deox parties bten distanctes : 

— line enveloppe 'A* dfiment knoie comprenant lea spWfiea" 
Hons tedukpiH relatives ft Tofire a savoir t 
h Mojena nuttftriek ft mettre en oeuvre 

• BftKretms dn personnel d’encadrenitilL 

—Une enveloppe TT dmnent lennfte, corapranant lea docu- 
ments guivanU : ‘ 

• Soumlasion fttablie coolormftmeat an modftle Joint an domaer 
d’appd d’oHres. 

• Bordereaux de prix et ticiis catimatiL 

Cee deux enveloppes seront pfacto dans une troitifane enveloppe dttawtf 
ftmfee et scellfte. a adresser par voie postale sous pli recommasdft au noon 
de Monsieur le Directed des achats 2130 Metkoui (TumBie) avec la 
rftmtim suivanie au min supftrieur gauche : 

'A.O. NP - Genie - Onl - KEF EDDOUR, ne paa oovrir 
avant le 28 Aofit 1985 A 10 henrea. 

L’ouverture ptibliqw des ptis aura lieu le 28 aoflt 1965ft 10 heuresauwftge 
de b Direction Achats ft Metlaoui. 

Touhuttfre nous parvenant pxt telex on apriaoette date ou net 
ks conditions ci-desGUB stipulftes, sera automatiquetnent - 
reeoure. 


Airlines Are Battling in the California Corridor 


(Confioned from Page 9) 
airline indusuy analyst with Ham’ 
brecht ft Quist lac. 

“Aircal is anempdrig to carve 
out some recognition by duplicat- 
iog the flair that PSA had as its 
trademark years ago," Louis A. 
Marekesano, an analyst with Jan- 
ney Montgomery Scott Ino, said in 
reference to AircaTs image-build- 
ing campaign that emulates the col- 
or and innovation once associated 
with its rivaL 

David A. Banrnillcr, AircaTs re- 
cently appointed president and 
chief (derating officer, ackn owl- 
’s previous lack 
e said there had 
been a joke that people in the San 
Fernando Valley, near Los Ange- 
les, “thought Aircal made air con- 
ditioners. We had to let people 
know who we are, and that we have 
a quality product” 


! In further attempts to woo tav- 
eiers, Aircal improved its reserva- 
tion sendee, stressed its increased 
leg room, improved its freouent- 
ffier plan and started an “Almost 
Firsi-Class M service that serves 
and wine even on the hoar- 
long flights to and from San Fran- 
cisco. It retained Admarketing Inc, 
a Los Angeles agency, to spread the 
word in floods of radio and televi- 
sion spots. 

PSA countered by introducing 
automatic check-in machines, of- 
fering more flights ou the half-hour 
during peak poiods and by hiring 
Young & Rubicam to spruce up its 
image. It also negotiated with 
Trans World Airlines Inc. to make 
its frequent-flier program more at- 
tractive. 

“It -had become hazy in the con- 
sumer’s mind just what we stood 
for,” said Paul C. Barkley, PSA’s 


president and chief executive offi- 
cer. “But we’re spending a lot of 
bucks to tell people about our im- 

f 'roved product. We have the best 
nequency and high reliability, and 
our frequent-flier program is as 
good a program as can be done." 

After a net lass of 535.6 million 
in 1982, Aircal eliminated routes to 
Fresno, Monterey. Las Vegas and 
Phoenix to take on the much larger 
.PSA in the Los Angeles-San Fran- 
cisco market. The management 
also reduced the work force by 25 
percent and negotiated 10-percent 
wage cuts that were reimbursed by 
150 percent this year after the earn- 
er returned to profitability. 

PSA, which also suffered from 
the fare wars, recession, high fuel 
prices and a disappointing season 
during the summer Olympics at 
Los Angeles in 1984. suffered 
smaller net losses but also renegoti- 


ated employee contracts, and in 
1982 it began its conversion to 
more fuel-efficient jets. 

Customer complaints prompted 
tire company to remove 15 of the 
100 scats in each of its new British- 
made aircraft, the BAe-146. But 
PSA’s expansion in other markets, 
such as Seattle; Portland, Oregon, 
and Vancouver, British Columbia, 
may compensate for the low capac- 
ity on some of the shorter flights 
for which the BAe-146 was de- 
signed. 

With no immediate new compe- 
tition in sight, Aircal and PSA can 
continue to fire at one another 
without damaging their yields. 

Speaking ofi the current competi- 
tion for market share, Mr. Sylvester 
of Hambrechi & Quist said. “Aircal 
jumped oat to a lead, but PSA is 
learning to play the game too. Il's 
hard to say just how it will end up." 


Boesky Pays $ 123.8 Million for Stake 
In Storer After Comcast Takeover Bid 

Rt’Mtn 

WASHINGTON — Ivan F. Boesky, the New York financier, has 
purchased a 9.6-percent slake in Storer Communication^ Inc.'s com- 
mon stock for investment purposes, he disclosed in a filing Monday 
with the Securities and Exchange Commission. 

Mr. Boesky said a group of companies he controls had acquired the 
equivalent of 1.659.200 shares in Siorer, including 1.259,200 shares 
and 400,000 warrants, for S123.S million. 

Comcast Cor p. offered last week io buy Siorer for u pack ace »»f 
cash, stock and warrants valued at S1.S4 billion. 


Earnings 


Revenue and profits, la mil flans, an In local cur rondos 
unless otherwise indicated. 


Cadillac FalrYlew 
is» (tear. ISIS 1*M 

RMIUM 117.5 130 

Oner W«t 7J0 tUI 

oper Share— 007 au 

Domtar 

Si QW. ms WM 

Rbv»hw« SZJS 5325 

Profit IBJ 22JJ 

Per Share (US 056 

1st Half mi TVS* 

Revenue 1,100. UUB. 

Profit 475 IU 

Per Share— U0 1.18 

N or t he rn Telecom 

ms wm 

© © 
am am 
ms im 
2ML 1.W8- 

179A 133J 

155 1.17 


Prod 

Par Share- 
lit Half 

Per Snore^ 


Texaco Canada 
MQuar. ms im 
Revenue. — 151 a i^w. 

Profits 720 WU) 

Per Share — OSS 073 

lit Half ms im 

tSSTizz ^ *4 

Per Share 159 151 

VaftadStUes 

Air Pttts A Cham, 

■manor. IMS im 

44OJ0 «*-» 

X7J 3U 
13S 151 

m ® 

SSSfiz: 9 9 

im s-mooth not tncJudaa 
gain of U.7 million amt 
cnargos of SSJ million. 

Alex. A Baldwin 


Bcnnca A Lamb 
2nd Quor. IMS IWj 

Revenue i»a tjlo ■ 

Oper Met — 11a 145 

Oner Shore— 058 059 

8 SfS&c Si S 

»M nmts oxdude aotns at 
ST7XDOO In Quarter and of 

SOULOOO In half from dseon- 
tlnuad aoarutton*. 

Bansootb 

M Quor. ins 1IM 

Revenue 25la iMO. 

Net Inc. 3435 

Per Share 155 1JQ 

1 st Half JUS 1M8 

Revenue 5.110. 

Net Inc 5900 StM 

Per Share — U2 l.VS 

1985 otmrtor not Includes 
chareootSM mUUan. 

Brack way 

■_ 3125 

IM 

072 


Kt Hall 1W im 

gJlSSrrr tS ® 

Commanwealth Ed. 
2nd Quor. IMS 72S4 
Revenue — uno tarn 
Net ln& H— 1897 1403 

Per Share 0J9 OH 

I it Half IK im 

Revenue 2510 Z»0 

Net Inc 3B5.9 MSJ 

Per Share— 171 ITS 

Crown Zelierbach 
2nd Quor. IMS lW 

Revenue 7W4 7QM 

Net Inc 215 325 

Per Share— 093 1 44 

lit Half ,1* IM* 
Revenue — 1^0 laBO 

Net Inc 48-7 517 

Per Share— 1.19 til 


Failure of Brokerage Firm 
Raises Questions on Safety 


Revenue 

Net lnc 

Per Shore— 
1st Half 
Revenue — 
Net Inc — - 
Per Share— 


9» 

1.16 


1984 

059 

im 

4501 

SJ1 

0.73 


DemUton Mfa. 
1983 
1908 

ss 


Naf Inc — . 

Per Share 

fMaedtn 
Revenue 

ll 


2nd Rear. 
Revenue — 

Net lnc 

Par snare — 
lit Half 
Revenue — — 

Nat lnc 

Per Stare — 


as ?ss 

a 553 

ms im 
2MA raj 
42.9 . 3M 
231 142 


Amor. Broodcadino 
M tar. I Its 1984 


Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Share — 
Mf Half 
Revenue— 

Net lnc 

Par Share— 


8S&2 BS4.1 

7106 7243 

151 249 

1985 im 

1550. 1490 

9248 9439 

OU 030 


Amrltmt 


and Quor. 
Net lnc — 
Per Shore. 
IN Half 
Net Inc — 
Per Share. 


ms 

1072 

140 

IMS 

3094 

152 


im 

18.93 

un 

im 

3006 

147 


1904 

mj 

1147 

146 

19* 

45X9 

1353 

135 


Amstad ind. 
Mtar. 1985 
R evenue— 7900 

Mei lnc 90S 

Per share — 053 

tMaattn - IMS 
Revenue— 4094 

Nat lnc 1934 

Per Share — 1.7S 


Apple Computer 
3rd Quor. IMS 1M« 
Revenue— . 3745 42X1 

Net Inc ta)173 ty 

Per Stare— — 030 

9 Months IMS im 

Revenue uos. iron. 

NM lnc 30 9 332 

Per Stare— 843 OSS 
a: tees. 1985 notslndudo tax 

tor ana caargaoisai-iimiiiaa 
In both periods, 

Avon Prodts. 
Manor. IMS IWJ 
7265 8163 


Net lnc «LS 47/ 

Per Share — 051 056 

IN HON 1985 IM* 

Revenue 1390. 1540. 

Net lnc 634 77 J 

Per Stare— 850 091 

Bank of Boston 
rad Ouar. IMS 1984 

Net Inc 395 »9 

Par Stare — IM 145 

Ut Half 1 MS W 

Net Inc 815 SM 

Per Share — 4.U Ui 


Brunswick 

MCRMr. nw im 

Revenue 397.1 3BOS 

Net lnc 3016 2015 

Per Snare 140 132 

1st Half ms im 

Revenue 7655 7664 

Net lac 5S4 51.1? 

Per Share 248 241 

Burlington Ind. 

Sid Quor. IMS im 

Revenue— 7424 8182 

Net Inc 535 2237 

Per snare uo aso 

9 Mentha IMS 1M« 

Revenue 23040 2422.0 

Net Inc 1549 8501 

Per Shore— 054 2M 

MW nets tncJuds gain of 9 
cents per s tare 
Central & Sift Weil 
2nd Quor. 1985 1964 

Revenue 6£5 6W.I 

Ner (nc 774 72.1 

Per Sham 071 048 

1W Half IMS im 

Revenue UNO 1390 

Net lnc 1463 t*3.» 

Prr Share 136 137 

Chrysler 

ted Ouar. ms im 
Revenue — 5380 53SO 

Net lnc 5964 8029 

Per Share 502 648 

Ilf Half IMS im 

Revenue — 11390 iottr. 

Net Inc 1.100 lj5Q. 

Per Share— ».» 12.12 

1984 nolo Include gods of 
53510 mUOm d nuartor ana 
of M9 million m half. 

Cl nett Peabody 
2 nd Odor. ms 1984 

Revenue , Jfco 2813 

Nef lnc (ail. 16 iM 

Per Stare— — 038 

1st Halt IMS 1M4 

Revenue 4419 4209 

Net lnc 233 1U3 

Per Share — 020 134 

o: leao. IV8S t-nxnlfi noth *■ 
dudms choree of SZ5 million. 

Coca-Cola 

andoaar. wm im 

Revenue M40. 1.9X. 

Nef Inc IWJ* 1&» 

Per 9Mre— UO 1-41 
1 st HaH IMS IM* 

Raysnue— Jgfa 3510 

tat Inc 33731 3&M 

Per Shore * 258 242 

Combustion Ena. 

2nd Quor. IMS IWJ 
Revenue—. 7004 745| 

Net inc 949 145 

Per Shorn — 029 044 

W Hau ,19M MM 
Revenue — l joo 1390 

Net lnc 173 281 

Per Share— 052 079 

Contorted 

taf Ouar. 1985 1»t 

Nel lnc 1629 1460 

Per Share — 135 130 

Jf* HeH 1985 im 

Net IIKL 31JIS 2735 

Per Shore — 256 119 

Commercial Bkstirs 
nd Ouar. 1915 im 

Net lnc Ul U 

Per Shore— 091 079 


2nd Quor. 

Revenue. 

Net inc - 
Per Store 
IN H«H 1*85 

Revenue 3140 

Net inc 8.12 

PerShore 093 

Dtsbold 

2nd Ouar. IMS 

Revenue 923 

Nat inc 43 

Per Stare. 031 

MtHOH 
Revenue — 

Nat Inc 

Per Stare 


2044 

1453 

1.11 


19M 

’t 59 

049 

mi 

3333 

1259 

0*2 


“i 

1904 

2383 

TS 


(Cominued from Page 9) 
customers, iheComex audits clear- 
ingbouse, and have tried our best to 
meet ihem," 

Mr. Federbush said be and Mr. 
Morrissey plan to resume their 
work as floor traders on the Co- 
mae, E Hons to coaiacl their de- 
faulting customers over the week- 
end were unsuccessful 

But the affair did not end with 
the Comex-Volume Investors 
agreement, said Thomas A. Russo, 
partner in the Wall Street law firm 
of Cadwalader, Wickersham ft 
Taft, and a leading authority on 
futures trading. “Aside from the 
many lawsuits the affair has 


spawned to date. I don't think any 
party is without blame," he said. 
"The uninvolved customers should 
never have had their funds frozen. 
No undercapitalized options writer 
should have been allowed to as- 
sume so huge an exposed position." 

The affair still infuriates many 
industry leaders because it raises a 
question about the safety' or cus- 
tomer funds. Mr. Russo mid. "But 
they are also upset," he said, “be- 
cause they fear it may slow the 
expansion of options trading and 
may also provoke the government 
to slow the approval of new con- 
tracts pending the strengthening of 
regulations to protect the public." 


Japanese Banks May Cut Some Rates 


QAfusy 

2nd Quor. 1985 1f*< 

RuvSSkj. 1374 11X1 

Not Inc 227 133 

PwrShorw— DuW 056 

1st Half IMS 1M4 

Ravenua 2713 2587 

NM inc 432 IJ3 

Par Shorn 130 0.97 

Dow Chemical 
lad Ouar. W IMf 

Ravanuo 1000. 2.990. 

NM inc 1553 1UJ 

Par Star*— 0*1 ON 

lit Hal# IMS 1989 

RSVMUM 5360. MSB- 

Net Inc 265* 3180 

Pm Snare 139 143 

Eastern Oat & Fuel 


2M Roar. 
Ravanua.. 
Naf lnc _ 
Par Shore. 
M Half 
Rovanue.. 
Naf Inc 
Pm Shore. 


1985 ltM 
3368 352* 

886 1530 

839 896 

1985 1984 

72X7 742* 

2679 4X04 

1.17 1*8 


■ Fst Interstate 
rad Ouar. ins 1984 
Nat me - , - 7672 9748 

Par Shore 152 147 

111 Half 1985 1984 

Hal Inc - 14831 13133 

Par Short) X15 2*9 , 

Fruetiauf 

2nd Qatar. IMS 1984 

Revenue— 6M.9 .7251 
Nat lnc— 2431 2X84 

Par Shore 133 J 31 

1st Halt . IMS 1984 

Rievanue 1430. i4ia 

Nat me : C22 4130 

PMStara— XI 3 .2*9 

OAF 

rad Quor. l ms im 

Ravemw ; 1881 1913 

Oner Nat — .1541 1131 

oper Shorn™ 0*7 037 

1MHB» IMS IM4 

Revenue 309 3613 

Oner Nat 265 193 

Oper Share— , 141 133 

Georgia-Pacific 
2nd Quor. IMS 1M4 

Revenue U38. 1473. 

oper Net — 67* 

Opm Snare— 051 060 

HI Half v IMS 1984 

Revenue 3370. X150. 

Oper NM — 116* 1 »* 

OPM Stare- 1*4 A97 

Men mauds gain ofSOmUr 
Hon mtxxHv* oa,ns of SIB mjt- 
Uaatn 1 HU smarter and of S26 
million (n hod 

General Mills 
4th Quor. IMS 1984 
Revenue— UTO- 1^0- 
Oper Nel — _ 3430 39 JB 

Oper Share— 038 086 

rear 1W 1M4 

Revenue AWL AIM- 

Oper NM 15J40 17430 

□Per Shore— 359 332 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Japanese banks are 
considering a reduction in the cou- 
pon rate on their five-year deben- 
tures to 6.3 percent from a current 
6.6 percem, which should cut the 
long-term prime rate to 72 perc e nt 
from 7.5 percent later this week, 
banking sources said Monday. 

A 0.4-percentage-poini cut is 
posable, although a 03-point re- 
duction is more Hkdy in view of 
prevailing market conditions, one 
source said. 

The banks will decide the new 


Taiwan to Reduce 
Tariffs 5% to 70% 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan wffl reduce 
import tariffs on 250 foreign prod- 
ucts to cut the country’s trade sur- 
plus with the United States and 
otto 1 nations, a Finance Ministry 
Spokesman said Monday. 

He said the tariffs will be cut by 
between 5 and 70 percent on cos- 
metics, furniture, chocolate, coffee 
and leather products but be did not 
say when they will take effect Tar- 
iffs on 1.100 products, including 
machinery and liquor, were oil be- 


coupon rale after monitoring the 
bond market a few more days, he 
added. 

The coupon on 10-year govern- 
ment bonds, the competitive in- 
strument to bank debentures, is 
also likely to fall 0.3 point, to 63 
percent, for August issues from 63 
for July placements, reflecting the 
current b ullish bond market, the 
sources said. 

But talks between the Finance 
Ministry and the underwriting syn- 
dicate may not agree on any cou- 
pon reduction ahead of the dead- 
line for setting August bank 
debenture coupons Thursday, they 
said. 


French Bank Cats Base Bale 

Reuters 

PARIS — Banque Paribas 
trimmed its base rate Monday to 
10.85 percent from 1 1-25 percent, 
matching cuts announced by Socife- 
tfc Genftrale and Banque Nationale 
de Paris on Friday. 


tween 2 and 3 percent in January. 

Taiwan’s trade surplus with the 
United Stares was S93 billion in 
1984 and $684 million with West- 
ern Europe. 


Signal, GM Gel U.S, Contract 

Reuters 

LOS ANGELES —Signal Com- 
panies Inc. and General Motors 
Carp, have been awarded a 5264- 
orilhon US. Army contract to de- 
velop a turboshaft engine for the 
new LHX light helicopter, it was 
announced Monday. 


STOCK US* 

USS 

DeVoe-Hdbein 


Inlctnaiioml bv 6 Vo 

7V4 

Gty-Qock 


lotematianaJ nv 2% 

3Vo 

| Quotes as of: July 22. 1985 j 


Investors seeking above at erage 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newlcrier 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 48 ft 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone; (0)3 1 20 26890 1 
Telex; 14507 firconl 


Monsanto’s Net 
Was Dotvii 14.5% 
la 2d Quarter 

United Press Iruematmnal 

ST. LOUIS, Missouri — Mon- 
santo Co. reported Monday sec- 
ond-quarter net income of $124 
milli on and earning s per share of 
$1.60, down 14b5percem from $145 
millinn and $1.77 per share in the 
corresponding period last year. 

Consolidated net sales for the 
second quarter were $1.63 billion, 
compared with sales oT $1.80 bil- 
lion in the second quarter of 1984. 

For the first six months of 1985, 
consolidated net income was $21 1 
million, compared with $320 mil- 
lion for the comparable period last 
year. Earnings per share were $2.72 
for (he first half of this year, com- 
pared with $3.90 for the period last 
year. 

Net sales were $325 billion for 
the first six months of 1985, and 
S3.S3 billion for the six-month peri- 
od last year. 

“Monsanto’s second-quarter re- 
sults reflect (he continuing difficult 
economic environment lot cbemi- 
cal-based industries,” said Richard 
J. Mahoney, president and chief 
executive officer. 

“Since mid- 1984, the LLS. manu- 
facturing sector generally has not 
gotten much benefit from the mod- 
est economic growth we have en- 
countered,” he said. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 
nKEATWA 
Ai US. DGtIAK CASH $1UD 

B, MULnCURHNCY CASH $1066 

C DOUAR BONDS |U38 

Dt MULTKDJHBsCYBONtB $1M5 

£ STHUNGASSET clOAS 

F08BGN & COLONAL 

MANAG&HsIT UffiSEfl LMT® 

14 MULCTS SI1OT5T>fiJSUS5EY i a 
TH.0STOW 7BLBt4J«0£) 

KX OTHER F&C FWD 5 , &£ 
BnRRMTKXtoL FUNDS UST 







r • ■ ' •• : /-• • • 

RA^;8,rtreRoy^e- 3& 4i«w*c VIctor-Hl^o- Afiroport de Roissy - Dutyfree - 
.. iCANNK; 6; ia Croiscite rue dn RbOne CRANS^UR-SlERREi -tes Trois Veterans- 


WE BELIEVE CONTAINERS 
BELONG IN YOUR 
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO 


PRIMARY 
PERIOD 
5 YEARS 


INCREASE 

YOUR 

WORKING 

CAPITAL 

100 % 


GUARANTEED 


SECONDARY 
PERIOD 
10 YEARS 


RECEIVE 
EARNINGS OF 

280 % 

ON CASH 
INVESTED 


PROJECTED 


TERMINATION 
PERIOD 
15TH YEAR 


RETURNOF 

CASH 

INVESTED' 

100 % 


GUARANTEED 


To: Trans Container Marketing AG 
Gellertstrasse 18, CH-4052 Basel. Switzerland. 
Please send me full details without obligation. 

NAME: — 

IBLOCX CAHTALS1 

ADDRESS: 


$ Containers are high earning, 
fully insured, tangible assets 
with a 15 year working life. 

# The Transco Group is the 
world’s leader in producing the 
highest annual rental return 
with the lowest commercial risk. 
5c 2000 serious investors have 
already purchased containers 
worth over USS35 million 
which are managed by the 
Transco Group. 

sfc These serious investors 
enjoy a secure US DOLLAR 
income from participation in 
international trade. 

* DO NOT MISS THIS 
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
TO ADD CONTAINERS TO 
YOUR INVESTMENT 
PORTFOLIO. 

$ For full details, without 
obligation, fill in our coupon 
today. 

TRANS 
CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 

Gellertstrasse 18, 

CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. 
Tel: (061] 42-23.77 
Telex: 64446 taco ch 
MINIMUM USS12.00Q INVESTMENT 



1 .OFFICE:—- HT~17 \ 


Opening for ML 
I- Sven in Himtw 


BccalbS£ribunc 

To 





ijbmmil fx’mJb'rs \«>w In 
ail Economic Krt»»en 





2 FORI 

Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and : 
we'll give you an extra month of^ Tribs free with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand 
price in most European countries! 

r To: Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune, ^ 
181, avenue Oiaries<te-Gai4le, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. | 
Please enter my subscription for; 


□ 12 months 

{+1 month free) 

□ 6 months 

(+2«eeJaM 

03 months 

{+1 week free] 

□ My check 
is enclosed 



Please charge m* 
□Access 

□ American 

Express 

□ Diners Qub 

□ Eurocard 

□ MasterCard 
PVsa 


iftad IrexAesu, haeJ 

nc(MCiAraM<ijcd!teK>ipKniTC>lHackd fo rr* utso o— ,xt. 

fbaei «atd ihicu^ Midi 31 . V3S6J 

[Gauntry Granev 

1 vta 

6mtx. 

3rt% 

Aujtra 

A.SdL 

4.020 

aiTo 

5.196 

Bolgwn 

Bfi 

5-020 

tfpg 

1 st. 6 

Denmoli 

DKi 

!. ,5 30 

1.0*0 

PO 

Fvfand 

FM 

I41Q 

'60 

<14 

France 

ft. 

1.350 

644 

259 

Goman* 

Dm. 

<e: 

as; 

144 

GtsttSntan 

Z. 

10! 

55 

30 

Gretas 

Dr. 


8464 

4.49? 

Nrixstan* 

n 

550 

m 

166 

Word 

tw 

115 

o2 

34 

W, 

In 

276,000 

l«W0 

82800 

LnemtoOkra 

LFr. 

9030 

4£76 

2668 

Norw 

KXr. 

) ZE 

7fi5 

423 

Portufld 

5t 

13.800 

W 

4.090 

Soon 

Pta. 

21^0C 

11500 

6J300 

Sweden 

SXr. 

1.470 

79S 

434 

Swiaedand 

SiV 

4T 



139 

Redoi Europe, htarthAfrcfl, forme* Finch 
Mta USA. Frardi Wynesc,Mid* Eon 

1 5| 32?) 174) » 

^DtAhia.Crii^ldnAnencD.GuitsnTK 
A» 1 $1 4tf| 238 1 130 


Card espoy date 

Gxdoemintl 
number 


.Signaluie- 


nl 


Name . 


Acftfress. 


Cry. 

Tel- 


. Ccvrtry . 


.Telex. 


i 

— I 
— i 

23-7-85 - 


VACATION WSntUCIJONS 
I wi be mweferg from . 


to — (dales), fl 

□ Pleceeuispend my submpikw during my rfaerttorxJe^^ i 

accordingly. □ I would like to have (he paper sets K> my vacation address. 1 

j^jPfease endow insHucttons). ^ 


,1^ 




m- 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 



Monday^ 

MSE 

dosing 

Tobias IncJodt tlw mrtfonwfde prices 
up hi the dosing an wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsew he r e. 


B Month 
KM Low Start 


Sh L Obk 

Dw.Yld.PE TflfeHMiUw QaoLChM 


(Continued from Page 10) 

WM 150 4J 13 2881 BOH I 

UnPL 176 7.2 9 771 38* 3 

ibnliB 179 6% 

Utal 450 7% 

tarti 230 7>Z It «» m 3 

1MOWH IS * 

lodcer to in i 

Muse JO lJ 12 597 OOVj 1 

MlfcDt 219 Z* 

tonCa 1JH1 1! a SMS 
VxiCapCLOO 5J 2 S3 5 

tanrdi JO 46 24 40 17* 1 


I MMM 150 43 
i MlnPL 2 M 73 
MbnltB 
Mural 

i Marti 120 72 
I vlMcblH 
■ MedCpr 

i Mohasc AC u 
MotifcDt 
i MonCa 1JBI 
i ManCapdOO SJ 
i Manrdi JO 46 
i Maiaan 2JO A3 
l MonPw xoo 73 
MonSt 1 JOa 9.1 
> MONY JB 9.0 
i Moons .72 IS 
iMoorM IjM 19 
MOTMOf2J0 13 
Monos 2JO o 

i NUnnaf7jo« 9.1 

i MorKnd 1J# U 
i MorseS JO 14 
MtgRtv 1.79a U 
Morton s 44 |J 
Motor* M TJ 
i Munfrd 54 13 
Mimas 

MurpO IjOQ U 
MuttvO JO 11 
Mu tom 1J4 M 
Mran. 


ten BOrt 
38* 38M 
MS 6% 
7% 7* 

am ana 
* % 
7 4% 

30V] 29ft 
2* 2U> 
53ft 52% 
S3 53 
17ft 17% 

S3 51% 
28% 271k 
19% 19% 
Oft 9% 
21ft 20% 
25ft 2Vft 
30 29ft 
52 51% 

83ft 83ft 
43 42% 

23ft 23ft 
20ft 20ft 
36ft 35V. 
36% 35% 

23ft 22% 
14ft 13ft 
2B* 27% 

19% 19ft 
14% 14% 
2% 2ft 


80% + ft 
38 ft 
6ft 

7% 

30% + ft 

% 

7 + ft 

30 % + ft 

2 % 

52% — % 
53 +2 

17ft 

S 3 + % 
27ft— ft 
19 % + ft 
9% — ft 
20%— % 
26 ft + ft 
» + % 
51ft— ft 
83 ft +1 
42 % + ft 
23U— M 
20ft— ft 
36 — % 
36 % -6 % 
23 ft 

14 — ft 
28ft + % 
19ft— % 
Uft— ft 
2 % 


! 7 Month 
HMiLw Start 


79% 13 Oa*h 
33% 25% ONE 
29 20% Oran 

12% 7% Oran 
38ft 19ft Ortor 
12% 8ft Ortor 
9% 6ft Ortor 
33% 24 Odor 
31ft IS* Out* 
3Sft IS* Ovrn 
19 13 OvSh 

37 2Sft Owr 
49% 34* Owe* 
lift 10ft Oxtai 


Div. YU. pe nosHtanUM QueLOftal h»l» Start 


% aaa l bhwui 

Dta.YJd.PE UiHMiIjmi QoOLOiPi WahLo* Start 


74 vn 
32% 32 
38 26% 

10% 10ft 
27% 27ft 
11% 17 
8ft 7% 
30ft 29% 
34 23% 

35% 35ft 
17% 16% 
a 35ft 
49ft 48% 
13% 13ft 


14 + % 

32ft— ft 
26% —1% 
Wft — ft 
27ft 

11 % + % 

B 

a + % 

24 + % 

35% + ft 
I7ft— ft 
35% + ft 
49% +1 
13ft— ft 


21% 
a 

32 
34 
37 

44ft 

a 

45% 
15% 
14ft lift 
30% 30% 
30% 30% 
13% 13% 
71ft 71% 
47 47 

51 51 

77 17% 

58% 59% 

a 35 % 

17% 17% 
17% 
12ft 


JO 4.1 
IJOQ M 
JO J 
JB U 
M 1J 
Pi 5JD 7J 
»E 1.90 89 
Pi 2J0 707 
P# AOO 12J 
jjf 4J52 125 
IjM 4J 
05 
9J 
TOP 
1J 
50 


14% 
31% 
12% 
20 % 
at a 

KS 79 
349 
IS 


w, 


Floating-Hate Notes 






wm 




KB 


Dollar 


MkdlrWiM 
Anted Irteh 91 
A1 Bed Irish® 

Atfted Irish Pen 
Arab B* can 91/96 
Afhntlc Fki arm 
Autaaistaifs 
BeaCornnlUM 
Bca Max Lanran 
Ba> Dt Rmo 89/91 
Baa Dt Remo 9] 
BnSvitoSPlriton 










vtr 


ta. 




E 


385 


L4 


JARDIHE FLEMING. FOB WGPOH0 U 

—IB I JJ= Australia — 

— (b I JJ= Hona Kona Trust 

— tb 1 JJF Japan Trust 

—{b I J.F Japan Tedmolnoy, Y 

— l«*l jjf Kona Grew* Trusty. 


m 


trihr. 


ft** 


Baa Carp 97 
Bk Grata 91/94 
Bk Grata 93/97 
BkiretaodW 
BkirawdiS 
BkMaaarort* 

Bk Montreal U 
Bk Montreal 91 
Bk Now York* 

Bk Nova Scotia ■/!! 
Bk Novo Sadia M 
Bk Tokyo a 

Bk Tokyo V 

Bk Tokyo SJ 


BttCadfed?* 
B<dl Fin 87/91 
BWIntH 
Brt lot 99 
B8dinfV3 


BtcaP 

Bft»97 

BtcoOctn 

BtaJanU 

ISSm* 

Bap 91 

Stall 


Ba Pcrftoe Perp 
BavnnraH/94 
Barclays BkPtrp 
Barclays O/S 95 
Barrtm O/S Pens 
Barclays O/S 94 
BktatamPm 
BeWura OaeW/W 

BetatoraQO 

Betatom 00/05 

BoranBMf 

BaranBkM/n 

Betatam 94/94 

ttatatara Od99/H 

CC0998 

OX* 15 

Coca 98/9! 

cm 90 

Cal 90 

□be 93/25 

ObctaM 

GBkMIWUv) 

CJbc 94 

Crateral S4L 94 
Central tnl 97/tO 
amt amicus 93 
Chase Man Carps? 
One Mot Core Oo 
Ornnkultt 
Chemical 94 CYfttyi 
ChdstknlaBkTI 
Christian la Bk 94 
encara AmWtwMvJ 
COIcnrpSeiJi 
ancsrpOdM 
□Harp 94 
□NcervPara 
attorn PtaP 97 
Camerua97 
Caavmnt* F*8f 
CauMRtk Mouta 
COmnUibMartrartfl 
Coop Fki CJLC 97 
CJanrt Of Europe ft 

Cd 16/98 
Ccf 99/99 
CdFebM 
0197 

Capra 17/77 

CvmeM 

CrDuHordBf/B 

CrFonctarrt«S 

Or Par Ewart 92 

CrLyomata 91794 

C/Lycmob® 

OLNmob9V97 

CrLyamub 19/94 

Or LvoaHb 91/95 

Cr Lyaraials 99 

CrLwnDrtsJoa92^6 

CrLtmaais97 

CrLyoaaatsai 

Or Lycnnrt Jenf2/96 

Cr National U 

CrNaHanal 98/94 

Cr National SB 

Cs d ttaas b d»94 

CrartBO B taH?* 

CrltaOanaU 

DoikM Rasya96 

□andlNataas»A99 

D9nNarka KavW 

Don Norsks DM9S 

DmmarkJao8l/98 

Dsnrark.OeJM/90 

DsiWurk99/9* 

DsmxrtPsn 

Die Erato Osst 92/M 

Drssaaer Bkta 

DrMrtwFft® 

DreskterFki92 

EktarodoNucS 

&H99 

Edt 99/95 

EOI97 

End 05 

End do 

Eld] 93 

Ed 98 

Eac99 

Exterior (Rt 91 /» 
Ftrray1e95 
Farravla 92/99 
Fbdand9D 
Fkmbh Paper 9I/9S 
PM Boston 91/91 
PMB83VSI96 
Prat Chicago 9? 

FM CNc*on 

FWOUanN 
PMCtlyTsxa«5 
FM inter 95 
Fo-dt! _ 

Fortune 5+L 92 
FVIfl Inf 94/96 
Gaofinanea 89/42 
Geaftura 92/44 

GA92 
am Pern 

Oft 94 
Gkafi 

Ot Woden 9Z/9S 
Grtndtavs92 
Grind km 94 
GtHMora 89/94 
HBlSvnusIM 
HB SfflHuol Psrp 
Htaw»rW9S 
Hans Kara Para 
Hrrtu Quebec 82 


id ft 

teabsad 95/86 
IndoaartaaVU 
IWII _ 
Irrtard 96/99 
IrakaUfJ 
I retort 94 
Heir 99 
ltdyI9/M 
ltdy65 
CltahC 


si, mm 
s% eva 

IDk. 2309 
Ski 3MB 
Hft 2749 
■ft 29-11 
Bft 83-12 
9» 09-18 
•ft a-n 

S 09-11 
9V. IVlfl 
■tv ton 
9ft 18-10 


lib 17-13 
lib 29-11 
79b 18-12 99 JO 
m. 15-M99JM 
9ft owe IB8.I 

Bft B-O 99 SC 
■lb 3MS IKLH 
■ sub nn 
I USUI 
Mh 09-10 99.91 
I 1449 1993 
7ft 1949 99 JO 
I 3041 
8b K-U 
9 2M7 

to 24-17 
I 1942 
9to 31-11 I 


Uto 3M9 
to 1742 
9ft IMS 

l 17 -n 
_ ■ V 

101b 

7* 

f% 


79k 
lib 
■% : 

10ft 1149 
fa m 

lib 1341 


X2Z 


EL' 


a 




a 


331 






Non Dollar 


79b 85-129147 
Mb 13-11 100.1! 

•lb 8940 

n im 

7ft 1949 
tab SMi 
9% 15-10 
fft 1941 
9ft tod 
fft 2947 
fft 2140 
8ft 2848 

io vm 

fft IMS 
7ft 1M9 
8368841 
B 0149 
1% 1M2 
K 2609 
7% 0W1 
7ft 8-12 
8ft JM? 
mb sa 

L12 25-B3 
fft 3047 
Oft 29-11 


8*. 07-01 
■41251680 
Oft TWO 
Oft - 
7% 0689 
» 15-71 
■ft 36-18 
Sib 1541 
Oft 3142 
fft - 


J2 


$ 






ift 13 a 

7% 1749 
t 74-11 
ift 21-11 
1% 2749 
7% 0649 
10ft 3M9 
8 ft -048 
\Vk 3349 
lOh ma 
■ft 29-11 
9ft 3610 
160 
7% 1*81 
fft - 
7% 81-11 
8 % 1541 
tab 1301 

fft tow 

10ft X48 
Oft 1M1 
lift 0649 
Oft 13-11 


rx-*- 


73% 
30% SSk 
«ft 40ft 

46 46 

47 47 

m w% 


2* 

8* 

1Z* 

18% 

3* 

43*' 

3* 

9* 

3* 

3* 

*4 

39* 

33* 

13* 

6 

8* 

24 

8*- 


a* 

4* 

Tr 

36 Vk 

29* 

7r 

41* 

25* 

Tr 

23* 

9* 

T» 

34* 

24 

T» 

17* 

15* 

T» 

49* 

26* 

Tf 

3% 

SB* 

Tr 

27* 

19* 

Tr 

30 

20k. 

Tr 

45 

13 

Tr 

31% 

20* 

Tr 

49* 

36* 

Tr 

8* 

5* 

Tr 

18* 

* 

Tr 

25* 

11% 

Tr 

14* 

tak 

Tr 

43* 

30* 

Tu 

16* 

9% 

Tu 

19 

16 

Tk 

41 

30 

Tr 

17* 

12* 

Tr 


53 29ft QunfcOl 1J4 2J 14 735 51ft 51% 57ft— % 

23% 75 QuakSO JO 3J 21 397 23% 23% 23ft— ft 

10ft 6% Quonex 23 294 9% 8% B%— ft 

34% 23 Ouestor 1J0 5.7 HI inn 37% '31% 31%—% 

24% 14 Ok Ren 3*o 9 14 192 25ft 25% 25ft— * 



58% 27 
45 39% 

10ft 5ft 
30% 14* 
43% 28% 
18% 12* 
24* 13% 
22% 14% 
24ft 17% 
10ft 5ft 
40ft 
23% 12* 
Sift 34* 
56% 54ft 
M 48 - 
8% 4% 

7ft 


24ft 23* 
10ft 10ft 
23% 71 
34% 34% 
33% 31* 
32ft 31% 
33 31ft 
29ft 38% 
05ft 100ft 
3* 3 ft 
1<ft U 
38% 30ft 
38* 38ft 
3ft 7ft 
SSft a 
39ft 
10% 
toft 


58% 32ft UAL 1JO. 17 
36W to UAL Of 2-40 7C 
16% 7% UCCEL 
29ft 28% UDCn 
24% 16ft UGl 2J4 U 
25% 19ft UGl Pf 2^> 'l- 3 
11% 8ft UNCRM „ , . 
U 10% URS *4 

31% 17* U5FG 2-20 W 
44ft » USGs 1J8 4J 
77ft 42ft U5GPf I JO 24 
18% 12* UniFrTl 30 U 
83 45ft Unllvr 2.12a IS 
109 7S UnINV UH a* 
41% 31* UComp lJf A0 
57% 32% UnCorb 3J0 A? 
7% 4% UnlonC 
19% 12% UnEfeC 1J2 
32 21 UiiEIpI 150 11.7 

40 29 UnEIPf 4 JO 118 

59% 40ft UnEPpf 4 JO IU 
34% 24% UnEl BfAMJJO I2J 
72 49ft UEI pfL 8Xj0 1 J » 
28 18% UnEIPf 2.W 11 3 

20ft 13% UnEl Pi 2.13 10.9 
26% 20% UnEIPf Z72 HU 
68 47 UnEl at 7J4 11.4 

52ft 34% UnPoc 1 jo 3A 
115% 82 UnPcpt 735 6J 
21* 11% Unlrovl .18 J 
70 SO unrvtpf 8J0 13.9 
5% 2V5. UnltDr 

>9% 10% UnBmd 
74% 9* UBntpf 

31% IS* UCUTVs __ 

32* 22ft UnEnrg Z*8 BJ , 
>1* 9 U ll linn ^oo aj 
30 19* Ulllupf X?7 112 

18ft 11% UHKi nr 129 I2J 
30ft 21ft Ulllupt ADO 13J 
14ft 10 Ulllupt 1.90 >12 
25 IS Unltlnd *0 2J 
43% 3S% unttim 32 J : 
47 28ft UJerBk IJ» IS 
14ft 9% UMMM 
3* 2 UPKMn 

38ft 22 UsalrG .12 3 

0* 5ft USHant 
42ft 29ft USLaas JO 11 
40% 23 USShoe J6 13 ! 
29% 22% usstad IJM 14 i 
58% 48% USStlpf 4J1P11J 
135*115% U5Sttprll75 9.9 

30 toft USStlOf 125 73 

39* 32% U ST Ob 1J2 A» I 
84% 57% U5WW 5.72 7.1 
13 6* UnSKk 

45 32* UnTach 1J0 12 1 

39% 30% (JTCtlPf 155 6J 
25 17* UnJTai 1.92 U 

31 21% Un1T2nf 1JO 5.1 

21 lift UWRl IJB AS 1 
33* 21 Unlfroe 3D 3 I 
20ft 14% unlvar JO 40 
to 19% UnlvFd 1.12 4J 1 
23* 15% UnLoot IDO A3 
53 26% Unocal 110 A3 

122ft 45 UDlahn 154 11 ■ 
a 23* USLIFE IJM 17 1 
10* 8 ft UsHrFd IJMa 9.9 
to* 20Tb UtoPL 132 9.1 1 
27* 21% UtPLpf 188 105 
28% 21* WPLpt 190 105 
23U IBft UtPLpf 136 KL2 
27 15* U Mil Co 1 -32b 5.1 

to 18 UttICoDf 144 I OJ 


) HOD M 54% it, 

1«33 Sift JJft S4'« 

I 178 14ft 16ft Uft . 

99 J9* 29V.* 59., 

I IS 23% a% Uft- 
54Qr a r* ?4 .'j . 
213 itr» n% •a'k 
; r n* ii* Hu. 

) 3* “ft toft Jtft. 

i S9J 41% 48 ft 41% . 

I 74 1 . 74% 74ft- 
) 1! 16 15% 15% 

1 25 42 00% OMi- 

I 82 104* 1 0ft* IC6* 

I 3380 <0% 40 40% 

f 8202 49* 48 49* < 

41 5ft 5* 5*. 
' 1734 19* 19 19* * 

1207 31 X » 

«ttr toft 24 to - 
18: ST* 55V.- SSVj - 
M EH Pi 3T-- 
48 47 47 

M 2t% 26ft 241k- 
6 WA 19* !*■-,- 

6 U 25% 76 ■ 

25782 65* 65% 65ft- 

2945 SI* SI* 51*- 
IOHSItIU Its 1 '? - 
9S7 to* toft to* 
452* 57'ft 54% ST* 
40 3* 3ft 3* 

ISO 19% 19* 19*- 
44 15% 15' V 15*- 
TP 31% 31% 31*- 
51 D 29 2S'k 70% - 
244 toft 20% toft- 
21 30 29* 30 

Toctz it* irn 17ft 
1 30 - 30ft to- 
st 14ft Uft 14*- 
43 24% toft 24 ft- 

7 43V: 4Ti 4Jft- 

27 A4Te IT A 44 - 

52 14 Itol 14 

97 2* 2 2* ■ 

964 34* 35% 34%- 
880 7* 7% 7% - 

402 38 ft to 38 - 

142 37* 37* I7ft- 
4745 28 27* 27% - 

231 54ft 54 We- 
ll 129ft 129 179 i- 

854 29% 28'k 29ft 
303 37% 37ft 3T-- ■ 
2155 81 80 £C* - 

4 8% B 3% ■ 

■ «JU 44 43ft 43% - 

435 37ft 37* 37% ■ 
2709 34* 23ft 73 - 
14 29* 29* 29* 
14 19% 19* 1»* 
77 25ft 25 ft 25% - 
61 20* 20 20 - 
173* 26% 24 toft - 
12* »% 23 23 - 

4733 28* 27% 28 
807 119% 118% 119ft - 
345 40 33ft 38ft- 
23 10% 10* 10ft- 
85* 25% 25* 2S;s- 
10 27* 24% 26% 
12 27ft 27* 27* . 
2 23% 23% 23% < 
49 24 Ve 2S% 25% - 

5 2 Yu 7T.1 22’ V - 



343 

'2 3~ 

498 34 


4* 4* 

22% 21 
44* 44 
40* 40* 




liT^- 


m 


S2* 24* 
54* 24 
8* 214 

UK 4* 
TB* 5* 
34* 20V6 
41* 34* 
to 25* 
44* 34% 
51* 43* 
92 77 

84* Mb 
40 14* 

38 10* 

49* 38* 
32* 24* 
45* 34* 
34* 17* 
26* 14* 
12 * 6 * 
14* 


m 


40* 
29* 
41* 
51 
85* 
8 * 
20* 
18 
50% 
31 

44* 
130 33* 
1053 24* 
39 11* 
46 14* 
1411 29* 
145 4* 
27 C* 
92 37* 
858 T2% 
10 6* 
56 8* 

M 39* 
140X88* 
245 40* 
132 39* 
» 30* 
1TB 13* 
274 22* 
643 46* 
42 3% 

78* 





«** Si ii 22 1,31 54 52* S3 -i 

£2 £535 Pf MS 9J 443 55 54* 55 + * 

» 19 XTRA ta 2! 10 20 26* 25* » 




Earnings 

Revenue and proftfs. In millions, m In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


2i* “££ '5 l* H » 2t% 2 a* 2 s* 

» ™ S2SS.S. M - 9 ,7 578 S4* S3* S3*— * 

7i» J2 ,a M 1Mi ia% + * 

S? IS 7»ros 32 1J 17 SB 20ft » 20* 

3S% 22% Zuraln 132 33 12 127 35* 35* 35* + * 


NYSE Highs-Lovis 


SN 9 t» Omr SuitM-FIrst Boston LM. 

London 


Hughes Tool Posts 
Profit in 2d Period 

Untied Pros International 

HOUSTON— Hughes Tool Co. 
reported on Monday net income of 
SI million, or 2 cents a share, for 
the second quarter of 1985. com- 
pared with a net loss of 5135.1 
million, or SI 42 a share, for the 
same period in 1984. 

The company reported net sales 
of S341 million for the three 
months ended June 30,-up 20.8 per- 
cent from 5270 2 million in the 
umtf quarter of last year. 

For the six months enrigrf June 
30, net sales were S634.8 million, an 
increase of 12 percent over the 
S558.9 million reported for the 
same period last year. 


AMEX Higjhs-Lows 




i§£ 


-i'-VjV 



























































































■ > p ~- 


. *iL*z js-^'U.*. •- 





ESTBRNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


Page 13 





Mondavi 



Tables Include toe nqtionwfde prices 
UP to toe dosing on Wall Street - 

and do not reftectJate trades ftfaewtwrt. 

Via The Associated Press 


UMmOi „ . 
hui low Stock 

D*. YKL PE 

Sk. Ckm 

ID® Web Low QuoLCb'® 


L 

A 

1 


u 
B 21 
A IS 


A UW 
60 


JO 


s 

J IB 
16 12 
n 

U 21 


17 


11 amount of 
, P re **enie of 
3 ranch of tf* 


J6 A 25 


’•to to 

-05 to 

>il to 

to 10708 
•31 to 1273-, 
to 25000 


1278 

1406 


interned 


3173 


73 
33*2 
3509 




7S 3% ADI n 
3fttb s* AL L* 

22* Q AMCn 
5* 2* AM Inti 
■«ft-«3 ATT Fd 5870 68 
6 2* AcmePr 

12 *** AcmeU 

leu w Adlan 
M 1* Acton 
jS m Admits 
30* i«h AdRusi 

*2 w Attot* 

BH i!4 A«W)C 
SIW 3W AflIPJS 
Mi 5* AlrExo 

U* »£!£■■ 

11*. WtAtCdpI 
4th . * Atom® 
iMu uh Almlten 

a a.asr 

K MAMoln 
3J* 1 m AJcoa pf 373 107 

■an, 1 1 AinCp 42 

W% m Amdahl 30 14 U 

S au. AiMdca JOB IJ 

m A AmBlit .IS IJ 7 

« 36tb AContri 180 28 13 

0% mb A EXP wt 

9 SKAFrucA 
b 5Wi AFruc B 

12U 7* AHM11M 

• 4 AlHWl 

19th 12th AMaA 

TB 'JLXSS 

42th MM.APett 
2th % Am Pin v 
u - 12K AProCi 

*th Mb AmRItV 

r ^ass" 

IK AlTUNU 
4th AWtol 
2th AndJcb 
SW Angles 
th vlAnolv 
3th Argo PI 
- 5th Artev n 
4* Arm 1m 
7V* Annuls 

7th A/TOWA 
4th AsmrD 
BK Astrex 
1 Axtrolc 

7 B._. 

2th Alias wt 

19th 13* Avondl 


JO IS 33 


19 4* 4Vh 4th— Vk 

223 MK 23* 24* — W 
i im lm 
200 4 ■ 3* 4 

91 m* S4lh B4Vh— 1 

I M M » 

10 10 10 10 

41 13K 13Vh IMfc + Vfc 
10 » H Mb — th 

IN 3 2* 3 + th 

262 271ft 24 VS 24th— * 
41 1794 17th 1794 
74 4* 494 4* . 

21 4BV4 4794 48— K 
h fll t blh 
396 12 UK 11th 

a ts s ,3 3n 

II 99 re 90 — K 

M 7 5* 7 + * 

74 71b OTB 9th + lb 

166 13 1216 13 +1* 

24 th S th 

20b as as 35 — Ml 

148 23* M . a* + K 
997 14* M 14H + K 
1M 6th 4% 6* 

122 13 IZ9h 13 + 14 

S 4444 4A4 Wt 
32 39 30% 3114— M 

13 93Q0x At M M 
12 400x 6K 4th 4Jh— th 
11 16 9 194 IK — 14 

2 41 494 4* 1» 

35 ISM. WK IS — lb 


IV 
5A 21 


105 

135 

15 


3W 

424 

St 


314 
3th 
si* 59 


— * 


3* 


91b 

12 * 

2th 

7Vh 

7K 

1IK 

11th 

12K 

VK 

1214 

39h 

17K 

1th 




2 

* 

* 

*— K 

84b 18 

1ft 

34 

Mlb 

MK 

14Vs — * 

4 

8 

7* 

7* 

7*— K 

60B 48 


459 

U 

WVh 

12*—* 

z 

61 

5* 

5* 

5*— * 

8ft 28 

7 

35 

2* 

2K 

2K 

13 

IX 

5* 

5M 

SW— K 



23 

3M 

3 

3 — K 


Bft 

1 

fK 

0* 

B*— K 


11 


IS 
2J 12 
28 

13 


1th 

3K 

4Vh 

5V. 


IK . „ 
3th— K 
ft* — 
SK + 
9K + 

9 


Astral el 180 MA 
AltlCM 


JO M O 


297 794 744 794 

190 12th 12 12th + 
070 IK IK IK 

2 12Vh 1214 12* 

151 K K K + 

10 4 3K 4 + V* 

ft MH 14* I4K— K 


19 31 


IS 

UV4 

41b 



IK 

11 

14 th 
19 
9K 


JO 


M 19 

*5 a 

a a 


10tb 

■Vh 

22 

13K 

1194 

UK 

19VS 

10V. 

UK 

14* 

’S 

5K 

10 

a 

15K 

20 


■M 


15 


InnEer 
'Id he 
payable 
■mult 


f *«- 


bit. _ 

-K 1 

2 ii - 

9C * _ ' 


• •*9 * 



— • — 3 J, r,7i i 5 244 Buquwi. 

pr i.« sk sKBueWipf 

— rT .. . •» r '• 34K 23th BlMlI 


4th 2K BAT In 
23V> 12V. DOMs 
3Vh IK BRT • 

BB'StSSpr JO 37 10 
9K 7th BcddwS 33a 3J 

r a’EKS-llB-W 

a a sssp jo as ^ 

4Vh 2Vi BnrnEn 20 

1044 &K Barawl 20 2.9 
6K 4 BarvRG 
9K «K Beard 
aS 11 B«idBiK iJU 1SJ 
5th * Bbltrnv 
33th 20 BwgDr 
30K 2194 BIcCP 
I4th 9V* BlgV 
24 1944 BhlkMI 

V 14 BloR B 
Nth 1414 BloR A 
29 13th Blesngl 

2th K BloCkE 
19K 12th BlountA 
wva nth Blount B 
45U 22th BokirP 
22K lltb Bolarwl 
18th 10th BOwVal 
10Vh VK BowlAs 
5th 2th Bounnr 
19 12K Bowne 

26V. 1914 BrsaiB 
II 11 V. Brauns 
369b 24th BmPA 
« 25K BmFB 

4V. 3t4 BmF p{ 

5 9K Buekhn 



2A 

26 ■ 






B*— K 


3K 

3K - K 

6* 

6* 



1JM 


2 

IjO 15 

15 9 

17 10 
AS 10 


k , . : t 
• * Ml- - 


1316 7K Busnn 


.140 u 7 ItM A JIA 4*1 

26 23 2294 21K 22 — K 

• 33 3 A 1 

21 12th 1IK 12K + 14 
15 10U 109b llBt + Vh 

22 99b K4 9K + K 

37 3K 3K 3K + V. 

51 

1 
5 
3 

■4 494 4K g4-K 

90 9 SK Wh 

S I IK 11th 11K + J4 

I Vh th th— lb 

344 32 31th 32 + Vh 

20 9VL 2SK 2916— th 

31 IS 14th 15 + M 

12 22 22 22 

37 2S9t 2BK 2»K + M. 

35 28V*. 2814 20J4- Jb 

21 2BK 28tb 2M — V. 
174 lib 1W IK— 14 

57 14V. 15K Tgb- th 
| 15K 159b 159b + 1b 
172 44 44K + K 

1 22th 22th 22Vh 4- Vh 
S3 UK 1114 UK— 14 

2 1016 101b MVi — M 
123- 4K 49b 4K 
350 lOVh 179b 1IK + K 

II 21th 2114 21tb— K 
114 17K 17»h 17K + K 

2 34K 34K 3494 + K 
29 39K 39K 1W. 

SO 4 4 4 — K 

14 3th 394 3th + Vh 

12 4K 4K 4K 

4 21U. 2BK 2614 + K 
32 DM Bib Btb— th 


M 


29 
2.1 II 


29 1 
25 6 
34 


JO 


140 


43 10 
17 

2A 10 


1.00 

TJ00 


10 
U 11 
2J 11 
ULO 


50 I0H 
60 2.1 


2414 119b GDIS 
10th 514 CMI Cp 
XU. IK CMX CP 


3 259b 2SK 2SK + K 

116 10 9K 19 + K 


2414 1BK Cowntf 
4K 3K ColtotO 
IK K C attn«t 
1014 TKCOWTOP -SO 
14K VK Cornea A 
22th I3K CMareg JO 
239b IMh Cdnocc M 

IRA ssss 

SK c oroen 

3th Castotai 

22Vh ISK CMAA 

” I* Mug 

KM ConMPf 3L50 11J 
99ft Cents# UOotZl 
14K arvFa 
5K Cotoc 

2K awiwH 

i7K 12K amipp 
2JK 15K CntMAS 

%. -asssifA siu „ 

2114 15K CWRw IJOa 4J 10 
12H I DllOvO _ . 

37K 129* Chlllns .17 J » 
nth 119b Citadel ' ,, l 

3294 KKCJIFd * 

S3 279b atFhtPf X50 M 
2JK 1014 CTvCOS IJfl <J » 
4214 2BW aortftt 1.W0 « 

1294 69* ClarkC 39rn 19 10 
4S 31KcSS 1J0«W l 

22K I OK Clopoys .14 U 6 

4K 3th ComVir • - 

— ok cam JO 1J w 
21h ColFwtS 
B Camfad 
■Vh Comine 
69b Cnmpa 
6*4 canwo 
4th anpCn 
5Vh CntpFd 
6t4 ConcdF 
6K Candy 
n ConrCp 
594 Cnnasr 
■ IK Cano iwl 

6 CoroOC 

u vh custom 
5K vICOdA 
„ 7K vlCnlAp! 

26 th 14K ContMH 

T 

3th 3th CoeCrn 

mu » SStl JOr 2J IV 
lK IK Court id Mm 32 
121b 7th CrstFe .«■ U V 
35 24 CrnM T -5_J? 

411b 23 CrawIM lJMOlS I 
1714 9K CrnCP 

nt 16^ CwCPPf IJ3 u 
TH dK CramK 
2K K cruteR 0 

BVh IK cnrsio 
2a 1396 cutnc 

2994 21K Curttet 

394 Vt CustEn 
3 IK DWG 
27lh 20 Ih Dol»En 
Blh SK DamaC 
1596 12th DOrnBA 100 1A4 
1596 12th DomEB 130 IW 

79b SK Damson 

30V* T7K Domspf 150 1 U 
24K 19th DomsPl 3J5 111 
23K 1DK DatoPd .14 U 
B 39* Datarm 
BK 314 00 Rose 
6K 39b moots 
34K 2S9h Del Ud> 

ISK 12 DMVd 
51b 2th Dei mud 
7 41b mantra 

Mlh 714 DHVl 
16 1014 CMwKp 

10K 10 Devon n 
1014 SK Dtao A 
5K DIOS 8 
BK DlaBttl 
__ IK DIB Icon 
K 14 Drtrtcwl 
7614 2396 DilPdS 

9th 6 ^ DItaSii 

Vh 1b DmaPert 
IMh 11 Domtrs 
289* 69h Downer 

2K IK Driller 

1394 91b DflvHs 
37 7314 Du com 

1 K DunlOP 
191b 11K Duplex t 
17K 13 Du*™ 

16K 9K Dvnlct 
Mlb UK Dvnoer 
9K 4K EAC 
14K 1» EECO 
7K 3K ERC 
&th 2th E5I 
3Vh 2V» EoolCI 
2394 17K EStnCo 
« 31V. Estgp 

12th 6Vh PchoBa 
3 116 BIAudD 

24K ISK EleAm U U« 
'5th 29* BlecSd 

K T* EnaMst 
10U 4K EngOU 7 

3 th EnrSrv 
17K 10K ESOn 
4th 2th Eratrpl 
I2b 59*. Brains 
32th 18K Espev 
4th IK Esprit 
35th 299* EsaRd 
369b 22K EtzLOU 
996 4 EvrJ A 

9K 4K Exert 


S 2fl> 35K 35V4- K 

S T *i Ab=S 

11 Xfh 33K 3BK— K 
J .TV* 9K 9K-K 

» +> 

* ip* 15K 15K + I* 

B 131b U 13K.+ K 
J 17 14K 17 +K. 

a a ss,g 

6 STM 271b 27M + W 

j j- 5 Shi 

M 14M UK— ^ 

£ iSS § ig + * 

-6 

■ s-ss 8 a- w - 

SB 7K 71b 7K 

u^s a sj nS+K 

11 19 asth 2» 2SK- K 

« i« a s Sh -K 
“ 25 SI— 2 
lS UK IfK ig *■ £ 

‘ 1Sk^!S=? 


17 


JO 


34 

10K 

UK 

26 

ISK 

7U 

Ulb 

694 

4K 


ZB 11 

zn 

w 

JB0 3J5 12 


jz .f a 


zi 


Si DVh WjJ 33K- K 


,9£ mtlTJf 


*» It ^ 


1.6 14 

U 11 


,ia 69 

J2 1J 


35 

J2 14 11 

IBS »1J» • 


-23t 5.1 13 
.T2tlZ5 10 
2> 


10 

29th 


J0 


40 
35 
J 21 


St JM 


12 

,10a M io 


21 
2B U 


M IS T7 
JtoUH 
J7e U U 
JO U 10 
JO 53 
ja 23 30 
n 

13 

17 

1JN 4J 8 

6J40UJ < 

.12 


■40a 3J 
JM106 


IB 


J2.2B20 

3hS“9 


ZE 79* 7K » + * 

i s -at »_k 

S 23th 23th 2314— K 

OT *K \ *K-M 

« IK IK IK 

j 2 $a a 8 3 &-M 

» UK 1» + K 

63 ’» »h » + K 

!psr 

™ 1 1 *a 

10 4K 41b 41b 

1 ?ss & «^s 

•» 3S 8 8*5 

s i&tSSiSa+s 

IHS 

^ "a »S» » + 

6 7K 7K 71b 
16 101b im tow. 

533 2K 2K 2K 

«%s|S 

0 11K 11K lUh 
0 2BK 20K 28V4 

10 » UK 189* I OK 

^ 12S raK ^4-3 
^4 r 

s 

mii 

^ A its: 

’5 ^ ’k + + 5 

S'35>V 

12 33th M9* »* +.K 

nsrr! 

33 79b 79* 79* 


I* F-atnnL 
IMh Sh FlSm 130a W | 

RI>B is j 

ISK UK FMChl* HO A* » 
20th 3Mh FItOCPiAM IO 

i3t t? i 

UK 414 Paodrm 4 

W 79b FgoteM 

vk sk radio. 

22K 15 FartPCA .15 
MVh 111* F afoMI. 

2 96 Fatomt 

<3K 30K Pranti 

4th 41b FrrJHty 
' U PiwiBI 
7K Friedm 
5 FrtuEn 
MM Prlxet) a 
9 FmWd _ „ 

4H FrtAWt .171 ZJ 
5th Furvtts 
4V4 GRt 
2V. GTI 

151b 10 GalaxC 

3 IK GdxvO 
M 249* Goran 
Wh 7K GatLII 
13K Mb GotmS 
4K 3K O rtlKQ „ 

1114 12K ODetns M 
5 M4 GnErtlP JO 

17K IZVh GnMier .10 
6K 3K Mdn _ 

UK 9K QenrDr JO 
UK 71b GeeRH 
4tS IK OdORhrt 
12K Mb GMRB»nJ0 
2BK 13M GrtlYS M 
22K llKGtonPO St 
14K a CntYIp 
asK iTKGimm 
37 239b Straw- 

5 2K GlobNR 
3 GatdW 
jVh % GUH=kl 

^ isest ^ “’j 

159* 10K GrTed) 17 

42K a CrtLkC 
36 VKGranma 
12K 4K Grobwr 
131b OK order. 

15K 10K GHCdB 
UK 229* «Wr 


29 2 I* + J? 

01 4M 4Vh 49b— v* 

3 11K 1IM 1IM 

29 14K MVh MVh— M 
1 249* MV Mft ^ 
H 149h 1414 ljjb— K 
61 M 9K 9K + Ji 

4 SO 29 20 — M 

16 41K 41K 4JK + K 
525 2SM 71 V —IK 

V MM 13K 139b- K 
ID Mb 81ft Kb + M 
160 7th 7 Th— 9* 
9 23 21 23 + Vi 

176 30K 30th 10th— 9* 
116 IK IK IK 

17 35®* 34 3SVh +1K 

U> 69* 4K 4K+M 

61 249* 24 349* + K 

riii — m 

« UK 11K I1K 



_ _ UK Know 
UK 10M Knoll 


30th SI KooerC 2J2 



117 15th I5M ISM + lb 

40 1CM Uth 14'b 

101 29M SV 29M + '4 


IK 114 LSB 
3K 39* La Bora 
74* SK LoPnr 
63K 23% uikeS a 
17*4 11 Lndmk 
149* Wi Load- 
13 BK Laura n 
, 7K 7M Lee Mi 
I. 31 1* 14V» LAItHl 


.tie 

P U 17 
44 
22 
IS 

.IH J 10 
6 


42 IK Uh IK + M 
i n ft m 

13 5 AS t*, 

138 44K 63 64K «th 

M 171b I7M 1714 — 

14 Uth UK UK— M 


14 POWB 
409* 30V* POIICP 
OK 5th PmWSt 
24th 15K PnrXOl 
|4K 7K Pol Teti 
2M PovFon 
5M POMG 
71M PEC Ur 

BM PeerYu 

45M 359* PcnEM 
MM 15VS PenTr 
2K K PECs 

» hi 17Vh Pen RE 1 180 
14M 7K Penrll JO 


JB IJ21 

MaXi d 

30 

H 

.12* U 4 
821 BA 
■«t> 15 15 
1200 11 10 
1J0 1? II 
2ST3A4 
78 10 
25 7 


JO 21 


0.9 


17 


4K «* 


150 

10 

so 

IJO 42 10 


5.1 7 

U A 13 


IJ M 
5 


BJ 

3 

23 


JO 25 7 
180b 11 15 


A U ) 


J* U 17 

JOb A3 U 

M 12 14 


H 


32 ISK 

* *K 

45 TCK 10K IW 
19 SVh SK J 

is 15^ 1 « is 

251 2 IK 2 + K 

3 2B9fc SN* 2*M 
4 M Ml Wh— th 

s «« V* 

113 179* I7M 17M 

^ lS ^ &-+1 

43 4 3K 3K— M 
40 12K HM 1» 

133 13K 13M 13K- 5 
24 4th 4 4 — Vh 

74x IZVh 12h 12M — M 
2 24th «K 349*— K 
95 22 219* lilt- M 

rn UK IW 11M + M 

^ » »-M 

IBM IBM IBM + Vh 

2ffl 4TK 4Hh 41th— K 
54 33*h 33th BO + M 

£ %Sk&-» 

1 


* 

ftVj 

5 Levitt 

10 

1 

* 

2? 

Th LWFPtl 

X 1A 10 


3lh 

lift UteRfl 


SB 

K 

3* 

2Vh UlfM 



H 

3* 

1* Lodge 




TV. 7 7 

29V 39 th 29K ♦ K 

SK SK 5M + M 

7'm 7V. 7\i * K 

» 27K a + t* 

IK IK IK 

3 J9b 3 + Vh 

J IK 1K- th 


1 0h. 
UK 


399* 74 Vi LDrtmr 
16M 9M LUITWX 
U'A 6M LuntrE 
16 9t* LuflO 

MK 10 Lvdal 
2*M 1QK LvnCS* 
10th IK LvRChC 
MVh 121b MCO Hd 


M 8 23 


u 


10 
5 

Lf 10 

U 15 

4 


60a 76 64 


11 

12 

157 

6 


1M MCO R* 

79* M5An 
1 MSArri 
*9b MSI Dl 

7* *"SP 

B» MocSch .14 18 73 
9b Macrad 
IBM MOPS 
flth Matartfl JOe 

saTsa* 

15K 39* MrkiVi 


IK 

129* 

4Vh 

TVb 

179* 

2'b 

IB 

159b 


M 2.1 3 


44 15 14M 149b — M 

243 MM 139* 139* — th 

40 111b 11 Vh I1M 

6 M 139b I3M 

225 ISK ISK 159* + W 

40 9<h * * 

1504 13K 13K 13K *■ K 
IE IK IK IK , 

1* • » * — t* 

13 IK IK IK 

17 BK BK JJ’i ^ 

70 31b 2M 3K + K 

34 14K 14V. 14*. — t* 
79 UK 14K 1*K— W 
37 1 K 1 + K 

12 1794 17 17 — Va 

47 11 19M I0M + W 

ISK ISK ISM — K 
4*a 4 4W. 4 1b 


29K 33 PwmiC 
149* 11 Portnll 
I2M UK Per Ini d M0 
2lh PetLw 
l* PeiLwt 

61* PtfLept 145 228 

.... 7K PetLOOf 3JB 23J 
17lu UK PolLepI 333 228 
2K IK PMILD 34*133 3 

I }k PicoPd 

2K Pier l wt 3 

Bit 3K PlonrSr » 

I6M 10M P HDM »l 
749b 62*b Plltway I2» 34 U 
if*. 6M Pimm 8B 9 30 
Wh I3ih PICTO a 
16th 11 PtvGml 
4K 2K PlyRA 
4th 2M PIvRB 
7K 3M PaneEv 
13K 7K P9rt5v* 

17V] 17b PasiiPr 
7K SM PralrOi 
249b I9M Pro«L 
BK 6>h PTOtlRd 
IM ih PremRt 
14K 7K PrwR * 

12K 6M PmRB 
5M 3** Prtsld 


S6 M 9h K— ■» 

Mx Bh 3SM Mlt * M 

11 *th 6 M 6M- 4 

1 OL. 33M ’Jb 

34 f’e SK 9 - '•* 

30 4Vi 4 is 4*s 

1 10 10 10 

1650a 10 9K 4 ‘.d 

2 10- 1CV lff» 

1 3Bv MM 38V 

At n S3, a * '« 

123 K '• ■* 

a*. »k »> 

71* 7K J'h 
29 Wt IN *'■ 

Wh »2 '2 

1JK 13V UK 

J9* SK 29* 


JO 


13 


6 

S3 

20C M 13 


7« 71: 7": + 

>0 9». 10 * V 

141* 1*M 14*1 

21* 2 2"« ♦ -1 

15 JM S’: S»* + v 

09 BK SK SM— h 

3 3*. 3*. 39. + t 

30 IS'i ISM 11V + . 
72 74"i 74li 74 U — 1» 
a BV BK B'a 

ISK IBM U' s - I. 
U IS'i 16 
4th 3'h J'»- M 

4V * V 

ru ik— 

1DK 10’1- M 

14 — it 

6K 


3 i S*w«w* 
it* rn SiHavn 
IT* I3*i 5WPfd 



.IBe 14 21 


l» 


.48 15 14 
.44ft 13 15 


.34 


.92 II 13 
801 


4V 

3'* 
lib 
MM M 
6K 


62 S 
77 4 
15 


229* 17th PrnCT* 152 7J 14 


a 


8 

25 

JOo 1.1 6 
IB 

.12 9 II 


21 


,10« 12 a 

JODtt 12 

.931122 7 


a 

34 

.. U I 
J0e U 10 


17th 

49* 

149* 

JK 

6K 

S 

17 

I5K 


.10 


109b 41b HAL 

UK 996 HUBC 

UK 79* Haro*! 

294b 26M Hndrn.fi _ „ 

349* 14K Hanfrd* JO 21 15 

2th K Horror 

39th IBM H0NT 8. .H 
43 221h Hadirpl 280 

4396 28 Vb MratW JOo JA, 6 
SK IS* HIHtCre 286a 16 9 
Wt* 5M HHhOl 

19th BK HldEx 

15K 10U HhllhM 

696 HrtrrtW 
9t* Hrtnlcfc 
29* Haidar 
3* Hrtlont 
K HelmR 
4 HermO 
IK Hlndrt 
99b Matron 
6lh HodvCa 
27 Harm! 

196 HroHor 

3th HrtlHwt J7tl28 

1996 UKHOtlPty 180 « 12 
6K 3M HuuOT JMZIA 
1IK 9K HOWIE _ 70 

13V. IK Howlln au 
46V. 31* HaOrtA U U II 
21* 159* HuMAwl 
46th J94t HUbclB 1JS 3J 13 
nib 14* Hubs wi 
21 Vh 17th HudGn 
ID 5* Husky B 
,1 6 ICEEn 

HI 3T* I CM 
529ft 45* iCHwl 


27 
31 
19 
1J 13 


IN 28 U 
Jit B8 17 


UK 

6 

3K 

29* 


JO 9 W 


3* 

13th 

16 

4* 

IK 

171b 

7th 

«tb 

9 

1BK 

10K 


JSt 93 


.12 


2M ICO 
3H l PM 
6K IRTCan 

_ _ lib imolnd 
40V. 2SM ImoOllB 1A0 
13U. AM lnttmt 
22th 11 Imtrai 
29b IK IBrtSy 
2t* mssvpf 
Mb intctva 

lllb taimk 
3K intBkni 
K lntl» wt 
6* mtHvd 
3th IntPwr 
IK iniProt 
6 mlSeaw 
6 lntmrn 

6 inThrpI 

229b UK ion las 
41 ■ UK iroqBrd 
4M 2K l*o4r 
ink 129b Joelvn 
7K SK Jacobs 
SK 216 JeiAm 

2 K JrtAwT 

•*b 4* J«ron 
3* jotuif'd 
71b jahaAm 
4M Journal 

,W* 3M JmaJkn 

39Vi 201b ICnGSPf AN UA 
«*. l* KapofeC 
16th ' 10 KavCp 


1 SK BVh BK— K 

44 17 UK If +K 
31 7K 7K Wh— K 
40 26* 259b »»- * 
S 33M 33 33K— Ifc 

35 Itb IK Itk + K 

13 1» 31th 37* 37th + V. 
n n 419b 40U. 41K + K 

2 3VM 39K 39M— 1b 

31 SS 36 24 + K 

is m m #9b— M 

9® 10th 10 10th + K 

I I2K 13* l«h + K 

« OK fib + W 

10 IS* ISK 15* — K 
« SVh 3th aw 
52 SK 51b 51b — K 

220 K K 9* + K 
13 4* 4M 4U. + Vh 

25 IK IK IK + K 

II UK 16M UK— K 
30 15* 15* 15* 

19 38* 30* MM— * 
ID 9K B* •*— K 

9 21b 3M 3* + * 

» 19 10K 1»* 

269 41b 4M 4* 

ID IS 14* 14* 

4 Ulb UK UK— K 
17 46th 46 46th + * 

3 23M 23U 23th „ 
S03 46* 45* 44*— K 

5 N* 23K 23K + H 
1 17* 17* 17* 

s r 7 7 7 -g 

28* 54 2* 29* 2* 

Mr 28 37 24* 2th 2th 

36 W 1M IN* 1A 

H M 21 1 4* 4* 4* 

280 30 37K 37*— K 

14 S%S:5B1& 

s: s a + * 

M 12* 12K 12* 

73 15* 15* 15* 

409 Jtb 3V* 3M + K 

IB * * * 

40 7* 7* 7* 

6 7 6* 6K-* 

30 3M 3* 3th — K 
1 6* 69* «*- * 

B41 7K 4* 6* + K 

0 Wt TDK 20* + K 


22 M 
21 

11 

8 10 


16 


MVh 21 w Morm of 235 108 
26th ISKMnftln 
43 Vi H* MOfVPr 
1BK 9K MOSlnd 
B* 5 MOtM 
22th 1IK MotRrtl 
20 B* MatMn 
29th 11 Mah-Us u 

ltM UK MOVE* “0 ' IAI 15 
26* Ulb MdVfl ■ J0b 22 11 

E ^SSSTa.U-Km. 
^saSSSSS* B ..« 

21* 13th M6dM JB 9 21 
34 36M MEMCO l.U 3J 13 

W 5* MercSL J4I 5.9 1 
SK BK Mel Pro .« 

3BM II MUTEX S 7 

25 14V* MulroC » 

BK 4M MenGn , , , •* 
13 BVh MMAm -44 A3 13 
32th 15 MW»"P W 

50M 3tVl MlnPpI 580 10.1 
66* 65Vb MlnPpI a« 1A5 
VK 7K MKWlW J4B 27 M 
209* 17* MtcblE 34 18 22 
13V. IK MOflMB AO A8 B 
42 33 MMlP Of AM 105 

17th 10th MOWB ^ J-j “ 
17M 10th 6600BA JB 18 U 
19* IS* NUMB 
49* 3’u MtBRIwt 

19K 13* Mraom 
IB 9* Minin n 
2* Mimed 
13M Mar Sir 

IH Mura in 

VW Mum wt 
13K NUMB 
... SK HortfC k 
14* 11K NfGap 
27 12* NtPatnt 

I9h K HrtsLB _ 

23* UK MMXAT .791 » 

17 lllb NPMRt 1« 6.1 14 
21 13 HProe IJBi a* ' 

49*6 39 NYTlma 60 IJ 17 

6* 416 NewbE * 

17* ID* Newcor J> 2J13B 
16M U* NwLwn 

17K 12 NwpEI IJO *8 10 
7 6 NlChlnn 

13* 5th Niamtt * 

13* io MordRe 7 

17* 13* MoCdOB „ ... 

N 29* NIPS Pi 4 25 122 
ii* 4* NueiDf a 

12* BK Numac 

24V. 14V. OCA 
22* ISK Oakwd 
12 4 OdalAn 

UK 4* OdeJB * 

279* W* omens 
7K 3K OOklep 
3* Openhn 


47 15K 15M 1P6 + K 


21* 21* 21*- VB 
lltb IBM IB* + V. 
68 OVl 48 +S 


349* 21* ProwEn 284 
5 31 PSOal Pi 4J5 118 

mi is pptptc SJ4R1 

34* TTb PBIPfE 4J7 114 

S* IS* PMOlD 284 IDJ 


51 7 


81 X 29V Jf'u -HV 
53 7'h 7'h 7*i 

30 K * K— • 

I U* 14* M* 

13 IT* 12 12 

43 4 4 4 

41 21* 21* 21* ♦ 'h 

7 3317 33* 33*— * 

aooz aii 37'] 36'i-Hi 

9 21t] 21K 21'*— * 

27 33 73 3JA. ♦ -1 

J02 73 73 33 

101 3 1 * 3 *9 


IS 

14K 

UK 

13* 

14* 

31* 

I9K 

’.5'« 

4* 


10 
17 
1 

>.» 58 35 
io io 
JJt 5 7 1« 
.16 IJ If 


.23 10 14 


U 


7K 

30-4 

7th 

n> 


J0 2J 


64 16* II UK * •» 


II 


62 


1J6 BJ 7 


71 

Sib 

214 

17 

9th 


.151 


17 


5 

U 

362 

74 

57 

a 


A50 AS 

I* 

J0& 3.1 9 
.10 3 43 


191 

10 

5 

77 

12 

3 

42 


13 
A 12 
31 
48 
9 22 


7th 


JBc 8 60 


4* OrWH A 15 11 ltt 


JO 39171 


8 U IS 


29 


13 

33 

8B 2J 33 
JOb 16 9 




ith 

11 * 

UK 

7tb 


Jll 7 9 17 


10 13 
5 


JW 10* KovJn 
n 141b Kenwln 
23* 10th Kelehm 
9V. 5* KevCb 

itk B KeyPh 
B 4K KerCd , 
2th lib Keren wt 
9M 5* K orea tm 
4*- 316 Kkddewl 



SS 3K 3M 
IS MM 14 14 — M 

is ss SS-* 

2 S R JK-K 

350x39* XM *JM +IM 
45 4K 3* 3*— K 

4 1316 1316 131b 

1 SS3&3S** 
iri srts 
"s v ’is 
"Bi» r=#' 

23 4th 4th 4K 


14* 

UK 

15 

13* 

129* 

1216 

12M 

12M 

36 


J2t 58 M 

JD If 10 


5K OrtolH B 
2th 1 Ormond 
25* 15* OSufOT S 
7* 5M Overte 
6th OxtrdF 
7K OxorkH 
IBM PGEPlA IJO 10J 
9*h PGEaie 1 J7 106 
OK PGEplC 1JH 108 
BK PGEpfD 1J5 118 
B* PGEpfE 175 W 
BK PGEPH* 1J0 TOtl 
« 29K PDEplF AM 126 

31* 27th PGEflFZ A06 128 
Sk SK PGEpIV 3JD 1U 
34K 17K PGEpfW 1ST 10.9 
33K 15* PGEpIV 282 118 
24M 17* PGEpTT 2J4 108 
M* It PGEPffi 262 118 
U 7* PGEpiH U1 108 
23 1»h PGEPfR 287 118 

U* U PCEPtP 285 10.9 
30* 13* PGEolO 280 118 
IV* ISK PGEPtM 1.96 UL9 
21 ISK PGEPfL 2J5 118 
20V> 14 PGElRK 284 10J 
219b 15th PGEPfJ 282 11-1 
11K 7K PGEpII 18V 105 
2416 14K PGTrn 184 A0 
41* 31 PacLtpf AM lOf 
47 34 PaeUpf ATS 108 

73 Jb 55. PaeUpl 764 114 


„ 12* 13* 126. ♦ K 

70 19* 19th 19M 

100 23* 22* p* + M 

136 MM M UK— * 

*5 2SK 24K 25 + * 

30 4* 4* 4*— K 

40 BK 4* SK + * 

U S* 4* SK + *6 

2* ODtb IO 80 — 1 

133 22* 21*9 22 + * 

1 33* 33* 331s— K 
03 UK 9K 9K— Vi 
70 3 22th 22* — W 
27 12 11* 12 +* 

6 I9M 19M 19th— * 

379 5K 5th SK + Jh 

S Wb W* 10* — * 

122 33* 32VS 32V* 

501 49M 49 Ih 49M —1 
SOUS OS ft 
IO It It A 

740 13* 13 13M — K 

7 12* 13K 12*— K 

IDta 42* 42th 42* + * 

5 15* ISK IS* 

“ ISM ISK IS*— K 
17* ITVi 17* 4 K 
3*h 3'h K + Vi 

19 IS* U + M 
9* 9* V* + K 

_ lSh 14K 14K 

'K a 5 3 « "ft*® 

14* 14M 14th— * 
I* B* B* + K 
13* 13* 17* „ 

15 14* 14*- * 

*h K K— K 
30* 20* 30* * * 
16* UK 16* 

70 21 20* 20*— * 

647 47Vj 41* 46 —IM 
U IK 4* SK + Vh 
3D 14 I3M 1W + JI 
2SS 14 13M 13* — * 

72 16* ISK M*— * 

17 6* 6th ftth- * 

29 T2Vh 11* 13 

47 11* UK UK + K 

5 1599 15* Wh * K 

IMxM* 34* 34* + lh 

43 6M 6* 6* 

146 I0K I OK 10* — * 
N 22 22 33 — K 

111 19* IB* IB*— 1* 

5 6* 6K 6th— K 

3 9* 9th 9* + K 

B1 25* 25* 25*- K 
| 4* 4* 49ft— th 

2 ft ft ft 

6 4* 4* 4* 

2 5* SK 5V. 

1 1* IK 1* 

27 22* 22* 22* + M 
ID SK Mb Mh 

I5S M* 13M 13*— W 
IX 10th 10* ID*— * 
B M* 14* 14* + * 
S 12* 13* 12*— K 
s u* n* u*— * 

16 UK UK 11*— Jb 
N UK 11M UK— K 

2 11* 11* UK 

17 34* 33* 34* + * 

45 31* 31* 31* + * 
X 20* 30 20*—* 

X 23* 23* Z3M + K 
M2 21* 21 21* + M 

125 23* 23* 23* + * 
U 23* M* 2» + * 

12 1099 10* 10*—* 

X 21* 21K 21* 

124 19* M* 10* 

25 UK IB* IB* 

16 11 II U 

5 20* SB 20* + * 

60 19* UK IB* + K 

13 21* 20* an* 

3 10* 10* IMh + * 


| 


O 

— 

m 

— 

1 

10* 

3th QuubOl 


98 

10% 

MW 

U*— '■ 

1 


R 





J 

9* 

5 RAI 

JSt A6 M 

77 

7* 

74k 

7K + W 


12 


J 

19 

11 


60b 5.1 9 


.toe ZJ 13 
X 1.9 19 
60 38 


16 27 
J M 


660 28 


18 13 

IB U 

0 


J6 


.10 


33 21» 29* 20* 

3 smta 40 40 40 

® 46 46. 46 — th 

20x67 67 47 


3* RMS El 
. - IK RTC 
u* 15* Rdoan 
® 13lh Ronsoa 
14* 1DM Rawed 
19* ITK RUSowi 
4th 1* Reotaw 
ISK 10th RMOlB 
50* 37* RmrtA 
B* 5* RMAK 
4* 3U. RuxNor 
17th U* RWieTP 
11H 10* RIoAlg 
3K f. RioGDr 
35* 16 RCfcwff 
35* 20K Rogers 
7 I* RaenvP 

6K 3* RovPlm 

34 7 2* Rudlck 

7* 4* RBW 

U* H* RlKMlI 
29* IS* RvkPlI 
I* 4* SPM 

34 ISSSf Z90 A7 ,0 
33* 10 SJWWI 
S* 3* AMD > 

UK 6* Sane 
2* K SCorla 

9 6* SDflQPt .90 100 

10 7* SDaop! 180 100 

■7* 60 U. SDOOPl 984 J1J 

741ft 55* SDOOPl 7N 10J 
60 49* SDOOPl 780 11.1 

24K IB SDOOPl 2 AT 106 
39* 32V. SDOOPl 46S 12J 
« 10* SDOOPl 260 118 

s* 3* Sanmrfc 4« M « 

11 9*h Sound Pi IJO 118 
IS* 11* Sbarron 

5* 3K Scaatrn 
38 17* Senetb 

U* 10* Schwab 
7* 3* SdMal 

35 19* SClLH 

17* 11 ScurRn 
63 34 SbdCn 

7th IK 5P0part 
6K S Seoul Pf 
IS* 10th SucCop 
4* 2th Sell Pro 
2* K SeisDH 
BK 3* Seim 
S* 3* SeOgAe 
4* 2% Semtcn 
15* fK srvhea 
II* «% Servarr 
IB* 10* S etens 
MK BK ShaurS 
2va S Sharon 
19* 9* ShPPWl 

MK 12Vh SlumS n 
14* 10 SlerSun 
UK 9* SKrai 
7th 5* sum 
15* B SlkecA 
6* 3* Silvrcxi 
4* 2th SlmcaS 
20* 10* smthA 
IB* 9* SmlhB 
B* SK SalltTan 
16* 13 SaraPrn 

Wt 7K SCEdPl 1^ IM 

iia r^iSSiSiK 

13* BK SCEd Bl 1.19 I0J 
51 Vj 35* SCEd pf A32 JIT 
14* UK SCEd Pi IAS 9.9 
rTvi 30* SCEd pf IX 3.1 
§K m? SCEdS 280 108 
2M 16* SCEd pi 381 1A1 
3* 3K Swucpn 
11* 5* Sprkrrm 
9 6 Sprk Pf IX 1ST 

7% .fife SpedOP 
MK 6 Spencer 861 
UK 


t i* i* 

73 U’l l*K 16"=— - 
56 IB* IB'x M"= 

6BB 1319 Wt ir- 4-2* 

S Ifh U* 19* *■ •• 

3f ]•» 3* 3* 

21 IS ll*» ll» 

102 43 K 43 43 — K | 

37 B* 8* BK + * 


ID'h 10* 10* 

16K 16*h llfh f K 


.. _ 7* SWW« 

*IU U*h SlorriH 
11* 6V SIOIW 
21 isvj stenen 
S* 4* SlrlCOP 
3* IK SlertEl 
23 8* StrlEd 

11* 5* SICTIWI 

j 1* SlrulW 
7>. j* SumJtE 
n 6* SunCK 
10. 4 SvASL 

Mh 11* hunj: 

MK U‘ : 5UPrFd 
i'. 1 1 SvpCra 

13* S 5 UP I IK! t 
IB* 11 'ft Suprtr 
6'e o'— Susauen 
IT 1 : Swntin 
4't SKIED S 
4* T Ear 
Tz TEC 
4 . TIE 
M 1 -.- TooPrd 
«>4 Tonefir 
T*h Tout 
ru Team 
I’h Ten Am 
I3K Teh Sim 
13* 7echOa 
3* TccTiTP 
V; Teenirl 
I": TftCIUW 
2 Tc>rca*i 

1 1'. Tcltlix 
G’« TrlDia 
6* Tclsn 
I'. Tcipspn 

. . 3 3 . Tpjmer •< 

]|i: 22* Tc*Cdg »J3 

4n C’l TcxAli 5 

4* Tpm a E J91 ES 10 

16* Te»AC mis.' 1U 

2 i Tir^an 44 

l’» TnwEn 

2 TWwell 

34 24* ToIEdol AZi* U4 

6l 44* « TolEOPl 2.7S Hi 
9* 4 k Toriei Jrt BJ 9J 
15 n TallPT# 24 
2* TalP' 1.1 
77 . — TciPIpl 2.88 108 

13‘. 6K TinsLi 8Si 
19* ll 1 . Tra»*« 

IB 1 . !;•• Trsn.-un 
IDJ. 7* i TrtSM 
lift 6". TrihCP 

4* Ov. TiiHme 

14 • ]L Tr:ao> 

A ~ i Tjfi V. c* 

IT* 23 TurnR n 
SI* ?l'i TurnrC 
V. »'» TniEan 
1* Twhwli 
1* UNA 

7 USR ina 
6* uitmie 

8 • unlaw 


7 


Dl 

7 


22 

71* 


a 

it". 

ltd. 

19* 

4 

to 

V. 


214 

:i 


73* 

1 

aw 


S’. 4 

IS 

23 

a 

a * 

3 

'■•k 


* 1 A — 

n 

;■ - u 

2 . 

A it- 

41 

14 c 

11 -m 


340 

f 

u 

Ji 41 


:* 

41: 


c: 


i 5* 5 - 

» t#M iw'4 

23 3S-. 34+ 

11 1th I* 

5 13K 12 

ix i'K ir- 

K SK S ■ 

I 2Ta 23’« 
9» 10 

16 S* H- 

8 10 * 

3455 6* 

121 

II 


5 - 

5* * . 


It* t * 


12 . 4 f 
I": t * 
1 *- 1 
?”* — I 

r-* 

tv 

IC's 10 i- - 

6'. 6V1 «■ K 

19 i 1«* l«h - * 
,'t 7* 7* 


ir» 

16* 

4* 

6* 


.44 II 15 

86a 3J 14 


6M 


10K 

23‘. 

11 

3'h 

SK 


11 

1930 

111 

i 


T4t« * a * 
41 4 I - . 

;* 2 4 2*4 

P* »6'9 17‘u + - i 
72* 71* ?U- + ■- 
It 4« 4'. 

T1 ■ 12* I. e— * 
■* 1* I*- 
2* 7;j— I 

UK n fti* + 4 

1!‘J H ■’ 

’* ** 7K“ X 

4t 4’-. 4* * I 

4* 4 « 4* ♦ 
S3* 72* 73K 
IB ; 111. II'. ■* * 
4". 4* 4*. 

19* ’.«K I#*— • 
;* + *h 


64 51 1C 


44 10 

Ale IB 
i»i *J 


!J3 42 10 


:t :t ;t 

I'u i. 1* 

3 3 13 

IKz n* JI'-u n* * K 

1301 ft) Bl ft> 

B 4 ! . 4 * It- . 

3IU 16* It*. »4(.- * 

‘ a ;*’* ;it :n.- * 

:i is* ijk n't 

41 IT* 17' i 

18 M'. MK 14* ♦ -e 

4 13 h !2 ■■ ID '. — h 
7 10* IO* UK 

A «•: A-i 4., 

si 6 r 2" 5, * *! 

xi ; i :t It- h 

:o* N i 72 .— * 
re 1 : 3* lu- 


ll 


in 


et> 10 * "» 


1* 




Uth 

35* — '. 



»h 

74K 





?<a 

2 : + * 









24": 

24 : a + * 









17* 




IBW 

a 





6K 

6W 4 > 


86 

B 

7-. 

Ts ~ yn 

13* 


5 IK 
11 9 

e 10 
230t BS 
25® 73 
4506 64V] 


6IK 61th 61K 
31* X'. 31 -a 
2* 2* S’, f '» 
r» 7 7 — 

I 1 * 

9 


10 10 


4* 
24* 
13 a 


IQ 


49 


B* Uniir.r n 


die 07 
54b ; 4 1? 
27 u 
iJ 


Xe 38 

a 7B 11 

44 16 16 


2.1 13 
A0 17 
1A 

9 


.9 5 


.16 


18 9 
B4 


39 23 » 
.EM 88 17 
.12 3 11 

IJOe 98 6 


JUS 
30 IJ M 


60 38 
AO 18 


■J* B2"i— 2‘: 
72 73 +1 

66 4i —Its 

B' XW 231= 22* + ;■ 
IB M'. 3rh X - . * W 
24* 24* 2**— H 
S’. s.» St* 

tow I OK 10* 

15W M’h ISK— '* 
3* 3K 3K 

26W 25* 26W -rl'4 
12 12 U — * 

7'. 7 7* + K 

UK U'. lit — .. 
161] 14' V M L 6 
5*' ] 56'- 56”- — Is 
s IK IK IK 

70® Sk* SK SVa— t» 

97 lit UK UK 4 ih 

2 3* 3* 3* 

144 1* l'« 1*— * 

98 7 6* 7 + 

1 SW S'ft S'. 

7 3 3 1 

1 11 II II 

43 11 10* 10W 

9 16* UK UK 

Uth 11 _ UK + d 

* r » K— 'h 

IB* IBlh IBW + W 

15* ISK IS* ♦ K 

13* 12* 12!h — * 

tow 10 10* + K 

5K SK 5K— * 
13* UK UK— K 
4* 4ii 4'i — W 
3K 3K 31.— K 
20 19* 1**— 

18V. IBW IBW — K 
7* 7K— K 
1* + Ift 


410 28 13 


I 

M* 

6 T 

IBW 


S'. 

9W 

12K 


X 


36 13 
19 IS 
4. 11 

IS 

43 IJ 14 

301 19 * 


BJ 


1232 

37 

79 

807 


U'ft ljgi. 1^ 


10K 10* 10V. 

10* lOVi 10th— W 

id* iot- 

U 11* 11*— ‘A 


S® 49* 49* 49* + Vh 


14* 14K MK— K 
42K 42 L* 42*b— K 
OK 22* 22K— * 
21* 21* 21* + * 
ih n it 
5* 3K 5* 

AK A* 6*- * 
t% 6 Ift ft'b + K 
BK BK BK 
6 th 6* 6* 


14* UnCcsF s S 
IK i>FW3* “ 

IW UFaadE 
Iftb UI.UN 
ID 1 JSAC. *4 
S'- unllpiv 
LK Un.Cm 
5'. 1/nlvBt 
23* ISK Ur.xRu 
IJ 1 . u* UnuPn! 

10‘h 9* VST n 

IBW 1IW VallwRi 
77* I 7 * VflUiPr 1 
Ti 2*4 Verlt 
23* lSlh VtAmC 
6' 4 3* VlPil 

* Verna 
9'. vermi 
Ta VrrtP6 
4* Vihle^i 
S': Vi cm 
Jim vinlse 
6' 4 tf'wal& 

B vcole* 

19.-* 13': V-tCCP 
| 5* U TC 

aw IB's waieor 
16* MK wako 
31 15 -JmngB 
32'. MW A'ancC 
71» . WrnC wi 

11* 3* JtsJlHi 

IX 74'. iltihPSI 
19K 12 WRITS 
jw 2K wtnffd 
51V: UW WHIM Pi 162 IAB 
3Vi l’-h Weemr 
5* 3i: wedee 
17r. u* AedtC n 

3* welmon 
7* Weldtrn 
4=« wellco 
2'. woicra 
16* wmeo 
w wmpcp 
6K WllBrC 
B'. WSfDrO 
5*. WDIfiH 
7'. wiHimn 
15* WIRET 1 J4 

5H V1WSL s 

3DW It* WhEnli 
5* 7'. Wlcnllo 
I3f* 10* wiener n 

13 7* WfllcxG 

23’h 19W Wlnlln 


r* -t i* 

“6* IW' 1* >W 

46 7W T: TW f h 

112 U : 12 • *■ 

i iJ* ir ■ u • * * 

II IS* IS'. 4 

ire 13"; 10* IBi: 

14 =* M’* ='« 

16 ibk u. i»;-— • 

M IW IK It* » 

41 IK 1* !*» 

7i IS 14*. IS 

3 31*. aw »w ♦ .» 

57 B 


10* 1C. + '. 

77 7". u'« ’ 

51 t?W l**i IKx * ■ 

1? 12W 12 Kj- '• 

79 13 »> ,•? — :■ 

7 13* 17 • ir.— K 

4 27* 27* 27*- - 

57 J": 7 •-.*■* 

a U 17'* U - d 

li S . S &• ( 

U : ■: J- ■ 

116 uw '.3+ K i - .. 

33 4 1 1 4 — • 

5 8. It tt 


n 


43 


11 


96 B 17 


35 


a:. 


82c .1 73 
.14 2.9 6 

11 


10* 

It 

2»w 

4'* 

IS'. 

UK 

tst. 

a* 

2l‘» 

13* 


82 78 ■ 


X 


U 

21 

11 

7.7 16 


17 


a 


40 34 9 


284 9.7 


46'h 3*W WIsP Pi 4 JO 98 
4'ft 2W WolltiB .We 38 21 
IS* 11 WkWmr 32 14 S 

17* 12* VVWdepIlX 11.9 
34 16W wort nn 


2iw 12 Wrainr 
3'h 


11 


wrgiHg 


8Si 

or 

8Se 




•* S'. B. 

law lC'i ID : * '• 

. IB'. UW U . 4 l. 

75 re SK h * * ■ 

23 . 27 77 

10 Ip IS* 15W— . 

>12 IBW U'h « 

u i?. »7’« .7;-- • 

’0 K » * ■ 

73 H* SOW U. 

J7H7I 12? : 12 ■» * 

■» 1l‘ a 19K <*t. r ’» 
3». IK JW 
, 17* IJ* IT* 

A IK !K I* 
j }-. Vi 3’. 

W it'. 16'.] Ift-'I— * 

5 4W 4 ] . 4* 

M UK II* UK— * 

2 7* 9W UK 

?i ?■. i 1 . rt 

,0 2U 7.K2.W 

60 6* 6K 6* 

17 IO'- 13 lOW— W 
516 13’. IS* 13* 

104 19". U"4 IB*- K 

re 20* x m - * 

447 13*, |5W 12* 

155 28’. 27". If. + '• 
91 3 !'• 

5 IT. 11* 11 » . 

4*1 13' a 12* UW + *• 
19 !1*. 22 • 73 - K 

UKJ 46 *• *6 — ' J 

5 IS* IS* 15* ♦ '■* 
a-, SW 3*- h ■ 
IS* IS'I ISK— 

IB* 1C U* + ■« 

MK 23 1 : XtJ— 

IvT IO* 11'- w * 


16S 

e 

10 

21 

:x 


1 v 

11* S* VonkCO 

M 

21 

B JW 

B - W 

1 z - — 1 

10K 5 a met 

.10 1.9 

»7 

SW SW 

SW + w 



. 

- . ■/ -j 

V • • ‘ 

es&f; 

■■ . t .’1 .£ 

" • • : 1. Vfr-.IJV 

■ W4, . • _ 


^.,41 3^'- . 


V; 

■■ ■ ■ - /■ 

pJP*. 



■, r h" 


laf'V 

flj: 

•».* - 

. .. ^ X''..- - .! I 

_«r»»- t .. w- 1 -t- k>- 


riu" 

iT 1 ?■'=;. ■?> - 1 ' , 

■**1 I 

-c* 1, , 

SmAi * p**' ,‘J t 









■* L". 



IP SfeSff * & lm I 

K S , S^S 5 -;s???»5 ! 3» Ji ‘ !! S3=^‘Fsa»^5a5e^ , «E:s«aa5a5iiJHaaaaB..si !: fc-H« 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALDTRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


IIS. Futures 


5 eown 

Season 

" " My 32 

High 

Low 

. Open Hfsn. Low Close CM- 


En.Soto 0JD4 Prav.Sato 5. 934 . 
P rev. Day O pm inf. 9.944 off 267 



Grains 


WHEAT (CBT> . - 
5000 bu mini mum- dal tors par bushd 
3-00 2.9ft, Jiil M U? 

UfcVs IDS >e 3MV. 107 

ItJ'.J 1T7U OtC l.t3V> llSV. 

I74'.i M2*t Mar 113W 3.ISU 

402 Ul Mar. 303* 305 

JJ2V3 Z01V9 Jul TtS'U ZB* 

E«J. Soles P rev. Sato rmt 

Prev. Day Own I nt. 3SJ44 off 399 

CORN (CBT) 

5000 bu minimum- dollars per buuwH 


XTTm Z97+. —OH* 
3 MMt UM -Off* 
113 113*6 +.00“, 

3.13 3.UVj +00*1 
M3 303*, +OOU 
2*1 U ZBTm +OI 'A 


3J1 

28 712 

Jul 

282 

Z83Vj 

2J6. 

2J94h 

—81 

XJlto 

184 

SK 

287 . 

£40 

285 

24*44 

—801V 

2.95 

286 

DK 

286'ft 

287% 

US 

135*4 — 80% 

3.10 

243 

(war 

2834* 


282V7 

28» 

3J1to 

1*7 

May 247Wr 

Z47U 

147V5 


286 

288 

Jul 

28BV) 

2J1U 

14016 

280V) 


10615 

133 

9M 

283 

286 

133 

Uev. 

+80*6 



4 "\. , • 


Eat. 5dto Prav.Sato SUM 

Prev. Dor Open lnl.1 14f7j upU58 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5000 bu mlnimiim* dollars par burnt 
7.99 Sil Jul 155M 5L» 

7J4 SA Aw SR 5J7+. 

471 580 Sen 5801ft SJD 

SAB 582*. No* AES Vi ASft, 

6-79 5JS»» Jan 342 547 

703 543 Mar 5J2 577 

7J9 171 MOV 177 58J 

ASS 174 Jul 3.7Bft 50fr*r 

AW 5,72 AM. 173 SOT 

Est.Sato Prev.Sato 3UB9 

Prev. Dav Open int 60775 off Ml* 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 tans- donors per ton 
196-50 117.53 Jol 12100 12190 

iKun moo Aua 134.50 iz7Jn 

l»4S 13JJ0 Sep 12416' 130.40 

i«ls> i25.oa oet moo ratre 

ia+00 13000 Dec 13150 ix.oa 

11100 moo Jon 13? JO MOJO 

20650 13750 MOr 14250 MMO 

11250 M3JN Mnv 

16780 147.90 Jul 149 JO 15LDQ 

Est. Solos Prev. Sales 14570 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 41757 up35J78 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBTI 
60800 lbs- doWara per 100 IBs. 


557 +JO 
555 +03* 

UM +J 04 

SJ4-+.02*. 

554 +534 

SJ5W +J4U 
5514 +.534 
5534 +.054 
i7f +56 


12450 12550 
12410 12750 
120.10 130.10 
13050 I32J0 
135JW 13750 
13S5D 13950 
M2. HI 14X70 
14580 
149 JO 15150 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37JOO Us.- cents aer nu 
14950 li«0 Jill 13373 133.90 

15020 12750 Sep 13450 13U0 

15050 12955 OK 13+75 13750 

149,75 1Z8JS Mar 13750 IJ0-ZO 

1450 13150 M«v 13B2S 13033 

14400 13450 Jul 13955 13955 

147 JO 13225 Sen 139 JO 139 JO 

13850 ' 13050 Dec 

Est.Soto Prev.Sato 
Prev. Dav Open hit. 1154 ut>3! 
SUCARWOftLD 11 (NYCSCEI 
112500 IbA- cents Per lb. 

975 254 Sen 3J0 354 

955 174 Od UO 379 

7.75 3JH Jan 354 450 

953 134 AMT 190 MO 

7.1S 150 MPV 4J» 454 

670 474 Sep 450 450 

4.94 402 OO 458 SOB 

186 106 Jill 455 470 

Est.Sato . Prev. Sales 

Prev: Dav Ocwn im 8449a up 1516 

COCOA fNYCSCE) 

10 metric tens- s per ton 

2415 1961 Sen 2060 2077 

2337 1945 Ok 2982 7118 

2190 1955 Mar 2111 3135 

3171 I960 MOV 

2330 2023 Sea 

2210 20S3 Dec 

Jul 

Est.Sato Prev.Sato 2713 

PreviDav Open ml. 20556 oftlB 
ORANGE JUICE WYOE) 
lAQWttn^centapertb. 

18XD0 13250 Sep 13475 13450 

18TJ6 13155 Nov 13155 13100 

180.00 12950 Jan 130,00 130J0 

177 JO 129 JO Mar 13050 I30J0 

1*2 JO 131 JO MOV 

Jul 

Est. Sales Prev.Sato 4 

Prev. Dav Oaen mt. Aim oH 139. 


13356 13343 
134JD 13550 
13650 137.M 
13740 1 30 70 
13U0 138.70 
13975 13973 
139 JO 13976 
14050 


370 752 

377 377 

354 450 

358 470 

457 445 

450 4.70 

44 487 

475 454 


2025 2074 

2081 2115 

2111 2135 
2153 
21*1 
2201 
3100 


13250 134.70 
I 31 J 0 1 3275 
mm mm 
13050 130 J 0 
130 JO 
130 JO 


3172 

2270 

Jul 

2740 

2780 

2780 

2780 

=9 

3185 



26J1 

2475 

2638 

2454 


22JW 

S«# 

2587 

2413 

2570 


— 85 

30.37 

2? 9Q 

Oct 

2587 

2540 

212S 

2580 

-85 

29 JO 

7^90 

Dec 

2470 

2SJJS 

2470 

247S 

— 86 

2987 

2340 

Jan 

-24SS 


2450 

3452 

—85 

2840 

2440 

Mar 

2455 

2475 

2480 

2483 

— -U 

2785 

3420 


2450 

2440 

2435 

2435 

+£ 

2533 

7J.95 

Jul 

24.14 

2435 

241D 

2422 

25.15 

2481 


2410 

2415 

2410 

2413 

+81 

EsI.Sato 


Prev.Sato 19J5B 




Metals 


COPPER (COMSX) 
25800 lbs.- cents pot tto. 


Prev. Dav Open Int 52770 up 41 504 
OATS (CBT) 

SHM bu mini mum- del lara per bushel 
1781b 150 ' Jul 181*6-144 

17« ijsib Sep UAtt 17714 

1531b 150 Dec 15015 151 

1J7U 1.42*, Mar 153 153 

153 1539b MOV 

Est.Sato Prev.Sato 433 
Prev. Dav Open I nL 2541 up 18 


150 154 +.02V, 

.176 177 +_MP6r 

150 180*4 +5016 

153 15» —804. 

15316 — 7016 


8085 

5780 

Jul 

6285 

6290 

6240 

6280 

—85 

. 5980 

5145 

Auo 




<235 

—.90 

mo 

5750 

Sep 

6380 

■<385 

6245 

A17D 

—.90 

. 8425 

5E50 

Dk 

6440 

<445 

6170 

6X90 

-90 

8420 

5940 

Jan 




6420 


0080 

5980 

Mar 

6540 

6540 

6475 

4400 

—.95 

7480 

61.10 

May 

6585 

6585 

6585 

6530 

—.95 

7480 

6180 

Jul 

6680 

6680 

6585 

6540 

—.95 

70.90 

6280 

5«p 

6670 

6475 

6680 

6680 

—.95 

7030 

6175 

dk 

<780 

6780 

6780 

6640 

—180 

7030 

6580 

JCn 




6680 

—1.00 

67.90 

6585 

Mar 




6720 

—100 



May 




6740 

—UK 

Est. Soto 


Prav. Sales 11800 





Prev. Dav Open int 80596 up 71 

ALUMINUM (COM EX) 

40800 1 bs^ cents PW ID. 


Livestock 



CATTLE (OWE) 

4Q500 lbs.' cents par lb. 


*747 

5445 

Aua 

5490 

55.17 

53.95 

5417 

—40 

6590 

5480 

Od 

57.10 

5727 

5410 

5422 

—78 

6785 

5890 

dk 

5980 

59 J7 

5BJ0 

5472 

— 7U 

<785 

5995 

Feb 

60.15 

60150 

5982 

5947 

— 73 

47J7 

<182 

Apr 

<180 

6140 

6080 

6087 

—M 

<625 

<180 

Jun 

<190 

6X10 

6170 

<170 

—85 


Est. Soto 19537 Prev.Sato 13824 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 49537 off 486 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMEt 
■Mja® lbs- cents per R». 


5980 

4115 

Jul 




4480 —180 



Aua 




4450 —180 

7*80 

4190 

Sep 

45J0 

4&J0 

4470 

4473 —185 

7040 

4(90 

Oec 

4435 

*480 

4575 

4570 —180 

76 JO 

5175 

Jon 




4480 —180 

7340 

4685 

Mar 




4645 —185 

<475 

5195 

MOV 




4785 —185 

6145 

4785 

Jul 




4485 —185 

5X10 

5180 

Sop 




4SJ5 —185 



dk 




*980 — I8S 



Jan 




Sai3 —1.45 



Mar 

• 



5085 —185 



MOV 




S1JJ —185 


Prev DavOaoi UP 

CNMA (CBT) 

11 03500 prirt- OH & Kras C ICO cc> 


Est.Sato Prev 5e'« *78 

Prev. Dav Oden int +714 oft ZS 

CERT. DEPOSIT »MM| 

11 miiiien-ots at ll»pc» 


Prev Onv Open in, JJ»9 up *T 

EURODOLLARS ClMMt 

St million pnat 100 pci 


Prev. Dav Open Ini 1205*7 uoUU 

BRITISH POUND (1MM1 
Socraouna- I POin,*aua!»M l 3COt 
14450 1 0700 Sen IJ85S 13B*S 13773 13815 

15040 17200 Dec iJ-'» 17803 !7tSC IJTOfl 

1JV00 IC680 Mar ljalo I8 *:e 13*10 IJ~5 

177*5 T.I9BS jun 13545 U5e» I U65 18643 

£sl. Sales 9572 Prev Sclet *14; 

Prev. Dav Open in; 43516 oM 419 

CANADIAN DOLLAR tIMMI 

iperdlr- InoinirauolsSOOOCl 


Prev. Dav Open Ini 8.1*7 ott 
FRENCH FRANC (IMMI 
Sner I rone 1 pcunleaua>*S0-GH>Ol 
.11390 JW88 5C*> HJ1C .ItJiJ :ij!0 11»g 

ll«as .3*670 Dec H2*e 

Est.Sato 1 Prev Sain 
Prev. Dnv Open int <Ot 
GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

S per marl,- 1 Mini equal* VQJOrai 

Wi J9M Sea J47* 74*3 J4S7 J49t 

J610 5971 Dec 7HS Jt?0 348S JS19 

JS9* JN0 Mi< JM0 

7633 7335 Jun 3587 

Esl.5oles 7750* Prev Sole* 77J 5 e 
Prev. Dav Open ini S4J17 up 355 
JAPANESE YEN (IMMI 
S per yen- 1 point eeuoit tacoKo; 

JJ04Z68 003870 SeP .004183 473*190 U4I70 X0418. 

hum 3)03*05 Dec .OO4Z20.3O4773 004194.00*7)1 

004307 -00035 Mar 004330 034235 3047:9 G04234 

Est.Sato U3* Prev. Seles 7.1*7 
Prev. Dav Open ini. 31-773 up 137 

SWISS FRANC (IMMI 
Soer franc- 1 paint eauais M 9Cfli 
5830 J*8C &CP *736 4?M 4710 4262 

5360 J53T Dec 4T3 4100 43*4 .42*8 

5355 J835 ATOr 6300 4U0 *X» .4335 

Est.Sato 1*J29 Prev.Sato 2157* 

Prev. Dav Open int. 2* J*6 el* 163 


€: 
Jim' ■" 


7170 

6X35 


6X57 


<140 


7100 

6240 



6X00 

6140 


7282 

6285 

Od 

085 

6587 

6X32 


7320 

6425 

Nov 

6470 

64 JO 

6X40 

6170 

7940 

6430 

Jan 

6455 

/a«* 

6590 

65.90 

7085 

<410 

Mar 

6685 

6495 

6450 

6625 

7045 

6400 

Apr 

6490 

6690 

6415 

64S 


May 

Est.Sato IJ96 Prev.Sato 982 
Prev. Day Open Int. A889 up id* 
HOGS (CMEJ 
AUHOlbs.- eenta per lb. 

54J7 45.9} Aug 45JS 4550 

51.75 41 JS Od 41-35 4U5 

5085 43.10 Dec 4130 43J0 

50.47 44JL5 Feb 4475 4190 

47 JS . 47-JO APT 4JJ90 42J»S 

*9315 4475 Jun 4480 "4SJKJ 

*9-85 45J0 Jul 45,25 45L25 

- 51.90 45JN AU» 

Est.Sato 5580 Prev.Sato SJ02 
Prev. Dav Oaen Int. 1*597 up 7 
PORK BELUES (CME) 

38JH0 lbs.- cents per lb. 

8257 095 Jul 5U0 5350 


Est.Sato Prev.Sato 153 

Prav. Dav Onen Int. 1779 udi 
SILVER (COMEX1 
1000 tray as.- cents per iray as. 

14615 5628 Jul 609J 6148 609J <1+1 

671 J 6038 Aug 6158 

11838 5738 Sep 6140 <21J 6128 6208 

12308 5908 Dec 6375 <348 <358 6325 

12158 5*58 Jan 6378 

11938 6078 Mar <408 646J 6388 64U 

MHSLO <218 MOV "■ 654.6 



Industrials 


1800 bd.lt 

Sen 14750 14820 14620 U 7 JC 
NOV 1*76C 148.30 146.JJ U7-2D 


4480 4582 
4050 40 L 65 

<220 4720 
4380 4387 
4180 4180 
4480 44 ; 19 




9458 6338 Jul 65 B 8 6608 6538 6642 +35 

9*08 C 41.0 Son 67 DJ 4 J 0 J 666 J 674 J +17 

79*8 6608 DOC 6 B 2.5 68 XJ 6 B 3 J 6898 +48 

7898 67 B 8 Jan 6955 +41 

7708 6778 Mar 7018 7018 7018 7 B 45 +0 

69 S 8 - 6938 May 7172 +45 

Est.Sato Prev.Sato 11994 

Prev. DavOpenlnr. 7 S 2*7 up 1580 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 tnev o*.- dollars per fray at 

449 JB 34180 Jul 27280 +.70 

39380 29080 Oct 26*20 27150 26980 27130 +IJO 

37150 257 JO Jan 27680 27880 Z 73-50 277.70 + 1 J 0 

329 JO 26450 Apr 281 JO 281 JO 771 JO 28250 +120 

31000 27100 Jul 285-50 28980 28150 287.90 +120 

Est Sales Prev.Sato 1558 

Prev. Dav Open int. 11 J 36 uaa , 

PALLADIUM CHYME) 

100 Irav oet- dollars per pe 


141 J 5 

RL 50 

Sop 9475 

9100 

9175 

+440 


141 JO 

9100 

Dec 9425 

*550 

9180 

9110 

+.05 

127 JO 

99 

Mar 



9540 

+IK 

11400 
Est.Sato 
Prav. Day 

Jun 

Prw.Satas 

247 


9505 

+OS 


Open Int, 6807 off 73 






SUM Canadian DoHars-ceatx per Unit. 
CDollr -72 r r t 


74.14 

.74 

MO. 

190 

r 

<2800 west GermM Marlcvcetrts pgr ua 

DMork 

31 

r 

416 

r 

3463 

32 

isa 

137 

. r 

3463 

33 

5 ma 

246 

r 

3463 

34 

128 

200 

X 4 S 

3(43 

35 

0 J 7 

183 

2 J» 

3443 

36 

081 

105 

140 

3463 

37 

r 

077 

r 


123800 French Fnmcs-lBIttt of a amt per mlL 
FFrnnc 100 1410 r r , r ■ 

1135 S ins r ' r r r 

11355 170 AM) r r 1^8 . 

, 11355 115 Iffl r . r . 418 

Ja p a niy Yeo-lWtbsof a cent per tmb- 
JTen 37 r r r r 

41 Jl 38 r r r- r. 

41.91 39 383 r r „ r 

* 1.91 * 0-284 r r 4.10 

4181 4 > 150 128 r r 

* 1-91 42 ms 120 r 089 . 

« 0-30 028 r sa|-.‘ 

„< 18 l 44 0.13 r - : r 116 ' 

43 JB 0 Swiss FnmaKiKitsper untt. 

SFranc 3 * r r . r > • r 

42.17 M r ■ ■ r r Qoz 

«.17 W 137 487 <J 7 OL 15 

*J 17 *0 2 S 5 125 ■ r 028 

ftK ] J 6 • 288 . r 

42.17 42 126 r r 0196 

42.17 43 02 * 1 J 8 r 153 

42.17 44 r 127 r r 

TWafcpB YPLiro CaBopp 

Total put vot SJM __ . .Pet epo 


r 069 ... 

r 2.12. 

r 2.16 v 


42.17 36 r • - r • r‘ 082 

«.17 W 137 487 <J 7 OL 15 

*J 17 *0 2 S 5 125 ■ r 028 

«-J 7 41 186 ■ 258 -. r 

42.17 42 126 r r 086 

42.17 43 02 * 1 J 8 r 153 

42.17 44 r 127 r r 

TWafcpB VPL1OT cadopap 

Total not voL 4288 Pet open 

. JSrf to * iro 4? d - »— NoapHon ofterpd. n— Old. 
Lost isprvtnhjm [pureftanrpflce).- ; 
Source; Ap. 


025 r 

1.18 L 50 

■ - r t 

086 r 

066 r 

181 t 

r r 


r 088 
087 0 .T 7 

r r 

r r 

050 


[Dt 176,1 M 

Int. 122,122 


GOLD [COMSX] 

MO Irav 02^- dal to* par tray oc. 

328 JD 30988 Jut 

48580 291 JK) Aug 31880 32220 

31 * JO 31550 3 ea 

49380 27780 Od 321 JO 32450 

4 B 9 J 0 301.50 Dec 32 S 30 33050 

48 SJ 0 30680 Feb 33080 33420 

49600 31470 APT 3 JB 80 33880 

43120 32050 JUI) 330 JD 33980 

425 +B 33180 AUO 

353 J -0 3398 B Od '■ 

' 5 MB® 34280 DK < 

37289 33580 APT 

EK Sales 26800 Prev.Sato 218 UI 
PtevJJOV Open 1 nt .132237 up 735 


. Financial 


UST. BILLS (IMM) 

*1 million, ptsof UO PCI. 

9323 . <494 Sep 9280 -9280 

9387 . *477 DK 9259 ,9249 

S 3 * 0*50 MOT 920 * v ’9289 

9228 8781 jun *123 9123 

7281 . 8400 See 9 T 55 9159 

91 JB, • 8985 me . 9182 9182 

9129 89 JB Mar - . 

•ML 9 * JOS. jun 1 

EsJ^Sota Prev.Sato . 6859 

Prev. Day Operr Int. 36801 off 209 
lOTfc. TREASURY (CBT) 

3100000 pr(n-PlSA32nd9 of 100 pet - . 

- 0421 7 MB. SOP 85-10 > 5-10 

07-13 75-13 Dk 04-4 04-0 

062 r 75 -t* Mar a cm 

85-7 74-30 jun 

84-4 B2-11 Sep 81-15 BT -19 

83-11 80-19 DK 

E si. Solei Prev.Sato 9 J 44 

Prav. Day Open int. 56840 up< 9 S 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
(OpcI-SHKMioiHrts * 32 nds of 100 Pdl 
79-13 57-10 54 P 76-4 764 

7843 57-8 Dk 75 75-3 

77-29 57-2 Mar 73-29 7+1 

76-6 56-29 Jim 73-30 7 M 

7521 56-29 OOP 73-4 72-10 

7424 5+25 DK 71-11 71-19 

7+15 5+27 Mar 70-31 70-29 


331 JO 
31720 32220 
324 JO 
32180 33680 
32580 33080 
32980 33430 
33080 33040 
33050 34380 
34*20 
35130 
35840 
36940 


(Indexes comptled snartiv Bdta,e market ei^sci 
5 P COMP. INDEX (CME) 
paints mi cents 

19800 160-00 Sea 196 30 19435 19425 1*480 —\M 

20085 175.70 Dec 1*985 199 J 0 1*785 1 * 7+5 —1 7 J 

5 »U 5 190.10 Mar 20190 2 O 1 . 0 C 2 S 040 TDQM, — 1 US 

Est.Sato Prav. Sato 3781 * 

Prev. Dav Onen Int. 67265 upUid 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

if&iS 21 -? J,, +S 20 * 3 10 JO — « 

70,100 2 ' 5 oO J 13.95 31415 - 1.15 

Est. Sales Prev. Sato 5.160 

Prav. Oav Oaen Int. 11154 un 38 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
paints and amts 

, 21-5 SJ» 3 !S-S“ T '485 113 00 11320 -9B 

JI2-” ISi-32 006 ,,5AS ,,5A5 * !4.*5 115 to -1.0# 

jjonn ?' t,r II2- 00 " 700 1,4 75 — IJ9 

.K„ ,M jun 11845 IJJUf I IB. #5 11845 -Hi 

Est Solos Prev.Sato 7225 

Prav. Dav Open int. 13 x 77 m «s/ 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody's— N.A. t 

R But*rs 1 88430 

DJ. Futures NJV. 

Com. Research Bureau. NA 

Moody* : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters ; base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Daw Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 
911.10 f 
1 .67X80 
116J2 
22X40 


Commmlities 


Goi^mSfities 


Cash Prices 


CdmlnadDv and UnH 

CMRh 4 Santo, lb 

PrWdom <4/3038 Vz. yd _ 

Steel billets IPHtJ. Ion 

Hwi2Fdrv.Ptilla.ton 

Stogy.N olhwPItt.- 

zme- E. st u Bash lb 

Palladium, oz 

Stiver N.Y.oa 

Source: AJ>. 


July 22 

Vbot 
MM AM 
124 1AI 
088 DJ6 
47388 <7388 

21388 21X60 
70-71 94-95 

1941 3644 

<0 4+71 64-67 

.43219 62599 

•41-47 650 

92-94 137-142 
688 7.15 


Dniclencfc 


My 22 

Cwnponr Par Amt Par RM 

INCREASED 

Apooee Enterprises Q 83 ■* +23 0-7 

Assk Dry Goods Q 25 *-l +* 

Storage EauITto O 80 +27 +)1 

STOCK SPLIT 
Assoc Drv Goods — 3- lor- 1 
USUAL 

Alexdr X AJexdr Svc Q 25 +29 8-2 

Allegheny & Western Q 85 9-3 +u 



London . 
Gonimodities 


Jon 



Ixmlon Metals 


,WN . • Prev loos 

ALUMINUM ” ** BW ** 

atert tog per mvtrtc top 

OPM 726 JKI 72780 7345 D 73 SJB 

forward : 74850 7 * 9 J 0 75680 

COPPER C ATHOD ES (Wgb Grade) 

Stortug par DMtrtc ton 

spat - 187400 187780 1869.60 187080 
fOOMird . . 180080 1880 JD 1856 J 0 1^780 
COPPER CATHDOES (Stoderfl) 
ftollui per metric ton 
SPOT -181780 184080 183880 184080 

forwent 185780 185880 185400 185680 
LEAD 

Stoflng pgr me tr ic to 
Spur 216 X 0 28780 29080 29180 

torwaind 29480 29580 29680 296 J 0 

NICKEL 

StorOng mt motiic to 

»Ot . 3,63008 I 44 M 3 ASOOB X 6908 Q 

terword X 67080 3 J 7580 3 JD 580 3 J 1080 
SILVER 

Pence pot ireyeenco 

Stmt « S SjO S 

Uw^SpKMeMcto 
spof 9,17680 9,17880 9,15080 9.15580 

toward 026480 9,16780 923080 9.13180 

ZINC 

Sterling p gr utetrlc to 

SSL™ 88 3£ §!f £S 

Souteu; AP. 


Stack A Decker 

Burlington ind. 

Cfrtrt Louisiana El 
Clncinncifl G & El 
Dayton pwr & Lht 
Dvca Pef rot e u m 
Eastern Util. Assoc 
Eaton Vance 
Fuller (H 81 Co 
GAF Corp 
Gillette Co 
Grumman Carp 
Hilton Hotels 
Horn* Pdl Bk Fla. 
Hughes Suapiv 
I awe Southern Utils 
Notional Data 
Potlatch Coro 
Searle l CD.) Co 
Third Not tonal 
Wocnovia Carp 
WMah-Tranik 


a .16 +27 +n 

a 21 H MS 

O 53 +15 JQ 

a j* +is Mf 

o jO +1 06 J 

a .is »•> 0* ’• 

Q -51 Vs +W +«■ 

Q .11 +12 7 - 3 J 

Q 88 +17 T-M 

O 85 0-38 W 

Q AS +5 *1 

O 85 +» M 

O A MO +* 

- ■■IS H 

a .08 8-23 W 

% :!? 3 JB 

a . 3 

S S ’K Jb 

Q .10 +15 +22 


Tneatiurv 




Offer 

BM 

Yield 

Prev 

Ytafet 

. 7.15 

JJJ 

780 

729 

725 

742 

743 

745 

727 

725 

721 

791 


Marlboro, the number one 
selling clgarettein theworld. 


Cdt-Utt 1 Putt-list 
PrfcsJhr to w Oct Jh to W Od 
Ttf 28f ------- 

17A H - 20 •• I/U 1/16 1/U H 
muc u is uu umni Hu 
« M M K m VH 4 16 1 1/U 

m Wr 4 VH TVU 2 » 

in 1/16 m Sh 418 l*» M A 

w - * ivui M n b . 

MM«im mass . 

Thai cdopM hL'UUU 
TsMvet vNm* UU27- 
TUM PBt PM W.40UOS 


MAULir Um«UD dowHUl+LS 
tu u rce : CBOf. - • 


Source: Saionoa Station 


Thai (kwwth Estimate Ig Cut 

Renters 

BANGKOK — Bangkok Bonk 
Ltd- pnsdkted Monday that Thai- 
land’s gross domestic product will 
grow 4 5 percent this year, down 
from a 4 ,9- percent projection at the 
beginning of 1985. The GDP is a 
coonuys irtal outpui of goods and 
services minus income from opera- 
tions abroad. ’ ' 


WMott-YronlK Q jo +15 +27 

A-AmmoI; M-Moamir; l+QDurtgrtv; +5wW- 

AnmnL 

Source ■ uPt. 


D.^IKitupps 

Options 


* GrnMiB Alert ountnerfev cent) oer tbH 


Mi 22 

Struct CoOs-Svttt* PotoMSe 

Prto to IM Mtr to me Ur 

33 207 16 * 386 117 0JT — 

« IJ1 284 244 041 090 !.» 

B W W 11 Sa J! 1JB 

5* M9 189 p J5 280 

|7 119 0J7 l.|j 116 — — 

U 889 OS2 086 - - - 

BsHmattd tow mL 1363 

Cots: FUNLirnepMiniLSUTS 
PUN iFrL voL 1825 ogtnMXJN 

Source: CME. 


Investor Group Buys ' 
Taft Broadcasting Stake 

Reiners 

WASHINGTON — An investor 
group including Robert Bass. a. 
member of the Bass family of Fort 
Worth. Texas, told the Securities ■ 
and Exchange Commission on ; 
Monday that it has acquired an 8* 
percent stake in Taft Broadcasting 
Co. common stock. i 

Tbc group said ii boughi 72i000 , 
Taft shares for investment put' ■ 
poses and may buy additional 
shares. The group is inadeiip of 12 
individuals, companies ana pan- ■ . 
nersbips. ' . 























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


Pagf 15 




* ' 




•:-c- 


••*e 

i ■■■ 


•.Vv 


.\w 

M.11. •; 


<■ l- >t) 

3r f 


Si 
SV jjS 
1? 


21 
a is 
*'S i! 
a 


■is* 


*4 


«4' P 


"ids 


». •» 


ITCC- 

■" rf' 


:v. .hivi 



:t :r 

:% : . 




. '4»pl •» .**. 


r.s 1 ' 

..Ml -8' 

:• * 


■at" ■»-« • ’■ 

! •'•»• ‘ 


;on-.n:r 





9mmr lJr 
»»* 

• <1 

: ‘.x ■ ■ ■ 

K ti 
a Ta 

a* *■ 

iW» 
if ni 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Toyota Said to Decide to Build Plant in U.S. 


the Associated Pros 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor Carp. 
has decided to build an auto assem- 
: in the United Stains and 
make a formal announcement 
Tuesday, the Kyodo New Service 


news agency said, without 
attribution, that the announcement 
wffl be made following a meeting of 
Toyota directors here. Toyota offi- 
cials declined to comment. . 


Earlier this month sources had 
said Nashville, Tennessee, and 
KansasGty, Missouri, were among 
the filaoes under consideration for 
locating a plant 
Kyodo saidToyota is planning 
to establish a plant somewhere in 
the Midwest or in the South, start- 
■ing, in 1988. 

Toyota began making cats in the 
United States in December in Fre- 
mont, California, in a joint venture 


China Invites 19 to Seek Onshore Oil 


The Astodmed Press 

BEIJING — China has invited 
19 foreign companies to explore for 
oil in vast areas of its western inte- 
rior, the official Co mmunis t Party 
newspaper reported. 

The People’s Daily on Sunday 
quoted Song Zh priming, general 

manager of the China Oil Develop- 
ment Corp., as saying that the com- 
panies had been invited to survey 
oil resources in Xinjiang Uygur, 
Shaanxi, Gansu, Ningxia Hot and 
Sichuan provinces. 

He said the companies, which he 
did not name, were based in die 
United States Britain, France, Ita- 


West Germany, the 
Netherlands and Romania. 

In March, Chinese officials said 
they would allow foreign compa- 
nies to explore for onshore oil far 
the first tune in 10 southern prov- 
inces. The government has allowed 
foreign companies to drill offshore 
since 1980. but the effort has failed 
to yield the large quantities of oil 
that it expected. 

China's crude oQ output Last year 
totaled 80U million barrels, far 
short of demand. 

Under the agreements used for 

have aanirrlftft all the risks andhave 
provided the technology. 


with General Motors Corp. How- 
ever. GM gets all those cars and 
sens them under the Chevrolet 
Nova name. 

Toyota's No. 1 ranking among 
Japanese automakers in the United 
States is under assault from Nissan 
Motor Co. and Honda Motor Co. 
Both build cars in the United Slates 
and have been able to increase 
dealer shipments despite the im- 
port quotas on cars made in Japan. 

Italy Registers Surplus 
fin Payments for June 

Reuters 

ROME — Italy had an overall 
balance of payments surplus for 
June totaling a provisional 1.446 
trillion lire ($657.2 million), com- 
pared with a deficit of IBS billion 
lire for the same 1984 mouth, the 
Bank of Italy said. 

The June surplus compared with 
a 3.497-trillion lire defiat for April 
and May 1985 combined. No sepa- 
rate figure was issued for May. The 
cumulative deficit for the first six 
months of 1985 totaled 6.521 triT 
lion lire against 4226 iriHioQ in the 
corresponding 1984 period. 


Olivetti to Own 
79% of Acorn 
After Refinancing 

Radas 

LONDON — Acora Computer 
Group PLC said Monday that it 
had readied an agreement on the 
m^or terms of its refinancing with 
Olivetti SpA of Italy, which look a 
493-percent stake in Acorn earlier 
this year. 

Olivetti has agreed to buy £4 
million ($5.6 mmion) in stock at a 
price of one pence per share 
through a direct placement. Acorn 
said. When the refinandng is com- 
plete, Olivetti will own 79.8 percent 
of the company. 

Barclays Bank PLC has agreed, 
subject to Olivet if s approval, to 
double Acorn’s credit to £16 mil- 
lion, the company said. Unlike the 
credit currently available to Acorn, 
the increased facility will not be 
related to stock or debtor levels. 

Olivetti, the largest office-auto- 
mation group in Western Europe, 
rescued Acorn from collapse in 
February by purchasing 49.3 per- 
cent of us wares for £10.4 milhoa. 
Acora manufactures personal com- 
puters. 


Less Growth Seen 
In Key China City 

Reuters 

CHONGQING. China — 
Curbs on credit and capital 
construction in China are likely 
to retard industrial growth sub- 
stantially in the second half of 
1985 m Chongqing, a city that is 
often an indicator for nation- 
wide economic trends. 

Jin Lie, vice president of the 
economic planning commission 
in Chongqing, said in an inter- 
view Monday that he expected 
growth to fall to 16 percent for 
the full year from 23 percent in 
the first half in the city. 
Chongqing has a population of 
about 3.2 million and is in Si- 
chuan province in southwestern 
China. 

China's industrial output and 
retail sales boomed in the first 
half of 1985. According to offi- 
cial figures, first-half industrial 
growth of 23.1 percent was 
three times higher than planned 
and was up from 14 percent in 
1984. A spokesman lor the Si- 
chuan bureau for foreign eco- 
nomic relations said hanks had 
an back on credit and there 
were curbs on the money supply 
and wage bonuses. 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Rises in European Trading 


Reuters 

LONDON — The dollar ended 
higher in European trading Mon- 
day after a busy day. Foreign-ex- 
change markets were surprisingly 
little ruffled by the weekend deval- 
uation of the Italian lira, dealers 
said. 

A devaluation, announced over 
the weekend, cut the value of the 
lira within the European Monetary 
System by 6 percent and revalued 
upward other EMS currencies by 2 
percent. The decision thus effec- 


tively devalued the lint by S percent 
within the EMS. The Italian Trea- 
sury said the devaluation was cru- 
cial to stabilizing the nation’s trade 
deficit and maintaining economic 
growth and employment. 

The dollar strengthened in Lon- 
don to SI .3895 to the pound, 
against SI. 398 Friday; rose to 
2.8856 Deutsche marks in Frank- 
furt from 2.8703. and to 8.778 
French francs in Paris from 8.73. 

Dealers said there was little cur- 
rency speculation in Europe fol- 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Most Sectors Little Changed; 
Groups Prepare for Rules 


Court liquidates compamy motes 


trijriii 


igFbm 


OTB 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — A court or- 
dered on Monday the liquidation 
of Internationa] Consolidated In- 
vestments Ltd, the former holding 
company of Overseas Trust Bank 
LuL, officials said . 

The order had been sought by 
the Hong Kong government, which 
took OTB over on June 7 after the 
bank was declared insolvent. 

The official receiver has been 
named provisional liquidator, offi- 
cials sauL 

Japanese-Owned Chain 
To Build Chicago Hotel 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — A $47D-miflion 
hotel will be built in Chicago by an 
international hotel chain owned by 
Japan Air Lines, it was anmymrwi 
Monday. 

Japan Air Lines Development 
Co. said it had contracted with 
Tishman Realty & Construction 
Co. to construct the 18-story hotel 


Bouygaes said it had agreed with 
Cqtnpagnie de Signaux « d’Emre- 
prises Electriqucs to set up two 
jointly owned subsidiaries that will 
broadly assume the activities un- 
dertaken by CSEFs Entreprises 
Electriques division. 

British Telecommunications 
PLC is expected to get a Favorable 
report from the Office of Telecom- 
munications, saying that BTs pur- 
chase of digital public telephone 
exchanges from Thora-Ericcson is 
commercially justified, sources ar 
the regulatory agency said. 

Deutsche Bank Capital Markets 
LidJtaid it named Stanley Ross and 
Rolf Levedag as managing direc- 
tors after the resignation of Karl 
MieseL 

Deutsche Lufthansa AG said it 
had ended talks with American Ex- 
press Co. and other companies out- 
side West Germany on the sale of a 
stake in its travel subsidiary Euro 
Lloyd Reiseburo GmbH. Toe air- 
line wifi instead discuss selling a 
minority stake in Euro Lloyd to 
FJLR.S.T. RetsbOro GmbH. 


Elders DEL Ltd. said its pastoral 
division would launch a computer- 
ized wool selling system as an alter- 
native to the auction system. The 
new system will start operating in 
Australia at Sydney, Melbourne 
and Fremantle m September. 

lid. has received an order 
6.5 trillion yen (527.3 mil- 
lion) to supply ana install a 9,875- 
mile (16,000-lalomcijci) network of 
optical fiber cables in Kuala Lum- 
pur, Malaysia Fujitsu spokesman 
said. 

General Electric Co. has agreed 
to share the cost of replacing a 565- 
milli on turbine controller, part of 
equipment damag ed in a fire in the 
Pingtung nuclear power plant in 
Taiwan this month, Taiwan Power 
Co. said. 

Grand Metropolitan PLC said its 
subsidiary Grandma USA Inc. 
completed on July 19 the sale of 
Pinkerton Tobacco Co. for $137.8 
million cash to a subsidiary of 
Svenksa Tobaks AB of Sweden. 

IBM Australia Ltd. has signed a 


contract worth $86 million to sup- 
ply advanced computer hardware 
to National Australia Bank LuL, 
the bank said. 

Inco Ltd’s stock price gains re- 
flect investor hopes Tor improved 
metal prices ana expectations the 
company will report higher second 
quarter profits, analysts said. Inco 
shares rose 150 Canadian dollars 
($2.02) to 20 dollars on the Toronto 
Stock Exchange last week. 

Scandinavian Airlines System 
has borrowed 10 million European 
Currency Units ($7.84 million} 
from a syndicate of international 
banks to buy new aircraft, SAS 
said. The loan is repayable over 10 
years at 5-percent interest. 

Westingbouse Electric Corp. 
reached agreement with 13 unions 
representing 28,500 of its workers 
on Sunday, hours before a strike 
onion officials said in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They 
said the 37-month contract calls for 
average wage increases of 3 percent 
a year. 


OPEC Focuses 
On Price Issue 

(Continued from Page 9) 
183,000 by about 100.000. Iraq’s 
minister, Qassrm Taki al-Oraibi, 
said his country’s quota should be 
raised to between 2 million and L5 
million bands from \2 million. 

In addition, the Saudis have sig- 
naled their intention to increase 
output. 

Mr. Subroto estimated total 
OPEC production at 14.5 million 
barrels a day, wdl bdow the 
group's self-imposed ceiling of 16 
million. He noted that buyers have 
been holding out in expectation of 
lower prices. 

Hopes for an increase in demand 
for OPEC oil are fading. British 
Petroleum Co. recently predicted 
that worldwide demand for oil 
would show no increase this year or 
in 1986 after rising about 2 percent 
in 1984. 

The ministers have been consid- 
ering proposals to regularly adjust 
their production ceding to reflect 
seasonal fluctuations in demand. 


Ratters 

LONDON — Most sectors of 
the Eurobond market ended Mon- 
day showing little or no change, 
with a lower opening on the U.S. 
credit markets having only a slight 
impact on the dollar straight and 
floating- rate- note sectors, dealers 
said. 

These sectors were hard hit last 
week following comments by the 
Federal Reserve Board’s chairman, 
Paul A. V olcker. that led most op- 
erators to conclude that an early 
cut in the U.S. discount rate was 
not likely. 

At the dose, dollar straights were 
unchanged to a shade easier, with 
some issues marked 'A point lower 
after the U.S. opening. Traders 
noted very little retail activity 
Monday, with trading restricted to 
professionals. 

Monday's major developments: 

BT Aaa Ltd. said it was awarded 
a mandate to arrange a S 100-mil- 
lion five-year Euronote facility for 
the state-owned Export- Import 
Bank of South Korea. 

The three- and six-month notes 
win be issued in 5100,000 denomi- 
nations. The facility demands an 
underwritten margin of 'A point 
over three or six-man lb Loudon 
interbank offered rates and a facili- 
ty fee of % point 

The difference between the un- 
derwritten margin and average 
winning bid from a tender panel 
will be split equally between the 
underwriters and Ex-lm Bank. Af- 


ter two years, underwriters may 
convert their commitment into a 
floating-rate note. 

Industrial Bank of Japan issued 
£50 million ($69.5 million) of IQ** 
parent Eurobonds due Sept. 3, 
1995, and priced at 10QY the lead 
manager. S.G. Warburg £ Co., 
said. The bonds are noncallable. 

Fees total 2 percent, with a Pi- 
per cent selling concession and 
combined management and under- 
writing fees of percent. 

The bonds are available in de- 
nominations of £5.000 and will be 
listed in Luxembourg. The pay- 
ment date is Sept. 3. 

•m 

Separately Monday, the Associa- 
tion of International Bond Dealers 
and the newly fanned Internation- 
al Primary Markets Association 
have joined to study members’ op- 
tions in preparing Tor future British 
regulation of the heretofore practi- 
cally unregulated Eurobond mar- 
ket. 

The Securities and Investment 
Board, one of two new official bod- 
ies set up to implement a new regu- 
latory plan for British financial 
markets, “has made it absolutely 
plain that there is no hope the Eu- 
robond market will not be cov- 
ered,” said Jan Dalhirisen, secretar- 
y-general of the Primary Markets 
Association. 

Legislation implementing the 
changes is due by the end of 1986 


lowing the devaluation of the lira. 
A U.S. dealer said. "The market 
seems to have reacted with remark- 
able maturity." The lira ended at 
1,918 to the dollar in Milan, com- 
pared with the 2.200 fixing last Fri- 
day. before the devaluation. 

Some dealers expressed surprise 
that the dollar had not risen higher 
because of climbing U.S interest 
rates and failing bond markets. 

London dealers said the market 
apparently fell that the dollar was 
still set in a low-term downtrend 
and that the pound should contin- 
ue to profit from this, aided by still 
high British interest rates. The 
EMS moves have had little impact 
on the pound, they said. 

The pound also showed little re- 
action to news that OPEC minis- 
ters have deferred discussion on 
production quotas until the au- 
tumn. although this could mean 
weaker oU prices in the interim. 

The Spanish peseta ended weak- 
er. It was quoted at a final 160.75 to 
the dollar, compared with Friday's 
closing 164.S5. A Finance Ministry 
spokesman said that the ministry- 
will let the peseta float downward 
against the dollar as an alternative 
to formal devaluation. 

On major currencies, dealers said 
the market is focused on the timing 
of an expected renewed downturn 
in the dollar. 

A U.S. dealer for a major com- 
mercial bank said that the dollar's 
failure to react to a nse in the 
federal funds rate to S’* percent 
despite the Fed's S1.5 billion of 
customer repurchases was addi- 
tional evidence of (be current 
downtrend. Federal funds are over- 
night loans among commercial 
banks. 

A dealer commented thjt bad 
news for the pound cn oil was nor- 
mally good news for the dollar, but 
the dollar gained little support 
from the lack of progress from the 
Organization or Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries. 

One chartist said a full dollar 
correction from its recent lows 
would be to the 2.93-to-2.°5-DM 
area. It has still not achieved this 
level but nor was it coming under 
renewed selling pressure. He said 
operators seemed to be taking their 
profits below the expected techni- 
cal peak and appeared reluctant to 
build long dollar positions. 

Tuesday's U.S. durable-goods 
orders and consumer-price dam 
amid provide new impetus. 


I 


Mondavi 

arc 


Prices 


NASDAQ print os of 
3 pjn. Nbw Yor* time. 

Via The Associated Press 


U Meath 
HUlUw Stock 

St4B3k» M 

Dtv. YkL NH Hlflh Law 3 l» M. Qrtm 

L. 

* k 


i* 

a 

239* 

» 

2J 

179*. 

in* 

Z 1 
71* 

HS 

sw 


TI ADC TI 

ISM AELn 

129* AFG 
1DV, ASK 
14 AomRt 
5* Acad In 
■W ACtirtn 
149k ACuRoy 
21* AdaCLt) 
Aft A dose 
5 AdvClr 
29* Aequtm 
17* 12W AIIBlti 
351* 17 AKvRt 
MW 9b AlrMd 
17M 71* Air Wise 

37M 24b AfecB 
3t ii Aim 
20V 44* AUOTVK 

MM IP* AMflWI 
27* ISM Allen Bv 
2H* SB* AIK) Bn 
5 IX* Allnel 
im 5V. AlpAMC 
141* 69* Alios 

3»9s IM Amen* 
129* «ft AWAIrl 
1714 an AmAetv 
MM 10b ABnkr 
MM tfS Am Carr 
Mfe 5M A Conti 
17W 12V. AFdSL 
BM AM AmFrU 
30M 14W AFIetcs 
J7W Z7W AGreel 
MW 8W Amlnu 
77M t AAioen: 
»W 1*W AMS 
IM* 72* ANIlns 
7M 4 APtivG 
4h N AQuosh 
l4W ISM ASocCp 
13* 7W AmSIt » 
* IM ASokir 

2W M ASura 
44W 2T» AmriTfs 

MW 12V. AmrwH 

aw 3W Armen 
28* IS AmsfcB 
aw 13M AJWCWS 
15* 9 Anionic 

ISM 7to Ananm 
3*W IBM Anth-fr* 
1M> Apoem 
am mi* Apomc 
31V* MW Apolec 

7m 11M ADlBhj 5 
WW 10W ApIdCm 
as 2D AoMMI 
m ( ApUSIr 
71* Archive 
2JW 15W Arno5v 

32W 1SW ArlzB 

' 9 SI* Artel 
17W im. AtdHst 
» 5W Astnwv 
221* IOW A tear 
25 114* ArtAm 

<3W 25 AllniBc 


TO U 
JO J 


ja 4.7 
I 

.lDe J 


62 

IS 

13 

1S2 

315 

242 

£ 

V 

340 

125 

35S 

5 

53 

157 




1A0 3LI 4S* 
11 
111 
185 

18 


-05* 2 
SO 2j0 
JU 3J 


M 25 
f 

50 35 


SO 34 
t 

JO 2J 
58 1.7 
M 3J> 


UM 30 
143 XI 


15» 

133 

413 

ms 

ma 

2(0 

120 

149 

42S 

34 

41 

91*4 

2590 

221 

1S7 

45 

M2 

105 

39 


1427 

140 45 579 
4 
in 

in 14 m 
40 25 781 

306 

40 

«2 

.12 15 SI 


S3 

28 

229 

a 

37 

343 

50b 25 12 

SO 

.12 .9 191 

36 

44 25 10 

40b 14 4 

.90 XI 34 


MU U 

25W a*u 

20W 20 
M 1SW 
21 30% 

m 7 
m 9i* 

as* am 
2H aw 
7 M 
113* 

— tV > 
TTW 171* 
34M 34M 
121* 12W 
ISM W* 
37 35 

IBM 1BW 
S At 
2IW 21 
20M 20V. 
23W 219* 
49* 39* 

59* 5W 
17M 119* 
1*W 16 
129* 1196 
119* 119* 
149* 13W 
12 11 W 

9W 9 
1*9* 1* 
n* a. 

30 299* 

35V* 349* 
I3W 139* 
7 69* 

199* MU 
369* 36W 

% 4 % 
33 32W 

13W 12M 

2 w 2 w 

41 49 

219* JIM 
7V* 49* 
299* 3M 
1*1* 16 
MW 1496 
149* 149* 
199* 19 
HU* 10M 
309* 30 
179* 16U 
259* 25 
15 14V* 

239* 23W 
99* 99* 
SV* 59* 
19M 19W 
MW 319* 
aw a 

139* 13W 
SM 69* 
a jiw 

2SV* 259* 
43 <29* 


MU 




uw 


155 

■aw 



14 


218 




. 3 


272 




219* 


342 




15 


t 3 


S- 


. 16W 


273 




nw 


68 




I3W 


50 




2SVS 


67 




S' 

179* Avntek 

10SS 









309* 


99 


, . 

8 - ‘ 

(ft 

4 AztCM 

JO 67 S? 

«V2 


M + W 
WW— »* 
799 
99* 

MM- 9* 
2W 

S»— 1* 
119* 

49*—)* 
179* — W 
349*— V* 
119*— »* 
I6M + 9* 
369* +196 
IBM + 9* 
S + W 
21 — W 

2DW— W 
229*— W 
4 + W 

59* + W 
12 

161* + W 
11W— V* 
119*— W 
13M — V* 
1196— to 
9W 

169* + W 
B*k + V* 
299*— J* 
35—9* 
139* 

694 — W 
199* + 9* 
369*— 9* 
4 —to 
to + 9* 
32M + U 
13W + 9* 

w- h 

40W— 9* 
3194 

79* + W 
29 + W 

16W— W 
149* 

141* 

199* + W 
10W— W 
20W— to 
16W— V* 
25 

15 + V* 

339* + W 
991 + 9* 
59*— 9* 
199* + V* 
32 •+ 9* 

a + w 

139*— to 
69* 

32 +1* 

259* — W 
4ZW 
13U 

12W— 9* 
2SW — 94 
209* + 9* 
69* 

69h— 9* 
6 **— to 
61* 

9W— U 
22W— W 
199* 

IBM + VS 
4W- to 


24W 13M 
3 IK 
IBM 12 
59* 39* 

t2M 41* 
161* 6 
191* 7W 
II 5W 
359* SOW 
19W 8 

66W 309* 
3694 21 
311* 1394 
44W 2194 
894 198 
139* 89* 

69* «W 
2194 139* 
J1W 10 
ST9* 211* 
794 294 
1594 994 

1194 99* 

II 229* 
32V> 131* 
12W 69* 

19 99* 

13M 6M 
344* >49* 
129* 6 

79* 4 

239* MW 
35W JIM 
40 24 

37M 31 
14 9 

29 a 
2094 229* 
19U 12M 
211* ISM 
2BW 7W 
179* 11V* 

aw aw 

4594 219* 

^ '?& 
369* 7494 
6ft 29* 
is** aw 
69* 4 
361* 229* 
2096 141* 
211* 15 
19 SM 
2S*k IOW 
159* 1DU 
5W 19* 
43W 2714 


ConenG 


la 58r A 

OmrC OBI 15 
Caremk 
Carter* t 
COBtVBB 

SrrBc & uo S3 

SnSS 2A50X7 
IIMI9S 1 St 43 

50 15 


Carm Hr 

a£S&i 


IK 

15 

104 

347 

126 

”5 

137 


1 

’3 


21 20ft 20ft— ft 

^liSig + ft 



OimS. 50 15 797 

a,™ ^ „ ru 
-12 1-2 » 




48* 


CtsLmm 

Chemex 

airvE. 

ChlCW 

aoFoc* 

Onmer 

Chronr 

ChrDws 


SZEr' 

SSS* 


CUTK. 
CtxUt A 


1*9* 49* 
24W 14 
B 11* 
21ft T2ft 
419* 16ft 
129* 6 
TIM 694 
dOH 3294 
5 1ft 
7V* 3ft 
24 1194 

16ft 99* 
2994 16ft 
I4W 9 
34ft 129* 
33M 10ft 
279* 13** 
73 17W 


162 

31 U 53 

1899 

1 *3 

26 35 464 
154 ID 20 

I 30 

CtZUTO 156 55 16 

City Fed M X0 2050 

Ctort? 34 

CWorCh S 

ClevIRt U0 105 27 

cmrtmo n 

iS 

Jto13 IM 

Coaank 44 

Cct>rn)i W 

CalnbR 1W 

Caiman M 

Collins 3 

CalUAc 150 X9 59 
cmrTJe 60S 

ColoNt 34 35 416 
Comars 6&5 

Cornells .12 5 262 

Comma .16 U 560 
i dial _ 622 
IM 45 76 

— lU 154 2A » 
iVShr 50a 45 » 

nAm 1? 

Comind 50 14 B42 
CamSy.i B 

1896 
15 333 

75 
127 
634 
5 20 

299 
5 

15 in 

370 
634 
146 
26 
1 
38 

19 

CnCaa 35001X4 195 

CCaaR 1580 95 14 

CCofS 350 1X9 130 

CnPaPS 158 XB 447 

CansPd 58 20 g 

Consul , 25 

CnttBcp 259b 52 7 

CttHttn 15 

Cl Lair 49 

Conmrt 9*3 

Corvrse 88 

CoprBlo 721 

Coons B 50 15 2818 
CooyM in 

Corepm 22 

Cordll. - 321 

CoreS/ 258 X9 63 
Corvu* 17> 

Cosmo M3 

Cr* Or I .14 15 9877 
Cronui 6 

Cn»Tr SO XI Ml 
CwnBk 72 

Crump 54 1J 96 
CullnFr 54 45 41 

Cullum 56 20 62 

Cycare U 


Sm 




- 1|t ,gr 


h 


i a 
•* 


' S Ui» 


51ft 

38 

22ft 

K 

12 

11W 

511* 

M 

1394 

17ft 

Iflft 

lift 

1SW 

40 

r 

m* 

21M 

3814 


18 

IU 

J5ft 

T 

im 

ii 

iiji Mh 

,,,'lf 23ft 
to. 

* ; jh 

i — i* 

M 
sw 

Uft 

N s. 

389* 

22W 

• 29W 

■ 9W 


3894 BSDO 
7ft BRCom 

16M Banco* l 

19 BCPHw 

5 Banclec 
4w BanoH 

26 BKNES 
Hi BkMAm 
Bw Banktfi 
18 Bonias 
69* BoranO 

6 BsTDA 

7 BasAm 
30*. EBetF 
35 BavSkf 
6ft Bavtv 
Sft BnchCl 
1094 Benhafl 
39ft BetzLb 
8ft BJgB 
MS DIB Bear 

r Billinas 
BHidlys 
39* Bio Res 
4U> Bloom 
194 Bioorc 
61* BMeR 
5 BWllnc 
2396 Boaton 
t«W BoOEvti 
7 BottTc 
91* B(KlBc 
594 BstnDft 
994 BfMFC 

S BnXCP 
Brenco 
1H BnuTom 
eft Brunos 
>6 BulW TV 
1JW Brnhm 
15 BurrBr 
in* BMAl 
3 Busin W 


120 65 


SO 48 
154 3J 


Iflta 17 
150 11.1 


1591 75 
80a 2 J 


150 4J 
M 15 

.16 13 
50a 18 

JOe 15 
.13 X7 
.M .9 


40 

49 

40ft 

48ft- W 

ao 

«ft 

BM 

BW 



199* 

iaw 

IBM — W 


34W 

33ft 

33ft— W 



9V* 

fto- to 

m 

10M 

10W 

IOW— W 

195 

SO 

49W 

49 Vi — W 


9W 

9 

9 - M 


ISM 

139* 

13ft + 9*. 

351 

17M 

17W 

17W ■ 

■ M 1 



Bft 

t + w 


low 

ID 

18 — W 

16 

lift 

134* 

139k— V* 

130 

35ft 

34ft 

34ft— V* 

2 Si 

371* 

S7W 

571* + W 

1121 

7ft 





low 

10M 

109*— W 


209* 

20 

20W — 1b 

51 

349* 

34M 

349* 



16W 

I6M 

16W.- 

9* 

3 

U 

18 

IB 



3 

2V. 

21* — b 



12ft 

129* — W 

170 

BW 

84* 

84* — to 

1S4 

BM 

8 

8 


37 

2 

IM 

2 ■ 

to 

158 

Bft 

HW 

6M— W 

520 

to 

W* 

99*— to 

256 

36W 

3596 

3* — W 

713 

aw 

22to 

2SW — W 



7 

7 — to 

28 

26 

25ft 

25*1— to 


5ft 

Sft 

Sft 


69 

aw 

22 

aw 


425 

13ft 

139* 

13ft 


a 


44* 


449 

lit 

IM 

lft— ft 

467 

15b 

159* 

15V» — V* 

>10 

319. 

SOW 

30ft ■ 

ft 


79 

181* 

19 ■ 

w 

5 

lift 

17ft 

taw 


17 

25ft 

2SM 

2SM 


551 

09* 

ES3 

IW — 9* 


Mi* 


9ft 

6 C COR 



B2 

8ft 

BW 

•W 


■ 12 

S CPRM) 



22S 

sw 

Sft 

SW 



. 11?* 

.AM CML 



13 

til* 

11 

11 


k ' 

71 

14 CPI 



51 

18ft 

IBM 

109*— W 


\* m 

lift 

59* CPT 



214 

6ft 

6 

6 

* 12 v - 


. 1096 

Sto CSP 



S 

10*. 

10ft 

tow — b 

4ft + ft 

■ y 

■■ft * _ • ■ 

*W 

24* CACl 



3S4 

4ft 

4W 

— • 


- ; Uto 

169* ObrvSc 

At* 

U 

312 

209* 

ISP 

3DM— Ml 

ii - *— " 


- 179* 
, 59* 

7b CoiAAle 
34* CdUlvO 


97 

44 

W 

% 

10ft 

49* + ft 

,r • .r' 


5 

2W CollonP 



34 

7to 

7ft 

296- ft 

’ " . f 


■ Uft 

8ft Co<nv 

.16 

1.1 

m 

14ft 

1396 

14ft + ft 


17ft 

10 ?* 

309* 

37ft 

79* 

22W 

94ft 

IOW 

» 

59* 

& 

in* 

19ft 

26ft 

4ft 

BM 

9ft 

iT 

jT 

3614 

I5W 

2FM 
36M 
26 V» 
1494 
19 
1994 
18ft 
25W 
12ft 
159* 
6W 
2B9» 


7 DBA 
6ft DEP 

15ft DSC 
19ft Do toys v 
4ft DnwtBlo 
8ft Darcrds 
B94 DlalO 
3ft DtSwtch 
JJ Datscp 
3 Dta*m 
4M Datum 

59* Dawson 

99* DebStis 
99* DodsD 
209* DckWA 
ft Detlaus 
1 Dernier 
4ft DenfMd 
lft Dlosonc 
ID DKeon 
A DiCTIMd 
1216 VHBtCm 
23 Dinner 

8 Dvtaod 
3ft DocuOl 

11 DlrOal 

2DW DomB 
13W DoyIDB 
9ft Drann 
BM Drtudr 
11W DreyGr 
12ft DucKAI 
149* DunhD 3 
9ft Our Iron 
Bft DwrFilt 
3W Dvnsai 
13 DyntcbC 


J20 1.1 
71 XI 


J4 35 

30 5 

150 X9 
SB 24 
200 U 


22 1 S 
2A 18 
56 48 


22 

3 

1789 

12ffl 

33 

376 

142 

243 

20 

3 

36 

50 
181 
530 
272 

2* 

13S 

70 

398 

12 

242 

379 

113 

X 

5 

105 

314 

213 

51 
551 

9 

401 

415 

72 

37 
387 
174 


MM 16ft 
10 10 
1*94 169* 
27M 27 
Sft 6 
22ft 21W 
1194 1TW 
4W 3ft 
21W 20ft 

394 394 

594 59* 
51* 594 
19W 189* 
Uft IJli 
23ft 229* 

it in 

Si f* 

T2W 12W 
6ft 694 
SOW 29W 
35 34 Vi 

1T9* 1196 
Sto 5ft 
259* 34ft 
36ft 35ft 
26ft 26 
1296 12W 
IBM 179* 
19 I8» 

16ft 169* 
23 2494 

1* lift 

14ft 149* 
6ft 5ft 
Z7 26ft 


1494 + W 
10 + W 

16W— W 

27W 

22ft + ft 
11W— 9* 
4 —to 
*1 4- ft 

394 

Sft— w 

SM 

169*— 96 

14 

23 

lft- Hi 

1296 

*W 

x +to 
35 +96 
11W 
59* 

24ft— ft 
359*- ft 
26ft- ft 
12ft— to 
1794-1 
IB**- ft 
169*— ft 
24ft— ft 
lift 

MM— ft 
Sft— ft 
26ft — ft 


1716 

15 
5M 

lift 

3494 

11 

1394 

16 
W 


9W ECI Td 
7 EIP .12 
> Eaum 
3ft CarlCal 
22 EcMlLJfr 154 


5ft EOCmp 
716 EIOlIc 
10ft ElPai 
7W Elan 
Bft EKHtg 


2S 
7 

XI 176 


.I3o 18 128 
30 

186 U All 

if 



10 ft Eldons 

.16 1.1 S 


4ft EttCBU 

276 

TOW 

69* ElCotns 



SW EtoNud 

»7 


12 ft HlcRtrl 


13ft 

4u sums 



l ElrHlEl 

332 


Sft EimaftJr 

464 


Sft Emu l*;i 

270 

9 

2ft Entm 

63 


lift 

11 

1 IW — 

to 

aft 

0 

8 W — 

to 

lft 

lft 

lft + 

ft 

10 ft 

10 ft 

1096— 

w 

33ft 

32ft 

33ft + 

W 

ISM 

10 W 

10 W 


12 ft 

12 

12 ft 


151* 

1496 

15ft — 

ft 

9ft 


9ft 


PW 

9ft 

fl* 



14 

M — 

96 

74* 

7ft 

7VS 



1596 

19 18ft 18ft + W 
14 1394 1396 

7)W 1096 1096-94 
IOW 094 10ft + V* 
7ft 79* 7ft— 9* 
■ Aft 694 + ft 
3ft 4 + ft 


f* 




— 

— 

2 

Sft 

6ft 

Aft + 9* 





139 

lift 

lift 






40 

179* 




7ft EnFOCI 



30 

13b 

13W 

13ft + ft 



JO 

1J 

1 

169* 

IAW 



10 EnzoBI 



in 

U 

129* 

129*— ft 





TO 


UM 




20 

XI 

61 

79* 

7 

7ft -t- 9k 



JHa U 

134 

29ft 

30ft 

29b— ft 

249* 




18 

16b 



161* 

7ta Bxovlr 



59 

J 


B — ft 

1 




F 



b 

ihm 




69 

mr* 


SSi& 

■r., 1 




766 




r n 



27 

HETjH 


16 

■ d "0 .. M 

W6 

24 

796 








MSI 

mr£ 


kI 




IW 

■b. 


■ f ri l 

7 Ftoroo* 



140 

g| 


13b — b 


1J32 

41 

706 

■ •jV 


Sf 



UO 

IS 

89 





M 

12 





7IW 

IIW Pllimec 


102 

27ft 

21 Hr 

21M + ft 

AM 

3b Final oe 

20 

40 

a 

4to 

Aft 

49* 

AM 

Sft— W 






139* 

ISM 

13b— b 

a 

10 FAtaBk 

1.12 

38 

43 

32W 

32 

32M + b 


23 FtAFfai 

22 

2J 

15 

39b 

ww 

20b + M 
38ft +19* 



138 

13 

346 

30ft 

37 


Sft FtColF 


73 

17V* 

rn 

17b- b 


20ft FComr 

130 

43 

231 

» 

ui 

28M-W 



7.12*967 

as 



- 1 




324 

■- - 



H ’ 

71* FExtc 



240 


uw 


H. ■ ' 

10 FPflpI 



12 





182 



35 —to 

■ . i 

12ft RFnCP 

JO 

33 

122 


fr 

27* 





2 


17b 

K . iL 

19 FIFlBfc 

80 

U 

148 






1JD 

52 

106 

349* 



1 2? 

UC 

23 

151 

46 


63W— IW 

42ft 

10b FNtdns 180 

34 

81 


-f/. 

38M— 1 

■ • . 

fck 1' ■ J T r *t ■ 

de 


Z10 





1JB 

X7 

130 


. z' 

48b + W 


M^t VTan 

JO 

33 

2S 


25U 

2SW + W 

■fi 


1.10 

45 



34 

24ft + to 


>40 

11 

92 


429* 

42W 


t r i - « J , . -■ 

1.12 

24 

1165 

g ri 

439* 


mcr 




109 

Wi.i 

Sft 

Sft— b 

* * 


8* 

14 

S3 

Hl3 

Hi 



139* FIOFdl 

JO 

IJ 

194 

a 




24 PlaMFI 

JO 

L» 

78 

419* 

41W 






14 

17b 

17ft 


16ft 

09* Flurocb 

34 

1J 

76 

1SV5 

IAW 


6ft 




09 

4W 

4 


law 


s? 

J 

4fl 

17b 

t*71 


19W 


8 

64 

18 



■ ^.1 


.96 

70 

11 

34W 

339* 

34b 



1J0 

U 

40B 

179* 




IIW FOrtoF 




22W 


2ft + 6 




168 

29* 


1019* 


T 

4 

594 

»b 

10ft— ft 

BW 


U 

51 

Sft 

IT 




88 

IJ 

282 


uT 






220 


tu 

Sft + ft 


lift FuirHB 

32 

1J 

113 


i£ 


| 




& 



■ 

16b 




14 

11 

mb 

1096— to 




1J 

40 

Bb 

« 

■ It 





133 

2ft 

2W 

SAW 





409* 

40 

49ft + W 






7b 

7ft 

7b + ft 





170 

lft 

l^M 

3 — ft 






209* 

10ft + ft 



J8 

.9 

a 

8ft 

Bft 


Mb 



1J 

1461 

am* 

23ft 






12 

16b 

l*v. 






231 

14ft 

14b 

14* — ft 






17 

ir 

1AM— to 

MW 

MW OaoIdP 

36 

45 

57* 

17ft 





33 

418 

13b 

13b 










17ft 




72 

17ft 

17W 

179k— ft 







5b 


a 

8ft GWPSB 

Mr 12 

356 

2iw 

28ft 

2BM— ft 

154* 

796 Grech 



152 

139* 

13M 


19ft 




522 

l*ft 

l*ft 


1596 




375 

159* 

159* 

13ft + to 

MW 

69 A Gull 

JOe 

8 

72 

UM 

13b 

r~ 




H 



k 



JO 

S 

r~m 

22ft 

23b 

22ft— b 




J 

Kp ■ 

III* 







R| 

aw 

Mb 





■h 


4 













wfl 


ft 

*- 9 * 




4 

V 

mm 

PUH 

i«* 




12 

64 

EJ 

m 


[■fFl 


140 

41 

2S7 

33ft 






30 

0ft 

0H 


1 


.141 


504 

S 






17 

JW 

3 











KT IK i T_T1 


J 

6B 

10 

TBb 


241* 


Ji 

8 

14 

2fl» 

20W 

ZW, 

9W 




40 

4M 

4b 

4M + ft 


Ii ( . 'tiB 



182 




im 



34 

19 

35b 

35 



15ft HlberCP «a> O 

517 

24W 

aw 


13ft 

8M Hfcfcnm 



i 

1096 

HIM 

in* + a 


rtutt* 



266 

4ft 

31* 






36 




17 




m 

7b 

79* 




Jd 

23 

218 

34 

23M 


30ft 


W0 

42 

190 

27ft 

27b 

27ft + ft 

616 



72 

4M 

3M 

4M 


HI i:7T, 9* 



2777 

saw 

26 


e ti 


JX* 

J 

111 


a«M 


MM 

7 HnlBin 



» 

14W 

ub 

14W + M 



140 

38 

114 


48b 




105 

26b 

76V. 

isaa + to 

lift 

4W Hirpami 



31S 

11M 

Mb 

lift- M 

ITU, 




8 

tv* 

S 



1096 

7W ILC 



15 

urn 

10ft 

10ft- W 

SOW 

139* IMSs 

.16 

A 

SB 

30 

20Tk 

30 

1AW 

7VS ISC 



92 

12b 

129* 

13ft— 9* 

6W 

Sft leaf 



751 

Aft 

6 

6ft + ft 

10M 




9 

6W 

t 

6 — to 


2ft tnaam 
IS imMN 



36 

Sto 

S 

Sto + ft 

469* 

180 

10 

34 

46b 

469* 

46ft + V* 

a 

20 ln£aR5C 



15 

2tM 

28M 

2BM- ft 

349* 

14M Irrlhm 



174 

189* 

18W 

1BW 

33M 

15 Insltitw 



60 

25b 

25 

259* + 1* 

121* 




IBIS 

59* 

Sto 

5M+ W 

15 

89* IMDDV 



49 

13M 

12 

13 — to 

23ft 

29* IntgOan 
lift I55CO 



7 

5 

39* 

16b 

3b 

16* 

3b 

is* + ft 
28b + w 

379* 

22M Intel 



3914 

28W 

28M 

1496 

44* IntlSv 



168 

5M 

5 

Sto + ft 

39* 

IW lntrT.-« 



7 

lft 

IM 

IM- to 

15ft 

3ft ijwmd 



83 

14 

I3W 

13M 

12 

Sft inutin h 



16 

a 

8 

IKU 

16M 

6W imrfPlr 

.16 

12 

37 

13 

12* 

1296 

39W 

21 W Inluahs 



1522 

3296 

32 

32ft — M 

IOW 




317 

BM 

1 

8ft + ft 

22b 




1B3 

17ft 

17to 

17M +ft 

13W 

Sft Intrmel 



M 

SM 


> 

25 

10V* IntCIlA 



205 

1S» 

1SW 

15b— W 

to - W 

20 




17 

10W 

10 

2SM 

139* fntKIno 

f 


17 

wb 

19* 

I*b + to 

19ft 

lift Intue 



159 

109* 

in* 

19ft + W 

12 

4ft inMobil 
ft IRIS 



355 

7ft 

7 

7b 

2ft 



219 

1 

fh 

fh 

25ft 

sw ircp> 



412 

2SW 

zsw 

25W— to 

149* 

5 loama 



441 

10?* 

10ft 

10* 

13M 




4 

0M 

0ft 

09* 

BW 

2ft itrl 



557 

7M 

7M 

2ft 

1 



Mr 

HRS 



mmmu 

15ft 

7ft JBReta 

.16 

1.1 

51 

149* 

14W 

14W | 

BV* 

2ft Jaeunt 



112 

69* 

A 

6 - 9*1 


4094 

371. 

894 

72 

7W 

13ft 

1894 

20ft 


75V* JOCKLft 
>494 JamWtr 
SW iofAAart 
149* JOflCB 
39* Jon lew 
6W Josptwi 
9W Junoi 
1194 Judin 


256 

30 

21 

• 12 , ^ a 

too 

216 

80 XI 35 


4094 3996 
1894 181* 
59* 59* 
21ft 20ft 
7ft 6ft 
Bft 8ft 

i* taw 

lift 1*9* 


40 

Iff* + M 
59* 

am- w 

7 + ft 

ai* * w 
in* 

1VW— M 


r~ 




K 








404 

199* 

10W 

19b + w 











36 

1J 

275 

31b 

30ft 

soft — 1 



160 

Ulh 

16ft 

16ft + ft 


lib Kaetor 

JDr 12 

ia 

(A 

ISM 

ISM 





3 

9i£| 


9W + W 


29b Kerne 

WO 

xo 

203 

60 

50M 

S*b— to 


JO 

72 


40 

391* 

39ft 





13 

7 

6* 

7 


7b KrvTm 



47 

■ 

79* 

7ft— 9k 








39* 


12b Kinder * 

J6 

J 

412 

219* 21M 

219* 



J6 


110 

6W 

6b 

49* 



23 


94 

14 

IM 

13ft 

899* 

13 Kulcke 

.16 

1J 

243 

15ft 

IW* 

151* 

1 




- 



" 1 

IIW 

AM LDBmk 



90 

7ft 

7ft 

7b— ft 





106 

14ft 

14U 

MW 

a 

096 LSI Lag 



543 

16 

15b 

95ft— W 





37 

14W 






!Z» 

15 

Mb 

U 





35 

4796 

47ft 

47b + ft 

% 


.16 

J 

93 

20b 

30ft 

SOft — w 

10 Laldlw 

20 

1.1 

34 

lib 


10 — w 



SO 

4J 

3 

16W 

lib 

IAW 



88 


S 

15b 

UW 

15W— ft 

31ft 

12ft LndBP 

80 

IS 

BS9 

30b 

SOW 

3Dft + ft 



S3 

33 

37 






20 

.9 

10 

30* 

a 



4ft LaeDta 



47 

A* 


. .. 

9ft 

7V* LeWbP 

J8b 34 

6 

1264 

■ft 

3b 

Stt 

SM 


lft UMtafa 



46 

3ft 





J07 

3 

90 

22ft 

aw 



4b LteCam 



1003 

Sft 

59k 

5ft + W 


20 

18 

3667 

19b 







7ft 

32ft 



MW 

34V* UncTffiS 

220 

62 

42 

359* 



Aft 


.76 

XI 

3 

5M 




10b uzCtai 

■35 


1288 




23* 

Ui 


a 

24 

23M 

239* 

.13* 




35» 

a 

aw 

2BM— to 

aw 

7M Lypnds 



601 

Mb 


28b + ft 

| 



M 



1 

Mb 




46 

UW 

u 

UW + w 





8349 

W* 

09k 

99* 






7ft 


79* 





51 

4ft 


4ft— ft 



24 

12 

4 

20b 

P ' J 

20M — ft 





150 

wm 

Kf.T 

2Aft 





222 

rf 1,1 

12b— ft 



730 

82 

40 

i_ii 

p' ^ .1 

36ft 





*6 

9 

■b 

■ft 

14W 


•Die 

116 

13b 

IW* 

13b 





228 

1SW 


159* + ft 






■ 





200 

32 

400 

* 

rr 

60b— lft 

19Vk 


20 

18 

11 


it X? 

IBM 





sa 




IJb 





_ 


0ft— ft 



1JD 


432 

ri 

i ■ ■ / 

3Sft— IW 

IM 




37 


i B 

43 — ft 

■ftj 

lb MM»or 



436 

HkT? 

b 7T 

3W + 9* 


.M 

J 

1 



X 


lib Ataxers 



663 



22M— ft 




12 



M — ft 

7* 

«* MavPt 



67 


■fjfl 

59k 




1 


BpjBB 


an* 


JB 

25 

US 


p T j 

*ft ■** to 





X 

■E 1 BBj 


H + W 


JK 

J 

31 

■W 


11 





363 

4ft 



■HZj 

■ y v! yM 



84 

13W 

13 

13W + 9k 

RT~] 




4*3 

21ft 

aw 


iTiM 


1.92 

42 

33 

30V! 





188 

72 

79 

83 

ISa 

62W 





IS 

a 



36b 

19b mraaci 

WO 

SM 

m 

tt 

36 

Mto 



J6 

38 

35 







259 

TTW 

lib 

16b— ft 

■cl 


80i) 33 

76 

16ft 

lib 

14W— 9k 





1140 

19ft 








3b 



Uft 




14 

7b 

7b 

79* 

fb 

at Micro* 

Jt 

W 

57 

*9* 

6W 






1184 

9ft 








7ft 

7W 

7ft + ft 

6 

3*W MlcSms 



112 

191 

5b 

3b 

59* 

39* 

Sft— ft 
3b + ft 




1J 

a 

22b 

aw 

22V.— b 

41W 


1.12 

Xf 

IX 

39ft 

39W 

39b — b 


ptr|aw~ l *. 1 V 1 j 




7b 





80 

1J 

222 

a 

37ft 

37ft— M 


■ i / M . . . 1 1 1 




5 



43ft 

Ft * •w^lTr^iijB 

88 

1.1 

aia 

44 

43 


a 

lb Minttcr 



111 

29* 



77b 

12ft HUmmr 



73 

a 

22W 

22b— b 

16ft 

r.t:: — r 

Jle 

.1 

184 

Oft 

9b 

9ft + W 

12 




410 

129* 

lift 


20ft 


88 

3J 

75 

18 



10* 

6 Mataclr 



16 

6* 

AM 


39b 

26W mote* 

m 


n 

34b 

34 

34b — ft 






19* 

IM 


2ib 


23m 18 

71 

32 

2ib 

21ft— W 

12 




1? 

11 

IM* 

10ft 

23ft 




606 

14W 

Uft 

14 — ft 

33M 

rib MoftuC 

W0 

42 

32 

31 

30b 

38b— W 

20b 

flM MarFlO 

Jn 


49 

19 

IBM 

19 + ft 









21W 

ISM WWlTAft 

88 

32 

63 

aw 

31 

31b 

7ft 

396 MOMlev 



46 


44* 

4ft 



J0 

18 

7 

14b 

Mb 

14% 

64 M 

30 Muftmd 

86 

1.1 

5404 

saw 

Vb 

5B - 9* 

26W 

m Mykmi 

.10 

8 

1103 

2597 

26 


1 




N 




1 


10ft 

6b NutrlF 



73 

9 

0 

0+9* 

Ub 

4b NlMHdS 



72 

>3 

124* 

121*— b 

r~~ 





O 



1 

59k 

2 




26 

2ft 

lft 

29k 

17ft 




163 

(7b 

17 


Mb 

2Sb OgllGp 

ub 

IS 

570 


49 


67b 

359* OhtoCa 

2JD 

84 

46b 

669* 

66ft— 9* 

32b 


XI 

55 

32ft 

XW 

32ft— Ik 

4ib 




1.0 

347 

« 

30ft 391k— b 



12 

72 

219k 

3tft 



3U 1 3 

124 

22M 

aw 

22ft— W 

10 




Q 

7b 

7b 

7b + W 

Oft 

13ft OptlcC 



a 

15ft 

159* 

159* 







36b 

30ft— ft 

ww 

10ft Ortwnc 



20 

15b 

15ft 

15ft— b 





1077 

7W 

7 

7W + b 





48 

5 

4ft 

4ft- ft 


14 



1J> 

31 

10W 

lfb 

10W 


24ft OWTP 


u 

55 

34ft 

339k 

339k- ft 




72 

lift 

lib 

lib 



QvMnM 

80 

1.7 

148 

aw 

72 

23 — W 

&b 

W OXOCD 



174 

9k 

to 

9fc 

r~ 





P 



| 







32b 

X 

32b + 9k 

lil 

39b 


IJOaXA 

161 

47 

46ft 

44ft- ft 






“B 


14W 


15 

10 

PacTal 

JO 

58 

94b 

14ft 

14b + to 

19ft 





175 

Uft 

If. 





.13 

18 

103 

8'* 

89k 

89k — ft 






84 

24* 

341* 

24* to to 

aw 


PorkOh 

80 

48 

19 

13M 

13ft 










Ub 

Mb 



» 


501 

12b 

129* 

13b 

59* 

PtwUPI 



51 

12W 

IrjjJ 

12ft — b 


7b 




IDS 

1* 

ra 

to — ft 






141 

179* 

16ft 



19 

PearlH 



1707 

24ft 

aw 

MW— W 








8ft 

_*w . 

35 



230 

68 


34W 

aw 

34W— b 

31b 

im 


80 

X3 

142k 

31W 

1 '-'l 


131* 

7H 




876 


j Lii 





1.13 

40 

05 

27b 


27b— W 

I3M 





127 

7V. 

7 







1301 

lift 

11b 

lift— ft 





7668 

159k 

14ft 

Uft— b 

•w 





6 

2ft 

2ft 

3ft— ft 

aw 

17b 




472 

bft 

36 

aw 

34ft 



80 

32 

3 

22ft 

239* 

23ft— to 




J2 

X5 

155 

bft 

Mb 

bft 

Bitl 

7 

Phxi»* 

.12 

18 

2 

BM 

8M 


Bt- 1 

ab 




IW 

13W 

«b 



IV 




872 

l*b 

19b 

19ft + ft 

» 

10 




102 

ab 

26 

» — ft 

39k 

lb 




35 

3 

3ft 

21k— ft 

17ft 

09* 




2 

12b 

12b 

I2W 

10ft 

6b 




56 

10ft 

IIHk 

10b 

37b 

179* 


,12 

3 

71 

3Sb 

35 

35ft + 9* 

7b 

4W 




151 


79k 

7b + W 

lft 

3 

Priam 



140 

4 

3ft 

3ft— ft 

1AU. 

5 

PrlcCm a 



lift 

119k 

lift + ft 

44 

33b 




366 

63 

A2W 

62b— ft 

BhTJ 

0 




45 

70b 

10 

low 

IBf mM 

49* 


.16 

XB 

» 

49k 

4W 

4b 

Vvfl 

XW 




200 

41 

40ft 

41 


12b 

ProplTr 

IX 

E9 

SA 

13ft 

Uft 

Uft— ft 


139* 




32 

179* 

179* 

17ft 


3ft 

Pulimn 



421 

7ft 

79k 

7ft— ft 

EJ 

129* 

PurtBn 

80 

18 

200 

26b 

aft 


1 





i 



J 

16ft 

Bft □ MS 9 



711 

Uft 

10 ft 

11b + W 

•9k 

39k Quadra 



218 

Bft 

Bft 

eft + b 

13b 

0 

QucdcCs 

33 

XD 

4 

12ft 

13ft 

Uft + ft 

33b 

96ft Quanlni 



XI 

37ft 


27b 





570 

41* 



12ft 

Mto Quixote 



651 

12b 

11b 

17ft + b 

rcw 

7b Quotm 



1118 

lift 


119k— *k 

r~ 





R 



1 






71 

9 

Bft 

9 


10 

RPMI 

8* 


027 

Mb 

15b 

14b + b 


B9h 

RadSn 




lib 

119k 

lift 

B a 




40 

Uft 

12 

UU 

ii 

5M 




15 

7b 

7 

7M 


29k 




186 

5b 

4ft 

4ft— W 

MV. 

10 

RMnr* 

IX 

XI 

444 


X 

Xb — ft 

a 

129* 


34 

IJ 


■12] 




14W 




1 


209* 

20ft— ft 






70 

SM 

89k 

■ft A W 


|- * J 




29 

27W 

av* 

aw —i 



Reeve* 



274 

12b 

12 Vk 

12V*— ft 



30 

JJ 

371 

•Sft 

5b 

*ft + to 

B . I 

k|H 


.12 


38 









48 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft— ft 


79* 




18 

0ft 

Bft 

9Vi * V, 

& 

0ft 




10*7 

139* 

Uft 

IS - 9* 

Hb 




14 

16ft 

It 

U — ft 

161* 

09k 


■15r 

13 


9!k 


9b— ft 

79b 

179* 

RnurrH 

J3e 

10 

13* 

24b 

24 

34 — ft 

w-j 

27b 


1J4 

xo 

838 



4ift— b 

Ivi 

0W 


34 

12 

314 

>44* 

MM 

74ft + b 

ID 

3b 




240 


9ft 

vb— ft 

ltb 

lib 




33 

19ft 

19 


179* 

10ft 

Rival 

SO 

SJ 

142 

15ft 



■SJ 





70J 




■TCi 

IIW 


M 

J 

16 



12ft— ft 

13b 

8V* 

RobVin 



82 

12b 

12 

12 

241* 

151k 


24 

X3 

314 

aw 

73 

23W 

13 

5b 




35 

in* 



13ft 

4H 

RayIRs 







ISM 

11 

Rvitpm 



196 

Uft 

169* 

16ft + W 


yj] 




13 

19 

IBM 

18b 

rs 

■■ 

■OT 

■i 

■ 


■■ 

1 

■VBf || 


Uft 

2494 

5094 

2016 

16W 

36 

79* 

1094 

10ft 

lift 

1296 

994 

259* 

36ft 

12ft 

34 

309* 

29V* 

6ft 

16 

30W 

129* 

7ft 

1194 

32ft 

42 

■94 

10ft 

161* 

row 

33ft 

3*» 

24ft 

51ft 

7ft 

9W 

31W 


ZW MMS 
5 NOPCOS 
18ft NBnTnc 
29ft NHCtV 
096 NKfitrs 
6ft NData 
16ft NHHC9 
4M NtLwfflB 
294 NAUem 
4ft Noude 
6ft MOtolT 
6W rwiwA 
496 NwkSac 
Uft NtwkSs 
17W Nftflrea 

69* NBrunS 
23ft NE But 
15ft NHmpB 
1596 NJNOtl 
39* NYAM 
7ft NWOBk 
17 


1W Nwpph 
2W NICBlO 
69* Nika B 
isvt Norrislr 
26W NrskBl 
Sft Norton 

5 NAM In 

61* NostSv 
13W NwNG 
1694 NwtFns 
IBM NMtLl 
16W NMlPE 
35ft NOMlI 
5 NudPh 
4M Numrae 
16 Numeric 


M 15 
250 45 
20 1 5 
84 X3 


50 35 


52 l.» 
JO 25 
1.12b 45 


5a 2 


80 35 
84 J 


184 75 
58 H 

50 22 
110 85 
.92 15 


58 Z* 


603 

11 

379 

418 

>62 

521 

79 

48 

an 

338 

9 
198 

S 

887 

2 

42 

22 

54 

38 
181 
160 
857 
382 
270 
536 
667 

39 
8 

10 
345 
1484 

67 

300k 

36 
87 

40 

37 
50 


69* 

TV. 

(ft 


Aft AW 
149* Uft 
24ft 29 
SOW 509* 
1994 191* 
131* Uft 
19W 1*W 
6 59 * 

3ft 
59* 

696 
794 

Bft ... 
259* 3494 
3416 33 
10ft 10 ft 
28ft 28 
309* 39ft 
21 2796 

Aft «W 
15ft T5W 
2494 24ft 
109* ID 
29* 2W 
11*1 lift 
4Bto 47 
43ft 42ft 
7W 7W 
79* 7W 
16 15ft 
191* 19ft 
329* 32W 
90b ■ 
2494 

529* .. . 
Sft Sft 
79* 7W 
31 30 


Aft + ft 
10ft + to 
MW— 94 
SOft— W 
19ft 4- ft 
Uft + ft 
law— iw 
5ft 

39* + ft 
59*4-1* 
696 + ft 
7W + to 
■9* 

2S9* + ft 
33 —1 

10ft 

28 — ft 
30ft + ft 

31 + W 

AW 
15ft 

2496 + to 

10ft „ 
2b— ft 
119* 

ATM- \h 
43 +1 
794 — b 

R“* 

_ 29ft— ft 
]** 24ft 
ft 52ft ■* to 
Sft- ft 
TV.— ft 
30—9* 


16 

7ft SAY Ind 



6 

I5W 

ISW 

15W— M 

10W 

1B% SCISv 



146 

Uft 

139* 

Uft— ft 

10W 

idw sei 



7 

18b 

18b 

lift— w 

15b 

7 SFE 

•lor 

12 

5 

.199 

89* 

Bft— 9* 

23 

1ZW SRI 

88 

33 

167 

71 W 

20b 

20b— b 

198* 

49* Soteods 

30 

IJ 

692 

19M 

19W 

19ft 

449* 

28 W soteco 

180 

17 

1639 

43M 

47ft 

42b— b 

23 

111* fiofHWi 



611 

319& 

21 

21 W + to 

16M 

7V, SXiiide 



52 

iaw 

UW 

I3W — ft 

75ft 

aw sipoui 

XOO 

4.1 

sto 

74M 

739* 

73ft- ft 

64* 

ii* smew 



33 

A 

5M 

5b— W 

IIW 

61* 5p»Bw 

OSr 

8 

41 

a* 

7b 

7ft— W 

9ft 

44ft 

5b SoteiSy 
12b 5ovnF 

.12 18 
180a 17 

32 

V 

7ft 

47ft 

7b 

43ft 

7ft 

43b 

31V* 

18ft SvBkPS 

J4 

U 

a 

31 

30b 

30b— ft 

119b 

aw Samoa 



161 

«r 

6W 

AW— W 

16 

8M ScanTr 



7 

MW 

14ft— w 

12ft 

8ft Sctwrer 

J2 

35 

100 

u 

12W 

13 + M 

22ft 

15W SrtiimA 

40 

1 3 

7 

aw 

72 

aw * ft 

Bft 

Sft Sci/Wc 



0 

4ft 

49* 

4ft— ft 

ZIM 

14 5CIKK 



177 

% 

TSb 

ISM f W 

?M 

6M SooGal 



171 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

I7W 

4 Saaaate 



1426 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft + ft 

4ft 

Zto SecToo 



1*5 

3 

2ft 

2ft— W 

12W 

1ft SEED 



244 

7ft 

2W 

2W- ft 

SOft 

17b 5eOM 

JO 

19 

6 

aw 

70ft 

aw— w 

lift 

5V3 Semten 



49 

Bft 

8 

B — W 

10ft 

5ft Senior 

JS 

J 

2578 

.89* 

BM 

Bb- ft 

1691 

nm SvcMer 

M 

8 

1095 

ia» 

TJW 

12ft— W 

25W 

I7M Svmal s 



108 

77 

21 

SIM— to 

23M 

14b Sorvieo 

1 


IB 

739* 

239% 

23V* — ft 

17W 

12b SevOok 

.14 

3 

140 

17 

16b 

17 * b 

34* 

71W ShrMea 

88 

U 

M0 

XW 

30ft 

Xft— ft 

XW 

77W Sturnte 188 

48 

220 

XM 

3Bft 

J8ft — ft 

IBM 

Oft SnelCrr i 

.16 

J 

ia 

T9M 

10 

19ft + U 

14W 

6W SheWi 



117 

lift 

109* 

nb— ft 

25b 

Mb snow* 

.13 

5 

IS 

3DW 

Wb 

29ft— to 

16ft 

low Siwnaai 



774 

10ft 

10 

10ft— b 

MW 

6M Silicon 



793 

71* 

6b 

7 

32ft 

9W silicons 



124 

1JM 

13b 

13W— to 

aw 

lib SIIIcVbI 



35 

1AM 

16 

14 — b 

TIM 

lib UlfCflx 



90 

71 

30 to 

sow- *» 

17W 

4ft 5IIKC 



12 

Aft 

69% 

*9* 

17ft 

11W SJmpIn 

JO 

XI 

70 

UW 

i5b 

iSb— w 

15W 

99k SlPPIn* 



152 

13W 

12b 

12b— ft 

Mb 

17ft SUzIeri 



340 

I Bto 

17ft 

17b + ft 

12ft 

8 Skipper 

JA 

6 

48 

0ft 

9ft 

Oft 

4b 

7ft SmllhL 



767 

3ft 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

54 

X Society 

l Ja 

18 

796 

49'-1 

4897 

aBT*— ft 


19ft 

10ft 

71ft 

28ft 

27ft 

Sft 

aw 

28ft 

9ft 

47W 

I9M 

27ft 

■94 

16ft 

199. 

9ft 

30 

251* 

27 

A8ft 

Aft 

7ft 

17ft 

26 

lift 

1694 

31ft 

34M 

\ 

149* 

3ft 

10M 

AW 

IW 

14 

Aft 

Mft 

6 

2AW 

7ft 

1194 

II 

2SW 


■ft SoctvSw 
SW SeHech 
9ft SoflwA 
189. SonocP a 
14W SonrFO 

4 SoHoao 
soto smaFn 
1 6ft MutrM 

S 1 * Sovrgn 
SOft Sovran 
Bft Saocay 
7 S pc Iran 
Sft SPACCII 
12ft SPire 
4ft Stars™ 

5 SHUBUt 
I9M Slonovs 
lift StdMIc 
If Stanhos 
31 U smSiB 

4W StateG 
4ft Sieiaer 
9ft SiewStv 
1AM Stwinl 

5 SMtal 
7ft Stnrtu. 

24ft StrwCI S 
19ft tirvser 
#eft Subaru 
34 subre 
2V's Sum mo 
Sft SumrHi 
ft SunCst 
7ft SupShy 
3. Surnlee 
v. Svkos 

6 SvmBT 
7*7 Svncor 
sw svntecn 
7ft Svnirc* 
14ft SrAsoc 

r* Svstin 
694 s vs imp 
Sft SVWGO 
12 5vsimt 


133 A7 
JOe 18 

JJ 25 
1JW SJ 
.10 1J 
188 38 


5* J 


70 X5 
150 X7 

150 5J 
1JO 1.9 
.15b XI 


.72 35 

.7* XI 

14a 1.1 
1.92 25 

.10 J 


«2 

22 

33 

4* 

64 

117 

>60 

M2 

iro 

'% 

i” 

10 

A* 

10 

37 

292 

10 

461 

37 
35 

38 
1 

330 

484 

49 

53 

33 

3fl7 

185 

&S63 

339 

1 

5 

•0 

234 

43 

350 

173 

70 

■9 

24 

101 


ir, 18 
if-* isi* 

78 77'. 

22 21ft 
4ft 4ft 
2F9. 25 
17ft 17 
Aft 6ft 
«7 46ft 
18ft 18 
24ft 24ft 
7*3 7ft 
141* U'* 
Sft 5ft 
5!* 5ft 
27ft 7T± 
lift 1S'- 
22i* aw 
6*ft 63ft 
4ft 4ft 
4’i 4ft 
14ft 14ft 
24’. 24'. 
7 Aft 
16'. 15ft 
3*’. 35U 
34 14 

13W 12'. 

R ft 

J'.A lft 
'• ft 
lift lift 

*'* 4 

lift lift 
3 2ft 
a 2ift 
4ft 49* 
9 8ft 
10ft 10W 
23ft 23ft 


IB- — •. 

a 

1^4- ft 
27ft- ft 
lift- ft 
4ft- >■ 

«r- 

6ft— ft 
46 A— •» 
U — ft 
241* — t. 
7ft— ft 
14 ft 

rr»— i* 
ir-j +■ 
r-ft 

64 — •„ 
|f* * ft 
4ft- ft 
14ft— ft 
74'. 

Aft 

35ft- * 

lSft~ •- 
69 +1 

3 

Uft - ft 
lft + u . 

aw — a- 

3ft- >. 
ft- ft 
lift V- ;• 

4 

111* + ft 
3ft— ft 
71ft— ft 
4ft 4- ft 

10ft - ft 
73ft— ft 


c 




T 



1 

14 

891 TBC 



12 

IOW 

Wft 

10ft— ft 

2SVk 

lift TCACB 

.12 

5 

19 

23b 



7W 

4b TocVlu* 



43 

Pi 

lb 






1*47 

17b 







tofi 

4'* 

4b 

4'k 





* 

0ft 

9to 

9b- ft 





141 

ISb 

Uft 

15b -r to 

33ft 

17V TTcmA 

1 


*6* 

31ft 

lift 

37ft 





P» 

10 



2SW 

131'j Telecro 

X 

IJ 

351 

IBW 

17b 

18 

28b 

13 Taisralct 



33* 

37 

a*b 






195 








73 

15 

Ub 

14b— ft 





43 

16ft 

to 

U — ft 

12b 


1 


3 

4ft 

4b 


Uft 




77 

10ft 

10ft 


17ft 

* TilrmO » 



139 

ISft 


14ft_ '.k 

48 


13t 

17 

X 


47 ft 






101 

7b 

7b 

Tto— ft 

J9lk 

13b ThouTr 



343 

Uft 

Ub 

14 — ft 

UM 




15 


9". 

01". + > : 

14 




* 

12ft 

13ft 

12V* 

4b 




rj 

■ 

k 


17ft 




360 

lAft 

15b 


31ft 

lift Tonsr* 



10 




17b 

ID TrokAu 



53 

12W 



131b 

6to TriDflSv 



AB 

9ft 

B'a 

0ft + «i 

XW 

22b TrusJo 

40 

15 

24 




r~ 




u 



” 1 

aft 



X5 

30 

339. 

Mb 

23b— ft 





7 

32'.- 

Mb 

22ft- ft 




3 

87 

8ft 

Sto 

5b 





3217 

1AU 


1ST* + ft 


7b UniK 



66 

10b 

10’ s 

TIP, 





35 


Xft 


TIM 

MM UnTrBc 

140 

2J 

*5 

105 

U4V: 

04ft— ft 





W3 

?4 



119k 

7 UBAISk 

■ 1ST 

18 

7 

9'j 

vb 

99* — ft 

35 ft 


IJS 

10 

IJ4 

Mft 

37'. 

28 <w 

II 

5ft UFnGrp 



30 

8b 

Bft 


22W 

lib UFsiFd 



51 

IB 

17b 

17b— ft 

17V 

5b UGrdn 

1841111 

76 

12'i 

12 

12W + ft 

IJ 1 * 

7w UPrna 



40 

12b 

Ub 

13ft— .ft 

SW 

2b USAni 



35 

3ft 

3 > 


X 

17ft US Ben 

IDO 

38 

2#3 

XW 



4ft 




6B 

3b 


3-5 - ft 

79% 

2ft US Dean 



4 

•A* 

2 b 

2=.- 

33b 

MW USNC* 



eta 

33 

31 

37ft— ft 

5ft 

Jto US Still 

.12 


Ml 


4ft 

4ft 

XM 

10b US Sur 

JOe IJ 

310 


19b 


37ft 

HW USTrs 

IX 


13 

37 

toft 


»b 

17W USIoln 

30 


156 


2lft 



Mb UnTeiev 



209 


Mto 

23b 







Mto 


32 

IT* UnvFm 



a 

XW 

19b 

aft + ft 

309* 

0b UnvHU 



628 

Uft 

18b 

18b— ft 

U 

517 UFSBk 



9 

17W 

Mb 

Mb— ft 

7*k 

3b UraeCr 



40 

4to 

Aft 

4ft 

AW 

2b Uscole 

Jie 15 

423 

Aik 

s'* 

6 

| 




V 



"1 

99k 

4b VLI 



Ml 

7b 

7 

7ft— Ik 

i7b 

7W VLSI 



383 

13ft 

13W 

139*— ft 

UW 

4b VMX 



37 

Aft 

tb 

Ab — ft 

lib 


JAP U 




Bb— ft 

Xb 




303 

8b 

Bft 

ab 

MM 

7 1 - ValFSL 



26 

17M 

17W 

17ft + to 

4TH. 

22<4 9/alNII 

IX 

19 

336 

42 

41 W 

41ft— b 

40 

XV! VaiLn 

.40 

13 


aw 

23 

BVi + ft 

16W 

Ub Von Dm 

40 

19 

44 

14ft 

14 

M — ft 

ISW 

AW Vanzeii 



a 

Sft 

fl 

8 - • ’« 

A9k 

2b Vcwru 



322 

3b 

3b 

39k- Ik 

28b 

ISW VlwP 

OH 

A 

742 

3*b 

25b 

a + to 

Uto 

SCk VtodpFr 

32e 33 

SM 

[0b 

IDft 


MW 

9ft viking 




lib 



aw 

12 Viral cX 



9 

17b 

Uft 

17b + W 

129k 

699 Vodovl 



IAS 

10b 

10ft 

109k- 9* 

32 

14W VaHMl 



4 

Uft 

It 

I6to — 9* 

j W 1 


25W 

16ft 

Uft 

25W 

2oV* 

I6W 

9ft 

14ft 

14M 

171* 

13 

14*4 

23W 

16 

31 W 
69* 
12b* 
46 ft 
159* 
17M 
109. 

aw 

0M 

34W 

219* 

59W 

W* 

31W 

12 

94W 

»M 

43M 

2BW 

1336 

an* 

12ft 

14ft 


19b WD 40 

M 

M 

7« 

X 

10b 

9W WalbCJ 

34 

IJ 

78 

14 

13to 

4b wikrTei 



157 

8b 

Bft 

14 WkhE 

1.76 

7J 

432 

22b 

22b 

IOW WFSL J 

80 

24 

954 

2* ft 

24b 

8<k WMSB 



770 

MM 

137k 

5b Wave Ik 



94 

4b 

Aft 

BM webas 

80 

X3 

69 

12b 

12b 

A WestFn 



49 

14b 

14ft 

Jto WJ7FSJL 



142 

17b 

17b 

5b WMUTe 



3 

8ft 

8to 

3b W1TIAI 



115 

13ft 

12W 

15ft wmarc 

.40 

JJ 

51 

17ft 

17b 

4b WHtvCs 



34 

IS 

14ft 

19ft wettro 

00 

2.9 

207 

31b 

Xb 

lb Wlcat 



1521 

Sft 

5b 

AM wtdcom 



745 

12ft 

12 

aw Wlllml 

185 

X7 

AX 

45 

44b 

79k WHIM. 



229 

14 

■3b 

tb wmiSn 



1 

Uft 

Uft 

69* WllmF 



45 

TVk 

6b 

49* windmr 

J7 

u 

152 

Sft 

Sft 

Sft wtnnEn 



35 

7b 

7b 

UMi wisarO 

80 

Ia 

n 

17 

Ub 

12W woodhd 

80 

45 

73 

13ft 

13 

189k Wortne 

84 

72 

720 

28ft 

aw 

4b writer 

■ISe 

1.0 

6 

8ft 

8 

21b Wvmon 

JO 

XO 

171 

77 

»w 

3b xeb*c 



244 

3 

3b 

5b Xkot 



IX 

8b 

Bft 

10% Xkhr* 



846 

14ft 

Ub 

239k YtowFt 

IJ0 

SJ 

1581 

43b 

43ft 

49* ZenLbi 

9W ilea let 

88a 

4JJ 

1180 

5 

aw 

12 

27b 

1* 

20. ZkmUf 

Ua 

Xs 

1 

37 

■8 

39 

2 to zitei 
3b zivad 

6ft Zandvn 

J8I 

.7 

220 

118 

483 

an 

Sft 

Uft 

9ft 

4b 

u 


» + L'a 

Uft - to 
6'* 

3J1*- to 
2496— ft 

raw- j* 

Aft — 
12 ft— ft 
14>4 

>7M 

lft 

um + v* 
in* 

>5 + ft 
309. — V* 
,5** + ft 
13V* + W 

44to— * 
14 

■Aft- W 
at— 9* 
5M— V* 
79. 

16ft 

13ft- ft 
saw — w 

asw- w 

Swift 

14-9* 
439*— ft 
to*** 

30 

29*_9* 
5 — ft 
WM + f? 


; j „• l 



















Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


walking rmm the I 1 
WOODS NEAR THE GOLF 
COURSE LOOKING FOR 
LOST BALLS TO SELL.. 



DtD YOU MAKE A I 

Any money? J | 


JUST ENOUGH TO 
PAY FOR THE 
POISON OAK SHOTS! 



!}BLa**X! ) iwi r you KNOww iene uiaJCKny. weve been a, 

70 FIND ME/ H!hv»3USH this before 


ACROSS 

1 Followers of 
bees 

5 Roll dice 

16 Moby Dick’s 
pursuer 

14 Senator Gam's 
state 

15 Capital or 
Majorca 

16 Valley 

17 Attract 

18 Persian 

16 Chester 

Arthur (No. 21) 

26 No. 13 

23 Liberate 

24 More! 

25 "Bali " 

28 A gland 

31 Cheer ' 

34 Charm or cash 

36 N.R.A. 
member's 
need 

37 Buddhist 

church, in 
Japan 

38 No. 25 

42 Dutch cheese 

43 Prevaricate 

44 Ship of 

45 Ecole 

Beaux- Arts. 
Paris 

44 Purplish red 

49 Affirmative 
reply 


56 Fruit drink 
51 Type of brandy 
53 No. 22 or 24 

61 Egyptian river 

62 Craftiness 

63 Love, in 
Madrid 

64 In the distance 

65 sanctum 

68 Network of 

nerves 

67 Portable 
shelter 

68 Tilts 

66 Was aware of 


1 Grass stem 

2 Needlecase 

3 James 

Carter (No. 39) 

4 Ledge 

5 Extended 
upward 

6 Not so easy 

7 King of 
Norway 

8 Kind of bus 

9 Football 
position 

10No.2or6 

11 Aureola 

12 Having wings 

13 Well, in Milano 

21 Hindu lamp 
rite 

22 Diamond 

25 Hemmed and 


26 Playwright’s 

pkjy 

27 Spanish land 
areas 

29 Gantry or 
Fudd 

36 Managua is its 
cap. 

31 Kind of race 

32 Mountain crest 

33 No. 19 

35 Yale campus 
tree 

37 Explosive, tor 
short 

39 Averse (to) 

49 Prefix with 
East 

41 French river 

44 Sappho 
creation 

47 Fluffy fare 

48 Rescuers 

59 Tum away 

52 Herbert 

Hoover (No. 

31) 

53 Picnic pest 

54 Abundant 

55 Pearl Bock 
heroine 

54 Panamanian 

_ native 

57 Dancer Bam hi 

58 Prayer ending 

59 Memo 

69 Sketched 



r p\fT\^ 





m 





f \! 


BEETLE BAILEY 

?or, THIS is ]@Ld 
MV Slippy 
BEETLE JTl B 


HCWDY, 

SON 


REAPY FOR A 
LITTLE HARP 
WORK? 


34 

k^T/TTvv 


THAT'S THE 
ANSWER I 
ALWAYS 

get y 




SP 



Q— 


ANDY CAPP 

7 DtDNOU GET DOWN 
l T O WRITI NG THAT r-> 
X LETTER, FLO?V 


ANDY— ASKING 
HlMTDCOVtE-^ 

BacktonouT 


7 I WAS TOO ^ 
[BUSY AGAIN, 
►* RUBE.'iOU -< 
KNOW HOW IT !S 






I CltM mi; Mt—rttaM—pwa. LM 
pin at H— fcWM«|WWH 

WIZARD of ID 


©Wm York Time*, edited by Eugote Malabo. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



GIVE UP! 

mwmm 

supfduhpepi 


r\ ittz 

mjCM' 

T&tWH 


jHBfc. 

\m&!. 


IW15H 
i <mp. 
6o mi 

■m m . 




P,o 


I DECIDED TO SPEND MY WHATS A RESEWAT10N2 
VACATION OVER HERE 
THIS YEAR." 


THAT SCRAIIBLB) WORD GAME 
• by Hand AmoM and Bab Lee 


REX MORGAN 


r I'VE SEEM 1 
DEALING WITH f 
YOU FOR OVER A 
SIX MONTHS, 
JACK' MY CREDIT 
tar SHOULD BE ^ 

rT good; 




## 



□ 


Jm 

= 

^-r"r 


SCRRY. CLAUDIA ' I'VE GOT TO MEANWHILE. 

► PAY CA«H WHEN 1 GET THE / AT CLAUDIA'S 
STUFF — AND MY CUSTOMERS OFFICE- , 

HAVE TO FAY CASH WHEN 1 DELIVER CT|WK§K 


f YES, Miss GALE ' I'LL X, 
HAVE MRS. BISHOP CALL 
YOU AS SOON AS SHE 
GETS INI I'M EXPECTING 
^ HE R ABOUT ONE««« 
O'CLOCK' JC 8 




GARFIELD _ 

1 1 KNEW A POG WHO WAS SO 
{gf OGLV,HE HAPTO... J 


Unscramble these four Jimbtes, 
one tetter to each aquare. to torni 
tour onfnary words. 


GANYM 




BOOKS 


THE HOUSE OF MTTFOBD 

By Jonathan Guinness. With Catherine 
Guinness. 604 pages. $22.95. 

Viking Penguin Ina, 40 West 23d Street, 
New York, N.Y. 10010 

Reviewed by Victoria Glendinning 

T HIS IS an urbane family saga far those 
who belong to what Jonathan Guinness 
calls “the talking classes.” The Mitford- girls 
have been talked about virtually since Nancy, 
the eldest, was bom in 1904; she became a 
novelist and a francophile. Diana married the 
fascist Sr Oswald Mosley, and Unity idolized 
Adolf Hitler; Jessica became passionately left- 
ist Pam and Debo opted out of notoriety, 
(bough Debo is distinguished as the Duchess of 

fV wwghire and rimtelaiiig nf ChatSWOTth. 

There is a biography of Unity, and a life of 
Nancy by Selina Hastings is m preparation. 
Nancy’s autobiographical novels and the mem- 
oirs of several other sisters have contributed to 
the Mitford mythology and the Mitford indus- 
try, to which “The House of Mitford" is a hefty 
addition. Jonathan Guinness is the son of Lady 
Diana Mosley’s first marriage, and his dangh- 
ter Catherine has helped him with the research. 

He is at pains to point out that he is taking 
the Mitford story seriously; the society gossip- 
cohimn way in which their activities have been 
chronicled (there has even been a musical) has 
trivialized them. His book begins with extesd- 
thets — Bertie 


Mitford, landowner, man be of ParUamt 
and the first Lord Redesdale, and Tins 
Gibson Bowles, magazine proprietor, si 
and practical joker. More than MO pager 
family history must be faced before the j 
Mitford girls and their brother. Tom, m 
thdr appearances. 

Elsewhere, however, the author playfully i 
fleets the reader from the serious approadi ti 


ed studies of the two 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


BEDE 3130013 E300 
EDEQ □□□□□ □□□ 
EDSEDSEIDQQD □□□ 
□Baa naanas 
□□□ aaa anaano 
□□Bsaa nanan 
EJGEJDD Z3DSD 0300 

□□□ns naa odbcis 
oboe aaaa ebhbb 
□□□□□ EBBOBa 
EBE3B3 Boa QB3 
□EBEBB BBBB 

□oe BcaaacaoBaaEia 

BEE 00300 EEBB 
EBB BBE3BB BBEB 


he himself has proposed; “The trouble is th&j& 
number of rather solemn people have fo ag -[~ 
occasion to unite about the Mitfords,” fiK - - 
nanratrve is desoleranized by quotations fedfe' 
poets, personal asides about Paris traffic atifj 
modem archi secure, and facetious ref erea* 
to grave events, such as “a bit of bother*^ 
Hungary in 1956. . W' 

Jessica, a prominent leftist writer, is thcoo^ 
surviving Mitford sister who did not mnpiw. 
with the Guinnesses for this book. Guinnett^. 
on the far right of the British ConservatSfe- 
party, and while be gives due weight totyn) 
variety of Mitford political attitude, a con® 
scending note is discernible on the subject g. 
leftist “waffle." And when Diana fell m k»e 
with Oswald Mosley, both the mas and lair 
ideas, “it was the passion oT Juliet and at the 
cwui time it was the conversion of Si Paid”— 
adnine analogies to apply to a married woman 
with two children, falling for the leader of the.: 
British Fascists. i 

Not unfairly. Guinness claims that here “we 
have to picture Fascism not as it appears today 
but as it appeared in 1933.” In any case, Diaat 
and Unity (“I want everyone to know that I ur- 
a Jew hater”) stuck to Hitler in the yean tint 2 
followed; Diana's wedding reception after berT 
marriage to Mosley was in Goebbds’s homer 
Unity's extremism was on the grand scale 
combines moral idiocy with tragedy: On the 
outbreak of war, she made a suicide attempt ' 
that left her brain-damaged. a . v > 

Guinness crowns his discussion of this tfjfc* 
easy topic bv drawing a distinction bowed*.. , 
Mosleys “hostility to the Jews." a ppar e n tly oik ’ 
political grounds, and Hitler’s “anti-Seot-_ 
tism”: there was a “vital difference" betweed'-' 
Mosley and Hitler which it is “ooly fair 
acknowledge, he says: “For Hitler, a Jew, hoif 
ever well-intentioned, could never fully re- 
nounce his Jewishness. For Mosley be could do 
so.” Words fail me. 

Victoria Glendinning has written biogrtwhies 
of Edith Sitwell and Elizabeth Bowen ana is at 
work on a biography of Rebecca West She wrote - 
this review for The Washington Post 



By Robert Byrne 

D IMITRI London, a 22- 
year-old master, and Joel 
Ben jamin, a 21 -year-old inter- 
national master, both of Brook- 
lyn, and Yehuda Gruenfdd, a 
29-year-old Israeli grandmas- 
ter, tied for first in & Brook- 
lyn College Open. Each scored 
3 14-14 in the four-round, 34- 
p layer Swiss-system tourney. 

Sharing fourth place were 
the Brooklyn grandmaster 
Dmitry Gurevich, the Queens 
international master Marini 
DIugy and Jay Bonin of 
Queens. Each taffiwri 3-1. 

London defeated DIugy in a 

mating attarfr of wOd abandon 
in the third round. 

Two traps that every player 
of the Caro- Kami classical 
variation must know are: 
1 ... B-K2?; 8 NxBP!, KxN; 9 
QxPch. K-N3. 10 B-Q3cb, K- 
R4; 1 1 Q-R3mate and 
8 . . . QxP?; 9 N/1-B3, Q-Q4 
(9 . . .ft-N5ch? loses a piece to 
10P-B3, BxPch; 11 K-Bl!); 10 
N-K5!, QxNP; 1 1 R-Bl. B-K2; 
12 N/K5-B3!, Q-N5; 13 
NxKBP! with a powerful at- 
tack. 

Dingy, who is a connoisseur 
of the Caro-Karm, chose what 
may be Black’s best defensive 
method — 12 ...NxN; 13 
NxN, 0-0; 14 B-Q2, Q-Q4. In- 
deed, a violent atteorot to at- 
tack with 15 0-0-0, QxRP; 16 P- 
QB3 has been seen, but the 
Queens grandmaster Leonid 
Shamkovtch has cast doubt on 


CHESS 


White's adventure with his sug- 
gestion of 16 ... N-Q4J7 
DIugy would have been 
ready for that, but not, after 15 
0-0, B-Q5, for London's specu- 
lative gambit with 16 B-KB4!? 
(rather than the ineffectual 16 
N-B4). 

Shamkovich suggests that 
defense by 17 . . . QxP could be 
defeated by 18 P-QB3, Q-R5; 
19 B-Q2, N-Q4; 20 Q-R5. NxP; 
21 BxP!, N-K7cfa; 22 K-RI. 
BxN; 23 BxP! 

DIugy could afford to play 
!7 ..TdxN, since 18 B-R7chf. 
KxB; 19 RxQ. BxB yields Black 
three pieces plus a pawn for his 
queen. 

On 19 . . . N-Q2. London cut 
loose with 20 BxP! which led to 
a delirium of attacking compli- 
cations. 

After 22 Q-R4. defense by 

22 . . . Q-N3ch; 23 K-Rl, P-K4 
would fail against 24 PxP, P-B4 
(24... NxP?; 25 R-B6!): 25 
PxPe.p„ RxP; 26 Q-K4, N-Bl; 
27 Q-K5, N-Q2; 28 Q-K8ch. K- 
N2; 29 Q-7ch. K-Nl; 30 B- 
B4ch, K-Rl, 31 Q-KBch. N-Bl; 
32 RxR, QxR; 33 R-KB1. 

After 23 R-B3, White could 
have defeated 23 . . . Q-B4ch; 
24 K-Rl, P-B4 by 25 R-N3ch. 
K-R2;26 Q-N4, Q-K2;27 Q- 
N6ch, K-Rl; 28 QxPch. Q-R2; 
29 QxP. N-B3; 30 Q-Q6, Q- 
KB2; 31 B-B4! 

In any event, DIugy tried 

23 . . . R-Rl?, letting the white 
attack come on with 24 P-B5! 

After 25 K-Rl, DIugy could 
not have saved himself by 

25 . . . P-K4 since 26 Q-K7!, Q- 


tmjoi 


a[;:;:as Mb 

\m Egg m affi 

leaoOM/wMTC t/mm 
PosMoa aftar X7 ... BxB 


KB3; 27 R-N3ch, K-R2; 28 B- 
K4!. R-KNi (28 . . . QxQ?; 29 
P-B6mate); 29 RxN, QxQ; 30 
RxQ. RxR; 31 P-B6ch>. K-Rl 
(31 . . . R-N3?: 32 RxPch); 32 
PxR. B-K3; 33 RxNp gives 
White a winning ending 
On 26 BxP, an attempted de- 
fense with 26 . . . Q-KB3 could 
be refuted by 27 Q-N3ch. Q- 
N4; 28 Q-Q6. for example. 

28.. . N-B3;29R/l-KBl!(bu! 
not 29 R-KN3?. BxB; 30 
RxQch. PxR; 31 Q-K5. KR- 
QI!: 32 R-KBI. R-Q4 wins fw 
Black). 

DIugy'* defense with 

26 . . . R-Kl was based on the 
point that While could not play 

27 BxN. BxB: 28 RxB because • 

28 ... Q-N8ch would force 
mate. But he bad not reckoned 
with London's annihilating 
rook sacrifice. 28 RxPch! 

After 32 Q-B3ch. Dingy 
could not evade 32 . . . K-K3; 

33 Q-B7ch. K-K4; 34 R-Q5ch, 
K-K5; 35 Q-B3mate. so be gave 
up. 


- 
























- *«-hV 'I't,;, .'mi . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 


Page 17 




SPORTS 


• - - • 




am 


^tSHb* 


A ni > 

f ; *■""* lodJ^ 

'air. S'5= • fn ." i PP e an*fc 

zzz^z. i ,u,ude s 




-V* 


eJ* 


’^V' A’^v* t! ’ 


-lC'*— t.~^“ 


'.,»v .. . . 

ii-'- " 


vSJr: *hv: .• i - . 7®% 

hcM^.--F fHia'SJS: 

L - ' '* J -> KCOlijt 



•'J-.iL, r * • - 
*'.’ i. ;_ 
f'-rv. :. ;• : 
- 7>-- ^ .,v.: 


!I 

Ai 


: taw 

■•■ -'•■••'' Siitas 


Catcher Mike Stiostia was knocked cold (and suffered a irald coocnsskn) when Cardinal 
iMScranner Jade Dark came in high and bird on W3Be McGee’s first-imriiig Ht on Sunday. 


-i-r* 


IARD 


Baseball 


Major League Leaders 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pet. 

Brail KX. 

84 

301 

55 108 

JS9 

HHundoraun N.Y. 

75 

390 

78 

103 

ass 

Boom Boo. 

90 

355 

SO 

121 

J<1 

Locy BeL 

59 

299 

38 

85 

JX 

P.BTDdtov Sea. 

90 

362 

SI 

113 

311 

Cooper MIL 

84 

342 

« 

106 

310 

WMlater DcL 

85 

348 

65 

108 

JW 

AVrtllnotv N.Y. 

37 

353 

« 

109 

309 

Gedman Bos. 

84 

277 

« 

85 

J07 

Molltor MIL 

86 

345 

63 

106 

307 

teas: R. Henderson. New Yortc.71; R token, 


t*» :;c.- j.-.« r. m~' 


K H ’ ." :■■■ 

<■*:)■.■•■ . - 

fi r ■ - 

‘A--: . -■ 

t.r I. r 


! i',-. 


.• "i - >' 

• -. • ‘sr- 


BoltlamTR; wnitokor, Mtroft, 66; MoUtor. 
Milwaukee. 63; Wilson, Konioa City. 61. 

Mia; Mntltnolv. Haw York. 76; K-Gttaon, 
Detroit, 65; Brelt Koran Cltv.C); E. Murray. 
Baltimore, 63; Baylor. New York. H; RMn 
Baltimore. 63- 

Hlta: Boons. Boston, hi; Wltoa Kansas 
afy, l!4; p. Bradley. Seattle. 113; Butltr, 
Ctovetond. IM; Mattingly. Now York. 109- 
DmMH: MOWOPIV. NOW York. Tfi Boon. 
Boston, M.- Buctuvr, Boston, 34; Owner, Ml l- 
woutMm, 23; G. Walter, Chtcoao. Hi Goottl. 
Mlonwota. 21; MomOv, Toronto, 21. 
TVMa: Wihon. Kanos a tv. 13; Puckett 


Major League Sta ndi ng s 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet- GB 

Toronto 55 B 598 — 

Now York 52 37 JM m 

Detroit 49 40 551 4to 

Baltimore 46 43 -517 7to 

Boston 47 44 -51* 7» 

Milwaukee » 49 .443 14 

Cleveland 2» 61 J22 25 

wool envision 

California 54 37 J9J — 

Oakland 48 43 -527 6 ‘ 

Chicago 45 43 .511 TVS 

Ksn env 46 44 .511 71b 

Seattle 44 47 484 10 

Minnesota 41 48 Mil 12 

Texas 35 57 280 19Vl 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 


.-to 

-- 7 



w 

L 

Pei. 

GB 

SL Louts 

S3 

36 

596 

— 

New York 

53 

37 

589 

*4 

Montreal 

52 

40 

565 

2VS 

Chicago 

47 

43 

523 

6V* 

PtiUodeletaa 

39 

51 

A33 

UVs i 

Ptttsfauroti 

30 99 
Wat Dhrtolaa * 

333 

33 

Lm AnoetoS 

51 

38 

573 

— 

Sen Diego 

53 

40 

565 

to 

dnchmatl 

46 

43 

517 

S 

Hourtan 

44 

48 

xn 

8to 

Ulan to 

48 

50 

444 

llto 

fcxi Frandseo 

35 

57 

580 

17» 


Minnesota, 9; Butlsr. Cleveland. I; Cooper, 
Milwaukee. 8: 5 AM wltti S. 

Homo Rom: Ftafc, Chicago, 25; Ktagmoiu 
Oakland, 21; Pr»si»v. Seattle, 21; Bntnonskv, 
Minnesota. 19: iLGitaoan, Detroit. 19. 

3Wm Bsns: R. Henderson. Now York. 42; 
Pattts. California, 30; Butior. dovalaNL 29; 
WUson. Kansas Cttv. 27; Col Una. Oakland, 25. 
PITCHING 

VMpLost/wlankia pet/ERA: Goidry. 
New York.1M, JIX3J1 ; Blrtsax.Oaidan(Lfr-Z 
JS0M6! Romankk. Cal MnrtUa 11-4,233.321; 
Cowlev. New York. B-X J27. 324: J. HowetL 
Oakland. 8X 727. 1.77. 

Itmwols: Morris. DetratL 1U; Blvtovsn. 
ClevetondL 115; FBamdstar, CMcaoa 187: 
Wilt. Cal Horn to. 103; Boyd, Boston, WL 
Savws: D. Moore. CatHomla 19; Hernandez. 
Detroit, 19; j-HowsIL Oakland, 19; Qutswi- 
borrr. Kansas Clfy, If; AJesmCNcaMB; 
Rlohatti, Now York. ». 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

O AB R H PCL 
McGee «U_ 83 322 57 IW 21* 

Harr SCI. SB 330 52 189 238 

Guerrero LA B 293 -34 *1 311- 

Gwytm SJJ. 87 357 48 107 200 

Parker Cln. 89 351 46 IBS 219 

Mare land CM. 89 337 38 94 297 

Raines Man. 86 331 S3 98 296 

TnnpMnIJ). M 386 34 89 293 

VtnXI PML 78 254 2« 75 293 

Oerter On. 80 274 XI 10 292 

Hsus: Murotiy. Artanto, 49; Coiomon. 
St. Loots, 65; RobtOA Montreal. 43; Sandbars. 
CMcaan, 40; Samuel, PMadsMila. 58. 

RBIs: Murphy. Atlanta. 72; Herr, 3L Louis. 
70; X Clark. Bt. Louis, 65; Parker. OncbmalL 
45; G. Wilson. PhlladoWtlQ, 64. 

Hits: Herr. ». Louis. 109; McGos,SLLnils. 
109; Gwymv Son Dlsaa, W7; Parker, Cincin- 
nati. US; Samusi, PWtodewvkv 102. 

DsaWss: Woiktch. MontrsaL M; Harr. 
SL Louis. 23; J. Clark. SLLout* 31; Modtock. 
Ptttrtturwi. 21; Porter. andnootL 21; Tem- 
Phrfwv Son OfcHXk 21. 

Triples: McGra-St. LouH.ll; Raines. Mon- 
treal. 8; SamusL Phlkxlelpnla 7; Coleman, 
St. Louis. 4; Gladden. Sam Francisco, 6. 

Home Rom: Murehv. Atlanta. 24; Guerre- 
ro, Los Anaeioo. 21; J.dork, SL Louis. 18; 
Parfcsr. Cmdnnati, 17; Horner. Atlanta. 14. 

stoteo Bases: Coieman. St. Louis. 45; 
McGee. Si. Louis. 37; Ralmrt. 66ontroaL'34; 
Lanes. CMcaoa. 33: Rodos. OndimcdL 33. 
PITCHING 

Woa-Lort/WtaBlM Pdf 7 ERA: Franco, 
ORdnnoN. 8-1. 289. 1 JO: Hawkins. San Oiaae. 
12-1 257. 116; Dorilne. New York. l»X 223, 
342; Gooden. New York. UX22A 127; Reuv 
cttoL Plttshuroh, H 200. 225 
strikeouts: Gooden. New York, 157; Rim. 
Houston. 132; Seta. OndnnatL 129; Votan- 
zuoia Las AnootiB, 12B: J. DeLeon, Pltts- 
tJUrPtt, 11A 

Saves: Reardon, MontrsaL 23; U*. Smith, 
cnicaga 21; Gossoon. Son Dleoa, 20; Power, 
Ctndimalf. 17; Sutter. Atlanta, 14 


*C V-- • 
.7 -r-r 
X '-I ' 
-c - 
»:• k •- 1 
M - 


Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


•< 16 


a . • 

• « vx 

— k 


K 1 • -■»* • 

** , t 

I . _ “ 

e- x •no. A <! . 

. ;■ *. W J! 

■ r • . • A > 1 - ^ 

X k. 


S' « • *iS 5(£ 


> r« AMERICAN LEAGUE 

> Otetond 100 W1 001— 4 M 1 

2 ; TSnxdS 400 809 J2X— 17 15 8 

r, 1 Krusosr, Atnertan (7). Young (71. Mura (8) 
5 i. tart Tetttetan; Clmtcv, Luma tSl.Lovallo MJ. 

Cmsdtii <91 and Allenien. w— Lama, *a L— 
V Kraessr. 7-9. HR-OaUond. Collins (3). 

1 , Tom 084 aoo ora— 7 is 8 

•••. ! A Detroit 111 OT 868— S 7 2 

: ■ * ' ' Cook, Notes (Aj, ScttmWt 18) and Potralll; 
' ' ■“ Twwll Scherror m, Lopez (91 and Melvin, 
v, S . W— SctwnldL 4.3. L — Lood. 1-6. H Re— Texas. 
T. K, Tolioson n». Detroit Gibson <191. 

: ■ .. Kansas OTy 380 800 208-4 8 0 

Ji . ! tetamera Oil 800 20B-6 7 1 

■■s ? Block. LxtCoss 17) and Sundbera; DMar- 
■ n tktsi, TjwarHiwx (7).Aase (B) and Dempmv. 

W-Tjwortfnm. 2-2. L-Black. 6-1 T. Sv-Aase 
i, . W>H fc -Kans as CHv. Bra It (141. Boltlmoro. 
;is? ’'mg (Ml. 

:? y < MH oral u S2S ON 020-4 18 

l t. Btalm 480 SX1 1SN— 8 12 

£ I, iJNetOHnonia (5). tandtoa island Boone; 

Nttesr. Crawtord (8), Stcntav «) and God- 
; Wta w-«lpp«r. 48. L-L«w. >Z W-NJp- 

•' **■. *4, L— Luga, H HRs— CaUtornta, Jack- 

j ** IM). Boston. Evans 111). Gedmsi 17). 

: • > N*w York 181 8M 018-5 9 0 

: .£ > Mh o HI DlU 808 888 018-2 7 3 

. NtokramdHaoov;Vfofo£utanJa(8)cBtd 
’ ■. SMos w— Nlokra. 98. L-VWa 1D4L HRS— 

- t tew York. WktHM 113). Mtewsota HrS9* 

; ? 1 :• mi. 

■k . MsMo 208 )H 001 — I 6 0 

1 j MBwoetee XI flat Btte-5 7 B 

f*.’ ;» Wk Vanda Bore (6), Long <81 end Scott. 

: p, Knrney (7>, Burris, Gibson <7) ond Moore. 
w — Bums. 5-7. L— Wills. +< 5v— GUnon 17J. 

; > t MRP-Sfoms. Davts It). Henderson (6). 

. M-. r .Tltomai (ITJ-Mltasiuteo. 1 Yaunt 19), SUnmans 


ptUa. Samuel CM), Schu (1). Wilson (9). dn- 
dnnatL Bltardslta ID, Parker (17). 

Cktcaao tN SM 818-1 9 8 

Son Pnmdseo m 811 Bte-2 7 8 

GunbSorenssn (8) and Davis; Lostev. Min- 
ion |8) and Bronly. w— Lartcev2N)L L-Gura, 
OX Sv— Minton (3). HR— Bon Frondoes, 
Leonard 170) 

Ptttsbargk 8M 088 883-8 12 • 

Sas Otepa 888 ON BtO-a )B ) 

TumoiLCcsKMeria C7). Guanta (9) and Or, 
tlz; Show. Letforts (7). Thurmond (9) and 
KsMaady.W— TunnelL 1-4. L— Snow, 7-7. HR— 
San Dleoa Martinez (73). 

SL Louts IX (M 180 3—4 8 8 

LOS Angeles BIB NS fW 8—3 18 0 

Kspstilra, Dayter <87. Baevor <9). Lahti (9) 
Horton (18), Faradt (10) and Porter; Rouss. 
Howell (9). Nladsnfuer (18) raid Sdosda 
Yoagor(l).W— UdULVAL— Nledonfusr.AX 
So— Forsch (2). HR— St Lou fa, Braun |1JL 


Transition 


CHICAGO— Plocdd Rudy Urns. ouHWfNr, 
on ttw Uday dtaablod QsL Moved Ron KHilo, 
outfletder, from tti* IS to 2Vday disabled ItsL 
Puratesod am Long. iMsr.fm Buffalo of 
IM Amertcmi AsxcTnHon. 

BASKET BALL 

NOW— I BasteitaH AssodaHon 

INDIANA— IWoaood Jeff Acres, Roy ToL 
berL lum a rd A BObWCterson. Carl NkJaomd 
Stu Primus, guards, mid lyan Dadols. cantor. 

FOOTBALL 
flnltomi Fooittffi 

BUFFALO— Stoned Jim KastalL Ibwbocfc- 
sr, and Mark Travnowtcz. cantor. R o t s ra od 
Robert Curry, nose todde; Mite Edds and 
Cfyde Avmd. wide rac e Ivors, and Darrell 
Warden, linebacker. Placed Craig Whitt. 
wWe receiver, on the oen-focibaji Injury UsL 

CINCINNATI — Stoned Kstth Cnilss,dotan- 
rtvs and; carl Zaidor. Hrafaac te n A n thony 
Tuaale. defenstve badu Tony Demote and 
ErfeStotet toeUm; Keith Ustarand Horaid 
Stanfield, tight ends, and KKn Lsckfln. ran- 
ntobadL- , • 

DENVER— Extandsd the coni mcl X Oorv 
Kubtok. quarterback. Ptaced Scott Rariasn. 
o f f ewsiee llnemmv an waiver*, ptaced Dale 
SwtnQ.o n en s iveHnemBn.cn re s erve re t ir ed 
net. Annaoncad that Stove SewelL rennlnp 
bock, — aaraed to a series X lour one-year 
contracts. 

LA. RAMS— Boned Danny Brodtay.wtds 
recWvsr. 

MIAMI— Stoned Lorenzo Hampton, rvn- 
nlnphpcfc; Mock Mss r s.X l s n sl,s tack Is, ixd 
Lou P a rtey. qu u rtorh ac fc. Read i ed terms 
with Food Rtwete mnxMrter. 

NEW ENGLAND— Aareed to terms with 
Tom Toth, offensive tackle; Gerard Phetan. 
wide receiver; Milford Hodge, deftralw 
todda and Tony Mwntord, rusitno bock, 
stoned From KopppL offensive tackle; Guv 
Morruo, coaler, and Tgny Mumfard, nnnfas 
back. Aiamnced Iho retirement X John Ao- 
chealL llnrtinrltsr 

N.Y. GIANTS— Announced that William 
Roberts Is out for the racoon toaowlna liga- 
ment surgery. Placed Kevin BsKRer. center, 
on In faired rtetrve. 

Philadelphia— C ut Joe 7»iaareft.euor- 
terbadc 

PITTSBURG H S i gn ed Darryl Stow, de- 
fensive and. and Cam Jacobs, linebacker. 

ST.L0UIS— Stoned Louis Wong aad Stoned 
scan Berooia oNeoelve tackle*, and DonnU 
Williams, running bock. 

SEATTLE— Stoned Ran Mottos, offensive 
tackle; Bob Otto, defensive end. and Konl 
KauXti, center. Announced that Deo La 
Boro me. tailback, has IsH training comp. 

TAS4PA BAY Agreed to terms with Stave 
Calabria, quarterback, on a muHtveor con- 
fracL Signed Jim Medea and Ervin Randle. 
Hnsfaocterk. 

WASHINGTON— Aareed to coatrad terms 
with RaebaN awrrv. defensive bock. 

UsMed states r eet hn l l Lengae 

LEAGUE— An nooncad the restoration X 
Jim Byrne, director X communications. 

OAKLAND— Fired GenoEffler.publ Jcrato- 
t tons director; Bill Baker jr-col lego scout log 
director; Gary Ptuchlna assistant general 
m anager; Scott Hefner, trainer, and Lonnie 
Julios, scout 

SAN ANTONIO— Retooled Rick NeuhetooL 
quarterback. 

HOCKEY 

Nattoaei Hockey Lesgae 

MINNESOTA— Announced (he reMremenl 
of Paul Hoi moron, forward. 

PHILADELPHIA— danod Kevin Me Cor- 


Qmpikd by Our Smff Front Disptmha 

NEWYORK — Davcy Johnson, 
a fiend for graph paper and com- 
puter printouts, has the 1985 sea- 
son figured col Tm a firm believ- 
er in the sine curve,” said the 
manager of (he New York M eta. “2 
know that if you have an extended 

BASEBAa ROUNDUP 

down period, you’ll eventually have 
a time when you stay an top for a 
while. We’re on the high side right 

DOW." 

Winners of 15 of their last 17 
games, the Mets thrashed Atlanta 
for the second straight day here 
Sunday, beating the waves by 15- 
10 to remain a half-game back of 
first-place St. Louis in the National 
League East. 

Following an 18-hit, 16-4 blow- 
out on Saturday, New York collect- 
ed 16 hits — every starter had at 
least one — and established a dub 
record by scoring 31 runs over iw 
Bnnyntritif. pntbf 

The team’s baiting average went 
up 12 points, to .242, during the 
weekend. 

“For a while, (here were a lot of 
players hitting twenty or thirty 
points below (heir lifetime aver- 
ages,” observed Johnson. “Now, 
look at thwn They're right where 
they should be. Audit’s not one or 
two guys doing it There’s not one 
gay on (he oaHchib who's not 
swinging the bat wdL And Tm not 
surprised one biL It’s the inevita- 
ble.” 

In the first 73 games of the sea- 
son, the injury-plagued Mets strug- 
gled frith an average of 3.4 runs per 
game. But in their last 17 outings 
they have averaged 11 hits and 7 
runs, evening off at 4 runs a game 
on the year. 

Johnson says that if his team 
averages 42 runs per game from 
here on in, h will have won the 
pennant. “Listen, we scored four 
runs a game last year and came in 
second,” be said. “Well, (his year 
everything’s been going along the 
same way. Except for one thing: 
We have Gary Carter now. And, 
unless my calculation’s off, he 
should n£an at least a point-two to 
our run production." 

Carter, the All-Star catcher, was 
the last New York starter to get a 
hit Sunday. He singled to short in 
the seventh inning and mMraf an 


RBI single in the eighth. George 

in five runs on three 
15th home ran of the year in the 
fifth, a three-run shot to dead cen- 
ter field off reliever Rkk Camp, 
and lined a two-run double in the 
seventh off Terry Foster. 

Atlanta, losing three in the four- 
game series, finished its season se- 
ries with New York at 2-10. 

“We’re just dad to get out of 
'here,” said Atlanta ceaterfiekler 
Dale Murphy, who smashed his 
24tb homer in the sixth off Mets 
starter Terry Leach, 1-0. “It seemed 
like they hit every pitch we threw at 
them the last two days.” 

The Mets jumped on Pascnal Pe- 
rez for two ran* in each of the 
second and third innings before ex- 
ploding for a five-run fifth off Pe- 
rez and Camp. At this point last 
season, Perez was 9-5; Sunday's 
loss pul him at 1-8 with a 632 
caraed-run average, highest of any 
starter in the league. As he left the 
locker room after the game, Perez 
said he was returning to Atlanta. 
The Braves were to open a series in 
Montreal Monday night. 

Rflh 7, Phases 6: In nnrinnari 
Dave Parker’s two-out, two-run 
homer in the seventh sparked the 
Reds to a come-from-behind vic- 
tory. After a single by Pete Rose 
(be now needs 34 hits to break Ty 
Cobb’s career record). Parker ht 
his 17th borne run of the season, 
surpassing his 1984 total by one. 

Astros 5, Expos 4: In Montreal, 
Glenn Davis bomered and drove in 
two runs and left fielder Jos6 Cruz 
made a game-saving catch to rob 
Hubie Brooks of athreonm home 
run in the ninth to help Houston 
end a six-game losing streak. 

Pirates 5, Padres 2: In San Die- 
go, Sammy Khalifa's two-nin dou- 
ble and an RBI single by Junior 
Ortiz keyed a three-nm second that 
carried Pitsburgh past the Padres. 
Lee T nnnell ended a personal 11- 
game losing streak with his first 
victoty since June 2, 1984. 

Giants 2, Cubs 1: In San Francis- 
co, Jeff Leonard bomered and Bill 
Laskey earned bis second straight 
victory after right consecutive de- 
feats to lead the Giants. San Fran- 
cisco took a 1-0 lead off Larry Gura 
with a freak run in the fifth. David 
Green led off with a single and 
went to second on Laskey’s one-om 


sacrifice. Dan Gladden then hit a 
high pop fly to the right ride of the 
infield; first baseman Leon Dur- 
ham and second baseman Sand- 
berg both tost the ball in the sun, 
and the ball dropped for an 85- 
foot. run-scoring single. An inning 
later, Leonard hit his 10th homer of 
the season. 

Cards 4, Dodgers 2: In Los Ange- 
les, pinch-hitter Sieve Braun’s two- 
nin home ran in the 10th beat the 
Dodgers for Sl Louis. Pinch-hitter 

witira double off^^Niedmfilec 
One out later, Braun sent Nicden- 
fuer's 1-0 delivery into the right- 
field seals to enable Jeff Lahti to 
gain his first victory of the year. 

Rangers 7, Tigers & In the 
American League, in Deiroit, 
Wayne Tofleson hit Aurdio Lo- 
pez’s 3-2 slider into the upper deck 
m right Odd for a two-run ninth- 
inning homer that beat the Tigers. 
Tofleson has hit only four home 
runs in his three major league sea- 
sons. the last coming on Aug 17, 
1983. 


Bine Jays Il t A’s 4: In Toronto. 
Jesse Barfield drove in three runs 


on two doubles and a triple to 
spark the Blue Jays' rout of Oak- 
land. Damaso Garda’s two- run 


single triggered a five-run seventh 
that iced the game. Garni a lead- 
off hitter, has a career-high 47 RBIs 
this season. 

Yankees 5. Twins 2: In Minne- 
apolis, Phil Niekro pitched a seven- 
hitter for his 293d career victory. 
Niekro, 46. was trying to surpass 
Satchel Paige and become the old- 
est pitcher ever to throw a major- 
league shutout, but Kent Hrbek hit 
a rwo-nin homer in ibe eighth and 
Niekro had to settle for his third 
complete game of the year. The 
Yankees have won IS of their 18 
games in July. 

Orioles 6, Royals 4: In Balti- 
more, Eddie Murray sliced a bases- 
1 coded seventh-inning double into 
the left-field comer, driving borne 
two runs and breaking a 44 tie. *it 
was a slider that didn’t seem to be 
thrown as bard as the rest,” said 
Murray, 29, of the pitch from Mike 


LaCoss. “My bat may be a hole 
slow non', and they're pitching me 
outside" II was Murray's 89ln ca- 
reer game-winning RBI and his 
seventh of the season. 

Brewers 5, Mariners 4: In Mil- 
waukee. Robin Yount hit a home 
run and drove in three runs and 
Ted Simmons hit a bases-empty 
shot to power the Brewers past Se- 
attle. 

Indians 4, White Sox 3: In Chica- 
go. Tony Beraazanfs bonier in the 
10th made Cleveland a winner for 
the first time in six games. 

Red Sox 8, Angels 4: In Boston, 
Rich Gedman and Bill Buckner 
drove in three runs apiece and 
Wade Boggs mended his hilling 
streak to 24 games — longest in the 
majors this season — with an RBI 
double as the Red Sox bent Califor- 
nia. Reggie Jackson hit his S19th 
career home run for the Angels, 
who loaded the bases with two outs 
in the ninth before reliever Bob 
Stanley got Brain Downing to 
ground oul (AP. UWJ 


Fighter Identified as Escaped Convict 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Sacco Dethrones WBA lidist Hatcher 

CAMPIONE DTTALIA, Italy (AP) — Argentine challenger Ubaldo 
Sacco stopped American Gene neither hr nine rounds here Sunday night 


Tennis 



;*W 

• it - - . . ■ 


to- " .JT: 

«»••* • , .j V* 

■* . lV ; vi 4’ ■ 


i * - * nte olox j MB 418 988 1—4 11 9 

■■ X :* ( Otoooo 888 882 881 8—3 10 8 

; 5 : k \ . Eosfortv (W.TlrtWMO (B) and WU- 
.. <ard;LonxGtaalon{6),S»Mnor(9)aMRsk. 
v • i tW-nnmpun. W L— Srillner, M HR— 
■ .* '■* ■. Oiwiaid, Barae uBrd U). 


y- NATIONAL LEAGUE 

r „ Atlanta 188 M2 427—11 IS 3 

. m 'jfkm Yorfc 821 858 Ox — 15 78 3 

•' , Perm . Camp (Si, Fbratar (7| and Cfcreno; 

teacta Gorman (7),McOowMI (I) 0«l Carter, 
y Rovnotat (7). W-Loadv IX L-Pmx 1-X 
Murpttv 1*4), Harnar m. 
s Wtahlwoto a (IB). Now York, Jatnon (6),Fas- 
‘w ITS). 

! - (i HMrtao Ml 281 8W--5 7 8 

, !■** * Mootroat 888 111 MB-4 7 I 

, . •;' r Sam. Diptno (4), CaOtaun (9), Dimitn (9) 
; , and Boltov; Rtohtor,Sf.Ctalra U),8urte (6). 

, . ■>jjRofaorao Wand flutara W Scc tl , 9X L— 
' : i «! Mahlar - 1*8. S— Smflti (IS). HR— Houston. 
I '■* 'p j.Davl* (3 l MontrsaL Mobstor W). 

T - f‘ ftdtixtotofalu 131 881 2M— 6 11 ■ 

1 — :-?rOnrtoooH Ml 282 MW ft 4 

v;.; ?*. Danny, Carman (7) and DtdL Wu(l (8): 
‘• 4 PrictoStaugr (3),8ucto»«i(6L Franco (7). 

..r* PtowrWmxailonioltoiW— FraacxW.l^- 
' v CormotvTX Sv P o«gr(17).HIta— PBUodot- 


Tour de France Winners 

wtanrasXtfaeTterds FraaafaievflBB ran 
KM world war II: 

1947: Jean Rablb Franco 
1948: Gtno BartalL ItXv 
19*9: Faurto CWP*. 

I95D: Fenflnand KuMor, SwKarfmid 
1951: Hugo Kabtot Swttxortand 
1*52: Faustn CoppL Itatv 
1953: Loatoan BalieL Franco 
1954: Louisan Sabot. Franco 
1955: Lmdson Babst, Franco 
1956: Roger Walkowlok. FRonc* 

1957: jaoquos AnauXtf. France 
1958; Cnortv GouL Luxombourg 
1959; PoderKo Bahatnontos, Sooln 
I9M; Oastono Hrtdnl Italy 
1961: Jocauoa Anquotil, Fraw 
1912: Jacques AnauettL Franco 
1W3: Jaeauas AnquetlL Franco 
1964: Jocquss AnauettL France 
IMS: Police ClmondL Italy 
I960: Luden Ahnar, Franc* 

HH7: Roger Pfngoon. France 
1908: Jon Janaseiv Haltond 
1969: Eddy Merckx. Belgium 
(978: Eddy Merckx. Belgium 
1971: Eddy Merckx Beta tarn 
1972: Eddr Merckx, Belgium 
1973: mfe Game, Spoilt 
1974: Eddv Merckx Bafgfcm 
1975: Bernard Thmnat Franca 
1*76: LucMi Van Imaa, BafXum 
1977: Bernard Ttrewanet, Franco 
1978: Bemara HinaXL France 
1979; Bemara Hlncutt. France 
1«H: Joop Zootomata. Holland 
7981: Bornara HkwuTL Franco 
1982: Berated HlnoX), From 
1183: Laurent Finnan, Franco 
1984: Laurent Ftonen, Franco 
1985: Ba raonl Hinault, Franco 


WOMEN 

(in Newport, Rhodo (stand! 

axis Evert Ltovd (1), OS, deL Gigl Fer- 
nandez. U5L 6-L 6-1 
Eva pfaft. Wort Germany, dot. Belinda 
Owdwett, New Zealand, 1-4 6X 
Pan Shrtver I2L U J- dot Leofa AitlonoaJlk 
VIA, 44. 6X 

Wendy TuntawH (3), Australia, dsL Etta*, 
both Smylto (7), Asutrolta, 4-7 (M), 6-1 
S om W oeli 
E ran dot Ptaft 74. 4-1 
Shrtvte (ML ttenbulL 6-L 7-4 (7-2). 

FtaX 

Evert dot. Shrtvgr. 6X 4-1. 


Jimmy Qwnor3(l).UJe dot. Jataft H tax*. 
Swftzortana 4X 6-4. 

Yannick Need (3), Francs, dot Aaron. 
KifcteMn (5), US. 6X44. 

Mtethi Jaltoh ArgordtaadM. Pafato Aitowl 
P eru, 6X6X 

Marceto inaorama, Argent in a, del GuIJ- 
torma VUos. Argentina. 6-1, 64. 

S M EM i 

Martin del tagoramo. 64, 5X M. 

Noah del Canon, 44. 34. « 


was bltyding freely from a cut uearhis kf 1 eye when referee Ernesto 
Magana of Mexico halted the bout at 1:28 of the ninth. 

Sacco opened the cut it the outer corner of Hatchers eye in the fifth 
round, when two quick up p a c uts put the champion on one kneeit was 
tiie first fight for both men since Hatcher beat Sacco in a 15-round 
dedson last December. 

Sacco, 29, raised his lifetime record to 47-3-1 (23 knockouts); Hatcher. 
26. fell to 23-3 (17 knockouts). 

Baring’s John Henry Is Retired at 10 

INGLEWOOD, California (AP) — Win Hairy, the world's all-time 
leading thoroughbred money-earner, has been retired from racing, Holly- 
wood Park track officials announced Sunday. 

“The time has come,” said owner Sam Rubin. “He’s touched the lives 
of a lot of people around the country, and we know all his fans want to 
remember mm as a daampion. None ctf os would want the risk of his being 
injured or breaking down in a race He’s been too good to all of ns.” 

The 10-year-old griding, who was to have made his 1985 debut here 
Sunday in the Underwood Handicap, recently developed a Sling in his 
right fondeg. John Heniy was twice none of the year and won five other 
Ecfipse awards. IBs lifetime earnings are $6^97,947 from 39 victories and 
23 other top-three finishes. 

FISA Seeks Lower Formula 1 Speeds 

SH.VERSTONE. England (UPI) — Auto racing’s governing body 
plans to impose new regulations that would reduce the speed of Formula 
1 cars, it. was announced Sunday. 

“It is very important that we take measures immediately to introduce 
new technical regulations to limit engine power and reduce speeds," said 
Jean Marie Balestrc, president of FISA. He added (hat the new regula- 
tions would be aimed at insuring “the safety and the positive develop- 
ment of the sport.” 

Balestre said the group wants to reduce engines from 1500cc to I200cc 
in 1987, a year earlier than planned, and that other technical regulations 
would be imposed on qualifying and turbo-charged engines. His com- 
ments followed a public threat by Ferrari to leave Farmnla 1 racing if 
“sporting and technical rules” were “not sufficiently guaranteed.” 

For the Record 

Three-time champioq Chechoslovakia will host the 19S6 Federation 
Cup women’s team competition in the week beginning July 21, the 
International Tennis Federation announced Monday in Lo n don. (UPI) 

Rick Sayre of the United States won Sunday's San Francisco Mara- 
thon in 2 boors, 15 minutes and 8 seconds. (UPI) 


By Mi chad Katz 

.Vnv York Times Strme 

NORFOLK, Virginia — Mike 
Blumberg, his 7 1 -year-old manag- 
er. said he was “dumbfounded” 
when he learned that his 27-year- 
old boxer, Roberto Medina, a man 
he knew as “a real friend, just like a 
son,” was in reality a 29-year-old 
escaped convict named John E 
Garcia. 

Kathy Graham, the fighter’s 
friend from St Petersburg, Florida, 
knew, and she said on Monday that 
so did another woman, who Gra- 
ham believes alerted the authorities 
about him. 

Garda, arrested 61 times in the 
Denver area, escaped from the Col- 
orado Slate Penitentiary in Canon 
City on June 25. 1982, moved to St. 
Petersburg and began a career as a 
professional borer. That career ap- 
parently ended Saturday after be 
somehow stood up to a six-round 
battering from Meldrick Taylor, 
one of four 1984 Olympic boxing 
stars who fought on a card here. 

Garda had a rough day. Compu- 
Box counted 408 punches landed 
by the Olympic featherweight 
champion. Somehow, he remained 
upright throughout the six rounds. 

Escorted to his dressing room by 
a dozen Norfolk poheemes. Garda 
was allowed to shower and change 
and then was handcuffed. He is 
being held without bond pending a 
bearing on his extradition to Colo- 
rado. 

Graham, who is 26 years old and 
works in a Sl Petersburg kennel 
was introduced to him by another 
boxer about two years ago. she said 
Monday nwnnng after she came 
bade from the jati. her ryes red. 

“They’re treating him real nice;*’ 
she reported. “I saw him last night, 
but today they said Saturday was 
the only visiting day.” 

She said their relationship was 8 
months old before he told her that 
be was a fugitive. “It was hard to 
believe," die said. “Robert was al- 
ways a gentleman, always soft-spo- 
ken." 

Brad Jacobs, the matchmaker for 
Akssi Promotions in Tampa, for 
whom Medina fought his first 14 
pro fights — he had a 12-1-1 record 
before fighting Taylor — agreed 
with Graham’s assessment 

“He was just an exemplary kid.” 
said Jacobs. “A tiger in the ring and 
the nicest guy you could ever meet 
outride.” 

Using the name Medina. Garda 
apparently lived with-a cousin in 
Sl Petersburg, supporting himself 
as a handyman ana carpenter. 

Graham said the fighter offered 
few details of Ms past, only that he 
grew up in Fresno, California, lived 
for a while in the San Diego area 
and was in trouble in Colorado. 

“I left it at thaL” she said. “I 
didn’t pursue it.” 

According to Dennis Cribari, a 
detective with the Denver police, 
Garcia was a “career crimmaT 
whom he had arrested personally 
several times. Charges included 
theft, auto theft, larceny and as- 
saulL 

Graham said the man she knew 
as the ggntie boxer had told her he 


■ ■ ' * * 4 € ' M 5 









Football 
CFL Standings 




' m : * v -" tr 

L ,■? . - 

[>-' " - - - ■ ' 

' » T . ■ ■ X 




EASTIIIN DtVtSION 

W L T PF PA PIS 


MwfttBl 

3 

0 

9 

77 

48 


Ottawa 

1 

1 

0 

63 

65 


Taranto 

1 

2 

0 

79 

n 


Hamilton 

0 

2 

a 

» 

a 



WESTERN DIVISION 


Brtt cunfa 

3 

0 

B 

Wt 

9 


— 

VVUUUlflPlI 

2 

1 

8 

82 

32 


BrfaMHfsn 

1 

3 


St 

19 


SualwMwnt > 

2 

8 

13 

72 


Catoarv 

0 

2 

0 

9 

61 



s h ' 1 


SUNDAY'S RESULT 

British Columbia 39, Calgary 14 


NO GAIN — A step ahead of the polk*, golfer Peter Jacobsen decided to s 
above, during Stmaay’s f™l round of the British Open. Jacobsen and fe 
Tom Kite bad been fining im their putts on the 18dt green when the stre 
more; after Ids fine operi-lteld; tiadde, Jacobsen acknowledged amused 
cheers from die spectators, right, before calmly putting out for a 72 and a 


<7 


S-i 


r v 


:Md. 








■HWvUitod Asm texmond 

John Garda, left, in custody after Saturday’s light 


served seven years in prison, but 
was on a work-rdease program. 

“One day, he just walked out the 
door and never went back," she 
said. “It wasn’t a Dillinger escape,” 
said the manager, a producer of 
trade shows who met the fighter at 
the Sl Petersburg Gym early in 
1984. 

“I saw him hitting the bag and I 
asked him bow come he hadn't 
turned pro. and he said because no 
cme had asked him." said Blum- 
berg. “I told him, Tm asking you.’ 
We became the greatest friends. 

“I guess it was because wc were 
such good friends that be couldn’t 
tdl me and put mein a position tike 
that I loved him, and I think he 
loved me. 

“He told me about his mother in 
Fresno. His mother kicked him out 
of his bouse when he was 14. She 
got married and she said, 'Roberto, 
this guy don't want you in the 
bouse so you've got to leave.’ A nice 
mother, huh? He catted his mother 
to wish her a Merry Christinas and 
she hung up on him." 

Garcia apparently had no trou- 
ble with the law in Florida. Both 
Graham and Blumberg said they 
believed boring helped straighten 
Garcia out 

“He loves it," said Graham. 
“And be was good at iL The boxing 
gave him something to look for- 
ward to, it gave him respect." 


It seems unlikely that the boring 
on national television got him back 
into custody. Medina had been on 
the USA national cable television 
network “four or five limes,” ac- 
cording to Jacobs. 

ABC was able to squeeze in (be 


squeeze 

bout Saturday after Mark Breland 
scored a first-round knockout and 
PerneD Whitaker did likewise in 
two rounds. 

That television had liule to do 
with the arrest was confirmed by 
Cribari, who said he received an 
anonymous call last week that Gar- 
da was really Medina and would be 
boxing in Norfolk. Graham said 
she believes the call was from an- 
other woman the fighter had met in 
Sl Petersburg. 

The Norfolk police were aimed 
Thursday. But no positive identifi- 
cation could be made, said Ll Cur- 
tis M. Todd Jr. here, until Garda 
look off his robe in the ring and 
exposed three distinct tatoos. 

“We did not know if H was him 
for sure until we saw the tatoos,” 
said Todd. We weren’t about to 
arrest him in the ring." 

Rumors had drculated at ring- 
side during the fight that Medina 
was not his real name and that he 
was a fugitive. Reporters ques- 
tioned him about it in the dressing 
room. 

“I don’t know what you’re talk- 
ing about," the fighter replied. 


'er Peter Jacobsen decided to stop a streaker. 


phee tie. 



•ta-r 

Fto 










“IwlkS 8 -<■»« J3£5JS*JFCEE£5S?mBe?5?!SSratfc Iffl I 

'.? l »’j^''p?*?5& K ^Sfls 5 "SsS$5- a IS9 : sfi , 8g=fl»5HBS¥58RB5swntyaasa^Haa3B#R..s«ft.'t««n.. 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1985 



ILLINOIS POSTCARD 


Wadsworth Lippizaners 

By Michael Cordon 

Reutm 

\L7 ADSWORTH, Illinois — The hoofbeai ballet of graceful Lippi- 
YY zaner horses dances across a dirt riding ring near this village m a 
performance of classical dressage practised only here and at the Imperial 
Spanish Riding School in Vienna. 

Temple Farms, outside Chicago, has one of die largest herds of this 
elegant breed, which originated 
□car Trieste more than 400 years 
ago when the Austrian court im- 
ported horses from Spain to im- 
prove domestic breeds. 

During the closing days of 
World war II, General George S. 

Patton ordered a special mission to 
forestall advancing Soviet troops 
and protect the lippizaners at Vi- 
enna from capture- In 1958, the 
American industrialist Temple 
Smith brought 20 Royal Lippi- 
zaners to the United States from 
Vienna, after yearn of negotiations. 

Smith, whose family stiD owns 
Temple Farms, died m 1980. 

“At one time after World Warn. ^ 
this breed of horse, due to wars and 
relocation and one thing and an- 
other, damn near vanished,” said 
Sandy Cassatt, manager of Temple 
Farms. “Mr. Smith in a sense saved 
it from virtual extinction by seek- 
ing out horses in Europe. He was 
almost as important to the develop- 
ment of the lippizan horse as Pal- 
ton was. *• v Wi&Ci 

“He may very well have saved 
the breed because I think the funds Dlmms Lippizaners. 

with which he paid for the anginal Enough their paces with only the 

££ dc f K3S a ionte>guide then/ 

k^^ nst of them gomg along Training begins when the horse 

““““v* _ is 4 or 5 years old and is not com- 

The Lippizan eT is a strong, plete mol age 10, 11 or even 1 2. 
graceful, highly trainable and con- The process tahfts even longer for 
rageous horse. Of the estimated the nders, who are not considered 
1,200 Lippizaners in the world, 165 m hf in thwr p rime-. un til app pyinh - 
are at the 7 ,500- acre (3,000-hect- jng miAflf age As in Vienna, only 
are) Temple Farms, whose com, stallions are considered strong 


Boys Town Is No Longer Just for Boys 

Famed Refuge’s Policy Has Changed Because r We Saw a Lot of Hurting Girls Out There 9 


PEOPLE 


Stolen Edisoma Found 



horses and trainers in business. 

From May to September the 
farm draws about 45,000 visitors to 
watch a show presided over by Karl 
Mikloa, a former student at the 
Spanish Riding School, and Ger- 
man-born Alf AthenstaedL 

Along with three rider-trainers, 
assistant riders and apprentices, 
dressed in classic Austrian army 
uniforms, the two riding masters 
put the horses through a perfor- 
mance ranging from ballet to leaps 
and kicks ori ginating in medieval 
cavahy maneuvers. 

They also demonstrate how the 
horses are trained, walking them 


through their paces with only the 
touch of a rein to guide them. 

T raining begins when the home 
is4 or 5 years old and is not com- 
plete anal age 10, 11 or even 12. 
The process lakes even longer for 
the nders, who are not considered 
to be in their prime until approach- 
ing middle age. As in Vienna, only 
stallions are considered strong 
enough for the exercises. 

Last year Cassatt bred the farm's 
performing stallions for the first 
time. In the past, only Lippizaners 
that did not perform were bred. 

The farm sells Lippizaners at 
prices ranging from 53,500 to 
575,000. There is a healthy market, 
Cassatt said, eqiedally among peo- 
ple interested in teams of four hors- 
es to pull coaches. 

“As coach horses they have no 
peer” Cassatt said. “The world’s 
champion team today, which hap- 
pens to be Hungarian, are Lippi- 
7a n s. Of the top seven or eight 
teams today, half are Lippizans.” 

' Art Buckwtdd is on vacation. 


By Judy Ktemesmd 

New York Times Service 

B OYS TOWN, Nebraska. — 
Boys Town is not strictly 
Boys Town anymore. Jcaninc Pb- 
trie, 16 years dd, is here, the only 
girl in the weight-lifting class. 
Her aster, Jessica, 15, cuts men’s 
hair in the barber class. And Tina 
John. 16, Is the first girl to be 
chosen as a fire cadet. 

They arc among 26 girls at the 
institution for homeless, way- 
ward, abused and neglected chil- 
dren, founded in 1917 by the 
Reverend Edward J. Flanagan, a 
Roman Catholic priest, ana fam- 
ous as a result ofthe 1938 movie 
“Boys Town,” starring Spencer 
Tracy and Mickey Rooney. 

Since June of last year, gjds 
from aD over the United States 
have been admitted to Boys 
Town, an incorporated village 10 
miles (16 kilometers) west of 
Omaha. Girls were first accepted 
in 1979, but until Last summer 
ratty 1 girls from the Omaha area 
wo^aflowed to live at the institu- 
tion. In the past six years 127 girls 
have lived there, with debt mare 
expected in August There are 
415 boys. 

“Pd love to see it half and 
half,” said the Reverend Val J. 
Peter, the institution’s executive 
director. “But I can’t guarantee 
it's going to happen soon. We’re 
going to go slow, and show every- 
body else how to do it” 

Peter said gtds were admitted 
to Boys Town “because we saw a 
lot of hurting girls out there.” 
Girls’ problems are more visible 
these days, he added, “because of 
the physical, psychological and 
sexual abuse that is now known 
to occur” 

The move to admit girls has not 
aD been roses. Five girls became 
pregnant and had to Leave, Pieter 
said. Girls also take more of the 
counselors’ time, he said, “be- 
cause girls talk about their prob- 
lems a great deal, while boys keep 
mridp themselves. ” 

The preponderance of boys has 
caused some problems fra: the 
girls, not all of whom believe a 
place with 16 boys to every girl is 
paradise. 

“If you smile the slightest at 
them,- they’re automatically in 
love with you,” said Jeanine Pc- 



Jn BMrt/Tha Nm YbA Tim 

Jessica Petrie, 15, one of 
the 26 girls now at Boys 
Town, practices haircut- 
ting skms on Joe B3ek. 

Lrie, the weight lifter, who is from 


trie, the weight lifter, who is from 
Sarasota, Florida. 

While Petrie said she made it a 
rule not to date boys from Boys 
Town, other girls said they were 
seeing boys from the school One 
of them, Mary Lou Sboffncr, 17, 
of Alliance, Ohio, when asked 
about the boy-girl ratio, said, 
“It's great — but it’s strange." 

The boys, too, have mixed 
opinions about the girls. “I think 
it’s beautiful,” said Du Wayne 
Smiley, 17. of Chicago, president 
of the student counaL “Most of 
the time you get tired of seeing all 
the guys. A gui around brightens 

He added that because Boys 
Town was “one of the best-disci- 
plined places around,” the boys 
and gins do not have to worry 
about fighting and sexual con- 
tact. “We’re au brothers and sis- 
ters here,” he said. 

On the other hand, Robert 
Crockett, 16, of Toledo^ Ohio, 
said he fhnug ht the growing num- 
ber of girls would only cause 
problems. “You know, mealring 


out of rooms at night, the boy-girl 
tiling,” Ik said. 

A sore point with the girls is 
that the boys art allowed to go on 
dates in cars with off-campus 
girls, while the Boys Town girls 
are not allowed car dates; they 
are supervised on social occa- 
sions. “We’re more restricted 
than the guys,” Jessica Petrie 
said. “WeVe not equal" 

Boys Town is home to a girl 
whose parents committed shade, 
a girl who was sexually abused by 
her father, a girl whose mother is 
a prostitute, a girl who is a mem- 
ber of Alcoholics Anonymous 
and a number of girls who wore 
referred by courts because they 
were considered unmanageable. 

“We did everything that a lrid 
could do — except we never 
killed anyone,” Jessica Petrie said 
in rf«mhing why she and her 
aster wore at Beys Town. 

The girls live in groups of seven 
in large, pleasantly decorated 
homes converted from dormito- 
ries. With each group lives a mar- 
ried couple, known as their fam- 
ily-teachers. The giris do most of 
the cooking and cleaning. They 
are awarded privileges on a sdf- 
motivating system in which they 
get points for sash things as good 
manners and good work habits. 
Points are subtracted for such in- 
fractions as fighting and truancy. 

The pant system results m 
some smprismgty good behavior. 
When a viator enters a guis* res- 
dence, each girl rushes up, ex- 
tends her band and rays some- 
thing fiVe, “Hdio, I'm Tina John, 
Tin very happy to meet you.” The 


lively dinner conversations, and 
afterward they are asked by their 
family-teachers to recount some 
of the thinp tfaw learned about 
their guest du r in g the table talk. 
Points are awarded to the giris 
according to their drills at these 
social graces. 

The boys live under a similar 
system, but in smaller groups, in 
houses. The family-teachers, ac- 
cording to Peter, are the staff 
members who are “in the trench- 
es" with the youths. One of them, 
Frank Coopenmith. 49, left a job 
managing a radio station to join 
his wife, Donna, 40, in becoming 
a family-teacher. The job pays 
them $18,000 a year jrantiy. The 


family- teachers act as the girls' 
pa y r ftP . foyhing than every- 
thing from personal hygiene to 
grocery shopping to etiquette to 
how to balance a checkbook. 

“It’s Eke bong at home with 
my own family. Coppersmith 
said. “It’s got a million head- 
aches. Bath's tbc most rewarding 
job I’ve ever had.” 

The girls attend classes with 
the boys at three schools on cam- 
pus: a noddle school for grades 
three through eight; the Boys 
Town High School, and the Voca- 
tional Career Center, which of- 
fers classes in welding, baking, 
hair styling, auto mechanics and 

electronics. 

The avenge stay, according to 
Peter, is 18 to 24 months, al- 
though some youngsters stay 
longer. Boys Town has no fences, 
and about 14 percent of the 
youths run away each year, he 
said, “but most of them came 
back on their own.” 

Shoffner said she had run away 
five times before she finally de- 
cided to stay awhile. Now, she 
said, she- is getting straight A 
grades, compared with the 
“straight Fs" she was getting at 
home. She credits her turnaround 
to “Frank and Donna” — the 
Cooposmiths — “who really love 
us and will do anything for ns.” 
Although the malraiip of (he 
Boys Town population varies 
from day to day, on a recent day 
Fontella Behn, 13, of Sarasota, 
was the ratty black girl on cam- 
pus. Overall about 35 percent of 
the youths are from minority 
groups, Peter said. 

“when 1 go out in public, 1 ted 
sort of embarrassed being only 
with white people,” Behn raid. “I 
wish I was back in Florida.” 

Most of the giris, though, seem 
to like Boys Town. 

'Dina Tweedy, 17, of Omaha, 
has a part-time job as a teacher at 
a preschool center and plans to 
become a special -education 
teacher. “Before 1 came here,” 
she said, “Td been in a lot of 
foster hones where they’d say, ‘I 
love you,' and then kick yon out 1 
couldn't even look people in the 
eyes or hold a conversation. 

“Now," she added with a anile, 
“I ihinlr 1 haw, a rhanry at mak- 
ing something oat of ray life.” 


About 5.000 artifacts and docu- 
ments stolen nine years ago from 
vaults of the Thaw Aha Edison 
Historical Site in West Orange, 
New Jersey, have bear recovered in 
Redwood City, California, in the 
home of a former Stanford Univer- 
sity professor, officials say. Phflfip 
Bums Petersen, 63. who was dis- 
missed by Stanford in 1977 after 
charges that he embezzled more 
than 560,000 from a petty cash 
fond, was indicted by a federal 
grandjury cm chaises or concealing 
stolen property, said W. Hunt Du- 
mont. a U.S. attorney. Among the 
most noteworthy memorabilia re- 
covered were an original sketch of 
Edison’s phonograph, a Matthew 
Brady photograph of Edison and 
an electric pen, the precursor to the 
mimeograph machine. Other items 
included letters to the inventor 
from President Frankfin Roosevelt 
and Helen KeBer. Phonographs, 
dearie light bulbs, recorders, com- 
memorative medals and hundreds 
of binders containing thousands of 
documents were recovered from 
Petersen's homes, according to an 
FBI inventory. The FBI had 
learned that Petersen was attempt- 
ing to seU some of the items to 
Bryan C. West, a North Carolina 
collector and dealer, federal docu- 
ments show. 


The Minnesota Orchestra has 
oigaged Edo de Waart; music di- 
rector of the Netherlands Opera, to 
succeeding the British conductor 
Negifc Manner, 61, as muse di- 
rector starting in the autumn of 
1986. De Waart, 44, who signed a 
four-year contract, will leave the 
Netherlands Opera in in 1988. 
Maniner, founder of the hugely 
popular Academy of Sl Martin in 
the Helds chamber orchestra, will 
leave the Minnesota post next May 
but continue with commitments to 
European orchestras. 

□ 

Ouries Z. Wick, director of the 
U. S. Information Agency, is 
among the wealthiest amdnls in 
the U. S. government, with a family 
income »*nw-riiti« 51 milli on last 
year, his personal financial disclo- 
sure statement shows. Wick, long a 
friend of President Ronald Reagan, 
reported outride income from vari- 
ous sources of at least $888,595 in 
1984. His annual government sala- 
ry is $75,100. Wick's wife, Mary 


Jane, had income of 5221.198, the 

^^asoTat least $1.98 ntiSm 

□ 

Rose Kennedy, matriarch of the 
Massachusetts political das, 
turned 95 Monday. Her doctor said 
riie was “more alert" and recover- 
ing from a 1984 stroke. 

□ 

Jeffrey Biegd, 24, of Plain view, 
New York, won the $15,000 fiat 
prize in the University of Maty.- 
land’s International Piano Festival 
and Competition. Biegd a doctor* - 
al candidate at Juilliard, perforated 
Prokofiev’s Concetto No. 2 in G 
minor. He was one of 92 entries, 
The second-place prize of $7,500 
was won by Igor Kamenz, 20, of 
East Germany, representing the 
Soviet Union. In third place, win- 
ning 53,500. was Makoto Ueno, 19, 
of Japan. 

□ 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher gave a reception at 
Downing Street after her party’s 
chief wfiijp, John Wafcehwn, 53, 
married his secretary, Alison Ward, 
35, in London. Ward was seriously 
injured and bis first wife; Roberta, . 
was killed when the Irish Republi- 
can Army bombed a Conservative 
Party meeting in Brighton last year. 
□ 


After nine years in a hospital 
psychiatric ward, Charles Maroon 
has been declared sane and re- 
turned to San Quentin to serve out 
a life sentence. Manscn. convicted 
of leading a mass-murder spree in 
California in 1969, has “been less 
of a problem in the last few years," 
said a San Quentin spokesman, 
Frederick Everiy. “It was decided 
that he could be more appropriate- 
ly managed" in the general prison 
population, Everly said. Manson 
was imprisoned at San Quentin in 
1971 to await execution in the kill- 
ings of the actress Sharon Tate and 

eigh t others. In 1972 the Supreme 
Court overturned the capital pun- 


ishment law under winch Manson 
was convicted, and he was sent to 
Folsom Prison. He was retained to 
San Quentin in 1975, bat sent the 
next year to (he prison hospital at 
Vacaville for psychiatric evalua- 
tion. His third parole bearing is 
scheduled for November. He was 
turned down for parole in 1979 and 
1982. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


to the 

INTERNATIONAL 

HERALD 

TRIBUNE 

AM) SAVE 

Ac o new iubucriw to lb* 
h J pmuborxJ Hwaid Tribune, 
you an u*e up to l im, 
the nowutand price, depending 
on your country of iwence. 

For detail 

an tfw spedd ntraductory offer. 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN UNES NTT 

OVB 1300 OFFICES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 



Ml 53 USA 


Oraiw Agmcr offices : 

PARIS D o rt iordos btaonfiood 

(01) 343 23 64 

HANKFUtr 

(069) 250066 



PARIS A SUBURBS 


60 KM WEST 

in mg gp etional nte. 
AUTMNnCWJUHUHIIL 
+ outfau U ng^ + (pieti house, tennis, 
pool priwte no!?. FSjDOOJOOO 
UCPjL Para 553 90 32 




VILLARS 

WRITER A SUMMER- 


REAL ESTATE 
. FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE LUGANO 
RESIDENCE BELLAVtSTA 

Uou ri ous ap a rtment * overlooking 6m 
UAe Lugano & itw beautiful wrraund- 
ns- Apartmm* tram 110 Hun. up la 
1a) mqpiBL fiadi has it's own fetpfaca. 
ImmAy, afar, wma cefler & porting 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

SNORT IBM. OMMMMG 
fill hirmhed STUDIO, in 

nx MouriHAira 

(near PANtWQN an daiy, weekly, 
madly beds, No apir*. efl yea- 
round. Teh 20? 7446 or leieranton 
a Moank.fO BOX 10 

iiiii 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 1 


Place Your Classified Ad QvkkJy end EasBy 

fa** 

INTERNATIONAL HBIALD TRIBUNE 

By Phono: Cot your local HT ropr n et *u bw with your tout. You 
wnl bo in formed of the cad immediately, and once prepayment * 
mode your ad wiB appear withm 48 hours. 

Coefc The bone tm»B$9JC per trio p er tfcy 4- local tram There are 
25 letters, egra and ipoem in rhe first kne and 36 in Ihefoflowtng knot 
Minimum ipacs i 2 ines. No obbrowaiiota accepted. 

Credit Cade America) Express, Diner's Chib, Bxaaxd, Made 
Qrd, Acorns and Visa