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The Global Newspaper 
Edited m Paris •“ .; 
Primed SimuUaxwourf^i^ 

. in Paris, London, 

Hoik Kong, 

The. Hague and MailhSfr^ 

WEATHER DATA APPEAK ON PAGE 14 

No.31#5t ~ ’ 


INTERNATIONAL 




ribune 


Published With The New York limes and The Washington Post 

** ~ 7 PAWS, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


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• 'T 7 -' The AmaKd Rm 

Presidertt Ronald Reagan greeting President Li Xhnaha. 


Israeli Ships Shell Sidon, 
TradeFtne With Moslems 

Revtem ian refugee camps outside Sidon. 


Beijing to Get 
Nuclear-Power 
Technology 

By Joanne Omang 

Washwpon Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan approved an ac- 
cord Tuesday allowing the sale of 
U.S. technology for nuclear power 
to China. The approval came hours 
before the president welcomed Chi- 
na’s president, Li Xiannian, to the 
White House. 

Mr. Reagan, using Chinese 
phrases, told Mr. Li that U -Chi- 
nese relations should be in the spir- 

efing President Ux5^ ^ 

' “Ely oar cotnmoa opposition to 

aggression, we ore not only enhanc- 
0| JJ D» 1 ingemr mutual security but bolster- 

JtijGU tlZuDIL “S worid P^ace as wen,” Mr. Rea- 
^JSVCM gan said, in an allusion to the 

’~7"% ~w -■ m m Soviet Union. 

• ifh IWtSTSQMdym Mr. Reagan, 74. who was operat- 
M/f 1/ iTH/JMyl IW ed on for intestinal cancer July 13, 
, looked fit but slightly pale and was 

■an refugee camps outside Sidon. a bit hoarse. He supported the d- 
Sidon’s representative in the bow of Mr. U, who is 76 at the 
Lebanese parliament, Narih Bari, welcoming ceremony. 



441 Being Held 
In South Africa; 
Tutu Asks Blacks 


4 To Stop Killing s 


By Glenn Frankie! 

tliufnn?r>n P.«| Strut i- 


two week 1 , .itjo ai j funeral in Du- 
duzj. He noted that the murder 


Th* Ma omu fini 

A funeral Tuesday for 15 victims of unrest in South Africa drew more than 25,000 
mourners. Police patrolled the service, in Kwatbema township, near Johannesburg. 

In Warsaw 9 A Reassured Regime 
Turns to More Repressive Policies 


KWATHEMA. South Africa — Saturday of the alleged triormer. 
Bishop Desmond Tutu, the Nobel "ho was beaten and burned, had 
Peace Prize winner, pleaded Tues- been sideo taped b> journalists and 
das with black township residents broadcast on television here and 
to stop killing fellow blacks ac- abroad. He warned that some s iew- 
cuscd as government collaborators, ers overseas might conclude. "If 
The police amuMinced that they those people can Jo something like 
had arrested 441 people since this, maybe they are not ready for 
South Africa declared a state of freedom." 


emergency on Sunday. 

Among those arrested was Molly 


The message received a mi ted 
reaction from the crowd, with 


Bv William Droadiak 

l^iisAiRfi.’m Post Semes 
WARSAW — As the fifth anni- 


matic leaders such as Lech Walesa - — 

believe that Solidarity, which is of- T . . , rH 

facially banned, must stop being J AT UZCImJ r lan s 
solely a protest movement and . 


XTl: To Visit UN in Fall S“S“dT!iSciu«if joiun- n* ™„y «. h<u u-. me 

Iulyl3, that created the bohdanty trade and economic proposals. nesburg and Pon Elizabeth, police community soccer sudium. and at 

The Solidarity underground re- U 7 adcTu- " ,emar, '^ r . . said. The report did not give the iiist u appeared thai moa residents 
cendy called upon supporters to , WA , K ^r^” '~< J 5 n . cr r Wojaecn 0 f townships where inci- heed the unpin. ii warning of 

boycott the OcL 13 demons to the jaruzclski. the Polish leader will occurroJ. the police vehicles roaming the 

Sqm, or parliament. Bui opposi- JJ 16 ? 4 * me opening of die I'nned -p, ff police released the names, township and not attend. Bui erad- 
tion figures have argued in favor of Nauons General Assembly this race, sex and home citv of the 441 uatly die audience began ic swell 
participation, if only to test the fall, his first visit to the wes! since they said they had detained under unul finally the entire vtadium w a> 
government's offer to poroit elec- taking power m 1981 the govern- Lhe"s»'eeping emergency proclama- packed with angry mourners, 
lion of some non-Communist inde- t* 111 announced Tuesday. ji on g ul unofficial sources in Jo- Bishop Keith Sutton of Uch- 


Bfackbum. 53. a member of ihe num > people booing his words, 
opposition Federal Progressive Earlier the crowd had chanted a 
Party and a leader of the women’s P^a in Zuiu to Oliver Tambo. the 
welfare group Black Sash, which vailed leader of the outlawed Afri- 
aids blacks. She is the most promi- van National Congress, the leading 
neni while lo be deiained in the black resistance movemem. 
curreni crackdown. "Please. Oliver Tambo. give us 

At leasi two more persons were weapons, we want to hit back af the 
killed os unrest continued ir. town- state. ' 


union revolt nears, the Polish gov- 


Retaer3 ian refugee camps outside Sidon. a bit hoarse. He supported the d- emmenl is confidently pursuing 

SIDON, Lebanon — Four Isrsc- Sidon s representative in the how of Mr. U, wto is 76, at the harsher, more restrictive policies in 

li warships shelled the port of Si- Lebanese pa rl ia m ent, N arils Bizri, welcoming ceremony. the belief that it hn< divided the 

doo in southern Lebanon on Tues- said earlier this week that the lead- The ceremony on the South opposition, according to Western 
day, setting a cargo ship ablaze in er of the Palestine Liberation Orga- Lawn of the White House lasted diplomats and Polish analysts. 


emmenl is confidently pursuing T1 ? e under S round «- 

harsher, more restrictive policies in 

the belief that it has dirided the e S.® n ^it c 


L'lith'J PrtSi tnicmatwrui/ 


the harbor, witnesses said. 

They said the warships bad 


huried dozen s of shells a the bar- camps. Ain el Hehveh and Miyeh 
bor and into suspected militia posi- Miyeh. They have a total of 22,000 


pizalion, Yasser Arafat, was pour- only about half as long as usual, 
ing money and arms into the and each man remained seated as 


bor and into suspected militia posi- 

t. uonsinjully anas beyond the city. . , , mi. u, Mcauiix ui vuui»c m mvxtre iiuu vcrc 

3 - The Route, a freighter with Hon- Mr. Ban charged that Mr. Ara- ^ ceremony, said to Mr Reagan NEWS AiVALlSIS 
L duran registry, took a direct hit and fat was trying to turn the camps that he wa^ "very happy to see that . 

r was set on fire. Its Greek captain into power bases m southern Lt*a- ^ ^ recovering m fasL” He J amz£lski s government has earned 
E said thai it had been trying to un- non and provoke a conflict with ^ ^ was firet out several stem actions, induding 


inhabitants. 


the other 
stood for ( 


ike, although they 
national anthems. 


Soviet leader, General Wojriech 


Since the visit to Warsaw m government’s offer to permit dec- taking power in 1981. the govern 
April by MikhailS. Gorbachev, the Uon of some non-Communist inde- men t announced Tuesday. 


Mr. Li, ^>ealdi$ in Chinese at 


load cement from Cyprus. 


local Moslem forces, which are food price ^increases, longer pri^n 


pendents to the 460-seat assembly. 

“Pan of Solidarity wants to grab 
whatever slice of power it can get 
right now. while another part says 
ills only a matter of lime before the 
government can be brought to its 
knees.” said a Western diplomat 


The witnesses said that return backed by Syria. nese ih order to deepen Knns ** aod MW rarbs “ As a resu ^, y?“> w something 

e from Moslem militiamen using Last week, Moslem mfl m a m en mutual understanding. ^ on academic freedoms. dose to paralysis. 


fire from Moslem militiamen using last week, Moslem mflmamen 

anti-aircraft guns, recoilless anti- in Sidon said they had intercepted . j. . ^ 

■ hank rifles and hand-held anti-tank, two container trucks driven by Jor- , *P“ m ? S 1 ^ 10 . aalists on the Soviet Woe. who be- 

v rockets was falling into the sea well damans trying to smuggle arms A 5S'vS ^ ^ M 1 - Gorbachev insissed 


The timing does not surprise spe- 


roent annouoceu tuesuay ,i on But unofficial sources in Jo- Bishop Keith button oi uch- 

Jerzy Urban, the spokesman, hannesburg said thev believed that f«W. England, representing the 
made the announcement at his j^rai jo^n people had archbishop of Canterbury, also at- 

weekly briefing. The general look ro j 0£ jed up Tuesdav. tended the service. In his purple 

power as the Communist Party was Al the poTiiical Funeral since liturgical robes, he moved among 
facing collapse ui the fare of chal- eniergencv was declared. Bish- the families of the dead, 
lenges from the Solidarity labor op Tlllu denounced both the gw- Few words were spoken, and 
movement, it has recently made eminent and its opponents who re- Bishop Sutton recalled the comfort 
progress in restoring order. sorted to killing as "sellouts " The his African parishioners had given 

Poland has also been moving to f unera | f f 0r 15 victims of the recent him year* ago in Uganda when his 
improve its relations with the out- b | 3ck U|}hsl> W3S hl .j d in Kwaib- daughter died 


lifiod Ao zr.ikdf sbori of the Israeli warships. 


ONAL rLTAkC TS.akM 


into the area. 

The trucks apparent 


private se^on that included v itt crackdown. 
President George Bush, Secretary ^ .. . 


In Tel Aviv, a mflitary spokes- The ^tnaeKs apparently came ^ state Gonge P. Shult2, Defense While Polish disdain Tor the 

man said that Israeli gunboats had ^meseporxrf Secretary W. Weinberget, Communtst autbonues seons as 

been on a routine pattol off the and Mr l3p aides. “ “ “ “ 

C fS- W ™i5 rSp0tlC!i SSd^slrk ^ «« to discuss a broad 

“a nrerehanu ship engaged msuspi- P<^dtoSyna. ranged issues, induding the status 

nC TT* ac 1 uvit £ . . . After Toesda/s sbdling, port erf- 0 f Taiwan, the nuclear technology 

The Isradt vcssds approached fidals said, the Roofcs seven-man agreement, and trade *tS 
ihe ship and were fired bn from «ew was rescued and three mem- femilv-ntennine noKeks. **' 

both the ship and the shore, the bets were taken to a hospital with n l?. ^ 

spokesman said. “Our gunboats re- injuries. The seven-man crews of 

turned fire toward the ship, which two other vessels in the harbor, r uSf t l ti^ e ri L ‘7.f!f 

was hit," he said. An Israeli sailor identified as the Lebanese ship “)*. I® : 9™f. 
was reported wounded. GRC and the Panatnanian-reas- liwS 

It was not known if the Israelis tered Manda. were also taken oE Jr* 

believed that the ships were cany- Firemen said the blaze on the 

ing arms for Lebanese Morion mi- Roole was out of control and (hat suggested by Bey mg. that 

litiamen or fighters in two Palestih- the ship was in danger of sinking. (Candmied on Page 2, CoL 4) 


and Mr. Lfs top aides. 


^.r na® 


Communist authorities seems as •opposition continues to stimulate 
profound as ever, the harsh mea- and set the pace far political 


-TV. hnn.«» . 7 , , , i , , niJCfc UHltS l. IIC1U lit (VHaifl- u,H> 

J5* “Jf- S " 3e WO - r L A ,4 l «^ S rCaChe ?- agrCC ' ema township near Johannesburg. “if* not su much what vou sav 
SSi men i! V'i 17 u crcd!tc l rs ^” Bishop Tutu warned that he and but that you're here and you hold 

£ lb L^ bcduh ^ lhe P*-™} K f i l ~ his familv would leave South Africa ‘her hands and that you feel.” he 

ir tnegovemmem m a m ta i n s the billion in interests and debt that unless blacks heeded his call to sum said. 

« *■ i" MM to reported ,lu, . to 


roup returning from the funeral 
ad .stoned the house of a local 


efense ^ .wm ^ reii aue in ivsc-iim. murdering other blacks. Politx later reported that a large 

lerger, Coi P inu ° tst autbontres se«ns as •f^^ition contiflues xo stimulate Referring to the killing Saturday F nu P reiurnmg from the funeral 

profound as ever, the harsh mea- and ^ for political in neiahbonng Duduza of a woman had .stoned the house of a local 

They were to discuss a broad ™ ^ P rw0 J ked fcw a e ns <* clandesunepres. stffl rorces to the usual irouble-spm black ofTicial and that the official 

ra^SL,k dSfSsSS Z^Z?***™™*' SmSS&CSS nnTS factory- “tesm Gdansk had fire^J rwo r.vunds uf hud ,hot 

^.u-ttorT^noiftov. wn toan angry. 2X1(1 occasionally and Warsaw. a , between 25.000 and 50.000. “If »nu* the mob. "Injures are un- 


. The subdued response has 
stemmed hi vsui /rein iht cofl'.inu- 
ing disarray in the leadership of the 


gets on the air. 

. T ae election w; ii be a central ic»i 
in a revived propaganda battle be- 


Biship Tutu told a enwd estimated h 311 fired two rounds of bud jhot 
at between 25.000 and 50.000. "If into the mob. "Injures are un- 


TV ®r‘ii*'riiv fixulership had 


fV y' Sohdanty movement over which tween SoUdarity and the govem- 

nniwgy to foUow in chaUengmg mem. It is expected lo mtensify in 
official policies. , August with the commemoration 


called for .a one-hour work stop- difficult ■«' >pc.ik i*ui .ur uur Iiix.tj- 
page, but Western diplomats said bon." 


on .botK sid«” of tlte For- White somec^tionspokes- 
ted Manda. were also taken oS S 0 *® Strait. He said the United bdieve it is inevitable that 
Firemen said the blaze on the Sta f? s a rajmoesj to rqect the idea, economic troubles and public di$- 
jole was out of control and (hat ^Ber suggested by Bey mg. mat communism will erode 

e ship was in danger of sinking. (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) the government's authority, prag- 


s,,a5!iE*S 


Widespread Fraud Reported in Haiti Referendum 

Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatches l n Port-au-Prince, the capital, places where the same passengers 

PORT-AU-PRJNCE, Haiti — about a dozen persons crowded also voted. 

There is evidence of widespread around a reporter outride Ihe dry There were no outride observers 


-.^rsAi* 


fraud in a referendum on the presi- hall polling slai 
deucy of lean-Gaude Duvalier, ac- they had voted 
cording to opposition leaders and Jacques John 
journalists who observed the voting i 0 r, sud be voi 

Monday. ."ves." His wife 

The Haitian government denied V g le( j ^ 
there had been any irregularities. ’ 

Officials said the results, which . 
WBSMMpKKdbrfonrTuHd,, 


porter outside the aiy There were no outride observers 
endum on the presi- hall polling station, and roost said of ihe election process. The United 
Hsude Duvalier. ac- they had voted more than once. States, which has been pressing Mr. 
orition leaders and Jacques John, a 28-year-old tai- Duvalier to make his rule more 
observed the voting j or> jjg yo^ eight times, all democratic, sent a single represen- 
, . ."yess." His wife, Rosman, said she tative. 
government doued V q 1w j ^ tunes. The ballots consisted of white 


pthu would show ^ omwh.bn- chauga^ induding aiaw reg- 

ing , victory for the Duvalier r^unt Onioned bvlHBfiom one voting ulating the organization of political 
. Al places insited by for- ■ 325SSK3w«SHI Voters were asked to vote 

agn reporters on Mndw. *« P^Srousbritei V" or "no” on whether the entire 

was no pretense of secret balloting, package should be accq ted. 

and many people aid they had Throughout the morning, include the cco- 

roied several times. Unlike during packed buses were seen bringing ^ ^ in 0 f ^ 

ream dections for the legislature people to vote at city haD and Sen ^ whil ^ Du- 

and mayors, voters fingers were taking them away. Journalists who JV. ^ ^ 

not droned into dve after ihe\ had followed one bus said it had 



August with the commemoration 
of the disorders in 1980 that gave 
rise to the anti-Commuaist trade 
union movement 

Mr. Walesa, on vacation with 
relatives outside Warsaw, has 
promised in recent interviews to 
announce ideas for specific reform 
next month so that Solidarity sup- 
porters can demonstrate in favor of 
something, instead of just against 
government proposals. 

His emphasis on reforms has 
emerged ont of concern that Soli- 
darity has concentrated too much 
on street and factory protests, 
largely ineffective, while the gov- 
ernment has been pushing through 
tough measures. 


the protests had little impact be- 

... . -. cause thev were not widely frit. — r — . - . . . 

t with the conunemoration . working Tor the government either teamed "the \er> people who are 

dBorders m 1980 that gave Unhke " “™ h “ c “{j police officers, local councilmen *** t ' ncs u>»"G *•' hold the comma- 

the anu-Communtsi trade ,. n . ue f re * astf o more b^ 11 1,00 t >r spies nuv together and prevent i«> 

movement “ 3 Sshop Tutu and another Angli- Knee.” 

Walesa, on vacation with ^ ^ an> reaSOD 4,5 can bishop. Simeon Nkoane. saved Mrs. Blackburn wav arresred in 

r es outside Warsaw, has (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) the life of an accused collaborator (Continued on Page 2. CoL 51 


you do this again, f wi'l find it known.” the report said, 
difficult »' >pcik nut ivi’r uur litxrrj- Bmlwip T utu called :!ia an w - . if 

lion." four leading black ifenc* in the 

Many of the blacks killed bv eastern Cape area "an incredible 


Many of the blacks killed by eastern Cape area an incredible 
blacks were people identified as itnng.. The government, lie said. 

v.? r _ _ .L . — ... .1 "fka, v^n n^viL ax U#. iv> 


political prisoners as a gesture, 
there has not been any reason ibis 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Mrs. Blackburn wj.v arresred in 
(Continued on Page 2. CoL 5) 


Toyota to Set Up Auto Plant in U.S.; 
Production Scheduled to Start in ’88 


By John Burgess Washii 

H &s/nnj! jiifT Pmi Smire auto ex 

TOKYO — The Tovota Motor A sure! 


Washington. Japan is now limiting year is to grow to 200.000 care, 
auto exports 10 2.3 million per year. They will all be marketed by GM as 


on imports that Con- ChevTolet Novas. 


Corp.. Japan's largest 'automobile &*** « considering would hun the However. Toyota feels iLs name 


The government won a major manufacturer, said Tuesday it 


Japanese auto industry, which had and its dealer network ore not best 
about S20 billion in 'sales in lhe served by this arrangement It has 


United Slates last vear. 


arranged to use a 50.000-vehicle 


gamble this month when it com- would set up a wholly owned plant about SJJ btuion in sales in ihe serveo oy inis airmgemenL it nas 

pleied a three-stage plan raising in the United States capable of United States last year. arranged to use a 50.000-vehicle 

Food and meat prices 10 to 15 per- turning out 200.000 cars a year. It ' "Toyota's move was bound to unused capacity at the joint veo- 

cenL and managed to do so without said production would begin in eomc, said \ asumasa Kunuuuaru, ture plant (0 produce Corolla- type 


! turning out 200.000 cars a year. It ' "Toyota's move' was bound to unused capacity at the joint veo- 


provokmg signlficanl protests. In 1988. 

1980. an attempt to increase meat The factory is scheduled 10 pro- 
gered the rebellion that duce compact cant with engine ca- 
idarity. Earlier moves 10 parities of 2,000 cubic cemiroeiers. 


senior researcher at Daiwa Securi- 
ties Research Institute. "Wc can't 


cars under its own name. 

Toyota has long been known to 


raise prices also touched off wide Toyota gave no firm word on the d 14 -* United States. 


expect that Japan will be able to want full control of a trey or pro- 
increase its direct export of cars to duction facility in the United 

■l. 1 - r ,v.0 VAn/wi,,.;. 


States and the 200.000-unil plant 


protests and toppled leaders. 


site vv the cost of the planL but it 


not dipped into dye after they had 
voted. 


stopped at three other polling (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Eeutn^un 

Jean- Claude Duvalier 


This time, the government was so reportedly would be in the Midw est 
confident the price increases would or . South and would cost from S600 
not cause trouble that it did not million to SS00 million. 


.. <* 1 
.. - 


Contest for Political Loyalties Divides Chinese in U.S. 


Vo- 


By I>avid Holley Francisco restaurant. Taiwan w 

uiAogda T ima Stnice the loyalty of the overseas Chin; 

LOS ANGELES — The voices of hun- mainland wants to take it away. 


Francisco restaurant. "Taiwan wants to keep seeks support Tor reunification of Taiwan 
the loyalty of the overseas Chinese, and the with the mainland. 


The latest weapon in this battle appeared 


dreds of children rang through the Chinese The conflict has roils in tire history of the on newspaper racks in Chinatowns across 
Confucius Temple School of Los Angeles 00 Chinese CommuniM revolution of 1 949 and the United Stales this month: a new overseas 


Jier bother to summon extra security pbn. approved Tuesday at a 

meeting of Toyota s board of direc- 
tors, marks lhe latest bid by the 
Japanese auto industry to get 
• • f T around export restrictions and pro- 

]1) M j ^ tectionisi sentiments in the United 

Im W/vl/ wm m/ %_/ aL/t States by setting up U.S. factories. 

Simultaneously. Toyota an- 
Before President Richard M. Nixon's trip nounced it would establish its first 
£0 Beijing in 1972, ethnic Chinese in the car factory in Canada. The plant. 
United States were overwhelmingly pro-Tai- scheduled for a 19RS opening, will 
wan. have an .annual capacity of 50.000 


This spring, full-scale produe- will achieve that. Mr. Toyoda said 
lion began at the California plant no derision has been made but the 
of New United Motor Manufactur- company is thinking of a 50-50 split 
ing Inc., as Toyota's joint venture between U.S. and Japanese pans in 
with GM is called. Output next the cars. 


INSIDE 


have an .annual capacity of 50.000 


this month: a new overseas 


v> “ - 

. q r AC- V - J " 


a recent morning as young immigrants, refu- 
gees and U.S.-born Oiinese- Americans re- 
riitd lessons in Chinese. 

Classes at the Chinatown school empha- 
size Chinese language and culture — espe- 
cially Confucian morality — rather than 
politics, said Johnny Chang, the principal. 

But books for its 1.000 students are gifts of 
Taiwan's government, “so it can’t be avoided 
(hat they have a bit of political content," he 
1 ‘They i 


With U.S. diplomatic recognition of the Corolla-type cars with engines in 
People's Republic of China m 1979. growing the 1.600-cubic centimeter range, 
numbers of Chinese diplomats, suidenls and In a third announcement, 
scholars came 10 the United Slates at a time Toyota said that 50,000 Corolla- 
when China was promoting moderation at type care per year would be made 
home and increased contacts abroad. Chi- for sale in the United States under 
nese-American institutions with ties to Beij- the Toyota name at its plant in 
i ng began to prosper. Fremont. California, which is a 

Immigrants from Taiwan are deeply divid- joint venture with General Motors, 
ed by a splii between tire native Taiwanese, The cars are scheduled to begin 
who speak their own dialect of Chinese, and coming off tire assembly fine in the 
Mandarin speakers who fled the 1949 Com- fall of 1986. 
munisi victory on the mainland. "We have received many re- 


Taiwan wants to keep the loyalty of the overseas 
Chinese, and the mainland wants to take it away/ 

Dennis Wong 
Pro-Nationalist clan association leader 


introduce more about things on j 0 provincial and linguistic distinctions edition of the Chinese Communist Party's munisi victory on the mainland. 




type care per year would be made 
for sale in the United States under 
the Toyota name at its plant in 
Fremont. California, which is a 
joint venture with General Motors. 




mm 

fm 




: ■ .- . . • 

'efr-' '■s' 

£ti 1- j ■ • 

J&gti,; 

t : 


■Taiwan and less about the mainland.'’ among ethnic Chinese. official People's Daily. 

' The school is run by the Chinese Consoli- Cantonese speakers from South China, for The right-pagyiaper, edited in Beijing but 

dated Benevolent Association, tire leading example, have no ancestral roots in Taiwan printed m San Francisco and New York, 
pro-Taiwan organization in Chinatown in and little reason to support the Taiwanese uses old-style Oiinese characters now aban- 
Los Angeles. independence movemenL If they or their dotted in China but generally familiar to 

The lessons taught there represent the relatives have suffered under communism, overseas Chinese. Ideological articles are 
struggle among the Communist government they may support the Nationalists in Taipei trimmed and extra emphasis is placed on 
in Beijing, the Natio nalis t government in But if they visit their native villages and feel features about life in those parts of southern 


F&J5 


Since its retreat from the mainland, the quests from our dealers and Trom 
Kuomintang has ruled Taiwan under martial government 10 set up plants ewer 
law, denying significant political power to there," said Toyota’s president, 
the Taiwanese who constitute 85 percent of Shoichiro Tojodx “We would like 
the island's 19 millioi} population. It is illegal to cooperate. Wed like to do our 
in Taiwan to support either communism or best to maintain good relations be- 
Taiwanese independence. tween the United States and Ja- 




It is in the 


language press that pan." 


a ^ Taipei and the Taiwanese independence pride in China's accomplishments, they may 
movement for the support of ethnic Chinese lean the other way. 
r* *L in America. Competition between Brijing and Taipei 

l r E~ L ' - This contest permeates Chinese communi- — through organizations such as the temple 

'*’ . ' iy life throughout the United States. Many school, with its Taiwan-oriented presen ta- 

' newspapers, bookstores, political associa- tion of Chinese culture — exacerbates the 
tions, language schools, chinches, business- differences. 


ide in China's accomplishments, they may China that have sent disproportionate num- some of the keenest political competition can 


bers of emigrants abroad. 

The new edition constitutes “a bridge" 
linking overseas Chinese with (heir home- 
land that “will play , a very great role" in 
promoting the reunification of Taiwan with 


some of the keenest political competition can Mr. Toyoda said the Japanese 

be seen. government hoped investment of 

The Chinese Daily News, the largest Chi- this type, by creating jobs in the 


the Chinese mainland, asserted Maurice about 100.000. 


nese-Ianguage paper in the United States, is 
a key pro-Kuominiang institution. It was 
founded in 1975 and chums a circulation of 




television networks, social clubs — even 
tome restaurants ~ can be classified by 
% '•here they stand. 

"This struggle goes on every day. in this 
-esuuranL this community, this state, this 
t t? nation," said Dennis Wong, a pro-National* 
» dan association leader, as he sat in a San 


Both governments view overseas Chinese Chuck, founder and editor in chief of the San 


United States, would ease protec- 
tionist pressure. 

Toyota produced 3.4 million ve- 
hicles last year, about half of which 
were exported, h has vehicle or 


fbe San Francisco Journal, where the new were exported It has vehicle or 
overseas edition of ■ (he overseas People's pans factories in about 30 coun- 
Daily is printed was foundeJ by Chinese- tries. 

.Americans in 1972. Its purpose is “to pro- Like all Japanese auto com pa- 
mote normalization of U.SL*Guna relations nies.. it is concerned about iong- 
and to promote understanding of China.* term access to ti*e American mar- 
said Diana Hong, (he general manager. ket. Under pressure from 


_ _ .Americans in 1972. its purpose is “to pro- 

Ss community.' ifos state, this Taipei wwfd like students and scholars From ethnic Chinese in the United States. 37 per- mote normalization of U^^na relations 
Dennis Wong, a pro-National* China now lemporarily.in the United States cent of them native bom Americans., with and to promote understanding ot Liuna. 
iation leader, as he sat in a San to turn against communism, while Beijing 325,882 living in California. said Diana Hong, the general manager. 


An explosives expert carrying an airline bug containing 
a bomb that was found* in a canal in Copenhagen. | 
Security was tightened following terrorist biasb. Page 3. j 

■ Mam- callers are on the verge of panic. But an office at the US. 

State Department calms them down and (hen tries to resolve their 
worries about friends or retain cs traveling abroad Pag? £ 

■ Two suspects were charged with arson and murder in the sinking of 

a Greenpeace ship in New Zealand. Page 3. 

■ Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of India resumed talks with a Sikh 

leader about unrest in Punjab state. page 5.. 

BUSINESS; FINANCE 

■ U.S. consumer pices rose a modal 0,2 percent in June as weakness 
in the economy and foreign competition held down inflation. Page 9. 



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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 'WEDNESDAY* JULY 24, 1985 



WORLD BRIEFS 


By David Binder 

„ Afew York Tunes Swtlee 

■ WASHINGTON— In the Sovi- 
et Union, where the first “cult of 
•personality” was created for Lenin 
more than 60 years ago, the prac- 
tice of exaggerated veneration is in 
disuse, ot orders from on high. 

■ Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the new 
Soviet leader, has discouraged 


says Paul K. Cook, the State De- 
partment’s senior Soviet expert 

Mr. Gorbachev has baited the 
use of “head of the Politburo” — 
not a legally valid tide, but one 
frequently used in the past, Mr. 
jCook continued, as “an early step 
•on the path to the cult” 

But the kind of cult that Stalin 
built for Lenin and later for himself 
is alive and wdl along the edges of 
■what Stalin used to can the “Social- 
ist camp,” fostering smaller avatars 
in the persons ofFidd Castro in 

Pnha, Kim II Simgin North Korea. 
Todor Zhivkov in Bulgaria and NV- 
colae Ceausescu in R omani a. 

Each presents himself more or 

less as a drily in his nafirmal firma- 
ment, and Mr. Rim and Mr. 
Ccausescu even seem to be enter- 
taming the idea of keeping power 
in the family. Mr. Kim is evidently 
bent on passing the torch to his son, 
Kim Jong II, and Mr. Ceansescu 
wm« similarly inrfinaH toward his 
son Nfcu. 

In Rutfam 
when Nikita S. 


taiy committee, did not say which of the seven delegates 
Ionian and the Palestine Libera 


tion Organization were favoured by fan 
The Israeli radio said that Mr. Peres was referring to Hanna Seam, 
editor of the Arab newspaper A1 Fajr. and Faiz Abu Kahmeh. fanner 
head of. the bar association in the Gaza Strip. 

Mr. Feres said Iasi week that the entire list, which included members of 
the FLO and (he Palestine National Council the PLO's legislative arm, 
was unacceptable. 


Nicolae Ceausescu 


Oram Na 

Fidel Castro 


Kim H Song 


Todor Zhivkov 


since 


nn- 


vrifed some of Stalin's worst deeds, 
the cult of personality has been 
officially denigrated. 

But in North Korea, President 
Kim, 73, is routinely described as 
the “Great Leader.” His birthplace 
is a national shrine and pant stat- 
ues of him dominate the landscape. 

He is described in the 25 volumes 
of his collected works as the “ingo- 
n ions thinker and theoretician” 
who inspired nearly every mental 
or physical accomplishment of his 
country for 40 years. 

Btran, birthplace of Mr. Castro 
57 years ago, is not a pil grims ’ 


shrine, bat the stations of his revo- 
lutionary march to Havana already 
are. 

The “Maximo Lider” appears on 
Cuba's 1, 10, and 20 peso notes. 

Mr. Ceansescu, who is 67. has a 
shrine at his tirtbjriace in Sconn- 
ewy ti, inaugurated since he came to 
power two decades ago. His colt 

was «inw in braiding, turn ing to riis- 

place the incipient cult of his prede- 
cessor, Gbeorgbe Gheorghiu-Dq. 

- la Mr. Ceaasescu’s first year is 
power, many rural Romanians did 

not know that Ghen rghrn- Dej had 


^ miiiji less the name of the 
successor. 

But in time; he published 25 vol- 
umes — entitled “Romania ad the 
Road to Budding the Mnltilaterally 
Developed Sooalist Society” — 
and could count on party agitators 
to see to it that his speeches were 
interrupted with cheers of 
“Ceausescu — Peace!" “Long Live 
Ceansescu!” “Ceansescu and the 
del” and “Ceausescu Tri- 
ll” 

tving covered himsdf with 
other honors, he was inducted July 
12 into the most prestigious scien- 


tific body, theAcademy of theSo- 
rialist Republic of Romania. 


In Bulgaria, Mr. Zhivkov, who is 
73, has governed for more than 
three decades, one of the longest 
tenures in 13 centuries of Bulgarian 
history. The country’s newest su- 
perhighway leads from the capital 
to his hometown df Pravets, in the 
Balkan Mountains, where his fam- 


sere. tfag ghavc be en otbg Israel Is Said to Favor& Arabs on list 

notable cults m Cbmmumsi coun- 
tries. Mao in with his little JERUSALEM (Reuters)— Prime Minister Shimon Pfcres said Tuesday 

n»ri hcvUr Tito in V iwnda - that two names on a fist of Pales ti n i a n s proposed for panidpatioo in 

via. and Enver Honda in Albania, Middle East pace talks would be acceptable to Israel an official said, 
whose works numbered The Israeli official said that Mr. Peres, addressing * dosed partiamen- 

40 volumes before be died ifl ApriL 
WakerUIbridithadatryatitm 
East Germany before he was de- 
posed in 1971, as did Hungary’s 
Matyas Rakosi, -Czechoslovakia’s 
Klement GottwaW, and Vietnam's 
Ho Chi Minh. 

But none of these cults of firing 
personalities the "wlH ' t -wst* t «« /i • 

set by statin, who rewrote offidai Ethiopian Jews Wm Israeli Concession 

raffled 

over not being fully recognized as Jews in Israel will no longer be asked 
to take a symbolic conversion bath, the country's chief rabbis said 
Tuesday. ' 

The statement, after a meeting between Prime Minister Shimon Feres 
and the two rabbis. Avraham Suapira and Mordechai Eliahn . followed 
weeks of protests by the 15.000 Mgrants. many of whom arrived in 
secret airlifts in January and March. Mr. Peres intervened in the riisphtfc 
after hundreds of the Ethiopian Jews journeyed to Ben-Gurion Airport 
lad u wpk say ing that they had >w»n f^muli-Hari hy the rabbis and waited 
to emigrate. - 

other Jews the Ethiopians wfD still be required to prove that they 
axe full-fledged Jews before marrying, and rabbis might demand that they 
take a irdkvek, or ritual bath. then. 


Soviet history, 

_ Volgograd), and 

other “Statin” cities in Poland. East 
G e rma ny, Hungary, and Bulgaria. 

Nor would it seem that heretical 
remarks about the current 
aHties bring the stern 
common in Stalin’s time — execu- 
tion or slow death in labor camps. 

It has usually taken at least a 
dozen years is power topromote a 
personality colt Leonid L Brezh- 
nev had been at it for only a fen 
years when he died in 1982 and 
little remains of that venture. 



povi 

died 


SidKfl^Sm ™ Chernenko, Malay sia tn Barricade Thai Border 

I twfnr» nil»e mnM oM ctnrfwl » ... ■_ i. 


school ' _ weening peocnalrtv cult is a 


manwit 

A Thivtnv statue dominates the cow, and merely a passing 
main square and a museum depicts phenomenon in the fringes of the 
scenes of Ids life. His sayings are Communist world. 


His successors, Yuri V. Andre- 
enko, 
sited, 
over- 


t\ fSZSlgSrtTteSS- . KUA1A lumfur, Matys * (.mo - » 


^bomeis visited by enry grade- SVS barricade, of couoele walkm some 


'Busiest Office Fve Ever Worked In 9 Widespread South African Police 

Handles Woes of American Travelers Fraud Is Seen Hold 441 in Crackdown 

J In Bait! Vote 


Hitam, deputy prime minis ter and minister of home affairs, told parlia- 
ment Tuesday. . , 

Malaysian security patrols and special forces will be stationed along 
the barricade, Mr. Musa said. It is aimed chiefly at keeping out Commu- 
nist guerrillas from southern Thailand and at preventing the smuggling rf 
dnigs, firearms and other items from Thailand into Malaysia. 

The northwestern link will be a concrete wall about 15 feet (437 
meters) high in Perak state near Kroh. Mr. Musa called the project a 
“positive move accepted by both countries” and said that Malaysia and 
Thailand have reached complete understanding about it. 


New York Tuna Serrice 

WASHINGTON — The calls 
are funnded to a room an the 
fourth floor erf the State Depart- 
ment, from aD over the United 
States and around the dock, half a 

millio n of tbem a year. 

A husband is missing in Thai- 
land. A son is out of money in 
France. A sister has died m Brazil. 
A business partner has been arrest- 
ed in EgypL 

The calls are taken by the Office 
of Overseas Citizens Services, 
which acts as an intermediary be- 
tween relatives and friends of 
American travelers and U.S. em- 
bassies and foreign governments. 

With more than 16 milli on 
Americans living abroad or expect- 
ed to travel abroad this year, the 
office’s staff of 75 is one of the 
busiest in Washington, particularly 
at the height of the qimmw tourist 


Furey, remembers a far more 
cal case involving a father 
daughter was in Nepal. 

“He was desperate because he 
hadn't heard from her in months,” 
Mr. Furey said. “He was convinced 
she was dead, and he asked us to 
get the embassy to find her body. 
Within two hours of our notifying 
the embassy, they had located his 
daughter. She had been sending 
him letters, but they most have 
been lost in the maiL The j 
ecstatic.” 


: man was 


of 


Many calleis seem on the verge 
ic. The officials who Grid the 


try to calm them down and 
then to solve the problem at hand. 
This is done by contacting U.S. 
diplomatic officials abroad or the 
government of the country con- 
cerned or both. 

- The office was called on to relay 
information to families of the hos- 


An estimated 5,000 American 
travelers ended up out of 
last year. The office 
families to have about S3 million 
transferred to embassies to tide 
them over. 

The office also receives 100 or so 
cables a day from U.S. diplomatic 
posts abroad. Many result m phone 
calls to relatives or business cd- 
leagues of Americans who are trav^ 
abroad and have run into dif- 
Ity. 


Six thousand Americans died 
abroad last year, and the office 
became involved in wr«t of these 
cases, other in notifying relatives 
or helping to tnalce. arrangements. 
Officials say such emergences are 
the most difficult of all to hanHte 

TAD. Tharp, the director of the 
office; said the Foreign Service offi- 
cers who make half his staff are 
rotated into other jobs evay three 
years “to make sure they don't go 
stale.” 

“It’s crazy, intense and very 
stressful” Mr. Furey said of the 
work, carried out in a large room in 
which the phones seem never to 
stop rin g in g “This is die busiest 
office Tve ever worked in,” he said. 

Officials lament that there are 


(Cootioued from Page I) 


linHts to what they can do for trou- 
bled travelers. Wjtl 


fith regard to the 
arrests of Americans abroad, of 
which there were nearly 3,000 in 
1984, the Stale Department avoids 
interfering in local government 
processes and does not take a stand 
on guilt or innocence. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

out elections; the right of the presi- 
dent to nam his successor, and the 
creation of a prime minister post. 

Opposition leaden have asserted 
that the constitutional changes 
were enacted in response to threats 
from the United States and other 
nations that foreign aid would be 
cut off if the government failed to 
improve tinman right* and move 
toward democracy. 

The opposition leaden describe 
the latest rfianaet as a step back- 
ward hue*™* they provide for a 
prime minister who is to serve at 
the pleasure of the president and a 
law that requires political parties to 
promise not to oppose the institu- 
tion of p residen t-xor-lif e, the ceo- 


crowd of abort 150 people who 
were stoning them and their vdri- 
. 1 F™ des, according to the police. An 
<HM| official spokesman said it was now 


Court Rejects Greek Publisher’s Suit 


Made policy not to soedfv thelocatkmof Bobolas, the publisher of Greece’s largcst-drculation paper, 

?r » a rut Etlmos, nad filed a suit seeking $379,000 m damages from Paul Anastas, 


Port Elizabeth and 
having ■t**nd*H an ill 
meeting last week in a 
township. 

The arrest occurred an hour be- 
fore she had been scheduled to 
meet three former UJL cabinet ■ Sharp Tone by UJS. 

Hie Reagan administration is- 


ATHENS (AP) — A civil court, riling a legal technicality, has dis- 
missed two suits involving a journalists accusation that an Athens 
blisher had links to the KGB. it was announced Tuesday. 


that’s that,” he said 


a Cypriot journalist who works as an Athens-based correspondent for 
The New York Times and the Daily Telegraph of London. Mr. Anastas 
had published a book alleging that Ethnos was published in cooperation 


that the South African government 


considerable ittponabiUty" 


with the disinformation department of the Soviet intelligence service. 

A $ 1 5-nnIBon counlersint was filed by Mr. Anastasi. In dismissing the 
suits in May. the court said they should have been filed in criminal courts 
that judged earlier cases involving the two men. 


KKSS " 11 ^ Austria Readies List of Tainted Wines 

trom Washington 


VIENNA (Reuters) — Government officials were drawing up a list of 
Austrian wines illegally doctored with a chemical used in automobile 
antifreeze, three months after the scandal broke. 

The list was bring prepared Tuesday as authorities exchanged reoinri- 
n.itif»rtg over the ap p are nt delay in taking action. Some called for the 


tral point of their opposition. 
Officials at one of the v 


tages aboard the jetliner hijacked 
last month in the Middle East 


James P. Callahan, a press offi- 
cer, said the staff worked day and 
night and called the fanriiw-s of 
each hostage twice a day, even 
when there was no information to 
relate. The office was also flooded 
with calls from tourists wondering 
whether airports they were plan- 
ning to use woe safe. 

Another official Thomas P. 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGRS 


BACHELORS • MASTBTS* DOCTORATE 

FerWoric, AokMc. UfeExpwW*. 

SmKMalMmuim 
for from evaluation. 


PAQFfC WESTERN UMVERSUY 

600 N. Sepulveda Blvd. 

Loa AraMta*. Gaiffomki 
90049, Dept. 23, USA 


In Beirut, Shiite Gunmen 
Flock to See f Rambo 9 FUm 


Ream 

BEIRUT — The American film hero Rambo, a virile war veteran 
who takes bloody vengeanace in Vietnam to win the release of 
imprisoned UJS. servicemen, has enchanted the Moslem mifitiamen of 
West Beirut, despite its pro-American message: 


After the Beirut airport hijacking incident, in winch Moslem* 
Ul he " ‘ ~ ' ' “ * * ‘ 


militiamen maided US. hostages, President Ronald Reagan joked 
that he would know what to do next time: Send Rambo. 

In “Rambo, First Blood — Part H" Sylvester Stallone is a Vietnam 
War veteran who returns to Southeast Asia to rescue U.S. prisoners of 
war. Abandoned by US. officials while on his mission, Rambo 
shooLs, bombs and garottes scores of Vietnamese to free the Ameri- 
cans and salvage what he sees as America’s lost honor. 

In Beirut,- Shiite Moslem militiamen are flocking to the Estzal 
theater, where a billboard of Rambo, festooned with weapons, towers 
above Hamra Street, where Moslem factions recently fought battles. 

Mohammed Swcid, a film critic for As Safir, a leftist daily newspa- 
per, said Beirut a u dien c es responded overwhelmingly to Rambo’s 
personality and would tend to overlook his Cold War politics. 

“What fascinates people here,” Mr. Swrid said, “is that Rambo 
believes only in his gun. only in himsdf. that everything in his world is 
done by brute force.” Politically, the critic said, Rambo is “an 
American messiah. The US. has been seeking him ever since the 
hostage crisis in Iran. But in militaiy toms, he is a fighter’s idoL” 


one ol the votmg sta- 
tions ai city hall said after several 
hours of operation Monday morn- 
ing that only one “no"baflot had 
been cast 

The ballots were printed in 
French, a language that is under- 
stood fay only about. 10 percent of 
Haiti’s six mBH on people. The uni- 
versal language of Haiti is Creole, a 
mixture mainly of African dialects 
and archaic French with some En- 
glish and Spanish. (NYT, AP) 


on bafl of 100 rand ($53).. 

The police also raided the Johan- 

nesbtug headquarters of the South The administration said the sys- 
Aftican Council of rhumb#* and tem apartheid was “largely re- 
united Democratic Front, the sponabfe for the violence” m Hack 
country’s largest anti-apartheid townships. 

movement, arresting one person The remarks went beyond an ad- resignation of Agriculture Minister Gflnther Haiden. The list was expecl- 

there and seizing records, the state- ministration statement Saturday ed to be sent to the gsvemmeuts of Austria's nine provinces, which will be -a 

V1-J ” jwVeri to dis*rih»te it immediat ely and warn the public against drinking 1 
the wines, a Health Ministry official said. 

The wines contain tone diethylenc-glyool which can cause kidney 
datnoy Tainted wines have also been found in West Germany, Switzer- 
land, toe Netherlands, Britain, France, Poland and North Amoica- Wine 
from 38 firms in the provinces of Burgenland, Lower Austria, Syria, the 
Tirol and Vienna were expected to appear on the Austrian list. 


ran television network reported, that it was “deeply troubled” by 
Johannesburg and Port FI era- the coatinnmg unrest in South Al- 
beth are die two major cities cov- nca. 

A State Department official said 
» w- ^ uJnitAitia6oa - s sharper toue 
635 ^ Monday reflected a desire to ensure 

cunty forces are given extraonh- that South Africa understood U.S. 

concern about the unrest. 


1 


narify broad powers tp arrest and 
hold people indefinitely, seize 
property and dose down opposi- 
tion groups without judicial review. 

Two black men were killed in the 
eastern Cape and two more were 
injured when p ol ice m e n fired at a 


U.S. House Tries to Keep Budget Cuts 

WASHINGTON (UPI) — House Democratic leaders decided Tues- 


t -v' 1' 


appear to be encouraging an over- 
throw of the government by more 


radical dements in South Africa. 


day to propose a reso l ution that would bind all spending bills to the 
of the Ui budget f 


Reagan Approves Pact Willi China 
To Sell Nuclear Power Technology 


version of the U 2 L budget that it has passed. 

The resolution, vdnch win be voted on Wednesday, is viewed as cenam 
to pass. It is intended to protect dx: cuts the House has approved fa* the 
budget regardless of whether a c ompr om ise is readied with the Senate. 


Both chambers have approved budgets that would reduce the deficit by 
S56 billion in fiscal 1986, but a co mp romise committee has tried unsuc- 


cessfully far more than six weds to reach agreement on specifics. 

Top congressional leaders from both parties were planning to meet 
with white House offidals in an effort 10 break the impasse. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

Was h i n gton should act as an inter- 
mediary. 

The dominant issues in Tues- 
day’s talks woe expected to be re- 
lations with the Soviet Union, Chi' 
na’s modernization effort and the 
mutually cautious plans to lower 
trade restrictions. 

The United States did S6J bil- 
Uon in trade with China last year. A 
projected $6 billion in nuclear pow- 


er plant sales could be opened to 
UJS. bidding under the new pact, 


which was signed later Tuesday. 

The president was briefed Tues- 
day morning by Mr. Shultz and his 


nuclear generating capacity by'the FdltagOn CflHs Rfl Ullll l l lg flU AcCldeBt 
The Energy Department has a p- 


nationa] security adviser, Robert G 
me, before be' approved the 






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there's a superb hotel 
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earest Inter*! 


or call yotir nearest !nter>Continental sales office. 



Poland Shores 
Confidence 


(Continued from Page 1) 
year for the government to solicit 
cooperation from its opponents. 

In addition, the government un- 
veiled last wedcaod a large bronze 


monument tmnnring 22,000 mem- 
bers of the internal security forces 
who died putting down anti-Com- 
munist resistance fighters after 
World War IL 

Last October, several security 
policemen were tried and convicted 
of the brutal murder of a pro-Soli- 
dazhy Roman Catholic priest, the 
Reverend Jerzy Popietoszko. 

Paying tribute to tltesecuritypo- 
lice so 90on after the trial was “nice 
salt into the wounds of tiie 
opposition,” a Western 
Commented. 


Rock Hudson Has 


McFariane, 
signing of the U&-Chmesejiudear 
agreement. 

The accord sets up a legal frame- 
work for tiie sale of nndear reac- 
tors to China for peaceful purposes 
and stipulates tMrt no matenaT or 
equipment shall be used for nndear 
explosive devices or any other mili- 
tary purposes. 

The pact was initialed during 
Mr. Ragan’s visit to China 15 
months ago, but was hdd up be- 
cause of mtdhgence information 
thal fhma mi gh t have Pa- 

kistan in its efforts to develop a 
nuclear-weapons capability. Both 
China and Pakistan have dwiiad 
the reports. 

In his briefing, the senior U.S. 
official said that China has under- 
gone a “very substantial change” in 
its attitudes toward preventing tiie 
spread of nuclear weapons in re- 
cent years. 

The Chinese, he said, made a 
public commitment to noaprolifer- 
atkm of nuclear arms in January 
1984, and repeated it in May 1984, 
and again in January 1985. 

'“It’s not written down in die 
agreement, but it Is absolutely dear 

to China” that U.S. cooperation in 
nuclear matters will cease If the 
terms of US. law axe not met, he 
said. 


mes far sales to China 
l§st two yearn, bat none has 
completed because the State De- 
partment has not concurred. 

At the White House on Tuesday, 
Mr. Reagan’s spokesman, Larry 
Speakes, denied that pressure fcom 
bu sines ses had played any part in 


the approval of the pact. 


WASHI NGTO N (AP) — The Defense Department on Tuesday ^ 
backed off from an earlier suggestion that a Soviet truck may have 
purposely rammed a U-S. militaiy car carrying three Americans m East 
Germany two weeks ago. A spokesman said the incident now appears to 
have bear an accident 

The spokesman, Fred Hoffman, said U.S. and Soviet militaiy officials 
had met after tire July 13 accident, which prompted a UJS. protest One 
American soldier was injured slightly in the incident, which occurred on a 
public highway northeast of East Berlin. 

“We’re still looking into the matter " Mr. Hoffman said. “Bat that 
have been discussions with the Soviets. Indi c at ions are that thy j nri rtffflt 
may not have been intentional” He declined to elaborate. 


Inoperable Cane# 


The' treaty nmst be submitted to 
Congress, bnt win automatically 


take effect after congress remains 
in session continuously for 90 days 
.without both houses passing a reso- 
Intion rqecting the pad 
Mr. Reagan's meeting with Mr. 
Li came one day after he nominat- 
ed Winston Lonl until recently the 
president of the Council on Farr 
rign Relations, to be U.S. ambassar 
dor to China. 

A . . Mr. Lord, 47, is expected to win 
of P^mtlteaiburb * confirmation by the Senate to re- 
tf Neumy^or-Sane, tte publicist, ^ Arthur Hummel 
Date Olson, said. “His doctors 


Cottyilcdbr Our Staff From Utpmdta 

LOS ANGELES — Rock Hud- 
son, one of Hollywood’s top stars 
during the 1950s and 1960s, is suf- 
from inoperable liver cancer 


possibly linked to acomred im- 
mune deficiency syndrome, or 
AIDS, his publicist said Tuesday. 
Mr. Hudson, 59, is at the Ameri 


have d iagn osed that he has cancer 
of the irwr and that it is not opera- 
ble,” Mr. Olson said. “He's been in 


and out of a coma. He’s a very, very 
sick man.” 


Mr. Olson said that, while Mr. 
Hudson’s most recent examination 
gave no indication of AIDS, “we 
have had reports from others that 
Rodt wassuffetfog from AfD& We 
simply don’t know. The reports 
have been confused.” (UPI AP) 


{dace Arthur! 

■ 15 Comparaes Seek Sates 

Fifteen U5. companies have 
sought authorization to sell nuclear 
power equipment and services to 
China, Tne New York Times re- 
ported from Washington, . 

A government official said Mbu- 
day that the companies are sedang 
to seH reactor vessels, — 
and design services, 

other hardware to 

plans to build lQjOOQ megawatts of 



■vt. 








.thi AtHMUrfftaa 

On Tuesday. 


Israel to Free 100 More Lebanese Prisoners 


fea Service 


JERUSALEM — The Israeli 


mateiy 335 
detainees still 


Shiite Moslem, 
in Israel 



Army command reaffirmed Tues- 
day that it was 


Those released 'Wednesday 


4 rot&sse 

Wednesday about 100 more Leba- 
n«e prisoners capt 

tails into southern Le „ 

tins year. This woddJeaveapproa- 


... incsoay 

would be the first group ct Arab 
prisoners defamed at the Adit pro- 
, OT camp.BOutfa of Haifa 10 be re. 
-iijinng teasedamoe3) prisoners were freed 
rather afterthehgadmgofaTWAairiui. 
er to Beirut last momh. 


Smce then, Israeli officials to* 
continued to main min that tin? ! 
were not releasing prisoners in ** 
' use to terrorist pressure but A* 
detirinfcs had been hdd a® 


security in southern Lebanon 1 
stabilized. 



Page* 3 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 



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UFE Ap'I KK. WH ITE HOUSE Amy Carter, 17, daughter of fonna President 
Jgmm uite, wons at tmr sraimier job as a nmner in tte bond pits at CKcago Board of 

Trade.*! don’t usually get recognized,” she sakL “I fed Hke one of the crowd.” ‘ 


To Television 

Battered by libel suits and at- 
tacks on their credibility, televi- 
skm networks and local stations 
are beginning to lei viewers talk 
back on screen. Critics of ABC 
confront network journalists six 
times a year. NBC runs segments 
of letters for four or five minutes 
every two weeks on its 'Today" 
show. CBS dropped its letters 
program and has yet to adopt a 
new format for airing viewers’ 
opinions. 

Newspapers do not run such a 


publish critical letters. Readers 

pawn simp ly turn 10 anftthffr pay 

if the material doesn't appeal to 
than. Television, on the other 
hand, risks sending viewers to 
another channel. 


Tips for Nominees 
At Senate Hearings 

Tom C Kordogos. a former 
lobbyist for the White House on 
Capitol Hill, now represents 
such corporations as Anhenser- 
Busch, Boeing, Heinz and Nor- 
throp. But he continues to lead 
the Reagan administration a 
hand with Senate confirmation 

hearing S- 

The work is unpaid, but the 
contacts and publicity are price- 
less. Some people question the 
propriety of a private-sector lob- 


byist helping the White House. 
Mr. Korologos has hdped with 
such contentious appointments 
as Alexander M. Haig Jr. for 
secretary of state, Edwin Meese 
3d for attorney general and Wfl- 
Bam P. dark for secretary of the 
interior. 

; His advice to nominees: Ap- 
pear at the hearing on tfme and 
don’t speak imlcMi spoken to. 
Remember that senators “can 
ask anything, questions that 
would never be admissible is 
court — hearsay, rumors, any- 
thing.” And finally, no nominee, 
before being confirmed, should 
ever go near his or her prospec- 
tive office, “not even to measure 
the chair. It’s an affront to the 
Senate” 


Short Takes 

The federal Merit Systems 
Protection Board, in a poll of 
4,900 federal employees, asked 
them whether they felt they 
would be rewarded or promoted 
if they worked harder. Sixty- two 
percent said they considered this 
unlikely. 

hi last week’s Intellectual All- 
Stars softball game on the Mall 
in Washington, the American 
Enterprise Institute, which leans 
to the political right, fielded only 
left-handed pitchers and the 
Brookings Institution, which is 
more lertish, used only right- 
handed pitchers. The right — or 


was it the left? — prevailed. En- 
terprise won 16-13. 

The Real Tara 
Of Scariett O'Hara 

Next year is the 50th anniver- 
sary of tiKpubticatiou of “Gone 
With the Wind” and- two coun- 
ties near Atlanta — Clayton and 
Coweta are quarreling over 
which should buiM a theme park 
based on Tara, the plantation ffl 
Scariett O’Hara, the heroine, the 
Los Angeles Times reports. 

Betty Tahnadge, a business- 
woman and the former wife of 
Senator Herman Talmadge. paid 
$5,000 seven years ago for the 
facade of the Tara plantation 
house that was used in the fihn- 
Shc plans to donate it to which- 
ever county produces the most 
“credfflc memorial" to Margaret 
Mitchell, the book’s author. 

Oddly, the film Tara, a stately, 
colonnaded mansion, bears tittle 
resemblance to the Tara of the 
novel Mrs. MitcheQ described it 
as “a dmnsy, sprawling budd- 
ing” that was built “according to 
no architectural plan whatever.” 

Bert David O. Sehnick, who 
produced the film, ordered the 
f».in«dr structure that is seen in 
the film, knowing that the public 
would not accept a nondescript 
budding as a real Southern plan- 
tation. 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


liked and Hated, British Class System Still Rules 


In Mexico, Opposition Loses Power 


jirpr.-r:!*-: 



By Richard J. Mrislin 

New York TlmaSaviee 

MEXICO Cmr — The nearly 
final assignment of seats in Mexi- 
co's national Chamber of Deputies 
after elections this month his re- 
sulted in a sharp loss of power fra. 
the country’s two strongest opposi- 
tion parties. 

The conservative National Ac- 
tion Party, the country's strongest 
opposition group, wril hold 38 
seats. That is a net loss of 13 seats 
in the 400-member chamber, which 
is the lower house of (he National 
Congress. 

The leftist Mexican Unified So- 
cialist Party, winch has run a dis- 
' tant third place in voting, will hold 
12 seals, five fewer than it gained in 
elections three years ago. 

The governing Institutional Rev- 
olutionary Party wflJ control 292 of 
the 400 seats. 

The distribution is based on a 
complicated combination of seat 
assignments. Three hundred, seats 


are chosen by direct election, and 
100 others are reserved for minor- 
ity parties and are allocated ac- 
cording to tiie percentage of the 
vote that these parties reorive. 

The National Action Party 
ted six seats in direct elections, 
other directly elected seats 
went to the Authentic Party of the 
Mexican Revolution, a tiny organi- 
zation that won them despite mini- 
mal advertising, public campaign- 
ing or apparent support 
Like most dements of the July 7 
elections, the distribution of seats 
by proportional representation 
drew charges of fraud from oj 
don leaders, who said ibqr did 
appear to reflect the mil of the 
public as shown by the direct vote 
for National Congress. 

They said lhc results appeared to 
be skewed to favor the Authentic 
Party of the Mexican Revolution, 
tire Socialist Workers Party and the 
Popular Socialist Party, all groups 
that tend to vote with the 
party on key issues. 


not 


mg tax dodgers. 
However, ' 


banking sources said 
that none of the ideas was new and 
that there were not enough details 
governing to assess the potential effect of the 
plan. 


Alvah Bessie Dies; Writer 
Was One of 'Hollywood Ten’ 




■to 


* i*!,' 

■il 1 . . TTw Associated Press 

TERRA LINDA, California — 
Alvah Bessie, 81, a writer who 
fought .in the Abraham Lincoln 
Battalioh_af the International Bri- 
gades in the Spanish Civil War and 
was one of the “Hollywood Ten” 
blacklisted during the 1950s, died 
Sinday of a heart attack. 

- ; Mr. Bessie's books include “Men 
in Battle,” about the Spanish Civil 
. War, and “Inquisition in Eden,” 
-CQQjrequDgbds struggles as a black- 
listed writer 

.V. Mr. Bessie was jailed for a year 
Boy, SteriHzecL, Wins Snit 

- y • ... Ifaiud Press ]nlemaHorsoi 

"r HARTFORD, Connecticut — A 
E>year-old boy who was accidently 
. given a vasectomy during two oper- 
■iXy fflions for hernias by a navy doctor 
7 50. 2982 will receive $820,000 under 

1 -■ out-of-court settlement of a fed- 

lawsuit. 


in 1947 after refusing to answer the 
House Un-American Activities 
Committee's questions. He was one 
of the so-called Hollywood Ten — 
directors and screenwriters black- 
listed from the film industry after 
defying the committee. 

Leo Alexander, 79, 
Consultant at Nuremberg 

WESTON, Massachusetts fUPI) 
— Dr. Leo Alexander, 79, a Vien- 
na-born psychiatrist and neurolo- 
gist and a former Harvard profes- 
sor, died Saturday of cancer. 

He was a consultant u> the US. 
panel at the Nuremberg war crimes 
trials in 1946-47. 

N Other deaths: 

P. V, Glob, 84, recognized as 
Denmark’s foremost archaeologist, 
Monday, in Arhus, Denmark. 

Charles L. Kuhn, 83, professor 
emeritus of fine arts at Harvard 
University, Sunday, in Cambridge. 
Massachusetts. 


Arrest Warrant . 
Issued for Meese 

Los Angeles Times Service- 

LOS ANGELES —The city 
attorney’s office has reissued a 
warrant for the arrest of Attor- 
ney General Edwin Meese 3d 
fra failure to pay a $10 jaywalk- 
ing ticket that he received five 
years ago. 

A Los Angeles police officer 
issued the ticket June 11, 1980, 
□ear Ronald Reagan's head- 
quarters for the presidential' 
primary election in California, 
Ted Goldstdn, a spokesman for 
the city attorney, said Monday. 

Mr. Meese, now the highest- 
ranking U.S. law enforcement 
official, is liable not only for the 
$10 fine, Mr. Goldstein said, 
but for an additional $120 JO in 
interest and penalities. 

“It’s the sort of thing you set 
down some place ana forget 
about,” Patriot Korten, deputy 
director of public affairs fra the 
Department of Justice, said of 
his boss’s ticket 


By William Tuohy 

. . Los Angries Times Service 

. LONDON-. — Prince Edward, 
Queen Elizabeth’s youngest son, 
and three royal cousins celebrated 
their 21st birthday last month at a 
lavish party at Windsor Castle. The 
gathering, with the queen herself as 
hostess, reportedly drew 600 aristo- 
cratic guests arid cost dose to 
$100,000. 

Pictures of the gnests sipping 
champagne were splashed over the 
pages of (he popular press, but 
than was Hide public criticism of 
the cost among the queen's sub- 
jects. 

The British class system, in fact, 
is still alive and wcR despite pleas 
from Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher — agrocer’s daughter — 
fra a country ‘Tree of class distinc- 
tion,’’ with privilege replaced by an 
“enterprise col tore.” 

To be sure, not everyone believes 
that the British class system is bad. 
Some argue that the rigidities in- 
herent in the system nave given 
Britain an uncommon degree of so- 
cial stability. 

But more than one critic has as- 
serted that Britain's upper class 
sets the tone for the rest of the 
couDtiy and that this causes con- 
siderable damage. Such critics 
draw attention, m particular, to 
what they see as an upper-class 
notion that bard work, particularly 
in commerce and mdnstry, is just 
not good form. 

“Die essentially static views of 
the old British upper class have 
won the day in Bniam,” said Ralf 
Dahrendorf, a former director of 
the London School of Economics. 
“They have spread, first to the 
working doss, then to tie middle 


class, or perhaps the other way 
mud. But they have not been di- 
luted, let alone replaced, by the 
ambitions and achievements of (he 
industrial middle class."’ 

And the values of the upper class 
are not worth emulating, Mr. Dah- 
rendorf contended, 

“Really hard work is simply not 
done” by the upper class, he said. 
“Work is a combination of dab- 
bling in the running of things, 
whether as nonexecutive directors, 
members of boards or gentlemen 
farmers, and of voluntary work for 
charities or other benevolent pur- 


■ I m »- t |IM 

qualify 

tneuppi 


According to the novelist Antho- 
ny Burgess, the author of “The 
Clockwork Orange" and “Earthly 
Powers.” the classes are so static 
that financial success alone cannot 
someone as a member of 
upper class. 

- Britain’s ruling class “rules 
through prestige, not money," Mr. 
Burgess said in a recent commen- 
tary in the Daily MaiL “No amount 
of financial leveling wiU ever liqui- 
date that class.” 

Class distinctions begin with the 
royal family. 

Mr. Burgess said: “There is a 
fine stratum of useless, degam re- 
tainers surrounding the royal fam- 
ily. Out of this climbs into the bo- 
som of a family a personage like 
Princess Diana, whom all the world 
loves. 

“She bakes no bread, paints no 
pictures, reads no books above the 
level of Freddie Forsyth, contrib- 
utes nothing to the world’s work; 
die m erdy proclaims the purely 
decorative function of her class. 
And this is altogether admirable. 
This is trim the gruffest mem- 


ployed miner accepts as a part of a 
heaven he will never reach.” 

As many see it, class distinctions 
in Britain are fostered by the strati- 
fied educational system. Lower- 
class children attend state-run 
schools and often drop out eariy. 
Middle-class children go to local 
grammar schools or minor prep 
schools. And. despite growing pres- 
sure to award scholarships to wor- 
thy but poor scholars, the expen- 
sive boarding schools such as Eton. 
Harrow and Winchester remain 
largely the preserve of the upper 
classes. 

What happens at school also 
makes a difference. The brightest 
students at Eton, according to 
young men there who are about to 
graduate, are looking forward to 
careers not in industry or com- 
merce but in banking or finance, 
where they hope to make some 
money and then possibly go into 
politics. 

Traditionally, too, education at 
traditional universities such as Ox- 
ford and Cambridge has concen- 
trated on producing generalists, 
not specialists. In the past, Oxford 
and Cambridge men were expected 
to lake on the mantle of empire, to 
go into government, the armed ser- 
vices, the clergy or teaching. 

The so-called Oxbridge system, 
according to those who have gone 
through it, has a heavy bias against 
tiie kind of education that in the 
United States. West Germany and 
France produces leaders of com- 
merce and industry. 

Industry, then, is viewed by some 
of the best minds in Britain as a 
decidedly second-rate choice, and 
this is reflected in the quality of 
Britain's corporate executives. 

As an executive recruiter put it: 


“The higher up you go in British 
industry and commerce, the worse 
it is in terms of ability and compe- 
tence." 

Some experts believe that class 
differences are a key factor in the 
industrial disputes that have 
plagued Britain. Most British exec- 
utives are uncomfortable with the 
workers, and the workers take 
pride in not mixing with managers. 

There is also markedly less occu- 
pational mobility here than in oth- 
er industrialized countries. 

The Economist, a weekly maga- 
zine. has pointed out that in no 
other developed country is the 
working class as tightly knit as it is 
in Britain, where three-quarters of 
the workers are second-generation 
blue-collar, compared with less 
than half in the United States. 

* For its pan. the middle class ap- 
pears to have accepted the values of 
the upper class, and it poses no 
threat to the aristocrats. Thus, the 
middle class contributes to the sta- 
bility that is envied by other coun- 
tries. 

And from the middle class it is 
possible to rise. Mrs. Thatcher, who 
grew up in an apartment above her 
father’s store, is a prime example. 
She worked her way out by winning 
a scholarship to Oxford. Her ac- 
cent, loo, changed along the way. 

Having made the climb herself, 
Mrs. Thatcher seems to believe that 
the way is open to all. although 
most sociologists would disagree. 

And though she has called for a 
meritocracy, she has reins tinned 
the practice of granting hereditary 
peerages, a practice that was aban- 
doned in the 1960s by a Labor 
Party prime minister. Harold Wil- 
son. 

The social differences in Brit- 


War Under the Ice: U.S. Nary Rushes Arctic Study 


■ EcononircFto Is Announced 

President Miguel de la Madrid 
has announced a plan to combat 
Mexico’s economic problems and 
to restore confidence in the peso, 
Reuters reported. 

The peso was devalued about 35 
percent on July 11. 

Mr. de la Madrid, opening the 
second national banking conven- 
tion in Guadalajara on Monday, 
said his plan included: 

• Reducing public spending. 

• Continuing to dismantle im- 
port barriers by substituting mod- 
em tariffs for Import permits. 

• Making foreign exchange poli- 
cies market oriented while still 
seeking to protect international re- 
serves. 

« Tightening customs proce- 
dures and more vigorously pursu- 


By Lee Dye 

Los Angela Tunes Service 

LOS ANGELES — - A major in- 
crease in the use of Arctic waters by 
Soviet and U5. submarines during 
the last two years has forced the 
U.S. Navy to undertake a scientific 
project to learn more about the 
powerful forces that shape that 
part of the Earth. 

The cat-and-mouse game that 
submarine crews have been playing 


in Arctic waters lately grew out of 
fears that the Soviet union may 
have achieved the capability to 
launch missiles toward inland tar- 
gets in the United States, long re- 
garded as beyoadtfceir reach. 

So little is known about the Arc- 
tic, a region that could play a cru- 
cial role in any military showdown 
between the Soviet Union and the 
United States, that the navy found 
It necessary to start an urgent five- 
year research program. 

Much of the research is m the 
area of sound propagation —bow 
sound travels freon one' point to 
anptber — under the ice cap, ac- 
cording to James Wilson, chief sci- 
entist of the project 

Beneath the ice, sound waves 
must do tiie work of this eyes as well 
as the ears, providing the only clues 
about what may lie ahead in the 
often treacherous waters. 

But sound waves behave much 
differently under the ice than they 
do in the open ocean, clouding ibe 
“picture" provided by such instru- 
ments as sonar, which is essentially 
an underwater radar system, and 
listening devices that should be 
able to distinguish between the 
sounds made by another submarine 
and tire sounds of ice crashing 
against ice. 

“The transmission of sound is 
just totally different there,” Mr. 
Wilson said. “It's just a completely 
different world.” 

“The Arctic has been a scientifi- 
cally ignored area,” added Mr. Wil- 
son, a physicist turned oceanogra- 
pher. He said that past expeditions 
to the Arctic have been “**' - — 
vival nature,” leaving _ 
understanding of forces 

The scientists and others spent 
six weeks near the North Pole last 
spring on research that will contin- 
ue several years. They expect to be 
bade in that area again next spring, 
the only time of the year that then 
work can be carried out 

“We’re on the frontier of under- 
standing what makes the Arctic 
work,” be said 

The project is of such impor- 
tance that the chief of naval opera- 
tions, Admiral James D. Watkins, 
visited the area last May, arriving 
aboard the attack submarine Tre- 
pan g, which broke cautiously 
through the ice. 

The admiral is a former subma- 
rine co mmand er and spent several 
boors at tiie research site before 

^M^WiLon axuHSf fellow re- 
searchers found that sound waves 
are bent down sharply and then 
upward as they travel beneath the 
icecap, much the same as a window 
glass refracts the sun’s light- The 
sound waves then strike the bottom 
of the ice and are either reflected 
back into the deep, or more often 
are scattered in many directions by 
the uneven surface, blurring any 
image that might be received by 
sensory devices. 


He said that it is not clearly un- 
derstood why the sound waves are 
beat so extrandy, but be suggested 
it may have something to do with 
the level of salinity, the extremely 
cold temperatures and the high 
pressures created by the weight of 
the massive ice fields. 

To learn more about it, Mr. Wil- 
son and his co-workers drilled 
holes through the ice at three 
camps about 250 miles from the 
North Pole. Charges of 55 pounds 
(24.9 kilograms) of TNT were 
dropped through the holes and det- 
onated. 

The blast shook the ice even at 
considerable distances, Mr. Wilson 
said, something that did not go 
unnoticed by workers whose lives 
depended on the ice’s not breaking. 

The sound of the explosion was 
monitored by sensors at various 
locations and at different distances 
from the impact area in an effort to 
learn how the sound waves are af- 
fected by sud> things as tempera- 
ture changes, currents, salinity, and 
texture of the bottom of the ice. 

The bottom of the ice field, 
winch is floating on the ocean, is 


very mconristeat, reflecting the dy- 
namic forces that mold the field. 
For example, giant pressure ridges 
form on top of the ice when two 
fields crush together, leaving a long 
scar across the ice fidd that may 
rise as high as 50 feet 

The surface ridges are eroded by 
weather, but the same type of 
ridges form on the under side of the 
ice, where they are shielded from 
the weather. Those underwater for- 
mations, called “keels,” often ex- 
tend down into the water as much 
as 150 feet, and that kind of forma- 
tion can have a major impact on 
soundwaves. 

Mr. Wilson said the world be- 
neath the icecap is quiet since it is 
deprived, with the exception of 
submarines, of the main source of 
sound waves in the open sea — 
passing ships. 

But it has its own symphony, of 
sorts, created by the powerful 
faces that shape the region. That is 
especially true in the winter when 
storms grind continent-sized 
chunks of ice against cadi other, 
forming pressure ridges that could 
be insurmountable to anyone on 
foot. 


The formation of a ridge is ac- 
companied by “an almost rhythmic 
rumbling'' Mr. Wilson said. 

That “rhythmic rumble." he add- 
ed, provides “certain characteris- 
tics that we can detect” with sound 
sensors, easily distinguishing that 
phenomena from the sounds made 
by a submarine. 

Other sounds also abound in the 
Arctic, he added, including the 
sounds oflife. 

“The underwater sounds are re- 
plete with all sorts of biological 
life,” be sokL 

One mystery that cropped up 
during research involved gray 
whales that travel under the ice, 
surfacing frequently, as they must, 
m widely scattered areas of open 
sea where they can breathe. 

Yet there are many areas in 
which the ice is unbroken for miles 
and miles. How do the whales 
know whidt way to go to be sure 
they will be able to surface for air? 

“It's a complete mystery to us 
right now,” Mr. Wilson said. He 
suspects, however, that whales, like 
submarines, depend on sound 
waves to ward off disaster. 


Danes Tighten Security Alter Attacks 


of a sar- 
in the 


Reuters 

COPENHAGEN — Prime Min- 
ister Poul Schluier delayed a visit to 
the United Slates on Tuesday to 
announce that new security mea- 
sures are being enacted following 
terrorist bombings on Monday. 

Postponing for 24 hours his de- 
parture to Washington, where he is 
to attend a meeting of the Interna- 
tional Democratic Union, Mr. 
Schhiter announced that security 
was to be tightened throughout 
Denmark as well as at border posts 
and ports. 

The Danish press condemned 
the bombings, against a synagogue 
and Jewish home for the elderly 
and a Northwest Orient Airlines 
office. 

Twenty-seven persons were in- 
jured. Five of tbe injured remained 
hospitalized and one of them, an 
Algerian, was in critical condition. 


The casualties included 14 
Danes, three U.S. citizens, four Al- 
gerians, two Poles, a Jordanian, a 
Swede, a West German and a Brit- 
on, police said. 

Danish police said that they had 
few dues about who had carried 
out tbe attacks. Six foreigners de- 
tained for questioning Monday 
night were released without being 
able to assist in investigations, offi- 
cials said. 

Islamic Jihad, a terrorist group, 
claimed that one of its Scandina- 
vian cells was responsible for the 
attacks as a reprisal for an Israeli 
assault last weekend on a village in 
southern Lebanon- 

Military experts detonated a 
bomb Tuesday that was found in a 
harbor canal several hours after the 
explosions Monday . 

The 


marked Northwest Orient, the air- 
line whose office was one of the 
targets. 

Police would not speculate on 
whether the bomb had been thrown 
into the water by terrorists who 
it have been p'lanning more ai- 


might 

tacks. 


In Sweden, Jewish leaders met 
senior police officials Tuesday to 
ask for greater security measures 
after the Copenhagen attacks. 

“We are very worried bv the 
bomb attacks and this is why we 
have requested an emergency meet- 
ing with (he chief of police,” lvar 
Muller, a spokesman for the Jewish 
community, said 

Police in Sweden increased secu- 
rity at Stockholm's synagogue; the 
office of El Al, the Israeli airline; 
and at the Israeli and U.S. embas- 


borab was in a flight bag sies. 


2 Charged in Greenpeace Sinking 


Reuters 

WELLINGTON, New Zealand 
— The police charged two persons 
Tuesday with arson in the sinking 
of the Greenpeace ship Rainbow 
Warrior and with murder in the 
death of the ship's photographer. 

Officers would not identify tbe 
two but said that the arson charges 
were related to two explosions that 
sank tiie convened trawler in 
Auckland harbor on July 10 and 
killed Fernando Pereira, a Dutch 
dtizeaz. They said the two would 
appear in an Auckland court 
Wednesday. 


Prime Minister David Lange 
said Monday that the sinking had 
been “meticulously planned” and 
had clear political overtones. He 
said there was no evidence (hat any 
government was connected with it. 

The vessel, the flagship of the 
international environmental orga- 
nization, was to have led a flotilla 
to French Polynesia next month to 
protest nuclear testing by France. 

Mr. Lange said Monday that tbe 
police and intelligence agencies 
knew the identity and motives of 
the saboteurs, 

The police have asked Interpol 


could not be detained there. The 
yacht and its crew are now reported 
to be near New Caledonia, and 
three detectives have flown to the 
territory. 


ain's class system arc being rein- 
forced by geographical differences. 
The north of England has become 
more heavily uorkmg class, and the 
south has come to be characterized 
by the striving, upuardh mobile 
middle class. 

Unemployment is concentrated 
in the north, and this has !a! some 
obsen ers. among imem the Oxford 
historian Michael Howard, to warn 
of a lone-term threat to Britain’s 
social cohesivencss. Unemployed 
young people, he says, "simply do 
not feel pan of society at all. and 
defiant I v turn ihcir hack on it." 


Police to Eject 
Abusive HecHers 

From Hyde Park 

*■ 

77:i- 4u.v«.'W /Vm 

LONDON — - Police will pro- 
tect orators at Speakers' Comer 
in London's Hyde Park from 
people who deliberately disrupt 
proceedings there. Attorney 
General Sir Michael Haters 
said Monday in Parliament. 

Speakers' Corner. an outdoor 
forum at Marble Arch m the 
northeast comer of the park, 
has long been open to anyone 
who wishes to make a public 
speech. But recently, soap-box 
orators have been harassed by 
abusive hecklers. 

“Ordinary heckling i> part of 
the fun.” the attorney general 
said, "but when it i> designed 
by a group of people scattered 
around the audience whose in- 
tention 15 total disruption, that 
cannot be tolerated." 

Sir Michael said die police 
hod been instructed on using 
existing part rules to send dis- 
ruptive people aw ay . 



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Police sources would not say . for help in the case. The invesiiga- 

. a l.. r - j r • 


whether the two were a Swiss man 
and woman who were arrested in 
Auckland Iasi week and 
with passport offenses. A po 
spokesman said in an interview 
that detectives would continue 
their inquiries both in New Zea- 
land and in the French territory of 
New Caledonia. 


lion has focused on the Swiss cou- 
ple, who rented a camper van in 
Auckland, and on four Frenchmen 
who chartered a yacht in New Cale- 
donia and sailed it to Auckland. 

The yacht was searched by New 
Zealand detectives in the liny Aus- 
tralian territory of Norfolk Island 
on its way back to Noumea but 


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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


Hcralb 


BWERN/OTONAL 



Sribunc Taking First, Tentative Steps to Arab-Israeli Peace 


PoWiabed With The New York Time, and The TduDgm Pori 


New Tactics on Japan Surplus 


. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone 
joined (he flow of Japanese visitors to Eu- 
rope to defend his country’s economic per- 
formance. In Washington it has long been 
the habit to blame most U.S. ills on Japan. 
Lately there has been a chorus of disapprov- 
al from Europe too, as governments seat to 
apportion blame for poor achievement. 

Despite this bashing, Tokyo is relatively 
unabashed. It advises its partners that the 
fault lies in themselves that they are debtors. 
With better knowledge of the Japanese mar- 
ket, their frustrations would vanish. 

The fog of trade war — thickened now by 
deeds as well as words — is needlessly dan- 
gerous. True to the habits of war, the decla- 
rations of commanders on either side con- 
tain truth and falsehood. But both sides may 
have chosen the wrong ground for battle. 

The problem is vast Japan is currently 
amassing a trade surplus of about $50 billion 
a year. This means that it is keeping the 
living standard of its own citizens about 4 
percent lower than it need be. By the same 
token, it is depriving other countries of an 
important number of jobs. The deficit corre- 
sponding to Japan’s trade surplus falls 
mainly on the United States, but is painful 
for Europe, too. There should be some sur- 
plus: otherwise Japan could not contribute 
to the development of the Third World. But 
too much is too much. 

Japan says that in a highly competitive 
market, American and European exporters 
are not making enough effort Not mnngh 
of them speak Japanese, the Japanese main- 
tain. But how many of these exporters speak 
F innish? Finland is a country with winch 
they are able to keep tolerable balance. The 
Japanese argument won’t entirely wash. 

Europe and America, on the other Hand, 
allege that the problem Hes in Japan's deep- 
rooted protectionist policies — its tariffs 
and other barriers, the particularly complex 
standards imposed before any product can 


cross its borders. Argument is then bogged 
down on the minutiae of import controls. 
Japan repeatedly announces programs to 
make the way of the foreign salesman easier. 
None of than have mudi effect, and Mr. 
Nakasone’s latest seems unlikely to prove 
the exception. Seduce a tariff by, say, 20 
percent and you are lucky if this reduces the 
price of the foreign product to the Japanese 
purchaser by 2 percent — a margin easily 
swallowed by a minor fall in the yea or by 
higher profit for the Japanese distributor. 

To instruct the Japanese bureaucrat to 
relax his resistance to foreign goods, or to 
ask the consumer to look a little more kindly 
on them, is likely to produce a polite yawn. 
Japan is still psychologically attuned to a 
form of economic chauvinism, which is why 
the public accepts a system of standards that 
deprives it of choice just as much as it 
encumbers the foreign exporter. 

Japan ought to relax its import barriers, 
but no exporter should expect this to pro- 
duce a quick change. Mr. Nakasone’s action 
will have limited effects because — like Mr. 
Reagan and Mrs. Thatcher — his power over 
his party and the executive is incomplete. 
What is needed is broader economic actum. 

Why does Japan consign so much of its 
output to the outside world rather than to 
satisfying its own needs? Why has growth in 
recent years depended so heavily on exports, 
not sales at home? Because, under present 
conditions, its citizens are encouraged to 
save too much of their intomes and the 
government does not offset tins by lowering 
taxes or raising its spending on the basic 
facilities — roads, homes and hospitals — 
that Japan sorely lades. Here, rather than in 
the piecemeal reform of import policy — is 
where Japan's main immediate effort should 
lie. And it is here that, recognizing Japan’s 
susceptibilities,' the United States and Eu- 
rope should concentrate the discussion. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Botha’s Turn of the Screw 


For decades some people have been observ- 
ing the lagging pace of change in South Africa 
and predicting an “explosion." Others have 
observed that the white minority’s immense 
advantages in organization and armed power 
were bound to deter or, that failing, muffle any 
such confrontation. Both forecasts now seem 
to be coming true. A profound, almost prere- 
volutionary discontent is everywhere appar- 
ent Stirred by the familiar injustices of apart- 
heid, it was brought to a bod by the black 
majority’s evident collective decision that the 
government’s reforms of last year were too 
little and too late. Meanwhile, the government 
is bringing its formidable powers of compul- 
sion more openly to bear. The latest incre- 
ment, in a society that already was for blacks a 
police state, is a declaration of emergency in 
Johannesburg and the eastern Cape areas. 

South Africa is now undergoing the most 
serious unrest it has known. Strikes, state- 
ments, demonstrations, some anti-while sabo- 
tage and terror seem constant Funerals, where 
blacks gather to mourn the victims of white 
guns, have become major political venues. 
There is considerable violence of black against 
.black but. far from being “mindless," it is 
plainly political, reflecting a strategy — part 
spontaneous, part generated by the revolution- 
ary African National Congress — to destroy 
the limited forms of urban-black authority 
established by whites. Black protest, harass- 


ment, arson and murder have left only five of 
38 local black councils operating; 240 black 
councillors, including 27 mayors, have re- 
signed. The black police set up by whites to 
police black towns are under similar pressures. 

btaJTstruc&iies of authority are thra’ttat 
blacks have created themselves. 

Violence, of course, is the essence of apart- 
had: otherwise white power would vanish. 
President P.W. Botha had undertaken limited 
reforms, although none touched the root prob- 
lem of political power few blacks. Now he is 
responding to (he consequent unrest with a 
turn of the screw. It treats the symptoms, in a 
way bound to breed greater alienation, and 
ignores the causes. Mr. Botha’s defenders say 
be has no political man date to move to politi- 
cal reform. In fact, he has no choice, if he is to 
halt his country's passage to a place of unend- 
ing tension and strife. 

The United States indicated that the latest 
unrest justified the government’s “new mea- 
sures.” and called lor the unrest to abate so 
that the government could return to the path 
of reform. This is so-called “constructive en- 
gagement” The US. administration’s inabil- 
ity to say that the people of South Africa are 
struggling for justice against a system that 
denies it to them could not have been demon- 
strated more dearly and more painfully. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Still Missing in Lebanon 


What is the difference between 39 and 7? 
Fickle media and an indifferent public. With 
no more Shiites clamoring for television inter- 
views and President Ronald Reagan engaged 
in another kind of struggle, the seven Ameri- 
cans kidnapped in Lebanon have disappeared 
again from U.S. consciousness. Sure we care, if 
reminded- But we seem not to know how to 
balance the massive obsession with the 39 
TWA hostages and persistent concern for the 
much longer suffering of the seven. 

. There is tidier drama in the story of a 
random group of passengers, who could be any 
of us, plucked out of the air and thrust into the 
eye of an alien political storm. But the still- 
misting Americans are, if anything, more inno- 
cent: They were voluntarily putting themselves 
at risk in Lebanon to help its people. 

William Buckley, a political officer at the 
American Embassy in Beirut, disappeared 16 
months ago. The Reverend Benjamin War, a 


Presbyterian minister, was kidnapped more 
than 14 months ago. The librarian at Beirut’s 
American University, Peter Kilburn. has been 
missing nearly eight months; the director of 
the university’s hospital, David Jacobsen, for 
two mouths; the dean of agriculture, Thomas 
Sutherland, fen five weeks. The Reverend 
Lawrence Martin Jenco, a Roman Catholic 
priest, was snatched more than six months 
ago; Terry Anderson, a correspondent of The 
Associated Press, more than four months ago. 

The State Department has been imploring 
Syria and the Shiites led by Nabib Beni to 
work as hard for their release as they did for 
the TWA hostages. And an Egyptian official 
hinted last week that a deal mi gh t be possible. 

But why was all America swept off to Beirut 
and the homes of grieving relatives of the 39, 
while hardly anyone now mentions the seven? 
We should let the question haunt us. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR JULY 24 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Barcelona Bows to Terrorism 
BARCELONA — Terrorism in Barcelona has 
had two epochs. The first began in 1882 and 
lasted several years. Thirty-nine bombs were 
thrown then by Anarchists, killing many. Thai 
the city resumed its normal life until five years 
ago, when the second period began. During 
these last five years 109 bombs have exploded. 
Fully 300 casualties are estimated for this 
period. The authorities are convinced that the 
dty is a nest of international European anar- 
chism. But the explosion of bombs is a so 
natural occurrence here, they cause not the 
shghesl wonder. People expect them like rains 
or sunny evenings and Barcelonians are as 
much accustomed now to the idea of dying 
from the explosion of a dynamite bomb as 
from the typhus fever or pneumonia. 


1935: British Warned on Gas Attacks 
LONDON — In realization of the fact that 
England, in the event of war, win be attacked 
by airplanes with incendiary and gas bombs, 
the British Medical Association approved res- 
olutions [on July 23] that instruction in mea- 
sures for anti-cbemkal warfare should be giv- 
en to medical students. The chairman of the 
association. H.S. Soultar, stated that the Mbi- 
.istry of Health is alive to the necessity of also 
educating thedvil population in this direction, 
and that precautions will be taken to ensure 
their training for protection against gas at- 
tacks. But Dr. AT. Jones said no adequate 
protection exists. “It is suggested," he said, 
“that we might be supplied with gas masks and 
seek protection in cellars. I think that means 
really that we would be suffocated." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chuma n 19581981 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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© 1985. International Herald Tribune. AH rights reserved. 



P ARIS — The Middle East is stir- 
ring. There has been anew atmo- 
sphere for six months or more reflect- 
ing a maiming sense that it is time to 
try again for an Arab- Israeli settle- 
ment. Now. movement has begun — 


[i-Egyptjan pace treaty in 
Soviet interest in restoring rela- 
tions with Israel is the latest, most 
significant sign. Moscow has not con- 
firmed details of the meeting between 
their two ambassadors in Paris last 
Tuesday, reported by Israeli radio. 
But there was no attempt to deny the 
meeting. Nor was there any sign of 
special irritation at the leak 
The Russians have realized that 
their hope of influencing any peace 
talks requires them to be on speaking 
toms with both sides. With Andrei 
Gromyko out of the way, opening the 
question implies that Moscow takes 
seriously the possibility of a diplo- 
matic engagement between Israel, 
and Jordanians and Palestinians. 

By raising the possibility of re- 
el Jews, hloscow canwark to head off 
opposition to enlarged peace talks 
from angry Israeli hawks and their 
American supporters. The two condi- 


yoy 


tiofis, reported by the Israelis, were to 
make sure the emigrants stay in Israel 
instead of moving on to the United 
States, and to halt anti-Soviet propa- 
ganda that is focused on this issue. 
They would be easy as chicken soup 
for Israel to digest, though they could 
scarcely please adamant Arabs. 

The condition for diplomatic rela- 
tions, broken after the 1967 Arab- 
Iaaeii war, would provoke more con- 
troversy in Israel. But it is 
modest compared with the j 
Soviet requirement of wit 
from all territories occupied in 1967. 
It calls only for “progress" on the 
Golan Heights issue, and hinls that a 
compromise border in the area an- 
nexed by Israel might be negotiated 
with the Syrian government. 

Soviet Ambassador YuH Voront- 
sov told Israeli Ambassador Ovadia 
Sofer that his omission of the West 
Bank and Gaza in the context of 
withdrawal was “not by chance.” 

AD this adds to the mystery of the 
sudden trip President Hafez aJ-Assad 
of Syria nude to Moscow a month 
ago. Mr. Assad may have beat told 
that the Russians intended to move 
as needed to get into peace talks and 


By Flora Lewis 

could not be stopped by Damascus, 
or they may have agreed on. a new 
initiative. Either way, it indicates that 
efforts by King Hussein of Jordan to 
get talks going are budging a land- 
scape that has been long frozen. 

There have been several signs that 
the Russians now understand the 
United States not only would not but 
could not deliver its ally Israel in a 
Middle East deal, just as Moscow 
cannot amply dictate to Syria, let 
alone the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization. This in itself is progress to- 
ward realism essential for agreement. 

Syria’s failed attempt to control 
the PLO, delating Yasser Arafat, 
must complicate Moscow’s plans. 
Bat it clarifies what is possible, and 
may accelerate Mr. Assad’s interest 
in getting involved in Arab-Israeli 


talks before he is left behind, instead 
of just trying to break them up. 

Meanwhile. Kuwait has an- 
nounced that it is suspending its on- 
erous annual subsidies to Syria. Jor- 
dan, and the PLO on grounds that 
they are not actively fighting Israel. 
This is an excuse. The Kuwaitis have 
been badly shaken by a series of 
bombings and an assassination at- 
tempt on the emir, obviously repri- 
sals for his steadfastrefusai to release 
Shiite terrorists convicted of attacks 
an tii e U-S. and French embassies. 

It is a message that time is running 
short for established Arab leaders, 
whatever their politics, facing the 
tides of mifitanL violent fundamen- 
talism. President Hosni Mubarak of 
Egypt felt obliged to imprison funda- 
mentalist leaden and shut down their 


important Cairo mosque became g 
calls to overthrow his government 

Prime Minister Shimon Pens d{ 
Israel has sent word to Moscow say. 
ing the Russians would be wcJcobk 
participants (o the Middle East 
“peace process” if they want “to 
move it forward*’ and recognize Isra- 
el. This is wise and prudeni. 

Failure to seize opportunities and 
to rdy instead on war to break dead- 
locks has been the tragedy of ife 
Middle EasL There are still people on 
all sides who argue that only guns can 
be trusted. Of course, they can be 
misted only to kifl. A period of great 
delicacy and difficulty is beginning 
The highest courage is io dare peace. 
Those who do deserve support, ewa 
if they must sidle along iu cautious 
ways. Results are. after all. more im- 
portant than bold postures. 

The Neve York Tunes. 



But Prospects Are Bleak 
For Any Real Progress 

By Dominique Moisi 



P ARIS — Sandwiched between 
the I >b anc se chaos and the Iran- 
lraq war, can the latest initiatives for 
peace in the Middle East, symbolized 
by the Jordanian-Palestinian propos- 
als and the subsequent Peres plan, be 
anything more than new diplomatic 
“tricks” leading nowhere? 

Present conditions are sifi 
ty different from those that 1 
si gning of the Camp David 
meat between President Anwar 2 
of Egypt and Prime Minister Mena- 
chesn Begin of Israel At that time, 
both Egypt and Israel were governed 
by comparatively strong leaders. And 
the United States was also willing in 
1977 to exercise its full influence and 
concentrate all its energy on working 
out a Middle East peace formula un- 
der the Carter ndiriinis trani f wi. 

But today, none of these positive 
factors is present. On the Arab side, 
the three main actors involved have 
three incompatible approaches to the 
peacemaking process. 

First, Syria has sufficient strength 
and self-assurance to play a regional 
role and could probably, like Egypt, 
engage m a peace process if it wanted 
to. But in reality. Syria is more inter- 
ested in securing control of Lebanon 


than in engaging in protracted peace 
negotiations with Israel 

Second, King Hussein of Jordan is 
certainly sincere in his attempt to 
negotiate with the Israelis. He knows 
that rime is miming short and that it 
may be his last chance to negotiate 
the fate of the occupied territories. 
Bnt at the same time, be is keenly 
aware of Jordan’s limitations. In 
King Hussein's mind, the sharp dete- 
rioration of the PLO’s position since 
their defeat in Lebanon means that 
he can negotiate from a position of 
strength with the Palestinians. But 
this self-assurance is counterbal- 
anced by his need to deal prudently 
with the Syrian government. 

Third, the Palestinians themselves 
— the PLO in particular — are too 
weak and divided to accept to enter 
into any meaningful process of nego- 
tiation. In the Arab world, those who 
want peace are not those who can 
implement iL The teverse also is true. 

Israel’s political spectrum is also 
divided. Prime Minister Shimon 
Feres, given the domestic limitations 
of his National Unity coalition gov- 
ernment has probably gone as far as 
be can in the recent talk of peace , 
negotiations. He has argued, with 



some shrewdness and courage, that it 
is better to negotiate with win than 
with a later, and possibly more am- 
servative prnoc minister. 

Bat Mr. Peres lacks the rfmrimm 
and the decisiveness with which to 
overcome Israeli divisions and fears. 
Stifl obsessed by the security of their 
countty — despite its mflitaiy superi- 
ority in the region — the Israelis are 
also too concerned with the deterio- 
ration of their economic situation, 
and too preoccupied with existential 
debates on the i"»n"ig of »W7i(witf 
ideal to engage in negotiation with 
their Arab neighbors. 

Embarking on a process toward 
such nepnrifltmn would imply for Is- 
rael giving back most of the territo- 
ries captured in 1967. Moreover, the 


Israelis 'cannot accept to begin a ne- 
gotiation process which would in- 
volve the PLO in as Arab delegation 
to the talks. By contrast, the Arab 
ode Minnnt accept the absence of the 
PLO from their delegation — for 
tymbolic, rather than other reasons. 

The situation is not helped by the 
lade of external pressures. The unit- 
ed States, after its frustrating experi- 
ence in Lebanon, is unwilling to play 
a more active role in the region and 
reluctant to take the necessary risks 
which bolder diplomacy requires. 

Elsewhere in the Arab world, lead- 
ers are more preoccupied with the 
posable consequences of the Iran- 
Iraq war, the nse of Islamic funda- 
mentalism and by the drop in the 
price of ml than by the Palestinians. 


Europeans, now more economical- 
ly independent from the Middle East 
because of new ofl discoveries, ap- 
pear either indifferent or cynical 
about any peace moves. 

Paradoxically, the main actors in- 
volved in the first stirrings of a peace 
initiative this year. Mr. Peres and 
King Hussein, are closer to each oth- 
er than were Mr. Sadat and Mr. Berio 
in 1977. They probably share the 
same belief that time is running short 
for valid negotiation, but neither can 
risk, or has sufficient strength, to 
consider moving forward. 


West’s Optimistic Attitude 
To Gorbachev Misplaced 


W ASHINGTON 
a decade of 

weak leaders, the Soviet Union fi 
ly has a stronghdmsman p r ep ar ed to 
set a fairly specific course. Unfortu- 
nately, there is nothing in Mikhail S. 
Gorbachevs record or his recent 
statements and actions to suggest 
that rapprochement with the United 
States is among his top priorities. 

The optimistic conventional wis- 
dom in America holds that Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s determination to put his 
own house in order wQl lead me Rus- 
sians to behave in a more “dvflized" 
manner abroad Hus is a 
taken view. Indeed, order 
chev-style may prove quite contrary 
to American interests and principles. 

For example, not one of the indi- 
viduals selected by Mr. Gorbachev 
for promotion to the Politburo and 
the central committee secretariat 
come from outside the traditional 
party apparatus. None has a reputa- 
tion as an advocate of a market-ori- 
ented economic reform, internal lib- 
eralization or greater openness to the 
West Indeed, these newcomers are 
known primarily for their ruthless 
efficiency. A record number — three 
out of 13 Politburo members — have 
worked for the security services. 

Consider Andrei A. Gromyko’s re- 
placement as foreign minister, the 
tough cop from Georgia, Eduard A. 
Shevardnadze. As Georgian minister 
of internal affairs, he collected infor- 
mation incrimina ting his party supe- 
riors and removed than on charges of 
corruption. As party first secretary of 
Georgia, he was most memorable for 
his vigorous anti -corruption cam- 
paign and brutal crackdown on dis- 
sent. His innovative use of television 
to build a populist image was com- 
plemented by flattery — fawning, 
even by Soviet standards — of who- 
ever reigned in Moscow. 

The conventional wisdom that sees 
him as a mere implementer of Mr. 
Gorbachev’s foreign policy may also 
be mistaken. If the general secretary 
wanted his foreign minis ter to be 
merely an obedient servant, he could 
have promoted any one of a number 


By Dinutri K. Sixties 

-After almost 


of faceless foreign policy bureau- 
crats. Instead, he chose a dynamic 
and imaginative party functionary. 

Like his choice of colleagues, Mr. 
Gorbachev’s substantive policies 
have been marked by vigor and 
toughness rather than open-minded- 
ness. He harps on the urgent need for 
radical economic reform. But like his 


generalities. Meanwhile, the Kremlin 
is busy imposing his no-nonsense 
style on the Soviet economy. Alcohol 
abuse is being attacked. CmTupt offi- 
cials find themselves under fire, and 
discipline is being strengthened. 

None of these steps address the 
fundamental structural problems of 
the Soviet economy, bat they may 
temporarily halt the country’s eco- 
nomic decline. They may also allow 
Mr. Gorbachev to pat off painful 
choices between guns and buna — 
to improve military capabilities with- 
out risking internal difficulties by 
squeezing the consumer too much. 

Recent statements by the Politburo 
leave no doubt that its first concern is 
to remind the world that (he Soviet 
Union is a global power second to 
none. There is. a feeling in Moscow 
that the United States took advan- 
tage of the Soviet Union during the 
last decade of decrepit leadership. To 
Soviet leaders, cutting Ronald Rea- 
gan down to size seems both sound 
policy and a way to redress their 
badly damaged pride. 

Already, despite an essential conti- 
nuity, Mr. Gorbachev’s foreign po- 
licy has been marked by a more asser- 
tive, even belligerent, tone. 

■ The Soviet position on “star 
wars” research has hardened consid- 
erably since Konstantin U. Chernen- 
ko’s reign. Most recently, on June 26. 
Mr. Gmbachev threatened to “reas- 
sess” Soviet participation in the Ge- 
neva arms control talks unless Wash- 
ington changed its approach. 

• The Russians nave retracted 
hints, made during the Chernenko 
period, about establishing an infor- 
mal linkage between Easi-West trade 
and Jewish immigration. 

• Harassment of the U.S. miEtary 



Arms Talks Deadlocked 
Over Which Side to Blame 

By Don Cook 


G ENEVA — From Stockholm to 
Vienna to Geneva, East-West 
negotiations on anns-control 8nd se- 
curity questions are dead in the wa- 
ter, with only meager hopes that the 
planned November summit meeting 
between President Ronald Ri 
and the Soviet leader, Mikhail 
bachev, might start the 


best, there might be some marginal 
window-dressing agreements in 
Stockholm, where 35 states that 
signed the Helsinki agreements are 
trying to negotiate a new accord on 
military confidence-building and se- 
curity. “This negotiation is like one of 
those hospital patients with a termi- 
nal illness, kept alive only by life- 


turn- nai mness, Kept alive only oy hie- 
ing. After two rounds cf the new support systems that nobody can dc- 
high- tach,” one Western ambassador 


OTTERS TO THE EDITOR 

A Powerful Alternative 


& “In Exile 22 Years, Militant 
Battles South Africa” (July 16) Glen 
Frankel leaves the misleading im- 
pression that Joe Slovo of the pro- 
Soviet Smith African Communist 
Party and the African National Con- 
gress are the main opposition to 
apartheid colonialism. The regime of 
President P.W. Botha fosters the 
same iOuaon: namely, American ver- 
sus Soviet imperialism. 

But there is a powerful alternative: 
the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAQ 
which is fighting fora genuinely dem- 
ocratic and non-aligned Azania, or 
South Africa. Mr. Slovo’s ANC 
backed Joshua Nkomo's Zimbabwe 
African People’s Union (ZAPU), 
whereas PAC aligned themselves 
with Robert Mugage’s Zimbabwe 


National African Union (ZANU). 
Zimbabwe has shown that African 
liberation movements are not neces- 
sarily Soviet puppets. 

MICHAEL WILSON. 

The Hague. 

Ignoring Wise Counsel 

Once in a great while a general, one 
sensitive to all shades of hnman aspi- 
rations, transcends the mflitaiy pro- 
pensity to solve international prob- 
lems by brute force. Obviously 
General W allace H. Nutting is such a 
man CU.S. General Opposes Nicara- 
gua Invasion, "July I). Unfortunately, 
it appears most unlikely that the Rea- 
gan administration wfll listen to his 
wise counsd about Nicaragua. 

SYLVAIN S. MINAULT. 

CMoe-Bourg, Switzerland. 


iiisaiK 


tiaisou tmssioQ in East Germany has 
increased. The m order of Major Ar- 
thur Nicholson Jr. in March was fol- 
lowed this month by the deliberate 
ramming of a US. military vehicle. 

• At the time of the hostage crisis 
in Beirut, the Soviet media accused 
Washington of planning to invade 
Lebanon. Moscow has also charged 
that United States was behind last 
month’s Air-In dia disaster and tire 
assassination of Prime Minister In- 
dira Gandhi of India in October. 

• The Soviet Union has increased 
its military and diplomatic pressure 
on Pakistan. Soviet combat jets have- 
invaded Pakistani airspace so fre- 
quently that Washington felt com- 
pelled this month to rush 100 Stinger 
ground-to-air missies to Islamabad. 

• The Russian leader has upgraded 
the Soviet commitment to Nicaragua, 
pledging $200 million in aid. 

Mr. Gorbachev is interested in de- 
tente, but be wants it mi his own 
terms. He is less interested in diplo- 
macy than in creating “objective re- 
alities” that win force America to 
become more accommodating. To 
this aid, he has offend an dive 
branch to Bering and announced a 
trip to Paris that He hopes will drive a 
wedge between America and its Eu- 
ropean allies. He would like to use 
Western European pressure to soften 
the U.S. stance mi arms control 

Mr. Gorbachev is a formidable ad- 
versary of a type that Washington has 
not encountaed before. But this need 
not prevent improved relations. He 
cannot make headway with the Euro- 
peans or Chinese without Ren ame 
concessions, useful to the United 
States. The administration has m arif 
dear that its arms control positions 
are not set in concrete: And if Mr. 
Gorbachev stopped insisting on . a 
ban on “star wars" research and of- 
fered concessions on offensive sys- 
tem he wooM trigger serio&sdeb&le 
in the Reagan camp about accommo- 
dating the Russians on the anti-bal- 
listic missile treaty. 

The summit meeting will be the 
right forum tateH Mr, Gorbachev he 
can do business with the United 
States. But be must understand that 
America faces him without illnonns 
and that there will be no free lunch. 

The writer is a senior associate at the' 
Carnegie Endowment for Internation- 
al Peace. He contributed this comment 
to The New York Times. : 


nudear arms talks in Geneva, 
ranking American officials no longer 
see much possibility of achieving any 
substantial agreement with the Soviet 
Union to limit nudear weapons in 
the remaining lame-dock yean of the 
Reagan administration. 

A senior State Department official 
who recently briefed the North At- 
lantic^ Treaty Organization Council in 
Brussels summarized the 
“The Soviets arc hardly interested in 
negotkting away their current advan- 
tage in strategic or intennediate- 
range missiles. So far they are not 
prepared to negotiate with us over the 
Strategic Defense Initiative project at 
all. And it is highly probable that 
they will tty to break out of the 1972 
and~ballistic missile treaty entirely 
when they feel they have a sufficient- 
ly advantageous mix in offensive and 
ddenavestratemc capabilities.” 

Last week there was one small 

straw of 
when 

centage «*n?ngs 
of weapons might be one approach to 
h a n dli ng the issue of strategic weap- 
ons. But the Americans said Soviet 
negotiators were vague abort details. 
Tbe UA National Security Adviser 
Robert G McFariane tola a White 
House briefing that he saw “a few 
signs” of promise in tbe talks. “The 
Soviets have begun to engage us in a 
more serious dialogue,” he said. 

But if there is a prolonged super- 
power deadlock, in Geneva, is any- 
thing likely to happen in the other 
two arms-control negotiations? At 


summarized the situation in Vienna, 
where 12 NATO and seven Warsaw 
Pact powers are discussing cuts in- 
conventional forces in Europe. 

Mr. Gorbachev himself has 
warned that the Soviet Union might 
have to “re-evaluate" the talks if the 
present d eadlock continues. 

So as the summer break in all these 
negotiations begins and preparations 
for a summit meeting get underway, 
the real underlying trend in Geneva 
seems to be not so much a search for 
a basis of negotiation bat maneuver- 
ing to fix the blame on the other side 
for the continued deadlock. 

However much the Soviet Union 
might be worried about the American 
hign^tecbnology edge — and the pos- 
sibility of a major breakthrough in 
the SDI program that they would be 
hard put to match in the years ahead 
— this does not add up to any great 
1 negotiate in Geneva., 
not be the Reagan adminis- 
tration that achieves the major break- 
through on SDJ or has to make tbe 
orurial decisions and vote the neces- 
sary funds for research and deploy- 
ment. That is for the 1990s at the 
earliest. Mr. Gorbachev will be 
around probably into the next centu- 
ry, and he can wait. Whether Mr. 
Gorbachev is wise to wait, whether 
the world win be any safer if the 
hiatus in arms-control efforts goes cm 
and on, is another matter. 

All that the negotiates can look 
forward to is more of the same. 

Los Angeles Times. 


r hi ' 






The writer, associate director of the 
Instinn Frampds da Relations Inter - ^ 
nationales, contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 34, 1985 


Page 5 


Sikh Leader, 
Gandhi Meet 
To Revive 




Jakarta Poor Strive to Share in 'Miracle' 


- Return . 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi held talks Tuesday 
with « Sikh leader. Harchand L_ 

Langowal, in an eSon to end 
three-year crisis in Pingab state. 

A spokesman said the two lead- 
en met without aides for 30 min- 
utes at Mr. Gandhi’s office and 
woe to hold further talks. 

Be quoted both Mr. Gandhi and 
Mr. LoMpwal as saying of their 
tolfc«“7ng meeting wait nffwi*n w 

Mr.' Gandhi consulted senior 
cabinet colleagues before the talks, 
wfajch foBowed a 17-month stale- 
mate in negotiations between the 
griveraflientand the Sikh political 
y, the Akali Dal, of which Mr. 
ral is president 

s were broken off on Feb. 14 

last year, nearly four months before 
troops entered the holiest Sfth 
shrine, the Golden Temple at Am- 
ritsar, to remove Sikh extremists. 

At least 600 and as many as 1,000 
Sikhs died in the assaulL 

It js the first time since Mr. Gao- ■ .... ■ - — 

El XHESB Soviet Said to Step Up Afghan Raids; 


Harchand Singh Ixmgowal, a Sikh poBtical leader, right, meeting Tuesday with Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi in New Delhi to discuss unrest in the Punjab, where most Sikhs Kve. 


a ■ 


throat in the governments hopes 

rSHteiss Insurgents Fire Rockets Into Kabul 

for political autonomy anti reK- Reuters 

gi^conMons in Punjab, where ISLAMABAD. Pakistan — So- 
most of Zofias 14 million Sikhs viet aircraft have been carrying out 

heavy bombing atiarW against Af- 
ghan insurgents in the strategic 


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live. 

The demands also inriod g a 
greater share of river waters flow- 
ing through the state and the trans- 
fer to Punjab of the state capital 
Chandigarh, which is currently 
diaied with the neighboring state 
of Haryana. 

The Akali Dal protests coincided 
with growing violence provoked by 
a Sikh extremist campaign for a 
separate Sikh state. 

Five months after the assault on 
the Golden T 
was assassins 
euards. The murder set off rioting 
m Delhi and north Indian states in 
winch at least 2,700 people, mostly 
Sikhs, were killed. 

Mr. Gandhi said two weeks 
that be welcomed Mr. 
efforts to ease tension among Sikhs 
and Hindus in Punjab. 

Mr, Longowal also has wel- 
comed the government's moves for 
peace but has said his party still has 
outstanding demands, Much in- 
clude the dismantling of special 
courts set up to try suspected Sikh 
extremists in Punjab. 

Mr. Gandhi's spokesman, H.Y. 
Sharada Prasad, said Monday 
night he could not say whether a 
decision had been marienn whether 
to extend the courts' t«m.^ They are 
due to expire Tuesday. 

Mr. Longowal has said bis party 
win meet next month to decide 
whether to begin a new, peaceful 
campaign. Sikh extremists have 
continued attacks on Hindus and 
prominent members of Mr. Gan- 
dhi's ruling party in the Punjab, 


its m 

PanjsMr Valley and, in turn, insur- 
gents have been firing rockets into 
Kabul, the capital city. Western 
here Tuesday. 

: diplomats said they had re- 
ceived fragmentary reports that So- 


viet planes began bombing the re- 
bel-held upper pan of the: valley, 
north of Kabul, about 10 days ago 
in wiuu appeared to be a move to 
counter an offensive. 

The official Afghanistan news 
service reported Monday that gov- 
ernment commando units had 
wiped out an important rebel base 
in the upper Panjshir. 

On July 16, the insurgents fired 


arha- 


Waskingtan Pat Scrricc 

TOKYO — Members of 
meut from North and South 
conferred Tuesday for more than 
two hours in the border truce vil- 
lage of Pamnunjom, openings new 
diannd erf contact between their 
mutually hostile governments. 

• The meeting called to work out 
details of a full-scale parliamentary 
conference that the two sides have 
agreed to conduct, ended inconclu- 
sively. But South Korea's chief del- 
egate, Kwon Jung Dal, said after- 
ward, “We have made some 
progress today. The results were 
good,” . ^ - 

It was the first rime that 'legisla- 
tors from the two sides had met 
since the Korean peninsula was di- 
vided in 1945. The parliamentary 
talks are proceeding in parafld 
with discussions on economic co- 
operation and the reunion of fam- 
ilies separated by the Korean war. 


The parliamentary meetings are 
meant to reduce tension on the 
peninsula. However, from the start 
the two rides have disagreed cm 
what their substance should be. 
The South has proposed that they 
be aimed at drafting a constitution 
for a reunified Korea. The North 
says the first order of business 
should be a joint declaration that 
the two rides would not attack cue 
another. 


more than a dozen rockets into Ka- 
bul, according to reports 
here, but no deaths were 
and damage was described as light. 

Western diplomats reported last 
week that guerrilla attacks on gov- 
ernment mutlaiy positions in Panj- 
shir had turned into a major offen- 
sive in the valley, which overlooks 
the main highway from Kabul 
north to the Soviet border. 

The Pakistan-based Jamiat-i-Is- 
lami guerrillas said Monday that 
government helicopters attacked a 
rebel stronghold in Panjshir on July 
6 and killed 131 captured officers 
who were about to be exchanged 
- for captured guerrillas. 

The Soviet Embassy in Kabul 
was hit by rockets three times this 
mouth and six or seven Soviet sol- 
diers were lolled there July 2, ac- 
cording to the reports. 

Other accounts said that Afghan 
crews of helicopters operating near 
the Pakistani border were ground- 
ed for several days after seven Af- 
ghan Air Force personnel defected 
July 13 in two Soviet-made MI-24 
gunships. 


By Barbara Crosscrtc . 

ffe*r York Times Service 

JAKARTA — Baharudin. a sell- 
er of birdseed, lives in the shadow 
of the Southeast Asian economic 
miracle. 

- He and Heri a medicine vendor, 
and Sutarmi who sells soft drinks, 
push their small carts along roads 
choked with cars, passing shops of- 
fering a panoply of consumer 
goods from East and West, unaf- 
fordable to them or the poor cus- 
tomers they serve. 

More than 65 percent of the la- 
bor force of Jakarta, a city of at 
least six and a half million people 
and the capital of the world's filth 
most populous nation, is made up 
erf people like Baharudin, Hen and 
Sum-mi, along with hundreds of 
thousands of street-food cooks, 
scavengers, bicycle- rickshaw driv- 
ers and prostitutes. 

In economic terms they are 
called “the informal sector."’ 

In human terms they are among 
the 70 percent of Jakarta’s inhabit- 
ants who live below the poverty line 
—earning less than S22 j 0 a month 

— in more than 700 city areas that 
development workers call slums. 

Their homes are often cramped 
shacks or a bit of pavement near 
their precious carts or stalls. In the 
rooming, they can be seen bathing 
in the garbage-strewn, malodorous 
drainage ditches near pipes that 
carry away excess water from the 
gardens of the better off. 

For the poor, education is scant, 
medical services minimal and pub- 
lic assistance nonexistent. Ironical- 
ly, many are rural people who mi- 
grated to the capital in search of a 
better life. 

Like their counterparts in other 
Southeast Asian dries, particularly 
Bangkok, which rivals Jakarta in 
size and complexity, these people, 
scrabbling to succeed at the edges 
of rapid development, are squeezed 



:•» Me- Irak 


The becaks, long an Indonesian mode of getting around, 
are being banned in Jakarta as unsuited to the image of a 
modern capital, part of Southeast Asia's economic miracle. 


no matter what economic climate 
prevails. 

In boom limes — Southeast Aria 
still has the world's fastest econom- 
ic growth rates despite a recession 

— the gap between them and ihe 
society in power widens. When the 
economy slows, the castoff laborers 
of contracting industries crowd 
their marginal turf. 

All the rime, someone or another 
wants to move them off the side- 
walks and out of the life of a city 
trying to shed its Third World look. 

Baharudin. Heri and Sumardi 
are luckier than most of the many 
thousands of street vendors. In the 
Jaunegara neighborhood of East 
Jakarta where they work and live, a 
cooperative movement has taken 
bold. 

They and nearlv 750 of their fel- 
low vendors in the neighborhood 

— booksellers, tailors’ hardware 


merchants and pigeon sellers 
among them — now call themselves 
KopKnIiniaja, an acronym devised 
from the Indonesian words for “co- 
operative of the street vendors of 
Jatioegara." 

From a storefront office. Kopka- 
linuja. under its director. Abdullah 
Suad Lubis, a former teacher, dis- 
penses information on everything 
from banking to babies. 

Bags of wheat distributed by the 
American Catholic Relief Services 
for the U.S. Agency for Interna- 
tional Development 'are slacked in 
a corner of the cooperative's small 
store. Neighborhood women's 
groups put them to use. 

Bahanidin, 2$. came to the coop- 
erative for the three-year loan lat 3 
percent interest 1 that’ got him ston- 
ed in the birdseed business. His 
only alternative would have been a 
usurious local monevlender. 


The cooperative and others here 
and throughout the country owe 
their existence to a 42-> ear-old, 
self-described Moslem idealist and 
former student activist. Adi Ss- 
sono. 

The founder, who was trained as 
a civil engineer at Bandung's Insti- 
tute of Technology and then in 
Utrecht, the Netherlands, at a Phil- 
lips Petroleum technical center, 
said he had been struck bs the 
growing gaps in Indonesian society 
when he worked in the develop- 
ment of the country's oil industry. 
Petroleum is Indonesia s major for- 
eign currency earner. 

“In our constitution, it is explic- 
itly stated that our economy should 
be dedicated to develop a social 
orientation, knowing that the ma- 
jority of our people are less educat- 
ed." he said. 

He and a few other like-minded 
former student activists got togeth- 
er indie late 1970s and founded die 
Institute for Development Studies, 
which he now directs full time. 

The institute, with a professional 
staff of 40 and score* of volunteers, 
encourages self-help projects 
through small offices scattered 
from Sumatra to Irian Java on the 
island erf New Guinea. 

The activist says he thinks his 
organization, which relies on aid 
from the government and on grants 
from foreign foundations, has 
reached only about 25.000 Indone- 
sians in a eountA of lb5 million. 


Soviet Decorates Patriarch 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — Patriarch Pi men. 
head of the Russian Orthodox 
Church, who has always cooperat- 
ed with Soviet authorities, has bees 
awarded the Red Banner of Labor 
for his “patriotic activities in de- 
fense oT peace" to mark his 75th 
birthday Monday. Tass an- 
nounced. 


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UJ£ Says Pressure 
Has Led to Change 
In UNESCO Policy 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Britain's threat to 
leave the Doited Nations Educa- 
tional, Scientific and Cultural Or- 
ganization has led to reforms with- 
in the 161-nauon group, according 
to Timothy Raison, the British 
minister for overseas development. 

In a written statement Monday 
to Parliament, Mr. Raison said, 
“Largely as a result of our pressure, 
advances have been made since 
early 1984 in planning better pro- 
grams, reducing politicization, in- 
creasing financial control and find- 
ing ways of improving 
management and the working off 
governing bodies." 

“By the end of the year," he said, 
“we should have a clearer picture of 
whether the organization will really 
be healthy enough to reclaim our 
allegiance.’' 

UNESCO is faced with a budget 
deficit caused by the ILS. with- 
drawal at the end of last year. Its 
direct or-generaf. Amadou Mahtar 
MBow, has proposed using $10 
roilKon set aside as protection 
against inflation to beb cover the 
k»s of the 25-percent U.S. share of 
die budget. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


— * 

1 ' 

?. 


Page 6 



INSIGHTS 


Spies in U.S. Navy: Experts See Vanity, Not Just Money, as Factor 


By Philip Shenon 


New York Times Senior 


■W^TASHINGTON - Federal officials 
11 / and intelligence analysts say that John 
▼ ▼ A. Walker Jr. passed Navy secrets to 
the KGB in an elaborate scheme that apparently 
involved espionage training in Austria and the 
use of Soviet couriers in Washington. 

In their most extensive account of how they 
believe the espionage operation was carried out, 
officials said that Mr. Walker, arrested May 20 
after FBI agents said he attempted to give a * 
Soviet agent classified documents, almost cer- 
tainly dealt with several agents of the KGB, the 
Soviet intelligence agency, in what they say was 
a 20 -year spying career. 

Intelligence analysts speculated that Mr. 
Walker was awarded a high rank in the Soviet 
armed forces, probably the Soviet Navy, and 
received decorations for his information. “He 
might very well have tried on his Soviet uni- 
form," said Robert T, Crowley, a retired senior 
official of the Central Lntefligence Agency. 

Mr. Walker has been indicted on espionage 



but has pleaded not guilty. 

Hmnils remain sketchy, the authorities 


say the KGB asked Mr. Walker, a retired Navy 
warrant officer, to make frequent trips to Vien- 
na, where he would pass along secret informa- 
tion collected from other members of the pur- 
ported navy spy ring. 

Vienna, they said, was also where Mr. Walker 


John Anthony Walker Jr. 

Bom 1 937, Washington, D.C.; high school 
dropout; divorced Barbara Joy Crowley, 4 
children; Navy 1 955-76, chief warrant officer; set 
up 3 private detective agencies. 


Michael Lance Walker 

Born 1 962, Vallejo, Cal.; graduated high school, 
Norfolk, Va.; married Rachel Sara Allen; Navy 
1 982 to present, yeoman third class, USS Nimitz; 
clearance for routine fleet information.. 



probably received training in the techniques of 
espionage. For security reasons, they said, there 


appeared to have been few, if any, recent face- 
Slates between 


to-face meetings in the United 
Mr. Walker and Soviet agents. 

Intelli g ence analysts said they believe that a 
Soviet diplomat who was named a co-conspira- 
tor in the alleged spying operation was a rela- 
tively low-level KGB agent who may never have 
met Mr. Walker. Instead, they said, the diplo- 
mat had been assigned to pick up documents 
that Mr. Walker left at secluded sites. 

Mr. Walkei, his brother, son and a California 
man who is described as his closest friend, have 
been arrested in whaiihe authorities describe as 
the most damaging spy case in 30 years. All have 
served in the navy. All pleaded not guilty. 

The KGB scheme, officials said, was designed 
to offer maximum protection against suryeil- 
lance bv American law-enf orcemdht agencies. 
The o fficials cautioned that many, and perhaps 
most details of the purported scheme will never 
be known unless Mr. Walker, who is accused of 
forming the spy ring, begins to cooperate with 
law-enforcement authorities. 

What is known, officials said, has been deter- 
mined largely from personal papers, travel re- 
ceipts and telephone records that were found in 
searches of Mr. Walker's home and office in 
Norfolk, Virginia, as well as statements made to 
investigators by his son, Michael L. Walker, and 
brother, Arthur J. Walker. 



Arttmr James Walker 

Born 1 934, Scranton, Pa.; University of Scranton 
2 years; married Rita Clare Fritsch, 3 children; 
Navy 1 953-1 973, lieutenant commander; 
employed by VSE Corp., defense contractor. 


The International Atomic Energy- Agency, a 
United Nations agency, is based in Austria. 
According to intelligence specialists, that has 
given the Soviet Union an excuse for posting a 
relatively large number of KGB agents in Vien- 
na posing as diplomats. The Austrian govern- 
ment is thought to have relatively little surveil- 
lance of foreign intelligence agents, they said. 

Andrew Deration Lee. a California man who 
admitted in 1977 that he had sold secret docu- 
ments to Soviet agents about UJS. spy satellites, 
received espionage training in Vienna, officials 
said 

The FBI has said that it knows of at least 
eight Tnggtinps in Vienna between Soviet agents 
and Mr. Walker since 1976. 

“I'm sure Vi enna was ihc standard debriefing 
site," said Ray S. Cline, former deputy director 
of the Central Intelligence Agency. 

Because of their neutrality, Mr. Cline said, 
“Austria and Switzerland have been the spy 
capitals since the end of World War II." He 
added that Soviet agents preferred Austria. 
“The Swiss are pretty tough on intelligence 
officers;” Mr. Cline said 

Other meetings took place in tire Philippines 
and Italy, according to documents released by 
the FBL 

Mr. dine, now professor of international 
relations at Georgetown University in Washing- 
ton, said those countries were probably chosen 
because Soviet agents felt that law-enforcement 


mems at a site in rural Maryland, tire FBI has 
said 

Cues about tire espionage operation were 
provided in a secret note reportedly written last . 
y*ar by Jerry A Whitworth, tire California man 
arrested in the case. According to the FBI. the 
note said that .American locations were "al- 
ways" used by the Soviet agents when they, 
passed money tt> Mr. Walker. 

The note also said that Mr. Walker passed 
along tire secret information overseas. ( “al- 
though U.S. locations are used sometimes,” the 
bureau said. 


0 


FF1CLALS said they had little informa- 
tion about a Soviet diplomat. Aleksey CL 
Tkachenko, who was recalled to Mos- 
cow after prosecutors named him as a co-con- 
spirator. The FBI said its agents had seen him in 
the vicinity of the sue in rural Maryland that 
Mr. Walker is charged with visiting on the night 
of his arrest. 

The FBI has identified Mr. Tkachenko as a 
rice consul in tire consular division of tire Soviet 
Embassy in Washington, a relatively low-rank* 


l 




,n 

4 ^ 



ing diploma L 
Officii 


agencies there were relatively lax in their surveil- 
lance of foreigners. “It would be a safer environ- 


Jerry Alfred Whitworth 

Born 1 939, Muldrow, Okla.; graduated Coalinga 
Junior College; married Brenda Leah Reis; Navy 
1 956-83, senior chief petty officer; unemployed, 
unsuccessful at stock market. 



meat," he said. 

Because of tighter security by American law- 
enforcement agencies, officials say, it appeared 
that relatively few, if any, face-to-face meetings 
between Soviet agents and Mr. Walker took 
place in the United Stales in recent years. 

Instead, they said, the Soviet agents used sites 
in suburban areas near Washington. Parcels ©t 
information were left by Mr. Walker and re- 
trieved later by Soviet agents, they said. 

In exchange, they said, the agents used the 
sum sites to leave packages of money for Mr. 


Ibg Nor York Tran 


They said that Mr. Walker’s case seems to 
follow what one investigative source described 
as a “common pattern’’ of Soviet intelligence 
agencies. 

“We don't know nearly as much as we’d like," 


the source said. “But from what we do know 
about the KGB, it's not that difficult to come up 
with a reasonable understanding" of the opera- 
tion of the purported spy ring. That understand- 
ing. be emphasized, “is based, to a large extent. 


on well-informed speculation." Any training 
that Mr. Walker may have received probably 
took place in Vienna, where the Soviet Union 
has a large embassy and controls numerous safe 
houses, officials stud. 


Walker. The officials sahf large cash payments 
to Mr. Walker for his information were made in 
the United States, another effort to avoid detec- 
tion. 

If Mr. Walker had received large amounts of 
money overseas, he would have risked being 
caught by customs officers when returning to 
the United States, said Mr. Crowley, the former 
CIA official who recently wrote a book on the 
KGB. 

“It might have been discovered with the mon- 
ey, and it might have tripped a flag," he said. “It 
piflifgg more sense to pay him in the United 
States." Law-enforcement officials say they be- 
lieve that Mr. Walker received hundreds of 
thousands of dollars from Soviet agents but 
have so Ear been unable to trace most of the 
money. 

Mr. Walker was arrested after leaving a bag 
containing more than 100 secret navy docu- 


/trials said that he may have been one of a 
number of KGB agents in the embassy who 
were periodicals 1 assigned to pick up material 
left by Mr. Walker at drop sites. 

•"Over the sears, the case had become rou- 
tine." said David A. Phillips, a former QA 
agent. “More and more cucr the years the yeo- 
men got the job of going to these drop sites," 

Some intelligence analysis say they believe 
that Mr. Walker's chief Soviet contact is a senior 
KGB official working in Moscow. 

Mr. Crowley, who was the CIA's assistant 
deputy director for operations, said he suspects 
Mr. Walker may have known the official tor 
several years, and perhaps even have been re- 
cruited by him. 

While moving up through (he KGB hierarchy, 
the off trial probably turned over the details of 
the case to other agritts. Mi. Crowley said. But 
he suggested the official might have met with 
Mr. Walker on occasion. 

They said that some spies wbo were caught in 
the United States in recent years bad probably 

allow* 


been given a uniform that he was allowed to 


wear at meetings with Soviet agents. This, they 
suggested, would have pleased Mr. Walker/who 


has been described by a former employee. RJC. 
Puma, as a self-deluded “James Bond." 

“It’s very possible that he is a commodore or 
an admira l by now." said Mr. Phillips, the 
former CLA agent. “That might appeal to Mr. 
Walker, and an astute Soviet agent would know 
iL” 

Mr. Walker retired from the United States 
Navy in 1976 as a chief warrant officer. “Most 
warrant officers wonder why they didn't be- 
oome at least a second lieutenant,'' Mr. Phillips 
said “Here was a situation where the Soviets 
could make him not only a second lieutenant 
bnt an admiral." 




New Right’s Elite , Disillusioned With Reagan, Directs Anger at His Foreign Policy 


By Bernard Wemranb 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON - They were key figures 
among the intellectual vanguard that endorsed 


Ronald Reagan. Disillusioned with the Demo- 
cratic Party, these articulate and combative neo- 
conservatives saw Mr. Reagan’s election in 1980 
as a vindication of their own view that liberal- 
ism had failed. They waited for Mr. Reagan jo 


reshape the foreign poDpy landscape, to deal 
firmly with terrorism, with the Soviet Union, 
with leftist insurgencies in Central America. 
They are still waiting. 

And, instead of applauding Mr. Reagan’s 


IHL^MONEY 

niiiH,irniH 

(ANINIERN^OT 
'OILimyCONFEREINICE 
,OOUBEll 24 - 25 , 1985 i 



and strategies. H.K Professor Dr. Subroto, Minister of Mines and Energy, Indonesia and President of the 
OPEC conference, and JohnS Herrington, US Energy Secretary, vm head a distinguished group of 
speakers from Europe, the Middle East, Latin America and the United States. 

OCTOBER 2A OCTOBER 2S 


KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 

— Professor Dr. Subroto, Minister of Mines raid Energy, 
hdonesia 

COMPBTTON FOR MARKET SHARE 

— Moderator: Herman Franssen, Chief Eoanomist, (ntemationd 
Energy Agency , Paris. 

— HJF. KepEnger, Chairman end Chief Executive Officer, 

The KepSnger Companies, Houston. 

— Afirio Parra, Managing Director, Petroieos de Venezuela 
(UJC) SA, London. 

— Douglas Wade, Senior Energy Anriyst, Shell Irternafcnal 
Petroleum Company Ltd, London. 

THE IMPLICATIONS OF OPEC PRODUCT IMPORTS AMD 
DOWNSTREAM STRATEGCS ON THE OH. MARKETS. 

— Nader H. Sritrai, President, Kuweit Petroleum international 
Lid, London 

HOW TWO MAJOR OIL COMPANfiES ARE SURVMNG 

IN A COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT. 

— AJen EL Murray, Resident, Mob3 Corporation, New York. 

— Arve Johnsen, President, Stated Stavanger. 

HOW SMALL PRODUCES AM3 DOWNSTREAM 

OPERATORS SURVIVE IN AN ERA OP GROWNG 

COMPETITION. 

— John R. HaB, Chairman raid Chief Executive Officer, Ashlcrd 
Oil hcorporafed, Ashlaid, Kentucky. 

— Eja Mrimivirta, General Manager, Neste Oy, Helsinki. 

— Nichob MongeBi, Assistant to the Executive Vice President, 
Ertfe Nazionale Idrocnrburi, Rome. 

— Said O. OunaBah, Mraiager, Supply GxxtSnation, Petranin 
Pcitidpafion, Dhahrcm. 


NEW CXJTLOOKS FOR UNTED STATES' ENERGY POLICY. 

— The Honorable John S. Herrington, United Stales' Energy 
Secretary. 

SHOULD THE UNITED KINGDOM RESTRICT PRODUCTION 
TO PROLONG ITS Ofi. REVH4JES? 

— The Rigttf Honourable John Moore, MP. ( finraidd Secretary 
t o the T reasury, United Kingdom. 

THE ffFECT OF FLUCTUATING OIL PRICES ON THE 
BANKING SYSTEMS, SHARE VALUES, INSTITUTIONAL 
INVESTORS AND WORLD BANK LOANS. 

— Robert B. Weaver, Senior Vice President raid Global 

Petroleum Executive, The Chase Manhollrai Bark, NA,N.Y. 

— Refer Gignoux, Senior Vice President, Shearson Lehmrai 
Brothers Ltd, London. 

— Robert L FrankSn, Founder and President, Lawrence Energy 
Associates Incnparaled, Boston. 

— Ian M. Hume, Assistant Diredor, Energy Department, The 
World Bark, Washing to n, D.C 
MEGAMSRGBR T1»D5 AND THE FUTURE OF THE OR 
NDUSTRY. 

— Robert F. Greenhrl, Managing Director, Mor g an Stanley & 

Co , hooroarated New York. 

NObKDN^^ 

MARKET AND THE FUTURES MARKET. 

— Mxfenatarc Nfcholcs G. V&ufe Ol Gonsullonr, London and 

The Hague. 

— Charles L Defy, Mcmo^Diredfcr,LM.lTsbhd&CaLld, London. 
— Rosemary Mrfaddo\ fteskfent, New York Mercantile 
Exchange, New York. 

CLOSING PANS. DISCUSSION OF CLBIRENT B'fERGY ISSUES. 


I 


RSXilSTRATO ; 

? * ' Tfepart^pdkin : fee s.£S5«r life ^ 
leepudstimo fcreadt.-' 

partiaprai. Fees are pgyabletn adaxsaif 


CONFERENCE LOCATION: 

Royd Garden Hotel, Kensington Ugh Street, LONX>l W84PT. Telephone (441)9378000. Telex: | 

2631 51. A fal odt of rooms hes been reserved far coriference partidpanfa. Please oontact hotel directly. J 
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM. I 

Please enroll the fafowing partidpart for the oJ conference. [3 Check endosed O Please invoice. | 


SURNAME. 


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handling nf th^rermt hostage crisis in ti-hmvOT, 

the neoconservatives have shed their restraint 
and now voice anger, frustration and puzzle- 
ment at the man whose rampaign agenda they 
enthusiastically supported. 

“To say Tm extremely disappointed in the 
way the president is dealing with terrorism is 
wrong. I'm disgusted." said Midge Decter, an 
author who is executive director of the Commit- 
tee for the Free World. “It’s worse to make 
thundering speeches and do nothing, like Rea- 
gan, than to be quiet and do nothing. He is 
substituting words for deeds." 

Like many other neoconservatives, Miss 
Decter said Mr. Reagan should have taken nriLi- 
tary action and strong economic retaliation 
against Syria as wdl as other terrorist strong- 
holds in the Middle East for the hostage mo- 
dem as weB as the car-bombing in Beirut of the 
UJS. Marine garrison in 1983, which left 241 
Americans dead. 

“To isolate Beirut airport now is laughable," 
she said. “Poor old Barnt airport. It’s dosed 
half the tune anyway." 

The intensity of Miss Decteris views on Mr. 


a duster of neoconserratives, a relatively i 
but influential group, many of them from New 
York. The members of this group, who began as 
Democrats, even Socialists in the 1930s, moved 
progressively to the political right since the late 
1960s. Their ideas nave been adopted in many 
Reagan administration programs. These indude 
the early tax cuts and budget cuts, the drive to 
deregulate and limit soda! programs, and the 
foreign policy views often espoused by Jeane J. 
Kirkpatrick, the forma- chief delegate to the 
United Nations. 


tives. The groan indudes snch figures as Irving 
KristoL the author, teacher and co-editor of The 
Public Interest magazine; Norman Podharetz, 
editor of Commentary magazine and Miss 
Dealer's husband; and Michael Novak, a theo- 
logian who is resident scholar at the American 
Enterprise Institute. 

Burton Yale Pines, vice president and direc- 
tor of research of the Heritage Foundation, said, 
“Much of the neoconsemlivc analysis, which I 
flunk is right, is that the foreign policy premises 
which drove the United States in the 70s were 
flawed, and yet Ronald Reagan seems to be 
conducting foreign policy on those flawedpre- 
mises.” The premises, he said, include the “false 
assumption rally developed under Jimmy Car- 
ter" that the United States has extremdy hmited 
options to react to crises as well as to the Soviet 
Union. 

“We are not some gian t tied down by the 
Lilliputians," Mr. Pines said, giving a view ech- 
oed by the neoconscxvatives. 

Mr. Podhoretthas called Mr. Reagan a “crip- 
pled hawk" and said his refusal to retaliate m 
Beirut would not only spur further terrorist 
attacks but also send the wrong signals to the 
Soviet Union. 


very much disappointed. I looked, as 
people did. to him to reverse the decline ot 
American power since 1975 that left a danger- 
ous tilt in the balance of power in favor of the 
Soviet Unkm." 

Mr. KristoL perhaps the nation’s pre-eminent 
neoconservalive. confessed he was "a little less 
upset about Reagan than Norman and Midge." 
He added: Tm older. Tm more stoical about 
the way the world is.” 

But Mr. KristoL 65. remarked: “This business 
of arms control; it really would have been more 
helpful if President Reagan said we're in favor 
of arms control if the Soviets ore serious. Bat it’s 
comical for us to sit there in Geneva for weeks 
and weeks and wait for a Soviet proposal It’s a 
charade. It miseducates the American people 
about (be possibilities of arms control." 


It is foreign policy, however, that is dominat- 
ing the attention of this 


“Why s&oaict anyone C 
States mil risk millions cf lives in defense of 
Europe against a Soviet attack or resist Soviet 
nuclear buukmail applied to the United States 
directly if even Ronald Reagan is imwtlljng to 
risk a handful of American fives in response to 
an aggression against the United States." he 
said. 

“It’s the latest in a series of episodes demon- 
strating that Reagan is, in fact, very prudent and 


E VEN an an issue such as Nicaraguaaad 
Mr. Reagan's efforts to arm the rebels 
fighting the leftist government there, 
some neoconservatives are critical of the presi- 
dent. 

“I don't think the appropriate U.S. actum in 
Nicaragua is military," Mr. Novak said, “but I 
also don't think that the artniini «t traikm fags 
been as forthright and constant in its effort as it 
ought to have been earlier. It’s allowed the 
situation to fester for a good many years and not 1 
taken the situation as seriously as iLs own analy- 
sis would demand." 


cautious about using American power despite 
group of neoconserva- his fiery rhetoric,” Mr. Podhoretz said. Tm 


Mr. Novak said he was disappointed in Mr. 
Reagan's handling of foreign policy but not 
especially surprised. “I was at Stanford when he/ 
was governor of California and was d isa b u sttf. 
then of the notion that Reagan was an ideo- 
logue." he said. “He always naturally worked 
through compromise. He's a classic consensus- 
oriented politician." 


Ogarkov’s Return: A Sign of Change? 




M 


By Celestine Bohlen 

Washington Post Service 

OSCOW — Last September, for rea- 
sons that are still mysterious. Marshal 


Nikolai V. Ogarkov, a forceful articn- 
■ the Soviet nrihtaiy, was 


late spokesman for 
removed from his job as chief of staff. 

Although not banished. Marshal Ogarkov, 67, 
seaned to be hovering on the edge of profes- 
sional oblivion. But last month, there were indi- 
cations that he might be returning to favor when 

a booklet of his was published and reviewed in 

the official press. 

Now Marshal Ogarkov is reported to be back 
at the center of the Soviet defense establish^ 
meat. Sources in Moscow have said that he has 
been appointed first deputy defense minister 
and commander in chief of the Warsaw Pact 
forces, the key move in a shake-up erf the De- 
fense Ministry started by MikbaO S. Gorbachev, 
the new Soviet leader. No date has been set for a 
formal announcement, sources said. 

The Defease Ministry shuffle, apparently ini- 
tiated last week before Mr. Gorbachev left Mos- 
cow on vacation, offers 3 good example of the 
new leader’s method in changing the top levels 
of government. 

In another move, Marshal Vladimir F. To- 
lubko, 70, commander, of Soviet Strategic 
Forces, was retired from his Irey position, which 
involves overseeing the Soviet nuclear missile 
arsenal His replacement is Yuri P. Maximov, a 
younger man who has been commander of the 
Turkestan military district. 

Marshal Tolubko had held theiob since 1971 
Before that he was deputy to me first Soviet 
strategic commander. According to Western 
diplomats. Marshal Toiubfco was absent from 
lire May 9 military parade this year, suggesting 
that he may be in poor health. 

In choosing Marshal Ogarkov, Mr. Gorba- 
chev las again reached for someone: with a solid 


professional background, a reputation for inde- 
pendent thinking and credentials as a tough 
manager. These same qualities have been used 
to describe Eduard A. Shevardnadze. .the new 
foreign minister, and Yegor K_ Iigacbev. now 
the second party secretary in charge of person- 
nel. 


will not have gotten his old job bade, and m 
chain of command he will serve under his for- 


mer 


— deputy. 

But Marshal Ogarkov is a strong personality 
with decided views, and in picking tan for sues 


I N many cases, Mr. Gorbachev has shown a 
willingness to skirt a well-established Sovi- 
et tendency to replace retiring executives 
with deputies who faithfully follow in their 
boss’s footsteps. 

Marshal Ogarkov, for one, is coming back 


Marshal Ogarkov is a strong 
personality and in re turning 

him, Mr. Gorbachev has 
made a statement that will 
undoubtedly reverberate 
through the military. 


from a form of political exile, and Mr. Gorba- 
chev^sreadmigout to someone who appeared to 
have been in disfavor also can be seen as a 
reflection of Mr. Gorbachev’s political st rength 
After his exit as chief of staff on Sept. 6 , Mar- 
shal Ogarkov apparently took up duties as com- 
mander of western theater forces, a command 
that existed largely on papa. 

As Warsaw Pact chief, Marshal Ogarkov will 
rank third in the Soviet military, after Defense 
Minister SergeiL- Sokolov and Chief of Staff; 
Sergei F. Akhromeyev. In that sense, his reha- 
bilitation cannot be' considered complete. He 


a key job, Mr. Gorbachev' has made a statement ' 
that will undoubtedly reverberate through the 
military bureaucracy. - 

By appointing Marshal Ogarkov, Mr. Gorba- 
chev is implying that his dismissal was no! 
warranted, an oblique challenge to those in the . 
Defense Ministry who favored it, In a system : 
that values continuity, such a break tscoosft ; 
ered unusual and a sign of coisderabiwdl- 
assurance. . • - . . ' \ 

The appointment also to indksneifrsLj 
Mr. Gorbachev has an affinity for Marshal’ 
Ogarkov’s views. Marshal Ogartcov has azgpod } 
that the Soviet Union must modernize 
f eases, and that it mast n tw audit ’ ™ 

technological challenge posed by 
Stales. ... 

The theme fits neatly into Mr. 
own emphasis mi the urgent need .to-pur d*.! 
Soviet economy on an equal fobriflg witir®’. 
high-technology rivals in the West ' 

But finally, by putting him badefc Moscow. 
Mr. Gorbachev has assured himself of Mtri si • 
Ogarkov’s loyalty, establishing -K&tiCf&taP 
not unlike the one between Mr. Go rfaac fcg 
Mr. Shevardnadze at the Foreign Mnastry*’ 
Variouspatterns have already — J ‘“ 1 

Goriachevs appointments: fltg — — - — . 
prise, the emphasis on proven latent 
modem approaches, and a shifts 
old men who have dung to their i 
The reported changes at ihr-fVf i 
■J* * sample The man who-wSl 

Gotand General Alexei A.^ Y< *" ~" 

the rarfhical directorate of 
Alexei Uzachcv, a man in his 
taads the political section with 
cast Germany. * e '~- wet 



n. 

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- 










* •• 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


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■’. /ntemuhtnal Herald Tribune 

P iARlS-r For his house's 20th 
anmvesary -Tuesday, Emanud- 
Ungaro delivered a blockbuster 
«flfcctwn that got him a standing 
ovatttHfc- Be brought bade evny- 
thing Paris HXttnre is fanxsis for -- 
a, total feeling of luxury, expressed 
*ritb wonderful fabrics, details and 
onbreadery, as wdl as inventive cut 
andpeeriess tedmique. 

The designer, who used to be 
nervoos and unsure of himself, has 
acxpd^’depUi-and authority. This 

Hebe Dorsey 

was demonstrated in his clothes, 
which showed the touch of a rod- 
low, casual hand even in the most 
outrt designs. The message tun 
was two wards, fluidity ana fenri- 
xnmty, -winch Ungaro said guided 
him throughout the collection. 
From the long peplura soils to the 
BeOocriveDtormaia evening dresses, 
evay garment stood otu like a work 
dart. 

Tbe strong-shouldered silhouette 
was focused on the waist, which 
was always emphasized with tight 
cfiaitwdrin belts or rippling pep- 
h»ws- ' The snhs were particularly 
good: Ungaro, a master tailor who 
studied under Cristobal Balen- 
daga, duwed dozens of styles in- 
stead of repea tingjust one is differ- 
ent colors and fabrics. Coats and 
<uifg were long, to the ankles — a 
, kxfc generally heavy and hard to 
put across, but Ungaro made it 
tight and pleasant with soft, fluid 
fabrics. His double-breasted coats, 
with deep pointed cuffs and sharp, 
velvet-faced lapels looked like 


something Napoleon might have 
worn on a battlefield. 

- The collection opened with a 
subdued palette: all shades of gray, 
from pale steel to dark charcoal 
But midway through, Ungaro 
brought in the circus colors he 


The evening mwns in strong pastel 
satins, which ended the show, 
brought down the house. 

Velvet was important here, as in ■ 
all tbe Paris fall-winter couture col- 
lections shown so iar this writ. 
Ungaro used rich burgundy and 
purple velvet as wdl as blade. His 
new top was a velvet turtleneck 
with a high , draped neHrimr. and 
embroidered with roses or silver 
snakes. Other turtlenecks, which 
dressed up the suits, were made of 

silvrfr or gold lanvL 

More velvet accents included 
buttons, quilted edgings os fur- 
lined raincoats, and tau, crushed 
panne velvet toques in bright col- 
ors. Long velvet tunics over short 
skirts also gave this collection an 
opulent edge. 

Ungaro kept reinventing tbe lit- 
tle draped dress that he put on the 
map. The dcw one has more fabric, 
wrapped around and around the 
body, which sometimes ended up 
not being as sexy as his light-fitting 
versions. But he had some .real 
beauties with his long mermaid 
dresses, their hems breaking out 
into dusters of knife pleats. Many 
were finished with slight trains. 

There were far fewer pants than 
usual the few shown being cut on 
the bias and draped over the an- 


kles, like Indian pants; some woe 
worn with spats. 

. After the show Ungaro gave a 
hn yh at the Palais Gafiicxa (home 
of Paris’s fashion museum) for 300 
people, not only his entire staff but 
people who wfcerf with Km when 
he was starting out and who arc no 
longer with the house. Among them 
were the former Brazilian model 
Betti Lucas, now Mrs. Jean-Luc 
Lngardfere, wife of the president of 
the French companies Matra and 
Hachette. 

Knowing his weakness for good 
wines, Ungaro's staff presented 
him with Chateau Pfctros carried by 
throe models wearing mini-coats 
from his first collection, dating 
from the days when he showed in a 
little room on Avenue MacMahon. 

Kari Lagerfeld’s collection for 
Chand, usually one of the high- 
lights of Paris couture, came as a 
slight disappointment: He failed to 
repeat his adroit combination of 
his style arid die Chand look. His 
long frock coats looked heavy and 
the combination of big, football 
shoulders with short, tight skirts 
seemed cheap. On the other hand, 
his idea of tightly belting the classic 
Chanel suit worked weJL 

Lagerf eld kept the Chand signa- 
tures — rows of gold buttons; in- 
cluding some down tbe back of 
hems, and ropes of pearls. Inis de 
la Fressange, the house model, 
wore tbe prettiest clothes of the 
day, opening with a long white 
cashmere bathrobe bdted m white 
quilted satin, a foretaste of tbe 
loag, beautiful, belted erfipe 
sheaths. She also wore a very Cha- 
nd outfit— a red, black ana white 
tweed cardigan over black velvet 
pants — and a full-length purple 


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Prince of f Pan 9 on the Steel Drums 


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By Michael Zwerin 

international Herald Tribune 

P i ARiS — Along with bagpipes, 
mandolin, harmonica, cello and 
tbe tuba, steel drums are listed as 
“miscellaneous instruments” in 
jazz polls. Andy Nareil wins an ( ^ 
increasing number of prizes in this 
category, which may seem like an 
obscure honor, but he does not play. ' ^ 
“pans,” as steel drums are called in 
their native Trinidad, in a miscella- 
neous fashion. 

His records are consistently in 
'Sthe top ten U.S. jazz radio airplay 
Vlists. He has accompanied several 
films, among them “Ghostbust- 
ers.” He has soloed with the Oak- 
land Symphony Orchestra and has 
in general popularized what Ik 
calls “one of the most interesting 
musical inventions of thiscentroy. . 

It all began in 1938, in Port of 
Spain, when a kettle-drummer 
called Winston (Spree) Simon 
found a dent in tbe bottom of his 
garbage can. Knocking it out with a 
hammer, he heard the blows make 
different notes as the shape of the 
dent changed. He hammered out a 
scale with new dents of varying 
sizes. The following year garbage 
can bands were the rage of the 


: ■''7 , Mardi Gras festival. 

‘ ^ Their nonstandard shape and 

• cheap metal, however, clanged with 
: "" r / £ ; l “” unstable intonation. After World 

War H, the U.S. Army solved the 
.. problem by leaving behind monn- 

- ' tains of sturdy oil drums. Steel 

U- 5 : e *■ bands grew to as many as 100 
‘ pieces, with sections from bass to 

•' tbe higher-pitched “lenoj*’ and 

• “melody” pans, depending on how 

nmcb Of the ofl dnun's depth was 

• utilized. Refusing in "panyards,” 

• ' . tbe bands played increasingly com- 

plex instrumental calypso (.another 



Trinidadian product); tbe best of yearlong elimination leading up to just try and ignore that. But most 
them now perform Mozart and tbe final contest, “Panorama,” dm- people were good 10 os down there 

C.I_U_ h*. ■ - - l -J TV. : ; , * _1 „ J .U ~W,A 


Schubert as wdL Trinidadians be- 
lieve they invented the fust new 
instrument since the saxophone. 
Every neighborhood and school 
basils sled band. 

In 1962, when Nardl was 8 , an 
Antiguan panman named Rupert 
was working as a counselor for his 
father, a soda! worker in New Y ork 


steel drums is expressed 
Simon in his book, “Si 


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ABTS/ LEISURE 



Star of Musical Mutiny’ Is the Bounty 


By Sheridan Modey 

International Herald Tribune 


ktmys. .w 



OmfaGarii 

Ungaro’s pepfum sirit 

velvet redingote reminiscent of the 
"Amadeus” look so popular this 
season. 

Frango&s Lesage, head of a cele- 
brated embroidery house that has 
been working overtime this season, 
said Lagerfeld ran up (he biggest 
embroidery b91 in Paris. This was 
easy to believe, just on the evidence 
of the extravagant, solidly embroi- 
dered, long twm sets, with motives 
ranging from abstract patterns to 
folkloric designs. Another lush 
note was tbe new fur line, including 
a floor-length sable coot, again 
worn by bus de la Fressange, 
seemingly over nothing. 


Panman Andy Nardl: Not “the kid” any more. 

his firsi band, “It was too cute — up energies of youth, crying for a 
Td rather not talk about it,” he place in the sun, in a country teem- 
said, laughing. They recorded for log with talent." 

Decca, took pan in a calypso show Nardl said: "There were, and 
in Carnegie Hall and, when Andy are, a certain number of people 
was 12 , performed during the na- who won’t accept a white Ida from 
tioaal music festival in Trinidad. New York playing their instro- 
Compeution is Recce during ihc meat. They fed 1 ripped them off. I 


tbe final contest, “Panorama,” aur- people were good 10 us down there 
ing carnival time. The winner is — we played on the radio and 
crowned "King of Pan.” Journal- made a lot of friends. I always give 


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L ONDON — The star of “Mnd- 
t ay " at die Piccadilly, is not 
David Essex, who wrote the music 
and plays Fletcher Christian, nor 
Richard Crane, who wrote the 
book, nor even Frank Finlay as an 
impressive Captain Bligh. The star 

THE BRrrKHgTAGE 

of this million-plus exuavaganza is 
William Dudley, who has designed 
aset of such stunning and versatile 
brilliance that were I the musical’s 
management Td be inclined to 
charge quite highly for tours of it 
on non-matinee days. 

Dudley’s ship rises 40 feet (12 
meters) from beneath the stage: it 
tilts, turns, rocks, floats and sways, 
all the while revolving to reveal 

cabins below deck, high masts, vast 
arem. of deck space and rigging. 
- Seldom since the days of Herbert 
Bcerbotun Tree can London have 
bad a stage set so consistently in- 
triguing and exciting to watch. It is 
a pity that the rest of tbe show 
proves something of an anticlimax. 

The problem with any Bounty 
script, including three movie ver- 
sions going back across half a cen- 
tury, is the vast sprawl of the story. 
The tale spreads across decades, 
encompasses England and Tahiti 
and Pitcairn Island, involves gener- 
ations of sail oss and tbrir descen- 
dants. It is also a tale of the old 
autocratic order coining up against 
idealist revolutionaries, ana the 
story of two leaders who .were per- 
haps more than a little in love with 
me another. 

To get all of that into three bows 
with 30 songs and a cast of 40 was 
not ever going (o be easy, and there 
are times when Crane's story line 
resembles a skeletal synopsis for a 
school lecture, while at others the 
Tahitians appear to have been as- 
sembled for a promotional video 
on behalf of a South Seas tourist 
board. 


A good many of Essex's songs 
sound remarkably alike, and his 
chorus numbers are at best Lionel 
Bart circa 1965. But his final solo, 
•TO Go No More A-Roving,” is 
immensely impressive, as are 
‘'Freedom’' and “Fallot Angels 
Riding” Unfortunately, all three 
turn up in the final 15 minutes. 
Michael Bogdanov, the director, 
drives the whole cruise along as fast 
as he can. and though there is not 
much t ime for more than minimal 
allowances of acting and plot, Td 
still not be inclined to miss that set. 
When (he show closes, they can 
probably sell it to Disneyland. 

□ 

It was brave of die Chichester 
management to revisit Christopher 
Hampton’s “The Phflantitr^wa” 
IS years after its initial and tremen- 
dous London success. It seems 
therefore somewhat unfair that 
such bravery has beat rewarded by 
some remarkable critical hostility. 
Yes, the play has dated, just as the 
audience members have. But to 
suggest that, because times and 
perceptions have radically altered 
since 1970, the play is somehow not 
as good as was first thought is ab- 
surd. 

“The Philanthropist” came 
equally out of Molifere and the Par- 
is student uprising of the 1960s. By 
reversing "Le Misanthrope” and 
considering the plight of someone 
who wanted 10 be nice to very nasty 


total political and social isolation 
of British academics with the in- 
volvement of others in an outside 
world already falling to pieces, 
Hampton came op with a collegiate 
black comedy rivaled only in recent 
times by Simon Gray’s “Butiey” 
for its chilly academic intelligence 
and bitchiness. 

To suggest that Hampton’s semi- 
detached teachers and tbeir girls no 
longer make much sense is like 
worrying about the fact that one 
does not often meet a Lady Brack- 
nell coming out of Safeway. These 


people are still a perfect reflection 
of their confused times. In the title 
role Edward Fox gives a perfor- 
mance of considerable comic 
charm and vague despair, matched 
impeccably by John Wells as his 
waspish partner m cerebral dehy- 
dration. The res( of the casting is a 
lot shakier, however, and Patrick 
Garland's production will look 
much stronger when it gets off this 
vast open stage and back behind a 
proscenium arch, but in the mean- 
time this is J period piece of great 
fascination, which gave us at least 
one joke that has entered public 
domain (“I'm a man of no convic- 
tions — at least I think l am"). 


"A Stale of Affairs.” which 
comes to the Duchess from the lyr- 
ic Hammersmith in a production . 
by Peter James, is variously hilled 
as “a sub at marriage" and' “a first 
play” by Graham Swanneii. neither 
or which would entirely satisfy the 
Trades Descriptions Act. Ki 'is a 
sequence of four sketches, almost 
any one of which might ha\e 
turned up 20 years ago as a radio 
play or as a part of ihe kind of Woi 
End revues that Harold Pinter atid 
John Mortimer were writing for the 
likes of Fenella Fielding and Ken- 
neth Williams. 

We first meet a man trying to 
work out how to tell his wife that he 
warns to make lo\c to her once a 
month instead of once a night. 
Then we meet a woman who de- 
cides 10 break a marriage by telling 
the truth about on affair. Then we 
meet a group of men in a pub 
garden discussing (he best ways to 
lie about extramarital affairs. Fi- 
nally we meet an exhausted couple, 
surrounded by the paraphernalia of 
a first child, wondering why mar- 
riages break up. 

Like Thurber cartoons or Sond- 
heim songs, all or Swanueli’s 
sketches are reports from the bat- 
defront of the sex war. .All are ad- 
mirably played by a cast led by 
Gary Bond and Ni'choh McAuliffe 


and all are about the borderlines 
between men and women, affairs 
and marriages, weddings and di- 
vorces. But all suffer terribly from 
their own timing. Unable to deter- 
mine whether he is writing sketches 
or monologues or plays, unwilling 
to commit us to any single couple 
for more than about 30 minutes. 
Swannell veers from the jokes to 
the insights to the comments 10 the 
character sketches without any real 
conviction that he has anything to 
sjy about mamage that most peo- 
ple have not been able to work out 
for themselves. Any of these 
sketches might have become an in- 
triguing full-length play, but they 
all stop at just about the poiat 
where thev sun to become imerest- 




PAR1S 


ODICINI 

32, Avenue Marceau 
PARIS Se 
723.84.33 


Not only our stewardesses smile. 


ists complain about a "pan shoot- credit to the guys who created the 
out mentality ” Nareil says it's like music, I cry and get them work, 
a gambit: "OJL, buddy, bow fast spread the good word about the 
canyou draw?” instrument. Anyway, by now rve 

The national pride attached to been doing it longer than most of 


them. Fm not The kicT any more.” 
On his latest album, “Slow Mo- 


ghettos. Rupert made sets of pans "The sons of former slaves invent- tk, n " (Hip Pocket, his own label), 
and taught some of the older chfl- cd indigenous music b orn ou t of ^ pans fit organically in soft dec- 
then bow to play them. Soon there frustration and social ostracism. ^ settings with a rich percussive 
was a set of pans in the Nareil Like jazz in the U. S-, born in the foundation. His custom-made two- 
. j borne is Queens, and ADdv formed South out of the womb of a quasi- and-a-half-octave melody pan can 
'* v j steel band that worked Parent- slave society, and the rundown ten- sound like a synthesizer program, 
1 ■ Teacher Association meetings and emails, or the waifs’ homes of New ^ ^ instrument called 

hospital benefits. Orleans, Atlanta and New York, so ^ balaphon. or perhaps a set of 

Nareil refused to tell the name ot was sled band born oat of tbe pern- dampened chimes. While there is a 
frequent Latin flavor, the rhythm 



has a jazz feel often an easy-listen- 
ing "crossover" variety. The elec- 
tronic and flute tweets are some- 
times reminiscent of' Olivier 
Mesaan. 

Above afi, Nardl said, he wants 
to avoid the “ethnic” bins in record 
stores: "If you play synthesizer, the 
Iasi place you want to be is in the 
synthesizer bin. In my case it’s the 
Caribbean bin. Death!" ■ 

Nareil wrote and recorded an 
hour of music for a yet-to-be-ro- 
Ieased Jane Fonda workout video 
that he says has “a funky reggae 
fed.” He has composed commer- 
cials for Apple Computer and con- 
ducts workshops at the growing 
number of universities that include 
steel drums as part of their percus- 
sion programs. 

The instrument turned out to be 
perfect for suspense scenes in the 
Eddie Murphy movie “48 Hrs.” 
NareU’s role was “to create tension. 
Td be playing along and all of a 
sudden the conductor would shout, 
‘Improvise!’ And Td just go crazy 
bemud a shootout.” 

During the carnival of 1946, 
Spree Simon played a Calypso 
tune, a hymn, . “God Save the 
Queen” and a classkaJ piece on his 
melody pan. Ihe governor, some 
ministers and many dignitaries 
were in the audience. The applause 
was deafening. “From there on- 
wards,” Simon wrote, “there was 
no stopping. Pan had graduated.” 


V ft 



Lufthansa 





ENTERJNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


Opm Htab Lew Ml On. 

Indus 135708 137220 IMn 1331 -SI— 551 

Trane TO36 7)029 49300 408X7— 243 

Util 16403 Ml) 15625 W*- 539 

Gama 54*73' 57054 55551 5*009 — 4» 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


HM) Lew Osu Ofec 
Comeosite HUB 11145 11159 -lin 

Inauslrials 139.17 12751 13741 —03? 

Transo. 11AW 1U.U 1U.U — OJJ 

Uimttoi SMO »« S7.«— J27 

Fkma 12043 11923 1I9J3 — 104 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


CIOS# ChW 

1971 UndL 

7748 — B.W 

8247 +0.1* 


Advanced 
Declined 
U n O w nged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
volume up 
Volume down 


019 553 

983 IDS 

<32 MO 

2033 2 046 

w no 

5 5 


<9,12*490 

77.960320 


Jut* n 

jmvw 

jxr m — 

Jutrl7 

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191435 431493 1,340 

3442J6 09798 L29) 

21X130 487.586 trc 
26X140 54U56 W93 

401410 9*413 &063 

s Haunt 


liesdajs 


IkVtf Ml 


Closing 


VoLd<P-M VWVM 

Prrr.iPM.roL 91S40JOB 

PrevaaoMekdcioa 11MH370 


Tobias Indude the nationwide prices 
up to the cfosino on Wdfl street end 
do net reflect lata trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 



NASDAQ Index 




GempwHr 

Industrials 


Close Otp 
30443 —040 
3056 +045 
39242 — 374 
36245 — IM ! 
291iB—2A< . 

sssr,s 


Standard & Poor's index 




AMEX Sales 


indDAritte 

Tnn* 

uiHWn 

Fkiaoce 

Canmlit 


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mo 3U» W« — 127 
taattt 17970 9044 — uo 
87.14 UU U» -240 

z3jo Em nm — u* 

1KN 19X30 mSS — 140 


4P.M. volume 
Prw.4 PALvotome 
Prev.cens.vewm 



AMEX Most Actives 


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13V 139 
to* W* 
12* 119 
6% 613 

10 * in. 

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AMEX Stock index 


k« *»■ ctosi carw 

23643 23547 23515 -M, 


llMaim 

MAI LOW Slock 


Dlv.YU.RE MfcHMiLOw Quot-Ott* 


Stocks Retreat in Late Selling 


j, 

\\ FIRST annual jli 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Late setting on the New 
York Stock Exchange turned a midday stock 
market rally into a rout Tuesday in very heavy 


144 64 1 
130 13 33 

.m 

Atnaxpf XfiO 84 
Am Has 1.10 <0 20 
AHospt 340 24 
AmAer 

ABokr B 

A Brand 340 64 9 

ABrVPf 275 93 
ABrtJpJ 2JJ 44 
ABdcvt liO | A 17 
ABldM 46 3.1 15 
ABunPr At 23 IS 
Am Can 2.90 £0 II 
ACanef 240 11J 
ACanpf 300 54 
ACOPM 270 104 
ACopCv 2516 >4 
_ _ ACatrtC 216 

439 A Cyan 140 34 T4 
18* ADT 42 37 25 
17* AEIPW 2260 94 9 
25 AfflEn) 121 28 16 
9* A Fan ll AS 24 16 
191b AGnCe 140 24 TO 
Alla AGAl Wt 
51* AGnl ptA 6340113 
58* AGnl me 5070 6J 
45* AGn lot 335 44 
40V* AGnpfD 2M 34 
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46* AHmim 240 AS 13 

8 * A Hasp 1.12 24 15 
* Am rich 661 74 9 
S3 AtltOrp M 4 24 
IBM AMI 72 27 13 
Z*b AmMot 

rSW" ' i 

13* A5LF1 ptf 11? 196 
10V» ASh Ip 40 34 11 
24* AmSM 160 52 10 
32M AmStor 64 14 12 
46* ASlTPfA 08 94 
51 AStrptB 6J0 114 
17* AT&T 130 55 16 
31V* AT&T p, 364 96 
321* AT&T pf 334 94 
1SW AWatrt 140. 44 8 
9 AWa5pf 135 104 
19* Am Halt 260 116 8 
58 ATrPr $64 1 86 
6* ATrSc 

64 ATrUn S64 *8 

8 * Amaran 160 42 8 
Vi Ameao 30 6 23 

22* NtWM 40 XI 13 
18* Am foe 

6* Amine 5 

50V* Amoco 3J0t> 53 8 
26* AMP 72 XI 21 
Ampeo JO 26 17 
Am no a 11 

AmSIh 160 44 9 
Amotad 160 40 15 
Anocmp 

Antons 21 

Anchor 168 54 
AnCtav 132 34 38 
AndrGr 30 U 15 
Anuoflc 60 23 15 
Anheuss 13 

Anhcupf 360 XI 
Antatr 38 17 IB 
Anthem 44 J 21 
Anthny 64b XI 9 
Apodw 38 26 TB 
ApctlPwt 
OpchPunXIO 11.1 
•pPWPf 760 113 
ApPwpf 340 126 
APlDto 1767 65 15 
APPlMu 68 

ArctlDn .Mb 6 13 
SrtPot 348 115 
WIPpf 1070 106 
Uftaat 60 17 9 
hrbto 148 54 IS 
AflnRI 
Armada 


86* 
8391 27* 
492 3* 
IBM 21* 
276 6* 

47 141* 

ssss 

57 

5X 

398b 

s* 

HZ 


Traders said arbitrageurs, investors who take 
advantage of small price differences to make a 
profit had bought Standard & Poor's 500-stock 
index futures contracts and sold the underlying 
equities. 

Earlier in the session prices moved higher on 
buying inspired at least partly by die view that 
the U.S. economy aad corporate earnings 
promised to pick up in the second half of the 
year. Technology issues; inducting bellwether 
IBM. led the advance, though their strength 
later dissipated. 

The Dow Jones industrial average ended with 
a loss of 5.83 to U51 31. 

The worst performances were concentrated 
among utility issues. 

The Dow utility average, hurt fay the convic- 
tion that interest rates wul not fall in the near- 
term and may firm slightly, fell 5.39 to 159.26. 
As institutions bailed out of tins sector, die 
utility index lost 327 percent of its value, the 
wont loss since April 23, 1974, when it suffered 
a 4.8-percent decline. 

Analysts said some buying interest had begun 
to shift from stocks that tend to do well in any 
economic environment into some of the stocks 
that need and would benefit from an economic 
pickup. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported the consumer price indei 


rose 02 percent in June and that durable goods 
orders that month rose an unexpectedly strong 
1.8 percent. 

Phillips Petroleum was the most active issue, 
up ft to 12% after reporting marginally lower 
second-quarter earnings. Exxon and Atlantic 


Richfield were moderaidy lower after reporting 
lower earnings. Unocal added % to 28% in 
active trading. 

Union Carbide was the second most active 
stock, advancing 2ft after Merrill Lynch analyst 
George Krug upgraded the stock to “okay to 
buy” from “neutiaL” 

AT&T followed, and with a loss of ft to 21%. 
was among losing utility stocks. In other tele- 
communication issues, Bell Atlantic lost 3ft to 
89ft, Nynex gave up 3ft to 84ft, Southwestern 
Bell fell 3 to 80% and Pacific Telesis lost 2% to 
75. U.S. West fell 2% to 77ft. 

Other utilities giving up ground inrindAH 
Kansas Power & Ugh t, off 2ft to 37%, Consoli- 
dated Edison, down 2ft to 34ft, Boston Edison, 
off 2ft to 38ft, and Midwest Energy, down 2ft 
to 29%. Ford was up ft to 43 ft. 

In pharmaceuticals. G.D. Searie tacked on ft 
to 64%. Merck ft to 116% and Upjohn ft to 
119%. 

Crown Zeller bach fell 1 to 39ft. James Gold- 
smith has raised his stake in the company to 
over 50 percent. 

Stoner Communications increased ft to 88. 
Investor Ivan Boesky said Monday that he and 
a group of companies be controls bold a 9.6- 
percent stake in Storer. 






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martian 

grow 

EXPO 





"Fellow Martians , lets give a big welcome cheer to the 
Grow Group , Inc. and its family of fine products F 


# For our 19K4 Annual Report, write: 

Grow ClhciniL'iil Europe N.V.. Omlcstrj:it S 
B-2fi50 Vansckur. Belgium Dept. (1 

Grow Group 

Awtgrip, Treewax, Devoe, three of our well-known brand ■ names 




21 


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BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 8 


WED3HESDAY, JM.Y 24, 198& 


** 


Page 9 


i - 


IWTEKHATIOHAI MANAGER 

Climbing the Office Ladder 
Means Jockeying for Space 


Prices 

Up 0.2% 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

*-• fjtierruzuonal Herald Tribune 

' ONDON — **Me Geooatitffl” managers want their own 
space. As a result of overcrowded, offices, the animal 
instinct of territoriality has come back with a vengeance 

after decades of corporate emphasis on planning offices 
for teamwork. 




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■' *" s “**' J! '~~ » with one day 

i him np against 

ners came to - — — — 

transferred ulXta If die office hadn’t 

been so small, the 
reporter might not 

violence to express his am- hava beco me yU AeOL 

mosity. 

Some copy editors on. a ma- 
jor U.S. newspaper have dubbed their open-space newsroom the 
“sensory deprivation chamber,” because of the harsh li ghting , 
ccM atmosphere^ a seating arrangement that gives no privacy and 
overcrowding. 

Innovative office planners both in the United States in 
Europe are seeking to take into account estimates of how much a 
company is likely to grow over the next decade. 

In designing a new office fear Iloyds of London here, office 
ave had to allow for potential growth following the 
ition of the insurance market. In the past decade, Lloyds’ 
membership grew from 7,000 to 26,000. 

“What companies rarely anticipate is how things are going to 
change,” says Philippe Meurice, an architect with the Pans- based 
firm, Espace Architectures SA. “We estimate by how much a 
company is likely to grow and we provide them witha system that 
enables them to control change without getting overcrowding.” 

1 OP executives have never had trouble bolding on to their 
own space. Luxury-furnished executive suites or bigger 
offices have long been considered a perk for senior execu- 
tives. It is the manager just below the senior level who has had to 
fight for an office space to call home. 

“One of the major concerns in Britain is privacy,” says John 
Francis, an interior designer with the London-based architectural 
firm DEGW Ltd. 

According to the preliminary findings of a study to be pub- 
lished at the end of the year by 

£ .... 1 -earimg wwn panie* M pfriaTIy tn the high-tech computer fiefaL 

~ , are more concerned with motivating their managers by providing 
them with a ©Dod work environment than they are with what it is 

* going to co6t them, according to a study by Budding Use Studies 

* LuL, a London-based research firm. It wdl be interesting to see 
how recent austerity measures amcthg some computer companies 

tA. like Hewlett-Packard Co„ are likely to affect caring companies’ 
v spendthrift habits. 

“The office is playing a part in how these companies think of 
rewarding their middle managers, just like a fringe benefit” says 
Shcena Wilson, a director of the research group conducting the 
study. 

According to the same study, most of the companies that have 
performed well in their sector realize what their middle managers 
want most is their own turf. A corporate culture that respects the 
rifli*'! - individual's right ’to privacy is as important as adequate and 
us. **-*-• pieasasrdffide space. *-- m ,7* -■/;•!. '! •vi-r : : :.l 

But companies have at their disposal numerous ways to intrude 
upon a manager’s turf in the office. At one major U.S. company, 
the chairman of the board recently took time out from negotiat- 
ing a major takeover bid to write a memo ordering everybody to 
dean, up their offices and their d e sks . 


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244 T 1 S 


Weak Economy 
In U.S. Is Cited 


Jane 

Washingtaa Paa Smiit 

WASHINGTON — Consumer 
prices rose a modest 02 percent in 
June as weakness in the U3. econo- 
my and foreign competition con- 
tinued to bold down inflation. 

The Consumer Price Index rose 
3.7 percent fax the last 12 months 
and the increase in inflation 
slowed from a 4.1-pcrceffl rale in 
the first three months to a 33- 
percent rate from April to June, the 
! jtbor Department said. 

Food costs edged np sligbtly af- 
ter falling, in May and transporta- 
tion prices dropped, the Labor De- 
partment said. In addition to 
moderate fuel and food costs, econ- 
omists attributed the modest infla- 
tion performance to strong i 
tirirm from imports, wtni 
helped to keep the costs of domes- 
tic goods low, and slow growth in 
the economy. 

The sluggish economy has con- 
tributed to lower wage demands, 
reflected in the continued high rate 
of unemployment, and the low rate 
of use of American plant and 
equipment: 

A separate government report is- 
sued Tuesday suggested that eco- 
nomic activity may be_ou the rise 
again. The Commerce D e par t me nt 
reported that new orders for fac- 
tory durable goods rose 1.8 per- 
cent, following a 3J percent in- 
crease in May. Both months’ 
increases reflected large orders for 
defense capital goods, the depart- 
ment said. * 

- Excluding defense orders, new 
orders increased 0.7 percent in 
June and 0.6 parent in May. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baldrige said that the new orders 
reports “suggests that the good s- 
produdng sector of the economy 
may be emerging from its doldrums 
of the past year ” 

“The mam problem for onr man- 
ufacturing industries has been the 
high level of the dollar ” Mr. Bal- 
drige said “A quick resolution of 
our budget problems would lower 
interest rates and the dollar fur- 
ther.” 

If Mr. Baldrige is correct, a pick- 
up in manufacturing activity could 
increase inflation somewhat down- 
the road, economists said. They 
also said another trouble spot in 
the price pictnre could be services 
whose prices have continned to es- 
calate. 

Jerry Jasmowski, chief econo- 
. mist for the National Association 
of Manufacturers, sad. “Despite 
die recent 13 percent Fall in the 
dollar, the exchange rate is still so 
overvalued that competitive pres^ 
sure from import prices will hold 
down domestic inflation. 



n» N|w Vfltk Tones 

< Yugo’ minkars at a production line in a Kragujevac, Yugoslavia, factory. 

'Yugo* Minicar to Make U.S. Debut 

Importers Hope $4,000 Price Lures Buyers 


By Warren Brown 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — One of the most ambitions 
campaigns to market a foreign auto since the 
Volkswagen Beetle arrived here in 1949 mil begin 
in Washington and Baltimore next month. 

Ambitions? Gall it audacious. Consider A Yu- 
goslav auto maker, Zavodi Crvena Zastava, will 
send the fust of an annual U.S. allotment of 40,000 
nricicars to Baltimore Harbor by Aug. 14. 

The cars, tiny 1.1-titer, four-cylinder, four-speed 
manual- t ransmiss ion jobs called Yog os. win go on 
sale Aug. 26 at Washing ion’s Capital City Motor 
Cars. It will be the first dealer in the United Slates 
to officially offer the new imports, according to (he 
Yugoslav Embassy. 

The cars wiD carry a port-of-entiy price of 
S3.99G, but destination charges in the Washington 
area could boost that base price to $4,215. An AM 
radio might get the price up to about $4300. 
Adding an air conditioner would put the sticker 
into the $4,900 range before taxes, title and other 
locally applicable fees. 

But buyers who could live without a radio and 
cool air conceivably could drive away for under 
$4300. That’s nearly $1,000 las than (he average 
price of a three-year-old used car in the Washing- 
ton area, *nd less than the 1985 base price of 
$5,195 for the Mazda GLC three-door aodd, one 


of the less expensive new cars sold in the United 
States. 

“You can put this car on your MasterCharge 
Card,” said Wayne Phillips, general manager of 
Capital Gty Motor Cars. “Were gang to get a lot 
of people wbo've been shut out of the market by 
oew-car prices, and we’re going to get people who 
can't get into used cars, too.” 

But Mr. Phillips and William E Prior, president 
of the Montvale, New Jersey-based Yugp America 
Inc., said their strategy was not limned to the 
selling price. 

“We’re offering a good value.” said Mr. Prior, 
who was in Washington last week with several 
Yugoslavian government officials to inaugurate 
Capital City Motor as Yugp’s “Dealer No. 1 ” 

The estimated 54 dealers who will sian selling 
Yugos in the Northeast are being urged to market 
the minicars as enuy-level, basic transportation. 

“The engine »nd transmission in inis car are 
basically dementary. But they’re bullet-proof. 
They're durable. People in Yugoslavia have to 
hang onto their cars a lone, long time. The cars 
have to last,” Mr. Prior said. 

He conceded that there is doubt within the U3. 
auto industry about any manufacturer’s ability to 
offer a quality car for $4,000. 

The dealers' profit margin on that kind of car 
would be too low, the labor and materials costs too 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 2) 


Arco Had Loss 
Of $1.1 Billion 
In 2d Quarter 


The AsiunateJ Pros 

NEW YORK. — Atlantic Rich- 
field Co. reported on Tuesday a 
record quarterly loss for an oil 
company, a $1.1 billion deficit in 
the second quarter that resulted 
from a previously announced deci- 
sion to streamline its business. 

Arco’s loss, which also was one 
of the biggest in the history of any 
compa ay in the United Stales, had 
been expected because of an earlier 
decision to take a one-time -only 
$15- billion charge against earnings 
for retrenchments that include get- 
ting out of the business of selling 
gasoline on the East Coast. 

Meanwhile, Exxon Corp., the 
world’s largest industrial companv. 
said its profit tumbled 44.S percent 
as it set up a contingency fund for 
losses that may result from a court 
judgment, now being appealed, 
that it overpriced erode oil between 
1975 and 1981. 

Phillips Petroleum Co. said its 
profit dropped 52.4 percent be- 
cause of the sharply higher interest 
expenses associated with a 543- 
billion stock buy-back program it 
implemented to escape from two 
hostile takeover bids. 

The reports Tuesday were a con- 
trast to the double-digit gains an- 
nounced Monday by four large oil 
companies as a result of a rise in 
gasoline prices despite a worldwide 
drop in erode oil prices. 

Arco said the loss of S1.099 bil- 
lion came on revenue of $5,771 
billion, compared with a profit of 
$406 million, or SI. 57 a share, on 
revenue of $6,093 billion a year 
earlier. 

77k loss trailed the record S4.87 
Union loss posted in the fourth 
quarter of 1983 by American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co., which had 
resulted from bookkeeping changes 
to revalue assets before (fie break- 
up of the Bell System. But it was 
almost as big as the SI-16 billion 
loss reported in the second quarter 
of 1984 by Continental Illinois 
Corp. and the 51.15 billion loss in 
the fourth quarter of 1982 reported 
by Bethlehem Steel Corp. 

Arco said its profit from con- 


OPEC’s Price Cuts Are Expected to Be Minor 


By Bob Hagcny 

Imemtuianal Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Oil ministers from 
the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries straggled Tues- 
day to reach a compromise expect- 
ed to involve minor cots in the 

Saudi Arabia and'&uwait, both 
big producers of heavy crude, are 
seeking redactions of around 50 
cents, authoritative sources said. 
But both countries appeared eager 
to find a compromise that would 


satisfy as many of OPECs 13 mem- 
bers as possible. 

Arab heavy, a key Saudi crude, is 
officially priced at $2630, com- 
pared with the free-market price of 
about $25. Became Saudi Arabia, 
unlike most OPEC members, in- 
sists on charging the official price, 
its oil sales have plunged in recent 
months. The Saudis hope a more 
realistic price will help revive sales. 

Ecuador and Venezuela have 
supported the idea of 
heavy prices. Some other Of 


members, though, fear that any re- 
duction in official prices would fur- 
ther depress the oD market general- 
ly. They also resent the idea of a 
price move that helps the producers 
of heavy crude compete against 
producers of tighter varieties. 

Such resentment is evident even 
among such close Saudi allies as the 
pro- 
duces tight crudes. AUtnhad, a 
semiofficial newspaper in Abu 
Dhabi, said in an editorial Tuesday 
that the Saudi price proposal “wifi 


ang 

United Arab Emirates, which 


solve the problem of one party at 
the expense of other parlies.” 

The official prices of the more 
expensive tight crudes are widely 
expected to be unchanged, even 
though most OPEC members have 
been forced to sell their light variet- 
ies at several dollars bdow the offi- 
cial rates. 

The reduction in heavy crude 
would be presented as an adjust- 
ment of “differentials" between the 
prices of heavy and tight grades 
rather than as a price cut. 


turning operations, which exclude 
extraordinary charges, would have 
been $402 million, or 51.79 a share, 
compared with $455 million, or 
51.76 a share, a year earlier. 

Sanford Margoshes. on oil indus- 
try analyst at the securities firm 
Sheanori Lehman Brothers Inc. in 
New York, said the huge lo» was 
not a cause for alarm because it 
represented a program “designed 
to improve the efficiency of opera- 
tions by getting rid of parts of the 
business that didn't fit." 

But he also said Arco may have 
gone too far by raising its debt 
burden to 55 percent of assets from 
26 percent last y ear at a time w hen 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 7) 

GM Earnings 
Fell 27.9% 
In 2d Period 

United Press /iflimJfHvu/ 

DETROIT — General Motors 
Corp. reported on Tuesday a 27.9- 
percent drop in net income for the 
second quarter of I9S5, citing the 
impact of future model programs, 
sales incentive programs and last 
year's acquisition of the computer 
company. EDS Corp. 

Net income for the quarter 
amounted to almost SI. 16 billion, 
down from $1.6 billion reported in 
the second quarter of 1984. Earn- 
ings per share were $3.52, a 31- 
percent drop from SS.09 a share 
reported a year ago. 

Sales for the quarter reached a 
record $25 billion, up 16 parent 
from $21.6 billion in the 1984 sec- 
ond quarter. 

Roger B. Smith, GM chairman, 
and F. James McDonald, the presi- 
dent, said in a statement that the 
company was “still feeling the im- 
pact of 'front-loaded future model 
programs as well as costs related to 
the EDS implementation and re- 
cent sales incentive campaigns to 
stimulate the market." 

For the first six months of 1985. 
GM reported a net income of $2.23 
billion, down 30.7 percent from 
$3.22 billion in the first half of 
1984. Pa share income declined to 
$6.78 from S 10.20 a share in 1984. 
Sales were a record $492 billion, 
up almost II percent from $44.4 
billion a year ago. 


= CHARTER = 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE” 

1ZS Ff 1J pcrsaTs anywhere 
Vi’c arc iltc be* in Greek Islands. 

Mediterranean Cruises Ltd. 

3 Stadloa St- Athens. 

Tel: 3236494. The; 222288. 


B Argentina Agrees to Set Higher Budget Targets 


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iftarRao: lJS3Birtsht 

Mortal.- Oa m do Benttus (Bmssois); Banat OmtrmxkM Itattona (MttanJ; Banouo No- 
Nonoto do fata f Parts); Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo}; IMF (SDR); BAH (dinar, rival artm). 
OOtor data from Bouton end AP. 


Routers 

BUENOS AIRES — Argentina 
has agreed to set stricter nudget 
goals in its loan agreement with the 
International Monetary Fund, a 
new memorandum of understand- 
ing with the IMF said 
Tbe new tarns for aSl-42-tnlIion 
IMF standby loan, needed to 
vide fresh money to repay a $48- 
bfllion debt, were published hours 
after tbe government seat congress 
a draft budget cutting the national 


Interest Rates 


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5- 5V. 

5W-5V. 

lift 12 

TWO ft 

Bft-8ft 

7ft 




IommUh 

B10-BV4 

5-51* 

5W-5W 

mo-iita 

1014-10 ft 

BftBft 

7ft 

r l 


a 

4 m— mi 

UwOh 

5Vk-SUi 

50-5 W 

ii «wii ft 

lOft-lOV. 

14* 

'« 



Cl " 

1»ar 

taw 

SH-5M. 

5W-SV. 

1114-11H 

10ft-)l ft 

BftOft 

■ ft 




Sutras: Morotm Guanmtv (dollar. DM. SF. Found. FF): Uovds Bank (ECU); Radars 
(SOU}. Bairns applicable to Intorbonk deoastts of St million minimum tor notvotonl). 


... . 

■* x • 




L i!, 


• •» 


■*;C' 



CIBK 

Pw. 

liman 

Oft-Sft 

wrwmiuta 

7ft 

7ft 

2 months 

14-14 

NMtadi 

7ft 

B 

I monttu 

Bft-Bft 

.fttaottft . 

m 

m 

fflnnflo 

04-14 

>nfe*r lorn Rata 

Rftfft Bftdft 

irear 

8 ft -8 ft 

-Cfte Paper 7B-?77 dew 

7JJ 

7 J0 

Aurrt: CwffrTS. 

^wooRTnonry BDK 

m 

7Z5 




’ . J.-r - 


\. V • 


r. * ■ 

... s. 


tflHftTfleaiwrMU 
CMiMidm 

cviftifdm 

?’’>■ SgSBBB 

LftntaraRata 
".OiMWMi 
!*.. WUtamMgrtntt 
Si'" ***** UMrtwk 
• f \ tttMfttnigrteak 


” v- v • • l_ 

»W : 


aflMowr 

V? faHMaffitakrtatt 
hnantafertara 
t«MMMerka*k 

i \ ‘ wtoto 

■«& Ban Raft 
»**■ CMtaOWV 
?■ nd8rmannrB« 


7J3 7J3 
7 M 7 M 
7/0 7/0 


AM 4JB 
5,10 5.15 

&2S US 
US US 
US UD 


Mh Hk 
Ml Wk 
M n 

1 11/16 *11/1* 


17 

m 

ira 

11W 


12 

im 

11H 


■W •* 
>* 4 ‘ 

sw ‘ 

yx.-i.-~ 

...» 

.re ‘•' u 

* 

v- ■ 


Mnwjuie 

CaflltaatT 

•MnteMNt 


S 5 
iv. tin* 

«* 


Sumosr Getters. Carrmeribank. CrUtt 
Lrennats. UOvdt/SanJL Ba* ot Tokyo. 


Atdmrn Dollar Bepwsiis 

Jofy 23 


Money Market Fnds 

July 23 

Mcnitt LvnCft «W*t» Asset* 
MftrnwwirW; M 

THernte Interest Rote Index; 

Sourest Merrill Lynai AP 


deficit for 1985 by two-thirds. 

President Rati! Alfonsin told 
congress the budget would narrow 
the gap between revenue and ex- 
penditure to 4.1 percent of tbe 
gross domestic product from 12 
percent last year. 

Under its previous agreement 
with tbe IMF, signed early in June 
shortly before unveiling an anti- 
inflation program Argentina had 
vowed to keep its budget deficit 
bdow 6 percent of the GDP in 
1985. GDP measures a country’s 
total output of goods and sendees, 
minus income from operations 
abroad. 

In. the new pact, Argentina 
pledged to maintain, as Tong as 
needed, a freeze on wages imposed 
as part of its attack on inflation, 
which reached 1,000 percent in the 
year ended in May. 

The document said a parallel 
freeze on prices could not be en- 
forced for long without affecting 
the economy and would end as 
soon as the race, between wages and 
prices stopped 


Argentine officials said the coun- 
try alio intended to clear, by March 
1986. the estimated S3.4 billion it 
was behind in payments to creditor 
cnrrmiPTcjy i banks, 

In return, the officials said, it 

Tuesday. hoped in September to draw S2J* 
$ 1.42-bulion billion of a $42-biDiOD package of 
fresh financing from commercial 
creditors. 

The IMF memorandum said the 
deficits of state-run companies 
were cut beyond the terms of the 
June agreement by raising tariffs 
before the freeze was introduced to 
levels 36 percent above those of the 
second half of last year. 

Other measures had been taken 
to clear tbe social security system’s 
deficit, as vowed in the June agree- 
ment, officials said. 

The government said it would set 
monthly limits on spending by 
state concerns, which would make 
weekly deposits with the central 
bank for interest payments on 
debts to foreign creditors. 

In his budget message, Mr. Al- 


fonsin said a substantial part of the 
planned savings would come from 
cutting back on state projects and 
on tbe deficits of state companies. 

Argentina said in the new IMF 
memorandum that targets for the 
stand-by pact after September 
would be set during a performance 
assessment due in October. 


It said (be central bank would 
not extend new credit to the rest of 
tbe banking system or to the pri- 
vate sector in iheeariy stages of tbe 
anti-inflation program. But it 
would offer rediscounts for a limit- 
ed number or uses such as export 
financing and seasonal crop cred- 
its. 



Jofy 23 

AM. PM cat# 
wnKwt nuo moo +s* 

LmmMm XZU0 — ’ +SJ 0 

Porta (lURItol 3Hfl5 30JB +4*7 

zvrta 322.15 32140 +415 

' London 32175 32251 +525 

HNYOft — injD -1» 

LuwnWow* Ports end London official Ex- 
ktoo; Mono Ktw and Zurich opening and 
desk* orfttK No* York Comas a/mfit 
contract. AH *rfcw Ut ILS. S oer ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 


V. 

- 4 V --'Y ' 

lit* 






‘.2 *■ 
If' 


Markets Closed 

Financ ial markets in Egypt were closed Tuesday because on a 
holiday. 


O 



UndtaonAvenuo 

#*7tthStm*i 
HenrToA 10021 

Cable The Cao+yle Mnw Yoc* 

JnMMilanlUMSZOW 

'MephOM 2U-TM-1COO 

A member ©I the Sharp Croup 
ilnwlWI 


o 


jfPTAPMAN 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDW 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $ 100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded the faaoMng 
. after al charges: 

IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981s +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: -24% 

M 1984:— 34% 

JULY 18, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $ 74750.89 


Cal or write RtwS Frazer at 
7APMAN. TrandAnatyss and 
RortfotioManagameni. tnc. 
Wafl Street Ptaza, New Mxx. 
New 'fbtk 10005 212-209-1 041 
■We* SMI €671 73 UW 



REPUBLIK TUNESIEN 

MINISTERIUM FUR VOLKS WIRTSCHAFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 

- iNTERNATIONAif A 0 SSCUBW 6 Nr. P 2225 
BAUINGEN IEURWESEN * KEF EDOOffi-PROJEKT 


Di« GAFSA Fhosphaies Company beabsirfui^l die Offemtiche Au&rhrri- 
bunp fOr die DurenfQhrunp von l^enieurarbeiten (Hr das KEF EDDOliR- 
Project wie fotp: 

— AOgttteiw Diensdeisttmgen 

— Verwalinng m»i Ingtandhaltuitg 

— Vatdiwcn 

Firmm. die pieh auf olen Kenarmtr Arbeiien $penal«siewn. kannen die 
Submuoioneunieri^en. so bald die SubmistiooRimschrribunp bekatnU pe- 
nuehi wurde. vom Service Gfodral, 9 fine da Roysmne <T Arabic 
S^oodite, Tonis, pegen Zahlung von dreiBip tunestsehoi Djnare bezif- 
hen. 

Angeboie. dir nirhl in IrarafetK-her Spnrhc abgytaft v.orden, haben krinr 
Gtutj^keit; alle Angebote mflaeen in zwei getreonten UmschUgen ringer- 
richl vtertkv: 

— Ein Umsdilag *A\ sorgEUtio verschkwsen, der die eaispr*» 
chendeo tedubdiea Spedfflcatioaen vie tolgl enchElb 

• Zor Verf&gimg stehendes Arb ei temaierUl (Muddnerie etc.) 

• ReferenzeD dra VerwaltangBperwmals 

— Bln UsueUig ’B’, sorgQltig verseWoasen, der die folgeoden 
Dokamente enlbalL: 

t Bn Angebot, das naeh dem beige fugteu Befspte) in den Ange- 
botsunterlageo abpefaBt wnrde 

• Preidiate und KoUtaror — i tilh g. 

Diese briden flituehi^e Bind in rinem drittro, soipfllte versrhlossenen 
Umdifag per Eioschrriben an Monsieur Le Direrteur aes Arhals. 2130 
Metlaaui ff uneven) tu eendes. Die linke obew Erke d» UmsehUgs muB 
wie folgl marlurtl ertlE 

A.O. N P 2225 - GENIE-CIVIL - KEF EDDOUR NE PAS 
OltVRIR AVANT LE 28 AOCT 1985 A 10 HEURES.' 

Dir 0ffnun» der I'njrfhlto* erfolpt am 28. August 1985 um 10.00 ll»r 
unler Z«dat«Hg der Offrntlirhkril in den B&n» der Vetkaufsdiiektion in 
Metlaoui. 

Fenwrhtiftliebe, »urh tlan S hlu&ennia eipirrllmde, odcr dir ji^epe- 
bnnai Bedingun^rn nU'hi erfQllende An^rbote werden rime Rtx-hl juI 
Bi-nifuiiR al^’fi'bul. 



Have all the advantages 
of a bank account in 
LUXEMBOURG, without 
actually being there. 


To discover the advantages ot banking in Luxembourg 
with BCC . all you have to do is to simply mail the attached 
coupon. We will promptly despatch to you by airmail our 
booklet containing detailed information about Hanking 
in Luxembourg. 

The BCC Group has offices in 70 countries, its Capital 
Funds exceed U SSI, 000 million and total assets USS14.300 
million. The Head Office and branch of the Bank of Credit 
& Commerce international S A. in Luxembourg enable 
you to make full use of the unique advantages offered in 
Luxembourg which include:- 

1 Total confidentiality of 
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2. The benefits of being able 
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3. Investments and deposits 
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are totally tax-free 
and there is no with- 
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or dividends. 

4. Luxembourg is a stable, 
prosperous financial 
centre in the heart of 
European Economic 
Community. 


Mail tins couoon tor your FWEE 
oooyri'lntemationaiand 
Personal Banning in Luxembourg" to 



Bank of Credit and Commerce 

INTERNATIONAL S.A. aSSKreSiffiSSS 



Name 

Address, 


Phone_ 

IHT24/7 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


Hiesdsps 

MSE 

Closing 

Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on wall Street 
and da net reflect late trades elsewhere. 


1 1 Month 
HWiLm Stock 


Sts. Close 

Di«. VW.PE 1 Ob High Lon QuoLOiVe 


(Continued from Page 8) 


34'-. 754* , 
?5’« A , 

B < , 

23 "e 

3U V; 
n. sto 

334* |tlt , 
IS 2 i 

S3’* ZSt i 
ffig in* i 
53 404 i 

Wi '64 
It"* 15 , 

iau. *% , 
214 12% , 
244 IBS* , 
31 34 i 

544 28<x l 
43% 2*4* | 
74 18% I 

21 13 i 

38 2346 j 

44'4 2*4 , 

2*4 l*Vi t 
144 7% i 
33% 23% I 
33V* 16% i 
144 114 , 
104 14 i 


30 Vi 37 
AH At 
74 74 

304 2*4 
4 to 
74 7 
304 30 
24 24 
524 524 
174 17V. 
554 534 
284 n 
19* 19% 
*4 94 

204 204 
28 2A* 

30*, 30>, 
52 v« 514 
43'i, 424 
Ti i J34 
1 20 194 

36% 344 
J7% 354 
234 73 
134 ljta 
284 20' ■ 
1 < 184 
144 144 
24 2V. 


37 —14 
A 1 * — V. 
74— 4 

\=t 

74 + 4 
30 -4 
24 
524 
174 

544 +14 
27 —4 
194- 4 

94 

204— 4 
274 +14 
30% + V. 
514 
424 

214- 4 
19% — 4 
344—14 
34—4 
234 + 4 
134— 4 
284 

194— 4 
144— 4 
24 



374 184 
474 274 
314 IS 
234 134 
144 I1U 
20 V. 134 
4*4 304 
29 234 

10 54 

194 134 
174 124 
824 574 
13 94 

314 224 
334 29 


US. Futures 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open High LOW Close Chg. 


: Semen 
High 

Season 

Lew 


Open 

HfaM 

Law 

Clean 

Chg. 

PORK BELLIES (CMC) 
38j»o lbs.- cento per lb. 
sun 52.30 Jut 

52*5 

52*5 

son 

5132 


BOAS 

50.95 

Aug 

52*0 

52*0 

SO70 

5097 

—50 

7620 

«2J7 

Feb 

aim 

4190 

*153 

«nr 

— JJ0 

7540 

S2J0 

Mar 

*3X0 

i-ios 

41*0 

61X5 

— 1J20 

75*0 

62.95 

May 

*125 

*180 

A2J0 

6230 

—1.10 

as 

45 JO 

Jul 

*3*0 

63*0 

6110 

■mn 

—180 

64X0 

Aug 

6280 

*200 

$280 

61*5 

-.95 

Est. Soles 7851 Prev.soies 6149 
Prev. Day Open Int. 9*«3 off SOI 






UCOTO 1*4 48 
UnCarb 141 6A 
UOWlC 

UnEIec 122 9 a 
UnElpf M0 M* 
Ufieipimac iii 
UnEI pi 2.98 112 
UnEIpl 2-13 ”8 
UnE: pf 2.77 105 
UnClpf 7*4 1 1 a 
UE ipJH »80 II* 
UnPoe i» 3* 
WIPE pl 725 63 
Unlrgyl .18 * 

Unrvipl EDO Wj 
UiUiDr 
UnSrnd 
UBrdp* 

UCbTtf 5 
UnEnrg 2-48 79 
Unfem 2*0 *.9 
UtlluM 397 112 
UlOuor 2JO 11* 
Ullfapf 4*0 HJ 


80 2T* 294 2«a . 

10 III 23»* 2?% 23", 

798 II to% loto 

IS 7* 11*, 114 IP*-. 

39 4901 37 3*4. 3* - 

7 *S3 42- 41'- 416. 

73 b m in. ir, 

TO 143 1G0% 707 127 ■ 

U 3274 414 <S4 40 '» . 

1221753 52 49% Site 

17 fa 5 "! S% ■ 

A 7183 1*4 »V. 104- 
40zS5 55 55 - 

*0 3ZH 33 XT.*. 

9B ;a a' » 2*%- 

12 w.s 1*4 i*fa- 

A 28' i Z5te ZA 

ISSatA*'* 45 A5 - 
300* 6** *8 At 

12 3924 52, 51% 51 V. ■ 

21 1151* 1.44. 115 - 
M 334 214 21 Vi 214 
5407 571* 541. 57—- 
23 3% 3% 34k 

13 1140 m* 1 99* 171* 

27 IJH 15% 15% - 

74 190 JHfc 111* 31 to • 
22 6RH 31% 29 in, < 
4 *59 S* 20% 20% - 

21 33', E* ■ 
3*0x 17"» 17% 17% 

J 3d* »% 30% 

22 144. 14% 14*4 - 

10 118 74-* 24% 24% . 

U 7 43% 43 43% 

IP 310 45 44 44 - 

11 35 14% l]T* 14 

I 1®A 21% z.t r*- 

B *93 JA% 3* 3*1* - 

981 8 7% 7% 

lo ?9 in. an* 37%. 

14 251 3T.j 36% 3+>- 

30 2703 30% 37% 2Ste ■ 

>4 Ml* 54 544* • 

732 131% 129 13»* ■ 

844 ;**. 28% 39VS . 
13 AA3 38% 374. 37% ■ 

8 3430 ICl 77 77%- 

20 7 Hi 8% 8% 

II 5*18 434 43 43%- 

297 12% J7% P*. 

9 1575 23% 23% 23% - 

15 33 1*». 19% I9i1- 

17 272 25*1 3 25 - 

7 23 20% 28 28% ■ 

10 *10 2*11 2*’-. 24 % ■ 

8 717 22% TT.k ZT4 ■ 

7 9283 2*'* » 28% ■ 

22 101 S 131* 118%1I9*S ■ 

11 434 38% 38% .38% ■ 

55 10% *0', HP, - 
13 1511 25% 24ii 34% - 

13 27 re% 26% 
38 27% 27'.* 27%. 

8 211- 23 23 - 

109 19% T*% l*to ■ 
A 105 25% 24% 24% - 
7 22% 22% 32% ■ 
7 24% 24 24V* ■ 

1 35% 35% 35%- 


WHEAT (CBTI 

5*00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 


190 2*7% Jul 183W 284% 

176% 104V* sen 106% 106% 

3*3% 112% Dec 115 115 

1749a 112% Mor 114% 114% 

4j02 101 May 3X3% IIM* 

132% 181% Jul 184% 184% 

3AS 1*3% Sep 288 288 

Est. Sales Phot. Sates 5,910 

Prev. Dov Open mi. 35438 an 104 
CORN (CBT) 

5800 bumlnlmum- dot keeper bushel 
121% 144 S«P 2A6% 2A7 

2.95 135 Dec 2JA% 117% 

1VQ 142% Mar 144 148% 

121 Vi 2A7 May 148% 2*9% 

184% 133 sen 135 US 

Dec 125 135% 

ESI. Sales prev. Soles 36295 

Prev. Doy Open I rrt. 114.10* an 467 
SOYBEANS (CBTI 
5800 Du minimum- duller* per bushel 
739 151 Jul 58*% 587 

7.56 54* A lip 588 558 

6.71 L40 3ct> 5J3% 5X4 

*48 5A3% NPV 588 588% 

679 582% Jem 547 548 

742 543 Mar 527% SJS 

72? 521 MOV 585 SJS 

*88 S24 Jul 587 587 

4L74 5.72 Alfa 581 581 

631 &3*% NOW ISO 550 

ESI. Sales Prev. Soles 28822 

Prev. Dav Open I nt. 40887 offlM 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT| 

100 tonv dollars per tan 
IfiOOO 11*80 A UP 128.10 12980 

179.50 12150 Sen 13080 13180 

18080 13580 OCt 13100 13480 

1B4JW 13LDQ OOC 1 3848 13988 

14380 13188 Jan 14080 14180 

30680 13780 Mpr 14480 14580 

16150 14380 MOV 14580 14*80 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 11486 

Prev. Dav Onen Ini. 448*2 off 195 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

AOkOOO lbs- dollars per 100 lbs. 

31.9$ 2280 AuO 2*42 2*45 

31.10 2280 Sen 2605 2*85 

30l 37 2190 OCt 2SA3 2545 

2985 22.90 OCC 2482 2482 

29JJ7 2340 JCn 3485 2485 

2840 34AQ Mar 244* 244* 

2745 2480 MOV 2635 2425 

25.15 2481 AuO 2625 2485 

Sep 2400 2480 

EsI.Sele* Prev. Sole* 16846 

Prev. Day Open i m. 51871 oft *99 
OATS (CBT) . 

5800 bu minimum- dollars per bush** 
1.79 185% Sep 137 187% 

182% 1.40 Dec 141 IA1 

147% 14T1 Mar 142% 142% 

143 1A3% MOV 143% 143% 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sate* Ala 

Prev. Dav Open I nr. 2.944 off 17 


179% 179% —.18% 
381 - 381 — v04% 

380% 388% —85 

3JM% 188% —85 

198% 198% —85 

144% 284% +81 

283 283 


142 243% —81% 

134 231% —81 

7.42 143 —80% 

247 247% — 80% 

283% 133% —80% 
231 131% 


S.71 +.14 

541 -.14 

58*% —.13% 
541 -J3 

531% —.13% 
541% — .13% 
530% —.11 

i£%±S£ 

540 


12440 12*30 —230 
127 JO 12740 —150 
12940 12930 —180 
11480 13*80 —190 
13670 13780 -280 
140J0 14050 —120 
14100 14150 -180 


2*87 2*88 —44 

2542 3544 —.46 

24.90 24.95 —AS 

2440 2447 —38 

2430 2431 —31 

24.15 24.15 —38 

74-05 24.04 -37 

23.90 2190 — 33 

2385 238* 


134% 184% —82% 
138% 134% —82% 
141 1.40% —82 

143% 141% —81% 


COFFEd CCNYCSCB) 

37500 lb&- cents per ID. 

15030 17780 SOT 13480 13*50 

15040 12935 D*C 13635 13650 

14935 12B50 MOT 13780 13780 

14880 13180 MOV 13830 13830 

14080 13550 Jul 13980 13980 

14750 13235 Sen 13830 13830 

13880 13880 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Sale* 850 

Prev. Dny Open Inf. 11894 up 44 
SUGAR WORLD ll(NYCSCE) 

1 1 2800 lbs.- cento per Ml 

935 2*4 Sen 1*5 180 

985 234 OCt 181 3.94 

7.7S 380 Jon 485 4.15 

9J3 384 MOT 485 451 

7.15 358 MOV 450 44* 

4*9 339 Jul 4.77 485 

630 434 Sen 

580 482 Od 484 588 

Est. Sales Pre*. Sales 20359 

Prev. Dov Onen Ini. 1784* up 3848 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric lons-S per fan 

2415 19*3 Sen 2185 2119 

2337 1945 Dec 2145 2167 

2190 1955 MOT 21*2 TIES 

2171 1940 MOV 2175 2200 

2330 2023 Sen 

2210 2055 Dec 2235 221$ 

Jut 

Est. sales 2.903 Prev. Soles 1828 
Prev. Day Open Int. 20851 off 5 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15800 lbs.- cento ner lb. 

1B2J30 13280 Sen 13430 13740 

18180 13185 Nov 13235 13690 

1*080 129*0 Jan 13050 13035 

17750 12*50 Mar 13035 13050 

1*250 13150 MOV 

Jld 

Est. Scries 300 Prev. Sales 128 

Prev.pavOnenlfit. 5890 up 22* 


2D«3 2115 

213* 2155 

2158 2175 

2175 2190 

2214 
2225 2224 


13430 13685 
13235 13345 
13050 130*5 
13085 13045 
13035 
13035 


1 57% 25 Zayres 
30 17% ZmlttiE 

21% 15% zeros 


30% 2f% ZateCn 182 4* ID 43 21% 28% 28%— % 

21% 9% Zapata 84 85 19 744 H} 9% *»- % 

S% Zav !J? 3 M •» >7 907 54% 53% 53% + % 

30 17% ZmltllE _ 12 145* 19% 10% 19% + % 

=1*» 15% Zeros 82 15 18 123 21% 20% 20*b + % 


21 270 17% 14% l*% + % | 35% 22% Z urn In 182 1J 12 320 3S% 34% 35 — % 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 







4QJQQQ lb*.- centiioflT lb. 






67*7 

51«5 

AuS 

5585 

SSJ0 

S3X0 



65.90 

5610 

Od 

57 JO 

57*5 

5635 

56*0 

+.18 






5980 



47*5 

59*3 

Feb 

6080 

61.10 

6080 

6007 

+*0 









6625 

61.70 




6227 



Est. Soles 24883 Prev. Soles 19,250 




Prev. Dov Open int. 45853 otiB0< 




FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 





<4800 lbs. -cento Per lb. 






7170 

41*0 




*215 



7100 

61*0 

Sep 

6290 

AIK 



+X5 

7SJ3 

62J2 

Oct 






7120 

6140 

MOV 

64-75 

4480 

6617 

6600 

+J0 


*5.90 

Jan 

6680 

6685 

6640 




M.1D 


67X0 





70*5 

*615 

apt 

4680 

67JN 

6*70 





MOV 







2J0* Prev. Sales 1.924 




Prev. Day Onen Inf. 9020 up I3i 




HOGS (CME) 

- 






30800 IW.- cents per lb. 






507 

4480 

Aug 

<5*5 

45.70 

44.90 



51.75 

40*0 

Ocl 

41.10 


40JO 



50X5 

42J0 

Dec 

4115 

4115 

42X0 





Feu 

44 JO 

44*7 

*175 

4192 





4210 





4985 

44.00 

Jun 

44.90 

44.90 

4610 


+85 

4985 

44*0 

Jul 

44X0 

44.90 

4450 



51.90 

4580 








6715 Prev. Sales 6841 




Prev. Dav Onen mi. 19333 ofl 364 






Industrials 


(bmmSdhieg 


Est. Sales Prev. Sales 773 

Prev. Dav Open tint. 1JW oH75 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5800 irav oz.- cents per moves. 

14018 5628 Jul *185 4195 

6215 6038 Aua 

11838 5738 Sen 42X0 4260 

K308 5908 Doc *368 4385 

17158 5958 Jan 

11*38 4078 Mar 4488 4518 

10488 *218 MOV 6575 6575 

9458 6338 Jul 4678 *478 

9408 6418 5CP 

7998 *408 Dec *948 4948 

7898 *74.0 Jon 

7708 6778 Mar 7158 7158 

6958 6938 May 7198 7198 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 11,934 

Prev. Day Onen Int. 704*1 oHTSO 


*108 4098 
6108 
6148 *158 
*2*8 4274 
4328 
*428 *40* 

*575 *494 
4448 *593 
*493 
4853 4848 
6904 
7)58 7015 
7198 7123 


Currency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option A Strike 

Undertylno Price Colls— Last „ Puts— Lest 

Sen Dec Mar Sep Dec Mar 

1 2580 British Poonds-cents Mr unit. 

B Pound 110 r r r r 025 

115 r r r r 050 

170 r r r 0.10 r 

125 1640 1*30 r 030 180 130 

138 1180 12.90 r 080 r 67 

IH 7.10 955 r 1.90 r AJO 

140 4.00 655 r 3.75 r 

14$ 2.18 455 640 AJO r 

150 180 WO 580 . r r 

58800 Canadian DcHors-anls pgr oan. I 

CDoilr n 230 r r r r 

73 150 r r r r 

74 o*2 0.93 r r r 

75 035 0*5 r r r 

42808 will German MaritA-cento per unit. 


PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 irov «■ aoi fan per ax 

141 JS 9050 Sen 9580 9535 94X0 9625 -55 

14150 9180 Dec 9535 7535 94*0 9675 — JS 

12750 9130 Mar 9535 9S3S WJ» 9535 -JS 

11480 9150 Jun 9645 96*5 95*5 9550 — JS 

Esi. sales Prev. Seles 702 

Prev. Doy Open int. 6*20 up 33 
GOLD (COMEX) 

TOO troy oz.- dollars per troy oz. 


29 T 

30 t 

31 625 


r r r 084 

r r r an 

r r 0X3 0.18 

14« r 088 083 

r r QJ0 054 

Ml r M3 i 

15* 2X4 085 r 

UA 1.75 122 r 


35 085 15* 2JM 085 r 

2* 045 1.76 1.75 122 r 

37 084 0X2 r r s 

125808 French Fraacs-ioms of a cent per unit. 

F Franc HO 600 r r 180 r 

4.758808 Japanese Ycn-IMHit of a cent per unit. 

JYen J9 102 r r r r 

40 188 r t r r 

41 UA r r r r 

42 0.70 138 1*5 053 r 1X8 

43 0 J0 080 120 r r 

44 0.10 r t r r 

62598 Swiss Franes-ceiiK Mr unit, 

S Franc 27 r r r 082 r 030 

38 4.71 r t 0X4 r 

39 3X* 4J1 r 089 040 

40 2.90 r r 022 r 087 

41 73* 101 358 039 0.94 r 


42 1 47 134 

4} 0.94 1X3 

44 055 1 48 


r 033 S 1*0 

r 1.19 1.7B r 


COTTON 2 (NYCE) 






SOJWIbfc-eentopwlh. 






77X0 

99*0 

OCt 

6085 

6020 

59*5 

5925 

—8* 

7180 

59X5 


60.10 

6024 

59*0 

59X0 

—M 


60X0 


6070 


60X4 

40.15 

— JS 

7000 

59 JS 


60*0 

60*3 

6030 

60X5 

— JS 

7085 

59*0 

Jul 

99.90 

5985 


59X0 


65X0 

5583 

Oct 

55*5 

55*5 

5630 

5630 

—80 

5985 

53*0 

Dec 

5645 

54 XO 

5150 

53X5 

— xo 

Est. Salas 

2000 Prev.SaleS 2*72 




Prev. Dor Open inf. T8X» w4i6 




HEATING OIL (NYME1 






42000 gaL cento per gcri 







66JS 







7645 

6690 

Sen 

69-25 

6920 

69.15 

*9X2 

+X9 

77.10 

67*5 

Oct 

7089 

70*0 

70X9 

7R39 

+X8 


*650 






+X9 

7225 

*9.15 

Dec 

7185 

7210 

7125 

71.95 

+X5 

7690 

*«jn 


7220 

7225 

7285 

7225 

+X5 

7190 

70X0 

Feb 

71.73 

7125 

71.75 

7128 

+*5 

7380 

*880 

Mot 




69*5 

+X5 

7600 

66X0 

A or 




67*5 

+■65 









Est. sales 


Prav. Safe* SJ26 




Prev. DtrvOoen Int. TUX upUS 




CRUDE OILIMYME) 






)800 bbL- (to liars per bbl. 






29X0 

2608 


2781 

7720 

369* 

27.15 

+J4 


24*5 

Oct 

2627 

2&X5 

2624 

26*4 

+J9 

29X0 

2640 

NOV 

2S85 

25.97 

2574 

2557 

+J9 

29X0 

2190 

Dec 

25*0 

25*0 


2SAC 

+J9 

29 JO 

24J8 


2SJ3 

MJ5 

25.18 

2523 

+.1/ 

29*6 

763S 

Feb 

3690 

S81 

2690 

2695 

+.14 

29*5 

2613 


2675 

2425 

2655 

2655 


29*5 

2193 

Apr 

24J5 

24*0 

2635 

24*0 

+88 

17.96 

ZIXA 

May 

2617 

2620 

2610 

2620 

+88 

2670 

2170 

Jim 

2199 

260$ 

2199 

2605 

+.13 

2780 

2600 

Sep 

7480 

2600 

2480 

2485 

+23 

Est. Sates 


Prav. Sates 2&536 




Prev. Day Open Int. 7»*27 im*S4 






Asian 

Convnodities 


VoHime: 25 mu. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Slaeapore ceato per idle 
Close 

Bid Adi 

RSSlAue- 17180 17L25 1 

«SS 1 Sep 1*875 16935 1 

RSS2AWO- 1*480 1A5JM 1 
R&S3AUB- UZDO 143X0 1 
RSS4AW- moa 14080 1 
RSS5AUV- 15X40 155X0 1 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malcnrsfpn riDBeHt per 3S Cobs 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
17050 17150 

14835 14935 

14480 16580 

1*2X0 14380 
15880 uaoo 
15380 15580 


Stock Indexes 


Financial 


Total cau voi- 1U34 Call onen Int. 1)9853 

Total pal voL <1*4 Pat ansa Sl \v5tx 

r — noi troaed. s — No an Han ottered, o— Old. 

Last Is premium (purchase price), 
force. AP 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI mllHoti-ptSai 100 pet. . 

9U3 8694 Sep 9229 9274 

9M7 8537 Dec 9U6 92*4 

9259 06*0 Mar 9285 9287 

9228 8781 Jun 91.70 9130 

9281 8880 SCO 9141 9141 

91-78 8985 Dec 91.13 91.13 

9139 B95B Mar 

94.93 90.93 Jim 

Est. Sal *4 11599 Prev. Safes 9525 
Prev. aw OacnlnL 3*817 up l* 

18 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
sioaooo orm-nis a 32nos of im P d 
68-21 75-18 Sen B4-U 85-4 

87-13 7S-IJ Dec 83-24 84-2 

BA-2 75-14 Mar 83-2 83-2 

85-7 74-30 Jun H3-6 87-9 

84-4 81 13 5cp 81-13 81-17 

83-11 80-19 Dec 

Esl. Soles Prev. Sotos 611* 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 56772 UP 532 
U5 TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 oct-SHUODRlsB SSndseflOOncll 

79-13 57-10 Sen 75-23 - 7*-3 

7* 13 57-8 Dec 74-19 75 

77-29 57-3 Mar 73-23 74 

76-e 56-29 Jun 72-27 73-5 

75-31 56-29 Sen 72 7 73-11 

74-34 56 25 Dec 71-16 71-22 

7+15 50-77 Mar 70-21 71-2 


92*1 9274 
9253 92*3 
92X4 9287 
91*8 9172 
9141 9141 

91.13 91.13 
90X3 
90*7 


8+23 84-31 
83-20 83-30 
03-26 82-31 
81-30 824 
81-0 81-13 

18-23 


75-19 75-38 
74-18 7+23 
73-28 73-30 
72-27 JM 
72-2 72-11 
71-12 71-21 
70-71 71-1 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cento 

19880 16000 Sep 195.75 19650 

30685 17570 Dec 198*0 199 JO 

30375 190.10 Mar 20150 281*0 

20650 20080 JUfl 

Esi. Sates 41407 Prow. Sates 53X51 
Prev. Dav Onen let. *5400 AfflAtt 
VALUE LINE'<KCBT) 

paint, and cento 

31X20 15675 Sea 211.78 71250 

217X5 208X8 Dec 21350 21*80 

E9t. Sales Prev. Sales 6383 

Prev. Dav Onen Hit. 12JTA up 42 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
pc into and cents 

118X5 9125 Sep 11X80 11630 

11730 10130 Dec 115*5 11610 

11875 10950 Mar «7X0 117X0 

12080 11650 Jun IW2S 11935 

Est Soles 13481 Prev. Sales U85 

Prav. Dav Open inL 12474 aHi 


19130 19355 
19690 19630 
281 50 199.10 
20290' 


20825 20850 
21110 21110 


11135 112*0 
11430 11440 
117X0 11430 
11935 11880 


Commodity indexes. 


Close 

Moody's 90120 f 

Reuters 1X86 j60 

DJ. Futures 111X3 

Cam. Research Bureau. 222.50 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f * final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Previous 
90520 f 
1X800 
11647 
22180 


aw Previa Bt 
Hteb Law Bid Apt Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

sleriUoq per metric tan 
AOO 104X0 100X0 99X0 10180 10280 102X0 
Oct 11040 1062D 10680 10435 107 JW 10730 
Dec 11480 11080 11020 110*0 11020110X0 
Mar m*0 11780 11980 11930 11940 119X0 
Mav 12280 122*0 122*0 12100 12380123*0 
An 12980 12980 T26A0 12720 12640 127X0 
OCt 13340 131X0 131X0 131*0 130X0 131X0 
Volume; S.1 94 latoal SO tatto. 

COCOA 

SterHn per metric fan 
Jlr 123 1215 1265 123 1330 1J77 

SOT 1250 14A7 1494 1495 1*72 1*74 

Dec 1X09 1X60 1X85 1*86 1X44 1X65 

Mar 1X96 1X71 1X94 1495 1X74 1*75 

Mar 1210 1487 1,7)0 1313 1X92 1X94 

Jh J2W 1204 1236 123 120? 1208 

Sep 1237 1221 1237 1238 123 1228 

Vofume; 3,116 lots oi 10 Ians. 

COFPEB 

SterUn per metric hm 
J>V 1X24 1455 145$ I4S7 1*50 1X56 

Sep 1X69 1485 I486 1409 1X91 1592 

Nov 1412 1538 1X34 1X39 U2* 1*32 

Jwi 1X68 1575 157$ 1578 1X71 1X75 

Mar 1*90 1*38 141* 1X20 1210 1212 

MOT 1225 IXA5 1X64 I*t6 1249 1251 

Jly 1260 1X99 123 1210 123 1284 

Velume: 622A lots of 5 Inns. 

GASOIL 

UA dedars per metric ton 
AUO 39X50 22125 22125 22280 219 JO 21 9 35 
Sep BOM 21980 219X0 21925 21725 2)580 
Oct 22050 21935 71? JO 21925 21880 TlSS 

NOT 23150 23180 22025 22135 5»J0 21925 
Dec 32225 23.75 22250 22380 215XQ 21780 


M. T. N.T. 22280 22680 22080 22280 

N. T. KT. 23280 2S45D mOO 22280 
N.T. N.T. 21080 22080 21280 31880 


API M-T. H.T. 30B80 31MB 3068021280 
. Volume: L577 tats of 100 ten6 
Sources t Reuters ana Leaden Petroleum St- 
emmed (ocaolii. 


volume: o lata of 2S tom. 
Some: Renters. 


Singapore Backs 
Finance Finn 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — The Monetary 

Authority of Singapore said Tues- 
day it Found no reason for concern 
about the financial health of Hong 
Leong Finance Ltd. and its subsid- 
iary, Singapore Finance Lid. 

The Authority said it had been 
informed by Horig Leong. Singa- 
pore’s largest finance company, of 
“im usually high withdrawals ai 
some of their brandies over the tea 
three days," apparently because of 
rumors about its finances. 


Ijondoti Metals 


_CJose . PtvrlOT* 
ALUMINUM « ^ Bid APc 

Storibw pot metric ton 
B—4 . 71SJ0 72*80 72780 

torword 73780 73750 74850 749 JD 

COPPER CATHODES (Hiatt Grade) 

SterUng aer metric too 
NWl . 1-55780 185980 187680 187780 

torword 18*188 186150 188080 188050 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Stertlna per metric tea 

■POt ■ 182480 182600 183780 184080 

torword 1.03980 184000 185780 I85B80 

LEAD 

Starling per metric tap 
wot 28280 28380 28*80 28780 

forward 29080 29180 29600 29580 

NICKEL 

Staffing per metric tea 
seat 353080 354080 353000 1*4080 

forward 35 8 580 159080 3X7080 0*7580 

SILVER 

Potcb pwr Irwraaace 

spot <3780 42380 43850 43V 50 

teraord 44U0 44*80 *51X0 *92, 00 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling ner nwtric ton 
spot 98*580 987080 9.17600 9,17000 

forward 983980 984080 9.1*600 9,14780 

SRC 

Sterthm Per metric ton 
5PO> 5*600 54880 Mltol asm 

torword 53580 53UD 53780 SXJJO 

Source: AP. 


Dividends 


Mr S3 

coftwonv Per Amt pgy rec 

USUAL 

Awpmhiem 0.12*1 B-30 m 

C^toe Manhattan g ^ Vl 

R^Tij Q « 1W5 9-14 

MS % & V4 R 

UrtmoJCarn O » a-w M 

S % >o-2t 9-ia 

Movtibwer a jg u a.ii 

Money ManaoehiMf Q .15 g.20 b-9 

S--8 K 

iSSSSSL"’ 4 " 8 3"S ’S3 

sgssfe. I a s? 

Union Bancorp Mieh O JS 9-13 8-23 

AjAMOTl; M- M onll il v: MwwtPrir; S-S cml- 

Soarce; UPI. 


Cash Prices 


CatnmnditY OTd Unit 

Coffee* Santos, lb 

Prinlct own MOO 38 i-a. «d ^ 

Steel hlltotoi Pitt J.I ot 

iron 2 Pdrv. PtHta., tan 

Steel scran No I hvy Pitt. _ 
Lead Spat, lb - 

Cooper elect. b> 

Tin (Streltsi. u» 

ZWrc. E. 51. L. Basis, lb 

PaHodUim.ax ________ 

Sliver N.Y.oz 

Source.- AP. 


Treasun' 



oner 

BU 

VIM 

VNU 

3-raentb 

7JS 

783 

7*0 

2X1 

6-monm 

1JS 

733 

734 

IN 

One year 

7*7 

7*5 

882 

7J0 

Source. Solomon Brothers 





DM Futures 
Options 

W. Gecnm Mart IXJOBfxrtxaaXiuroKft 


»*e QdfrSeiw . PftJWi 
Price see dk Mr SB Dk W 

33 112 2J4 xa U3 052 - 

J* IJ4 209 2JB Qjt HJM IJM 

25 0J4 153 282 173 US MS 

X <L3A 1.11 15* 18 18 IN 

37 8.18 UA LU LIS — -» 

38 009 851 UB - _ - 

eshnated teM veL 6334 

Cette; Man. vaLUaaaBWtaL 31*48 
Fob : iten. wL 158* bm» ML »88B 
Source: CME 


index Options 


wntt Odbtal - PateUot 

no" fT S « ** *" ^ 

IS * n m > in* l-u 4 _ 

J5 «toi3to«,ttain*% to tn* 

» fte *1- -Tils $n* on* 1 % S? 

“* J ..ftn,®*-' 11 * Jto 27ntm JS 

m u/ussiua 4 a s>k st » 

m in* i5fl* S n* FontTh-T 
>'« i* to 1 ml it. - rr. _ 

TbW<sB vehene SJS* 

Toted caB«MRM.<KjD 
1*4 OTI aMt 14 S5n 
TWtaBBBptoW.WJM 
IB0M-. 

KWltKM lowKn QstcBUI — 147 

Source: CBar 
















































































35 3?^ 
‘j J«5 

^ g^Rl 


fy’5>«u Vi. ^ v .*.-. .. . 


«' H JfS Ji^'H 
«S' 2 . iS'+fc- 



ESmaa^gONAL HERALD TRIBUJjE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


Page 11 


THE EUROMARKETS 


V-n '«**• 


Dornier 


‘»e *SM» • 

f|||| Seeks link 

. ls * !&!&&'* • •- y- •: 

i 5^ «* s* 

S- 

• “ ii'&'&.K 


' To Airbus 




11 


*S.s > 


U ,2 '$k u> l*s 

'^nm 


u 

l* 1C 

1 It 

U 10 
11 

-» B 

>0 
u 
ii ?c 
■ ti 

it 

■A 

1 * 


By Warccn Gcdcrv . 

IntcmcBSomt Herald Tribmr . 
MUNICH - 7 - The dijrf execu- 
tive of Dormer GmbH said Tues- 
day that the company-w hoping to 
gam a-fodnai.imk to the Airbus 
Industrie consortium by seeking a 
minority state mXteutscbe Airbus 
Gmbh... ' -. 

Deutsche Abbas is a subsidiary ' 
^kof West Germany's leading aero- 
S'i j& space group, Messersdranti-Bta- 

S’^»» kowBfcto, winch owns a' 37.9- 

■: 2:* ah.’&s pereent sftri* in Airbus Industrie, ' 

~ kC V?~ SS!i as does fr»<^s stare-owned Acto- 
spauak- Bfitish Aerospace has 20 


:i a* 

tob if* Si £■->’ 

»^s‘ a-i 

Ui, vt- « 

HRb ‘JS li 1 
473 dj T* 7. 

w 7 Ji jSn 

Si? 3S 


n swte IS *k ?Sii 



Claims Mount 
Ag aimtCaman 

, ■ . Rais* w . 

'HONG KONG — Caman 
Investments Ud.’s fiquidaiors 
said Tuesday they were review- 
ing new claims wnb about 1.5 
billion. HongJKoug dollars 
(about $193 irnffion) against the 
company. 

- They said the new claims 
could bring total deficiencies to 
more than 6 billion dollars, 
Tbe liquidators, the account- 
ing firm ofArthnr Young Inter- 
national. said the datnis were 
nor included in an initial esti- 
mate prepared by Carrian’s di- 
rectors after the company went 

into liquidation in November 

19B3. . .. 

A company official said it 
rni^ht be years before the Bqui- 
dattou was completed. 


Coknmodore Pins Hopes on Amiga 


By Dawd£ 

New fork Tuna 

■ NEW YORK — in fire first in- 
troduction of a nsqor home com- 
jxtter system since IBM broogbl 
OTt its ill-£atedPQr two years ago. 
Commodore International Ltd, oa 
Tuesday displayed its long-awaited 
Amiga, ‘hoping the.macfanc's do- 
zing color -graphics tod stereo 
sound capability wffl aem Commo- 
dore’s mnl 

The Amiga marks a sharp 
change m strategy fq^Commodore. 
It wm cany a bare price of about 
$1,400, much moTe Tomensive than 
the Commodore 64. that put. dm 
company’s kjgotypG-iD. ubIimm of 
fining rooms. Company officials 
say it is aimed noFonly at home 

users bm smdl boririeaes and stu- 
dents, making Jl a, competitor of. 
Apple Computer lot's Macintosh. 

The Amiga read Ac Macintosh 
Mn amihr 


ics and arebuill around the same 
microprocessor. But unlike the 
Macintosh, ihc Amiga's graphics 
are in color, and retailers and con* 
sahants Who have seen the results 
rfie m as stunning. Until 
now, they contend, computa-gen- 
enued mawings of the Amiga's 
fity and resohnian were av&3- 
: only on 510,000 engineering 
WOdEStft&OOS. 

“People who haven't - said any- 
thing nice about a borne computer 
in three years rave about the 
Auriga/* said Barnett Wiseman, an 
analyst for Infocosp, a market re- 
search group in Cupertino, Califcr- 
Bthehnd of computer 


miL itus is me jona or compmer 
that people really get ached about. 
But mese days, that is no guarantee 

of success." 

Right now, a guarantee is prc- 
asdy what Commodore needs. In 
die quarter ended in March, Com- 
modore lost J2Q.8 nuffiotL 


The b«gir Amiga model will 
come with 256,000 bytes, or charac- 
ters, of internal memory, but the 
machine is designed to handle up to 
8 million bytes in later versions. 

About 27 software packages will 
■ be available when the machine goes 
on tbe in September. 

At 51,400, the machine's price 
could be a problem, analysts say. 
Like the PQr, it may prove far too 
expensive far tbe borne user. Bui 
Cure Smith, a Commodore execu- 
tive, disagrees . “This p 1 *^'*** is 
really targeted at businesses 
and professionals who wifi want to 
work at borne,” he said. “Undoubt- 
edly some people will use it for 

entertainment and education, but 

thyi is not the main market.” 

Analysts are skeptical, but say 
Commodore should be able to sell 
50,000 to 100,000 units by the end 
of the year. That figure depends 
portly on how many computer re- 
aders agree to carry the machine. 


ProfitDedines 
At British Gas 

Ream 

LONDON — Britain’s go- 
vernment-owned gas corpora- 
tion, a candidate for denation- 
alization, announced on 
Tuesdays 17-percent decline in 
its pretax profit. 

Sir Denis Rooke, die chair- 
man of British Gas, said at a 
news conference that 1984-85 
profit fell to £1 billion (509 
billion) from £121 billion the 
previous year. 

Sir Dalis said British Gas 
had faced stiff competition in 
aB its mufq business areas last 
year. The company will retain 
its monopoly of the British gas 
market, ana Sr Denis said de- 
nationalization would allow the 
corporation to expand its ex- 
ploration program to areas out- 
ride the British Isles . 


Italy’s 600-Miffion-ECU Offer 
Said to Be Fully Subscribed 

Ream 

In the Euromarket Tuesday: 

The Italian Treasury’s 600-rmi- 
b'on-European-Currency-Unii of- 
fer of eight-year Treasury certifi- 
cates has been fully subscribed, the 
Bank of Italy said. The certificates, 
priced at par, carry a fixed annual 


ois: <c rj*» lit. ,!?♦* 

■5i ,a '‘Uffcfe 

; ; n =» 3fc | 4 

ft'ri , 1 ? £ X S 3 


iser is interested in a stake in Deut- 
sche Airbus “deady below a 25- 
parcent blocking minority but erne 
that could be more than a 10 -pear- 
cart holding.” ■ 

Mr. Ftxba said he had hdd 
talks earner this year with the MBB 

cuss a stdee in Deutsche Airbus. 

“ 'rA ^ M ® 8 ®“de no ex- 

“ b & SV, pasdbjectkms to our proposal of 

*r is - 4 >■ ^ obtainiog a stake in Deutsche Air- 

7L r bus." Mr. Fischer said. 

i* A -1 :«°J k Y » MBB Bad no comment but the 

^ -J :* *a na. 

.4l/ *.2 . 


compaxry is to hold its annual press : ■: 

conference Wednesday when the COMPANY NOTES 
Domier interest in Airbus is ex- " 

peered to be diseased. 

Mr. Fischer said Dormer’s inter- 
est in. acquiring a stake in Deutsche 
Airbus bos the full >»eK*>g of 
Daimler-Benz, the West German 
automaker, which recently bought 
a 65 .5-pcrcent controffing interest 
in Domier. ^ 

Industry sources say that MBB, 
winch views tbe Dornier-Darmler 
fink up as a 

threat, nuqr be very reludant to 
itsDeut- 


BriSah Petroleum Co. said its of- ares) dl palm and rubber planla- 
fer to purchase Mebon PLC, the tion m Jonore. 
paint Tmm ufmil me i , been de- FBtadd Ltd. predicted that its* 
dazed unoondition^ now that it semiconductor exports to the Unit- 
owns 94.4 percent rf'tbe company, ed Stales would fall 30 parent in 
or5.) minion ordinary shares. Brit- its current fiscal year, which ends 


125 pence 




NEW YORK — American Ex- 
press Co. reported on Tuesday flat 
second-quarter profits, as a lame 
loss from reserves set aside for its 
K :•> a jj,; g,- Rremtxi’s Fond insurance snbsid- 
n i -t '3 Y iary offset gains in its other busi- 
. i* s: i- a.; nesses.’ 

■a t ^ jf <: The financial-services company 

: :2.* a.l tod eanm^s of $140 nulfion or 61 
•> jl-;-*!., cents a share in the second quarter 

•< ;i£ iA. X compared to $139 million or 64 
? ]\ £7 cents in the second quarter erf 1984. 

•• ;•-««, 4); 

?55:S 


»'■ W 


!4B J.; 

10 D ;:a 


Germany's sec- 
.ace group after 
MBB, does subcontracting work on 
several Airbus modds, mriuding 
the A300-600, A3 10, A320 passen- 
ger planes. 

Domier executives say lower- 
than-expected returns on subcon- 
tracting work on Airbus planes for 
MBB depressed 1984 earnings, 
which are expected to be released 
on Wednesday. Domier had net 
mmrw of 26 miTKnn Deutsche 
marks ($9 million) in 1983. 


ish Petroleum is 
for each Mebcn 
Dresdner Bank AG has filed an 
to fist its shares cm the 
c Exdiangewith Daiwa 
Securities Co. as lead underwriter. 
The hank would become the first 
West . German stock to be listed in 
Tokyo. Twelve foreign 
are currently fisted on 
exchange; 11 of them based m 
United Stares. 

Qtfhrie Rope] Sdfc. of Malayria 



issued and 
million 
Lembdga ¥Ja 

Gntfi rie 


.for 7.71 
1 millio n) from 
jnan Johor Teng- 
had agreed in Octo- 
ber to’ buy 50 percent of Ladang, 
owner of a 4.640-acre (1,856-hect- 


next March. HhachTs microchip 
exports to the United Stares totaled 
180 bHlion yen ($748 million) in the 
previous year, about 60 percent of 
its total exports. 

Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. will 
become a 100 -poceot owner of 
Ready Mixed Concrete Lid. by 
buying a 50-percent stake for 63.75 
million Hong Kong dollars (58.2 
mQfian) from RMC Group PLC 
Hntchuon said the move would 
strengthen its quarry and aggregate 
division. 

Nippon Sheet Ctas C0l of Ja- 
pan, Libbey-Owens-Ford Co. of 
the United Stares and Hankiik 
Glass Industry Co. of South Korea 
will form a cooMny to iprodnee car 
windshields in South Korea. Nip- 
pon said the new company would 
begin production next year. 


Occidental Petroleum Corp. 
to repurchase 23 million 
of its 1530 cumulative pre- 
ferred stock for $253 million from 
Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc., the 
New York-based securities firm. 
The purchase will be made in cash 
derived from the sale of one of 
Occidental's Colombian subsidiar- 
ies. 

Rreffi Ericsson Grides Lid. has 
acquired a 15-percent stake in tbe 
joint optical-fiber venture 
launched by Dunlop Olympic Ltd. 
and S umitomo Electric Industries 
Ltd. In Australia. The 
Optix Australia Led. is 
to begin production later this year. 

Sanyo Electric Gx said it had 
-suspended sales of its portable 
rigfai-mfltiracter videotape record- 
ers in the United States because 
market tests were unsuccessful 
About 3.000 units have been sold 
since the product was introduced 
there in February. 

Sumitomo Rubber Industries 
i is negotiating to buy an un- 


specified stake in Dunlop Tire 
Corp., a spokesman said. The Japa- 
nese newspaper Nikkan Kogyo 
Shimbun said Sumiiomo had 
reached an agreement to buy a 10 - 
percent share; but the spokesman 
said the figure was still unifcr dis- 
cussion. 

TVopnacton Trust PLC said it 

would make a £1 15 millitm ($159.8 
million) bid in and shares for 
Scottish Northern Investment 
Trust PLC. Throgmorton said a 
holder of 100 Scottish Northern 
shares would receive around £81 in 
cash, including* special two-pence 
interim dividend per share and 30.5 
new Throgmorton shares. 

Yatau Mining Gx, a wholly 
owned subsidiary of Mitsubishi 
Metal Corp., said it had discovered 
gold ore in ire tine and lead min» in 
northeastern Japan. The van has 
243 grams (about nine ounces) of 
gold per tan of ore, a particularly 
high ratio, but an estimate of its 
total yield is still unavailable. 


lira rate on Monday, wire 
scriptions opened, of 1308 lire. 

Baaque rationale de Paris was 
issuing, under ire own lead manage- 
ment. 75 million ECU of SVper- 
cent. 10-year Eurobonds priced at 
par. bond market sources said. 
They said the issue is callable after 
seven years at par. 

Fees comprise a 1 Vpercart sell- 
ing concession, a V percent man- 
agement fee and a V percent un- 
derwriting fee. The bonds are 
available in denominations of 
1,000 ECU and will be listed in 
Luxembourg. The pay date is Aug. 
29. 

AustraHa Gas Light Co. issued a 
50-nuIlion Australian dollar bond 
due in 1992 and priced at 100*k 
The issue pays 13 percent and was 
dol immediately quoted cm the grey 
market 

Fuji Bank Ltd. and Mitsui Bank 
Ltd. in separate London newspaper 
... .. . . .. announcements, said they are caH- 

(Conurmed from Page 9) mg s25-million noating-raieHrertif- 

thcre is growing uncertamty about ica^e of deposit issues for early re- 
ihe course of °U prices. demption. 

For dre fust half. Arco reponed The p^j launched in 1983, 


interest rate of 9 percent. 

The offer closed earlv because of 
strong demand helped" by the de- 
valuation of the lira last Saturday. 

Lire subscriptions to tire offers 
were calculated on the basis of the 
official ECU-Iira exchange rate rul- 
ing July 18 and equivalent to 1.459 
lire. This compares with on ECU- 


Arco Had 
Large Loss 


t*- • 

k *- ' 

. •: • 

i ?w tc. 

L !■ 

'S- 

e I «■ 
l d 


an i « 
*»* ' 


Tiny Yugoslav Auto to Hit U.S. Market With Pitch to Entry-Level Buyer 


(Continued from Page 9) 


met 

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. ih 5 '.; high, and the distribution and 
' J 1 i, S,t ; parts- supply schemes too expen- 
'i ■ ! • >>»’! site to make such a car profitable, 
i- >. il~ tbe critics say. 
i'Ciak" But Mr. Prior contends that 
^o has many things going for it 
' ■■'j -w.-i fhai the critics fail to conader. 

• - ft-* ZastavaY assembly workers are 
; r’ Ai'-’’ paid tire emivalaii of Tretween 60 
j* j;;V cents and $1 an hour in UA dd- 
L-i l . a~- ins. The company produces 92 
percent of its own camptmenre and 
raw materials, mdudmg steeL 


• A- i 
S * 


And Yugo America lac. has a 
streamlined distribution system 

Knt-lci-H by a qwnpiwr - cnnlm llHt, 
centrally located parts-sopply ap- 
eration. That wiO hdp us to ofler 
quality at this price ($4,000) for as 
long as is humanly possible,” said 
Mr. Prior, whose company is effec- 
tiveJy rfje importer and Ui dis- 
tributor of the Yugos. 

*Tm not really concerned about 
Otxr nnrnhw of mrit nln jjl year 
one or year two," he said. 

“Our real cooceni is that there is 


about a three-year window between 
now and tire time thummicaiswDl 
become a booming segment of the 
U.S. airto marke^ he said. “We 
have to nse that window to cream a 
brand name for Yuan— to make it 
tbe wwgje name ior rmrAem in 
the United States.* 

There wiD belots ofccarpetition. 
Japanese anto-makers such as 
Inro Motors Ltd. nd Suzuki Mo- 
tor Co.' already are shipping 
“smaUer-than-sub" gnbcompacts 
to the United Stales. Sdufh Korea’s 


Hyundai Group and Daewoo Mo- 
tor Co. also have plans to introduce 
subcompacre into the coimtiy with- 
in the next two model years. 

Mimcan will account for less 
than 1 percent of projected US. 
auto sales for 1 985 but are exported 
to constitute 13 percent (13 tmHion^ - 
can) of tiie domestic market in 
)989, according to amomotive- 
market studies V Merrill Lynch, 
Fierce, Fenner &. Smith Inc. 

Mr. Poor and Yog) dealers like 
Mr. Phillips are betting that they 


can keep overall service and prod- transportation with quality and du- 
oct quality high enraub and prices rabihty.” 

Shades of Volkswagen. The 
trusty VW Beetle entered (he US. 
soport^lOOpen»t bM«ttthe market with a base manufacturer's 

sticker price of $1,595. 

improve their product mix by add- 


ing Ip r ppr cars such as the 1.5-liter 
Y trap Model 103. 

. “What it really comes down to is 
keqaing your promises at a price 
that is affordable," he said. “We’re 
not gping to represe n t ourselves to 
be any more than the car — basic 


VW has had its ups and downs in 
the United States since then. But its 
initial success opened the road for 
imports, thereby creating perma- 
nent nharigpt in the range, quality 
»nd marketing of automotive prod- 
ucts sold in the United States. 


a loss of S747 million on revenue of 
51 2.538 billion, against a profit of 
S801 million, or $3.10 a share, on 
revenue of $12,571 billion a year 
earlier. 

Exxon said profit in the second 
quarter fell to $745 million, or 99 
cents a share, on revenue of S 22.97 
billion against profit of SI J5 bil- 
lion, or S 1.63 a share, on revenue of 
$24.31 billion. 

It said $545 million, or 71 cents a 
share, of the decline in earnings 
reflected an extraordinary charge 
a ptinet earning: tO a con- 

tingency for losses in the oil-pricing 
case. Without that charge, earnings 
would have been $1.29 billion, or 
$1.70 a share. 

For the first half, Exxon said 
earnings fell to $2:07 billion, or 
$2.70 a share, on revenue of S46.23 
billion, against earnings of S2.S3 
billion, or $3.39 a share, on revenue 
of S49J1 billion. 

Phillips, the nation’s eighth-larg- 
est oil company, said second-quar- 
ter profit fefl to $1 10 million, or 49 
cents a share, on revenue of 53.99 
billion, against profit of $231 mil- 
lion, or 50 cents a share, on revenue 
of $4.05 billion a year eariier. Earn- 
ings per share from the previous 
year were adjusted for a recent 3- 
for -1 stock split. 

For tbe first half, Minings fell, to 
$216 minion, or 64 cents a share, 
from $424 million, or a restated 92 
cents a share. Revenue dipped to 58 
million from $ 8.01 nrifliaa. 


will be repaid on Sept. 11 at par, 
while the Mitsui issue, also 
launched in 1983, will be repaid 
Aug. 30 at par. 


SATOE rJWCKDS AND PICTURES 
DOONESUJRY 

DASyiNTHEIHT 


The Global 
Newspaper. 



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E.F. Hutton Talks 


“Thank you” 

That’s the most important 
thing we can say to our 1^500 
employees and our thousands 
of customers and clients. The 
loyalty and support of our 
clients and the commitment to 
excellence and integrity of our 
employees is what built our 
reputation over 81 years and 
what has seen us through the 
trying times of these past few 
weeks. You are the best. 

To those in government and 
industry who look on with 
concern, we simply say, if you 
judge us on our merits, we are 
confident of your conclusions. 

We will continue to meet 
the investment needs of our 
clients in more than 500 local 
communities and we are proud 
to say “When E.E Hutton 
Talks, People Listen ” 


Sincerely, 


D-rr) 

Robert Fomon 
Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer 




•jV 











Tu esdays 

*Y1EX 

Closing 


Tables Include Hie nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wail Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
I'ia The Associated Press 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


7 fc 

a«* aw 

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35 34 

*S'< 33 
17V. V* 
134k Vn 

TV 4W 

7% W 

aw iw 
25 1» 

30% 21% 

3V, la 


Cored tan 

CosCrn TS 

CaaCrnt 

CiitCrd Jpr Z1 1? 
Cross 152 1? M 
CrewIM IMalS 8 
CrnCP 
CrCPB 

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Curllc* .92 3.1 II 
CustEn 


55 H h S- % 

5 ^ ^ 2 S + ,A 

145 9% 9W 9%- V* 

328 3* 3314 33% + 1% 

i an* aw* a***- v 

A 16% 16% uw 

3 13% 13% 13% + W 

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4 26% 26% 

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17 4% 6% 

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256 9W 4 
ID 11% 11% 

15 293 31% 31% 

7 3% 3% 

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18 26 15% IS 

10 II 22 22 

29 2 28% Ufa 

28 13 28% 27% 

10 35 28% 28 

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33 94 44% 43% 

22 23 22 

10 4 10% 10W. 

11 520 5% .4% 
17 443 IBta 17% 

38 21*6 21% 

11 5 36% 36% 

12 15 39% 39% 

2 4 4 

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3 4% 4% 

6 2 38% 28% 

7 2 8% 8Vi 


4%— V. 

23% +1% 
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9% 

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26% + % 
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31% — % 
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28% + % 
27% — % 
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43% — 1 
22% — % 
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36% — % 
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16% 11% 
10% 5% 

4V 1% 

CDI 6 


19% ,13% 
17% 9% 

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JR* 

CoesNJ 

CogleA 

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LOIRE 1 

58 95 

M'A 18% 
6% 3% 
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Calmol 
Calton n 
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10% 7% 

"□(prop 

JOt 10JI 

BV 9% 

Cameo 

J2 1J 

3% 13% 
Q% 18W 
15% 25V 
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CdnOcc 

CWIne 

Cardiff 

Cardll 

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■22.113 




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10% 6% HAL .109 1.1 22 

» 9% HUBC .600 32 12 

2W 25V HrKJvm n 
34V 16V Hanfrds m to is 
2% * Korvev 

39% 18% Hasbrs .15 J 13 
43 22% Hasbrpf 2D0 4J 

«]% 28% Hosting 40a IJ 6 
2S% 15% HlltlCre 2J6e 8J 9 
10% 5% HlttlCh 21 

19% m Htmex =« 

15% 10% HelttlM 44 4.9 8 
9% 6% HWnWr 50e 25 10 
17% 9% Hetalcfc .10 4 10 

4% 7% Haidar so 

14% 3% helHmt 

2% % HglinR 

6% 4 Hentio 26 

5 1%-Hlndrl 21 

17 9% Hlntron 19 

5% 2% Hofman 

15% 6% HoItvCP J4 15 12 

39% 27 rtnrml 108 25 13 
16% 1% HmHar Jll 85 17 
6% 2% HrnHwt 571127 
19V 12% HotIPtv 140 95 12 
6% 1% HoltPwf 

6% 3% HauOT 510214 
18% 9% HovnE 10 

13% 8% HOwIln 50a 14 7 

46% 31% Hubei A 152 35 13 
46% 29V HUMS 152 35 » 
23% 14% HubBwl 
61% 40% HubOl pf 256 34 
21% 17% HudGa A0 25 14 
10 6% Husky g 56 £1 


54 15 12 
1-08 25 13 


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46 25% 
8 33% 
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1110 38% 
26 41% 
23 31% 
95 23V 
AS 9% 
272 1t% 
45 13% 
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00 15% 

60 TV 
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49 4% 

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81 38% 

591 9 

598 2% 

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7 14% 

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3 46 

434 44V 
5 23% 
2 61% 

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54 7% 


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24% 34V— 1 
33% 33% + % 
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41% 41% + % 
29% 30% +T% 
23 23% — % 

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10 % 10 %+ % 
12% 13% + % 
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15% 15%—% 
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11% 11% 

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23% 23%—% 
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18% 18% + V. 
7 7% + % 


13% NRMn 
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11% NtOsO 
12% NtPatnt 
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11% NPfnRt 
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29 NYTlino 
4% NewbE 
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13% NkUNH 
12 NwpEI 
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139k NoCdOg 
29V NIPS Pf 
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6% NwelOt 
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16% OEA 
15% Oafcwd 50b 
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4% OdotBs 
10% Olsten* 54 
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5% OrfolH B 50 
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152 £9 17 60 17% 

1506 £7 11 59 2) 

M 15 17 1299 4JW 

590 48 7 24 5% 

32 1A 03 25 13V 


40 17% 14% 17% + % 

59 2) 28% 21 + % 

1299 45% 4S 45V— % 

24 516 5% 5% + % 

25 13V 13% 13% — % 
153 13b 13V 13V— % 

16 16% 14% 16%—% 
20 6% 6% 4% 

129 12% 12 12 

9 2% 2% 2H— % 

67 11V 11% 11% 

9 15» 1514 15V— % 

27Qz 35 *5 3* + % 

10 3 3 3 

84 6% 6% «% 

52 10% 9% 99k— % 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
23 July 1985 

Tbanefassat value quotations shown below ore supplied Mr ere Funds listed with Ok 
exception of some funds whose auotes are based on Issue prices. The foltovrara 
marginal symbols Indicate frequency of quotations supplied for me IHT: 

Id) -dotty; (w) -weekly; lb) -Dl-montWv; Ir)- regularly: til irregatarty. 


AL AML MANAGEMENT 

(w) AMMol Trust. SJ* 

BANK JULIU5 BAER 8. CO. Ltd. 


Bk Horn Sofia 94 
Bk Tokyo 93 
Bk Tokyo P 
-8k Tokyo 17 
Bk Tokyo Fabom 
Bk Tokyo Det«/?1 
Qqnknmorloi 0/596 
Ban*xrsTHai80 

Bankers Trad 94 
BN Capital 9* 

BOB Fkl 87791 

BbllntK 
BM lot 99 
BhlW93 
Ba bldacuez 89 


— Id I Boerbond 

^{d I iqulboer America — 
— [d ) Envfbovr Europe — _ 
—Id ) Eoulboer Pacific— 

— Id 1 Grobor — 

—Id S stockbor 

BANOUE IMDOSUEZ 
— td > Asian Growth 

— (w) Dtverbond 

— Iwl FI F— America 
— Iw) FIF— Europe 
— tw) F|F— Pacific. 

— td 1 IMtoRiez Mufti bends A 
— td) Indasuez Muttttxrnds B 
— td I Indasuez USD <MAA.F1 


LLOYDS BANK INTL. FOB 438.C-enev= II . 

S 567AC — Ifw) Lloyds Inti Dollar S :t£2D 

— Hwl Llovdstnri Euroao 5F 11658 

_ _ — Mw) LlOrdS Inn Growth SF 179.90 

— Hwt Lloyds ln!1 Income — 5F 31950 
— Mw) L lords ini I N. America- * IPS. DO 
— Hwj ucvdt- inti Pacific—, sf IT7.90 
I^2S — Mw) novas mil Smaller Cos. - SH 14 


8 21% 22% 
10 18% 18% 
5 6% 6% 
5 9% 9% 
7S 25% 25% 
21 5 4V 

3 6 6 

3-5 4% 

.1 5 5 

15 22V 22V 
315 139k 12% 
267 10% 10% 


23% + 9k 
live— % 

4% 

22- £ 

5 + % 

4 

4% 

5 — % 
22V 

•13% — V 

10% — Vb 


8 

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11 



7 


55% 

15V I CHS 

10 

241 


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288 

29 

3 

TW 

2W 


2% |PM 

JHr 20 

33 


2W 


16% 

6}S IRTCpn 

37 

26 

14V 

14% 


2% 

l*hi imoGo 

.lie 46 

4 

2% 

2% 

TV + H 

7% 

1% Imolnd 


5 

IW 

1% 

tw 

ML. 

25% imaOilg 160 

361 

37% 

37% 

37% — % 

IJU. 

*W intlohl 

13 

60 

12V 

1T% 

12V— W 

22% 

Tl instres 

50 S 85 

22 

21% 

2>% 

21% 


IV IrtMSv 

7 

304 

1% 

1% 

IV— % 


4% 14% — V 
1% 11% 

IV 11V 
1% 12% + V 
1 11 — % 
4 34 — % 

1% 31% — % 
28% 

23% 

21 % 

23 — % 
23V— % 
10V 

21 %— % 
78V 19 + % 

18% 18% 

17% 17V— % 
20 20 — V 

18% 18V— % 
20% 70V 
10% 10%— %■ 
20% 20V 
401 40 

40% 40% +1 

45 \=\ 

38% 

6 % + % 
23%—% 
BV— % 
4% 

»V— % 
10 % • 
38% 






m 


JiiH! , j| 3 [ i ■ ji:; 


Die CAFSA Phosphates Company beabsichliet die Offentliche Auschrei- 
hunp Ihr die DurcMuhrung allpjcmdneT Eroarbeilcn for die lolgenden 
Projekle; 

— Allgtorioe Dien*tlci»lunge a uad SAsduMhong 

— luBttndhaimng des Transportwegg ztun Wasdiwerk (Kon- 
veyor) 

— Wanchwerk mid Beforderung 

Fumen, die anf Arbdten dieser An apcmlisiert sind. kuoneo die Submis- 
Bionsunt erlagen, so bald die SubtnissicmsauschretliHmg bdcaont gemacht 
vrurde, vom Serrice General, 9 Roe du Rojaume d’Arabie Seoa* 
ditc, Tunis, gegefl Zahlung von dreiflig Dinar beziehen. 

Angebote, die oicht in franzfcischtrr Spiache ahgebBt wuiden, haben keine 
GuJLiglceil: alle Apgebote nrilMen in zirei getramlen UmschlSgen einger- 
eictn wenfen: 

— Ein Umnchlag ’A’, sorgfaltig renchliMfii, der die ent«pre> 
dundeo teehnuefaen Spenfikatxtnai trie fdgt endiSll: 

• Znr Verfogong stebende Arbeitnnittel (Nasdunerie etc.) 

• Rdoeittoo des V’cmllnoppenoDsb 

— Ein U mnch l ag T, sorg£alt»g reiKhlostea, der die folgenden 
Doknmente entbnlt: 

• Ein AngeboL, du nidi deni beigefugten Beispiei in den Ange> 
botennierlageo abgefaBt wurde 

• Preulute und Kostenyoraiudilag. 

Diese beiden Umschlage sind in eincm dritten. wigflldg veisehloasenen 
Umschlag per Einschreiben an Monsieur Lc Directeur tfa Achats. 2130 
Meibom (Tunes ienl zu sendw. Die links’ obere Ecke des Umec faUgs rmifl 
vrie foigt maridort sein: 

'A .0. N P 2223 - TERRASSEMENTS GfiNtRAUX A KEF ED- 
DOUR NE PAS OLPYRIR AVAYT LE 21 AOtT 1935 A 10 
HEURES.* 


Die SErentliche Offnung der UrascJ 
10.00 trhr id den Bums der Verka 


erfolgi am 21. August 1965 um 
ekdon in Metlaoui. 


MINIS TER1UM FUR VOLKS W1RTSCH AFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 

MTERNAT10NALE ADSSCISBB0NG Nr. P 2224 
STJUHKONSIMTION FUR DAS KEF EDDOUR-PROJEKT 

Die CAFSA Phosphate* Company beabsichfigt die Offendicfae Adscbrei- 
buiK fur die DmrhfOhnxng des StahlkoasmiklioDsbam (Or das KEF 
EDDOUR-Projdfls wie folgt 
fiMlniiilli«lhing6w>d nrtii1»n 


— SchachtSffnmig 

— Krangerost 

— Umrjjftnnng der Lagerfaanser 

Firmen, die sich auf obig beschriebtse Arbeiten spedaluieren, kSnnen die 
SubmisgioasudteHagen, sobaJd die Subrnisslonsauschreibung bekannt ge- 
machi wurde, vom Serrice Gfnfral, 9 Roe dn Rovanme tT Arable 
S^oadite, Tank, gegen Zahlung von dreifiig Dinar beziehen. 




GQltiglcdt; alle Angebote mflssen in zwri getromtea Umschl^oi eioger- 
eiefat werden: 

— Ein Umadilag *A\ sorgfaliig verscblotaen, der die entgpre- 
ebettdea teduisdien Sperifuationen trie folgt enthfilt: 

• Znr Verbigung a t efcende Arbehamittel (Mudunoie etc.) 

• Referenzes des Verwaltungspenonals 

— Ein Unuchlag f B’, sorgfaldg wncfalOHeo, der die folgenden 
Dokqmente entbalu 

• Bn Angebot, das uadi dem beSgefngten Beispid in den Anse- 
botaameriagen abgebfil unde 

• Preifiliate und KostamwanseHlag. 

these beidcq Umachlage sind in einern dritten, aoigflitig veischlossenea 
Unuchlag ner Einschreiben an Monsieur Le Directeur des Achats. 2130 
Metfaoui (Tunesien) zu senden. Die Unite obere Ecke des Umschlags muB 
trie folgt mariden sc in; 

-A.0 N P 2224 - CHARPENTE METAUXQUE KEF EDDOUR, 
WE PAS OUVRIR AVAYT LE 23 AOCT 1985 A 10 HEURESn 
Die SCeadiche OfTnung der Umschlfce eriolgt am 23. Almost 1985 am 
10.00 Lihr in den Bilros der Vertuitairektion in MetlaouL 




£ 


St 


— {U } Boerbond — .SF^TOJO — Him) Lloyds InH Income — . 

=13 1 ^raa5= = . =:{*» fcj j"! j 6iaE~ 

=iS 1 1£££ pSSSLzz If !?mSS -*« w> uovt * in, ' t smol,er 

—Id 1 Grobor SF 10UDD NIMAR8EN 

— Cdistackbor 5F 16O7JJ0 — Id 1 Ckm A 

— twl Class B-U5 

SlO^t -«»>C»e»C. Japan 

SF 805 OBL ■ FLEX LIMITED 

S IB 61 — 'wl MulticutTKicv 

8 1180 — :w> Dai ter Medium Term 

8 1753 — <W. Dollar Long Term 

STUM — iwl Jeoanase Yen— 

S 16146 — Iwi Pound Stoning 

S 1015.71 — furl Deursctte Murk 

BRITAN N1AJ*OB27L SI. Heller. Jersey SUSfiSSP 

— tw) BfiLDoIlor Income *0885* 5 ’" nj * """ ' " - — 

SOJ7- ORANGE NSSSkti GROUP 
. SI. 113 PB SSSn. The Hager CC7TP tatTO 
cl 136 — :a 1 Bevrr Be*S0irgcn++ 

soSI PARISBAS-ORGUP 
cum —10 1 inlrmclteal— 


—tw> BrtLDoiiar Income 
— tw) BrttSManoaCurr 
— td ) Brtt. intl5 Monas jwrtf 
— td } BrtL intUManagJtarH 
— tw) BrfL Am. Inc & Fd 
— tw) Brtt. Gold Fuad 

=rd i Brit. JdeanDkr Pert. Fd 
— tw) BrtLJersw Gilt Fund 
—td 1 Brt>. World Lets. Fuad 
— td I BrIL World Tedm. Fund 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— tw) CaM lan Fund 

— tw) Capital Italia 5A 


si: jo 

— S10 97 
— S DCS 
— S1158 

Lia— 

. DM 105? 
*FL 1034 
^SF997 


snsK - ; * 1 OB-.s-OVI 3M IJSIJT 

• ,n?2 -IWVOHLIGESTIWI- SF 9L3 

_|* . C^LI-D0/.LA9 1 1.30 57 

* 0 743 “ l *»i OBL . -YEN V linma) 

* 0743 -Iwl OBLI GL'lDEN — f L 13K.94 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL — Id I PABWL.FUND 19379 

-Iwl CCT^tol InH Fund S3J46 -Id I PA»;NT=P FUND. 1 1J5J4 

— tw) Capital ItaHaSA SI S3 — td I pea U5 Trecvure Bend s 112.23 

CREDIT SUISSE 1 ISSUE PRiCESl ROYAL fl. OF reNspA^B 24*. VJE *»*«!»£> 

— td > Actions Seines SF487JI0 •+>«/; RBCCarei V =ma LI1 SH£9 

— td) Bond Valor Swl SF KMJD S« Far EassSPor.llc fa — - 1 1154 

—(d) Band Motor D^nork DM 111J3 -fiwi BK Ini i Ccoilai Fd. S5a.Y* 

—td) Bond valor US-OOLLAR S1304? -*• w: =BCInl"«=rerC 5I1J7 

— tdl Bond Valor Yon— — Yen 1UU1JW -Wd i R6Cfto;CJrrw*c» Fd — S7L64 

— td) Convert Valor Swl_ SF 11755 -+!«*' RDC Norn Amrr. Fd S IC.0V 

ZJ2 , ,^H Vah,r UM3 °LL^P. e 51^76 SKA NCI FOND -NTL FUND < 46^ 236772 : 

Z,2{ 77V.00 BkI slat 

=td ) CS Foods— Inti— SF 113.75 — IwlAcc : Bk)— — St-i3 Cltcr— -SS.74 

— td ) CS Money Morkgt Fund— S J075JM SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD 
- d 1 CS Money Marlcgt Fond OMIWfflO 17 DewmsWrr i.LondontJl. 377^040 

— td J Energle— Voior, SF 751^ — te ) SUB Band Fund S7X44 

— tdl Ussec — SFK3JQ _t«| SH8 Inti GroyylbFwta S3303 

={d | SSte=VdSrt===ZI If 1603 SWIM MW K CCRF ( iSSU E P R‘CES| ^ 

DR EXE L BURNHAM LAMBERT INC — td 1 0^fark°BondSe"lec1lon ’ DM I^JI 

— id ) Oolkir 9ond Setccuon SU?J6 

. —la J Fiar'n Bond Selection 
•JesS —* a 1 Inlervalor — 

S 1tJ 7 J jQpgo ParlFol 

(m) WHk F lMidai Ud -id ) sSSita Bond Select fon 

tw) WtaebMfer Holdings. FF 1K59 — td i swhs Foreign Bond Sel 

tw) Workfwlde Securities S /S 3 V 3 J- ’si^? Z^S ) 
tw) Worldwide Special S/S 2%. S 14713)9* =}S 1 Universal 
DIT INVESTMENT FFM — W ) Yen Bond Selection 


— Id J Enorglg— Valor — SF t 

— tdiussec— 5F9 

— <d J Eun»o— Valor SF 1. 

— id > Pacific — Vidor SF 1 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Wlndie si er Home . 77 Lond on Won 
LONDON EC2J01 1 9209797) 
tw) Flnsbvry Groun Ltd 
tml Winchester Diversified** 

(ml whKbestar Rnanciol Ltd S 

tw) W i nchester Holdings. FF 1i 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

— Hd ) Ccncentro ■— DM21 

— Kd ) infl Rent e nftiod DM93 

OthBiBHargnt 6 Uoyd George. Brussels. 

a m) D4iH Commodity Pool— 829288 
ml Currency (Gold Pool 
ml VWlKfa-Ut* Fuf. Poof 


SI37J6 
FL T2AM 
SF 3650 
SFE9J3 
CTCSS4 
SF 10730 
330.75 
SF 8455 
SF 119A1 
Y10532JO 


— <mlwinch.UfeFuf.PooI— S579.il 
— <m) Trens world Fut. Pool— s 828.49 


5J5J5S UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

DM 9X90 _(d ) Amco US. SB SF 3850 

—Id 1 Bond-Invert SF67JB 

— td 1 Foma Swiss Sn SF 1S3J0 

— Id 1 JaoaR-inveU SF 877 so 

— (d J Sctll South Air. Stv SF 43250 

— td ) Shoo (stock price) SF JOeJJO 


FBC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS U1 ?1Q N INVEST MENT Frankturt 

1. Laurence faunty WIL ECL 01 4ZM480 ” ! ImSSSS n*S ^ 

— tw) F4C Atlantic S13JJ2 ZlSS * 

— /wi gilt. PiifAiwm tm a —fa } Uiffrax ■ ■ w.w 

=tlj FACOrtggd V I- S^S-tdlUNIZINS- DM1M.15 

FIDELI TY PO B Oil Hamilton Bermuda OtBer Funds 

3 — ^TtomVolues Comman_ snw (wJ Actlbonds liweslmenfs Fund. S ZL50 

T. } *Sgr yqtae s C unuPret SW2A2 tw) Actfvesflntl 511.78 

a 1 FVNWy Amer. ksm t s 87X14 i»i etn— 1 1 n S358 

d * FkWIIty Australia Ftevl- 5950 tw) Aouita International Fund— S 14* JE 


*9.70 i W ) Aaullo Internatlooal Fund— S 14*30 


— J2 > R5 c ?!2[ V T R,ntf .*■ if 5 A"* Finance 1.F S 39157 

— td ) FtaeHtv Dir. Svgs.Tr S 12559 <b I A rH w c 1.72X50 

) FWeWy F^r Ml Fund 1 2X60 J W) Tr^rlnnFi fAEIF)™ lioSo 

Si (w) BNP Interbond Fund — _ S11X44 

5! S2W0 wisondsekNi-lssue Pr SF 13X75 

~ii ! BUSS? PTnrilta r.Fimd 5 UW (ml Canada Gtd-Mortaoge Fd * 9 33 

< d ' c ap‘taJ Preierv. Fd. Inti li!A» 


— td ) FJdeRtv Frontier Fund — 8 U88 

— id > Fidelity Pacfflc Fund S 1 3 8 . 37 (d > Capital Preserv. Fd. In 

— td I Fidelity SpcL Growth Fd. — S1SA0 !.i rnSJf c..^ T 
-tdl Fidelity World Fund 5 3L5S (d mu.r. AuS^Uo F^dl 


m 


FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01-639- Ml 3 

- — tw) Dollar Income 

— tw) Forbes High Inc. GIM F 
— (w) OoW l 
— tw) Gold Appreciation 
—On) Strategic Trad 
GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— tw) East investment Fund 8340: 

— fw) Scottish World Fund_ £110. 

— (w) State St. .Amerlcon. 5 173. 

CantLTngt I hi I wcApon 1,0 1-49 14330 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CCRP 


Arbttraoelnc 
iw) GAMedca Inc. 
tw) GAM Australia 
Iw) gam Bataan Inc 
(w) GAM 

twi QAM 

tw) GAM Hong Kona Inc 
Cd ) GAM international Ir 
(w) GAM japan Inc 810080 Jil 

laaa ps^ ai'fer tjsft 

twi gam podne inc $ hbxS 52 * HA*.™! ygtf 04 


d ) cj.P. Japan Fund- 1 1CU7 

,m) Cleveiana Offshore Fd 9 9.11X57 

tatu. t«l Columbtq securities FL 11145 

CbSS (blCOMETE 879051 

8X15 ,OT] ConreH. Fd. inn A Cerfs 1 1051 

8X6? twj Ccnvert. Fa. inn B Certs 82X85 

8U6 ! !?! DCC - *86.98 

Id ) B. Witter WIc Wide Iv) TsT SHJ5 

<b ) Drakkar Invent. Fund N.V_ $ 1.16952 

834056 (d 1 Dreyfus America Fund X HL36 

£11025 (d 1 Drgy'us Fund Inti.. *4056 

S 17352 twi Dreyfus Inlerccn1inenl_ S 37 JU 

I ivv) The Egiabiishmeirt Truil 8 1.17 

td 1 Europe Obiiootkws _____ 4087 

wv First Edo Fund SMA39JM 

Jb ) FIJtv Stars LM 591X40 

tiya; tw) Fixed Income Trans—— S UU* 

ll«J7 IwJForscle* Issue Pr SF2B5JS 

l "’ Pore*hmd 8JJ3, 

» |MI Cnrmiln Uvllwi u Jp 7062 

- 899M 
_ 89X57 


inoja iw Formula Selection Fd. 

id I FondlfaKa 

iFiURo td) Gavernm. Sec- Funde. 


(ml GAMrlntCorp. 




tw) GAM sSS^UtaS^mBf 1295^ 0 }“ t ISSaSSSSSSc.SS 
(ml GAM Systems Inc 5 iSc76 !h KlSSfiS!!',** Purj3 


m E ISSB. 


tw) GAM Worldwide inc 

Im) GAM Tyche IA. Class A 
G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 
— <w) Berrv Pot Fd. Ud-_ 
-<a) G.T. Applied Science _ _ 


Alean HJC GwttiFd— 81X83 W ) Klelnwart Benson Inn 


.Asia Fund 

.Australia Fund 

. Europe Fund— 


Non Dollar 


— <d > Glt. Dollar Fund 

— td>G.T. Bond Fund 

-W ) &.T. Global Techntay Fd 
— <d > GlT. Honshu PutWInder 
— W G.T. Investment Fund. — 
— W 1 G.T. Japan Small CcFund 

— <d ) G.T. TodcvJtosy Fund 

— <d I G.T. South China Fund— 


— (d ) Cmabuw < Far East) 

— Id ) CSF <Bo<onc*d)_ 

— td ) inM. Band Fund. 

—Id ) mt. Currency US. 

—Id > ITF Fd JTedmoto . 

— Id) CSeas Fd (N. AMERICA) 


|wl Inter me r*ot Fund 8 30533 

<d > Inter mining Mat Fd. C1.B'_ 1*31.40 

ir) Inri Securities Fund s HOC 

, Id I investo D W5 DM SLC 

SI771* ,r } 'nves* Attarl»oa« SA4» 

<r l Hoffommo Ini'l Fund SA 81479 

Iwl Joptn Selection Fund S1175S. 

I9J3 twUapon PtjcKK Fund S97J1 

S 1X10 Itp. 5 JkftBT Ftm. inR. Ltd J1)^5X*T 

(d 1 Klelnwart Benson lari Fd SZXH , 

< w) Klelnwart Bens. Joo. Fd 1 7*M. f 

iw| Korea Growth Trust _____ S*J6 

Id 1 Leicco Fund SUM 

iwl LeveroBoCag HofcJ. J1C83 ' 

fd 1 Llautboer S1531ID 

iwl Lunfond- 87X9* 

tm) Moonatand N.V.._ SWXIS 

Id ) Mwloiorium Set. Fd 8 17» 

lb) M*fonr* y 109275 

tWlNAAT 8 Iftil. 


8 ACT l») Klelnwart Bens. Joo. Fd- 

82459 ("! Korea Growth Trust 

J IT JS IS ( Ltrccm Fund 


*i»l G.T.EWO. Small Cox Fuad SI 1*4 Iw) Ueverooe Cop Hokf S ICO f 

— td ) G.T. Dollar Fund SISM 'dlUavttwer SUM 

IMS* IWI Ltnrfn nrt 87X94 

S 1139 tm) Mognatand N.V.„_ SKLM • 

82X49 Id ) Meclotanum Set. Fd S 175? 

* 18.72 lb ) Meranrp— Y 109375 

S43J1 IWlNAAT 8 tail. 

87752 Idl Nlkko Growth Package Fd 8 871738, 

— Id ) G.T. Swnh anna Fund— 81*97 Nippon Fund— — — 82952* 

** s‘95 iwl PANCURRI inc S 11** 

HK » l Portan Sw. R Ei) Senew SF UWJJ * 

«r»E w r ,alVBl «» M V / 

(b l PWBdn _1_ 8M8B.il * a 

8 2934 {wl PSCO Fund N.V.— (T3UJ B 

EBC TRUST CO.tJERSEY) LTD. t*{ ^COIM I N.V — ... f KBM . * 

1-3 Seale SL5). HettertQS143M31 <5 \ !nrl fml ^ ' 

TRADED CURRENCVfunD: ib • Pri— Tech S*?«« 1 


9 J I > (*1 


FemschriWichd. narh deui SrhluSlcrmin cintreilende, oder die augege- 
be oen Bfdingunaen nicbi erfutimdt: An^ebole werden ohne Rccbt auf 
Bcrufung abgelehnL 


Die Htainkhe OtTnung der UmschlSge eriolgt am 23. August 1985 am 
10.00 Lihr in den Bilros der Vertaufsdirekiioa in MetlaouL 

Fernsduiftiiche. nach dem SchluBtermin ontrefTende, oder die angege- 
benen Bedingumra nichr erfQllende Angebote werden ohm Rcchl auf 
Berufimg abgriehnL 


•n n* 



EBC TRUST CO.tJERSEY) LTD. " FSCOlnlL N.V — ... S KBM .3 

1-3 Seale SLS). HettertU53L3M31 <41 PirttiTti Inn ?«Kl *MJ5 J ‘ 

TRADED CURRENCV FUND. lb • Pr'— Tech — — - SW* ' 

Ofdllnc: BU__81D59 Offer __S10509 Cuanlum Fund N.V JMMJJ 

OidiCap.: Bid 81154 ®“non J2 5»*» «-E ; . 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND W \ POittinve3»_ LF144&58. : . ‘ 

—Id) Short Torn) w* lAeeum) 8 ! 4SdS ^ ' Reserve injured D<«ijjis_ jWNU 

—Id ) Short Terra ’A" (Dittri SOJflfl* J*} Satnwni PcrfWte-. — _ SF18XJJ." 

—fd ) Short Tdnn ’B’ (Accjmi S15SM ! Swl J Tgdt,SA Lurembcniro_ Siftft-) 

—Id } Short Term T3' [OiSfrl- SC59SQ- ***! Seven lArrawSFwtd ssa&i 

-tw) Long Ter m _ ***! «U»Si. EW* Equity HdgsNV 1 W.11^ 

_. fw) Strafegr Investment Fund, SUnk 

JARDINE FLEMING. POT JB Ope Hg Kg Id I SvntaA Ltd.'.'CloR AT . . s 9/i •. 

~*bl J-F AvUr vbq _ 84.14 iwlTecnnoGrawfh Fund JF BS7L _ ' 

— jb > J-F Hono K pno Trust. 83X86 iwl Tokyo Fan Hold, istol— tun - 

—jb) J.F Jaw Trust—. Y e*:* i w> Tokyo Pot Hold N.V S . ■ 

3wj j.F «3«??S8r_l 17 ^ s?i vssss&s r a'A* 

“i b l jj PaejncSeeS-lACC) 8 552 tw) TwS'SlwlIwIJ’v.C^a 

tml Tweedy. Browne I U.K. i n.v. s lOOi ji : • 
id > UKXO fiuwi _ . . DM BL» . j 

Id i Uni Bona Fund 8 MP»ff ■ 

IB ■ UNI Capital Fund—— 

lv.9VonoerbiiiA«eis . fisno 

Id ) WurW FjtjJ 5 A S 1143 

OM — Deutsdw Mqrts; 9F — Eeiglura Francs: FL — Dutch Flortn; LF 
*jn» n *oure FrenMi SF — Ewtat Frcna, a — ayked- + — etter Pnc«;o — neff! 
Aatvo P/V 810 lo 81 p er uni I; N A - Not Auollabh.; N.C. - NctComtnanlcated.o- 3 
New; s — suspended; 5/S — Stack Stan; • — ■ Ex^.utdand; — i 

Of®** Pprtarmance index Jure; • — Rettatnot^riciw *• — Formertv a 

. «¥" ntwlde PundLfd^# — Offer Price Lno. 3% . relim. chorgg: +» — doHy stock 8 

• *> on Amsterdam Stae|t Exchange " 













































tntfkNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


* * ^ 

S=S|: 

v. Sk. 


Danish Bank Names Evan Galbraith 

NeW York Branch Head To Be a Director 


:S- ic . *. 

_ ' ".i 


ass «r«:rs 

for liberia, based in Monrovia. He 
was director of the New YoA- 
dcfctank.A/S.OM ofOie lrngot baQk > s divisLonal training 

coggneroal ban ks m R enmark^haa ^ Athens _ Ahnxd jdam 

anBOanCed ^ takes over responsibility for the 

WP managexncptrf twining centerand also becomes 

it plans to open m New York m f OT the dxvisacn. 

November. . Succeeding Mr. Jdam in Khar- 

The tank said n has reennwd corporate officer 

Werner Stange, a scanor vice pres- for * Mohammed Qasm 


WemCT Siange, a senior vice presi- 
dent at Morgan Guaranty Trust 
Co. of New York, to serve as gener- 

4ia «le 


v. \y> i: 


fourth overseas. Mr. Stance set up STC TefecoranmnicatkHis U4, 
Morean’s offices in Zurich i 


Morgan’s n ^ rrtt in Znneh and L o n d on. has named Lot Lauda- tjonal myest^fflt panJun& 
FrSfort. SStenCTposLofanamaitet- gurngin 1963 a Morgm et 

He will be assisted by Beni Han- mg manager for India.He will be Gem Pans. 

who has been appointed depu- based in Not Delhi and be respon- «- 

tv waeral manager of the branch, able for business devdopment in . - . 

1983, Mr. Hansen has India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and deputy managing director or i 

been responsible for Nordic Amex- Nepal. company. 

Esso Autralla said Stuart On 


• KLM Orders ' 

— : — | 10 Airliners 

Evan Galbraith From Boeing 

ToBeaDavctor amsSdam — klm, im 

international Herald Tribune Dutch national airline, has ordered 

LONDON - Evan G. Gal- 10 Boeing 737 passengw planes ;to 
brmth,'S7, the U.S. ambassador n^ part^ iis xnodw“‘«g 
to fiance who is leaving his fleet, the anime announced Tues- 
post later lids month, will be- day. 

come a director and senior ad- The value of the order, the first 

viser of Morgan Stanley Into 1 - purchase of Boemgjeis by KLM, is 
national, the mtematmnal arm estimated at 1.1 billion guilders 
of the privately held interna- (53383 million), according to an 
tjonal investment bank, Mor- airline spokesman. 

. 3 E 2 ass ?k 

S 933 S 2 EgHSdE 

tonal inwKtment hanking, bo spokesman. 

tinning in 1963 ai Morgan et Earlier this year, KLM managp- 

OemParis. meat decided to replace its fleet of 

DG-9s with two types of aircraft, 

one for low-density short routes, 
deputy ""paging director of the and one for busier medium ranges, 
company. In May, the airline announced 

rtw Manhattan Bank has ap- that it had ordered 10 Dutch-bull 

rr Fnifter F-100 oassenser tdanes for 


Cuwilit 

Atom Aluminum 

mow. im ,'w 

SSK=: .i® ’« 

PKStart— — IJn 

IStH-M IMS 1W 

m 

UailcdStues 

American Express 
atdQuor. ins ’*»* 

55^.- ® ® 

Par Shore— OAl 

BM._ S jg 
SSS£^= Ti ’S 

Results Include L ehman 
Bremers Kun n loud 
QSiOcautrefl In AteY. tPH 

Arm co 

Bftsssr- — 

JSfe i= ^ " 

WWW u« W 

Revenue — V*A 
M ik. loMS gS 

Per Snore — 

a: loss. 

Ashland Oil 

3rd Oust. WB JHf 

NT I IK. «U 5W 

Per Snore 1-7* ,jn 

’ » Month* MB Vm 
, Revenue—. 4BKL 

Net me. 10M ft* 

■ per Snore — V* IS* 


Earnings 

Revenue and protlli. in millions, ore/n loenl currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


Page 13 


Onion Camp 

mu OvOr. «» iw 

Revenue 5PJ ! 

Nel me. 54 : 


OJ' 

Irt Half MB 'MJ 

Revenue — «1.3 

Nei Inc 

Pvr Sham. — ' krJ 

Union Pacific 

2 u,0 “ r - iwa 'Sm 

Revenue -,XT. 

NMinC 1J1- 

pei snore — • '0 

WMH JiS 

Revenue iS?. 

run me. -pi 

K*r Snore — SO 4 ■** 

universal Poods 

1KI QVOT. 1VIS W 

SSuSTS. — iim m 

oper nb! — J-g 


tSsssvss 

York branch is a result of Copen- ^^Sr^oSTwiih thercoS SoS U.K. corporate its shorter routes- Tj* 

haown Handeisbank’s decision ear- dnator ,? e 0 5:I TS Moral is bamtina. Hewas ?sq CTant gmeral spokesman said the Boeing 737s 
^T^rS^itsISiiereent. SS? of 3Sd be used on the crime's Eu- 

tTBE«^SbSE JSbranchmParis. topean routes. 


gUi&c IU * .... "V- ~ 

jortflim, Nordic American Bank- 

jag, and the bank’s continuing in- .■ 

CU RRENCY MARKETS 

'overseas brandies in London, Los ■ 

Dollar Mixed in New York, Off in Europe 

ev aanpany, has a^xiinted Lars- ^ . ^ Ift ei anio from SI 3975 Deal- He said the feeble reaction to the 

fkfljEum president erf its OMnpikd by Ov Staff From Dhpmdm tosbewfited positive indicator was “a agn of 

Dutch subsidiary, Pharmacia Ne- NEW YORK - The dollar re- m *** r^SsSlffi sweakness Bow weak the dollar is at the mo- 

s ^dStend BV. bounded in New YoA after mt- “t ^from N o one wants dollars now. 

f Comnereml Ba ok of Kuwait has vous and volatile trading Tuesday political atua- In Tokyo, the dollar closed at 

appointed Mohammed Abdulrab- but dealera said downward pres- 239 Japanese yen, down from 

SnYahya as chief general manag- sure remained despite favorable 240.65 yen Monday. 

a Mr. xahya, who in 1981 was factors for the dollar. Other ^ New Yrak^icra md ^ LondOD, the pound ros e to 

The dollar hsddedinfid in esriier eOT, * BItd ^ 113895 


^ appointed general manager with 

V s, medfic responsibility for the cred- 

it, financial planning and person- 
nd development areas of the bank, 
flpwwig Matt van der Wee, who 
-•vssirtHh "in continue as an adviser to the 
? » '-t*iSE board. 

' - Tt WI n.i— Cn«wws9c InropcT inwst- 


^jj^^dodihodino^or 

European trading. . . oRMO- 23640 Swiss francs, up Aiks, lata ilnllar r 


rose to 
51.3895 


^^ooaliiuje as an aoviser 10 uk d 

b°jtobeax, Europe’s largest invest- Earlier, in European trading the g.665 French frants, down from 

e doDar feD as bearish serrament * 77 * and 1JW7.80 ltahan lire, 
in Tdkyoto beheaded 5 K 2 £Sl- overpowered a positive report downfipm 1^18.10. 

SbL Van Weradi who previous- wflhng to aMadt to abointhe US. economy, currency Among European currenqrtead- 

vJ Robeco’s portfolio manager The volatility m New York wm dealers.said. eWwSrism about the ability of 

Z_ e ihiiAi, a«o caused bv traders and specuiatoTS, _ _ „ 

said the longer-term 


- .5! ivw S^oithcflst Asia. caused by traders ana specuuuuia, - „ w^-oik. MUmine the U.S1 economy to revive strong- 

'• ? Bechtel Qina Inc. has appointed, but dcatoa sai d tee ^ »nn»nncgmenL “But 20 min- ly, coupled with wm^ confident 

is Raymond Portlock president, sue- downward trend was attnbmaMe tee hmOTnomra. it m Washington’s abtety to cut the 

J laic SySncj B. Ford. 10 some gpod ^ by o vmas mal^^ ^ budget dsfidt, art daatm| ™ 

srpwttock moves to Begingfrom mromtions, such as pension funds . ^ weakened." said a deal- buyers, analysts said. (AP, UPJ, 

^S^ ereh '’ raS British potmd er in Frsnltfqtt. *«*”> 


dollar teu as o«tua«_ &.//&; auu *«see™ • 

overpowered a positive report gown from J.918.10. 
about tee US. economy, currency Among European currency trad- 
dealers said. ers, skqindsm about the abtety of 


Bors-Woraar » 

aas- iS ig 8 

oSo «a U 

Ht HMI Mg* .MM N 

RMAUS '■?*. P 

WS&rz SS W S 

Atlantic RichfieW “ 

■haul Aygr nfts iw £ 

toSuSEZ 5J7& 64M. * 

S5tTE:ZZtgll.iOO r 

Par Share — tJB 

ia Half 1« WW 

Rvswwe 11J4Q. l^a 1 

wStiSSr talNM l 

p«r Snare— - * ,D i 

a- loss. IMS non Inctutis f 
chon* °t *U 1 from , 

dtocootlnusd ootralions. p 

CeMmose ! 

SftSST— w ^ 

£S ■ 

HtHOH ,«» ."•? i 

Ravanue 1 JJA 1 -™} i 

OoarNft — “5 2V5 

OP#r Shore-. S2* SJ9 
wf naw axefade oa *» ot**] 
million fro m sate of open- 
Non*. 

Emtiart 

52f^27—“ jsj 7i2 

RJSt£rn Si oao 

MKoU mu ”•* 

Ravanue BJA 

Hat Inc *i ft! 

fsmr jharfl— 14 

nets IntWdm oaht ot SM mV- 
Den tram sate of imtl. 

Exxon 

52^ ^ 

gSSic IS 'iS 

lit HaU IMS IMf 

S2J22L 423a 4MUL 

ESE ■« ■» 

ms no* **eludo dtane at 

SUSmHUen. 

Hwculcs 

jMiQuar. IMS tM4 

sr? t=z 

Par 5nara — OJS US 


in ttait rm 

Revenue — U4 lift . 
Net Inc — WJ | 

per Shares US W< , 
ttUnofi tacmae&nefSB- 1 i 
mlinon from sale of business. 

insenalVRand 
tadQuar. IMS IMS 
Revenue — *»■> 

Net Inc — — 1W JW 
Per Share 

lit Halt MSS IMS 

Revenue — IJJJ 1 

Net Inc »* 

Par Share— 1* 

Johnson Controls 
WtQaar. I® »M* 
Revenue — jjU 3W 
Net Inc — 'g-f* X-jJ 

Per Share— MO 
f Month* ,«« Jgi 

Revenue 

Net int _ — U» 
PerShane— UJ M0 
Kimberly-Clark 
an oear. nu 1MJ 

Revenue ■2L3 

Retire 7U ?5S 

Per Snare — 1^5 ,J9 

U» HaH ’MS . Hgf 

Revenue — M}t 

*K ** 

rwirriMa 

Koppors 

MdOvar. Wg M« 

rimiw — , «5M *Tri 

Net inc lalHO 

• Par Snare — — 0-« 

» BBSt MW Bite 

I 5S?T2? I01SU to 

P 0 f — dflv 

| a: ML IMS nets incti&o to* 
SSw &Vfll7?mllfionln 

*..u loti i-nwinfll flit i/I* 


New York times 
JBdQuar, im imj 

Revenue — 3*M 30U 

Net me 21 J 771 

Par snare — a?S 070 

id Had IMS 1M» 

towenue — »><3 

Pef Shore — U2 

Ocd dental Pet. 
MdQBnr IMS im 

5 «S— VgL 3JS1 

Net inc 13W l*t» 

Par Share— U7 075 

lit Halt ms W 

Revenue — . 7rBO WOO 

Net inc — UU »la 
Per Share— BJt ■•7° 

oiln 

and Qoor. IMS iw 

Revenue — gg 

Net inc iU* "5 

Per 5m»c— 0S5 

lit HaH IMS JM* 

Revenue *37.5 *3*2 

Net IBC Mj§ £2 

Per Share— IJ* 134 

Penn Central 

w<w- «« JS5 


eludes lots of UJ million 
trom discontinued opera- 
tions. 


McDonald's ’ 

SadQuar. IMS J* 1 

Revenue ,**M f 

Net Inc l”-M ’“5 I 

PerSnara — w *•** t 
ta Half t*5 

Revenua 1^“^ .VSS 

Mai inc. 301.45 iwjv ; 

P^srSriZ; ui 2J7 \ 

Merrill Lynch j 

MdOuar. IMS MM . 

Per Shore — Bi* 

lit HaH IW 

Revenue — USA IJSi 

Nil inc InllO 

Per Share — 137 

allots. 

3 M 

Wflwr. wia 1 * 

K- © © 

Per Snore— IM IM 

SSL— X © 

MoMI 

T-|| A . UM IMS HM 

BL£Se IASOO. 1W 

MS&5= ^ © 

lit Half 1« ’M 

Revenue SUM- 

Met inc 731 J 76LB 

Per Sham— 1J* 1J0 

Morrison- Knudsen 
2 nd Quar. HW t"{ 

Revenue «U 

Net I nc l H JA 

Per snare Ul MO 

Revenue «!■* *•" 

Net inc 17J 3U 

1 Per Share— '-61 'iO 


SEr 1 *S 

Per Share— AjS6 

lit HaH «« ,3^ 

Revenue — 'J™; 

Nes inc. 712 *M 

Per Share — 1J7 1.W 

Nets include mum g «^ 
minion vs ssi 17 million m 
morion. 

PepUco 

Br= I I 

°M»«- ^ 

IH HOH ,1«5 

Revenue IMA WnL 

Op er Net — 17*-£ 77JI 
Oper Share— ta* U3 
PMbro-Soloman 
w Quar. lfflS IMS 

Revenue fclSCL 

Nel inc HU 103“ 

KistSr?!: a« 068 

lit Half WM IM* 

Revenue 1M3L , %S° 0 

Net inc — 78^ ana 

Per Shore — 1AI 1A7 

Philip Morris 
2nd Qatar. IMS MM 

SUSS— 3JH1 leia 

Net me 321-1 

Per Snare— =M 110 
IH HaH tm WM 

Revenue 7AJA UMl 

Net Inc — *701 4C^ii 

per snare— ABO 326 

PMlIlps Pet. 

SpdQuar. IMS MM 


Ration Purina 
am Ouor. ms IM* 
Revenue 1J» 

MSS- & ™ 

wsSrTZ 1*7 wn 

Reynolds ind. 

TndOuar. im »M 

Revenue 3-tOO. 1J60 

Net inc ^ 

Per Shore — IS* A 65 
1U HaH IMS MM 

Rptiinu - — 6 J 00 . 6 JX 

EnSr“ 4W0 *fiS 

Per Share — 133 '•* J 

Per snare results reHated ler 
Ststar-I soht. 

SafKO 

2nd Quar. 1*05 IMI 

W.? «S.7 

Oner Nel — 3^** »* 

Doer Snare- 033 155 

IH HaH ,«M 1WJ 

DauMUD 1.1211 

swi 

Oper Snare— 1^7 1^3 

ScharlnQ-Ploooh 

1 2 nd Quar. IMS MM 


Revenue 17S3 

Nel inc 513 «* 

Per Shore — 1A1 

let HaH MM l«* 

Revenue **W> *611 

Nel Inc 10W 101 - 

Per Snare— 101 “0 


5S’SS’= ^ ^ 

Per Snare — 03* 1® 

Kt — 216 A «« 
Per Share— 034 1*2 

PSA 

BISS— X iS 

Nel Inc 737 ITS 

IU HaH IMS MM 

Nel Inc — 722 IOI1.1J 

Per Share — 0.74 — 

a loss. Per share resvIHjn- 

ttr payment ot preferred dli£. 

iSsadsotSiM million in l*S 
SZTnranrf JM million m 
iSwauarfor. MSU preferred 
gMdtQd^mro S3J3 million 
and SX0 million. 

Quaker State Oil 

Bad QtKST. IMS 19M 

BBS?— 

Net Inc 1T33 Jj32 

Per Share — 035 OJI 

IU Halt MM IMJ 

Revenue 4802 Ml L4 

Net Inc 1*2 '76* 

Per Share— OJW 


Sea-Land * 

2 nd Quar. IMS MB4 JJ 

Revenue *'** J S-s P 

Nel inc 160 775 

Per Share — 034 114 J 

M HaH MM IM* „ 

BTTSrzr % ft* ; 

Per Shore— 03* 126 J 

Seem, Roebuck * 

SS®ST- *2£ *!2S! . 

Per snare — 17? 0.W , 

lit HOH tm ItjH I 

Revenue — lljoa 1731 a 

Nel inc *M3 S«3 

Per Share — IU J- 1 * 1 
sods metuae ooina of EU 1 
million vs .»«/, mtJtJ^Z.'Jl , 
ouortmr and of f 1 1 l i* l, KE , 
vs SUT.1 million m noH. im 
nem also include earn 01 SSt I 
million. 

Slnaer 

n, Quar. 1*15 IM* 

BvSXS— 5512 SOU 
Oner Nel — W 1 1 •* 

Oner Short— 031 031 

1 st HaH IMS MM 

BJSSa— 1.160, 

Oner Nel 3U 

Oner Snore— 130 
me nets 

CM million in auoner and or 
S9.T million in hod 

SmltbKHne Beckman 
2 nd Quar IMS 1M4 

Revenue 770.7 j)15 

Net Inc Ml * >•“ 

Per Snare — 1-M '30 

IU HaH MBS MM 

1 Revenue 13*- '<Sg-3 

. Net Inc - — 2532 2M ■ 

. Per Share — 320 3.11 

; sttiwesf Airlines 
■ 2 nd Ouor. IMS 1*M 

1 Revenue 1®*3 1373 

1 Nel me M-* i 3 .! 

per Shore — 035 0 *7 

Iff HOH IMS 1HJ 

. Revenue — 305 J 3W.« 

I Net Inc — — M3 MJ 
» Per Share — 033 032 

1 Sterling Drug 

* 2 nd Qoor IMS IM* 

* BIBB— 

* Net inc nsi 

» Pw Share— 035 Oil 


SS._ jW S 
SSK,r= IS “S 

leas results restated 

Third National 
am Quar. IMS MM 
Nel inc — , *3® *65 

per Snare — 125 ' 

lu HaH MM MM 

Net Inc r ; « l§4l 

Par Slwre — 230 —6 

Tiger int'i 

1 ml Aciar. IW 19M 

KtSS'— 7792 »2; 

Nrl inc. — »a»102 06» 

Per Shore— - 003 

lit Moll MM MM 

Revenue — 5*92 5*6* 

Net Loss — 143* 6J 

a loss. r«M nrh melude lets 
at S IV million tram aaconr.n- 
ved ooerauom. 

Transom erica 
2nd Ouor IMS MM 

Rovenoe 12 W 5273 

Nel inc **35 532 

Per Shore — 0.70 0 63 

lu HaH JW MM 

, Revenue — 4 JW. 

Nrl inc 5 2: I15J8 

I Per Share— 123 1.70 

i eyijpMh nerj mciude pouii ot 
, if* i mi-'flon vs J3S2 million. 

Ittl ovortrr net also M.uOei 
I ooln m U f million. 

i Union Carbide 

2 nd Ouor. IMS JM* 

. Revenue -410 

‘ Not inc. 101-0 1-60 


Oper Snore- 03B DM 
o Aiuuiim t IMS 1M4 

B!S5-_ 3551 ng 

dpoi Net — liiB 
Ourr Shorts >3* 1 

ms nets esclude itsses s» 
tssSJOO ‘n goarfrr ana at 
usZMHnfmontta ttomoif- 
continued operations and 
Urn el St f tmmori 

Vulcan Materials 
ton Ouor. ,1*M JM* 
Revenue — M l » ^*1 

Net inc 253. 

Per snare — =23 —1 

la Halt IMS I*** 

BBS— «•» ^ 

W&sr. "t5 Vt5 

Walt Dlsnay Prod. 

3rd floor. IMS IIM 

544* 4CJ 

Nel Inc 424 45* 

Per Share— ] 3o 1 -* 

* Manna IMS 1*M 


Revenue 1 « *•'* 

Nd inc ''*■■ *414 

Per Share — Jil **3 


Per Share — 1 24 133 

IU HaH IMS WJf 

BMtnuf *330. *330 

Net inc. l“0 2»n 

Per snort— 1*5 131 

Quarter nets uielvde 0O.ru ct 
Sis million vs Ilf million 
from so>e el Businesses 

union Electric 
2nd Quar. IMS ™. 

Revenue — »J*d J*M 

Net inc 851* M3? 

Per Share — 023 D-l 

ill Hall IMS 1*M 

liS? ^ 

Per Share — 1*1 ij- 

Per snore results otter ore 

lerred a-vdends 

Utd Bks Colorado 
XdOw. 1M» I*** 

Net inc 00. .82 

Per Share — 077 0.7a 

IU Hull IMS IM* 

NCI inc J5-1 154 

Per snare 1*5 140 


if £4 e-monin net includes 
earn at Vo I mill.en Iren 
eponoe in aceountina 

Waste Management 
2nd Quar. »M1 l«* 

Revenue 389 1 BC3 

Nd inc *'■■ m™ 

Prr Snore— 03* 04fl 

IU Halt .IMS IM* 

Revenue ^33 5BS B 

Net me t?3* m— 

Per Share — 121 

Western Airline* 

-nd Quar. IMS IM 4 

Revenue — W’ ,-ln? 

Nel Inc 31.7IOHJ. 


Rtwnve— 1S7* 2*3* 

Nel Inc 31.7IOHJ. 

Per Shore — 0*7 “ 

1st HaH IMS IMI 

SvISSo—. 64*0 »-? 
Nei me — — *52 iOIJC. 


2 nd Quar. IMS JM* 

Revenue *813 tftl 

Net me 4*4* 3*32 

Pee Share — 1*4 '■“t 

IU HOH WM IM* 

Revenue i.es Ml * 

Net Inc — - »■§ 5734 

Per Shore— 228 

Ui. Home 

laa Qoor. IMS IMI 

Revenue 2*36 28a0 

Net inc 04* CalSi 

Per Snare — CJ2 — 

Ul HaU IMS IM* 

Revenue — *455 »6* 

Net Loss — 231 «■•* 

a: loss, nets include taint 01 
sfmxo vs uiaiuc m auarter 
%d ot SSJ vs 91} million in 
noH. 

U3. West 

vm Quar, IMS IM* 

rSS , __ L«n 1410 

wet me 2414 203-* 

Per Share — 233 -'3 

IU Halt IMS l*M 

Revenue 3340. 15*0 

Hoi Inc *»3 *060 

Per Snare — sa *-3 


Revenue 64*0 »12 

Nei me *0)34.. 

Per snore — l ** — 

0 . loss l«5 nets include to* 
ereum at inmiuU" m Quar- 
ter o ndotS23.lmii.dn in nail 

wnlem Co. America 
2nd Quar. IMS IM* 

Revenue 1324 1*V. 

Net loss 1^6* ■»■■* 

IU no It .IMS m» 

tSir Hb S 

western SAL Assn. 
M Quar. t*« *Mf 

Net Inc 'l33 J4 

Per Share. — 2*3 6-3 

III H»H ’MS IM* 

Net Int 2003 6 .M 

Per Snort — 3tl u — 
WcverTiaeuser 
2nd Quar. I«u WM 

RB.er.uc — If* 14-0 


Net 1 nr !.‘*0 

Per Share — 0 1 ' 073 

IU HOH .I*** .'.W 

Re.mue "Af?, lain 

Net me *W 1*037 

Per Snore — 065 0«4 

Zenith Electronics 

Qunr. IMS IM* 

Revenue — IMS *740 

Nei inc «Jl43 Jft* 

Per snare — — 0-»* 

IU Hall W I*** 

Revenue 77M 7V6.7 

NOI inc — 30* 

Per Stare— 015 1J8 

a loss itSS Quarter results 
restated 


T uesday ^ 

arc 










































































ACROSS 
1 Touch endwise 
5 Ann and May 
18 Angel's bad 
news 

14 One of the R's, 

synonymously 

15 Type of type 

16 Hebrew month 

17 Laceration 

18 Palindromic 
title 

19 Sheet-music 
marking 

28 Single-combed 
fowl 

23 Put on guard 

24 Novel: Prefix 

25 Legislative 
council 

27 Popular bread 
form 

29 Abbr. on a map 

32 River craft 

33 Skirt style 

34 Prefix at 
NASA 

35 Doyle classic 

38 “Let’s 

Again,” Cosby- 
Poi tier film 

39 Sub in a tub 

48 Winnie Winkle' 
of comics, e.g. 

41 In the Army 
for three yrs. 

42 Sought 


43 Caught a 

glimpse of 

44 Broadcast 

45 Simp 

4€ 'Bamateam 

53 Proof of 

oxidation 

54 Harry’s mom 

55 Set of rules 

57 In addition 

58 Playful 
mammal 

59 Like Steven? 

60 Downhill racer 

61 Lustful looks 

62 Thrill, mod 
style 

DOWN 

1 Danish district 

2 Former ring 
king 

3 Osmonds' 
home 

4 Discarded or 
bounced 

5 Tripod item 

6 Once more 

7 Goalies 'gear 

8 Relative of etc. 

9 System of 
meaning • 

19 Sal of the 
diamond 

11 Kitchen 
tempter 

12 The aid for 
Karpov 

13 Brought up 


21 Went out with 

22 Teachers' org. 
25 Golden Fleece ' 

searcher 

28 Up to the time 
that 

27 Longed for 

28 many 

words 

29 Frantic fracas 

30 Pollster's 
discovery 

31 “And - 

bed”: Pepys 

32 Herring barrel 
■33 Eight furlongs 
34 Stratagems 

36 “I am very 

loath to be 

. . Shak. 

37 In 

(troubled) 

42 Gawain's title 

43 Devices on 
destroyers 

44 Behaved 

45 No-bope type 

46 Very, in 
Versailles 

47 Pea pod 
48Startof N.C.'s 

motto 

49 An arachnid 

50 Cloy 

51 Noah's scout 

52 Jeannie 
portrayer 

56 He’s on the line 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maieska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


PEANUTS 


o 

o 








‘rUU'RE uJELCOME 



BLOND IE 



| PRETTY GdOOh 
HUH ? 


did you see i /-» rr H 

THAT BALL < ( WASN'T] 
r FLV •> J * — ' V THE i 

c ball] 


BEETLE BAILEY 

rteKefc \» g °- 4 gee! itsavs 


youR 

ROOM, 

SARGEJ 


’‘HOME'/ 


1 9 £3 

Ira® « 




THE 0LP BRASS BED— 
THE WALLPAPER... 
THE WASHSTAND... 



rr was vquw< 

WWSTWKICH 




IF VOU \ WOULD V©U HAVE 

HEED AN "UHCLE SAAA 

AMVTHING / V/Af4T5YfcXJ" 




& 


ANDY CAPP 


C itmwh-mnor mmpmw .ite 
Onl * New* Amence Si«e>caM 


| ON 

in 


* ** 
* * 


WIZARD of II) 




THEREAf^NTAhfV \ * 
HAS8>*ipi1>Rfl£T RULES \ V: 
F' GETTING RH>cr THIS 1 * 
LA&>»taos«N3Tl«E f," 
~ JUST HARD ONES^/ V 

s '^§10^ 


so,m Tie 

1T6OHGT0 


m 



X 

HWJ1 V 
IfoHCVfeOF 

<mmw( 


REX MORGAN 


Y€S — FIRST,* I V 
DID TOMPKINS ) CALL DR. MORGAN'S M I'LL 
ASK FOR ME, I OFFICE f HIS NURSE '-~ r - w 
V JEAN? VsaID IT WAS URGENT ' I I 

■VrMS*^r> 1 THOUGHT THAT'S 1 M 
■ If rWtfW WHERE YOU WERE IBwcU Y 

I I'X M 


I WAS 'TELL THE BOSS THAT 
I'LL BE'WfTH HIM IN JUST A . 
FEW MINUTES i 


I wonder what 

MISS GALE WANTS Z 


BOOKS 


ACTS OF WILL; 

The Life and Work of Otto Rank 

By £ James Lieberman. 485 pages. S 24.95 , 
The Free Press, 866 Third Avenue, Mm' 
York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Paul Roazen 

O TTO RANK was a brilliant psychologist. 

one of the founders of 20th-century depth 
psychology. He stands with Freud. Jung and 
Adler as an explorer of the unconscious, but 
has only now been rewarded with a compre- 
hensive biography. Before the falling out be- 
tween Rank and Freud in the tdd-1920s. Rank 
bad spent far longer in Freud's circle than any 
other of the so-called dissidents in the history 
of psychoanalysis. Rank was the first Freudian 
to analyze arL He was Full of fascinating ideas, 
though he expressed himself in prose that 
proved too dense for most readers. 

For almost 20 years, he functioned in Vienna 
as Freud's personal favorite: He served as 
Freud's assistant and secretary to the Vi enna 
Psychoanalytic Society, as well as undertaking 
his own writings. Rank was so dose to Freud as 
to be almost a son, and the other psychoanalyt- 
ic leaders were jealous of bis special position. 

Once Freud feO ill with cancer in 1923, there 
was bound to be a problem with his chosen 
successor, for, contrary to expectations. Freud 
lived an for 16 years. As he struggled to hold 
Rank within the psychoanalytic movement, 
other analysts, especially Ernest Jones, stigma- 
tized every original idea of Rank's as heresy. 

Eventually, Rank established his own fol- 
lowing, notably at the Pennsylvania School of 
Social Wart As a therapist, be was far more 
optimistic than orthodox analysts of the time. 
He advocated shorter analyses, and the use of 
termination dates, as a way of speeding psy- 
chotherapy. He was altogether more interested 
in the here-and-now of his patients than the 
Freudian ideal of reconstructing the past 
He sounds like a contemporary of ours in his 
dubiousness about the therapeutic power of 
rational insight. He highlighted the signifi- 
cance of emotional reliving rather than the 
place of reason in therapy. He was a pioneer in 
revising Freud’s notions erf* female psychology, 
and in recommending as attitude to “cure” 
that was flexible instead of static. 

E. James Lieberman sot only revives the 
human meaning of lunik’s concepts but docu- 
ments an important chapter in the history of 
psychoanalyse, for. once out of the fold of 
Freud’s faithful followers. Rank was branded 


Sointibn to Previous Puzzle 


Boos aaaao □□□□ 
Eonm □□nan manta 
□Eno □□□□□ naan 
DEEsnnrnmtanaaaamQ 
□□□a mam 
ann □□□aana □□□ 
□moon ana □□□□ 
cnaannaasaaaaaa 
bedo ana maaom 
□cm mamammm amm 
□mm aamm 
EcanamaaQaanaam 
□obq maaam aama 
nonE naasD qbqb 
dedd aaaam □□□□ 


as insane. There is no evidence of menial . 
illness but as late as 1957 the eminent aide 
Lionel Trifling wroie in a New York Times 
review of Jones’s authorized biographv of 
Freud that Rank had died insane. 

Lieberman ‘s biography is thorough and eta. 
sdentious. The early discussion of Rank's ado- 
lescent diary is particularly moving. Liebo, ' 
man might have explored further ifc 
remarkable personality of Rank's first wife. 
Tola, who after their separation became a lead, 
ing child analyst in Boston. Others vriH h, 
assessing Rank s stature, pay more attention to 
the legitimate contributions of earlier psycho, 
analytic “heretics.'' such as Jung. 

Paul Roazen. the mhor of "Helene Darxh- 
A Psychoanalysis Life.” wore this renew for the ^ 
Los Angeles Times. j 


BEST SELLERS 


The New YorJ. lian 

TTnsfisi ishaed on reports from mote Z.tJW bpcLstnft 
ibxcogbcul the Umicd States. WYcL. oa b>\ an not vassal 

consranivc 


7Vb Lot *«fa 

Week Widali, 

1 SKELETON CREW, bv Stephen King .1 j 

2 THE HUNT FOR R£D OCTOBER, bv 

Tom Clancv • . 3 It 

3 THE CIDER HOUSE RULES. h> L-bn 

Irving — 2 4 

4 THE FOURTH DEADLY SIN. b> Lin- 

n w> Sudcn - — 1 

5 LONESOME DOVE, bv Larrv McMnrtn a 4 

6 TUBAL SACKETT. bv Louis L’Amour .. 6 q 

7 HOLD THE DREA.Vf. by BartxuM TaiLir 

Bradford — 5 10 

S IF TOMORROW COMES. b> Sidnc;,- 

Sbetdon — 7 a 

9 THINNER, bv Ricbard B^ditnan .... S 3 

10 A CATSKILL EAGLE, bv Robcn B 

Parker - I. 1 ! 

I! INSIDE. OUTSIDE. bv Herman Wcmk .. 13 13 ' 

12 FALL FROM GRACE, bv Lam CotL-cs - | 

13 THE LOVER, bv Manucrile Dhqs .... — i ' 

14 CHAPTERHOUSE DUNE by Frank 

Herbert !1 W 

15 FOOTFALL, by Lam Niven and Jem 

PMirncDe — J 

NONFICTION 

1 YEAGER: An Autobiography, br Chuck 

Yeager and Leo Janos 2 2 

2 1ACOCCA: An Autobiography . bv Lee la- 

cocca with William Novak . I a 

3 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Pom and Nancv Auson 3 11 

4 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES. 

by Coenefl Cowan and Mdvyn Kinder .. 4 It 

5 MARTINA, by Martina Naviatilova with 


George Vccscv . 

6 LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Boscag- 

lia 6 47 

7 NUTCRACKER, bv Sbana Alexander . - 15 J 

8 MOUNTBATTEN. bv PhiUp Zaxfcr 7 8 

9 CONFESSIONS OF A HOOKER. b> Bob 

Hope with Dwayne Nell and 5 JO 

10 THE DANGEROUS SUMMER, by Er- 
nest Hemingway — — 4 

11 THE SOONG DYNASTY, by Siering 


12 BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
kady N. Shevchenko K 

13 THE HEART OF THE DRAGON, bv 

Alasdair Clsyxc $ 

14 MY MOTHER'S KEEPER, by B.D Hy- 

15 ^E BRIDGE ACRO^ FORFVTR . in " 

Richard Bach . 10 

ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 DR. BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER 

DIET, by Stuart M. Berger | 

2 THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jeff 

Smith ^ — — — 2 

3 NOTHING DOWN, bv Robert G. Alien 4 

4 SMART COOKIES DON'T CRUMBLE. 

bv Sonya Frirdman 5 

5 WEBSTER'S NINTH NEW COLLE- 
GIATE DICTIONARY 3 


BRIDGE 


*lT WAStfT A VERY GOOD VERSION 
OF W-WHSON TODAY/ 


»)Yf 15" THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Hand Arnold and Bob Lna 


Unscramble those tour Jumbtea, 
one letter to each square, to form 
ftnr onfriary words. 


THECK 


HIWSS 




GARFIELD 



By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal. 
West opened with three 


drove him to slam. Six dia- 
monds was not totally safe, for 
V/ West opened with three g faad led his spade roit, 
spades. His nand was far from ^ P* have taken 

typical, but such tactics will t.^rr 1 ^ 

ofum succeed in their disrup- and sufferai a heart ruff at the 
tiveaim. secondtncL 

As it turned oul he was put- But West led a dub. and 

ting his head into the lion's South had no trouble. He won 
mouth: North was waiting in his hand and played trumps, 
with open jaws, hoping for a When the queen fefl conve- 


whh open jaws, hoping for a 
contract of three spades dou- 


bled. But this would have net- 
ted at best 900 points, and 
probably less. 

North-South did better 
when South reopened with 
four diamonds, and his partner 


NORTH 

+AQM5 

eAJtna 

OAK 

•XI 


if® ■ 

♦QS7S5 *W2 , 

SOUTH 

*7 

CK» ^ 

0 JI09S73 

4SAJ43 • 1 

Neither dte to n burt blt The 


niently, he led to the heart king 
and drew the missing trump. 
With the heart queen marked 
on his right, he daimed an 
overtrick for 940, announcing 
a ruffing finesse agaist the 
heart queen. 


Wm North EMt South 

3* Pw» Pmta 40 

PW 4* Pm 39 

Pan «* Pass Pan' 


Wen led the dub Ore. 


BROTED 


CRIONI 


WHAT THE 
FISHERMAN TURNED 7 , 
TV EXECUTIVE KNEW j 
HOW TO MAKE. 


Now arrange the ebriad lettera to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Answer here: THE “ C X T T 


Yesterday's 


{Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbtec MANGY VILLA FONDLY COMPEL 
Answer. A guy who's busy coping has no time for 
this — MOPING 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Alee me 

Amsterdam 

ATMes 


Casta Del Sal 

DutoUa 


tun Palmas 

LDMa 

Leaden 


ZMrttM 

MIDDLE E I 

Mum 

Better 

DamaKH 

i en r e a i e m 

Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Aaddaatf 

Srdaar 


LOW 

c P 

22 73 fr 

U 57 fr 

24 7S fi- 
le 64 fr 

II 52 Ir 

15 3 e 

14 41 cl 

14 41 fr 

34 57 fr 

U sr fr 
21 70 It 

f 4S a. 

M t 

19 44 fr 
17 43 a 

11 ffl fr 
7 45 »r 
71 70 tt 
21 70 d 

21 70 fr 

12 M tr 

20 U fr 

17 43 fr 

15 59 a 
12 54 fr 

22 73 fr 

12 54 sh 
14 41 a 

13 55 a 
7 45 d 

Z3 73 fr 
9 48 0 

11 a d 
17 43 fa- 
17 43 h- 
13 55 sh 
13 55 fr 


28 82 12 54 ti 

34 97 15 59 fr 

» TV 17 «3 Jr 


LOW 
_ . C P 
BaoeMK 30 84 34 7S St 

aoiitne 34 n 23 73 0 

Heoo Kens 33 91 25 77 cl 

Manila 34 93 2S 77 0 

New Deni 33 91 34 79 ci 

Saoei 30 84 24 75 d 

SMnetal 32 90 2S 77 fr 

StMOPOK 30 84 26 79 a 

TaM 31 M 24 75 d 

Tokyo 34 *3 34 75 <r 

AFRICA 

Algiers 29 14 17 63 fr 

Cam — — — — no 

Cape Town — — — — na 

Casablanca 34 93 23 73 fr 

Harare 3g 48 11 52 fr 

Looos — IK 

NefreM 25 77 9 48 d 

Toole 33 91 19 44 fr 

LATIN AMERICA 

BoaoofAlns 14 57 11 52 a 

Caracas 28 13 21 70 far 

Lima — — — — no 

MtotceCttr 23 73 14 57 d 

Riede Janeiro — — no 

NORTH AMERICA 

AttSiaran 16 61 10 so sh 

Afloita 30 84 23 73 si 

BMon 28 82 17 63 fr 

Chicago 28 12 12 54 fr 

Deaver » 82 14 57 pc 

Detroit 26 79 » 50 fr 

HamAlbl 31 88 23 73 fr 

Hous to n 34 91 23 73 PC 

Lm Angela 29 M 20 68 to 

Miami 30 86 24 75 sf 

MlquMOoBf 31 18 15 59 fr 

MaotreeS 28 73 14 61 hr 

Nassae 30 84 21 70 it 

New rent » U 18 64 *r 

Sw Frendaco 19 64 13 55 pc 

Sanffle 25 77 13 53 fr 

Taranto 22 72 13 5S fr 

Wadlnetoe 29 84 10 44 pc 

oovettast; pc-partty doudv; r-rabi: 


addend 14 61 9 48 fr 

rdaey 14 57 10 50 tfi 

d-ctovidv; fa-foggy.* fr-f olr; frh all; 
sfyshawan; naanaw; M-eJormy. 


WEDNESDAY’S FORECAST — CHANNEL; Smooth. FRANKFURT: Ooutfy. 
TJmaM-14 r77- 57J. LO N TON : Cloudy . 24-13 {75—55). 6UDRID: 
(97—66). NEW TO Bit: Fair. Tema. 29—18 


thunderstanns. TemiL 34 —M (97—66). NEW YORK: Fair. Tema. 29—18 
84 — 44). PARIS: Cloudy. Temp. 27— 14 (81 — 57). ROME: Fair. Tom 5— *1 
93 — ‘70I.TCL AOTV: NKHIRiqi: Fair, Ten*. ft— 130*9 — HL smokos: 
JTiwndersfeniaj Tenw. 31—25 (W— 77). HONS KOMC: Fair. Temp. 32 — T 
190--eu. MANILA: Ratn.Temn.31 — 24 (18— 75). SEOUL: Fair Tom ffl — 2 
JM-Tf). SIHUPORE; Thuncierstanre. Tonw. »-2T|8t_S) ? 

Oowfy.Temu.31— 23188— 73). 


WiHd Stock Markete 

Via Agence France-Presse July 23 

Oomg prica in local avrmdet unless othawae indicated. 


ABN 

ACF HoWlna 
Arean 
AKZO 
AheW 
AMEV 

A-Oam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

BuetirmannT 
Calood HkJo 
Elsevter-NDU 
RAJbsr 
GWBrocwtM 
Helneken 
Heoeavens 
KLM 

NaaTOen . 

NatNedder 
NedHaya 
Oce Vender G 
Pakhoad 
PMltoa 
Robeco 
Rodomco 
Rollnai 
Rorwrfo 
Royol Dutch 
Unuever 
venommeran 
VmP Stork 
VNU 

ANPJCBS Gear Index : 218.18 
Pravfeas : 219JB 


Arimd 
Bekoert 
Cocked II 


EBES 

GB-nmo-BM 
OBL 
Gevaert 
Hoboken 
Infercam 
KredRtbank 
Petreflna 
Sac Generate 
Safina 
Sotvoy 

Tradton Elec 
UCB 

Unwg 

VWIte Mantagne 

Cwra af SM Index : 231141 
Previm : 231M2 


Hooch 
Horten 
Himeel 
IWKA 
Kail +Sol* 

Kantodt 
Kaufbaf 
Kioecfcnar H-O 
KloecXner Warfce 
Kruno SMil 
Unde 
Lufttwraa 
MAN 

Mannesmann. 

sis*-* 

PKI 

Poncho 

Pra^eaa 

•RWE 

Rhetnmetan 
:Schedna 
SEL 
Siemens 
Thyseen 
Veoo 

Voaswooenwvrk 
Wtrila 

Cowim ouxi nk index : 
Prevlotm : 1414A9 


HIvridSM 
Kloof 
Nedbank 
Pres Stern 

IJHjtena 
West Hofdtaa 


2375 2400 

7^ 

^ JraS 

1480 1450 

M' 

3300 3350 
443 650 

NA. — 


5TC 12 » 

Std Chartered 459 <74 

Sen Alliance 456 461 

Tate mid Lyle <55 <55 

Tesco 248 241 

Thorn EMI 319 319 

T.l. Group 319 32S 

T ratal oar Hse 363 365 

THF 120 121 

Ultromcr 205 2M 

Unflevert 1021 73210 45/64 

United BiscuHs 1 44 140 

Vlcken 2S0 M0 

W ootworth 425 423 

P.T.38 Index : tlt.l* 

Previous : rase 
F.TAJLI8* Index : TZ32.18 
P rvr l sui : uii.ie 


Cow Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 
How Per 
lnchcape 
MaJ Ban khm 
OCBC 
OUB 
DUE . 

SbanorWo 
Sim Darby 
SJaroLond 
frnoro Frees 
fStownshlp 
St Trading 
UgtadOrararas 

straits Times lad ID 
Previous : 749X1 


2AS 246 
t5S 155 
■ SAC 51 5 
2.15 115 
HU. 231 
£85 535 
U) 855 
285 286 
162 253 
NJQ. — 
152 152 | 
259 252 

STD 555 
995 059 
382 386 , 

188 1J9 

386 386 


ranpestfeMedi Index : 111651 
Pravie u s : niue 


Sevens "S 


23995 24450 
3289 3260 
10200 10430 I 
2«0 2700 

is nss 

13700 13*70 

<111 «M2 


Am Dairies 
Barclays 


U4 134 

377 384 

5<1 554 

55 305 

323 315 

194 ifg 


fh Mhfat 


| T, 5»-2 

I. TOKYO 


AEG-Talefunksn 
Allianz Vers 
Altana 
BASF 

Bay Hypo Bank 
Bay Verefnsbank 
BBC 

BHF-Bwik 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Coni Gunwnl 
Daimler -Benz 
Degussa 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bonk 
Dre san er Bonk 
GHH 
H aro e n er 
Hocmtef 


131 13250 
M05 1395 
36480 37S 

219 221 

3W 371 
409 413 

Z£A 2U 

S 33 ^??- 

*2 417 

2950 227 

14450 146 

64250 88550 
347 371 

15580 156 

58280 28550 
28080 28350 
'*« W 
3M 301 JO 
425 610 


Owing Kang 
China Light 
Green Island 
Hcng Seng Bank 
f lendersen 
China Got 
HK Electric 
UK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 

Bssssjr 1 

»?»•' 
ffitdi Whampoa 
Hymn 
urn city 

J online 
Jardlne Sec 
Kawioan Motor 
Miramar HaW 
New World 

SSTpST™ 

steivx 

Swire Pacific A 
Taf Cheung 
WohKwang 
WieetockA 
Wing On Co 
Winsar 
World Inn 


..22 2240 

ms ibjo 

1680 1640 
640 640 

4L50 44 

2425 245 

'IS ,u ? 

» 37^ 
6£0 640 
755 7J0 
985 9JB 
350 175 
6J0 6J0 

27.10 2740 

® $$ 

1250 UB 

UO &m 

31 38 

775 780 
2.125 115 
1330 13433 
250 3 

263 263 
•> ,ms 285 
090 050 

Suso. — 
174 2 

SJB 5 
225 225 


|)CC 194 in 

BL JJ Si 

Blue arete 835 533 

BOC Group 267 367 

gaols 183 1B4 

Bawator Indus m 2B8 

BP sag 513 

BrltHomeSt 2B2 282 

BrH Tstecom 163 1S5 

Bril Asrosioce 306 211 

Brltoll 201 203 

5 TR . 315 314 

Bwmati 282 285 

Cable Wireless 525 525 


Banea Conan 

Central® 

Oeaholeb 

Cred ttal 

ErWonto 

Furotliuita 

Full 

Flnsfder 

C ensro ii 

IFI 

Ita Ice mend 

ItaJgas 
ttalmohincrt 
Meriiabaneo 
i Mordedlson 
Olivetti 

Br 

Rinaseaite 

SIP 

SME 

Snla 


KUtS5?TSr“ ;ls " 



AGA 

AMO Laval 

AMO 

Astra 

Alias Caoco 
Boliden - 
Electrolux 
Ertajon 
Eswlte 

Hcndetaboalcen 

P h otnv u Uo 

SwjMtefaMotd, 


ii5 m 
i97 m 
316 329 

M * 

164 147 

715 TO 

55 Si 
200 200 

fua. 227 


Codbory Sritw 
Charter On 
Commerc ia l U 
Cons Gold 
CoorTquids 

825^ 

Beers* 

Dbtljiera. 

Dnfffomcin 

Fiaons 

F« S .GWI 

Gkao i 

srar** 

Hansen 

JtaMr 


145 144 

183 115 

210 213 

487 491 

13 131 

393 39S 

551 SC 

275 278 

623 Wi S2» 

—5? 321 

S25H 52444 

148 148 

616 fin 

2M 21] 

120/441217/64 
»3 294 

720 725 

245 ao 

ra 830 

187 186 

343 341 

686 617 


i mperial Grom 165 164 

Jaguar 255 254 

LMSeairilln 27] <m 

Laoal General 679 684 

L iards Bank 393 m 

unrna 765 144 

ManismidSn ^ ie 

as,ss« a w> w, 

Nat West Bank 477 679 


^ £8 


Anglo American 2950 

1 Anglo Am Gold 17000 1 

Barlows 1225 

Bfyuaor ^ 

BdftelS 

DrBeers ius 


'& m 

1440 1400 
3100 3150 


PandO 338 354 

P Wdngt aa 271 271 

Pl ene y 143 ug 

Prudential 662 449 

» smSS- % 

w* 373 373 

M inn LS7 

Reuters 271 

Rovm Dutch t .4253/64 43>, 

RT2 £17 544 

faatgii 6« tv 

Satesburv 312 31 

Soars hdMInas 93 

Shell 648 a 


AlrLtaulde 
Alfttwm AH. 

Ay Dassault 
Banco Ire 
BIC 

BonoraJn 

HESS’ 

Carrefeur 
Oiarpeurs 
OuaMed 
Dartv 
Du max 

Elf-Aqullalne 

Eurena l 

Gen Ecu* 

Hochetto 

LofaraaCap 

Legrand 

Lesiew 

roraol 

MarteJI 

Matra 

Merlin 

Mictwiln 

MoetHemwsY 

MautlMK 
Ocddenfole 
Pernod Rk: 
Perrier 
Peugeot 

Prlfi temes 
RodWeehn 
Aedoute 
Roussel Ueiof 
Sonofl 

Skis Rasslanol 
Teiemecon 
Thomson CSP 
Total 

Aoefi Index : 28*84 
Prevteul : 28984 
CAC Index iZITJI 
Previous : TIL48 


410 612 

290.10 291 

1189 1184 
421 618 

Sll 516 
IM 
”0 789 

2300 2330 

2ifia 2i4i 

641 648 

533 543 

5 3£ ^55 

7*3 795 

187-50 It? JO 
772 786 

« 650 

1490 1£B 

537 543 

2245 ffl 

• too m 

2420 2425 

IS? 

1700 T73B 
2006 2010 . 
1145 1184 1 
IQ 1849 1 
eS S3 
722 720 1 

22 715 

517 514 

27JJ0 276 

1421 136J 

1SH 1568 
7V0 70? 

1380 MOO 
2535 300. 
S26 517 

207 210 


Prevtow: J75.N 


ACl 
ANZ ' 

BHP 

Bcrol 

Bowolnvme . 
Costtemoine 
Cotes 
Cemalce 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunlap 
Elders M 
Ip AafraHa 
Magellan 
MIM 
, Mwr 

I Nat Aust Bank 
1 Newscora 

NBreken HIU 
^t»Hdor 
Old Coal Trust 

Santas 

Thomas no lion 
western Mining 

« SS. 8 *® 9 

All (hdlaartes lade 
previous : 92486 


Altai 

Asahl Checn 
AsahiGiuse 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 

Conan 

Casio 

Clteh 

Dot Nippon Print 
Ww House 
Pntw oSecurttfcs 
Fame 
Pull Bonk 
Full Photo 


280 OJ7 

89 

112 107 

780 780 
485 8 

205 a 
4.18 488 
3.14 3.12 

285 IS 
116 ITT 
108 105 
2.10 110 
383 193 
1T2 no 
4J0 488 

680 686 

13 5 28} 

170 IS 
118 185 

380 580 
223 120 
424 406 
490 480 
UO UO 


400 406 

S & 


SSO 556 
.951 972 

*» % 

1 U 0 noo 

ifflj £ 

S' w 

ion taw 


Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi CObie 
Hondo 

Japan Air Lines 
KaHma 
Koraai Po— 1 
KawaMkl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubcto 
Kyocera 
MateuEtecind* 
Matsu Elec Works 
MitsubteN Bank 

Mitsui and Qi 
Mittufcoahi 
MMumf 
MC 

NGK lasutotors 
NBiko Sec 
Nippon Koaaku 

Nippon £W 

Nippon Steel 

Nippon Yusea 

Nissan 

Nomura Sec 

Olympus 

Pioneer 

gteoh 

Sharp 

Shbmzu 

SMnetsu Gbamtoai 

■W. 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumrtoma Chen 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 

TS&ffine 

Takeda dura 

TDK 

Tellin 

T0W0 Marine 
Tokyo Etee. Power 
Toopan Printing 

Taray Ind 
Todifba 
Toyota 
Yamakhi Sec 

NWdcM/PU . moe x ; 1 
PrerteU* : T277184 

■towiMfgxugt2.il 
Preview : fetXAl 


Adig 

Aitmrlsse 
Autephon 
BMkLwe 
Brawn Bowl 
Qba Getoy 
Crodlt Sutesc 
Etoctrawatf 
H ak torbank 
intordlsceunf 
Joenb saatord 

JelmoU 
LondtsGvr ' 

Nestie 

OailkwB 

Roche BOby . 

Samo a 

Stfrindter 

sofrw 

Swvcfitonca 

ISc^ r 

sessst 

UntonBvik 

Winterthur 

Zurich ins • 

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Tnrnolii My 23 \ 
Canadian stock na , 4 P 


2625 AMI PrceM 
3AAJond»H 
2»0Aon(ooE 
»AproindA 
7755 Aft Enen/y 

100 Alta NOT 
79AtoamaSf 4 
BOO Andes W A 1 
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1800 AfcO I 
DI8 BP Canada 
OT«B°nkBC™ 
2046a Bank N si 
.49100 Barricko 
|i»0 Satan All 
86237 Bonanza R| 
|2830 Bralorne | 

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U4J7BCPhoi^ 
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I igggcctaMqtRM 
W*9S CTlrs Al^w 

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|i3TOctakm«siN 
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10600 CetertTri 
l£00Ctnem« 

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9f»3 CTL, Bar* 

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19462 Conk* Rd 
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14420 GL Fa«t 
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S17M 17% I7M+ U 
H4te 144b 141b— lb 
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S914 9V6 9M. 

SIS* IB* 1BVL— U 
S15Mi 15 15 

S22W 22Vb 22Vb— * 
S24* 24* 2614— l«k 
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SIS* 18* IS*— * 
345 330 3M 

445 440 440 — 5 

S]7* 17* 17*+* 
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IOTER3SATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 

SPORTS 




^•2phv h ?^ ne - -. 

?sa!gc^ 

iS^SAt 

y^tion h rue 


ope Runs Spain’s Gauntlet 


fituhitauml ReraU Tttimt _ - much atom it at this wtriy day.” 
LONDON — Of aB the ways to he says. 

»yhale and hearty for thegrratest “But the World Cup’s always ai 

i»Timg ft.m a man’s life, me least the back of my mind, and I expect 


time president-elect of big brother retreat, awareness and, when oeoes- 
Real Madrid Theinientw Ids flat- saiy, getting taw’s retaliation in 
toy was crystal-clean “I would first— was, be says, taught tan by 


and we can do better than the terri- 
ble results in 1978, which fame, at 
19, was very traumatic." 








Johan Cruyff hobbled away 
TStceo Maradona fled after sur- 


Ieast the back of my mind, and I expect love to see wearing the the wily Brazilian C abmh o, with God (and Spain's defenders) 

ming jt will come mcr wmngi y m the white of Real Madrid,* he said, whom be dared goal -scoring du- willing, Sanchez has a year to go on 

Ipan- foreground as the months pass.” The news that Mendoza had talked ties before leaving Umversdad Na- dreaming of a greater homecoming. 

Those months, ftnwji^ might with the Mexican, as bad Barcelona riored Autonoma de Mexico for He is hardly able to forget how 

may last summer and half of Europe's Atkffcoin 1981. Mario Kempes was called from ex- 

rr— ' elite this year, precipitated passion- Atletico, in debt a reported £4 fle with Valencia w score the prafr 

ate ‘’Sanchez Must Stay” demon- million (about S5 5 i 
strations walked a financial cigb 





Rob Hughes 


'totarfc. -An4 if HropSandiez is to fulfill if he were not Spam's most wanted chea 
jVhis destiny, he has 10 months to mercenaiy — its hottest shot, most com 
? dodge the Spanish boot. coveted transfer prospect, mew ob- and 


i^EBS 


ain’s most wanted chest. 27 two weeks i 
hottest shot, most coming to bis peak. 

prospect, most ob- and ecdosive, hc h 


rations walked a financial 

TtreattractiOtoareobvion&San- Sanchez’s time in 


cried £4 
ion), has 
k during 
L It pays 


should be him £85,000 or £250^)00 depending 
ill, stocky on which media source you bdievc, eoiipi 


sals that gave Argentina the ? 
told Cup. ^ 

aps be also saw how fleeting A 
ss glory was. how within a a 
of years the Argentine was 3 




1 lot, 


cfeez is expected to return home UK the best foreigner in £ p*w^ and' chan 
prodigal son next May. His na- perhaps better than our own super- mg < 
lion’s one. anthentic World Cup stars,* commented Ranvin MctH q- Real 


hopedepoads on him. 


n gamst match-winner. 


za last month after Sanchez, al- spectacular overhead scissors lack. 


So the tightrope bow is under 
Sanchez’s feet. 

He sees the Wodd Cup horizon, 
but cannot simply prepare to be at 


* iO:. s;-, f . , 


r - 'jj Tl Kjo- 

’-■i. k 

• ' ■ MiMunr, 
: ■* -.oii. 


■*in . 


Both San c hez and the country ready the top Hat Division scorer He also, until now, has proved Ins peak on arrival First, bis dub 
** «ffl knew there is no vaM iosur- with 19 goals, had won the Spanish pretty adept ai looking after him- and its tens of thousands of hungry 
ancepdicy on im making the teazn. Cup for Atletico Madrid. self. fans ogpect him to nm to the break- 

j , , “1 have to cry not to t hink too Mendoza happened to beat that That art — a mixture of judicial Log point for them. - 

It would of course be human 

( nature not to go quite so often 

1 riaiiyi 1 Imfo Hif ilwngjit nf 

a tt a«l, nn* r* u d x winch must have haunted his Atie- 


Cup for Atletico Madrid. 

Mendoza happened to be at that 


A Horse Only Time Gould Beat 


tastve, he has a hfisiering but, with Europe beaconing, it oa the read looking m vain for 
Speed, an appetite for big could Ql afford to be without the someooe to believe he could dimb 
is (witness his goals against match-winner. out of his subsequent anticlimax. 

on Barcelona, his.sdnmat- So the tightrope now is under 77* ^ monsman may dream 
play in a. 4-0 thrashing of Sanchez’s feet his dreams. But he also builds in 

Ladrid) and a flair foe the He sees the Wodd Cup horizon, for tire future. And 

darovrxhead sdsscgsiadc. but cannot simply prepare to be at whatever 1986 brings Hugo San- 
ta, until now, has proved Ins peak oa arrival. Fust Ins dub ^e anticipates, a decade from 
dept at looking after him- and its tens of thousands of hungry no w i msWno a living by puDing 
fans exped 2ms to nm to the break- 

art— a mixture of judicial ing point for than. That’s better than tearing out 

— sassSS S 

,u H.. .I S3sSS«t naaae 



i 

jfijr 




to^^mdowav the smfl of dreams. 


CaifM ty Of Sutff Firm Dlspattha 
WASHINGTON — When fu- 
mre getwatioos of racing fans look 
bade oa John Henry, they will be 
mew impressed by the statistics he 


• ^ Ion 


MJNHmOs 


C-- 

■ ^■’ r - Ltrl* 
•-LltVt k 


:m: :• > 

. v J- 

— i o 

.v: 


- Al H • 
\~}y -. 

J r*i •. 

; t-i-jn 

_ ••* 1 'libt. s 

a,',;:..-’. . 
» *.• 

r .'i. 

!-S , : : - 


1». . 



; J ‘\': ‘ ^ j, Few horses — even great “iron 

. r\ '<ij f^uai ;• borses** of the past like Rdso and 
ot •>;. ;7 C - jforego — were so consistent and 

t " ‘ Qurable. John Henry raad 53 times 

" ijni ™ 1 over an eight-year career and 

.. scored 39 victories, most of them in 
NOMimos top^laas competiticBi. 

if- V:,. . . And even if inflation and bonus 

- .1 ^ , payments make million-dollar 

‘ tnii ' earnings commoimLace in the fu- 
* ! • ; ■ %• ■-L'.tvt i. ' wre. few thoroo^breds are going 

r '■ ;.!> . to approach John Henry’s bankroll 

j: a . : :•, ’•« ■ »t«rA : of S6397.947. 
v J*- : ‘ But ookl numbers don’t begin to 

£ . " ™ _ convey John Henry’s virtues or his 

v. ' agojficance in the sport. In Sn era 

x: v - ;• when the cost of thoroughbreds has 
v} skyrocketed and only the super- 

' , _ ■ ■ 'fitt •> i*, rich can afford the best-bred hors- 
i * i: . vmi. t - es, be was a reminder that the little 

.*_■ • ■►r-j. oumstfflcanstrflceittichmracmR. 

s. ^ ' Hewas proof, too, that thecotnball 

..... ... t ■ c. qualities of heart courage and 
, competitiveness sometimes can 
a : ■ jr . o- t. overcome a humble pedigree. 

f;'.‘ .... t . t The only thing John Henry 

i.j s.-v.. . - '! i' “• couldn’t overcome, ultimately, was 

a .. v • . = r-.L? h *' age. He injured a tendon last week 

. itjjihife training in California for his 
UM&.’ti \M) viNOiii\Tixs Jrst start as a 10-year-old, and 
ct >•. . fa". ‘ *hile trainer Ron McAnaDy pro- 


while trainer Ron McAnaDy pro- 
fessed hope that the gelding could 
make another comeback, he had to 
know that this was the end. So. too, 
did his owner, Sam Rubin. 

When McAnaDy explained the 
nature of the injury, Rubin told 
him, “We’ve come a long way. and |£ 
we’ve had a lot of good times. 

Good things don't last forever.” 

On Sunday, Rubin called McAn- 
aDy from New York with his deri- 
sion: John Hairy would be retired. 

Hrardidje Hunk John Henry Jain Hrany, en rate to victor 
would take the remanent? 

“Probably not well,” said Rubin. , . . . ... 

-He fives for racing. Besides, John ca p £ dc *riy had taught him somo- 



And yet, far away, Mexico Gty 
calls. Meaco, whore his slriDs were 
honed daily in the streets around 
Judin Valbaena. Home, where h is 
father Hector gave up soccer as a 
career becauseii didn’t support sax 
children — two of whom. Hector 
Jr. and Hondo, also became soc- 
cer pros, and another, Hugo's sister 
Herimda, an Olympic gymnast in 
MoctreaL 

So the man has sporting pedi- 
gree. and lie married into sport, 
too, his wifebeing the daughter of a 
soccer coach. Another coach, Bora 
Mihxtinovic, laments haring had to 
mold a Mexican team entirely with- 
out access to Sancbez, who last 
played for his co u n t ry four yean 
ago. 

"Bora tefls me young Luis Flores 
and I be the ideal combina- 
tion,” says Sanchez. “And though 1 
have no regrets about coming to 
Europe, I hope the coach is right 


Si 


San c hez : Stocky and explosive, a blistering turn of speed and an appetite for big occasions. 



Latest USFL Wrinkle: Franchise Without Players 


Ctm^tkd by Ov Sag Fw* Dispatches dais had told his agent the franchise would 
SAN ANTONIO, Texas — The San Amo- not fold, whether or not it fields a team, 
nio Gunslingers have become the United *Tbeysaid they’ll keep it intact, even though 
States Football League's latest phantom team he {Owner Clinton Manges] doesn’t pay us.*' 


— a franchise with no players. 

In a terse statement, toe finand 


rers. I .riding said. “It’s like what happened in 

inancifllfy irou- Chicago last year. The players are left out on 
rosier Monday a limb. More or less, it s to hell with them." 
ill owed a total The Gunslingers have struggled through 


bled dub waived the entire rosier Monday a limb. More or less, it s to hell with them." 
afternoon. The players are still owed a total The Gunslingers have struggled through 
of about $450,000 in salary from the final two their two-year existence. Two weds ago. 


games of the recently completed season. 
“As of July 22, the Son Antonio Gimsling- 


Manges estimated the team had cost him $17 
million on its way to season records of 7-1 1 


failed to meet the Monday aftermvn pay- 
ment deadline, the 22 -day gnexjnee proce- 
dure would have ended with the automatic 
waiving of the entire team. But Manges acted 
just before the deadline. 

General Manager Roger Gill said the plat - 
ers would eventually he paid and thjt the 
team would play again next sea-on 

“We’ve got a year to prepare." Giif sjsd. 
adding that if the players “don't make it with 
another team, well rive them a chance to 


as have waived 46 players so they can home- an d 5-13. Although paychecks had been late play with us. As soon a» we fulfill our pay roll 


diatdy pume an opportunity to play profes- 
sional football this fall in the National 
Football League in the event soother USFL 
dub claims them.’* the statement said. 

1 iiudmrirer Jeff Lading said league offi- 


several times this year, he said he could meet 
the most recent expenses any time he chose. 


obligations, we’ll start to pursue player* " 
“1 don't hare an official statement from the 


Hrbek’s Grand Slam 
Defeats Orioles , 5-4 

CcnpM by Otr Staff Fnm Dapatdia Hal McRae had bases-looded sm- 
MINNEAPOUS — KmtHrbek gles in a five-run fifth that carried 
hit a baaefrlaaded home nm, his the Royals past New Yrak. Kansas 
third homer in Ids last seven at-bats Gty*s George Breit, who had bees 


SCOREBOARD 


Transition 


Baseball 


NEW YORK— £)ocad BuKb Wynraor, 
cotcMr, on toe l£4ov dttabtMl Hit. RacailM NATIONAL LEAGUE New Yerv 1C9 ODO Ml— « II 0 

Scan Brocllay.catciiar, from CaliMiBuc of Hit Si-LA»I» M2 ODO MB— • 11 • Homo* City MO DM Mi— S » I 

IM •motional Loom. Sao Francbco IN >11 OOB— 1 7 2 Rramuum. Bort, (51. Snirloy 17). FUner 

loom AnOulor. Lahti <■) ana Nieto. Porter (8); (7) ana hbjwv: Gufcicm. Joim (5). Quben- 

CINCINNATI— AettvWed Dave Von LaPoint. Carroits II) ana Brwilv. W— Ando- bwrv 18) an> Sundbora. W— Janes. 7-Z L— 

Corner, catcher. Ploced Frank Poxtore. lor,l«4.l RoimuMen. 3-5 Sp-Qultenbevry INI. 

pltchor, on 15dov dtaoMod IU. SF- Leonard (II). Boltltnoro 2M Nl I0>— « 18 I 


Monday's Major League Line Scores 


New York 109 MO Ml— 4 18 0 

Ktunen City OM DM Mi— S 7 8 

Rosntuuen. Bord, (5a. Snirley 17). FUner 
(7) and Honor: Cubicra. Jonci (SI. Quben- 


and his second 

gmwc to Ufi Minnesota to a 3-4 a 359 average and had a 12-game 

hitting streak, went O-for-3 and 

BASEBALL KOIBDUP 

-victoiy over Baltimore here Mon- 

day night Hrixi’s 43Woot seo- «“8« A 

cmd-Sig off Stonn Davis ton, Texas, roofaeOddibe Mcl^w- 


pltchor. on ISOov dtioMad ibL 
MONTREAL ActtvWed Dim Schotzeder, 


darn in four leading the American tj« gnp with puaior. Recount romt shtne*. ouwetow, 


Ml 820 100 — 7 11 | Minnesota 


2M Ml tOO— I 18 I 
use om on— i 7 a 


■MONOID— 1 « 1 


Qavls ana Oeimnav. ffovlora Ml; Smitfi- 


a 359 avenge and had a 12-game 
bitting streak, went O-for-3 and 
slipped to 3SS. Yankee Rickey 
Henderson went 2-for-S and took 


front iniTTiPMimlU of the Amorlam Anocto- Mahler and Benedict; Palmer. Lucas 15). sen. Eufentla (7). Davis 18] ana Soku. W— 
IIwl Swit Mickey Mahler, pitcher, and Hoborao (81 and FHzuoroU. Nicosia <81. W — Smitfuon. 9-t. t — Oovis. 44. 5v— Oavls (U). 


Skeetar B^mes. infloMer. to Indtonapodk. 

PITTSBURGH— Onttanod Mrs* DoLOtab 
Pltchor. to Hawaii of the Pacific Coast Loasua. 
Activate d Rod Scurry. Pilcher. 

FOOTBALL 

Ntat c nta FootOcft Lcapuo 


McMer.l48lL— Palmar. 6-8. HR — At- Harper 
(Wl. 

cMDpan mo om no— « « a 

Mm Yortc ON ON 081-1 i I 

Soto and BllonMio; Femaadn. 5iu 181. 
Gorman (»). W— Sota.PJl. L— Fernandez. W. 


ATLANTA— Stoned Bin Frolic. ortensNe HR»-Cla. Concepcion (0). Redus 151. 


fdCfclR. 

GREEN BAY—Cii! Bob Wlncklor and RIU 


Mftattatod j^ecovering from a shoulder kd the ri^wilh a tamer that *•"****- 

John Ucxny, en ODOte to victory in tile 1984 Arimgtoa MSoa sprain, Hrbek ended the first half new England — A oreed ♦» cantmcf 

of *he season hottmji 2A3, but Fames 7, Astros & in tne Na- wrm» «mi Gerard ptmioa. •«• no tvw. 

• . _ , . i l2i# - i tjonal League, tn Philadelphia, Phil n.y. jet t a— < oeao a nan and Bin 
ence deariy had taught him some- “Now John comes around and openea tne second tall wnn a Garner and Alan AshbyTost Mike ****». *w» rnoivera. and Tray Beraan. 

± ^ Schnridl’s twcnnit pop-up in the ^^ht^s*p-wi c^ro* Adams. 

John Henry was smart m comne- passes afl toe horses and wins going - new iam> mntL and Schmidt hit Jeff Heath- «wno twc*. io tear onrywr camraen. r»- 


Cfetaope NO 08 Oil— S 11 0 (4). SJmm 

San Dtaoo 810 110 080- 3 * 8 Cleveland 

Trout, Brvnfor (4). Frarler (5). Mta*)Jll» Tna 
(71. Smith (II end Davis, Lake (8). Dravecky, Ruble. E 




takes off down the stretch. He 


He’D bite me ata almost cvmrbody John Henry was smart in compe- passes aD the horses and wii 

to dse who comes near him, except tition, toa Some great horses have awav by 2% lengths and eqi 
?•« Ron and his groom. Josh -and the ooiy one running ^rieata are Em- trad: record.’* 

■n stable boy. Lottie. But when he’s lled accordingly, but John Henry “There was never an expl 


Brazing, ai about 3 in the after- could do anything. Although ob- of what was wrong withlofcn be- 
ACKtn. vnu can sometimes co over streperous in the mornings, he was fore the race,” said Rnbm. Itwasa 


game-winning grand slam in an 8-4 
victory over New Yak an 'Ihnrs- 
dayata a two-nm, pinch-hit homer 
in Sunday's 5-2 loss to the Yankees. 

But Hrbdds 12th tamer of the 
year was overshadowed by Eari 
Weaver’s fourth-inning perfar- 


Sdmndt’s two-out pop- 
ninth, and Schmidt hit Ji 




Kr-r.' 

t»V-^ 


ki.*J 


WtaMarATS w^asssayrs ssajssass 

““KSSt cdn,. SWM 

. . . D „ - field, John Henry could go to the John Henry was hdped by the 

What made John Henry so go«R front If a speed dud devdoped. be proliferation of big-money grass ped a foe (ftw ta by Fred 
How could a horse who sold origt- would patiently sit behind the lead- races during his career; top horses “1 J h ad canght tne nan, 
nally for $1,100 (and eventually ers and let them blow each ocher of previous generations bad to run ^ 

cost Rubin $25,000) go on to domi- ouL ft necessary, he couM come nickly on the dirt to ears big mon- to ta me wait realJyh^WnmX 
MleU3. raring? ... from far off the pace, as he did in ey, and the harder surfaces took a 

McAnaHy has always insisted fall’s Ballantme Classic at the greater physical toll cm them. John 1™“* n 

*at John Henry was an unusually Meadowlands. which proved to be Henry was abetted, too, by them- Mimiesota CKUip^^rte dad a oaii 
ptefligenl racehase, and his re- (fie last race of his career. ven racing secretaries at the tracks “J 115 

cord suggests that be did leant from “*ye thought John was tick that wherehe campaigned. ’wEIaSSX. 

tspenence. Other horses might rnght,” sridRubin. “In his stall his Rather than nsk losing a big footed ^from the smds, lean see 
Mre this capability, but the good head almost touched the floor, box-office attraction, they would how weaver might oeupset 
ones usually are retired to stud so Usually, it takes three or four peo- give him soft weight as s ig n m e n ts , r^.t r? 

qmckly that they don’t gel a chance pi e to -addle John, but now nobody ror handicap races in order to en- tame plate umpire Dale Ford toe 
h show what they could accom- £„«! to hold him. And he walked tice him. So while Kelso and Fore- }*■ 



uc no- tame with Gerard Pholaa. vrtae receiver. _ _ _ ^ 

Trt Phfl N.Y. JETS-Siaaetf Ooaa Alton and Bin Sv ~ 5 *" l m ♦* >;. 

Mike W«tara^rM».*taL«ndT«vB««^ 3SSt3 ■ • 

Head*- g 

PHILADELPHIA— Stoned ftandal) Cw»- L I Wlu ^ .t! t l^? u ' Cna W,PI 
nlnehanv quarterback; Tom Pol lav. Una- Sc,,mW, *■ . 

baefcor; Dove Toob. cerrtw; Todd Jonktav nitmMPi T 

n. ,, ■- IMI d n-dmM f nfelel yMo — HH)MJI 8 > ■■■ • ■ 

Kw JWTTtJon ono Koonev wwuY* *"»• rr .. »» • mLl) Dm -. l,.^ 

ct lva n, one Dj pi n r JAofrl^ dMflfOJv# Dm McwiiiwniL wwin loi ona “unQ# ho»p 


Smlttitorv 9-T. L — Davi-v 44. Sv-Oavls (U). 
HRs— BaL, Murrov 114 1. MirA.HrbeV IIS). 
Caatomla MS SU BO- 1 18 3 

Milwaukee 3M 830 38>-U 15 8 

Staton. Clements IS). Coneit 19) and 
Boone: vuckovlch. Waite 17) and Moore W— 
VWMvlen, 4-7. L-nStotaft 4-8. 5 V— Worts 1 1). 
HRe-cmilorota. DeCinces 01). MIL Cooper 
(4). SI mmoaa 17). OaJJvir 14). 

Cleveland Ml BM 008-1 * 8 

Texas dm IN 810-3 8 1 

Ruble. Easterly (8). Bor Kiev (81 and Banda. 
Welsh. Harris 18) ana Petrolll. W— Morris. 3-1 
L— RuMe. 24k. HR— Toxin. McDowell le). 
Detroll 8M 0M Oil— 4 V 3 

cm cono 810 in so * — 9 It a 

O'Neal. Bair (7). Berenouer ll) and Costilla. 
Motvtn (7): Nelson. Aposlo (81. Stanton 181. 
Gleaton (8) ana Fhlc. w— Nelson. 44. L— 071- 


(81. Carman <*) and VlrelL W— Carman. H eaL 5-3. 5v— Gleoren (II. HR— CM. Fish ISA). 
L— HoataOBCh, O-l. HRs— Hou. Crux (4I.PMF 

.RumMI (31. Schmidt 1131. __ , _ _ .. 

jJIJSSS 7 \ Major League Standings 

Mcwunorm. Guonix le) and Pena: Honey- AMERICAN LEAGUE 


men. N omad Gearuo Anr odmhrtstrattve as- 


If there wasn’t much speed in a again." 
field, John Henry could go to the John Henry was hdped by the 


V. * u £ . experience. Other horses might night," said Rubin. “In bis stall his 

1.'- V* MX# lliia Pimhilihi hill th# o/rat - ■ * — iL. 


Rather than nsk losing a 
box-office amactioo, they w 


V- 'I pDdt in the long, long run. As a around like a shlujnp. 


■ m \ griding, John Henry did. 


“Well, the race starts and he’s 15 
i John Henry never showed much lengths behind. We look at each 
abiHty until be was introduced to other in the box, and I say, ‘I don’t 


"- turf raring as a 3-year-old; before believe this. Something’s wrong more than 127 
i; > then he even had lost a 520,000 with this horse.’ Then lo and be- of racing. 

J* j&innng race on the dirt. He did hold, he starts to fly. Next thing I 
''' i 7*%i of his taring on the grass know he's at the bead of the stretch 
} -"hereafter, and when he woo his and measuring the horses in front 
i first Friipse award at the age of 5, of him, about right of ’em. 

,*•- he was considered strictly a tnrf “Chris McCarron, Ms jockey, 

?> '■ [ : spedshsL But during tbe next year won’t hit him. He knows John 
i . he entered, won, tbe country’s doesn’t like the whip. And Chris 
V 4 • two most prestigious races for older has said that if there's a hole, 

*;i, horses on tbe dirt: the Santa Anita John ’ll find it himself. He’s that 


UUX-UUM. BIUBIAIVU, «, ~ , B-. -_J 

give him soft weight asagnments 

ror handicap races in order to en- tame plate u^n: Dale Ford for 
tice him So while Kelso and Fore- iSf 

go -the great gddings with whom 
he was often compared - fie- 

127 ^ ^ : »- J&ESSKSieS 



Stslonl. ,i iA>i 

PITTSBURGH— Anaounrad that Tom Dlx- 
cxv ceatar. nos loft the leom. BOIBO 1 

ST. LOUIS— StanoB Lance Smith and Rob 

Monaco. attentive Unomen; Ron WoWev.lulF 

bodUJovNavocek. wide roedvor; Scott WII- jNI 1 * 
naira, ttahl and, and Rlcltv Anderson, otace- Taroati 
Uckor. tAn* 

United SteCos Poahertt Leave* and Ke 


Honeycutt, i-f. Sv— Guenle (1). HRs — Pit. K- 
halHo 11). Peno 17). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Seattle Ml 0M 011—1 4 1 

Toronto Ml M8 OB*— 3 7 1 

Lanaeton, Barofea (5), Snyder (6). Lena (61 
and Kearney; Filer. Acker (8). Lave lie (8). 


SAN ANTONIO— Relaacod all 41 player* Otoidf" (81 and AltoneoiL W-FItor. I-a 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
End DJviuoo 

w L Pel. GB 

Toronto 54 37 J02 - 

New York S? 38 579 3'.^ 

Oe troll « 41 J44 si's 

Boston 48 U SD 7V, 

Bata more 41 M 511 8(5 

Milwaukee *0 49 M* 14 

Cleveland V tS Jl» H 

WMt Division 

California J4 38 JET — 


bocoum ollnabiutv to moel twn overduo pav- Lona*ton. *7. Sv— Coutfll (12). HR— Seo- Oakland 


EDMONTON— taunouncod IN rettromoid 
a f Tod Groan, amtotont coach. 


. Pnestav OS). Cfttawo 

Oaklaad 818 in Ml— 4 11 1 Kansas Cltv 

Boctoa m m fix— 4 7) 4 Seattle 

CodlrolL Young (Si. Atherton (7) and Minnesota 
HeoNi; loUqt. Otar 1 7), Stanley 19) and Ged- Texas 


48 44 SO 4 
44 43 SI? 41V 
47 44 Sit 4Ve 
44 48 M M 
« 48 .447 11 

36 57 JS7 1BVS 


PHILADELPHIA— Named Paul Holmgren "»«- W— Loilor. 4-5. u-CodlroU. 8-7 Sv— 


; last two years 




fUuU 


Eari Weaver 

Tew knowycue&dn’l catch thebaO.’ 


ootids next ptch into the left-field 
ban -leC ban you (fidnV ” First scats for the gamewirmer. Schmidt 
Jockcv Club Gold Cup andtbeOak base umpire Kea Kaiser finally es- had lofted a towering foul ball just 
SS hSZSJ cortedW^ver off the field. . . «> tbe left of home (date; neither 




d I gt« one more swiDg." 
Mels I: Id New York, 


oafc&ntf coodL 

COLLEGE 

FAIRLEIGH OICKINSOH— Announced 
ttN roNvnaHan of Stan wrleto, athletic dlreo- 
tor. Namod Barbara LeeNnefcy Morlm ath- 
letic cBroctor. 


Golf 

PGA Leaders 

Leaderooo the ProtontanN Goiter* AMCO- 
otkw tour throne* toe Quod cities open, 
•Mdi ended Jotr 21: 

EARNINGS 

I. Curtis Slrancv SS37J9) 

1 Lcnnv WofflOns 33708 

a Rev Fiowd mm 

4. Corey POvUl 3QLS85 

s. Cahrtn Pee» 2MJB3 

4. Mark O'Meara 39X815 

7. Crate Stadtor 27L701 

A Bemno r d Loneer 267 AU 

f. Hal Sutton 361JQ4 

m Fuzzy Zoeller 2115(8 

11. Roaer MoltWa 30X291 

12. John Mono Hey 20L17S 

IX Lorry Mb> 196ASB 

14. Hale invin 180419 

15. Tom Watson 179383 

SCORING 

1. Den Pooler. 7039. X Cow Pavta. 7X54. X 


Stanley (9). HRs— OaL. Heath 19). Baker 
112). 


Tennis 

MEN 

(IB Wasbieona) 
Stnctas Ftnoi 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EOtt Division 

w L Pet. GB 

SI. Louis 54 16 M0 — 

New York M 38 583 llj 

Manfred 52 4l 559 3,y 

Cnicaao 48 43 SO 4Vz 

Pnllodelpnia « SI 440 I4"a 

PUtaburoh 31 59 J44 23 

WMt Divifloa 


Yannick Noah, Prance, dot. Martin Jalte, Lot Anarln 
Aroanttna. 6-4. 60. 50,1 O 1 *®® 

Doubles Final Cindnnati 

Hans Gndomelster.OiUa.and victor PeccL Houston 
Pwflbuav.doLDovtd Graham. Austratla.and Aiiania 
Soloes Toroczv. Hunaory. 6114 64 San Francisco 


51 39 567 — 

53 41 559 to 

47 43 532 4 

« K 41) ID 

41 » 451 10V, 

35 58 J76 171? 


BlancpaiN 


. he mured, and won; tbe country’s doesn’t like the whip. And Chris Tree Invitational. His margins of 7 ££ 

V i ■ *^0 oStprestigio(i5 races for oWcr has said that if there’s a hole, victory were a nose, abend and a . to 2 J& 

V: ! ;■ : taesa C82 the St: the Santa Anita JohnTl find it himself. He’s that neck. He was a horse who wouldnt JJJ btalra coctog his heete Gaxureco^ trtak uCQtona ;was ,.hoi Sutton 201^4 

and the Jockey Club landed ’competitor. BttOnJt wffl I? SS *~SS5i 2SS 

lJ ; : T : ; <3oW Cop. Maturity and expen- chick at him to maybe remmdimn. bahty of growing dd. (WP. NYT) SS to sSS ™ kZ! 5^“" 

' ’ — ned-season by the Tv-ins, Scd a how they feel I deserved to be out, iahon irwin ibcuid 

v'” > ; — _ _ _ — ^ m protest because Ford did not give but Tmriad I gw caw more swing." 1S-Towww *°" 5COR | HO 17WB3 

'K/TC/in/Vfl I lim0V*6 I Ativn* I /|ee r.fifrm/lfDC Smithson a dmne* tojrarm upaf- Reds 5, Mris 1: Io New York, 1,0cm Pooler. 7039. icorwPavin.7a5n 

C4/f M/f v AA/lvvf xa/(W Xivl'M » IWwCij ter the delay. Said Miller: T think Mario Soto tamed in his sixth com- lory mh* 71*1.4. RavFioyd. tub 5. Lomv 
■ ? .“ . there should be a limit as to how piete game of the season and broke 

Bv Murray Glass 594 minion to S59 nnffionforl9S6; ed dgaeriatwn for initial roster tong a guy can argne." a streak of eight consecutive losses strand, m*. i«. John Mohortw, tws. 

Vrw Ynr* 7w from S113 miTH nn to $64 mfllicm COSL ■ Snritaswi went on to scatter in Stoppmg the Mels. average driving distance 

' .. NEW YORK— N^tiators, for for 1987 and from S155 milBon to Ht right hits m hfrax 

V. • ; -i Wairs dub owDcra save the 586 mfllicm ror 1988. nancud business behind us, Fdir remter his fourth sttiugbt victory. Ride Mahler went the distance for sandy Ly«.mA.6,cr B gTvrt B » s .272s.7.Bm 

; . “< ■davere’ npStS.i^S5iiS finan- m. 4 sa^a rateratmg that the two sides Red Sox M’s 4: With two dou- the fourth time this year, and Bob ei«on. ms. 9 . jmv 

"to orold woi loward m •juami bks tod. single, Wadi Bop n- Horn. Tmt Ouper and Siyce ’^S^^SStSin m,n< 

1 /mJc thr ac ? u ^ anrD j >tts 1OT “ without agreeing cm the owners’ tended die maor leagued longest Benedict drove in two runs apiece 1, coivin Pee*, bz*. 2 , dovw eowctoi. aoi 

S-’iKW- ”?? .¥? rft 05 sahavts and .revenues rather than ^^81 figures. gtrcakof theism to 25 as Atlanta topped the Expos. xLarroNrtor»,je7.4.Haiein«in,j44.s.Nui» 

.yners foresee for this season and [Lhj. nrojectioos that bear no re- _ _ , ^ ■ ■ , . , lnmiiim BniMn nact urcrt p, ,e,, i,i,TQiiitii 4. r n p, n Rewtcwj jot^ rnvw, ^ 57.7, Tim nottIl tsi 

• h, % the real three seasons. But tbe to rcalitv ” Donald Tbe owncra, on tbe otter hand, games m leading Boston past visit- Cardmab 5, (ftmtt 4. In San 1 00 ^ Tev*n. jso. 9. woroe lavl j*s ul 

rembiance t^ca^.i^onaiu ^ ^ sUtU5 ^ affect mgC^kland. Francisco, pmeh-hmer Steve Tomietta-JA 

’-1 ; £ £s^ d fc?2e^s! ti4 offer for the contribution to Btae Jtys3, Mariners 1: In To- Braun stn*ed his second consecu- ji, 

- ; if a strike starting in lessSrem * f 2 1 # l J ar S aaufl 8 sewoa ^ players « pension and benefit routo, Tom Filer pitched seyenm- tive gamwwnnmg hit, a single m a. 5. 

‘i *TVe adted them to use whafs plan. The phyera say there can be mags of cam-hit ball for his first theaghdktomakeJoaqmnAndn- owe Tr-toio** R«»r om> 

l: 'i'^hink this was a step in the htapening now. Tte m**™ nomovemenimtbe^tmtfl they nMi gne trinoh since July jar the wmmgest pittier in the 

’w-^OKht dirpctinn’’ wid S Mao- still are not dose to where wt arc, rccovethat proposal 1981 Her, roallea from the nn- amors at 16-4. average putts psb round 

• v ‘ bat they have cot their numbers on Full barttatanK committees of nors July 5, allow! ju« a second- Cuhs5, Pa*es3: In San Di«o, 

' hE lossrafr^l^operatious." Keith Mordand’s eighth-iiS BSSSSSSXSStt 


fouziT+r-, w.t '.ili 


v ’ By Murray S94miIlkaitoS59 mflHon for 1986; 

Nt» York Hm Sendee from $113 ntiSion to $64 million 
NEW YORK — Negotiators, for for 1987 and from S155 tmUion to 
‘ittasshaJPs dub owners gave the $86 million for 1988. 


77 , sauitica auu is. 

tars foresee for this season and ,^ r 
the mxt three seasems. But the semblance to 


that bear no re- 
ality," Donald 


Mario Soto tamed in his sixth com- Lom>Mue,?e5L4.RovFioy&n4i5.Loiviv 
plere^itairf tire season and broke 

a streak Of eight consecutive losses Stronoe. 70.94. IB. John MahoHvy, 7WS. 
in stopping tne Mels. average driving distance 

Rick Mahler went the distance for sandy 1 , vi*. 2735 . t Grog Twteos, 2735 . 7 . biii 

tbe fourth time this year, and Bob demon, ms. a Tom Purtzor. 272A 9. Jmv 

Eto^Teny Harper and Brace ~TJSSSStm pa.rway 
B enedict drove in two runs apiece 1 , coivin pbon. bz6. 2 , dovw Eowaroi. no. 
as Atlanta toooed the Exoos. XUryvNAon, J67.4.H0le Irwin, J6L5,Mll» 

~ x »- y n,i,fn 1T1 Can R»tetxvlJa«»Renn«-.jS7. 7. Tim Norris. 751 
C * n *™ 5| . '*™r. 4 “L 5311 L Dow Towed, J5Q, 9. Wayne LovL 746. 10. 

Francisco, 


v‘ forecast did not necessarily Fehr, the players* labor Icada, said 
; itothcoutloolcfOTlhepossibitity after a double bargaining session. 


. a strike starting in less than two 

■f ifttRalu 


/3Mf0 £ C«n HfinW, J57.7.TimNmTH8 

UHBS *6. in Dan L QO^ To*i«n, J50. 9. Wavne LwL J46. ilk 

inch-hitter Steve Tom Ktta. ja 

iris second consecu- oree» in regulation 

•7,/Ti rr.7^1^- LJackNlcwoM JI9.2. Brace LtalskbJll. 


“1 ihinlr this was a step in tire 
,4 T ffiht direction.” said lie Mao- 


least we have narrowed the 
inferences between us." 
tve^' - Those narrowed cat-paper differ- 
' ^ ■' • rices, however, must be translated 
: > into real mowanent in tire negotia- 


happening now. The projections 
still are not dose to where we are, 
bat drey tavc cot their nambera an 


t < S£?±SE?E loss^Lnbasriren aerations.” 


on whai tire irfayas betaved were hours. The smaller sisskm involved botaertm high by hiitina his augor Lopes. 39, setup tire winner when 
too tow a percentage of increase for Fehr and Marvin Miller, a consul- league-leading 26th of the year as be doubled off Roy Lee Jackson 

-8 . _ E ■_«_ A. 4.4 ***“ _ _ . . _ ta. -« VirLlx. L^JaI AaftoMt «*■ J iLLul ImA iifwrtnri aT 


^folSSKaSb. revainc and too high a peremtage totire Major League Hayes tire white Sox banded Detroit its 
"■og agreement tf the two sides are to increase for player sa l a ri es. Association, for. the players, and seventh loss m mnegmes. 


•rertSSfiSSwaSouL* 0 Those rates of increase were MacFhafl and"Bany Rcoa,'Mac- Brewera 3: In MB- aonnqJts. M wda nd thra tanneed 

: 74Theowi^o^Slist«n984 changed fortire revised projections. FhaiTsomnselforttao^ 

Jdustiy losses as $43 nrito, but The owners, in the original smaller group tfiscussed approach- m fiw runs — G&Com r and M Los/m- 

t* ? '«MMday reduced that figure to study, also included player depran- es. tire nw sides might ay in an 
h : : -'28J^K^Sted lo^also aS as oh eperaung expense when effort to move closer togrther. 

' fere towered, from S58mfflioa to a team issddln the revised prqjco Ne^tranons were to cononta VPT) 

f -* 29 nuffion for tins season; firm tions, MtaPhafl said they dmioat- Ttresday. Qty, hfissonn, TVilhc Wlsftj ata .buighpastttaDoagcxs. fAr, UP!) 


jar the winsingest pitdier in the 

□mors at 16-4. average putts per round 

ajm 5, Padres 3: In Sian Diego. <• cow. 2&n i Bob tv aomoott 

Krilh Mwdand's dghfruS fiSS!5SSSKiE2aS 

Single scored oavey Lopes tram 7.DonFomianendR«iStnck.3&92.9,Dsn 
third with Chi c a g o’s deciding run. poomv. sbm. io, Two im *rfm was 
t /we 10 sxrt lrntta vnmer when percentage OF SUB-PAR holes 

tapes, » set w i me winns wnen UCnt0 m Tom WBfMn ,ju.i 
be doubled off Roy Lee Jackson lorry woman*, xn. *. piuiip Block mor, 
and stole third, Ms second steal of t*"* mj» one Larry Nelson, m. i. hoi 
the night and 35th of the year in 37 **■ "• "SEaT 



B iv w c r s 16, Angels 3; In Mil- attaints. Mordand then bounced i,cow pavto mi pwua waemnar. las, 
a niiiVw> ltot OgliVM —who drove a hit OVtt a drawn-in infield. CurmstraroN. Lorry Fttnki* ana Jaev Stode- 

m fivn runs —0x2 Cooper and Pirates 6, Dodgers 3: In Los An- ^ 9 - r * e ^“ 1 *^ 

Ted SumnoDS all homered m a 15- gdes, rookie Sun Khalifa's first i, hoi smumi cunis 2711 
hit barrage that buried California. mfflor-leaguehomenxn,athree-nm ^ “ler. a aj. jw *L- J 

Royris-S, Yankees 4r. In Kansas shot in tire fwmh, earned Plus- Fnd cSSS*5e tw fib»«l m ^Lam-' 
rify Vfiggrairi TVtnirt WtlttW and .burgh past ttaDodgaS. (AP. UPI) Mire and Budtfy CarOfW, 3S1 



JOAILLIEP 







Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1985 


ii 


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D 37 
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P U 

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T 


OBSERVER 


Gone With the Scribes 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK —It's been a long 
time since anybody in the 
United States has called baseball 
“the national pastime.” People un- 
der 30 may doubt that anybody 
ever did so, yet such is the truth. 

All summer long radio voices 
and sportswrilers vibrated about 
“the national pastime.” As summer 
ended, “the national pastime” cul- 
minated in “the fall classic.” That 
was the World Series. 

It’s been a long time since any- 
body called the World Series “the 
fall classic” except for the occa- 
sional aging sportswriter who 
learned his cliches in the days when 
sportswriters were called “the 
scribes” 

It's been a long, long, long time 
since anybody called sportswriters 
“the scribes." 

When baseball was, as Red 
Smith used to say, just a game that 
children can play, it bred a child- 
hood language bloated with zest 
and maLarkey, a circus language 
used by Bamiim’s disdptes to wide 
at the crowd as if to say. “Look, we 
all know this is hokum, but isn't it 
fun?" 

Behind the gaudy lingo was a 
sophisticated view of life in which 
dignified language was deemed un- 
fit for matters that were basically 
bunkum — like baseball. 

□ 

Now, though, we have “the 
sports industry,” which is not — 
definitely not — just games that 
children can play. This is high- 
stakes capitalism. Lawyers, ac- 
countants, agents, physicians, 
judges, arbitrators, labor leaders 
often take up more of the sports 
page than the players. That's run? 

There was a lovely illustration of 
the grown-up state of affairs a few 
weeks back when Howard Cosell, 
on ABCs “Monday Night Base- 
ball,” asked Dave Winfield of the 
New York Y ankees if there was 
bad blood between him and the 
Yankees owner, George Steinbren- 
ner. Cosell was trying to infuse a bit 
of boyish zest into a very dull TV 
game, but Winfield was having 
none of it. 

He smiled tolerantly at the ques- 
tion, as one might smile at a child 
who'd been asked if eating spinach 
would make him as strong as Pop- 
eye, and said, “It’s justbuaness, 
Howard.” 


As Calvin Coolidge observed, 
business is the business of America. 
Business is for grown-ups; business 
is for big bucks; business is not for 
fun. 

□ 

Business, bong serious, required, 
a serious language to match its 
gravity. Sportswrilers — no longer 
“the scribes” — had to concede 
that calling baseball “the national 
pastime” was misleading nonsense. 

For years dull people who read 
newspaper with straight faces had 
been writing editors to argue that 
since horse-racing attendance far 
exceeded baseball’s, it would be 
more accurate to call horse racing 
“the national pastime.” 

More cynical types observed that 
there were dozens of other activi- 
ties that might be more properly 
called “tbe national pastime." 
Which had always been true. “The 
scribes” had always known this 
truth but had risen above it because 
they knew a higher truth; to wit. 
that the pursuit of truth has noth- 
ing to do with fun at the ball park. 

Event in the time of “the scribes,” 
everybody knew it was silly to call 
the World Series “the fall classic,” 
but talking silly was pan of the 
pleasure adults took from sports 
when they were just games that 
children could play. 

Tbe fact about the World Series 
was that it was not a classic but a 
prime-time television special per- 
formed at the end of a complicated 
playoff schedule that was likely to 
produce a contest between mis- 
matched teams on cold, latc-fall 
nights that often Teel more wintry 

than autumnal. 

□ 

As in other divisions of the 
sports industry, television riches 
have produced comically bloated 
salaries so that journeyman per- 
formers receive hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars for eight months of 
mediocre work. Most people can 
no more grasp why players getting 
such gravy ought to be on strike 
than they can understand why the 
owners are angry because the play- 
ers won’t make them slop paying 
such outrageous salaries. 

This is business as incomprehen- 
sible to most as the corporate rat- 
ing game businessmen play in Wall 
Street. Business — hey. there's an 
authentic national pastime. 

New York Times Service 


Elizabeth David, the Master of the Laconic Recipe 


By Charles Rosen 

S OME of the recipes in Eliza- 
beth David's first book, 
“Mediterranean Food.” pub- 
lished in 1950 and said to have 
completely transformed the eax- 
inghabiis of the British upper 
middle class, were picturesque 
rather than practical The Greek 
Hi<h called picti. or brawn (bead- 
cheese), is one example; 

“A pig's bead is boiled for 
hours in water strongly flavoured 
with bay leaves and peppercorns. 

“When cooked it is cut up into 
chunks, the juice of 3 or 4 lemons 
is added to the strained stock, 
which is poured over the brawn, 
arranged in large earthenware ba- 
sins, and left to set. 

“Not very elegant, but usually 
very good.” 

Many of the other recipes in tbe 
book are more easily negotiated, 
but the improbable ones are not 
beside the point if one wishes 10 
understand Elizabeth David's 
charm. Within a few years of the 
appearance of “Mediterranean 
Food,” and above all with the 
publication of “French Provincial 
Cooking" in 1960, she was accept- 
ed by many as tbe most important 
living writer on food. This posi- 
tion is confirmed by her new book 
of essays, “An Omelette and a 
Glass of Wine” fViking, S 1 8.95L a 
collection of her articles over the 
last 35 years. 

David's supremacy does not 
come From her style — which is 
serviceable, plain and a little 
brusque — or from any attempt 
to write fancy prose. Although 
she often reminisces about places 
she has visited and meals she has 
eaten (particularly French Pro- 
vencal meals that represent the 
cooking she knows best), this is 
not a significant part of her writ- 
ing. 

David's baric medium of ex- 
pression is the recipe. David 
treats the form somewhat high- 
handedly, but her mastery of it is 
evident, and she presupposes a 
reciprocal mastery on the part of 
her readers. The directions tend 
to the laconic: “simmer until 
done”; “cook in a moderate 
oven.” Beginners might be ad- 
vised not to start with her book. 
Cooking is learned above all by 
watching other people and by tri- 
al and error. More significantly, 
the finest recipes do not always 



Elizabeth David: 'That is tbe authentic recipe. One of them anyhow/ 


inspire the most sympathetic 
reader to cook — or ev en to eat. 

This is particularly true with 
David. Not - only were the more 
improbable recipes beyond the 
grasp of her original readers, so 
were most of the ordinary ones. 
She admits it in the preface to the 
Penguin edition of “Mediterra- 
nean Food": 

“This book first appeared in 
1950, when almost every essential 
ingredient of good cooking was 
either rationed or unobtainable. 
To produce the simplest meal 
consisting of even two or three 
genuine dishes required the ut- 
most ingenuity and devotion. But 
even if people could not very of- 
ten make the dishes here de- 
scribed, h was stimulating to 
think about them: to escape from 
the deadly boredom of queuing 
and tbe frustration of bujnng the 
weekly rations: to read about real 
food cooked with wine and olive 
oil, eggs and butter and cream, 
and cushes richly flavoured with 
onions, garlic, herbs, and brightly 
coloured southern vegetables.” 

David spent the war years in 
Cairo and Alexandria, Egypt, and 
had been a student m Paris. 
“Mediterranean Food” made the 
past come alive again, and it did 
so the way poetry evokes an exot- 
ic or long-vanished ambience. 

This is why the most extrava- 
gant of David’s recipes are as re- 
vealing as those that can be more 


easily realized. In fact, some of 
the most difficult are, paradoxi- 
cally, the simplest to carry out. 
She describes the reaction to one 
in her new book: 

“On page 96 of ’French Coun- 
try Cooking’ is a four line descrip- 
tion of el pa y aB. the French 
Catalan peasants one-time morn- 
ing meal of a hunk of fresh bread 
rubbed with garlic and moistened 
with fruity olive ol When tbe 
book fust appeared in 1951, one 
reviewer remarked rather tartly 
that she hoped we British would 
□ever be reduced to breakfasting 
off so primitive a dish. I was shak- 
en, not to say shocked — I still am 
— by the smug expression of Brit- 
ish superiority and by the revela- 
tion. unconscious, of the review- 
er's innocence. Believing, no 
doubt, that a breakfast of bacon 
and eggs, sausages, toast, butter, 
marmalade and sweetened tea has 
always been every Englishman’s 
birthright, she ignored countless 
generations of farm labourers, 
mill workers, miners, schoolboys, 
whose sole sustenance before set- 
ting off for a long day’s work was 
nothing more substantial than a 
crust of coarse bread or an oat- 
cake broken up in milk, butter- 
milk, or when times were good, in 
thin broth, when bad in water.” 
We might notice here the per- 
haps unintentional contrast be- 
tween the drab English life 
evoked by “a crust of coarse 
bread” arid the simple but spicy 


existence of the Catalan peasant 
with his “hunk of fresh bread 
rubbed withjaxiic.” This is not a 
breakfast difficult to make — ex- 
cept that the old-fashioned bread 
that makes a decent basis for rub- 
bing with garlic is by now more 
□early impossible to find in the 
French countryside than in New 
York or Paris, and expensive 
wherever it turns up. 

David is a writer of pastoral as 
are many of tbe finest writers on 
cookery. Pastoral is a literary 
form that evokes a golden age, a 
time when life was uncomplicated 
and pleasures were simple. Good 
cookbooks may introduce us to 
exotic cuisines and transport us to 
the romantic Orient (or Scandina- 
via or Latin America) without our 
setting a foot outside the door, 
but the cookbooks that touch the 
heart most strongly are those that 
take us back in time — to moth- 
er’s cooking and childhood mem- 
ories or to an ancient and more 
splendid age. 

David wishes to return to a 
mythical past — when food was 
fresh, unadulterated by chemical 
preservatives, unspoiled by sham 
and pretentiousness. It is this 
mythical dement in her work that 
explains its emotional power. 

Hie greatest influence on her is 
perhaps Edouard de Pomiane, a 
researcher at the lnstitut Pasteur 
in Paris who gave informal talks 
about cooking on French radio in 


the 1930s. His was a cookery of 
friendship. He once wrote that 
there are three kinds of dinners: 
business dinners, those given to 
return invitations and dinners for 
friends. Business dinners should 
be catered, he recommended (no- 
body will like the food anyway). 
As for dinners to return invita- 
tions. Pomiane knew nothing of 
them: His friends never invited 
him, he said, because they' all 
wanted to eat at his bouse. His 
recipes are filled with his desire to 
please his friends, not to impress 
or dazzle them. 

David’s cookery is less gener- 
ous than Pomiane’ 5 . although she 
has used his great recipe for sad- 
dle of hare with cream and acidu- 
lated beets for years and observes 
ironically that the star of nouvelle 
cuisine, Michel Guerard. has tak- 
en it up recently. She has. howev- 
er, inherited Pomiane’s offhand 
humor. In an essay entitled “Exi- 
gez le Writable Cheddar Fran- 
qais” (“Demand Real French 
Cheddar”'), she gives a redpe for 2 
fondue far less indigestible than 
the un compromising Swiss ver- 
sion, and adds dryly. “Well, that 
is the authentic recipe. One of 
them anyhow.” 


Excerptedffom an article in The 
New York lanes by Charles Ro- 
sen. a pianist and teacher at the 
State University of New York in 
Stony Brook. 


d . 


PEOPLE 

Yet Another Big Trope 
Located by Florida Dicers 

Mel fisher, whose divers in: 
hauling up the first port of an esti- 
mated 54G0 nriiiion worth of Mg 
and silver from a Spanish gaUs^ 
that sank near Key West, has locat- 
ed another major treasure trci c 
300 miles (490 kilometers) 

“After spending the whole das oi; 
here off Key West, bringing up’ kjc v 
of silver bah. f went out last ragin 
and celebrated, and then I'm toy 
my crew from Fort Pierce had jig; 
hit it also.” Fisher aid. The booi-j 
from the wreckage, just off Fort 
Pierce, included a double-handled 
gold cup etched with rabbits and 
peacocks, a gold snake bracelet and 
hundreds of goid doubloons worth 
an estimated 55.000 each. Fisher 
and his Treasure Salvors Inc. had 
just completed a J5-ycar search for 
the royal Spanish galleon Nuestri 
Senora de Atocha. which sank m i 
hurricane in 1622. when they round 
wreckage that may be from five 
treasure ships, half of a fleet that 
went down in 1715. Fisher's crews 
have been working in the area of 
the first five ships, hauling up 
about 7.000 silver coins from pee 
wreck alone. The new treasure 
were amid wreckage far from the 
original five, indicating that li- 
miting Tive might be close by. At 
the Key West wreck. Fisher said hi; 
team had brought up more than 
200 silver bars by Sunday and lost 
count bv Monday. 

□ 

"When I saw the Herod Aiucu* 
theater here. I knew it was the per- 
fect place for 'Priam.' Its semi-cir- 
cular stage and the enormous arch- f 
es in the background arc a 
wonderful setting," the Britisli 
composer Sir Michael Tippett, Su, 
said in Athens after his opera 
“King Priam" was staged in th- 
ancient theater. Tipton said the 
Herod Atticus could have been 
built especially for "King Priam." 
The opera’s story, from the Iliad of 
Homer, tells of a king of Troy who 
had to live with a prophecy that ins 
son. Paris, would be the cause of ha 
death. The open-air theater at the 
foot of the Acropolis was built ia 
A D. 161 by Herod Atticus, a par- 
ton of the arts and consul of Rome, 
in memory of his wife. The conduc- 
tor of the Athens performance. b\ 
the Royal Opera, was Elgar 
Howarth — who in 1962. at “Kang 
Priam’s" world premiere, played 
the work’s opening note on second 
trumpet. 


•/ 


. i ; * ^ 


,«-V 
1 ■ I 


> 


'7 


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REAL ESTATE 
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FRENCH PROVINCES 


SAINTRAPHAB. VAIL HKNCHRhn- 
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1200 m from tee, 2 ap artments of 5 
-I- 3 rpcm, cakn & resderAd area 
Tel: Geneva 61 05 04 or France 94/9S 
92 34. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


H5B40U) CORNER HOUSE m quiet 
street. Hcrrod s area London. 4 bed- 
rooms, 3 bet hru orm, modem Idtehen, 
(fining room, firing room. Roof ter- 
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£860,000- Tel: 01-493 5424 


SPACIOUS maisonette. 2 large bed- 
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(fining room. Pleasant gmdan. 
£150)000. Freehold 5 minutes from 
Hmroek Tri Owner 01-373 4444 


ITALY 


TUSCAN FARMHOUSE, completely 
restored, 10 fan Florence. 1 bn odt 
dub. W hedae laid Tel 055858092. 


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PARIS A SUBURBS 


ST NOM LA BRETECHE 
SUPERB PROPERTY 

217 sqjn. firing space. 

Private moor swrniengjjool, Finnish 
sauna, axerdse room, 1700 irem. park. 
VERY HK3H CLASS 
FZBOOOQCt negotiable 
COP. (3) 95492 00 


CHAMP MARS 

7*K c h ornwig old pioda-twre. „ 
high dass, 72 earn., 3 roans 380 26 08 
AGB4CE DE L’ETOILE 


CLOSE ETOUE 

17th, high doss pied-a-terre, 
art deco, 77 sqm 380 26 08 
AGENCE CE L’ETORE 


PARC MONCEAU 

6 rooms, 210 sqjR, aid btdcKna, panels. 
f«t price. 380 26 0B 


DE L’ETOILE 


S1UWO CENTER PARIS, Good price 
cause doptxhiro, Fufly equipped and 
fwrvsbedTah Boor, beteony elegont 
buMr&Tel trffiat 508 45 & home: 
236 84 40, 


EXCEPTIONAL ON SEME: between 
Louvre & NtRre Dome, 3- floor house 
avaWije. garden, passiMity to odd 3 
floors. 80 sqjn. terraces. F6.200.000- 
TeL 326 98 66. 


BASTILLE fitted loft. 190 sqjrL, large 
firing + 4 bedroom. 2 baths. Pass- 
ble office use. Tet 27240 19 


1ST. US HAUEE renovated bukfing. 
Charmin g Bql 7 7 sqjR entirely re- 
done, char Oder, beams. 525 11 03. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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PARIS A SUBURBS 


181H MOULIN DE LA GAIETTE. in 
superb residence, luxury, soton/fivxtg, 
bedroom. 90 tqjn. On private gartfen 
50 sqm. Sunny. UTTfif544 44 41 


FRANCOIS ler. Duplex, 4th-5lh. Chic 
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230 sqm. view, modem kitchen. 
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AVE GEORGE V. Very luxurious, fiv- 
avt 727640^ SUIlny ' 720 79 62 


USA GENERAL 


LARGEST LANOHOiDMG IN NY 
area. Lea Aon 2 hours by ax to 
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ST. MORITZ - MADULAIN 

Aparfancrh 54 sqm up to 90 sqm. 
generously designed in the Engadin 
style, tap qudjty + bu8t-wi kuchea 
Pcrlang sound, indoor swimming pool 
Beautiful sutaundnmikBig. 15 mm to 
5t Moritz. Paces: SraiO^ftO up to 
5F420.00Q. Free tor sale to foreigners. 
Mortgage* low Sues* Merest rates. 

EMERA1D-HOME LTD 

Darter, CH-8872 Weeen 
Tel: CH-5 8-431778. 

Itx: 876063 HOME Of 


REAL ESTATE 
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SWITZERLAND 

HOLLAND 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


LAKEG0CVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

lovely aparimrts with mognificent 
views of uka Geneva and mountain! 
Montreal. VBtxs. Verbier, Les Diabier- 
att. Chateau d'Oex near Gstaad. 
leyWL EucriSsnt OpportwafUec 
Far Foreigners 
Prices from SI23JM0. 

Uberri mortgages re 6Vb% irterest. 
GLO« PLAN 5-A. 
torf Estate SperiritilL 
Av Mon Repos 24, 

CH-1005 Lausanne, Swrtzeriand. 
ToU (21) 22 35 IZ Tbe 251 B5 MBJS 
btoMidrad Store T970 

Renfhouse international 
020448751 (4 lines) 

Nederhoven 19-21, Amsterdam' 

AT HOME M RAI0S 

PARIS PROMO . 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT OR SALE 

SwTpiS** 563 25 60 



PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

74 CHAMPS-ELYSSS 8th 

Sturio, 2 or 3^oora apuitmenl. 
One month or more. 

IE CLARDGE 359 67 97. 

Embassy Service 

8 Awe. de Menton 
75008 Preix 
latex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT M PARIS 
562*7899 


ST. CLOUD LUXURIOUS. HOUSE 
Large Itvint 5 bedrooms, 4 baths. 
ABP HYSEES-GONDORDE 
9, Rue Rmrefe 75008 tan 
Talr(l) 265 ll 99. Telex 640793F. 



REAL ESTATE 
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Elysees-Concorde 

Apmtmerts/houses 
Short term rmiUto 
nwlabk from 1 week onwards 
ABP, 9, fan Rorate 75008 Pais 
Teh ft 265 11 wTTetex 640793F. 

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iHli § 


FOO! LARGE RECSmTON, 1 bed- 
roatiL avedabte 1/8 to 15/9. 05551 
09« 



81 AVE FOCH 

Luxorious Studios 

Phone, color TV, ^Aen, short term 
team. No agency fees. F4500/mcrth. 
Vert today, 11 am to 6 pm 
Te£ 574 8257. 

GREAT BRITAIN 


BESADIT LOIRS 
PRESTIGIOUS APARTMENT 
6 ROOMS, 3 BATHS. 
F30/XXJ. 225 32 25. 

on* oawxjnL wra rumwiea, newvy 
redone, quirt- F4500. Teh 720 37 97 



ST. GERMAIN B4 LATE 2 room 
new, high decs. TV, chcrm. 451 6277 

BHH.TOWBL SUMMSL. Beautiful 3 
roam Art, very quirt. 550 27 82. 

H»«PARK«V1CB. Dekue sto 
efim, from F300/doy. Tri 704 2927. 


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! PARIS AREA FURNISHED 







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BOULOGNE 

h very rice buMnn. 80 tarn, 
apretmert + SUPB» TBKACE 
GOOD COMMIKIN. 
F7.500 + chcrge! 
VJLGJ. 766 0326 

217 RUE ST HONORS, 180 st^ra. 
krgn 6 roans, 2 + new batfu. 
FI £000 + chape! Today TAxn Star 
B, 4th floor, note*. Tel 5009075. 



: «■* i 


BROOKLYN HEIGHTS. Harbor view, 
kfleury doorman buBtfing, fuly tor- 
rahetl equipped, 4 roams, avertable 
SajtTl-2 yean $1600 Paris. 326 4504 
PT8) 643 00 70 or (51 9 728 6432. 


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The mirode Jojoba cri. produced from 
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Cxhfi ng PknMions Afaaady Pro- 
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Thereafter, protections shew average 
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PANAMA GOMMMB with nomnee 
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Frankfurt. Tek 747808 Tx 412713 


ATTENTION ONSHORE $1 Hoag 
Kong red estate company for Erie, 
wnng 3 prime income praduring 
propertes m Los Angsle! USSU nit 
ion. Please contact Bax 41405, LH-T, 
63 Long Acre. London. WOE 9JH. 


PROMISSORY NOTES from lOObonh 
to he world Lays, venture capital. 
L/Cs Ifbers of Credt] far your inv 
porWxpprt proiedl froni maw USA 
* S^.retrio. Precious rnnsk Send 
to tbt 241176 Demo Greece. 


WORIDWU* V&miRE CAPITAL 
nnaa write yourj rantirentenliincoR- 
Hb ”*1 Tritune, 

92521 Neuily Cedex. Frara. - 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SBJUNG BAR-RESTAURANT Paris 
3rd, Maras tfinria. chanring setting. 
Rent FI. 100/ month, wary good tom- 
over FaWJXB. Tet 887 Mil 


COMRJTBtS - CbnsuhaU sentioas, 
fries, export- Mojar brands - toirost 
price! Mr. Lawrax*, Foris Tbe 21 3822 
Fet (1) 563 29 89 or (1) 348 30 DO. 


PASSPORT 35 COUNTRES. 
GMC, 26 Ktoomnous St, 106 76 
Athere, Greece. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


FREELANCE VURfflNG 

Copy Cencepia Granted . 

To fixnoM 

Your “ Shore of Impact" 

Compel Sna convindng & competitive 
Most Meda 4 befawJheSi*. 
Adverttti ng concept! 

22 yean on frbrand bustoea. 
Most motor mufitortanri, fast moving 
consumer product! Art director, pro- 
dudion. 60 TV spate. 

Write: Priruengrocht 624/H - 
1017 KT Amsterdom. Tlba Netherlands 
Tet 31^0-Z7j08ud2 


wn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UMJMITB) INC. 

ILSA. I WORLDWIDE 

A complete persond & business sanies 
prowfing a avow cdteetm of 
trienled, versatH & mjftifaniri 
•ntividuris far ri| social i 
promortorol occastare. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, MYjC. 10019 
Servia Representatives . 
Needed worldwide. 


PANAMANIAN corporations provide 
the advantages of axnptete mnfiden- 
taSty, zero tax WtSty & US. dolor 
atrreney environmeft. we offer com- 
pany f a mo tion services on a fist, 
ratable and compentive hnrit \Ve 
are pcroculrxty imrested in More 
op with offshore buswvt coreutenft 
in ofhr countiw. Conics K L Dar- 
tng»n,P08 1327,Fanaino9A, Prixs- 
ma Tbe 3121 XB«A PG- Tet 23- 
0634 a 23-4819 fares 23-67791 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


PROMOTION SERVICES 

Pubfiqty ^ Advarttong . Morittting - 


to do laasiass a USA. Oi 10th year at 
fret, ratable lervtcu. Gxrtach Robert S. 
Want, Premier* Want Pubfishing Cam 
^Jgl K St, N.W, WasiOTgtoa, 

(202) 783-1887, Wadtoiduo D.C 
(212) 925-1997 NYC 
Tehsc 3725487 AO U 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


PRINCIPALITY 
OP MONACO 

Unique jewefiety business 
far sate, 144 jqjn, luxurious show- 
room, For further deSris please contact 

AGES! 

26 bq Bd PrinaeM Charlotte 
Monte.Corto, MC 98000 Mamin 


DIAMONDS 


Shopping m Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

The largest showroom m 

Antwerp, Diamond Cty 

Afftefatoretr 33A. Tet 323/234361Z 


“AMONDS FROM AM5TBDAMaS 
dMrtes - lOMd pnem Come to the 
Amsterdten Dtonxmd End s anae ask 
mroom 12A. 
Wtieqserpleln 4. Ti 25723J / 797602 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOOROma W MUNKH 
re asonable pn cei, fiA 
For i n farrti u l M I COX " 


PRIVATE DEIBCIIV2 SCANDINAVIA 
& Ftokni, caB Norway; 24 fnun 02- 
42 72 14. Tlx 18949 Agent. Manager 
G. BeHev, farmer poSiz/anny rifi- 
ctr, contacts wofMwxfe- Post ro J«n- 
bcmetarqe td. N0154 Otto 1 Norway 


HONG KONG, YOUR TAX Shelter, 
re-n-rroidng ceriw, nomnee, irode 
rtt, bridge far Owo moritet, at Room 
m. Star House. UT, Hong tog. 
Un 39644 CSMGT Tet 3/72fl8Kt 


BUSSB S ADDRESS. Mai riW 
phone, telex, secretarial serente 

517 92 IT (12 hwA Tkc 61344 B 


BOA 


• ^---ywgy wi^SEtjtaARIAI. and 

London Wl. 

SsinHs, ir™ 1 ”- 8 ” 


Imprime par Offprint. 73 rue de TSmiffle. 7301 & Paris. 


m facMs. Ax. Faufefa 1754. Te^ 
SS/njS157 33.Tfami)M%M: 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSINESS CENTRES 

Furnkbed Executive Offices 
i vriffiSecrateiai, Telex 

i no i iii ii 


AMSTSBIAM Euro Business Center 
Keberear. 9 9 1 015 CH Amsterdam 
TeMMO) 227B35. Telex; 16183 
ATHB4S Executive Services, Ariiens 
Tower B. Suite 506, Athens 610. 

Tet Q0 m 7796 720. Telex- 216343 
rtOMBAYi Soi»ta ChanWi, 213 
Nan roan Pomt, Bombay 400 021. 
Tet 244949. Tele* 011-6877. 
BHUSSH-S: 4. Rue de to Presse 
1000 Brvesefo T* 217 83 60 
Tetesc 25327 

DUBAI; RO. Bat 1515, DNATA 
Axftoe Cwrtro Dubd ’lJ AE. 

Tet 214565 Trimt 4S911 
LONDON: 110 The Strand. 

London WC2R OAA. 

Trtgll 836 89 la/fbu 24973 
MADRID; C/Orense N 3 6S4, 

28020 Madrid. Tel 27DS6 dO or 
270 66 04. Telex: 46642 
MILAN: Via Boccaccio 7, 

20123 Miton. Td 86 75 d?/80 59 279 
Telex: 320343 

NEW YORK 575 Madbon Avenue 
New York. NY 10022. Tek QIS 605- 

0200. Teteto 125864 / 237699 
MUS; 80S, 15 Avenue Victor Hugo 
75116 Paris. Teh 502 Is 00 
Tde* 630693F. 

ROME; Via Sawia 78, 00198 Horn. 
Tri, 85 32 41 - 844 80 70 . 

Tofcnt 613458 

SINGAPORE: 111 North Bridge ltd. 
Telex: 812656/31298). 


LUXEMBOURG 
BCKUT1VE SERVICES 

fTtcne, telex and fafl buamss setvicK. 
fimatrust, 29, fan Fhibna 8, 


geneva “ is S«S* S5 

f^WMBted officta to rent. Demtdb- 
cy B ^no i tri&& phoney Trade, trim 

Tel- (22) 86 17 31 in 47trg» KBS 


dim l mnkv, Matoti^Sr|» 


1961. MC^PO 
Tet B!7-4lfr (5 fine.) Tw.'^? 


-- i 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

tnltea 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phono: Cafl your local IHT lepresentnfrve wrth ycu. text. You 
wl be toformed ot the cart immediatety, and once preperyraeni re 
mada your ad will appear wdhm 48 hours. 

Cart: Tf» banc rates $9.80 per fine per day -r local taxes. There ore 
25 letted ti^a and spooes to the firei fine and 36 n the favfawx^rme^ 
Mnimwn space re 2 fines. No abbrevxjtiore accepte d . 

Crw£t Cards: Amencan Express, Diner J Cfab, fairocord, Atoster 
CardL Acebss and Vaa. 


iffADOma 

Parle (For classified only): 
747-4600. 

EUROPE 


: 2636-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2S21. 
Bnmels: 343-1899. 
Catrenhagem (01) 329440. 
Frankfurt: (069) 72-67-55. 
Lausanne 29-58-94. 

Lisbon; 67-27-93/60-2S44. 
London: (01) 836-4802. 
M ad r i d. 455-2891/4553306. 
MSan: (02) 7531 445, 
Norway: (03) 845545. 
Romm 679-3437. 

Swoden: (08) 7569229. 

Tel Avhrj 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt 

UNITED STATES 

New York: (212) 752389a 
Wort Coast: (415)3628339. 


SOUTH AFRICA 


LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aires; 4) 40 31 
Ptart.312) 

Caracas: 33 14 54 
Gu ay o qu i . 51 45 05 
Uumx 417 8S2 
taiansa: 6905 11 
5w> Jomk 22-1055 
SanNeao: 6961555 
$ao PaukK 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 


421999. 


<246303. 

Kawarh 5614485 

st 341 457/8/?. 
r. 416535. 

Saudi Asabsa: 

JotJdak 647-1500. 

UAL; Dubai 224101. 

FAR EAST 

Bangkok: 390416-57. 

Hong Kanro 5-213671. 
Mretfla: 81707 49 
Sooufi 735 87 73. 

S kw opofo: 222-2715 
Taiwan; 752 44 25/9 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne; 690 8233. 
Sydney: 929 56 39. 957 43 20. 
Perth; 326 96 33. 
Paddington, Queensland: 

369 34 53. 



1 


ff r.-f- 


)7. 


*24 


§ 


SSR.43 




REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


UJSJL. 


FOR RB4T DENV9 COLORADO 

Prestigious Home Denver Courtry Oub 
Area. SjOOO plus sq. ft. carriage house, 
tennis court. 125 oernv 10 mmutes to 
d ownt a wv 15 minutes to arport. 

6 months to 1 yr. Prinripds only. 
(SOI) 862-8546. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


AMERICAN FAMILY, serfs to rent. 3 
bedroom famahed apartment o> 
house in Paris Or eonventaJ to a 
Gemaiei Loye far flu school year. 
Tefi 387 9040 or UJC. 854 2385. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

positions wanted 


AMERICAN GML, 20. Uwfang for a 
job wdh an Anenoon firm in northern 
Briy « two-ten Switzerland area. 
Spcric fluera bt*oa. Kgh school «od- 

091 / 541038 Bettnc 


•a, ™u™*gwx, tar mtsBtng 
position. London 2450080. 


MCE NIR1IGM HOS1BS, 24, 
kxda fat 'patJime assmnmerts in Lon- 
don. CoS 01 225036b 3tm to Uptu 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Don’t mb* 
MtBNATKMAl. 
SKZETAIIAL POSITIONS 

TWSDAYS 

k> (he MT dcaxffied Section. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS AVati 


CHfiPA MAXM-DOMO to Ciok far 
VaR* t«- 

dm m Bflridw, CO. EuMrmnoe re- 
quoted re Fraren obssw & kxoe dkv 
tyStow 

rwwea tot nunogacienr cf 9 w. 

PART TIME oriaciuBfi 
er; t doctor 'i hon w; 3 we£ 

gl fenoyuietittym «tc» I w, ream 

■mwooge or engue cfll dnvore 

Ima W42S* 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 

RB4CH WOMAN 4a speaks Ger- 
man/ Amertcon seeks temporary peti- 
tion at cooky newCTi en far I worth 

from 27/7 - 24/8, Expenence in USA. 
Free to travel Akrimum F6Q00. Sto- 
out offers only. Pans 7D7 01 46. HI 


B4GUSH NANMES A MOtHBff'- 
Hefas N«h Agenqr. 53 Cteitdi ■- 
Hare, Sussex. UtL Td- En^uon (27? 
29044 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAflC RB4T A CAL fiteftge can 
<Mlh phone- Both Spot. Mecrts 
Joguar, BMW. imouimtK. small care 
46 r Pierre Charon. 75008 Prire Tri 
72830.40. Tefal 63»97 F CHAROC 


CHAUFFEUR 

SERVICES 


HOME HUB SERVICES. Defeat cn 
ehouffeur. Tel 704 2927. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO WWW A BJROWW 
CAR niro THE USJL 
This doaxneri explains fufly viri 0* 
must do to bring a car into the 
safety and legally. & mdoda new 6 
■reed turepean auto price! btn«'B ,i F ,, 
DOT & EFAaoveawn oddrasm s*- 
tom daoratea & tiippm praackrrt 
ai we« athsripMA. wUSmtd 
strong daSor, you can tna-v » 
USSllajO when btfftsg a WKrths- » 
BMW ot Eurspi A MTpvttirQ >i to 
Sto. To receive i(n now, 

7D0Q5Mgari 1. West GrttMiT 


WariUhrUe Car ! 

TRANSSHIP C __ 
8am.-Sraidt*Str. 5&IHI 
2800 Breaen 1 
Tri: (CJ471/1425* The 246584 Tro»5 
. Bci den Muehren 91 
2000 HaRburg 11 
p^37na^JT4W4 D 
1 aw dOT/EFA * band it USA 
M em ber of ACA. Wothtogun 


WORLDWDE Ctr dupana A insr 
risATX, NV, NitmsTtpBfA 
w»rp,fl*^ua,K3.'231 1^3 T* 31535 


PAGE 5 
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CLAssmms 


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