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WEATH 0 I EUTA APPEAL ON PaGE .76 

Nd.:il^58 


INTERNATIONAL 




Publidied With The New York Times and Hie Washington Post 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


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By Frank j: Prial giwiigaeorfertofireoiithepopu- 
' New York Tones Service lanon, the South African govexn- 

BARIS — France recalled its ®«l bis only remforced its repres- 
ambassftiorto South Africa on . . 

WednciS&y and suspended all new The measures against the South 
a protest against the' A&ican government may have been 
iis®«ritrda af a state of emei»a^ ' P r<an P tcd “ P?n by mounting 
that The number of arrests raffle pressure on the Frenchaovermneot 
owhdown has risen to more than to take sterna 1 action uian the rest 
gw . - ... of the Western nations. 

^he' punitive measures, an- Le Monde, a Paris daily newspa- 
s»Msca by ^hime Minister Lan- per, ran a scornful cartoon criticiz- 
ren^Fabrns, are the most serious mg what it raw as an equivocal 
taken against South Africa by a stand by lhe United Stales, and it 
Western country since the state of warned in an editorial .that “the 
aaaxaxy vent into effect Son- moment has without doubt come to 
a™ - step up tile pressure on the leaders 




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India Reports 
Peace Accord 
With Sikh Parly 

Untied Pros Jruenutikmal in 2 SUICtnCOt that Mr. LoilgOUa] 

NEW DELHI — The Indian bad no authority to speak on behalf 
government and a major facti on of die Sikhs. “Ours is the real Akali 
(he Sikhs’ political party reached Dal*nd tbe government should ne- 
agreenwm Wednesday to end four godate with lhe ad hoc commute 1 
years of suiTc, which led last year to have appointed," he said, 
the army’s attack on the revered {Parkash Singh Badal an Akali 
Golden Temple and the reprisal Dal leader and a fanner Punjab 
assassination of Prime Minister In- chi^ minister, said the government 


dixa Gandhi. 


must punish anti-Sikh rioters who 


The agreement was announced killed more than 2,700 people after 
in Parliament by Prime Minister the as s ass in ation of Mrs. Gandhi in 


Rajiv Gandhi after wo days of October.) 
negotiations between officials and Tbe 8°’ 
the Akali DaL majordn 


t conceded all ihe 
f the parry, which 


day - sum up me pressure on me leaders 

There was no immediate com- in Pretoria satfaattjwr take action 
meat on the move by the South before it is too late. 


African] 


fust an hour before Mr. Fabins 


Mr. raUns said that both the ma de iris announcement, Claude 
freeze do new investment and the Estier, president of the foreign af- 
recaDcf Ambassador Ken* Boyer fairs cMamisaan of the National 
wereeffective immediately. He said Assembly, called on the gentern- 


100 FREED — Foamer detainees waved to friends after 
Israel released diem Wednesday from the prison at 
AtStp north of the Israeli defense fine in sooth Lebanon. 


1b Beirut, the Shiite Moslem leader, Nabth Bern, criti- 
cized Washington for faffing to secure the freedom of all 
the Leba ne se in Atfit About 330 are still being held. 


“I have great pleasure in an- churns fo represent most of India's 
ooundng to the house that after 15 million Sikhs, who form 2 per- 
some months we have t ?k en a very ° enC of the nation's population. 


I Gandhi said. Kdemng to a leader agreed to: 

1 of the Akali Dai, he added, “About • Designate Chandigarh as the 

20 minutes bade, Mr. Harchnnd capital of Punjab slate, where most 
3 -g Singh Loogowal and 1 have signed Sikhs live. Chandigarh is presently 
j\ ^ >*/|nO 8 memorandum of seitlemem." the shared capital of Punjab and 

jTm.m fH/o Mr. Longowal said later, “The Harvana. 

period of confrontation is over and • Hindu-speaking areas added 
rd, administration offi- carefully satisfied with the deal" to Chandigarh when it became the 
that an election will be [Before the announcement, hard- capital will revert to Haryana state. 
L Mr Peres, the Labor line Sikh pditidans discounted A federal commission will be set up 
Foreign Minister Yitz- Mr- Gandhi's efforts to reach an io deiermine specific areas of Pua- 
of the Ukud bloc, who accord, Reuters reported from jab thai should go to Haryana be- 
uHhcr than Mr. Peres in Chandigarh. cause of the loss of the capuaL 

[Jcttjnder Singh, leader or a mili- * A nver-wmers dispute is to be 
such a victory would tarn Stion of the Akali Dal said (Quirfnned on Page 2, Col 4) 


‘ step fon 
said. Refi 


forward today," Mr. Under the pact, the govemmenc 


, to a leader agreed to: 


that the two measures had been 106111 to 00016 °P with “concrete 
decided an by the French cabinet measures to express France’s ab- 
at ita we^hr meeting Wednesday horrence of themethods being used 
nuwnirw by the South African l e a d e r s. 


U.S. Maneuvering Between Israelis, Arabs 


InS&y, the Socialist govern- Mr. Eaier said th at “faced with 
merit reversed a long-standing po- ®di f aring abrogations of f un d a- 
lky of opposing economic sane- mental human rights, it is no kmger 
tions nprinct South Africa. At the pommle to take refuge m verbal 
time, Mn Fabins said that invest- protestations.” 


By Bernard Gwetrzman 

Ht w York. Timer Staffer 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan admmistra- 


1»JL it is no kmwa- ■ “r.r- ZZJZ. Hussein contends that no agreement is posa- Party leader, will defeat foreign Minister r nz- 

Sine in verhal IS *>le without high-levd Palestinian mvolvemeni hak Shamir, the leader of tbe Likud bloc, who accord, Rci 

X ™ 8P £5“^ ^r° l I » in the negotiations. Israel having negotiated a has been consistently tougher than Mr. Peres in Chandigarh- 


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ffmgj Mr. Labuis said that invest- ptowsumhhis. 

tTM-ni in the- whito-mlcd nation French investment in South Af- 

would be cat within 18 months ini- rica amounts to Sl^ MKori. To 


« wu. m »»» (be interests <a two w us closest menos m me -- .t.. r*>aniiaium* 
vMssabaosr \fiddle East — Israel and Iordan — is in serious ^SSS^wbh' 

French investment in South Af- danger of offending both. SSfi t S?feSiS vS' 

ica amounts to Sl^ bfiOkm. To The issue is how Palestinians should be in- R P ea ^ 


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idansnlclb action moved up that timetable by 

■AiitThtt almost 16 monuis. 


supply its nuclear generators, chided in the peac 
France boys about 25 percent of its been at the heart 
ur wtmim from South Africa, which nearly 20 yors. 
is also France's most important It has never bee 


item that has 
impasse lor 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


ouid like to. opposing negotiations. [Ji 

although it The U.S. hope is that such a victory would taut 

— — i— give Mr. Peres a mandate for negotiations with 

Jordan and Palestinians in the West Bank and 


agree to enf ^* Israel in d ire c t ne gotiations, per- politician. Off tbe record, administration offi- ^ ^ satisfied with ihe deal to Chandigarh when it be 
haps accompanied by some Palestinians ap- dais express the hope that an election wiD be [Before the announcement, hard- opi^WTUreveritpHan;; 
proved by toad. ■ held in toad and that Mr. Peres, the Labor lm« Sflth pohuoans discounted A federal comnnsaon will 


(Continued on Page 2. Col 4) 


never been easy for the United States to 


that some Palestinians have to be 


to bis statement, tbe prime min- source of inqxirted coal arid the maneuver smoothly between Israel and moder- w . 

ter said: “Ffcrafl people who sop- biggest mariert far France’s dec- ateArabs because the Arab and Isradi in loests wtaJeUA admucBteationtitereis 


the Gaza Strip. Until then, they acknowledge, nrn .V A | - TT 

ffs Thatcher Almost Loses 

aroeal for S2 billion m additional aid this year. T ~ . 

Because of the problems involved, senior ad- d\n LVfV ftl 6DC 

minis tration officials say, the United States V v X U> J X# iLI vtlovd 

must handle tbe Hussein initiative cautiously. •' 

“We’re in no rush,” a leading State Dqpart- 
ment official said after a meeting between Mr. 


izraradaldisaiiiiinaiion; it under- beginning ofthe 1980s by Frana- senby Yasser Arafat, the leader of the Palestine ^ *8^ & odds, has ^finally brought the Were mi alra^StateDqiart- 
mines the moral and political ttHne,acansotthimof Frendicotn- Liberation Organization, and that has raised PL ® . mt0 agreement (m the usdntoess of a ^nt offiaal said ter a meeting between hfc 
SuSonSi mSSSk SSs. negotiated accordwth tod. The officials say Shd re. and senior Middle, East rapern headed 


By Harvey Morris Wednesday that they were warned 
Hemen by John Wakeham. the chief whip 

responsible for party discipline, 
LONDON — A revolt. within tbe ihm a government defeat in the pay 


principles 

based. 


panics. 
[The UN 


Council will The immediate question is whether to accept Be faces 


“Events of tbe last few days have meet Thursday oo the atuariaain King Hussein's proposal for the United States P 0 ®®* ^ 1 
drawn a grave and serious aeterin- South Africa, in response to an to meet with a Jordaman-Palcstinian ddega- oown j 11 K 
ration. By rngtaffing the state of- urgent request by France, the Unit- turn, thereby keeping alive the Jordanian lead- for along i 
emergency and conferring foil ed Nations announced Wednesday, efs peace initiative, or to yield to Israeli asser- - . Mr.Pere 
powers on the anny and ponce, in Reuters repeated from the United tions that the United States Should not at down governmeQ 


assistant secretary 


Arab peace 


talking with lhe players.' 


i and South Asian ruling Conservative Party brought debate could have meant an early 
studying to do and the government to within 17 votes general election. 

of a parliamentary defeat over M«. Thatcher does not have to 
y accepting the plan plans to substantially increase the call an election until 1988 although 



powers onthe armyand pdSce, in Reuters repwted from the IMu» tionsthartiv: United States should not tit down government, is regardafcas more wilting to run for meeting wth the Jordaman-Pakstmian dele- salaries of some top public offi- most commentators expect her to 
multiplying arbitrary arrests and in Nations in New York.] with Palestinians but instead press Hussein to nsks for peace ton arfy other leading Israeli (Continued oo Page 2, CoL 6) aais - fix it for the autumn of 1987. 

.1 to the worst rebellion that Mrs. Commentators believe that she 

. _ _ — Z — r — - — •— ^ •- •• ' • j; ' - - jh v ■ Thatcher has faoed ance a land- will face shaip criticism Dram dis- 

Aides' Say US.CdhsIdered Bombing 

J n House of Commons. 48 Conserva- Hm nav vote was the latest sm- 


House of Commons. 48 conserva- The pay vote was the latest set- 
tive parliamentarians voted with back for the government, which 
the opposition Tuesday night and this month polled a poor third in a 
50 abstained. Welsh by-dection and has been 

The rebels were apparently falling in opinion polls, 
swayed by complaints from then* Ttercbdlkmoune in the closing 
constituencies about tbe govern- days of the parliamentary year, 
meat’splans to increase the salaries which ends Fnday. Before Partia- 
of 2,000 armed forces officials, man resumes in late autumn, Mrs. 
judges and top civil servants by Thatcher is expected to reshuffle 
between 12 percent and 46 percent her cabinet. 


ase 


By Tod BrinHcy 

New York Tima Sendee 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration seriously consid- 
ered attacking a bare in Nicaragua 


j ing the XJ5. Embassy in Managua, 

e teadmg to a more generalized mih- 

tary confrontation. 

"““2^ For several years, administtation 
officials have contended that the 
cara * ua * Sandintos main tain secret bases 


riBas were bamed,-acwdmg to se- yadof m a duo^c that 

mor admnus&atirai oCtoaals. Nicaragua has repeatedly dmitaf. 

BS^oroflSwtohaveao- 
10 mteffigeoce information 

gsassss 

volved m the tmeost attack last (hat one or more of the 


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Salvadorans involved in the shoot- 
SEKS “ mg of tbe marines in San Salvador 


"r^SiS^tsemorlev « at one of 

The rfan, disaKsed at senrar tev- xhe camps near Managna. 

* in the White House, would have u^T these newlwi 


Thi New YcHl TkM 


A worker in (he port sausage plant at Kjbbntz Mizra. 


eisintnfiwmie«owe,wouinimve U these new reports that 
involved a so-called surgical air jmntired the d i s c ussia ns about re- 
strike against one or more t raining mikiinn (be officials srid. They 
camps that the admin ist ration says acknowledged that (he information 
Nicaragua has set np m the cotm- ^ n ot conclusive, but died a to- 
ajwdeMit farftomManapia.. port that cme or more of the Salva- 
Tto officials decided not to rany ^^5 yjsiied Nicaragua 

out the plan but to warn the Ntea- within 48 hours of the shootings. 
iHgmrn government instead ra se- The dndcmatic note delivered 
nous oonsequenc^ should the ad- ^ wedtSosaid the United 
mmutratKm conclude ; that ri was states had “indications ibat proia- 
imj^tote^artsmtoetomre nui^ ^ under way tointSSS 
Mca^ hwar^ a program of attacks 


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Israelis Debate the Politics of Pork 

Bills to Ban Sales of 'White Steak’ Are Sensitive Issue 


over the next year. 


to a report on Wednesday, a par- 


Tfae Conservative dissidents Samentary committee concluded 
were am o ng those who accused the tjial Britain was justified in sinking 


government of insensitivity in jra Argentine cruiser, the Geoen 
awarding pay increases of up to Beltran 0, during the 1982 Falk- 
£20,000 ($28,000) in a single year at hinds war. 
a time when h was urging low-paid Bui in a minority repon. Labor 


workers to tbe private sector to members of tbe Commons’ Foreign 
acoqit single-digit percentage m- Affgin; Ccamniuee sad that ques- 


AHaixs Committee saa urn ques- 
creases and has offered pubhc-scc- remained and railed for 8 
tor teachers only 6 percent. Some parliamentary inquiry into the af- 
pubhc-sector unions tone already 
settled for modest increases. ‘ „ ... . 


Daniel Ortega Saavedra 


' ;.v<* 

lNO-*\ _. L*W V 


SSRcS»gSf! 




By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Times Service 

KIBBUTZ MIZRA, Israel —The manager of 
toad’s biggest park factory sits behind his desk 
wearing a long white butcher’s coat arid a worried 
wrinkle on his brow. 

- The sign on the vrall above him reads: “Promote 
Pork. Run Over a Chicken,” But pig jokes are not 


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have acquired a taste for bacon, ham, pork ribs, 
pork gala mis and And they have been 

consuming them to ever increasing volume. 

Kibbutz Mizra, to northern Israel, is the coun- 
try’s biggest pork producer and sells its products lo 
more than 300 butcher shops and grocery stores. 
Its factory employs 70 people and it is rate of 20 
producers that contribute to 10,000 tons of slaugh- 
tered pork a year that Israelis consume. 

imdersu^t Two laws pOTdr^bdOTctoeKnjjet, < jj scussa j b, cophamsms, For mstaace, restaurant 

2*5“ menus refer S pS as “white steak.” • 

When the spokesman for the Mtoistiy of Agri- 

are three countries m the worid 
vriiere there arc such laws,” said (he factory man- 

ager, Sar-Shalom EyaL “The first is Libya, the to were bOTgaaw about cocaina 
second w Saudi Arafo and to Iran they are dying ^ [natty doMniow, to ! said. “Trnthto^ 

to push throutto such a law but haven’t yet.” truthfully, truthfully, we don t deal with it Notfot 
YosaSaridTa leftist member of partimneMfrom good or bad. 1 am idling you the absolute troth. I 
the Citizens Rights Party, said: “I told (be Knesset am sorry. Goodbye. 

ihat they arc talking about lhe pork worse than The rigorously Orthodox political parties have 
they talk about tbe FLQ They have presented the long been trying to Impcoi, Mr. Eyal said, “bu t it 
pig as a dear and present danger, as if the pigs of had become a kind of game. How do you call h, 
the world are attacking Israd and we have to do “hide and seek? ” 

something about it immediately.” Two things occunoi brarever, that have led to 

“1 doa’i cat pork and I never imagined I siting rtffrhg game, 
would be tbe defender of pia” to srid. ^theti- . First, the Agudai Imd Party, a xmisly Or- 

raDy, it is not a creature I admire. M tf that a l i M ^4 W ]fidi v RabttAvrahama^ira, has 
what people warn to eat, it is thorngbL, ror yeara been inlrodriring a law that would make 

. to many ways the proposed pig-bannmg tows 5^1^ pork a crimeL The rtfigious see as tosnfifi- 
tonch.on some of lto most senaave issnes m «oa deat a ‘^ 62 law that already makes it iDcral to 
today: tiie nseofaninaea^ly mfljtant reh&OK a^pigseawt to selected districts to pre&i- 
nghL the need by Ubot ■ Bwy pohtici^ who areas remote from centers of 

were onrahaid-ccwSocahsts, to strike a t^giou® jewSh population. Prospects for passage of tire 
pose m order tooourt an mararin^- traditJOfia] ^ haveriow inroroved because of the current 
electorate aitotto rote of poikm a Jewish naaoiL ^ 

SttZSl&ESSXES MS Ss 

” imawm in which oSTbig party would wmt to 


a program 

that u has either practiced or sup- fl r, a j n ^ n g 
ported terrorism and has character- ^" ^heretfieUt 
aed US. aippart of anfrgoywn- tains a larae milit 
ment rebels as state- sponsored “Wc are aware 

terrorism against Nicaragua. mmi nf Nu 
. HttiyEBa-gold, the U.S. am- 
bassador to. Nicaragua, ddwered 
the American wanting to the San- ctotaeoi of 

fttessssss^t 

tiie adntinistration had “laid down 

tbe gaanltet” with that warning by ti 

slating that a second situation £ 

would be sufficient to warrant a BWeatEi 
limited US. mflitaiy strike. ^ fjriled 

i&JsSzfmZSZ " 

day: “We have outlined is firm - ■Drug ra 
tones our policy on attacking ter- other dtie 
roost centos or those responsible netted 134 
for terrorist attacks,” United Press 
toternarional reported bom Wash- 1 

togtem. “That policy remains. The - 
governments responsible under- • 

Sand that." avt 

HVe will take appropriate &o HGuatenu 

tioa Tbe lcyd of our rehouse will litical kiDii 

be proportioaue to tto loss to- snrgency t 
c an ed," Mr. Spealws said.] tions appn 

Stoce Ust fm tto Reawn admin- „ 

istrarioD has said that ilNicaragua ■T* 


1 terrorist attacks President Daniel Ortega Saavc- Partia 
nsmmd to Hondu- dra, responding to the noie. said in Th 
United States main- a speech last week that “Nicaragua ihron 
Qitazy presence, has neither practiced nor support- the 6! 
ue that the govern- ed terrorism, nor has it been to- Da 


in view of the onerous duties they 
had to cany out.” 

The vote on Triesday was specifi- 
cally on an £11,000 increase m the 
salary of Lead Hailsham, the Jord 
chancell or who is the head oT the 
judiciary, the only increase that 
Parliament must approve. 


and 368 Argentine seamen were 
killed to tto bloodiest encounter of 
the war. 

The majority report of the 
11 -member committee said that the 
was justified cat military 
grounds and was not undertaken 
for political motives. Opponents of 


The government scraped Mrs. Thatcher have alleged that she 
rough on a vote of 249 to 232 to ordered the attack to scuttle Peni- 
e 650-seat chamber. wan peace efforts. 

Dozens of Labor parfiamentari- The report said that the evidence 


mmt of Nicaragua supports those vttived in any terroristic act” Nica- ans were absent from the final vote, pointed to the General Bdgrano 
involved in these preparations,” the raguans, be said, were “victims of Their presence could have caused a being pan of a coordinated Argen- 
note said, “and we believe lira gov- United States terrorism” because government defeat followed by a tine formation preparing to attack 
eminent of Nicaragua may be di- of the UX support for the Nicara- confidence vote. a British task force steaming for lto 


reedy involved.” 

INSIDE 

■ West European defense offi- 
cials failed to raid disputes over 
a planned fighter jet Page 2. 

■ Drug raids n Chicago and 
other cities under a new law 
netted 134 suspects. Page 3. 

■ Roane and General Electric 

proposed a refund plan for 
arms costs found to be exces- 
sive. Page3. 

■ Guatemala is troubted by po- 

litical killings and a Mantisi in- 
surgency as November's elec- 
tions approach. Page 4. 


gnan rebels. 


Some Conservative rebels said Falklands. 


Police in Auckland Question Identity 
Of 2 Arrested in Greenpeace Sinking 

The Associated Press be appear in coun again Thursday, As the investigation spread to 

AUCKLAND, New Zealand — charged with five separate mum- Switzerland and possibly France, 
A New Zea 1 ^ court refused bail grattoo violations relating to false the police to New Zealand said they 
Wednesday to a French-speaking passports and to making false im- would pursue leads in New Caledo- 


pmTvW and arson to the bombing marriage declaration by tto worn* 
and tanking of the Rainbow War- an. 


amage declaration py iae worn- 7^ want uj question the 

II. . . . . ... French crew of a yarat that left 

The defendants made two bnef Auckland just before the Rainbow 


eat,” Leviticus says. “They are unclean to you.” 

. Tbe problem today is that many secular Israelis, 
who make up at-least two-thirds w tto population. 


form its own coatition with the smaller religious 
(Continoedoo Page2,CoL5) 


planes, like tto Soviet MiG-2 f, tto 
Utoted States would probably or- 
da a “angical" air stoke to destroy 
them. Tto senior offiaal said tto 
White House had decided that any 
future Sandtoist-tospred terrorist 
attacks would constitute “another 
stuatkm Eke acquiring MiGs." 

Tto torn surgical air strike is 
used to describe a Bunted attack 
intended to destroy a specific target 
and then end without furttor m- 
vctivemeol and with limited avifian 
^A«aialtieR. Some administration of- 
ficials say the Sandtoists woold al- 
most certainly respond to even a 
limhed attack, perhaps by attack- . 


■Tto US. State Department 
defends the favorable trade sta- 
tus of Romania, despite pro- 
tests. Page 4. 

! ■ In Pakistan, death of a 
Bhutto calmed, for a tune, po- 
litical strife between 23a and 
f main foes. Page 5. 

SCIENCE 

VUtaafast silicon drips are 
spariang a new revolution in the 
computer industry. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 
■Brad tos criticized its credi- 
tor for what it termed “exorbi- 
taot" imenst rates. Page 9. 


nor, a vessel belonging to Great- The defendants two bnef Auckland just before the Rainbow 
peace, tto environmental protec- appea r ances at Auckland DBtna Warrior explosion. Three detec- 
tion group. Gwrt rat Wednesday. They entered ^ - m New Caledonia trying 

The suspects were identified as P^ 5 rtoy woe I0 ^ ^ie yadtt. the Ouvea. An 

Sophie Fredfirique Claire Turenge, charged with murder, arson and jog^y was unsur- 

36Tand Alato lacquesTurenge, «! oonapinicy to commit arson. ccssful 

Bui there was cotmisc® about their Those charges relate lo the use c£ w ■ ^ w tt... i ».ai~ii Pn i^» 

SSitoto and nationalities, aqjlwives ttoi on July 10 sank tto "Swiss Cafl Pa^porb Fake 
^ it was not known if ttoy were Rainbow Warrior, a converted Swiss passports told bv tto man 
Sm nSLi. trawler used by Greenpeace m its and woman charaed m the striking 

““ ■ _ . campaigns agatost whaxmg and no- of tto Rainbow Warrior are false, 

Tto poto offi w m charge of dear testing. A crewmember, Fer- the Swiss government said 
the investigation, Datoctm 1 Super- nando Pereira, died in tto orolo- Wednesday, Reuters reported from 
mtendent Allan Galbraith, said ^ 3^ 

that court appearances by the man ^ ^ ^ SQI ^ ^ A spoJcesman said the Justice 

and woman did not mean ;that he- AucMand haffior, was to have left and Police Minisuy had no record 
ws seating down his inquiries. this weA at tto toad of a flotilla to of tto names Alain and SqplheTur- 

Tto police arrested the two last protest against French nuclear test- cage, which were given by the two 
week for on a charge of having mg at Muraroa AtoIL when they were arrested last week, 

entered New Zealand illegally on A New Zealand detective was “The passports hdd by the oou- 
June 22 with false passports. The scheduled to fly to Switzerland to pie are false. These people do not 
ample, who say they are Swiss tin- help Swiss authorities and Interpol exist in our records,” the spokes- 
zens, deny the charge. They are to check tto couple. man said. 


. .■% 






*H <?> IO H towny tf*<S*aa9P339SSSSSEC!:Bie3ani900SSPP«*»»>> lm I 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TpUBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


Aides Fail to End Row U,S, Ending U.S. House Sets Ceiling 
Over European Filter Case Against On Its Spending Bills 

By Axel Krause of urgency," said a British Defense fffiSMIfillf Compiled tyOurSttff Fmm Dbpa&a “My position has been no buc 

intJutiotdHenMTriburx Ministry spokesman. m f WASHINGTON -The House get,*’ said Senator John H. Chafe 

PARIS — Five West European Several officials, who declined to rwi * approved legislation Wednesday of Rhode Island, the third-rankin 

defense ministry officials failedata be identified, said that a new meet- f if I PH Jit KfPTK btntiing aDits spending bills to the member in the Senate Republica 
neetingteRyStoSvTthei “8 would be scheduled in the fall, ICUflWtCId House budget plan, anattempt to leadership. He said that no budge 


•J Krause of urgency," said a British Defense 
Herald Tribune Ministry spokesman, 
rc West European Several officials, wlw declined to 

officials failedata be identified, said that a new meet- 


meeting in Madrid to resolve their “8 would be scheduled in the fall, 
protracted dimute over plans for ann “ rqports ra Paris, London and 
jointly building a new combat Bonn that several other plans for a 
plane for the 1990s, participants new fighter were bong studied by 
w»tn»cHav defense nnmsfjy and industry offi- 


said Wednesday. defense nnnisuy and mnus 

_ " dais in consultation witl 

The project, known as the Euro- heads of government, 
pan fighter Aircraft, u widely re- - At ^ ^ it appe 

garded as a major test of European only a political solution at tl 
raoperation. It could lead to the est lewfe can resolve the 


tation with their 


appears that 


By Ronald J. Osrrow 
and Robert L Jackson 

Lea Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
government has decided to drop its 
32-month-oki labor fraud investi- 
gation of Jackie Presser, president 


rf itmSJZn 681 levels M n* 0 ™ “* of the Teamsters union. 

?J’^,??^i repre ' “ces,” said a senior official in Government sources said Tues- 


Campded fy Our Staff From Dapanba “My portion has been no bttd- 

WASHINGTON — The House get," sard Senator John H. Chafee 
approved legislation Wednesday of Rhode Island the third-ranking 
binding all its spending bills Co the member in the Senate Republican 
House budget plan, an attempt to leadership. He said that no budget 
cut the federal deficit without wait- would be preferable to a budget 
mg for a House-Senate conference “that is bad and in many respects 
committee to agree on a budget, deceives the people" about how 
The resolution, approved .242- well it would deal with the nation's 
184, commits the chamber to deficit problem, 
achieving the £56 billion in savings Robert J. Dole of Kansas, leader 

for the next fiscal year that was of the majority Republicans in the 
called for in the budget It passed Senate, and Pete v. Domenid, a 
earlier. The measure is not binding Republican of New Mexico who is 
on the Senate. chairman of the Senate Budget 

The Senate has passed its own Committee, have both suggested 



WORLD BRIEFS 


seating orders Of S30 hillion. Bonn. He added that Manfred day night that the investigation was ’ n “ ! Senate has passed its own Co mm it te e, have bot 

Agreement has been blocked by Warner, defense minister of West being dropped because the Justice target, also calling for 556 billion that forgoing a budget 

a dispute between France and Brit- Germany, would continue pressing Department had concluded that “ savings, but the houses differ on option, 

ain over such questions as design for a five-nation solution. tb e case igHwi "prosecutive ma- which programs to cut Talks be- Meanwhile, the top 

leadership and engine require- If France withdraws from the ft/* politically sensitive case twem A® two chambers broke and Republican leadc 


“Unfortunately, the situation is TuTluTv 

, . ik jLTjTtj ■ “ Bonn would be to establish a four- 

solutions in sight, said a senior ^ ■ fiohter-hnmher o mantTg 

ttrapre mdnstiy cyculivc in ^ ^ 


Ray Maria, the dep 
general in the Labor 


West Germany after the meeting, gS-Agf WrSm.STnS who oversees labor racketeering in- 
whiefa examined several comprch West Germany and Ita- vesngations, said, “We have no 

PS&fi2KS.S££ 

„. 7V , . buildmg a new fighter with France The decision not to prosecute 

The defense officials from the as the mam partner, and is examm- Mr. Presser came six months after 
five partiapaimg countries, which mg several other proj^iududing federal prosecutors in Cleveland 

COO l )Cra 5 V ? matures between Gcr- recommLitd that he be indicted 
^ Swun, are to review the results man and U.S. aerospace compa- on charges of authorizing union 
of the Madrid meeting as a matter nres. navmentfro “vhnst Mining " «r 


;tive mer- **idt programs to cat Talks be- Meanwhile, the top Democratic 
itive case twem to® two chambers broke and Republican leaders freon the 
r Depart- down last week after Senate negoti- House and Senate met at the White 
aal to a ators rejected a House compromise House on Wednesday with Presi- 
wianH as providing too nrach for domestic dent Ronald Reagan. 
i nS p ector programs rad too little for military The session was called to discuss 
partmGM programs. the congressional agenda before 


payments to 
cronies who 


>st employees, or 
no work but ap- 


2 Spanish Officers Are Jaded 
For Holding Mock Executions 


pcared on the payroll of Cleveland pesskaanthattheHonseaiidSea- 
Teamsters Local 507, of which Mr. ate will be able to agree on a budget 


“Although I am still working to legislators leave town Aug. 2 for a 
reach agreement with the Senate monthlong recess. The stalled bud- 
conferees on a budget resolution get talks, which have backed up 
for fiscal year 1986, 1 believe that other legislative business, are cer- 
tbe House must take fmnmitian- tain to be a prime topic 
steps to implement its own bud- Mr. Dole said that he hopes the 
get,” said Representative William Senate wfll have an alternative defi- 
H. Gray 3d, a Democrat of Penn- at-reduction package to offer to 
sylvania who is chairman of the the House tins week, but so far 
Budget Committee. Senate Republicans have not set- 

Tbe move came amid increasing tied on the details of that offer, 
pessimism that the House and Sen- (VPI, AP, NYT) 


Presser is secre tary- treasurer. 

Mr. Prcssert reported status as a 
source of information for the FBI 


5KST ■ Line-Item Veto Killed 

Thomas P. O'Neill Jr, a Massa- The Senate rebuffed a final at- 
chusetts Democrat who is speaker tempt Wednesday to break a Sh- 


in other investigations was a key ^ ^ Hoase : Wednesday, buster blocking a bffl to give line- 

■ , ■ .. . J k Manu aT nc ihinlr <h» hiiiltrM i, nnl Hmi vaIa nmrnr In PtmiiImI 


United Press [nianational 


ZARAGOZA, Spain — Two games in June 1984. 
army officers who villagers Prosecutors said soldiers herded dais in the Department of Justice 
into a public square far mock exe- villagers into the square, where had ordered a new inquiry into why 
raitiinns during war gamwa were sen- Lieutenant tniguwy read a proda- the FBI did not teU toe department 
tunnw! Wednesday to prison terms mation ordering the executions of for nearly two years that Mr. Press- 
of four and five months militar y Mayor Josfc Ganndo and the court a had acted as an informant, 
authorities said bailiff, Generoso Ara, for harbor- Providing information to the 

A military tribunal here ruled mgrebds. FBI does not nwrnaUy give a per- 

that Captain Carlos Aleman and /* ** mayors wife screamed, so n mmnmity from prosecu non. 
Lieutenant Jaime Iniguez had been Mayor Galindo and Mr. Ara were But in Mr. PressertcMe, the 
overzealous in canymgont orders, P 1 "** before a wall and Lieutcn- sources said FBI officials were 
but it acquitted thanof charges of Ini ft , . ez his men to fire, concerned that sensitive mforma- 
mnitAndi«ihedieno> ^ The soldiers fired blanks. bon about other investigations 


impediment to prosecution, 
of Abates during war sources familiar with the case said 


"Many of us think the budget is not item veto power to President before the Senate in my 19 years," ^The'meeti 
the soundest thing in the world Reagan. The Associated Press re- Mr. Hatfield said after Wednes- Soviet Union 
because we waste too much time on ported from Washington. day’s vote. Burt who stc 

it-" Even the unexpected help of Mr. Reagan has long called for ranndiaw affi 

Mr. (yNeffl’s statement followed Senator Edward M. Kennedy and the power to loll individual spend- pledged the 3 
remarks by some Se nate Rroubli- the president’s first personal lobby- mg items, saying he would malm c j v y liberties, 
cans suggesting that no 1986 con- ing since his cancer surgery failed cuts that Congress had been unable 
gressknuu budget at all might be to muster the 60 votes needed. The to accomplish. He telqihoned wa- 
better than a compromise that did motion to limi t debate failed, 58- vexing senators on Sunday «nH RpKpl T 
not cut domestic spending enough. 40. Monday to lobby thwm iiouoi x 


It was also learned that high offi- baausewe waste too much time on ported from Washington. 


Even the ones 


Mr. O’Neal’s statement followed Senator Edward 
r emar ks by some Senate Renubli- the president’s fh 
cans suggesting that no 1986 con- ine sin ce his can 


spooled 
M. Kern 


but it acquitted them of charges of “ nre - 

militar/disobedience. The s^iere fired blatriks. . 

"Zwere orders stage a a JaS5fiffl2Ml 

make itas rralhstic as mss&L^ but 
they went too far," said a Defense 

lieutenant Iiun^uddSe pan- 
Jesus dd Monte. el lhat 1 m had orders to call or ‘ L - 


Pentagon Calls Bamming an Accident 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Defense Depanmem has backed off 
from an earlier suggestion that a Soviet truck may have purpose!;, 
rammed a UiL military car carrying three Americans in East Germtey 
two weeks ago. A spokesman said the incident now appears to have been 
an accident. 

The spokesman, Fred Hoffman, said Tuesday that U.S. and Soria 
miGtaiy officials had met after the July 13 accident, which had prompted 
a U5. protest. One American soldier was injured slightly in die inciaem, 
which occurred on a public highway northeast of East Berlin. 

“We’re still looking into the matter," Mr. Hoffman said. “But time 
have been discu ssions with the Soviets. Indications are (hat the inodou 
may not have been intentional." He declined to elaborate. 

Humus p. O’Neal jr." U.S. Completes Middle East Study 

WASHINGTON ( UPI) — The Reagan administration has completed 
a study of the mQitaiy balance in the Middle East that is expected to bad 
Mr. Dole, then pulled the bill to renewed requests this fall for arms sales to Jordan and Saudi Arabia, 
from consideration. The wcckloog the White House said Wednesday. 

filibuster threatened to block other Lany Speakes, the White House spokesman, said the review had 
measures from coosukrattoa be- examined “the ability of individual states to react to several levels of 
fore Congress begins as recess. threats,” including those posed by outside forces, neighboring countries 
Mr. Kennedy, a Democrat of and terrorism. 

M a s sachus ett s, said in endorsing Decisions on the Middle East have been on hold since February, when 

the measure, “The budget process the administrati on, facing opposition in Congress to possible anus 
is in shambles, the deficit is out of requests from Arab states, undertook the review, 
control, and Congress is part of the 
problem. Congress has too much 

Saw and Burt Criticizes Soviet Rights Record 

But Senator Mark 0. Hatfidd, a BONN (Reuters) — Richard R. Bun, the U.S. ambassador-designate 
Republican of Oregon, leader of a to West Germany, charged Wednesday that the Soviet Union's human 
group of senators b l o c kin g the bilL rights record has worsened over the past decade and said that the United 
called it “constitutional ma d ne ss.” States would use a mee ting in Helsinki of foreign ministers from the West 
The opponents argued that the and the Soviet bloc to focus on the issue. 

line- item ' n ^> would give too much Mr. Bun, at at a news conference in Washington relayed to Europe by 
Down- to the president, upsetting satellite, said that the United States would accuse Moscow of reneging on 
the balance of powers between the its commitments under the 1975 H elsinki accords at next week's gather- 
branches of government. ing to mark their 10th anniversary. He also said lhat Washington wookj 

“We have stopped one of the not consider improving ties with the Soviet Union until it tow: action lo 
most dmgoous proposals to come improve its observance of civil liberties. 

before tte Senate m my 19 yous, “The meeting will allow us to remind the world of the failure of the 
Mr. Hatfield said after Wednes- Soviet Union to observe the final act of the Helsinki accords," said Mr. 


m lo dc a prune topic. control over the purse, and the 

Mr. Dole said that he hopes the president has too little." 
aare wiD have an alternative defi- But Senator Mark O. Haifidd, a 

-reduction package to offer to Republican of Oregon, leader of a 


notion to limit debate fuia, 58 - ““ Rebel Reportedly Seized With Nkomo 

— HARARE, Zimbabwe (Reuters) — Zimbabwe's state security mimy 

tfcr, Emmerson Munangagwa, said Wednesday that security forces had 

I w • A a ~u winj* a nil 1 raided the house of the chief opposition leader, Joshua Nkomo, mid had 

ndia Announces Accord With Sikhs 


During the hearing, Captain Ale- might be disclosed in the course of 
man acknowledged that the modi prosecuting hhn. 


might be disclosed m the course of (Cautioned from Page 1) ate who was unable to control the 

PI MV CU tSfc^k PmriHAm Rnnniri a federal tribunal dfflwit m the : party, was 

Mr. Presser is modem Ronald headed by a Supreme Court iudae. n^ased from jafl m March tlus 
Reagan s lone pohncal aipporter A report win submitted within year as Mr. Gandhi's first concilia- 


of terror 

and Hyn- 


among 
ers. Bu 


og mmor American labor six months and will be binding on tory gesture to the Sikhs. 

But l §roughoi i t the unusually bo^ ^ Haryana states. ^ justreonduded nq 


▼ ▼ aux k/ i i wt ao Mr. Munangagwa interrupted a debate in Parliament on the renewal of 

- n . IQfi . c:i . a state of emergency in force since 1965 and said that the rebel had been 

B^mnmgm 1981.5ikfa separat- foun d in Mr. l&o’s house in the southern city of Bulawayo. 

j 1 ??* “Nkomo was present when we arrested the dissident but he said 
“otiting," the minister read from a message that he said had just come 
Wh ° from intelligence officials in the city, capital of Matabddand province 


jcnis aei Monte. el that 1 m had orders to call off the long course of the investigation jjjg K0V emment also agreed to came ®s a surprise because the 

_ 1x1 * **5®“® “J*® mock executions if the villagers ap- Justice Department officials insist- promote the Punjabi lamm^roo- Akali Dal was in disarray. Mr. 

Spanish Gvrl War, Lieutenan t lm- peared frightened but thattney had ed that politics would play no role ken by Silrhc and to racouraeeali Lougowal led one faction whfle the 

guez led a nme-man ^eoai forces appeared calm. ttlnK other was headed by the father of a 

squad to the northeastern moon- The decision not to prosecute is noritiex^^ p zealous religious leader, Jarnail 

1 Sakarinran WnricflnStrikft certain to be controversial because Dirl rrmlfitiiiiml ■ nr«i4 #«v Singh Bhmdranwale, who died in 


r “otiring,” the ntinista read from a message that he said had just come 

Wh ° from intelligence officials in the city, capital of Maiabeldand province 
posca a separate state. and Mr. Nkomo’s power base. Mr. Nkomo, contacted at Ms Harare home 

In June 1984, Mrs. Gandhi or- said: “I haven’t heard anything about this nonsense. What is a dissident 
dered the army to storm the head- [rebel] anyway? These are all Lies, and they are mad.” 
quarters of the extremists, at the 


guez led a nine-man special forces appeared ^i™ 
squad to the northeastern moon- — — 


BACHBiNt,IKASTBt,DOCTOIUCrE 

EARN A DEGREE. Uu raw pan apHtaa m 
BMHORUMrdHAHllNBHIHn 


hrHtCMEnMlH 

Z1M7I-11S4 

WMUnBM, 
5wWh.CA.DSA BOZO 


The Associated Press 


Salvadoran Workers Strike ^cmtroveml because 

of Mr. Prosser's political oonnec- 
The Associated Press tions and because the Justice De- 

SAN SALVADOR — About partment rejected the recommen- 
1 15,000 public and private workers dation of sbike force prosecutors, 
staged a one-day strike in El Salva- Department officials had sent the 
dor on Tuesday to demand higher investigators back to the fW d for 
wages and frealom for four jailed more work, delaying the case for 


But the government refused to 

accept Sikh demands lhat an am- Til™? r« hnirw^intf^v if /tnu-tenronsi measures were lm- 
ncsty be prodairnwi for Sikh sol- P«^ WotarfAy in bdi.’, wca- 

diers who mutinied last year, for JV “V V era Gig ara t state to ctnb sectarian 

withdrawal of army troops from violent in which at least 37 people 

U^ror.nM.ti lolled m Uk pas.^. 

fecial conns m Punjab. «P«n«l from ifew DdU. 

Mr. LongowaL a relative m otter? terrorist activity in the state. A police spokesman in Ahmed- 


Golden Temple of Amritsar, the 
holiest shrine of the Skh religion. 

■ Violence in Western State 

Anti-terrorist measures were im- 


labor leaders. 


nearly a year. 


Hospital Denies Rock Hudson Report 

PARIS (AP) — The American Hospital of Paris denied Wednesday 
that Rock Hudson, the film actor, is being treated for inoperable liver 
cancer. It said tests have not yet revealed what ailment is responsible for 
his collapse and hospitalization. 

“As far as we brow that report" of Ever cancer “is false," Bruce Redor, 


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W rm The Global Traveler In Mind 


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Mr. Gandhi's announcement abaci, the state's largest city, said A press agent for Mr. Hudson had said he was suffering from liver 
was greeted by a loud thumping of that police started enforcing an cancer and was being treated by specialists from the Pasteur Institute in 
desks by members of both ine ml- anti-terrorist act cm Wednesday. Puis, winch specializes in medical research and has conducted a search 
ing Congress (I) Party and the op- The law provides the death pen- for *be cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS. 

P°5^°?- ... , „ . alty for extremist acts that kiU and 

Tie laid hae prompted a call by gives the authorities broad powers . , „ _ _ 

awmh hones and hold «« Shultz Assails Greece Over Hijacking 

^ WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State George P. Shultz tdd 

a . n . j, c , Congress on Wednesday that Greece’s release of a sdf -confessed accom- 

astora neportea to survive Acadent h ^ ackcrs ^ aTWA “» J«« was -a tenibie way to 

“I personally fed one of the worst things the Greek government did 

was send the hijacker to Algeria to get thar Greeks aboard the airplane 

..out," Mr. Shultz told the House Foreign Affairs Committee during a 
review of terrorist threats against U.S. diplomats. 

He was referring to Ali Atwa, who was arrested at Athens International 
Airport after being bumped from (he flight to Rome on June 14. The 
plane was Mjackedafter takeoff. Mr. Atwa said he had in tend to be the 
third hijacker aboard the plane: 


Pastora Reported to Survive Accident 

SAN JOSE, Costa Rica (AP) — 

Ed£n Pastora Gdmez, an anfi-San- 
dinist guerrilla leader, was in a heli- 
copter that disappeared over Nica- 
ragua, an official of his rebd force 
said Wednesday. A cousin said lat- 
er that Mr. Pastora had anived 
“healthy and safe” in Panama. 

Hector Dario Pastora, secretary 
of an opposition group Hn ked to 
Mr. Pastora's guerrilla fences, said 
the helicopter in Much his cousin 
had been traveling developed en- 
gine trouble Tuesday. 

He said that Mr. Pastora, widely 
known by his nickname of “Com- 
mander Zero,” had then trans- 
ferred to another helicopter in 
southeastern Nicargua and Down 
to Panama. A Costa Rkan radio 
station with ties to Mr. Pastora’s 
Democratic Revolutionary Alli- 
ance said that he had suffered 
“slight" injuries. Ed& Pastora G6mez 



For die Record 

Anny colond downgraded and expelled 
from the Communist Party because of views favoring the Solidarity 
tmian, was arrested July 3, opposition sources said Wednesday. (AFP) 
An exgbshm [ damaged the Beirut offices Wednesday of the West 
G«man amine, Lufthansa, police said. (Reuters) 

Israel saM Wednesday that Egypt told Prime Minister Shimon Panes 
that it is going to lift all restrictions on trade and tourism between the two 
countries. . fl/p/; 

. HaM J cfffcW meifia proclaimed a government victory in Monday’s 
referendum op constitutional amendments affirming President Jean- 
uaude Duvalier’s appointment as lifetime leader (UPI) 


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Bills to Ban Pork Sales in Israel Prove Sensitive 


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(Comhaied from Plage I) 
parties — the big major parties 
must strive lo keep on good terms 
with the Orthodox parties. 

Not surprisingly, when the pre- 
liminary reading of Rabbi Sha- 

S lira's law was hdd by the Knesset a 
ew weeks ago, it was approved by 
a vote of 57 to 23. It must go 
through three more readings in & 
next two months before it passes. 
Officials say they believe it wilL 
While Rabbi Shapira’s bill could 
have been ejected, the same could 
not be said for an almost identical 
MU that is being combined with it 
and was pul forward by a Labor 
member of parliament. Rabbi 
Menachem Hacohen. 

“Even assimilated Jews always 
looked upon the pig as an anti- 
Jewish symbol” said Rabbi Haco- 
hen, explaining the reason for his 
bilL “I am against religious legisla- 
tion, but the pig is a symbol of 
destruction for Jews.” 

“Having pigs here is like intro- 
ducing the symbol of the swastika." 
be went on. “The older generation 
understood this and maw sure the 




pig was not brought into daily life. 
But now society has changed and 
we have many Israelis who don’t 
care about symbols. Many of them 
don’t know what the inside of a 
synagogue looks like. The sale of 
pork his become an expression of 
assimilation within me Jewish 
state, and we have to fight it." 

Rabbi Hacohen added a second 
explanation for the ban’s prospects 
this year, one that comes a lot clos- 
er to oqilaining why Mr. Peres sup- 
ports it Since coming to power, 
Mr. Peres has been crying to adopt 
a new, more traditional imag e for 
himself and his secular party. After 
he was elected, he went to pray at 
the Waifing Wall He avoids bong 


seen driving on the Sabbath and be 
has been studying the Torah with 
one of IsraeFs most distinguished 
rabbis. 

Why? Roughly 52 percent erf Is- 
rael’s Jewish electorate now are 
Ashkenazim, or Jews of European 
origin outside Spain, and 48 per- 
cent are Sephardim, or Jews from 
Noth Africa, Spain and the Arab 
world. The Ashkenazi population, 
however, is relatively old white the 
Sephardim are relatively young and 
are growing faster. The Sephardim 
trad to be more fundamentalist 
and adhere mote closely to tradi- 
tional Jewish law. 

Each year they represent more of 
the voting public: A widespread 


assumption in recent years has 
been mat former Prime Munster 
Menachem Begin, an Ashkenazi 
from Poland, owed much of his 
success in w inning Sephardic votes 
to his ability to project a religious 
aura and appeal to the Sephardim's 
more traditional Jewish identity. 

One expert on religion, Janet 
Aviad of the Van Leer Institute in 
Jerusalem, describes the pork law 
as a perfect issue for Mr. Peres. By 
supporting it, he could appeal to 
the religious, improve his image as 
a traditional Jew and say to his own 
party that be was not backing rdi- 
gious legislation but simply seeking 
to outlaw a symbol repugnant to 
the Jewish people. 


U.S. Risks Off ending Israelis, Arabs 



(Continued from Page 1) 
gation was underscored last week 
when Hussein finally sent Wash- 
ington a Mst from Mr. Arafat of 
seven Palestinians for possible in- 
clusion in the delegation. ■ 
Jordanian officials had miH that 
all the Pales tinians would be ac- 


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nian- Palestinian group if the Pales- 
tinians were not regarded as ynn - 
ine representatives of their people. 

Officials acknowledge that few 
Palestinians who do not have HnW 
with the PLO can be regarded as 
representative of tire Palestinian 
people. Bui Washington will not sit 


to the PLu — and thus acceptable. 
None of the three — ■ a Strip 

lawyer, an East Jerusalem editor 
and a Paris-based historian — can 
be considered Pal estinian leaders. • 

The officials said there would be 
little point in meeting with a Jorda- 


rads right to exist and 

Nations Security Council Resolu- 
tions 242 and 338, which form the 
basis for negotiations." . 

If Mr. Arafat actually met the 
U.S. conditions, thereby obliging 
Washington to meet with his repre- 


sentatives, he would provoke a ma- 
jor rift between the United States 
and IsraeL And that would not im- 
prove the chances for early negotia- 
tions. 

Mr. Sbultz reportedly shares 
some of the Israeli concern that the 
PLO is trying to use Hussein's 


[5223 


“wrong Detween Mr. Murphy and 
the Jordaman-Palestinian group 
would be followed by direct talks 
with IsraeL Mr. Shultz, also wants 
the Jordanian leader to produce a 
more representative Ha of Patestin* 
ijtts. particularly from tire West 
Bank. 









IEPS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


Page 3 


-Says He Felt Burden More During Reagan’s Surgery 




J 4 ! that \j c ^ 


eta4 *JsSS 

' e ~-»ataoSi!*( 




Bjr Gerald M. Boyd 

New Turk Times Service 

. WASHINGTON — Vice Presi- 
dcntGoorge Bush say* he fell the 
harden of responsibility more 
heavily when President Ronald 
Reagan underwen t cancer surgery, 
an July 13, than be did when die 
president was shot in 1%). 

In the first interview he has 
granted since being acting {Resi- 
dent for eight hours on the day of 
Me. Reagan's operation, Mr. Bash 
said his sense of responsibility was 
brightened that day by iris "more 
defined" rale. Before the surgery 
Mr. Reagan signed a letter tempo- 
rarily tnrmng over power to the 
viceinesideaL 

ML Bash suggested that the fore- 
warning of the surgery, compared 
with the surprise and shock of the 
shooting, had allowed Mm more 
time to reflect on the situation. 

' He noted that there were fewer 
“question marts” about the plea- 
dent’s health in the most recent 
satgney, but added, “With the actu- 
al transferring of power there was 
somewhat of a different feeling.” 

% strongly denied that he bad 
been shunted aside by Donald T. 


I , | . sragery, auueu, wuu meacro- 

il2hts }}«.„ , al transferring of power there was 
lte COrJ somewhat of a different feding.” 

- 7C He strongly denied that he had 

boar shunted aside by Donald T. 
nr-* -V* 2 ^ thelS Rerih, fMs White House chief of 
“URhien gaff. He said that the most difficult 

*! mnnwat nf fbn» nnirut nne ih» “nn_ 



George Bosh 


that throughout nr fcb of last 
weekbeand thewMie House op«- 
atfd fu H fiimliy tp that in 

(he period when the piesidfflt was 
tosmtalfeedin. 1981. 

To not sore that scfaeduling- 
wise, and the way people per- 
formed, there wasn't macs differ- 
ence,” he said. "And I think that 
most people around the country 
fdtthal&ingswenialoagsnooth- 
ly." . 

He said he did not know if Ms 
actions had hurt orhdpcd his pub- 
lic standing in regard to a possible 
bid in 1988 for the Republican Par- 
ty nomination for the presidency. 

The relationship between the 
vice president son Mr. Regan, lie 
chief of staff, has been the subject 
of some speculation since Mr. Re- Suspects WiT 
gan assumed responsibility for the local law enf 
day-to-day operations of os White 
House during the president's con- ~g j 
vnlesccnce. I ~C/i. A 

- The vicepresident saidthat there 
was “no sense of tension” between * _ 
him and Mr. Regan. He acbmwlr Lot Angela 

edged, however, that, there bad CHICAGO — 

been a disagreement over whether ties said they db 
be fihffliUri return to Washington of a nationwide fa 
from Maine on the day of Mr. Rea- marijuana sums 
gan’s surgery. Mr. Bosh had gone don ms$ by an* 
to bis afiwu 1 ™* house in Kenne- and seizing cars, 




Thi Aaodtfcd Prw 

Suspects were arrested and property was seized in Chicago and other dries, as federal and 
local law erforcement agents applied a new statute in a crackdown on drug dealing. 

134 Arrested in Major U.S. Drug Raid 


Lor Angela Time* Senior booses, two gasoline Stations, two 

CHICAGO — Federal authori- candy stores, five taverns, two res- 


Justice 

that thee 


at officials said 
focused on the 


ties said they disrupted operations teurants, two jewdry stores, a flow- operations of the Herrera organiza- 
of a nationwide heroin, cocaine and er shop, two mobile homes and a lion, based in Durango, Mexico, 


_ marguana snugg ling distribu- large number of automobiles. which allegedly has dominated nar- 
' ' " 134 persons The raids took place in Illinois codes trafficking in metropdiian 

r stores, lav- and Indiana, with additional ar- Ch i ca g o and northern Indiana for 


for the weekend but dwn earns and apartment bouses. 


rests in Colorado, California and two daades. 


cidcd to return to Washington.. 
"There was a difference in com- 


ed^iANkom 

!rib>.b*A % v,ai c seemm ^ 

w ‘— '■’-MUiNsoiitoaalfc 

inP^T.raior.ilienae 4, 
:r,z: rebel 
incrr. 3^« a ; 0 

sted i'-Miiasi but I* j, 
'mUt :na: nr void hatj majp 

i r : ~ 

*5. V«r- Vu '.i.: j.; hi- Harare ic 

ii> ’A b i ^ 

ter. jr- .T..n " 


k Hudson Report j 

.UQ. l 1 :’ rj. r ■' 

sV: irwpoaafehe 

wriii iur-er: rrf.Miktr 


.it tetofa. 

&3 sv p:\xu Bob- 

jat* ‘r.r.c 'rer. rn.Xis'c 

■u-d he U' 
tiali! r.::.-T.e 
earcii r_u ^jrjcaciBB 
iUier.o s>r.i.-ss Jf® 


the vice president went on, as the c_ 
president s doctors began provid- 
tag enconragjng news. aw -y 

While Mr. Reamn was under anr color 
esttoiaand its effects at the Naval he hi 
Merfical Center in Bctbesda. Mary- hep< 
land, the transfer of power made ior fc 
Mr. Bush acting presiaem. tions 

In the letter Mr. Reagan had able, 
written: “I have determined, and it T 
is my intention and direction, that sona 


away from the White House for the sidelines.’ There was notha 
p was under an- colon surgery, Mr. Bush said that ih«L It’s verv unfair to Dc® 
Ktsatihe Naval he had attempted to balance what absolutely unfair." 
Bctbesda, Mary- be perceived as appropriate behav- Mr. Bush said that the 


The seizures were made Tuesday Texas. Nearly 500 agents from six 
under the 1984 Comprehensive different agencies took part. 

Crime Control Act, which allows A statement from the Justice De- 
the government to rise civil courts partment said: “As a result of the 
to obtain forfeiture of property al- new Jaw, the United States now 
Legcdly used in drug transactions, owns all of the seized property and 
It was the first large-scale action the burden is on the former titie- 


sfical Center m Bctbesda, Mary- be perceived as appropriate behav- ^ said that the prefer- 
4 .the transfer of power made ior for the vice president with emo- eace of some Reagan aides that be 
■. Bush acting presidenL tions with which he felt comfort- remain at his nlace In Kennehunk- 


irnder the new law. 

On Tuesday, federal agents 
sated 31 houses and apartment 


bolder to prove be has no knowl- 
edge that the property was used to 
facilitate drug transactions.” 


comfort- T «nn>fn at his place in Kennebujik- 
port reflected a wish to avoid 
on [ having a rea- *Tna^itenmg tw^swvi to what was 


written: “I have determined, and it “I pride myself on having area- •‘heightening tension to what was 
is nty intention and direction, that sonaole good sense of how to act in supposed to be a routine opera- 
Vfce President George Bush shall tins situation,” he said. *T was not tkm." 

discharge these powers and duties concerned that I was stepping into Asked about his schedule during 
in ray stead commencing with the thefimdight,ncrlwasIconremed Mr. Reagan’s recuperation, which 
administration of anesthesia to thatl was being elbowed out of the doctors Wc estimated wQl take 


powers. it too much or out of it, because I bly not be a lot of activity by him in 

Mr. Bush said Tuesday that he Rally just think from the way it that period, 
had spent the right hours as acting worked out, it worked pretty wefl. Much of official Washington will 

president at his official residence Mr. Bosh, interviewed in Ms be on vacation, he noted, tiros re- 
here, on the grounds of the Naval West Wing office^ down the hall during the likelihood of any need 
Observatory. He engaged in the from the preadenfs Oval Office, for a change in his rale. 


Kay Kyser Dies in U.S. at 79; 
Led Band on Radio Program 

Lm Angela Times Senate In 1944 he married Georgia Car- 

LOS ANGELES — James Kern roll, a magazine cower giri who be- 
Kyser, the b andleader who can- came a anger with his band. She 
ducted radio's “Kay Kyscfs Rol- and their tmee daughters survive 
lege of Musical Knowledge,” (fled him. 


Treasure Ship Called Scientific Boon 


By Jon Nordhcimcr 

New York Tuna Service 


KEY WEST, Florida — Besides ure might be too high. 


the Atocfaa off the Florida lor in B«wm in 1618, a generation in 1950 and de 
IS years, said Tuesday that the fig- after the wreck of tot Spanish Ar- years of Ms fife 


mada off the coast trf England, Mr. 


yielding riches’ of rilver and gold. An inventory of what the divers ^ dx wreck could 


Hill, North Carolina. He was 79. TT _ _ 

From 1933 until 1949 “Kay” UJL GovemmentDropfi 

School Pmushinenl Bin 

career 20 nrilfion people were fis- The Amaaud Prat 

uming to his weekly program of LONDON — The Conservative 
dance muse mterepereed with quiz aovemment has dropped a MU that 
quMtions. He stopped perfpnmng wouW have let parents decide 
in 1950 and devoted the last 35 whether tbdr chi&rcn could be 
^ of to fife writing with the subject to corporal punishment at 
Christian Soenoc Church. school. 

During World War ° Kyscfs Th c Education secretary. Sir 


years of Ms fife woritine with the 
Christian Science Chorea. 

During World War n Kyscfs 


prove to be a saentittc nonanza, ^ Mathewson said, “We’re not 
according to the chief archaeologist tieasure hunters as mnch as we arc 
of Treasure Salvors. Ina. ... an grehaool^itai recovery team.” 
“It’s a virgin shipwreck in sitn. He said he was distressed to 


Singjrdcunonds ai wholesale prices 
b> ordering direct from Antwerp, 
the world's mos imporunt cut- 
diamond market. Give diamonds 
to the ones you love, buy for 
investment, for Jour enjoyment. 
Writes airmail for fret price list 
or callus; 

Joachim Gotdenstein 
diamaotexport 
Eaubthbed 1928 

PdifcMfMtraut 62, B-2018 Arrtverp, 
Belnnm -TeLs (323)234.07^1. 
Teles 71779 ayi Ik 
at the Diamond Club Bldg. 


4>.Mdpiu«nNiiM«w ra— o v 
iabO MSHMAd 


“It’s a virgin shipwreck in sitn. He said he was distressed to 
one of the greatest treasure finds learn thal the divers had removed M^wn, couia atw to tins stuqy. 


from an ancient shipwred 
ed anywhere,” said Dudcj 
ewson. 

Backers of the limited 
ship spent years and mi 


& IUUO 1DUU.UHUUK UIVU5 UOU iOUUVWt t_ 

record- 200 silver ingpts in thrir first flush 


of enthusiasm. about 300 miles north of Key West In 1983 he was named, president 

High winds from Che tropical off the coast Of Fort Pierce, Flori- of The Mother Church, The First 
storm kept crews away from the da, another crew of Treasure Sat- Church of Christ, Scientist, in Bos- 
find Tuesday, and no other remov- von Avers has located a treason; ton, an honorary title given to a 


The excavation of the Santa more than 500 camps, bases and .schools free to choose whether to 
Margarita, a sister ship of the Alo- hospitals. When the tmlitaxy draft cane ‘and spank students. 

dm that lies a few miles to the beckoned. Mr. Kvscr said he coaid - • - j 

nor t hea s t , coold add to this study, do more for the war effort as a _ 

be said. • rivifian titan in the Army. He was f “ ' 

In another major discovery, given an exemption. I 

about 300 miles north of Key West In 1983 he was named preridem | 


r\ UllnrtUn* ““P s P Bni y™ 5 81111 nup™* find Tuesday, and no other remov- von divers has located, a treasure ton, an honorary title given to a 

V/Ver IilJavMl'fi dollars to search hundreds of al of treasure is to take place until trove believed to be from fiveships member who has made a rignifi- 

- .. Mn,M Xiilv nf MO tiAHMi Fnr lh« MU ..l J- 1 . --1 1... * 


^ c 

:ie s. j-r;- - i.-mrsw- 


square miles of sea bottom for the additional divers and archacologi- dial sank in 1715. 
remains of Nncstra Scfiora de Aio cal assistants can be hired. - - — — - 


cant contribution to the movement. 


ish treasure fleet. Toe vessel sank in 
, . nT . a hurricane on Sept. 6, 1622, about 
— *•' 40nriles(641alometera) west of this 


Mr. Mathewson said, “What we 
think we have is most of the hull 


irar-i* :r.; •- -s «. ■ ri 

.1 Lheir G:::- 

mg- .V-i.' i 


lSl^SS«S2'^iSof5S CSJ 8° 01 fl* 8 Atocha, pinned 
40 mfles (64 kflometers) west of tins of bars ana nicely 


kiij:- -t- 

x -Sir. - r 
Al wj -J‘- •• 


V) ttdontl 
t cf - 

IC- 

id nfTico 

r trill l->r.r- 
r. u±i: 


i- ’,{*• luitou- 
-. I- $ 




island rily 

At first, members of the compa- 


preserved.” 

If that is correct, be said, the 


Gme al more uun S4Q0 nmfaon. awn time opaolouiiqiaitmlal 


Dole and Kemp Call a Trace 
To Halt Republican Fend 


.. ito* 
:JU*S 

.. yjtlA 55 


r. -U# 


sure at more than MOO million. 

Md Fisher, the salvage operator, 
whose crews had been searching for 

Bulgarian Urges 
Area Nudear Ban 

Reuters 

ATHENS — Todor Zhivkov, the 


Washington Post Service 
WASHINGTON —Two of the 


mous time capsule, as important as Washington Pott S*nkx is not between two members of 

Pompeii or even King Tufs tomb.” WASHINGTON — Two of the j£Sam!So m watched the 

Scholars over the years have Ire- R^ubhcan Part/s leading prea- programTSled to say he appred- 
Quemly otittecg the xnetimds and dati^ mug topagmne ^ ^ Dole’s restraJcom- 
rianns of Mr. Fishers operations, Jack F. Kimp rf New York and ments, accordmii to John Buckley, 
but news of the discovery of the Senator Robert J. Dole of Kansas, Mr. Kemp's press secretary/ Whfle 
Atocha brought betghxcacd aca- have arranged a private truce in ^ Rcpub^cans wffl conrimie to 
demic interest therc m crrosuigly tart pcMic feud, disaereemman? usnes. Mr. Kbno 


denric interest 


Dr. GttHge Bass, director of ar- After a week of bitter exchanges 
aeoiogy for the Tnstjmte of Nan- Mr. Dole muted Ms criticism at 
al Archaeology at Texas A&M Mr. Kemp in an appearance on a 
niversitv. RudT“From what Tve tdeviaoo interview program. “I 


TLaJ V«JJ Wedneadav ticM Archaeology at Texas A&M Mr. Kemp in an ap 
University, sarnTTiom what I’ve televisioo interview 

SrI^SShrpivwitnoT»riori- beard it sounds like a spectaailar think I make harder 
Balkans shoul d be g iven top pnon ^ a spcaaj thing to find an times than he does, but the quarrel 


m linacasuigiy uui puouc iciui. disagree on many issues, Mr. Ktanp 
After a week of bitter exchanges wanted to dampen the ran- 
r. Dole muted Ms criticism at cat” Mr. Bacldcy said. 


ty by area governments. in tuft canto ifau mn jrive a pictnre 

i^ts-oSKtf aiss g&vfiits 

said such a move could be the first NewWorid. 


Mr. Dole said through an aide 
Tuesday that the two mem had 
“agreed it was a little bit early for 
the fireworks over 1988 to start.” 


a n*Ewnse and T 

) /t ^ ^ J raised mqor otgections. 


step toward a nuclear-free Europe. Mr. MatiKwson, who has a mas- 
A1 though Greece simporis the tig’s degree in marine archae ology, 
Bulgarian proposal, Albania has said he hoped the Atocha’s cargo 
turned it down, Romania is delay- would provide i n si g h t into a range 
ing a response and Turkey has of subjects, 
raised major objections. Noting that the vessel was bunt 


ft 


CONCORD 



r.£-y>: 


3 


Boeing and GE Propose 
Refund for Excess Costs 


By Wayne Biddle 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON - The Boeing 
Co. and the General Electric Co., 
which rank fifth and sixth, respec- 
tively, in the nation as weapons 
contractors, have offered refunds 
on spare parts and equipment that 
the Pentagon considers overpriced, 
the Defease Department has an- 
nounced. 

Secretary of Defense Caspar W. 
Weinberger said Tuesday, the day 
the proposals were made known, 
that Ik had ordered the creation of 
a similar refund policy throughout 
military industry. 

Both companies have offered to 
refund, within three months after 
delivery, the money paid for spare 
parts or support eoutpmcnl if the 
prices were found by the govern- 
ment to be unreasonable. 

“We believe this is a constructive 
step in demonstrating to the public 
that none of us want or seek prices 
that lead to the kind of examples 
which have been the focus of so 
much attention in reoem times,” 
Edward E. Hood Jr. vice chairman 
of GE said in aletier on July 1 to 
William H. Taft 4th, deputy secre- 
tary of defense. 


Mr. Hood added that GE would 
agree to retroactive changes in ex- 
isting contracts to cover previously 
delivered parts and equipment 

For more than a year — since 
accounts of vastly overpriced mifi- 
taiy spare parts fust came to public 
attention — weapons suppliers and 
the Pentagon have been under pres- 
sure to improve purchase proce- 
dures. Congress is considering 
broad amendments in military -pro- 
gram bills this year. Some of the 
changes have angered contractors 
as too severe. 

A Boeing vice president. Lionel 
D. Alford, wrote to Mr. Taft in 
April: “Instances continue to occur 
where the price (Mu we charged for 
a .spare pan or item of support 
equipment is challenged after the 
procurement has been completed.” 

“In order to eliminate this prob- 
lem,” he added, “we are establish- 
ing a policy whereby any item that 
has been purchased at prices that 
thereafter appear to have been un- 
reasonable can be returned to 
Boeing.” 

The Defense Department did 
not explain why the April offer had 
not been made’ public sooner. 


US. authorities said that more 
than 2,000 persons are involved in 
the Herrera organization. 

The 134 persons arrested were , 
accused by federal grand juries in 
nitfink and Indiana of fairing part , 
in conspiracies to smuggle and dis- 
tribute heroin, cocaine and man- 1 
juana. They also are accused of 
allegedly using telephones and; 
irawKnginterataie to facilitate nar- 
colics offenses. 1 


Every piece of jewelry has a story to tell. 



) iiias LALAoUNISl 

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raeli 


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An art carried to perfection in Swiss watches. 

The David Morris Exhibition of the most exclusive Concord Wadi Collection 
in The Conduit Street Showroom from July I5lh to 28th 
and in ThcOwrehill Hotel Showroom from July 29th to August 9th PJH5 


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j 38 Conduit Street, London W1 
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Carlton Tower, Catogan Place, London SWl 
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A measure 
of excellence 


ii 

J Mobil if 
iGrandJr 


a 1BBS Motw Coiwawon 


Fans at the Mexico City Olympics gasped 7 f 
when Bob Beamon long-jumped 29 2 7 r' — 
8.90 m.— surpassing the existing world record 
by an incredible 21 inches. Today. 17 years 
later, that jump remains a measure of excel- 
lence tn athletics. 

Seeking to better Beamon's mark is 
history's second longest jumper. Carl Lewis. In 
fact many of the world's finest athletes will be 
vying for records and points in this summer's 
IAAF -Mobil Grand Prix. A season of 
16 international meets, the Grand Prix is 
sponsored by Mobil and organised by the 
international Amateur Athletic Federation. 

Forthcoming Grand Prix competitions 
include the Bislett Games in Oslo on 27 July, 
the 1AC Meeting in London on 2 August, 
and the Budapest Grand Prix in Budapest on 
4 August. 

Grand Prix points are awarded to ath- 
letes on the basis of their performances and 
times. World records gain extra points. At the 
conclucion of the season. Grand Prix awards 
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female athletes and to the outstanding per- 
formers in each event. 

Mobil supports the Grand Prix because 
it believes in rewarding consistent achieve- 
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truest measure of excellence. 






. *WH*! 



Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD^EURU^ THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 



Barbie’s Lawyer: An Anti-Establishment Renegade 

By Jeffrey uibnch trial investigation failed to confirm His father, Raymond Vergfcs, origi- bead of die Khmer students’ asso- year for his courtroom tacts 

ThiAaadmedPms that be had killed anyone during a ally from the French Indian dation, lata to head the bloody attacks on judges. He then w 


Byje&cy Uibnch trial investigati 

The Associated Press that he had k 

PARIS — Jacques Vetges, the H. 

lawyer defending the Nazi war Prosec ut ors 
criminal, KlansBarbie, is an enig- two months w 
ma. stand trial on the reduced 

Resistance fighter, fonner mem- career ® 


s, origi- bead of die Khmer students’ asso- year for his courtroom tactics and 
Indian dation, lata to head the bloody attacks on judges. He then went to 


World War IL Ocean island of Reunion, was in Communist regime in Cambodia 

Prosecutors are to dedde within charge of the French Consulate ax daring the 197%. 
two months whether Barbie is to Ubon in 1925. He lata resigned Fran 1951 to 1954, Mr. Vergis 
stand trial on the reduced charges, and set up shop as a doctor in Laos. lived in Prague as secretary of the 
Mr. Vdgfes's career is studded “I was E urasi an , bon at a time International Union of Students, 


in Cambodia Morocco, where he woriced as a 
liaison officer between the rebel 
4, Mr. Vergfcs Algerian Army and otha African 
cretazy the independence movements, 
of Students, Alta Algerian independence in 




As Elections Approach, 
Guatemala Is Troubled 
By Insurgency, Killings 


By Robert J. McCartney 

Waskingftm Pan Semte 


at the state-financed San Carlo? 
University to infighting among 


rorists, Mr. Verges. 60, seems an 


unlikely candidateto take un Bar- objects that arouse Ws passion, in 1928 and Mr. Vogte spent his 
bie’s r a ji sff . He is vague on certain aspects of youth there, attending the Lyc£e 

_ _ . his past, his relationships with such Saint-Deniss where he was a class- 


KGB and amemba of thePo&bu- organ of the ruling National Itiber- 
ro; and Giovanni Beilin guer, anon Front 


Barbie, who has been in French 
custody since 1983, is facing 
charges of compliaty in the decor* 


his past, his relationships with such Saint-Denis, where he was a class- 
personalities as Pol Pot, Raymond mate of Raymond Bane, lata to 
Barre and Ahmed Ben Bella. become prime minister of France 


youth there, attending the Lyc£e biotha of the laic Italian Comma* Bur a year later he left Algiers 
Saint-Denis, where he was a class- mst Party leader. . “following political differences" 

mate of Raymond Barre, lata to Mr. Vcrgis returned to France in with Presunat Ben Bella, 
become prime minister of France 1955 and took Iris oath as a lawyer Back in Paris, be founded a pro- 
sod currently a presidential hope- at the Paris bar. Chinese monthly. Mr. Vergis matte 

fuL His first case was that of Dj amil a numerous trips to China and met 


"H speculation Mid many outrageous M, 


« | A|j | h i nuu iilhiit uuuulluu>) 

and 1944 while he was a Gestapo articles, but be never denies any- 
offica m Lyon. A judge last week th in g «^ about him. 
droppai more senous charges in- ^ereisaconunonpointinanof 
volvmg assassinations, arresta- his cases: a systematic attack on the 


He has been the subject of much and currently a presidential hope- at the Paris bar. 

B 1943 mamlnlirtn nvtA mermr raitrarmAiic fill Hie firrt rocp v 


His firct case was that of Djamfla 


During World War II at 17, Mr. Bouhired, a young Algerian woman with Mao seraal times. 


thing said about trim. Verges joined the Free French accused of being part of a bombing 

There is a common point in all of forces in England, Later serving in network during the Algerian war 
his cases: a systematic attack on the Algeria, Morocco, Italy, France foe independence against the 


tions and deportations” ifter a pie- K-*Sta2T.f VZZZ 

• he admits a sympathy with people is, he did his university studies in Verges married ha, converted to 

who are at odds with society and its Oriental languages, history and Islam, and took the name Mansour. 

AfehflllS in Tanara morals. law. In 1 945, he joined the Commu- The Algerian National Libera- 

“My law is to be against laws," 
be says in one of his several pub- 


GUATEMALA CITY — Polili- fatinlEdUB. .... .. 
cal kfflmgs by rightists, a stubborn Sattstus compiled by the UA 

Mantistusuqpicy and a faltering ^ 

economy are ffliag this country nonally sbtjml thllMings ng 
as it hauls toward November dec- guenons hud declined sonOTlat 
lions to choose a civilian president from lasl ,y w f , _ . .. . . . 
to replace the current military gov- According to the U.S. statistics, 
p nrSw , y * the average number of ooccombai 

Jacones Verri* " The far right and the far left pwh^ ldlli^ was 31 a month in 
Jacques Verges to belong violence to try to 

provtAe the ann^s leadership into vjdi 39 a month in the last half a 
He was not seen again until laic ranp^linp the election in the name ‘”5- . , , _ _ 

1978. of safeguarding the country’s secu- f ^ t !SL Saf ^ S ,S T ?h P , 

Where was he? He won’t say. “I pity, according to Guatemalan and sources suggested that the 


Afghans in Japan 
Seeking Asylum 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Seven Af ghanistan 
na t ionals have been stranded in a 
airport hotel here for almost a 
month because no country has 
agreed to give them asylum, an in- 
ternational agency official said 
Wednesday. 

The Afghans, aged 16 to 43, ar- 
rived at New Tokyo International 
Airport on June 29 aboard a Paki- 
stan International Airlines flight 
and tried to board a plane for Can- 
ada. They were stopped because 
they lacked proper passports. They 
have not legally entered Japan, 
however, ana nave beat detained at 
the Airport Rest House because the 
Justice Ministry of Japan does not 
recognize them as political refu- 
gees. 

A statement issued by the minis- 
try said the seven left India, where 
they had lived for several years, to 
escape poverty, not persecution. 
The ministry has asked Pakistan 
International Airline to fly them 
back to New Delhi. The Afghans, 
however, have refused to leave. 


its Oriental languages, history and Islam, and took the na 
law. In 1945, rejoined the Commu* The Algerian Nat; 
s," mst Party. tion Front asked Mr. 1 

ib- During his student years, Mr. charge of a group 


lished woks. “My moral is to be Verges headed the liaison commit- formed to defend rebels. He be- Palestinians in Greco: and Switzer- ship with Pd Pot and 


part of a bombing In 1965, he went back to Algiers 1978. of safeguarding the country's secu- im Mutual support woup and 

the Algerian war as a lawyer. Using his French pass- Where was he? He won’t say. “I rity, according to Guatemalan and church sources suggested that the 

ice against the ■ port, he went to Lsrad at the re- do not have the intention of cun- foreign observers. U^. figures were mompete. Itfid 

c war, Mr. quest of the Palestine liberation mug for office or becoming a min- But even skeptics said the na- n0 ‘ °* ler alternative tigures. 
averted to Organization and the Algerian gov- ister, so the employment of my tion’s top officers seem determined some extent, me vigilant 
►Mansour. eminent to defend the first Pales- yean and my nights belong to me, io hand over the presidency to one squads protaWy have responded uo 

al Libera- timan guenilla put on trial there be said. of the country's civilian politicians anmcrcase mleftist-oncntcdpdn. 

gfctotake He was expelled from the country. Among the most prevalent theo- for the first tune since 1966. ical activism this year, according to 

f lawyers Subsequently, he defended other ries is that he renewed his friend- The army, which has ruled Gua- a °* sourccs \ . 


Organization and the A 
eminent to de fend the 


The Algerian National Libera- timan guenilla put on trial there 
tion Front asked Mr. Verges to take He was expelled from the country. 


to band over the preside 
of the country's civilian 
for the first time since 1 


U.S. figures were incomplete. It fid 
not offer alternative figures. 


r to one squaas piuanny nave icspomicu io 
itidans an increase in leftist-oriented pofct. 
ical activism this year, according to 


lawyers 


The army, which has ruled Gua- a sources. 


t why Barbie, who is awaiting tions of colonial students. It was at mg the judicial system, 
in Lyon for crimes against that time that he met Pol Pot, that In 1961, he was suspended fra: ; 


against morals.” 

But why Barbie, who is awaiting 
trial in Lyon for crimes against 
humanity stemming from his 
Woiid War II activities? 

“Given the person, not real but 
mythological, fabricated for politi- 
cal reasons by the government and 
the media, I think it is the duty of a 
lawyer to defend him," Mr. Vergfcs 
said. “I think that an accused has 
the right to a defense, and not a 
parody of a defense." 


tee between the different assoda- came a terror of the courts, attack- 


land on char} 
In March 1 


, he told friends he 


was traveling to Alicante, Spain, denies it. 


in chose bloody years in Cambodia. 
Mr. Verges neither confirms nor 


State Department Defends Romania’s Trade Status 


temala either directly or from be- Student associations that de- 
hind the scenes since a U.S.-backed themselves as progressive 

coop in 1954, recognizes that a d- B®* up organizing since 

Si preadentwSfind it easier late 1984 after tying low for more 
to obtain increased US. aid. The than a year because of past violence 
officers are also tired of trying to them, student leaders sail 

cope with accelerating inflation The na tion s Manual insurgent^ 
and stagnant growth, Guatemalan cstunatt lby **“ “"V 
officials and foreign diplomats about 2,000. are active despite hav- 
said mg lost considerable ground to the 

However, the armed forces governmmi sinoe 1981 and 1981 
would continue to exert consider- , Most of the guerrillas are based 


By Don Shannon 

Los Angela Times Service 

STrighiVa dSe^d^r: WASHINCTON A coalition noted tiiat it hasto prnited to far theUmted ‘States .ud 114,831 Crit^attheh^imgconmimt- inniuntains Tfig Gmttem^ 

paro^ofadefen^ of nSriom and SerS were allowed to go to West Genna- ed on whm they said was the Ro- SS^SSma Migia Victores border with Mexiro. The numba 

In Mr. Verges view. Barbie was tive politicians has opposed the Soviet bloc stales. uy p - , R .. goveraments hostility to down as chief of state, Guate- of wounded recaved at the iram- 

insgoificant, an SS captain who continuation of favoraSe trade sta- Support for Rranania also came. R i n™. ir™ P<ditidans and foreign dip- ujs i mdilaiy hospital has risen by 

would have remained monymous tus for Romania, but the State De- from Senator John Heinz, a Repob- R^ntmuomod that the United Tbe VMadJXm Kyn ;*rec- ^ r aboul 5 percent tins year, to an 

were it not for the fad that he was paxtment has defended the desig- l«an of Pennsylvania, who read a ^ P 1155 ^® 1 will govern f abom 65 a month, ac- 

connected with the arrest and nation as a tool for encouraging the statement from the Helsinki Com- ' with the knowledge that offending fonjng ^ phynaan, Ma- 

death of Jean Moulin, the greatest emigration of dissidents aid bol- mission, a group that monitors the “SS'iSSiSJLS^ Site k^£%S£SS& *e army couIdlSd to a mUitaiy J" Amoldo Leal Cruz. 

hom nf Prwn«k P«rid«n> ^ : IOTQ intmgftAnal armidc nn hit. CTBC r eOUinTTg would- be emigrants Monday Lrom the Ro m a n i a n City __ n,A Whil* viAlMr* has flflrapfMl 


sdor, said that most-favored-na- 
tion status was not u a subsidy” and 
noted that it has been granted to 
140 nations and withheld from only 
14 Soviet bloc states. 


1984, be noted, a record 5,545 Ro- eminent would continue to allow 
mauians were permitted to leave its citizens to emigrate freely. 


In Mr. Verge’s view. Barbie was tive politicians has opposed the govemnamis uosumy n 

insignificant, an SS captain who continuation of favorable trade sta- Support for Rranania also came. R n™ 

would have remained anonymous tus for Romania, but the State De- from SenatorJohn Heinz, a Rcpob- S3^SSSv£S3SSf K»»fs«2d. 

were U not for the fact that he was partment has defended the desig- lican of Pennsylvania, whp retd a Stales would end Romania; most; tor of UmBaptist Frramer Fellow- ^ ^ 


hero of the French Resistance. stem 
Mr. Verges bdieves that Moulin from 
was betrayed by the Resistance it- u. 


that nation's independence 


2979 international accords on hu- 
man rights. 


tora^uiMtegoveimiientlorall oS Medias jha a Baptist mnnster ha 4 m the past three and a half most international attention, the 
advanced educaUML hadbeen airotolforthe axthtime economy is the principal worry of 

Last mraith, Mr. Rra^n extend- m 16 months. Afc Kyer said the HSls and political pundits agree most Guatemalans. 

Romania’s favorable status for a munster, loan Stef, had been ha- vSI™ -n,- -t ■ n 

savin* that ha had rarrivad r«««d tUransa of his m ““ * °? nS ? an D«»Crat, Vimao _ The officially recognized mfla- 


there have been two While violence has attracted 


In testimony Tuesday before the The statement said that emigra- 


seu muiM mtemai squabbling. Senate finance subcommittee on tion statistics in Romania have nn- ed Romania’s favorable status for a minister, loan Stef, had been ha- , u nrTrwflan rwtw-ri r vi^-; r, 

if? ,t ^^If 0 S OIlt P n,akedlc international trade, Edward J. Da- proved in recent years, although yea, saying that he had received rassed because of his success in teS“iS?Si 

tnal a trial of the Resistance. winslti, the State Department coun- "internal conditions are grim.” In assurances that the Romanian gov- building a congregation. 


trial a trial of the Resistance. 

Mr. Verges, a twin, was bam 
March 5, 1925, in Ubon, Siam, lata 
Thailand, die son of a French dip- 
lomat and a Vietnamese wo man. 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE GOMMNHES 
IN EUROPE &THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


Britain Considers ID Cards for Fans Consumer Facing 

soccer games, also said that fans The thrust of the inquiry was OtOT^B 

LONDON — A judge investi- should be fenced in and all matches switched to place greater em phasis r TV , ,, If 
gating soccer hooliganism in Brit- should be limited to home support- ou hooliganism after riotingby En- mUJJQIH %JOwXD96 

aim n ai« ftiWirt an/L>i4 WarlndOilatr <h» CTS. fflt* ^ J— *L 40 


Ccrezo, is the early front-runner, don rate has quadrupled this year 
He is proposing a cautious program to 16 percent from 3.8 percent in 
of economic and political reforms 1984, and diplomats said that a 


and hopes to join Jos6 N 
Duane of EL Salvador as 


ledn more realistic figure for current in- 
sec- Dation was 60 percent annually. 


PROGRAM. THURSDAY 25th JULY 

13.35 THE NATURE OF THWGS 

14.30 SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON 
1500 SKY TRAX 1 

15.45 SKY TRAX 2 
IS JO SKY TRAX 3 

17.30 MR ED 

IBOO THE LUCY SHOW 


"Europe^ Best View' 


10 JO CHARUE^S ANGELS 
1920 LEARNED FREWS 
20.10 THE UNTOUCHABLES 
21.06 GILLETTE WORLD SPORTS 
21 .35 ALL STAR WRESTLING 
22.30 SKY TRAX 


SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SELLS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION, RATES, MARKETING A 
AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT SKY CHANNEL SALES, 
SWAN HOUSE, 17-19 STRATFORD PLACE, LONDON WIN 9AF 
TEL: LONDON (Of) 493 1168 TELEX: 268395. 


Reuters 

LONDON — A judge investi- 
gating soccer hooliganism in Brit- 
ain recommended Wednesday the 
introduction of identity cards far 
dub supporters, closed circuit tde- 
vision and greater police powers to 
root out violent fans. 

Justice Oliva Popplewdl, ap- 
pointed by the government to find 
ways of stopping crowd violence at 


KEEP UP TO DATE WITH 

HRMRCBCOME 

APPEARING EACH WfflNBDW 
ANDFWDWINTHEIHr 


'pie thrust of the inquiry was 


“Unless urgent steps are taken to persons, mostly Italians, at the En- »?7“” ~ _ taryis 

produce some more effideatmeth- ropean Cup final between liver- 7 fc5fcRU, Italy ^ One of two favor t 

od of exdoding hooligans, football pool and ftventus in Brussels on brothcrs *®° J* ““f™ tive » 

mav iwtbe able to continue in its Mav 29. th^ collafscd July Mario 


on hooliganism afta rioting by En- 
gEsh fans led to the death of 38 


Reuters 

TESERO, Italy — One of two 


may not be able to continue in its May 29. 
present form much longer.” he said Mr. ftxxriewdL a High Court 
in an interim report issued before judge, saw! the staifinm fire at 
the new season starts next month. Bradford in northern England was 
Prime Minister Margaret an accident but urged stringent 
Thatcher and her government new safely precautions. 


a High Court time rightist leada. 

K^rl. b«a arrested on suspicion of caps- Whoever wms ih 


ond Christian Democratic pres- The economic growth rate was ex- 
dent in Central America. peered to stay fiat again this year 

Mr. Cerezo, viewed as the least after a minima! expansion of 0.2 
conservative of the leading candi- percent last year. 

dares, is said to be the one who 

most worries the army. The mili - 

taiy is believed to look with greater IT IT Pjlhi hu vuc 
favor on Jorge Carpio, a conscrva- viO DH llOIIa 

Mari^S^do^l Alarcdo, a long- Backs New Rules 


“L ing manslan^rer and catastrophe, 
larthem England was magistrates said Wednesday. 


Whoever wins the Nov. 3 ballot, On Immig rafion 
or the runoff that ensues if no can- & 

didate wins a maj ority, will rein* The Associated Press 


asked the judge to invertigale soc- ^ woe a co 5 a£e S Se dSa hte iStiSn 

S “tional identity or dub inemba- Alps. In the warrant for his antst. 
May afta a stadium ure killed 56 chin card system in Fjuriand and th«- Trwim nnhKr nrnwmt/w cniH 


GiufioRota, 58, i* lAerasipa- office in January faring a host of 
son to be arrested following the problems. 


persons and after a 15-year-old 
was crushed to death undo - a ; 
dining a riot by fans. 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The House of 
Commons has voted 309 to 194 to 
approve immigration rales that 
e limina te sex discrimination but 


« a < '°“ a P? e **. ^ aam ™ lTkiian High cm the list is the so-called approve immigration rules that 

■ ■ , I M - . « . , tbCT- Alps. In the warrant far ms arrest, dirty war of assassmations aad kid- euntinate sex discrimination but 

^ Trento public mosKutor raid nappings of leftist political activists make it tougher for both husbands 
Wales designed to exdndefaiis Mr. Rota, who wit h his b rother otha suspected s up por te rs of and wives to join spouses who al- 
&om away matcces, inttoductem Aldo owiw a Bronte mmmg com- gncnfllas fighting the governmenL ready- live in Britain 

race plex m d udmg die dam, might be Human rights activists and In the drirate before the vote, 


tire dam, might be 


In the debate before the vote, 


m a J J ^ m , . _ _ * KHUISUOO UWMIUA MM* IWTGilllilMIU UVU UJ Ulll dlll. 

''ZLLaSSE! ^ ^ ^ Human rights activists and In the drirate before the vote, 

aro^ d playmg firids. and dosed charged with causing multiple church sources said killings and ab- Home Secretary Leon Brittan said 

SSSJSK2 011 ^ *** “tastrophe ductions in the capital and in al Tuesday that the rules would main- 

trouoic ma r e r s. throuah nesliaence. r. i 


He called for tougher pa 
for hooligans and laws mAh 
crime to hurl missiles and 


through negligence. 

A technical team was due 
Wednesday to inspect the twin-ba- 
sin dam which salt a wave of mud 


. ’ i . . . 

i 

» ^ ‘ ■ ■■-•-* 

Oiwnino t 




tifSri 


Opening for ToUk 
la Seen in Mo*oow 


omit Leaders Vow to Push 
an Economic Recovery . 



P%-2=E; 




mm 


wssaase .ras-rresl 
^■g geaese Sa^.S aal 





U&Smp 7 
U’Bnmd' 


mm I- 




cdsscene or racist slogans at match- water down the Stava valley, 

cs. They were dying to pinpoint the 

He aim suggested givin g prifoy location of the weak point in the 
the power to search all fans before earthwork walls of the aam, built in 
entry to grounds and arrest fans on 1961 andsold to the Rota brothers’ 
the basis of video evidence. co mp any in 1979. 

Mr. Popplewdl said identity 

cards were not needed in Scotland 

where crowd violence has- de- 3 Men nob Fans iiestaaran! 
creased since alcohol was banned a genre Francr-Pmse 

from soccer grounds in 1981. PARIS — La Coupole rcstau- 

The government is banning aloo- rant in the Montparnasse district 
hoi at socca gr ound s in the rest af was robbed early Monday by three 
Britain and on trains and buses to men wbo held three employees at 
ma t rixes. The ban is backed by stiff gimpoint, according to Jean Lafon, 
new penalties, including jail terms, the owner. 


least one rural area west of here tain firm control on immigration, 
have increased in recent months. The rules are a response to a May 

and they blamed the government's 28 rnlingby the European Counca 
security forces for this “death Human Rights, which found Brit- 
squad” violence. ain guiltv of sex discrimination be- 

“Before handing ova power, cause of the country's ban on non- 
they want to sweep things up a British husbands joining 
Httle,” said Nineth de Garda, a non-British wives who live here, 
leada of the Mutual Support The new regulations allow bus- 


Httle,” said Nineth de Garcia, a 

leada of the Mutual Support The new regulations allow bus- 
Group. Ha organization, which bands in but require that all foreign 
was founded a year ago, has be- mouses prove that they have a 
come Guatemala’s leading human place to live and can support than- 
rights group. Two of its leaders selves and that the marriage was 
were assassinated this spring. not entered into primarily for im- 
General Mejia Victores denied migration purposes. The rules ap- 
last week that the armed forces ply to the spouses of both British 
were responsible for any of the kill- and non -British citizens. Pirvkms- 
ings. He said the Mutual Support ly, the marriage motive test applied 
Group was m a nip u lated by the wily to foreign husbands erf British 
guerrillas and attributed 10 killings women. 


the only to foreign husbands of 
lings women. 


ms a r w- S gjSljkSIs: SgH 


UA BeemiyalW^r^ 
ra ajAia 








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By Hctx Dorsey 

Ittienueioml Herald Tribune 

- PARIS “ Once . again, Yves 
Saint Laurent has upset the fashion 
applecart and left abnost everyone 
efce behind, ffiscoliectiod Wednes-' 
day was as pure and sc&ple as an 
ice cub^ making otter Paris de- 
signers in.- thiS: week’s fall-winter 
couture showings look Eke. they 

PARK FASHION 

had gone overjxard and over-rick: 

Noprops.no effects* no razzma- 
tazz at Saint Laurent There was 
not even any music, but qx^atms 
did not notice it until midway 
through the show because there 
was music in the Dow and rhythm 
of Saint Laurent’s clothes. 

Once a purist, always a purist, 
and this tune the designer outdid 
himself. In his most restrained cd- 
kedod ever, he let the suz$Hcity of 
Us clothes speak fra itself. His 
sense of proportions and subtle 
palette also devated this collection 
io a fcvd all by itself. 

This was a silhouette without ex- 
cess: strong, square shoulders, a 
bdtedwaist and skirts barely skim- 
misg the kne^s, a continuation of 
. Saint Laurent's pure and Parisian 
look People locking for a revolu- 
tion came out disappointed. Atti- 
tudes here mattered as modi as the . 
clothes. This was not a cute or even 
a pretty lode, but a woman taming 
up in such outfits would make ev- 
erybody else look ovadressed. 

Sameof tbe clothes were so sim- 
ple that they had an elite chic. The 
daytime clothes were spare and 
sHm, generally classic pants and 
skinny, ribbed turtleneck sweaters, 
but shown, in a new touch, under 
furs, including three-cruaiter-lengih 
silver fox coats ana full-sleeved, 
Rnsrian sable blousons. 


Since Chanel discovered humble 
jersey. Saint Laurent has made it 
his own. He used it repeatedly for 
Ins belied tunics as well as new 
flared rates with a full, swilling 
back. This shape, which reappeared 
in short, stiff satin eveningjackcts, 
is sure to become a big influence. 

Saint Laurent also used whip- 
cord and generally flat- textured 
fabrics, winch again put the accent 
on fit and cut. His newest prints — 
notably the gold-rimmed black 
roses on brightly colored back- 
grounds — bad a finish that looked 
like cordovan leather. Velvet, al- 
ways a key fabric hoc. was more 
important than ever, notably in a 
strongly draped, long blade eve- 
ning gown. 

Two-thirds of the collection, 
which used 133 different models, 
was devoted to evening wear. The 

wT bladtf’esperially a^tiraped 
blade jersey sheath that was strictly 
for connoisseurs. 

For daytime. Saint Laurent 
played with several nuances of the 
same muted colon (reaching inter- 
esting combinations in grays and 
hazels) but in the evening wear he 
brought back bright hues. Heavy 
satins and velvets gave the evening 
picture a lot of body. 

There was something for every- 
body, from dresses domed within 
an inch of the models' lives to 
with blade velvet tops over 
colorful satin skirts. Trains 
bustles were often part of the 
picture. Sunt Laurent also revived 
lace, both stiff guipure and softer 
Chantilly, the latter often covering 
brightly colored satm. - 

The ingenne dress to end all in- 
genue dresses was a strapless Em- 
pire gown with a bosom cf crushed, 
draped brown velvet and a skirt 


tie 


made of miles of black-over^ while 
chiffon. But most of the evening 
dresses were long-sleeved, giving 
them a covered-up look that took 
time lo adjust to but ended up 
seeming diainctly eieganl. 

As always, Saint Laurent mixed 
colore with the case of a painter. He 
combined gold with Indian pink 
and pale rose; or iee bhjc with Nile 
green and panna. Turquoise; pink, 
and green were also shown togeth- 
er, but in the end. black and blkk- 
and-wirite were the real women of 
this understated ooOectron. 

Guy Laroche has gained a lot of 
social dout since be hired Drfcda 
M Hfe to do Ids international public 
relations. A lot of wealthy Ameri- 
cans showed up at bis collection; 
Whether anyone was buying is an- 
other questioo. 

Laroche is a nks, uncomplicated 
designer and his clothes are for 
women who like nice, uncomplicat- 
ed elegance. There was no adven- 
ture here but sound, sincerely pret- 
ty dotbes that are sure to mt the 
right mari e in the tight miliwi 

His opening suits, worn with 
complicated skirts tied up in the 
front over boots, missed the mark, 
but he recouped with some attrac- 
tive, if conventional, blade suits 
worn with white satin blouses. His 
big masculine coats were worn over 
pant-suits, complete with shirts 
and neckties, a fashion that flew 
out of tbe window last season, but 
they would wrak fra women who 
do not insist on tbe very latest 

The bt-coJor dresses, with most 
of the body draped in bright-col- 
ored satin while the shoulders and 
sleeves were black, could find their 
way into a sophisticated wardrobe. 

Madame Grfcs, dean of Paris de- 
signers, dosed the day with a small 



OnrL* Gait 

Saint Laurent's lacy look. 

collection that her fans would not 
miss for anything. Year is, year 
cut she turns out the same coats, 
capes and ponchos, but her sense of 
fabrics, making them flow with the 
ease of a natural spring, produces 
results that area pleasure to watch. 
Some of her evening dresses, espe- 
cially the draped ones, are stiD out- 
standing. 


A Death Calms Political Hostilities in Pakistan 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Post Serna 

ISLAMABAD. Pakistan — In a 
part of the world where the primary 
allegiance is to the family , death 
often brings a truce in political bat- 
tles. 

Thus the death in Cannes, 
France, last Thursday of 
Shahnawaz Bhutto, 27, youngest 
son of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, the de- 
posed prime minister who was exe- 
cuted in 1979. stirred an outpour- 
ing of sympathy from the 
martial-law government of Presi- 
dent Mohammed Zia ul-Haq. 

Concern over the political influ- 
ence of tbe Bhutto family in this 
country seemed to have been put 
aside. 

Moreover, Mr. Bhutto’s daugh- 
ter and political - heic, Benazir 
Bhutto, was told that no restriction 
would be put on her return from 
more than a year of voluntary wile 
in London, even though she had 
sworn to avenge her father, who 
was hanged an charges of conspira- 
cy to commit murder. 

“We thought we must share their 
sorrow,” President Zia said in a 
brief interview. U I have believed 
yon should not take politics to 
one’s blood. There are human rela- 
tions. 

“You can have differences of 
opinion,” he added, “but on occa- 


sions of a death in a family the 
sorrow transcends all barriers.” 

In that mood, the president and 
the prime nunister, Mohammed 
Khan Junqo, led the list of officials 
offering condolences to Sbahnawaz 
Bhutto’s mother. In official State- 
ments the president offered “heart- 
felt sympathies,” while the prime 
mintow eftiri th« riwath bad “ raiwri 

me untold grief and dismay.” 

Mr. Bhutto will be buried within 
10 days — as soon as French au- 
thorities release the body and ar- 
rangements can be made to fly it to 
this country — on the family estate 
in the village of Laricana, about 150 
miles (240 kilometers) north of Ka- 
rachi 

The funeral will be held in & 
mood of political, tension mixed 
with- feudal obeisance, as- old ser- 
vants and fanners from that vase 
area of Sind prorincejoin political 
figures in paying respects. 

Already, members of the banned 
Pakistan People’s Party are making 
plans u> turn the funeral into a 
political rally. Pakistani security 
forces are countering by arresting 
selected People’s Party leaders. 

Benazir Bhutto, 31, tire eldest 
daughter of Mr. Bhutto, who re- 
tains her touch fra tbe rough-and- 
tumble of Pakistani politics despite 
her Raddiffe and Oxford educa- 
tion, wiB return to a split party. 


Some members have bolted to nm 
fra die nonpartisan elected assem- 
bly that was set up as a transition to 
.constitutional government. 

“She almost has to crane baric,” 
said one longtime diplomatic ob- 
server of Pakistani politics, who 
added, referring to People's Party 
members: “That crowd m London 
is divpiced from reality. If she stays 
with them fra too long, she’ll have 
trouble arranging a comeback.” 

Pakistani cffiaali and others 
commented that the daughter 
would be foiced to walk a narrow 
line on her return. 

She has to be outspoken enough 
to energize her political supporters, 
many of whom have become dispir- 
ited with the absence of a Bhutto 
figure in tbe country mid the in- 
creased popularity of an' assembly 
without any People’s Party mem- 
bers. 

But if she comes across too 
strongly, she tuns tire risk of bring 
sent to jaiL She was allowed to 
leave tire country to get medical 
treatment for an ear infection in 
late 1984 and has been living in 
London. After the execution of her 
f ath e r, she was held under boose 
arrest or in jaiL 

Pakistan’s security apparatus has 
began preparing fra political ef- 
fects from her return. An indepen- 
dent Pakistani newspaper reprated 


this week that two opposition lead- 
en had been arrested in the Sind, 
the province where the Bhutto fam- 
ily’s political power is the greatest 
One was Makhdum Khmqnzza- 
mau. acting bead of the People's 
Party, who was making arrange- 
mesus fra tire funeraL The other 
was Mir Qh-nt* Bakhsh Bfaimput, 
chief of the Pakistan National Par- 
ty. Other People’s Party leaders 
have been barred from entering the 
province for the funeraL 
It seemed from the messages of 
condolence made public hoe, how- 
ever, that tire initial government 
concern was for tire loss felt by the 
Bhutto family, and only secondari- 
ly for the political consequences. 



By Seth Mydans 

Net" York Times Sernce 

MOSCOW — For tire first time 
in more than five years of. unde- 
clared war, the fighting in Afghani- 
stan has come into Soviet living 
rooms on the evening television 
news. 

A two-and-a-h alf -minute report 
earlier this month showed what ap- 
peared to be battlefield footage and 
heroic words from a group of Sovi- 
et soldiers. 

That an officially controlled tele- 
vision program would show burn- 
ing trucks, evictions and Soviet 
troops assaulting an mween enemy 
raised eyebrows among Western 
diplomats here. 

A Soviet journalist said be be- 
lieved that tire footage had been 
filmed in Afghanistan but that the 
battle scenes were likely to have 
been at least partly staged for the 
camera. 


Several days after this report, tire 
evening news again showed Af- 
ghanistan, with a repon on a vic- 
tory by government forces over 
“mercenary bands" in which “more 
than 100 cutthroats woe annihilat- 
ed" and a large number of West- 
ern-made weapons and much sub- 
versive literature were seized. 

The ffim footage in tins case was 
limited to a look at stacks of weap- 
ons said to have been captured. 

“This is definitely an escalation 
of news coverage,” a Weston mili- 
tary attach* said. “One of the lag 
things the Russians have going for 
them is that their own people 
haven’t been seeing the war on tele- 
vision day after day.” 

Some Russians say there is little 
Soviet opposition to tbe war be- 
cause it is not regularly reported in 
tbe Soviet media. 

Soviet television programs rarely 
show negative subjects about tire 


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Soviet Union. But the evening news 
regularly shows Western film foot- 
age of floods, fires and other disas- 
ters outride Soviet borders, as well 
as demonstrations, riots and batiks 
in other parts of the world. 

Scares of tire conflicts in Central 
America, taken from Western tele- 
vision reports, are shown frequent- 
ly- 

A Western diplomat said the So- 
viet media presentation of tbe war 
in Afghanistan has been evolving in 
a way that acknowledges that tire 
war has become a fact of life, 
though a mated one, in this coun- 
try. 

‘There’s no way lojust pretend 
it’s not there, with more than 
100,000 young men rotating 
through Afghanistan at any tune, 
and souethm g Hke IOJOOQ casual- 
ties a year,” be said 

Since tbe fifth anniversary last 
December of the Soviet sweep into 
Afghanistan, tire controlled news 
accounts have grown more frank 
about soldiers fighting and dying 

there. 

The Soviet forces are invariably 
referred to as a “limited contin- 
gent” and described as fulfilling 
their “internationalist duty.” 

A few reports of heroism have 
appeared in recent months in the 
press. Some diplomats see this as 
anindkatioo that the Kremlin does 
not expect the war to end soon, and 
is therefore presenting it as a glori- 

ocs endeavor. 


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trayed Soviet heroes are said to 
have died'on tire battlefield in curi- 
ously scalar rixcngistances. by set- 
ting off grenades that killed them- 
selves and their “bandit” attackers. 

Occasional tdevisGti reports on 
Afghanistan have , until now fo- 
cused on Soviet aid projects or on 
daily life in KabuL 

Tbe new television report was 
different ■ 

. As automatic weapons rattled. 
Soviet xtidias dashed from behind 
armored vehicles, crouching low, 
raring past coils of barbed wire to 
take positions an a rocky field. 

Soldiers atop an armored per- 
sonnel carrier fired machine guns. 
Smoke rose in tbe distance. An offi- 
cer scanned tbe UDs with binocu- 
lars. 

There was no sign of the enemy 
nor of return fire. 


Amman Aide 
Shot to Death 
In Ankara 


Roam 

ANKARA — An unidentified 
gunman shot to death a Jordanian 
diplomat, Ziyad al-Sati, as he was 
driving to wok hoe Wednesday, 
police said. 

Turkish Foreign Ministry 
sources said that Mr. Safi, 40, had 
been first secretary at the Jordani- 
an Embassy for three years. ■ 
Witnesses said tire attacker fired 
five rounds into Mr. Safi's car at a 
busy intersection in tire city's em- 
bassy district, killing him instantly. 

They said (he attacker fled on 
foot and police sealed off tbe area. 

An anonymous telephone caller 
to an tpig piafinnal news agency in 
Ankara said that the Islamic Jihad 

K had killed Mr. Safi because 
s a “servant of imperialism." 
In Amman, Jordan 5 Foreign 
Ministry said: These criminal, 
cowardqr acts against Jordanian 
citizens pexfontting their 
duty abroad will not deter Jordan 
from continuing its national duty 
and serving Arab issues and tire 
Palestine problem.” 

Tbe mimstiy said an official del- 
egation would bring back, the diplo- 
mat's body. 

Foreign Minister Vahit Hale- 
foglu or Turkey said every effort 
would be made to capture and pun- 
ish the attacker. 

The attack was the latest of sev- 
eral o yingt Jordanian officials and 
diplomats abroad since 1983. 

On April 3 this year, a bazooka 
was Brea at the Jordanian Embassy 
in Rome by a man who said he 
belonged to the Palestinian Blade 
September group. 

On March 21, Black September 
elaimad responsibility fra attacks 
that injured five pawns in tire of- 
fices of the Royal Jordanian Air- 
lines in Rome, Athens and Nicosia. 

Last December, a Jordanian Em- 
bassy counselor, Azmi al-Muffi, 
was shot (o death in Bucharest 
Black September claimed responsi- 
bility. 

In November, Aswan Trashat, a 
minister at the Jordanian Embassy 
in Athens, escaped an assassination 
attempt- - 


EXPERIENCE COUNTS! 
NON-RESID&fTIAL 
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CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY 
for ADVANCED STUDIES 
School tf ft ri cM aid Jitowoggnent 
Offica of Jht D*on, Room HT-1 
tOQ Gaffi a* m, 

Novato, CA 94947. (41S) 382-1400. 


WHY THE OWNER 
OF A EATER PHILIPPE HAS MORE 
THAN JUST MONEY’S WORTH. 



The Golden Ellipse, 

' It takes nine months 
shown here. Some- 
complicated Patek Philippe 
■ Every element is micro- 
ance which represents a 
hair. Every wheel, gear, 
until it is virtually friction- 
just as most Patek 
From one generation 
Ifetek Philippe watch 
heirlooms that have 
dispensable. 

• After 600 hours 
as near absolute per- 
can achieve, each 
it takes less than a 



complete the Golden Ellipse 
even several years for a 

model. 

scopically hand-finished to a toler- 
fraction of the thickness of a human 
pinion and cog is polished by hand 


Philippes are handed down 
the next, so are the tools that 
makers use to perfect them - 
become as precious as they are in- 



of testing, regulating and refining to 
fection as human hands and minds 
watch is lubricated so delicately that 
cupful of oil for an entire year's production. 

Everythingaboutagold Patek Philippe that can be gold, is gold - ISct.goId - 
right down to the dial, the winding crown, the strap buckle, and the spring bars 
that bold the strap to the watch. In automatic Patek Philippes, even the winding 
rotors are of solid gold, since the additional weight increases the winding 
ffidency. 

But tbe real cost is in the lime, patience, tradition and absolute dedi- 
cation to fiawlessness that makes it a Patek Philippe. 

Like any other work of art by an acknowledged master, a Patek 
Philippe appreciates in value because the scarcity of such quality is grow- 
ing at a disheartening rate. 

Thus, if you are aiming for perfection you need patience. Persev- ^ 
erance too. And perhaps a streak of the stubbornness required to 
achieve the best things in life. But isn’t it this that relates Patek Philippe 
watches to their owners? 

Which makes one think . . . why not invest in a Patek Philippe? 



PATEK 

PHILIPPE 


GENEVE 


Write for catak>Que to. 

Petek PhiHppe SA^ 41. rue du Rhone. CH-1211 Geneva 3. 


FOR MASTERS OF THEIR TIME. 


COME TO 



fWu 


ATTEND A CONFERENCE THAT COULD 
TRANSFORM YOUR OUTLOOK ON WORLD BUSINESS. 

It is the annual International Business Outlook 
conference sponsored by Oxford Analytica and tbe International 
Herald Tribune to be held September 19-21 at Christ Church 
Collie, Oxford. 

In three challenging days, key senior executives will be 
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region by region, in intimate delegate groups, by leading academic 
authorities. 

Each briefing team comprises senior academic 
contributors to Oxford Analytical Daily Brief and country studies 
for governments and major international companies. 

Each delegate’s specific interests win be covered in 
extensive question and answer sessions. 

Spouses may attend free, and there will be an 
extensive social and cultural program culminating in a banquet at 
Blenheim Palace, where the guest speaker will be The Right 
Honourable Dr. David Owen M.P., Leader erf the Social 
Democratic Party, United Kingdom. 

Finally, in addition to tbe published introductory 
report, delegates wffl receive a comprehensive summary report. 

This conference provides senior executives with a 
unique opportunity for reflection, learning, and refreshment in the 
tranquil beauty erf a great university. 

If you attend no other conference this year, this should 

be the one. 

Places are strictly limited and you are urged to apply 


now. 


—Attach business card or fill in — 


Hcralbca&feeribunc. 


j Please stndwdoails and lustration fam 
® Name 



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J 


OXFORD 

ANAIYTICA 

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Page 6 


THURSDAY, HflLY 25, 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune. 


PublnM With n» New York Time* and The Washington Port 


The Message to Pretoria 

any damage rJaimc that may arise as a result. 

To be sure, the old order was collapsing. 
Blacks had begun to use unions to negotiate 
not just for economic benefits but alk> for 
political influence. When the government in- 
voked its already great powers of repression to 
charge moderate blades with treason — and to 
deliver than to a brutal police — the protest 
became palpably revolutionary. 

Blacks began testing their capacity to dam- 
age the economy — once with a general strike, 
other times with local rent strikes and boycotts 
of white businesses. Simultaneously, radical 
black youths began murdering blade officials 

and policemen whose duties implied collabo- 
ration with the white regime. These attacks, 
and the counterattacks of the police, claimed 
more than 500 lives, mostly black, in 10 
months. They destroyed black administration 
in dozens of segregated towns, requiring the 
authorities to invade militarily to assure dis- 
tribution of water and electricity. 

The resort to martial law has now touched 
off tiie next South African debate: whether 
Mr. Botha went too far or not nearly fax 
enough in his promires of reform. It is a 
pathetic question because no reform worthy of 
the name was ever promised, much less tried. 
Having abandoned apartheid's myth that all 
blacks were aliens. Mr. Botha substituted only 
an offer to consult docile blades of his choos- 
ing one day in a “non-statutory forum. 7 ’ To the 
most moderate possible black leado - . Chief 
Gatsha Buthelea, this was “a lousy crumb 
from the white man's table." The message is 
stark: The First World blessings of democracy 
and prosperity depend most of all on the 
consent of the governed. A government dis- 
daining that consent puts all else in jeopardy. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


South Africa’s new slate of emergency 
amounts to martial law and cuts through much 
recent debate about the country’s future. It 
proves again that a minority of whites ca n n o t 
enjoy First World prosperity and democracy 

while pursuing colonial dominion over blacks 
held in Third World conditions. 

Through endless cycles of repression and 
reform, the white regime has been unable to 
escape its central dilemma: If the whites refuse 
to share their wealth and power, they inspire 
the black majority to revolt; and if they try to 
suppress rebellion with force, they betray their 
law and culture and are left with a Second 
World, Polish-style order. 

President P.W. Botha has now provided 
dramatic evidence for both premises. Al- 
though his reforms have been politically triv- 
ial, they had the effect of discrediting the 
central doctrines of apartheid. By vaguely 
promising to reward the docility of urban 
blacks. Ire abandoned the pretense that all 
were citizens of tribal homelands and mere 
guests in South Africa. When he then failed to 
deliver on the promise to consult them about 
their political future, be invited the violence 
that now propels him to draco nian measures. 

The crackdown not only subjects blacks to 
arbitrary rule by the police and militia, but 
also sacrifices tbe ornaments of white demo- 
cracy. In much of the country blacks can now* 
be dragged from their homes and detained at 
wDL They can be denied free speech and as- 
sembly and any role in putative political activi- 
ty — even garbage collection in segregated 
towns. And to sustain this order, white news- 
papers and courts will be repressed. People 
will disappear without trace; the police and 
militia win not be answerable in print or in 
court, and the authorities will be imm une to 



Washington and Pretoria: Helping Conflict Along 


W ASHINGTON — Lyndon 
Johnson used to tell a story 
about a small boy in Texas who spot- 
ted two trains heading down the same 
track Emm opposite directions. The 
lad lit out tor home. A stranger 
stopped him and asked where be was 
rushing. Tbe boy pointed to the dis- 
tant trains. “I sec," the mim said, 


By Joseph Kraft 


China as Nuclear Partner 



With the signing of the U.S.-Chinese nucle- 
ar agreement, its text mil at last become pub- 
lic. Tbe long delay has ended and the Reagan 
administration has decided to go ahead with 
the agreement while President Li Xi airman is 
in Washington. When it readies Congress, it is 
Hkdy to become tire focus of a careful exami- 
nation of the intricate system of roles that try 
to prevent the proliferation of midear weap- 
ons. The agreement would enable rhma to 
buy civilian power reactors in America on 
condition that it gives no assistant to other 
countries trying to build midear weapons. 

This agreement was initialed 15 mouths ago 
during President Reagan’s trip to China, but 
after his return it slid silently into the deep 
freeze. The administration has never offered a 
public explanation, but it appears there were 
intelligence reports of Chinese technicians 
working at Kabuta, where Pakistan has been 
building a uranmm enrichment plant with 
technology stolen a decade ago from a rinrilm- 
facility in the Netherlands. The rhin«c than 
disappeared from the Pakistani nod ear plant, 
and Bering repeatedly declared that it does 
not help other countries to make weapons. 

That uow presents the United States with a 
choice. One side of the argument is that C3nna 
has never offered the kind of detailed and 
carefully defined assurances that meet Ameri- 
can legal standards. The other side is that it is 
well worth securing even the Chinese style of 
pledge from a country that already possesses 
both nuclear weapons and a good command of 


nudem technology — and that had previously 
been unwilling to offer any pledge at alL 

Congress can block the agreement by a joint 
resolution. That is unlikely, but there are two 
vin He of congressional that the admin-, 

istration is going to have to address. A number 
of senators, most of them Democrats, will 
press for assurances that the agreement meets 
the letter of the American nuclear export laws 
ihar were *n ariwH to prevent the proliferation 
of weapons. There are also objections, origi- 
nating in the Defense Department, that even 
ClvOian nitrii-ar technolo gy hag, in the Chinese 
context, military applications. These have less 
to do with weapons directly than with the 
development of nndear power plants far naval 
ships, particularly submarines. 

The administration bears the burden of 
demonstrating that tins fna/ti-quai i- 

a year ago, is satisfactory today. That is not an 
impossible case to i" g ke, but the administra- 
tion is going to have to make it openly and 
forcefully. A lot depends on the precise lan - 
guage of a text that no one outside the admin-, 
istration has yet seal. But at least potentially 
there may be important benefits hoe for coo- 1 
trolling the spend, of nndear weapons. Until • 
recently China chose to remain entirely out- 
ride the structure of international promises 
that seek to prevent proliferation. An agree- 
ment with the United States providing access 
to oertain UJL technology would provide a 
powerful incentive to come in and stay in. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Lame Duck or Fond Monarch? 

Four and a half years into the presidency of 
Ronald Reagan the American public is bong 
abruptly forced to face reality: The vigorous 
74-year-old man they re-elected so overwhelm- 
ingly last November has descended almost 
overnight from the peak of his physical and 
political power. By its failure to confront Mr. 
Reagan’s mortality last November, the nation 
has lumbered itself with a genuine lame duck. 
— Alex Bnanmer in The Guardian {London). 

American presidents are not just elected 
political leaders; they are also in a sense mon- 
archs. Peoples who have found a leader worthy 
of ibeir love are loath to lose him. Such figures 
are not to be discarded lightly. 

Ronald Reagan is sum a president. That 
fact makes practical calculations as to whether 
he will be up to doing this, that or the other 
somewhat beside the heart of the matter. 

— The Sunday Telegraph ( London J. 

Moderates Out in Sooth Africa 

Having embarked too timidly on the road to 
reform, President Botha succeeded only in 
radicalizing extremists. IBs policy is rejected 


by the more reactionary wing of the National 
Party and by the new parties to its right. So he 
has been compelled, doubtless against his will, 
to declare a state of emergency. 

Moderates in the various factions of the 
black community, who were ready to (day tire 
card of gradual liberalization, have been iso- 
lated and neutralized. Tbe diehards of the 
African National Congress, now openly ma- 
nipulated by the Communist Party, thus have 
free ran. The way is dear for Marxist subver- 
sion to try to knockdown a “domino" erf prime 
importance to the free world, given South 
Africa’s strategic position on a vital sea route 
and its reserves of rare minerals that are indis- 
pensable to the arms industries of tbe West 

We can expea the worst Alas, we can no 
longer hope for the best 

— Le Figaro (Paris). 

Terror Bombs in Copenhagen 

If anyone thinks tenor bombs in Denmark 
can serve the purpose of creating a climate 
against making room for American firms, or in 
favor of denying Danish Jews their natural 
place in society, they have miscalculated. 

— Krisieligt Dagblad (Copenhagen). 


ran- 
never 

seen a train wreck other.' 

That story drives home the slightly 
foolish role played by Washington in 
the latest act of the tragedy that is 
South Africa. A collision between 
blades and. whites is now wrecking 
that country. Overambitious efforts 
to hdp have left America in the posi- 
tion of confused bystander. 

The stage for the latest act was set 
by the government of President P.W. 
Botha. It came to office professing a 
p rogram for the hardest thing in prai- 
ries — reform from above. One fea- 
ture was to protea the borders 
against forays from neighboring 
black states by elements a the Afri- 
can National Congress, which was 

Said tn he ri»mnmis i-dn inTnnte ri_ To 
that end the South African army, and 
native guerrillas it sponsored, made 
dee p raids Ango la and Mozam- 
bique. At that point the Reagan ad- 
ministration stepped in with its pol- 
icy of “constructive engagement/' 
v Washington promoted accords be- 
tween South Africa and Angola and 
Mozambique. In return for an end to 
raids, the black African states 
"were supposed to sever ties with the* 
Soviet Union, Cuba and the ANC 
But none of the parties could deliver 
on their promises. The raids from 
South Africa continued. A month 
ago, in an acknowledgment of failure, 
the United States withdrew its am- 
bassador from Pretoria. 

President Botha drove 
new cons t i tutio n in 1983 
legislative assemblies tl 
sen ration to the Asian i 
minorities. Last January the blade 
majority was invited to participate in 
a “nan-statutory forum.” The pur- 
pose was to promote dialogue and 
even n«otiation on racial conditions. 
As an added inducement, the govern- 
ment a major chmy in the 
practice of apartheid: The legal re- 
quirement that blacks living in settled 
areas be transported to rural reserva- 
tions was quietly abandoned. The 
huge black settlements near mqor 
white dties were, in effect, accepted. 

As so often happens with rabrm 
programs, the Botha program back- 
fired. The success of the border raids 
convinced blacks in South Africa that 
they could not rdy on neighboring 
black states. Almost overnight, reli- 
gious, union and educational leaders 
came together in anew organization, 
the United Democratic Front. 


The concessions extended to 
Asians and “coloreds” persuaded 
blacks that they were dealing with a 
“divide and conquer" strategy. Lead- 
ers militant « gainer any co- 

operation with tbe regime. Pressures 
a gains t white rule not only included 
strikes, boycotts and demonstrations. 
There was also a sustained and often 
violent campaign against blacks 
thought to be cooperating with the 
regime as officials or informers. 

With its authority challenged, the 
government cracked down. Leaders 
of the UDF were arrested and 
charged with treason. Violence in the 
black townships was suppressed by 
force. Still, the use of police power 
was selective, and the government 
continued to call for dining™ 

But leaders who were on trial for 
treason were not exactly in a mood 


fa* dialogue. Even blacks who am- 
donned the violence refused. Chief 
fiaidw Butbefezi, the 7nln leader, 

r-aTU-H iKfftrrtha rrffw^a Intmy crumb 

from the white man’s table." 

Selective repression, moreover, 
could not keep violence from spread- 
ing. Soweto, tne huge black township 
outside Johannesburg, had been rela- 
tively calm in the past two years. On 
July 17 the township suddenly erupt- 
ed. A crowd of L000 black youths 
commandeered seven buses and or- 
dered the drivers to take them to tire 
I oc^a xirtho me .J^ere followed 

demonstrators. Two daytaler Mr. 
Botha invoked emergency powers. 

Nobody should doubt tbe govern- 
ment’s capacity to repress trouble. It 
the and an iron resolution 
not to share political power. The only 


A Co ntinuing Tragedy of Too Little Too Late 


W ASHINGTON — The South African government is 
once again a day late and a concession short in its 
drive to forestall the inevitable. Conciliatory words that 
would have signaled a breakthrough a few years ago come 
across now as empty justification for aimed repression. 

The repression itself might have worked a few years ago 
to produce at least an uneasy calm. Now it serves only to 
radicalize the black population, threatening to turn what 
thegovennnem calls “riots" into full-fledged revolution. 

Tne time-tested way of AeaH np with violent uprisings is 
to isolate the' radical leadership while raking serious 
concessions to the rank and file. South Africa is expert at 
isolating, but incompetent at raying concessions. Again 


and 


it makes concessions oniYafter the thing 


ceased to hold even symt 
Negotiations, in fact, may be the way out of the turmoil 
and lqustice in South Africa. The danger is that the 
government, once again bang too dever for its own good, 
will try to negotiate with its own handpicked “trusties,” 
rendering any agreement worse than useless. The govern- 
ment knows which black leaders have the confidence of 
the majority. If the whites really are ready for peaceful 
change (as opposed to buying time to retain thdr absolute 
power), they know how to do it. The fear is that they will, 
as has become their sorry custom, do too hole too late. 

. — Syndicated. columnist William Raspberry. 



W ASHINGTON — Pressed by 
growing turmoil in southern 
Africa and increasing outrage at 
home, the U.S. Congress has at last 
determined to try a more interven- 
tionist policy. Taken separately, its 
provisions — particularly on South 
Africa — are a courageous departure. 
Taken together, unfortunately, they 
send a dangerously mixed signal that 
is more likely to encourage conflict 
and repression than to bang about 
the reform that Congress seeks. 

On July 11, in separate actions, tbe 
House and Senate voted in opposite 
directions. Tbe House, determined to 
support anti-Communist resistance 
movements around the world, voted 
to repeal the Clark amendment, 
which prohibits military intervention 
in Angola, and to terminate all mili- 
tary and non-emergency economic 
aid to Mozambique unless that coun- 
try kicks out its Soviet-bloc military 
advisers. The Senate followed up 
with a bill to impose economic sanc- 
tions on South Africa. 

These steps can seem to put the 
United States on the side of justice. 


behind Africans fighting both Com- 
munist domination and racial op- 
pression. But in Africa die reaction is 
likely to be doser to disbelief. 

Consider Angola's reaction to the 
vote on the dark amendment. Since 
1976, when the amendment ended 
CIA involvement in the Angolan civil 
war, relations have inched tenuously 
forward. The United States does not 
officially recognize Angola, but the 
Reagan administration has condua- 
ed extensve negotiations with Luan- 
da over independence for Namibia 
and the departure of Cuban troops 
from Angola. American commercial 
interests m Angola, particularly in oil 
and banking, have expanded consid- 
erably. But these achievements; and 
larger US. goals, arc now at ride. Just 
two days after the House vote. Ango- 
la angnl y broke off talks on Namibia 
and Cuban troop withdrawal 

Tbe amendment's repeal makes it 
harder than ever fen the Angolans to 
send the Cubans hone. It revives the 
threat of US- mQitaxy involvement 
an tbe side of anti-government insur- 
gents and thus encourages Luanda’s 


FROM OUR JULY 25 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: A Signal of Trouble in Spam 

LONDON — The Morning Post says: "The 
attempt made at Barcelona [on July 22] to 
assassinate Senor Antonio Maura, leader of 
the Conservative party and former Premier of 
Spain, supplies another prim indication that 
the state of the country is far from tranquiL 
Although the crime may not have been the 
result of an organized conspiracy, it must be 
regarded as the product of the passions excited 
by the violent agitation being carried on by the 
Republican and Socialist parties." Tbe Daily 
Graphic adds; “The political situation in 
Spam is exceedingly bad. In this state of things 
the apostles of anarchy find their opportunity. 
The anti-derical policy of Premier Josfi Cana- 
lejas has not improved the outlook, for it has 
only encouraged the revolutionists." 


1935: Croatians Take Over Zagreb 
VIENNA — According to the Catholic news- 
papa “Reichsposi," Croat peasants were mas- 
ters in their own capital Zagreb, for twenty- 
four hours during a recent mass demonstration 
Tor their leader. Dr. V ladimir Machek, of 
which little has been beard outside of Yugosla- 


the Belgrade government. About 300,000 peas- 
ants from all parts of Croatia gathered and tbe 
presence of such masses made it impossible for 
the police and military, held in readiness in 
barracks, to take action. Word passed among 
the crowd that Croatian flags must be hoisted 
When a huge sixty-five-foot flag appeared on 
the building of the governmental paper “No- 
vosti” the crowd burst into shouts of “long live 
tbe free and independent states of Croatia." 


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JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chmmm 1958-1982 

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Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

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ROLF D. KRANEFUHL Director 4 At 


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Dirraar t 


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® 198X International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 



Vietnam in Isolation for How Long? 


L ONDON — Clouds over the 
f Chinese mountains are reflect- 
ed in still paddy water on the Viet- 
namese side, but it is not quite a 
traditional landscape. A gutted lo- 
comotive stands before the ruined 
border town of Dong Dang, threat- 
ened by Chinese troops in the old 
French fort above. No Taoist im- 
mortal sits on the highest peak, only 
a Chinese radar sweeping the sky. 

Foreign observers wondered dur- 
ing Vietnam’s recent dry season of- 
fensive in Cambodia why China 
had failed “to teach Hanoi a second 
lesson." The physical reality cm this 
closed border— where the railway 
once led all the way to Moscow — is 
that Beijing is teaching Hanoi a 
lesson every day of the year. 

Vietnam is now one of the most 
isolated coo curies in the world. The 
only legal form of exit is by a hand- 
ful of air services —two a week to 
Bangkok, one from Ho Chi Mmh 
Gty to Paris, two to the Socialist 
bloc and a shaky link via Laos. 

“If Beijing offers to shake hands, 
we will not refuse,” says a senior 
.Vietnamese leader. “We would 
much prefer to exchange the pre- 
sent state of cold war for one of 
peaceful coexistence with our 
neighbor, even though it would still 
be another form of struggle." 

In lace April two Vietnamese del- 
egates attended a United Nations 
conference held in Beijing about 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion, but their tentative contacts 
with the Chinese yielded nothing. 
There has been talk of other meet- 
ings, perfiaps in Bangkok and New 
York, with equal lack of results. 

The Chinese demand, supported 
by the United States, its Western 
allies and the Association of South- 
east Asian Nations with lesser de- 


By John Gittmgs 

grees of enthusiasm, is for a total 
withdrawal from Cambodia by the 
Vietnamese army. The majority of 
foreign diplomats in Hanoi agree 
that this is not a negotiating Offer. 
“It is one of those issues — just as 
Afghanistan is for the Soviet Umou 
— where the U.S. has no material 
interest in offering to strike a rea- 
sonable bargain,” says one Western 
diplomat with no great sympathy 
for the Vietnamese case. 

Vietnamese leaders, casting one 
eye over their shoulders at the Chi- 
nese-Soviet negotiations, put this 
case in the most unemotional terms 
of international realpotitik. A min- 
ister attempts to construct a ratio- 
nal American argument in favor of 
normalizing relations with Hanoi 
“If Vietnam is isolated,” he argues 
on behalf of Washington, “it has no 
choice but to strengthen its ties with 
Moscow. That is simple logic.” 

In. effect tbe Vietnamese are of- 
fering to draw a line at tbe preseat 
extent of Soviet influence m their 
country. The Russians have “base 
facilities" (not an actual base with 
physical territory) for ibeir fleet at 
Cam Ranh Bay, plus air cover. It is 
a respectable presence, but it could 
still be flattened by American fire- 
power from Subic Bay and Clark 
air base in the Philippines. 

The Russians, who bear the 
weight of a$4-biUion debt and sup- 
port for most of Vietnam’s major 



et.sburce explains that they only 
insisicou mainta ining their "party- 
to-party? relations with Hanoi 
Faced' with what at present ap- 


pears to be a son-negotiable situa- 
tion, the Vietnamese naturally- 
claim that, if necessary, they can 
solve the Cambodian problems by 
themselves. Tbe foreign minis ter. 
Nguyen Co Thadu insists that by 
tbe end of 1985 Vietnam will have 
cumulatively withdrawn one- third 
of its troops from Cambodia since 
the first withdrawals began in 1981. 
“Come bard; in 1987 or 1988 at tbe 
latest,” says a minister with de- 
termined cheerfulness. He forecast 
that by then the Vietnamese pres- 
ence would be reduced to a smalt 
mobile interval cion force. 

Those foreign countries (and 
they are few) who try to mediate 
sympathetically between Vietnam 
and its enemies urge it to realize 
that China will never permit a mili- 
tary solution in Cambodia, and that 
Vietnam is doomed to poverty wdl 
into the 21st century unless it can 
find a negotiable way ouL 

The Vietnamese leaden arc often 
accused of enjoying their predica- 
ment, because they suffer from a 
“war psychosis” or because they 
“need a foreign enemy” or both. 
This sot of analysis is on a par with 
the belHease image of China paint- 
ed in Western propaganda until 
President Richard Nixon decided 
to open the door to Beijing. 

But, as with China in the 1960s, 
the isolation of Vietnam also helps 
to reinforce dogmatism and nega- 
tive diplomatic postures. Vietnam 
will also be wary — just as Mao 
Zedong was during China's decade 
of isolation — of offering a softer 
face that might be slapped down. 

The writer, who visited Vietnam 
lost month, is a Southeast Asia spe- 
cialist on the foreign desk of The 
Guardian in London. 


dependence on aid from the Soria 
bloc. Instead of promoting America's 
role as an honest broker, the repeal 
confirms Angolan fears that Wash- 
ington sides with South Africa. 

Congressional action on Mozam- 
bique risks a similar reversal Rela- 
tions have improved since 1984, when 
President Samora Madid signed the 
Nkomati accord with Sooth Africa. 
He has sought Western aid and tech- 
nology. encouraged die local private 
sector and promoted trade with the 
West — a significant turnaround for 
a committed Marxist. Bui now the 
House, seems to be telling him that all 
this is insufficient: Unless he sends 
borne foreign military advisers, he 
will lose U.S. development aid. 

How will these mixed signals play 
in Pretoria} It is there that they may 
do the most damage. South Africans 
wiD argue that Lhe sanctions are just a 
ritual gesture to appease American 
protesters. Citing tne votes against 
Angola and Mozambique, hard-lin- 
ers will deny that the sanctions repre- 
sent an enduring shift in U.S. policy. 
Mixed signals man America will en- 
courage South Africans to conclude 
thal if forced by events, America will 
choose apartheid rather than Com- 
munism for southern Africa. 

South Africa’s initial 


last week in declaring a state of emer- 
gency. Calmer reflections on the costs 
of resisting outside pressures may fol- 
low, but unless the contradictions in 
America’s signals are reversed in con- 
ference, they can only dilute the ef- 
fect of an unprecedented bipartisan 
stand against one of the world’s most 
pernicious oligarchies. 

— Pauline H. Baker, a former staff 
member of the Senate Foreigi 
Relations Committee, writing 
in The New York Tunes. 


hope for avoiding a bloodbath lies in 
a soaring of economic power, as ad- 
vocated by Chief ButhdezL 

But there America re-enters the 
picture. For as “constructive engage- 
ment" collapsed and police repres- 
sion waxed m South Africa, protests 
by blacks and liberals gathered force 
in America. In response to that pres- 
sure — and 10 embarrass the Reagan 
administration — - both Houses of 
Congress have approved economic 
sanctums against South Africa. But 
sanctions can only harden the resolu- 
tion of tbe re gime, while weakening 
the economic power of the blacks, 
who need jobs and purchasing power 
to bade up strikes and boycotts. 

The sad fact is thal tbe United 
Stales has only the most limited abili- 
ty to influence events in South Africa. 
Overplaying that weak hand is buy- 
ing a ticket to watch a catastrophe. 

Las Angeles Tones Syndicate. 


The Charge 
Can Finally 
Be Dropped 

By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 

W ASHINGTON - The ques- 
tion of whether it was wise and 
necessary for lhe United States to use 
nuclear weapons against an enemy is 
wartime has always seemed 10 me cut 
and dried. Of course it was. The inter- 
esting question over the years has 
been whether, as some believe, the 
United States dropped tbe bombs on 
Hiroshima and Nagasaki to intixni- 
daic an ally in peacetime. 

Did Washington mean to initiate 
“atomic diplomacy" and make the 
Soviet Union bow to postwar U.S. 
territorial and political designs? Did 
America lake tne leap into the atomic 
age. in the process killing great num- 
bers of Japanese, primarily to im- 
press Stalin and advance otherwise 
unworthy American interests? 

On both sides, those who have de- 
bated this question hare understood 
what a terrible and indefensible thing 
that would hare been. Among other 
results, it would hare put upon the 
United States the principal blame for 
destroying the wartime anti- Hi tier al- 
liance and starting the Cold War. 

For exactly this reason the Soviets, 
playing on the still considerable 
American feelings of guilt and confu- 
sion about lhe bomb, continue to 
insist that the United States in 1945 
did indeed practice “atomic diploma- 
cy." Just tne other day in Geneva, 
Georgi Arbatov and Andrei Gromy- 
ko's son Anatoli renewed the charge 
that the bombs had been dropped to 
impress the Kremlin. 

I first came upon this accusation 
in 1965 upon publication of Gar Al- 
perovitz’s “Atomic Diplomacy: Hi- 
roshima and Potsdam." a provoca- 
tive revision of the generally benign 
and them generally accepted view of 
the decision to use the bomb. Mr. 
Alperovitz argued that the atomic 
bomb had determined much of Hany 
Truman's ostensible shift to a tough 
anti-Soviet policy in Europe. 

In due tune scholarly responses 
were prepared, using materials not 
available vtfhen Mr. Alperovitz was 
writing. This makes it possible, I be- 
lieve. to support the simple, square, 
old-fashioned view that Truman 
dropped the bomb to win the war, 
and to support that view not simply 
on tbe basis of a distaste for the 
revisionist blame- America historians 
of the 1960s and 1970s but on the 
bans of lhe historical record 
There was, to be sure, a great flush 
or excitement when news of an im- 
pending bomb first spread. Daniel 
Yergin recalls Secretary of State 
James Byrnes saving privately that 
the first test in New Mexico “had 
given us great power.” Winston 
Churchill was elated that “we now 
had spiwJhiiig in our hands which 
would redress the balance with the 
Russians." Secretary of War Henry 
Stimson, detecting “a great c h ange 
... in my own psychology." thought 
America had the “master card” to 
a postwar settlement. 

“Most of the Americans who knew 
about the bomb thought it could be 
put to work in diplomacy,” Mr. Yer- 
gin writes in “Shattered Peace," “hut 
did not know how.” They never 
learned Mr. Stimson brimmed with 
fuzzy thoughts about vast, newly con- 
ferred American influence in Asia as 
wdl as Europe. But the specific appli- 
cation he came up with was not to 
wield the bomb as a stick but to offer 
it to the Russians as a carrot The 
Russians would not have it. 

Averell Haniman, then America's 
ambassador in Moscow, says that at 
the crucial pre-Hiroshima Potsdam 
summit the bomb “never entered tbe 
discussions." Flying home from Pots- 
dam, Charles Bohlen and Llewellyn 
Thompson, America's top Soviet 
hands, pondered its posable influ- 
ence on U-S.-Soviei relations and 
found no way to bring it to bear. 

Adam Ulaxn, the Harvard scholar, 
adds in “Dangerous Relations" that 
“no one has presented a single piece 
of evidence showing that the U5. 
ever employed its then monopoly of 
nuclear weapons to wrest concessions 
from the UiLS-R. And eves more to 
the point, no one has explained what 
it was that the American atomic 
blackmail allegedly prevented the 
Kremlin from doing.” 

Mr. Ulam offered a footnote to his 
book in a conversation the other day. 
The Soviets never brought up the 
charge that the United States had 
attempted to use its nuclear monopo- 
ly for coercive political purposes, he 
told me, until tne American revision- 
ist historians started writing about it 
Thar is to say, the whole notion of 
“atomic diplomacy” arose in the first 
instance not from real Soviet appre- 
hension and not even from Soviet 
propa ga n d a bat from the workings of 
America's free society. 

The Washington PasL 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

The Nazi Record Is There 

■ Those who nodded when Preadem 


missed the Nazi movement as tbe 
work of “one man ” shooM keep an 
eye on your “From Our Pages" series 
of news from 50 and 75 years ago. 
The items from July 16 ana 17 about 
anti- Jewish riots in Berlin in 1935 
refute that naive interpretation. With 
humble honesty, could we not learn 
from the dismal record? 

MARK SHAPIRO. 

Boulogne-Billascourt, France. 

The Communists in Chile 

IPeter D. Bell’s opinion col umn 
“Chile’s Bullied Democrats Ou gh t to 
Be Supported" (July 16) is patently 
Moscow-inspired propaganda. How- 
ever distasteful one may find Au- 
gusto Pinochet's dictatorship, there 
should be noplace in your prestigious 
newspaper for such absurdities as 
Mr. Bars assertion of Chilean Com- 
munists' “long adherence to the rules 
of Chilean politics.” 

J.P. WARD. 

London. 


Learning From Africans 

I was delighted bv the opinion col- 
umn “Africa: Ills of Dark Continent 
Can Be Cured” (July 1 7) by C Payne 
Lucas and Kevin Lowthcr. I did a 
doctorate in anthropology in Burun- 
di. where I quickly realized how 
much we have to karn from tbe Afri- 
cans. Thar mysticism, love of nature 
and respea for wisdom would be 
healthy influences in our materialis- 
tic, gadget-oriented societies, lhe 
complexity of the lan g na ges indicates 
a superior level of intelligence. When 
will the West stop judging other an- 
lizations by its own rigid standards of 
efficiency and production? 

ANNE STANFORD. 

Palma de Mallorca, Spain. 


Letters intended for pubheatwt 
should be addressed “Letters to tin 
Editor* and must contain lhe writ 
er’s signature, name and fall ad 
dress. Letters should be brief am 
are sidtject to editing We eanno 
be responsible for the rearm, o. 
unsolicited manuscripts. 









*'"4 

J ro PW 

*“» S. n, 


INTERNATIONAL HKBAIfl TKfiiUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


Page? 



on 



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• By WilEamJ. Broad 

• New Tort Tima Sertiee '. 

A QTJIET breakthrough in the 
creation of uttrapowaful sill- 
coo chips is prO(>dling the oomptfr. 
ffTevofiition; into new realms. 
Grcafa r and greater speed of 
has always been a • 
of computer sdmtists, but 
now they are starting to bifid chips 
that are so fast, the toy devices can 
master amjptadties and irregular- 
hies of nature that preyjMJdydud- 

ed them. 

For example, computer technol- 
ogy had been too slow to gpi a grip 
on radio waves; these speea-of- 
}jght ggnals would have to be 
translated almost instantaneously 
into the digital poises that are the 
llHTE^B? “ computation. Now, 
“superchips” are bemg^ produced 
that can do that and more, bringing 
ibe power and precision of tbe aigH 
tal revtobition to bear <m what sci- 
entists call signal processing. 

Hie Defense Science Board, 
which advises the U.S. Defense 
Department on matters of re- 
has haled the devdopment 
of these chips as the Pentagon's 
single most important program far 
creating new technology, surpass- 


ing even the radar-evading 
“stealth” bomber or laser weapons. 
Ihe reason is that the diips prom- 
ise to revolutionize the design of 
tanks, ships, planes, radios, radar, 
sonar, satellites, submarines, ms- 
sOes — in fact, nearly everything 
that runs an electricity, 

The chip breakthrough has been 
brought about by a surge in capa- 
bilities of materials scientists as 
they have learned to manipulate 
molecules and even atoms die way. 
other technicians use nnts and 
bolts. 

Abetted by nearly SI billion in 
U. S. government rands; die com- 
puter chip is gong from thousands 
of transistors on each tiny square of 
silicon — once an incredible capac- 
ity — to teas of nnliions of transis- 
tors. 

“This country has adapted a nril- 
itary posture m Much we tryto 
counter the numerical superiority 
of our adversary with advanced 
technology," said ED. Maynard 
Jr., director of the P enta&m's so- 


dipt is known as VHSIC (pro* 
pounced VISik), an acronym for 
Very High Speed Integrated Gr- 
ants. Although die Pentagon is 
pioneering the technology, aspects 
of it arc starting to appear in civfl- 
ian markets as wdL 
AH along there have been two 
thrusts toward greater speed; the 
much-discussed supercomputer 
and the less-visible snperehip. The 
appeal of the 
been its great fknhSiiy. ‘ 
on the other hand, are extremely 
jecific in their tasks. VHSIC 


perchip program. “Given that pos- 
ture, we have to stay at the fon- 
t's what toe 


program ts 


front. That’s 
all about.' 

The Pentagon's quest for super- 


con tractors m 36 varieties, are de- 
signed to do angle Jobs znA do 
them exceedingly wdL 
VHSIC is also t fiff cicnt froci die 
race for powerful memory daps, an 
area in whkh the Japanese have 
excelled Memory advances are 
mainly achieved by repetition, of 
electronic dements and gpodquafi- 
ty control, whereas the design of 
the advanced central processing 

units that arr-the br«in« nf- cnmpnt- 

ecs (and some specialized types of 
memory) is much more challeng ing 
has remained out of Japanese 
reach so fan "They’re good m im- 
plementation. not innovation^ 



One of the new Very High Speed Integrated Grant drips. 


IN BRIEF 


‘f'Hj Largest Known Space Entity Found 

” i ®[ £ . u~.tr rw -r\ * ■ i. 


Scientists at Kitt Peak National Observatory at Tucson. Arizona, have 
spotted a superduster of galaxies one billion light-years long, probably 
the largest known entity in space, according to Jack O. Bums, a Universi- 
ty of New Mexico astronomer. A Hght-year is almost six trillion miles. 

Scientists believe formation of such a duster would require more 
gravitational force than previously attributed to aS galaxies and stars 
known to humans, Dr. Bums said. The u n iver se most be dnwwtMied by 
some form of dark or unseen matter" that could be made of “the exotic 
particles predicted recently by high-energy physicists,” he said. 

In another study, physicists from the University of California at 
Berkeley. Princeton university and McMaster University in Ontario 
report that data collected aboard a balloon 24 miles above Earth provide 
the most convincing support to date of the “tag-bang" theory that the 
mriverse begin with tbe esmiloaon of a super dense primeval atom. 

The physicists found mat relatively short wavelengths of cosmic 
background radiation dosely fit the s p e ctrum of light that would remain 
from such an explosion. Professor Paul Richards of Berkeley said, 
“Observing that light is the strongest single piece of evidence for the big 
bang. No <me can figure out my other reason for that radiation bong 
there." 

Another recently reported astronomical finding is a super dense star 
that spins 100 times a second and gives off inmsnaTiizegular pulses of X- 
European Space Agency satellite, die star, 
■ ’* oscillations, was reported on in the 
y Midri d . van de r KBs of the space 
agency’s Space' Science Department fa Noordwfik, the Netfaeriands. 

(AP.UPJ) 

Age for Depression’s Onset Dropping 

is 


Westmgboue 
Crap., a VHSIC contractor. 

Inc high-speed chips are so irvo- 
futkmary than nm«y na- 

tions have for the technol- 
ogy, a request , the security- 
conscious Pentagon has turned 
down. “There’s no access,” said 
Frasqois Htisbourg, an offioal at a 
French rfw ^ n j rc company and 
former international security advis- 
er to die French twinfctw of de- 
fense. “VHSIC has tremendous 
promise, but the program is com- 
(rietdy dosed to the mks.” 

The six American pioneers of 
VHSIC technology are Honeywell, 
Hughes Aircraft, International 
w « ni*M Machines Cap, Texas 
Instruments, TRW (teamed with 
Motorola), and Westmghouse 
(teamed with National Semacon- 
doctor). The program, begun in 
1980, is scheduled to receive more 
than Si hilHrm from the govern- 
ment by the time it around 
1990. The first drips are just ap- 


pearing in military systems, with 
vastly more powerful raxes on the': 
horizon. 

Pentagon officials say VHSIC 
has two goals. The Gist phase, * 
which ends this year, at the 
creation of chips with “clod: . 
rates," or data proceamg speed, of 
25 tndlEon hertz, or cycles per sec- 
ond. The second phase is aimed u 
dock rates of 100 nriPion hertz. - 
The oentral processors in most „ 
home computers today run ax ooe 
milli on or two nrinioa hertz at best. 

The speedup is achieved by ; 
shrinking a chip’s key dements. .. 
The finnt cm a drip’s swiftness is . 
determined mainly by the time it 
takes dectridty, moving at the 
speed of light, to flash from one 
component to another. Using the . 
breakthroughs of materials soence 
to shrink the distance between the 
transistors and other components, 
on a dap, everything can happen >: 
faster. The industry standard for ■ 
the size of components is now 
about 3 tnirrnn S (a human hair be-, 
tng some 100 nricnms wide). Phase 
one of VHSIC achieved a size of 
1.25 microns, Mule phase two aims 
at half a micron. 

An added allure of the incredible . 
«firinbmg ehip is the achievement 


of greater power, since many mare 
components can be sqocaco into a 
small space. Phase-two chips win 
contain tens of niiiiinns of transis- 
tors. "It’s been fasanatinglo watch 
these advances,” stud Dr. Jade 
Kilby, who in 1956 Co-invented the 
silicon chip and later helped devel- 
op the VHSIC program. “We’ve 
crane further ana faster than any- 
one expected.” 

The high speeds of VHSIC tech- 
nology are opening new realms in 
the distal revolution, according to 
scientists and government officials. 
In tbe past, chips set their own 
agenda and pace. Now VHSIC 
technology is accelerating the trend 
by which drips fk* on eh«n«np»s 
and the extremely high speed of 
same phenomena in the real wotid. 

At the heart of these develop- 
ment* is the ability to represent 
tigh tiling-quick phenomena pre- 
asdy, in digital tram, rather than 
in imprecise waves, as in analog 
systems. Digital systems represent 
information in the form of pulses 
that are either on' or off, but not in 
between, allowing for great preci- 
sion. Analog systems represem in- 
formation in tbe form of waves, 
such as a television signal or the 
grooves of a record. The waves and 


the analogous signals ihey create in 
electrical systems can be imprecise 
and subject to interference. 

“The di gi tal d omain is getting 
wider” said Dr. Thomas A. Zim- 
merman, a VHSIC scientist at 
TRW in California. “VHSIC tech- 
nology is supporting the natural 
evolution of an electronic systems 
to become more digital and less 
analog. The dmdinghne has natu- 
rally been moving toward digital, 
but VHSIC is speeding that oararaJ 
evohnioa." 

In most cases, digital processing 
m ea n s huge increases in accuracy. 
Digital watches are more exact 
than analog ones. Pictures radioed 
to Earth from distant planetary 
probes can be processed digitally to 
remove static and produce stun- 
ning photographs of. say. Jupiter or 
Saturn. 

Hie VHSIC revolution is start- 
ing to allow the digital processing 
of such radio signals very quickly, 
almost in “real time;” or as soou as 
they are received. Dr. Stroll at Wes- 
doghouse said a typical VHSIC 
goal was to be able to digitally 
process signals in radar receivers 
rax aircraft, which operate at about 
10,000 million henz. “We can't 
process digitally at that speed yet,” 
he said. “So we take the frequency, 
reduce it to slower frequency, with 
losses all the way, until we can 
dig e q the data.” 

Some specific VHSIC projects 
include application to “smart* fly- 
ing bombs, sonar buoys that detect 
enemy submarines, jamming pods 
for electronic warfare; radars, elec- 
tronic packages for fighter aircraft, 
sonar-guided torpedoes, surface- 
to- air missiles, and tanir weapon- 
control systems. 


VHSIC-iype digital lecbfiology 
is starting to make inroads into 
civilian markets, promising a quiet 
revolution in all lands of devices 
that process electromagnetic Sig- 
nals. For instance, digital chips mil 
eventually be used in color televi- 
sion sets. 

Scientists say television signals 
will continue to be broadcast in 
analog form, but digital television 

hog agnaF^o^digiial form, open- 
ing up a wide range of possibilities. 
Instant calculations could be made, 
for instance, to improve picture 
quality by removing “ghosts;” the 
double images that plague recep- 
tion, particularly in large cities. 
Pictures could be stored in comput- 


er memories and frozen rax the 
screen. Viewer could watch several 
channels at once or freeze a partic- 
ular picture frame and zoom in fra 
close-ups. 

Not all observers are sanguine 
about the Pentagon’s efforts to pio- 
neer the development of high-speed 
chips. Congress* General Account- 
ing Office recently charged that the 
VHSIC program had fallen behind 
its goals. 

Pentagon and industry officials 
disagree, contending that whatever 
delays have been encountered are 
normal for so ambitious an under- 
taking. “If nothing else was devel- 
oped, the program has already been 
a success, ’ said Dr. Stroll. 


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U. S. Scientists Look for Antique Air 


• ageatwtiidia 

r the first time 

to a national study 


CAMBRIDGE, MassadxusetlsfNYT) — Die 
most likely to experience a major depression for 
ly over this century, 
by researchers at Harvard Medical 
Tbe study found that while women bom in the 1930» were most likdy 
to experience a' m^ra 'ticprasdix'at about the age of 50, the onset of 
i fra women bran since 1950 is fikdy tg.be before age 30. 


women are more susceptible to denressiai than men, the 
difference between men and women in rates of depression se em s to be 
tfimmishing, the study said. That difference was greatest for the (rider 
grewps studied. 

New Device Measures Plant Stress 

RICHLAND, Washington (NYT ) — Scientists at the Banefle Pacific 
Northwest Labraatories here believe they have crane up with a device for 
detecting and measuring plant responses to environmental conditions, 
i of the Ceres device; name 


. By Lee Dye 

Lot Angela Timer Service 

S dENTCTTS at Los Alamos 
National Laboratory in New 
Mbqco are searching for old tele- 
scopes and other sealed items that 
might contain “(rid arc” This coald 
help determine whether the worid 
is experiencing a “greenhouse <£- 
feet,” or warmmv trend brought on 
by increased carbon dioxide m the 
atmosphere. 

The scientists believe that if 
items that have been scaled la 
many years could be opened under 
laboratory conditions, the air in- 
side them should tefl how much 
carbon dkuride was in the atmo- 


the results could provide a record lot of instruments and hollow but- 
of the changes in the level of carbon- tons, Mr. Ogard said. 
i fionnde * The he aHAri, wiO be not 

Many scientists beliew the bunK only to extract the air without can- 
ing of fossil fads is raising the level- laminating the sqmple but to do so 
of carbon dioxide in the air. Car-' without destroying the instrument 
bon dioxide traps solar radiation in^ Equipment, frequently consisting 
tbe Earth’s at mosphere, almost Wee* of-rifedlcs that can be named into 
irfrt t h u s causing the 


a glass «hiwld t thus ranging me 
greenhouse eff ect That could lead 
to rising te mp er atur es woikbtide, 
possibly several degrees over the 
next century, tbe E a vnoi a nmnl 
Protection Agency estimates. 

- The presence of carbon dioxide 
in The air has been m e asu red in 
some areas as high as 330 parts per 
nriUkai, which is believed by some 


t- 




. *■ J 

4. „ 

it. 


te uses of the Geres device; named after the Roman goddess of 
agriculture, indude predicting irrigation schedules, evaluatmgthe effec- 
tivenesa of fertilizers, or determirring the impact of poifintanls.^ The device 
is based on the physiological principle that, as plants are stressed, tiny 
pores on their leaves, called stotmies, open or close. 

Opening or doting of the stoma tea causes a slight change in the 
diameter of the plant’s stem as water is retained or expelled by the plant 
This change is detected by the Ceres device, said Dr. Peter A. BeecQow, 
rate of its inventors. He said researchers couM document the response of 
sunflowers to vehicle exhaust within two minutes of exposure. 

Proteins Gue to Viral Complications wtK 1 

SEATTLE fWF) — Doctors have long been puzded as to why certain Code, and 
viral disuse*, such as measles, influenza and mononu c leo s is, and the 
vaccines against those diseases can in rare cases lead to severe compiica- 
dons such as encephalitis and other diseases of the nerve tissue. 

The best-known example occurred during 1976, when a U. S. vaccina- 
tion c ampaign against swine flu was called off after a number of people 
developed a complication called Guifiam-Bani syndr om e. Now a team 
from the University of Washington medical school has found that the 
viruses contain proteins that are gmflf to same proteins m aki n g up tbe 
nerves’ protective myelin sheath. 

When after infection or vaccination, the immune system produces 
antibodies tailored to attack the virus proteins, they said, the antibodies 
may also attack the myelin sheath, causing the compluattoas. 

Ancient House Found in Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM (UPI) — A leading Israeli archaeologist has unearthed 
r emains that he termed the oldest house found so far in Jerusalem, da t ing 
back 2,000 years before the time of King David, who is thought to have 
died in about 962 B. C 

Yigal Shiloh, bead of archaeology at Hebrew Univwsity, said he found 
the rectangular house in the side of the hill known as the Gty of David, 
believed to be the oldest part of Jerusalem, about 400 meters south of the 
Old City. The house was probably inhabited by Jebnates or Canaani tes, 

Dr. Shiloh said. . 

He has excavated Only the main room of the house and said he did not 
know how many rooms it had. He iden t ified h as a house by die large 
number of utensils found in it. 

Treating Cowlicks, TJncombable Hair’ 

CfflCAGO (UPI) — Doctors from ihe Medical College of Ohio in 
Toledo say treatment with biotin, a B vitamin found in small amounts in 
most foods, can tame a rare childhood condition known as “uncn iith fl bte 
hair” *t\A rpiii rf help people with cowlicks, or unruly tofts of hair. 

In the Journal of the American Academy of PeaMldogy, Dr. Water 
B. Shelley said uncombaWe hair, slow-growing and .straw-adored, 

‘’stands ont, totally noocorapliant with the wishes of any comb.” He said 
cowficks, which afflict about 3 parent of the population, might be a 
‘localized” version of uucombabk hair, which appears normal but under 
a microscope displays defects. - 

Dr Mw»ffa y cud fe twri hiotm to treat a young boy with uncoinbable 
hair because it had been used to promote hair growth in bald balries with 
nutritional deficiencies. After four months, the boy’s hair “became pfiant 
and somewhat combabte," Dr. Shdiey said. ... 

Rapid Particakte-Counter Developed 

LIVERMORE, California (UPI) — A new system that 
continuous information about the exhaust parti 
combustion can help scientists desist acceptable 
electricity from coal, according to James Wang of 
Labraatories here. 

Dr. Wang said test results indicated ihe Sandia system could provide 
Jhe first rapid, reliable information about the amount and are of particles 
inside a variety of combustion systems. The system could also providing 
information about combustion effluents or airborne particles, data enn- 
cafly needed in hospitals, microelectronics factories, foundries, gas tur- 
bines and hot gas cleanup equipment associated with most dirty Fud 
combustion systems. 

The system, developed with funding from the U. S. Department of 
Energy, collects parade samples, sorts them according to size and 
dete rmines the amounts of pan frylat**- matter in a given volume. It also 
deans the particle collectors automatically for continuous operation. 


i »,aaaasiaate 


the items can be dated precisely, 

Letters, Documents 
On Captain Cook’s 
Explorations Sold 

I ONDON — Letters that be- 
/longed to die 18tb-oeatary 
British explorer Captain James 
Cook, and documents about his 
voyages, have been sold fox 
£129,470 (about 5180,000) at Soth- 
eby’s in London. 

The papers, including letters 
from King George HL came from 
the Sandwich family trust The 4th 
Eari of Sandwich, who died in 
17S2, was first lord of the admiralty 
and sponsored Code’s vqyages. 

Code discovered the Hawaiian 
Islands in 1778 and named than 
the Sandwich Islands afro: Ms pa- 
tron, but feat name waa out of use. 

Cook was the son of a Yorkshire 
farm laborer. He joined the Royal 
Navy in 1755 and made three long 
vqyages to the Pacific. He chatted 
die coasts of New Zealand, Austra- 
lia mid North America as far north 
as the Bering Strait He also plotted 
the locations of many Pacific is- 
lands and was responsible fra Brrt- 
ain’s actuation of its Australasian 
territories. 

In 1779, when Cook was 50, he 
was killed by islanders in a beach 
scuffle at Kealakekna Bay, Hawaii. 


Industrial Revolution. 

Some srientists, however, dis- 
pute the theory thaubegreenhonse 
effect is occurring. 

The search for “historical air," 
which has just began, has been con- 
centrated so far in museums, where 
the records needed to date the 
items should be most complete, 
said Allen Ogard of the Los Ala- 
mos lab, whidx is operated by tbe 
Umvereity of Cafitomia fra the 
U. S. Energy Department 

Finding the right items “doesn’t 
look fike tfs going to be easy,” Mr. 
Ogard said. We are finding that 
most thine that can be opened, 
have been/’ 

It is also proving difficult to ex- 
tras tbe afr man sealed items wi th- 
orn tainting it, he said. 

Those problems notwithstand- 
ing, Mr. Ogard and another re- 
searcher; Jane Pahs, have asked 
museums across Ihe country to try 
to find items that could ytdd air 
samples fra the study. He said that 
such things as hollow buttons from 
nrihUry uniforms, which can be 
dated precisely, and hollow decora- 
tive hardware are among the arti- 
facts they ate seeking. 

Possibly the most promising 
items are old nautical instruments 
that had to be sealed against salty 
air. These can be dated reliably, 
and service records should indicate 
whether they have been opened. 

Tbe search has turned up some 
drug bottles in Maine that were 
sealed nearly 100 years ago, and a 


the items, is being made; but each 
item will probably call For a differ- 
ent piece of equipment, he said. 

In addition, some way must be 
found to prove that the air con- 
tained in the item is as old as the 
records indicate. 

“We’re funfing it very difficult to 
do that,” Mr. Ogard said. One pos- 
sibility would be to sample so many 
tans of the same type that the 
numbers would yidd some degree 
of confidence. 


sure 


It will be equally important to be 
re that the carbon dioxide was 


actually in tbe air when the item 
was sealed; tbe item, for instance, 
must not have been sealed by flame 
because burning produces carbon 
dkuride, Mr. Ogard said. 


of 



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campos industriafesanexos ate Industrie Quimfca debase 
y dottrinando ef idkxrw ingtes (otros idiomas se valors r^n). 
El imbito en que se movers abarca Ideas, productos, y 
tsendogias tin otvidar tat vW 6 n econdmica o de gestfon 
que deberfl preshflr su actividad. 

Q paquete remunerative estart a nivei international, con- 
temptando benefftios extoasalarteles miry bmpoftaniea 
apaite de una remraieradbn de primer orden que se deter- 
mfaiarti durante las entravtetaw. Ref. AS/457. 

En sale case nuestro cHonto participa en elproeBSOdeSe/ecctdn. 
desde las primwas fasas, por to que si no desean que su eumeu- 
tum se entregue a atguna ampnasa en concrete ttiganto constat 
en la carta que nos dirijan, 

PA 

PA Division de Personal 

po Castdtana, 135-28046 Madrid Tels. 279 65 01/02. 
Tuset, 19 - 08006 Barcelona - Tel. 200 53 22. 


SOLICITOR / ATTORNEY 

To serve as European copyright litigation specialist for American 
film industry. To be based in London with extensive European 
travel. Must write and speak fluent German and English (Dutch 
and Spanish a strong-*-), and ideally have some law firm or 
corporate international experience. Background in intellectual 
property field recommended. 

Phase scad resume voder the Bos D 3 15, 

lo the Imamatkwd Herald THbuue, 

181 Avene Q u nle»4 o faJle, 92521 NetnBy Cedes, France. 


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«, THURSDAY, JULY 25,1985 



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From this moment on 


Photo: S. Fuk^m u 


“Early on the morning of August 6, 1945, the 
Enola Gay, named for the pilot’s mother, cut 
east to west across the rivers of Hiroshima, 
opened its hatches, and an atom bomb fell 
free. From that moment to this, nothing has 
ever been the same in the world ” 

So begins the cover story in this week’s 
TIME, Roger Rosenblatt’s survey of the forty- 
year Age of the Atom— an age characterized 
not by a hero or an idea, but by a weapon 
and a threat. 

The story offers four perspectives on 
that day’s reality: as seen by a Hiroshima 
schoolboy; by a physicist who observed the 
mission; by former President Nixon, one 
of only eight Americans in history with 
the power to approve the use of nuclear 


weapons; and by American writers, paint- 
ers and film-maters whose works assimilate 
the monstrous possibilities of what surely 
may be called the age of anxiety. 

These diverse views of the influence of the 
Bomb on peace, war, science, culture, the con- 
duct of life and the survival of conscience, 
sometimes conflict and sometimes coincide. 
But as Rosenblatt points out, “Everybody 
lives in Hiroshima”: it is a responsibility that 
will not go away. Ibis extraordinary article 
explores the ways people cope with this self- 
imposed handicap, and even find ways to 
make it work forthe common good. 

This is the kind of journalism that attracts 
to TIME 32 million men and women readers 
around the world every week. 



timi section 1 ■*» 


THE ATOMIC AGE 




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U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


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BUSINESS/ FINANCE 


THURSDAY, JULY 25 , 198 £ 


Page 9 


"The pattern 


summers could be 
reversed in 1985” 


) 


wm street watch 

There May Be Some life 
Left in the Old Bull Yet 

By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

lalenotumd Herald Tribune 

, ARIS — Is it any wonder that everybody oa Wall Street is 
taking the poise of the stock market? After bH, it has 
.never labored at this high an altitude before. And now, 
almost three years after its birth in August of 1982, the 
ball market is almost exactly at that stage in Sfa whan historicall y 
prices have started to go downhill 

But there is growing controversy now about just bow old and 
infirm the bull market really ii 

“One cannot escape raising the issue erf whether a new maria* 
cycle began in the summer of 1984,” said Leon Cooperman, 
chairman of the investment 
jwficy committee at Goldman 

His answer is a “weak no,” 
but that reflects a shift from 
the firm’s long-standing posi- 
tion that Wall Street is in the 
late stages of its advance from 

three summers ago. 

Elaine GarzareSi, director 

of sector analysis for Sbearson L eh m a n Brothers, has no doubt 
about her optimistic diagnosis: “This up torn in the stock market 
is not the second leg but a new bull market.” 

She views last July as a “bear market bottom" to the do wn t urn 
that began about a year earlier. It was a period when assorted 
Wall Street indices fdl 14 to 32 percent, ate notes that in the past 
12 months the S&P 500, NYSE, Wllsirire and NASDAQ compos* 
ice are up about 30 percent, with the lagging Dow, Value line and 
Amex up about 25 percent. 

“Although the S&P 500 is now 12 percent above its October 
1983 peak, the Amex and NASDAQ axe still about 7 to 10 
percent below their June 1983 peaks,” dwpamted out “The Dow 
is only 4 percent above its November 1983 peak. 

“The 1983-84 bear market was similar to the 1962 and 1966 
bear markets, which were associated with economic slowdowns 
and not recessions,” she said, adding that the gain in stock prices 
from the 1962 bottom was 75 percent before the next bear market 
and the comparable advance after the 1966 trough was 48 
percent. 

R OBERT Farrell, chief market analyst at Merrill Lynch, 
this week also pronounced that the market was “stiQ in 
good shape.” 

But he thinks the vital signs may be tricky, because “the longer 
a trend persists without interruption, the greater the probability 
of some deterioration or the development of a top. Accordingly, 
the market’s pattern of the past three summers — that is, a poor 
be ginning followed by a decisive upturn in August — could be 
reversed in 1985.” 

Eugene Peroni, technical analyst at Bateman Echler JfiH 
Richards of Los Angeles, also likes the patient’s health. 

“The incremental steps to new highs indicate good technical 
conditioning that should help to prevent a serious decline over 
the short run,” he said. “This gradual and consistent progress is 
somewhat in contrast to ihemaxkefs behavior in the firstquarter, 
but the psychological tone among investors is sumhr. This Is a 
(hill market that breeds doubt among many observers regardless 
of their sympathies toward either the buBuh or bearish rides.” 

Nobody ever accused the stock market of having aheart, but if 
it did, it no doubt would be IBM. Byron Wien, head of IL&. 
portfolio strategy for Morgan Stanley, makes that point in nottiig 

tyM bem off iUf?«Uin 1985 “Some 

observers are asms this disappointment to explain the oonftising 
behavior of the whole stock market” 

Even if IBM is currently feeling a lhde under its bellwether 
role, he recommends the stock: “what we are witnessing is the 
rocky shift from an eamings-driven stock market to one in which 
(Continued on Plage 15, CoL 2) 




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SAO PAULO — President Jos6 
Samey oC Brazil has sent a stem 


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Santa: Renters. 


Markets Closed 

Financial markets were dosed Wednesday in Venezada f or a hotiday. 


itors comjdairung of “exorbitant 
imerest rates" and rixurim the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund of 

“d OgHi^iic " 

In an address Mondav to mart 
the three mouths since the death of 
Tancredo Neves that thrust Me. 
Sarney into office, the prerident 
said that, although he had mberited 
the wont crisis m (he nation’s lns- 
twy, he refused to be a “caretaker 
of catastrophe.” 

He oullhed a plan of social pri- 
orities that would danumit a mini- 
mum of a 5* to 6-percent rate of 
“eoonmnic growth without infla- 
tion.” 

Brazil would honor its commit- 
ments and has no wish to create an 
impasse with croditocs, he said, but 
it was time they realized that die 
country was powerful enough to 
look after its own interests. 

“We won’t allow the dogmatic 
intransigence of international fi- 
nancial f wg>n~tT»nnrHE to force an 
unnecessary recession on os,” said 
Mr. Samey, aOutfing to the IMF. 

Mr. Sarneyfe more-bdJbigereut 
stance came as Brazil and its crab- 
tors were "pin involved in negotia- 
tions after & six-month dday while 
the government changed. 

The IMF is considering whether 
a recent S65-biUion padcage of 
pnUic mending cuts and success 
against inflation, now forecast at 
140 percent instead of 250 percent, 
are sufficient grounds for restarting 
the flow of cash to Brazil. 

Mr. Samey attacked “exorbitant 
interest rates winch we have to suf- 
focate our economy to repay” and 
insisted on a steady increase in 
spending on urgent programs for 

hw»lfb ( wfamlinn mm hn^uang 

■ New Measures in Mexico 

jpr __ Mr . Tr .._ janCTi^Qund 

j nUM8lllyy L .W »J WWMMiMJ 

control. The New Ybdt : lmies re- 
ported Wednesday from Mexico 
u«y. 

While no details were an- 
nounced, President Miguel de la 
Madrid said the additional changes 
would include reducing govern- 
ment mending by cutting opera- 
tions of both the federal govern- 
ment and its industries; removing 
the application process intended to 
protect against imports and replac- 
ing it with a tariff-based system, 
and revising (he system of foreign 

exchange to give additional advan- 
tages to non-petrokann exports and 
protect foreign reserves. 


China Posts 
Trade Deficit 
In First Half 

Aeutm 

BELTING — China had a $3.16- 
bSfira trade deficit in the firat half 
of 1985 compared with a surplus of 
IKL95 billion in the same period of 
1984, theMhnstry of Foreign Eco- 
nomic Relations and Trade an- 
nounced Wednesday. 

Exports fell \3 percent to $11.26 
billion from $1 1-41 billion in the 
comparable 1984 period and im- 
ports rose 70.4 percent to $14.42 
billiou from SS.46 bfflion. 

Huang Weq'un, a spokesman for 
the nmrisby, attributed the dectine 
in export value to falling interna- 
tional prices /or com, peanuts, soy- 
beans and oil. 

Mr. Huang said imports of steel 
materials, copper, equipment and 
machinery, vehicles and domestic 
appliances rose riiarply, but he 
gave no breakdown. 

Imports from Japan rose 102 
percent to $5J3biHi«i, butuxports 
rose, only 11 percent to SL94 bil- 
lion. Imports from Hong Kong 
rose 261 percent to S2-25 Whoa, 
wfcDe exports fell 24,7 percent to 
$203 bilW 

Mr. Huang srid foreign trade for 
all of 1985 would be more than the 
$49.97 hOHcn recorded last year, 
but dedmed to make a forecast or 
to say whether the trade deficit 
would also increase. China had a 
SU bfl&Hi deficit in 1984. 

International prices for China’s 
farm commodity exports started 
rising in June and total export 
earnings in the second half of 1985 
win be higher than in the fim half, 
Mr. Huang said. 

China will continue to impart 
maiwiftk and equipment ■ needed 
for its modernization programs, 
but has put tight controls cm im- 
ports of televisions, refrigerators, 
tape recorders, other domestic ap- 
pliances and vehicles. 

He added China’s foreign- ex- 
change reserves are adequate to 
cover aB import requirements. 

China had fatHgn .reserves of 
$11.26 billion ai the end March, 

' down from $14.42 bflfitm at the aid 

of 1984. 



lta Nm VoA Tim 

Mario L. Piariro by a so^p- wrapping machine at a plant in AveUaneda, Argentina. 

Argentine Executives Try to Adapt 
To Business life Without Inflation 

So adept had Mr. Pideiro become at m a n a g ing 
Algandro Uanro A Sens that there was still mon- 
ey to be made with inflation at 30 percent a year, 
be said. But running the company, which has sales 
of about $24 million a year, became increasingly 
difficult as inflation crept up, reaching a record 
1,129 percent in the 12 months ended June 30. 

Durin g the years of inflation, $»«•*» concer n s as 
production costs took a back seat while managers 
focused on the more imminen t worries of timing 
rises in prices — trying to match the cost of raw 
mnierinfs with the cost of die final product. As 
supply and product costs began going up almost 
duly, the mixing and matching of those prices 
became as complicated as solving a Rubik’s Cube. 

“It was impossible to act on opportunities,” Mr. 
Piikaro arid. “No one had any time because every- 
thing happened so fast” 

So much management time was spent on these 
calculations — Algandro Llauro & Sims employed 
four money managers for the task — that business 
executives could not worry about equipment fail- 
ares that were also increasing production costs. 
The idea of improving the plant's efficiency also 
(Cootkmed on Page 15, CoL 1) 


By Lydia ChaVcz 

New York Tima Senke 

BUENOS AIRES — For Mario L. Pifieiro, a 64- 
year-old Argentine executive, the prospect of liv- 
ing in a wood without inflation is both attractive 

Hint nmrttlmg 

Mr. Pifieiro, who manages ihehouschdd-prod- 
ucts company of Algandro tlauro & Sons, ravens 
a stable economy. But after years of adjusting his 
business practices to acute inflation, he and other 
executives have come to think of snch stability as a 
dusty textbook concept. 

If President Raul Alfonsin’s anti-inflationary 
program works, rampant inflation will disappear 
and Airatme businessmen's carefully honed sur- 
vival mlh wfl] become obsolete. 

“Most of the peojile who work here are younger; 
and their only knowledge of how to manage in a 
stable economy comes man books,” Mr. Pifieiro 
said recently. 

“Even 1 have forgotten,” he said. “We’re going 
to have to adopt and think in a more rational way. 
In i nflatio n you are always attentive to momentary 
o iyor mni nea Now things will wqric more logical-- 


Shell Oil Co. 
Says Earnings 
Declined 19.3% 


Untied Pros Imemutionnl 

NEW YORK — Shell Oh Co., 
the scventh-largest U.S. oil compa- 
ny. Wednesday blamed a 19.3-per- 
cent earnings decline in the second 
quarter on lower selling prices for 
domestic crude oil and natural gas 


Toyota: Why It Made Its U.S. Move 


■f 

By Warren Brown ** taled $23 bilBon, versus Honda's 

Washington Peat Sender *’ $1(X2 MUnn. 

WASHINGTON — Toyota Mck , Honda’s 1 984 US. sales perfor- 
tor Corp. has finally accepted an‘3S 0Ia “ c c Nat 

winm of the fluto hasincss: Yo n^r anlgod Nissan Motor Co^ which 
can’t become a world antfflnotivo/*h^f85f298 passenger cars in the 
power pfaw you bufld cars hi t^ic Dniicd States last year. Nissan 
Uniled States. 


That was the significance of 
Toyota’s announcement Tuesday 
that it would start buildzng mid- 
sized cars in the Untied States by 
1988, according to auto industry 
analysts and officials. 

Toyota long has been Japan's 
largest auto producer. But among 
the three biggest Japanese car com- 
panies, Toyota has been the most 
timid in eaabHshiog a manufactur- 
ing presence in the United Stales. 

Toyota’s past reluctance to eater 
the Untied States on its own as a 
manufacturer is understandable, 
analysts said. Even with “vcftoniary 
quotas” limiting the shipment of 
Japanese care to the United States, 

Toyota sold 557.979 cars and 
trucks in the United States last 
year, more than any Japanese or 
other foreign automaker doing 
business in the U.S. marker. 

With Japan’s par-car production 

dwetion at thejeani-venture compa- 
hf ny* New United Motor Manufac- 

wriflS Ioc. was insignificant in 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

a pidenp truck riant in 
Tennessee, in 1983 and 
1 100^00 trucks here last year, 
'oy ota executives were farced to 
like note. There was even specula- 
tion in the U JS. automotive trade 
press that Honda might some day 
overtake Toyota in the American 
market 

“But few anto industry analysts 
took that talk seriously. They said 
that Toyota simply would follow 
Honda's example and use UJ5.- 
bmti care to get around import 
quotas and to maintain its post don 
in the world's largest most lucra- 
tive and most open automotive ba- 
zaar, the Uni tea States. 

Toyota took a tentative step in 
that direction late last year when it 
began building Nova passenger 
care with General Motors Corp. in 
Fremoal, California. Initial pro- 


strongty that it intends to operate 
as a world anto power," said Arvid 
Jouppi of Arvid Jouppi Associates 
Inn, a Detroit-based marketing 
analysis firm. 

Toyota and other Japanese auto 
makers also believe that they “will 
always face some kind of quotas" 
exporting care to the U.S. market, 
sard David HeaN, an analyst -with 
DrexdBumhain Lambert Inc. US. 
quotas limited Japanese auto ship- 
ments last year to nearly 1.9 million 
and limits shipments for this year 
to 2L3 million. 


inn Co., ranked 10th. an- 
nounced its second-quarter com- 
ings rose 7 percent primarily be- 
cause of stronger gasoline prices 
and lower crude oil costs. 

Mesa Petroleum Co. said its sec- 
ond-quarter profits plummeted 
58.7 percent. 

Shdl, headquartered in Hous- 
ton, had a second-quarter profit of 
$337 trillion agains t $418 dilUofl 
in the year-ago quarter. Per-share 
figures were not riven because 
Shell became a wholly owned sub- 
sidiary of the Royal Dutch-Shell 
Group June 7. 

Revalues decreased 4.6 percent 
.to $5.10 biHkm versus S5 J2 trillion. 

Shell’s president, John T. Boo- 
kout, said average U5. etude oil 
prices fell $134 a barrel and natu- 
ral gas liquids dropped $224 a bar- 
rel in the first six months of 1985 
from a year earlier. 

He said reduced selling prices for 
refined petroleum products com- 
bined with higher production costs 
and exploration expenses to re- 
strain earnings. 

For the first half Shell earned 
$633 millio n down from $743 mil- 
lion in the first six months last year. 
Revenues were down 4.4 percent to 
$9.84 rillian versus $10.30 billion. 

Sun, based in Radnor, Pennsyl- 
vania, earned J 146 milUan, or SI. 30 
a share in the April- June quarter, 
in> from $137 muHon, or 51.17 a 
share, in the 1984 second quarter. 
Revenues decreased 6.8 percent to 
$3.68 biHkm from $3.95 trillion. 

U5. refining and marketing op- 
erations posted a profit of $56 mil- 
lion in toe latest quarter vs. a $7 
million loss a year earlier as petro- 
leum product prices firmed and 
crude ofl prices eased. 

For the first ax months, Sun's 
earnings decreased 2 percent to 
$273 million, or $242 a share, from 
$280 mflUoii, or $240 a share, in 
the first half last year. Revenues fell 
10 percent to $ 735 billion from 
$8.16 billion. 

In Amarillo, Texas, Mesa Petro- 
leum had second-quarter earnings 
of $9533 million, or $139 a share, 
down from $230.91 million, or 
$333 a share, in the same quarter 
last year. 

Revenue dipped 13.6 percent to 
$87.64 million versus $102.47 mil- 
lion. 


The 1985 quarter included rut 
after-tax gain of $83 million, which 
boosted earnings by S123 a share, 
from the sale of some of Mesa's 
Unocal common stock and Other 
transactions related to its unsuc- 
cessful bid to acquire the Los An- 
geies company. 

Mesa's six-month earnings fell 
40 percent to $146.47 million, or 
S112 a share, from 5243.24 million, 
or S3.42 a share. Revenues were 
down 6 percent to 5193.92 million 
from $206.10 million. 


OPEC Stalled 
biDebateon 
Minor Cuts 

By Bob Hagerry 

Itaemancml HensS Tribune 

GENEVA — Oil ministers from 
the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries on Wednesday 
continued their efforts to reach a 
compromise over minor price cuts. 

A senior delegate said dm minis- 
ters, in the third day of a meeting 
here, were considering at least two 
proposals. One would involve re- 
ducing the official price of heavier 
crudes by about SO cents. A second 
would involve a smaller reduction 
on heavies combined with a amor 
increase on light varieties. 

Iran's minister, Mohammad 
Gharazi. said he favored (he latter 
approach. Saudi Arabia and Ku- 
wait have been seeking a reduction 
in the price of heavy crudes. Both 
produce heavy oil and wish to price 
it more competitively in relation to 
the more-expensive light crudes. 

Several countries, notably Libya, 
Algeria and the United Arab Emir- 
ates, have argued for no change, 
even though most OPEC oil is be- 
ing sold at market-relaxed rates $2 
or S3 lower than official prices. 

A former senior OPEC delegate 
commented, “It's a shame they are 
spending so much time” on minor 
price adjustments. “They should be 
wring other things,” he said. 

On Monday, the ministers 
agreed to dday until autumn dis- 
cussion on the contentious issue of 
how to deal with several members' 
requests for higher output quotas. 

The ministers also have been dis- 
cussing this week ways to improve 
an auditing system set up last win- 
ter to monitor members* compli- 
ance with OPEC rules. 


poet the plant to turn out 30,000 
passenger care in 1985 and to in- 
crease that number to 250,000 an- 
nually by 1988. 

Most of the Fremont plant cars 
will be assembled for GM*s Chev- 
rolet Division. The remainder, 
Toyota at first seemed to ignore about 50,000, will be bmh spedfi- 
Hooda’s US. manafacturing ef- caHy for Toyota, 
forts. But Honda last year com- Nissan, Mazda Motor Corp- and 
hined imports with hs American- Mitsubishi Motors Corp. also are 


But Toyota’s joy ride began ittn- 
ning into bunros in 1982, the year 
Mom Honda Motor Co s Japan’s 
third- largest car company in terms 
of sales, began assembling Honda 
Accord seduts in Marysville, Ohio. 


made cars to sell 508,240 units in 
the United States, only 49,559 units 
less than Toyota’s U5. sales in 
1984. 

Toyota last year controlled 46 
percent of its home market, versus 
Honda’s relatively skimpy 9 per- 
cent market share in Japan. Toyo- 
ta’s worldwide sales last year to 


following Honda’s example, Japa- 
nese onto makers as a groupcoold 
wind op assembling up to 900,000 
emt a year in the United States by 
1990, according to analysts. 

Toyota's decision to Kart its own 
assembly operation “recognizes the 
fact that it can’t afford to lose its 
grip on tins auto market and says 



HARRY WINSTON 



presenjj. • 

their latest creations as well as 
a selection of their rarest stones 

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July 26 to July 31, 1985. 




New York Genfcve 


Paris 


Monte-Carlo 




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Associates Brings 
U.S. Discount Brokerage 
Across the Atlantic— 
to London. 

A SAMPLE OF OUR VERY LOW COMMISSION RATES 

500 shares of any price stock $ 80 

1.000 shares 110 

5.000 shares 300 

10,000 shares 450 

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50 options @ 3 J 80 

If you live in Europe or the U.K. and you make your own investment 
decisions, Andrew Peck Associates will charge you much less in 
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Our London office gives you the convenience of a U.S. discount 
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AQOnTJATFiLINC. / s \ 


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1 


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39 Bedford Square, London WClB 3EG, England (01)580-1096 Telex: 8812130 iMCLElSG) 
32 Broadway. New ’fork. N.Y. 10004 (212)363-3770 Telex: 429097 (STOCKS! 
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MEMBERS NASD, SfPC, S1A 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


mt aval table at orass Urn* 


NYSE Diaries 



NYSE index 


Pin* to ut _ Today 

HI* Low dec* JPJ*. 
Com main ItlM ItUS ni 09 11057 

industrials 139.17 13741 137J1 1S&J3 

Transit. 11*25 113.15 11115 111J2 

Utilities’ 5980 STM S7M 57 JQ 

Floanet 12053 119L33 T7VJ3 11*27 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


wn Sots* nm 

July 23 22UM 54*741 «7 

July 22 191035 47*492 1J4Q 

July 19 - 240296 m»8 1491 

July It 712,130 417,504 Tit 

July 17 260 MO 54U56 1193 

‘IndiKM bi Itw sates fteores 



AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
uo to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 



Standard & Poor's Index 


Prevtooi Today 
Hips low aw* 3 PM. 
industrials 21*43 2UM 211*4 21124 

Trans*. urns i79.ni jasAJ 17745 

Udlltlss 17.15 5404 a*35 KU2 

Finance 2M SSM ZL01 2244 

CoriHWUtS 194,98 17231 TOSS 17174 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Trans*. 


Week Yew _ 
Close Noon *ao 
30U3 794*1 305.17 
31154 31171 31043 

Mai — 37550 

JOB - 35*74 

STUB - 3ta.il 

30429 - 301*5 

274.14 — 2W-5J 


AMEX Sales 


3 PJH, volume 
Prev. a PAL volume 
Prey. cons, volume 


AMEX Most Actives 


VOI HWI LOW LOST Oft. 

B*“ In MET 4*. «». 4 . 

Te«*;r 3TS 17*. 164. i”.. - 1 , 

AM 'nil J783 4ft 11 «■« - 

HMTI It'S M Jf., 34 

fCirOv 1798 1 S<t • ** — •, 

TIE 15*4 p, 4>, _ vt 

waneB 139V 17 < r 1 - . 

EctnB# 107- «}ft ij >j . » 

Tvlrwl, I2K ?"i J. 3' ■ — , 

MicniE 1X4 ilk 13' t — •. 

Ke.Pn I lai :: n*. 11 :. — 

MMta ’53 77 'fi ,T; - 

PelL« 730 7 t Sft 14 - . 

FnrtMC 724 TJli lift lift — , 

Bovwnr 6«7 5H 5'-. 5-r *■ •. 


AMEX Stock index 


Previous Ted*, 

High Low Clast 3 pm. 

VH 235 IP 235 IS 3341 


of Z92e10.l 
pfA 192 115 
dpi 87 10.9 
Pi 950 1U 
Pt 1150 104 
Rt 954 11 J 
*7 
5 

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Jt, US 
JO 45 
50 U 
80 35 


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275 

93 

287 

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18 

88 

30 

84 

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280 

113 

300 

5.9 

1375 

123 

230 

110 

281b 

85 

180 

38 

82 

37 

226 a 

98 

138 

28 

88 

20 

UU 

30 


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71 451* 

401* 




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12ft — ft 
13ft— I* 
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444* —2ft 
14 

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57VU-3W 
21V— ft 
15V— I 
7fh 

18ft — ft 
17ft 
121* 

29ft + ft 
9ft — 1* 
151* + ft 
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2ft 

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214* + 4* 
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29 — ft 
31 - ft 
8 

OB -1 
m ■ +1 

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25ft— ft 
23ft— ft 
30ft- ft 
26 ft + ft 
37ft— ft 
28ft 
24ft 

82 ft + ft 
25ft + 1* 
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44V, — V* 

43ft- ft 
14ft 5 1* 
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32ft— ft 
28ft — ft 
37 —1ft 
341* + ft 
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sw 

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if*-* 


Dow Average Continues Slide 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Prices an the New York 
Stock Exchange posted a broad loss Wednesday 
in a carryover of selling from late in Tuesday r s 
session. 

Hie Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, 
down 5.83 on Tuesday, dropped 9.63 to 
1,342.18 an hour before the dose. 

Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. dose in New York, for rime reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 

Losers outnumbered gamers by nearly 3 to 1 
among New York Stock Exchange-listed issues. 

Analysts said the market had come a long 
way in a short time in its rally over tbe past two 
and a half months. 

Tbe temptation to cash in scone profits, they 


noted, has been heightened lately by the level- 
ling off of the bond market after a sharp dedine 

in interest rates. 

Rates were little changed in the credit mar- 
kets Wednesday. There are widespread doubts 
in the financial world that they will go much 
lower in the near future. 

For the stock market’s rally to continue, 
many analysts believe, the economy will have to 
fulfil] hopes far a resumption of steady growth, 
boosting corporate earnings. 

DuPont dropped W to 60. The company re- 
paled second-quarter profits of 51.10 a share, 
down from $1.81 in the comparable period last 
year. 

The NYSE's composite index fell 1.12 to 
110.57. At the American Stock Exchange, the 
market value index was off 1.67 at 233.4s. 

Volume on the Big Board came to 104.96 
million shares with an hour to go. 


Steel Production in U.S. Oft Sharply in First Half 


r* 


$ 


Patten 

BRUSSELS — Steel output in the United 
States fell sharply in the first half of 1983, but 
production in the European Community and 
Japan rose slightly, the International Iran and 
Steel Institute said Wednesday. 

Tbe institute’s monthly bulletin reported that 
output fay the U.S. industry, whim has been 
struggling against import competition, shrank 
by 12 percent to 40.9 millio n metric tons. 

EC production totaled 61.5 milli on tons, up 


1.1 percent, and Japanese output was 53.5 mil- 
lion tons, a rise of 2.6 percent. 

Crude steel output m the 30 countries cov- 
ered by the institute's figures totaled 220 mil- 
lion tons in tbe half year, down 1 percent bom 
the first half of 1984. 

Last week the Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development said leading 
sted producers in the West and Japan were 
heading for a renewed squeeze in the second 
half of 1985. It warned of falling prices, demand 
and output and rising competition 








Z10 

98 

88 

Zl 

130 

38 

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480 

103 

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280 

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97 

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18ft utmoCft 
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McNeil MM 35 
Mood 120 sa 
mvn 34 vs 
Medfrn 50 22 
Mellon 248 5JJ 
Mellon pi 280 94 
Melvin 144 33 
Merest ISO 20 
Mere* 330 z * 
Meram mm 14 
IMerLvn 40 24 




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23% J River 56 15 
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TOft JOBOF I54H20 
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57 JerCpf 936 123 
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281% Jomun 1J0 28 
37ft JotinCn 156a 44 
21ft Joraen LOO 44 
1* JPBtWIB 50 11 
271% JOvMfa 140 &7 


18 135 35 341* 

11 2924 38ft 35ft 

12 193 26ft 25ft 

936 12 lift 

7 544 461* 43ft 
1003 761% 761% 
210x63 62 

lOOz 63 62ft 
201105ft 105ft 
24 181% 17ft 
20 3 lift lift 

16 3414 47ft 48ft 
9 144 47ft 41ft 

T7 44 251* 24ft 
15 »1 25ft 25ft 
15 244 24ft 24ft 


34ft— ft 
361* 

25ft— ft 
13+1% 
45 —11% 
76ft— 1* 
62 —1ft 
62ft— 1ft 
I05ft +lft 
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lift 

471*— 1* 
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25ft— ft 
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24ft— 1* 


63 28ft 

in* is 

323* 22ft 
281* 20 
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10 3ft 
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91* Bft 
3ft 3ft 
1W Jft 
22ft 22 
251* 26ft 
27ft 271* 
23 32ft 
211* Sift 
66 45ft 


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2944 + ft 
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19ft + ft 
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lft— ft 
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Halwdpf J6 £3 
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E2 























































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD Tg] [gUffE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


Page II 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Daimler’s Dornier Unit 
Says ’84 Net Rose 22% 


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^ Warren Gedcr ■ . . ■ 

I ntavatiavtHcraU Tribune 

MUNICH — Dbmiflr GmbH,' 
West GermaoyVseccad largest 
aen^paoe jsroup, reported Wednes- 
day a 22-percent mcrease in net 
profit 10.-.3I.8 miBioJi Dencsehe 
maria^J limfllioD) is 1984 bom 
26 nalEen DM a year earlier. * 

Map&ed Rsdier, chief executive 
at DonEer, noted, however, that 
19*0* income was distorted by 
gtiaordinaiy yw*, indnding the 
idease of. provisions for risks that, 
(ftdnot materialize. 

OpOTUng^rtrfit was up “slight- 
ly" io.46 m3hQn DM last year from 
43 noihoQ DM in 1983. 

Mr. Fischer to predict 

UJL Shipbuilders 
Reports Decline in 
Annual Revenues 

Reuten 

LONDON -- British Shipbuild- 
ers reported Wednesday that its 
revduies fell 2A percent to £865.9 
nriOioa (about 51^ billion) from 
£886J8 million in the year ended 
Match 1. 

A spokesman for the state- 
owned company said losses for ihe 
year, including £27^6 miTH on in 
extradnfinaiy items, fell to £106.8 
tnillk>a from £232 mfflioa the year 
before. He said iiading losses de- 
clined to £25 million from £160.9 
miDioii. 

Graham Day, the chairman t mid 
the company’s fmandal perfoi- 
. mance should continue to improve 
despite current depressed ship 
prices and despile a jade of signifi- 
cant improvement in worin de- 
mand for new merchant ships. 

Me. Day said that despiti 
gress in many areas, British 
builders would continue to operate 
in ffrffiraih circumstances. “In a 
market where Far East shipbuild- 
ers persist in selling Rn»nrang 
sales on terms winch do .not cover 
costs, let alone provide profit, Eu- 
ropean shipbuilders, tfaear employ- 
ees and governments inevitably pay 
theprice," he said. 

“Unless more 
ries are adopted in'Soutb 
and Japan it is difficult to see bow 
any European shipyard can main- 
tain its capacity," be added. 

French Bank Cots Base Rate 

RtVUB 

PARIS — Credit Commercial de 
France has cut its base cate by 0,4 
percentage paints to I0.85;percent, 
effective nrimedi ‘ ~ ' * 

woman said 



man automaker. He said however, 
he estimated, that group revalue 
would dimb to 2 blfioaDM from 
L5 biffion DM in 1984, fed by brisk 
sales in space technology and dcc- 
tro-mcdnanc 

Mr. Rsdier said 1984 profit was 
depressed by two factins. Produc- 
don tedmobgy costs far its sew 
commercial utility aircraft, the 
Donuer 228, were coosidorably 

above expectations, and returns mi 

subcontracting work oa several Eu- 
ropean Airbus Industrie aircraft 
were below expectations. ■ . 

Military orders accounted for 46 
percent of total orders last year, 
down from 51 patent m I9$3. A 
board member, Karl-Wilhelm 
Scfafifcr. said Dormer had received 
89 firm orders for its sew 228 
plane, an order flaw that would 
keep production at capacity 
through the end of this year. 

The company hopes to expand 
sales of its small commercial air- 
craft in the United States; where a 
major expansion of its sales net- 
work is planned. 

Company executives say that 
Dornier wrS compete for major 
contracts from the West German 
government to build helicopters, a 
sector that has been dominated in 


aerospace rival here, Messer- 
schmitt--BWkow-ffiohm. 


Japan to Study 
igJAL 




FuQy Private 

Roden 

: TOKYO — The Transport 
Ministry wiB study whether to 
make Japan Airlines Ltd. a fully 
private company, a ministry of- 
ficial said Wednesday. 

The government now owns 
35.7 percent of JAL and the 
airtine is partidly by 

fitcgovenmienC ■ 

The study is part of abroad 
review of deregulation in the 
aviation industry following a 
U 3. -Japan agreement on April 
30, wfawh ended JAL’s monop- 
oly of Japan's international air- 
freight services and allowed the 
Japanese freight Bne, Nippon 
Cargo Airlines, to provide 
&ans-ftd& services. ' 

The agreement also provides 
for more passenger services be- 
tween Japan and Micronesia 
and across the Pacific, and sug- 
gests dot Japan's two domestic 
airlines, AIT Nippon Airways 
Ltd. and Tost Domestic Airlines 
Lid., be allowed to start inter- 
national services, industry 
sources said. 

The Tran^XHt Ministry said 
it would also study whether to 
open international routes to the 
domestic airlines, as proposed 
in the U.S.- Japan a gfp*^n^ni i 
and whether to allow more 
competition on domestic 
routes. 


IBM Wins Approval 
For Plant M Mexico 


Dollar Rises in Europe on Quiet Day 


-V 

.7*8 Associated Pros 

MEXICO CTTY —Internation- 
al Business Machine Carp, has 
been granted government approval 
to operate a wholly owned subsid- 
iary to bufld personal computers in 
Mexico. 

The National Commission an 
Foreign Investments announced' 
Tuesday lhat .it had approved the 
proposal, which had been negotiate 
ed for more than two years. 

The commission also announced 
of several other U.S. and 


investment projects with 
majority fo r ei gn ownership. They 
a y?SfL mitti rm Irani de- 

vdopmentpraectonMadePiedra 
near the Pacifi c coast resort of Ma- 
zatlan by the U.S--owikxI BMA Co. 

of Mexico. 

IBM will invest $91 mfflioa over 
the next five years in the microcom- 
>ject and has agreed to 


sented a revised proposal, the com- 
misaon said. An earlier plan was 
turned down in January after it 
drew protests from 30 other com- 
panies who make personal comput- 
ers in Mexico, most of than assem- 
bled from imported kits and with 
majority Mexican ownership. 

They argued that a wholly owned 
IBM operation would have an un- 
fair advantage and could drive 
them out of business. 

But the ccmmission said that be- 
cause IBM would he exporting 92 
percent of its production, the 
smaller companies would be pro- 
tected. 

Under a 1973 law, Mexicans 
must own more than 51 percent of 
subsidiaries of foreign c ompani es 
operating in the country. But the 
law was relaxed, last year to allow 
up to 100>percent foreign owner- 
ship in 17 odds. 


Reuters 

LONDON — The dollar ended 
Wednesday generally higher in Eu- 
rope, reaching the day’s highs 
against major currencies in Lon- 
don. Some dealers cited short-cov- 
in the rise. 1 

dealers said there was no 
new major economic impetus and 
sentiment remaned soft in the for- 
eign-exchange market for any ma- 
jor move. 

The dollar ended the day in 
Frankfurt at 2.8734 Deutsche 
marks, up from 2.85 DM Tuesday, 
atSI 39710 the pound in Lon don, a 
strengthening from SL4I25, and at 
8.723 French francs, up from 8.665. 

Dealers said the dollar was still 
deriving residual support from die 
1.8-percent rise in O.S. June dura- 
ble-goods orders, announced Tues- 
day, and was still trading in a range 
between 2JJ4 And 2.90 DM. 


Dealers said erratic trading was 
dominated by the (Mar. While the 
pound fell against the dollar it con- 
tinued firm against QwHnaixil 
currencies. 

Dealers said the pound was very 
resilient to the dollar's afternoon 
rise and only fell below $1.40 when 
the U.S. currency broke above 188 
DM in London. 

News from the current meeting 
of the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries was insub- 
stantial during the day and so the 
depressing effect of future lower oQ 
pnees on the pound continued to 
be overshadowed by high British 
interest rates. 

A dealer for a U.S. bank said 
that Wednesday's buying was 
mostly technical He said there was 
a gap on chans up to 18950 DM. 
He said he bebeved that traders 
were attempting to push the dollar 


to this level before taking profit* 

The dollar's firmer performanc< 
came despite a lower federal funds 
rate earlier in the day of 7 9/!$ 
percent, compared with Tuesday's 
average 7.83 percent. Federal ftud^ j 
are overnight loans among U.S* _ 
commensal banks. 

No U.S. major economic data is 
due until next Tuesday’s U5. mer* 
chandise trade figures for June. . 

After banks wound down itf 
London, U5. operators uxdc swift 
profits on the U^. currency, taking 
it off its highs to below 188 Dm 

a gain 

The lira continued weak, slip*; ? 
ping to 1,927 to the dollar at uxr, ,. 
dose from hs opening at 1,917 and' 
the dose yesterday at 1,923. 

In Tokyo, the dollar was little 
changed against the yen, dosing at 
238 yen, compared with 239 Tues- 
day. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


ogy gap between what is produced 
in Mexico and abroad will be no 
more than ri x mon ths md theprice 
differential between 10 and l5per- 
cent, according to the announce* 
ment It said supply industries are 
to be developed in Mexico. 

IBM, which has been operating 
in Mexico for more Jhan 50 years 
and was recently authorized to 
make electronic typewriters here, 
will build its System-51 microcom- 
puter in the new project. 

Approval came after IBM pre- 


COMPANY NOTES 


Alcan Ahm a a fa m Ltd. produc- 
tion wodeera at the Kitimal, British 
Columbia, smdier complex have 
voted to accept a three-year con- 
tract The Canadian Association of 
Smelter and Allied Workers said 
the contract provided 2-petoenl 
raises m the second and third years. 

Asa Temhab Ltd has canceled 
its contract for 1 billion Hong 
Kang dollars ($130 millian) with 
Far East Consortium Ltd. to build 
a container lenmnal in Hong Kortg 
because of the alleged failure of Far 
East fo "proceed regularly and d£G- 
gently with work under the con- 
tract” 

Brooks Sateffite Inc. has agreed 
in principle to atxpriie Interconti- 
nental Products Corp., a distribu- 
tor of mellitc Earth stations, for 
about one million shares. It said 
Intercontinental would have a 30- 
percent interest in Brooks after the 
acquisition. 

. Bamab 03 PIC is actuating 
Leed Petroleum Cop. of Denver 
from Atlantic Oil Crap, and other 
interests 'for a total af_ about $26 
imOioiim the next five years, teed 


Petrctenn has interests in US. on- 
sboreemloratioa acreage. 

GJ. Cafes ft Col of Australia has 
entered into a share-placement 
agreement with K mart Holdings 
Pry. to raise part of the cash re- 
quired to finance its takeover of 
Mycr Emporium. Ltd. Kmart wiB 
t»k*» up an as yet undetermined 
number of ordinary shares in Coles 
at 355 Australian doOan each 
CS253X 

Federal Mogd Graphs board had 
authorized the reptnoutse of up to 
1 mtifira i shares of the company’s 
common stock. The company cur- 
rently has 13.5 million shares out- 


Hove of Rarer PLC has railed 
its stake in Debenbims PLC to 
2123 million ordinary shares, or 
I2ril percent. Debenhams is the 
subject of acbniesled takeover bid 
from Burton Group PLC 
Industrial Equity PacSe Ltd-, a 
Hoag Kong investment firm, re- 
torted that it lad bought 24,800 
Esquire Radio ft Electronics Inc. 
co mm on shares, or 5.1 percent of 
the total outstanding. It said it had 
acquired' the stock ier investment 


purposes and may boy additional' 
shares. 

Japan Air lines has <«gnwi fetr 
ten of intent with Boeing Co. for 
the purchase of four new 747 jum- 
bo jetliners for $418 millio n. 

Minebea Co, a precision ball- 
bearings manufacturer, has pur- 
chased Miami Lakes Operation, a 
division of Harris Coip. and a lead- 
ing U.S. maker of switching regula- 
tors for computers, for about 3 bil- 
13 on yen (Sli5 million). 

Soriftt de b VSeffle Montague 
SA, the Belgian fine smelter, has 
taken over Asturienne- France for 

1.08 btDion francs and Fnmfaise 
Asturienne de Paitidpatioiis for - 
150 million, industiial subsidiar-’ 
ies of Asturienne des Mines in . 
which VidDe Montagne already . 
owned a stake. • 

Toshiba Cap. and Mitsubishi' 
Corp. will cooperate in building the; 
first calor-pictzire-tube manafac^ 
rating plant in India. They have? 
received an order of 6 bfflion yea 
($25 million) from UP EZectrumcs' i 
Com for collaboration in bidding^' 
the facility near New Delhi. . ••• 


p a ptoR a B ta mp ,i n 2d Eurobond Market Is Firmer 

UnHed Press In/ermmorud 

WILMINGTON. Delaware — 

The Do Pont Co. on Wednesday 
said its second-qnarter earnings 
were S268 xnfflion, 39 percent be- 
low the record net income it posted 

it eanuaf SF.10 per shareJbr the 
quarter on sales of S8.5 billion, 
which fell 6 percent from last 
spring’s $9.1 billion in sales that 
produced record quarterly earnings 
of $437 milium, or $1.81 a share. 

Bull Results Show 
Return to Balance 
InFtrstHalfof 9 85 

Reuters 

PARIS — Compagnie des Ma- 
chines Bull, the French governmen- 
t-owned computer group, returned 
to balance in the first half after a 
consolidated net group loss of 258 
milli on francs (about $30 million) 
in the first half of 1984, the compa- 
ny said Wednesday. 

Sales rose by 23 percent to 7.4 
billion francs from 6 billion a year 
earlier, but this rise partiy reflected 
the restructuring of the group’s 
commercial network in the fust 
half of last year. 

Group sales fra 1985 are expect- 
ed to nse by around 17 percent 
from the 1984 level of 13.6 billion 
francs, an increase in line with last 
year's I6.8-percent rise. 

Bull said forecasts for activity in 
the second half indiraiwd that the 
group would probably return to fi- 
nancial babmne in 1985. It reported 
a. consolidated net loss of 489 rml- 
6o5 francs last year.' 


Remen 

LONDON — The Eurobond 
market ended* shade firmer where 
changed after a quirt day’s trading, 
although dealers said dollar 
straight issues were below the levels 
seen Wednesday morning. 

At the dose, dollar straights were 
unchanged to Mi point higher, hav- 
frem opening 
the lower 
markets. 

dealers said. But they said the mar- 
ket here was kept underpinned by a 
relatively low Federal Reserve 
Board funds rate of 7 VS percent. 

Wednesday's major develop- 
ments: 

Mitsubishi Bank Ltd’s London 
breach is arranging a 50-mflHon- 
European -currency-unit certificate 
of deposit issuance facility, the first 
of its land, according to the lead 
manager, Chemical Bank Interna- 
tional Ltd. 

The facility has a life of five 
years and will provide for the issu- 
ance of three and six-month CDs, 
which wiQ bear interest at the inter- 
bank offered rate minus V4 percent. 
The CDs win be priced on a dis- 
count- to-yidd basis. 

A tender panel of banks wiH bid 
competitively for the CDs, Chemi- 
cal added. 

Limited fat, a speciality wom- 
en’s clothing and lingerie retailer 
with more than 2,000 stores in the 
United States, is issuing a $50- mil- 
lion convertible Eurobond with an 
indicated coupon of lo 6ft per- 
cent, the lead manager, Swiss Bank 
Cop. International, said. 

- Tne issue will have a put option 
after Five years at a price that will 


give a yield of around 9ft ; 

The conversion price will ' 
to give a premium of 20 to 24 per- 
cent over the company’s share price 
at the dose of Wall Street trading 
on July 30. 

The bond is callable if the com- 
pany’s share price exceeds the oon- 
vemon price by more than 130 per- 
cent. It would be called at 106 
percent before I990,dedimngby I 
percent per year thereafter to par. 
The expected payment date is Aug. 
14 while the final maturity is Aug. 
15. 2000. The issue is available m 
denominations of SI, 000 and 
$10,000 and will be listed in Lux- 
embourg. 

««« 

HJ. Hefaz Co, is issuing a 373- 

milli on- Australian- dollar, 12ft- 
percent Eurobond due Aug. 28, 
1990. and priced at 100ft, oook- 
-nmner Qnon Royal Bank Ltd. 
said The issue is noncallablc. 

Fees total 2 percent, with & 1ft- 
percent sgflfag concession and ft 
percent for combined management 
and underwriting fees. 


Tenneco Reports Drop 
In 2drQnarter Earnings 

United Press International 

HOUSTON — Tenneco Inc on 
Wednesday reported its second- 
quarter Earning * 25.4 per- 
cent, to S164 million from >220 
million in 1984. The per-share 
earnings were $1.03 a share, down 
from S1.4S. 

Revenues were S3B billion in 
both periods. 


An Orion official said the issue 
was not related to a swap transac- 
tion, an unusual feature for an Aus- 
tralian dollar borrowing. The offi- 
cial said the bands were selling 
well, and are currently offered at 
less ft. 

The bonds are available in de- 
nominations of 1,000 doDara, will 
be listed in Luxemb o urg and be 
payable in Australian dotians. The 
pay date is Aug. 28. Commerzbank 
AG is the other lead manager fra 
the issue. 

m+m 

The Federal Business Develop- 
ment rtawfe of fjTmrtu y>iff in a‘ 
London newspaper announcement 
that it was calling its 60-nriHion- 
Canadian-doflar issue of lift per- 
cent Eurobonds due in 1990 for 
eariy redemption on Aug. 23. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


XEROX CORPORATION 

(CDBa) 

The undersigned uooancea dal as from 
July 29, 1985 a K» Aaucittw N.V H 
Spuh tmt 172, Amsterdam, dir. ep. 
no. 45 of the CDKb Xerox Corpora- 
tion, Mcb repr. 1 ahare, will be 
payable with Dn*£JLl net {dhr. per 
reooid-diie 647-X965: non $—.75 per 
tk.) after ded»to» of 15% USA-lax "• 
*—.1125 - Dfla. —37 per CDH- 
Div.ne. beloapng to oc»-iemdeata of 
The Netberima will be paid after de- 
duction of as additional 15% USA-tee 
(- *—.1125 - Dfla.— 37) with DQa. 
1.74 net. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY PLV. 
Anuterdam, July IS. 1965. 


_,The_ ,. 
Chase Partnership 


Cali or visit oar Chase PrivateBaahmg International offices: 


* * * 




.V..r 

!**• ' : s: 

3 i’ 


Channel 

KeithBish, 

PO Box 127, 

Hilgrove Street, 

St. Hetier, 

Jersey; Tel: 534 2556L 


France. 

Eric de Serigny, 
41 me Cam bon, 
75001 Paris, 
Tel: 703 1300. 


Luxembourg . 
Oswald Von Goertz, 
47 Boulevard Royal, 
Luxembourg, 

Tel: 21383. 


Monaco. 

FedrodeAviDez, 

‘Park Palace,’ 

27 Avenue de la Costa, 
Mome Carlo, MC 98007, 
lei: 25 72 72. 


Switzerland 
Barry Gelier, 

63 rue de Rhone, 
PO Box 476, 

1204 Geneva, 
Tel: 35 35 55. 


United Kin g dom. 
Paul Lakers, 
Woolgate House, 
Coleman Street, 
London EC2P 2HD, 
Tel: 726 5310. 


United States. 
Evelyn Kleine, 
350 Park Avenue, 
New York, 

NY 10022, 

Tel: 415 1000. 


West German y 
Albert Reifferscheid, 
Thnnusanlag e 11, 

6000 Frankfiirt/Main 1, 
Tel: 254556L 


1- 


Or contact a local PrivateBanKng International office in: Amsterdam. Bahrain. Hong Kong. Houston. Angeles. Miami. Montevideo. Munich. Nassau . Panama. Puerto Rico. San Francisco. Singapore. Zurich. 


V. 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


Flo&riiig-Rate Notes 




iOW, 







sc 


— <b J j.F Pacific Seo5.(Acc) _ 








Wednesday 

mse 

Goring 


Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
up to ttw dosliw on wsdl Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


JM — Oeufsgje Mark; BF — BjRjlum Francs: FL — Dulcti Florin; LF — 
1 « E 1 c? 5F Francs; 0 — osfcad: + — OHer Pr1cos:b — bkl 


Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 
on July 22, 1 985: U.S. $1 21 .53. 
Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


M^n?sl^ f S t K!Sa lnel - ** ** - 

nice os on Amsterdam Slock Exchange 







49 V. 76* 
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87* 18 
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Infor ma tion: Pierson, Heldring & Pierson N.V, 

Herangracht 214, 1016 BS Amsterd a m. 


BEAR 

STEARNS 


53 29* QuofcOS 1J4 IS 14 3955 5T* 48* 49*— 2* 

23* 15 QuokSO JO 15 21 436 23* 22* 23 — vE 

10Vj 6* QuOMX 23 71 9 8* 9 + * 

34* 23 Qurttar 140 SJ> 10 1852 32 31* 32 + Vi 

26* 14 Qfctoll 440 14 16 329 25* 24V5 25*—* 


VWe are pleased to announce that the following members 
of the International Division have been 
admitted to the firm as 
Limited Partners: 


Wolfgang Fischer 

Eurobond Trading London 


John A. Mack 

International Fixed-Income Sales New Vbrk 


Cynthia E. Frank 

International Fixed-Income Sales New York 


Brian V. Murray 

International Corporate Finance New ‘Mark 


Bernard Laurent 

International Corporate Finance London 


Richard E. Scofield 

International Corporate Finance New ’fork 


David L. Weaver 

International Fixed-Income Sales New Ydrk 


Bear, Stearns & Company 

New Vbrk/Atlanta/Boston/Chicago/Dallas/Los Angeles/San Francisco 
Amsterdam/Geneva/Hong Kong/London/Paris 


July 1985 


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S 46* Xerox of 545 
29 19 XTRA 44 


54 22 4911 52* 51* 52 -I 

9.9 481 55 55 55 

25 1C 63 76 25* 25*—* 




30V. 24* ZoleCp 1J2 
21* 9* Zapata J4 

57* 25 Znyres M 
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21* 15* Zeros J2 
35* 22* Zumm 142 


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Trade Ministers 
To Discuss Tariffs 
For Hurd World 




S£ 



t 


S£ 


S3 






± 


Reuters 

NEW DELHI — Trade ministers from devel- 
oping nations meeting here are expected to set a 
ti me t a ble establishing a global system of tariff 
preferences for poorer nations by May 1987. 
trade officials said Wednesday. 

The ministers attending the two-day meeting, 
which begins Thursday, are also expected to 
agree on setting up a legal framework for the 
system by October to ease trade barriers among 
Group of 77 members, they said. 

The conference, which follows three days of 
talks by trade officials, is likely to adopt a 
resolution urging developed nations to end pro- 
tectionism, they added. 

The trade officials said the system will call on 


wi il y ii te d 1 # 


t 


Toe trade officials said the system will call on 
developing states to ease tariff barriers to pro- 
mote exchanges among them, especially joint 




ventures and long-term agreements. - 

Under the proposed rales, the ieast-dcvc- 
joped nations wfflw allowed to maintain exist- 
ing tariffs and the rules will not override region- 
al trade agreements. 

The resolution calling for action by industri- 
alized states on protectionism also urges them 
to reform the monetary system and cat interest 
rates to ease Third World debt 


WHAT WOULD LIFE BE UKE 
WITHOUT in 


EACH FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


















































• ->v 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25 , 1985 


Page 13 


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1 * 1 * ♦ <» 
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w*- w 
:«• 



Tl»U» 130 
T*XAW 

TMAE J*t 7J 
TmAEpfUl 1X0 
Tnan 


n si* 

104* 1M* 
*1- M* 

#*. *W 

w* m* 

74* 7H 
I* 31* 
91* 2V. 
17H 17U. 
71 70W 

4V. 4V* 

13S 12M) 
34*0 IW 
1U* in* 
M* 7*i 
5 4*i 

4H 44* 
Wl 23V) 

17*1 161* 

S'* 4!* 
IW* 1»VJ 
91* >16 


33V) 

17V— 4* ( 

1«- + 1* 
91* I 


Seize the work! 

The International Herald Tribune. 
Banging the World's Most 
Important News to the World’s 
Most Important Audience. 




Kidder, Peabody 8 Co. 

Incorporated 

International Investment Bankers • Founded 1865 

NEW YORK LONDON PARIS GENEVA HONGKONG ZURICH TOKYO 


Statement of Consolidated Financial Condition May 30, 3985 


ASSETS 


Cash segregated under federal and other regulations 

Deposits with clearing organizations and others 

Receivable from brokers and dealers 

Securities purchased under agreements to resell 

Receivable from customers— less reserve for doubtful accounts 

Securities owned by the Company — at market value . . 

Inve stm e nt s in and advances to unconsolidated subsidiaries— at cost plus equity 

in undistributed earnings 

Office furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements— at cost less allowance 

for depredation and amortization 

Other 

Total 


10.647.000 
31,052^)00 

3,012,000 

497.541.000 
5,174,921*000 

955.361.000 
3,638,207,000 

10.547.000 

64.327.000 


LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY 

Short-lain loans * W™" 

Payable to brokers and dealers 337p75,D0D 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 4£!70f02fl00 

Payable to customers ™ 

Securities sold but not yet purchased— at market value 

Drafts payable 

10,207,821,000 

Subordinated borrowings & stockholders' equity 

Subordinated borrowing 119,015,000 

Stockholders' equity 224^45,000 343,060,000 


St* Notts to Statement of Consolidated Financial Condition by writing to office nearest you. 

Members All Principal Securities Exchanges • SIPC 


New York Boston Philadelphia Chicago San Francisco Los Angeles Atlanta Dallas KansasCity 

Albany Altoona Amarillo Austin Baltimore Buffalo- Camel Cherry HiD Cincinnati , ° e ^ snd %r P"Tl 
Detroit Fait Lauderdale GwfakGiy Hagerstown Hartford Houston Jacksonvffle LoweB M^«e 
Minneapolis Morristown Newport Beach Norfolk Palo Alto Phoenix RHsbw^i Portland ME Portland OR 
FkoriZtt Reading Sacramento Si.Loms Salt Ute City San Die go S an )ose San Juan Sar®oU 

Spokane Springfield Tampa Toledo Troy Tulsa Washington White Hams Wdkes-Barte 


IF YOU CANTELLUS EXACTLY 
WHAT THESE WILL BE WORTH 
IN SIX MONTHS TIME, 



YOU MAYN0T NEED 
OUR OPTIONS. 


Only last year the Chicago 
Mercantile Exchange launched Its 
options on the Deutschemark and it 
quickly became the most actively 
exchange - traded currency option 
in the world. 

And now, with CMEfs latest 
options on the British Pound and 
Swiss Franc, together with an 
interest rate option on the Eurodollar, 
corporate treasures, bankers and 
dealers have even greater flexibility in 
managing rate uncertainty. 

Corporate treasurers use CME 
options as “insurance policies” 
against future rate fluctuations in 
hedging strategies, tender or take- 
over situations and as an insulation 
against translation exposures. 

Leading banks, institutions and 
government dealers use CME options 
as an essential dealing and arbitrage 
tool to lay off foreign currency and 
interest rate risk. The high volume of 
CME options and the tight pricing 


which arises from the link between 
our options and futures contracts has 
enabled our customers to benefit 
from an improved and even more 
sophisticated service. 

For a free copy of “Options on 
Currency Futures: An Introduction" 
and/or “Options on Eurodollar 
Futures: An Introduction", write to 
or telephone Keith Woodbridge or 
Neil McGeown at Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange, 27 Throgmorton Street 
London, EC2N 2AN. 

Telephone: 01-920 0722, 

Telex: 892577 IMMLON G. 

CHICAGO 
MERCANTILE 
EXCHANGE 

International Monetary Market - Index and Option Market 

FUTURES AND OPTIONS WORLDWIDE 

27 Throgmorton Street. London EC2N 2 AN 01 -920 0722 
30 South Wacker Drive, Chicago. Illinois 60606 
312/930-1000 

67 Wall Street. New York 1 0005 21 2/363-7000 






























































F 


Page 14 


INTER3VATIONAL HERALD TOIBUWE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


ADVERTISEMENT 


MITSUI BIGJNEER 1 N 6 & 
SHIPBUILDING SO. LTD. 

(CPUs) 

The a ndmapi e d samara I fas m fan Jwty 
30, 1985 at KsAwefafe N.V, SpjU 
ITS, Anatntkm, dfr. cp. no. 20 granny 
and bf an "Aflkfc *h") of tfae CDEa SBfri 

hT^bfevSfa Pfla-ZfcT^o- CDR, rapr. 
100 ik. rad with DU* &M per COB, 
nr. 1,000 *tu- (div. per record -dale 
(&3I J9Kx pan Yen 25 p. an.) a&ar dedudioc 
of 13% Japan ese tn — Yen 37-SQ *“ DSs. — 
.50 per (±>R. trot. ICO shft_ Yen 375.— - 
DBs.5. — per CDR, rent LOQOds- 
VnhtWM^davii m Jap, nx - Yca5&— 
■ Dfla. — iBl per CDR. tenr. 100 aha. Yea 
500. — ■ DBt. 6.70 per CDS, rent LOQOefe, 
bededaclftd. 

Alter HL3L1985 die drr. mD t*dr be pod tmder 
riwfaction of 20% Jap. tn ion. Dfk 247; Dfle. 
24,70 net per C DR, iq r. rap, 100 and LOOQ 
da. och, hi aoonibwx with the Jjpua w tax 


AMSTEBDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Ararierdm, Jn if 16. 1965. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


mm COMPANY, LTD. 

(CDReJ 

The tmdenunal anoantces that as limn Mj 
30, 1985 at Ka+Anoeialie N.V„ Spa mast 
172, Amtenkm. dir. cp. no.31 (accompa- 
oled by an "Affidavit"! of the CDR* Ricoh 


UU per mg.wpr.1 

(dry. per recoiil-dflie (&3LI985; 

Ya 5. — p. *L1 alter d«W k w of 15% 
JapuKse tax — Yen 75. — » Me. 1-01 per 
CuR, lOOehb, Yen 750 l— * Dik laiOper 
CDR, LOOOdH. 

Without an Affidavit 20% Jap. tax “ Yen 
loa- - Dfk 155 per CDR. 100 ife. Yen 

WOO. Dfle. 13i0perCDa LOOOihs, 

will be deducted- 

After 3L. 10.1985 (be £v. will only be paid 
under dedaemm of 20% Jin. tax tap. Mk 
5.13c Dfle. 51 JO net per CDR, mpr. rap. 100 
and WOO eh*, each, ha accord a nce vm the 

Jananw bra rwuiatiOQ*. 

DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY NX 
A m a tenla m. Jdy 16, 1985. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ASAffi OPTICAL CO., LTD. 

(CDRn) 

The undersknedajuwnnee* tbn *» from July 
26, 1985 it Kt*-Aeeodnie NX Spraaaat 
172, Aaeten lu n. div. cpn. no. 20 (acoxn- 
pained by an "Affidtvir'Tof the CDEa AanU 
OpdeaTO*. Lid- will be payable with Dfla. 
M2 net par (UK, nor. 100 As. and 
wili DR*. 69.20 net per CDR, 

1.000 *■. (dw. per reauddatB 3I.CS.1S 
Yea 6t-—p A.) after d e du ction ef 15% 
■e lax - Ya 90.— - Dfk. L22 per 
rapt 100 if*. Yen 9001— “ Ms. 
1220 per CDR, repr. 1.000 lie. 

Whhoat an Affidavit 20% Jan. tax " Yea 
J20,— - Dfk LfiSperCDR. rent lOOiht. 
Yen 1.200— - Dfle. 1630 prtCDR, rror. 
WOOeba^wiU be deducted. 

After 3L1QJ965 the drv. will only be mid 
under dednetk* of 20% Jap, tax ran. Dfle. 
651; Dfle. 65.10 net per CuR repc. rem. 100 

and WOO aha. each, in scetmtence’ «m tfae 
Japanese tax ngulanore. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY NX 

Amsterdam, Jtdy 12, 1985. 


ADVmTSEMENT 

HITACHI LTD. 

(CPBaJ 

The rmd etaig ned enaounce* that a* bun Jnfr 
25. 1985 at Ka+Aegodane NXSpqktaa 
172.Aineteidam,diT.qu.n«,25(tecQn- 
praied hj an "Affid^l of tbe GDRa T 
cU Ltd. will be peyabk with Dfla. 2 


Yen 5.— p. ah.) after dedndioa of 
Jepai M c tex" Yon 37&— -Dflg.5J9 per 
COR. tew. 500 eh*- Yen 150— - Dfle. 
10.18 per CDR. repr WOOeht, 

Without an Affidavit 20% Jap. tax ■ Yea 
SOO — — Mk 6.79 per CDR. rat 500*1*. 
Yen WOO.— - Dfk 1158 per CDR. imr. 
1*000 lb. w31 be deducted. 

After 3Uai985 the iv. wfll only be 
under dedaeftea of 20% Jap. tax np 1 
27.16; DO*. 5432 net per CDR 
500 and U000Jw.cwh.BH 

tfae t«« frg nlanrm, 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.Y. 
Amtenka. July 1L 1985. 


I 


liS. Futures 


S*o*oo Sanean 

Hte!l Uw 


My 24 

Opan Wsh low Ctaea Cha. 


Grains 


WH EAT (CUT} 

fcOOO bn mlnfnwm- aonan par b«M 
3JM U1 Sap Xfta Mi 

3 Jtm UHW Dae £071* UM 

IWi 1JHT* Mar U*t* MOV. 

402 19Wt Mcnr ZM 2JSVS 

i nu jui in vr 

US Ul Sn ISBh un 

. Esf.Sal** Prcv. Sates &0TI 

Pr»v. Day Optfllnt. 3SM off 95 
COMKCBT) 

SMO.tw ml nhnwm- UoUars ear buebai 


aaivij 

zvs 
£10 
131V. 
6Vb 


ZO sap Lett 1CM 

ZM Oac 2JMfc 2J5VI. 

K2 MOT ZJZn 2A2V1 

Zf7 MW UA VT-k 

Z33 Sap 2J2W UM 

221 oec 2Z1M 232V* 

ES. Solas Prav. Soles 29J70 
praa.DovOpanint.n4Sn up 7D . 
SOYBEANS tCBT) 

MOO bu mlnlmum-Mloo per bvabaJ 

1M 54M Aue SJ9 £45 


2 MUi AS3 - 

101 Vi £fll« —JO 
101 Mlfe —07 
Z7IW znte —BTk 
£73 173 -MK 

177 1» — 07 


liOte Z41 —SOM 
13S 14 213M. —IB 
ZJWi ££»» —02 V. 

1 M Klfc -A 
131 231 —on. 

230K HOW —A 14 


1 

_ T 

7- 


S 

X 

e 


Al u 

A. M 
Ai 51 
B< 51 

B. «7 

b* n 

£ 3 

* i* 
g 32 
2 11 
? y 

El 44 

R 13 

S3 

m IT 

IE ® 

ij 35 

Lx ,ff 

Ss 

M 3s; 
M 33 
M 19> 
Nl S6 

Si?’ 

Pi ,n 

sr rr, 
vt 44* 
VI 57 
W JfV 
Zx «!■ 

N iS 

£f k 

gnu 

J*4»M 

Ti2A* 

3 SI 

Wt. 

si 

« 4r ' 

fts 

B , 

28 

T. 



GENERALI 

Assicnrazioni Generali 


Established 1831 - Central Head Office in Trieste (Italy) 

1984 Highlights 


from the Report of the Board of Directors 

1000 US Dollars! 

1984 

1983 

Premiums written 

1.380,316 

1,177.553 

Premiums ceded 

-220,213 

-204,637 

Nel premiums 

. 1,160.103 

972.916 

Net invesimenl income 

270,986 

212,251 

Technical interest allocated to Life funds 

-125,884 

- 96.509 

Insurance underwriting result 

- 56.611 

— 74,744 

Sundry income and expenditures 

- 8,735 

6,863 

Operating profit 

79,756 

47,861 

Profit on sale of properties and securities 

16.969 

31.857 

Unrealized capital losses on securities 

- 11,048 

- 4,692 

Allocation to reserve for realized 



capital gains to be reinvested 

- 5,691 

- 17,764 

Taxes . 

- 20.476 

- 24,659 

Total other items 

- 20,246 

- 15,258 

Profit for the year 

59,510 

32.603 

Per share ( Dollars! 



Profit 

0.476 

0.261 

Dividend 

0.258 

■0.168 

Pay-out ratio (percent) 

54 

64 

Ai! of Ik* above- listed figure* havr bren convened al the rail- of exchange of Lite 1,935.87 to ihe US Dollar. 


» Cross premiums written by the Cumpuny tulalled $ 1.380.3 m of which 8 388.3 m 
for Life and 8 992 m for Non Life. 

' Total investments reached S 3,057.4 m showing a growth of 18.1%. 

1 Net investment income totalled 8 271 m showing a growth of 27.7%. The average 
yield has grown to 9.6%. Realized capital gains generated from the sale of securities 
amounted to $ 1 1.3 m and from the sale of properties to 8 5-7 m. 

• TTie years profit, showing a growth of 82.5% over the previous year, amounted to 
8 59.5 m of which I 40.7 m For Life and 8 18.8 m for Non Life. 

1 8 21.4 m from the year's profit were allocated to the •special reserve set up also for 
the purchase of own shares*. 

• The accounts include 8 38.9 m allocated to reserves and arising from: revaluations 
8 18.5 m, exchange adjustments $ 14.7 m and property sales profit S 5.7 m. 

1 The shareholders' surplus including the year's profit reached $ 554.6 m showing an 
increase of S 72 m over the previous year. 

The dividend amounts to 8 0.258 per share, showing an increase of 53.8% over 1983. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


136 

MU 

Ml 

Mite 

570 

5Jt 

Mite 

MQ 


5*0 JJSVj 13N6 
NOV um 143 te 

Jen iso isvi 

MOT Mite M4 
May Ul 272 
Jul 173 ITJte 
Aug M6te Mite 
Nov 140 163 

Prw.Sttea 33ASB 


SOBS HOLM PLt 

(GDIs) 

Tbe imit wrijii iHl that as from 

July 26, 1^85 at Kaa-Asaoriatk N.V^ 
Sptastraar 172, Aosterdani. div. .cp. 
no. 21 of die CDRs Sean Holding 
Pk, each repr. 100 da- al 25p, 
will be pnable with Dfls.9.79 (ie final 
dividend tor the year ending Januaiy 31. 
1965) 22 p. per share. 

Tax credit £-.943 

CDR. 

Non-residents of die United Kingdom 

ran only ijmn ftrif tar c red i t when lb* 

relevant tax treaty meets this facility. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam. July 12, 1985. 


Dfla. 427 per 


8 

8 

739 

1 SB 
tM 
432 

est.sotes 

Piwv. Day Opta In*. 40667 up BO 
SOYBEAN MEAMCBT) 

106 tens- dollars p*r ten 
USM 119J0 Aua 13430 12540 

177-SJ T22J0 Sep 1 2450 128-00 

1*0-50 125JM Oct 127 JO 127 JO 

l«400 1XLM Dec 13150 13430 

IfUQ mao Km 13620 13476 

20450 T37J0 Mar UOJO U0J0 

16250 UUO MOV M2J0 14X00 

Es>. Sain Piwv. Sates UMt 

Prwv. Day Open ml. 44030 up 276 
SOYBEAN oil ccbtj 
6OM0 R» doitars per TOO Um- 
X1J3 22J0 Aap 2420 2M9 

31-10 2£50 Sep 2X50 2172 

XJ7 22.90 Oct 2C95 211D 

3 955 22.70 Dec 2447 2440 

29B7 2140 Jen 2*25 3435 

2840 34.15 Mar 2415 2425 

2745 2405 May 2410 2410 

25.15 2170 Aug 2190 2400 

2400 2185 Sep 2405 2405 

EsL Sales Prav. Sates 14204 

Prw.OayOpeninL S£mwS5i 
OATS(CBT) 

5J)00 bu minimum- Solteri per buiMl 
1.7* 1J4VI Sep M4 1J6W 

ij2te ijbu Dec IJs ij7 

1^7W Ul Mar 1^0 l^Ote 

1A3 143te May 141 Ml 

Erf. Sate* Prev.Scla* 270 

Prwv. Day Open Hit 2A46 up 2 


136 

132 

SJSte 

MS 

5J* 

564b 

U Ml 

SM 

um 


sjm -Bite 

£331% —0614 
137te —xnvi 

SM -MV. 

156te -JIM 

5A4W — Jt» 

SSTH-Jt 3te 

166 —mu. 

SJSte —Bite 


12130 12160 

12550 125L70 

127^0 12750 

13250 tJ2Jt» 

134R 13520 
13S.1D 13410 
14150 MUD 


3401 2411 
25J5 2142 
2477 2451 
3430 3436 

14 <M 14 ft* 

2400 2400 

2190 2197 
win aft no 
2176 2160 


— 1J0 
—1.90 
— 1J0 
—150 
— ' I JO 


— UJ0 


+J0 3 
—02 
— .16 
—^11 
—.16 
—.15 
— wll 
— .10 


U2U. U2W> —MV, 
1J6W 1 JIM —J1H 
ijow usw —m 
i4i U9te —ju 


Livestock 


ADVERTISEMENT 


CATTLE (CM El 
40000 104- cents per fte 
6747 5150 Awe 5100 5X8S 

6559 56.10 Ocf 5425 54» 

6755 5050 DK 5055 59JU 

4745 3942 f*eb 6Q.10 60 JO 

67-57 6050 APT 61.12 6125 

6425 61 JO Jun 6227 6227 

Est. Sates 304E2 Piwv. Sates 24766 
Prev.DavOpen InL 49JNS up 130 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44000 1 b4- cents per fc. 


3225 5255 —LOO 
5SH2 5177 —53 

5752 5740 —122 

5&60 5465 — U2 

4050 6052 —56 

6120 61 JO —57 


FUSED fliniSGP PIC 

(CDR’s) 

TbeimdcnigDed announces that aa bom 
Jidy 26, 1985 at Kas-Aaoodatie 
Guni e traat 172, Amsterdam, dir.cn 
25 of Ae CDR’s Foeeeo S& 
Pic-, each repr. 50 d ura , will be 
payable with DB*. 12.18 (re final dhri- 
dead lor die year ending 3L12.1904) 
5,4 p- per share. 

Tax credit £1JS7 = DfkS24 per 
CDR. 

Noa-remdenta of the United IGngdon 
can only rfaim this tax credit when the 
relevant tax treaty ™»*« thi* fadlily. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, July 12, 1965. 


7X70 

61X0 

Aub 

61X8 

6155 

60X0 

6077 

—133 

7350 

61X0 

Sep 

62.10 

62.10 

6082 

6150 

—130 

7232 

6232 

Oct 

62X0 

S3 




7X20 

63X0 

Nov 

63X0 

6250 

6245 

—135 

79X0 

65X0 


6a 00 

6650 

64X0 


—1X0 

70X5 

66.10 

Mar 

66.13 

66X5 

6535 


—135 

7065 

66.15 

Apt 

66X0 

6470 

65X0 

65X0 

—135 



MOV 




65X0 

—JO 


Prev.DavOpen lit 4544 off 76 
HOOS (CME) 

30^ 00 i bm ^cua per lb. 

5437 4480 Aup 4480 4545 

51J5 40JB Oct «J0 aua 

SOBS 4220 Doc 4215 4157 

5047 4175 fteb 4350 44T0 

47JS 4140 APT 4200 4200 

4903 4458 jun 4L77 4357 

4953 4440 JW 4471 4472 

3100 4500 AUP 

EsL Sates 4326 Prev.Sates 6491 
piwv. Day open Inf. i*4M up 153 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

3BO00 Ibv- cents pvr lb. 


4453 4505 +.10 

4007 4057 +.10 

41JI 4217 —.13 

4112 4162 —JO 
41.10 41 JO —20 
4123 4355 —AS 
4450 4447 —M 
4X9 S —AS 


82X7 

3BX0 

Jul 

soxo 

52X0 

RL4S 

52.10 

+3* 

6045 

5070 

Auo 

50X0 

52X0 

5030 

5250 

+753 

7630 

6L7S 

Feb 

6155 

62X5 

6035 

6130 

— 57 

75X0 

81X0 

Mar 

6135 

6250 

60X0 

6035 

—150 

7540 

6230 

May 

GJA 

62X5 

6030 

6153 

— X5 


j Ciurreyiey Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 


Calls— Last 


J«ir23 


Puts— Last 


ojM amm I 


Afejp ofiiiixg 

CBOT 

BOND 

FUT U RES 

— 8c 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 


*15 


* ROUND TURN 
HAY AND 
OVERNIGHT 


* Applies ontrlo trades 
axmrdhai 2V) contract* prr 
calendar matlh. Pfrtr 2V> 
contracts S 21 round turn. 

Cali one qfovr professional* 

212-221-7138 

BEFUBUC CLEABBfG 

COHFOBJmOM 


A 512 BdtnD OmmU BaoL 


no r 

115 r 

I2B r 

T25 16A0 

130 1150 

LH 7.10 

T4B 400 

145 lit 

130 150 


CDallr 


72 220 

73 1J0 

74 052 

75 025 
625*8 I WMl nqp 

I DMarh » r 

» r 

31 425 

32 357 

33 Z25 

34 IAi 

35 055 

36 BAS 

37 024 
I Fiwncfc FroocP-li 

'FFranc 110 450 

3» 1Y *^ 

40 208 

41 121 

41 0J0 

*3 039 

44 0.10 


16J0 r 

1190 r 

955 r 

435 r 

455 LW 

"SreSP 


r 025 
r «50 
o.io r 
ax Lao 
050 r 
150 r 
its r 
4» r 
r r 


053 r 

055 r 

per wilt 


Ml 

r 

112 

154 

126 


» 


USJM Froncti Froacp-IOIfea ef ■ cm! pv oolL 


004 
r an 
am aw 
0JB 033 
020 051 

0A2 r 
1M r 
122 r 
■ 


JYen 


i of a cart per 


150 

on(L 


\s 


IX 

473 

4J0 

r 


TjOB 


852 


41 


iSFnwc V jr 

% 

% 

2 gS 

TeM call vet llSM can a 

Tefal pm woL 4144 Pet a 

i— No* treKteis— No op! ton offered. P— Old. 

Lart b premium (purrtwM price). 

Sauna*.’ AP. 


431 

r 

351 

134 

153 

IAS 


r 059 BAO 
r an r 

1* }J w 

r 073 a 
r 1.1? 12« 

r _ 


muntn 

I lot tULTCS 


Seaton Season 

Hlen Law Open Hip 

7650 ‘ 4110 Jut 6173 42) 
7115 4X00 Aua 

EsL Sates un Prev.Sates 7A33 
Prev.DavOpen tat. »JS va37* 


SOM Season 


Law 

CiDM 

On. 

Utah 

UM 

Open 

Hteh 

LU" 

CMS* 

Ote 

8100 

8250 

—150 

7+20 

SOX 

D*e 7+99 

7+31 

7+0 

74-6 





7+6 

58-70 

*cr 


73-t# 

2\\ 




»M7 

58-25 

Jtm 7HS 

79-15 

7>2 

7>J 




75-2 

65 



7215 

73-15 

—17 




EsI. bates 



1W 


Food 


COFFM CPfYCJCE) 

375B0H»>cwraperitak 
MtAO 17150 Jot 13060 13060 13060 UL» *5.15 

i5oao arjo Sep wus tjijs bias 133.15 +U3 

15040 IT? 25 Dec 13S5Q 136.10 13451 135.95 +1.94 

149 JS 12*56 Mar 13750 13750 13650 137AI +1A1 

MUD in5B Alter U7A? I37J? 13750 13755 +153 

14750 13US Sep 13041 +1A0 

13050 I3S5D Dec 13075 +162 

EW.SMM Prev.Sates 3,135 

Prev. Day Open lot. UJ01 afiivs 

SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYOCE) 

112500 R&- evils per lb. 


9J5 

244 

Sw 

342 

364 

3X7 

3X8 

—.12 

955 

274 

Oct 

170 

179 

357 

348 

—.13 

7JS 

340 

Jan 

292 

450 

1X8 

IM 

-.18 

933 

33* 

Mar 

421 

428 

4.1Z 

43? 

-.12 

7.15 

3LSB 

Mav 

434 

6X1 

430 

432 

—.14 

6X9 

339 

Jul 

4J» 

430 

4X2 

4X5 

—.15 

630 

434 

Sep 




4X8 

—.18 

556 

652 

oa 

477 

412 

473 

475 

—.TO 

Ert. Sates 


Prtv.5otes 24200 





Prav. Dov Open Inf. *6660 aft 896 
COCOA (HYCSCO 
10 motrtclOfu-SPor ten 

2415 1*63 SeP 2120 2123 

2337 BO DK TIB TUf 

2190 1955 Mar z>77 2177 

2200 WO Mar 219* 2199 

Z1B0 1968 Jill 

2330 2023 Sep 

2235 2093 Dec 

EsL Sales Prev.Sates ZS83 

Prev.DavOpen int. 2US4 up 433 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

UjOOOIba-centsperlb. 

18250 U2J0 Sep 136.15 13020 

18150 13155 Nov 13270 13X95 

U050 12950 Jan 1850 13055 

17750 12950 Mar 13050 13050 

16250 13150 Mav 

15750 14220 Jul 

EsL Soles Prev. Sales 373 

Piwv. Dov Oam inf. 5,134 off 254 


2104 2114 

214S 2153 

2167 2172 

219$ 2190 

2195 
2206 
2233 


— I 

-2 

-3 


12550 13130 
132A0 U2X 

1S9JS 12955 

12950 129 JS 
129.10 
129.10 


—US 

—1.15 

-1.18 

— 1.10 

—1.IS 


Metals 


COPPER (C0ME3C1 

2 &X 0 Its.- cents per lb. 


■ i mad 

f^TTVj 





f. F ' | 








| >1 .] 


■ . r 

K . - ie. j 

B ■ 



f | 



w -5- ! 


■ * 1 "1 


■ ' ^ i 1 1 
















[* * - J 















■ r - Vi 









f 1 , t.| 





I * 




l'i.| 



|U 1 





f 'f . 1 















■ 




XI 7 A- 





Prev. Day Open int. 004M2 eH30S 

ALUMINUM (COMfiX) 

40500 lbs.- amts per lb. 

59 AO 4X15 JUt 

7430 4350 Sep 447S 4460 

7060 4490 Dec 4130 4SJ5 

7650 51J5 Jon 

7X60 4635 Mor 4670 4670 

66J5 5X9S MOV 

63A5 4755 Jul 

5210 5)60 See 

Dec 
Jon 
Mar 
May 

Ert. Sales Prev.Sates 101 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1 <717 up 13 

SILVER (COMEX) 

6000 trav ox- cents per trov or. 


4560 4560 
45.90 
4660 4655 
47 JS 
47.95 
4BA5 
49 JO 
miK 
5QJ5 
S1A5 


— AO 
—A0 


14515 

5825 

Jul 

807X 

6095 

6065 

6072 

—XI 

421 J 


Aua 




6083 

—22 

11KL0 

5735 

S«P 

6125 

41*2 

6095 

6TU 

—22 

12305 

5905 

Doc 

6275 

6Z75 

179 fl 

624.9 

—22 

12155 

S9S5 





629X 

—22 

11935 

6075 

Mar 

6385 

6402 

6355 

6382 

— 2X 

10460 

6215 

May 





—22 

££ 

fno 

641.0 

Jul 

SUP 

6565 

6675 


458J) 
667 JD 

656.9 

5675 

—23 

—23 

7995 

6605 

DM 

6605 

6805 

6105 

662X 

—22 

7895 

8785 





688.7 

—22 

7705 

6775 

Mar 

7005 

7015 

4*85 

699J 

—22 

71*5 

6*35 

May 




71 OX 

—22 

Ert. Sates 


Prev.Sates 15377 





Prev.DavOpen lot. 7QA99 off* 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50tror QL-OoHarioer Irovac. 

4950 2*150 Jul 27230 27250 

3*100 23050 OCt 27110 27490 

' 257 JO Jtm 27650 279J0 

32950 26450 Apr 28250 264X 

30250 27X80 JlA 28850 289 50 

Est. Sates Prev. Soles 15S4 

Prev.DavOpen Int. 11A04 up 4 
PALLADIUM (NTMB7 

1 00 tray oz-OoOors per OI 
14US 9060 Sep 9613 9675 

14150 91X Dec 9475 9493 

1TT50 9130 Mar 9SJS 9650 

11400 9150 Jun 

Eft. Soles Prev.Sates 240 

Prev.DavOpen Hit. 65*5 off 26 
SOLD (COMEX) 
wo tray oz^ dollars per Irov at 
32850 30950 Jul 

48550 291X0 AW 3 ILK 319A0 

31659 11159 Sea 

49100 29750 Oct 32250 22350 

' __ 301 JO Dec 327 JO 32720 

40550 30600 Feb 33050 33160 

31470 APT 334A0 33550 
43X70 32OJ0 Jun 33070 339+0 

33150 AUP 34440 3*4M 
2*070 31550 Oct 

39350 34250 Dec 

37250 35550 Apr 

Est. Sates Prev.Sates 3X19* 

Prev. Dov Open Ini.132607 oft 1603 


27250 27290 
271 JO 27X40 

27650 27770 

28150 28260 
28050 28750 


9450 9440 
9460 9490 

952S 95+0 
9565 


31 090 
21750 31 9X 
321 .W 
321J0 32290 


33050 331 JO 

33450 32550 


345.10 

3SL30 


+150 

+150 

+150 

+150 

+150 


+.1S 

+.15 

+.15 

+.1S 


+1.10 

+1X0 

+131 

+90 

+90 

+90 

+90 

+90 

+.90 

+90 


Financial 


UST. BILLS (IMM> 

11 million- ptsaf 100 pet. 


9133 

■6X4 

Sap 

9177 

92X2 

*232 

*173 

—51 

*357 

BJL77 

Dec 

92X7 

9223 

92X0 

92X1 

—52 

*2X9 

86X0 

Mar 

9112 

*116 

9209 

9104 

-53 

9228 

•751 

Jun 

9150 

*1X0 

91X7 

9120 

—52 

*251 

8850 

Sop 

91X7 

91X7 

9127 


-51 

9ITO 

■955 

Dec 

91.15 

91.15 

9159 

9U2 

-51 

*729 

•9X8 

Mor 




9057 

—51 

90X3 

90X3 

Jim 




*0X4 

—51 


Prev. Day Open Jrw. 361B5 mute 
M TR. TREASURY (CUT) 

SI 00X00 Prtn-Pti L32rKtaof 100 pet 


•*■?! 

73-18 


8 54 

85-10 

8+33 

8+23 

__g 

87-13 

75-13 

DK 

S4-* 

64+ 

83-22 

83-22 

-• 

8+2 

75-14 


SMI 

83 

82-23 

■2-23 

—6 

83-7 

7+30 

Jim 




81-28 

— 8 

8+4 

81-8 

Sop 




81-5 

— « 

83-11 

80-7* 

dm 




80-15 

—8 


Ell. 


f-Sates 
rv. Day 


Prev.Sates 9657 
Open Int. 56733 off 29 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 pcMIOOXOOptsO 3Ms of 100 pet) 


79-12 

57-10 

Sep 

7+4 

7+11 

75-18 

75-19 

— u 

70-13 

57-8 

Dec 

75-3 

755 

7+14 

7+17 

— u 

77-29 

57-2 


7+3 

74+ 

73-10 

73-1* 

—11 

7+6 

5+29 

Jun 

73-5 

73-74 

72-22 


_y 

75-31 

56-29 

Sop 

73-13 

72-21 

7100 


12 

7+24 

5+25 

dm 

71-24 


71-8 



7+15 

5+27 

Mar 

71-4 

71+ 

7+22 

7+22 


7+26 

63-12 


7+18 

70-24 

7+5 


.IQ 

72-27 

63-4 

Sep 

7+5 

7+5 

6921 

69-21 

—ID 

72-18 

62-24 

DM 

6+75 

69-15 

69-6 


10 

49-16. 

6+6 





— TO 

EsL Sates 


Prev. 5atei 141155 




Prev. Dor Open IntJiaJW) off 1542 
GNMA (CBT) 

*100X00 prtiv on 0,32nd! of WOpct 
77J6 99-13 Sep 7S-23 75-26 



CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 
tl million- steal TMecI 
*7 JB 85X0 Sep «2>2 92.1* 

9127 8634 OK 91.7) VMS 

91.7J 6656 M&r 

9140 8643 Jun 

91.15 87X6 Sr» 

*029 WJ4 Ok 

8X33 88JC Mar S9.90 09?) 

Est 5am Prev. Sam 8* 

pro*. oav Dreamt jaosoIm 

EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI million- ote of IDO PCI. 


9203 

•1*5 


9554 
9162 
91 «7 

7031 

WA1 

*an 

•9.40 8*?« 


■nytjti | 



1 11 f 


w 





■ ]r T » 







KTtTJ 


TT* 


hTitH 








* 





FTT j 











■ 


.J /* 9 

i 'y j 




M ij r. 

rrXi m 

; Xk 



■B 

onEzizszm 




Prev. OavOeen Inf. 1Z2J06 upX335 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

Sper pound- 1 point eauomojooi 
16*50 1X700 Sop IJ06& 14010 1J87S ijns 

16040 1.0200 Dee 1X70 tjno 1J770 1 je«s 

U915 IMS Mar IJ8Q0 MOOD 13740 1X35 

1J79S 1.19CB Jun 13765 

EK. Setts Prev.Sates 13.785 

Prev Day open ini 42A71 uo 560 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

spar dir- 1 point cwaJi SOX0OI 


—M 

-at 

-w 

-51 

-34 

-Of 


-XJ 
— 3i 
-XI 
-51 
—M 
-56 
-54 
—X* 


+» 

+S 


.7583 

.7035 

Sea 

.7365 

.736* 

.7372 

.7566 

.7006 

Dec 

.7374 

J174 

J3S9 

.7504 

X*81 

Mar 

7365 

7365 

.7344 

J360 

.7070 

Jun 




Est.sam 


Prev. Saws 

129 



73W - 

7364 - 

734+ _ 

73)1 - 


Prev- Day Ooen mt. 6235 off 67 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

(per franc- 1 Mbn eauaisioxocoi 

.11500 X96K Sep .1(05 

.1)405 59670 pec .11375 

Eif. Sate} Prev. Sate? 2 

Prev. Oar Open mr. 3*9 

GERMAN MARK (IMMI 
sper mark- tsaMteoualisaoooi 
J5S5 5920 Sea 3494 JJOo 3T>6 3501 

3610 5971 Dec 3576 2534 3504 3530 

3599 3040 Mar 3540 

J633 3335 Jun Ml 

Est. Sates Prev.Sates 37.138 

Prev. Dov Open tnt. 52365 off 16*9 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S ppr van. 1 point eavo Is SO 000001 
004268 503870 Sec 004 190 304198 304178X041*4 

00(350 503905 DeC 504201 50*J1* XD4J02 50CI7 

004307 504835 Mar 504230 304220 504221 X04240 

Est. Sales Prev.Sates ID.es 

Prev.DavOpen int. 31316 off 760 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

* atr tew t ootot eauais S05001 
ASM J480 Sea 4^4 .4283 ATM .<281 

6360 3531 Doc 4290 4314 .4271 6216 

A383 3835 Mar .4332 4332 4315 4356 

Est. Sales Prev.Sates 2X450 

Prev. Day Ooen mt. 30515 uc65! 


+20 

+22 

♦24 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130000 ba.n.- s per ixoo oa.li. 

17730 135J0 540 14460 14448 14060 V4060 -550 

184.10 13750 Nov 145.70 145J0 14X90 14C.90 —5X0 

18750 14450 Jfln ISO JO 15tJO 14860 14860 -500 

19550 15X00 Mar 15X00 15850 155.10 155-10 — MB 

17460 153X0 MOV 161. K) 14253 16050 14050 -550 

18X00 17050 JUl 16850 148J0 14850 16650 —5XO 

17650 17450 S6P 171X0 17100 171X0 17150 —100 

Est. Sales 2J49 Prev.Sates 1393 
Prev. Day Open im. L434 aft 212 
COTTON 2 (NYCE) 
soxo 0 lbs.- cents per ip. 


77X0 

59X0 

Oct 

59.90 

6080 

5*X5 

40X5 

+ 80 

73X0 

S*.40 


59X5 

60 70 

5945 

60 44 

+.94 

7635 

60X0 

Mar 

60X0 

6125 

60 40 

AT. 10 

+ 95 

70XO 

5*X5 

May 

60.15 

41X5 

60.15 

60X0 

+.75 

70X5 

59X0 

JtX 

59X5 

6030 

5954 

60X0 

+J6 

65X0 

SOO 

OCt 

S4JC 

5490 

54X0 

54X4 

+.38 

59X5 

53X5 

Dee 

53.75 

54X0 

53X5 

5190 


EsI. Sates 


Prev.Sates 12*2 





Piwv. Day Onen inf. I9X*1 up 567 

HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42X00 paL cents per oa> 


75X0 

uxs 


68X5 

MX0 

68X5 

6934 

+37 

76X5 

64X0 

Sen 

69X0 

70X0 

69X0 

70.22 

+30 

77.10 

67X5 

OCt 

7030 

7135 


71 17 

+38 

74X5 

4850 

NOV 

77X5 

7210 

71X5 

7200 

+X8 

7125 



71.90 

7295 


7276 


76X0 

69JO 

Jan 

72X0 

7335 

72X0 

7335 

+1X0 

7190 

70X0 

Feb 

7250 

7250 

7250 

7268 

*90 

7100 

68X0 

M or 

70X0 

70X0 

7000 

7035 

+.*Q 

74X0 

4800 





48X5 

+.» 



May 




67X5 

+.90 

Esl. Sates 


Prev. Sales 6+20 





•-> 3fT • - 


Prev. Day Open int. ZL5C8 off 826 
CRUDE OIL (NTMR) 
ixoo bbL- dollars per bbt. 


29X0 

24X8 

SeP 

27.10 

27X7 

2 7X9 

2733 

+.17 

S3 

24X5 

Oct 

26X1 

26.75 

26X1 

26x8 

♦31 

2440 

Nov 

25.93 

2637 

21*2 

3626 

+J0 

2950 

23.90 

Dec 

2552 

25.90 

2552 

25X4 

+36 

29X0 

2438 

Jan 

2S3S 

25X2 

2535 

25X7 

+33 

29X6 

2425 

Feb 

25X0 

2537 

25X0 

2534 

+38 

29X5 


M or 

74J70 

25X0 

2470 

24.*9 

+JB 

29X5 

Aar 

24X4 

UJ0 

2444 

2465 

+37 




Est. 

Prev. 


Prev.Sates 15X33 
Open int. 54X90 off 4J47 


Stuck Indexes 


(Indexes compiled snorflr before market clowi 
SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

Hotels and cents 

19850 160X0 Sap 19X65 19X75 19)55 19235 —130 

200X9 17SJ0 Doc 1*430 19635 19430 19530 —130 

20X75 19030 Mol 1*950 199.10 19850 197.73 —160 

20X50 200X0 Jun 201X5 201X5 301X5 201X5 —35 

Est. Soles Prev.Sates 47352 

Prev.DavOpen InL 6UM off 116 
VALUE LINE OCCBT) 

Mri rtfs and cvnh 

71X20 1B5J5 Sen 20875 208X0 205 JO 20830 —220 

21255 200X0 DeC 21235 212A5 20890 209.70 —260 

Est. sates Prev.Sates 7 .WO 

Prev.DavOpen lot. 12314 up 541 
NYSE COMP. INDEX INYFE) 
points and cems 

118X5. 9135 Sep 112X5 111X5 HUB HIM —.90 

H 7J0 10130 Dec H465 11465 11355 11350 — 90 

11875 ID? JO Mar 116.15 116.15 114X0 114X0 -1A0 

12050 116X0 Jun 117.95 117.95 1 17.95 117.95 —05 

Ert. Solas Prev. sotes 1X481 

Prev.DayOpanmr. 1X255 up it* 


.rr:.l-9' T 


an 




Market Guide 


CBT: 

CME: 


NYCSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


Chlcaao Board af Trade 
CMcaoo MarcanNie Eicehanoa 
International Monetary Market 
Of Ctdcaao Mercantile Ekrttanaa 
New York Cocoa. Supor. Coftee ExcDonoe 
New York Cotton Encftonae 
Commodliy Esetanaa New York 
New York Mercantile E«chonae 
Kamos atr Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exenonae 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 

Reuters 

Dj. Futures. 


Close Preview 

900.70 f 9Q&20f 

1*681,90 1,686.60 

- NA 11503 

Com. Research Bureau- N-A. TOM 

Moody's ; base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1975. 


DM futures 
Options 

W. Cartoon Jfort-USflB marts at* or mar* 

Mr 24. 


All of these securities having been sold, this announcement appears solely j or purposes of information. 


July 18, 1985 


6,482,161 Shares 


Becton, Dickinson and Company 


Common Stock 

(par value $1.00 per share ) 


The First Boston Corporation Goldman, Sachs & Co. 


Sop he wr Ie Dec Mar 

33 M W UJ 0.11 LB - 

34 132 250 2X2 831 877 152 

35 171 164 250 DJll U! 164 

034 153 U7 132 130 TJI 

au <ui i.i* 112 — — 

ox; 044 oar - - - • 

_ teMreLUS _ 

Tin HI. 4J84 6*0)1 lot 365S1 
Tua VOL 1272 open (at. 21111 
t CME. 


j Dividends 


My 24 

Par Amt Par Ri 
USUAL 


| Aided Stares 
Ba* of Montreal 
, Beverly Enterprises 
Broekway 
Brush Wellman 
Canodlan Oce. Pet 
Carflna Oteaefe 
CetacCorp 
CILCCRP Inc 
ansrtMated Pocars 
Cromn. A Knawfas 
Farr Co 
First aiia«o 
Goodyaar Canada 
Kaneas Gas A El 
Keane inc 
Karr Addtfon Mima 
urv Tulto 
Midwest Enemy 
NoftneottUHiitte* 
NenmofCorp 

?ss?a, ssr 

RrtUnslnc 
Sfhrn Indiana GAE 
Superior Sura. Mfo 
Trom Lautskna G 
usufe Care 
U5 Trust 

fU_riL — 

nyift itfor 


Q XI IB-21 9-20 

Q A9 8-29 B-2 

Q JM 10-14 M0 

Q 33 9-30 9-16 

0 .U 9-20 9-4 

O .16 10-1 94 

O .12 10-1 9-4 

2 „■¥ M 

Q J5VS MB M3 
Q M 8-24 8* 

Q 30 6-30 8-9 

O 56 9-U 1-23 
0 33 10-1 9-6 

Q 3} 9-X 9-9 

Q 3) MO M 
Q 35 826 8-12 

9 .15 M2 MS 
OX7W MB B-3 
O X9 «-l M3 

0-39*1 MO MO 
Q AS 9-T B9 

Q 32 •« M 
0 .10 M3 8-23 

Q .15 9-15 M 
Q 35 9-4 MB 

S .U lb M0 BA 
AS MO b® 
g ff> 8-20 B-5 
O 35 8-23 8+ 

Q 36 9-1 84 

0 JO 1M5 IB-lB 

a .18 M 


AAnraal; M Mo mm y; Q^aorieriy; S-S«oL 


Source; l/PI. 


MODERN HEALTH CLUB 
In Downtown Dalles, Texes 

A very exquisite fitness center 
located in the prestigious 
Adolphus Hotel, for sole by 
owners. Includes street level 
juice bar and the latest equip- 
ment, Ideal for owrier/opers- 
i tor. Current owners can help 
with immigration process. 

Write to: Clerk Hatch 

745 Fort Street . 
Honolulu, HI 96513 


ComnwMiities 


SUGAR. 


Mr 2* 

H»Otl . Low BUI Ad arw 


Od 1320 1390 L196 1308 —19 

Drc 13D 1305 1305 1328 -18 

Mcr 1350 1331 1340 1330 —13 

May N.T. N.T. 1365 1385 —15 

Aua N.T. N.T. 1309 1325 -I 

Oct N.T, H.T. (1335 1J60 —8 

faL wrt j 260 te*» of SB tom. Prev. actual 
rta: 1X37 lots. Opan tntrtnl: ME93 
COCOA 


Jly N.T. N.T. — 23*0 +2S 

S*P 2JD0 2350 Z0S0 Z060 +1 

Doc ZXSS 2534 2530 2534 +4 

Mar 25B 2591 2540 2547 +9 

May N.T. HT. 2545’ — +10 

JtY N.T. N.T. 2560 — +8 

S«P , N.T. N.T. £055 — +| 

Ert. vP Ls .79 Jala of 10 fan* Prev. actual 
sates: St l o t s. O ren Bteiwit: 827 
COFFEE 

Franc* francs re IBB M 

J*v nj. «x ix» 1550 —no 

1JW 1J3S 1^5 1J60 —25 

Nov 1JB0 1J74 1X05 1X25 —39 

Jan N_T. N.T. 1X60 — —JO 

MOT N.T. N.T. 7X95 — —65 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1,905 — —65 

J jy. . N.T. N.T. 1X40 — - 

,f»LvojU«i lots of S tan* Prev. octuol sates: 
11 lafs.Opan Interest: 3*8 

Soares; Bourse ou Co mmerxe. 


London 

Commodities 


Law iS"* 


My 24 

PiwvWas 
BM Ask 


S ter W aapwiws li lcten 

19UD 9730 9850 10050 995010138 
1BMD 13X40 103X0 1WJJ0 10630 1D820 
IWAD W7AB 10750 107X0 11030 11060 
1JBX0U4X0 1W50 11938 


oa 

Ok 


U 


1115X0 


ass»8 MiaM ” 


OCt 13000 12950 12950 1»60 13X00 13X60 
Vrtvma: 2B30 fats of 5B tuna. 

COCOA 

Sterflaa Par ntatric tea 

JIT 1365 1357 USB 1363 1345 i JSB 

K 

.UN TX9S 


U95 ; 

£L H2 J330 - 331 1338 1336 U 


M0 1745 1337 1342 1346 1J37 

Volume: 3336 lots of W tons. 

COFFEB 

SterUnspnr urarictoa 

Jly 


3£ 

JOB 


1X15 ij2S 1XT2 um u Wi ■ > 9/a 
1X45 1X79 VMS ue 156 IJQO 

m 

Vstente: 72H lots 0*51008 
OASOIL 

m rasli II Isd 

22135 222X0 

g. 

P* c 224X0 mj5 2M5B 3ta m3 mxo 

% ftf: 

ri N.T. N.T. 20050 222JB XOBOO 21150 
Ww-- U* MauflOO tons. 1 “ 

aS^}^Ss^ anaL f n ^ f yf n f e ^ n **■ 


Commodities 


Mr 24 

MOteOATOIgGOLO FUTURES 

W. i^T .,£^15,^3,/“ 

SSz K: 8: 3S S3 S3 3 

Ocf — 22350 3 71 50 32250 334JJ0 32tLQ0 32 
DK _ N-T. N.T. S650 rmnn jjann 33 
Fob _ 3J05B 33U0 OT50 moo moo 33™ 
M — N-T. N.T. 33550 33750 33950 34150 
Jim — N-T. icr. 34050 34250 3050 34550 
vwuma: 25 tetesf tooml^ 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 

U A X p f BB«Oi 


AMO 


SS raS MM, mSi 


DOC J .... 

Vohmto: 102 lots aflOOoL 


N.T. N.T. 32190 -pCJn 

N.T. N.T. mp SS 

N.T. N.T. 327X0 33U0 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 

— ■ kflo 



mx o in5o inSi 


Nov 

DOC 1.. 

votaima'.iMt, 


,sft2s »»■» 
IS^9 I!J99 , 9 2nJ 19356 


’?35g 19550 191X0 i*SX0 

1M50 mao 19450 19650 


S INGA PORE RUBBER 

StegopMW cants P6T kflo 

O- ^aviaas 

msiAUB. 17150 17135 17150 T7^ 

WJO 169X0 16t75 14935 
RSS2A ua_ 16450 16550 16450 16550 

RSSSAvs- 1X250 1050 1050 1050 

^SfAuO_ 1SUB 16050 15850 16050 

RSS5AV0_ 15350 U550 15150 15550 


*er m rinwlfi par 2 S teat 




Ml B. 


900 9SD 

ss ss 

■80 920 

870 710 

860 900 

M0 908 
. BSD 890 

■nr - ~ m m 

VuhsTM:Olotsof2StaftL 

Source; Reuters. 


Previous 
■M Ask 



930 

910 


CO 

•80 


970 

s® 

2S 

?20 

£S 

TO 



J*fy 23 


Srft* 

"■■■Ju w m 

n i n 

lilt St U ov, 

* " S §S B? 

w unxisniSt ? 
w VTilSTUM M,ra.ra. ,ra - 
vu * .» 11 /MB* - 1 » - 

Trirtcojlwtare BUM 

TS *4* Mu teL 4^X0 
TrtrtM vsbMW tOSB . 
them mm m. jam 

HWsiRtt (JM.1K9I OwWI-15 

Sources C80E. 


Ftb-LxE 
XOB Sw DO IM* 

1® VI4 A - 

vu« % m 

a 


j Cash Prices 


CommodUv and Use 
CnWse 4Sontaa. lh._ 
Prlntcfofti 64730 38 W. yd _ 
Steel billets IPlMj.^ U*ZZL 
Iren 2 Fflry . PWia. ton — 

Copper stecL. ih ... 

Tin (straltel. lb 

One. e. St. l. Basis, lb 

Ptmacflunuar - 
Silver N.Y.cs I 
Source: AP. 


My 24 

W«l Abu 
1X1 1X5 

8X0 876 

<7358 OXM 

tom mm 

7*71 *M5 

19-21 38M 

68-71 6+67 

6X251 63957 

•X1-X7 858 

9S4F7 137-KI 
LOSS 7X5 



Mr 24 


Claae 

BU a ** km Ask 

ALUMINUM 

StwHna par nMfric tea 

rtX>t 71650 77850 774X0 7TJ30 

loreard 73950 729X0 73750 777X0 

COPPER CATHODES (HW» Grad*) 
aivfimi per mvtnc Ion 
spot UM3M lyOKLOO 1JR7J0Q l&fJB 

forward 1571X0 T572J0 156150 vSlJI 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Starti ns par metric tea 


153450 153450 752S» 
155250 15)950 154050 


forwortf 154*50 i; 

LEAD 

SlsrCbia per metric ton 

font 2B*XO 2*060 28250 2B3M 

forward 29750 29850 29050 29158 

NICKEL 

Teritoa P«r metric too 
seat 3X3000 3X4050 liTBKW 3X6058 

forward 3X8050 3X9000 3LS8S50 3X9DX0 

SILVER 


soot 


43250 

44550 


43250 433X8 
44550 46600 


43150 
444.10 

TTM (Standard) 

g« >> * f tJWJO^MSffll 956650 957050 
forward *58550 *59050 953950 958050 
ZINC 

Sterftas per metric ion 

55450 55550 54650 SOXO 
tnremrd 5050 54550 53150 51650 
Source: AP, 


L 


Treasury Bffis 


Mr 23 



Otter. 

BU 

YUM 

P ret 
YJ*N 

Jtwnlh 

725 

723 

741 

7X1 

+monm 

7J5 

733 

731 

731 

One rear 

7X7 

7X1 

US 

7^* 


Sourer : sotonen Brothers 



United Pros /nrenuawnrf 
TOKYO — A group at ISJaps- 
ncse fi nancial instnotioos said 
Wednesday that it would extend « 
569^-naffion loan to ibe Turkish 
goveminau to faMim construe* 
don of a new Bo^xvus bridge. 














i 

























TTfcFnrpTM ATTHNAI- HERALD 1MBUWE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


Page 15 


•: 13 
«• 15 


:■ ?3jn 


K 

cl. a 


*•514 


: «: 

JJa-. 

u. 


**3>r, <\ 

A- 


Hi 
Sfl - 

5-' 7 * 
. Si 'i 

i'v- % 
Bjj » 


si ss , 

np* 

«*« JJ-'k -. 
si» '* 


K& Car Safes Business Tries to Adapt in Argentina 

Fell by 7.3% 

In Mid- July 


SEKSSiWSSS- «*=.. ~ 


(Continued from Page 9) promised W im- 


Valic4Stataa 

Abmonon (H.FJ 

nu iM 
su IV 

159 KM 

ms w* 

31X2 
1.13 


tadOiw. 

Net inc 

Per Share— 
MHSH 


Utatei Press International 


took a bade scat because ll was too -^£^8 own efficiency and slop 

expensive to bomw money, axifl no money to pay its eiyrases. 

money was available fori wig-term p OT Alganaro uanro & Sons, 

investments. _ there was an immediate effect Mr. 

When inflation readiea 25 to » ■ p^ fn ^ trucks went out to dc- 


Sth the task of malting sure all of 
the company’s money was invested 
in pnxfecis or earning interest Sxa 

“ r . ■ T fhp AHI 


Airtwme Ah’ FrtlBM 
Sad a nor. TK5 WPI 

Revenue. 


1UX 


CTBSffl “WfiETEt SS- fl fl 

raeiro’s 20 tracks wait outrode- tarn of about 1 percent a flay, ne ^ iE 

DETROIT — US. automakers percent a month, tong-tom funds ^ ^ hut came badt saw. 
reputed Wednesday that sales disappeared and all loans were set f^Unyere said they wanted to sol v * “*T‘wTkw, '<aid. If ihe 

t in arid- July as up to be repaid within seven days.* ihdr stock cm hand before getting ease now,. M r. Po^ 1 0 P ^*_ ~ L..~ 


PirStori- 


“There was a total dewpilalhar For firet time in years. Program is 


Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler ‘“There was a total decaptfa 
Carp. then share of the non," Mr. PifieirD mid. » ou can t 

pmrirrt at the c*p««c of General grow if you can’t nwest moony. 


- 2nd Osar. 

PtrHwre— . H73 « R««w* — 
— im n.h lncluM,oaln ot Nellnc. 

“We fed enormoudy more at swan. 

Alcoa 

ita 

Revenue 


i«s 


MotoreCap. . 

The seven companies, GM, 
Ford, Chryder, American Motors 


With the company’s b orrowi ng 
costs reaching about 15 percent a 
month in real terms, he said, bor- 


'5S . Corp-, Honda Motor Corp., Yolks- rowing was out erf the question. 


Net Inc 
Per snore- 
in HnW 
Revenue- 
Met Inc. — i 
Per &hore_ 




"j"; 


T> 

-1w 


% 


«i 




“W 6 «iTc.^.tJnr^wouW managers will be unnecessary. — 

9SS£gH« is?JS T£SU ~- 

“SL’T , £ » as Tssistsa-f 

120-perscm sales force^pohsbed it y ptonTMr. Pifidro said, is that bu Amw . 

«2K3KMf±a n3S35gSi“ --£ S£= 

*? win because no one wM rffidy to 0 f pace controls and the 

fl- i h w. dMmm uni “ll Vnillie ™ . _T inFlannn 


Hfc 

04V 

IMS 

!» 

057 


nw 



4 Month! 

Net inc — 

Per Shore— 

Carlisle 

ms 
134.1 
7X5 
DJO 

let Hail w*5 

Revenue— 

Het Inc- 

Per snare — 


Chubb . 

2nd floor- W 


1JB 

JtM 

M9t Oner wet — 
m*5 oper Share— 
^ lit Hob 


225 

050 

ms 

445 

MS 


ms auorler net include* oper Met — 
of siZ6 million oner Share— 

Amer. Brands Coachmen ind. 

IKS 
1XM. 


MW ... . — —— — | ” . 

bankrupting the country s private 

— sector. 

To ^ probkm, to Al- 
LtiSS fcxafaadnininralMnimvtM^ 


soppliers will be the winners, and a 
lower infla tion rate will make capi- 
tal projects a possibility. 

Just after Mr. Alf raisin's package 
was announced, the cost of tong* 
team funds fdl to 7 percent a 


Pm* snore — 
lit Half 
Revenue — 

Net Inc. 

Per Share— 


>5jn 

1X5 

IMS 

U3S. 

J39 


1471. 

9SM 

141 

1M* 

XSl*. 

2DIJ7 

1X2 


ladQuar. 

Revenue — - 

N«t inc. 

p*r Shore — 

lit HoH 


Net inc. 

Per Share— 


IKS 

1135 

451 

0.71 

4 

ats 


lfM 

1X5 

0.79 

im 

TJX 

lXt 


lfM 

1M 

7.94 

053 

1K4 

31X4 

1SJ* 

077 


Now, Mr. Kfidio said, his sales month, fr«n 25 percenL If the pro- 
force will have to be attentive to gmm works, the cost oonlo drop to 
consumers’ purchasing cycte and 2 or 3 percent a month. 

shoppers’ ability toccmiwcqunli- There are senouscocoansaDoct 
ty as well as pnee- 


MdQwor. 
Revenue — 
oper Mel — 


AmfoC 

IMS 
HOA 

044 


Ji-’ Vi SS3te 


<& 


*n flus?r jqu' 






r- *•'« 
• • «* 
Ati 


•- -* • 

■ v -J J 

il . 


the craiq»rable 1984 period. 

There were nine selling days m 
both periods. 

The industry reported these fig- 
ures for the 1985 period, compared 

with 1984: GM, 120,124 vs. 
139,587, down 13.9 percent ot a 
daily rate basis; Ford, 56,716 vs. 
*3,219 up 6.6 percent; Chrysler. 
29,749 vs. 28,791, up 3J percent, 

e m^iting nmuvans. 

Among the smaller companies, 
AMC reported 3,730 vs. 7^80, 
down 48.8 percent; Honda (U.S.- 
built models only), 3,603 vs. 2,733, 
op 31.7 percent; Volkswagen ot 
America (U.S.-bnilt), 1,816 ys. 
2216, down 18.0 percent, and Nis- 
san 989 vs. 0 last year. Totals, 
216,727 vs. 233,826, off 73 percent. 

Ni ssan began production of its 
Smtra pawnger car in Smyrna, 
Tennessee, in late March. 

GM*s market share dropped to 
55.4 percent from 59.7 percent a 
year ago, while Ford’s rose to 263 
percent from 22.8 percent and 
Chiyder's rose to 13.7 percent from 
123 percent. 


TEhe Daily Sowrcefiar 


austral, set at a Bxed exdiange rale 
of S135 or 1,000 old pesos. Most 


IMJ 

«ou 
in 

134 

W HoH IK* 

Nwomw U* ''St 

oS^afe: M4 0" 

thcV^^^sprqbable gSSSr®*" - 

Xhc austerity program immedir that s®®® Banimor»c« 

SSSSfft gftp 1 i 

ULauro & Sons. With inflation nm- itisntos. pm- shore __ 


Taking die Pulse of ihe Aging Bull Market 

^ . r TUr molra Ct/vlr ulection 


warned Terry C. Webb, manager of « sda ^ m 

VS. investments at Foragn&Co- mount, he said- 
lonial Managpmenl LuL m Lon- stocks he said the fond owns and 

don, a SI -85-billion closed-end probably wifl add to if the market 
fund, begun in 1869, that is recog- -gcrsdiaperrasheoroectsm thc 
mzed as the world's oldest invest- coming months, are J^," lec "lT > ' 

-assst— an*. BSSFKtf-Sfi 


(Continued from Page 9) 
the valuation placed on a riyai 
levd ofhi^h-qnality profits will be 
increasing. 

Martin Zweig headlines his car- 
rent edition of Zweig Forecast, “A 


for the stock market. 

“The best bull markets have al- 
ways developed out of a lousy bus- 
ness environment — - more often a 
recession," he said. 


on “sectors 

that have already done wen," such 
as regional banks and speaaBty re- 
— oc saw. tailers, where he thinks pnee-eam- 

tK _ p-jpnil Reserve hhhi and m- rates will go down farther and 
the Federal Reserve wa» iL _ views WaD street pnees now as 


and Xidex. 


Par Shore 

Bed oa oiektnxon 

ms ttM 

RlvAnut »95 

NSt IfIC. TOM 15X 

Per Snare — 14» 044 

9 iiantn J* *JK 
Revenue 

Net Inc. 413 

Per snare— 243 157 

Boll A Howell 

SUSS— <*jj >'« 

SJJSS.— bo ial 
hShScT— lil* xxr l 

Boials 

giSSSf , __ m2 i«J 

iE.- fl a 

1st HOlt 1-K* *■* 


of US million from 
unis*. 

Coleman 

Snd Qaar. 

Ravenoe— 'Si 

Mol inc 

Per Shore— 0*4 

WHbM I* 

Reveniw — 

Met inc. 

Per Shared- 

Corn. Edison 
2nd floor. WB 

Revenue 

Nat Inc. B353 

Per Shore— 0A1 

tsiitaH -U“ 

Revenue — 
n«i inc 

Per Share — 

Cons. FrolflMwaw 
am flo w. "g j® 

Revenue 44** 

Net inc. us 

PM- Shore— W« •» 

u> HOH ms m 

Byenue MJO 


Provo 

m Qoar. HK jjffl 

SS* 217.95 *15J l 

Per Snore — "" 

K*r 4 g«-tra 

Par Shore— OM 
o.'tett 

Duke Poww 

jnU Oust, lfU 

Revenue — *J5o miJ 

Net Inc. 'Slfi 

Per Shore— 07« 

Emery Air Fretuht 
SndQMr. m* Jgj 

Revenue 3343 3015 

N*I inc — 4.13 

Par Shore— UJ 


7 .48 


HB4 nc/f nut fitc/udes ehofpe 
ettmoM 

GOOM 

s a 
a h 

lot Half 2JJ 

Revenue — , 704J 7S*i 

Doer Nyt — JM 

Oner Share— 0.74 B.» 

Qua rani ee Fin. 

2nd floor. 1W 

Revenue— (U 

Net inc. J. J® 

Par Shore — 0X3 

lit HOH ms im 

Revenue — »l-i 

Nil inc, 

per Snore — 


Revenue — **M 
Oner Net — J*5 

□aer Shore- °- 4 ' 

m* nwt rstciuttnoajn 
uriMO from efliconrtfmeO 
operafMn* 

Medio General 
Ml Offer. m3 1M4 
Revenue — 

Hd inc. — 

Per Snore — 
lit Half 


14IJ 

law 

1X4 

IVS4 

271X 


545 

(OIJX 


4 15 
048 


lsia 

ia)34 


2*J.7 

M7 

1X4 


xua 

DU 

1.71 


1*M 

13*3 

744 

1.15 

’IS 


1»«4 

1350 

9144 

044 

1M4 

% 

US 


Fin. Cp America 

30d Quar. IKS JJJj 

3555 17.91 10733 

IHBaH mS 1*M 

HBl LW 5*03 7943 

FK Seeorftv 

MOW. ™ 

Net inc. — n^d 

Per Share— 033 IMS 

ist Kan ms 

Net inc — 

Per Shore 

Fortune Fin. 

Snl floor. ms 

Revenue ®J 

Met inc 

Persnare — 0X9 

f Months m» 

Ravenoe MM 

Net inc — - 
Per Share— 


*1 

0X0 


1X4 


1M4 

114 

Ui 


IM4 

4S3 

0X7 

023 

1«M 

122X 

036 

041 


Horstiev Foods 
M0 Ouar. m| mi 

Par Share 

Hi Halt ms 1M» 

Revenue — 

Net inc. 

Per Shore— 

Home Fed. B* Florida 
IMS IM* 
2* 1X4 

0*0 im. 
1M4 
US 


9300 

4441 

1X3 


mi 

3HL65 

133 


147X 
•IS 
1X9 
IMS 

Revenue — MJ-3 - 

NM inc 1« 

per Shore— 3X4 

Halt neb e»rtm» oaim ot 
c? million. 

Midi loan Nan 
HO floor. m* 

Net Inc 4* 

Par Share — »7 j 

HI Half m» 

NM inc “I 

Per Share — , u 

Midland- Roll 

jwl floor. m* 

Revenue 1™ ® 

Oper Net — JJI 

ooer Snore— 0* 

MHoM IKS 


Republic Airlines 

SS»s= W g 

m hdU m* ,m 

Revenue 0*4 

mer Net — 4lf 
Oper snc r e_ l-' 1 


■S4 

oxs 


Reynolds Metals 


m « 

U 

041 

lfM 

ex 

OBI 


Suttfluor. 

Reveruc 

Net inc 

Per Shore — 

lit KaH 

Revenue — 

MM inc 

Per Snare 


ms 

9T1X 

*« 

031 

IKS 

ITU. 

11.9 

as 


HM 

UWJ. 

3JJ 

134 

MM 

I.M3. 

57* 


□aer Net — 

Oner Share— 


339.7 

045 

3X3 


1*14 

177.7 

7*7 

E-57 

lfM 

345.4 

11.79 

S.fl 


l«5 auortwr nH InciuOea 

c r ctHt o* Si J miii-xi 

Rlcoel Textile 

Jr* flow m* ..l*M 

Revenue *■? 

SS'storrz: 143 

f Month i IKS IKS 

Revenue — 


2X5 

045 




ox; 


maeer. 

Per Shore— 

rear W 

nm inc 7*3 

pot Shore — 1J2 iui 


JM4 nert ; ^* . l f***“ ^ 
SZP million la Quart * ranOOt 
Ml million m noU fr om Oil- 
eaaf Jnued aaenwwn* 


Ryder Syslems 
2nd Ouar. m» KM 

Revetn* — 

Oper Nat — 3ira 

Oper Shore- 0.7S 

IN Half ms lfM 


*34 4 
3411 
023 


JMS non 

B99MXL 


tachKH choree of 


Goodyear Profit Fell 

By 20% in 2d Quarter 

ss^SSSS 


Revenue — 
NM Inc — - 
Per Shore — 


3SSX 3M9 


94S 

1X0 


Bio 3 Hid. 

tadQMr - iSi 

Revenue 3K4 

NM inc . 

Per Snore — 


12X1 

0X2 


market," he asserted. 

That is also the view of Surcai 
Bhinid, chief portfolio strategist at 


Thr Associated Press 

AKRON, Ohio - Goodyear JS 

Tire «& Rubber Ca said Wednesday nmwc— . ajg 
that second-quarter sales declined 


jot ■ 



vises investors to become “aggrcs- WaflStreet,Jwtwercm no great ^ jggj mfllion, or 81 cents per 

rnshtqputmnewmonj. A ot sales of SIS9 billion, 

d compared with earoings of $108.6 

auauecu ^ SKsUB per share, on sales of 

“Enphoria is absent, but there a f WiSfcrceL $2.65baHon. 

a good deal of complacency." follow currently on wau anwt. 


ave buyers. 

But is anything currently ailing 
Wall Street? 


Per Share. 

Cabot 

Mamr. m? 

Revenue f1» 

NM inc TX» 

Par Share — BX« 

f Moaltn 

5M* 
lji 


Net Inc 
Per Shore — 


lfM 

TO* 

1341 

0X3 

lfM 

J79.9 

274 


19M 

44U 

26X4 

042 

lfM 

115 


9092) 

jSS&si is 

Cant. Telecom 

SndQuor, mg KM 

RMnue — ^ 

07B 044 

lfM 19M 
244a 2xaa 

NM K>C JttJ 1004 

Per Share Ul 2X7 

1965 ih to Inclodr ta in 0*311.9 
mUMonmmaaUofprooony. 
ItUmullM nMtoHa 

Cram 

Sad floor. ms 


Per Shore — 
utHaH 


R e venue 

Neiinc 

Per Snore — 
lit KaH 


T9M 

2114 


Called 


39X2 


297J 

9X1 B4B 
143 044 

ms KM 

521 X 391.1 

Net Inc 12X7 lOX* 

Persnare— 145 l« 

msntutti tnd udu l/ nWyty- 

mtes Com. acwlred m ftk 

Deluxe Check Print. 

Su u 

Per Shore— 0SI 

lit hoH ms 

Revcnue- 
NM Inc - 

Per Shore 

Detroit Edison 

SSSKT— ^ ^ 

^ *S5 


FPL Group 

— ms 
_ lxea 

NM Inc 

PM-Shara — Ore 

Fuqua Ind. 

2nd ouar. IKS 

Revenue 

NM Inc Mg 

Persnare — I2n 
lit HoH JKS 

Revenue 

NM me — ■ 

Par Shore — 

GATX 

and Ouar. IMS 

Revenue 2113 

Net Inc W 

Per Shore— BM 

111 Half t« 

Revenue 

Net Inc “ 

Per Share — >-l* 


194 

1.92 


9674 

SSX6 

049 


19*4 

2237 

11X 

1.12 

19M 

4144 

213 

247 


■s 

0X9 

19M 

419.9 

11.9 

1X3 


077 

mi 

3.7 


3*09 

4616 

1.12 


3303 

3946 

090 



Sfoc?. 


Wednesday^ 

arc 


;» T 


•N^C* *■ 


MsrKf j- — 



1X0 34 


.10* J 

X0 M 
44 34 




-xfJ'- 7 ’ " 







u-l 

NM 


11 ADC 71 
_ UK A EL I 

^ SfiB 

14 AomRt 

5(6 AOOdin 
Iff Aaelrin 
vm AOJRCW 

2 K.‘ 

S'* Advdr 

-- ** Aoaurm 
17H lJltiARBM 

rTVj 7(6 AlrVftoc 

J»Vl 24*6 AIMB 

» 11 A MM 

20% <M AMOnw 

34(4 10*6 AleffWt 
22(1 lSVb AlleaBv 
2M 20*6 AUdBn 
5 »6 Aline I 

11% S’* AleMIc 
MU *K ABU* 

IM 13(6 Amooat 
12(6 4(6 AWAlrl 
1716 M AmMv 
1416 1M6 ABOkr 
1416 g6 AmQlT 
9(6 5(6 A Cunli 
1716 12(6 AFflS L 
M6 4V6 AmFrsl 
3BV6 14 1A AFIelCS 
J7V6 2716 A Greet 
1416 0V6 AmlnlX 

I2V6 6 AMaant 
2216 141* AMS 
16*6 22*6 A Nil i« 

7(6 3(6 APhvG 
4V6 16 AQumh 

3416 lSUd ASOCCP 
MVi 71* AmSH S 
A 1H Motor 

44ft 21ft Amritrs 1X0 4X 
2416 12ft Amrenrt 
Bft 3ft Amaen 
3916 1* AtroKB 140 3X 
raft 13ft Airwod 9 xo 
IF* 9 Anfttrtc 
19ft 7ft Anqren 
jPk 10(6 Andrew 
lift 6ft Apaoee -»2 14 
30ft 1*1* APOtoC 
31ft 141* APPjeC 
27(6 lift Art? to 5 
19ft 1016 ApjdCni 
36 » ArtOMt 

lift a ApW«r 
71* 3ft Archi ve 
22ft 15ft ArooSv 
321* 16ft ArUD 
f 6ft Artel 
ITV. I Oft AreHM 
9 5ft AStrMV 
21ft 10ft Alcor 
» 11(6 AtlAm 

Oft 25 AtlntBC 
13(6 7ft AttoRJ 
14 Oft AH Fin 

29 19ft MMI 
Mft 3ft AtSeArs 

30 15 AIwUQc 
lift 5ft Autmlx 

Wft 4ft AUXton 
1316 3ft AvoOT 
2Sft * Avntor 
25ft 17ft AvnI H* 

30 13ft Avate 
30(6 lift AvIatOP 
8ft 4 AllClW 


34 


148 33 


40b 2X 


JSftJfSft-ft 

a ? 

im & 

^ds«=S 
««s=* 

S&3SS88-* 

r ’Si r * ft 

22 21ft 21(6 
4ft 4 4 

6 5ft * 

1216 11*6 12 

If* 1*0(6 10ft — 1ft 

12 lift Jlft— ft 

«S8Sra=5 

‘Si ’k + ft 

wh 35 35ft — ft 
13ft 13 — ft 

fJk Afli H* + ™ 

fir et* 

^ 3 2 ^ + k 

30ft 29ft 30ft— ft 

\ \ 

at 3816 — ft 

§5* 221* 2216— ft 
tSS dS $-1 

r s» 1-5 
155 gs w=a 

10ft 10ft 10ft . ^ 

71ft 21 ?!}? + 2 

lift 16ft toft— ft 
2S» 25ft 2SH13 ft 
1516 14ft 15 — „ 
24ft M + 14 
9ft 9ft »6 
5ft 5Vi H6 7 * 
19 18ft 1* + ft 

31ft 31 3116- ft 

law if* ’SSlivS 

Mk M 6»» + « 

ns a* 

-Mat 25 25 — p _w 

Sft 41ft -1 
13 IK 13 — S 

g: aw + 1* 

1 s 

a IS 

ivs 4ft 4(6 + ft 


10ft 12 CnrdDJ* ■ 

5ft 3ft CorettC . 

T3V6 4ft Carenft 
left t corMfi 
21ft 7ft Cm*V*t 
ll SV6 Cencore 
35ft 30ft our Be 1 

19ft 0 Centenr 

5&ft 3016 CenBto 2ffl> 37 
36M 71 CnBsnS 1X2 4.1 

sm is** cfwoke aj “ 

4414 21 kk CMirran 
■ft ift Carmlk 
13(* 8» Cefus 
0(6 4V6 OubsEji 

21ft 12*6 CWmS* 

21ft 10- CWtPrf 

n 5ft ChKTch 

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41V 1BV WfCnLt 
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gJSS»-_ 25X6B JlSK 

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nt hoh ..m* 

5 W= « 

Per share— 4X0 IBM 
1M4 quarter net Ineludot 
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2nd Ouar. KM 
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Per Shore— 031 


36ft 10V Nw.NL S _X0 7-7 
Mft 16V NWStPS 2.10 9.1 
55ft 35ft NOUll 
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SIV 16 Numeric 
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Ind floor. «KS 1W 

nm inc AS ,5, 

Per Shore — M7 J-K 
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Howard Savinas Bk 

ware * m* 

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Hughes Tool 

K«5 1K» 

UIJi 7712 

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WHaH Kg «K 

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NM Inc _ 

Persnare— Ml 

a: ton 

Illinois Tool Works 

2nd floor. Kg .'JR 

Revenue 14W 

Net inc >5M 1*07 

Per snore— ax* M* 
UtHaH KM m* 

srrsr— sg ® 

PM Shore— 1-W 

Kansu Cllv Sttiern 

2nd Qaar. IKS 1KI 

1HX 1213 

SmTI?— t\f 10.19 
Ptr Shura — V14 MB 

Id HOH km IK* 

Revenue 


iiTU 

10X7 

an 


Nan Inlcraroup 

2nd Ouar. ms 1K4 

Revenue »XH 79*9 

NM Inc 10)153 U* 

Per Share— — O— 

lof Hall K« 'K* 

Revenue 3T5 a 

Net Inc (al333 

Per Share— — 
a: (ass. 

Norfolk Sthern 
2nd Ouar. MM 1K4 

Revenue 8WX 9M3 

NM me 1»J 'J*i 

Persnare — 2X0 - 14 
lit HOH 1*M , 1W4 

Revenue 1J«X 1 

Net inc 2KX M9J 

Par Shor t — >■ 3-79 34K) __ 

1985 rusuits ineluM Norm Per Snare — 
American von Line* «■ u Matt 


.Xi3 

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l«S4 nets **cJud* ea*ru oi S'J 


1X1? 
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1 14 


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Pennwott 
2nd auar. KM 


nulfoa In Oicrter jnJ el KU 
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Souibb 

toil Ouar. lfM 1«4 

Revenue 4V* 44? 6 

Net inc KJ *’> 

Per snare — Of 7 v£S 

1*1 HOH ms fK* 

Revenue — 91 » 

NM ln«. 94a 6* ? 

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St anodyne 
2nd Ouar. 1**5 

Revenue H79 

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S?3 

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2472 

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Revenue — 

NM me 

Persnare — 

111 HaM 

Revenue — 

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ru 

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Phelps Dodge 
Ted Ouar. MM 

Revenue — 

NM inc 

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«** ™ «S 

NmTH? 13X 10)15.7 

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at U4 million. 

Philadelphia Elec. 

SS®SJ-_ uSx *25 

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Trans World Airlines 
2nd floor. 1?U 1K» 

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Cper Net _ SS4 

1SS4 Oper Shcre_ ul6 >51 
03^ 111 Hall .HU m» 

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2nd Ouar. 19U MS4 

Revenue 'XW, 1X53 

Net inc WJ91X 1-3 

Per Shore — — 1X9 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


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BOOKS 


I Designate 
8 Actor Walter 

1«K rations 

14 Site of ancient 
Greek games 

15 Indonesian 
omrigger 

16 Stevenson 
villain 

17 Dwarf 
chestnuts 

19 Well-informed 
about 

20 “A peculiar 
sort of a ga]’’ 

21 FeorAg 

22 Guide 

24 Make new 
money 

26 Former 
Japanese 
naval base 

27 Gridiron get- 
together 

29 Wreck; min 

33 Sioux 

06 Participle 
former 

38 City on the 
Humboldt 

39 Rock guitarist 
Clapton 

40Wefty , s'* 

Wedding'* 

42 Legatee 

43 Swindle 

44 A goal of NOW 

45 Like Mercury 

47 The Tempter 


49 Column 
molding 

51 Nip 

53 Purposeless 

56 Mrs. Stanley 
Kowalski 

59 Pulsation 

60 a legume 

62 Commotion 

63 Blackcaps 

66 Guinness or 
Templeton 

67 North Sea- 
Baldc canal 

68 Pub game 

69 Taylor's "A 

at 

Oxford" 

76 Withered 

71 Corpulent 

DOWN 

1 Extras in an 
env. 

2 Hungarian 
composer 

3 Zola or 
Berliner 

4 AJO. 1-A.D. 

100. e-g. 

5 Bridge bid 

6 Annex 

7 Upper edge 

8 Lengthy period 

9 Beam thrower 

10 Dolt or 
rockfish 

11 Pbotog.'s 


13 Moved out 
18 Surveyor’s 
instrument 
23 U-boat 

25 Crowded 

26 Marquee 
28 Fragrant 

bloomer 

30 Out of the wind 

31 Sideslip 

32 Whig's 
opponent 

33 Five-time 
Presidential 
candidate 

34 "The Willow 
Song,” e.g. 

35 Wear in the 
Highlands 

37 What a certain 
guzzler 
empties fast 
41 Old tongue 
46 FI a. game fish 
48 Nothing 
50 Pythoness’s 
revelation 
52 Bastes 

54 dtado 

55 Fulfills 

56 put 

(remain) 

57 Indian weight 

58 A Cotton Belt 
grape 

59 Breakwater 
61 South African 

fax 

64 Hasten 

65 Peck or pat 


BEETLE BAILEY 


I'VE NEVER SEEN 

anythin© uke this' 



THE AWAKENING TWENTIES: A 
Memoir-History of a Literary Period 

By Gorham Munson. 317 pages. $19.95. 
Louisiana Suae University Press, Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana 70893. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yaidley 

TN THE literary landscape of ibe 1920s Gra- 
X ham Munson was a distinctly minor figure, 
though you certainly couldn't tell that to Gor- 
ham Munson. He was an energetic, opinionat- 
ed fellow who basked in the glow of more 
consequential figures but emitted relatively lit- 
tle light of his own; the books he published are 
lost u the shelves, the causes and fancies he 
espoused have long since been forgptten. At 

the time of his death in 1969 he had completed 

what he called "a book of related essays on 
subjects that were formative of the literary 
pmod known as the Twenties in America." If 
you arc wondering why it took a decade and a 
half for the book to see the light of day, the 
book itself provides the answer. 

"The Awakening Twenties" is actually two 
bodes, and that is its problem. The first is a 
j^th^ot 5 'ectivehistqty<rfU.S.literary and 
cultural life m the years immediately preceding 
the artistic explosion of the ’20s, and of the 
first fire years of the 70s themselves; there isa 
great deal of useful material, much of it serving 
to remind us of people who played important 
ides before vanishing from memory. 

The second is a memoir of sorts in which 
Munson attempts to demonstrate the high re- 
gard in which be was held by mhos more 
eminent than he, and in which he goes on at 
interminable length about his infatuation with 
the teachings of the mystic G. L Gurdjieff. 

In the first half Munson writes with evident 
and rather pleasing emotion about the coming 
erf peace in 1918 and, with it, the sense that the 
young had been freed to follow what they saw 
as their destiny; “They were conscious of 
themselves as a generation in revolt against the 
Genteel Tradition of American letters. They 
saw themselves as the young generation. Its 
James, the moulders of the future. They were 
aware that a new period was starting with 
them, and very soon they voiced this aware- 
ness. Just as there was ai 


a new age. “American society was wdl on the 
way from an agrarian to an urban society, and 
American industry was accelerating fra: the 
leap from the machine age to the power age 
that would take place dmmg World War F; it 
was inescapable that this time of change would 
produce a new art and a new literature. 

Among the prewar influences on this process 
Munson singles out several little magazines, 
notably Others. Seven Arts and The Soil, this 
last the creation of the foog-Eorgoitm Robert J. 
Coady, who “looked for an indigenous life, for 
an indigenous art, for the possibilities of an 
indigenous an." and whose influence on bet- 
ter-known publications of the '20s seems to 
have been significant. Munson pays his re- 
spects to Randolph Bourne, the editor and 
writer who called upon his generation to ex- 
plore the promise of America, and to Waldo 


thrillingly of a conception 
created by the young writers 


Ireland, a young Spain, so there was a young 
America emerame from the bankruptcy of 


WIZARD of ED 



man’s political hopes at Versailles and! 
inga revival in literature and the arts.” 

Munson is at pains to point out, though, (hit 
the revolution of the 70s did not emerge in full 
bloom but was the result of a shifting in the 
American artistic ground that can be traced to 
the Armory Show of 1913 in New York, at 
which the showing of Marcel Duchamp's 
“Nude Descending a Staircase” and other 
Modernist paintings announced the craning of 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


-rank, who “s 
of America to i 
and artists.* 

As the '20s begin. Munson writes with justi- 
fiable nostalgia about Greenwich Village —its 
cafes, its salons, its “revolution in manners and 
morals"— and with equally justifiable anger 
about the death of it as a cultural Latin Quar- 
ter. “succeeded by a quarter that is solidly 
bourgeois with its high- rent apartment build- 
ings and disagreeably commercial with its 
tourist attractions." He describes the Washing- 
ton Square Book Shop, “the Greenwich Villag- 
ers’ favorite shop for browsing and even fra 
purchasing books when the price could be 
afforded,^ and the path-finding magazines to 
be purchased there: The New Republic, The 
Nation, Freeman, Dial, Little Review, Vanity 
Fair, Modem School, Smart SeL 
There were also books, more and more of 
than issued by “some five or six young pub- 
lishers, who would ultimately rejuvenate the 
whole industry": these firms “welcomed the 
new r ealis ts, the new critical voices, the new 
poets — and thereby became partners in the 
creation of a period.* Id addition to the estab- 
lished firm of Scribner's, revitalized by Max- 
well Perkins, there woe new firms that quickly 
came to have an incalculable influence: Alfred 
A. Knopf, Boni & Liveright, B. W. Huebscfa, 
Harcourt, Brace & Howe. Munson accurately 
assesses their importance. 

At this moment, unfortunately, “The Awak- 
; Twenties" veers off into self-serving ] 
i reminiscence. A long chapter about ! 
Crane exists primarily to demonstrate Mun- 
son’s highly suspect ’ theory that the poet's 
sudden decline can be traced to a crisis follow- 


deed anaBB □ana 

□anno □□ 

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□ QDDQ 


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ing an emosure to Gurdjieff and his Institute 
for the Harmonious Development of Man. A 
chapter on Munson’s relationship with Robert 
Frost, such as it was, is pointless, and a chapter 
on his nonexistent but devoutly wished-fra 
relationship with Charlie Chaplin is embar- 
rassing. As for the chapter on Gurdjieff and his 
disciple A. R. Orage, its main effect is to leave 
one wondering how someone of Munson's in- 
telligence not merely coaid be attracted to tins 
twaddle as a young man but could remain 
dazzled by it as an old man. 

Jonathan YartSey is on the staff of The Wash- 
ington Post. 


Manuscript of Petrarch Poem 
Found in East German Library 

United Prat international 

BERLIN —A I4tb«ntury manuscript of a 
poem by Petrarch has been found in the Re- 
search Library of Gotha in East Germany. 

The offical news agency, ADN. said the 142- 
verse Latin manuscript, from the collection of 
the dukes of Sachsen -Gotha, recorded a poem 
that Petrarch declaimed in 1341. when he was 
given his poet's laurels in Rome. 


DRIPUT , 


TTT1 


MELFYS 


□H±] 



WHAT THE 
MILLIONAIRE 
LEFT. 


By Alan Tmsooct 

the diagramed deal, the 
y*J two no-trump was Ja- 
»by, showing a fit and asking 
the opener to show a singleton. 
When this proved to be in 
chibs, North look an optimis- 
tic shot at slam. 

Since most of the strength 
far South represented duplica- 
tion in the diamond Sint, the 
contract was a bad one. But the 
fates were on South's ride after 
the normal diamond lead. He 
look his two diamond winners, 
discarding hearts from the 


BRIDGE 


dummy, and led a dub to the 
queen. 

East won and shifted to the 
bean queen, bm it was too late. 
South won in dummy, ruffed a 
dub, ruffed a diamond and 
ruffed another dob. This es- 
tablished two club winners, 
and after trumps had been 
drawn the dubs took care of 
the bean losers in the dosed 
hand to make the slam. 


NORTH 

♦ A IC 7 ♦ 

O Alii 
© _ 

• 0-JTS4 

WEST EAST 

• 11 3 j ♦ 8 5 

42 j| | TKQ91 

«■ Q J 10 8 6 C 9743 

*10 8 3 2 * A K » 

SOUTH <D> 
ftQJItl 
O J 107 
4AKI2 
4>3 

Neuter site was vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

South 

Vest 

North 

East 

1 * 

Pees 

2 N.T. 

Pus 

3* 

Pass 

• A 

Pen 

Pen 

Pass 




West ted the rtlmnflnd queen. 


Now arrange the ebetod lattera to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above eartooa 


te nrnaniiii] 


Yesterday's 


EUROPE 


{Answers tomorrow) 

Jumtahn; KETCH SWISH DEBTOR IRONIC 
Answer. What the fisherman turned TV executive 
knew how to make-THE ■■NET' WORK 

WEATHER 




MtlMM 


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30 84 24 75 
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25 77 10 59 

30 M 17 54 
36 79 18 84 

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27 >1 12 54 
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pc -partly dowdy j r-ratn; ti whwrari; sw-sn ow; ti-enrmy, 

THURSDAY’S FORECAST — CHANNEL; Slightly atom. FRANKFURT: 
M*D H Rw'?"d B e? t FoJr.""T Jilfc 29--2l" 

(m— ^k*tSkvoT Te ™- 2S - 23 


World Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse July 24 

Closing prices m local ennweia unless otherwis e indicated. 


ABN 

ACF HottUtlO 

Aagon 

AKZO 

AhoM 

AMEV 

AT>om Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

BuehrmarmT 

CotandHIdg 

Eleevler-NOU 

FBfctor 

Gtat srocoda 

Hefneken 

Haoeavont 

KUM 

Nop men 

Nat Nodrfar 

NodUovd 

Oca Vender C 

PafclMaO 

Phllbas 

Robaco 

Redames 
RoHneo 


Ravel Dutch 
Unltever 
VOnOtnmeran 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


5D2xd 500 
■OX 238 
10OB0 99J D 
121 JO 120 

239 JO 238JVJ 

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waS % 

9150 93M 
»» 3SJ0 
U2 129 JD 
7240 71 

211 JO 210JO 
150J0 I50J0 
67.10 4&30 
t2M tSM 
48JH 48 
76J0 7550 
176 17650 
349J0 349 

6450 U 
4850 4870 

TUB 7450 
131 JO 13140 
49 JO 6950 
4550 4SJJ0 
194 1969 
350 341® 
29 29 JO 
240 240JSO 
213 21250 


IWKA 
Kntl + Sail 
Kar*lodT 

Kmrfhof 
Ktaecknor H-O 
KtaeCknarWark* 
Krann Stahl 
Unde 

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MAN 

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Muartcti Ruack 
Nlxdorf 
PKI 

Porsche 

Pmmat 

PWA 

RWE 

^Rhalnmetall 

bchertno 

siemens 

Thvsnn 

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[Welle 


AHPXBJ Oral Index : 219J0 
Prmees : 219.19 


ArtMd 

Befcnert 

Codturill 


EBES 

6o-Irk> 4M 
GBL 
Ceveert 
Hotiokan 
iRtorcem 
Kradletiiank 
Pvtnifino 
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Selina 
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CoTTtm stack Index : 231 «J1 
Praviem : 2313L6I 


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5710 5700 
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3260 3240 
2930 29» 
3725 3728 
1U0 1840 
4000 3940 
5470 5470 

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4525 4465 
3735 2700 
5020 4900 
1730 1731 
4820 4810 


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AJItoraVen 

Anana 

PA5F 

Bayer 

Bay Hvna Bank 
Bff£.VfcreffBbank 

SHF-Bank 

BMW 

Cafflrnarstxmk 
Cant Gam ml 

DalnHar-Bara 

Doauaca 

Dwtsche Babcock 
Oewtidie Bank 
Dresaner Bank 
GHh 

Heraenef 


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1400 MB 
36M0 36&90 
2MJ0 219 
214J0 219 

341 349 
398 409 

2315D 33230 
326 332 
41050 409 

220 2150 
1 45 14A70 
838K253 
364 367 
1525D155J9 
574^ 58260 
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312 31759 
277 292 

292JS 298 

233 23U0 
25950 240 

286 287 

6250 63 

11050 111 

487 4K50 
22150223J0 
168 168 
19250 194 

IMS 1940 
527 52650 
63150 61750 
1305 1320 
27050 271 

14250 MS 
17950 170 

293 293 

*«7*S 478 

33B3S4J0 
531 m 
11750 U6J0 
227ZZV50 
29450 303 

5IO 569 


Commerzbank Index : M8359 
Previous : HtSJt 


6k East Asia 
Oieuira Kona 
OUnaUebf 
Green Island 
Hang Sene Bank 
HendersoM 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Really A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shorn Bank 
HK Telephone 
HKYoumatel 
HK Wharf 

Hutch WhanvM 

Hyson 

wnetta 

J amine 
Jam) me Sec 
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Miramar Hotel 
HtawWarW 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Preps 
Stelux 

Swire Pa d l i e a 
T at Cheung 

WatiKwano 

Whedock A 
Wing On Co 
Wlnsar , 
WorUlnfl 

Hang Sena index; 

Previous : 1018$ 


MM 23 
T7JW 1U0 
14J0 JU0 
8M && 
OSS 4550 
2575 2J3S 
11 JO 1150 
855 US 
12 T2 
3750 37 

651 650 
755 755 

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190 190 
655 &70 

2450 27.10 
055 056 

035 035 

1250 1250 
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855 850 
39 38 

7J5 7JS 
2.125 2.125 
HI 1138 
2923 290 
26 263 

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091 090 
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125 125 
164553 


Mi 


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Anglo American 

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De Beers, 

Drislenlcin 

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240 840 

.2800 2930 
lino 17009 
1180 1225 
1200 1273 
4000 4400 

1020 1045 

4025 4350 
1410 1440 


GFSA 

Harmony 

HtveW Steel 
Kloof 


Prnestvvn 
Rush kit 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
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West Hakllrw 


Cmm Prev 

2850 3100 
2350 3375 

S» 5J5 

7000 7475 
1405 1500 
4490 4750 
1425 1680 
835 fiSfi 
3350 3300 
650 463 

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Ceanwslte Slack ledex ; IB8U8 
Prevtea* -. U1SJB 


AACora SI m SISH 

AiSM-Lvans 220 220 

Anglo Am Gold SStU, br 

ass Brtt Foods 210 21 Q 

An Dairies 134 134 

Barclays 379 • 377 


ELAT. 303 350 

B eecham 32S 323 

BICC 194 196 

BL 35 35 

BlueCVrclB 531 535 

BOC Group 366 267 

Bans 184 183 

Bawater Indus 313 279 

BP 511 SM 

BrftHomeSr 283 282 

Brit Telecom 1(2 1B3 

Brit Aerospace ,W m 

mm 205 201 

0TR 313 315 

Bunnoh 202 782 

cable Wlrotesf 530 525 

CodburvSdiw 145 145 

CMrter Cans ID 183 

CWnmencW 0 909. JIB 

Coni Gold 479 407 

Cnvtoutdm 137 139 

Doteefy 391. 393 

DeBoers* 540 si 

DHIUlen, 275 275 

Drifttanle fn CZlta 123 k< 

Finns ta ss 

FreeStGed 32M X25W 

cec 172 148 

Gen Accident 619 616 

GKN _ 30i 308 

(SIOMt 1211/641213/64 


Grand MM 
GRE 
Gutaness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Logoi General 
UevdsB«ik 
uxwbo 
Luas 

Mariu and So 
Metal Bom 
M idland Bank 
Nat West Book 
PondO 
p II kl notan 
Pleesey 
Prudential 
Rncal Elect 
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363 

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363 

684 

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392 

145 

288 

142 

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379 

677 

88 

271 

142 

642 


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Sakahurr 
Sears Holdings 


SW& 5102ft 
379 373 

• SS 

278 278 

429*4253/64 
539 537 

US ■ 640 

314 312 

*31% 93 



One 

Pra*. 


488 

488 

stc 

93 

92 

Std Chartered 

454 

459 


458 

456 

Tate and Lyle 

455 

455 


248 

248 

Thorn EMt 

324 

319 


327 

319 

Trnfaipar H» 

343 

343 

THF 

in 

rat 


2U 

209 

Unhewn;.! . 

10 45/4410 20732 

United B North 

1*4 

144 

Vickers . 

250 

290 

Wool worth 

41 

429 


F.T.3* Index: 99658 
Pravte — : 9Il.lt 
F.TAEJN Index : 13(630 
Prevleas : HUH 



Mil Current ■ 
IPrevkws : Uif 


: I5M 


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AlsHrnn AH. 
AvDassauB 
Bancairv 
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TOW. 

A*e#t Index : sous 
previous : aout 
CAC index : 21Ue 
Prevleas : 31750 


620 619 

290 2ML10 
1219 1199 
624 421 

515 511 

1820 1840 

811 790 

2»3 208© 
2149 2M0 
414 641 

546 511 

185 18750 
761 773 

654 450 

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53* SI 
2245 2345 
595 400 

2410 2420 
1540 1545 
H®1 1700 

2030 2004 
1148 1145 
1845 1855 
87 BS 
712 722 

716 717 

516 517 

341 362 

277 275 

298 22550 
1417 1431 
1540 1995 

Ml? I 
S» 2S5 
530 

208 207 


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242 

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wASasSdttfifc. ia&e&muiieik __ _ • 


EVFERiVATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 




■is 


*T Ur can ^ 


fe&s 

wags 

eJeSrS 1 ® 


Dodgers’ Hershiser Holds Pirates to 1 Hit 


Uft; 

rfifsS 

afSLS* 


Compiled by Our Stag [From Pbpatdta- 

LOS ANGELES — Otd Her- 
staser may betaking* page from 
the book of HaU-of-Famex WhKey 
Ford on tbe subject of near-no- 
hiuers. Ford bettered they were 
easy as long as there was no pres- 
. suze. “I once had a no-hitter go- 
ing” Ford said several years a 
“Bat some loose broke it up ; ‘ 




• Henfattg, who tamed in a one- 
hitter against the Padres on April 
26 and also has a two-hitter and 
three-hitter among bis 10 victories 
in 13 decisions tins season, strode 
ont seven. It was his tooth shutout 
and sixth complete game of the 
year. 

"The win against San Diego was 
much betterrhe said. “I had mini 
better staff. X might haw kepi tbe 
Pirates off balance with ray wfld- 


-- 

.X. y-^voaaa,^* 

X '-!■ u , -Ns* 

• Jr,wn «3 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

mghL Pittsbragh’s Jason Thomp- 
son's second-inning line drive fall- 
ing in joist in front of Los Angeles 
im fidder Pedro Guerrero. 

Considering the six walks Her- 
sinser issued, ir wasn’t the tidiest of 

one-hitters, but the right- hand er 
couldn't be faulted for Ms tuning: 
The 6-0 victory, coupled with San 
Diegp's loss to Chicago, extended 
the Dodgers' lead to Itt games in 
die National League’s Western Di- 
vision. 


The Dodgers gave him a0 the 
runs he needed oy scoring three 
tunes in the fourth ag ainst Sick 
ReuscbeL Steve Sax had atwtHWt, 
two-run single and Hershiser plat- 
ed Sax with 8 angle of his own. 
Guerrero, Greg Brock and Mike 
Sciosda also bad run-scoring hits; 
Ken Landreanx had three hits aod 
scored twice. 

Hershiser is hardly shy on the 
subject of no-bitiera. “Every time I 
walk out to the mound 2 


first batter and every other one 
after that” 

“He’s got mod stuff, that’s all 
there is to U, said Thompson. “I 
hit a fastbalL He nms bis fastball 
away. And he’sgot a good sinker— 
it's like hitting a bri<X” 

CdM 8, Padres 1: In San Diego, 
Rick Sutcliffe pitched seven 
inning s &nd Ryne 

four hits and scared twice as 
ao handed the Padres that third 
straight defeat Sutcliffe, the 1984 
Cy Young Award winner, had been 
restored to active duty earlier in (he 
70. the 


day after bring on 
abled list He allowed 


15-day dis- 
rix hits, 
walked one and strode out four. 

Reds 4, Mefs te In New York, 
Tom Browning pitched Ms second 
shutout and tbnd complete game 
of the year and Dave Parker hit Ms 
200th career homer, a two-nra shot 
as CmcinnaJi stilled the Mets. A 
nra-scoring double gave Pete Rose 
a career total of 4,159 hits, tearing 
him 33 shy of Ty Cobb’s all-time 
i 4J“ 


t hink 

feet game,” he _ 

retiring the record of 4,191. 


Expos 4, Braves 2: In Montreal, 
Tub WaUacb’s fiure-ran first-in- 
ning double propelled the Expos 
past Atlanta. Jeff Reardon, in relief 
of Joe Hesketh, recorded Ms major 
league-leading 24th save by pitch- 
ing 1% perfect innings. The losers’ 
Dale Morphy hit his 25 th homer of 
die year, drove in Ms 74th run and 
scored his 72d; Murphy leads the 
league in all three categories. 

Ptflfes 12, Astro* 6: In Philadel- 
phia, Mike Schmidt honored and 
drove in three runs, and Bo Diaz hit 
his first two home runs of the year 
to pace the Phillies* rout of Hous- 
ton. Jerry JCoosman worked SVi in- 
nings in picking up his 221st vic- 
tory lifetime. 

Canfinafc 6, Giants 3: In San 
Francisco, Danefl Porter drove in 
two runs with a homer and a bases- 
loaded walk tobdpSL Louis past 
the Giants. Winner Danny Cox 
went the route for the eighth time 

this 

Rangers 8, Indians 4: In the 
American League, in Arlington, 



Women Beginning to Blend In 
With the Globetrotters’ Weave 


..... 

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As wnpre Eric Gregg made dear,Met cafthor Gary Carter tfidritrea|y have to Btafingerto get moot cal agpiast Dave Coooepdta. 


Ore! Hershiser 

Texas, rookie center Crider Oddibe 
McDowell became tbe first player 
in the franchise’s 14-year history to 
hit for the cycle in helping Texas 
down Gevdaod. McDowdL a 1984 
Olympian and the 1984 U.S. ama- 
teur player of the year, bad two 
angles, a double, a triple, a home 
run and drove in three runs. He 
also has right consecutive hits, ty- 
ing the dub record set by Rioo 
Cartyin 1973. 

Angels 2, Brewers (h In Milwau- 
kee, Brian Downing homered and 
Rod Carew had three hits, includ- 
ing an RBI angle, as California 
increased its Western Division lead 
to 6 Vi games. Kirk McCaskill 
pitched his first major-league shut- 
out. 

Blue Jays 4, Mariners Z* In To- 
ronto, Doyle Alexander strode out 
a career-high 11 and Damaso Gar- 
da’s two-tun double capped a 
threo-nm eighth that put the Blue 
Jays past Seattle. 

Red Sox 3, A% 2: In Boston, 
Mike Eg«w ar>H Rich Gedman hit 

btck.-10-blCk tj^wrwi - fnnfng hnny » 

nms and Broce Hnrst, walking one 
and striking out 11, recorded his 
fifth straight victory . 

White SoxS. TSgera 3: In Chica- 
go, Britt Burns's suing of scoreless 
mnings ended at 19ft, bin he struck 
out 11 and scattered six hits to lead 
the White Sox past Detroit 
■ Royah 5, Yankees Z* In Kansas 
. City. Missouri, Tun Sundberg had 
- three RBb and Dane Iorg doubled, 
tripled, drove in a run and scored 
un p ih er to pace tbe Royals’ second 
straight defeat of New York. 

Twins 5, Orioles 2i In Minne- 
apolis, Gariy Gaetti, Kent Hxbek 
and Tam Bronansky drove in first- 
inning runs, »nd Mi nne so ta hung 
on to beat Baltimore: The Orioles 
have lost six of their last eight 
games. (AT, UPI) 


By Barry Jacobs 

A tew York Timet Service 

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina — Gradually, fit- 
fully, the three women moving near the top of the key 
mastered the basics of the figure-8 weave 

Soon they were floating smoothly before Coach 
Laity (Gator) Rivera, stationed by the foul line. and. 
to and behold, as he interspersed passing the basket- 
ball with making it undulate around his body to the 
strains of Brother Bones's version of “Sweet Georgia 
Brown,” a bit of Harlem Globetrotter magic material- 
ized in the steamy Charlotte Coliseum. 

Watching and awaiting their turns to Uy the rou- 
tine, IS otha women cheered and applauded. 

Riven said the weave, a warm-up drill, is “the 
rhythm section, the area that sets the tempo” for tbe 
Globetrotters’ ballhandling wizardry and comic flair, 
which annually attract \2 million customers to arenas 
around the world. 

But business has been suffering recently. Some of 
die exhibition team’s comic sets have grown stale, 
according to the the team’s president, Paul Duma. 
Meanwhile, more and mere professional and college 
players display dazzling dexterity, diluting the Globe- 
trotters' appeal. “If we had continued in the same 
fashion,” oud Dwyea, “we probably would have been 
out of business in a few years.” 

Then came the 1984 Olympics and a gold medal for 
the U.S. women’s basketball team. After taking over 
management of the Globetrotters earlier this year, 
Duryea set out to add ai least one woman to the team. 

After the Charlotte tryout, which ended Wednes- 
day, six to qghi women will be invited to attend the 
Globetrotter veteran's camp beginning. Sept 30. 
There, two women will probably be selected to become 
Trotters. Tbe show’s 60th season begins 17 days later 
in Brisbane, Australia. 

Q 

Rivers, the player-coach, is seeking women who are 
skilled perimeter players with good hands and quick 
reflexes. *Tve seen some girls who are going to rive 
our guys fits,” said Rivers after one day’s panhandling 
drills full-court scrimmages. 

Tbe first-year coach admitted surprise at the inten- 
sity and rough play, but guard Sandra Hodge said that 
was nothing new. In fact, die said, such ignorance d 
women’s play underlines the importance of the Globe- 
trotter opportunity. 

“I think having a woman on the team could be a big 
thing — the recognition we get now is really poor, 
said Hodge, who averaged 26.7 points a game at the 
University of New Orleans, the highest career average 
in women’s National Collegiate Athletic Association 
history, and played professionally in Sweden last year. 

“You have so many women who finish allege who are 

really good but have no place logo in this country.” 

Recognition was suitably plentiful at the tryout 
sessions m Charlotte Before and after each two-hour 
workout, and during brief rest breaks, reporters 
swanned around Rivera and the more renowned wom- 
en, such as the Olympic captain Lynetle Woodard and 
Pam and Paula McGee; who were two-time NCAA 
champions at Southern CaL 

Early speculation bad (he McGee twins and Woo- 
dard as favorites to make the Globetrotters, but (be 
twins’ strength is playing near the basket, where men 
would be likely to overpower them. 

Woodard, on the othri hand, seems well suited for 
the team’s needs. A 5-foot- 1 1-inch (1.77-metcr) guard, 
she’s the cousin of recently retired Globetrotter Hu- 
bert (Geese) Ausbie and already knows many of the 


team’s routines. And apart from her playing skills, she 
has a big smile and an easy charm —“that little shot of 
charisma” Duryea says lie's looking for. 

Others who have Impressed are Hodge, a flashy, 
slender shooting whiz, and the stocky, aggressive play- 
nuker Joyce ^ Walker, a three-time aD -America at Loui- 
siana Siatefrom 19S1 to 19S4. 

“This is like a dream to me,” said North Carolina 
Stale’s Linda Page, echoing a constant theme among 
the women during the tryouts. Said Woodard: “l‘m in 
basketball heaven.” 

But once they make the team, women can expect 
less dreamlike conditions. The State Department has 
warned Duryea that female players may be barred 
from the court when the overseas tour reaches Saudi 
Arabia, and perhaps other Middle Eastern countries. 

Then too there will be the burden of representing 
women’s basketball, the glare of public scrutiny and 
long days of travel in a male-dominated entourage. 



Iha^yMTawftaGnki 

Lynette Woodard: Tm in basfaediag heaven.’ 


■Lw cum 

.• '.rax 
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■- ■»-?« 
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Marino Seeking Fatter Contract SPORTS BRIEFS 


SCOREBOARD 


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By Michael Janofsky 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Dan Marino, 
the Miami Dolphin quarterback, 
reluctantly began training camp 
this week. Manno wants a new con- 
tract, something Joe Robbie, the 
team’s owner, bad promised him in 

NFL TRAINING NOTES 

January, during the week before 
the National Football League's Su- 
per Bowl XDC 

But so far, Robbie has not en- 
gaged Marino's attorney, Marvin 
Danefl, in any substantive negoti- 
ations. Marino had considered 
staying out of camp, but agreed last 
weekend to report — with the un- 
derstanding that Robbie would 
meet with Demoff this week. 

As a rookie in 1983, Marino 
signed a four-year contract, worth 
approximately $2 million. He is 
looking tor a package that would 
pay him about the same as Joe 
Montana, the quarterback of the 
San Francisco 49ers, who makes in 
excess of $1.1 motion a year. 

□ 

Coach Hugh Campbell of the 
Houston Oflffs may find the pres- 
sure to turn things around a tittle 


more acute this season. Tbe OQers, ed about the wide receiver Jerry 
who have endured four stratgbt los- Ricej their No. 1 pick from Missis- 
ing seasons with a combinedrecord sunn Valley State. At 6-foot-2 and 
of 13-44, have had more draft picks 208 pounds 0-87 metes, 9434 Iri- 
(30) in the first five rounds of the lognuasl Rice owns co have the 
last four drafts than any other team size and strength to go over the 
in the NFL. Twenty-eight of those middle, a route sddomnm by San 
players are on the training cany Francisco 


roster; the other two were used in 
trades that brought in the ru n ning 
back Butch Woolf oik from the Gi- 
ants and the center Jim Romano 
from the Los Angeles Raiders. Of 
the 56 players who were on the 
Oiler roster in 1980, 42 are no long- 
er in fombalL 

a 

The Los Angeles Rams made out 
well in their recent trade with Buf- 
falo. Vince Ferragamo, the quarter- 
back they sent to the Bills, bad 
become nothing more than an ap- 
pendage for them. In Tony Hunter, 
the Bills’ first-round draft choice of 
1983, the Rams get the most com- 
plete tight end they’ve Jtod sinoe 

in 1983. The only caveat as far as 
Hunter is concerned is Ms health. A 
had back has limited biro to part- 
time status in each of his two NFL 
seasons. 

□ 

After watching him work out in 
informal drills, the 49ers are exrit- 


1 ji ^ 


Xfi* 5 



receivers other than 
Dwight Cade “When we drafted 
Dwight,” said KB Walsh, the coa- 
ch, Tie had caught so methi n g tike 
12 halls in his senior year. The great 
tiring about Jerry is that he caugh t 
more than 130passes in iris senior 
year.” Rice wflf probably start the 
season as the third receiver, behind 
Clark and Freddie Solomon. 

a 

With mom NFL camps open, the 
pace of rookie signing is increas- 
ing, with the exception of those 
drafted on the first round. Only 11 
have signed, and several general 

manager s have pointed to the con- 
tract tbe linebacker Fmawnrf King 
of Alabama sign«l with Cincinna ti 
as a reason Ring was the 25th 
player taken on the first round and 
oneof the earliest to agn. Yet in ihe 
view of many agents, he agreed to 
terms far betow what he might have 
redeved had he waited. 

“What's happening,” one gener- 
al manager ci-M, “is that many 
agents with unsigned No. Is picked 
ahead of King are afraid to sign for 
less. That’s what’s balding up the 
round.” King signed a four-year 
contract, with base salaries of 
$125,000. $150,000, $175,000 and 
$225,000 and a signing boons of 
$500,000. Overall, 214 of the 336 
players drafted had signed through 
Monday. 

Q • 

The possibility that Anthony 
Cartsx of the Oakland Invaders 
might join the Miami Dotehms 
staggers the imagination. Attor- 
neys for Carter are investigating 
howto free temirom his obligation 
to the United States Football 
League team. He was a Dolphin 
draft choice in 1983; Carter, Mark 
Duper and Mari: Gaytan are all 
abort tbe grrnr. size, under 5-10, 



Baseball 


Tuesday’s Major League line Scores 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

MIUMMH 1 
» • 

Co* ona Porlar; Krakow. Oowl» <t>. Minton 
U). Jaflcaat (TLBlua C*J aid BrM r.W— Cn, 
124. L— Krvkew. 44. HR— Si. Ux*v Porter 
13). 

CladanaM in mite— 4 V • 

Moron «m m mo— • s i 

Brmvnlnom) BUordollo; Dm Una, Sick t*>, 
Gorman <f) and Carter. W— Brwrtno. M. 
L— Carlton. )ML HR— CtoelnnoiL Porttar 
tin. 

on 3 m mb — 1 1) i 

1U M3 #1*— 13 U • 
Kiwpavr. Macfcton «>. MnJhb l«, Haeth- 
coefc 111 and Boltov; KoannonOiDdrai It), 
ftvdur (»> arm Olaz. W—Knnman. 5-2 L— 
Kjwopar.M. HRs— Houston, DOVH3 ISl.Tnon 
12). PMtadotoMa Schmidt IW. Diaz 3 12). 

IN HI M-a 7 1 
t * 


Smith. Comp (7) and Corano; Hoskotte 
Burks (4|, Rsordan (B) and FUiaonild. Vr— 
Hoskotn. w. Lr-sniltti.44. Su— ^ RoaraoD IM). 
HR— Atlanta. Murohy (35). 

B30-51J • 
1H— 1 7 1 
SutdHte. MorfcBtti (*) and Davtt; Howklu, 
Stoddard (ol.vroina m and Kamsdv. Bocnv 
m.W-SutcnHa.S-7. L HawMiM.ta-3.HW— 
Sen Dtooa McRsynokte (11). 

1 ■ 
M • 

Rnnchol. Scurry (S). Winn (I) and Psna; 
Horohtoor and Scteda W-HanhlMr. 124- 
L— RouicftoCM. 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Ehft Otviclaa 


The record-setting yearling son of Nijinsky BL 


Coh Sets $ 13 . 1 -MiDion Auction Mark 


Toronto 

W 

57 

L 

37 

PCI. 

dot 

GB 

New York 

S7 

39 

•571 

3Vj 

Detroit 

40 

42 

SO 



49 

44 

SB 

7V* 

Bottfmore 

44 

45 

SOS 

9 » 

Mfwoukee 

44 

54 

M < 

15 

Cfevgfand 

» 

a 

J1S 

77 

CoMornla 

West DMstoe 

55 

a 

J91 


Chtcago 

47 

41 

so 

6te 

Karaos City 

41 

44 

SB 

6W 

Oakland 

44 

45 

516 

7 

Seattle 

44 

49 

xn 

11 

MtonesoM 

43 

4fl 

jen 

11 

Texas 

37 

57 

594 

149) 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Dhrtsloa 

W L 

SL Louis 55 M 

Pet. 

MU 

GB 

New York 

53 

39 

576 

2te 

Montreal 

XI 

41 

564 

3Vi 

Chicago 

49 

41 

533 

6W 

PtittaattoWa 

41 

51 

-444 

14W 

Pittsburgh 

3) 

so 

J41 

24 

Lob Angelas 

West Division 

a 

39 

571 

__ 

San Dtaao 

52 

42 

55) 

lte 

Cincinnati 

44 

43 

527 

4 

Hoasten 

44 

so 

AM 

9te 

Alton to 

4) 

51 

.440 

1IV5 

San Francisoo 35 

99 

zn 

uv> 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
SOMHO m M) 000-1 B 0 

Toronto M MB 03x— « 4 0 

Moor*, Vande Bern IS). Norm tl) and Kaar- 
nay; Ateoandor.CauaUI l«) and WWtt. Alton- 
mm (0). W— Alexander. 04. L— Moore, W 
Sv— Caudill 031. HR— SonttlA Calaaron (71. 

•10 0M m - 2 7 t 
•30 Ml ItB ft It | 
LanatorauMcGatly {*), Howell (Si and Tert- 
latan; Hum ond Gedmon. W-Hujl 74. L— 
Looaterd. #4. HRo-OokHw* Tafttotan «l. 


Bonan. EaUar (Ml. Gedman It). 

0 • 

5 l 

McCaekM and Boone; Darwin and Moore. 
WMMeCBMRLM. L— Oorwto.4-11. MR— OR. 
Horn la. Downing It). 

now YorR no mb tot— a I t 

Kama city tit ou BJ«-5 U t 

Whlieaa FWw (t). Bawl »). RteneW (II 
and Haney; Sabarhooen. QuHondernr (0) 
and Sundpora-te— S ofcerhaoervll-S. L— WWV 
m, W. HR— New York. Pagllanilo (I). 
Baltimore Ml Ml ltt-3 0 • 

MlaeaeM 3M 101 d»-s 0 • 

McGregor. Dixon 17) and Roytoro: Butch- 
er, Davit f»| and Ladner. W— Botetwr, 74. 
L— McGregor. U. 5v— Oavli l Ml. HR*— Bal- 
Hmon. Sheet* |1«. MtonmolA Loodnw 14). 
Detroit MMtM— 1 4 3 

Chicago M0 tt «*— 5 I • 

Tom end Cool uio. AAefvIn (B); Bums and 
Hill 1 V-Bura. 11-4. L— 7anona *-HX HR*- 
Detrott. Evgns ()•). Sanchez (41. 

Ctevelend Ml W* RM 4 0 

Texas 1M tot tox-t 13 l 

HMlon. Barkler Ml. Easterly Ml. Waddell 
(4) ana Banda. wiDord (4); Hough, Razotna 
(4) and Brummer. w— Houan. 0-«l L— Hea- 
ton. S-13. Sv— Razema (41. HRs— -Cleveland. 
VUfcovtch (31. Tenj*. McOawell (71. 



BASEBALL 


LEXINGTON, Kentucky (AP) — A sou of NHinslw II was sold for 
$13.1 million at the Keeneland y carting sales here Tuesday night, shatter- 
inethe world record fear a thoroughbred bone sold at public auction. 

The bay colt, owned by Warner Jones Jr, was purchased by BBA- 
England on behalf of Robot Sangster, the English soccer-pool magnate 
Tbe previous record, $10i2 million, was paid in 1983 by Saugster’s Aston 
Upthorpe Stud for a colt by 1964 Kentucky Debry winner Northern 
Dancer out of the mare My Bupers. 

The record-setter’s ifam is My Qianner, making him a half-brother to 
Tipple Grown winner Seattle Sew. Nyksky n, also a son of Northern 
DaiK», is a former Emcpean horse of the year and the sire of more than Tour Leaders 
80 stakes winners, among them Golden Fleece, the champion 3-y ear-old 
in England and Ireland. . 


Tennis 


m <) ad, lus Miami speed Throw IRS Seizes Property of NFL’s Dorsett 

ni Nut the wise old receiver * J 




RdtKtent Dorian quarterbadr Mama, at practice on Tuesday. 


in Nat Moore, ibe wise old receiver 
who had one of Ms best yean ever 
last season, and the Dobxrin® have 
die capability of pring formations 
with four wide receivers and no 
tight ends. Most defenses won’t 
have enough agile backs to cover all 
of them at once. 

□ 

.Jack Reynolds, die made line- 
backer who retired from the 49os 
after 15 NFL seasons, has agreed to 
return to (be dub as a training- 
camp coach — Pat SnQivan, die 
New Eng land Patriot general man- 
ager, gives Gerard Phelan, the for- 
mer Boston CoOege receiver and a 
fourth-round draft pick, a good 
chance to makE the crab. “Tbe coa- 
ch likes hun," Sullivan said, refer- 
ring to Raymond Berry, "because 
he reminds Mm of Mmseff.” In his 
playing days with the Baltimore 
Colts, Berry was a favorite receiver 
of John Unites. 


DALLAS (AP) — Two houses belonging to Dallas Cowboy running 
back Tony Dorsett were seized Tuesday night in an effort to collect more 
than $400,000 in back taxes, according to the Internal Revenue Service. 

The bouses could be sold within 30 days if tax debts allegedly owed for 
1979, 1980 and 1983 are not satisfied, aid Marlene Gaysek. an IRS 
spokeswoman. She said tbe sales would satisfy the IRS liabilities, but that 
the National Football League player h as 180 days from tbe date of any 

sate to pay the taxes and reclaim his properly. . M _ 

Apart from the tax Setts, Dorsett was namedm a ovil Jawsral filed June 
25 by Fust Gty Bank of Richardson (TecasX alleging that he had failed 
to pay a $175,000 unsecured note signed in March. State district court re- 
cords indicated Dorsett had not responded to tbe suit as of late Tuesday. 

Missing Pitcher Suspended by Braves 

ATLANTA (AP) — The Atlanta Braves have suspended without pay 
pitcher Pascual P e r ez, who has been missing since Sunday, when he 
worked ineffectively against the Mets in New Yorit- The team’s efforts to 
locate him have been unavailing. . .. 

’ Pferez, who has been on the disabled list twice this season war an ailing 
right shonider, has a 1-8 record and an e&med-nm average of 652; he has 
a one-year contract for a reported $450,000. In 1984 he was 14-8 after 
missing spring Training and the first month of the season because he had 
been jailed on drug charges in his native Dominican Republic. 


MEM 

Eandan 

I, jorm McEnroe, S61USZ. X Ivon Lendl. 
SSS7 £33. X Mail WUondor. U14A37. 4. Jimmy 
Connor* SI7M91. 5, Berts Bm*v, BK737. 4, 
Tim Montfte. 054.174. 7. Andert Jerrvd. 
tUXISk a T om0 Sm id, B17J47. X MUOSXnr 
Medr, 3BUS7. W. K4vln Currm. S19XC2. 

ATE Cliuinlor roiUni 

VJoha McEnroe,l«9m POtatxa. Ivw LandL 
13US.& Mote wnanoor. 10R4I. < Jimmy Con. 
narx IttSi. X Kevin Curran. MX>. & Andon 
Jorrycfc 6LH 7, Artera Oomez. turn. X Yan- 
nick Noate SUX», JoaWm NvNrmn. 51 JO. 10. 
Bark Becker, 5U7. 

Grand PrixPoM* 

1. Jetm McEnroe. US. X Mets WUaoder, 
L7JCL z fvart Lendl, 1^00. 4. Jimmy Connor* 
1AQX X Boris aedur. U0B. A Tatmldc Noah. 
MKL 7. Mltactav Mecir, I.IU X Anders Jar. 
ryd. TJB73. 0, Kevin Curran UW, IX Thn 
MaraUn Knx 

WOMEN 


NEW YORK— RncttvDled Many BvsTrum. 
BHcltor.OotkoAa<IOganl|Ra{mu4sin.nltdtor. 
to Columbus el tbe Internal lonol League. 

TEXAS— Acquiraa JeH Rusmu. otteflor. 
tram CMcIrmatLeemptetlnB me July 19trodo 
tor Buddy BotL Assigned Russell loOUanoma 
City at the American Asocial Urn. 

Notional League 

ATLANTA— Susuomted Pascuoi Peru, 
ottenor. Indoflnitety wWiout oov. 

CINCINNATI — Placed Joe Price, oltchor. 
me 15-dov tfHahtod list, ond moved Frank 
Pastor*- pitcher. Horn the 15 to 71 -Oov <fls- 
abtod list Recoiled Andy McGamoon. oltcn- 
•r, from Denver Mine American Ajuoclalksv 
BASKETBALL 

Mattonao Basketball Anoctotiu 

DENVER— cm Kenny Brown and Lenny 
Drtmer.giiorM Joe Car/aOlnB- Russell Cross. 
Mark Longkoma end Eddie Smith, forwards. 

MILWAUKEE— Stoned Eocene McDowell 
and Quentin Anderson, forwards. Cozed 
McOumoM Ray Knight, centers ond Mario 
Elio, ouard. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football Loagee 

ATLANTA— Stoned Mike Gann, defensive 
and. 

BUFFALO — Sioaed Chris Bufkeft wide re- 
ceiver. to a series of one-voar contraclv 
WSfyodCnUo HWie, wfeto receiver. Oaimed 
Jim WaWovwMerecofver, (ram wahmra. An- 
nounced im Kevin Lamar, center, m left 
OOIW. 

DALLAS— Cut Sieve jodison, Greg Petty 
and Rod RudeL wide reeeiven: Lance West. 
Joe Ellis ana Dev Id DeJ smelt, guards; Kent 
Untonmamu Hghl end, and Brent Burks. Dan- 
ny Buaard and Mike Cnrmody, tackles, 

DETROIT— Stoned Kevin Glover, center. 

I NDIANAPOUS— Announced that Tim 
Whsftlngton^efenstaMcfciiMtettNMtom 
Acaalrad Eddie McGill. ItoW end. from St. 
Louts ter on undisclosed draft choice, 

LA. RAIDERS— Sienod receiver Jessie 
Hester to a five-year contract. 

NEW ENGLAND— Signed Jim Bowman, 
defensive back, to a tour-year oontroa. 

NEW ORLEANS— Stoned DavU Carter, 


H oward Burch, running bock, ond Ron Wat- 
son# ftotawitvt 

N.V. JETS — Sinned Brian Lull, defensive 
tackle, and Matt Monaer. linebacker. 

PHILADELPHIA— Slaned Dwav(le JUes 
ond Grog waiters, llnobodign. Ksa Reeves 
end Kevin AUen. offensive linemen. 

ST. LOUIS— Stoned Rich Dowsoa. center. 
Waived Aten D owers and John walker, twi- 
ning Docks. 

SAN FRANCI SCO-Stoned Jerry Rite, 
wide receiver. Rlckev Moore. tuUDock. ond 
Scot! Barry, auanerbeck. 


U.Se Horse Racing 


THOROUGHBREDS 

Jockeys 


J- 

■d 

at 

■y 

lb 

J. 

s. 

il 

T- 

1- 

It 

itf 

IT 

a 

e 

n 

> 

c 


N.V. GIANTS— Announced that Jock Oil- 
ver.oHmtvu Hneirwahos left camp. Wolwed 


I# Marling NoyraMtovo, SW4570. X Chris 
Evert Uovd. 34SZM*. X Hang MandUkowi 
BMM71 A Helena Suka«te S54IJT2. 5. P am 
Shrivor. S2UAR. 4. Ctaudle KOMg-KmcA. 
finm X am Gorrtson, SMZJK. a Kaffir 
Jordon, st4V4L0. ElixuMti Smvlle, SOim 
10- Kaitiv Wnaia, 020311 

Sreud Prtk Patels 

1. Chris Even Lievd. urazManina Navra. 
titaw, 1300. 3. Manveio Mafewa 730. 4. Pam 
Shrlvar. OfIL S. Zina Garrison. 431 4, CtoudlD 
KohrieHCDscfv4)a 7, Gabriele SctooftoLSia & 
Steffi Graf. mo. «.K 0 «hv Rinridi.490L 10, San- 
dra CoecftW. 457. 


U.S. Auto Racing 


Mounts 

1st 

2nd 

Purses 

Ptnoov 

783 

165 

129 

SA04U26 

McCarron 

Ml 

155 

143 

MJ94J16 

votoseuez 

701 

119 

113 

S4J72J92 

Stovsra 

974 

134 

131 

UM4740 

Cordero 

SIB 

1D4 

77 

S4.H7.040 

Day 

046 

304 

140 

53.931,441 

Detnnaussaye 

731 

109 

103 

SX79LM5 

NUgllore 

•a 

ia 

110 

0714407 

aim toy 

11)4 

223 

Ml 

12.941,491 

Shoemaker 

400 S3 
Trounrs 

61 

S2J92M0 

Starts 

1st 

2nd 

Purses 

Lukas 

583 

129 

to 

UWM2 

Whitt tnetwm 

762 

43 

43 

5189X573 

Gombefotl 

57 

9 

6 

S24AH4 

Mott 

349 

74 

56 

S1J9&4I9 

LBarrara 

242 

36 

41 

51.741495 

von Berg 

•44 

114 

136 

S1J22E39 

Frenkel 

147 

41 

33 

SI .649430 

Steohens 

136 

n 

32 

S1A2149 

Junes 

253 

0 

43 

SIAlQflll 

Brothers 

336 IM 
Harm 

57 

S1J74.I74 


Siam 1st 2nd Purees 

Soertd A Buck 

5 

4 

0 

0390524 

Talk's Prespvd 

7 

4 

0 

59I7JU0 

Gralntan 

7 

3 

4 

5791.9® . 

Creme Fraiaie 

9 

3 

5 

*730539 • 

Imp Society 

ID 

7 

2 

S65U53 

Precision 1st 

7 

3 

3 

S66US0 

Mom's Cammndr 

7 

6 

I 

151&538 

Proud Tram 

I 

4 

2 

4501977 

Oners crown 

4 

3 

1 

umm , 

Fran's valentine 

6 

5 

8 

5053165 


NASCAR EARNINGS 

l. Bill Elliott, 575X411 2, Darrell WoJirln 
SM1A48. X Harry Gam. VIMTi A Terry Lo- 
Oonte. 445X201 S Geo « Badlne. XXOjffS. & 
Ricky Rudd. B7U00, 7, Da» E arntta n tt . 
S275JKL 4, Noil flenooff, 074730. 9. Bobby 
AiHsan. tznzXL n. Lake Speed. 519W2S 
GRAND NATIONAL POINTS 
1, Bill Elliott. 24M.X Darrell WaUrlB,237S.l 
GeoH Boaiiw. 2 ». 4 Neil Barnett. 2240. X 
RJdty Rudd. 233). A Terry Loaonte. 2221 7, 
Kyle Patty. 7107. X Harry Ganl.2144. V. Bobby 
Allison, 214ft la Lake Speed. 1041 


5TANDABDBREDS 
Driver Bantings 

1. William O'Donnell, SWUM. Z John 
CamaaeU. oanJOL X Michel Lachance, 
synwt 4, BW1 Webster. SUQM. 4 waiter 
Cose Jr. SiJ«7.14$. 4. Carmine AJMatteUa, 
11310,171. 7. William Cilmaur. MJiftML a. 
Roy Rem man, SIJ4U074. 9, Eddie Dates. 
WJHS9& IX John Patterson Jr. si jnail 
Hone Earn Ings 

1. On the Road Agoin, S43i3«. x Mark Sis. 

3300^9. X Staff Dimeter, 5342051. 4, Tuff 
Cboi«e, SSiMtX S, Master Willie. 5333m X 
Mortlm's Prido, 5310330, 7. Falcon Sister. 
S27X178. X Workaholic. B4X13S. 9. Pershing 
Swore, 322X4I& IX George S, (222430, 


_ . , __ *• , 









F 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1985 


'Beyond Hatred’: A Japanese View of Hiroshima 


By Christine Chapman 

T OKYO — “We w era beyond 
haired* We didn't /«/ any- 
more. I believed we were com- 
pletely destroyed," Masuji Ibuse 
said of the bombing of Hiroshima. 
“It seemed so hopeless.” 

Ibuse is the author Of the novel 
“Kuroi Arne" (“Black Rain"), a 
20th-century masterpiece about 
the survivors of Hiro shima. The 
English novelist C P. Snow once 
said: “Here is a novel by an elder- 
ly Japanese writer which turns 
into a majw work of art. ... I 
don’t like throwing words like 
‘masterpiece’ about, but if! were 
thinking of, say, 10 novels of high 
class written in the last 25 years. I 
think I should include this one." 

At 87, Ibuse is a revered sensei, 
a master, of Japanese literature. 
He has been writing novels, short 
stories, poetry and essays for more 
than 65 years. For his stories of 
rural Japanese, he is loved and 
honored by his countrymen. For 
“Black Ram,” published in 1965, 
he is acclaimed throughout the 
world Translated into at least a 
dozen languages, “Black Rain” 
evokes the moments and days im- 
mediately following the dropping 
of the atomic bomb on Hiroshi- 
ma, reconstructing how the people 
reacted. Ibuse re-creates the expe- 
riences of the Stdznma family, and 
their friends and neighbors who 
lived in or near the city, using 
diaries that Clash back to scenes of 
ordinary life and extraordinary 

Robert Jay lifton, the Ameri- 
can psychiatrist who wrote the 
1967 study of atomic bomb vic- 
tims, “Death in Life: Survivors of 
Hiroshima,” called “Black Rain" 
“a highly superior novel by a dis- 
tinguished writer ” While Lifton 
qualified its impact for him be- 
cause of certain “scientific and 
medical inaccuracies," he praised 
the power of its “psychic truths” 
about “the pained wisdom of the 
20th-century survivor.” 

A survivor is What Ibuse is — of 
the great earthquake of 1923, 
when he sat, badly frightened, in a 
Geld as Tokyo was destroyed; of a 
wartime government assignment 
as an unwilling reporter in South- 
east Asia; of Anxnican air raids 
on Japan. Upon returning to To- 
kyo from Singapore in 1942, Ibuse 

Art Buchwald is on vacation. 


left for western Japan, where he 
was burned out twice by B-29 
raids on Kofu and Fukuyama. In 
the wry, detached tone lie uses in 
“Black Rain,” he commented: “In 
Kofu the American army was a 
great success, not so good in Fu- 
kuyama.” 

Ibuse calls Fukuyama, 100 
miles (160 kilometers) from Hiro- 
shima, his hometown. He was 
bom Feb. 15. 1898, in a village in 
Hiroshima prefecture, the second 
son of landowning farmers. Al- 
though he has spent most of his 
life in Tokyo, where be went in 
1917 to enter university. Ibuse was 
in Fukuyama on Aug. 6, 1945, 
when refugees from Hiroshima ar- 
rived in tracks escaping from the 
devastated city. Horrified by thdr 
condition, Ibuse wrote a short sto- 
ry about them in 1951, then 
“Black Rain," whose descriptions 
of victims alive and dead reveal 
what he saw in Fukuyama. 

“I didn't want to write about it 
right after the war,” he said at his 
home in Tokyo. He had just fin- ’ 
idled the nap he sometimes take s 
in the afternoon if he gets up early 
in the morning, to work chi a new 
edition of his collected writings. 
“Only gradually did I begin it, 
with a story titled The Marriage 
of My Niece.’ Then I began to 
think of writing more details 
about the bomb and the people." 

in the novel, the hoped-for mar- 
riage of Yasuko, the country niece 
who lives with her city relatives, is 
the dominant story line as Ibuse 
contrasts traditional life with a 
scientifically altered new world. 
Though she was safe at work dur- 
ing the attack, Yasuko was 
mar ital by the blade, rain that fell 
on Hiroshima after the bombing. 
The rain was black because of dirt 
blown into it from the blast, and 
considered lethal because of radi- 
ation. (Lifton wrote that Ibuse’s 
belief in the deadliness of the 
black rain was his main inaccura- 
cy: “Most authorities believe that 
them , was no medically significant 

level” of residual radiation.) 

Yasuko develops the ieukemia- 
iike A-bomb disease. An arranged 
marriage for her becomes impos- 
sible. Her uncle, Shigematsu Mi- 
nima, badly burned, tries to un- 
derstand the catastrophe by 
writing a “Journal of the Bomb- 
ing," in which he records details of 
daily existence amid the chaos. 



Mora Soda 


Masuji Ibuse, the author of "Black Rain.* 


Going into Hiroshima on Aug. 
10 four days after the bombing, 
with orders to buy coal for hS 
company, Shizuma carries with 
him a bundle of essentials. “It was 
full of things necessary for surviv- 
al amidst the ruins: a bottle con- 
taining stomach pills, a trowel, old 
magazines, eucalyptus leaves, dri- 
ed rusks, a round paper fan, and 
the like.” Shizuma only slowly be- 
comes aware of the futility of his 
assignment in a city that has been 
turned to carbon, mid of the inad- 
equacy of his provisions. 

A 10-volume collection of 
Ibuse’s work will be published in 
the fa& by Stinchosha Co. of To- 
kyo. One of the novels to be in- 
cluded is “Black Rain.” At first 
Ibuse was reluctant to talk about 
tbe book — was reluctant, he says, 
even to read it a gain to make mi. 
nor revisions for the collection. 

“I don’t want to read it any- 


more,” he insisted, “because it’s 
about war. Gradually the image of 
war is fading from my mind.” 

Readers have written 'to give 
him additional infor mation. He 
has re-examined records and cor- 
rected facts. Tbe inclusion of snch 
changes in the new edition in- 
volves a painstaking process for 
him. He is a meticulous reviser, 
“very strict" about his writing, ac- 
cording to Masaru Kawashuna, 
his editor at Kodansha Interna- 
tional, publisher of the En glish 
verson of “Black Ran"; it toil 
appeared in English in 1969, 
translated by John Bester. 

Dressed in a heavy kimono for 

fromTgLass of whiskey. Hfemfe! 
Setsuyo, served bowls of green 
tea. Except for interludes during 
the war.tbe Ibnses have lived in a 
traditional Japanese bouse in the 
neighborhood of Ogikobo since 
tbar marriage in 1927. 


*Tm not good at speaking with- 
out drinking," Ibuse said before 
returning, hesitantly, to the sub- 
ject of has book. He said be had 
doneresearchfor 20 years because 
T aimed to make a documenta- 
ry." in composing the novel he 
used the diary of a neighbor and 
fishing friend from Fukuyama as 
well as records from city offices 
and other documents. The name 
of his fishing companion was Shi- 
zuma Shigematso, the reverse of 
the name used in the aaveL Shige- 
marsn’s niece was indeed named 
Yasuko and his wife Shigeko; they 
also kept diaries, the niece record- 
ing the progress of her disease, the 
wife describing what they ale dur- 
ing the war. Tbe family asked 
Ibuse to use their real names, 
though other people demurred. 
“The diaries are combinations.” 
Ibuse said. 

The real Yasuko married, and 
adopted a child. She and her unde 
have died, but Shigeko Shige- 
matsu is still alive. 

Known for portraying Japan's 
“unchanging people" — farmers, 
fishermen, villagers, policemen, 
doctors — Ibuse reveals the char- 
acteristics of provincial Japan. 
Hu characters are generous and 
frugal, resentful of authority yet 
accepting it, driven by supersti- 
tious and old customs and blandly 
igporant of tbe outside world. 
Above an, as is seen most vividly 
in “Black Rain," they have a resig- 
nation toward life. This quality, 
shoganai, as Tt can't be helped,' 
produces the wry Tmmnr of the 
novel 

In person Ibuse was subdued at 
first. But after the tea and whiskey 
give way to a Japanese feast and 
more whiskey, he started telling 
stories about Tokyo before the 
1923 earthquake, of beloved 
friends and writers (now dead) 
such as Osamu Dazai and Naoya 
Shiga, ofhis lack of success in the 
1920s as an editor for a now-de- 

two ir^KWthat bis 
Russian publishers sent him, at 
his request, instead of royalties. 

He complained, though that 
*Tve lived too long — these days I 
can't write poems.” He also said 
that though for most of his life he 
has been an avid fisherman, he no 
longer fishes; nor, he said, does he 
paint — 20 years ago he did stud- 
ies of nudes at a studio near his 


home — or drink sake. He is 
afraid now of too much sake, but 
not of Johnnie Walker Black La- 
bel He used to drink “from morn- 
ing to night," but at the moment 
he has too much work to do, hav- 
ing just completed a novella. 
“Cbakai N ikk i* (Diary of a Tea 
Ceremony), and compiling the 
new collection. 

In 1917 he entered Waseda 
University to study French and 
Russian literature, and also took 
painting at the Japan Fine Arts 
School In 1918 he wrote the first 
verson of “The Salamander ” a 
satire on intellectual pretense that 
is still his most popular story in 
Japan. He quarreled with a pro- 
fessor and left the university after 
his second year. After surviving 
the 1923 earthquake, but not his 
editorial job, he refused to join the 
leftist movement, taking a differ- 
ent path Iran many writers in the 
late 1920s. 

In 1 937, when Japan’s national- 
ism and xenophobia were at fever 
pitch, he wrote a historical novel 
about a fisherman who went to 
the United Stales, “John Manjiro, 
the Castaway: His Life and Ad- 
venture," translated into English 
in 1940. In 1950, after his en- 
forced wartime experiences as a 
journalist, he wrote a satire 
against wiliMricm , “Lieutenant 
Lookeast,” translated in 1971. 
The Eeotenani, a fanatic during 
the war, remains one afterward, 
ordering villagers around as he 
once did soldiers. Formerly their 
hero, he is now the village idiot, 
though his behavior has not 


He has won Japan's major liter- 
ary prizes: the Naolti, the Yo- 
rmun, the Noma, the Japan Ait 
Academy Award and, m I960, 
membership in the Academy; in 
1966, he teemed the highest na- 
tional honor for artists and schol- 
ars, the Order of Cultural Merit 

“Black Rain” is No. 2 on the 
Ministry of Education’s short list 
of recommended reading for ju- 
nior and senior high school stu- 
dents. The Salamander” is No. S. 

More than 400,000 hardback 
and paper copies of “Black Rain" 
have been sold in Japan. The fig- 
ure may seem low for a major 
work, but Kawashuna, the editor 
at Kodansha, pointed to the Japa- 
nese dislike of antiwar novels. 
“Black Rain” is not a happy sto- 
ry," he said. 

Christine Chapman is a Tokyo- 
based writer who specializes in 'the 
arts. 


PEOPLE 


Defiant Chef in N, Y. 



One of the United States's most 
renowned chefs. Paul Pludbooune 
of K-PauTs Louisiana Kitchen in 
New Orleans, celebrated at a party 
in a Columbus Avenue restaurant 
to announce his arrival in New 
York for a five-week stay— only to 
be told by city health inspectors the 
next day that he could not open the 
place to give New Yorkers a sample 
of Cajun cooking. Prudhonune de- 
nied several of the health and 
building violations, and opened the 
temporary K-Paul’s anyway. "We 
are not endangering anyone's 
health," be said. “Our food is good 
and it’s dean. The violations we 
were died for were grossly unfair." 
When Marvin Bogner, an assistant 
health commissioner, was told that 
the restaurant had been opened, he 
said that inspectors would dose it 
u gain and that Prudhonune could 
be arrested Among the violations, 
Bogner said, were “massive” fly in- 
festation, unfinished floors and 
walls, improper storage of meat, 
improperly vented ovens and tack 
of a valid permit Pradhomme, 
famous for such Cajun dishes as 
blackened redfish, Cajun jamba- 
laya and shrimp remoulade, 
planned to keep the “instant res- 
taurant” in New York open only 
until Aug. 23. He and his staTf did a 
similar sampler of K-Paul cooking 
in San Francisco two years ago and 
plan to go to Paris next summer. 

□ 

The rock singer Bob Gddof, in 
Washington to urge more congres- 
sional aid for starving people in 
Africa, received the 1985 Congres- 
sional Arts Caucus award. Geldof, 
an organizer of the televised Live 
Aid concerts July 13 in Philadel- 
phia and London, appeared at a 
news conference with Peter 
McPherson, administrator for the 
Agency for International Develop- 
ment, who said AID and Live Aid 
would work to alleviate hunger in 
Africa. Earlier, the television actor 
Ed Asner, president of tbe Screen 
Actors Gaud and a member of a 
group called Africa Tomorrow, 
told a House subcommittee on wa- 
ter and power resources that devel- 
opment projects in Africa had to be 
tailored to village life. Africa To- 
morrow is dedicated to helping Af- 
ricans achieve self-sufficiency 
through low-technology projects. 

O 

Two Frenchmen have arrived at 


Falmouth, England, aboard a spe- 
cially built double windsurfer, 
claiming to have made the first At- 
lantic crossing by such a craft 
Frederick Beancbene, 31. from la 
Battle; and Threm Carora, 29, from 
La Rochelle, armed 11 days be- 
hind schedule after a 41-day trip 
from New York aboard the 22-foot 
(6.7-meter) fiberglass craft. The 
men said their most worrying upset 
occurred Monday when they cap- 
sized and lost die last of their food 
and several pieces of equip man. 
The two took turns sailing the craft, 
which is 6 feet 6 inches (2 rectos) 
wide and has a small cabin. 


■/ 


• i 

V. 


In the counroom. Chur* von B*. 
low was dignified and urbane, but 
at home in Manhattan you might 
catch him in jeans and a black 
leather jacket. Or maybe doing hn 
Queen Victoria imitation, putting a 
napkin on his head and sucking in 
his lower lip. That was bow von 
Buiow, recently acquitted of twice 
trying to kill his rich wife, posed for 
die photographer Helmut Newton 
for the current issue of Vanity Fair 
magazine. The novelist Dominick 
Dunne, who wrote the accompany- 
ing article, described von Bulow's 
jacket as having “zips, the works, 
like what you'd see in one of those 
leather bars.” Much of the article 
concentrates on von Bulow’s girl- 
friend, Andrea Reynolds (who also 
posed in black leather) and how- she 
charmed the media during von Bu- 
low's trial in Newport. Rhode Is- 
land, but a former husband, Shel- 
don Reynolds, saw- another side of 
her “If Claus has to many Andrea 
he will wish he'd been convicted." 
Dunne quotes him as saying. 
Dunne also wrote that von Buiow 
wants Robot Duvall to play him if 
his story is ever filmed. 

□ 

Yehudi Menuhin has received his 
knighthood from Queen Qizabedt 
a 20 years after being awarded the 
honor. Though the American-born 
viohmsi has lived in Britain more 
than 25 years, be was naturalized as 
a British subject only this year, at 
last becoming eligible to attend an 
investiture ceremony at Bucking- 
ham Palace. He said afterward that 
he told the queen, "I feel as if I have 
been belatedly baptized." and that 
she laughed and said she w as very- 
pleased he had accepted British cit- 
izenship. 


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PARIS D es fa ordoe In tnma U o u d 

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gage, worldwide. CaH Chert*: Pam 
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REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


VA1BONML Vary xmtimri. high 
doss vita, 300 nun. being spool, 
poot 15x6, pool house, ewatabra 
rtaf, SOSO sq. m. land, south. 
FSiOffjffl. Promotion Mozart, Piece 
Momi. 06000 hfc*. 93/87 06 20. 


BEAUX PROVENCE A ABLES.BuHdina 

lot 650 x^dl Al fbaEtes ii pme wed 
& unimcMdad view, TeL Eeymond in 
Frtinw WW« Mfanv) 


MONACO 


LES UGURES 

fleouMUly decorafad, bang South 
3-ROOM APARTMENT nx mle: Kvmg 
roan, 7 bedrooms, bathroom, stower. 
room, futty equpped kitchen, loaa. 
ceflar & parking span, wew over Med- 
Mrranean, kmunouj residence with 
swnming-pdoJ and tenrii COurl, in (*> 
vole porlc, 

AGEDi 

26 Bn 9d- Process ChorloH? 
Manta Garia. MC 98000 Monaco 
TeL- (93) 50 66 00 Tlx- 4794 1 7 MC 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


ST SUIPICE Duplex, taroee, beams, 
hrep/affl. kviivj, 2 rooms. FI .950.000. 
T* 542 0303 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


I7TH MEM ETOUE Superb pieck* 

teme 40 mmi, aB con v en i ences, tum- 

rioMjfy equpped by interior designer, 
fith Roar, sunny, nd Pictured in 
"Hqim 4 Gcrden . FASO ,000. Tet 
563 20-11 offia* hours. 574 69 54 


FASSANDBK-fOOl Old briefing, 
modem decorat io n, 4 rooms, 4 baths, 
Tet 562 dm 


LQVH.Y DUPLEX, high up, near Mttig- 

non, 105 sqjiv, 2 bedrtxno. 35 sqm. 

Tet 562 03(0 


SWITZERLAND 


VILLARS 

WINTER & SUMMER 
MOUNTAIN PARADISE 

faafaeLi. rongmg from studios 
to 4 rooms. AvoBSm For Seta To 
Foralpian. High don residential ar- 
eas with roognificwiJ views. Prices from 
Sfl 95.000 la SF635JH0. Long farm 
mortgages at 6 J% interest. 

For urforrnatiort: 

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CH-1005 lAUSAhNL^ Switzerland 
Tet (21) 22 35 1Z Tic &B5 MHJS CH. 
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LAGO MAGGiORE 
ASCONA 

In this world fanous resort we offer first 
das* ap a rtments aid houses. Right 
cboue die aid viloge of Ascona or on 

the lake with fadoor pot^yuo wfl find 
ywjr home. Prices from SF320J00 up lo 
sn.ioaooa Mortgages t* £w Swiss 
interest rates. Those real estates are 
free far sale to farmgners. 

EMBtAU! HOME UD. 
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.VIA LOCARNO 27 A 

CH-66T2 ASCONA 

IB. 04-93-352184 


USA GENERAL 


LARGEST lAJSHOURNG IN NY 

area Lsn then 2 hours by ax to 
NYC Over 5^400 acres ( 2,160 hect- 
ares). 40 acre Idee, 2 stately homes, 
guest houses, staWes. corrt*. numer- 
ous outbwkfings. Mogmficent veiws. 
Ae-flm- 5ervi«d by state rood. Aih- 
ing US DJ& nAoa Terms. Write to 
Box 2519, Herdd Triune, 92521 
Neuily Cedes. Fronce 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


ICAR CAM4E5. August. Beautiful vil- 

la, 700 sajn, 1 K ha pcxfi, pool, tennis, 
faeafttossng view on sea and moo* 
tans. Private access to sea aid port. 
Contact- PI 825 2450. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON, for the best furmhed fit* 
aid houses. Consult the Speadsin 
PNEp*. Kay and Lew. Tet South of 
PaV352 6111, North of Park 722 
5131 Telex 2T&6 RS1DE G. 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 
Dehm* rentob. Vafanusttr, 174, 
Anderdan. 020621234 a farm 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Avw ae Mohm 
75008 Paris 
Trie* 231696 F 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGS4TIN PARIS 
562-7899 


STAYING IN PARIS? 

RJRNBKD t UNFURNISHED 

RRST-OA55 APARTMENTS 

..Mirtimuni rental 2 months. 
Aho flris l houses far seta. 
WTBR URBtS, 1, rue AAaBen, 
Pons (8T. Tefc 563 1777 


Elysees-Concorde 

Apartteenb/ houses 
. . Short taroi reotak 
"flSrtW"" 1 weak onwards 
ASP. 9. Rue Rows!*. 75008 Pans 
Tet ft 265 liTreta 64Q793F. 


'frt.FJSOO August. Tel. 11)540 0597 [ 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AT HOME IN PARK 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT OR SALE 

563 25 60 


74 CHAMPS-a YSEES 8 ft 

Stwfio, 2 or 3-room apartment 
One month or more. 

L£ CLARDGE 359 67 97. 


ST. aouo LUXURIOUS HOUSE 
large Eying 5 be drooms, 4 baths. 
AJM> ECTOT^COPObtB* 

9. Roe S 
Teb (1)265 


Roycta. 75008 ParieH 
5 1 1 99. Talers 640793F. 


166. PORTE PASSY. 100 sqm. 3/4 
room, double twig, 2 bedrooms, 

•levbtor, service entrance, up to 6 

Avriofak from now to end 
.Teh 5208* 17. 


CUT YOUR HOTEL BRJL try a Ftatotel 

apartment near the Efral Tower. Lux- 

ury tfufiae to 5-room epartmerf 
from am waek upwards. FLATCfTT 
14 rue du ThMfre, 75015 Paris. T< 
575 62 2a Tl* ^211 F. 


SHORT TBUH STAY. From 1 weet 

fully equipped stufios, end 2 rooms , 
up to 4 persons. Champs Bysees, Latin 
Quarter and Montparnasse. Mord ser- 
oriole- Mr Agrosti BP 248 ■ 
Paris cedes OtTefc 322 82 50. 


SHORT TERM STAY. Advantages of a 

hotel without maumwwnees. fad at 

home in rioi stuci os, one bedroom 

end more in Paris. SOBHJM: 80 rue 
de rUnivarsM, Pane 7th; 544 39 40 


MONTPARNASSE, AUGUST/ SOT, 
2-roam Rat, both, nqumped Idrchon. 
very fight, awt. tetepbono, TV. 
%D00mf + F3ri50 deposit. Tefc 501 
52 74 (rare 9 am / 7 tm. 


5 MINS. ETOUE Double Evina, 2 bed- 

roams, very cxiet, conirortoWe. 
R5/WX 15/B- 12/9/Tefc 572 1097. 












EfiSBSviSaK-fr l ■■ 



PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


■in. uuw ua vetanw. rem- 
nnae, fivmg, (Sting, 4 bedrooms, 3 
bams, office, maid's room, 1600 sqm. 
terrace, fantada view on Sefae. He S) 
Ums aid al Paris. Vrih Guaxfian 
every day esrcmt Saturday afternoon 
and Sundays: 16 Qua de Cetelw, 
75004 Paris 


OUAIDE LOUVRE 

3b&S^ r T^&38 


WBT SWNB5. large houu m large 
gaden, reception. 5 bedrooms, 3 
50 20 or (3) 96931 25. 


USA 


FOR 8B4T DBWft COLORADO 

PrestwowHame Denver CoiBtrtOub 
Areo. 8^300 plus tq. ft. carnage house, 
tenrw court, 1J5 oaes. 10 mmutes to 
downtown, 15 minute to airport. 

4 TOOths to 1 yr. Pnncipah only. 
(Ml) S62-8546. 


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, Av Morvfepos 74, 

04-1005 Lnsonne, Switzerknd 
Td (21)23 35 12-71*25 185 MEUSCH 


OFFSHORE TAX SHaTH 

, COMPANIES 

UK, Ue of Mon, Turin, Chonriel Islands, I 
ramno, ubena and maa aflshgre 
arocn. Complete support fadfaiei 
Very sfnd confidenhaity. 

free canwllation: 

Roger Griffin ILE, F.CA 

Brochurer Capuutu Management Ud,j 
Western rtiusfl, Vietorio Street, 


US. OO. COMPANY irteiefled in tfc- : 

vekjprng asscocdions '-vsh investors or 
nvostor representatives to rase ccp- 
Id for 08 and gas nploratian acovi- 
ta in US. Company that has driled 
504- well over 3 year period with 
ffiflt success rde. Serious inquiries 
arty. Please .reply: Mr. Edmund G. 

Worth, TX 76108. Teh 18171 2^2455. 


RDUdAKY BANKING an Inge td- 

krtera&ttd loans. The ody ooroner- 
eid brink with a repntnntobve office 
m IWan speoang m B» service. 
Arab Overseas Bank & Trust (W.L) 
Ud. 28 Bfaek Phree tao d,-L»>M 
*1. Mb M-W 8171 


■ fv« UK), 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


COMLVTHl PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 

(510,000 -28,000 FOB) and suppfies: 
T-eheb, nbborn, pastes, atandon, 
puxzeb ett Major a eat cards ac- 
cepted. Kama iS. Pbstfadi 17034U 
Fnmkfurt. Tel. 747808 Tx 412713 


ATTENTION OffSHORE $1 Hong 

Kong red estate tonpeny for sale, 

Owring 3 prime iname producing 
properties in Los Angete. US51 2 n£- 
few. Elease co n tociflax 41 405. LH.T., 
63 Long Acre, London. WC2E 9JR 


SRI LANKA/ 50MA11A. Previous ren- 

dered both countries wth good con- 
nections now awaiUta to represed 
D. Wick. PjO. Bax 
. AZ 8531 2 USA. TeL- 
feteK 165025. 


HAVE US CUBITS dec re law cod 

Swiss francs. Encetare cafiateol/ 
bank gumaatea Wri te deto ilfc Leon 
Berman Associaa, 3800 KBawa 
Drive. HoByvwod. fj 33021 USA. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTI 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

(MJMITED INC. 

U5JL A WORLDWICS 

A aompjde penond & business service 
providing a ttnigue coBedien of 
talented, versatile & nxMngud 
individuals far afl so ad A 
ff ome fad oaHBOnt. 
212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, MYJC 10019 
Service EwreseittoWes 
Needed Worldwide. 


HOW TO OET A W PASSPORT, 

report • 12 countries ondyzed. De- 
ws: WMAl 45 Lyndust Tetroot. 
Suita 506, Cenhd, Hang Kong. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS FROM AMSTBDAMdl 

-guaBtiet - fawest prices. Come to the 
Amsterdam Diamond Enchange afc 
far Bab Hendriksen m room T2A. 
Weepmttan 4. Tel- 2tf238 / 797602 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ZURKH-ZUR1CH-ZURKH 

BUHCO R 

BAMWOKTRASSE S2 

THE FINANCIAL CENTER 

• Your in tegrated Bus' nets Services 
Compaq in the Rncnad Cento 

•Office bifaHtucture: Executive 
Officoj, dedkatad leiesfene, tefax. 
wenoyec e ntar, mutnngud 
secretaries 4- recesbomti. 

• Donieta your addren <* Zurich's 
renowned braneis street. 

Bednere Servkief C uniutf Carp. 
Bdmhafitosse 52. CH-3022 Zurich. 

Tel: 01/711 92 07. 71*813 062 


V YOU WANT TO BOB! 

THE GERMAN MARKET 

SENATOR QFRCT A 
MANAGEMENT SBtVJCB 

Yew enm d ete offia with Secretariat, 
tate*taW»t,n«deetvw i + other fa. 
cSncs. We burid up your burinw and 
bertang corrioCS to HteesfeoB and es- 
tablish your product* and service*. 
SENATOR GMBH 
P.OJJ. 2553, M000 Ha mbu rg 1: 
Phone: [4QJ440 555. Tfau 21 


YOUR RJIINISHED OfflCE 
. , IN LONDON 

• 7cfay 24 hour oooihA riASwetpham 

• Rjl euppart wrviai indudfagi 

secretarial, tetex, etc. 

• Corporate Representation Sarnia 

• Short or long term pvofcfaifity 
Wadd-WMelosfaeB Cerrtret 

1 lOTTre StnsKi fatal WC2ROAA 
Tat 01 434-891* The 24973 


MANRArSe prMnt detpHte efiflieuk 
e co norac tenet. Shore comptete faoB- 
ticn / services. Moke* office. Europe- 
on managem en t, confidential since 
1M1.MCUPO Box. 1569. MMmtiEa. 
Tel: 817-41B7 gfinml The- 22232 ■ 

IMPETUS * ZURICH * 2S2 76 21, 
Phone / tetas > mofeu. 


AUTO CONVERSION 


DOT/CPA OONYBSIONS to US. 
mea. tavtan guarantee d. VIA 
Ccrtc, 1182$ Bei Air Rd, Bofatnore, 

myzioer. Tot 301 - 592 - 3200 , ik 

4995689 VIA US. 


AUTO RENTALS 


ROIT A CAR M TRANCE 

UnEmtncJ IdomstBi. 

(1) 587 V 040^1^60 Bd. St. 
Marael, 75005 Paris, France. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TR AS CO 

„ DC MERCBieS SPBOAUST5 
Swtoertcmd, West Germany 4 England 

Tax free - U® - European defivery - 

USffVDSn 

Shipping by ffie experts 

IN sroaCOT ISA, Black. Gray. Bbe 
38Q SEC Bock, S3w 
280 SE/L- Hodc, Bfae 

DIRECT PROM SOURCE 

Titan London Ud. 

6567 Park lane, l ando n W\. 
Tefc01-6» 7779 
Tehw 8956022 TRAS G. 


COOPBl ST JAMES 

OffidAL AGENT 
OF BMW (GB) LTD 

Whta mu ore in Eurapei we can offar 
aamidnratta savings on brand new 
BMW con to most s p e effiaC i on e. Fu 8 
factory warranty. 

We can cfao supphr right or left hand 
drive tax free BMWs at tourist prices. 
Wti dso supply factory bwlr bulat- 
prarf BMWV and ihe A^na BMW 
range tax free. 

Cefl landon (01) 629 6699. 


^BBeaBBgaa 

SSSKodAitkWoo-WbBo 1 

500 SEC dark bWgrey leather 
380 5EL nautical bfaWgrey laather 
380 SE danpagne / browm farther 
Pre-ownud BMWs/Ponche also 

Tbt S22851 10 gun. - 10 pun. 

American Owned and Opera t e d 


10 YEARS 

W* Mvtr Core fa tbe Worid 

TRANSCO 

KtatsiiBaaanstartflodofmonjIhw 
. . 300 brand new cars, 

1aS 0 SB££ , 335'- 

SA, 95 Nooretata un , 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSOC, far inwdRM drimy 

FROM STOCK 


band, conversion in USA 

RUTE INC. 

iTNUNUSSra. 5 X 6000 FRANKFURT 

W Gena, i«l Rffl-232351, tbe 411599 


.••BUY YOUR CAR TAX FRS**' 
Ra Meroedes, Porsche, BMW, Ferrari). 

‘c^ssWBC 

far.deatare & tourists. 


EXCAUBUR 

tre AirtomcdJ ei Ertr n eidto ufa e e 

Park Pakxe, Mom Carlo 
PrmocoytE de Manoco 

T#fa 25 7179. Tbt 479550 Aim MC 


BMW Ml RAdNO DRIVER 

cxteM you; Bw your BMW, new or 


Printed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


NEW MERCEDES BBtZ. WANTED 
RIGHT HAND DRIVE MOOBS TAX 
FRK INCLUDING 123 SHOES. ANY 
SPECS. WE GOUECT. Tel UK 505 
1804/ 090*74521 5 Tlx 747083 


EUBOPORT TAX REE CARS 
G4 far Free cridto 
Bax 1201 1, Rotterdam Airport, Hatbnd. 
Tefa 010623077. The 25071 EPCAR NL 


TRANSMUMX BBjOUM. 21 Gcrtet 


03-384.1054 Tlx 32302 Tranmi R to 
stock; M ei ce de s v BMW, A50. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US MUMGRAHON vin. Attyv Splos 
& Rodney 1925 Briekri Av. Worm Ft 
33129. Tet (305) 6439600, tx 441469. 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


USA SUMMa SPEOA13 U>I Anoetes 

faxn Cl 99. Nmv York from £130 US. 
Autoure London 01-551 4451. 


NY OPffi WAY JT SO. Emycfay N.Y. - 
West Coast S145. Pirns 22)9290. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


CHARIBt A YACHT IM QRSCE. LV 

red from owner of largest fleet 
American management. Excafieni 
crowi. govt bended. Volef Vadto, 
Ata Thomutoldeouc 22C. Piraeus, 
Greece. Tet 4529571. 4529486. Tbt 
21-2000. USA offices: fir Road, Am- 
bfar.PA 19002. Tel: 215 641 1624. 


SMMG TOUR HKX3D 38 YACHT. 


HOTELS 


LISA. 


TUDOR HOia, 304 East 42nd S», 

N«v York City. In f ml i w atta. East 
Seta McmhattoL 1/2 block from lfl>l 
Sngle from S7lfc doubles from 585. 
Upon showing this ad- 20% discount. 
7*422951. TeL 2129868800. 


SHOPPING 


SOOM. 45 South Audlev Street. Lore 
don W1 . TeL 01-493 0403 near Amen. 
can Embassy. Exdusm dnkfiers 
wear. Hand made m b-^ard. 1-10 
yean + ananal styles from France 8 
My. Bnnq sat advert with vou A we 
wdgnreQ an any purchase over £20 


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wffl be informed of the cost xnmadiataty, and once prepo^nent 4 
made year ad vriS opoecy vrithm 48 haws. 

Ccret: The banc rate a S9J0 per fine per day + toed taxes. There are 
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HEAD QfRCE 

Ptafar (For darefied only}: 
747-4A4XL 


HfltOPE 

A rntta rd u n i. 2636-15. 
ADwnts 361-8397/360-2421 . 
Dnneefa: 343-1899. 
C np e n tioge n : ( 01 ) 32944a 
Ftwhfarfc (069) 72-67-51 
Ireittaine- 29-S8-94. 

Labam S -27-93/66-2544. 
Londoro (01) 8364802. 
Madrid: 455-2891/4553306. 
Mtaw (32)7531445. 
Honanys P3) 845545. 
Ranres 679-3437. 

Swretaoi W) 7569229. 

Tel Airim 03455 5S9. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 


UNIltD STATES 

NtetVwta (212)752.3690. 
Wart Caart: (415)362-8339 


SOUTH AHUCA 

Bowmrtoo: 421599 


LATIN AMERICA 

Boenoe Aire*: 41 4031 
Pepl. 312) 
CavwMi3314 54 
Guayaquil: 51 4505 
Urns 417 BS2 
Ffaaatao: 6905 11 
Soa Jm 22-1055 
SoRtiooa; 6»1 555 
Sno Pkrefa: 852 1893 


mtdoueast 

Bahram 246301 
Kwrate 5614485. 
Lebanon! 341 4 S 7 /B/ 9 . 
Ortar 416535- 
S«SAro6i* 
taddak 667-1500 
UAXr Dubai 224161. 


FAR EAST 


u - .! 390G6-57. 

HonoKanjfcS-713671. 

>tartritac8l>W49, 

Sftreri: 735 87 73, 
SlflsefMf*: 223-2725 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9 
Tokyo: 504.1925 


AUSTRALIA 

Metboonw 6908733 „ 

Sydnay; 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
Ftahr. 32B9933. 
Pnkfagtm. Oueea ri e w d ft 

349 34 53. . • 


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