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**VSl 


The Global Newspaper 
. Edited in Pans 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong! Singapore, 

The Hagie and Marseille . 

WEATHER DATA APPEAR OH PAGE 16 


No. 31,859 


INTERNATIONAL 




Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


PARIS, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


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US. Confirms Offer Conferees 
By Soviet in Geneva Agree on 

■ By Hedrick Smith 

fitw York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Soviet ne- 
gotiators at the Geneva arms calks 
have raised the possibility of offer- 
ing a 30-percent cutback in strate- 
gic nuclear missiles and bombers, 
along with a related reduction in 
nudear bombs and warheads, ad- 
ministration officials said 
just -last Friday, earlier public 
hints from Moscow in a similar 
van were dismissed b\ the Reagan 
White House as “ realty propagan- 
da," on the ground lhai they were 
not parl of toe Geneva arms negoti- 
ations. 

The significance of the latest dis- 
closure is thai U.S. ofGcials now 
say that, in Geneva, the Soviet side 
has raised the possibility of a cut- 
back in nudear warheads and 
bombs, something the administra- 
tion has sought for three years at uuumeuve u m u i m i m wu mu 6 uu 

along with a cutback in strategic Edward l Rnwnv ^ dcfense authorization bill for 

misses and bombers. The devei- toward L. Kowny ^ year berinmng Oct 1, 

optoeni came late in the round of Aides said approval of the produc- 

talks chat ended July 16, officials era Europe or in the British and a ° n ? °ew chemical weapons 



Conferees 
Agree on 
Nerve Gas 

House-Senate 

Action Seen as 

Reagan Victory 

By Bill Keller 

Nw York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — House and 
Senate negotiators have tentatively 
agreed on legislation that would 
allow Uu Defense Department to 
end a 16-year moratonxnn and re- 
sume production of chemical weap- 
ons, according to congressional 
and Pentagon sources. 

The agreement was expected to 
be presented Thursday to the full 
conference comnrioee working on 
the defense authorization hill for 
the fiscal year beonning Oct 1. 
Aides said approval of the produc- 


ed Wednesday- French nudear forces. swanca »»uicu. 

They were quick to caution, how- Nonetheless, the Soviet moves a mgor gam Jj* **Reagan 
ever, that tins idea has been raised bave intrigued some U.S. officials administration, the conferees 
only in informal discussion and and left St opening to be probed a Hou^passed require- 

that the Soviet negotiating team when the next round of arms talks 106,11 1021 American alhes m Eu- 

™^T iiy ^ jproposai *£**,»*«*•— 

Without mentioning specific So- JSfiSCSS.SSSjlB 


seemed assured. 

In a major gain for the Reagan 


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embracing it. 

What has happened, these offi- 


rope agree to deploy the new weap- 
ons before production could begia- 
The compromise bill would re- 


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VS nceotimore have been un- r Dunng 1116 ble * h .f. ^ trvely harmless substances that be- 
abic to dereimine whether the Sovi- Soviet negotiators ^vere twhing ro come toxic after they are mixed 


promising. wnn 


Sovin aegpaalony/en wiling .o 




West Unlikely 
To Back France 
On South Africa 


Reuten 

LONDON — France’s decision 
to lake economic and diplomatic 
action against South Africa ap- 
peared to he an isolated move 
Thursday as the United Stales and 
Britain said they would not change 
their policies toward the whire- 
minomy government 
Laity Speak es. the While House 
spokesman, made no direct com- 


In WlM Germany, the South \f- 
nean issue appe.irc\l like!;, to cv- 
poyc a split sn Chancellor Helmut 

Kohls coalition government. 

The West German opposition 
Social Dcm.vrjtic Parr, has -aid 


On Pace 2: 


I Five more blacks were toiled :r. 


T*» Smwd P.n> 


Subroto, Indonesia's 
energy minister and 
president of OPEC, 
addressed a press 
conference in Geneva 
on Thursday following 
the decision by OPEC 
to cut the prices of some 
crude oil. .Algeria, Libya 
and Iran, whose oil 
minister, Mohammed 
Gharazi, is at left, voted 
against the move. 


its ambassador to Pretoria and call ® The police coiunuvuoner. a com- 
a meeting of the United Nations plex and very powenu! Prciona in- 
security Council to consider the fw-ial. 

state of emergency in South Africa. 

But he said in'Wsshmctoti that . _ 

there would be no change in the mat B^in should fo.low ’he French 
U.S. poliev of “constructive en- ' ej ^- That view i> supported in lhe 
ga semen i" toward South Africj SO^crnaictvUijiion pj memberv jf 
ihjt aims at influencing Pretoria by lhc rr<x Democra;> am. i..e youth 
maintaining dialogue as well as in- . cl Lhoncsuor kohl s own 

vesunenl and trade. Christian Democrats 

“In our view, the policy we have There appeared so he no imreedi- 


loid out towards South .Africa is a aie plans in Belgium, the Nether- 
correct one.” Mr. Speakes said. lands. Spam. Portugal or Swucer- 
France acted after South Africa land to follow France, alihough 
declared a state of emergency un- some of the nations welcomed the 
der which almost SOG people have move. 


been arrested and \t killed since 
Sunday. 

The United Stales is South Afri- 
ca's largest trading partner, fol- 
lowed by Japan. Britain. West Ger- 
mans and France. 


Foreign Minister L'l'fc Clie- 
mann-Jeasen of Denmark de- 
scribed the French aciinn as a 
"splendid initiative" and sJtd Den- 
mark, which recemlv banned in- 
vestments ir, South Africa, was 


auic muciciuuuc wucuki uicouvi- ... - 7, -* 

et Unkm meant this term to refer 10 ® et ^ r - . « 

only to nudear missile warheads or CTelc l£rms i. bul 11 6nabl “ 10 In May, the Senate approved flie 
2 so to bombs and cniise missiles, f 06 !* 6 m **"***"»* wlh a administration’s fuD r^uest for 
tfU applied onfy to missile war- underetMding on each si 633 milhon for dhamcal weap- 

heads. "this would bean to be a adc ^ 5 posmoo. on*. The House voted Ian month to 

serious proposal*' Edward L Mr. McFariane did not allude to acocyt an expenditure of $124.5 


Th» Auooctad Pi« 




serious proposal,*’ Edward L. Mr. Mcrariane aid not amide to 
. Rowny, a seiuor State Department wh » l ^ disclosed Wednesday. 

adviser on arms control, said but to another Soviet concept, 
.■? Wednesday. raised recently in Geneva and pre- 

In past arms negotiations, such viouslv disclosed, for limiting dif- 
feefers have sometimes been a pre- feroni categories of nuclear weap- 
lude to finding formulas for com- ? ns - s h c ^ as . land-based 


side of the other side s position." ons. The House voted lan month to 

Mr. McFariane did not allude to accept an expenditure of $124.5 
what was disclosed Wednesday, nrifliou. 
but to another Soviet concept, - The agreement was worked out 
raised recently in Geneva and pre- by a panel of House and Senate 


members, including Representative 
Les Aspin, Democrat of Wisconsin, 
who heads the House armed ser- 


, rvsvm. 

Him 


lude to Finding formulas for com- ons, such as land-based who heads the Hi 

promise. At present, however, the intercontinental missiles, to a cer- vices committee. 

Reagan administration has taken a lain percentage of each side’s over- The nerve gas i 
cautious stance. & strategic arsenal. the last majw disp 

Mr. Rowny ^ Hut recent m Soviet to Insist oa Ban Ste'SffiSSS 

“hints that the Soviets would re- „ . _ resoiwcuneraicot 

duce weapons as well as launchers The chief Soviet negotiator for versons of the 5. w ^ sw 3UJU w 

are vague and have not been ta- space anm at tlw Geneva talks said fe^e authoraamm bill. cuts orobablv would have little ef~ 

bled." Thursday that Moscow would in- Participants said the conferees draresatted 

Other officials said the Soviet sist on a ban on ^research into a hoped to finish die bill Thursday y * progress in OPECs 

concqjt was hedged with coodi- space-bwed missBe deface sysr and present U to the House and w end a?our-vear decline in 

lions that the administration found tem, and he dismissed U.S. argu- Se n ate for final approval next 


OPEC Approves, in Vote of 10 to 3, 
Minor Cuts in Pice of Some Crude Oil 

Bv Bob Haeerrv ers, an investment banking unit of btans hope the lower prices will 

inJmtiooul h™£ Tribune American Express Co. allow them to increase salts. 

Nonetheless, three OPEC mem- The ministers avoided the drn- 


b percentage of each side’s over- The nerve ^s issue ws one of ExportingSuntries 

strategic arsenal. approvedbvaSSorityrote'niura- 

l Sorid to Insist <* Ban 23tSSSff IS^JlStdS^ ** 


IN ODCUICICNS. Uircc UrLv UlCIlr iMJfc HUUI 9 IW 3 0 VVWW uu- unr r i J • • ^ . 

SliiiKr ^^JlsssLS'fS? 


Mr. Speaker said. “We have eonsidennu clostr.a its consulate in 
made clear our view that the South . 

African government must move (Continued on Pose 1 Col. 1) 

promptly away from apartheid. ■ - — — ■ 

which we find to be repugnant and 

which is the basic cause for the • a 

violence South Africa is witnessing iifitiniT 

today. 

Mr. Reagan recalled lhe U.S. m « 
ambassador. Herman W. Nickel, f /) fV/i tOjpt 
from Pretoria list month to express M. a i/tCA/t 

displeasure over South African mil- . m 

itary raids into neighboring Bo- ji ni£)n/*/YTI ■ / 
tswana and Angola. /XflltTl HAH l l Jo 

1 Congressional leaders said the , , 


oastoo has no meaning at an. meeung 
Thr 10 other member? approved Vienna. 


French decision to impose sane- opi £ «^ Pw ” 
tions against Pretoria should help . BEIRUT— Syrian-hacked socu- 
speed passage of tough American nty forces announced new- niea- 
measures that are before Congress, surcs Thursday to defend LS. m- 
The Associated Press reported sutuiuw m West Beirut, which is 


' Oil tr^m and said the An Iraqi delegate said his coun- ^n^fer'^rLarei 

mtspro^^d havehi^e ef- ^ a ro i e in tiys cnU for a larger quota was Bri?a.nSdPaSS ently none of them foreigners. 

feet on the market and rqir^^i^ OPEC as its tiny delegatioa Snore n demand than a request. Britain remained firmlv be- A coordination committee, made 

Uttle. if any, progress m OPECs 3 Iran, which sits next to Iraq at «*ai orttain remained nmii> ne- f^nr^ntatives of lhe 1 eha- 

efTort to end a four-year decline in suggests, ftge IS. OPEC meetings under an alphabet- hmd Washington on the South Af- Moslem militia 

oa '"’“* . a S*udi proposal to reduce lhc offi- believa ,ha, tac« banaad gam.a, ,te caaipas 

But some said OPEC achieved a dal prices of heavy crudes by 50 W^sineYratfs sanctions would hit ven hadlv of the American University of Bei- 

^ A V ^K b> r SV ^Jl 1 ! ?b ' cents a band and medium grades S cSl Se against the black population of ^ »*“! 

bte during the four^ay meeung by 2 0 cents. Official prices of s2d Sh Africa." she ml adding UmversttyHos^laL both of which 

m . ■ ■ hghta varietiesare uiichangetLal- that they would "be eoumerprev J^ongbeenopen to armed mil, - 

‘They’ve gone for the nniumum though free-markei prices are ^ “«-ihhine fm" fri>m ihe in- ductive. uamen. ... 

of disturbance," said Paul McDon- about $2 or $3 lower, forcing nearly ^ ^siaoomg uetv irom me in estimate British ^ committee, which iniro- 

a .. r nnr»- - -i „f? j:." Slue. . - r « .. .*• .(inwl iimil.ir h.'m nf Ri-imr mfi-r- 


i mBrr^Mah U menis that this could not be veri- we*. 

Specifically, they said, the Soviet fied, Reuters reported. The conferees remained dead- 

Unicn insisted on linking a redne- “Work on space weapons, even locked over several provisions gov- 


oil prices. 


lion of strategic offensire arsenals at an early stage, is accompanied endng military contracts. «« dunnft “ c ,our - da - v mxUl * 6 

to a firm ban against research on by signs that can be observed by The military bill also inditded ■ 

strategic defen^ewsiems and a national technical means," the ne- ttompromuies, negotiated last wedfe “TWye gone for the muumum 
limiton imermediate-range often- gotiator, Yuli A. Kviudnsky, said, that would hnul the munbCT of MX ofduauibance, said Paul McDpn- 
^ j-jlL i j Mxi n <;.,noi tAoknicii mminc n ic a missiles to be deoloved to 50. allow aid. chief oil analvst at the London 


lighter varieties are unchanged, al- 


predominamlv Moslem, after gun- 
men abducted seven people, appar- 
ently none of them foreigners. 

A coordination committee, made 
up of representatives of the Leba- 
nese Army and Moslem militia 


save missiles that would require cut- “National technical means” is a missiles to be deployed to 50, allow aid, chief oil analyst at the London all OPEC members to 

backs in U3L deploytnems in West- term for satellite survdlkocc. (Continued on Page 2, CoL 6 ) office of Shearson Lehman Broth- counts. 

An OPEC official said the cuts 


‘They’ve gone for the minimum though fret-market prices are 
disturbance,” said Paul McDon- about $2 or $3 lower, forcing nearly 


vras “subbing OPEC from the in- exptfTls estimate British The committee, which imro- 

i u a • w h investment in^outh Africa at more duced a similar ban at Beirut fntcr- 
Iran, Libya and Algeria, which P bi hcm andlav^ ouS national .Airport, smd that police 

also rejected last January s SI cut “J , 311 a** oimcm mta a quaner r would be bolstered 

in offrcial prices of light crudes. ° r a million British jobs depend on ■_» inwii-m inoitniinnt in 


. 

. M'lrW*' 
. .. vi 7' 

‘~r-. ’-'■J 7 -' 




Ficial prices of light crudes. a million British jobs depend on 


t-” .MOW' 
. "as iC0 




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Australia Links AIDS to Semen Donor 

4 Women , Artificially Inseminated, Infected by Virus 


and array units would be bolstered 

were effective immediately and es- commerce with Pretoria. * at the tiro -American institutions to 

rimaied that they r^ucal theaver- (jo^ 0D piindple. In practice, each Mrs. Thatcher's views came in a^udgeordcrai five 

to tad to offrrh^ discounts CO ^ sund^mol in rmlnatv 

S?‘v^cS UdlArab ' 1,KU ’ ai ' A wbotar OPEC, oliue ieuder. Ri^' Hauerslev. said she 

^^ q L“ mBe,m ' 

crude, whjd\_ has im ^enan Pe- don’t think market reabty is reali- moral lead on this or any other 


Compiled by Oar Scoff Frvm Dupatdtes AIDS Sy 

SYDNEY — Four Australian tor for a 


toms consulted a doc- David Pennington, chairman of the troleum Institute 


problem. 


New South Wales AIDS task force, 27 degrees, fdl to 


ivity rating of 
6 from $2630. 


in i minx raarsei rcauiy is re an- nnu i«u uu uu» «« uu, c , ^ indicuneni was accoropa- 

. ... . „,. lW s nied bv a recommendation that the 
Mr. Nabi of Algeria argued that Only in milnamlv ami-apartheid f ■ h sentenced to death if 
PECs three once cuts over the Scandtnavradid there appear to be the ISuws s^d No 


women have been infatted withSe Three 5the womea later berame They.werereoptmedinApril.on the Last Winter, when the British coal aBtt3EZ2Sk*i Sc^SSa^Kap^^ 

virus for AIDS, or acquired im- pregnant by msen^ntm from te ' strike temporarily mcreased de- ^ £ d done nothing to unqualified enthusiasm for the ini- SS^Swfor IteMW 

mune deficiency syndrome, other donws and gave birth to earned ran, the doctor added. mandfor heavy crude, Arab heavy Mm-Ji*,. tiative bv Paris oate was set tor me inat. 

through artificial insemination healthy children, all now more than Donors must undeigo blood was raised 50 cents. Arab medium. help mcmbeTS ' uaiive t>y i^ans. TJ* lhc 

with donated semen, a health a year old. No husbands in the tests at the time sperm is donated, rated at 31 degrees, fell 20 cents to " “ maded wnUi flfons to t 

spokesman said here Thursday. cases were found to have the anti- The test is repeated three months S27J0. _ __ _ _ - _ Lebanon ufier the 

The cases wen: betieved ta be the bodtatouufateaepteeentaot tatar taj il: »®nve. the temen u toto erntta T * 0 1 * Poor Mlirl Pflril S&l'eSta'hSSert 


Fust documented of the virus’s hav- 


AIDS. 

Doctors emphasized that al- 


ihen released for use. 

Health Minister Neil Blewitt has 


ingbeentrmmit^to^amD- 

al^SSD^SLSTjd 4 toT«“MTOlh^o3dW« utenuntherofviSinsby OKeodof 
Wales Health Departmoi others through sexual contact or by next year. Sydney, a city of 33 

A spokesman added that connr- fonajjjjg blood and organs. million people, is estimated to have 


mation was obtained this week that AIDS attacks the rartmme sys- 150,000 to 200,000 homosexuals. Mexica which is not a member of tioL^stmmKincd riv-ildefcnrean 

the four women were, infected in ^ having victims unable to fight Westmead Hospital noted that 0 PEC and earlier this month cut TEsERO Italy - Actmg on a off iS for a^rS 

1982 dunng insemination a! Wot- <^$ 3 ^ Homosexuals are a high , artificial insemination had b® 30 ^ prices by about $1. . forecast of hea^»!|- coil defense n^inc S the “S 

mead Hospital, all by semen from ^ gjroup, as are intravenous drug routine in Australia m the last de- Tbe official price of Saudi heavy office demanded Thursday that a Dolomite Mountain 

one donor. The inseminations were and persons receiving blood cade. More than 100,000 women a Sli u ab0 ut $1 above that prevail- dan^rous mountain of mud that ua “ nuK ™ mnaa[ 

unsuccessful. transfusions, such as hemophiliacs, have been inseminated since 1980. jog on the spot, or noncontract, was left after a dam burst last Frt- _ . hvdroloei* 

A person who has the AIDS vj- The Westmead Horottal immu- When the hospital realized a few markeu but the Saudi Arabians da > ^ unmediatelv removed insivcted the dam site at ih 

rus wfll not necessarily come down nolccisi. Dr. Graeme Stewart, said weeks ago that women might have hope 0 jj demand win revive later Unless bulldozers leveled the HY Tmi maastraies o 

with the disease. One of the women was essential that doctors and been exposed to AIDS through ar- this year. pile soon, they said, thunderstorms v ■ j. -j an r a r annft; j ] 

has swollen lymph glands, an AIDS patients around the world be made tificial insonination, it sent a letter Unlike most OPEC members, could send it oozing down the var- . . ‘ er j al 

symptom. But the others are in aware 0 / the discovery in Australia, to all recipients of the procedure die Saudi Arabians have insisted ley toward this town, w here rescue j; aue f v 1 . WO uid not be a d'uasit 

good health 1 and are unlikely to where screening of sperm donors is during the past five years, offering on charging the official price. That workers are still recovering bodies .3 . ■ 1 c-, . . 

exhibit the major symptoms, the required now by law. antibody testing. It said SO percent policy has helped shrink their soles from the flood disaster. The rush of ~ ■ -> n"efense' Minisirv i 

hncniiiil said. an cruvm hanks in Australia 0 / the women replied and that none in liitie more than two million bar- water washed away the reson ham- .. 


rated at 31 degrees, fell 20 cents to 
S27JS0. 

Official prices for similar crudes 
produced by other members are to 
fall by like amounts, although 
members have discretion in deter- 
mining the exact levels. Venezuela 
is widely expected to reduce its 
prices enough to compete with 
Mexico, which is not a member of 


Italians Fear Mud Peril 
K Storm Hits Dam Site 


. jT . TPCFUn Iiilv _ Ai’tino nn i uoos. summo nco emi ucicox ono 

OPEC and earlier this month cut 1 1Xa] y - H 0 f, on a tialian Armv officials for an etner- 

nrires hv -rhoui S l forecast of heavy rai a Civil defense ,iail ‘ in Arm > 011 ‘“ r ™ _ 

^ Tbe official price of Saudi heavy officials demanded Thursday that a & enc y meeting alia the u eather 


ing on the spot, or noncwitract. 5 ™ W* after a dam burst Iasi Fri- 
markeL but the Saudi .Arabians day he immediately removed, 
hope oil demand wih revive later Unless bulldozers leveled the 
this year. pile soon, they said, thunderstorms 

Unlike most OPEC members, could send it "oozing down the val- 
ihe Saudi Arabians have insisted ley toward this town, where rescue 


Rock Hudson, the Ameri- 
can film actor, has AIDS, a 
spokeswoman says. Page 3. 


uan*s mi . The sources said the actions co- 

• incided with efforts to improve 

Lebanon's image after the hijack - 
T% if 1 el ing of a TWA jetliner Iasi month 

* VI 11 Cl M (ft 1*1 1 and [ he ensuing hostage crisis. 

. iixuva m. mj. A tnjcl uiih high explo- 

p v sives crashed into the Iraqi Embas- 

S l lam Wifp sy in West Beirut in December 

JL^Ct m C7JLIC/ 1981, killing M peiiple. A similar 

, ,. f , r trm * OD April 18, 1983. 

and coordinator of relief opera- ^ lhan M a , lhe 


tions. summoned civil defense and |_ f _g Embassv 
Italian Army officials for an emer- ^ five ^spev.-ts. who were not 
gency meeting after ihe weather i^ en tiried. were arrested weeks af- 
report for the Dolomite Mountains Kr lhe havc rc- 

was issued. mained in custody since. 

Claudio Datei. a hydrologist jh e underground Islamic Jihad 


who inspected the dam site at the claimcd responsibility for the U.S. 
request of Trento magistrates <» Embassy blast. An anti-Iraqi group 
Wednesday, said: l am alarmed. If j, ^ sponsible for the Iraqi 
it rains this is material which could 

liquefy. It would not be^a disaster bunions Thur^av «- 


hospital said. 


All sperm banks in Australia trf the women replied and than 


TTie discoveries were made after were closed in November because of the tests proved positive. 


the woman who came down with of the AIDS fear, said Professor 


to little more than two million bar- water washed away the resort nai 
rels a day, less than a quaner of the let of Stava and part of Tesera 


l AFP.AP) level five years ago. The Saudi Ara- Elveno Pasiorelli. local prefect 


Brush With Nuclear War Still Haunts U.S . ? Soviet 


Rv Walrer Pinois causing almost certain “chaos in part of the back to the Pentagon and wondering if I d the same urne. it was to prevent their umn- 

iL, East CoasL" as Secretaiy of Defense Robert ever see another Saturday nighL” tended use should Soviet forces attack and 

WicunSA tv ^fiirriiv On V S. McNamara put it during one of the first According to the recently released notes of try to seize control of them. 
WASHINGTON-On S^ur^Oa 27, pu “» that White House meeting on Oct. 27, 1962, Under the NATO treaty, a Soviet attack 

ku 6 A nil" Soviet "air defenses in Cuba, which that Mr. McNamara told the Excom that “inva- on Turkey would have Jed to “general war," 

lutaS. kluTishchev, offered to wttiidrawnu- bovtet air oetenses m vA.ua, ^ ^ joevitable: If we according lo Bromley Smith, wfclihetime 

Ctear missiles from LUba, madcnt Joon f. 1 ,l """ tl C micriW IVriwv 1 he Soviets MV executive director rtf lhe National Secn- 


Kennedy approved plans for air strikes on 
lhe missile sites, air bases and anti-aircraft 
installations on the island. The strikes were 
to take place Monday, just two days later. 

Kennedy and his colleagues on the Execu- 
tive Committee of top officials, known as 
Excom. convened to nandie the crisis, ex- 


TheBomb 
The Cuban Crisis 

Third of [our articles 


leave U.S. missiles in Ttirkey, the Soviets was executive director of the National Secu 
might attack Turkey. If the Soviets do attack ritv Council. 


the Turks, we must respond in the NATO 
area.” 

Thai -same day, however, Kennedy also 


Kennedy also delayed retaliation for the 
shooting down of the U-2, despite his order 
that the United States should destroy any 


V, AuheS>t% S, in id licence believed that SovietnucTear force, or even 10 keep track of put the missies in Cuba and his moves to get F^ ; Srt-nin, that if Khrushchw took the 
20 Soviet ^udSJ h oulof the costing enstr provoked oppMtoon missiltfs oul of Cuba, the United States 

missiles on the island were operational, with “The actions that we took on Saturday," in the Politburo. Two years later he was wouM remove its missiles from Turkey, but 

more becoming combat-ready each day. Mr. McNamara said to j MHidm immediate disarm- a comimunent was needed the next day. 

tkj. 1 -;-. a > n i a , 1 ,., lhat could have led, might Kennedy ordered the immediate uisann Amnn«< 


authorized actions designed to send peaceful Cuban-based anti-aircraft battery that hit a 
signals to Khrushchev, who had started the y g_ piane. 

Cuban crisis as an obvious gamble and now p na ii y , Kennedy authorized his brother 
was signaling that he wanted to aid Jt with- ^bert [ 0 gjve assurance to the Soviet Union 
out fighting. Both Khrushchev s decision to iju- o0 gh ns ambassador in Washington, Ana- 

mil tk* inieEilM in Aika and hkfflflVK in CCI ,.i> >k. 


INSIDE 

■ A Soviet general confirmed 

some details of a military re- 
shuffle. Page! 

■ The Reagan administration 
wants to expand aid to security 
police forces of four Central 
American countries. Page 3. 

■ An American businessman in 
China is on trial on charges that 
a fatal hotel fire was caused by 
his smoking in bed. Page 4. 

WEEKEND 


k - The abductions Thur*ixv oc- 

Minisirv in curn -'d in three separate incidents 
n 5“ 5 /iri »£?« in of Beirul 1,01 g««aH v f re- 

q^med bv foreigners. Thineen 
^ foreigners, including seven .Ameri- 

SSrJn StaSlStridh « have been tte&d in Lebanon 
identified. A . sjoJ-K^aman said it lhe las , 1() monlhi Mli are slU | 

was uuposstblc to confirm or deny . . 

OfliSak at the American Uni- 

10 a HSLIk?. tLto versirt and hospital recently cow 

J5T” . mb s io zr*; Un ^ n R «“ 

aiii offiaa 1 !)' n»»“S. “ armed mililiimcn and ^llsd on ihc 

man, a, 55 MtaB.bcte «J iota« awtorilics Ic , hanfcr u a^ngc 

^ T d I^nirtl fit ^ of direr American staff 

vs te^S' : S?5nS die niffllberi abdu0,ed Nt " 

Helicopter* Jlew Jo^ over tne loci _ n .4 i nne »qc^ 

valley Thursday, searching Tor «mber and June i ... 

signs of victims under the river of In another development, tne ts- 

mu j. raeJi-backed South Lebanon Army 


vember I9W and June l 4 S5. 

In another development, the Is- 
raeli-backed South Lebanon Army 


■ Apufa, Italy’s nig 
marked by tKousan< 
of history'. 


J heel, is 
of years 

PagcK 




more becoming combat-ready each day. Mr. McNamara said in a recent interview, removed from power. 

The Joint Chiefs of Staff had told the “were actions that could rjjeW, tca&A ^ 

Excom that theplanned bombing raids could have led, to a Soviet m il '^0' rcs g )Q ^ : - , ‘ ?J. USi^^SS; Miwcow teat the 

not be expected to destroy all the operational “l recaJ! leaving the. Wfttle hou« that step was utended ».*» Moscowteat tee 


ihroughUiegM- Ui >ri ,tou* ta -'■g ^ '«J 
tiiat at least one of them could be launched, dens of the White House to my car to drive a range of .U00 miles (2.400 kilometers). At 


that a commitment was needed the next day. 

Some officials objected to the proposed 
deal, but Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson 
asked, according to tbe notes of the meeting, 

(Continued on Page 5. CoL 1) 


BUSINESS/FTNANCE 

■ Mexico devalues the peso and 

makes cuts in government posi- 
tions. Page 13. 

■ Sir James Gohkntitb has be- 

come chairman of Crown Zel- ' 
lerbach Corp. Page 13. 


Trento magistrates in charge of Thursday reopened crossing points 
the judicial investigation issued a it had sealed off between tne nar- 
fourth arrest warrant, for AJessan- row strip it controls near the Israeli 
dro Bassanefli. managing director border and areas north of the belt, 
of the Prealpt Mining Co., w hich Israeli Army radio reported, 
owned tee dam. judicial sources The crossings were dosed two 
said. weeks ago after three car-bomb at* 

Giutio Rotta, a co-owner of the tacks on South Lebanon Army 
company, was already in detention, checkpoints at the northern edge of 
and his' brother. Aldo Rotta. has the Israeli-proclaimed security 
been served an arrest warrant in a strip, just north of the Israeli bor- 
Como hospital. Matteo Tomaa. a der. 

i. ■ r . ... i . i. « ^ ■ j- n 


forestry inspector, has also been 

arrested. 


Suicide bombings on July 9 and 
July 1? killed five South Lebanon 


The charges include involuntar. Army soldiers. 12 Lebanese civil- 
multiple manslaughter and invol- ians. Two Israeli soldiers were 


untarily causing a disaster. 


slightly injured. 



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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERAL^TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


South Africa 9 s Top Policeman: Complex and Very Powerful WORLD BRIEFS 


By Alan Cowell 

New y«* Times Serrirf 
PRETORIA — When he met 
with reporters the other day to give 
details of South Africa's new state 
of emergency. Lieutenant General 
Johann P. Coetzee. the commis- 
sioner of police, was asked a ques- 
tion that be took to be political in 
nature, so he declined to answer. 

He is a policeman, he said, nota 
politician: “The legislature makes 
the laws, and 1 obey them." 

But the image — of a ample cop, 
although one on a big beat — 
seemed to fall far short of the reali- 
ty. For years, as a secret policeman, 
he has been at the forefront of 
South Africa’s onslaught against 
political enemies, and be is said by 
associates to be an expen on inter- 
national co mmunis m. Since the 
state of emergency was proclaimed 
Sunday, be has had nearly absolute 
power to control the lives of mil- 
lions of South Africans. 

In charge of the day-to-day run- 
ning of the emergency, he is one of 
the most powerful men in the land. 

A protector to some and a hard, 
ruthless enemy to others. General 
Coetzee also seems more complex 
than his comment would acknowl- 
edge. 

In bis spare time, according to 
one account, he is a sculptor. He 
bolds university degrees in political 
science and history. He is said to be 

5 Blacks Die 
In Clashes 
With Troops 

By Glenn Frankel 

Washington Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Five 
more blacks have been killed in 
clashes with South African security 
forces, according to police reports 
Thursday. Police announced they 
bad arrested 127 more- people in 
their crackdown on black activists. 

The official death toll since Sun- 
day, when the white-minority gov- 
ernment declared a state of emer- 
gency in 36 South African cities 
and towns, stood at 16. Arrests un- 
der the declaration, which gives the 
police and army sweeping powers 
of arrest and seizure of property, 
stood at 792. 

Four persons were shot dead and 
16 others wounded in a confronta- 
tion between security forces and a 
crowd Wednesday in the black 
township of Daveyton, east of Jo- 
hannesburg. according to a police 
report released Thursday. 

Soldiers in the East Cape region 
shot and killed a 16-year-old black . 
youth Thursday, police said. They 
said blacks had stoned an army 
vehicle but refused to divulge the 
name of the township or the identi- 
ty of the victim. ' 

Police have cut back sharply cm 
the amount of information raeased 
on such modems as part of a cam- 
paign to play down unrest. 

A police vehide was fired on 
Wednesday and a policeman 
wounded in the Port Elizabeth 
township of Soweto, police said. 
They also reported about a dozen 
other incidents of unrest in uniden- 
tified townships Wednesday and 
Thursday. 

The reports of new deaths 
seemed to contradict police claims 
in recent days that unrest in the 
townships was winding down fol- 
lowing the declaration of a state oF 
emergency. 

A spokesman for the Detainees' 
Parents Support Committee, a civil 
rights monitoring group, said 
Thursday he believed police were 
withholding the names of at least 
100 people who had been detained. 

Meanwhile, the white commis- 
sioner of police for the dry of 
Soweto, said Thursday be was ban- 
ning all gatherings this weekend to 
celebrate the 67th birthday of Nel- 
son Mandela, leader of the out- 
lawed African National Congress. 

Mr. Mandela has served 22 years 
in prison on a life sentence for 
conspiring to overthrow the gov- 
ernment 


an arid student of ancient Greek 
philosophy. One newspaper said 
his achievements included a doc- 
toral thesis on Trotsky. 

Underlying those scholarly ac- 
complishments, however, is anoth- 
er reality. General Coetzee, 56, 
beads a 44,000-member police 
force that, even before the emer- 
gency, was viewed with loathing 
and fear by many blacks. 

White liberal South Africans call 
its actions heavy-handed and ex- 
cessive. Its tactics in black town- 
ships have been harsh, and many or 
the 500 people who have died since 
unrest was renewed last September 
have been killed, by official ac- 
knowledgment, by the police them- 
selves. 

The security police have been 
accused in open court of tenure. 
Their task, moreover, has been to 
act as the guardian of polities de- 
signed to shelter white minority 
•vie, and General Coetzee has risen 
through the ranks. 

When be met foreign reporters, 
he seemed to he at pains to avoid a 
threatening posture, while making 
it clear, too, that hi* current, wide- 
ranging powers include the ability 
to declare total censorship. He 
made no secret of his determina- 
tion to “cool down" the black 
townships with those powers. 

His whole working life, since he 
joined the mounted police in 1946, 



Words each as 
f ruthless’ are used 
to describe him, bat 
this assessment is - . 
balanced by 

<• 

reference to the 
thoughtfulness with 
which he perceives . 
his role. 


Johann P. Coetzee 


has been devoted to the force, im- 
plying great loyalty and much am- 
bition, and his reputation was buBi 
in the security branch. 

His true value emerged when as a 
“handler*’ of secret agents be mas- 
ter-minded and controlled the inf3- 

tbe SouLh African Com^misi^r- 
ty and other opposition groups. 
Gerard Ludi, for instance, me of 


General Coetzee’s agents, provided 
the evidence that put Bram Fischer, 
the country’s leading Communist, 
behind bars in 1966. 

South Africans who have studied 
his career use such words as “ruth- 
less" to describe his abilities as an 
interrogator and security operative, 
but they balance this assessment by 

r e f w p n g to his thou gh tfuincSS in 

his overall perception of his role. 


The pofice. he was quoted as say- 
ing before the emergency was de- 
clared, “must sot be another force 
to tear asunder what is already a 
deEcate nutation.” 

Interviewed when he took over 
as comnrissianer, he was quoted as 
saying he was more troubled by car 
theft than by subversives, and he 
set as priorities a streamlining and 
modernization of poEce work 
against common cmninals. The 
p re oc c up a ti ons have changed since 
then, however: 

General Coetzee had beaded the 
security police for four years when 
be took over as commissianer of 
police in June 1983. He was the 
third successive commissioner to 
have been d r a wn from the that 
branch, suggesting that the govern- 
ment's priority! in appointing its 
most senior policeman is to cope 
with those who would challenge 
white power. 

In that ask General Coetzee has 
played a central role in police ef- 
forts to undermine the outlawed 
African National Congress, the 
most prominent of the exiled 
poops fighting apartheid. 

In one interview he said the most 
important internal security job for 
die police was to penetrate the 
“sgjport systems” used by the con- 
gress’s operatives inside South Af- 
rica, implying the creation of a 
wide network of informers. Before 


7 Nations to Seek Auti-EBjackine Steps 

: moon tins vio- _ . _ * 

hms-focnred *° m (Reuters) — Western UhtnomM pW) 

sometimes on purported poDctcd- to press for tougher standards at aupons considered to be vulnerable fe 
laborators— could ieooar&zethm ^jackets, delegation sources said. There i 


the 

African in: 

— Western anti-terrorism «pms agreedThw 
’^ u - - to oress for touzher standards at airports considered to be 

were few details. 

The agreement was readied at a meeting of officials from seven 
industrialized countries, the latest in a regular series started in 1978 when 
countries at a summit meeting here agreed on measures to combat ah 
terrorism. The seven are the United States, Canada, Italy. Japan, France, 
Britain and West Germany. 

A source said: “They agreed to approach the International Gvg 
Aviation Organization to seek a general tightening of standards, qq. 
proved technical means, belter trained and equipped staff ami improved 
reporting of suspicious activity.” The sources said there was no agree, 
meat on the call by the United States for a boycott of Beirut InleraatiQtal 
Airport and a ban on Lebanon's Middle East Airlines. 





laborators— could jeop ar dize tfadr 
lines of conmmntcatum to their in- 
formers, sDencing sources. 

General Coetzee is said to be- 
lieve Thar the battle aptinq infihra- 
lors and urban guemHasis.a psy- 
chological war. rather than a 
straight physical fight. Those infil- 
trators who arc identified, he is said 
to believe; should be pursued and 
destroyed without compromise. 

He is said to be a man of * 
decisions who has the ear of 
dent Pieter W. Botha. He is a mem- 
ber of the secretive State Security 
Council of military, police and gov- 
ernment figures, which has great 
influence over the nation's affairs. 

By some accounts, . General 
Coetzee has pondered aloud 
whether there should be some alter- 
native to trials for suspected urban 
guerrillas, because public bearings 
allow Ids opponents to gain in- 
sights into his tactics and strategy. 

Ironically, in a newspaper inter- 
view shortly after he was appointed 
police commissioner, he was 
quoted as saying that South Afri- 
ca’s greatest success in countering 


iv 


Poland Tightens Grip on Universities 

WARSAW (Reuters) —The Polish authorities tightened their political 
grip Thursday on Poland’s universities, where dissent and support for £ 
ideals of the banned Solidarity free trade union are still entrenched. 

The parliament voted overwhelmingly to make changes in the educa- 
tion laws that ban political activity in universities and make it easier for 
the government to dismiss teachers. The legislation will also allow the 
authorities tororevent the election of politically unacceptable university 
heads and revives the need for teachers to take a loyalty oath to die 
principles of socialist education. 

The parliament also voted late 
recognized unions created since 191 
any return to trade union, pluralism 

unions were given a legal right to be consulted by factory managements 
about working conditions and the distribution * 



urban guerrillas had been its ability ^ ti n /■» • . nn_n 

to do so without declaring a state of Women rail on Compromise at 1 alto 


emergency. 



General Nikolai F. Chervov refused to confirm or deny in 
Moscow on Thursday the return of Marshal Nikolai V. 
Ogarkov, former chief of staff, to a high military position. 


Austria Publishes List 
Of 136 Tainted Wines 


s 


Renters 

VIENNA — Austria’s Health 
Snistzy, in an attempt to ease 
iblic alarm over the wme scandal, 
ilisbed a list of 136 wines 
laced with a toxic chemical used in 
car antifreeze. 

The list, comprising wines sold 
by 46 companies, was issued 
Wednesday during a dispute over 
who was responsible for an appar- 
ent delay in action since wine 
mixed with diethylene-glycol ■ was 
found in Austria three months ago. 

Meanwhile, a fifth person was 
detained in connection with the 
scandal after arrests last weekend. 
Police said they had begun investi- 
gations into 10 more wine a 
nies and said they 
tional proceedings. 

In Marseille, police seized 90,000 
bottles of Austrian wine after tests 
disclosed the presence of diethy- 
lene glycol a spokesman for the 
importer, Claude Cherki, said 
Thursday. 

In West Germany, the Wiesba- 
den public prosecutor issued a war- 
rant for the arrest of a wine import- 
er alleged to have forged 
documents to import laced Austri- 
an wine. 

Three wine companies, which 


had sold doctored Austrian wines 
bought at low prices, are being in- *!»*£*. SrJTSS 1 

vesugated, police said. Theyaddcd rephed with 

that they suspected all the compa- 


nies of knowing that the chemical 
which can cause kidney damage, 
had been added to the wine. 

The contaminated Austrian wine 
has been found in West Germany, 
Switzerland, the Netherlands. Brit- 
ain, France, Poland, Greece and 
North America and Hong Kong. 

Austria’s Health Ministry first 
advised the public on Monday not 
to drink quality Austrian wines un- 
til a nationwide hunt for laced 
wines had been completed. 

Since then the chemical which 
was used to sweeten wines, has also 
been found in ordinary table wines. 
Wines with potentially lethal doses 
of it have been found in West Ger- 
many and Austria. 

The ministry’s statement came 
nearly two weeks after a simil ar 
warning by West Gennany. where 
large quantities of contaminated 
Austrian wine have been seized. 

An Austrian Health Minis try 
spokesman said the list did not in- 
clude wines containing “a few 
t” of the chemical The list 
[tides wines from Italy’s South 
Tirol region and one from Hungary 
marketed by an Austrian company. 


Soviet Hints 
At Military 
Shake-Up 

By William J. Eaton 

Los Angela Tima Service . 

MOSCOW — A Soviet Defense 
Ministry spokesman confirmed the 
removal of the commander of the 
Soviet nuclear missile units Thurs- 
day amid signs of a top-levd mili- 
tary shake-up. 

Marshal Vladimir F. Tolubko, 
70, one of a dozen deputy defense 
ministers and the bead of the Soviet 
Strategic Forces since 1972, was 
removed. But his successor was not 

nufruit 

In another move, Colonel Gener- 
al Alexei A. Yepishcv was replaced 
as head of the aimed forces’ politi- 
cal directorate by a former deputy. 
General Alexei D. Lizicbev, 57. 
General Lizichev was a senior staff 
officer with Soviet troops in East 
Germany until mid-July. 

General Nikolai F. Chervov, 
who confirmed the shifts in replies 
to questions at a news conference; 
identified Marshal Tohibko’s re- 
placement only as “another talent- 
ed and able military leader” who 
would be named later. 

He refused to confirm or ‘deny 
reports that Marshal Nikolai V. 
Ogarkov has returned from obscu- 
rity as commander of Warsaw Pact 
forces in place of Marshal Viktor 

G. Kulikov. 

“We do not have such infoima- 
a smile to 

questions. 

The reports, which included the 
two.changes announced Thursday, 
were published in the West a week 
after the Soviet Communist Party 
leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, met 
with mtlhaiy commanders during a 
tiro to the aty of Minsk an JulyTl. 

Marshal Ogarkov, 67, was uncer- 
emoniously removed as chief of 
staff and first deputy defense min- 
ister in September and transferred 
•to “other work.” 

Marshal Ogarkov has advocated 
greater spending on arms to fend 
off a perceived threat from the 
United States. 



World 


NAIROBI (UPn — Negotiators at the United Nations Women’s 
Conference failed Thursday m an effort to reach an 1 1 th- hour agreement 
on apartheid, sanctions against South Africa and Zionism, thus dealing a 
setback to U.S. efforts to limit political declarations in the final decs- 
meat. 

“We are not jmng to be able to resolve these problems; we have nm out 
of time.” said Rosario Manalo, head of the committee set up to draft the 
document, which is to chan women’s strategies until 2000 . 

The inability to agree on wording acceptable to the 157 nations on the 
controversies means the document will come to a vote Friday at the 
plenary session, where Communist-bloc nations and the Third 
have a large majority. 

The US. delegation, headed by President Ronald Reagan’s i 
Maureen, had demanded that die final document drop its call for 
mandatory sanctions against Pretoria and its equation of Zionism with 
racism. 


Sikh Militants Reject Punjab Accord 

AMRITSAR, India (AP) — Sikh miEtanis pledged Thursday to 
continue their “holy war” for greater autonomy, condemning the settle- 
meat between moderates and the Indian government announced 
Wednesday to resolve the Punjab crisis as “aarab in the bank.” 

President Rajiv Gandhi ana Harchand Singh Locgowal leader of a 
moderate faction of the Skh party, signed an 11 -point accord aimed at 

in Punjab, hom^of miostof the Sikhs in India. Xoaaa f 

Analysts said the success of the agreement, however, hinged on the 
reaction of two Sikh leaders. P&rkash Singh Badal a former Punjab chief 
minister, and Gurctuuan Sing h Tohra, president of the ««»iu Sikh 
religious council Both arc members of Mr. LongowaTs Akati Dal party. 




T » 

! ! • 


For the Record 


Economics Minister Martin Barfgemann of West Genna- 
ny, left, Thursday in Bnisseb *nni Foreign Trfede Minister 
Jacques Pqos of Luxembourg at the ministers’ meeting. 

EC Offers Concessions 
Li Steel Fight With U.S. 


Rentes 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Community offered new conces- 
sions Thursday on sted exports to 
the United States and vowed it 
would retaliate against any unilat- 
eral import curbs imposed try 
Washington. 

The French minister of industry 
and foreign trade, Edith Cresson, 
said the EC was prepared to Emit 
its sales of 16 of 17 specialty sted 
products, excluding semifinished 


Two men blew tbemselres upas they were trying to plant a bomb during 
a wave of attacks an the police in Colombia's three main cities, Bogotk 
Cali and Medellin, officers said Wednesday. (Reuters} 

AM 74 persons aboard a Colombian military cargo plane, nosed into 
passenger service during a national airline pilots* awe, died Wednesday 
■Wbea use plane crashed in the jungle during a rainstorm, officials said 
Thursday in Bogoti. The Aviauca airline stake ended Thursday. ( UPI) 
Secretary General Javier Pfaez de Ctafihr of the United Nations bn 
been admitted to a hospital in New Yoik for tests after abdominal i 


bowel his spokesman said Thursday. (Reuters) 

The new gov ern m ent of the breakaway Turkish Cypriot state called 
Thursday for peace negotiations with the Greek Cypnot side to establish 
a two-zone federal republic. (AP) 

Prime Minister Fefipe Gonzflez of Spain and Prime Minister Mirio 
Somes of Portugal met briefly Thursday in Lisbon to discuss the entry oT 
their countries into the Europem Community. (Raders) 


Diplomats said die tough West rinrrprfinn 
German stand was backed by the wriUCUOfl 

Netherlands and Denmark, whale The size and terms off a loan to Scandinavian Airlines System reported 
Italy wanted to allow die payment in a Reuters dispatch Tuesday were injected The size of the loan w» 
of inves&nent subsidies to contin- 100 nriHian European currency units (578.4 million) and the interest we 
ue- set at 9 percent over 10 years. 

U.S. Arms Plan lor Arabs Assailed 


research or environmental pur- 


But he also has argued for a sted, to 85 percent of last year’s 
greater emphasis on conventional level 


West Cool Toward South Africa Sanctions 


(Continued from Page 1) 

Johannesburg. Norway also wd- 
comed the French move. 

Sweden took similar measures 
against South Africa in 1979 and 
tightened investment regulations 
this year. 

Canada took steps earlier this 
month to curtail its trade' with 
South Africa. 

In Paris, the leader of the em- 
ployers’ federation, Yvon Gattaz, 
described the French step as seri- 
ous and hoped that it would not 
impair trade. 

Jean Franco is- Poncel, foreign 
minister during the previous 
French administration of President 
Valery Giscard d’Estaing, warned 
that while some action was neces- 
sary, “we have too many interests 
in Africa to isolate ourselves.” 

At the United Nations, France 
proposed that the Security Council 
call on South Africa to lift its emer- 
gency decree and also asked the 


other members of the lunation 
body to support imposition erf* 
sanctions against Pretoria, includ- 
ing suspension of foreign invest- 
ment 

The council was due to meet lat- 
er Thursday at the request of 
France. 

In Washington. Mr. Speakes said 
the United States had no plans to 
hold high-level meetings with 
Sonth Africa od the state of emer- 
gency. 

■ South Africa Seeks Talks 

South Africa has proposed hold- 
ing high-level talks with the United 
Slates somewhere in Europe to ex- 
plain its recent actions and to try to 


down in some black areas of the 
country and to resume negotiations 
for the independence of South- 
West Africa, also known as Namib- 


ia. 


But 8 senior State Departnumt 
official said the administration 
wanted to be fairly certain that 
talks would lead to a change in the 
South Africans’ policy. 

“We’re not setting precondi- 
tions,” he said, “but we want evi- 
dence that at some print, they will 
be prepared to negotiate seriously 
in the region.” 


arms on the ground that nuclear 
arsenals oo both the U.S. and Sovi- 
et tides were so great that neither 
could strike first without receiving 
an unacceptable retaliatory blow. 

Marshal Ogarkov. who publicly 
defended the Soviet Union after its 
air force shot down a South Korean 
airliner in September 1983, was 
once regarded as a possible minis- 
ter of defense. 

He was shunted aside, however, 
when Dmitri F. Ustinov held the 
minister’s post and Konstantin U. 
Chernenko had become Soviet 
president. Marshal Ustinov died in 
December and Mr. Chernenko 
died in March. 

There has been no official 
nation of why Marshal 
was removed. Western diplomats 
speculated that be may have had a 
personality clash with Marshal Us- 
tinov or opposed resuming amu- 
control talks with the United 
States. 

Another change announced re- 
cently was the promotion of Gener- 
al Pyotr Lushev, 61, head of the 
Moscow Military District to com- 
mander of Soviet forces in East 
Germany. 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


BACHHXXS • MASTER'S ■ DOCTORATE 

foe UMi, Acodi m tc Ifl* Dwti-m w 

Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 

PACBK WESTON UNIVERSITY 

60c N. Sepulveda Btvd„ 

Los Angeles. Californio 
90049, D«Pt, 23, U-SJL 


region. 

■ Tutu Criticizes Reagan 
Bishop Desmond Tutu of South 

|/uiiu no ikkMii awuuiu auu i v ujr iu Africa, recipient of the 1984 Nobd c • ifT*Tf v? i 
end the chill in relations between Peace Prize, accused President oDHlII Will £iXD 6 l 
the two countries, according to Reagan on Thursday of giving “aid * * 

Reagan administration officials, and comfort to the perpetrators of |llf*nral Fnfplffnprs 
The New York Times reported one of most radsl^ysrems since 
Thursday. Nazism and Communism." 

The officials said the South Afri- “We will not forget what has 
can request, made in the last week, happened to our people and where 
was under intense study. Someoffi- the American administration stood 
eials are said to favor such a meet- at a time when we needed than 
ing to provide South Africa with an desperately,” Bishop Ttiiu said in a 
incentive to ease the present crack- telephone interview. 



JSmy'i Mwtynk Sax. ® 

Esf. 1911 

tell rhe taxi driver “sank roo doc noo’ 
5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 
Fallen rurm Srr 9 , MUNICH 
M/S A5TOR 


ar sea 



Reuters 

MADRI D — Hundreds of thou- 
sands of illegal forego residents 
have three months to obtain a resi- 
dence permit or face expulsion 
from Spain, a move aimed at com- 
bating crime committed by foreign- 
ers. 

Under a new law, foreigners who 
do not have their documents in 
order by Oct. 23 are liable to be 
expelled. The law came into effect 
on Wednesday. 

Authorities can also expel for- 
eigners who are working wi thout a ' 
work permit are engaging in illegal 
activities, arc endangering public 
order or state security, are begging 
or are insolvent. 


She said the European conxmis- 
sioner for external relations and 
trade, WBly de Qercq. had dis- 
closed this final offer after die EC 
rejected a U.S. demand for a 25- 
percent cut from the 1984 levels. 

The minis ters, mean while in- 
structed the European Commission, 
to prepare a list of retaliatory mea- 
sures to be improved at a special 
meeting next Thursday if no solu- 
tion is found, diplomats said. 

The United States has set a dead- 
line for that day and threatened 
unilateral action to slash imparts 
from the EC of all 17 disputed 
products to the 1981 level if there is 
no agreement. 

That measure is particularly un- 
favorable to the EC as exports of 
those products in 1981 were less 
than one- third of the 1.4 mi&taii 
tons (1.54 million short was) 
shipped last year. 

The U.S. move would virtually 
halt further shipments of the prod- 
ucts for the rest of 1985. 

Mr. de Gercq said that the U.S. 
trade representative, Clayton Yeut- 
ver, was due to report Tuesday to 
the Reagan administration's Eco- 
nomic Policy Council 

Semifinished products nuke 19 
the bulk of the European exports 
under dispuje, but the EC has re- 
fused to n^otiate on them, diplo- 
mats said. 

Industry ministers also agreed in 
principle on a three-year transition 
period for phasing' out restrictions 
on sted output and prices within 
the EC as part of a plan to modern- 
ize and streamline the industry. 

But they did not adopt commis- 
sion proposals to extend subatfes 
to ease plant dosings beyond the 
end of this year, the deadline previ- 
ously set by ministers. 


By Dayid B. Otcaway 
Washington Post Service 
WASHINGTON — Twti con- 
gressional supporters of Israel have 
warned that the Reagan.adminis- 
tration’s plans to sdL advanced 
weaponry to Jordan and Saudi 
Arabia would provoke a divisive 
arms-sales debate and .would harm 
U.S. efforts to renew thepeace pro- 
cess in the Middle East 


mari e negotiations” for peace at the 
same time that the United States 
proposes to sell sophi sti cated arms 
to Israel's Arab neighbors. 

The comments by the-two House 
members, known as strong sup- 
porters of Israel were taken as a 
precursor of the likely reaction of 
many senators and representatives 
who have backed resolutions or 
amendments expressing strong op- 
position to selling sophisticated 
arms to Jordan and Saudi Arabia 
now. 

The arms- transfer stndv 


The warning was made by two 
Democratic representatives, Tom 

Lantos erf California and Lawrence . __ „ 

J. Smith of Florida, prior to a ^ arm-wnsier study is ex- 

closed-session briefmg^or three “ 

House committees on a new ad- Sc P^f n . ber - ™ mj ? ra J* on 
nrinistratiem study on the weapon- < £“ ste - 10 sdl additional advanced 


ry needs -of Middle. Eastern coun- 
tries. 

The congressmen assailed the 
administration for presenting the 
document at what Mr. Lantos 
called “thekast opportune time.” 

' “You're setting yourself up in a 
very, very confrontational mode 
with both the House and Senate,” 
Mr. Smith said Wednesday. 

Mr. Lantos said it tamply bog- 
gles the human mud” to 
Israel to engage seriously in 


aircraft, mobile groand-to-air and 
air-to-air missiles to Jordan and 
Saiidi Arabia. 

Seeking to allay congressional 
concern, Richard W. Murphy, as- 
sistant secretary of state lor Near 
Eastern and' Sooth Asian affaire , 
told the House Middle East sub- 
committee Wednesday that the 
study was “not a decision docu- 
ment” and made no specific recom- 
mendations for any arms sales. 

Mfr. Morphy also said that 
“some” of tbs seven names of Pal- 


estinians being considered for t 
J ordanian-Palestinian delegation 
to preliminary talks with the Unit- 
ed States wire acceptable to Wash- 
ington. 

He did not indicate which, bnl i 
noted that Prime Minister Shimon !•' ‘ 
Peres has reversed his initial oppo- 
sition to the list and accepted the 
two West Bank residents an it, 
Hanna Seniors and Fazz AbuRab- 
meh. 

Israel is still strongly opposed to 
the meeting because h fears the*d. 
.outcome may be the start of a •* 

logue between the United States ] . 
and the Palestine Liberation Orga- • 

nization. . 

■ Israd-Egypt Relations jfcr 

Mr. Peres has odd Israeli offi- | 
rials that there has recently been in 
improvement in relations between > . 
Israel and Egypt, The New York 
Hums reported Wednesday from > 

Td Aviv, quoting a source dose to ■ 
discussions between the two na- 
tions. 

officials, reached by 
denied that there had 

been 
toward 


iH 








^rchmge in Egypt's poficy 


Conferees Agree on New Nerve Gas Weapons 




(Contained bora Age 1) 

the air-force to make three rests of a 
new anti -satellite weapon aimed at 
an object in space, and allow re- 
search costing op to $2.75 billion 
fra- the Stralegc Defense Initiative, 
the space-based rrdsste . defense 
program. 

Several sources said the compro- 
mise on chemical weapons would 
probably get an angty response in 
thcHoase. 


The House, after blocking the 


formally agreed to deploy the 
weapons in Western Europe. Mr. 
Spratt said that because the weap- 
ons would most likely be used on 
European batflefidds, Europeans 
shpuld be forced to confront the 
issue 

The Senate approved the pro- 
gram with few limits Senate con- 
ferees argued that the NATO pro- 
vision would cause political 
problems in Europe and give allies 
a veto over a matter involving 
American security. 


The conferees also agreed to sevJ 
eral other safegnanb 00 the prof 

gram, indnrtn^r rial 

the Pentagon overcome technical 
problems that have been found in 
the chemical Bigeye bomb and tbit 
the two chfflmak dint <wmhine a 
form a lethal agent in the net 
weapon be stored in -separate 
states. 



Because of the 

tty of the chenricaf weapons isae. a 

, House aide said, Mr. Aspin was 

gysetbynmusrera. * adrmnistration's plans 10 romne TheagrcemenLworked om bv a Revising an tmusoal arrangement 
Economics Minister Martin products of chemical weapons group tSded Represent*- m ^teHonrewouttbcpltt 
inHemann of West Gennanv said four years, anoroved oroduc- c a a 


after the existing aid arrangements 
expire. 

He said the commission had 
been ordered to work oufa^ew 


The most stringent was a re- 
quirement devised * “ 

tive John btSprattfe: 
of Son*- -”**■-**• 


bad worked out a -deployment plan 
with tite allies. The conferees ap- 
proved a nGabihdmg statement 


plan to allow only limited aid for could am ATf) “j 


^ Jgr Qemocra t ,spod§ritg that- die new weapons we ap o ns who swkdvtT sa 
“leaded;** replace existing year, would argue &x l 

Cy Unless NjWD. ..stockpiled ' w eap o ns in theHonse. - 


Sources sad tint Me. Aspu,* 
former opponent ' of chrafidt 
switched: sttefel 










N: - 



** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


Page 3 


S “U.S. Plans to Expand 
Aid for Security Forces 

«-. WrA, dcrerf.- a ^ Il «Ttr . ; ■ " 

In 4 Latin Countries 




~'-cs, Ca 


«£SS^' 


ByDpyleiicManus . 

La Angela Tunes Semce - 

JFproach ^ ^ • WASHINGTON —The Reagan 

■Sfa! ughia, 6 inter ^io, administration is planning a major 
3 -wc euuiS*? °f ftoSc i ‘ e_iJ “ ‘ 


to even scrutinize what the Bdrnm- 
istration is doing.” 

Mr. MDler said he would attempt 
to block US. aid to Guatemala, 
which he charged “is carrying on 


ic cdu^T 1 ? °f C otpansion of aid to Central Amen- wmea he cnarged ^ carrying oi 
i ««rccs Sl ^f .ra^ntenialsaaraty forces, renew- - gsno?de a S? UKt *** g*® people, 

.‘•w it ■ - .«jj ti» J — ■ » Administration officials 

that they may have to drop aid to 


“S U^ des with police 
idle that have long beeoadS 


'of death squad assassinations, ac- 
cording to government officials. 

Responding to an attack in San 
Salvador last month in which four 
U.S. marines were among 13 per- 
sons k3M, "the administration will 


^ponVni, 


.■J* a ‘"wa arc <M 5wfi ask Ccmgress for at least S53 m3- 
^ chT^Sci} :ii<m * ' ‘ ' 


’ in equipment and training for 

police forces in four Central Amer- 
- -ition vMl a *k ican commies, the officials said, 
.pt-uticailv UnajxJ.Tj 0 *^ . The OA also has moved to in- 
^ !acTffiJf lc « , fc arase its hdp to Salvadoran inter- 
■ • ^n, jial security units, resuming its sus- 
«i-."csc:i'. i fc Sl pended relationship with the 


- rated V 





rfvethrveprobsenB 

tile JiTim.i. ^“Hln 


5 sLateces until 2000^ **>' "dering 
'vita 

-b»x- r-siwss sJ 


It would be the Erst such large- 
.scale program since 1973, when 
■ Congress ended training of foreign 
police after allegations that it tied 
the United' States to human rights 
abuses. The plan also would reverse 
■a ban cm most U.S. security aid to 
Guatemala, which ended in 1977 
; because of killings of civilians. 

1 Such aid would have been widely 
'opposed in the United States only 
two years ago, when El Salvador 
ce forces were accused of mur- 
_ thousands of Salvadoran ci- 
vilians. But administration officials 
say they are satisfied tfaat the Salva- 


*»>!«;: Ronald Reag® 1 
: fisa! uocumsn dr» ; 

:a anv. ,t*. equiuon cfZi^ r 


let Punjab Accaj 

ikh fiuitjr.: i pledged TW, administration’s plans a 
ir iu;ur.rrr\. ^damiiatWp -Utors areHkdy to appri 
he lniar. .’.HernTJ . “Congress is clearly i 


gWcreseu ane 
-j "a '.tibia Aciai' 


reformed. They foresee Utile difri- 
* culty in winning congressional ap- 
proval for aid. 

“They've cleaned up their act,” a 
.State Department official said at 
'the Salvadorans. “A lot of the gar- 
bage in the middle and upper ranks 
are gone.” 

A congressional opponent of the 
administration's plans agreed legjs- 
rove the aid. 
_ in the mood 
to be wiffingly stampeded," said 
George Miller, 

ar- 

unneces- 

.^ry. “We have lost our willingness 


Guatemala. 

. The aid package, the details of 
which axe still under discussion, 
indudes at least $53 million for 
equipment and training for the po- 
lice forces of H Salvador, Guate- 
mala, Honduras and Costa Rica. 
The amount could grow i>»later 
years, officials said. 

The aid would buy vehicles, radi- 
os and technical equipment for po- 
lice forces, pay for training of spe- 
cial anti- terrorism uxuts and 
expand the programs of a new re- 
gional police training institute in 
Costa Rka, they said. 

The administration has already 
taken a series of actions in. response 

to the June 19 deaths of the four 
U.S. marines and nine civilians, 
who were gunned down as they sat 
at a sidewalk caffc in San Salvador. 

The CIA has increased the size of 
a counterterrorist team that is 
working with Salvadoran authori- 
ties ana has provided its station in 
San Salvador with equipment to 
improve interception of rebel radio 
communications, officials said. 

The State Department, mean- 
while, has offered a reward of up to 
$ 100,000 for information leading to 
the arrest of the gunmen and has 
sped up aid to the Salvadoran gov- 
ernment’s Special Investigative 
Unit, which is working on the case. 

Officials believe they con win the 
debate over helping foreign police 
forces with poor human rights re- 
cords. 



Panel Moves to Cut Medicare, 
Extend U.S. Cigarette Tax 


By Spencer Rich 

It aihingm Pl>h Stove 

WASHINGTON — The House 
Ways and Means Committee has 
voted to extend the 1 6-cen ts-a-pack 
cigarette tax. enlarge the federal 
welfare program and cut Medicare 
irng as it approved legislation 
it would reduce the federal defi- 
cit by S 19 billion over the next 
three years. 

The final vote Wednesday was 
22-14. without a single Republican 
supporting the measure. 

Republicans reportedly opposed 
the measure because of the exten- 
sion of the cigarette tax and 
changes in the welfare program. 

“The bill proves that budgets are 
not dead, that deficits are as worri- 
some as ever before.” said Repre- 
sentative Dan Rostenkowski. a 
Democrat of Illinois and chairman 
of the House Ways and Means 
Committee. “We have once again 
met our budget target without cut- 
ting the nation's safety net." 

Mr. Rostenkowski said the 
Medicare cuts would not bun ben- 
eficiaries. 

The Medicare cuts in (he bill 


3 Networks to Let U.S. Examine Hijack Crisis Tapes 


By Aloe S. Jones 

He* York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — After a day of 
negotiating with Justice Depart- 
ment officials. ABC NBC ana Ca- 
ble News Network have agreed to 
comply in large measure with sab* 
poenas for luge quantities of vid* 
d other maieru 


itfcjr.d SjRzr: unioKiLk*, Representative George Mil 
. Tugcini ‘il.-wv jc-J*' .Democrat of California, who 
rarer r rfiuj: -j wzwZ goes that the aid may be unne 


cotapes and other material relating 
to the 17-day Beirut hostage crisis 
that followed the hijacking of a 
TWA airliner last month. 

A CBS spokesman said Tuesday 

that the network would seek a _ - — . . 

“We’re going to argue that the meeting with Justice Department 1 

best way to keep that under control officials on Thursday to discuss the *e3fi 

is to get involved in the training vKleotanes. films. stiH 

process,” a Stale Department offi- 
cial said. “Of course, there is an 

opposing argument that we did In sqnrste statements, the three 
train them in the ’60s and it simply networks characterized their deti- 
prorimrd mm^ '-rirawi tTypressinn -sons somewhat differently. Both 
But m leave that argument to the ABC and NBC seemed to have 
opposition.” reached a com p ro mi se with the Jus- 


subpoena, but that no dwjft/wi had 
yet been made regarding what the 
network would do. 


' i-j r:asmtm 

JKkws Sikh: in India 

• c^rcrtricr.:. h.Muxer.kngiK — — — 

^y^£S, : U.S. Says Relief Is Stalled in Ethiopia 

Kenyan Trucks Not Allowed to MoveFood, Official Asserts 


tice Department regarding the ba- 
sis for turning over the material. 

Both indicated they would pre- 
view the material sought by the 
department and provide any mate- 
rial that could help identify or 
prosecute the hijackers. 

The original subpoenas would 
have allowed federal officials to 
view all videotapes and other mate- 
rials relating to the hostag e crisis, 
according to network officials. 

ABC, CBS and NBC were served 
from the Jus- 
asked for all 

,hs 

unit audio material ta fru in^eout 
and Algiers in connection with the 
hijagtnwfl - a similar subpoena has 
been issued far CNN, but it was 
not delivered Tuesday. 

The subpoenas asked for materi- 
al — whether broadcast or not 


tejwru'.v: 


t'.vv.T iva'v 

r.rc? Maalm 

%-i-.cv— — * 

/ii 

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.— r 2 rlcixarfB 

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de Cuellar 
•* \ j-rk ?<■: 

- k .r.f.inr.r-i-oa^san** 
iav I* 

ridkawa'- 1 ..-i.o 

T J »|n J pr£ 5 i 


tinnr:. 


ik 


•k- j.'tJ; 

ji”' - ‘.'Til 

ats.S”' - ;ri 


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1 ,.i. iT.C (h£ 0^ 


The Associated Press 

■. WASHINGTON — A Reagan 
■administration iniernational aid 
(Offidal expressed “deep frustra- 
tion" Thursday .with Ethiopia be- 
cause thai..cQ«atiy' J s. gpv^nmeqt. 
. has refused to. aHo«Ltiucks. rented, 
by the United States to distribute 
emergency fqod shipments. _ 

,i M. Peter McPherson, adminis- 
.• trator of the Agency for Interqa- 
.tional. Devdopment. told a edn- 
. gresaonal panel that the United 

• States had planned to rent 100 
■trucks with drivers in Kenya. 

■ The agency intended to have 
'■those trucks driven to Ethiopia, 

• where they would deliver food to 
•starving people. 

The trucks would be controlled 
by the private voluntary organiza- 
tions that are, for the most part, 

• handling food distribution in the 
Marxist-governed country, Mr. 

-‘McPherson said. 

One major problem in Ethiopia 
is the lack at vehicles to transport 



M- Peter McPherson 


grain and other food from the pons 
to the people in need, he said. A 
substantial Amount of food is sit- 
ting in the ports. 


bs Assail^ Rock Hudson Has AIDS, 

His Spokeswoman Confirms 




He tdd the House Select Com- 
mittee an Hunger that the agency 
could not get permission to send 
rented trucks into the country. 

“We think there is no reason we 
can’t bring” tracks and Kenyan 
drivers into Ethiopia, he said. 

Tic Reagan tiamna^tntian has 
repeatedly criticized the Ethiopian 
government for fating to make 
available their own trucks to make 
food deliveries. 

On a related matter, Mr. 
McPherson said that Ethiopia now 
“appears ready” to allow addition- 
al feedings in two northern regions 
of the country, Tigre and Eritrea. 

U.S. officials say millions of 
hungry people in those two prov- 
inces have been unable to get rood, 
or have been denied it, breause of 
the civil war between die Marxist 
government and secessionists. 

Mr. McPherson told the panel 
the United States has provided 
“enormous amounts of food" to 
Ethiopia and other countries in Af- 
rica, totaling wdl over $1 biltion. 

As for the long-term, he said he 
did not consider Africa a “conti- 
nent of desperation," and he point- 
ed to India as an example of a 
country that has become virtually 
sdT-suffidenl in food just two de- 
cades after a severe famine. ■ 


Computer Aids 
For ILS. Phones 
Are Proposed 

The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — The 
U3. government proposed ma- 
jor rues revisions Thursday to 
allow Americans to program 
high-powered telephone-com- 
pany computers to leave or take 
messages, ring several phones 
to deliver a message at a set 
time^ screen unwarned calls or 
set priorities for accepting in- 
coming calls. 

The Federal Communica- 
tions Commission, in the pro- 
posal , abandoned its present 
approach, which separates the 
telephone and computer indus- 
tries by applying strict defini- 
tions to different kinds of ser- 
vice and by banning most 
phone services defined as “en- 
hanced." 

The pang chairman, Marie S. 
Fowler, said that the commis- 
sion was seeking to “bring tech- 
nological benefits to the com- 
mon man." 

The present rules were estab- 
lished before the breakup of the 
Befl System into several region- 
al systems and would continue 
to apply to the American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. 




. 

* "■ MiilS fi, 


! : 


Compiled bi Our Staff From Dupatcha consult with aU AIDS sp ecialis t, 
PARIS — Rock Hudson has but fell SI and had gone to the 
' AIDS, or acquired immune deft- American Hospital of Paris. 

’dency syndrome, and has known it Upon examining him, doctors at 
’ ys&j , for more than a year, a spokeswom- the hospital discovered “abnonnal- 
a#! ^ an for the American film actor said iues" in his liver and planned to do 
" rfc \ Thursday. further tests as soon as he was 

' • j:.J & v ' The spokeswoman. Yanou Col- stronger, Mrs. Collar! said. 

..lart, said that Mr. Hudson, 59, had Asked how the actor acquired 
. ... : n£l u ^i(been diagnosed in the United the disease, which most frequently 
States as having AIDS. strikes homosexuals, intravenous 

She said he had come to Paris to £ i ru 8 users and recipients of blood 
— — transfusions, Mrs. Collart said. 


Vc 1 




* lvW'-P 

m: •**•••• 



' ; / \ Lr-: «?' 


-M 


Haulers 

‘ GENEVA ■— Spaghetti guide- 
'™es have been published by the 
International Organization for 
Standardization. The standards 
‘specify bow to visually assess the 
1 surface of spaghetti and other pas- 
* tas and how to judge “resistance to 
cuttiqg between te«h and crashing 
^ between tongue and palate.” 

: : 

■•er,V 


“He doesn’t have any idea now 
bow be contracted AIDS." She 
added: “Nobody around him has 
AIDS." 

Earlier this week, another agent 
of Mr. Hudson had said the actor 
bod inoperable liver cancer. The 
hospital denied that report 
Wednesday and said Mr. Hudson 
was hospitalized Sunday with “fa- 
tigue and general malaise." 

(AP, Return) 


ve fa# 


V. * : 

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Su£fea 


SHIRTMAKER - TAILOR 


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broadcast — covering the hijacking sisted such subpoenas in all but the 
le hijackers, captor most extreme circumstances, re- 


incident, the 
guards, negotiators, the hostages 
and afi interviews, according to 
network spokesmen. 

A Justice Department offidal 
said the networks had indicated a 
willingness to provide material that 
went on the air. Inn “had a prob- 
lem” turning over material that was 
not broadcast 

The courts have upheld subpoe- 
nas for unpublished material from 
journalists and news organizations, 
but only in exceptional circum- 
stances, according to John G. 
Koeld, a partner in the New York 
law firm of Debevoise £ Plimpton. 

. Mr. Koeltl said that anyone issu- 
ing such a subpo ena must demon- 
strate that the material being 
sought is crucial to the care ana 
unavailable elsewhere. 

Journalists have customarily re- 


garding them to be an attempt to 
make journalists an agency of law 
enforcement that might compro- 
mise their role as 
gatherers of news. 

Government sources said the 
federal authorities had identified 
most, if not aQ. of the hijackers and 
mainly wanted the material as cor- 
roborative evidence. 

But Patrick S. Konen, deputy* 
director of public affairs for the 
Justice Department, said the sub- 
poenaed material was “important 
to the government’s efforts to pur- 
sue criminal prosecution of the hi- 
jackers. 

Mr. Konen added that there 
were no plans at present to subpoe- 
na notes or photographs from other 
news organizations but he would 
not rule it out. 


reduce program outlays by SR'.Z 
billion over the next three years. 
Medicare provides health insur- 
ance for elderly and disabled 
Americans. 

The committee approved provi- 
sions Wednesday extending cover- 
age of the Medicare program and 
Medicare tax to all newly hired 
state and local employees' begin- 
ning in 19S6. 

The committee also approved 
provisions to prevent hospitals 
front turning away emergency pa- 
tients for fear the patients could 

not pay and to require that private 
health-insurance plans provided by 
employers permit widow s. divorced 
spouses and children of employees 

to continue in the group-health 
plan at their own expense. 

The committee also vourd to lim- 
it increases in Medicare pay menu 
to hospitals to J percent in 1 9X6. 
freeze payment rates to doctors if 
they did not agree to accept the 
Medicare payment as their full 
payment and wipe out existing pro- 
visions guaranteeing private hospi- 
tals a return on equity. 

In a major change in the pro- 
gram of Aid to Families with De- 
pendent Children, the hill requires 
all stales to provide welfare to Jo»- 
income families with needy chil- 
dren if the father is present but 
unemployed. 

Welfare for such families cur- 
rently is optional, and only 23 
slates. Guam and the District of 
Columbia, provide it to such fam- 


ilies. Making those families eligible 
throughout the country would* add 
about* 75.Q00 families to those on 
the rolls. 

The other billion in deficit 
reduction comes through addition- 
al revenues. 

More than half (if (hat 5^ billion 
tome* from permanently extending 
the existing tax on cigarettes of 16 
cents a pack. One cent of the ij\ is 
to be set aside for the next few 
years to support tobacco price-sup- 
port programs. 

The tax was due to drop to S 
cents a pack on Oct. 1. 


Manila Pressured to Ban 
Sale of Dogs Cats to Eat 

Rna r\ 

MANILA — Animal liners 
overseas have sent more than 
SO.OOO postcards to (he Philippine 
National Assembly urging a ban on 
the slaughter and sale of dogs and 
eats for human consumption. The 
cards show a photograph of a dog 
being cooked over a barbecue gnW. 

Manuel Garcia, deputy floor 
leader of the rolmc New Society 
Movement, said Thursday that 
most cards were from the United 
States and Britain. He said he fa- 
vored legislation to impose a maxi- 
mum fine of 1.000 pesos (S5S> and 
six months in jail for anyone con- 
victed of killing and veiling dogs 
and cats for consumption 


Ban Urged on Skin Remedies 
Tied to Nerve Damage in U.S. 


Wtahtngran Part Service 

WASHINGTON — Several 
remedies for diaper rash and other 
Arn conditions contain an ingredi- 
ent that has been found to cause 
nerve and liver damage in research 
animnk, according to a petition de- 
livered to the Food ana Drag Ad- 
ministration. 

The petition, from a group of 
scientists and health activists, 
asked the agency Wednesday to re- 
move the products from the mar- 
ket The agency has no reports of 
serious side effects in humans from 
theproducts, a spokesman said. 

Tne ingredient, iodochlorhv- 


droxyquia, is found in the over-the- 
counter product Vioform and the 
prescripuon product Viofonn-Hy- 
drocortisone, both manufactured 
by Ciba-Geigy as skin cream. 

A spokesman for Ciba-Geigy 
said, “we don’t feel that the peti- 
tion is justified based on the safety 
record of the product." 

I odochlorhy droxy quin was con- 
tained in Entero-Vroform, an oral 
remedy marketed by Ciba-Geigy] 
for travel ere’ diarrhea. Entero-Vio- 
form was suspected of causing 
more than 10,000 cases of a serious 
neurological disorder before its! 
manufacture was ceased in 1982. 1 


PiageT 


Lxfy't much 
In IS carat gold. 
water tw in fit. 
with ax u o-1 la t 
quartz movement. 

Instant lima- zone change. 
Other models for men 
end woman with round 
or o]uare bezel. 



Aldebert 

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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JLXY 26, 1985 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA GENERAL 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


REAL ESTATE 
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EMPLOYMENT 



Pope Praises Chinese, 
Seeks to Improve Ties 

Remarks Seen as Response to Release 
Of Bishop Imprisonedfor 30 Years 


Bv EJ. Dionne Jr. 

N*ew York Timer Semsf 

ME — Pope John Paul II 


7*5 Executive Sdver-BLue-VMlc 
735 Burguvty/Bnge Leolhw 
635 Becftjsmai Sue-3woundy 
535 HodArt* Nua-WMe 


. ROME — Pope John Paul II 
issued an unusually warm message 
of praise Thursday directed to the 
* people of China. Vatican officials 
Nmr jBmnnmcenB on stm* said it was pan of the pope's efforts 
7 § 10 “prove ties with the Chinese 

gowSnott. 

535 Rad^ttc Bk»wMe “The church is sympathetic to 

500 sec dori bWgrey Mb the commitment to modernization 
g ffl infaifa 'flBr tote; and progress in which the Chinese 
people are engaged," the pope said 
•"***» JSffi!* before a crowd of about UWJOU 

P«>Pj e “ Su Peter's Square for his 
ArwHcbi owned Bid Operated weekly general audience. 

He said, “The Catholic Church 

10 YEARS lodes upon China as one great fam- 

w.DA.b.HteVMd ay, the birthplace of lofty rad!- 
uons and vital energies rooted m 
TRAN5CO the antiquity of her history and 


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We Deter Can to ft* World 


TRAN5CO 


Keeping a entr ant stock of marathon j Culture. 


the bishop of Shanghai, had been 
imprisoned for his refusal to break 
ties with Rome and raxjgmzc the 
Chinese Patriotic Catholic Associa- 
tion, 

The official Xinhua news agency 
had said that Bishop Kung had 
“admitted his crime and showed 
repentance." 

But a Vatican official said 
Wednesday that the Holy See 
doubled that Bishop Kung had “re- 
pented,” and that the agency's an- 
nouncement may have been a way 
of masking a reversal in the govern- 
ment's position. 

The official added, “That he 
should now have decided to toe the 
line at age 84 after 30 years in 
prison nude people a little bit 
doubtful about the veracity of that 
thing. In order to save face, they 
have to say that be has toed the 


rates ™* Was ^«P0Pe> ruS {™j° r £ne " ' 

EoT statement on China since the On- hi .. { rpmarV . .l, 

Trornco sa. 95 nese Communist tfivcmioeDX. an- - - 5 s bn ? “*“■ “P 0 !* 

ooonced the releaseon July 3 of an 


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PORSCHE. for n ua iw Jiulc ddbtry J 


who arc followers of Jesus Christ,’' 
iie said, “will contribute to the 
common good of their own people 

by practicing the virtues that are A • • /7J • T~l 

iSJy&r'sartiS American m China Faces 

centuries-old Chinese tradition.” m y-v nm yy w 

Prison Over Fire at Hotel 

>a, wisdom and a sense of fidelity _ 


The Reverend Ignatius Kung. 84, bishop of Shanghai as he 
was released this month after spending 30 years in jafl. 


FROM STOCK 


eluded “justice, charity, modera- 
tion, wisdom and a sense of fidelity 
and loyalty." 

“1 pray that Almighty God may 
abundantly bless the Chinese peo- 


By Jim Mann 

Lot Angeles Times Serricr 


would onh have been a any room 
fire," said Mr. Ondrifc. sitting alone 


teljwrwra, lUff^famrami 
bond, convroMM m USA 


RUTEINC 



pie and their worthy aspirations for months ago, when a midnight fire 
progress and peace," he said. swept through the 1 Ith floor of the 


HARBIN, China — Three at a table on tilt stage of an auduo- 

nnlh« aon xuhen * mirtniohl fim num in this Clt> in r.Onb«Wlm 


BAHRAIN — t Iran and Iraq re- An American television crew 

n.. .jJ. f •_ i. .... , . ’ 


portea Thursday an upsurge in which is making a yearlong docu- 
wcS^rii ^8 ht “ 1 8 “ strategic sectors of the mentary on the Western world that 

wctom.tf 00332351. Ik 411559 Qulf war ftx»L wffl be shown on Chinese simc tdc- 


which is making a yearlong docu- five visiting North Koreans and 
mentary on the Western world that four Chinese hotel workers leaped 
win be shown on Chinese state tele- 10 their death and a Chinese- Amer- 


swept through the 1 Ith floor of the China. . 

recently constructed Swan Hotel In a ac *i5’ R ^ lR £ **■ 


In Baghdad, a military spokes- vision starting next February, ican businessman died of asphyxia- 
man saia Iraqi troops seized Irani- filmed the pope's statements. lion. 

an positions cm a strategic maun- Improving ties with China has On Tuesday. Richard S. Ondrik, 
tain on the northern front, where been one of John Paul's lone-stand- another American businessmen in 

the hotel that night, made a dra- 


tam on the northern front, where been one of John Paul's long-stand- another American businessmen in 
fierce fighting has been reported ing objectives, and he has used a the hotel that night, made a dra- 
during the past several days. number of occasions to make over- malic plea in his own defense on 
In Tehran, Iran's nation al press tures. On Feb. 18. 1981, for exam- the dosing day of a c riminal trial at 
agency said Iranian forces killed or pie, the pontiff addressed Chinese which he is accused of causing the 
wounded 250 Iraqi troops in the residents in Manila to ask Beijing fire by negligently sm oking in bed 

Sff 86 gssrssEM* .jsksks 

BagSad did not refer to the Su- The Vatican official said that SiSSS 


the same tune. Chinese prosecutors 
are seeking to recover apprati- 
mateiy 25Q.OOO yuan (about 
S90.000) in compensation from Mr. 
Ondrik for damage to the hotel 
Two lower-level Chinese hotel 
employees are also being prosecut- 
ed on charges of dereliction of 


malic plea in his own defense on dutv. One, Zhang Guoyun. the 
the dosing day of a criminal trial at supervisor in charge of secu- 

i L -Y. 1 r • rilv f nr rh„ hn>#1 iriinKWvl fK>if L 


rity for the hotel, admitted that he 
had been drinking on duty and bad 
failed to combat the fire. The other. 


“It is difficulty drink of myself a poor attendant named Gu Su! 
as a cn m i n al. Mr. Ondrik, 34, an confessed that he had been awav on 


oil industry aperttolda thrw- Molher n<wr a bath. They 
judge panel “That is because the — r.« 


iMSuuauuiuuuuuu lu un. ju- J UC vaUCaD 0111031 SUO lOat nfln -T ••■ft,™. IVMIICI. rhi> ** w ““ 1 ' ‘“ fc 7 

marfighting and Tehran made no both sides have used the Reverend RCLS SSoS couJd . ** &en,eoi:::d 10 U P lo fivB 
mention of a battle in the north. Matteo Rico, the Italian mission- HSl yCars m P™ 011 - 

where earlier this month it said ary who brought Christianity to Sfrw^ 11118 5UCh M acadcnL 212 Summing up the state's case 
Iranian troops had launched a se- China, as a symbol for the possibil- auiercnL — . 1 — . * 4 - rw "' 1 — " r — J ~ 

lies of cross-border strikes. itv of reconciliation. The none 


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nes of cross-border strikes. ity of raconriliation. The pope umuuc, a representative ot a 

The Baghdad spokesman said mentioned the priest Wednesday. **°“8 Kong company called Ener- 
Iraqi troops had taken a 6,288-foot and the Vatican official «i~H that Southeast Asia Ltd., 

(1,936-meter) mountain in the the Chinese government had cefc- ^ detained and barred from !eav- 
north, infiicnng heavy casualties brated Father Ricci’s work as a J* a fcw “ a >’ s afler 

and “purging” the area of enemy court astronomer. A P™ 18 fi 1 ®- 

troops after repelling counlerat- He said that the Chinese govern- He » charged with violating a 
tacks. me nt had restored Father Riccft law lhat prohibits “negligently" 

The Iranian press agency said tomb last year as part of the 400th a fire that results in death, 

heavy artillery, mortars and short- anniversary celebrations of the sei 't° us injuries or major pnroeny 
range rockets were used in fighting priest’s work. In turn, the Vatican Iosscs - tf convicted, he could be 
in the Sumar region, about 90 miles observatory had given some astro- sentenced to up to seven years in 
(145 kDometersj east of Baghdad.- nomical equipment to the f>in/w pnson. Tliejndgs are expected to 


years in prison. 

m concerning such an acadent are Sumnung uo the state's case 
, . against Mr. Ondrik on Tuesday, 

Mr. Ondrik, a representative of a the prosecutor. Zhang Weixino. ad- 
Hong Kong company called Ener- mitted that the Swan Hotel “had 
gy Projects, Southeast Asia Ltd., some serious problems in fire pro- 
was detained and barred from !eav- tection." -And he urged the judges 


ing Harbin a few days after the to give Mr. Ondrik “some lesser 


He is chained with violating a 
v that prohibits “nttliRentiv” 


Burma Train Bombed; 61 Die 


THE MBICBXS SKOAUSTS 
SwHzarbmi. Was! Germany 4 England 




T« frw • UC - European de&ray . 
USB’A/DOr- 


No one has claimed responsftril- 


law that prdhilxts “n^ligenUy” 
setting a fire that results in death, 
serious injuries or major property 
losses. If convicted, he could be 
sentenced to up to seven years in 
prison. The judges are expected to 
announce a decision within three 
weeks. 

In a closing statement, the first 
full public accounting he has given 
si nce h is arrest, Mr. Ondrik did not 
specifically deny smoking in bed. 


punishment" than the seven-year 
violating a maximum. 

negligently" Nevertheless, he said. Mr. On- 
Its in death, drik “is the person w ho is directly 
or pnroeny responsible for the fire.” 
le could be According to the prosecution. 
toi years in fire investigators found that Mr. 
expected to Ondrik's room was the only one 
rithin three where the burn marks showed the 
fire moving from inside out. 
at, the first Mr. Ondrik read his plea to the 
he has given court from notes lhat he had writ- 
drik did not ten in the jail cell he shares with a 
ing in bed. Chinese inmate. There were loud 


SNppng by Iha nptril. 


‘f'-'Mttn mi 


MCE 


RANGOON — The Rangoon- ity, but sources here said that the 
Mandalay mail train was blown off Karen National Union had earlier 


Instead, he said he did not general- murmin-s among the Chinese spec- 
ly do so bur could not recall wheth- tators when be said that his greatest 


£2 


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the tracks Wednesday night by a sabotaged rail lines between the 
targe bomb planted by rebels, the capital and Mandalay. They specu- 
state press agency reported Thins- lated that guerrillas might have in- 
day. It said that 61 aboard were filtrated from bases near the border 


ty oo so but could not recall wheth- tators when be said that his greatest 
er he smoked in bed on the night of regret was for the death of his fel- 


the fire. 


low American businessman. Alan 


sasF™™ 

,« building, b 

of the hotel managen 


me explosion was about 145 
sales (235 kilometers) north of 
Rangoon. It was so powerful that it 


The sources linked the attack to 
the forthcoming congress of the 
ruling Burma Sodialisi Program 


burled the locomotive and six Party, scheduled to open in 


coaches oil the track. 


He also told the tribunal and a Eng. 

urtroom full of Chinese specta- “I grieve for those who died, lot 
re that he had been made "very those who were trapped in the 
gry" by testimony about the fail- building, but most of ail for mv 
e of the hotel man ag em ent to friend and co-worker Alan Eng" 
te proper fire precautions. he said. “I shall always blame my- 
“If there had M been a smoke self for not being strong enough to 


goon next week. 


alarm, a fire alarm" or anyone from fight Lhrough the smoke and lead 
the hotel staff on the floor, “it my friend to safetv." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


Page 5 


v 


Cuban Missile Crisis: Deadly Showdown That Still Haunts U.S . and Soviet 


' (Confined from Page I) 




"-i.- 


to 

trade the vritiufrawal of U.S. mis- 
siks from Turkey for the withdraw- 
al of theSowet missiles from Cuba, 
ifwe'flTOjxeparedtojjhienp the 
usaotUiS. missiles in Turkey?” 

Khmsivchfivaca^ theKen- 
nedyprojjosaL .The planned at- 
tacks hgfliiist Cuba never took 
place., Carrying out the US. side of 
the bargain depended upon ihe So- 
viet. Uruon’s “remaining silent on 
the deal” according to McGcorgc 
Bund^whowasPrcsidentKcnne- 
dy*s national security adviser. 

“They kept qofet, and' the mis- 
siles came out,” Bundy said. 

The Cuban missile crisis brought 
the superpowers closer to nuclear 
war than at any time in the 40 years 
aace Hjrorfnma. In drawing bade 
from eh* edge. Washington and 
Moscow teamed a lesson that ap 
pears tb- hive governed their mili- 
tary behavior ever since: neither 
side wffl allow tbe other to hold a 
nuclear advantage for long. 

In the 1950s. tbe United States 
under Preadent Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower riot; only expanded its lead 
ovfer the.Scwiet Union in numbers 
— of. nudes? weapons but it also be- 
ntshop of Shiinak.-^ gan doping intermediate-range 
pendijf* y» “ ! "“"^.ask missiles in NATO countries. 

” - >fcar\ i n ^ Jupiux missiles in Turkey, across 
ihe border from the Soviet-Union, 
were considered by Moscow to be 
first-strike weapons, just minutes 
from Soviet cities and impossible to 
stop once launched. 

U.S. officials had sent the mis- 
siles to Turkey as weapons to deter 
soy Soviet invasion, bat without 
«t much thought as to how .the Rus- 
sians would perceive them. 

In the midst of the Cuban crisis, 
however, the Soviet point of view 
was recognized. 

In a white House meeting on 
Ocl 16, 1962, General Maxwell D. 
Taylor, chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, described the U.S. 



'I recall leaving the White House that night, 
walkings through the gardens of the White 
House to my car to drive back to the 
Pentagon and wondering if I’d ever see 
another Saturday night.’ 

Robert S. McNamara 

Telling of Saturday, Oct. 27, 1962, when a decision 
was made to attack Soviet missiles and other sites in 
Cuba two days later. - 


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in Turkey as a “pistol 
pointed at the head” of the Soviet 
Union. A Soviet counterpart 
against the United States would be 
created, be said, if Khrushchev suc- 
ceeded in putting missiles in Cuba. 

The Cuban crisis gave both rides 
an opportunity to look at the con- 
sequences of launching even some 
of the limited number of missiles 
available then. What they saw per- 
suaded both sides that a nudear 
exchange had to be avoided. 

Mr. McNamara said one Soviet 
missile in 1962 “directed at Miami 
or New York or even Washington, 
might have lolled a million or two 
'ptiUkra people. That was some- 
■’ihing that a responsible president 
didn't wish to expose his nation to 
and was determined not to do.” 

The Cuban crisis also showed 
that any confrontation between the 
superpowers could quickly escala te - 
to a nuclear showdown. 

Since the missfle crisis, the super- 


powers have repeatedly taken steps 
to avoid situations that could lead 
to confrontation, even as ihe two 
have continued to compete politi- 
cally and militarily. 

In those: areas where both. US 
and Soviet forces operate, private 
agreements are worked out to pre- 
vent military attacks or accidents. 
When they do occur, systems exist 
for not letting them get out of band. 
For example, the navies have 
worked out rules of the sea so ves- 
sels can carry out ex erases with a 

minimum of dangpm rK incidents. 

The crisis was a taming point in 
the nuclear age. It also provides the 
only case study of the land of crisis 
that, many people still fear, may 
lead someday to nudear war. 

The first U-2 photos showing the 
start of medium- range missile de- 
ployment in Cuba appeared the 
morning of Ocl 16. 

Kennedy quickly called a meet- 
ing of his top aides, including Sec- 
retary of State Dean Rusk, 
tary of the Treasnry C. 

Dilloo, Attorney General Rnl 
F. Kennedy, Vice President John- 
son, Secretary of Defense McNa- 
mara, Mr. Bundy. General Taylor 
and Bromley Smith as note taker. 

This group, the Excom, began 
the first of a series of sessions to 
deal with tbe crisis. The first day’s 
sesrions, on Oct. 16, were secredy 
tape recorded by Kennedy. Tbe 
transcript of the discussions that 
day — more than three hours — 
was recently made public, with 
some deletions for security reasons. 

It illustrates, more than any sin- 
gle account, the questions, doubts 
and conflicting ideas that run 
through the minds of leaders in the 
nudear age at a time of crisis. 

Tbe first option seized upon was 
a ‘‘surgjcaT’air strike to destroy the 


missiles. Mr. McNamara stressed 
initiall y that analysts had to find 
and target the nuclear storage sites. 

“If we are to - conduct an air 
strike against these installations,” 
he said, “or against any part of 
Cuba, we must agree now that we 
will schedule that prior to the time 
these missile sites become opera- 
tional L” 

“If they become operational be- 
fore the air strike, I do not believe 
we can state we can knock them out 
before they can be launched," Mr. 
McNamara said. 

General Taylor responded that it 
would be difficult to determine just 
Mien the missiles were operational. 
General Taylor said his mproach 
would be to have “an initial pa use,” 
to get the target picture correct, 
while keeping secret that the Unit- 
ed States knew of the mi«net 

Then, be added, “virtually con- 
currently, an air strike against tbe 
rites that we know of. At the same 
rirnft, nival blockade." 

These would be accompanied by 
reinforcement of the U.S. Navy’s 
base at Guantanamo in Cuba and 
evacuation of dependents. 

He also wanted mobilization of 
reserve military units, but as for 
invading the island. General Taylor 
warned: “That’s the hardest ques- 
tion militarily in the whole busi- 
ness, one which we should look at 
very closely before we get our feet 
in that deep mod in Cuba.” . 

The idea of a blockade, which 
became the first option, was not 
put forward resolutely by Mr. Mc- 
Namara until the end of the first 
day. That may have been because 
when the idea was first offered by 
General Taylor, tbe president said, 
“I don’t see how we could prevent’’ 
further missiles from coming in by 
submarine. 


In fact, large missiles could not 
have been loaded into submarines 
but no one brought that technical 
detail to tbe president’s attention. 

Mr. Rusk stressed the interna- 
tional implications of a “surgical 
strike." 

‘There is no such thing, I think, 
as unila teral action by the United 
States,” he said. “Any action we 
lake wiH greatly increase the risks 
of direct action involving our other 
alliances and our other forces in 
other pans of the world." 

He went on to offer, as a first 
suggestion, that the United States 
publicly announce the presence of 
tbe missi es “some time this week" 
and build up forces to “deliver an 
overwhelming strike at any of these 
installations.” 

In the interim, be wanted “to 
alert our allies and Mr. Khrushchev 
that there is utterly serious crisis in 
the making here and that Mr. 
Khrushchev may not himself really 
understand that or believe that at 
tins point" 

“I think," Mr. Rusk added, 
“we*D be faring a situation that 
could well lead to general war." 

He stressed that everything 
ought to be done to prevent that 
before the positions of the two 
powers became too rigid for 

rhange 

By the time the officials had 
made their presentations, it was 
dear there were some basic dis- 
agreements on keeping secrecy, 
consulting afKeg_ preparing an in- 
vasion and striking at the missiles. 

Kennedy then noted that Khru- 
shchev was undertaking the de- 
ployment in the face of Kennedy's 
wanting just a few months earlier. 
United 


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“They’ve got enough to blow us 
up now anyway” the president 
said. “I think it’s just a question of 
... This is a political struggle as 
much as military." 

Robert Kennedy, who later in 
the week became a forceful advo- 
cate for a blockade of Cuba, on the 
first day supported an air strike, or 
even invasion. 

Another early suggestion by the 
president's brother was the possi- 
bility of creating an incident in 
Cuba to permit military action 
“through Guani&namo Bay or 
something or whether there’s some 
ship that, you know, sink the Maine 
again, or something" in reference 
to the Havana harbor incident that 
ted to the Spanish- American War. 

Several times during tbe day, 
John Kennedy questioned his aides 
as to why, in their opinion, Khru- 
shchev was doing something that 
might lead to nuclear war. 

Mr. Rusk said the CIA director, 
John A. McCone, had “suggested 
some weeks ago that one thing Mr. 
Khrushchev may have in mind is 
that he knows we hare a substantia] 
nuclear superiority but he also 
knows that we don t really the un- 
der fear of his nudear weapons to 
the extent that ... he has to live 
under fear of ours. Also, that we 
have nuclear weapons nearby, in 
Turkey and places like that.” 

Mr. Rusk went on: “Khrushchev 
may feel that it’s important for us 
to learn about living under medi- 
um-range missiles, and he’s doing 
that to son of balance that." 

At the afternoon session, Mr. 
Bundy agreed with a State Depart- 
ment idea that perhaps Khru- 
shchev might be putting the mis- 
siles in Cuba as a pk>y to trade for 
“something in Berlin, saying he'll 
disarm Cuba ... if we yield some of 
oar interests in Berlin.” 

President Kennedy burst out: 
“It's just as if we suddenly began to 
put a major number of MRBMs in 


Turkey. Now thal’d be goddamn 
dangerous, I would ihink." 
MRBMs are medium-range ballis- 
tic missiles. 

Mr. Bundy replied. “Well, we 
did, Mr. President" 

Kennedy responded. “Yeah, but 
that was five years ago.” 

In fact installation of Jttpiters in 
Turkey had begun in 1960 and was 
continuing. 

By the end of that first day. Ken- 
nedy listed three options: “We're 
going to lake out these, uh. mis- 
siles," but questions remained as to 
“a general air strike" and “general 
invasion." 

As the week unfolded, however, 
the notes show that the Excom lei 
the air strike, which Kennedy ten- 
tatively set for the following Satur- 
day, Ocl 20. slip by ami then 
moved up the blockade, which was 
publicly announced Oct. 22, along 
with public announcement (hat the 
missiles had been discovered. 

As the crisis unfolded over the 
next five days. Mr. McCone told 
the group the first missiles were 
already operational and the presi- 
dent ana his advisers weighed 
which Soviet ships to stop and 


which to let through the blockade. 

In the end, it was determined 
that a military confrontation with 
the Soviet Union would be belter in 
Cuba than on the high seas. But 
when Khrushchev accepted the 
deal that Kennedy offered — dis- 
mantling his missiles in return for 
the withdrawal of the Jupiter* from 
Turkey — a confrontation was 
averted. 

In retrospect, Mr. McNamara 
and Mr. Bundy said, it was secrecy 
that made possible the final resolu- 
tion. secrecy that allowed days of 
discussion and analysis, and then a 
hack-channel offer of a confiden- 
tial deal to end the crisis. 

“We avoided tremendous brou- 
haha of selling out our European 
friends" by removing the suppos- 
edly Turkish-owned Jupiter mis- 
siles. Mr. Bundy said. “But we did 
it keeping it secret. Not altogether a 
happy thing to do. It has costs. 

playing secret diplomacy” 

Mr. McNamara said that in to- 
day's world it would he difficult to 
maintain the secrecy that worked 
so well in l%2. when the world 
really did go “to the brink.” 

Next: lie /0".» Arab-1 sruvli War 


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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL 



[tribune. 


Published WhkTfce Sew York Time* and He WtAlagWa Post 


A Bad Japanese Choice 


Apparently shocked by the strength of pro- 
tectionist sentiment in Washington. Japan 
now seems intent on cutting its $50-billion 
trade surplus with the United States. Unfortu- 
nately, its officials are said, to be eyeing the 
path of least political resistance— not opening 
Japan to more imports, but limiting us ex- 
ports. The aim would be to placate the U.S. 
Congress as well as various nations that have 
been roused to anger by industries that must 
compete with Japanese goods. But it would be 
a costly step backward for the world economy, 
which can prosper only through open trade. 

Superb traders though they are, the Japa- 
nese and their government have grown cynical 
about open markets, and not without reason. 
Titty are no slouches at inventing ways to 
protect high-cost domestic industries, notably 
agriculture, that widd disproportionate influ- 
ence in Tokyo. But Japan is less protectionist 
than either the United Slates or western Eu- 
rope. Even if Japan were to abandon all sup- 
port for its small and inefficient farms (a 
system created by America's occupation as a 
Jeffersonian counterweight to authoritarian 
industrial Japan), its imports from America 
would increase by only a few billion dollars. 

The main cause of America's 5 140- billion 
trade deficit with all countries is the big budget 
deficit, which keeps interest rates high and 
sucks in foreign savings. That bids up the value 
of the dollar and makes American exports less 
competitive. Yet no progress has been made in 
reducing the budget deficit. If forced to 
choose, most Americans would probably pre- 
fer to finance that deficit by losing exports 
rather than by siphoning credit away from 
bousing and other private investment. 

America's fiscal neglect has left Japan to 
bear the resentments of the trade burden. 
Admitting more imports would loose a domes- 
tic political storm, so Tokyo is tempted to limit 
exports of cars or electronics equipment. Trim- 


ming those exports to, say. 1983 levels would 
permit Japanese manufacturers to increase 
profit margins without much threatening their 
workers, who are assured of lifetime employ- 
ment. Only the politically weak employees of 
small suppliers would really be at risk. 

The export controls could immediately im- 
prove America's trade balance and earn the 
gratitude of all Japan's competitors, who could 
then raise their prices. But the quick fix could 
also become a worldwide cancer. 

The major industrial nations have already 
begun to cartelize steel apparel textiles and 
shipping, rewarding high-cost -producers and 
freezing out the poorer nations. Japanese ex- 
port limits could accelerate the rigging process 
in a dozen other industries. 

There is a better response, for Japan and the 
rest of the world. Japan could divert some of 
the resources now going to exports toward 
domestic investment and foreign aid. 

For all their wealth, the Japanese have yet to 
buy adequate housing and roads or even ser- 
vices for their poor. They have also failed to 
invest enough in defense of the democratic 
alliance. By diverting funds to social spending 
they could reduce die amounts that flow to 
other capital markets, strengthen the yen and 
make foreign goods more competitive in Ja- 
panrSimilariy, by giving much more economic 
aid to poor countries, to compensate for the 
higher military spending of other allies, titty 
could stimulate Third World demand for 
American and European goods. 

Past Tokyo governments have rejected the 
‘Tatter Japan" solution, arguing that trade 
imbalances are caused by the profligacy of 
others, not the thriftiness of Japan. But virtue 
is not the issue. If Japan wants a more stable, 
open world trading system, it needs a con- 
structive alternative to protectionism. Export 
controls are not the answer. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Anti-Terror Test, Pari II 


Three Israelis have been sentenced to life 
imprisonment and 12 others to terms ranging 
up to 10 years for acts of terror against West 
Bank Arabs. The 15 had been convicted of a 
range of offenses including murder by ma- 
chine gun. the attempted assassination of three 
Palestinian mayors and a hideous plot to blow 
up one of Islam’s holiest shrines, the Dome of 
the Rock in Jerusalem. Israel has fairly reaped 
much credit for finally applying the law to the 
(error network that the authorities had allowed 
to develop among Jewish settlers on the West 
Bank. However, the case of the 15 is now 
moving back from the courts toward the politi- 
cal ar ena. Moves are afoot among the crimi- 
nals' many and fervent supporters to gain 
clemency by legislative action and to press 
president Chaim Herzog for pardons. 

In the battle against Arab terrorism Israel 
has been generally successful, managing in 
difficult circumstances to live a normal nation- 
al life and to do so while still preserving Israel 
as a free society. In recent years, however, 
Israelis have beat tormented % the spectacle 
of a strain of Jewish terrorism, too. 

Unfortunately, the deputy prime minister. 


Yitzhak Shamir, spoke for many when he 
described the 15 convicts as “excellent people 
who made a mistake/’ The way to ensure that 
there will be no more Jewish underground, he 
said, was to free the l5.'How can Israel impris- 
on 15 of its own, others add, when it has 
recently yielded up 1,150 convicted Arab ter- 
rorists in a trade for three Israeli POWs? 

The Israelis will have to make their own 
choice. On it, they know, rests a fateful ques- 
tion of the definition erf their society. 

On it also rests a question of the reputation 
of their society. Israel's claim to a special 
kinship with the West arises from the fact that, 
unlik e any Arab nation, it shares the democra- 
cies' professed reliance on the sanctity of the 
law. That is the basis on which Israel comes to 
the United States and other countries and asks 
for a partnership against all forms of the 
international crime of terrorism. This claim 
imposes the painful requirement of showing 
that Israel’s aversion to terrorism extends to 
Jewish as weQ as Arab conduct. The judicial 
system has worked its mil on the 15 terrorists, 
and now it is the political system’s turn. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


A Meaningful African Summit 

The Organization of African Unity’s 21st 
summit, which ended last weekend, provided a 
refreshing change from the political squab- 
bling and rhetorical flourishes [at] most of the 
earlier gatherings. African leadens, under the 
direction of Tanzania’s President Julius Nyer- 
ere. concentrated on measures to put the conti- 
nent's economic house in order, looking be- 
yond the need for short-term famine relief to 
far-reaching structural changes with agricul- 
tural reforms at their heart. The members also 
made a plea for greater Western support, in the 
form or direct aid or more generous terms for 
rescheduling of a crippling external debt, 
which deserves a sympathetic response. 

— The Financial Tima (London). 

A 'Cultural 9 Visit to Europe? 

Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone has re- 
turned home after a 10-day trip to four Euro- 
pean nations and the European Community. 
[His] itinerary was studded with visits to muse- 
ums and historical moauments in reflection of 
his efforts to give Europeans the impression of 
a “culture-minded prime minister." ’ 

In summarizing the outcome of Mr. Naka- 
sone’s trip, we must review Euro-Japanese 
cultural relations in the framework of the en- 
tire Japanese foreign policy. We say this espe- 
cially because Japan now faces the most seri- 


ous economic friction in the postwar days. 
Prior to Mr. Nakasone’s departure, many peo- 
ple thought that the trip would be untimely 
because of the deterioration of Japanese-Euro- 
pean relations. At the EC summit held at 
Milan in June, British Prime Minister Marga- 
ret Thatcher severely criticized Japan, and the 
joint communique referred to the criticism. 

In his press conference, Mr. Nakasone said 
that Europe was in an acme situation, indicat- 
ing his awareness of the serious situation. He 
said the achievement of his European nip was 
in deeper mutual understanding. Deepening of 
mutual understanding is the very basis of for- 
eign policy, but Mr. Nakasone must remember 
a short statement by French Premier Lament 
Fabius who said that the French government 
expected a practical result. Mr. Nakasone’s 
trip has given us an occasion to think about 
Japan's relationship with Europe. 

— The Mainidii Daily News (T okyof 

Paris Gives Up on Pretoria 

With its sanctions against the South African 
regime, France has broken ranks with its Euro- 
pean partners. For the first lime a country erf 
the European Community has pat Pretoria in 
the dock. But effective pressure can come only 
from major partners and heavy investors, and 
these are to be found in Washington and 
London, much more than in Paris. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


It’s Time to Refurbish Some Trans-Atlantic Attitudes 


g ONN — Incommrating on U-S.-Brropeafl relations, it is 

• litany of°tfa2itional ties, shared ideal^ro^mi heritage, 
commercial links and interdependence. That sort of talk is 
very comforting, but it is not relevant to four trends that I see 
in looking at UJS. relations with Europe today. 

The first trend is that American eyes are turning more 
across the Pacific and the Rio Grande than the Atlantic. The 
reasons are well known: the shift in population from the 
Northeast and Middle West to die Southwest and West; a 
wave of immigration that is not European but Hispanic and 
Asian; the dynamism of Japan and its dominance of the US. 
market in many electronic and consumer fields; the economic 
emergence of South Korea, Taiwan and an evolving China — 
always an object of American fascination. 

This strong interest in Asia may be temporary. Many 
contend that it will be. Perhaps. But for the moment it is 
a trend that Europeans should not ignore. 

A second trend, related to (he first, is the changing Ameri- 
can view of Europe. There is a feeling pervading the United 
States, caused in some degree by what Europeans themselves 
say, that Europe is in decline — a continent of pessimism and 
sclerosis (the often cited European inability to create new jobs 
is a case in point); that the European Community is, accord- 
ing to European statements, bogged down in deiail and unable 
to make significant progress toward European unity; that 
NATO Europeans are not doing their share but increasingly 
abdicate then- responsibility to the United Stares. 

This chang in g view of Europe is fed also by the feeling that 
Europeans complain no matter what America does: Com- 
plaints about the dollar being too weak six years ago are 
matched by complain is about the dollar being too high now, 
and there are endless other examples. 

A third trend is that (he problem of dealing with the Soviet 
Union, which should be a unifying force in relations, is often 
in fact the reverse. Whether the issue is the Olympics or the gas 
pipeline or arms control European and American interests 
and thinking are obviously very different Europeans have 


By James G. Lowenstein 

more of a vested interest in a broad range of relations with the 
Soviets, both economic and political. They share the same 
continent They are used to developing subtle relationships 
with other stares with different political systems. 

A fourth trend is the American tendency to see relation- 
ships with Europe in terms of one issue. The issue today is lire 
SDI; a few years ago it was Euromissites and the two-track 
decision. These are important matters but are of concern 
chiefly to officials in foreign and defense ministries, to some 
members of parliament, to some journalists and to a few- 
political scientists. They are really not the bread and butter of 
daily life or of the relationships among people. And they 
distort the Ui>. perception of relationships with Europe 
because they lead to a view of those relations based on who 
supports or does not support the latest American proposal. 
□ 

What suggestions do I have for dealing with these trends? 

Europeans should make a bener case for themsdves. It is 
really not necessary for almost every European visitor to the 
United States to bemoan the inefficiency erf the European 
Community, Europe's economic weaknesses or its helpless- 
ness in the face of the military power of the United Stares and 
the Soviet Union. Europeans should emphasize the positive. 

The EC has accomplished a great deal in the economic and 
political spheres; it has fallen short of maximum expectations 
but has far exceeded minimum hopes. The work of the 
European Court, coordination of foreign policy positions, the 
frequency of European Council meetings of beads of govern- 
ment. the European Monetary System, three expansions of 
EC membership — these are all European accomplishments 
that are important, durable and headed in the right direction. 

Nor is Western Europe small, poor or weak. Its combined 
populations, GNPs and military forces put it on a par with 
America. It has a high standard of living — higher in some 
respects than America’s — and a quality of lire that is the 


envy of the world. West Europpaj hate way reason to be 
proud and confident. Why not be so? 

Step ex peering America rn rekavc differently. It is a compli- 
cated and volatile society which is energetic ami dynamic cn 
the one hand and unpredictable on the other. Why should its 
Foreign policy not reflect those characteristics? 

The United States does not have a dssse poiiitituc. Ameri- 
cans are less attuned to foreign policy questions than Europe- 
ans are. US. government machine^.-, both executive and 
legislative, is vast and difficult to coordinate. And America 
has. in effect, a permanent coalition government —a coalition 
because of the separation of executive and legalative powers 
and because neither political partv is disciplined or sociologi- 
cally or philosophically unified. There is no use hoping that 
Americans will behave" differently. They won't. They can't, 

Try not to make the same mistake that Americans sc often 
make of seeing U.S. ‘European relations ;;; stark biack white 
terms. Europeans lend to go through periods when they 
believe that the United Slaves can do no wrong and other 
periods when it can do no right. Neither absolute condition 
has ever existed. Periods of hero worship inevitably lead to 
disillusionment. Periods of disillusionment evoke a desire to 
seize on anv evidence that things have changed dramatically. 

The fact is that there are always both positive and negative 
aspects in UJS. policies and in L T .S.-European relations at any 
given time. The sole exception in the last 50 years was the 
postwar period, but that was an exception that proves the rule. 

Why not lake a long-term view of relations? Af;cr all. 
Europeans pride themselves on their sense of history. Why not 
use it? Look at relations with the United Stales historically. By- 
doing so, Europeans may help Americans to do the same. 

The writer is a former U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg and 
deputy assistant secretary of state for European affairs, and now 
a partner in the IRC Group, an international consulting firm in 
Washington. This comment has been adapted by the internation- 
al Herald Tribune from an address on June .5 to the Atlantic 
Association of Young Political Leaders. 


Middle East Dramatics: 
New Faces in the Cast? 


By Robert E. Hunter 


W ASHINGTON — The terms of 
Arab- Israeli diplomacy have 
changed in recent months. The golf 
between Israel and the FLO and Jor- 
dan is as deep as before, but it has 
narrowed. Instead of uttering impre- 
cations into a void, both rides now 
shout directly at one another. 

The issue is no longer whether Isra- 
el and Palestinians can talk, but how. 
In a region knee-deep in failed hopes, 
this is a political miracle. 


The shift began to take shape in 
February when Yasser Arafat, having 
been humiliated in Lebanon, appar- 
ently concluded that his future, at 
least for now, depended on diploma- 
cy. He threw in his lot with King 
Hussein, who, snpposedly speaking 
on Mr. Arafat’s behalf, proposed 
talks between a joint Palestinian-Jor- 
danian delegation and the United 
States. The next step would include 
Israel in an international conference. 

In years past Jerusalem might have 
dismissed such a tentative groping 
toward PLO recognition of Israel. 
Instead Prime Minister Shimon Peres 
set forth his own terms: No PtO 
members in the joint delegation, no 
international conference to include 
the Soviets and no preparatory talks 
with Washington that exclude Israel. 

When the list of proposed Palestin- 
ian delegates passed from Mr. Arafat 
to King Hussein to Washington and 


landed in Jerusalem, Mr. Peres 
promptly rejected it This elicited a 
huffy declaration by the U.S. Stale 
Department that Israel would not be 
permitted a veto. Of course, Israel 
does have a veto: It alone will decide 
whether to talk at all 
Washington's pique was evidence 
less of careful analysis than of being 
out erf practice in Middle Easiem 
peacemaking. By all precedent. Mr. 
Arafat was certain to put dose allies 
on bis first list; equally, immediate 
Israeli agreement was not likely. Both 
rides are professionals, and the stakes 
entail issues of survival 
When he came to power last year 
Mr. Feres was lightly regarded as a 
diplomatic innovator. He belied that 
image by skillfuUy engineering Isra- 
el's withdrawal from Lebanon. Last 
week he ventured onto Mr. Arafat's 
own turf by meeting two prominent 
West Bank Arabs. Mr. reres thus 
signaled that there ought be an alter- 
native to dealing with the PLO. 

. That has long been unthinkable. 
Lacking any direct means to express 
their desire for a recognized national 
identity. West Bank and Gaza Arabs 
have looked to Mr. Arafat as their 
symbol. Indeed, over the years Israel 
and some dements of the PLO have 
bad a common interest in preventing 
the emergence of effective political 
leadership on the West Bank 



The structure of bargaining on the 
Arab ride may not be able to accom- 
modate a direct Israeli approach to 
Palestinians that bypasses the PLO. 
Jordan and Egypt are architects o! an 
effort to counter Syria’s influence in 
the Arab world by producing move- 
ment in Arab-Isradi peacemaking. 
But they depend on Mr. Arafat for 
their Palestinian connection, and 
would be nonplussed by a sustained 
Israeli effort to deal directly with the 
West Bankas and Gazans. " 

Yet there is a bidden premise be- 
hind this judgment: that Israel win 
not permit a major change of status 
for the occupied territories. 

Many Israelis, however, have 
learned from experience in Lebanon 


and from the emergence of yet more 
anii-Isradi radicalism (among Leba- 
nese Shiites) that time is short for 
making a reasonable deal over the 
occupied territories. 

To be sure, it would be difficult for 
Mr. Peres to be forthcoming enough 
to remove Mr. Arafat from the Pales- 
tinian equation. But he has given no- 
tice that Israel has cards to play with 
Arabs in the West Bank and Gaza. 

The seriousness of all this maneu- 
vering was dramatized by a meeting 
Jast week between the Soviet and Is- 
raeli ambassadors to France. The So- 
viets reportedly dangled a key Israeli 
interest (Jewish emigration), plus the 
possibility erf restored diplomatic re- 
lations. Israel would have to move 


toward resolving the issue of the Go- 
lan Heights and getting .America to 
tone down anti-Soviet rhetoric. 

The new Soviet leadership under 
Mikhail Gorbachev has shown itself 
to be attentive to new currents in the 
Middle East and capable of imagina- 
tion. Lacking on the other side, how- 
ever. is evidence that the Reagan ad- 
ministration is capable of playing its 
own necessary role in , Arab-Isradi 
peacemaking with imagination, te- 
nacity and commitment. 

The writer is director of European 
studies at the Center for Strategic and 
International Studies at Georgetown 
University. He contributed this com- 
ment to the Los Angeles Times. 


Living Dangerously on a Diet of Lemons, Walnuts and Noodles 


W ASHINGTON — George Bush did not 
tour Europe to talk about lemons, wal- 
nuts and noodles. Strategic nuclear defenses 
«nri collective measures against terrorism 
were supposed to be the mam topics. But the 
first stop was Italy, and “there we woe,” the 
vice president recalled in an interview the 
other day, right in the thick of a trans- Atlan- 
tic trade war ova Italy’s favorite food. 

The pasta war is only the latest in a series of 
trade tit-for-tats between America and Eu- 
rope. Sometimes it's steel, sometimes chick- 
ens. Hk latest flare-up started when the Eu- 
ropeans refused to respond to complaints of 
discrimination against American citrus pro- 
ducts. Last month the Reagan adminis tration 
let them have it with increased tariffs on 
pasta. Europe cracked back with increased 
tariffs on American lemons and walnuts. 

These are grown-ups at work? Right: We 
see shortsighted, quick-on-the-trigger grown- 
ups playing politics for lack of targe vision, 
strong leadership and a concerted policy. 

A tentative truce seems to nave been 
worked oat for the pasta war. But just as a 
“phony war" can be the prelude to real war, 


By Philip Geyelin 


is we learned in World War II, so the mind- 
ess reflexes revealed in the pasta war could be 
the harbinger of something a whole lot worse. 

What Mr. Bush encountered in Europe was 
anly a whiff of the trade warfare winds that he 
thinks are reaching gale force in the U.S. 
Congress. The latest blast is to be found in an 
rffort by Democrats to get out in front on 
protection for American jobs and industries 
igarnst foreign competition. In the case erf the 
Democrats’ rail, goods from Japan, Brazil, 
raiwan and South Korea are die target Not 
to be outdone, Senate Republicans are push- 
rig a crackdown aimed solely at Japan. 

Mr. Bush says he has “never seen the Con- 
gress so up in arms about" foreign competi- 
tion. He is passing the word to the Europeans 
ind the Japanese: “It's textiles, telecommuni- 
cations, shoes, anus, beef, almost everything 
fou could think of.’' There is a strong possi- 
bility, he is saying, that a constructive U.S. 
jolicy aimed at containing a global trade war 
ivill get lost in the congrcssumal stampede. 

“We're finding more and more legislation 


getting into the veto-proof range in terms of 
signatures," Vice President Bush reports. And 
there lies the heart of the problem. 

Asked if congressional protectionist pres- 
sure may not strengthen the administration's 
hand in dealing with wbai it regards as unfair 
trade practices abroad, Mr. Bush responds 
with an emphatic yes. He even sees signs of 



degree 

real war, so with trade war: “The 
ability to getlo the verge without getting into 
war, John Foster Dulles said, “is the neces- 
sary art.” The question is whether the U.5. 
government is capable of “the necessary art." 

The numbers are stark- Last year the U.S. 
trade deficit hit a record 5123 billion. That is 
10 times the figure 10 years ago; and it could 
reach $150 billion this year. 

For this state of affairs the Reagan admin- 
istration has no easy answer other than to 
denounce the Democrats for “protectionist 
legislation of the rankest kind" (as Treasury 


Secretary James A. Baker 3d called the new 
Democratic trade bill) and to preach “free 
.trade” and promise to work for “fair trade.” 

In that splendid spirit the administration 
sought agreement at the Bonn meeting of the 
seven leading Western industrial nations in 
May for a new round of global trade talks. 
But that effort foundered on French insis- 
tence on linking trade negotiations with mon- 
etary reform, without some progress on the 
UJS. trade deficit and the dollar, prospects 
look slim for a solution to trade problems. 

It may be, as U.S. Trade Representative 
Clayton Y cutler says, that the Democratic 
approach invites “the worst of all worlds; it is 
patently anti-consumer, undermines the in- 
ternational trading system and invites retalia- 
tion that would cost jobs.” But unless the 
administration can come up with a more 
reassuring alternative, the protectionist pres- 
sures now bufldmg in Congress may well 

S ail A runaway Congress would be the 
likely instrument for practicing “the 
necessary art" of going to the verge without 
getting into an uncontrollable trade war. 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


FROM OUR JULY 26 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: New Yorkers Flee Heat Wave 
NEW YORK — Americans in the Eastern half 
of the United States and in some places in the 
West found themselves in a half-baked condi- 
tion [on July 25}. There was an occasional 
shower, but it was brief and thoroughly inade- 
quate for relief from the heat wave. Besides 
three deaths here from the weather [on July 
24], there were ten drownings in New York 
waters and many drownings elsewhere. Hie 
heal sent 500,000 persons to Coney Island. It 
was the biggest bathing day of the season. The 
Rivmgton street bath, oldest bathing place in 
the city, was taxed to capacity all day, a crowd 
of more than a hundred waiting at sunrise for 
the door to open. So great was the demand that 
every twenty minutes one set of bathers was 
dismissed and another took its place. 


1935: Pravda Sees Fascist TTireat 
MOSCOW — On the eve of the seventh world 
congress of the Komunera — also known as 
the Third, or Communist, International — 
“Pravda” advanced the startling thesis [on July 
25] that Communists should cooperate in the 
maintenance of democratic governments as a 
bulwark against Fascism. This is a radical 
departure from the long-held doctrine of the 
Kanin tern, under which bourgeois govern- 
ments were regarded, litre Fascism, as the ene- 
my of the Communist movement. Presumably, 
the policy is explained by the success of Fas- 
cism in Germany. As the “world revolution" 
dreamed of by Lenin and Trotsky has receded 
further into the background, the Komimern’s 
propaganda in recent years has been chiefly 
directed to combating the Fascist menace. 


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Encouraging Thoughts lor a Cancer Convalescent 


D ear president reagan. 

It is perhaps presumptuous of 
me to write to you, but L too, have 
had cancer, and I thought that some 
of my experiences and reflections 
might be helpful to you. Just 10 years 
ago this past spring I was treated at 
Beihesda Naval Hospital for chest 
cancer, and 1 am truly happy to be 
here to write to you today. 

I congratulate you on the derisive- 
ness and grittiness you have shown in 
handling your disease. Your no-non- 
sense affinnativeaess has already 
done a great deal to dispel traditional- 
notions that cancer means death and 
that resignation is the way to go. 

During the course of my illness, an 
irreverent friend assured me that I 
had little to worry about “At lost 
cancer is curable." he said. “It’s not 
like baldness or acne: Those arc prob- 
lems that medicine really can’t Ox.” 

He was right. As you are probably 
aware, 50 percent of the people being 
diagnosed today win become survi- 
vors, a figure up from about 25 per- 
cent in the 1950s. There are, in fact, 5 
million Americans alive today who 
have bad cancer. Three milbon of 
them are long-term survivors who 
have lived more than five years since 
the discovery of their disease. 

Figures, i realize, are of limited 
solace. They don't tell us what we 
really want to know: what will hap- 
pen with my cancer. Thai, Mr. Presi- 
dent, is what 1 found to be the tough- 
est part of my ordeaL 
It wasn’t tne surgery or the radia- 
tion or the chemotherapy that really 


got to me. It was the fear of recur- 
rence, the niggling doubt that was 
always present, pickpocketing my 
peace of mind, making me scrutinize 
and doubt my own body. “You be- 
trayed me once, body," I used to say 
to myself. “How am I to be sure you 
won’t do it again?" And 1 would set 
off looking for lumps, bumps, swol- 
len veins or new pains. 

Don't do that. Fear and doubt are 
unavoidable potholes in the road that 
lies in front of you. Don't, if at all 
possible, stumble on them or tarry in 
that part of the road. Walk bravely 
and briskly, as you are doing. The 
anxiety that we all experience about 
the return of the disease is a natural 
but, I am firmly convinced, useless 
phenomenon. It punishes us for no 
constructive purpose. The joy of 
work, the warmth of family and the 
stimulation of friends were wonder- 
ful antidotes to my fears, and I highly 
recommend them to you. 

There are certain problems that 
many cancer patients encounter (hat 
I did not experience and I suspect, 
that you also mil escape. But they are 
worth remembering because they af- 
fect many people with conditions 
similar to ours. Shunning and social 
ostracism are not as prevalent as they 
once were, but cancer calls forth irra- 
tional fear and loathing in some cir T 
cles. Even I, a physician living in a 
sophisticated, urban area, had a few 
friends wbo disappeared when I be- 
came ill and did not show up again 
until 1 was good and well. 

Your paycheck, employment secu-- 


rity and medical coverage wiH contin- 
ue, as did mine, for the duration of 
your Alness, no matter how compli- 
cated or prolonged This certainty is a 
tremendous privilege and relief that 
will allow you, as it did me, to devote 
your full energy to yon r recovery. 

Employers' attitudes and practices 
vary widely and, while federal law 
does prohibit discrimination against 
people with cancer, the reality is that 
die job market can be a roiuih place 
after a bout with the Alness. Deferen- 
tial treatment, and frank discrimina- 
tion defy not only- basic fairness but 
also America's tremendous national 
investment in cancer research and 
treatment Why cure people only to 
lock them out of the economy? 

Another enormously troublesome 
area for cancer survivors is insurance. 
An individual with a history of can- 
cer is considered an insurance risk 
and often denied coverage or offered 
a policy with a disclaimer for condi- 
tions related in any way to the cancer. 

This behavior may make sense to 
actuaries bur it is unfathomable to 
people who have struggled through a 
disease and now want to enjoy the 
protection afforded to others.. 

People live with cancer. People five 
through cancer. People five beyond 
cancer. They can be presidents, sena- 
tors, Olympic medal winners, doc- 
tors, parents, artists, workers, farm- 
era, whatever. Many could use a'fitde 
bdp in the way of improved public 
attitudes and public policies. 

Your presence in these, ranks is 
providing a sense of visibility and 


strength. When an opportunity pre- 
sents itself, you might consider initi- 
ating some activities that would cre- 
ate a for um to address the issues or 
cancer survival in a formal way. 

In dosing, l would like to pass 
on to you two sayings that have 
been very helpful to me. 

There is an appreciation of life, a 
brilliance of the moment that proba- 
bly visits many people who have boat 
forced to deal intimately with the 
possibility of their own deaths. Some- 
one once described tins to me as u Tbe 
reds all get redder.” They da 
And finally a recommendation I 
know that you'll appreciate: “Cele- 
brate the journey." Don’t dwell on 
the diagnosis. Skirt those potholes. 
Enjoy the breeze and the sun and the 
magnificence Of the road still running 
out in from of you. 

Sincerely, 

Fitzhugh Malian 


Dr. Mulltm, author of “ Vital Signs , " 
is secretary far health and environment 
of New Mexico. This open letter ap- 
peared in The Washington Post 


Letters intended for pubiicatio i 
should be addressed "Letters to th 
Editor^ and must contain the writ 
er's signature, name md full ad 
dress. Letters should be brief an 
are subject to editing. We caanc 
be responsible for the return c 


LETTERS 

Policy in a Democracy 

Regarding "It's Simple: Democracy 
Is Angels Electing Devils” (July 16): 

Charles Krauthammer is right u> 
point out the critical role that bureau- 
cracies play in many erf America’s 
major successes, but surely he over- 
states his case. In the Western demo- 
cracies. political participation is tea- 
erally limned to electing officials. 
Policy formulation is thereafter the 
. prerogative of such officials and does 
not always reflect the wishes of those 
who elected them. The Vietnam War 
is the most obvious example. Mr. 
Krauthammer’s assertion that “when 
people choose their government the 
result is authentically representative 
of the people” is specious. 

ILYAS BAKER. 

Bangkok. 

Real Distress in the Bush 

As a geologist withheld experience 
in Africa, I can confirm the excellent 
report of Blaine Harden, “Little Pro- 
gress Made in Rural Africa During 
UN’s Decade for Women" (July I0f 
My work meant that I camped in the 
bud) with Africans and visited their 
villages. It is unfortunate that SO 
many well educated Africans sbem to 1 
be ashamed of the lack of progress of t 
their rural countrymen, to toe point 
.of denying the existence erf condi- 
tions that visitors can demonstrate 
with slide photographs. . . ' ; . 

7 SYDNEY U. BARNES. 

- Rome. 







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EW YORK — The Problem of 
American Opera. Critics have di- 
agnosed it, learned societies have 
pondered it, and composers have 
offered their various solutions. Some find 
hope in a return to Romanticism, others in 
an infusion from Broadway. But for John 
Eaton, whose new opera “The Tempest' 
receives its premiere in Santa Fe tomorrow, 
there is no problem at alL “American opera 
does not need to be saved,” he said m a 
recent interview, “it only needs to be done.” 

Eaton has been “doing” opera ever since 
he wrote the one-act “Ma Barker” in 1957, 
while still an undergraduate at . Princeton. 
Since then, he has drawn critical acclaim, 
and when given the chance, popular support 
for his works, while remaining on the fringes 
of the musical es tablishm ent. Two previous 
Eaton operas have achieved a measure of 
success: the 1978 “Daman and Robespierre” 
was recorded by CR1, and “The Cry of 
Gytaemnestra” went on to performances in 
California and New York after its 1980 pre- 
miere at Indiana University in Bloomington, 
where Eaton is a professor of music and has 
found fertile ground for his operatic ven- 
tures. 

Reviewing “Clytaemnestra” when it was 
performed at Purchase, New York, in the 
1982 PepsiCo Summerfare festival, Bernard 
Holland in The New York Times called 
Eaton’s music “inventive” and “strong” and 
said that it “commands attention." In 1980, 
following the work’s Bloomington perfor- 
mance Andrew Porter, in a report for the 
Financial Times of. London, -called Eaton 
“the most interesting opera composer writ- 
ing in America today.” A year later, after the 
San Francisco Opera’s performance of “Cly- 
taemnestra.” Porter agreed to write a libretto 
for a future Eaton opera. The occasion for 
their collaboration arose in 1983, when Ea- 
ton settled on “The Tempest” as the source 
for an opera (o be perforated at Santa Fe. 

The composer has not earned critical ac- 
colades by keeping his finger on the public 
- pulse. Audiences, he believes, need to be fed 
more than pablum in the opera house, and 
until composers provide more challenging 
works ana managers seek them out, be said, 
we will continue to be trapped by A cycle in 
which highly-touted premieres are quickly 
followed by oblivion. 

“America is too much concerned about 
opera as a farm of entertainment," he said. 
“1 remember the former director of an opera 
house saying, ‘We're trying to provide enter- 
tainment for tired businessmen.' That kind 
of apologetics sets in motion a process of not 
being adventurous. 

“In Europe, the opera house has been the 
point where composers have tried new ideas 
and used new material," he explained. “That 
has not been the case in the United States up 
until now — to our loss. Long ago, the opera 
house should have become involved with 
electronic music and with micro tonal music. 
But in America for the last 30 or 40 years, 
operatic music has been much more conser- 
vative than chamber or orchestral music. 
There are many otherwise very good com- 
posers who condescend when they write for 
the operatic stage.” 

E ATON does not believe that such 
concessions are necessary, either fa- 
singers' sake a fa the audience. In 
“The Tempest,” as in most of his preceding 
six oneras. he reo nines the singers to produce 


quarter tones, helping them along with elec- 
tronic instruments that can produce any 
latch, or with conventional instruments di- 
vided into two groups tuned a quarter tone 
apart. 

“The things die voice can do are only 
be ginning to be explored.” he said. “Every 
tingle vernacular and folk tradition in the 
world is involved with microtones. They are 
natural fa the voice — far less trouble for 
the singers than highly chromatic music, 
once they get the music in their ears. There is 
no reason why the voice, of all instrunumts, 
with such shades of expression, has to limit 
itself to a prison house of 12 bars.” 

Having observed strong audience respons- 
es to his previous works, Eaton is skeptical of 
the plaint by opera managers that listeners 
will not turn out for contemporary works. 
Neither the performers, nor the audience 
need to be specialists or aficionados of con- 
temporary music, he believes — they just 
need to use their ears. 

“If people come without prejudice and tit 
down and listen and involve themselves in 
the music, they will have no problems," 


should do to prepare themselves tor my 
‘Tempest’ I can only paraphrase what Bee- 
thoven said about his Tempest' Sonata — 
‘Read Shakespeare.’ " 

The Eaton ^Tempest” is not pure Shake- 
speare, however. Porter, retained about one- 
third of the original lines, especially (be 
better-known songs and set speeches. For 
the rest, he worked in the style of Shake- 
speare, counting on Eaton’s music to convey 
the pictorial effects and to delineate charac- 
ter, as Shakespeare's language does in the 

^^he relationship between composer and 
librettist is crucial, Eaton believes, and it is 
here that marry of his colleagues go wrong. 
“The probkan with most operas today is that 
they’re just plays set to music,” he said. “In 
fact, the libretto is the punctuation of the 
music, and the librettist has to rdy on the 
composer as dramatist. If the drama is notin 
the music, it ? s not an opera.” 

The Eaton/ Porter ‘Tempest” began, not 
with verses , to be set to music, but with a 
complete musical outline by the composer. 
T told Andrew what. I wanted to happen, 
who should be singing — a working skeleton 
of the opera.” The skeleton was fleshed out 
with earn working on his own portion, fol- 
lowed by telephone consultations. 

Is it presumptnous a inappropriate for an 
American. composer to tackle Shakespeare? 
Eaton admits to having been a bit intimidat- 
ed; he had set only some sonnets before. But 
he scons the notion that American compos- 
ers should stick to native subjects. 

“The operatic world is international,” he 
declared. “Italy and other countries have 
ejven up their puerile nationalism long ago. 
we're still acting like a little, provincial 
country, instead of the leader of world cul- 
ture. American composers are always trying 
to create ‘Americana’ operas, but it isabsura 
to deny, the validity of anything written by 
an American that doesn’t have hillbillies a 
break dancers in it” 

N OT surprisingly, Eaton is skeptical 
about the efforts of organizations 
that have undertaken to promote 
American opera. Too often, he said, they 
have sought outthe lowest common denomi- 
nator and funded works guaranteed to of- 
fend no one. “Many operatic performances 
arc stale, tired stuff,” he said, ^and they are 
furthered by inanitions like the National 
Endowment for the Arts.” . 

Nor does heiind the answer in appropriat- 
ing the wares of Broadway. Both serious and 
vernacular traditions have their strengths, he 
believes, but he is wary of yoking the two 
under the modish label “op era/ musical the- 
ater.” 

T just wish the slash mark between them 
were a little bigger,” he said. Tm not saying 
that Broadway isn’t good fa what it is; but 
entertainment and art are two different 
things, and they have two kinds of audience. 

“No great and genuine operatic works will 
develop oat of Broadway alone,” he added. 
“America is in the unique position of being 
able to call on the entire operatic tradition. 
Why in the world, having these possibilities, 
do we want to limit ourselves to the piddling 
music of Broadway?" 

To hear Eaton speak, one might conclude 
that he was a voice dying in the wilderness, 
that other American composers of opera 
were second-raters a charlatans. Not so, he 
insisted. “There arc a lot of composers work- 
ing in a conservative language, and I don’t 
mean to deny the validity of what they are 
doing.” Eaton responded favorably to the 
mention of Minnesota composer Stephen 
Pauhis, whose opera “The Woodland era” 
received its premiere in St. Louis this year. 
John Harbison is also on his short fist of 
favorites. And Eaton said he is eager to hear 
the operas commissioned by the Metropoli- 
tan Opera from Jacob Druckman and John 


“The future fa opera is bright,” he said. 
“It would be much brighter if more compa- 
nies would really begin a search fa artistic 
excellence and quality, and insist on that 
We underestimate our audiences. We ought 
to give them something genuine — a dramat- 
ic image in music — that is what win bring 
people to contemporary opera.” ■ 

Michael Fleming writes frequently about 
music and musicians. He wrote this article for 
The New York Times. 




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Eaton, right, confers with stage director Bliss Hebert. 


Dislocating Shakespeare at Stratford 


by Mel Gussow 


S TRATFORD-UPON-AVON— See- 
ing this season’s repertory here one 
is faced by the inescapable conclu- 
sion that someone at the Royal 
Shakespeare Company has locked the cos- 
tume strop and thrown away the key. Cos- 
tuming is of the catch-as-catcb-can variety. 
This leads to modern dress, or, more accu- 
rately, quasi-modern dress versions of "T roi- 
Jus ana Cressida,” “As You Like It” and 
“The Merry Wives of Windsor.” The ap- 
proach is perhaps best exemplified by the 
appearance of Falstaff in billowing knicker- 
bockers and argyle socks as if dressed fa a 
weekend of golf. 

The eclectic and often jarring costuming is 
Indicative of a deeper sense of dislocation 
that one feels this summer at Stratford. Tal- 
ented individual director? have each opened 
a Pandora’s Box of reinterpretation, forcibly 
dying to demonstrate that Shakespeare can 
speak directly to our times. It should be 
noted that the changes are not, fa the most 
part, textual - 

A quest fa relevance has provoked How- 
ard Davies to uproot that most problematic 
of Shakespeare plays, “Troilus and Cress- 
da,” from Troy ana to transplant it to the 
mid- 19th century and the period of the Cri- 
mean War. The setting — and this season’s 
settings are as eccentric as the costumes — is 
a formerly elegant town bouse, battered by 
war. It is wed, alternately, as a command 
post by both Greek and Trojan forces. Dom- 
inating the stage is a long staircase against 
which rest remnants of doors and windows. 
Are there no carpenters in Crimea? As a 
symbol of twin decaying civilizations the 
setting has its point, though it is an obstacle 
in moments of battle, the duel between 
Hector and Ajax takes place on adjoining 
tabletops, a bizarre choice, and a precarious 


arena fa precision parrying. It is to the 
credit of the actors, David Burke and Clive 
Russell, and to the fight-master, Malcolm 
Ranson, that the adversaries are so nimble, 
in this and other plays, actors not only climb 
on tables, they' also repeatedly kick over the 
chairs. At Stratford inis summer, the furni- 
ture is much offended, and something simi- 
lar might be said about Shakespeare. 

In a year when Samuel Beckett took angiy 
exception to any divergence from his stage 
directions as well as his dialogue, one can 
only wonder what Shakespeare might say 
about this “Troilus and Cressida” — with a 
monocled Paris. Pan dams played as a fey 
lounge lizard, a pouting Achilles, a tailed- up 
Helen and a portly Ulysses wearing pince- 
nez. There is an inconstancy in the approach, 
in the ages of the actors as well as in their 
comportment. They seem to have wandered 
on stage from various ships of state. All this 
is underscored with portentous piano music 
and the sound of an offstage arsenal. 


T HERE is an idea afoot. Davies has 
tried to illuminate the play's bitter 
cynicism, the pervasive decadence 
that overcomes all attempts at heroism. The 
characters, with the exception of the Ram bo- 
like Ajax. are self-compromising, sometimes 
to the point of cowardice, as represented by 
Achilles crave ’ " ’ ’ ' ' 

to gun down 
appear on 

ized in the title characters:' Anion Lesser’s 
spineless Troilus and Juliet Stevenson's 
Cressida, who craftily adapts herself to the 
demands of the malicious Greeks. However, 
Davies's search fa period parallelism acts to 
obscure Shakespeare's content. 

It is Stevenson who deserves this season’s 
Stratford acting crown, for her Cressida and, 
especially, for her Rosalind. From her first 
appearance in Adrian Nobles production of 



“As You Like It." she projects an endearing- 
ly persuasive personality. One look at her 
and Hilton McRae's Orlando i.s struck silent 
— and we believe him. Actually there are 
several such first sightings, and each is 
played to the maximum romantic effect. A 
dear-eyed English beauty. Stevenson has a 
most mellifluous voice that can shift from a 
caress to a command without sacrificing her 
charm. Though her Rosalind ha\ a deter- 
minedly feminist streak, as in her assumed 
manly guise she takes charge of her fellow 
and sister castaways, she is able to be both 
witty and winsome. When she. Celia and 
Touchstone abandon the court, the three are 
like playful fugitives from a Nod Coward 
comedy, a feeling that is embellished by 
Nicky Henson lending Touchstone a Cow- 
ard crispness of speech. This is a high-style 
Fool, which makes his falling for the ragtag 
Audrey all the more amusing. Fiona Shaw's 
Celia has a gawky gracefulness. Add to this 
Alan Rickman's appropriately melancholic 
Jaques, played like a dinner guest w ho has 
stayed loo long at the party. Campbell Mor- 
rison's Sumo-size Charles the Wrestler and 
Joseph O'Coaor’s adept doubling as two 
dukes, both the banished and the tunisher. 
and the result is a worthy ensemble. 

The production, however, is an oddity. 
One naturally expects a sylvan forest of 
Arden, an environment whose bountifulness 
is in stark contrast to the barren court. Noble 
has instead conceived a wintry forest, as 
represented by a broad, billowing white 
sheet that is thrown over the scene in court in 
order to quick-change the setting. Chairs in 
outline under the sheet look like polar ice- 
caps. The objective may be to show that the 
good duke and his men bring their warmth 
with them as a kind of traveling companion, 
but. in context, they look discomforted. De- 
spite the setting. Noble's “As You Like It." 
led by Stevenson, is the most edifying of the 
three Shakespearean productions. 


BiU Alexander's "Merry Wives of Wind- 
sor" is a distinct disappointment, coming 
after his sinking production of “Ruhard 
HP Oast summer at Stratford. ihs> season ji 
the Barbican in London*. With “Merry 
Wives," the notion — less than an idea — is 

to shift to a modern Elizabethan renod. 

“Mem Wives" now takes place in she N50». 
and the atmosphere and de^or are like :hat 
of a television situation corned \ . Two subur- 
ban wives try to trick a satync suiu*r i Foi- 
st off) while deceiving their own complacent 
husbands. The evening prankish to the 
point of being jokey, even to trying for 
laughs by having actors lejp on and off a 
turn table stage as if it were a trolley. The 
company plays for easy laughs and often 
wins them — at the expense of an apparently 
indestructible comedy. There are. along the 
way. performances deserving of a less cat a- 
Iter production, including "Peter Jeffrey's 
Falsiaff and. in particular T L md -ay Duncan 
and Fran cine Morgan as the merriest of 
Windsor wives. 

B Y all odds, the most impressive pro- 
duction seen at Stratford is not t>\ 
Shakespeare, but by Maxim Gorky — 
“Philistines," in j new adaptation by Dusty 
Hughes. Hughes is the author of "Commit- 
ments." an incisive play atvui young En- 
glish radicals, and his sensibility is on exact 
match with that of Gorky. A richly layered 
family play, with political and vcial over- 
tones! “Philistines" is clearly one of Gorky'-* 
finest works, although it did not seem so 
several years ago when it was done off-off- 
B roadway in New York. The difference, of 
course, is the Royal Shakespeare Company 
As was demonstrated in David Jones's pro- 
ductions of “Enemies.” “Sumnterfolk” and 
"The Zykovs." the company has a great 
affinity lor Gorky, a feeling that is expressed 
with equal understanding in John C'aird's 

Continued on page f * 


Ashton’s New Juliet 


by Fabienne Marsh 


I ONDON — In a rehearsal studio at the 
London Festival Ballet House, Sic 
Frederick Ashton watches Kather- 
J ine Healy and Peter Schaufuss 
dance the pas de deux he choreographed 30 
years ago. It is the bedroom scene from 
“Romeo and Juliet,” known in the Prokofiev 
score as "Leave-Taking Before the Parting." 

Props are few, so the sleepy Juliet awakens 
to three orange plastic chairs and. to her 
despair, sees Romeo, banished for killing 
Tybalt, getting ready to leave. No protest en 
pointe or embrace on her knees will stop him. 

“Utterly splendid," the 81 -year-old Ash- 
ton says quietly between puffs on a cigarette. 
Then he stands and walks over to correct the 
arm position of the 16-year-old ballerina, 
who tackled her first full-length dramatic 
role as as Juliet in Wednesday’s London 
premiere of this choreography, first done in 
1955 by Ashton for the Royal Danish Ballet. 

Katherine Siobhan Healy was born in 
Manhattan, the only child of art-loving par- 
ents. She displayed an early talent for ice 
skating, and was coached by and starred 
with John Curry, at the age of 6, she per- 
formed her first solo in the annual Supers- 
kate spectacular at Madison Square Garden. 
Three years later, she was featured in the 
book ‘To a Very Young Skater” (Knopf). 

But at 4, Katherine had seen T Am a 
Dancer,” the documentary film about Ru- 
dolf Nureyev, and a few months later saw 
him live in New York in the National Ballet 
of Canada’s production of "The Sleeping 
Beauty.” From that moment on, “Nothing 
would do — I bad to dance,” Holy said. 

By the time she was 9, Healy had been 
chosen by George Balanchine to play the 
child heroine in the New York Gty Ballet's 
“Nutcracker." At 12, she starred as a young 
dancer dying of leukemia in the film "Six 
Weeks," with Maty Tyler Moore and Dudley 
Moore. At 13, she won a silver medal at the 
International Ballet Competition in Jackson, 


Mississippi At 14,- she won a gold medal in 
the junior division of the prestigious Varna 
Competition in Bulgaria. 

Last year at the Festival of Two Worlds in 
Spolelo, Italy, she danced a solo to the voice 
of Maria Cauas in an excerpt from by Saint- 
Saens’ “Samson el Dalila “ Peter Schaufuss, 
the artistic director of the London Festival 
Ballet, went strajgfat to Heal/s dressing 
room and asked if she would appear as a 
guest artist with his company- “I thought 
nothing would ever come of it,'’ she said. Tt 
sounded like a dream." 


R ECENTLY, her dream deferred for 
the day, she sat in an office four 
flights above the Festival Ballet 
dance studio and explained why she had 



a cut in her toe that was the product of daily 
nine-hour rehearsals — ax hours of which 
are divided between "Romeo and Juliet” and 
Ronald Hynd*s “Cqppilia." She slipped her 
foot back into pink sandals that stood oni 
only because everything else she wore 
matched her blue eyes. 

Healy’s approach to the role of Juliet was 
as consistent as her color scheme. “I read the 
Shakespeare play properly," she said. T 
took h into school and sat down half of the 



'.MtoSpXI 



listen to it, and listen to it — and lucidly it's 
gorgeous music, otherwise I think I would 
get sick of it." 

Any difficulties Healy fossees in dancing 
Juliet are interpretive, not technical. “The 
most difficult pan is sustaining Juliet for 
three acts,” she says. “Even in “Copptiia" I 
have the dancing to fall back on — the 
technique. The thing (hat has really gotten 
me where 1 am is my technique, mainly 
because I have not had a chance to try a 
dramatic role before. Things like fouettis, 
hops en pointe — aU the pure ‘trick’ dements 


Healy and Schaufuss. 

— there's none of that with Juliet. It’s either 
the character or nothing” 

In her spare time, she reviewed ihe work of 
former Juliets. Norma Shearer, in the film, 
and Marcia Haydfe and Carla Fracd in their 
ballet performances, arc her favori tes. When 
asked how she sees Juliet, she comments, “I 
don't think she's totally innocent.” Ashton 
and Schanfuss “pretty much left me to my- 
self with the actual character,” she says. 

“Every day I did it differently because I was 
just feeling my way.” 

For both Ashton and Schaufuss, the pro- watching wuntuedon matenes on teievis 
duction bolds spatial memories. Thirty years and reading a biography of Elizabeth L 
aTter its creation and 20 years after the Koval T'm a definite English history buff," 
Danish Ballet performed “Romeo and Ju- v ’ " * ' 

liet" in New York. Ashton has restaged his 
version with Nids Bjorn Larsen, a dancer 
from the original production. Schaufuss can 
remember when nis mother, Mona Vang- 
wsft. and his father, Frank Schaufuss. 
danced Juliet and Mercutio for the Roval 


Danish Ballet — and recalls his own perfor- 
mance as the nurse's mischievous page. 

The 5-fooi-2 ballerina finds the training 
different here. “In Europe, they’re much 
more classically oriented, said Healy. "The 
classes are different. In the Slates, we tend to 
push things for ‘the line.' Here, they're much 
more conscious or what you shouldn't do, 
even if it does give you a better ‘line.’ ” 

The few moments she has had to herself 
here have been spent visiting Blenheim with 
her mother, who accompanies her on tour, 
watching Wimbledon matches on television, 

__ . she 

says. In her last year m high school in Brook- 
lyn. she will study modem poetry . German, 
fifth-year French and European history. Af- 
ter that. Til probably be coming here full 
lime — if they still want me.” ■ 


Fabienne Marsh is a London-based writer. 


Earplugs for Orchestra Players 


by Donal Henaban 


N EW YORK — The symphony 
orchestra, looked at as a species, 
is about as likely an organism as a 
centipede. A strange hundred- 
legged creature,. the orchestra m ana g es to go 
about its business working wonders of coor- 
dination and cooperation when, by the lopks 
of it, purposeful movement in any direction 
would seem out of the question. How an 
orchestra functions is a mystery to outsiders, 
and probably is only dimly understood by 
'the legs themselves. But. we know that 100- 
plus talented individuals must and often do 
coalesce into a quasi-military organization 
requiring corporate discipline such as Fred- 
erick the Great imposed on his Prussian 
troops. AH this in the service of the suppos- 
edly contradictory ideals of an and com- 
merce. The symphony orchestra is a triumph 
of Ulogjc. 

” OU 

tore 

__ you bad 

ippened onto a Monty python television 
chnnring, or into Alice’s Wonderland. The 
truth is that earplugs have come to be widely 
used by orchestra members, a surprising per- 
centage of whom find sound levels on their 
jobs painfull y hig h and go to remarkable 
lengths to muffle the decibel impact. 

A survey reported in ihe June issue of 
jfenra Sordino, the official publication of the 
International Conference of Symphony and 
Opera Musicians, found excessive sound lev- 
els to be an “alarming problem” in all 23 
organizations surveyed. More than half of 
the 900 musicians responding said they suf- 
fered nervousness, tension, anger, disgust or 
irritability as a result of instrumental din. 
More than three-fourths stated that their 
playing was adversely affected. Nearly half 


believed they could exercise no control over 
the problem and so felt helpless, frustrated 
and trapped. Fear of deafness was a com- 
mon complaint. 

Earplugs are worn now and then by unfor- 


tunately positioned musicians in virtually all 
orchestras, particularly by those who must 
sit directly in front of brass or percussion 
sections- Nobody thinks this bizarre practice 
a good solution, since protection is achieved 



at the expense of being able to hear the 
music. So, although the managements of at 
least half a dozen orchestras are contractual- 
ly obligated to provide earplugs, many less 
radical solutions have been put forward in 
recent years. Plexiglass shields are attached 
to Lhe backs of chairs in many leading or- 
chestras. In Pimburgb. acoustic paneling is 
used around the percussion when the orches- 
tra is in the pit. Other orchestras mandate a 
separation between certain instrumental sec- 
tions. The variety of muffling tricks is wide, 
running from initalling carpeting to placing 
the brass on risers so that the sound waves 
travel over most orchestral heads. 

O NE good question is why loudness 
has become such an issue today, and 
many possible answers occur. Or- 
chestras certainly do not play the standard 
repertory appreciably louder today than 
they did’ 50 years ago. when the more thun- 
derous works of Berlioz. Wagner. Mahler, 
Bruckner. Strauss, Stravinsky and Bartok 
were already concert staples. But the in- 
creased use of percussion instruments by 
20th-century composers has to be taken into 
account, as does the introduction of elec- 
tronic instruments, especially at the pop con- 
certs that symphony orchestras are often 
called upon (o play. 

Just as important, it is safe to say, has been 
the building of many acoustically hard mod- 
em halls, in which normal problems of vol- 
ume balancing are exacerbated. Urban audi- 
ences, furthermore, may have become so 
inured to loud sound, thanks to traffic noise, 
subways, air hammers and rock amplifica- 
tion. that increased volume is required if 
music is to make any emotional impact The 
faculty of paying attention to soft sounds 
has declined as music of all sorts has prolif- 

Coniinued on page 9 






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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1983 


TRAVEL 


Apulia: Italy’s Ancient and Rugged Heel 


by R.W. Apple Jr. 




W ' HEN we told people last fall 
that we planned to spend a week 
or so in Apulia, we drew a lot of 
blank stares. Oh, an artistic Ital- 
ian friend said he had beard that it was fuD 
of Romanesque churches, and a political 
British friend said be half remembered from 
his school days a maxim to the effect that “it 
is better to be a prefect in Apulia than a 
subprefect in Rome,” and someone else said 
that Luigi Barzini had described it as the 
undiscovered wonder of his country. But 
most people we talked to didn't even know 
where the place was. 

Funny, thaL, because all sorts of people 
have tramped through Apulia — Puglia to 
the Italians — in the last 2,000 years or so. 
Greeks, Romans, Byzantines. Franks, Nor- 
mans, Swabians, Angevins and Bourbons all 
hoisted their banners there, conquering only 
to be conquered in turn. In our own time, 
though, Apulia’s site in the heel of the Italian 
boot, far from Rome and Florence and Ven- 
ice, has made it a touristic backwater. Most 
foreigners who know it do so because of its 
poverty. It is a prime example of the nagging 
problems del Mezzogiomo, the imbalance be- 
tween the affluent north and the backward 
south. 



but about the best one con do at the railway 
station of Canne della Battaglia, near Can- 
osa di Puglia, is stand on the rising ground 
south of the River Ofanto and wonder in 
which Held the carnage took place, precisely 
where the light Carthaginian troops man- 
ning the center of the line gave way to the 
legionaries so that their more heavily armed 
comrades on the flanks could surround the 
Romans and tear them to bits. It is beguiling, 
though, in that remote spot, to consider the 
fascination that Cannae has always held for 
generals, even as recently as 19 1 A when the 
German Army used von Schlieffen's modem 
adaptation of Hannibal's envelopment tac- 
tics for its thrust through Belgium into the 
heart of France — and to recall that the 
Germans, like Hannibal won the battle but 
lost the war. 


But the Roman empire finally fell apart, 
too, and the south of Italy, including / — ,s - 


Iha Nn> Vork Tb 


WeU, the churches are there all right, and a 
lot more, too. But the first thing we noticed 
as we drove from Naples across the ankle of 
the boot was the tomatoes. Millions of them. 
For two hours, we passed almost nothing but 
open trucks, heavily laden with crimson 
globes, shining in the midday sun like the red 
in the Italian flog, bound for markets in 
Milan and Munich. My wife, enchanted by 
the sight, called the highway the autostrada 
di pomodoro. I was less jolly: I was afraid 
there wouldn’t be any left for me. 

There were. Apulia may not yet have 
achieved industrial maturity, but its plains 
and its undulating plateaus once again pro- 
duce cornucopias of wheat, figs, grapes, ol- 
ives, almonds and tomatoes, as they did in 
the Middle Ages. (Somehow, most of the 
profits never seem to trickle down to the 
peasants, but profits there must be from all 
this bounty.) Flat and dry and hot, even- in 


September, Apulia seldom looks scorched, 
because there are too many fruit and olive 
trees, too many vines carried on high trellises 
above the rich, red day. The cattle look 
sleek, and so do the homes, some of them 
wearing little blue beads to ward off the evil 
eye. And the sea, not wine-dark at all bat 


blue-green, dear enough to gdc out stones 


feet, is never 


on the bottom at a depth, of : 
far away. 

Every so often a white village looms out of 
the heat haze, looking like something towed 
over from the Aegean, seemingly bleached of 
every last trace of color by the almost fright- 
eningly intense sunlight Go into one, park 
the car and walk around — tryCisternino, or 
perhaps Ostum — and you mil soon discov- 
er nuances of color, hidden piazzettas, bits of 
Renaissance sculpture, tumbling flowers, 

Se little^ town of AlberobeDo, withrtts hun- 
dreds of trulli — curious windowless lime- 
stone dwellings with conical roofs, white- 
washed inside and out In Apulia, Oriental 
images spring insistently to mind, and the 
trim, viewed from afar, resemble a bedouin 
encampment. Some of the huts are very old. 


some brand new, most are still lived in by the 
townspeople. 

The southern three-quarters of Apulia (ex- 
cluding the mountainous Gaxgano penisula. 
which forms the spur on the boot) is rich not 
only in fruits ana wine, not only in its blue 
skies and soft air and satiny beaches, but 
also in artistic treasures. They are easy 
enough to reach, especially for the motorist 
traveling from Rome or Naples to catch the 
ferry for Greece. And the region is compact 
enough so that one can follow its story, if one 
is so inclined, in rough chronological order. 
Let ns do just that 


j Apulia, 

was chopped into rival fiefdoxos ruled by 
Lombards and Saracens and Byzantines and 
Franks. It fell to Robert Guiscard, the 12th 
son of a modest Norman knight — who with 
several of his brothers sought fame and for- 
tune in the south because the little family 
castle in the Co ten tin Peninsula was too 
small to hold them all — to impose order on 
the chaos. By all accounts, he and his war- 
riors were brave but horribly cruel; one Nor- 
man, enraged by his wife, told her to put on 
her weddmg dress and burned her at the 
stake. 



A PULIA was once part of Magna Grae- 
j\ da — Great Greece, the network of 
XX Greek colonies in southern Italy — 
and Taras was its most opulent and exuber- 
ant city. Magna Graeda was to Greece as the 
New world is the the Old. in the view of 
many European writers, and if that is so 
Taras was the New York of the fourth centu- 
ry before Christ John Boardman, the histo- 
rian, puts h this way; "The Greek cities in 
the west were prosperous, nouveaux riches; 
their temples were that little bit bigger than 
those at home, their art that little oil more 
ornate. Artists and philosophers could readi- 
ly be tempted from Greece by commissions 
or lecture toure.” 


Yet like the Normans who settled in En- 
gland after the conquest, Robert's followers 
soon began building cathedrals, not unlflce 
those aL -Ely and Durham, and parish 
churches. These now dot the Apulian coast, 
sometimes only a few miles apart, Roman- 
esque testaments to a strange marriage of 
piety and barbarism, a blend of the weighty 
grandeur of Caen and frothier dements from 
the Orient — interlaced arches, the painted 
Saracenic arch, fanciful friezes and capitals. 

“They remain in delightful obscurity," 
says the English traveler H. V. Morton, “the 
timeless activity of small harbors going on 


Conical-roofed trulli in Alberobello. 


all round them and weekly markets bong 


held in their shadows.” Mblfetta’s cathedral 
has its supporters, as does Barletta’s and 
Bitonto's. See them all if you can, but if you 
can see only one I would choose Tram’s, 
because I brow of no cathedral thai can 
quite match it for initial impact. It stands 
behind a broad, barren square on the very 


edge of the sea, chalk-white against blue, 

riflyy lmg 

Lions and elephants march across its fa- 
cade, accompanied by fish and centaurs and 
griffins and magical birds and one man, only 
one. Beneath arc a pair of bronze doors, with 


Taranto, which rose from the ruins of 
Taras, is a supriangly spruce and modem 
town, with a big naval rase and fine broad 
boulevards, and it has a splendid museum of 
antiquities that is the best posable place to 
pick up the thread of Apulia’s history. There 
you will see an Ezos and an Aphrodite, both 
by Praxiteles or one of his pupils; tombs 
decorated with caryatids and a collection of 
vases that captivated even a philistine like 
me, a man who seeks cover at the first 
mention of die dread words “Greek pot" 
These are painted not with endless proces- 
sions of horses and soldiers and shields but 
with elegant animal and floral and geometric 
motifs. The Hellenistic j ewclry is even more 
remarkable, especially a fragile diadem dec- 
orated with delicate flowers of. colored 
enamel 

After the Greeks came the Romans, of 
course, and they, too, have left their mark on 
the land. There are the two columns — one 
lete, one just a stump now — that 


complete, 
marked th 


Castel del Monte. 


i the end of die Appian Way at Brin- 
disi the town where the poet Virgil is 
thought to have died. It was the Romans’ 
chief port for Greece, and it is the Italians’, 
And there is the curiously clumsy statue up 
the coast at Barletta, the largest Roman 
bronze in existence, wearing the armor of a 
general and bolding an orb and a cross. He is 
an emperor, though no one knows which 
one, and his odd appearance results from the 
tribulations he has suffered. Like the four 
horses of Venice, the Colossus of Barletta 
was part at the booty from history’s neatest 
robbery, the sack of Constantinople m 1204; 
unlike, the horses, the Colossus was lost 
crossing the Adriatic, and when it washed up 
on. the Apufian coast, local priests hacked off 
the bands and legs and melted them down 
tor church bells. The extremities that we see 
today are bad 15th-century replicas. 

Almost nothing remains to remind the 
visitor of one of the Romans’ worst defeats, 
which was inflicted by the Cartha ginian 
Hannibal in 216 B.G The battle of Cannae is 
stm studied at West Point and Sandhurst, 



• were carved by a local artist, Barisano 
da Tram, who was also responsible for the 
famous doors at RaveDo and at Monreale in 
Sicily. Inside, the light is tamed — turned 
tawny gold — as it passes through thin, 
narrow alabaster panels. 

Most of the cathedrals are based on the 
design of the church of Sl Nicola in Bari, 
which was founded in 1087 to receive the 
fruits of one of the more brazen escapades in 
religious history, the theft of the bones of St 
Nicholas of Myra from Asia Minor by 47 
Barese sailors. (In addition to bis association 
with Christinas, Nicholas is the patron saint 
of sailors and fishermen, children, robbers, 
wolves, pawnbrokers and Russia — an eccle- 
siastical one-man band.) Although the art 
historians rave about his church, it disap- 
pointed us. Its most noted exterior feature is 
the Lion Door, but the lions looked suspi- 
ciously like pet golliwogs to me; the inside 
would be boring except for the magnificently 
carved episcopal throne, dating from 1098. 


A LONG with Tram’s cathedral and Ba- 
L\ ri’s throne, the most fascinating Nor- 
JL JL man legacy in the region may be the 
beautiful pavement in the cathedral at 
Otranto, an ancient port near the tip of the 
Apulian heeL (This may be a good time to 
note that, in Apulia, many place names are 
pronounced with the accent on the Gist syl- 
lable and not on the next-to-last; thus it is 
OH-trahn-toe and TAH-rahn-toe and 
BRIN-d£b-zee). The tessdated pavement, 
laid by a monk named Pantaleone, fills the 
whole nave and choir and shows trees of life 


peopled not only by Adam, Eve, Noah and 
Heal worthies but also by Rex Ar- 


. •• .- : r... 


The Colossus of Barletta. 


other bibfical wortmes out also by Kex 
turns — he of the Round Table — and 
Alexander the Great and the signs of the 
zodiac. After 800' years and more, the or- 
anges and tans and blades still stand out 
boldly from the gray background. Like the 
tireless Morton, I “felt that I might have 
been walking on the Bayeux tapestry.” 

Perhaps the greatest figure in Apulian 
history was the Emperor Frederick II, who 
reigned from 1197 to 1250. A Gorman from 
the Swabian royal house of Hohenstanfen 


ate, full of marble and other stones, that was 
laid down in some stream bed eons ago. 

Nothing could be further in spirit from the 
Caste! del Monte than the youngest of Apu- 
lia's masterpieces, the Baroque city of Lecce. 
The softness of the yellow local stone, as 
Osbert Sitwell explained in 1 925, "allows the 
rich imagination of the South an unparal- 
leled outlet. The houses seem to be fashioned 
from snow." We walked through the city at 
midday; even cats and dogs take siestas in 
Lecce, we noticed, and everything was 
dosed, even the kiosks. But the buddings 
provided the animation — here a wrought- 
iron balcony supported on brackets and sup- 
porting two beautiful basketwoxk terra cotta 
vases full of palms, there a shady courtyard 
festooned with coats of arms and a fine 
octagonal urn set in a circular pool, to the 
right a church facade topped with elaborate 
stone baskets full of stone flowers outlined 
against the sky, to the left another buildii 
front fairly exploding with columns and j, 
intents and capitals and oculi and scrolls and 
swags and baskets of fruit and arches and 
pilasters and arcades and putti and saints. 

It all has a decidedly Spanish flavor, a 
whiff of the Plater esq ue, the architectural 
style that gained its name from its resem- 
blance to the work of a silversmith. “Art, like 
morality, consists in drawing the line some- 
where,” said G. K_ Chesterton, but Leccc 
obviously wasn’t listening. ■ 


® 1985 The New York Times 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA, Arkadenhof (td:1515). 

— July 30: Slovenia 


July 27: “The Philanthropist” 
(Hampton). 

July 29-31: 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


CONCERT 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Milan 
Horvai Conductor, (Handel, 
Brahms). 

•KQnstlerhaus (tel:57 .96.63). 
EXHIBITION — - To Oct. 6: “Vi- 
enna 1870-1930 Dream and Reali- 
ty: The greatest names of the Vien- 
nese fin-de- sifcde." 

•Schdnbrunn (tel:t53.43.551. 
CONCERT — July 31 : Franz Liszt 
Chamber Orchestra. (Handel Mo- 
zart, Tchaikovsky). 

•Theater an der Wein (tel: 
57,71.51). 

THEATRE — July 27-31: “Cats” 
(Webber, TS. Eliot). 


“The Scarlet Pimper- 
nel" (Orczy). 

GLYNDEBOURNE, Opera Festi- 
val (tel: 8124.11). 

July 27 and 29: ‘Tdomeneo" (Mo- 
zart). 

July 28 and 31; “Albert Herring" 
(Britten). 

LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 


628.87.95). 

TER — July 27: “Red 


(tel: 


ENGLAND 


CHICHESTER, Theater Festival 
(tel: 78.13-12). 


THEAT1 
Noses’ 

•London Coliseum 
S36J1.6I). 

BALLET — London Festival Bal- 
let — July 27: “Romeo and Juliet" 
(Ashton, Prokofiev). 

•National Portrait Gallery (tet 
930.15.52). 

EXHIBITION — To Oct 13: 
“Charlie Chaplin 1889-1977.” 
■Regent's Park Open Air Theatre 
(tel: 4862431). 

THEATER — July 27: “A Mid- 
summer Night’s Dream" (Shake- 
speare). 


July 29-31: “Ring Around The 
Moon" (Anouilh). 

•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734.9032). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Aug. 25: 
“217th Summer Exhibition.^ 
•Royal Opera (td: 240.10.66). 
BALLET — July 29 and 31: 
“Birthday Offering (Ashton, Gla- 
zunov), “La Bayadere” (Petipa, 
Nurcyev, Minims). 

July 27 and 30: “Varii Canricd" 
(Ashton, Walton), “Enigma Varia- 
tions" (Ashton, Elgar). 

•Tate Gallery (td: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITION — To August 18: 
“Paintings by Francis Bacon: 1944 
to Present.*' 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.711 

EXHIBITIONS —To October 22: 
“Textiles from the Wellcome Col- 
lection: ancient and modem tex- 
tiles from the Near East and Pern.” 


To Aug. 30: “David Hockney, ret- 
rospective.” 

To July 31: “Powers of Photogra- 
phy." 


GERMANY 


AVIGNON, Festival (tel: 
8624.43). 

DANCE — July 27-29: Odile Du- 
boc Company “Une Heure d’An- 


July 27: Karine Saporta Company 
“Incandescence." 


CHARTRES. Organ Festival (tel: 
2134.03). 

RECITAL — July 28: Geoffrey 
Marshall 


BAYREUTH, Wagner Festival 
(td: 20221). 

OPERA — July 27: “L’Or du 
Rhin." 

July 28: “Walkyrie." 

July 30: “Siegfried.” 

MUNICH, National Theater 
(td:21851V 

OPERA — July 29: “Norma" (Bel- 
lini). 

July 28 and 30: “Giustino" (Han- 
del). 


VERONA, Arena di Verona (td: 
23520) 

CONCERT — July 29: Concert ge- 
bouw Orcbestra. 

OPERA — July 27, August 1: “D 


Trovatote" (Verdi). 
):“Aida" (Ve 


July 30: 


erdi). 


July. 

July 28 and 31: “Attila" (Verdi). . 


August 2: “Giselle” (Adam). 


JAPAN 


COMM1NGES, Festival (tel: 
8832.00). 

RECITALS — July 31: Quatuordu 
Capitole de Toulouse, Suzanne 
Chaisemartin organ (Mozart, Liszt, 
Brahms, Sauguet). 






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WEEKEND 


appears 
every Friday 


To September 1 :_“Engfoh Carica- 
e 1620 to ‘ 


tare 1620 to the Present/ 

Td September 15: “Louis Vtrittou: 
A Journey through Tune." 


ORANGE, Festival (td: 343434). 
OPERA — July 27: “Boris Go- 
doiwov" (Mussorgsky). 


PARK, Centre Georges Pompidou 


(td: 277.1233). 

IONS - To Aug 19: 
Mean-Pi erre Bertrand," “Paler- 


EXHIBIT!! 


ATHENS, Festival (td: 321)439). 
CONCERTS — July 29: Athens 
State Orchestra, Byron Kolassis 
conductor, Few Ts’Ctag piano (Bee- 
thoven, Brahms). 

THEATRE —July 27 and 28: “Les 
Adamians* 1 (Aristophanes). 

July 30 and 31: “Le Bourgeois 
GentiUhomme” (Molifire). 

August 2: “Medea" (Euripides). 


TOKYO, Goto Museum (tel: 
703.06.61). , 

EXHIBITION — To July 28: 
“Chinese Pottery from Han to 
Ming dynasties." 

•Kokuritsu Noh-gakudo (lei: 
423.1331). 

EXHIBITION — To Aug 18: 
H Noh Masks." 

•Zeit Photo Salon (id: 246.13.70). 
EXHIBITON — To Sept. 16; 
“Tsukuba City." 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 


SALZBURG FESTIVAL 


SALZBURG — This important Western European Festival runs 
from July 26 until September 1 ar 1 ’ * * 


— . and includes opera, ballet and theater 

presentations as well as numerous concern and recitals by well- 
known artists. Some of the highlights include the following: 
BALLET — August 20, 23, 26: The Hamburg State Opera. “Sl 
M att hew P assion" (Neumeier, Bach). 

CONCERTS — July 29 and August 8, 11. 15. IS, 21, 25: Vienna 
Philharmonic Orchestra. 

August 4 and 5: London Symphony Orchestra. 

August 27 and 28: Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. 

OPERA — July 30:“Cannen" (Bizet). 

July 28 and 31: “Cossi Tan tune" (Mozart), 

August 6, 10. 14, 19. 22: “Macbeth” (Verdi). 

August 7 and 15: “Capricdo” (Strauss). 

RECITALS include Jessye Norman, Luciano Pavarotti. Pete* 
Schreier, Andrfe Watts. 

For further information tel: 662.42541. 


AIX-EN-PROVENCE, Festival de 
L'Art Lyrique et de Masque (tel: 
2337.81). 

OPERA —July 27:“OrfecT (Mon- 
teverdi). 

July 29: “Ariadne auf Naxos" 


illy 30 and 31: “The Marriage of 
Figaro" (Mozart). 

CONCERTS — July 28: Lyon Op- 
era Orchestra (Mozart). 

ARLES, International Photogra- 


phy Festival (tel: 96.76.06). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Sept. 30: 


moNS 
“F. Fontana, S. Bowman, L. 
Herve.” 

To Sept 15; “Disciples of Ansel 
Adams." 


mo," “David TrcmleiL r . 
•Musie d’Art Moderne (tel: 
723.6137). 

EXHIBITION — To Sept. 8: 
“Robert and Sonia Delaunay.'’ 
•Musfce du Grand Palais (td: 
261-54.10). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 2: “Re- 
noir.” 

•Muset du Petit Palais (tel; 
265.12.73). 

EXHIBITION — To Sept 29: 
“Gustave Dork" 

•New Morning (id: 52331.41). 
JAZZ — My 28: Sun Ra Arkesira. 


ITALY 


•Saini-Chapdle (td: 34035.17). 
CONCERTS - 


July 29 and 30: 

Are Anti qua de Paris (Middle-Age 
and Renaissance musk). 


GENOA, International Ballet Fes- 
tival (tel: 59.16.97). 

BALLET — July 27 and 28: The 
Dance Theatre of Harlem “Swan 
Lake” (Tchaikovsky, Petipa), “Vol- 
untaries” (Poulenc, Tetley). 
VENICE, Museo Correr (tel: 
25625). 

EXHIBITION — To July 28: “Le 
Veniae PossiWL” 

•Palazzo Fortuny (td: 70.09.95) 
EXHIBITION — To July 28: 
“Horst Photography. 1931-1984.*’ 
•Teairo La Fenicc (id: 23:9534). 
OPERA — July 27. 28, 30 “Ar- 
imda” (Rossini). 


AMSTERDAM, Art Theater (td: 
25,94.95). 

THEATER — To July 28: “PiaT 
(Gems), American Repertory The- 
ater. 

EXHIBITIONS — To Aug. 20: 
“Out .and About in Amsterdam: 
From the Fairgrounds to (he The- 
ater, 1780-1813?*- 
To Aug. 20: “Anarchism in France 
and The Netherlands.” 
•Koninkbjk Palos op de Dam (tel: 
24:86.98). 

EXHIBITION — To Sept 8: 
“French Bibliographic History in 
The Netherlands." . 

•Maisou Descartes (td: 22.61 34), 


EXHIBITION — To Sept. 8: 
“I m ag ina tion Seizes Power; a brief 
survey of European protest move- 
ments in the 60 V 
•Rgksmnieum (td: 733131). 
EXHIBITION — To Sept 29: 
“Rembrandt drawings." 
•Stadschouwbuig (td: 2433. Ill 
THEATER — July 27, 28: “The 
Spanish Bra ban ter (Bredero), En- 
glish Speaking Theatre Amster- 
dam. 

•Van Gogh Museum (tel: 

76.48.81). 

EXHIBITION — To Aug II: “Les 
fleurs du mal" Filiden Reps and 
Charles Beauddaire. 

•Westerkerk (tel 24.77.66). 
EXHIBITION — To Sept 15: 
“The World of Anne Frank, 1929- 
1945.“ 


SINTRA. Palado de Ouduz (td: 
923J919). 

EXHIBITION: To July 30: “Lisa 
in Lisbon (1845)”. 

•Palido da Pena (id: 9233919). 
RECITAL — MarieUe Nordmann 
harp. (Handel Debussy). 

•Sintra Regional Museum (td: 
9233918). 

EXHIBITION — To July 28: 
Paintings by Christine Hdene. 





r , 5. 


with an English wife, he gave his kingdom 
just laws, promoted Lhe arts and sciences, 
wrote a learned book on falconry and built 
tbe Caste] del Monte, probably the finest 
castle in all of Italy. He was the father of the 
ill-fated Manfred, celebrated by both Byron 
and Tchaikovsky, and was described by his 
contemporaries 35 stupor mundi et immutatar 
mirabilis — the wonder of the world and the 
marvelous innovator. 

His monument the castle, stands in a 
commanding position on a conical hillock, 
its bold outlme only lightly touched by time, 
although its rooms have been stripped bare. 
The honey-colored structure remains a mys- 
tery, a building without kitchens or servants’ 
quarters and almost without windows, an 
abstruse exercise in medieval mathematics, 
octagonal in shape, with eight rooms on each 
floor, an octagonal turret at each of the eight 
corners of the greater octagon. Only one bit 
of decoration remains — the single heroic 


doorway, clad in a rosy natural coaglomer- 

s, (hat 


\ 


UNITED STATES 


NEW YORK, American Museum w 
of Natural History (td: 87333.001 JS 
EXHIBITION — To Aug. 31: 

-r _r A.Mnl 


“Maya: Treasures of an Andeni 
Crvifization,” 


PORTUGAL 


EXHIBITION — To SepL 27; 

Jaheriands." 


“Descartes andTbe N< 
•Amsterdam Museum of Hstoty 
(tel: 253832). 


ESTORIL, Music Festival (td: 


26839.001 
ALS 


RECITALS— July 27-and 29: Al- 
berto LysyvioUn (Bach), 


•Metropolitan M&semnof Art (to- * 

535.77.101 , 

EXHIBITIONS — To Sept. I: . * 

“Man and die Horse." x f 

•Museum of Modern AN 
(iefc708.94.001 

EXHIBITON— To Ocl 1: "Run ! - 

Schwitters," - ’ 

- V 


* 

1 




r" I 




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4.* ■ !. ; >i^ni • 

'..ni.iUa 

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-infra: 

.-■■'l ...’urc reireia:-: 

f. !..■:<£ 

■'■-■CiTi* 

.. -r - ttuiIIc.' 

... . ■ 

. .• \i .• .■j.fj-ifc 

■ • • ■ . : « tr.e 

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b,: r - 

. : : . -V£ 






Down on Anxiety Beach, 
Or the Risks of Vacation 


by Roger Collis 

i'S every frequent business traveler 
f\ knows, the principal cause of trav- 

- r-\ d stress is not travel itself — the 

crowded airports, dislocated 
sc he d u les, jet lag, coping with different lan- 
guages and cultures —but the simple fact of 
being away- from the office. According to 
Stanley Zflch, director of Blue Sides Re- 
search Institute in Broken Springs, Colora- 
do, travel stress is now recognized as a major 
factor in executive morbidity. "Human na- 
ture abhors a vacuum. The longer you are 
; absent from the executive suite, the greater 
ride you-run of rival relationships developing 
‘which may ultimately usurp your power 
:^basft. Anxiety about this is more insidious, 
: - v more debilitating than the day-to-day pres- 
sures of office life." Most of you will identify 
Jsaaiii this typical scenario: 

- > . ;lt has been a long exhausting day. On the 


You’ve managed to empty your mind of 
practically everything except whether you 
should chance a martini or move straight 
into the wine, when zap, a heavy thought 
threatens to engulf the fragile optimism of 
lunch. Suddenly you see the dark signifi- 
cance of the chairman's parting words. 
That’s why Helen, your secretary, was so 


open briefcase and prepare to shift mental 
.gears from the pleasant meeting with the 
Danes you have just left to the somewhat 
■' more combative session with the French that 
.-■you- expect tomorrow. You find it hard to 

■ concentrate, not so much because you are 
tired, ac the propinquity of the blonde, but 

’'because of a free-floating anxiety about your 
-.job. 1 In retrospect, you shouldn i have gone 
cm an. overseas trip with talk of a major 
1 reorganization back borne in Burnt Plains. 

' Sure enough, there's a telex waiting for 
- you at the hotel:. “Urgent you call me 3:30 
;A-M your time Tuesday. Charles requires 
-you brief . . . garbled . . . your markets. 
Regards Greenwald." As you reach for an 
• . antacid tablet you decide that smoked eel for 

• lunch wasn't such a great idea after alL There 
ought to be a corporate health warning on 
every airline ticket: “Excessive business 
travel may seriously damage your career.” 

Astute practioners of “Management by 
Absence" (MBAs) cover themselves in sever- 
al ways: traveling with the boss or key rivals 
among their peer groups, or waiting until 
they themselves are out of the office on a trip 
' or vacation, maintaining a high profile when 
traveling by calling the office incessantly 
and conducting their normal business on the 
road. (Have you noticed how many success- 
ful executives are never involved with busi- 
ness of the country they are visiting? They 
spend aU the time on the phone to some- 
where else, especially bade home. Thus they 
.can indulge in the spurious glamour of ex- 
pense-account living while minimising the 
risks of being away from the action). 

This is why vacations are even more haz- 
ardous than business trips (except for the 
French, who all go away during the month of 
August). They are certainly not the happy, 
restorative institution that folklore and the 
tourist industry would like us to believe. The 
. reason, quite simply, is you're even further 
removed from the center of the universe. 

Of course. it may seem like paradise. No 
budget meetings, no presentations to the 
board, no secretaries to kick you around. A 

* glorious fortnight away from the telephone. 

That's just it. Belter the devil you can see. 
Better a problem screaming on the phone 
than screaming in your mind. On vacation. 

. the normal three in the morning sweats can 
break out at any time of day or night 

Imagine you're a prisoner on Tahiti Plage 
. at Saint- TVopez, or some other golden ghet- 
> to. There is a faint breeze off the sea, just 
enough to stir the palm trees, set the batch 

■ boys to work tightening the parasols and 
waft the first, pungent smdls of the plat du 

„ jour across the serried rows of baking bodies. 
Monsieur Ffclix is starting on his rounds with 
a sheaf of menus. Fingers are snapping to 
. order aperitifs. The beach is coming to life 
after a gloriously somnolent morning. 


Stratford 


Continued from page 7 


production of “Philistines." In this case attention to the subtext, with looks erf 

there is the additional pan-cultural factor of askance and helples sn ess as her husband 

the central theme. A strong-willed working- crushes all dissent Among the other vivid 

class father fulfills a dream by educating lus characters are a philosophical old bird catcfa- 

soo and daughter out or their class, then er (he prefers birds to people) and an embit- 

greets their disdain of him and his values tered young intellectual, an inveterate truth 

with a kind of reverse snobbery. In different teller. 

form, this conflict has been the basis of a Each of these people, no matter how nn-‘ 
□umber of contemporary English plays, in- nor the role, thinks that he is the leading 
eluding works by David Swrev- character in the play. That is precisely how 

Gorky’s son and daughter « «£** 

to sdfMffltaem givas the play both momentum a nd inlensi- 

duough t he love, for .chyacters ^ ^er 

2“*” ffodSfin lhe Steps into caricamrl. Her patentee is 

drawn to a widow n it is the hi&Hty artificial arching a shoulder, walking 

family home. In the h U . armealine m profit and physicalizing the emotion out 

family's foster son .a ^ g* roleL It Sighted to sep “As You 

3&S£l3'£'JS35S5i “5 If and u to r^&uadictin, the 

KwSsuccessFor the most part, the others evidence m “Phflistm«, Shaw is a peroep- 
S^EoSSn failure. At« says. “Life a particular gift for charac- 

fiver”Fteai i&K ®are Sfd^is nofmelodra- Caird’s production, presented within the 
ma^ut aSn^ated ennui fcimehow the self- crnTnaj af the smaller of Stratford's the- 
SSS55 becomes oppressive; there is aters, the Other Place, furnishes the play 
contempt never vw j=_ with a simple but firm base of reality. Eveiy- 

CHDtured by thing seems to occur around the dining table. 
* No matter what the time of day, the samovar 
many of Cairds actors is simmering. The characters ire eating and 

The emotions are sizable enough tor trage- dr inking and the atmosphere is dense with 
dy or melodrama, beg in ni n g with the dicta- CTV v animosity and poignance. With “Phi- 
lo rial father. Without sacrificing the charac- k^es.” the Roya ] Shakespeare Company 
tor's weight David Bute make us see the a g a ; n expresses the vitality of Gorky the 
absurdity of his thunderous, reflcave reao- d ^pma tict, second in Russia only to Cbe- 
tipas. He is funny even when he is furious. h ^ a relief — in contrast to this 

For one thing, he is totally dismissive of his season - s Shakespeare— to find the company 
meek wife, never missing an opportunity to accomplishing its goal without updating the 
denigrate her, an attitude thatis not so pia V and without shifting events from Russia 
distant from that of the father in Christopher [0 ^ p^piid i coal- raining co mmuni ty/ ■ 
Durang's “Marriage of Bette and Boo. 

Margery Mason plays the mother with subtle © I9S5 The New York Time 


DOONESBURY 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


Page 9 



TRAVEL 


Side Trips to France’s Little-Known Wines 


by Frank J. Prial 


I S there life after Beaujolais? And Bur- 
gundy and Bordeaux? Yes, although 
you’d have a tough time proving it in 
the United States. In France, the big 
three have their proper place in die wine 


pantheon, but they are by no means alone. 
There are literally hundreds of delightful 
wines that never see the inside of an elegant 
restaurant, never find themselves in a con- 
tainer heading for New York or Houston, 
and never (weU hardly ever) get a mention in 
the wine guides. 

Hie)' are the kinds of wines that make 
wandering around France so much fun — 
except, of course, for those insulated unfor- 
tunates who eat only m three-star restau- 
rants, drinking only expensive wines. The 
tittle-known wines are as intriguing as the 
tittle-known places. There should be enough 
time on any trip to enjoy both of them. 

Nor is it necessary to go very far afield to 
find these delightful wines. Bordeaux, for 
example, is home to the great wines of the 
Midoc, of Saint-Emilion and Sauternes. Bui 
it is also the center erf a far vaster wine 
region, the southwest of France, that encom- 
passes such wines as Monbazillac, Bergerac, 
Lalande-de-Pomerd, Cdtes de Duras, Cer- 
ons, Gaillac, Cdtes du Fronton and Lavillc- 
dicu, just to name a few. 

Burgundy is Burgundy, certainly, but not 
far from the great vineyards of the Cote d’Or 
are, dozens of fine but unknown little 
wines. At the southern cod or the Burgundy 
district are the villages of Givry, for instance, 
and Montagny and Bouzeron. From the 
north, near Chablis, comes a red called 
Irancy. To the west are the COtea Roannaises 
and die wines of Saint-Pom^ain. South of 
the Beaujolais region, and reaching as far as 
the Crite-Rdtie on the northern limits erf the 
Rhone Valley, is the wine appellation known 
as Coteaux du Lyonnais; to the east are 
Bugey and (he wines of the Savoie and the 
Jura. And so it goes in France. 

French wine names can get confusing. 
There is a Rally in Burgundy and a Reuilly 
produced in central France near the headwa- 
ters of the Indre River. There is Bugey, 
mentioned above, and Cdtes de Buzet, which 


Have they reviewed the budget figures with- 
out you? Could they? You bet they could. 

It's the executive Diaspora, the vacation 
exiles. Most mornings you can see them 
congregating at post office counters along 
the Cdte d’Azur and those idyllic get-away- 
from-it-ali islands in the Greek archipelago. 
That distinguished gentleman in a baseball 
hat and Hawaiian shirt is surely a vice presi- 
dent of something or other. He’s been wait- 
ing for nearly half an hour trying to get 
through to his office, nervously sucking a 


An unscientific 
study of stress 
by absence 


cigar and hefting a fistful of un familiar 
coins. “Cabine qua tie!” Notice how author- 
ity soon loses its edge in the stale darkness. 

Of course, he’s got a terrible line. He 
clamps the phone to one ear and a cupped 
bana to the other. The roaring of a mighty 
ocean punctuated by electronic whirs and 
burps. Then the faint voice of his secretary. 

“Helen, it’s me. Yes, it’s me. Can you hear 
me? Yes, I can hear you. Pm practically 
shouting. What's that? Operator, I’m trying 
to speak to my secretary. Yes, mv secretary. 
This is Mr. Geist speakmg Thank you. Hel- 
en? We made iL Yes, we’re all fine: Having a 
great time here. Yes, the weather’s fine. Just 
perfect. Helen, listen, ah the reason Tm call- 
ing Ah, did the chairman say anything 
about that meeting he was going to set up? , 
Yes, on the budget. Exactly. What do you 
mean he’s had the meeting? He can’t do that 
without my figures! What figures? What’s 
that? Kari didn't give him any figures, did 
he? Karl's not authorized to give any figures 
outside the department, yon know that. 
What? He fell out of a tree? He's upped them 
three! Percent or tripled? Fahcrissake, he 
can’t do that. Listen, he’s no business doing 
that. I’d better speak to Kari. Can yon put ’ 
me through? Sorry, I didn’t get that Karl's 
with the chairman! Helen, this is a terrible 
tine. Operator? Is that the operator 

Out there, beyond Monsieur Felix’s im- < 
maculatdy raked sand, stretch acres of hdp 
wanted ads in the IHT. Of course, there are ^ 
the headhunters. But tike bank managers ^ 
with loans, headhunters only offer you 
something when you don't need iL Right 
now at the office, they might be disnissing 
you. “I hear Tom is leaving the corporation. w 
“Is that so? Does Tom know yet?^. 

Relaxation, they say, is the mother of 
anxiety. A Stanley ZDch apothegm triggers 
an appalling stream of consciousness as you 
clamber aboard a martini “Even a paranoid 
can have enemies.” 

If you're still planning a vacation this 
year, consider these options: Combine it 
with a business trip to limit the downside 
hazard, preferably over a public holiday 
back home; invite the chairman along, it's a 
small price to pay; make it a winter sports 
vacation over the end of the year break when 
nobody’s in the office; check the bindings on 
your golden parachute. If aU rise fails, re- 
member there are worse places than Saint- 
Tropez for updating the r£sum£. ■ 



A Montbozillac vineyard \ 

comes from the southwest of France. Of 
course, there are also Cdtes de Bourg, Cdtes 
de Blaye and Cdtes de Bergerac. 

Some of these wines are exported from 
time to time, and it's worth looking out for 
them. Monbazillac, for example, is a via 
liquoreux, a full-bodied, sweet white dessert 
wine in the style of Sauternes. It has none of 
the finesse of the great Sauternes such as 
Y quern or Suduirauu but a good Monbazil- 
lac will age well and properly chilled will 
prove a delightful companion to a wedge of 
Roquefort or a slab of fresh foie gras. 

when they can be found. Monbazillacs 
are good bargains, far less expensive than 
Sauternes or Barsacs. Winch helps to explain 
why, a few years ago, Monbazillac growers 
were tearing up white-wine vines and plant- 


ftmt Dwrrfon dv Toni >int 


ing red. There was no money in the whiles. 
That has changed somewhat': the world has 
discovered sweet dessert wines and there is a 
market for them. Cerons is another such 
wine, produced in a tiny area just north of 
Bar sac and Sauternes, south of Bordeaux. A 
good one will have a touch more elegance 
than a Monbazillac. 

Givry, from the Cote Cholonnaise. is not 
too difficult to find outside France, it is a 
true Burgundian, coming as it does from the 
pinot noir grape and vineyards only a few 
miles from the great vines of Santenav and 
Chassagne-Montrachet. More than 75 per- 
cent of aU Givry is red. but some white is 
made from the chardonnay grape. Montagny 
is a white wine made from chardonnay 
grapes. It comes from the Buxy area, just 


north of Maconnais. It can he richer than the 
Macon wines, a manifestation perhaps >*f 
nobler ancestors from the gseat white Bur- 
pundv vineyards a feu mile* to the north 

The white wine of Bou. eron. also m the 
Cote Chatonnaisc. is nude from the jiigote 
grape Once, when white Burgundies were 
affordable, the aiigolc was looked down on. 
No longer. The wine is. «n lacs, a good 
inexpensive substitute for higher-priced Bur- 
gundy whiles. 

One of the best of these wines, is nude b\ 
Auhen de Yiliaine. who i> belter known a*, 
one of the owners of Romjnec-Cor.n He 
also produces an excellent red bureurds 
from his Bouzeron property, called La Di- 
goine. It is exported in considerable quanti- 
ties. 


A NOTHER of these lose:’ known wines 
is Lalandc-de-Pomeroi. a good-Mjed 
IX wine region ju>t north ot Pomeroi 
iiseir with some 2CW proprietors working 
2.500 acres. Some of the chateau* that are 
exponed include Bel-Air. Eki!ev-Grjve«\ 
Clos I'Eglise. Roquebrune and Tou relies. 
When Lalande-de-Pomcrol wj> still known 
os Neac. its prices were *erx low The* arc 
not cheap anymore, but thev are aenerat!) 50 
lo 30 percent less than the 'Pomerols. 

Some years ago. a man named Hector de 
Galard appeared in New York wnh wines 
from a property colled Chateau Bell cue la 
Foret in an area called Cotes du Fronton, an 
appellation not far from Toulouse, in the 
southwest of France. It wj> a well-made, 
delicious wine, and it did quite well. One 
doesn't hear so much of it anymore, but u is 
around and definitely worth trying. From 
tennais wines, by the way. are made primari- 
ly from a grape called the negrette that i* 
almost exclusive to that area. 

Lovilledieu is mentioned only because :i is 
so rare, h may be one of the least-known 
appellations in France. It lie* along the up- 
per reaches of the Garonne and produce* a 
light, fruity red wine (hat should be drunk 
soon. Hardly anyone who doesn't h\e m the 
region will ever drink it. Still, foi Mime rea- 
son. it's nice to know that it’s there ■ 

r rn 5 The Vo. Ycrk T.nu\ 


Earplugs for Orchestra Players 


Continued from page 7 


era ted in our culture. If a musician wants to 
get through to us now he must bellow. 

Other answers propose themselves as wdL 
It may be that orchestra musicians have only 
lately reached the point where they fed they 
have the right to complain about ancient 
grievances such as onstage noise. They are 
labor unionists now, willing and able to exert 
pressure for better working conditions. In 
fact, the very success of orchestra musicians 
in labor negotiations over the last two de- 
cades may be a contributing factor In the 
days what even, famous orchestras lured 
players for half the year or less, toleration of 
poor working conditions was probably easier 
than it is now, .when year-around employ- 
■ mem has been achieved in many organiza- 
tions. Evqp now, the survey reports, many 
managers and conductors do not want to 
bear complaints about excessive sound lev- 
els, which must make the pain harder to 
bear. Even when salvation is not immediate- 
ly practicable, understanding from above 
can be a salve. 

1 do not think it occurs to most people 
who attend symphony concerts to fed sym- 
pathy for ordiestra musicians, nor should 
they, since mosL people drudge away at in- 
comparably duller and more onerous jobs. 
And yet, a better understanding of what 
makes orchestras tick might help conoertgo- 
ere enjoy what they pay their mosey to hear. 
A gnat many books Have been written that 
purport to reveal the workings of orchestras 
to the outsider, some of them worth book- 
shelf space. However, I have not been so 
taken with any example of the genre as with 
Linda Btandford’s 'The LSO — Scenes 
From Orchestra Life," which is published by 
Michael Joseph in London ana distributed 
in the United States by Merrimack Publish- 
ers’ Circle of Salem. New Hampshire. 

Tire LSO, of coarse, is the London Sym- 
phony Orchestra, a self-governing group 
that hires and fires its conductors and guest 
artists. It has the reputation in England of 
being unruly, raffish, unpredictable and bril- 
liantly superficial in tire “American" style. 
The author, an expaienced journalist who is 
married to the cellist Lynn Harrell, does a 
splendid job of getting inside the orchestral 
psyche and rummaging around. She pro- 
vides the usual, ever interesting, professional 
de tails — ~ inside stuff about oboists' reeds, 
bom players' lips and the like — but the 
book’s real achievement is in capturing with 
rare sharpness just who these murky individ- 
uals are and how they get along together, 
when they do. 


T HEIR relationship with Claudio Ab- 
bado, whom they chose as their prin- 
cipal conductor, is typically prickly. 
Here is a sample exchange from a rehearsal. 
“Abbado to the brass: ‘You’re playing too 
loud.’ First trumpet: You’re wrong. You 
can’t hear properly from where you are.’ 
G audio: ‘Are you telling me about balance?’ 
Tnmmet; ‘Yes.’" 

Abbado, it seems, bears such arrows from 
the ranks as patiently as Sl Sebastian. “And 
yet, in some inexplicable way, he binds the 
orchestra to him. On one level the players 
kick against him, com plain and defy him. A 
popular LSO saying these days goes: *We 
rehearse because G audio needs to practice 


been fixed.” Some of this interplay may 
sound familiar to New York Phimannonic 
observers. As the great Russian music critic 
Leo Tolstoy put it, “All happy orchestras 
resemble one another; every unhappy or- 
chestra is unhappy in its own fashion.” 

Linda Blandford. whose husband served 
time in tire Gevdand Orchestra, under- 
stands what musicians are up against. “Crit- 
ics," she says, “are heartless beasts, lightly 
tossing off remarks about lade of inspira- 
tion,' ‘another ragged, lackluster perfor- 
mance’ and complaints that ‘deeper mean- 
ings were not revealed.’ Or so it seems to 
those on the receiving end. Everyone loves a 


good review; everyone resents a bad one. 
Music as the idealization of man’s highest 
yearnings is all very well for those who do 
not spend nine hours a day pursuing it, 
blowing, scraping, bowing and tonguing, 
self-employed and overworked. How hard to 
come to the symphonic works as a player, 
the sheer problem of making the sound, 
strings that go flat, reeds that don't speak, 
muscles that ache. Who will sit out there 
making allowances for colds, headaches, sick 
children, grumbling parents or just the dis- 
traction of days spent in the car rushing 
between engagements. 

“An orchestra is reviewed as an entity as if 


it were in possession of one heart and one 
soul. It is no more and no less than the sum 
total of its players at any given moment. 
... Ail thev - have in common is that they 
live with the constant contradiction between 
trying to make a living and, at the some time, 
trying to keep within them enough vulnera- 
bility to make music at its highest and most 
intense level. Not surprisingly, music some- 
times loses." No, it is not necessary to have 
sympathy for orchestra musicians, lei alone 
make excuses when things eo wrong, but a 
little understanding cannot nun. ■ 

E /«W 5 The Sen- York Turn - 1 


The International Herald Tribune's daily paid circulation continues to break records, up 5% in the 
past year and 24% in the past four years. More than a third of a million people in 1 64 countries 
around the world now see each issue. And latest figures indicate that this rapid growth continues. 


International Herald Tribune circulation 
figure prepared for OJD audit for period 
from January' 1 , to December 31, 1984. 










v--'. 



i 


his memaiy.' And yet, deep down, he must 
reach them because when the concert comes, 
most of the details he has worried over have 






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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1983 


NYSE Most Actives 

w Won low Lost 0*0. 


PtlllPI 5 

31974 Vis 

V2% 

13 

+ '» 

WomrL 

30023 40 

38 

39% 

— f% 

SearleG 
All RIOl 

18224 641# 
18193 *0*. 

64% 

59% 

64% 

404* 

+1% 

IBM 

15380 130% 

128% 

130% 

+ 1*6 

ITT Cp 

14220 3T» 

32% 

32% 

* % 

Exxon 

1X016 53'-. 

51% 

S3 1 * 

+ 'J 

Unocal 

13048 3P» 

29% 

30% 

+ 'x 

AT&T 

12*43 72 

21% 

21% 

+ '!■ 

Sctilmn 

11159 38% 

37% 

38 'x 

+ *4 

AZP 

Am Exp 

11055 26V# 
10515 45 

25% 

44 

26 

XX'i 

— % 

TerOGs 

10388 17 

16% 

16% 

+ '# 

Houlnd 

10333 18% 

27% 

27V) 

+ 1# 

Revnins 

9991 27% 

34% 

Z7V* 

+ '<* 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


SOTKtt 

UlllitfCS 

Industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


open Hran Low Laai Ow. 

IMIK 1340.13 11W88 1338.90 13S301 + 4.71 

Trans 08T.85 9*404 6?8 V C0SJ8 - 3« 

Ulil 157.93 IJ9J2 15445 15849 *■ 004 

Como 559.41 St'.Ji 551 Jl 557.17 * 003 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 

Declined 

unchanged 

Total l59um 
New Highs 
New lows 
V olume ua 
Volume down 


Close Prev. 

707 669 

WO 1006 

*5a 36i 

3035 3066 

M S3 

4 7 


61341.610 

47,6874150 


NYSE index 


hwi Low Clan cvm 
C ommit* 111J5 1HL92 HUS +0.12 

liXhnlrlolS 13760 137.15 13760 +024 

Tronsn. 111.77 I11JW 11163 -039 

Utilities 5769 5763 5769 +010 

Finance >1668 11662 11073-0*3 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Boy Soles ■smr> 

July 54 mws 511262 1,420 

Jlriv 23 22MMZ 54+741 047 

JU<V 22 19L635 47+492 1640 

July 10 240276 489J98 1271 

July 18 312.130 487606 918 

‘included in 11 m salts Mourn 


Ihursda^B 

MSE 

Closing 


VM.4T4PM 12UHM 

Pnw.4PJH.voL 123680600 

Prev oomeUoM dose 13l8tlfii0 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to tbc closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Pres s 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
unearned 
Total ■»«■* 
New Hlofti 
new Laws 
volume ua 

Volume down 


Commit* 
induftrtofa 
Finance 
; mwnmee 
i UIB1H** 
B oflfct 
T roam. 


Wert 

Oom Ql'W *90 
304+4 +073 306JB 
314.13 +1.77 3I2JS 

SLU-lb 39806 
35466 — 107 36661 
29S66 — 033 3016* 
397.12 — 039 303+6 
37360 + 165 271.96 


vol Mian Law LMi C9a 


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AmJofii 

KcvPu 

DomeP 

Srrtlc! 

BAT in 

GkmFt 

T*rr wl * 

AllrBU 

ForntL 

GUCdu 


Standard & Poor’s index 


AMEX Sales 


4W 

6% 

SV* 

6 

4935 

to--. 

UK 

to 

4M5 

17% 

16 't 

16# 

ISM 

u 

liV. 

«■* 

M3* 

17% 

16% 

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74 27 

M% 

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ID 

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55» 

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13 

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Trans*. 

UliaiM 

Finance 

Composite 


men Low Ckm arpe 

214.12 212J1 21197 +UJ 
17863 17763 lTRM —033 
84.11 83L7I OH +022 
2268 2138 22+2 —0.13 
19133 101.17 1910* +06* 


4 PAL vohana 
Prav. 4 pjw. volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


AMEX Stock Index 1 

High Law Ctow ChV* 
315.11 33447 23SJC + W- 


12 Month 

High Low Stock 


SK ClOH 

Div. YhL PE 100s High Law OuoL Ch’ae 


23") 14 AAR 68 U 14 40 22 21*1 71% — U 

173s 9*0 ACS 13 127 lb*# IF# 14 - Hi 

16% 9% AMCA 2 13% i?% VP* 

2H# 13 AWF JO 17 41 607 13V# IJX IJ% 

13*1 ITT# AMF wd 3 BO Ijv# 13% 13'* + '« 

5014 24% AMP 8 6741 47'# 45V 44V— % 

227-a 18V AMR pi 2.18 «4 7 32%. 22V 22V 

14'i 7V APL 75 ■»=• ■ 9’i 9% + U 

61V 44V ASA 100 46 1570 47>i 45*1 47V + V 

Z7 CiAVX J2 ZJ II 59 14 x% 14 

2SVg It AZP 172 106 B 1 1049 26V 25 i 26 

60 34V. ADILflb 1.40 26 16 1055 57X. 56-4 5*V — V 

21% 1» AecoWdsJ» 2J 1« 449 31V 21 21V— V 

MV 13V AcmoC M 26 SB 16 15V 16 + V 

10% 7V AcmoE J2b 4.1 10 3 B D 7D 


23 '-1 14 AAR +8 U 

17V 9V ACS 

16% 9% AMCA 

21V 13 AMF JO 17 

13V ITT# AMF md 

5014 24V AMR 

22V 18V AMR pi 2.18 9* 

14*1 7V APL 

61V 44V ASA £00 43 

27 I2 1 1 AVX 32 23 

28 la 16 AZP £72 <06 


Prices Mixed iii Active Trading 


T2 Month 

HhSl Low SM 


Piv.Vld.PE TDQtHloh Low Dual. OllM 


W# 7V AcmeE 
>9 15 AdaEx 

70 11 ’a Adrr5B.il 

IP 5 BV AdvSv# 
41’# 23V AMD 
13V Pi Advent 
IF* 9 Aerflex 


MV 13V AcmoC M 26 BB 16 15V 16 + V 

10V 7V AcmeE JZb 4.1 10 3 B D 7>) 

19 15 AdaEx 1.92010.1 36 18% IBV 1BV— 

70 ll'o AdmMI 32 16 7 3? 171) 17% 17V— '•# 

IP 5 BV AOvSv# 631 AA 19 40 121# 12 12 — V 

41’# 23V AMD IB 3754 30 39‘a 39V + V 

13V 4% Advert .12 13 32 IS A l# 4V 

15% 9 Aerflex 14 46 15'# 14'a MV— V 

49V 77 1 . AetnLi 164 5.7 34 3180 46 45V 46 + 'a 

57V 52V AelLol S.79o10J 60 56%. 5a 564. + V 

37V 18’- AtuniK 120 U I 3951 J0’» 29’v 30 — V 

IV 2% AIMen 33 2% 2% 2% 

56V 39># Air Pro 130 2.1 12 2553 S’ S5V 55V— V 

74V 13 AirDFrt 40 IB 12 66 11 V 21V 21’- — V 

2'# 1 AIMoa s 42 2V I 7 V 

79'# 23V AtaP Pi 2.92c 102 30 28V 2BV 2BV— V 

33V 27'- AklPplA 3.92 117 IS 3' 304. 30V— X 

B'# 6'-. AtaP dpi 67 10.9 25 B 7% B 

106 ■&>— AlaPol 1160 106 70Z105 105 105 —1 

I6V 11V AIOOSCS MM 6.7 11 25 15V 15V 15V 

26V 9V AIlkAir .16 6 10 1088 25% 24V 25 — V 

24V 10V Albnoi JB 16 IB 16 24 23'- 23V— •- 

33'- 24'# A It* Km .76 26 12 525 30V 29V 29V— V 

31'- 23'- Alcan UO 4J 28 3125 27V# 26V 27V + V 

38% 271# AlCoSId 1.30 36 13 90 376# 37V 37V 

37 17 AlcxAlx 160 36 667 23V 28V 28V— V 

26”i 20V Alevdr 22 1* 74V 24V 24V 

89 '-J 72V AllgCo 2061 26 25 106 824. B2'y B2 , *i — V 

384. ffl' i AlOlnl 140 Si 88 25V 24V 244.— V 

20V 15'A Alain pi £1« 11.1 9 19V 19V 194. + Va 

90 83V AlplptC 11.25 116 34 97 9aV W»— '» 

34V 25V AllBPw 2.7D Lf 9 14S3 304. 30V 30V— V 

23V 154. AJJenG JOb 26 17 362 23V 22V 23 

464. 28V. AMOCO 160 46 0 1994 44V 44V 44V 4- V 


2V 1 AIMoa s 
79'# 23V AiaPoi 2.92CIIL2 
33V 27'- A taP plA 3.92 1L7 

8'# 6'. AtaPdOl 67 10.9 

106 88'- AlaPol 1100 106 

76V 11V AI095CS MM 6.7 11 

I6V 9V AllLAir .16 6 10 

24V 10'# Al&rtoi JO 16 18 

33'- 24'# A'DKm .76 26 12 

31'- 23'- Alcan I JO 44 28 

38V 271# AlCaSM «JB 36 13 

37 17 AlexAU MM 36 

26'# 20V Aleydr 27 


66 53V A Id Co pi 6.74 106 85 63V 63V 63V + V 

706V 100V AJdCpf 12J1C1I.9 9 1831# 103V 103V 

23V 15’— AIMPd 18 B 20 19V 20 — V 

60% 42V Alld5lr 2.12 36 9 303 58V 58'i 5BV 

12V 4V AlllsCh 1 12 SV SV SV — V 

34% 24 AllBCoi 5 32V 32V 37V 

29V 20 ALLTL 1J4 66 9 254 78V 78V 786# + V 

39V 29V Alcoa IJO 3J 32 <®4* 36V 351# 36V + 1# 

22% 13V Amax .101 627 161# It 161# + V 

40 32V Amatol +0.1 86 18 K# 35% 35% + V 

34 22V Am He# t.10 3.9 20 2390 20V 28% 28V#— % 

40% 90’# AHes Pi 360 2.9 1 122V# 122V# 122V# — <- 


140V# 90’# AHes Pi 360 2.9 

2V 1% AmAor 

21V# 15% ABnkr 

70 55% A Brand 3.90 6.1 

30% 24V ABrOPi 2.75 96 

•TV 56% ABrdpf 267 4.1 


225 IV IV IV 

39 30V 20V 20V 

349 64% 63V 63% — ’# 

2986 30V# 29% 30% + % 

2 64V 64V 64V + % 


115 56% ABdCSl 160 16 17 755 114 113V 113% + % 

29% 19% ABIOM 66 19 16 165 30 29 30 +1 

» % 20% ABinPr M 24 15 23 28% 2T% Z7%— % 

V 40% AmCan 2.90 56 II 223 5B% SO 58% * V 


25V 21V ACanei 240 II.) 
52V 37 ACanoi 360 19 
114 103 ACnnpf 1+75 12J 

20% 16% ACaoBd 2J0 116 
30% 25V# ACapCv 2Jle 8.6 
II 6’# ACenlC 
56% 43V ACyon 


260 11.1 4 25% 24V 25V + V 

3J» 19 i 50V 50V 50 V— % ' 

+75 12J I 112V# 112% 112V#— % ■ 

+20 116 62 20V# 1*V 20 

261 e 16 16 29V 29 29% — V# 

184 307 7% 7V 7V— 1 

1.90 36 M 1343 53% 52V 52V— V 


L'mltJ Prvu Inh'r'hilii’nal 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Slock Exchange finished mixed in active trad' 
ing Thursday, acting tentative in the face of 
uncertain U.S. economic outlook. 

The failure of the Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age io drop below 1.341 encouraged buying, 
trader* said. But blue-chip .stocks continued lo 
attracted investors looking for a haven until a 
clearer picture of the economy emerges. 

The Dow Jones average rose 4.71 10 1.353.6 1. 

Volume totaled 123.29 million shares, down 
from 12S.6 Wednesday. 

Analysis said investors have been adjusting 
to a climate in which interest rates are no longer 
falling and an economic pickup is onh a prom- 
ise. They ascribed recent declines io Fjrofit- 
taking in sLocks that have had a good run in the 
first half of the year. 

The market has suffered w'hile managers re- 
structure their portfolios, said Larry WachieL 
first vice president at Prudentiai-Bache Securi- 
ties. He said the adjustments could continue 
ihrough the rest of the week. 

While many people think the economy has hit 
bottom, the absence of any signs of sirong 
upward momemum is keeping the market from 
moving ahead, said Kevin Keeney of Southwest 
Securities. 

After the market closed, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported the nation's basic money supply 
fell S4.8 billion in the week ended July 15. 

Phillips Petroleum was the most active 
NYSE-bsied issue, up hi to 13. In other petro- 
leum issues. Atlantic Richfield advanced to 
604.. Exxon added h to 53'--. and Mobil rose '/« 
to 31 , /8. Chevron gained '■« to 38'* and Unocal 
added -is to 30ia. Standard Oil of Ohio rose 1 to 


27% IBV ADT .92 +7 25 622 25% 25 25 — Vi 

24V 17V AElPw ISta 96 9 2053 23 22V 23 + % 

49V 25 Am Exp IJO 2.9 15 10515 45 44 44% — V 

25V 9V AFaml l M 20 16 275 24 % 23% 24V + % 

36% 19% AGoCp 160 +0 10 3920 33V# 32V 32% 


16 6% AGnl wl 270 14 13% 131# — V# 

55% 51V AGnl PlA 6J24«11J 1050 56 S5V 55% + % 

96% 588. AGnl pi B 567c '67 13 88 87% 87% —1% 

71V 40% AGnpfO 264 46 85 66 65Vj 65% + % 

36V 25V AHorlt IJO 3J 11 20 35% 35% 351# - % 

12V 7% AHaW 43 11% 11% 11%— V 

66% 46% A Home +90 A3 13 2526 67V 62 62'- — V 

46% 76% AHaso 1.12 25 IS 7059 45% 44% 45% — V* 

97V 68VAIWTCB 660 7J 8 1517 89V 88 88 —1 

90% 53 AlrKSrp 64 6 24 2171 85V 85 85 

150 112V# AIGpPi 565 4.1 5 144 142% 143V# + % 

2BV IBV# AMI 32 28 12 3558 26V 25% 26 — % 

5% 2% AmMol 797 3V 3V 3% 

29 16% AP rasdi .121 6 4 223 20% 20V 20H— % 

13% 5 AS L Flo 5 SO 6% 6V 6V 

18% 12% ASLFI m +19 156 23 14 V 14 14V 

16 10% Asnip 60 66 10 115 13V 13 13V— 'A 

JSV 24V AmSM 140 SJ 10 521 »V 30 30% 

67% 32% AmSlor 64 16 11 903 63% 61 61V— 1% 

78 46 V AStrpfA 4J8 66 17 73% 72% 72% —1 

57V# 51 AStrpfB 660 1+0 43 56% 56% 56% — % 

S4V 17V ATBT 1J0 56 16 12937 22 21V 21% + V 

41V 31V# AT8.T pi 364 9J 109 39 38V 39 + V# 

42 32% AT&T pf 3J4 9+ 1628 39% 3V# 39V— % 

27% 15% AWatrs 160 46 7 380 22V 21% 2I%— V 

12V 10 AWalpi IJ5 106 100* 12% 12% 12%—% 

13% 10 AVkoSpf 125 106 240* 12% 12% 12% 

28% 19V; Am Hall +40 114 0 IDS 21V 20% 21 — V 

72% 58 ATrPr 564 84 14 68 67% 47V— % 

18 6V ATfSe 96 15% 15 1SV 

89% 64 ATrUn 564 66 11 82V 82% 82V + V 

40V 26% Ameren 160 42 8 58 37V 37% 37V — % 

50 24% AmesD 20 4 23 836 47 46% 46% — V, 

29% 23% Arnold! 60 32 14 233 2SV 241# 25 + V# 

2BV 18V# AmlPC 159 28 27% 27% — V# 

14 6% Amfesc S 61 7% 7V 7% + 1# 

69 50% Amoco +30P 5.1 B 6628 65V 64% 65V + V 


Amfesc S 61 7% 7V 7% + 1# 

Amoco +30P +1 B 6628 65V 64% 65V + V 

38% 24V AMP .77 11 21 7121 34V 34% 34% + V 

24 11% Amoco JO +2 18 129 13% 13V 13% 

21V 12V Amreps 12 2Z7 23 21V 27V +1% 

3 21% AmSHl 140 46 9 231 34V 34V 34V— V 

% 25V Amsied 160 +9 15 111 40V 40% 40% + V 

4V IV Anpcmp 26B 3 2V 2V 

24V 16'i Anton s 21 409 23V +3% 73V + 'A 

29V 19V Anchor 148 56 51 27 2aV 26V— V 

46V. 27% AnClPV 137 +1 36 264 44V 42’- 47V. — 2 


l?Momii 
High Low Stack 


66% 43% 
4% 3'- 

29V 21V 
26V 22 
SV IV 
28 16 
41 28% 

25V 19V# 
37V 29 
26V 13 
30% 27V 
56 30V 

404. 271; 
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19'.# 13V 
20 15V 

21V# 14V 
30V- 23 
68% 35 
7V 6% 
23 19 

51V 46% 
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MV# 48V 
2DV 12V 
7 IV 
IS 3V 


31V 21V CBI in 
1 25 48V CBS 

B5 57V# CBS of 

■% <rv ccx 
12 8% CCX of 

60V 27V CIGNA 
32V 23% ClGpi 

15 8Lc p ' 

S9V# 25V- CNA Fn 
11% 9% CNAI 
30'w 16% CNW 


JO 43 1 
+16 116 

12 

16* 56 
140 II 9 
65 7.9 
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44 +4 21 


11% 9% CNAI 1J4 116 6 UK 11% 11V 

30'h 14% CNW 313 19% 19 19W— V 

46'/. 3SV CPC IM +20 5.1 11 988 43V 47V 43 — V# 

26 14% CP Nil 140 66 9 78 24'- 23% 23% - V 

22V 19'# CRIIMI +07*106 934 JO# 20Vi 20V 

2BV IBV CSX 1.16 4.1 10 2BS 28% 27V 78% + V 


12% 9% AndrGr JO 1J 15 

77V 17 Anpellc 60 +3 15 
34V 20V Anneuss 13 

71% 48 Antaupf+60 5J 
19V 13% Anixlr JB 1.7 18 
16V SV Anthem 64 J 21 

15V 10V Antliny 440 36 9 

13 9W Apache 38 +5 10 

2 % AoChPwt 

19V 15% ApchP un+10 11 J 
34V 28 ApPwaf 4.18 1+9 
31% 24 ApPwaf 360 126 


1J 15 61 12 11 V 11 V— 'A 

+3 15 8727 26V 26V + V# 

13 3029 32% 32 32V— % 

5J 2B 67V 67V 67V— % 

1.1 13 48 lbV 16V 16V 

J 21 187 14V 14% 14"- 

30 9 59 14V 14V 14V ■+■ V 

+5 10 370 11 10V 11 4- ‘M 

197 I VI 
1J 379 187# IBV 18V 

+9 6 33% 32% 32% — V 

26 11 30’- 30 30'- + 'A 


2BV IBV CSX 1.16 4.1 

40'/, 24 CIS 160 +9 

17% 71# C 3 Inc 

33V 22V CnbOl .92 34 
16V BU Caesar 
25V 11% Cal Fed 48 +2 

54V 32V Col Fd pf 4.75 9J 

+0% 13% Cailhn J5t> U 

15 11 V Cammi .12 J 

2 *'A 15>- CRLKe 40 

7% 3 CirmR a .161 


60 +9 46 35% 34V 34V + % 

99 631 BV 8% S*l + ’.# 

.92 34 10 457 27 2a% 27 + V, 

17 494 15V 15% 15V 

48 +2 6 1231 22% 21% 22% 

35 96 15 51% 50V 51 — % 

J5b 1 J 183 18% 18 IBV + V 

.12 6 20 14% 14% 14% 

48 747 23% 23 23V + W 

.161 175 3 1 -* 3% 3 V. 


U% '59V CornSa IM H 11 HI 75% 74% 74V— V 


401# 37% Cam5 wl 
15V 9V CdPacs 48 
22% 14% CanPEO 60 
23% 150% Cod Cits JO 


27V 15V CoaHds J7 +3 10 2118 23 


20 38 37% 37V— % 

539 14% 14% 14V 
207 21V 21% 21V— V« 
20 397 213 208% 209 —3% 


3«% 18% ApIDla TJ6I 6J 26 281 27!# 26V 26V— V 

15% B ApdIMP bA ilffi 14V 14% 14% — bg 

24V 15V ArtJiDn .14P'4 IJ 3301 2TV 21% 21V 

99 71 ArlP Pi 963e 96 3500*100 99 100 +2 

30V 23% ArlPpf +58 116 15 30V 30 30V + V 

24V 14 ArhBst 40 1.7 9 117 23V 23% 23% — V 

24% 16 Arkla 168 +7 18 927 19V IBV 19 

V % ArlnRi 55 » ?» + 

15% 11% Armada 3 15 15 15 

13'# 6V Arm CO 1291 10V »V 10% + % 

23 15% ArmcPi +10 9.7 9 21V 21% 71V + % 

24% 15% ArmsRb 48 31 7 68 15% 15V 15V— % 


14% 10 Carina p 48 95 11% 11 T1 

40% 79 Carlisle 1.02 II 10 47 33% 32V 32V— V 

26V 15% CaroFI 40 16 12 105 24% 24V 24V 

30V 19% CarPw +60 95 7 2990 Z7V 27% 27% 

25% 19V CarP pf 267 10J 5 35% 25 25 — % 


35V CarTec +10 56 II 132 42V 42 


11% 71# Corral 67 6 II 78 SV B% B%— V 

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M l Falls $4.8 Billion 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The narrowest measure 
of the UiL money supply, M-l, plunged 
54.8 billion in mid-July, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported Thursday. 

The Fed said M-l feD to a seasonally 
adjusted average of S591.6 billion in the 
week ended July 15 from- a revised S596.4 
billion the previous week. Hie previous 
week's figure was revised upward by S2QQ 
million. M-l includes currency in circula- 
tion, travelers checks and che eking deposits 
at financial institutions. 

For the latest 13 weeks, M-l averaged 
S5S5.9 billion, an 11.1 percent seasonally 
adjusted annual rate of gain from the previ- 
ous 13 weeks. The Fed has said it would like 
to see M-l grow between 3 and 8 percent 
from the second quarter of this year through 
the fourth quarter. 

47%. The company reported lower second-quar- 
ter earnings. 

Warner-Lambert was the second most active 
and the session’s biggest loser, dropping 4% to 
39'.j after First Boston analyst Ronald Stem 
advised selling it. 

G.D. Searie was third, unchanged at 64%. 
Upjohn dropped 2 3 >i to 1 14ft. 

Among technology issues, IBM rose 1ft to 
130ft, Digital Equipment advanced 2ft to 104ft 
and Advanced Micro Devices inched up ft to 
29ft. Cray Research fell 2ft to 94ft. Data Gen- 
eral rose 3ft to 42ft after it reported higher 
earnings. 


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A sociologist claims, that in becoming part of the 'Crowd . the individual feels 
accepted, the irony being that acceptance can diminish opportunity. The human 
connection is imperative. But it can be distorted by "Elitists . pre-conditioned to 

capteTize on the timidity of the ’Crowd’. . . . .. _ . 

A "Crowd" craving leadership. On the "Street", communication is overfull. Each 
day, an analyst somewhere, is preparing a buy, sell or hold recommendation, on one 
of the docks on the N.Y.SJE. or the issues listed on NASDQ. How can an investor 
communicate? 0 

Perhaps the random walk theory makes sense. The concept .hat the random 
behavior of particles was paralleled by the price behavior of stocks was formulated 
in 1900 by a mathematician, Louis Bachelier. His stud ies were rediscovered by 
researchers around 1960, and tested in a succession of statistical projects. 

The evidence shattered the claims of “chart tsts'-“technicaj analysts - concer- 
ning a system of forecasting stock market levels in the basis of past patterns. 

There are fewfree lunches on the “Street”: an investor has to sniff scoresof reports 

before ingesting a"three star" security -a chore that the average ichap cannot handle, 
for he cannot contact “Eiitists"-he cannot communicate with "Sponsors - who buy 
“wholesale" - ultimately retailing their inventories to the "Crowd" at premium pnees. 
"The law of supply and demand on the “Street" are legislated by "Elitists . they create 

demand, they manufacture the "paper", the stock. , _ 

In tracing the pirouettes of “Elitists", we focus upon securrtiesthatoffer dramatic 
gain, downplaying entities with limited leverage. In stressing that SOTo of equities 
recommended by CGR subsequently advanced, and that 92%of our carefulfyhoned 
"short sales" have sagged, we are not seeking plaudits; we merely want readers to 
mock prevailing opinion. Our forthcoming letter highlights securities that may be 
under persistent ‘EDrisT accumulation; shares that can catapufL 
For your complimentary copy, please write to, or telephone . . . 


f* ADIT A I C.VXX Capital Venture Consultants 

UAN 1 Amsterdam B.V. 

GAINS KahferetraatllZ 

1012 PK Amsterdam. The Neth erlands 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Tekuc 18536 


* Name: 

j Address: I 

| Phone: MT26/7 j 

Fast performance Poes not guaranies future results 



12 Month 

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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S . Stocks 
Report* Page 10 


FRIDAY, JULY 26,1985 


** 


Page H 


TECHNOLOGY 



Seels 
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covered c-« 
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:s - ccr.cer- 
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that may be 


The process allows 


and position of each 
microscopic droplet 


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x:18S36 



l« o ' 


Computer Helps Analyze 
Makeup of Fuel Sprays 

By MARSHALL SCHUON 
■ iVew York Timex Senibe 

- - EW YORK — The ways in which gases ignite and 
■ inside an automobile’s engine have long fascinat- 

ed engineers, and studies have int ensifi ed m this de- 
cade, both because of new tools and because of the 
need for for better fuel economy and performance. 

Lasers bave aDowed researchers to peer into the very heart of 
fire, and sophisticated devices such as mass spectrometers have 
let them .analyze the exact chemistry of a flame. But until now. 
studies, ot the best way to distribute the gas molecules that fuel 
the flame have been almost impossibly difficult. 

The technology that is changing all that — and that promises 
new designs in fad injectors and spray nozzles — was developed 
by three engineers at the General Motors Research Laboratories 
in Wanen, Michigan. The tool 
is called computer-vision 
spray analysis, a process that 
allows rapid study of the 
shape and position of each mi- 
croscopic. droplet in a fuel 
spray. 

Density of the fuel affects 
combustion as well as the cre- 
ation of soot and other pollut- 
ants, and the density iisdf is determined by the shape and spacing 
of the droplets. Yet even a single spurt of fuel produces tens of 
thousands of complex relationships, and manual analysis is both 
, error-prone and laborious, often taking mnrnljp of work. 

“If there ever was a perfect instance of a process nwdinp 
computer automation, this is it,” said Gary BertoIHni, who 
worked withYong Lee and Larry Oberdier in creating the system. 
The goat was to get the process down to 10 seconds per processed 
image. At the moment, the researchers are down to 40 seconds 
per image, and they say that U sufficient for practical application. 

Previously, Mr. Bertolbni said, photographs were taV»i of fuel- 
spray segments through a glass-walled combustion chamber. 
Each of the images was then studied with a method that allowed 
analysis of individual segments. The approach meant viewing 
and evaluating thousands of projected imag es, malring jud gmen ts 
to determine if each droplet was in the area of spray that the 
resear c h e r wanted to study, and then using a ruler cm the desired 
droplets. 

T HE new method uses a pulsed laser light to freeze droplet 
motion, which is then recorded by & video camera and 
stored on a videodisk. According to the engineers, the most 
difficult aspect of applying computer virion was something that 
hitmans take for granted in looking at a picture, the ability to 
separate and understand what is seen. 

In the case of fuel sprays, poor imago quality confused the 
computer, and the problem finally was overcome by mathemati- 
cally estimating image distortion and adjusting the backgrounds 
to create consistent shading. A series of steps then allows the 
computer to find the desired droplets ana to measure their 
*, volume, density and special relationships. 

The equipment itself proved to be another stumbling block. 
The researchers, who work in the instrumentation department of 
the General Motors lab, said they had to find a way to store the 
th ou-yrnds of images, to make them high-quality and to retrieve 
them one frame at a time. The solution involved a computer that 
synchronizes the video camera, the magnetic disk and the nitro- 
gen laser to the en gin e’s combustion cycle. 

Currently, the system is semiautomatic, with the operator 
malring key judgments T<m7obieci. selection, preprocessing and 
measurement: but a fully, automated analyzer is bdng devdopcd. 

“The semiautomatic process has turned out to be extremely 
useful, " Mr. Lee said. “We need the semiau t o m a ti c mode to 
compare with and validate the automatic. And there are times 
when a researcher may have a small batch of samples to evaluate 
and doesn’t want to gp through the effort of setting up the 
complete automatic program." 

Robert R. Bockemuehl, head of the instrumentation depart- 
ment, said the development would allow GM to work, more 
(Continued on Page - 15, CoL 1) 


• _ .? • 


* ’» 

"a 


i:-- • - »• 

- • •- - * • • 


| Currency Rates 

<>••■ late* j„fyss 

t C DM. FJ=. ILL. owr. BwF. IF. Tn 

Aon UM 4343 1 12335 * 37JD5* 0.1484- 331* R745* tUMr 

■U) 5737 IUB2S 20,1241 4322 1012* 17JU9 9U28S *4.108* 

Irt 23445 404 - — S2J0S* 14Mx W8- 4M»* 12237* LH75* 

i CM LIUS - — 4JOS5 U2D3S 239738 43444 1)2 2258 32430 

MflOO 1.IU5B 2397.U 44833 21930 59*35 32209 81737 8301 

MwY«rtc(c7 07095* 2*77 UX 7.922 225 5734 2MB 22.U 

Prt I7M5 1227) 20297 <53, *7*8 15. HS* 172 2439* 

Tolnm &US 33UB 8128 2732 12*4* 7437 *1298* HU) 

Zortc* 2251 22994 41345* 34.91* 0.1225* 7264* 40404* 03815* 

1 1CU Q.7842 03544 22458 43243 130)39 25377 452051 13338 U7334 

■ IWft 132784 072893 23*43 89532 134972 33138 593747 24049 245354 

Ckobm in London mt Zurich, fixings toother gunman centers. Hew York rotes at* PM. 
toi Commercial franc (bi Amount* needed to bur one pound (cl Amounts needed to buy one 
donor f i urtltsof HOM Units oflMO ly) Units of 1QM0 NO.: not quoted; «A: notmoitobfe. 

to} Tfc boy one pound: SUJLIAOK 

MwrDaDarVolEea 


CUrranor per UJS3 
Araan. natral 030 
AartraL* L4347 
Amk-.adiL 2032 
Mm.flB.tr. 50 
BruDcraz. 4320X0 
ComAhC 13498 
UmWlkroM 1039 
EoVPLpBDBd 07927 


Comma per OS3 
Fin. markka 539 
QraotdraC- 13130 
HflOO KaM S 7.7595 
Indian rupee 1202 
iado.rwiata 1.114X0 
Irtflt 03194 

Israeli Itak. 1373.90 
KewalH (floor 03012 


r U3J 
MaUnr.lfafl. 24C3S 
MM.NM 350X0 
Norw. krone 833 
PMIBB9P 1735 

Port, pseudo 167X0 
Saudi rival 1551 
Stem. I 2703 

S. Air. rand 13157 


CMTNKY p»r IUI 
S. Kor. woo 87730 
Sgcav potato 14445 
Swed. krona 8387 
TsMWlS 4033 

TliallwU 24*55 
Tnridslillfa 530L45 
UAEdtrtWM 1*725 
VencLboffv. 1431 


(*4 


, (Sterflam: 13913 4rlih E 

j SoanatK Banov air Benelux (BnnstKsJ; Banco commentate ttaUana < Milan u Banuut Mo- 

' ifooais Oe Pans t Ports); Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMP (SDR); BAH (dinar, rival tHrOami. 
SOknr data from Reuters and AP. 


fritenestRates 


fovaii rose; Pep orito 


My 25 



Dollar 

P- Marti 

salts 

Franc 

Starting 

Franca 

Franc 

ECU 

SDR 

l«*th 

7M 

«lkS 

5W5W. 

int-int 

9^-IOW 

8«rfl w. 

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5lb-5Ui 

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10 felon. 


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Sources: Maroon Guonriy (dollar. DM SF. Pound. FF); Uovds Bonk (ECU); Route*' 
(SDR). Ratos opnikoOie la mto rt an k doaaslts at SI million minimum (or eautvatenti. 


heyMeueynate»jofy2s 



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dole 

Pra. 

July 25 

1 month ft-8 


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ft 

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7 7/11 

Smoattis In-Ilk 


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ft 

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I XMMbTreonnrBnft 
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■ y CD'iaWJdo n 

m 

7.10 

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735 

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735 

740. 

WA. Mwey Market Fands 

; V ’ * 
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748 

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450 

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530 

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tmowklrttetenk 

sa 0 

sa 



\ WlrtHflk 

530 

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Source: Merrill Lynch. AP 


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9IJ/M 911/1* 


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119132 Ub 
115/141115714 


5 5 

41k 45/14 
Ml Ml 


Sources: Revttrx O mmonOonk. Croat 
L «*vwM Lindt Sp»*. Son* of Tokyo. 


AafauMlarBepaalti 


Goldsmith 
In Control 
At Crown 

Company Agrees 
To Study Change 

The Associated Prat 

SAN FRANCISCO -i Sr James 
Goldsmith won control of Crown 
Zeflerbach Carp. Thursday when 
Ire was ejected ' diamnnn But ana- 
lysis called the move a temporary 
truce that left uxrele&r whether the 
S3, 1 -bUBon-a-year forest-products 
company wiD be restmouzni or 
liquidated. 

Sir James’s General Oriental Se- 
curities Ltd- Partnership, Much in 
the past year increased its stake in 
Crown to more than 50 percent, 
will name 6 of the 11 directors on 
the board under the agreement. 
The board previously had 12 direc- 
tors. 

William T. Creson, who analysts 
said had little room to maneuver 
once Sir James gained a majority of 
the stock, win continue as presidai 
and chief oecotive officer. 

Crown's announcement said the 
board would consider at least four 
directions the company might ta k e : 

• Restructuring along the lines 
previously proposed by Crown, ex- 
cept that its timber properties 
would be bdd by a corporation 
rather than a partnership. 

• Purchase of more shares of 
common stock by General Orien- 
tal. 

• Self -tender by Crown Zefler- 
bach for about 5 miflifm shares of 
its common stock for S41.50 per 
share in a combination of cash and 
securities. . 

• Transactions with third par- 
ties. 

Crown’s stock dosed at $38.25 
an the New York Stock Exchange, 
down 75 cents from Wednesday. 

“A temporary truce has been 
hammered out,” said Mark Rogers, 
first vibe president of Dean Witter 
Reynolds Inc. in New York. 
“Whether that can last is another 
question. The long torn is undear. 

I think that first option about re- - 
structuring is the leading one. hut 
they’re rdookmg at all their op- 
tions. Goldsmith’s under no obliga- 
tion to do any of those four.*' 



The automated engine testing room at the Fiat factory. 

Watching f The Other Fiat 9 Grow 

As Auto Sales Slow, Agnelli Opts for Diversification 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

TURIN — When Giovanni Agnelli, chairman 
of Fiat SpA, recently said the company was ready 
to participate in both tire US. Strategic Defense 
Initiative and Eureka, a Western European effort 
to devekm Ugh technology, he also focused atten- 
tion on the company’s fast-growing activities out- 
side antomalting. 

Referred to within the company as “the other 
fiat,” these activities currently account for about 
half of Fiat’s annual sales, and they are being 
mnkQy expanded internationally. Last year’s total 
sales rosea percent from a year eartier to a record 
218 trillion tire ($124 billion at current rates). 

“The automobile business, representing about 
half our sales, is slow, while the other sectors are 
growing faster and, while not giants individually, 
they also are malting money” Mr. Agnelli said of 
Fiat during a recent interview in which be dis- 
closed that Fiat planned to compete for contracts 
under the Uii. space-based mflitaiy program. Fiat 
would bid in the fields of rocketry, robotics and 
laser weapons, he said. 

Company executives, in separate interviews, em- 
phasized that net earnings in such sectors as tele- 
communications, production systems, rivUun and 
mihiary aviation, bioengineering, thermomechan- 
ics, mil transportation, tourism and miliiary equip- 
ment were currently growing faster than the profits 
generated by automobiles, and that this trend was 
expected to accelerate in the next few years. 

Some of these sectors, such as robotics, have 
expanded as a direct offshoot of the modernization 
of Fiat’s automobile busings. For example, tire 


earlier this year started producing its 
r ireT000 engine for medium-class cars, at a plant 
that Fiat says is the most advanced of its kind in 
tire world, null at a cost of 630 billion lire near the 
town of Tennoli in southeastern Italy, the plant 
will be turning out one engine every 20 seconds by 
mid- 1986, its full capacity, thanks largely to auto- 
mated assembly tines and robots designed by Fi- 
at's production systems division, known as Co- 

may. 

But Fiat’s robotics business has expanded con- 
siderably beyond Tennoli. At the end of last year, 
Comau reported booked orders of 1 trillion tire, 
roughly double the year-earlier level, with foreign 
orders accounting for about 56 percent of the total, 
including for U3>. and British automakers. The 
unit’s sales last year rose to a record 579 billion tire 
from 464 billion tire in 1983. 

Moreover, these sectors will substantially bene- 
fit from what Mr. Agnelli described as Fiat's 
program of “technological renewal,’' a program 
outlined to shareholders and reporters earlier this 
month. It would increase Fiat group investments 
to 9.1 trillion lire between 1985 and 1987 from 12 
trillion lire spent between 1981 and 1984, 21 
billion of wmcb was spent in research on new 
industrial products and technology in both civilian 

and military sctois. 

Although Fiat does not provide a breakdown of 
its profits, executives sain that sectors outside 
aulotnaking also contributed substantially to tire 
148-percent increase in net earnings last year, 
wftica totaled 627 bfltion tire, compared to 253 
billion lire in 1983. Mr. Agnelli said that profits 

(Continued ou Page 15, CoL 2) 


Mexico Devalues 
Peso, Orders 
Spending Cuts 


Knurrs 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico has 
devalued the peso 20 percent ami 
introduced sweeping measures to 
trim its bureaucracy and modernize 
trade in an effort id stop the decline 
oT its economy. 

The package was designed to 
halt what Finance Minister Jesus 
Silva Hercog said was a vicious 
cycle of falling productivity and 
industrial competitiveness in Mexi- 
co. Under the measures announced 
Wednesday night, some govern- 
ment posts have been abolished 
and new import tariffs introduced 
in place of an archaic system of 
import permits. 

Export revenues in Mexico, the 
world's fourth-1 argesl oil exporter, 
have been falling fast in recent 
months as the interna tional market 
slackened while inflation and gov- 
ernment spending rose. 

Analysts said lack of confidence 
in President Miguel de la Madrid's 
ability to make major economic 
changes had led to a renewal of the 
flow of funds abroad, which 
marked the start of the 1982 liquid- 
ity crisis and Latin American debt 
problems. 

Eartier this month, the govern- 
ment allowed the peso to float on 
the tourist, or free, market in an 
effort to calm wild fluctuations that 
have driven it to record lows 
against the dollar. The devaluation 
of the controlled rate was designed 
to narrow the gap between the two. 

The free rate in recent days has 
ranged from 370 pesos to the dollar 
to as much as 400 pesos along the 
UJS. border. 

The controlled peso will be 
about 280 to the dollar, from 233. 

The controlled rate accounts for 
about 80 percent of Mexico’s for- 
eign dealings, including essential 
imports and repayments on its S97- 
biliion foreign. 

Exporters are required to ex- 
change the dollars they earn at the 
controlled rate. But with such a 
wide gap, the temptation to cash 
them at the free rate bad become a 
major problem, according to indus- 
trial sources. 

Mr. Silva Herzog said the deval- 
uation would also help restore the 


competitiveness of Mexican ex- 
ports. 

To keep the controlled peso jt j 
realistic rule, the goiemmeit: u iii. 

front Aug. 5. start j neu system of 

adjusting it regularly jjir.sj tire 
dollar, he said. 

Also on Wednesday night. Car- 
los Salinas de Gcrun. the budget 
secretary, announced a series of 
measures, cumina'ine t>5 soiern- 
mem posts and cutting expenses. 

The finance defier, of the puMro 
sector in the first four months of 
this year had ahead* reached 67 7 
percent of the planned deficit for 
the whole sear, according to offi- 
cial figures. The saving this year 
from the cuts woulJ amount to 1ft) 
billion pesos »S53u million at the 
controlled ratei. 


British Telecom , 
AT&T Sign Pact 

flcdm 

NEW YORK. — British Tele- 
com PLC end American Tele- 
phone £ Telegraph Co. said 
Thursday that they had s-gr.sd 
an agreement to provide a new 
international telecommunica- 
tions lick. 

Texas Instruments Inc., the 
new- system's first customer, 
will use the (ink to connect its 
headquarters in Dallas with its 
main European communica- 
tions hub in Bedford. England. 

Texas Instruments, using 
proprietary satellite dishes, will 
have the capability of direct, 
door-to-door communications, 
a spokesman for British Tele- 
com said. The dishes will be 
linked through an Intelsat busi- 
ness service satellite. “Until 
now. international satellite 
communications users have 
been required to use communi- 
ty or urban gateway antennas 
shared with other 'customers. 
This is a JfuJv innovative and 
trend- setting agreement." the 
British Telecom spokesman 
said. 


l9.Yt.l--l r r* j !■ ' ' ■■ V 



ns 


In UJK. at £257 Million 


Compiled bp Our Smff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Britain’s balance 
of payments fdl by £467 motion 
(5652 million) in June, but other 
earnings resulted in an overall cur- 
rent account surplus of £257 mD- 
tion, the Tirade and Industry De- 
partment said Thursday. 

Despite last month’s fall, the 
trade figures remained in tine with 
Treasury forecasts of a £3-biltion 
surplus by the end of 1 985. 

Hie ministry said imports ex- • 
ceeded exports during June by £243 
million. But the deficit was offset 
by a £500-million surplus in so- 
called “invisible trade” such as 
hanking, shipping, tourism an d 
government transactions. 

During the second quarter of the 
year, exports to countries within 
the European Community fell by 
5% percent and to developing 
countries by 7 percent. 

However, the decline was offset 
by a 20-percent rise in British ex- 
ports to North America, the de- 
partment said. Imports from North 
America fell by 18 percent during 
the second quarter. 

Government sources said the 


June trade figures had returned to a 
more nonnaf position following the 
erratically large trade surplus of 
£724 milfion in May, the fust sur- 
plus since February 1984. 

Analysis said the May staple 
was due mainly to a reduction i 
non-oil imports and a favorable 
movement m the oil surplus. 

The fail in exports in June main- 
ly occurred in semi-manufactured 
goods; cars and oCL 

The June oil surplus was £842 
minion, £7 million more than in 
May, department figures showed. 
But this masked a sharp drop in 
both dl imports and exports, of 27 
percent ana II percent respective- 
ly, the department said. 


outlook might have affected ship- 
ments. The normally slack summer 
season, when demand for oil was 
low and Gelds shut down for main- 
tenance, oould also have affected 
the figures. 

The department said the under- 
lying level of non-oil export volume 
has shown tittle change in thr last 
six months, while the underlying 
level of imports has been flat since 
the end of 1 984. (AP, Reuters) 


U.S. Business Productivity 
Rose at 0.5% Bate in Quarter 


July 25 

AM. PM CUV* 
Hons Kens 31805 319J0 +130 

ummfaoar? J19J5 — + 135 

Paris (125 kilo) SMB mil +U3 

Zurich JIMS JUJB —MS 

Leados 31948 31740 —035 

MMYtric - 3W38 + 040 

Litxtmbaonr, Paris and London official be- 
ings; Hang Kant and Zurich aoerUno and 
closing prices; New York Comas current 
contract. AH prices In US. t Per ounce, 
source: Routers. 


By John M. Betty 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — Productivi- 
ty at Amman businesses other 
than farms rose at a 03-percent 
annual rale in the second quarter, 
reversing a portion, of a large drop 
that occurred in the first quarter, 
the Labor Etepartmenr reported 
Thursday. 

The second-quarter rise still left 
nonfann productivity 0.4 percent 
lower than it was in the same quar- 
ter of 1984 and the prospect for 
future gains oncmaifl- The Reagan 
administration expects productivi- 
ty improvements to gel back on a 
higher trad: as overall economic 
growth picks up. . 

Administration officials said the . 
midyear update -of the economic 
forecast, postponed until at least 
late next month, will show the 
economy expanding at about a 5- 
percent rate in the second half of 
this year. 

Such a surge in growth of the 
gross national product, adjusted 
for inflation, would mean an in- 
crease in real GNP during 1985 of 
about 3 percent, down from the A9 
percent estimated in the last update 
of the Reagan forecast in April 

Real GNP rose at only a 03- 
percenl rate in the first quarter and 
at a 1.7-percent rale in the second. 


GNP measures a country’s total 
output of goods and services. 

Most private forecasters also 
predict that economic activity will 
speed up in the second half of the 
year, though so far there are few 
concrete signs of it. 

However, only a few private 
economists believe that growth will 


it is more likely to be 
between 2 percent and 4 percent. 
Another small group expects the 
economy wiD contract with the na- 
tion falling into another recession. 

The chairman of the Federal Re- 
serve; Paul A Volcker, said last 
week that Fed poticy-makera be- 
lieve the economy will expand at a 
4-percent rale in the second half. 

■ Homes Resales Are Up 

Sales of existing homes last 
month in the United States, boost- 
ed by strong gains in the Northeast 
and Midwest, climbed to tfadr 
highest levd in nearly five years, 
The Associated Press reported 
Thursday. 

Existing homes were sold at an 
annual rate of 3.07 million units in 
June, a 1-percent gain over May, 
ariyw rifn g to a survey by the Na- 
tional Association of Realtors. 

The 3.07 million annual rate was 
the highest since October 1980, 
Mien existing homes were sold at 
an annual pace of 3.21 million. 


L-WT-. **r-e*!7 * t \ .-j. a 



The man with exceptkmalgoak 
needs an exceptional hank. 


What makes TDB exceptional 
Our service in Switzerland, for example. 


As the 6th largest commercial 
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At TDB we serve our custom- 
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Moreover^ now that we are 
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we provide access to the broad 
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If you would like more infor- 
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TDB. t I k 6 lb Urgst o Wtt/iy/ hmk 
in Switzer! Ji;J. ii .» KiM\r if'.Vn 
Amtricjii Express Ompjn\, n bid? 
but uvtis uj US$64 A biilimt jaJ 
sbunboLicrf' ftf.'iit) ••) US$4 A hi!li»u. 



Trade Development Bank 


[[' The Trade Development Bank building in Geneva. 
f at 96-98, rue life Kbof/v. 

An American Express company 







P*? 










25 July 1985 

nwiwiM Mrt *ota« Pi^iwrisJwwn below ora supplied by me Ponds listed wim me 
Bxceptton of some hmds whose quotes ore based on Issue prices. The fallowing 

*,«po 

BANK^UL^BAERiCOLhl !Sr! 

—Id I rX^nn ? ~ SF 121 9 JU — H"! Lloydi ,n H l '*COmo 

— (d> Ewlbaer America ___ S 1206.00 — T!" 1 Llovch "’•I N. Amt 


—Id I Equlboer Europe 
— Id I Eoulbaer Pacific. 

—Id I Cupar 

—Id ) Stnekhnr 

BAMQUE INOOSUEZ 
—Id I Aston Growth Pun 
— (wj Olwurbonri 

-Iw) PIP— America _ 

— <w> FIF— Europe 

-Iw) F1F— Pnrifit. _ 


_ SF ir-SLM “ r,w 

_ SF 119200 
— 5F 102200 NIMARBEN 

_ SF 1509.00 —Id ) Class A 

— (w 1 Class B - UA. 

S10J7 -<«'» Class C-JdPon 

SFS4J5 OBL1FLEX LIMITED 

J J8J1 — iwl Multicurrency 

JiJflO —(w) Dollar Medium Term. 

*1723 — (W) Dollar Loro Ter m 

S 98.04 — Iwl Japanese Yen 


—Id ) Irfdosuez Mullibands A 19806 —Iwl Japanese Yen__ZIH 

— Id) Indetuez Mullibands B_ * IftlA* — tw) Point start inn 

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BritanniaJ-OB 271. St. Heller, Jersey ~!"j gg 

—Iwl Brll-Doflar Income , 50087* ~l*l» l ™rrgt c . , . — 

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^RttKiKSCE- as 33888*®=- 
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—Id) Bond Valor D-mark ___ DM ill. 

—Id) Band Valor US-DOLLAR S 120. 

—Id) Bond Votor Yen— — Yeti 10946. 

—Id) Con sort Volor Swf SF 117. 

—Id) Convert Valor US-DOLLAR. S 120. 

—Id I cI'rSSs— B ands — . I. fn. 
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*133* —Id | PAR US Treasury Bonfl___ S1I1.70 

ROYAL B. OF CANAOA.POB 24LGUERNSEY 
“ 4J1 JS -Hw) RBC Canadian Fund Ltd. S 1 1 09 


411.25 -Hw) RBC Canadian Fund Ltd. S 1109 

106^ -HwIRBCFcrEastftPocfflcFd S1134 

111.77 -Hw) RBC Inti CnaltrB Fd S2199 


-Hwl RBC Inti IrvffltwF n. S 11 J7 

■MO) RBC \ta\Currency Fd 524.64 

-Hw» RBC North Amer.FdL__^_ S10JJ9- 

SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (46-8-236270) 


—id ) CS Money Morhet Fund 5I07i 

—10 ) CS Money Market Fund DM104. 


771.00 SKANDIFOND INTL FUND 1444-236270) 

: 76J0 — Jw)lnc: Bid SSJ1 Offer 55.91 

11175 — IwlAct: Bid — SSS3 0Her _5L94 


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—Id ) Energle— Volar. 

—Id ) ussec 

—Id ) EuroDO— Valor. 
—Id) Pacific— Valor. 


SF IsSjs ~ (wl SHB Growth Fund _ _s 2KB 

SF 15835 SWISS BAN* CORP. {ISSUE PRICES) 
-<* ] A»™P'l“:Vatar_ . SF 539 JO 


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PIT INVESTMENT FFM — W ) Ten Bond Selection Y 1032800 



DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

n+fri ! iISTSImLXm R2«in UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

— Hd ) Inti RententOfW DM «02 — «f | Amco u.5. SH SF 3725 

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— (ml 04 H Commodity Pool- 529208 ”* —Id ) Fcnsa Swtia St). — - SF 15453 

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-Im) Trans World Ful. POOL. 5B2M9’*’ — Id I Sima (slock price) _ — SF 20x00 

F4C MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

1. Laurence Paunty Hill. EC*. 01-623-4480 — H * K n lrenla ... DM 45JM 

—Iwl F&C Atlantic 5 IKE f Unltonds DM 25J0 

— Jw| FB.C European S12J0 — HSjSfia DM 79 JO 

— twi p*r oriental SZ7J4 — (d)liNlzms — — . DM J1L55 

FIDELITY POB 470. Hamilton Bermuda Other F Unds 


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—Id ) Fidelity Sccl. Growth Fd. 

—id ) Fldetltv World Fund : 

FORBES PO W87 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01-839.3013 
— Iwl Dollar income ______ ! 

— Iwl Forbes High Inc. Gilt Fd 

— IW) Gold Inramp 
— Iw) Goto Aopredatlan _____ 
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GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— tw) East investment Fund— _ S 


Im) Cqnoda Gtd-Mortaage Fd S9J3 

,d * Capital Preserv. FdL mn I11A4 

*'«* (w) Citadel Fund $142 

S3KIS (d ) CJ.R. Australia Fund S9J2 

u Id f CJ.R. Jaoon Fund $ 1(7.44 

( iti ) Cleveland Offshore Fd S 1)1257 

S Bj07* Iw) Cotumala Securlfles___ FL II1A4 

Jga/T jbICOMETE S 79051 

. 1 M3 } w Convert. Fd. inM A Certs S 1005 

tlii ■ Convert. Fd. Infl B Certs S 28.95 

S 1 76 iwl D.G.C . S 86.98 

* Id I D. witter Wld Wide Ivt Tst StlJ2 

. fb } Drakkar Invesl.Fimd N.V- S 1.16942 

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PD 119. Sf PeierPwl. Guernsey. (W 1-28715 {S'} fhS. 

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(m)GAM ArMtroge Inc 

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(w) GAM Ermlloge 
In) GAM Franc-vol 

Iw) GAM Hong Kong Inc 

(d ) GAM Internal lanol Inc. 
iw) gam Jooan inc— 

I w) GAM North America me. S 107.44 ;z,\ , |(T bv < h2: , i^=Tm 

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60.99 

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G.T. (MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. Iw) Japan Selection Fund S 117.25 

—(w) Berry Pac. Fd. Ltd S9J4 (w) Jaoon Pacific Fund 1 10155 

—Id ) G.T. Applied Science S 15.10 (ml JsfferPlni lnH.Ud_^_ S 11452*3 

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-Id ) G.T. Dollar Fund 

—Id I G.T. Bend Fund 

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—Id ) G.T. investment Fund S 1EL67 (b ) Meteore. 

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— Id 1 G T Technology Fund 1 27*2 d Nlkko G. 

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524.92 I w) Korea Growth Trust _____ S976 

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—Id ) Int. Currency U* 526*6 lr i p>nMi vni.v u u J • ! w, « 

-Id 1 ITF Fd (Teehnoleoyl S13*» lb ) pTeSSU 

-Id ) O-Seas Fd IN. AMERICA)—. 527*4 | w > PSCOFu^NaT ZZZ ,7^72 

ESC TRUST CCUJERSEYI LTD. j*> PSCO HM. N.V__ 5 105*6 

MSwtaSUI.H«Ucri(Bl*-36331 (d I Putnam tall Fund 566*4 

TRADED CURPENCY FUND. I?.} Prl— Tecti^ ^ 5 934*8 

i^Idllnc: Bid 510.26 Offer 510*0$ » Ouwilum Fund N.V. S 4*94*4 

laidlCop.: Bid 51 1*3 Offer 511.680 !2!52!pJ5H d LF1734JB 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND , Id } H«n»l»V«*t. LF 1*55*8 

-id I snort Term A- (Accumj — 51*866 d Reserve ; Insured Denoiits_ 5109SJ3 

—Id ) Short Term ’A‘ (Distrl 50.9932" ?? ^ ta — t SF 102*5 

-Id) Short Term'B' lAecuml SU009 W J iCl/TetJL SA Luxembourg-. Siail 

-Id ) Stwrt Term -B' (Olstri s 0*911* wj Seven Arrows Fund N.v JB2Z2S 

-In) Long Term 521*7 *) State SI. Bank Eaulrv HdasNV 1 10.63 

JARIJI WE FLEMING. f*OB JB GP0M, ,s !7l fSIgllZSKSH?^ VlS 

~ -j-P Auslralm — — . 5 4.16 Iw) Tecimo Growth Fund SF 85.71 

“hM c , T ^ t 21 * 6 fwi Tokyo Poc.HoM.15eo) 5 mi 

— JjJ I ff -JOPW Jfy?!— ; Y 4616 Iw) Tokyo Poc. Hold. N.V. 5 )2ljj 

“i b } f E i aDDn penology __ Y 17*54 Iw) Tronseodiic Fund 5 77.73 

-Iw) J.F Korea Growth Trust— — KW Id I Turqumse Fund 5 106J1 

”7hTTgpS5i: X^ c i.;;, J") Tweedy^ rowne rw.ClassA 52.252.52 

— Ib ) J F Pacific SecS.IAcc) S s.93 Jw) Tweeoy^rowne n.v.CkjssB 5 1*82*6 

(ml Tweed y.Brawne (U.K-I ilv. & 100 1J? 
Id ) UNICO Fund - DM 81 JO 

Id) UNI Band Fund 51*77.79 

lb i uni Capital Fund SI127J6 

(wl vanoerbui Assets 5 1220 

Id ) World Fund SA 511.71 

BP c “ Frsmo; FL - Dutch Florin: LF - 

Luxembourg Froncs; SF — Swiss Francs; o — asked; t- — aiior Prices -h — ■ bid 
clwngoP/VIlOIpJloor unl); N£r-Nnj ' AvanabJeTN.C. - MolCammunlciled.-o- 
rjew. s- susoeflMd. S/S — SlOuk 5alii; ■— E -.-Dividend- ■■ — EvR1&; — 
Gro» Performance lnde« June: • — Redemof -price- E*.i“ouonn m _ Cfirmerlv 


. 51*84*6 
. *109206 
_ 5 13272 
_ 5 105*6 

566*6 

_ S 934*8 
% 4*94*4 
LF 1734*0 
LF I*55l5B 



8h. 7148 99.90 
SH 20-11 100.1) 
10*. 164)9 *9*7 
7H 12-11 9**1 
8-v 7V TO 99*1 


«H 09-11 
BU CC-fil 
9-S 11-11 
lire. 2n» 
9H W-1C 
85. CS-B I 
BH 29-11 
«H 27-13 
B9> 21-41 
07-11 
7>fM 1M1 
is u-n 
e'* Ti-oi 

I8H 11-84 
9*5 )MI 

as u-oi 

9H 2748 
7H 05-12 
89. 13-11 

15 09-11 
*•. U4B 
7H 194)9 
8S 094)1 
9H 1518 
2H U4H 
9H DB-SS 
Is - 

71-10 
«k 26418 
IB 7*8 
99. 304JS 
10 7)4® 

n-w 
m 12*9 

HJ68823-I1 
10 01-09 

8* 17-12 

16 1641 
7% mi 
7Ti 23-13 
BV 2549 
lOh. 3008 
822 25-10 
8b SK7 
F.Y 29-11 
«. IK8 
6S 8748 
8*1 2Sl«4B 
K 214® 
«*) 22-10 
IH OWN 
8% 15-11 
6H 24-10 
8s 154)1 
BVi 31-13 

as 22*1 
8H 13*8 
7H 11*9 
9 14-11 

in rt-ii 
lli 27-09 
7<S 06*9 
IDS 3049 



8 

9b 
as - 

*». 1945 
9% 15-11 
7L 33-1! 
US 24*S 
I. 2)4! 
7 H D7-M 
SS 3041) 
BS 36-15 
SH 43-n 
81 h 19-75 
10r. B*-S5 
IDS 1841 
9.9 07-1 ! 
««. 134)9 
P- 30-11 
18 274* 

SH 5W9 
109. 3041 
IW 79-1! 

n. lf-ai 

8H 084)1 
IS 28-11 
IBS 11-09 
IN 0341 


8W 09*1 
17-11 
8H 26-11 
10H 1149 
BH 12-17 
96. 144® 
I 16-13 
6N 09-10 
IS 3148 
H 1 34a 
ISC 
ISA 18*9 

7*453)6-09 
7 J X4B 
9H HMD 
16-11 
8H 15*1 


50H 35H SCM TJX) LI 13 171 48<k 4IVS «W— V, 

12W BH SL Wd *3 I* TO 6 I2H ITS T2H — V. 

J2H I9W SPSTOC JO 27 14 22 30H 30VU MW— W 

20 15 5oblne JJ4 J 31 I) 1» I5h UH+tk 

21H 16 SoonRv 259015* 210 17 16H 1646— V4 

»H 11H StadBs JO I* 17 60 19 IIS 19 

MW 59k StadSe 31 83 11 TOW 11 

2b IS StadSwt » 5h 2D » 

38S 21H Set (On 6 A0 1.1 26 7731 27%38-t-H 

34H 249k Sofewy 1*0 SX 10 3900 32H 3175 32S 

35W 34W SO»a SI 1* 11 2105 Z7V5 2696 2696—91 

23 16H SfJoLP 1J3 7J 7 31 22% 22 22% — Vk 

11H 9 SPuui 120 10* 61 I1W 1196 119k 

9W 3H vISaksit 32 416 4ta 496 

35H 24W SOHIeM .16 * 16 1328 34H 33b 34W 4- I* 

54 51 SolIMPt 3*30 6.9 • 200 53S 52Vk SIS 

28H 18W SDleGe 224 90 I 1912 25W 24H 24S— 96 

99. 6V SJuanB ,92e 9 3 IT 1BJX 996 9V5 9W 

11H 8W sJuanR 21 a 11911196 1116—9* 

51 91 Sondr *6 1* 15 388 34* 34 349k + H 

IBS SAnltRt 1.94 7* 13 132 2496 24V* 34 W— 16 

3SH 21 SFeSoP 1.00 3* 14 22*2 3296 32 W 3276 + 96 

46 28' . Sara Lee 1A4 3* 12 701 42 41V6 42 . + 1* 

23% 1 39k ScrvElP 1A0 8.1 7 49 20 IW 19H 

23 'k 16% SOVEA 134 to 1 22W 2216 22W— 9k 

12W *HSdvept 1*8 108 1 119k 1116 11S 

99* 5 Savin 273 IW 794 806— 96 

13'% ?>.. Savin of t *0 IT* 12 12*6 T2fk 12%— 16 

OH 189k SCAN A 2.16 8J 9 541 27H 259k 26—94 

52W 33 SchrPla 1A8 5L4 14 928 4914 48% <89. 

49S 34 W Scfilmb 1 JO 3.1 1011159 38S 3796 3876 + 96 
13=4 7’- SctAM .12 * 20 1425* 139k 1296 1396 + S 

33 22W Scaolnd Jt 24 (4 928 32 319m 3196— 1* 

61 W aw Sco l Pet 11 99 61 w 6116 611b 

43W 26H SoortP 1*4 2* 11 379 <294 «24k 429* + S 

WS IIS Soottvs *2 3* 10 208 13<6 13S 139k— W 

431. rc’6 Scovui U 6 4196 4TH 4196 

43 22'.* sea on <2 1.1 11 61 40V5 40 40 — S 

13 9-* SeaCtpf IA6 11* 4 12S T2V5 129k + * 

lo'o T2H SeoC DfBZIO 13* 5 15*6 1596 15S 

16*» 12s Seac ate 2.10 lSJ tio 16 isu. 159»— 14 

TT'i Ty-J S«Lnd AS 21 9 596 23 Vj Z3S 23S— 'S 

5W 3W SeaCo US 5 5 5 — V* 

44H 30 Seaorm *0 1.9 12 7Y7 43H 429* 43s 

21 W 12W Seowil 17 151 179* 1696 17S+ U> 

3TH 20 SeOlAtr A0 U 17 61 30b 3tBk 30H— 96 

32*6 2IS swrpw 1*0 37 I 200 26H2W62696+1* 

MS *376 SoorteG 1 DO 1* 1818224 64S 644k 64S 

3996 29H Sears 176 4* HI 4348 364b 36 3614 4- Ik 

906S 91 SaariPf 9AJB93 320 9056. 105S \059i + %* 

31H l*S SecPcrco IJ4 <9 7 4781 27H 269, 2716— Vk 

19H ITS SeiaLI 14 IBS 18 18 

40 2D*k SveCPk 41 U IB 417 389k 37S 389k + 9k 

I6S 119k shdkfee 72 92 21 36 1396 U9k 13H— (* 

259- d hw. Shawln *0 2J 9 82 26 2SH 23*6— Vk 

3*S 281b SheliT 2*7e A2 7 1195 38S 37Tk 38Vk— Vk 
MU ITS ShelGVo SO M 6 697 27 3694 27 + V. 

40 24 Shrwtn .92 14 7 399 39H 389. 39 — W 

IS 4S Shoerwn I SOB 1H » BS— Vk 

16H 12 Shawbt AO 47 13 23 13 12H T2S— V* 

1*96 139k Star Poc 1A6 923 8 168 18V6 18 18s + Vk 

44H 34b Signal 1JB 2J 17 710 4396 43S 4396 + Vk 


S H 1094 11 
2Vb 29k ZH 
77 31 171b 31 +96 

3900 27H 31H 32V* 

2105 Z7Vb 3696 2696—9* 
31 22V. 22 22V* — Ik 

61 111* 1196 l>9k 
32 414 46b 496 


701 <2 41Vb 42 .+ V» 

49 20 1996 199b 

1 22W 221b 23W— 9b 

1 ll«h 1196 11*6 

273 lib 79* SI b— 16 
12 1296 1296 12%— 16 
548 279b 259b 26—94 


11 99 61 Vb 61 U 6TVb 

1*4 13 11 57V <29* <29k 429* + S 

*2 3* 10 208 139b 13% 139k— V* 

(4 6 419* 419* 4194 

A 1.1 10 61 40VS 40 40 — 9b 

1 46 II* 4 129* T2W 129k + % 

2.10 13* 5 15*6 1596 15% 

M0 113 110 16 159* 159k — S 

Jl 11 9 596 23W Z«6 23V6— ■% 

US 5 5 5 — W 


16% 119* Shokfee 72 52 
269d T2S Shawln AO 2J 
3*W 281b SheliT 2*7e L2 
M'“ IT'* SheVGVo BQ ifl 

40 24 Shrwtn .92 «A 
8% 4Vb Shoerwn 

16% 12 Showttt AO 47 
19% 13% Star Poc IA6 923 
44*6 24% Signal 1JB 2J 
65 4 Vm Stgnlpl L12 65 

41 25% Stager AD 1JD 

33% 27% Slngrpf 3io 10A 


18 1214 Sky lino . _ _ . _ 

26% 20% Slattery A0o 3.1 15 5 25H 25% 25%— 9b 

15% 796 Smittlln J2 3J 138 8% 8% 896 

71*6 SOH SmkB 280 LD 11 1191 «Vi 68% 6914— 91 

79% MW Smuckr 1A8 TA IB 61 7656 159* 7596— lb 

41% 2*% SnapOn 1.16 27 13 236 40 39% 3994 + % 

15% 12% Snyder 2 j)0 T3A 14 43 14% 14% (4% + V* 

<3% 23% Senpf 200 68 7 1995 3696 33% 3396— % 

19% 12% SanvCP .15e 18 12 5008 15% 15 15% — % 

30V* 229* SooUn I70L2 23 63 28% 28% 2W6 + Vk 

40'^ 2ff% Source 3*0 8.1 43 39% 39% 39Vb— % 

73V4 ia% SrcCapt 2A0 IGA 1 ZJ7» 23% 23%+ % 

30% Sojerln 2A8 9.1 12 77 27% 37% 27V*— % 

<9% 38% Sdudwn 1 00 U 16 37 40% 40% 40% 

35 24 • SoetBk 1253 L7 11 587 37% 32 32% 

10 6 SoetRS 2.131 Jl* 40 7 7 696 6%— V* 

27*6 19 SCdlE s II* 87 8 3630 *4% 26% 24% + 96 

23% 14% SouthCo 1.«2 9.1 7 29J7 21% 209* 21% + 9b 

26H 17% SQlnGss 1JU 7J 8 70 2SW 24% 24H— % 

44 29% SNETI 272 6.9 16 525 39% 39 39%— i* 

27'u 71% 5oRvpf 2A0 9A 2 27 27 27+% 

31 23 SoUnCo 1J2 a.: 2tt 28% 289* 289* — % 

JCT 23 soutlnd 1*0 U 12 W77 34% 37 38% + % 

16% 11% SoROV .12 9 19 1310 1396 13% 13%+ V* 

SV; A 1 - Soumrk J1 y t 2*41 Mb 8% 8V. 

S3 <7 Somkpf 7J8ol4J 9 59 50 50 

31 1494 Swairi .13 A 19 1976 2W9 29 2>Vk— % 


599 39% 3»H 39 — % 
508 89k 8% 8%— % 
23 13 12Tb 72H— V* 
168 18V* 18 18% + Vk 

710 43% 43 U. <394 + % 
IM 64 63% 6396 

392 3M6 3T% M%— % 
4 W 33 33 + Vk 


48 3A 20 207 13% 13% 13% + % 


5 259k 25% 
138 8« 8% 


Non Dollar 


Ksuer/MoL 
Am 8kg 97 
Bk.'toiinoiM 
Bb Tokyo 88/90 
BA Indosvczfl 
BetovimK 
attaoniB/Jl 
Cwi Gold Fin 9S 
CK»ni« 

& Funder 00 
CTNoHanal 91/9S 
Danmark 93798 
IBM 

Ireland 93 
i refund 94 
UmUEuroH 
MigBk Den 9**9 
MtOBL Dan 91/94 

Mmne 

RM05 

SndWm 

Slaw Chat Sfo Peru 
Yorkshire Int 91/74 


Coupon Next Bid Aflcd 
12H U« 

12% 27-09 
1794 2(4® 

17H IMB 
17% 18-10 
1296 1548 
»W 
I7H 23C9 
12% 09-11 
17% 1M9 
m 224 
12% I4-H1 
17% U4B 
12% IW? 

17H 2MB 
16-10 
ir* 09-10 
13% 07-a 
17% 8KB 
12% 36-M 
WO 1W9 
12% 77-09 


1.16 IS 12 236 40 3946 39% + *6 

2Ja TJA 14 43 14% 14% 1496 + V* 

2*0 60 7 1995 349k 33V* 3396— % 

-15e 1* 12 5008 15% 15 15% — 96 

1.20 L2 23 63 2896 381*3896+% 

3220 61 43 3W6 39% 39Vb— % 

2A0 1IU 1 2JV* 23Vk 23%+ % 

2AS 9.1 13 77 2726 37% 37V*— % 


44 291b SNETI 272 6.9 

27'u 31%50Rvpf 2A0 9A 
31 23 SaUllCO 1J2 0.0 


18*. ItH Swt For 

18W 109b Swt DOS 1*4 6* 


9 59 50 50 

1976 2994 29 »W— % 

283 139b 131* 131b— % 

252 18V* U 18% 


Sourer : Cndtt Subse-Flrst Boston Ltd. 
Unaon 


B8vb 589. SwEell 6.00 7A 8 1058 81 SOW 8046— % 

59 19% SwEfir -52U1 11 7 26% 26 36— % 

36=6 18'* SwtPS IJI 7.7 f S3 man 24%— % 

179k 11% Saorton S2 3J 397 48 16% 159 6 1596— % 

27% 15% SpectP 125 2296 219* 32V* + % 

59 3496 SPMTV 1.93 17 9 2868 53 51% 51*6 


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BUSINESS PEOPLE 

APPEARING EACH WEDNESDAY 
AND FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


38 30% Spring* 1.52 <6 13 20 33% 339k 32% + % 

43*6 32'r SqugrO XM 4J 11 416 38% 379* 389k + 96 

739* 41*6 Sdvlbto 1.76 2.6 19 2479 7206 71% 72% + % 

3<% 17% Slolev JO U If 527 22% 22% 22VS— Vk 

33"h) 16% StBPnl JO 25 12 113 23 22H 22H— % 

20 *k 11 SfMotr J? 15 11 114 13 ' 13V 139k— % 

509* 39% swoon 280 5.9 8 3624 40 4796 479* +1 

23% 7U SIPOCC? A0 20 10 231 32% 20% 20%— JVb 
V69i UL. Stonde* 5S Xb 10 59 )<*% W> UU.— Vu 


31 19% StanMc .96 3 l) 12 

35% 33% 5lorrett IAB 3J 10 

11% 9 SfOMSe 1JSW5C.7 

3% 7H steego .13 lo 

30% l4»b sterchi Jo 19 10 

I2‘u Mo SfriBCP 74 68 ID 


34% 34 SlcrlDe 1J0 U 13 2654 
23H IS'k StavnJ 170 M 13 192 

34 26% STwWm 1AB S.» 17 » 

12 B'b StkVC Pf iOC 90 4801 

4SH 34U» StsneW IA0 37 9 IS 


82 3A IB 99 14% U** 14 U. — Vu 

.96 XI 12 509 31% 30 U 31% + % 

JB U Id 21 3296 33% 3296— V* 

■20OI0.9 a IT 1006 11 

.13 L0 25 3% 3 3 — % 

76 3.9 10 8 . im 199b 1 99b + % 

76 &5 10 17 11% 1196 1196 — H 

JO 38 13 2654 32% 31k. 319b— 9* 
JO JJ 13 192 22% 2ZV* 22%— % 

AB 5.* 17 » 38% 28% 28%— 9b 

M 98 480x 1196 11% 11% — % 

A0 37 9 15 43 43 43+lb 


39 24 Stonec M 1.9 11 885 30% 30% 30B 

53% 3k9k StaeShg 1.10 li M « 43% 43b— % 

31*. 15% StorEfl 1.92 9A u 93* 209k 309* 20% 

1296 2 vtSlorT 547 ZVj Sb 296— % 

88% 36’* S sorer AO S T-M3 88 ■ 071* 8796— 9b 


Rorar Group 
tadOttar. 19*5 1914 

Rrvenup 1 44.1 135A 

Net Inc. 12A8 12A2 

PerShore— ojb 058 

1*9 Halt 1985 1984 

Rgyenue 261.1 3418 

Net Inc. 1BA0 115 

Per Shore— 087 087 

Sealed Power 
2nd Ouar. 1985 1986 

Revenue 1678 I3L1 

Hbl Inc. 93 954 

PerShore — 0A9 082 

l*t HaH 1985 19M 

Revenug 32*9 259 j 

Net Inc. U.1 1978 

PerShore— 137 158 

Senricemastor IML 
htaQtar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2458 208.1 

Net Inc. — 8.14 781 

PerShore — 025 034 

WHOM m» 19M 

Revenue 4768 411 J 

Net Inc. 1537 1387 

PerShore — BA6 0A2 
For shore mutts odtustoa 
for j-for-2 spat tn Mar. 

Service Merchandise 
2BdQaar. 1985 19M 

Revenue 5457 351.1 

Net Inc. £L56 9.98 

PerShore 002 Ql29 

1*» HaH 1985 YM 

«9*W 9927 61SJ 

Net Inc <a)3J 8A6 

PerShore— — 0J9 

a: loss. 

Sboklee 

WOw. T9BS HH 

Revenue 1038 lift® 

Net Inc 6.1 29 

PerShore 0A7 033 

7 Month* MU 19M 

Rtamnue 309.1 J49.9 

Net Inc *4 127 

PerShore — 044 098 

Shell Oil 

2nd Gear. 1985 1984 

Revenue 51 00. 5J50. 

Net Inc 3373 41U) 

Ml HaH 1115 1989 

(Nvfwt 98*0. iDJoa 

Net Inc 6338 7*38 

• Signal companies 
SbdOmr. 1985 1984 

Revenue L42Q. 1520 . 

M«Mnc 7?X n JS 

PerShore— 0A9 0A3 

1 ft Half T9IS 1989 

srrr- 

Per Stare— . 137 1.16 

WW ne fe Inc lude oabi 0 / SI 
minion from tSsconlinueti op- 
erations. 

SThecst Booking 
MQear. 19U 1984 

Net inc 10.15 16.19 

PerShore (Us va 

1*8 Hair 1985 1914 

Net inc 2688 3245 

Per Share U 5 iai 

Sthwest Forest fnd. 

2nd Ouar. IMS TVS* 

Revenue 17885 2O9A0 

Net Inc _ fa>288 S3* 

Par Share — 0X2 

l*f Hatf 1985 1984 

Revenue — 34933 38*41 

Wine (0*48 « 

PerShore — aja 

a: toss. 

stone Container 

ahdGbw. mj iMB 

Revenue 3023 3119 

Net Inc _ — 1 39 9 AS 

PerShore— 0.10 047 

W HaH U15 19M 

Revenue «9A 6J9A 

Net Inc. 9A8 ■ 1186 

PerShore. cat aj* 

Sim Co. 

3SK 3^S 

SJfez « *B 9 

7jS 

Wine 2738 2808 

PerShore— 2A zS 
bottmaudachontotSBmU- 

thm rspgtn of 323 million. 


Svbron 

2nd Ouar. 1985 19M 

Revenue 1348 I28J 

Nel Inc 159 179 

Per State — 0.12 034 

is* HaH M85 19M 

Revenue 2405 250.5 

Net Inc 4.19 610 

PerShore QJ4 153 

' imnolwtnduOo loom oftlj 
million to auartor and of S3J 
million In bolt Horn disco n- 
ttnutd operations. 

Tenneco 

Md aw. 1985 1984 

Revenue 3760 1790 

Net Inc 16*X) 7701) 

PerShore 183 1A5 

Id HaH 198S 1994 

Revenue — tabq. 7jml 

Net me 2278 3750 

PerShore— 137 2A5 

IM4 nets incl u d e pain of 26 
cants nor share. 

Trans World 
MONT. ms )9M 

Revenue— S298 50*3 

fWini 3081 a® 

PerShore — 079 07B 

ldHotr ms low 

^vonue 1010. 9677 

Nrf IOC- 4704 49.16 

PerShore T.19 137 

Tribune 

and Ouar. ms 1914 | 

tayenua 5063 *663 

Net Inc 3*5 293 

PerShore — 085 072 

lit Heft 1985 1984 

Revenue 9SA 860.7 

& & 

Tyson Foods 

JfdQoor. 1915 1984 

Revenue 2868 1898 

Net i nc 983 5.18 

PerShore (U7 077 

tMaattn 1985 1984 

Revenue ftUA 542.1 

Net inc 26.11 1180 

Per Share 135 0A0 

Par shaty results adtustad 
lor S4ar-T split fa April 

UM Financial Gp 
2nd Ouar. i985 1984 

Net Inc 1.14 *65 

PerShore 009 05 ) 

Id Hatf 1985 1984 

tat inc lo)687 7A9 

PerShore — 085 

o; loss. 

Volley Fed. Savings 
andOuor. ins |m 

SSII&ez & 

is Half 1985 1914 

Net Inc. 167 10)68 

PerShore 1.18 _ 

s.' lass. 

WoslUngton Post 

MQuar. 1985 19M 

Rmrenue — 28*3 2 S 6.1 

Net Inc 3*1 27.15 

PerShore — 2A1 1.94 

WHOM ms 1914 

Revenue— SD9 475 A 

Nel inc. 5902 3631 

Per Stare — 434 287 

insovartar net Indudcs aaln 
of Sl.i inliacn from sale of h- 


7*4 571. 
1855 50 
86 28 

I 2035 17‘b 
1 '00 27 

501 43 
60 44-, 
! 85 I3i; 

1 1926 7H 
447 IH 

59 :r, 

25 23% 

2033 4 4 

63 35' b 
I 31 133 
1304 13% 

: 34 

57 6'. 

115 II 
16 13% 
2702 35 
-to 40% 
1812 29% 
21 «1 : 

103 50% 

104 «‘ T 

:ioi 3iv 
tool 19 
306 <v% 
898 33% 
46 31 
336 25H 
III 12 
343 IS 
106’ 28% 
95 *H 
38 6% 

’6 38 
178 12 

44 f. 

26 8'b 

«W J7 

HXt B9 
3*001 73 
159* 36’. 
178 38 W 

r-4 39 
5S« 12 
274 22*4 
981 45% 

1 3% 

81 BO-r 
e 3'. 

83 13% 
46 19 


»'■« 6 %—% 
10 Vj 10% 6 •» 

23>« 21 - '« 

4J'* 43% - H 
56 • 57 — IH 
4»H 49% -r H 
27'.* 27% — 
I’H (7H— '• 
a'- 21 L _ 4 
43 43 

44'g 44-1— v> 
13% 13% , 

7’..— ■» 
r* 2H — H 

21-4 21-4— ;« 

23« a 1 * *■ % 
3% <n + % 

33% JS t-1 
lJl'-rlJIH— H 

ir-» 13 * % 

3* > 

6*-> *J— % 

)D% IO T i — % 
«3"s ir« 

J4% 35 +% 
40". 40 : + ’» 
a _ > 29". * H 
41% 41H— 4 
W 50% + ■) 
9 - ?%— % 

2>«. 21% + % 
1* 19 + H: 

4*H 49-b 

30% 31% + *■ 
J1 31 — P 

25% 2S'« ' 

111"; 12 +». 
141; 15 — 

2S 3"« - 4 
4% 4% 

ft - V+— % 

37% S8 +5 
11% 11H— * 
i s 6'. *■ 

T-. 8-k-W 
34 34%-» 

99 B9 
TU IB 
36" ■ 3^ + 

3* 3S'«- - 

ze; 38b- '"7 

ip- 1: + 

Z2 2 2% + J: 

44% 44%— 

3% 1% 

99% ac: + w- 
3 Ti+’t 
13% 13% — % 
18% 1* 


33 '. Kero* 
4ft' x xera< at 

19 XTRA 


300 52 92 tA’" M . 52 S3 

5 45 9.9 1 55 55 55 

■64 2 S 13 2 S3"-.- 25% 25% - 


24% ZalfCo 
9% Ztaara 
25 Zovrej 
IPb ZonlthE 
IS*. Seros 

23% Zumln 


1J2 4 7 10 4 28% 25 28". 

S< 8.3 23 T25i 10% O’. 10’* 
43 !0 !6 1*31 53 49"* S3 - 

_ , 12 3855 20% 19" ; »"*• 

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U5 3? 11 52 34V- )« 34 


M 5 E Histis-i/Ais 


NEW HKW5 U 


Wetterou 

Id Osar. nu 19U j 

Revenue — 7483 717A 

Net inc — 73 Jj ! 

PerShore — DAS OAf 

White Consol Mated 

BMQuer. I9»S m< 

Revenue 5913 596.9 

OPWNet — 143 19.1 

OoerShora_ 100 108 

id naif ms ir» 

Revenue IML 1060. 

Oner Net 399 30J 

Oner Share_ 131 IJ 8 

Wife* Chemical 
Mow. ms m* 

Revenue— 349J X25 

tat inc 1*72 I LX 

Per Share— 108 1.11 

Id HaH IMS mt 

Revenue— 734 A 7493 

Net Inc SM 3007 

Per Stare 1J5 2.11 



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Page 13 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


ENgve 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


esserschmitt Reports 7% Increase in Net Profit 



.jfi; /£'**$ 


By Wawen Gcdcr 
hiiernaiionai Herald Tribune _ . 
OTTDBRUNN. West Germany 
1- Messerschnntt-BoIJcow-BIofafli ' 
RmbU West Germany's largest : 
itospace.aiid defense group* re- 
ined ^Thursday a 7-percent iri- 
jrease in net profit to 98 million 
poitsdw mans ($34.1 million) in 
|984 from 9L? million DM a year 

tariief. 

I As previously reported, revenue 
[lipped Ikperceot to 5.72 billion 
last year from 5.87 billion 

5M. • ••••■' 

!' Hanns-Axnt Vogrfs, the MBB 
^airman, attributM the revenue 
j^ine to stagnant sales of Airbus 
j^iosortuun planes and civilian he- 
licopters. - 

Mr. Vogels said he expected sales 
to riinft to. above 5.7 billion DM 
for thecorreol year. He said that as 
bf 1986, sales would grow an aver- 
age 10 patent annually for an un- 
specified period, chiefly as a result 
of a marked upturn in orders for 
commercial aircraft in recent 
awn thsriit ® expected to continue 

through not year. 

. Overall bidets on hand are ex- 
pected to reach 9.8 billion DM by 
year’s end, -Mr. Vogels predicted, 
[c omp ared .with 8.4 billion the pre- 
.•viousyear. . • 

Mr. Vogels noted, however, that 
_ itch of the. group’s sales revenue 
stems from mums on development 
B ’’rather than actual production. He 
MBB will need to con- 


centrate .on obtaining orders for *Tbe need to share risks of TA- 
produciion of advanced aerospace 11 development amid lead to clos- 
systems and other high-tech equip- er Dornier ties to Airbus, perhaps 
merit if it is to improve profitability the establishment of a Deutsche 
and secure jobs. Airbus-Domier joint venture,** one 

The chairman said that MBB's MBB official said. Mr. Vogels said 
Airbus aircraft business had acco- a decision oc TA-11 production 
nwlated losses of some 1 5 billion will be made before year's end* 
DM over the past years, including a - . . . th _ 

200-maiiooIossin 1983anda 110- 

million . deficit last year. But, he !° brad a .mv nmem 
said, the loss would beern to some ^ 

60 million this year and 1986 would 2ft 
likely mark the break even poinL, s&arply mcreased thm the plane, 
“I'm confident 1987 


Mr. Vogels also said MBB repre- 
sentatives would return from the 
United States this week with pro- 
posals concerning possible cooper- 
ative ventures between MBB and 
U.S. companies under President 
Ronald Reagan’s proposed Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative. 

Closer to borne, Meseodumu is 
anxious to explore possibilities of 
merging both civilian and military 
technology with Krauss-MaKei 
AG, West Germany’s leading tank 
maker and a major locomotive pro- 
ducer which recently was acquired 
by a consortium incl u ding 


ag MBB. 

Mr. Vogels suggested that MBB 
was interested m es tablishing a 


called ' the European Fighter Air- 

theV^i^r^ f£££i: d< s do r^ ( gS 

sche Airbus, the wholly-owned tiim “e ^ 

MBB subsidiary which has a 37.9 onpnaOy planned - 

pereau stake in Airbus Industrie. The fourindude^est Germany, 

™ SS ean ., Airbus C0nsorUum ’ with MBB and Doraier in major production link with Krauss- 
Mr. Vogels said. roles, dong with Britain, Italy and id locomotives and MBB train 

, ] 4i7 e - ( ? nc ^ t f half ' A,rbus Spain. “An previous attempts to cars, in addition to developing new 
booked 7» orders tw paaenger 5 ^^ the participation of the mobile anti-tank systtms combin- 
, Frendi aerospace group, Dassanlt, ing MBB guided missiles and 
'w * OT have fallen through," he said. Kx&uss-Maffei lank technology. 

the A-320. Mr. Vogels said. Twm- ■ 
ty-two or those orders were placed 
last month by Lufthansa, the West 
German national airlines. 

Mr. Vogds said he saw “no im- 
mediate need" to respond positive- 
ly to an interest expressed oy Dor- 
nier GmbH, West Germany’s 


ICl Reports Drop in 2d- Quarter Profit 9 
Cites Increasing Strength of the Pound 

Reuters 

LONDON — Imperial Chemical Industries PLC reported on 
Thursday that second-quarter pretax profit fell 7 percent to £268 
million (5375 million) from £287 million in the second quarter of 
1984. 

Share prices for ICI, Britain’s largest chemical manufacturer, 
slumped further on the London stock exchange, to 659 pence from 
Wednesday's dose of 689 pence. 

ICTs report was the latest indication of bow much the recent 
rebound of the pound is hurting export companies. 

Fears that the pound's strength, particularly against the Deutsche 

down their earlier forecast of pretax profits of around $295 million. 

Its total fust-half profit of £535 million was up only £3 million from 
the first half of 1984. First-half revenue rose 16 percent to £5-58 
billion from £4.81 trillion. 

The failure to boost profits substantially was due mainly to the 
pound's strength in the second quarter, the company said. 

fimy Price, a share analyst with De Zoete & Bevan stockbrokerage. 
said the higher exchange rate had cat £50 million to £60 million from 
the second-quarter profit. 

“The main problem is sterling," she said. “ICTs results showed that 
their underlying trading situation is satisfactory.” 


Dollar Is Mixed in New York, 
Generally Weaker in Europe 


Comcast’s Lean Style Renders Consistent Profit 


By Geraldine Fabrikant 

/few York Tima Smiee 

NEW YORK — Last fall what 


- . H ^ r - Ua 


.iOMPANY NOTES 


the old days because people could 
not get television without it.” 

second largest aerospace grotto wtw yukk —L ast miwnen 

acquire a mhrorityTtake m Dent- Co ^- Cor P; S^ cccd S “ SSJSSLSSJSf^SS? 
sche Airbus. But company execu- nadungiugral of bufldmg a $100- madet^ dec^itofcaisprunan- 
tives say a Dorajersmk^ possible mflboa aA positipMhe cqpma- hr on cable and Muzak, both of 
if plans for the Airbus TA-11, a n ^ s ^ financial officer, Julian 
nvin -engined long-distance air- ^odsky, sent a memo to the stafL 
craft, reach the development stage. He pomted out dm there was a 

— f 0r obtaining telephone 
from information and 


Comcast’s Record of Growth 




Broken Hifl Pty. is expected to 
I, ^announce record earnings of more 
■1 >; dan 700 million Australian dollars 

' : wf ' : ^ ($500 million) when it reports Fri- 
year ended May 31, 
said. The previous 
1983-84 when net 
to 6IL24 mtllinn 
^ ^ dollars from 544.76 milli on. 

Ctnon Inc. will speed up plans to 
b»» £*, l .■* InOd an office equipment plant in 
" ' 1:, the United States. Canon, which 


ond quarta. The company posted 
bQfioaintnequ 



sales of $ 2 ^ billion in the quarter, a 
10.5 -percent increase from $154 
trillion a year earlier. 

Piulips International BV and 
Dongwon Electronics Co. of South 
Korea have signed a contract to 
produce VHS video-cassette re- 
corders in South Korea. 

Siemens Ltd. of Smith Africa 
said it would employ new workers 

... . at plants where 1,250 workers are 

: . ■? l had planned to start building the on strike wniess unions involved in 

' • ;> 1' i -,! ■ ^ a .'I plait in 1988, now will select a ate a pay dispute accept arbitration 

: ■ • • • the end of 1985 and begin con- and investigation of tneir members’ 

. ”*'• Mark/ in IQU Th» n lfln l COnduCL 

Storage Technology Corp., 
whose net loss widened in the seo- 
ond quarter to S15.9 millio n from 
S4J million a year ago, said it had 
built up unencumboed cash re- 
serves of $115 million. The compa- 
ny filed for protection under Chap- 
ler 1 1 of UJ>. bankruptcy law last 
year. 

Sumitomo Electric Industries 
Ltd. of Japan and two Australian- 


numt 

suggested that enqtiqyees use the 
tdqjhooe directory wnenpossible. 

Comcast' s managanent u hanDy 
spendthrift T he EttMcaom came, 
company that last Tuesday made a 
$2.1-bfllion lad for Storer Commu- 
nications Inc. is considered among 
the best-run companies in the in- 
dustry. Its- management style and 
its consistent profitability explain 


ly on cable and Muzak, 
which produce steady monthly in- 
come. 

Net profits of Comcast rose 35 _ 
percent last year, to S122 million. * 
on sales of $103 million. That 
marked the 13th consecutive year 
of record profits for the company, 
the nation s 16tb-largest cable op- 
erator. Although 80 percent of its 
revenues cone from cable televi- 
sion, Comcast is also the largest 
independent operator of Muzak 
systems, which provide about 20 
p erc e nt of revenues. 

Comcast did not make its repu- 


why several industry observers taUqn by leaping into the biffiest 
have compared its bid for Storer to markets. In fao.it has avoided btd- 
Capital Cities Communication <&Bg on the large urban franchises 
bat's pending purchase of ABC iha* devoured capital at so many 
“Comcast, like Capital Cities, other companies. Instead the com- 
brings a lean management style to pany. based in Bala Cynwyd.Penn- 
the table,” said Barbara Dalton sytvama. gradually inched its way 


in 1986. 
itive 


kdractbn 
aakB 

= ^-> r-^and toners. 

'' CSR Ltd. expects that first-half 



minion Australian dollars ($35 mil-- 
1km) of last year’s first half, Keith 

rhairrmin, caid »t Ihf an- 

meeting. However, he said 
net for the year ending March 
:• | 3 l should rise from the 922 million 
i: -rdoQars in 1984-85. 

-!* !;i: - General Dynamics Conx, one of 
- 'I" the largest UJS. military contrac- 
»-iore, vnO close its shipyard at Quin- 
J. i* cy, Massachusetts, next year be- 
;; of poor busmess conditions. 

•The yard, which employs 4.200 
‘ 101 years ago. It 

: WO Ships. ' — — — 

, WJL Grace & Co. and General _ „ - 

^M3Is Inc. have reached an agree- India W ill Purchase 
e ’ ment under wluch Grace subsidiar- „ c p _ 

Ilia wQl acquire 27 Dane’s restau- A oUper-LompUteTS 
. rants, and 25 : Casa Gallardo Remm 

Modcaa restaurants. The terms 
were not announced. 


Russell an analyst at Ptudeatial- 
Bache Secnritiftt. “It could take 
Storeris properties and wring a lot 
more cash flow out of the systems.” 

“Comcast has had the fastest 
conventional earnings growth re- 
cord in cable,” added Dennis 
Ldbowitz, a vice president and me- 
dia analyst at Donaldson, Lufkin & 
Jenrette Securities Inc 

Ralph J. Roberts, chairman of 
Comcast, started the company in 
1 963, expanding h by acquiring ca- 


op by buying systems in wdtto-do 
suburban areas. 

Having purchased those systems, 
it then managed them wdL 
When it bought the suburban 
Baltimore television cable 
in 1983, fer example, it pakf SI 28 
nriHion, or about $1^250 per sub- 
scriber. At the rime, that was aa- 
sidered an unusually high price 
Within 18 months, however, Gan- 
cast had increased the number of 
bones buying cable services to 


! X, f d ^ t KV e | We &SsKTcabte^3teins and 117,000, from 92,000. and at the 

Ltd. and Pirdli Encsson LtiL, nave Muzak operations. “Since we went same ume cut costs. As a re 


: agreement on pro- 
fiber in A 



readied a basic 
during- optical fiber in Australia. 
The company, Optix Australia 
LkL will be capitalized at 4 million 
Australian dollars (SZ8 million). 


tsui Leasing 
ad MTB 


^ Korean Air Lines has placed an 

; : onier for six McDonnell Douglas 
u -MD-STs with a consortium of 22 
i ' *- Japanese leasing companies led by 
-COnentLeamig 

- Development Ltd. and 

- • :-JUasing Gi Korean Air will pay 
! r~i* 2 lB milliQO over 10 years. 

>;v McDouneB Douglas Corn, re- 
spotted that orofits increased 10.5 
• * ^'percent to Sw.l million in the sec- 


Brtaabi 

Brtf. 5fMrtundart 
: ;*» ifH 1983 

HSS BUS 

I’WwUM. 7903 IS7JB 


public in 1972, and long before 
that, the company has not bad a 
down qaaxter,” Mr. Robots said. 

Mr. Robots began his career in 
1948 at a Philadelphia advertising 
One of his accounts was 
Gxp* the supplier of re- 
corded background music. He 
joined Muzak as a vice president in 
1950. 

Two years later, be became a vice 
. NEW DELHI — The Indian In-, president for Pioneer Belt Co. In 
stitute of Science plans to import 1955, he bought the company, and 
two super-computers from the when he sddit eight yean later, it 
United States and one from Japan bad become the second-largest bell 

company in the country. 

He then started a venture capital 
company that bought a cable sys- 
tem in Tupelo, Mississippi, in 1963. 
The cost was less than SI million. 


to aid research in atmospheric sci- 
ence and bio-engineering, the gov- 
ernment reported Thursday. 

The computers, with front-end 
processors, peripherals, software 
installation, training and documen- 
tation, are expected to cost around 
300 million rupees (S25 million), a 
spokesman said. 


result, 

cash flow for the Baltimore 
rose to S 14 million from S 8 

Analysts expect that Comcast 
would be able to bring mud] the 
same magic to Storer. 

“Comcast's operating margins 
should be about 32 percent this 
year, while Storeys have hovered in 
the 10-percent range," said Mrs. 
Dalton Russell of Prudential 
Bache. “Storer’s figures reflect the 
overbidding that has characterized 
cable. With that building behind 
them, the economics of those sys- 
tems begin to make sense. When 
Comcast applies its management 



United Press bnemuionol 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
mixed in New York late Thursday 
but came under some selling pres- 
sure on concern over a report that 
10 percent of savings and loans 
institutions in the United Slates 
were in serious difficulties. 

The dollar was generally weaker 
in Europe. 

Dealers in New York said trad- 
ing was light and erratic, with the 
dollar bouncing up and down with- 
out direction much of the day. 

“But the market was a little con- 
cerned over the testimony on the 
thrift repeat," one deafer said. 
"And it could be even more of a 
negative for the dollar in Europe on 
Friday.” 

A study by the Federal Home 
Loan Bank Board, the chief regula- 
toraf the thrift industry, estimated 
that 10 percent of federally insured 
savings and loan institutions are 
insolvent. 

The board's chairman. Edwin 
Gray, in testimony before the Sen- 
ate banking committee, said if (he 
insolvent thrifts were liquidated it 
would cost the insurance fund S15 
billion to pay off depositors. 

In New York, the British pound 
rose to $1.4095 from SI. 4080 
Wednesday. Other late rates in 
New York included: Deutsche 


mark, 2.8720 to the dollar, up from 


2.S660; French franc. 8.735, up 
from 8.71: Italian lire. 1.920. down 
from 1,924; Swiss franc. 2J435. 
down from 13450 and the Japa- 
nese yen, 239.15. up from 238.90. 

In European trading, there was a 
quiet day with little news for the 
markets to focus attention on, deal- 
ers said. 

It ended at SI. 4105 10 the pound 
in London, a weakening from 
5L397 Wednesday, at 8.7 105 
French francs in Paris, down from 
S.723. and at 2,8645 DM in Frank- 
fun. down from 2.S734. Dealers 
said the dollar was still stuck in a 
182-1O-2.90-DM range and that 
there was little temptation 10 take 
either long or short positions. 

Earlier, in Tokyo, the dollar 
firmed against the yen, dosing at 
238.95 yen. up from 23^50 
Wednesday. 

Dealers in London said they had 
seen a flurry of rand selling, which 
Johannesburg dealers earner said 
had come from foreign sales of 
South .African slocks, which have 
been hard hit by the nation’s racial 
problems and foreign pressures. 
The rand weakened sharply against 
the dollar in London, reaching 
1.915? to the dollar from 1.S832 
Wednesday. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


TH Niw York T*ra> 

Ralph J. Roberts, chairman of Comcast cable company. 

the first US. cable company to do a In fad several indusliy observers 
Eurobond offering. It was the first believe that Comcast’s 52.1 -billion 
publicly held cable company to bid is a smart move. “It is on the 
raise money through limited part- aggressive side of reasonable," said 
oerships, company officials say. John Malone, president of Tele- 
and, in an innovative move for the Communications lnc^ the nation's 
cable industry, it also obtained largest cable operator. 


long-term loans from insurance 
companies. 

Although the Storer bid is the 
most ambitious undertaking to 
date, both Mr. Roberts and Mr. 


Initially cable was one of many 
investments, but “it looked like the 
best one,” Mr. Roberts said. “Ca- 
ble performed a critical service in 


style, the margins are likely to Brodsky believe it is crucial in a 

match Comcast s. — 5 J * i -*-* i — 

Another dement in Comcast's 
success is its attention toils cost of 
funds. Most of its tong-term debt is 
at fixed rates, with interest costs at 
under 10 percent. 

Mr. Brodsky said Comcast was 


Tele-Communications is a bid- 
der for Warner Amex Cable Com- 
munications. a company that Com- 
cast also considered making a bid 
for. 

Mr. Malone noted that interest w 1 •_ 

period of rapid consolidation with- rates were down and that Comcast, JjlClZSllSfilltl MhvB&riC 
m the industry. “This is a cross- which plans to sdl Storer’s seven 1 E>- 

roads in our business," Mr. television stations, would be doing JiepOTtS lo /€ iuSe 
Brodsky said “Cable companies so at a time when television sta- ^ 
are buying each other up. There tiona are bringing top prices. Com- l« fKyyflf f/)r H/Wf 

- cast expects to sell the Storer sta- J J J 

lions for $850 million or more. 


World Bank Is Set to Issue 
$300-MiMon Bond in Japan 

Return 

TOKYO — ■ A 10 j-percenl cou- 
pon has been set for the World 
Bank's S 300- million 10-year bond 
to be issued in Japan at par price, 
underwriting syndicate sources 
said Thursday. 

The bank will formally sign Fri- 
day for the noocaliable bond, the 
first fully fledged foreign currency 
issue here, they said. The payment 
date is Aug. 1$. 

The selling commission is l'i 
percent, while management pays Vi 
percent and underwriting per- 
cent, the sources said 

The 56-member syndicate is lead 
managed by Nomura Securities Co. 
and co-managed by Daiwa Securi- 
ties Co. 

In other Euromarket develop- 
ments Thursday: 

ENI International Bank is ar- 
ranging a £250- million acceptance 
faculty to be guaranteed by the 
Italian state-oil company ENI in 
another refinancing of ENI debt. 

S.G. Warburg <fc Co. said as one of 
-the lead managers. 

The facility, which a Warburg 
official said has been under discus- 
sion for some lime, is for five years. 

It allows the borrower to issue Eur- 
onotes denominated in dollars or 
European currency units on an un- 
committed basis in addition to the 
pound acceptances. 


The pound-acceptance facility 
has an underwriting fee of 1/16 
percent and a maximum accep- 
tance commission of 3/16 percent. 

Warburg will manage the books 
and act as tender panel agent, with 
National Westminster Rank PLC. 
Bankers Trust International Ltd., 
and Sumitomo Bank Ltd. as co- 
dead managers. 

The Warburg official noted that 
the lead management group decid- 
ed to proceed with uie financing 
despite the collapse of the lira on 
the foreign-exchange market last 
Friday. 

• •• 

Sums International Finance Ltd. 
of Hong Kong is issuing a 40-mil- 
1 ion -European -currency- uni i Euro- 
bond paving 9 percent over 10 
years and priced at par. the lead 
manager. Sanwa International 
LtiL, said. 

The noncallable bond is guaran- 
teed by Sanwa Bank Ltd. and is 
available in denominations of 
(.000 ECU. A small sinking fund 
will operate in the final four years, 
reducing the issue by 4 million 
ECU a year. The payment date is 
Aug. 23" while listing will be in 
London. 

The selling concession is 1 U per- 
cent, while management and un- 
derwriting combined pay 3 -i per- 
cent 


will only be a handful left, and we 
want to be among them.” 


ICI 

''MOW. |98S 

;. St MM 1985 

-85S?* 5390- 

•. Ejmtw- sno 
; . nr Short — 0507 


Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, are In heal currmtdea 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


4*io. Kawasaki Heavy lad. 

S2E5U — 


Bristol-Myers 


Prom. 

Par Share — 
o: tom. 


Belt Canaria Enf. 

kid Qua-. 1985 1984 Matsustilta Elec. IlML 

ten: ms 19M 


andOaer. 
Ravanue 
Nat Inc. , 
Per Stiora 
HI Halt 
Revenue 


E* 


nes 

11M. 


Net Inc. 2SOg 


1.060. 

lll.M 

U1 

2.J20L 

mm 

m 


non 

136 


.Per share 
!«HoH 


Pram. 

Per snort... 


IjOB 

1985 


S295 

2.10 


ss. 

4302 
1 JR 


Revenue. 


1ST UT 


' Cm. General Elec 

ms~~ 

.•JSfHew 
Revenue... 

; gram — 

■ Per Share _ 


1161 

1.43 

ms 

7114 

1759 

2.15 


W 

1.16 

1984 

611.7 

mas 

123 


Imperial OH 

; SS flw - ' was 

.-■te— : ® 

Per Short 0.94 

1985 

. « 
■- Pwstori— 1.75 


1984 

2210. 

12i0 

078 

1994 

cm 

221 J 
128 


■ a* .«■ 



Jntorunovinooj Pipeline 
,MOtor. 1983 1914 

:■ ■- - ywnw WJ 1174 

' 311 27.15 

^ P»r Short __ mo QJ3 

' ' )&**» 1785 MM 

- SESE""— *«J7 33826 

• -SML — «J7 4129 

.. Short _ 141 146 

Pl «*r Development 
J*! 2 » ires i9M 

ft*"**— 187J 1610 

r At* - ,1J>4 1B -27 

J, j[ 1' ihort — 026 041 

m> ’*' 1 senrscanoda 

SHOW 19U 1914 

kvenot 1430. 1471 

jSter ’IS 

'Transawwtfa Pipeline 
. * Shwr. 1985 19M 

'® « 

.w Shorts. 062 055 

.HHtaH 1983 1984 

WOO. 2220 


ProJrtl 127JBO 100700 

Per Wart — 7043 6224 

77 trillion 

Mitsubishi Oil 
Year 1H9 1« 

Revenue 12 T 1JT 

Net Lost 0410 OSIO 

T: trillion. 

Mitsui Ena. A sitlPblda 
Year 1944 1983 

Revenue 351460 312440. 

promt 5pm 34m 

Par Short — 7J5 £91 

Nippon Express 
year 1904 1913 

PMIrs OWO L9M 

Per Snore — 9.16 7.11 

StllOflOOl 

Year 1*84 1983 

Revenue WM Mum 

PmflH OMO iam 

Per snare — 2547. 3691 

Suzuki Motor 

Year 1904 17S3 

RnmN 676410 634.M0. 

PrafH MSU M7a 

Per Share — SL21 1923 

Norway 

Norsk Hydro 

Id Half 
•vent 
PraDts 

UiHed Stales 

Anter-fido Hess 


Per Share. 

Capital atles Comm. 
Mtar. 1W « •• 

Revenue 257-1 

Net me S2-51 . 7034 

Per Share — 115 391 

i« Halt ms 1«4 

Rtvenue 5012 e5&4 

MM loe. 66.97 6645 

Per Shore — S2B 5.10 

Champion Spark Plus 
2nd Quar. WOS 1H4 

Revenue 2T2J 

Net inc U 

Per Share — 008 025 

Ut HaH i* m4 

Revenue 41W 42S4 

Net inc. 1W 1*2 

Per Snare — 023 OSO 

Cotaate-Palmolive 
2nd Quor. 1« IWf 

Revenue 1250. 1280 

Oner Net ine. 50J7 4S.W 


Id Half ‘ INS 

»5r= iffi 

Per Share — 126 

FtPSla mn HOPS 

S S8SL. ffi 
WBusz S 3 
jS 

lit 


Id HaH 

Revenue 

Ntt Inc. 


Kay Carp, 
v. 7f8S mt 

» 1615 2232 

Net inc. __ 228 (a 1053 

Ptr Shore _ 075 — 

Id HaH ms 1904 

Revenue 3414 4349 

Net inc 052 Ia)U 

Per shore-^ 014 — 

a: loot. IMrm* ItteMe solo 
of S2J million. 


ms nets drtrf* mrteef SU 
million from end of unit at 
SIJ million y3.p70.W9 m 
•uartor and of fit million v% 
late ot SIJ miaien In hah 
from tBsconttmod operations 
and ooitrs at saipoO to ova? 
tor and of St 1 million In halt 


Hike 

mover. 19*5 

Revanue — ». 257.1 

Net inc *2* 

Par Share OLIO 
Veer Ml 

Revenue — _ 9464 

Net inc — 103 

Per Share 027 


U.S. Commission Authorizes 
End of Intelsat Monopoly 


_ 922 

Pd* Shore — 2J0 121 


Landmark Bkina Fla 

million tn hoH tram tBscon- ™ 


rimed operations. 

FSt 3 them Federal 
M Q ear. 1985 1904 


id HaH 
wefinc — 
Per Shore. 


1X1 

023 


022 

19(4 

742 


Net inc 
Per Share — 
'id Hoff 
lie 


m &§ 

SbS 
120 — 


Oner 
Oner Share.. 
Id Half 
Revenue — 

Oner Net — 
Oner Share. 


061 

1905 

2490 

9X95 

1.17 


055 

1914 

9,490. 

K43 

198 


Per Share — 
a: loss. 

Freeport-McMaran 
JhdQoar. HB 1904 

Revenue — — 1909 2179 

Net Inc 2057 2596 

Par Share — 038 035 

MSe- & 

Wed include choree Of 
WB 


Lawenstetn CMJ 
Poor. 1«K 1904 

tovenue UU 1559 

Net Inc 421 794 

Per Shore 191 1X7 

irtHau ms mj 

B 

Per Shore — 322 3X8 

ms haft net htdudaa pain at 
Stt mutton Item 1 
at debt. 


Computer Sciences 
Id Qaar. IMS . 1W4 


million vs S3.7 million In 

rterondotttlJ- “ 

I miff Ad In had. 

Gerber Products 


Revenue 

Net inc 

Per Share 


1S74 

520 

028 


1719 

444 

024 


£££’_ 

Net inc 

Per Share — 
Id Halt 
Revenue __ 

Net me 

Per Share 


Maavffle 
ins 


1903 im 

Revenue 1M98. 16^- 

Prams USA 1980 


2nd Quar. IMS 
Revenue — WO 
Net me - — 31-75 

Per Share — 02B 

la Halt ms 

Revenue — X7«. 

Net me 

Per Share— 092 

Amer. Petrcfina . 
2nd Qaar. ms 1984 


ESC 

U5 

19*6 

4440. 

133X4 

128 


Wit 

irflhore_ 


taH 1983 

«e— 2480. 

mo 

137 

Bk East ftsJa 
HflH 1985 

-elite 55J3 

r Share ^ 859 

opu 


»u 

1 .» 


1S84 

4»40 

as 


Revenue. 

Net inc 

p» r Share— 
Id HaH 

Revenue 

Net inc 

Per Share _ 


586.9 

12.92 

198 

1903 

1.140. 

1021 

0X5 


4909 

1073 

144 

1984 

12)50- 

2693 

229 


- 3 ill'- PlHItfil 

I Xjt— — 89910 66970. 

■snorts fixi S941 
. trillion. 



1913 

19 T 


IHI 

■■V 1984 

.-j«nue_^. 945900. 

— - Hits 0670. 

6X8 

trillion 


1983 

1.1T 

11X40 

8.99 


AMP 

2nd Q*wr. m* MJ 

Revenue 6203 irrj 

Nel Inc — — Jt? 

Per Shore — 031 054 

id Kd« m >MJ 

Revenue — . 82S9 93S.9 

Nel Inc 1J70 

Per Share — OeQ t-W 

AnhBusttr-flusch 

naouar. ires iw 

Revenue 7910. 1 Jit 

NCI inc 17“f3 

per Snore __ 0X1 071 

id Halt ng ms 

SSTT-z: ft® 

Per Shore 141 120 

Per shore result* adtusnd 
tor J-tor-1 nun in Juno. 


Cox Comm. 

Old MOT. 1*85 1984 

Revenue 2102 1W2 

Net IK £0 2U 

Per Share-1 1.1* AM 

KtHOH WB W84 

Revenue — 3»i^ 

Het Cnc ft® 

Per Share— W3 141 

vets Include, .gate of S127 
mllilenjaurJge 
ant ofS 22 JmJjjlonvs ts mfh 

elude writeoff of SS mfUfen. 

Dart A Kraft 
2nd Bear. 

Revenue Z640 

Nel inc 11U 

Per Share 

HI Halt WH 

Revenue 

Net me 

Per Shore — 147 

piamond Shamrock 
2nd Qaar. m* '* 

Revenue . '-® 0 : 

Met Inc __lo»7*M M3 

per Shore — A48 

1st Half ,W# JJJU 

Revenue — 1 j*A 

Net me falJttw )2W 

Per Snoro — — Ml 

a: toss. itU nets Include fan 
of wtfU million. 

Downey SA L 
Id HaH ms 1984 

Revenue »- 
Net inc __ 

Per Share— 

DuPont 

2nd ouar. l«5 MM 

Revenue A50A 

Net Inc — mj 

Per snore — . 1.10 


Id Qaar. 1*85 mj 

Revenue — 2M9 st« 

Nel UK. 11-“ 

Per Share— AW DJ3 

I98S nel bKfvdes chare* of MOwr 
*2 1 million. 


204 

05V 

ms 

9349 

329 

aw 


lof 

049 

1984 

*»X 

024. 


1984 

254J 

Alt 

mB 

407 

197 


NL Industries 

ms 1981 

Revenue — wu V92 

«e_ ^ 

Stare 0.16 096 

ipee nets Include aolns or 
I 12 UJOC In auarter and 01 
snueo In half from dlsean- 
timed operations. 

Morflmast Utilities 
Id Hoff wh ire* 

Revenue — 147A i ,970 

Net Inc - — 1«M| Ml* 

Per Stare— 1X5 144 


5979 

VA 

1W4 

ita 

S2X 

2.90 


Id HaH 
Revenue 
Net me 


ires 

479J 

19.9 

1.10 

ms 

9713 

407 

235 


Per snare results after pre- 
ttrreddfrfdendt. 


19M 

123X 

7X0 

A93 

1904 

22S2 


- A70 


im 

2460 

1095 

DJI 

1984 

4X70 

2173 

137 


156X 

305 


0*7 


9,100. 

43TO 

1X1 


GHfortf-HIII 

tad Qaar. m3 

Revenue 1279 

Nel Inc — 0J6 

Per Share— AlO 
Id Half 1J« 

Revenue — 

Net me (o)*x 

Per Share— 
a: lass. 

Goodyear Tire Rubber 

tad Quar. JJ* -Jg 
Revenue— zsjo. IgA 
Nel me — - M7 M*9 
Per Share— Mt IJU 
ldIM t ms MM 
Revenue— i*A %«A 
Nd InC. 

Persnare— 142 2« 

Hoover 

2nd Qaar. W Jff* 

Revenue — i*^ 

»Sfc=' ffl ffi 

JgS 

1911 

to* credtts of PerStare 

vs 5».4 million In uiHoM 

auarter and of St J million vt 
323 million In hah. 

IO 11*7 

did Qaar. ms i«4 

Ravenoe 637.9 6409 

Nel inc — lalSU 1046 
Per Shore— — AX 
Id Half WOS T9*4 

Revenue — i«L i.tkl 

Nd Inc (a)43X . 1235 

PerStare — — 037 

otiose. 


Mesa Petroleum 

ms 1M4 

834 1615 

Hit inc — Wt 

Per Share— U8 Ml 

td HoH MR MM 

Revenue 93.9 206.1 

Nel inc 14AS 2433 

per Shore— US 343 


Pacific Resources 

1 Ouar. m3 IM 

Netmc ' = ^ M 

Per Share— AM - 

Id HoH HOB mt 

Revenue 72J3 MSI 

Nd Inc IM 10WX9 

PerShare — A67 — 

a: lass. 

Pitney Bowes 
2nd Over. MB mt 

Revenue— 4517 




42SJ 

3137 

A81 

MM 


nets include lass of siua 

million usuafn of S^HmUIbn 

bi auarter and Ofjiidf 
million vt tain of UUS 
nan Ai nan tnm sale of sear- 


Per Shore, 

1st Half MS 

Revenue— 1674 KU 
Nel InC — 67.28 61^ 

Persnare— 139 157 

Ites auarter net includes oair. 
o!S7J million. 


By Elizabeth Tucker 

Wcahinpm Pest Service 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Commtnucations Commission au- 
thorized on Thursday private 
American companies to compete 
with Inidsat, the global satellite 
consortium, ending ns 20-year mo- 
nopoly' in providing telecommuni- 
cations services to most of the 
Western world. 

The International Telecommuni- 
cations Satellite Organization is 
owned bv 110 member countries, 
with the united States holding the 
largest single share. 

[The federal agency gave a con- 
struction permit for a satellite to 
RCA American Communications 
Inc. and conditional construction 
approval pending the bolstering of 
their finances, to International Sat- 
ellite Inc. and Pan American Satel- 
lite Corp.. Reuters reported from 
Washington. 

[The agency deferred action on 
two other applications for satellites 
by Orion Satellite Gup, and Cyg- 
□115 Satellite Corp. because they did 
not comply with all technical stan- 
dards.] 

Companies such as American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. and 
Western Union Corp. use the ser- 
vices of Intelsat for international 


The Asioaaifti Press 

TOKYO — Matsushita Electric 
Industrial Gx. Japan's giant elec- 
trical appliance company, reported 
on Thursday an 18-percent in- 
crease in consolidated net profit of 
127.8 billion yen ($534 million) for 
the first half of 1985. compared 
with 108.7 billion yen a year earlier. 

Matsushita, which markets ap- 
pliances worldwide under the 
brand names of Panasonic, Naticra- 


: past 

tug-of-war developed between In- 
telsat and a handful of entrepre- 
neurs who contended that they 
could launch satellite networks to 
provide business telecommunica- 
tions sendees for less than Intelsat 
can. 

Intelsat lobbied on Capitol Hill 
to make sure private systems will 
not cause the organization anv eco- 
nomic harm. Intelsat argued that to 
compete it must be given the right 

to charge different rates to differ- 

cm locations rather than the flat fee 

it now charges. This, it said, could Japan Construction Orders 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Orders received by 
SO major Japanese construction 
companies fell 12 percent in June, 
to a seasonally unadjusted 955.16 
billion yen ($4 billion), from 977. 1 4 
billion in May. 


communications services. Commu- 
nications Satellite Corp-, the U.S. 
representative to Intelsat, coordi- 
nates such services between Intel- gj Technics and Quasar, said sales 
sat and clients in the United States. rPSC j x J>emnl lo i,491 billion yen. 
Over the past several months, a with 2.236 billion, be- 

cause or brisk sales of videotape 
recorders and office and factory 
equipment. 

The company said a relatively 
slow growth in sales was the result 
of a sluggish domestic market. 

Domestic sales increased 6 per- 
cent for the six-month period, 
while overseas sales rose 17 per-' 
cent. 

Net earnings per share surged to 1 
70X13 yen from 62-36 a year earlier. 


force lesser-developed countries lo 
pay higher rates they cannot afford 
for Lntenu 


international 
lions services. 


telecommumca- 


THiMSMAnONM. 

MANAGES 

AWEBOY GUOEffr WNK 6UCH6NAN 
WtDMSDW WrHfKT 


ssssaii'sseasf 


FotoroU 

2nd Over, itss 

Moore McCormack u«. Revenue 30M 


MQoar. 
Revenue.. 
Net li£ — 
PerStare. 
HMtaiT 
Revenue-, 
Net inc. __ _ 
PerStare.. 


7X4 

068 

35 


(9*4 

M7J 

6X7 

A66 

198* 

24U 

6.12 

■XZ 


3116 

7J 

Art 

19*4 

586.9 

13J 

846 


Per slten mutts after are- 
farted ahrkitnds. 


Nel inc. >A7 

Per Starr Ml 

Mart 
SfM, 


NaMtea Brands 
MW. WW MO* 
Revenue— . UMA MJJ. 

Sf 88 

Revenue aSS W 

-PerShoraZZ ’So 

, Newman t Mining 

mow. ' ires M" 

Revenue 1712 1711 

Mix 17J 11* 

PerStare W9 042 

111 Hail WS 1WJ 

Revenue .30.9 m7 

Net inc. 2A9 26S 

PerStare — 0*9 


Nel Inc - M 

PerShare 033 

1st Hoff MS 

Revenue __ 5601 

Nat me toux 

PerStare— — 
a: loss. IMS nets Include 
ctiorgeeotSSmintonlnaixtr- 

ter and of S3S mHi ten m trait 

ntvtrt Capper & Brass 
Bd oaar. MU 1*04 
Revenue — 11« 1M4 

Oper Net — . 4X2 lalSZI 

Opct Stare— A79 — 

lei Hstr MS IM 

Revenue— rtlx 3UJ 

Oper Net 17J (0)215 

oner State— All — 
a: toss. 


Revlon 


2taQa*r, 

Revenue — 
ml inc — . 

Pwr Shore — . 

1st HaH 
Revenue 


mu 

3824 

346 

ate 

ms 

1.13a 


NM inc— 6M 


Ul PerStare. 


S7BX 

»J 

083 

MM 

1.MA 

5S4 

131 


STOCK 
DcVofr Holbein 
Imenutiooal bv 

CtyChdt 
International av 


US* 

6% 

2 % 


US* 


7% 


3% 


Quota as of: July 25, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capiial gains in global slork 
markets can simply write us a 
noirand tbr weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 483 
10J7BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone; (0) ) 1 20 26090 1 
Telex; 14907 firco nl 


REGULAR QUARTERUT 
DIVIDEND 


57.5C 


per common share 
Payable: September 15, 1985 
Reconl; August 23, 1985 
Dedaied: July 24, 1985 

Continuous dividend payments 
since 1939. 

Cyril J. Sknith 
Vice President & Secretary 
P.O. Box 1642 
Houston, Tbias 77251-1642 


PANHANDLE EASTERN 
CORPORATION 

diversified in energy— mtural gtt transmission 
oil and ssscxpkimtion and ^oductk» 
contract drifting, coal mining > 


. ADVERTISEMENT - 


APPOINTMENT 

NOTICE 

Northern Telecom 



David G. Vice 

David G. Vice. 51, has 
been appointed president of 
Northern Telecom Limited. He 
succeeds Edmund B. Fitzgerald, 
who retains his responsibilities 
as diairman and chief executive 
officer of Northern Telecom 
Limited. 

Mr. Vice has also been elected 
to the board of directors uf the 
corporation. In his capacity as 
president, he will be the cor- 
poration's chief operating officer 
with worldwide responsibilities. 

Mr. Vice, a native of Camp- 
bellford. Ontario, had been pres- 
ident of Northern Telecom 
Canada Limited. 

Northern Telecom is the 
second largest designer and 
manufacturer of telecommuni- 
cations equipment in North 
America and sixth in the world. 
It is the world's largest supplier 
of fully digital telecommunica- 
tions systems, and is a significant 
supplier of integrated office 
systems. 

It employs more than 47.000 
people throughout the world 
and has research and develop- 
ment facilities, and 47 manufac- 
turing plants in Canada, the 
U.S., United Kingdom. Republic 
of Ireland, Malaysia, and Brazil. 
Its common shares are listed 
on the Montreal, New York, 
Toronto. Vancouver and 
London. U.K. stock exchanges. 


i 






Pa 


r l 


High i 


23ft 

17% 

16’ 5 
ZIVs 
\Vn 
50V 
23** 

14'. 

611* 

27 

28 Vs 
60 

2S-'* 

24** 

10'ft 


16 


JO 
19ft 
41 '6 
IIV 

is% 

-!9Wl 

57% 

37% 

3M 

S6 : l 

24% 

?lt 

29V 

33% 

Srt 

106 

l6’» 

26% 

?*’1 

33'* 

Sift 

J8'i 

n 

W 

86' 

28* 

an 

60 

341 

23V 

46* 

66 

1061 

23* 

6C'' 

121 

J4’ 

261 

361 

221 

40 

34 

1401 

211 

to 

30'. 

70" 

US 

29> 

28' 

60' 

25= 

52: 

114 

20= 

30" 


11 


46 

67 

60 

150 

28 

S 

29 

13 

18 

16 

•1 


I 

_ 1 


z 

§ % 
« 


ai 6; 
A> 5* 

AI 52 
B> SI 

* S 

Bi 33 
73 


Bl 

B, ’6 

5' '6 

? » 
Cc 75 

Di 27 
El 44 
FI 11 
Ft » 
Hi jJ. 
£ 'i 

M x- 

j-i 1B , 
LC Tty 
A* 34- 
M 3t ; 
M 53 
M 

N1 S6 
01 
P( 


81 
II 
P I” 
o IS 3 

5 ' 35 

Rl 67 
SI 33 
SI 27*. 
Vi 444 
VI 5* 

;8- 
N 191 
7 * 1 ' 

Ai g 

a. is 

B2l’. 

ji sc* 

T«*£- 

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0:6*1 

% 

SiJ4', 

Ml- 


„ 50'; 
fSO'. 
7461 
--■19% 
»«■ : 
1I24»« 
B 6>; 
12 
a 

T. 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


Ihursdays 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The . issociaied Pres* 


12 Month 
H Km Low Slack 


Olw. via. PE 


Sis. 

lift High Low 


Clou 
Pool, ante 


J# 

.12 


12 

18’i 

6% 

3ft 


J2 


.14 

26 


40 


SS A 68 


JO 

.06 

.IS 


7U lie ADI n 
26-« 8". ALLOb 

22% 12 AMCn 
5T# 2% am intr 
88% 63 ATT Fa 
6 2ft AemoPr 
t‘fa Acmou 
9*. Action 
w* Aewn 
. 1ft AflmRs 
30% 18ft AdRusl 
21'i. 15 Adobe 
8% 4ft A wane 
51V. 28 '4 AfliPbS 
64; 5*1 AlrExo 

12 5ft AIrCoi 
1346 9*. A real pf I JO 

lOB'-i 85ft Almilon 
9ft 6ft MboVtf 
6ft 5ft Alena 
19 9ft Alohain 
17* ft Altec 
36 29ft Alcoa pt 3.75 10.6 
aft 11 AlzoCP 
18ft 9ft Amdahl 
ITS S% Amedeo 
13ft 4ft AmBIH 
43ft 12ft AEvpwf 
6 Sft Af rue A 
6 5ft AFrucB 
12ft 7ft AHlrhM 
B 4 A Israel 
16ft 13ft AMUA 
18ft 12ft AMxeB 
3ft ft AMSId 
7ft 3 AmOll 
62*: 54ft APetf 
16 12ft APrecs 

8ft 6ft AmRIly 
16ft lift ARovIrt 
6 3 ASclE 

1*. Amaal 
4ft Andai 
2ft AndJco 
9 Andrea 
ft vJAngi v 
3'% ArgoPI 
5ft Arlevn 
7ft Armels 
7% ArrowA 
13ft Arundi 
6ft Asmrg 
8ft A9lrc> 

1 Astro! c 
7ft Asrroipf 140 I3J 
% AllaCM 

2 Auditor 


25 

6 a 

4 14 


43A 4ft 4ft + 
23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 
Wl 18ft 18ft— Vi 
4ft 4ft 4". 


82 

105 

1 

81ft 

5ft 

81ft 

Tft 

8iv + ’y 
5ft 

02 58 

34 

ID ft 

TO 

10ft 

38 

75 

M 

U% 

5% 

13 

51 1 

13 - % 

2ft— ft 

5 

IS 

3% 

3 

3 

S 18 

leS 

28 

73-. 

27% — ft 

U 12 

J2 

17*4 

17% 

17ft — *B 

83 

37 

««y 

4% 

4%— la 

IJ 2) 

73 

V 

48ft 

8 

*8 

5% 

48 

A 

5 

151 

lift 

11 

11 — ft 


36 . 

U 18 2422 
14 
U 


>95 lift 12 V 13ft 

37 100-7 «9ft 100% + ft 

21 7 #•» 7 + ft 

29 91. 9ft 9V; + 

39 131# to 13 + ft 

Z7 % N» % 

200: 34ft 34 J*'y + ft 

125 22': V. 22’.— ft 

14ft IJ’.» 14 - 


S3 


3J8 


850 13 


3ft 

6 

9 ft 

is% 

2ft 

7ft 

716 

lift 

12ft 

24 

97. 

12ft 

J’» 

17ft 


.06 24 


71 


JO 



55 

5% 

Sft 

S3* - ft 

7 

2SS 

>2*6 

35V 

131# 

Mft 

12** + % 
34%— V 




6 


IJ 

6700: 

61. 

4 

6 

10 








6% 

6ft + ft 




Uft 

14% + 

30 




toft 

118 

3ft 

.Ha 

3ft 

18 

38 

3V 

3% 


71 


59% 

S9% 

59% — ’l 



Ilk 

III': 

14% 

4 


6 

7% 

0 + ’■« 



13% 

13% 

13% + ft 



Sft 

S 

5% + ft 

7 

78 


2ft 

2'b 

13 

U 

5V 

W 

Sft + 



3 

3V 

}’*— ft 

14 

1 

toft 

toft 

toft 

43 

1% 

1% 

1% 


M 

3V 

3% 

3% 


1 

6+ 

Aft 

0'v 



•ft 

9ft 

VU 

13 

12 

41, 

9 

9% + % 


.15 18 


6*a 


19ft 13ft Avondl JO S A 13 


433 

262 

1197 

35 

415 

16 

11 


21ft + ft 
8ft 8<-3 + ft 
lift 12 + W 

. . 1ft 1ft 

«jj ,a £ ,3 s»i)5 

3ft 3'b 3ft -I- ft 
14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 


21 

8ft 

12 

1ft 


40 U 10 
J2o 3J 


4ft 2ft BAT In 
23ft 12ft BOM] 

3ft 1ft BRT 
16ft 10ft BSN 
13% 7ft Badger 
9ft 7ft BaldwS 
Aft 2ft BatvMwl 
26ft 21ft BonFd Z7Sel(L5 
7ft 4ft Banslr g 
9ft 6ft BnkBM 
*ft 2Vi BflmEn 
l Oft oft Bomwl 
6ft 4 BarvRG 
13ft 10% Baruch 
9ft 4ft Beard 


M 


JO 


44 14 

a 

3L0 


1400 

4*. 

4% 

4>'k 



103 

24ft 

23V 

24ft 

+ 

% 

1 

2% 

:% 

2% 



342 

1 I'- 

« 

12*6 

+ 

% 

58 

ll 

loft 

11 

+ 

u. 

77 

Vft 

9% 

9% 



21 

3ft 

an 

3% 

+ 

% 

9 

76ft 

28% 

28% 



55 

7% 

7% 

7% 

+ 

% 

3 

8% 

8% 

8% 



10 

3% 

3% 

3% 

+ 

lb 

10 

6ft 

6ft 

«ft 



18 

6 

Fi 

8 

+ 

% 

9 

lift 

lift 

lift 



103 

tou 

9% 

■n> 

+ 

% 


l2Men»i 
HigHUMr KOr 


Diy. YW. PE 


Ml 

KfaHtglLOw 


i~i~. 
cue Oiim 


7T: 

11 

Uft 

» 

30V 

31% 

IS". 

9ft 

74 

19% 

78ft 

14 

28'; 

14'v 

2? 

13'y 

7*9 

V 

19ft 

tow 

m s 

ir-s 

4F, 

22": 

18'T 

10% 

101 1 

9*. 

5% 

Ty 

It 

17% 

26ft 

IVft 

IB 

lift 

37 

7tV: 

40 

25% 

4ft 

3'# 

5 

7% 

5ft 

3% 

34% 

M's 

Uft 

1% 


BergBr 
Bicep 
Blow 
Birth. VI 
BIdRD 


ft B10AE 


Hrxno 
Broun* 

BmFA 
BrnFB 
BrnFpf 
_ _ Buektin 
3ft Burifi Df JO 105 
40 2.1 


1JW 

14.9 


1 

lift 

lift 

lift— '•# 

32 

10 

15 

401 

31% 

Sift 

31% + % 

77 

14 

9 

140 

30-b 

29% 

JD% +Tft 

a 

17 

18 

24 

lS'k 

15 

IS 

■ '■« 

ISO 

J 5 

10 

18 

72% 

22% 

27* 




18 


28 

27’y 

77V:— % 



20 

30 

28 

?7V 

28 +% 

to 

23 

10 

18 

27% 

77'* 

27lb- 

-% 



« 

1 

1 

1 — ’’I 

AS 

57 

8 

09 

18% 

Uft 

18% + 'i 

40 

Z5 

fl 

Tl 

16% 

16% 

Wt— 1# 



33 

il 

<2Vl 

«% 

41ft +1 

-» 



H8 

MH 

ll'.'i 

11% + % 



10 

7 

10% 

10 ft 

10+s + % 



20 

380 

5% 

5% 

Sft + ft 

Ai 

15 

17 

585 

18 

17ft 

IT* + ft 

1 M 



171 

21% 

21 U 

21% 




10 

1 

17V 

17V 

17ft 


100 

73 

11 

fl 

37 

38% 

365* — ’b 

no 

ZS 

to 

55 

39% 

39% 

397* 



ao mo 


8 4 4 4 

11 3*4 3'.. 3'm- ft 

. 3 4ft 4ft 4ft 

4 »ft »ft 28ft - ft 
48 a 1 * 7ft 8ft + v. 


26ft lift CDIS 

nrv s'i cmi cp 

19ft 13ft CHS 
17ft 9ft CoesNJ 
8ft 4V? CoglcA 
14ft 10 COIRE 
To 1 « 18ft Cairr.oi 
6 "j 3-J Cal lan n 

■j Colin wi 
Jft Calorap 
9T# Ccmco 
i> campnl 
. . I3>. C Marco 
23ft 131 1 CdnOcc 
35ft 257|i CWine 


12 

19 

1.9 IS 
17 
S 

9J 11 
14 23 


1ft 

10ft 

TA"d 

3ft 

22ft 


JQflOJ 13 
JJ 1.9 10 


13 


15ft 

15ft 

lift 

48‘r 

6U 

22ft 


.10 


18 
.7 17 
20 


4ft Cardiff 
lft Cornu 
7ft Cores 
7ft COreA 
5ft CareEn 
36 caroPnf 5 JO 10.9 

3ft Coiblan AOl 1AJ 9 

15ft CojflA JOb 5J 9 

XTh 25ft CosFd ZJOo &8 
7ft 3ft COSlInd 

ft Ccnlenl 38 

2Sft CCnMpI ISO llA 
6ft ConlSc UBg122 
Sft Celcc JO 3.1 8 

2v CIlmpH 19 

12ft enmpp .72 43 61 

29ft ISft CMMAS .16 

29 IS’V CP'MB* .14 

r, P-n Ci'-ivpl .35 113 

21ft I Sft CK.rCv IJOo 6J 10 
12ft 8 CntOug 

36ft 32 cihio ai -:m 


3 

13 

5 

3 

1S7 

63 

1 

32 

3 

I 

41 

78 


H. 

31 

14ft 

9ft 

4ft 

17'. 


45 

22’. 

10ft 

8ft 

12 

12ft 

lift 

12ft 

1911 

10’-. 


37ft 12ft Ctilltn 
33*. lift Citadel 

S ft 16ft CIIFlt 
ft 18V CtvGas 
42ft 28ft crarmi 
12ft 6ft ClorkC 
21ft CkJnm 
io’ 4 aapovs 
6ft Coftl 
2ft ColF wls 

f Cgmlea 
ft Comlnc 
6ft Comeo 
6'A CoffluO 
4ft CffloCn 

5ft CfUPFCI 
20ft I4H Cnchm 
15ft 6ft County 
TSi 12 ConrCo 
•ft 5ft Con tret 
5i» 1ft CortQvet 
10 6 ConsOG 

70 16ft CnSfw n 
151a sft viContA 
20 7ft vICnIAof 
26ft 14ft CanIMII 
14ft )4ft Conv* n 

19ft 19ft Cooley n 

2 7. Coradlon 

3ft 21 j CosCrn 
1 ft CasCrwt 
10'. 5*1 CnlCra 
12*4 7ft CrslFo 
35 24 Cross 

48ft 23 CrowIM 
17‘d »'• CmCP 
13ft 7ft CrCPB 
2ft =« CrulcR 
S’i 1*1 Cry* TO 
25 13ft Cubic 


.17 


36 
6 

IJOO X3 9 
120 4A 10 
1.93e <9 
J8e 28 11 
1.009 ZS 10 
.16 1 A 7 
.70 Z0 f 


JOr 2 J 18 
■15c IJ 9 
122 3 J 16 
IJOo 15 8 


J* 1.7 1« 


27 a 27 a +i'«« 

13 10ft 10 10ft + ft 

1 18% 18% 18% 

96 lift 11 V, IV*— ft 

6 4 59* 8 

67 Uft Uft I3VS + % 

130 2SV» as* 2Sfc + ft 

42 Sft Sft Sft 

% % ft 

8V# 7% 77.- ft 

17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
Y-. 2% 2VS ♦ ft 

15% 15 15% + % 

207. 20W 105* * ft 

32ft 37ft 32ft + ft 

9% 9ft— -1 

1% 1»» 1% 

15ft 15ft 15ft 
15% 146# 14%-% 
12% I7U 12% + ft 

400* 46 44ft 46 + ft 

50 4 3ft 4 + ft 

10 15% 15% 15% 

14 32ft 3H. 32ft + % 

IV 3ft 3% 3ft 

28 1ft 1ft 1% 

MCI 29ft 79% 29% + % 

2 13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 

1. 6ft 6*6 6% 

ib Ji a ft 

8 15*6 15ft - 15ft 

J 21' 459 27*6 26% 2616— ft 
J 22 57 28*6 28 28 — ft 

9 6% 6% 6% 

1 19% 19ft |9ft 

10 896 8ft 8*6— ft 

500* 34 34 34 

2TB TV* 34% 38 -H% 

SOS 30% 30ft 30-4— ft 
4 ) 30 29ft 29% ft 

45 Z7ft 17 27ft 

3 39% 39ft 39*6 + ft 

4 10 10 10 

15 40 J9ft 39ft + ft 
549 13V» lift lift— 1ft 

17 10 9ft 9% 

36 8*6 8ft 8*6 + ft 

143 19ft 191s 19ft 
14t 9% 9ft 9ft + ft 

200 9ft 9V# 9ft— ft 

2 7ft 7ft 7ft 

205 7ft 7ft 7ft — ft 

14 7 6% 7 — ft 

4 16ft 16*6 16% 

15 15ft 15 15% + *6 

42 25% 24ft 24ft — *4 

157 8ft Sft 8*6 

80 4ft 4% 4*6 

20 6ft 6ft 6ft ft 

81 19% 19*6 l»ft + ft 
54« 14%. 13** 14 — *6 

16 18% 18 18 — ft 

38 23ft 23 23% 

130 14*# 13ft 13ft— y 
475 I9*c» 19ft 19% 

120 ft ft *6 

IJ 2% 2ft 3*6 

155 ft % % 

501 946 9 9ft— ft 

1 9ft 9% 9*6 -f tw 

39 34 34 34 + U 

2 }•% 39*6 39% 4- ft 

89 16ft 16ft 16ft * ft 
13 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
20 ft % % 

266 2*6 2ft 2*6 + ft 

46 23*6 23ft 23% 


17 Merit h 
HUB Low Stock 


Oft VM.PE 


Sis. 

100s h»n LOW 


Osh 

OlWLOfW 


JtPi 21ft Curitct 

1U ’ i CuSlEn 


.92 11 U 


27 10 
61 I 


29ft 3fl + % 
% *» 


Si L4 11 
U8 119 9 


3 1*6 DWC .131 SS 

37% Try DaloEn JZ IJ 

15ft 12ft DomfiA 200 15J 

15ft 12ft DamEB 2J0 180 

7% 3% Damson 

loti 17% Da ms of ZS0 111 

74ft 19ft Oompf 175 IBJ 

23 T: 10% DoloPd .16 IJ 

8 3% Ogtgrm 

8% 3ft DeRosa 
ST’.# 35% DelLoO 
irk 12 DgiVfli 
Sft 7% Denned 
7 4ft &»mfn 
I0!k 7ft Oesgnl 
16 10ft DeulCP 
11% IQ Oevonn 
10U 5% DlOO A 
10 5*6 Olag B 

31 8*k Diaam 

3% 1ft Dig icon 
74ft 25ft OJIlrds 
6ft 3ft Diodes 
6 Dir Act n 
Aft Dbrico 
1 Vi OomtP 
ft DmcPtwi 
16*6 11 Donates 

23% 6*# Downey 
2ft t% OrllW 
39 23ft Dvcom 
I '•« Dunloo 
19ft 11% DUUlKS 
17% 13 DurTst 
16*s 9ft DvnJet 
24% 18ft omeer 


J31 U 13 
.92112.1 10 
25 

JOe 27 

40 

34 

JO J 21 


JO J 18 


9*g 

1»» 

2% 

% 


12 

.100 IJ 10 


JO 29 11 


46 25 17 
AQO 15 14 
J7gZl t 1718 
JO 14 10 24 


143 2 1% 2 

56 24ft 2J% zn— *6 

04 13% 13V* 13*6 

138 1156 1T-T 12ft — V* 

64 3% 3*6 3%-ft 

9 l*ft 19 M6 

13 »ft 20% jqvs ♦ v. 

724 lift 1216 13W e % 

K r< 5 5% + ft 

I 3ft 3*6 1ft ♦ ft 

3 34’« 36*6 34*6 + *6 
60 15*6 15% 1516 + *6 
523 2*6 2% Zto— ft 

17 116 4ft 4% + ft 

21 7% 7*6 7% + *6 

5 15 IS 15 - % 

O lift U UK 4 ft 

22B 9*6 9ft 9ft 

13 ■ 7ft 7ft— ft 

89 31 30ft 30ft 4 V, 
12 1% >ft 7ft 

§ 7Hft 49 L, 69ft —1 ft 

4‘L 4*6 4V6 

136 7% 7*6 7ft 4 ft 

37 Mft 10’fa 10ft 

209! 2ft 27. 2% 4 ft 

3* ft 4 

159 15 14% 14% — ft 

144 24*6 23*6 24ft -f *u 

2 1% 1*6 1*6 

28 27*6 28 4 ft 

% % % 

lift 18ft lift- ft 

t6ft 14ft 16ft — ft 
13ft 12*6 12%— V* 
2316 23% 23% a ft 


43 

707 

4 

77 


15 


9*6 4ft EAC 
16*6 12*6 EECO 
7ft 3 ?g ESC 
6ft 2ft ESI 
3ft 2ft EB9ICI 
23% >7'’* ESTTlCo 
40 31ft Eslgp 
13% 6V: Echoes 
3 1ft EtAudD 
2SV6 IF's EleAm 
Sft 2% ENCSd 
B% 51. Elsuwr 
13ft 10% EPiMdn 
6 2T6 EtnCcr 

r* ft Etwmw 

10% 4% Eneoti 

3 ft Eiu-Srv 
« 7>6 10% ESDn 
t7ft 5% Ern ins 
32ft 18% Esaev 
416 lft Esprit 

S ft 2®% EviRd 
% 22ft EKLov 

9% * EVTJ A 

9*6 4ft Excel 


1J0 4.9 
A96*1*J 

.12 


13 

42 

94 

40 

45 


MO 


S3 
3S34 

4J 12 71 

2 

4V 12S 
4k J 6 

13 7 

50 

8 37 

14 

AOe 2.9 10 


JO IJ I 


,72e 2J 28 
39 

JO 14 84 
ABB SS II 


7ft 7ft 7ft 
14*6 14% 14% 

4% 6 4U + V# 
6L. 656 6ft— % 

3 2?6 276- V. 

20ft 20% 30ft 4 ft 
35% 35U JS% — % 
14 13% 13% -V Mi 

1% 1*6 1*6 
23*6 2346 23*6 — % 
4% 4% 4% + % 
6% 4% 4*6 

12 11% lift — ft 

Sft Sft 5*6— ft 
ft % ft + S 
9% 9% 9% + ft 
% % «6— % 
145 14ft 13ft 14 +1 

14 10 9% Ifl +*6 

2 22% 22ft 22*6 * ft 
20 1% 1ft 1% 

2 35ft 35ft 55ft 
11 30% 30% 30% — % 
45 lft Oft 0*6 + ft 
40 7ft 7% 7% — % 


12% Sft FRA 
22% 14% Fafitnd 
4ft 1% FalrmC 
11*6 3% Ftdato 
12*6 9Vi FI Conn 
15ft 11 FWvmB 
2& 1 * 20ft Fstcrpn 
lSft 11*6 FftchP 
18 41k FltcGE 

llv. 7V# FionEn 
43ft 2S*v FloRch 
30ft 22ft Flgh* 

14ft 4ft Foodrm 
10 7ft FOOTWM 
14'*l 29ft Foote M 
9ft 5*6 FRilllC 
117 72 FardCnpAOOe 

Z3ft IS FonBCA .15 
23V. 15 ForetCB J? 
37"j 11% Fores! L 
2 % Fotomt 

4Jft JOtft Frontt 
24 14 FreaEl 

10% 7*6 Frledm 

12ft 5 FrlesEn 
26 14% Frisch s 

15% 9 FmlHd 
12ft 5*6 FurVlts 


28 
11 7 


1.00a 84 8 
JO 62 11 
-50 Z.T 8 
ASt AS 20 
5 


21 

4 

35 

96 

3 

248 

3 

32 


JO 1.7 8 
MU SJ 11 

4 


J 95 
A 95 
38 


JO 


2.9 11 
19 

J8&3J 12 


9 21 
47 
22 


9ft Sft Sft 

19% 10 19U + ft 

2 ft 2*6 2 % + ft 

4% 4ft 4ft— ft 

lift lift lift 

13 12ft 12% 

74% 24 24 — *6 

14 13*. 13% + U 

14 10 9% 10 

7 7*6 7ft 7ft 

92 42ft 41% 42% + % 
133 24% 25% 26% + *6 
18 13*6 13*6 13ft + % 
22 «% 1% 8% + ft 

2 12 33 3! + *6 

332 4% 4ft 4ft— U 

1500:106% 104V. tow + % 
47 23% 23ft 23*6 + *6 

14 23ft 23% 23*6 + ft 

943 29% 27Vi 27ft — 2% 
107 1% lft lft + ft 

71 3S 34% 35 + % 

29 24% 14*6 28% + ft 
1 8*6 lft tft + ft 

521 10% 10% >Oft- ft 

15 24% 24% 34ft 
13 15ft 15*6 15ft 
42 10% 10ft 10ft + *6 


IlMonei 
HKWLow Stock 


D m. m PS 


5=9 

iCCsHmaLrw 


Our Cta* 


1J0 


JJ IJ 14 


3 1*6 GoJxrO 

SI 5* ft Oo ran 
18ft 7ft Oan.it 
Uft f% Gelms 
4ft 2ft Qnics 
irw 12% GOefnf 
5 2ft OflClDP 
17ft 17ft SnMlcr 
696 2% Genww 
18ft Sft Germ Dr 
13% 7% CkoRel 
12ft F-. GwRsntUO U 
38% J3’.J Catty s .11 
22ft lift ClanFs 
Mft i fttfrtj 
35% 19*6 Glotflt 
37 23*4 Glnrnr 

5 294 ClobNR 

»6 T’cSdW 

1% ft OhJFld 
ISft 15% GorRps 
27% ls*i GmiWT 
16 8*6 OrthCb 


47 

43 is 


5J 9 
5.7 13 
J 14 


62 J 1 . 1% 

1 aft 28ft 21ft ■*■ 

44 9!% 91* 91, * % 

■~9 u ;:% u * u. 
15 Jft 3*6 3*6—1. 
3T2 17” 4 17 17 — ft 

1 3': 3ft 3ft 

30 lAft 16*6 laft * % 
^ . 3% 4 9- ft 

17,12ft 12 12ft— ft 


So U 


J8 2-5 7 
UK5C3J 14 


A4 Z2 10 


Vl 


J6 4.1 
JOr J 
32 Z9 


6 V. GrohOG lJ5d36A 


24% 16% CmaAu 
12 8 Grant 

2ft % Grant yrl 

15% lff% GrTecb 
43% TJ GrtUtC 
A ft G rerun % 
17ft 4*6 Creftur 
ix- 8% Great 
15% l«% GtfCdo 
36% 22% Glfttr 


1.9 13 

8 


M 


18 
IJ 18 
18 
13 

J»4J W 
SI 

A0 U 14 


51 13% 13% 13% 

7t ix«. ir*. + *• 

II 2«ft 74*6 24% 4- ft 

1296 51% 2Kk 21ft— % 
is* i:'i 11% nr- + % 

71 35 34% 34% — ft 

2! 30% 30ft 36-4 * ft 

130 3% 3% 3% 

27 19% 19% 19% ♦ \u 

49 3% 3% 3*6 

44 14 . % 

u irv ipr* !*%*■« 

1 26% 26% 28% 

5 IDT* ID * 10ft— % 

71 7 6% 7 

37 Sft 211'J 2Hj— % 
97 1% 8% 8ft 4- 

10 ft ft ft + 

139 14 13ft 14 Aft 
849 44ft 4Xi 0*8 + ft 
60 34ft 13% 33% — % 
47 13 12% 17ft + >6 

17 11% U% H% + 'A 
859 13% 13 1316 

354 Mft 3496 34%—% 


tr Mania 
HtRiLun StoSk 


D*». T«. PE 


Srt. 

T30KH.B7I LSW 


Ziyi* 

saw Dio* 


S3** IS MMW a !J ID 
«■* T.rn Mussrrry J«e Z7 S 
23*6 17*. MfcDIE 7* U 73 
IXu 8ft MCftMS JS 4.9 8 
42ft 33 MgrPpf 450 KU 

1716 10% VJXnB 30 M 16 

17ty 10ft WatWA It 11 ll 

19ft 15 ft WAcdn 

4*6 3'. IMoRrwl 

19ft Uft MfOGIh ISA EJ 7 
ID «*• Mtglnn 
* 3»m 
fft MuftS 
Tft VtVod 
4"» MavttL 
1% Mnroln 
8ft Myerin 


1% 

13% 

6% 

9ft 

Sft 

13ft 


JO 11 57 
17 


44 JTft 3T -i 3t .( * « 

B B% B*« Sft * % 

298 13% *7 » ! 7-» ” 

2i 12% is ::* + *• 
430t 41% ;l‘l 4J'I- ft 
37 IP. l»k lift — ft 

W lift 1S‘6 '*M» * •» 

t left >0% 14ft— * 

JS 3ft j> 3 - 

18% 19ft l«ft 
IS T-. tli 
lft 1% w — 

9% 

5ft 


197 

13 

8 

74 


•■ft 

Sft 


JttrU 10 


2% 

u 


9% 

Sft 

8ft 

Tft— ft 
II * . 


N 


.10e 1.1 33 
JO SJ 
A0o3J 12 
■93T12J 7 


10% |% HAL 

1*6 10WHMG 
1916 9% HUBC 
loft 7*6 Hometi 
7966 24 Hnavm n 
34% l«*& Hflnfrd » JB 2J 
Th % Hflrvey 
39Vi ll'i Hoshrs . - 
43 7215 Htottrpf 2J0 5J 

4X4 a'A Kosttna AOa U 7 
35% 1516 H Where 2J6e 8-5 to 


T7% 


10% 5% HlthCh 

19% 8*6 HIthE* 

15% 10% HettnM 

i’i Hein Wr 

Vi* Helntek 

7*6 HeWor 
T. HeHonr 
% HglmR 
4 HersftO 
1*6 Hiddrl 
9% Hhitran 
2'h H atmgn 
6% Hotly Co 
27 HopM 

6*6 HmHtr 
6*6 Ilk HmH wt 
19% 12*6 HatIPTv 
6% 1% HoflPwt 

6% 3ft KDuOT 
18%. 9% Hovme 
13% 1% Howtm 

44% 31% HubRA 

48% 29% HuaalB 

61% 40% HubO) Pi 2J6 
10 8% Husky a 36 


31 
23 

M 4J I 
J0e 24 9 
.10 J 10 


74*6 

2% 

4ft 

5 

17 

Sft 

15ft 

39*6 

18*6 


34 9% 9V6 OK + . 
27 Uft !8ft 11% + % 
4 TS% 18% 18*6 
2 7*6 7% 786 

IJ1 34% 33% 23% — 

14 IV 34% 34 34% +• % 

10 1% 196 1% 

A n 4MJ Mft 33% 34 —2% 

13 40% 38% 38% — 1% 
SO 34% 34 3&ft +2% 

282 24ii 22 -6 24% 4-1% 
93 9% 9*6 8% + % 

74 UFk 10% 10ft— % 

14 13% » 13% + *6 

4 0*6 8*6 8*1— % 

15% Uft 15% + *6 
3% 7% 7% 

5. 4% 4%— if* 


$4 

S 

643 


» 


15 12 
IJ8 SJ 13 
Jit 8.1 17 
J7TTXS 
MO 9.7 12 


■91e21A 

10 

JOB IJ 7 
X4 13 

3J 12 

3J 
U 


1-52 

1-53 


*6 *6 — 

44 4ft 4ft 4ft— % 
3 1% I*i 1% 

19 18ft 18% 16ft + % 
73 3 2*6 2ft + h. 

Z7 ISVj 15% 15*1— % 
*3 3SH 37% 37%— *t 

173 8?# BV'j B%— % 

7 2 2 2 

53 ir.-j ia% uva + *5 
■ 5% 5*6 596— % 

325 4% 4ft 4ft 

6 U'l 14% 14% — % 
10 lift lift 11% 

IS 45*6 45% 45%— *6 
33 44% 44 44% — *6 

5 S*% 58% Mft— 1W 

174 7% 7 7 — % 


1 


4% 

15% 


2% GTI 
10 GafoxC 


35 

2U 


1 + % 
I2*h— ft 



Julr 2S 


Mason Season 
High Law 


Open High low Close Ow. 


Groins 


1*3% 

3.74% 

4.02 

MS* 
Esi. Salt* 


UIV2 

3jr* 


WHEAT fCBTJ 

5X»Q bu minimum- dollars oer bushel 
178% 192% Sep 192 7.98 193 2.97% 4-J4% 

101% Dec 3J2W UJTVj 3J2 JJbft 4-J5 

101 Mor 101% 3.07 10H: 10* V +J5% 

191% May 193% 2.94% 291ft 2«S*t +.04ft 

2-73 Jul 273% 277 273ft 278% +.03% 

277 SeP 279*# +J3V# 

Rrwy. Soles SJll 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 31558 up 15 
CORN fCBT) 

5J00 bu minimum- dollar* net bushel 
121% 240V sea 240% 240*. 239 2J9*fc — Jlft 

232% Dee 333 234 231*. 233'* +JI 

a % Mar 240 242 139** 1*3*. +02 

MOV 244 248% 243% 244% +J7 

288 248 Jul 245 247% 244% 247 +.02 

lB8ft 231 5ep 231% 232% 230% 232% +.01% 

225ft 230% Dec 221% 122% 230% 223% +J3ft 

EM. Sales Prey. Sam 24J33 

Pre*. Day Open int.USJSS gala* 

SOYBEANS <CBT> 

5JOO bu minimum- dolloriper bushel 
7S6 538 Aug 5J0 543 5J7 540% +JO% 

471 532 Sea 5J3 538 531% 535% +J3% 

868 535% Nov 537 541% 5J4% 5 39% +.02 

6.79 5.45 Jan 545% 531% 544% 549ft +J3ft 

732 536 Mar 536% 5# lft 535% SJ»% +J3 

7J9 534% Mov S3A% 539 S33 536*- +J2‘- 

638 53 7\# Jul 539% 171V: 537 5.70 +.02 , 's 

A74 534 Aug 535 539% 535 535% +JI% 

638 6J2 Sep 5.44 545 544 545 

633 5J8% Nov 539 541 SJ8 540 +J1% 

E si. Sates Pray. Sam MJ13 

Prev. DovOoen Int 40J04 pH 663 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT) 

100 lons-daliars per Ion 

1BOJO 1 19 JO Aug 123.10 134.20 12200 122J0 —120 

Sea 115-30 126.80 129,70 12*30 —.90 

OCI 12730 129 JO 176-90 127J0 

Dec 13200 133.70 13140 13230 

Jan I34J0 13630 IMJ0 13440 

Mor 13BJ0 139.50 1J730 13730 

May 14130 143.00 14030 141.10 

Jgl 146J0 147 JO 14530 14530 

prow. Sales 164*8 


Season 

High 


Season 

Low 


Oaen High Law Close Chg. 


PORK BELLIESICME) 

3UJ00 lbs - cenrs oer lb. 

SO 45 5030 Aug 5250 

7630 8035 Feb 6140 

7540 60 40 Mbr 61.40 

7540 6030 MOV 6230 

76.00 62.00 Jul 6250 

71.15 8100 Aug 4150 


5330 

6210 

6130 

63.00 

6275 

6130 


Esi. Sales 6.193 Prev. Sales 0.114 
D rev. Day Open mt. 93*3 off 179 


5245 

6130 

4135 

•230 

6250 

6130 


5230 
6132 
6125 
6240 
6240 
41 X« 


+130 

+J2 

+.70 

+35 

+40 

+20 


Food 


17930 
10030 
184 00 
183.00 
20430 
16250 
167.D0 

EsI. Soles . 

Prev. Day Open Int. 43,978 off 840 

SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 


12250 

T25J0 

1MOO 

13200 

13730 

14130 

147.90 


-.70 

—.70 

—30 


-.40 


<OJQO Ibv dollar* nor \M lbs. 
31.95 22J0 Aug 78.15 

24JS 

26J9 

24 JI 

+X 

31.10 


Seo 

25.47 

2X70 

25 42 

25-67 

+35 

30 J7 

Od 

74-85 

75.18 

24J1 

23,16 

+35 


2190 

Dec 

24.40 

2-L74 

sa 

24.73 

+37 

29 J7 

23jW 

Jan 

24.75 

24 JO 

14M 

+A 1 

2860 

74J0 

Mar 

24-00 

2L40 

24 J0 

74.40 

+A0 

27.45 

3X90 

Mav 

24 JO 

2*35 

2AJ0 

24J5 

+36 

25 35 

23.9S 

Jul 

24J» 

2A15 

2195 

24.15 

+J0 



AOB 

2190 

23 90 

ZL*a 

24 J0 

+30 

2175 

Sep 

23.75 

2175 

2X75 

2X75 

+.15 

Est. sale* 

Prev. Sales 16AT7 





Prev. Day Open int. 4946? on 2453 
OATS fCBTJ 

5J00 bu minimum- dollars oer bushel 
1.79 1.32'+ Sea 131 132V. 131 

132% 134*. Dec 136 136ft 1J51. 

137*. 1.38*4 Mar 138 138 1.17 

1.83 141 Mav 139 139 139 

EsI Sales prev. Sales 387 

Prev. Oav Open Int. 3J09 uo 63 


131 — JI'. 

135% — Jlft 
137 — JI*. 

137*. —Jlft 


Livestock 


CATTLE tCMEJ 
M/naibv- cants per ib. 
6747 52.25 Aug 

65.90 55-02 Oct 

67.15 5732 Dec 

1745 iS-tU Feb 

67J7 «03U Aar 

66.25 61-70 Jun 


5735 

55.73 

5735 

5845 

#0J7 

• 1.00 


5335 

5630 

58J5 

5830 

6030 

6130 


EsI. Soles 22383 Prev. Sam 28466 
Prov. Day Open Ini. 40,947 oil 56 


S?30 
5535 
57.10 
5735 
59 50 
60 JO 


S3J7 +3J 
55.72 —.05 

57.30 — -50 
58.12 —.77 

5935 —97 

#030 — 1 JO 


FEEDER CATTLE ICME) 
+i Joo lbs.- cents pot lb. 


73.70 

6040 

AUO 

4035 

61.17 

60Jj 

60.17 

-JO 

7X00 

60 S3 

SCO 

61 JS 

6U7 

60 JS 

60.42 

— Jfl 

77 J2 

61.42 

OCI 

6140 

41.90 

4030 

40.75 

—SR 

7X20 

6X» 

MOV 

62-45 

4X00 

6IAS 

6180 


79 AO 

64.90 

Jan 

4435 

66 75 

63 AS 

6JM —MS 

70 JS 

65J5 

Mar 

65J5 

6&40 

64-J0 

64 JS — 1.15 

7045 

6550 

Apr 

Mnv 

65 JO 
65 JO 

65 JO 
65 J0 

64 JO 
64.90 

64 J0 —1.00 
4480 —.60 


ESI. Soles 287* Prev. Sales 2007 
Prov. Dav Oaen Ini 9.146 ud 202 
HOGS fCMEJ 
30-000 lbs.- cents ner ID. 


54 J7 

44JS 

AUO 

*5.15 

4540 

•14.95 

45.07 

+.02 

51.75 

«J7 

Otl 

«J.75 

40.45 

1C 40 

4Q46 

+J* 

50.85 

*1.75 

d<?c 

42-25 

42-50 

419? 

42.17 

-J5 

50.47 

4X12 

Feb 

43-50 

4X40 

4320 

43.25 

—37 

*7J5 

41 10 

Apr 

41-25 

4IJ0 

41 JO 

41J7 

—33 

69.05 

4X23 

Jim 

4X60 

4X80 

4X50 

4X80 

+.2S 

49J5 

51.90 

44 JO 
4500 

Jul 

Aug 

44 JS 

44J5 

4425 

44J7 

43J0 

-.10 
— IS 


Etl. Sales *391 Prev Sales 5.9*4 
Prev-DovOoenlnl. 1 9408 uPl20 


GI^rellcy , Options | 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option A Strike 
Underlying Price Call*— Last 

Sep Dec Mar 

12308 British Poontfs-centf par uilf. 


Jaiv J5 


. PUIS— LOR 
Ses Dec Mar 


BPOuna 

1*0.95 

140.95 

140.95 

U0.9S 

140.95 

1*0.95 

140.95 

1*0.95 

140.95 


ion 

no 

ns 

{S 

IS 

140 

145 

150 


r 31JS 


16.10 

1140 


435 

445 

290 


1040 


4.15 


2S.W 
21 JO 
IS* 

1 1 JO 
6.70 
MQ 
130 

0.90 

SUM Canadian Dallart-ctnb per uni 
CDollr 71 r r 

7«J0 72 r r 

74JJ0 73 1.10 r 

74.00 74 037 r 

7*J0 75 0.17 r r 

433M West German Marta+cents oer unit. 


0.10 

030 


035 

034 

135 

175 


2. JO 
430 


*35 
7 JO 


032 

030 


0.18 

038 


□Mori. 

39 

r 

r 

r 

r 

aw 

36.78 

» 

5JK 

r 

r 

r 

r 

34.78 

31 

187 

08 

r 

0J3 

r 

34.78 

37 

299 

3A5 

2JQ 

ZM 

0.77 

MTS 

33 

201 

285 

r 

0.15 

r 

34.78 

34 

IX 

111 

r 

034 

0.78 

34 JB 

35 

069 

M3 

in 

OM 

125 

34 JB 

36 

0.40 

IM 

r 

r 

r 

36.78 

J7 

031 

0.7S 

r 

r 

5 

12X000 French Frmcs-lOths of g cent oer unit. 


F Franc 

110 

r 

f 

r 

0.95 

IM 

114.43 

115 

r 

Ml 

r 

r 

r 

6J5AH0 Jopanosp Yen-iontu of a cent per unit. 


JVen 

3? 

r 

4 94 

r 

r 

r 

4IJ0 

40 

1.98 

r 

r 

0 JOB 

01 fl 

*1 JO 

41 

r 

W7 

r 

r 

r 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE7 
37J0O lbs.- cents Per lb. 
150 70 177 JO Seo 

12935 
12830 
131.00 
13530 
13275 
138 JO 


150.40 
1*935 
140 JO 
148-00 
147 JO 
13800 
Esl. Sales 


134.75 134.99 133J5 13174 

Dec 137.7S 137JS \KJSQ 135-75 

Mar 13880 13880 1 37 JO 137 JO 

Mav 139 JO 139 J4 137 80 137-BO 


Jul 
Sep 
Dec 

Prev. Sales UJ22 


13845 

138J0 

13935 


—.13 
— JI 
+50 


Prev. DovOoen ml. ia,W ua**8 
SUGARWORLD II INYCSCEJ 
llTJOdlbs.. cents per lb. 


9.7S 

244 

Sen 

3J8 

X9Q 

X54 

190 

+J4 

•315 

2.74 

Oct 

170 

*30 

3.70 

4.13 

+A7 

7.75 

xoo 

Jan 

4J0 

4J7 

400 

4J7 

+A7 

•J3 

3J4 

Mar 

434 

469 

434 

469 

+50 

7.15 

3 J8 

Mav 

4A1 

4.70 

460 

4K 

+JO 

bJ.9 

X79 

Jul 

4AI 

SJ5 

4JI 

SJ5 

+J0 

508 

4J2 

Oct 

4JH 

535 

4J84 

5-25 

+J0 

Est. Sain 

Prev.Sato 87.141 





2096 
21 J9 
2162 
2186 


21*7 

2179 

an 

2271 

2239 

2264 


Prev. Day Open int. 98258 uplIJM 
COCOA (NYC5CE1 
10 metric lanvsaer ton 

2*15 1963 Sep 2100 2150 

707 1945 DK 21*7 2189 

2190 1955 Mar 2165 2205 

2200 I960 Mav 2186 2215 

21B0 I960 Jul 

2330 2073 Sra 

2235 2D 55 Dec 

Esl. Sales 1313 Prev. Sales 21.209 
Prev Day OPen Int. 2*522 UP1238 
ORANGE JUICE 1KYCE1 
15JOO lbs- cents per lb. 

1S2J0 I32J0 Sep I3SJ0 13650 13180 13*^ — 1J5 

181 JO 131435 Nov 13255 13235 131J0 131.20 —M0 

10000 179 AS Jon 12875 12875 12820 12820 — 1J5 

177.50 129-50 Mar 129 JO 12930 128 JO 12800 —IIS 

lfcTJO ljl.50 May 127-00 —130 

15750 14120 Jul 127 JO — 130 

Esi. Sales 700 prev. Sale* 163 
Prov. Day Open Int 5J*5 all 91 


Metals 


COPPER (COMBXI 
2SJ00 IDs.- cenlsper lb. 


B8JS 

59 JO 

57 JO 
58 AS 

Jul 

6270 

6195 

62-70 

6240 

6X50 

+40 

♦45 

8210 

57 JO 

Sap 

6X10 


42-75 

62J0 

+40 

84 JS 
8420 

58 JO 
99 A0 

Dec 

Jon 

6430 

84*0 

6340 

6X90 

6410 

a 

90 JC 

59 A0 

Mar 

64.70 

45.10 

6435 

64A0 

+.15 

7400 

61.10 

MOV 

64J5 

65J5 

65J0 

65.00 

+.15 

7440 

61.30 

Jul 

65AS 

45.45 

65J5 

6540 

+.15 

711.90 

6*30 

Sep 

6635 

64-25 

6635 

65JS 

+.10 

70 JO 6X75 

70.20 4SJ0 

67.90 ' 45.45 

Esl. soles 

Dec 6640 6640 
Jan 

Mor 

Men 

Prev. Sales 64*9 

6440 

6AJ0 

6445 

64.75 

67.10 

+J5 

-as 

—.10 


Prev. Dav Open Inr. 79.777 oH265 


ALUMINUM (COM EX1 
*0000 ibs.- cents per in. 


59*0 


<3.15 


74J0 

7040 

7630 

7340 

66.75 

4345 

5110 


4390 
*4.90 
51 7S 
*635 
S3.95 

AS 


Esl. Sales Prgv. Sates 149 

Prev. Dav Open int. 1+77 gff*0 
SILVER (COMEXI 
SJ00 irovoi- cenisaer Irovax. 


Jul 

Aw 

4*40 

6450 

4440 

4440 

4460 

+30 

+30 

sen 

44.90 

45.90 

4485 

4445 


Doc 

Jon 

45.90 

46J0 

4SJ0 

4540 

48.10 

+J0 

+30 

Mar 

MOV 

JUl 

seo 

Doc 

Jon 

MOT 

MOV 

4645 

4645 

4645 

48.7S 
4745 
48.15 
4845 
49.90 
S0J5 
so.95 
51 AS 

+30 

+JO 

+.70 

+J0 

+J0 

+J0 

+30 

+30 


146IJ 
#21 J 

563 0 
603A 

Jul 

Aug 

6120 

6145 

6090 

409J 

NN4 

+14 

+1J 

H83J 

5730 


617.0 

617J 

910J 

6140 

+14 

I«0J 

5V0J 

Ooc 

6300 

630.0 

*22J 

6264 

+TJ 

171X0 

5950 

Jan 

63X0 

6330 

63X0 

6310 

+IJ 

ic*ao 

6070 

*710 

Mar 

MOV 

642J 

642-0 

*3SJ 

#J9J 

#404 

+1J 

945.0 

•woa 

6330 

6610 

Jul 

Stop 

6S9J 

661.0 

659J 

#504 

66BJ 

+U 

+U 

799J 

TWO 

6400 

67BJ 

Dec 

Jan 

605J 

687.0 

685J 

6840 

6894 

+1J 

+1J 

770.0 

4770 

Mar 

70X0 

7030 

70X0 

700.7 

+u 

7170 

*930 

Mar 

715J 

7I5J 

71X0 

7110 


ESI. Sain 

Prev. Sales 15.197 





Prov. Day Open Ini. 70223 up36* 

PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 Iro v ot ■ aoi lor soor irov o* 

44930 241 J0 Jul Z72J0 274 JO 272J0 27350 

J93J0 250 JO Oct 274.00 37500 371 JO 27*00 

37330 25730 Jan 77930 77930 27630 278J0 

37950 7o4 30 Apr 28130 28150 28130 38L20 

302 JO 27100 Jul 26830 

Esl. Salas Prev. Sales 1J15 

Prev. Dav Open ml. IIJ7t off 233 


+40 

+Jfl 

+40 

+40 

+.60 


PALLADIUM (NYME! 

100 irov a:- dollars per oz 
141.75 9030 Seo 

14150 91 JO Dec 

132SQ 91 70 Mor 

114.00 9130 'Jun 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 

Prev. DovOoen mi. 6330 all 65 


9425 

9430 

953O 


94.95 

•SJO 

9S.T5 


7425 

9*50 

9SJ0 


94A5 

9*85 

95 IS 
9530 


+JS 
— J5 
-.05 

— as 


GOLD (COMEX) 

100 irov o:.- dollars per irov o:. 
32830 309 jo jul 

?9|J0 
71530 
79700 
301 JO 
306 JO 
314 70 
M0-S0 
DlOO 
moo 
3*2.00 
BUD 


485J0 

31830 

*9100 

#8»50 

*9530 
496M 
*15.70 
438*0 
395 70 
39100 
372.00 
Esi. Sales 


Prev. Dor Ooenlnl.l3jj19 up932 


3I9J0 

Aug 31970 320*0 VtJO 31930 

Sep 31030 320J0 31850 321+0 

Oel 323.10 32190 320.00 373J0 

Dec 327.70 »7.W 333J9 327.20 

Feb 33250 JJ2J0 33870 331 50 

Apr 335.70 334*0 335.70 335.70 

Jun 33890 319 JO 33890 348JQ 

Aua 1+5.70 34870 345.70 34830 

Oel MOJO 350 JO 350 JQ 350*0 

Dec 35850 1S5L50 35850 355. hj 

Apr 366 JO 366.00 36*00 364.70 

Prev Sales 2X74? 


+A0 

+J0 

+30 

+30 

*X 

+30 

+J0 

+20 

+30 

+X 

+20 

+20 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMMI 
SI million- ersof 100 pci. 


9X33 

54.94 

Sap 

9270 

•242 

9270 

9240 

+07 

9107 

85 77 

Dec 

92J8 

92J1 

9238 

9248 

+07 

9259 

58.60 

Mar 

9305 

9214 

9704 

9112 

+08 

9138 

87 01 

Jun 

91.71 

91.73 

9UI 

91.78 

+.08 

9201 

8X00 

5eo 

909 

91.43 

909 

9147 

+.07 

91.75 

89.05 

Dec 

91.11 

91.14 

91.11 

9130 

+09 

9139 

50.93 

&S» 

9093 

Midi 

Jun 

90A5 

9085 

9085 

90.95 
90 72 

+J» 

+.06 


4.731 prev Safes 89*s 
Prev. Oa, Open InL 37,78* oil *0' 

ID YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

SlOOJOO pr.n- Pi:- A 3?nas ol 100 PCI 


*1 JO 
41 JO 
*1 JO 


4* 


0.10 


1.06 

0.70 


059 


42500 Swiss Froncs-cenf s Per unit. 


SFronc 
*7j3 
*7*3 
*7A2 
*163 
*243 
4203 

Total call vgl. 

Total put vot. 


4J3 

350 


6J0 


WM 


140 

0J9 

053 

11.6*0 

*489 


190 


ITS 

IJ3 


031 

063 


Call oaen Int. 
Put open inr. 


r— Nat traded, s— No option nliered. a— Old. 
LbsI % premium I our chose at it el. 

Source: OP. 


179.148 

124234 


86-71 

75-18 

bco 

84-70 

M7S 

84-11 

84-20 

07-13 

:>-i3 

Dec 

&J-20 

83-21 

83-13 

M- 18 

66-7 

25-7 

8+4 

8X11 

75- 16 

74-10 

01-3 

80 19 

Mor 

Jun 

Sen 

Dec 

97 22 

82 22 

37-19 

82-19 

8124 

01-t 

sail 


esl Sale-. 


Prev Sales I0J1* 


Prev Du * Open Ini. iUU up 1*52 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

18 ns'-1 IQOJOO-nis & JIndsol IDOdCII 


TP-IJ 

■I!) 

.■7.?V 

»Vb 

75 31 

74 34 

/4-IS 

7*76 


1 10 

S/8 

i?I 

56-79 

46-19 

44-75 


% : 


Sop 

Doe 

Mar 

fun 

SCO 

ChX 

Mar 

JU-1 

Jrio 


75-1 4 

74-12 

73-13 

92-17 

71-7S 

71 I 

70-14 

6927 


75-18 

7J-14 

73- IB 

7IX 

7126 

71-4 

JO- 17 

70 


75-6 

74-4 

73-6 

7711 

71-17 

79-79 

»IJ 

69-26 


75-13 

-74-11 

73-12 

n % 
7I2J 
71 

70-17 

6«?* 

69-9 


—7 


-0 

—9 

-10 

-11 

-17 


Season saasar 
High Low 


Open High Law Ciese Chg. 


72-18 63-2* Dec 

49-16 4S-4 Mor 

Esl. Sole# Prev.5alesi47.lD7 

Prev. Oav Open inrJ19JS8 up 1858 
GNMA (CBT} 

SI OdJOO prip- pts A 32ndi of 100 PCt 
77-76 5*12 Sep 74-30 75 

76-28 59-4 Dec 7+8 7*8 

7&4 58-31 Mar 

75-17 58-25 Jun 

75-2 65 Sep 

em. Solos Prev. sales 502 

Prev. Day Oaen Ini. *576 up 151 
CERT. DEPOSIT (1MM) 

SI million- pts of 100 net 


68 - 2 $ 

48-10 


—13 

—14 


7+71 

74 


7+a 

74-4 

73-14 

77-30 

72-11 


92.7* 

92J7 

,% 5 

91.15 

9U3 

89.91 

ESI. Soles 


85.00 

6534 

mi 

8820 


Sep 

Dec 

Mor 

US 

DK 

Mor 


92JS 

9159 


92.13 

9159 


92JI 
91 59 


92.12 
9159 
• L2* 

90 J* 

90*a 
70.15 
•9 AS 


9159 

9126 

9844 

90.08 

8*26 

8945 

89.16 


9129 
9U4 
98*2 
9852 
981* 
*9 S3 
■952 
9933 


100 prav. Soles 309 

Prev. Oav Open Int. 3414 up 34 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mllHort-otSof lOOPCt. 

924$ 8*53 Sea 91J2 91 JI 

92.00 8*80 Dec 91 JI 9 US 

9156 14.10 MO r 9088 90.94 

91.1$ 8631 Jun 90.47 90 53 

9034 07 J6 Sep 9811 9816 

9053 0728 DOC 8936 I9A4 

9823 87*4 Mar 09 #5 8950 

89.9$ *9.19 Jun >9.16 89.16 

Est. Soles 38J82 Prov. Sales 31711 

Prev.Doy Open Int. 12*636 up 1*30 

BRITISH POUNO (IMMI 
5 per pound- 1 point equals SOJaoi 
1.445b 1.0200 Sep 1A025 1-4070 1J930 M020 

1.40*0 1-0200 Dec 1-3940 1J9T0 1JS4S TJ92S 

U915 1J4S0 Mor 1J84S 1JB40 1JM5 UW3 

1J79S 1.1905 Jun IJ790 

Esl. Sales 10-456 Prev. Soles 10J90 
Prev. Oav Open Int. «2A33 up 112 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

$ per air- 1 point eeuoliUJOOl 
7585 .7025 Seo 7401 .7403 .7385 .7386 

7546 .7006 Dec 737D 7070 7370 .7367 

.7504 JWl Mar .7355 .7355 7355 7349 

7360 3070 Jun .7350 7150 .7350 .7337 

Esl. Sales 1.107 Prev. Soles 1J7* 

Prev. Day Open Int. *325 up 90 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

»per franc- 1 calm eauoisSUWOOi 
.11500 J9680 Sea .11425 

.11*05 -0*670 Dee .11375 

EM. Sales Prev. Sale* 

Prev. Oav Open int. 39* 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 
spot murk- 1 aatntoaualsMJnoi 
-3555 3930 Seo 3503 3514 J4B7 J493 

-3610 7971 Dec J534 4542 4514 4522 

7599 J040 Mar JS45 4570 4545 4552 

4633 4333 jun _ 45*4 

ESI. Sales 244*5 Prev. Soles 2eJS7 
Prev.Dov Open Ini. 5*470 up 2.105 
JAPANESE YEN t)MM) 
soar ven- 1 ooinl eauols SHJ0OOO1 
J04768 3X0870 S*P J04187 J04203 J04178 J0H86 

004350 J03905 D«C 37X211 JXM221 37X302 3)04209 

004307 3X14035 Mar 3XJ4237 37X229 JQ4237 J042J1 

Est. Sales 7.77* Prov.Sales 844$ 

Prev. Oav Open ini. 31441 oW 155 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Spcr franc- 1 oolnl cauals $80001 
AtOD 44H) SeP .4390 .4098 aTSS 4279 

-OM) 4531 Dee A323 4333 4392 4314 
4383 4835 Mar 4354 

Est. Sain 26JIJ Prev. Soles 24497 

Prev. Oar Open fnl. 31474 up$59 


+338 

+337 

+337 

+337 

+337 

♦337 

+.07 


+336 

+337 

♦J7 

+337 

+J» 

+J7 


+25 

+30 

+25 

+25 


+1 

+J 


industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

1303)00 bd. ll.-iperlJ0blxl.tl. 

19740 13540 Sap 12940 139.90 13740 13840 —240 

386.10 137 JO Nov 139.90 U0.9C 13840 13940 

187.00 14*60 Jan 146.70 1474a 1*540 imao 

195.00 150330 Mar 15340 15*00 153.00 15170 

376.40 15100 May 15740 15840 157 JO 157+0 

1833)0 168.00 Jul 16100 36540 TAUX 16440 

17AM 171 JO Sep 166373 166.00 166330 16800 

Est. Soles Prev. Sales 2.77* 

Prev. Dav Open int. 84*9 atf 87 


8 6 I CEE 

$516 15% I CHs 
1 2ft ICO 
4 216 I PM 

17% 6*6 IRTCpn 
96 i-4 HnaGo 

Tft I'm Imalntt 
40ft 25% ImpOllg 1AO 


JSr TjO 


II 

10 

313 


IcnpGe .lie *5 


13ft 6% inltght 
22% 11 Insltns 
Sft lft Instsv 
7V6 insSvpf 

6% IntCtVQ 
lift Irthnk 

3ft IruBknt 

+4 IntBkwt 

6% IrRHvd 
8ft IIP 
3% intPwr 
lft IfHProt 
6 Intseow 
6 Inrmrn 
• inThrpf 
22ft 12ft ionics s 
<1 11*6 IrgaBrd 

4Vi 2ft isofy 


Jtt 

17% 

)l 

Aft 

1% 

17% 

1176 

7% 

4ft 

9 

1M» 

10ft 


12 

40 .9 86 

4H 9J 
A0 

.T3 J 


14 7 6% 6%— % 

231 501. 49% 49ft 
62 3% 3V» 3% 

27 2% 2% 316 

69 17*6 1716 17J6 + ft 
637 7. 3% 2~» + N 

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287 tft lft lft 

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13 Sft Lournn 22 

27ft 21% LearPP U0 134 


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39% 24% Larbnr 
16% 9% Lome* 

14% 4% LundyE 
16 9% Lurlo 

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29% 18 Matrix 1 It 

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17% 17% 17ft 
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17% lift NPtnRt 
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6ft 41* NewBE 
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83 14% 14 1416 + ft 

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a-« a, 

M. 9ft 

2'i 7*6 


1C‘S 

17 


Z5 7ft 


23 ft 
9% 

S'-y 


4ft 


24% 

13'. 

15% 

lift 

flft 

fl 

2% 

31a 

Uft 


i% UNA 
2 U5R Ina 
8% Ultima 
8 . unlcswl 
tl'y UniCPPf 
8% Unimrn 
IS 1 -: UAirPd 


.71 S3 
.*ie 9 : 

J4p r 


16% unCcreF * SC it H 


1% U Food A 
ift UFoodB 
10% UtMed 
flft Id: USAGwt 
8% Sft Unilei 4 
14% 8% UirvCm 

10% 5% UntvRl 
21% 15% UMvRu 
15ft 9% unvPat 


10 

1*3 

17 

155 


13 

19 

AM 45 19 


1ft Ift 1«~ . 
7 ft 2% Tft 

12 lift lift 1 ^ 
l"i 11 lltl - , 
14% i,% left— . 
'■tr y 'O'. 176 9 , 
7* 22ft flft 

13 * 17 - . 

(ft (% Tft 

lft 1% Tft * , 

:s •* ft 15 + . 

!■'•: i«ft l+.-l- 
“rj T% 

I*'. 10ft IV6 - h 
7% »ft 7 
17% I 'ft 17ft— . 
13 ’J 13'. Uft + 6 


.400 2J 10 


lO'.y 9% vST n .Me 3.0 
18% 11% VallrRs 140 7J |l 
27% 17% Vaigarg 44 IJ 16 
8% 2% Verll 
ZP6 15% VIAmC 
6% 3% VtRyn 
1**6 Vft vemli 

6% 2% Vartple 
V Sly vlcon 
64 '6 53% ValMt 
12% 8 vamex 
19% IJly vulcCP 


JO 1 9 17 


12 13 
4J 11 


10' a 1C 10 
IS IT", If, 

2’ 26 "1 I6ft- , 

6'J 8'. »'--•! 

I 'ft 17% (7%_ , 

,% «% 4% — 1 

10ft >?% * - 

4% 4'. 

6"> 6' s 6-1 - 

•a--* ia-* er* 

10% 10% Uft 
lift 18ft 18% * 




w 


IS 7t 
40 15 15 in 
JCe 1 9 9 16 

.16 • 12 J«9 

11 J 12 37 


.96 A 
1.17 6 1 
.16 1.4 


.02* .1 23 
.14 3J • 
.021 


8 5% WTC 

28% 18% waioor 

16% IOVj Wales 
31% 15 WOnaB 
32*ft MJ6 wonac 
1% »• *m C wl 

11% 3% W*hH s 
1M Wft WshPil 
I9*e 13 WRIT* 
lift FftwaiscB 
5% j% ww re 
arUun 
Jig lv. wetcar 
17% 11% wed'en 
6Vk 3% Welman 
10ft 7 WeldTo 

14 7% Wetotrn 

10% 4% W9IICO 

4% 1'* WelGrd 

29>i 16% Weseo 

iiy % we*pcc 

18% 61? WsIBrC 

8% WMOr g 
5% WDtglll 
7% WTHUhn 
21ft IS*# WIRET 154 

13% 58k WstSL 5 

30% 11*6 wnenls 

5% 7ft Wichita 

13% 10% Wiener n ao 

13% r« WIIICXG j 

flft 19% Wlnlln r-74 108 

4ft 2% Wolf H 8 -10e 3.1 23 

10% 8 wastrm JO 43 10 

17 11 WkWear 52 11 7 

Si? 2% WwdeE 194 

T7H 13% WWdC Dl 180 1X2 
34 16% Worfhn .251 

21% 12 Wrafhr 02 .1 
1216 3% WrgtHg JSe 42 


012 

17 

433 

I 

a 

*3 

15 


-82 Zl 9 


11% 

1J16 

ZJft 


JO 


IG 
11 
21 
19 
76 16 


34 


5% S': J— 

76'. 36 ft 76ft + . 

1# 16 16 t , 

l“% Uft 17% 4 + 

17% U% I? - •: 

S'. . % 

64 9ft 9'. 9ft - 

02 121 '.X II*' . 170'. -I - 
41 1*% 19ft 19 'J 

0 lift 11 , II -f ♦ ft 

J-. ?% X.- 1 

•lft 9% 9ft 

r. -.ft Vft 
14ft 55ft I6'x— 1« 

4% 4% 4% 

8ft a oft 

lift 1'H 11% 

•ft 9ft 9ft + 

j-* 2ft r. 

29 28ft 39 +% 

lft 1 lft ♦ ■* 

eft *% 

10 9ft 9ft- ft 

13% 13% 13% - II 

79 17". 17'j 18ft 4 .} 

43 20' j 20ft 20% 

95 *3% iVt ll%-% 
34 J7-". 77% 27ft + ft 
SO 3% 3 3% 4 -, 

10 Uft Uft Uft 

K ir.: 17% 12% 

Tex flft 20ft 70*. 

4 Sft 3% 3% + i 

2 9% 9% 9%-ft 

66 17 ft Uft 17 4 ': 

IM 3«fc 3% 3-ft 

34 Uft 1**6 14*. 

17 M% 18% 18 ft 

48 20ft 19ft 2C — ft 

727 12% 121. 171'.- + % 


9 

71 

37 

730 


11% 5% YanXCo 


u si r-y 7% s * + 


10ft 3 zimer .10 1.9 


44 5‘. 


The Daily Source lor 
Intetnationai Investors. 





—140 
— Z0Q 
— 7-40 
—240 
—150 


COTTON 11NYCE) 
50000 ibe.- cent* per 10. 
7750 5940 Oct 

73.00 5940 Dec 

PtJS 60.00 Mor 

70JO 59 JS MOV 

70J5 5940 Jul 

6550 54 JO Oct 

59 25 5355 Dec 


40-50 
40.45 
6l JO 
60J0 
99.90 
54 JS 
5A10 


40 AS 
40.75 
61-70 
61.05 

5SJ0 

SJJ0 


Est. Soles Prov.Sales 27*4 

Prev. Dav Open ini. IBJ02 Dll 289 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42000 gal- cants par oaf 


60.15 
60.10 
40-75 
60X0 
59 JO 
54.7S 
S4J5 


40.72 
4048 
61 JO 
41 J0 

40.15 
55-00 

54.15 


+.17 

+J4 

—.10 

+J0 

+.15 

+32 

+JS 


7SJ0 

6605 


69.10 

70.70 

68.90 

70 JS 

+TJ1 

76.45 

66.90 


7000 

71 A0 

6900 

7136 

+1JM 









74J5 

48-50 

NOV 

7145 

7X15 

7105 

7245 

+45 

7825 

69.15 

Dec 

72A0 

7X70 

7230 

7X60 

+44 

76.90 

6940 


72.90 

7*45 

7200 

7X90 

+A5 

7X90 

7X00 

7*00 

III 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

7190 

7X35 

7200 

73-30 
7100 
69JD 
61 JO 

+A2 

+65 

+AS 

+48 

Esl. Sales 

Prev. Soles 8AZ4 





Prev. Oov Open mt. 2I.9S6 oft5S2 


CRUDE OIL (NYME] 
IJOO D0I- dollars oer bbl. 
29-50 24 JB Sea 

2450 24-45 OCI 

2950 2140 Nov 

2950 2X90 Dee 

79,50 3438 Jan 

39.46 24JS Feb 

39.45 24.13 Mar 

29.45 im Aor 

27.96 5165 May 

3 7 JO 24J0 Sep 


27J0 

36J7 

2632 

25J5 
2155 
2530 
75 M 
2LBQ 
7445 
24.10 


7745 
26.91 
2L4* 
24 07 
3SJ0 
25.50 
25.15 
24.95 
2435 
7435 


Esl. Sales Frev.Sole* auu 

Prev Dorr Ooen Ini. SU17 efi IJ63 


27,15 

2638 

24.H 

25,75 

25J0 

2530 

25.00 

34J& 

3444 

74.10 


2738 

263* 

2635 

26.02 

5535 

25.50 

25.10 

34.95 

24.75 

2442 


+J4 

+JI 

+.15 

+.17 

+.15 

—J2 

+34 

+J3 

+j; 


Cammoclities 


JWt2S 


Prey too* 


HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UJJwroapca 

Clou 

Hfgfi Law Bit! Ask Bid 
Jly _ N-T. N.T. 31 9 JO El JO 318J0 320 JO 
AU0 _ N.Y. N.T. 319.00 321 JO 318J0 EOJO 
Sec _ N.Y. N.T. 331 JO 323J0 32UJ0 322J0 
Oct — 32100 3Z3JC JZ3J0 32SJ0 32ZJ0 374J0 
Dec ~ 32830 J2S30 327 JO 32900 3SLJ0 338J0 
Feb - N.T. N.T. 331 JO 333J0 330J0 3XL00 
API _ N.T. N.T. 336J0 33&00 335.00 337 JO 
Jun— N.Y. N.T. 340J0 3<3J0 340JO 34X00 

volume: Stofs of 100 a t 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
ILMl 


KJab 

319J0 

N.T. 

K.T. 

N.T. 


Prev. 

Law Settle 
27950 31 9 JO 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


327.10 


Settle 

319.10 

320.90 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
MoJorsicn cants per kUe 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMS I 
paints and cents 

I9BJ0 140 Jo Sep 192J0 193-00 1*1.95 19280 

20085 175.78 Dec 195J0 195 JO 1MJ5 19555 

20X7) 190.10 Mor 19BJS 19835 198.15 I98J5 

30LOT 200 JM Jun 201 Sfi 

Esl. Soles 57.HS Pf tv. Salts 71270 
Prgv. Dav opon Ini. 61 J2I aH 3J63 

VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

21120 10575 Sep 206.75 207 JO 205.9D 307.10 

17J5 200JM Dec 210J0 711.10 209J5 31075 

Esl. Soles Prev. Spies BJB72 

Prov. Oav Open im. 11.99* aW790 


+,« 

+JB 

+5 

+.90 


+1.10 

+150 


NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYFEJ 
pomrs and cents 

11885 9US Sap 11170 11270 111J5 Il2j0 

11770 10170 Dec 11 US 11400 111*0 11X75 

11875 10830 Mbr tl&SO 11SJC llSJO USJD 

120 JO 11650 Jun 11730 117J0 U7J0 11775 

Esl. Soles 11789 Prev. Sain 15450 
Prev. Dav Qamlnt 12J84 0(1344 


+5? 

+45 

+45 

+45 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody’s. 


Reuters 


OJ. Futures. 


Close 

9oo.ro r 

1M.90 

115.13 

22Z30 


Com. Research Bureau. 

Moody’S : base JM : Dec. 31. 1931- 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : ease i00 : Seo. is, 1931. 
Dow Jones ; base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 
900.70 f 
1.681.90 
115.00 
22150 


Aug. 

Seo. 

Oct. 


Nov , 

Dec. 


BM 
191 JO 
1WM 
19150 
19250 
19130 


Volume: 10 tots. 


Ask 

19145 

1«LS0 

19250 


Prewlam 
Bid ASA 
19)50 172J0 
1TOJM WL25 
19X00 193J0 

173J0 19SJG 
1WJ0 1WJ0 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Slogapere cents perkho 


RSS 1 Aug_ 
R5S 1 Sep_ 
RSS 2 Aug _ 
RSS 3 Aug_ 
RSS 4 Aug. 
RSS3 Aug_ 


BH 

17145 

14X00 

15350 

15X00 


17150 

16975 

I6&0Q 

18X00 

160J0 

IS&OO 


Preview 
M Ask 
17140 1714$ 

169 J0 189 50 

184 Jo I45J0 
T£M 18X00 
1S8J0 14000 

13X00 JS5J0 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Metoyglaa rfmHaPwSS tans 

Bid Aik 

Aug « 0 950 

5*0 890 936 

Del — 990 930 

Nov 8£fl 9M 

Dec 810 910 

Jan - 860 TO 

Mar 860 900 


Preview* 
Bid 


900 

m 

890 


Mav 

Jlv. 


840 




Volume: 0 lots ot25 ton*. 
Source; tinders. 


870 

MO 

M0 

830 

M 


950 

930 

930 

929 

TO 

900 

900 

B9D 

TO 


To Our Readers 


The S & P 100 index options 
were not available in (his editon 


because ol transmission delays. 


Ijondon iYletals 


JufySS 


BM 


CtoW 

BH Ask 
ALUMINUM ^ 

Shrrllng per metric fen 
*POt nun 719m T14J0 71M0 

Mrwan) 741 JO 74150 739 JO 73SSD 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Sterling per metric (oa 
SPOI _ 1J95J0 1.10QJO IJ8X00 1JS5J0 

forward 1J77J0 1J78J0 1J71J0 1J7Z0D 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

ShrrHng pw mstrteton 


1J4QJ0 1J45J0 1J33U00 1J38J0 
■■■LMOJO 1J49J0 1J52J0 


1J88J0 U 


forward 
LEAD 

srarRag per metric IM 
Spot 290J0 291 JO 

forward 29750 29BJR 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric ton 
spat 340SJO 341SJ0 3A30J0 X840J0 

forward 35SOO0 344000 34B0JO 3490J0 

SILVER 


298JB 


42950 

44250 


431J0 


43200 

445J0 


43050 
443J0 

TIN (Standard) 

Storting per metric %n 

5SL™ SlffiSSIIS 

ZINC 

Starling per metric ten 

spot 54100 944J0 $54 JO SSJ0 

forward S3750 S38JD SOJO S4SJ0 

Jourep.- AP. 


j Dnitonb 


CampoDT 


J*W 25 

Per Amt Pay Rec 
USUAL 


AMP Inc 

Anwr indent Find 
DuPont 
Eaton Corn 
Elec Cord Am*c 
Engraah ine 
Georg lo-Pod He 
Hughes Tael 
Inland Steel 
jonnoch LW 
MhnesofoP&L 

Natl Med. Enterar* 
Newman) Mining 

Outboard Marina 

Pan Amertcm Bks 
Panhandle Eastern 
BjSWttllrWjgriaa 
sncYT intwsrnta 

Trortawgrid Carp 



a> Annual; M-Moptm „ G^uortertr; s-ScbL 
miwh, 


Source; up/. 


China Sets Surcharge 


Reuters 

HONG KONG - China im- 
posed a 15- percent surcharge on 
imported ears and other motor ve- 
hicles effective July 16, according 
to a newspaper report here Thurs- 
day. 



Uj 25 


High Low BM 

SUGAR 

FraocR traocs per metric ton 
Oct 1422 1405 1410 

Dec N.T. H.T. 1415 

Mar 1461 1445 1449 

May N.T. N.T. 1478 

Aua N.T. N.T. MU 

Oct NX .N.T. 1347 


AM Otto 


\x& 

1® 

X 


+ 14 
+ 11 
+ 7 
+8 
+ 1 
+ 11 


Eat. vgL: 438 lots of 50 Ions. Prev. actual 
solo*: 372 let*. Open bitarew: 18458 
COCOA 

French franc* per 100 kg 

Jlv N.T. N.T. — Z2S0 UROL 

§£ US 3SS %% IS “Sk 

SS It?: a* US ^u„Sf 

_ Si: Si: 3S - K 

COFFEE 

Premh trone* per 180 kg 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 1440 1410 +80 

Sea 1AM 1JW U2i 1/25 +S 

Nov 1.905 TJ55 U05 1J9S +75 

Jpn N.T. N.T. 1.900 1.980 + 60 

Mar N.T, N.T. 1J4S 1.990 + 70 

T K S* 1% = ti 

73^iTSi2S£!^? , 5S PwortM ' 

Source: Bourse ao Commerce. 


foci 

Dec 

Mor 

!Ator 

Aag 

Oct 


DMRSurs 

Options 


nr. German Mert-HUX mono, arts per mat 


Mi 25 




s 

M 

o.a 

0J6 


242 

W2 

138 

095 

m 

843 


VQ 

1.93 

148 

i.n 

055 


, Mwn 

SSI Bf 

077 
1.11 
170 


U4 

074 

U4 

118 


15* 

143 

m 


BstfmaM total «oL 4JQI 
Cota; WedvsLXSa mee M. 38057 
W» : WML vsL 2533 Ml W. 22533 
Source: CMS. 


Shultz Meets Mexican Aide 

L'aaeil Pros fnlffnantoial 

Washington — secretary of 



commodity and imt! 
Coffee 4 Santas. Ib_ 


July So 

Tbb M 

— 145 144 

Prinidath *4/30 38 la. yd _ dlm BJl 

Steel billets CPltt.l. ton <7jje 4714* 

iron 2 Fdry. Philo, ion 213M J!X» 

Sfovl scrap No 1 hw Pltr. _ 70-71 9M5 

Lead Snot. IB Z 1P71 JW* 

CCPPVT rttn.lh It-n IM 

Tin fStrallsl.lh -.. _ 63)82 UJS* 

2KJC. E. St. L. Basis. lb 041^47 158.1 

P allodium, o: ’ ~ 


Sliver N.Y. or . 

Source: AP. 


9S-97 MM?' 

— - 859 1-31 


Ijondon 

Commodities 


JsJt 23 

Ctoi# Prevwa 

sugar" 1 ** w b * au b " *“ 
Sicrilna pw metric tea 
]Aog 104-00 99 J0 70540 104JC 98J0 tOOM 
11540 104JO 11540 11860 10X90 WJ 
11850 10730 11840 119JJ0 7 07 JO Wg 
'<!•* 128.40 12850 11450 
12X00 121 XO 13140 1JZM 13041 12M® 
12540 12540 13526 1)850 12440 1244J 
148 JO 131.40 140 JO 14"> JO 12980 129*9 

volume: 3457 lots ot 50 tons. 

Cocoa 

Starting per metric ton 


Jlv 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 


1367 1945 !7» i7if ITS* 1 Jfl 
1708 1585 1597 1730 1702 UW 
l APS 1574 1588 I58« I5°l 
1.70S 158S 159* 1407 1499 IJM 
1717 17172 1711 1712 1.714 lull 
» 1,730 1730 1,777 1.7?) I.-® 

ip 1738 1.737 1738 1740 IJ*? 1J» 

Volume: 4484 tors of 10 ton*. 

COFFEE 

Sterna* per metric tea 


Jan 

Mar 


Jly 


1.530 -.388 15M IJQ2 1480 15«. 

l3n 150s 1533 :ju I$fl l^ -*» 
1415 1565 1577 1528 15^ 1« 
1452 1400 1415 1418 l5» 14 
I4B0 1445 144$ 1550 1545 li£ 

1725 159S 1490 1700 1470 U£ 

1JSS 1730 r.rto ITS 1715 w* 
Volume: 5722 tot; ol 5 lens. 

GASOIL 

UJS. dollar* nee metric Ion 
A no 22150 E 3M S3.50 2Zl?i 2:155 rig 
2J® tojw 730SS raja naa»S 

221.25 219.75 223J0 221/0 22533 HKS 
25230 X2Z 7?2JK 7753) 2ZL50 OJ> 
2347S 2S4J0 2H3D 77*25 7U.OO »+* 
N.T. N T. 575115 22LM 52250 , 

H.T. N.T. 272 JO 225 tn 51670 Htg 1 
N.T. N.T. 3i:» 23000 3K»mg 
N.T. N.f. 20800 71830 50000 
Volume; 1499 Wscf 1* Saw 
Source*; Reuter j trvJ Lemon Potro'Aua tr 
chcpge locteir 


Dee 

Jon 

Fca 

Mor 

API 


” rvatiLiYkj 1 un — accreiary W l - -■ ■ — — — j 

Stare George Raioliz of the Unit- U 'jmKjiin Rife 
ed States flew Thursday to Mexico 1 OtIO J 

for his annual meeting with For- j 


meeting 

eign Minister Bernardo Sepulveda 
Amor and to set iro a meeting be- 
tween President Ronald Reagan 
and President Migud de la Madrid. 
No date he been set for that meet- 
ing. 


Mr S3 


ontr 


M 


Xrnonts 
VmonR! ‘ 
OfWYtor 


?.17 

rr 

u i 


r»M 
rts 7J» 
IX 

74 ! 191 


YttK 

7Ji 

: 7 JT? 

• •*: 


SnwSrtrednSm 


r 4 




— 

1 
















































Ki 



i * ■. 
. -■*- 

. if 


‘ *,■ 
< v. 
'*iv 


r-. 
V . 
•-1 




. . I» • 

* s»- 

V?. 

mi* 

iii *i 
. • !• 
>» 
*r. 
. r-A 




. .»• 

i-r ft 
-t =.- 


The 



** 


UNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


Page 15 


Ecuador Plays the Role of Maverick for OPEC 


By Bob Hagertv 

International Herald TriPvne 

GENEVA — Most ministers 
swept into this week’s OPEC meet* 
ins with an ego-inflating retinue of 
aides, bodyguards and lackeys. 
Fernando Santos Alvite of Ecua- 
dor flew in alooe from Quito — and 
he flew tourist class. 

Mr. Santos, who is deputy minis- 
ter of energy and natural resources, 
explained m an interview that the 
minis ter was occupied and another 
regular delegate was ilL 

In any case, he said. Ecuador's 
president had deckled that the 
country’s austerity program only 
allowed for sending only otae or 
two delegates. 

To All a few of the chairs allotted 
to Ecuador, Mr. Santos borrowed 
three staff members from his coun- 
try's embassy here. 

As its small delegation suggests. 


Ecuador is marginal in the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries. Only one member or the 
organization, Gabon, produces less 
oil. ’ 

But Ecuador has been singled 
out for breaking OPEC rules, and 
the country's problems illustrate 
why the group is unable to dictate 
prices to (he market: No country is 
reedy to subordinate its own inter- 
ests to those of OPEC. 

Last spring, Mr. Santas acknowl- 
edged, Ecuador received a “polite” 
letter from OPECs executive coun- 
cil remonstrating with the country 
for producing cm at abom 280.000 
barrels a day, nearly 100,000 bar- 
rels above its quota. (Several other 
members, received similar letters, 
Mr. Santos said.) 

Ecuador politely replied that it 
was not really breaking the rules 
because it accepted a reduction in 


its quota last October only on the 
condition that economic condi- 
tions permitted it to make such a 
move. They have not, Mr. Santos 
said. 

Nonetheless, Ecuador reduced 
its output in July to about 250,000 
barrels. The idea was to show soli- 
darity with OPEC, Mr. Santos said. 
Then, too, he allowed, buyers were 
holding off in the hope of lower 
prices. 

Ecuador has formally requested 
a larger quota. But Mr. Santos said 
it would nave lobe granted retroac- 
tively, because on Aug. 1 the coun- 
try intends to raise its production 
back to 280,000 without wailing for 
OPEC’s approval 

The amount by which Ecuador is 
deemed to be ovraproduring “has 
no impact whatsoever on the [glob- 
al] market,'’ said Mr. Santos, a law- 
yer. “But for us it is a v i tal necessi- 
ty" 


Ecuador is struggling to service 
foreign, debts totaling more than S8 
billion. The country has a popula- 
tion of about 9 million, compared 
with Sandi Arabia's ID million. 

Even though the Saudis are pro- 
ducing less than a quarter of their 
peak level, however, their oil out- 
put is stUl about 10 times that of 
Ecuador. 

Last spring, there was some talk 
within OPEC of expelling Ecuador 
for overproducing. 

Mr. Santos dismisses that talk as 
an effort to send a warning to larg- 
er OPEC members that were ex- 
ceeding their quotas. 

Although Ecuador’s government 
still behaves OPEC is worthwhile, 
Mr. Santos said, "an important and 
growing segment" of the populace 
favors pulling out. 

Either way, there will be little 
effect on air traffic between Gene- 
va and Quito, 


Merger Bid Sets 
Australian Mark 

Agatce Franre-Prrsx 

SYDNEY — Australian 
Alan Bond made on Thursday 
the biggest takeover bid in Aus- 
tralian corporate history by of- 
fering 1.1 billion Australian 
dollars ($760 million) for Cast- 
lemaine Tooheys Ltd., the 
brewers. 

The bid by Bond Corp. sur- 
passed Elders lXL's one-bO- 
lio/! -dollar takeover of Car) !on 
& United Breweries in 19S3, 
and the GJ. Coles supermarket 
chain’s 985-mtllion-dollar bid 
for Myer Emporium earlier this 
month. 

In the announcement. Bond 
Corp. said that it was changing 
its offer of 7.10 dollars a snare 
for 50 percent of Castiemaine’s 
issued capita] to 730 dollars a 
share. 


BUSINESSPEOPLE 


Prime Changes Structure in Europe 


A New Look 
AtSprays 

(Continued from Page tl) 

closely with outside suppliers in 
improving the design of rud-injec- 
tion systems. 

*T don’t think anybody knows 
what the ideal distribution of these 
droplets might be," he said. “If we 
knew that we'd like to have a par- 
ticular size of droplet at a particu- 
lar location at a certain tune, we 
would be able to get far better per- 
formance." 

In addition, he said, the new sys- 
tem of study will have direct appli- 
cation in the design of paint noz- 
zles. “In paints,” he said, “droplet 
size certainly correlates with the 
kind of surface you get But until 
now, that whole technology has 
been developed by trial and error." 

The new means of study is “a 
huge thing for GM," he continued, 
since fuel and paint systems are 
major parts of the company’s busi- 
ness. “Until now," he added, “this 
whole phase of research has been 
kind of an art. What we want to do 
is make it a a race.” 


As Auto Sales Slow , Fiat Branches Out 


(Continued from Page 11) 
would again rise “substantially" 
this year, but declined to estimate 
1985 net earnings. Sales this year, 
he said, would rue between 8 per- 
cent and 9 percent 

Meanwhile, Fat also intends to 
establish alliances with West Euro- 
pean companies in such fields as 
telecommunications and military 
aircraft engines, and with Ford 
Motor Co. of the United States in 
automaking, Mr. Agnelli said. 
Sharing the risks of future invest- 
ments with others, particularly 
with Ford, in automating had be- 
come a necessity, he said. 

Fiat executives added that the 
Iveco truck division has joined Oto 
Mel are. an Italian govermnem- 
owned armaments company, to 
produce a new-generatian armored 
vehicle for the Italian army, which 
would replace the U 3. -designed 
M-47 tank in the 1990s. They also 
died a joint venture between Fiat’s 
Telettra telecommunications sub- 


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Seize (he world. 

The International Herald Tribune: 
'the World’s Most 
News to the World's 
Important Audience. 


szdiary and Hewlett-Packard of the 
United States to develop software 
for improving hotel services, such 
as direct telephone billing. The 
companies pfr w to announce its 
first contract with a hotel group in 
September. 

Mr. Agnelli said that if Hat did 
not undertake such cooperative 
ventures, the investment needed 
could become prohibitive. He em- 
phasized that auto mating would 
remain the company's laijjst single 
source of sales and profits in me 
years ahead. The predominant 
question about that sector re- 
mained unanswered: what results 
will emerge from the talks with 
Ford? 

Commenting on die automobile 
market, Mr. Agnelli said that the 
outlook for the industry was 
gloomy because of whai he termed 
excessive production capacity, the 
“fragmentation" of European pro- 
ducers, sluggish economic growth 
in Western Europe, and the need to 
cut automaking costs. 

As a result, he has been pursuing 
negotiations with Ford for about a 
year, both in Detroit and in Turin. 

Speculation about what is under 
discussion has centered on a full- 
scale merger, a more limited agree- 
ment io establish joint production 
and design operations, and more 


recently, the establishment of a 
joint company in which Fiat and 
Ford would each own 49 percent, 
with a bank or some other financial 
institution holding a 2-percent 
shareholding. “It is one of a dozen 
or so scenarios,” a Fiat spokesman 
said this week. 

Commenting on the talks, Mr. 
Agnelli said that Fiat and Ford 
recently completed a major feasi- 
bility study ot what the two compa- 
nies might accomplish together, 
primarily in Western Europe, 
where they currently control, re- 
spectively, 118 percent and 11.7 
percent of the market Volkswagen 
AG of West Germany, according 
to industry estimates, is currently 
in first place with 12.9 percent. The 
outline for establishing what Mr. 
Agnelli described as “a common, 
unique company" has emerged 
from the smoy. 

The study also showed what 
economies of scale might be ac- 
complished by combining or reor- 
ganizing European operations of 
Flat and Ford, which Mr. Agnelli 
did not identify. But he emphasized 
that the key question facing the two 
companies was how, in practice, 
the streamlining could be accom- 
plished. "We have determined 
what we can do, but not how,” he 
said. 


Board Criticizes 
Bank of Boston 

United Press huenwiumal 

BOSTON — Directors of the 
Bank of Boston have criticized the 
institution for failing to report 51.2 
billion in currency transactions 
with foreign hanks. 

The board said Wednesday that 
it was “distressed" that the bank 
“exhibited widespread laxity and 
poor judgment in its failures to 
comply with" the Currency ami 
Foreign Transactions AcL 

The bank pleaded guilty in Feb- 
ruary to charges of failing to report 
1.500 transactions with nine for- 
eign banks during the four years 
following a 1980 federal regulation 
that imposed ibe reporting require- 
ment. It was fined a record 
S 500,000 by a federal judge. 


Textron Income Soars 79% 

United Press International 

PROVIDENCE. Rhode Island 
— Textron reported on Thursday 
that net income for the second 
quarter was up 79 percent to S48.6 
milli on, compared with S27.2 mil- 
lion for the same period Iasi year. 
Net income for the first half was up 
81 percent to S97.2 million, emu- 
pared with £53.7 million for the 
same period last year. 


By Brenda Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Prime Computer, 
the U.S. maker of minicomputers, 
has restructured its European oper- 
ations after the appointment of 
Richard Williams as vice president, 
international marketing opera- 
tions. 

Mr. Williams has moved from 
Prime's European headquarters io 
London to its corporate headquar- 
ters in Natick, Massachusetts, 

lo-day operations of all non-lLS. 

subsidiaries and distributors. With 
his departure, (he European sub- 
sidiary operations have been divid- 
ed into two regions. Northern and 
Southern Europe, headed by Mal- 
colm Padina and Charles Picasso, 
who have been named vice presi- 
dents. 

In their new posts, Mr. Padina 
will have responsibility for Prime 
Computer's operations in Britain, 
Scandinavia and the Benelux coun- 
tries, and Mr. Picasso for West 
Germany, France, Switzerland and 
1 taly. Mr. Picasso will also continue 
to direct distributor operations. 

Until replacements are found, 
both will continue to act in their 
former positions: Mr. Padina as 
managing director of Prime Com- 
puter (UK.) Lid. and Mr. Picasso as 
director of marketing support for 
Europe, the Middle East and Afri- 

^NJVL Rothschild & Sons LnU. the 
London-based merchant bank, said 
Georges C. Karl was, who is a di- 
rector of Banque Privee and Roth- 
schild Bank AG, has been elected 
to its board as a nonexecutive di- 
rector. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co„ the U.S. 
health care, cleaning, sports, food 
and laundry products concern, said 
Alain de Cordemoy has been 
named to the new post of director 
general of its French subsidiary. 
Previously, be was director geueral- 
commcraal of the Paris-based unit. 

NCR Core, has named Frederick 
Newall to the new post of group 
marketing vice president for Eu- 
rope. based in Loudon. Mr. Newall 
will turn over his duties as chair- 
man and managin g director of the 
British unit NCR Ltd. to Rex M. 
Fleet, who returns to that post after 
two years in the Dayton, Ohio, 
headquarters as vice president, fi- 



Cathay Pacific Airways has ap- 
pointed John Mosey manager 
for Britain and Ireland, sucreed- 

S ! Duncan Dickson, who has 
E the Hoop Kong-based carri- 
er. Mr. Mosey, wbo wiD remain 
in London, was formerly com- 
mercial manager for Europe. 


nandal systems division, of NCR's 
US. marketing organization. NCR 
is a maker of computers and other 
business information -processing 
systems. 

" First Austrian Bank of Vienna is 
opening a representative office in 
Vicenza, Italy, to be headed by G. 
Ha monte, who was era tral manager 
responsible for international busi- 
ness at Banca Cattolica del Yeneto 
SpA. 

County Bank, the merchant 
h anking arm of National Westmin- 
ster Bank PLC of London, has ap- 
pointed Michael Wickham regional 
director for Southeast Asia, based 
in Singapore. He previously was 
with County Bank’s capital mar- 
kets division in London. 

First Boston Corp. has opened a 
branch in Tokyo and appointed 
James M. Walsh resident manager. 

Chase Manhattan Bank has 
named Mark E. Shannon assistant 
general manager of its Paris 
branch, succeeding Jeremy Jewiu. 
who, as previously reported, has 
moved to London as assistant gen- 
eral manager, U.K. corporate 
hanking. Mr. Shannon formerly 


was in the special loan administra- 
tion department in Chase's New 
York headquarters. 

Vetco Gray, a new Houston- 
based company created by the con- 
solidation of Gray Tool Co. and 
Vetco Offshore Inc., subsidiaries of 
Combustion Engineering Inc., has 
named Barrv S. Kaufman, vice 
president. Eastern Hemisphere, 
and C. Jean Fntsche, vice presi- 
dent, Asia-Pacific. Mr. Kaufman, 
who previously was in charge of 
finance for Gray Tool, is based in 
London in his new posL He is re- 
sponsible Tor Veico Gray’s opera- 
tions in Europe, the Middle Fjm 
and Africa. Mr. Frilsche heads 
Vecio Gray's operations in the 
Asia-Pacific region from Jus base in 
Singapore, where he formerly wj> 
with vetco Offshore. 

Eggar Forrester, the London 
shipbroker. has opened a liaison 
office in Japan. The new office, 
which Ls based in Tokyo and will 
serve the Far East, is' headed by 
Philip Milner-Barry, a director of 
Eggar Forrester since 1983. 

LRC International PLC, a con- 
sumer products and services group 
based in Britain, has appointed 
John A Connell a nonexecutive 
director. Mr. Connell is on the 
board of HJ. Heinz Co., with re- 
sponsibility for the U.S. -based 
food company’s European opera- 
tions, and also >en« as deputy 
chairman of its British unit. Hj. 
Heinz Co. Ltd. He succeeds Sir 
Peter Gadsden, who has resigned 
from the board but who will remain 
a consultant. 

Philips NT of the Netherlands 
and Kyocera Corp. of Japan have 
appointed Osamu Sabun president 
of a new joint venture to be estab- 
lished in Tokyo in the field of 
home-interactive sysiems. It will be 
called Japan New' Media Systems 
Inc., and will develop and manu- 
facture products based on the 
growing convergence of video, au- 
dio, computer and communica- 
tions technologies and applica- 
tions. Mr. Saburi currently is 
director of product planning at 
Kyocera. 

Samuel Montagu & Co. has 
named Robert E Beale a managing 
director. Mr. Beale is head of the 
London-based merchant bank’s 
dealing division, a post he has held 
since December 1984. 


Thursday^ 

ore 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices ns of 
3 run. New York time. 
Via The Associated Press 


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7ft 4ft DmnBlo 
63 DorlGp 
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11 patsep 
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4ft ft Denous 
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34* 22 D tones 
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29* 11 DlrCnl 
34* 20ft DomB 
27 13* DOVIDB 

14* 9ft Drontz 
19 8* Drexlf 

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19ft 72ft DuckAl 
25ft 14* DvnkD 1 
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15* B* DurFII s 
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28* 13 DyntcUC 


109 

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27 aft 27 
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6* 4ft 4ft— ft 
702ft 102* 102ft 4- ft 
21* 21ft 27ft + * 
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21* 21* 21ft 
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11* lift 71ft 
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24* 24ft 24ft- ft 
12 * 12 12 
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19 Uft lBft 
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18* 18* — * 
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291 

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172 

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102 

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US 

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a* 


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a* 

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lift 

lift— ito 

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29 

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3 





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282 

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Pa, 


12 Mp 
High i 


3'i 

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21 li 
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0 $ 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


V 


PEANUTS 



BOOKS 


CARPENTER’S GOTHIC 


"Lthvi "Aiin.v* (ictus ,• 

he «i*iv '*:£> *::fenti«|a53 w »*o “ 


By William Gaddis. 262 pages. SI 6.95. 
Elisabeth Sifton Books l Viking, 40 West 
23 d Street, New York. A*. Y. 10010. 



ACROSS 

1 Goalie’s feat 
5 Fairway boo- 

boos 

It Kind of patrol 

14 Avocado’s 
shape 

15 Professeur's 
milieu 

16 Net man 
Nastase 

17 Salvation 
Armyofflcial 

20 Zoo features 

21 Author 
Repplier 

22 Poet's 
contraction 

23 Frontier 
country 

25 British burglar 
33 Acclimatize 
34Downatthe 


49 Of a region 

52 Slatted 
structure 

57 Time, to 
Einstein 

60 Singular 

61 Engine-room 
helper 

62 Part of A. D. 

63 Repute - 

64 Item in a 
register 

65 up (squeal 

on oneself) 


24 Nobelist in 
Chemistry: 

1934 

25 Wooden shoe 

26 Plaf or Head 

27 Prickly pears 
e.g. 

28 Uncover, to a 
bard 


|! anythin© x 
can pc? to 


35 First-year- 
La tin verb 

36 Shade of blue 

37 Conserva- 
tionist 
Cleveland 

39 Originate 

40 Slugger Mel 

41 Gulf of the 
Arabian Sea 

42 Railway 
warning signal 

43 Injury 
sometimes 
caused by an 
arsonist 

47 Cashier 

48 Wing of a sort 

C New York 


1 Lounge 
furniture 

2 Tel 

3 Ruffed lemur 

4 Designer 
Schiaparelli 

5 Misrepre- 
sented 

6 Quaker grays 

7 Hannibal and 
Scinio 


29 Whiplash 

30 Chinese island 

31 Moslem title of 
honor 

32 Name 

37 Appends 

38 Converge 

39 Prefix with 
merge 



Reviewed by 

Chrisropher Lehmann-Haupt 

O NE comic scene in William Gaddis' re- 
markable new novel —his first in nearly a 
decade and his third in 20 years — reveals Paul 
Booth, a Vietnam veteran turned media con- 
sultant. frantically drawing a diagram for his 
harried wife, Elizabeth, trying to show her 
certain outlandish schemes he is working on 
The passage begins, in Gaddis' quirky style; 
“Problem look, problem Liz you don't try "and 
see the big picture he came on scattering hills, 
envelopes, mailing pieces in thrilling colour, 
flushing the blank side of a letter opening Dear 
Friend of the Bowhead While —look." 

It continues'. “He had a blunt penriL — 
here's TeakeJI . . . and a smudged circle ap- 
peared and shot forth an arrow, — Got his own 
constituency here ... a blob took roughly 
kidney shape, — Senate committees and the 
big voice for Administration policy up here 


public j... - - —1 •! t-cj’" 

rallied 1“ J Pc: seuir. pape-baefc aicng *h ; 
“The RcCiVr s :!i.T%“ ' i y 55 ; 'JR" • wseA ^ 
pin: .-I jn ! i->ca;-v'o tw who Parlay a " 

icho*" 1 . j w :~rnift’r.: i~ ~ '■ cs ( ; inancta; 
“Orpvnter'ft G«':hw ‘ ;•» about a grownup 
nuke* .1 child'* rv-**. or' e\ rryihing. 



fought sh 
significant r. 

” childish .:f:c: 


French :r. one c? hsitory'* 

Ji’odimc rwiv tiu; k. 
J> :S» v-^jixis 




T ■* 
rt; 


V 


j: 


T 

i * 




it 


a 


something vaguely phallic. — and his 
»ig third world Food for .Africa program 


whole big r .. _ — 

over here . . . and an arrow shot to distant 
coastlines shaped up abruptly in a deformed 
fooi print." 

About 2Q pages later, a man named 
McCandless, who owns the house overlooking 
the Hudson River that the Booths are renting, 
pays a call on Liz and remarks, “l didn't know 
you had children?" She sees that he is looking 


at the “blobs and crosses, lightning strokes 
bails of arrows" her husband hi 


has drawn, and 

says. "Oh, oh that that's jus L nothing." 

This little joke illustrates any number of 
things about Gaddis's compressed, complex 
novel not least of them Booth’s nutty patron- 
ization of his deceptively compliant wife. More 
significant, the incident is typical of the way 
that the discovery of innocem-seeming objects 
is the msinsmratby which die plot of “Carpen- 
ter’s Gothic" unfolds. The novel could be de- 
scribed as a mosaic of curious objects, which 
seem to have lives of their ow-n and must be 
viewed just so if the pauem they form is to be 
seen. 

Most important of all, the joke or the dia- 
gram evokes one of the novel’s major themes, 
sounded only a moment earlier when McCand- 
less echoes Liz Booth's lament of the Hallow- 
een mess that the neighborhood kids have 


>0 cniioiMi uojCkts c; 

Gaddis'* pi n have muHspie aatsnf prey-lino 
themselves. v C'- the J.JnWiv of h:> 

It nu> jiM K: -h.il F'jpi succeeds in is*s piaui 
stan .1 war m Afrii-_: r*. prnmnrisj die isssr*, 
of a fundanver/.j!'.*'. rr. '.cHer. Re*, trend Bicsj 
Ude. Or Fju! n:u;. ■•wn oni> u> words 
emptv gestures 

[1 depend* - :*<-■ degree on which of 1 }* 
>eter.if meanrne* of the novel’s usic tnc 
chooses to cmptuMre. Most iitculit. "Carpen- 
ter’s Gothic" refer* t::e style -f ;h- heir* the 
Booths are renting Hu: 1 ! m.iy also refer to the 
rude and bar baron? Christianity that Ldc hat. a 
made of what hi.* tor.'- mo>i fumouxearpenre; ”1 
K-yin. Or to McC.ir.dIev>' embittered Mew tf 
civilization: “Two hundred years buftj, 
ing zhi.-ft grej; bastion of middle djo. idue;, 
fair playf pay tour debts, fair pay for hor.oi.- 
work, two hundred years that's about ail n jt 
progress, improvement esety where. wfi3ts 
worth dome is worth coir.; weii and the;. ^ 
out that's the most dangerous tbr.g of aS. af 
our grand solutions turn snto" the rest of ihr . 
world's "nightmares." 

Or one might apply the mis to the frrm of' 
the novel. This seem., arproprurc in several 



Solution to Previoas Puzzle 


■OH 

UBU BD 

a 

m 



\tud" “grotesque ... . 

atmosphere of degeneration and decay." to alt 
one dictionary's definition i f literary- gotek^ 
More satisfying stiil is 10 compare the hai j 
with Gaddis's 'previous two novels, both ■£ ; 
which seemed to me virtually unreadable be < : 
cause of their length, repetitious ness and co-nr ; " 
plexily: here he ha,* taken their visions and ■ 
brought them down to human scale 

Some of Gaddis's more passionate admirer* 
may regard this act of becoming cotv.par jlb A"- ! 
accissihleas one of stepping down in assshew.; 
class and compromising the best thing', he has ’ 
stood for. But I disagree. In "CarpenterY ' 
Gothic" Gaddis has not so much reduced the 
complexity of his fiction as compressed tt 


Christopher Lchmc.r.n-Haup: •: rr. the mslfcf 
The Sc h- York Times. 


8* 


Irish Aviation Firm Buys Joyce Mask 

The I'n-Ji 

LONDON — The Irish aircraft c.:*mpar.v; 
Guinness Peat Aviation Ltd. says it has K’ught 
a death mask of James Joy ce and will display it . 
in Ireland. The company bought the xl4^ 
privately, for an undisclosed sum. before a 
scheduled auction at Sotheby's, which had esti- 
mated that it would bnr.g £12.000 to £:4.&n 
(S 16,800 to SIWOOi. 


■4 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscort 


O N the diagramed deal 
Nonh bid four hearts, 
with a faint hope that his part- 
ner held that suit But he 
judged that his hand would be 
an adequate dummy in spades. 
South predictably retreated to 
four spades and was doubled. 
This contract seemed headed 
for a penalty of 500 or 800 
whether West led a club or a 
bean, since Smith had no 
quick entry 10 his hand for a 
trump finesse. 

But something went wrong 
with the defense. East took the 
dub ace and did not give his 
partner an immediate ruff. He 
led the diamond jack and then 


shifted to die dub five. When 
West ruffed he assumed that 
the five was a suit preference 
signal and instead of shifting 
to hearts, and collecting 500. 
he led a high diamond. 

South gratefully ruffed in 
his hand, picked up the miss- 
ing trumps with a finesse and 
made his doubled Contract- 
Dummy’s clubs took care of 
the heart losers in the dosed 
hand. 

Jf East-West had collected 
the full penally against four 
spades doubled they would 
nave won the match by 7 
points but not necessarily’ the 
title. 

The South team was previ- 
ously undefeated in the double 


knockout event and would'" 
have been entitled 
match. 


if a re- 


NOItTlI 

* A4 

•7 64 10 55 

:• 3 

* k j 10 4 2 


WEST 

*kc: 

92 

-> A K Q97G 4 

*8 


Evsr 
♦ * J 
7 K 31 4 
C- J 10 8 J 
46 6, 47 J 


SOUTH iD) 

• Q J 10 9 ? 3 
"874 

* 3 

*Q6 J . 

North and South wm vulcembtej 
The Mddlng -. 


Sen fa 

West 

North 

East 

2 •:- 

3 N.T 

1 1 

Da. 

(« 

Pass 

DM. 

Pass 

Pass 


Wen led tbe dubdgbz 


LENZOZ 



□n 


MOOGLY 





Y/HAT A COWVER - 
5 ATOM BETWEEN 
. HUSBAND 1 AND 
WIFE SOMETIMES (S. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
geaed by the above cartoon. 


— cnnmi] 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 
Jumbles: HENCE YIELD PUTRID MYSELF 

Answer What the millionaire left— 

MUCH TO BE DESIRED 


WEATHER 


c * 

E 3! 

EUROPE 

HIGH 



C 

F 

AI ti 

Algarve 

79 

84 

ai a 

Amsterdam 

IS 

77 

At S3 

AflMHU 

33 

91 


Barcelona 

30 

H6 

Bl 47 


a 

a 

81 S 


TO 

68 

B; S 

Brussel* 

28 

82 

2) 76 

BMctarcst 

29 

84 

?! '6 

Budapest 

28 

K! 

ri ^ 

Copenhagen 

21 

70 

£5 IS 

casta Dei Sal 

30 

86 

Dl 27 

Ddhl hi 

17 

63 


EdlnSrureh 

23 

73 


Florence 

35 

9S 


Frank furl 

a 

82 

S' jl 



86 


Helsinki 

23 

73 

IT 

IStoramn 

21 

70 

^ 3S" 

Las Palmas 

» 

n 

K '8' 

Lbbafl 

24 

75 


London 

27 

81 


Madrid 

37 

99 


Milan 

31 

W 


MOSCOW 

17 

63 



2b 

79 


mcc 

27 

Bl 

fcll 

Oslo 

21 

n 


Paris 

33 

91 

V. 357 

Prague 

25 

77 


Rovklavik 

11 

52 

55” 


31 

88 

IS 33 

Stockholm 

18 

64 


Strasbourg 

.11) 

86 


Venice 

21 

88 


Vienna 

28 

82 


Wnrun? 

21 

fll 

"zav 

Zurich 

38 

U6 

M 19' 

— tv 

MIDDLE EAST 


LOW 
C F 


ASIA 


Bonefcofc 
Selling 
Hong Kong 
Manila 
New Delhi 
Seoul 
Sha natal 
Singapore 
Taipei 
To* TO 


HIGH LOW 
C P C F 

30 B6 25 77 

32 90 21 70 

33 91 24 79 

31 B8 25 77 

31 88 24 75 

34 93 23 73 
33 91 25 77 

29 84 2S 77 

32 90 20 68 
31 88 24 75 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cape Town 

Caui Man ca 

Harare 

Logos 

NCrtroBI 

Tonis 


34 97 19 46 
36 97 23 73 
19 . 66 6 43 

26 79 21 7D 


— — — — no 


29 84 22 72 
23 73 9 4 
32 90 20 48 


9 48 


LATIN AMERICA 

14 41 14 57 


BaemM Aires 

Caracas 

Unto 

Marten City 


— — — — no 


22 72 12 54 d 


NORTH AMERICA 


Ankara 
Offrot 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
TW AW* 

OCEANIA 


16 61 9 48 

31 88 23 73 


X 84 18 44 
32 90 20 48 


Anchorage 
Atlanta 
Boston 
Chicago 
Soever 
Detroit 
110001)1(0 
Houston 
Loo Angel n 


Minneapolis 


AwcMond 

Sydney 


14 57 10 50 
19 44 6 43 d 


Nassau 
New York 
Son Francises 
Seattle 
Toronto 
Washington 


68 

U 

52 

Cl 

70 15 

MCA 

59 

0 

ii 

10 

50 

tr 

82 

22 

72 

11 

86 

18 

64 

fr 

B2 

19 

66 

si 

82 

12 

54 

PC 

84 

18 

64 

St 

B8 

23 

73 

Ir 

93 

24 

73 

DC 

84 

19 

66 

PC 

88 

24 

73 

PC 

82 

It 

67 

PC 

81 

11 

52 

CJ 

86 

31 

70 

PC 

84 

20 

68 

PC 

70 

f2 

54 

fr 

83 

13 

55 

Ir 

79 

8 

46 

cl 

84 

20 

68 

PC 


cKloudv; t^lefloy; ir-jalr; h-hall; no -not available; o-everenst; 
pcnai-tiy cloudy; r-rata; sh- anawers; sw-sn ow; sMiormw. 

F 9?^^ ST <7i . Sl . l HP t ? ''57 W «!V- •= RAN KFU ,RT : CJwgr. 


▼ « -wT r lV*rM ni iauamS: fliiumircnoiipy.hKflllRFUKT; UOUa«r, 

L’lr.o . 2? f*. Jf 2 Z’JZi L 0H R°Ki Variable. Temp. 25 — 15 (77--»l. 

^ T “*"" ,i - , ‘ *" ' YORK; Showers. Tema 


MADRID: daudv. Temp 36-19 (97-*6j.'N|w' tour; anowers. Tema 

^?. ,S + c S . h ^iy f .T?!!)P^- ?? W E: <****■ 


9i em *?e J ?i » '^bamcIdk W- P 01 “Qllobjo. ZURICH: SWm'y/1>ma 
31 — 15 188— 591. BANGKOK; Fair. Temp. 23 — 25 (91 — 77) HONG komg- 
{=»"• Twiia. M-n tW-BlL MAHIlX Jhundererorms.' T?mS Z?*i 
(90 — 751. SEOUL: Fair. Temp. 32 — 24 ( 90 — 721 SINGAPORE* 

ThumlmiwrrtS.Temp.3ll— 25 (86— 771. TOKYO: Fair, Tema 33 — 25(91 —77). 


Wbrid Stock Markers 



|~ InmnnUiH | 


date 

Prev. 

ABN 



ACF Holding 



AEGON 

iOOJM) 

loan 


122.70 

121 JO 




AMEV 



A'Doro Rubber 



Amro Bank 

8860 


BVG 

«Kan 

198-50 

Buehrmann T 



Caland Htag 

37 JO 


Elsevier-NDU 



Fokker 



Gist BrocadsE 

212-50 21150 

Hefnnken 



Haogovms 

67J0 

£7.10 



6260 

Naandmi 






Nediiavd 

174J0 

176 




Pakhoed 

64J0 



«30 

4880 

Rafaeca 

7620 

7680 

Rodamcu 



Rollnco 



Rnrento 

Roygl Dutch 

45.90 

196JH 

45J0 

194 

Unlteuwr 

352H0 

350 

VonOmmeren 

2190 




140 


21550 

213 


j Prevtou : 219.10 



II Braefe II 

Arbed 



Bekoert 



CocfcerllF 



Cobeua 



EBES 



GB-lnw-BM 

3710 


GBL 

1835 


Gevaert 

■r'l 


Habokeh 

KSl 


Inlercom 

2285 


Krodletbank 


8910 

Petra lino 


5610 1 

5acGen*raie 


■ [.Vill 

Sofina 



5oi vav 


PXtotjl 

Traction Etac 



UCB 


III 

Urtero 


i'll 

Viellle Montagna 

igj 


1 Current Slack Index : 231 L44 1. 

j Previous : 23MJ1 



11 IVaakfnrt 1) 

AEG-Telefunken 

127 J0 

129 

Allianz Vera 

1370 


Altana 

3S9 3MJ0 



Bayer 

315 216-50 



361 [ 

Boy VeeHnsbank 

39650 

398 

BBC 

230 273J0 1 

BHF-Bank 

323 

326 

BMW 


Cbm menbank 

214J0 

220 

Cant Guromi 


Mi 

Oal ml or- Befit 

£31 JO 

UB 

Degussa 

366 

364 

Deutsche Babcock 

155 152J0 

Deutsche Bank 

561 574 JO 

Dnsttaer Bank 

269 

2781 


106-50 16250 

Haroener 

29BJ0 30BJO 

HOChHef 

. “S 

610 I 


Via Agence France-Presse July 25 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


rJ a 


Hoesdi 
Horton 
HussH 
IWKA 
Kali Soli 
Karstatft 
Kauitaf 
Kloeckner H-D 


Close Prev. 
108J0 IIOlBO 
1ST 183 
312 312 

Z74 277 

285 2S1S0 
233 233 

258 259.50 
281 286 


KtoecfcMT Werfca 42^J 4250 
Kruno Slow iiojo naso 


Undo 
LufttaMa 
MAN 

Mannesmonn 

Mucndi Rusdt 

Nlxdarl 

PKI 

Pometie 

Preusoao 

PWA 

RWE 

Rftelmrneaatl 
Scherfng 
SEL 
Siemens 
Thvssen 
Veta 


487 487 

. 219 221.50 
IM-50 148 

180-50 19250 
1910 19Q5 
520 -50 527 

622 631 50 
12BS 1305 
273 270-50 
139.20 142-50 
176 179.50 
293 293 

44070 46750 
344 3SQ 
53010 538 

11550 11750 
rung zo 


ValtawaMiMferk 291 JO 29650 


WeUa 


5T3 S09 


Ceaimenbanfc Index ; 1394.70 
Prev loos : 140359 




Bh East Asia 

□wim Kona 
Chino Light 
Green Island 
Hang Seno Bank 
Honderaan 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Really A 
HK Hotels 
HK Lana 


HK Shong Bank 
Toieplwne 


HK 

HK Yaumatoi 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson 
litncifv 
Jordlne 
-fortune sec 

Kowloon Motor 

Miramar Hofei 


SHK Props 


23 22J0 
1120 17.90 
1650 

BJO 8X0 
44-25 45J3 

itf ft 

8.90 855 
12J0 T3 
37 M 

650 M5 
755 755 

IS 955 
175 190 
655 645 
27 JO 265D 
046 045 
097 095 

1120 1250 
1550 IS 
850 855 
36 38 

75S 7J5 
115 112$ 
1130 1120 
195 1925 
2650 H 
103 2 

092 091 
SuSP. — 
1.95 1-95 
505 120 
255 125 


84 0 84> 

7m im 
14800 16300 
1115 1180 
M2S 1200 
5850 6000 
980 1010 
3725 4025 
1600 1610 
27oo jsse 
2025 2250 


.Hiveld Steel 
Kloof 
-Ned bank 
Pres Stem 
Rusptot 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasol 

West Holding 


C»« prev 
525 530 

6700 7000 
1455 1485 
4400 4450 
1575 1633 
835 835 

2900 3350 
650 650 

NA 5600 


SM Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tote and Lrie 
Teseo 

W m EMI 
Group 

TmMearHw 

THF 

UHromar 
I id lever £ 
Jnltod Biscuits 
Vktan 
Wootomrth 


443 

455 __ 

453 451 

24B 248 

319 324 

330 327 

360 363 

119 121 

.200 21T 

10 45/44 10 45/M 


145 

242 


Composite Slock Index : I04SJ0 
Previous : 1M3J4 


AA Corn 

AUtod-Lyons 

Anglo Am Gold 

Assert l Foods 

Ass Dalrm 

eorclovs 

Bass 

BAT. 

Beecham 

BICC 

BL 

Blue arcie 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Boweler Indus 
BP 

Brit Home St 

Brit Telecom 

Brfl Aerospace 

Brltoil 

BTR 

Bwmoh 

Coble Wireless 

Codbury Schw 

Charter Cons 

Commerdal U 

Cons Gold 

Ceurtoulas 

Doraety 

De Beers* 

Distillers 

Driefanleln 

Flsons 

FreeStGed 

GEC 

Gen Accident 

GKN 

Glaxo I 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

1CI 

imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
Ltovds BonK 
Lanrho 
Lucas 

Marks and Sn 
Metal Bex 
Midland Bank 
Ngl West Bonk 
Pando 
PUklnatan 
Piewey 
Prudential 
Raeoi Elect 
RanatoMem 
Rank 
Reed init 
Reuters 
Royal DultirE 
RTS 
SaatcM 

Safnsbwrv 
. S«o rs Honings 
i Shell 
; STC 


S1» S14«i 

218 220 

sn SUV. 

212 210 
134 136 

379 379 

527 534 

291 303 

315 325 

190 194 

34 35 

531 533 

263 266 

179 184 

383 m 

511 511 

280 283 

179 182 

295 303 

205 205 

303 315 

281 
530 520 

1« 145 

181 183 

m 208 

454 479 

123 127 

£ IS 

272 275 

Sigh EM* 

320 M3 

52DW SZJW 

168 172 

610 618 

2M 208 

125/641213/64 
29S 294 

713 720 

245 245 

820 825 

188 188 

343 367 

459 699 

S Sfi 

I i 

% S 

288 291 

140 142 

43S 

37V 379 

«? 479 


368 270 

138 146 

$2 6S9 

12 8 134 

WOW SV8M 

3JO 378 

271 778 

435/64 47711 

539 539 

645 645 

314 314 

-« 93 l 


F.T.30 Index : 911 JO 
Previous :n4Je 
F.TAE.104 Index : 1221 JO 
previous : mut - • 


MHn 


Banco Comm 

central 

Clsatateis 

Cnd Hal 

Ertdanla 

Farmlioiia 

Flat 

Flnslder 

Generali 

«FI 

Hoi cem enti 

Hahns 

HaimaMllarl 

MedtoBoicci 

Montedison 

Oli™*tl 

Plrein 

RAS 

Rlnascente 

S.P 

[5ME 

Snla 

SVWtoQ 

Slef 


23299 
3115 
9800 . 
2521 2 
11050 11 
13180 i: 
4000 



MlBCurronl index : 1516 
Previous : 1536 


PM 


AirLIquWe 
Alsthom AIL 
Av Dassault 
Biancalre 
BIC 

Banarobi 

Bouraues 

B5N-GO 

Carrerfour 

Charseura 

Clue Med 

Darlv 

Dumex 

EII-Aaulloln« 

Europe l 

Gen Eaux 

Haeftetto 

Lata rye Cap 

Lea rand 

Lesicvr 

rOreai 

Marten 

Moira 

Merlin 

Michel In 
Moer Hennew y 
Moulinex 
Ocd dentate. 
Pernod Rle 
Perrier 
Peuaeat 
Pr (memos 

Rodlotectw 

Redout* 
Roussel Uokri 
Staail 

SMs Rasslgnei 
. Tiiemecan 
1 Thomson C5F. 

? ferial 


434 


1670 1495 

538 539 


Seen Index : 30534 
-evlegs : 20UB 
.ac index : 214J0 
, Previous ; 21839 


Cold Storape 
DBS 

Fraser Weave 

Haw Par 

IndKupe 

MOl Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

DUE 

Shonarlua 
SlmeDarbv 
ST»re Land 
SDore Press 
S Steamship 
St T rao lnu 
United Overseas 
(JOB 



Strata Tlai^M Index : 771 M 


Prev leas; 


-StoddMtai 


AGA 

Alla Laval 
Asaa 

Astro 

Altos Copco 

Boitoen 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Eoielto 

HWHtofSbtxiKOn 

Pharmacia 

Saap-Sconla 

SandvtK 

Skanska 

SKF 

SwmllshMctch 

Volvo 


113 114 

197 197 

3T8 320 

445 430 

107 109 

NA 183 
280 281 
2*8 251 

360 365 

W 7 167 


286 m 


406 47. 

w w 

227 229 

195 70S 

235 235 


Ksrs 5 “'- M 


L . 


ACI 
A HZ 
BHP 
BOrtri 

Bauoatnviiie 

Cosilemame 

Coles. 

Comal co 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunlop 
Riders ixi 

ici Australia 

Mood tan 

MIM 

Myer 

NalAusl Bank 
News Corn 
N Broken Hill 
PoseMon 
Old Cool Trust 
Santas 

Thamas Nation 
Western Mining 
Westpac Banking 
WaoasMe 


120 £20 
4J7 420 

4.93 4^} 
1J0 UT 


All Ordinaries Index : 94130 
PrevigtfS : 93SJ0 


Fullhsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
Koiima 
Kansai Power 
Kaveisokl Sled 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kvocera 
Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec works 
Mi tsubishi Bank 
MJfeuofahl diem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui and CO 
MtaukalM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 

NlWcoSec 

Nippon Kogatui 

NlPBOQ Oil 

Nlpoon Steel 

Nippon Yusen 

Nissan 

Nomura Sec 

Olvmaus 

Planner 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Stdmadzv 

ShkietM Chemical 

Sony 

Sumitomo Bonk 
Sumitomo Cnem 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Talari Carp 
Talsha Marine 
Tokedo Cham 
TDK 
Teliln 

Tokio Maine 
Tokyo Elec. Power 
Touaan PrtntiflS 
Taray tna 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yomaicni sec 


Toronto JutrZl 


Gmat£an 
235 Abn Prce 
WCAcklands 
17250 Agn too E 
. 201 Agra Ind A 

j H45KAI1 Energy 
4400 Alla Nal 
225AtoomaSt 
1567Arocen 
1700 Atco 1 1 
5950 BP Canada 
. 4055 Bank BC 
114455 Bank N 5 
1 1Z10B8 Borrtc* o 
200 Baton A 1 
6330 Bonanza R 
10200 Bralama 
2960 Broma lea 
400 Brando M 
33557 BCFP 
12495 BC Res 
15WSBC Phone 
2423 Brunswk 
20350 Budd Can 
■050 CAE 
200CCLA 
13000 Cad Frv 
11300 Carnoeauf 
38000C Nor west 
, 1WC Packrs 
I2ZO Can Trust 
7400 C Tung 
. 43951 Cl Bk Com 
W8S59CTlreAf 
68oacuiiia 
4450 Caro 
3600Crtanes« 
MOCetan 175a 
9775 Centrt Tr 


8400 
34000 


8400CDIstb Bt 
CT1. Bank 


9280 Coiivenfrs 
Cosaka R 


5fc 

Dav 


HIUW/DJ. index ; 12&47M 
Previous : 12777 JO 
taw index : 114161 
Previous : 1D50JS 


Zarfefa 


Tgfcyo 


Aka) _ 

Asahi cnem 

Asahl Glass 

tank of Tgfcva 

Brtaaesiane 

Canon 

Casio 

Utah 

Dei Nippon Print 
Dai wa House 
Da hna Securities 
Ponue 
Full Bank 
FWIPtwte 


388 


383 
849 

— 860 
922 920 

366 560 

533 9«i 

T3o0 1400 
442 439 

TOVO 1100 
761 750 

997 993 

7060 7230 
■ 7B0 lW 
(*30 1880 


Adlo 

AlusuNw 
Auloptan 
Bonk Leu 
Brown Bevorl 
CD» Galgy 
Credit Suisse 
Elect rowan 
HolderBank 
inienottawnt 
Jacob Svchgrd 
Jelmoll 
Landis Gvr 
Maevenpich 
Nestle 
Oertlkon-8 
Roche Baby 
Sandaz 
Schindler 
Sutzer 
Survetllanoe 

r«..i — u 

awuMir 

SBC 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss veltatanfc 
Union Bank 
Wlnfenpwr 
Zurlcti Ins 


SBC Index : SOWS 
Previous 506.10 


NXJ.: not auotedj NA) not 
avalknie; xd: M-dMdewL 


63001-™-. « 
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gtofrawnx 

17«7 L 

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7748 Dentaan A n 
^ngM'sonBf 
TWODevciaxi 
<SSi°DlcknsnAI 

iSSif S!2 n8n ® 

18036 Dotaseo 

14732 tTomon A 
Donahue 
Dll Pont A 
14235 Dy lex A 
7810 Ettfhom X 
TOoemeo 
iT»5 Eaultv Svr 
3480 FCA I nil 
. 366 C Falcon C 
9J381 Fiaibnige 
UJOFWIndA 
'gOFOtyFin 

eSS ondlsA 

Goac Comp 
'WOGMcruta 
HJOGIbrnHar 
73 MGoWcsmt)( 
ma Graft g 
*25 Grandma 
,0 SDGL Forest 
Groytwd 
(3121 H Group A 
300 Hiding A ( 
600 Hawker 

[nil 

, 734 H Bay Co 
17344 IfYTOSCn 

gginS" 

>899 Inland Cm 
jilt Thom 
£199 Intpr pip, 
8700 Janneck 
i Kerr Adg 
2D433 Labaft 
43188 LoCMnrb 
rtHLOnlCem 
37WLaaina 
W2LLLAC 
11846 UMaw Co- 
'^fOLumonlcs 
7Q0MD5HA 
fWMetoiHX 

1072 Maritime I 


stocks rw AP 

617%. 175- in— i s 
57 j; |7 

SIS’* 18 18-0 + ?i) 

*816 8\i 8%, 

i7»ft i75u— 't 
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521 k. 21 n 
W V. 8 - 1 i 9 — to 

W3 32to 33 *■ '. 

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430 420 430 

617* 174* 174*— <i 
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623 22*. 227 ft— to 

6154k 15 T5to + to 
S34VJ 33 34to +lto 
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SV7W 17to in* 

SWu if - 
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423 22'.-: 22to— to 

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3472 NValsan A I 
250 MoIumi B 

400 Murphy 

.300 NoBISCo L 
132151 Noranda 
13574 Moreen 
146134 Nva Alt A I 
400 NowSCO VV 
7010 NuVVSl sn A 
I'M Oakwoaa 
SemOsnowo A I 
105*6 Pan W Alrin 
8100 Pamaur 
4384 PcnCan P 

1300 Pembina 
4800 Phonic Or. 
IOOO Pine Poini 
7^0 Place GO a 

104927 Placer 
12530 Pravlgo 
400 Que Slurp o 
S75 Q POyrock t 
— TOC Rodpath 
SCORa Sfmh, A 
1540 Rogers A 
1100 Roman 
2500 Rothman 
4100 Scenlrc 
950 sc oust 
28*93 Scar.. Can 
38200 Snell Con 
vtMSsnemti 
2100 Staler B t 
39100 Soulkm 
103CT Soar Aetgt 
50031 BrodKI 
374M6 Stalct) A 
IJJXI Sulotru 
11000 Sieco R 
55100 SYdnev o 

25 Tolctjro 

39500 Tor, 

100 Tec* Cor A 
33146 Teci B f 
MM2 To* Can 
' 09481 Tnom N A 
19039s Tor Om Bk 
«105 Tor-Jar e I 
303 TrerOors A I 
1500 Tnrw Mt 
S900 Trim! 1 Res 
41452 TfnAllo UA 

SIMOTrConPL 
36^ Trimoe 
T68S0 Trilon A 
JnJ Trliee a t 
250: Turbo 
1471 Un CatbHl 
77*9 U Entpre« 
29(» u Kent* 

3100 U SHcae 
<200 Ver}li A I 
VlTDVeMorcfl 
16500 Wostmin 
300 Wesloa 
93596 Wood Vrt A 
IW3 Yk Beer 
Total saiesi 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


Page 17 


!S -5 


SPORTS 


Prickle Becomes flood 


3^^tJS«L'S'.»lRr Flayers 
P-jiSSSSe^fe' to Join. Rival FiFL 


s r fc > , te.j 


•“*'£. s .ir.. c , & By Gary Pomconcz Don Weiss, executive director. of 

* aC Iw WadtitgM Pen Service . the. NFL, STO. “It would not be 

■ *2-:*: i j , ‘ ^ say*? WASHINGTON — Gradually, appropriate for ns to make a com- 
• '**&• , n Mh* Ae triddetas become a flood. Nu- am other than to say that we are 

1 >■“ 'fekjjooos stars have left the U.S. not going to engage in any conver- 

■ -T- ’■ j. ,, ini . l ' i 0 r >V?toothaII' te«®» and followed ihe satioos with players unless we are 
c,f Js "riv warrant into tne Nadooal Football certain that those players are coo- 


CM 

QM 

m 


Why» 


iKWUMll 

arrant into 
'< * 


Nadooal Football certam that those players are coo-. 


. 'he inSi How vast has tltt dnun of stare “That's one opinion and an erfone- 

> Kftc ton} tu ffl i on the USFL? Big enough to ous one." 

' * *orA Tmvide a boon to the NFL. Con Meanwhile, the USFL continues 


BsatT 


ejess 

o®h\ 

CJWfc 

■gwfcSg 


N37 


d "OW Q ®lQtt 


Cubs Defeat Padres 
With an Infield Hit 


tttTaorife a boon to the NFL. Con 
ider the USFL losses: 

, • Kicker Tony Zendejas JEx- 
:: , ■■* f • ™[,,L*'»ress to tbeRfid&n&ti* USft.’s 
■ nidjjj. ** ^dd goal leader ID 1985. 

V;' 'c.*i , • WVdeiecdver Tremaine John- 


7 ' ^"'ihehr. * • wide recover irumamt 
f. jW* on (Outlaws To Chargers; 

u'-. : : 7 y»? ihji t JW« ftp ”” , * 1 l 9 ?* 

I i™, . mntraM KnMi 


o the Redskins), the USFL’s 
pal leader in 1985. 
idereedver Tremaine John- 
Jatlaws to Chargers), who 
90 passes in 1984 before a 
-long contract holdout in 


Meanwhile, the USFL continues 
re malre cutbacks. San Antonio re- 
wased all 46 players earlier this 
week. The league office and numer- 
ous teams have made cutbacks in 
top personnd. At present, only five 
of the 14 teams have pabtic rela- 
tions directors. 

“Usher has told os there are 


OWBCrOFf®! 

L \ f 


lg4B! 


PCR 

WEffiU? 


, -«mw 4D7‘ “V 
■‘here. yri*. 1 

" ... i . in 


... Vr^Jibn ? 1 


in 1985, second 


?t» 5 t iii the USFL: ■ 

* • Running back Maurice 


!arthoa (Generals to Giants), who back to basics.” 


cones available, and if Arizona 
tries to unload Dong W illiams , that 
reUsyou the owners are trying to go 



r 


Lea Angrier Times Service 

SAN DIEGO — A hard ground 
ball by Richie Hebner in the 10th 
inning enabled the Chicago Cubs 
to beat the San Diego fames, 4-3, 
Wednesday night It was the Pa- 
dres’ fourth straight loss. 

With Ryne Sandberg on third 
and Leon Durham on first, Hebner 
grounded a ball up the middle with 
two outs in the lew of the 10th. The 
Padre shortstop, Garrv Templeton, 
ran a long way to pick' it up. But he 
hobbled it, causing a tardy throw to 
Gumdo Martinez, the lust base- 
man. 

Martinez was playing first be- 
cause Steve Garvey andTcrrv Ken- 


drive that hit the center-field fence. 
Ryan departed. He had given up 
three hits and struck out seven. 
Kevin Grass, the Phillic pitcher 
who ended Ryan's no-hit bid with a 
double, gave up nine bits in eight 
innings. 

Expos X Breves 1: Bryn Smith 
pitched 2 three-hiiler in Manual 
to beat Atlanta. One of the Expos’ 
runs came when center fielder Dale 
Murphy lost Vance Law's fly ball 
in the lights. It went for an inside- 
thc-park home run. 

Dodgers 9. Pirates 1: Greg Brock 
hit a grand slam in the sixth moing 
and later added a run-scoring sin- 


cause Steve Garvey and Tem- Kea- gle to help the Dodgers beat Pitts- 
nedy, who had lad a ninth-inning burgh in Los Angeles. Bob Welch 


- ■ — ■ — - gained his fourth consecutive tri- 

BASEBALL ROliNDUP un ?P h on a five-hitter. 

Blue Jays 3, Mariners 1: In the 

rally to tie the at 3-3, had American League. Jesse Barfield 


already left for pinch-nmners. 

“I don’t know, man, " be said of 
the throw. “It was real dose." 


hit a two-run homer and Jeff Bur- 
roughs hit a bases-emptv shot in 
Toronto as the Blue Javs Seat Seat- 


M ^Wcd nearly 1,800 yards the past Usher recently gave Leigh Stein- 

• r .-\ seasons, proving that more berg, Young's agent, clearance to 

V777 r Win one tunning back can thrive in negotialewiththeTampaBayBuc- 

P nj k m x^fcrschd Walker’s Jersey. caneers of the NFL, the team that 

• r^'^nir. Tins list does not indude the possesses Young's rights in that 
“ ui: ' N ■t^ireungham. running back Joe league. Sieinbeig says Usher did 
7 . 7 . m -Sbbs, who led the USFL in rush- not, however, give him the right to 


VANTAGE POINT/ Ira Berkow 

Belated Admission From Baseball’s Crowned Heads 

Nr<o York Tima Soviet players say at least give us a proposal, but so far along way to roin order for the owness to come 

NEW YORK —In the face of an impending the crowned beads haven’t. . completely clean about their income. Fehi 

players strike — the deadline, as baseball fans The crowned heads are getting mnch more points stifl to inflated projections in the rise ol 


50 in order for the owners 10 come 
can about their income. Fehr 
inflated projections in the rise of 


is Ang. 6 — the crowned heads of base- from the networks now— it is a six-year total of Midi essentials as players* salaries and operating 
1 mitt <-ri this week that they were slightly $1.1 b3Boa' which began in 1984 — and the costs. 


recent statements about financial losses, players want to stay at thepoceatage leva, one- wire baseball being as popular as it is, many 

nagodgment was a mere pittance, total- ihisd, that they’ve czgoyed from TV loot for people have views on the situation of a possible 
millio n over five years. WeS, nearly 20 years. This would mean about $60 strike, whether they know or care about the 
___________________ milKon a year instead of the current $15.5 mil- particulars. 

A * *t A lion. On a local newscast the other night, for exam- 

3*8 Association the crowned heads have said that the added pie, a man named Tommy McDonald first read 

, , m . TV revenue is essential for them. They loudly the sports news, then ventured an opinion. He 

lioi-u ta fitill a Inn n i.: .1 . .1 .1 1 : 1.1 . 1 .. .l 1 1 u 


7rfc jJSFL contract 


making 


players want to stay at the percentageteveL < 
third, that they've enjoyed from TV loot 


With baseball being as popular as it is, 1 


■ ll NFL. The Bills own his NFL. we’re not talking about a technical 


”' -"t 'V.imiv 
<:• v 11- 


Nor does fins list indude quar- 
oback Bobby Hd>ert. the USFL’s 


-.pTraieer passing leader, whose USFL 
. : i„ ^antract aqmred with the Oakland 
Vi 10 w : 


.-rJyagi * deal with one of several 
• \ .l ^hwested NFL teams. 

«. And, pertomost damaging of 

11 for tlw USFL. the agents for two 

^ • i the leagne’s most coveted play- 

■ n— quarterbacks Jim KeUy and 

— ieve Young — are taurine about 

reach of contract and say they are 
pandering i«Vmg rhwr clients 10 
<n I in;; lijv Juuriy V S J | IFL, toa 

toc fact that Anthony Carter, 

__ r- ie electric wide receiver for the 

......... 'Ti Vtt j CISj of. wanting to es- 

.... w.. 


breach in Steve’s contract,” Stein- 
berg says. “There were clauses in 
his contract designed specifically to 
avoid the kind of situation that 
occurred this season. 

“The conditions Steve bargained 
had to do «t& the quality of coach- 
ing be would receive; with quality 
management and with an owner 
who owns businesses off the field 
that Steve would be involved in. It 


The Players Association 
believes there Is still a long 
way to go in order for the 
owners to come completely 
dean about their income. 


proclaim that they’re losing money like crazy was not in 5 
and that they can’t afford to pay the players the that when a 
kind of money they have been. year, why, 1 


was not in sympathy with the players and said 
that when a ballplayer was making $100,000 a 
year, why, that was plenty good enough for 


did not have to do with playing in what’s a hundred million dollars or so between Basketball Association teams, winch 

the Coliseum with 3,000 fansTwith liege and subject? warned of doom if they continued paymg huge 

fewornoieservesoatheteam,widi Some of what the Major League Baseball sa j aries '^?, accountmits agreed 

no TV or radio contract to speakof players Association has icnncd “paper losses” substantially and the NBA Players Association 
and with creditors hned np around — fnr nf irmal roster negotiated a salary cap. 

i the block." costs tor last year, (bis year »md the next three However, when the firm reviewed the basc- 


Tbe players reton that the crowned heads someone playing a game, 
have not established that their wallets ate in- This trenchant observation would draw heavy 

deed as fiat as baseball cards. The Players Asso- note of approval from the PoUtburo. In a earn- 
ria ripn hired the accounting firm, Stid- system, however, where there is this 

man & Seidman, that checked thebooks of the weird partiality to tree enterprise, an individual 
NanVmai A«*viarinn f«mc which generally cams what the market will bear. 


■ |^;jpe frOG the option year of his was'bwidied, ilstig said, “bc^ Bn »ch a belated admission on the part of of the Players AssocationTthat “they weren’t . , . . 

.. coatram m 1986 to play for cause he wasn’t paid the last two the crowned heads points up whal the players comparable to those of the NBA, not even m neea Ol a Dll Cup, 

; c r;* NFL team that oyms his nghB weeks of the season and the play- have been contending since last December, remotdy." In fam, the players contend thatthe 

. 17 ,‘j/’ Miami — adds to an already Lastig said the leagne has when the coDcctivebaigaimng agreement ended owners are making mobqr. The crowned h«ds Meanwhile, the crowned beads, most of 

ystal-dear picture. said.it will «qiiw responsibility and n^otiations on the new one were in their have said that they lost $43 irfflion in 1984. The whom have other businesses besides baseball 

■The Invaders have until Aug. 1 •, for Kelly’s contract if the GamMers. eariy stages. That is,' that the Ownerf. figures players accountants .read the books at a auier- ^ ship bull ding and car dealing and pizza 
.■ deride whether Yo pick up the - ~are unabre to make p^rmaits. Lus- were oorterbe swallowed Whofc-rad thacihejr- eat angle from iheowstMi^nd dcttrmmed Uhl r-franduang. can wnte off their baseball tosses, 
?tion- If they do. Anthony will tig said he is waiting to find out if were often simply grist for the owners’ pubho- the dubs made a 59 unlliQn profit. On Monday ’ ^ jugg^ thar books — all within legi loop- 
lay for them next year." says Bob the Gamblers will be sold and relations mills. ... the crowned beads announced that, waL, we — in order to derive an advantage in their 

foolf. Carter's Boston-based moved to New York, which he If the chibs are not in financial distress, as the didn’t really lose $43 million, we lost only S28.5 entangled ledgers. And if they have 10 sell the 

gent. “If he had bis preference, claims would be a bonanza market players daim is the case, then there is no reason million. dub, there is a nice profit and sweet capital 

uwgh, Anthony has always want- for a player such as Kelly, who has for the players to buckle to proposals by the For 1985, the crowned beads originally said gains to be enjoyed. 

J to P“y for h™®-*’ two years on his contract. owners to cut back on free agency and salary they were going to lose $58 million, but now Yet crowned beads have historically been 

- * Two weeks ago, the USFL com- “If the Gamblers aren’t sold and arbitration, to institute a salary cap, and to they have tempered that projection to read $29 able, when necessary, to prove they were in need 

' ' nssiooer, Harry Usher, said of the moved, I would try to solve Tim’s agree to give bade, numerous other points of million. Similar reductions were; for 1986, $94 of a tin cup. It just takes artful accounting. 


However, when the firm reviewed the base- 
ball dubs’ statements for accuracy, it said, ac- 
cording to Don Fehr, acting executive director 


Kelly’s contract with the finan- years — hav 
dally troubled Houston Gamblers the owners, 
was breached, Lustig said, ‘Tie- But such : 


Tor last year, this year and the next three Howeve 
— have been eHnunaied or moderated by -ball dubs’ 


Yet, crowned heads have 
historically been able, when 
necessary, to prove they were 
in need of a tin cap. 


The Padres trailed. 3-2. entering ^ Jhnmy Key. who has become 
the bottom of the ninth with Lee one of the most dependable Toron- 
Smith on the mound for the Cubs. lc> pitchers, lowered bis earned-run 
Bat Garvey, who hit a memorable average 10 2.65. He vent 7‘ j in- 
playoff homer here last season biu&s before Bill Caudill and Gar)' 
against Smith, lined a double off Lavelle took over. The slumping 
the left-center-field wall. Jerrv Da- Mariners have lost 12 of 15 games, 
vis ran for Garvey and scored on Royals 5, Indices 3: Frank 
Kennedy’s single through a pulled- W* drove in four runs »ilh i»© 
in infield. Jerry Royster ran for 1101116 nuiS a°d a sacrifice fly in 
Kennedy. Kansas City to build a lead over 

There were now two 001 s, with Ncw Yort for Charlie LeibrandL 
Kevin McReynolds up. But Roys- 8411 030 Quiscnbeny had to pitch 
ter decided to steal — a move that two perfect inn ings to keep the 
Dick Williams, the Padre manager. Royals ahead. It was the third save 
agreed with — - and Royster was in three nights for Quisenberry. the 
thrown out by catcher Steve Lake. lea 8 u = leader with 21. 

“Ifl make it, we have a chance to Red Sox 6. As ft 'ft ade Boggs 

win,” Royster said. "If I don’t. three hits at Boston to extend 
we’re still tied. But we’ve got to quit hiwiitt streak to 27 games, and 

titling around waiting Tor borne ^ Red Sox had 12 other hits. But 
runs. We’re waiting for the big in- “ took a bases-toaded walk to Jack- 
ning too much. You can't expect Ie Gutierrez bn the bottom of the 
guys to hit and hit all year" ninth to give Boston its fourth 
Canfinds 4, Giants 0: John Tu- sl ™ 8hl „ 

dor shut out the Giants on six hits , So \^ Dan peu T 

at San Francisco. It was Tudor’s flaw » fanMuaw at Che ago. out- 

fifth shutout, tying him with Fer- P ,,c ^ n B T f m ** : P te » 

nando Vatamfffor the league ,n 8 ** veieranridit-hander rram 

lead. All the Cardinal runs camcto wu,n,n B h,s c™ 

the fifth inning and were unearned. up nine hus anJall the Tlg^r 

Am «« nbjJri 1 -v T™w/i'r r. runs, but his teammates made two 


Meanwhile, the crowned beads, most of 


tig said he is waiting to find out if were often simply grist for the. owners pubho- 
the Gamblers will be sold and relations mills. 

moved to New York, which he If the clubs are not in financial distress, as the 

claims would be a bonanza market players daim is the case, then there is no reason 
for a player such as Kelly, who has lor the players to buckle to proposals by the 
two years on his contract. owners to cut back on free agency and salaiy 

“If the Gamblers aren't sold and arbitration, to institute a salary cap, and to 


due 10 catcher Alex Trevino's fum- ... ...... .. 

bling of Tbdor' s one-out bunt One “ rors f , hal COIUr,buled 10 h,s 
out later, Willie McGee hit a three- 0 Rbiw ._ j, r_. R r vJp _ 

run home ran. A walk to Tommy 8 y 

Herr, a sieal and Jack Clark's single 1 5th complete game 

acmunted for ih* oih^r nm ^ ^ ^ R ^~ 


accounted for the other ran. 

. Reds 3, Mtts 2: Cindruiati com 


cn at Arlington. Texas. He gave u p 
seven bits, struck out nine and 


ff the ebibs rm; not ip f inancial « the didn’t really lose $43 million, we lost only S28-5 

players daim is the case, then there is no reason million. 

for the players to buckle to proposals by the For 1985, the crowned beads originally said 
owners to cut back on free agency and salaiy they were going to lose $58 million, but now 


■ . ■ '■ 0 u* la, an uvn wrut lutxw miv 

°L\ f C talked five. Mike Hargrove led 
12-bit attacl with a 

dSShJ ® angle, a double and his first home 
dnve >n the winning ran with two nm of ihe season. 

“U £ Orioles 4, Twins 2: Eddie Mur- 

■ rU ^ S ft o, ra y hit a (wo-nm home run. and 
Mike Boddicker ended a personal 


.. ... „ _jt - — j— — — - ~ — - ~o— — 1 - out in the ninth. Earlier. Milner 

holes— in order to derive an advantage in their scored the first two runs for the 
drdn t reaDy lose $43 minion, we lost only $28^ entangled ledgers. And if they have to sell the Reds and. in the third inning, threw 
^h* 011 - dub, there is a nice profit and sweet capital Rafad Santana out at the plate as 

For 1985, the crowned beads originally said gains to be enjoyed. he tried to score from second on a 


xodus of USFL stars, 
nch a critical thing to t 
Jew suns will devefo 
ague." Usher also sail 


stars. “It’s not contract with the USFL" Lustig axraom 

S ’ c league, said. “If I can’t work it out, I would bonuses 
in our lake the USFL to court But if the players, 
recently team goes under and the league • In th 


S have tempered that projection to read $29 able, when necessaiy. to prove they were in need 
». Similar reductions were: for 1986, $94 of a tin cop. It just takes artful accounting, 
million to $59 million; 1987, SI 13 million to S64 Tlic classic case was the financier J.P. Mor- 

nunkm, and 1988. $155 million 10 586 million, gan. In 1933. Morgan, the richest man in the 


ayers. Combined with last year’s newly admitted re- 

in the same vein, the playess do not look dnetion, that’s a total difference in the first 


, 4 . Mt the NFL’s interest in these goes under, all you end up with is a adoringly at the owners’ stand on their problems financial statement and the new one of $19<L5 
1 *' b - layers was a “compliment" to the lawsuit against a bankrupt league, concerning TV money. The owners don’t want million for five years. 

•‘y'JFL. It’s sort of a Catch-22.” to give the players as modi as they want; the The Players Association believes there is stiD 

: i " flrDivagent Views have emerged I wm—mmmmmmmmmmm 


income taxes in 1932. 

But how was that possible? 

Losses, he explained. Losses, losses, losses. 


ijiibool the exodus of drawing-card 
T , p. layers from the USFL One view 
; «ii" 1 riates to the USFL’s $132-biDion 
4 inti trust suit against the NFL en- 

coring the NFL from appearingon 
* a-f three television networks. The 
rial date tentatively is scheduled 
* stt jQr February 1986. 

■* “That lawsuit is the biggest bb- 
bde of all in moving from the 
JSFL to the NFL" says Greg Lus- 


Is Any Yearling Worth $ 13.1 Million ? 
The Answer, Almost Certainly, Is No 


3 T- 


Baseball 


By Ancircw Beyer past decade. This time, his rival was shook las head to indicate that the 

Washington p<m Service not an Arab sheikh but Wayne Lo- most expensive yearling transao- 

WASHINGTON — Wien the kas, the prominent American train- tion in history was over. 


AMERICAN LEAOUE 
K«t DMitaa 


die Ohio-based agent for KeDy. bay cdt was led into -the auctirai «■» sat flanked by his money- 

uMET L. «« ? tt i .j i... inM nonm Pnowi. Tliim xul 


r-"Sf i«8 tat Keendand Tuesday f night, ^ dand sale don’t shock the rating SS 


^ um, except in those situations like the bidding ( 
; u'ob Angdes, where the team is anx- once an m 

: ^us to get rid of anybody." yearling ihoi 

• y “1 don’t think the NFL is being flying from 
.rsmoas at afi," says Art Wifldn- and within 
: : S ». the Philadelphia-based agent price had sk 
-’^Roriet “The NFL is the master lion. 

-'J the smokescreen. I thmk the Withther 


the bidding opened at $1 million — Lloyd French, 
once an unthinkable price for a ThelHddingforthesanofh^in- 
yearling thoroughbred Bids came sky II and My Charmer grew by 
Dying from aB over the pavilion, increments of $100,000 and 
and within a minute or two the $200,000, passed the existing world 
price had skyrocketed to $9 mil- record yearling price of $102 mil- 


rice had skyrocketed to $9 mil- record yearling price of $102 mil- 
on. Hoc, aB the way to $123 nriTKop, 

With the riffraff weeded out, the where Lukas tried for a knockout 

- • ; jFL is domg exactly what it al- serious bidders could now get pundL He upped the ante to $13 
; ■ '? does: say one thing and do down to business. In the rear of the nriUion, but the Sangstor forces 
.! ; ' Aer. The NFL is not bring can- pavilion stood Joss Collins, the rep- were onfazed. After OriHns nod- 


price did come as a surprise: “There 
wasn’t the presale exatement over 
this colt that we’ve had over other 
record yearlings," said Keendand 
publicist James Williams, “al- 


pnbncist 
ibouah it 

that he wi 


.is not bring can- pavihan stood Joss Collins, the rep- 

i .11.. — 1 d .Iuti 


that he was one of the two best in 
the sale." 

The record setter has an inqxc- 


i'-ang politically expedient.’' 


high-priced yearling market for the 




W 

L 

pa 

GB 

Toronto 

Si 

37 

All 

— 

now York 

S3 

40 

Sts 

to 

Dotroit 

30 

43 

443 

to 

Boston 

50 

44 

432 

TVS 

Baltimore 

47 

45 

411 

m 

MHwaukM 

40 

51 

Am 

u 

Oevotand 

30 

west DMsion 

43 

333 

27 

California 

St 

38 

406 

— 

Kansas CUv 

4f 

44 

437 

to- 

Chicago 

47 

44 

416 

TVS 

Oakland 

M 

46 

411 

B 

Seattle ■ 

44 

50 

4M 

12 

Minnesota 

41 

09 

At J 

n 

Texas 37 SB 

NATIONAL LRAOUB 
East DMsJea 

set 

1«V 


W 

L 

pa 

GB 

SL Louis 

56 

36 

409 

— 

Now York 

53 

40 

470 

3VS 

Montreal 

54 

41 

-561 

3Vj 

Chicago 

SO 

43 

431 

to 

PMkxtetaWa 

42 

51 

A52 

Wto 

Plttsburta 

31 

West DMsion 

61 

■337 

25 

Las Aneatos 

S3 

39 

476 

— 

Sad Diego 

S3 

43 

447 

TVS 

CJndftncrt 

4» 

43 

433 

4 

Houston 

44 

SI 

AO 

T6VS 

Atlanta 

41 

52 

Ml 

72VS 

San Frandecs 35 

« 

JUS 

Wh 


dub. these is * nme profit and sweet capital Rafad Santana out at the plate as thr^mroe T^nR wreak £ 

gains to be enjoyed. he tried to score from second on a toSLnSSilU fcS- 

Yet crowned beads have historically been single. Pete Rose had two hits for struck out eidu° in seven 

able, when necessaiy. to prove they were m need the Reds. He now needs 3 lhits to struck out aght in seven 

of a tin cup. It just takes artful accounting. break Ty Cobb’s record. Irakis a Brewer; 4- Rnfinn n. 

^ S; i Noton Ryn a ‘lller and 

y Wglrngua IMI he pad no l«. to gam, in |ta ei*U. SSJKSlhSS. MSLS 
mwne taxes m 1932. when Von Hayes tat an mside-the- fck gave up three rans on right hits. 

io«_, ^ park home run m Ptaladdphia. Af- two^ralk and had one «nkeom 

Losses, he explained. Losses, losses, losses. ter Hayes circled the bases on a before tf leT ^ ^ 

ning. Stew Gibura and Donnie 

ABM Moore {niched the final three in- 

AkNw nings for California. 

“ _ „ ■ Uncertain Future for Perez 

isasebaii Pascual Perez is back in Atlanta 

and has contacted the Braves, The 

udmgs Wednesday’s Major Leagne line Scores £^1535^21 

e national LEAcui BonLStanwv in ood c*omen.w-stani«v.s. the team Sunday in New York after 

ODCkUMlI HI ••• Ml— a 7 • S. Li I IomIL H MR* Oakland. KlftBmat >■ . i ,, u, .l. u_, Vnrlr 

PCI GB mm Yerfc IN 111 M-3 I 1 |jj»,Murah»t1M.Hwilh{W».OOwlsU71.BM- “*“*8 D “ lcn PV »** ,NCW *ora 

i aii — RBbtaan, Franco (7i. pMMrm an* sitar- ton. BucJimr (id. Mets and has smee been suspended 

I J65 to hollo; Aunflera McOowefl (SI onh HunSa. Now Yorfc MS Ml SIB— I f I without D2V 

I M3 to Corhrr I*). W— Franco, LI. L— McDowoH-SJ. tom Citv MB Ml 10*— * I ■ . 'j 1 ’ - ■ 

I SO 710 Sv— Powor (II). HR— Nwt Yoric, HtrnandBZ Cowtoy. SMrlov (SI, FlNtor ML Bordl (7), *“ an mtmiew pUDUSnea m 

< ' 411 m <•!. Alton (Cl onh Hmoov; LoflsnmrfL Outaen- TbursdaV S editions Of Tnf Atlanta 

Am u st Loots sob mb mb— i 7 2 Dotty tsi and sundbora. w— Lotoronen, 1B-S. Cfsisiitution Perez said. “I don’t 

I JW 27 SooFraNdtco MMNM i 1 L-CO.-WV. S^. Sv-C3uHonbotTv {21 ». HRs- ^ _ :_v,” , 

Tudorane Porter/ Gott.Davte IS}, Gomtti Now York. AioWhwWim.Xjwawcny.VwilM leel gooa l need lime. 1 migbt not 
i sh — (7).bido iw and ttovidwvb— T udor , 2 (u>. Bottom i ui. play baseball for a lent long tune. 

I so to- con, 44. hr— S i. Louis. McGm Ifl. Bommaro Mi BM MI-4 7 a I -Lj _ br-aV ■■ 

l SH 716 Aftootfl m MG BOO— 1 3 B NUawwto Ml 000 «n — 3 9 • ‘“Wuibi. 

I 511 I MoMd Ui Sit Mx-3 7 1 Bohtflcker. aom <8) and Porda. Dofnpwv Perez WUS 14-8 fOT the Braves 1251 

1 AM 12 BohroNon. Dohmon (S| onh BoaoMd: tt|; Schrora. Wortlo m. EiHomla (*» and year but Oflly 1 -8 with a 6.52 earned 

► AO n smith and Frtzooreid.W—SmtttwlM.L— Bo- Sotto.W-4ttddkkor.lD.l0.L-5cl»nim,S-lB. mvera oi >hic ceainn He has 

I J«9 l*W drcolon.Sf.HRo— Allonta.Harpor (ii).Mon- Sv-Ana* IS). MR-«oWmcro. Murray (IS). J™ arewje uus sowffl. nc 

_ (tool ln ui. Dotroit ooi n bib— s w b been on the disabled list twice this 

n o ma o «m bu bio— i * • cmcooo «e im mb— * 4 2 season with arm problems. 

; P £ “ "SSSammaai EZELLi “IJtoew peopk w«e looking for 

wo ma w and virau. w-GroM. M. L~Rvoa u. ctiiccoa. waKor ns). me, bui I needed to be leit alone. 


Major League Standings Wednesday’s Major Leagne Line Scores 


NATIONAL LKACU1 BovWHoMov t» ood Godman.W-S1anlav.S- 

Ondnaatl 1«1 OM boi— j 7 0S. l H on oI L K HR*-OaUand. Umtmat 

mm YOrtC Ml Ml MO— 3 S 1 [22>,Mun>ftv (1W.Hoath(M).DOwls(171.Bo*- 

RaWnKn. Franco (71. Ponor (7) and Bllar- tan. BtnAnor (11). 
hollo; Aouftera McOawofl (S) and Hurtfla. Now York 
Carter 10). W — Franca. 0-1. L— McOowon.54. Konoos CUv 
Sv to mr 111). HR— Now York. Homndoz Cowtoy. Shtrlav I 

(•). Allan (Cl and Ha 

St Loots MO ON 400—4 7 2 Dotty CM and Suml 

San FrancHoo 0M 0M 010-0 > 1 L— Cawtoy. B-L Sv 


rtSa. Now Yarn 0M Ml «1B— I f l 

.W tom! CUv 030 Ml 40*— lit 

ndoz Cowtoy. Shtrlov (51. Flohor (4). Borhl (7), 
Allan (Cl and Hobov; LoOsnandt Oulten. 
7 2 dotty (Maud Sundbora. W— Loferondt. 104. 
i 1 L— CoMrtov’.B-LBw— OulOOMfconY (21). HR*— 


(7). Bloc Ifl and TrovUMb Vo— Tudor, 1VB.L— 2 (14). Bottom Mil. 

Gan, 44 HR— SI. Louis. McGoo (4). Bernmoro 201 BM Ml— 4 7 C 

Atlanta MB MB BOB-1 3 0 Wmulg 001 0M Ml— 3 f • 

W nt rod UintMs-a 7 1 Bodcflcker. Aom (I) and Pardo, Donwwv 

Bcdrcdan. DOdmon dl and Baaodkl; (9); Schrom. Wardlo (f). Eirfomla (*> and 
smith and FrusorcdcLW— SmWwUaL-Bo. Scrtoo. W Bod dl c k or. 1H0. L— SOirpnyBlB. 


drcolan.Sf.HRo— Atlanta. Harpor (II). Mon- 
trow. Law Ul. 

Itt o i t o o 040 BU 010—1 f • 

P MtoMlo M a Ml Ml 11*— J 3 I 


tv -Amo <5>. hr— S oRtmor*. Murray (IS), 
totroil 0M BM MB-S » 0 

arieaoo 3M IM MO— 4 4 2 

PotryondCasHDo; Seavar.Cloaton (f)ond 


Ryan, South (I) and Ballcv: GroowTekidwo Flak. W — Pctrv. 114. I — Soever. IBS. HR— 
(f) and VlralL W— Gras*. 94 L — Ryan, H. Chlcacn. waDcar (15). 


SY— Tckutve OM- MR— PhHodotoWw Mayo* 

fh l c o o n M 1 IM 0 MI— 4H0 

Sad 04*00 MO 3N MI •— 3 7 1 


Btviovon and Willard; Hoolon, Notts (4). 


ma wo ? t a Pena said in the interview. He said 
• mmeib Notts (M. he spent Monday and Tuesday in 


W LmwnDunarl Ui. dot. Mart Dickson #r "" n U, ‘ Lt 

(I3),U^*4>L norm i(2l. Boono 14). 

OatUonno VJJafc (IS), ATMatlnb doL PtMrl ! *? totsnfcll l l 

SttriL CiectiostoroWa, M, 4-2. r*ZZ. I- 

Jaro NavratiL OochoslovoMa. dot Aoron 

y . trfi .i-.in iii us -LA. AA. u dttl (S), Lovollo (f) anhAlionson.w— KCV.W. 

Jnttt liu AraMtatt' hM Ncnn b-Vb— .WH S u LBuoUo (5).HRo-Toran- 
■ Mcrttn^Jono ^ ID. 4UW0WVB, sec Nom ^ Mr1W() lWi w . 


er. Vfith Ncwthem Dancer 24 years wowwvt 

old, Nijinsky IIwiD one day be the ^StSo** 
dominant stallion in the world. ckxsonan 

Hgmtwi 

The dam of the yearling, My Atlanta 
Charmer, produced the great Seat- son Frandooo 
tie Slew and four other stakes hors- 

-**■ Tennis 

But can any yearling be worth — — — - 

$13.1 milli on? The answer, almost ill clay cour t cham pionships 

crittimly, is no. If the Kijinsbr colt • 
goes on to win the English Derby sceowt Round 

and to be the champion of his gen- Yon mckNoo h ui, pm 

exation, he mkht be sym&ated for l ^JJ'S5^Su!L 
as modi as $50 milHoa as a stallion ikd, 
prospect, tvtkh would also be a ooJitorme vno*. ihj.a 

world-record sunk Essentially 
Saogster is taking odds of 3 to 1 x^dtstom to), us* m, 
that this handsome young thor- wjhr 
ougbhred— who has never seen a 
racetrackytt— ^ win grow up to be oma Argentina, fri 0-1. 
the best horse cm a continent. Any 1 

bookmaker with the necessaiy cap- oil. Frm 

ital would dadly take that wteer. metmr. one, w m. 

toon Lendl I W# CmOm 

But Sangster (who is m ihebook- zi«>iinpvic vwnk 

malting business himsdfj is not an ^ Se ™ r *2* 
irrational man. Since the mid- jm hh» ciorc. (7>, ah 
1970s, he has acquired tens of mil- Aiwm Gm in, e» 
lions of doflara worth of horaes mBt t,J ‘ Crea ‘»* tev1 * Wo 
from the Nolhern Dancer line. He w °twdmi 

owns countless racehorses, stal- zmo coniam. tu. u^. 
lions and mares with many the uj.h,hi4 

bought Tuesday afternoon. DoooieSMnc»(»),u^ 


tea 0*00 mo 3M mi o-2 i i sNmort (ci, sovniot w and petraiiL w— New York with his brother, “ivan- 

Eckoratty.BrMotar (7).Smltli (I), Fnuior BTylevorv, 4-10. L— Heaton. S-S. HRs^Cttvo- dcrillR nmtind and trying to figure 
(10) and Davtx, Lako (S); HoyLStoAtard (f), Vukovlrti (4), Hororavo (1). Toaos. 


LoNorto DO) and Knrno dy, Bactiy (10). W— 
Smith. 54. l— Stoddard. V4. SY-Frarior (2). 
HR» — Chlcoco, Sandbora 1151. San Dttaw 1 
Nettles (10). 

PBtrture t OM IM BM— 1 9 1 I 

LMAMOtts 044 044 IS*— f 9 2 I 

Robl no cn.Holland (41. Wind I7LCBMW 1 
IDandPonwwcirtandSclasclaw.WOicivS- | 
1. L— RaMnam U HR*-PH»wrorw ] 

lock 15). Los An o o l oL Brock (15). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE I 

CMHMMB 110 348 BOW-4 12 S 

MftwouMo 2M Ml 011-4 10 I 

Romani CL album (7). Moors (9) and | 


WOJkor ()}, MCDowail (C). 


(hinge OUL” 


Yaimlek Noah (4), France, dot Th lorry Tu* Boono;Hh»uera Ladd (S), McCHn (71, FVw 


Otti (?) and Schroodor. Romanlck, 124. 1 


narco (2). Boono 14). 

Seattle OM •» 400-1 7 2 

Toroew OM Ml Ofe-1 7 3 

Yoww. Thomas (I) and Koamrtr; Kcr. Cou- 
dttl Ul. Levant tn and Alionson.W-Kev.f4. 
L-Yo«M,X-n.Su- Lovotlo (5I.HRB— Toron- 


smwflwwW. Di- M, 7-6 (7-1). 

Bkdn* Mhnkm US-d4tMoroNo Inoar- 


MXootav Modr (5). CzodustovaUa. tot. 

PhJJl pm Tuekntes, UL M. 4-L 

Gw Porpof 05). Franco, dot Hans OUdo- 
metslor. Chile, Mr 5-1 
man Lendl (», C 40 C»Ml n> a fcla dot. Sleto- 
dan Zlvnllnovlc, Yugoslavia. W, 54L 
TIM Round - - 
Hans Sdwaier 112), Wo N Germair, tot, BASKETBALL 

Jose Lab Gere, (7), Argentina. 64. 64. Hgtleanl MdHUl AssoctaJtai 

Anarn Gomm (2), Eeuador.daL LlDor PI- INDIANA— Cu) Kelvin Joiawon, Rolpb 

met (fj. CDedNrtttdMN 3-A.7S.SA. Jaduar, Kamv Pattervn gvonti. ora Tarry 

WOMEN'S SINGLES MOr1la torwori 

Third Bagad FOOTBALL 

ZJna Garrison, (2). U.S* Uet Jenny Klltch, CanaSeo Fwlbon Loogge 

U. 64. 24, 14. EDMONTON— Traded Mart Korvalh. » 

GaDrl ol a I g g oWi pi.ArDomina.dot Susw itralvo nock, to Taranto lor (vtarscontldar* 


SMOond Oil OM 142-5 M 1 

lesion 2M IN 811—6 » I 

Subwv HowoH m ana Totttoton, Heath tfl: 


Transition 


''■JZ ASY OPENER — Ivan Lendl returning a shot to Slobodan Zivojinovic in his first 
"natch at the U.S. day Court Oiampionsbps in IndanapoiK Lendl trianphed, 6-4, 6-0. 


«*«« « ** **** g be 

bought Tuesday afternoon. mdoic sranc (isi, tw. Mowns Tor. 

So when he keeps the market T *K^ ,, Gomp«ai,’u,sL dm. Kotor mo wwieevo 
strong with a reoord-shattenng w. Butgona 64. o-l 
pnrdase. he is bolstering mi. iiaiy. ml Hettn ka- 

the value of all the bones he at a^xi rvan.u_s.ae). Katween hwvohi ui, 
ready owns. He didn’t have lobe ux.hu. 
whouy crazy to. spend 313.1 million 

lor a year-old horse. Just a little Monurio Nuiom n>. Buioaiia, tot. so. 
crazy. • mm ernes ill), vwaii*ia 7* 14 74 



attoM. Staled Clifford Toney, defensive 


Debate Saeneol13)<U.S« del. Ml cneno Tor- back: Don Mdteel and Frank Badcovac 


Summer Exhibition Or 
Rare Jewels Of THe World 


Unabacttra. Acthratod Mllsen Jonah running 


Koto GamncrLUJLdeLKMorina Moioeva bade. n ettaseaLwiwood Hidltoa.detawlra 


(S). Bulgaria. 64, 6-2. 

Rafiaoile Reset (U). Italy. doL Hotan No- 
ted. Canada 6< 6a 
Anna rvan.UJS.de). Kathleen Horvath Ul, 


Itooman, aad Mike Robbaon. llnebeckor. 

HAMILTO N Sta ted uffortt Chatham, 
nsnnkfis bKko 

WINNIPEG — Activated James Hood, wide 
receiver. Itoleond Mflto Milter, wise rocely. 
or. 

National E — M 1 — mn 

CINCINNATI— Announced the reUramont 
ol Mb ObtuvuL. attonshm flneman. 


to 


umei ahJiW)- 

■ Vi Bro*u , uv*Road ■ KmCHisenxTCt London SW| TturrHdi* w • < *Ki W 71 Ttux ji.njo 
a* ttfbRLDWtOt. Bv AmOWIbENl 






Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Blind Blinding the Blind 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Tough lu 
blind folks. For you there i 


IN blind folks. For you there will 
be no more Playboy magazines in 
braille from the U. S. Library of 
Congress. 

Congressman Chalmers P. Wylie 
has caught you. And put a stop to 
iL With the consent and approval 
of the entire House of Representa- 
tives of the United States. And of 
all decent, right-thinking people, 
too. I'll bet 

All right so the Famous Playboy 
pictures — those disgusting pic- 
tures — are not reproduced in the 
library's braille editions. 

Thank heaven for small favors. 
But our House of Representatives 
was not so easily satisfied, because 
what about the inf amo us Playboy 
partyjokes? 

What about the vQe Playboy Ad- 
visor with his licentious hints on 
what to do about — well, this — 
and that? “Is the honorable mem- 
ber telling this House that the 
braille edition does not make it 
possible to visualize the most min- 
ute details of the Playmate of the 
Month by application of fingertips 
to, ah, shall we say — T 

“Unfortunately, no, Only the 
reading material is reproduced. In- 
famous party jokes, vile Playboy 
Advisor hints, interviews with 
American presidents discussing 
lust they have felt in their hearts." 

Cries of “Shame! Shame!" 

Partyjokes. Lust. 

These are concepts that outrage 
the House of Representatives. 

□ 

Speaker O'Neill was hard 
pressed to defeat motions for rent- 
ing more mercenaries to overthrow 
the Nicaraguan government, which 
was assumed .to be in cahoots with 
the Soviet Union in a plot to de- 
stroy the moral fiber of America's 
blind with braille Playboy party 
jokes. 

Many a member reminded the 
press gallery what Lenin had said: 

“Today partyjokes at the finger- 
tips of the blind; tomorrow the 
novels of D.H. Lawrence in the 
hands of women and college girls." 

Speaker O’Neill blocked resolu- 
tions calling for the imnrigratioa 
bureaucracy to hound dThT Law- 
rence out of the United States, but 
only after testimony from Con- 
gressman Wylie that D.H. Law- 
rence had been dead for many 
years. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 




Throughout the turmoil Con- 
gressman Wylie remained the very 
bedrock of responsible literary crit- 
icism. The distinguished Ohio Re- 
publican, known in his native state 
as “the Buckeye Saimc-Beuve” 
(sometimes “the Buckeye Longi- 
nus” or “the Buckeye Edmund Wil- 
son"). refused to be drawn into 
debate about licentious jokes and 
vile advice. 

The facts were sufficient. Gov- 
ernment money paid for braille edi- 
tions of 36 magazines selected by 
blind readeis for their literary mer- 
it 

“1 do not feel that Playboy meets 
those standards,” Wylie an- 
nounced. 

He was referring to the literary 
standards of journals like Good 
Housekeeping and Popular Me- 
chanics, which are also produced in 
braille at government expense. 

D ■ 

The usual bleeding hearts were 
heard from. 

“Censorship!'’ they cried. “Who 
are we, in spite of our infinite wis- 
dom, to decide that the blind are 
entitled to expensively produced 
magazines, idling how to build 
bird houses, and how to dust be- 
hind radiators, but not to maga- 
zines Idling how to use birdhouses 
and radiators to make one’s sex life 
more fulfilling?" 

Congressman Wylie noted that 
the question at issue was not the 
type of advice to which the blind 
were entitled, but the literary quali- 
ty of its donors. 

While it was true, he noted, that 
officially approved magazines in 
the 1930s bad split a great many 
infinitives in such articles as “How 
to Build Your Own Autogyro" and 
“Seven Keys to Tastier Macaroni 
and Cheese,” both Popular Mer 
chanics and Good Housekeeping 
were better edited nowadays and 
certainly more literate than Play- 
boy, which often contained inter- 
views with politicians. 

Congressman Wylie < *mph g< ^ 7f *d 
that not all blind people enjoyed 
reading Playboy in braille. Since 
they would be depriving only a few 
— and those few. people of inferior 
literary taste — the members readi- 
ly voted the braiUe Playboy out of 
existence. 

Thus do the blind blind the 
blind. 

New York Timer Service 


MOVING 


Bias Charges Mar 
Dinesen’s Memory 


jfyBanyShbchtcr 

The .AssodJiaJ Press 

K AREN, Kenya —The writer 
Isak Dinesen and the dere- 
lict stone cottage she once lived in 
have become subjects of contro- 
versy in the centennial year of her 
birth. 

The Danish writer, whose real 
name was Baroness Karen 
BUxen-Fmecke, was considered a 
liberal when her best-known 
work, “Out of Africa,” appeared 
in 1937, but the critically ac- 
claimed proGle of life in colonial 
Kenya is now regarded by some 
African intellectuals as racist 

The Kenya Tunes newspaper, 
controlled by President Daniel 
Arap Moi’s party, the Kenya Af- 
rican National Union, has ques- 
tioned why permission was given 
for a movie about Dinesen to be 
filmed in Kenya this year. The 


film, also called “Out of Africa,” 
slats Meryl Streep as the writer 
and Robert Redford as her Brit- 
ish lover, Denys Finch Hat- 
ton-The film is due for release 
shortly before Christmas. 

The paper also asked why the 
wealthy, predominantly white 
Nairobi suburb of Karen, and a 
Danish government-funded 
women’s college at the foot of the 
Ngong Hills, where the writer 
lived, should still be named after 
the “racist Bitten." 

Dinesen, who left Africa in 
1931 and died in Denmark in 
1962, was further denounced by 
the Kenyan daily in a lengthy 
report that described her servant 
Kamande Gatura, now in his 80s 
and paralyzed by a stroke in 
Marcn, as a victim of “colonial 
injustice." 

Kamand e, a key character in 
“Out of Africa” under the name 




Meryl Streep as Blixen in f3m “Out of Africa.* 


Karen Blixen: Racist? 

“Kamarite," was a bright but 
sickly child nursed to health by 
Dinesen on her cof fee plantation. 
She later trained him as her chef. 
In the book she described him as 
a figure “half of fun and half of 
diabolism.” 

The newspaper alleged that a 
New York photographer, Peter 
Beard, did not adequately com- 
pensate Kamande for a book the 
two produced in 1975, “Longing 
for Darkness,” a remembrance of 
life on the plantation. The daily 
further chained that Beard was 
trying to evict Kamande from a 
hog ranch near Nairobi 

“It’s nothing but fitimT said 
Beard, using a Swahili word that 
means tumult or slander. Rela- 
tives of Kamande made the 
ch a r ges , he maintained, because 
they are worried about losing in- 
come after the death of Ka- 
mande, whom Beard claims to 
have, supported since the early 
1960s. 

Kenyan police have investigat- 
ed similar allegations, raised ear- 
lier by one of Kamande's grand- 
sons. The police said the charges 
were unfounded. 

Meanwhile, restoration work 
has begun on Dinesen’s farm- 
house by the state- run National 
Museums of Kenya, in a project 
designed to turn me house into a 
m useum A committee of Danes 
who live in Kenya has severed its 
lies with the project, however, 
fearing that the National Muse- 
ums director, the paleontologist 
Richard Leakey, intends to mini- 
mize space in the museum actual- 
ly devoted to Dinesen. 

“We don’t want to raise money 
in Denmark for a Karen Blixen 


museum that will end up showing 
mainly old tractors." said one of 
the Danes. 

Leakey denied that he would 
downplay Dinesen in the muse- 
um but said that to make n 
popular with Africans as well as 
Europeans he wanted to put old 
fans implements on display at 
the plantation house. 

“If we are going to establish a 
museum that will solely glorify 
Karen Blixen. using government 
money and property, is it relevant 
to current truths?” he said. “She 
is a historical truth. Colonialism 
is a Fact. She is a good example of 
the more liberal-minded settler. 
And we don't want to portray her 
either as a scoundrel Or a hero- ' 
ine.” 

Many Kenvan intellectuals are 
uncomfortable with the master- 
servant relationship detailed in 
Diuesen’s book, a s well as de- 
scriptions of Africans as primi- 
tive. Her defenders, however, say 
the critics overtook passages that 
praise the African character and 
that show a doser affinity to Afri- 
cans than to the clannish British 
colonial society. 

Dinesen was attacked by white 
settlers in the 1920s as “proba- 
tive” for opposing regulations 
that permitted what was virtually 
forced labor. 

Chris Lukorito Wanjala, a Ke- 
nyan educator and director of the 
Institute of African Studies, said 
the Kenya Times “was ech o ing 
the radical view among the Ke- 
nyan. intelligentsia . . . that to 
fight British colonial culture you 
have to be militant against writ- 
ers” such as Dinesen. Wanjala, 
who said that two years ago he 
became the first instructor at the 
University of Nairobi to lecture 
on “Out of Africa.” maintained 
that a dose knowledge of Dine- 
sen’s writings reveals “that she 
might have been a radical among 
the white settlers. I am fascinated 
by her artistic vision, and her 
book, placed in its historical con- 
text, gave a liberal understanding 
of her environment” 

A Kenyan journalist Law- 
rence Kibui, 60, said the charac- 
terization of Dinesen as racist 
was simply false. Before leaving 
Africa, she made sure that even 
squatters on her property were 
allotted farmland by reluctant co- 
lonial authorities, he said. 
“Among these people were -my 
relatives, and they are still on the 
land Karen helped secure. This is 
the only case I personally know, 
of a white settler doing this." 


PEOPLE 


Koch Rescues Rest 


Mayor Edward L Koch of New 
York has settled the flap over Paid 
Prudhomme's temporary Cajun 
restaurant: He rolled out the city 
buildings commissioner, health 
commissioner and deputy mayor to 


inspect the Upper west Side eat- 
ery, then ruled that city, inspectors 
bad deviated from normal proce- 
dures by dosing the restaurant af- 
ter a city employee who attended a 
pre-opening party there filed an 
anonymous complaint. Koch. who. 
is miming for re-election, said the 
dosing was a mistake by “overzeal- 
ou5 ,r inspectors. Restaurants are 
closed only when they present life- 
threatening situations, he said; oth- 
erwise, they are given 30 days to 
correct violations: The mayor' also 
said several congressmen from 
Louisiana had asked him to inter- 
vene, but he stressed, “We are not 
waiving a single rule” for Pfu- 
dhomme. “We are saying to him. 
We want to expedite things.'" 
Pnidhomme brought his 50-mem- 
ber staff and a cabinet-load ' of 
spices to New York for a month- 
long version of his New Orleans 
restaurant, K-Paul's Louisiana 
Kitchen. 

O 

John Naisbitt, author of the best- 
selling book “Megatrends,” is 
billed as a former special assistant 
to President Lyndon B. Johnson, 
but Nancy Smith, an archivist at 
the Lyndon B. Johnson library in 
Austin, Texas, says there are no 
documents showing that Naisbitt 
worked in the White House. An 
article in The Washingtonian mag- 
azine by Lynne Cheney says: “It s 
hard to find anyone then associated 
with the White House who remem- 
bers him.” Naisbitt,. wfao parlayed 
best-sell erdom into lecture-circuit 
stardom, responded: “I was special 
assistant to John Gardner,” the sec- 
retary of health, education and wel- 
fare. “During the period I was 
Gardner's special assistant '65-’66. 

I was on loan to the White House to 
do special projects. I met with the 
president many times, a number of 
times.” Smith said Naisbiti’s name 
appeared once, for a bill-signing 
ceremony, on the diary cards filled 
out by secretaries each time John- 
son had a meeting in the Oval Of- 
fice. She noted that many, adminis- 
tration employees were detailed to 
the White House for special pro- - 
jects and that there was no record 
of them as presidential aides. Nais- 


bitt did not dispute the article's 
revelation that he pleaded guilty in 
1978 to bankruptcy fraud in federal 
court. He said “Megatrends,” pub- 
lished in 1982. has earned- more 
than $1 million in royalties. 1 

□ i 

l 

The dissident - Romanian poet j 
Dorm Todoran arrived in Rome > 
Wednesday night after being _ al- ! 
lowed lb immigrate to the United 1 
States. “I left Romania- in tears, j 
convinced that 3 will never see ijJ 
again,” he said. “If 3 thought thing? 
would change, 1 would not have 
left.” The pnze-winnmg writer and 
literary critic was accompanied by 
his. wife, Entifia Oku, and daugh- 
ter. Alexandra. Western diplomatic 
sources noted that his departure 
came after a U. S. congressional 
panel approved a treasure that 
would extend most-favored-nation 
status to Romania for anoiheryear. 

. □ 

Woody Allen has signed a three- 
movie contract with Orion Pictures 
that bans the release of the films in 
South Africa, to protest its “atro- 
cious racial policies." The writer- 
director said: “1 wouldn’t overesti- 
mate my gesture, because it’s just a j 
gesture, but if it encourages other 1 
filmmakers to speak out or gesture 
out, we could have some influ- 


Brigadier General Janies Dozier,* 
the U.S. Army officer who 'wart 
kidnapped in Italy by Red Brigade 
terrorists in December 1981 and 
held for six weeks, is retiring to his 
hometown of Arcadia. Florida, af-_ 
ter a 35-year military career to be- 
come president of Golden Grove 
Man agemen t Co„ which operates 
orange groves. 

Angry Vietnam veterans picket- 
ed Sylvester Stallone's hit movie 
“Rambo: First Blood Part II” in 
San Francisco, complaining that it 
psychologically prepared youths 
for war and glamorized the Viet- 
nam conflict. Stallone plays a Viet- 
nam veteran who rescues American 
prisoner of war in Vietnam. “We; 
too, were brainwashed with similar 
propaganda before- 'the- ^Vietnam. 
war,” said Eduardo Cohen, spokes- 
man for the Veteran’s Sperms Al- 
liance. “But, when we gotto Viet- 
nam, we found that it wasn't like 
the John Wayne movies.” 


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Tat (93) 01 00 36 


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deep water harbor, marinas, hotels, 
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