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First of three articles. 


;■ ^iudaLi* ■ 

1 - Sovvi iL^w. Brezhnev. Hu voice was dear and 
sr ^»ab»J!j**‘ derisne. His 
'••« SpanishZ?^ ; project hope of a bright future. 
■Sa-.ino fifteen months later, it was An- 

rur: cj:rvedf ^ ^ dropo/s own coffin that was borne 
-n 4 - 'ti^nn, a* over the vast square, shimmering in 
• ur ha oJj , ^ the pale sunlight on a windy Febru- 
Jranco ary morning, 

*-"•«! The question many thoughtful 

V*..- 11 N people asked at the time was 
kin* « whether Andropov’s brief tenure as 


" -• *yi tm ^ people osilcu at me umc was 
Kiitn W whether Andropov’s brief tennre as 
! W .j Kremlin leader would be a mere 

- jQfc "W footnote in Soviet history books or 
r*w .■ ow of i® ream chapters. 

’^'kedittf. It was difficult on that freezing 
1 re ?®t Febniary day to pass judgment. In 
q mourning him l the Russians ap- 
i-. peared to mourn a loss of policies 



him by phone tt 
his voice was fin 
I thought, wdl, 
weaver” W' 
AS the end of 


a^ulaMrahd 
emerge. 7he;pb 
Government on 
Pavd Laptiev ai 


IJii/lMdQlld Ani a I' 

Yuri V. Andropov, in November 1962, helped bear Leootil 
L Brezhnev across Red Square for burial beMnd Lenfa’s 
Mausoleum. Only 15 mourns later, Aadrapor vras dead. 


JibflSab,.^ 

^fwarSada^^ 

1 J ‘-UK\ JL 




mourning hnn, STfSaS ap- . Inacotn^that tKatsmfOTtna- Andyet,hetontiinad tonmthe 
pcaredto mourn a loss of policies d<m as a priv^ to be (Espibuted country as # by rapote 0811101,1116 
!w c-cned. brieflv to nflWa on a need-to-know basis, the troth official noted. Only members of h» 
SlSSviSS'osSwSw- fedrffic^ttoknow^amcmlybe family, dose ppfitfcal assotiatej a 
et system into anew era. iq^roadi^byMtsKlersbypieang few personal antes and Mr. Gorbf- 

- in nimsmcL Andrrmn^x is together brts of mformaiioa ana chev, the yotmust member of the 

^ngtbm. ‘ Politburo SEavuri te.hada* 


^ iR wjw m 
'j'rr^b 

1 : ■> >»•■- hirJB! 

• -•' -jrv 
5 \ 


our Classified Ad On ti/tifr- 

mtukX\OH^Hmm 


■ iqg point it left a lasting impact The tragic, coarse, brutal and at CCM to U* Kuntsevo hospital 
that W immediate successotKon- the same time hitman and delicate apartment that wnaer. . 
stan tin U. Chernenko, could not aspects of Russia have always 'Gverythitighad been done to fix 
undo. Ultimately, it created the ba- struck this correspondent as almost the apartment in a way that would 
sis of the optimism md activism bibHcaL Now, after the death of penmiAndropov to forget Obit lie 
that has sustained the admmistrar three leaders m three years, there is was ina hofpitaL When hecaDed 
tictn of the current Soviet leader, new hope for a new start. officials in far talks, he would greet 


died Fob. 10^ 

Gconnnttee secretary. 
iWben the death was 
theneKtday, U^csmeiaa 
to the vast majority of Sofyiet'riti- 
sms. While Andropov’shealih was' 
deteriorating in the last two 
nywitit^ the propaganda macbm* 
ay had moved into high gear, cob* 
atmganilfiirionthaiftemderwas 
more active tian ever. 

The initial shock mined into’S 
widespread depression vrtieai it was 
announced . tn^t Konstantin IX 
_ _ Ch ern enko, .71 at the time, bad i 

•»* dected -general secretaiy of 
n? rSK ^ Commmmt Party, the cotm- 
are for bow fyeubf uwini try's most powerful post. He was 
s later, Andropov was dead, not cntyd&r than Andropov and 

- obviously tepoar health, bat he 
Anrivrt hi. -utrT.inaiT vjj was also pmffof the Brezhnev “ma- 

fu^tiuuna^nm the country for IK 

dSES* aJSvvittK 

few personal aiites and Mr. C3crba> Wa s it a return to the Brezhnev 

chev, the youngest member of the «»? What was to become of the 
Pofidmromd&favwile, had ao- 5?P«i ar sat ^ «vnfhzat«» . 
cess to tire Knntsevo hospital ^ Andropov had raised? 
apartment that winter. ' Looking hack, one can see why 

fir “T* ™ * 

Rm. Andropov pushed Mr. 
permit A ndropov to finga fl « h; Ooitadm to the fore and planed 

in the leadership a group of yotm- 


Gorbadiev Says 
Soviet Will Halt 
Nuclear Testing 
For Five Months 

Om^ikd br Our Staff From Dupacha Stales, for its pan, ref rams from 
MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- conducting nuclear exploaons " 
cbev. the Soviet lender, announced Mr. Gorbachev called the arms 
Monday a five-month unilateral race an "immense threat to the fu- 
momatoriuzn on nuclear rests begin- tun of the entire world cniliza- 
rung on Aug, 6, the 40th anniversa- tion" and called his announcement 
ry of the IXS. atomic bombing of of a ban a step toward forging a 



UfA M fi W jftw 

SOVIET APPEAL TO WEST — The new Soviet fore^n 
.minister, Etfamrd A. Shevardnaze, ri^it, was received by his 
Finnish c oun te r p ar t, Paavo Vayrynen, when he arrived in 
IHdanki on Monday to mark the 10th anniversaiy of the 
.rinriag of die European security accord. In a statement, he 
called for a <feire to inqxove East- West relations. Page 2. 


ry of the IXS. atomic bombing of of a ban a step toward forging a 
Hiroshima. toller agreement on nuclear di&ar- 

At the same time. be asked that mameiu. 
the United States also refrain from "Sin nog hi fjouuie the lermr- 

tests during that period. In Wash- nation of the dangerous competi- 
mgton, a senior UJS. official said tion in building up nuclear arsenals 
that the administration would re- and wishing io set a gu*\3 eaaniple, 
ject the Soviet propnaL the Soviet L’nicn has decided to 

TM^Onio^ptopo^ 
such a test ban m the post and aka vear « ^ 

His announcement Mondavap- 
versary as a possible starting date, peered to have been timed to coin- 
The announcement, carried by ride with the opening of meetings 
Tass, the Soviet news agency, was in Helsinki to mark the 10th anni- 
released shortly after President versary of the signing ol the 1975 
Ronald Reagan issued an tnviu- Helsinki accords on European se- 
Doo to tire Soviet Union to send a curity, cooperation and human 
team of observers to witness nude- rights. 

v tests at the US tot site is Neva- ^ Knior L; SL , na jS 4l0 

iiiiun i. u. - spoke on the condition that he was 

f s^^f h n^hr ( ^SS,£ li 1101 “id that Mr. Gotba- 

SftfctaSS —.MW Mr. tap.-*- 

effect ... as long as the Uni led (Continued oo Page 2, CoL 3) 


t«aim of observers to witness nucle- 
ar tests at the U.S. test site in Neva- 
da. 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


MRtiufl S. Gorbachev. 


Hut Andropov’s brief tenure Is 


Wbea Chernenko died in March proving to have been a turning soft hoosaobc and seated in a com- 


than m a hwrig room, Wearing * Seas of national revival and re- 


1985, Mr.iGortudrev became the P®t all tire morerrau*- fortabte aimchaSr. A battery of 

heir and executor at the Andropov able when one ranembm dut he tdt^ihaoawasnemby andhewas ' w TwSS 

witi.nnt.iu.A n A^v« was scnously iflfar much efto 15 constantly on the phene. «H years of mactm(y. These men 

mnntkc Hie VitlttMlv mIIovimiI fitlt, * " 


inheritance. Without the Anrhc^av was sonously in 
interlude, he would nor have been m o n t hs. His kid 
able to consolidate his power so months mto his 
quickly and move so forcefully. use a dialysis ma 


months. His kidneys cotared four 
months into his nue and he had to 
use a dialysis machine at least twice 


tea years of inactivity. These men 
had had to wait on the sidelines for 


Botha Refuses to Meet Separately 
With Tutu on South African Unrest 


r “his voice was' 


far too k 
Brezhnev 


The Soviet Union is a country of awrek* • 

unfulfilled potential, a country I® labs September 1983 Us con- 


recalled anoffidal who had known, the gathering crisis. 


while a complacent 
nmistration ignored 


Conpikdby Ow Sufi Flrom Dispaa&a 

JOHANNESBURG — Presi- 
dent ReterW. Botha rejected Motir 


constantly hoping for a chance for ditkwi became so grave tij&the was 
a new beonnnuL During the past hospi tal ize d . In October, doctors 


Andropov for neriy^ltoeedttada. Rt » ' SKEtmfBSH 


a new be ginning . During the past 
four yean, ii has lived tUpi^h a 
period of uncertainly, depression 
and RropinfL yet one that aoo evenr 


-It was in December,” tire oflk brought about a true generational 


said, ^ahd when we fimtiwd 


removed one of bis kidneys (hscasstng business at h an d and I Th e second 
from that point on, a Unofficial w about to learei Ire got tq» from dameotal and. 


t was more fim- 


■’ blade unrest and sad instead that 
i die Nobd Peace Prize winner could 


aiiuiaugiiiK. yei one uuu.iu3u even- recalled, Andix^ov was restricted Us anndtair and «nb ty nl me ? He . . , . 

w 


mOTemqxn- join arimnh 
. , , African presi 


AQ OfFtCE 

.-..fc.’rt .- 

mmom 


transition — from Brezhnev to Ah- .msWe the goyeron^pt^Wiq»taLw 
tfflopov to Chcmenko la Mr. Gar- -X^tsevt^^ahrays ati«*ed<o«^ t-j 
badhev. alysis machine. 


Soviet Naval Challenge 
To U.S. Grows in Pacific 




me Soviet Union has lived in a false 
paradise. Foqa toeg tinny the oto- 
w" (Owtaaed 6a Page 5, CbL I) 


CHINA 


/ *5 •• 

SOVIffiMl 




join a church group dial the South 
African preaunt is scheduled to 
see in three weeks. 

. Mr. Botha’s office said theprea- 
debt Tias . a w wi ri . hit 

tight schedule" to include a meet- 
ing with an Anglican Church dele- 
gation on Aug. 19 , led by Archbisb- 
op Phflfip Russell of Cape Town. 
Archbishop Rnssdl is white and 
Ksbop Tutu, the AngBcan bishop 
of Johannesburg, is Made 
The president’s office said Mr. 



meat spokesman expressed disap- 
pointment over Mr. Botha’s refusal 
to hold immediate talks with Bish- 
op Tutu, Renters reported.] 

Bishop Tutu took a political risk 
in making the request to see the 
South African president. The Asso- 
ciated Press reported. Many blade 
leaders have opposed negotiation 
with the wUte rulers until they 
demonstrate a commitment to be- 
gin disman tling apaitbcill » 
Bishop Tutu said lari week he 
was willing to meet Mr. Botha to 


By Robot C. Toch forcttmther^umtiutt-cantinues 

Lorhngda Tima Scrrice to detcnoratc - 

TOKYO — On the shallow sea ^ WgFJi* 
bottom of the Tsugaru Strait be- anhuervi 

tween the home islands of Hokkai- 


Admiral Sylvester R. Foley, 
commander-in-chirf of tire US. 
Pacific Fleet, saidin an interview ai 


ITOU UAUUUKUUlHUUKUnUr 1 

do and Honshu, Japanese innSli- ^ 

grace experts have identified tire P°*«? * not only m the 

northern Pacific but along the on- 


SSL The trades are mute 


■ttP JTATtS 


SUTM AFRICA 


lakMTNT. 

artSTl-!' 


ins* 
JJHA-T' » 


bfihat kQFwatoway m time of Dwang m Yietoatn. 
crisis. The US. ambassadw to Tokyo, 

Similar tracks have bem detect- Mike Mansfidd, said: “Wto you 
ed in the Soya, or La Perouse, Strait ^cseong bar is a threat that 
to tire north and the Korea Strait to been generajylost m the shuffle 
the south. These passages are stra- tweause of wa samgtons concen- 
tegicaUy critical because ii is cm Enn^re. 

through them that the Vladivostok- The result, according to Peter 
based Soviet Pacific fleet must sail Potondca of the Australian Nation- 
to pass Japan and reach (be open d Umyeraty. is (hat ‘hhe Pacific 


' I 

I 






1 APAN 


discuss ways to end the political 
violence in the country’s black 
townships and the state of emer- 
gency invoked July 13. 

Responding Friday, Mr. Botha 
said Ire would negotiate with azry- 

Botha’s reply i nd i ca te d he was not 1 — - - -- - — — - — f one opposed violence aid ne 
wining to hold an eariier, separate ** invited Bishop Tutu tocallhisof- 

mcetinff with Bishop Turn, and that Bishop Desmond M- Tutu fice to make an appointment. 
^BcSia“(*5oSydoan’twani GovernmemsoureestoM United 

SS5S-SSS 

appeared to be an- a000 ^ ^pg^i«a^ireM| 

gty at the president’s re^mnse, say- “I had hoped that I might have lSJSS5SLSSf *““® 
mg: *T don’t play pdBucal games, been able todo someth; obvi- po teSirESlS , Sr Roth.-, w 
and I would have thought the atua- ously, he thm^ tfiffiwniff" Bish- ^? d v^>“°T a ^ vc 

tion requires stat^^mtiiip. I have 

ck»e i3l I could about it on my thought Mr. Botha had missed an ao !^^ eir 1851 raccung broke down 

VBofc.taco^untafiro,. 

the other dd^ation, he added, be- [In Washington, a State Depart- (Continued on Page 2, CoL 8) 



and I would have thought the atna- 

dooe'iS^coul^S^m^oa m3 
side." 

“I don’t see bow 1 can gp" with 
the other delegation, he added, be>- 


since their last meeting broke down 
in 1980. 

Mr. Botha has come under fire at 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 8) 


Btc- 


« ■ ii' . 


U.S. Foresees No Revolution Soon 


•A.:..; Vi *• 
' : NS'” i 


By LesUe R Gdb 

New York Times Saw 


the situation in South Africa. This South Africa see the disorders there . . ' 

review includes a study of whether as part of a cycle of violence, pres- 

Preci/knt Rfmslri Dkhmii chroilH am- for rh-tno#- nnit wnrKann gpiernttlflll luUtt 3 .W. 


General Tito Okello 

New Leader 
Is Sworn In 
By Uganda 

(.'mini Pm i Imenvumiul 

KAMPALA. Uganda — Lint- 
tenant General Tito Okello. the 
commander of Uganda's armed 
forces, was sworn in Monday as 
president of a new military govern- 
ment. two days after rebel troops 
toppled the civilian government of 
President Milton Ooote. 

General OkeUo. 71, promised 
elections and a return to civilian 


Pacific. 


region is destined to become tire 


The crawler marks, similar to main focus erf superpower rivalry." 
those found in Swedish and Nor- Masashi Nishihara of Japan’s 
wegjan fiords, dramatize a Soviet National Defense Academy said 
buildup m northeast Aria that has that as the Russians eyed oppertu- 
altered mfliiary realities in the area, mties io convert their mDitaiy mus- 



WASHINGTON — A State De- Pre< f lfflt Rc ?« aD „ should ®?« repression. 


pailmem stsdy has conchtded that ^ £SF* Wi “* 'PW ** ™»**V «a°- with the cywle getting a little worse ..griSS 1 q iiJS nSSS 
CSiMm&JftAltohM sanctions against each «P^d *e, who was identified hv Radio l lean- 


saasfc 

IttaWiaNiWtoW 


In the view of many U.S. mOitaty “p ™ 
commanders and civilian spedaL 
ists in the.regioa, Soviet forces, 
while ostensibly defensive, are anolh 
poised to imhmdale Japan mid come. 
China and are increasingly capable For the 
of challenging the U.S. Navy ation in t 
throughout the Pacific. remain ge 


de iiuo political advanti 
FhQippinescu Indonesia, 


Indonesia. &r exam-- I960* that triggered the Soviet ntiK- etrQnnd* border tripled in size to cangovtmmcn 1 
raaaftretheriAaf tary expansicxi in the n^km. abont 450,000 men in 52 divisions, naied soaety. 


the ritoation in South Africa has 

eritettod “a new staged and that the „ ^? ca ' u ^ _ 

unrest there is ynmji more wide- White House, Stoic Depart- 
spread than in lire phst But it says ment and intelligence officials who 
the unrest does not represent a fun- were interviewed e m p h a s i z ed that 
damental threat to the South Afri- there was nothing in tire intdli- 


war for decades to 


Moscow accelerated us buildup 
when the United Stans and China 


that unless progress was made to- who was identified ^' Radio Ugan- 
™ird sharing power with the black ^ 35 ou ^J? ader his rebd 
sjoritv, tte cycle would evennnl- £r TO* a .^ he ^ ““P 
lead to an explosion, but ihev did 

*i assert that a crisis was ne^r. *"!* ?[ “i rlhe ^i l ?» nda ' 

{Brigadier Okelk) joined ihe new 

“There is no sense that this could president at tire swearing-in cere- 


noi assert that a crisis was near. 


mnpatc japan ran began drawing together m 1970 

increasingly ccmabfe For tire tnesent, ihesecapty ate- ^ redoubWTthe effort after the 
ig the U.S. Navy ation in the region is behoved to ii c Meat m VtoJnsm m 1975 


\ 0311 W**™* 111 m ^ white^iomi- “There is no sense that titis could president at the swearing-in cere- 

,000 men in 52 divisions, soaenr. Hcy-makets to make baric changes out ^ ^ a lifisthreaiening mony. The Associated PTOss repon- 

two airborae divisons A. high_White House official far i? way for the governmenu" said an ed from Kampala.] 

i? mflmt _W*th intelligence rqiorn Official famiff^hS Stale Dc- Order was remmin* Mondav «n 


way Tor the government, saia an 
official familiar with the State De- 


cnauenging uie u.5. wavy anon m me rt&on is beneveo to U-S _ Meat in Vietnam in 1975. Forty’ percent of the Soviet « took 
rooghont the POafic, reman generally favorable to (he ^ d^eat was broadly seen as pre- Union’s imacontinental misriles, straint s 

Over the last decade, the Joint “« lts aUlcs - “■ saging a wholesale U a withdrawal land- and submarine-based, are po- gency." 

riefs of Staff concluded eariier Nishihara saia. from Asia, ritioned in the Far East, along with Offiri 


Chiefs of Staff conceded eariier Nishihara said. 


ritioned in the Far East, along with Officials said a nnmber of intefli- punitive actions. 


ta- than by threatening it or taking ^ j{^ nol 


tins year, Soviet activity has creal- ft was the Chinese-Soviet poliri- Spurred by these events, Mos- more than 30 percent of Soviet me- gpnee studies were being conducted A wide n 
ed an “unfavorable balance" of cal split and border dashes of the cow’s ground forces along the Sovi- (Continued on Pas^ 6, CoL 4) jas part of a continuing review of officials in 


e of administration 
ved in policy on 


(Otntimied on Page 2, CoL 7) 


INSIDE 

■ Gunmen En Spain killed an 
expert on terrorism. Page! 


si. pcS> ' 




! •- !■ 


^ .• tc* 


"■ ‘ ■ Americsm emptoym are in- 

creasingly devismg policies to 
control or prohibit strarfemg by 
employees. Page! 

IThe woBXri’s eoMaeoce in 
. i/ Nairobi broi^it unity, and sur- 
prising agreement on a rarfica/ 
15-year strategy. . . Page .6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE - | 

f:~>: ■ Major British banks an-. 
"'’2 s ncamced .a cut io their base 
karting rates to 1L5 percent 
V. ftwh 12 percent Page 9. 

'isrf- KThe Reagw administration 
cut back us prediction of 
■j£[. growth rf the U3. gross nation- 
al product for 1981 Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

pj # More rape victims in the United. 
” i Sates are string those who they 
tfp'' maintain confiibmed to the 
' .$ crime through negligence. : . 


Peru’s Debt Plan Challenges World Lending System orders ReLe 

o. ai rates; longer rtpaymenl periods and new Moreover, no Latin American government gotiatious are under way with its creditors. Of Tail A/1 Aptnifif 

^ trading oppartimities from devdqped couu- except Venemda, which has huge foreign Peru wfl] hnm iis paymtsits to the equivalent vijaucuAtu isi 

Vew YoHc Tima i,em<x exchange reserves, has been able zo rmegoti- of 10 parent <d its exports, he said. ^ 


LIMA — Peru's announcement that it Bnt in an apparent criticism i 
would limit payments on its foreign debt Fidel Castro d Cuba, who receni 
represents tire mastdaring challenge to odst- P n ^/wa) Ap\* mantanm, Mr. 


trading opportunities from developed coun- except Veneznda, which has huge foreign Peru wfl] Hnm iis 
Hies. exchange reserves, has been of 10 percent of i 

Bat in an apparent criticism of Preadent ate its foreign deit without first working out Theinaugnrati 
Fidel Castro oiQiba,^»recentiy called for an austerity program with the IMF. by extreme securi 

a regirmal debt maratorinm, Mr. Garcia can- At the same ti&Krthecootinaing economic car bombings; by 


f 10 percent of its exports, he said. 

The inauguration ceremonies were marked 
tr extreme security measntes after a wave of 


icpresenis me mos. tumuli c na uc a gt : m cam- a regional debt maraionum, Mr. uaraa can- At foe same toe coucncnng economic car bornbings; by leftists designed to disrupt 

mg roofletary rules since the eruption of the tiooed that the (tebi problem should be difficulties of the largest debtras — Brazil, the first transfer erf power from one freely 
Latin Americanacot crisis three years ago, ‘ m North-5outh, rich-poor tarns rather than Mexico and Argentina--' bare kept alive the elected Peruvian president to another since 


Page 6. ! and seems certain to cause consternation in in an East West i 


international banking circles. (Latin American diplomats said (he a 

The country’s new president, Alan Garcia penman poEcy couia influence a n y*ri 
Pfcrez, said in his inaugural address Sunday Monday in Urn* of ]] foreign ministers 
that Peru would Until payments on its for- tfie rjuiag ma gmnp Butting Hm. region's b 
dgndebt over the next 12 mouths to no more gest debtors. Renters reported.! 
than 10 percent of its .export e arnin g s as it Ten percent of Pern's annual eaqxwt can 
sought to renegotiate its S14-b2Bon foreign ings wonld be abont $310 mflUou. Offirii 
debt indicated that the ftovemment of Mr. G) 


search for new 


context. search fw new approadira that couU reduce J912. . ... , . 

sad (he new the vaa outflow of rcsoiiriasfrcxntlwr^jo^ In his speech, Mr. Garda proposed the THejJhw judges debberated less 

» a meeting Mr. Garcia said his government intended formation of a peace commission to seek S hea ? 3 ?.S 3 S! 

inriafcterscf to repay its forrigndebt “because we are ways to end the five-year gueniUa war, and toan an hour °f arguments by de* 
srestotfsbifi- hottest and assumed a responsibility to do bdd out the possibility of pardons for those *? lse attmneys for the of 
r so.” But be pamled ad uutPeni’s entire “wtontnmmSSocracy.” Geoiges Faans, who has been on 

leroortcani- anticipated eipcrttstiniingscrf S3. 1 bflHon in Mr. Garda also gave special emphasis to a hungCT strike since June 3. 

iouToffidals 1985 would not cover (he mteiest and priori- intensifying the fight against narcotics traf- Mr. Fatsam provisiOTal noer^ 


In his speech, Mr. Garda proposed the , ioe^uircejuagcs aeiiDeratM 
formation rfapeKe commSw seek 30 minnus after heannan 

ways to end the five-year gueniUa war, and ” 


official familiar with the State De- Order was returning Monday io 
partment report, vdiich was pre- Kampala, where soldiers bad gone 
pared last week. “It could have ad- on a two-day looting rampage, 
verse short-term economic effects Military sources said l IS North 
— boycotts and no-shows for work. Korean Array and police ins true - 
But it is not going to slop foreign tors who had been working for the 
investments. People who want to Obote government have been 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) P ^dtou|S2id that General 

—— OkeUo, once a close friend of Mr. 

Obote, would act as head of state 

Guadeloupe Court 

n 1 The radio said General Okdlo 

Uroers IlClCSSC would appoint an executive prime 
_ _ _ . . . minister, who in turn would ap- 

Of Jailed Activist p^ota. 

The new military rulers have sus- 
RAQCP TPBBP C3bmCl ’ d ^° lv ' ed PW- 

BASSE-TERRE Gnadeloupe-~ lument, banned foreign-currency 
The appeals court hoc ordered transactions and closed bordered 
Monday the release of a Guade- Mflitory officials said afl former 
taupe mdqjcndeitcc advocate from Obote cabinet minister who sur- 

8 5SEL rcndt ? ed P*'? he«° ralosed. ex- 


The Associated Press 

BASSE-TERRE Guadeloupe — 
The appeals court here ordered 
Monday the release of a Guades 


a Paris i 


tH* • a a i-i_ i rendered haw been released, ex- 
THhraree judge deliberated less cept for the former security chS. 
an 30 nuumes after hearraa more o^Rwakasia. 3 

an an hour of arguments by de- permanent secretaries who bead- 


SS a? it Tm pottetrttrf Pern’s annual eag»ri cam- raudpatedE3pcrteannn^cnS3.1 bflbonu 

oragn ings wraild be about $310 milliou. Officials 1985 would not cover the interest and print* 
indicated that the government of Mr. Gar- pal payments of SS^WHondue this year. 


fane attorneys for the rdease of rtmuiistries under Mr. Obote have 
Georges Fararrs, who has been on been promised amnesty if iheTrt 
ahtMBWstnltesutceJone3 mm to their jobs. ofTalah said. 

JMf! LCSEf PS Kenym .gov* 


Mr. Garda, a 36-year-old Social Demo- da’s predecessw, Fernando Belaundc Terry, Peru has not made 

* 1 1 .V ' n J. .4 J- PI Lm!a t- -g iMmwmv i i al JaKt nrmr 


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described as “an accomplice” in the coun- mans to export earnings has been frequently 
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America should treat the foreign-debt issue growth, no regional debtor 'has, 'until now, 
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paid mean (ban 51 HiTKnn annually before commercial debt principal tor more than, a 
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llMoaibie tins year. Cckcrs wbo supply uwdi of the coca paste frop ?.J^ m ?? J” uLi? «^finned io diplomats m Nairobi 
te any payments on its that is transformed into cocaine in neighbor- conditions: that, he arnuder tos tfui Mr. Obote has been granted 
incipal lor more than a ing Cokmibia and then smugglcd^o & P*sspo^ Kenya. 

icmmarreaisoD interest United Slates. his nafi^ tdtmti^r cam, and that Diplomats believe the dowsed 


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nr and is$475nrnHcomaQe8ra on interest United States. SS 

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inks. . tries to curb annsspeoding and said Pent Sl ^ 

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Thesame coun rqccied onidy Wwiem 
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(Continued on Page 3, CoL 6) 16 Britons, hud fled to Kenya. 




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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD I^JBUKE, TUESDAY, JULY SO, 1985 


Shevardnadze, in Helsinki, 
Gills for Better Ties With West 


By Mark Wood 

Reuten 

HELSINKI ■ — Foreign Minister 
Eduard A Shevardnadze of the So- 
viet Union, on his Erst trip abroad 
since taking office thfe month, 
urged the West on Monday to join 
in a drive for a radical improve- 
ment in East-West relations. 

In a statement issued after Ms 
arrival for the commemoration of 
the 1975 Helsinki Accords on Eu- 
ropean Security and Cooperation, 
Mr. Shevardnadze praised the 
agreements and said they should be 
protected. 

“We are convinced," he said, 
“ that the current tense si tuation in 
the world calls for joint efforts 
srimt»d at r adically im p rovin g the 

political dimate in Europe and in 
international relations as a whole.” 
In separate remarks, be said that 
holds his first meeting 


with the U.S. secretary of state, 
ltz. on we 


P. Shultz, on Wednesday, 
."The 


“we will have to obtain peace.’ 
two are toprepare the agenda fora 
Soviet-U.S. summit meeting in No- 
vember. Mr. Shultz left Washing- 
ton for Helsinki on Monday. 

The Soviet minister's comments 
appeared to indicate that Moscow 


would take a conciliatory line at die 
three-day meeting of foreign minis- 
tm from the 35 states that signed 
the accords 10 years ago. The meet- 
ing was scheduled to start Tuesday. 

Praising the spirit of dfaente, 
which the West regards as having 
died with the Soviet military inter- 
vention in Afghanistan in 1979, 
Mr. Shevardnadze said the poten- 
tial of the Helsinki accord should 
be used to improve East-West ties. 

The United States has said it 
plans to use this week’s gathering 
to assail the Soviet Union for what 
it sees as Moscow’s failure to abide 
by the human rights commiunents 
of the Helsinki ag r”* 1 "*"** 

Besides the meeting with Mr. 
Shultz, Mr. Shevardnadze, 57, is 
also scheduled to have separate 
talks with his counterparts from the 
major West European states. 

In his statement, Mr. Shevard- 
nadze said that the Soviet Union 
valued the opportunity for such 
contacts offered by the Helsinki 
gathering. 


Praising the 1975 accords, he 
rid that Me 


said that Moscow had demonstrat- 
ed its deep commitment to them 
and viewed them as a good founda- 
tion for improving East-West coop- 


eration. 


“Thai is why we believe that this 
foundation should be protected 
and its erosion prevented, 1 ' he said. 

Mr. Shevardnadze appeared not 
to understand English, and in his 
brief comments to reporters spoke 
only Russian. 

■ Moscow Press Attacks West 

The Soviet mess issued a broad 
attack cm the West mi Monday to 
counter the criticism that the Soviet 
Union is expected to face in Helsin- 
ki United Ness International re- 
ported from Moscow. 

Pravria, the Communist Party 
daily, charged that die West had 
violated the Helsinki accords while 
the Soviet Union had remained 
faithful to them. 

“The cheap and hypocritical 
rumpus, raised time and again in 
the United dates and some West- 
ern European countries over thgir 
alleged concern for nondbservance 
of the Final Act, only belies the 
intentions of the architects of such 
campaigns,” Pravdasaid. 

“All they want,” Pravda said, “is 
to use the Helsinki Accords as a 
pretext for interference in the inter- 
nal affairs of countries whose polit- 
ical system they want to under- 



Strict Law 
On Wines 
Promised 
In Austria 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Bild Says film Shows a Fit Sakharov 

BONN (Reuters)— The West German newspaper Bild said Monday 
that it bad obtained a recent film of Andrei D. Sakharov leaving a elkuc 


Reaters 


mine. 


Wine believed to be contaminated with a toxic sweetener 
was removed Monday from the shelves of a Vienna market 



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Gorbachev Sets Testing Halt; Gunmen Kill 
U.S. Invites Soviet Observers 


(Continued from Page 1) 
day that the Soviet Union would 
stop nuclear testing from Aug 6 
until Jan. 1 and had asked the pres- 
ident to make a rimilar decision. 

The official said that Mr. Reagan 
made Ids own proposal in a letter 
that was ddfvered Monday to Mr. 
Gorbachev. He said that the timing 
of Mr. Reagan’s letter was coinri- 
dental and had nothing to do with 
Mr. Gorbachev's message. 

(Reuters, UPI, AP) 

■ Reagan’s Proposal 

David Hoffman of The Washing- 
ton Post reported earlier from Wash- 
ington: 

Mr. Reagan invited die Soviet 
Union on Tuesday to send a t«m 
of experts to obsave and measure a 
U.S. midear explosion at the Neva- 
da test site. 


Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said that the Mr. Rea- 
gan’s invitation “dearly demon- 
strates the U.Sl intention to go the 
extra mile" in arm* ng gntiatimw 
The invitation a ppe ar ed to rep- 
resent a modification of a proposal 
by Mr. Reagan in September that 
both countries permit on-site in- 
spections of nuclear tests. 

Mr. Speakes said that die invita- 


tion was “ unilate ral" anti “uncon- 
ditional" 

He noted that Mr. Reagan had 
suggested the exchange oT experts 
in his address to the United Na- 
tions on SepL 24. 

“The president views this pro- 
posal as a means to increase confi- 
dence in verifiable limits cm under- 
ground testing," Mr. Speakes said. 
“To date, the Soviet Union has 
refused to agree to this practical 
and fair-minded approach.” 

“As a demonstration of our seri- 
ousness," he added, “the president 
has extended to the Soviet leader- 
ship our invitation for a Soviet 
team to observe and to measure a 
unclear test at our Nevada test ate. 
This offer, which is unconditional, 
is a unilateral step which cleariy 
demonstrates the C.S. intention to 
go the extra mile. 

“The Soviet experts are invited 
to bring any instrumentation de- 
vices that the Soviet Union deems 
necessary to measure the yield of 
this test This UJL initiative dem- 
onstrates our commitment to 
achieving verifiable limitations in 
nuclear testing." 

Mr. Speakes said he did not 
know when the next nnrlrar test 
would be conducted. 


Spain Expert 
On Terror 


VIENNA — Chancellor Fred 
Sioowatz pledged Monday that a 
strict new wme law would be 
before the autumn grape 
to prevent a repeal of Aus- 
tria's wine scandal 

Mr. Smowatz.- speaking after a 
meeting of 'top officials, also de- 
clared his confidence in Agricul- 
ture Minister GQnter Maiden do- 
spite opposition calls for his 
resignation. 

Rye million liters (13 million 
gallons) of Anstrian wine have 
been seized and exports haw been 
stopped after revelations that some 
wines were sweetened with diethy- 
lene-glycol a chemical used in anti- 
freeze. 

Health officials have warned of 
the danger of kidney and brain 
damage, »nri tire <re»ndai has un- 
dermined Austria's image abroad, 
especially in West Germany. 

Sixteen persons vintners and 
chemists have been arrested in the 
minting which is believed to have 
started more than five years aga 

Mr. Snowatz said nis govern- 
ment would call a special session of 
the assembly at the end of August 
or the beginning of September to 
pass what Ire called “the strictest 
wine law in Europe.” 

Government sources have said 
the law will oblige wine makers to 
include foil details of ■ wine's 
source and its contents on the label 
and wiD outlaw tire use of sweeten- 


in Gorki, the city where be is under internal exile, and being reunited with 
his wife, Yelena G. Bonner. 

Bild said the 10- minute color film showed the dissident, a Nobd Peace 
Prize laureate; in good health and apparently alert. In a film obtained by 
the newspaper last month, Mr. Sakharov's doctor presents a report saying 
the physicist, who is 64, was being treated at the clinic for heart probiems 
and symptoms of Parkinson's disease. 

Bild smd Mr. Sakharov, who was exiled to Gorki in 1980, was admitted 
to the Zemashko hospital there in mid-April of this year, apparently after 
starting a hunger strike. Two scenes from the latest film indicated fee was 
released July 1 1, the newspaper said. It did not say bow it obtained the 
film. 


Bonn Said to Expel 4 Libyan Envoys 


BONN (Renters) — West Germany has expdkd four Libyan diplo- 
ic murder exiles opp 


opposed to the Libyan 
i, the weekly news magazine Dcr Spiegel 


mats on suspicion of 
leader. Colonel " 
said Monday. 

The West German Foreign Ministry and Libya's diplomatic 
tatives in Bonn declined to comment on the report, which said the four 
diplomats left at the end of last week. “Security agents in Bonn accused 
them of planning criminal activities in order to eliminate opponents of 
the Qadnafi regime living in West Germany,” Der Spiegel said. 

The report followed a security alert 10 days ago around the Libyan 
People's Bureau, as the embassy is called, and a police hunt in West 
Berlin for a possible assassination squad. The hunt was called off last 
week. 


India Asks U.S. to Curb Sikh Training 

NEW DELHI (UPI) — The Indian government asked the United 
States on Monday to close paramilitary training camps run by private 
dozens such as one in Alabama where several Sikh militants' received 
training in the use of arms and explosives. 

The foreign minister, Khursheed Alam Khan, told the lower house of 
Parliament oat the United States should fight terrorism either by dosing 
the schools or amending its laws to prohibit such training 


“We value our relations with all countries, but we cannot compromise" 
when it cranes to terrorism, be said. He said it would be “unfortunate if 


tire United States look an extreme legalistic view on the issue bv allowing 
such terrorist training camps to operate freely." 


The Associated Press 


ax 


MADRID — Gunmen believed 
to be Basque separatists killed one 
of Spain's top anti-terrorist experts 
Monday in central Madrid, a De- 
fense Ministr y spokesman arid 
Major Jose Marzo, a Defense 
Ministry spokesman, said Vice Ad- 
miral Fausto Esoigas Estrada, 60, 
director-general of defense policy, 
died of bullet wounds. 

The admiral's driver, Francisco 
Maranfo Garda, 57, was wounded 

«nd ftmd in rriliml mniiilinn Thy 

police said more than 30 bullets 
were fired into the car. 

Major Marzo said the admiral 
was on his way to work at tire 
Defense Ministry when a car cut in 
front of his vehicle and blocked the 
street According to his account, a 
gunman got out of the car «iid 
opened fire. 


A public prosecutor investigat- 
ing the cases of those arrested said 
in a television interview that other 
substances had also been found in 
wine, added to enhance the sweet- 
ness. and that this could give an- 
other dimension to the scandaL 


■ Discovery in Japan 

Japanese officials have reported 
the disco very of three more brands 
of Austrian white wine containing 
di ethylene- glycol Reuters reported 
from Tokyo. 

Food officials said two of the 
three conraminNtnd wines h»d been 
fo und in Tokyo and the other in the 
western city of Osaka. Two other 
brands, one each from Austria and 
West Germany, had already been 
found to be contaminated. 


Hudson Wants to Change Hospitals 

PARIS (UPI) — Rock Hudson has asked to be transferred to a French 
military hospital for treatment for acquired immune deficiency syn- 
drome, or AiDS. the actor's publicist, Yanou Collar!, said Monday. 

Another source, who asked not to be identified, said Mr. Hudson. 59, 
who is in a special isolation unit at the American Hospital here but has 
not been treated for AIDS, asked to be transferred to the military hospital 
because he had met a French military doctor and had confidence in him 

A U.S. Embassy spokesman said the French Defense Ministry agreed 
last week to accept Mr. Hudson's request if his condition warranto! it 


The police said the attack Xjy 


1 NTELEVENT 85 


International Telecommunications Conference 
Cannes, France, September 22-24, 1985 


Focusing on the 
evolution, impact and 
future of competition 
in the telecommunications 
industry worldwide. 


Join leaders in the vvwW of telecom- 
munications to discuss telecommunications 
policy development in the U.S., Europe and 
Asia and the global implications. 

The outstanding group of more than 
thirty speakers at this fourth annual confer- 
ence will indude: 

— Richard E Butler, Secretary General, Inter- 
national Telecommunication Union. 

— Bryan Carsberg, Director General, Oftel, 
UJC 

— Sir Donald Maitland, Chairman of the In- 
dependent Commission for Worldwide Tele- 
communications Development, ITU. 

— Sir Eric Sharp, Chairman, Cable & Wire- 
less, pic 


A UNIQUE SYMPOSIUM 
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COSPONSORED BY 


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PEAT MARWICK, MITCHELL 
&CO. 


INTERNATIONAL 
HERALD TRIBUNE 


Hcralb^fe. (tribune 




peered to bean action by ETA, 1 
group is seeking independence for 
three Basque-speaking northern 
provinces of Spain. ETA is the 
Basque-language acronym for 
Basque Homeland and Liberty. 

Witnesses told the police that 
pro persons took partin the shoot- 
ing, tire gunman and his driver. 

Police officers found spent car- 
tridges of a 9mm Parabdlum pistol, 
a weapon commonly used by ETA. 
at the site. Later, tire car was found 
double-parked on a residential 
street about 10 blocks away. 

Police blocked off the street, 
cleared out residents and detona t ed 
a bag in the car containing nearly 
seven pounds (about three kilo- 
grams) of plastic explosives, timed 
to go off within a short while. 

Admiral Esaigas Estrada was 
the 24th victim of political violence 
in Spain this year, police officials 
said. 

ETA has claimed responsibility 
for 23 deaths this year, including an 
ambush that killed a colonel 
his driver June 12, the day of the 
signing of a treaty admitting Spain 
to the European Community. 

After that killing police found 
the assailants' car parked in an un- 
derground garage, where it explod- 
ed shortly after bomb experts be- 
gan examining iL A policeman was 
lriDed and another seriously injured 
in the eroloaon. 

Since 1968, ETA has claimed re- 
sponsibility for the deaths of more 
than 530 police and military offi- 
cials. 

The highest ranking victim of an 
ETA attack was Admiral Luis Car- 
roro Blanco, whose car was blown 
up Dec. 20, 1973. 

Admiral Carrero Blanco, rare of 
the closest aides of Generalissimo 
Francisco Franco, was scheduled 
to take over power after the dicta- 
tor's death. 


Israeli Jets 
Bomb Base in 


Soviet Central Asia Hit by Earthquake 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — An earthquake struck Soviet Central Asia on 
Monday, felling co mmunicati ons and power lines and causing wide- 
spread damage to buildings in the city of Dushanbe, according to tire 
government newspaper. Izvestia. 

No figures for crcualties were given. The state-run media normally 
specify no human losses when minor earth tremors occur. 

Dushanbe, a city of 530,000, is the capital of the Soviet Union's 
republic of Tadzhikistan. Izvestia said tire earthquake registered six to 
seven points on the 10-point Soviet scale for measuring the intensity erf 
earth tremors. ' 


For the Record 


Bekaa Valley 


The Associated Pros 
BEIRUT — Israeli Air Force jets 
raided a Palestinian gnerrfila base 
in the Bekaa Valley in eastern Leb- 
anon on Monday, setting a com- 
mand headquarters of a Libyan- 
backed faction on fire, radio 
stations and the Isradi command 


reported. 

Lebano 


‘barton's stale-run radio and 
the Christian-controlled Voice of 
Lebanon quoted their Bekaa corre- 
spondents as saying that six Isradi 
jets had attacked tire Bar Elias area, 
about 30 miles (50 kilometers) east 
of Beirut. 

The radios said there was no im- 
mediate word on casualties. But in 
the Syrian capital of Damascus, a 
Syrian Army Command statement 
said that a “number of inhabitants, 
mostly women, children and old 
men. were kille d or wounded” in 
the raid. 

In Td Aviv, the military com- 
mand said that all planes had re- 
turned safely to base, and that the 
pilots had reported hits on their 
targets. 

Both of the radio stations and 
the Isradi mifitary sources said the 


Iran's Council of Gnanfians has approved three candidates for the 
p re si d e ntial elections on August 16, me official Iranian news agency 
reported Monday. They are President Ali Khamenei, seeking a second 
term, former Economy Minister HahibOflah Asgar-Owladi and Mah- 
moud Mostafavi Kashani. a Moslem mullah. (Reuters) 

At least 406,000 people were stranded as rivers flooded six districts in 
northern Bangladesh after rains, officials said Monday. (Reuters) 
A van parked near the law cowls in Belfast exploded early Monday 
while the police were evacuating the area Buildings were damaged and 
one officer was injured by glass, officers said. (AP) 

A Stdfiau poBce inspector active against the Mafia, Giuseppe Mon- 
tana, 35. was slain Monday by two ornmen. (Reuters) 

The British government raged the British Broadcasting Corp- on 
Monday not to show an interview with Martin McGuiness, reportedly a 
key leader erf the outlawed Irish Republican Army. (Reuters) 


U.S. Expects No Revolution 
In Current Pretoria Crisis 


(Continued from Page 1) 
invest always find a way to do iL” 
The study, which was prepared 
by the department’s Bnrean of In- 
telligence and Research, predicted 
that the South African government 
would harden its policies internally 
and externally. 


The prevailing sentiment 

administration experts on 

Africa is that the present disorders 
will subside. One said, “Sbarpevilk 
blew over, and Soweto blew over. 


and even though this is wane, 
there’s nowhere it can really go.” 


“The riots will stop even the gla- 
cial pace of internal 


target was a two-story command 
TopuIarFr 


5 in French Circus Are Killed 

The Associated Press 

CHAMBERY, France — Five 
members of a French circus were 
electrocuted Sunday when a pole of 
the tent they were erecting touched 
a power line, the police raid. They 
said the victims of the accident in 
the Alpine village of Landy includ- 
ed the manager of tire Paris Grcns. 


center of the Popular Front for the 
Liberation of Palestine-General 
Command. 

The command is six miles from 
the Syrian border. The Popular 
Front-General Command is head- 
ed by a former Syrian Army officer, 
Ahmed JebriL 

The air strike was Israel's eighth 
in Lebanon tins year. It «>m<» a day 
after, the Syrian defense minister, 
General Mustafa TlaS; made an in- 
spection tour of Syrian forces sta- 
tioned in Lebanon under 

an Arab League peacekeeping 
mandate. 

■ IsndStn&s Death Penalty 

The Israeli cabinet, under public 
pressure to execute Arabs who 
murder Jews, set up a committee on 


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the use or cranial pun- 
ishment, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Jerusalem. 

The committee was created amid 
tension over the slayings last week 
of two Jewish teachers from the 
northern Israeli town of Aftda. 
Three Palestinian teen-agers from 
the Israeiktocupied West Book 
have been arrested in the case. 

Co mmuni catio ns Minister Am. 
non Rubensttih said after a five- 
ham cabinet meeting that the com- 
mittee would study possible 
in. the use of capital pun- 
ishment fra* terrorism ana premedi- 
tated murder. 


, reform,” an 

official said. 

According to administration of- 
ficials. the study asserts that the 
bulk of the South African protest- 
ers are teen-agers who are not kd 
at controlled by the outlawed Afri- 
can National Congress, the oldest 
and most influential organization 
seeking blade majority role. 

The study calls special attention 
to what it says is a generational 
factor, noting that the protesters 
are generally younger than those 
who opposed the government in 
earlier crises, such as that in the 
township of Sharpeville in March 
I960 and in Soweto township in 
June 1976. 

“The leaders of the ANC 
couldn’t shut this off even if they 
wanted to," the official said. Offi- 
cials said that the report noted that 
even though the disorders had wide 
backing among blacks, the protest- 
ers had neither aims nor access to 
arms. 


Although concerned about what 
Pretoria will do next, theseeqxits 


expressed even greater concern 
rcalle 


about what they called an ovcrrcac- 
tion in the United Stales that might 
put South Africa further beyond 
the reach of American influence. 


Botha Rejects 
Tutu Meeting 


(Cootamedifeoai Page 1) 
home and abroad for force to 

crush unrest rather than opening a 
dialogue with blacks. 


Meanwhile, police reported that 
an army foot patrol mot dead a 
black man as he drove a car at the 


soldiers “at high speed” in a dad) 
overnight in New Brighton- town- 
ship in the eastern Cape Province. 


The State Department report 
also observes that the South Afri- 
can government is now attesting 
what exists of a moderate leader- 
ship group. Administration offi- 
cials consider this a serious mis- 
take, because these leaders might 

be the only ones who could help 
control the situation. 


Police said the NaA which re- 
sulted in the third black death in 
two days, was one of several ‘iso- 
lated incidents of unrest" that took 
place overni ght as South Africa en- 
tered its ninth day of a stats of 
emergency. The vritite-mnonty 
government imposed emeigW 
rule in 36 dues and townsfaips- 


Polke headquarters in Pretoria: 
said the number of activists -do-.. 


Ex-Gestapo Man Geared 
In 1942 Murder of Jews 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


fl«WOrS*MtfIBtS • DOCFOWOE 

tar WM* 1 M» fevwlMn. 

Smd dttariad rnvmt 
for tree evoluaHon. 

PACRC WESIBM UMVBSnY 

• .7 40b N. ScpuhndQ BhrtL, 

-. .Lbs Anar l r x CoiHpmta - 

• - »OW9. D«*. 23, USA. 


Reuters 

HAMBURG — A former mem- 
ber of the Gestapo, Hani Schulz, 
70, was cleared Monday of dwiw 
« mui ^g three Polish Jws 
an>00 « 5,000 transported from the 
town of Zawierde in 1942 to the 
death camp at Auschwitz. 

The Hamburg court acquitted 
inm. after a 17-month trial, on the 
ground that the charges, after 40 

vnn ivmiU ... I . . 


tained under emergen cy 
rose to 1.205. up from 1.1— 
Sunday. The number of difly 
tendons has ArinwH after r““* 
mg more than 200 a day 
first three days of the 
proclamation. . 

Cases of stone throwing and . 
son were reported m the 



years, could not be proved beyond 
^asmablc doubt The defendan 


wuul me defendant 
had also been accused of complic- 
ity in four other cases of murder. 


Town, and “on ocrasioalbcp 0 ®^ 

were forced to lire W onoke 

rubber ballets to di»»«e 
mobs," the report said. That** 1 ® 1 
no usuries or arrests. , 

The area has stayed rebnre$ 
calm during 1! months of protest \ 
against apartheid. Sea* A&5P. 

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Mickey Moose Receives China’s President 

Resident Li Xiannian of Quna pats Mickey Mouse on die nose in Disneyland in Anaheim, 
California. Later, in a speech to manbere of the Chinese- Amelia Mr. Li said Sunday 

that Taiwan would retain meet of its independence if it were reunited with the mwmlgwl under the 
principle cf “one country, two systems.” Mr. Li visited California at the end of a 10-day US. tour. 


U.S, Employers Taking a Harder Line on Smoking 


By Sarah Oates 


WASHINGTON — With de- 
mands increasing for a smoke-free 
workplace; US companies are de- 
vising policies that range from in- 
stalling smoke-filtering machines 
to banning smoking altogether. 

Robert Rosser, a partner in a 
consulting firm that has set up 
smoking policies for several large 
companies, estimates that more 
than half the companies in the 
country now have some type of 
policy. He predicts that naif of 
American companies will have 
banned smoking in five years, 
mainly in order to save money. 

The consulting firm’s largest cus- 
tomer to date, Pacific Northwest 
BdL has announced that its 15,000 
employees will not be able to 
smoke at work after Oct 15. 

Pacific Northwest deckled on the 
smolrinn ban after agumrinK for 
> a half years over 


riles a report written by William 
Weis, one of the partners, which 
contends that smokers increase a 
company's costs by up to $4,600 
per employee annually, counting 
the expenses of health and life in- 
surance; absenteeism, cleaning and 
maintenance, and work time wast- 
ed by sm oking. 

The tobacco industry disputes 


ill 


tuic a smoking policy for employee counselor for a group called Action 
and business considerations. on Smoking and Health. John F. 

Mr. Rosoer said that some com- Banzhaf. said that nonsmoking 
panics consider merely limiting workers who are irritated or mane 
smoking but abandon the plan 
when it becomes too expensive. 

One of his clients originally wanted 
to set up smoking lounges on every’ 
floor but eventually instituted a no- 
smoking policy for employees 


U.S. Experts Say Computer Program 
Used to Tally Votes Is Open to Fraud 


By David Burnham 

Nt»> Yak Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The com- 
puter program that was used to 
cornu more than one-third of the 
votes cast in the US, presidential 
election last year is very vulnerable 
to manipulation and fraud, accord- 
ing to expat witnesses in court acr 
DOCS r^atlengtng focal and COO- 
gressonal elections in three states. 

The allegations that vote tallies 
rgimtitfflrf with the widely-used 
computer system may have been 
secretly altered have raised concern 
among election officials and com- 
puter experts. That is because of 
the rapidly increasing use of such 
systems, the lade of federal or state 
standards that mandate specific 
safeguards, and the lack of comput- 
er still* among most local voting 
authorities. 

“There is a massive p otaaial Far 
problems,'' said Gary L Green- 
halgfa. director of the International 
Center on Election Law and Ad- 
ministration, a consulting group in 
Washington. He said computer-as- 
sisted voting systems “centralized 
the opportunity for fraud.” 

Mr. Greeabalgh said that while 
lever-type voting machines could 
have their counts rigged .only ma- 
chine by machine, vote-counting 
by computer was done at one cen- 
tral site in most counties. 

With most computer systems, 
when a vote is cast, holes are 
punched in a thin cardboard ballot. 
The computer program then 


“reads” the boles in the cards and 
totals them, presumably counting 
all votes and counting them only 
once each. 

The vote-counting program that 
has been challenged in Indiana, 
Maryland and Wen Virginia was 
developed by Computer Election 
Systems of Berkeley, California. 

In TnHiana and West Virginia, 
the company has been accused of 
helping to ng elections. The com- 
1 has also been cfaal- 


trols had remained “essentially un- 
changed” in recent years. 

In 1984. Computer Election Sys- 
tems provided more than 1,000 
county and local jurisdictions with 


w orida, but experts there 

have not been permitted to exam- 
ine the program. 

Civil lawsuits in West Virginia 
and In diana, which the company 
and county election officials won in 
lower courts, are pending before 
federal appeals courts. In Mary- 
land and Florida, the cases were 
brought in state courts and are still 
pending. 

John H. Kemp, president of 
Computer Election Systems, do- 
med m a telephone interview that 
the company was involved in 
fraudulent schemes. County offi- 
" rink involved in the cases haw also 
categorically denied participation 
infraud. 

But Mr. Kemp also said that any 
computer system could be tam- 
pered with. “It is totally economi- 
cally infeasible W.have a fraud- 
proof system," be said. 

Mr. Kemp said that while there 
were differences in the programs 
used by various jurisdictions, the 
company’s fraud-prevention con- 


U.S. Request to Restrict 
Computer Use Is Refused 


The Associated Press 

PRINCETON, New Jersey — 
Officials at a major computer com- 
plex under construction here have 
refused a Stale Department request 
to exdude some foreigners from 
using the $125-mtilion machin e, 
the center's financial officer said. 

Unless there is further action by 
Congress or President Ronald Rea- 
gan, Soviet and Chinese nationals 
win be permitted to use the federal- 
ly funded Cyber 205 computer at 
the John Von Neumann Center for 
Scientific Computing when it be- 
comes operational early next year, 
Allen Simsgaffi said Sunday. 

The computers, 100 limes faster 
than current models, will be avail- 
able to academic and commercial 
nseachers regardless of national- 
ity, Mr. SinisgaDi said. 

Officials at each of four centers 
where the computers would be-lo- 
cated have turned down the Stale 
Department request pending a rul- 
ing by Mr. Reagan or Congress on 
access to the machine 



The State Department does not 


Tear what users might get out of the 
computers since they would con- 
tain no resticted information, he 
said. Rather, the government fears 
that certain nations might gain an 
advantage simply by teaming to 
use the powerful machines. 

“There's a lot of national securi- 
ty sensitive-type things that can be 
done with a supercomputer,” said 
Michael Marks, special assistant to 
Under Secretary of State William 
Schneider Jr. “We think the Soviets 
could gain certain insights by using 
these computers.” 

Mr. Sirusgalli said use of the new 
computers would be limited to sci- 
entists screened by several commit- 
tees. Users will be given an access 
code for a specified time. 

The National Science Founda- 
tion is funding the Tour U.S. com- 
puters. The machines also will be 
located at Cornell University in 
Ithaca, New York; the University 
of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana; 
and at a San Diego-based consor- 
tium headed by General Dynamics. 

The computer complex is backed 
by an association of 12 universities, 
including Princeton and Rutgers 
universities. 


that 'collected and counted 34 J 
million of the 93.7 million votes 
cast for president, along with all 
votes for other offices and issues in 
those jurisdictions. 

Although it dominates the com- 
puter voting market, the co 
has right competitors, Mr. 
said. According to the Fi 
Sections Commission, about 60 
percent of American voters used 
Mwrwtrind of amMterized election 
system in 1984. No allegations have 
been made against the other com- 
panies. 

Concern about weaknesses In 
preventing computer fraud led the 
National Bureau of Standards and 
the Federal Elections Commission 
separately to recommend ad 
a series of safeguards. But state 
federal officials acknowledged that 
the recommendations, made In 
1978 and 1981, have not resulted in 
signi fi ca n t improvements. 

In three of the four legal chal- 
lenges brought against Computer 
Election Systems, the losing candi- 
dates hired separate computer con- 
sultants who have said in court affi- 
davits, testimony and interviews 
that their examination of the com- 
pany's program showed it bad been 
designed in such a way that vote 
totals could be altered without 
leaving any sign of tampering. 

The allegations that the Comput- 
er Election system was open to ma- 
nipulation were supported by expe- 
rienced computer consultants who 
independently examined material 
obtained in the pending court cases 
for The New York Times. 

One of the experts was Howard 
Jay Strauss, the associate director 
of the Princeton University Com- 
puter Center. He said the program 
used to count votes in Indiana was 
vulnerable to manipulation. 

“Extra votes may be ottered in 
the form of bogus ballots on 
punched cards, or vote totals may 
be altered through the use of con- 
trol cards," Mr. Strauss said. “Ei- 
ther of these assaults on the 
could be performed 
a computer novice.' 

Mr. Strauss added that someone 
with a “fair amount of computer 
knowledge” could nun off the por- 
tion of the program designed to 
document any changes made in ei- 
ther (Ik program or the voles bring 
counted. 

Eric K. Clemons, an associate 

professor of decision sciences ax the 
Wharton School of the University 
of Pennsylvania, said that because 
of the excessive complexity of the 
program, “a doctored version of 
the code could be used to modify 
election results, and it would take 
weeks of study 10 determine what 
had happened." 




Mandy Lawther, 
IHT Executive, 
Dies at Age of 31 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Mandy George 
Lawther, 31, an advertising execu- 
tive for the International Herald 
Tribune, died of respiratory prob- 
lems Sunday at her home here. 

Mrs. Lawther, a native 0 / 
Bournemouth, Fit gland, joined the 
IHT in the London office in 1979 
and moved to Paris in 1981. 


’ . y; * cr of the newspaper’s medal re- 
J. v i pona In this job, where she worked 
V r- ]*lh both advertisers and journal- 
ists, she was known for her energy, 
.• care and invariable cheerfulness. 
Funeral services for Mrs. 
: ; Lawther, who is survived by her 
\'. V husband, James Lawther, wiD be 
• ; >y bdd Friday in Bournemouth. 

' A _ __ _ _ . , 


Pentagon Critic in Congress 
h Denied Military Aircraft 


The Associated Press 
WASHINGTON — Represen- 
tative J ohn D. Dingefl, a Dsnociat 

of Michigan who is a harsh critic of 

the Pentagon, will not get the cus- 
tomary military aircraft for a 
monthJt 
said. 

Hie 


Jong overseas trip, aides 


seen the stars in the heavens in this 
particular conjunction.” 

Last year, Mr. Dinged made 
public that General Dynamics, the 
nation’s largest military contractor, 
had charged taxpayers for such ex- 
ecutive benefits as country dub 
dtns and kennel fees far boarding 




Coordinator of Papal Trips 

The Associated Pnsi 

„ v . VATICAN CITY — Pope John 
^ ^ ?aul H has named the Reverend 
, . .^loberto Tucri, head of the Vatican 

as the chief coordinator of 
':-,:‘*r“i*pa] visits abroad. 


at of Defense lob- 

Jffce wrote Mr. Dingefl 00 
July 12 that it was rejecting a travel 
request for members of the Energy 
and Commerce Commutes headed 
by Mr. Dingefl “doe to heavy de- 
mand for mihtaiy transportation 
during the recess period 

Bui Representative Dennis E. 
Eckart, Democrat of Ohio, who 
was scheduled to go on the 27-day 
trip 10 Europe, sod he had bees 
told that the Pentagon “pulled the 
plane" because “they weren’t hap- 
py with the way Mr. DmgcU was 
treating them.” 

Mr. Dingefl, who said it was the 
first time in his 30 years in Con- 
gress that he has seen a committee 
chairman's travel request denied, 
said: “This is the first time 1 have 


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BUSINESS PEOPLE 
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complaints about smokers, tire cost 
of mstaTKng smoking lounges and 
empathy for the employees who 

y w j to. 

“The bottom line is that Pacific 
Northwest Bdl decided it would be 
better to invest in helping people to 
quit rather than investing m selling 
up places fra people to smoke,” Ire 
said. 

The Federal National Mortgage 
Association in Washington has 
limited smoking by its 1,000 em- 
ployees to certain areas in the 
workplace, has pnt smoke-filtering 
machin es on the desks of smokers 
and has restored the ashtrays from 
the conference rooms. 

The American Federation of 
State, County and Municipal Em- 
ployees reports that more and more 
nonsmokers are calling to inquire 
about then- tights. “Smokers are 
getting very defensive, and non- 
smokers are getting more militant,” 
said the union’s director of re- 
search, Linda Lampkm. 

When it is working with 
nies, Mr. Rosneft 


The bottom line is that Pacific Northwest 
Bell decided it would be better to invest in 
helping people to qnh rather than investing 
in setting up places for people to smoke. 9 


I he firafiny and has en rnmisskmeri 
reports of its own that say smokers 
are not less productive on the job. 
Nevertheless, a study commis- 
sioned by the Tobacco Institute, a 
group supported by the industry, 
found that more than 30 percent of 
large corporations had adopted 
some type of smoking policy. 

The survey, by the Human Re- 
source Policy Corp„ is based on 
responses to an eight-page ques- 


ettc smoke hare been 
successful in suing for, and setting, 
a smoke-free area m which to work. 

Estimates of the effect of ciga- 
rettes, pipes and cigara on people 
who do not smoke but are exposed 
to smoke range from 500 to 5,000 
additional cases of cancer each 
year. The highest estimate comes 
from a study co-wriuen this year t;. 
an Environmental Protection 
Agency epidemiologist. 

The Tobacco Institute contends 
that studies asserting that passive 
smoking causes cancer are based 
on “questionable research." 

At least eight slates and more 

than 100 municipalities have bws 
when it realized that the cost would that prohibit smoking in the werk- 
be $60,000 10 set up and ventilate place if any non smoker requests a 
each smoking room. smoke-free' environment, acccrJ- 

Another company that switched mg to Action on Smoking and 
to a no-smoking policy received an Health. 

extra savings when its autodial sex- San Francisco received eucnsb: 
vice took $500 off the monthly bill publicity for its ordinance support- 
because the office srajed cleaner, Tag workers who requested a 
according to Mr. Rosner. smoke-free office, put into effect in 

The executive director and chief March 1984. According to 3rucc 


Tsuimj;. the cr.vtT.r. mental health 
inspector who i> cnarcr or en- 
foremen:, none o' t'r.r ipr:ou- 
Rijtviy i><.' c-.inipia:n:>. ’.'.j: hj-.c 
been filed have gene U> ■.ruf! and 
enforcer-van: jctr.d,- incut 

one da;, out of p- wc-rfc-icdi.. "!l - 
going u*r. -r.ioo.ini* he 

Pressure-. .■ni.cr: "7 ag.nr.'J 
xmok'r.o own r \\i in* Ixnna 
i-i smoker'. Four : f r a r.’.e> 
surteved :n the lot'ac. 
study reponec ;i?ar 
hire smoker*: a! - . 

However. rcrccv 

pervisor*. -•jr-r.-.-i i\ 

Anahsis Cu.7 in Fr.r.,et *n' Sew 
Jersey, j.i mis- 

sioned Sj me uisutu.L-. mads 
no sense to refrain iron; peo- 
ple M.Tipo bceatcfe '.mciitM. 

“An employe ;■ ticnx 

himscif j thrr d .• ; ■.he popJa- 
S r..-: la r r.*: - m r.'V: w : ^aid 
Ar.r.e iirovde:. as !*::.-. 1 ’.0 the 
president 0.' toe ir.-trtatc. frank 

ii\ a form of d is . •£- 
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iivtitute 


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tionnaire sent to the ljDdu largest n 1 fiy • 1 1 

sen** and industrial company Kelease of raisaiis Ordered 

on Fortune magazine s list as well 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Mr. Faisans’s parole. Guadeloupe 
is a French overseas department. It 
has tittle local autonomy. 

Outside the courtroom, about 
200 demonstrators applauded and 
began singing when the decision 
was announced by the judges. 

“This ts what we asked for," said 
a man who said he was a member of 
the Popular Union for the Indepen- 
dence of Guadeloupe, one of the 
political parties, that had banded 
together for four days of protests in 
support of Mr. Faisans. 

In Poime-i- Pitre, where the big- 
Auolher32 f percent chose 10 iasti- gesi protests were held, police were 


as the 100 companies reported as 
the fastest growing businesses in 
the country by Inc. magazine. 

Of the 445 companies that re- 
sponded, 32 percent hod smoking 
policies that limited smoking on 
ihejob in some way, and 24 percent 
had considered but rejected a 
smoking policy. The report found 
that 3 percent banned smoking in 
work areas and L5 percent forbade 
it anywhere on company premises. 

The study also said that 45 per- 
cent of the companies had institut- 
ed smoking policies for what it 
termed health and safety reasons, 
and 16 percent of the companies 
had been required by law to do so. 
32 J paw 


clearing away the remaining Kirri- ; 
cades and debris after the pre-tests. ■ 
Mr. Faisans. 48. was convicted in ; 
Guadeloupe last year ana vr.-. 
lenced to three years in jail for) 
slashing with a machete a a lute I 
French teacher in Guadeloupe w ho 
had allegedly kicked and insulted j 
black suident. Bom on Guade-i 
loupe, Mr. Faisons was active in the [ 
independence movement, and was 1 
vacationing oc the island at the 
time, court records show . 


He went on a hunger strike in j 
prison on the island, and was irons- ! 
ferred to jail in Paris on June 25 1 
because ra superior medical facili- 
ties. according to court records. 


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Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


PoUnfaed Wbh Hk New York Time* and He fuhBflon Poet 


The Budget News Is Bad 


The news from France is very bad, said 
Churchffl in June 1940. Is the same true for 
America's economy today? 

The problem is not whether growth in the 
second quarter, or some such arbitrary peri- 
od, was 3.1 or only 1.7 percent. Economies 
frequently have cyclical ups and downs, and 
weather them — partly automatically but 
sometimes with the help of moderate discre- 
tionary policy changes by the authorities. 

The actual problem is far more funda- 
mental The American economy has been 
weakening because real interest rates have 
been high and the dollar far too high. All this 
is because the borrowing needs of business 
and government combined far outrun the 
savings of the public. When that happens, 
one of three things results: 

• The Federal Reserve can print money 
to enable the commercial banks to absorb 
the part of the government deficit that ex- 
ceeds America’s savings — a hopelessly in- 
flationary course that the Fed is not taking 

• Or competition for scarce savings can 
force interest rates up so high as to choke off 
corporate investment and consumer borrow- 
ing. The budget deficit can then be financed 
from genuine American savings, but at the 
cost of a recession. The budget crowds out 
more productive borrowing. 

• But since America does not live izt a 
closed economy, the path to disaster is 
slightly different As interest rates rise, 
funds are attracted from abroad, bloating 
the dollar against other currencies and mak- 
ing American producers uncompetitive. So 
exports weaken and imports swdL The pro- 


cess compresses profits and scraps jobs in 
the industries exposed to foreign competi- 
tion and in all the nwbw t™? allie d to them. 
It is because the budget deficit crowds for- 
eign funds m that American jobs are at stake 
and passions for protection run high. 

President Reagan's role to date in the 
battle to reduce the budget deficit is uncon- 
vincing. He started by reducing taxes, be- 
lieving either that Congress would then have 
to reduce social expenditure or that lower 
taxes would work a supply-side miracle; but 
both beliefs were naive. His subsequent ac- 
tion has been inadequate, partly through 
bad judgment, and partly through bad luck. 
Bad judgment made him too inflexible for 
too long on the near-term levels of military 
spending. Social Security benefits and taxes; 
and he distracted attention from the imme- 
diately acute budget problem by proposing 
fundamental reforms of die tax system. Bad 
luck intervened when the Beirut hostages 
distracted attention from the budget (lives 
are more important than jobs); and there 
was then the personal surgery that occa- 
sioned sympathy and further distraction. 

There is crying need for political leader- 
ship to knock sense into Washington's war- 
ring factions. Public opinion an its own will 
certainly not do this; we are not yet at the 
stage where the populace, as envisaged by 
Lewis Carroll demands less bread and more 
taxes. When France fell 45 years ago. there 
was de Gaulle to rally strength from chaos. 
The American economy will fare ill without 
stronger leadership now. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


A Short List of Culprits 


The budget deficit has become a menace to 
the financial stability of America and most of 
the world. It happened over the past four years 
gradually, steadily and with plenty of advance 
warning. The signs of danger ahead are dear. 
Yet every past attempt to reduce that deficit 
has (alien into political deadlock. Who is to 
blame? Hie answer is, many people, but a 
handful bear prime responsibility. 

First of course is the president He was the 
chief advocate of the great tax cut of 1981 — 
reckless legislation that Congress went along 
with and that has left the government far short 
of the revenue to pay for even the spending 
that the president hims elf supports. Mr. Rea- 
gan has abandoned any serious attempt to cut 
the budget further, but has also continued his 
adamant opposition to any tax increase. How 
does he dad with the implications of a con- 
tinuing deficit of $200 billion a year? He 
doesn't. He blames Congress. 

But Mr. Reagan is not alone on the list. 
Donald T. Regan also has earned a place. As 
secretary of the Treasury in the administra- 
tion’s first term he had a primary responsibil- 
ity for the ruinous 1981 tax oil As White 
House chief of staff in the second term he has 
gathered the lines of power into his own hands 
and helped cut off the inconveniently indepen- 
dent views that the president used to get from 
the Council of Economic Advisers and the 
Office of Management and Budget As long as 
President Reagan is against taxes, he is unlike- 
ly to hear any doubts or suggestions to the 
contrary from his chief of staff. 

Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger 
also bears much of the blame. His anglcmind- 
ed pursuit of more defense money, well be- 
yond any justifiable claims of the defense 


buildup, derailed countless attempts at com- 
promise and cooperation in reducing the defi- 
cit The Democrats have their own sins to 
answer for, bur it is very difficult for them to 
give ground on social 'programs when Mr. 
Weinberger successfully demands more for the 
Defense Department than it is able to spend. If 
the deficit results in the financial consequences 
now widely predicted, this administration in 
general and Secretary Weinberger in particular 
will be remembered as having left the national 
security weaker than they found it, despite 
those i mmens e procurement contracts. 

As for the House Democrats, Speaker 
Thomas P. O’Neill Majority Leader James C 
Wright and William H. Cray 3d, chairman of 
the Budget Committee, have all made substan- 
tial contributions to the impasse with, most 
recently, their insistence on the full cost of 
living increases for Social Security benefits. 
Like the military forces, so Soda] Security can 
only be damaged by the cumulative effects of 
uncontrolled deficits. Under the guidance of 
Mr. O’Neill and Mr. Gray, the Democrats’ 
plans this season for reducing the deficit have 
contained loo much fluff and padding to de- 
serve to be taken wholly seriously. 

A group of Republican senators has now 
made a sensible proposal that could reduce the 
defidt by half over the next three years. It is 
the last chance for progress this summer, and 
very probably the last chance in the Reagan 
presidency. The chief impediments to success 
are the attitudes and habits of those listed 
above. If inertia and the defidt win again, the 
threat to the American economy will keep 
rising. No one needs to be in any doubt about 
what’s happening, or who’s responsible. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Scientific Data Need Air 


Many scientists are reluctant or unwilling to 
share the raw data on which their published 
articles are based, notes a committee of Ameri- 
ca's National Academy of Sciences. It recom- 
mends that sharing of data should be a “regu- 
lar practice.” The advice leans in the right 
direction. Sharing of data by researchers is a 
necessity, not merely a desirable goaL 

Scientists are entitled to keep information to 
themselves until they publish their principal 
findings. But unless raw data are then made 
accessible, others may find it impossible to 
check the claims based thereon. And un verifi- 
able claims do not belong in science. 

Scientists are usually generous in sharing 
special materials or techniques, because every- 
one profits from the free interchange. But a 
colleague's request to see raw data can easily 
be taken as a challenge to diligence or veracity. 
Desire to protect data from criticism or preda- 
tory use often prevails over the scholar’s duty. 


In a case noted in the Academy’s report, a 
researcher maintained that each execution in 
America prevented seven to eight murders, a 
claim chad by t be Justice Department in ask- 
ing the Supreme Court to restore the death 
penalty. Raw data were not immediately made 
available to other researchers; when they were, 
criticisms of the research were corroborated. 

Experiments are easier to replicate in phys- 
ics or biology than in social science, but that 
does not imply a Lesser duty to make raw data 
available on request Access to data is the only 
way to establish that it has been fully and 
fairly reported. Some data are acquired subject 
to confidentiality, trade secrets or military 
security, but most science is a process of free 
and open inquiry, intentionally kept free of 
such entanglements. A scientist who denies 
legitimate inquirers access to the data frus- 
trates the validation process of science. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR JULY 30 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Why So Few British Babies? 
LONDON — The falling birthrate was dis- 
cussed at the British Medial Association Con- 
ference [on July 29J. “Tennyson's ‘torrent of 
babies,'" said Dr. J.W. Ballantyne, who 
opened the discussion, ‘lias been reduced to a 
mere rivulet." The marriage tie is being at- 
tacked, and popular novelists find much of 
their popularity resting on the presentation of 
conjugal unions in which disunion is impend- 
ing. “Parents argue that children are expen- 
sive.” Dr. Ballantyne said. “They hardly seem 
to think of the future. Present-day civilization 
seems to have no room for the baby. The baby 
finds no place for itself in the apartment sys- 
tem." Other causes, he said, were late mar- 
riages, the higher education of women, the 
entry of women into economic competition 
with men, and even possibly athletics. 


1935: U&3oviet Protocol Is Tested 
MOSCOW — Ambassador William C. Bullitt 
has been instructed by the State Department 
to follow die current session here of the sev- 
enth congresses the Komintern, with a view to 
detecting possible violations of the Soviet un- 
dertaking. at the time of American recognition 
of the Moscow government, to refrain from 
Communist propaganda in the United States. 
The question of propaganda might be consid- 
ered to arise in connection with statements 
such as those made by Herr Pieck, in his report 
to the congress. Pieck urged the American 
Communist Party "to fight for the creation of 
a massed party erf workers and peasants.” The 
undertaking by the Soviet government for the 
cessation of Communist propaganda in the 
United Stales was one of the terms of recogni- 
tion by the latter country in November 1933. 


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TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1935 


In Diplomacy, Even Lip Service Can Serve 


H ELSINKI -— The Final Act of the Confer- 
ence on Security and Cooperation in Eu- 
rope, signed in H elsinki at a 3S- nario n summit in 
1975. was the Mghpoim of d&ente, which soon 
began collapsing. That helps explain why expec- 
tations and disappointments were too greaL 
It was a compromise. Neither side raw away 
anything it actually had; neither gamed sub- 
stance. ft was not a treaty but a set of principles, 
negotiated by consensus. Every delegation had a 
veto, including Malta, winch used it too much. 

Inevitably there was cynidsm. Still the world 
has been the better for the accords and the added 
jive dipl omacy in a rimw of wnrinn. 
to say the Russians came oot ahead 
focus too narrowly on Moscow’s long efforts to 
rarity World War U bonier changes. When it 
became obvious tiutt partition of Germany made 
a peace treaty impossible, the Russians began to 
press for a European conference. Finally, Secre- 
tary of State Henry Kissinger decided tbae was 
nothing much to lose in mere words. He consid- 
ered the conference a minor sweetener for the 
Russians in his plan to involve them in a network 
of obligations. The condition was parallel pro- 
gress in the Vienna Ttcffi fT f'rinng to reduce con- 
ventional forces on Europe's central front 
The European allies were not pleased, feeling 
rtmi the United States ^ traded their interests 
too tightly in its search for a big power deal — a 
Soviet-American “condominium^ was the early, 
angiy French <^ ia r gr r he did not take the 
Helsinki process alfthat seriously, Mr. Kissinger 
agreed to let the Europeans lead the talks. LIS. 
policy was to keep a “low profile.’' 

The Europeans hit on the idea that in exchange 


By Flora Lewis 

for the political and security Jemima tioa that the 
Soviet Union sought, there should be a large 
section on human rights. The link to Vienna was 
allowed to slip, and ultimately to snap. Those 
talks have marked time ever since. 

But the ratification of bosderc was not abso- 
lute. It pledged only that they could not be 
changed by force, leaving open, at West Goman 

The Hdsmte Final Act cannot 
be acclaimed agaioatershed , 
but neither was it a trap, 

insistence, the possibility of negotiated change 
someday. That was hardly a Western concession. 

As time proved, neither was Soviet endorse- 
ment of hnrnan fi ght* more than tip service. But 

anuxiicenis on this score as U^dtotL: Soviet- 
drawn man — and more, since these issues had 
r raffitiVn>aii y considered exclusively domes- 
tic affairs. The Russians might not heed Western 
arguments, but they could no longer say they had 
not accepted the western right to make them. 

The big losers were dissidents who seized an 
the promises and tried to call their own govern- 
ments to account- Out erf about 100 Sawet citi- 
zens who joined Helsinki watch groups, 79 have 
been arrested at least mice, 49 are Rill impris- 
oned and only two were never bothered, accord- 


ing to a Frankfurt-based rights organization. 
This is a devastating record, but it matters that a 

record is being kept ami published. If the world 
had been paying such dose attention in Statin’s 
days, not to speak of Hitler’s, who knows bow 
many lives might have been saved? 

As it turned out, the main beneficiaries of 
Helsinki woe the governments of Eastern Eu- 
rope. especially those trying to wangle room for 
national maneuver despite the Soviet embrace It 
gave them a place erf thrir own on the diplomatic 
team and it easier to pursue their relations 
with Western Europe. The pain of the East-West 
division for Europeans was relaxed a biL 

The neutral countries and nonaligned Yugo- 
slavia, threatened with being squeezed to insig- 
nificance between the two blocs, also found a 
new rede for themselves in the Helsinki process. 

On its 10th anniversary. Helsinki cannot be 
acclaimed as a watershed, but neither was it a 
trap. Successor conferences were among the few 
places where Soviet-American exchange contin- 
ued, if only as a shouting match, in the years 
of broken contact. The united States and the 
Soviet Union are using the current meetings to 
p rep are their November summit 

The real importance of Helsinki is not for the 
superpowers but for all the others who live in the 
shadow of giants, whether by force or tar choice, 
as in the West And perhaps it was useful to make 
dear that there is not going to be a sudden 
breakthrough to a free and peaceful world. Nei- 
ther is breakdown inevitable. Demanding too 
much of diplomacy is counterproductive. Helsin- 
ki is much better than nothing. 

The Hew York Tunes. 


The Mysterious Near East 
Could Be Less Mysterious 


By Philip 

W ASHINGTON —Not the least 
of the rewards ol this business 
is that you do meet such lively, inter- 
esting people. Consider my new pen 
pal Leon Periswrig, whose letterhead 
associates him with “A Professional 
Law Corporation” on Wflshire Bou- 
levard in Los Angeles. “One would 
have to be a jerkbead." he writes, to 
conclude that Israel's Shiite prisoners 


Geyelin 

were psychoanalyzed as victims of 
the “Stockholm syndrome.” 

It was not just OK but maybe even 
funny to make sport of the Shiite 
faith. “What you don’t know you 
can’t hurt,” was apparently the rule 
for many. It was not a general rate, 
but the exceptions were enough in 
evidence to confirm that there is 
a double standard at work, to the 


Thereto a double standard at icoikj to die 
detriment of a balanced public perception of die 
Middle East — and of a balanced US. policy. 


were “hostages just as the innocent 
American travelers who have abso- 
lutely nothing at afl to do with your 
bastardly Arab friends.” 

What strikes me as interesting 
about Mr. Perisweag is not his dis- 
agreement (fair enough) and still less 
his redundancies with respect to my 
acuity (“defective brain ... battered 
brain ... birdbrain”)- It was the 
nasty impulse, all too common in 
America’s narinnnl discourse on the 
Arab-Isradi issue, to proceed from 
an arguable defense of Israel and its 
policies to a gratuitous, indiscrimi- 
nate slur on “Arabs” — to speak of 
them collectively, to judge the many 
by the egregious excesses of the few. 

A positive pro- Israel prejudice is 
understandable when it is in favor of 
a secure Jewish state as a moral obli- 
gation to a people heavily in civiliza- 
tion's debt, a democracy with shared 
values, a friend. It is also natural 
enough for this attachment to trans- 
late into a tolerance of one or another 
Israeli government action or policy 
that works arainst proclaimed U.S. 
interests: the Lebanese invasion, the 
West Bank settlements, opposition to 
the Reagan “peace initiative.” dis- 
trust of the current delicate eff oils to 
build on Camp David's beginnings. 

But those are issues that can theo- 
retically be dealt with on merit and 
on principle. The problem becomes 
more difficult to deal with when a 
double standard is introduced — a 
mindlessly negative, anti-Arab preju- 
dice that would not be tolerated if it 
were directed at Israelis or at Jews. 

It is not so much a matter of a flaw 
in America’s national character. It 
comes down to a matter of familiar- 
ity. of understanding, of stereotypes 
in cartoons, cm television, on movie 
screens and in the written word. 

Scholars write of Arab “tribalism” 
and unsettled “nomadic” instincts. 
The suggestion is that “Arabs” are 
somehow incapable of statecraft or 
stable nationhood. They dress fumy, 
carry guns. Anwar Sadat was an ex- 
cep non; Yasser Arafat is the rale. 

Easily, Americans accept the Israe- 
fi definition of every hostile act 
against Israeli occupation forces as 
“terrorism" and of every ii 
Shiite or PLO-connecied ~ 
as a “terrorist” 

- Americans excuse an Israeli 
eminent for its rejection of 
peace proposals, out of sympathy for 
its domestic political concerns. So 
Congress shoals its approval of bil- 
lions of dollars (rf unconditional eco- 
nomic and military a id Jordan's 
King Hussein, by contrast, is sent to 
the back of the bus, despite all his 
hard efforts to promote the peace 
process at great personal and politi- 
cal risk, until be meets not only 
America's but also Israel's require- 
ments as a n wyiriaHng partner. 

The recenthostage crisis was illus- 
trative. Allyn Conweti, the informal 
choice of the hostages as their spokes- 
man, was unique among the hijacked 
plane’s passengers forhis firsthand 
familiarity with the Arab world, as 
a busines sman based in Oman. For 
expressing his understanding of the 
Shiite ride of the argument — as 
emphatically distinct from the hijack- 
er? acts — Mr. Con well was pilloried 
by commentators as prejudiced by 
where he makes his money. 

The newsletter circulated by the 
American Israeli Public Affairs Com- 
rahtee suggested snidely that Mr. 
Conwefl had “gone native," and cited 
approvingly his dismissal by colum- 
nist George Will as an “energetic col- 
laborator. Consider the likely re- 
sponse tO similar charges a gainst an 
American doing business in TdAvrv 
and proclaiming sympathy for IsraCL 
Others among the passengers who 
had anything nice to say about thrir 
captors or their treatment, or saw any 
symmetry between their plight and 
that of tiie Shiites in an Israeli prison. 


detriment of a balanced public per- 
ception of the Middle East — and of 
a balanced UJS. i 
A t the fust 


5. policy, 
show of di 


disfavor for 



far behind. Never mind that it is quite 
literally the wrong word; Arabs as 
well as Jews are “Semites” by nhnic 
origin and by definiti on. It is enough 
to note that for bigotry applied to 
Arabs there is no comparable rebnke. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 



Tt’sajvngle in there .* 


The Bomb Exists, So WeLive Withlt 



By Stephen 

W ASHINGTON —John Hersey, whose report on 
Hiroshima is recalled bya whole generation, 
ends his update, “Hiroshima: The Aftamath” (New 
Y oifcer, July 15), will laconic reflections on one of the 
hibaksaha, or “explosion-affected persons.” 

Kryoshi Tanimoto “read in the papers that the 
United States and the Soviet Union were steadily 
climbing the steep steps of deterrence,” Mr. Hersey 
writes. nKe lived m a snug little house with a radio 
and two television sets, a washing machine, an electric 
oven and a refrigerator, and he had a compact Mazda 
automobile, manufactured in Hiroshima ... His 
memory, like the worlds, was getting spotty.” 

One hesitates to deny a survivor his chosen 
consolations. But is the world in fact forgetting the 
horrors of the bomb, as Mr. Hersey’s references to the 
seductions of national armaments and indivi dua l 
comforts suggest? Is it not just as conceivable that 
people have made a sensible and necessary decision to 
cope with difficult circumstances — to care for their 
defenses and, meanwhile, to get on with their lives? 

There is a common view that people who are not 
caught up by a drily sense of the fragility of the 
nuclear peace and lie paramountcy of disarmament 
— and, it sometimes follows, (he madman potential of 
Ronald Reagan — are victims of a wrongheaded, 

-- and perhaps maharistic sensibility. “Psychic 

the phenomenon is sometimes called. 

Ie fed this way in flashes, if not in longer 
it brings them to a print of emotional 
and relentlessness in political controversy. 

I have known some of those flashes, but something 
else troubles me more regularly. It is not so much the 
share premonition that we are all playing carelessly 
on me brink of nuclear devastation as the queasy 
feeling that in nuclear matters we do not have 


Some 

spells. 



budgeti 

somehow domesticates and makes part of one's life. 
How can mature people allow these things to happen? 

How can someone who observes the arms buuoup 
and the political tensions not fed that we are playing 
on the brink of nuclear disaster? 

AJoag with the negatives, there are sane positives. 
Over 40 years, the nuclear powers have shown a 
readiness to learn both the mechanics and the politics 


S. Rosenfeld 

of restraint in the actual handling erf thrir weapons 
and their crises. Public opinion, good sense and 
self-interest have forced them to. That no further 
bombs have been dropped is no reason to relax, but it 
would be foolish to deny the instruction that comes 
from understanding of why they have not been. 

These days, for instance, there is a new wave of 
attention in and out of the American government to 
the procedures and apparatus of nuclear command 
and control. The onset of more accurate warheads 
inevitably provoked new consideration of nudear 
war-fighting strategies; keener attention then started 
flowing to the possible “nudear winter” effects of 
applying these strategies. You do not have to be 
sanguine about the eventual results to see that public 
opinion and internal debate have worked to draw the 
American and Soviet governments, in their separate 
ways, into arms control talks. 

The 40-year reviews of Hiroshima are themselves 
instructive. They have focused on the ablations — 
this indudes all situations since the two bombs 
dropped in wartime —when the use erf nuclear 
weapons was considered more or less seriously but 
was ultimately rejected. In the last analysis, if not 
always the first, governments have been responsible. 
In the consensus view — which, granted, may or may 
not finally be guiding — the single accepted function 
of nuclear weapons remains deterrence. 

Nor, in asking why the nuclear peace has held, can 
Hiroshima itsdf be ignored. The great purpose of 
dropping the bomb was, I believe, to win the war 
quickly and cheaply, and it accomplished that 
purpose, producing a Japanese surrender within days 
and saving the mamr American fives and the far 
greater number of Japanese lives that would have 
been lost in an invasion of the home islands 

But a great effect of dropping the bomb was to 
demonstrate nuclear power. The demonstration 
played into the calculations by which the powers have 
kept their rivalry on the safe side of direct 
confrontation far 40 years — in every instance except 
Cuba, by a large margin on the safe side. 

This conclusion is rgected by those who fed that 
the bomb, poring a historically new threat to the fife 

of the planet, was bom in an. Bui it seems to me the 

practical essence of living with the bomb. 

The Washington Past 



By Richard Reeves 

This is ihx second of cea antdb, 

N AIROBI — Kenya a *3vrttaftj 
as the great African sucre* 
ry. a beautiful, free-enterprise fc. 
mccrjcy where no ox is sufife 
Looking at central Nairobi from ter- 
tain angles, you couU believe ifaq. 
There ore shining towers and fa abt 
names such as Coke. Datstte a &4 
Barclay's. Neighborhoods such as 
Muihaiga look more than a. little fiL* 
Beverly Hub in the daylight 
At night, men with machine gum 
walk the roads of Muthaiga, pawed 
periodically by private radtihptinj 
trucks carrying men and attack dogs 
behind iron -grilled windshields. 

A Nairobi newspaper recently' of. 
fered this advice: “Create a 'safe hi* 
%en.‘ DO NOT try and tackle the 
intruders, and DO NOT switch cz 
any inside lights- Build a grill gate 
(fixed to masonry, not to wooife 
frame) separating the living ana 
from the sleeping area. Remain in 
your 'safe haven’ and activate your 
'alarm and wait for assistance.” . 

Residents of neighborhoods all 
over the country are trying to protect 




name is the Swahili word for ma- 
chete.) The gangs of 15 or 20 Young 
men mug in the cities and. invade in 
the suburbs, charging over walls and 
fences, lulling watchmen and break- 
ing through from doors arid windows 
with targe rocks and battering rams. 

That load or violence is new, a sign 
that Kenya is not really working. The 
society does not have systems or ms 
infrastructure to absorb explosive 
population growth. The gangs are 
made up of high school and co&eze 
graduates whose fathers got “good" 
jobs — office jobs — when while avd 
servants left after the independence 
of British East Africa in 1963. Bet 
now there are no new jobs. 

The British and other Wegeners 
told them that “education" was the 
key. Every morning, across 

yon see uniformed children i 

trotting through fields, holding then 
books nigh. The country is crazy for 
education — yet education seems to 
be leading it nowhere but to corrupt 
government and violent crime. 

The tragedy of Africa u not simply 
famine; there has always been mass 
starvation, even if it seems wane now 
because erf overpopulation. It is the 
inability «o use the political and eco- 
nomic systems of the “developed" 
world, or to find new systems that 
might work on the blade continent. 

Kenya, one of Africa’s best and 
brightest places, is on the edge of 
disaster — and will almost certainly 
be pushed over the edge by overpop- 
ulation. Its “democracy" is a one- 
party police state ran by an autocrat, 
Daniel Arap Mai, who* scans deter- 
mined to combat free speech and 
simplify map-making by naming lo- 
calities after himself. (The image 
of Jamo Kenyalta. modem Kenya's 
founder and Mr. Moi’s patron, is dis- 
appearing everywhere these days.) 

Kenyas “free enterprise" system 
works belter than the socialism erf 
neighboring countries, but it is a par- 
ody of capitalism. Annual per capita 
GNP is declining at a rate of 4 per- 
cent. Almost every transaction is con- 
trolled — not by the government but 


by people high m the government. 

For example, a recent law* banned 
the import of secondhand clothing 
from Europe and the United Slates. 
That has raised the cost of dothing to 
poor people almost tenfold, because 
now they have to buy from private 
Kenyan manufacturers, companies 
whose stockholders are widely said to 
be front men Tor the politicians who 
promulgated the new law. 

Political leaders have imitated the 
fife-style and manners of the former 
British colonial masters, but hare 
done little to maintain the substance 
of British systems or replace them 
with workable indigenous systems. 
When an Australian couple went to 
the police after a nighttime mugging 
in central Nairobi recently, the offi- 
cer’s solution was to ask than to walk 
the same route the next night. They 
did. and. sure enough, the same pan- 
ga muggers appeared from (he same 
alley. The police, unbeknownst to the 
Australians, were waiting in ambush. 
They gunned down the muggers. 

Part of the reaction to the public 
breakdown beginning in Kenya has 
been to blame “outsiders." which 
means people who are not black. The 

30.000 white “expatriates" and the 

40.000 “Asians” — mostly Indians 
who have been in Kenya for genera- 
tions — are conspicuously prosper- 
ous and could become scapegoats for 
the government's failure to eovera- 

“They've.made a mess 
but there things work out one way w 
another," said a bored-sounding Brit- 
ish consultant to the Kenyan govern- 
ment. “Natural factors, you kno*- 
Famine, war. Europe went throu^ 
all of this, too, and it survived." 

Universal Press Syndicate. 


Israel in No Hurry Now 

Regarding “Prospects Are Bleak for 
Any Real Pmpess h f July 24}: 

Dominique Mmsi has a point when 
he armies that prospects for an Arab- 
IsraeB settlement are bleak. But I 
would add that at this juncture a 
settlement is not an Israeli priority, 
given Israel’s strategic advantage. 

We are entering what could be 
termed an “Israeli era,” in which Is- 
rael perceives itself as fairly secure, 
and thus as having no need for com- 
promise. Its borders with Egypt are 
guaranteed by Camp David; those 
with Syria by international arrange- 
ments; those with Lebanon by a com- 
plex network of tacit arrangements. 

Yet Israel faces increasing chal- 
lenges at borne and abroad, the fu- 
ture of the occupied territories de- 
pends on changing Israeli circum- 
stances and American perceptions. 
fadi k haled agha. 

Riimaiudk France. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Ahvays After the Deed 

In response to Ga&naih Urges POSH- e — ’•* ... 

cal Appointees for Embassies" fjidy IS): 


In urging political appointees for 
major embassies and throughout the 
State Department. Evan G. Gal- 
braith, former U.S. ambassador to 
France, pursues his vendetta against 
the Foreign Service, which be regards 
as disloyal to president and country 
— i.e^ to Republican conservatism. 

Career morale already suffers from 
the system that selects and trains offi- 
ces with care, encourages their ex- 
pertise and promotes them with pain- 
ful slowness over a lifetime, only to 
hand over the most challenging jobs 
to inexperienced beneficiaries of 
White House patronage. 

More successful non-careerists — 
such as Mr. Galbraith’s homonvn. 
former Ambassador to India John 
Kenneth Galbraith — far from view- 
ing the Foreign Service as a nest of 
'ipers. have always been prctr.pt to 


from either party and, without parti- 
san subservience, to defend the inter- 
ests of the United States. 

When Talleyrand praised his sub- 
ordinates for intelligence and lack of 
zeal, he was not advocating frying 
but condemning eager-beaverism of 
the sort that led Evan G. Galbraith to 
shatter so mnch crockery in France. 

Public diplomacy is essm tfai but 
it has not lessened the value of the 
preferred diplomatic instruments of 
Jules Carabon, a prominent French 
diplomat of the early years of this 
crattiry: two honest men speaking-in 
confidence and with absolute trust in 
each other’s discretion. A lifetime of 
can-do dynamism may bring success 
m a political appointee’s first career, 
but too often it unfits him for the 
ticklish business of his second career. 

JOHN BOVEY. 

Retired Foreign Service Officer. 

Pjriv 


Would-be historian Wayne Keys* 
C American Topics, ” July 22) shou» 
be told that Robert Todd Lincoln 
was not at Ford’s Theater when 
father was shot in 1865. Nor was be 
present at the assassinations of Presi- 
dents Garfield and Me Kinky. 

Abraham Lincoln's eldest son was 
m the White House speaking with 
John Hay. until he was called to the 
bouse across the street from Foris 
Theater where his father lay dying. 

In 1881. now Garfield’s secrciaiy 
of war, Robert Lincoln went to the 
Washington railroad station to deliv- 
er a message, only to find that the 
president had just been shut there. 

In 1901 he was invited to nw*» 
McKinley at the Pan-AlBcricjn Ev 
position at Buffalo. He arrived 
find a group gathered arour.d the 
filler, president tnorulh wounded. 

MORTON FI NER. 

S' Tr.w- France. 









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INTERNATIONAL HERALD, TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1983 


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Soviet in Transition: Andropov’s Drive ttrRevive a Stagnant Society Left a Legacy 


(Continued from Page I) 
pian notions that served as part of 
the vision of the Communist future- 
guiding the elite had seemed attain- 
able. But the old belief that Russia 
was riding tije crest of history had 
been supplanted by a widespread 
fediog here during Brezhnevas last 
years that Communism everywhere 
was in retreat and the Americans 
everywhere on the march. 

Nothing iQuminates so obviously 
ihe discrepancy between utopian 
ideological constraints and reality 
as does (be Communist Party pro- 
gram, which is supposed to be the 
bibie of the Soviet parly, and was 
adopted in 1961. 

By the end of ihe 1970s, the pro- 
gram asserts, the Soviet stare and 
economy would be so advanced 
that the population would be en- 
sured an abundance of everything. 


camps and suppression of internal 


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tural disasters and food shortages, 
widespread corruption, and the old 
problem of drunkenness. 

The authorities sought to put up 
a brave front to obscure public dis- 
content and the loss of optimism 
and confidence. Yet it seemed aD 
loo dear that Soviet society was 
ready for changes. 

Much has been made of the fact 
that Andropov had served for IS 
years as chairman of the KGB, the 
Soviet security police and intelli- 
gence agenty. In the West, the 
KGB is associated with spies, labor 




There was undoubtedly. a cruel 
side to Andropov, who .master- 
minded the suppression of the dis- 
sident movement He (ode over as 
KGB chairman in 1967 at a time 
when the dissidents were just start- 
ing to gain momentum, with many 

C urrent Soviet personalities 
the scientific and cultural 
communities joining in demands 
for liberalization. 


specifies, among other things, there 
was to be so much food that aD 

at factory restaurants; schootehiR 
dren ana -students would get free 
clothing and books; all citizens 
would have rent-free housing; wa- 
ter, gas and beating would be free, 
as would all transportation; aD citi- 
zens would have two months of 
paid vacation a year and, of course, 
such things us medical care and 
other vital services would be free. 

Tbe program, in short, promised 
virtual paradise on earth. For the 
fanners of Kazakhstan who did not 
read party documents, tbe promise 
was summarized by Nikita S. 
Khrushchev. By 1980, he said, the 
Soviet Union would “overtake 
America'' in everything — food, 
wealth, comfort, industrial 
strength. 

By the eariy 1 970s, it had become 
aD too apparent that the program’s 


pledges were fantasy. At thebegin- 
mng of the 1980s, the gap between 
rhetoric and reality had become 
intolerable. Most people knew it, 
yet the utopian exaggeration, con- 
tinned. 

A aeries of internal and external 
problems produced a crisis in Sovi- 
et society and deepened the feeling 
of gloom among the elite: the war 
in Af ghanistan, the Polish- labor 
movement crisis, Brezhnev’s pro- 
tracted illness, declining rales of 







in 1982, most prominent dissidents 
had either been forced into exile, 
like Alexander L Solzhenitsyn, or 
tried and sentenced. Some were 
placed in psychiatric hospitals 
while a -few, such as Andrei D. 
Sakharov, were sent into internal 
exile. 

In its efforts to destroy the dissi- 
dent movement, tbe KGB sought 
to prevent any form of organized 
opposition ana to remove hs prom- 
inent spokesmen. That left rite 
movement without a sense of direc- 
tion and leaders to rally around. 

Here, however, the KGB is also 
regarded as an elite organization, 
the guardian of the Soviet system, 
an agency that has been recruiting 
the Best and the brightest young 
men and women. The job not only 
gave Andropov the best available 
information about tbe country and 
the world, but it also provided trim 
with an aura of authority, which 
Russians respect. 

The image of the secret police as 
an all-knowing and all-powerful in- 
strument of oppression is deeply 
imbedded in the Russian psyche. A 
friend recalled a remark by Andro- 
pov in 1967 thal illustrates the 
point. 

Andropov was a secretary of the 
Central Committee ar the time, or 
one of the 21 top people who ran 
the Soviet Union, and he had just 
been appointed KGB chair man. As 
they walked together past the KGB 
headquarters on Moscow’s Dzerz- 
hinsky Square, his friend recalled, 
Andropov said: 

“An my life I have been walking 
past this buildmg with a feeling of 
unease and awkwardness. Imag ine , 
Pm going to become its boss.” 

The KGB reputation gave An- 
dropov an nrmg p within the coun- 
try of strength and firmness. As 
imimnal leader he held out a prom- 
ise of hope. The very picture of the 
new leader taking charge as 
smoothly as Lf he had been 
groomed for it all his life could not 
but create a surge of optimism. 

What he told the people was 
hardly new; the whole country was 
aware of the chasm between Soviet 
rhetoric and reality. What was dra- 
matically new was that the Kremlin 
leader himself was telling it without 
sugarcoating. 

In doing so, he seemed deter- 
mined to create a picture of pur- 



im Assooosad Prm 

In 1983, when Yuri V. Andropov made an appearance in 
public, be was so weakened that aides had to support him. 

Hie Kremlin rule of Andropov was brief, 
only 15 months, bat the reformist policies 
he initiated and the people he turned to, 
including Mikhail S. Gorbachev, suggest 
that it might have been a turning point 


pose and resolve. Stria disciplinary 
measures were combined with ap- 
peals to logc and reason, tbe latter 
suggesting that intelligence was fi- 
nally bring applied to the nation's 
buaness. 

Many of (be party’s objectives, 
be said, had failed “the test of 
time." Many of its enshrined goals 
were unjustified and some con- 
tained “dements of separation 
from reality ” Ihe economy was 
being run on a trial-and-error basis. 


bemgnn 
which is 


“irrationaL” 


After 65 years of Soviet power, a 
Kremlin leader was tiling the na- 
tion that the economy and society 
were seriously weakened, and dial 
this feebleness was the. result, in 
huge measure, of the absence of 
rational understanding and ratio- 
nal direction. 

“Frankly speaking,” Andropov 
said, “we have not - yet studied 
properly the society- in which we 
•Live and work, and we have not yet 
fully discovered the laws governing 
its development, especially eco- 
nomic laws.” 

For a Communist, elite, which 
was supposed to foresee the future 
and said the country was being gov- 
erned by the “scientific principled* 


of Marxism-Leninism, these were 
staggering admissions. 

His aim, Andropov said , was to 
sort things out ana bring order to 
the nation's existing social and in- 
dustrial capacities. Then, be said, it 
would be necessary to make 
changes in “planning, management 
and the economic mechanism,” or, 
in effect, in the entire system. 

“I do not have a recipe,” he said. 
Butihe country was iB prepared for 
a highly competitive future and 
“now we must make up for what we 
have lost” 

Not everyone was happy. 

When one speaks of changes in 
the Soviet economy, it is important 
to keep in niihd that one is mitring 
about the entire society. A11 Soviet 
citizens work for the state. A huge 
and strictly hierarchical bureaucra- 
cy presides over this edifice; the 
world's second largest economy. . 

One of the haDmai ks of Brezh- 
nev’s 18 years in power was stabil- 
ity. As he grew older, Brezhnev was 
tncreasnigy reluctant to make per- 
sonnel changes and fdi comfort- 
able only with the old, familiar 
faces. Top officials had acquired 
lifetime job security. 

Given the hierarchical nature of 


authority, this also meant almost 
automatic job security for officials 
at the middle and lower levels of 
the bureaucracy. 

' This, however, also meant an 
enormous resistance to changes. 
Andropov's tenure was marked by 
a struggle along generational lines. 
It was also marked by straggle be- 
tween. on one hand, an established 
and largely corrupt machinery, im- 
pervious to reforms, and, on the 
other hand, a coalition of younger 
and better educated people who 
wanted to revitalize the nation. 

It would be a gross oversimplifi- 
cation to assume that only tbe cor- 
rupt dements of party bureaucracy 
were opposed to Andropov. Many 
orthodox Communists feared 
broad changes because, once initi- 
ated, they could acquire an uncon- 
trollable life of their own. 

'The question was whether the 
party could hold the society togeth- 
er to make changes, particularly 
while confronted with President 
Ronald Reagan’s arms buildup and 
Moscow’s extended commitments 
to its allies and various diems 
.throughout the world. 

The fact that Andropov openly 
confronted the party and country 
with unpleasant reality changed the 
tone of debate. But the entrenched 
ppporirion was lying in wait, pub- 
licly agreeing with the new policy 
course but privately speculating 
about how long the’ ailing leader 
would endure. 

The coalition for change led by 
Andropov included powerful 
groups in sod cry. Among them 
were technocrats, younger people 
in general, some senior officials 
who bad become increasingly con- 
cerned about tbe feebleness of the 
economy and, perhaps surprising- 
ly. the KGB. 

Andropov must have known fall 
well just how immovable the sys- 
tem was. In a one-party state, the 
new leader inherits the entrenched 
opparot of his predecessor. Only 
gradually can he bring in his own 
people, only cautiously can he chal- 
lenge tbe sacred privileges erf a bu- 
reaucracy identified with the ruling 
party. 

Looking back again, it seems re- 
markable how fast that Andropov 
moved on aU these fronts. 

The men who run the country 
today are Andropov’s men. He an- 
gled out Mr. Gorbachtv as his heir- 
apparenL AU others were com- 
pletely unknown only two years 
ago. Mr. Ligacbev, now second in 
. command, was a provincial leader 
in Siberia for 18 years. Nikolai 1. 
Ryzhkov, Vi tali I. Vorotnikov and 
Viktor M. Chebrikov were so ob- 
scure that not even all analysts of 
Soviet affairs knew who they were. 

While there were relatively few 
changes al the lop, the pace was 
quick at other levels. Hundreds of 
persons who held real power in 
Moscow or in the Drovinces were 


removed and thousands of middle- 
echdoo officials were replaced or 
shifted to other duties. 

In the struggle against the bu- 
reaucracy, Andropov seized on the 
issue of corruption. Members of 
Brezhnev's entourage and some of 
his dose relatives had become in- 
volved in various scandals. A feel- 
ing of political and social disgust in 
the country was fueling demands 
for change. 

Apart from the insights he 
gained from KGB reports, Andro- 
pov could witness instances of cor- 
ruption and misuse of power al- 
most daily. 

An ascetic figure, be lived for the 
Ian 16 years of his life with his wife 
in a one-bedroom apartment on the 
rixcb Boot of a massive building at 
Kutuzovsky Prospekt 26. The 
apartment consisted of a kitchen, 
during room, living room and bed- 
room. He also had the use of a two- 
story dacha at Barikha. outside 
Moscow, whose Living space was 

roughly equal to that of an average 
center-hall colonial house in the 
United Stales. 

A few floors under Andropov's 
Moscow apartment lived Brezhnev, 
whose palatial apartment occupied 
the entire floor, and Brezhnev's 
crony and interior minis ter, Niko- 
lai A. Shchdokov, whose apart- 
ment was equally grand. Even dis- 
tant relatives of these and other 
high officials drove Mercedes- 
Benz cars and had buili palatial 
dachas at Barikha, at government 
expense. 

Friends of .Andropov say thal 
even while he was in the KGB he 
had on several occasions expressed 
anger and disgust over the elite's 
corruption. .As Soviet leader, be 
used the issue to force personnel 
changes. The bureaucracy was 
deathly frightened of this gaunt 
and withdrawn man, assuming that 
he knew everything about each of- 
ficial from the KGB files. 

Yet these people could be re- 
placed only gradually, since they 
were the mainstay of the party and 
the ha«s of the system. It was a 
difficult issue, and' Andropov must 
have been aware of the magnitude 
of the task. 

Before his kidneys gave out in 
February 1983. Andropov had a 
talk with a leading Soviet novelist. 

“He i old me that doctors were 
giving him about five vears to live," 
tbe novelist recalled fater. “But he 
said the things he wanted to do 
would require at least 10 years of 
work." 

Once he became seriously ill, An- 
dropov gave the impression of a 
man in a hurry. His speeches be- 
came bolder and more direct and 
he announced that a comprehen- 
sive blueprint for economic 
changes would have to be complet- 
ed in two years, or before 1986. 

At the same time, he initiated the 
most far-reaching internal econom- 


ic debate between economists, 
managers, scientists. Central Com- 
mittee experts and officials to de- 
termine the course of these 
changes. 

In his speeches he seemed to fa- 
vor a new pricing system, fiscal 
incentives, reducing the authority 
of the slate planning commission, 
and measures to “provide scope for 
individual and local initiatives" 
The trend was in the direction of 
market socialism. 

The debate abated when he was 
hospitalized in September }9S3 
and no clear blueprint emerged 
from iL .As be conducted business 
from the Kuntsevo hospital Ik 
seemed to focus almost entirely os 
the personnel issue, sensing that he 
had only a short time to live. 

He had seen the hidden dangers 
facing a leader seeking to make 
radical changes while he worked as 
a Central Committee secretary, 
first for Khrushchev and later for 
Brezhnev. 

Khrushchev was removed when 
he precipitately initiated changes 
that threatened bureaucratic privi- 
leges. Alexei N. Kosygin's profii- 
oriemed reforms in i%5 died a 
slow death in the bowels of the 
bureaucracy, while a passive Brezh- 
nev' waited oa the sidelines and 
used the failure to consolidate his 
pre-eminence. 

By focusing on the personnel 
changes and advancing young and 
energetic people who were building 
their careers, he was hoping that his 
strategy would be carried out by 
the new generation. 

At the end of December 19S3. he 
made Mr. Cbehrikoi au alternate 
Politburo member and pushed Mr. 
Vorotnikov and Mikhail S. SoJo- 
mentsev to full membership. He 
had prepared a speech for tbe Cen- 
tral Committee but could not deliv- 
er it himself. 

The last section of that speech, 


even at that lime, seemed like his 
political testament. The course had 
been set. he said. 

“We have raised people's expec- 
tation." he wrote. It was the Jui> of 
all Central Committee members to 
stay the course, he said, in w hat was 
almost a pica. 

Although his health was a state 
secret and even Central Committee 
members did cot know much about 
iu the word had filtered out that 
Andropov’* days were numbered. 
His opponents were waiting. 

A remark by a 7+jear-oW Cen- 
tral Committee member in Januarv 
29S4 illuminates this 

“What's all this about Andro- 
pov?" he said with evident con- 
tempt to some young people at a 
wedding party "He is just an old. 
sick man." 

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‘Pag* 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 


For Women, a Look Forward 

Nairobi Meeting Brings Unity on a Radical 15-Year Plan 


By Elaine Sdolino 

New York Times Service 

NAIROBI — Whai mosi of the 
delegates will remember about 
their three weeks in July in Nairobi 
is that despite the odds, the United 
Nations Decade for Women ended 
on a note of unity and of a shared 
sense of purpose. 

Is the words of Virginia Allan, 
the only member of the American 
delegation to the Decade for Wom- 
en conference also to have best a 
delegate to the Mexico City and 
.Copenhagen conferences: "I'm not 
sure how many women recognize it, 
and for the most part governments 
don't like to recognize it, but there 
.is indeed a powerful international 
women's movement Finally, there 
is commonality, and it will spread." 

Although parliamentary wran- 
gling, recriminations and political 
grandstanding often overshadowed 
the discussions, the conference 
ended in a stunning climax — 
■agreement on the “Forward-Look- 
ing Strategies" document on tactics 
until the year 2000. 

The document is nonbinding but 
has symbolic value as a world man- 
date for change. It potentially mil 
be of greatest use to women of the 
developing world. 

In many of its more than 350 


paragraphs, the document de- 
scribes m radical-sounding lan- 
guage what women hope to gain in 
the next 15 years. Some of the doc- 
ument’s recommendations go far 
beyond existing laws, traditions 
and customs in many countries. 

Among its recommendations are 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

an appeal to governments to pul an 
economic value an the “unreznu- 
nerated contributions of women" 
who bear children, keep house and 
raise crops. Other recommenda- 
tions include government funding 
of women’s organizations, accessi- 
ble child care and flexible sched- 
ules for working parents. 

Water became a women's issue 
at the Nairobi conference. Up to 75 
percent of Africa’s fanners are 
women, who often spend six hours 
a day fetching wood and water. 

The final document, which was 
passed unanimously, calls on gov- 
ernments to "relieve the burden 
placed on women by the task of 
fetching water” by constructing 
wells and dam., 

The final document illustrates 
how different the needs of women 
in various cultures can be. In one 
paragraph it urges governments to 


consider the desire of couples in 
foreign-service jobs to be posted 
together, in another it calls for the 
abolition of laws that discriminate 
against women in inheritance, 
property ownership, child custody, 
and freedom of movement. 

Ten years ago, the idea that 
women should be singled out as a 
group with separate interests baf- 
fled much of the world. . 

Now the “Forward-Looking 
Strategies” are bolstered by vol- 
umes of data compiled by the Unit- 
ed Nations, citing patterns in dis- 
crimination and plotting ways for 
women to achieve equality. 

But the effectiveness of the docu- 
ment depends on the political will 
of independent governments to 
carry il out. The introduction to the 

final paper acknowledges that the 
worsening economic situation over 
the decade has had "serious reper- 
cussions far women.” 

Perhaps the greatest achieve- 
ment of Nairobi was the definition 
of a potentially powerful new 
force: an international women’s 
movement. Legislators began to or- 
ganize an international women's 
in unparliamentary organization. 
Women expressed the desire to 
strengthen the UN Commission on 
the Status of Women and talked of 
a grass-roots women's conference 
in India in 1990. 



Ethiopian Relief Center 
Emptied Again; Officials 
Deny Reports of Force 


North Koreans, left, faced UN officers Monday during talks in Panmunjoni truce village. 

Arms Cut Proposed at Panmunjom 






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China Says Parts of Tibet 
Were Crime-Free in 1984 

The Associated Press 

BEIJING — Tibet's crime rate 
has fallen sharply in the past four 
years, and one- third of the moun- 
tainous region recorded no crimes 
last year, C hina 's Xinhua news 
agency said. 

Last year, 742 crimes were re- 
ported among the autonomous re- 
gion's 1.8 milli on people, down 
from 1,090 in 1981, Xinhua said 
Sunday. 


United Press International 
PANMUNJOM, Korea — 
North Korea proposed Monday a 
reduction of troops and weapons 
around the uuce site of Panmun- 
jom, saying such a move would ease 
tension and improve the mood for 
talks between the two Koreas. 

The proposal was made at the 
429th meeting of the Military Ar- 
mistice Commission, composed of 
delegations from North Korea and 
the U.S.-led United Nations Com- 
mand. The talks are held at Pan- 
munjom, which has been the site of 
recent talks between the Koreas. 


U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Charles 
F. Horne 3d, the senior UN dele- 
gate, said the United Nations wel- 
comed North Korea’s proposal 
“We welcome any constructive 
proposal by your side,” he said. 

Panmunjom has bom the scene 
of a number or outbreaks of shoot- 
ing, scuffling and other incidents, 
some falaL The most recent was a 
gun battle between North Korean 
and UN troops in November, when 
a Russian delected while on a sight- 
seeing tour of the truce village. 

He ran across the demarcation 
line and was pursued by North Ko- 


reans. Two Noah Koreans and a 
South Korean woe killed, and a 
U.S. soldier was wounded. 

Zn August 1976, two U.S. sol- 
diers were axed to death by North 
Korean soldiers in a dispute. 

The North Korean spokesman. 
Major General Lee Tae Ho, pro- 
posed that both sides destroy mili- 
tary installations in the headquar- 
ters area, reduce security personnel 
from 65 to 30, limit weapons at the 
headquarters to handguns, bar all 
weapons in the surrounding Joint 
Security Area and send a team to 
verify compliance. 


Soviet Poised to Challenge U.S. in Pacific 


(Continued from Page 1) 30 destroyers, 31 missile sul 

drum-range SS-20 missiles, bomb- tines, 103 attack subs, and twe 
ere. fighter planes and naval forces, jot amphibious landing ships. 

The Soviet Navy has 830 ships in All told, they have “three 1 

the Pacific, more than half of them the tonnage of the U.S. 7th FI 
combatants, including two mid- Mr. Mansfield said, 
sized aircraft carriers, 14 cruisers, a U.S. official said that in < 


30 destroyers, 31 missile subma- ily as a ploy to frighten Japan ratb- 
rines, 103 attack subs, and two ma- er than as serious preparation for 


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All told, they have “three times 
the tonnage of the U.S. 7th Fleet,” 
Mr. Mansfield said. 

A U.S. official said that in exer- 
cises this spring that passed first 
through the Sea of Japan and then 
circumnavigated Japan; “The Sovi- 
ets told the Japanese, ‘We’re here in 
your bathtub, and in force.* " 

The official said the Sea of Ja- 
pan, dubbed the “Emperor’s bath- 
tub” after Japan crushed Russia 
there in 1905, was now more like a 
Soviet lake with no serious Japar 
nese competition. 

The recent increase in Soviet 


invasion. 

Those islands, however, have the 
added value of protecting the ap- 
proaches to the Sea of Okhotsk, 
which the Russians maintain as a 
sanctuary for their long-range mis- 
sile-firing submarines. 

Initially, some experts viewed 
the Soviet buildup as a defensive 
overreaction to Chinese cross-bor- 
der forays in 1969. 

Those incursions made the 
Kr emlin acutely aware of the vul- 
nerability of Siberia, where 80 per- 
cent of its energy and most of its 
other natural resources are located, 
along with the Trans-Siberian rafl- 


(I) 346.1 1.50 
(93) 87.14.30 


forces on four northern islands his- road. The railroad is **the carotid 
toricaliy considered part of Japan artery just under the Soviet skin" in 


but occupied by the Soviet Union 


ily terms, a UJ>. official said, 


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since the end of World War II — because it runs only a few miles 
islands lying only a few miles off from the Chinese border for more 
Hokkaido — is also viewed primar- than 1,000 miles. 


By David B. Octaway 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The Ethio- 
pian famine relief center at Ibnet, 
where the forced evacuation of 
about 56.000 people in late April 
an international outcry, has 
again beat emptied of almost all 
residents, according to officials of 
private relief agencies and the U.S, 
goveramenL 

risen toaTFeast* 100,000 at the end 
of May, has been reduced to 6,000, 
the officials said Friday. • ; _ ; 

Unconfirmed reports reaching 
Washington say that thousands of 
residents may nave beat forced to 
leave. 

U.S. relief officials say that the 
Ethiopian official said to have or- 
dered the fust evacuation, which 
resulted in many deaths, is still in 
charge of Gaidar province, where 
Ibnet is located. Tncy say he was 
never seriously reprimanded, de- 
spite a government promise to do 
so. 

The U.S. Embassy in Addis Aba- 
ba has asked Ethiopia's Marxist 
government about the reports of a 
uew forced evacuation and has 
been told that all those who left 
Ibnet did so voluntarily. 

The government has adopted a' 
policy of trying to dose most of the 
camps or to reduce their popula- 
tions drastically. Contagious dis- 
eases are a serious problem in the 
camps. The government wants as 
many people as posable to return 
to fanning now that the rainy sea- 
son has begun. 

No one disputes that tens of 
thousands of the famine victim^at 
Ibnet returned voluntarily to their 
homes after receiving seeds, food 
supplies afid farm took. But mys- 
tery surrounds the circumstances 
under which tens of thousands of 
others left. 

“We simply don't know what 
happened to the people,” said a 
Unofficial. 

The Ethiopian government has 
refused to allow anyone from the 
U.S. Embassy to visit the camp, be 
said. 

“We honestly don't know how 
they got from I20JXX1 or 70,000 
down to 6,000 people,” the Ameri- 
can official added Estimates of the 
camp's ori ginal size range widely. 

A new government rule requires 
30 days’ notice before any Western 
relief worker may leave the Ethio- 
pian capital to visit the relief cen- 
ters. UR officials say they think 
the requirement is part of a govem- 



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(Continued From Bade Page) V 


meat effort to curtail the number of 
Western relief officials in the coun- 
try. Hus campaign has increased 
suspicions about what is happening 
at Ibnet and other relief camps. 

Concern about a possible new 
forced evacuation stems from a re- 
port by a United Nations official 
who visited Ibnet in late June and 

was told of people being expefled at 
nigh t. 

World Vision, a California- 
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workers at Ibnet. But a spokes- 
woman, Card Johnson, said World 
Vision personnel there had not sent 
any reports about qectidns. . 

Only children ana the very sick 
or feeble remain at the Ibnet camp, 
she said. 


Chum Army Cuts 
Its Officer Corps, 
Chief of Staff Says 

The Associated Press 
BEUING — China has made a 
severe cut in the number of army 
officer administrators under a pro- 
gram to elimina te overstaffing and 
waste, modernize the military and 
promote younger officers, the 
country’s chief of staff said in an 
interview published Monday. 

General Yang Dezhi said the 
number of officers in general head- 
quarters, the political department 
and the supply department had 
been reduced by 23.8 percent and 
the number in regional mditaiy 
commands by 50 percent 
The general spoke in an inter- 
view with the New niina Mews 
Agency that was printed in the 
Communist Party newspaper Peo- 
ple's Daily. 

China announced in June that it 
would demobilize one million offi- 
cers and soldiers in the army over 
the next two years and promote 
younger officers in the regional 
c omman ds. The army strength is 
put at about four million. 


Marchais to Meet Gorbachev 

Reuters 

PARIS — The French Co mmit - 
nist Party leader, Georges Mar- 
chais, will meet with the Soviet 
leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, dur- 
ing his current vacation in the Sovi- 
et Union, a party spokeswoman 
said Monday. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1985 

ARTS /LEISURE 

New York’s Flatiron District Stands Tall 


Page 7 


Tape , Record Piracy 



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By Michael Zwerin ' 

. . Jpuntadorihl Herald Tribune . . 

■n X<$tJTRHJX, Switzedand — * 
iVl^Terahi Ertegun predicts 
podauday: “If something isn’t 
dark abont it. piracy and private 
copying arc going to put us all out 
of faiiymess and m-Iu years there 
toB be no recorded musk left to 
tape. 7 * He was between sets in the 
mosaams’ ter during the recent 
Montrose Jatz Festival 

“Pirates in Singapore refuse or- 
ders far less than a contametioad: 
180,000 cassettes. Forty percent of - 
all cassette sales in Italy are pirates, 
in Tmfcey it’s 95 percent About 40 
pwfiimj gtate cassettes are import- 
ed by Saudi Arabia each year. In 
Indonesia, a country of 140 million 
people, pirating records is not ille- 
gal Ana now consumers can buy 
two-tape machines which can copy 
cassettes at high speed.” 

The son of a Turkish diplomat, 
jErtegun mew up in Switzerland, 
Britain, - France and the United 
States. Settling in New York in the 
1950s, he and his brother Ahmet 
founded Atlantic Records. Nesuhi 
produced more than 200-jazz al- 
bums including “My Favorite 
Things” by John Coltrane, 
“Charles Mingus’s “Pithecanthro- 
pus Ezectos,” Ornette Coleman's 
“Change of the Century” and at 
hast 20 records by the Modem Jazz 
Quartet. 

When Warner Communications 
bought Atlantic, Ertegun became a 
vice president of that organization, 
and for 15 years has been chief 
operating officer of WEA, its inter- 
oational arm. Last year he became 
president off the International Fed- 
eration of Phonographic Industries 
(IFPI), fighting what he calls “un- 
authorized duplication.” 

So he travels half the year speak- 
ing to lawyers, senators, managers, 
minis ter* and presidents, while 
remmisemg about '‘that wedd,” 
the world of Mingus and Coltrane. 
The switch to the world of interna- 
tional finance was, “very hard for 
me at first” • ■ 

Ertegun is a powerful man, one 
of the higtest placed music town 
in the music business. He interrupt- 
ed the interview to listen to the 
Modern Jazz Quartet, "Aren’t they 
amazing?” he exclaimed. “John 
[Lewis] is playing better than ever.” 

This erudite man who speaks 
four languages and attends festi- 
vals as much for pleasure as busi- 
ness, was wearing a sports shirt 
with a “Cosmos” logo over the 
heart He had been instrumental in 
Warner’s dedskm to found that 
Naptfexk soccer tenth. “I ran the 


NYSE Most Actives I 

VM. HM> Lam Lot CM. 


dub. I signed Pete,” he said, with 
the same proud grille he flashed 
later, saying; “We just signed M3a 
Davis. It’s a good move for ul m 
be pleased to be working with 
him/’ 

Fifteen years ago Warner’s had 

minimal rn tfernatinmil distribution. 
Ertegun signed unknown or under- 
exposed artists, hired smart local 
partners and executives and while 
Warner’s Atari division was losing 
a billion dote, Ertegun arid, 
“Without wishing to sound immod- 
est, WEA has passed most of its 
competitors. It ts a profitable oper- 
ation.” 

But most of bis time how is in- 
volved with industry problems. For 
example, Japanese record stores 
rent record* jot home taping. “The 
IFPI lobbied for a law forbuldmg 
that, and one was finally passed. 
But it covered only Japanese prod- 
uct, imported records are stfll rent- 
ed. Now we are. lobbying against 
that.” 

Hong Kong was home port for 
pirates m the 1970s. When the fe- 
deration'slobbyisg succeeded 
there, they moved to Singapore: 
“Recently we got word that a con- 
tainer of cassettes was being 


We alerted the mgerian. govern- 
ment and the shtprMii was inter- 
cepted. But fra every one you seize, 
maybe 10 get through. The industry 
— record companies, publishers, 
artists — are losing bflfions of dol- 
lars a year because of these crimi- 
nals.” 

A pirate m9 ^ ma« unautho- 
rized duplications of released re- 
cords, without studio or royalty ex- 
penses. Pirate product sells at 
about one-tinni the price of the 
original Third Worm officials tefl. 
Ertegun: “ ‘You’re right. We're 
stealing. But if we have to pay the 
list price we can’t afford to buy 


faWdCurdn* 

Nesnfai Ertegun 


your records anyway.’ It’s a tough 
argument” 

In developed counroes the prob- 
lem is home taping. Ertegnn wants 
a surcfaaige on blank cassettes to 
help balance lost income: *Tve 
been trying to convince artists to 
contribute a percentage of their 
royalties to hop us fight fra that 
Their creations arc being stolen. 
George Benson just announced 
that fie would be the first to do iL” 

But some artists wonder how 
much of any surcharge would reach 
them, and how do you decide who 
gets how modi? In Ins publication, 
“Jazzletter,” Gene Lees writes: 
‘Tittle kids with tape recorders 
worry me less than big ««np«i»e« 
with accountants. . ■ . The laws 
off the marketplace should be al- 


DOONESBUKY 


UVB&UeA&HB&TOWID 
CEL&FATE TmENPCFOfBOF 
J T&M05rm&GlVBMMHUK& 

: frdHmfrwwwm- 


prene u xs win build a new and far 
hMihHiw imwi! industry.” 

Meanwhile, Ertegun sighs after a 
strong set by Jack DeJohnette: 
*Tm tWtiirni^ of producing again, 
of starting my own labeLJazz re- 
cords are viable if you control 
costs. I really tove that music.” 


mmeANOGCfi&oNFm, 
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. By Eleanor Blau 

New York Tones Serrtce 

N EW YORK — When Peggy 
Tajdiarino moved four years 


J. YTariiarino moved four years 
ago to the loft on Fifth Avenue at 
18tb Street where she runs a public 
relations concern, the area was so 
deserted after dark that she would 
grasp a can irfiiw chemical Mace in 
her pocket. Today she has aban- 
doned the Mace, for the streets are 
alive, day arid night, in the Flatiron 
district. > 

Once vaguely defined as “in be- 
tween” Gramengr Park. Chelsea 

and Greenwich Vj ^, the district 

is rapidly emerging with its own 
character. ' The Flatiron Boildine, 
the largest in the world when bum 
in 1902, is the flagship structure; 
dramatically wedged between 
Broadway arid Fifth Avenue at 23d 
Street 

At the turn Of the century, when 
lower Broadway was known as La- 
dies* Mile, this was New York's 
fashionable shopping district To- 
day the area is bang upgraded with 
remarkable ease, as strong real es- 
tate farces edge it back to its origi- 
nal ek ganco 

There are now many more apart- 
ments here than several years ago 


Chinese Newspaper 
Praises 'Superman’ 

Tht Associated Pros 

BEIJING — The Workers’ Daily 
newspaper praised die 1978 Holly- 
wood nhn “Superman” and an- 
nounced that it would soon be 
shown to Chinese midiem** 

“It is clear from viewing this film 
that ‘Superman’ is a brave hero of 
incomparable strength who dearly 
distinguishes what to love and hate 
and culls strength from weakness,” 
the papa said Sunday. “He is the 
embodiment of might and justice, 
and reflects the American people's 
desire for kindheartedness and 
beauty. For tins reason h has been 
welcomed." i 


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—not only m Wt conversions that 
were encouraged by city policy 
adopted about five years ago, but 
also in new apartment bidlmngs. 

Advertising agencies fleeing 
midtown rents have been flocking 
here. Geer, DnBois, an advertising 
pioneer of sons when it moved in 
1981 to Fifth Avenue near 16th 
Street, recently was joined by its 
17th competitor in the area, Ken- 
yon & EdchardL Publishers also 
are moving to the area, which was 
once a punishing center; about a 
dozen have ma d e the duray. — 
including Viking Penguin fa ft, and 
Charles Scribner’s Seas — or are 
about to. 

Clothing stores and other shops 
catering to office workers have 
sprang up, with such names as 
Royal Silk, Fine Design, Qty Life 
and FoDdorica. And restaurants 
open every other day, it seems, 
many amid ornate cast-iron pillars 
in cavernous spaces that once 
housed warehouse showrooms. 

Joanna’s was an early arrival 
Now there are La Cokxma ami 
Cafe Setyokan, for instance, as well 
as America, where the conversa- 
tions of more than 500 patrons 
mage in a deafening roar. Disco- 
theques also abound: Limelight, 
the Peppe r m in t Lounge, Dance- 
leria and Private Eyes. 

“At night, this place is crazy,” 
said Alan Eckstein, owner of the 
State Office Supply store at Fifth 
Avenue and 20th Street. Eckstein 
bought bis store, then a few doors 
from its current location, 11 years 
ago. About a year lata the big 
changes began: resides is started is 
and businesses began to set up of- 
fices, many in the forma sites of 
men's manufacturers and 

related businesses, wind: had dom- 
inated the are a for decades. 

Robert .Goodstem saw the wave 
of the furore and became a land- 
lord, renting space to various con- 
cerns at 1 1 west 19ib Street. His 
family had had an overcoat busi- 
ness there from 1947 until the early 
1970s, when competition from im- 


ATOmi 
LEAVE FOR iu 


prats and other problems forced it 
to close. 

Arthur Levin, a partner in the 
three-year-old F Stop Cafe on West 
19th Street, also grew iqr in the area 
when it was a menswear domain. 
“Every loft was full of manufactur- 
ing.” recalled Levin, whose family 
owned a lighting fixture concern. 
“The streets were choked with 
trucks unloading, pretty much the 
way the garment district is today. 
At night, it was absolutely dead” 

Thai in the 1960s, the menswear 
trade began to disappear, some 
factories moved to the South, 
where labor was cheaper, and some 
showrooms moved uptown. 

“Traffic began to go," Levin 
said. So did retail b usinesses that 
bad served the industry. For a de- 
cade, he said, the area was “not 
very viable.” But as menswear com- 
panies were leaving, photographers 
and some artists were starting to 
move in. As Levin put it, “Photog- 
raphers in a sense rescued the 
area.” Photo laboratories and other 
services for them appeared. 

Susan Rjchman, publicity direc- 
tor of Scribner’s, cried when she 
heard the company was tearing its 
midtown offices Last fall for 115th 
Fifth Avenue; near 19th Street 


“Now 1 never want to be any- 
where else,” she sakL “Here it’s not 
crowded, even at lunchtime. You 
can have business lunches right in 
the area and you don't have to 
reserve a table a day in advance. 
Architecturally it’s more interest- 
ing.” And sin nuts into so many 
people in publishing on the streets, 
she said, that the atmosphere is 
"almost dubby.” 

Bui problems exist. Some busi- 


^ i t 


aStfMUWK 

s- S 5ri w#BC 

'■ fef? wwfeon 


them, are being forced out, unable 
to afford the higher rents asked for 
lease renewals. 

Owners can get 58 to S25 a 
square foot for modernized space 
offered as offices. Those rates are 
about half of mi diown commodal 
rents, bul wdl above what longtime 
businesses in the Flatiron district 
are accustomed to. Seven years ago, 
Moe Ginsburg paid only SI.80 a 
square foot to rent the site of bis 
retail menswear business at Fifth 
Avenue and 21st Steel. 

Nancy Schndber, who is in the 
film business, is among the few 
who disparage changes in the Flat- 
iron district, where she has lived for 
a decade. “I liked the fact that 
nobody lived there,” she said. 

Levin of the F Stop Cafe said the 





'««>* no 

Manhattan's Flatinm area. 

changes for the most part had not 
destroyed anything. “This uea was 
dead,” he said. Ke added ibai its 
unusual mix of office and residen- 
tial space may account for fewer of 
the (ouches (hat he find.- preten- 
tious is SoHc and on CVLumbus 
Avenue. "Filth Avenue sail has jts 
liquor stores and cigar stands.” he 
said. “It may be one of the more 
livable gentrirrcaltoas.” 






The Director 8c English speaking staff of 

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Dow Jones Averages 


Omd KH Lorn LOST Cks. 

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Tirana 6S&JA M9J02 SWJO 67920— *42 

inn 157.16 TW47 15*34 U3L26— 236 

Comp S5*M 55*55 54952 35126— 6.14 


NYSE Index 


Frwrtsu* „ Today 
HOk Law ON IT* 

Compaalt* 1TL4S 1102* 11125 110M 

*2%°* *81 fij ’K 

STS i®} i?iS ffl at 


Mondays 


AMEX Diaries 


Aduancad 
Dodlneti _ 
(indwaad 
Total iMuas 
Now HWM 
Now Umh 


Osm Pro*. 

159 350 

40a 282 

237 346 

70S 7M 

U M 

U • 


NASDAQ Index 


Campasita 30*62 3072* 2»J0 

industrials 31*64 31346 31126 25553 

Flnanas 30445 — 398.12 HSU 

insunmas «*92 — 3PJO 23249 

UttlltlM 26535 — 30024 MS34 

Banks 26629 - me wn 

TRUMP. 2760 — 275.17 30049 


AMEX Most Actives 


NYSE Dfaries 


Dow Jones Bond Avcrrages 


Bonis 

7947 

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Tables (ltd ode Mrs nalfoawMd n-lcss 
op to ttii dosJno an Wall Stmt and 
do not rofloct lots trades alsewttera. 

Via The Associated Press 



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Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 


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Prices Fall on N.Y. Exchange 


Compiled bp Our Su^ From DispaJeha 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange were sharply tower ax ntidafta- 
Doon with technology issues sagging and inter- 
est-sensitive stocks under pressnre from prafit- 
-^aking for a second week. 

Although prices in tables on these pages are from 


the 4 PM. close in New York, for time reasons, 
Ms tnricle is based on the market at 3 PM. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was off 13 
points to 1,344. Declines ted advances by a 4-1 
margin on volume off 70.67 mflHon shares. 

Philips Petroleum (ex-dividend) led the ac- 
tives, off 14 to 13. IBM was off IK to 13014 and 
Digital Equipment was off 314 to 101K. Texas 
Instruments, which reported a S3^nrillion sec- 
ond quarter toss on Friday, was off 214 to 10314. 

Analysts said the market was “skittish” and 
“wraried.” 

Philadelphia Electric Co. was off W to 1544. 
Southern Qj. was down !4 to 2114. Middle South 
Utilities was off V4 to 14, Pacific Gas & Electric 
was off 14 to 1855 and Boston Edison was off 54. 

National Semiconductor was up 14 to 13% in 
’active trading. 


Telephone issues were mixed. AT&T was 
unchanged at 2114 but Nymcx was off 14 to 83ft 
and U-S. West was off % to 76%. 

UJS. Steel was up J4 to 29%, Campbell Soup 
was down 1V4 to 73 Vi, Piflsbury was off Vi to 
49%. General Foods was off % to 76%. 

In other blue-chip stocks, General Motors 
was offW to 70%. 


West German Sales Seen Up 1 % 

Ream 

MUNICH — West Goman retail sales are 
expected to rise just under a real 1 percent — 
that is, after discounting fra inflation — this 
year after increasing only 0.1 percent last year, 
the IFO economic research institute said Mon- 
day. 

It said consumer spending should rise by a 
real 1 5 percent after a marginal 0.6 percent 
increase last year. But it said that most of the 
increase. in spending will he fra tourism and 
services rather than consumer goods. 

IFO said its most recent survey off retailers 
showed that they expected their investment 
ihig yew to stagnate in nominal terms 
and fall \£ percent in real teems despite the 
anticipated nse in sales. 


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Table* include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wolf Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


(Continued from Page 7 ) 


in* Cofthira 34 M IS 304 34 * 34 

10 th Core In M 4 2 12 118 19 * 12 % 

30 % CornGl IJS 17 19 672 47 «i 46 % 

2 *% CorBlh 1 J 0 11 02 40 47 % 

« CunCm J 4 J 21 24 74 % 74 % 

4 % CrOlO 1 D 4 9 8 % 

32 Crane i=sao <u n 1 1 S 4 j 9 % zavi 

44 * CroyR 5 24 391 96 % 94 

171 % CrehNpflW 11 J S lBW 18 % 
49 % CrefcH pf 129 B IS 42 51 % 51 % 

IB% CrmnK 120 5.1 12 5 B 23 % 23 

36 % CrwnCfc 13 226 65 * 64 % 

27 * CrnZBl 1.00 16 IB 1004 3 ® 39 % 

43 % CrZd Pf 483 9.9 . 15 46 % 46 % 

20 % eulbra JO 15 >8 26 33 % 31 * 

17 * CulIrWlS 32 4 S 4 26 * 24 

58 % CumEn 220 32 3 738 64 % 65 % 

B% Currlnc l.ioaioj! 19 10 % 10 % 

30 * Cvrrw 1 J 5 U 1 ( 13 34 % 34 % 

29 % Cyclops 1.10 IS 9 31 44 % 44 % 


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Statistic* Index 


KeralbS^nbunc. 


KM£ 


of 


- Ca. b..^, J % fl Q 
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b > If/}) ^ 

| iNC ^AL 

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P.12 

AMEX WgUa/towP.12 
HYSE Micas P. 7 
NYSE BUK/tam P. B 
CaoootaB atadis P.14 
Currency nm* P. » 
ComnmfiMs 
OMdmds 


Earning* rental* P.13 . ' 
fling rata note P.w . 
GaM nrMa . P. 9 
interest rotat . P.9 
Morttt ■HtnnBnr.P. 7 
Osttm P.W 

P.W -OTC Stack - P.T3 • 
p.W Otar imrkah p.w 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 7 


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1985 


Page 9 


3 *;$$ 


FUTURES AND OPTIONS 

Foreign-Currency Bulls 
Feed Off a Weaker Dollar 

By H.JM. MAIDENBERG 

Hew Y#k Tima Service 

N EW YORK — Fordga-carreacy futures bulls contin- 
ued to forage through the market last week, feeding on 
the continued weakness in the dollar. They enjoyed 
their best meal laic Friday, when their baying forced 
those who had sold short earlier in the day to pay dearly to buy 
back contracts. 

Brokers explained that, although most foreign currency traders 
were bullish, many thought it prudent to cover their positions for 
the weekend by selling equivalent numbers of futures short 
There had been rumors all day concerning possible devaluations 
of the French and Belgian francs and an upward revaluation of 
the West German mark. 


The movements in 
the Swiss franc 
tend to be 
exaggerated 


* =*•* 




. •- I; 

. ?• *■ 

. ’ 

y ■«. ■. 
.V 'i •’ 


In any case, the spot, or 
nearest, futures contracts in 
all major foreign currencies, 

gains . on the week^The British 
pound, for example, scared 
2.65 cents, to $1.4125; the 
mark, 0.68 cent, to 35.47 
cents; and the Swiss franc, 

1.13 cents, to 43 52 cents. And last Friday, it took about 238 yen 
to buy a dollar, or five yen fewer than the previous week. 

P ERHAPS the best gains were made by the “cross-rate 
spreaders,” so termed because they play one foreign cur- 
rency against another, rather than against the dollar. Of 
these spreads, the biggest gains in recent weeks were made by 
those who had bought the Swiss franc and sold the West German 
mark short. A foreign-exchange futures spread involves the 
simultaneous purchase and sale of contracts in two currencies. 

“There are several good reasons for using the Swiss tranc-maik 
cross-rate spread,” said Donald M. SeUrin, senior futures analyst 
at Prudential- Bache Securities. “One is that the Swiss franc is not 
as liquid as most other major currencies because there just aren't 
that many around.” 

As a result, the moves in the Swiss franc tend to be exaggerated, 
he noted. Last week, the strong rise in the Swiss franc reflected 
demand from holders of the I talian lira, which was officially 
devalued by roughly 6 percent the previous weekend, as well as by 
holders of French and Belgian francs who thought those curren- 
cies would also be devalued. 

By comparison, the West German mark, which has become a 
surrogate for the dollar among European and other foreign- 
exchange traders, is a much more liquid currency and is thus less 
volatile. 

Given this situation, Mr. SeUrin observed that, when the 
dollar's value peaked late last February, the Swiss franc's premi- 
um over the mark was about 500 points, or 5 cents. A month ago, 
the spread had widened to 600 points and, based on last Friday’s 
dosing spot September futures, it was 805 points. 

“This meant cross-rate spreaders who had bought the Swiss 
franc and sold the mark about the time the dollar peaked in 
February did quite well,” Mr. Sdlon continued “Because both 
the Swiss franc and made futures represent 125,000 currency 
units, each 1 cent move equals $1,250 per contract.” 

Leaving aside transaction costs, those who put on a Swiss 
franc-made spread around March 1. when the Swiss franc’s 
premium over the mark was 5 cents, had as of last Friday’s dose, 
a paper profit of just over 3 cents, or $3,750 a spread Prudential’s 
senior futures analyst said 

The leverage profit is even more impressive because the initial 
cash margin for a spread is roughly half chat for a “straight” 
purchase or sale. Most brokers require an initial cadi margin of 
about $3,500 for a straight foreign-currency position. . 

As for the extraordinary strength of the British pound which 
went from a record low of $1X(2 when the dollar peaked four 
months ago to $1.4125 at last Friday’s dose, currency traders 
continued to rite the recent decline in real domestic interest rates. 

Last Friday, for example, the real return on 90-day Treasury 
bills was about 32 percent, while that on comparable British 
short-term instruments was slightly more than 6 percent. Real 
rates of return on any investment are determined by subtracting 
(he animal inflation rate from the yield. Currently, 90-day Trca- 
(Comumed on Page 13, CoL 5) 


\ Currency Kates | 


Craw Bates 


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aasimu In LanOn ana Zunen,nxUteem eater Eunween ctnnrs. rmw roncrmasuT^r-jn. 
to; ComtmtT l oi/mnc (b) Amounts noedK) to bur one pound (c) Amounts needed to ten am 

Hotter f) unltaoneoM Untts at UtOO ty) undent 1OU00 NjO. : not Quoted; HA~- not avaliaale. 
(*) Tot arm* poaod: fUSMH5 


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corraey p«r uu corranev par usj 

Areon-outrel uo Fhraidn 5 356 

AadTOU MOBS Greek Mac. 1320) 

Aartr.KUL IMS Hon? Knot 7345 

Beig.fia.fr. 57 jo ladtonranat 11.87*5 

ON MarepiA 
It U*7 Irish t 09174 

10.1725 Israeli Ml 1.M150 
Egypt, pond 0J«S7 fenMtqdlMr 03003 


r VSS 
MBtay.rira. 24*3 
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Norw. kroon 024 
PUL POO 104875 
Port, oscodo 147D0 
Saudi riyt» 14507 
ShML* mu 
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r lus 
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Snoo. porta 14050 
Swod. krona 13025 
Taiwan 1 4035 

ThalhaM 3*755 
Tartan** 53045 
UA£ dlrtjom 24725 
Varan. boUv. 14.15 


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iooroas; Bonqua du Benelux iBrvssmHI; Banco Canmerdate itatkona (/Man); Cherekat 
Ban* (Now York!; Banaum HaHarxHe « Paris (Ports); Ban* a/ Tokra (TOkro/; IMF tSDRi; 
BAII (dinar. rtyoLtBrhamf.Ortwr data {rom Routers tma AP. 


Interest Hates 


<v % 


farocuiTtagy BcMrito 



Mr 29 


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UtaardMt 

Wo 

WO 

OmtaMRta 

4J0 

*40 

(taaMordh MartanK 

5.15 

MO 

OoMatt tataromk 

MS 

5J0 

Utadh tataflxta 

MO 

530 

Fraara 

WuaitaBata 

«4 

994 

CoUiibmv 

914 

911/14 

On* moth tatartaa* 

9 11/14 

911/16 

nmm nmmM 

m 

904 

1 itato liitmtiuaK 

911/14 

911/14 

■rttai 

Ota Ban Rata 

lift 

n 

CaBMarey 

12 

rat 

.■ 9MwTn««TS* 

» 27/32 

119/32 

Otaan laMDaak 

10 line 

115/14 


1.1 <“ 


5 

*s/w 

s* 


5 

Ok 

M 


Sources: Reuters. Ommeatmk. Crtdt 
LmenHUevds Bonk. Bonk ol Tokyo. 


Ariaa Pollar P ep et to 

Jufy29 

Imontn m-8 

2 uianHU 7YW-IM* 

jiAMta nn*a» 

4 months W-ws 

irear I a-in 

Source: Routers. 

UA Maaey MarfceC Fonda 

Job 29 

MWrtH Lynch RKXhr AocH 
St day (nreragavWd: A» 

T a to i uf« inftnsJ Rote Index: 7309 
source: MenWLyncKAP 



Jafy29 



AM. 

fjh. 

Chfte 

HanaKoag 


Clsd. 

+a» 

LgimralaHim 

■mm 

— 

Part* (125 kilo) 32359 

32145 

+ 4J4 

Zurich 

32233 

324JS 

+ 930 

London 

32340 

33WO 

+ 945 

now York 

— 

324.10 

+230 


iMxmnboun. Ports and London oftfekH fbt- 
teas; Mono Kona on d Zurich ooenJne cud 
dostno prices/ New York Cam* current 
contract. Morten In US. t per ounce. 
Source; Reuim 


U.S. Cuts 

Forecast 
For GNP 

Sees 3% Growth 
For AU of 1985 

The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration on Monday offi- 
cially lowered its prediction for 
U.S. economic growth this year but 
continued to insist the economy 
would rebound sharply from its 
sluggish performance of the first 
six months of 1985. 

In a statement by Beryl W. 
SprinkeJ, chairman of the Council 
of Economic Advisers, the admin- 
istration dropped its April estimate 
of 33 percent growth for the year 
and acknowledged that the gross 
national product now is expect ed 
to dimb only 3B percent. 

The rate of inflation, which was 
expected to be 42 percent for the 
year, has b**" trimmed to an even 
milder 4.0 percent in the revised 

figiiri -8 

The t rimming of the administra- 
tion’s optimistic projection for the 
growth of the gross national prod- 
uct had been expected following a 

r vtb rate of only 1.7 percent in 
second quarter of this year. But 
some outride economic experts 
said that even the new prediction is 
unrealistically rosy. 

For the first rix months of 1985, 
the gran national product grew at 
an annual rate of just 1 percent as 
manufacturing in the United States 
was being battered anew by foreign 
competition, resulting in a drop m 
sales both at home and abroad. 

But in order to achieve even the 
reduced 3 percent growth now pre- 
dicted for 1985 as a whole, the 
American economy will have to ac- 
celerate in the second half of the 
year at an annual rate of 5 percent 
— five times the pace of the first rix 
months. 

Few analysts arc predicting such 
a sharp turnaround. Most of them 
are forecasting a rebound in growth 
of around 3 percent in the second 
half of the year. 

“The a dminis tration has moved 
in the right direction, but they 
haven’t quite found the courage to 
say that we are going to stay in a 
growth recession for the whole 
year,” Roger Brinner, economist at 
Data Resources Inc., a private fore- 
casting firm, remarked when be 
was told of the revised figures last 
week. 

In Mr. Sprinkel’s statement, 
which was read attire ^ White House 
by Larry Speakes, spokesman for 
President Ronald Reagan, the ad- 
ministration also projected a 
steady decline in the civilian unem- 
ployment rate, which has been 
stagnant in recent months, hover- 
ing around its current lewd of 73 
percent. 

Mr. SprinkeTs long-range fore- 
cast of continued healthy growth 
for the U.S. economy was not al- 
tered by today’s revisions. 


Texaco Net 
Rose by 1% 
In 2d Quarter 

United Press International 

WHITE PLAINS, New York — 
Texaco Inc. reported on Monday 
an increase in earnings of 1 percent 
in the second quarter, while reve- 
nues slipped from levels of the like 
period oT 1984. 

Net income rose to S30S million, 
or $128 a share from $302 rntZhoo, 
or $122 a share, in the same quar- 
ter of 1984. Revenues Fell to $11.7 
billion from $13 billion in the year- 
ago quarter. 

For the fust rix months of the 
year, net income increased to S625 
mini on, or $2.56 a share from $623 

mffiom or $2.47 a share, in the first 

half of 1984, the company said. 
Revenues for the half totaled $23.7 
billion, even with revenues of the 
year-earlier period. 

While the quartet’s results were 
only slightly belter than the compa- 
rable 1984 period, “worldwide op- 
erating results reflected a notice- 
able improvement compared with 
the first quarter.” the company re- 
ported. 

“Worldwide downstream opera- 
tions reflected significantly im- 
proved refining and marketing op- 
erating margins in the second 
quarter, particularly in the United 
States due to reduced crude oO and 
product aoqniatioa costs as wdl as 
higher gasoline prices.” 

The company also noted that an 
imbalance m pdroteum supply and 
demand has “continued to exert 
downward pressure on spot market 
crude od prices and ultimately 
upon product prices.” 


Japan V1R, TV Exports Up 

Reuters 

TOKYO —Japanese video tape 
recorder exports rose to 2.09 mil- 
lion units in June from 1 .83 million 
a year earlier and from J.89 miHion 
in May. Color television exports 
rose to 796,303 in June man 
444,246 a year earlier and from 
621,399 in May. 



Two tiere of Anne Klein fasinons displayed at Lord & Taylor h 
n, left, the cheaper fine, and the higher-priced designer seed 


U» taw Yert Tam 

in Manhattan: Anne Klein 
designer section, with better materials. 


Designers Turn Out Cheaper Lines 

Wrinkles in Policy oi Fashion Houses Are Ironed Out 


By Pamela G. Hollie 

New York Times Sendee 

NEW YORK — As Douglas and Jeanne Johns 
of Baltimore wandered through the Anne Klein 11 
section os the third floor of Lord & Taylor in New 
York, a black-and-tan blazer displayed ahove the 
racks caught their attention. The price tag said 
$248. “Not bad,” Mr. Johns said to his wife. 

In the Anne Kirin d^rig n*^ section a short 
distance away, however, they spotted another jack- 
et of similar design, but in silk rather than wool. 
There was another difference, too: the $600 price 
tag. Moreover, to purchase the rest of the designer 
ensemble, a skirt mid blouse complementing the 
jacket’s subtle shading, added more to the cost. “It 
would take $2,000 to look right in the jacket.” said 
Mrs. Johns. 

When tower-priced designer lines were intro- 
duced a few years ago, designers hoped that people 
such as the Johnses would oe won over to the idea. 
While retailers were enthusiastic, business got off 


with the 


mar - 


to slow stan as i 

problems involved in entering io~i he 1 
ktu_ Only now, after several disappointing seasons, 
are the wrinkles finall y being ironed out of many of 
the offshoot lines. 

“We have not been completely successful with 
what we wanted to do," admitted Didier Gnun- 
bach, chief executive officer of Yves Saint Laurent 
Inc. “Our first attempt was too basic.” This year. 
Saint Laurent's second-tier line. Variation, is 
younger-looking to answer criticism that its previ- 
ous designs were too outdated and its prices too 
high to attract working women. The items cost 
about 30 percent less than Rive Gauche, the top- 
of-the-liae coUection. 

The payoff for designers who succeed is dear. 
Ralph Lauren, one of the first to try tins approach 
with the addition of a Classifications Him* of appar- 
el, Hm pushed annual sales to $100 million, from 

(Confirmed oo Page 13, CoL 5) 


U.K. Base Rate 
Cut Half a Point 
To 11.5 Percent 


By Bob Hagerrv 

Intematiimil HcrulJ Tnhm e 

LONDON — Britain's major 
banks reduced base lending rates 
Monday to 11.5 percent from 12 
percent, and economists predicted 
that the pound's strength would 
allow another cut within a few 
weeks. 

The reduction, which followed a 
dear money-market signal from 
the Bank of England on Friday, is 
the second in two weeks and leases 
base rates 2.5 percentage points be- 
low their peak last January, when 
the government pushed rates up 4.5 
points to stop a plunge in the 
pound's value. 

Since then. Britain's high interest 
rates have attracted huge sums 
from foreign investors. As a result, 
the pound has surged about 35 per- 
cent against the dollar and 15 per- 
cent against the Deutsche mark. 
Despite Monday's interest-rate cut, 
the pound continued to strengthen, 
closing in London at $1.4285. up 
from SI .4055 Friday, and 4.035 
DM. up from 4.02S. 

Britain's short-term interest 
rates remain more than rii points 
above those in West Germany and 
about three points above U.S. 
rales. Because of that rate advan- 
tage, many economists expect in- 
vestors to continue bating the 
pound. 

The pound's strength, in turn, 
has created fears that British ex- 
ports will be priced out of thrir 
markets and that unemployment 
will rise from the current level oT 
about 13 percent. Imperial Chemi- 
cal industries PLC last week 
blamed a decline in second quarter 
profits on (he rise of the pound, 
and the Confederation of British 


Japan R ank Introduces Low-Rate Import Loans 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan's Export-Im- 
port Bank said Monday that it has 
introduced tow-inlerest-rate loans 
to encourage imports of foreign 
manufactured products. 

The loans, which be denomi- 
nated in either yen or dollars, are 
meant to be used for imports of 11 
specific categories such as telecom- 
munications equipment, electric 
appliances and medical equipment, 
officials said. 

Effective immediately, the spe- 
cial yen loans wifi cany an, annual 
interest rate of 6,5 percent com- 
pared with the long-term prime 
lending rate of 72 percent at pri- 
vate banks, the offiaals said. 

Dollar loans, to be made avail- 
able from the government's special 
foreign-exchange account, will 
bear a floating interest rate at ft 
point above the six-mouth U.S. 
TVeasury bifi rate. 

The loans, Mitch wifi have matu- 
rities of one year to less than five 


years, will be granted to encourage 
imports of qteafied manufactured 
goods of special interest to Japan’s 
major trading partners, such as the 
Doited States and the European 
Community. 

The preferential-loan program, 
part of the government’s trade ac- 
tion plan dne to be announced 
Tuesday, wifi be valid until March 
1987. 

The government plans to an- 
nounce Tuesday the details of steps 
designed to boost the share of for- 
ogn products in Japan's market 
and help redress Japan's $45-b3- 
lion world trade surplus last year. 

The bank said the 11 preferred 
categories include medical/ phar- 
maceutical products, power gener- 
ating equipment, specialized ma- 
chinery for particular industries, 
metalworking machinery, general 
industrial equipment, office ma- 
chines, tetoconunmicatiops appa- 
ratus, electrical machinery, road 
vehicles, other transport equip- 


sional and scientific use. 

Separately, a government survey 
released Monday indicated that 
about 66 percent of Japanese con- 
sumers are “wonied” about a pos- 
sible influx of foreign products and 
services because of Japan’s market- 
opening- trade “action program.” 

The survey also found that 21.6 
percent of respondents said they 
were not “specifically worried 
about the affects of more overseas 
products entering Japan's market, 
the report said. 

The figures were derived from a 
random survey of 2^65 people na- 
tionwide conducted by the Prime 
Minister’s Office in February. 

The survey said 60 J percent ex- 
pect some boidiis from an increase 
of imported goods, while 32L2 per- 
cent said they anticipated no par- 
ticular benefits and 7J5 percent said 
they were uncertain. 

Some respondents feared that 
trade liberalization would hurt do- 


mestic industry and lead to sales of 
products that may be unsafe and 
insufficiently serviced. They also 
said that language difficulties could 
make goods and services from 
overseas unattractive purchases. 

Asked about possible benefits, 
202 percent said the cost of Japa- 
nese goods and services would fall 
because of foreign competition. 
19.7 percent said consumer choice 
would widen, and 10.7 percent said 
foreign goods and services would 
he cheaper than (hose from Japan. 


industry has teen lobbying noisily 
for iower interest rates and i 
cheaper pound. 

“We believe the message is get- 
ting through." Sir Terence Beckett* 
director general of the confedera- 
tion. said Monday, "but we’re still 
looking for further reductions " 

The government is w eighing such 
pressure against its desire to sub- 
due inflation. “They are walking a 
light rope." said Richard Jeffrey, an 
economist at the London si oA bro- 
kerage of Hoars Goveu Ltd. 

Consumer-price inflation has 
quickened to about 7 perceni from 
4.6 percent at the end of Ns4. To 
counter that treed, rfce government 
has sought to reduce import costs 
by supporting the pound. 

Economists generally say the 
pound's rise has-been steep enough 
to push inflation below o percent 
by year-aid. But some are con- 
cerned that recent wage sett lenient* 
calling for increases of ‘ to 10 per- 
cent threaten to push inflation hack 
up next year. 

Given that worry. Stephen Lew- 
is. a senior econcmifi a: Phillips & 
Drew, argued that the government 
is being loo hasty abaut pushing 
rates lower. “The government may 
well be panicking” about the threat 
io exports and jobs, Mr. Lewis said. 

He warned that the government 
risks creating the impression (hat it 
is losing its resolve to fight inflation 
in the face of political worries. Such 
an impression became general lale 
in 19S4 and was widely blamed for 
the pound's collapse early titis y ear. 
Mr. Lewis said that if the govern- 
ment appears too eager to ret rates 
fall, foreigners will pull out of the 
pound as fast as they swarmed in 
titis spring. 

But several other leading econo- 
mists said Monday's rate cut was 
justified by the strength of the 
pound and progress in slowing in- . 
flu tiem. The government's encour- 
agement of lower rates does not 
threaten “the primacy of their anti- 
inflationary stance,” said Keith 
Skeoch, chief economist at James 
Capel & Co. 

David Kern, chier economist at 
National Westminster Bank PLC. 
said there was no sign that the 
government was pushing rates 
down too quickly. He said he was 
maintaining his forecast that base 
rates would fall to 10 or 10.5 per- 
cent by v ear-end. 


Quarter of NYSE Sales Seen as Retail 

By Vartanig G 

New York Times 


G. Vartan 

i Service 

NEW YORK — Retail broker- 
age customers, according to a new 
study funded by the Securities In- 
dustry Association, account for a 
frr larger share of New York Stock 
: trading than is generally 


Activity by these investors 
amounted to about 28 perceni of 
total Big Board volume in May and 
June — the two months covered by 
the study — the association said in 
the first of a planned series of regu- 
lar reports. 

“There might be a bit of leakage 
in our figures, say 3 percent, at 
most,” acknowledged Jeffrey M. 
Schaefer, chief economist for the 
brokerage industry’s trade group. 
“This wxild put retail activity at 
about 25 percent of the total.” 

But Perrin Long of Upper Ana- 
lytical Services, the acknowledged 
“dean” of brokerage-stock ana- 


AMC Studying 
JapanVentwre 

The Aaoaated Press 

DETROIT — American Mo- 
tors Corp. is considering a 
joint-venture agreement with a 
Japanese auto company, 
AMCs president, Jose j. De- 
deurwaerder, said Monday in 
an interview. 

Mr. Dedeurwaerder told 
Automotive News, a Detroit- 
based journal of the automobile 
industry, that AMC, an affiliate 
of France's government-owned 
Renault, would make an attrac- 
tive partner for a similar-sized 
company in Japan. He said that 
a joint-venture agreement could 
be made final within the next 
year, but he declined to talk 
about specific candidates. 

An AMC spokesman said, 

“We have been tafiring to a vari- 
ety of auto companies,” adding 
that “I don’t know of any 
nameplate at this particular 
point" 


lysts, said he sticks by his estimate 
that retail volume in May and June 
accounted for slightly less than 11 
percent of aggregate turnover on 
the Big BoarcL^I don't want to pick 
a fight with the SIA, but no matter 
whose figures are correct the im- 
portant thing is the trend," be said. 
“And that shows that public partic- 
ipation has been dedming for the 
last two years." 

Mr. Schaefer objects to what he 
described as “the common folk- 
lore” that retail participation has 
been estimated variously at be- 
tween 10 and 15 percent of overall 
volume, while trading activity by 
pension funds, mutual funds anti 
other institutional investors has 
swelled to gigantic proportions. 

Activity by member firms, spe- 
cialists and related sectors accounts 
for about 26 percent of total Big 
Board volume, according to the as- 
sociation. Of the remaining “pub- 
licly traded share volume,” it said, 
institutions represented slightly 
more than 62 percent, while the 
retail sector accounted for nearly 
38percem. 

The big discrepancy in estimates 
by the association and Mr. Long 
stems from the method used in de- 
riving data. The trade group said it 
utilized “a comprehensive uni- 
verse” of 1,528 broker-dealers and 
4,377 participating institutions. 

Mr. Long said his source is the 
Big Board's own regularly reported 
figures for trades of 900 shares or 
less. “I dunk that’s a valid proxy 
for activity by the retail sector,” he 
said. 

In producing its own figures for 
market participation, die associa- 
tion apparently is sensitive to fre- 


quent references on Wall Street 
and elsewhere that institutions are 
dominating the market to the im- 
plied detriment of the small inves- 
tor. 

■ Fund Sales Soar 

Net sales of mutual funds for the 
first half of 1985 seem virtually 
assured to exceed the total for any 
entire year on record. Industry 
sources die several reasons. They 
say there is now a far greater diver- 
sity of fund products. Many inves- 
tors have favored mutual funds for 
their Keogh plans and Individual 
Retirement Accounts. And mutual 
funds appear to appeal increasingly 
to individuals who prefer this 
method to making their own invest- 
ment decisions about the vagaries 
of the securities markets. 


Hong Kong Lias More Firms 

Afteece Frmce-Prtsse 

HONG KONG — The total 
number of new companies regis- 
tered here in the lust six months of 
this year rose 25 percent to 8321 
compared with 6,669 in the like 
period last year, official figures 
showed Monday. The total of offi- 
cially registered overseas compa- 
nies rose 2 percent to 2jD40, com- 
pared with 2,005 at the end of 1984. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PHCS AT 247.85: 
A: Ui DOLLAR CASH St 030 

B, MULTlCUBSMOt CASH Sit L» 

O DOLLAR BOWS $11-33 

D* AflJLTTOJSBEhCY BON3S $1134 

e, sraawG asset cion 

raeGNiCCXONAL 
MANAG£M&jr IS5EV) UMtTH) 

kwuCAsrai srefflr.srjfiRiBser.CJ. 
’tel 053427351 TELEX 4W2063 

- -TCEomafiCfun&SB 
/N7BtNA7KXAI RAIDS UST 


snxx 

US* 

USS 

DcVoe- Rolbeia 
lnlcraaiional nv 

6% 

7% 

Giy-Gock 

Intranafirawl pv 

2% 

3% 

| 'Quotes as of: July 29, 1965 | 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities for 
Herengracht 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3 1 20 260901 
Telex: 14507 firco nl 


First Mortgage Notes 

with a 

13 % 


fixed 

interest 

rale 


The mortgage noies are bong offered iixfat dually or in groups by Berkla Mortgage 
Cwp. The mortgage notes each provide to payment d 13% merest per year tor approxi- 


no further than this number 


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Notice is hereby given that Comcast International Finance N.V. has elected to 
redeem all ofilfiou (stand ing8percent. Convertible Honda due 1997 (the "Bonds") on 
August 15. 1 985 (the "Redemption Date'’!, at the redemption price of 103 percent, 
of their principal amount, together with interest, accrued thereon from December 
1 . 1984 to the Redemption Date in the amount of US$66.44 per US$1,000 Bond (the 
"Redemption Price"). 

On August 15. 1985. the Redemption Price will become due and payable upon 
all Bonds, and interest on the Bonds shall cease to accrue on and after that dote. 

Ail Bonds, together with all interest coupons appertaining thereto, maturing 
after the Redemption Date, are to be surrendered for payment of the Redemption 
Price at the Corporate TVust Office of Bankers That Company, in the Borough of 
Manhattan. The City of New York, or at the specified office of any one of the 
following paying agents: (a) Bankers TVust Company in London. Daohwood 
House. 69 Old Broad Street. London EC2P 2EE. <bl Banque du Benelux S- A. at 
rues des Colonies 40. 1000 Brussels. Belgium, (cl Banque Indosues Luxembourg. 
39 Allee Scheffer L-2520 Luxembourg, id) Bankers TVust Company at 12-14 
Rond-Poinl des Champs Elysees. 75386 Paris, France and le) Swiss Bank 
Corporation at Aeschenvorstodt 1. CH-1002, Basle. Switzerland. 

The Bonds are convertible into Class A Common Stock of Comcast Corporation 
("Common Stock”) up to theclose of business on August 15. 1985 at any of the above 
offices. Each US$1,000 principal amount of Bonds is convertible into 116.3795 
shares of Common Stoek after givingeffect toa three-for-twostock split effected in 
June. 1985. Baaed on the closing price of the Common Stock on July 2, 1985 of 
US$20.75. each US$L.0QQ of Bonds would convert into approximately US$2,415 
worth of Common Stock. The right of conversion will terminate at the close of 
business on August 15. 1985. No payments in respect of interest (except in respect 
of matured coupons) or dividends shall be made upon conversion of any Bond. 

Holders of Bonds who wish to convert their Bonds into Common Stock should 
tender their Bonds for conversion not later than the close of businesaon August 15. 
1985. together with all interest coupons appertaining thereto maturing after such 
date. 

Comcast International Finance N.V. 

By: Bankers TVust Company 
ox Thutcr 

July 15. 1985 


Lloyds 

Eumfinance NV 


Copies of the audited accounts of 


7100 5195 sen 59OT 59 X 

7132 9135 Od saw 58.77 

T3XD *030 NOV 6113 6115 

JIM 8230 Jon 62.40 4260 

71SS *190 Mar 62.90 6270 

7165 6115 APT 6117 62X7 

6530 610 MOV 6245 <245 

Esf.SaXi 17*4 erw. Sales U03 
Prev. DOV Opm Int 7457 dp 172 
HOGS (CMS} 

31000 rbA' amts per lb. 

507 41(7 AIM 4X75 *4X5 

5175 39.15 Oct 3LW 3940 

5055 ■ 4062 OK 4045 4170 

5147 4133 Fed 4140 4L95 

4735 39X7 Apr 39X5 3975 

49-05 <165 Jun 4270 4170 

47X5 4X25 Jul 4X10 4X20 

5130 4245 AiM 4X30 4230 


Est Safes 6.132 Prav. Sale* UH 
.Prev. Dev Open Int. 18X26 off 237 
PMC MUBtCMD 
xaooo Mr cams nrh 
1045 5130 Alio 5245 34.15 

7*30 5952 Fob *100 6195 

7540 SIX M or 59X0 *025 

7540 ■ 6150 MtfV 6140 6170 

7600 6150 Jlrf 6100 61X0 

7115 6125 AIM 6100 MXO 

£st.Sotes 6AM Prev. Sales 4524 
Prev. DaV Open I nt 9420 iip221 


>9^1 jqjH 

3115 MX 
3930 3773 

4077 40X0 

38X5 37-32 
4190 42 M 
4248 4240 
■OJ8 41X0 


enaea di December ly&r are now 
available from: 

The Secretary Lloyds Bank Pic 
71 Lombard Street London EC3P 3BS. 


5045 5260 
59X5 5940 
57X5 5892 



Qnrency Options 


LUMBER tCMS) 

130X00 bcLfL-Sper lXOOM.lt. 

19750 13550 5e*> 13840 138X0 

186.10 137X0 NOV 14110 140.10 

WJX 14440 Jen 147X0 147X0 

195X0 15100 MOT 15240 15X50 

17640 153X0 MOV 15750 15150 

1HD0 163X0 Jul 16070 16170 

176X0 166X0 SflB 1*550 16150 

Est. Sates 1743 Prav-Setes 1X06 
Pr*v. Day Open Ufl. 1450 on 4 
COTTON 2IHYC8) 

Sam lbs.- cants Mr lb. 

7750 S9XS Oct 4128 4128 

73X0 5940 Dac 6078 6028 

7675 6100 Mar 4172 4172 

7100 597S MOV 4150 U40 

70X5 5940 Jul 40X0 40X0 

6550 SOO Oct 5575 5555 

5975 5255 Dac 5X40 5X4* 

EsT. Soles Prav. Sole* 1767 

Prev. Dov Open (At. 10X9* ubTH 


5970 59.99 

5970 59X8 

6113 6130 
6131 6127 

99.70 5971 

54J0 54X7 

5130 S3 l« 


HEATING OIL (NYMC> 

42X00 got- cants car pci 
7X50 4635 Aim 7190 7130 

7*43 46X0 San 71X0 72J0 

77.10 <7X5 Oct 72.90 7X20 

74X5 6150 NOV 7X55 7U5 

7873 69.15 Dac 705 7445 

7690 69X0 Jen 74X5 7*X5 

7190 7100 Fab 74X0 74.10 

7100 611X0 Mar 

74X0 6100 Aar 


7130 7039 
7135 713« 
7225 7231 
7113 Till 
7170 73.75 

7130 74X0 

74X8 72X0 

71.10 
MOT 


Est. Sates Prev. Sates 9.179 

Prev-Dev Oban lot. 22.148 an 1X13 


CRUDE OIL (NYMEI 
1X00 bbL- dollars par bbL 
29X0 21 OB Sap 2734 2752 

2950 24X5 Od 2179 26.95 

2950 2*40 Nov 2649 26X* 

2950 2X90 DOC 2432 2649 

7950 2*38 Jon 26.10 2632 

2946 3435 Fab 25X8 26X5 

2945 203 MOT 25.70 25X1 

2945 2X93 Aar 2545 2545 

27X6 2X65 May 2530 2530 

37X0 NOT See 25X0 2500 


EsLSaltl Prev. Safes 9.179 

Prav. DavOotn lift. 92X61 oft 201 


2735 2737 

2660 26.79 

2638 2645 

2608 2638 
2538 36X0 
25X3 26X0 
2567 2573 
2540 25 40 
2530 2530 

2500 25X0 
X7 




PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Oatton A Strtka 


pac Mar Soa Dac Mar 


1W 30JE __ r 

m 15J8 WOT 

no liyo r 

05 7-» 948 

Mi <9- 4S 

s 2 g 


I 72 DoJ ^ k a5o* att T “"'V 

72 05 r r 


r r r 

r r r 

030 r r 

065 X40 <38 

1-SD r 6J0 

xss 670 r 

r 9 JO r 

r r r 


UtT-IOUlIMM) 

SI ml Dion- pfs at loo pet 
9X33 8AM Sap 92X6 *2X9 

9X07 1577 Dac 9235 9233 

9259 8668 MOT *150 9155 

9238 87X1 Jfin 91-55 9155 

92X1 88X0 OOP 91.17 9134 

91.78 99X5 DOC 9014 *0X9 

9139 895a Mot 98X4 90X4 

♦on 9093 Jun 

Est-Sales _ Prov. Salas 7329 

prsv.DavOpBPim.374M upTO 
MYR. TREASURY (CBT) 


9263 9248 
9225 9233 
91X9 91X3 
9150 9156 

91.16 9131 

WX* 9093 
9064 9066 

9041 


(Indexes comm led shortly before market close! 

SP COMP. INDEX (CME1 
octets and cents 

1*1X0 MOOT Sep 19250 19255 189 JO 1*9.95 —2.90 

208X5 17570 Dec 19520 1*530 19255 19265 — 2.95 

20X75 19010 Mar 19630 19635 19550 1*600 —160 

30658 20000 JiMl 1 9855 19855 1985S 1*855 —2X0 

Es>. Sales Prev. Salas *X713 

Prav. Day Open In!. 59481 off 13*1 
VALVE LINE (KCBTI 


GLM was! Gannaa Mqrta-csatB par naO. 


r r 

r r 

Q65 r 


*108X88 it lu-Ni62MofM>d 
■HI 75-18 Sap 8MB 863 

87-13 75-13 08C 82-31 83-1 

■6-2 75-14 Mar 82 82 

K-7 74-30 Jun 

8*4 81-8 Sap 

83-11 80-19 Dac 

Est-Sotas Prew. Sofas 7436 

Prev. Day Open lot. sum op 1.161 
US TREASURY BONDS tCET) 

rspct-fioaoeapisa 32nd> of ioo pen 

79-12 87-10 Sep 76-18 74-23 

78-12 - 57-8 DOC 73-15 73-21 

7W9 57-2 Mar 73-16 7^73 

JIM 71-30 71-25 

75-X1 56-29 Sea TOOT 71 

74-24 56-25 Dec 70-6 70-9 

74-15 54-27 Mar 69-17 4922 

74-» 63-0 Jun 6000 69-1 

73-27 634 Sep <7-10 68-17 

72-11 62-24 Dec 

OT-16 <727 Mar <7-22 <7-22 


- — - ■; 


5 JO 5X3 
X90 4JD 
342 350 

2J0 102 

169 133 

1J1 1J0 

055 1J8 


0X2 0,15 

r r 
015 042 


058 1.26 

147 1J3 


»» ♦ 



3X34 37 027 0X7 1.27 r 8 r 

LAAaMJapanne Ye^MOMafacsalPerpefL 

J ^ n _ 2 ,,5 r r r r 0X8 

*o . 2J? r r r r r 

5" 1 Q.lX r 022 .r r 

42X0 42 062 r r (lsa r r 

«X0 43 0L3* 064 1X0 129 T r 

44 r OOT 022 221 r r 

<UM Sates Fraacs-cenis par BBIL 

34 &60 r r r r r 

ex 37 628 r r r r r 

39 456 425 r r r r 

4326 40 150 151 r 020 r r 

4X38 41 244 130 r UO OX r 

«OT c IX* r r o3 . r r 

43 123 112 r OJD r r 

-D- 38 44 DJ8 159 r r r r 

Total coXyoL UR ColltMM, 1SL87I 

T to! pot vai . La# . WfjpSffi tSjS 


83-21 83-31 
02OT 82-29 
•1-3* 81-30 
■1-4 
80-13 
79-23 


31320 «25 Sea 20520 20520 30240 32X70 —350 

217X5 20000 Dec 208.10 208.10 306X5 20*70 —110 

EH. Sale* Prav. Soles 1518 

Prav. Day OpeflliU. 11629 up 53 
NYSE CO MP. I NDEX [NYFE1 
points and cants 

nxxs 9153 sop iiixo iuot hoot uaxs — 1.90 

11720 HJ120 Dac 11350 11355 111.90 111X0 — 1J0 

n«25 10950 Mar 115X5 115X5 11X70 11X70 —120 

Est. Sale* Prav. Sales 9,193 

Prw.Doy Oaan int. 1X691 op 478 


Commodity indexes 


7*i 74-20 

7W 73-18 
IM 73-19 
71-9 71-23 

70-16 70-29 
*9-26 70-6 
49-6 69-17 


Close 

MoodY*9 900.701 

Rwon — 1,700.90 

D J. Futures NA 

Com. Research Bureau- NA 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; 1 - final 
Ranters : base 100 : Sep. 18. mi. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Previous 
698.90 ( 
1694.80 
11570 
22640 


67-18 68-13 
<7-27 
67-5 <7-12 


imjeim um . putapeal 

. trad ed. »— No aotton offered- o-Ofa. 

LaN to premium (purrhow prtca). 

Scarce: AP. 


Prav. DayOpan Int 227520 ta>XM7 
8UWXOT mTiipts ASfcKteoflOO pet 

£2 HE 7W4 £2 S * 2 

JMO Mar 73-3 73-2 71-28 73-10 

75-17 50-25 Jun 73-20 72 -OT 7M0 71-24 

7SG 46 - 5 * p . 7U-33 71-5 7049 714 

ft- 8 o»a» . Prey.Soiaa . 1 W 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 4509 upB 


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Bit. 9JQD 4JP6 Uti 


OXi. 193Q 

FM 1/410 


FJ=- 1-200 

DM 432 


It 0 4U 

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Ta Subscription Menage-, IrrtemrtkxiQl Herald Tribune, 181 , avenue Owtes<i&Oaufie < 
92521 Neuffly Cedex, Frmce. Telj 74707 29. Tefet 61 2832. 

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□ I mild Eke to haw the paper sent to my median oddriSL {Please endoteinsbudion^ jj.7^5 



Gommwllties 



Jabr29 

dm 

SUGAR ”** L " r B “ ** 

Prencii frascs par metric toa 
oa 1OT0 1J67 L315 L320 +34 

Dec M.T. N.T. 1 J35 1JS5 +30 

A*ar 1404 TJ50 1J95 14S0 +£ 

Mav MU 1415 1420 1440 +X 

oa _ H.T. mIt: l^S 1^ +8 

sates: xa &££. ° t * Ual 

COCOA 

Freac* fraacs par MB kg 

Jhr N.T. N.T. NA _ _ 

£ ass % s is a =i 

*5 ^ ™ 28 w i :g 

Jty N.T. n.t. aim — —so 

Sap N.T. N.T. 2X35 — —SO 

rf .lOTw tt^Prev. octotf 

aoias: 1Q3 loti. Open interest: 822 

COFFEE 

Praocli Irenes per IN kg 

& KEs . u» Unch. 

JfO Ty»XJ UBD 1127 1M0 +3 

tjov UffV L87C 7JB5 1475 + 10 

aS- S't H-I- ''W +17 

Mar U.T. N.T. 1^35 7^45 4-25 

NT MT s'™ 1400 +1S 

pr -- 

soiree: Boone Ou Commerce. 


Commodify and un» 

Coffee 4 Santas, lb 

Prhtldofn 44/30 38 M, Vd _ 

Steal blltets ( PHI. J. ton 

Iron 2 Fdr y. PMIo. fen 

stool ktop No 1 nvyPitt. , 
laV Sont-Bi 

Copper alact. lb 

Tin (Strcrttil, U> 

OnoE-SI. LBcrstLlb — 
Polk>dlum.oz _____ 

Stiver N.Y.oz 

Source: AP. 


hfy29 
Y «v 


313X0 313X1 

Ml 8 M 8 
Ml 3GM 
68-71 64-71 

1X773 LM4 
8XVX7 8 J 8 
fj-rs Tn-ns 
LOT 7X2 


London c 
Commodities 


China Investment 
Said to Be on Rise 


HV1 Futures 
Options 


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1 Ml CsSKad MMXB 

Prtca ta te 0d IN AN Ig M Rtr 

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S H ! H HI lyiiH 2*k j 

IN Hi 1625716 P| Ok A I » S 9 t 

m m » h m n S 

SO l/U 11/U137T, 14 - - - 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — Foreign in-, 
vestment in Shenzhen. tbeKggcst 
of Q una *s spetial cconanic zones, 
rase 75 percent in the first half of 
1985 from a year earlier, to $134 
minic«i,thepro-Begnignew^)ffl)cr, 
Ta Kung Pao, reported Monday. 

In the same pmod, foreign com- 


Cote-Sant 
Prtea Sag Dac M 

31 1*4 3X3 " 

a u| m i 

35 DM 147 


J*fy29 

»• PNssimc 

SSf 


138 129 279 oS U3 5*8 

JS DJ9 Ssa 


I HI a a » = - 


» 88 Ul W r 

pots . PrLvaL 3L119 aoH ML 23M 
Source: cms, 


SUGAR ^ 4 *' B ” M ** 

Stertlag Par metric Ion 

SS J21S !!?■“ ll 2 * 8 1UX0 117X0 130OT 
OO 12*XO 11660 11740 11760 177X0 127OT 
DOC 13060 119X0 H9OT 171X0 130X0 132OT 
Mar 141X0 12840 139OT 12940 139OT 13»J0 
“or WO 31 OT 132X0 lOOT HZX0 1-8X40 
is 12-S2 ,MJM laaQ MSPO 146X9 

Oct 147OT 14SX0 130X0 140X0 1S05B am 
Vol uma : 4X7D late of SO mns. 

COCOA 

Storltoa parmehictoo 

1AM L735 1X34 1X3S 1XBS US0 
1X0] 1657 1661 1643 1X08 I JO* 

Ry UQ M Utt UD UN UK 

MOT 1696 1655 1656 1651 1JC0 

Mgy 1JM 1676 1676 1678 1J80 1OT2 

Jhr 1JX 1695 1693 1696 1J34 1JM 

saa n-t. n.t. ins \ra wo 

Volu me: 3.119 Ms Of W tans. 

COFFEE 

Stamaa gar metric Ian 
fly L51S 14*0 1JM Uft) 1690 1JM 

Up UCB 1617 1523 1J» 1637 iSl 

M»* 1576 1655 1571 1573 1513 LOT 

Jm 1615 U95 1613 16U UJ8 162T 

Mm- 1668 1630 1640 1644 1647 USS 

May ]iW4 1665 1675 1677 1678 liC 

J*9 15M 1691 1JBS U8B U» L71S 

VoMna: US* Ms of 5 ton*. 
gasoil 

ws. uattori gar metric ion 

AW 23L2S 22175 234X5 


oa 

Not 223JS 222X5 22273 234X0 
DK WOT 225OT^M 225X5^5 gg 
Jm N.T. N.T. 22UB23US 2910932158 

Frt n.t. KT. mm 2U50 nwo 

Mar N.T. K.T. 331X0 2ZU0 7QJB8 23Ujj 
M 21850 Z17J5 21750 217.75 2B8J5 21158 

uatumo: ijS4Msaf MOton. 

Sources: Revhnend Leaden PetfoU*’ &’ 
enret (gasoil). 


M — — — 


THNaNiMaM WJN 
taMaflmaiW.5UJB 
WMohM^n 

WMMHR 8 I 

LWUL44 aoteW62+84S 
Source: COOE. 


Treasury BOis 


mats and conpany officials recent- 
ly when he said the special 
economic zones were an “experi- 
ment” ihatcouMfaiL However, the 
Hang Kong newspaper quoted a 
S hen z h en official as saying the 
zone is profitable. 


I job 26 vv__aa 

fa To yur Readers 

: oti«r m nad rM . 

3-raertfi 7X2 7xa 765 7x* ^ xjrv^gnos wefe not available in 

Mnonm 737 73S 7X5 721 “IS edi t ion became of mmnn| ^ 

ore year 768 76* 8X2 757 problems. 

Some: SbUmeo Bremen 


Nippon Oil Has 
15% FaU in Profit 

Aa Her* 

Ja^^?uLS ippon 03 Co- rf 
Japan said Monday that jetoud net 
tpiaWlZfiObanonyen/giy^ 

hon) in the year e mfe* March 31 
15 percent down from 14.84 biflioo 
y® a year earlier. 

&les for the year totaled 3.647 

t^on yen, down 5^ percent from 
3^4 tnOjoa yen. Qn a per-share 
earnings totaled 
1 j- 45 yen, compared with 16.18 yen 
year eariicr. 3 


Pakistan Sets New Gertificste 


Reuters 

KARACHI — Pakistan wifl in- 
troduce foreign-exchange bearer 
certificates an Thursday that will 
be redeemable in either rupees or a 
foreign currency of choice, the gov- 
ernment said Monday. The certifi- 
cates, which wiQ be free of aS 
wealth and income taxes, *31 be 
available for purchase with ao con- 
trofe <m inqm or escort, Ae gov- 
ernment sod. • 





































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JJOTBNATIONAL herald 


!, TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1985 


Page 11 


But Transfer of Technoldgyto Member Firm May Mean Rough Seas Ahead 


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By Michael Schrage 

Washutgton Post Semin ' 

AUSTIN, Texas — With 'the. 
still and savvy that once mde him 
Washington’s consummate high 
technocrat, retired Admiral Bobby^ 
Ray Inmaa has turned his talons 
from the -classified to the propri- 
etary. 

The man who managed the roost 
sophisticated national security 
iedmolqgies In the United States 
— he; ran the National Security 
Agency from 1977 to 1981 and 
served as deputy director of the 
CIA —has giided smoothly to the 
private sector. 

Mr. Inman is chairman and chief 

executive officer of the Microdeo- . 

ironies ft Computer Technology 
Com. research consortium, or 
MCC, winch presents itsdf as the 
America computer industry’s re* 
mose to Japan's highly publicized _ 
*Wth Generation” computer chal- 
lenge for global supremacy in the 
information-processing industry. 

The creation of William C Nor- 
as, chairman of Control Data 
Coqx, in 1982, MCC was seen as a 
sew cooperative venture by Ameri- 
can companies to achieve break- 

S is in areas of basic research 
to Che evolution of informa- 
tion technology. The idea was that 
member companies would finance 
the venture, underwrite its research 
programs and lend it some of their 
best scientists and engineers. 

In many respects, MCC is the 
forerunner of what may prove to be 
the next generation of industry re- 
search and development — a coop- 
erative of companies that share 
first-level efforts that later will be- 
come proprietary products. MCC 


has. about 300 employees and an. 
animal bwtot approaching S100 
million but Gas not disclosed what 
isbemg^pentonspedlkpitis^ms. 

' Mr. Inmaa retired from public 
sendee in July 1982 and joined 
MCC in January 1983. He. sur- 
prised and annoyed many of the 
members of his board by rejecting 
many of the. researchers initially 
offered by the member' companies 
as not good enough. • 

Although MCCs seven research 
programs — which range from 
semiconductor packaging to new 
computer architectures to parallel 
processing— were supposed to be 
nm by scientists from MCC mem- 
ber companies, six of the seven are 
independent scientists recruited by 
Mr. Inman. Clearly, Mr. Inman has 
not lost his Washington-honed' 
touch for assuring, a comfortable, 
level of autonomy. 

MCCs member companies and 
Mr. Inman all concede that the real 
test of the consortium is just now 
beginning: WQl MCCs. research 
and development efforts ultimately 
translate into innovative products 
and services? 

. “My primary worry is technol- 
ogy transfer" said Mr. Inman. “I 
can’ t guarantee that all these com- 
panies will use these technologies.” 

Even in the fast-paced higb-tech- 
nolojry industry, effecting a smooth 
transfer from basic research to pro- 
totype to production model has 
proven to be one of the thorniest 

problems facing American oornpa- 
tries. Academic commentators on 
indust/y from Robert Reich to 
Ezra Vogel all <ranntwnt that Japa- 
nese industry's sk»n.< at quickly 


bringing innovations to. market 
give.it a competitive edge. 

Mr! Inman concedes that MCC 
can succeed briOisnilyasareseardi 
and development pqs&nizaliba but 
ultimately -fail in Jts mission if 
meiriberocRupanKS prove to beunr 

milling ' nr ifnaMfr pp nrram^nndqt r 

themselves to the flow of technol- 
ogies that emerge from the. consor- 
tium. . 

- Mr k Inman SOT? • the cftremrtinm 
“could .be vjabkf yriih 14 or 15 
members,” but hifrifcastms io add 
that he doesn’t expect more than, 
two or three of thggl companies to 
drop out over linear term. 

Actually, Mr.lSdsan seems more 
intent on attraaing and keeping 
key researchers.^tnan mollifying 
shareholders. “iVe tried to give 
them the feeling that they’re the 
members ofVdub — an exclusive 
group, an dile group,” Mr. Inman 
said. 1?- -‘ 

The Anson location has not 
proven detitmetual'm attracting re: 
searchers frean CflfiTomia or Ivy 
T-gflgT ?* and Mr. Tnm»w 

ckveriy has secured a diversity of 
sbarehoJdeas xamriux from Boemz 
Co. to Eastmml^Sk Cato Min- 
nesota Mining ft Manufacturing 
Co. to assure mat researchers have 
a broad market- of companies for 
their innovations. ... 

A random sampling of research- 
ers affiliated with MCC reveals 
that they are happy with their 
wxnkmgenvironinent, adequately 
compensated and optimistic about 
the prospects for the application of 
their research. 

**I »hmtf Mr. Jntmm has set the 
right tone for this; place," said 
Doug Lena!, an 'sSttfeaal-ffltdli- 


gence researcher who came from 
StanTord University and the Xerox 
Palo Alto Research Crater. 

However, the tone also includes 
an overwhelming concern for the 
proprietary nature of the research. 
Elevators are equipped with special 
locking devices that prevent indi- 
viduals without the appropriate 
card keys from having access to 
certain floors at the Austin com- 
plex of black glass buildings. In- 
deed, the seven programs are care- 
ful partitioned so that companies’ 
not funding certain programs 'are 
expressly prohibited from receiving 
information from them. Research- 
ers traditionally have been opes 
about their findings, but not ai 
MCC. 

Indeed, Mr. Inman declines to 
publicly disdosc the research mile- 
stones of MCC, arguing that, as a 
private enterprise, the organization 
is under no obligation to do so.. 
Consequently, though, there is no 
real external way of measuring how 
wdl MCCs disparate research pro- 
grams are doing. 

Samuel H. Fuller, an MCC 
board member and the. Digital 
Equipment Corp.'s vice president 
for research and architecture; in- 
sists that “it’s at least as ambitious 
as Japan’s Fifth Generation” goals 
and that the 10-year research pro- 
gram is “right on schedule.” 

It may wdl he that MCC — as a 
consortium — helps define the new 
level of proprietary emphasis as 
companies increasingly rely on se- 
crecy as wdl as innovation to pro- . 
tect a technical edge in the market- 
place. Mr. Inman sees secrecy as a 
part of the reality of intensifying 
global competition. 



Bobby Ray Inman 

The current membership is Ad- 
vanced Micro Devices Ino, Allied 
Carp., BMC Industries Corp., Bell 
Communications Research (Bell- 
cor). Boeing, Control Data, Digital 
Equipment, Eastman Kodak, 
Gould Inc^ Harris Corp., Hon- 
eywell Inc, Lockheed Corp, Mar- 
tin Marietta Corp~ National Semi- 
conductor Corp, RCA Corp., 3M, 
United Technologies Corp., Mo- 
torola Ino, NCR Corp^ Rockwell 
International Corp. and Sperry 
Corp. Reportedly. General Motors 
Corp., flush with its acquisitions of 
Electronic Data Systems Corp. and 
Hughes Aircraft Ox, also is explor- 
ing an MCC membership. 

Japan Exports More Vehicles 

A trace Fnmce~Pressf 

TOKYO — Japanese vehicle ex- 
ports in the first half of this year 
rose 8 3 percent over the tike period 
of 1984 to 3,269,3] 5 anils, the Ja- 
pan Automobile Manufacturers 
Association said Monday, 


B 


^■Tlrlii l 




Many Dealers Await U.S. Refunding Report 


Reuters 

LONDON — The Eurobond 
market ended lower Monday, with 
the dollar-straight and floating- 
rale-note sectors nervous ahead of 
this week’s UJL Treasury quarterly 
refunding announcement, some 
dealers said. 

Some dealers expect the size of 
the refunding to total 5ZI bflhon to 
$22 billion, out others said that it 
would be S23 biltian. 

One doDar-straighl trader said: 
“Wednesday’s announcement is 
dominating sentiment right now ” 
He added mat morning lasses of W 
to Vi point had been extended to 
falls of V4 to % point by the dose as 
the lower trend on the U.S. credit 
markets prompted further mark- 
downs. 

Among developments in the Eur^ 
omarkets Monday: . 


New Zealand issued £100 million 
of 12-year, Boating-rate notes pay- 
ing 1/16 point above the three- 
month Lcodon interbank offered 
rale, the sole lead manager, S.G. 
Warburg & Ca, said. 

The issue is callable after five 
years at (jar. 

The minimum coupon is 3 per- 
cent, while fees total 36 basis 
points, comprised of a 20-basis- 
point selling concession and com- 
bined management and underwrit- 
ing fees of 16 basis points. A basis 
point is a hundredth of 1 percent. 

The notes are available in de- 
nominations of £3,000 and £50,000 
and wQl be listed in London. The 

pay date is Aug. 14. 

. •** 

Hama Ox, of Japan, issued $50 
million of 10&-percent Eurobonds 
due July 17, 1991 and priced at 




W * H - 




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change PjVSIO to SI P*r unit; N.A — Not Available; ^--NOIConnWJntoltifljO-- 

N«w; S ~ wwsndedj S/S — Stock Sollt; * -- Ex-DMtfena: - r * V- 
Orort Pnrtormonea index June; •— Radempf-Prl«- Ex-Cogpon.-fty ftmwifi y 
Worldwide Fond Ltd; 0 — Offer Price tod. » prelim, ctxjrse; ++— ddllv stock 
once as on Amsterdam Stock ExctoMM 


The infernafionai Herald 
Tribune’s daily paid circulation 
continues to break record s, up 
5% tn the past year and 24% in 
the past four years. More than 
a third of a million people in 
1 64 countries around the world 
now see each issue. And latest 
figures indicate that this rapid 
growth continues. 


In i erne hand Herald Tribune circubhon 
figure prepared tor OJD audit ror period 
from January ], to December 31, 1984. 

1984 

160.709 



\_ 







MARKETS 


Dollar Lower; Pound Up Despite Rate Cut 


Reuters 

LONDON — The dollar moved 
still lower against major currencies 
Monday in moderately active trad- 
ing. In Frankfurt, iheU.S. currency 
was fixed at 18304 against the 
Deutsche mark, down more than 4 
pfennigs from 18792 on Friday. 

The British pound, meanwhile, 
shrugged off a half-point cut in the 
base lending rate — to 11.5 percent 
from 12 — to move higher against 
mast major currencies. It finished 
at SI.42&5, up from SI. 4240 at the 
opening and more than two cents 
higher than Friday's dose of 
51-4075. 

Dealers said the cm in the base 
rate, the rate from which all other 
British lending rates are scaled up- 


ward, came as the dollar was fall- 
ing, helping the pound absorb the 


But the pound remained equally 
steady against European curren- 
cies. with the Bank of England's 
trade-weighted index closing at 
84.7. up two basis points from the 
opening and five from Friday's 
dose, to its highest level since Sep- 
tember 1983. 

Against the Deutsche mark, ster- 
ling closed at 4.0305, up slightly 
from its opening 4.0245 and Fri- 
day's close of 4.0340. 

“A half-point cut isn't enough to 
worry anyone.” one dealer said, 
pointing out that U.K. rates were 
still high compared with most other 
major economics. 

with bearish dollar sentiment in- 


tensifying because of the impasse 
in budget talks in Washington, 
dealers said they expect the dollar 
to test the 2.SU-mark support level 
this week. 

Dealers said the undertone also 
remained weak because of expecta- 
tions that trade ami employment 
data due this week will paint anoth- 
er gloomy picture of the I'.S. econ- 
omy. 

in other European trading Mon- 
day, the dollar fell to 2.29 SO Swiss 
francs from 2.3490 Fridav : to S.62U 
French francs from 8.7jg5. to 
1,895.65 Italian lire from 1,42151, 
and ro 3.1875 Dutch guilders from 
321365. 

In Tot vo. the dollar fell to 
237.50 veri from 238.95 Fndav. 


JideiaisRgiiet 



The litnal Oak 


101 H, the lead manager, Banque 
Paribas Capital Markets, said. 

The naoc&Dable issue is guaran- 
teed by Dai-lchi Kangyo rank. 

Fees total 1H percent, with a l 1 ^ 
percent selling concession and 
combined management and under- 
writing fees of ft percent 
The bonds are available in de- 
nominations of 510,000 and will be 
listed in Luxembourg. The pay dale 
is Sept 17. 


Security Pacific Australia Ltd. 
was expected to launch shortly a 
1 00 - mill; on- Enr opean-currcncy- 
irah, 8%-percent Eurobond issue 
due July 1990 and priced at 10014, 
bond market sources said. 

Hie noncallabk issue is to be 
guaranteed by Security Pacific 
Corp. 


V-V.D' 






W5 


r *11 * 

C- v>: - 






1 % 


Internationally acknowledged 
to be the finest cigarette in the world 


a 

Mm 



lunnii 

Pa n.-< \v ir } brk ( 

IHf-MOS! I )LST I NCilTSHl:!") TOBACCO HOI Sl ; IN THfc WORLD ' 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 30. 1985 


Mondays 

AMEX 

Qosii^ 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades etoewhere. 

i 'ia The Associated Press 


14 

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15 
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9 

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74ft FoPOCnd4J»0 
lift ForjIC A 35 A 94 
15 ForstCB m A 95 
13ft FortsfL 37 

ft Potent 

4ft FrfHly 231 

M FrMCI 19 

7ft Frftdm JBb U T2 
5 FrlesEn 

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9 FrntHO 47 

4ft FrIA wt .171 27 
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231 

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75 15ft 15ft 
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42 

25ft— ft 
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31ft- ft 
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165ft— 1 
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23ft- ft 
27 —1 
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6ft + ft 
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1996 

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14 

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120 

72ft 71ft 

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1 135 

6ft 

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i SB 

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I 49 

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11 

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1 618 

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200 143 
J0bl3 
22 

A ,10a 20 
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15ft Oft UnxPol 


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28 17ft 
14ft 10ft 
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35 12ft 
40ft 34ft 
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101 


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109 


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12 

27 

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27ft 17ft Valaori 44 1.7 is 
Bft 7ft vcrll 

23ft 15ft VlAmC Mb 14 9 
6 T -h 3ft VIRSH 
14ft 9’« vemll JJ3 1.9 11 
6to 2ft vertofe 
9 5to Vlcon 10 

516 2ft v In roe 
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14 IS : !?% 13ft— ft 


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22% 

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17% 

18 

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30 

12 

616 

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1616 

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44 

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lift OhArt 

■24 

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27% 

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24 

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26 4- ft 

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13% 

13ft— ft 

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30 

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16ft 
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lift Bft 
6V. 3ft 
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Bft 5ft 
1616 12ft 
10ft 7ft 
lift 7ft 
1116 
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168 


15 . 10ft PGEnfA 1 JO HU 
IW Bft PGEptC 125 1U) 
12ft “8ft PGEPfD 123 I1J 
12ft Bft PGEplE 125 113 
36 29ft PGEotF 434 1X2 


17 14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 
I lift lift lift 
19 11 10ft 11 —ft 
19 lift lift lift— ft 
29 33ft 33 33 —ft 


5ft Yank Co 14 26 7*k 7ft r-* 



The Boeing Company 

Second Notice of Redemption 

8%% Convertible Subordinated 
Debentures Due 2006 



To all Debenture Holders: 

On June 17, 1985, you were notified that your 8 %% Con- 
vertible .Subordinated Debentures were being called for 
redemption by the Company on August 2, 1985. You were 
informed that your valuable right to convert your deben- 
tures into Boeing common stock would terminate as of the 
close of business on July 26, 1985. This right to convert 
has now been extended until the dose of business on 
August \ 1985. 

Ifour Letter of Transmittal indicating your desire to convert 


AWVVJ Ul U1UC1 LU 

preserve your right to convert. 

At today’s market prices for Boeing stock, you will gain a 
substantial financial advantage if you choose to convert your 
debentures rather than allow them to be redeemed by the 
Company. We urge you to take advantage of this final oppor- 
«£ < 25? rt ^debentures. Please call us at 

5? I l ational Bank of Bost ° n at 

(617) 929-6803 if you need further information or if you have 
any questions about your debentures. 






En ^ ^i-aw-|,y J 1 ’ -£• 





























































*J 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1985 


Page 13 


: r - > 
j' ' ■' ? 

.-‘Vi 


- '?■ 
V; *. 

t. • 
*• 


V L 

; A 
*1. 

*■ 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


BTR to Sell Hememann for $140 Millioii 


faucets 

LONDON — BTR PLC, the 
British engineering, energy and 
transporation group, said Monday 
that it has agreed to let Octopus 
Publishing Group PLC buy its 
Hdnamum Group is a transaction 
valued at £100 million (S140 mil- 
lion). 

The sale is being handled 


through the issue of 18.75 mTIKnp 
new Octopus ordinary shares to 
BTR, which would own 35 percent 
of the cniarged capital of Octopus. 

Octopus shares were at 540 
pence in early trading on the Lon- 
don Stock Exchange, 
with the 535-pence dose on i 
BTR’s shares were quoted at 318 


BAT to Sell Mardon for $241 Million 

Reuters 

LONDON — BAT Industries PLC said Monday it has agreed to 
sell its Mardon Packaging International subsidiary lev £1725 million 
(S241 5 million) in cash to a new Canadian consortium that includes 
senior Mardon management. 

The British company announced in April that it was seeking a 
buyer for Mardon because, whQe the business was sound, h was not 
EMy redevelop on the worldwide scale comparable with BATs four 
major areas: tobacco, paper, retailing and financial services. 

BAT sai d Mardon was being sold to Lawson Mardon Group Lid. It 
confirmed .that jbe buying group indudes senior managers from 
Mardon Pac ka gi n g’s Canadian and British businesses, as well as other 

industrial and f inancial investors. 

The announcement ty BAT of the mlp had nn immediate effect nn 
the company’s share price on the London Stock Exchange. They were 
trading at 293 pence each Monday, up from an earlier 291 pence but 
down oo Friday’s dose of 295 pence: 


pence cadi, down from 320 pence 
at Friday's ckse. 

When the sale is completed, the 
chairman of Octopus, P. Hamlyn, 
would own 39 percent of the en- 
larged Octopus share A 

farther 5 percent would be owned 
" the remaining directors and em- 

of Octopus. 

[ememaim is a long established 
publisher of hard-cover, trade and 
educational books. 

The group made a pretax profit 
of £7 mBBoain the year to Dec. 29, 

after adjusting for nonrecurring 
items relating to BTR’s ownership. 
Net assets were £20 million at that 
dab 

HrinemamT s managing director, 

Nicolas Thompson, wiB join the 
board of Octopus. 

A joint statement by BTR and 
Octopus Hememman would 
operate as art autonomous compa- 
ny within the enlarged group. 

Because of his mterest in the out- 
come, Mr. Hamlyn is unable to 
participate in the recommendation 
of the transaction or to vote bis 
shares at the extraordinary meeting 
to approve the purchase. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Adelaide Steamship Co. of Aus- 
tralia had only a 27-percent bold- 
ing in Wormald International Lid. 
when its $47.2-million bid dosed 
on July 17. its takeover consultant, 
Hartford (Fairfield) Pty., said. 
Wormald directors have recom- 
mended rejection of the Adsteam 
bid. 

Beecfaam Group PLC the British 
pharmaceuticals concern, said it 
has received notification from Jap- 
anese national health insurance au- 
thorities that its broad-spectrum 
antibiotic Augmentin can be intro- 
duced in Japan early next month. A 
product license was sought last 

Burton Group PLC, the British 
clothes retailer, said it bought 1.25 

milli on shar e* in T~Wv» nhams PLC 

on Friday for a total of $540 mil- 
lion. lW purchase brings Burton’s 
holdings in Debenhams tojust over 
10 percent. Burton has offered 
£550 million ($770 million) for De- 


benhams. The bid closes on Friday. 

Dow Chemical Co, of the United 
States is planning a dollar-bond 
issue in Tc&yo. the first by a private 
borrower, but the issue will take 
some time to complete because it 
involves negotiations on Tees 
charged by a commissioned bank 
in Tokyo, securities industry 
sources said. 

Mitsubishi Hectric Gap: of Ja- 
pan said it has won an order for five 
electricity transformer plants 
worth IS billion yen ($63 million) 
from Kuwait’s Ministry of Electric- 
ity and Water. The five transformer 
substations with 132,000-volt ca- 
pacity each will be delivered in 
1987. 

Nippon life Ins u r ance Co. of Ja- 
pan denied a report that said it had 
refused to buy part of a Dai-Idd 
Kangyo Bank Ltd. share issue 
aimed at raising 30 billion yen 
($126 mfliinn ), and that the refusal 
triggered a *wiin^ among financial 


shares cm the Tokyo Stock Ex- 
change. The report was in Nikkan 
Kogyo Shin bun, an industrial dai- 
ly. 

Times Mirror Co. of the United 
States said h bought about 3105 
percent of the slock tendered under 
its July 1 offer to repurchase 7J 
millio n of its common shar e* 

Total kdouesie, a unit of the 
French ml company, plans to drill 
100 weDs in the Handil o3 field off 

' Kalimantan In donesia, from 
now until the end of 1989 to main- 
tain oil production at 150,000 bar- 
rels a day, the Indonesian state oil 
company Pw taminfl, said. 

Union Exploshros Ko Unto SA, 
the Spanidi rhonwraU conglomer- 
ate, has sold two o3 tankers for a 
total of 3.8 billion pesetas ($23.17 
minion) as part of an asset-strip- 
ping plan, a company spokesman 
said. He said the safe would not 


Dresdner Bank’s 
Operating Profit 
Up 1.3% in Half 

Return 

FRANKFURT — Dresdner 
Bank AG said Monday that its 
operating profit, excluding 
trading on its own account, rose 
13 percent in the first six 
m onths of 1985, to 402.8 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks (51413 
million), from 397.5 million 
DM in the corresponding peri- 
od last year. 

The bank said in a letter to 
shareholders that total operat- 
ing profit rose to a record level. 
It did not provide figures, but 
said total operating profit was 
boosted by higher own-account 
earnings, particularly in securi- 
ties. 

Group operating profit also 
rose, the bank said, but it did 
not give detailed figures. 

Dresdner said its interest sur- 
plus rose to 133 billion DM 
from 130 billion in the first half 
of 1984, while the commission 
surplus on securities trading 
rose to 454.9 million DM from 
425 mfflioo. 

Dresdner attributed the rise 
in commission surplus to higher 
earnings in securities trading 
and to an increased number erf 
new stock issues. 


plies, and he did not disclose 
naipg of the buyer. 


U.S. Tool Orders 
Rose 5.5% in June 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — U3. ma- 
chine-tool orders rose 53 percent, 
to $235 million in June from $2227 
million in May, the National Ma- 
chine Tool Builders Association 
said Monday in its monthly statisti- 
cal report. 

The industry trade association 
said the June orders were up 226 
percent from $191 .8 million in June 
last year. 

Total shipments of machine 
tools rose 34 percent last month, to 
$237.6 millio n, from $1773 million 
in May and were 16.7 percent 
above the orders of $2033 milli on 
in June last year. 


Fashion Designers Find 
Success in Cheaper Lines 


(Coorinord from Page 9) 

only SIS milli on five years ago. 
And other designers envision simi- 
lar growth. 

Indeed, there has been no short- 
age of designers willing to try their 
hands at less expensive lines. Be- 
side Saint Laurent's Variation line 
and Lauren’s Classifications, there 
is Anne Klein EL Portfolio from 
Perry FI Ik, and Bill Blass’s Bias- 
sport. Even Karl Lagerfeld, known 
as the designer for women with big 
bank accounts, joined the trend in 
April with KL Sportswear. 

Lauren jumped into the lower- 
priced field in 1979. Bui the broad- 
er movement to secondary designer 
lines — mainly sportier clothing at 
prices between better sportswear 
and designer dothes — took off 
about two years ago. 

One impetus was to bring down 
the cost of designer clothing. Bui 
the major reason for the secondary 
lines was to build on designers' 
reputations and «paw| business. 
A lower-cosi designer line, such as 
Ellis's year-old Portfolio, can great- 
ly increase business. 

“We plan in the next two to three 
years to do almost four times the 
business we do.in collections.'’ said 
Zachary Solomon, chief executive 
officer of Perry Ellis Ltd. “We 
could have $100 million in sales in 
the next three to four years in men’s 
and ladies' Portfolio business.” 

For deagnen, the secondary de- 
signer lines represent a significant 
marketing departure. Even though 


many of them have licensed their 
names for apparel, they have per- 
sonally shied aw3y from associat- 
ing themselves with lower-priced 
designer lines. The exception is 
Halston, who was criticized by fel- 
low designers three years ago when 
he created Halston JD for LC. Pen- 
ney Co. 

Retailers generally have wel- 
comed the new designer lines. “I 
think the woman today needs more 
chokes," said Gerald H. Blum, ex- 
ecutive vice president and director 
of marketing for Lord & Taylor. 

But many retailers were initially 
disappointed. “Wc were so excited 
that this designer or that one had a 
new line that we didn’t evaluate the 
line on the strength of the merchan- 
dise," said Mary Hughes, merchan- 
dise manager of Dayton -Hudson 
Department Store Co. in Minne- 
apolis. which enthusiastically 
bought several lines, then found 
that many did not sell well. “The 
styles were not fresh. Except for 
Anne Klein II. the clothes were a 
rehash. They did not deliver 
enough value for the money,” she 
added. 

Most designers admit they mis- 
judged the enthusiasm of shoppers. 
They found that neither their 
names nor lower prices guaranteed 
sales. 

The new line of clothing required 
that designers change their way of 
thinking V olume became impor- 
tant. And price became a primary 
consideration. 


Bulls Are Feeding Off Dollar 

(Continued from Page 9) 
sury bills rates are returning 730 
percent and the inflation rate is at 4 
percent on an annual basis. 

Looking ahead, Mr. SeUtin ex- 
pects funner turmoil in European 
cross rates. “The European curren- 
cy scene will continue to be analo- 


gous to a leaky garden hose: step 
on one leak and the others will 
spurt," be said. “It is Only natural 
that people will jump from weak to 
what they perceive to be stronger 
currencies.* 

Similarly, he noted, a currency 


also becomes less attractive when 
investments denominated in it pro- 
duce lower yields than can be ob- 
tained elsewhere, adding: 

“However, there are two impor- 
tant factors that traders in foreign 
exchange should keep in mind. One 
is that most foreigners regard the 
United Slates as the safest haven 
for their savings. The second thing 
to remember is that no market can 
aim on a dime as quickly as those 
in currency futures because it is 
governed more by fear than by 
greed." 


British National Coal Boa rd Loss 
Widens to a Record $ 3.1 Billion 

The Auonaled PreiS 

LONDON — Britain's suie-owncd National Coal Board said 
Monday that it had a record loss of £22 billion i$J.I2 billion at 
current exchange rates) in the fiscal year ended March 51. largely 
because erf a year- long strike by miners. 

Die board reported a loss of £875 million in the 1983-84 fiscal year, i 
The board, which owns 174 coal mines and employs about 170.000 I 
miners, attributed £1.75 billion of the loss to the strike. The walkout 
was called by the National Union of Mineworker> to stop the closure 
of 20 unprofitable mines and to save jobs. 

The strike, which the union called off in March after 557 days, was 
opposed by miners in the most productive coalfields. But it still closed 
or crippled two-thirds of the mines. 

The board said that output in the latest fiscai year fell to 42 million 
ions from 105 million tons in the previous year’ 

Ian MacGregor, the board’s, chairman, said :n his report dial having 
survived the strike he looked forward "avifidcmis- to die future. 


Earnings 


Revenue ana profits, in millions, are local currencies 
umess otherwise .nti/catea 


Vailed Stale* 

Amer. Standard 

2nd Qua r. 1WI 1«U 

Revenue 1713 BVTfl 

NM Inc. 37 J 35.! 

Par Shorn BBS 0.90 

in Halt ins iw 

Revenue 1J70. 1AM 

Net lot . 5 tJ> 37 3 

Per Share 1-47 UC 

ltS4 nets include results c> 
Trane Ca,acaurredFeO MW. 
19U toff net includes lass Ct 
Slt.f minion from Oisanl.r.- 
ued oner a lions. 

Ar ms tr o ng World fnd. 


Oner Share- flJtf 1*1 

:fSrne!se,ChrSee3.rnctl: ■ 

mn,\M ;i\ quarter and d SZ 
million in naif 

Cooper Industries 
znaouar. 

Revenue 

►cei int 

Pr- Share 

Hi Hall 

Revenue 

Nel Inc. — - 
Per Snare 


IMS 1M4 

8J60 531 7 

253 

OS’ 

ms ism 

UlS Wt2 
S2.9 «S 
lie C£J 


Foster Wheeler 


Md Ouar. 

1985 

19B4 

Revenue ___ 

4X9 

4033 

Net Inc 

35.2 

27 1 

Pot Share 

IJi 

1 n 

l*f Hatf 

1985 

I9S4 

Revenue 

8045 

191 J 

Nel me 

50.5 

M4 

Per Snare 

309 

70S 

I9SS nets Me/ide pain at SSZ 
million. 


2nd a nor. 

Revenue 

Nel Inc 

Per Snore — 
111 Hell 
Revenue — 

Nn me 

Pe* Snsro 


ms 

31S 6 
U1 
315 
IMS 
467 9 

r.«4 

CAI 


Boeing 

tadOuar. IMS 19W 

Revenue 34TC. :.7« 

Oner Net 1340 icro 

Oaer Snare— M3 C.7H 
let Half IMS IM4 

Revenue ajoo 4J30. 

Oner Nn 5460 HOC 

Oner Share- 148 i-=3 

/cut nets e.eiuoe pom otSJf' 
million, tn*o*r snore reum 
restated tor JAor ! SOU! in 
April 

Clark Equipment 


Greyhound 
IMS 

73^0 
MS 
ou 
ins 

1-330 
S7.0 
1.14 


2nd Ouar. 

Revenue 

Net me 

Per Snore 

lit Kell 

Revenue 

Ne* t«»i 

Per Shore — 
tv* nets rnc/ude BO:n 
m.illon 

Kerr-McGee 
2nd Ouar. IMS 

Revenue 8440 

Net Inc. 

Per snare 5 77 

In Half IMS 

Revenue — 


IS*t 
249A 
Ul 
iZ4 
IW* 
4*1 3 
r e.*s 
0*7 


IM4 

££2t 

2*1 

0.73 

lfM 

M» 

il94 

o* Ur 


m* 

ks: 


m* 

1*K 


Per snore ZX ILi 

Year IKS 1»« 

Ke*e««*e 'CitC ' 

Net T.i. . 51A«- 5* t’ 

Per Shore SA1 It. 

Texaco 

2nd Cucr IKS IW* 

Revenue ... II 7X "i 1 .' 

net inc — - 

Per :*are _ 1 2S i 71 

HI Hell lt!S l«M 

Re«e--.e Zl~ ;i7?a 

he" me. 5^ 0 *22 7 

Per snare — lie : *" 

Texas Air 

2nd Quar IKS in* 

Revenue *!1 212 ; 

Mi -nc 4'Z i;* 

PerSac-e.- C *7 3*: 

HI Moll IMS me 

Ce.enuc 9SM Sit 

nci ini. SI* tf 

re' snere : C.7t 

men ir-use V • rtC •» d 
11 ' r m ■ >rUi -tn c- .* 
.'m.. 

ili.-i.i .j. 1 ! one • 

TOSCO 

Ota Quar IW IM* 

Revenue _ *3* : &r ■ 

rrrmc It-Si 1 — 

Pe r Snc-e — * *7 Si* 

Hi Hail IKS ire* 

Revenue — ! <■}' - 

Net Lsia i*’ 2’J. 

Waldbaum 

2nd Ouar. ms Its* 

Revenue ... *27 • Till 

Net me . . . * 32 l*c 

Pe- Sncre._ 20* •••. 


and Quar. 

1985 

1984 

Net UK. 

691 

73 j 




Revenue 

Otter Net 

5IU 

610 

ISA 

Per snare — 



Ptrfcnu* — 

in: 


Oper Shore— 

CJ9 




Per Stuie 

1JA 



1985 

1984 


19B5 

1984 

Its* per snore 

eaz' 

Revenue 

Otter IBM 

4 TILS 
1055 

4X7 

1431 

Revenue 

Nel inc. — _ 

31J8 

1934 

3,9.9 

PB8 

C O tor tfitasSr nj <- 

JV** 


SATIRE IN WORDS AND PICTURES 

DOONESBURY 

DAILY IN THE IHT 


) 


Mondays 

OTC 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices os ot 
3 pjn. Nsw York llms. 

Via The Associated Press 


UMantti 
W pi Low Slats 


low 1 PJ*. CKve 


l» 

2* 

r 

23 
IZk 
nn 

lit, 

1«4 

11M 

5W 

I7H 

ISV. 

U1& 

I7V2 

StVs 

24 
MW 

»n 

ZM 

at» 

5 

11H 

14<A 

2rtt 

1» 

171* 

tom 

MVS 

M» 

ITVi 

30H 

17Vi 

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17V* 

2ZW 

IM 

nt 

*vo 

24 V, 
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• 

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241* 

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311* 

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31VO 

272k 

111* 

35 

ins 

71* 

227* 

321* 

1 

171* 

7 

221* 

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14 

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STS 




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If AELs 
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10*3 ASK __ 
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SV. A codln 

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2M AdocLO 

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17 AOCVRt 
97* AlrMd 
774 Airwisc 

257* AlexB 
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Ok AWAIH 

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TOTS ABnfcr 
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57* ACo«M 
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271* AG rent 

a*s Am mu 

6 AAtoont 
147k AMS 

ANiins 
APTIVG 
AQuash 
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7>* AmSIts 

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127* Amrws* 
37* Amgen 
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137« Antpads 

f Anioglc 
77k Anoren 

1ST* Andrew 

67b Aaogee 
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M>* APPleC 
11M ABlDIos 
ID1* APtdCm 
20 AplOMt 
8 ApMSIr 
37k Archive 
15V* ArgoSv 
14V* ArlzB 
SVk Arid 
107* AsdHsl 
57k Asfrosv 
101 * Alter 

Ilk AtlAm 
2S AflntBc 
77* AllhFd 
•’* AtlFbi 
1 * 1 * AtiPess 

n AfScAr s 

IS AtwdOc 
6M AulTrT 
SM Airtrntn 
41* Auvtgn 
37* Avocre 
6 AvnlGr 
I tvs Avnrrtc 
13'* Avatar 
117* AwlatGp 

4 AH CM 


22 

10 

103 

43 

* 

JO S3 234 

as 

M 1J 157 

72 
4*4 

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JD A7 3*7 

1 a 

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33* 

1.40 3J 45 
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444 

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no 

17 
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337 

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335 
311 

40 U 48 

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M 1J 1BS4 
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18 
187 

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17 
411 

1JB 35 13 

347 
12* 
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IJSO 4J 147 

125 
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A U M 

2*4 
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501 

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73 
130 
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a 

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14 

Mb 24 14 

26 

.12 3 243 

14 
16 
5 
345 
l&S 
354 
92 
38S 
8 
34 
3*2 
153 
101 
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7*8 
27 


18 

25 

30M 

UK 

20W 

4M 

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27V* 

2th 

7 

117* 
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14«k 
35 
I TVs 

147k 

357* 

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41k 

217* 

1*7k 

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37k 

6Vk 

137k 

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107* 

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137* 

11M 

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141* 

277* 

347* 

13 

7 

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Mb IP 
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247k 
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307* 

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47k 

22 

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417* 

137k 

UW 

21 

28M 

15 

7 

71* 

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227k 

IM 

IBM 


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20 V* 
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241k 

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69k 

iih 

41* 

147* 

34V* 

12M 

167* 

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IBM 

47* 

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21M 

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lUk 

16 

1071, 

117* 

137k 

111* 

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27 

34»k 

129k 

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« 

29M 

137* 

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22'* 

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s* 

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157* 

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57k 

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SOM 

77* 

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25 

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49k 

47k 

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9 

IBM. 


^ + M 

20M 

13 — * 
20M 

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249k— 7* 
3W 
7 

nn 

47k— Vk 
147k 

34V* — 7* 
12% — W 

14H 

JSta— v* 
I* + M 
47b— Vk 
21W + % 
197k 

21 M — 7k 
37b 
4Vk 

ll*k— 7k 
14M 

IBM— W 
117k— % 
137* 

117k + Vfc 
TVk 

1ST* — % 
27 — Ik 
347k— V* 

13 — n 

6M 

22 + V* 

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+ Vk 

29M 
14 — V* 


M- *k 
38-74 
22M 
7Vfc 
27M 
171*— M 
14M— Vk 
141*— Vk 
1774 — IM 
lUVfc . 
22 — Vk 

14M— M 
347k 
15W— M 
2JM— 7* 
97* f % 
6 

law — 1 * 
sow 
77* 
1»— 7k 
44k 

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25 

41V,— M 
137k + W 
107k— M 
28 

20 + Vk 

15 
7 

7—1* 
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4 — Vk 
9 — 
237k 
im 
IBI* 

47k + Vk 


□Month 
HWilpw Sloe* 


Soles ta Net I n Month 

Dhr-Vid. met HWi Lew 3 PJA OTPc WkhLew Stack 


SIM 387k 

a 7M 

22V* leAfc 
3S If 
12 5 

11'4 6M 
51% 241* 
M B7k 
137* BU 
181* 109b 
IBM 07* 
lift d 
15W 7 
40 30U 

SOM U 
tW 

107» 57% 

S 1 W n 
n% jew 
20 9 

is m 


8% 

I5W 

im 


8M 

low 

w* 237* 

23M 16% 


12V% 

24 

137* 

a* 

u 

8 

5% 

14% 


317* 16 
207k 15% 

291* 197k 

in 3 


BBDO 

BRCom 

Bancokl 

BcpHw 

Banctec 

BariflH 

BKMES 

StMAm 

Bankvt 

Boning 

BaraiD 

BbTiia 

BasAm 

BsetF 

BavSki 

Baylv 

BncnCf 

Bcnhan 

BelzLO 

Big B 

Big Bear 

Billings 

Bind* 3 

BtoRtk 

Bbwn 

Blosre 

BioicR 

Blrdlnc 

Booran 

BabEvn 

BaltTc 

BasWc 

Bsmoio 

BsfnFC 

BraeCp 

arena) 

BrnTam 

Brunei 

BididTr 

Bmhm 

BMA1 

Businia 


.90 49 
1J6 42 


2J2 41 
.12 14 


1J0 43 
JO U 
.16 22 


.12 2J 


JO 10 
104 41 


n 

48 

47% 

n 

15* 

8 

9 

1«V 

IBM 

6 

32% 

Ezm 

56 

IBM 

low 

319 

im 

m 

973 

441 * 

45 % 

12 

9% 

9 % 

IX 

■cJ 

Lxl 

IX 

mili 

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24 

8% 


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lew 

10% 

114 

IM* 

13% 

TBS 

X 

344S 

109 

569b 

56*b 

16 

7% 

7V, 

50 

9kh 

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85 

20% 


308 

X 

3fh 

44 

14% 

14H 

12 

17% 

17% 

50 

3 

ZVk 

n 

12 

liw 

742 

9% 

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708 

9 

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44 

25 

2% 

8 

% 

158 

Wk 

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SV 

34% 

242 

X 

21% 

71 

7W 

7 

250 

25% 

34% 

9 

6% 

S% 

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21 

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» 

12% 

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X 

573 

fit 

A 

295 

15% 

144k 

u 

31% 

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m* 

19% 

151 

25% 

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1019 

M 

ow 


477*— V* 

0 

IBM— U, 

327* + W 

1870— n 

10 % + n 

45%— 7k 

m— n 
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87*— M 
18M + % 
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567k- H 
7W— Ji 

in— n 

19*k— Vfc 
347* 

147k + % 
17% — Vfc 

2M- n 

117* 

87* — Vk 
89k + M 
2Vk + Vk 
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347*— % 
21H- Tfc 
7% + % 
24M— 7* 
6% + M 
20 % — 1 
12 -V* 
47k 
17* 

I5M 

SOW— % 

in*— Vk 

25M + W 

Blfc — M 


nn SVk Carwmk 270 

1*1* 6 Carter! f 512 

21% 7'u CaseVBS 497 

II SVk Cencari 51 

^5 5 B ,J0M ^ 

SAM 30% Can Bat USB 41 130 

34% 21 CnBUiS \SI 44 89 

31% 14% CFdBke O 21 II 

44 % 221 M centran JO 10 236 

87* 1% Cermlk . 36 

'5S 

liM 155SSS 8 J 

hkTcfi 



84 

14S 

JOB V5 iS 

m ^ 

t 341 

97 

74 3J 1127 
IJM X* 149 


._ QtrtNiis 

5% arm,* 

447* ZI7* Onto 
34M 14% CM«r 
I2M 6 Clprtao 
7M 4 Gram 
23% 14% CtzSGa 
35% 211* CttFW 
40% 34V, CtzUt A 

sen 21 ctxui b 
14% 9 a typed 
29 22 CfVMQt 

28% 22V, CtarkJ _ .. 

21 M 157* ClevIRI 200 1V0 
2H% 7% CimtlM 
17% 11M CoagIF 
28% 9 CeBeLB 
457* 22% CocoBtl 5*0 L2 
* 


127* 12% 12% — % 
12 UK 11%— % 
19% 19% 197k— Vk 
97k 9W 9% — V* 
34 ZJM 33W 
19 1BW IBM + M 
SI 49 4974—3% 

34% 347* 3474—1% 
30% 29% 297*— M 
43V4 427* 42% + % 
3M 3M 3W 

'» 'S * 

5% it* IT-" 

IOV. ID 10 

«5% " 5 % n m-% 
10% 97* 10 

117* 12 —7* 
297* an*— % 

9% «%— M 

im ink— 7k 
— 6% + % 


if* 


53 

. M 
JBbU 
JO 3 J 


2J 


2*0 

22 

674 

413 

54 

22 

188 

32 

173 

M 

129 

143 

2M 

19 

31 

11 

890 

417 

245 

348 



9W 6 
13 5 

11% 4M 
71 14 

11% SVk 
II 5% 
6% 77k 

21 K 147k 
17% 7% 

5% 2% 
5 2M 
147* |Vk 

T 'ft 

UTs 12 
5% 37k 


C COR 
CPRM! 

CML 
CPI 
CPT 
CSP 
CACI 
CblVSC 
Cal MIc 
CdtSlea 
CallonP 
Com* 

CanonG 
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CardOle Mr 
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551 


.16 


13 

4078 

365 

462 

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12 541 
314 
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181 
1.1 224 

114 
417 
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15 528 


8% 8% 
5% 4% 
11 107* 

28% 197k 
6% 4 
11 (Ms 
47k 4% 
20% 70% 
10W 97k 
4% 4VJ 

14% !4Vb 
30 19% 

1% 15k 
IK 177* 
4% 4V* 


BW 

5 — % 
10%— % 
sow + w 
* — % 
10%— Si 
4% — U 
TOM 

’SvkTS 
2 % — n 

14% — % 

’EM 

177*— % 
4%— n 


167* 

30 

13% 

79k 

10% 

9M 

8% 

a% 

10'* 

18% 

11% 

8 

10% 

9H 

27 


08 J 


.72 7 J 


28 
1J 14SB 
22 
18 
1091 
15 7BS 
20 


Cogonic 
24% 147* Cohml 9 
6M 2% GotaBR 
15V, 8% Catagen 

4% 4 CollM 
34% 22% CoiLCAC 1JD 
20% Mb* CnlrTte 
21% 15 CoVoNt J* X7 
19% 574 Comars 

20% 10% Comcxts .12 J 2711 

15% 18% Comdto .14 1J 70 

5Vfc 17* Camdlal 829 

43% 27M Comerc 2.10 S3 184 

43 22% Once II 104 25 117 

13% 97* OnIStir 50a 49 4? 

31% 21 CmWTl 1 JD 5J 2 
77* |% CoaiAnt 

10 % 16 M comma 
15% 77* comSys 
24 12 CmoCds 

HVk 3W Compaq 
25 % 13% CmaCrs 
4% 27* Consul 
87* CCTC 
15% CIWAS 
9% CmoDt 

37k CPfEnt 

4% CmptH 
4 CmMdn 
5» CmpCR 
27k ChlPlM 
*74 CmpPds 
9% CmTkfcS 
4% Cmautn 
3% Cnsfi 
4 Comehr 
6% Conan 1 
_ 217* cncap 

18% 14% CC 00 R 
247* 217* CCacS 

9% 4% ConFbr 
54% 29% CnPass 1J8 23 
5% 3% Cam Pd 08 2.1 

10% 3% Consul 

41% 28V, CntlBcn 2040 SJ 
181* 47* CNHTT9 
8 4 CtLosr 

14% «*k Convgl 

24% 137* Cenvrse 
7W 17* CoprBto 
217* 13% Coots B 

417* 14% CdPVtel 

12% 6 Cor com 

117* 47* Corrfis 

407* 33M CorrSI 
5 1% Carvus 

TV, 3H Cosmo 
24 117* CrkBri 

16% 9% Crenus 
297* 177k CromTr 
147k 9 CwnBk 

347* 13% Crump 
33% 18% CulInFr 
38 14% Cultam 

29 17% cveore 


48 

33 

3J0O12J US 
1.480 99 120 

3J» 12J 333 
4 

1 

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93 
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318 
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32 
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29 
13* 

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44 

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56 20 9 


M0 25 


258 


23V, n% 23M 
IBM 18 1BW— % 

27 25% 257* -1% 

14% 14% 14%— Vfc 
191* 19 + % 

45M 45 45V, 

157* 15% ISM + V* 
27k 21* 396 

17 16% 16%—% 

3% 5 3 — M 

13% 12% 12% 

5% Stk 5% 

36% 357* 36V* + % 
18% 18% 18% 

20 19% 19% + % 
18% 17% 17%—% 
20% 19% 30% + Vfc 

12 117* 11%— % 

M 1 3% + % 

39% 37% 377k— % 
40 39% 39% — % 

10% MV* 18% — % 
29% 27% 29%— % 

1 % 1 % 1 % + n 

28 29% 28 

9V, 87* 07* 

20% 20 38% 

11% IBM 107*— IS 
23% 21% 21% — % 
J 2% 2% — % 
9% 9% 9%— n 

29 28% 28%— % 

10 9% 97k— % 

7% 7% 7% — % 
10% WTfc 10% 

9 87* 9 

ns 9 71* 

4% 6% *% + 7* 
STS BVk BVk 
IBI* 18 II 
4% 6% 4% 

3 2% 27* — % 

9M 9% 9% 

67k 6V& 6% + % 
34% 34% 24% + 7k 
17% 17 17 — % 

2374 23% 23% + % 
7% 7% 7% 

54% 54 54 — % 

3% 3% 3% 

4V. 3% 4 — % 

37% 37 37 — % 

13 12 raw— 1% 

4% 4% 4% 
m m mtH 

14 137k 14 
1% 17* 1% 

3M* 207* 2DM 
37% 25% 26% — % 
7 6% 67k — Vk 

uwfc ion io% — n 
1% 

3 % 37 * 3 % 

14 13% 137*— % 

147k MW T4Vk— V* 
267k 24 Vk 247k 
11% 10% 11% — % 
34 337* 337*— % 

207* 30% 38% + Vk 
27H 27% 27% 

21 38% 30%—% 


17% 

30% 

37% 

23% 

7% 

109 

22% 

14% 

9% 

22 

5% 

8% 

77k 

19% 

19% 

26% 

4% 

87k 

9% 

147* 

57* 

19 

157* 

38% 

367* 

15% 

7% 

29% 

367* 

20% 

27 

147* 

19 

197* 

19% 

25% 

13% 

15% 

6% 

2074 


7 DBA 
14% DSC 
207* DatavSY 

16 % DatasF 

4% DmnBM 
83 Dari Go 
9Vk Dotards 
87* ota IO 
3% DtSwfch 

11 Dotscp 
3 Dtnstti 

47* Datum 

S7k DOWMO 
97* DeMhS 
9% DmcIsD 
20% DeklbA 
% DeNous 
% Denekr 
47k DenMM 
7% DiooPr 
2% Dtaeone 
10 Dkson 
6 Dlaned 
12% D tglCm 
32 Diene* 

8 Dvfaad 
3% DoaXM 

124 DFrGHf 
20% DemB 

12 DrchH 
1376 DoyIDfl 

9% Drontz 
8% orexlr 
11 % DrwGr 
12% PuefcAi 
147* DunkDS 
9% Duiirai 

BH DOT F1IS 

3% Dynscn 
>374 DmtchC 


Jt 


82 

2403 
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T?V ♦ V 

14 * 

17 V 
ffi -r -J 
I3'« — % 
17V 

5o%— % 
5 % — v 
nv ♦ % 

45%- % 
14' , — v 
leV 

AN— V 

4/»— l> 

IV 

l~s— '» 
13 — V 
XV— ’* 
8 — V 

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1} H, Xebec 
14V 5v Xtcer 
10W 10V XWe, 


779 

2*8 

476 


31 * a 3w— % 
9% 9% 9-i— % 

14% 14% MV— % 


4JN 24% YtowFt 180 2* 599 43N 45 42 —IN 


30% 4% ZmLDB 

13% •% Heater 
40% 79V ZlonUl 
8 2V 2ttd 
12V 3V Thud 

IBV 6% Zonden 


JBo 68 
IJ6 14 


881 J 


987 

8 

5 

180 

2 

36 


27 54V 2SW —19k 

12V 17 12 — V 

39% 39W J9W 
3W 3 3 

5V IV 5V + % 
in* m* ii%— % 


































































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1985 



PEANUTS 


JUST EIGHT 
MORE VEARSf 


MV WHOLE LIFE 
L WILL CHANGE.. 


WHAT HAPPENS IN 
EIGHT MORE YEARS? 


I GET TO HANG AROUND | 
SHOPPING MALLS' I 


BOOKS 


7-30 SrtMtwM Fww I 





BLONDIE 


WHATARE < I ljL THE IrfiJJL 
you DOING )? SALE5 ARE 
COMING 


SO Ito MAKING UP WHtfT OOVOU J JUST 
^ OUR SHOPPIMST HAVE DOWN TWO ^ 

USTK^- y so PAR ? J T m=MS 


MR BOW TIES 
/ AM? MINK 
L JACKETS 


ACROSS 

1 Therefore 
6 Jewish month 
11 L.B.J. and 
R.M.N.,aoce 

14 Angry get- 

out 

15 Old-womanish 
1® Drivers’ org. 
17 Houdiiii's 

grip? 

lSN.Y.-to-Ore. 

dir. 

20 Down Under 
native 

21 Exploit 

22 Suffix with 
add 

23 Tent 

25 Bandleader 
Shaw 

27 Unification 
Church, e.g. 

30 Vegas 

31 Movie mogul 

32 A feast 

famine 

33 Weakens 
35 Jr., e.g. 

3® Superficial 

displays 
38 Friendly 
correspon- 
dents 

41N.K.V.D. 

predecessor 

42 Season 

43 Diocese 

44 Not suitable 
4® Football pas. 
47 Defeat 


48 Use a divining 
rod 

49 Tadpole, 
caterpillar, 
etc. 

52 From Z 

53 Chief 

55 Cover with 
netting 

50 Celtic Neptune 
G8 Present for 

Mom and Dad 
82 Hood's exit 
S3 Iroquoian 


64 Statue's garb 

65 Frat vets 

66 Sped 

67 Circuit courts 

DOWN 

1 "New Earth” 
composer: 

1035 

2 Jacob's twin 

3 Equine has- 

beens 

4 Hideaway for a 
skeleton? 

5 Impish 

6 Sailor 

7 Puzzles 

8 Muscles 

9 Order having 
teeth 

10 Affirmation of 
beliefs 

11 Conceited 
person? 

12 Kind of girdle 

13 Twain hero 
18 P.l. 


24 Dolomites or 
Pennines 

26 Grate 

27 Former Soto 
coin, for slant 

28 Homophone 
for air 

29 Pandora's box, 
in a way 

33" Song." 

Huston hit 

34 Indonesia’s 
Islands 

35 Crandall of 
baseball 

37 Sponsorship 

38. Catherine , 

last wife of 
Henry VIII 

39 Meadow 

40 Coterie 

42 Straphanger 

44 MoandStu 
from Ariz, 

45 "Shed !’■; 

Keats 

46 Hospital 
department 

47 Habitat for 
bats? 

50 Gaggle 
formation 

51 Positive pole 

54 Aroma 

56 Slightly open 

57 Survive 
problems 

58 Easy on 

the 

•1 Eng. monetary 
units, formerly 


mi 

*30l 5 


BEETLE BAILEY 

WHAT 'S THAT ] 
LITTLE BUILPH4G, i 
MR. ZERO? y s 


THATfeTHE 

SMOKEHOUSE 



YOUR WIFE CAN'T 
STAMP PIPE SMOKE 
lN THE HOUSE, 

V HUH* y 


ANDY CAPP 


VOUVEG* 
ON THERE 
-DO MX 
— , SOME 


itau 

JACWE 


WELL.YES,AN»/J • -V I I \OLfSHOULb EMPtXTf 
, L MDfZE STAFF, WfiV ^ 
[ NO” n ; • I (7 ~ SHOULCWTVOU?! 


F Iris LSTIO the\ 

LIKES OF WM, WE «U- I ?? 
>■ — _ NEVER <5E=TTHE< 

7 Lr^smosWBsrrj ** 


© New York Tana, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


VIZARD of ID 

4UM &&trl 





*1f kips have kidheys.ix) sues hwe busmeys y 

T?T? scrambled word same 

lUI LUf V by Herd Arnold and Bob Lob 

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REX MORGAN 

W mmmm lrr you'd ) e 
UNTIL A FEW MONTHS AGO W" LIKE MY ^ * 
I FELT THAT NO OWE 1 RESIGNATION , * 
HAD A BRIGHTER FLTTUEE YOU CAN HAVE ? 

. wrm OUR COMPANY THAN IT, /AR. > s 

YOU, CLAUDIA { w TOMPKINS ' ) S 




f 1 DIDN'T CALL YOU IN 1 
HERE FOR YOUR J 
* RESIGNATION' I'M ^ 
TRYING TD FIND OUT 
WHATS HAPPENED TO 
. YOU— AND TD HELPJ 
hr IF THERE’S A ^ 

I problem' is there a 
V PROBLEM? 


NO, SIR ' 1 




GARFIELD 


|«3W* flAVf& 





ITS TIMES 
LIKE THIS 
I WISH OWE 
COULD TALK 


KLASS: How Russians Really Live 

By David K. WWis. $55 pages. $16.95. 

Sl Mania's Press Inc., 175 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 1 00 10. 

Reviewed by 

Christopher Lchmann-Haupt 

D AVID K. WILLIS, an Australian by- 
birth, served from 1976 until 1981 as 
Moscow bureau chief for The Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor. Doling that time, be became 
aware of what all long-term visitors to Russia 
seem inevitably to notice. Far from bring the 
classless society that its theoreticians and 
founders dreamed of. the Soviet Union de- 
pends ugoa finely calibrated degrees of rank 
and privilege to keep its people motivated and 
its economy moving Willis calls the resulting 
perquisites and payoffs by the simple name of 
Mass. 

Instead of merely mentioning ihis phenome- 
non among numerous other sociological obser- 
vations, as so many authors of books about die 
Soviet Union have done, Willis devotes an 
entire volume to iL It is fitting and useful that 
be has done so. Most readers with even a casual 
interest in contemporary Russian life have 
heard about the shortages of consumer goods, 
the inordinate time it takes to perform the most 
basic household shopping, the endless lines 
one must wait in to acquire the simplest luxury. 

They have heard or the shadow economy 
and the Hade market, of the terrible shortage 
of living space, of the near impossibility of 
buying a new car. Yet few readers will be aware 
of the pervasiveness of klass in Russian society. 

SolatotoFinioiBFinde 


□ 00 s □□□□□ anna 
onmn 03000 0000 
□Banaaaaao 0000 

ODQEQ HQOElOBaE 
00Q1G300CJ 0O0 
ggq anuaa □□□ 

□GOO 003 □□□□□□ 
0000300 Q00E300E3 
Q00D00 u20Q 0000 
000 00O00 Q00 

000 aaannaa 

00000000 00003 

0GO0 0000030000 
GOO0 00000 O0O0 
OD0O 030DQ QQQ0 


In Wilh'j’i new. it i? the ke> lias uindt lh- 
spnng that powers the |«ari. (ha: drive the 
whecL or. ^hidr. the entire Rus>iar. sv.v ( -T 5 
lurches forward, s quwlmg and thumping and 
leaving behind it broken bits of machinery and 
an occasional i^ih or humar. mind 

"in the Uraied Sates ciaw. ts hsked to in- 
come," writes Wilits. "ir. the L'nu«! Kingdom 
it is still connected to birth, speech, manners. 
In the U. S. S. R- k.'asi is 3 deadi> serioui 
business, bound up aiihjob. wnneriioas. Itfc. 
tiative, vieiiauce. and mcenutlv .“ K!css is w*j» 
you have in abundance if >«-u are ai the lop — 
iif you are a Communist Partv chief, a gm-ern- 
ment minister, a miiitary marshal, a settlor 
general, a member of the KGB or police elite, 
or among the handful of well-known scientists. 
inldleclua]». artists and entertainers. But khu 
leaks down, even to the lowest levels of the 
urban and rural classes. Ewrvonc has ai least a 
tiny piece of A' Airs, even if oniy 3 job in a 
theaier bos office or the power 10 admit pa- 
tients to a hospital emergency room: otherwise 
it would not be possible 10 sirnoc. 

Klass is interesting 10 read about, up to a 
certain point, in Willis's hands, it presides an 
occasion for funny or pathetic anecdotes and n 
permits him (0 reveal some s-cmficant details 
of Russian life: lhai u is not unusual to spend 
mare than 5U percent of one's budge: on food, 
or that banks pay only 2 percent' on savings 
deposits. We learn uha: Russian authors re- 
ceh'e in royalty payments [the more their 
books sell, the lower the rate) and that it has 
proved possible to hnbe traffic police with 
copies of Plavboy magazine. We arc told that 
because of klass and what it has done to 
Russian hcalih core, the life eireciancy of men 
and women is less than what it was 30 years 
ago. Klass allows Willis to discuss the problem 
of non-Russian naiionabtits in the Soviet 
Union and to conclude that, contrary to some 
speculation, it is not likely to cause serious 
problems of dissension, ai least withm the 
foreseeable future. 

The only serious drawback to “Klass" is that 
its author* seems throughout to be driving at 
some final climactic point. What that finally 
turns out to be is contained in the question: 
Will klass eventually serve to undermine the 
Soviet empire? Willis's answer seems 10 be that 
maybe it will in the long run. but not in the 
immediate future. For the time bring at least, 
he concludes, klass is more an instrument of 
party control than it is a time bomb tickiig 
away in the foundation of the Soviet system, 

Christopher Lehmann -Haup 1 is on the staff of 
The Netv York Times 


B y Robert Byrne 

J AM Tinman, a 33-year- 
old Dutch grandmaster, 
achieved an easy triumph in 
the second Interzonal Tourna- 
ment, held in Mendetaxco, 
Mexico. Hie winner’s ‘score 
was 12-3. 

Die inteaonals are the sec- 
ond step in the two-year cyde 
that win qualify for the next 
stage, the Candidates Tourna- 
ment, were Jesus Nogneiras, a 
26-year-old Cuban 'grandmas- 
ter, who came in second with 
10V&-4K; Mikhail Tal of the 
Soviet Union, a 48-year-old 
former world champion, who 
was third with 10-5, and Ke- 
vin Spraggett, a 30-year-Hd 
Canadian international mas- 
ter, who took fourth with 9-6. 

Those who had already 
qualified for the Candidates 
Tournament from the Gist 
Interzonal, which was hdd in 
Gaxnmarth, Tunisia, were Ar- 
tur Yusupov and Aldcsandar 
Bdyavsky of the Soviet 
Union and Lajos Portisch of 
Hungary. The remaining place 
win tie decided by a playoff 
match between Viktor Gavri- 
kov and Alexander Chemin, 
both of the Soviet Union. 

Ttmman used his current 
favorite variation against the 
English Opening to defeat the 
British grandmaster Jonathan 
Speelman. 

The point of doubling the 


CHESS 


QBP’s by 3 . . . BxN; 
4NPxB was not to create a 
vulnerable weakness, but to 
cripple them so that they 
could _ not be used 
aggressively. 

Speelman did undouble 
those pawns by 9 PxPe.p^ 
PxQP, but be thus acquired a 
readily attackable weakness 
— his backward QBP. His 
attempt to take tactical ad- 
vantage of Timman’s piece 
placement with 10 PxP, FxP; 
11 Q-R4 came to nothing 
against the simply prepared 
11 . . . 0-0! The trick was 
that 12 QBxN. NxB!; I3BxB, 
QB21; 14 BxR, OxPch; I5K- 
Bl, QxRch; 16 K-N2, RxB 
can hardly be bad for Black. 

Tinman did permit Sped- 
man to seize a pawn with 19 
RxRP, but after 19 . . . QR- 
Q1 several white pawns were 
hanging and could not be 
saved. 

The Englishman tried active 
countcrplay with 20 N-N5, 
but after 20 . . . QxP, 
Blade’s threat of 21 ... N- 
K6di dominated. 

After 23 N-B7, Tinnnan 
could not play 23 ... R- 
QBI? because of 24 Q-Q7! 
threatening to mate with 25 
N-R6ch! However, his 
23 . . . NxP!; 24 Q-B6, R- 
Q8 ait through (Ik technical 
problems and left Black with 
a winning game- 


L m. 




PwiUoa after a N-B7 

On 25 RxR, NxR. Speel- 
man could offer no real de- 
fense, but vainly hoped for a 
miracle with 26N-R6ch. 

After 32 . . . RxQ. the 
party was over, but Speelnun 
played to the time control 
before giving up. 


DfcunOKNNG 


MM n*23lP f«3 

_ two tw> 

1 Ntn w a 5*y *-o* : 

4 MM n-qw » «« 

5 MO IWJO g W*fcfc P»N 

5SS, ES? S£T 

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10 nr p*p 

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13 NxP u a Hi IBP . 

MX** WO »5» TOM 

n x-m Qsap » w# MO 

u sun HQ* * 110 

5^ £3? 


MIRNIF 


STEJER 


WHAT A SPONGER 
NEEDS IN ORDER 
TO KEEP AFLOAT. 

6 — / 
Now arrange the drtrfed letters to 
farm the suprtsa answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles; MERGE RANCH EFFACE GAMBIT 
Answer: How some prominent family trees were 

started— BV “GRAFTING" 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


— HIGH 

C F 

Mmtw 24 79 

A ms ter d am 71 7B 

AMmw 32 m 

BcraMM 30 M 

eeteraM 34 100 

Berlla V TJ 

BreSMll 21 7B 

Bacbarast 35 95 

Badapast 34 n 

CoMofcjRsan 28 M 

Costa Od Sol 33 71 

PWUa IS 57 

CdlDburtib 15 59 

Home* 34 77 

Frankfurt 22 73 

Mm 34 84 

KchMU 17 M 

Istanbul 30 B6 

LUPaKnat 27 81 

Lisbon 25 77 

Landau 20 68 

Madrid 31 SB 

■Man 31 00 

Moscow 23 73 

Men** 30 U 

Nice 39 84 

Otfo 22 72 

PWU 22 72 

Pram 27 44 

Bterklavtk 11 52 

name n OB 

StodduM 21 70 

smunuro 21 61 

Venice H 81 

Vlonna 30 84 

Warttw M 82 

Zdrtcfi 17 M 

MtPDt-E EAST 
Ankara 31 88 

Beirut 32 90 

Demoaon 36 77 

Jerusalem 33 7l 

T«l Avtv 92 70 

OCEANIA 

AOddtmd 15 S9 

Svdaev 23 73 

<Fdoudv; to-fowr; Ir. 
stvamwere: swenow; ■ 


LOW 
C F 

20 48 fr 

14 57 d 

21 ffi Ir 
17 44 fr 
17 44 Ir 
17 43 Stl 

15 57 fr 
17 a Ir 
17 64 el 
IS 59 o 
23 73 Ir 

12 54 r 
W 75 cl 

14 61 r 
21 70 r 

12 54 fr 
17 66 fr 

21 70 Hr 
11 64 d 
U 57 « 
17 43 ef 

22 72 d 

13 55 d 

15 59 Fr 
Z1 78 It 

14 57 fr 

15 59 d 

15 57 d 
7 48 r 
21 70 If 
13 55 Ct 

16 41 r 

23 73 fr 
20 48 'fr 


9 48 Ir 

34 7S fr 

M 54 fr 

17 63 fr 

21 70 fr 


B 44 r 
13 55 fr 
fair; tvtwiU 


Bangtask 

Mltag 

HaOBKOM 

Manna 

New Da<M 

Seoul 

SkflasUf 


AFRICA 

Afale r s 

Cairo 

Cane Town 


LATIN AMI 

Buenos Aina 

Caracas 

Unto 

Morten CHr 
Rio da Jknetra 


24 75 o 

24 75 fr 

27 M fr 

25 77 D 

25 77 SI 

24 75 fr 


35 95 18 

S « 27 
20 48 4 

24 75 » 
23 73 9 
28 82 21 

36 77 n 
ERICA 

15 » 8 
27 84 22 
18 44 12 

23 73 16 

24 75 14 


NORTH AMERICA 


Andaman 19 

Atlanta 28 

Sanaa 27 

CMaoea » 

Damror 24 

Detrofl 27 

Hanoi ela 31 

t iea rt ea M 

LosAaaeie* a 

Miami 33 

MtanaapoOi 35 

Mammal 24 

NS»0a 38 

Mew York 27 

5aaPronclcco 18 

SMtle 30 

Tomato 27 

MskiDatoa 28 

Mmrcost; PC-partty 1 



Wbrld Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse July 29 

Oosing prices in local cturendes unless otherwise indicaled. 


1340 1340 
3330 33)0 ] 
15753 ffl®S 
3M5 8230 


ASN 

ACF HoMlna 
AEGON 
AKZO 
Ahold 

AMEV 

ADam RuUxr 
Amro Bonk 
BUG 

Boefirmonn T 

CafcandHkta 

Elsavter-NOU 

Foklw 

Gin Brocades 

Helmfcm 

Haoeowm 

KJ-M 

Naarcian 

Nat Nedder 

NadNoytt 

OceVander G 

Paknoad 

Pinup* 

Robeco 
Rodomco 
Rollnoi 
Rwwita 
fend Dutch 
UnOmr 
van Cknmanm 
VMF Start 
VNU 


AJJPgg^-des = 217- 


ArtMd 

Bafcaert 

Cockoriu 


EBes 

GB-mno-BM 

GBL 

Gevaort 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

Kretflrttwnk 

Paliullnu 

See Generals 

Safina ■ 

Sthar 

TradfanCtec 

UCB 

Unam 

VtaUia Montana 


Hoacfnt 
Haescb 
Horten 
Hatael 
IWKA 
Kail + Sab 
KarModl 
KOUfltaf 
Ktaodaier H-D 
KtaecknerWerke 

KSf sww 

LuHboma 
MAN 

Manmainaisi 
Muendi Rueck 
NiMtart 
PICI 

Porsche 
PraUSBOD 
PWA 
RWE 

Rhetamefafl 
Sg-rtno 

Siemens 
TTivasa 
Vsba 

VWkBMaowMrerk 
We« a 

COmmentnak index : 0*7.70 
Pnrnieaa M377J8 


A6a 

Anglo American 

Anoio Am Gold 

Bartows 

Btyvw 

Suftate 

DeBeara 

DHefoirfetn 

Elands 

GFSA 

H ar mony . 

■Hiwita sisal 

Kloof 

Nedbenk 

Pnastevn 
Ruwkn 
SA Brews 
St Halm 
Saeol 

THel I l.il.rlrw 

"f*f rwnuriB 


e Stock index :Mf7j» 

: wruo 


VMIIeMortane 4800 4780 

Cwrwf Stock Index : 23Z7J3 
Prarteas : 2X048 

I VrmmMmt |! 


AEG-Tatofudw 

Aiitamvors 

Altana 

BASF 

Bayer 

Bay Hyaa Bank 
Bov vuraliiiiMiiik 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbonk 

ContGummi 

Dalmiar-Bam 

Dcflutw _ 

Deutsche Babcock 

OeutscfMBaok 

DresdnarBonk 

GHH 

Haraener 

Hocfiftef 



AI0e<H.MM 
AnrtDAmGolfi. 
AeaBrtffootb 
Ass Dairies 
Barclays 

». 

Beecham 

BlCC 

BL 

Blue Orcte 
BOC Group 
BaoM, 

Btmater Inda* 
BP 

BrttHameSf 
Brii Telecom 
Brit AeromocB 
Brttoll 
BTR 
Burmoti 
CoNe Wireless 
! Codburv Scltw 
Charter Cons 


5139k 

St39k 

223 

218 

508 

X&V* 

214 

214 

1« 

U9 

30 

387 

337 

534 

273 

2H 

3» 

323 

173 

in 

as 

34 

32S 

MS 

272 

no 

s 

3K 


818 

514 

284 

2R1 

185 

184 

330 

318 

208 

206 

% 


.117 

SIS 

143 

1*4 

180 

1«4 


Conmierc ta fU 2D7 208 

Cora Gold 452 450 

Gourtaukb 123 122 

Da*W*V 3» m 

De Beers i 485 480 

Dfsflllen 776 774 

Driefanteln S2Ni II?' 

Fteons 339 326 

Pree SI Gad nffij S20M 

GEC 173 172 

Gen Accident 415 613 

GKM 20? 3H3 

Glaxo C 1211/331217/64 

Gnnd Met 303 JD1 

GRE 720 720 

Gulnnese M 244 

| GUS S35 S» 

Hans o n 170 IBS 

HcMfca- 377 347 

ICI *62 467 

, imperial Gram tn 148 

Jaguar 258 2U 

Held Securities 272 34 

Legal G en er al 467 A44 

Lloyds Bank *07 407 

Louche 1*4 164 

Luca* 270 271 

marks and Sp 146 144 

MofalBax 443 435 

Midland Bonk m 373 

.NatWMt Bank 492 682 

P.and a 363 343 

PllUnotcn 281 270 

RKta & V 

man Elect 134 m 

Randtontein 382W 890M» 

Rank 335 S3 

Roed Inti 634 627 

Rcutera ®3 270 

Royal Dwtchi 434WJ337/44 
RTZ 544 537 

(aatcM 650 645 

SaftbuTV 320 216 

Sfars Hold taps &m 9M 

& V 

SM Chartered *57 447 

Sun Aliianco 461 451 

Tate and Lvte 44> 441 

Tosco 262 253 

TtemEMI 327 336 

TraMavlbe 3*1 W 

THF 127 124 

Ultramar 213 ,_713 

Unilever t UW, JO 21/32 

United Bteadts 171 167 

Vk*em 2S3 246 

Waatwortti 450 440 

F.T.38 index :m* 

P revious :73C1B 
F.TAE.W0lmg; TN7J8 
preview : 123779 


24477 24500 
.3202 rai 
10M5 10270 
2*87 2648 
11230 11400 

nsn xm-i 

4097 4070 
smo. _ — 

M« 54400 
7490 .9700 
46300 46400 
1620 1602 
77000 WOOD 
117000)11300 
2039 2030 
4000 57*0 
3020 3032 
at»in Ban 
MS U4 
2370 2380 


AfarUQuMe 
Alsthom All. 
AvDanoutt 
Banco! re 
Bic ^ 
Bongrafn 
Bamaues 
BSN-GD 
Ganrefour 
Qrargears 
Outs M«d 
□arty 

nontax 

OMteritatae 


AO 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bom 

eauaakwnia 

Qtsttematae 

Cotes 


Nippon Kosaku 
Nfppan Oil 

aasvKL 

rtwpon iinen 


Si 

CMdap 
Elders Ik] 
iCiAustnrno 
MODetkm 

mim 

Nc4Au*t8ank 
News Con) 

N Broken HIR 


Hucliette 

LafaraeCop 

Learand 



AMU Mtor : 20K28 


CACtadex^ma 
Prevtous : IOJ0 


CoMStoras* 

DBS 

Fraser Heave 
Haw Par 
tnchcopa 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
am 

OUE 

ShangrWa 
8Ime Darby 
SttaraLand 
suom.PraB 
sstaamsMo 
SfTradta 
uattod Overseas 
UOB 

Straits Thmi lad l 
Prrrtous : 77144 


S 245 
S4D 
545 
29 133 

131 
585 535 
565 845 
179 3J8 
1S6 25* 

^ l5, 

5J6 

099 039 
348 X48j 

Si is! 

de* : 777 AS 


■V" 

5 


Thomas Nation 
Western Mining 
Westnac Banking 
waodskte 

AH ordtoarm index : 99678 


I Atari 

AsaW Chens 
I AnWOtai 
Bar* M Tokyo 
Brtdsestom 
Canon 
Casio 
CJteb 

Did Ntooan Print 

DaheoHaus* 

Datwa Securities 

Fanuc 

Full Bank 

Fpfl Photo 

Fujitsu 

Hitachi 

Hitachi Cable 

Honda 

Jaean Air Unos 
Kalhna 
Kansai Power 
Kawasaki Steal 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
MoHu Elec Inds 
Matsu Etec Works 
MltaubW, Bank 
AtitaubtaMCham 
NWauNshiEtefr 
Mltsutristu Know 
Mitsubishi Oxp 
M itsui art co 
Mlteutoshl . . 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGKInsukrtors 

NtekoSw 


Nippon Yusen 

Nissan 

Nomura Sec 

Otymnue 

Wo naer 

Rtaoh 

Sharp 

Mnww 

Sbkietsw Chemical 

Sow 

Su mi t om o Bank 
Sumitomo Chert 

TOkedaOwm 

TDK 

Tokie Marine 
Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tappan Printing 
Toruy Ind 
Toshiba 

Toyota 
Yamakrtl Sac 

MW/8J. lodsx j 


Pmtow:V*na 


CtaM Prey. 

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245 248 

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345 365 

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Hoodehtaanken l» 1*7 

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SwedlshMafcn IN 177 

Vohm HJ3. — 

AffaarsvaerMBo Index ; 374J9 
Previous : 377.10 



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Montreal suck marlais quwa* 
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teas. 


4 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1985 


Page 15 


^ SPORTS _ 

iS^SLoit Brock: Baseball’s Liberation of a Southern Black 

"7^ w^.f By George Vecsey _ base on Hany Walker's hit, sec 

i." ‘ r i„; ‘ York nma Service _ . _ ^ „ , . . . , . , . , win tire 1946 World Series, and 


■ JLT J 

>iS.J . ByGeorec Vecscy 

■ '-. r i , Sou York Tima Service 

[]- Injjp * t COOPERSTOWN; New York — It starred, 
‘ fecej.' H-iou Brock recalled, with a radio broadcast, 
J ^eidH^KMOX in Sl Louis reaching all the way down 

' ". ^ f'nlii&m Loiii.ajana. Thm was « hftsehall 


“">■ jw ream was a black man named Jackie Robinson. 
i: \ -or-.hi^ “i was a 9-year-dd in a Southern town,” 
- :'a * s% Brock said. “Jim Crow was king. i was searching 

t Oie dial of an old Phflco radio and I heard Harry 

tiv 1 _ i r_ j. n r. j t LA- l j.. 


________ _ base on Harry Walker's hit, scored a double, to 

„ «. ^ ~ >. » i . i j. i e u win the 1946 World Series, and he did not deny 

*1 was a 9-year-old in a Southern town. Jim Oow was king. 1 was searching the oiai of an old that hustling gave him an edge. He corrected the 

i . nn , , ... old story that his minor-league manager. Eddie 

philco radio and I heard 9 a game in which Jackie Robinson was playing, and I felt pnde in Dy^hadchidcd him for not running out a 
being alive. The baseball field was my fantasy of what life offered. 9 — Lo« Brock t Another North Carolina player, Hoyt wa- 

3 1 M aroaL helm, joined Slaughter in the hall. Wilhelm 

- — - — — holds the record for roost games pitched in the 

... . , l II i » major leagues, 1.070, from 1952 through 1972. 

The sport nself has long since dealt with the Slaughter suffered Croat the reputation, fair or the choice to be a dmjot togue bwebau player. His longevity is partially explainable bv the 
gregation that kept black players out of so- unfair, and was not voted into the HaD of Fame Traded to the Cardinals in 1964 so ' the Oibs mostly effortless knuckleball he thm* arid bv 


— Lou Brock 


7 a 

• :r 


of an cMPhflco radio and 1 heard Harry segregation that kept black players out of so- unfair, and was not voted into the HaD of Fame 

r- jr, caray and Jade Buck, and I felt pride in being c^ed*'organizixT baseball until 1946. Oki-time in the IS yearn after his retirement from baseball 

• i ?ri alive- The baseball field was my fantasy of what players have been inducted, and their feats mo- in 1959, despite a .300 career batting average, 

life offered." morialized in tbe ever-sophisticated displays at He finally made it last March in a vote of the 

#{* From the moment Robinson materialized on the hatt. Die years of deprivation are not ig- Veterans Committee, along with Arky Vaughan, 
-'^t that radio in 1947, Brock was sufficiently re- uored when Monte Irvin and Buck Leonard and Tve never been bitter, and I'm not nod at 

to become the leading base-stealer in the Cool Papa Bdl and Judy Johnson and Roy anybody now." S&uehter said. Asked what he 


inj, vauve- 

»r- ijjj *t s life offered. 


: k Sunday a: ms induction into tbe Hail ot tiama. yet another summer. Cardinal games on KMOX, Slaughter chose to 

7. Ha,. Also inducted woe Hoyt Wilhelm, the late But Brock took history and made it live with seeit as a tribute to the greatness of their mutual 
7 11 ;w Joseph Floyd fArky) Vaughan, and by the most an eloquence (hat was closer to Martin lather team. When asked specifically if be had opposed 

far-reaching of coincidences, Enos (Country) King’s “1 have a dream" speech than to most Robinson, Slaughter said: 

"j Slaughter, who played in those first games acceptance speeches. Even the touchinriy grate- “Tve never in my life spoke against a blade 

u "UjA)I n_JL hM«t run Klunx fol talks by Wilhplm ^tnnohim- nnrf vmisnan’, nlmw I mic wwat nf nAina Bnhiinnw, but T 


s, along with Arky Vaughan. Maury Witisas the most feared base-stealer. His career is all the more remarkable because 
bitter, and Tin not road at He finished with a 293 bating avenge m ^ ^ nol ^ ^ major he was 

ughter said. Asked what he 2,6 16 games but is best town for lus 118 stdai ncarly 29 He pj tched J ^ al 

k s memories of listening to bases in 1974 and ms 938 stolen rases in his j^ooreville ^ N 0 nb Carolina Snie League. 
KMOX, Slaughter chose to p areer - Henderson, now with the Yan- ^ ^ was released once bv Moorcsville. and 

the greatness of their mutual kees, broke Brock s_ single- season record with h lhrr _ vears : n ^ __ uvine 






' ^ monies Sunday behind the Hall of Fame cm a 

- ' ’^4* - day so gargeous that it should have been framed 

. ''■ 1,; iVh m a display cabinet of its own. Tbe biggest 
' ; ' W iliy 0 : cheers were for Ted Williams, Stan Muriafand 
[01!^." Yogi Bora: With 22 previous Hall of Fame 
7'. ":i^* membeis, six of them black, in attendance. 

^ dou. Brock addressed Slaughter's generation of base- 
V baH 


seches. Even the touch: 
ilhetm, Slaughter and 


’Huy sat next to each other during the cere- daughter, Patricia Johnson. 


iday behind the Hall of Fame chi a Brock never raised a bitter feding, but he did at me, when Ford Frick’s signature was printed 
eons that it should have been framed note that some major league players had feared on my back, I never complained, either. 
iy cabinet of its own. Tbe biggest the influx of blade players when Robinson ar- ang)ner said be had merely maintained tbe 


*Tve never m my life 
player. 1 was accused of s 
stepped on a lot of player 


ike against a black 
ajg Robinson, but I 


be lost three years in the service - taking 
130 in 1982 for thc (wkJand A s. . shrapnel in his pitching arm at ihe Battle of the 

Brock recoiled politely uto rinded Ja Bu j^ -before he e«F got out of Class D ball, 
some writers saw him as a speaaha and that ^ a pilching insmSix for the Yankees in 
some players had resented his dedication 10 lhe Wilhelm said he often tries to 

stealing base&. ... soften the blow for vouna olavers who are 


re wnirn saw nun as a spw.au« anu Now a pilchill g ^5^-^ f or ^ Yankees in 

re players had resented his dedication 10 ^ minor leagues, Wilhelm said he often tries to 

LUng bases. soften the blow for young plavers who are 

People cquatesteatag a base to winning a Meascd ^ ±aa how . ^ sunlved ^ 
gune.-'he said. “They don’t equate a home run ^ ^ 
or a single to winning a game. A stolen base is - - 




Lou Brock 


bailing average in i9?5. He c:ei on Auc. 30. 


Arky Vaughan, tike Slaughter, was selected to 1952. at Eagleville. California, tro.r.n to m»l- j 


—'I uti.. 


SPORTS BRIEFS Heady Shot 

Lendl Wins Tennis Tide, but Not Fans HelpsRookie 

INDIANAPOLIS (WP) — Ivan Lendl, who piqued civic pride last U/ifi ftf flfthf 
week by saying be did not want to play in the tournament, won the men’s rr w®”* 



for coming, even if you didn’t want me to win," Lendl 


The Associated Pros 

CROMWELL, Coanecticul — 
PGA rookie Ph3 Blackmar won the 
Greater Hartford Open golf tour- 
nament Sunday in a sudden-death 
playoff, and credited a photogra- 


*!-’* 


Saturday, tire crowd pulled for Boris Becker against Lendl and Sunday 
switched its allegiance to Gomez, often booing LendL "That's the way it 
goes,” Lendl said. “That’s too bad. Maybe next year your Boris will win." 

Joyner Wins Festival Heptathlon 

BATON, ROUGE, Louisiana (UPfl — Jackie Joyner, alvei medalist 
> at the Los Angeles Olympics, produced 1985’s largest heptathlon point 
Tvx total, 6,718, on Sunday night at the National Sporo Festival, while Andre 
. -p Phillips won the 1 10-meter hurdles in 1325 and the 400-meter hurdles in 
-‘ill 4803, both times second fastest in the world this year. 

J l* Kirk Baptiste rallied to post the world’s third best time for 1985 in the 

J' -100 ureters, 1020. Charles Simpkins pulled off a major surprise by 
outdueting world record holder Willie Banks and Olympic gold medalist 
Al Joyner m tire triple jmnp. Simpkins’ winning leap of jo feet H % indies 
(16.34 meters) was almost 10 inches better than that of Banks. 

y Olympics oi 1984 Commemorated 

ifj LOS ANGELES (LAT) — The achaoeat created by the 1984 Olym- 

pics was rekindled Sunday as former gold medalist Refer Johnson re4it 
* the Olympic torch atop tire Los Angdes Memorial Coliseum to coxnmem- 

onue the first anmvemary of tire Summer Games. 

. '36 Nearly 20,000 persons cheered as the ceremony was conducted to 
;a* honor volunteers, torch-bearers and others who helped staged the Games. 

5*’ For the Record 


... » ■ 


'- : .i»i 1* 

: i;? I 

••• i 


Mite McOdtam, the undefeated World Boxing Assodamm junior- The final bole was the closest 
middleweight champion, successfully defended his crown in Miami when brush Blackmar had with bogey in 

referee Robert Ramirez stopped tire bout in tire eighth round because the 37 holes he played Sunday. He 

David Braxton, the WBCs No. I contender, had a bad cut in his left had 11 birdies ana 26 pars during 

eyelid. fAP) his lift hours on the golf course. 

The Wolmijamptoa Wanderers, one of England's most famous soccer Blackmar. at 6 feet 7 (2 meters) night’s game and had to remain 
dubs, was ordered disbanded by a judge in Bi rmingh a m because of debts and 260 pounds (117.9 kilograms) behind that night while tire team 

totaling 700,000 pounds ($980,000). . (UP!) the largest player on the profes- flew on to Cleveland. 

Race driver Mario Andretti was in stable condition in lndianapohs sional tour, finished regulation Martin was to be reexamined 
foliawma nueerv on his riehl collarbone, broken during a crash late m D lav at 13-under-oar 271. tied with 


Blackmar sank a 10-foot puu on 
the first hide of tire playoff — the 
37th hole of the day, necessitated 
by a five-hour rain delay cm Friday 
that threw the tournament schedule 
into disarray. 

That putt defeated Jodie Mudd 
and Dan Pohl, but, said Blackmar, 
if it had not been for Bob ChOd, an 
Associated Press photographer, he 
would not have been in position to 
win his first tournament. 

“Td just tike to thank the pho- 
tographer I hit in the head,” BLack- 

“^n^e final hole of regulation. 
Blackmar’s approach shot sailed 
off comae and beaned Child, who 
was standing beside the green. 

*Tm glad he stowed it," Black- 
mar said. “It probably would have 
gone out of bounds.” 

The ball caromed off Child and 
onto the fringe of the green, bom 
where Blackmar was able to save 
par and gain a spot in the playoff 
with Mudd and PohL 

Child was taken 10 tire fim-aid 
trailer, where he received 12 stitch- 
es in his forehead. But he was bade 
on tire job in time for tire playoff. 

The final hole was the closest 
brush Blackmar had with bogey in 
the 37 holes fie played Sunday. He 
bad 11 birdies and 26 pars during 
his UK hours cm the golf course. 


Jays Sweep Angels, 
Pull Away in AL East 


CctnfuieJ hr Oar Slcft Fr«>m Z>upj!MB 

TORONTO — The Blue Javs are 


BASEBALL K0L>DI P 


again the talk of tire American homer jsc H£ \LRxj 

-r f . two-run shot. h:» :ou::h homer ;r. 

In these last four games, the 10 games u. help complete 

huung. pitching and defense three-gamesweep of CicveUr-d. 
seemed to aU come logetiier at . * . „ . ^ 


once." said Toronto's manager. . ■ 
Bobby Cox. after his team complet- ■ i 
ed an impressive sweep of the Cali- 5*; 


Mariners 7. Red Sox 2: Jim Prex- 
ley got four hns and Domingo Ra- 
mos singled m two key rues as 


Ml Oil IUILUUMW eWIiLT VI UK \.iLU~ #, , », 

foruia Angels with a 5-1 xictoiy 8 e ^ t i % SS^ w 1 1 

Sunday A s 5. Brewers 2: Ir. Milwaukee. 

The Blue Jays won iheir team -Alfredo Griffin had three hits, 
record-lying eighth straight and in- «oroJ three times and oawc m a 
creased then & in theEas! Di«- f f °^ hn i . D * uin > K D ^ ln - 
sion to seven games -tireir biggest , 

margin of tblreason. Thev b^i who had an 

[heir winning streak the preribus RB' double and wjdUd nice. 
Sunday, when (hey hridmSy a V,- soored on a udd pitch b> Da^in to 

game lead over skond-plare New a 2 * : B u f. m . ,he *38^ .. 

y Rangers8.\ankees2:ln.\rlmg- 

Thc Blue Javs outscored the AL Jon. Texas. Cliff Johnson went 3- 
West-leading Angels. 28-7. in the **•? dro « . m “ 
series andmiUtthem, 52-28. The »■“« * hle ^ 

Angels had not lost four in a row 


since last Sqitember. 


starter since September 1982. The 


. . Iho Auoca*Hl P>tn 

Catcher Donnie Scoff had the balljand a good look at Dwight Evans of the Red Sox sliding 
home, bat he (fid not have time to make tbe tag. The Mariners won Sunday’s game, 7-2. 

Martin’s Lung Punctured by Injection 


“I think we’ve got a pretty good Yankees, coramiued thr« errors in 
lineup when some people ;mm '(hit- drefirsi mnrng as the Rangers took 
ting," Cox said. “But when every- 3 

one swings the bat tike they're do- . “* n ^5 ^ ,a " 

ing now, f ihink ii’s an awesome L^igue. Chicago ended a 

kjL, d - three-game losing streak with us 

George Bell put Toronto ahead T 0111 *9 ^os .Aji^Ics. but lost start- 
withauEo-run double in tire first jPB,*®*" “ Su, jW f e m the 
inning and Doyle Alexander scat- j 1151 inning with a pulled leg mus- 
tered debt hits to make the lead ”7. , „ , . , 

«nnd un Davey Lopes, drove m four runs 

“r- . . nii.h o k.niiw ,n A .Iniikl. ... lull. 


t was tire closest The Associated Pros 

had with bogey m ARLINGTON, Texas — Tbe 
ilayed Sunday. He New York Yankees’ manager. Bifly 
ad 26 pars during Martin, had a lung punctured by a 
f the golf course, doctor’s injection during Sunday 


^ — — — Dav Lope ^ ^ f(Hir ^ 

AlHawter struck om nine. The toa an d ikmblc y help 

Jv run he gave up came on Reg- cod “**. . temnmates fi\c- 
. ia«n'ri?.h U» game winning streak. 


foraiion in the lung, which caused affected Martin's right side jusi be- 
au to come between the chest wall low the shoulder. 


and the lung. 

“Martin experienced problems 
with breathing, and he complained 


g,= «■«=;■= =ve 

h^ital^bout 7:45 PM. but re- T^m 3, TwiisZ: Detroit’s Dar- UVK “ ^ 

Ph^S«3:VonHayes 


only run be gave up came on Reg- ^ 

gie Jackson's 17th home run this c • „ 

season, in the eighth inning Jack- r C* u 10^^’ 

son’s 520th boitier in tire majors P ,ds > J ud H ^ ,on 

put him one behind Willie McCo- ‘ n » help end a six- 


foil owing surgery on his right collarbone, broken during a crash late m play at 13-under-par 271, lied with in Mnndav said the Yankees' 
the Michigan 500 on Sunday; he also inoirred a fractured hip socket and Pohl ami Mudd. Stic relations director Joe Safety 

pelvis. The race was won by Emerson Fittipaldi. (Ar) Mudd, putting first in the play- y . . . 

Italy defeated the United States. 3-2, to win the final of the Galea Cup. off on tire par-3, 172-yard 161b 
the Davis Cup of junior tennis, in Vichy. France. (Ar) bole, slid his 13-foot putt past the ' raca f .*r a P^ 5 . 1 ? 

Cuba’s Mtinnw baseball team, making its first appearance in tire cup on the left side. complaining of back spasms, Safe- 

United Slates in 26 yean, rallied to defeat San Diego, 6-4, in the UE. Blackmar, 27, then rolled bis ^ sa {£- ^ 

Open Amateur Baseball Tournament in Palm Springs, California Sooth pan straight into the cup. htadiumDrst aid stanon and 

Korea defeated a Ventura. California, team by 6-2. (AT) When Pohl left his right-foot 

Sammy Winder, tire NFL Bronco’s Pro Bowl nmninghack, underwent putt short of tire hole, Blackmar ^ 123111 doctor ' 

emeraency surgery for appendicitis early Sunday in Dcnver. the team was ihe winner. Shortly afterward Martin coin- 

said there was no word on when he would be able to play again (AP) Ray Floyd and Wayne Grady, plained of chest pains, Mycoskie 
Nicky Farrugia, 24, the Maltese long-distance swimmer, Sunday be- co-leaders after tire third round, said, and he ordered Martin taken 
came the first to cross tire 60-mile channel between Sicily and Malta, his each shot 72 on Sunday and fin- to Arlington Memorial Hospital 


1 guess 1 nnsjuagea ine 
ness of Martin’s wafl. Usual! 
pie associated with baseball ] 


wthbreatmnE.and nerompuuny morial said Martin arrived at tire time list, 
of shortness of breath. Safety said. aboui 7;45 p R but ^ Tisers 3, Twins 2: Detroit’s Dar 

I guess I nu sludged the thick- imifiwm mnn->a^r rell Evans, who beean a resureencc 


ceived no treatmenu The manager tell Evans, who began a resurgence 
stayed only about 10 minutes and, at the plate two months ago in 
as soon as the X-rays were finished, Minnesota, hit his 300th homer in 


com plaining of baric spasms, Safe- small bole, but Hying with a punc- 
ty said. He was {akea to the Artiag- cured lung poses a problem. 


o the cup ton Stadium first aid station and 

left his right-foot given an injection by BJ. Mycos- 

_ _F' . lfra V Via D AMdArp tMlll Hn^tAT 


lot more tiiidcer chest wall" My- rcu , raa j l0 ^ stadium. Wilken- ti» e mayors to break a 

coskie said. . dorf said. Martin was seen noiin in lie at the Metrodome. . . - • . , 

“It’s not thatsenous," sud the tiic ^ ^ eighth innmg ^ Evans had only two homers and JS'h.w'Sr 
doctor. “The needle created a very ^ b- j- our bef ore ^[,,5 4.f or .4 fi'tf-hitter for his third uunplcce 

small bole, but flying with a punc- Martin remained overnight in his against the Twins on Mav 15. k M 

tured lung poses a problem. motel room in Arlington. A coach, since, he has had 20 homers and 48 , txposo. Reds ft In MontraaL 

“We're sure not going to send Lou Pinirila. will substitute as tire rbj. 

him up in a plane with a puncture Yankees’ manager if Martin is un- Orioles 6. White 5 


at the plate two months ago in m VT^ cZ T, , 
Minnesota, hit his 300di homer in f nd .; uan ^plcd during 

ihe majors to break a sUih-innina f® ,hre ^™" ' “ W °i Jl ^. [ A, ‘ 
tie at the Metrodome. " ,3nu m Philadelphia. Jem koos- 


problem." able to be in Ocveland fot 

Mycoskie said the back spasms night's game. Safety said. 


Lou nnreua. win substitute as ine kb I. 

YanJcftS- manager if Martm is un- 0^ ^ wu,* Sox I: Rich 
able 10 be m Cleveland for Monday Daueft E(tdie Murraj and Gar\- 


Roenicke hit bases-empty homers 
in the sixth as Baltimore won in 


organizing committee said. 


isbed a stroke back at 272. 


j Baseball 

Sunday’s Major League linescores 


Golf 


AMERICAN LEAGUE Worn* 5a*. 

caHtomin an m 910—1 1 1 Hum.7-a.Hi 

TWwiiO 2H 1» •#»-« U D Evans 1121. 

MeCaskllL Clements (SI am Boom; Ale*- Cleveland 
mder and Whttt W— Alexander. 10*. L— Kensas Clt' 
M BC aifc n i. *7. HB— CoUtafTUO. JOCfcMll (171. Rvhla.Ea 


f»| and 5a*. Ged man 16), VV—Moon, ILi 


GREATER HARTFORD OPEN 
[Final scores and money wtratlmn Sunday 
In Ihe Stamm Canon Jammy Davis JoGreot- 
er Hartford Open aw Itw par -71. MOO-vanl 


H^ 7iHR^n.;W«i»>: Bosmn. Tourmonent CU* of Conwetlcu, 


mecasxiii, Clements (51 and Boara; A ho.- Cleveland 10* ON *21-4 * • ^PiiiLUiaai 

Ider Old wmtt W— Aiexamr. ifr* l- Keosas City MB HI 0fl»-7 IB • 

cCasLIII, S-7. HR— Cal Hornla. Jackson (171. ■ Rvhia. Easterly '«J. Thompson IB] and WII- 

_ , __ lard; GuWcm LaCots (Bl. OulsfifRjarrv III ^ 

22? — WBB1BW-J B 2 and WOttian. W-GtiWaa 7-5. L— Ruhle. 2-7. 

****** *» «« w»-* 7 o Sv — Qutsenberrv 1231. HRs- Konsas City, f TZZmZT'Lks 

Ttewa. HmondRs III and Matvln; McRae (M, BofflonMlB). 1C. ^ 


x-PWI Blscfcmr, sioaan 
Dan Pate. 15X800 
jodie Mudd. 152X00 
wavna Grady. S2SJ0O 
Rav Ftovd S2&200 


— ■ — • » I v m-miUKUHTY IXJI. — mobs wit. . „ HM u .»«< 

*»> "«• Matvm; MCRO* n BonwiI nw. Breff Upoer, SI»^2S 

ass- issst^: sssar 

E Krumer. Howell (Bl and Totttalonj Dmurf n. i-ty Rlrmer, StL400 

■M m ™_I . . Wolfs f«.G«Hon(») and MOOT* w^rywer. Hoen. SMAOO 

M- UMMl Sv- Ml an. Mnr* WMa. SH*0 

r?. SELirrL- J NW Tarn w <» MM » « JO* RWIW, *10400 


“We bn max-* , , 

awe 001 B01 m-\ 4 J ' ' 

MeDnoar and Dnnosev; Bums. Lana (B> ’ 

ond Skinner. W—McGreaor.S*. L— Bums, 11 - 
7- HRs Baltimore. Dauar 171. Murray (IB). • B _ 

Roenicse [iSf. and Hr 


Scott Hoetl. SMAOO 

*— 170). mnr* WMo. S1MB0 

00B 02B MM » « Jade Renrnr. *10200 
550 no BIx— B II B Mark O'Meara, *10500 
. Allen IS). Bonll (71 Gil Monwn. sioxm 


»"««• z«e 200 TIB— 7 11 1 YorLHendef 

Boa “ n 1B1 MB BOB— 2 9 1 . Nl 

"tooreawsraH^umtCfoivawJPJ.CteM' ahobIb 

PtUtadcipaia 


Major League S tandings 

AMERICA* LEAGUE 

Cod DteMoa 



W L 

Pd. 

GB 

Tor onto 

43 37 

M 24 

_ 

. New York 

S3 42 

-556 

7 

D«1 tell 

52 M 

X 

aw 

Bmton 

S3 44 

J31 

9Vi 

■ BaUimora 

40 44 

JOI 

10W 

• MllUnufcoo 

41 54 

AR 

19 

Cfevotara 

38 44 

J13 

309a 

! i CaWomta 

West Dtvfslon 



54 O 

571 



Kamai aty 

59 U 

SO 

3 

Ooklara 

SI <7 

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5 

Oifc«a 

« <7 

SB 

4Vj 

-Swttie 

44 £2 

m 

10 

.> «noe»ta 

45 51 

JS) 

10 

Tnai 

» 59 

J98 

1? 

. NATIONAL LEAOUB 



/ 

Bad MvINM 




W L 

Pet. 

GB 

Sf. Loud 

59 37 

SIS 

— 

tew von, 

54 41 

J77 

3W 

PanirMl 

54 43 

JM 

4Yj 

Jikaoo 

51 44 

sa 

BVj 

fiiiacMBhia 

44 S3 

.454 

ISHi 

.,’imbvrah 

31 45 

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18 

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WMl DHrtCloa 



54 40 

S63 

— 

< on Otego 

5J 44 

535 

4 » 

Incinnoti 

51 45 

S3) 

5 

ouston 

45 54 

>55 

ll'Y 

»onio 

43 54 

■443 

1JW 

“> Fnmci&ca 3» eO 

J*4 

IBVi 


aystram, Shirley (21. Alim (S). Bonll (7) Gil Moraon. s' 0 - 200 
and BnuBev: Welsh. Razema (IlonaPelrollL Dan Forsmon. S1IUW 
W-waML 2-2. L— Bysiram. 0-1. HRs— New Ban Eastwood. *W200 
York. Henderson 114). Texas. McDowell 1101. HuOle Green, SBJHA1 

NATIONAL LEAGUE -W>" MOlloHW. MJ71A3 

. NATIONAL LEAW f j|,n NeltelU **771 A! 

Philadelphia Ml XI nx— 7 I 1 puzxy Whr. 

BadraslM Comp W. Barker t7] and Cor- 
one; Koosman and VlralL W — Koosmatli yifL ^ 

L— BedrosKm, 5-11 HRhMM. Homer 
1121. Rum (i). Philadelphia, genu (71. Geonc Jtonw, sum 

Houston maooi3w.nl> 1 3eT^ClUio 

New York BM OBI 0M— 4 0 4 Tom Purntr, tUSUO 

Nlekro ond Ashby. Baliev (3); Danina. Gar- David Lndstrm, S3ASZJ0 
man (5], Sisk (Bl aM Carter. Reynolds (71. ^ wadklns. SU5L50 
1M— Ntekran B-0. L— Oorlino. MK HRs— Now Norman, 51453J0 

York. Strawberry 2 <1*1. Victor Reoaiad. OASIS) 


Victor Reoaiad. OASTS) 4T.73-4M9-4W 


for X-rays that showed a small per- 


Transition 


RD OPEN BASEBALL 

ilnnines Sunday AiMMcm Leaoue 

Davit Jr^Grsat- CHICAGO— Purdnsad the contract of Joel 

*■-71. MOO-vord sklmw. catcher, tram Buttalo at rtwe Amert- 
of Connecticut can AsaodaHon. Asslanad Steve Flreovtd, 
pitcher, to Bafiate. 

72-47-M4B— 271 KANSAS CITY— Placed Shortstaa Buddy 

M 'ff 4B 66 —2 71 Blancaiano an the tt-dav dhobi ed list. TO- 
40-B7-7D-44 — 271 RONTO— Placed Jim Clancy, pttchor. an me 
7D4545-72— 272 uOavdleabledlM. Purchased ttw cuniractiil 
4*48-48-72—272 Tom Henke, pitcher, from Syracuse at me 
72-48-45-68—273 intemotienal Leaoue. 

70- 44-4 4 -48 — 273 national Laaaae 

71- 484448-273 HOUSTON— Optioned Ran Matttfe PlKAsr. 
71494744—2)3 to Tuaan al the Pacific Coast League- Re- 
4440-7247—274 colled Gannon Rteera. InftaUer. trom TliC- 
60-4846-71— 274 son. Purchased the contract ot Charles Ker- 
48*71 -4448— 274 few, under, irwn Tucson. Placed Jim 
64-714847— Z7< PanAovlts, ftrfMdor. an ttw is-dny dfsatfed 

71484848—275 Ibt. 

40*704848-275 FOOTBALL 

604049-48—275 Nattaaai Football Leaoue 

70-704946-273 DETROIT — Placed Billy Sims, nmnlno 

75444945-275 • back, Homer Ellas, (ward, and Rob Rudlck. 
(6-7149-70-274 hah) end. an ttier ahvslcolly unable to oer- 
44-71-7049—274 (arm H*L Slsned Jama* Johnson, linebacker, 
71 44-7049—275 and William Graham, sotety. 

47- 71 46-70— Z76 • HOUSTON— Released Wfce OeiKHiW nnK 
70494948-276 Ran Harter, UekArs, and Mark SchlecM and 
7246-7046-274 Jack «ML punters. 

72494746-276 INDIANAPOLIS — RelesseQ RldcDwenger 
7146-70-70—277 and Tony CJdwk*, hiJIDOCkA R»V Brown, de- 
69-70-48-70— 277 tenstee and,! racy Groom, guard, Nell Harris. 

48- 70-7344—277 defensive back. Eric SmMbSCtety.Brvw MV- 
7L 7048-W— 27* ers,mmter,Phll Smith. Cori Alkens.ond Ran- 
724048-75 — 271 tfy Grant, wide receivers. Phu Bromley, cen- 
6749-71-71—278 ter. Ron ZMfcewWtf, linebacker, and Eddie 
487149-72-278 mcGIN. tWit end. 

67.734670—278 l_A. RoWeni— Announced Curt Marsh. 


Owners May Propose Change 
In Players 9 Pension Payment 

United Press International Said they Will not pay OUe-titii'd, 

NEW YORK — Negotiations but have' offered no specific plan. 


Andre Dawson \ two-run homer, 
his first in su weeks, supported 
rookie Joe Heskelh's four-hu pitch- 
ing agamst Cincinnati. 

Cardinals 4, Padres 2: Darrell 
Porter drove in three runs with a 


between major league baseball's 
team owners and players could ea- 
ter a new phase Monday, with own- 
ers possibly offering a counter-pro- 


ter a new phase Monday, with own- progress bn minor issues. Don 
ers possibly offering a counter-pro- Fehr, tire acting executive director 
posal on lire key issue of pension of (be Players Association, said the : 
money, according to their chief ne- oh vers droDned some minor dk»- 


48-714647— Z7V 
7 14 64848—2)5 
69^04848—275 
69494 9 48— 2 75 
70-704946-273 


^ ^,^ S “ tt ^ CG ,^ r ’ S double and a homer as St. Louis 

'ODOSP ( Tian ffp f ^± lle y- 155 ^ 111 ci ^ won in Son Dhm John Tudor got 

U r U ® C ViiiailgC against starter Bnu Bums, who ^ Ulh vi , lon ‘ m ^ Ul 12 
. n ^ had a one-hitter the first five in- sU ms while endinc LaMarr H« 19 

sion r avment ] | -^ une 

J Murray has homered in fjie of Giants 3. Pirares 2: In San Fran- 

«;■( .vii nm mv his last seven games to boost his cisco. David Green's two-out sin- 

noSrifie dan* ,0tal for ^ V* 3 * t0 18 has 311 in the sci ’ rc ‘ i Chn ' Brown 

buihave offered no specific plan. , ,^ ame strcak . from second base to complete a 

The sidtt met for three hours Royals 7, Indians 4: In Kansas sweep of the four- came series with 
Sunday night and announced more aty. Missouri, Steve Balboni hit a Pittsburgh. ' M P. L Ph 


ire baseball s The sides met for three hours Royals 7, Indian* 4: In Kansas 
rers could cn- Sunday night and announced more Gty. Missouri, Steve Balboni hit a 
ay, with own- progress on minor issues. Don 


money, according to their chief ne- 
gotiator. 

Faced with an Aug. 6 strike 


players dropped some minor pro- 
posals. He said he believes more 
“lesser issues" can be resolved 


deadline set by the players, man- within a few days, presumably 
agemem's executive council sched- clearing the way for talks on the 
iiled a Monday morning meeting, major issues oT pension payments, 
and tireir chief negotiator, Lee salary arbitration and the free- 
MacPhail, said the issue of pension agenl system. 

bc l ^ ucl ^ fi £ d : - . Meanwhile, the commissioner of 

tiiik aboui it, he said, j^^ball, Peter Ueberroth, said in 
“We’Udoour best to gel something Coopmlown , New York, at the 
toother. Baseball Hall of Fame, that he 

The owners and players were to wou y ^ ^ ^ j 0 bdp reach 
meet later Monday at the head- a seidetnenL 


Blanc paiN 


meet later Monday at the head- 
quarters of tire Players Association. 
Daring the talks, the players 


“We can’t allow these negotia- 


RBWraon. stvpor IS). Buchanan (Bl and Bl- 
■or della; Hasken and FimwraUL W- Has- 
kttn, 84. L— flafalnaan. S-i HR— MontraaL 
Oawsan (W. 

St.Laab JOB 1M 186-4 M B 

Son Dltao BIB MB 1BB-2 IB B 

Tudor, LAhtl (91 and Porter; Hovt. Tlw- 
m ond IS) ana Kennedy, W— Tudor, 124. L— 

Hovl.lJ-iSv— Lahll(T2).HR—5L Louis. Por- 

ter (4). 

CWcaoo MO 2M W0— 9 11 1 

Lot Armies 3» ICO M0— 2 S 1 

5 uldina,SareMHi (1 1. Brusstar (7) and Da- 
vta; PoiMlL Honevcutt (j), Castillo (7), Oka 
(Bland AdascfauW— Sa«n*«i.3iL— PowilL 
b-i. Sv — Brvntar IS). HHs-CWeaoa U»es 
<9>, Motthaws <61. Dovi* 191. 

PtHUjursh BM Oil MB 8-1 « I 

San Fraud tea 108 011 809 1—3 M 0 

110 Inninnl 

ReusctHK. Guante t9 1 ond Pena: Krukan. 
Davis 1 10). Garrolls HB) ond Branlv. W— 
Carrel is. 5-1 L— ‘ Guonte.2-3 HR— Son Fron- 


BM NO 008-0 « B Larry Mia. SUOA) 
•63 30) Bfl*— 4 If 8 Tom KlUe. tUBJB 


-Steve Pate. *345250 


Football 

CFL Standings 


71.734946—278 ouonLwUI beanthelnlvrad IlsJter *J* w**ks. 
7348-7246—278 w.Y. JETS— PJocnJ Tony Pals*, fullback, 
4845-78-73— 271 stan VtaMemeray guard, ond Glenn Dennison. 

ttoMMdionflw Physically unobli to perform 
_______ list. Signed Bab Gn»P,Pvnler.CWmod Pete 

McCartney, tackle, bam waiver*. 

11 PHILADELPHIA— Slomd eorneitock 

■U ikn man Edward* and guard Greg Horan. 

— SAM DIEGO— Stoned NO.1 draft tedLOften- 

live lineman JUn Lncftev of Ohio Stale. 


Cenwtlmi Faottxdl Leagw 



Eacteni Divttloa 



w 

L 

T 

pp 

PA 

Montreal 

3 

1 

0 

« 

74 

Ottawa 

3 

1 

D 

77 

76 

Toronto 

2 

* 

8 

114 

B8 

Hamilton 

0 

3 

0 

39 

93 


WMtera Division 


Brit am 

4 

0 

0 

134 

47 

Edmonton 

7 

2 

0 

79 

112 

Winnlwr* 

7 

7 

0 

M 

97 

Saskalctavn ' 

2 

0 

KJ 

72 

Cntvorv 

0 

3 

0 

43 

72 


SUNDAY'S RESULT 



Tennis 


Ottawa i«. Comm* 12 


as CLAY COURT CHAMPIONSHIPS 
(Al tnotanooolts) 

MEN'S SINGLES 
Fetor 

IvanLendl.Caaiosiavokte.def.Anflt'MGo- 
mm. Ecuador. 81, W- 

ME*TS DOUBLES 
FHMrt 

Ken FWdi. U 5* ora RoWf Seguwi u 5- . 
aei. k i m Warwick. AusIraiin.et'O Pm ri Si07». 
CiK>«xt(i«at.ia. 6-J. fi4 


have been awaiting a management boas 10 fail he said, 
counter-proposal to tireir demand Ueberroth did noi elaborate on 
for one-Otird of a Sl.l billion tele- what role he would lake in the 
vision package. Tbe owners have talks. 

England Wins, Just like * 66 

The Associated Press 

LEEDS, England —England and West Germany replayed the 1966 
World Cnp soccer final Sunday and raised some $64,000 for a fund set 
up after 56 spectators died in a fire in May. 

. Eighteen of theplayers who figured in the 1966 final staged a replay 
at Leeds United’s EUand Roan ground, which is 15 miles Trom die 
northern English city of Bradford where the tragedy occurred. The 
fire swept through the wooden stand at Bradford Citys Valley Parade 
stadium May 11 — the day the dub was celebrating promotion to the 
Ehglisb League Second Division. 

The rematch of the 1966 World Cup final was set up to help the 
disaster fund, reportedly now at more than $42 million. 

Nineteen years ago England triumphed, 4-2, in overtime in one of 
the most dramatic finals in soccer history. Sunday. England again 
came from behind with striker Geoff Hurst scoring three times. 

’With most of the players now in their mid-40s. the rematch was 
■ reduced to an hour, with England winning. 6-4. after trailing bv 4-3 at 
. halftime. Due Seder saved mice for West Germany. 4 ten 'Dill mice i 
Mr England. 



benoit 

DEGORSW 


?:■ E'.? >.;»>.'? Sr f 

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INTERNATIONAL HERAUtfVIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1985 


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The 'Kiss’ of Hector Babenco 


By Helen Dudar 



, the principal 

figures involved in “Kiss oF the 
Spider Woman" sat down with a 
large audience to watch the movie. 
The two Stars had never seen (he 
final cut William Hun, who plays 
Molina, the romantic movie- 
struck homosexual spent the first 

7fl minu tes crin g in g in his seat and 
then became so absorbed that his 
self-consdousncss evaporated. 

Raul Julia, who is Valentin, the 
fiercely dedicated radical activist, 
could not match Hurt’s involve- 
menL His mind flickered from the 
film to his memories of working 
on it in Brazil to the audience, 
wondering whether these people 
were interested or merdy polite. 

The director. Hector Babenco, 
a charisma deal Ty passionate Bra- 
zilian who had poured four and a 
half obsessed years into his first 
movie in English and who knew 
every frame of it, was transfixed- 

At the fadeoul. Hurt, relieved, 
said to hims elf, “Gee, that’s pretty 
good." He turned to embrace Ju- 
lia, and a lens popped out of his 
eyeglasses. He was cm bis knees. 


groping around the dark floor for 
his lens, when 2,800 spectaiore 
rose to begin a long ovation. 

The wo actors were gine by the 
time the Cannes jury voted Hurt 
as the best actor. (A month later, 
the judges at the Tokyo Festival 
far Young Film Makers gave the 
film a special award.) 

Babenco hung around Cannes 
as long as he could stand the hys- 
teria and high anxiety — “It's like 
you give LSD to 15,000 people" 
— and then, with his wife, fled 
into the hills to recover. 

“Watching the movie, I started 
to discover why I liked the book. 
Incredible! Both characters are 
part of myself.” like the Manuel 
Pmg novel it is based on, the film 



loneliness and pain, Molina spins 
out scenes from a favorite movie 
to the horribly tortured Valentin, 
who attends with reluctance and 
disdain. “Enjoy what life offers 
you," Molina says. “What life of- 
fers me is The Struggle,” Valentin 
replies. It is a beginning of an 
unlikely friendship between two 
men, each a prisoner of his social 
role. 



William Hart (left). Rani Julia play cellmates. 


Babenco found “Kiss of die 
Spider Woman" in 1978. One of 
the dements that hooted him was 
Molina's memories of vintage 
movies. 

And in New York, after a 12- 
hour flight from his home in Sao 
Paolo, he is still simmering with 
excitement over his delayed self- 
discovery. A large, roundish fig- 
ure, Babenco, 39, is a nonstop 
talker, a geyser of detail opinion 
and confession, delivered m ro- 
bust Fngispfr diar , having been 
largely acquired through leading, 
is bravely mispronounced. 

Although he has never been a 
political activist, part of Hector 
Babenco is the “prophet and the 
revolutionary." the person who 
grieves over inequality and hun- 
ger, the purist who thinks he can 
change the world. Then, “there's 
another side of Hector. He’s like 
Molina, who fives in the world of 
dreams. In my youth in Argenti- 
na. I was polluted by movie fanta- 
sies, it was like my city, Mar del 
Plata, was too small my parents 
too narrow. 1 was looking for a big 
window to see that the sun was 
_<hmirig I’m a very romantic nwn 
1 believe in the capacity to be 
tender and to receive. I prefer to 
say yes instead of no. I am from 
the culture of yes." - 

Among (be remarkable thing s 
about “Kiss of the Spider Wom- 
an,” which just opened in the 
United States, are the people who 
said yes to pniwnnl conditions. 
Babenco had great difficulties 
finding finance. “We don’t like 
anarchist projects ,’ 1 was one 
American prospect’s response; a 
reference not to the film ’s content 
bat to the director’s indepen- 
dence. 

He raised a little more than SI 
million from a dozen investors in 
the United States and in BrazL 
The funding was not enough for 
the wages of the stats, or for that 
matter, the director, all of whom 
worked for expenses. It is a mea- 
sure of the power of the final 
script by Lennart Schrader that 
Hurt ana Julia did not hesitate to 
go to Sao Paolo to work for de- 
ferred salaries to be paid if the 
picture turns a profit. 

The first Mbuna was Burt Lan- 
caster, whom Babenco met in 
1981 on a trip to Los Angeles to 
receive an award for his third 
movie, “Kxote." That film, about 
Brazil’s army of abandoned chil- 


dren. brought him an internation- 
al audience. He began work on 
“Kiss of the Spider Woman” then, 
never suspecting h would con- 
sume him. “My family life went 
down the drain,” he said. “I quit 
home for tang months and lived is 
hotels. I was a little bit out of my 
mind during the time I was in- 
volved in tins.” 

Babenco was in Los Aagdes 
hunting for money and a second ' 
strong actor when someone sug- 
gested Rani Julia, then on Broad- 
way in “Nine" and now in “Aims 
and the Man." Julia recalls a 9Q- 
mmuie telephone call from Ba- 
benco, the first of many. The 
script was sent, “the best that I 
had read in years,” he said. What 
he really wanted was the Molina 
role. He settled for Valentin. 

Then in 1983, Lancaster suf- 
fered a heart attack and had to 
withdraw from the project. Ba- 
benco, exhausted ana depressed, 
packed up and started for hom^ 
“I called Raul from the airport 
and said, listen, I talked to you 
yesterday and didn’t have the 
courage to say I'm not going to 
make this movie here. I think I can 
raise some money in Brazil and 
make it with Brazilian actors.’ 
Raul yells, TD learn Portuguese, 
m start at Berlitz Monday. FH go 
to Brazil.’” 

Within a day, Julia had another 
thought: William Hurt, whom he 
knew as a fellow member of the 
New York theater community but 
had never worked with. The script 



Babenco: “Both characters are part of myself.’ 


Hurt was finishin g 


England, 

“Gorky 


Park," 


and his reply came rapidly. “Very 
shy, very modest,” Babenco said 
“Would I consider inviting him to 
play Molina?” 

Babenco, offered the services of 
a major American movie star, was 
thunderstruck — and resistant To 
Hurt he said, “Listen, my first 
impulse is to say no because I 
think you are too handsome, you 
are too well built. The character 
must be. more fragile.” But he 
agreed to fly to New York to see 
Hurt try ' on the role, and, at a 
reading, was stunned by “the 
sweetness, the tenderness, the ca- 
pacity of Bill to present himself in 

such a fragile, unprotected way." 
He wept, died his tears and said 
the film was back on track. 

Rehearsals started in New York 
in July 1983 and continued in SSo 
Paolo, where shooting expenses 


were relatively modest Julia re- 
searched his role in books by 
Smith American activists and he 
met men who had been impris- 
oned and tortured. He concluded, 
“There are no fat revolutionar- 
ies,” and dimed off more than 30 
pounds^ emerg in g a gaunt 15Z 
Hurt explored the Iocafhomosex- 
ual hang out^ talking to the regu- 
lars and dancing with them. And 
be did a screen test that, he said, 
“freaked everybody out" 

“He came with a lot of makeup, 
a ponytail wig and a beauty 
mark,” Babenco recalled. “I said, 
‘Listen, Bill you look like a witch. 
The only thing misafng is the 
broomstick.’ ” With Lancaster, 
Babenco had imagined Molina as 
a fairly flamboyant figure: But 
Hurt’s first readings had shown 
bimaway to deal with the contra- 
dictions and the poetry to be 
found in a feminine sensibility 
“trapped in a soccer players 
body. They settled on a henna 
rinse and, for the evening movie- 
telling times, discreet quantities of 
eyeliner and lipstick. 

Although Julia came to love the 
Valentin role, he still yearns to do 
Molina. Interviewed in his dress- 
ing room between “Arms and the 
Man” performances, he reported 
that Puig had turned his novel 
into a “b rillian t" play that has 
been a great success in Brazil. Per- 
haps somebody would produce it 
here whh-Raul Julia as Medina. A 
day later, Babenco’s intense 


brown eyes lit 19 at the idea. “It’s 
a two-character play, a bargain to 
produce even in New York. May- 
be Bill Hurt would play Valentin 
and Raul Juba would be Molina.” 
Maybe Hector Babenco would di- 
rect. 

■ ‘Seriousness and Passion* 

In her review far The New York 
Times, Janet Maslm wrote: 

“Kira Of The Spider Woman,” 
begins with a theatrical-sounding 
homosexual describing the plot of 
an old movie (“her petite ankle 
slips into the perfumed water”) 
for the benefit of his prison cell- 
mate. 

There is nothing in this seem- 


opening to betray the film's tre- 
mendous reserves of seriousness 
and passion. Nor are there suffi- 
cient dues in the previous film 
careers of the director. Hector Ba- 
benco or the two stars, W illiam 
Hurt and Raul JuHa, to anticipate 
the stature of the work they do 
hoe. “Kiss of the Spider Woman” 
is a brilliant achievement, staged 
with perfect control and fierce 
originality, which make it one of 
the best films in a long while. 
From its droll playful opening to 
its transcendent coda, it has the 
mark of greatness from banning 
to end. 


Helen Dvdar, a 
wrote this article 
Times. Art 
turn. 



writer, 
The New York 
is on vaca- 


PEOPLE 


Qmsto 9 s Pam Wrapping 



Christo, the American artist, is 
finally to wrap the Print Neuf 
bridge, spanning the Seine in cen- 
tral Paris, with 40.000 square me- 
ters (48,000 square yards) of gray 
canvas is September, city officials 
announced. The two-week 
which Christo has been work 
since 1975. wjfi cost the artist . 
million, raised through the rale of 
his collages and drawings. Road 
and river traffic *31 aw be affect- 
ed. Other works by Christo. 50, a 
Bulgarian-born artist who is mar- 
ried to a Frenchwoman, include the 
wrapping of 11 islands off Miami 
in pink plastic, wrapping pan or 
the Australian coastline and the 
bun g in g of a gigantic orange cur- 
tain. in the Grand Canyon. 

□ 

Fidel Castro, the Cuban leader, 
has signed a SlJ-million deal with 
the New York publishing firm Si- 
nun & Schuster to write three 
books, U. S. News & World Report 
said, the first on the failure of reli- 
gion and the second go the Third 
World and the failure of economic 
policies. No details on the third 
volume were available. 

□ 

Pad Chanters “The Sfflc Shoe." a 
fervent Roman Catholic’s irrita- 
tive journey through time and 
space in search of truth, received 
polite applause and mixed reviews 
Saturday at the Salzburg Festival 
“I suffered for four hoars,” the 
Swiss critic Martin Etier comment- 
ed at die end of the 240-minute 
play, the 1985 festival’s first stage 

performance. tm«a Varrovsky, of 
the Handelsblatt, in Dflsseldorf, 
said the play should have been 
shortened and needed mote dra- 
matic emphasis. The Austria Press 
Agency praised the “weigh tlessly 

H«« who ^directed the 

play in 1967 in Munich’s Res- 
denziheater “was up to the task in 
Salzburg as welL The festival 
opened Friday with Herbert von 
Karajan conducting Georges Bi- 
zet’s “Carmen” to acclaim from the 
sdl-out audience but a mixed re- 
sponse from critics. 

□ 

The Mexican violinist Henryk 
Szoryng performed Saturday at 
Monaco's royal palace, his first 
concert since undergoing colon and 
hernia surgery last month. At the 
end of the concert, featuring LakTs 



violin to Prince Rainier to ii-e ry 
the eaucrkSUMcn of the Mbs* 
Cario Rstoania: ^sund- 
ing young Mosegassue ttoliaita * 
Szeryng deserbed Vsliaisse, whe 
nude the ir.wuroetn in :Sbl, a 
being the Ar.tor.io Stradivari of } 
French violin makers, and said the 
gift was a token of hi? frienddup 
toward Monaco 

L- 

Laurence Ofirier is to be sets 
next April 19 in the new British 
musical "Time,” at the ftaanuoa 
Theater, but whether he will be a 
physical, onstage presence "can 
only be told in time." auttrdingtbt 
musical's creator. Dare Clark. Oliv- 
ier. 78, will not appear ts person, 
but will utilize a device new to the 
theater, described as “one step be. 
yond a hologram." “Time .' 1 billed 
as (he most expensive show- in Brit- 
ish musical history, will star the 
English pop star Cliff Richard as a 
rock 'n* roll singer who defends the 
Earth against alien aggressors ui a 
trial set in space. 

□ 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother of Britain, who celebrates 
her 85th birthday next Sunday, is 
getting a special present from Brit- 
ish Airways — her first trip through 
the sound barrier. On Aug. 6 . she 
will board a Concorde at Heathrow 
Airport for a two-hour flight 
around Britain’s coastline, flying at 
maximum speeds of 1.450 mph 
(2,320 kph). British Airways' chair- 
man, Lewd King, who organized the 
special flight, said Sunday: “We 
had heard that flying on Concorde 
was one of her long held wish- 
es." . . . Prince Claries and his 
wife. Diana, celebrated their fourth 
wedding anniversary Monday 
without any public engagements. 

□ 

The actress AH MacGnpr was in 
her early 20 s, unmarried, pregnant 
and terrified when she went to get 
an illegal abortion at a seedy New 
York hotel MacGraw, 46, de- 
scribed the experience in an article 
People magazine, saying she want- . 
ed people to know about the dan- 
gers women faced before abortions 
were legalized, and adding that she 
and her boyfriend at the time were 
not sufficiently responsible for par- 
enthood. 


-V 


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Urns 417 8 S 2 
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Sao Paula; 8521893 
MIDDLE EAST 


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Kuwait] 5616485. 

Uianon: 361 457/879, 
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Saudi Arabia: 

JedcUa 667-1500. 

UAL Dubai 22416 T. 

EAR EAST 

Bangkok: 390-06-7. 

Hong Kron 5 - 213671 . 
Matla: 8 V 707 49 . 

Soaeb 7358773 . 

Sfaigaporo: 222 - 2725 . 
Taiwan: 752 66 25 / 9 . 

Tokyo: 504-1925, 

AUSTRALIA 

MoUmwrmi 690 8231 
Sydney; 929 56 39, 957 63 20 . 
Perth: 328 9833 . 

Aoddbftfon, Queondand; 

369 36 53 - 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR MCE. Rad Edate 
Agency, buying an ap artm e n t or a 
vied? Save a serious problem with a 
tariau company* Promotion Mozart 
ari for our brodwe: 19 Aw Auber 
or Hotel Merid en 06030 Nee. Teb 
( 93 ) 87 08 a -BIAS 80 


CANNES PARC MONIHEUKY ttu- 
dios, 2 roaan, high don tamo, pod. 
SeEng office on she at Hotel Mont- 
Bewy, 25 Av. Beawiyour. Tel J 93 | 38 
6766 orMeriJnW| 9 4356 & 


CAP KHtAT. Near Grand Hotd, 
Cap's mod beautiful 350 njn haury 
waterfront Mia. Tet ( 93 ) 99 66 14 . 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
PARK PALACE 


Goitei Triangle of Monte Carlo, i 
buUmg, 5 th itoor with front end i 
temocus, color & parking. 

For Worowtions Heme 
Tel No to Monte Cwto 
Between the date 

22 nd & 306 July, 1985 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


LOFT MARAIS 

AKHnKTSDUPUX 
LUXURIOUSLY DECORA 1 TO 
SUN - THtRAa - PARKING 


Hfeh price 
EMBASSY 562 


16 40 


NBM1Y MADRID 

Beautiful townhoui& 550 sqjn. + 
garden + fato condition. 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE, 
FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 
, : FOR SALE 

PARIS & SUBURBS 

SWITZERLAND * 

ISA RESIDENTIAL 

CHAMP DE MARS 

Ttffe Ideal pierkMorro. high doiL 
Mrmy, 72 ioa. 3 roaro.T«J 739 Q 26 06 
AtficS DE PETOfiC 

VHIARS .. 
WINTER & SUMMER' 
MOUNTAIN PARADI5E- 

Aportmenlfc ronging from studn 
to 6 raooaTAwfii* For Sft* T» 

PENTHOUSE PARK AVE. New Yah, 
fintrt faaiticin, huge term, 2 bed- 
room, 1 brih, to buy or rent. Teh 
(5121 472 9259 / 021 319 7737 . 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

CLOSE ETOJLE 

ITtfe Oianriag PSed a lerre 77 oqm. 
Art deco, hiflft dare, 380 26 08 
AOBKEtimiaiE 

CANADA 


Iff 

eat vwih mugaficenf wevw. Pricee from 
SF 195 D 00 to ffg 35 J» 0 . Long farm 
martgicqreft ASKettored. 
for mfarmftions 

GLOBE RAN SLA. 

. red eriate epedafote 

SWITZERLAND 


LAGOMAGGIORE 

ASCONA 

In this wortd famous resort we offer fine 
dare uuuffarofli md .houses. Right 
obowv the aid vflage of Aioono or on 
the Irite with indoor pool »tw wfl find 
your hama. Pncm froen & 32 OXI 00 Up to 
5 F 1 .I 0 QU 00 . Mortgcge: ft low Swai 
intormt rate There red estate ora 
free far sofa to wrefriesi. 

RMBtAlP HOME UBl 

RESRDB 6 ZA TIZiANA 

VIA LOCARNO 27 A 

CH -6612 ASCONA 

IGL CH- 93-352184 

for. Monterat 24 , 

0+1005 LAUSWit SwttwlOTd 
Tet ( 21 ) 2235 lZTbr 251 B 5 A*JSCH. 
Ertftfohed Stoat 3970 

COTE D*AZUB VifafroncM, in hitfixv 

aft buiUngi ihort/long farm apart- 
roent wSh autetic period furniture. 
Write to: MOR 1 BL 15 Bd Victor 
Hugo 06000 Nfae ranee for free 
brochure. 

In the churning mountain resort of 

LEY5M 

RESIDENCE LB HONES 

Ovarlooldng a splenrfd Alpine panora- 
ma. 30 min. from Montreux and Lite 
Geneva by car. 

- you can own qudhy residence* 
with indoor wtoramg pool aid 
fitness fortifies in OT efaal 
enwanmeri far failure and sports 

-f^Sa^wSF. rftes 
to BOX mortgages. 

PUaee ujutud: 

Raefrfance fa* freaex. 1854 Leysin 
swrnmAMD 

Tefc(a 25 ] 341 ] 55 Tbt: 456120 SLAICH 

GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON. 4 bedroom^ tfl camfartsy 

hmahed residence in amtrft London 
needed from Irt October - Id May. 
Write offer* to Mb Cbpdewele, Son 
Juan, tea. Sf»a 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

SWITZBttAND 

LAKE GENCXA- 
M ONTRHLX or to flwse world fbnreus 
resorta CSAN 5 -MONTANA, IES 
DUUOBSfS,. VH * BL V 01 ARS. 
JURA ft region of GSTAAD. From 
SniOJMO Martoogre 60 K ft 6 KX 
•nfarert. 

REV AC 5 -A. 

52 Montbriflcnl, 0+1202 GBCVA. 
Tet 022 / 361540 . Telex; 22030 

AT HOME M MUDS 

PARIS PROMO 

APABTMWrS FOR RB 4 T OR SAl£ 

iriSsfofo* 563 25 60 


74 CHAMPS-aY5KS 8th 

Studio, 2 or 3 -rootn cftortmnt. 

One month or more. 

IE QARDGE 359 97 . 

IMMOBUiBt SA, roe de Bourgl 7. 

1003 [nwmne.Smtzerlcnd. TEL- 1021 ) 

20 91 07 . The 2+453 BALCH. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


A 1 MA MA 8 CEAU 
Boautrfii 2-bedroonz u p u t toi al 
<Mdbfab brjhart toon d» 
ABP BiYSmS-CONDORDE 
9 . tee terda. 75008 Pori. _ 
Teb ( 1)265 It 99 . Telex 64 U 793 F. 


15 TH TOUR TOTEM. Studio 
floor, open new. F 6500 ofl ettargee 
mduded. Tour Bw» Gauche, 5 roant, 
douUe Vving 3 bedroom. 2 bdta. 
parking. FI 7500 . Cabinet Rower 553 


SHOW TBUA STAY. Advantage, of o 

hotel wetfewt Hwomenierwn, feel at 
hone in nice ttarfoLone bedroom 
and mare in Pin. SOSSiM: 80 roe 
d» IDnemniri. PttriiTlht 546 3940 


AVt POOL new^TOjMO. Moran, 3 
faedroonn. fi 6 .'JOO. V 3 b, 7 beC- 
iooiw. nADOTle St. Loan, 200 
mm. woeiaui, rSO/XXL duplex, 
top floor, terrace, chorm. 551 0965 . 


OB ST LOUIS 
6 . 


ICAR TROCAOOO and Victor Hugo. 

-»>orT mrm panue. Lnvnec, no agert- 
cy. FflJOOj 55356 7 B org 3 23 46 . 


7TH; VAIBNNE 75 il towriow 3 

ST. CCUMAM DBJH 


3 roomfiaL 

s r8%r* 


«TH ST QOtMAN. 2 roon IdtdwL 
bath. MSn/Augrat. Teh 633 1S4 
awfy am or fate pm. 


MARAEe 2 -rocw flat, 32 KVm, dear, 

both free now lym +. fSOO + 
heaMB Owner 77* 03 36 today 


NEAR BEAllBOUIft 3raatn 

ran^^bdmy. sroty, qjiu. 


today 


16 IH. FOR 2 MONTHS. 1 bedroom 
o p mto m tt. 5800 /month. 224 80 64 . 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBenON EXECUTIVES 

to the fctemaf f m itW HmSdflt- 

buna, wAmmeteiefn 

t)f a nmBan nwdtra waM- 
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tw hiM and imbntry, wi V 
road h Jmt Mex ut (Amb 

613595) b efore J Don, mt- 

wreitf foot w. cm telex yao 

both, end wur nierrqpe wm 

appear water 48 hoar*- The 
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aqumdent (Mr fan. You muft 
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tMsom ONang wnm 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OflFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


hie of Man, Turht Angela, 

Wondi, Panama Ijberia Gmhrond 
moss other ofhhora orta. 

• Confidents advice 

• Inwwfiote qvoifabity 

• Nom in e e Mtvieesi 

• Bearer thaw 

• Boat redriratiorai 

• Aeeowwtg & adnnidrdian 

• Md), tei^one & Max 
Fran ae plm nto tv beo Me f frore 

sakrcdraATC 

SBIVKS UP 
Head Office 

Mt PleaHatt, Douglas, Mo of Man 
T* Dai 
Tetat . 

t q qrfo n toriwMive 
M OW Bond R-Uwfan W1 ^ 
Td 01-693 6264,1^28247 SCSLDN G 


OFFSHORE TAX SHELTER 

COMPAMB 

...faiLTui 
.tiberioi 

as. Compete swccort foe* 

Very rtrid connae n udity. 

Free cota u lWioft 
Soger Griffin UJL, F.CA. 

W estem'fEw* wSriafttew,^' 
Doughs. We of Man. (06261 23303 / 4 . 
Tele 627389 COCMAN G 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNTHES 


AUGUST 5«i 
ON SALE JULY 29nd 

BUSINESS WEEK 

INTERNATIONAL 

• LLOYD'S: 

WHATS NEXT 

• LABOR TROUBUE 
JARS SOUTH KOREA'S 
ECONOMY 

• "BLACK FRIDAY' 

FOR THE 
ITALIAN LIRA 

NOW ON SALE AT 
ALL INTKNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


CCM. LTD 

Companies formed U£ & woridwide 
indudmg We of Mon, Turks & Gob* 
Anguffo, Paramo ana Ltonria 

For furflier in f ormaio n . pietne contact 
in oh - S Upper Chech St. Doudai. Ue 
of M ot, vw Great Britain , 
P 624 ) 237 B,tUfi 279 M 


COMPUTB PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 

MKsg 

punok «c. Mqcr craft Cffdi 'oc- 


FRAUD INTL REPORT, GMC. 26 
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BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BROKERS 

INVESTMENT ADVI50RS 

Your dmn tr cot im rot in one of Amtri - 

throughi Hi a bifcn dofcx nut «JuUry. 
SaaDO tree. Wreariy Phnied A 
UMtondi FWd. rfgfa ornual earthy 
ctBured for many, many yam. Gee ' 
om ammonium ma Bam. Mol 
d ovoiabb in Enafatv Frondi, Gennon. 
Contactr 

GLOBE P 1 AN SLA. 

Am MavRspcs 24 , 

04-1005 Lnsaanms, Switieriord 
Teh pl| 22 3512 -m 25 18 S MRS CH 


OFFSHORE COMPANES 

UX non rmidenl Co ny a n iefc 
Nominee 6ra<ton &. bearer term. 
Canfidanbd hanfc account. 

Fufl amort mUL 
Panonto & Lbem axnpanies. 
Oflrhons ink. 

1PXJL, 17 Vtffente SLLandOT 
El Teh 01 3771 6/4. Tbo»39]l G 


USA 

BUSINESSES 6 REAL ESTATE 
Budnessideif oomnerdal, ekknhid & 
rendenbd red MKteute & leases. 
Property management 6 busies de* 
vdoproent. Wry with your reguro- 

(tamest Brdun, 14795 Jdhey Rd, 


#210, Irvte, CA 92714 USA. 71 
TOO, The WJ194. 


[gqcral cusra blazs mto 

town. We are MW Seeking ddtribu- 
ton far ofl major bnpean oowtaes 
for oar uriqee Amaioa» 4 ype fc«t- 
foodprod^^wpgrt^tepro) 
rtorts d £ 7 , 500 . bcdl e nt eadt re- 
turn*. WM e ihifo hed UK eonpany 
wifo pravwi auttari. Wito it te first 
Mona to: Gerord Cutal dK Hi 
Sotos 22 . Propmct HouMs, 32 Saver- 
eign Swet, Lee* ISTJBl 


muOARY BANKING on large cot 

IdmoiBcd nan- me adyouamsb 
sud btoi wittl □ representative office 
in London ipeoarong m Ms service. 
Arab Oversees Bo* &'TnniMH ^ 
Ltd. 28 Stek NM Road. London 
SEl tel O ' -735 817 * 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


PANAMA U 8 EHA. CORPORATIONS 

from Lt»600 arolobfe now. Td 
628352 SATO 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


WTL 

BEAUTffUL PEOPLE 

UNUMJTEDB 4 C 
U-S-A, 6 WORUnMUC 

A eom p toe persend & buanen service 
i edlerifa ti of 

_ - 6 

far al load 


212 - 765-7793 

112 ^ 45-7794 
330 W. 56 th St, N.Y.C 10019 
Service Repreuntotivei 
NeededWorfcfwide. 


INVEST 2 WfiSS to Defter Hedth. 

Enter Cbrdtoe Rsk Prar trt ion & 
Hedth Sccwxitwr.ng Prooran now. 
Begonf nunaoiL peocdul Surrey 
owtotryade, hijtoty qodiied *Sa 3 
wptoteon. Vbtt Won Ltocfcd Cbiv 
be, Enton near Goddmirto Sumy 
GU 8 SAL 45 min. London. Sfag 
|P 62 )P 92233 . 


HOW TO OB A 2 nd PASSPORT, 

report - 12 countries trained Do- 
tofc WM4 45 Lyndhinf Terrace, 
Sorfe W. CeotroLnong Kong. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMOMS 

Your best buy. 

fine demondi in any pace range 
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fatabEtedlnS 

Mhoondraat 6182018 Antwerp 
- Tebffl 3 ) 234 07 51 H 
Ibe 71779 jyl b. AJtheDiamond Oub. 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond m&stry 


DIAMONDS ROM AMSTODAM t£ 

<M*i« - towea prices. Come to the 

Amsterdam Damond Euchengc avL 
far Bab Hendraaen in »o o» ija 
W retprsfe'--! V H 773 S 7976 C 2 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


CLOSING BAfBC - FOR LOAN tro» 

odtoro, al eun Sroee. etc Baric in 

Zanc fl, br anch c? 6 bfeon baA. Gfl 
341 600 or 056/491 362 . 


OFFICE SERVICES 


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IN ZURICH 

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ousRcss 

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Ward Pracesm / Ticxstotiun 
Osatptew Farm 
innwibmL 


33 bnflwHL 048001 Zurich 
Tet 01 /2146ni. Ifa 812656 IN0F 

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YOUR RJHHBHB9 OfflCE 
_ M LONDON 

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AfCWEHNG SfiJVKE, navtary, 

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invents *ZUBCH • 2 S 2 76 21 . 
. Phone / telee / malboK. 


OFFICES FOR KENT 


CENTER OF. 
MONTE CARLO 

200 egjn. A» CONDmONP 
, . , OPBCE SPACE 
to W m kflWKH andmodern tarittng, 
_ , decorated. 

For tether, detob please cento ffi 

, AGHH 

26-Bit Bd Pnrneste Q^rione 
Mento Croia, MC 98000 Maaaai 

T* (931 SO 66 00 («d \SXI - 

Tele* 479 417 MC 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS ABEA FURNISHED 

miBEAUfiOURG. Awurt. Mcertu- 
db, l^ w^^nnol bdEony. T3JXC. 

SHORT TERM in Lftto Quarter. 
No agenb. Teh 329 38 83. 



r? 


r*tE33££!E m5eji 

Epraiari 

1 UFTT i r ri 




!f '!* Ii ^ 



16fh. Place Vktor Hugo 

3 REOTflONS + 2 8HMOOMS 

Z bftfas. RMOO. 

Tet 563 68 M 




USA. 

fOR KBIT DENVB COLORADO 

fo^^raffanie Demer CounfrjrChb 

fanw court, 125 ocrec. 10 nmute to 
dowieawn, 15 nenufas to drpan. 

6 montfa to 1 gs Pmripak afty. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


large mmem company 

eeebnr one of « finanarf manager: 
an uxfonehed ta to rent begtonng 
Sepi 25. Stuctofc NeuOy teSow 
(nete’ Boil), vrith teg* toeia 2 bed- 
room, tenon or cawredbacony + 


Hritoea 


poHgm. Tet 778 13 31 
wo office 


r hoars 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


PARS ORGANIZATION web mob 
afttncfant/recepdoOBf. legit md 
weekend worii ot rote bcte Sceary 
FB057 per roonrft. AppSajtiora from 
C o nei ie w m nAf i at a era resident m 
Poris wtfli spaUa French and of En- 
gfah moter toogoa fhoald be far- 
wared together wth tit, worh hWnry 
and ttootagropb tot fW i uiwiel Sec- 
biTniJMiln 75726 (fans 
Cedws 15, before 12/8/85 


AMBBCAN PfiOOPREADSl A 

neadedL part lim to London, aw 
phone between 103 0 am. & 1 
landam 01-439 9738 . 


ft 

pun. 


GENERAL 

. POSITIONS WANTED 


__ T , .A + PS- 

ranted *ilh experfee in outstohon & 
htavkhip area aporiiians, seek em- 
pbyemaai to Cemrri America, Aaa or 
Africa Any serious offers coreidered. 
Contact Kfadier, 12 rve Leramr, 
5333 Samdweier, brasnLwg- Tet 
332/359317. 


90 YEAR OLD MALAYSIAN nrno 


03 /: 


ta empteyment NentOnd caS K_L 

536667 « write la Mss Matting 9. 
S514/6M5ubOTg Joyo, Moloyna 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


UJ PARMCW YORK. Warn, «... 

gent penon worted to cm te 1 yr. 
old orl itorting nxLSepL Crif 201- 
63S-TV25 cr send totter with refer- 
ence* to Mra. Mandof, 26 Britton SL 
Jenny Qty, NJ 07306 USA 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANmQ) 



AUTOS TAX FREE 


ROUS ROYCE 
BENTIET 

• RR. Spur Ltonsine 

- RR. Camcrau* Lund Erftori 

• RR. Elver Spirit 
WSteSpr 

- Berifey Twbo 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHBH 

MorieCarlo 
Pnoapatty or Monaco 
Tel- ( 93 ) 5 C 66 84 
Tete 469675 MC 
Official Drea Fadory 0 « 6 r 
EntobbNcd ence 3925 


ASTON MARTIN 

- Lagonda 

- Volant e 

- Vantage 

JAGUAR 

- Sovereign 42 l 
■ Soveragn 5 3 L 

- XJS romertble 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHSIS 

Monte-Corlo 



EUROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 

Cc4 or write far free catalog, 
■ax 12011 
i Ahp ortf Ho 
ldS»77 


Telex 


HU 


ffCAR NL 


ins AUDI 4000 Sr brandnew, fac- 

tory UjS. spaa, fufo boded, imnet*- 
oto tfatywy. O* w Germany (0)67- 
5601702 or 386361 


PAGE 6 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


APWJE Cegroler I 

Ewnpeon Office - 7 nw do Chartoes 
«S 0 O NEU 1 LT SUR SSNE 
Utete Porte Mahl) 

a reelring a 

BILINGUAL SECRETARY 

(ENQU 5 H MOTHER 
tor ia tax and \ 

If you tpeci Aim 



land training etdwfing Aort- 

haraL at letsf three jum experiinca in 
o renter paction and are molfeofed 
wderthurerte, phase rend your CV to 
mmcoae Bmrn.sc. 

We «* 4 d Bet fa meet you 
fro* Aogait 5 ttl Onwards 


SECRETARIES 
OVERSEAS 

Tfatto^K^faetMoridinioiiaduudi. 
•Ml to fis^dass recretoria « 4 un fas. 
KOTdmcrctonrftashmabeen 
Nflhly farted it ype are ot env 
geyWjOOTtadv us far the bed edwe. 
seorefanat ■ pel u to anraage on imr- 
w*r « Loaiea 

. . Secrrtarire 

IN “iW,S"nSr toM 

tanMmei 4 Conubanh. 


•ptWtob, dynanc, organized Wm 
goataew wnenca__diHrablr 
, 75008 Pocv 

|W ^ro«AS fl 5 IANr.bi 1 Putifah. 

ngbipOTeocedsecctey + wowo. 
aon & »P level eontoc lUb. Fro. 
guwt t raw; tafatj End* fu- 
^^TOmiAOE.lTS^c^ 


SECRETARIAL SECRETARIAL 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE POSITIONS AV AILABLE 


FOR WASMNGTON 

EXECUTIVE SKRETARY 

career woods US atom or green cord, 

word praocenr. Permanent portion. 
S 3 ZwO per anaum. Tel: far urgent 

PMB (1) 229 59 25 


SMALL PARS BASED POMBHBt 
mR> mierootianal cgnne rtHe , Mb 


UnApt/E SS 0 C 5 for AMERICAN 
FWMSeiPAHS: 

6 >BS*,.BrioaL Drtdi or German 
normaxL 

to or phone: 1IL 

75114 PdriA Franoe. Teh 


»ired 


l»MS; 

V«?ft Hugo, 7511b Para, 

727 61 


WOKMOMAL, TRANSLATOt, 
ten* / faigUy Engfah mote 
tegut, tenter wSt fadned & legal 
•orang, ahity to type own work on 

SrfTBfWSS 

"WfiL 


WGUSK-SPEAKNG bsmaada / 
S e c retary nsmtd te prirafe office 
« Geneva enh Bueot teach den. 
tend * fi^.A«*eoiti i *ould hara 
perm te faMtaerbid end be 
Mr 35 yeon. Phase send ful CV. 
ond fteogrofto to fbt 11, 17 Gras- 
SSwe. London Vrt 


TRAVB.AGB 6 CY, wte rea« 0 ry,b. 
Httptd Frneh/^xiwi «ah wu «r- 
penencre' qpe ne nce m ant op. 
protfffid Send written rnutne to- 
• Bo. 2 S 32 . Herald Tobim. 92531 
r-towHy Ccao. France 

BD MMDffUBNE. Stwfro kt-e-y 

'sneff. 1 *^ " 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


ATTRACTIVI AMHQCAN ' 
fluent French, Bnnsh bc.^ . , 

•cfaeatedto SwibertawL andasma 

German. Spanish, flofim, see le 

Eon as pmonal otatran/oKtonm 

secratary to i ni ernc Ao nd amonot 
AH® to travel, woritod/find ftfr 
nape, tea, US\ Conoda Conte- 
an. South Amenta, 5 owrtu«*L **• 
de East, Africa fteierily Gw* 
tfaedor. fa^tutm tod bdw 
trend conference odneMte^f*; 
«mw itwetary « BfflftrfAfP*' 
rettepoS^iioc^An®**- 
to Ban 2479 , ttetf IrtM 
Newly Ca tena _ 


V 


» V 


Tribune. 92521 Neudly Cette fi— » . 


JUST BACK B80MJMW] 

toSMfanf, ntemdian b 
teo din, rnffingual 
hordwtong, ro preience m a P”f. 
froben / monoganeie, tnefing, (**■ 

meat, <an asp* ronmoa 
now bore d « Genrm N * '*** 
refaeett, reeks dresofa-ii r- -*, ■ 

wMe te x m}S35nS& o*. 

1211 Gengvo J 


RAMMTAD nirsSi; 
BtNGUAL AGBtcr Tuey . 

P.*758«« 7 ,,W R»- 


w»«E.®KaT 

mature, e e c eea n l Engktli 
wont praeenaa. rerta. 
)ob.toceifantn&y< 


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